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The Vir g inia Beach Sun 

___>..> v.„,f^i^^y.ci.. v.. . %^^. Virginia Beach-s Newspaper 25C 



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Council says 
won't grant 
exemptions * 

The Virginia Beach City 
Council recently decided not to 
allow any exemptions to its 
proposed water impact fee ~ at 
least not yet. 

^TTie"counciT is considering an 
impact fee for the Lake Gaston 
water pipeline. The fee would 
be levied on new homes and 
^usinesses_bas|d oiLthe number 
of drains in the builtHngr"'"'^^' 

The council decided it was 
too early to grant exemptions to 
the proposed water impact fee. 

Action on the impact fee has 
been put off until the council's 
Jan. 6 meeting. At its last 
regular meeting, council said 
that any fee, if created, would 
be applied retroactively to 
building permits issued after 
Dec. 16. 

The fee would pay for 5 1 per- 
cent of the pipeline's cost. The 
remainder would come from an 
increase in water rates. 

$34 million 
office project 
planned 

A $34 million, six-building 
office complex has been 
proposed for Oceana West In- 
dustrial Park, next to Lyn- 
nhaven Mall. It is possibly the 
largest office complex in the 
city. 

The project, "Lynnhaven 
Corporate Plaza," will consist 
of four, three to ten-story office 
buildings. Plus, a combination 
athletic-social club and a 
parking garage. 

The buildings will center 
around two large, landscaped 
plazas and a four-story atrium. 
The complex will be just off 
Lynnhaven Parkway, just north 
of Lynnhaven Mall. 

On the recommendation of 
the Virginia Beach development 
authority, city council recently 
supported three $10. million 
state industrial development 
bonds for the project. 

The project will cost about 
$34.5 million. All but $4.5 
million will be fmanced by the 
bonds. 

The pr oposed offi ce 
will be 430,000 square feet. Of- 
fice space will account for 



Sun Series 



Innovaticwi key to departmen 



.3S 



340,000 square fwtT^iccoraing^ 
to building plans. 

Three lawyers, Jahn Summs, 
of Virginia Beach, and Martin 
Ganderson and John Deal, of 
Norfolk,, are" behind the 
development. 

Legislators 
to hold 
public hearing 

Members of the General 
Assembly Delegation will hold 
a public meeting on Thursday, 
Jan. 2 at 7:30 p.m. The purpose 
of the meeting is to give 
Virginia Beach residents an op- 
portunity to express concerns 
about the 1986 legislative 
package before the upcoming 
General Assembly Session. 

It will be held in the Virginia 
Beach City Council Chambers, 
City Hall Building, Municipal 
Center. 

For information, contact 
Robert Mathias, 427-4721. 



John E. Meyers, new vehicle 
salesperson for Virginia Brach 
Dodge, Inc., Virginia Beach, 
received an award for individual 
performance in selling Dodge 
vehicles. 

A resident of Virginia Beach, 
Meyers has reached the Silver 
level of recognition in IXxlge's 
unique Sales Professionals Club. 



By Cheryl Martin 

This is the first of a three- 
part series on the Virginia Beach 
Police Department's innovative 
crime fighting techniques. 

Innovation is the Virginia 
Beach Police Department's key 
to success, according to the Chief 
of Police, Charles R. Wall. He 
vi^s the department's 
progressiveness as a major factor 
in the city's low crime rate. 

For example, the department 
has been computerized for at 
least nine years while many other 
Ttiajor -ciFies are just starting to 
use computers. Officers in sauad 
cars are able to tie into local, state 
and federal information banks on 

the spot, 

. .„4Jntil a year and a half ago, the 
city had more computers in use 
than any police department in the 
country. Phoenix is now the 
leader, according to the chief, 
who is in his 27th year of law en- 
forcement. 

Law enforcement officials 
from all over the world have 
come to view the computer 
system in Virginia Beach. 

Computerization is not the 
only feature in the department to 
draw attention of law enfor- 
cement officials from as far away 
as Spain and Australia. 

Crime Prevention 

The department is very in- 
volved in crime prevention. Its 
ESCAPE program has received 
much recognition. 

This crinac prevention program 
is part of the curriculum in all 
fourth grade classes in the city. 
The program's goals, which 
teaches personal and property 
safety, is teach the children a 
safer way to grow up. 

"If we can teach these children 
good crime prevention habits 
before they are set in their ways 
our goal is met," Wall, who has 
two sons of his own, said. "A 
recent study shows that nine-and 
10-year-oWs art ^t^ v«y im- 
pressionable and are willing to 
accept new ideas. As children get 
older it is more difficult to 
change their habits and at- 
titudes." 

Block Security 

Another very successful crime 
prevention program in Virginia 
Beach is Block Security. 

There are currently 60 neigh- 
borhoods involved in the Block 
Security program. That is more 
than double the number of two 
years ago. 

"When the number of 
burglaries is up seven or eight 




Virginia Beach Chief of Police, Charles R. Wall is in his 27th year of 
law enforcement. 



percent for the first 10 months of 
this year, I think it is significant 
that a6 burglaries have occured 
in Block Security neigh- 
borhoofjs," Wall said. "This 
really shows the success of the 
program." 

' The department has stringent 
requirements for becoming a 
Block Security neighborhood. 
The participants must earn their 
"watch sign." The program is 
designed basically for single 
family residential neigh- 



borhoods. Poor visibility in apar- 
tment complexes and townhom'es 
make implementation of this type 
of program difficult. 
Got Ya 
"Operation Got Ya" is the 
crime prevention program for 
Virginia Beach businesses. The 
police department works directly 
with the business owners in a 
variety of areas. They will come 
into the establishment and 
demonstrate shoplifting to show 
the owners weak areas in security. 



High school papers 
take top ratings 



^ 



Bayside High School's news- 
paper, Shore Lines, won a 
Trophy Class rating and Kemps- 
ville High School's newspaper, 
Treaty, won a first place rating in 
the 1985 Virginia High Schoq^, 
league's (VHSL) publication 
contest. 

In addition, Shore Lines re- 
ceived a Medalist certificate form 
the Columbia Scholastic Press 
Association in November, a rank- 
ing which the association gene- 
rally bestows on only ten percent 
of student publications which 
earn a first place rating. The 
ssociation cited Shore Lines for 
exceptional merit in writing/edit- 
ing and design/display. 

The school newspaper entries 
were from the 1984-85 school 
year. English teacher Linda Cobb 
sponsors Shore Lines; English 



teacher Sarah Seeley sponsors 
the Treaty. 

Trophy class represents the 
highest VHSL rating; it is award- 
ed for "outstanding achievement 
i^ (juality public^ions service to 
the school and community." 
Shore Lines received 944 points 
out of a possible 1,000, for the 
trophy rating. 

The VHSL student newspaper 
evaluator said of Shore Lines, 
"...a very attractive job. I was 
especially impressed with the 
meticulous design. This says a 
lot about the pride you have in 
your publication." 

The Treaty barely missed the 
trophy class, garnering 870 
points for a first place rating. A 
student newspaper must receive 
at least 875 points for a trophy 
class rating. 



Ma' ' Atkins^wins^by 



getting *' Ugliest" for charity 




"Her Royal Ugliness," Ma Atkins loves her work and her boss Okie 
Ocamb. 



By Cheryl Martin 

"Ma" Atkins is a special 
lady. Her customers at 
Smokie's Bar in Virginia Beach 
are the first to sing her praises. 

She has been crowned "Her 
Royal Ugliness" at the Ugliest 
Bartender's Ball. This was in 
recognition of her raising over 
$4,000 in the Fifth Annual 
Multiple Sclerosis Ugliest 
Bargender Contest. 

Ma Atkins endured pies in 
the face and eggs in her hair to 
raise the money. Her fun- 
draising methods are unique. 
For a 25 cent donation the 
contributor can hit her in the 
face with a pie. The stakes are 
higher for beer and egg "sham- 
poos." 

"Oh they (the customers) 
have done a lot to me during 
this contest," she said. "The 
worst had to be the shampoo. 
The>' put light and dark beer in my 
hair, along with eggs and 
tomatoes." 

It may be hard to believe she 
would endure such torture in 
the name of charity, but it is 
true. For the doubling types 
Atkins has pictures of the 
event. 

The funny part is, she said, 
soon after the shampooing her 
hairdresser asked ^hat she had 
been doing to her hair to make 
it so soft. 

"Ma and her Ugl^ Campaign 
Team are to be congratulated 
for all their ugly efforts," Ellyn 
B. Fresco, Ugly Bartender 
Coordinator, said. "Especially 
See MA, page 5 



They also, have a special credit 
card to use when educating 
owners about credit card fraud. 
Store Design 

The chief would like to see the 
department become more in- 
volved in CPTED (Crime 
Prevention Through Engineering 
Desing) projects. Working with 
businesses on store design will 
lead harder to hit targets, accor- 
ding to Wall. Factors to consider 
include the types of windows put 
in, also theirjilacement, type of 
shrubbery to use as well as 
lighting. 

The department was inyplved 
in this type of project with 
Virginia Beach General Hospital. 
They- provided Tnput~wnhe 
design- of the Hospital's new 
wing. A big area was lighted 
because staff members must go to 
park areas at odd hours. 
Trauma Team 

The department has also 
established a special trauma team 



for dealing with family problems 
and child abuse. Team members 
are police officers and social ser- 
vice personnel. 

"When a call comes in, they 
(police and social services) 
respond together," Wall said. 
"This way the police can handle 
any law enforcement needed and 
social services is there for coun- 
seling the people involved. The 
teams are really super," he 
beamed. 

^ — Crime Solvere '" 

Crime Solvers is another out- 
standing program in Virginia 
Beach. The program has a 98 
percent conviction rate. Over the 
fast three or fpurlyearjCj3iily,.5ix 
people have been acquitted; ac- 
cording to Wall. 

"In reviewing over the last two 
years, our program in com- 
parison with other cities of one- 
fourth to one-half million people 
has been chosen the most produc- 
See INNOVATION, page 6 



Police Chief honored 

Virginia Beach Chief of Police, Charles R. Wall recently received 
the Dictograph Public Safety Leadership Award. 

The award is given in recognition of his innovation in police 
techniques, relationship with fellow officers, and profile within the 
community, according to Dictograph, a security systems company. 

Wall has served as Virginia Beach Police Chief since 1 98 1 . 




Selon House Director, Susan Jones, says the shelter opens it doors to 
girls who need help: 

Typical Beach runaway 
doesn't go far from home 



By Cheryl Martin 

The typical runaway in Vir- 
ginia Beach is a white female 
between 14 and 16 years old, 
according to Susan Jones, direct- 
or of Seton House, a home for 
runaway girls. The runaways 
usually don't go far from home 
and they rarely leave the city. 

Why do children run away? 
Jones says there are probably as 
many reasons as there are run- 
aways. 

"Some are just spoiled and 
mad because they can't get their 
way." Jones said. "Others may 
be running from something like 
sexual, psychological or emotion- 
al abuse. Others still may just be 
confused. They feel ugly and 
unwanted, like I'm going out to 
eat worms and die." 

In most cases, the girls event- 
ually find that they are really 
loved and wanted. 

Seton House, a private non- 
profit organiEation, has been 
helping runaway girls in Virginia 
Beach for one year. The tempo- 



rary shelter for girls, ages l3 
through 17, opened its doors Jan. 
1, 1985. 

Seton House on N. Lynnhaven 
Road, is not a fiophouse for 
runaways, Jones stressed. The 
first rule for girls who want to 
come to the shelter is they must 
contact their parents. 

It is a place to come and be 
safe during a crisis. The ukimate 
goal is to reunite the girls with 
their families. 

According to Jonei of the 85 
girls the program ha^elped this 
year, only two have not been 
reufiited with their families. 

In these cases, if the staff at 

Seton House feels it is not in the 

gin b oest mterest to return 
home, tltf case is turned over to 
Social Services. 

There are three full-time stafi' 
members at Seton House. All are 
degreed counselors. There «re 
also three part-time staff mem- 
bers, who work the night shift. 

The system is set up as a 
See RUNAWAY, page i 



2 Virginia Beach Sun, January 1, 1986 



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Taking a stand 

It is time for Virginia Beach, as a city, to make a 
resolution to help end discrimination and human 
suffering. -> / 

All across Virginia, city governments and univer- 
sity boards are demanding that South Africa grant 
equal rights to blacks. The way these groups can in- 
fluence the South African Government is by total 
divestiture of holdings in companies that do 
business with South Africa. 

One oL the Strongest anti-Ajjartheidflieasures in 
the state and a good model to follow , was enacted 
recently by the City of Richmond. 

Richmond City Council voted to sell all holdings 
in companies with -South Africairoperatibns. The 
city will have to sell between $40 million and $50 
million in holdings, according to Mayor Roy A. 
West. " 

Richmond's ordinance also bars the city ad- 
ministration from awarding contracts to companies 
with South African ties; except under emergency 
circumstances. 

Most Virginia universities and localities with 
policies on South African-related investments have 
decided to sell holdings in companies that do not 
abide by the Sullivan Principles. These are 
guidelines developed in the late 1970s by Leon 
Sullivan, a General Motors board member and 
Philadelphia clergyman. They forbid 
discrimination against South African black 
workers and require a commitment by companies 
to improve the conditions of those employees . 

, * 

These guidelines do make a difference. But it will 
take a Une stance like that taken in Richmond to 
bring about real change. . 

Virginia Beach must stand firm against apar- 
theid. It can do so by enacting a policy similar to 
that of its neighbor to the north. 

Virginia Beach residents who want to see an end 
to the social injustice of apartheid should also urge 
the General Assembly to vote on statewide action. 

The divestiture issue is likely to come up during 
the General Assembly session convening Jan. 8. 

Del. William P. Robinson, Jr. (D-Norfolk) has 
said he will introduce a pair of resolutions. One will 
condemn apartheid and the other will request the 
state pension system divest itself of South African- 
related holdings as soon as possible. 

Virginia Beach residents should press their local 
and state representatives to take action against 
apartheid. —CM. 




A job weir done 



Congratulations to teachers, administrators, 
librarians and students in the Virginia Beach City 
Public Schools for their active participation in 
Virginia Reading Month. 

Facing an already hectic December, schedule 
because of the holidays, these people still found the 
time and the energy to promote reading. 

Several groups collected used books to give to 
others. These books will go to people as close to 
home as the Tidewater^Detention Home and as far 
away as Columbia, South America. Their efforts 
truely promote and surpass the theme of the 
program, "Becoming a Commonwealth of 
Readers." 

Programs featuring storytelling through songs 
and a festival honoring Dickens were also held. 
Also, community programs for parents to help 
them, help their children with reading. 

The fruit of their labor should last the year 
through for they have worked extremely hard to 
bring the joys of reading to all residents of Virginia 
Beach. —CM. 



Radiation Oncology Department completed 

Virginia Beacli General Hospital recently celebrated the completion of the Radiation Oncology Depar- 
tment. On liand for the event were, from left Dr. Anas El-Mahdi, chairman of radiation oncology; Rita B.^ 
Wood, VBGH president; Sally Grieb, administrative director of radiation oncology; and State Senator Joe 
Canada. The hospital estimates between 7,000 and 8,000 treatments will be administered during the first 
year of operation. 



Aiding Choke Victim 



By C. Everett Koop 

(Second of a two-part series) 

The "Heimlich Manuever" for 
rescuing choking victims was 
devised in the early 1970's by 
Henry J. Heimlich, M. D., 
Professor of Advanced Clinical 
Sciences at Xavier University. 



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Heimlich's manuever depends 
for its success on the fact that a 
choking victim has a large 
volume of air in his lyngs, even if 
he was exhaling when the choking 
began. If a rescuer presses shar- 
ply repeatedly on the vic- 
tim's abdomen at a point between 
the rib >eBge I and/the inajvdl.uthat 
reservoir of air is expelled up the 
airway with a great deal of force, 
thus dislodging the obstruction 
from the victim's throat. 

As noted in last month's 
column, the Heimlich Manuever 
can be performed on standing or 
seated victims and on persons 
who have fallen to the floor. 

It can be performed on 
children and even on one's self. 

When the victim is standing, 
the rescuer stands behind him 
and wraps his arms around his 
waist. He then makes a fist with 
one hand and places the thumb 
side of the fist just above the vic- 
tim's navel and below the tip of 
the breastbone. He grasps the fist 
with his other hand and presses it 



into the victim's abdomen with a 
quick upward thrust. Several 
thrusts may be necessary to clear 
the airway. 

The technique for the seated 
victim differs only in that the 
rescuer kneels behind the chair 
and wraps his arms around both 
chair and victim (unless the chair 
back is too large, in which case he 
turns the victim and performs the 
Manuever from the side). 

The victim who has collapsed 
to the floor is rolled onto his 
back, face up. The rescuer strad- 
dles the victjm and places his 
hands, one on top of the other, 
on the victim's abdomen, with 
the heel of the bottom hand 
■^lightly above the navel. He then 
presses ioto the abdomen with^a.^ iiLlflL.prevent it. The American 



Alternatively, the victim can 
position his abdomen against the 
edge of a chair back, a table or 
similar solid object and press 
himself quickly and forcefully 
against it. As with the other for- 
ms of the Manuever, several 
thrusts may be necessary. 

Whenever the Heimlich 
Manuever has been performed, 
the victim should be seen by a 
physician as soon as possible, 
even if no complications are ap- 
parent. Injury from the 
Manuever is rare, but it can occur 
if the Manuever was not perfor- 
med properly. 

The best way to deal with obs- 
truction of the airway, of course, 



quick upward thrust, repeating; 
thrusts as necessary. 

A choking infant is either held 
in the rescuer's lap or placed on a 
firm surface, such as a table. In- 
stead of fists and hand, the 
rescuer uses two or three fingers 
for the quick upward thrusts into 
the baby's abdomen. Repeat as 
necessary, taking care not to in- 
jure the child with too much for- 
ce. 

Many people have saved them- 
selves from choking by 
positioning their own hands 
slightly above their navels and 
thrusting upward quickly and 
repeatedly. 



Red Cross, whose experience 
with this problem h great, offers 
the following advice: cut food in- 
to small pieces and chew slowly 
and thoroughly, especially if you 
wear dentures; don't laugh and 
talk while chewing and 
swallowing, and avoid excessive 
intake of alcohol before and 
during meals; finally, keep 
children from walking, running 
or playing while they have food 
in their mouths, and keep small 
objects, such as marbles, beads 
and thumbtacks, out of the reach 
of infants and small children. 

Koop is the U. S. Surgeon 
General. 



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Citizen pleased 
with coverage 

Editor; • 

Many thanks for the fine and 
accurate article you published in 
the Virginia Beach Sun (Dec. 11) 
relative to the operation and ser- 
vices made available to senior 
aduUs in our Community. 

We received many favorable 
comments. 

Will Ashman, 

R.S.U.P. Coordinator, 

Virginia Beach 



Most Virginia Beach residents 
are aware that the U.S. Surgeon 
General issues an annual report 
on the health consequences of 
smoking, and that these reports 
summarize evidence implicating 
smoking as an important cause of 
cancer, obstructive lung disease 
and heart disease. 

We are also aware however, of 
the tremendous importance of 
the tobacco industry in our state 
as an employer, a taxpayer, and 
a benefactor to many worthwhile 
causes. It can be difficult to 
weigh all these arguments fairly 
and form a solid opinion about 
tobacco's place in our society. 

Last month however, some- 
thing happened which should 
help us decide. The Medical 
Society of Virginia held its an- 



nual meeting and adopted two 
resolutions: 

"The Medical Society of Vir- 
ginia accepts the challenge 
issued by U.S. Surgeon General 
C. Everett Koop, M.D. to work 
with voluntary health agencies 
and all citizens of the Common- 
wealth to create a tobacco-free 
society by the year 2000. 

The Medical Society of Vir- 
ginia recommends that ail hospi- 
tals and health care facilities 
in the Commonwealth of Virginia 
prohibit the sale of tobacco 
products through gift shops, 
vending machines or other pati- 
ent and visitor services. It is also 
recommended that smoking in 
hospitals by employees, medical 
staff, patients, and visitors 
See TOBACCO, page 6 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

£ttaWitMfnl92« 



138 South Rosemont Koad 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 234S2 
(804) 486-3430 

Hanesbyerly 

pMlher 

GregwyD. GoUfai 

aaatoM publahtr 

LeeCdtM 

Chy Coimci rtponer 

The Virginia Beach Sun is 
published every Wwlnesday by 
Bycrly Publications, Inc. 
Second Class postage (UPPS- 
660-140) is paid at Lynnhaven 



Station, Virginia Beach. Sub- 
scription rates: $10 a year, 
within Hampton Roads; $15, 
two years. $15, one year outside 
Hampton Roads; $22.50, two 
years. The Virginia Beach Sun 
is a member of the Virginia 
Press Association and the 
Virginia Beach Council of the 
Greater Hampton Roads 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Other affiliated newspapers 
are: The Chesapeake Post, The 
Portsmouth Times, The 
Tidewater News, The Southside 
Sun, The Dinwiddle Monitor, 
and The Brunswick Times- 
Gazette. 



Write 
Us A 
Letter 

LettCTS to the editor are 
welcomed and encouraged. Let- 
ters should be typed, double- 
spaced and written in 
paragraph form. They should 
include the sender's name, ad- 
dress and phone number. 

Letters may be written on all 
topics, but the editor reserves 
the right to edit as necessary. 
Send letters to The Virginia 
Beach Sun, 138 South 
Rosemont Road, Virginia 
B«ich, Virginia 23452. 



Writer's 
Block 



Facing the 
plight of the 
Third World 

By Cheryl Martin 

The new year is a time of 
reflection as well as looking to 
ideals for the future. It is a 
good time for us as a nation to 
review our policy toward the 
"Third World." 

Too often we, as a people, 
are^^willing to accept the 
propaganda put Tortfi by 
government, ours and theirs, or 
corporations who exploit these 
people, without reallyi 
examining the facts. 
.„ jieie-Ji.a!^hoit„priJse jaecs. 
by the famous author and poet 
Kahlil Gibran that 

metaphorically depicts our 
behavior. It is called "Two In- 
fants," and goes like this: 

"A prince stood on the 
balcony of his palace ad- 
dressing a great multitude 
siimTnoncd for the occasion and 
said, 'Let me offer you and this 
whole fortunate country my 
congratulations upon the birth 
of a new prince who will carry 
the name of my noble family, 
and of whom you will be justly 
proud. He is the new bearer of a 
great and illustrious ancestry, 
and upon him depends the 
brilliant future of this realm. 
Sing and be merry! 

"The voices of the throngs, 
full of joy and thankfulness, 
flooded the sky with 
exhilarating song, welcoming 
the new tyrant who would affix 
the yoke of oppression to their 
necks by ruling the weak with 
bitter authority, and exploiting 
their bodies and killing their 
souls. For that destiny, the 
people were singing and 
drinking ecstatically to the 
health of the new Emir. 

"Anotljer child entered life 
and tliat luDgdom at the same 
time. While the crowds were 
glorifying the strong and belit- 
tling themselves by singing 
praise to a potential despot, and 
while the angels of heaven were 
weeping over the people's 
weakness and servitude, a sick 
woman was thinking. She lived 
in an old, deserted hovel and , 
lying in her hard bed beside her 
newly-born infant wrapped 
with ragged swaddles, was star- 
ving to deaUi. She was a 
penurious and miserable young, 
wife neglected by humanity; her 
husband had fallen into the trap 
of death set by' the prince's op- 
pression, leaving a solitary 
woman to whom God had senit. 
that night, a tiny companion to 
prevent her from working and 
sustaining life. 

As^he mass dispers e d and 



silence was restored to the 
vicinity, the wretched woman 
placed the infant on her lap and 
looked into his face and wept as 
if she were to baptize him with 
tears. And with a hunger- 
weakened voice she spoke to the 
child saying, 'Why have you 
left the spiritual world and 
come to share with me the bit- 
terness of earthly life? Why 
have you deserted the angels 
and the spacious firmament and 
come to this miserable land of 
humans, filled with agony, op- 
pression, and heartlessness? I 
have nothing to give you except 
tears; will you be nourished on 
tears instead of milk? I have no 
silk clothes to put on you; will 
my naked, shivering arms give 
you warmth? The little animals 
graze in the pasture and return 
safely to their shed; and the 
small birds pick the seeds and 
sleep placidly between the bran- 
ches. But you, my beloved, 
have naught save a loving but 
destitute mother. 

"Then she took the infant to 
her withered breast and clasped 
her arms around him as if wan- 
ting to join the two bodies in 
one, as before. She lifted her 
burning eyes slowly toward 
heaven and cried, "God! Have 
mercy on my unfortunate coun- 
trymen!" 

At that moment the clouds 
floated from the face of the 
moon, whose beams penetrated 
the transom of that poor home 
and fell upon two corpses. " 

We all too often, like the 
foolish countrymen drinking to 
the "yoke of oppression," close 
our eyes to reality. We are 
willing to accept the rhetoric 
See FACING, ^^ 7 



i^w 



Virginia Beach Sun, January 1, 1986 .1 








Our society is but 15 short 
years away from the dawn of the 
21 century. As educators, our 
challenge is how to best prepare 
our children today for the world 
they will live in tomorrow. 



No one can say for 5ure what 
the future holds in store for us 
but futurists, those who seriously 
seriously think about and plan 
for the future, can give us an 
idea a£jKbai!^«ejna)t£xpecL.„ 




By Mary K. Clwltoii 



A new friend in Tidewater, 
knowing my passion for Alice 
Walker's The Color Purple, gave 
me the ultimate booktalk one 
day. 

"You know," she said, "you'd 
probably like another book 
which came out at the same time, 
but which nobody noticed as 
much because of The Color Pur- 
ple. It's called The Women of 
Brewster Place by Gloria 
Naylor." 

She was so right. 

Naylor calls her book "a novel 
Ifl^seven stories," which is^xactly 



Teachers must prepare 
students for tomorrow 



By analyzing demographic in- 
formation, current trends and 
significant events, futurists have 
identified certain forces at work 
in society today which will surely 
impact on the education we 
provide for our children. These 
forces include the explosion of 
information and the increasing 
-i?; role of new technologies. 
"""Since about the end of World; 
War II, our society has witnessed 
rapid changes as we move from 
the industrial age to the high-tech 
age of information. 

In 1950, only about 17 percent 
of the work force were engaged in 
information type jobs, i.e. 
creating, processing or 
distributing information. Now 
more than 60 percent of the 
labor force work in information 
type jobs while only 13 percent 
work in manufacturing. With the 
recent advances in robotics, this 
trend will obviosly continue. 

With the large numbers of 
scientific and technical reports 
being generated each day, some 
futurists are stating that in for- 
mation in this area will double 
every twenty months. John 



m©: 



Naisbitt, writing in Megatrends, 
states that we will be "drowning 
in information but' starved for 
knowledge." 

In light of this, futurists 
predict that the primary goal of 
education will be to produce 
citizens able to solve problems 
that cannot presently be forseen. 

"Tomorrow's citizens miist be 
effective problem solvers, per- 
sons able to make good choices, 
to create solutions on the spot," 
writes Arthur Combs. 
"Education must concentrate on 
the growth and development of 
persons rather than on content 
and subject matter" 

Students must understand 
wH«^ SidTidw rnfo7malion -can 
be found and put to use effec- 
tively. Key intellectual skills such 
as analytical and critical 
thinking, ability to make 



4iuigments JiiFter caiirefut c6n £ 




^^feteach 
the childrerL 



The Virginia Beach 
Education Association 



sideration of opposing points of 
view and options will need to be 
emphasized in educating the 
young. 

The rapid and myriad number 
of changes created by new 
technologies, from computers to 
video, have already had a 
profound effect in our society. 
Today computers are regularly 
used in the home, school and on 
the job. New technologies will 
also influence how education is 
delivered to students. 

Some futurists predict that the 
new technologies will allow 
teachers to develop and monitor 
individual education plans based 



on the studertts' developmental 
needs and preferred learning style 
and allow students the flexibility 
of home study or a combination 
of study at school and in the 
workplace. 

Trends indicate that education 
will not end with a graduation 
diploma but will become a life- 
long process. 

The new technologies will con- 
tinue to create rapid change in the 
job arena and some futurists are 
predicting that the average per- 
son will change jobs at least seven 
times. Schools must therefore 
prepare citizens who can p.dapt to 
change and have the attitudes and 
values necessary to do so . 

Marvin Cetroa, ^writing in 
Schools of the Future, believes 
education should provide a 
"broader .vocational training 
with emphasis on increased 
ntefacy skills and teamwork skills 
rather than a narrow training for 
a single, first job." 

Information and new 
technologies are but two of the 
important trends already iden- 
tified which will impact public 
education in the future. 

The focus given to education 
over the last several years in 
Virginia and the nation has been 
a recognition that we must 
prepare our school systems to 
help students deal with the com- 
plexities of our future. We can- 
not afford to slow down or stop 
this progress npw as we reach the 
treshold of tomorrow. 

-* 
Every day teachers enter the 
classroom, we are aware that the 
students we are teaching will not 
live in the same world we have 
know. We live in"an exciting age 
ahd our children should be 
educated to take part in and take 
advantage of the achievements of 
the future. 

This can be accomplished if we 
as educators and parents con- 
tinue to recognize that our most 
important resource, today and in 
the future, is our children. 



Virginia Beach 
Newsweek in Review 

Tlic tfittowiiqi U*^9l«^soni« nf iho major news sttiries arfeitin^i Virjiinisi Beach diirinii the laU wetk. 



Erosion Commission 
under much criticism 

The Virginia Beach Erosion 
Commission has been highly 
criticized by local officials as 
being inefficient and costly. For 
more than 30 years the state 
agency has managed and main- 
tained two major city tourist atr 
tractions. They are the resort 
beach and Rudee Inlet. 

Cit)|igyianger Thomas H. 
Muehlenb'eck has ordered a 
study of the commission. This 
is the result of complaints'- by 
commercial fishing boat cap- 
tains that shoaling is 
threatening the Rudee 
navigation channel. 

The city is also preparing to 
enter a long-term agreement 
-with the Army-Corps of 
Engineers that may result in 
contract maintenance of the 
nrtlet channel. 

February 1987 will mark the 
end of a 25-year agreement that 
recognized the commission as a 
partner of the city and the corps 
in the beach nourfshment 
program. ' 

The commission contends 
that with a 15 year old dredge, 
it has a hard time maintinaing 
the channel because of poor 
equipment. 

One alternative suggested by 
Councilman H. Jack Jennings, 
Jr. is that the commission be 
supervised directly by the city 
manager. 



Rhodes and Rosenblatt 
endorsed for judgeship 

The Virginia Beach Bar 
Association has endorsed 



Donald H. Rhodes, former 
mayor, and General District 
Cdurt Judge Alan E. Rosen- 
blatt as candidates to replace 
Circuit Court Judge Henry L. 
"Les" Lem who retires this , 
week. 

James E. Brydgps Jr., 
president of the bar assodiation, 
said the names of both men will 
be submitted to the city's 
delegation to the General 
Assembly for their con- 
sideration in replacing Lam. 

Rhodes, 52, has practiced law 
at the Beach for 24 years and is 
with the firm of Rhodes and 
Watson. . 

He was a memHeF^of the ' 
House of Delegates from 1974 
to 1976. He served on the City 
Council from 1970 to 1973 and 
was rnayor for two of those 
years. _ . 

Rhodes, the secretary of the 
city's 300-member bar, has 
been a commissioner in chan- 
cery for the Virginia Beach Cir- 
cuit Court since I §75 and a 
divorce commissioner since 
1976. 

Rosenblatt, 37, was named a 
General District Court judge in 
March 1984. He served as an 
assistant public defender from 
1979 until his appointment to 
the bench. He was an assistant 
commonwealth's attorney from 
1976 to 1978. 



Vocational program 
receives recognition 

The Virginia Beach 
Vocational Program is one of 
seven rehabilitation programs 
nationally to be recognized for 
outstanding service to in- 



, dividuals with disabilities. 

It is administered by the 
Adult Services office of the 
Mental Retardation/Develop- 
mental Disabilities Division of 
the Community Services Board. 

The program provides per- 
manent employment for some 
disabled individuals through 
the Virginia Beach Vocational 
Center. It prepares others for 
employment in the community. 

The Vocational Center 
receives employment contracts 
from governmental and local 
agencies, Jill A. White, adult 
services supervisor, said. About 
50 employees perform a variety 
of^obs^T^flOther 75 people^are 
employed locally. 

Queen City residents 
•rema+n without services 

Queen City residents caught 
in a dispiute between the cities 
of Virginia Beach and 
Chesapeake are without paved 
streets, sewers and water. 

Quten City is a small com- 
munity of 33 homes. One-third 
of those homes apear ' to be 
beyond rehabilitation, accor- 
ding to a preliminary study by 
the Virginia Beach Department 
of Housing and Community 
Development. The residents are 
black and most of them are 
poor. 

The community is cut in two 
by the Virginia Beach- 
Chesapeake city line. Two- 
thirds of Queen City lies in 
Virginia Beach; one-third is in 
Chesapeake. The line actually 
slices through three houses in 
the community. 

Federal government funding 
cuts and garbled deeds have left 
the project in limbo. 



Beach resident travels to Zambia 



Novel is mermerizing 



what this remarkable first novel 
is. 

Brewster Place, "the bastard 
child of several clandestine 
meetings between the alderman 
of the sixth district and the 
managing director of the Unico 
Realty Company," is a deadend 
street somewhere in a black ur-| 
ban glietto, complete with absen- 
tee landlord and drunken super. 

In a setting desperately and 
deliberately drab, Maylor has 
written some of the most vivid 
vignettes of the human condition 
I have ever read. Her writing style 
is exquisite, as in this introduc- 
tory piece: 

Brewster Place became 

especially fond of its colored 
daughters as they milled like 
determined spirits among its 
decay, trying to make it a home. 
Nutmeg arms leaned over win- 
do wsills, and saffron hands 
strung out wet laundry on back- 
yard lines. Their perspiration 
mingled with the steam from 
boiling pots of smoked pork and 
greens, and it curled on the edges 
of the aroma of vinegar doubhes 
and Evening in Paris cologne that 
drifted through the street where 
they stood together - hands on 
hips, straight-backed, round- 
bellied, high-behinded women 
who threw their heads back when 
they laughed and exposed strong 
teeth and dark gums. 

They cursed, badgered, wor- 
shiped, and shared their men. 
Their love drove them to fling 
dishcloths in someone else's kit- 
chen to help him make the rent, or 
to fling hot lye to help him forget 
that bitch behind the counter at 
the five-and-dime. They were 
hard-edged, soft-centered, 
brutally demanding, and easily 



pleased, these women of Brewster 
Place. They came, they went, 
grew up, and grew old beyond 
their years. Like an ebony 
phoenix, each in her own time 
and with her own season had a 
story. 

The women whose specific 
stories appear in the book include 
Mattie, unmarried and pregnant, 
who so invests in her son Basil 
that he can't help betraying her. 
Etta Mae, who finds fieeting 
hope and acceptance in one-night 
stands in rented rooms, "before 
she had to face the locking 
doors" in their eyes. Kiswana the 
community organizer, trying 
-desperatelyloji rove she's one of 
the people and not a middle class 
sellout. 

Ciel, who loses two babies 
trying to keep their father with 
her. Cora Lee, the baby maker. 
Theresa and Lorraine, about 
whom the others spread un- 
pleasant rumors aboul^ unnatural 
acts. 



Each woman "stars" in her 
own story but also^lays minor 
roles in the stories of various 
others, and one of the most 
memorable characters is Ben, the 
drunken super, who befriends 
Lorraine when she most needs it, 
even though she reminds him of 
his daughter, whom he drinks to 
forget. 

Naylor's writing lifts this book 
far above a mere sociological 
tract into a highly structured 
series of interwoven tragedies. 

When I finished several of the 
Stories, I really had to sit and 
return to the present. They were 
not only transporting and 
mesmerzing, hut left rite with the. 



feeling of haying been run over 
by a truck~a pretty rare event In 
modern fiction. 

The Women Of Brewster Place 
is an unforgettable book one can 
love beyond reason, just like the 
women it. 

My friend was right. 



Brian Smkh of Virginia Beach, 
is one of five Virginia Tech 
students who spent six weeks in 
Zambia. 

Smith found that moving 
around in the African nation 
wasn't the go-as-you-please con- 
venience it is hwe. 

"If you needed to go into town 
you had to jump on the chicken 
truck at 7 a.m.," he said. 

Chickens, one of the main 
• money-makers on the farm where 
he worked, were peddled at 
various open-air markets in the 
nearest city, Lusaka, the nation's 
capital. And the 32- mile ride into 
Lusaka took almost an hour-and- 
a-half, bumping along mostly 
diri roads. 
, "With that kjnd_rt f transpnr- 



tation you couldn't run down to 
the 7-11 whenever you got hun- 



gry," Smith, a senior a^onomy 
student said. "I lost about 10 
pounds while there." 

Although Smith was only jok- 
ing about quick trips to the store, 
it does illustrate the greater 
understanding the students gain- 
ed about another culture. 

Twice while the students were 
there, the whole country almost 
came to ia stand-still because 
there was no fuel to power cars, 
buses or farm equipment 

A private, anonymous dona- 
tion to Tech's College of Agri- 
culture and Life Sciences made 
the trips possible. The dona- 
tion was designed to help solve 
food problems in Africa. Four 
agriculture students were selec- 
ted, a nd a fifth st udent with a 
background in human nutrition 
and food was added to the group 



at the request of Zambian offi- 
cials. 

Brady Deaton, associate direc- 
tor of Tech's international agri- 
cultural programs designed the 
students' trip as a way to address 
Africa's food problems and 
Tech's education mission. 

"A common bond among the 
students: is a commitment to 
understanding and learning more 
about agriculture to meet food 
need," Deaton said. "Personal 
sensitivity was considered impor- 
tant by the interviewers — people 
who can relate to others and can 
be honest about themselves. 

The students have tried to 
remain in contact with people 
they met in Zambia. But the mail 
service between here and Zambia 
hasn't always cooperated. 

In many ways, "it was a hard 
way of life," said Smith. 



BYERLY PUBLICATIONS 

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And CIRCULARS 



Complete composition, 
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Call 

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627-5020 



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Campaign 25 

The Portsmouth Times, The Chesapeake Post, The Virginia Beach Sun 

Earn as much as you want by selling subscriptions! 

Are you, your church or civic group loolcing for a really worthwhile fund-raising 
project? 

Do you want a quick and easy way to earn hundreds of dollars while at the same 
time helping to support YOUR city's dedicated, independently-owned community 
newspaper - the only one with all the pictures, news, features and editorials of most in- 
terest to your family and friends? If so. Campaign 25 is the solution. 

Admit it. You care about your community, and so do we. And together we can work 
to make it an even better place in which to li\^ and do business. That's why for every 
25 new subscriptions you or your group generates for The Portsmouth Times, The 
Chesapeake Post or The Virginia Beach Sun, we'll gladly rebate back to you $125, or 
half-off the regular $10 a year subscription rate. Th^'s a savings of 50%! 

In addition, you'll enjoy the pleasure of receiving your hometown newspaper, 
loaded with all the club news, pictures and ads which mean the most to you, delivered 
through the mail to your home every week for 52 weeks. 

Why not give it a try and join the dozens of other people and groups who have 
already taken advantage of this campaign. For more details, call 547-4571 or simply 
stop into any of our newspaper offices and pick up a Campaign 25 sign-up form. 

We want to be your newspaper! 



n Yes. Please mail me a Campaign 25 sign-up form. 
D Yes. Please call me about your Campaign 25. 



Name 



Address 
Ciiy 



State 



Zip 



Phone 



RMin lo: CiMpaigM 25. c/o Tfce Virginia B^cl" »•■■ 
1 M S«wth SMMioni Ro«d . Virglni* Beadi. VA., 23452 



Tf" 



4 Virginia Beach Sun, January I, 1986 



Trail Club will hike at Seashore Park 

Tidewater Appalachian Trail Club is planning a day hike at Seashore 
State Park on Saturday, Jan. 18. Hikers will meet at 10 a.m. at the 
park's nature center. Bring lunch. Call hike leaders at 481-9124 or 874- 
1526 for information. 

Virginia Beach Happenings 



Warner has perfect attendance 



Astronomers present free workshop 

A two-hour workshop on telescopes will be held Tuesday, Jan. 14 at 
the Virginia Beach Campus of Tidewater Community College. 

The Back Bay Astronomers will sponsor the free lecture from 7:30 to 
9:30 p.m. at the main campus off Princess Anne Road. For reser- 
vations, call the Continuing Education office, 427-7195. 



Student art show to open at TCC 

"Works in Progress: Midyear Student Art Show" will open Thur- 
sday, Jan. 24, at 7:30p.m., at the Virginia Beach Campus of Tidewater 
Community College. 

The show wHl be on display in the Princess Anne Building, Rooms 
100-E, 100-F, and the corridor during campus business houfsVorby 
appointment. For information, call the Humanities Division at TCC, 
427-7183. 

Over-50 ballroom dance planned 

Saturday Night Ballroom Dance for the over-50 crowd will be held 
at Bow Creek Recreation Center, 3427 Clubhouse Road. 

A valid facility use card or guest pass is required. Call 463-0505 for 
information. 



Johnson named to Who's Who 

Mike Johnson of Virginia Beach, a student at Samford University, 
has Jjeen selected for inclusion in the 1985-86 edition of Who's Who 
Among Students in American Universities and Colleges. 

Selection for the honor is based on academic achievement, service 
to the community, leadership in extracurricular activities and potential 
for continued success. 

An international relations major, Johnson is the son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Eules D. Johnson. ' ' 




Republican Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kans) presents an American 
flag that was flown over the U. S. Capitol in the final hours of the first 
session of the 99th Congress to Sen. John Warner (R-VA) in 
recognition of the Virginia senior senator's 100 percent voting atten- 
dance record in the first session. Only eight percent of the senators 
made each of the Senate's approximately 380 roll cail votes in the first 
session. Warner, who is serving his second term in the United States 
Senate, also had a perfect attendance record for the entire 96th 
Congress, becoming the first Republican senator in a decade to earn 
that distinction. 



Swim League makes a splash 

The Virginia Beach Parks and Recreation Department will be sp8n-'. 
soring a competitive swim league beginning in January for children 
ages eight to 14. 

RegistraMon will be held through Friday, Jan. 17 at the- Virginia 
Beach Recreation Center/Kempsville, and practice will begin Tuesday, 
Jan. 21. 

Each participant must be able to swim the length of the pool using a 
basic crawl stroke. The league is designed for the swimmer with little or 
no competitive swimming experience. 

Call 495-1892 for inormation or to volunteer to coach or help with 
swim meets. 



Movie to be feature at recreation center Children's films at Great Neck Library 



"The World's Greatest Athlete" will be shown on Friday, Jan. 10 at 
7 p.m. at Bow Creek Recreation Center, 3427 Clubhouse Road. 

A valid facility use card or guest pass is required. Make advanced 
reservations by calling 463-0505. 



t- 



Shurbutt's work displayed at gallery 

Contemporary photographs by Virginia Beach artist David Shurbutt 
will be on view Jan. 2 - 31 at the Humana Gallery, a satellite space for 
art sponsored bSf4Wg Wtglnfe "Betfi Arts Center. The ^lery is located 
in the dining room of Bayside Hospital, 800 Independence Blvd., 
Virginia Beach, and is open to the public from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
everyday. Admissioii is free. 

Shurbutt, who is currently Exhibits Coordinator for the Virginia 
Marine Science Museum, received a B.A. in art and a M.A. in media 
art from the University of South Carolina. 

Shurbutt 's work consists of black and white photographs he "con- 
structs" through processes such as hand-coloring and toning prints, 
and hand-manipulation of the negative. The result of such hand- 
munipulation is a print that may even resemble a painting, drawing or 
collage. s . 



Lecture on U. S. Life-Saving^ervicefr 

Captain Robert F. Bennett will present "Those Who Stood Ready - 
A History of the U. S. Life-Saving Service" Tuesday, Jan. 7, 7:230 
p.m. at Station One Hotel, 2321 Atlantic Avenue in Virginia Beach. 
The presentation is the third in a series of eight programs, "Our 
Maritime Experience" sponsored ^y-4hg-Viigiaia- ^each-M ari tMn e; 
Museum. 

Bennett is a graduate of the U. S. Coast Guard Academy, retired 
from active duty in 1982 and new serves with the Charleston, S. C. har- 
bor pilots. He is the author of Surf boats. Rockets, and Carronades, a 
history of the Life Saving Service from its origin to the year 1870. 

The event is free and open to the public and a reception will follow. 
Call 422- 1 587 for information . 

Exercise-T-Thon to help basketball team 

The second annual Sun Wheelers Exercise-A-Thon will be held on 
Sunday, Jan. 12 at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. at the Virginia Beach Recreation 
Center/Kempsville gym. Classes will be led by experienced instructors. 

A $2.50 donation is asked of each participant, with proceeds going to 
the city's Sun Wheelers wheelchair basketball team. 

For information, call 495-1892. 



Beach Day scheduled in January 

Youth ages six to 12 are invited tocelebrate "A Day in the Tropics" 
at the Kerapsville Recreation Center on Saturday, Jan. 1 1 at noon. 

Beach games, music and refreshments will be featured, and par- 
ticipants are encouraged to arrive in their favorite beach wear. 

A valid facility use card or guest pass is required. Call 495-1892 for 
information. 



New telephone numbers for City Dept. 

Effective Wednesday, Jan. 15, the Virginia Beach Department of 
permits and Inspections will initiate a new telephone system. 

The new numbers are: Building - 427-8060; Electrical - 427-8070; 
Plumbing - 427-8066; and Zoning - 427-8074. 



17 piece band to present concert 

The Atlantic Express stage band will provide musical entertainment 
Sunday, Jan. 12 at 2 p.m. 

The scventeen-piece band will be presenting a concert to appeal to all 
ages at the Virginia Beach Recreation Center/Kempsville Playhouse. 

Call 495- 1 892 for information. 



. "Green Eggs and Ham," "Curious George Rides a Bike," "Harold 
and the Purple Crayon," "Lucky Corner" and "George the Gentle 
Giant" will make up a film program for children ages 3 and up on 
Saturday, Jan. 11, at the Great Neck Area Library, 1251 Bayne Drive. 
The program will last approximately one hour. 
For information call the library, 48 1-6094. 



VOA previews Tos|;^at library 

Members of the Virginia Opera Association will give a preview of 
Tosca, by Puccini, on Sunday, Jan. 12, at 3 p.m. in the Oceanfront 
Area Library, 181 1 Arctic Avenue. 

The VOA will be performing Tosca later in January. 

This preview will provide an introduction to the opera and the com- 
poser, Puccini. Advance registration is necessary. Call the library, 428- 
41 13 to register or for information. 



Student receives ISU award 

Daniel D. Stackhouse of Virginia Beach has.been admitted to Iowa 
State University "With Recognition and Award" for high academic 
achievement . He is a pre-electrical Engineering Major . 

Students admitted to ISU "With Recognition and Award" receive a 
certificate and a $100 award. Those named will enter ISU during the 
spring, summer or fall semesters in 1986. 



Eton College alumni dance planned 

The Virginia Beach chapter of the Elon College Alumni Association 
will hold its annual dance on Saturday, Jan. 18 at the Cavalier Golf and 
Yacht Club in Virginia Beach from 8 p.m. until midnight. 

Cost of the dance will be $13'per person or $25 per couple. For in- 
formation contact Henry Pittman, president of the Virginia Beach 
alumni chapter, 340-2957. 

Returning women's network at TCC 

The Returning Women's Network at the Virginia Beac!K:ampus of 
Tidewater Community College is a support group of individuals con- 
sidering a return to college or the workplace after an extended absence. 

Their purpose is to provide mutual support and encouragement and 
to discuss issues to common interest. 

For information about programs scheduled for the winter quarter, 
contact the Counseling Center at the Virginia Beach Campus of TCC, 
427-7211. • \ ' 

VBGH offers free prenatal class 

Virginia Beach General Hospital is offering a free four-week prenatal 
class beginning Monday, Jan. 6 at 7:30 p.m. in the Hospital's Health 
Education Center. 

An instructor from the Hospital's maternal Child community, 
programs will teach couples what to expect during labor as well as 
familiarize them with hospital procedures in the Birthing Center, nur- 
sery, andpostpartumtmits;^ — 

Pre-registration is required: FOr information, call the HealthQuest 
Office, 481-8141. 

Exchange organization seeks local reps 

Educational Foundation for Foreign Study, a non-profit inter- 
national exchange student organization, is looking for people to help 
with its growing program in the Virginia Beach area. 

The Foundation would like to make its programs available to more 
schools in Virginia Beach and in surrounding towns by finding ad- 
ditional area representatives. Area representatives serve as local contac- 
ts, tailoring a high school exchange program to the town and area. 

For information, call Ms. Spjut collect at 850-3258. 

Parenthood/Lamaze classes offered 

NDC Medical Center, in cooperation with the American Red Cross, 
will offer an 8-week "Preparation of Parenthood/Lamaze Class" 
beginning Thursday, Jan. 16, at 6:30 p.m. These classes will be taught 
byA.S.P.O. certified instructors. 

Classes will be held at NDC Medical Center, 850 Kempsville Rd. 

For information or to register, call 466-5910. These classes are open 
to couples in the Tidewater community at a cost of $50. per couple. 

VBGH offers program on healthy eating 

Virginia Beach General Hospital is offering a Culinary Hearts JCit- 
chen class beginning Tuesday, January 7 from 7 - 9 p.m. in the hospital 
cafeteria. 

The program, designed hy the American Heart Association, is 
desicneH for people on a low sodium or low cholesterol diet or people 
who have high coronary risk factors. 

Pre-registration is required. For information or to register for the 
class, call the VBGH HealthQuest Department, 481-8141 . 

Beach resident named to Who's Who 

Lisa E. Pributsky of Virginia Beach is among 61 Virginia Tech 
students to be named in the 1986 edition of Who's Who Among 
American Universities and Colleges. 

The listing of students in this directory is based on academic achiev 
ement, service to the community, leadership in extracurricular activities 
and potential for continued success. 

Students are selected from more than 1,400 institutions of higher 
learning in the United States and several foreign countries. 

Bard's Companions to meet 

The Bard's Companions of the Shakespeare By-The-Sea Festival will 
meet on Monday, Jan. 6 at 6:30 p.m., at the Virginia Beach Recreation 
Center/Bow Creek, 3427 Clubhouse Road. There will be a potluck 
supper. 

Volunteers are needed and new members are always welcome. 

For information call 471-4884. 

The Bard's Companions are sponsored by the Virginia Beach 
Shakespeare By-Tbe-Sea Festival and the City of Virginia Beach Parks 
and Recreation Department. 



Paintrngs by Delulio at Center Gallery Beach resident receives collegiate honors 



Ten paintings by Virginia Beach artist Joe De lulio will be on view 
Jan. 2-31 at the Municipal Center Gallery, a satellite space for art spon- 
sored by,the Virginia Beach Arts Center. The gallery is located on the 
second floor corridor of the Virginia Beach City Administration 
Building at North Landing Road and Courthouse Drive. Hours are 
weekdays 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free. 

De lulio describes his painting style as "Classical Impressionism." 
His works feature rich colors and are executed in a loose, nebulous 
way, thus vaguely resembling the famous Impressionist style. 

For information call the Virginia Beach Arts Center, 425-0000. 



Learn to use microwave oven 

Microwave cooking classes for bieginners and advanced cooks will be 
held in Virginia Beach in January. 

The three-week programs, which are sponsored by the Parks and 
Recreation Department and Agriculture/Cooperative Extension Ser- 
vice, will demonstrate proper techniques for preparing meats, poultry, 
seafood, casseroles and desserts, arid will also offer helpful hints. 

Separate three-week sessions will'be held on Tuesdays, Jan. 7, 14 and 
21 from 6:30 - 9 p.m.; Thursdays, Jan. 9. 16 and 23 from 6:30 - 9 p.m.; 
and Fr^^ays, Jan. 10, 17 and 24 from 10 a.m. - noon. All courses take 
place in feoom 117 of the Kempsville Recreation Center. 

A $5 materials fee will'be collected at the first class. Call 427-451 1 to 
register. 

Medical assistants sponsor bloodmobile 

The Virginia Beach Association of Medical Assistants will sponsor its 
13th annual Bloodmobile for the American Red Cross in conjunction 
with Virginia Beach General Hospital on Jan. 8 from 1-7 p.m. at 
VBGH Health Education Center. 

The goal is 1 1 pints of blood . 

Cesarean Section classes scheduled 

NDC Medical Center is offering Cesarean Section Classes beginning 
Saturday, Jan. 11 at 9:30 a.m., followed by weekly classes through 
Feb. 1. The classes will be taught by an A.S.P.O. certified instructor at 
NDC. Medical Centerv 850 Kempsville Rd. 

Cost is $25. per couple. 

For information or registration, call NDC Medical Center, 466-5910. 



Christian Enoch Moore of Virginia Beach has been selected for the 
1986 edition of Who's Who Among Students In American Universities 
and Colleges. He is one of 35 students selected from the Georgia In- 
stitute of Technology. 

Campus nominating committees and editors of the annual directory 
choose students based on their academic achfevements, service to the 
community, leadership in extracurricular activities and potential for 
contmued success. i 

Moore joins an elite group of students selected from more than 1 ,400 
institutions of higher learning ain all 50 states, the District of Columbid^ 
and several foreign nations. Outstanding students have been honored in 
the annual directory since 1934. 



Crime Solvers seeking 
information on murder 



Virginia Beach crime solvo-s is 
offering a cash reward of up to 
$1 ,000 for information concern- 
ing the Jan. 25 murder of a 
20-year-old Virginia Beach wo- 
man. 

On that Friday, at approx- 
imately 5 p.m., Lisa Ann Jolley's 
body was discovered in the bath- 
room of her apartment by her 
husband who had just r^uraed 
home from work. The Jolly's 
lived at 4619 Bamaby Cohrt at 
the Pembroke Court Apart- 
moits. 

Jolley's body was lying face 
down in the bathtub which was 
full of water and death was 
caused by strangulation and 
drowning. Jolley was las* seen at 
-the apartment earlier that morn- 
ing by her husband. She had be«i 
anployai by decorator acc^sor- 
ies located at the outlet mall on 
Virginia Beach Boulevard. 

Anyone with information 



about this homicide should call 
Crime SolvCTs at 427-000. Cash 
rewards are also paid for infor- 
mation about any crime commit- 
ted in Virginia Beach or about the 
location of wanted people, ^olen 
property or ill^al drugs. Callo-s 
are never asked to reveal their 
names or appear in court. 




f 



^HWHBM^P^pi 



•^i.^ 



, Virginia Beach Sun, January 1, 1986 5 




William Miller 

* ", 

Miller 
elected to 
board 

The Virginia Restaurant 
Association at its Annual Mem- 
bership Meeting elected William 
R. Miller III of Virginia Beach to 
the Board of Directors as a Direc- 
tor representing the second 
Congressional District for 1986- 
1987. 

Miller is president of Miller 
Enterprises which operates the 
Duck-In restaurant and The 
Grape & Grain, a wine and 
specialty foods shop, in Virginia 
Beach. 

He graduated with a BS from 
Hampden-Sydney and has a. 
Masters in Education from the 
College of WiUiam and Mary. 

Prior to entering the foodser- 
vice business, Miller sgent his 
time in education at Norfolk 
Academy as Principal, Assistant 
Headmaster, Guidance Coun- 
selor, Coach and Teacher from 
1967-1981. 

Miller serves as elder and 
deacon at Calvin Presbyterian 
Church, as secretary and board 
member of the Virj?inia 
Association of Independent 
Schools. He was named Coach of 
the Year by the Virginia Prep 
League for four years.. He has 
also serVed VRA as tfeasurer'and ' 
nresident of the local VRA chap- 
ter in Virginia Beach. 

Savvides 
re-elected as 
director 

Michael C. Savvides has been 
re-elected to the Board of Direc- 
tors as a Director at Large of the 
Virginia Restaurant Association, 
for 1986. 

Savvides is president of three 
corporations owning and 
operating the Black Angus 
Restaurant, the Shipmates 
Restaurant & Lounge, and the 
Ramada iTin Oceanfront in 



Jobs increase 
in middle 
management 

Employment opportunities in 
the first half of 1986 will increase 
for middle management and /or 
professional staffs in Virginia 
Beach, according to statistics 
from a national survey. 

More than 1400 executives 
responsibly for hiring in com- 
panies throughout the country 
responded to the poll conducted 
by Management Recruiters Inter- 
• national, Inc. (MRI). 

A total of 38.8 percent of those 
surveyed in the South Atlantic 
area indicated they were planning 
to • expand their middle 
management and/or professional 
staffs in the next six months. 
Another 56.3 percent in the 
region planned to maintain 
current staff sizes and 8.2 percent 
planned staff reductions. 

This is a 7 point increase in 
staff additions from the second 
half of 1985 and a 4 point 
decrease in planned staff reduc- 
tions. 

By comparison, 37.1 percent of 
those polled thrdughout the 
country were planning to increase 
staff sixe; 51.3 percent said they 
would maintain staff size; and 
11.1 percent indicated possible 
staff reductions. 




Dr. Carol Schreiner 



TPI appoints 
new unit 



director 



.i...-.i.i.iimiiitttM 




PiiS: 



Y t Yrrh i vr i ri ii Vi' i V ii V i Y iii v i VMM ii Y i v i r iit ' ii! > *»w 



Frank Latham of Management 
Recruiters of Virginia Beach gave 
the statistics high reviews. 

"We seem to be experiencing 
the same level of projected hiring 
as of a year ago," Latham said. 
"In looking at industry here, we 
feel that this is a positive mode 
that will continue throughout 
1986." 



Dr. Carol Schreiner has been 
appointed M.D., as Unit Direc- 
tor of the Adult Treatment 
Program at Tidewater 
Psychiatric Institute in Virginia 
Beach. She will be responsible 
for the overall development and 
management of the hospital's 
25-bed, adult treatment 
program. 

Schreiner has been a member 
of TPI's medical staff since 
1982. She also maintains a 
private practice with 
Psychiatric Associates of 
Tidewater, with offices in 
Virginia Beach. 

She is a graduate of Temple 
University Medical School in 
Philadelphia and completed her 
residency at Southern Illinois 
University, School of Medicine 
in Springfield, Illinois. She later 
served oh the Southern Illinois 
faculty as an assistant professor 
of psychiatry and as director of 
the consultation liaison service. 




Ceco 
Building 
joins 
firm 



Ceco Buildings Division an- 
tiounced that Mid-Eastern 
Builders, Inc., Virginia Beach has 
become a Ceco metal building 
contractor. 

"We're proud to have Mid- 
Eastern Builders, Inc. as part of 
the Ceco team," said Ron 
Padawer, Ceco Buildings 
Division vice-president, 
marketing. "Mid-Eastern 
Builders, Inc. has a fine service 
tradition and pow they have the 
backing of Ceco". 

Ceco Buildings Division, based 
in Columbus, Mississippi, is the 
nation's fourth largest supplier of 
metal buildings. 

In joining Ceco Buildings 
Division, Mid-Eastern Builders, 
Inc. becomes part of a nation- 
wide network of Ceco metal 
building contractors. Accordin^^ 
to industry reports, the metal 
building industry's market share 
for^ low-rise, non-residential 
structures rose from 37% in 1973 
to 55% in 1983. 



yirginia Beach 
dealer wins 
Italian cruise 

Virginia Beach resident, 
Joseph Gianascoli of Copy Data, 
Inc. was recently awarded a 10- 
day expense-paid trip to Italy as a 
result of outstanding copier sales 
achievements for Sharp Elec- 
tronics Corporation. 

Gianascoli will begin his 
vacation at the ancient port of 
Genoa, Italy, by boarding the 
Eugenio C. cruise liner and 
sailing to Palermo, Sicily. Two- 
day stopovers in historical 
Florence Rome and Naples are 
also included. 




Sarah Grieb 



Grieb joins 
VBGH staff 
as director 



Sarah B. Grieb, of Virginia 
Beach, recently joined the staff 
of Virginia Beach General Hospi- 
tal as administrative director of 
Radiation Oncology. 

Grieb vflill be responsible for 
directin^and supervising the 
sf9flH)e^nologists of the radia- 
tion oncology unit, as well as 
coordinating the patient care and 
treatTient in the department. 

She received her certificate 
from Riverside Hospital in Ra- 
diologic Technology in 1977 and 
in 1979 received her certificate in 
Radiation Oncology Technology. 
She also attended the College of 
Charleston in Charleston, S.C. in 
pursuit of her Bachelor of Scien- 
ce degree. 

Grieb is a member of the 
American Society of Radiologic 
Technologists, the Virginia Soc- 
iety of Radiologic Technologists 
and the American Association 
for Medical Dosimetrists. 



Ma Atkins wins 

Continued from pan* 1 

since Smokie's is a small bar 
with a maximum occupancy of 
only 49 people. " 

Smokie's Bar has been get- 
ting "Ugly" for multiple 
sclerosis since tfie contest's in- 
ception in 1981. 

"Smokies is a great place - a 
home away from home," Ma 
said. "I have the best customers 
and boss (Okie Ocamb) in the 
world. If not, this little place 
wouldn't be able to bring in so 
much money for the contest." 

Atkins raised her children by 
working in the restaurant 
business, which she has been in 
for over 15 years. She has 
worked at Smokie's for the last 
six years. She will attend the 
Ugly Bartender's Convention in 
Nassau from Jan. 2 through 
Jan. 6. 

Eligibility for the^JglyHBar- 



tender's Convention consists of 
raising a minimum of $2,500 
for one trip, $5,000 for two 
trips and $7,500 for three trips. 

The five top winners from the 

'Tidewater area willbe attending 

the convention. Also attending 

from Virginia Beach is Cherie 

Brawner of Port Side Inn. 

As this year's grand prize 
winner. Ma will also travel to 
Las Vegas courtesy of Eastern 
Airlines. 

In the Tidewater area 250 
mixologists participated in the 
contest. They were not judged 
on their looks but how wiell they 
raised money for the Multiple 
Sclerosis Society. 

They raised $40,000 during 
the four- week contest. 

The funds collected by the 
contest are used to support the 
research and Chapter Service 
programs which benefit the 870 
people in the Tidewater area 
who live with multiple sclerosis. 

Multiple Sclerosis is a 
chronic, often disabling disease 
of the central nervous system. It 
strikes young adults, usually 
between the ages of 20 and 40. * 
As of yet, there is no cure for 
the disease. 



Polivnick scheduled to conduct 
Syrtlplldny 's performance 



PAT celebrates 
anniversary 

Psychiatric Associates of Tide- 
water, Inc. (PAT) is celebrating 
its fifteen year anniversary. 
. PAT was one of "the first 



Peter Bunting 



VirginiaBeach: 

He was awarded the Weilman 
Award in 1975, the Virginia 
Restaurateur-or-the-Year Award 
in 1980, the First Citizen of 
Virginia Beach Award in 1982, 
among others. 

His Outstanding achievements 
span across the food service in- 
dustry and the civic and business 
affairs field. 

Savvides has served on the 
VRA Board for over 20 years in- 
cluding serving as VRA president 
in 1972. He has made great 
strides in the areas of government 
relations and membership 
recruitment. 

He currently serves as Co- 
Chairman for the VRA 40th An- 
niversary Celebration and Ex- 
position, culminating in the '86 
Convention and Trade Show in 
April. He has ^so served on the 
Board of Directors for the 
National Restaurant Association. * 



private psychiatric practices~es^ 
tablished in Tidewater. Founded 
in December 1970, by seven 
psychiatrists practicing independ- 
ently in Norfolk and Virginia 
Beach, PAT has grown to 37 
mental health professionals, in- 
cluding psychiatrists, clinical 
psychologists and clinical social 
workers. 

There are now seven offices in 
Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Chesa- 
peake, Suffolk and Franklin. 

PAT offers comprehensive 
evaluation and treatment for 
children, adolescents and adults. 



Bunting joins 
advertising agency 



Paul Polivnick, guest conduc- 
tor, and candidate for the 
position of Music Director, will 
conduct The Virginia Sym- 
phony's concert at the Pavilion 
Theatre in Virginia Beach on 
Thursday, Jan. 9 at 8 p.m. 

The winner (yet undetermined) 
of the first Internatioal Clarinet 
Competition will appear with 
Maestro Polivnick and The 
Virginia Symphony in the Con- 
certo for Clarinet, K.622 by 
Mozart. 

Polivnick is presently the 
Music Director and Conductor of 
the Alabama Symphony Or- 
chestra. Prior to coming to 
Alabaina; Mr. Polivnick was the 
AssdcratePrmcfpal Conductor of 



Peter A. Bunting has joined 
Barker Campbell & Farley Ad- 
vertising and Public Relations as 
an advertising account executive. 
Bunting will direct account ser- 
vices for some of the agency's 
automotive, financial and in- 
dustrial clients. 

< Before joining the agency, he 
served four years at a Norfolk 
agency. 

Bunting is president and a past 
treasurer of the Tidewater chap- 
ter of the Vietnam Veterans of 
American. 



Associate Conductor with the In- 
dianapolis Symphony Orchestra 
for three years. 

He has studied conducting with 
Leonard Bernstein, Walter 
Susskind, Franco Ferrara, and 
has served as assistant conductor 
of the Aspen Festival Orchestra 
under Jorge Mester. 

A graduate of Jullrard School, 
Polivnick holds a^regree in con- 
ducting; however, if <■ double 
majors were awarded he would 
have been eligible for degrees in 
both violin and conducting. 

The finals of the Internatioal 
Clarinet Competition will be held 
on Jan. 5, at Old Dominion 
University. Judges for the finals 
will include the internattoiTanjr 



The Milwaukee~ Sy ii ipl i o ii y O r - 
chestra for four years and was the acclaimed clarinet players, and MasterCard accepted. 



Stanley Drucker and F. Gerard 
Errante, and Maestro Richard 
Williams, Music Director and 
Conductor of The Virginia Sym- 
phony. Four finalist have been 
chosen to compete. 

The public may attend rehear- 
sal by The Virginia Symphony on 
Tuesday, Jan. 7 at 7:30 p.m. in 
the Pavilion Theatre. Reser- 
vations will be needed. Call 623- 
8590 or 380-0040. 

Tickets for the concerts are 
available at all First Virgiia 
Bank Branches; at the Pavilion 
Box Office for the concert on 
Jan. 9, 428-8000. 

Tickets range from $16 tgo $6 
with discounts available to senior 
citizens, sfudertts and children. 
^hoieer^sa,T^mericanr Express 



"My Old Manure" 

If your loll is very poor, 
If viin kavt sand or clay galore, 
If yoar yard to • bore, 
you need my old manare. 
If yoa Hve on the sIiok, 
If yoo are rich or poor, 
you can afford for sure, 
my aged, old, black manure. 
II does not smell at all, y'all. 
It wUI no) bum anything al all. 
In fKt your plants will have a ball, 
with the grandest manure of them all. 
It will keep your plants warm 

this winter, 

this old manure that I deliver. 

it to, to your plants, a fancy dinner, 

without It thev may moan and shiver. 

If you want your yard to be revvin, 

ami you'd like to put your phuls 

in heaven, 

yon would have to call me after seven, 

427-1011 




Start 
. your Day 
With Our 
All-New 

BREAKFAST BUFFET 

Tuesday Saturday 

8:30 11:00 

Sunday 



ONLY 



$2 



95 



8:30 11:30 



SfcAFOOD RESTAURANT 

3010 HIGH STREET, PORTSMOUTH 
Tue.-Sun, 8:30 A.M. -2:00 A.M. • Closed Mon. 
397 8196 



Campaign 25 

The Portsmouth Times, The Chesapeake Post, The Virginia Beach Sun 

Karn a.s much as >ou »anl b> selling subscriptions! 

•Are you, your church or civic group looking for a really worthwhile fund-raising 
project? 

Do \ou want a quick and easy way to earn hundreds of dollars while at the same 
time helping to support YOUR city's dedicated,' independently-owned community 
newspaper - the only one with all the pictures, news, features and editorials of most in- 
terest to your family and friends? If so, Campaign 25 is the solution. 

Admit it. You care about your community, and so do we. And together we can work 

to make it an even better place in which to live and do business. That's why for every 

25 new subscriptions you or your group generates for The Portsmouth Times, The 

Chesapealte Post or The Virginia Beach Sun, we'll gladh rebate back to you $125, or 

half-off the regular $10 a year subscription rate. Thai's a savings of 50%! 

In addtlton, you'll enjoy the pleasure of receiving your hometown newspaper, 
loaded with all the club news, pictures and ads which mean the most to you, delivered 
through the mail to your home every week for 52 weeks. 

Why not give ii a try and join the dozens of other people and groups who have 
already taken advantage of this campaign. For more details, call 547-4571 or simply 
stop inioany of our newspaper offices and pick up a Campaign 25 sign-up form. 

We uaiii to be your newspaper! 



U'v I'ka-i. iiuiil mc.i ( .imp.uL'ii 2^ mlmi up tiMiii 
^l■^ l'k',i-i.'oill mi-.thnutMuii ( .imp.iiL'ii -' 

N.lMll.- . , - 



( ;U 



I'lUMH- 



Kfliifii III < .imtmiitn 25. t ii Jht \ intinia Bcaih Sun, 
I.^KSiiiilh RiiMnninl Kind. Viriinii Hniih. V A., 2W52 



6 Virginia Beach Sun, January 1, 1986 




Wheelchair basketball 
tournament begins 



Seton House on N. Lynnhaven Road is open to Runaway girls age 13 through 17. 

Typical Beach runaway 



CoRtinued from page 1 



Action and excitement are ex- 
pected as teams from the United 
States and Canada gather in 
Virginia Beach for the eighth 
Annual Mayor's Invitational 
Wheelchair Basketball Tour- 
nament. 

Play will begin Fridayf Jan. 10, 
with games held at the Virginia 
Beach Recreation Center/Kern-- 
psville gym and at the Kempsville 
Junior High School gym. 

On Saturday, Jan. 11, a high 
jump exhibition will be featured 
at 5 p.m. and the Tihatfipionship 
game at 7 p.m., both in the 
VBVRC/Kempsville gym. 

An awards ceremony will 
follow the championship game. 

Call the Virginia Bea ch 
Recreation Center/Kempsville at 
495-1892 for information. 



Opening Round Games 

Location 



Team 



Time 



Virginia Beach Sun Wheelers (VA) 

vs. 6 p.m. 

Roanoke Star City Wheelers (V A) 

Carolina Tar Wheels (Charlote, NC.) 

vs. 8 p.m. 

Niagra Bullets (Ontario, Canada) 

Washington Bullets (D.C.) 

vs. 6 p.m. 

London Flames (Ontario, Canada) 

Kitchner Twin City Spinners 
(Ontario, Canada) 

L_-vs. i-Sjun. 



Eastern Paralyzed Veterans Assoc. 
Chargers (Long Island, N.Y.) 



VBRC/Kempsville 
VfeRC/Kempsville 



Kempsville Jr. 
High School 



Kempsville Jr. 
High School ' 



counselor trainee program. To be 



employed part-time the staff 
membeis must have completed 
at least three yeara of counseling 
and be working toward a degree. 

Seton House is fortunate in 
that two of their part-timers 
already have undergraduate de- 
grees and are working on their 
masters', Jones said. 
, Seton Houses is the dream of 
several Virginia residents who 
felt there was a need for this type 
of shelter in Virginia Beach. It 
receives some money for salaries 
under a grant from the National 
Youth Runaway Act. The rest of 
the funds come from private 
donations. 

The house was originally call- 
ed Mother Seton House. 
"Mother" was dropped from the 
name because many people 
' thought it was connected with 
the Catholic Church, Jones said. 

The only connection to the 
Catholic Church is that it owns 
the building Sevon House rents. 

The maximum stay is the 14 
days for girls at Seton House. 
' During the time the girls are at 
the center, individual and family 
counseling is provided. Families 
can come back for the house's 
weekly family group sessions. 

"Parents don't have it easy 
either," Jones said. "In a run- 
away situation, ui^at^«;9q,9a^is 
to blame. The best thing we can 
do at Seton House is to empower 
the family not to need us." 



■^ 




LcH^stoJoit inmo(iel stMes prograffi 



Furnishings in the bedrooms were provided by various Virginia Beach 
Civic organizations. 




Garth Notel of Virginia Beach is 
in a model freshman studies 
program this year at Catawba 
College. The son of Mr. and Mrs.* 
George Notel, he has been 
involved in the vanguard pro- 
gram since September. 

Called Educare, from the Latin 
"to lead out, to educate," the 
program offers freshmen high 
challenges in a supportive atmo- 
sphere. 

"It pays more attention to the 
transitional nature of the fresh- 
man year," Stephen H. Wurster, 
Catawba president, said. "It's a 
structured, interdisciplinary pro- 
gram designed to provide as 
much assistance as possible in 
helping students successfully 
navigate the passage from high 
school to college." 

Educare is part composition, 
part studies in classical civiliza- 
tion and part study skills, all 
bound together in a comprehen- 
sive whole. 

Students focus on a number of 
"moments," relatively brief 

H'- Master Learner sessions, 

"^tittiilir groups that meet with an 

adviser twice a week, emphasize 

study skills and social adjust- 




Garth Notel 



ment. The advisers serve as 
models for the students. 

THe"Master Learner sessions, 
which are made up of 13 or 14 
students, allow the advisers to 
get to know their students well. 
If a problem arises, they can 
detect it early on. 

Notel says the Master Learner 
sessions, English and lectures all 
work together. 

"If you don't get something in 
the lecture, you get it in the 
adviser group," he said "and the 
papers in English prepare you for 
the civilization tests." 

The sheer volume of the 
material makes the course a real 
challenge, Notel added. He notes 
that he is learning about explicit 
defmitions and different ways to 
indentify and summarize pas- 
sages, skills that he will be able ' 
to apply in other classes. 



Tobacco free society 



Home help freebies 

As the cooler days of fall begin to set in, it's a good time to concen- 
trate on indoor, projects— so here are a few freebies to help you put 
your house in order. ^ 

Carpet care 

There are things about carpets that most of us go through our entire 
lives without knowing. The realm of the unknown existing under ydur 
feet is explained in this 12-page freebie. The Complete Book of Car- 
peting. 

Carp f t t f xtu r e ^ «»- «■ d escrihed— you'll le arn that different-textures^ 



varnish, lacquer or shellac; or whether to use paint remover; He's got a 
simple cotton ball test that will tell you. 

Whatever your particular question is, Mr. Formby "wotild" like to 
help you. Simply write him a letter and explain your problem (include a 
stamped, self-addressed envelope) and he'll send you a personal reply 
full of good wood advice. 

Directions: Send a long, stamped, self-addressed envelope. 

-Ask For: Advice on your wood care problem. 

Mail To: Homer Formby, P. O. Box 667, Olive Branch, MS 38654. 



Conlinued from page 2 
should be prohibited and/or 
regulated in a manner consistent 
with the health care mission of 
the provider." 

These two brief statements by 
the MSV have tremendous im- 
portance to the people of Vir- 
ginia. The MSV is not an 
organization of detached scien- 
tists in some Ivory Tower. This is 
the state-wide organization of all 
or our doctors who know very 
well the importance and contri- 
butions of the tobacco industry to 
our state, as well as the effects of 
tobacco use which they see 



everyday in their patients (us). 

Our doctors have considered 
all the pros and cons and they 
know -what they are saying by 
these resolutions. The woes of a 
declining tobacco industry may 
be a serious challenge to our 
state's economy, but there 
should no longer be any doubt in 
the minds of Virginians that the 
harmful health effects of tobacco 
are of overwhelming importance j 

By Kevin R. Cooper, M.D., 
Chairman, Virginia Interagency 
Council on Smoking or Health. 



Pops concert set 
Freebies for plant lovers for Pavilion Theatre 



By Terry Bisbee 

Copley News Service 



work in different environments. Stairs, for instance, demand a densely 
tufted, low-pile carpet. 

Judging quality of carpet vs. price can be tricky, so this booklet of- 
fers advice on what to look for and how to administer the "grin test" to 
a carpet. 

Help for those who already own carpets and are not in the market for 
a new one can be found in the carpet-care section. There also is infor- 
mation on how to remove spots that you may find on your carpet— 
chocolate, wine or shoe polish, to name a few. 

Directions: Send a postcard . 

Ask For: The Complete Book of Carpeting. 

Mail To: Dupont Co., Room G-40284, Wilmington, DE 19898. 

Solar heating booklet 

Ase you interested in k free source of heat for your home? 

Thought you would be. Your windows and patio doors can be used 
to collect the sun's heat— a common nassive solar heating techniaue. 

A passive solar heating system uses the structure of the home to 
collect, store and distribute heat from the sun with very little, if any, 
mechanical assistance. Even in the northern parts of the country, 
passive solar heating can supply a home with 30 percent of its heating 
needs, and up to 80 percent in a milder climate. This means significant 
savings in your heating bills! 

The 16-page booklet. Passive Solar: Using Windows and Patio 
Doors 10 Cut Fuel Bills, examines several types of passive solar heating 
systems and how they work. 

There also is a section that wiH remind you of the factors you need to 
check when selecting windows and doors for passive solar heating. 

Directions: Send 25 cents, postage and handling. 

Ask For: Passive Solar: Using Windows and Patio Doors to Cut Fuel 
Bills. 

Mail To: National Woodwork Manufacturers Association, c/o 
Sumner Rider & Associates, 355 Lexington Ave., New York, NY 
10017. 

Furniture Friend 

Homer Formby is the "Dear Abby" of wood care— he'll answer 
your questions about restorations, refinishing, staining and the like 
through his write-in service. He's a nationally recognized expert on the 
subject, and has over 50 years of experience working with wood. 

For example, Formby talks about one of the most common problems 
with an old piece of furniture, a darkened ugly finish. This "ambering" 
is caused by years of exposure to light. But modern technology has 
made it quicker and easier to remove that old finish. And he'll tell you 
exactly how to do it. 

Do you need to know if you should use a product that will take off 



These freebies are for those Virginia Beach residents who love to 
grow things. And we've even got one offer for those wishing they could 
cultivate green thumbs but haven 't quite managed yet . 

Gardener's Wick 

Ever sat back and looked at a room full of thirsty plants and wished 
for an automatic watering system? 

Of perhaps the problem is that the violets are getting too little water 
and dracaenas are getting too much. 

The automatic watering and feeding wick and plant food is a simple, 
self-watering and feeding system that can be installed in potted plants 
to keep them uniformly moist. 

The wick consists of a woven material that is drawn through the 
drainage holes in the plant pot to connect the plant dirt with the tray 
below. It draws water from the container up into the pot by capillary 
action. 

Receive four wicks with this offer, enough for two plants, and 
enough food concentrate to make 2 gallons. 

Directions: Send 50 cents, postage and handing. 

Ask For: Authomatic watering and feeding wick. 

Mail To: Automatic watering and feeding wick, Vern Bills, Monarch 
Industries. P. O. Box 1744, Santa Ana, CA 92702. 

Orienul Seeds 

Looking for a way to grow Moo Goo Gai Pan? Tired of searching 
high and low and never fmding fresh ong choy? 

Why not try growing Oriental vegatables? 

This offer includes one phcket of Oriental seeds and a listing of other 
available varieties. 

Hueng kunn seeds (Chinese celery), which take approximately 90 
days to grow and can be grown indoors, too. 

The packet is a standard-size seed packet, retailing for 89 cents in the 
stores. 

Other seeds this company carriesHfldude those of Chinese cabbages, 
mustards, parsley, bok choy, snow pea and Chinese kale. 

Directions: Send SO cents, postage and handling. 

Ask For: One packet of seeds and catalog. 

Mall To: Tsang & Ma, P. O. Box 294, Belmont, CA 94002. 
Dryii^ Frvlta tnd Flowers 

Make a delightful potpourri sachet from the petals that fall from 
bouquets or from old blooms that have fallen in the yard. Dried Fruits 
and Flowers, a two-page instruction sheet, explains how to dry the 
petals — use the sun or an oven — and spice them up appropriately. It's 
a great way to use the "leftovers" In from the garden. 

The detailed directions cover methods of dehydrating, stam blan- 
ching (recommended for pretreatifig v^etables) sulfuring fruits, drying 
and storage tips. 

Directions: Send a long, stamped, self-addressed enveloix. 

Ask For: Dried Fruits & Flowers. 

Mali To: Freebies Magazine, P. O. Box 20283-CP. Santa Barbara, 
CA93120. 



The Virginia Symphony Pops 
concert on S^mday,■nan?^9 at 
7:30 p.m. in the Pavilion in 
Virginia Beach, will feature the 
McLain Family Band in a copcert 
of traditional, bluegrass and light 
classics. 

Harold Evans will guest con- 
duct the concert and lead The 
Virginia symphony Pops in 
works by Aaron Copeland, 
Brahms and Grieg and such 
popular favorites as The Orange 
Blossom Special and Peter 
Schickele's Far Away From 
Here. 

The McLain Family Band's 16 
year career has included six Ken- 
nedy Center appearances, two 
concerts at Carnegie M^ll and 20 
visits to the Grand Ole C5p>y. 



They have perf ormed in 62 
forelgrTeountfies^slnusical am- 
bassadors of the U.S. State 
Department and have recorded 
twelve albums. 

The band combines the vocal 
and instrumental talents of father 
Raymond K. McLain (guitar and 
accordian), Raymond W. 
McLain (fiddle and banjo), Ruth 
McLain Riopel (mandolin and 
bass), Michael Riopel (guitar, 
mandolin and harmonica), Nan- 
cy Ann McLain (bass and man- 
dolin) and Michael McLain 
(mandolin and banjo). 

Tickets are available at all First 
Virginia Bank lobbies and are 
priced from $6 - $16. To reserve 
tickets by telephone call 380-0040 
or 428-8000. 



Cayce's life subject 
of lecture series 



Free lectures and a movie on 
the life and work of Edgar Cayce 
are scheduled daily at the 
Association for Research and 
Enlightenment. 

Lectures are at 3 p.m. followed 
by the 30 minute movie at 4 p.m. 
Lectures include Wednesday, 
Jan. I, Ideals: Ideals for thtf New 
Year, by Shirley Winston; Thur- 
sday, Jan. 2, Dreams: Is That 
Really Me? by Jeanette Thomas; 

Friday, Jan. 3, Heahh: Health 
Patterns by Mae St. Clair; and 
Saturday, Jan. 4, Dreams: Door 
to Creativity by Walene James. 

A.R.E., 67th St. and Atlantic 
Avenue, Virginia Beach is open 
for visitors seven days a week, 
from 9 a.m. until 5:30 p.m., 



Monday through Saturday and 1 
p.m. until 6 p.m. on Sundays. 
For information call 428-3588. 

Innovation 

Continued (rom page I 

tive in the country," he said. 
"That means for the hours put 
in, we solved more crimes." 

Wall added that he was im- 
pressed by th fact that about 40 
percent of callers don't accept the 
reward money. 

Wall began his police career as 
a military police officer in the U. 
S. Army. He has served as the 
chief of police in Washington 
Township Police Department in 
New Jersey, Rockville, Maryland 
and Morgantown, West Virginia, 
seling the people involved. The 
police here since 1 98 1 . 



Virginia Beach Sun, January 1 , 1986 7 



Cold weather means more caution on the road 



Virginia Beach residents are on 

i the move. For most, "neither" 

snow, nor rain, nor dark of 

'^ night" can Iceep them off the 

highways -in any season, in any 

weather. 

Each year, thousands of deaths 
and injuries on' the nation's 
highways can be attributed to 
severe winter weather. The best 
bet is to stay home. However, 
business or holiday plans often 
make' winter traveling necessary.- 
If traveling is a must, the 
following tips may make the 
journey safer. 

Before the cold weather hits, 
be sure the car is in good running 
order and is properly serviced. 
Have a reliable mechanic check 
the battery, ^tifreeze, wipers 
and windshield washer, ignitioHj 
and thermostat. 

Good tires are very important. 
Not only are they safer, but in 
many jurisdictions, there are 

„™3j?My HP?? for peop^k 

on a snow emergency route 
without snow tires, chains, or all- 
weather radials. 

Plan long trips carefully. 
Listen to weather reports and 
traveler's advisories and keep an 
alternate route in mind. Inform 
someone of travel plans and 
arrival time. Travel in daylight, 
use major highways, if possible, 
and try not^o travel alone. 

Before starting out, clean snow 
and ice off all parts of the car- 
windows, hood, roof, trunk, and 
lights. Snow left on the car could 
affect visibility once driving is 
started. 

Keep the gas tank as full as 
possible, especially if unfamiliar 
with the roads or passing through 
rural areas. A full tank also 
prevents gas line freeze up. 

Even if restricting winter 
driving to short, local trips, cer- 
tain supplies can help in an 
eihergency. Always keep basic 
items like a windshield scraper, 
battery booster cables, a tow 
chain or rope, a bag of sand, a 
blanket, and a flashlight in the 
car. 

For longer trips, add a tran- 
sistor radio (with extra batteries), 
a first aid kit, road maps, some 
nonperishable foods, and mat- 
ches and candles. 

Don't overdress when driving. 
Even on short trips, clothing 
should be loose-fitting and com- 
fortable. After the car has war- 
med up, take off heavy outer 
clothing, but pull over to the side 
of the road to do it. Don't try to 
struggle out of a coat while 
driving. 

If caught on the road during a 
winter storm, keep calm. Give 
some indication of trouble - turn 
on flashing lights, raise the hood, 

Fogle takes 
first place 
in track meet 

William and Mary women's 
indoonrack~^nd field team 
opened its 1985-86 :'ate at the 9th 
Annual Wi1!:am and Mary All- 
Comers Meet. William and Mary 
made a strong showing in run- 
ning events. 

In the 600-yard run, the Inr- 
dianswent 1-2-J. 

Junior Angie Fogle, of 
Virginia Beach, placed first in the 
600-yard run. 

Fogle graduated from Green 
Run High School. 

Facing plight 

Continued from page 2 

handed to us, forgetting that 
what is really involved are the 
lives of oppressed, im- 
poverished people upon whom 
humanity has turned its back . 

Governments and cor- 
porations still try to deal with 
these countries as they did 
before World War I - keeping 
the power in the'hands of a few, 
so as bettger to exploit the 
riches of the small countries. * 

The era of "Banana 
Republics" is over. It is time to 
look into the face of reality. 
Most of the people in these 
countries are too busy trying to 
keep themselves fed, clothed 
and sheltered to worry about 
any form of government. 

Those who are interested in 
governing don't necessarily 
i want to choose Communism or 
i Democracy. They want to look 

at the good and the bad of each 
and come up with a system of 
their own. 

We in this country, more 
than any other, should under- 
stand and appreciate their 
feelings. Yet. we are actually one 
of the major offenders in not 
allowing them to proceed in 
their own way. 



or tie a cloth from an antenna or 
door handle. 

Stay in the car. Don't leave the 
car to find shelter or a telephone 
unless one c&n be seen close by 
(really close - yards away). 
Disorientation comes very 
quickly in a blowing snowstorm. 

For heat, turn on the ear 



engine for brief periods. To avoid 
deadly carbon monoxide 
poisoning, always leave a down- 
wind window open slightly and 
make sure the exhaust pipe is 
clear of snow wTien ihe engine is 
running. 

Wh«n caught unprepared, 
there are many items in the car 



that can be used. Papers and 
maps can be crinkled up and stuf- 
fed in clothing for added war- 
mth. Rugs and removable seat 
covers can be used for added in- 
sulation. Huddle with passengers 
and try using coats as blankets. 
They may be more effective that 
way. 



Evercise from time to time by 
clapping hands and moving arms 
and legs. Don't stay in one 
positin too long, but don't get 
overexerted by shoveling or 
trying to push the car. 

Leav6 the dome light on at 
night as a signal to rescuers. If 



there is more than one person in 
the car, sleep in shifts. 

Winter presents many 
challenges for the snowbelt 
traveler. By staying calm and 
using all that's available to stay 
as warm as possible, the situation 
will remain one of j^onvenicnce 
rather than a life or (feath peril. 




cLb 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 


LECALNOTICBS 



VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach on the 13th day 
of December, 1985 
Elizabeth Ann LeFevre. Com- 
, plainant 

V. " ' ' -' '^^___ __ 

Fredenck W. Chapin " 
a non-resident 

Serve: Secretary of the Com- 
monwealth 

Mary D. Chapin 
5657 Dodington Court 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23455 

Anna L. Karp 

304 Westover Avenue 

Norfolk; Virginia 23517 

Linda Yaw 

985 Sunnyside Drive 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23464 

Kay H. Finkelstein 

Serve: Robert H. Bennett, Attor 

ney 

2697 International Parkway 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 

Ernest A. Natividad 
4405 Articles Lane 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Sovran Bank, NA 
Serve: Cliff A. Cutchins 111, 
Registered Agent 
One Commercial Place 
Norfolk, Virgfnia 23501 , 

The Chesapeake and Potomac 
Telephone Company 
Serve: Huburl R.Stallard 
703 East Grace Street 
Richmond, Virginia 23219 

Bank of Virginia 

Serve: Sarah R. Myers, 

Registered Agent 

7 North Eighth Street 

Richmond, Virginia 23219 

United States of America 
Serve: U.S. Attorney ■, 
Eastern District of Virginia . 
U.S. Federal Court House 
Gsan by Street 
I^orfolk, Virginia 

Department of the Treasury • 
Serve: U.S. Attorney 
Eastern District of Virginia 
U.S. Federal Court House 
Gran by Street 



J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By Phyllis N. Styron 
Deputy Clerk 
223-2 4T 1-22 VB 



Norfolk, Virginia 



VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGTNIA 
BEACH ON THE 19th DAY OF 
DECEMBER, 1985 
IN THE MATTER OF 
THE ESTATE OF MARJORIE 
R. CASON, DECEASED 
CHANCERY NO. C.P. 6125 
SHOW CAUSE ORDER 

Ir appearing that a report of 
the accounts of United Virginia 
Bank, Executor of the Estate of 
Marjorie R. Cason, deceased, 
and of the debts and demands 
against said^^te have been filed 
in the Cl^^Office of this Court 
and that more than six months 
have elapsed since the 
qualification, of said personal 
representative, on motion of said 
personal representataiv?, it is 
ORDERED that the creditors of, 
and all others interested in, the 
estate do show cause, if any they 
can, at 9:00 a.m. on the 13th day 
of January, 1986, before this 
Court at its courtroom against 
the payment and delivery of the 
Estate of Marjorie R. Cason, 
deceased, to the legatees named 
in the will, without requiring 
refunding bonds. 

It is further ORDERED that 
this Order be Published once a 
week for two successive weeks in 
The Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper published and having 
gerieral circulaU<Mi i^.Jh% C3iy of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

ENTER THIS ORDER: 
A Copy Teste: J. Curtis Fruit, 
Clerk 

By Jeanette I. Jones D.C. 
Norvell O. Scott III 
Counsel for United Virginia 
Bank 

WILLIAMS, WORRELL, 
KELLY & GREER, P.C. 
600 United Virginia Bank 
Building 
P.O. Box 3416 
Norfolk, Virginia, 23514 
x> 

223-11 2T 1-8-86 

NOTICE OF 

PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach Planning 

Commission will hold a Public 

Hearin g on Tu esday. January 14 . 



Kearney Floyd, Trustee 
716 Pennsylvania Avenue 
Norfolk, Virginia, Defendants 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of the above styled 
suit is to partition certain proper- 
ty owned in fee simple by the 
complainant Elizabeth Ann 
LeFevre and the defendants 
Frederick W. Chapin and Mary 
D. Chapin located in Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. And an affidavit 
having been filed that diligence 
has been used without effect to 
ascertain the location of Mary D. 
Chapin, whose last known ad- 
dress is 5657 Dodington Court, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23455. 

The property which is the sub- 
ject of this suit is described as 
follows: 

ALL that certain lot, piece or 
parcel of land with the buildings 
and improvements thereon, 
situate in the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, and known, 
numbered and designated as Lots 
1 and 2 as shown on that certain 
plat entitled: "Survey of Block 
Six of Oceana Gardens", which 
plat is duly recorded in the 
Clerk's Office of the Circuit 
Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, in Map Book 21 
at page 3. 

h is therefore ORDERED that 
the said Mary D. Chapin do ap- 
pear on or before February 3, 
1986. in the Clerk's Office of this 
Court and do what is necessary to 
protect her interest. 

And it is further ORDERED 
that this order be published once 
a week for four successive weeks 
in the Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper having general cir- 
culation in the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. 



1986 at 12:00 noon in the Council 
Chambers of the City Hall 
Building, Princess Anne Cour- 
thouse. Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
A briefing session will be held at 
9:00 a.m. in the Planning Depar- 
tment Conference Room, 
Operations Building. Planning 
Commission action is not a final 
determination of the application, 
but only a recommendation to 
the City Council as the viewpoint 
of the Planning Commission: 
Final determination of the ap- 
plication is to be made by City 
Council at a later date, after 
public notice in a newspaper 
having general circulation within 
the city. 

Those members of the public in- 
terested in attending the public 
hearing should be advised that, 
for reasons the Planning com- 
mission deems appropriate, cer- 
tain items on the agenda may be 
heard out of order and that it 
should not be assumed that the 
order listed below will be exactly 
followed during the public 
hearing'. 

The staff reviews of some or all 
of the iteijis on this agenda 
suggest that dprtain conditions be 
attached to approval by City 
Council. However, it should not 
be assumed that those conditions 
constitute all the conditions that 
will ultimately be attached to the 
project. Staff agencies may im- 
pose further conditions and 
requirements during ad- 
ministration of applicable city 
ordinances. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATlONj^ 
1. An ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Virginia Beach 
General Hospital for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 



CLASSIFICATION from R-4 
Residential District to 0-1 Office 
District on certain property 
located on the North side of Old 
Qonation Parkway Extended 
beginning at a point 625.48 feet 
East of J^irst Colonial Road. Said 
parcel contains 2.075 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Dep|irtment 
of Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of W. T. Brown & 
Associates for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING . DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from A-1 
.Apartment District to A-2 Apar- 
tment District on the North side 
of Oconee Avenue, 80 feet West 
of Hutton road. Said parcel is 
located at 2548 Oconee Avenue 
and contains 3.45 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

3. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of WAI, a Virginia 
Limited Partnership, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-5 Residential District to 
B-4 Resort-Commercial District 
on certain property located on 
the North side of Owl's Creek 
Lane, 800 feet more or less East 
of Gregory's Lane. Said parcel 
contains 2.68 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH;' 

4. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Giant Square Shop- 
ping Center Company for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
FROM B-1 Business-Residential 
District to B-2 Community- 
Business District on the East side 
of S. Lynnhaven Road, 530 feet 
more or less South of Silina 
Drive. Said parcel is located at 
444 South Lynnhaven Road and 
contains 3.5 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Runnymede Cor- 
poration for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION fiom B-2 
Community-Business District to 
1-2 Heavy Industrial District on 
the West side of Butternut Lane, 
523.42 feet South of Bonney 
Road on Lot 21 -A and Lots 22- 
28, Block C, Rosemont Cor- 
potation. Said parcels contain 
31,363 square feet. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROI JGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Masciola and Com- 
pany for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-7 
Residential District to A-3 Apar- 
tment District on the South side 
of Norfolk Avenue, 211.56 feet 
West of Indian Avenue. Said 
parcel is located at 1012 Norfolk 
Avenue and contains 28,314 
square feet. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

7. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Masciola and Com- 
pany for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from A-1 
Apartment District to A-3 Apar- 
tment District beginning at a 
point 90 feet more or less South 
of Norfolk Avenue, 400 feet 
more or less West of Indian 
Avenue. Said parcel is located at 
1012 Norfolk Avenue and con- 
tains 2178 squfflT feet. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
KJROUGH. 

8. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of G. Geoffrey & Linda 
J. Brockclbank for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-6 
Residential District to 0-1 Office 
District at the Southeast corner 



of Bonney Road and South Fir 
Avenue. Said parcel is located at 
4313 Bonney Road and contains 
9491.7 square feet. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Plann ing. KEMPS VILLE 
BOROUGH. 

9. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Bruce B. Mills for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT .CLASSIFICATION 
from A-1 Apartment District to 
B-2 Community-Business District 
on the West side of Happy Street, 
231.31 feet South of Bonney 
Road on Lots 10-15, Block 11, 
East Norfolk. Said parcel con- 
tains 15,000 square feet. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

10. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of George and Willie 
Held for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-6 
Residential District to B-2 Com- 
munity-Business District at the 
Northeast corner of Witchduck 
Road and Ruritan Court. Said 
parcel is located at 400 and 404 
South Witchduck Road and con- 
tains 1.4 acres more or less. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available tin the Department 
of Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

11. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of C. L. and O.V. 
White, a General Partnership, 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from O-l Office District to 1-1 
LighrtBdastriri •Wstri« ascer- 
tain property located on the West 
side of Chimney Hill Parkway 
beginning at a point 1 16 feet Nor- 
th of Smokey Chamber Drive. 
Said parcel contains 3.37 acres. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

12. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dimensions, Inc. for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-1 Resid*nfial District to 
0-1 Office District on the East 
side of Diamond Springs Road, 
500 feet more or less South of 
Lawson Hall Key on Lots 1-12 
and part of Lot 13, Section 6, 
Wesleyan Pines. Said parcel con- 
tains 12.84 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

13. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dimensions, Lnc., for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-5 Residential District to 
0-1 Office District on the East 
side of Diamond Springs Road, 
1360 feet more or less South of 
Lawson Hall Key on Part of Lot 
13 and Lot 14, Section 6, 
Wesleyan Pines. Said parcel con- 
tains 1.16 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

14. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Mildred Lucille Reid 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from AG-2 Agricultural District 
to 1-1 Light Industrial District on 
certain property located on the 
South side of London Bridge 
Road beginning at a point 300 
feet more or less East of Shipps 
Corner Road. Said parcel is 
located at 1417 London Bridge 
Road and contains 2,524 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

15. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Mildred Lucille Reid 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from AG-1 Agricultural District 
to 1-1 Light Industrial District on 
property located 600 feet South 
of London Bridge Road begin- 
ning at a poing 3(X) feet more or 
less East of Shipps Corner Road. 
Said parcel is located at 1417 
London Bridge Road and con- 
tains 1.214 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

16. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Amos J. Ward ctals 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from AG-2 Agricultural District 
to B-2 Community-Business 
District on the West side of 
General Booth Boulevard, 420 



feet more or less North of Dam 
Neck Road. Said parcel is located 
at 1544 Oceana Boulevard^^nd 
contains 7.1 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PRINCESS Af^NE , 
BOROUGH. — 
W.'"W'10rHihance upon' Ap 
plication of Amos J. Ward etals 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from AG-1 Agricultural District 
to B-2 Community-Business 
District 600 feet west of General 
Booth Boulevard, 420 feet North 
of Dam Neck Road. Said parcel 
is located at 1544 Oceana 
Boulevard and contains 4.9 acres. 
Plats with more detrailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. PRIN- 
CESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
18. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dominion Resour- 
ces, Inc., for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION from R-3 
Residential District to 0-1 Office 
District on certain property 
located at the Southwest corner 
of London Bridge Road and 
General Booth Boulevard. Said 
parcel contains 5.69 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

19. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dominion Resour- 
ces, Inc., for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION from R-3 
Residential DlStrfrt to M 'Lf^t 
Industrial District on certain 
property located on the South 
side of London Bridge Road 
beginning at a point 650 feet 
more or less West of General 
Booth Boulevard. Said parcel 
contains 8.92 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information, are 
available in the Departmernt of 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAI I JSE PERMIl : 

20. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dominion Resour- 
ces, Inc., for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for a storage yard 
for Virginia Power Company on 
certain property located on the 
South side of London Bridge 
Road beginning at a point 650 
feet more or less West of General 
Booth Boulevard. Said parcel 
contains 8.92 acres. Plats ^ith- 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning, PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

21. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Auto Care Centers of 
America for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for an automobile 
service center at the Northwest 
corner of Holland Road and 
Grant Avenue on Lots 1-20, 
Block 4, Pecan Gardens. Said 
parcel contains 51,000 square 
feet. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

22. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Kramer Tire Com- 
pany. Incorporated for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
automobile repair and sale, in- 
stallation and service of tires on 
certain property located at the 
northern quadrant of the inter- 
section of Holland Road and 
Lynnhaven Parkway. Said parcel 
contains 37,000 square feet. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

23. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Hester C. Brinster 
for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for a home occupation 
(babysitting) at the Northwest 
comer of Cavalier Drive and 
Holly Road. Said parcel is 
located at 4300 Holly Road and 
contains 31,319.6 square feet. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

24. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of PCK Corporation 
for a CONDITIONAL L'Sr 



Mi 



■m 



^t^ 






8 Virginia Beach Sun. January 1, 1986 



¥ii?/g£mi 




©loL Ho 




UCALNOTICIS 



D 



LiCAlNdTICiS 



LKALHOnCIS 



LKALNOnCIS 



UGALNOnCIS 



LEGAL NOTICES 



plication of Uommion Resource, 
Inc., for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION from R-J 
Residential District to O-l Office 
District on certain property 
located at the Southwest corner 
of London Bridge Road and 
General Booth Boulevard. Said 
parcel contains 5.69 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

19. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dominion Resour- 
ces, Inc., for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-J 
Residential district to I-l Light 
Industrial District on certain 
property located on the South 
side of London Bridge Road 
beginning at a poing 650 feet 
more or less Wcs^"of "General 
Booth Boulevard. Said parcel 
contains 8.92 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 

20. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dominion Resour- 
ces, Inc., for a CONDITIONAL ' 
USE PERMIT for a storage yard 
for Virginia Power Company on 
certain property located on the 
South side of London Bridge 
Road beginning at a point 650 
feet more or less West of General 
Booth Boulevard. Said parcel 
contains 8.93 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

21. An Ordijhance upon Ap- 
plication of Auto Care Centers of 

^nerica for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for an 

automobile service center at the 
Northwest cornet of Holland 
Road and Grant Avenue on Lots 
1-20, Block 4, Pecan Qardens. 
Said parcel contains 51,000 
square feet. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

22. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
ptieation of Kramer' Tire Com- 
pany, Incorporated for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
automobile repair and sale, in- 
stallation and service of tires on 
certain property located at the 
northern quadrant of the inter- 
section of Holland Road and 
Lynnhaven Parkway. Said parcel 

.contains 37,000 square feet. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

23. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Hester C. Brinster 
for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for a home occupation 
(babysitting) at the Northwest 
corner of Cavalier Drive and 



For The Elderly for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PEI^MIT for a 
home for the aged at the Nor- 
theast corner of Club House 
Road and Duplin Street on Lot 
16, Block 48, Princess Anne 
Plaza. Said parcel is located at 
3420 Club House Road and con- 
tains 13,000 square feet. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 

28. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Peggy Davis for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a day care center on the East 
side of Centervilie Turnpike, 295 
feet North of Livingston Oak 
Drive. Said parcel is located at 
2100 Centervilie Turnpike and 
contains 1.13 acres. Plats with 

jnore detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

29. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plicaiton of Mary Susanne 
Knisdjr for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for a pre-school at 
the Northeast corner of Kem- 
psville Road and Alton Road. 
Said parcel is located at 1072 Old 
Kempsville Road and contains 
2.5 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

30. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Sterling W. and 
Bonnie T. Thacker for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 
commercial kennel on the North 
side of Indian River Road, 1000 
feet West of the North Landing 
River Bridge. Said parcel is 
located at 3756 Indian River 
Road and contains 21.33 acr^s.. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the Depar- 
tment of Planning. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

AMMENDMENTS 

31. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend the Master Street and 
Highway Plan to include a 250- 
foot, six-lane limited access ex- 
pressway from the Laskin Road 
interchange with the Virginia 
Beach-Norfolk Expressway (44) 
to the Chesapeake' City lin^ a!t t^ 
Virginia Power easement south 
of Elbow Road. More detailed 
information is available in the 
Department of Planning. 
DEFERRED BACK TO PLAN- 
NING COMMISSION BY CITY 
COUNCIL ON SEPTEMBER 
30, 1985: 

32. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article 2, 
Section 221 (E), of the Com- 
prehensive Zoning Ordinance 
pertaining to procedural 
requirements and general stan- 
dards for conditional uses. More 
detailed information is available 
in the Department of Planning. 



ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION from R-1 
Residential District . to R-8 
Residential District on certain 
property located on the South 
side of Northampton Boulevard 
at the intersection with Shell 
Road. Said parcel contains 7.5 
acres. Plats with more detailed 

information are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
37. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Crystal Point 
Associates for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION from R-8 
Residential District to PD-H2 
Planned Unit Development 
District on certain property 
located on the South side of Nor- 
thampton Boulevard at the inter- 
section with Shell Road. Said 
parcel contains 7.5 acres. Plats 



decedent or her estate. 
Stanley A. Phillips 
Commissioner of Accounts 

223-10 IT I-I-86VB 

NOTICE OF 
' PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Board of 
Zoning Appeals will conduct a 
IJublic Hearing on Wednesday, 
January 8^ 1986, at 2:00 p.m., in 
the Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Municipal Center, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. The 
staff briefing will be held at l.;30 
p.m., in the City Manager's Con- 
ference Room .'The following ap- 
plications will appear on the 
agenda. 
REGULAR AGENDA: 

Case 1. William R. Carver, 
Occupant, requests a variance to 
allow parkitig of major 
recreational equipment in front 



, .with more dftalied,, ijafornriaiion^^ o^ instead of behind 

are available in the Department the nearest portion of a building 

adjacent to a public street on Lot 
8, Block Y, Section 2, Thalia 
Trace, 296 Thalia Trace Drive. 
KEMPSVILL-E BOROUGH. 

Case 2. John H. and Dorothy 
E. Schleicher fequest- a,.variance 
to allow parking, of major 
recreational equipment in front 
of a building instead of behind 
the nearest portion of a building 
adjacent to .i public street on Lot 
19, Block A, Section 13, Princess 
Anne Plaza, 3436 Woodsman 
Lane. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

Case 3. Norman R. and Sandra 
V. Armolt requests a variance to 
allow parking of major 
recreational equipment in front 
of a building instead of- behind 
the nearest portion of a building 
adjacent to a public street on Lot 
5re, Block I, Section 4, Chimney 
Hill, 3643 Campion Avenue. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

Case 4. Thomas E. Warzewski 
requests a variance to allow 
parking of major recreational 
equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest por- 
tion of a building adjacent to a 
public street on Lot 2, Block 11, 
Section 1 1 , Princess Anne Plaza, 
B045>Ashlawn Terrace. Princess 
Anhe Borough. 

Case 5. Talson Builders, Inc. 
rquests a variance of 1 .5 feet to a 
13.5 foot side yard setback (south 
side) instead of 15 feet as 
required (stoop and steps) on Lot 
9, Block B, Section 2, Three 
Oaks, 2208 Wild Oak Crescent. 
Princess Anne Borough. 

Case 6. Beverley R. Allen 
requests a variance of 20.2 feet to 
a 9.8 foot front yard setback 
(Lookout Road) instead of 30 
feet as required and of 7 parking 
spaces to 16 parking spaces in- 
stead of 23 parking spaces as 
required (restaurant addition) on 
Lot 1-A, Block 2, Chesapeake 
Shores, 4497 Lookout Road. 



of Planning. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

38. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article II, 
Part C of the Comprehensive 
Zoning Ordinance pertaining to 
the PD-H2 Planned Unit 
Development District. More 
detailed information is available 
in the Department of Planning. 
DEFERRED FOR 30 DAYS BY 
PLANNING COMMISSION 
ON DECEMBER 10, 1985: 

39. Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard 
to certain elements of the Sub- 
division Ordinance, Subdivision 
for Martha Smith. Property is 
located on the North side of 
Crystal Lake Circle, .170 feet 
more or less North hof Bay 
Colony Drive. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

40. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Great Neck Village 
Associates, a General Partner- 
ship, for a CHANGE OF 
ZQNING. DISTRICT 
CLASSIFrCA'prON from B-2 
'^'fftWifflify-^fltisineJ^ bi^rict 'to 



Holly Road , Sa i d par ceLJs — }^ Motion-of th e P lann i ng 



located at 4300 Holly Road and 
contains 31,319.6 square feet. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 

BOROUGH. 

24. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of P C K Corporation 
for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for a single family 
home in the AG- 1 Agricultural 
District on certain property 
located 600 feet North of Indian 
River Road beginning at a point 
2400 feet West of Princess Anne 

. Road. Said parcel is located at 
29^7 Seaboard Road and con- 
tains 60 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PUNGO BOROUGH. 

25. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Giant Square Shop- 
ping -Center Company for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a tire, battery and accessory 
store on the West side of In- 
dependence Boulevard, 151.75 
feet South of S. Witchduck 
Road. Said parcel is located at 
741 Independence Boulevard and 
contains 12.32 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 

.Planning. BAYSIDE 

BOROUGH. 

26. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Morning Star Baptist 
Church for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for a church and 
related facilities at the Southeast 
intersection of Northampton 
Boulevard and Pleasure House 
RMd. Said parcel contains 1.336 
Kres. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

27. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
pUcation of Bow Creek Home 



Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article 1, 
Section 107 (f) of the Com- 
prehensive Zoning Ordinance 
pertaining to amendments. More 
detailed information is available 
in the Department of Planning. 
DEFERRED BACK TO PLAN- 
NING COMMISSION BY CITY 
COUNCIL OJ^ NOVEMBER 4, 
1985: 

34. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Ronald L. and Holly 
Hall, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICAION from R-3 
Residential District to 0-1 Office 
District on certain property 
located at the Southeast corner of 
General Booth Boulevard and 
Princess Anne Road and shown 
as "Residue Acreage" on that 
certain plat recorded in Map 
Book 168, Page 51, in the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court. Said 
parcel contains 3.25 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Plan ng. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

DEFERRED FOR 60 DAYS BY 
PLANNING COMMISSION 
ON NOVEMBER 12, 1985: 

35. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of E & R Enterprises 
for a XHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-8 Residential District to 
A- 1 Apartment District on cer- 
tain property located at the Nor- 
thwest comer of 26th Street and 
Molly Road. Said parcel contains 
25,265 square feet. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

36. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Crystal Point 
Associates for a CHANGE OF 



^ity- 
A-2 Apartment District on certain 
property located 710 feet East of 
North Great Neck Road begin- 
ning at a' point 6(X) fet South of 
Mill Dam Road as shown on the 
plat entitled "Subdivision of 
Property for Great Neck Village 
Shopping Center" on file in the 
Department of Planning. Said 
parcel contains 5.097 acres. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 
41. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Henry Kuwabara, 
Joan Mallen and Robert 
Steinhilber for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION from O-l 
Office District to B-3 Central- 

Business-Di 

side of Bonney Road, 1000 feet 
more or less West of Bendix 
Road. Said parcel is located at 
4456 Bonney Road and contain s 
2.47 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 
Robert J. Scott 
Director of Planning 

223-13 2T 1-8 VB 

AUCTION: 

1977 FORD PINTO 

Serial Number: 7X12YI70950, 

Auction Date: JANUARY 8, 

1986. Time 1 1 :00 a.m. at Norfolk 

Motor Company, 7000 N. 

Military Hwy. Norfolk, Virginia, 

23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company reser- 
ves the right to bid. 

223-16 IT 1-01 VB 
OFFICE OF THE COM- 
MISSIONER OF ACCOUNTS 
CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH, 
VIRGINIA 
DECEMBER 13, 1985 
MABEL R. KENNEDY. 
DECEASED 

NOTICE is hereby given, pur- 
suant to Section 64.1-171, Code 
of Virginia, that the undersigned 
Commissioner of Accounts, 
having for settlement the account 
of Catharine Folkes Baker. 
Executrix of the Estate of Mabel 
R. Kennedy, deceased, and 
having being requested so to do, 
has appointed the 20th day of 
January, 1986, at 3:00 p.m., at 
129 S. Great Neck Road, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, as the time and 
place of receiving proof of debts 
and demands against the 



-J^Iorth — Bay sid e Borough. 



ce of 5 feet to a 5 foot rear yard 
setback instead of 10 feet as 
required (swimming pool) on Lot 
55, Block F, Section 1, Part 2, 
Windsor Oaks West, 3709 Pine 
Grove Lane. Kempsville 
borough. 

Case 14. Jay F. Wilks requests 
a variance of 18.5 feet to a 1.5 
foot front yard setback instead of 
20 feet as required and of 5 feet 4 
inches to a 2 foot 8 inch side yard 
setback (south side) instead of 8 
feet as required (carport) on Lot 
B-1, Block 6, Section E, Cape 
Henry Syndicate, 7116 Holly 
Road. Lynnhaven Borough. 

Case 15. E. A. and J. P. Smith 
request a variance of 6 feet to a 2 
foot side yard setback (west side) 
instead of 8 feet as required 
(proposed duplex) on Lot 21, 
Block 10, Ubermeer, 219 55th 
Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 

Case 16. E. A. and J. P. Smith 
request a variance Of 14 feet to a 

4 foot side yard adjacent to a 
street l(Holly Avenue) instead of 
18 feet as required and of 3.8 feet 
to a 6.2 foot rear yard setback in- 
stead of 10 feet as required 
(Proposed duplex) on Lot 23, 
Block 10, Ubermeer, 219 55th 
Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 

Case 17. Robert and Cherie 
Pritchard requests a variance of 5 
feet to a 5 foot side yard setback 
(east side) instead of 10 feet as 
required (residential addition) on 
Lot 24, Block 5, Section 7, Win- 
dsor Woods, 3845 Old Forge 
Road. Kempsville Borough. 

Case 18. Lee Jones requests a 
variance of 3 feet to a 7 foot side 
yard setback (west side) and of 10 
feet to a "0" rear yard setback 
instead of 10 feet as required 
(Trellis) on Lots 6 and 7, Block 
29, Shadowlawn, 609 GoldsSoro 
Avenue. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

Case 19. Danny K. Martin 
requests a variance of 5 feet to a 
10 foot rear yard setback instead 
of 15 feet as required (swimming 
pool) on Lot 104, Phase 1, Broad 
Bay Point Greens, 2360 Haver- 
sham Court. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

Case 20. Kiritkumar S. Patel 
requests a variance of 1 loading 
space to "0" loading spaces in- 
stead of 1 loading space as 
required and to allow stack 
parking where prohibited 
(proposed hotel/motel) on Lot 9, 
Block 43, Virginia Beach 
Development Company, 309 20th 
Street. Virginia Beach Borough. 

Case 21. Kiritkumar S. Patel 
requests a variance of 5 feet to a 
"0" front yard setback instead of 

5 feet as required and of 10 feet 
to a "0" side yard setback (west 
side) instead 10 feet as required 
and to allow stack parking where 
prohibited and of 1 loading space 
to "0" loading spaces instead of 
1 loading space as required 



(mot e l add itieB~84fflit 



Case 7. Woodstock Construc- 
tion, Inc. requests a variance of 1 
foot to a 7 foot side yard setback 
(west side) instead of 8 feet as 
required (deck extension) on Lots 
11 & 12, Block 10, Salt Marsh 
Point, 1325 Brant Road. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

Case 8. Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. 
Field, Jr. requests a variance of 
8.7 feet to an 1 1.3 foot side yard 
setback (east side) instead of 20 
feet as required (detached garage) 
on Lot 207, Birdneck Point, 1304 
Wren Place. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

Case 9. J. H. Gwaltney by 
William E. Culverhouse, Attor- 
ney, requests a variance of 3 feet 
to a 7 fooi rear yard setback in- 
stead of 10 feet as required (ac- 
cessory building) on Lot 455, 
Cape Story by the Sea, 2307 Oak 
Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 

Case 10. Clydes, Inc. t/a The 
Corner Market request a variance 
to allow stack parking where 
prohibited (restaurant addition) 
on Lots 4 & 5, remainder of tots 
1, 2, & 3, Lynnhaven Beach, 2272 
North Great Neck Road. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

Case 11. Henry F. and Betty 
M. Baker request a variance of 2 
feet in fence height to a 6 foot 
fence instead of a 4 foot fence as 
allowed in a required side yard 
adjacent to a street (Parkside 
Place) on Lot 7, Block E, Section 
1, Laurel Cove, 1301 Conrad 
Lane. Lynnhaven Borough. 

Case 12. Mr. and Mrs. Floyd 
P. Wilson requests a variance of 
10 feet to a "0" side yard setback 
(east side) instead of 10 feet as 
required (deck), Holly Bend 
Condominium, Phase 4, 2758 
Manoomin Place. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

Case 13. Lawrence E. and 
Emma Z. Wolfe request a varian- 



8, 10 and 12, Block 43, Section 2, 
Virginia Beach Development 
Company, 308 21st Street. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

Case 22. Monica and Gary 
Lamm request a variance of 10 
feet to a 10 foot side yard ad- 
, jacent to a street (Croatan Road) 
instead of 20 feet as required 
(new residence) on Lot 1 1 , Block 
18, Croatan, Surfside and 
Croatan Road. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

Case 23. Foster J. and Letitia 
M. Matter request a variance of 
20 feet to a 30 foot setback from 
Great Neck Road instead of 50 
feet as required (through lot - 
swimming pool) on Lot 4, Sec- 
tion 2, Green Hill Farms, 1813 
Claiborne Place. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST 
APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD!!! 
Paul N.Sutton 
Secretary 
223-7 2tl-l VB 

NOTICE OF. 
PUBLIC HEARING 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City 
Council of Virginia Beach will be 
heard in the Council Chambers 
of the City Hall Building, 
Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, January 13, 1986, at 
2:00 p.m. at which time the 
following applications will be 
heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 
1. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Edward L. & 
Elizabeth M. Bowdoin for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-3 Residential District to 
R-5 Residential District on cer- 



tain property located on the 
South side of London Bridge 
Road beginning at a point 3^32 
feet more or less West of Geheral 
Booth Boulevard. Said parcel 
contains 4.798 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Edward L. & 
Elizabeth M. Bowdoin for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from AG-2 Agricuhural District 
{0 R-5 Residential District on cer- 
tain property located 350 feet 
more or less South of London 
Bridge Road beginning |t a point 
3432 feet more or less West of 
General Booth Boulevard. Said ■ 
parcel contains 1 .506 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Deparfment. 
of Planning; PRINCESS ANN# 
BOROUGH. 

3. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Edward L. & 
Elizabeth M. Bowdoin for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from AG-1 Agricultural District 

^ to R-5-Residential District on cer- 
tain property located 600 feet 
South of London Bridge Road 
beginning at a point 3432 feet 
more or less West of General 
Booth Boulevard. Said parcel 
contains 4.248 acres. P^lats^ with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

4. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Elmer C. & Dorothy 
W. Blake and Elaine C. Parker 
for a CHANGE OF^ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-5 Residential District to 
A-2 Apartment District pn the 
West side of Pleasure House 
Road, 400 feet South of 
Brigadoon Drive on Lot 21, 
Chesapeake Beach. Said parcel is 
located at 2337 Pleasure House 
Road and contains' 32,975 square 
feet. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Carl J. Ward for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-8 Residential District to 
A-3 Apartment District on cer- 
tain propedrty located on the 
North side of Hollis Road, 590 
feet East of Pleasure house Road 
on Lots 7 & 8. Said parcels are 
located at 4700 and 4704 Hollis 
Road and contain 34,412 square 
feet. Plats with more detailed in- 
formation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of The Southland Cor- 
poration for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 

Light Industrial District to B-2 
Community-Business District at 
the Northeast corner of Newtown 
Road and Greenwich Road. Said 
parcel is located at 264 S. 
Newtown Road and contains 
25,378.9 square feet. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. . . BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

7. An Ordinance upon Ap- ^ 
plication of Kimmell ' 
Automotive, T/A Tread Quar- 
ters for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for the installation of 
tires and tire service at the North- 
east corner of Independence 
Boulevard and Constitution 
Drive on Parcel P, Block 33, 
Pembroke Manor. Said parcel is 
located at 628 Independence 
Boulevard and contains 28,401 
square Peet. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

8. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Semion Nmn Ramus 
for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for a contractor vehicle 
parking lot on certain property 
located on the Northwest side of 
Shell Road on Parcel A beginning 
at a point 230 feet more or less 
Southwest of the intersection of 
Shell Road and Baysjde fioad. 
Said parcel contams 16,117 
square feet. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

9. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Welch Industries, 
Inc., T/A Welch Camper Center* 
for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for a contractor's 
storage yard on the East side of 



Virginia Beach Sun, January I, 1986 9 



C-pc-p O /^ O O 



C- 



w 



'r^ C7^ r'^ 



(i 




IP 



UECAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICBS 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTKK 



PERMIT for a single family 
home in the AG-1 Agricultural 
District on certain property 
located 600 feet North of Indian 
River Road beginning at a point 
2400 feet West bf Princess Anne 
Road. Said parcel is located at 
2997 Seaboard Road and con- 
tains 60 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PUNGO BOROUGH. 

25. An Ordinance' upon Ap- 
plication of Giant Square Shop- 
ping Cenier Company for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a tire, battery and accessory 
store on the West side of In- 
dependence Boulevard, 151.75 

-feet South of S. Witehduek 
Road. Said parcel is located at 
741 Independence Boulevard and 
contains 12.32 acres. Plats with 
rt)ore detailed information are 
available in the Department of 

TT a n n i n g : ' ' B AYSTD E 
BOROUGH, 

26. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Morning Star Baptist 
Church for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for a church and 
related facilities at the Southeast 

■ intersection of Northampton 
Boulevard and Pleasure House 
Road. Said parcel contains 1.336 
acres. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

27. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Bow Creek Home 
For The Elderly for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 
home for the aged at the North- 
east corner of ^Club House Road 
and Duplin Street on Lot 16, 
Block 48, Princess Anne Plaza. 
Said parcel is located at 3420 
Club House Road and contains 
13,000 square feet. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 

28. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Peggy Davis for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT. 
for a day care center on the East 
side of Centerville Turnpike, 295 
feet North of Livingston Oak 
Drive. Said parcel is located at 
2100 Centerville Turnpike, and 
contains 1.13 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

29. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Mary Susanne 
Knisely for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for a pre-school at 
the Northeast corner of Kem- 
psville Road and Alton Road. 
Said parcel is located at 1072 Old 
Kempsville Road and contains 
2.5 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

3U. All Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication. of Sterling W. an d 
Bonnie T. Thacker for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 
commercial kennel on the North 
side of Indian River Road, 1000 
feet West of the North Landing 
River Bridge. Said parcel is 
located at 3756 Indian River 
Road and contains 21.33 acres. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 
REFERRED BACK TO PLAN- 
NING COMMISSION BY CITY 
COUNCIL ON SEPTEMBER 

30. 1985 

31. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article 2, 
Section 221(E), of the Com- 
prehensive Zoning Ordinance 
■pertaining to procedural 
requirements and general stan- 
dards of conditional uses. More 
detailed information is available 
in the Department of Planning. 

32. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article 1, 
Section 107(0 of the Comprehen- 
sive Zoning Ordinance pertaining 
to amendments. More detailed 
information is available in the 
Department of Planning. 
DEFERRED BACK TO PLAN- 
NING COMMISSION BY^ITY 
COUNCIL ON NOVEMBER 4, 

k985 

33. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Ronald L. and Holly 
Hall, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-3 
Residential District to 0-1 Office 
District on certain property 
located at the Southeast corner of 
General Booth Boulevard and 
Princess Anne Road and shown 
as "Residue Acreage" on that 



certain plat recorded in Map 
Book 168, Page 51, in tlje Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court. Said 
parcel contains 3.25 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

DEFERRED FOR 60 DAYS BY 
PLANNING COMMISSION 
ON NOVEMBER 12, 1985 

34. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of E & R Enterprises for 
a .CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-8 Residential District to 
A-1 Apartment District on cer- 
tain property located at the Nor- 
thwest corner of 26th Street^ and 
Holly Road. Said parcelconlains 
25,265 sq uare feet. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

35. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
.plication of - Cry-staLlPaini 

Associates for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION from R-1 
Residential District to R-8 
Residential District c* certain 
property located on the South 
side of Northampton Boulevard 
at the intersection with Shell 
Road. Said parcel contains 7.5 
acres. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

36. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Crystal Point 
Associates for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-8 
Residential District to PD-H2 
Planned Unit Development 
District on certain property 
located on the South side of Nor- 
thampton Boulevard at the inter- 
section with Shell Road. Sai(j^ 
parcel contains 7.5 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

37. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article II, 
PUtVC dfin^^COmt^hmsive 
Zoning Ordinance pertaining to 
the PD-H2 Planned Unit 
Development District. More 
detailed information is available 
in the Department of Planning. 
DEFERRED FOR 30 DAYS BY 
PLANNING COMMISSION 
ON DECEMBER 10, 1985. 

38. Appeal from Decisions ol 
Administrative Officers in regard 
to certain elements of the Sub- 
division Ordinance, Subdivision 
/or Martha Smith. Property is 
located on the North side of 
Crystal Lake Circle, 170 feet 
more or less North of Bay Colony 
Drive. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in the 
Department of Planning. LYNN- 

^iAV ENDORQ j UGII. 



bers of the City Hall Building, 
Municipal Center, Virginia 
Beach, Vifgiaia. The ■ staff 
briefing will be held at 1:30 p.m., 
in the City Manager's Conference 
Room. The following ap- 
plications will appear on the 
agenda. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 
Case 1. Fred J. Blum requests a 
variance to allow parking of 
major recreataional equipment in 
front of a building instead of 
behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public 
street on Lot 8, Block 6, Section 
10, Princess Anne Plaza, 3017 
Gentry Road. Princess Anne 
Borough. 

Case 2. Ronald J. Mickiewicz 
requests a variance to allow 
parking of major recreational 
equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest por- 
tion of a building adjacent to a 
public street on Lot 16, Block A, 
Courthouse-Forest, 2344 Court 
"Circle ."ftincess Anne Borough. 
Case 3. Larry L. Wagner requests 
a variance to allow parking of 
major recreational equipment in 
front pf a building instead of 
behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public 
street on Lot 11, Block C, Am- 
berly Forest, 3901 Meroe Court. 
Kempsville Borough. 

Case 4. James P. Setliff requests 
a variance to allow parking of 
major recreational equipment in 
front of a building instead of 
behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public 
street on Lot 2, Block AA, Sec- 
tion 1, Thalia, 238 2 Thalia Trace 
Drive. Kempsville Borough. 
Case 5. William. L. Hiltibran 
requests a variance to allow 
parking of major recreational 
equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest por- 
tion of a building adjacent to a 
public street on Lots 26 and 28, 
Block 61, Shadowlawn Heights, 
826 Virginia Avenue. Virginia 
Beach. Borough. 

Case 6. Michial and Virginia 
Holeman request a variance to 
allow parking of major 
recreational equipment in front 
oU» , ibuildiagi instead; , ot /behiod 
the nearest portion of a building 
adjacent to a public street on Lot 
56, Section H4, Part 3, Green 
Run, 4201 Lindberg Place. Kem- 
psville Borough. 

Case 7. Bon-Dence Associates 
requests a variance of 32 feet to a 
3 foot setback from Route 44 in- 
stead of 35 feet as required 
(proposed ofHce building) on a 
Parcel, Kempsville Area, 4575 
Bonney Road. Kempsville 
Borough. 

Case S.'' Ahthony Beninato 
requests a variance to allow 
tenants to advertise on a center 
identification sign where 
prohibited (6 tenants) on a Par- 
cel, Princess Anne Plaza, 3623 
Virginia Beach Boulevard. Lyn- 



39. An OWinance upon Ap- 
plication of Great Neck Village 
Associates, a General Partner- 
ship, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 
Community-Business District to 
A-2 Apartment District on cer- 
tain property located 710 feet 
East of North Great Neck Road 
beginning at a point • 600 feet 
South of Mill Dam Road as 
shown on the plat entitled "Sub- 
division of Property for Great 
Neck Village Shopping Center" 
on file in the Department of 
Planning. Said parcel contains 
5.097 acres. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

40. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Henry Kuwabara, 
Joan Mallen and Robert 

•Steinhilber for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION from 0-1 
Office District to B-3 Central- 
Business Districi on the North 
side of Bonney Road, 1000 feet 
more or less West of Bendix 
Road. Said parcel is located at 
4456 Bonney Road and contains 
2.47 acres. Plats With more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH, 

Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 
Robert J.Scott 
Director of Planning 
223-4 2t 1-8 VB 

NO I let Uf 
PUBLIC HEARING 
The Board of Zoning Appeals 
will conduct a Public Hearing on 
Wednesday, January 15, 1986 at 
2:00 p.m., in the Council Cham- 



nhaveh Borough7 
Case 9. 24th Street Associates 
requests a variance of 5 feet in 
building height to 40 feet in 
height instead of 35 feet in 
building height as allowed (54 
unit apartment development) on 
a Parcel, Birdneck Area, Barber- 
ton'Drive. Lynnhaven Borough. 
Case 10. E. O. Pavey, Jr. 
requests a variance of 7 feet to a 3 
foot rear yard setback instead of 
10 feet as required and of 5 feet 
to a 3 foot side yard setback (east 
side) instead of 8 feet as required 
(accessory building - detached 
garage ) on Lot 23, Block 10, 
Chesapeake Shores, 4521 Lee 
Avenue. Bayside Borough. 
Case 11. Bonny's Corner 
Associates requests a variance to 
allo^ tenants (K-Mart, Giant 
Open Air Market and Peoples 
Drug) to advertise on the center 
identification sign where 
prohibited on Parcel 5, Acredale, 
1205 Fordham Drive. Kempsville 
Borough. 

Case 12. Professional Realty 
Corporation requests a variance 
of 2 feet in fence height to a 6 
foot fence instead of a 4 foot fen- 
ce as allowed in a required side 
yard adjacent to a street (Delaney 
Street) on Lot 2, Block L, Bran- 
don, 5737 Brandon Boulevard. 
Kempsville Borough. 
Case 13. Blanche M. and Howard 
H. Summers, Jr. request a 
variance of 10 feet to a 10 foot 
side yard setback (north side) in- 
stead of 20 feet as required (ac- 
cessory building) on Lot 5, Briar- 
Cliff, 1029 Briar Wood Point. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 
Case 14. Bayfront Associates, 
Ltd. request a variance of 3 feet 
^o a 5 foot side yard setback (east 
side) and of 8 feet to a "O" side 
yard setback (west side) instoid 
of 8 feet each as required on Lot 



X in the Subdivision of Part of 
Property of David I. Lcvine, Bay 
Shore Colony, 2822 Shore Drive. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 
Case 15. Trustees, of Morning 
Star Baptist church request a 
variance of 8 feet to a 22 foot 
front yard setback (Pleasure 
House Road) instead of 30 feet as 
required and of 10 feet to a 15 
foot side yard adjacent to a street 
(Northampton Boulevard) in- 
stead of 25 feet as required and of 
1.664 acres of land area tO 1.336 
acres of land instead of 3 aci-es of 
land as required for a church on 
Lots 1 and 3, James Garrison 
Plantation,. 4800 First Court 
Road. Bayside Borough. 
Case 16. Michael D. Lugar 
requests a variance of 2 feet in 
fence height to a 6 foot fence j^n- 
stcad of a 4 foot fence as 'allowed 
in a required setback from a 
street (both Eddystone Drive and 
Gravenhurst Drive) on Lot 5, 
Block F, Section 9, Rosemont 
Forest, 7400 Eddystone Driver 
Kempsville Boroiigh. 
Case 17. Gersal Construction 
Corporation by Sonny Fiofc 
requests a variaiice of 10 feet to 
an 8 foot side yard adjacent to a 
street (First Landing Lane) in- 
stead of 18 feet as required and of 
2 feet to a 6 foot side yard set- 
back (east side) instead of 8 feet 
as required (attached garage) on 
Lot 1 1 , Block 4, Section G, Cape 
Henry, 2596 aore Drive. Lyn-- 
nhaven Borough. 
Case 18. Thomas C. Kyrus 
requests a variance of 12 feet to 
an 8 foot side yard adjacent to a 
street (Maple Street) instead of 20 
feet as required (new residence) 
on Lot 302,' Cape Story by the 
Sea, Northeast Corner of Ocean 
shore Avenue and Maple Street. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 
Case 19. Dolphin Condominium 
Unit Owners Association request 
a variance of 270 square feet of 
sign area instead of 200 square 
feet of sign area as allowed on 
lots 3 and 4, Block 17, Virginia 
Beach, 1705 Atlantic Avenue. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 
Case 20. William L. Corby 
requests a variance of 19 feet to a 
31 front yard setback instead o^ 
50 fet as required (new rpsitjence) 
on Lot 90, Phase 1, Broad Bay 
Point Greens, 2304 Haversham 
Close. Lynnhaven Borough. 
DEFERRED AGENDA: 
Case 1. Resort Developments 
(The Tailor Shop) requests a 
variance to allow 2 free-standing 
signs instead of 1 free-standing 
sign as allowed and to allow a 
tenant (The Tailor Shop) to ad- 
vertise on the free-standing sign 
where prohibited on a Parcel, 
Birdneck, 508 North Birdneck 
Road. Lynnhaven Borough. 
ALL APPLICANTS MUST 
APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD!! 
Paul N, Sutton 
Secretary 

22 3 .i 

223-14 2T1-08VB 

NOTICE OF • 
PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission will hold a Public 
Hearing on Tuesday, January 14, 
1986 at 12:00 Noon in the Co^n- 
cil Chambers of the City Hall 
Building, Princess Anne Cour- 
thouse, Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
A briefmg session \yill be held at 
9:00 a.m. in the Planning Depar- 
tment Conference Room 
Operations Building. PLAN- 
NING COMMISSION ACTION 
IS NOT A FINAL DETER- 
MINATION OF THE AP- 
PLICATION, BUT ONLY A 
RECOMMENDATION TO 
THE CITY COUNCIL AS THE 
VIEWPOINT OF THE PLAN- 
NING COMMISSION. FINAL 
DETERMINATION OF THE 
APPLICATION IS TO BE 
MADE BY CITY COUNCIL AT 
A LATER DATE, AFTER 
PUBLIC NOTICE IN A 
NEWSPAPER HAVING 
GENERAL CIRCULATION 
WITHIN THE CITY. 
Those members of the public in- 
terested in attending the public 
hearing should be advised that, 
for reasons the Planning Com- 
mission deems appropriate, cer- 
tain items on the agenda may be 
heard out of order and that it 
should not be assumed that the 
order listed below will be exactly 
followed during the Public 
Hearing. 

The staff reviews of some J>r all 
of the items on this agenda 
suggest that certain conditions be 
attached to approval by City 
Council. However, it shoud not 
be assumed that thc^ conditions 
constitute all the conditions that 
will ultimately be attached to the 
proj^. Staff asemries may im- 



pose further conditions and 
requirements during ad- 
ministration of applicable city 
ordinances. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION: 

1. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Virginia Beach 
General Hospital for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-4 
Residential District to O-l Office 
District on certain property 
located on the North side of Old 
Donation Parkway Extended 
beginning at a point 625.48 feet 
East of First Colonial Road. Said 
parcel contains 2.075 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of PJanning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of W. T. Brown & 
Associates for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from A-1 
Apartment District to A-2 Apar- 
tment District on the North side 
of Oconee Avenue, 80 feet West 
of Hutton Road. Said parcel is 
located at 2548 Oconee Avenue 
and contains 3.45 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

3. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of WAI, a Virginia 
Limited Partnership, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-5 Residential District to 
B-4 Resort-Commercial District 
on ceriain property located on 
the North side of Owl's Creek 
Lane, 800 feet more or less East 
of Gregory's Lane. Said parcel 
contains 2.68 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available i n the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

4. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Giant Square Shop- 
ping Center Company for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from B-1 Business-Residential 
District; to ,B'2 Cornraunity^ 
Business District on the East side 
of S. Lynnhaven Road, 530 feet 
more or le^s South of Silina 
Drive. Said parcel is located at 
444 South Lynnhaven Road and 
contains 3.5 acres. Plats with 
more detailed informatin are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Runnymede Cor- 
poration for a CHANGfe OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 
Community-Business District tO' 
1-2 Heavy Industrial District on 
the West side of Butternut Lane, 
523.42 feet South of Bonney 
Road on Lot 21. A and Lots 22- 
28, Block C, Rosemont Cor- 
poration. Said parcels contain 
31,363 square feet. LYN-_l 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Masciola and Com- 
pany for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-7 
Residential District to A-3 Apar- 
tment District on the South side . 
of Norfolk Avenue, 211.56 feet 
West of Indian Avenue. Said 
parcel is located at 1012 Norfolk 
Avenue and contains 28,314 
square feet. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. . 

7. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Masciola and Com- 
pany for 4 CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from A-1 
Apartment District to A-3 Apar- 
tment Districi beginning at a 
poing 90 feet more or less South 
of Norfolk Avenue, 400 feet 
more or less West of Indian 
Avenue. Said parcel is located at 
1012 Norfolk Avenue and con- 
tains 2178 square feet. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

8. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of G. Geoffrey & Linda 
J. Brockelbank for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-6 
Residential District to O-I Office 
District at the Southeast corner 
of Bonney Road and South Fir 
Avenue. Said parcel is locatol at 
4313 Bonney Road and contains 
9491.7 feet. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the [Apartment of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 



BOROUGH. 

9' An Ordifiance upon Ap- 
plication of Bruce B. Mills for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from A-1 Apartment District to 
B-2 Community-Business District 
on the West side of Happy Street, 
231.31 feet SOuth of Bonney 
Road on Lots 10-15, Block 11, 
East Norfolk^ Said parcel con- 
tains 15,000 square feet. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

10. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plicatin of George and WiHie 
Held for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICAITON from R-6 
Residential District to B-2 Com- 
munity-Business District at the 
Northeast corner of Witchduck 
Roa d and Ruritan Court. Sajd^ 
parcel is located at 400 and 404 
South Witchduck Road and con- 
tains 1 .4 acres more or less. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

11. An Ordinance upon Ap- . 
, plication of C. L. and O. V. 

White, a General Partnership, 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from 0-1 Office District to M 
Light Industrial District on cer- 
tain property located on the West 
side of Chimney Hill. Parkway 
beginning at a point 116 feet Nor- 
th of Smokey Chamber Drive. 
Said parcel contains 3.37 acres. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

12. An Ordinance upon Ap* 
plication of Dimensions, Inc. for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-1 Residential District to 
0-1 Office District on the East 
side of Diamond Springs Road, 
500 feet more of less South of 
Lawson Hall Key on Lots 1-12 and 
part of Lot 13, Section 6, 
Wesleyan Pines. Said parcel con- 
tains 12.84 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

13. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dimensians, Inc., f^y- 
a, , ,CH,ANQ«„«Of ,oZ»Wi»^ 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-5 Residential District to 
O-l Office District on the East 
side of Diamond Springs Road, 
1360 feet more or less South of 
Lawson Hall Key on Part of Lot 
13 and Lot 14, Section 6, 
Wesleyan Pines. Said parcel con- 
tains 1.16 acres. BAYSIDE, 
BOROUGH. 

14. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Mildred Lucille Reid 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION ' 
from AG-2 Agricultural District 
to I-l Light Industrial District on 
certain property located n- the 
South side of London Bridge 
Road beginning at a point 300 
feet more or less East of Shipps 
Corner Road. Said parcel is 
located at 1417 London Bridge 

^oad and contains 2.524 acresi 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

15. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Mildred Lucille Reid 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from AG-1 AgricuUural District 
to I-l Light Industrial District on 
property located 600 feet South 
of London Bridge Road begin- 
ning at a point 300 feet more or 
less East of Shipps Comer Road. 
Said parcel is located at 1417 
London Bridge Road and con- 
tains 1.214 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

16. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Amos, J. Ward etals 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from AG-2 Agricultural District 
to B-2 Community-Business 
District on the West side of. 
General Booth Boulevard, 420 
feet more or less North of Daitt 
Neck Road. Said parcel is locate 
at 1544 Oceana Boulevard and 
contains 7.1 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information" are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

17. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Amos J. Ward etals . 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFTCATION 
from AG-1 Agricultural District 
to B-2 Community-Business 
District 600 feet West of General 
Booth Boulevard, 420 feet North 
of Dam Neck Road. Said parcel 
is located at 1544 Oceana 
Boulevard and contains 4.9 acres; 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are availabel in the 
Department of Planning. PRIN- 
CESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

18. An Ordinance upon Ap- 



Tta Beach Sun^ January 1 , 1 986 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



Chestnut Avenue, 173.18 feet 
South of Bonney Road on Lots 8- 
19, Block A as shown on the plat 
entitled "The Rosemont Cor- 
poration, being a part of 
Jacksondale" and the Northern 
25 feet of the closed portion of 
Second Street. Said parcel is 
located at 3757 Bonney Road and 
contains 1.04' acres. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

10. An Ordinance upon .Ap- 
plication of James N. Hall 
Associates for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
gasoline pumps in conjunction 
with a convenience store on cer- 
tain property located on the West 
side of Rosemont Road, 300 feet 
more or less South of Hilber 
Street. Said parcel contains 
28,923.84 square feet. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

^ITl CTTnTIA "^^ A C H 

BOROUGH: 

11. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
" plication of Exxon Corporation 

for a CONDITIONAL USE 
JPERMlf for an automobile ser- 
vice station at the Northwest cor- 
ner of Atlantic Avenue and 
Laskin Road and Lots 1 and 2 
and the southern 40 feet of Lots 
6-8, Block 75, Virginia Beach 
Development Co., Map #3. Said 
parcel is located at 3100 Atlantic 
Avenue and contains 20,000 
square feet. VIRGINIA BEACH , 
BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 

Ruth Hodges SmiffiTcKTC 
City Clerk ■■ 
223-12tJ-lVB . - 

VIRGINIA: In the Circuit Court 
of the City of Virginia Beach 
RE: Estate of Mary Lindsay 
Studds, Deceased. 

SHOW CAUSE 
AGAINST DISTRIBUTION 
IT APPEARING that a report 
of the Accounts of Bank of 
Virginia, Executor of the Estate 
of Mary Lindsay Studds, - 
deceased, and of the debts and 
demands against the Estate has 
been filed in the Clerk's Office, 
and that six months has elapsed 
since the quafificatiorT, on motion 
of the personal representative, it 
is ORDERED that the creditors 
of, and all others interested in, 
the Estate Show Cause, if any 
they can, on the 17th day of 
January, 1986, before this Court 
at its courtroom against the 
payment and delivery of the 
Estate to the legatees without 
requiring refunding bonds. 

It is FURTHER ORDERED 
that the foregoing portion of this 
Order be published once a week 
for two successive weeks in the 
Virginia Beach Sun, a newspaper 
published in the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. 
A Copy Teste: 
J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By Jeanette L. Jones, D.C. 
W. Shepherd Drewry, Jr., p.q. 
3007 Pacific Avenue 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23451 
(804)428-2188 
223- 9H2t 1-1 VB " 

In the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, on the 9th day of Decem- 
ber, 1985 

Bonnie L. Trudo, Plaintiff, 
against Charles B. Trudo, 
Defendant. 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is for the 
said plaintiff to obtain a divorce 
a vinculo matrimonii from the 
said defendant, upon the groun- 
ds of continuous and uninterrup- 
ted separatrt for an excess of 
one year. And an affidavit having 
been made arid filed that the 
defendant is not a resident ofthe 
Stale of Virginia, the last known 
posf'Offire address being: Rural 
Box 1, Box 149A, Cadyville, New 
York, 12918, it is ordered that he 
do apptar on or before the 30th 
of January, 1986, and do what 
may be necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. It is further 
Ordered that a copy of this Order 
be published once each week for 
four .successive weeks in the 
Virgiiwa Beach Sun, a newspaper 
of ^ieiat circulation in this city. 
A Copy Teste: 
J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
ByrWttie K. Bennett, D.C. 
Halbert T. Dail, Esquire 
154 Newtown Road, Suite B3 
Virginia Beach, Va. 23462 
2 2M64t 1-8 VB _^ 

' In the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit court Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 3rd day of 
December, 1985. 
Daafel Luscher, Pfaintiff, 
againstDeborah Cambron 
LuscHcr, Deftndant. 



ORDER Of PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is for the 
said plaintiff to obtain a divorce 
a vinculo matrimonii from the 
said defendant, upon the grounds 
of one (1) year separation. And 
an affidavit having been made 
and filed that the defendant is not 
a resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post of- 
fice address being: 187 Westwood- 
Place, Ashville, North Carolina, 
, 28806, it is ordered that she do 
appear on or before the 24th of 
January, 1986, and do what may 
be necessary to protect her in- 
terest in this suit. It is further Or- 
dered that a copy of this Order be 
published once each week for 
four successive weeks in the 
Virginia Beach Sun, a newspaper 
of general circulation in this city. 
A Copy Teste: 
J. Curtis Druit, Clerk 
By: Patti K. Bennett, D.C. 
Robert G. Byrum, Esquire 
2145 bfd Greenbrier Road 
Chesapeake, VA 23320- 2694 
T19-144tr-lVB 

VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 3rd day 
of December, 1985. 
In re: Adoption of Melanie Barsh 
Dawson and. for the change of 
name of said child from Melanie 
Barsh Dawson to Melanie Barsh 
Ogden 

By: Frank Scott Ogden and 
Christine B. Ogden, Petitioners 
To: Richard D. Dawson 
1099-D Fountain Lane 
Columbus, Ohio 43213 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

This day came Frank Scott 
Ogden and Christine B. Ogden, 
Petitioners, and represented that 
the object of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the above 
named infant, Melanie Barsh 
Dawson, by Frank Scott Ogden 
and Christine B. Ogden, husband 
and wife, and affidavit having 
been made and filed that Richard 
D, Dawson, a natural parent of 
said child, is a non-resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 1099-D 
Fountain Lane, Columbus, Ohio 
43213. ^ 

It is therefore Ordered that the 
said Richard D. Dawson appear 
before this Court within ten (10) 
days after publication of this Or- 
der and indicate his attitude 
toward the proposed adoption, 
or otherwise do what is necessary 
to protect his interest in this mat- 
ter. 

It is further Ordered that a 
copy of this Order be published 
once each week for four suc- 
cessive weeks in the Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of 
general circulation in this city. 
A Copy Teste: 
J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By: Patti K. Bennett, D.C. 
G. Wilson Nelligar, p.q. 
748 Lord Dunmore Dr., Suite 102 
Virginia Beach, VA 23464 

22\^4tl-l-86VB 

VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 

of the Circuit .Court of the City 

of Virginia Beach, on the 3rd day 

of December, 1985. 

In re: Adoption of Jo Ann 

Hilburn and Valerie Louise 

hilburn 

By: Robert Charles Sullivan and 

Joyce Ann Sullivan, Petitioners 

to: James Willis Hilburn 

P.O. Box 1152 

Oklawaha, FL 32678 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

This day came Robert Charles 
Sullivan and Joyce Ami Sullivan, 
Petitioners, and represented that 
the object of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the above 
named infant(s), Jo Ann Hilburn 
and Valerie Louise Hilburn, by 
Robert Charles Sullivan and 
Joyce Ann SulUvan, husband and 
wife, and affidavit having been 
made and filed that James Willis 
Hilburn, a natural parent of said 
child(ren), is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address beng. 
P. O. Box 1152. Oklawaha, FL 
32678. 

it is therefore ORDERED that 
the said James Willis Hilburn ap- 
pear before this Court within ten 
(10) days after publication of this 
Order and indicate his attitude 
toward the proposed adoption, 
or otherwise do what is necessary 
to protect his interest in this mat- 
ter. 

It is further Ordered that a 
copy of this Order be published 
once each week Tor four suc- 
cessive weeks in the Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of 
general circulation in this city. 
A Copy Teste: 
J. Curtis Fruit. Clerk 
By: Patti K. Bennett. D.C. 
John M.Cloud, p.q. 
Attorney at Law 
214 Executive Bldg. 
Janaf Shopping Center 
Norfolk, VA 23502 
(W4) 46 1-23 1 6/6803 
219-15 411-1 VB 



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ANTIQUES 



BESSIE'S PLACE - Inside-outside flea 
market, rain or shine, Sat. Sun. Stay 

warm all winter. 622-2926. 4i ii-ig 

CASIH PAID FOR ANTIQUES, old fur- 
niture, glassware, china, coUectables and 
old toys too. Will buy one piece or a 
houseful. Call day or pight. 485-4659. t.'n 



ADULT CARE 



NURSES AIDE - Private duty. 35 -I- yrs. 
exp. working with sick and elderly. Ex- 
cellent reference. Mrs. & sal. negotiable. 
393-6286.- 4i 12-25 

ELDERLY CARE - Annond Whithurst 
Manor. Beautiful licensed residence for 
ladies with 24 hour quality care and per- 
sonalized attention. Call 482-3 128. 4t 12-I8 



APPUANCES 



DRVER FOR SALE - Fxcellent working 
condition. Almond colored, $150. Call 
460-1062. , 2112-25 

DRYER - Kenmore, needs little work, 

$70. Call 588-1383. nj^ 

WASHER-DRYER - Heavy duty. Ex- 
cellent working condition. Will deliver. 
$100 each 473-8145. 4ti2i8 



AUTOS 



•80 CITATION, - 1 owners, 62,000 mis., 
5 new Michelin radials, AM-FM, power 
steering and braskes, air, very reliable, 

$2100. 440-1476. 4112-I8 

FORD - '82 Escort. 4 spd., 2 dr. Hatch- 
bk., AM-FM cassette; very good con- 

dition; $3200; 583-7057. 4112-18 

DODGE - 1976 Aspen, good condition. 
$1500. Call 42 2-%58 afte r 10 a.m. 4H2-i8 
1958 FORD STEPVAN - White, trimmed 
in red. stove and sink, converted into a 
sleeping camper, sleeps 3, new motor, 
new transmission, mint condition, $1,500. 
Call 393-0159. , 4i 12-ig 

CARS, JEEPS & Trucks under $300 
now available at local sales. Call 1-518- 
459-3535 for your directory to purchase. 
24hr«. 41 1 2-25 

'83 PONTIAC - 2000 wagon, 5 speed, 
AM/FM cassette, air cond. $5,300. call 
after 5 p.m. 587-9337. ix 12-25 

•74 BMW - 2002. Air Cond.. stereo. 
AM/FM. excellent condition. Best Offer. 
Call 547-7374 after 6 pm. Days - 397- 
7606. TFN 



BUSINESS EQUIPMENT 



FILING CABINETTS, all sizes, new. used, 
damaged, all at good prices Budget Of flee 
Outfitters 943 Canal Drive 487-2202. 

1112-25 

OFFICE DIVIDER SCREENS - limited 
quantity, several sizes and colors. Your 
choice $59.00 each, while they last. 
Budget Office Outfitters, 943 Canal Drive 
487-2202. , 11 IMS 

I CAMPERS I 



INTERNATIONAL - '86, 32'. self- 
comaifled, air and lots of extras. $8,700. 
M ust«|l. 485-5280. 4i n-ii 

VVS' - "73 tamper, nev. Michelin tires, 
looi'ts like new. $2895. 487-6256. Excellent 
condition. 4iiJ-n 



CHILD CARE 



CHILD CARE - In my home, NOB area, 
USDA Program, all meals included, call 
4 40-9282. 1,12-1. 

24 HOUR BABYSITTING - Christmas 
shoppmg, partying, call now for New- 
Years Eve. Reservations, Granby St., 
Oceanview area, Norfolk. 58^-0175. 21 11 

NORFOLK - Playmates needed for 4 year 
old. $25 per week. References furnished. 
Call 853-4994. *iM4 

CHILD CARE - Newborn and up. By 
rapORsible and caring woman with ex- 
dleni references, competitive rates, lots of 
1 LC, Worfc^ area. Call 583-TO59 or 855- 
1390. «I2II 



CHILD CARE 



BABYSimNG - My home. Ingleside 
area. Full or part time. 461-5874. 4i I2-18 

CHARLESTOWNE LAKES SOUTH - 

Experienced, dependable mother will care 
for your children in my home, any age, 
anytime. 479-1379. 4i 12-25 

EXPD. MOTHEK will care for your child 
in my Lynnhaven-Holland Rd. area. 
Mon.-Fri. Hot lunches, reasonable, 427- 

2182. 41 12-25 

BABYSITTING - Provided in my Nor- 
view home, experienced mom/nursing 
assistant, any age/hours, $35 week. 853- 

0462. ^__^^ 41 1-14 

MOTHER OF FIVE - W/references, will 
babysit in my home near Gate 5, NAB, 
reasonable rates, naps, hot meals, struc- 

tured time. 460-3043. :_ 40-7 

WILL BABYSIT - In my Ben Moreell 
' h^me, all ages. 440-8850. 1 112-25 

CHILD CARE - WiU babysit in Por- 
tsmouth area, in my home, very 
reasonable price days or nights. Call 484- 

0802. 4112-25 

BABYSIT - My home, expd., $40 wk., 
lots of toys &. TLC, Kempsville area, 456- 

0495. 41 12-25 

BABYSITTING - Exp'd. mom will 
babysit in my home, South Newtown R( 
a rea. 497-0433 anytime . 4t 12J5 

CLEANING SERVICES { 

METICULOUS about cleanina? So are 
we. We do homes, lawns. Call any hour. 
622-4253. 4T1-21 

HOUSECLEANING - For the holidays, 
efficient, reliable, honest, 588-6216.41 12-11 
CLEANING - Daily, monthly, weekly. 
For more info, call 622-%53. 4t 12-18 



DOCS 



PrrBULL PUPPY - 5 mos. old, male, 
good with kids, housebroken. $100. Call 
473-8425 or 499-3894. itn 

AMERICAN ESKIMO SPITZ male, well 
disciplined, make offer. 468-6754. 1 1 12-18 
BASSET HOUND PUPS - AKC 

registered, tri-color. wormed, 2 females 
left. $250 each. 853-1987. 11 12-ig 

BLUE DOBERMAN -8 "mos. old. AKC 
registered, needs a good home. $200. Call 

473-8425 or 499-3894. iti-i 

AKC SCOTTIES - (One rare white). Also 
AKC Schnauzer, shots, wormed and will 
hold until Christmas. Call 468-2513. 

41 12-25 



FOR SALE 



OLDSMUBILE - Factory spinner, 15" 
hub caps. Cost $500 will sell for $200. 
424-6521. 4nj 

PRINTER - Daisywheel, DIABLO 630. 
40 small CPS. like new. Call 464-4156 

?L!ii? 

CX)MPUTER — 640K RAM, M MB 
hard driv e. IBM hardware and software 
compatible, like new. Call 464-4156. 

2112-25 

COMMODORE VIC-20 computer 
w/tape drive, 2 tapes, $100; cast-iron.gas 
grill, needs propane, new still in box, $35; 
videotape case, $25. 587-9337. h 1218 

STEREO SYSTEM- excellent condition, 
2 speakers, recorder/player, AM/FM 
radio $75. Foot fixer, fool care system 
Ji5. 58 8 -3730 linn 

WET SUIT - Tesca, 1 pc. sleeveless, 
unused, ixut 54, $100. 427-3496 or 407- 
2568^ iTi-i 

HAMS - Just in time for holidays. 
Genuine old fashioned country cured 

h ams. Call Ivw, 859-6618. 2112-18 

TELESCOPE - Meade model 2080 with 
LX drive, used 3 times with many extras, 
$800. Call 428- 5207 . itm 

AIR COMPRE^OR- Used. 5 hp, 80 gal. 
tank. $650, 857-5900. «ii2-ii 

IIARLEY TEE-SHIRTS - par- 
t»/a»sessoriei, gifts. Moped sale, large 
selection, low prices. Christmas lay-a- 
way. NOW AT BIG SIDS 461 -8959.4, 12-18 



TO PLACE CLASSIFIED 
ADS, CALL 547-4571 



FIREWOOD . 



LAWN & GARDEN 



SEASONED OAK — $75 a pick-up load, 

also fire logs 3-3'/2 cords, $170, 721-3107, 

• Virginia Beach. 4M^ 

OAK - 90<t^o all hardwood. Cut, split and 
seasoned. I ton pickup (I) $65. (2) $125. 
(3) $185, 547-0266. 4ii-2 

FIREWOOD - All seasoned hardwood, 
split and delivered, V* ton truckload, $65, 
fast delivery, eaU 721-3819, 721-5504. 

4112-18 

FIREWOOD 

All oak, cured, $85 a load, almost a cord' 
delivered. Pick up your own $10 and up. 
627-3198 or 625-4108. 4112-I8 



FURNITURE 



HELP WANTED 



RECEPTIONIST - Clerk typist. Greets 
the public, performs clerical functions. 5 
hours per week. High school plus clerical 

experience. 482-3270 a 12-25 

PART OR FULL TIME — phone 
workers to process and sell orders. Must 
be handicapped or under doctor's care in- 
cluding pregnancy. Guaranteed wages 
and bonus. Apply in person, Pembroke 1 
Bid., Room 443, Virginia Beach. 9-2. 4i 1-8 

TYPESETTER - AM5810 exp. full or 
part time with established printer. 547- 

^813. 1112-11 

RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE CLERK - 

Responsible person needed, straight 
hours, standard wage plus commission. 
Call 547-4571 . tfn 

TYPISTS - $500 weekly at home! Write 
P. O. Box 975, Elizabeth, N.J. 07207. ifa 

GOVERNMENT JOBS - $16,04O-$59,230 
per year now hiring. Call 805-687-6000. 
Ext. R-3458 for current federal Ust. 

1611-2246 

PROOFREADER ■ Great Bridge area, 
Monday's only 8 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Call 
547-4571. un 

SALESPERSONS WANTED - Hottest 
product of the decade - Pay telephones 
Qualified leads, 480-2128, Mr. Hussher ifn 

GOOD INCOME - Working with mail 
from home, experience unnecessary! 
Details,, send self-addressed stamped en- 
velop to J. Johnson, Box 9, Harborton, 
Va. 23389. y>, 

MANAGER TRAINEE - Kenny's Shoes 
Corp. is looking to fill several positions in 
the Tidewater area, our average managers 
income is $24,000 plus. You will earn 1 1 
to 13 thousand with pur 12 mo. intensive 
traning program. Kenny's offers all full 
time personal benefits, an extensive 
benefit package which includes major 
medical dental, prescription life insurance 
paid vacation, penition plan and much 
more. Collie is perferred but not man- 
datory, relocation may be required after 
training program. Call before 12 a.m. 
John Purvis -486-6615. 4ii2-ifc 



HOME IMPROVEMENT 



BATHROOM REMODELING 

ceramic tile, tub kits, vanities, rotted 
floors and repairs of all types. Quality 
work. 486-1 377 411-8 



HOMES FOR SALE 



GREAT NECK - Area, twnhse, 3 bedr- 
ms., V/i baths, all brie, 2 yrs. old, rented. 

$76,000.481-2800. 102^11 

GOVERNMENT HOMES from $1 (U 
repair). Also delinquent tax property. 
Call 805-687-6000 Ext. GH-3453 for in- 
fonnation. 41 12-25 

I HORSES, C ATTLE, ETC. | 

TWO YOUNG ROOSTERS - (table size) 
free. 547-4571 days - 482-5733 nights, ifn 

ABRABIAN DISPERSAL sale mare, 
gelding, & fillies. Good bloodline. Must 
sell!421-%93 ._ _ _ 111:18.4 

INSTRUCTIONS 



SCUBA LEMONS -A gift ol adventure - 
Scuba lessons - Call Lynnhaven Dive, 
481-7949. 4112 



TILLER - iSears, 5 HP Reartine. excellent 
condition. 1 yr. warranty; $650; call 460- 

0483. - II 12-25 

CHAINSAW - 18" HomeUte with extta 
chain and case. $l50 firm. Good con- 
dition. 1-562-2804 after 6 p.m. or anytime 
weekends. "" 



LOANS 



ATTENTION - Independent mortgage 
brker, qualified home owners - need 
money - call 490- 1 486 . 4112-11 



LOST AND FOUND 



FURNITURE FOR SALE - 2 piece sec- 
tional sofa, recently cleaned, good con- 
dition. 3 tier cottonwood table, call 461- 
6562. " " ITiriF 

BftOWN, black &, white Herculon love 
seat & matching chair, GC, $75. 468- 

2416. 1112-18 

HICKORY^-Layern sofa, qiiality made, 
with JLcaditional styling, blue, beige & 
rust, hardly used, $275. 588-5580 or 464- 

2259. 411-7-86 

SOFA - Contemporary, light brown, 
modular design, allows various 
arrangements. $40 0. 468-4927. iii2-i8 
OFF WHITE SOFA - Two early 
American chairs, and coffee table. Good 
condition, best offer. Call 547-9310. 

41 12-18 

COMPONENT STEREO SYSTEM - 

Like new, good Christmas gift. Call for 
details - 543-5326. 1112-11 

PARTIALLY new sofa, blue, orange & 
beige, tweed, with bamboo frame. EC, 
$175. 440-5689. itm 

LOVE SEAT - I year old, gray 
backgound, blue floral print, EC, $175. 
Call 420-1690. xi\-\ 



LOST - black male - chow-chow- missing 
since 12-10 - Green Run area, Virginia 
Beach. Please call 587-7582. Reward! 

^ il 12-18 

^CAT -_gtay^-;biBJKa)itfipedi 7^aHh;^ld,^L 
white paws and neck, female with white 
fleacoUar. Salem Lakes. 471-1807. 1112-I8 

CAT - REWARD - $100 - Female, gray 
with black tiger strips, slender build, 
gteenfyeSriuicollaifiliuppeaied Nov. 23 
from -Ew«H- -Lanfr,' -Great -Bfidge area I 
More infromation, call 482-1460. 411-2 

LOST, STRAYED - Doberman - female, 
4 yrs old, black and rust. Westhaven. 
Reward -Call 398-9005. 4i 12-25 

HIMALAYAN CAT - Male, looks like 
long hair Siamese. $50 reward. Red Wing. 
425-7676. 1 1 12-18 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 



ACOUSTIC folk quitar, Yamaha, model 
FG-335 II, LN with soft case & strap, 

$180,340-8418. 1112-I8 

SAXOPHONE, used, alto, GC, $300; ask 
for Kevin, 467-3917 itm 

SAXOPHONE, Bundy, Selmer, E-C, 

$400; 460-3653. it 1-1 

TROMBONE - 3 yr. old Bundy by 
Selmer. $200 negotiable. Evenings and 
weekends. 340-2550. Days 427-1 111. 

41 12-18 • 

I^URLITZER ORGAN - has band box, 
excellent condition, $600. call 479-1540. 

h 12-18 



MUSIC LESSONS 



PIANO LESSONS - Teacher with music 
degree will accept all ages and levels. 
Ghent area. 622-7060. ' _ 4i 12-18 



PETS 



PARROT - Hahns McCaw, tame and 
talking, cage included, $500. Call 482- 
1583. 11 12-4 

TWO PEACH FACE LOVE BIROS - 

Pretty, gentle, trained. Moving, must sell 
- $145. Cage all equipped. Call daytime, 
547-4574. eveninas, 583-0983 anvtime. ifn 



POSITIONS WANTED 



MEAT CUTTER - 10 yrs. exp. in packing 
plant slaughter house. Call 464-2638; ask 
for Ron or leave message. 4i \^■1'^ 

HANDICAPPED person desires part or 
full time job stuffing envelopes at home; 
call Sylvia, 423-1029. 1112-25 



J^ENTALS 



WINDSOR WOODS - 4 bedrms, Vh 
baths, air, fireplace, new carpet, fenced. 
Call 721-7620. 411-2 



SERVICES 



NEED TYPINQ OR FIUNG DONE! 

good quality, low cost - my home, call 

''83-0691 1,12-18 

DISC JOCKEY — All occasions with a 
variety of music. 15 years experience. 
Ready for holida)(s. Forjmore info., con- 
tact Mr. Brook - 42Ji«356 or 340-3002 or 
486-0983 after 7. 812-5-86 

CAR SPARKLE SERVICE ■ Car wash 
and/or polish by hand at your home or 
workplace. Our mobil unit comes to you. 
Price from $10. Including the interior. 
547-28 20. Ifn 

TYPIST - Experienced, reasonable rates. 
Oceanfroni location will alccept and 
return by mail if you are out of the area. 
42814665 4112-25 

NEED HELP? I'm a "Jack Of AH 
Trades". Tutor, artist, sec-typist, 
babysitter, and mothers helper. Norfolk 
area. Call 857-6839. 41^ 

WINTER REPAIR - Small problems 
become costly bills by spring. Save now! 
Repairs (24 hrs.) 482-5113, satisfaction 

guaranteed. ^411.2 

TYPIST - Experienced reasonable rates, 
Oceanfront location will accept and 
return by mail if you are out of the area. 
428-4665. 4n^ 

EXPERIENCED MAN - will do lan- 
dscaping, all types of yard work or house 
painting. Call 486-2336 111218 

ALLIED VIDEO SERVICES, INC - 

Transfer home videos afid slides to video 
tape. Free estimates. Call 424-9757. ifn 



SHARE 



LARCHMONDT - Female with samt. 
Walking distance ODU. $180 plus 
utilities. 423-8720. 41 1211 



JEWELRY AND WATCHES 1 (.REENRUN - Va Beach to share* 



RING ■ Ladies, Sapphire and diamond. 
Custom design. 1 of a kind. Never worn. 
CaII467-8(n7. \ 111225 

JEWELRY - Ladies 14kt. opal and gold 
bracelet and matching opal necklace. 
Ladies watch 14kt. gold and dimaonds. 
Andre Palet. 467-8027. _"i"' 



twnhse., on busline. $50 to $67.50 per wk. 
plus utilities. Call 490033. 41 12 is 



BENT TREE — Large house with 
young professional. $200. mo. plus '/i 
utilities. 420-1586. itii 

LYNNHAVEN - Frofciiionai. .Non- 
smoker. Nice home. Washer, dryer. $230 
mo. plus 1^ utilities. 468-0333. 4i 1218 



^Virginia Beach Sun, January 1 , 1986 II 



CALL THE 

EXPERTS! 



For Help With That 
important Project... 

To0lacead 
Call 547-4571 



SCREEN PRINTING 




FIREPLACES 



FIREPLACE REPAIR 
& INSPECTION 

Also masonry work of all 
types. Free estimates^ I 
quality work. 486-1377 



SCREENPRINTING 

Sweats, T-shirts, golf shirts 

One dozen minimum. 

CRUZIN GEAR 

495-1102 



HOME REPAIRS 



CAR CARE 



MARK'S ROOFING " 

Specializing in Roof Patching 

All Work and Materials 

Guaranteed 

Stop Most All Leaks 

For Only $79.95 583-9168 



CARSPARKLE CAR POLISHING 

Car-Sparkle Service- 
Car wash and/or polish by hand 
at your home or workplace, our 
mobile unit comes to you. Priced from 
SIO, including the interior. i 

547-2820 



MARVING GOIN HOME 

IMPROVEMENT 

Roofing and Home Repair. Res- 
idential; Commercial. Free esti- 
mates. LOW OVERHEAD CVTS 
COST. 4K-5«5 



PAINTING 



CABINETS 



Best Kitchen 

Old work. New work 

Old cabinets that need a 

facelift. 

547-9667 



Rand Patterson 
Custom Carpentry 



Remodeling/New Work 

Cabinets/Counters 

Shelves/Design 

License/Free Estimates 



587-7269 



SANDBLASTING 

Painting, Trailer Repair 
TEMPORARY 
STORAGE 

20 and 40 ft. containers 
for sale -steel, fiber- 
glass and aluminum. 

Call Brenda 487-0336 



ENTERTAINMENT 



RICARPO, INC. 
REALTORS 

S47-4555 

ta 1 JONIWTOWII BOAP 

CHItAPIAKI,VA 

PLYMOUT PARK - $49,900 VA ap 
praised. No money 'needed VA on 
lovely 3BR with 2 story workshop/gar- 
age. Jean Arsement 482-4400. 

GREAT BRIDGE 
GREAT BRIDGE GARDENS: 

$86,900. Reduced! Hurry to see this 
super 5BR 3 bath 2 story near schools. 
Shirley Clayton 482-3646. 

WILDWOOD: $94,600. Sparkling 
brick rancher with lovely kitchen, 
woodstove and fenced lot convenient to 
Bypass. Nancy Register, 547-273G. 

PINES OF WARRICK: $34,900. Ex- 
cellent assumption. Beautiful executive 
4BR Colonial 2 story with 2 car garage, 
treed toti^ elite area. Ralph Gates 482- 
3418 or Betty Sholes 421.7763. 

NEW HOME SPECIALS 
EVA GARDENS: From $62,900! 
Brand new hpines goiiig fast uuw with 
lots of custom features. Dennis Register 



ETHERIDGE MEADOWS: $89,900! 
Super value. Custom 4BR brick ranch 
by Hecht Construction, energy saving 
features, move in now. Closing Costs 
paid less PPDS. Irene Capps 421-7350. 

POPLAR RIDGE SOUTH: From the 
$89,000! Popular Hearndon built 
homes in this fast growing area. 
Wooded section open. Model open 
daily 1-5. Tom Seddon 547-1616. 

ETHERIDGE WOODS: From 
$112,900. New section now open. 
Executive 4 BR homes, several styles 
available, choose your lot and home, 
now. Only 2 left. Open weekends 1-5. 
Ken Bowden 482-4737. 

FOXGATE QUARTER: $124,900. 2 to 
choose by Wynn Const. Unique ranch 
and 2 story, 2- car garages, lots of 
amenities. Closing Costs paid less PP- 
DS. Pam Biittner 482-3335. 



Disc Jockey 



The Night Crawler 

X-mas - New Years • Birthdays 

For All Occasions 
For more infornnation - Call 

340-3002..425-J935AA 4?J.-W l\ 



F^hodesF^ealtyLtd 

220 BattlefieW Boulevard. South 
Chesapeake. VA 23320 • 482-4771 



DEEP CREEK: 22 acres!. Farmhouse! 
Lots of room, close to schools, major 
roads, neighboring cities. Jennie Draper 
487-7381. 

OAK MANOR: $79,000 - Reduced! 
Needjquick sell! Brick ranch with den, 
dining room, screened porch, wooded 
lot. Karen Gaskins 482-5580. 

POPLAR RIDGE: $117,000 - Pool! 
Spotless 2-story colonial 4 bedroom, 
2Vi baths, formal dining room, 16 x 16 
workshop. Dalton/Beverly Edge 482- 
5185. . 

ETHERIDGE MEADOWS: In the 

$80's - 4 bedroom ranch with custom 
features, deck, ceramic tile baths, storm 
doors and windows, jQ|j/xiQ3(e^54ji 

7226. 

GREAT BRIDGE: $73,000 - 135 x 200 
lot! Brick ranch! Call Sharon Street- 
man 482-1829. 

CLEARFIFXD: $73,000 -lust TSSai' 
Contemporary ranch. .2-car garage, 
quick possession. Olivia Conley 547- 
1486. 

GREAT BRIDGE: $1 10,000 - Wooded 
lot! Cape Cod! 4 bedrooms, lots of 
custom features. Good assumption. 
Beverly/Dalton Edge 482-5185. 

WILSON HEIGHTS: $90,800 - 
Popular floor plans! Great location! 3 
full baths. Must see. Karen Gaskins 
482-5580. 

ETHERIDGE WOODS: New listing! 4- 
bedrooms, 2-story colonial with great 
room, beautiful Williamsburg wood- 
work and decorations. Joan Kistler 547- 
0090. 

WESTOVER: $69,900 - Nifty house for 
thrifty family! extra large den, eat-in 
kitchen, detached garage. Joyce Bryant 
485-2874. 



MixDUMAN 

MM N IMil* 81. SalMk. Vk. 
NcvOBiUHoqiM, 
Opal Dug 1:30 Id I PM Sam! * to S m. ' ' 



SECURITY 



KEY SECURITY GUARD 
SERVICES 

Armed and Unarmed 
24 HR SERVICE. REASONABUE 
RATES. CALL MON.-nU. M. 
625-5333 



Attention Moms 

girthday Coming Up? A new party 
theme? Why not hire my party ponys 
for the event? They're delivered to 
your backyard. 

Reasonable rates. 464-0953 



$2.50 OFF PER WEEK 

Piano lessons - euilar. bass, piano. 

Call 490-1653 
Peel & Tollison Whse. 



BATHROOMS 



BIRDS 



BATHROOM REMODELING 

Vanity, Vinyl Floors, Shower 
Enclosure. Repairs of all types. 
Quality Work. 
486-1377 




ChesVa Aviary 



Retail & by Appointment 

Parakeets & Cockateils 

After 4 p.m. 

420-4739 

L ow Prices 



627-8944 



539-3434 



GENERAL 1^ FAMIIY DENTISTRY 
HAPPINESS IS A HEALTHY MOUTH 

• Albert P. Solomon D.D.S. 

• Alan G. Forbes D.D.S. 

General & fannily Dentistry 

Greenbrier Sq., Suite 2E 

1324 N. Battlefield Blvd. 

Office 547-2171 Ans. Service 625-0561 




TRAVEL 



1984 FORD BRONCO 4x4: 2 tone 
paint, automatic, powei- steer, air con- 
ditioned, tilt, cruise, captain's chairs, 
one owners, perfect. $11,499. 

1983 FORD RANGER: 4 wheel drive, 
air conditioned, stereo/tape, 2 tone 
paint, wheels. Avg. retail $7,400 sale 
price $6700. Save $700. 

1984 FORD MUSTANG: Hatchback, 
automatic, power steering, air con- 
dition, stereo, tilt wheel. Avg. retail 
$6825, sale price $6226. Save $600. 

1983 FORD LTD: 2 tone, automatic, 
power steering, air conditioning, tilt, 
cruise, power windows, stereo., Avg. 
retail $6450, sale price $5700. Save 
$750. 

1984 DODGE DAYTONA: 'Turbo', 
loaded with options, leather, 
stereo/tape, one owner $9875. 

1984 MERCURY LYNX: S^tion 
Wagon, automatic, power steeriiig, air 
conditioning, stereo, only 12,000 miles. 
Avg. retail $6250. sale price $5650. Save 
$600. 

1982 MERCURY CAPRI: Coupe, 4 
speed, power steering, stereo tape, 
sunroof, economical and sporty. Avg. 
retail $4575, sale-price $3800. Save 
$775. 

1984 FORD MUSTANG GT: 5 speed. 
Turbo, stereo/cassette, air con- 
ditioning, power windows, power locks, 
tilt aluminum wheels. $8500. 
1981 OLDS CUSTOM CRUISER: 
Station Wagon, full sized luxury, 
loaded with equipment, wire wheels, 
diesel. Avg." retail $4850, sale price 
$3200. Save 1650 

1W2 FORD ESCORT: Station wagon, 
GL, power steering, streo, cruise con- 
trol, luggage rock, squire package. Avg. 
retail $4675, sale price $4,300. , 



% 



GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

Home sites for sale 

for 

People Planning 

Home & Custom 

Builders 

SALES OFFICE 

333 Providence Rd. 

CALL 464-9317 



David R. Copley 
Real Estate Counselor 




428-78 II - Of . - 499-4453 - H. 



1^:^21, 



Atlantic Realty 
25th a Pacific 



if if if if 




National Realty, Inc. 



2520OilmertonRd. 
Chesapcalce, VA. 

23320 



485-5950 



CAMELOT: $62,900 spacious, 4 
bedrm, 2 bath, ranch formal living and 
dining rm, den, attached garage. Ed 
Thompson, 487-917* 

HOLLY COVE: $41,900 " 

3 bedrm, 1 '/] bath townhome extra Ig 
master bedrm., central air, fenced yard. 
Fred Helm 420-8188. 

LOXLEY JPLACE: 2 bedroom Cape 
Code, gas heat, covered patio, garage, 
family room. Quiet, established area. 
LesBoykin 487-3110. 

CAMELOT: $58,500. 4 tjcdraom, 2~- 
hath Ranch. Corner lot, living and 
dining rooms, garage. Some fruit trees., 
John Bateman 487 1346. 

GENEVA MOBILE HOME PARK: 

$31,500. Price includes lot plus 2 
bedroom 14'x70' mobile home with 
den, fireplace, living room. Diane 
Crider 393-2647. 

BRAMBLETON: Residential or com- 
mercial building lot. Lot size 25' x 125'. 
Call for details. Gail Harrison, 483- 
6013. 

HOLLY COVE: $41,900. Excellent 
condition on 3 bedroom, VA bath 
Townhome. Combination dining & 
family room, living room, covered 
patio. Dex Cutler 545-9480. 

GEORGETOWN POINT: 4 bedroom, 
IVi bath Stucco Spanish home. Oaffle- 
room, den, fireplace. Some owner 
financing available. Clarence Pegram 
424-3504. 

N. INGLE8IDE: $59,500. 3 bedroom, 
IV^ bath Ranch. Living room, den, 
fireplace, gas heat. Large fenced lot, 
detached garage. Frank Brown 485- 
3473. 

TIMBERLAKE: $58,900. SeUer^will 
pay $1,000 of closing costs on _1 
bedroom V/i bath Townhome. Living 
& difung room, central air, fireplace. 
Vicki Ford 543-5062. 



t. 

904 Kemps ville'Rd. 
Suite 105 

Virginia Beach, ''A, 
234f>-; 

495-6700 



POPLAR HALLS: 4 bedroom, 2 bath 
Tri-level. Gas heat, den, attached 
garage, convenient location. Ray 
Wallace 488-51 17. 

CATHAM HALL: $79,900. 3 
bedroom, 2'/i bath Contemporary. 
Owner will consider financing. Living 
room, attached garage, heat pump. Doc 
Viteni420-T29r. 

PARK PLACE: $47,900 - New 3 
bedrm, VA bath, colonial, living rm, 
thermal windows, wall to wall carpet. 
Edith White 466-8460 

BROOKWOOD;^S8,000 SpaclOUi 4 
bedroom, vA bath Ranch. Large fen- 
ced yard, den, living room. Very 
flexible seller. Qndy Sanford, 463- 
5020. 

BRAMBLETON: $36,500. Duplex, 
with 1 bedroom, each unit. Stove, 
refrigerator, gas space heat. GREAT 
INVESTMENT! Hazel Hearne 463- 
0889. 

TIMBERLAKE: $49,999 - Sellers wilt 
pay $1,000 closing cost on 2 bedrm 
townhome, living rm, fireplace, central 
air, storage shed. Beth Munson, 474- 
0162. 

CAMELOT: 4 bedroom, 2 bath Ranch. 
Living & dining rooms, 2 dens, wood- 
burning ftimace, fenced. Doc Vitelli, 
420-1293. 

LAKE CHRISTOPHER: $95,900. 
Priced below VA appraisal. 4 bedroom, 
2 bath Contemporary. Uving & dining 
rooms, den, fireplace, 2 car garage. 
Professionally landscaped corner lot. 
Ray Wallace 4«8-5nT. 
LINDALE: $97,000. Seller wUl pay 
some closing costs on 3 bedroom, 2 
bath brick Ranch. Living & dining 
rooms, den, fireplace, detached garage. 
MANY EXTRAS! ! Ondy Sanford 463- 
5020 

EASTON PLACE: $83,430. SHOW 
CASE CONDITION!! 3 bedroom, 2 
bath Traditional. Gas heat, fireplace, 
living & dining rooms, I Vi car garage. 
Edith White 466-8460. 



Opportunity available in sales 

and managenient; avenige 

income for sales representives 

in excess of $55,000. 



"l 




Contact Larfy R. Coiey for 

confidentiai interview at 

490-1947. 



AVON SALES 

Full or Part lime 
For Ciiristmas 

487-6809 



f 



77 Plymoulh Grand Fury 

400 engine, P/S, P/B, R/H, Air, Elec- 
tric Windows, Current Slicker, Dark 
Blue, Light Blue Top and Interior. 
Good Running Condition. 

$1,600 cash - negotiable - 
587-0175 



CITY AMUSEMENT CO. 9 am. to 5 pm. Monday -Friday 

Video Game s -$96.00 - T«fnD«»t. AMmMi. Wml. ComiMnd. Omwi IUm tni Tin. 
$149. -V>niuird.l*o«ll»,Zlxxon,SurTr*.Lo«Ton*,S|»Mfi™tW.A«roF(|ti»r $250.00 ■ Spi« Invi4(r 

Plnball Games $149.00 -tUwhldtSarPool V fo't<*a.\M.mmai%«mtK^ 

$ 1 95 - Tridm. Oorilt'i Aniih, Dfeco Fnv. Dnfon a nnW 
$250.00 - PtKwwi, SmIIi Win. Tlim Wtrp. famr Plly. Ftmra md »k 



» Fo<-ii*«. b<iti«Hiiu»IXm»|Kt . 

^88:2512^ 



For Classifieds 

Call Brenda At 
547-4571 



Chesapeake f raUel ^ttmtt 

' VOUR HOMETOWN TRAVEL PROFESSIONAL! 

• Cruises 
, free perjoral Deliveries •Exotic Vacations 

• Compgtenied Airline Ticketing ^ ^^^^1 Reservations. Renul Can 
. P.„port » Visa Awstance ^ ^ ^^.^^ ^^^^^^ 

• BuunesJ Meeting Planning 

OVER 35 YEARS COMBINED EXPERIENCE 



420-7705 



S-TR-E-T-C-H 

YOUR TRAVEL DOLLAR 







g08 LlVf OAi^ Df^lVf CHESAPEAKE VA 



GREEN RUN - hi Virginia 
Beach, all adults, 1,2 and 3 
bedroom apartments. 
Heat and hot water included. 
Pines Apt. 468-2000. 



DRAFTING SERVICES 

CUSTOM HOUSE DtSIGN. AOCHTION AND 
RENOVATION PLANS. SURVEY tSMFTlNC 



461-7736 



ANDERSON'S 
PAINTING 

INTERIOR/EXTERIOR 
WALLPAPERING 
FREE ESTIMATES 
CALL 583-7472 

NO JOB TOO BIG OR TOO SMALL 



BE A 

Merchandising 
Representative 

FOR BESTSELLING 

Cover Giii 
Cosmetics 

and 

Noxzema Brand 
Toiletries 

Paii-Time 



Tidewater Area 

Cover Gill and Nonzema lusl Iwo ol lh« 
tamous names thai will make you tove this 
|0b' You'll call on stores Ihal already sell our 
products. 10 rearrange existing displays and 
sel up new ones and deliver special promo- 
tion ilems This is a great opporlunily tor 
people reentering lh« work force Priof retail 
or merchandising experience preferred 

• Good hourly pay • Independence and flex- 
ibility • Work up 10 20 hours/week • Drive your 
own car |we reimburse) 

RMpondtawHtMIW: 

BrttfltaynoM 

Hw Um i d l w tmptoynw* M « n nr 

D^t l>N, I SM Ov KKh Blv4. 

MUnwn.rW.. 11204 

An Eou* OppOftufwl, €mptOife( M/f 



iCOnPOWATION 
TEAfl/IWOI^K KEEPS US ON TOP 



Norview Coin Sliop 

Buying and Selling Gold 

and silver coins. 

Stamps. 

42 Southon ^oprring C^to- 

Norfolk 853-8118 



$$$$$$$ $$$$$$$$$$ 



TIDEWATER MORTGAGE SERVICE 



YOUR INSTANT MONEV MORTGAGE SERVICE 

1ST. • 2ND. • 3RD. MORTGAGES 

I REAL ESTATE ■ BILL CONSOLIDATION ■ REFINANCING 

FAST PROMPT SERVICE 



Mtention Camptrsl 

A unique holiday gift for the family. A gift certificate for season 

campsites at $75.00 discount during holiday offerings. 
Lan« *ood«J sites, wvimn**. fishing, wmnls. hor^^ack rtdifig. 1 200 .cres. 

Mt. Fair Resort Farm 

In the Blue Ridge - 1 5 miles west of Charlottesville. 

804-823-5202 

Rt. 2. Box 383 MasterCard 
Visa rrnT»t, Va, 22932 _ _ 



Home & Business Cleaning 

We specialize in quality work 
Reasonable rates 

FAYTON-FAYTON 
JANITOR SERVICE 



• CONSOLIDATE YOUR BILLS 
•k CONSTRUCTION LOANS 

• HOME IMPROVEMENT LOANS 

• ANY PURPOSE LOANS 



• WE SERVICE ALL OF VIRGINIA ^| 

• PRIVATE SOURCES 

• LOW. LOW 
INTEREST RATES 

FREE CONSULTATION m*% 

399-7011 



New & Like New Baby Clothing 

PREEMIE ■ 6 X 

42CM PORTSMOUTH BLVD 

ALEKANDERISCOf^^JER 488-S26I 



PPFWinilS CREDIT rITING-NO PROBLEM 



"^^^^ 



tm^^imm^mimm^ 



IWW^IWW^W^W^ 



W«H«^iW^^^P«^ 



!2 Virginia Beach Sun, January 1, 1986 




^ 



Beach residents excell in military 



SOUTHWEST 



Science Museum of Virginia 

To Judge the altitude of the comet, use this method. Hold your hand at 
arm's length in line with the horizon. Make a fist. A fist spans ap- 
proximately 10 degrees of altitude in the sky. For example, nine fists 
would equal 90 degrees of altitude, and the arm would be straight up in 
the air. Use the number of fists shown on the sky map to locate the 
altitude of the comet. 

Early January excellent 
for viewing Comet 



"January is an excellent time 
for viewing Halley's Comet in 
Virginia Beach. Just after sunset 
on Jan. 1 12 are the best days for 
viewing success. 

The comet is visible in the 
southwestern sky in the early 
evening hours. Look for the 
comet in the constellation 
Aquarius. 

As the month progresses, the 
comet's altitude will decrease to 
only one degree. By Jan. 25, it 
will be barely above the 
horizon." 

During the second half of 
January, the comet will be above 
and to the right of Jupiter in the 
western sky. Watcti the relative 
motion of these two objects as 
they sink into evening twilight by 
month's end. 

The comet should be visible 
with the naked eye. However, 
binoculars will aid considerably 
in viewing. 

Beach residents wanting to see 
the comet should take advantage 



of the January 'window.' By the 
end of the month, the comet will 
"have dropped below the horizon. 

As it reaches perihelion, or its 
closest proximity to the sun on 
Feb.- 9, the sun will hide the 
comet until late in February. 

The comet should emerge from 
the sun's glow about Feb. 20, and 
will be visible in the morning sky 
just before sunrise. Look for the 
comet in the constellation 
Capri^rnus around Feb. 23. 

By this time, the comet should 
be brighter than in January, and 
its tail should be more 
prominent. 

For up-to-date information on 
the comet, call the Halley 
Hotline, 804-257-1076, at the 
Science Museum of Virginia. 
This 24-hour servcie is prepared 
by members of the museum 
planetarium staff. 

Contributed by Science 
Museum of Virginia, 2500 W. 
Broad St., Richmond, Va. 



Halt holiday blahs 
before they start 



The Christmas candy has set- 
tled permanently on your hips, 
the Christmas tree looks shabby 
and bare. Kippy and Junior have 
returned to college before having 
that happy family gathering, the 
fa la la's have become the boo 
hoc hoo's. 

The post-holiday season is 
known for an increase in depres- 
sion and suicidal thoughts, but it 
doesn't have to be that way, 
according to David W. Harrison, 
asastant profe^or of psycholo- 
gy at Virginia Tech. 

A little planning and a rain on 
pre- holiday expectations can re- 
duce the tendency for after-holi- 
day blahs. 

The causes of post-"holiday de- 
pression are many. 

For weeks brforehand, Vir- 
ginia Beach residents have carri«l 
out their routine work and added 
, to it the stress of gift buying and 
relatives visiting and parties and 
too much food and alcohol. 
Fatigue sneaks up on them. 

Add i^ .'lis the usually unreal- 
istic expectations — that every- 
one will be merry and joyful, the 
family will relax together and 
everybody will be warm and 
caring. Then when Mom is 
cranky from prq)aring too much 
food for too many people, when 
everything is too rushed to enjoy 
each other's company, the worn- 
down body can't deal with the 
shattered expectations. 

And then everybody goes 
home. The Chriamas project is 
over, and time drags. Already 
tired, people aart thinking about 
evwything that went wrong, not 
jua with Christmas, but with the 
whole year. The garage didn't get 
cismed out. The prson feels 
they grumped at their family too 
much, or made too jnany mis- 



takes at work. Boy, its depres- 
sing. 

So its time to make New 
Year's resolutions: lose 20 
pounds before spring, be kinder 
to the dog, be Super Employ- 
ee and never smoke another 
cigarette. This sets the person up 
for another bout with depression 
a few wedcs later when they've 
gained another two pounds, lost 
that important account and bur- 
n^ a hole in the new chair. 

To le;ssen the post-holiday 
blahs, be aware of the effect the 
disruptions of the holidays will 
have on routine. 

Try to reduce the stressful 
things from outside, maintain a 
proper diet, take normal health 
precautions. Get plenty of rest. 

To keq> from becoming de- 
pressed by the ^orto- days — 
which make some people fed 
they have less time to accom- 
plish things — organize and plan 
ahead. But make sure goals are 
reasonable. 

Take a look at what is ecpecte(J 
from the holidays. Try to be 
reahstic. And, when things don't 
go as planned, try to be accep- 
ting. 

If you think Chriirtmas ^ould 
be spent with family and friends, 
but are far away, make plans to 
be with someone else, e^ecially 
during that crucial week of 
Christmas. 

And if going to be with a large 
crowd ot people when accus- 
toms! to living alone, make sure 
there is time and privacy to be 
alone some of the time. 

WhOT e&sng into the new year, 
make resolutions reasonable 
goals, as not to be depressed by 
failure to keq) them. If planning 
ahead, reali^ically, at reason- 
able goals and ronain aware of 
the arcss of the s^son. 



Marine Pvt. John R. Kosmela, 

son of frank e. Kosmela of 
Virginia Beach, has completed 
recruit training at Marine corps 
Recruit Depot, Parris Island, 
S.C. 

" During the 11 -week training 
cycle, Kosmela was taught the 
basics of battlefield survival. He 
was introduced to the typical 
daily routine that he will ex- 
perience during his enlistment 
and studied the personal and 
professional standards 
traditionally exhibited by 
Marines. 

He participated in an active 
physical conditioning program 
and gained proficiency in a 
variety of military skills, in- 
cluding first aid, rifle marksman- 
ship and close order drill. Team- 
work and self-discipline were 
emphasized throughout the 
training cycle. 

Navy Petty Officer 1st Oass 
ncluird„ A,. Elkins, whose wife, 
Patricia, is the daughter of phiilip 
and Helf a Pasqualino of Virginia 
Beach, recently returned from a 
seven week deployment while 
stationed with Fighter Attack 
Squadron 33, embarked aboard 
the aircraft carrier USS America. 
While deployed Elkins par- 
ticipated in exercises United Ef- 
fort and Ocean Safari. 

During United Effort, the 
squadron defended North Atlan- 
tic Treaty Organization (NATO) 
ships and aircraft from mock at- 
tacks staged by the United 
Kingdom, Norway, and other 
countries. 

The battle group then conduc- 
ted Ocean Safari exercises off the 
coast of Great Britain. The 
squadron defended the carrier 
against "raids" by British air- 
craft. 

Navy Hospitalman Apprentice 
Todd J. Anderson, son of James 
H. Anderson of Virginia Beach, 
was graduated from Field 
Medical Service School. 

During the five-week course at 
Marine Corps Base, Camp 
Lejeune, N.C, Anderson was 
prepared for duty with Marine 
Corps combat units as a Naval 
hospital corpsman and dental 
technician. 

Anderson studied the fun- 
damentals of battlefield survival, 
personal protective measures, 
and received instructions on basic 
tactics and the use of weapons for 
self-defense. 

To graduate, he was required 
to demonstrate basic proficiency 
in emergency medical techniques, 
casualty evacuation, field 
sanitation and preventive 
medicine procedures. 

Navy Vice Adm. Paul F. Mc- 
Carthy, whose wife, Sandra, is 
the daughter of Lucille B.. 
Williams of Virginia beach, is 
currently deployed to the 
Western Pacific while stationed 
aboard the amphibious command 
ship USS Blue Ridge, homepor- 
ted in Yokusuka, Japan. 
While deployed, McCarthy 
participated in the welcoming of 
the sultan of Brunei Darussalam 
while the ship was operating off 
the coast of Brunei, on the north- 
western coast of the island of 
Borneo in th south China Sea. 
The Sultan's visit was his first to 
any U.S. Navy ship at sea. 

McCarthy also participated in 
exercise Annualex, a combined 
operation involving units of the 
U.S. Seventh Fleet and the 
Japanese Maritime Self-Defense 
Force. 

Navy Seaman Recruit Lynne 
D. Sheets, daughter of Herbert 
L. and Evelyn P. Sheets of 
Virginia Beach, has completed 
recruit training at Recruit 
Training Command, Orlando, 
FL. 

During Sheets' eight-week 
training cycle, she studied general 
military subjects designed to 
prepare her for further academic 
and on-the-job training in one of 
the Navy's 85 basic fields. 

Sheets' studies included 
seamanship, close order drill. 
Naval history and first aid. Per- 
sonnel who complete this course 
of instruction are eligible for 
three hours of college credit in 
Physical Education and Hygiene. 
A 1983 eraduate of Bayside 
High School, Virginia Beach, VA, 
she joined the Navy in Augusts 
1985. 

Navy Seaman Recruit Richard 
T. Thomas, son of Percy J. and 
Diane A. Thomas of Virginia 
Beach, has completed recruit 
training at Recruit Training 
Command, San Deigo. 

Navy Seaman Recruit Jeffrey 
A. Case, son of James D. Case of 
Virginia Beach, has completed 
recruit training at Recruit 



Training Comntand, Great 
Lakes. 
Navy Seaman Lisa M. Clark, 

daughter* of John R'. and. 
Kathleen Z. Clark of Virginia 
Beach, has completed recruit 
training at Recruit Training 
Command, Orlando, FL. 

A 1983 graduate of Princess 
Anne High School, she joined the 
Navy in August 1985. 

Navy Seaman Recruit Avelino 
R. Sarino, son of Avelino R. and 
Augustina R. Sarino of Virginia 
Beach, has completed recruit 
training at Recruit TRaining 
Conimand, Great Lakes, IL. 

During the eight-week training 
cycle, recruits studied general 
military subjects designed to 
prepare them for further 
academic and on-the-job training 
in one of the Navy's 85 basic 
fields... 

Studies included seamanship, 
close order drill. Naval" history 
and first aidr J^ersonnel who 
complete this course of instruc- 
tion are eligible for three hours of 
college credit in Physical 
Education and Hygiene. 

Navy Petty Officer 1st Class 
William Campbell, son of 
William Campbell Jr. of Virginia 
Beach, a crewmember aboard the 
frigate USS Ainsworth, recently 
participated in a firefighting par- 
ty. 

During a port visit to Dubrov- 
nik, Yugoslavia, a brush fire 
broke out on a nearby hillside 
and not only threatened the Ain- 
sworth, but hillside homes as 
*well. 

The crewmen quickly volun- 
teered to assist in the firefight. 
Using water pumps from the 
ship, and clearing brush from the 
hillside, the mountainside homes 
of four local residents were 
saved. 

The Ainsworth is currently 
deployed with the Sixth Fleet. 

Marine 2nd Lt. Michael J. 
Rentner, son of richard J. and 
Joanne E. Rentner of Virginia 
Beach, was graduated from The 
Basic School. 

While attending The Basic 
School, located at the Marine 
Corps Development and 
Education Command Quantico, 
Va. Rentner was prepared, as a 
newly-commissioned officer, for 
assignment to the Fleet Marine 
Force and given the responsibility 
of a rifle platoon commander. 

The 26-week, course includes 
instruction on land navigation, 
marksmanship, tatics, military 
law, personnel administration. 
Marine Corps history and 
traditions, communications and 
the techniques of military instruc- 
tion. 

Rentner was also taught 
leadership by example and the 
importance of teamwork. He was 
also required to participate in a 
demanding physical conditioning 
program. 

Navy Seaman Recruit Michael 
T. Lundsgaard, son of Susanne 
Lundsgaard of Virginia Beach, 
has completed recruit training at 
Naval Recruit Training Com- 
mand, Great Lakes, IL. 

During Lundsgaard's eight- 
week training cycle, he studied 
general military subjects designed 
to prepare him for further 
academic and on-the-job training 
in one of the Navy's 85 basic 
fields. 

Lundsgaard's studies included 
seamanship, close order drill, 
Naval history and first aid. Per- 
sonnel who complete this course 
of instruction are eligible for 
three hours of college credit in 
Physical Education and Hygiene. 

Navy Seaman Apprentice 
Derek G. Lawson, son of Harvey 
L. and Judith A. Lawson of 
Virginia Beach, has completed 
recruit training at Recruit 
Training Command, San Diego. 

Navy Seaman Recruit Ricky L. 
Ulmer, son of Eugene L. and 
Sharon L. Ulmer of Virginia 
Beach, has completed recruit 
training at Naval Recruit Com- 
mand, San Diego. ^ 

Navy Seaman Robert B. 
Cauider, son of Bobby E. 'and 
Betty M. Cauider of Virginia 
Beach, has completed recruit 
training at Naval Recruit Com- 
mand, San Diego. 

Navy Seaman Gregory D. 
BbIz, son of Sue Martin of 
Virginia Beach has completed 
recruit training at Recruit 
Training Command, Great 
Lakes, IL. 

Navy Seaman Recruit Richard 
T. Thomas, son of Percy J. and 
Diane A. Thomas of Virginia 
Beach, has completed recruit 
training at Recruit Training 
Command, San Diego. 



Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class 
Ivan K. Marfil, whose wife, 
Melinda, is the daughter of 
William H. and Mary M. Mynes 
of Virginia Beach, recently repor- 
ted for duty at Naval Air Station 
Oceana, Virginia Beach. 

Navy Petty Officer 1st Class 
Daniel C. Guiterrez, whose wife, 
Brenda, is the daughter of Helen 
S. Horner of Virginia Beach, 
recently made a port call to 
Villefranche, France, while 
deployed with the command ship 
USS Coronado, homeported in 
Norfolk. 



Navy Chief Warrant Officer 
Robert P. Pitman, whose wife, 
Katherine, is the daughter of 
Donald G. and Evelyn Austin of » 
Virginia Beach, recently made a 
port call to Villefranche, France, 
while deployed with the com- 
mand ship USS Coronado, 
homeported in Norfolk. 

Prior to the ship's port call, the 
Coronado participated in the 
French sponsored naval exercise 
lies' D'or which involved naval 
units from the U.S. France, 
United Kingdom, Spain, and 
Greece. 



VBGH using lasers 
to improve treatment 



Virginia Beach General Hospi- 
tal will soon begin using a new 
laser, providitig tremendous ad- 
vances. in_ treatment of tumors 
and ulcCTs, in addition to more 
complicated internal disorders. 

The acquisition of a multi- 
purpose Yag Laser by V BOS will 
increase the ho^ital's capabil- 
ities in noninvasive surgery, as 
well as enhance patient recovery 
periods while reducing trauma 
' and complications sometimes 
seen from traditional surgical 
techniques. 

"The new Yag Laser is one of 
the most sophisticated lasers on 
the market," Rita B. Wood, 
VBGH president said. "The ca- 
pabilities of this laser, combined 
with the professional capabilities 
of our medical staff and our 
existing laser treatment, results in 
the most comprehensive laser 
program in the area. Special 



medical training is necessary for 
laser use." 

The* Coastal Laser Center in- 
cludes four lasers: the Argon 
Laser, tJie Eye Yag Laser, the 
C02 Laser and the multipurpose 
Yag Laser. 

The Hospital began u»ng laser 
surgery six years ago, and in 1983 
it was the first hospital in the area 
to use the C02 Laser for neuro- 
surgery. 

Existing laser treatment at 
VBGH includes treatments for 
diseases or disorders in the areas 
of neurology, gynecology, urol- 
ogy, ophthalmology and derma- 
tology. 

The multipurpose Yag is ex- 
tremely effective in the treatment 
of bleeding disorders of the gas- 
trointestinal tract, such as ulcers; 
in the treatment of lesions of the 
tracheal and bronchial areas; and 
in the removal of tumors in other 
sensitive areas. 




BACKYAR 

KlATURAL' 




B}^ Craig Tufts 



Winter Water For Wildlife 



It's winter and it's very difficult for 
wildlife to find water. Put yourself in 
the place of your friendly blue jay, 
cardinal orjjray squirrel: all their famil- 
iar summer watering .sites are frozen 
. or hidden beneath snow; the summer 
leaves and other lush vegetation that 
furnish water for many small song- 
birds are gone. 

It's a critical lime for active winter 
creatures who need water as much in 
winter as they do in summer — due in 
part to the stress of coping with the 
weather and a scarce food and water 
supply. ^ 

Thai's where you come in — not only 
as provider of winter food but also of 
water, lis not always easy. Winter 
birdbaths not only freeze, they get 
dirty faster than summer ones. Why? 
Because winter users are apt to out- 
number summer bathers. Whole fam- 
ily groups— instead of the occasional 



J 




'^ 



summer singles or pairs — descend on 
your water supply. One flock of rob- 
ins can leave a dirty birdbath behind. 
Also, your most frequent winter visi- 
tors are fruit-eating birds, notorious 
for their messy droppings. 

So, frequent cleaning and ice- 
breaking are inevitable. However, here 
aise a few ways to save steps and stave 
off nature's icing-up process. 

• Place yiiur birdbath close enough 
to the house so that your chores 
lincluding lugging water buckets 
becau.se your outside faucets are 
turned off for the winterl are rnade 
lighter 

• Site your birdbath on the south side 
of the house, to capture as much 
warmth as possible from the winter 
sun. All the better if vou can tuck 



the bath to leeward of good, dense, ^ 
windshielding shrubbery, 

• Put a livestock watering-trough 
heater in a large birdbath. Thermo- 
statically controlled, it keeps the 
water at about .\^ degrees, without ' 
running up your electrical bill — or 
boiling the birds. (Be sure to always 
use proper oiitdooi exiension cordsl. 

• Spend a bit extra on a birdbath 
with a built-in thermostatic heating 
coil (available through some bird- 
feeding supply stores- or catalogs), 

• You might like to try painting the 
interior of your birdbath with black 
exterior latex paint. Friends of mine ' 
tell me' this turns the bath into a 
solar collector that warms the water 

on sunny days and helps cut down 
on the number of de-icing trips to 
the container. (I haven't yet tried 
this one out myself.) 

• Build yourself a bird-sauna— such 
_^ as the one designed by Harv and 

Robin Cashion. members of the 
National Wildlife Federation's 
Backyard Wildlife Habitat Pro- 
gram™: take a 6- to lO-inch-deep-,. 
galvanized pan with a 2- to 2',;-fooi 
dianwwfr-Wnrp some thermostatic 
heating tape around the outside cir- 
cumference. Place rocks inside the 
pan from within '4 to 2 inches of the 
surface lor even let some rocks pro- 
trude), thereby providing the birds 
with different depths of water for 
bathing and drinking. Plug the heat- 
ing tape intii an outdixir extension 
cord. Set the pan snugly into a 
stained wooden frame. (.Anchor a 
small perching branch among the 
rocks, over the water) Now, sit in 
the warm house and watch the birds 
splash in their warm sauna. With 
this set-up you never have to de-ice— 
just clean up once in a while after 
u>ur guests. 

Fnr more infnimaiion ahnut wildliie 
uioiinj your home, cbniaci the 
Saiional Wildlife Federation. Depi. 
BS. 1412 Ihih Street. N.W.. Washing- 
ton. D.C 2lllK^fi-22hh. 




I EACH ROOM 

* 3 ROOMS OR MORE 



Offer Expires Feb, 1, 1986 




$5.95 

Commercial Cleaning Available 



588-3732 



mm 



HiieViiginfa Bead i Sun 

60fh Year, No. 2, Vireinia Beach. Va. ^^— ^^ "~'"^n^'^T''"T^^'TT"Tr^^^^""''^~'^ ^^^""^ i««.«. 



I, Virginia Beach, Va 
January 8, 1986 



Virgmia Beach 's Ne ws paper 



Virginia 

Beacii 

Business 



Boardwalk 

contract 

awarded 

_ . A contract for a boardwalk 
overlook project has been 
awarded to Luke Construction 
Co., Inc., for $327,267, the 
lower of two bids received. 

The overlooks are part of the 
Resort Arra Advisory Com- 
misslon's Demonstration 
project for pedestrian parks 
east of Atlantic Avenue. 

They will consist of concrete 
slab, pile-supported overlooks 
from the resort area boardwalk 
with beach access ramps, steps 
and hand railings at 13th Street, 
14th Street and 20th Street. 

The engineering consultant's 
estimate for the project was 
$275,000. The difference bet- 
ween the bid and the estimate is 
attributed to the price of a 
specialty item. 

The city plans to reduce the 
project costs by using alternate 
railings and renegotiating that 
item with the contractor: 

Hospital 
named Best 
in the East 

Virginia Beach General 
Hospital recently received the 
"Best in the East" first place 
honor for its radio advertising 
campaign on the Birthing Center. 

In its fifth year. Best in the 
East is an annual competition 
sponsored by the Virginia Society 
for Hospital Public Relations and 
Marketing. The av^rds com- 
petition acknowledges superior 
accomplishments of hospital 
public relations professionals in 
the eastern United States and 
Canada. 

The radio ads focus on the 
many birthing options available 
to parents who use the new 
facility. , 

The campaign was designed to 
announce the benefits to the 
public with a special emphasis on 
appealing to perspective fathers. 
As a results, parents from cities 
geographically beyond the nor- 
mal patient base often elect to 
have their child at VBGH. 

The campaign was designed 
with the help of VBGH staff 
physicians and administrators by 
Davis & Phillips, Inc. a full- 
service marketing firm. 

Southeastern 
Steel named 
top dealer 

Southeastern Steel Buildings, 
headquartered in Vii^ginia Beach, 
has been named the largest dealer 



4 



Takes more than buMs to make a cop 



By Cheryl Martin 

staff Writer 

This is the second of a three- 
part series on the Virginia Beach 
Police Department's innovative 
crime fighting techniques. 

Virginia Beach Chief of Police 



Charles R. Wall attributes the 
low crime rate in Virginia Beach, 
as compared with other cities of 
similar size, to two main factors. 
One is the unusual makeup of 
the city. Virginia Beach is 
basically urban and suburban 



without an inter-city area, Wall 
said. 

The other factor is the excellent 
training Virginia Beach police of- 
ficers receive. 

Most cities of a quarter to a 
half million people have about 50 
percent more manpower per 




capita than Virginia Beach, Wall 
said. The city has 1.3 officers per 
1,000 people, where most have 2 
officers per 1,000. 

"Our technology and training ' 
are important," he said. "We 
may have fewer officers on a per 
capita basis, but a lot of energy, 
time and money is spent on 
training them. As a force, we 
have very high standards." 

The chief points out the depar- 
tment also has strict working 
policies, stricter than those 
required by law. 

To insure compjianee with the 
department '&43olki^,,the^£liief. 
has appointed a sergeant to carry 
out inspections. 

"The sergeant reports directly 
to me," Wall said. "He is my 
ears and ey?s on the street." 

Wall takes great pride in the 



training his officers receive. 

"We offered the first live-in 
police academy in the. area last 
winter," he said. "We were able 
to use some of the facilities at 
Camp Pendleton for the 
program. It worked out real well. 
It was much better for the of- 
ficers.", 

Wall said they will not be able 
to offer the live-in arrangement 
for the upcoming academy in 
February. But he hopes to return 
to the system for the following 
academy session. 

Shooting Range , 
- Theshoot+ng range available*©- 
the officers is another source of 
pride for Wall. It is the only out- 
door range in the area. Aside 
from Virginia Bea^h police of- 
ficers, it is used by other cities. 

Set MORE, pace 12 



Woods not reappointed 
to Beach School Board 



On the "Shot/Don't Shoot" course officers may be met by friend or foe. 



Controversial water fee adopted 



ByLeeCahill 

City Council Reporter 

City Council has adopted an 
ordinance establishing a water 
resource fee to p ay for the Lake 
Gaston water project. 

A proposal to delay action for 
further fine-tuning of the or- 
dinance, which was deferred on 
Dec. 16, found no support. 

Councilman John A. Baum, a 
cc'nsistent advocate of the or- 
d Jiance, felt that a delay would 
'i;iseless, pointing out that the 

X ''.'ote was about as close as 
CoujWil would get to unanimity. 

Major changes in the ordinan- 
ce made since Dec. 16 were the 
elimination of the retroactive 
clause and a provision for 
phasing in the impact fee over a 
one-year period. 



f 



Still to be satisfied are residents 
now on well water who will be 
treated under the ordinance the 
same as new water custpmers 
when city water is avaiht^ to 
them and therefore subject to the 
new impact fees. 

Mayor Harold Heischober 
assured the well-users, who had 
showed up at the council session 
to voice their objections, that the 
council would have additional 
amendments within 30 days to 
address their concerns. 

City Manger Thomas H. 
Muehlenbeck presented four 
possibilities which are being 
studied by the staff. They are: 

• Holding the mandatory con- 
nection ordinance in obeyance 
for 10 years except in neigh- 
borhoods where 75 percent of the 



property owners sign contracts 
for service. 

• Giving existing residents ser- 
v^by private wells until June 30, 

**tWI to obtain sufficient neigh- 
borhood contracts to qualify for 
public water service. 

If a sufficient percentage of 
residents request service, then the 
water resource recovery fee 
would be the fee in effect at the 
time the contracts are signed and 
such amountSrould be due at the 
time the city provides service. 

• Changing financing options 
to extend years for payback from 
four years to eight or 10 years at 
eight percent interest. 

• Having the staff examine 

projects included in the current 

Capital Improvement Program 
See WATER, page 5 



By Lee Cahill 

_ City Council Reporter 

Five Planning Commission 
members arid four School Board 
members were among year-end 
appointments made by City 
Council at the last meeting. 

Losers in the shufle were 
School Board Chairman Roy A. 
Woods and Planning Com- 
mission member from the Prin- 
cess Anne Borough, Richard J. 
LaClaire.- Both were replaced. 
Woods by Ulysses Spiva, a 
professor of education at Old 
Dominion University and former 
dean of the education school at 
ODU, for an at-large seat, and 
LaClaire by Bryan Evans Jr., 
former presidnet of the citizens 
Action Coaltion, a group which 
has supported slow growth. 

The School Board will elect a 
new chairman. 

A second new appointment to 
the Planning commission was 
Donald H. Horsle'y of Black- 
water replacing James E. Snyder, 
who retired. Horsley, a farmer, 
was 1984 man-of-the-year in 
Virginia Beach agriculture. 

Reappointed to the Com- 
mission were Thomas A. Am- 
mons, chairman, and Albert W. 
Balko, at-large members, and 
Charles Krummel, from the Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. They were ap- 
pointed to four-year terms. 
Floyd E. Taylor, a former 



civilian personnel director at the 
Oceana Naval Air Station, was 
appointed to replace Susan 
Flanagan representing the Pungo 
Borough. Flanagan wanted to 
leave the board to resume her 
teaching career. 

Woods has served on the 
School Board since 1966 which is 
16 years longer than any other 
School Board member. 

He was reappointed in 1982 
despite Council's informal rule 
limiting board members to three- 
year terms. ^ 

Reappointed to the School 
Board were B.S. Campbell, 
Kempsville, and Andrew Ege Jr., 
at-large. 

Other aoDointments made by 
Council included: 

Plumbing and Mechanical Ap- 
peals Board — two year terms, 
William L. Hendricks, Donald 
D. Jones Jr. and David V. White 
Jr., all reappointed, and Arnold 
L. Rosenberg, new. 

Virginia Beach Development 
Corporation — appointed for four 
years, Wylie Cooke, Charles M. 
Reynolds and Mason Moton; 
three years, James Lindsey and 
John Boone, and two years, Dor- 
cas Helfant and John Perry, and 
as an ex-officio member Ronald 
Proctor. 

Advertising Selection Com- 
mission — two year terms, reap- 
Se« WOODS, page 5 



in North Americafor1>crmaSteef--fto^gygr, are all in a day's work 



buildings 

PermaSteel, headquartered in 
Toronto, Canada, sells 
throughout the United States and 
Canada. 

President Rhae Adams, Jr., of 
Southeastern Steel was 
recognized at the company's 
recent sales meeting lield in 
Toronto. 



Duke&Asso. 
awarded building 
contract 

Duke & Associates, Inc. of 
Virginia Beach has been awar- 
ded the contract to build new 
offices for the Virginia Beach 
advertising and public relations 
firm of Barker, Campbell & 
Farley. 

The new offices will be 
located in the first floor of the 
CPI building, 240 Business 
Park Drive in Virginia Beach. 

The 7,000 square foot oftlcc 
facility will be the new head- 
quarters for the firm. 

Completion of the project is 
scheduled for February, 1986. 



Not the stereotype 
of a British butler 



By Cheryl Martin 
staff Writer 
Serving champagne to 3,000 
guests without wasting one drop 
or how to properly select and 
store fine cigars are not duties the 
average homemaker must learn 
to handle. 
These and other similar duties. 



for Phillis Garfield of Virginia 
Beach. 

But then, Garfield is not the 
average homemaker. In fact, she 
is the first American woman to be 
trained as a Butler Administrator 
in the traditional British fashion. 

Garfield graduated in Decem- 
ber from the renowned Ivor 
Spencer International School for 
Butler Administrators: Trained 
British Style. Though Garfield 
was not the only American in her 
class of 14, she was the only 
woman. 

"On the first day of class, I 
kept waiting for another woman 
to show up, but she never did," 
Garfield said. "It would have 
made it easier. My classmates 
were fabulous. They just treated 
me like one of the fellas. Mr. 
Spencer said having a woman in 
the class was a real asset, because 
it brought in another perspec- 
tive." 

What made the wife of an 
American Navy man da:ide to 
become a British-trained butler? 

"We were stationed in 
England," she said. "The son of 
a friend of mine, who taught at 
the American High School, took 
the course. One day she s^, 
'Being a Navy wife this 
(butlering) is right up your alley." 



1 didn't think much of it then, 
but the more I thought about it 
the more I liked the idea. " 

Garfield admits that people are 
surprised when she tells them 
about her training. 

"When I tell people they 
usually say, 'What!' But when I 
explain my rationale for 
becoming a butler it usually 
makes sense to them. I'll admit it 
is a little different, but I love it." 

Garfield said her family's reac- 
tion was similar in the beginning, 
but they came around. 

"Once they understood, they 
were very supportive," she said. 
"It meant a lot of work for them , 
too." 

Her oldest son, Peter, 19, 
returned to the states in Septem- 
ber to attend college at the 
University of Florida. Her 
husband and other son, Michael, 
15, returned later that month for 
new orders. Garfield stayed in 
England to finish school. 

"This meant my husband had 
to find a house for us in Virginia 
Beach and move in without me," 
she said. "He also had to be both 
mother and father to Michael 
while I was gone. If they hadn't 
been supportive of me I wouldn't 
have done it." 

Being Female Helps 

As a butler administrator, 
Garfield feels that being a woman 
is not a detriment but an asset. 

"Everything I've learned is 
very natural for a woman," she 
said. "It is like running your own 
household, but on a grander scale. 
Hopefully prospective employers 
will view it this way also. " 

See NOT. page 5 




Will the real €uriey please step forward? Actually ail three firenghters are Gurleys. From the left are, 
Master Firefighter Charles L.Gurley. retiring Deputy Chief W. R. Gurley Sr. and newly promoted Captain 
Michael Gurley. 

Deputy Fire Chief W. R. Gurley 
retires after 38 years of service 



During the past 38 years and 
four months, Deputy Fire Chief 
W. R. Gurley, Sr. has seen a lot 
of changes in Virgiftia Beach. 

He began working as a fire- 
fighter for the town of Virginia 
Beach in 1947. long before its^ 
1963 merger with Princess Anne 
County officiaHytmRlrtt a city. 

Over the years, he moved up 
<he Fire Department ladder, 
becoming captain, shift captain, 
district chief, and finally deputy 
chief in 1977. 

His retirement, marks the end 
of a career he summarizes as "in- 



teresting, with a lot ot 
challenges." 

"In 1%3." he recalls, "there 
were just 19 paid firefighters, 
while in 1985 there were 300." 

He credits Virginia Beach's 
population growth with the rising 
level of fire services needed by the 
City. In addition to responding to 
the growing demand for fire sup- 
pression services, the Fire Depar- 
tment has also become in- 
creasingly involved in fire preven- 
tion and education. 

"This profession has many 
rewards, because you're helping 
oeoDle." Gurlev said. Two of his 



three sons share his interest in 
this field. Rex is a volunteer 
firefighter for the city. One of 
Gurley's last official duties was 
to present a captain's badge to his 
son Michael, who has been a 
Virginia Beach firefighter since 
1978. 

Gurley has plans to slay busy 
after retirement, with traveling, 
camping, fishing, and spending 
time with his four grandchildren 
on the agenda. 

"The city's been real good lo 
work with," he said "I'll really 
miss the people." 



The Virgirtia Beach Sun, January 8, 1986 




Relieving traffic problem 

Most motorists will agree that traffic is a 
problem in Virginia Beach. One, that without some 
major road improvements, will only get worse. 

A preliminary report on a study done by con- 
sultant Robert Longfield addressed these problems. 
The report, presented to City Council on Dec. 9, 
recommended 28 major road projects to solve the 
city's traffic problems. 

While Beach residents agree there are traffic 
problems, they aren't pleased with some of the 
recommendations for improving the problem. 

Protests of the proposed projects began pouring 

in from residents at a December public hearing on 

Longficld's traffic plan. Around 400 residents at- 
tended the meeting. 

Many of these residents were from the Little 
Neclcarea. They came to voice their opposition to 

'"tiKf^eiiritieMattSntMi Old Dora 

be made a four-lane street between Little Neck 
Road and Independence Boulevard. 

As originally conceived in the 1970s, Old 
Dominion was to have run from the Oceanfront to 
the city's western limits. Twice in the past six years 
(in 1979 and again in 1983) City Council has voted 
against the parkway. 

Longfield agreed to drop the controversial road- 
way from his highway plan. 

Some 20 residents from the Brookfield Crossings 
area in Kempsville attended the hearing to protest 
the Baxter Road Project. They were barely heard 
over the masses from Little Neck. Their fight goes 
on. 

Brookfield Crossings residents are preparing to 
fight the extension of Baxter Road which could 
destroy several homes in the neighborhood . 

Longfield recommended extending Baxter Road 
beyond its current terminus at Princess Anne Road. 
According to city planners, the extensiori would be 
four lanes wide and would run along Churchill 
Drive to Providence Road. 

The four-lane widening of Churchill Drive would 
destroy several homes along the street. 
7 Longfield said this, project was needed to relieve 
traffic pressure on nearby Edwin Drive, which runs 
parallel to Baxter Road. 

Area residents ftar Edwin Drive will be saved at 
the expense of their community . 

The reality is Virginia Beach is growing and 
without changes the traffic condition will only wor- 
sen. In compiling his study, Longfield based con- 
sideration on an estimated population of 500,000 
by 2010. 
Progress never comes without some loss. 
Virginia Beach's challenge is to achieve this 
growth with minimal damage. The City Council 
and staff are working to devise a road project plan 
that will affect as few homes as possible. 

But the fact remains that some homes will have 
to go. When residents fight to save homes in one 
neighborhood they are asking the city, in many 
cases, to destroy someone else's home. 

It is time for Beach residents to pull together as a 
city. A unified plan, which best relieves traffic 
pressures with the smallest possible loss in homes is 
the goal that must be reached. —CM. 

Farewell Chief GufFey 

Many Virginia Beach residents over the years 
have come to know and respect Deputy Fire Chief 
W. R. Gurley. Gurley retired at the end of the year 
after serving for more than 38 years as a Virginia 
Beach firefighter. 

When Gurley started in 1947 as a firefighter 
Virginia Beach was just a small town. It would be 
16 years before the community reached city status 
by merging with Princess Anne County. 

At the ceremony marking Gurley's retirement 
and the promotions of several firefighters. Fire 
Chief Harry E. Diezel spoke on the comradery of 
firefighters. He pointed to the fact that fire service 
is often a family affair. 

This is truely the case for Gurley. Many have 
followed in his footsteps, beginning with his 
brother Charles. 

Master Firefighter Charles L. Gurley has served 
the department for 23 years as a paid firefighter. 
Prior to 1%3 he was for 11 years a volunteer 
fireman. 

Two of Chief Gurley's three sons have also 
followed their father. Rex is a volunteer firemafn 
for the city. Newly promoted Captain Michael 
Gurley has served the fire department since 1978. 

One of Gurley's last duties was to present 
Michael with his new rank. 

With four grandchildren, there may be more 
Gurleys to follow the path taken by the chief. 

Standing time with his grandchildren is high on 
the list of Gurley's retirement activities. He also 
plans to spend time traveling, camping and going 
fishing. — C.M. 




Will he hit out of the park? 

Robert Crall and his son Tim, 7, took advantage of a warm day to get in some batting practice. 




Editor: s 

President Reagan's relentless 
drive to develop "Star Wars" has 
become the major obstacle to 
arms control. 

Lett&s 

1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 H I ii M i .uuLMJJJJlUlLJilLLLLLlJJJJl t 

At the Geneva summit, our 
President wasted an unpreceden- 
ted opportunity to negotiate with 
the Soviets, to extract major con- 
cessions that could have cut the 
number of nuclear missiles in 
half. 

And now we are faced with an 
arms race that is expanding from 
the earth into the heavens. We 
are being asked to pay for the 
most expensive military buildup 
the world has ever known. 

And we must contend with the 
resulting federal deficit that 
threatens to wreck the American 
economy when our catastrophic 
debts come due. 

This is happening even though 
there is no scientific evidence that 
an effective space-based defense 
can be built. The majority of 
leading scientists oppose the Star 
Wars program and have called 
for a ba*"'en space weapons* 
They be1iev»^at development of 
Star Wars and anti-satellite 
weapons would increase the risk 



fearms 



of nuclear war and escalate the 
arms race. 

The Reagan Administration 
has ignored the best scientific, ad- 
vice, spurned Soviet arms control 
initiatives, and rushed ahead with 
a dangerous and expensive gam- 
ble. 

That is why the Union of Con- 
cerned Scientists is working hard. 
We want to stop the arms race in 
space before it really gets off the 
ground. 

It is not yet too late, but time is 
growing very sort. UCS needs the 
public's help immediately to stop 
the dangerous fantasies of the 
Reagan Administration " and to 
ensure that the sanctity of space 
is maintained for future 
generations. 

We must convince the 
Congress and the Administration 
not to purstie the Star Wars 
illusion, and we must do so now. 

Star Wars 

President Reagan first in- 
troduced the concept of a space- 
defense system in March 1983. It 
caught many of his advisers off 
guard and sent Pentagon resear- 
chers into a frenzied attempt to 
define systems which had even a 
vague potential for doing what 
the President believed possible. 

Many of the ideas they came 
up with seem more at home in the 




realm of science fiction than in 

^^cience fact. They include particle 

1}eam weapons, homing kill 

vehicles, and super-powerful 
lasers activated by chemical reac- 
tions or nuclear explosions. 

And the funding required for 
this program is equally out of this 
world. Four billion dollars has 
already been appropriated to 

evaluate the feasibility of the 
program. The total cost to 
develop and deploy the system 
has been estimated as high as $1 
trillion by former Secretary of 
Defense Schlesinger. 

Real purity might be woprth 
such a price, but Star Wars is, in 
fact, a very dangerous fantasy. 

Study finds peril 

In a study conducted for UCS, 
a distinguished panel of scientists 
and military experts assessed the 
feasibility of the Star Wars 
systems and their effect on 
American security and arms con- 
trol. They concluded that an ef- 
fective defense of our population 
is technologically unattainable. 

The panel found that it would 
be far easier to design, build, and 
deploy measures to defeat a Star 
Wars system than it would be to 
construcfthe sj^tem it«^.- In, se- 
dition, the panel found tbaj Star 
Wars would be useless 'dfeainst 

See ARMS, page 7 



Paying One's Bills on time i 



For small firms in Virginia 
Beach that do business with the 
federal government, there's good 
news and bad news 



i n iiiiii m iiiiiiii 



Commentary 

_MjJllli ll !A l JlL ! Jl J.1JUL ' UiJiLU-U ' IL I J 1 1 ' **^ 

The good news is that the feds 
continue to spend about $150 
billion annually for goods and 
services. For many small com- 
panies, this is a lucrative and 
steady market. The bad news is 
that if a firm does contract with 
the goverftiiierif, if may have to 
wait months to get paid. 

Several years ago, federal 
laxity in meeting its financial 
obligations reached such a point 
that the Congress passed a law 
requiring federal departments 
and agencies to pay their bills on 
time or face paying interest on 
the bill. 

The interest had to come out of 
the agencies' existing operating 
budgets since Congress refused to 
appropriate additional money for 
that purpose. This appeared to 
bring about a substatitial im- 
provement in the manner in 
which the government paid its 
bills. 

Recently, however, the 
problem has been rearing its 



ugly head again. From the num^ 
ber and type of complaints 
emanating from small firms, late 
payment has all the earmarks of 
once again becoming a serious 
stumbling block for cash-flow 
conscious small businesses. 

While many federal agencies 
are complying with the law and 
paying their bills on time, others 
are not. " 

Some contractors are reporting 
having to wait as long as six mon- 
ths to receive payment and when 
they do interest is not included. 

A litany of complaints in- 
cluding the following have been 
reaching Capitol Hill lately: small 
firms are being paid beyond the 
date specified in the contract and 
without payment of interest; the 
feds are requiring notices in 
writing from small firms deman- 
ding payment of interest; the. 
government takes discounts of- 
fered by contractors for early 
payment even though actual 
payment is made after the ex- 
piration of specified discount 
periods; some agencies accept 
partial deliveries of items of 
equipment or supplies but fail to 
make timely payments on in- 
voices for such partial deliveries 
and neglect to make interest 



payments; other departmeivf> 
request resubmission of invoices 
which automatically resets the 
clock on the payment period, and 
some refuse payment of interest 
on utility services maintaining 
they are exempt from the law. 

This is only a partial list of 
recent federal abuses of the 
Prompt Payment Act which 
Congress passed three years ago. 

As the Chairman of the Senate 
Small Business Committee has 
noted, "Small businesses have 
enough difficulty in retaining and 
attracting capital and should not 
be forced to borrow capital sim- 
ply because the federal gover- 
nment cannot or will not pay its 
bills on time." 

Most government contracts 
impose specific delivery dates and 
penalties that may be imposed on 
contractors if delivery dates are 
not met. The government is no 
,less obligated to meet the terms 
of payment than contractors are 
in delivering goods on time. 
Congress should assure that the 
agencies comply with the law. 

By the National Small Business 
Association fNSB), a private, 
non-profit, bi-partisan 
association of business owners, 
115 15 th Street, NW, 
Washington, DC 20005. 



Writer's 
Block 



The Virginia Beach Sun 



UtMithtiin 1926 



1 38 South Rosemont Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 234S2 
(804) 486-3430 

HarKsbytrly 



Greptry D. Ge^dfarb 
Cheryl Martin 

SMffWrilBf 

LeeOM 

The Virginia Beach Sun is 
published every Wednesday by 
Byerly Publications, Inc. 
Second Class postage (UPPS- 
660-140) is paid at Lynnhaven 



Station, Virginia Beach. Sub- 
scription rates: $10 a year, 
within Hampton Roads; $15, 
two years. $15, one year outside 
Hampton Roads; $22.50, two 
years. The Virginia Beach Sun 
is ^ member of the Virginia 
Press Association and the 
Virginia Beach Council of the 
Greater Hampton Roads 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Other affiliated newspapers 
are: TTie Chesapeake Post, The 
Portsmouth Times, The 
Tidewater News, The Southside 
Sun, The Dinwiddle Monitor, 
and The Bruns-wick Times- 
Gazette. 



Write 
Us A 
Letter 

Letters to the editor are 
welcomed and encouraged. Let- 
ters should be typed, double- 
spated and written in 
paragraph form. They should 
include the sender's name, ad- 
dress and phone number. 

Letters may be writtA on alt 
topics, but the editor reserves 
the right to edit as necessary. 
Send letters to The Virginia 
Beach Sun, 138 South 
Rosemont Road, Virginia 
feach, Virpnia 23452. 



Overcoming 
the blues 
of winter 

By Cheryl Martin 

Slaf f Writer 

Well the holidays are behind 
us. January is here-. Everyone is 
settling to that ho-hum time of 
year. The novelty of winter 
wore off with the passing of 
OTriStmiaf. Now everything- is 
just dead and dreary. Spring is 
still a ways off. 

We quietly, float along, get^ 
ting by until the-fiKt fiowers of 
spring bring the rejuvenation of 
the year. 

This has always been a per- 

-pkxing timcof year for me, and 

I'm sure there are many others 

in Virginia Beach who share my 

view. 

1 hate to waste time. Time 
spent unproductively is wasted. 
So what can be done during the 
dormant months of January 
and February to avoid wasting 
precipus time? 

Sometime could be spent in 
scientific endeavors, like wat- 
ching for Halley's comet. But 
only so much time can be spent 
freezing in the death of night or 
in the pre-dawn hours in the 
hopes of catching a glimpse of a 
flash of light in the sjcy. 

Let's see. It is really too cold 
to go walking but not cold 
enough for sledding or other 
winter sports. How can we pass 
the time? 

There is that pile of un- 
finished projects collecting dust 
in the spare room. Perhaps it is 
time to brave the clutter and in- 
vestigate just what there is to be 
completed. Finishing old 
projects does provide one with 
a sense of accomplishment. 

While we're in a "construc- 
tive" mood, aren't there about 
a million little projects that 
need doing around the house. 
^ We're on a roll now! 
* What better time to see to 
those mundane little duties, like 
fixing the light switch in the 
garage, than now. There is no 
shopping or gift wrapping to 
keep us from them. Nor are 
there picnics to attend or gar- 
dens to be planted. 

Gardens to be planted... now 
there's an idea. We could get a 
head start by planning the 
spring garden. If we are really 
ambitious, plants could be star- 
ted from seeds. 

House plants also require 
special care during the colder 
months. How are yours fairing? 
What about those books 
you've been meaning to read. 
What better way to spend a 
gloomy January day than 
curled up with a good book in 
front of the fireplace? 

Still haven't sparked your in- 
terest? Perhaps you would like 
a group-oriented activity. There 
ajce matiy . yoJiinteer programs 
that would truiy appreciate 
some help. Why, there are 
volunteer programs to suit 
anyone's talents or interests. 

Classes are starting at the 
community college. This would 
be a good time to bone up on 
some knowledge or just take a 
class for fun. 

The winter/spring\^schedule 
for the Virginia Beach 
Reacreation Department is hot 
off the press. The number and 
variety of activities offered is 
almost endless. Everything 
from fitness to swimming to 
coping with aged parents is 
covered. 

January and February could 
turn out to be very productive 
months. Why we could become 
.Sd— ^Jtls?, spring will arrive 
hefore weknowit! 



Beach groups 
receive grants. 

The Virginia Commission for 
the Arts has awarded grants to 
two Virginia Beach groups. 

Ttee grants are for general 
operating expenses in 1986-87 and 
for summer, 198b. projects. 

The next deadline for grant 
applications is March 1. 
Receiving challenge Grants for 
arts organizations are the 
Virginia Beach Arts Center, 
$19,000; and the Virginia Beach 
Orchestral Association, $20,917. 



The Virginia Beach Sun, January 8, 1986 3 




It is a question 
of reading statistics 



ymm^im^MmMkm^^ 



Each year the Virginia General 
Assembly faces the major issue of 
fuijding the 'Standards of 
Quality', a constitutionally 
required document made up of 12 
'standards' to which each locality 
must suKscriFe in establishing iB" 
school program. 

^Enacted in 1972 with the new 
Virginia Constitution, the stan- 
dards f ome up for funding each 
biennium and are invariably 
revised in the interim session as 
well. 

Just as invariabte4ias b«#n 4;be~ 
practice by the General Assembly 
of not fully funding the 
requirements laid out in the 
Standards. Obviously, what 
money the'state does not provide, 
the local governments must pick 
up, r ■ 

In the first year of implemen- 
tation in the 1974-75 school year, 
the 'established' per pupil cost 
across the Commonwealth was 
$687. The 'actual' cost was $833, 
an average difference of $146 per 
pupil that the localities had to 
pick up. 

In the 1984-85 school year, the 
established cost per pupil was 
$1,605 with the actual cost tur- 
ning out to be $1,8'96, a differen- 
ce of $291. 

This difference, in varying 
amounts, has existed every year 
to the present, even in the face of 
a 1973 Attorney General's 
opinion which said, in part, 
"...the General Assembly must 
take into account the actual cost 
of education..." 

This continuing deficit in 
school funding has placed the 
Commonwealth in the difficult 
position of being more than a 



half billion dollars short of full 
funding of the standards for the 
1986-88 biennium. Last sumrher 
the State Department of 
Education drafted a biennium 
budget of $2.7 billion, an in- 
crease of $515 million and 
declared that, as of the 1986-88 
school biennium, the Standards 
would be fully funded. 

The Research Division of the 
Virginia Education AssociatioQ, 
disagreed (see chart) and revealed 
that the Department figures 
would only achieve 92 percent of 
projected needs. 

Since last summer, however, 

muoh has happened. Late this 

Tan; tTir"St'atr' DepartnTCfttV 

figure was reduced to $419 




the children. 



The Virginia Beach ^ 
Education Association ^ 

million because of underprojec- 
tions of state revenue and the 
oyerprojections of costs of 
educators' salaries and the rise of 
the CPI (Consumer Price Index). 

In December, it was further 
reduced by $20 million because 
of new figures on sales tax 
revenue. Then on Dec. 9 of the 
Joint Legislative Audit and 
Review Commission (J-LARC) of 
the General Assembly published 
a report which said that the Stan- 
dards of Quality could be fully 
funded with a $192 million in- 
crease, plus catagorical funding, 
by simply applying a new for- 
mula. 

JLARC's formula would apply 
a weighted median concept to all 
but the more affluent of the 
state's localities and do away with 
the State Department's system of 
statewide averaging. Needless to 
say, VEA is skeptical and doesn't 



think it is fair to leave the 'arge 
localities aut. 

The last dimension of this con- 
fusing issue is Governor Robb's 
proposal. Where will he come 
down in all of this? The Gover- 
nor is scheduled to deliver his 
budget message to a joint 
legislative session this week. In 
the meantime, the State Depar- 
tment is preparing an answer to 
JLARC's funding proposal. 

There is no time within recent 
memory that there has been such 
a diversity of approaches on fun- 
ding the Standards of Quality 
and with such far-reaching con- 
sequences. 

In a recent ariicle„,X.Mfl]le.,., 
about the future of education and 
of the changes that have occured 
since World War II, moving from 
the Industrial Age to the High- 
Tech Age; from manufacturing 
and other traditional jobs to in- 
formation type jobs. Education 
and educators must \ead the way 
as the changes occur, not be in a 
catch-up i"ole. 

To do this we need the 
facilities, the equipment and the 
continual training to do the job. 

A recent Virginian 

Pilot/Ledger Star poll showed 
that 60 percent of those polled 
said that the state should set aside 
additional money to meet the 
demands of the Standards of 
Quality and 51 percent said they 
would agree to a tax increase to 
meet those needs. 

The dilemma in Richmond this 
year, as always, is to reach 
agreement on how much money 
is needed. Then, determine how 
much legislators are willing to 
pay.and finally, how it will all be 
funded. 

Both Governor Robb and 
Governor-Elect Gerald Baliles 
pledged to fully fund the Stan- 
dards of Quality. 

I represent an overwhelming 
number of teachers when I say, 
"Do it now! Find the money, and 
fully fund the Standards, so that 
we can get on with the job of 
fully educating our children, now 
and for the future." 



PiRCENT OP THi iSTIMATED COST 

OP THI STANDARDS OP QUAUTY 

ACrUAUY FUNDfD 

(1979-1M*) 



100 
98- 
96- 
94 
92- 
^90- 
§88 J 

^84- 
82- 
80 
78- 
76- 



GODWIN 



DALTON 



Level I /projected by 



the Virginia / Education 

Association, 



FISCAL 
YEA« 




IWS l»76 1»77 



— 1 1 

I97S 1979 1980 



Actiial 

1 1 1 1 i I 

1982 1983 1984 I98S I9M I9t7 IfM 



^Proposed by (lie Board of Education to achieve 100 percent funding of the Standards of Quality in the 
1986-88 biennium at 51 instructional personnel/1000 ADM. The VEA projected cost of funding the Stan- 
dards (based on 57.8 instructional personnel/lOOO ADM) indicates that the Commonwealth will beat 92.7 
percent of full funding in 1986-88. 



Books 



By Dana Porter 



Foat's autobiography 
looks at women's role 



Two years ago Ginny Foat was 
found not guilty In the state of 
Louisiana for the murder of 
Moises Chayo which had oc- 
curred in 1965. 

A successful businesswoman, a 
prominent political activist, and a 
past president of the California 
NOW (National Organization of 
Women) Foat was twice accused, 
' imprisoned, and tried for murder 
through the machinations of her 
former husband. Jack Sidote. 

Sidote, a known alcoholic and 
a "self -described killer" repor- 
tedly threatened Foat, "if you 
ever leave me, I'll kill you or I'll 
see you rot in jail..." 

Fear kept her rooted within 
that relationship for more than 
five years, a battered wife with 
little self-esteem left to her. 
Finally however, Foat broke free 
of her 'cage', rebuilt her life, and 
eventually became active in NOW 



and that organization's fight to 
ratify the Equal Rights Amend- 
ment. 

True to his word, Sidote 'con- 
fessed' to authorities about two 
murders, which he claimed Foat 
had committed, himself being 
only an accomplice. 

Ginny Foat reveals her 
husband's revenge and its effect 
on her life in Never Guilty, 
Never Free. 

The reader is given a deeper 
understanding of why thousands 
of women today remaiii in 
marriages and relationships while 
beng tormented by their paren- 
ters. The physical, emotional, 
and psychological realities of 
domestic violence are examined 
through Foat's experiences. 

Foat, who afterward sup- 
pressed her vile life with Jack 
Sidote, tries to free herself 
through writing this book. Her 
autobiography reveals more 



clearly than ever "how easy it is 
for woment to fall into the trap 
of measuring their worth by the 
man they're with". 



"My Old Manure" 

ir roar soil ii very poor. 
If yon have sand or clay galore, 
if your yard is a bore, 
you need ray old manure. 
If yon live of the skorc, 
if yon arc rich or poor, 
yon can afford for sure, 
ray aged, old, blacit manure. 
It does not smell at all. y'all, 
it wUI not bum anything at all, 
in fact yonr plants will have a ball, 
with the grandest manure of them all. 
It will lieep your planU warm 

this winter, 

Ihk old nannrc that I deUver. 

it if, IB yonr piMto, a fncy dtaiaer, 

wttboat it they may moan and rtiver. 

If you want your yard to be revvia, 

and yon'd like to put your pianls 

in heaven, 

you would have to call me after seven, 

427-Ull 




Virginia Beach 
Newsweek in Review 

^ Ti(f t0ltD«4i^ i^ » iifit of $Oint of the major news StortW tfMmg Vtrg*nl« Bwch tf««i«g «|ie las< week . 



Del. Owen Pickett 

Pickett intends to run 
for Ind District seat 

Del. Owen B. Pickett, D- 
Virginia Beach, announced his 
candidacy for the congressional 
seat being vacated by Rep. G. 
William Whitehurst, R-2nd 
District. 

If he wins the Democratic 
nomination, which no one else 
is formally seeking, Pickett, 55, 
will face in November one of 
the Beach's most formidable 
Republicans, State Sen. A. 
Joseph Canada, Jr. 

Pickett has been a member of 
the House of Delegates sipce 
1972. He is a former chairman 
of the Virginia Democratic Par- 
ty and is identified with the par- 
ty's moderate-conservative 
wing. 

Question is who is 
supporting whom 

When State Sen. A. Joseph 
Canada Jr., R- Virginia Beach, 
announced his plans to run for 
the 2nd District U.S. House of 
Representatives seat, he 



released a list of 27 prominent 
supporters. 

When Del. Owen/ickett. D- 
Virginia Beach, entered the 
race, he also produced a list of. 
backers - 208 of them. 

Five names were on both 
lists. They are Robert ,H. 
DeFord Jr., Thomas C. Kyrus, 
William R. Malbon, James R," 
McKenry and Bruce L. Thom- 
pson, all of Virginia Beach. 

A Pickett strategist says the 
five are part of a growing group 
of Canada defectors. 

Pickett adviser Kenneth V. 
Geroe, a Virginia Beach lawyer, 
said many people only appeared 
ot^.-Gafjada^iaisL.JbecaM.sil.ibsj', 
mistakenly believed that Pickett 
would not run. He said he ex- 
pected others to announcr their 
support for Pickett in the future. 

Canada said he expected 
something like this to happen, 
but he has picked up a lot more 
support . He plans in about two 
weeks to release a second list of 
supporters. 

DeFord, Kyrus and McKenry 
all said their support of Canada 
had been based on their belief 
that Pickett would not run. 
They intend to support Pickett. 

Thompson said he may join 
the many people who are going 
to give support to both sides. 

Malbon said he is undecided 
about which candidate to sup- 
port now. 

Overman vows to make 
good on promises 

Bill R. Overman was sworn- 
in as sheriff last week. He 
vowed to make good on cam- 
paign promises to eliminate 
deadwood in the department. 

There will definitely be 
changes in the top echelon of 
command, Overman said. He 
added that competent people in 
the department have nothing to 
fear. 

Overman said he plans to in- 
stitute comprehensive training 



designed to increase deputies' 
roles as law enforcement agen- 
ts. 

Other planned changes in- 
clude a pre-employment 
screening, aimed at hiring more 
qualified applicaints. There will 
also be a career development 
program designed for employee 
, retention. 

The new sheriff conceded 
that change may come slowly. 
Among the obstacles he has to 
hurdle is the fact that he will be 
working under former Sheriff 
S. Joseph Smith's budget until 
mid-year. 

In his first budget. Overman 
said he plans to ask for more 
men, positions andmore- 
equipment. 

Residents present 
list to legislators 

-New laws should be pasSed 
giving local citizens the powpr. 
to adopt ordinances, recall elec- 
ted officials as well as elect their 
mayor and school board mem- 
bers, Virginia Beach residents 
told city legislators last week. 

The requests were made at a 
public hearing held annually by 
the city's six representatives to 
legislature before the opening 
of the General Assembly 
session. This year's meeting at- 
tracted nearly 20 people, five of 
whom rose to speak. 

The speakers also called for 
new legislation requiring 
changes in road financing 
methods, accountability among 
elected officials and a sand 
replenishment program for 
Sandbridge beaches. 

Hearing the legislative 
requests were State Sen. A. 
Joseph Canada and Delegates 
Robert Tata and Harry R. 
'Bob' Purkey, all Republicans. 
Also on hand were Delegates 
Glenn B. McClanan, Owen B. 
Pickett and J. W. 'Billy' 
O'Brien, all Democrats. 



Be My Valentine! 




THE HEART 
$15 

(Actual Size) 




This Valentine's Day warm someone's heart by 
showing them how much you care by publishing 
your personal Valentine message in The 
Virginia Beach Sun's Feb. / 2 Val&itine's Day issue. 

To or.der your Valen^ne ad simply write your 
special message below and enclose your personal 
check. 

■ Mail ad and check to Valen^ne, The Virginia 
Beach Sun, 138 South Rosemont Road, Virginia 
> Beach, Virginia. 234S2. 

— Please keep message to 20 words. 

(Please circle one) 
The Heart The Kiss The Cupid 

My Message: 

(Please type or print) 



THE KISS 
$10. 

(ActuafSize) - 




THE CUPID 
$5 

(Actual Size) 



Naine/tHjnftber of person sending ad . 



For more information call S47-4571 



MM 



4 The Virginia Beach Sun, January 8, 1986 



Teen weight problems series offered 

Fran Johnson, M.S., R.D., representative of a local nutrition and 
weight services firm, will lead a series on teen weight'problems for teens 
and their parents for three weeks beginning Wednesday, Jan. 15, at 7 
p.m. in the Oceanfroht Area Library, 1811 Arctic Avenue. 

Johnson will discuss how diet, eating behavior and physical exercise 
can be cotnbined to combat weight problems. Registrations need to be 
placed in advance. 

For information and to register, call the library, 428-41 13. 



■■■ ^ ■■■I MM f!i»f M I M Iiit*W*lN«* 



■;vr;iT;.Y,7.-..T,...-mnoii>im>i.iiiLyj 




Free lectures scheduled at A.R.E. 

Free lecture*, and a movie on the life and work of Edgar Cayce are 
scheduled daily for the week of Jan. 12 to 18 at the Association for 
Research and Enlightenment, Inc. 

Daily free lectures are offered at 3 p.m. followed by the 30-minute 
movie at 4 p.m. 

The lecture schedule is: Sunday. Jan. 12, "Keys to Understanding 
Your ESP," by David Aberegg. Monday, Jan. 13, "The Soul's Jour- 
ney/' by Walene James. Tuesday, Jan. 14, "Mind Is the Builder," by 
Pluma Beck. Wednesday, Jan. 15, "Growing to Heaven," by Kathleen 
Meade. Thursday, Jan. 16, "Working with Dreams," by Lindy 
reiMgfrFrtdiy, Jan. 17, "Handbook of Spifin»»lGrowth.;!,bjt Betty 
Barnes. Saturday, Jan. 18, "Through the Looking Glass," by David 
Osborne, 

A.R.E., 67th St. and Atlantic Avenue, Virginia Beach is open for 
visitors from 9 a.m. until 5:30 p.m., Monday through Saturday and 1 
p.m. until 6 p.m. on Sundays. For information call 428-3588. 

^weet Adelines holding guest night 

Sweet Adelines, Inc., prospective Virginia Coast Chapter, will be 
hostessing a guest night on Jan. 21, at 7:30 p.m. at Thalia Trinity 
Presbyterian Church, 420 Thalia Drive, Virginia Beach. 

Worrien who are interested in learning the art of four-part harmony, 
barbershop style, are urged to attend. For information call 464-5823 or 
479-3882. 



Time for Girl Scout cookies 

The Virginia Beach Girl Scout Cookie Safari is coming. During the 
Safari, Girl Scouts will ostrich run, elephant walk, monkey scramble 
and kangaroo hop to kickoff Colonial Coast Girl Scout Council's 
greatest cookie sale. 

The Southside Safari Kickoff is on Jan. 18 at Princess Anne High 
School in Virginia Beach from 1 to 3:30 p.m. 

Girl Scouts will be selling the nationally famous Samoas, a caramel 
covered vanilla cookie rolled in chocolate and toasted coconut and the 
Thin Mint, a super thin chocolate and peppermint wafer, covered with 
cocoa. 

A new cookie, the Pecan Shortees, a delicate crunchy shortbread 
with crisp pecans will also be on sale. 

Four traditional favorites. Trefoils, Chocolate Chunks; Tagalongs, 
and Do-Si-Dos can also be purchased down during the 1986 Girl Scout 
Cookie Safari. 

Cookies sell for $2.25 a box. 

For information call 625-5805 in Norfolk. 



Free classes offered at LMH for diabetics 

Leigh memorial Hospital is offering free classes for diabetics, their 
fatnlfies afid frieiiar«llJan. 15-16 from 7 to 9p.m. in the hospital's 1-B 

Classes are taught by registered nurles and register&l dietitians . 

Topics covered in the sessions include: types of diabetes, how to test 
blood and urine, diets and medications for diabetics, complications of 
diabetes, tips on exercise, traveling, and emergencies and community 
resources for diabetics. 

The classes are free, but pre-registration is recommended by calling 
466-6620. 

Opera preview at library cancelled 

The preview of Tosca by Puccini, on Sunday, Jan. 12, at 3 p.m. in 
the Oceanf ront Area Library has been cancelled . 



Class set for Sew Master Volunteers 

The Virginia Beach Department of Agriculture/Cooperative Exten- 
sion Service is accepting applications for the 1985 Sew Master Volun- 
teer Program. 

Participants will receive 24 hours of training in clothing construction 
skills and will then be required to volunteer 24 hours to the Extension 
program. ,. < 

Classes will begin Feb. U, and will run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on 
Tuesdays and Thursdays through Feb. 27. 

A fee of $10 will cover the cost of a training notebook and materials. 

For registratiori.and information call 427-45 11. 

Dance for special people planned 

A dance for physically and mentally handicapped people will be held 
. Saturday, Jan. 18, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the Bow Creek Recreation 
Center, 3427 Clubhouse Rd. 

The dance is sponsored by Preceptor Xi Chapter-of Beta Sigma Phi 
Sorority, the Virginia Beach Department of Parks and Recreation and 
CLASP (Citizens Loving All Special People). 

Participation is free. Refreshments will be served and door prizes will 
be given. 

Transporralion is available through TRT at $5 per roundtrip per in- 
dividual. Transportation deadline is Jan. 9. Call Carolyn Wismer at 
853-8789 after 7 p.m. weekdays. 

For information call Lynn Gallob. 463-1148 or Ken Gearliart, 422- 
1381. 

CLASP to meet at Bow Creek Rec. 

CLASP (Citizens Loving All Special People) will hold its monthly 
business mectng Thursday, Jan. 16, at 7:30 p.m. at the Bow Creek 
Recreation Center, 3427 Clubhouse Rd. 

For information call Lynn Gallob, 463-1148 or Ken Gearhart, 422- 
1381. 

VBGH holding a ski safety workshop 

Virginia Beach General Hosjjital is offering a ski safety and con- 
ditioning workshop On Thursday, Jan. 9 from 7 to 9 p.m. in the 
Hospital's Health Education Center. The free workshop is for skiers of 
all ages. 

VBGH, the Virginia Beach Orthopedic Associates and the Ski Center 
of Virginia Beach sae sponsoring the workshop to promote safety and 
preventive measures for skiers. 

Dr. Robert W. Wadd^, orthopedic surgeon, and Tim Harschutz, 
Ski Center consultant, will demonstrate pre-conditioning exercises, fir- 
st aid techniques and equipment safety. 

The workshop al» feattres travel and resort information. 

For iflformation <w 0e workshop, call the VBGH HealthQuest 
l^I»rtment, 48I4I4I. 




Wap|>adoodie Puppets Martina and Perez will star in upcoming performance at the Virginia Beach Recreation Center/Bow 
Creek. 

Wappadoodle Puppets present Martina & Perez 



The Wappadoodle Puppets will present "Martina & Perez," on 
Saturday, Jan. 18, at 11 a.m. at Virginia Beach Recreation Center/ 
Bow Creek, 3427 Clubhouse Rd. 

Admission is free. Children six and under must be accompanied by a 



sibling at least age nine or a parent . 

"Martina & Perez".is presented by the Performing Arts Division of 
the City of Virginia Beach Parks and Recreation Department. 

For information call 495-1892. 



Eisenhower enlisted wives club meet Break dancing contest to be held 



The U.S.S. Dwight D. Eisenhower Enlisted Men's Wives Club will 
hold its monthly business meeting on Thursday, Jan. 9, at 6:30 p.m. at 
the Ship N' Shore Building, NOB. The guest speaker will be the budget 
counselor from Navy Relief Services. 

Bring any suggestions for changes to the wives club by-laws. 

There will be babysitting available for a nominal fee. 
Tor information Call the Ike Care Line, 423-5062. -■ — — ^— ' 



Cancer Support G^oup to meet 

,.NDC NJgdical Ceflter, 8^QKem>svill9iI^(^j,wiil holjd an ppen forum 
style meeting of its Cancer Sip^rt droup on Thursday, Jan. 16 at 7 
p.m. The meeting is free and open to the public. 
For information or to reserve a space, call 466-5995. 

Basic meditation classes offered 

"Basic medication classes" - a 10-week series is being offered by the 
Department of Health Services of the Edgar Cayce Foundcation, 67th 
Street, Virginia Beach. Classes begin Jan. 22. at 7 p.m. 

Tuition is $55 if paid in advance ($60 at-the-door). 

Call the Edgar Cayce Foundation for information, 428-3588. 



Humana Hospital Bayside Auxiliary meets 

The Humana Hospital Bayside Auxiliary will meet Wednesday, Jan. 
22, 10 a.m. in the cafeteria of the hospital. 

Dave Raibie, Development Officer for The Virginia Marine Science 
Museum will be the guest speaker. He will speak and show slides related 
to the new museum. 

Members and guests are invited to attend. 

Guest relations volunteers needed 

As part of a new program at Leigh Memorial Hospital, the Guest 
Relations manager is seeking volunteers who will visit patients, provide 
social contact, and answer any questions the patients may have. 

Volunteers are also needed in the admitting and information desk 
areas of the hospital. These volunteers assist patients, families and 
visitors who come into the hospital. 

For information contact Volunteer Services, 466-6940. 



Community volunteers receive award 

The American Heart Association, Virginia Affiliate has recognized 
volunteers in Virginia Beach for outstanding performance in the 1985 
campaign. 

The Tidewater Council received the Over the Top challenge Award 
for exceeding its campaign goal for 1 984- 1 985 . 

This year, $3 million in contributions has been allocated to research 
and community education to prevent heart disease, still the nation's 
number one killer. 



Brothers' and Sisters' program offered 

Virginia Beach General Hospital will sponsor a Prepared Brothers' 
and Sisters' Program Saturday, Jan. 18 from 10-11 a.m. 

The VBGH visiting tour starts in the lobby, and takes children to the 
Birthing Center, Postpartum Unit and the Newborn nursery. 

The program is offered to children ages two to six and children seven 
and older in a separate tour and class at the same time. 

For information on the program, or to preregister call HealthQuest, 
481-8141. 

Fitness line to stress weight maintenance 

"The Fitness Line" program will be held Wednesday, Jan. 15 at 7 
p.m., at the Kempsville Recreation Center, Room 1 17. 

It is sponsored by the Virginia Beach Parks and Recreation depar- 
tment. The program offers monthly programs and newsletters designed 
to encourage fitness. 

January's topic will be "Weight Maintenance Through Nutrition," 
and will feature a speaker from NDC Medical Center. 

A valid facility use card or gitest pass is required. Call 495-1892 for 
information. 



A break dancing contest willbe held on Thursday, Jan. 9, at 4 p.m. 
at the Creeds Activity Center. It is free to registered participants. 
Prizes will be awarded. For information call Virginia Beach Recreation" 
Department's Youth Activities office, 47 1 -4884. 

Bingo night set for Kempsville Rec ** 

Bingo Night will be Friday, Jan. 10 from 8 to 9 p.m. in the Teen 
Lounge at Virginia Beach Recreation Center/Kempsville, 800 Mon- ^ 
mouth Lane. Valid facility use card or guest pass required. Call 495- 
1892 for information. 

Arm wrestlers to compete 

An arm wrestling contest will be held on Friday, Jan. 10 at Shelton 
Park Elementary School Sports Center (gym) 1700 Shelton Rd., for 
ages 10 to 16. For information call Youth Activities, 471-4884. 

Post-Polio Syndrome lecture set 

Nancy McKeel, Psy. D., guest lecturer from Ghent Psychological 
Practice, will discuss "coping" at the Monday, Jan. 13, meeting of 
NDC Medical Center's Post-Polio Support Group at 7,p.m. 

An open forum style support discussion will follow the lecture at 8 
p.m. Both the lecture and membership in the support group are free 
and open to the public. 

Call 466-5910 for information or to register. 

Taking the fear our of children's surgery 

Virginia Beach General Hospital will offer pre-operative surgical 
tours for children who will be having surgery at thehospital on Satur- 
day, Jan. 18 from 1 1 :30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. 

Preregistration is required. To register their children by calling 
HealthQuest, 481-8141. 

Date correction for Exercise-A-Thon 

The second annual Sun Wheelers Exercise-A-Thon will be on Sun- 
day, Jan. 19, not Jan. 42. 

Dance exercise sessions will begin at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. at the Virginia 
Beach Recreation Center/Kempsville gym, 800 Monmouth Lane. 

A $2.50 donation is asked of each participant, with proceeds going to 
the city's Sun Wheelers wheelchair basketball team. 

For information, call 495-1892. 

STEP program is open to parents 

STEP - Systematic Training for Effective Parenting, a positive ap- 
proach to parenting through skills which aid in dealing with family 
conflict will meet at the Family Center in Virginia Beach near Mt. 
Trashmore on Tuesdays, January 21 , through March 1 8, at 7-8:30 p.m. 

Cost is $30/couples; $20/person and include workbook and play- 
shop, f 

Pre-registration is required by Jan. 13. 

For general information contact Ginny Lawrence or Paula McCann, 
622-7017. 

Meeting scheduled for NVB civic league 

The North Virginia Beach Civic League will meet Tuesday, Jan. 14^ 
at 7:30 p.m. in the library auditorium of the Association for Research 
and Enlightenment, 67th and Atlantic Avenue. 

The meeting will be an open discussion of issues of general concern 
and priorities for 1986. The program will also include the introduction ■ 
and installation of new officers and directors. 

All residents and property owners of North Virginia Beach are urged 
to attend. 



Advertising Sales 

Salary, Commission. Travel 

Call The Virginia Beach Sun 

486-3430 



The Virginia Beach Sun, January 8,7986 3^ 



Water fee 

f^ Continued from pagr I 

and those neighborhoods which 
have met the 75 percent petition 
. requirernerits. The staff then will 
provide a recommendation for an 
appropriate method for ad: 
dressing these conditions at a 
-- J'uture City Council meeting. 

Most of the speakers among 
the well-users decided to delay 
their remarks until council came 
up with amendments to address 
their concerns. 

In many instances the well- 
users have requested city water 
with no success. They feel they 
are being unjustly treated because 
they would have escaped the fees 
if they had been provided water 
when they requested it. 

In the meantime, they have had 
to spend money on wells to 
provide their own water source. 

While the ordinance has been 
considered generally to establish 
an impact fee for new construc- 
tion, it actually addresses new 
water connections, which would 
include existing properties still on 
well water. 

Residents also complained that 
they would not have known how 
they would be affected by the or- 
dinance except fo a Sunday 
newspaper article. 

Councilwoman Barbara 
Henley, who was asked by 
Heischober to speak on council's 
position on the %ell-Wsers, safd 
that it was not the intention of 
Council to conceal the impact on 
well-users, but that the emphasis 
has been on new construction 
rather than new connections. 

Before opening the floor to the 
public, she said that the city has 
proposals on how the issue would 
be addressed, but that ordinances 
were not available yet. She said 
council has been aware of the 
problem and that she made a 
reference to it during an open 
session in October. 

She questioned the accuracy of 
the newspaper article which 
stated the problem was not 
discussed at a meeting. 

Henley said that she shared the 
concerns of the well-users. 
•< because, "I'm on a well, too." 

Property owners under the 

ordinance will be required to pay 
a resource recovery fee based on 
the number of drainage fixtures. 
The fee for an average single- 
family house containing two 
baths and modern appliances 
would have 24 drainage fixture 
units at $95 each would be ap- 
proximately $2280. The fees were 
recommended by Arthur Young 
and Company, city consultants, 
in a financial study. 

The fees would provide 5 1 per- 
cent of the cost of the $176.1 
million Lake Gaston project with 
the rest coming from increased 
water rates. 

Following the Dec. 16 meeting 
builders bombarded the city for 
building permits hoping that the 
city would lift the retroactive 
feature of the ordinance, which 
council did. 

This means that the fee will not 
be imposed on the projects for 
which the permits were issued . 

Richard Guy, attorney 
representing the Tidewater 
Builder's Association, made it 



clear that the builders would ex- 
, peel the same treatment accorded 
well-users. He said tliat an 
element of unfairness is involved 
in trying to find ways to help the 
well-users. 

At issue, he said. iS a serious 
quesiton of fairness and equity. 

"I wonder how these people on 
wells differ from me who have 
been paying taxes all these 
years," Guy said. "If the well- 
users were given a longer time to 
pay, others will want a longer 
time to pay. if exemptions are 
given in any way, two classes 
would result." 

Councilman Robert G. Jones, 
who voted against the ordinance, 
did so, he said, because he 
thought the well-users' position 
should be considered along with 
the ordinance. He also had reser- 
vations about provisions which, 
would raise questions of equal 
protection. 

Jones, who is a lawyer, said 
that the law would require the 
pasties to Be feaied "equitably. He 
suggested a one-month 
moratorium, until Feb. 14, to 
allow the neighbors now using 
wells to reach the 75 percent 
agreement needed to bring city 
water to their communities. , 

Developers would enjoj^ the 
same status thereby -avoiding 
question of equity. He said he 
supported the recovery fee, but 
would have difficulty adopting 
the ordinance without the brief 
moratorium. 

He said that he wanted con- 
.-irinrotinr. °r.f tfin pfovisionf! ten- 



tatively proposed by the cJty 
manager in relation to well-users 
along with. the consideration of 
the ordinance. 

Councilman H. Jack Jennings 
Jr., who also voted against ap- 
proval of the ordinance, has been 
opposed to the recovery fee and 
has suggested a real estate tran- 
sfer fee instead. 

The Tidewater Builder's 
Association also has opposed the 
recovery fee and has proposed a 
transfer fee or a real estate tax in- 
crease to spread the cost over all 
the citizens. 

The water system, however, 
has been set up to be self- 
supporting with users paying for 
the service. 

The city's water ordinance 
makes connection to the city's 
water system mandatory shortly 
after the system is available in a 
neighborhood. 

Until changes are made in the 
ordinance. City Attorney Dale 
Bimson saW, the-t5Tdtnance 

would apply to new construction 
and properties now served by, 
wells. 

Jones said that the city would 
have to make any chaijges apply 
to new construction as well as to 
the well owners. 

"Maybe," r-replied Mayor 
Heischober, implying that this 
may not be the case. 

Although most of the speakers 
who had signed up to speak on 
the ordinance, decided to wait for 
further developments, others did 
make statements. 




Newly promoted firefighters are congratulated by Fire Chief Harry E. DIezel. 

Fire Department promotes firefighters 



Not the stereotype 



Continued from page 1 

There is much more to being a 
butler administrator than the old 
stereotype of "Jeeves the 
Butler," according to Garfield. 

The "administrator" in the 
title denotes the fact that they run 
the household, she said. They are 
responsible for the entire staff, 
which can be as many as 20 em- 
ployees. 

The butler administrator han- 
dles all scheduling and paying of 
the household bills. In many 
households now, the butler ad- 
ministrator has a computer in his 
or her office to help in per^sonnel, 
billing and inventory matters. 

"In many cases it is still a 
situation where ' 'Madame' 
doesn't know where the kitchen is 
and 'Sir' is too busy making more 
money to be bothered. It is left 
up to us to keep the household 
V mning smoothly,", she ex- 
plained. 

Garfield says that butler ad- 
ministrators are trained to give 
outstanding service. This means 
anticipating what will need to be 
done, such as preparing a guest 
room, and seeing that is done 
before they are asked to do it. 

In the case of setting up a guest 
room, there is more to be done 
than just putting fresh linens on 
the bed. The guest must be made 
comfortable. Niceties, like ex- 
pensive chocolates, mineral water 
and liquors, should be on hand. 

"IF we are seeing to a dinner 
party for 300 people and one of 
the guests says 'I'm a vegetarian' 
we aren't supposed to panic," 
Garfield explained. "A well 



prepared butler can offer the 
■guest an omelet or perhaps fish, 
which the chief can quickly 
prepare." 

While the role of the butler 
administrator has expanded from 
the days of old, Garfield says 
they are still trained to provide 
traditional services. 

Their education at Spencer's 
school included learning how to 
select fine clothing and han- 
dmade shoes as well as making 
plane and hotel reservations. 
They were also instructed on the 
proper manner in which to set up 
and stock a wine cellar. 

How does Garfield plan to use 
her skills here in Virginia Beach? 
Beach Bound 

Garfield said she is not looking 
for a long-term position until af- 
ter June of this year, when her 
husband retires from the Navy. 
Garfield hopes to remain in 
Virginia Beach. She admits they 
must ^o wherever her husband 
finds a civilian job. 

In the meantime, she would 
like to find a position with a 
business firm, working in the 
board room perhaps. Or with a 
hotel that provides private butler 
service for its top floor quests. 

"Many businessmen don't like 
to be seen in the large public 
dining rooms at hotels," Garfield 
said. "Mainly because they 
don't want their competition to 
know with whom they are 
meeting. For them, a butler to 
plan private dinners and events is 
ideal." 



Campaign 25 

The Portsmouth Times, The Chesapeake Post, The Virginia Beach Sun 

Earn as much as you want by selling subscriptions! 

Are you, your church or civic group looking for a really worthwhile fund-raising 

project? 

Do you want a quick and easy way to earn hundreds of dollars while at the same 
time helping to support YOUR city's dedicated, independently-owned community 
newspaper - the only one with all the pictures, news, features and editorials of most in- 
terest to your family andjriends? If so, Campaign 25 is the solution. 

Admit it. You care about your community, and so do we. And together we can work 
to make it an even better place in which to live and do business. That's why for every 
25 new subscriptions you or your group generates for The Portsmouth Times, The 
Chesapeake Post or The Virginia Beach Sun, we'll gladly rebate back to you $125, or 
half-off the regular $10 a year subscription rate. That's a savings of 50*7o! 

In addition, you'll enjoy the pleasure of receiving your hometown newspaper, 
loaded with all the club news, pictures and ads which mean the most to you, delivered 
through the mail to your home every week for 52 weeks. 

Why not give it a try and join the dozens of other people and groups who have 
already taken advantage of this campaign. For more details, call 547-4571 or simply 
stop into any of our newspaper offices and pick up a Campaign 25 sign-up form. 

We want to be your newspaper! 



□ Yes. Please mail me a Campaign 25 sign-up form. 
D Yes. Please call me about your Campaign 25. 




State 



Phone 



Rttmn to: Campaita M, c/o Tfc« Vli|tata fc^fc ftw, 
I3S South Rosemoni Road, Virginia Beacli, VA., 234S2 



In'a ceremony held last week, the 
Virginia Beach Fire Department 
recognized promotions and one 
retirement. '' 

Retiring after 38 years of ser- 
'vice Is Deputy Chief W. R. 
Gurley, Sr. Prior to being named 
deputy chief in 1977, Gurley 's 
positions in the Fire Department 
included firefighter, captain, 
shift captain and district chief. 
. Named to fill the deputy chief 
opening is James W, Carter, who 
was promoted from district chief. 
Carter has been with the Fire 
Department since 1970. He has 
held the position of firefighter, 
lieutenant and captain. 

Promoted to district chief is 
Iby B. George, III, who is 
moving up from battalion chief. 
George has been with the Fire 
Department since 1972, serving 
as firefighter, inspector, in- 
vestigator, supervisor and 
assistant program manager. 

Donna P. Brehm has been 
named as battalion chief, a 
promotion from her role as cap- 
tain. She is the first female bat- 
talion chief for Virginia Beach 
and for any major fire depar- 
tment nationwide. She has 
worked in the Fire Department 
since 1977. 

Thomas E. Poulin has been 



promoted to captain from in- 
structor. He joined the Virginia 
Beach Fire Department in 1980. 

Alpheus J. Chewning has been 
promoied^tQ- captain — He ~ha& 
been with the Department since 
1974. 

Also promoted to captain is 
Michael Gurley, who received his 
^o.^.^;.,'- Ko>4^^ fj-om his father. 



retiring deputy Chief W. R. 
Gurley, Sr. Michael Gurley has 
been with the Fire Department 
since 1978. > 

The promotions and^fetrrefnent 
were effective Dec. 31, with the 
exception of Gurley's, which is " 
effective Saturday, Feb. 1 and 
Chewning's, ' which is effective 
Thursday, Jan. 16. 



.WQndsJiot reappointed 



Continuitf fronTpage r 
pointed, Dave Kensil, Melvin 
Koch, Pamela Lingle, Harry B. 
Price J., Michael Savfides, A. 
James Debellis, Robert Fentress 
and A. Lynn Fisher; new David 
P. Pender. 

Building Code Appeals 
Board,— Robert L. Yoder to fill 
the unexpired term of Arnold 
Rosenberg. 

Community Services 

Board— three year terms, Joanne 
Chebetar, Nancy L. Clark, 
William O. Haltman and 
Madelyn Richardson. 

Development Authority — 
Clinton W. Shank to fill the 
unexpired term of State Delegate- 
elect Haity Perkey which ends in 
August of 1987. 

Frances Land House Board of 
Governors — three year terms. 



reappointed James M. Fletcher, 
Donald Fraser, and Janet Wer- 
ndli, and appointed Adm. Dick 
Romble. 

Southeastern Virginia Area- 
Wide Program— four years, j! 
Roy Alphin. 

Tidewater Community College 
Board— William Moosna for 
five-year term ending June 30, 
1990. 

Tidewater Stadium Authority 
—three years, Allen N. Rothen- 
berg. 

Resort Area Advisory Com- 
mission, Robert Vakos. 

Volunteer Coordinator, Mar- 
nie Morgan. 

Board of Zoning Appeals — 
five years, William B. Smith ap- 
pointed by the Circuit Court. 




SHORT NOTICE 

AUCTION 

OF RARE VALUABLE STOCK 

PERSIAN RUGS, 

And other Oriental Rugs — A complete shipment of genuine handwoven Persian and other Oriental rugs has 
been ordered for pre-Christmas sales for stores. Thesegoods did not arrive on time and those financially respon- 
sible for the unpaid shipment have instructed their U. S. agents to auction the entire collection and other valuable 
pieces in single units. 

This collection which is over 200 pieces, all sizes, in our opinion, is the finest collection in design, craftmanship, and 
colors of handmade carpets, rugs and runners we have ever seen in all our years of selling the finest quality Orien- 
tal rugs and carpets. 

Virginia Beach CONVENTION CENTER PAVILION 

1 00049th Street 
- (1-64 exit 44 East - stay on 44 East to the end) 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

SAT. JAN. 1 8 AT 2 PM. - VIEW AT I PM. 

TERMS: CASH OR CHECK 
All payments to authorized recipients are at Fidelity Union Trust Company Each rug comes with a Certificate of Authenticity and ap- 
praisal. Auctioneer LiquidatorsOryus 201 227-648'4 



SUBSCRIBE 

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Mail to: The Virginia Beach Sun, 138 South Rosemont Road, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 23452 



The 
Virginia Beach 

Sun 



486- 
3430 



■iai 



^^■■i 



■■ 



■■■■■ 



m«i 



mimrmmm 



( 



6 The VifgintarBeacli SunTlanuaryS, T986 



David Wills 
wins Harry 
Pickett Award 



David \Mills of Virginia Beach, 
has won the annual Harry Pickett 
Award as sales person of the year 
for The Hickory Printing Group, 
Inc., Hickory, N.C. 

Wills' sales were close to $2 
million. 




The criteria for this award does 
not entirely rely on sales dollars. 
. Thej3aDafitability of those dollars, 
attitude, the sales person's 
relationship with peers, with sales 
sctvice^fiople, production and 
plant workers and management 
are important. i" 

Before joining The Hickory 
^Printing - Group m Februaty, 
-=»m,~Mrr- Witts worked for his 
father, also a printer. 

"I try to treat my clients as 1 
would like to be treated myself, 
to respond to their needs," Wills 
said. "I believe in working hard, 
and I have some very good people 
working with me who have a 
similar philosophy." 




New job forecasts 47 
percent higher for '86 



David Wills (right) receiving the Harry Picket! Award as sales person of the year, The Hickory Priming 
Group, Inc., from A. R. Pendrj (left) Vice President/Sales, Commercial Division. 




A total of 19, 439 new jobs 
are expected as a result of 
manufacturing and basic non- 
manufacturing announcements 
made in 1^85. This activity in- 
cludes both announced new 
facilities and expansions of 
existing facilities known to the 
Virginia Deparmtent of 
Economic Development. 

This figure represents a 47 
percent increase over the 1984 
figure of 13,201. 

Manufacturing announce- 
ments made in the Common- 
wealth this year totaled 143 
with 8,909 expected jobs. Four 
of these announcements were 
new plants in Virginia Beach. 
These include €assco Ice & 
Cold Storage Co., Ecotac, 
GUL USA Inc. and Sorbilite. 
There were .expansions of 
existing firms in Virginia 
Beach, including Capital Foun- 
dry of Virginia, Lite Desserts, 
Inc. and Tidewater Cook, Inc. 

The no n m a n f act u ring 
segment contributed significan- 
tly to the yjrginia economy this 
year. A record 10,530 new jobs 
were reported this year as a 
result of major basic non- 
manufacturing announcements 
with investments exceeding 
$168 million. 

In 1984, 4,200 new jobs and 
$85 million in investments were 
■ anounced. 

This activity included 
operations such as wholesalers, 
distributors, corporate 
headquarters, administrative 
''offices, research and develop- 
ment, business services, and 
other industries considered 
basic employers. 

Nineteen of the 20 manufac- 
turing Standard Industrial 
Classifications reported new 
and/or expanding industry this 
year. The groupings with the 
greatest expected employment 
growth were: SIC 35 - Nonelec- 
trical machinery, 1,387; SIC 20 

- Food and kindred products, 
1 ,088; SIC 37 - Transportation 
equipment, 1,058; and SIC 36 

- Electrical and electronic 
machinery, equipment, and 
supplies, 980. 

Twentv..K€ven firms, in- 



cluding GUL USA INc, an- 
nounced plans to employ 100 or 
more people. Thirteen were new 
firms and 14 were expansions. 

Thirty-four companies an- 
nounced investments of $2 
million or more; 11 were new 
facilities and 23 were expan- 
sions of existing firms. Seven 
firms announced investments of 
$16 million or more. 

Manufacturing announ- 
cements this year represented 
over $453 million in investmen- 
ts for Virginia. Ne;v plants ac- 
counted for 57 percent of the 
total and expansions, 43 per- 
cent. 

Seven new foreign-related 
coffipanies were among the fir- 
ms announced this year. 
Among them is GUL USA Inc., 
a subsidiary of GUL Wetsuits 
of Cornwall England. 

In addition to the manufac- 
turing announcements 
discussed so far, Virginia ex- 
perienced , CiQnsideral)Ie nonr: 
manufacturing activity in 1985. 
Virginia'will be the location of a 
new $25 million long distance 
telecommunications network 
for SouthernTel of Virginia. 

Virginia also is the location 
of the new state-of-the-art Soft- 
ware Productivity Consortium 
(SPC) that will create 175-200 
jobs. Nonmanufacturing ac- 
tivity this year represented ap- 
proximately 10,530 jobs and 
over $168 million in investmen- 
ts. 



This report is compiled from 
inforamtion received from 
various State agencies, in- 
cluding the Department of 
Economic Development, public 
utilities, railroads, and private 
development groups. All in- 
formation is obtained on a 
voluntary basis and no claim is 
made that the lists are com- 
plete. This report is based on 
an/iouncements of planned 
manufacturing and non- 
manufacturmg capital expen- 
ditures; however, in some in- 
stances at the time of 
publication, some of these in- 
dwHrie(i>nm be in operation. 



MaryBedar^^ (,.y .noij«;jik,.,,> 



Barbara Bell 



Carol Maxwell 



Ann Laskin 



TPI appoints director and unit coordinators 



Mary A. Bedard, R.N., M.S. 
has been appointed as the Direc- 
tor of Nursing for the Tidewater 
Psychiatric Institution in Virginia 
Beach. 

As Director of ; Nursing, 
Bedard will be respcg^ible for the 
development and implementation 
of all nursing services as well as 



administrative supervision of the 
nursing staff. 

Bedard received her Bachelor 
of Science Degree in Nursing 
from the College of Sant Teresa 
in Minnesota and her Master of 
Science Degree in Psychiatric 
Nursing from Boston College 



School of Arts & Science. 

Three nurses have been ap- 
pointed to unit coordinator 
positions at Tidewater 
Psychiatric Institute: 

Barbara Bell, R. N.C. has been 
appointed as the Unit Coor- 
dinator of the secured 
Adoleslcent Unit. 



Carol Maxwell, R.N., B.S.N.. 
has been appointed as the Unit 
Coordinator of the open 
Adolescent Unit. 

Ann Laskin, R.N.C., has been 
appointed as the Unit "Coor- 
dinator of the residential Treat- 
ment Unit. 



MPA program to aid insurance buyers 



James M. Thomson, Com- 
missioner of Insurance, has an- 
nounced the implementation of 
the Virginia Market Assistance 
Plan. The MPA program is a 
voluntary arrangement created 
to respond to a preceived need 
to assist commercial insurance 
buyers in Virginia Beach and 
elsewhere in obtaining difficult 
to place commercial lines 
liabihty insurance. 

The Plan will help in the 
placement of municipal liability 
insurance (excluding pollution 
coverages), insurance for day 
care providers, liquor liability 
insurance, and products 



liability for businesses with an- 
nual sales of three million 
dollars or less. 

The Plan will not apply to 
areas where an assigned risk 
plan or other residual 
mechanism already exists, such 
as * property insurance, 
automobile insurance and 
workers compensation. 

Virginia Beach firms seeking 
coverage in the designated 
areas, should, through their 
agent, contact the Virginia 
Market Assistance Plan, c/o 
The Independent Insurance 
Agents of Virginia, 8600 



Mayland Drive, Richmond, 
Virginia 23229, 747-9300. 

Each application to the Plan 
must be executed by a licensed 
Virginia agent and be accom- 
panied by a non-refundable ap- 
plication fee of $100. 

A Producer's Committee will 
try to place the risk in question. 
If unable to secure coverage, 
they will fqrward the ap- 
plication to the Underwriting 
Committee for consideration. 

The Underwriting Committee 
is comprised of insurance com- 
panies who have agreed to par- 
ticipate in this Plan, and who 
will try to find a way to write 




Divaris Rc«l Estate is leasiiit agent fnr The Atrium and college Park Square III office buildings in Virginia 
Beach near the Chesapeake border. 



risks presented to the Plan. 

Commissioner Thomson em- 
phasized that this Plan is 
designed to help those who have 
been unable to find coverage 
and is not designed to help 
someone who already has 
coverage to find a lower 
premium. 

One of the Plan requirements 
is that a risk seeking coverage 
must have been declined by 
three insurance companies prior 
to submission to the Plan. 

The Plan will operate as long 
as its services are deemed 
necessary by the Bureau of In- 
surance. 



Davaris to 
handle office 
park leasing 

Davaris Real Estate of Virginia 
Beach has been named exclusive 
leasing agent for office space in 
the Atrium and College Park 
Square III. The two office 
buildings are located at the 
College Park Square Center iji 
Virginia Beach near the 
Chesapeake border. 

The Atrium, at-^77 GoHege^ 
Park Square, is a ncv^ty construc- 
ted building with a three-stroy 
sun-lit atrium. The building of- 
fers 1,00) - to 6,000-square-foot 
office suites that face the 
solarium. 

The building, constructed by 
Larrymore Corporation of 
Virginia Beach, features both of- 
fice and retail spaa. 

The College Park Square 111 
office building is located at 6465 
College Park Square near major 
thoroughfares. 




Hino Diesel Truck, North America, President Toshiki Amano, (left) 
awards Virginia's first Hino Truck franchise to Edward B. Snyder of 
Checkered Flag. The Hino trucks, ranked number two in worldwide 
commercial diesel vehicle sales, will be sold at Checkered Flag at 5636 
East Virginia Beach Boulevard. 

Checkered Flag first 
with Hino trucks 



Hmo Motors, Ltd., the world's 
second largest medium and heavy 
diesel truck manufacturer, has 
named Checkered Flag Motor 
Car Company its first frahchise 
in Virginia. 

The franchise was officially 
awarded in December during 
cereitionies at Checkered Flag's 
Toyota dealership in Virginia 
Beach by Toshiki Amano, 
president of Hino Diesel Truck, 
North America. Edward B. 
Snyder, Checkered Flag 
president, was on hand to sign 
the franchise agreement . 

Checkered Flag is the 56th 
dealership to be named to the 
Hino Diesel Truck USA network, 
which is projected to total 165 
dealers nationwide by 1987. 

Hino will eventually name two 
other Virginia franchises, one in 
Richmond and the other in Nor- 
thern Virginia. 

The Hino line will be sold and 
serviced at Checkered Flag's 
Norfolk location at 5636 E. 
Virginia Beach Blvd. According 
to Stephen M. Snyder, a vice 
president with Checkered Flag, 
the firm's service technicians 



have been specially trained by 
Hino master technicians to 
provide topsjuality. maintenance 
for both individual and fieet 
Hino truck owners, i 

The Checkered Flig Hino store 
carries the full line of Hino's 
medium and heavy duty trucks, 
priced from $20,000 to $34,000. 

"These are outstanding multi- 
purpose trucks. The Japanese call 
them reliable workhorse 
machines of the road, and it's a 
fitting description," said Edward 
B. Snyder. "These trucks have C 
been very well received in this 
country and we expect sales in 
Hampton Roads to be as brisk as 
they've been elsewhere in the U. 
S." 

Hino introduced its line of 
medium-duty commercial trucks 
to the U. S. market il 1984. The 
Japanese manufacturer ranks 
second to Mercedes .^eenz as a 
world-wide producer of commer- 
cial diesel vehicles. Sales for 1985 
are projected at $25 million, with 
a 40 percent increase per year in 
the next five years expected for 
the U. S, market. 



the Virginia Beach Sun, January 8, 1986 "7 



New battalion cjiief Donna Brehm has earned her rank 



By Beatrice Kitchen 

Standing a full 5'5" at a 
compact 114 pounds, Donna 
Pratt Brehm may not seem at 
first glance like a typical fire- 
fighter, let alone a battalion 
chief. 

But once she starts talking 
aoout her profession, rest 
assured, she has earned the 
position step by step, 

A lady who obviously knows 
what she's talking about, she is 
the country's first female bat- 
talion chief in a major fire 
fighting operation. 



'We know of one other 
woman in this position," she is 
quick to point out, "in a small 
town in Indiana." 

A m* |,r,r.r,r*ifr,ftrimf» with thc 

attention this promotion has 
brought, Brehm nevertheless 
feels that the interest created by 
this "first" in Virginia Beach is 
an "important step to making 
women aware that this is an 
open career field." 

"Years ago, we just weren't 
brought up to consider the 
possibility of firefighting as a 



Arms control measures 



Continued from page 2 

cruise-missiles, submarine-4aun-' 
ched weapons, and clandestine 
devices. 

At best, this program might 
protect a few missile silos. At 
worst, it will provoke the Soviets 
into a massive escalation of 
nuclear arms designed to over- 
wheliit or outflank American 
"(KfcftsesV The arms race will be 
beyond control. 



As a result, UCS has initiated a 
powerful and infiuential program 
to make sure that the science fic- 
tion fantasy of space weapons 
never becomes a terrifying 
reality. We have mobilized scien- 
tists and citizen activists in an ef- 
fort that combines public 
education with effective lob- 
bying. 

A majority of the members of 
the National Academy of Scien- 
ces-our nation's most prestigious 
scientific body—have joined 
UCS. They stated their op- 
position to the development, 
testing; and deployment of anti- 
satellite weapons and ballistic 
missile defense systems in space, 
such as the Star Wars scheme. 

The appeal was sent to both 
President Reagan and Premier 
Gorbachev. Among those sup- 
porting the effort were 57 Nobel 
Laureates, more than half of the 
living American recipients of this 
prize in the sciences. 

Six thousand members of the 
scientific community are par- 
ticipating in our Scientist Action 
Network, sharing their 

technological expertise with the 
public in national as well as local 
forums. 

Eminent scientists are 
testifying under UCS sponsorship 
before Congressional commit- 
tees, while others are helping to 
educate citizens on the threat of 
nuclear war and alternatives to 
the arms race. 

These efforts by the scientific 
community are aided by letters 
and phone calls to members of 
Congress from thousands of UCS 
sponsors who have joined our 
Legislative Alert Network. 

Such lobbying activity has 
helped to cut one billion dollars 
from the budget for development 
of space weapons, but Presiden- 
tial arm-twisting has nevertheless 
resulted in far too large an ex- 
penditure for these programs. 

Last July, as part of the UCS 
education effort, many of the 
leading members of the original 
Manhattan Project team met in 
Washington to mark the 40th an- 
niversary of the detonation of the 
first atomic bomb at Trinity site 
in Alamogordo, New Mexico. 
They came together in hopes of 
finding new ways to achieve 
peace-rather than searching for 
new w«ipons of war. 

The activities of these 
prominent scientists highlighted 
the risks associasted with the 
ceaseless search for a 
technological solution to the 
nuclear arms race and demon- 
strated that arms control 
negotiations are a feasible and 
secure alternative. 

Framework for Mcurity 
Finally, rather than simply op- 
posing new weapons programs, 
UCS advocates a set a policies 
which we believe can achieve true 
national security, not the false 
security of Star Wars and a 
nuclear buildup. 
This framework includes: 
•Negotiations to ban all 
weapons from space. 

•Negotiation of deep and 
meaningful cuts in superpower 
nuclear forces. 

•Adopti<m of 4 |»licy of "No 
First Use" and withdrawal of 
nuclear weapons from front-line 
positions. 

•Achieving a treaty to ban all 
nuclear weapons tests. 

•Development of a global 
program for curtailing the spread 
of nuclear weapons to Miditional 
countries. 

To achieve ih^e gc^s wih 
require an effective, long-term 
campagin combining the best ef- 
forts of the scientific community 
with participation by a broad 



gp e ct r u m-of-Ameiican citizens. 

The Union of Concerned 
Scientists is working hard to 
bring to bear ou special resour- 
ces-our knowledge of the science 
of weapons technology, our 
awareness of the devastating effec- 
ts of nuclear war, and our 
reputation of_ responsibility 
among " national leaders and 
members of the meida~to help 
change the perilous course of our 
nation and our world. 

The policies we advocate Have 
been endorsed by many leading 
scientists and military experts, 
individuals who do not often take 
public stands but who share our 
views on the issues and believe 
them to have a special importan- 
ce. 

We also need your help if our 
efforts are to succeed. You can 
talk to your relatives, your frien- 
ds, and members of your com- 
munity, helping to make them 
aware of the nuclear threat and 
of the fact that workable, non- 
military solutions are available. 
Howard Ris 
UCS Executive Director 




Virginia Beach Fire Department Battalion Chief Skip Brehm helps his 
wife, newly promoted Battalion Chief Fonna Brehm, pin on her new 
shield. 



career," Brehm said. "It's still 
a novelty. I figure in the next 
ten years we'll see a change in 
that direction." 

Her story is unique in 
another aspect. Her husband 
Skip is also a firefighter for the 
city, having earned his title as 
battalion chief a little over a 
year ago. 

"We don't work together," 
Brehm stated. "We think it's 
important to keep our identities 
separate. During the past two 



years, for instance, we haven't 
run into each other on the job 
at all. And we don't expect 
things to change. Our shifts and 
locations will still be different." 

She will be stationed at the 
Training Center on Birdneck 
Road and has mixed feelings 
about leaving her "buddies" at 
Company 2. 

"I'll miss 'em," she said a lit- 
tle wistfully. "This was my 
proving ground. I'll miss the 
comraderie." 



She glances through the glass 
window at her colleagues, fellow 
firefighters all, then the quick 
smile returns, "but I'm really 
looking forwardt, to the 
challenge of the administrative 
side, even though it means 
leaving field work." 

Brehm's interest in 
firefighting b^an 10 years ago 
when, as a newlywed, she sim- 
ply wanted to spend more time 
with her husband. 

Skip was in the Navy and 
volunteered as a firefighter for 
the city when he was off duty. 
She soon volunteered and , 
found out she liked the 
challenge, both mentally and 
physically. A couple years later 
found tRerii l)oth wdrlclng for 
the city as firefighters. 

Educational and professional 
advancement followed for both 
as degrees were earnea and 
promotions received. 

She now holds a master's in 
public administration, earned 
with support from the city's, 
employee tuition reimbur- 
sement program. Her company 
loyalty extends far beyond 
Company 2. 

"The city has been good to 
me," she explained. "When 
Skip and I were first married, I 
worked in a bank at a very low 
salary. When I joined the fire 
department, my salary neariy 
doubled, plus the city helped 
me with my last year of under- 
graduate school, then reimbur- 
sed my master's. I've been able 
to take advantage of a lot of 
personal development oppor- 
tunities that are offered and feel 
truly fortunate to be working 
here." 

Of her role as part of a fire- 
fighting couple, Brehm said, 
"The biggest problem is that we 



never have a whole day off 
together without someone 
having to go on duty. But on 
the other hand, we're always in- 
terested in each other's days. 
And we tend to motivate each 
other a lot." 

She was asked if there was 
any problem having the men * 
respond to her as an equal when 
she first came aboard . 

"I was lucky because 1 had 
been a volunteer for two years 
prior to joining the city." she 
said. "Like any new person, it 
took time to join in with a new 
group. But 1 really can't say 
there was any difficulty because 
I was a woman." 

And as far as the headaches 
with her new position? ~^' ^ 

"The biggest change will be 
the change of pace," Brehm 
noted, "I'll be going off shfft 
work into a work week with 
normal daytime hours. And 
because of the position 
available and promotions and. 
retirement! up the line, 1^11. be... 
filling an administrative slot at,, 
the training center and that 
means I'll be leaving 
firefighting. I'll miss it, the sen- 
se of belonging to a group. I'll 
be working instead with 
training, equipment, physical 
fitness and safety issues, kind 
of a hodgepodge." 

Asked about future goals, 
Brehm responded, "The next 
step logistically would be to 
district chief, but it'll be two 
years at least, before 1 would 
even be eligible to test for 
that." 

Kitchen is a communication 
specialist with the City of 
Virginia Beach Public Infor- 
mation office. She is the new 
editor of "Beam", the city's 
newsletter. 




nmn 




^©ki 




LKAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOnCK 



c 



LEGAL NOTICES 



NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City 
Council of Virginia Beach will be 
heard in the Council Chambers 
of the City Hall Building, 
Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, January 27, 1986, at 
7:00 p.m. at which time the 
following application will be 
heard: 

AMENDMENT: 
1. Motion of the Planning Com- 
mission of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, to amend the 
Master Street and Highway Plan 
to include a 250-foot, six-lane 
limited access expressway from 
the Laskin Road interchange with 
the Virginia Beach-Norfolk Ex- 
pressway (44) to the Chesapeake 
City line at the Virginia Power 
Easement south of Elbow Road. 
More detailed information is 
available in the Department of 
Planning. 

Plats with more detailed inftwm- 
tion are available in the Depar- 
tment of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 
Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC 

City Clerk 

225-18 2t 1-15 VB 

VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the Cily 
of Virginia Beach on the 13th day 
of December, 1985 
Elizabeth Ann LeFevre, Com- 
plainant 
v, 

Frederick W. Chapin 
a non-resident 

Serve: Secretary of the Com- 
monwealth 

Marj D. Chapin 
5657 Dodington Court 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23455 

Anna L. Karp 

304 West over Avenue 

Norfolk, Virginia 23517 

Linda Yaw 

985 Sunnyside Drive 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23464 

Kay H. Finkelstein ' 

Serve: Robert H, Bennett, Attor 

ncy 

2697 International Parkway 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 

Ernest A. Natividad 
4405 Articles Lane 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Sovran Bank. NA 
Scr\c;ClilTA.Cutchiiism. 
Registered Aceiif 



One Commercial Place 
Norfolk, Virginia 23501 

The Chesapeake and Potomac 
Telephone Company 
Serve: Huburi R. Stallard 
703 East Grace Street 
Richmond, Virginia 23219 

Bank of Virginia 

Serve: Sarah R. Myers. 

Registered Agent 

7 North Eighth Street 

Richmond, Virginia 23219 

United States of America 
Serve: U.S. Attorney 
Eastern District of Virginia 
U.S. Federal Court House 
Granby Street 
Norfolk, Virginia 

Department of the Treasury 
Serve: U.S. Attorney 
Eastern District of Virginia 
U.S. Federal Court House 
Granby Street 
Norfolk, Virginia 

Kearney Floyd, Trustee 
716 Pennsylvania Avenue 
Norfolk, Virginia, Defendants 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of the above styled 
suit is to partition certain proper- 
ty owned in fee simple by the 
complainant Elizabeth Ann 
LeFevre and the defendants 
Frederick W. Chapin and Mary 
D. Chapin located in Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. And an affidavit 
having been filed that diligence 
has been used, without effect to 
ascertain the location of Mary D. 
Chapin, whose last known ad- 
dre*is is 5657 Dodington Court, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23455. 

The property which is the sub- 
ject of this suit is ^escribed as 
follows: 

ALL that certain lot, piece or 
parcel of land with the buildings 
and improvements thereon, 
situate in the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, and known, 
numbered and designated as Lots 
I and 2 as shown on that certain 
plat entitled: "Survey of Block 
Six of Oceana Gardens", which 
plat is duly recorded in the 
Clerk's Office of the Circuit 
Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, in Map Book 21 
at page 3. 

It Is therefore ORDERED that 
the said Mary D. Chapin do ap- 
pear on or before February 3. 
1986. in the Clerk's Office of this 
Court and do what is necessary to 
protect her interest. 

And it is further ORDERED 
that this order be published once 
a week for four successive weeks 
in the Virginia Beach Sun, a 



newspaper having getteTal cir- 
culation in the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. 
J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By i'hyllisN. Styron 
Deputy Clerk 
223-2 4T 1-22 VB ._ 

VIRGINIA: 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA 
BEACH ON THE 19th DAY OF 
DECEMBER,J?85 
IN THE MATTER OF 
THE ESTATE OF MARJORIE 
R. CASON, DECEASED 
CHANCERY NO. C.P. 6125 
SHOW CAUSE ORDER 

It appearing that a report of 
the accounts of United Virginia 
Bank, Executor of the Estate of 
Marjorie R. Cason, deceased, 
and of the debts and demands 
against said estate have been filed 
in the Clerk's Office of this Court 
and that more than six months 
have elapsed since the 
qualification, of said personal 
representative, on motion of said 
personal representataive, it is 
ORDERED that the creditors of, 
and all others interested in, the 
estate do show cause, if any they 
can, at 9:00 a.m. on the 13th day 
of January, 1986, before this 
Court at its courtroom against 
the payment and delivery of the 
Estate of Marjorie R, Cason, 
deceased, to the legatees named 
in the will, without requiring 
refunding bonds. 

It is further ORDERED that 
this Order be Published once a 
week for two successive weeks in 
The Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper published and having 
general circulation in the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 

ENTER THIS ORDER: 
A Copy Teste: J. CurtisVruit, 
Clerk 

By Jeanette I. Jones D.C. 
Norvell O. Scott III 
Counsel for United Virginia 
Bank 

WILLIAMS, WORRELL. 
KELLY & GREER, PC. 
600 United Virginia Bank 
Building 
P.O. Box 3416 
Norfolk, Virginia, 23514 

22.V112T1-S-W 

NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

The Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission will hold a Public 
Hearing on Tuesday, January 14, 
1986 at 12:00 noon in the Council 
Chambers of the City Hall 
Building, Princess Anne Cour- 
thouse, Virginia Beach, Virginia. 
A briefing session will be held at 
9:00 a.m. in the Planning Depar- 



tment Conference Room, 
Operations Building. Planning 
Commission action is not a final 
determination of the application, 
but only a recommendation to 
the City Council as the viewpoint 
of the Planning Commission. 
Final determination of the ap- 
plication is to be made by City 
Council at a later date, after 
public notice in a newspaper 
having general circulation within 
the city. 

Those members of the public in- 
teres||d in attending the public 
hearing should be advised that, 
for reasons the Planning com- 
mission deems appropriate, cer- 
tain items on the agenda may be 
heard out of order and that it 
should not be assumed that the 
order listed below will be exactly 
followed during the public 
hearing. 

The staff reviews of some or all 
of the items on this agenda 
suggest that certain conditions be 
attached to approval by City 
Council. However, it should not 
be assumed that those conditions 
constitute all the conditions that 
will ultimately be attached to the 
project. Staff agencies may im- 
pose further conditions and 
requirements during ad- 
ministration of applicable city 
ordinances. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION: 

1. An ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Virginia Beach 
General Hospital for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-4 
Residential District to 0,1 Office 
District on certain property 
located on the North side of Old 
Donation Parkway Extended 
beginning at a point 625.48 feet 
East of First Colonial Road. Said 
parcel contains 2.075 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. ^ 

2. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of W. T. Brown & 
Associates for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from A-1 

"^ Apartment District to A-2 Apar- 
tment District on the North side 
of Oconee Avenue. W) feet West 
of Hutton road. Said i»rc«l is 
located at 2548 Oconee Aveiue 
and contains 3.45 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

3. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of WAI, a Virginia 
Limited Partnership, for a 



CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-5 Residential Di'sfriS to 
B-4 Resort-Commercial District 
on certain property located on 
the North side of Owl's Creek 
Lane, 800 feet more or less East 
of Gregory's Larje, Said parcel 
contains 2.68 aci'es. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

4. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Giant Square Shop- 
ping Center Company for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
FROM B-1 Business-Residential 
District to B-2 Community- 
Business District on the East side 
of S. Lynnhaven Road, 530 feet 
more or less South of Silina 
Drive. Said parcel is located at 
444 South Lynnhaven Road and 
contains 3.5 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Runnymede Cor- 
poration for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION from B-2 
Community-Business District to 
1-2 Heavy Industrial District on 
the West side of Butternut Lane, 
523.42 feet South of Bonney 
Road on Lot 21-A and Lots 22- 
28, Block C, Rosemont Cor- 
potation. Said parcels contain 
31,363 square feet. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH . 
A. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Masciola and Com- 
pany for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION from R-7 
Residential District to A-3 Apar- 
tment District on the South side 
of Norfolk Avenue, 211.56 feet 
West of Indian Avenue. Said 
parcel is located at 1012 Norfolk 
Avenue and contains 28,314 
square feet. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

7. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Masciola and Com- 
pany for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION from A-1 
Apartment District to A-3 Apar- 
tment District beginning at a 
point 90 feet more or less South 
of Norfolk Avenue, 400 feet 
more or less West of Indian 
Avenue. Said parcel is located at 
1012 Norfolk Avenue and con- 
t^a 2178 square fert. Plau with 

ContiMMd on pate I 



^glg^mmmmmmmmmmm 






vp 



8 The VtTginia Beach Sun, January 8, 1986 



¥0 _y;3 O O 



LiCALNOTICB 




LKALNOnCiS 



LKALNOTICeS 



UCAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



Continued from page 7 

more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

8. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of G. Geoffrey & Linda 
J. Brockelbank for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-6 
Residential District to O-l Office 
District at the Southeast corner 
of Bonney Road and South Fir 
Avenue, Said parcel is located at 
4313 Bonney Road and contains 
9491.7 square feet. Plats with 
more detailed Information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

9. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Bruce B. Mills for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 

1 J-QmJblApartmeM J3^tnc^ . 
B-2 Community-Business District 
on the West side of Happy Street, 
231.31 feet South of Bonney 
Road on Lots 10-15, Block 11, 
East Norfolk. Said parcel con- 
tains 15,000 square feet. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 
IJL An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of George and Willie 
Held for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION from R-6 
Residential District to B-2 Com- 
munity-Business District at the 
Northeast corner of Witchduck 
Road and Ruritan Court. Said 
parcel is located at 400 and 404 
South Witchduck Road and con- 
tains 1.4 acres more or less. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available tin the Department 
of Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

11. An 'Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of C. L. and O.V. 
White, a General Partnership, 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from 0-1 Office District to 1-1 
Light Industrial District on cer- 
tain property located on the West 
side of Chimney Hill Parkway 
beginning at a point 1 16 feet Nor- 
th of Smokey Chamber Drive. 
Said parcel contains 3.37 acres. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

12. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dimensions, Inc. for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-1 Residential District to 
0-1 Office District on the East 
side of Diamond Springs Road, 
500 feet more or less South of 
Lawson Hall Key on Lots 1-12 
and part of Lot 13, Section 6, 
Wesleyan Pines. Said parcel con- 
tains 12.84 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

13. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dimensions, Inc., for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-5 Residential District to 
0-1 Office District on the East 
side of Diamond Springs Road, 
1360 feet more or less South of 
Lawson Hall Key on Part of Lot 
13 and Lot 14, Section 4, 
Wesleyan Pines. Said parcel con- 
tains 1.16 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

14. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Mildred Lucille Reid 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from AG-2 Agricultural District 
to 1-1 Light Industrial District on 
certain property located on the 
South side of London Bridge 
Road beginning at a point 300 
feet more or less East of Shipps 
Corner Road. Said parcel is 
located at 1417 London Bridge 
Road and contains 2.524 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

15. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Mildred Lucille Reid 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from AG-1 Agricultural District 
to 1-1 Light Industrial District on 
property located 600 feet South 
of London Bridge Road begin- 
ning at a poing 300 feet more or 
less East of Shipps Corner Road. 
Said parcel is located at 1417 
London Bridge Road and con- 
tains 1.214 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

16. An Ordinance nporr Ap- 
plication of Amos J. Ward etals 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from AG-2 Agricultural District 
to B-2 Community-Business 
District on the West side of 
General Booth Boulevard, 420 
feel more or less North ut Dam 
Neck Road. Said parcel is located 
at 1544 Oceana Uoulcvi d and 
contains 7.1 acres. Plats with 
moa- tietdilcu information arc 



available in the Department of 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

17. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Amos J. Ward etals 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
frojm AG-1 Agricultural District 
to B-2 Community-Business 
District 600 feet west of General 
Booth Boulevard, 420 feet North 
of Dam Neck Road. Said parcel 
is located at 1544 Oceana 
Boulevard and contains 4.9 acres. 
Plats with more detrailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. PRIN- 
CESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

18. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dominion Resour- 
ces, Inc., for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-3 
Residentiai'District to 0-1 Office 
Distfict on certain property 
located tit the- Sotrthwest comer • 
of London Bridge Road and 
General Booth Boulevard. Said 
parcel contains 5.69 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

19. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dominion Resour- 
ces, Inc., for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-3 
Residential District tol-l Light 
Industrial District on certain 
property located on the South 
side of London Bridge Road 
beginning at a point 650 feet 
more or less W^st of General 
Booth Boulevard. Said parcel 
contains 8.92 acres. Plats with 
more detailed , information are 
available in the Departmernt of 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAI I JSE PERMIT: 

20. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dominion Resour- 
ces. Inc., for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for a storage yard 
for Virginia Power Company on 
certain property located on the 
South side of London Bridge 
Road beginning at a point 650 
feet more or less West of General 
Booth Boulevard. Said parcel 
contains 8.92 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

21. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Auto Care Centers of 
America for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for an automobile 
service center at the Northwest 
corner of Holland Road and 
Grant Avenue on Lots 1-20, 
Block 4, Pecan Gardens. Said 
parcel contains 51,000 square 
feet. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

22. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Kramer Tire Com- 
pany, Incorporated for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
automobile repair and sale, in- 
stallation and service of tires on 
certain property located at the 
northern quadrant of the inter- 
section of Hollaiid Road and 

. Lynnhaven Parkway .Sf^id parcel 
contains 37,000 square feet. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

23. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Hester C. Brinster 
for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for a home occupation 
(babysitting) at the Northwest 
corner of Cavalier Drive and 
Holly Road. Said parcel is 
located at 4300 Holly Road and 
contain^ 31,319.6 square feet. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

24. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication ol PCK Corporation 
for a CONDITIONAL USF. 
PERMIT for a single family 
home in the AG-1 Agricultural 
District on certain properly 
located 600 feet North of Indian, 
River Road beginning at a point 
2400 feet West of Princess Anne 
Road. Said parcel is located at 
2997 Seaboard Road and con- 
tains 60 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information arc 
available in the Depart mcni of 
Planning. PUNGO BOROUGH. 

25. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Giant Square Shop- 
ping Center Company for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a tire, battery and accessory 
store on the West side of In- 
dcpcndciuc BoultHarU, 151.75 
feel South of S. Wiichduck 
Rnucl. Saul parcel i*- Incniccl at 
741 Independence Boule%ard and 
contains 12.32 acres. Plats with 



more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. BAYSIDE 

BOROUGH. 

26. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Morning Star Baptist 
Church for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for a church and 
related facilities at the Southeast 
intersection of Northampton 
Boulevard and Pleasure House 
Road. Said parcel contains 1.336 
acres. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in the 
Department -of Planning. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
J7. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Bow Creek Home 
For The Elderly for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 
home for the aged at the North- 
east corner of Club House Road 
and Duplin Street on Lot 16, 
Block 48, Princess Anne Plaza. 
Said parcel is located at 3420* 
Club -House Road and contains 
13,000 square feet. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 

28. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Peggy Davis for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a day care center on the tast 
side of Centerville Turnpike, 295 
feet North of Livingston Oak 
Drive. Said parcel is located at 
2100 Centerville Turnpike and 
contains 1.13 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

29. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Mary Susanne 
Knisely for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for a pre-school at 
the Northeast corner of Kem- 
psville Road and Alton Road. 
Said parcel is located at 1072 Old 
Kempsville Road and contains 
2.5 jacres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

30. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Stc4^^1ing W. and 
Bonnie T. Thacker for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 
commercial kennel on the Ndrth 
side of Indian River Road, 1000 
feet West pf-the North Landing 
River Bridge. Said parcel is 
located at 3756 Indian River 
Road and contains 21.33 acres. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 
REFERRED BACK TO PLAN- 
NING COMMISSION BY CITY 
COUNCIL ON SEPTEMBER 
30, 1985 

31. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article 2, 
Section 221(E), of the Com- 
prehensive Zoning Ordinance 
pertaining to procedural 
requirements and general stan- 
dards of conditional use&i More 
detailed information is available 
in the Department of Planmng. 

32. Motion of the Banning 
Commission of theCCit^^of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to" 
amend and reordajn.. Artjcl£ 1, 
Section 107(0 of the ComprelicF- 
sive Zoning Ordinance pertaining 
to amendments. More detailed 
information is available in the 
Department of Planning. 
DEFERRED BACK TO PLAN- 
NING COMMISSION BY CITY 
COUNCIL ON NOVEMBER 4, 
1985 

33. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Ronald L. and Holly 
Hall, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-3 
Residential District to 0-1 Office 
District on certain properly 
located at the Southeast corner of 
General Booth Boulevard and 
Princess Anne Road and shown 
as "Residue Acreage" on that 
certain plai recorded in Map 
Book 168. Page 51, in the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court. Said 
parcel contains 3.25 acres. Plats 
Willi more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

DEFERRED FOR 60 DAYS BY 
PLANNING COMMISSION 
ON NOVEMBER 12, 1985 

34. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of E & R Enterprises for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-S Residential Disirici to 
A- 1 Aparimeiil Disirici on cer- 
tain properly located at the Nor- 
thwest corner of 26th Street and 
Holly Road. Said parcel contains 
25,265 s(|ii,ire feet. Plais with 
more cleiailcd infornialion arc 
available in the Depart nieni of 
Planning. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH 



35. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Crystal Point 
Associates for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-1 
Residential District to R-8 
Residential District on certain 
property located on the South 
side of Northampton Boulevard 
at the intersection with Shell 
Road. Said parcel contains 7.5 
acres. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

36. An Ordinance upon , Ap- 
plicatjpri of Crystal Point 
Associates for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-8 
Residential District to PD-H2 
Planned Unit Development 
District on certain property 
located on the South side of Nor- 
thampton Boulevard at the inter- 

- scctitJTp-with- Shell Road , Said 
parcel contains 7.5 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

37. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article II, 
Part C of the Comprehensive 
Zoning Ordinance pertaining to 
the PD-H2 Planned Unit 
Development District. More 
detailed information is available 
in the Department of Planning. 

DEFERRED FOR 30 DAYS BY 
PLANNING COMMISSION 
ON DECEMBER 10, 1985. 

38. Appeal from Decisions ol 
Administrative Officers in regard 
to certain elements of the Sub- 
division Ordinance, Subdivision 
for Martha Smith. Property is 
located on the North side of 
Crystal Lake Circle, 170 feet 
more or less North of Bay Colony 
Drive. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in the 
Department of Planning. LYNN- 
HaVEN BOROUGH. 

39. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Great Neck Village 
Associates, a General Partner- 
ship, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 
Community-Business District to 

^-2 Apartment District on cer- 
tain property located 710 feet 
East of North Great Neck Road 
beginning at a point 600 feet 
South of Mill Dam Road as 
shown on the plat entitled "Sub- 
division of Property for Great 
Neck Village Shopping Center" 
on file in the Department of 
Planning. Said parcel contains 
5.097 acres. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

40. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of rfenry Kuwabara, 
Joan Mallen and Riroert 
Steinhilber for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from 0-1 
Office District to B-3 Central- 
Business District on the North 
side of Bonney Road, 1000 feet 
more or less West of Bendix 
Roa9. Said parcel is located at 
4456 Bonney Road and contains 
2.47 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation arc available in the 
Depariment of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 
Robert J.Scott 
Director of Planning 
223-4 2t 1-8 VB 

NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 
The Board of Zoning Appeals 
will conduct a Public Hearing on 
Wednesday, January 15, 1986 at 
2:00 p.m., in the Council Cham- 
bers of the City Hall Building, 
Municipal Center, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. The staff 
briefing will be held at 1:30 p.m., 
in the City Manager's Conference 
Room. The following ap- 
plications will appear on the 
agenda. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 
Case 1. Fred J. Blum requests a 
variance to allow parking of 
major recreataional equipment in 
front of a buildipg instead of 
behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public 
f street on Lot 8, Block 6, Section 
10, Princess Anne Plaza, 3017 
Gentry Road. Princess Anne 
Borough. 

Case 2. Ronald J. Mickiewicz 
requests a variance to allow 
parking of major rrcreational 
equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest por- 
tion of a building adjacent to a 



public street on Lot 16, Block A, 
Courthouse Forest, 2344 Cou-t 
Circle. Princess Anne Borough. 
Case^. Larry L. Wagner requests 
a variance to allow parking of 
major recreational equipment in 
front of a building instead of 
behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public 
street on Lot 11, Block C, Am- 
berly Forest, 3901 Meroe Court. 
Kempsville Borough . 

Case 4. James P. Setliff requests 
a variance to allow parking of 
major recreational equipment in 
front of a building instead of 
behind the nearest portion of a 
building adjacent to a public 
street on Lot 2, Block AA, Sec- 
tion 1. Thalia, 238 2 Thalia Trace 
Drive. Kempsville Borough. 
Case 5. William. L. Hiltibran 
requests a variance to allow 
parking of major recreational 
equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest por- 
tion Of a building adjacent to-a 
public street on Lots 26 and 28, 
Block 61, Shadowlawn Heights, 
826 Virginia Avenue. Virginia 
Beach Borough. 

Case 6. Michial and Virginia 
Holeman request a variance to 
allow parking of major 
recreational equipment in front 
of a building instead of behind 
the nearest portion of a building 
adjacent to a public street on Lot 
56, Section H-4, Part 3, Green 
Run, 4201 Lindberg Place. Kem- 
psvUle Borough. 

Case 7. Bon-Dence Associates 
requests a variance of 32 feet to a 
3 foot setback from Route 44 in- 
stead of 35 feet as required 
(proposed office building) on a 
Parcel, Kempsville Area, 4575 
Bonney Road. Kempsville 
Borough. 

Case 8. Anthony Beninato 
requests a variance to allow 
tenants to advertise on a center 
identification sign where 
prohibited (6 tenants) on a Par- 
cel, Princess Anne Plaza, 3623 
Virginia Beach Boulevard. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 
Case 9. 24th Street Associates 
requests a variance of 5 feet in 
building height to 40 feet in 
height instead of 35 feet in 
building height as allowed (54" 
unit apartment development) on 
a Parcel, Birdneck Area, Barber- 
ton Drive. Lynnhaven Borough. 
Case 10. E. O. Pavey, Jr. 
requests a variance of 7 feet to a 3 
foot rear yard setback instead of 
4D feet as. required and of 5 feet 
to a 3 foot side yard setback (east 
side) instead of 8 feet as required 
(accessory building - detached 
garage ) on Lot 23, Block 10, 
Chesapeake Shores, 4521 Lee 
Avenue. Bayside Borough. 
Case 11. Bonny's Corner 
Associates requests a variance to 
allow tenants (K-Mart, Giant 
Open Air Market and Peoples 
Drug) to advertise on the center 
identification sign where 
prohibited on Parcel 5, Acredale, 
1205 Fordham Drive. Kempsville 
Borough. 

Case 12. Professional Realty 
Corporation requests a variance 
of 2 feet in fence height to a 6 
footfence instead t>f a-4 foot fen- 
ce as allowed in a required side 
yard adjacent to a street (Delaney 
Street) on Lot 2, Block L, Bran- 
don, 5737 Brandon Boulevard. 
Kempsville Borough. 
Case 13. Blanche M. and Howard 
H. Summers, Jr. request a 
variance of 10 feet to a 10 foot 
side yard setback (north side) in- 
stead of 20 feet as required (ac- 
cessory building) on Lot 5, Briar- 
Xliff, 1029 Briar Wood Point. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 
Case 14. BayfronL Associates, 
Ltd. request a variance of 3 feet 
tQ a 5 foot side yard setback (east 
side) and of 8 feet to a "O" side 
yard setback (west side) instead 
of 8 feet each as required on Lot 
X in the Subdivision of Part of 
Property of David I. Levine, Bay 
Shore Colony, 2822 Shore Drive. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 
Case 15. Trustees of Morning 
Star Baptist church request a 
variance of 8 feet to a 22 foot 
front yard setback (Pleasure 
House Road) instead of 30 feet as 
required and of 10 feet lo a 15 
foot side yard adjacent to a street 
(Northampton Boulevard) in- 
stead of 25 feet as required and of 
1 .664 acres of land area to 1 .336 
acres of land instead of 3 acres of 
land as requiffd for a church on 
Lots 1 and 3, James Garrison 
Plantation. 4800 First Court 
Road. Bayside Borough. 
Case 16. Michael D. Lugar 
requests a variance of 2 feet in 
fence height to a 6 fool fence in- 
stead of a 4 foot fence "as allowed 
in a required setback from a 
street (both Edd>slone Drive arJ 



Gravenhurst Drive) on lot 5, 
Block F, Section 9, Rosemont 
Forest, 1400 Eddystone Drive. 
Kempsville Borough. 
Case 17. Gersal Construction 
Corporation by Sonny Fiore 
requests a variance of 10 feet to 
an 8 foot side yard adjacent to a 
street (First Landing Lane) in- 
stead of 18 feet as required and of 
2 feet to a 6 foot side yard set- 
back (east side) instead of 8 feet 
as required (attached garage) on 
Lot 1 1, Block 4, Section G, Cape 
Henry, 2596 Shore Drive. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 
Case 18. Thomas C. Kyrus 
requests a variance of 12 'feet to 
an 8 foot side yard adjace^it toa .. 
street (Maple Street) instead of 20 
feet as required (new residence) 
on Lot 302, Cape Story^bY the- 
Sea, Northeast Corner of Ocean 
shore Avenue and Maple Street. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 
CSise 19. Dolplyn Condominium 
Unit Owiiers Assdciation reqvrest 
a variance of 270 square feiet of 
sign area instead of 200 square 
feet of sign area as allowed on 
lots 3 and 4, Block 17, Virginia 
Beach, 1705 Atlantic Avenue. 
Virginia Beach Borough. 
Case 20. William L. Corby 
requests a variance of 19 feet to a 
31 front yard setback instead of 
50 fet as required (new residence) 
on Lot 90, Phase 1, Broad Bay 
Point Greens, 2304 Haversham 
Close. Lynnhaven Borough. 
DEFERRED AGENDA: 
Case 1. Resort Developments 
(The, Tailor Shop) requests a 
variance to allow 2 free-standin| 
signs instead of 1 free-standin| 
sign as allowed and to allow i 
tenant (The Tailor Shop) to ad- 
vertise on the free-standing sign 
where prohibited on a Parcel, 
Birdneck, 508 North Birdneck 
Road. Lynnhaven Borough. 
ALL APPLICANTS MUSI 
APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD!! 
Paul N.Sutton 
Secretary 

223 

223-i4 2Tl-08VI 
NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virgigia Beach Plannin 
Commission will hold a Publi 
Hearing on Tuesday, January 14 
1986 at 12:00 Noon in the Coua 
cil Chambers of the City Hal 
Building, Princess Anne Com 
thouse, Virginia Beach, Virginia 
A briefing session will be held a 
S 9:00 a.m. in the Planning Depai 
tment Conference Roon 
Operations Building. PLAN 
NING COMMISSION ACTIO^ 
IS NOT A FINAL DETER 
MINATION OF THE AP 
PLICATION, BUT ONLY fi 
RECOMMENDATION TC 
THE CITY COUNCIL AS THI 
VIEWPOINT OF THE PLAN 
NING COMMISSION. FINAl 
DETERMINATION OF THI' 
APPLICATION IS TO BI 
MADE BY CITY COUNCIL AT 
A LATER DATE, AFTER 
PUBLIC NOTICE IN A 
NEWSPAPER HAVING 
GENERAL CIRCULATION 
WITHIN THE CITY. 
Those members of the pubHc In-" 
terested in attending the public 
hearing should be advised that, 
for reasons the Planning Com- 
mission deems appropriate, cer- 
tain items on the agenda may be 
heard out of order and that it 
should not be assumed that the 
order listed below will be exactly 
followed during the PuBlic 
Hearing. 

The staff reviews of some or all 
of the items on this agenda 
suggest that certain conditions be 
attached to approval by City 
Council. However, it shoud not 
. be assumed that those conditions 
constitute all the conditions that 
will ultimately be attached to the 
project. Staff agencies may im- 
pose further conditions and 
requirements during ad- 
ministration of applicable city 
ordinances. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION: 
1. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Virginia Beach 
General Hospital for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSlfJCATlON Trom H-4 
Residential District to O-l Office 
District on certain property 
located on the North side of Old 
Donation Parkway Extended 
beginning at a point 625.48 feet 
East of First Colonial Road. Said 
parcel contains 2.075 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 
2. An Ordinance upon Ap- 

C iinlinunt on pagr 9 



' 1 



The Virginia Beach Sun, January 8, 1986 9 



in^ 



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LICALNOnCB 



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LiCAL NOTICES 



LfCALNOnCIS 



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LECALNOflCIS 



Conllnued from page S 

plication of W. T. Brown & 
Associates for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION from A-1 
Apartment District to A-2 Apar- 
tment District on the North side 
of Oconee Avenue, 80 feet West 
of Hutton Road. Said parcel is 
located at 2548 Oconee Avenue 
and contains 3.45 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

3. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of WAI, a Virginia 
Limited Partnership, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-5 Residential District to 
B-4 Resort-Commercial District 
on certain property located on 
the North side of Owl's Creek 
Lane, 800 feet more or less East 
of Gregory's Lane. Said parcel 
contains 2.68 acres. Plats with 
more detai!^^ informatiqir arc 
available in the Departmerif of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

4. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Giant Square Shop- 
ping Center Company for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from B-1 Business-Residential 
District to B-2 Community- 
Business District on the East side 
of S. Lynnhaven Road, 530 feet 
moje or less South of Silina 
Drive. Said parcel is located at 
444 South Lynnhaven Road and 
contains 3.5 acres. Plats with 
more detailed informatin are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Runnymede Cor- 
poration for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 
Community-Business District to 
1-2 Heavy Industrial District on 
the West side of Butternut Lane, 
523.42 feet South of Bonney 
Road on Lot 21 .A and Lots 22; 
28, Block C, Rosemont Cor- 
poration. Said parcels contain 
31,363 square feet. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Masciola aiid Com- 
pany for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-7 
Residential District to A-3 Apar- 
tment District on the South side 
of Norfolk Avenue, 211.56 feet 
West of Indian Avenue. Said 
parcel is located at 1012 Norfolk 
Avenue and contains 28,314 
square feet. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning.' LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

7. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Masciola and Com- 
pany for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from A-1 
Apartment District to A-3 Apar- 
tment District beginning at a 
poing 90 feet more or less South 
of Norfolk Avenue, 400 feet 
more or less West of Indian 
Avenue. Said parcel is located at 
1012 Norfolk Avenue and con- 
tains 2178 square feet. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

8. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of G. Geoffrey & Linda 
J. Brockelbank for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-6 
Residential District to 0-1 Office 
District at the Southeast corner 
o( Bonney Road and South Fir 
Avenue. Said parcel is located at 
4313 Bonney Road and contains 
9491.7 feet. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

9. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Bruce B. Mills for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from A-1 Apartment District to 
B-2 Community-Business District 
on the West side of Happy Street, 
231.31 feet South of Bonney 
Road on Lots 10-15, Block 11, 
East Norfolk. Said parcel con- 
tains 15.000 square feet. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

10. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plicatin of George and Willie 
Held for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICAITON from R-6 
Residential District to B-2 Com- 
munity-Business District at the 
Northeast corner of Witchduck 
Road and Ruritan Court. Said 
parcel is located at 400 and 404 



South Witchduck Road and con- 
tains 1,4 acres more or less. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

11. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of C. L. and O. V. 
White, a General Partnership, 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from 0-1 Office District to I-l 
Light Industrial District on cer- 
tain property located on the West 
side of Chimney Hill Parkway 
beginning at a point 1 16 feet Nor- 
th of Smokey Chamber Drive. 
Said parcel contains 3.37 acres. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

12. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dimensions, Inc. for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-1 Residential District to 
0-l*Office District on the East . 
side of Diamond Springs Road, 
500 feet more of less South of 
Lawson Hall Key on Lots 1-12 and 
part of Lot 13, Section 6, 
Wesleyan Fines. Said parcel con- 
tains 12.84 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

13. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dimensions, Inc., for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-5 Residential District to 
0-1 Office District on the East 
side of Diamond Springs Road, 
1360 feet more or less South of 
Lawson Hall Key on Part of Lot 
13 and Lot 14, Section 6, 
Wesleyan Pines. Said parcel con- 
tains 1.16 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

14. An Ordinance Upon Ap- 
plication of Mildred Lucille Reid 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from AG-2 Agricultural District 
to I-l Light Industrial District on 
certain property located n the 
South side of London Bridge 
Road beginning at a point 300 
feet more or less East of Shipps 
Corner Road. Said parcel is 
located at 1417 London Bridge 
Road and contains 2.524 acres. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH, 

15. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Mildred Lucille Reid 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from AG-1 Agricultural District 
to I-l Light Industrial District on 
property located 600 feet South 
of London Bridge Road begin- 
ning at a point 300 feet more or 
less East of Shipps Corner Road. 
Said parcel is located at 1417 
London Bridge Road and con- 
tains 1.214 acres. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

16. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Amos J. Ward etals 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from AG-2 Agricultural District 
to B-2 Community-Business 
District on the West side of 
General Booth Boulevard, 420 
feet more or less North of Dam 
Neck Road. Said parcel is located 
at ;^544 Oceana Boulevard and 
contains 7.1 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

17. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Amos J. Ward etals 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from AG-1 Agricultural District 
to B-2 Community-Business 
District 600 feet West of General 
Booth Boulevard, 420 feet North 
of Dam Neck Road. Said parcel 
is located at 1544 Oceana 
Boulevard and contains 4.9 acres. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are availabel in the 
Department of Plapning. PRIN- 
CESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

18. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dominion Resource, 
Inc., for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-3 
Residential District to O-l Office 
District on certain property 
located at the Southwest corner 
of London Bridge Road and 
General Booth Boulevard. Said 
parcel contains 5.69 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

19. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dominion Resour- 
ces, Inc., for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-3 
Residential district to I-l Li^ht 
Industrial District on certain 
property located on the South 
side of London Bridge Road 
beginning at a poing 650 feet 



more or less West of General 
Booth Boulevard. Said parcel 
contains 8.92 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 

20. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dominion Resour- 
ces, Inc., for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for a storage yard 
for Virginia Power Company on 
certain property located on the 
South side of London Bridge 
Road beginning at a point. 650 
feet more or less West of General 
Booth Boulevard. Said parcel 
contains 8.93 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

21. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Auto Care Centers of 
America for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for an 
automobile service center at the 
Northwest corner of Holland 
Road and Grant Avenue on Lots 
1-20, Block 4, Pecan Gardens. 
Said parcel , contains 51,000 
square feet. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

22. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Kramer Tire Com- 
pany, Incorporated for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
automobile repair and sale, in- 
stallation and service of tires on 
certain property located at the 
northern quadrant of the inter- 
section of Holland Road and 
Lynnhaven Parkway. Said parcel 
contains 37,000 square feet. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

23. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Hester C. Brinster 
for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for a home occupation 
(babysitting) at the Northwest 
corner of Cavalier Drive and 
Holly Road. Said parcel is 
located at 4300 Holly Road and 
contains 31,319.6 square feet. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department . of Planning. 
VIRGINIA BBACii 
BOROUGH. 

24. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of P C K Corporation 
for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for a single family 
home in the AG-1 Agricultural 
District on certain property 
located 600 feet North of Indian 
River Road beginning at a point 
2400 feet West of Princess Anne 
Road. Said parcel is located at 
2997 Seaboard Road and con- 
tains 60 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PUNGO BOROUGH. 

25. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Giant Square Shop- 
ping Center Company for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a tire, battery and accessory 
store on the West side of In- 
dependence Boulevard, 151.75 
feet South of S. Witchduck 
Road. Said parcel is located at 
741 Independence Boulevard and 
contains 12.32 acres. Plats with 
more detailed inforihatibri are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

26. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Morning Star Baptist 
Church for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for a church and 
related facilities at the Southeast 
intersection of Northampton 
Boulevard and Pleasure House 
Road. Said parcel contains 1.336 
acres. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

27. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Bow Creek Home 
For The Elderly for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 
home for the aged at the Nor- 
theast corner of Club House 
Road and Duplin Street on Lot 
16, Block 48, Princess Anne 
Plaza. Said parcel is located at 
3420 Club House Road and con- 
tains 13,000 square feet. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 

28. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Peggy Davis for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a day care center on the East 
side of Centerville Turnpike, 295 
feet North of Livingston Oak 
Drive. Said parcel is located at 
2100 Centerville Turnpike and 
contains 1.13 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

29. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plicaiton of Mary Susanne 



Knisely for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for a pre-school at 
the Northeast corner of Kem- 
psville Road and Alton Road. 
Said parcel is located at 1072 Old 
Kempsville Road and contains 
2.5 acres. Plats with m'ore 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

30. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Sterling W. and 
Bonnie T. Thacker for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for a 
commercial kennel on the North 
side of Indian River Road, 1000 
feet West of the North Landing 
River Bridge. Said parcel is 
located at 3756 Indian River 
Road and contains 21.33 acres. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in ihe Depar- 
tment of Planning. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 
AMMENDMENTS 

31. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend the Master Street and 
Highway Plan to include a 250- 
foot, six-lane limited access ex- 
pressway from the Laskin Road 
interchange with the Virginia 
Beach-Norfolk Expressway (44) 
to the Chesapeake City line at the 
Virginia Power easement south 
of Elbow Road. More detailed 
information is avaijable in the 
Department of Planning. 
DEFERRED BACK TO PLAN- 
NING COMMISSION BY CITY 
COUNCIL ON SEPTEMBER 
30, 1985: 

32. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article 2, 
Section 221 (E), of the Com- 
prehensive Zoning Ordinance 
pertaining to procedural 
requirements and general stan- 
dards for conditional uses. More 
detailed information is available 
in the Department of Planning. 

33. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article 1, 
Section 107 (0 of the Com- 
prehensive Zoning Ordinance 
pertaining to amendments. More 
detailed information is availabld^^ 
in the Department of Planning. 
DEFERRED BACK TO PLAN- 
NINO COMMISSION BY CITY 
COUNCIL ON NOVEMBER 4, 
1985: 

34. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Ronald L. and Holly 
Hall, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICAION from R-3 
Residential District to 0-1 Office 
District on certain property 
located at the Southeast corner of 
General Booth Boulevard and 
Princess Anne Road and shown 
as "Residue Acreage" on that 
certain plat recorded in Map 
Book 168, Page 51, in the Clerk's 
Office of the Circuit Court. Said 
parcel contains 3.25 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Plan ng. PRINCESS ANN& 
BOROUGH. 

DEFERRED FOR 60 DAYS BY 
PLANNING COMMISSION 
ON NOVEMBER 12, 1985: 

35. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of E & R Enterprises 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-8 Residential District to 
A-1 Apartment District on cer- 
tain property located at the Nor- 
thwest corner of 26th Street and 
Holly Road. Said parcel contains 
25,265 square feet. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

36. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Crystal Point 
Associates for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-1 
Residential District to R-8 
Residential District on certain 
property located on the South 
side of Northampton Boulevard 
at the intersection with Shell 
Road. Said, parcel contains 7.5 
acres. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
BAYSlbE BOROUGH. 

37. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Crystal Point 
Associates for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-8 
Residential District to PD-H2 
Planned Unit Development 
District on certain property 
located on the South side of Nor- 
thampton Boulevard at the inter- 
section with Shell Road. Said 
parcel contains 7.5 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 



are. available in ^e Department 
of Planning. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

38. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article II, 
Part C of the Comprehensive 
Zoning Ordinance pertaining to 
the PD-H2 Planned Unit 
Development District. More 
detailed information is available 
in the Department of Planning. 
DEFERRED FOR 30 DAYS BY 
PLANNING COMMISSION 
ON DECEMBER 10. 1985: 

39. Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard 
to certain elements of the Sub-- 
division Ordinance, Subdivision 
for Martha Smith. Property is 
located on the North side of 
Crystal Lake Circle, 170 feet 
more or' less North hof Bay 
Colony Drive. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

40. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Great Neck Village 
Associates, a General Partner- 
ship, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 
Community-Business District to 
A-2 Apartment District on certain 
property located 710 feet East of 
North Great Neck Road begin- 
ning at a point 6(X) fet South of 
Mill Dam Road as shown on the 
plat entitled "Subdivision of 
Property for Great Neck Village 
Shopping Center" on file in the 
Department of Planning. Said 
parcel contains 5.097 acres. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

41. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Henry Kuwabara, 
Joan Mallen and Robert 
Steinhilber for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from 0-1 
Office District to B-3 Central- 
Business District on the North 
side of Bonney Road, 1000 feet 
more or less West of Bendix 
Road. Said parcel is located at 
4456 Bonney Road and contain s 
2.47 acres. Plats with more 
detailed jnformatioi} are 
available ifl the ttepsrjEment of 
P! a; tif n i rife ; K EM P S VI L L'E 
BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 
Robert J. Scott 
Director of Planning 

223-13 2T 1-8 VB 

( 

In the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, on the 9th day of Decem- 
ber, 1985 

Bonnie L. Trudo, Plaintiff, 
against Charles B. Trudo, 
Defendant. 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is for the 
said plaintiff to obtain a divorce 
a vinculo matrimonii from the 
said defendant, upon the groun- 
ds of continuous and uninterrup- 
ted separation for an excess of 
one year. And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: Rural 
Box 1, Box 149A, Cadyville, New 
York, 12918, it is ordered that he 
do appear on or before the 30th 
of January. 1986, and do what 
may be necessary to protect his 
interest in this suit. It is further 
Ordered that a copy of this Order 
be published once each week for 
four successive weeks in the 
Virginia Beach Sun. a newspaper 
of general circulation in this city. 
A Copy Teste: 
J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By: Pattie K. Bennett, D.C. 
Halbert T. Dail, Esquire 
154 Newtown Road, Suite B3 
Virginia Beach. Va. 23462 

221-I64tl-8VB 

Office of the Commissioner of 

Accounts 

Circuit Court of the City of 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

December 23. 1985 

Frances Elizabeth Duffey, 

Deceased 

NOTICE is hereby given, pur- 
suant to Section 64.1-171, Code 
of Virginia, that the undersigned 
Commissioner of Accounts, 
having for settlement the account 
of United Virginia Bank, 
Executor of the Estate of Frances 
Elizabeth Duffey, deceased, and 
having been requested so to do, 
has appointed the 20th day of 
January, 1986, at 3:00 p.m., at 
129 S. Great Neck Road, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, as the 
time and place of receiving proof 
of debts and demands against the 



decedent of her estate. 

Stanley A. Phillips 

Commissioner of Accounts 

225-9 It 1-8 VB 

VIRGINIA: In the Circuit Court 

of the City of Virginia Beach, 

12/27/85 

In Re: Estate of Richard D. 

Tayloe, Deceased 

SHOW CAUSE ORDER 

AGAINST DISTRIBUTION 
OF ESTATE" 

THIS DAY came RICHARD 
R. D. TAYLOE, Executor of this 
Estate and filed with leave of 
Court a Motion for Show Cause 
Order against distribution of this 
Estate. 

It appearing to the Court that a 
report of the accounts of 
RICHARD R. D. TAYLOE, 
Executor of the Estate of 
RICHARD D. TAYLOE, 
deceased, and of the debts and 
demands against the Estate has 
been filed in the Clerk's Office, 
and that six months ahve elapsed 
since the qualification, on motion 
of the Executor, it is ORDERED 
that the creditors of, and all other 
persons interested in this Estate 
do show cause, if any they can, 
on the 3rd day of February, 1986, 
at 9:30 a.m., before this Court at 
its courtroom, against the 
payment and delivery of the 
Estate to the parties entitled 
thereto, with or without requiring 
refunding bond as this Court may 
determine. 

It is further ORDERED that a 
duly certified copy hereof be 
published once a week for two 
successive weeks in the 
Virginia Beach Sun, a newspaper 
of general circulation in this 
jurisdiction. 
A Copy Teste: 
J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By Jeanette L. Jones, D.C. 
JoAnn Blair 
Clark & Stant, Attys. 
900 Sovran Bank Building 
One Columbus Center 
Va. Beach, Va. 23462 
225-10 2t 1-15 VB 

Take notice, that on January 
if, 1986, at 10:00 o'clock a.m., 
at the premises of 4753 Virginia 
Beach Blvd., Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, 23462, the undersigned 
will sdl at "^tiblrc auction , for 
cash oHly, reserving the right to 
bid, the following motor vehicle: 

1978 Chevrolet Camaro, Serial 
#1Q87U8N588135 
Pembroke Auto Sales 
225-16 It 1-8 VB 1__ 

Take notice, that on January 
13, 1986, at 10:00 o'clock a.m., 
at the premises of 4753 Virginia 
Beach Blvd., Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, 23462, the undersigned 
will sell at public auction, for 
cash only, reserving the right to 
bid, the following motor vehicle: 

1976 Oldsmobile 98, Serial 
#3X39T6M377815 
Pembroke Auto Sales 
225-17 It 1-8 VB 

VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 31st 
day of December, 1985 
In re: Adoption of William 
Joseph Graham 

By: Gina Michelle Morrison and 
Jon Stark Morrison, Petitioners 
To: Peter Walsh 
c/o U.S. Marines 
Quantico, Virginia 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

This day came GINA 
MICHELLE MORRISON and 
JON STARK MORRISON, 
Petitioners, and represemed that 
the object of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the above 
named infant(s) William Joseph 
Graham, by GINA MICHELLE 
MORRISON and JON STARK 
MORRISON, husband and wife, 
and affidavit having been made 
and filed that Peter Walsh, a 
natural parent of said child(ren) 
is a non-resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known ix)st of- 
fice address (as of October, 1983 
being: c/o U.S. Marine, Quan- 
tico, Virginia, and that due 
diligence has been used by or in 
behalf of the said petitioners to 
ascertain in which county or cor- 
j)oration the^aid natural parent 
IS. without effect. 

It is therefore ORDERED that 
the said PETER WALSH appear 
before this Court within ten (10) 
days after publication of this Or- 
der and indicate his attitude 
toward the proposed adoption, 
or otherwise do what is necessary 
to protect his interest in this mat- 
ter. 

It is further ORDERED that a 
copy of this Order be published 
once each week for four suc- 
cessive weeks in The Virginia 
Beach Sun. a newspaper of 

( OBliUMd M ^1^ 10 



■■■■ 



I 



lO'The Virginia Beach Sun, 



January 8, 1986 



LEGAL NOTICES 



Continued from pane 9 

general circulation in this city. 

A Copy Teste: 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 

By: Patti K. Bennett, D.C. 

Melvin J. Radin, Esquire 

500 Holiday Inn Waterside 

Norfolk, Virginia 235 10 

(804)623-1216 

225-18411 -29 VB 

Take notice, that on January 7,, 
1985, at 10:00 o!j;lock a.m., at 
the premises of 4753 Virginia 
Beach Blvd., Virginia Beach, 
Virgihia, 23462, the undersigned 
will sell at public auction, for 
cash only, reserving the right to 
bid, the following motor vehicle: 

1980 Chevroiet Chevette, 
Serial #1B6898Y148318. 
Pembroke Auto Sales 
2?5-81tl-8VB 

Take notice, that on January 10, 
1985, at 10:00 o'clock a.m., at 
the premises of 4753 Virginia 
Beach Blvd., Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, 23462, the undersigned 
will sell at public auction, for 
cash oniyi reserving the right to 
bid, the following motor vehicle: 

1978 Chevrolet Monza, Serial 
i)'lM07V8U225176 
Pembroke Auto Sales 

225-12 It T-S VB 

VIRGINIA: In the Circuit Court 
of the City of Virginia Beach 
In Re: Estate of Foye K. Johnson 
Deceased 

SHOW CAUSE ORDER 

AGAINST DISTRIBUTION 
OF ESTATE 

THIS DAY came W. 
TAYLOR JOHNSON, JR., 
HENRY H. JOHNSON and 
FOYE K. ADKINS, Ej^ecutors, 
of this Estate and filed with leave 
of Court a Motion for Show 
Cause Order against distribution 
of this Estate. 

It appearing to the Court that a 
report of the accounts of W. 
TAYLOR JOHNSON, JR., 
HENRY H. JOHNSON and 
FOYE K. ADKINS, Executors 
of the Estate of FOYE K. 
JOHNSON, deceased, and of the 
debts and demands against the 
Estate has been filed in the 
Clerk's Office, and that six mon- 
ths have elapsed since the 
qualification, on motion of the 
Executors, it is ORDERED that 
the creditors of, and all other 
persons interested in this Estate 
do show cause, if any they can, 
on the 3rd (Jay of Epbruaxy, 1986, 
at 9:30 a.m., before this Courtat 
its courtroom, against the 
payment and delivery of the 
Estate to the parties entitled 
thereto, with or without requiring 
refunding bond as this Court may 
determine. 

It is further ORDERED that a 
duly certified copy hereof be 
published once a week for two 
successive weeks in the Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of 
general circulation in this 
jurisdiction. 
A Copy Teste: 
J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By Jeanette L. Jones, D.EX 
Jo Ann Blair 
Of Counsel 
Clark & Slant 
900 Sovran Bank Building 
One Columbus Center 
Va. Beach, Va. 23462 
225-11 2t 1-15 VB 

NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

Virginia: 

the regular meeting of the City 
Council of Virginia Beach will be 
heard in the Council Chambers 
of the City Hall Building, 
Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, January 27, 1986, at 
7:00 p.m. at which time the 
following applications will be 
heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION: 
PUNGO BOROUGH: 

1. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Ocean Island 
Associates for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-4 
Resort-Commercial District to R- 
6 Residential District on certain 
property located at the Southeast 
corner of Sandpiper Road and 
Whitecap Lane Said parcel con- 
tains 12.76 acres more or less. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
PUNGO BOROUGH. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

2. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Robert H. Joseph- 
berg and James C. Nocito for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-6 Residential District to 
B-2 Community-Business District 
on certain property located at the 
Northeast corner of South Bir- 
dneck Road and Longstreet 
Avenue in Olive Heights. Said 
parcel is located at 104 South Bir- 
dneck Road and contains 1.3 
acres. Plats with more detailed 



LEGAL NOTICES J 

information are available in the 
Department of Planning. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 
3. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Helen V. Standing 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
f^j)m B-2 Community-Business 
District to B-4 Resort- 
Commercial District on certain 
property located on the West side 
of N. Birdneck Road, 151 feet 
South of Bluebird Drive. Parcel 
is located at 565 N. Birdneck 
Road and contains 20,822 square 
feet. Plats with more detailed in- 
formation are available in the 
Department of Planning. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 
4." An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Lessie M. Gimbert 
and Gary M. & Robin B. Van 
Auken for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION from R-5 
Residential District to A-2 Apar- 
tment of District on certain 
property located on the South 
side of the Virginia Beach Toll 
Road, 700 feet East of Doyle 
Way. Said parcel contains 6.5 
acres. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in the 
Department of Planning. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Eunice and James 
Johnson and Mary Jane Hyman 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-5 Residential District to 
B-2 Community-'Business District 
at the Norftheast corner of South 
Birdneck Road and Owl's Creek 
Lane. Said parcel contains 29, 
925.72 square feet. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Jack J. and, Jeanne, 
Osmond for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 
Residential District to A-1 Apar- 
tment District on certain property 
located on the East side of South 
Birdneck Road, 300 feet more or 
less South Beautiful Street on 
Lots 1.2, 3,6, 11,12,13,14, 15, 
16, and 17, Subdivision A, 
Seatack, Said parcels contain 
2.22 acres. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

7. An Ordinance upon Ap-. 
plication of Ronald L. and Holly 
Hall for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-3 
Residential District to 0-1 Office 
District on certain property 
located at the Southeast corner of 
General Booth Boulevard and 
Princess Anne Road and shown 
as 'Residue Acreage" on that cer- 
tain plat recorded in Map Book 
168, Page 51, in the Clerk's Of- 
fice of the Circuit Court. Said 
parcel contains 3.25 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

8. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Snyder Family Trust 
by Edward -B. Snyder, Trustee, 
for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for automobile sales 
and service on certain property 
located at the Southeast corner of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard and 
Kings Grant Road. Said parcel 
contains 5.1 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 
AMENDMENTS: , .,, ,. , 

9. Motion of the Planning Com- 
mission of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, to amend and 
reordain Section 4.1 of the Sub- 
division Ordinance pertaining to 
bikeway location, type and wid- 
th. More detailed information is 
available in the Department of 
Planning. 

10. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Section 1.1 
of the Subdivision Ordinance 
pertaining to definitions of 
streets. More detailed infor- 
mation is available in the Depar- 
tment of Planning. 

11. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Section 4.4 
of the Subdivision Ordinance 
concerning notification on plats 
of certain soil and slope con- 
ditions. More detailed infor- 
mation is available in the Depar- 
tment of Planning. 

Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC 
City Clerk 
773-18 ?t 1-15 VB 



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CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



PERSONAL 
RATES 

1 time 

2 times 
4 times 



20 words 
or less 

$ 6.40 
11.20 
14.00 



Additional 
word s 

.32 
.56 

.70 



Run your personal classified ad four times for only 
$14 00 YOU can cancel your ad at any time, however, 
there can be NO REf UNDS and NO CHANCES. 

All Classified ads run in three newspapers (Virginia Beacn Sun, cnesapeake Post 
and portsmoutn Timesi no additional cdarge. 



Please print clearly using one word per box. 




V 














„ 


















20 words. 



Issues. 



Run my personal ad for 

Payment Is enclosed ^ — 

Make cneck payable to Bveriv Publications. 

MAIL TO: Classified, Box 1 327. Chesapeake, va. 23320 



Name 
Address 
City 



.State. 



Zip 



FOR HELP With your classified ad, please call 547-4571 . 



PERSONAL ADS must be placed 
by private individuals, com- 
mercial and business related 
ads do not qualify for 2-tlme 
and 4-tlme personaUates. 



COMBINATION RATE: Run this same personal ad 
in any other Byerly Publications newspaper 
for an additional $2 50 one time, $4.50 two 
times, or $6.00 four times. Newspapers In 
Franklin, Emporia, lawrendevllle, Dinwiddle 
and Williamsburg. Call 547.4571 for details. 



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ANTIQUES 



BIG FLEA MARKET 

And Antique Fair Hampton Coliseum, 
Jan. 12th Sunday 12-7 p.m. lOO's of 
exhtbtttJTS from 7 states: Admission 
$1.50,422-8800. luj 

CASH PAID FOR ANTIQUES, old fur- 
niture, glassware, china, coUectables and 
old toys too. Will buy one piece or a 
houseful. Call day or right. 485-4659. ifn 



ADULT CARE 



NURSES AIDE - Private duty. 35 + yrs. 
exp. working with sick and elderly. Ex- 
cellent reference. Hrs. & sal. negotiable. 
393-6286. 4i 12-25 

ELDERLY CARE • Armond Whithurst 
Manor. Beautiful licensed residence for 
ladies witR 24 hour quality care and per- 
sonalized attention. Call 482-3128. 4t i2-i< 



APPLIANCES 



DRYER FOR SALE - Excellent working 
condition. Almond colored, $150. Call 
460-1062. 2112-25 

DRYER - Kenmore, needs little work, 
$70. Call 588-1383. it 2-25 



AUTOS 



; oven 



BRONCO - "85 - loaded. Moving over 
seas. No equity. Assume lease. 464-1085. 

111-7 

PEUGEOT - 10-Speed, 6 mos. old. Ex- 

cellent condition. $275. 428-1987. ii 1 8 
VW - '81 Pickup, diesel. Stick shift, 
stereo. Excellent condition. $2700. 490- 

1344. ]i±» 

'80 CITATION, - 1 owners, 62,000 mis., 
5 new Michelin radials, AM-FM, power 
steering and braskes, air, very reliable, 

$2100.440-1476. 4i 12-18 

FORD - '82 Escort, 4 sjxJ., 2 dr. Hatch- 
bk., AM-FM cassette; very good con- 

dition; $3200; 583-7057. «ti2-i8 

DODGE - 1976 Aspen, good condition. 
$1500. Call 422-%S8 after 10 a.m. 4t 12 18 

1958 FORD STEPVAN - White, trimmed 
in red, stove and sink, converted into a 
sleeping camper, sleeps 3, new. motor, 
new transmission, mint condition, $1 ,500. 
Call 393-0159. 4ti2-i« 

'74 BMW - 2002, Air Cond., stereo, 
AM/FM, excellent condition. Best Offer. 
Call 547-7374 after 6 pm. Days - 397- 

7606. TFN 



BUSINESS EQUIPMENT 



FILING CABINETS, all sizes, new, used, 
damaged, all at good prices Budget Office 
Outfitters 943 Canal Drive 487-2202. 

11 12-25 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 



OWN YOUR OWN beautiful discount 
shoe store. Ladies or Children. Nationally 
known brands. *Jordache 'Bear Traps 
*Bandolino *9 West 'Johansen 'Evan 
Picone "USA "Pro Keds 'Child Life 
•Cherokee * Giggles and many more. All 
first quality merchandise. $15,900 to 
$19,900 includes beginning inventory- 
training-fixtures-grand opening 
promotions and round trip air fare for 
one. Call today. We can have your store 
opened in 15 days. Prestige Fashions 501- 
329-7''^7 11 1-7 



CAMPERS 



J 



INTERNATIONAL - '86, 32'.-self- 
contained, air and lots of extras. $8,700. 
Must sell. 485-5280. 4ii2-i« 



r" 



CHILD CARE 



^BABYSIT - Day care provided, hot 
meals, USDA program, Willoughby area. 
Call 480-2760. inj 

CHILD CARE - Newborn and up. By 
responsible and caring woman with ex- 
client references, competitive rates, lots of 
FLC, Norfolk area. Call 583-7059 or 855- 
1390.. 411211 



CHILD CARE 



BABYSITTING - Provided in my Nor- 
view home, experienced jhom/nursing 
assistant, any age/hours, $35 week. 853- 

0462. 411-14 

MOTHER OF FIVE - W/references, will 
babysit in my home near Gate 5, NAB, 
reasonable rates, naps, hot meals, struc- 

tured time. 460-3043. 40^7 

WILL BABYSIT - In my Ben Moreell 
h ome, all ages. 440-8850. 1 1 1225 
CHARLESTOWNE LAKES SOUTH • 
Experienced, dependable mother will care 
for your children in my home, any age, 
anytime. 479-1379. 41J2-2 5 

BABYSrr - My home, expd., $40 wk., 
lots of toys & TLC, Kempsville area, 456- 

0495. 4t 12-25 

BABYSITTING - Exp'd. mom will 
babysit in my home. South Newtown Rd. 
area. 497-0433 anytiine^ 4t 12-25 

CLEANING SERVICES 



HOUSECLEANING - Resolution No. I 
Clean up your house. Good rates, ex- 
cellent references. Call 340-8109, 420- 

8592. 111-8 

METICULOUS about cleaning? So are 
we. We do homes, lawns. Call any hour. 
622-4253. " 4T1-21 



DOGS 



MALTESE DOG - Small white dog, 
male, 1 year old. weighs 4 to 5 lbs. Extra 
good with children, AKC, has shot record 
$200,428-7481. lii-7 

BLIJE TICK - Walker pups. 7 weeks old, 
3 males. $45 or best offer. Call 421-3394. 
iii-g 

LHASA APSO PUPPIES - Both parents 
AKC registered. Born Nov. 7, also stud 
service. Call 587-8314. 4ii-28 

DOBERMAN PINCHERS - Purebred, 
black & tan, 4 females, 3 months old. $75. 
CalL623-1146. 111-8 

IBLUE DOBERMAN -8 mps. old. AKC 
registered, needs a good home. $200. Call 
473-8425 or 499-3894. mo 

PFT BULL PUPPIES - Full blood. 9 
pups. Tan, white and brindle. $I00-$t7S. 
Call 491 -2061. ni-8 

PITBULL PUPPY - 5 mos. old. male, 
good with kids, housebroken, $100. Call 
473-8425 or 499-'>894. iri-i 



ARTICLES FOR SALE 



TO PLACE CLASSIFIED 
ADS, CALL 547-4571 



.^^ 



FIREWOOD 



LAWN & GARDEN 



IL 



SEASONED OAK — $75 a pick-up load, 
also fire logs 3-3 '/2 cords;$T70, 721-3107, " 
Virgini a Beach. 4ij 8 

OAK - 90^0 ail hardwood. Cut, split and 
seasoned. 1 ton pickup (1) $65. (2) $125. 

(3) $1 85, 547-0266. 411-2 

FIREWOOD - All seasoned hardwood, 
split and delivered, V* ton truckload, $65, 
fast delivery, call 721-3819, 721-5504. 



FRUIT TRJipS,^ nut trees, berry plants, 
grape vines, landscaping plant material - 
offered by one of Virginia's largest 
growers. Free copy 48-page Planting 
Guide-Catalog in color, on request. 
Waynesboro Nurseries Inc - Waynesboro, 

VA 22980. <■ 1-^* 

FENCE - Chain link security with 10 ft. 
wide gate, 10 ft. high, 400 ft. long, com- 
plete, delivered. $750. 588-6832. 11 1-8 



FURNITURE 



WATERBED - King-size, brand new, 

. everything with mirror headboard. 

Sacrifice $250. Call 54T-7374. ifn 

ONE COUCH AND CHAIR ■ Deep 
Rose, excellent condition - call 488-3678. 

-_-, ^- --- . 1,1-7 



FURNITURE FOR SALE - 2 piece sec- 
tional sofa, recently cleaned, good con- 
dition, J TiercDtlonwood table, call 461- 

6562, '"M8 

SOFA - Contemporary, light brown, 
modular design, allows various 
arrangemen ts. $400. 468-492 7. 1112-18 

OFF WHITE iSOFA - Two early 
American chairs, and coffee table. Good 
condition, best offer. Call 547-9310. 

4t 12-18 

COMPONENT STEREO SYSTEM - 

Like new, good Christmas gift. Call for 
details - 543-5326. it 121 1 

BROWN, Mack & white Herculon love 
seat & matching chair, GC, $75. 468- 

2416. 1112-18 

HICKORY - tavern sofa, quality made, 
with traditional styling, blue, beige & 
rust, hardly used, $275. 588-5580 or 464- 

2259. , 411-7-86 

PARTIALLY new sofa, blue, orange & 
beige, tweed, with bamboo frame. EC, 
$175,440-5689. 111-1 



HELP WANTED 



REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT 

sales$l,800 per month guaranteed salary, 
plus commission. Liberal travel allowan- 
ce. Call on commercial accounts. Local 
territory. Outstanding opportunity for 
self motivated individual. Training 
provided. For interview call 919-735- 
0031, M-f, 9-4. liii 

TEXAS REFINERY CORP needs mature 
person now in Tidewater area. Regardless 
of experience, write A. H. Hopkins, Box 

711, Fort Worth, TX 76101. \i±» 

RECEPTIONIST/CLERK TYPIST - In 
Great Bridge area. Part time to start. 8:30 , 
to 5:00, Wed, Thur. & Friday. Typing a 
must. Call Mrs. Slate at 547-4574 on 
Mon. Jan. 13 for interview. ifn 

GOVERNMENT JOBS - SI6.040-$S9.230 
per year now hiring. Call 805-687-6000. 
Ext. R-3458 for current fedei;al list. 

^ 1611-22-86 

TYPISTS - $300 weekly at homel Write 
P. O. Box 975, Elizabeth, N.J. 07207. tfn 
SALESPERSONS WANTED - Hottest 
product of the decade - Pay telephones 
Qualified leads, 4«)-2128, Mr. Hussher ifn 

TYPESETTER - AM58IO exp. full' or 
part time with established printer. 547- 

2813. 1112-11 

RECEPTJONIST — Qerk typist. Greets 
the public, performs clerical functions. 5 
hours per week. High school plus clerical 

experience. 482-3270 2i 12-25 

PART OR FULL TIME — phone 
workers to process and sell orders. Must 
be handicapped or under doctor's care in- 
cluding pregnancy. Guaranteed wages 
and bonus. Apply in person, Pembroke 1 
Bid., Room 443. Virginia Beach. 9-2. 4t 1 8 

GOOD INCOME - Working with mail 
from home, experience unnecessary! 
Details, send self -addressed stamped en- 
velop to J. Johnson, Box 9, Harborton, 
Va. 23389. [fn 

RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE CLERK - 

Responsible person needed, straight 
hours, standard wage plus commission. 
Call 547-4571. tfn 



HOME IMPROVEMENT 



FUR COAT - Natural full length muskrat 
coat with racoon collar, size 12-14, 4 yrs. 

old. $900. 49 1 -1412. um 

WEIGHT BENCH - w/leg bars, new, ex- 
cellent condition. $60. Call 583-1095. u 1 -8 
WHEELCHAIR TABLE-For sale, $125 
Call 427-1673. iii-7 

TELESCOPE - Meade model 2080 with 
LX drive, used 3 times with many extras, 

$800. Call 428-5207. itm 

SMALL TO MEDIUM doghouse; $35; 

545-4039. iiM 

LARGE LR MIRROW - $100. 74' Audi - 
$500. running condition, carpet 9 x 16, 
rust color, $170, washer $110 - working 
condition. 857-1964. ii!.8 

OU^MOBILE - Factory spinner, 15" 
hub «ps. Cost $500 will sell for $200. 
424-6521. 411-2 

WET SUIT - Tesca, 1 pc. sleeveless, 
unused, size 54, $100. 427-3496 or 467- 

2568^^ iTi-i 

PRINTER - Daisywheel, DIABLO 630, 
40 small CPS, like new. Call 464-4l» 

^ a 12-25 

COMPUTER — 640K RAM, II MB 

hard driv e, IBM hardware and software 
compatible, like new. Call 464-4156. 

2112-25 

COMMODORE VIC-20 computer 
w/tape drive. 2 tapes, $100; cast-iron gas 
grill, needs propane, new still in box, $35; 
video tape qi»e, $25. 587-9337. n 12-11 



BATHROOM REMODELING 

ceramic tile, tub kits, vanities, rotted 
floors and repairs of all types. Quality 
work. 486-1377. 4t 1-8 



HOMES FOR SALE 



GREAT NECK • Area, twr.h:c. 3 bedr- 
ms.. 2'/: baths, all brlc, 2 yrs. old, rented. 
$76,000.481-2800. iiu-il 

GOVERNMENT HOMfS from $1 (U 
repair). Also delinquent tax property. 
Call 805-687-6000 Ext. GH-3453 for in- 
formation, 41 12-25 

i HORSES, CATTLE. ETC. 



BLACK ANGUS - Registered bull calf. 
10 months old, $250. Call487-5652. n 1 » 

TWO YOUNG ROOSTERS - (table size) 
free. 547-457 1 days - 482-5733 nights, ifn 

THOROUGHBRED - 2 year old colt, 
pretty mover, good manners, no vices, 
will mature over 16 hands, $2,000. Call 

421-2363. in^ 

ABRABIAN DISPERSAL sale mafe. 
gelding. & fillies. Good bloodline. Must 
sell! 421-9693. 1, imj 

i INSTRUCTIONS y 



BASKET WEAVING CLASSES - In my 

home. Cost $35, includes supplies. 460- 

9459. 111-7 

SCUBA LESSONS - A gift of adventure - 
Scuta lesaons • Call Lynnhaven Dive. 
48 J -7949. 4.1-2 



LOST AND FOUND 



LOST CAT - Male, black/brown stripes, 
Windsor Woods area, 6 months old. 
REWARD, 340-8728. ?LL!1 

CAT - REWARD - $100 - Female, gray 
with black tiger strips, slender build, 
green eyes, no collar, disappeared Nov. 23 
from Ewell Lane, breat Bridge area. 
More infjomation, call 482-1460. 411-2 

PITBULL - Male, disappeared in Vepco 
area, answers to the name "Bear", $200 
reward leading to location of dog! Call 
855-2414 uu» 



MOTORCYCLES 



_'78 yamaha - 73CC, good condition. 
$250. Call 487-5652. nns 

81 YAMAHA - 550 Maxit. $500. Engine 
O.K., needs battery, call 853-5578. n 1 7 

82 HONDA CB125 - EC, less than 900 
mis., must sell, $600; anytime 461-2824. 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 



SAXOPHONE, Bundy. Selmer, E-C, 

$400:460-3653. it 1-1 



MUSIC LESSONS 



PIANO LESSONS - Teacher with music 
degree will accept all ages and levels. 
Ghent area. 622-7060. 4i i2-i« 



PETS 



8' BOA CONSTRICTOR - With cage, 
very tame, $250, before 9 p.m. call 4%- 

1953. ui± 

YOUNG PARAKEETS - Green and 
yellow, sky blue and aqua blue, $10 ejrc 
463-2223. 'iu-8 



POSITIONS WANTED 



HANDICAPPED person desires part or 
full time job stuffing envelopes at home; 
call Svlvia, 423-1029. ut7.^^ 



RENTALS 



NORFOLK...-2 bedroom, 1 bath, house, 
fenced yard $425. Duplex - 3 bedroom, 2 
baths. Port Norfolk, $475, 483-0948. 11 1-8 

WINDSOR WOODS • 4 bedrms, 2>/i 
baths, air, fireplace, new carpet, fenced. 
CaU 721 -7620. 411.2 



SERVICES 



ALTERATIONS AND TAILORING • 

Done by experienced professional. Fast 
service, low rates, all work guaranteed. 
Call Dawn Keams, 482-7289. 411-29 

DISC JOCKEY — All occasions with a 
variety of music. 15 years experience. 
Read> for holidays. For more info., con- 
tact Mr. Brook - 425-8356 or 340-3002 or 

486-0983 after 7. ^ 812-5-86 

CAR SPASaaS service ■ Car wash 
and/or polish by hand at your home or 
workplace. Our mobil unit comes to you. 
Price from $10. Including the interior. 
547-2820. tfn 

NEED HELP? I'm a "Jack Of All 
Trades". Tutor, artist, sec-typist, 
babysitter, and mothers helper. Norfolk 

area. Call 857-6839. 411-2 

WINTER REPAIR - Small problems 
become costly bills by Spring. Save now! 
Repairs (24 hrs.) 482-5113, satisfaction 
guaranteed. 41 1.2 

TYPIST - Experienced reasonable rates, 
Oceanfront location will accept and 
return by mail if you are out of the area. 
428-4665. Mhi 

EXPERIENCED MAN - wUI do lan- 
dscaping, all types of yard work or house 
painting. Call 486-2336 1112-18 

TYPIST - Experienced, reasonable rates. 
Oceanfront location will aicce'pt and 
return by mail if you are out of the area. 
42814665 4112-25 



ALLIED VIDEO SERVICES, INC • 

Transfer home videos and slides to video 
tape. Free estimates. Call 424-9757. ifn 



SHARE 



HOME TO LIVE IN PERMANENTLY 

for person 50-70, in exchange to watch 84 
yr. old gentlemen. Bonuses. 466-9433. 

111-8 

NEED SINGLE PERSON to share large 3 
bedroom home. $3(X) includes all. in 
Virginia Beach. Call Mike Nichols, 463- 
2H0 or 340-0335. utf 

BENT TREE — Urge house with •■ 
young professional. $200. mo. plus 'A 

milities.4»)-1586. iTl -i 

LARCHMONDT - Female with same. 
Walking distance ODU. $18(J plus 
utilities. 423-8720. 41 12-u 

GREEN RUN - Va. Beach to share 
twnhse. . on busline. $50 to $67.50 per wk . 

plus utilities. C all 4 90-033. * 12-18 

LYNNHAVEN - Professional. Non- 
smoker. Nice home. Washer, dryer. $230 
mo. plus '/> utilities. 468-0333. 4t 12-I8 



TRANSPORTATION 



MIUTARY CIRCLE • Need ride frwn 
Western Brand) area. Chesapeake. Ap- 
prox. 7 ajn. arrival. Will pay gas. 488- 
1854, 111-8 



The Virginia Beach Sun, January 8." 1986 1 1 




National Realty, Inc. 



2520GilmertonRd. 
Chesapeake, VAt 

23320 



485-5950 



CAMELOT: $62,900 spacious, 4 
bedrm, 2 bath, ranch formal living and 
dining rm, den, attached garage. Ed 
Thompeori. 4R''<"''< 

HOLLY COVE: $41 ,900 . 

3 bedrm, I '/i bath townhome extra Ig 
master bedrm., central air, fenced yard. 
Fred Helm 420-8 1 88. 

LOXLEY PLACE: 2 bedroom Cape 
Code, gas .heat, covered patio, garage, 
family room. Quiet, established area. 
LesBoykin 487-31 10. 



CAMELOT: $58,500: 4 bedroom, 2 
bath Ranch. Corner lot, living and 
dining rooms, garage. Some fruit trees. 
John Bateman 487 1 346. 

GENEVA MOBILE HOME PARK: 

$31,500. Price includes lot plus 2 
bedroom 14'x70' mobile home with 
den, fireplace, living room. Diane 
Crider 393-2647. 

BRAMBLETON: Residential or com- 
mercial building lot. Lot size 23' x 125'. 
Call for details. Gail Harrison, 483- 
6013. 

HOLLY COVE: $41,900. Excellent 
condition on 3 bedroom. IV^ bath 
Townhome. Combination dining & 
family room, living room, covered 
patio. Dex Cutler 545-9480. 

GEORGETOWN POINT: 4 bedroom, 
2Vi bath Stucco Spanish home. Game- 
room, den, fireplace. Some owner 
financing available. Clarence Pegram 
424-3504. 

N. INGLESIDE: $59,500. 3 bedroom, 
\Vi bath Ranch. Living room, den, 
fireplace, gas heat. Large fenced lot, 
detached garage. Frank Brown 485- 
3473. 

TIMBERLAKE: $58,900. SeUer will 
pay $1,000 of closing costs on 3 
bedroom 1 Vi bath Townhome. Living 
& dining room, central air, firq>lace. 
Vicki Ford 543-5062. ' 



904 Kcmpsville Rd. 

Suite 105 

Virginia Beach va. 

495-6700 



POPLAR HALLS: 4 bedroom, 2 bath 
Tri-level. Gas heat, den, attached 
garage, convenient location. Ray 
WaUace 488-51 17. 

CATHAM HALL1 $W,^efr. ^ 
bedroom, I'A bath Contemporary. 
Owner will consider financing. Living 
room, attached garage, heat pump. Doc 
Vitelli 420-1293. 

PARK PLACE: $47,900 - New 3 
bedrm, I '/i bath, colonial, living rm, 
thermal windows, wall to wail carpet. 
Fdi'*- "'hite 466-R460_________ 

ThROOKWOOD: $68,000. Spacious 4 
bedroom, I'/j bath Ranch. Large fen- 
ced yard, den, living room. Very 
flexible seller. Cindy Sanford, 463- 
5020. 

BRAMBLETON: $36,500. Duplex, 
with 1 bedroom, each unit. Stove, 
refrigerator, gas space heat. GREAT 
INVESTMENT! Hazel Hearne 463- 
0889. 

TIMBERLAKE: $49,999 - SeUers will 
pay $1,000 closing cost on 2 bedrm 
townhome, living rm, fireplace, central 
air, storage shed. Beth Munson, 474- 
0162. 

CAMELOT: 4 bedroom, 2 bath Ranch. 
Living & dining rooms, 2 dens, wood- 
burning furnace, fenced. Doc Vitelli, 
4»)-1293. 

LAKE CHRI^OPHER: $95,900. 
Priced below VA appraisal. 4 bedroom, 
2 bath Contemporary. Living & dining 
rooms, den, fireplace, 2 car garage. 
Professionally landscaped corner lot. 
Rav Wallace 488-51 17. 

UNDALE: $97,000. SeUer will pay 
some closing costs on 3 bedroom, 2 
bath brick Ranch. Living & dining 
rooms, den, fireplace, detached garage. 
MANY EXTRAS!! Cindy Sanford 463- 
5020 

EASTON PLACE: $83,430. SHOW 
(JASE CONDITION!! 3 bedroom, 2 
bath Traditional. Gas heat, fireplace, 
living & dining rooms, 1 '/i car garage. 
Edith White 466-8460. 



RICARDO, INC. 
REALTORS 

S47-45S5 
sa 1 jomMTOWN boap 

CllltAPUKI,VA 

GREAT BRIDGF. 

NORCOVA^ ESTATES: $84,900. Im- 
maculate brick ranch on large treed lot, 
huge den with fireplace close lo IVIall. 
Ralph 482-3418 or Betiv 421-7761 

MIDDLE OAKS: $73,500. Belter than 
new Colonial brick townhome, 2'/! 
baihs, deck & privacy fence priced un- 
der apprai'ial. Jean Arscmenl 482-44()n 

WILSON HEIGHTS: $95,500. Quality 1 
4BR brick ranch on ap. 'A acre in 
prestige area near schools. Nancy 
Register 547-2730. 

PINES OF WARRICK: $119,900. 
Fabulous 4BR Dutch Colonial in this 
elite, wooded area, long list of 
amenities. Shirley Clayton, 482-3646. 

CENTERVILLE FARMS: $107,000. 
On '/i acre. Spacious 4BR 2'/: baths 
Iwme with 2 cargarage'jmr'ITsfedT 
Beverly Cornell, 547-1133: 

NEW HOME SPEOALS 

EVA GARDENS: From $62,900! 
Brand new homes going fast now with 
lots of custom features. Dennis BcHstcr 

547.^015. 

ETHERIDGE MEADOWS: $89,900! 
Super value. Custom 4BR brick ranch 
by Hecht Construction, energy saving 
features, move in now. Closing Costs 
paid less PPDS. Irene Capps 421 -7350. 

POPLAR RIDGE SOUTH: From the 
$89,000! Popular Hearndon built 
homes in this fast growing area. 
Wooded section open. Model open 
daily 1-5. Tom Seddon 547-1616. 

ETHERIDGE WOODS: From 
$112,900. New section now open. 
Executive 4 BR homes, several styles 
available, choose your lot and home, 
now. Only 2 left. Open weekends 1-5. 
Ken Bowden 482-4737. 

FOXGATE QUARTER: $124,900. 2 to 
choose by Wynn Const. Unique ranch 
and 2 story, 2 car garage, lots of 
amenities Ifss Oosing costs paid less 
pPDS; Pam Biittner 482-3335. 

1 ' 



David R. Copley 
Real Estate Counselor 




428-7811 -Of.- 499-4453 -H. 



^^&l. 



Atlantic Realty 
25th 4 Pacific 



Home & Busing Cleaning 

We specialize in quality work 
Reasonable rates 

FAYTON-FAYTON 

JANITOR SERVICE 

420-4442 _ 



t 



GEORGETOWN^ 
POINT 

Home sites for sale 

for 

People Planning 

Home & Custom 

Builders 

SALES OFFICE 

333 Providence Rd. 

CALL 464-9317 



GREEN RUN - In Virginia 
Beach, all adults, 1, 2 and 3 
bedroom apartments. 
Heat and hot water included. 
Pines Apt. 468-2000. 



Norvlew Coin Shop 

Baying and Selling Gold 

and silver coins. 

Stamps. 

42 Southern Shopptaig Center 

Norfolk 853-8118 



AVON SALES 

Full or Part Time 

487-6809 



Opportunity available in sales 

and management; average 

income for sales represendves 

inCTCC98of$SS.000. 




Contact Larrr R* Coicy for 
confidential interview at 
,490-1947. 



77 Flymoulh Grand Fury 

400 engine, P/S, P/B, R/H, Air, Elec- 
tric Windows, Currenl Stk-ker. Dark 
Blue, Light Blue Top and Interior. 
Good Running Condition. 

$1 ,600 casli - negotiable - 
587-0175 



New & Like New Baby Clotding 

PREEMIE-6X 

4204 PORTSHOUTH BLVD 
ALEXANDERS CORNER 488-5261 



AUCTION SALE 

Valuable Farm Equipment Of 

Donald Stokes 

Dinwiddia, Va. 

Sat, Jan. 11 

10K)0A.M. 

.Severe weather date: Wednes- 
day, Jan. 15. 

DIRECTIONS: Take Route 460 
West from Route 1 or Interstate 
85 south of Petersburg. Va., go 1 
mile to farm (stone colqmns). 

John Deere 4400 groin combine, 
357 hours; Ford 7600 tractor, 832 
hours; Ford 800 tractor; 1973 
Ford F-700 grain truck; 9075 
miles 20,000 bushel grain bin; 
meter mill; plows, disc, planters, 
registered minature horses, 
geese, peacocks; selection of 
shop tools plus many other 
items. 

Loader available 

TERMS: Cosh or good check. 

Sole authorized by Donald 
Stokes. 

For information or brochure coll 

Bonded Auctioneers 

Paul W. Cerny & Son 

7334181 



For Classifieds 

Call Gloria At 

397-7606 




nvv 

220 Balllefield iiouJevard, South 
Chesapeake, VA 23:^20 • 482-4771 



DEKP CREEK: 22 acres! Farmhouse! 
Lots of room, close lo schools, major 
roads, ncighboring.cilies. Jennie Draper 
487-7381. 

OAK MANOR; $79,000 - Reduced! 
Need quick sell! Brick ranch with den, 
dining room, screened porch, wooded 
lot. Karen Gaskins 482-5580. 

POPLAR RIDGE: $117,000 Pool! 
Spotless 2-sloi^' colonial 4 bedroom, 
2'/2 baths, formal dining room, 16 x 16 
workshop. Dalton/Beverly Edge 482^ 
5185. 

ETHERIDGE MEADOWS: In the 

$80's - 4 bedroom ranch with custom 
features, deck, ceramic tile baths, storm 
doors and windows. Ron/Doxey 547- 
7226. 

GREAT BRIDGE: $73,000 - 135 x 2W 

Jut ! 4UH(t-Tanrh*~mtT SliiiroiTsis 
-tnmT48r-1829.' —— ~ 

CLEARFIELD: $73,000 - Just listed! 
Contemporary ranch. 2-car garage, 
quick possession. Olivia Conley 547- 
1486. 

GREAT BRIDGE: $1 10,000 - Wooded 
lot! Cape Cod! 4 bedrooms, lots of 
custom features. Good assumption. 
Beverly/Dalton Edge 482-5185. 

WILSON HEIGHTS: $90,800 
Popular floor plans! Great location! 3 
full baths. Must see. Karen Gaskins 
482-5580. 

ETHERIDGE WOODS: New listing! 4- 
bedrooms, 2-story colonial with great 
room, beautiful Williamsburg wood- 
work and decorations. Joan Kistler 547- 
0090. 

WESTOVER: $69,900 - Nifty house for 
thrifty family! extra large den, eat-in 
kitchen, detached garage. Joyce Bryant 

485-2874. 



mlkDUMAN 

MMNIMiiaSI.Sirfrii)k,V>. 

NwOBlaHoqiM 

Opai 1Mb' • JO lo I PM Swi. » u S PM. 



627-8944 



539-3434 



1984 FORD BRONCO 4x4: 2 tone 
paint, automatic, power steer, air con- 
ditioned, tilt, cruise, captain's chairs, 
one owners, perfect. $1 1 ,499. 

1983 FORD RANGER: 4 wheel drive, 
air conditioned, stereo/tape, 2 tone 
paint, wheels. Avg,^ail $7,400 sale 
price $6700. Save $705r 

1984 FORD MUSTANG: Hatchback, 
automatic, power steering, air con- 
dition, stereo, tilt wheel. Avg. retail 
$6825, sale price $6226. Save $600. 

1983 FORD LTD: 2 tone, automatic, 
power steering, air conditioning, tilt, 
cruise, power windows, stereo., Avg. 
retail $6450, sale price $5700. Save 
$750. 

1984 DODGE DAYTONA: 'Turbo', 
loaded with options, leather, 
stereo/tape, one owner $9875. 

1984 MERCURY LYNX: Station 
Wagon, automatic, power steering, air 
conditioning, stereo, only 12,000 miles. 
Avg. retail $6250, sale price $5650. Save 
$600. 

1982 MERCURY CAPRI: Coupe, 4 
speed, power steering, stereo tape, 
sunroof, economical and sporty. Avg. 
retail $4575. sale price $3800. Save 
$775. 

1984 FORD MUSTANG GT: 5 speed, 
Turbo, stereo/cassette, air con- 
ditioning, power windows, power locks, 
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1982 FORD ESCORT: Station wagon, 
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retail $4675, sale price $4,300. 



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t2 The Virginia Beach Sun, January 8, 1986 



More than bullets 



( onlinued from page 1 

the sheriff's department* and 
even FBI agents. 
The range is divided into two 

sides. 
The one side is' a fairly typical 

range with sections for rifle and 
pistol practice. There are also 
some innovative features. 

The range has metal rather 
than paper targets. The advan- 
tage is that they simulate real life 
situations tnore closely. When hit 
the targets will fall, though it may 
take more than one shot to down 
them, as can happen in an actual 
situation. 

, There are also a series of doors 
set up. The officers can use them 
to practice coming through a 
door and then sliooting. 

There are two main features in 
the second part of the range. 

Trees at the back of the range 
are ideal for sniper practice. 

White the department sttll tiscs 
ll^ "tfaiff ional' "SfiootTDonT 
Shoot" filmslQ train the officers, 
it also has a simulated course set 
up for the same purpose. 

"The shoot/don't shoot range 
is important in the officers' 
training," Wall said. "Studies 
show that most confrontations 
occur at close range and*in poor 
lighting." 

On the shoot/don't shoot 
course, officers run along an 
alley way. At the first turn there 
are a series of store fronts. 
Posters pop up at the windows of 
the store fronts and officers must 
make a split second decision on 
whether or not to shoot. One 
time the poster may be a gunman, 
another time it could be a woman 
with a child or a news 
cameraman. 

There is al^o an indoor section 
of the course. The officers come 
down a dark hallway, make a 
quick turn and are met by either 
friend or foe. 

Another innovation in the 
department has been to decen- 
tralize some of the detectives, 
Wall said. They are now handling 
property crimes out of the 
various precincts. Uniformed of- 
ficers, however, handle as many 
as one half of the investigations. 



police 
These 



Cahill's City Council Cor ner 



freeing the detectives to concen- 
trate on more serious cases. 
Mounted Patrol 

A fairly recent addition to the 
department is the Mounted 
Patrol Unit. It consists of six of- 
ficers and a lieutenant. ' 

"A mounted patrol has a 
number of advantages," Wall 
said. "They are a highly visible 
unit and can cover 10 times the 
area of a foot beat. They are also 
popular with the public." 

During the summer months the 
mounted patrol is stationed at the 
Beach and tourist areas. For the 
holiday season, they have a 
special job. The patrol'is assigned 
to the various mall parking areas 
to help in reducing crime. From 
now until the start of the summer 
season, the patrol is placed in 
high crime areas. 

More felony arrests are made 
per officer by mounted ^patrols 
than foot beats, the chief said. ^ 
" ''One of nly mounted officers 
has five drunk driving arrests," 
Wall said proudly. "Two of them 
even involved pursuits . ' ' 

The mounted patrol is also 
present at major events like 
parades. Their presence is for 
more than just show. They are 
used in crowd control. 
Volunteers 

The department also has a 
number of volunteers. 

There is an auxiliary 
force with 60 members, 
volunteer officers give a 
minimum of 20 hours per month 
to the Police Department. 

There are over 100 other volun- 
teers working in various aspects 
of the department. Wall sees this 
type of community involvement 
in the police department as the 
wave of the future. '' 

"The relationship between the 
officers and the volunteers is of 
great value," he said. "Or- 
dinarily officers only see citizens 
that are victims or who are being 
arrested. These volunteers are in- 
dicative of the general 
population. This relationship 
also helps the volunteers to see 
police in a different light. 
Perhaps this will help to improve 
the image of the police." 



Items discussed 
in closed session 

Prior to the regular Council 
meeting. Council met for three 
hours in executive session. 
Among the subjects discussed 
were appointments to boards and 
commissions and the new water 
resource recovery fee ordinance. 

Following the formal session. 
Council again went into executive 
session for a performance 
evaluation of Council appointees 
and for a discussion of an eight- 
foot bike path along little Neck 
Road to which some residents 
have objected. 

Residents feet that the eight- 
foot bike path is acceptable along 
a small portion of the road which 
'is only 18 feet widet but is not 
needed on the rest of the road 
which is 30-feet wide and serves a 
residential community. 

Residents are especially con- 

trees- ""■■ 

Council waives 
rezoning condition 

By a vote ot 8-3, Council 
waived a condition imposed on a 
rezoning application on March 
,17, 1980 which required a 100- 
foot buffer along the western side 
of property at 943 First Colonial 
Road. The trees were to remain jh 
the buffer strip. 

The request was made by the 
Virginia Wparh Federal Savings 



and Loan which is selling the 
property to 2YA Associates. 

The property was rezoned 
from R-4 To Residential District 
to O-l Office District. 

The applicant maintained that 
the condition was not required of 
other properties in the area. 

Dissenting from the waiver ac- 
tion were Vice Mayor Reba Mc- 
&lanan, and Counctlwomen 
Meyera Oberndorf and Barbara 
Henlev. 

Tax exemption 
code revised 

Senior citizens and disabled 
persons receiving tax exemptions 
are given some leaway for late 
filing under an ordinance adop- 
ted by City Council. 

The City Code sets the cut-off 
date for applying for relief at 
June 30. Ocasionally, ap- 
olications are received after the 
cut-off date and the denial of the 
relief causes hardship for ap- 
plicanlsr " ""~ "^ ' 

The new provision authorizes 
the processing of late ap- 
plications for tax exemption, 
deferral or freeze in dases where 
the applicant is a first-time ap- 
plicant, or where the failure to 
grant the relief requested would 
result in a hardship to the ap- 
plicant. 

The city manager would be 
permitted to accept and process 
late applications between July 1 
and Jan. 31 of the tax year. 




Sqmaky Clean 



STEAM 
CARPET CLEANING 



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Commercial Cleaning Available 



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588-3732 




Marcel recognized 
in resolution 

Sally A. Marcel, assistant 
registrar whd died on Novt 24 is 
recognized in a resolution adop- 
ted by City Council. 

Marcel served for 12 years at 
the Pembroke-Aragona Phar- 
macy, registering more than 
10,000 voters. 

David Marcel, her husband, 
accepted the resolution. 

Funds awarded for 
Owls Creek boat ramp 

The Commission of Game 
and Inland Fisheries has awarded 
the city $150,000 for the con- 
struction of improvements to the 
Owls Creek Boat Ramp. No city 
funds are required. 

Removal planned for 
Potters Sand Fence 

The city will try once more to 
remove the'^Potters Sand Fence. 
Council awardedacontract for 



the removal to Hydro Cor- 
poration for $148,884. the low 
bid of four under a "no-cure-no- 
pay" contract. 

The feiice erected as a device to 
keep the beach from eroding, 
proved unsuccessful and has 
become a safety hazard to swim- 
mers and boaters along the 
oceanfront from 17th Street to 
20th Street. 

Since 1979 several contracts 
have been authorized for removal 
of the fence without success. 

Last May, only two firms sub- 
mitted bids on the removal 
project and both were considered 
high. 



Council meeting 
rescheduled 

The Feb. 17 meetng of City 

Council has been rescheduled for 

Feb. 18. Feb. 17 is a legal holiday 

honoring Geoig£.- WaMngton's 

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The Vir g inia Bea cb 5un 

'"'''^''"'Il^yS'i^'''''''' ^"-^ Virginia Beach 's Newspaper o^ :i\% si >^;^ \, 25C 



Virginia Beach 's Newspaper 



Beach 
I 



Bagley to be 
keynote speaker 



Richard M. Bagley will be Ihe 
keynote speaker at the Hampton 
Roads Chamber of Commerce- 
Virginia Beach's annual meeting 
on Friday, Jan. 17 at the Pavilion 
Convention Center at noon. 



Bagley was recently appointed 
by Governor-elect Gerald L. 
Baliles to serve as Secretary of 
Commerce and Resources for the 
Commonwealth of Virginia. He 
has been a member of the House 
of Delegates of the Virginia 
General Assembly, since 1965, 
where he served as chairman of 
the House Appropriations Com- 
mittee. 

Bagley has also been a member 
of the Joint Legislative Audit and 
Review Commission; the Cor- 
porations, Insurance and 
Banking Committee; the Rules 
Committee and many others. 

Tickets are $15 per person or 
$110 for a table of ewight. Con- 
tact Hampton Roads Chamber of 
Commerce-Virginia Beach, 490 
1221 for reservations. 



Local businessmen 
elected to offices 
in state VH & MA 

Two Virginia Beach 
businessmen have been elected 
to offices of Virginia Hotel & 
Motel Association, Inc. 

Mike Savvides, General 
Manager of the Ramada Inn - 
Oceanfront was elected to the 
Boad of Directors for a three 
year term. 

Savvides will represent the 
local lodging industry and will 
make regular reports on area 
innkeeper activities at all VH 
&MA board of directors 
meetings. 

Edward Doty, assistant to the 
president of Cavalier Hotels of 
Virginia Beach, was elected 
state Treasurer. 

Doty has served as an officer 
of the association for the past 
year, and a director for ijiany 
years. 

VH& MA was organized in 
1937 aftd now represents over 
30,000 lodging rooms in 
Virginia. ~ 




Coastal Virginia 
Bank elects new 
board members 

Walter J. Blasczak, H. G. 
Browney and Randolph L. Ives 
have been elected members of the 
board of directors of Coastal 
Virginia Bank in Virginia Beach. 

Blasczak is CEO of Peck 
Purifier Sales Company and 
President of Walter J. Blasczak & 
Associates. He is a member of the 
Elks Club and Elizabeth Manor 
Country Club. 

Browney has been a Tidewater 
builder and land developer since 
1948. He is past president of the 
Military Highway Business 
Association and member of the 
Deep Creek Ruritan Club. He is 
owner of the High Chaparral. 

Ives is president of Randolph- 
Ives and Wagner, Inc. and Ham- 
pton Oil Company. He is past 
captain of the Kedive Harley- 
Davidson Unit, past president of 
the Wesleyman Bible Class , ex- 
green beret, and was a represen- 
tative of the Fifth Congressional 
District of Virginia Gasoline 
Retailers and served oo the board 
of directors. 

Other directors of Coastal are 
bank president Emmett M. 
Storey, III; Stuart H. Buxbaum; 
George A. Christie; Robert W. 
Clyburn; Joseph T. Fitzpatrick; 
Reon G. Hillegass; Jean Miller; 
Cindy Snyman; and W. Lewis 
Witt. 



L 



Virginia Beach resident Rena Paragus has been crowned Miss Philippines of Virginia 1986. Helping crown 
her are outgoing queen Cynthia Romero, also of Virginia Beach, and Philippine Consul Tony Villanor. 

Beach girl crowned Ms. 
Philippines of Virginia 



The 10th Annual Ms. Philip- 
pines pageant of Virginia, spon- 
sored by Filipino Womens Club 
of Tidewater was held recently in 
the Virginia Beach Dome under 
the direction of Rose Daria, 
executive administrator, and 
Gene K. Hammett, Artistic Ad- 
visor of the Tidewater Ballet 
Association, who served as dance 
and movement choreographer. 

Rena Parag as of Virginia 



Beach was crowned Miss Philip- 
pines of Virginia 1986 by 
outgoing queen, Cynthia 
Romero, * 

Romero, considered by the 
Philippine community as one of 
the outstanding queens, is an 
honer roll student and very in- 
volved in university community 
outreach programs. 

Her parents. Dr. Aleli and Cris 



Romero are active members in 
the Philippine community as well 
as Catholic Churches of St. 
Gregory and St. Matthew in 
Virginia Beach. 

Dr. Romero serves as 
curriculum liaison for the 
Academy of the Tidewater Ballet 
Virginia Beach branches at St. 
Gregory and St. Matthew church 
schools. 









Cityturmn 
trash into 
heat, mone^ 




By Cheryl Martin 
Stiff Writer 

The City of Virginia Beach is 
working on a project with 
Virginia Natural Gas to extract 
the methane gas produced 
naturally at Virginia Beach's 
Landfill No. 2 on Centerville 
Turnpike. 

- VNG will poirchase the 

"TTOtlrane gas from the city .- It- will - 

be mixed with VNG pipeline 

volumes and distributed to 

customers. 

The recovery of methane gas 
from landfill waste is an 
emerging technology. The 
Virginia Beach project is expec- 
ted to be the second largest such 
undertaking in the eastern United 
States, according to P. Lee 
Starkey, VNG public infor- 
mation manager. Methane is also 
being recovered at the Fresh Kills 
Landfill in New York and at ap- 



proximately eight other sites in 
the United States. 

"We seldom have projects that 
are so totally beneficial to 
everyone involved," Virginia 
Beach Vice Mayor Reba Mc- 
Clanan said. "I'm really excited 
about the project." 

, - McClanan said the city expects 

jdaj^mJ3fit.y^mXl50.Q99..ari.4 

$200,660 in revenue from the 
project annually. These funds 
will most likely go into the city's 
general fund she said. Some of 
the money may also be directed 
by into related projects. 

The city's Public Works 
department began in 1983 ! 
evaluating the recovery of: 
methane formed at the landfill . : 
In June of 1984, the City Council 
awarded the contract for the 
project to American. Alternate 

Sec TURNING, pages 



Bids open on Virginia 
Beach Boulevard widening 



Dare led to career as playwright 



By Cheryl Martin 

staff Writer 

For Deborah Pryor, being a 
playwright was not a lifelong 
ambition, but just something that 
happened. 

"Becoming a playwright 
wasn't really a conscious 
decision," the Virginia Beach 
resident said. "1 enjoyed writing 
short stories and poems when 1 
was growing up. I did have an in- 
terest in theater. As kind of a 
dare to myself I took a class in 
college (William & Mary) in. 
writing plays taught by Dr. Louis 
Catron. Things just happened 
from there." 

A requirement for the class, 
Pryor, 29, said, was to write a 
one-act play. At the end of the 
term Catron chose four of the 
plays written by students to be 
performed at the campus theater 
workshop. One of those chosen 
was Pryor's. 

It was through Catron's en- 
couragement that Pryor even- 



..i 




tually pursued a playwrighting 
career. After graduating from 
William & Mary she went on to 
receive a master's in Fine Arts in 
Playwriting from the University 
of Iowa. 



"My career as a playwright has 
just evolved," Pryor explained. 
"The theater business is like that. 
You stand on a threshhold and 
see a door open, then there are 
other doors; but there are no 
guarantees. One day you realize 
you are no longer a college student 
but a professional and a company 
is puttng on one of your plays." 

One of Pryor's plays, "Wetter 
than Water" is currently being 
performed in Norfolk by the 
Virginia Stage Company. 

The performance marks the 
opening of a new concept at the 
theater. The "Second Stage" is 
meant to be a place where several 
stages of play development can 
effectively and comfortably take 
place. 

"It is really a new concept for 
all of us involved," Pryor said. 
"The whole five weeks (two 
weeks bf rehersal and three weeks 
of performance) is like a con- 
tinuing rehersal process, during 
See DARE, page 7 



ByLeeCahill 
City Council Reporter 

The State Department of 
Highways and Transportation 
will open bids on Jan. 22 in 
Richmond on the first phase of 
the three-phase Virginia Beach 
Boulevard improvement project 
which has been in the city's 
Capital Improvement Plan since 
1972. 

Al Nash, the department's 
district engineer, told City Coun- 
cil at a recent workshop, that the 
total project, estimated to cost 
$50 million, should be completed 
by the mid I990's. Specifications 
for the first phase, from 
Rosemont Road to Witchduck 
Road, calls for a Nov. 1, 1987 
completion date. 

Nash said that the construction 
contract, which should be awar- 
ded within 30 days of the Jan. 22 
date, stipulates that two lanes will 
be open to traffic in both direc- 
tions at all times. 

Also the contractor is required 
to call a public hearing with 
property owners who will be af- 
fected by the construction. The 
public hearing, he said, will 
probably be scheduled within two 
weeks of the date the contract is 
let. 

Each of the three phases are 
expected to cost approximately' 
the same, $16 million. Although 
the actual construction cost for 



the first phase is greater, Nash 
said, the state already owns the 
required rights of way. The state 
has yet to acquire rights of way 
for the other two phases of the 
construction. 

When completed Virginia 
Beach Boulevard will have an 
eight-lane facility from the Nor- 
folk City Line to Farmington 
Road, with dual left turn lanes in 
at most intersections, phased 
traffic signalization and some 
right turn lanes. The feeder roads 
would be eliminated. 

Jim Cleveland, second district 
engineer, said the contract in- 
cludSt a bridge over Thalia 
Creek, starting first. Nash said it 
is the most complicated section 
and will probably be finished 
last. 

Generally, Nash assured coun- 
cil that efforts will be made to 
keep traffic flowing but "we're 
not going to tell you... we're not 
going to have any disturbances." 
Nash also said that the Depart- 
ment would work closely with ad- 
joining property owners. 

The road will be financed by 
the federal and state governments 
(95 percent) and the city gover- 
. nment (5 percent). 

The city's CIP contains an 
allocation of $1.5 million for the 
first phase and $8%, 150 for the 
second phase. The first phase is 
3.3 miles and phase two from 

See BIDS, page 12 



Police department adds 
more innovative programs 



By Cheryl Martin 
Staff Writer 

This is the third of 'a three-part 
series on the; Virginia Beach 
Police Department's innovative 
crime fighting lethniques. 

In keeping with its continuing 
effort to improve crime fight 
capabilities, the Virginia Beach 
Police Department is planning a 
number of new law enforcement 
programs, according to the Chief 
of Police Charles R. Wall. 

Barrett leaving . 
city for position 
in private sector 

Virginia Beach City Manager 
Thomas H. Muehlenbeck has an- 
nounced the resignation of 
Michael J. Barrett, assistant to 
the' city manager for resort af- 
fairs. 

Barrett has been employed 
with the City since 1980 and has 
served as the executive director of 
the Resort Area Advisory Com- 
mission since Jan. 1, 1985. .- 

Barrett is leaving city em- 
^iloyment to become the chief 
executive officer of the Runny- 
meade Corporation on Feb. 3. 

Muehlenbeck expressed his 
high regard for Barrett as a 
public manner and indicated 
that his professional skills and 
dedication would be missed. 



One program that Wall is very 
excited about is the Enhance 91 1 
system. This system will provide 
dispatchers with more infor- 
mation than the current 911 
system. 

Under the enhance 911 system, 
when a call comes in to the 
dispatcher the location of caller 
will appear on computer display 
terminal, Wall said. 

"This will make such a dif- 
ference," he said. "There are 
times when a caller can't tell us 
his location. It could be that the 
caller does not know his location 
or he could pass out from pain or 
smoke inhalation. 

"Under the current system it is 
very frustrating for the dispat- 
chers when they^ki»w thrxatler 
needs help and they can't send it 
because the dispatcher doesn't 
have the location of the caller," 
Wall added. 

There are other advantages to 
the enhance 911 system. 

Many of the Virginia Beach 
residents who live on the Norfolk 
border get Norfolk services when 
they call 911. These calls then 
have to be transferred to Virginia 
Beach. 

According to Wall the enhance 
system will be able to determine 
whether a call should go to 
Virginia Beach or Norfolk. Thjs 
will save valuable time in an 
-mergency situation. 

Sec INNOVATIVE. pi«e« 




Volunteers honored for outstanding service 

Ginny Hardin, s volunteer In Infant Stimulation Program sponsored by the Virginia Beach Mental Retar- 
dation Developmental Disabilities Program, plays with Johnalhon Maurid, 18 months, and Drew Bar- 
ii«n, 2, while their parents attend a meeting. Hardin is one of approximately 40 volunteers who work with 
the program. The volunteers were honored recently by the Voluntary Action Center of SoMlh Hampton 
Roads for their outstanding service to the cominunity. 



^mmmmmmmmmt 



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2 The Virginia Beach Sun, January 15. 198(S 



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The battle goes on 

Drunk driving has received a lot oif publicity over 

- the past years in Virginia Beach and elsewhere 

throughout the country. The holiday season has 

been an ideal time to remind people of the dangers 

of drinking and driving. 

In fact many Beach <!^idents may feel too much 
has been said on the subject and that it has reached 
overkill. Recent statistics of holiday highway 
fatalities speak djiferently. 

Over the recent Christmas and New Year's 
holidays the death toll in Virginia reached 21 
people with only a couple of these deaths being 
directly attributed to alcohol consumption. 

During the same period last year, 29 people wdre 
killed with at least seven deaths being attributed to 
alcohol consumption. 

While eight may not appear to be a significant 
decrease, it still means ijiat eight more lives are con- 
tinuing than were after last holiday season. 

The daflgeif s of Jfrinfcii^ and^ivift&can never be 
repeated too many times. The campaign against 
driving under the influence of alcohol or other 
drugs must continue until the time when no deaths 
can be attributed to this killer. 

Throughout the year, not just during the 
holiday season, Virginia Beach residents must 
remember the importance of having a designated 
driver when there will be drinking. By the same 
token. Beach residents who host parties and serve 
alcohol must make arrangements for the safe 
arrival home of all of their guests . 

The fight against drinking and driving is a con- 
tinuous battle all must wage. —CM. 



Understanding religious freedom 

Thursday, Jan. 16 marks the 200th anniversary 
of the adoption of "A Statute For Religious 
Freedom." The bill, passed in 1986 by the Virginia 
General Assembly was the first in Western history 
to outlaw religious persecution. 

The Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom was 
drafted in 1777 by Thomas Jefferson. At the time 
he wrote the bill, the idea of separation of church 
and state was difficult to accept for many 
Virginians. - 

Even Patri^k^fPS;, iv^MeJoquently denoun- 
ced taxation without representation, supported 
another bill that would establish a general 
assessment for Christian worship. The tax would 
replace an earlier .assessment that had been ear- 
marked for sujjport of the Anglican Church . 

Largely through the efforts of James Madison 
the legislation was passed. 

Five years later, in drafting the First Amen- 
dment of the Constitution the philosophy expressed 
in the Virginia statute became the law of the land. 

In the statute, Jefferson expressed his feelings 
about corruption associated with an alliance of 
church and state. He wrote: "To compel a man to 
furnish contribiitions of money for the 
propagation of opinions which he disbelieves, is 
sinful and tyrannical... Our civil rights have no 
dependence on our religious opinions, any more 
than our opinions in physics or geometry ..." 

For Jefferson the statute did more than just 
guarantee the freedom to choose a church. The 
statue was concerned with intellectual liberty. 

In writing to Madison, Jefferson said, "It is 
honorable of us, to have produced the first 
legislature with the courage to declare, that the 
reason of man may be trusted with the formation 
of his own opinions." 

Jefferson's wish for himself and his countrymen 
was freedom to pursue religion where ever in- 
telligence and conscience led. 

This is a very important concept to remember . 

In recent years much has been said about the 
freedom of religion and the separation of church 
and state. The moral majority and other religious 
groups argue that it is wrong not to have prayer in 
schools. They have objected to the lack of religious 
information in public schools regarding Christian 
holidays. 

While on the surface their complaints may ap- 
pear to have some validity, it is lost when the true 
concept of the right of religious freedom is remem- 
bered. 

Americans tend to forget that religious freedom 
is not limited to the choice of which Christian 
denomination one chooses to associate. Rather, 
religious freedom is the right to adhere to any 
religious philosophy or to choose no religious af- 
filiation. 

Under the Constitution, Americans are afforded 
the right to worship the God of their choice, be he 
the Christian, Jewish or Moslem God or even 
Satan, They may also choose to worship trees or 
money or any deity they wish. 

The 200th anniversary of "A Statute For 
Religious Freedom" is* an ideal time to stop and 
regrasp the true meaning of the legislation. —CM. 




Writer's 
Block 



Great Neck archeological 

to be rescued 




By Howard A. MacCord Sr. 

One of the prices we pay for 
progress, prosperity, comfort 
and convertience is the damage or 
destruction of archeological sites, 
both historic and prehistoric. We 
lose hundreds of such sites every 
year in Virginia. Such losses are 
inevitable, and 1 doubt if most 
citizens would vote to save a 
majority of sites, if doing so 
would block progress or interfere 
with our c^-nfort or prosperity5^ 

Commentary 

On the other hand, historians 
and archeologists generally see 
the loss of sites as the destruction 
of evidence needed in the resear- 
ch they do on behalf of the 
public. They know how incom- 
plete and fragile the record of the 
past is, and they hate to see any 
site lost without having a chance 
to see, evaluate and (in important 
cases) study it. 

How to reconcile the needs for 
progress with needs to study im- 
portant archeological sites is a 
problem our society has not yet 
solved to evejaine's satisfaction. 
The ma|or s^fflbling block is the 
colt of Stcn^udies, and who 
pays? 

If a site is lost due to a 
federally-funded or licensed 
project, federal laws require 
historical and archelogical studies 
to be done (and paid for) as part 
of the project. This places the ar- 
cheological remains in a category 
with timber, non-historic struc- 
tures, groundwater, bedrock, or 
^ther items which must be moved 
or coped with as part of the 
project. 

However, federal laws apply 
only to about 10 percent of the 
many earth-disturbing projects 
done annually in the Common- 
wealth. 

For the other 90 percent, no 
provision is made for the needed 
studies. In some instances, a 
civic-minded landowner or 
developer will pay (or help pay) 
for archeological studies. Such 
efforts often provide favorable 
publicity for and attract attention 
to the project or development. 

In rare instances, a developer 
preserves a historic site as a per- 
manent attraction. Good exam- 
ples of this are the study and sub- 
sequent protection of, colonial 
house sites at Kingsmill near 
Williamsburg, and the preser- 
vation and interpretation of a 
canal lock in Richmond as part of 
a project done for Reynolds 
Metals Company. 

Who should pay, though, for 
historical-archeological studies 
done on other sites? 

It does not seem fair to expect 
or require the land-owner to pay, 
since in many cases, the historic 
site has no economic value to the 



owner. Actually, historic and 
prehistoric sites and data belong 
to the whole public, although 
through accidents of history, sites 
happen to be on land owned by 
individuals or corporations. 

Since study of a site is 
beneficial to the pijblic, and the 
data become public property, 
such studies are truly "Public 
Business". As such, it seems only 
fair that public funds be iised for 
suchg work. 

Funding can be from one sour- 
ce alone, or it can be a mix of 
local, regional, state, and federal 
appropriations, supplemented in 
any case, by contributions of 
money, supplies, equipment 
time, and labor from a variety of 
non-governmental sources. Using 
a mix of such resources in 
rescuing data from a site results 
in maximum data-yield at least 
cost, which is the desired result. 

Many sites have been studied in 
this manner in the past, and the 
jnethod holds the greatest 
promise for low-cost results on 
future projects. 

Great Neck Site 

I Given this background and 
' philosophy, let us address the 
need for rescue work at a major 
archeological site at Great Neck, 
at the north end of Pungo Ridge, 
between Broad Bay and Lyn- 
nhaven Inlet. This area contained 
what was without doubt the most 
important Indian site in all of 
Tidewater Virginia. 

Because of the location, the 
good soil, and the diverse food 
sources available, the site has 
been (and is) a highly-desirable 
place to live. 

Indians lived on the site off 
and on for about 10,000 years, 
and at least one major, fortified 
town was there during late 
prehistoric times. 

In 1585, the village of 
Chesepiuc, visited by explorer 
Ralph Lane of the Roanoke 
Island colony, was at Great 
Neck, and shows on John 
White's map of the region. Two 
other sites shown on the map are 
Apasus, on the west side of Lyn- 
nhaven Inlet, and Skicoac, 
located on the eastern branch of 
Elizabeth River in Norfolk. None 
of the three sites h^ yet been 
identified with certainty. 

Since the Chesepiuc (also 
Chesopean and Chesapeake) In- 
dians were friendly, the land bet- 
ter than that on Roanoke Island, 
and the deepwater port (Ham- 
pton Roads) far superior to 
Albemarle Sound, the 1587 
colony intended originally to set- 
tle at or near Cape Henry. 

Instead, they were landed at 
Roanoke Island, from which 
place they planned to move north 
as soon as they could. While the 
Lost Colony is still "lost", it ap- 



pears that they did actually move 
north and live with or near the 
Chesopiean Indians for many 
years. They were later killed by 
Chief Powhatan, shortly before 
the arrival of the Jamestown 
colony in May, 1607. 

Evidence to prove or disprove 
the fate of the Lost Colony is 
waiting to be found in ar- 
cheological sites representing the 
late prehistoric Indians of the 
Chesopiean Tribe and their 
neighbors. The proof has not yet 
been found, because almost no 
archeological work has been done 
in the area. 

Still worse, no deliberate 
program to seek the evidence is 
planned for the area. 

In contrast, the North Carolina 
Four Hundredth Anniversary 
Committee, working with East 
Carolina University, is making a 
deliberate search of archeological 
sites in eastern North Carolina 
for evidence of contact between 
the Lost Colony people and the 
local Indians. 

A similar search should be 
made in Virginia. 

Over the years, Floyd Painter 
of Norfolk has, in jiis spare time, „ 
been studying the Indian sites in 
the area, including a limited 
amount of digging. Around 1956, 
he was able to salvage materials 
and data from a mixed Indian 
and White site where Baylake 
Pines subdivision is now built. 

The items he found date from 
early in the 1 7th century, which 
indicate an early settler's 
homesite, built on what had been 
an Indian habitation site, 
possibly Apasus. 

Digging at Great Neck 

Since 1978, Painter has been 
digging part of the Great Neck 
Site (also known as the Riding 
Ring Site and as Virginia Beach 
site No. 7). He has found several 
graves^ storage pits, quantities of 
broken pottery, animal bones 
and shells, and stone tools and 
waste. Painter has published 
reports on his 1956 work and on 
part of his more-recent work. 

In 1981-82, Dr. E. R. Turner, 
III of the Virginia Research Cen- 
ter for Archaeology (VRCA) dug 
part of one building lot at Great 
Neck at the request of the lot 
owner, who was building a home 
there. 

Turner found graves, storage 
pits, parts of a village palisade, 
and parts of two Indian 
longhouses or cabins, like those 
illustrated by John White and 
Captain John Smith. A report on 
Turner's work is not yet written 
or published. 

In 1984, a fringe area of the 
Great Neck Site was uncovered in 
the right-of-way for Highway 279 
(Great Neck Road) by ar- 
cheologists from James Madison 

See GREAT, page 9 



The Virginia Beach Sun 



Biublisheitki 1926 



138 South Roseimnt Road 
Virpnia Beach, Vlr^wi 23452 
(804) 486-3430 

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puUuhtr 



GrtfoyO. GMfarb 



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CityCtuiKirtpertiei 

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published every Wwincsday by 
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Second Class postage (UPPS- 
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Robots are 
coming to 
the beach 

By Cheryl Martin 
Sr»ff Writer 

Robots are coming to 
Virginia Beach! 

Unlike the Transformers and 
other robotic creatures that in- 
Vaded Virginia Beach homes at 
Christmas time, these robots 
are not for child's play. 

Their specialty is trash collec- 
tion. Yes, exiting things will be 
happening in the way of trash 
collection in the city beginning 
in March. 

A new, automated trash 
collection system will begin in 
March at 16,000 homes in some 
sections of the Green Run, 
Kempsville, Pembtokfi ^ and 
Great Neck areas of the city. 

With the new system, one 
employee drives the truck to the 
front of a home and pulls a 
lever that triggers a robot arm. 
The arm will grab the can, hoist 
it into the air and dump the 
contents inside the truck. The 
robot arm will then put t*he can 
back on the street. 

I wonder if robot trash 
collecting arms are any quieter 
than human garbagemen. 
Imagine an end to the banging 
and slamming of garbage cans 
at 6 a.m. 

Could they possibly be 
neater? What an innovation. 
No more dented, squashed cans 
or piles of spilled garbage to 
contend with at the end of trash 



Only time will tpll if these 
robot trash collectors have beert 
programmed with all this in- 
novation. Even if they are noisy 
and messy they don't eat as 
much or need holidays like 
human garbagemen. 

All in all I find the whole 
concept fascinating. I hope I can 

keep my curiousity under con- 
trol until March, when I see 
these creatures in action. 

Not thrilled by robots? 
Perhaps a new4rash can com- 
pliments of the city will excite 
you. 

Yes. The city will provide 
homeowners on the robot 
routes with special garbage 
cans. 

Now these are no ordinary 
garbage cans, mind you. They 
are 90-gallon cans. This means 
they will hold as much trash as 
three ordinary garbage cans. 

These large cans will hold 
items such as shrub trimmings 
and discarded Christmas trees, 
along with large boxes and all 
of the family's garbage. 
Imagine, everything neatly 
placed in one can. I'll bet they 
will foil most dogs too. 

You look perplexed. Oh! 
You are wondering how on ear- 
th you are going to carry such a 
large can to the curb each week. 
No problem. This time the city 
has thought of everything. 

These amazing cans come 
equipped with wheels! 

If you have a very large 
family and fear that even a 90- 
gallon can will not, be able to 
handle a week's refuse there is 
still hope. Additional cans may 
be purchased at True Value 
Home Centers. 

Now with the amazing trash 
cans the city will discourage 
residents from piling up other 
items along the curb. Bulky 
items, like refrigerators, sofas 
and tree trimmings will be 
picked up separately. 

With all this automation I 
wonder if the city has a plan to 
help remind husbands to place 
garbage out front each week? 

Maybe they could program 
the robot arm to snatch absent- 
minded husbands out of bed on 
trash day. This treatment would 
quickly cure the problem. 

Oh, the beauty of this system 
is almost endless. 

Can you believe all this 
automation is actually going to 
save the city money. That's 
right. The city expects to save 
$3.1 million over the next six 
years. 

Six years is the time it will 
take to phase the program in 
throughout the entire city. 

Now that's what I call 
phenomenal— progress com- 
bined with financial savings. 

On top of all this, those of 
you who dislike progress 
because it takes jobs away from 
Sec ROBOTS, ptfe 3 






The Virginia Beach Sun. January IV 1986 





Teachers working to 

I. 

see dreams come true 



Virginia Beach teachers join 
with Our colleagues' around the 
nation this month in celebrating 
two upcoming national events. 

The first national holiday in. 
honor of Dr. Martin Luther 
King, Jr. will be celebrated on 
Jan. 20. Teachers were among 
the thousands of Americans who 
worked to see this holiday 
become a reality. 

On this special day, we en- 
courage all citizens to take the 
time to remember and reflect 
upon the ideals of equality, 
freedom and brotherhood for 
which Dr. King stood and fpr 
which he paid the highest price. 
His quest for economic and social 
justice in America had its foun- 
dations in the historic words of 
our founding fathers that "all 
men are created equal" and are 
entitled to "life, liberty, and the 
pursuit of happiness." 

Dr. King's dream of an 
America where people are judged 
by the "content of their charac- 
ter" and where opportunities are 
open to all is one that will not 
fade. 

As educators, we contmue to 
work fot his dream because we 
believe that justice and equality 
are ideals which hold forth the 
promise of a brighter tomorrow 
for all our%children and our 
nation. 

This month will also see the 



fruition of another dream. The 
dream of space flight has nour- 
ished the national imagination 
since the early 1960's when 
President John F. Kennedy 
challenged Americans on the 
•moon by the end of the decade. 
The goal was accomplished and 
our space program has continued 
to achieve new heights. 

While throughout these last 
years space flight has been reser- 
ved for those few with specialized 
training, all that will change this 
month with the voyage of the 
space shuttle Challenger. On 
board will be the first "private 
citizen" to fly in space, Christa 
McAuliffe, a wife, nipther of two 
and a history teacher from Con- 
cord, New Harfipshire. 

Chosen from 10 finalists out of 





a field of more than 11,000 
teacher applicants, McAuliffe 
said in a recent interview, "I 
want to open the door. The fact 
that just an ordinary person is 
able to fly says a lot about our 
future." 

She plans to share her ex- 
perience with thousands vof 
American students when she 



conducts two lessons to be 
televised live from the space shut- 
tle. 

The first lesson is entitled, 
"The Ultimate Field Trip" and 
will include a lour of the shuttle 
and a discussion of the 
astronauts' jobs. 

The second lesson will deal 
with the reasons for and benefits 
of space exploration and will be 
called "Where We've Been, 
Where We're Going, Why?" 

The lessons will be transmitted 
to classrooms through the Public 
Broadcasting Service (locally 
WHRG-TV). 

The other finalists in the 
teacher in space competition are 
available to speak to classes or 
groups about the space program. 
Teachers can request such a 
presentation by writing the 
Education Services Office at the 
Langley Research Center, Ham- 
pton, V A 23665. 

McAuliffe's journey will truly 
be an exicitng adventure. Space 
travel and space living will be a 
part of our children's future. 

Already NASA has announced 
plans for the construction of a 
space station in the early 1990's. 

This mission of the Challenger 
will help all citizens to see that the 
future is now. We wish McAulif- 
fe 'Godspeed!'- 




m©M:E Overcoming the 

anxiety of computers 



By 
arolyn Caywood 



"Computer literacy" always 
makes me feel like a blacksmith 
in the age of General Motors. It 
somehow suggests that I'm old- 
fashioned, not too bright, and 
approaching joblessness. 

According to author John 
Shore this kind of anxiety is often 
unnecessary. Computer anxiety 
can be caused by a variety of fac- 
tors ranging from the conviction 
that "I'm going to break it!" to 
jargon that sounds like it came 
froni,a bad spy thriller. 

In his book. The Sachertorte 
Algorithm, Shore gives an exam- 
ple: "One of your processes 
branched to an illegal address, 
tried to execute Joe's code, and 
died after committing a fatal 
protection violation." 

This, he says, "Encourages the 
anxious computer novice about 
as much as medical humor en- 
courages the preoperative 
patient." 

Poor instructions or documen- 
tation and callousness born of 
ignorance on the part of bosses 
complete the process of 
frightening the very people com- 
puters are supposed to help. 

The Sachertgrte A Igorithm and 
Other Antidotes to Computer 
Anxiety is an informative and 
witty way to begin replacing these 
worries with understanding. 

There are reasons to worry 
about computers but they are not 
necessarily the ones that concern 
most people. Rather than fearing 
how foolish, the computer will 
make us look, we need to wonder 
whether our data is really safe in 
today's complex software. 

Shore explains clearly and sim- 
ply how both software and hard- 
ware work. 

He uses the example of his 
Aunt Martl's recipe for sacher- 
torte to show how a computer 

iRobots are coming 

Continued from p»g* 2 

hard working people, can rest 

easy. 

Not one trash collector will 
be laid off as a result of the new 
system. In time the total num- 
ber of employees may decrease 
through attrition. 

I wonder if other Virginia 
Beach residents are planning to 
watch this historic event on 
their first trash collection day in 
March. I know lam. 



follows ihsti-uctions. Readers 
without any background can .feel 
confident that they understand 
the basic principles involved. 

This provides the necessary 
background so Shore can discuss 
the "software crisis"~the wide- 
spread existence of unreliable 
software. 

The software crisis occurs as 
programs increase in size and 
complexity. Methods of building 
programs that worked on a small 
scale become traps whfen they are 
applied to large projects. 

Shore sees programming as a 
literary activity as well as 
mathematics and architecture. 
Bringing these three disciplines 
together can control complexity. 

A comparison of Strunk and 
White's Elements of Style with 
Kernigh^n and Plauger's book 
The Elements of Programming 
Style shows how a program 
resembles an essay. 

Designing the structure of a 
program requires one to think 
like an architect. Shore feels that 
"Structure is the key to coping 
with software's intrinsic com- 
plexity." In order to visualize this 
complexity, consider that, 

"In two hours on a computer 
that executes a million instruc- 
tions per second (fast^ but still 



modest by supercomputer stan- 
dards), about seven billion in-^ 
structions get executed. Con- 
structed from billions of their 
basic building blocks, computer 
programs are elaborate structures 
by any measure. 

For comparison, imagine that 
seven billion pieces are used to 
construct a skycraper 200 feet 
square and 1500 feet tail-that 's a 
total volume of sixty million 
cubic feet, considerably larger 
than the Empire State Building. 

If this volume were divided in- 
to seven billion pieces, the 
average piece would be a cube 
with sides about 2.5 inches. In 
fad, skyscrapers are constructed 
out of much larger pieces. Com- 
puter programs are fnankind's 
most elaborate artifacts. " 

People who will never write a 
program still need to get past 
their anxieties and take advan- 
tage of this flexible, capable, per- 
vasive and important tool. The 
Sgchertorte Algorithm is a large 
step in that direction. 

Readers can use it to "Patch 
the cracks in user-friendly 
facades" as well as to develop in- 
formed opinions about the effec- 
ts of computers. Reading this 
book is as much a delight as a 
reassurance. 



The American Dream is 
theme for January courses 



"The American Dream: Past, 
Present, and Future," is the 
theme for January term courses 
at Virginia Wesleyan College. 

David G. Garraty, assistant 
professor in management, 
business and economics, is the 
director of the unique program. 

"January Term at Virginia 
Wesleyan provides an oppor- 
tunity for students and faculty to 
pursue a single subject of their 
choice in an intensive two-weeic 
course of study in the middle of 
the academic yeaf," Garraty 
said. 

A numbcrof faculty members 
are offering courses which relate 
to the theme. These projects run 
the gamut from the Broadway 
musical and Hollywood versions 
of the American dream to the 
v^ real nightmare of hazardous 
wastes. . 

On-campus courses include 
"Determining the Odds on 
Chemical Risks," "What if the 
American- Dream Became a 



Nightmare?," "Risky Business: 
Hollywood's View of Growing 
Up in America," "Finding 
Folklore: An Introduction to 
Fieldwork," and "A Nicer 
Giant." 

In preparation of Black 
History Month observed in 
February, a course entitled "The 
Dream Lives On" will be offered 
and will focus on the lives, con- 
tributions, struggles, and dreams 
of black Americans. 

Other courses offered cover 
such subjects as cartooning, 
dream interpretation, law school 
and legal careers, gourmet 
cooking, the good and bad 
association of bacteria and food, 
visiting pre-Revolutionary chur- 
ches in Virginia, motivating 
votnmeer workers, sewing, and 
more. 

Although these courses carry 
no academic credit, two January 
Terms must be successfully com- 
pleted by students to meet 
graduation requirements. 



Virginia Beach 
Newsweek in Review 

iht Mhmit^ \%*mot$am* of the majof aews Morie* arf««Httg Virginia »?»ch duriftg <•» »»«* **fek. 



i ^ ^ili^^s-»^,»M ■ 'ni ^ *^ tf^A \ t^**.'t 



Beach condemnation 
and restoration urged 

The Ocean Park Civic 
League asked the City Council 
to condemn and restore almost 
a mile of severely eroded 
Chesapeake Bay beach, whose 
ownership has been in question 
for more than 50 years. 

The city and the new Ocean 
Park Corp. are waging a battle 
in Norfolk Circuit Court over 
the beach, which is immediately 
west of Lynnhaven Inlet. 

The residents said in a letter 
to Mayor Harold Hesichober 
that while litigation has been 
going on the beach has been 
eroding and the rights of the 
public destroyed. 

At high tide, about half an 
acre of the disputed beach 
property is under water. 

The residents have charged 
that the dredging of the Lynn- 
haven Inlet by the Army Corps, 
of Engneers has hastened the 
demise of the beach. 

Among the questions to be 
settled in the 19-year old Ocean 
Park court case are: Is the 
beach public or private? If it is 
private who owns it? 

Land dealer Edwin B. Lin- 
dsley Jr. claims he owns the 
beach front. 

The Ocean Park residents say 
that the city may condemn the 
beach without weakening its 
claim of public ownership. 

Catholic center hoping 
for June opening 

The Catholic Family and 
Children's Services is hoping 
for a June opening of its new 
5,000 square-foot building on 
Princess Anne Road. 

"This new office means a 
wider range of services will be 
available to the families of 
Virginia Beach," Elizabeth C. 
Growling, executive director, 
said. 



The new office will be behind 
the Kempsville Masonic Lodge 
and near the Church of the 
Ascension at 4844 Princess An- 
ne Rd. The office is presently at 
5347 Virginia Beach Blvd. 

The non profit organization 
each year serves thousands of 
people. 

McCoy intends to run 
for fourth council term 

J. Henry McCoy Jr. announ- 
ced he will run for a fourth term 
on the City Council. 

McCoy, a 52-year-old den- 
tist, represents the Kempsville 
Borough. No challengers have 
yet declared for his seat. 

McCoy said he feels he has 
gained a lot of experience over 
the past 12 years on council. In 
his next term he hopes to ad- 
dress what he calls the three 
niajor problems facing the 
'cify^walef, schools and roads. 

McCoy was first elected in 
1974 to the council, defeating 
incumbent Garland Isdell. He 
was unopposed for re-election 
in 1978, and won' a plurality of 
votes in a 1982 six-way race. 

jIn addition to McCoy's seat, 
others up for election this year 
arf the at-large seats now held 
by Nancy A. Creech and Robert 
G. Jones, Pungo Borough held 
by Barbara M. Henley and 
Bayside Borough held by Louis 
Jones. 

Fletcher elected School 
Board chairman 

James N. Fletcher, a depar- 
tment store manager, was elec- 
ted chairman of the Virginia 
Beach School Board. 

After his unanimous election 
by the board, Fletcher pledged 
to push for better com- 
munications between the board 
and City Council. 

He takes the leadership role 
formerlv held bv Rov A 



Woods, who was not reappoin- 
ted to the board. 
Vice Chairman Robert' H. 
vtallis Jr. will remain in the 
'"same post at least until July, 
when the board annually elects 
officers. 

Fletcher took over the chair- 
man's gavel at a board 
workshop that also featured the 
swearing of two new mem- 
bers, Flo^d E. Taylor and 
Ulyssess V. Spiva. 



I 




Spence named 
Neptune chairman 

Melvin M. Spence, a Virginia 
Beach architect, has been 
named the chairman of the 1986 
Neptune Festival by the Nep- 
tune Festival Board of Direc- 
tors. 

Spence, who succeeds 
Douglas Talbot, served last 
year as^vice chairman and has 
actively supported the festival 
for the past 10 years. 

Spence is a former member 

See NEWSWEEK. pa2e 12 



Be /Vly Valentine! 




THE HEART 
$15 

(Actual Size) 




This Valentine's Day warm someone's tieart by 
showing them how much you care by publishing 
your personal Valentine message in The 
Virginia Beach Sun's F^. 1 2 Valentine's Day issue. 

To order your Valentine ad simply write your 
special message below and enclose your persortal 
check. 

Mail ad and check to Valen^ne, The Virginia 
Beach Sun, t38 South Rosemont Road, Virginia 
Beach. Virginia. 23452. 

Please keep message to 20 words. 

(Please circle one) 
The Heart The Kiss The Cupid 

My Message: 

(Please type or print) 



THE KISS 
$10 

(Actual Size) 




THE CUPID 
$5 

(AcUMlSize) 



Name/number of person senefcig ad , 



For more Information call 547-4571 



'wm 



4 I hi^ Viruinia Beach Sun. I;inii,i 



ii)K6 



Free lecture series set at the Arts Center 

The Virginia Beach Arts Center will present a slide/lecture series by 
arts professionals beginning Tuesday, Jan. 2! and contitrues through 
Feb. 25 at 7 p.m. in the Arts-Centner's main gallery. 

.This series is free and open tolhe public. The talks will be given by 
area artists and art historians. ■ 

Participation for this lecture series is limitM to 50. For reservations 
call VBAC at 425-0000. 



Virginio Beach Happenings 



Virginia Beach DMV offices closed 

Virginia Beach Department of Motor Vehicle offices and driver's 
testing stations will be closed Monday, Jan. 20, in observance of Lee- 
Jackson-King Day. Many vehicle license agencies will be open that day, 
however, and DMV sflggests calling first to be sure. 

Mammography screening available 

The Virginia Beach Unit of the American Cancer Society is joining in 
a s»atewideft«e9«"€«meer©eteetioB'Awar«fless Program. 

Through Jan. 17 Virginia Beach women ages 35 or older can call I- 
800-468-8898 to be screened for eligibility for mammography to be of- 
fered in February at $40 in cash (no checks). 

Casting for movie set for Beach 

American Independent Productions, from HoHyweed, is conducting 
a rrationwide talent search lolcasi a new^jnaior motion picture called, 
"StarDancer". 

In Virginia Beach, an open casting call/talent search will be at 
"Rogue's". 507 N. Birdneck Rd. 

Bloodmobile coming to Sanpiper Rec. 

American Red Cross bloodmobile will be at the Saiipiper Recreation 
Center Building, 720 New Guinea Street on Friday, Jan. 17 from 9 a.m. 
to 3 p.m. • • 

CPR classes offered by Red Cross 

° The Virginia Beach office of the American Red Cross will offer CPR 
on Saturday, January 18 and Wednesday, January 29. 

Also, Multi-Media First Aid is scheduled for Saturday, January 25. 

Preregistration is required for these classes and a $12 fee is required 
to cover course expenses. Call the Virginia Beach office, 449-2311 for 
information. 

Adam Thoroughgood DAR to meet 

The Adam Thoroughgood Chapter, National Society Daughters of 
the American Revolution, will hold its regular meeting at the home of 
Mrs. W. E. Vanden Bu»g, on Thursday; Jan. 16, at 10:30 a.m. The ad- 
dress is 245 Capot Road, Virginia Beach. 

The speaker for the meeting will be Commander W. C. Luedtde, 
USN(Ret.). 

Sons of Italy lodge meeting slated 

A general meeting of Sons of Italy of Roma Lodge No. 254 will be 
held at 3097 Magic Hollow Blvd., Virginia Beach, on Monday, Jan. 27 
af 7:30 p.m. 

Beach art students' works displayed 

Virginia Beach art students' works are among those on display at the 
YWCA of Tidewater Fifth Annual Teen Art Show. The show begins- 
Jan. 26 and runs through Jan. 3 1 . 

The awards ceremony will be held on Jan. 26, at 3 p.m. at the 
YWCA. 

For information, call the YWCA, 625-4248. 

Variety of health programs offered 

The Virginia Beach Health Department Hypertension Control 
Program is now located at the Human Resources Building: 3432 
Virginia Beach Boulevard, Suite 103. 
The staff will coMuct free employee blood pressure screenings and 
jcatioMi programs for local businesses and industries upon request. 
Jtviquals may make appointments for blood pressure screening 
and cotnlselling by calling 463-4241 . 




WICKS! 

FOR KEROSENE HEATQtS 
NEXT DAY DELIVERY BY MAILI 

SAVE TIM^* MONEV BY FOLLOWING THESE STEPS: 

1 . FIND BRAND NAME & MODEL NUMBER OF HEATER. 

2. CALL 3W-S75S FOR PRICE (MOST BRANDS $4.M.7.*5 
PLUS TAX , POSTAOE & HANDLINGi 

3. SEND CHECK OR nIonEY ORDER TO: 

The Hearthstone 

610 fflGH ST. PORTSMOUTH. VA. 23704 

Htalenfmm 159 M • Hardio-fuid wicks our sperialiy • Wt iiaull wxks, loo! 



FANTASTIC 
SEAFOOD, 
GREAT STEAKS. 




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SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 

3010 HIGHS" • PC^SMOnTi- 

-397-8196 




Comic book convention coming to Beach 

A comic book and science fiction conventioii will be held on Satur- 
day, Jan. 25 at Pavilion Convention Center from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Admission is (3. and^inc4udes movies and ati activities. — 



Astrologer to lecture in Virginia Beach 

World famous astrt^oger Noel Tyl will return to Virginia Beach to 
present an all-day lecture workshop, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 18, 
in the Ramada Inn at 7th and Oceanfront. 

■ For advance reservations and information, contact Ted Sharp, 425- 
6933. 

Winter wildlife film festival scheduled 

Back Bay National \Vildlife Refuge will host an afternoon of wildlife 
films on Sunday, Jan. 26, from 1 to 3 is.m. in the Visitor Contact 
Station auditorium. 

Those interested in attending should come early since there is seating 
capacity for only 40 individuals in the auditorium. For information call 
the Refuge Center. 804-721-2412. 



More events on page 6 



I'On Golden Pond" auditions set 

The Virginia Beach Parks and Recreation Department's Performing 
Arts Ui#t will be holding auditions for "On Golden Pond" Friday, 
Jan. 24 from 7 to 10 p.m. and Saturday, Jan. 25 from 1 to 5 p.m. 

The play requires a cast of three men ages 35-70, two women ages 15- 
70 and one boy age 10-15. Evening and weekend rehearsals are 
-sdleduled and will take place at the Kempsville Recreation Center 
Playhouse. 

Performances of the play will beheld March 13 through 23. For in- 
formation, call Ann Hicks or Pam felley, 4^5^1892. 

Course on mysticism offered at library 

Steven Poplin of Old Dominion University will lead a noncredit 
course on mysticism on Thursday mornings beginning Thursday, Jan. 
23, at 10 a.m. at the Oceanfront Area Library. 

The course has a fee of $52 and will last through Thursday, March 
13. 

CaH the library, 428-41 13 for information and to register. 

High school senior art exhibit set 

The Department of Art and School of Arts and Letters at Old 
Dominion University announced the 1986 High School Senior Juried 
Art Exhibition to be held Jan. 26-Feb. 16 at the University Gallery. 
Works by seniors in Virgiia Beach will be among those selected for the 
exhibition on the basis of originality, artistic quality and technical 
execution. Julia Boyd, Curator of Contemporary Art at the Virginia 
Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, will serve as Juror. 

Categories in the exhibition will include Painting, Drawing, Print- 
making,, Photography, Sculpture and Mixed Media/Crafts. 

The University Gallery, 765 Granby Street, is open from noon to 5 
p.m. on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. - 

For information on the exhibition and entry procedures, contact 
Jean Kondo Weigl or Ron Snapp, Co-directors of the University 
Gallery, Department of Art, ODU, 440-4047. 

Fogg's Restaurant site of VRA meeting 

The Virginia Beach Chapter of the Virginia Restaurant Association 
will meet at Fogg's Seafood Restaurant, 415 Atlantic Ave. on Monday, 
Jan. 20 at 7 p.m. The program will be an alcohol awareness seminar 
presented by the Norfolk Beverage Company. 

The new officers of the Virginia Beach Chapter are president - 
Wayne Rauch of ForH^den City first vice president - Kal Kassir of the 
Corner Market Pub and Restaurant; second vice president - Michael 
Freer of the Lynnhaven Lounge; treasurer - William G. Gillon Jr. of 
Abbey Road Restaurant and secretary - Linda J. Gray. 

The 1986 Board of Directors are William R. Miller III of Duck In; 
David Grimm of Long John Silver; Nabil Kassir of the Crosswinds, 
and Robert (Slick) Halstead of the Ocean Crab House. 

College lunchtime lecture series set 

Lunchtime lectures winter quarter at the Virginia Beach Campus of 
Tidewater Community College will be devoted to providing career in- 
formation to participants. The lectures are given each Tuesday during 
the academic quarter in the Kempsville Building, Room D-114, from 
12:30 to 1:30p.m. They are open to the community, free of charge. 

For information cntact the Counseling Center at TCC, 427-721 1 . 

Registrationt)pen for ballet academy 

The Academy of the Tidewater Ballet will hold registration for the 
Winter-Spring Semester beginning Monday, Jan. 20. Registration will 
continue through Monday, Feb. 24. 

A full dance curriculum will be offerred in classical ballet, jazz, 
character, pas de deux, pointe, and theatricaltap as well as specialized 
classes for adults in jazz and ballet, and creative dance for pre- 
schoolers. Classes will run through May 31. 

The A.T.B. is Virginia's oldest not-for-profit dance educational in- 
stitute, and is celebrating its Silver Anniversary during the 1986 season. 

The faculty is headed by Gene K. Hammett, artistic advisor to the 
Tidewater Ballet Association, Petersburg Ballet, and Virginia Dance 
Company. 

For information^ call 622-4822. 

The Virginia Beach branches are located at St. Gregory's Church, 
5.145 Virginia Beach Blvd., and at St. Matthews Church, 3316 Sandra 
Lane. The telephone number for both locations is 420-925 1 . 



Senior citizen bingo exchange set 

A senior citizens bingo exchange will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 
p.m. on Friday, Jan. 24 at Virginia Beach Recreation Center/Bow 
Creek. Participants are asked to bring a $3 gift, so that everyone wins. 

An additional 50 cents will pay for a beverage and dessert to go with 
bag lunches broughtfrom home. Reservations are required by Friday, 
Jan. 17. , 

Youths can enjoy Saitirday spectacular 

A Saturday Spectacular featuring games and sports for youth ages 
six to 16 is set for Jan. 25 at'2 p.m. at Virginia Beach Recreation Cen- 
ter/Bow Creek. A facility use card is required for this free event. 

Taco Bingo scheduled for Bow Creek 

■ Taco Bingo will be offered on Jan. 25 from 7 to 9 p.m. for youth 
ages six to 15 at Virginia Beach Recreation Center/B6w Creek. Prizes 
will be featured along with the game and tacos. Advanced reservations 
are required. 

Meeting set for Ocean Park dvic league 

.JPMLQcean Park Civic League wilLroeet=Oft ThttrsdayrJafr; I6«t 7:30 
p.m. at the Ocean Park FireStation. 

Michael J. Barrett, Assistant to the City Manager and liason to the 
Resort Area Advisory Commission will present a report of this commit- 
tee. All residents of Ocean Park are invited to attend. 

Lynnhaven Parish DAR meeting slated 

„_The Lynnhaven Parish Chapter, National Society Daughters of ttie 
American Revolution will meet on Thursday, Jan. 16 at 1 p.m. at the 
homeof Mrs. Alan Monteleone. 

Mi's. H. C. Ackiss will be co-hostess. 

J. Curtis Fruit, clerk of the circuit court Virginia Beach will discuss 
"Restoration of Old Princess County Court Records". 

Delegates and alternates to the Virginia DAR State Conference to be 
held in Richmond in March and to the DAR Continental Congress to . 
be held in Washington in April will be elected at this meeting as will the 
chapter nominating committee. 

Reservations for the meeting should be made with Mrs. Monteleone 
or Mrs. Ackiss. For information call Mrs. Eugene Connors, 464-3640. 

Fellowship Center hosting psychic fair 

The Fellowship Center will host a "Psychic Fair" on Saturday, Jan. 
18 from ntJOlf Until 6 p.m., at 620 14th St., Virginia Beach. 

The Fair will include the talents of psychics, hand analysists, Tarot 
readers, and astrologer, and psychomotrists. 

The readings are $10 each and the proceeds will benefit the 
Fellowship Center, an aquarian age center focused upon individual 
growth and community involvement. For information call the center, 
428-5782. 

VGGH presents Be Trim program 

Virginia Beach General Hospital will sponsor a Be Trim program for 
people who wish to lose weight. Free introductory sessions will be of- 
fered Monday Jan. 20 and Tuesday Jan. 21 at 7 p.m. in the Health 
Education Center of the hospital. 

For information call 481-8141 on weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Indoor flea market planned 

An indoor fiea market is set for the Virginia Beach Recreation Cen- 
ter/Kempsviile on Saturday,. Jan. 25, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., in room 
117. 

The cost to rent a table is $5, and a valid facility use card is required. 

For information or to reserve a table, call 495-1892. 

Volleyball tournament coming up 

A volleyball tournament open to men and women age 18 and up will 
be held at the Virginia Beach Recreation Center/Kempsville on Satur- 
day, Jan. 25. 

This tournament is open to the first eight teams to register before 
Wednesday, Jan. 22. Teams should consist of not more than eight 
players, four of whom are female. 

The cost to enter is $22 per team. Refreshments will be provided and 
trophies will be awarded to first and second place teams, and the "Most 
Valuable" team. 

Call 495-1892 for information. 



I 



Bingo game for special people planned 

A bingo night for physically and mentally handicapped people will be 
held Saturday, Jan. 25, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the Bow Creek 
Recreation Center, 3427 Clubhouse Road. 

The Pembroke Kiwanis Club, the Virginia Beach Department of 
Parks and Recreation, and CLASP (Citizens loving All Special People) 
will sponsor the event. 

Transportation is available; however, for planning purposes reser- 
vations must be made by Jan. 16. Call Carolyn Wismer at 853-8789 af- 
ter 7 p .m . weekdays or anytime weekends . 

For information call either Lynn Gallob, 463-1 148 or Ken Gearhart, 
422-1381. 

Roma Lodge planning pasta dance 

Sons of Italy of Roma Lodge No. 254 will have a Pasta Dance on 
Saturday, Jan. 18 at 6:30 p.m. at 3097 Magic Hollow Blvd., Virginia 
Beach. 

For tickets and further information call Barbara or Jerry Hyatt 497- 
0274. 

Winter beach walk at wildlife refuge 

On Saturday, Jan. 25 at 9 a.m. a guided walk of the B?ck Bay 
National Wildlife Refuge beach and surrounding habitats will be of- 
fered. The walk will be one and one half miles long and will take ap- 
proximately 1 and one half to two hours to complete. 

Participants will see a variety of wintering shorebirds and possibly 
some waterfowl, deer, and other forms of refuge wildlife. 



Individuals interested in taking the walk should contact the refuge at 
721-2412 for reservations. . 

The tour will begin from the Visitor Contact Station and participants 
are encouraged to dress warmly, wear comfortable walking shoes, and 
bring binoculars. ■ 

Leaflets and additional information cam be obtained by writing Back 
Bay National Wildlife Refuge, P. O. Box 6286, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia 23456. 

Beach student attends CBS seminar 

Morgan Ashton of Virgi^ Beach, a freshman majoring in Jour- 
nalism at the School of Visuat Arts in New York City, recently attended 
a seminar with CBS' "60 Minutes" commentator Andrew Rooney and 
Charles Kuralt, seen regulary on his "On The Road" series. 

Ashton is a graduate of Frank W. Cox High School. He began his 
studies this fall at SVA's Communication Arts Department. 



The Virginia Beach Sun, January 15, 1986 5 



Virginia Beach Sun Wheelers roll into action 



The basketball makes a 
swishing sound as it drops 
through the hoop, echoing the 
sound of wheels as they spin by. 
Another practice session has 
begun for Virginia Beach's 
wheelchair basketball team. 

The Sun Wheelers rolled into 
action in 1976 under the sponsor- 
ship of the Virginia Beach Parks 
and Recreation Department's 
Therapeutic Recreation Unit. 
9 Since then, the team has played 
hundreds of games and competed 
in many tournaments throughout 
the United States, 

mmmmmmmmmmnm 

Sports 

wmmmlKimmmmm 

As members of the National 
Wheelchair Basketball 
Association, the Sun Wheelers 
are the only sanctioned team in 
the Virginia Beach area. 

The recent Eighth Annual 
Mayor's Inyitational Tour- 
nament in Virginia Beach offered 
the Sun Wheelers a chance to 
compare their, skills with thesse 
of top-rated teams from Canada 
as well as the U.S. 

The Sun Wheelers finished 
fourth overall in the tournament. 
They won the first evening, 
beating Roanoke in a conference 
game 59 to 58. In the second 
day's competition they had two 
losses. 

The Sun Wheelers were beaten 
61 to 39 by the Carolina Tar 
Wheels and 62 to 49 by the Twin 
City Wheelers. "S 

"If i didn't want to win, -l 
wouldn't be here," says Tony 
Briley, who has been a team 
member since the Sun Wheelers' 
first season. "I like to be com- 
petitive." 

An avid basketba^ ^slayer 
before a fall left him wheelchair 
bound, Briley coached basketball 
for years before hearing about 
the Sun Wheelers. He now holds 
a team record for most games 
played as a Sun Wheeler. 

Several other team records are 
held by Bob Petty, a team mem- 
ber who wasn't sure he'd be able 



to play when he first joined the 
team five years ago. He became a 
starting player in his first game. 

Petty, heard about the Sun 
Wheelers from his brother Tony, 
a labor supervisor in the Parks 
Division. 

"It takes a lot of practice," 
Petty, whose idol is basketball 
legend "Magic" Johnson, said. 
Petty's record against neigh- 
borhood non-wheelchair players 
is impressive. "I haven't been 
whipped vet." 

Petty made the all-tournament 
team at the recent Mayor's In- 
vitational. 

He and teammate Briley tried 
out for the wheelchair basketball 
Olympic team this past summer, 
and while neither was chosen they 
agree that the experience was 
worthwhile. 

One reason the Sun Wheelers 
can concentrate on the game is 
that they aren't hampered by lack 
of funds. 

"We're, the only team in the 
country funded entirely by a 
municipality," Buddy Wheeler, 
therapeutic recreation supervisor 
said. 

Money for extras comes from 
Sun Wheelers, Inc., a local fund- 
raising group. 

New on the Sun Wheeler scene 
this year is Coach Pam Fisher, 
who brings four years of playing 
college basketball at Virginia 
Wesleyan College to the position. 
She also serves as head of a range 
of other wheelchair sports spon- 
sored by the Parks and 
Recreation Department. 

"Pam is a good coach," Petty 
said. "She has a lot of patience 
and she's learning fast." 

She hasn't had to leaf n a 
totally new way of basketball, 
since the rules for wheelchair 
basketball are only slightly dif- 
ferent from those she played un- 
der, j 

"The fundamentals are still 
there," she said. 

Because wheelchair sports use 
a lot of upper body strength, she 
hopes to incorporate weight 



training into future practices. She 
is impressed with the team's spirit 
and wilUngness to take advice. 

"These guys just don't give 
•up,'' Fisher added. 

In addition to fostering a com- 
petitive spirit, being a team.. 



these"benefit»is Randy Harvey, a 
new team member this season. 
Before joining the team, he suf- 
fered from depression, and he 
says being a Sun Wheeler has 
done much to combat this 
problem. 



"This is the first time I've ever 
been able to compete with any 
hope of success," Harvey said. 
"Ironically, I've always tried to 
compete with able-bodied 
pe ople." 



Team members encourage 



potential players to join the Sun 
Wheelers. To find out game dates 
or how to join the team, calk*l95- 
1892. 

"Once sports gets in your 
system," Briley said, "it's thewre 
to stay." 




Photo by Carote Arnold 

(left to right) Mike Hill, Ken Nelson anjl David Becraft shoot for ihe hoop during a Sun Wheelers practice round. 



member also offers, other 
benefits, according to Coach 
Fisher. 



"It's an outlet for the team 
socially as well as 
recfeationally," she Said. "This 
gives them a chance to be a mem- 
ber of a team, socialize, travel 
and meet new people. Team spirit 
and morale is really a bonus." 

One player who is reaping 



Dates set for Boardwalk show 



l»u.»nf»t.iiif« i«i .■i"Si«»'#« »»*»'-« 



The 31st Virginia Beach Boar- 
dwalk Art Show, known as one 
of the coutnry's largest and most 
highly acclaimed juried shows 
held each year at the Virginia 
Beach oceanfront, has been 
scheduled for June 19-22. 



iittiliiliri i ii i i i K 



i n iiiiiiiiiiiiiii m 



Entertaifimem 

j;.j..j.;...jjJML!JJJJlLLUiLliiililill! B!t!B£ 

The show, featuring $12,500 in 
cash prizes, is sponsored by the 
Virginia Beach Arts Center and 
attracts regional artists as well as 
artists from all states. 

Boardwalk Art Show applican- 
ts must send, six slides represen- 
tative of their work, for purposes 
of jurying, with their application. 

All applications must be post- 
marked no later than March 1, or 
thev cannot be considered. Ar- 



tists will be notified of their ac- 
ceptance or rejection March 28. 

From its humble beginnings as 
a small outdoor exhibit in 1956, 
the Boardwalk Art Show has 
evolved into the largest show of 
its type on the East Coast, 
generating excellent sales and 
publicity for its exhibiting artists. 

The show offers artists a 
unique opportunity to exhibit 
and sell their work, and in past 
years sales have been recorded in 
excess of one-half million dollars. 

All artists whose work meets 
the standards of the jurors are 
encouraged to apply. 

All work must be original, 
created by the applicant, and of 
professional quality. Eligible 
categories of work include: oils 
and acrylics, watercolors. 



graphics, drawings, sculpture, 
mixed media, ceramics/pottery, 
creative crafts (fiber, glass), 
jewelry, photography and print- 
making. All printmaking and 
photographic processes must be 
original and of a limited edition 
to be accented.. 

The show will run continuously 
for eight blocks along the ocean- 
front boardwalk from 11 th to 
19th Street. 

Application fee is $15 per entry 
(non-refundable). Space fee is 
$100 for the first space (10' x 4' 
deep) and $856 for additional 
spaces. 

For information and ap- 
plications write or call the 
Virginia Beach Arts Center, 1711 
Arctic Avenue, Virginia Beach, 
425-0000. 



Beach resident to be juror for TAA 
miniature art works exhibition 



Virginia Beach resident Martin 
Johnson will be a juror for the 
Tidewater Artists Association, 
Inc. jufored exhibition of 
miniature art works from Feb. 15 
through March 12, at the Her- 
mitage Foundation Museum in 
Norfolk. 

The exhibition is open to all 
members of TAA. Non-members 
may join TAA by paying yearly 
dues of $15 for regular individual 
membership or $10 for a full time 
student. 

There will be an $8 entry fee" to 
submit up to three entires for 
judging. Original works in any 
media are eligible for selection, 
but may not exceed 12 inches in 
any dinreiRtoir(mchidtnrf««»e- h 

Work should be brought to the 
studio facility of the Hermitage 
Foundation Museum, 7701 North 
Shore Drive. Norfolk, on Feb. 7 
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. or Feb. 8 
from 1 to 5 p.m. 

Johnson is a gallery artist 
with the PhylHs Kind Gallery in 
New York City. He has a degree 
in architecture from Virginia 
Tech and a M.F.A. from the 
University of North Carolina. He 
has exhibited locally at the 
Virginia Beach Arts Center and 
the ODU Gallery in Norfolk. 
. Prospectuses will be mailed to 



all members of TAA and are 
available at the Virginia Beach 
Arts Center, 18th and Arctic, 
Virginia Beach, and the Her- 
mitage Foundation Museum. 



7701 N. Shore Drive, Norfolk. 

For more information write 
TAA, P. O. Box 3508, Norfolk. 
VA 23514. or call Nancy 
Prichard, 489-4087. 



McLain Family Band joins 
Virginia Symphony for show 



Kentucky's McLain Family 
Band will join The Virginia Sym- 
phony Pops in a concert at the 
Virginia Beach Pavilion Conven- 
tion Center on Jan. 19, at 7:30 
p.m. 

Guest conductor. Harold 
Evans will conduct the Virginiji 
Symphony Pops. 

The first half of the concert 
will sbo»case the orchestra in 
two selections by the American 
composer. Aaron Copeland, his 
ever-popular Fanfare for the 



CoHiiiiOji Man and bclcciioiis 
from his ballet. "Rodeo". 

The McLain Family Band will 
be featured on the second half in 
a number of traditional and blue- 
grass selections. The McLain 
Family Band will perform both 
solo and with the Pops. 

Tickets are available at all First 
Virginia Bank lobbies and are 
priced from $6 to $16. To reserve 
tickets by telephone, call 428- 
mO '(SouthsTde'). MasterCard. 
Visa, Choice or American Ex- 
press accepted. 



Advertising Sales 

Salary, Commission, Travel 

Call The Virginia Beach Sun 

486-3430 



i«^^e^K^^ 



Eniou the superhowi 
in Nags Head 

Why just watch the Superbowl at home when you can 
make it a weekend of football and fun? Come to the new 
oceanfront Ramada Inn and enjoy our football fever! 
Off season room rates and delicious seaside dining 
are sure to make this a weekend to remember. Our 
Superbowl Sunday includes: 50" TV screeiL±l^a8h 
bar • Free munchies • Free pizza and hot dogs at 
half time • Prize drawing • Special room 
rates. Call today for reservations. 



919*441-215! 



RAMADA* INN 

A1 N>gi Hgtd Bgach 

Kill Devil Hills 



P. O. BOX2716. 1701 S. Virginia Dare Trail. KillDevilHills.NC 27948 



SUBSCRIBE 

52 issues mailed to your home 

I year 2 Years Out of Town 
$10 $15 $22.50 



Senior (ilin'n\ Rt'iiivt SI Disiounl 



Name 

Address ' 

City/State/Zip 

^hone , 



Check enclosed for $ 1 

D Renewal 



D$I5 



S22.50 



Mail to: The Virginia Beach Sun, 138 South Rosemont Road, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 23452 



The 
Virginia Beach 

Sun 



486- 
3430 



aaoi 



mgmimmmmmmmmm^ 



iv^ 



6 The Virginia Beach Sun. Janii,T\ K\ 1986 



PA J students look to the future 





Students at Princess Anne Junior High take time to consider future plans when they participated in a 

.^Career Day at the school. Community members from 51 different professions were on hand to answer 

kudents questions concerning their various fields. The event was sponsored by the school's guidance 

d^artment. 





More Beach happenings ira's discussed at KempsviUe library SBde show set for Aragona Garden Qub 



PSI to hold dinner meeting 

The Tidewater Chapter of Professional Secretaries International will 
hold a meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 21, at 6 p.m. in the China Garden 
Restaurant on Military Highway (near Military Circle Shopping Cen- 
ter). The program will be presented by Barbara Johnson, assistant to 
Pat Robertson of Christian Broadcasting Network. 

For information on this meeting or PSI, call Cathy Nirdlinger, 547- 
'"6466. ■ - ^- — ~ — — =_ — . — . 

Professors to speak at Oceanfront 

Professors from Old Dominion University will be in the Oceanfront 
Area Library on Tuesday mornings beginning Tuesday, Jan. 21, at 10 
a.m. to offer a noncredit course covering a variety of subjects. 

A fee of $30 will be charged . ' 

Dr. David Ost will cover Medicine and Eihic; on Jan. 21; Dr. Roy 
Aycock will cover Milton's Samson Agonistes on Jan. 28; Dr. Jerome 
Weiner will cover The Middle East and the United States on Feb. 4; Dr. 
Laiwrence Dotolo will cover The Rise of the Gothic Novel on Feb. 1 1 ; 
0%. Franklin Jones will cover Theory of Adult Education on Feb. 18; 
ai^ Dr. Dennis Darby wilLcovei Current and Future Problems with 
Gibund Water Supplies in Tidewater on Feb. 25. 

Registrations ne«i to be placed in advance. Call the library, 428-41 13 
to register or for information. 



Christopher J. Coffing, a financial consultant, will discuss individ- 
sual retirement accounts on Wednesday, Jan. 22, at 7 p.m. in the Kem- 
psviUe Area Library, 832 KempsviUe Road. 

He will cover current laws; tax benefits; the arrangement spouses, 
private business and parents can make to take maximum advantage of 
their IRA's; how to set up an IRA; the minimum investment required; 
etc. 

Registrations need to be placed in advance. To register or for infor- 
mation call the library, 495-1016. 

VBGH of fer&blood pressure screenings 

Virginia Beach General Hospital will offer free blood pressure 
screenings on Tuesday, Jan. 21 from I to 3 p.m. and Wednesday, Jan. 
22 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. in the main lobby of the hospital. 

Participants will receive information about hypertension and a 
record card of their blood pressure reading. For information call 481- 
8141. 

IndianXakes PTA workshop set 

The Indian Lakes Elementary PTA workshop, 7 p.m., at the school, 
1240 Homestead Drive. Program: "Parents Can Learn Too." Baby- 
sitting prpvided by Girl Scout troop 392. 



The Aragona Garden Club will meet on Thursday, Jan. 16, at 10:30 
a.m. at the home of Mrs. Chris Monti. Program: "American Land- 
scape" slide program by Chris Monti. For information call 499-6160. 



Back Bay bus tour set for seniors 

A five inile bus tour for senior citizens and handicapped individuals 
will be offered on Sunday, Jan. 26 at 10 a.m. The bus will carry par- 
ticipants along the Refiige dike roads past waterfowl impoundments, 
through rniarsh^areaS, upland^ areas, anrf^rioflt^ane 4ifl€s-to^*iew, 
migratory ducks, geese, and swans and other wildlife. 

Any senior citizen who is at least 60 years of age and any individual 
who is unable to walk long distances due to a physical disability may 
sign up for the trip. 

Reservations aretequired since the bus has seating capacity for only 
20 individuals. 

Although individuals with physical disabilities are encouraged to par- 
ticipate on the tour, the bus is not designed for wheelchair use and 
riders must climb two steps to board the bus. 

After the tour, participants may want to stay for the Winter Wildlife 
Film Festival to be held in the Visitor Contact Station Auditorium from 
1 to 3:30 p.m. 

Reservations for the lour can be made by calling the Refuge at 804- 
721-2412. 



Tlio Virijini:' Riw.!' Sun, January 15, l')S(i 




Hammaker named 
trustee for 
Iiumana4iospital 



W. Kirk Hammaker has been 
appointed to the board of 
trustees, for Humana Bayside 
Hospital, for a three-year term. 

Hammaker has also been elec- 
ted first vice president of the 
Navy League of Hampton 
Roads, an organization con- 
sisting of retired military and 
civilian businessmen who support 
the Navy and National Defense 
efforts. 

He has been employed with 
Pembroke insurance Agency of 
Virginia Beach for J 3 years and is 
currently a partner and president 
of the firm. " 



John E. Boon 

Boon named 
^Fe&idei¥and 
chief officer 

The Dilks Company, Inc., of 
Virginia Beach announced the 
appointment of John E. Boon as 
president and chief executive of- 
ficer. 



Business 



Boon has over 20 years ex- 
perience in the computer and sof- 
tware systems industry. The Dilks 
Company, Inc., concentrates on 
the development of aviation 
oriented computer systems for air 
traffic control and air defense. 



Cheryl A. Smith 




Smith promoted t€^ 
medias supervisor 

r Cheryl A. Smith has been 
promoted to media supervisor at 
Barker Campbell & Farley Ad- 
vertising and Public Relations in 
Virginia Beach. 
' She will direct the agency's 

£, staff in the implementation of all 
media planning/buying and 
research. 

^^t^ hiH i j mr i ' i T i i ii r iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i ii i iiii i iiii 

Ad noim 

Smith has served as a media 
buyer at the agency since 1 98 1 . 

She holds a 1978 associate 
degree in Business Technology 
from Tidewater Community 
College in Virginia Beach. 





Benson joins 
Davis «fe Phillips 

Janice Benson of Virginia Beach 
has joined Davis & Phillips as 
assistant media buyer. 

Benson will be responsible for 
placing all print and selecter 
broadcast advertising. 

Benson holds a bachelor of arts 
degree in communications from 
the Univerity of Maryland in 



Gladys Shott 



Shott named 

operations 

manager 

Gladys T. Shott of Virginia 
Beach was promoted to data 
prodessing operations manager at 
Virginia Beach General Hospital. 

*■ 

Shott will be responsible for 
the maintenance, coordination 
and planning of the Hospital's 
data processing system. She 
joined the VBGH staff in 1973 as 
a mail runner and worked her. 
way up through the ranks. Mott* 
recently she served as assistant 
manager of data processing. 

Shott attended Berry College in 
Rome, Ga. and majored in 
history and political science. She 
is a member of the Data 
Processing Managers 

Association. 



Time to begin thinking 
ahout income tax returns 



-Palrieia Moore 



Moore promoted 
to manager 
at hospital 

S. Patricia Moore, of Virginia 
Beach, has been promoted to 
manager of budgets and disburse- 
ments at Virginia Beach General 
Hospital. 

Moore will be responsible for 
preparing the annual budget and 
supervising the payroll and ac- 
counts payable departments. She 
joined the VBGH staff in 1981 as 
an accountant and most recently 
served as a financial analyst. 



Moore holds a bachelor of 
science degreejji accounting from 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
She is a member of the Health- 
care Financial Management 
Association. 



Internal Revenue Service 
estimates .2.5 million individual 
incorne tax returns for 1985 will 
be filed by Virginians. Ap- 
proimately 127,000 returns will 
come from Virginia Beach area, 
according to IRS figures. 

The 1985 tax forms are 
generally unchanged from last 
year, 

There are, however, a number 
of changes in the tax laws to con- 
sider when completing the retur- 
ns. 

•The tax tables and schtdules 
have been adjusted so that in- 
flation vi;fill not increase taxes . 

Indexing has also increased to 

$1,040 the amount allowed as a 

deduction for each exemption 

— dairited on the return- and tJie 

"Icto WacRef'OTS'oumr ^ all 

filing statuses have increased. 

The amount for single in- 
dividuals is now $2,390 and for 
married persons filing a joint 
return the figure is $3,540. 

•There are changes related to 
divorced and separated in- 
dividuals. 

The exemptions for children of 
divor<;ed or separated parents will 
be claimed by the parent having 
custody unless that parent wavies 
the right to claim the exemption 
or a pre- 1985 written agreement 
states the non<u$todial parent 
can claim the child. 

Under a pre-1985 agreement, 
the non-custodial parent must 
provide at least $600 for the 
child's support. 

Those individuals recently 
separated from their spouse may 
file as unmarried if they did not 



live with their spouse at all during 
the last six months of the year 
and their child is living with 
them. 

•Beginning in 1985, the deduc- 
tion for use of a car in perfor- 
ming sejvices for a charitable 
organijition has increased to 12 
cents per mile. 

If the total deductions for gifts 
of property is more than $500, a 
form listing the property must 
accompany the tax return. 

For 1985, if individuals do not 
itemize de-ductipns, they may 
deduct one-half of their 
charitable contributions. 

•Those individuals who use 
their automobiles for business 
purposes can claim 21 cents per 
mile for the first 15,000 miles of 
business use of their car in 1985. 

•Ortglnaf TJwncrs of ' atficseJ" 
powered car, van, or light truck 
after January 1, 1985 may be en- 
titled to a one-time credit or 
refund of diesel fuel tax. 

Additiotta^f information on 
these topics and other changes 
appears in the instructions which 
<6me with the tax package. 

Last year some Virginians may 
have received their refunds later 
than usual because of problems 
that arose from major changes 
the IRS made to its returns 
processing system. 

The IRS has resolved these 
problems by installing more 
computer equipment, redesigning 
computer programs, and in- 
creasing its staff to improve the 
level of service to the public. 

The IRS is advising Virginians 
to file their returns as soon as all 
the necessary records are 
available from employers and 



financial institutions. 

Individuals who file at the last 
minute are more likely to make 
errors on their returns. Common 
errors which delay processing in- 
clude mathematical errors, in- 
correct use of the tax tables, and 
entries on the wrong lines. 

A review of the return before it 
is mailed will avoid many of these 
errors. Processing of a return will 
be faster if an individual uses the 
pre-printed label on the tax 
package and the envelope 
provided with the tax form. 

The Internal Revenue Service 
will continue to provide toll-free 
telephone service and walk-in 
asssistance to Virginians. 

The hours for the Norfolk of- 
fice are 8:15 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 
Monday through Friday. The of- 
fice is^ RTthe Federal Building on 

^^rahbyMall. ■— 

In addition, the IRS will offer 
group return preparation 
assistance in local communities* 
during and after normal working 
hours and on weekends as part of 
its Outreach Program. 

The toll-free number is 1-800- 
424-1040. This number is less 
busy early in the morning or later 
in the day and during days later 
in the week. 

The IRS said many answers to 
general tax questions can be 
found in the tax package instruc- 
Uons or in over 90 free IRS 
publications that can be 
requested using the order form in 
the tax package, or by calling 1- 
800-424-3676. 

Virginians can alsp use Tele- 
Tax, a service that provides 
recorded tax information on top- 
ics of general interest. The Tele- 
Tax telephone number is l-800r 
554-4477. 



Credit Union 
names Lloyd 
as planner 

The Virginia Beach Federal 
Credit Union has named Frances 
Lloyd the Financial Planner. 

She will be responsible for ad- 
ministering a personal financial 
plan designed to help individuals 
organize their financial affairs in 
an effort to reach their future 
goals. 

She was recently certified as a 
Professional Financial Planner 
by Old Dominion University. 

She also holds the position of 
Investment Coordinator and is 
responsible for the various 
savings certificates and IRAs of- 
fered by the Credit Urrion. 




SHORT NOTICE 

AUCTION 

OF RARE VALUABLE STOCK 

PERSIAN RUGS 

And other Oriental Rugs — A connplete shipment of genuine handwoven Persian and other Oriental rugs has 
been ordered for pre-Christmas sales for stores. These goods did not arrive on time and those financially respon- 
sible for the unpaid shipment have instructed their U. S. agents to auction the entire collection and other valuable 
pieces in single units. 

This collection which is over 200 pieces, all sizes, in our opinion, is the finest collection in design, craffmanship, and 
colors of handmade carpets, rugs and runner* we have ever seen in all our years of selling the finest quality Orien- 
tal rugs and carpets. 

Virginia Beach CONVENTION CENTER PAVILION 

1000 19th Street 
(1-64 exit 44 East - stay on 44 East to the end) 

VIRGINIA BEACH 

SAT. JAN. 1 8 AT 2 PM. - VIEW AT I PM. 



TERMS: CASH OR CHECK 

All payments to authorized recipients are at Fidelity Union Trust Company. Each ruj comes with a Certificate of Authenticity and 
praisal. Auctioneer Liquidators/Dr)^; 20 r 227 6484 ^^^^ 



ap- 



Dare led tcfcareer 




Janice Benson 



Continued from page 1 

which we are still making changes 
and improvements." 

Usually a play is rehersed and 
fine tuned for about four weeks 
before it is presented to the 
public, Pryor said. 

"This system has given me new 
insight into my work," she said. 
"Being right there with actors, I 
can see when something isn't 
working and correct it. It is 
much clearer than when I just 
read a scene over and over to 
myself." 

Pryor said she is also able to 
make improvements in the play 
by picking up on audience 
response during the performance. 

In writing her plays Pryor said 
she draws on her own life ex- 
periences. But, she does not write 
about specific events or people in 
her life. 

"When 1 try to write about a 
rece nt ev entor someone I'm close 
to it comes out vefyTTat and two- 
dimensional," she said. "I draw 
on experiences but let them just 
filter down." 

"Wetter than Water," for 
example, is set on an island of the 
Louisiana coast in the heart of 
Bayou country. The play explores 
the effect a young, mysterious 
Cajun girl has on those around 
her and the devastating con- 
sequences. 

Pryor said that much ofJuit 
understanding of that area came 



from stories her father told of 
growing up in the region. . 

"Wetter than Water' is really 
more of a dream state with 
Louisiana overtones," Pryor 
said. "The play actually focuses 
on the isolated couple on the 
island lost in a world of their 
own." 

What are Pryor's plans for the 
future? 

Well, she is just letting things 
happen as they may right now. 
She is a member of the 
Washington D.C. Playwrights 
Unit, which aids in getting 
readings for her plays. She also 
has an agent in New York. 

For the present, she plans to 
stay in Virginia Beach with her 
parents Dr. Donald and Barbara 
Pryor. To supplement her income 
as a playwright, Pryor does bill 
collecting for her father. 

Pryor's first fitH -len gth play .. 
"Burrhead," was produced in 
1983 at Washington's New Play- 
wright Theatre. Since then her 
plays have won her the Goucher 
College Open Circle Playwrights 
Award and an honorable men- 
tion int he FDG/CBS Dramatists 
Guild Awards. 

She has also had readings in 
New York at the Ensemble 
Studio Theatre. Circle Repertory 
Theatre aad Double Image 
Theatre. 



Campaign 25 

The Portsmouth Times, The Chesapeake Post. The Virginia Beach Sun 
° Earn as much as you want by selling subscriptions! 

Are you, your church or civic group looking for a really worthwhile fund-raising 

project'' 

Do you want a quick and easy way to earn hundreds of dollars while at the same 
time helping to support YOUR city's dedicated, independently-owned community 
newspaper - the only one with all the pictures, news, features and editorials of most m- 
terest to your family and friends? If so. Campaign 25 is the solution. 

Admit it You care about your community, and so do we. And together we can work 
to make it an even better place in which to live and do business. That's why fof every 
15 new subscriptions you or your group generates for The Portsmouth Times, The 
Chesapeake Post or The Virginia Beach Sun, we'll gladly rebate back to you $125, or 
half-off the regular $10 a year subscription rate. That's a savings of 50%! 

In addition, you'll enjoy the pleasure of receiving your hometown newspaper 
loaded with all the club news, pictures and ads which mean the most to you. delivered 
through the mail to your home every week for 52 weeks. 

Why not give it a try and join the dozens of other people and groups who have 
already taken advantage of this campaign. For more details, call 547-4571 or simply 
stop into any of our newspaper offices and pick up a Campaign 25 sign-up form. 
W^want to be your newsp aper! 



m 



i 



iT 



] Yes. Please mail me a Campaign 25 sign-up form. 
] Yes. Please call me about your Campaign 25. 



Name _ 
Address 

City 

Zip 



State 



Phone . 



IM Soatb RmMM« mmt, VhgWi •«•*. VA.. 23452 



mm 



8 T'lC Vlrnjnia Beach Sun,..lanuai\ 1^ t986 



Virginia Beach Fire Department offering free inspections 



In an effort to curb preven- 
table fire tragedies involving loss 
of life and home, the Virginia 
Beach Fire Department is of- 
fering free inspections of 
fireplaces, woodburning stoves, 
and other portable heating ap- 
pliances to city residents during 
the winter season. 

According to Captain Joey 
Weinbrecht, who works in fire 
inspections for the Fire Preven- 
tion Bureau, the people who need 
to take advantage of |his free ser- 
vice usually don't. 

"The most frustrating part of 
my job," said Weinbrecht, "is 
trying to make the public under- 
stand the importance of taking 
prevention seriously. 

"Our eyes are trained to see 
obvious fire hazards, things that 
the general public wouldn't think 
to notice. We know how fire 
travels and how heat travels 
tfeRQugh^ jwalls,„ contrihiiting to 
fire. Too many times, we've 
pointed out a potential hazard 
with a chimney or wood stove 
only to be told that 'that unit's 
worked fine for five years or so'. 
The next week we may find our- 
selves risking our lives to. save 
that house." 

Every year winter comes 
around bringing with it a few 
months of on again-off again bit- 
ter cold and blustery winds. The 
season is accompanied by the 
roar of fire engines as they 
scream through the city streets, 




Virginia Beacli Fire Department Capt. Joey Weinbreciit demonstrates 
proper use of a fire extinguisiier. 



rescue vehicles close behind. In 
too many cases, fires were indeed 
preventable. 

Most tragic losses by fire are 
due to negligence or lack of 
knowledge of the appliances and 
fuels being used. 

It may take a few dollars to 
buy a life saving device such as a 



fire extinguisher, a few minutes 
to install a smoke detector, or a 
phone call and a bit of incon- 
venience to engage the services of 
a professional chimney cleaner. 
But these costs are small when 
compared to the replacement of 8 
home or the lifelong grief caused 
by a child lost in a fire. 



Captain Weinbrecht, 12 years 
with the city's Fire Department, 
offers some easy tips that, taken 
seriously, may save a life. 

Safety Tips 

•Contact a professional chim- 
ney cleaner to rid chimney of 
creosote buildup. 

Creosote is a combination of 
moisture and acetic acid caused 
from resins in the wood. 

Cleaning should be done at 
least once a year, and especially 
prior to using the fireplace for the 
first time each winter. . 

Creosote built up from last 
year can easily ignite with the fir- 
st hot fire. There is a creosote 
build-up if the chimney walls or 
door on tlie'woodstove are black 
and shiny. 

•Don't let children near the 
fireplace. 

They shouldn't be permitted to 
toss tissues or paper into the fire, 
as theyrnay be tempted to do so 
when parents are not in the room. 
Especially keep an eye on them if 
they wear flowing nightclothes. 
Be sure to keep the screen in 
place, as popping embers can 
ignite carpet and furniture. 

•In a new townhouse or condo 
be careful with the fireplace. 

If planning to add doors, in- 
stall only the doors designed for 
that particular make and model.' 
Do not modify the design or add 
anything that has not benn tested 



by manufacturer with the pre-fab 
unit. 

•Artifical logs are nice for at- 
mosphere and so convenient, but 
be sure to follow instructions. 
The directions should state that 
they are safe for burning in 
woodburning stoves or pre-fab 
fireplaces. 

If they have a wax base (to 
bond them), don't use them. Wax 
burns at a high intensity and can 
cause internal damage to the 
structure of the heating unit. In- 
stead, the wrapper may say "Do 
not remove paper"-if it does, by 
all means, do NOT remove the 
paper! 

•Use the correct fuel with 
kerosene heaters. Manufacturers' 
tests are done with 1-K fuel, so 
the standards and warranties 
quoted on labels are based on I-K 
fuel. 

Remember the symptoms of 
carbon monoxide and sulphur 
dioxide poisoning- headaches, 
burning eyes, and nausea. These 
symptoms result from a cruder 
fuel being burned or inadequate 
ventilation, or improper use of 
the unit. Do not use gasoline in a 
kerosene lieater! 

•To prevent chimney fire from 
getting out of hand, keep an all 
purpose fire extinguisher handy, 
located in the direction of the 
exit, so it can be grabbed, used, 
■ Etrtdthe person can keep on run- 
ning out the door if necessary. 
This prevents having to run back 



toward the fire to get out of the 
house. 

•Get a permit from the Depar- 
tment of Permits and Inspections 
(427-4211) to install wood stoves 
or free standing fireplaces. This 
department is there to protect the 
consumer, so it'» worth the extra 
phone call and paper work. 

•In case of fire in a wood 
buring stove, if it appears to be 
getting out of hand, close the 
stove doors and the air fiow con- 
trol knobs. Then call the Fire 
Department. 

Do not open the stove door, as 
the back flash could blow the fire 
into the living room. 

•Kids and kerosene heaters: 
The tops of kerosene heaters can 
become very hot and children 
have been known to suffer third 
degree burns on their hands as a 
result of a curious touch . 

Par^rttS Of small children might 
want tp temporarily bypass por- 
table heaters that are easily tri£^ 
ped over or bumped into by an 
energetic toddler unless strict 
supervision can be applied. 

Kerosene heaters should pnly 
be used in well-ventilated rooms 
and should not be placed in a 
pathway,- such as a hall. 

•Install and test a smoke detec- 
tor. It's just a few dollars. 
Establish the habit of testing it 
once a month. They all have test 
buttons. If they beep when 
testedi' they are working. 



ae^UamelerBcrehdes, 
IMxaliDnsToAliiw Kecowry 



Gas After Pncessiiig - 
AHra.9e%Metian^ 




ir-M'DinCaici EwyaO'-aO' Dctff 



View of tlie Methane Gas Recovery project at Virginia Beacb Landfill No 2 Drf CeHtiervffltf Turi^lke. m. 

Turning trash into money 




Nichelle Cobb 



Peter Koehler-Pfolenhauer 



Angela Umphers 



Continued from page 1 

Energy Limited, a New Jersey- 
based firm. 

Under an agreement with 
American, VNG will receive up 
to one million cubic feet of 
pipeline quality gas per day from 
the landfill, according to Starkey. 
The gas must meet pipeline stan- 
dards for purity and heat con- 
tent. 

VNG expects to receive enough 
gas from the landfill to fuel 9(X) 
to 1,1(X) homes on a winter day, 
according to -Ann Rasnic, VNG 
director of Gas Fuel Supply. 

"During the winter, a peak 
consumption time, we must use 
higher cost gas to meet the 
,.d£n»nd.." Kasnic said. "The gas 
from the landfill will enable us to 
help offset this cost." 

For the approximately 1 6,(X)0 
residential gas customers in 
Virginia Beach the individual 
savings is minimal, she said. 
Rasnic estimated individual 



savings for Customers at about $6 
per year. 

American has begun work to 
construct the necB^j^y wells and 
gathering equipment to recover 
the gas. The facilities are expec- 
ted to be installed and 
operational by mid-summer. 

VNG is paying for the project, 
which is expected to cost about 
$2.2 million, McClanan said. 

The project also has enivron- 
mental benefits. 

"As a recycling project it is 
ideal," McClanan said. "First by 
recycling the trash then conver- 
ting it back to recover the 
methane is wonderful." 

The gas formed at the landfill 
is the result of anaerobic decom- 
position of refuse deposited at 
the landfill, Starkey said. The 
materials anaerobic decom- 
position at the landfill is similar 
to the naturally occurring process 
that has produced fossil fuels 
during the ages. The process is 



just speeded up in this type of 
project. 

The refuse at the landfill is 
producing recoverable amounts 
of methane about 14 months af- 
ter being deposited and covered, 
according to David Ehrlich, 
American president. There will 
be an adequate production of 
the methane within the landfill 
for approximately 15 years. 

There is also the potential that 
additional amounts of methane 
will be produced at the site during 
the next 15 years, Rasnic said. 
More likely, she added, this site 
will be closed and a new sight 
opened after 15 years. 



Lynnhaven DAR honors goo(i citizens 



Nichelle Leigh Cobb of Kem- 
psville High School, Peter 
Koehler-Pfotenhauer of Green 
Run High School, and Angela 
Umphers of Tabernacle Baptist 
High school have been Good 
Citizens by the Lynnhaven Parish. 
Chapter, Daughters of the 
American Revolution. 

The National Society DAR 
established a Committee in 1934 
to recognize and reward the 
qualities of Good Citizenship 
among senior high students. 

The three DAR chapters of 
Virginia Beach sponsor this con- 



test in the accredited senior high 
schools in the city. 

The student selected from each 
school must exemplify the 
qualities of leadership, depen- 
dability, service and patriotism. 

The student winner receives a 
Good Citizens Pin and Cer- 
tificate. Then his qualifications 
are judged on the state level. The 
State Winner is given a special 
pin and a cash award of $1(X) and 
is then in competition for the title 
of Divisional Good Citizen and 
an award of S250. He is then 
eligible to compete for the honor 



of being named the National 
Good Citizen. 

The National Good Citizen is 
presented to the DAR's Con- 
tinental Congress, which meets in 
Constitution Hall, Washington, 
D.C. during April. At that event, 
he or she receives a sterling silver 
bowl suitably engraved along 
with a $1,0(X) scholarship to be 
sent to the college of his choice. 

Mrs. Nevelyn Stark serves as 
Chairman of the Good Citizens 
Committee for the Lynnhaven 
Parish Chapter. 



Adam Thoroughgood DAR presents awards 



Innovative programs 



Conlinacd from page 1 

The new system would also 
benefit the approximately 150 
families near the North Carolina 
border who currently cannot use 
the 911 system. Wall said. 

"The enhance 911 system will 
make 91 1 services available to all 
Virginia Beach residents," he 
said. "This is one of the greatest 
benefits of the system." 

The department is also in the 
process of obtaining a new 8(X) 
niegahertz trunk radio system. 
Wall said. This system will 
greatly increase the number of 
channels available to the police 
department as well as other 
departments in the city that use 
the radios. 

"Because of the capacity of 
our current system we are able to 
use a limited number of chan- 
nels," Wall said. "The 800 
megahertz system will provide us 
with about 20 more channels. 
Especially at peak times, like the 
holidays, this will be a great help. 
At peak times, with the current 
system, the channels often 
become jammed." 

Another advantage of the 800 
megahertz system is that speical 
grouping of channels can be 



made, according to Wall. If, for 
example, there is an incident that 
requires the police and fire depar- 
tments as well as public utilities, a 
special grouping can be made so 
that they can communicate with 
•one another without tying up the 
pain channels. 

Wall said the police depar- 
tment will begin to use the new 
system within a year. He said it 
will take 18 to 24 months for the 
system to be operational 
throughout the department and 
at least another six months for it 
to be effective city wide. 

Wall said the department is 
working on a number of other 
innovations, but the implemen- 
tation of these is tied up in the 
current budgeting process^ 

Wall stressed that the 
cooperation the department 
receives from the city manager 
and the City Council are essential 
factors in the department's 
ability to implement innovative 
programs. 

"Without the support of the 
manager and the City Council we 
could sit up here and come up 
with millions of programs but 
they would just be dreams," Wall 
said. 



The Adam Thoroughgood 
Chapter, Daughters of the 
American Revolution, presented 
three area students with Good 
Citizens' awards. Each student 
was presented a Good Citizen 
Certificate and pin by Louise 
Wicker. 

The Good Citizen award is 
based on the student's leadership, 
which includes personality, self- 
truthfuUness, .loyajty, pun- 
ctuality; service, which includes 
cooperation, courtesy, and con- 
sideration of others; patriotism, 
which includes unselfish interest 
in family, school, community 
and nation, to an outstanding 
degree. 

It is recommended that thr 
senior class choose, by vote, three 
seniors having the above 
qualifications. From the three, 
the faculty selects one student to 
represent the school. 

These winners names^ 
mendations and submitted 
writings have been sent to the 
district chairman for further 
competition at District and ^tite 
level. 

The three students selected 
were: 

John C. Balderson, Cape 
Henry Collegiate School, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. George S. Balder- 
son. 

Balderson is a strong student, 
winning the National English 



Merit Award. He is resp>onsible in 
his home helping with brothers 
and sister. He is interested in the 
community and is active in his 
■church. John hopes to attend the"' 
Univesity of Virginia and study 
medicine. 

Ell/abeth H. VonKolnitz, Cox 
High School, daughter of Mr. 



and Mrs. Henry VonKolnitz. 

VonKolnitz is an outstanding 
student at Cox, being chosen for 
Who's Who Among American 
High School Students. She is ac- 
tive in many clubs and has held 
many offices. At home she is 
helpful and is active in her chur- 
ch. 



Tina Carter, Princess Anne 
High School, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Ronald Carter. 

Carter is a member of the 
National Honor Society, she is an 
outstanding student and plans to 
attend William and Mary. She is 
active in her church and home, 
helping in many ways. 




The Adam Thoroughgood Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution recently awarded three 
V?4inla Beach high school students the DAR Good Citizen Award. Lonlse Wicker, far nght, chairman of 
the DAR Good Citizen Committee presents awards to, from left. Tina Carter, Princess Anne High School; 
John Balderson. Cape Henrj Collegiate; and Elizabeth VonKolnitz, Cox High School. 



The Virginia Beach Sjun, January 15, 1986 ,9 



Great Neck archeological site needs to be rescued 



Conltnued from page 2 
University, under a contract with 
the Virginia Department of High- 
ways ajid Transportation. A. 
report on that work is currently 
being drafted. 

While most of the Great Neck 
Site is already destroyed by con- 
struction of houses and streets, 
parts of it yet remain, which can 
(with the lot-owners' per- 
missions) be studied. As a result 
of local interest in the site, state 
funding is being made available 
to test those areas early in 1986. 
Just how much is to be dug is 
unknown. - 

Costs of project 

Costs of the work done at 
Great Neck thus far have varied. 
The work done by Painter aadbis 
student and volunteer helpers has 
not cost t^e state or localities any 
money. 

The 1981 work done by Turner 
was supported by VRCA, using 
funds from state and federal 
sources, totalhng about $10,000. 

The cost of tBe' James Madison 
University work in 1984 was paid 
out of federal and state highway 
construction funds, \*ith a total 
of about $275,000. 

Cost of the planned 1986 work 
is not yet certain. Costs can be 
kept low if volunteers are invited 
to provide much of the work for- 
ce, and if City-owned equipment 



can be provided to move topsoil 
as needed. 

Obviously, the cost of ar- 
cheological work can vary con- 
siderably, as can the results. An 
element of luck is always present 
in digging. Sometimes a lot of 
expensive work will produce only 
a few new facts, while in another 
effort, much important new data 
can come from limited work. 

U is impossible to predict 
results ahead of time \*ith any 
degree bf assurance. Because of 
this uncertainty, some people 
might ask if the results justify the 
costs. This brings us to the 
questions, "What price is 
Virginia's Heritage?" How can one 
put a dollar value on information? 
What is society willing to pay to 
learn the fate of the Lost Colony? 
What is it worth to learn how In- 
dians lived in and adjusted to the 
coastal environment? What can 
we learn from them that will help 
us adjust to that environment 
toda^? At what price, and whose 
cost? 

While there are many opinions 
on how the above questions 
should be answered, this writer 
ventures the following estimate, 
based on his many years of ar- 
cheological work in Virginia and 
elsewhere. A reasonable figure 
would, in my opinion, be around 
ten cents per year per person in 



the Commonwealth. This would 
make about $550,000 a year 
available for needed ar- 
cheological work throughout 
Virginia. While it is unlikely 
today that the Virginia General 
Assembly would appropriate 
funding in this amount, that 
body might make part of the 
amount available as a show of in- 
terest by the State. 

Accordingly, other ways for 
meeting the heeds should be 
developed. Again, I can suggest 
some ways to meet the needs, 
while at the same time, involving 
the public closely with the work . 

One way of raising the needed 
funds would be a check-off con- 
tribution on Virginia Income Tax 
Return, Form 760. An amount 
for archeology could Jbe 
designated by the payer, similar 
to the method used to obtain 
' funds for wildlife protection. 
Alternatively, the method used 
by the U.S. Internal Revenue 
Service could be followed. In 
this, a taxpayer indicates that one 
dollar of the payment can go 
toward funding national elec- 
tions. A similar designation could 
be for archeological work. 

Either way could be tried for a 
few years, and if found to be un- 
popular or insufficient, the 
method could change. In either 
case, action by the General 



Assembly would be needed to 
have the Department of Taxation 
collect and distrbute the tax- 
payers' contributions. 

Another approach, which I 
highly recommend be tried, is the 
local archeological program, 
such as that in effect in Fairfax 
and Alexandria, both of which 
suport a full-time archeological 
effort. Every city and county 
needs an archeologist at times. 

Since most cities and counties 
cannot afford a fulltime ar- 
cheologist, the solution is to hire 
a part-time archeologist. 

Under this plan, a locality 
could meet its archeological 
needs by paying a small retainer 
fee to an individual archeologist, 
living nearby and knowing the 
people and the countryside. 

The work would include wat- 
ching for sites exposed in coastal 
erosion, inspecting construction 
sites ahead of construction and 
investigating finds made by any 
citizen\)f the area. * 

The individual could be the 
locality's Staff Archeologist and 
as such could add much to the 
cUttoral Hfe of the locality, 
through teaching, lecturing, 
helping with local exhibits, 
leading field trips, and similar ef- 
forts. 

For tjie Tidewater area, I 
would recommend one ar- 
cheologist to be shared by the 



cities of Virginia Beach, Norfolk^ 
Portsmouth and Chesapeake, 
and the counties of Northampton 
and Accomack. 

This makes six governments 
for which the archeologist would 
work, and the archeologist could 
divjde his time among them, ac- 
cording to the needs and how 
much the localities pay. 

If the archeologist works an 
average of twenty-four days a 
month, each of the six localities 
could get an average of four days 
a month, or forty-eight days a 
year. Most of the work would be 
on behalf of the locality gover- 
nment, especially the planning 
and public works departments. 

However, other work could be 
done on private lands at the 
request of individual landowners 
who see site evidence or suspect a 
site is present. There need be no 
charge to the landowner, since 
the county or city retainer would 
cover the costs. 

The work would be primarily 
survey work, with limited testing 
to determine a site's importance 
(or noji-importance5r,Mi3re- 
extensive work, such as ex- 
cavation, would then be 
arranged for and funded separate 
from the survey contract. 

Since the cost of an ar- 
cheologist's pay and expenses is 
around $125 per day, a locality 



receiving four days service 
would pay a monthly feie of $500, 
for an annual total of $16000 for 
forty-eight days arc^ological 
work. This figure is substantially 
less than the cost of i full-time 
archeological set-up, and also is 
less than having forty-eight days 
work done under individual con- 
iraets for specific projects, as 
must be done at present. 

Other plans might be devised 
for specific projects, such as that 
needed for the Great Neck Site, 
among scores of others in eastern 
Virginia. 

The question "What price is 
Virginia's heritage?" is a knotty 
one. However, it can be solved, if 
landowners, government of- 
ficials, and concerned citizens at- 
tack the problems^coBstructively 
and with good will. 

The work needs to be done, 
and it need not cost some 
outrageous figure. With public 
involvement, projects can be 
done with the least cost, and 
every participant will enjoy th 
good^ feeling which comes- from 
doing a needed and important 
job well and efficiently. 

MacCofd is a retired ar- 
cheiogisi and retired Coionel 
AUS. He now resides in Rich- 
mond. 



¥0 ^^ ^ o 




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'&(:^^ 




UCAL NOTICES 



LiCAL NOTICES 



UCAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICK 



NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 
Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City 
Council of Virginia Beach will be 
heard in the Council Chambers 
of the City Hall Building. 
Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, Janua^ry 27, 1986, at 
7:(X) p.m. at which time the 
following applications will be 
heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION: 
PUNOOBOROUGHr ' 

1. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Ocean Island 
Associates for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-4 
Resort -Commercial District to R- 
6 Residential District on certain 
property located at the Southeast 
corner of Sandpiper Road and 
Whitecap Lane. Said parcel con- 
tains 12.76 acres more or less. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
PUNGO BOROUGH. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

2. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Robert H. Joseph- 
berg and James C. Nocito for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-6 Residential District to 
B-2 Community-Business District 
on certain property located at the 
Northeast corner of South Bir- 
dneck Road and Longstreet 
Avenue in Olive Heights. Said 
parcel is located at f04 South Bir- 
dneck Road and contains 1.3 
acres. Plats with more detailed 

information are available in the 
Department of Planning. LYN- 
NH A VEN BOROUGH. 

3. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Helen V. Standing 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from B-2 Community-Business 
District to B-4 Resort- 
Commercial District on certain 
property located on the West side 
of N. Birdneck Road, 151 feet 
South of Bluebird Drive. Parcel 
is located at 565 N. Birdneck 
Road and contains 20,822 square 
feet. Plats with more detailed in- 
formation are available in the 
Department of Planning. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 

4. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Lessie M. Gimbert 
and Gary M. & Robin B. Van 
Auken for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 
Residential District to A-2 Apar- 
tment of Dtstricr on certain 
property located on the South 
side of the Virginia Beach Toll 
Road, 700 feet East of Doyle 
Way. Said parcel contains 6.5 
acres. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in the 
Department of Planning. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Eunice and James 
Johnson and Mary Jane Hyman 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-5 Residential Distric. tJ 



B-2 Community-Business District 
at the Norftheast corner of South 
Bjrdneck Road and Owl's Creek 
Lane. Said parcel contains 29, 
925.72 square feet. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 

borough; 

6. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Jack J. and Jeaime 
Osmond for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 
Residoitial District to A-1 Apar- 
tinent District on cmain^jroperty 
located on the East side of South 
Birdneck Road, 300 feet more or 
less South Beautiful Street on 
Lots 1, 2, 3, 6, 11,12, 13, 14, 15, 
16, and 17, Subdivision A, 
Seatack. Said parcels contain 
2.22 acres. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 
PRINCESS ANN^DROUGH: 

7. An OrdinanSBupon Ap- 
plication of Ronalow and Holly 
Hall for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-3 
Resicfential District to 0-1 Office 
District on certain property 
located at the Southeast corner of 
General Booth Boulevard and 
Princess Anne Road and shown 
as 'Residue Acreage" on that cer- 
tain plat recorded in Map Book 
168, Page 51, in the Clerk's Of- 
fice of the Circuit Court. S»id 
parcel contains 3.25 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

8. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Snyder Family Trust 
by Edward B. Snyder, Trustee, 
for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for automobile sales 
and service on certain property 
located at the Southeast corner of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard and 

,Kings Grant Road. Said parcel 
'containsiS.I acres. Plats with 
morf^tailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 
AMENDMENTS: 

9. Motion of the Planning Com- 
mission of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, to amend and 
reordain Section 4.1 of the Sub- 
division Ordinance pertaining to 
bikeway location, type and wid- 
th. More detailed information is 
available in the Department of 
Planning. 

10. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Vifginia Beach, 



nation is available in the Depar- 
tment of Planning. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited 
' to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC 
City Clerk 

''■>.3-IR2t 1-15VB ' 
VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 31st 
day of December, 1985 
In re: Adoiitipn ^f William 
Joseph Graham 

By: Gina Michelle Morrison and ' 
Jon Stark Morrison, Petitioners 
To: Peter Walsh 
c/o U.S. Marines 
Quantico, Virginia 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

This day came GINA 
MICHELLE MORRISON and 
JON STARK MORRISON, 
Petitioners, and represented that 
the object of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the above 
named infant(s) William Joseph 
Graham, by GINA MICHELLE 
MORRISON and JON STARK 
MORRISON, husband and wife, 
and afhdavit having been made 
and filed that Peter Walsh, a 
natural parent of said child(ren) 
is a non-resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post of- 
fice address (as of October, 1983 
being: c/o U.S. Marine, Quan- 
tico, Virginia, and that due 
diligence has been used by or in 
behalf of the said petitioners to 
ascejrtain in which county or cor- 
poration the said natural parent 
is, without effect. 

It is therefore ORDERED that 
the said PETER WALSH appear 
before this Court within ten (10) 
days after publication of this Or- 
der and indicate his attitude 
toward the proposed adoption, 
or otherwise dcwhat is necessary 
to protect his interest in this mat- 
ter. 

It is further ORDERED that a 
copy of this Order be published 
once each week for four suc- 
cessive weeks in The Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of 
general circulation in this city. 
A Copy Teste: 
J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By: Patti K. Bennett, D.C. 
Mclvin J. Radin, Esquire 
500 Holiday Inn Waterside 
Norfolk, Virginia 235 10 
(804)623-1216 
225-18 4t 1-29 VB 

VIRGINIA: In the Circuit Court 
of the City of Virginia Beach 
In Re: Estate of Foye K. Johnson 
Vngmetr-iQ- — Deceased " 



amend and reordain Section 1.1 
of the Subdivision Ordinance 
pertaining to definitions of 
streets'. More detailed infor- 
mation is available in the Depar- 
tment of Planning. 
11. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Section 4.4 
of the Subdivision Ordinance 
concerning notification on plats 
of certain soil and slope con- 
ditions. More detailed infor- 



SHOW CAUSE ORDER 
AGAINST DISTRIBUTION 

OF ESTATE 
THIS DAY came W. 
TAYLOR JOHNSON, JR., 
HENRY H. JOHNSON and 
FOyE Kr ADKINS. Exwutors, 
of this Estate and filed with leave 
of Court a Motion for Show 
Cause Order against distribution 
of this Estate. 

It appearing to the Court that a 
report of the accounts of W. 
TAYLOR JOHNSON. JR.. 



HENRY H. JOHNSON and 
FOYE K. ADKINS, Executors 
of the Estate of FOYE K. 
JOHNSON, deceased, and of the 
debts and demands against the 
Estate has been filed in the 
Clerk's Office, and that six mon- 
ths have elapsed since the 
qualification, on motion of the 
Executors, it is ORDERED that 
the creditors of, and all other 
persons interested in this Estate 
do show cause, if any they can, 
on the 3rd day of February, 1986, 
at 9:3Q *.in., before this Court at. 
its courtroom, against the 
payment and delivery of the 
Estate to the parties entitled 
thereto, with or without requiring 
refunding bond as this Court may 
determine. 

It is further ORDERED that a 
duly certified copy hereof be 
published once a week for two 
successive weeks in the Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of 
general circulation in this 
jurisdiction. 
A Copy Teste: 
J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By Jeanette L. Jones, D.E.C^ 
Jo Ann Blair 
Of Counsel 
Clark &Stant 
900 Sovran Bank Building 
One Columbus Center 
Va. Beach, Va. 23462 ' 
225-11 2t 1-15 VB 

NOTJCE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 
Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City 
Council of Virginia Beach will be 
heard in the Council Chambers 
of the City Hall Building, 
Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, Febraury 3. 1986. at 
2 p.m. at which time the 
following application will be 
heard: 

AMENDMENT: 
1. Motion of the Planning Com- 
mission of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, to amend and 
reordain Article II, Part C of the 
Comprehensive Zoning Ordinan- 
ce pertaining to the PD-H2 Plan- 
ned Unit Development District. 
More detailed information is 
available in the Department of 
Planning. 

Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
All interested persons arc invited 
to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC 
City Clerk 
227-2 2t 1-22 VB 

PUBLIC NOTICE 
The Virginia Beach City Coun- 
cil, will consider: 

An ordinance to amend the 
Master Street and Highway Plan 
(dated December 16, 1974) to 
realign the intersection of Indian 
River Road anifElbbw Road (as 
shown r>n maps in the Depar- 
tment oi Planning). Monday, 
January 27, 1986, 7:00 P.M., 
City Council Chambers. 
Ruth H. Smith, CMC 
City Clerk 
227-8 It 1-15 VB 



VIRGINIA: In the Circuit Court 

of the City of Virginia Beach, 

12/27/85 

In Re: Estate of Richard D. 

Tayloe, Deceased 

SHOW CAUSE ORDER 

AGAINST DISTRIBUTION 
OF ESTATE 

THIS DAY came RICHARD 
R. D. TAYLOE, Executor of this 
Estate and filed with leave of 
Court a Motion for Show Cause 
Order against distribution of this 
Estate. 

Itappearingto the CouiHiii^i a 

report of the accounts of 
RICHARD R. D. TAYLOE, 
Executor of the Estate of 
RICHARD D. TAYLOE, 
deceased, and of the debts and 
demands against the Estate has 
been filed in the Clerk's Office, 
and that six months ahve elapsed 
since the qualification, on motion 
of the Executor, it is ORDERED 
that the creditors of, and all other 
persons interested in this Estate 
do show cause, if any they can, 
on the 3rd day of February, 1986, 
at 9:30 a.m., before this Court at 
its courtroom, against the 
payment and delivery of the 
Estate to the parties entitled 
thereto, with or without requiring 
refunding bond as this Court may 
determine. 

It is further ORDERED that a 
duly certified copy hereof be 
published once a week for two 
successive weeks in • the 
Virginia Beach Sun, a newspaper 
of general circulation in this 
jurisdiction. 
A Copy Teste: 
J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By Jeanette L. Jones, DX. 
JoAnn Blair 
Clark AStant.Attys. 
900 Sovran Bank Building 
One Columbus Center 
Va. Beach, Va. 23462 
225-10 2t 1-15 VB 



VIRGINIA: In ihc Clerk's Oflicc 
of Ihc Circuit Court of the Ciiy 
of Virginia Beach on the t3th day 
of December. 1985 
Elizabeth Ann LcFcvre, Com- 
plainant 

V. 

Frederick W. Chapin 

a non-rcsidcnt 

Serve: Sccrciary of ihe Com- 

monwcallh 

Mary D. Chapin 
5657 Dodinglon Court 
Virginia Beach. Virginia 23455 

Anna 1.. Karp 

304 \\'e'>io\cr Axcnuc 

N.tiV^.lk. Viigmi.i2<5n * 

Linda Yjh 

985 Sunnysidc Dn\c 

Virginia Beach. Virginia 23464 

Kay H. Finkclsicin 

Serve: Robcrl H. Bcnncit, Altor 

nc> 

2697 Iniornalional Parkway 

Virginia licach, Virginia 23462 

ErncM A. Naiividad 
4405 Articles Lane 



Virginia Beach, Virginia 

Sovran Bank. NA " 

Serve: Cliff A. Culchins III. . 
Reeisiered Aeent 

One Commercial Place 
Norfolk, Virginia 23501 

The Chesapeake and Potomac 
Telephone Company 
Serve: Huburt R. Stallard 
703 East Grace Street 
Richmond, Virginia 23219 

Bank of Virginia 

Serve: Sarah R. Myers, 

Registered Agent 

7 North Eighth Street 

Richmond, Virginia 23219 

United States of America 
Serve: U.S. Attorney 
Eastern District of Virginia 
U.S. Federal Court House 
Granby Street 
Norfolk, Virginia 

Department of the Treasury 
Serve: U.S. Attorney 
Eastern District of Virginia 
U.S. Federal Court House 
Granby Street 
Norfolk, Virginia 

Kearney Floyd, Trustee 
716 Pennsylvania Avenue 
Norfolk, Virginia, Defendants 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of the above styled 
suit is to partition certain proper- 
ty owned in fee simple by the 
complainant Elizabeth Ann 
LeFevrc and the defendants 
Frederick W. Chapin and Mary 
D. Chapin located in Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. And an affidavit 
having been filed that diligence 
has been used without effect lo 
ascertain the location of Mary D. 
Chapin, whose last known ad- 
dress is 5657 Dodinglon Court,- 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23455. 

The properly which is the sub- 
ject of this suit is. described as 
folhiws: 

ALL that certain lot, piece or 
parcel of land with the buildings 
and improvements thereon, 
situate in the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, and known, 
numbered and designated as Lots 
1 and 2 as shown on that certain 
plat enliiled: "Survey of Block 
Six of Oceana Gardens", which 
plat is duly rc'cordcd in the 
Clerk's Office of the Circuit 
Court of Ihe City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, in Map Book 21 
at page 3 . 

It is therefore ORDERED that 
the said Mary D. Chapin do ap- 
pear on or before February 3, 
1986. in the Clerk's Office of this 
- Court and do what is iiecessary lo 
protect her interfsi. 

Ai.j I, :■ KiMlier ORLF Kri> 
that this order be pubiislKu .. . 
a week for four successive vnvVs 
in the Virginia Bea^ '^ Sun, a 
,ic . I ,i(Ki haviilj; l; — /'l' ^-ii- 
culaiion in ihc Ci'v of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. 
J. rur'i^ hruil. C k 
Bv i'hylh- \ Siuon 
Deputy Clerk 
223-2 4T 1-22 VB 



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10 The Virginia Beach Sun, January 15. 1«)R6 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 
Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City 
Council of Virginia Beach \vill be 
heard in the Council Chambers 
of the City Hall Building, 
Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Statkui, Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Moiiday, January 27, 1986, at 
7:00 p.m. at which time the 
following application will be 
heard: 

AMENDMENT: . 
1. Motion of the Planning Com- 
mission of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, to amend the 
Master Street and Highway Plan 
to include a 250- foot, six-lane 
limited access expressway from 
the Laskin Road interchange with 
the Virginia Beach-Norfolk Ex- 
pressway (44) to the Chesapeake 
City line at the Virginia Power 
Easement south of Elbow Road. 
More detailed information is 
available in the Department of 
Planning. 

Plats with more detailed inform- 
tion are available in the Depar- 
tment of Planning. ' - 
All interested persons are ifivited 
to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC 
City Clerk 
225-18 2t 1-15 VB 1__ 



NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 
Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City 
Council of Virginia Beach will be 
heard in the Council Chambers 
of the City Hall Building, 
Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, Feb. 3, 1986, at 
2:00 p.m. at which time the 
following applications will be 
heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION: 
VIRGINIA BEACH 

BOROUGH: 

1 . An Ordinance upon Ap-- 
plication of David K. Hiilquist 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from B-5 Resort-Commercial to 
H-2 Resort Hotel District on the 
Northwest corner of Atlantic 
Avenue and 4th Street on Lots 1- 
4 and 7-9, Block 8, Ocean Lot In- 
vestment Company. Said parcels 
are located at 400 and 424 Atlan- 
tic Avenue, 205 4th Street and 
208 5th Street and contain i. 16 
acres. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Joseph E. and Susan 
C. Thain for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-7 
Residential District to B-4 
Resort-Commercial District on 
Lots 9, 10 and 11, Block 18, 
Shadowlawn. Said parcels are 
located at 312 Winston Salem 
Avenue and contain 13,931 
square feet. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

3. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Four Star Produc- 
tions for a CHANGE OF 
ZONIGN DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-6 

- Residential District to B-2 Com- 
munity-Business District on cer- 
tain property located on the East 
side of Newtown Road, 170 feet 
more or less North of Connie 
Lane on part of Site 23, New- 
some Farms. Said parcel contains 
1.972 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. BAYSIDE 

BOROUGH. 

KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 
I 4. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
'< plication of Fred H. Rosenblum 
^ for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFigATION 
from R-8 Residential District to B- 
2 Community-Business District at 
the Southwest corner of Indian 
I River Road and Ferry Point 
^ Road. Said parcel is located at 
5521 Indian River Road and con- 
tains 16,988 square feet. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Colcon Development 
Co., for a CHANGE OF ZON- 
ING DISTRICT 

CLASSIFICATION from B-3 
Central-Business District to B-4 
Resort-Commercial District on 
certain property located on the 
South side of Southern 
Boulevard beginning at a point 
450 feet East of Constitution 
Drive on Lots 74078, A. C. Jarvis 
Land. Said parcel cotnains 
10.0349 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are avail- 
able in the Department of Plan- 
ning. KEMPSVILLE 

BOROUGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of John E. Shomier, Jr. 



and Erma Young Shomier for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-8 Residential District to 
B-2 Community-Business District 
on Lots 30-34, Rock Creek, 
Phase 1. Said property is located 
at 1846 Salem Road and contains 
1.006 acres. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIl : 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUOn: 

7. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Hop-In rood Stores, 
Inc. for a CONDI HONAL USE 
PERMIT for gasoline pumps in 
conjunction with a convenience 
store on certain property located 
at the Northeast corner of Cen- 
terville Turnpike and Old Ridge 
Road. Said parcel contains 
32,434.7 square feet. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH^ -..™^^ 
VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH: 

8. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Property Buyers, 
Inc.. for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for multi-family 
dwellings in the C-1 Distrijgl on 
certain property located on^ the 
South side of I9tfi Street, 330 feet 
more or less West of Jefferson 
Avenue. Said parcel contains 
1.817 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are avail- 
able in the Department of Plan- 
ning. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

9. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of R. Larry Turner, 
Pres., Turner & Associates for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a day care center on certain 
property located on the West side 
of General Booth Boulevard 
beginning at a point 450 feet 
more or less North of Red Mill 
Boulevard. Said parcel contains 
1.25 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

10. Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrjative Officers in regard 
to certain elements of the Sub- 
division Ordinance, Subdivision 
for Rodney B. and Brenda J. 
Kellogg. Parcel is located at 3153 
Colechester Road. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC 
City Clerk 
227-3 2t 1-22 VB 

VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 

of the Circuit Court of the City 

of Virginia Beach, on the 3rd day 

of January ,^1986 

Gilbert G. Cauwet and 

Josepha G. Cauwet, Petitioners 

vs. 

Richard fiiikY, Respondent 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of the above-styled 
suit is to obtain an order from the 
Circuit Court directing the Clerk 
of said Court to enter upon the 
margin of Judgment Lien Book 
32, at Page 199, that a judgment 
obtained by respondent on Feb- 
ruar.y 23, 1978, against the 
petitioners has been paid and is 
discharged and released as a lien 
upon the property of petitioners. 

And it^ appearing by affidavit 
filed according to law that 
Richard Bailey, the above-named 
respondent, cannot be found af- 
ter the exercise of due diligence; it 
is therefore ORDERED that the 
said Richard Bailey do appear on 
or before March 14, 1986, in the 
Clerk's Office of this Court and 
do what is necessary to protect 
his interest. 

And it is further ORDERED 
that this order be published once 
a week for four Successive weeks 
in the Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper having general cir- 
culation in the City of Virginia 
Beach. 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By Phyllis N. Styron, D.C. 
Kellam, Pickrell & Lawler 
(Douglass W. Dewing, Esquire) 
1020 First American Bank 
Building 

Norfolk, Virginia, 23^10 
225-21 4t 2-5 VB 

Take notice that on January 18 
at 10 a.m. on the premises of 
Weavers Auto, 10%, Virginia 
Beach Blvd., Virginia Beach, 
Virginia 23451, Weavers Auto 
will sell at public auction for cash 
reserving unto himself the right 
to bid the following motor 
vehicle: 

1978 Chevy, Identification No. 
CPL 3283305324. 
227-1 It 1-15 VB 



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CLASSIFIED AD MAIIL-IN FORM 



PERSONAL 
RATE S 

1 time 

2 times 
4 times 



20 words 
or less 

$ 6.40 
11.20 
14.00 



Additional 
word s 

32 

.56 
.70 



Run your personal classified ad four times for only 
$14.00 YOU can cancel your ad at any time, however, 
there can be NO refunds and no changes. 

All Classified ads run In three newspapers (Virginia Beacn sun, Chesapeake Post 
and Portsmouth Times) no addlSOnai charge. 



Please print clearly using one word per box. 










--.^ 








■ 


, 






— 


1 








20 words 


_ 





Run rpy personai ad for 
Payment is enciosed ^ 



issues. 



Make check payable to Byeriy Publications. 

IMAIL TO: Classified, box 1 327, Chesapeake, va. 23320 



Name 

Address 
City 



.State. 



-ZIP- 



FOR HELP With your classified ad, please call 547-4571 . 



PERSONAL ADS must be placed 
by private Individuals. Com- 
mercial and business related 
ads do not qualify for 2time 
and 4-tlme personal rates 



COMBiNATibN RATE: Run this same personal ad 
In any other Byeriy Publications newspaper 
for an additional $2.50 one time, $4.50 two 
times, or $6.00 four times. Newspapers In 
Franklin, Etpporia. Lawrencevllle, Dinwiddle 
and Williamsburg. Call S47-4571 for details. 



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ANTIQUES 



CASH PAID FOR ANTIQUES, old fur- 
niture, glassware, china, collectables and 
old toys too. Will buy one piece, or a 
hou,seful. Call day nr p-Kht. 485-46.^9. I'n 



ADULT CARE 



NURSES AIDE - Private duty. 35 -I- yrs. 
exp. working with sick and elderly. Ex- 
cellent reference. Hrs. & sal. negotiable. 
393-6286. ■" '^» 

ELDERLY CARE - Armond Whithurst 
Manor. Beautiful licensed residence for 
ladies with 24 hour quality care and per- 
sonalized attention. Call 482-3128. 4i 12 ig 



APPLIANCES 



DRYER FOR SALE - Excellent working 
fondiiion. 'ftlmond cblored, $150. Call 
460-1062. i\\i-ii 

DRYER - Kenmore, needs little work, 
$70. Call 588-1383. 112-25 



AUTOS 



BRONCO - '85 - loaded. Moving over- 
seas. No equity. Assume lease. 464-1085. 

' 11 1-7 

PEUGEOT - 10-Speed, 6 mos. old. Ex- 
cellenl condition. $275. 428-1987. n 1-8 
VW - '81 Pickup, diesel. Stick shift, 
stereo. Excellent condition. $2700. 490 
1344. 111-8 

VW-'81 RABBIT - Excellent condition, 
very clean, only 50,000 ifiiles, air, 5 speed, 
fuel injection, luxury package. $4,000 or 
best offer. 484-2528. fi^J 

FORD - '82 Escort, 4 spd., 2 dr. Hatch- 
bk., AM-FM cassette; very good con- 

dition; $3200; 583-7057. 4t i2.i» 

DODGE - 1976 Aspen, good condition. 
$1500. Call 422-9658after 10a.m. 4i 12 18 
1958 FORD STEPVAN - White, trimmed 
in red, stove and sink, converted ipto a 
sleeping camper, sleeps 3, new motor, 
new transmission, mint condition, $1 ,500. 
Call 393-0159. <m2.| 8 

'80 CITATION, - 1 owners. 62,000 mis., 
5 new Michelin radials, AM-FM, power 
steering and braskes, air, very reliable, 
$2100.440-1476. 4i i2-i8 

•74 BMW . 2002, Air Cond.. sttieo. 
AM/FM, excellent condition. Best Offer. 
Call 547-7374 after 6 pm. Days - 397- 
760<S. TIN 



BUSINESS EQUIPMENT 



FIUNC CABINETS, all sizes, new, used, 
damaged, all at good,prices Budget Office 
Outfitters 943 Canal Drive 487-2202. 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY ! 



OWN VQUR OWN beautifut discount 
shoe store\.adies or Children. Nationally 
known brands. 'Jordache 'Bear Traps 
'Bandolino '9 West 'Johansen 'Evan 
Picone 'USA 'Pro Keds "Child Life 
•Cherokee * Giggles and many more. All 
first quality merchandise. $15,900 10 
$19,900 includes beginning inventory- 
training-fixtures-grand opening 
promotions and round trip air fare for 
one. Call today. We can have your store 
opened in 15 days. Prestige Fashions 501 
329-->i/i7 1,1 - 

I CAMPERS 

INTERNATIONAL • '86, 32', self- 
contained, air and lots of extras. $8,700. 
Musi sell. 485-5280, 4iim« 



CHILD CARE 



BABYSIT - Day care provided, hoi 
meals, USDA program. Willoughby area 
Call 48027^1 ^ hjj 

CHILD CARE - Newborn and up. By 

responsible and caring woman with ex- 
cllent references, competitive rates, lots of 
1 LC, Norfolk area. Call 583-7059 or 855 

IJ90. 4IIMI 



CHILD CARE 



iL 



BABYSITTING - Provided in my Nor- 
view home,*" experienced mom/nursing 
assistant, any age/hours, $35 week. 853- 

0462. 41114 

MOTHER OF FIVE - W/references, will 
babysit in my home near Gate 5, NAB, 
reasonable rates, naps, hot meals, struc- 

tured ti me. 460-3043. 411-7 

WILL BABYSIT - In my Ben Moreell 

home, all ag es. 440 -8850. 1 1 12-25 

CHARLESTOWNE LAKES SOUTH - 
Experienced, dependable mother will care 
for your children in my home, any age, 
anytime. 479-1379. 4i 12-25 

CHESAPEAKE STREET • Mothr of 3 
will babysit from 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. & 1 1 
p.m. -7:3 0. 587-5355. 2t 1-21 

CLEANING SERVICES I 



ALLOW THE "SUNSHINE EXPRESS" 

to get you back on the track with a clean 
and shinny start. We excel in residential 
move in-out, and small business clean- 
ning. Reasonable rates, references. 426- 
7 824, 428-0556 or 460-2255. 4i2S 

HOUSECLEANING - Resolution No. 1 
Clean up your house. Good rates, ex- 
cellent references. Call 340-8109, 420- 

8592. 11 1 -a 

METICULOUS about cleanine? So are 
we. We do homes, lawns. Call any hour. 
622-4253. ' • 4Ti-2i 



DOGS 



MALTESE DOG - Small white dog, 
male, I year old, weighs 4 to 5 Ib.s. Extra 
good with children, AKC, has shot record 
$200,428-7481. 111-7 

LHASA APSO PUPPIES - Both parents 
AKC registered. Born Nov. 7, also stud 
service. Call 587-8314. 4<i-2a 

DOBERMAN PINCHERS - Purebred, 
black & tan, 4 females, 3 months old. $75. 
Call 623-1546. inj 

BLUE DOBERMAN -8 mos. oW. AKC 
registered, needs a good home. $200. Call 
473-8425 or 499-3894. itm 

PIT BULL PUPPIES - Full blood. 9 
pups. Tan, white and brindle. $lQp-$175. 
Call 491-2061. 11 1-8 

PITBULL PUPPY - 5 mos. old, male, 
good with kids, housebroken, $100. Call 
473-8425 or 499-'894. itm 



ARTICLES FOR SALE 



FUR COAT - Natural full length muskrat 
coat with racoon collar, size 12-14, 4 yrs. 
old, $900. 49 1 -1412. im-7 

STAINED GLASS - M" x 42" $2^ each. 
4-15" Chrysler rims, 4 for $60. call 397- 
5029. 2n£i 

TELESCOPE - Meade model 2M0 with 
LX drive, used 3 times with many extras, 
$800. Call 42 8-520 7. itm 

SMALL TO MEDIUM doghouse; $35, 
545-4039. III-" 

LARGE LR MIRROW - $100. 74' Audi - 
$500, running condition, carpet 9 x 16, 
ru.st color, $170, washer $110 ■ wbrking 
condition. 857-1964. n ; « 

OLDSMOBILE - Factory spinner, 15" 
hub caps. Cost $500 will sell for $^X}. 
424-6521. 411-2 

WET SUIT - Tesca, 1 pc. sleeveless, 
unu^l, size 54, $100. 427-34% or 467- 

2%8; ITM 

VACUUM - Kirby, \'h yrs. old; paid 
$900, sell for $300 or best offer; call 467- 

9709. 111-15 

PHILCO PORT. COLOR T.V. - 19". 2 
swivel rockers, I cedar chest, I bedroom 
suit, RCA floor model combination con- 

sole, cheap! 468-4368. 11 M4 

COMMODORE VIC-20 computer 
w.'tape drive, 2 tapes, $100; cast-iron gas 
grill, needs propane, new still in box, $35; 
video tapecase, $25. 587-9337. ii 12 i« 



TO PLACE CLASSIFIED 
ADS, CALL 547-4571 



FIREWOOD 



SEASONED Oak — $75 a pick-up load, 
also fire logs 3-3'/: cords. $170, 721-3107. 
Virginia Beach. 4i 1 r 

OAK - 90% all hardwood. Cut, split and 
seasoned. 1 ton pickup (I) $65. (2> $125. 
(3) $185. 547-0266. 4 . 1-2 

FIREWOOD - All seasoned hardwood, 
split and delivered, '4 ton truckload, $65, 
fast delivery, call 721-3819, 721-5504. 



FURNITURE 



WATERBED - King-size, brand new, 
everything^ with mirror headboard. 
Sacrifice$250. Call 547-7374. iin 

ONE COUCH AND CHAIR r Deep 
Rose, excellent condition - call 488-3678. 

. III-7 

FURNITURE FOR SALE - 2 piece sec- 
tional sofa, recently cleaned, good con- 
dition, 3 tier cottonwood table, call 461- 

6562. I '12-18 

BROWN, black & white Herculon love 
seat & malduni-chait,. GC. $75. 468- 

2416. - _..i'j'-"* 

HICKORY - tavern sofa, quality made, 
with traditional styling, blue, beige & 
rust, hardly used, $275. 588-5580 or 464- 

2259. ■ 411-7 -86 

PARTIALLY new sofa, blue, orange & 
beige, tweed, with bamboo frame. EC, 
$175,440-5689. 'tm 



HEALtH/ NUTRITION 



WANTED - People seriously interested in 
losing weight and earning money. 468- 

0040. ; 4l^5 

CAMBRIDGE DIET - Better than ever, 
drinks, soups and bars. 464-0589. 21 1-22 

BAHAMIAN DIET - Dick Gregory's 
Slim-Safe Diet is here. 523-0307. 7. 1 .77 



I HELP WA NTED 

REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT 

sales$l,800 per month guaranteed salary, 
plus commission. Liberal travel allowan- 
ce. Call on commercial accounts. ^^1 
territory. Outstanding opportunity for 
self motivated individual. Training 
provided. For interview call 919-735- 
0031, M-f, 9-4. 11 1-8 

TEXAS REFINERY CORP needs mature 
person now in Tidewater area. Regardless 
of experience, write A. H. Hopkins, Box 

711, FQrt Worth, TX 76101. ui-8 

RECEPTIONIST/CLERK TYPISt~ In' 
Great Bridge area. Part time to start. -8:30- 
to 5:00, Wed, Thur. & Friday. Typing a 
must. Call mS. Slate at 547-4574 on 
Mon. Jan. 1-3 for interview. irn 

GOVERNMENT JOBS - $16,040-$59,230 
per year now hiring. Call 805-687-6000. 
Ext. R-3458 for current federal list. 

1611-22-86 

TYPISTS - $500 weekly at home! Write 
P.O. Box 975, Elizabeth, N.J. 07207. ifn 
SALESPERSONS WANTED - Hottest 
product of the decade - Pay telephones 
Qualified leads, 480-2128, Mr. Hussher ifn 

TYPESETTER - AM5810 exp. full" or 
part time with established printer. 547- 



2813 



111211 



RECEPTIONIST — Clerk typist. Greets 
the public, performs clerical functions. 5 
hours per week. High school plus clerical 
experience. 482-3270 21 12-25 

SALESMAN - Outside sales. Established 
route. Good opportunity. Musi have own 
transportation. Advancement to Sales 
Manager possible. Apply in person. Male 
or female. Maturity a plus. Franklin Of- 
fice Supply. Franklin, Va. 562-7091 «^ i 1-22 

GOOD INCOME - Working with mail 
ifrom home, experience unnecessary! 
Details, send self-addressed stamped en- 
velop to J. Johnson, Box 9, Harborton, 
Va. 23389. ifn 

RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE CLERK 

Responsible person needed, straight 
hours, standard wage plus commission. 
Call 547-4571. tfn 



[■■ 



HOME IMPROVEMENT | 

BATHROOM REMODELING 

ceramic tile, tub kits, vanities, rotted 
floors and repairs of all types. Quality 
work. 486-1377 4. 1 g 



HOMES FOR SALE 



GREAT NECK - Area, twnhse. 3 bedr- 
ms,, Vh baths, all brie, 2 yrs. old, raited. 

$76,000.481-2800. 1112-11 

GOVERNMENT HOMES from $1 (U 
repair). Also delinquent tax property. 
Call 805-687-6000 Ext. GH-3453 for in- 
formation. 4112-25 



HORSES, CATTLE, ETC. 



BLACK ANGUS • Registered bull calf. 
10 months old, $250. Call 487-5652. 11 1 » 
TWO YOUNG ROOSTERS - (table size) 
fre e. 547-4571 days ■ 482-5733 nights, im 

THORUIGHBRED - 2 year old coll, 
pretty mover, good manners, no vices, 
will mature over 16 hands. $2,000. Call 

421-2363. iiM 

ABRABIAN DISPERSAL sale mare, 
gelding, & fillies. Good bloodline. Must 
sell! 421-9693. 1,1218 

INSTRUCTIONS 

t 



BASKET WEAVING CLASSES ■ In my 

home. Cost $35, includes supplies. 460- 
9459, 1117 

SCUBA Le^ONS - A gift of adventure - 
Scuba lessons • Call Lynnhaven Dive, 
481-7949. 4.12 



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LAWN & GARDEN J 

FRUIT TREES, nut trees, berry plants, 
grape vines, landscaping plant, material - 
offered by one of Virginia's largest 
growers. Free copy 48-page Planting 
Guide-Catalog in color, on request. 
Waynesboro Narseries Inc - Waynesboro, 
VA 22980 - 41 yT^ 

"fence - Chain link security with 10 ft. 
wide gate, 10 ft. high, 400 ft. long, com- 
plete, delivered. '57'iO. 588-6832. 11 is 



LOST AND FOUND 



LOST CAT - Male, black/brown stripes. 
Windsor Woods area, 6 months old. 
REWARD, 340-8728 . 2m i5 

CAT - REWARD - $100 - Ferpals^-Way 

with black tiger strips, slei;der build, 
green eyes, no collar, disappeared Nov. 23 
from Ewell Lane, Great Bridge area. 
More infromation, call 482-1460. 4i 1-2 
PITBULL - Male, disappeared in Vepco 
area, answers to the name "Bear", $200 
reward leading to location of dog! Call 



MOTORCYCLES- 



'78 yamaha - 73CC, good condition, 
$250. Call 487-5652, nija 

81 YAMAHA - 550 Maxit, $500. Engine 
O.K., needs battery, call 853-5578. 11 1-7 

82 HONDA CB125 - EC, less than 900 
mis., must sell, $600; anytime 461 -2824. 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 

.SAXOPHONE, ■ Bundy. Selmer, E-C, 

$400; 460-3653. , iTi-i 



MUSIC LESSONS 



PIANO LESSONS - All ages including 
pre-schoolers. Play for your enjoyment, 
461-5366. " 211-21 

PIANO LESSONS • Teacher with music 
degree will accept all ages and levels. 
Ghent areaT^2r-7060. 4t ij-ia 



PETS 

8" BOA CONSTRICTOR - With cage, 
very tame, $250, before 9 p.m. call 496- 

1953. njj 

YOUNG PARAKEETS - Green and 
yellow, sky blue and aqua blue, $10 ea.; 
463-2223. . ni-s 



POSITIONS WANTED 



MANAGER - 10 years exp. looking for 

- xhallengijag position. Payroll exp. also 

College Degree. 588-1949. ii].|4 



RENTALS 



ROOM FOR RENT - $55 week. Call 919- 

435-6742. . 41W 

ROM FOR RENT - Private room, semi- 
private bath, living-room, HBO, kitchen 
privileges, air conditioned and 
washer/dryer. Must see to appreciate. 
$250 month. Call486-2092. i^il 

ROOM FOR RENT - Office in South 
Norfolk - 17 X 33' with 2 bathrooms. $135 
per month. Call 420-3485 or 482-1013. 

II 1-14 



SERVICES 



ALTERATIONS AND TAILORING - 

Done by experienced professional. Fast 
service, low rates, all work guaranteed. 
Call Dawn Kearns, 482-7289. 4i 1-29 

ATTENTION SMALL BUSINESSES - 

Bookkeeping done in my home. Pick up 
and delivery. Reasonable rates. Call 
Robin at 627-8526 after 5:30. 412-05 

NEED HELP? I'm a "Jack Of All 
Trades". Tutor, artist, sec-typist, 
babysitter, and mothers helper. Norfolk 

area. Call 857-6839. 4n4 

WINTER REPAIR - Small problems 
becoiTie costly bills by spring. Save nowl 
Repairs (24 hrs.) 482-5113, satisfaction 
gu aranteed. 411-2 

I YPiST - Experienced reasonable rates, 
Oceanfront location, will accept and , 
return by mail if you are out of !he area. 

428-4665 . 4ih. 

CAR SPARKLE SERVICE - Car wash 
and/or polish by hand at your home or 
workplace. Our mobil unit comes to you. 
Price from $ia. Including the interior. 

547-2820. 15, 

DISC JOCKEY - All occasions with a 
variety of music. 15 years experience. 
Ready for holidays. For more info., con- 
tact Mr. Brook - 425-8356 or 340-3002 or 

486-0983 aft erj. 812-5-86 

EXPERIENCED MAN - will do lan- 
dscaping, all types of yard work or house. 
painting . Call 486-2336 1112-n 

TYPIST - Experienced, reasonable rates. 
Oceanfront location will alccept and 
return by mail if you are out of the area 
42814665 4412-25 

ALLIED VIDEO SERVICES, INC - 

Transfer home videos and slides to video 
tape. Free estimates. Call 424-9757. ifn 



SHARE 



HOME TO LIVE IN PERMANENTLY 

for person 50-70, in exchange to watch 84 
yr. old gentlemen. Bonuses. 466-9433. 

- - - [nj 

NEED SINGLE PERSON to share large 3 
bedroom home. $300 includes all, in 
Virginia Beach. Call Mike Nichols, 463- 
2110or34O-033^ 11 1« 

TRANSPORTATION ] 

MILITARY CIRCLE - Need ride from 
Western Branch area, Chesapeake. Ap- 
pro*. 7 a.m. arrival. Wijl pay fAs. 488- 
1854. Ill" 



The Virginia Beach Sun, January 15, 1986 1 1 



f 



• • • * 




National Realty, Inc. 



252DGilmertonRd. 
Chesapeake, VA. 

23320 



485-5950 



CAMELOT: $62,900 spacious, 4 
bedim, 2 bath, ranch formal livmg and 
dining rm, den, attached garage, Ed 
Thomnt'in 4<!-' "'■" 

HOLLY COVE: S4I ,900 



3 bedrm, 1 '/j bath townhome extra Ig 
master bedrm., central air, fenced yard! 
Fred Helm 420-8188. 

LOXLEY PLACE: 2 bedroom Cape 
Code, gas heat, covered patio, garage, 
family room. Quiet, established area. 
LesBoykin 487-3 110. 

CAMELOT: «8.500, 4 bedroom, 2 
bath Ranch. Corner lot, living and 
dining rooms, garage. Some fruit trees. 
John Bateman 487 1346. 

GENEVA MOBILE HOME PARK: 

S3 1,500. Price includes lot plus 2 
bedroom 14'x70' mobile home with 
den, fireplace, living room. Diane 
Crider 393-2647 

BRAMBLETON: Residential or com- 
mercial building lot. Lot size 25' x 125*. 
Call for details. Oail Harrison, 483- 
6013. 

HOLLY COVE: $41,900. Excellent 
condition on 3 bedroom, IVi bath 
Tovynhome. Combination dining & 
family room, living room, covered 
patio. Dex Cutler 545-9480. 

GEORGETOWN POINT: 4 bedroom, 
2W bath Stucco Spanish home. Gahifr 
room, den, fireplace. Some owner 
financing available. Clarence Pegram 
424-3504. 

N. INGLESIDE: $59,500. 3 bedroom, 
1 'A bath Ranch. Living, room, den, 
fireplace, gas heat. Large fenced lot, 
detached garage. Frank Brown 485- 
3473. 

TIMBERLAKE: $58,900. SeUer will 
pay $1,000 of closing costs on 3 
bedroom 1 Vt bath Townhome. Living 
& dining room, central air, fireplace. . 
Vicki Ford 543-5062. 



David R. Copley 
Real Estate Counselor 




428-78 II - Of. - 499-4453 • H. 

Atlantic Realty 
25th & Pacific 




Tx,. 



I 




Be Complete. 

Put yourself in the 
reader's place. If you 
were considering buying 
ihis iicm. tthal would you 
warn 10 know about il? 
Give the iicin's age, con- 
dition, si/e, brand name 
and any oiher imporiani 
information needed. And 
don'l forget to include 
(he price: Ads ihal list 
prices will gel Classified 
shoppers' aileniion first, 

Asoid Abhrrti«lion<>. 

A fess accepted and \ 
recognizable ab- 
brcsialions are OK, but 
an ad full of ihcm just 
confuses the reader. They 
will go on 10 ihc ne\l ad 
rather than trying lo 
decipher yours. A good 
rule of thumb is. "Spell it 
oui or lea\cii out." 

Be AtailiMe. 

1 isi your telephone num- 
ber and'or address so 
that the prospect will 
know how loconiaci you. 
Slate Ihc be-.t hours lo 
call, loo— if xou'rc not 
home when a poteniial 
buyer calls, chances arc 
ihey will not callback. 

I ccl free lo ask lor help, 
bevause help is free for 
the asking and that's why 
we're here. Our siaff arc 
experienced prolessionals 
and ihcy know the infor- 
mation and action words 
[that will help make the 
sale Call 547-4571 for 
help wiih your classified 
ad 



"W— ~""^T" 






N 



904 Kempsville Rd. 

Suite 105 

Virginia Beach VA. 

2.*V,- 

495-6700 



POPLAR HALLSt 4 bedroom, 2 bath 
Tri-level. Gas heat, den, attached 
garage, convenient location. Ray 
Wallace 488-51 1 7. 

CATHAM HALL: $79,900. 3 
"Siaf^ffi7^2'/2 bath Contemporary. 
Owner will consider financing. Living 
room, attached garage, heat pump. Doc 
Vitelli 420-1293. 

PARK PLACE: $47,900 - New 3 
bedrm, I'/i bath, colonial, living rm, 
thermal windows, wall to wall carpet. 
Fh;- "'iilie466-«46n 

BROOKWOOD: $68,000. Spacious 4 
Beard6m;T% bjint Ttm&t. IMgeTeti- 
ced yard, den, living roam. Very 
flexible seller. Cindy Sanford, 463- 
5020, 

BRAMBLETON: $36,500. Duplex, 
with 1 bedroom, each unit. Stove, 
refrigerator, gas space heat. GREAT 
INVESTMENT! Hazel Hearne 463- 
0889. 

TIMBERLAKE: $49,999 - Sellers will 
pay $li000 closing cost on 2 bedrm 
townhome, living rm, fireplace, central 
air. storage shed. Beth Munson, 474- 
0162. 

CAMELOT: 4 bedroom, 2 bath Ranch. 
Living A dining rooms, 2 dens, wood- 
burning furnace, fenced. Doc Vitelli, 
420-1293. 

LAKE CHRISTOPHER: $95,900. 
Priced below VA appraisal. 4 bedroom, 
2 bath Contemporary. Living & dining 
rooms, den, fireplace, 2 car garage. 
Professionally landscaped corner lot. 
Ray Wallace 488-5 11 7. 

LINDALE: $97,000. Seller wiU pay 
some closing costs on 3 bedroom, 2 
bath brick Ranch. Living & dining 
rooms, den, fireplace, detached garage. 
MANY EXTRAS!! Cindy Sanford 463- 
5020 

EASTON PLACE: $83,430. SHOW 
CASE CONDITION!! 3 bedroom. 2 
bath Traditional. Gas heat, fireplace. 
living & dining rooms. 1 '/: car garage. 
Edith White 466-8460. 



% 



GEORGETOWN 
POINT 

Home sites for sale 

for 

People Planning 

Home & Custom 

Builders 

SALES OFFICE 

333 Providence Rd. 

CALL 464-9317 



Opportunity available in sales 

and management; average 

income for sales representives 

in excess of $55,000. 




Contact Lari7 R. Coley for 

confidential interview at 
m-l94T 



Home & Business Cleaning 

We specialize in quality work 
Reasonable rates 

FAYTON-FAYTON 

JANITOR SERVICE 

420-4442 



Norview Coin Shop 

Buying and Selling Gold 

and silver coins. 

Stamps. 

42 Soutlmn Shopping Center 

Norfolk 853-8118 



RICARDO, INC. 
REALTORS 

W3'r« #11" •>«•• ■rld«« 
547-4S35 

3^1 JONNtTOWnaOAB 
CHISAPIAKI^VA 



PLVMOURH PARK: 49,900 VA ap 
praised. No money needed, VA. Lovely 
3BR with 2 story workshop/garage. 
Jean Arsement 482-4400. 
INDIAN RIVER ESTATES: $62,900. 
Perfect starter home, 16 .x 20 detached 
garage, nice condition. Charlotte 
Pietrucci 482-3836. 

great bridge 
(;rf.at bridg'e gardens: 

$86,500. Super buy on this roomy 5BR 
3 bath home near schools. Shirley 
Clayton 482-3646. 

PINES OF WARRICK:im.900.XjOod 
assumptio. Fantastic 4BR Colonial 2 
story, 2 car garage, treed lot. Ralph 
Caies 482-3418 or Betty Sholes 42^1- 
7763. - 

NEW HOME SPECI ALS 
EVA GARDENS: From $62,900! 
Brand new homes going fast now with 
!ot« of custom features. DenrrisTRegister" 

ETHERIDGE MEADOWS: $89,900! 
Super value. Custom 4BR brick ranch 
by Heclit Construction, energy saving 
features, move in now. Closing Costs 
paid less PPns Irene Capps 421-7350. 

POPLAR RIDGESOUTH: From the 
$89,000! Popular Hearndon built 
homes in this fast growing area. 
Wooded section open. Model open 
daily 1-5. Tom Seddon 547-1616. 

ETHERIDGE WOODS: From 
$112,900. New section now open. 
Executive 4 BR homes, several styles 
available, choose your lot and home, 
now. Only 2 left. Open weekends 1-5. 
Ken Rowden 482-4737. 

KOXGATE QUARTER: $124,900. 2 to 
choose '"' Wynn Const. Unique ranch 
and 2 story, 2 car garages, lots of 
amenities Less Closing vostspaid less. 
PPDS. PamBiittner 482-3335, 

MT. PLEASANT HFIGHTS: 102,900, 
28x 72 4BR ranch, marble vanities, wet 
bar and more. Help on Closing Costs. 
IVlary Roach 482-5183. 




I ^xfcs Realty Ltd 

22() BattlefieW Boulevard, South 
"Chesapeake, VA mm • 482-4771 

Mt. Pleasant Heights: 923 Glenda 
Crescent. Three/Four bedrooms, 2- 
slory colonials, lots of extras. Builder 
pays closing cost with 3-2-1 buy down. 
Joan Kistler 547-0090. 

OAK MANOR: $79,000 - Reduced! 
Need quick sell! Brick ranch with den, 
dining room, screened porch, wooded 
lot. Karen Gaskins 482-5580. 

Popular Ridge South: 944 Weeping 
Willow Dr. 616 Willow Oak Dr. Two 
brick ranches, 4-bedroom, great finan- 
cing. Ron Doxey, 547-7226 or Patsy 
Gardner 485-1557. 

ETHERIDGE MEADOWS: In the 

$80's - 4 bedroom ranch with custom 
features, deck, ceramic tile baths, storm 
doors and windows. Ron/Doxey 547- 
7226. 

GREAT BRIDGE: $7J»000 - 135 x 200 

li'l! Orick r.inih' ( ,|M Shii'"" Sirccl- 
man 482- 1 829. -'* 



CLEARFIELD: $73,000 - Just hsted! 
Contemporary ranch. 2-car garage, 
quick possession. Olivia Conley 547- 
1486. 

GREAT BRIDGE: $1 10,000 - Wooded 
lot! Cape Cod! 4 bedrooms, lots of 
custom features. Good assumption. 
^Beverly/Dalton Edge 482-5185. 

WILSON HEIGHTS: $90,800 
Popular floor plans! Great location! 3 
full baths. Must see. Karen Gaskins 

482-5580. 

Etheridge Woods: 717 Hempstead 
Court. Builder says sell! 3-2-1 buy down 
on 2-story 4 bedroom colonial. Come 
by for details on financing. Joan Kistler 
547-0090. 

Weslover: 1 110 Wadena Drive. Super 
buy for the $. 16x 20 den. detached 
garage. $69,900. Joyce Bryant, 485- 

2874. 



GREEN RUN - In Virginia 
Beach, all adults, 1 , 2 and 3 
bedroom apartments. 
Heat and hot water included. 
Pines Apt. 468-2000. 



»d 



LOG HOME SALES 
INCREASING 57% PER YEAR 

Old Timer Log Homes combines natural beauty, low 
cost, energy efficiency of logs with todays lifestyle 
and produces high profits tor its dealers 



Timer Log Homes is the manufacturer of the 
finest (og homes m the industry We offer numerous 
<og options that S(wll out high profits and satisfied 
customers We offer a protected territory, technical 
assistance and an opportunity that could malie you 
financially secure 

Unlimited Income Potential 
-FCATURINQ- 
^ Quality Log Home packages from $8 50 
per square foot 

• Solid 6", 8". 10' . and 12" uniform treated 
logs 

^ Jongue and groove construction 

• KILN dried logs 

• Homes in White Pine, Yellow Pine. Poplar, 
Hemlock and Fir 

• Custom designs always available 

• Old Timer Log Homes thoroughly trains 
its dealers to insure success 

INVESTMENT 100% 
SECURED BY MODEL HOME 

Individual selected must have ability !o purchase or 
mortgage a $17,000 model home 
Call Mr Roberts. (615| 832-6220 COLLECT' Old 
Timer log Homes, 44? MetropIeK .Or , Sutte t05. 
BIdg D Nashville. TN37?n 



mlkDUMAN 

UHNM*8LSiMgft,Va, 

NarOMaita*tW 

0|M Mb M* to i rM SML « to S PIM. 



627-8944 



539-3434 



77 Ply moil I h drand Fury 

4tM» inRine. P/S, P/B, R H, Air. KIrc- 
trie Windows, Current Sfirker, Dark 
Blue, Light Blur Top and Interior, 
(iood Running Cnndilinn. 

$ 1 ,600 cash - negeliabie - 
587-0175 



For Classifieds 

Call Gloria At 

397-7606 



1984 FORD BRONCO 4x4: 2 tone 
paint, automatic, power steer, air con- 
ditioned, tilt, cruise, captain's chairs, 
one owners,' perfect. $11,499. 

1983 FORD RANGER: 4 wheel drive, 
air conditioned, stereo/tape, 2 tone 
paint, wheels. Avg. retail $7,400 sale 
price $6700. Save $700. 

1984 FORD MUSTANG: Hatchback, 
automatic, power steering, air con- 
dition, stereo, tilt wheel. Avg. retail 
$6825, sale price $6226. Save $600. 

1983 FORD LTD: 2 tone, automatic, 
power steering, air conditioning, tilt, 
cruise, power windows, stereo., Avg. 
retail $6450, sale price $5700. Save 
$750. 

1984 DODGE DAYTONA: 'Turbo', 
loaded with options, leather, 
stereo/tape, one owner $9875. 

1984 MERCURY LYNX: Station 
Wagon, automatic, power steering, air 
conditioning, stereo, only 12.000 miles. 
Avg. retail $6250, sale price $5650. Save 
$600. 

1982 MERCURY CAPRI: Coupe, 4 
speed, power steering, stereo tape, 
sunroof, economical and sporty. Avg. 
retail $4575, sale price $3800. Save 
$775. 

1M4 FORD MUSTANG GT: 5 speed. 
Turbo, stereo/cassette, air con- 
ditioning, power windows, power locks, 
tilt aluminum wheels. $8500. 

1981 OLDS CUSTOM CRUISER: 
Station Wagon, full sized luxury, 
loaded with equipment, wire wheels, 
diesel. Avg. retail $4850, sale price 
$3200. Save 1650 

1982 FORD ESCORT: SUtion wagoil, 
GL, power steering, streo, cruise con- 
trol, luggage rock, squire package. Avg. 
retail $4675, sale price $4,300. 



CALL THE 

EXPERTS! 



For Help With That 

important Project... 

•- » 

To place ad 
Call 547-4571 



GENtRAL ft FAMILY DENTISTRY 




HAPPINESS IS A HEALTHY MOUTH 



•Albert P. Solomon O.D.S. 

•AlanG. Forbes D.D.S. 

Ger)eral & Family Dentistry 

Greenbrier Sq., Suite 2E 

^-____1324N. Battlefield Bl vd . 

Of fice 547Tr7 r™ "AnsrService 625-056 1 




TRAVEL 



YOUR HOMETOWN TRAVEL PROFESSIONAL! 



• frtt Perional Deliveries 

• Compuierued Airline Ticketing 

• Pjjsport ft Vua Auisuncc 

• Business Meeting Pljnrtmj 



• Cruises 
•Exotic Vacations 

• Hotel Reservations, Rental Cars 

• Never A Service Charge 

OVER 35 .YEARS COMBINED EXPERIENCE 



420-7705 



S-T-R-E-T-C-H 
YOUR TRAVEL DOLLAR 



^^Q fiA 



2(X1<; Olddnviihnoi Ri'iiil - Siiiic 102 



FIREPLACES 



BATHROOMS 



FIREPLACE REPAIR 
& INSPECTION 

Also masonry work of all 
types. Free estimates, 
quality work. 486-1377 



BATHROOM REMODELING 

Vanity, Vinyl Floors, Shower 
Enclosure. Repairs of all types. 
Quality Work. 
486-1377 



HOME REPAIRS 



CAR CARE 



MARK'S RQOFING 

Specializing in Roof Patching 

All Work and Materials 

Guaranteed 

Stop Most All Leaks 

For Only $79.95 583-9168 



CARSPARKLE CAR POLISHING 

Car'-Spafltlc ^^fvicc- '*' 

Car wash and/or polish by hand 

al your home or workplace, our 

mobile unit comes to you. Priced from 

$10, including the interior. .o-ja 

547-2o20 



MARVING COIN HOME 

IMPROVEMENT 

Roofing and Home Repair. Res- 
Wential, Commercial. Free esti- 
mates. LOW OVERHEAD CUTS 
COST. 4K-5655 



SCREEN PRINTING 



CABINETS 



SCREEN PRINTING 

Sweats, T-shirts, golf shirts 

One dozen minimum. 

CRUZIN GEAR 

495-1102 



Best Kitchen 

Old work. New work 

Old cabinets that need a 

facelift. 

547-9667 



ENTERTAINMENT 



Rand Patterson 
Custom Carpentry 



Remodeling/New Work 

Cabinets/Gounters 

Shelves/Design 

License/Free Estimates 



587-7269 



Attentiun Moms 

Birthday Coming Up? A new party 
llieme? Why hot hire my party ponys 
for the event? They're delivered to 
your backyard. 

Reasonable rates. 4644>9S3 



Disc Jockey 

The Night Crawler 
Can do "Wolfman Jack" 

For All Occasions 

For more information Call 

431-0077 



$2.50 OFF PER WEEK 

PlHO lessons - nitar, bass, pkuM. 

Call 490-1653 
Peel & Toliison Whse. 



A 



DRAFTING SERVICES 

CUSTOM HOUM OCSIGN AOOITION AND 
ItflMOVATION PtANS. SURVtY DRAFTING 



^ 461-7736 



SANDBLASTING 

Painting, Trailer Repair 

TEMPORARY 

STORAGE 

20 and 40 ft. containers 
for sale - steel, fiber- 
glass and aluminum. 

Call Brenda 487-0336 



ATTENTION 

INCOME TAX SERVICES 



Call today and ask about our Income Tax 
Service Section starting January 22, 1 986. 
Ask for Gloria and let her help you take 
advantage of this special and save money for 
your firm. 



SECURITY 



BIRDS 



KEY SECURITY GUARD 
SERVICES 

Armed and Unarmed 
24 HR SERVICE. REASONABLE 
RATES. CALL MON.-FRI. M. 
62S-S333 




ChesVa Aviary 



Retail & by Appointment 

Parakeets & Cockaleils 

After 4 p.m. 

420-4739 

L ow Prices 



397-7606 or 547-457 1 




Squeaky Clean 

STEAM 
CARPET CLEANING 



EACH ROOM 
3 ROOMS OR MORE 

Offer Expires Feb. 1, 1986 



$5.95 

Commercial Cleaning Available 

588-3732 




I 

i 
I 
I 
I 






■■MHiiMHil 



mamm 



12 TheV 



Re;u'h Sun, I tniinrv 15. 1986 



Cahill's City Council Corner 



Community College 
Week proclaimed 

The Tidewater Community 
College campus in Virginia 
Beach is one of the strongest en- 
tities in the city. Councilman J. 
Henry McCoy Jr. said in con- 
nectioriwith a proclamation of 
Community College Week Jan. 
19-25. 

.Dr. George Pass, TCC 
president, said that for the first 
time this year, the Virginia 
Beach program is out of Camp 
Pendleton, where it started, and 
completely in its own buildings 
on the Princess Anne Road 
campus. He said that 15,000 
students will be served at the 
Jieaeh campusJhis year. 

Percent program 
for arts requested 

.~r -The ^irgtftia-Beaeh Art*"and 
Humanities Commission has 
requested City Council to adopt 
a Percent for the Arts program 
Tor the city. '' 

Under the program, the city 
would contriblite a certain per- 
centage (one percent) of its 
Capital Improvement Budget 
for the purchase of art for 
public places. 

Andrew S. Fine, commission 
chairman, said, however, that 
the commission is not tied to 
the one percent and the 
allocation can be figured under 
another formula. If the one 
percent program is approved 

' the commission will have 
$224,893 a year over the next 
five years with which to com- 
mission art. 

Council, generally, liked the 
concept. Councilman H. Jack 
Jennings Jr. said, that the 
proposal was premature 
because the city had so many 
other pressing problems. He did 
not think the program was a 
city function and should be a 
function of private enterprise. 
Councilwoman Nancy Creech 



asked whether any research had 
been done to determine how- 
private developers coyjd par- 
ticipate in the plan. 

"Down the road, we would 
like to see a contribution by 
developers," Fine said. 

Councilwoman Meyera 
Oberndorf, who liked the con- 
cept, also asked about private 
support. She said that in other 
states, because of the cutback in 
federal and state funds, cor- 
porations have -adopted parks. 
She proposed a dollar match 
uui, public funds. 

Fine said that major cor- 
porations in Virginia Beach 
have tseCTT good abmiF'TnwfctnF" 
commitments to art in the city. 
He said that one of the corner- 
^Tlones of the commission 
program is^lo set up a private 
trust for the arts. 

Councilwoman Barbara 
Heaky said her concern was 
:„.jMlan£^.the„MlocaiiM.lcailJ?t^ 
the city's bond package. She 
wanted to know where the 
money was coming from. 

City Manager Thomas H. 
Muehlenbeck said that the 
money may have to be tran- 
sferred from the general fund to 
theCIP. 

Henley concluded that the 
allocation would be encum- 
bering the bonds or the 
operating budget. 

Councilman J. Henry McCoy 
Jr. said he would be more com- 
fortable with a set amount 
rather than the percentage, but 
found the concept "good." 

Mayor Harold Heischober 
said that the operating budget 
may be the better place to in- 
clude the program. 

Vice Mayor Reba McClanan 
said the concept was excellent 
and long overdue, while Coun- 
cilman Robert G. Jonfes ex- 
pressed some misgivings about 
the possible controversy over 
the art selected. 

Heischober, noting that Jen- 
nings said that the program was 
premature, said that he had 



phone calls saymg •'we're ten 
years too late." 

Council will cqpsider an or- 
dinance on Jan. 27 establishing 
the program. 



Commercial property 
deterioration studied 

The city staff has been asked 
to look into the "overall 
general deterioration"' of the 
commercial property vvhich 
backs onto Cape Henry Drive. 

Councilman fi. Jack Jen- 
nings Jr. asked the sTafr TO^ 
study the problem and to ask 
for the cooperatiorL of local 
businessmen to improve the ap- 
pearances of the property. 

The subject came up in con- 
nection with a road closure 
.^ . r££juest . which, was .approJ^ed- 
with a number of stipulations. 

South Bay Corporation was 
granted the closure for a por- 
tion of Holfy Avenue beginning 
at the eastern boundary of Jade 
Street and running for 167.04 
feet in Lynnhaven Shores. 

Area residents opposed the 
closure but requested additional 
safeguards with the approval of 
the closure. 
"Noting against the closure 
were Councilman John A. 
Baum, Vice Mayor Reba Mc- 
Clanan an(J Councilwoman 
Meyera Oberndorf. 

Alfonso Strazzullo, represen- 
ting Lynnhaven Shores, asked 
that the height of any building 
on the 25-foot street be restric- 
ted to two stories, that a fence 
be constructed. He also 
requested that a tree line 25 to 
30 feet high be retained, and a 
retention system by used for 
drainage. 

The height restriction and 
buffer were incorporated in the 
motion. 



^Kl^ 



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FIRST 

VIRGINIA 

BANK 



of TIDEWATER 

Norfolk, Portsmouth, 
Va Beach, 

Chesapeake 628-6600 
Peninsula 838-7673 
Suffolk 539-3477 

Nansemond 483-1345 
Eastern Shore 787-2390 
Member FDIC 



Apartment complex 
rezoning okayed 

As City Council approved a 
rezoning against the recom- 
mendation of the Planning 
Commission, Councilwoman 
Barbara Henley wanted to 
know "what happened to our 
firm policy" that council was 
not going to approve any ap- 
plications unless all the 
agreements were available to 
council. 

On a motion by Coun- 
cilwoman Nancy Creech, coun- 
cil approved by a vote of 7-3 the 
application of Carl J. Ward for 
a change of zoning from R-8 
Residential District to A-3 
Apartment District for 4700 
and 4704 Hollis Road. 

Dissenting were Coun- 
cilwoman Henley and Meyera 
Oberndorf. CouHcilmen H. 
„Jack. Jennings, Jr.,iindXQuis R . 
Jones were absent — 

Grover Wright, attorney for 
Ward, said his client wanted to 
build two eight-unit buildings. 
A-2, a less dense apartment 
zoning, would permit him to 
bild only 14 units. While A-3 
would permit him to build 19 
units, he said that he would 
agree to a deed restriction that 
the units be hmited to 16. 

No agreement was available 
to council, however, at the time 
the rezoning decision was 
made. 

Council has a policy 
requiring agreements to be 
submitted ahead of time. 

Creech's motion was con- 
ditioned on a deed restriction 
limiting the number of units to 
16. 



ASSE seeking host 
families for students 



The International Student Ex- 
chango Programs (ASSE) is 
seeking Virginia Beach families 
to host 15 Scandinavian, Frencli, 
Spanish, German, Dutch, Swiss 
and Canadian girls and boys, 16 
to 18 years of age, coming to this 
area for the next school year. 
These European and Canadian 
teens are anxious to learn about 
this country through living as 
part of a family, attending high 
school and sharing their own 
culture and language with their 
newly adopted American family. 

The students are fluent in 
English and arc sponsored by 
ASSE, a non-profit, public 
benefit organization, affiliated 
with the Swedish and FinH|sh 
Departments of Education and 
cooperating with the Canadian 
Provincial Ministries of 
Education. 

The exchange students arrive 
from their home count,rx.shortly 
before schoof begins in iair 
Silgusf ancT refiiiTi "artWr'encf of 
the school year in June. 

Each ASSE student is fully in- 
sured, brings his or her own per- 
sonal spending money and expec- 
ts to bear his or her share of 
household responsibilities, as 
well as being included in normal 
family activities and lifestyle. 

The students are well screened 
and qualified by ASSE. Families 
may select the youngster of their 
choice from extensive student 
applications, family photos and 
biographical essays. 

Students and families are en- 
couraged to begin corresponding 
prior to the students arrival. 

ASSE is also seeking Virginia 
Beach high school students to 
become ASSE exchange students 
abroad. Students should be bet- 
ween 15 and 18 years, old 



Bids open on project 



, Continued rrnm page t 

Rosemont Road to Great Neck 
Road, three miles. 

Paul Blanchard, the highway 
department's design supervisor, 
outlined the steps in the first 
phase. The project will also in- 
clude related improvements on 
north and south Thalia Road, 
Columbus Loop , and Indepen- 
dence Boulevard. He said the ser- 
vice roads will be closed prior to 
each step in the construction. 

In setting the completion date 
the state tried to allow sufficient 
time for completion of the 
project, Cleveland said. 

The road can be built in the 
time allowed, but that meeting 
the deadline may require more 
equipment, more pesonnel and 
overtime, Nash said. It will cost a 
little more. 

Signalization will be at the 
same locations they are now, he 
said, but the traffic system has 
been designed so that additional 
signals can be installed. 

Councilman H. Jack Jennings 
Jr. asked about bikeways. 

Nash said that bikeways are 
not in the plan because the State 
did not receive ^request from the 



city for bikeways. He said, 
however, that the 14'/2 feet of 
right-of-way on each side of the 
(jctvciiiciii nas aiiipic space lur 
bikeways. A pedestrian path is 
included on the bridge. 

Councilman J. -Henry McCoy 
Jr. said that he did not see a need 
for a bike path because it was 
not safe on the highway. 

Jennings said that pedestrian 
and bike traffic always seems to 
be forgatten. He asked whether 
the trees on the median strip 
could be saved. 

Nash said that although the 
road has a 28-foot median, the 
median will dwindle down to six 
feet with dual left turns. He said 
it was not safe to have trees on a 
six-foot median. He said that 
smaller varieties of trees might be 
planted later, but that this type of 
landscaping is not included in 
the contract. 

Nash said he thought the con- 
tractor would have to work at 
night to meet the completion 
date, but that the state does not 
dictate to the contractor anything 
which is not in the contract. He 
said certain hazards are related to 
night work. 



Students should have a good 
academic record and the desire to 
experience a European or 
Canadian culture and language 
through living with a warm and 
giving volunteer family. 

For information about 
becoming a host family or 
becoming a student 'abroad 
should contact ASSE's local 
representative: Brenda McAleer, 
496-0718 or write to Brenda at 
2299 St. Marshall Rd., Virginia 
Beach, V A 23454. 

Newsweek 

Cnnlinued from page 3 
of the House of Delegates, a 
director of the Virginia Beach 
Pops, the Virginia Maritime 
Historical Museum and the Fir- 
st Virginia Bank of Tidewater. 

He also serves on the board 

of the Virginia Beach council of 

the Hampttjn Roads Chamber 

'oT Commerce, wRichspoiisWs 

the Neptune Festival. 

The 13th Neptune Festival 
will be held from Sept. 19 to 
Sept. 28. 

Lustig recommended 
for judgeship 

Virginia Beach lawyer Wayne 
Lustig is one of three can- 
didates recommended by U. S. 
Sen. John W. Warner, R-Va., 
for a judgeship in Virginia's 
Eastern U. S. District Court. 

Lustig, long active in 
Republican politics, is a former 
chairman of the 2nd 
Congressional District 

Republican Committee. 

Warner recommended the 
candidates as possible 
replacements for Judge John A. 
MacKenzie, 68, of Portsmouth, 
who has entered semi- 
retirement after 18 years on the 
bench. 

Warner said he expected 
President Reagan to send a 
nominee to the U. S. Senate in 
the spring and that the nominee 
would got up for confirmation 
in July. 

Judicial appointees are 
screened by the Senate 
Judiciary Committee and con- 
firmed by the full Senate. 

NAF Credit Union adds 
phone for disabled 

The Naval Air Federal Credit 
Union has a TTY machine 
available for the convenience of 
hearing or speaking impaired 
customers. 

The receiver-transmitter 
telephone unit will enable 
hearing or speaking impaired 
customers who have TTY's to 
call the credit union for account 
transactions and for infor- 
mation. 

A TTY machine can receive 
telephone transmissions and 
convert them' to an alpha- 
numeric digital readout on a 
small screen. 



WE' VE MOVED ! 




CTS agents, standing, left to right are: Janet Massey; Cher Carr, Owner and Presiftent; Wendy 
Grymkowski; and (seated), Kathie Ripley. Not pictured are: Diane Johnson and DeniceTlnsley. 



Just one block over to the corner of Old 
Greenbrier Road and Juniper Crescent in The 
Chelsea Commons building, Suite 102. 

We invite our friends, old and new, to come 
by and visit. While you're here, check out our 
great vacation packages and low air fares. 





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V 



The Virginia Beach Surt 

6othYear No 4 Virginia Beach, va. ^^-^ VirRinia Beock's Newspaper '^ 25$ 



Virginia Beach 's Newspaper 



Watermen crabby over sancutuary restrictions 



By Cheryl Martin 

slafr writer 
Virginia Beach watermen want 
the General Assembly to pass 
legislation allowing crab har- 
vesting between the Chesapeake 



Bay Bridge-Tunnel and Cape 
Henry Lighthouse from May 1 
through Sept. 1. The Virginia 
Waterman's Association has 
asked City Council to support the 
request. 



This area is part of a protected 
sanctuary that has been restricted 
to commercial crabbers during 
the summer months for ap- 
proximately 44 years. The san- 
ctuary was established to protect 



crabs during the spawning season 
because rhey are extremely 
vulernable to capture at this time. 
A triangular area, the sanctuary 
eMends from Willoughby Spit to 
the Cape Henry Lighthouse to 




the Eastern Shore. 

For Virginia Beach watermen, 
this restriction has meant turning 
to the inland waterways of the 
Lynnhaven System as the source 
for their crabs. All this commer- 
cial crabbing activity in the Lyn- 
nhaven System, which includes 
the Kistern and western branches 
of the Lynnhaven River, Long 



Creek (which connects Broad Bay 
to the, Lynnhaven Inlet) and 
Broad and Linkhorn bays, has 
led to over crowding. 

"In recent years the number of 
crab pots has reached almost in- 
tolerable levels, so that citizens ' 
who ytilize these saifle bodies of 
water- for recreational pursuits 
Sec CRABBY, page 6 



Old Donatio^ Parkway 
controversy not over 



ByLeeCaliill 
CUy Council Reporter 

Although a consultant backed 
away frotn the ©Id Donation 
Parkway project before an on- 
slaught of area residents, City 
Council apparently is unwilling 
to throw in the sponge yet. 

King's Grant area residents, 
who objected to having the road 
included in the Master Street and 
Highway Plan, thought their in- 
terests would be best served by 
getting the right-of-way acquired 
for the project away from the city 
and into the possession of the 
original property owners. That 
would end their on-again-off- 



again status once and for all,l 
Councilman H. Jack Jennings Jr.r 
toldcDAmcil 

He asked c-©tto«l,^cco«lingli'. 
to adopt a resolution directing ^ 
the city manager and the city at-;- 
torney to report back to City 
Council the method the city 
should use in disposing of the^ 
right-of-way. ■- 

Other council members, seven" 
of them, in fact, disagreed. They 
wanted to wait until they adqptedr 
the highway plan which will be 
considered by the Planning 
Commission in February or Mar- 
ch. 

See CONTROVERSY, page 6 



Virginia Beacli watermen David Portlock (front) and Bob Crisher secure crab pots they liave stored at D&M Marine, off Shore 
Drive in Virginia Beach. They say opening part of the crab sanctuary in the Chesapeake Bay will give them a place to crab. 
Currently they must rely on the inland waterways of the Lynnhaven system and ocean areas to place their pots. Helping them is 
Bobbv Crisher. 5. : ~ 



Veterans redoubling efforts 



Caring for others is motivation 

. ^i^ ., , 1 :--j :_ n ., or.^ rv.on,> nroat nicrpc anH kifir^Q anH nthpf hirth defcCtS. 



to raise funds for memorial 

Letters of request for par- \ 
ticipation on the advisory com- 
mittee will be mailed out to each , 
of Tidewater Mayors . 



By Cheryl Martin 

staff writer 

Caring for other people is what 
motivates Clarence W. Keel of 
Virginia Beach in both his 
professional and civic activities. 

Keel, president of the Seaboard 
Saving and Loan Association, 
h£s been aanaed to the March of 
Dimes Birth Defects Foun- 
dation's National Council of 
Volunteers. He is also the chair- 
man of the March of Dimes 
National Telethon Against Birth 
Defects for the Tidewater Chap- 
ter. 

"Caring and wanting to help 
others is what keeps me involved 
with the March of Dimes," Keel, 
38, said. "That, and wanting to 
help give children a better chance 
in life. In my work...I think it is 
the same thing. In the savings and 
loan business I have the oppor- 
tunity to help people, whether its 
with buying a home or a car. In 
the case of my employees, I am 
able to help them grow as 
professionals and as in- 
dividuals." 



Keel, who was raised in Ports- 
mouth, attributes his caring at- 
titude to having grown up in a 
large family with caring parents. 

'7r is very scary 
when your first child is 
only three hours ^std 
and the doctor says he 's 
not going to live. I can 
relate to that. I can also 
relate to when they tell 
you your child will be 
fine. J think I cried both 
times, but the second 
was much more joyous 
than the first.''— 
Clarence Keel 



and many great nieces and 
nephews. We still all get together 
at Christmas. My parents had a 
great love for one another and a 
strong desire to help others. They 
instilled this in all of us. If you're 
not taught as a kid to care,' 
helping people is hard to develop: 
at 40." -- ■i 

Keel, who has been actively in- 
volved with the March of Dimes 
for the past seven years, has held 
a variety of positions with the 
Tidewater chapter, ranging from 
walk chairman to fundraising 
coordinator to chairman of the 
chapter's board of directors. 

Keel said he first really realized 
the effect that birth defects can 
have on a family when he was a 
young teenager. His sister's first 
child, who was born with spina 



bifida and other birth defects, 
lived only 25 days. 

When the opportunity came 
along to work with an 
organization like the March of 
Dimes, "that is doing such a 
tretfiendous job in helping to find 
ways to save babies botn with bir- 
•^-drfects," Keel sw4 hfi coulda"* • 
pass it up. 

"My first son was born with a 
minor birth defect, fortunately he 
was completely cured," Keel 
said. "It is very scary when your 
first child is only three hours old 
and the doctor says he's not 
going to live. I can relate to that. 
I can also relate to when they tell 
you your child will be fine. I 
think I cried both times, but the 
See CARING, page 6 



Spurred on by an endorsement 
of the Hampton Roads Council 
of Veterans Organizations, the 
Virginia Beach Veterans 
Memorial Committee, Inc. will 
redouble its efforts to raise ap- 
proximately $200,(K)0 to con- 
struct a Tidewater Veterans 
Memorial monument on 19th 
Street opposite the Virginia 
Beach Pavilion. Target date for 
completion is Veterans Day 
(November 1 1 ) of this year. 

in prdBR!$wniiJiXthis.memorial 
a truly Tidewater project, the 
Virginia Beach Committee will 
rotate its meetings throughout 
the area. 

The Senior Advisory Commit- 
tee, composed of representatives 
of financial, business and 
building organizations will be 
enlarged to include the mayors 
(or their personal representatives) 
of the cities of Norfolk, Ports- 
mouth and Chesapeake. 



Mayor Harold Heischober of 
Virginia Beach is already a mem-, 
ber of the advisory committee ^ 
and he is also a member of the 
board of directors of the Virginia 
Beach Memorial Committee. 

William Myers, treasurer and 
director of fund raising reported 
-Jhat due.ja Ibe holidays, fund 
raising had been restrained, but 
added that the Cavalier Garden 
Club of Virginia Beach' had 
presented a $1,000 check to Fred 
M. Tripp, president of the com- 
mittee. 



Willia Zieger, a member of the 
Vietnam Veteran? of America is 
now serving off the board of 
directors of«e Virginia Beach 
Veterans MeArial Committee. 



"I come from a large family," 
he said. "There were six of us. 
Our family has always been very 
close. There are 20 grandchildren 



Beach shriners elected 




Herbert Smith 



Herbert D. Smith of Virginia 
Beach has been elected illustrious 
potentate ot Khedive Shrine 
Temple. 

He succeeds David A. Darden 
of Suffolk as head of the 6,100 
member Norfolk Shrine Temple. 
He is the owner of the Smith 
Electric Company in Virginia 
Beach. 

Smith served as worshipful 
master of Lynnhaven Masonic 
Lodge, Number 220 in 1969-70 
and was appointed district deputy 
grand master of the 56th Masonic 
District in 1979. He is a past 
president of the Virginia Beach 
Shrine Club and was the first cap- 
tain of Khedive Temple's horse 
patrol. 

Also elected were George H. 
Golden, chief rabban and B. 
Clyde Dalton, high priest and 
prophet, both of Virginia Beach. 



Textbooks recommended for 
adoption are on display 



New textbooks recommended 
for adoption in the public schools 
of Virginia Beach arc on display 
al several locaiions throughout 
the .ii\. Texts to be used in a 
number of subject areas have 
been under consideration during 
this school year. 

Cfn the ■secondary level, foreign 
langua,.-. social studies, and 
laiiciiaei- irts textbooks have 
been recommended, language 
arts and social studies icxtboc^ks 
ha\e been rcvommended at the 
elementary level. 



The texts will be on display al 
each of the five branches of the 
Virginia Beach Public I ibrary 
through Tuesday, Feb. 18. In ad- 
dition, the books will be on 
display at the School Ad- 
piinisirafion Building in the 
municipal complex on Princess. 
AmieRoad. 

At their meeiinu on il'h 18 the 
School Board v^ill take action on 
the adoption of the recommen- 
ded textbooks. Should the 
recommendation of the Depar 
•tec BOOKS, page 6 



Beach resident receives Rotary scholarship 




Mar> Kalherine Lu.on (left) of Virginia Beach has been awarded a $1,000 scholarship by .he RoUry Club o. tape Henry The 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. .lonalhan Lu.on, she is a junior French major al Virginia W^sleyan tollege. f>« "^'^ »* 'h Lu'""' 
from left, are Steve Stocks, director of admission and financial aid .1 VWC and Tom Clements, president of the Rotary chap- 
Icr. The scholarship h awarded on the basis of financial need, academic promise and an interest m some form of international 
relations. . 



mmmmmmi^mm 



VI 



2 The Virginia Beach Sun, January 22, 1986 



".i iii i ii n i 'i I I I I I i V' II l ~.. "i; ' II ' I " L ' " » "'.■::' ■■-::.:■-..;■::■::-:-' 



JMmWB I .^ jlRi.f l a.i 'i tTO.yj.^B *f 



Priority is education 

"Johnny" reads on an elementary school level, 
but he is in college because he is an outstanding 
athlete. Many think he's headed for the pros. 

He has never had to seriously perform 
academically in school because he has always been 
a star athlete. 

What happens if "Johnny" doesn't make it to 
the pros? What happens if he suffers a severe injury 
or someone a little better beats him out. Where will 
he be? He can't fall back on his education, because 
he doesn't have One. Is he really any better off than 
the kid that quit school at 1 5 ? 

Johnny is an imaginary person, but there are 
student athletes in Virginia Beach as well as other 
towns that could easily be Johnny. 

While competing in athletics may be beneficial to 
students, the school's first priority should'be to see 
that these students receive an education. Without 
"" aneducation these students wili4>e4Hiable to com- 
pete in a much more important game— the job 
market. 

Virginia Beach Del. J. W. "Billy" O'Brien is in- 
troducing legislation that would toughen the 
academic standards for public school students who 
participate in school athletics and other ex- 
tracurricular activities. 

Under present standards, students are allowed to 
participate if they passed at least four courses the 
previous semester. The guidelines are enforced by 
the Virginia High School League, (VHSL) an 
association whose membership consists of one 
principal from each of Virginia's 284 public high 
schools. 

O'Brien's proposal would mandate that'students 
pass at least five courses every grading period. 
Most students take six courses each grading period. 
In such cases, his proposal would allow them to fail 
one subject per grading period. However, a student 
would become ineligible if he failed the same sub- 
ject during two consecutive grading periods. 

In addition, O'Brien's bill would mandate that 
students maintain a minimuin 1 .6 cumulative grade 
point average each grading period to remain 
eligible. 

The average is computed by assigning four points 
for a "A",ihr^ pmnts-fqra "B" ^i^ soon. A 
student recelvinl %tra^m k^ vs^uld have a 4.6 
average. The 1 .6 average means that students could 
receive less than straight C'sapd still participate in 
extracurricular activities. 

A student could meet the existing guidelines for 
all four years in high school and still not achieve 
enough credits to graduate, according to O'Brien. 
To receive a high school degree, a student must get 
credit for passtng 20 courses, an average of five a 
year. 

O'Brien's legislation is a step in t4ie right direc- 
tion. For the students sake, a mandatory C average 
standard would be even more appropriate. 
His proposal has not been received very well. 
Members of the State Board of Education and 
the state NAACP have said that these tougher 
standards could result in some students dropping 

out of school. ^ 

William J, Burkholder, Virginia education 
department deputy superintendent, said that the 
proposed law is too rigid and does not take into ac- 
count students with low intelligence and learning 
disabilities. He added that students might be en- 
couraged to avoid difficult courses . 

W. Paul Matthews, executive secretary of 
Virginia's NAACP, contends that the proposal has 

SccPRiOiUTY,p*ge6 



Police's stand commended 

Virginia Beach police officers should be com- 
mended for the hard stand they have taken on 
drunk driving. 

Angered by what they perceived to be the city's 
judical leniency, police recently crowded the court 
docket with almost 100 DUI (driving under the in- 
fluence) cases. 

Police officers said the court's low conviction 
and high dismissal rates have discouraged police 
from pursuing drunken driving cases. Arrests in 
Virginia Beach for driving under the influence 
dropped sharply last year. In 1984, police arrest 
2,152 people on DUI charges. Last year that num- 
ber dropped to 1,427, 

Statistics show that in 1985 Virginia Beach courts 
convicted about 77 percent of those people arrested 
for drunk driving. The statewide conviction rate 
was 88 percent, according to the Virginia Depar- 
tment of Motor Vehicles. 

In order for laws against drunk driving to serve 
as a deterrent, people who are caught driving under 
the influence must be punished. It takes everyone— 
citizens, police and courts— working together to 
bring an end to this continuing problem.— C.M. 



X t'^ 



Protect children's eye sight 




Nowhere is the world more 
wonderful and awe inspiring than 
in the eyes of a child. However, 
every year over 160,000 children 
suffer serious eyeAnjuries. Many 



of these injuries could be preverf- 
ted by children wearing safety 
eyewear at home, school and 
play. 
Young active lifestyles 



in 




Virginia Beach require adequate' 
protection. To guard against in- 
jury. The National Society to 
Prevent Blindness— Virginia Af- 
filiate recommends that children 
who wear glasses, wear glasses at 
all times which meet strict ANSI 
Z87.1 industrial standards for 
safety. 

■i^BHHBI 



iTri'l'lYl' l MV l .M. ■'. I ' fl !i 1 1 1 1 N 1 1 1 1 



stssa 



Many everyday objects are 
threats to young eyes— soda bot- 
tles, clothes hangers, projectile 
toys, a variety of pointed objects, 
BB guns, fireworks, and 
baseballs. 

A child may not remember to 
take off his or her glasses when 
playing soccer or tp change to a 
saferpaitieforejdiinbi.ng a tree. 
Therefore, they should only wear 
lenses and frames that meet or 
exceed ANSI Z87 standards, 
because they provide an added 
margin of safety oyer ordinary 
streeteyewear. • 



Every year over 160,000 children suffer serious eye injuries. Many of 
these injuries could be prevented by children wearing safety eyewear at 
home, school and play. 



Eyewear must pass rigorous 
tests of strength and reliability to 
earn the Z87 stamp. Now that 
safety eyewear that meets in- 
dustrial standards is available for 
children, its use is recommended 
to prevent many of the traumatic 
and blinding eye injuries that oc- 
cured in the past. 

Ask eye care professionals for 
safety glasses. 



"Bottle Bill" makes good sense 



By Linwood Helton 

Recycling of beverage con- 
tainers makes good business sen- 
se. Why is the basic fact so 
thoroughly ignored in the 
discussion of a "bottle bill" for 
Virginia? 

Nine states now add a refun- 
dable nickel or dime depoat to 
the cost of beer and soft drink 

-containers^'^ese states report aa 
1^0 Pf^^S^P in beverage con| 

That is hardly surprising. 
Making beverage bottles or cans 
worth a dime gives the consumer 
incentive to return the containers. 
It gives people incentive to pick 
up bottles and cans which can 
carelessly discarded. 

Each year three billion bottles 
and cans are thrown away in 
Virginia. Many of these end up 
on our highways, along our 
" beaches, and, in our fields and 
rivers and parking lots. The rest 
wind up in our already over- 
crowded landfills. Either way, 
Virginia taxpayers pay a high 
price to dispose of these con- 
tainers. 

•Tourism: Beverage containers 
comprise 40 to 60 percent (by 
weight and volume) of roadside 
litter\ and 60-80 weight and 
volume) of roadside litter, and 
60-80 percent of litter in our 
parks. This has real implications 
for the state's $4 billion tourist 
trade, the third largest business in 
the Old Dominion. Vermont and 
other states which have enacted 
container legislation have 
realized, as we in Virginia should, 
that clean highways and parks 
lure visitors. 

•Trash pickup: (Jovernment 
figures reveal that it costs 
Virginia's state and local agencies 
at least $10 million annually to 
pick up beverage containers. 
Merchants spend considerable 
sums to remove such litter from 
parking lots and other areas 
where it is discarded. 

•Trash disposal: Authorities 



calculate that it costs $7 million 
each year to dispose of Virginia's 
bottles and cans in the state's 
solid waste landfills. The rapid 
increase in solid waste generation 
and a sharp decline of available 
land for disposal sites have 
resulted in a near crisis for many 
of Virginia's localities. We tould 
prolong the life of our landfills 
by reducing the volume they must 
' 'handfe. 
' •Pkriners: A study for the 
Virginia State Farm Bureau 
reveals that throwaway beer and 
soft drink containers cost state 
farmers between $1.2 and $3.5 
million annually in damage to 
equipment and time spent in 
cleaning up this litter. 

•Safety: Discarded bottles and 
cans cause thousands of injuries 
each year in Virginia. Experts 
estimate that bicyclists in Virginia 
spend $1 million a year in bicycle 
tire and tube replacement caused 
by broken glass from discarded 
bottles. 

At the same time, the "bottle 
bill" has significant economic 
benefits. 

•Savings to consumers: 
Beverages sold in refillable bot- 
tles cost 35 percent less than those 
sold in disposable bottles and 
cans. In the nine states which 
have enacted container 
legislation, Jbeer and soft drinks 
are again available in refillable 
glass bottles (in addition to cans 
and plastic containers). At 
present, Virginians pay the full 
cost of the container with every 
one-way, throwaway can or bot- 
tle they purchase. 

•Energy savings: Recycling 
bottles and cans saves energy. 
Recycling aluminum cans, for 
example, saves 95 percent of the 
energy to manufacture them 
from raw materials. Recycling 
steel cans results in a savings of 
74 percent. 

Glass manufacturers find that 
using recycled gfass allows them 
to reduce the temperature of thier 
smelters. This saves energy and 



extends the life of the smelters. A 
bottle bill in Virginia would 
provide a local supply of recycled 
glass to state glass manufacturers 
which currently acquire crushed 
glass from, bottle bill states like 
New York, Connecticut and 
Michigan. This would save a 
significant amount of energy. 

•Increased employment: While 
it may be true that recycling of 
beer and soft drink containers 
would cost some jobs in the con- 
tainer manufacturing industry, 
studies indicate that container 
legislation in Virginia would 
result in a net increase in em- 
ployment. A "bottle bill" would 
produce an estimated 1 ,000 jobs 
in Virginia in the beverage, retail, 
transportation and recycling in- 
dustries. The experience of other 
states with similar laws confirms 
this expectation. 

Given all these economic facts, 
it is not surprising that a recent 
Gallup Poll revealed that 75.9 
percent of Virginians supported 
the "bottle bill" concept. What is 
surprising is that some Delegates 
and state senators have not yet 
come to appreciate the financial 
benefits of recycling bottles and 
cans. 

For the past decade the Old 
Dominion has sought to control 
litter through a program of 
public education and fines. This 
has not worked. It is time now to 
use a more businesslike ap- 
proach. 

For more information in 
Virginia Beach call John Mar- 
shall, Board of Virgiiiians for 
Returnables. 428-6384, 

Holton, Virginia 's first 
Republican governor since 
Reconstruction, served from 
1970 to 1974. 

The Virginia Forum, a non- 
profit, non-partisan, educational 
organization, makes available to 
the state's media the views of ex- 
perts on major public issues. Let- 
ters should be sent to the Folrum, 
P. O. Box 1234, Yorktown, Va. 
23690. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 



Establbhtdin 1926 



138 South R<mmont Road 
Virginia Beach. Virginia 234S2 
(804)486-3430 

HoHsBy^fy 
pubUm 

Grtgory D. G<^dfarb 

Cfxryl Martin 
Staff Writer 

LhC<M ** 

C/ty Counti/ itporta 

The Virginia Beach Sun is 
published every Wednesday by 
Byerly Publications, Inc. 
Second Qass postage (UPPS- 
660-140} is paid at Lynnhavesi 



Station, Virginia Beach. Sub- 
scription rates: $10 a year, 
within Hampton Roads; $15, 
two years. $15, one year outside 
Hampton Roads; $22.50, two 
years. The Virginia Beach Sun 
is a member of the Virginia 
Press Association and the 
Virginia Beach Council of the 
Greater Hampton Roads 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Other affiliated newspapers 
are: The Chesapeake Post, The 
Portsmouth Times, The 
Tidewater News, The Southside 
Sun, TTk Dinwiddie Monitor, 
and The Brunswick Times- 
Gazette. 



Write 
Us A 
Letter 

Lrtters to the editor arc 
welcomed and encouraged. Let- 
ters should be typed, double- 
spaced and written in 
paragraph form. They should 
include the sender's name, ad- 
dress and phone number. 

Letters may be written on ali 
topics, but the editor reserves 
the right to edit as necessary. 
Send letters to 7^e Virginia 
Beach Sun, 138 South 
Rosemont Road, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia 23452. 



wllilK 



^E^tt^^^a^ijjatgjjB! 



Begin work 
on income 
taxes now 

January is nearing the end 
and that means it is time to 
begin working on income tax 
returns. Or at least this was 
always my understanding. I'm 
beginning to find that I am ac- 
tually part of a small minority 
that dares to utter the word 
taxes before at least the middle 
of March. 

In a recent conversation with 

"a^friend I was matfe aware «f 

the reality that most people 

prefer to put off dealing with 

income taxes. 

She was very astonished that 
my husband and I had already 
begun work on our tax returns. 

"This is only January. Why 
on earth are you worrying 
about taxes now?" she asked. 
"That is one nightmare we put 
off until at least the first of 
April, sometimes longer." 

The poor dear almost fell off 
her chair when I said I never 
thought of filing taxes as a 
nightmare. Perhaps this is 
because we plan and keep files 
the entire year. 

"You mean you actually 
keep records and file all the 
receipts and necessary papers in 
one place?" she said. "Ours are 
all over the house. It will take 
me froiTi now until April just to 
find them!" 

Frankly, I was just as 
astonished by her attitude as 
she was my mine. I truly cannot 
comprehend why people choose 
to put off filing their taxes. The 
longer any project is postponed 
the more difficult it appears. 

Considering the number of 
returns that are filed each year — 
,the Internal Revenue Sefvice 
estimates that 127,000 1985 
returns will come from the 
Virginia Beach area alone— you 
would think that everyone 
would want to be the first to get 
their returns in. The sooner a 
person files, the sooner they 
will get their refund, if they are 
entitled to one. If a person owes 
money, preparing the return 
early allows more time to come 
up with the money. It also gives 
them an earlier chance to 
correct their filing status at 
work, so that perhaps next year 
they won't have to pay. 

There are also other advan- 
tages to filing eariy, mainly that 
it reduces the chance of errors. 

The IRS says individuals who 
file at the last minute are more 
likely to make errors on their 
returns. Most of these mistakes 
result from rushing through the 
job. Common errors which 
delay processing include 
mattiemattcat errors, incorrect 
use of the tax tables and placing 
entries on the wrong lines. 

When returns are completed 
well before the April 15 filing 
deadline there is plenty time to 
review them before mailing. A 
good review of the form will 
more than likely reveal these 
common errors. Thus the whole 
problem of delays in processing 
is avoided. 

Keeping go6d records 
throughout the year helps to 
making filing income tax retur- 
ns easier. This also aids in filing 
the returns promptly. Ob- 
viously some records come 
from other sources, like em- 
ployers and financial in- 
stitutions. 

If good records are kept these 
statements will just confirm the 
information in personal recor- 
ds. Thus, it is just a matter of 
waiting for the offical 
documents. These should be 
available by early February at 
the latest. 

So really there is no excuse 
for not filing returns early. 
Maybe you won't make it into 
the eariy bird club this year, but 
good organization and planriing 
will have you ready for next 
year. Now is the time to start 
keeping records for your 1986 
tax returns. 

It is amazing how just a little 
planning and record keeping 
make the job of filing taxes so 
much easier. 



i 



The Virginia Beach Sun, January 22, 1986 3 











School nurses make sure 
students are healthy, safe 



Virginia Beach has an excellent 
school nurse program, which 
now includes a full time nurse in 
each school. School Nurse Ap- 
preciation Day falls during this 
week and t can think of no better 
way to extol the merits of the 
school nurse program than by 
citing those talented and 
dedicated professionals who 
protect, help and love the 
children irr our pubHe^ehools. — 

They are Elinor McElwain, 
coordinator, Betty Adams, Prin- 
cess Anne Junior High, Virginia 
Allison, Plaza Elementary, 
Rosemary Barringer, Hermitage 
Elementary, Joyce Beaman, 
White Oaks Elementary, Patricia 
Becker, Courthouse Elementary, 
Shirley Bright, Green Run High, 
Marie Bryant, Kempsville 
Elementary ^and Elizabeth Car- 
tjaugh, Greal Neck Junior High. 

Carla Cavanaugh, Kempsville 
Meadows Elementary, Isabella 
Cochrane, C.E.L.. Elaine 
Day wait. Kings Grant Elemen- 
tary, Dorthory Dowding, Bayside 
High, Elinor Eklund, Lynnhaven 
Elementary, Kathryn Emmert, 
Rosemont Elementary, Eileen 
Fay, Lynnhaven Junior and Jean 
Felts, C.E.L. 

Carol Flack, Windsor Oaks 
Elementary, Marilyn Frizzell, 
Cooke Elementary, Leah Galjan, 
Holland Elementary, Emily 
Graves, Brandon Junior High, 
Muriel Graves, Providence 
Elementary, Karlamae Harris, 



Kempsville Junior High, Dorothy 
Heffington, Brookwood Elemen- 
tary and Anita Hicks, College 
Park Elementary. 

Dorothy Hoskins, Kemps 
Landing Elementary, Susan 
Hurley, Green Run Elementary, 
Betty James, Virginia Beach 
Junior High, Josephine Jessen, 
Seatack Elementary, Carol Kelly, 
John B. Dey Elementary, Shirley 
Keyes, Bayside Junior -High, 
Nicole Kilby, Independence 
Junior High, Barbara King, 
Alanton Elementary, Carol 
Kowalski, Kellam High. 

Linda Lepow, Linkhorn Park 
Elementary, Audrey Lewis, In- 
dian Lakes Elementary, Madeline 
Mair, Pembroke Meadows 
Elementary, Tina Marchant, 
C.E.L., Pamela Marra, Center- 
ville Elementary, Ann Mathers, 
Trantwood Elementary, 
Elizabeth Mc Bride, Kingston 
Elementary and Carolyn Meyer, 
Windsor Woods Elementary. 

I rtis Morelen. Plaza Junior 



High, Dawn Myers, Creeds 
Flpmentary, Katherine Phillips, 
Williams Elementary, Vina Poff, 
Kempsville High, Vivian Puckett, 
Princess Anne Elementary, 
Patricia Quintin, Fairfield 
Elementary, JoNancy Reckling, 
Princess Anne High and Tillie 
Rivenbark, C.D.C. 

Ann Scaglione, Luxford 
Elementary, Elizabeth Schley, 
First Colonial High, Hildegard 
Scott, Newtown Road Elemen- 
tary, Mary Seibel, Arrowhead Ele- 
mentary, Elizabeth Shimkus, North 
Landing Elementary, Dorothy 
Soule, Pembroke Elementary and 
Bridget South, Thalia Elementary. 

Mary Urquhart, Bayside 
Elementary, Mary Jane Watts, 
Woofistock Elementary, Dorothy 
Wawner, Shelton Park Elemen- 
tary, Rita Weimorts, Malibu 
Elementaty^ JMane Westbr«okj 
Poiijt O'View Elementary and 
Betty Whitley, Thoroughgood 
Elementarv. 





BooMg Book captures the 
heart of Canada 



By 

Toad Loliniaiui 



In early June of 1984, 100 
• noted photo journalists arrived in 
Canada. Their assignment was 
not to photograph the rich or 
famous or to document a natural 
disaster. They had come instead 
to find and record the heart and 
soul of the country. The result, A 
Day in the Life of Canada, is a 
breathtaking and moving book 
filled with images of Canada 
today. 

On June 8, the photographers 
were in place in the villages, 
cities, mountains and islands 
throughout t^e country, ready to 
spend the next 24 hours recording 
the events around them. As dawn 
broke they shot pictures of 
families getting up, children 
boarding school buses and far- 
mers feeding their animals. 

As the day progressed they 
made portraits of workers in 



small businesses, on ranches and 
in paper mills, feallet classes and 
prisons, monasteries and shop- 
ping malls, all became the focus 
of their lenses. Breathtaking 
scenes of the Canadian Rockies 
and Niagra Fall^ were intersper- 
ced with views of children being 
born and people being buried. 

Over 100,000 pictures were 
shot on June 8 and the 
photographers returned to their 
headquarters with almost as 
manyipiemorable stories. 

Sam Garcia, assigned to the 
North Magnetic Pole arrived by 
plane at, an isolated ice flow and 
discovered that his pilot was 
planning to follow him with a 
gun because of the proximity of 
unfriendly polar bears. 

In Newfoundland Diego Gold- 
berg's assignment was abruptly 
changed when he discovered that 



his subject, a well-known hunter 
had been killed during a caribou 
hunt. Goldberg's pictures of the 
mourners and funeral are a 
moving tribute to a respected 
community member. 

Others had more light-hearted 
encounters. In Toronto a formal 
wedding portrait was disrupted 
when an automatic lawn 
sprinkler suddenly came on. The 
resulting picture by Douglas 
Kirkland is an action filled view 
of a wet yet good natured wed- 
ding party dashing off in several 
directions. 

Anyone with a special fondness 
for Canada will certainly want to 
browse through this book. But 
others who appreciate good 
photography or simply enjoy 
pictures of people being people 
will find A Day in the Life of 
Canada a memorable experience. 



7^ 



Trees Timberland acreage decreasing 
throughout Virginia Beach 



|ByPaulF.R«vdl 

StateFtrttter 



Anyone who has observed the 
rapid growth of Virginia Beach 
over the last 10 years will not be 
surprised to learn that the area of 
Virginia Beach covered by forest 
has decreased. Still, it is in- 
teresting to look at how rapid the 
decrease has been. 

The United States Forest Ser- 
vice has recently released forest 



statistics for the Coastal Plain of 
Virginia. These statistics are the 
first issued since the previous 
survey in 1976. 

The statistics show that tim- 
berland acreage is decreasing in 
Virginia Beach at a rapid rate, 
reflecting increasing urbanization 
and conversion to agricultural 
use. 

Total forest land in Virginia 



Hodges elected president 
of therapists group 



Virginia Beach resident Dr. 
Fredrick H. Hodges, executive 
director for the Virginia branch 
of the Volunteers of America, a 
national Christian social services 
organization, has been elected to 
a two-year term as president of 
the Virginia Association for 
Marriage and Family Therapists. 

Hodges, an ordained United 
Methodist clergyman, hais 
developed and-flianaged a VOA 
marriage, fami^ and sex coun- 
seling center, a state licensed 
child care center and transitional 
living programs and group 
residences for the mentally retar- 
ded and disabled in the Tidewater 
(Virginia) ar» since joining the 
VOA in 1971. 

Hodges has taught and 



tacilitatea seminars and 
workshops for Tidewater Com- 
munity College various locations 
including Virginia Beach General 
Hospitals. 

Hedges received a BA in 
history and government and 
philosophy and religion at 
Wilmington College in Ohio, a 
Master's of Divinity, with em- 
phasis on counseling, at 
Methodist Theological School, 
also in Ohio, and a Doctorate of 
Ministry at Wesley Theological 
Seminary in Washington, D.C. 

He is a member of the 
American Association of 
Marriage and Family Therapists 
and the American Association of 
Sex Educators, Counselors and 
Therapists. 



Beach is down 21 percent or 
13,000 acres to 48,000 acres 
which accounts for 29 percent of 
the city's 164,000 total land 
acres. 

Commercial forest land 
acreage, that is, acreage available 
for growing a timber crop, has 
decreased from 58,000 acres to 
45,000 acres. 

Farmer-owned timberland 
acreage dropped from 19,200 
acres to 6,600 acres. This was due 
in part to land sales for develop- 
ment and clearing of forest land 
for agricultural production. 

Corporation ownership of 
forest land was up from 6,600 
acres to 11,000 acres while in- 
dividual (non-forest) ownership 
dropped 5 percent to 24,221 
acres. 

Forest industry activity has 
been on the decline in Virginia 
Beach. This is reflected by the 
fact that there were no reported 
holdings of forest land by forest 
industry. At the time of the 
previous survey in 1976, forest 
industry owned 2,590 acres of 
timberlandx 

In the 34 counties and large 
land area cities that were covered 
in the Forest Service Survey, tim- 
berland acreage decreased by 6 
percent or 230,000 acres. Tim- 
berland now accounts for 38 
million acres or 59 percent of 
total land in Virginia's Coastal 
Plain. 



iPlllllli^^ 





TI»*f8ltiHriiig hmn$t etwm* of th» ai»jor sews »«ork« tUttiH V itt,M» Bwli tfurtnf »»«• »«^« **"k • 



Commission says 
build expressway 

The city Planning Com- 
mission unanimously recom- 
mended to build the proposed 
Southeastern Expressway. 

Although the exact location 
of the highway is still unknown, 
the commission recommended 
placing a tenative route on the 
city's Master Street and High- 
way Plan. This would allow the 
city to lobby in Richmond for 
the project. 

The six-lane, limited-access 
highway would begin at the 
Laskin Road interchange of the 
Virginia Beach-Nori'olk Ex- 
pressway. It would run along 
part of London Bridge Road, 
then veer Co Itie southeast, 
where it will cross into 
Chesapeake and hook up with 
interstates 64 and 464. 

The project would cost about 
SI 40 million, according to State 
Highway Department 
estimates. 

The state has said it will not 
pay for the highway, so tolls 
may be charged to cover con- 
struction costs. Tolls m^y be 
kept on the Virginia Beach- 
Norfolk Expressway beyond 
1992 when they are scheduled to 
expire. 



Residents oppose 
Foad proposals 

About 250 residents jammed 
into Kempsville Recreation 
Center Saturday to address 
members of City Council. The 
residents raised objections to 
road improvements contained 
in a proposal from consultants 
Harland Bartholomew & 
Associates. 

Present to listen to the 
residents were Mayor Harold 



Heischober and council mem- 
bers J. Henry McCoy Jr., 
Meyera Oberndorf and Louis 
Jones. 

They pledged to oppose two 
proposals in the $632 million 
package of road improvements 
presented by the consultants. 

One is the extension of Bax- 
ter Road from Princess Anne 
Road to Providence Road. The 
proposal would affect the 
Brookfield Crossing area of ex- 
pensive new homes. 

Building a fiyover at the 
Virginia Beach-Norfolk Ex- 
pressway near Mount Trash- 
more was the other project. The 
proposal would link Virginia 
Beach Boulevard with Holland 
Road, improving the north-to- 
som^ TfaTfTc flow diimg f uslf 
hour. Residents feel that it 
would create a heavier flow to 
traffic on Edwin Drive, which 
runs past Mount Trashmore 
and through the Larkspur 
neighborhood. 

The main theme of the 
meeting was the residents' 
request that officials promise 
that they would build beltways 
and loops and expand existing 
main roads such as Kempsville, 
Princess Anne and Holland 
Roads rather than approve the 
consultants recommendation, 
which calls for thoroughfares 
that slice through the heart of 
Kempsville. 



Beach man killed 
in Guatemalan crash 

Paul Consolvo, a 24-year-old 
history buff from Virginia 
Beach was among the 93 people 
who were killed when an 
Aerovias jetliner crashed iii a 
northern Guatemalan jungle 
over the weekend. 

The two-engine jet crashed as 



it approached the Santa Elena 
airport, about 150 miles north 
of Guatemala City. 



Holland intends to 
run against McCoy 

F. T. "Tom" Holland an- 
nounced he will run against 
Councilman J. Henry McCoy 
for the Kempsville Borough 
seat in the spring election . 

Holland, 38, a clerk for the 
Norfolk & Western Railway 
Co., serves as vice chairman of 
the Wetlands Board. 

This is Holland's third try for 
the City Council. In 1984, he 
ca me in fifth among seven can- 
llidat^lfor two at-larp scats. 
In 1982, he came in fifth among 
nine candidates for the other 
two at -large seats. 

He is the fifth candidate to 
aiinduhce for City Council . 
Others are McCoy, Sheldon L. 
Corner, John L. Perry and 
the Rev. Barnett 

Thoroughgood. Corner said he 
probably will run for H. Jack 
Jennings Jr.'s Lynnhaven 
Borough seat. Perry and 
Thoroughgood will run for the 
at-Iarge seats held by Robert G. 
Jones and Nancy A. Creech. 



Surplus funds to 
be reallocated 

A $1.5 miUion surplus in 
federal impact funds to the city 
schools appears likely to be 
soaked up by higher-than- 
expected costs of buildings the 
proposed Salem High School. 

At their workshop the School 
Board members agreed to ask 
the City Council to reallocate 

Sec NEWSWEEK, page 12 



Be My Valentiml 




THE HEART 
$15 



(Actual Size) 




This Valen^ne's Day warm someone's heart by 
showing ti)em how much you can by publishing 
your personal Valentine message in The 
Virginia Beach Sun's Feb. 1 2 Valentine's Day issue. 

To order your Valentine ad simply write your 
special message below and enclose your personal 
check. 

. Mail ad and check to Valentine, The Virginia 
Beach Sun. 138 South Rosemont Road, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, 234S2. 

Please keep message to 20 words. 

(Pieoie circte one) 
The Heart The Kiss The Cupid 

My Message: 

(Please type or print) 



THE KISS 
$10 

(AcUialSize) 




THE CUPID 
$5 

(Actualize) 



Name/number of person semMi^ ad . 



For more infonnaUon caH 547-4571 



!■■ 



4 The Virginia Beach Sun, January 22, 1986 



Beach legal secretaries association to meet 

The Virginia Beach Legal Secretaries Association will meet on Mon- 
day*. Jan. '27, at Fogg's Seafood Restaurant, 415 Atlantic Avenue, 
Virginia Beach, pinner will be at 6 p.m. and the meeting will begin at 7 
p.m. 

For reservations, contact Mrs. Kay Lawson, 622-5000 prior to Jan. 
24. 



|'!'!'!;y,jjt!;'i'|'^ 



.i.ii.ii i ii i m Tm 



itMiHi■■^l■v^^^^■^r;;;^■■.■.■;.•;.■nTlV^f|■!i« 



Stages in the lives of couples discussed 

The Psychiatric Associates of Tidewater, Inc. will present an after- 
noon of mini-workshops on Saturday, Feb. 1, addressing critical times 
that couples are likely to face. The mini-workshops are $3 each, and 
participants may register for as many as they wish. The program will be 
in the PAT office at 1020 First Colonial Road, Virginia Beach. 

The schedule is: Romance to Reality: Keeping Love Alive, 1 p.m.; 
Parenting: Not Just Husband and Wife Anymore, 2 p.m.; Living 
Through Separation and Divorce, 3 p.m.; and Blending Families: The 
Challenge of Stepparenting, 4 p.m. 

Pre-registration is required. Call 461-1644 for information. 



Friday, Jan. 24, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the hospital classrooms. 

To tie in the "Super Bowl" theme, every blood donor will have the 
opportunity to guess the score of the game, which will be played Jan. 
26. the person coming closest to the winning score will receive two 
Tidewater Dinner Theatre tickets. 

Each Leigh Memorial blood donor will receive a free movie p4ss. 



Beach students on bean's list 

Two Virginia Beach residents have been named to the Dean's list at 
Lynchburg College. Both are freshmen. They are: Jeffrey S. Burns, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Francis G. Burns and Evarista M. Speckhart, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Vincent J. Speckhart. 

The list is composed of studetits who have achieved a 3.5 or better 
grade average on a 4.0 gijade scale. 



Bloodmobile coming to Virginia Beach 

American Red Cross Bloodmobile will be in Virginia Bea^li on 
Friday, Jan. 24. It will be at the Sandpiper Recreation Center, building 
702, New Guinea Street from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and a^OQ Annex. 4th_ 
_Streebl^etlng House from I0^.nr.to2 p.m. "^^ 



Home security, fire safety program set Checking accouiit seminar planned^-^ 



Ballroom dance for the over 50 crowd 

A Ballroom Dance for those over 50 will be held on Thursday, Jan. 
30 at Kempsville Recreation Center, in room 117 from II a.m. to 1 
p.m. 

A valid facility use card or guest pass is required. Call 495-1892 for 
information. 



Sign up for therapeutic rec. programs 

Registration for winter/spring therapeutic recreation programs 
sponsored by the Virginia Beach Department of Parks and Recreation 
will be held Monday, Jan. 27 and Tuesday, Jan. 28, from 2 to 8 p.m'. at 
the Kempsville Recreation Center, room 1 17. 

These programs and event's are for persons with mental, physical, 
developmental, behavioral, emotional or learning disabilities and are 
designed to provide leisure, recreation and therapy, 

A valid facility use card is required. Call the Therapeutic Recreation 
Unit, 471-4884 for information. - 



The Virginia Beach Police and Fire Departments will be sponsoringa 
home safety display at the Great American Outlet Mall Jan. 23, 24 and 
25, during mall hours. Information on home security and fire safety 
will be available. 

The Police Department's Crime Prevention Unit will be offering the 
Ident-a-Kid program on Jan. 23 and 24 from 6 to 9 p.m. and Jan. 25 
from 1 to 5 p.m. 



Children's films at Windsor Woods 

"The Puffed Up Dragon" and "t'etunia" will make up a children's 
movie program on Saturday, Jan, 25, at 10:30 a.m. in the Windsor 
Woods Area Library. 3612 S. Plaza Trail. Children between the ages of 
three and eight will enjoy this 20 minute program. 

For information on this program and others offered by the library, 
call 340-1043. 



Virginia Beach Federal Credit Union will offer a seminar on checking 
account reconciliation to Virginia Beach itsidents on Wednesday, Feb. 
5, at noon and again at 6:30 p.m. at the Pembroke Branch, 313 Kellam 
Road. 

Reservations are required as seating is limited. Call Virginia Beach 
Federal Credit Union, 486-0720 for information and reservations. 



Herbs topic for garden club meeting 

The Lake Smith Terrace Garden Club will meet on Tuesday, Jan. 28, 
at 7:30 p.m. at the Bayside Presbyterian Church on Ewell Road. The 
topic for the evening will be herbs. The speaker will be Stephanie Mon- 
tague. 



Pool tournament offers family fun 

A Family partner pool tournament will be held on Friday. Jan. 31 at 
6 p.m. at Kempsville Recreation Center, 800 Mommouth Lane. 

JC valid facility use card^^orjuest £ass ilKSGUM 
■ sign-up infofitiation. ~ . 



iSpring registration set for VWC 

■- - , "^ . '■•• 

Registration for regular daytime classes for the spring semester at 
Virginia Wesleyan College will be Monday, Jan. 27 from 9:30 a.m. to 
3:50 p.m. in the college's Cunningham Gymnasium. 

Classes begin Tuesday, Jan. 28. 

Faculty advisors will be available in their offices from 8 to 9:15 a.m. 
to assist new students or returning students who require advice or 
changes in preregistration. A complete schedule of the day-long 
registration is available in the registrar's office. 

The Adult Studies Program is holding registration daily from 9 a.m. 
to 7:30 p.m. through Monday, Jan. 27. For information call the 
college, 461-3232, extension 212. 



Bald Men's Club installs officers 

The Bald Men's Club of Virginia Beach recently installed the new 
1986 officers. 

New officers include "Buddy" Byers, president; "Dick" Broudy, 
first vice president;^ "Junie" Hudgins, second vice president; Roy 
DeHart, secretary; Bill Scott, treasurer; and Henry Roughton, sergeant 
at arms. 

Directors for 1986 are "Joe" Hudgins, "Ned" Ballance, "Joe" 
Brown, "Bob" Humphreys and "Gil" Keene. 



Beach resident makes UNC Dean's list 

Keith C. Buckhold, of Virginia Beach, was named to the fall 
semester 1985 Dean's list at the University of North Carolina, 
Wilmington. 



Fourth annual goldfish bowl scheduled 

Lynnhaven Dive Center will hold its fourth annual "Goldfish Bowl" 
on Saturday, Jan. 25 at 1413 N. Great neck Road. The event is 
scheduled to begin at 9 a.m. for children and 1 1 a.m. for adults. 

Hundreds of goldfish will be turned loose into the indoor pool at 
the dive shop. Using only mask, fins, and snorkle, each team will work 
together to capture the elusive goldfish. The team with the most live 
fish wins. 

For information contact Cindi Kaiser at Lynnhaven Dive Center, 
481-7949. 



Political sdence fiction film series at VWC 

"Political Science Fiction" is the theme of the spring semester 
Political Science Perspective film series at Virginia Wesleyan College 
beginning Tuesday, Feb. 4. 

The series is coordinated by the Political Science Department and is 
free and open to the public. All showings will be on Tuesdays at 6:30 
p.m. in the Science Auditorium. Reservations are not required. 



"Super Bowl" blood drive set for LMH Local TOPS chapters meeting 



The Leigh Memorial Hospital "Super Bowl" blood drive will be held 




Squeaky Clean 



STEAM 
CARPET CLEANfNG^ 




EACH ROOM 
3 ROOMS OR MORE 

Offer Expires Feb. 1,1986 




Commercial Cleaning Available 



588-3732 




FANTASTIC 
SEAFOOD, 
GREAT STEAKS. 




Chcit 



SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 
3010 HIGH ST •PORTSMOUTH 

397-8196 



Take Off Pounds Senisbly (TOPS), Virginia Chapter 305 meeting on 
Thursday, Jan. 23 at 7 p.m., Hebrew Academy, 1244 Thompkins 
Road, off Indian River Road. Prospective members welcome without 
obligation. For information, call Kay Tucillo at 420-0491 after 7 p.m. 

New chapter of Take Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS) is meeting on 
Thursday, Jan. 23 at 6 p.m.. Boon Cinic, Little Creek Naval Am- 
phibious Base. Prospective members welcome without obligation. For 
information, call Barbara at 460-5997 or 460-5092. --,— ^^. 



Virginia Wesleyan ODK elects officers 

The Omicron Delta Kappa chapter at Virginia Wesleyan College held 
election of officers recently. 

Victoria R. Rominger of Virginia Beach, a senior and daughter of 
Mrs. Frances P. Hughes, was elected secretary. 

Another senior, Carole Ann McCraw of Virginia Beach, was elected 
treasurer. Her parents are Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Shaw McCraw. 



Notel on Catawba Dean's List 

Garth R. Notel of Virginia Beach was named to the Catawba College 
Dean's List for the fall semester of the 1985-86 academic year. He is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. George R. Notel. 



Toughlove Support group meeting set 

Toughlove parent support group will ffteet "Hiesday, Jan. 28 at 7 
p.m. at Community United Methodist Church, 1072 Old Kempsville 
Rd., Virginia Beach. The group will also meet on Wednesday, Jan. 29 
at 7:15 p.m. at Kings Grant Baptist Church in Virginia Beach. For in- 
formation call Dave Carter 424-0917 or Delma Wright 479-1478. 



Mottieis nnrch on bfath defects in progress 

Rebecca Fenska of Virginia Beach, is the March of Dimes' Hampton 
Roads chairman for the Mothers March on Birth Defects. The 
Tidewater mothers march will run through Sunday, Jan. 26. 

Virginia Beach marchers will knock on doors, distributing literature 
on birth def«:ts and ask for contributions. ; 

"Last year the mothers march rais«l $126,812, we hope ill 1986 we 
will meet our goal of $1 35,000," Fenska said. 



Correction 



•A Statute For Religious Freedom" was passed in 1786 by the Virginia 
3ena-al Assembly. 



Meeting set for calligraphy guild . 

Tidewater Calligraphy Guild will meet Thursday, Jan. 23 at 7:30 
p.m., at Thalia Presbyterian Church, 420 Thalia Road behind Willis 
Wayside. Speaker: Norfolk attorney Eli S. Chovitz on copyright laws. 
For information, call 464-2490. / 



Beach chapter NARFE meeting 

National Assoication of Retired Federal Employees, Virginia Beach 
Chapter 974 will meet Thursday, Jan. 23 at 1 pm., Bayside 
Presbyterian Church, 1400 Ewell Road. Program: memorial service for 
deceased chapter members, followed by social hour. Bring white 
elephants for next auction. For information, call Blanche Ganger at 
340-2218. 



Dinner set for widows, widowers 

Widows and Widowers of Tidewater will meet on Saturday, Jan. 25 
for a covered-dish supper at 6:30 p.m.. Meeting House, Little Creek 
Naval Amphibious Base. For information, call 420-6734. 



Free recital at Old Donation Episcopal 

Old Donation Episcopal Church recital with Lee Dougherty, 
soprano, on Saturday, Jan. 25 at 3 p.m. at the church, 4449 N. Witch- 
duck Road. Free and open to the public. For information, call Ruth 
Champbell at 464-4084. 



New arrivals in 
Virginia Beach 



Virginia Beach General 
Hospital announced the births of 
Virginia Beach babies. 

Terri and Larry E. Aldrich, 
Sr., son; Nancy and Robert T. 
Allen, daughter; Theresa 
Bacheller, daughter; Booker and 
Kyle Bates, daughter and Doris 
Bea, daughter. 

Melanie Ann Bell, daughter; 
Kathleen and Thomas J. Bonan- 
no, son; Donna Burdell, son; 
Teresa and Robert E. Byrd, Jr., 
daughter and Mary and Reed 
Cruit, son. 

Regina and Micholas J. Danzi, 
son; Kerry E. Deverell, daughter; 
Michelle and Robert A. Estep, 
daughter; Darlene and Michael J. 
Flowers, son and Susan and Elias 
Gabler, Jr.,son. 

Karen and Richard D. German, 
daughter; Pamela and Steven R. 
Grane, son; Christina and 
Patrick K. Green, daughter; Julia 
and Dennis H. Greene, daughter 
and Tracie and Stephen E. 
Heroux, daughter. 

Sherry and ^ Mark R. 
Holloman, son; Janice and 
Thomas M. Honsowitz, son; 



Clara and David E. Howell, 
daughter; Karen and Wilson J. 
Howell, Jr., son and Jacqueline 
and Jeffrey Ivester, daughter. 

Phyllis and Charles A. Jones, 
Sr., son; Jacqueline Ann Lee, 
daughter; Gail and Douglas 
McArdle, son; Patricia and 
Roger H. McGregor, twins, son 
and a daughter and Cassandra 
and Bernard J. Mahon, Jr., son. 

Gina and Craig G. Miles, son; 
Catherine and James D. Morton, 
III, son; Rita and Ted MuUins, 
son; Lisa and Keimeth Price, 
daughter and Sabrina and 
Etonald C. Ritchie, son. 

Deborah and Richard D. Rob- 
bins, soni Melinda and Graham 
Simpson, daughter; Janice and 
John Earl Smith, daughter; Carol 
and Brian A. Barnes, son and 
Anita and John D. Terry, Sr., 
daughter, 

Leslie and Dale M. Watktns, 
son; Brenda and William Floyd 
Whitlow, daughter; Marrion and 
Robert A. Wimins, daufhter; 
Wamla and Frank WlUiimsom, 
son and Ruth and Robert C. 
Woni«;k.s<m. 



The Virpinia Beach Sun, lanuarv 22. 1986 5 . 



Noted attorneys to speak at law seminar 



Wade M. Smithy local counsel 
in the "Green Beret ' Doctor" 
murder case popularized by the 
book and movie Fatal. I'isinn, 



Business 



which fiiany Beach residen- 
ts viewed on television recently, 
and Bobby Lee Cook, named one 
of the natioir's top siic homicide 
lawyers by People magazine, will 
be the luncheon speakers at jhe_ 



16th Annual 
Seminar. 



Criminal Law 



Smith's presentation, "Brave 
New World-Crushing the Dark 
Force in the 21st Century," will 
be delivered on Friday, Feb. 14, 
a! the Fredericksburg Sheraton 
Motor Inn. Cook will present "A 
Phoenix Too Frequent" at the 
Williamsburg Hilton on Friday, 
Feb, 21. 

The seminars are sponsored by 
the Virginia State Bar's Criminal 
Law Section in cooperation with 
the Cornmittfee on C o n tinuin g 



Legal Education of the Virginia 
Law Foundation. 

In addition to the luncheon 
programs, the seminar will 
feature a variety of professional 
development sessions throughout 
the day at each site. Sessions will 
begin with on-site registration at 
8:15 ajn., followed by a welcome 
and opening remarks by Section 
Chairman William Robinson, Jr. 
at 9 a.m. Programs begin at 9:15 
a.m. and continue until 4:15 
p.m., with the luncheon break at 
noon. 



McCiinniss, 3>ithnr of Fatal 
Piston, as "a sturdv. gracious, 
exurberant man... who posessed 
in an uncommonly full measure, 
a combination of kindness and 
wit." McGinniss quoted one of 
the jurors as saying, months 
later, that, "We wanted to 
believe. We really did. Maybe if 
Wade Smith had just talked to us 
a little longer..." A senior par- 
tner in the Raleigh firm of 
Tharrington, Smith and 
Hargrove and a native of 
Albemarle, N.C., he is 
recognized as one of "the most 



Smith is characte rized by Jo e — ^^ enown e d pr aetkioners of Ws 




David Jackmah 



Bob Bentti 



CBN names 
vice presidents 

. -iO , 1-!.,^ ' '-Aifirt^Tl i>'(UiA*»i-f K»-i(ii-'^-« tfi ' f 



sLi^XWP Virginia B^aqjr reftdpnt^f.r,,^tj>f«e9f:T;echnQlogy 
have been named vice presidents 
for The Christian Broadcasting 
Network, Inc. 

David Jackman, who was 
director of budgeting, becomes 
vice president-budgeting, 

Jackman earned a bachelor's 
degree in electrical science and a 
master's degree in business ad- 
ministration from Rochester In- 



Robert J. Bentti, who jomed 
CBN in 1982, becomes vice 
president-controller in charge of 
accounting. 

He earned his B.S. degree in 
business administration from 
Fairmont State College, 
graduating summa cum laude, af- 
ter serving in the U.S. Air Force. 



TCC offering special 
program for lawyers 



Lawyers and other legal 
professionals In Virginia Beach 
will have the opportunity to par- 
ticipate in a series of American 
Law Network teleconferences, 
beginning Jan. 30 at the Virginia 
Beach Campus of Tidewater 
Community College. 

The teleconferences, scheduled 
bi-weekly through June, will 
cover topics including trial tac- 
tics, legal audits, wiH drafting, 
malpractice cases, and the New 
tax Act. Topics for the first two 
teleconferences are "Basics of 
Consumer Law" (Jan. 30) and 
"Trust and Gift Techniques for 
Financing Children's Education" 
(Fjeb. 14). 

TCC is co-sponsoring the con- 
tinuing education activity with 
the Committee on Continuing 



Legal Education of the Virginia 
Law Foundation. The program is 
being offered iii Virginia in 
response, to the mandatory an- 
nual continuing education 
requirement for lawyers recently 
instituted by the Commonwealth. 

Sessions usually run for ap- 
proximately four hours, (noon to 
4 p.m.) followed by discussion 
featuring a resource person from 
the Tidewater area legal com- 
munity. 

To register contact the Com- 
mittee on Continuing Legal 
Education of the -Virginia Law 
Foundation at (804) 924-3416 for 
details. For local site information 
and directions to the college, call 
the office of Continuing 
Education at the Virginia Beach 
Campus, 427-7195. 



Beach residents named 
to VWC fall Dean's list 



Forty-eight Virginia Beach 
residents were named to the 
Dean's List at Virginia Wesleyan 
College for the fall semester. 

To earn Dean's List status, a 
student must be full-time, 
carrying 12 or more semester 
hours, and earn at least a 3.5 
grade-point -average or better on 

a 4.0 scale. 
Beach students on the Dean's 

List are: 

Katherine Abourjilie, Mary 
AWborn, Stacey Ake, Bonnie 
Alexander, Heather Baker, Susan 
Banks, Ruth Banks, Maria 
Bastidas and Patricia Brown. 

Fontaine Cassada, Judith 
Chapman. Pecanne Condon, 
Lori Daughtridge, Elizabeth 





a 



Chamber director 



Dean, Laura Dombey, Katherine 
Dotson, June Doyle and 
Christine Doyle. 

Mary Elliott, Wendy Elzie, 
Robert Flynn, Rosemary Flynn, 
Amy Gallup, Joni Gamble, Julie 
Garcia, Teresa Giles and David 
Glendon. 

Lisa Harkness, Anne Morin 
Howell, Gail Johnson, Ronald 
Keseeker, Aline Langston, 
Michelle Leary, Angela Liller, 
David Lokie, David Luton and 
Mary Luton. 

Carole McCraw, Cynthia 
McKinney, Mary Mina, Lisa 
Murrary, Louise Parker, David 
Pcnn, Jane Porter, Kelly 
Prickett, Robert Rice, Leslie 
Smith and Karen Solomon. 



James R. "Jim" Dobbins has 
been appointed as executive 
director of the Hampton Roads 
Chamber of Commerce 
Virginia Beach office. 



B.I.E. luncheon 
set for Chambo* 
of Commerce 



The Hampton Roads Cham- 
ber of Commerce-Virginia 
Beach office will hold a B.LE. 
(Business-Industry- Education) 
Day Luncheon on Tuesday, 
Feb. 1 1 at 1 p.m. at the Virginia 
Beach Plaza Hotel, Bonney 
Road. The theme is 
"Education, An Investment in 
the Future." 

The guest speakers will be 
Dr. Dan Duncan, retired from 
Virginia Chemical Company, 
Inc., and Dr. James S. McCar- 
thy, professor of physics at The 
University of Virginia. 

All chamber members are in- 
vited at attend. Call 490-1221: 
for reservations. The cost is $12 
per person. 



Beach resident 
named marketing 
representative 

Virginia Beach resident Martha 
McClees has been appointed to 
marketing representative for the 
"Forward Hampton Roads" 
economic development program 
of the Hampton Roads Chamber 
of Commerce. 

McClees was formerly a 
regional director for regional 
development at the chamber. Her 
new duties will include the 
gathering of site information on 
property for possible industrial 
or manufacturing development. 

McClees holds a B.A. degree 
from Texas Christian University 
and is currently working on her 
M.B.A. degree at Old Dominion 
University. 



DMV offering 
loans to buy 
safety car seat 

Expectant parents in Virginia 
Beach who cannot afford to pur- 
chase a child safety seat can now 
apply for a seat from the Virginia 
Department of Motor Vehicles 
state loan program before the bir- 
th of their child. 

Applications which reflect the 
new prenatal provision are 
available from Virginia Beach 
DMV branch offices or by calling 
DMV's Safety Seat/Belt Hotline 
1-800-533-1892. 

Since January 1983, when 
Virginia's child safety scat law 
went into effect. DMV has 
loaned over 9,000 safety seats for 
children under age four and 
weighing less than 40 pounds. 

To qualify for a seat, parents 
or legal guardians must meet 
poverty income guidelines, have a 
valid Virginia driver's license and 
transport the child in a vehicle 
manufactured after Jan. 1, 1968, 



Dobbins is a probation and 
parole officer for the Virginia 
'State Department of Correc- 
tions. He also has over 20 years 
of operational, technical and 
management experience in 
naval aviation with a 
background in project 
management, and personnel 
management and training. 

He holds a B.A. degree in 
business administration from 
Lynchburg College and a 
degree in manpower, personnel 
and training. Dobbins com- 
pleted his military service with 
the rank of commander. 



Automatic 
teller open at 
credit union 

Virginia Beach Federal Credit 
Urtion has opened a new walk- 
up/drive-up automatic teller 
machine at the FCTCL, Dam 
Neck Military Base in Virginia 
Beach. 

The new machine enables all 
Virginia Beach Federal Credit 
Union members to conduct 
financial business 24 hours daily. 
The machine is also available for 
deposit of iTiilitary paychecks. 

Virginia Beach Federal Credit 
Union, in its 26th year of 
operation, has six full-service of- 
fices in Virginia Beach, all with 
ATMs. 

The administrative office is 
located at 324 N. Great Neck 
Road in Virginia Beach. 



craft in the .state." 

Cook has won about 90 per- 
cent of the some 250 murder 
cases he has tried since 1949. The 
son of a country store owner. 
Cook was named as one of six 
criminal lawyers whom his 
colleagues would "trust their 
lives with" in a People magazine 
article in 1978. 

He is best known for his 
criminal triaJ practice, although 
his practice ha^ included civil trial 
work as well. Among his most 
spectacular court victories is the 
acquittal in a murder trial of an 
American soldier in Wiesbaden, 
Germany in 1965. In another 
case. Cook convinced a jury in 
south- Ga.T4nad& up of people 
- earrrifig' less - t+ran'^26,e0e'-Twr" 
year, to award the heirs of An- 
drew and Thomas Carnegie and 
John D. Rockefeller $5.5 million 
in taxpayers' monev. 

A review of recent develop- 
ments in criminal law at the 
federal and state levels is slated as 
the seminar's first session, with 



attorney's need for preparation. 

Following the luncheon 
session, "Investigation and 
Preparation of Criminal Cases in 
Virginia" will be presented at 2 
p.m. by Richard G. Brydges from 
the Virginia Beach firm of 
Brydges & Brydges. 

At 2:45 p.m., James E. Kulp, 
senior assistant attorney general, 
and J. Lloyd Snook, 111 from 
Charlottesville, will discuss the 
unique problems involved in 
preparing capital cases for trial in 
Vir^inta^ ^ - — 

The day's final session involves 
a defense attorney and a 
prosecutor who will examine the 
intentions arid techniques behind 
-"the- seleetk«t- of a jury -in- a 
criminal case. This program 
features Guy O. Farley, Jr. of 
Fairfax and Willard M. Robin- 
son, Jr., Newport News Com- 
monwealth's Attorney. 

Anyone interested in attending 
either session of the seminar 
should contact the Continuing 



Professor Roger D. Groot from ,^egal Education office in 
Washington and Lee University Charlottesville at (804) 924-3416 



as the speaker. 

At 10:30 a.m.,., "The Crime 
Control Act of 1984 and Proper- 
ty Detention in Virginia" will be 
presented by J. Frederick Sinclair 
of Cohen, Dunn and Sinclair in 
Alexandria. 

Murray J. Janus from the 
Richmond firm of Bremner, 
Baber and Janus will speak at 
11:15 a.m. on the sentencing 
phase of the criminal trial and the 



The seminar registration fee, 
which- includes the luncheon and 
an informational handbook con- 
taining topic outlines, is $65 for 
VSB Criminal Law Section mem- 
bers and $75 for nonmembers. 

To reserve a hotel room for the 
night before either seminar, con- 
tact the Sheraton Motor Inn in 
Fredericksburg by Jan. 31 at 
(703) 786-9321, or the William- 
sburg Hilton by Feb. 7 at (804) 
220-2500. 



IF BANK IRA'S 
WERE ONCE THE 
SMART MOVE- 
NOW IT MAY BE 
SMARTER TO MOVE 
ELSEWHERE. 



Why not consider an IRA with the 
Oppenheimer Family of Funds? 

It may be one of the smartest moves you could 

make this tax season. 

For more information or seminair reservations, please call E. F. 
Hutton at 446-1400 or 1-800-572-1414. 

Come to our free IRA Seminars every Saturday until April 15. 

Where: E. F. Hutton 

101 St. Paul's Blvd., 

Norfolk, Virginia. 



When: 10 a.m. every Saturday until April 15 

W » will srad lou lurlNf r dtliils n »tll •« • (r« pro«»ec(u». wliirli comilw iiiort 
compMr inrormilloii. Includliiii ckarfn and nfmxt. RMd all ■•Icrtah 
n.«fyll> bdort )ou 1ii>mI or wnd mono ■ 




SUBSCRIBE 

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Mail to: The Virginia Beach Sun, 138 South Rosemont Road, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, 23452 



The 
Virginia Beach 

Sun 



486- 
3430 



I 



Ml 



6 The Virginia Beach Sun, January 26, 1986 



Crabby over restrictions 



Continned from page 1 

are severely and adversely affec- 
ted," Lynphaven Borough 
Councilman H. Jack Jennings Jr. 
said. "Navigating is very difficult 
even through the channels 
because there are crab pots 
everywhere." 

There is also a restriction that 
prevents setting crab pots in the 
channels, according to Jack 
Travelstead, chief of fisheries 
management division of the 
Virginia Marine Resources 
Commission (VMRC). There is 
no limit on the number of pots a 
licensed crabber can have. Nor is 
there any restrietion on tfw- 
distance between pots. 
' Jennings said if the state would 
allow crabbing in the restricted 
area it would alleviate some of 
the crowding in the Lynnhaven 
■Systems He^wWed-that-thts woald^^- 
also help to remedy the unsafe 
conditions for boaters in the 
inland waterways. 

Emmett Sanford, president of 
the Lynnhaven Watermen's 
Association, contends that the 
pots do not get in the way of the 
boaters. The problem, he said, 
lies with inexperienced boaters 
who do not steer clear of the pots 
or mistake them for channel 
markers. Water skiers are also a 
problem, he said. They like to use 
the crab pot markers for a course 
to zig-zag in between and 
sometimes they cut too close. 

He did say there has been some 
problems with pots being placed 
in the channels. This, he said, is 
being done by part-time crabbers, 
not the professional watermen. 
Sanford said the waterman's 
association plans to do some self- 
policing in this area. When 
watermen find pots in channel 



areas, Sanford said, they intend 
to move them to another area. 

"We realize that conflicts 
exist," he said, "We want to 

'7 don't think 
opening the sanctuary 
mil stop crabbing in 
Linkhorn and Broad 
bays. As long as there 
are crabs in an area 
there will be fishermen 
who want to catch_ 



them. "'—Jack Travel- 
stead, Virginia Marine 
Resources Commission 

work with the boaters so that we 
can all enjoy the waterways." 

Jennings said that better 
education of boaters as well as 
stricter enforcement of existing 
regulations would help the 
situation. But, he said, the fact 
remains that thereare just too 
many crab pots in Broad and 
Linkhorn bays and the rest of the 
Lynnhaven System. 

"I wholeheartedly support the 
lifting of the cFabbing restriction 
in this section of the sanctuary," 
Jennings said. "I hope the rest of 
the council will support it also." 

Jennings said if necessary he 
would also support it for a one 
year trial period. 

Some city officials have 
suggested that the lifting of the 
crabbing restriction in this 
segment of the sanctuary be ac- 
companied by a restriction of 
crabbing in the Lynnhaven 



System, primarily Linkhorn and 
Broad bays. 

Sanford said the watermen 
would be willing to accept crab- 
bing restrictions in Linkhorn and 
Broad bays if the sanctuary 
restrictions were lifted, but not 
restrictions on the entire Lyii- 
nhaven System. 

Travelstead said that his agen- 
cy could see the reduction of the 
sanctuary, based on biological in- 
formation from the Virginia In- 
stitute of Marine Science, in and 
of itself. He added that the\ 
VMRC has not made an^fficial 
statement of support yet. He at- 
tributed this to the question ota 
trade-off between the sanctuary 
and Linkhor^ji and Broad bays. 

"What bothers us is we don't 
think there is a need for the trade- 
off,'" Travelstead said- "What 
vre^ have here is an individual case ., 
where because of the sanctuary 
some crabbers don't have a place 
to crab. I don'tTltii^k opening the 
sanctuary will stori crabbing in 
Linkhorn and Broad bays. As 
long as th^fe^re crabs in an area 
there will be fishermen who want 
to catch them." 

Because of legislative deadlines 
the matter may not be presented 
to the General Assembly this 
session. Sanford said the water- 
men will keep working on the 
matter until something is done. 

City Manager Thomas H. 
Muehlenbeck said the city feels it 
is just too late to act on it for this 
year. But he said they will have 
until next year to get the word 
across. Bob Matthias, Inter- 
Governmental Relations Coor- 
dinator for Virginia Beach, said 
the Virginia Beach General 
Assembly delegation held similar 
sentiments. 




Caring for others motivates Keel 



Continued from pa^ 1 

second was much more joyous 
than ^ first." 

Kerf;Js very comitted to the 
March "^of Dimes. He quickly 
points out the picture of three 
poster children he has in his of- 
fice. It sits next to a picture of his 
wife, Linda and their three 
children, Christopher, Cheri and 
Brian. 

He finds his current position as 
telethon chairman for the Tide- 
water March of Dimes chapter is 
both exciting and challenging. 

The upcoming national 
telethon in June will mark the 
third anniversary of the event for 
the organization. The local chap- 
ter participated for the first time 
last year. 

"The telethon is a big in- 
volvement and challenge," Keel 
said, "Having never worked with 
television before it was a new ex- 
perience for me, I was involved in 
everything from production to 
fundraising. This covered 
everything from what went on the 
air down to getting people to 
donate food to feed the volun- 
teers." 

Keel proudly points out that 
the chapter raised in excess of 
$80,000 last year, a figure he ex- 
pects to double this yeat. 
Nationally, $13 million was 
raised last year by the telethon. 

Keel stresses that the March of 
Dimes is the only organization 
that has found a cure for what it 
was originally formed 
for— polio. Since that time the 
organization has moved into the 




Clarence Keel 



birth 



broader area of fighting 
defects. 

"I think the telethon has bjcen 
very beneficial in letting people 
know what the organization is all 
about," he said. "A lot of people 
remember saving dimes and the 
polio vaccine. But, I think a lot 
of people aren't sure what the 
organization does now. We still 
provide funds to the Salk Foun- 
dation and aid polio victims but 
we are doing a whole lot more," 

Some projects of the March of 
Dimes, like the polio and rubella 
vaccines, are very dramatic. Keel 
said. But he feels some of the less 
dramatic projects of the 



organization are also very impor- 
tant. 

Chiefs amoi^gAesft jsKeel's^ 
dpintoif, is eduStingm^plftlic, 

The biggest cause of birth 
defects is low birth weight, babies 
born too small, too soon, accor- 
ding to Keel. A good percentage 
of these cases could be prevented 
with education. 

"Mothers, be they 15, 25 or 
even 35, need to be educated 
about the importance of good 
pre-natal care," he said. "With 
the proper care they are more 
likely to carry their babies full 
term. This gives them a much bet- 
ter chance of having a healthy 
baby," 

Keel said not a day goes by that 
he is not doing something that 
relates to his work with the Mar- 
ch of Dimes. If he had to put a 
figure on it, he would say about 
20 percent of his time is devoted 
to the organization. 

When he is not busy working 
or involved in MarcTi of Dimes ac- 
tivities. Keel enjoys snow skiing, 
sailing and scuba diving. When 
he can "find the time and the 
patience" he likes wood working. 

Keel's civic involvement does 
not end with the' March of Dimes. 
He' is active in'^the Pembroke 
Kiwanis Club, the Hampton 
Roads Chamber of Commerce 
and River Shore Baptist Church. 
He is also involved in a number 
of professional organizations. 
These include the Financial 
Managers Society, Institute of 
Financial Education and the 
Savings and Loan Institute. 



Bobby Crisher, 5, of Virginia Beach hopes to be a crabber, like his 
dad, "Bob" someday—HiaHf If there fe^sliU a place to crab his father 

said. '^*>^'~^S^^"■:li^:~--''T'"^■fs?^-*"*:s?"~~-■■■---■~•-■-^: 



proximately 6 feet tall, 155 poun- 
ds, having a mustache, black 
hair, and brown eyes. He was 
wearing dirty, dark blue work- 
type clothing and a brown leather 
baseball cap. 

A cash reward of up to $1,000 
will be paid if a call to 427-0000 
resulis in the arrest of this man. 

Rewards are also paid for in- 
formation about wanted persons, 
stolen property, drugs, or any 
other crime. Calls are handled 
confidentially and you don't have 
to, give your name to collect the 
cash rewards. 

Seeking facts 
on suspect 
ill shooting 

The Virginia Beach Crime 
Solvers program is seeking in- 
formatioit that will lead to the 
arrest of the man responsible for 
the Nov. 11 shooting of a 56- 
year-old Virginia Beach resident. 

That Monday at 11 :40 p.m . the 
man walked out of his apartment 
in the 4600 block of Savoy Court 
in th# PembK)fee Court lApar- 
tmenfs to leave ^Ot his job as a 
security officer. He was in 
uniform ?ind armed. 

As he reached his car, he heard 
someone yell "Yo Captain." As 
he started to turn, he was shot in 
the back by a male assailant, 
"^The victim described the man 
as a light skinned blacic male in 
his mid twenties, 5'9" tall, and a 
medium build. He was last seen 
running towards Ferry Plantation 
Road. 

The motive for this shooting is 
still unknown. 

Crime Solvers asks that anyone 
with information about this 
malicious assault call 427-0000. 

Callers are eligible for cash 
rewards of up to $1,000 if an 
arrest is made based on their in- 
formation. 

Cash is also paid for infor- 
mation about any crime, or for 
information leading to the ap- 
prehension of wanted persons or 
the recovery of drugs or stolen 
property. Ckllers' narties are not 
required to collect the rewards. 




Information 
sought on 
sexual assault 

Virginia Beach Crime Solvers is 
looking for information that will 
lead to an arrest in the Nov, 22, 
1985 sexual assault that occurred 
in the Ocean Park section. 

On that Friday morning at 
12:30 a.m,, a Virginia Beach 
woman was awakened and 
assaulted in her town house in the 
3700 block of West Stratford 
Road. During the assault, the 
woman was able to bite the man 
infiicting injury to his genitals. 

Before leaving through the 
front door, the assailant struck 
her several times and knocked her 
down a flight of stairs. 

The man investigators are 
looking for is black, in his late 
twenties or early thirties, ap- 






Virginia Beach 4-H volunteer 
honored as national winner 



Blaine Eaton, a Virginia Beach 
4-H Adult Volunteer was selected 
as one of six national winners in 
the 4-H Wildlife and Fisheries 
Adult Volunteer Leader 
Recognition Program. 

As part of this recognition he 
will receive a trip to the 51st Nor- 
th American Wildlife and 
Natural Resources Conference, 
March 21-24, 1986, in Reno, 
Nevada. 

At the Conference, Eaton will 
be recognized as one of the six 
national winners for 1^5 and 
presented a plaque, fhe i.on- 
tinuing sponsor of this 4-H 
recognition program since l98Qii 
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Ser- 
vice, 



tiaion, j:i, is a car- 
diopulmonary technologist for 
the U.S. Navy. He has been a 
herpetologist since he was nine 
years old. For the past three years 
he has contributed his knowledge 
and skills about snakes, wildlife 
and fisheries to the 4-H Program 
in Virginia Beach as a Volunteer 
Leader, 

As a 4-H leader he has worked 
with 4-H members to help them 
learn and experience wildlife in 
their natural habitat. This has in- 
cluded many fishing and field 
trips. His forle is snakes, and 
Consequently, he has done 
iwmerous cxhiHiis and lectures 
on the "Snakes of Virginia" 
thrqughout the ciiv. as well as 



responded to sn^|te calls from 
local residents, .^ 

"I enjoy especially to teach 4- 
H'ers about snakes since people 
don't really understand snakes," 
Eaton said. To see the young 4- 
H'ers reaction to the feel of a 
snake is hard to explain. Most 
people think snakes are slimy, 
when actually they are not , " 

As a 4-H volunteer, he has 
been involved in various other 4- 
H activities and events such as 
building a float, a parade, 
Christmas carolling, Veterinary 
science project and contest judge. 
He says 4-H ha* helped him have 
more patience in working with 
young people. He has a goal of 
someday organizing a 4-H 
Wildlife and Fishing Club, 



Priority is education 

Continued from page 2 

racial overtones. He said it has iinplications toward 
the black athletes who are in school and doing the 
struggling because of their athletic participation. 

Matthews said there needs to be a system where 
students can achieve academic and athletic success 
at the same time. 

O'Brien's legislation actually is pushing for a 
system where students can achieve success in both 
areas. 

The opponents of this legislation are not thinking 
of the students' best interest. Athletics is benefical 
and does play a vital role in some student's lives. It 
should never be allowed to overshadow the impor- 
tance of receiving a good education . 

A student who cannot maintain a 1.6 grade 
average should be spending more time on 
academics. Tutoring and other help would be more 
beneficial to the child than athletics. 

Virginia Beach schools abide by the VHSL 
minimum standard. There is nothing to stop the 
&;hool Board from passing stricter requirements. 
, If O'Briens legislation is hot passed the School 
Board shouFd take it upon itself to impose tougher 
standards. 

The welfare of Virginia Beach students must be 
the priority. They should have the right to the best 
education possible. If participation in athletics is 
diminishing their opportunity for a good education 
then participation should be restricted. — CM. 



Controversy 

Conllnued from page I 

Although Jennings made one 
concession afier another, council 
recently approved a substitute 
motion proposed by Council- 
woman Nancy A. Creech, to wait 
until the plan being prepared by 
Harland Bartholomew, the con- • 
sultant, is completed arid to then '■ 
have the staff investigate the 
proceedings the city would use if 
the road was definitely out of the 
plan. 

Following objections from 
citizens at a public hearing, the 
consultant said he would take 
Old Donation Parkway out of the 
plan. This led to the proposal of 
the resolution. 

Councilman John A. Baum 
said that he did not think the con- 
sultant should make a statement 
before a large crowd that Jie - 
wouldn't recommend something. 
Mayor Harold Hesichober said 
that the problem is not whether 
Old Donation Parkway is built or 
not, but that other communities 
may inHsem the same situation 
and the problem has to be 
resolved for all. 

Baum attributed the resolution 
on Old Donation Parkway to the 
response of the residents. Com- 
paring fundamentalist preachers 
to Old Donation Parkway area 
residents, he said, Old Donation 
takes first place. 

"What fundmanetalist 
preachers have to do with this is 
beyond me," said Jennings. 

Jennings pointed out that 
previous councils voted to 
remove the road from the high- 
way plan, but kept the right of 
way. He said that hundreds of 
property owners have signed 
petitions asking the city to sell the 
right of way back to them. He 
said that it is not a fair shake for 
the owners of property to live 
under this uncertainty. 

"AH I'm trying to do is 
represent my constituents," Jen- 
nings said. 

"Council could piecemeal the 
consultant's plan to death; other 
residents have concerns," Creech 
said. 

Councilwoman Barbara Henley 
said she recalled that when coun- 
cil took Old Donation off the 
plan, it demonstrated a conscious 
ieosign josreftiin the right-of- 
way for possible future needs. 
The resolution said, however, 
that the right-of-way would be 
disposed of, she added. 

In 1979 when council tctok the 
road off the plan, it did not 
relinquish the property, Jennings 
said, "That's the thorn on 
everybody's side." 

Councilman Robert G. Jones 
said that he would support the 
resolution if the manager's report 
came back with the consultant's 
report. 

Jennings agreed to remove one 
paragraph to satisfy Henley and 
Jones which implied that the 
right of way would be disposed 
of. He also agreed to a another 
change in wordage to suit Jones. 
Creech made her substitute 
' motion anyway and did not with- 
draw it when Councilman Louis 
R. Jones suggested that council 
support Jennings' resolution with 
changes so that it was virtually 
the same as the Creech motion so 
"we'll all walk away happy," He 
said that Jennings was trying to 
get the intent of council to the 
people in the King's Grant area. 

The vote for Creech's motion 
was 74 with Jennings, L. Jones, 
R. Jones and Councilwoman 
Meyera Oberndorf dissenting. 

The action means that the 
council will wait until it considers 
the master ptan before deciding 
what to do about Old Donation 
rights of way. 



Textbooks 

Continued from page 1 

tment of Instructional Planning 
and Development Sefvices be ac- 
cepted and the texts adopted, 
they will be used in the schools 
from July 1, 1986, to June 20, 
1992, 

All of the books recommended 
for adoption were proposed by 
curriculum committees of the in- 
dividual subject areas, following 
thorough review of each text by 
teachers in those subject areas 
throughout the school division. 
The curriculum committees, 
which are comprised of parents, 
teachers, students, and school 
administrators, meet on a regular 
bf sis during the school year. 

State Beard of Education 
procedures for the adoption of 
textbooks have been strictly 
followed in the selection of the 
recommended texts, in each case, 
the Virginia Beach Public 
Schools Department of Instruc- 
tional Planning and Development 
Services recoiiimends to the 
School Board the committee's 
first choice for adoption. 



iBiai 



IfeMN 



mmmmmm 



The Virginia Beach Sun, January 22, 1986 7 




Richard Pancoast, director, 
Engineering and Maintenance 
Control Division of the Public 
Works Department (PWD), at 
Oceana Naval Air Station in 



Military 



Virginia Beach, began 1986 by 
concluding more than 39 years of 
service to the United States 
Government. 
Pancoast 's January departure 



was filled with fond farewells, a 
retirement certificate and the 
presentation of the prestigious 
Navy Meritorious Civilian Ser- 
vice Medal and accompanying 
certificate. 

Although he started with civiJ.., 
service in 1944, at the Naval Sup- 
ply Center, Norfolk, Pancoast's 
career was interrupted in 1945 by 
active duty Naval service and 
then a return to college. 

Resuming his civil service 
career in 1948 as°an engineering 
aid for the Army Corps of 
Engineers, Norfolk, Pancoast 



received several promotions. 

Pancoast transferred to .NAS 
Oceana in 1954 and has become a 
familiar face since then— in- 
strumental in the building of the 
station»from an outlying field to a 
master jet base. 

Several promotions, including 
those to architectural engineer 
and to supervisory architectural 
engineer, put Pancoast in line for 
his October 1982 promotion as a 
supervisory architect, his position 
before retiring. 

Pancoast and his wife Mildred 
reside in Virginia Beach. 



Spain sighting of Air 
Force flight training 



During his retirement ceremony, Richard Pancoast, Engineering and maintenance Control Director, 
PWD, displays the Meritorious Civilian Service Medal and certificate presented recently by Captain L. F. 
Norton, NAS Oceana Commanding Officer. 

Architect's career built on excellence 



The northern plains of Spain, 
populated with deer and wild 
boar, were once the hunting 
grounds for Spanish kings. 

Today, the hunting grounds 
are the skies for Air Force Staff 
Sgt. Sandra L. Lynch- 
Maldonado and members of the 
406th Tactical Fighter Training 
Wing, who provide realistic air- 
to-air and air-to-ground gunnery 
ranges for American fighter 
pilots stationed in Europe. 

Lynch-Maldonado, daughter 
of Shirely A. Smith of Virginia 
Beach, is an administration 
specialist who^ives and works at 
Zaragoza Air Base. 

The northern Spanish base is 



Oceana hoi 
quarterly Na 
family school 

Naval Air Station Oceana in 
Virginia Beach will hold its quar- 
terly Navy Family Information 
School Tuesday, Feb. 4 and 
Wednesday Feb. 5 from 9 until 
11:30 a.m. The school will be 
held at the Navy Family Service 
Center, Building 333, Naval Air 
Station Oceana. 

, Discussions will include pay 
and allowances, Chaqipus, 
medical benefits, housing 
referral, survivors benefits, and 
Navy Family Assistance 
Programs. 

Call the Oceana Navy Family 
Service center, 433-2912 for 
registration and information. 
Registration closes Friday,-.Jan. 
30. 



different than most base; becausf- 
there are no aircrafts permanently 
assigned here. This allows 
American unit from other coun- 



tries to use the facility for 
training. 

"I'm in charge of the ad- 
Sec SPAIN, pmc * 





Pholo by SFC Rich Lamince 

Staff Sgt. Sandra L. Lynch-Maldonado of Virginia Beach adds the 
total duly days an airman has worked for his annual performance 
report. Lynch-Maldonado is administration specialist at Zaragoza Air 
Base, Spain. 



Virginia 




residents am active in 




Promotion 

Paul D. Banforth, son of Bar- 
bara Banforth of Virginia Beach, 
has been promoted to the U.S. 
Army to the rank of sergeant. 

Bamforth is an infantryman at 
Fort Lewis, Wash., with the 
Second Infantry. 

Ronald D. Hedspeth, son of 
Frank B. and K. E. Hedspeth of 
Virginia Beach, has been appoiii- 
ted a sergeant in the U.S. Air 
Force. 

The new non-commissioned 
officer completed- training in 
management, leadership, human 
relations and NCD respon- 
sibilities, before being awarded 
this status. 

I?edspeth is a radiologic 
specialist at Malmstrom Air For- 
ce Base, Mont., with the Air For- 
ce Hospital. 

He is a 1980 graduate of Prin- 
cess Anne High School. 
Marine Lance Cpl. Darryl S. 
Parker, son of Steven D. and 
June A. Parker of Virginia 
Beach, has been promoted to his 
present rank serving with Second 
Marine Division Camp Lejeune, 
NC. 

Wilton L. Batchelor Jr., son of 
Bobbie J. Harling and stepson of 
Alan E. Harling, of^ Virginia 
Beach, has been promoted to the 
U.S. Army to the rank of 
.^ specialist four. 

Batchelor is a heavy-vehicle 
mechanic in West Germany, with 
the Third Support Battalion. 

He is a 1976 graduate of Prin- 
cess Anne High School. 

Hilton L. Branna, son of Win- 
nie Q. Patrick of Virginia Beach, 
has been promoted in the U.S. 
Air Force to the rank of senior 
airman. 

Brannan is a fuels speaahst at 
MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., 
with the 56th Supply Squadron. 

His wife, Cynthia, is the 
daughter of Otha L. Green of 
Virginia Beach. 

New Duty 

Marine 1st Lt. David L. Mit- 
chell, son of Richard J. and Delia 
C. Mitchell of Virginia Beach, 
recently reported for duty with 
Second Marine Aircraft Wing, 
Marine- Corps Air Station, 
Cherry Point, NC. 

Honors 

Air Force LI. Col. Thomas C. 
Waldrop, son of Margret P. 
Waldrop of Virginia Beach, has 
been decorated with the 



' Meritorious Service Medal in 
West Germany. 

The Meritorious Service Medal 
is awarded specifically for out- 
standing non-combat meritorious 
achievement or service to the 
United States. 

Waldrop is a periodontist with 
the Weisbaden Regional Medical 
Center. 

Newly promoted Air Force 
Master Sgt. Phillip J. Vicknair, 
whose wife. Vera, is the daughter 
of Lois M. Cernetich of Virginia 
Beach, has been decorated with 
the Air Force Commendation 
Medal in England. 

The Air Force Commendation 
Medal is awarded to those in- 
dividuals who demonstrate out- 
standing achievement or 
meritorious service in the per- 
formance of their duties on 
behalf of the Air Force. 

Vicknair is a communications- 
electronics programs supervisor 
■with the 2176th Information 
Systems Squadron. 

Sgt. Irvin R. Uzzle, son of 
James I. Uzzle of Virginia Beach, 
has been decorated with the Ar- 
my Commendation Medal at 
Langley Air Force Base, Va. 

The Army Commendation 
Medal is awarded to those in- 
dividuals who demonstrate out- 
standing achievement or 
meritorious service in the per- 
formance of their duties on 
behalf of the Army. 

Uzzle is an air traffic control 
specialist with the 1913th Infor- 
mation Systems Group. 

He is a 1980 graduate of 
Kellam High School. 

Tech. Sgt. Ricky R. Gregory, 
brother of Ronnie L. Gregory of 
Virginia Beach, has been 
decorated with the Air Force 
Commendation Medal at Malm- 
strom Air Force Base, Mont. 

The Air Force Commendation 
, medal is awarded to those 
individuals who demonstrate out- 
standing achievement or 
meritorious service in the per- 
formance of their duties on 



behalf of the Air Force. 

Gregory is a missile system 
maintenance technician with the 
341st Organizational Missile 
Maintenance Squadron. 

Training 

Airman Wendy D. Welch, 

daughter of Navy Master Chief 
Petty Officer John E. and Diana 
I. Welch of Virginia Beach, has 
graduated from the U.S. Air For- 
ce wideband communications 
equipment course at Keesler Air 
Force Base, Miss. 

Graduates of the course were 
taught to install, operate and 
maintain special radio equip- 
ment, and earned credits toward 
an associate degree in applied 
science through the Community 
College of the Air Force. 

Welch is scheduled. la serve 
with the 728th Tractical Com- 
munication Squadron at Eglin 
Air Force Base, Fla. 

She is a 1984 graduate of Frank 
W. Cox High School. , 

Airman J)irk L. Bonko, son of ; 
Lawrence W. and Annmarie 
Bonko of Virginia Beach, has 
been assigned to Keesler Air For- 
ce Base, Miss., after completing 
Air Force basic training. 

During the six weeks at 
Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, 
the airman studied the Air Force 
mission, organization and 
customs and received special 
training in human relations. 

In addition, airmen who com- 
plete basic training earn credits 
toward an associate degree in ap- 
plied sicence through the Com- 
munity College of the Air Force. 

The airman will now receive 
specialized instruction in the per- 
sonnel field. 

He is a 1982 graduate of Kem- 
psville High School. 

Airman Chris D. Holmes, 
whose former guardian is Mary 
Clary of Virginia Beach, has been 
assigned to Sheppard Air Force 
Base, Texas, after completing Air 
Force basic training. 



During the six weeks at Lack- 
iland Air Force Base, Texas, the 
airman studied the Air Force 
mission, organization and 
customs and received special 
training in human relations. 

In addition, airmen who com- 
plete basic training earn credits 
toward an associate degree in ap- 
plied science through the Com- 
munity College of the Air Force. 

The airman will now receive 
specialised instruction in the 
medical services field. 

Spec. 4 Frederic R. Farinas, 
son of Pedro P. and Beatriz R. 
Farinas of Virginia Beach, has 
completed a U.S. Army primary 
leadership course at Schofield 
Barracks, Hawaii. 

Students received traiiitng in 
supervisory skills, leadership 
principles and small unit training 
techniques essential to a first-line 



Advertising Sales 

Salary, Commission, Travel 

Call The Virginia Beach Sun 

486-3430 



supervisor m a technical or ad- 
ministrative environment. 

Farinas is scheduled to serve 
with the 125th Military In- 
tdligence Battalion. 

He is a 1979 graduate of 
Ketham High School. 

Air Force Reserve Airman Lori 
A. Russo, daughter of Isaac J. 
Williams Sr. of Virginia Beach, 
has completed Air Force basic 
training at Lackland Air Force 
Base, Texas. 

The airman, who is remaining 
at Lackland for specialized 
training in the security police 
field, studied the Air Force 
mission, organization and 
customs and received special in- 
struction in human relations. 

Completion of this training 
earned the individual credits 
toward an associate degree in ap- 
plied science through the Com- 



munity College of the Air Force. 
Navy Seaman Recruit Steve M. 
Dujmoy, son of Carol L. Spruill, 
Virginia Beach, has completed 
recruit training at Navy Recruit 
Training Command, Naval 
Training Center, San Diego. 

During Dujmov's eight-week 
training cycie, ne stuaiea general 
military subjects designed to 
prepare him for further academic 
and on-the-job training in one of 
the Navy's 85 basic fields. 

Dujmoy's studies included 
seamanship, close order drill. 
Naval history and first aid. Per- 
sonnel who complete this course 
of instruction are eligible for 
three hours of college credit in 
physical education and hygiene. 

Senior Airman Michael P. 

Aldridge, son of Antoinette M. 

Aldridge of Virginia Beach, has 

Se* ACTIVE, page 8 



Campaign 25 

*, 
The Portsmouth Times, The Chesapeake Post, The Virginia Beach Sun 

Earn as much as you want by selling suiarriptions! 

Are you, your church or civic group looking for a really worthwhile fund-raising 

project? 

Do you want a quick and easy way to earn hundreds of dollars while at the same 
time helping to support YOUR city's dedicated, independently-owned community 
newspaper - the only one with all the pictures, news, features and editorials of most in- 
terest to your family and friends? If so. Campaign 25 is the solution. 

Admit it. You care about your community, and so do we. And together we can work 
to make it an even better place in which to live and do business. That's why for every 
25 new subscriptions you or your group generates for The Portsmouth Times, The 
Chesapeake Post or The Virginia Beach Sun, we'll gladly rebate back to you $125, or 
half-off the regular $10 a year subscription rate. That's a savings of 50% ! 

In addition, you'll enjoy the pleasure of receiving your hometown newspaper, 
loaded with all the club news, pictures and ads which mean the most to you, delivered 
through the mail to your home every w^k for 52 weeks. 

Why not give it a try and join the dozens of other people and groups who have 
already taken advantage of this campaign. For more details, call 547-4571 or simply 
stop into any of our newspaper offices and pick up a Campaign 25 sign-up form. 

We want to be your newspaper! 



U Yes. Please mail me a Campaign 25 sign up form. 
n Yes. Please call me about your Campaign 25, 



Name _ 
Address 
City 

Zip 



State 



Phone, 



Rrtan lo; C*mpMt« 25, t/« T»t Vhg^ iMrt Sn. 
IM So«lh Rosemom Roa4. Vk'^Ai BiaA. V A., 23^2 



mmmt 



wmfmmmmmn 



8 The Virginia Beach Sun. January 22. 1986 



Spain sight of 
flight training 

Continued from page 7 

ministration office in the con- 
solidated base personnel office," 
she said, "We take care of ad- 
ministrative actions on people 
and programs. We control and 
review all personnel actions, to 
include orders, promotions, and 
regulation." 

Zaragoza Air Base has the 
mission to support fighter 
training. Units stationed in 
England and Germany often ex- 
perience weather tha' prohibits 
them from getting the necessary 
training. Zaragoza, with 
generally good weather for 
flying, is the ideal place for units 
tt) practice and experience 
situations they may encounter 
during combat. 

"Spain is a beautiful country," 
Lynch-Maldonado said. "Since . 
my family has been here we have 
met some really nice people. Our 
neighbors have us over for fiestas 
7T(]3arties). The most interesting 
one was wheii "we celebrated 
Christmas Eve with them. It was 
a real faitiily get together. We 
also went to the beaches for a 
week a,nd traveled up and down 
the Mediterranean coast." 

Virginia Beach 
man receives 
Navy award 

Lieutenant Timothy A. Disher, 
USN, a 1977 graduate of Frank 
W. Cox High School and son of 
Rear Admiral and John S. Djsher 
was awarded the navy 
.Achievement Medal during 
ceremonies held recently in Seat- 
tle. 
-J, Lt. Disher was recognized for 
-his service aboard the nuclear 
powered submarine USS John 
Adams (SSBN 620), homeported 
in Charleston, S.C. 

He was cited for his unsur- 
passed leadership, technical skill 
and watchstanding ability. Lt. 
Disher was responsible for coor- 
dination and execution of a 
major inspection and was a 
major factor in.the ship's receipt 
of two successive awards for anti- 
submarine warfare excellence. 

He is now assigned to the 
Naval Reserve officers Training 
Corps Unit at the University of 
Washington. As Senior Class In- 
structor, Lt. Disher oversees the 
leadership and management 
training for 50 midshipmen and 
officer candidates about to be 
commissioned in the Navy. 

In the same ceremony, his 
wife. Lieutenant Sharon Disher, 
Civil Engineering corps, USN, 
was awarded the Navy 
Achievement Medal for her work 
at Charleston, S.C. She is also 
stati(|%d at the University of 
Wa^ington, pursuing a 
— postgraduate degree in .Civil 
Engineering. The medals were 
presented by Rear Admiral 
Disher, the Chief of Naval Air 
Training in Corpus Christi. 




Virginia AFL-CIO announces 
1 986 agenda for workers 



Pholo by SFC Rich Umance 

A castle on the highway between Madrid and Zaragoza looms above a 
small village as a reminder of Spain's ancient past and heritage. This 
castle is just one of the many cultural and historic sights available to the 
Air Force men and women stationed in Spain. 



Active in military 



Continued from page 7 

graduated from the U.S. Air For- 
ce electronic communications 
and cryptographic equipment 
systems repairman course at 
Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. 

Graduates of the course lear- 
ned to operate and repair 
specialized communications 
equipment. They earned credits 
toward an associate degree in ap- 
plied science through the Com- 
munity College of the Air Force. 

Aldridge is scheduled to serve 
at the Pentagon, Washington. 

He is a 1978 graduate of First 
Colonial High School. 

Pvt. Charles W. Rosen III, 
grandson of Walter I. and Billie 
R. Basnight of Virginia Beach, 
has completed one station unit 
training (OSUT) at the U.S. Ar- 
my Infantry School, Fort Den- 
ning, Ga. 

He is a 1985 graduate of Green 
Run High School. 

Private Charles W. Burroughs 
III, son of Adelia W. Silcox and 
stepson of Fred G. Silcox of 
Virginia Beach, has completed 
one station unit training (OSUT) 
at the U.S. Army Infantry 
School, Fort Benning, Ga. 

Burroughs is scheduled to serve 



with the 1st Infantry Training 
Battalion at Fort Benning. 

He is a 1985 graduate of Green 
Run High School. 

OSUT is a 12-week period 
which combines basic combat 
training and advanced individual 
training. 

The training included weapons 
qualifieationsj' squad tactics, 
patfiottifigiAiandBiHK: -warfare, 
field communications and com- 
bat operattfihs. Completion of 
this course qualifies the soldiers 
as light-weapons infantrymen 
and as indirect-fire crewmen. 

Soldiers were taught to per- 
form any of the duties in a rifle or 
mortar squad. 

Re-enlistments 

Spec. 4 Douglas B. McNeill, 

son of retired Navy Lt. Comdr. 
Alexander and Louise P. McNeill 
of Virginia Beach, has re-enlisted 
in the U.S. Army at Fort Bliss, 
Texas, for five years. 

McNeill is an armor crew 
member with the Third Armored 
Cavalry Regiment. 

He is a 1980 graduate of Prin- 
cess Anne High School. 



Improving workers' compen- 
sat»on statutes, strengthening 
unemployment compensation 
laws and reforming voter 
registration rights arc among the 
top priorities for labor leaders in 
the 1986 session of the Virginia 
General Assembly, according to 
the Virginia State AFL-CIO. 

Along with state elected and 
local union leaders at news con- 
ferences in Roanoke, Richmond, 
and Norfolk, AFL-CIO Prtsi- 
dent David H. Laws detailed an 
ambitious legislative agenda for 
the 108,000-member Federation. 

"We call upon our new Gover- 
nor and the General Assembly to 
take advantage of the oppor- 
tunities this historic session 
provides. We arc moved, as are 
many Vifginiahs, by the Gover- 
nor's hope for a 'Ne\* Dominion' 
and are confident that his vision is 
that of our own; that its foun- 
dations are built soundly upon 
the principals of justice, com- 
passion and equality of oppor- 
tunity. A New Dominion for aH, 
not just for a few.' 

Specifically, the AFL-CIO 
urged the General Assembly to 
restore recognition of the many 
occupational diseases currently 
not covered by Virginia Workers' 
Compensation provisions. "The 
recent Supreme Court decision, 
Gilliam v. Western Electric, 
obliterated much of the progress 
that has been made over the past 
30 yiearrki this area," according 
to/Laws. VTenosynovitis, carpal 
timnel '^xndrome, and hearing 
loss are examples of diseases no 
longer covered under current 
provisions. 

The Federation also urged the 
Legislature to include gradually 
incurred injuries as compensable 
diseases. Numerous other states 
now recognize such work-related 
illnesses as back injuries as com- 
pensable. 

In the area of Unemployment 
Compensation, the unions want 
the equation for determining who 
receives relief expanded so that 
part time employees who are la|d 
off can be eligible for aid. 
Current laws, they say, 
discriminate against lower wage 
earners and part-time workers 
and "fail to recognize the reality 
of Virginia's occupational 
demographics in the middle 
1980's." 

The Federation also renewed 
its call for statewide voter 
registration characterizing 
Virginia's current ranking of 46th 
of 50 states in the percentage of 
eligible voters on the rolls as 'ab- 



Beach students are recommended 
for appointment to academies 



Fifteen young men and women 
from Virginia Beach have been 
nominated by Congressman G. 
William Whitehurst (R-Va.) for 
appointment to the nation's 
various service academies. 

The following persons will be 
considered for appointment to 
the academies for classes begin- 
ning this summer. 

U.S. Air Force Academy: Kerri 
D. Harper, Princess Anne High 
School; Kevin A. Ege, First 
Colonial High School; and James 



F. Jordan, Jr., Kempsville High 
School. 

U.S. Military Academy: John 
D. Martin, First Colonial High 
School. 

U.S. Naval Academy: Neal D. 
Baldwin, Green Run High 
School; Michael A. Conner, First 
Colonial High School; John B. 
Blakemore, Princess Anne High 
School; Karen A, Chasse, Kem- 
psville High School; Peter A. 
DeAngelo, Kempsville High 
School; and Christina M. 



Mental retardation program 
in need of more volunteers 



symal" and "are of the few 
notable failures of Charles 
Ro'bb's administration. Statewide 
registration is feasible this year if 
Governor Baliles will make it 
priority." 

The Labor leaders also took a 
firm stand against the anticipated 
reintroduction of a bill to ex- 
pand the uses of polygraph 
machines in employment prac- 
tices, calling them "unfair" and 
"unreliable." "What's good 
eSough for George Shultz is good 
enough for workers," quijjped 
Laws. 

Other concerns tor labor this 
year include support for the 
proposals of " the American 
Federation of Teachers for full 
funding for the Standards of 
Quality for public education, 
support for making Brown Lung 
disease (Byssnosis) compensable 
as a work-related illness and 
lowering the interest rates banks 
can charge on consumer credit 
card loans. 

Finally, the labor leaders said 
tliat they would ask the 
Legislature to approjjriate fun- 
ding for labor studies center at 
one of the Commonwealth's 
pujblic universities. Based on con- 
cepts similar to centers located in 
numerous other states, a labor 
studies center would provide op- 
portunities for working men and 
women to study labof law, health 
and safety courses and labor 
history. 

"We expect a great deal of 
resistence to this idea obviously," 
said Laws. "But this will be an 
ongoing objective for the union 
movement in Virginia from now 
on. The men and women who 
build our roads and bridges, 
work in the factories and mills, 
teach our children and make our 
governments work deserve a 
place where they can learn about 
the achievements of the workers 
who won them the opportunities 
they enjoy today. A labor studies 
center will be a source of pride 
for workers and their unions and 
an invaluable tool for the 
academic eommunity." 

Laws concluded by 
acknowledging that while the 
Federation faces an uphill battle 
in trying to achieve much of its 
agenda he said,, "the Virginia 
labor movement has consistently 
beaten the odds in recent times. 
The Virginia AFL-CIO has added 
50 new affiliates to our base of 
400 local unions in the past 18 
months. Labor's esteem in the 
public mind is heightening year 
after year, reversing the trend of 
the '60s and '70s according to the 



national polls. 

"Eighty-five percent of our 
endorsed and targeted House of 
Delegates candidates were suc- 
cessful last November, and our 
early endorsement of a 
progressive, longshot for 
Lieutenant Governor not only 
has given us important friends in 
high places, but has effectively 
destroyed the "labor- 
endorsement-is-the-kiss-of-death 

myth forever." 



1986 is success 
story for Beach 
Crime Solvers 



Virginia Beach Crime Solvers 
would like to take this oppor- 
tunity to share our success story 
with the many people who have 
made Crime Solvers the great 
success that it is. 

Each week. Crime Solvers, 
through local newspapers, 
radios, and television, highlight 
an unsolved crime as our "Crime 
of the Week," These cases are 
generally of a serious riature and 
investigators are either at a dead 
end or need more information to 
make an arrest. 

Since May 3, 1982 when Crime 
Solvers first began receiving calls, 
we have solved 47 "Crimes of the 
Week" including several rapes, 
robberies, burglaries, and three 
homicides. 

To date, Virginia Beach Crime 
Solvers has assisted the Virginia 
Beach Police Department with 
the arrest of 1030 people. Those 
arrested have been charged with 
2130 crimes ranging from mur- 
ders to larcenies. Crime Solvers 
has also assisted in thje recovery 
of $565,465 worth of stolen 
property and in the confiscation 
of $932,622 in illegal drugs, over 
98 percent of the cases involving 
Crime Solvers information havte 
been successfully prosecuted. 

The Crime Solvers board of 
directors, composed of citizens 
from all areas of the community, 
oversee the operation of the 
program and provide money for 
cash rewards to be paid. In our 
four years of operation $56,335 
in rewards have been authorized. 
Since the reward fund is totally 
comprised of tax-deductible con- 
tributions from citizens and 
businesses, we hope our con- 
tributors are pleased with the 
program's success. We also hope 
our callers will continue to call 
our 427-0000 telephone number 
and make 1986 even more suc- 
cessful. Crime Solvers wishes 
everyone a prosperous New Year. 



:r?(r7i /a P O ^ 




ucm-NOTiCTS ] I ucAmoiiCTS 



LiCAL NOTICES 



Dineen, First Colonial High 
School; Perry M. Pascual, Kem- 
psville High School; David M. 
Pernini, Bayside High School; 
Ronald C. Romero, Green Run 
High School; and John W. 
Stouffer, III, Bayside High 
School. 

U.S. Merchant marine 
Academy: 

Christopher P. Engel, Cox 
High School. 



The Mental Retardation/De- 
velopmental Disabilities 
Programs of Virginia Beach 
needs volunteers in the following 
programs: '' 

The Infant Stimulation 
Program needs volunteers to 
work one-to-one with mentally 
retarded and developmentally 
disabled children ages birth to 
two years, in a classroom setting. 
Volunteers are requested to work 
I '/j hours per week for the school 
term, September-May. 



Volunteers are needed evenings 
and weekends to work with men- 
tally retarded and developmen- 
tally disabled children and adults, 
4-8 hours per month. Persons 
with recreational skills and a siv 
month commitment are required. 

Volunteers are needed every 
Wednesday 10-1 1:30 a.m. to wat- 
ch children whose mothers are at- 
tending a mothers' support group 
for families with handicapped 
children. New, interested 



mothers are also welcome to at- 
tend the meeting. 

For information contact Beki 
Eure, 499-7619. 

The Respite Center needs 
volunteers, either individuals or 
groups, to assist mentally retar- 
ded and developmentally 
disabled children on field trips 
during school holidays. Also, 
volunteers are needed on week- 
days after school until 6 p.m. 
Reliable, energetic teenagers are 
welcome. 



VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the City 
ofVirginia Beach on the I3th day 
of December, 1985 
Elizabeth Ann LeFevre, Com- 
plainant 'Jt"--' 
v. 

Frederick W. Chapin 
a non-resident 

Serve: Secretary of the. Com- 
monwealth 

Mary D. Chapin 
5657 Dodington Court 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23455 

Anna L. Karp 

304 We-.! over (^ venue 

Norl'olk. Virijmia 2^517 

Linda Y.iw 

985 Sunnyside Drive 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23464 

Kay H. Finkclstcin 
"^^c: Robert H. Bennett, Atlor 
ney 

2697 International Parkway i 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 

Erncsl A. Nalividad 
4405 Articles lane 

Virainia Beach, Virginia 

ScMun Bank. NA , 

Si" V.' rill I \ ( iiii-hin^ III. 

ReiiAlcied Ahciu 

One Cnmrnercial Place 
Norfalk. Virginia 23501 

The Chesapeake arid Potomac 



Telephone Company 
Serve: Huburi R. Staltard 
703 East Grace Street 
Richmond, Virginia 23219 

Bank of Virginia 

Serve: Sarah R. Myers, 

Registered Agent 

7 North Eighth Street 

Richmond, Virginia 23219 

United States of America 
Serve: U.S. Attorney 
Eastern District of Virginia 
U.S. Federal Court House 
Granby Street 
Norfolk, Virginia 

Department of the Treasury 
Serve: U.S. Attorney 
Eastern District of Virginia 
U.S. Federal Coui I H»usc 
Granby Street 
Norfolk, Virginia 

Kearney Floyd, Trustee 
716 Pennsylvania Avenue 
Norfolk. Vireinia, Defendants 
ORDER Of PUBLICATION 
The object of the above styled 
suit is to partition certain proper- 
ty owned in fee simple by the 
complainant Elizabeth Ann 
LeFevre and the defendant- 
Frederick W. Chapin and Mary 
D. Chapin located in Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. And an affidavit 
having been filed that diligence 
has been used without effect to 
ascertain (he location of Mary D. 
Chapin. whose lasi known ad- 
dress is 5657 Dodington Court, 



Virginia Beach, Virginia 23455. 

The property which is the sub- 
ject of this suit is described as 
follows: 

. ALL that certain lot, piece or 
parcel of land with the buildings 
and improvements thereon, 
situate in the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, and known, 
numbered and designated as Lots 
1 and 2 as shown on that certain 
plat entitled: "Survey of Block 
Six of Oceana Gardens", which 
plat is duly recorded in the 
Clerk's Office of the Circuit 
Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, in Map Book 21 
at page 3. 

It is therefore ORDERED that 
the said Mary D. Chapin do ap- 
pear on or before February 3, 
1986, ill ihc Clerk's Office of this 
Court and do what is necessary to 
protect her inicrt".i. 

And it is further ORDERED 
that this order be publishei ( nc. 
a week for four successive weeks 
in the Virginia Beath Sun, a 
newspaper having general cir- 
culation in the Citv of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. 
.1. C"urti<. Fruit, Clerk 
Bv r'liyllis N. Styron 
rX'putv Clerk 
223-2 4T1 -22 VB 

VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 31st 
day of December, 1985 
In re: Adoption of William 

CMliMCd M |Mgt 9 



t- 



The Virginia Beach Sun, January ^6. 1986 9 



Wiwijimm M^miMi S 




LEGAL NOTICeS 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICE 



Coitlinued from page 8 

Joseph Graham 

By: Gina Michelle Morrison and 
Jon Stark Morrison, Petitioners 
To: Peter Walsh 
c/o U.S. Marines 
Quantico, Virginia 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
This day came GINA 
MICHELLE MORRISON and 
JON STARK MORRISON, 
Petitioners, and represented that 
the object of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the above 
named infant(s) William Joseph 
Graham, by GINA MICHELLE 
MORRISON and JON STARK 
MORRISON, husband and wife, 
and affidavit having been made 
and filed that Peter Walsh, a 
natural parent of said child(ren) 
-is a non-resident of the State of 
_yirginia, the last known post of- 
fice address (as of October, 1983 
being: c/o U.S. Marine, Quan- 
tico, Virginia, and that due 
-^ diligence has been used by or in 
-behalf of the said petitioners to 
ascertain in which county or cor- 
poration the said natural parent 
is; without effect. 

It is therefore ORDERED that 
the said PETER WALSH appear 
before this Court within ten (10) 
days after publication of this Or- 
der and indicate his attitude 
toward the proposed adoption, 
or otherwise do what is necessary 
to protect his interest in this mat- 
ter. 

It is further ORDERED that a 
copy of this Order be published 
once each week for four suc- 
cessive weeks in The Virginia 
Beach Sun. a newspaper of 
general circulation in this city. 
A Copy Teste: 
J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By: Patti K. Bennett, D.C. 
Melvin J. Radin, Esquire 
500 Holiday Inn Waterside 
Norfolk, Virginia 235 10 
(804)623-1216 
225-18 4t 1-29 VB 

NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City 
Council of Virginia Beach >yyi be 
heard in 4he< Council i .Chamheis 
of the City Hall Building, 
Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, Febraury 3, 1986, at 
2 p.m. at which time the 
following application will be 
heard: 

AMENDMENT: 
1. Motion of the Planning Com- 
mission of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, to amend and 
reordain Article II, Part C of the 
Comprehensive Zoning Ordinan- 
ce pertaining to the PD-H2 Plan- 
ned Unit Development District. 
More detailed information is 
available in the Department of 
Planning. 

Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC 
City Clerk 
227-2 2tl -22 VB 

NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 
The Board of Zoning Appeals 
will conduct a Public Hearing on 
Wednesday, February 5. 1986, at 
2:00 p.m., in the Council Cham- 
bers of the City Hall Building, 
Municipal Center, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. The staff 
briefing will be held at 1:30 p.m., 
in the City Manager's Conference 
Room. The following ap- 
plications will appear on the 
agenda. 
REGULAR AGENDA: 

Case 1. Cecelia M. Salch 
requests a variance to allow 
parking of major recreational 
equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest por- 
tion of a building adjacent to a 
public street on Lot 12, Block C, 
Section 2, Charlestowne Lakes, 
2012 Wanda Circle. Kempsville 
Borough. 

Case 2. Valerie Cappetta 
requests a variance to allow 
parking of major recreational 
equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest por- 
tion of a building adjacent to a 
public street on Lot 135B, Block 
A, Section U Part IB, Rosemont 
Forest, 1409 Bridle Creek 
Boulevard. Kempsville Borough. 

Case 3. James F. and 
Anastacia Davis request a varian- 
ce of 2 feet to an 8 foot side yard 
setback (west side) and of 5 feet 
to a 5 foot rear yard setback in- 
stead of 10 feet each as required 
(swimming pool) on Lot 22, 
Block B, Section I. Colonial 
Oaks, 22m Hunters Wood Way. 



Lynnhaven Borough. 

Case 4. Peter B. Easton, Jr. 
requests a variance of 5.8 feet to 
a 14.2 foot front yard setback in- 
stead of 20 feet as required and of 
0.9 feet to a 4.1 foot side yard 
setback (east side) instead of 5 
feel as required (2 storv addition) 
on Lots 26/28, Block 23, 
Shadowlawn, 510 Virginia 
Avenue. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

Case 5. Edwin R. and Sandra 
B. Mitchell request a variance of 
7 feet to a 3 foot rear yard set- 
back instead of 10 feet as 
required (swimming pool) on Lot 
6, Blocl G, Section 9, Haygood 
Point, 728 Harris Point Drive. 
Bayside Borough. 

Case 6. David A. and Linda S. 
Arnold request a variance of 2 
feet in fence height to a 6 foot 
fence instead of a 4 foot fence as 
allowed in a required side yard 
adjacent to a street (King William 
Road) on Lot 21, Block 7, 
Diamond Springs Homes, -55i1 
Haden Road. Bayside Borough. 

Case 7. David L. and N^ildred 
G. Frazier request a variance of 

11 feet to a 19 foot front yard 
setback instead of 30 feet as 
required (carport) on Lot 4, 
Block J, Hifltop Manor; '1872 
Thomas Lane. Lynnhaven 
Borough. ' "''''[ 

Case 8. Hugh C. Winters 
requests a variance of 2 fe^t in 
fence height to a 6 foot fend^ in- 
stead of a 4 foot fence as allo'wed 
in a required front yard setback 
(Indian River Road on Lot' ^6, 
Westview, 725 Avella Sli'eet. 
Kempsville Borough. 

Case 9. Saverio J. Carollo 
requests a variance of 18 feet to a 

12 foot setback from Kempsville 
Road instead of 30 feet as 
required (through lot) and of 2 
feet to a 3 foot side yard setback 
(north side) instead of 5 feet as 
required (accessory building- 
storage shed) on Lot 30, Block E, 
Section 1, Fairfield, 620 Pleasant 
Hall Drive. Kempsville Borough. 

Case 10. Nelson Tibbitt 
requests a variance of 6 parking 
spaces to 44 pailcing spaces in- 
stead of 50- paVktrtg' spat*5 as 

restaufaiht and '5t(^ squai-e'feet 
for general offices) on Lot A, 
Plat of Lakeside Convalescent 
Home, Londofi Bridge Area, 
2548 Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
#104. Lynnhaven Borough. 

Case 11. M. Shevel and Jean. 
F. Siff request a variance of 5 feet 
to a 3 foot side yard setback (east 
side) instead of 8 feet as required 
(deck) on Lot 15 and part of Lot 
17, Block 17, Section D. Caoe 
Henry Syndicate, 114 80th 
Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 

Case 12. Richard L. and 
Deborah L. Gobdboy request a 
variance of 1 foot 10 inches to an 
8 foot 2 inch rear yard setback 
and of 1 f6ot 6 inches to an 8 foot 
6 inch side yard setback (east 
side) instead of 10 feet each as 
required (^cQessory building- 
shed) on Lot 19, Section 1, Dun- 
barton, 813 Aqueduct Court. 
Kempsville Borough. 

Case 13. Surfside Sooth, lnc.» 
requests a variance of 25 feet to a 
10 foot setback- from Ocean 
Shore Avenue and of 5 feet to a 
30 foot setback from Red Tide 
Road instead of 35 feet each as 
required and of 16.5 feet to a 3.5 
foot side yard setbacks (both 
sides) instead of 20 feet each as 
required and to allow parking in 
the required setbacks where 
prohibited and to waive the 
required lanscaping where 
required and of 1 loading space 
to "0" loading spaces instead of 
1 loading space as required- 
(hotel/motel) on Lots 3 and 7, 
Block F, Lynnhaven Beach, 2328 
Red Tide ,Road. Lynnhaven 
Borough; 

Case 14. John F. Campo 
requests a variance of 5 feet to a 
10 foot side yard adjacent to a 
street (Garfield Avenue) instead 
of 15^ feet as required and of 5 
feet to a 5 foot rear yard setback 
instead of 10 feet as required (ac- 
cessory building -detached 
garage) on Lots 21 and 22, Block 
38, Pecan Gardens, 3545 Faraday 
Lane. Princess Anne Borough. 

Case 15. Ronald W. and Bon- 
nie T. Lee request a variance of 3 
feet to a 7 foot rear yard setback 
(west side) instead of 10 feet as 
required (accessory building - 
storage shed) on Lot 2, Section 8, 
Lynbrook Landing, 705 Wagons 
Way. Bayside Borough. 

Case 16. George H. Metzger 
requests a variance of 2 feet to a 6 
foot side yard setback (south 
side) instead of 8 feet as required 
(residential addition) on Lot 5, 
Block B, Section D, Cape Henry, 



8102*Oceanfront Avenue. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

Case 17. Nelson P. Tibbitt, Jr. 
request a variance of 3 feet in 
fence height to a 7 foot fence in- 
stead of a 4 foot fence as allowed 
in a required front yard setback 
(entrance columns) on Lot 3, 
Tibbitt Acres, 4209 Marchris 
Court. Bayside Borough. 

Case 18. George E. Freund 
request a variance of 5 feet to a 5 
foot side yard setback (north 
side) instead of 10 feet as 
required (swimming pool) on Lot 
59, Phase 1-A, Southgate, 2224 
Crossroad Trail. Princess Anne 
Borough. 

Case 19. Wallace S. Harwood, 
Jr. requests a variance of 4 feet to 
a 6 foot rear yard setback instead 
of 10 feet as required (enlarge 
existing accessory building) on 
Lot C, Ubermeer, 404 53rd 
Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 
DEFERRED AGENDA: 

Case f. T. G. Patel requests a 
variance of 25 feet to a 10 foot 
setback from the right of way tine 
established on the Master Street 
land Highway Plan as adopted by 
the City Council instead of a 35 
-foot setback as required (In- 
dependence Boulevard) on a Par- 
cel, Pembroke Area, Indepen- 
dence Boulevard and Columbus 
Street. Bayside Borough. 
, ALL APPLICANTS MUST 
APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD!! 
Paul N. Sutton 
Secretary 
229c-8 2tl-29VB 

NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 
Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City 
Council of Virginia Beach will be 
heard in the Council Chambers 
of the City Hall Building, 
Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
On Monday, Febrary 10. 1986, 
at 2:00 p.m. at which time the 
following applications will be 
heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION^ 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

1. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Virginia Beach 

'Gefieral Hospital for ^ CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-4 
Residential District to 0-1 Office 
District on certain property 
located on the North side of Old 
Donation Parkway Extended 
beginning at a point 625.48 feet 
East of First Colonial Road. Said 
parcel contains 2.075 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH- 

2. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of W. T. Brown & 
Associates for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from A-1 
Apartment District to A-2 Apart- 
ment District on the North side of 
Oconee Avenue, 80 feet West of 
Hutton Road. Said parcel is 
located at 2548 Oconee Avenue 
and contains 3.45 acres. Plats 
m'fih more detail^ information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

"5. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of WAI, a Virginia 
Limited Partnership, for' a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-5 Residential District to 
B-4 Resort-Commercial District 
on certain property located on 
the North side of Owl's Creek 
Lane, 800 feet more or less East 
of Gregory's Lane. Said parcel 
contains 2.68 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

4. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Great Neck Village 
Associates, a General Partner- 
ship, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 
Community-Business District to 
A-2 Apartment District on cer- 
tain property located 710 feet 
East of North Great Neck Road 
beginning at a point 600 feet 
South of Mill Dam Road as 
shown on the plat entitled "Sub- 
division of Property for Great 
Neck Village Shopping Center" 
on file in the Department of 
Planning. Said parcel contains 
5.097 acres. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

5, An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Henry Kuwabara, 
Joan Mallen and Robert 
Steinhilber for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from O-I 



Office District, 1000 feet more or 
less West of Bendix Road. Said 
parcel is located at 4456 Bonney 
Road and contains 2.47 acres. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

6. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dimensions, Inc. for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-1 Residential District to 
0-1 Office District on the East 
side of Diamond Springs Road, 
500 feet more or less South of 
Lawson Hall Key on Lots 1-12 
and part of Lot 13, Section 6, 
Wesleyan Pines. Said parcel con- 
tains 12.84 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

7. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dimensions, Inc., for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-5 Residential District to 
0-1 Office District on the East 
side of Diarnpnd Springs Road, 
1360 feet more or less South of 
Lawson Hall Key on Part of Lot 
13 and Lot 14, Section 6, 
Wesleyan Pines. Said parcel con- 
tains 1.16 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

8. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Giant Square Shop- 
ping Center Company for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a tire, battery and accessory 
store on the West side of In- 
dependence Boulevard, 151.75 
feei South of S. Witchduck 
Road. Said parcel is located at 
741 Independence Boulevard and 
contains 12.32 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

9. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Morning Star Baptist 
Church for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for a church and 
related facilities at the Southeast 
intersection of Northampton 
Boulevard and Pleasure House 
Road. Said parcel contains 1.336 
acres. Plats with more detailed 
ihfbrmation are aVaitebfd in the 
Department of Planning. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

10. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Auto Care Centers of 
America for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for an automobile 
service center at the Northwest 
corner of Holland Road and 
Grant Avenue on Lots 1-20, 
Block 4, Pecan Gardens. Said 
parcel contains 51,000 square 
feet. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

11. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Kramer Tire Com- 
pany, Incorporated for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
automobile repair and sale, in- 
stallation and service of tires on 
certain property located at the 
northern quadrant ©f the inter- 
section of Holland Road and 
Lynnhaven Parkway. Said parcel 
contains 37,000 square feet. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

PUNGO BOROUGH: 

12. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of PCK Corporation 
for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for a single family 
home in the AG-1 Agricultural 
District on certain property 
located 600 feet North of Indian 
River Road beginning at a point 
2400 feet West of Princess Anne 
Road. Said parcel is located at 

2997 Seaboard Road and con- 
tains 60 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PUNGO BOROUGH. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

13. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Mary Susanne 
Knisely for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for a pre-school at 
the Northeast corner of Kem- 
psville Road and Alton Road. 
Said parcel is located at 1072 Old 
Kempsville Road and contains 
2.5 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KE.MPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH; 

14. Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in r^ard 
to certain elements of the Sub- 
division Ordinance, Subdivision 
for Martha Smith. Property is 
located on the North side of 
Crystal Lake Circle, 170 feet 
more or less North of Bay Colony 
Drive. Plats with more detailed 



information are available in the 
Deplartmcnt of Planning. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited 
to attend. v 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC 
City Clerk 
229-9 2t 1-29 VB 

TAKE NOTICE that on 
January 24, 1986 at 10:00 am. at 
the premises of Tidewater Impor- 
ts, Inc., DBA Hall Pontiac CMC 
Honda, Inc., 3152 Virginia Beach 
Blvd., Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
23452, the undersigned will sell at 
public auction, for cash, reser- 
ving nnp itself ihe rigtit to bid, 
the following motor vehicles: 

198i^ Pontiac J2000, Serial 
#1G2AD77J9E7289480. 

1980 Chevrolet Monza, Serial 
#1M27VA7246146. 

1984 Pontiac J2000, Serial 
#1G2AB6909E7351237. 

1983 Pojuiat FZBircCSttiar 
)!'1G2AS8718DN224481. 

1984 Honda Prelude, Serial 
#JHMAB5221EC051943 

1983 Honda Civic, Serial 
#JHMSR3324DS014067. 

1984 GMC SI 5, Serial #1GT- 
CS14Y4E2528715., 

1982 Jeep CJ-5, Serial #1JC- 
CM85A1CT063580. 

1984 Renault Alliance, Serial 
.)!'1XMDM9608EK192003. 

1984 Pontiac Grand Prix, 
Serial #2G2AJ37AOE230381 1 . 
Tidewater Imports, Inc. 
DBA Hali Pontiac GMC Honda, 
Inc. 

F. C. Rice 
Comptroller 
229-12 It 1-22 VB 

TAKE NOTICE that on 
January 24, 1986 at 10:00 a.m. at 
the premises of Tidewater Impor- 
ts, Inc., DBA Hall Pontiac GMC 
Honda, Inc., 3152 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, 23452 the undersigned 
will sell at public auction, for 
cash, reserving unto itself the 
right to bid, the following motor 
vehicles: 

1984 Jeep Cherokee, Serial 
IHCyH"3ET110837. _ 
Tidewater Import^, Inc. 

DBA Hall Pontiac GMC Honda, 

Inc. 

229-11 It 1-22 V B 

In the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit pourt of the City of Virginia 
Beach, on the 13th day of 
January, 1986 

Lisa Lynne Bodner, Plaintiff, 
against Paul Thomas Bodner, 
Defendant. 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is for the 
said plaintiff to obtain a divorce 
a vinculo matrimonii from the 
said defendant, upon the grounds 
of separation in excess of one 
year. And an ^fidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 97 
Marvin Avenue, Akron, Ohio, 
44302 it is ordered that he do ap- 
pear on or before the 6th of Mar- 
ch, 1986, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his interest in 
this suit. It is further Ordered 
that a copy of this Order be 
published once each week for 
four successive weeks in the 
Virginia Beach Sun, a newspaper 
of general circulation in this city. 
A Copy Teste: 
J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By: Patti K. Bennett, D.C. 
Edward F. Holloran, Esquire 
3408 Boyd Road 
Virginia Beach, VA 23452 
227-12 4t 2-12 VB 

TAKE NOTICE that on 
January 24, 1986 at 10:00 a.m. at 
the premises of Tidewater Impor- 
ts, Inc. DBA Hall Pontiac GMC 
Honda, Inc., 31^2 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, 23452, the undersigned 
will sell at public auction, for 
cash, reserving unto itself the 
right to bid, the following motor 
vehicles: 

1983 Renault Alliance, Serial 
#1 AMDC9569DK219375 (1629R) 

1982 Concord, Serial #1AMC- 
AO55OCK10271O(1578R) 

1983 Chevrolet Citation, Serial 
#IG1AH11R3DTI03426(I606R) 

1983 Renault Alliance, Serial 
#IAMDM960XDK252408 
(1439R) 

1981 Toyota Celica, Serial 
#JT2RA43C4B0():5321 (1638R) 

1985 Renault. Serial #1XMAC- 
9534FK244603 

1983 Jeep, Serial #IJCCM88^ 
E6DT023821 (I607R) 

1983 Honda. Serial WHMAB- 
5228DC002527(164IR) 

1985 Renault Encore, Serial 
#1XMDM9306PK 157370 



i 



1983 Chevrolet Camaro, Seriaf 
#1G1AP87S4DNI57781^(1522R)' 

1982 Honda Civic, Serial 
#JHMSL532OCS0O1568(1592R)' 

1984 Pontiac 2000. Serial 
#1G2AB2702E7306913(1601R) " 

1982 Pontiac F/B, Serial ff\G2' 
AW87H8CL508558(I450R) 

1983 Chev. Blazer, Serial 
/!'lG8CT18BIEk)IG8309(159lR); 

1985 Pontiac F/B, Serial 
#1G2FW87H6FN202537 (I624R1 

1984 Pontiac Fiero, Serial 
))'IG2AM37R1EP321854 (1462R) 

1982 Pontiac J2000, Seri^ 
#1G2AB69G6CK5 10271 (1581RJ 
Tidewater Imports, Inc. ' 

DBA Hall Pontiac GMC Honda;, 
Inc. 

F. C. Rice 

Comptroller ' 

227- 16 It 1-22 VB ^ 

! 

VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Offiqe 
of the Circuit Court of the Ciliy 
of Virginia Beach on the 16th d^y 

of January, 1986 _} 

Maryland Casualty Compko^. 
Complainant, 1 

V. 

Wayne E.Carter 
701 Fentress Airfield Road 
Chesapeake, Virginia 23322 
Joseph Boyd 
1322 Rica Court 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23456 [ 
James Frey 
1 540 Hadley Court 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23456 
and 

c/o James D. Hooker, Jr., 
Esquire 

Hooker & Slipow 
2625 Princess Anne Road 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23456, 
Respondents. 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of this suit is to 
determine whether or not 
automobile liability insurance 
coverage is provided to defendan- 
ts herein by the named plaintiff, 
Maryland Casualty Company, as 
a result of the operation of a 
motor vehicle by the defendant, 
Joseph Boyd, on the evening of 
Friday, July 26, 1985, on Lyn- 
nhaven Parkway in the City of 
Virginia Beach at the entrance of 
Primrose ShoppitigCenter. 

Afi ''Affidavff is'' attrchcd 
stating that due diligence has 
been used without effect to ^sper- 
tain the location of the party to 
be served, to-wit: Joseph Boyd; 
and that the last known residence 
of the party to be served was in 
the City of Virginia Beach, the 
city in which service is soiight, 
and that due diligence has been 
used without effect to ascertain 
his location; therefore, it is 

ORDERED that the said 
defendant, Joseph Boyd, appear 
on or before March 10, 1986, and 
do what is necessary to protect 
his interests. 

It is further ORDERED that 
this Order be published once a 
week for four successive weeks in 
The Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper of general circulation 
in the City of Virginia Beach. 
Enter: 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By: Phyllis N.Styron, .DC. 
I ask for this: 
Allen W. Beasley, p.q. 
1700 First Virginia Bank Tower, , 
101 St. Paul's Blvd., 
Norfolk, Virginia 23510 
James D. Hooker 
Attorney for James Frey 

229-4 4t 2-12 VB 

Office of the Commissioner of 

Accounts 

Circuit Court of the City of 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 

January 13. 1986 

Paul A. Stover, Deceased 

NOTICE is hereby given, pur- 
suant to Section 64.1-171, as 
amended. Code of Virginia, that 
the undersigned Commissioner of 
Accounts, having been requested 
by Lynda D. Stover, Ad- 
ministratrix of the Estate of Paul 
A. Stover, deceased, has appoin- 
ted the I2th day of February, 
1986, at 3:00 p.m.. at 129 S. 
Great Neck Road, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, as the time and 
place for receiving proof of debts 
and demands against the 
decedent or his estate. 
Stanley A. Phillips 
Commissioner of Accounts 
227-18 It 1-22 VB ■ 

Take notice, that on January 
24, 1986, at 10:00 o'clock a.m., 
at the premises of 4753 Virginia 
Beach Blvd.. Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, 23462, the undersigned 
will sell at public auction, for 
cash only, reserving the right to 
bid, the following motor vehicle: 

1976 Ford Gran Torino Elite, 

Serial i»G21 HI 53661 

Pembroke Auto Sales 

227-17 It 1-22 VB 

CoMlhiMd oa pi«c 10 



10 The Virginia Beach Sun. January 22, 1986 



I 



LEGAL NOTICES 



Continued from pife9 



_J 



VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 14th 
dayof January, 1986. 
In re: Name change of Megan 
Marie Clough 

By: Vivian Clough-Sheely, 
Petitioners 
To: Michael Albrecht 
Charlotte, North Carolina 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
This day came Vivian Clough- 
Sheely, Petitioner, and represen- 
ted that the object of this 
proceeding is to effect the name 
change of the above named in- 
fant Megan Marie Clough by 
Vivian Clough-Sheely, her 
mother, and affidavit having 
been made and filed that Michael 
_ Albrecht, a natural parent of said 
r child, is a non-resident of the 
^ . State of Virginia, the last known 
; post office address Jjeing: 
' Charlotte, North Carolina. 

It is therefore Ordered tha^ the 

said Michael Albrecht appear 

I before this Court within ten (10) 

I days after publication of this Or- 

I der and indicate his attitude 

^ taw-ard the propose4 name 

—f— change, or otherwise do what is 
I necessary to protect his interest in 
this matter. 

It is further Ordered that a 
copy of this Order be published 
once each week for four suc- 
cessive weeks in the Virginia 
'_ Beach Sun, a newspaper of 
" general circulation in this city.' 
A Copy Teste: 
J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By: Patti K. Bennett, D.C. 
Beverly Yeskolski, p.q. 
2301 Kenstock Drive, Suite 201 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23454 
229-6 4t 2-12 VB , 

NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 

i Virginia: 
The regular meeting of the City 
Council of Virginia Beach will be 
heard in the Council Chambers 
of the City Hall Building, 
Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia, 

' on Monday, Feb. 3, 1986, at 
2:00 p.m. at which time the 
following applications will be 
heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION: 
VIRGINIA BEACH 

BOROUGH: 

1. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of David K. Hillquist 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from B-5 Resort-Commercial ta 
H-2 Resort Hotel District on the 
Northwest corner of Atlantic 
Avenue and 4th Street on Lots 1 - 
4 and 7-9, Block 8, Ocean Lot In- 
vestment Company. Said parcels 
are located at 400 and 424 Atlan- 
tic Avenue, 205 4th Street and 
208 5th Street and contain 1.16 
acres. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance 'upon Ap- 
plication of Joseph E. and Susan 
C. Thain for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-7 
Residential District to B-4 
Resort-Commercial District on 
Lots 9, 10 and 11, Block 18, 
Shadowlawn. Said parcels are 
located at 312 Winston Salem 
Avenue and contain 13,931 
square feet. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

3. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Four Star Produc- 
tions for a CHANGE OF 
ZONIGN DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-6 
Residential District to B-2 Com- 

-it 

munity-Business District on cer- 
tain property located on the East 
side of Newtown Road, 170 feet 
more or less North of Connie 
Lane on part of Site 23, Ne\y- 
some Farms. Said parcel contains 
1.972 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. BAYSIDE 

BOROUGH. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

4. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Fred H. Rosenblum 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-8 Residential District to B- 
2 Community-Business District at 
the Southwest corner of Indian 
River Road and Ferry Point 
Jload, Said parcel is located at 
5521 Indian River Road and con- 
tains 16,988 square feet. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the I^partment 
of Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Colcon Development 
Co.. for a CHANGE OF ZON- 
ING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-3 
Central-Business District to B-4 
Resort-Commercial District on 
certain property located on the 
South side of Southern 



:: 



:: 



ii 



LEGAL NOTICES 



Boulevard beginning at a point 
450 feet East of Constitution 
Drive on Lots 74078, A. C. Jarvis 
Land. Said parcel cotnains 
10.0349 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are avail- 
able in the Department of Plan- 
ning. KEMPSVILLE 

BOROUGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of John E. Shomier, Jr. 
and Erma Young Shomier for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from .R-8 Residential District to 
B-2 Community-Business District 
on Lots 30-34, Rock Creek, 
Phase I. Said property is located 
at 1846 Salem Road and contains 
1.006 acres. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

7. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Hop-In Food Stores, 
Inc. for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for gasoline pumps in 
conjunction with a convenience 
store on certain property located 
at the Northeast corner of Cen- 
terville Turnpike and Old Ridge 
Rqad, Said parcel contains 
32,434.7 square feet. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

VIRGINIAj BEACH 

BOROUGH: 

8. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
' plication of Property Buyers, 

Inc., for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for multi-family 
dwellings in the C-1 District on 
certain property located on the 
South side of 1 9th Street, 330 feet 
more or less West of Jefferson 
Avenue. Said parcel contains 
1.817 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are avail- 
able in the Department of Plan- 
ning. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

9. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of R. Larry Turner, 
Pres., Turner & Associates for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a day care center on certain 
property located on the West side 
of General Booth Boulevard 
beginning at a point 450 feet 
more or less North of Red Mill 
Boulevard. Said parcel contains 
1.25 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of ' 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

10. Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard 
to certain elements of the Sub- 
division Ordinance, Subdivision 
for Rodney B. and Brenda J. 
Kellogg. Parcel is located at 3153 
Colechester Road. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC -«*> 
City Clerk 
227-3 2t 1-22 VB 

VIRGINIA; In the Clerk's Office 

of the Circuit Court of the City 

of Virginia"Beach, on the 3rd day 

of January, 1986 

Gilbert G. Cauwet and 

Josepha G. Cauwet, Petitioners 

vs. 

Richard Bailey, Respondent 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of the above-styled 
suit is to obtain an order from the 
Circuit Court directing the Clerk 
of said Court to enter upon the 
margin of Judgment Lien Book 
32, at Page 199, that a judgment 
obtained by respondent on Feb- 
ruary 23, 1978, against the 
petitioners has been paid and is 
discharged and released as a lien 
upon the property of petitioners. 

And it appearing by affidavit 
filed according to law that 
Richard Bailey, the above-named 
respondent, cannot be found af- 
ter the exercise of due diligence; it 
is therefore ORDERED that the 
said Richard Bailey do appear on 
or before March 14, 1986, in the 
Clerk's Office of this Court and 
do what is necessary to protect 
his interest. 

And it is further ORDERED 
that this order be published once 
a week for four successive weeks 
in the Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper having general- cir- 
culation in the City of Virginia 
Beach. 

J. Curtis Fruit, Qerk 
By Phyllis N. Styron, D.C. 
Kellafii, Pickrell & Lawler 
(Douglass W. Dewing, Esquire) 
1020 First American Bank 
Building 

Norfolk. Virginia. 23510 
225-21 4t 2-5 VB 



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CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



PERSONAL 
RATES 

itlme 
2 times 
4 times 



20 words 
or less 

$ 6.40 
11.20 
14.00 



Additional 
word s 

.32 
.56 
.70 



Run your persdnal classified ad four times for only 
$14.00 YOU can cancel your ad at any time, however, 
there can be NO refunds and NO CHANCES. 

All Classified ads run In three newspapers (Virginia Beach Sun, Chesapeake Post 
and Portsmouth Timesi. no additional charge 



Please print clearly using one word per box" 



20words 



Run my personal ad for 
Payment is enclosed ^ 



issues. 



Make check payable to ByerivPuOlications. .:-:^..,^-^. 

JMAiLfO: ciasslf iM^Box 1 527, chesap 

Name ;_ ' 



Address 
City 



.State_ 



ZIP. 



FOR HELP With your classified ad, please call 547-4571 . 



PERSONAL ADS iDust be placed 
by private individuals, com- 
mercial and business related 
ads do not qualify for 2-time 
and 4-time personal rates. 



COMBINATION RATE: Run this same personal ad 
In any other Byerly Publications newspaper 
for an additional $2.S0 one time, $4.50 two 
times, or $6.00 four times. Newspapers in 
Franklin, Emporia, lawrencevllle, Dinwiddle 
and Williamsburg Call 547-4S71 for details. 



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TO PLACE CLASSIFIED 
ADS, CALL 547-4571 



FIREWOOD 



FURNITURE 



WATERBED - King-size, brand new, 
everything with mirror headboard. 
Sacrifice $250. Call 547-73WP'"'""'"' ' -iTl. 



seat & matching chair, 
2416. 



HICKORY - tavern sofa, quality made, 
with traditional styling, blue, beige & 
rust,Jiardly used, $275. 588-5580 or 464- 

2259. 41 1-7-86 

PARTIALLY new sofa, blue, orange & 
beige, tweed, with bamboo frame. EC, 
$175,440-5689. itii 



HEALTH /NUTRITION 



ANTIQUES 



CHILD CARE 



CASH PAID FOR ANTIQUES, old fur- 
niture, glassware, china, collectables and 
old toys too. Will buy one piece or a 
houseful. Call day or niitht. 485-4659. i;n 



ADULT CARE 



NURSES AIDE - Private duty. 35 + yrs. 
exp. working with sick and elderly. Ex- 
cellent reference. Mrs. & sal. negotiable. 
393-6286. 4i 12-25 

ELDERLY CARE - Armond Whithurst 
Manor. Beautiful licensed residence for 
ladies with 24 hour quality care and per- 
sonalized attention .Call 482-3 1 28 . 4i 1 2- 1 8 



APPLIANCES 



WASHER-DRYER - Heavy duty. Ex- 
cellent working condition. Will deliver. 
$100 each. 473'«145.' 21129 



DRYER ■ Kenmore, 
$70. Call 588-1383. 



needs little work, 

II 2-25 



AUTOS 



BRONCO - '85 - loaded. Moving over 
seas. No equity. Assume lease. 464-1085. 

II 1-7 

PEUGEOT - lO-Speed, 6 mos. old. Ex- 
cejteni condition. $275. 428-1987. m i-g 
yw ■ '81 Pickup, diesel. Slick shift, 
itereo. Excellent condition. $2700. 490- 
'344. 111-8 

VW-'Sl RABBIT -Excellent condition, 
very clean, only 50,000 miles, air, 5 speed, 
fuel injection, luxury package. $4,000 or 
best offer. 484-2528. 4,24 

FORD - '82 Escort, 4 spd., 2 dr. Hatch- 
bk., AM-FM cassette; Very good con- 

dition; $3200; 583-7057. 4ii2-i8 

DODGE • 1976 Aspen, good condition. 
$1500. Call 422-%58 after 10 a.m. 41 12-18 

1981 CHEVETTE-Need good little car for 
around $2,000 - aulomalic, air, radio, 4 
door, deluxe, 65,000 miles. Call collect! 1 - 
740-8481, Richmond. Work in Ports- 
mouth, will call you back. ii 1.21 

'74 BMW -,2002, Air Cond., stereo, 
AM/FM, excellent condition. Best Offer. 
Call 547-7374 after 6 pm. Days - 397- 

7606. TFN 



BABYSITTING - Provided' in my Nor- 
view home, experienced mom/nursing 
assistant, any age/hours, $35 week. 853- 

0462. 411-14 

MOTHER OF FIVE - W/references, will 
babysit in my home near Gate 5, NAB, 
reasonable rates, naps, hoi meals, struc- 
tured time. 460-304 3. 4i^ij 

CHESAPEAKE STREET - Mothr of 3 
will babysit from 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. & 1 1 
n m. -7:30. 587-5355. 211-21 

CLEANING SERVICES | 

ALLOW THE "SUNSHINE EXPRESS" 

to get you back on the track with a clean 
and shinny start. We excel in residential 
move in-out, and small business clean- 
ning. Reasonable rates, references. 426- 
7824, 428-0556 or 460-2255. 4i2-s 

HOUSEKEEPING is a pleasure, let your 
house be my service, old fashion cleaning, 
(lid timev fee $32 per day, $60 twice a 
week. Call 479-0637 ask for "Pleasure". 

41212 

HUUSECLEANING - Resolution No. 1 
Clean up your house. Good rates, ex- 
cellent references. Call 340-8109, 420- 
8592. 11 IB 

METICULOUS about cleanina? So are 
we. We do homes, lawns. Call any hour. 
622-4253. 411-21 



WANTED - People seriously interested in 
losing weight and earning money. 468- 

0040. 412-5 

CAMBRIDGE DIET - Better than ever, 
drinks, soups and bars. 464-0589. 21 '1 -22 

BAHAMIAN DIET - Dick Gregory's 
Slim-Safe Diet is here. 523-0.307 ir 1.7? 



HELP WANTED 



DOCS 



BUSINESS EQUIPMENT 



FILING CABINETS, all sizes, new, used, 
damaged, all at good prices Budget Office 
Outfitters 943 Canal Drive 487-2202. 

1112-25 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 



MALTESE DOG - Small white dog, 
male, I year old, weighs 4 to 5 lb ■• Extra 
good with children, AKC, has shot record 
$200,428-7481. 1.1-7 

LHASA APSO PUPPIES - Both parents 
AKC registered. Born Nov. 7, also stud 
service. Call 587-8314. 4ii-2» 

DOBERMAN PINCHERS • Purebred, 
black & tan, 4 females, 3 months old. $75. 
Call 623-1546. lu^ 

I BLUE DOBERMAN -8 mos. old. AKC 
registered, needs a good home. $200. Call 
473-8425 or 499-3894. iTi-i 

LABRADOR PUPPIES - AKC, black, 
males $150, females $125. Parents on 
premises, 8 weeks old. Call 421-9165. 

412-12 

PITBULL PUPPY - 5 mos. old, male, 
good with kids, housebroken, $100. Call 
473-8425 or 499-3894. IT 1-1 



REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT 

sales$l,800 per month guaranteed salary, 
plus commission. Liberal travel allowan- 
ce. Call on commercial accounts. Local 
territory. Outstanding opportunity for 
self motivated individual. Training 
provided. For interview call 919-735- 
0031. M-f, 9-4. 111-8 

GOVERNMENT JOBS - S16,040-$59,230 
per year now hiring. Call 805-687-6000. 
Ext. R-3458 for current federal list. 

l6tl-22-8« 

1'YPISTS - S500 weekly at home! Write 
P. O. Box 975, Elizabeth, N.J. 07207. ifn 
SALESPERSONS WANTED • Hottest 
product of the decade - Pay telq)hones 
Qualified leads, 480-2128, Mr. Hussher ifn 

TEXAS REFINERY CORP. offers plen- 
ty of money plus cash bonuses, fringe 
benents to mature Individual in the Ham- 
pton Roads area. Regardless of experien- 
ce, write A.N. Byers, Texas Refinery 
Corp., Box 71 1, Fort Worth, TX 76101 . 

11 1-29 

AN OHIO OIL CO. offers high income, 
pi '/is cash bonuses, benefits to mature 
person in Hampton Roads area. Regar- 
dless of experience, write P.O. Read, 
American Lubricants Co., Box 426, 
Dayton, Ohio 45401. 111-22 

HOUSEKEEPING - And companion, 
will stay in sometime, 5 days per week. 
Call 399-8920 or 397-6554. ii 1-22 

SALESMAN • Outside sales. Establish^ 
route. Good opportunity. Must have own 
transportation. Advancement to Sales 
Manager possible. Apply in person. Male 
or female. Maturity a plus. Franklin Of- 
fice Supply. Franklin, Va. 562-7091. 21 1 22 

GOOD INCOME - Working with mail 
from home, experience unnecessary! 
Details, send self-addressed stamped en- 
velop to J. Johnson, Box 9, Harborton, 
Va. 23389. ; ifn 

RECEPTIONIST/OFFICE CLERK • 

Responsible person needed, straight 
hours, standard wage plus commission. 
Call 547-4571. tfn 



HOME IMPROVEMENT 



ARTICLES FOR SALE 



"atJSINESS iSa»PORTUNITIES" - $$$ 

MLM Information Recording 471-2407. 
Looking for ambitious people. $$$ 41 2 1; 

OWN YOUR OWN beautiful discount 
shoe store. Ladies or Children. Nationally 
known brands. 'Jordache 'Bear Traps 
'Bandolino '9 West 'Johansen *Evan 
Picone 'USA 'Pro Keds 'Child Life 
•Cherokee • Giggles and many more. All 
first quality merchandise. $15,900 ic 
$19,900 includes beginning inventory- 
training-fixtures-grand opening 
promotions and round trip air fare lor 
one. Call today. We can have your store 
opened in 15 days. Prestige Fashions 501- 
329-2362. 1.1-7 

I CAMPERS ! 

INTERNATIONAL - '86, 32', self- 
contained, air and lots of extras. $8,700. 
Mtist sell. 485-5280. 4112-it 



CHILD CARE 



BABYSIT - Day care provided, hoi 
meals. USDA program. Willoughby area. 
Call 4 80-2760. un 

CHILD CARE - Newborn and up. By 
responsible and caring woman with ex- 
cUent references, competitive rates, lots of 
TLC, Norfolk area. Call 583-7059 or 855- 
1390. 4ii2.li 



FUR COAT • Natural full length muskrai 
coat with racoon collar, size 12-14, 4 yrs. 
old, $900. 49 1-1412. mm 

STAINED GLASS - 20" x 42" $25 each. 
4-15" Chrysler rims, 4 for $60. call 397- 
5029. 211-2 1 

TELESCOPE - Meade model 2080 with 
LX drive, used 3 times with many extras, 
$800. Call 428-5207. mj 

SMALL TO MEDIUM doghouse; $35; 
545-4039. n±f 

LARGE LR MIRROW - $100. 74' Audi - 
$500, running condition, carpet 9 x 16, 
rust color, $170, washer $110 - working 
condition. 857-1964. nj » 

OLDSMOBILE - Factory spinner, 15" 
hub caps. Cost $500 will sell for $M0. 
424-6521. 411-2 

WET SUIT - Tesea, 1 pc. sleeveless, 
unused, size 54, $100. 427-3496 or 467- 

2368^ iTi-i 

VACUUM - Kirby, I '/i yrs. old; paid 
$900, seU for $300 or best offer; call 467- 
9709. ims 

PHILCO PORT. COLOR T.V. - 19". 2 
swivel rockers, I cedar chest, t bedroom 
suit, RCA floor model combination con- 
sole, cheap! 468-4368. inj4 

COMMODORE 'viC-20 computer 
w/tape drive, 2 tapes, $100; cast-iron gas 
grill, needs propane, new still in box, $35; 
video tape case. $25. 587-9337. n 12 11 



BATHROOM REMODELING 

ceramic tile, tub kits, vanities, rotted 
floors and repairs of all types. Quality 
work. 486-1377 4.1-8 



HOMES FOR SALE 



GREAT NECK - Area, twnhse, 3 bedr- . 
ms., 2'A baths, all brie, 2 yrs. old, rented. 
$76,000. 481-2800. n 12-11 

GOVERNMENT HOMES from $1 (U 
repair). Also delinquent tax property. 
Call 805-687-6000 Ext. GH-3453 for in- 
formation. 4t 12-2; 

[_ HORSES. CATTLE, ETC. 

BLACK ANGUS - Regislered bull can. 
10 months old. $250. Call 487-5652. n 1 n 
TW O YOUNG ROOSTERS - (tabic size) 
free. 547-4571 days - 482-5733 nig hts, jfa 

THOROUGHBRED - 2 year old .u.i, 
pretty mover, good manners, no -vices, 
will mature over 16 hands. $2,000. Call 
421-2363. 1,1.7 

ABRABIAfp DISPERSAL sale mare, 
gelding, & fillies. Good bloodline. Must 
sell! 421-9693. h_12^ 

i INSTRUCTIONS I 



BASKET WEAVING CLASSES - In my 

home. Cost $35, includes supplies. 460- 
9 459. in^: 

SCUBA LESSONS - A gift of adventtire - 
SculM lessons ■ Call Lynnhaven Dive, 
481-7949. 4,1.2 



LAWN & GARDEN 



1 



FIREWOOD - You cut. $40. I cm, $80. 
Easy access. Small & large quanlilics. 421- 
7588. 1.122 

OAK • 90<!'o all hardwood. Cut, split and 
seasoned. I ton pickup (1) $65. (2) $125. 

(3) $1 85, 547-0266. 4i 1-2 

FIREWOOD - All seasoned hardwood, 
split and delivered, 'A ton truckload, $65, 
fast delivery, call 721-3819, 721-5504. 



FRUIT TREES, nut trees, berry plants, 
grape vines, landscaping plant material - 
offered by one of Virginia's 'largest 
growers. Free copy 48-page Planting 
Guide-Catalog in color, on request. 
Waynesboro Nurseries Inc - Waynesboro, 
V A 22980. 411.29 



LOST AND FOUND 



PITBULL - Male, disappeared in Vepco 
area, answers to the name "Bear", $200 
reward leading to location of dog! Call 

855-2414 i.m 



MOTORCYCLES. 



ONE COUCH AND CHAIR • Deep 
Rose, excellent condition - call 488-JI678. 

'\ 1. 1-7 

FURNITURE FOR SALE - 2 piece sec- 
tional sofa, recently cleaned, good con- 
dition, 3 tier cottonwood table, call 461- 

6562. 1 1 12-18 » 

BROWN, black &.ji[hite,HeicuJoft40v«.« 
GC, $75. 468- 

1112-18 



, '78 yamaba - 73CC, good condition, 
. J15fi.ralL487-5652. __ii i!8 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 



SAXOPHONE, Bundy. Selmer, E-C, 

$400:460-3653. iti-i 



MUSIGLESSONS 



PIANO LESSONS - All ages including 
pre-schoolers. Play for your enjoyment, 
461-5366. 211-21 



POSITIONS WANTED 



VA. BEACH - Furnished studio apt. Near 
CBN, all utilities, laundry privileges. $75 
week, 424-4419. 11 1-22 



RENTALS 



ROOM FOR RENT - $55 week. Call 919- 

435-6742. 412-5 

ROM FOR RENT - Private room, semi- 
private bath, living-room, HBO, kitchen 
privileges, air conditioned and 
washer/dryer. Must see to appreciate. 
$250 month. Call 486-2092. 41 2-5 



SERVICES 



ALTERATIONS AND TAILORING - 

Done by experienced professional. Fast 
service, low rates, all work guaranteed. 
Call Dawn Kearns, 482-7289. 4i i-29 

ATTENTION SMALL BUSINESSES - 

Bookkeeping done in my home. Pick up 
and delivery. Reasonable rates. Call 
Robin at 627-8526 after 5:30. 412-05 

CAR SPARKLE SERVICE - Car wash 
and/or polish by hand at your home or 
workplace. Our mobil unit comes to you. 
Price from SIO. Including the interior. 

•' M;-aa). ifn 

DISC JOCKEY — All occasions with a 
variety of music. 15 years experience. 
Ready for holidays. For more info., con- 
tact Mr. Brook - 425-8356 or 340-3002 or 
486-0983 after 7. sn-s-at 

ALLIED VIDEO SERVICES, INC -" 

Transfer home videos and slides to video 
tap e. F ree estimates. Call 424-9757. ifn 



WANTED TO RENT 



NEW AGE MAN and gentle dog seek 
inexpensive residency. Prefer country set- 
ting. Days: 4«(l-8202. nights - 473-8635. 




N 



\ 



Be Complete. 

Pui yourself in ihe 
reader's place. If you 
were considering buying 
this iiem, «hai would you 
warn to kno«. about ii? 
Give ihe iicm's age, con- 
dition, si/e, brand name 
and any other importani 
in formal ion needed. And 
don'l forHci 10 include 
Ihe price; Ads thai lisl 
prices \sill get Classified 



•\ 



:\ 



^ 



\ 



shoppers' ailenlion first . p 

Atoid Abbresialions. 
A few accepted and 
rccoBni/abIc ab- 
bresiations arc OK. but 
an ad lull of ihcm jusi 
confuses ihc reader. They 
will go on to the nc\i ad 
rather than trsing 10 
decipher yours. A good 
rule of thumb is. "Spell it 
out or lease il out." 

Be Atiilable. 

list your telephone num- 
ber and /or address so 
that the prospect will 
know hovs loionlaci you. 
State the best hours to 
call, too— il you're not 
home when a potential 
buyer calls, chances ,irc 
ihcy will not call hack. 

Feci tree to ask lor help, 

because help Is free lor 

the asking and that's why 

we're here. Our staff are 

experienced professionals^ 

1 and thev know the inlor- 

Smation and action words 

Uihat will help make the 

Isale. Call 547-4571 for 

/help with siHir cla>.siljcd 

ad 



\ 



^ 



^ 



^^"^^^ 



♦ ♦ • # 




National Realty, Inc. 



2520GilmertonRd. 
Chesapeake, VA. 

23320 



485-5950 



/ 



CAMELOT: $62,900 spacious, 4 
bedrm, 2 bath, ranch formal living and 
-dining rm, den, attached garage. €rf" 
Thompson, 487-912.5 

HOLLY COVE: $41,900 

3 bedrm, 1 Vi bath townhome extra Ig 
master bedrm., central air, fenced yard. 
Fred Helm 420-8188. 

LOXLEY PLACE: 2 bedroom Cape 
Code, gas heat, covered patio, garage, 

.(^?5!&,<'^9°™jQ'?'??i' es^blj?hed are«, 
Les Boykin 487-3 110. 

CAMELOT: $58,500. 4 bedroom. 2 
bath Ranch. Cornur lot, Uving and 
dming rooms, garage. Some fruit trees. 
John Bateman 487-1346. 

GENEVA MOBILE HOME PARK: 

$31,500. Price includes lot plus 2 
bedroom l£x70'iiiobik home with 
den, fireplace, living room. Diane 
Crider 393-2647. 

BRAMBLETON: Residential or com- 
mercial building lot. Lot size 25' x 125'. 
Call for details. Gail Harrison, 483- 
6013. 

HOLLY COVE: $41,900. Excellent 
condition on 3 bedroom, I'A bath 
Townhome. Combination dining & 
family room, living room, covered 
patio. Dex CuUer 545-9480. 

GEORGETOWN POINT: 4 bedroom, 
2H bath Stucco Spanish home. Game- 
room, den, fireplace. Some owner 
financing available. Clarence Pegram 
424-3504. 

N. INGLESIDE: $59,500. 3 bedroom, 
l'/4 bath Ranch. Living room, den, 
fireplace, gas heat. Large fenced lot, 
deUched garage. Frank Brown 485- 

3473. 

TIMBERLAKE: $58,900. Seller will 
pay $1,000 of closing costs on 3 
bedroom 1 Vi bath Townhome. Living 
& dining room, central air, fireplace. . 
Vicki Ford 543-5062. 



904 Kempsville Rd. 

Suite 105 

Virginia Beach, VA. 

2340- 

495-6700 



POPLAR HALLS: 4 bedroom, 2 bath 
Tri-lfvel. Gas heat, den, attached 
'' garageT'cbnv'enient location. Ray 
Wallace 488-5 11 7. 

CATHAM HALL: $79,900. 3 
bedroom, 2'/2 bath Contemporary. 
Owner will consider financing. Living 
room, attached garage, heat pump. Doc 
Vitelli 420-1293. 

PARK PLACE: $47,900 - New 3 
bedrm, I '/i bath, colonial, living rm, 
""thermal wShdaws, wair'lo'waircafpefr 
Edith White 466-8460 

BROOKWOOD: $68,000. Spacious 4 
bedroom, 1 '/i bath Ranch. Large fen- 
ced yard, den, living room. Very 
fiexible seller. Cindy Sanford, 463- 
5020. 

BRAMBLETON: $36,500. Duplex, 
with 1 bedroom, each unit. Stove, 
refrigerator, gas space heat. GREAT 
INVESTMENT! Hazel Hearne 463- 
0889. 

TIMBERLAKE: $49,999 - Sellers will 
pay $1,000 closing cost on 2 bedrm 
townhome, living rm, fireplace, central 
air, storage shed. Beth Munson, 474- 
0162. 

CAMELOT: 4 bedroom, 2 bath Ranch. 
Living & dining rooms, 2 dens, wood- 
burning furnace, fenced. Doc Vitelli, 
420-1293. 

LAKE CHRISTOPHER: $95,900. 
Priced below VA appraisal. 4 bedroom, 
2 bath Contemporary. Living & dining 
rooms, den, fireplace, 2 car garage. 
Professionally landscaped corner lot. 
Ray Wallace 488-51 17. 
LINDALE: $97,000. SeUer wiU pay 
some closing costs on 3 bedroom, 2 
bath brick Ranch. Living & dining 
rooms, den, fireplace, detached garage. 
MANY EXTRAS!! Cindy Sanford 463- 
5020 

EASTON PLACE: $83,430. SHOW 
CASE CONDITION!! 3 bedroom, 2 
bath Traditional. Gas heat, fireplace, 
living & dining rooms, 1 '/i car garage. 
Pdith White 466-8460. 



EXPERT 
1AXHELP 




B.L.MOORE 

TAX PRACTITIONER 

Suite 210-5541 Parliament Dr. 
Virginia Beach, Va., 23462 



Individual-Partnership & 

Corporate Returns Prepared 

Financial Statements 

Prepared Year Round 



For Appointment Call: 

497-4788 



T= 



kr 



ADDED 

TOUCH 
BUSINESS 
SERVICES 

•VPECIAUZlfK! IN REUABIUnr 

Individual & 

Small Business 

Tax Service 

13 Yean Bjptrienct In 

Total Offict Strvict 

4510 Holluid Office Park 

Viixinia Beach, VA 23462 

499-3721 



AnENTION AU 

1040A&1040EZ 

FILMS I 

IWi BLOCK 

Will File Your Federal 

and Virginia Returns 

FOR ONLY 

$19.00 

48 HOUR SERVICE 
CALL: 

461-1968 



DUNSTON TAX SERVICE 

Joseph L. Stone, EA 
Proprietor 

Personal Tax Returns 
By Appointment Only 

101 Mt. Pleasant Road. 
(Great Bridge) 

Phone:482-2360 



William L. Deford. CPA 

Income Tax Service & Bookkeeping 

482-1410 



Place your Ad 

here 
Call Gloria at 

397-7606 



RICARDO, INC. 
REALTORS 



1lll9'r«#1hierMtl 
547-45SS 

331 JONIMTeWIIKeAB 
CNMAMMUCI,VA 



PLVMOURH PARK: 49,900 VA ap- 
praised. No money needed, VA. Lovely 
3BR wi(h 2 story workshop/garage. 
Jean Arsement 482-4400. 

GREAT BRIDT.F 

Middle Oaks: $7.1,500, Almost new 
brick Colonial townhome, 2'A kbaihs; 
super area. Jean Arsemeni. 482-4400. 

Norcova Estates: $84,900. Roomy brick 
'-^P£i!-S;„2aJftfW4fmJcligH,aittveni€ni to 
Greenbrier Mall. Ralph Cales 482-3418 
or Belly Sholes 421-7763. 

Pines of Warrick: $119,900. Fabulous 
4BR Dutch Colonial in elite wooded 
area, lots of amentieis. Shirley Clayton, 
482-3646. 

.™„. NEW HOME SPEC! aIs 
EVA GARDENS: From $62,900! 
Brand new homes going fast no^ with 
lots of custom features. Dennis Register 

547-3015. 

ETHERIDGE MEADOWS: $89,900! 
Super value. Custom 4BR brick ranch 
by Heclit Construction, energy saving 
features, move in now. Closiiig Costs 
paid less PPOS ?rene Capps 421-7350. 

POPLAR RIDGE SOUTH: From the 
$89,000! Popular Hearndon built 
homes in this fast growing area. 
Wooded section open. Model open 
daily 1-5. Tom Seddon 547-1616. 

ETHERIDGE WOODS: From 
$112,900. New section now open. 
Executive 4 BR homes, several styles 
available, choose your lot and home, 
now. Only21eft. Open weekends 1-5. 
Ken Bowden 482-4737. 

FOXGATE QUARTER: $124,900. 2 to 
choose by Wynn Const. Unique ranch 
and 2 story, 2 tfar garages, lots of 
amenities Less Closing costs paid less. 
PPDS. Pam Biittner 482-3335. ' 

MT. PLEASANT HEIGHTS: 102,900. 
28x 72 4BR ranch, marble vanities, wet 
bar and more. Help on Closing Costs. 
Mary Roach 482-5 183. 



GREEN RUN - In Virginia 
Beach, all adults, 1 , 2 and 3 
bedroom apartments. 
Heat and hot water included. 
Pines Apt. 468-2000. 



MixOUMAIM 

■iiwi«MitaS(.s>n<!at,va. 

NcwOBKIHoiilllll 
<*«■ ft* MD to » PM Sth. , (o 5 FIM. 



627-8944 



S39-3434 



1984 FORD BRONCO 4x4: 2 tone 
paint, automatic, power steer, air con- 
ditioned, tilt, cruise, captain's chairs, 
one owners, perfect. $1 1 ,499. 
19S3 FORD RANGER: 4 wheel drive, 
air conditioned, stereo/tape, 2 tone 
paint, wheels. Avg. retail $7,400 sale 
price $6700. Save $700. 
1984 FORD MUSTANG: Hatchback, 
automatic, power steering, air con- 
dition, stereo, tilt wheel. Avg. retail 
$6825, sale price $6226. Save $600. 

1983 FORD LTD: 2 tone, automatic, 
power steering, air conditioning, tilt, 
cruise, power windows, stereo., Avg. 
retail $6450, sale price $5700. Save 
$750. 

1984 DODGE DAVTONA: 'Turbo', 
loaded with options, leather, 
stereo/tape, one owner $9875. 

1984 MERCURY LYNX: Station 
Wagon, automatic, power steering, air 
conditioning, stereo, only 12,000 miles. 
Avg. retail $6250. sale price $5650. Save 
$600. 

1982 MERCURY CAPRI: Coupe. 4 
speed, power steering, stereo tape, 
sunroof, economical and sporty. Avg. 
retail $4575, sale price $3800. Save 
$775. 

1984 FORD. MUSTANG GT: 5 speed. 
Turbo, stereo/cassette, air con- 
ditioning, power windows, power locks, 
tilt aluminum wheels. $8500. 

1981 OLDS CUSTOM CRUISER: 
Station Wagon, full sized luxury, 
loaded with equipment, wire wheels, 
diesel. Avg. retail $4850, sale price 
$3200. Save 1650 

1982 FORD ESCORT: Sution wagoit, 
GL, power steering, streo, cruise con- 
trol, luggage rock, squire package. Avg. 
retail $4675, sale price $4,300. 




DRAFTING SERVICES 

CUSTOM HOUSf DESIGN, ADDITION AND 
RENOVATION PLANS, SURVEY DRAfTING 



RRYr_Lgr.MORN I 



461-7736 



Amusement Games Sale 

Excellent For Home Game Rooms 

Video Gines - $99.** - Asteroids. 

Missile Command, Stralovox. 
$149." • Moon Cresia, Space Invadcn. 

Baltlezone, Zaxxon. 
PinlMll Gaines ■ S199.'* - Tine Warp, 
( ounlDown, ft P«r*ton. 
»Se.**Jake(Mnes 



CaJI-488-2S12 



The Virginia Beach Sun, January 22, 1986 1 1 



RhtxfesF^dtyLtd 

22U Battlefield Boulevard. South 
Chesapeake. VA 23320 • 482-4771 



(ireat Bridge: $73,000 - Brick ranch on 
1." X 200 lot, 3 bedrooms. Frances 
Hedge 547-1 173. 

Poplar Ridge: Choose from 3 brick ran- 
ches, 3 or 4 bedrooms, large lots', one/ 
inground pool, great price. Call Don 
Irby 547-3956. 

Wllshn Heighls: $99,500 - Lots of 
space! 3 full baths! Brick ranch in 
prestigious neighborhood. Formal 
dining room. Dalton/Bever^ Edge 482- 
5185. _..,,._,.„.,„.„ 

Vlt'ilson Heiglils: $109,500 - Owner 
anxious to sell this 5-bedroom brick 
fane; D0imTrBy7547;395S: 



Oak Manor: $79,000 - Charm with 
economy. Spacious rooms with 
scpjened porch, large wooded lot. Joyce 
l5ryanl, 485-2874. 

<""■«»! Bridge: S14SJ5Q0.: 20x40 pooj,3. 
acres, mother-in-law .suite, 2-story dut- 
ch colonial. Karen Gaskins, 482-5580. 

Deep Creek: $59,000 - Great area with a 
great price. 3 bedrooms, brick ranch, 
garage. Joyce Bryant 485-2874. 

Poplar RidgcSoulh: $99,800 - Owner 
anxious to sell. Will pay $1,200 of 
buyer's closing costs. 4 bedroom brick 
ranch. John Patgorski, 482-5822. 

Brentwood: $77,500 ■ lots of .space, 
reasonable price. 4 bedroom home in 
nice neighborhood. Corner lot. Jennie 
Draper, 487-7381. 

Great Bridge: New 2-story colonial, 
ready to move into. Builder pays closing 
cost. John Patgorski, 482-5822. 

Great Bridge: 4 bedroom. Cape Code 
located on 1 acre. Close to schools, 
shopping center, interstate. Call Joan 
Kistler. S47.n090, 

Wilson Heights: Williamsburg detail 
throughout this elegant home. 4 
bedrooms, formal dining and lots more. 
Vicki Carmean 487-8156. 



CALL THE 

EXPERTS! 



For Help With That 
Important Project... 

To place ad 
Call 547-4571 




GENERAL & FAMILY DENTISTRY 



.■* isKO'Mmjti^t, '' jcx<syffJf Jt ■' 



^^PPINESSJS A HEALTHY MOUTH 



•Albert P. Solomon D.D.S. 
• Alan G. Forbes D.D.S. 
General & Farmfy Dentisty 

Greenbrier Sq., Suite 2E 

1324N. Battlefield Blvd. 
Office 547-2171 Ans. Service 625-0561 




TRAVEL 



YOUR HOMETOWN TRAVEL PROFESSIONAL! 

• Free Perjonil Deliveries * C™'"' 

• Computerized Airtine Ticketing • Exotic Vacations' 

• Passport 4 Visa Assistance * Hotel Reservations. Rental Can 

• Business Meeting Planrting 'Never A Service Charge 

OVER 35 YEARS COMBINED EXPERIENCE 

420-7705 

S-T-R-E-T-C-H 
YOUR TRAVEL DOLLAR 






2()<H Old Grocnhncr Road - Suite 102 



FIREPLACES 



CAR CARE 



* 



GEOROETOWJl 
POINT ; 

Home sites for sale 

for 

People Planning 

Home A Custom 

^Builders 

SALES OFFICE 

333 Providence Rd. 

CALL 464-9317 



FIREPLACE REPAIR 
& INSPECTION 

Also masonry work of all 
types. Free estimates, 
quality work. 486-1377 



CARSPARKLE CAR POLISHING 

Car-Sparkle Service- 
Car wash and/or polish by hand 
at your home or workplace, our 
mobile unit comes to you. Priced from 
$10, including the interior. 

547,2820 



■tr, tn'"",' 



■o^^..' nf- 



T 



HOME REPAIRS 



ENTERTAINMENT 



I-- 



MARKS ROOFING 

Specializing in Roof Patching 

All Work and Materials 

Guaranteed 

Stop Most All Leaks 

^For Only $79.95 583-9168 



Attention Moms ' 

Birthday Coping Up? A new party 
theme? Wh/not hire my party ponys 
for the ev*it? They're delivered to 
your backyard. 

Reasonable rates. 464-0953 



Properties Unlimited 

Commercial Real Esate 

Marvin Goldfarb 
•3431 High Street 
399-8390 



MARVING COIN HOME 

IMPROVEMENT 

Roofing and Home Repair. Res- 
idential, Commercial. Free esti- 
mates. LOW OVERHEAD CUTS 
COST. 4K-5655 



Disc Jockey 

The Night Crawler 
Can do "Wolfmanjack" 

For All Occasions 

For more information • Call 

431-0077 



David R. Copley 
Real Estate Counselor 




Me! 



428-781 1 -Of. -499-4453 -H. 



Atlantic Realty 
2Sth A Pacific 



BATHROOM REMODELING 

Vanity, Vinyl Floors, Shower 
Enclosure. Repairs of all types. 
Quality Work. 
486-1377 



$2.50 OFF PER WEEK 

Ptano lessons - niitar. bws, piaM. 

Call 490-1653 
Peel & Tollison Whse. 



CABINETS 



Opportunity available in sales 

and management; average 

income for sales rvpresentlves 

In excess of ^5,000. 




Best Kitchen 

Old work, New work 

Old cabinets that need a 

facelift. 

547-9667 



SCREEN PRINTING 

SCREENPRINTING 

Sweats, T-shirts, golf shirts 

One dozen minimum. 

CRUZIN GEAR 

495-1102 



Contact Larry R. Coley fon 
confidential interview at 
490-1947. 



BIRDS 



SECURITY 




ChesVa Aviary 

Retail & by Appointment 

Paralteeis & Cockateils 

After 4 p.m. 

420-4739 

L ow Prices 



KEY SECURITY GUARD 
SERVICES 

Armed and Unarmed 
24 HR. SEXVKX. REAS(»^iABLE 
RAIES. CAIX MON.-iia. 94. 
625-5333 



Norview Coin Shop 

buying and Selling Gold 

and silver coins. 

Stamps. 

42 Southern Shopping Center 

Norfolk 853-8118 


. 






ANNOUNCING THE OPENING 
OF THE PRACTICE OF 

JOHN L. GRANT, M.D. 

?u(mcE imnw to N&mwGiCAL surgery 

4041 TAYLOR ROAD 

SUITE F 

CHESAPEAKE, VA 23321 

483-0002 






STEEL BUILDINGS 

40X75XI2i. $3.21 Ft. 

40X100X14 $2.97 Ft. 

50X100X12 $2.89Ft. 

60X100X12 $2.69 Ft 

70X100X12. $2.55 Ft. 

100X100X12 $2.45 Ft. 

. Allied Steel: l-8<K)-635-4l4l 
Allied Steel Buildings, Inc. 
3975-C Lawrenceville Highway 
Tucker. Georgia, 30084 





^«i|WV> 



^t^^^^g^^^mt^^^mme^^^ 



12 The Virginia Beach Sun, January 2?, 1986 



Cahiirs City Council Corner 



Council amends 
no-wake ordinance 

City Council amended its 
no-wake ordinance to prohibit 
wakes "that are capable of 
causing damage" to other boats 
or vessels or to bulkheads, piers 
or shorelines. 

City Manager Thomas H. 
Muehlenbeck said that the 
present city code had no 
guidelines or criteria for the 



establishment 
zones. 



of TiO-wake 



Henley unhappy 
with legislation 

Pungo Councilwoman Bar- 
-bara Metilcymkedihe eiryitaff 
to closely follow the progress of 
the bill being introduced in the 
General Assembly that would 
allow mobile homes in 
agriculturally-zoned land 
prohibiting regulation by the 
local government. She also 
suggested that council adopt a 
resolution protesting the 
proposed legislation. 



Mobile vending 
may be peraiitted 

For the first time this summer 
the city may permit mobile ven- 
ding units at the resort strip. 

Bathers and pedestrians 
would have easy access to 
snacks, such as New York 
sausages, ice cream, candy and 
ices from the units which are 
being proposed by the Resort 
Area Advisory Commission 
(RAAC) to contribute to the 
festive spirit of the oceanfront. 

RAAC has suggested four 
units be permitted on an ex- 
perimental basis this summer 
from May 1 through Sept. 15, 
one each at the newly- 



constructed stub street parks at 
13th, 14th and 20th Street and 
the Norwegian Lady Plaza at 
25th Street. 

Mike Barrett, assistant to the 
city manager for resport ac- 
tivities, said that while the 
program has received no over- 
whelming support from Ocean- 
front proprietors, neither has it 
had overwhelming opposition. 

The franchise agreement 
between the city and the vendor 
would control the vending units 
which would be required to, be 

i.fiOJi:iable. non-motorized catls,,, 
displaying colorful motif with 
umbrellas or canopies and 

-^^pro p e rly at tired attendants. ' 



The city would control the 
size and the area where ttle unit 
would operate arid would 
require disposal of litter by the 
vendor. 

" -"A 'ptT-Wdder's conference is " 

scheduled at commission 
headquarters, 302 22nd Street 
at 10 a.m. March 3. 

Operating hours would be 
from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily 
except from May 1-22 when the 
units will be open only on week- 
ends. 

A resolution approving the 
program will be considered by 
City Council. Tim Barow, 
commission chairman, said the 
carts will make an important 
contribution to the overall 
resort program. He said council 
already has approved outdoor 
cafes which will provide quality 
service. The carts, he said, will 
replace the proliferation of 
vending machines on every cor- 
ner and offer an opportunity 
for providing convenient ser- 
vices. 

Councilxyoman Meyera 
Oberndorf recalled that ap- 
proximately 10 years ago a 
young man working his way 
through college met resistence 
from the restaurant interests 
when he wanted to operate a 
mobile unit. 

She said she. did not think 
there would be any type of con- 
flict with the present businesses. 



Police firing range . 
must be relocated 

■J Residential development 
nearby is forcing the Police 
Department to relocate its 
^ firing range. 

City Manager Thomas H. 
Muehlenbeck as proposed that 
■ the range be relocated from its 
, present site at the foot of Leroy 
Drive off Seaboard Avenue to 
the city-owned Creeds airfield. 
He said that the cost of 
,,„j;elacaiiagahe^to^t would be 
the same as the cost of altering 
the present range to avoid en- 
danpnfig^ future residenTs^T 
the Foxfire project. 

The Capital Improvement 
Budget includes a $272,550 
allocation for the changes at the 
present location whiih include 
" ToTaTin''g ""IWe ' T0-p6s i f i b h 
weapons firing range 90 degrees 
toward undeveloped, city- 
owned property. 

Muehlenbeck pointed out 
that some of the homes will be 
built within 100 feet of the 
range where they will be subject 
to noise and the possibility of 
ricocheting ammunition. 

Police Chief Charles Wall 
said the site, which contains 
260.04 acres, could also serve 
other pQblic safety programs 
such as the K-9 Corps, helicop- 
ter operations, and training 
classes. 

Councilwoman Barbara 
Henley said that when 
development started at Foxfire, 
she knew something would have 
to be done. She asked that a 
public hearing be scheduled 
immediately to explain the 
project to the area residents. 
The proposaF has possibilities 
and noted also that the animal 
control facility in the residen- 
dial development may also have 
to be relocated. 

Wall said th? police would 
use a maximum of 50 acres. 



City releases 
demographic stats 

More than 21,000 persons 
. were added to the population of 
Virginia Beach in 1985. accor- 
ding to figures just released by 
the city's Planning Department. 
The current total population 
for Virginia Beach is estimat^ 
at 343,200. 

The Building Permits Office 
has also released the latest 
figures for the number of 
residerrtial nmts-HocatC' 
Virginia Beach. More than 
7,000 units were added in 1985^ 
bringing the number of housing 
units to a total of 123,955. 

Council to hold 
breakfast meeting 

City Council will have a 
breakfast meeting with the 
School Board at 7:30 a.m. Feb. 

7. • 



Newsweek 

Continued from page 3 
the funds to the school,, plan- 
ned for a site south of Lyn- 
nhaven Parkway near Indian 
River Road. 

School Superintendent E. E. 
Brickell told the board that the 
school system ended up getting 
$1.57 million more than expec- 
ted in impact aid funds. Impact 
aid funds compensate school 
systems for educating children 
of federal and military families 
who work at local non-tax 
paying facilities. 

E. Carlton Bowyer, assistant 
superintendent for operational 
services, said nearly all that 
money would be needed to pay 
for design changes to Salem 
High, made because of ad- 
ditional demands on the high 
school curriculum. 



City planning second 
annual play competition 



This year's Second Annual 
One-Act Competition, sponsored 
by the Virginia Beach Parks and 
Recreation Department's Per- 
forming Arts Unit, includes three 
original award winning one-act 
plays from across the country. 

Emertainmeiit 

"Growin' Pains" tells of a 
shop owner who takes a protec- 
tive interest in a teenage boy. 
Together they learn about loving 
and living. 

TW«-eharacter study will be 
directed by Shirley Hurd, who 
was the as sistant directo r in 
"Ricfiar^nr^^of The 1985 
Shakespeare By-The-Sea 
Festival. Her television and film 
credits include "Lady MacBeth" 
for BBC Scotland and CBN's 
"Another yfe." 

"A HalTof a Heavenly time," 
by Matthew Witten, is a farcical 
comedy with a dash of "Twilight 
Zone" atmosphere. The two 
main characters are dead, and 
they are trying to decide what to 
do in their after-liveS. 

Cameron Dye will direct this 
comical play. Dye graduated 
from the University of Virginia 
with a degree in lighting design 
and has worked with the Virginia 
Stage Company as master elec- 
trician/lighting designer. 

Dye came to work for the Per- 



forming Arts unit in 1980 as 
lighting designer/production 
iiianagci , and he dircclod "Soim.- f 
thing Blue" in the Kempsville 
PJayhouse's 1984. One-Act Com- •« 
petition. • ' 

"The Tears of Gml" centers , 
on the conflict of breaking away 
from a secure past. This sensitive 
and touching play reveals the 
complex relationship between a 
woman in her thirties and her 70- 
year-old grandmother. 

Robert Nelson will direct this 
poetic one-act. ' Nelson is 
managing director of the Virginia 
V a44©y".."' Thaalte. . ..« Aad», „ h a s 
choreographed stage combat and 
taught acting and makeup work- 
shops in the Virginia Tubtic 
iSchools. He directed "The Pinch 
Hitter" in the Kempsville Play- 
house's 1982 One-Act Com- 
petition. _ 

Scheduled £erformance dates ^ 
areFnSaKTan.lTancTSatuFaayr ' 
Feb. 1 at 8 p.m., and Sunday 
Feb. 2 at 3 p.m. All three plays 
will be performed at each 
showing and will be held at the 
Kempsville Playhouse. 

Plays may contain subject mat- 
ter not suitable for young audien- 
ce members. 

Admission is free and reser- 
vations are not required.v Large 
groups (10 or more) may want to 
call ahead. 

For information call Anne 
Hicks, 495-1892. 



ArtSaturdays program 
offered for children 



The Virginia Beach Arts Cen- 
ter is sponsoring ArtSaturdays, a 
February and March winter 
program of art activities for 
children ages seven to 12, begin- 
ning Saturday, Feb. 1 . 

This program is speciaHy 
designed to promote creativity 
and imagination in children 
through artmaking outlets which 
are fun and constructive. 

All classes take place on Satur- 
days in February and March at 



the Arts Center's studios. 
Children sign up for a month of 
ArtSaturdays at a cost of $25 per 
child, which includes all 
materials. The hours are 10:30 
a.m. to noon for children ages 
seven to nine; noon to 2 p.m. for 
children ages 10 to 12. 

Deadline for registration is 
January 27. Call or stop by tjie 
Arts Center, 1711 Arctic Avenue, 
425-0000. 




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TheViyginia 

60th Year, No. No. 5, Virginia Beach, Va. « ^^*-f^ lAVrt/M,-^ D^^^i. *o ; 




\M 



■^1 



1 ' 



Virginia Beach 's Newspaper 



25C 



Language barriers 
borkeninESL 



By Cheryl Martin 

Staff Writer 

Reading street signs or taking a 
trip to the grocery store does not 
present a challenge for most 
Virginia Beach residents. For 
non-English speaking members 
of the ctMumtinity; • however , 
these tasks can be a major ordeal. 

" I thi nk you are only able^to 

learn a language by being in the 
country," Christiane 

Thomaschki said. "In school in 
Germany I studied English and 
my grade would be comparable 
to a B. I thought I would be able 
to speak a little bit of English - 
when 1 got here. I got to the im- 
migration office in New York. I 
was overwhelmed . " 

Thomaschki, who came here to 
spend a year with her aunt, said 
she came with the intention of 
improving her English. She con- 
sidered attending a local college, 
but really wanted something less 
expensive. Then she discovered 
the English-as-a-Second- 
Language program (ESL) offered 
by the Adult Learning Center 



(A.L.C.) of Virginia Beach 
Public Schools. 

Thomaschki enrolled in the 
program in September. She said 
she is very impressed with the 
program and that her English has 
greatly improved. 

"I am very happK «enousiy. 1 
really like the school system and 
the teaching atmosphere," 
Thomaschki said . "There is hot a 
lot of stress here. It is, how do 
you say it, a leisure atmosphere. 
It has helped improve my English 
very much. It is a chance four 
hours a' day to speak only 
English. We have to t)ecause we 
(the students) are all from dif- 
ferent countries." 

There are four "Rs" in the 
ESL program— reading, writing, 
listetiing and speaking. They are 
dealt with at each of the four skill 
levels, according to Margaret 
Kierman, a teacher in the 
program. 

Students who are lacking in 
Qne or all of these skills are 
placed in Level I. Some may only 

See LANGUAGE, page 8 




Kyong Campbell, an ESL student, concentrates on her lessons. 



Residents 
angered by 
realignment 

ByLeeCahili 

City Council Reporter 

Residents of Indian River 
Road packed City Council cham- 
bers, but most left disappointed, 
some angry, over the realignment 
of the road finally adopted by 
■eottneit;-™ " " 

The 7-4 decision of council 
means that two residents ^yill lose 
their homes and others wilt lose~ 
the greater portion of their front 
yards. 

What the residents resented 
most was that after considering 
various plans since June of last 
year, council approved one fhaf^ 
was revealed to the public only 
last Thursday. 

The plan, however, is actually 
a combination of the others. 

"We spend six months and 
they come up with a hybrid with 
no discussion," said Marie Dill, 
of the 4200 block of Elbow Road . 

Dill's home will not be affec- 
ted. She was accompanying her 
neighbor, Evelyn W. Clark, also 
of the 4200 block of Elbow Road, 
whose property will be affected. 

See RESIDENTS, page 10 




More revising planned for 
Conflict of Interest ordinance 



ByLeeCahili 

city Council Reporter 

Final adoption of a Conflict of 
Interest ordinance for Virginia 
Beach has been postponed for at 
least six weeks. 

The time is to be used to 
evaluate three proposals, conden- 
sing them into one document for 
City Council's consideration. 

The proposals include; 

•The ordinance presented by 
the Ethics Committee. 

•That same ordinance with 
changes proposed by City Attor- 
ney Dale Bimson's Office. 



•A much briefer (one page) or- 
dinance drawn up by Councilman 
Robert G. Jones. 

Under a motion approved 
unanimously by City Council af- 
ter a three-hour discussion, the 
Ethics Committee was requested 
to study the ordinances and to 
present a single version by the 
end of the two weeks. At that 
time, a committee composed of 
two council members will be 
given the ordinance to study for 
possi ble changes , and atlowing. 
time for study by council, the or- 
dinance should be back on the 



council agenda within 30 days. 

Speakers before council 
requested a deferral because of 
the brief time (a few days at 
most) they had to consider the 
city attorney's changes. 

Disagreement over the city at- 
torney's changes was directed 
chiefly at: ' 

•The deletion of a section on 
standards of ethical conduct 
which was described by Bimson 
as being "vague, overbroad and 
unenforceabfe." "Wftar woufcf 
you have done with the Ten 



Suite A- 1 04— a place 
Jaycees now call home 



Music in Motion members DeShelle Perry, 15, Christy Montuaro, 12 and Kel Breslin, 14 are "Villlages" in 
the upcoming performance of "The Lotus Tree." 

Beach students put on 
their dancing shoes 



By Cheryl Martin 

Staff Writer 

"Great, terrific, overwhelmed, 
privileged and all the great words 
you can think of," is how 14- 
year-old-dancers, Kel Breslin and 
Juan "Tony" Moore described 
their opportunity to study and 
dance with professional dancers 
Nancy Thuesen, with the Dennis 
Wayne Dancers and Kenneth 
Hughes, formerly with the 
American Ballet Theatre. 

The Virginia Beach youths are 
members of the newly reformed 
dance troupe. Music in Motion of 
Virginia. The company's first of- 
ficial performance will be at the 
Pavilion on Saturday, Feb. 1 at 8 
p.m. 

Music in Motion is a national 



organization with seven com- 
panies throughout the United 
States. It is open to dancers ages 
eight to 18. The concept of the 
organization is to provide quality 
instruction for dance students 
where they live. 

Music in Motion as originated 
in Virginia Beach in 1965 or 1966 
by Barbara Thuesen, who now 
runs a chapter in New York. All 
of the other Music in Motion 
companies are run by her former 
stodents. 

Thuesen, who is a professional 
dancer and choreographer, said 
what inspired her to form the 
group was the fact that students 
who were serious about studying 
dance often couldn't find good 
professional training where they 



lived. This meant that to study 
dance the students were forced to 
leave home to study in large dan- 
ce centers like New York. 

"I was faced with the situation 
myself," Thuesen said. "My 
daughter, Nancy, wanted to be a 
dancer. My husband was 
stationed here in Virginia ^ach, 
so we couldn't pick up the family 
and move to New York where 
she would have good teachers. 
Nor did I want to send her off on 
her own and I couldn't leave my 
husband and son to go with her." 

Thuesen's solution to the 
problem was to form her own 
company. Thus Music in Motion 
was born. 

The company's philosojjhy 

Sec DANCING, |M«tB 



By Cheryl Martin 

Staff Writer 

Thp Virginia Beach Jaycees 
finally have a place they can call 
home. 

For the past seven or eight 
years the organization has rented 
meeting and office space in the 
Pembroke Manor Civic Center. 
It was their's to use for meetings 
two nights a week. They were 
also provided with a small office 
spMice where they "could store 
their goodies," according to 
Mark Roth, Jaycee president. 

The new meeting house/office, 
Suite A-104 in the Holland 
Commerce Park Complex, 468 S. 
Independence Blvd., is the 
Jaycees' to use 24 hours a day, 
365 days a year. 

A grand opening celebration is 
planned for Tuesday, Feb. 25. 

Roth said that Michael Katsias 
and R. G. Moore have been in- 
strumental in helping the 
organization obtain the meeting 
place. 

He feels that having a place at 
their disposal all the time will 
help the chapter to function more 
like a business. With 220 mem- 
bers, communication can be a 
problem. Roth said. He feels the 
central location will help improve 
this and other aspects of the 
organization. 

One of the first tasks for the 
Jaycees, upon settling in, will be 
to modernize their record keeping 
and mailings, according to Roth. 
A computer donated by Vansant 
& Geisler Co. and a photo-copier 
from the M. Katsias Realty Co. 
mil aid them in updating their 
roster and other projects. 

"An organization as large as 
ours in a city the size of Virginia 
Beach needs a meeting place of its 
own to better serve the members 
and the community," Roth said. 
"It will definitely improve com- 
munication between the members 
and raise the image of the 
organization in the eyes of the 
community. I think a bright, new 



atmosphere will also serve as an 
inspiration to the members." 

While the rent is a little higher 
for the new office than it was in 
the civic center. Roth said the 
value of what they are getting is 
much greater. 

The goal of the Jaycees, which 
is open to men and women bet- 
ween the ages of 18 and36,is to 
provide leadership training and 



community development. The 
organization uses a triangle con- 
cept. Roth said. The sides of the 
triangle are the areas of develop- 
ment—individual, community 
and management. In the center of 
the triangle are the members. 

"The reason for cutting off 

membership at age 36 is to give 

young people a chance to gain 

See JAYCEES, pqe 12 




*««li 





Snow comes to Beach 

Snow fell in Virginia Beach this weel(, turning everything into a winter 
wonderland. 



rmmm 



2 The Virginia Beach Sun, January 29, 1986 



TmnWm i Tfif l TlWTBTTffnT l JirT^jj^ 



EdMlm 



smmammam 






w iiit M iilii 



Law trades conflicts 

The proposed conflict-of-interest law in Virginia 
Beach could create another set of conflicts for 
several City Council members. 

The proposed ethics law would require City 
Council members to disclose annually the names of 
clients or customers to whom they sell services of 
more than $10,000 or materials of more than 
$30,000. 

They would also have to disclose the names of 
clients or customers from who they have received 
fees or commissions of more than $250 if that client 
or customeORRSars before^^^^ 

But certain professions like lawyers, denliMs, 
bankers^and funeral directors, all of which are 
represented on council, are bound by professional 
codes of ethics that require confidentiality of 
patient or client records. 

Faced with this situation, what should a council 
member ^o?- Bfeak - a— clJent's Jionfideflcg „..Qr_„ 
withhold information from the public? 

Some claim that such disclosures are vital to 
ethics law. That, for example, the identification of 
major clients of lawyers is especially important 
because of the ease with which the interest of one's 
clients can be confused with public interest. 

They contend further that the names of clients 
could be disclosed without breeching confidence as 
long as the substance of the communication 
remains confidential. 

If the council member or the professional 
association he belongs to doesn't view disclosure in 
this manner, what should he do? 

Some may say that if the members cannot resolve 
their private and public conflicts then they should 
not serve on council. On the surface this argument 
appears quite valid, but what if it results in the lack 
of competent candidates for council? Is the public's 
best interest really being served? 

Another way to resolve the conflict would be to 
hire full-time council members. 

Take for example, Montgomery County, 
Maryland, which has a similar conflict-of-interest 
law. The seven-member council is full-time. They 
are paid $35 ,000 per year. 

Virginia Beach council members are part-time 
and make $15,000 per year. If Virginia Beach chose 
to swfteh- <oi4t-ftiIMiine council and paid them 
$35,000 per year it would cost the city ah additional 
$220,000 per year. 

Aside from financial considerations, another 
question is whether Virginia Beach really needs 
fuUtime council members. Montgomery County is 
about twice as large as Virginia Beach in 
population. 

The conflict-of-interest ordinance in Virginia 
Beach was sent back to the Mayor's Ethics Com- 
mittee, which wrote the proposal, for amendments. 

Among .the changes recommended is a 
requirement that officials let a standing ethics 
committee decide when professional confidentiality 
takes precedence over public disclosure. 

Hopefully the committee can resolve this issue in 
a manner that will serve both the council members' 
professional ethical standards and the public's right 
to know. 

The ethics law needs to be accurate, but it also 
needs to be implemented. Delays serve no one's 
best interest.— CM. 

An end to vending machines 

Hopefully two ordinances recently passed by the 
Virginia Beach City Council will decrease the num- 
ber of vending machines in the beach area. 

The guady machines that eat money and attract 
bees and trash are an eyesore. 

One ordinance permits mobile vendors at four 
city stub streets, at 13th, 14th, 20th and 25th 
streets. They will operate under a franchise 
agreement with the city. 

The franchise agreement will control the vending 
units which would be required to be portable, non- 
motorized carts displaying colorful motifs with 
umbrellas or canopies. 

These brightly colored carts will be a definite im- 
provement over the existing vending machines. 

Tim Barrow, chairman of the Resort Area Ad- 
visory Commission, which proposed the ordinance, 
said the carts will replace the proliferation of ven- 
ding machines on every corner. 

The city would control the size and area where 
the units would operate and require disposal of lit- 
ter by the vendor. 

The other ordinance permits beachgoers to carry 
their own food and drinks to the beach, as long as 
the containers are not glass and the drinks are non- 
alcoholic. 

As long as litter regulations are enforced, this 
ordinance will also help improve the area. 

Add to these the addition of outdoor cafes along 
the boardwalk and the atmosphere presented to 
residents and .toursits alike, will be a gala 
one. — CM. 




Officers elected for Medical Society 



the Virgijiia Beach Medical Society has elected new officers. They are, from left, Ramnath Nayakj 
treasurer; Thomas M. Krap, president; Duncan S. Wallace, president-elect; and WHUam S. Teachey,! 
secretary. 



Another view of budget law 



"T^e VA's ability to continue 
providirig minimally acceptable 
levels of health care and services 
for disabled veterans are in 
jeopardy as a result of budget 
cuts mandated by the Gramm- 
Rudman-Holling balanced 
budget law," warned Albert H. 
Linden, National Commander of 
the disabled American Veterans 
(DAV). 



ommentary 



As a result of the sequestering 
provisions of the law, recently 
implemented by President 
Reagan, the Veterans Ad- 
ministration (VA), will lose more 
than $234 million in budget 
authority funding and over $196 
miliiofli in^dg^tjOqllays during 

"Major cuts in such area? ,as 
hospital construction and read- 
justment benefits for veterans 
jeopardize programs that have 
already been pared to the bare 
bones. In the case of the VA's 
construction jw^ram, the cuts 
mean badly deteriorating 
facihties— that have already gone 
too long without rejdacement or 
modernization— will have to wait 
that much longer." 

Linden, who leads the 
organization of more than one 
million war-time disabled 
veterans, said the cuts fly in the 
face of Congressional promises 
to maintain quality health care 
for America's disabled veterans. 

"Almost $40 million in budget 
cuts for readjustment benefits 
will mean men and women who 
served during our nation's wars, 
primarily Vietnam vets, may not 
get all the assistance they need to 
return to society as working, 
productive members. 

Certain educational benefits 
may be in jeopardy as well. The 
DAV questions how severely hurt 
may be young veterans who've 
counted on continuing their 
education after service. 

In addition, the VA's ad- 
ministrative systems— the 
processing of disability claims, 
program appUcations and ser- 
vices—are all threatened by cuts 
such as a $32 million reduction in 
general operating expenses, a 
$2.3 million cut in medical ad- 
ministration costs and a $5.8 
million cut in burial benefits and 
miscellaneous operating expen- 
ses." 

Linden, who is a single-leg am- 
pxitee veteran of the Vietnam 



War, said the DAV's particularly 
concerned about the plan to cut 
more than $8.1 million in medical 
and prosthetic research funds. 

The cuts average 4.3 percent 
across-the-board for the VA, ex- 
cept for direct medical care, 
which was limited by law to a 1- 
percent reduction. 

"That's almost $85 million 
taken from a system that is. 
already turning away more than 
25,000 veterans a month from 
their doors. Veterans who need 



help and can't get it elsewhere," 
Linden said. 

The former Army helicopter 
pilot emphasized that disabled 
veterans, in particular, are com- 
niitted to inaking whatever 
sacrifices are necessary to fairly 
and equitably reduce the nation's 
growing federal deficit. "But it's 
not a fair and equitable solution 
when you jeopardize programs 
that are badly needed by men and 
women who've already paid a far 
greater price for all of us in 
America." 



Time for economic summit? 



By Rep. Norman Sisisky 

Last November, President 
Reagan and Secretary Gorbachev 
met in Geneva to begin serious 
. discussions on arms control and 
other pressing internafidnal 
pi'oblems. 

These discussions are vital to 
our mutual understanding and to 
world peace. 

We will still have our dif- 
ficulties with the Soviet Union, 
but at least our leaders have 
taken that first important step. 

At home, we are facing serious 
economic problems that are just 
as critical to our country's future 
and will take the same concen- 
tration to effort to resolve. 

I think the time is right for 
President Reagan and the leaders 
of both the House and Senate to 
put aside partisan bickering and 
start serious discussions on how 
to resolve our budget and deficit 
difficulties. 

I have written to the President, 
House Speaker Tip O'Neill and 
Senate Majority Leader Robert 
Dole urging them to convene a 
domestic economic summit con- 
ference as soon as possible. 

This is an extraordinary 
request, but the long-term 
economic problems we face are 
very disturbing, and within mon- 
ths we must make some critical 
and hard decisions about our 
domestic and national defense 
priorities. 

In the closing hours of the 1985 
session. Congress passed and the 
President signed into law the 
Gramm-Rudman-Hollings deficit 
r^uction plan~a law that could 
fundamentally alter the budget 
process and establish a new, and 
uncertain balance between the 
President and the Congress. 

Gramm-Rudman-Hollings also 
has a built-in budget cutting 
mechanism that goes into effect 
automatically unless the 



President and the Congress can 
make the required deficit reduc- 
tions. 

The uncertainty of Gramm- 
Rudn^aQ-HoiUngs itsdf ij^a com- 
pelling reason for a dpTV^sfic 
summit coniference. 

Over the past several years our 
federal budget deficit has reached 
record levels. 

This deficit inhibits capital 
forniation, makes America 
dependent on foreign capital, 
drives up the value of the dollar 
and puts us at a disadvantage in 
the world market. 

What's more, every year we 
must pay more interest on our' 
debt and that means there is less 
left over for our important 
domestic programs and our vital 
national security. 

If we are going to solve our 
long-term economic problems, 
the administration and the 
Congress must cooperate closely. 

We have to put aside the pet- 
tiness that often keeps the House 
from working effectively with the 
Senate, and that keeps the 
President from working closely 
with the Congress. 

There's no room for political 
posturing. Ail of us must accept 
our responsibility to the 
American people. 

The stakes are enormous and 
the longer we put off 
problems, the greater they 
become. A domestic summit con- 
ference will not be a cure-all and 
we cannot naively expect to 
resolve all our economic 
problems by convening one. 

But if the President and the 
leaders of Cognress can hammer 
out an agreement that seriously 
confronts our deficit crisis while 
protecting vital domestic 
programs and our national 
security, we will have taken a 
major step in the right direction. 



our 
will 



The Virginia Beach Sun 



EaMtMinl926 



WBai.>*rf,^__ 



1 38 Smith R(^mont Road 
Yirpnia Beach, Virginia 21451 
(804)486-3430 

Hane$by»fy 

pMUm 

Gr^ory D. G<^art> 

mana pni tdtef 
Cheryl Mortip .,^ 

Staff Writer 

LeeCtrftW 

O^ Cound reporter 

The Virginia Beach Sun is 
published every Wednesday by 
Byerly Publications, Inc. 
S^ond Class postage (UPPS- 
660-140) is paid at Lymhaven 



Station, Virginia Beach. Sub- 
scription rates: $10 a year, 
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Greater Hampton Reads 
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Other affiliated newspapers 
are: The Chesapeake Post, The 
Portsmouth Times, The 
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Sun, The Dinwiddte Monitor, 
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ters should be typed, double- 
spaced and written in 
paragraph form. They should 
include the sender's name, ad- 
dress and phone number. 

Letters may be written on all 
topics, but the editor reserves 
the right to ^t as necessary. 
Send letters to The Virgirtia 
Beach Sun, 138 South 
Rosemont Road, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia 234S2. 



Writer's 
Block 



Facing 

language 

'barriers 

By Cheryl Martin 

Staff Wriler 

The room is a bee hive of ac- 
tivity. Small groups of students 
;idbat.,MQLmaUy during a class 
break. 

While the subjects of the 
cOnVersiations are or 
dinary— one women is having 
trouble with her son and the 
other parents all sympathize, 
another group is discussing 
household repairs— something 
may appear a btrumisual to the 
uninformed observer. 

Many of the students speak 
with heavy foreign accents 
representing most parts of the 
world. The majority of the con- 
versations are in English but 
occasionally a foreign tongue 
can be heard. It starts innocen- 
tly, when a speaker can't think 
of the right word to express an 
idea in English. Then absent- 
mindedly, the group slips into 
speaking in a more familiaif 
language. 

"Speak in English," their 
teacher remitids them in a 
friendly way. 

These Virginia Beach studen- 
ts are enrolled in the English-as- 
a-Second-Language program 
offered by the Virginia Beach 
Public Schools Adult Learning 
Center. 

While their reasons for being 
in the United States are as 
varied as the people them- 
selves—some are the wives of 
American servicemen, others are 
students just visiting here, and 
others still are refugees trying to 
.^li^aff. nfsvf liyes for themselves — 
jii^y share a common bond: 
Learning to communicate in 
English is important. 

These students' dedication 
has to be admired. They are not 
school age children, but adults 
who must readjust to studying 
along with learning a new 
language. Many are also faced 
with reality of having to survive 
in a new environment and also 
support their families. 

The language barrier can also 
be a problem for them in fin- 
ding jobs. A number of the 
students attend class and work 
fulltime,. 

I was fortunate enough to 
recently meet and talk with 
some of these sudents. Very 
impressive with their 
meticulous attention to detail. 

In speaking with me, they 
tried very hard to understand 
my questions. When giving 
their answers they chose their 
words carefully in order to 
property convey their feelings. 

Because of the size of our 
country, many Americans never 
have to face the problem of 
languae barriers. We take it for 
granted tha everyone can un- 
derstand us. 

Thinking back on a trip to 
Mexico, I could relate to some 
of the difficulties these people 
face. My Spanish is almost non- 
existent, so I was very depen- 
dent upon a traveling com- 
panion who spoke fJtJid 
Spanish. When he was off with 
other members of our group I 
was faced with not being able to 
communicate with the people 
around me, or trying to search 
out those who happened to 
speak English. 

It is a very strange feeling 
being surrounded by people and 
not being able to understand 
what they are saying or make 
them comprehend what you are 
saying. 

Imagine leaving all that is 
familiar and dear to you forever 
and starting over somewhere 
new. Not just another town or 
state, but a place where you can 
not speak the language and 
were unfamiliar with the 
customes of the people. Or- 
dinary tasks like going to the 
grocery store or filling out ap- 
plications could become major 
ordeals. 



mM 



The Virginia Beach Sun, January 29, 1986 3 




Why teachers are leery 
of merit^ay system 






A recent poll conducted and 
released by the Virginian Pilot/ 
Ledger Star confirms that a 
majority of the public would like 
to see raises for teachers based 
upon merit. In this poll, 59 per- 

cenr said' ' ffifey'Tavor a merit 

system making a teacher's pay 
— level and all raises based pn per- 
formance. ^ 

Nearly all polls on merit pay 
for teachers have shown similar 
results since major school 
recommendations started being 
Tcleased in the last three years. If 
the public wants merit pay for 
teachers, why have most school 
boards across the nation con- 
tinued with salary systems that 
grant a general increase to all 
teachers and a step increase for 
teachers who have maintained at 
least satisfactory performance 
the previous year? 

The answer, like so many other 
popular ideas, is that merit pay 
for teachers in practice is not as 
simple as it sounds in theory. The 
Virginia Beach City Public 
Schools for example have had a 
form of merit pay since 1975. The 
plan, now in effect for over 10 
years, was designed to compen- 
sate teachers with over 10 years 
experience who have commen- 
dable evaluations and involve 
themselves . in extensive 
professional involvement and 
development. 

At least 700 of the system's 
3,000 teachers have applied and 
are receiving $800 for their effor- 
ts. This program can be im- 
plemented administratively and is 
generally accepted by teachers. 

The one general criticism of the 
program is that it seems {& stress 
accoinplishmeftts outside Of the 
classroom and does not stress 
classroom performance or ex- 
cellent teaching. 

In November 1983, Dr. E. E. 
Brickell, division superintendent, 
formed an Incentive Pay Com- 
mission whose purpose was to 
develop a plan that would 
recognize and reward outstan- 
ding teachers. The commission 
was composed of teachers. 



business leaders, a PTA represen- 
tative, building principals, and 
central office administrators with 
representatives of the Office of 
Personnel Services and the 
Virginia Beach Education 
Association serving as resource 
persons. 

The commission worked for 
over a year and recommended a 
three step plan. Based upon ex- 
perience, teachers could be 
eligible for one of three sup- 
plements if they exhibited 
"distinguished" teaching and 
were involved in a number of 
professional growth activities. 
The amounts suggested were: 
$! ,300, $*i«ee; and^,50fr:- 




\^fe teach 
ths children. 

The Virginia Beach 
Education Association 

The commission established 
the following tenets for an incen- 
tive pay plan: 

•Each teacher will have an 
equal opportunity to participate in 
the incentive pay plan. 

•Incentives for outstanding 
teachers who participate in the 
plan will be in addition to the 
provisions for a solid and respon- 
sible salary schedule. -^_„--^ 

•The plan must be ad- 
ministratively feasible. 

•The evaluation process will be 
objective, impartial, and con- 
sistent. Evaluators will be 
provided sufficient staff 
development to apply assessment 
and evaluation consistent with 
the evaluation process . 

•The plan must be explained to 
all employees at its inception and 
revi<fwed'on a regular basis. 

•The plan should be reviewed 
on a regular basis to determine if 
it is meeting its goals and objec- 
tives. 

•The appeals procedure for 
resolving disputes, if any should 
arise, will be the same as the 
current policy until the procedure 
can be studied to determine if any 
revisions are necessary. 



The commission left the 
definition of "distinguished" 
teaching up to the school system. 
Consequently, the proposed plan 
was piit on hold until a new 
evaluation program could be 
developed to consistently, and 
impartially, determine which 
teachers " could be rated as 
distinguished. The evaluation 
committee has been hard at work 
for over a year. 

At this point in time, an 
evaluation system is being piloted 
by school principals and teacher 
volunteers in each school. All 
participants will be asked to 
evaluate the evaluation program 
to determine its effectiveness. 
One of the key questions that is 
being asked is, should the new 
evaluation program be used to 
determine merit pay? 

Many of the administrators 
and teachers who worked so hard 
to conie up with the new 
evaluation program will not be 
"sorprised if a large number of the 
administrators and teachers 
currently piloting the program 
say that the process might very 
well help teachers improve their 
teaching but should not be used 
as a basis for determining who 
should be considered 
distinguished and who should 
not. 

The lesson being learned in 
Virginia Beach is not unique. 
Merit pay is not being shunned 
because teachers blindly refuse to 
entertain the notion that top per- 
formers should not be well com- 
pensated. The fact of the matter 
is that a merit pay plan, that is 
well conceived and relatively im- 
partial, demands too much time 
and administrative effort con- 
sidering the limited impact it has 
on motivating teachers to become 
more proficient iiok the ll^ssroom. 
Money fe not the ultimate driver 
of teachers. 

More and more research is in- 
dicating that the factors that 
motivate top teachers to remain 
in teaching and encourage all 
teachers to strive for perfection 
have to do with a reward system 
that goes beyond salary. For 
example, one of the most rewar- 
ding experiences of teaching is 
having the principal come by the 
room and tell a teacher he is 
doing a good job !- 

If Virginia Beach ultimately 
decides to forego expansion of the 
current merit pay program, all 
will not be lost in the city. There 
are still many ways to motivate 
teachers to continue to reach for 
excellence. 



■Ill; 





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Police and students 
say buckle up now 

State police are enlisting the 
aid of high school students in 
Virginia Beach and throughout 
South Hampton Roads to 
spread the message of "Buckle 
Up.^' 

The project is called a 
"safetython," and its goal is to 
get more motiJrists to make the 
seat belt part of their driving 
routine. Police say that just a 
one percent increase in seat belt 
use would save 900 lives next 
year. 

To promote voluntary seat 
belt use, state police arc using a 
Tnethod similar to that used in 
walk-a-thons and other events. 
The students get sponsors to 
sign up. Each sponsor pledges 
to buckle up for the next 30 
days* 

High school students will 
compete for the most pledges. 

Sheriff instituting 
fitness program 

Sheriff Bill Overman said he 
will institute a physical fitness 
requirement for the depar- 
tment's empleyees within the 
next month. The fitness 
requirements are part of Over- 
man's sweeping plan to 
rejuvenate the department and 
transform it into a more active 
law enforcement agency. 

Overman has criticized the 
department's lax training of 
deputies. He said the depart- 
ment, which has discouraged its 
employees from pursuing law 
' enforcement, has been content 
to simply manage the jail and 
appear in courtroms. 



Humane Society 
stops Fish Bowl 

Lynnhaven Dive Center, in 
Virginia Beach, abandoned its 
plans for a fourth "Goldfish 
Bowl" after animal lovers 
protested and city officials 
threatened to lodge criminal 
charges. 

For the past three years, the 



center has damped 1,000 gold- 
fish into its pool and offered 
prizes to the people who cap- 
tured the most. Last year, 
about 50 people competed. 

Elizabeth Sills, a former 
president of the Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to 
Animals, read about the event 
in the newspaper. Outraged, 
she called the city's animal con- 
trol superintendent, William H. 
Clark. 

Clark said he discussed the 
dispute with city attorneys. Un- 
der state law, the dive center 
could be charged with cruelty to 
"amnufls. It cduTd' also BeT 
charged with violating a 
Ijrxjhibition against using ver- 
tebrate animals as prizes or in- 
ducements. 

The two misdemeanors carry 
a combined maximum sentence 
of $1,100 in fines and a year in 
jail. 

Jennings angered 
by dredging halt 

The sudden halt in dredging 
at Rudee Inlet, has upset Coun- 
cilman H. Jack Jennings Jr. He 
charged that partisan politics is 
threatening access to the ocean 
fishing grounds. 

Jennings, whose Lynnhaven 
Borough includes the inlet, said 
the Virginia Beach Erosion 
Commission has failed to main- 
tain the inlet. He contended 
they were "behaving rather 
childishly." 

The commission, whose job 
under state law is maintainng 
the resort beach north of the 
inlet, pumps sand to the beach 
from the navigation channel by 
dredging that is supposed to 
continue 24 hours a day. The 
constant dredging is needed to 
keep the channel open for the 
large fleet of ' recreation and 
fishing boats that depend on it. 

The commissioners, who are 
appointed by the governor, 
removed thejr dredges from the 
inlet. theii,mdXQ.PTqt^ff,,ifyeiT 
employees who work on the 
battered boats. 

The decision came in the 
wake of recent criticism of their 
work by city officials and 
fishing boat captains. 





How construction damaged 
Trees trees can be helped , 



The Division of Forestry 
frequently gets calls from 
residents of newly constructed 
homes in Virgin^ Beach concer- 
ning the poor c^ndi|i6!t) of the 
trees on their lots. c> 

The trees on sites under con- 
struction or where construction 
has recently been completed are 
under a variety of stresses. These 
stresses may kill the trees unless 
steps are taken to help them. 

Due to the rapid growth and 
resultant construction boom in 
Virginia Beach, many trees in the 
city are suffering from construc- 
tion related problems. 

Construction damage can 
result from several causes. Bark 
abrasion, soil compaction, and 
root cutting are the three biggest 
killers of trees on construction 
sites. 

Bark abrasion usually results 
from bulldozers hitting the trees 
during land clearing. The 
resultant wound lets in infection 
much as a cut or abrasion would 
on a person. 

Soil compaction is caus^by 
frwjuent machine or foot traffic 
within the trees' root zone. The 
piling of construction materials 
under or against trees also causes 
compaction. 

Root cutting results when 
grades aft towered or when 
various underground utility lines 
are installed. 

Soil compaction imp«les air 
flow to the roots while root cut- 
ting upsets the delicate balance 
betw«n a tree's roots and its 
branches. 

If a person knows what to look 



for, spotting construction 
damage on a lot can be easy. Soil 
compaction and root damage can 
be detected by looking at the 
tree's crown. One sign is bran- 
ches that don't leaf out fully. 
Another is "branches die back 
from the top of the tree. 
Sprouting along the trunk of the 
tree is still another response to 
stress. 

Look for soil disturbance in 
the yard where utility crews have 
been. If the disturbance is under 
the area shaded by tree, there is a 
good chance that roots have been 
cut or damaged. 

Look at the lawn for signs. If 
new grass growth is poor or if 
there are bare spots, there is 
probably some soil compaction. 
The effects of soil compaction 
and root cutting may not show up 
immediately. Often the problems 
caused by construction damage 
don't appear serious until a year 
or two later. 

Several steps can be taken to 
help trees recover from construc- 
tion damage. Root cutting has 
deprived the tree of water, so 
starting a regular watering 
program is a must. This is 



especially important in July and 
August when high temperatures 
put all trees under stress. 

Using an auger or a long spike, 
punch holes in the soil to a depth 
of 18 inches under the tree's 
crown. This will increase air and 
water penetration to roots. These 
holes can also be used to add fer- 
tilizer to the soil. 

If construction is still ongoing, 
put up protective barriers to 
protect the root system and trunk 
from equipment damage. 

If the tree's top or lateral bran- 
ches are dying back, they may 
need trimming and thinning by a 
professional tree service. These 
professionals can also top trees if 
root damage is severe. 

Topping shguld be slight, 
however, to avoid niinlrig the 
aesthetic quality of the tree. 
When selecting a tree service, do 
so with care. A future article will 
discuss this in detail. 

The Division of Forestry will 
be happy to provide advice to 
residents who think they have 
construction damaged trees. The 
Division can be reached at 488- 
1921. 



Extended deadline for tax 
exemption applications is near 



V Certain Virginia Beach senior 
citizens and disabled persons now 
have until Friday, Jan. 31 to file 
affidavits for exemption, deferral 
or freeze of their fiscal year 1985- 
86 real estate taxes. 

Formerly, the deadline for 
filing was June 30 of the previous 
fiscal year. Due to an ordinance 
proposed by Councilman H. Jack 



Jennings Jr. arid approved by 
City Councit, this deadline has 
been extended for first time ap- 
plicants and individuals who 
would be faced with hardship 
without the exemption. 

Contact the Real Estate 
Assessor's Office, 427-8847, for 
information. 



M@M 



Mvy MiysMlMMRy 



The dilemmas of providing 
^ood substitute care for their 
children as well as a supportive 
home environment are very real 
concerns of working parents. 
Two recent and different books 
may be of interest to such 
families. 

Child development expert 
Fredelle Maynard's The Child 
Care Crisis - The Real Costs oj 
Day Care for you and Your Child 
is aimed at parents with pre- 
school children who are con- 
sidering employment. 

Maynard has an obvious 
distaste for mothers who work 
outside of the home for reasons 
other than economic and em- 
pathy for those who must. While 
it is true that her reports on 
available surrogate care are 
colored by this bias, the basic fac- 
ts are very useful to parents. 

Maynard is thorough in 
describing the negative aspects of 
day care centers, nannies and 
family care situations, while 
minimizing the positive. Whether 
or not the reader shares the 
author's belief that your children 
are drastically affected by sub- 
stitute care, the descriptions of 
available day care options are in- 
formative. Most parents want to 
consider the minuses of any 
choice and Maynard does 
examine those problems. 

Representing a somewhat dif- 
ferent prospective is well known 
pediatrician T. Berry Brazelton. 
His latest book, Working and 
Caring, accepts the trend that 
many mothers are not staying 
home with their pre-schoolers, 
even when family finances per- 
mit. 

Brazelton follows three 
families— a professional couple, 
a single mother and a blue collar 
couple— through their pregnan- 
cies, the mothers' return to work 
and the babies' progress to tod- 
dler stage. 

His concern for the children 
involved is apparent as arc his 
feelings for their {»rents as he 



A look at 
child care 

discusses the usual crises and sen- 
se of guilt carried by mothers. 
Brazelton 's common sense ad- 
vice reflects his years of experien- 
ce and fiis non-judgmental ap- 
proach will be appreciated by 
parents who are often defensive 
because they are not a 
"traditional family". 

The Child Care Crisis will be 
helpful to those who need to in- 
vestigate child care options and 
the reader should not allow 
Maynard's value statements to 
overshadow its facts and worth- 
while cautions. 

Working and Caring can help 
employed parents feel good 
about raising their children at the 
same time. As Brazelton writes. 
"The ultimate reward is when 
your children grow into balan- 
ced, flourishing individuals who 
identify with both sides of you - 
the working and caring." 



School population 
continues to grow 

Reviewing school population 
projections for next year, 
Deputy Superintendent E. 
Bruce McGuire said at the 
recent School Board meeting 
that Green Run High school, 
unlike the elementary schools in 
its zone, will get no relief from 
already crowded conditions. 

The school, with a capacity 
listed as 2,000 students, had a 
population of 2,677 students in 
the last count, taken just before 
Christmas. Already the most 
populous senior W:g1i " tn 
Virginia, the number of studen- 
ts at Gre en Run may top 3.000 
next year. 

McGuire predicted that the 
school system would once again 
set a record for growth, jum- 
ping by -more than 2,000 
students to a total of 62,000, 
when school starts Sept. 2. 
Most of the increase, he said, 
will be in the lower el*fiientary 
grades as young families 
moving to South Hampton 
Roads continue to buy their fir- 
st^homcs in Virginia Beach's 
new developments. 

The board also received 
schojol administrators' 
proposals for school boundary 
shifts that would affect more 
than 4,000 elementary and 
junior high students, mostly to 
supply students for the opening 
of Birdneck and Rosemont 
Forest elementary schools, but 
also to make room for more 
elementary students in the 
Bayside area. 

A public hearing on the 
boundary changes Is scheduled 
for Tuesday, Feb. 4 at 7 p.m. in 
the auditorium of Princess An- 
ne High School. The changes 
are scheduled for adoption by 
the board at its Feb. 18 
meeting. 

Critics contemplate 
.,fikcawg.councU ticket 

Five outspoken critics of the 
city's growth policies are con- 
sidering running as a ticket in 
the City Council election. For- 
mation of the ticket, called the 
"Team for Responsible Leader- 
ship," would attempt to wrest 
control of the council away 
from the majority that often 
lines up with developers in 
rezoning matters. 

The ticket would include 
Nancy Parker, a Planning 
Commission member who 
would run for an at-large seat; 
Walter Vargo, a former 
president of the Council of 
Civic Organizations; H. S. 
Myers, a one-time unsuccessful 
council candidate and CCO 
board member; John Moss, a 
member of the Citizens Action 
Coalition; and John L. Perry, a 
former member of the Citizens 
Advisory Committee. 

The ticket woidd compete for 
all six open council spotsjsxcept 
the Pungo seat held by Barbara 
M. Henley, whose re-election 
they support. 

Although no decision has 
been made on whether to run, 
group members say it appears 
likely that the ticket will enter 
Into the race. 



FANTASTIC 
SEAFOOD, 
GREAT STEAKS. 




Ciuit 



SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 
3010 HIGH ST • PORTSMOUTH 

397-8196 



J 



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mfmmtmmimi 



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r-\ 



4 The Virginia Beach Sun, January 29, 1986 



Animal Menagerie provides entertainment 

Animals will abound at the Virginia Beach Recreation Centcr/Kemp- 
sville on Sunday. Feb. 2, at 2 p.m., during "Animal Menagerie." the 
show will feature real animals from the Norfolk Zoo, stuffed animals, 
and balloon animals created by Dusty the Clown. Magic tricks and 
juggling will also be performed . 

Call 495-1892 for information. 

VirgmiQ fifQcA Happmm^ 



BJSSSS 



W^padoodle Puppets present qiedal show 

The Wappadoodlc Puppets will present "I'm Special." Featured in 
the show are Mighty Mike and his Magic Machine. 

The first showing will be held on Saturday, Feb. 1 at 11 a.m., at the 
Kempsville Recreation Center Playhouse. Another show will take place 
at the Bow Creek Recreation Center on Saturday, Feb. 15, at 1 1 a.m. 

Admission is free. Children age six and under must be accompanied 
by a sibling at least age nine, or a parent. "I'm Special" is sponsored by 
the Department of Parks and Recreation's Perforniing Arts Unit. Call 
495-1892 for information. 

Resident named to Lipscomb fionor roll 

Virginia Beach resident Emelyn Punzalan, has been named to the 
honor roll at David Lipscomb College for academic achievement 
during the recently completed fall quarter. 

Punzalan is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ernesto O. Punzalan, of 
Virginia Beach. She is majoring in mathematics. 

Beach residents win Britannica drawing 

Selina Day and Daniel Cox, both of Virginia Beach, have each won a 
Britannica World Atlas in the Encyclopedia Britannica weekly 
drawing. 

Dance to be held for special people 

A dance for physically and mentally handicapped people will be held 
Satiu-day, Feb. 15, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., at the Bow Creek 
Recreation Center, 3427 Clubhouse Rd. The dance is sponsored by the 
Fraternal Order of UDTL/SEALS, the Virginia Beach Department of 
Parks and Recreation and CLASP (Citizens Loving All Special 
People). Participation is free, 

Transportation is available through TRT at $5 per roundtrip per in- 
dividual. Feb. 6 is the transportation deadline. Call Carolyn Wismer at 
853-8789 after 7 p.m. weekdays or anytime weekends. 

For information call Lynn Gallob, 463-1 148 or Ken Gearhart, 422- 
1381. 

Organ recital planned at church 




Tax counseling available for seniors 

Members of the American Association of Retired Persons will be in 

the Oceanlront Area Library, 1811 Arctic Aye., on Wednesday after- 

* noons from 1 to 4 p.m. begiiming Wednesday, Feb. 5, to aid senior 

citizens in filling out 1985 Federal Income Tax forms. This service will 

continue until the filing deadline in April. ^j 

Registration is not required. For information, call the library, 428- 
4113. 

PMS is topic of five-week class 

Premenstrual Syndrome wil be the topic of a five-week class offered 
by Psychiatric Associates of Tidewater, Inc., 880 Kempsville Rd. 
*'"PMS: Facts and Action" will begin on Monday, Feb. 10, from 7:30 
to 9 p.m. 

Mary Jdhnson, registered nurse and licensed professional counselor, 
will facilitate the classes, which include guest speakers. 

The fee is $50. Enrollment is limited and preregistration is required. 

Call 461-1644 for information. 



Credit Union to hold IRA seminar 

Virginia Beach Fedei^l Credit Union will offer a seminar on In- 
dividual Retirement Accounts on Wednesday, Feb. 12, at noon and 
again at 6:30 p.m. at the Pehibroke Branch, 313 Kellam Rd. 
^1 The seminar will cover the tax advantages of an IRA, reqi ri r ement s 
and conditions of IRAs, how to roll-over an IRA, and hoW to borrow 
funds for an IRA for a tax savings. •.' 

Call Virginia Beach Federal Credit Union, 486-0720 for information 
and to make reservations. 



Beach dancers perf orpi 

Virginia Beach dancers Heather Beck, 10, daughter of CDR and Mrs 
Arthur Beck, and Kevin Lytle, 12, son of Mr. and Mrs. P. L. Lytle, 
were among those participating in "Dance Happenings." The event, 
which was for senior citizens, was held at Thalia Lynn Baptist Chaurch. 
They presented a lecture/demonstration choreographed and staged by 
Gene Hammett, artistic adviser to the Tidewater Ballet Association. 



Parents Without Partners orientation set 



Parents Without Partners, Chapter 216, orientation for prospective 
members will be on Thursday, Jan. 30, at 8 p.m. at 3512 Sea Horse 
Way. For information, call 486-3294. 



An organ recital will be presented by Rev. Joseph T. Carson, III, 
associate minister at the Virginia Beach United Methodist Church, 
Pacific Avenue at 19th Street on Sunday, Feb. 2, at 8 p.m. 

Rev. Carson studied organ extensively through the years as he pur- 
sued his theological training at Randolph-Macon College and Emory Plflfietarium OreSCntS DOCtrV DrO&ram 
University. The program will include the music of Bach, Brahms, Fran- " " J r o 

ck. Barber, Vaughan Williams and Pachelbel. 

The recital is free and open to the public. A nursery will be provided. 



.^i 



KempsrmmiWmmt met 

The Kempsville Branch 99, Fleet Reserve Association and Unit 99, 
Ladies Auxiliary will meet on Wednesday, Feb. 12 at 8 p.m., at 4529 E. 
Honeygrove Rd,, Suite 302, Virginia Beach. 



The Virginia Beach City Public Schools planetarium program for 
February is "Poetry Under the Stars." 

The program will be presented on Sunday, Feb. 2, 9, 16 and 23 and 
on Tuesday, Feb. 4, 11, 18 and 25i All shows begin at 7 p.m. in the 
planetarium at Plaza Junior High School. Admission is free. Call the 
planitarium, 486-1855, for reservations Monday through Friday bet- 
ween 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. 



Tax forms available in Beach libraries Beach Itepublican Women install officers 



All of the Virginia Beach libraries have income tax forms available 
for the public. The most frequently used forms are available for 
pickup, while the unfrequently used forms are available for copying. 
Bring dimes to make copies. 

For information call 427-4321 . 



Trail club hiking at Seashore State Park 

Tidewater Appalachian Trail Club will have a day hike in Seashore 
State Park, on Sunday, Feb. 2. Participants are to meet at the park 
Visitor Center at 1 p.m. Call hike leaders at 484-7391 or 874-1526 for 
information. 



Harrison receives master's from ISU 



~ Roberto. HarrisoiT Jr. oT Virginia Beach "waSTmor^ 
sons who received degrees from Iowa State Univesity during fall 
semester commencement exercises. He received a master's in animal 



The new officers of the Virginia Beach Republican Women's Club 
for J986 were recently installed by State Senator Joseph Canada, R- 
Virginia Beach. They are president, Barbara Wool; first vice president, 
Mary Lou Overman; second vice president, Jackie Sayer; treasurer, 
Courtney Wharton; recording secretary, Ruth Wallace and correspon- 
ding secretary, Barbara parramore. 

For membership information call Claire Breeden, 428-7667. 



Haase named to Ole Miss honor roll 

Edgar Troy Haase of Virginia Beach, has been named to The Univer- 
sity of Mississippi Chancellor's Honor H^ for the 1985 Fall Semester. 
-A grade point average from 3.75 through 4.0 is required of full 
time students carrying at least 12 semester hours for listing on the 
Chancellor's Honor Roll, 



science. 



Musicians federation sponsoring party 

The American Federation of Musicians, Local 125, is sponsoring a 
free party for all working musicians on Sunday, Feb. 2, from 3 to 9 
p.m., at the Upi»r Deck, 16th Street and Atlantic Avenue, in Virginia 
Beach. 

Admission is by invitation only. They are available at local Music & 
Sound Shops. Sorry, no guests, musicians only. Because of state laws, 
anyone under 19 years of age must be accompanied by a parent or 
guardian. 
For information, call 622-8095. 



Bloodmobile coming to college 

The American Red Cross Bloodmobile will be in Virginia Beach on 
Thursday, Jan. 30 at Commonwealth College, 4160 Virginia Beach 
Blvd. from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 



Haase is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Edgar E. Haase of Virginia Beach. 

Hospital offering a variety of programs 

Virginia Beach General Hospital is sponsoring several events during 
February. 

Four Jazzercise classes will be offered. Junior Jazzercise for children 
ages eight to 12 will meet on Saturdays. Jazzercise on the Lighter Side 
for adults just beginning an exercise program wil| meet on Tuesdays 
and Thursdays. For more advanced adults Jazzercise classes will be of- 
fered on Mondays and Wednesdays, and Saturdays. 

A Smoke Stoppers program will be held on Monday, Feb. 3 at 7 p.m. 

A free public forum on "Identifying and Controlling Coronary Risk 
Factors," will be on Tuesday, Feb. 4 at 7:30 p.m. The speakers will 
be Dr. Jesse St. Clair, cardiologist and Allen Bostain, VBGH exercise 
physiologist. 

All of the events will be held in the hospital's Health Education Cen- 
ter. For information call the HealthQuest Department, 481-8141 . 



Free prenatal class starting at VBGH 

A free four-week prenatal class will be held at Vir|inia Beach 
General Hospital beginning on Monday, Feb. 3, at 7:30Fkm. in the 
hospital's health education center. 

Pre-registration is required. For information, call the HealthQuest 
Office, 48 1-8 141. 

Class helps siblings prepare for baby 

Virginia General Hospital will sponsor a frfe Prepared Brothers' and 
Sisters' Program on Saturday, Feb. 1, from 10 to 11 a.m. 

The visiting-tour starts in the lobby, and takes children, ages two to 
six, and parents to the birthing center and newborn nursery. 

A class discussion, geared for children, helps explain basic newborn 
care. 

For information, call the VBGH HealthQuest office, 481-8141 . 

Beach chapter of Church Women meet 

The Virginia Beach Church Women United will meet on Friday, Jan. 
3 1 , at 10:30 a.m. at Luther Manor, 350 Malibu Dr., Virginia Beach. 

Lunch will be served in the cafeteria- immediately following the 
meeting. Call Laurmel Buergey, 464-3510, by Wednesday, Jan. 29, for 
lunch reservations. Nursery will be provided. 

The guest speaker is Bob Uhl, of St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Chur- 
ch. 

Series to focus on minorities m literature 

Helen Moore, a veteran storyteller who has taught for over 35 years, 
will begin a series entitled "Mino^es in <3MMr»i's Literature" on 
Wednesday, Feb. 5, at 7 p.m. in the Bayside Area Library, 936 In- 
dependence Blvd. The first session will be a special storytime for pre- 
schoolers and their parents. 

The series, which will explore how aninorities are presented in 
children's literature and how these books are meaningful for the family 
of the '80s, will last the month of February on Wednesdays. 

Advance registration is necessary. Call the library for information 
and to place registrations, 464-9280. 

Registration open for adult learning classes 

The Virginia Beach Public Schools AduU and Continuing Education 
Department is currently accepting registration for spring classes. These 
classes are offered in the day and evening at the Aduh Learning Center 
and in the evening at seven other schools in Virginia Beach. 

Tabloids that describe classes and include mail-in registration forms 
are available at all Virginia Beach libraries and at the Adult Learning 
Center, 4722 Jericho Road. 

Call the Adult Learning Center, 499-3528, for information. 

Employee symposium presented 

An Employee Symposium will be presented at the meeting of the 
—Virginia BeachChapterof the Virginia Restaurant Association. on^ 



^ 



Monday, Feb. 10 at 7 p.m. at the Red Lobster, 709 Independence Blvd. 
All restaurateurs are invited to attend. For information call Linda 
Gray, 499-5609. 

Boys Club Parents Council to meet 

The Boys Club of Virginia Beach will have a Parents Council meeting 
on Thursday, Jan. 30 at 7:30 p.m. All interested parents of club mem- 
bers are invited to attend. 

The club is located in the ynited Way Building, 4441 South Blvd. For 
information call 499-231 1 . 

Boys Club honors soccer champs 

The Boys Club of Virginia Beach recently held its indoor soccer 
awards night. Boys who played on the 14- various soccer teams were 
honored with patches and certificates. Trophies were awarded to the 
chainpionship teams and boys nominated to the all-star teams. 

The championship teams for each league were: The Wings for the 
seven to nine year old Cadet League and The Cosmos for the 10-13 year 
old Junior League. 




lean I 



LInkhorn Park Garden Club meeting Ki„gs Grant PTA holding talent show 



Squeaky Clean 

STEAM I 

CARPET CLEANING 



The Linkhorn Park Garden Club will meet on Friday, Feb. 7, at 1 1 
a.m. at the Princess Anne Country Club. 

B. H. Bridges Jr., landscape architect, wil! present a program on 
"Trees Are Our Roots". 

Members are asked to bring Valentine arrangements for juding. 



Kings Grant PTA will sponsor'a Talent Show and Spaghetti Dinner, 
on Friday, Jan. 31, at 6:30 p.m., at Kings Grant Elementary School, 
612 Little Neck Road. Cost is $3.25 for adults, $1.75 for children 12 
and younger. Tickets available at door. 



EACH ROOM 
3 ROOMS OR MORE 

Offer Expires Feb. 1, 1986 



$5.95 



Registration open for winter mini-term I^<*"« ^ cover "Pereonal Disaimament" 



Commonwealth College, Virginia Beach Campus is accepting 
registrations for the Winter Mini-Term which starts Tuesday, Feb. 18. 
Call 3^-0222 for information. 



Commercial Cleaning Available I Indoor Field Olympics planned 



588-3732 



Indoor Field Olympics will be held at Kempsville Recreation Center, 
Tuesday, Feb. 4 through Thursday, Feb. 6 at 4:30 p.m. each day. The 
event is open to youths ages six to 12. 

Call 495-1892 for information. 



Personal Disarmament," lecture by James Frid, international lec- 
turer from Washington, D.C., on Friday, Jan. 31, at 8 p.m., Life 
Federal Savings and Loan, 1756 Laskin Road at Hilltop. For more in- 
formation, call 496-0855. 



TOPS groups meeting at Bayside 

Take Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS) will m«t Friday, Jan. 31, at 9:30 
a.m., Bayside Presbyterian Church, 1400 Ewell Road off Independence 
Boulevard. Prospective members welcome without obligation. For 
more information, call Sue McDonald at 497-0734. 



The Virginia Beach Sun, January 29, 1986 5 



Bank of Tidewater 
begins construction 



When Bank of Tidewater 
awarded the construction con- 
tracts for its permanent head- 
quarters building in Virginia 
Beach to contractor L. J. Hoy, it 
was celebrated as a most 
significant milestone in the 
development of the institution. 

Business 

"Our new t)uilding, located i|i 
Hilltop on Laskin Road, is very 
significant to Bank of Tide- 
water's image and commitment 
to the city," J. Burton Harrison, 
presidentiSaid. "When we move 
to the new facility next Septem- 
ber, we will demonstrate a per- 
Fi€flee4hat p e opl e e x pect to see 
in their banks." 



The two-Story, 17,000-square- 
foot building will cost $1.2 
million. The architectural firm of 
Waller and Todd designed the 
facility to house banking services 
andadministrative offices. 

The bank's temporary offices 
are at 612 Nevan Rd. in Hilltop. 

Bank of Tidewater has been in 
operation since July. Original 
projections for the financial in- 
stitution have been surpassed. 

Larry Harcum, vice president 
and chief operations officer, will 
oversee construction of the 
building. He and Betsy Duke, 
vice president andj;hicf financial 
officer, are in the process of 
reviewing sites and planning ad- 
dttionai branch locations 
throughout Virginia Beach. 



Wheat , First Securities to 
sponsor stock market seminar 



Wheat, First Securities will 
sponsor a Stock Market Seminar 
on Tuesd ay, Feb. 4, at 7: 30 p.m. 




Don R. Hays 



in the Virginia Beach Plaza-Hotel 
onBonney Road. 

Don R. Hays, nationally, 
recognized investment strategist 
for Wheat, will speak on "The 
Stock Market: Boom or Bust?" 
The seminar is free and open to 
the public. 

Hays, senior vice president and 
' director of investment strategy 
joined Wheat in the fall of 1984. 
In this position he provides stock 
market forecasting, industry 
group analysis and individual 
stock recommendatins for the in- 
stitutional and public clients of 
the firm. 

Since his arrival at Wheat, he 
has been proclaiming his thesis 
that the stock market was in the 
initial stages of a long-term 
secular advance. 

In retrospect, his projection 
proved to be on target; the stock 
market responded in 1985 with a 
330 point (28 percent) advance by 
the Dow Jones Industrial 
average. 

During his presentation. Hays 

I. will share his outlook for the year 

ahead and cover specific ideas for 

taking advantage of upcoming 

trends. 




Van Seters named general 
manager of CBN center 



Jacques Van Seters has been 
named vice president and 
general manager of CBN Center. 
His responsibility will include 
development, construction and 
operation of CBN's planned 
hotel-conference center. 

Van Seters, 50, joined CBN in 
November as managing director 
of the future hotel-conference 
center. 

Born in Rotterdam, The 
Nf t herlands, Van Seters came to^ 
the U.S. in 1961 after a number 
of years of experience in Europe 
in hotels and on board cruise 
ships with the Holland-American 
Line. 

Besides heading the hotel- 
conference center at CBN, Van 
Seters' responsibilities will in- 
clude all CBN construction 
projects, building maintenance, 
space allocation, housekeeping 
and grounds maintenance. 

Structural work on the 250- 
- room hotel-conference center is 
expected to start in late April in 
early May this year and be 
finished during the summer of 
1987, Van Seters said. Plans call 



for expansion to a total of 500 
guest rooms at a later date. 

Van Seters and his family live 
in Virginia Beach. 




Jacques Van Seters 



Send a friend to jail 



The Tidewater Chapter of the 
March of Dimes is sponsoring a 
"Jail and Bail" fundraiser on 
Thursday, Jan. 30 and Friday, 
Jan. 31 at Lynnhaven Mall in 
Virginia Beach. 

Participants can let the March 
of Dimes know, by way of an 
. "arrest warrant," if there is 
someone they want jailed. The 
chapter will send a uniformed 
police officer to make the arrest. 
The culprit will be placed in a 
mock jail in the center court of 
the mail. 

After being charged, sentenced 
and fined by a presiding judge. 



the jailbird must post a minimum 
of $100 bail. 

Once jailed, participants will 
be allowed as many phone calls as 
necessary to raise baiL 

Advance registration is a must 
for the event, and March of 
Dimes officials suggest that the 
person being arrested "be„of 
good humor." It might be a good 
idea to inform the arresta of the 
plan, but keep the time and day a 
secret. Jailbirds will be freed af- 
ter an hour. 

To arrange an arrest call the 
March of Dimes in Virginia 
Beach, 486-1001. 



Dilks Co. names 
operations analyst 



Warren G. Love has been ap- 
pointed principal operations 
analyst for The Dilks Company 
Inc., of Virginia Beach, v 

Love is a 30-year U.S. Air For- 
ce veteran. He recently retired in 
the grade of colonel, having ear- 
ned ratings as a master air traffic 



controller and as a command 
pilot with over 4,500 hours of 
flying time. His last Air Force 
position was as chief of staff of 
Tactical Information' Systems 
Division, which manages air traf- 
fic control, communications, and 
data automation for Tactical Air 
Command bases world-wide. 



Dickenson to be director of 
Florida Presbyterian Homes 



Rev. Dr. Daniel D. Dickenson 
of Virginia Beach has been 
named executive director of the 
Florida United Presbyterian 
Homes, Inc., in Lakeland, 
Florida. He will begin work on 
Feb. 1 and assume the full 
responsibility of the position on 
Aprit+: 



in Norfolk from 1970 to 1977, 
having held prior pastorates in 
Bcrryville, Va., and Lexington, 
Va. He is a past moderator of 
Norfqlk Presbytery and has ser- 
ved on and chaired numerous 
agencies of the presbytery. 



She is a member of the 
American Hospital Association, 
American School Health 
Association and the American 
Alliance of Health, Physical 
Education, Recreation WdOah- 
ce. 



(Left to right), Patrick L. Standing, chairman of the building commif- 
tee for Bank of Tidewater's Board of Directors, Larry G. Harcum, 
bank vice president and chief operations officer, and Jack Todd, ar- 
chitect with Waller and Todd, break ground for Bank of Tidewater's 
new permanent headq uarters building in Hilltop on Laskin Rd. 

Rochelle named manager 
of VBGH HealthQuest unit 

Jacqueline J. Rochelle was 
recently named manager of 
HealthQuest at Virginia Beach 
General Hospital. 

Rochelle will be responsible for; 
coordinating and promoting aW 
HealthQuest acitvities, including 
health education programs, 
health screenings and health risk 
appraisals. Before joining the 
VBGH staff, Rochelle served for 
nine years as a health and 
physical education teacher. 

Rochelle holds a master of 
science degree in health education 
and a bachelor of science degree 
in health and physical education 
from Old Dominion University. 

Comptek Research 
appoints new 
vice president 

Donald H. WoUett has been 
appointed vice president and 
general manager of Comptek 
Research, Inc. 's technical ser- 
vices division based in Virginia 
Beaeh ^— _ — „—. 

WoUctt, formerly the director 
of federal systems operations 
within Comptek Technical Ser- 
vices, will now be responsible for 
all of the division's activities. 

WoUett, 42, joined Comptek's 
Virginia Beach office in 1974 as a 
systems engineer and has held 
various technical and managerial 
positions of increasing respon- 
sibility, most recently directing 
all of the military technical ser- 
vices contracts within the 
division. 

He holds a bachelor's degree in 
computer science from the 
Naval Postgraduate School, and 
a degree in electrical engineering 
from Penn State University. 



Rev. Irvin K. Mc Arthur, who 
has held the position since 1%9, 
is retiring. 

Dickenson served, until June 
1985, as president and chief 
operating officer of Westminster- 
Canterbury in Virginia Beach, 
and since then as a consultant for 
the organization. He had been 
the chief admnistrator of this 
continuing care retirement com- 
munity since June of 1977. He 
was a trustee of the organization 
rom its formation in November 
1976. 

Dickenson is a Presbyterian 
minister and was formerly pastor 
of Lafavette Presbyterian Church 



~ "He Is serving a fdur yearrefm" 
on the Board of Commissioners 
of the Eastern Virginia Medical 
Authority, to which ht was elec- 
ted by the Virginia Beach City 
Council. He was charter 
president of the Cape Henry 
Rotary Club in Virginia Beach. 

A native of Danville, Dicken- 
son graduated froBtn^ashington 
and Lee University and received 
three theological degrees in- 
cluding the Doctor of Ministry 
degree from Union Theological 
Seminary in Virginia. 

He is married to the former 
Margaret Boyer, daughter of 
Presbyterian missionaries to 
Korea, and they have three grown 
children and one granddaughter. 




Jacqueline Rochelle 



IF BANK IRA'S 
WERE ONCE THE 
SMART MOVE- 
NOW IT MA^ BE 

ELSEWHERE. 



Why not consider an IRA with the 
Oppenheimer Family of Funds? 

It may be one of the smartest moves you could 

- make this tax season. 

For more information or seminar reservations, please call E. F. 
Hutton at 446-1400 or 1-800-572-1414. , 

Come to our free IRA Seminars every Saturday until April 15. 

Where: E. F. Button 
101 St. Paul's Blvd.. 
Norfolk, Virginia 
When: 10 a.m. every Saturday until April 15 

Mr will wild >IHI turllwr dMiili u Ktll » ■ frK proipicCyi.. oklcli coglllai norr 
romptolc informilion. Indudlni ctntt/n and nptmn. RHd ■y' ■•Itridii 




ca. ef yll> btfon > ou f nvnl or send inoiw> . 




Donald Wollett 



Campaign 25 

The Portsmouth Times, The Chesapeake Post, The Virginia Beach Sun 

Earn as nmch as you want by selling subscriptions! 

Are you, your church or civic group looking for a really worthwhile fund-raising 

project? 

Do you want a quick and easy way to earn hundreds of dollars while at the same 
time helping to support YOUR city's dedicated, independently-owned community 
newspaper - the only one with all the pictures, news, features and editorials of most in- 
terest to your family and friends? If so, Campaign 25 is the solution. 

Admit it. You care about your community, and so do we. And together we can work 
to make it an even better place in which to live and do business. That's why for every 
25 new subscriptions you or your group generates for The Portsmouth Times, The 
Chesapeake Post or The Virginia Beach Sun, we'll gladly rebate back to you $125, or 
half-off the regular $10 a year subscription rate. That's a savings of SO^ol 

In addition, you'll enjoy the pleasure of receiving your hometown newspaper, 
loaded with all the club news, pictures and ads which mean the most to you, delivered 
through the mail to your home every week for 52 weeks. 

Why not give it a try and join the dozens of other people and groups who have 
already taken advantage of this campaign. For more details, call 547-4571 or simply 
stop into any of our newspaper offices and pick up a Campaign 25 sign-up form. 

We want to be your newspaper! 



Yes. Please mail me a Campaign 25 sign-up form. 
J Yes. Please call me about your Campaign 25. 



Name 



Address 

City 



State 



Zip 



Phone 



Retan «•: C«*prtpi 25, c/o The Vh^ria Icwk Su, 
13i SoBlfc RowMMt Hoirf, VlrgJali 9fA, VA., 13452 



mmmmam 



■IH 



mMmmmm 



6 The Virginia Beach Sun, January 29, 1986 



J_^ 




Beach optometrist addresses forum 

Noted expert on children's vision problems, Dr. J. Baxter Swartwout, second from left, joins with Virginia 
Beach optometrists on the committee' which planned the 21st annual Forum on Learning Disorders, held 
gently at Old Dominion University. Joining Dr. Swartwout, who addressed the Forum, are Drs. Hal 
Breedlove, Robert Titcomb, Howard Kahn, and William C. Holcomb, who is President of the Tidewater 
Optometric Society. The TOS sponsored the event, along with the ODU Darden School of Education and 
the Virginia Optometric Association. 



Arts Center planning 
overnight trip to D.C. 



The Virginia Beach Arts Cen- 
ter will be sponsoring an over- 
night trip to Washington, D.C, 
Friday, Feb. 28 through Satur- 
day, March 1, to view "The 
Treasure Houses of Great 
Britain," an exhibir at The 
National Gallery of Art. 



Entertamm€frt 

Trip participants will be 
staying at The Old Colony Inn in 
Old Town Alexandria. The trip is 
open to all interested partis, in- 
cluding members and non- 
members of the Arts Center. 

"The Treasure Houses of 
Great Britain" is a traveling 
exhibit featuring paintings, sculp- 
ture and interior design objects 
ranging in period from the 15th 
to 19th Centuries. The exhibit is a 
celebration of 500 years of 
English art collecting, especially 
by British royalty. 

The $95 cost per person in- 
cludes bus transportation, a night 
at The Old Colony Inn based on 



double room occupancy, all 
museum fees, breakfast and lun- 
ch on the bus Friday and lunch 
on the bus Saturday. 

Trip participants will have 
Friday evening and Saturday 
mornltig to explore Washingrdn.- 

Saturday morning the bus will 
take people into the Smithsonian 
museum area. Persons who want 
a single room must pay an ad- 
ditional $35. 
The chartered bus will depart 



from the Arts Center, Friday, 
8:30 a.m. and arrive in 
Washington before the 1:30 tour. 
The bus will depart from 
Washington at 1 p.m. and will 
arrive at the VBAC at ap- 
proximately 5 p.m. on Saturday. 

There is no registration 
deadline, but the bus will only ac- 
commodate 46 people. For in- 
formation and to register call or 
stop by the Arts Center, 1711 
Arctic Ave., 425-0000. 



Gallery displaying paintings 



Paintings by Virginia Beach 
artist Joe De lulio will be on view 
Monday, Feb. 3 through Friday, 
Feb. 28 at the Humana Gallery, 
800 Independence Blvd. Hours 
are 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission is 
free and open to the public. 

De lulio is a self-taught artist. 
He describes his large acrylic 
paintings as "impressionistic," 
and using rich colors, bold 



strokes and nebulous forms, he 
executes them very quickly and 
fer^ntly. 

(Jjrrently, De lulio is a full- 
time painter who exhibits his 
award-winning work locally. He 
is also involved in commercial art 
projects, mainly television 
documentaries. 

For information, contact the 
Virginia Beach Arts Center, 425- 
0000. 



SUBS 




I BE 



52 issues mailed to your home 

I year 2 Years Out of Town 
$10 $15 $22.50 



Senior (ili/ens Kfi-i-i\e SI DismunI 



Name 

Address 

City /State/Zip 
Phone . 



Check enclosed fir^ $10 D%\S 

D Renewal 

Mail to: The Virginia Beacli Sun, 138 Soutli Rosemont Road, 
Virginia Beacli» Virginia, 23452 



n $22.50 



The 
Virginia Beach 

Sun 



486- 
3430 



Mid- Atlantic Sports 
and Boat Show opens 



The 33rd Annual Mid-Atlantic 
Sports and Boat Show will be 
held at the Virginia Beac. 
Pavilion from Saturday, Feb. 8 
through Sunday, Feb. 16. This is 
the largest exhibit of boats 
(power and sail, marine related 
products and services in Virginia 
and the Carolinas. 

Every square foot of The 
Pavilion is used including the 
theater galleria and lobbies to 
handle the overflow of exhibits. 

New in '86 will be outside 
exhibit area to displaiy a wider 
selection of boats in the 28 foot 
to 36 foot size of power and sail." 
The show has grown steadily over 
the years and the 1986 show will 
feature over $5 million worth of 
displays. 



Auxiliarists 
to appear 
at Pavilion 

Division V, U.S. Coast Guard 
auxiliarists from eight flotillas in 
addition to Flotillas 61 and 63; 
from Division VI will man the 
U.S. Coast Guard Exhibit at the 
Mid-Atlantic Boat Show being 
held in the Pavilion in Virginia 
Beach from Saturday, Feb. 8, 
through Sunday, Feb. 16. 

The auxiliarists will • be 
discussing boating courses, 
federal boating regulations, buit 
registration, titling of vessels, 
personal flotation devices, 
navigation lights, visual distress 
signals, radio communications, 
aids to navigation and other per- 
tinent boating information. They 
will even swap sea stories. 

They will also provide mem- 
bership information. The 
auxiliary is open to both men and 
women. 



Show hours are Saturdays IQ 
a.m. to 10 p.m., Sundays noon to 
8 p.m. and weekdays 6 to 9:30- 
p.m. Admission is $} for adults 
and $1 for children 12 years and 
under. 

The show fleet will include 
boats up to 36 feet in length, in- 
cluding runabouts, fishing boats, 
luxurious family cruisers and a 
wide variety of sail boats. All 
major manufacturers of out- 
board engines will be represented 
and also several inboard engine 
manufacturers. The latest in elec- 
tronic equipment will be on 
display -^with factory represen- 
tatives in attendance. 



Also on display will be 
numerous public service exhibits 
including the U.S. Coast Guard, 
National Weather Service, 
Virginia Game Commission and 
the F.C.C. Numerous South 
Hampton Roads fishing clubs will 
also feature interesting displays 
of mounted fish trt^Jhies and 
fishing tackle. 

A nautical flea market will of- 
fer visitors a wide variety of 
nautical gear and accessory 
bargains. 

This is a "Selling Show" and 
several financial institutions will 
offer on-the-spot financing to 
prospective buyers. 



Deadline nears for 
TCC London tour 



The Virginia Beach Campus of 
Tidewater Community College 
will sponsor its 10th annual trip 
'to London, England during June 
7 ^o .14. Persons interested in 
joining the tour may contact 
JCC history instructor Derris 
Raper as soon as possible for in- 
fqrination on fees, air travel and 
resetvations. 

^Participants will lodge in a 
small, family-run establishment 
in central London and will tour 
Westminster Abbey, the Houses 



of Parliament, the National 
Gallery and the theatre district . 

A three-credit college history, 
course (History 299) will also be 
offered in conjunction with the 
trip, but persons need not enroll 
in the course to take the trip. 
Also, persons need not make the 
trip to successfully complete the 
course. 

Raper can be contacted 
through the Virginia Beach Cam- 
pus of TCC, 427-7100, or by 
caliiug 545-2640. 



Poetry contest scheduled 
for high school students 



Photographs 
by Somers 
al gallery * 



Nine photographs by Virginia 
Beach artist Lynn M. Somers will 
be on view Monday, Feb. 3 
through Friday, Feb. 28 at the 
Municipal Center Gallery, 
located on the second floor 
corridor of the Virginia Beach 
City Administration Building at 
North Landing Road and Court- 
house Drive. Hours are 9 a.m. to 
5 p.m. Admission is free and 
open to the public. 

Somers will show her black and 
white silver print photographs, 
all of which were shot and prin- 
ted in England, Spring 1985, 
when she spent three months 
studying at the University of 
London. 

Somers, assistant curator at the 
Virginia Beach Arts Center, is a 
recent honors graduate of James 
Madison University. 

Her works on display are a 
series of landscape pieces inten- 
ded to describe various English 
locales. 

For information, contact the 
Virginia Beach Arts Center, 425- 
0000. 

Beach girl 
breaks W&M 
track record 

William & Mary women's in- 
door track and field team went to 
George Mason University for the 
Father Diamond Memorial Track 
meet. ______„____^ 

wmmmmmM 

Sports 

■■■MHHHiHMMMHnHBBi 

"We faced some pretty strong 
competition. These teams were 
probably the strongest we'll face 
this year," Jenny Utz, head 
coach said. 

In addition to George Mason, 
W&M encountered powers 
Villanova and Delaware State, as 
well as Maryland, Georgetown, 
and Temple. 

The Tribe took its top 12 run- 
ners and field specialists to the 
competition and returned to 
Williamsburg with one school 
record, three personal bests,- and 
one Eastern qualification. 

In the 500 meters, junior Angle 
Fogle of Virginia Beach, set a 
school record with a time of 
1:19.28. She is a graduate of 
Green Run High School. 



The Virginia Tech English 
department is sponsoring a 
poetry contest for Virginia high 
« «:hool students. 

; The Eighth Annual Virgmia 

High School Poetry Competition 
is open to Virginia students in 
grades nine through 12. 



Prizes will be $100 first place, 
$50 second, $25 third and $10 
fourth, with four fourth place 
awards to be given. 

Poems should be typed and 
doule-spaced, but neatly hand- 
written entries will be accepted. 
Each entry should include the 
author's name, age, grade, home 
address and telephone number; 
the name and address of the 
author's high school; and the 



signature of the sponsoring 
English teacher. 

High schools are encouraged to 
submit all sUident entries in a 
sffilgle envelope.' 

Entires should be mailed to 
Poetry Contest, English depart- 
ment, 124 Williams Hall, 
Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 
24061. Address all inquiries to 
Joyce Smoot, contest coor- 
dinator. 

To receive copies of the win- 
ning poems and judges' commen- 
ts, include a long self-addressed 
envelope stamped with 40 cents 
postage. 

Entries will not be 
acknowledged or returned. The 
• entry deadline is March 28, and 
winners will be notified in May. 



Virginia Symphony Youth 
Orchestra performance set 



The Virginia Symphony YouTh^ 
Orchestra, which includes 
student musicians from public 
and private schools in Virginia 
Beach, will present its 15th an- 
nual Winter Concert. 

The performance will be in the 
auditorium of Lake Taylor High 
School in Norfolk on Sunday, 
Feb. 9 at 3 p.m. 

The orchestra will open the 
program with works by Mozart, 
Halvorsen, and Ellington. The 
group will be led by Michael W. 



Hodgis, ¥an3^nd orchestra^ 
director at Norview High School 
in Norfolk. 

C. Sidney Berg will lead the or- 
chestra in works by Aaron 
Copland, Bach, Betthoven, and 
Khachaturian. Berg is principal 
timpanist with The Virginia 
Symphony, founder and conduc- 
tor of The Tidewater Winds and 
director of music education for 
the Norfolk Public Schools. 

The concert is free and open to 
the public. 



Jazz guitarist and vocaHst 
highUght Pops performance 



Jazz guitarist Charlie fiyrd and 
jazz vocalist Amy Ferebee will be 
featured in The Virginia Sym- 
phony Pops concert on Sunday, 
Feb. 2 at 7:30 p.m. at the 
Pavilion. 

A native of Chuckatuck in Suf- 
folk, Byrd has performed with 
the National Symphony, 
Houston Symphony, Baltimore 
Symphony, Boston Pops, The 
Virginia Pops in 1982, as well as 
three White House appearances 
for Presidents Johnson and Ford. 

The popular local jazz vocalist, 
Ferebee will join the Charlie Byrd 
Trio. 

Harold Evans will guest con- 
duct The Pops. He has appeared 



numerous times with The 
Virginia Symphony Pops this 
season as well as with The 
Virginia Symphony in their new 
family scries, The Peanut Butter 
and Jam Sessions. 

The concert will be performed 
in two halves. The Charlie Byrd 
Trio will join The Pops in both 
havles. 

Tickets are priced from $6 to 
$16, and may be purchased at all. 
First Virginia Banks and the 
Virginia Beach Pavilion Box Of- 
fice. To order tickets by 
telephone, call 428-8000. For in- 
formation call The Virginia Sym- 
phony, 623-8590. 



iW^i^ 



The Virginia Beach Sun, January 29, 1986 7 



Local navyman's work keeps world prepared 



By Rick Wilson 

Within the Navy tijere's a 
group of people whose 
whereabouts and activities are 
virtually unknown. Often 
mistaken as being part of the 
cliaplain corps because of the 
acronym given them — NAV- 
CHAPGRU— are the men and 
women who are the N'avy's only 
combat stevedores, the Navy 
Cargo Handling and Port Group. 

Military 

Navyman Ronald Weber, son- 
in-law of Marc and Fanutsa 
Segall of Virginia Beach, is one 
of the few serving [n ;1ms unique 
group. He is a boatswain's mate 
stationed with the cargo han- 
dlers, who are headquartered in 
Williamsburg. 

"I like this job and 1 feel it's 



very important," Weber, petty of- 
ficer first class, said. "I enjoy 
going out on the deployments 
and 1 especially like the tem- 
porary duty assignments conduc- 
ting crane courses at commands. 

He works in the Training 
department conducting basic and 
advanced cargo handling classes. 
Weber also supervises the loading 
and unloading of cargo. 

They load cargo to be stationed 
throughout the world for use in 
emergency situations. 

Everyone reporting to Weber's 
command must be trained in 
'asic cargo handling. To accom- 
plish this, the group trains con- 
stantly when not actually 
loadirrg urunloading cargo. 

. NAVCHAPGRU also trains 
people from other naval activities 
in cargo handling skills. , 






They provide advisory and 
training support in winch 
operations and advanced cargo 
handling to 12 Naval Reserve 
cargo handling battalions. 
During a national emergency, the 
reserves could be recalled to ex- 
pand the command's staffing, 
normally 170 people to 1 ,800. 

In peacetime, NAVCHAP- 
GRU deploys its people to areas 
around the world to load and 
unload cargo from ships. It also 
deploys (o remote sites such as 
the island of Diego Garcia in the 
Indian Ocean, and annually sen- 
ds a detachment to the Antarctic. 

Weber said he's glad to be a 
part of the group because they 
travel a lot and travel is one of 
the reasons he joined the Navy. 
He was also familiar with 
military life because several 
members of his family had served 
in one branch or another. 

"My family is basically a 
military family," 4Vebefr^n-U- 
year sea service veteran, said. 
"My father is a veteran of the 
Korean War and my grandfather 
is a World War II veteran. I also 
have four, cousins who served in 
Vietnam." 

Weber has no regrets with his 
decision to join the Navy. He 
says he's matured and learned to 
handle responsibility. He enjoys 
his job and the travel involved in- 
spite of the occasional separation 
from his wife, Mary. 

"I have to prepare my wife for 
ihe separations," the 6-foot-3- 
inch-tall Weber said. "I give her 
enough notice to gear up for the 
fact that I'll be gone for awhile." 
Although the separations are 
difficult, Weber has no intention 
of giving up the Navy. His plans 
have been the same since he 
enlisted— to stay in the Navy at 

least 20 years. 

Petty Officer 1st Class Ronald Weber (left), a Navy boatswain's mate, jnck Wilson is a Navy jour- 
adjusts a crane cable to lift a cargo crate. (Photo by Navy photographer „gijg( serving with the Navy 
Thomas E. Butt) Public Affairs Center in Norfolk. 




BeMy Valentine! 




THE HEART 
$15 

(Actual Size) 




This Valentine's Day warm someone's heart by 
showing them how much you care by publishing 
your personal Valentine message in The 
Virginia Reach Sun's Feb. 12 Valentine's Day issue. 

To order your Valentine ad simply write your 
special message below and enclose your personal 
check. 

Mail ad and check to Valentine, The Virginia 
Beach Sun, 138 South Rosemont Road. Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, 23452. 



Please keep message to 20 words. 

(Please circk one) 
The Heart The Klsi The Cupid 

My Message: 

(Please type or print) 



THE KISS 
$10 

(AcWalSize) 




If^CL \0\JrlLJ Name/number of person sending ad. 



55 

(Actual Size) 




Ronald Weber is assigned to the Navy Cargo Handling and Port Group in Williamsburg, Va. (Photo by Navy 
Photographer Thomas E. Butt). 



Virginia Beach residents on 
the move in the military 



For more information call 547-4571 



Honors 

• Cpl. Lloyd G.Summerville Jr., 

son of Frankie M. Summerville 
of Virginia Beach has been 
decorated with the Army 
Achievement Medal at Fort Polk, 
.La. ^ 

Summerville is a team leader 
j with the Fifth Infantry Division. 

Sgt. Gail R. Gurnee, daughter 
;of George W. and Sheila M. 
Gurnee of Virginia Beach, has 
been named outstanding non- 
commissioned officer of the year 
for the 347th Tactical Fighter 
Wing at Moody Air Force Base, 
Ga. 

Gurnee is an outpatient ser- 
vices supervisor with the Air For- 
ce Hospital. 

Promotions 

David J. Pace, son of Nellie M. 
Kundtz of Virginia Beach, has 
been promoted in the U.S. Air 
Force to the rank of lieutenant 
colonel. 

Pace is a Software Support 
Branch chief at Offutt Air Force 
Base, Neb., with the Air Force 
Global Weather Central. 

Navy Ensign Michael A. 
Yukish, a 1978 graduate of 
Kellam High School in Virginia 
Beach, was commissioned in his 
present rank upon completion of 
Aviation Officer Candidate 
School. 

Training 

Pvt. 1st Class Philip A. 
Lukens, son of Frank A. Lukens 
of Virginia Beach, has completed 
the tactical communications 
systems course at Fort Sill, Okla. 

He is a 1982 graduate of Kem- 
psville High School. 

Navy Airman Martin C. Car- 
ter, son of retired Marine Corps 
Master Sgt. and Mrs. Michael C. 
Carter of Virginia Beach, has 
graduated from the Air Traffic 
Controller School. 

A 1985 graduate of Green Run 
High School, he joined the Navy 
in May 1984. 

Navy Seaman Recruit Lorri A. 
Scott, daughter of Bonnie K. and 
Dempsie F. Scott Jr. of Virginia 
Beach, has completed recruit 
training at Recruit Training 
Command Orlando, FL. 

A 1985. graduate of Gr«n 
Run High School, she joined the 
Navy in September 1985. 

Navy Seaman Recruit Julia H. 
Gage, daughter of Jackie L. and 
Anne A. H^^riscsn "oT Virginia 
Beach, has completed recruit 
training at Recruit Training 
Command Orlando, FL. 

A 1982 graduate of Floyd E. 
Kellam High School, she joined 
the Navy in September, 1985. 

Navy Seaman Recruit Jerry O. 
Roberts, son of Jerry O. Roberts 
of Virginia Beach, has completed 
recruit training at Navy Recruit 
Trainine Command, Naval 
Trail ; '. San Diego. 



Navy Ensign Geoi^e O. Lange, 

son of Robert E. and Tomino O. 
Lange of Virginia Beach, has 
completed the Basic Surface 
Warfare Officers' Course. 

Navy Airman Apprentice 
Allan J. Parnell, son of Navy 
Capt. and Mrs. A. D. Parnell of 
Virginia Beach, has completed 
the Basic AwiQoics,.("Avi4t*P4»., 
electronics") Technician Course. 

Marine Pvt. Christiaji Rose, 
son of Hans and Heidrun Rose of 
Virginia Beach, has completed 
the Infantry Combat Training 
Course at Marine Corps Base 
Camp Lejeune, N.C. 

Navy Petty Oficer 3rd Class 
John D. Fallon, son of John S. 
and Karen A. Fallon of Virginia 
Beach, has graduated from Basic 
Electronics Technician School. 

Army Private Mark W. Dem- 
psey, son of Maurice E. Dempsey 
and stepson of Mary E. Dempsey 
of Virginia Beach, has completed 
one station unit training (OSUT) 
at the U.S. Army Infantry 
School, Fort Benning, Ga. 

The private is a 1985 graduate 
of Princess Anne High School. 

Second Lt. Mark D. Flitton, 
son of Lillian W. Flitton of 
Virginia Beach, has completed an 
armor officer basic course at the 
U.S. Army Armor School, Fort 
Knox, Ky. 

New Duty 

Airman Norman S. Bradford, 

son of retired Navy senior Chief 



Petty Officer Richard D. and , 
Margaret C. Bradford of Virginia 
Beach, has been assigned to 
Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas. 

He is a 1979 graduate of 
Kellam High School, Virginia 
Beach. 

Marine 1st Lt. Richard K. 
Davidson, son of Navy Capt. and 
, Mo^ . Richafd. ,5,„ D^idsou.^Qf ,,. 
Virginia Beach, is currently on a 
six month deployment to 
Iwakuni, Japan. 

Davidson is stationed with 
Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 
312, based in Beaufort, S.C. 

A 1979 graduate of Frank W. 
Cox High School, he joined the 
Marine Corps in May 1983. 

Airman Ronilee A. Reamer, 
daughter of retired Navy Master 
Chief Petty Officer Raymond R. 
Reamer and Dorothy L. Fulmer, 
both of Virginia Beach, has been 
assigned to Keesler Air Force 
Base, Miss. 

Airman Thomas M. Kellar, 
son of retired Navy Petty Officer 
1st Class Argel T. and Janet M. 
Kellar of Virginia Beach, has 
been assigned to Lowry Air Force 
Base, Colo. 

He is a 1985 graduate of First 
Colonial High School. 
Marine Cpl. David B. Forbes, 

son of Mr. and Mrs. Collye D. — 
Forbes of Virginia Beach, recen- 
tly reported for duty with Third 
Force Service Support Group on 
Okinawa. 




Two sought 
for crimes in 
Beach area 

Virginia Beach Crime Solvers 
is looking for two people, Angela 
Marie Miles and William Allen 
Morgan. Both are wanted in con- 
nection with crimes committed in 
Virginia Beach. 



If a tip leads to the arrest of 
either person, a reward of up to 
$1,000 will be paid. 

Miles has warrants on file 
charging her with three credit 
card thefts, three credit card 
frauds. Six forgeries'; and four ut- 
tering charges. Miles is white. 5 





Villi "; M --an 



Angela MHIs 

feet 4 inches tall, weighs 159 
pounds, has long brown hair and 
blue eyes. 

Morgan is being sought in con- 
nection with the Sept. 29 
shooting of his 42 year old 
estranged wife in the parking lot 
of Independence Jr. High 
School. Morgan is white, 5 feet 
1 1 inches tall, weighs 167 pounds 
and has gray hair and blue eyes. 

Anyone with information on 
Sec CRIME, pa|« 10 



m^m 



m^m 



mmm 



mmmm 



8 The Virginia Beach Sun, January 29, 1986 



Language barriers broken 



Conttaned from Page 1 

be able to communicate with 
facial jestures. 

"This can be a real challenge 
for the teachers because the 
students all speak different 
languages," R. L. Clark, adult 
education specialist, said. "We 
counted once and there were 
something like 27 different coun- 
tries and about 20 languages 
represented. Of course, these 
figures are always changing as 
students come and go." 

At Level I all four of the basic 
skills are dealt with 
simultaneously, Kierman said. In 
the higher levels, as the students' 
skills improve time can be spent 
on individual skills. 

Because the teachers cannot 
converse with the students in 
their native languages much of 
the teaching is done with visual 
aids. 

"In Level I it is best to start 
with body parts?" fiahds, feet, 
I«gs, face, then move to 



the students in the learning 
process. 

When students first enter the 
program they are given an oral 
and a written test. This aids in 
determining at which level they 
should enter. They are also tested 
to move up to higher levels. 

"Listening can keep a student 
in a level a little longer," Kier- 
man said. "This is because it is a 
skill they need to develop most: 
hearing and understanding what 
they have heard. If they don't 
comprehend what they are 
hearing they can't take notes. " 

The ESL program is constantly 
being revised and upgraded to 
better meet the needs of the 
students, James Dardent, adult 
education administrator, said. 
Many of the exercises used in the 
classes are designed by the 
teachers. 

New coursM 

New this year is a creative 
writing and American literature 




Maria Cartagena, from Puerto Rico, and Christiane Thomaschld, from 
Germany, are students in Level IV of the ESL program. 



clothing," Kierman said. "We class for students in the higher 
start with nouns. From hands, levels. The students spend an 
for example, you can move on to hour a day in the class. They are 
numbers and left and right." «^s«l to American literature, 

1 '^pe sy^^em progtessM tA r oiigh ^ y^n^yhi in BwiM»-<Bany -of than, 
cfalbrs and furniture in the class- "^Tli^*!!^ also given a chance to 
room up to pictures of objects, try their hand at creative writing 



like household items. The next 
step is teaching the students per- 
sonal information, including 
name, address and telephone 
number. 

In these lessons the students 
hear the teacher say the word, 
then say the word themselves. 
They see a picture of the object 
and write the word also. 

Because the program has con- 
tinuous enrollment, lessons are 
repeated regularly. This aids all 

Beachg 
hungry 



in English. 

The students are also very in- 
terested in how the American 
legal system works. 

"They want to know about 
property deeds, how a person can 
register a will and what to do 
when they are served with a 
warrant," Dardent said. "They 
are very interested in how the 
democratic system works. 

To provide the students with 
this information, the ESL 
program is starting to bring in 
members of the community to 



lecture on these subjects. 

"Some of our students, for 
example, are very frightened of 
the police," Kierman^said. "This 
is because in their owq country 
the police often mean trouble. 
They don't understand that when 
a police officer speaks to them he 
may just be being friendly or only 
wants information." 

Meeting members of the local 
police department could help to 
dispel this fear, she added. 

For students in Level IV lear- 
ning to speak English like 
Americans do is one of their 
goals. Some studied English in 
their own countries, but what 
they learned was British English. 
This is very different from the 
English Americans speak, Kier- 
man said. 

"We are learning to speak 
every day English, like 
Americans," Thomaschki said. 
"We learn the idioms and every- 
thing, which is what I wanted." 

For Maria Qartageni the 
idioms are very conf\ising. 

"I And the idioms very con- 
fusing," she said. "My step- 
children will say something is 
bad, but they mean it is very 
good. Sometimes I Just don't un- 
derstand. 

Cartagena, whose husband is 
stationed here with the Navy, is 
from Puerto Rico. She is hoping 
to develop her English to the 
point where she can return to 
teaching, as she did in her home- 
land. 

ESL classes are offered both 
during the day and in the 
evening. For many of the studen- 
ts the classes are a family affair. 
Husbands and wives or parents 
and children, sometimes whole 
families enroll in the classes 
together. 

Many, like a father and son 
from China, attend classes in the 
morning and then go straight to 
their jobs. Learning to speak 
English is very important to 
them. 

ESL classes are offered at 
A.L.C., 4722 Jericho Rd. Mon- 
day through Friday from 9 a.m. 
to 1 p.m. and on Tuesday and 
Thursday from 7 to 9 p.m. 

Starting this weet adttll- 
education is offering classes af 
two new locations. Plaza, and 
Brandon Junior High Schdols. 
ESL will be offered at these sites. 
It meets at Plaza Junior High on 
Tuesday and Thursday and at 
Brandon on Monday and Wed- 
nesday. Both classes are from 7 
to 9 p.m. 

Adult Educations coursies are 
offered at seven locations in 
Virginia Beach. The courses 
range from adult basic education 
to computer classes to crafts. In- 
formation on classes is available 
at A.L.C. and all city libraries. 




oers won't go 
this summer 



— rz=r7Z By Lee CahiU 

aty CodhcO Keporter 

Beachgoers shouldn't go 
hungry next summer. Not in 
. Virginia Beach. 

First, City Council approved 
outdoor cafes along the board- 
walk operated under a city fran- 
chise. 

Recently it approved two more 
ordinances which will make 
eating easier on the strip. 

One ordinance permits mobile 
vendors at four city stub streets. 
They also will operate under a 
franchise with the city. 

Skip Hendricks, representing 
the Hotel and Motel Owners 
Association, said the association 
is not opposed to mobile vending, 
but doesn't want a lot of litter. 
He asked that the vending 
operations be evaluated the first 
year to determine whether the ef- 
fect is positive. 

Robert Wigg, a local vendor 
endorsed the ordinance, saying 
that vendors now have no place 
to go. 

The other permits heachg<nr'. 
to carry their own fooid and 
drinks to the beach so long as the 
containers are not glass and the 
drinks are not alcoholic. 

But another ordinance ap- 
proved last week is bad news for 
fishermen. It will be unlawful to 
fish from the sand beaches south 
of 42nd Street in Virginia Beach 
Borough between 10 a.m. and 5 
p.m. from Memorial Day 
weekend through '.abor Day 
weekend. The prol ibition has 
always been an un /ritten rule. 



but the oriUnance Jeave^ no 
doubt. 

Another ordinance which makes 
it unlawful for anyone tq sleep on 
the beaches between 8 p.m. and 8 
a.m. was amended to give 
operators of cleaning equipment 
authority to request people to 
move out of the way of the 
cleaning equipment. It adds to 
the ban on sleeping impeding of 
the operation of the beach 
cleaning equipment. 

With attention to aesthetics, 
council has also approved or- 
dinance changes pertaining to the 
use of recently-acquired mobile 
refuse containers in the Virginia 
Beach Borough. 

The containers are provided by 
the city. These and privately- 
owned bulk refuse containers 
(dumpsters) have to be located 
out of public view. The changes 
also limit to 200 pounds the 
amount of refuse placed in the 
mobile container. Call for collec- 
tion seven days a week from May 
1 through Sept. 30, six days a 
week Monday throiigh Saturday, 
April 1 through Oct. 31, and four 
days a week Monday, Tuesday, 
Thursday and Friday, Nov. 1 
through March 31. 

The mobile containers also 
have to be removed out of view 
of the public no more than two 
hours after collection. 

Action on a sixth ordinance 
was deferred. The ordinance 
eliminated the requirement to 
post signs indicating prohibition 
of bicycle riding. The deferral of 
two weeks, however, was to allow 
a review of moped use on side- 
walks. 



Councilman Robert G. Jones 
questioned the elimination of the 
signs. He said his son was 
arrested for riding a bike on the 
boardwalk, outside of the bike 
path. He said he was not in favor 
of removing conspicuous signs, 
remarking that his son had 
received no warning. 

"To be frank, there really are 
no signs," said Michael Barrett, 
administrative assistant to the 
Resort Area Advisory Com- 
mission (RAAQ which recom- 
mended a review of the Beach or- 
dinances. He said that signs in- 
volve an expense and would 
resuh in sign pollution. The law 
already prohibits bicycle or 
moped riding on any sidewalk 
within the City except sidewalks 
that have been designated as 
bicycle or moped routes. Riders 
also are restricted to the path 
marked on the boardwalk for 
bike riding. 

Councilman Robert Fentress 
said that bike riders should know 
they're not supposed to ride on 
the other side of the line, but, he 
added, "I'm sorry your son got 
arrested." 

Fentress said regulations are 
needed for mopeds which 'ride all 
over the place.'.' He also said that 
part of the bike path on the 
boardwalk is too narrow. No 
bikes stay on that bike path." 

He asked that the use of 
mofseds on the sidewalks be 
reviewed. 

Councilman H. Jack Jennings 
Jr. abstained, saying that he or a 
member of his family may apply 
for a franchise. 



Level I ESL students are hard at work. At the table are, from left, Kyona Campbell, Yong Hwa, and 
Fatima Colson. \_/ 



Put on their dancing shoes 



Conllnutd from Page 1 
aids the students greatly in lear- 
ning their trade. Professional 
choreographers and dancers are 
often brought in to work with the 
students. The directors of the 
various Music in Motion com- 
panies also travel to work with 
students in other locations. 

Currently Thuesen and her 
daughter Nancy, who also runs 
an affiliate company in Ken- 
tucky, are here working the 
Virginia Beach students for their 
upcoming performance. 

Thuesen said that having them 
work with the professionals, 
helps the students to better un- 
derstand the profession they are 
considering. The companies have 
high standards and all members 
must audition to join the group. 
As a prerequisite students must 
have completed at least one year 
of classical ballet. 



Performances also' put high 
demands on the students. For 
example, when the students 
recently had two days off from 
school, both days they were in the 
stu,dio from 1 1 a.m. to 5 p.m. for 
rehearsals. This is in addition to 
their regular dance classes in the 
evening. 

Christy Montuoro, A2, of 
Virginia Beach says the upcoming 
performance has created a hectic 
schedule for her, as she is in the 
studio for rehearsals most 
evenings until 9 p.m. Sunday is 
the one day they do not have 
practice, she said. 

"Sometimes it is hard for my 
friends to understand," Mon- 
tuoro said. "When I have to 
devote so much time to my dan- 
cing we kind of drift apart. But it 
is something I am use to, having 
been dancing for eight years." 




Two generations of Music in Motion teachers, Barbara (front) and 
Nancy Thuesen, work with dancers. 

\ 



Auxiliary to hold eight 
annual auction/buffet 



Over 125 items will be available 
for auction af the 8th annual 
Auction/Buffet sponsored by the 
Auxiliary of Virginia Beach 
General Hospital on Friday, Jan. 
31 at the Cavalier Conference 
Center and Beach Club. 

The event will begin at 6 p.m. 
with a silent auction featuring a 
variety of art works, hand- 
knitted sweaters and dinner cer- 



tificates. At the conclusion of the 
auction, the auxiliary will raffle 
offa 1986 Ford Escort.. 

The proceeds from the fun- 
draiser will be used to help pur- 
chase of a mamography 
radiographic unit. 

The ticket price of $20 per per- 
son includes the buffet and open 
bar. For information call 464- 
1022. 




This custom-bnHt Bradley GT automobile is one of the many items 
available for auction at the Eighth Annual Auction/Buffet sponsored 
by the Auxiliary of Vii^inla Beach General Hospital on Friday, Jan. 
31. 



Darlene Kelly, co-director of 
the Virginia Beach company, said 
she is extremely impressed with 
the dedication of the students. 

"Especially this close to a per- 
formance a lot of demands are 
placed on the students' time," 
Kelly said. "Dance is important 
to them and that is why they are 
here. They must really budget 
their time. Some even bring their 
school books with them and work 
during rehearsal breaks." 

For Breslin and Moore the time 
schedule is not a problem, they 
just want to learn as much as they 
can. The boys say how they en 
ded up in the company is "as bit 
weird." 

"We are breakdancers and 
auditioned for "Street Games" 
which was choreographed by 
Darlene and Judith Hatcher (She 
is the other co-director of the 
company)," Moore said. 

"1 was acutally a street mime," 
Breslin chimed in. "Yea, that was 
before we knew how to dance." 
" ' "fhey received scholarships to 
study at Kelly and Hatcher's 
studio, the King's Grant 
Academy of Dance. Both are 
nOw planning to pursue careers as 
dancers. 

"My friends think I'm crazy 
for going into dance," Breslin 
said. "They spend all their time 
playing basketball and stuff. But 
they don't joke me around about 
it. I used to play sports too, but I 
gave it up for dance." 

One of the pieces the company 
will be performing in their up- 
coming show is "Tlie loius 
Tree," choreographed by 
Thuesen. It was originally per 
formed by the first Music in 
Motion company here in Virginia 
Beach in 1967. 

The allegorical tale of a young 
handicapped girl, Marie, shun- 
ned by villagers is an adaplafton 
of a story by Tony Vickers. Nan- 
cy Thuesen performs the part of 
Marie and the Lotus Tret 
played by Hughes. 

"You can see that the parts 
played by older members of the 
company really test thei' 
technical skills, "Thuesen said, 
during a rehearsal of "The Lok- 
Tree." "There are simpler pari' 
for the junior members of tin 
company, but they still ar 
gaining valuble skills." 

Designing a piece to suit dm'. 
cers of varying skills is . 
challenge choreograpically, sht 
said. This often means reworking 
parts of a dance or creating a 
whole new piece. 

Hatcher, now a director and 
teacher, was a member of the 
original Lotus Tree cast. 

"The beauty of Music in 
Motion is that it is ongoing," she 
said. "It has a strong past, 
having been around for 20 years, 
and a promising future. 

Hatcher said that Music in 
Motion helped her to fulfill her 
dance dreams of being a teacher 
and choreographer. 

"Barbara once said, if she 
could create one good dancer and 
one good teacher her work would 
be completed," she said. "The 
good dancer, of course is her 
daughter Nancy. 1 made 'a promise 
to myself that I wouki the good 
teacher." 

A unique piece in the up- 
coming show is "Childsong." It is a 
folk ballet set to the music of Neil 
Diamond and incorporates the 
language of deaf-signing with the 
language of dance. Signing will 
be performed by members of the 
Tidewater A§§oc«tion for the 
Hearing-Impaired . 

1^ 



The Virginia Beach Sun, January 29. 1986 9 




V «■ « V- V v^ 



"*^^l^^ 






mm^ 



10 The Virginia Beach Sun, January 29, 1986 




Residents angered by relignment 



By Del. Glenn B. McClanan 

Ashley McDaniel, 13, an 
eighth grade student at Indepen- 
dence Junior School, was chosen 
from 49 applicants from the 84th 
House of Delegates District, to be 
a Page during the 1986 session of 
the Virginia General Assembly. 
She is the daughter of Lee and 
Shirley McDaniel, 

During her stay in Richmond, 
McDaniel is residing at the John 
Marshall Hotel wkhlhe other 
Pages. So that she will not get 
behind in her classees, she has a 
mandatory study hall from 7:30 
to 9:30 p.m. McDaniel said her 
main problem is that she cannot 
take any tests away from her 
school, and will have to take 
them upon her return. 

As a Page, she does errands for 
the extremely busy state 
legislators, freeing their time to 
concentrate on the many issues 
before them. For two weeks, she 
works on bill books, making sure 



all of the delegates have copies of 
the many pieces of legislation. 
For the next two weeks, Mc- 



Daniel will be working on the 
House floor, where she responds 
to any request the legislators may 
make during the meeting. 

Ahhough she is having a lot of 
fun and meeting many interesting 
people, she says the job is hard 
work. However, this hard work 
haS'taught b«r. » iot^ about 4|ie 
legislative process and she is con- 
fident that she will learn even 
more during the remainder of the 
sixty day session. 

Delegate Glenn B. McClanan, 
84th District, said "Ashley is 
becoming keen around the 
General Assembly for her frien- 
dly smile and her willingness to 
work. She does so much for so 
many people without complain- 
ts.' He added that "Ashley is 
definitely starting early to be a 
good citizen." 



Master road plan amended to 
include Southeastern Expressway 

By Lee Cahill .. ot Highways and Transportation. 



Cil) Council Reporter 

The city's Master Street and 
Highway Plan has been amended 
to include the Southeastern Ex- 
pressway. 

When the road was first 
proposed by Councilman Robert 
G. Jones in 1983, it met with a 
lukewarm response. The council 
then showed no interest in having 
it studied by the state Department 

Public hearing 
on station site 
scheduled 

The Virginia Beach City Coun- 
cil will hold a public hearing on 
the selection of a refuse transfer 
station site on Monday, Feb. 3, at 
2p.m. 

The public hearing will be held 
in the City Council Chambers at 
the Municipal Center and will in- 
volve the sites of: Cleveland 
Street; Greenwich Road; North 
Landstown Road, or London 
Bridge/Crusader Circle. 

The transfer station will be a 
distribution center for the tran- 
sfer or refuse to a disposal area. 
The building will be enclosed 
with vehicles traveling into and 
emptying inside the facility. 

For information, call the 
Department of Public 
Works/Solid Waste, 427-4201 . 

Crime Line 

Continued from page 7 

the location of either of these or 
any other wanted person should 
call Crime Solvers at 427-0000. 

Rewards are also paid for in- 
formation on the location of 
stolen property and drugs'or any 
other crime. 



Inclusion in the city plan, 
however, will promote state and 
regional studies. 

The six-lane road would be a 
limited-access highway beginning 
at the Laskin Road interchange 
of the Virginia Beach/Norfolk 
Expressway. It would run south 
along part of London Bridge 
Road, veering to the southwest 
where it would cross into 
Chesapeake and hook up with In- 
terstates 64 and 464. 

Voting against the road's in- 
clusion in the plan were Vice 
Mayor Reba McClanan and 
Councilwoman Barbara Henley. 

Chesapeake City Council 
members have been enthusiastic 
about the project from the start. 



LEGAL NOTICES 



of 



of 



Office of the Commissioner 

Accounts 

Circuit Court of the City 

Virginia Beach, Virgiia 

January 21, 1986 

William 0. Sherman, Jr., 

Deceased 

NOTICE is hereby given, pur- 
suant to Section 64. 1-1 71 Code of 
Virginia, that the undersigned 
Commissioner of Accounts, 
having for settlement the account 
of William O. Sherman, III, 
Executor of the Estate of William 
O. Sherman, Jr., deceased, and 
having been requested so to do, 
has appointed the 12th day of 
February, 1986, at 3:00 p.m.. at 
129 S. Great Neck Road, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, as the time and 
place for receiving proof of debts 
and demands against the 
decedent or his estate. 
Stanley A. Phillips 
Commissioner of Accounts 
231-14 11 1-29 VB 



C'onlinued from Page I 

The project is intended to 
correct the unsafe .intersection at 
Indian River and Elbow Roads 
while providing an adequate* 
right-of-way width (110 feet) for 
a six-lane facility on Indian River 
road. 

The homes of both James 
Moseley, at 4686 Indian River 
Road, and his mother, Sarah 
Moseley, at 4768 Indian River 
Road, located at the -northern 
part of the improvement, will be 
taken by the realignment. 

Moseley asked council to curve 
the road on the opposite side of 
the street to save the homes. He 
said that the properties have been 
in the family for more than 100 
years. He has been living in his 
home for 17 years, and his 
mother in hers for 24 years. 

He said he had not been 
notified about the public hearings 
on the road project. 

Moseley also said that council 
did the people an injustice by 
permitting new development in 
the are& without considering the 
impact on the road. He said -a— 
developer has begQTT blllldlTig"" 
homes in an area which could 
have been used for a road. 

The plan selected by council 



uses the existing alignment of In- 
dian River Road south of Elbow 
Road and a new alignment north 
of Elbow Road which follows 
that provided by an alternative 
proposed by the neighborhood 
extending approximately 1600 
feet north-northwest from 
existing Indian River at Elbow 
Road. There, the alignment 
follows the alignment provided 
by the neighborhood to the 
existing alignment at the 
Rosemont Forest subdivision. 

The cost of this plan, recom- 
mended by the Planning Depar- 
tment, will be lowest of all the 
alternatives. It will be east of an 
area of Stumpy Lake where the 
soil would make it more expen- 
sive to build a road. The length of 
Independence Boulevard would 
be shortened by approximately 
600 feet. The overall length is ap- 
proximately 2000 feet shorter 
than the neighborhood alternate. 

The alternate also will bring 

the road within 10 feet of the 

home of Howard Everton, of 

4253 Indian River road, and 

"iroven of his neightjors. 

Couincilman Dr. J. Henry Mc- 
Coy Jr. made an motion to 
choose the neighborhood plan, 
but the motion was lost when a 



substitute motion, made by 
Councilman John A. Bauni, 
passed. 

Voting against the Baum 
motion wg-e McCoy, Vice Mayor 
Reba McClanan, and Coun- 
cilwomen Barbara flenley and 
Meyera Obemdorf . 

Moseley said that the city 
should have talked to him at an 
earlier date. 

McCoy replied that every ef- 
fort was made to contact the 
neighbors before two public 
meetings. 

Moseley said that his mother 
had received a call from the 
Planning Department last Thur- 
sday to look at the plans. "My 
house is in the middle of the 
road," he said. 

All of the proposals affect the 
Moseley family, he said, and 
aske() CouncU to find another 
way. He said that the people 
should not be penalized for not 
knowing about the meetings. 
That isn't a crime, he said, but 
"to cause my mother to find 
another place, that wQjgM.be, a 
crime." — — , 

Everton said that the quality of 
his community was more 
valuable than that of a com- 
.jQunLty still on paper. He refgjTgd_ 



to Glenwood, a subdivision being 
constructed in the area by R. G. 
Moore. 

He said the neighborhood plan 
would have the least impact oh- 
the community. Whh that alter- 
native only one of the Moseley 
homes would be taken . 

Baum said he couldn't see how i 
anyone could say the niegh- 
borghood proposal was good 
alignment. He recalled that a 
speaker had said there was not a 
straight road in Virginia Beach, 
"but we can at least try . " 

Everton said that the problem 
had no easy solution. The neigh- 
borhoQji alignment is less 
straight, but would not bring the 
road 10 feet of the front door of 
eight residences. 

He said that the hybrid version 
would have the same impact on 
the community as one of the 
other alignments. 



McCoy said that "We can't 
spare everyone," and agreed with 
Everton. 

His motion drew applause. 
When Baum made his motion, 
there was a smattering of ap- 
plause. . 

As the losers gathered in the 
hallway later, the atmosphere 
was of disillusionment, 
hopelessness and anger. 



Ashley McDaniel, a Page, serving during the 1986 Session of the 
Virginia General Assembly shares a bill with Delegate Glenn B. Mc- 
Clanan, 84th District, her sponsor. 



Beach girl working 
as Assembly Page 







LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOnCBS 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 
The Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission will hold a Public 
Hearing on Tuesday, February 
11, 1986 at 12:00 Noon in the 
Council Chambers of the City 
Hall Building, Princess Anne 
Courthouse, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. A briefing session will 
be held at 9:00 a.m. in the Plan- 
ning Department Conference 
Room, Operations Building. 
Planning commission action is 
not a final determination of the 
application, but only a recom- 
mendation to the City Council as 
the viewpoint of the Planning 
commission. Final determination 
of the application is to be made 
by City Council at a later date, 
after Public Notice in a 
; aewSpapet having general cir- 
v?j]teiie» withjin.the Oty. 
Those members of the public in- 
terested in attending the Public 
Hearing should be advised that, 
for reasons the Planning Com- 
mission deems appropriate, cer- 
tain items on the agenda may be 
heard out of order and that it 
should not be assumed that the 
order listed below will be exactly 
followed during the Public 
Hearing. 

The staff reviews of some or all 
of the items on this agenda 
suggest that certain conditions be 
attached to approval by City 
Council. However, it should not 
be assumed that those conditions 
constitute all the conditions that 
will ultimately be attached to the 
project. Staff agencies may im- 
pose further conditions and 
requirements during ad- 
ministration o^ applicable city 
ordinances. 

REGULAR AGENDA: 
SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 

1. Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard 
to certain elements of the Sub- 
division Ordinance, Subdivision 
for Patricia F. Hurd. Property is 
located 370 feet more or less 
Southwest of the Southern ter- 
minus of Hurds Road. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION: 

2. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Galore Associates for 
Earl and Lula P. Wilson for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from AG-2 Agricultural District 
to R-6 Residential District on 
property located on the East side 
of Holland Road, 2300 feet 
South of Monet Drive. Said par- 
cel contains 3.95 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

3. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Galore Associates for 
Earl and Lula PI Wilson for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from AG-1 Agricultural District 
on R-6 Residential District on 
property located 600 feet East of 
Holland Road, 2210 feet more or 
less South of Monet Drive. Said 
parcel contains 20.06 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Departent of 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 



BOROUGH. 

4. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Herbert C. Scott for 
a Change of Zoning District 
Classification from AG'2 
Agricultural District to R-3 
Residential District on certain 
property located on the West side 
of Seaboard Road, 1200 f^t 
more or less North of Princess 
Anne Road. Said parcel is located 
at 2329 Seaboard Road and con- 
tains 3 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of G. C. Manson, Jr. 
and Margaret L. Manson for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
Jrom A-1 Apartment District to 
B-4 Resort-Commercial District 
on the North side of 28th Street, 
150 feet West of Pacific Avenue 
on Lot 3, Block 2, Central Park. 
Said parcel is located at 312 28th 
Street and contain 7500 square 
feet. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of J. J. Waterfield and 
Marie B. Waterfield for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-7 Residential District to 
A-2 Apartment District on 
property located on the North 
side of Virginia Avenue, 370 feet 
West of Rudee Avenue. Said par- 
cel is located at 1001 Virginia 
Avenue and contains 10,410.84 
square feet. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in -the Department of 
Planning. VIRGINIA BEACH 
BOROUGH. 

7. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of J. J. Waterfield and 
Marie B. Waterfield for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from A-1 Apartment District to 
A-2 Apartment District on 
property located on the North 
side of Virginia Avenue, 490 feet 
West of Rudee Avenue. Said par- 
cel is located at 1001 Virginia 
Avenue and contains 1 .438 acres. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 

8. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Elsi-Wan for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-6 Residential District to 
R-8 Residential District on cer- 
tain property located on the West 
side of Riddle Avenue beginning 
at a point 115 feet South of Air- 
station Drive. Said parcel con- 
tains 2.86 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

9. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Perkins Building 
Corporation for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from A-1 
Apartment District to A-2 Apar- 
tment District certain property 
located on the South side of Old 
Virginia Beach Road, 587 feet 
West of S. Birdneck Road. Said 
parcel contains 1.31 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 



of Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

10. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Reid Farm 
Associates for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFCIATION from R-6 
Residential District to A-2 Apar- 
tment District on certain property 
located at the Southwest corner 
of Virginia Beach Toll Road and 
Pritchard Road. Said parcel con- 
tains 28.774 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

11. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Lyie L. Tatroe and 
Earle W. Greene for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-5 
Residential District to B-2 Com- 
munity-Business on certain 
property located at the Southwest 
corner of Salem Road and 
Recreation Drive. Said parcel 
contains 14.8 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

12. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Beachtowne Realty 
Corp., T/A Beachtown Builders, 
for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-8 Residential District to 
B-2 Community-Business District 
on certain property located on 
the South side of Bonney Road, 
327 feet West of Alicia Drive. 
Said parcel contains 34,848 
square feet. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Delpartment of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

13. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of County View Mobile 
Court for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from I-l 
Light Industrial District to B-2 
Community-Busiifess District on 
certain property located oh the 
West side of Euclid Road, 75 feet 
South of Norfolk & Southern 
Railroad. Said parcel contains 
28,953 square feet. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 

14. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of County View Mobile 
Court for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for gasoline pum- 
ps on certain property located on 
the West side of Euclid Road 
beginning at a point 75.53 feet 
South of Norfolk & Southern 
Railroad. Said parcel cwjtains 
1.022 acres. Plats witli mOre 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

15. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dr. Kanak R. Roy 
for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for a private club on 
the East side of Kempsville Road, 
503 feet North of Lobaugh Drive. 
Said parcel is located at 810. 
Kempsville Road and contains 
37,026 square feet. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 



16. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Jan Kottke for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a preschool on the Northeast 
side of Indian River Road begin- 
ning at a point 2486.23 feet 
Southeast of Elbow Road. Said 
parcel is located at 4100 Indian 
River Road and contains 1.5 
acres. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in the 
Department of Planning. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

17. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Arthur K. Downs for 
a CONDITIONAL USE PER- 
MIT for an auto repair 
establishment on certain property 
located on the North side of 
Princess Anne Road, 420 feet 
more or less East of Kempsville ' , 
Road. Said parcel is located at 
3124 Princess Anne Road and 
contains 25,164.75 square feet. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. KEM- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

18. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Robert Lee Sowder, 
II and Paula M. Sowder for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a single family dwelling in the 
AG-1 Agricultural District on 
certain property located 520 feet 
more or less Northwest of the in- 
tersection .of Muddy Creek Road 
and Shipps Cabin Road. Said 
parcel contains 5.1 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. PUNGO 
BOROUGH. 

STREET CLOSURlE: 

19. Application of County View 
Mobile Court for the discon- 
tinuance, closure and aiiandon- 
ment of a portion of Ohio 
Avenue beginning at a point 
75.53 feet South of Southern " 
Boulevard and running in a 
Southerly direction a distance of 

360 feet more or less. Said parcel 
contains 21,606 square feet. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. K^M- 
PSVILLE BOROUGH. 

20. Application of PS Associate's 
11, Ltd., for the discontinuance, 
closure and abandonment of a 
portion of Branksome Drive 
located 590 feet more or less Nor- 
theast of S. Indepertdence 
Boulevard, 520 feet Northwest of 
Edwin Drive and running in a 
Northwesterly direction a distan- 
ce of 305.24 feet. Said parcel con- 
tains 19,514.88 square feet. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 
AMENDMENTS: 

21. Motion of the Planning 
commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article 1, 
Section III of the Comprehensive 
Zoning Ordinance pertaining to 
definition of billboards. More 
detailed information is available 

in the Department of Planning. % 

22. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article 2, 
Section 216 of the Comprehen- 
sive Zoning Ordinance pertaining 
to billboards. More detailed in- 
formation is available in the 
Department of Planning. 

23. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 



The Virginia Beach Sun, January 29, 1986 11 



Wfe/lim 








c-p 




LEGAL NOTICES 



n 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES'' 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article 2, 
Section 237 of the Comprehen- 
sive Zoning Ordinance pertaining 
to billboards. More detailed in- 
formation is available in the 
Department of Planning. 

24. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virgina, to 
amend and reordain Article 9, 
Section 91 1(c) of the Comprehen- 
sive Zoning Ordinance pertaining 
to use regulations for billboards. 
More detailed information is 
available in the Department of 
Planning. 

25. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article 10, 
Section 100 1(c) of the Com- 
prehensive Zoning Ordinance 
pertaining to use regulations for 
billboards. More detailed infor- 
mation is available in the Depart- 
ment of Planning. 

26. Motion of the Planning 
Commission oif the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article 10, 
Section 1011(c) of the Com- 
prehensive Zoning Ordinance 
pertaining to use regulations for 
billboards. More detailed infor- 
mation is available in the Depar- 
tment of Planning. 

27. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article 10, 
Section 1014 of the Comprehen- 
sive Zoning Ordinance pertaining 
to sign regulations for billboards. 
More detailed information is 
available in the Department of 
planning. 

28. Motion of the Planning 
commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Section 5 of 
the Site Plan Ordinance per- 
taining to underground utilities. 
More detailed information is 
available in the Department of 
Planning. 

29. Motion, of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article 2, 
Section 225 of the Compreheri- 
sive Zoning Ordinance pertaining 
to bicycle rental establishments. 
More detailed information is 
available in the Department of 
Planning. 

DEFERRED INDEFINITELY 
BY PLANNING COMMISSION 
ON JUNE 11, 1985: 

30. Application of George 
Loizbu, Andreas Loizou and Ef- 
thymios Loizou for the discon- 

.tinuance, closure and abandon- 
ment of a portion of Broad Street 
beginning at the Southeast corner 
of Broad Street and Pennsylvania 
Avenue and running in an 
Easterly direction a distance of 
250 feet to the Southwest corner 
of Broad Street and Southgate 
Avenue. Said parcel is 60 feet in 
width and contains 15,000 square 
feet. BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
DEFERRED FOR 60 DAYS BY 
PLANNING COMMISSION 
ON DECEMBER 10, 1985: 

31. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Section 4.1 
of the -Subdivision Ordinance 
pertaining to streets and alleys. 
More detailed information is 
available in the Department of 
Planning. 

32. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Section 4.4 
of the Subdivision Ordinance 
pertaining to lots. More detailed 
information is available in the 
Department of Planning. 

33. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article 5, 
Sections 573 and 582 of the 
Comprehensive Zoning Ordinan- 
ce pertaining to minimum lot 
area, lot width, yard spacing, 
maximum lot coverage and 
height regulations in the R-8 and 
R-9 Districts. More detailed in- 
formation is available in the 
Department of Planning. 

34. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach. Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article 6, 
Sections 602 and 613 of the 
Comprehensive Zoning Ordinan- 
ce pertaining to minimum lot 
area, lot width, yard spacing, 
recreation space, maximum den- 
sity, height and lot coverage 
regulations in the A-1 and A-2 
Apartment Districts. More 
detailed information is available 
in the Department of Planning. 



35. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Thomas F. Owens, 
Sr. for a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from A-1 Apartment District tq 
A-4 Apartment District on the 
East and West sides of Realty 
Avenue, 420 feet South of Old 
Virginia Beach Road on Parcels 
E, J, K, L and M, Block Oceana 
Gardens. Said parcels contain 
1.776 acres. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

DEFERRED FOR 30 DAYS BY 
PLANNING COMMISSION 
OIVI JANUARY 14, 1986: 

36. Motion J of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article 2, 
Section 221(E), of the Com- 
prehensive Zoning Ordinance 
pertaining to procedural 
requirements and general stan- 
dards"foTiconditional uses. More 
detailed information is available 
in the Department of Planning. 

37. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, to 
amend and reordain Article 1, 
Section 107(f) of the Comprehen- 
sive Zoning Ordinance pertaining 
to amendments. More detaifiS"^ 
information is available in the 
Department of Planning . 

Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 

Robert J. Scott ' 
Director of Planning 
229-16 2t 2-5 VB 

Take notice, that on January 
31, 1986, at 10:00 o'clock a.m., 
at the premises of 4753 Virginia 
Beach Blvd., Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, 23462, the undersigned 
will sell at public auction, for 
cash only, reserving the right to 
bid, the following motor vehicle: 

1980 Jeep Pickup, Serial 
#JOD25NN00%88. 
Pembroke Auto Sales 
231-4 It 1-29 VB 

Take notice, that on Jantiary 
31, 1986, at 10:00 o'clock a.m., 
^t the premises of 47,53, .Yiifgioia 
Beach Blvd., Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, 23462, the undersigned 
will sell at public auction, for 
cash only, reserving the right to 
bid, the following motor vehicle: 

1975 Lincoln Continental, 
Serial #5Y89A8714I4. 
Pembroke Auto Sales 
231-3 It 1-29 VB 

Take notice, that on January 
31, 1986, at 10:00 o'clock a.m.-, 
at the premises of 4753 Virginia 
Beach Blvd., Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, 23462, the undersigned 
will sell at public auction, for 
cash only, reserving the right to 
bid, the following motor vehicle: 

1978 Datsun 280ZX, Serial 
#GHLS30I 11243. 

Pembroke Auto Sales 

231-2 It 1-29 VB 

Take notice, that on January 
31, 1986, at 10:00 o'clock a.m., 
at the premises of 4753 Virginia 
Beach Blvd., Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, 23462, the undersigned 
will sell at public auction, for 
cash only, reserving the right to 
bid, the following motor vehicle: 

1979 Buick Electra LTD, Serial 
#4X69X9H577165 
Pembroke Auto Sales 

231-1 It 1-29 VB :_ 

Auction: 1%5 Chevrolet Cor- 
vair. Serial Number: 

10537wl9I3I5. Auction Date: 
February 3, 1986. Time: 11:00 
a.m. at Norfolk Motor Com- 
pany, 7000 N. Military Hwy., 
Norfolk, Virginia 23518. Norfolk 
Motor Company reserves the 
right to bid. 

Norfolk Motor Company 
229-18 It 1-29 VB 

Auction: 1972 VW Bug, Serial 
Number: 1122349159, Auction 
Date: February 3, 1986. Time 
11:00 a.m. at Norfolk Motor 
Company, 7000 N. Military 
Hwy.. Norfolk, Virginia 23518. 
Norfolk Motor Company Reser- 
ves the right to bid. 
Norfolk Motor Company 
229-T7Ttl-29VB : 

In the Clerk's Office the Circuit 
Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, on the 22nd day of 
January, 1986. Doria Elizabeth 
Curies Hale, Plaintiff, against 
William Joe Hale, Jr., Defen- 
dant. 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is for the 
said plaintiff to obtain a divorce 
a mensa et thoro to be ma-g«l in- 
to a vinculo matrimonii from the 



said defendant, upon the grounds 
of desertion or cruelty. And an 
affidavit having been made and 
filed that the defendant is not a 
resident of the State of Virginia, 
the last known post office ad- 
dress being: 401 West Tague 
Street, Greenfield, Indiana, 
46140, it is ordered that he do 
appear on or before the 17th of 
March, 1986, and do what may 
be necessary to protect his in- 
terest in this suit. It is further Or- 
dered that a copy of this Order be 
published once each week for 
four successive weeks in the 
Virginia Beach Sun, a newspaper 
of general circulation in this city. 
Acopy-Teste: 
J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By: Pattie K. Bennett, D.C. 
L. S. Parsons, Esquire 
820 J St 4merican Bank Building 
300 East Main Street 
Norfolk, VA 23510 ' 
231-8 4t 2-19 VB 

VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 21st 
dayof January, 1986. 
In re: Adoption of Shannon 
Marie Sneed 

Ely: Carl Eugene Swartz and 
Susan Marie Swartz, Petitioners 

To: James Anthony Sneed 
1917 East Scott Street 

■ Pensacola, Florida 32504 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
This day came Carl Eugene 

i Swartz and Susan Pauline Swar- 
tz, Petitioners, and represented 

-that the object of this proceeding 
is to effect the adoption of the 
above named infant. Shannon 
Marie Sneed, by Cart Eugene 
Swartz and Susan PauHne Swar- 
tz, husband and wife, and af- 
fidavit having been made and 
filed that James Anthony Sneed, 
a natural parent of said 
child(ren), is a non-resident of 
the State of Virginia, the last 
known post office address being: 
1917 East Scott Street, Pen- 
sacola, Florida 32504. 

It is therefore Ordered that the 
said James Anthony Sneed ap- 
pear before this Court within ten 
(10) days after publication of this 
Order and indicate his/her at- 
titude toward the proposed adop- 
tion, or otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his/her in- 
terest in this matter. 

It is further Ordered that a 
copy of this Order be published 
once each week for four suc- 
cessive weeks in the Virginia 
Beach sun, a newspaper of 
general circulation in this city. 
A Copy Teste: 
J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By: Patti K. Bennett, D.C. 
Gary W. Searcy, p.q. 
505 S. Independence Blvd. 
Suite 212 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23452 
231-7 4t 2-19 VB 

Auction: 1974 Ford Mustang, 
Serial Number: 4F02Y265513, 
Auction Date: February 8, 1986, 
Time, 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Motor Company, 7000 N. 
Military Hwy., Norfolk, Virginia 
23518. Norfolk Motor Company 
reserves the right to bid. 
Norfolk Motor Company 
231-11 It 1-29 VB 

VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the City 
of Virginia Beach, on the 31st 
day of December, 1985 
In re: Adoption of William 
Joseph Graham 

By: Gina Michelle Morrison and 
Jon Stark Morrison, Petitioners 
To: Peter Walsh 
c/o U.S. Marines 
Quantico, Virginia 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
This day came GINA 
MICHELLE MORRISON and 
JON STARK MORRISON, 
Petitioners, and represented that 
the object of this proceeding is to 
effect the adoption of the above 
named infant(s) William Joseph 
Graham, by GINA MICHELLE 
MORRISON and JON STARK 
MORRISON, husband and wife, 
and affidavit having been made 
and filed that Peter Walsh, a 
natural parent of said child(ren) 
is a non-resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post of- 
fice address (as of October, 1983 
being: c/o U.S. Marine, Quan- 
tico, Virginia, and that due 
diligence has been used by or in 
behalf of the said petitioners to 
ascertain in which county or cor- 
poration the said natural parent 
is, without effect. 

It is therefore ORDERED that 
the said PETER WALSH app«ir 
before this Court within ten (10) 
days after publication of this Or- 
der and indicate his attitude 
toward the proposed . adoption, 
or otherwise do what is necosary 



to protect his interest in this mat- 
ter. 

It is further ORDERED that a 
copy of this Order be published 
once each week for four suc- 
cessive "weeks in The Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of 
general circulation in this city. 
A Copy Teste: 
J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By: Patti K. Bennett, D.C. 
Melvin J. Radin, Esquire 
500 Holiday Inn Waterside 
Norfolk, Virginia 235 10 
(804)623-1216 
225-18 4t 1-29 VB 

NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 
The Board of Zoning Appeals 
will conduct a Public Hearing on 
Wednesday, February 5, 1986, at 
2:00 p.m., in the Council Cham- 
bers of the City Hall Building, 
ManictpaT' Center,"' Virginia 
Beach, Virginia. The staff 
briefing will be held at 1:30 p.m., 
in the City Manager's Conference 
Room. The following ap- 
plications will appear on the 
agenda. 
REGULAR AGENDA: 

Case 1. Cecelia M. Salch 
requests a variance to allow 
parking of major recreational 
equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest por- 
tion of a building adjacent to a 
public street on Lot 12, Block C, 
Section 2, Charlestowne Lakes, 
2012 Wanda Circle. Kempsville 
Borough. 

Case 2. Valerie Cappetta 
requests a variance to allow 
parking of major recreational 
equipment in front of a building 
instead of behind the nearest por- 
tion of a building adjacent to a 
public street on Lot 135B, Block 
A," Section I, Part IB, Rosemont 
Forest, 1409 Bridle Creek 
Boulevard. Kempsville Borough. 

Case 3. James F. and 
Anastacia Davis request a varian- 
ce of 2 feet to an 8 foot side yard 
setback (west side) and of 5 feet 
to a 5 foot rear yard setback in- 
stead of 10 feet each as required 
(swimming pool) on Lot 22, 
Block B, Section 1, Colonial 
Oaks, 2208 Hunters Wood Way. 
Lynnhaven Borough. 

Case 4. Peter B. Easton, Jr. 
requests a variance of 5.8 feet to 
a 14.2 foot front yard setback in- 
stead of 20 feet as required and of 
0.9 feet to a 4.1 foot side yard 
setback (east side) instead of 5 
feet as required (2 story addition) 
on Lots 26/28, Block 23, 
Shadowlawn, 510 Virginia 
Avenue. Virginia Beach 
Borough. 

Case 5. Edwin R. and Sandra 
B. Mitchell request a variance of 
7 feet to a 3 foot rear yard set- 
back instead of 10 feet as 
required (swimming pool) on Lot 
6, Block G, Section 9, Haygood 
Point,«^728 Harris Point Drive. 
Bayside Borough. 

Case 6. David A. and Linda S. 
Arnold request a variance of 2 
feet in fence height to a 6 foot 
fence instead of a 4 foot fence as 
allowed in a required side yard 
adjacent to a street (King William 
Road) on Lot 21, Block 7, 
Diamond Springs Homes, 5537 
Haden Road. Bayside Borough. 

Case 7. David L. and Mildred 
G. Frazier request a variance of 

11 feet to a 19 foot front yard 
setback instead of 30 feet as 
required (carport) on Lot 4, 
Block J, Hilltop Manor, 1872 
Thomas Lane. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

Case 8. Hugh C. Winters 
requests a variance of 2 feet in 
fence height to a 6 foot fence in- 
stead of a 4 foot fence as allowed 
in a required front yard setback 
(Indian River Road on Lot 56, 
Westview, 725 Avella Street. 
Kempsville Borough. 

Case 9. Saverio J. Carollo 
requests a variance of 18 feet to a 

12 foot setback from Kempsville 
Road instead of 30 feet as 
required (through lot) and of 2 
feet to a 3 foot side yard setback 
(north side) instead of 5 feet as 
required (accessory building- 
storage shed) on Lot 30, Block E, 
Section 1, Fairfield, 620 Pleasant 
Hall Drive. Kempsville Borough. 

Case 10. Nelson Tibbitt 
requests a variance of 6 parking 
spaces to 44 parking spaces in- 
stead of 50 parking spaces as 
required (2400 square feet for a 
restaurant and 5100 square feet 
for general offices) <5*i Lot A. 
Plat of Lakeside Convalescent 
Home, London Bridge Area, 
2548 Virginia B«ich Boulevard, 
#104. Lynnhaven Borough. 

Case 11. M. Shevel and Jean. 
F. Siff request a variance of 5 fe« 
to a 3 foot side yard setbfxk (east 



side) instead of 8 feet as required 
(deck) on Lot 15 and part of Lot 
17, Block 17, Section D. Caoe 
Henry Syndicate, 114 80th 
Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 

Case 12. Richard L. and 
Deborah L. Boodboy request a 
variance of 8 feet 2 inches to a 1 
foot 10 inch rear yard setback 
and of 8 foot 6 inches to a 1 foot 
6 inches side yard setback (east 
side) instead of 10 feet each as 
required (accessory building- 
shed) on Lot 19, Section 1, Dun- 
barton, 813 Aqueduct Court. 
Kempsville Bof oiigh 

Case 13. Surfside South, Inc., 
requests a variance of 25 feet to a 
to foot setbaek ^rom Ocean 
Shore Avenue and of 5 feet to a 
30 foot setback from Red*Tide 
Road instead of 35 feet each as 
required and of 16.5 feet to a 3.5 
foot side yard setbacks (both 
sides) instead of 20-feet each as 
required and to allow parking in 
the required setbacks where 
prohibited and to waive the 
required lanscaping where 
required and of 1 loading space 
to "0" loading spaces instead of 
1 loading space as required- 
(hotel/motel) on Lots 3 and 7, 
Block F, Lynnhaven Beach, 2328 
Red Tide Road. Lynnhaven 
Borough. 

Case 14. John F. Campo 
requests a variance of 5 feet to a 
10 foot side yard adjacent to a 
street (Garfield Avenue) instead 
of 15 feet as required and of 5 
feet to a 5 foot rear yard setback 
instead of 10 feet as required (a:c- 
cessory building -detached 
garage) on Lots 21 and 22, Block 
38, Pecan Gardens, 3545 Faraday 
Lane. Princess Anne Borough. 

Case 15,. Ronald W. and Bon- 
nie T. Lee request a variance of 3 
feet to a 7 foot rear yard setback 
(west side) instead of 10 feet as 
required (accessory building - 
storage shed) on Lot 2, Section 8, 
Lynbrook Landing, 705 Wagons 
Way. Bayside Borough. 

Case 16. George H. Metzger 
requests a variance of 2 feet to a 6 
foot side yard setback (south 
side) instead of 8 feet as required 
(residential addition) on Lot 5, 
Block B, Scctibn"0, CajjeHeftfy, 
8102 Oceanfront Avenue. Lyn- 
nhaven Borough. 

Case 17. Nelson P. Tibbitt, Jr. 
request a variance of 3 feet in 
fence height to a 7 foot fence in- 
stead of a 4 foot fence as allowed 
in a required front yard setback 
(entrance columns) on Lot 3, 
Tibbitt Acres, 4209 Marchris 
Court. Bayside Borough. 

Case 18. George E. Freund 
request a variance of 5 feet to a 5 
foot side yard setback (north 
side) instead of 10 feet as 
required (swimming pool) on Lot 
59, Phase 1-A, Southgate, 2224 
Crossroad Trail. Princess Anne 
Borough. 

Case 19. Wallace S. Harwood, 
Jr. requests a variance of 4 feet to 
a 6 foot rear yard setback instead 
of 10 feet as required (enlarge 
existing accessory building) on 
Lot C, Ubermeer, 404 53rd ' 
Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 
DEFERRED AGENDA: 

Case 1. T. G. Patel requests a 
variance of 25 feet to a 10 foot 
setback from the right of way line 
established on the Master Street 
and Highway Plan as adopted by 
the City Council instead of a 35 
foot setback as 'required (In- 
dependence Boulevard) on a Par- 
cel, Pembroke Area, Indepen- 
dence Boulevard and Columbus 
Street. Bayside Borough. 

ALL APPLICANTS MUST 
APPEAR BEFORE THE 
BOARD!! 
Paul N. Sutton 
Secretary 

229c-82tl-29VB 

NOTICE OF 
PUBLIC HEARING 
Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City 
Council of Virginia Beach will be 
heard in the Council Chambers 
of the City Hall Building, 
Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
On Monday, Febrary 10, 1986, 
at 2:00 p.m. at which time the 
following applications will be 
heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 
1. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Virginia Beach 
General Hospital for a CHANGE 
OF ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from R-4 
Residential District to O-l Office 
District on certain property 
located on the North side of Old 
Donation Parkway Extended 
beginning at a point 625.48 feet 
East of First Colonial Road. Said 



parcel contains 2.075 acres; Plats 
with more derailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordiflance upon Ap- 
plication of W. T. Brown & 
Associates for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from A-1 
Apartment District to A-2 Apart- 
ment District on the North side of 
Oconee Avenue, 80 feet West of 
Hutton Road. Said parcel is 
located at 2548 Oconee Avenue 
and contains 3.45 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. LYNNHAVEN^ 
BOROUGH. 

3. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of WAI, a Virginia 
Limited Partnership, for a 
CHANGE OF ZONING 
DtSTRieT eLASSIEIGATION 
from R-5 Residential District to 
B-4 Resort-Commercial District 
on certain property located on 
the North side of Owl's Creek 
Lane, 800 feet more or less East 
of Gregory's Lane. Said parcel 
contains 2.68 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

4. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Great Neck Village 
Associates, a General Partner- 
ship, for a CHANGE OF 
ZONING DISTRICT 
CLASSIFICATION from B-2 
Community-Business District to 
A-2 Apartment District on cer- 
tain property located 710 feet 
East of North Great Neck Road 
beginning at a point 600 feet 
South of Mill Dam Road as 
shown on the plat entitled "Sub- 
division of Property for Great 
Neck Village Shopping Center" 
on file in the Department of 
Planning. Said parcel contains 
5.097 acres. LYNNHAVEN 
BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Henry Kuwabara, 
Joan Mallen and Robert 
Steinhilber for a CHANGE OF 
ZONIN(f DISTRICT 
CLASSlFtCATfON' frbrW 'O-J 

■ Office District, 1000 feet more or 
less West of Bendix Road. Said 
parcel is located at 4456 Bonney 
Road and contains 2.47 acres. 
Plats with more detailed infor- 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

6. Ah Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dimensions, Inc. for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-1 Residential District to 
0-1 Office District on the East 
side of Diamond Springs Road, 
500 feet more or less South of 
Lawson Hall Key on Lots 1-12 
and part of Lot 13, Section 6, 
Wesleyan Pines. Said parcel con- 
tains 12.84 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

7. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Dimensions, Inc., for 
a CHANGE OF ZONING 
DISTRICT CLASSIFICATION 
from R-5 Residential District to 
0-1 Office District on the East 
side of Diamond Springs Road, 
1360 feet more or less South of 
Lawson Hall Key on Part of Lot 
13 and Lot 14, Section 6, 
Wesleyan Pines. Said parcel con- 
tains 1.16 acres. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

8. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Giant Square Shop- 
ping Center Company for a 
CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT 
for a tire, battery and accessory 
store on the West side of In- 
dependence Boulevard, 151.75 
feet South of S. Witchduck 
Road. Said parcel is located at 
741 Independence Boulevard and 
contains 12.32 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

9. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Morning Star Baptist 
Church for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for a church and 
related facilities at the Southeast 
intersection of Northampton 
Boulevard and Pleasure House 
Road. Said parcel contains 1.336 
acres. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

10. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Auto Care Centers of 
America for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for an automobile 
service center at the Northwest 



■■■■ 



^'^•^^•^^^^ 



^^^immrmm 



w^^^rmr^m 



»!■. mm* 



12 The Virginia Beach Sun, January 29, 1986 

_# 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



corner of Holland Road and 
— Grant Avenue on Lots 1-20, 
Block 4, Pecan Gardens. Said 
parcel contains 51,000 square 
feet. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

11. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Kramer Tire Com- 
pany, Incorporated for a CON- 
DITIONAL USE PERMIT for 
automobile repair and sale, in- 
stallation and service of tires on 
certain property located at the 
northern quadrant of the inter- 
section of Holland Road and 
Lynnhaven Parkway. Said parcel 
contains 37,000 square feet. Plats 
with more detailed information 
are available in the Department 
of Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

PUNGO BOROUGH: 

12. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of PCK Corporation 
for a CONDITIONAL USE 
PERMIT for a single family 
home in the AG- 1 Agricultural 
District on certain property 
located 600 feet North of Indian 
Riyer RoadJifiginnijtyi !atJ.A pojiit 
2400 feet West of Princess Anne 
Road. Said parcel is located at 

2997 Seaboard Road and con- 
tains 60 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
■ available in the Department of 
Planning. PUNGO BOROUGH. 
KEMPS VILLE BOROUGH: 

13. An Ordinance upon Ap- 
plication of Mary Susanne 
Knisely for a CONDITIONAL 
USE PERMIT for a pre-school at 
the Northeast corner of Kem- 
psville Road and Alton Road. 
Said parcel is located at 1072 Old 
Kempsville Road and contains 
2.5 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 

SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

14. Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard 
to certain elements of the Sub- 
division Ordijjiance, Subdivision 
for Martha ^mith. Property is 
located on the North side of 
Crystal Lake Circle, 170 feet 
more or less North of Bay Colony 
Drive. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in the 
Department of Planning. LYN- 
NHAVEN BOROUGH. 

H Plats with nMce.4etailed infcy. 
mation are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC 
City Clerk 
229-9 2tl -29 VB 

In the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, on the 13th day of 
January, 1986 

Lisa Lynne Bodner, Plaintiff, 
against Paul Thomas Bodner, 
Defendants 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
TTie object of this suit is for the 
said plaintiff to obtain a divorce 
a vinculo matrimonii from the 
said defendant, upon the grounds 
of separation in excess of one 
year. And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 97 
Marvin Avenue, Akron, Ohio, 
44302 it is orderedjhat he do ap- 
pear on or before the 6th of Mar- 
ch, 1986, and do what may be 
necessary to protect his interest in 
this suit. It is further Ordered 
that a copy of this Order be 
published once each week for 
four successive weeks in the 
Virginia Beach Sun, a newspaper 
of general circulation in this city. 
A Copy Teste: 
J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By: PattiK. Bennett, D.C. 
Edward F. Holloran, Esquire 
3408 Boyd Road 
Virginia Beach, V A 23452 
227-12 4t 2-12 VB 

VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 

of the Circuit Court of the City 

of Virginia Beach on the 16th day 

of January, 1986 

Maryland Casualty Company, 

Complainant, 

V. 

Wayne E. Carter 

701 Fentress Airfield Road 

Chesapeake, Virginia 23322 

Joseph Boyd 

1322 Rica Court 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23456 

James Frey 

1 540 HatJley Court 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23456 

and 

c/o James D. Hooker, Jr., 

Esquire 

Hooker ASlipow 

2625 Princess Anne Road 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23456, 

Respondents. 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
The object of this suit is to 

determine whether or not 

automobile liability insurance 



coverage is provided to defendan- 
ts herein by the named plaintiff, 
Maryland Casualty Company, as 
a result of the operation of a 
motor vehicle by the defendant, 
Joseph Boyd, on the evening of 
Friday, July 26, 1985, on Lyn- 
nhaven Parkway irt the City of 
Virginia Beach at the entrance of 
Primrose Shopping Center. 

An Affidavit is attached 
stating that due diligence has 
been used without effect to ascer- 
tain the location of the party to 
be served, to-wit: Joseph Boyd; 
and that the last known residence 
of the party to be served was in 
the City of Virginia Beach, the 
city in which service is sought, 
and that due diligence has been 
used without effect to ascertain 
his location; therefore, it is 

ORDERED 'that the said 
defendant, Joseph Boyd, appear 
on or before March 10, 1986, and 
do what is necessary to protect 
his interests. 

It is further ORDERED that 
this Order be published once a 
week for four successive weeks in 
„The_^yirgima Beach Sun, a 
newspaper of general circulation 
in the City of Virginia Beach. 
Enter: 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By: Phyllis N. Styron, .DC. 
I ask for this: 
Allen W. Beasley, p.q. 
1700 First Virginia Bank Tower, 
101 St. Paul's Blvd., 
Norfolk, Virginia 23510 
James D. Hooker 
Attorney for James Frey 
229-4 4t 2-12 VB 

VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 

of the Circuit Court of the City 

of Virginia Beach, on the 14th 

day of January, 1986. 

In re: Name change of Megan 

Marie Clough 

By: Vivian Clough-Sheely, 

Petitioners i. 

To: Michael Albrecht 

Charlotte, North Carolina 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

This day came Vivian Clough- 
Sheely, Petitioner, and represen- 
ted that the "bbject of this 
proceeding is to effect the name 
change of the above named in- 
fant Megan Marie Clough by 
Vivian Clough-Sheely, her 
mother, and affidavit having 
been made and filed that Michael 
Albrecht, a natural parent of said 
child, is a non-resident of the 
State of Vifgjffia; the last kno«n 
post office address being: 
Charlotte, North Carolina. 

It is therefore Ordered that the 
said Michael Albrecht appear 
before this Court within ten (10) 
days after publication of this Or- 
der and indicate his attitude 
toward the proposed name 
change, or otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his interest in 
this matter. 

It is further Ordered that a 
copy of this Order be published 
once each week for four suc- 
cessive weeks in the Virginia 
Beach Sun, a newspaper of 
general circulation in this city. 
A Copy Teste: 
J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By: Patti K. Bennett, D.C. 
Beverly Yeskolski, p.q. 
2301 Kenstock Drive, Suite 201 
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23454 
229-6 4t 2-12 VB 

VIRGINIA: 111 the Qerk's Office 

of the Circuit Court of the City 

of Virginia Beach, on the 3rd day 

of January, 1986 

Gilber/ G. Cauwet and 

Josei^ G. Cauwet, Petitioners 

vs. 

Richard Bailey, Respondent 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

The object of the above-styled 
suit is to obtain an order from the 
Circuit Court directing the Clerk 
of said Court to enter upon the 
margin of Judgment Lien Book 
32, at Page 199, that a judgment 
obtained by respondent on Feb- 
ruary 23, 1978, against the 
petitioners has been paid and is 
discharged and released as a lien 
upon the property of petitioners . 

And it appearing by affidavit 
filed according to law that 
Richard Bailey, the above-named 
respondent, cannot be found af- 
ter the exercise of due diligence; it 
is therefore ORDERED that the 
said Richard Bailey do appear on 
or before March 14, 1986, in the 
Clerk's Office of this Court and 
do what is n«;essary to protect 
his interest. 

And it is further ORDERED 
that this order be published once 
a week for four successive weeks 
in the Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper having general cir- 
culation in the City of Virginia 
Beach. 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 
By Phyllis N. Styron, D.C. 
Kellam, Pickrell & Lawler 
(Douglass W. Dewing, Esquire) 
1020 First American Bank 
Building 

Norfolk, Virginia, 23510 
225-21 4t 2-5 VB 



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times, or $6.00 four times. Newspapers in 
Franklin, Emporia, lawrencevllle, Dinwiddle 
and Williamsburg. Call 547-4571 for details. 



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ANTIQUES 



CASH PAID FOR ANTIQUES, old fur- 
niture, glassware, china, collectables and 
old toys too. Will buy one piece or a 
housefull. Call day or night. 485-4659. ifn 

BIG FLEA MARKET - Area AnUaue 
Fair, Hampton Coiisium, Feb. 9th. Sun- 
day, noon to 7 p.m. lOO's of exhibitors 
from 7 sutes. Admission $1.50. 422-8800. 

2t2-5 



ADULT CARE 



NURSES AIDE • Private duty. 35 + yrs. 
exp. working with sick and elderly. Ex- 
cellent reference. Hrs. & sal. negotiable. 
393-6286. 4i 12-25 

ELDfatLY CARE - Armond Whithurst 
Manor. Beautiful licensed residence for 
ladies with 24 hour quality care and per- 
jfioalized attention. CaU 482-3128. 4ijm8 



APPLtAIMCES 



WASHEK-DRVER • Heavy duty. Ex- 
cellent working condition. Will deliver. 
SlOO each. 473-8145. 2i i-29 

DRYER - Kenmore, needs little work, 
$70. Call 588-1383. 112-25 



AUTOS 



BRONCO - '85 - loaded. Moving over- 
seas. No equity. Assume lease. 464-.1085. 

It 1-7 

PEUGEOT - 10-Speed, 6 mos. old. Ex- 
cellent condition. S275. 428-1987. n i-g 
VW - '81 Pickup, diesel. Stick shift, 
stereo. Excellent condition. $2700. 490- 
1344. inj 

VW-'tl RABBIT - Excellent condition, 
very clean, only 50,000 miles, air, 5 speed, 
fuel injection, luxury package. $4,000 or 
best offer. 484-2528. 4t2-« 

FORD - '82 Escort, 4 spd., 2 dr. Hatch- 
bk., AM-FM cassette; very good con- 
dition; $3a)0; 583-7057. 4iiMg 



DODGE - 1976 Aspen, good condition. 
$1500. Call 422-9658 after 10a.m. 4ii2-u 

19«I CHEVETFL-Need good little car for 
around $2,000 - automatic, air, radio, 4 
door, deluxe, 65,000 mites. Call collect! I - 
740-8481, Richmond. Work in Ports- 
mouth, will call vou back. II 1-21 



BUSINESS EQUIPMENT 



FILING CABINETS, all sizes, new, used, 
damaged, all at good prices Budget Office 
Outntters 943 Canal Drive 487-2202. 



I BUSI NESS OPPORTUNITY 

"BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES" - $$$ 

MLM Information Recording 471-2407. 
Looking for ambitious people. $$$ 41 2. 1 ; 

OWN YOUR OWN beautitut discount 
shoe store. Ladies or Children. Nationally 
known brands. •Jordache 'Bear Traps 
•Bandolino *9 West 'Johansen "Evan 
Picone 'USA 'Pro Keds 'Child Life 
•Cherokee • Giggles and many more. All 
first quality merchandise. $15,900 to 
$19,900 includes beginning inventory- 
training-fixtures-grand opening 
promotions and round trip air fare for 
one. Call today. We can have your store 
opened in 15 days. Prestige Fashions 501- 
329-2362. 1,17 

I CAMPERS 

INTERNATIONAL • '86, 32'. self- 
contain«l, air and lots of extras. $8,700. 
Must seU. 485-5280. 4i 12-11 



CHILD CARE 



CHILD CARE 



BABYSITTING - Provided in my Nor- 
view home, experienced mom/nursing 
assistant, any age/hours, $35 week. 853- 
0462.__ 4m4 

MOTHER OF FIVE • W/references, wili 
babysit in my home near Gate 5, NAB, 
reasonable rates, naps, hot meals, struc- 
tured time. 460-3043. °4i i.7 

CHESAPEAKE STREET - Mothr of 3 
will babysit from 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. & 1 1 
n.ai.-7;30. 587-5355. 2c 1-21 

CHILD CARE • Newborn and up. By 
responsible and caring woman with ex- 
cllent references, competitive rates, lots of 
TLC, Norfolk area. CaU 583-7059 or 855- 
1390. -411^-11 



CLEANING SERVICES 



ALLOW THE "SUNSHINE EXPRESS" 

to get you back on the tj'ack with a clean 
and shinny start. We excel in residential 
move in-out, and small business clean- 
ning. Reasonable rates, references. 426- 
7824, 428-0556 or 460-2255. *2^ 

HOUSEKEEPING is a pleasure, let your 
house be my service, old fashion cleaning, 
old timey fee $32 per day, $60 twice a 
week. CaU 479-0637 ask for "Pleasure". 

. 412-12 

HOUSECLEANING - Resolution No. 1 
Clean up your house. Good rates, ex- 
cellent references. Call 340-8109, 420- 
8592. II i-g 

METICULOUS about cleanina? So are 
'we. We do homes, lawns. Call any hour. 
622-4253. 4T1-21 

DOCS I 



BABYSIT • Day care provided, hot 
meals, USDA program, Willoughby area. 
Call4»-2?60. „n 



MALTESE DOG - Small white dog, 
male, 1 year old, weighs 4 to 5 \b^- Extra 
good with children, AKC, has shot record 
$200,428-7481. it 17 



LHASA APSO PUPPIES - Both parents 
AKC registered. Born Nov. 7, also, stud 
service. Call 587-8314. 4ti-28 

DOBERMAN PINCHERS - Purebred, 
black &. tan, 4 females, 3 months old. $75. 
Call 623-1546. inj 

BLUE DOBERMAN .8 mos, old. AKC 
registered, needs a guod home. $2u0. Call 
473-8425 or 499-3894. it 1-1 

LABRADOR PUPPIES • AKC, Mack, 

males $150, females $125. Parents on 
premises, 8 weeks old. Call 421-9165. 

41212 

PITBULL PUPPY - 5 mos. old, male, 
good with kids, housebroken, $100. Call 
473-8425 or 499-1894. IT 11 

ARTICLES FOR SALE 

FUR COAT - Natural full length muskrat 
coat with racoon collar, size 12-14, 4 yrs. 
old, $900. 49 1-1412. iijj 

STAINED GLASS - 20" x 42" $25 each. 
4-15" Chrysler rims, 4 for $60. call 397- 
5029. 21 1-21 

TELESCOPE • Meade model 2080 with 
LX drive, used 3 limes with many extras, 
$800. C all 428-5207. jtm 

SMALL TO MEDIUM doghouse; $35; 

545-4039. II I -8 

LARGE LR MIRROW ■ $100. 74' Audi - 
$500, running condition, carpel 9 x 16, 
rust color, $170, washer $110 ■ working 
condition. 857-1964. h m 

OLWMOBILE -'Factory spinner, 15" 

>hub e^is. Cost %m will sell lor SiBO. 

424-6521. *lj 

WET SUIT - Tfeca. I pc. sleeveless, 
uhused, size 54. $100. 427-3496 or 467- 

2568^ IT It 

VACUUM - Kirby, 1>4 yrs. oM; |wid 
$900, sell for $300 or best offer; call 467- 
9709. 11115 



TO PLACE CLASSIFIED 
ADS, CALL 547-4571 



ARTICLES FOR SALE 



PHILCO PORT. COLOR T.V. - 19". 2 
swivel rockers, I cedar chest, 1 bedroom 
suit, RCA floor model combination con- 
sole, cheap! 468-4368. n 1 u 

FOR SALE - Stun Guns - free - Call Her- 
man, 483-1598. 212-5 

COMMODORE VlC-20 computer 
w/tape drive, 2 tapes, $100; cast-iron gas 
grill, needs propane, new still in box, $35; 
video tape case, $25. 587-9337. 11 12-18 



FARM EQUIPMENT 



Eqalpmenl ABcUon • Saturday- 
February 8th - 10:30 a.m. Daniel Peace, 
Quinton,Va. M.F. "1805" Tractor, J.D. 
"300" Tractor, A.C. 185 Tractor, Oliver 
"1650" Tractor, A.C. D-17 Tractor, 
Farmall "130" Tractor, Oliver 25 Com- 
bine, 1974 Chev. Truck, 1969 CMC 
Dump Truck, 1959 Chev. P/U, 1968 Ford 
"600" Truck, 1960 Chev. Truck, Taylor- 
way Offset Disc, J.D. Corn Planter, J.D. 
Drill, Betterbuilt Liquid Manure 
Spreader, -^Nl- Maimre Spreader,- -N;Hv 
Haybaler, New Idea Mower, Papec 
Miiter /Grinder, 3 Plows, 2 Chisel Plows, 
Seed Dleaners, 24' Heavy Equipment 
Trailer, Farm Wagons, Trailers, Platform 
Scales, Horse Collars, etc. For detailed 
brochure Contact Ownby Auction & 
Realty Co. 212-5 



FIREWOOD 



FIREWOOD - You cut. $40. I cut, 180. 
Easy access. Small & large quantities. 421 - 
7 588. II I 22 

OAK - 90% all hardwood. Cut, split and 
seasoned. I ton pickup (I) $65. (2) $125. 

(3) $185, 547-0266. 4ii.2 

FIREWOOD • All seasoned hardwood, 
split and deliver^l, 'A ton truckload, $65, 
fast delivery, call 721-3819, 7,21-5504. 

«I12-1« 



FURNITURE 



ONE COUCH AND CHAIR - Deep 
Rose, excellent condition - call 488-3678. 

hK? 

FURNITURE FOR SALE - 2 piece sec- 
tional sofa, recently cleaned, good con- 
dition, 3 tier cottonwood table, call 461- 
6562. 111218 

BROWN, black & white Herculon love 
seat & matching chair, GC, $75. 468- 

2416. 1112-18 

HICKORY - tavern sofa, quality made, 
with traditional styling, blue, beige & 
rust, hardly used, $275. 588-5580 or 464- 
2259. 411-78* 

PAR'^IALLY riew sofa, blue, orange & 
beige, tweed, with bamboo frame. EC, 
$175.1440-5689 in-i 



HEALTH /NUTRITION 



WANTED - People seriously interested' in 
losing weight and earning money. 468- 
0040. ] ±2± 

CAMBRIDGE DIET • Better than ever, 
drinks, soups and bars. 464-0589. 21 1 -22 

BAHAMIAN DIET - Dick Gregory's 
Slim-Safe Diet is here. 523-0307 ■>,i.->-> 



HELP WANTED 

EXPERIENCED BANK BOOKKEEPER 

to work in bookkeeping department. 
Must be familiar with return and collec- 
tion items. Mastercard, Visa and all fun- 
damental bookkeeping functions. Proof 
Dept. experience helpful. Interviews by 
appointment only. Call 547-5164. 
(Rotating Saturday hours.) 412-19 

FULL-TIME TELLER - 2 years bank 
teller experience. Mon-Friday, with 
rotating Saturday yours. Interview by ap- 
pointment only. Call 547-5 164. 41 219 
TERRITORY MANAGERS NEEDED 
for young aggressive Co. 2SV» com- 
mission paid on sales. Protective 

terriroty. Call Williamsburg - 564-0755 
after 4 p.m. weekdays, anytime. Satur- 
day, Mr. Meyer. 4i 2-19 

SALESPERSONS WANTED - Hottest 
product of the decade - Pay telephones, 
—lifted leads. 480-2128. Mr. Hussher tfn 
TVnnS • $500 weeUy at home! Write 
P.O.Box975,EUzabeth,N.J.07207. tfn 

GOVERNMENT JOBS - $16,040- 
$59,230/yr. Now hiring. Call 805-687- 
6000, ext. R-3453 for current federal list. 

813-19 

REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT 

sales$l,800 per month guaranteed salary, 
plus commission. Liberal travel allowan- 
ce. Call on commercial accounts. Local 
territory. Outstanding opportunity for 
self motivated individual. Training 
provided. For interview call 919-735- 
0031, M-f. 9-4. Mjj. 

TEXAS REFINERY CORP. offers plen- 
ty of money plus cash bonuses, fringe 
benents to mature individual in the Ham- 
pton Roads area. Regardless of experien- 
ce, write A.N. Byers, Texas Refinery 
Corp., Box 71 1 , Fort Worth, TX 76101 . 

!iii? 

AN OHIO OIL CO. offers high income, 
pi '/is cash bonuses, benefits to mature 
person in Hampton Roads area. Regar- 
dless of experience, write P.O. R«d, 
American Lubricants Co., Box 426, 
Dayton, Ohio 45401. 111-22 

HOUSEKEEPING - And companion, 
wili stay in sometime. 5 days per week. 
Call 399-8920 or 397-6554. 11 122 

GOOD INCOME • Working with mail 
from home, experience unnecessary! 
Details, send self-addressed stamped en- 
velop to J. Johnson, Box 9, Harbonon, 
Va. 23389. «•< 



HELP WANTED 



PROJECT MANAGER for shopping 
center project in local area. Experienced 
only - salary commensurate with ability. 
References required. Reply: Bailey and 
Associates P. O. box 400, Jacksonville, 
N.C. 28540. u±» 

SALESMAN - Outside sales. Established 
route. Good opportunity. Must have own 
transportation. Advancement to Sales 
Manager possible. Apply in person. Male 
or female. Maturity a plus. Franklin Of- 
fice Supply, Franklin. Va. 562-7091. 21 1-22 

HOME IMPROVEMENT 

BATHROOM REMODELING 

ceramic tile, tub 'kits, vanities, rotted 
floors and repairs of all types. Quality 

work. 486- r:i77 ~-=^^^- 4rF8 



HOMES FOR SALE 



GOVERNMENT HOMES from $1 (U 
repair). Also delinquent tax property. 
Gall 805-687-6000 Ext.. OH.3453-fDr-inT-, 
formation. »i3-n 

ALBERMARLE ACRES - Great Bridge - 
for sale by owners. 420 Collington Drive. 
Call 482-3197. Selling price $85,000. 4tM9 

j HORSES, CATTLE, ETC. 

BLACK ANGUS - Registered bull calf. 
10 months old. $250. Call 487-5652. u 1-8 
THOROUGHBRED - 2 year old colt, 
pretty mover, good manners, no vices, 
will mature over 16 hands. $2,000. Call 
421-2363. 112:7 

ABRABIAN DISPERSAL sale mare, 
gelding, & fillies. Good bloodline. Must 
sell! 421-9693. 11 1218 

INSTRUCTIONS I 



BASKET WEAVING CLASSES - In my 

home. Cost $35, includes supplies. 460- 
9459. hTjT 

SCUBA LESSONS • A gift of adventure - 
Scuba lessons - Call Lynnhaven Dive, 
481-7949. 411-2 



LAWN & GARDEN 

FRUIT TREES, nut trees, berry plants, 
grape vines, landscaping plant material - 
offered by one of Virginia's largest 
growers. Free copy 48-page Planting 
Guide-Catalog in color, on request. 
Waynesboro Nurseries Inc - Waynesboro, 
V A 22980. 411-29 



LOST AND FOUND 

PITBULL ■ Male, disappeared In Vepco 
area, answers to the name "Bear", $200 
reward leading to location of dog! Call 
855-2414 II I -a 



MOTORCYCLES 



'78 yamaha ■ 73CC, good condition, 
$250. Call 487-5652. ting 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 



SAXOPHONE, Bundy. Selmec, E-C, 
$400; 4:'> 3653. .1 



MUSIC LESSONS 



PIANO LESSONS - All ages including 
pre-schoolers. Play for your enjoyment, 
461-5366. 211-21 



POSITIONS WANTED 



VA. BEACH • Furnished studio apt. Near 
CBN^ all utilities, laundry privileges. $75 
week, 424-4419. 111.22 



RENTALS 



ROOM FOR RENT - $55 week. Call 919- 

435-6742. ^M 

ROM FOR RENT ■ Private room, semi- 
private bath, living-room, HBO, kitchen 
privileges, air conditioned and 
washer/dryer. Must see to appreciate. 
$250 month. Call 486-2092. 41 2-5 



SERVICES 



ALTERATIONS AND TAILORING • 

Done by experienced professional. Fast 
service, low rates, all work guaranteed. 
Call Dawn Kearns. 482-7289. 41129 

ATTENTION SMALL BUSINESSES ■ 

Bookkeeping done in my home. Pick up 
and delivery. Reasonable rates. Call 
Robin at 627-8526 after 5:30. *mu 

ALLIED VIDEO SERVICES, INC ■ 

Transfer home videos and slides to video 
tape. Free estimatp. Call 424-9757. ifn 

CAR SPARKLE SERVICE - Car wa$h 
and/or polish by hand at your home or 
workplace. Our mobil unit comes to you. 
Price from $10. Including the interior. 
547.2820. |ft, 

TEACHER - Certifinl in elonentaryand 
special education. Available for tutoring. 
CaH 484-5964. iii-2> 

DISC JOCKEY — All occasions with a 
variety of music. 15 years experience. 
R^dy for holidays. For more info., ccm- 
tact Mr. Brook - 425-8356 or 340-30(» or 
486-0983 after 7. ui-i-k 



WANTED TO RENT 



NEW ACE MAN and gentle dog seek 
inexpensive residency. Prefer country set- 
ting. Etays: 461-8^)2, nights - 473-M3ST 

412-12 



■wa 



TTie Vffginia Beach Susdn, January 29. IMS 13 



♦ ••. • # 




National Realty, Inc. 



x_ 



2520GilmertonRd. 
Chesapeake, VA. 

23320 

485-5950 

Oak Muor: S86,000 - 3 bedroom, 2 
bath brick ranch in quiet neighborhood, 
(pombination living and dining rooms, 
central idr, familj room, Deep Creek 
school system. Ed Thompson 487-9125. 
Victory Park: $35,000 - 2 bedroom, 1 
bath Bungalow. Central air, vinyl 
siding, corner lot. Excellent buy for 
your first home. Ernie Carter, 485- 
2073. 

Cimelot: $58,500 - 4 bedroom, 2 bath 
ranfh. Living and dining rooms, 
garage, few»a back yard, corner lot. 
, John Bateman,487-J 346. ''':C 11 
West Mondcn: $58,500 - Like new 3 
bedroom brick ranch. Living and dining 
rooms, fireplace, central air. Larry 
Spruill, 485-1548. 

Dunedin: $58,500 - Newly listed 3 
bedroom, 1 Vi bath ranch. Living and 
dining rooms, den, fenced yard. Qreat 
first home of investment. Gale Johnson 
483-0391. 

Camdot: $60,000 - 3 bedroom, 2 bath 
ranch. Living and dining rooms, den, 
central air. Gail Harrison, 483-6013. 
Deep Creek: $45,000 - 4 bedroom, 2 
bath Cape Cod. Living and dining 
rooms, detached garage, located on 
1 .62 acres. Zadie WilUams - 420-9739 
CAMELOT: $59,000 - Spacious 4 
bedroom, 2 bath ranch. New carpets 
and roof. Larged fenced yard, den, cen- 
tral air. Fred Helm, 420-8188. 
BRAMBLfTON: Residential or com- 
mercial building lot. Lot size 25' x 125'. 
Call for details. Gail Harrison, 483- 
6013. 

HOLLY COVE: $41,900. Excellent 
condition on 3 bedroom, IW bath 
fownhome. Combination dining & 
family room, living room, covered 
patio. Dex Cutler 545-9480. , 



904 Kempsville Rd. 
Suite 105 

Virginia Beach, VA. 
23464 

495-6700 

Edgefield Eut: )S9,500 - 3 bedroom, 
1 'A bath townhome. Living and dining 
rooms, central air, electric heat pump, 
insulated doors and windows, shed. 
Ray Wallace 488-51 17. 
Pecan Gardens: $48,900 2 bedrom, I '/: 
bath Townhome. Central air, stove, 
refrigerator, dishwasher, disposal, fen- 
ced yard. Doug Douglas 48 1 -5976. 
Chatham Hall: $79,900 - Beautiful 3 
bedroom, Z'A bath Contemporary. 
Located in the center of Kempsville. 
giving and dining rooms, garage, cen- 
tral air, fireplace, fenced. Hazel Hear- 
ne, 463-0889.™'™- 



Baybcrry Place: $121,500 - Ideal for the 
busy executive, this 4 bedroom, 2'/2 
bath Colonial includes brick hearth 
with wood stove, wood deck, sprinkler 
system, living and dining rooms, central, 
air. Doc Vitelli, 420-1293. 
River Oaks: $55,900 - Newly listed 3 
bedroom Ranch. Living and dining 
rooms, gas heat, utility roomt fenced 
yard. Convenient to bases and sho^J- ' 
ping. Ray Wallace 488-51 17. ' 

Lyaakaven Forest: $89,500 - Exceptional ' 
3 bedroom, 2Vi bath traditional hopie,, 
Living and dining rooms, thermo pane 
windows, custom deck, spacious eat io 
kitchen. For a private showing call: 
Doug Douglas 481-5976. ' '^ 

Plymouth Park: $49,900 - This 3^; 
bedroom ranch needs a nev( owner!! ' 
Storm doors and windows, carport plus 
2 car detached garage, gas heat. Ex- 
cellent starter home. Hazel Hearne, 
463-0889. 

Georgetown Colony: $89,900 - Ap- 
proximately 2500 square feet of living 
area in this 4 bedroom, IVi bath brick 
ranch. Gas heat, central air, living and 
dining roms, 2 family rooms, fireplace. 
Doc Vitelli, 420-1293 



CALL THE 
EXPERTS! 




For Help With That 



Important Project... 

To place ad 
CallS47-4S71 



CENERAL A FAMILY DENTISTRY 



HAPPINESS IS A HEALTHY MOUTF 

• Albert P. Solomon D.D.S. 

• Alan G. Forbes D.D.S. 

General & Family Dentistry 

Greenbrier Sq., Suite 2E 

1324N. Battlefield Blvd. 

Office 547-2171 Ans. Service 625-0561 




pyxxfesFfcaltybd 

220 BatUefieW Boulevard, South 
Chesapeake. VA 23320 • 482-4771 



Las Gavtotas: Country* club in Great 
Bridge. Colonial 2-story, 4 bedrooms, 
2Vi baths, 2 car garage. Reduced! Lin- 
da Spruill. 547-8800. 

Great Bridge: $89,700 - Duplex! Almost 
new. Maintenance free 2 bedroom 
units. Great investment. John Patgor- 
ski, 482-5822. 

Greenbrier: $75,900 - Lakefront! 
Adorable' ranch. Decorated just 
beautifully. Lar^e kitchen. Call Frances 
hedge, 547-1 173. 

Ml. Pleasant Heights: $99,900 - Unique 
Williamsburg, 2-story design, built #ith 
the young in mind. Call for details. 
Joan Kistler, 547-0090. 

Chesapeake Colony: Terrific 4 bedrrom 
Cape Cod. Builder's own home. Lots of 
extras. Call Cindy Fowler, 482-5074. 

Pines of Warrick: Just listed! Iih- 
TnacuTale C BedrOCiir-wtth-Taistorti- 
features. Woodstove, detached shed. 
Dalton/Beverly Edge, 482-5 1 85 . 

Great Bridge: $148,600- Mother-in-law 
^apartment plus 3 acres with large 

beautiful colonial home with 20x 20 
^inground pool. Karen Gaskins, 482- 
■5580.' 

Deep Creek: $59,000 • Adorable 3 
bedroom brick ranch. 1.5 car detached 
garage. Joyce Bryant 485-2874. 

Hickory: $79,90e - 3 bedroom brick 
illnch' lots of extras. Assumability of 
loan appealing. Joh Patgorski, 482- 
5822. 

Elherldge Woods: Beautiful 4 
ibddropm, 2'A baths. Part of the 
Williamsburg collection. Ready for 
your final touch. Builder pays some 
closing cost. Joan Kistler, 547-0090. 

Brentwood: $64,900 - Exceptional 
value! Large playroom and 3 
bedrooms, screened porch, fenced yard. 
Dalton/Beverly Edge 482-5 185. 

Norfolk Highland: Close to schools! 
Large lot! 3 bedrooms. Call now. Don- 
na Stutzman, 482-5258. 






TRAVa 



YOUR HOMETOWN TRAVEL PROFESSIONAL! 

• CruHes 

• free Perional Deli»en*j • Exotic Vicitions 

• Compoienied Airlme Ticketing ^ ^^^^1 Rejervstioni, Rental Cars 

:'^::^j:X^^l .N,v.rAS.rv.c.Ch.rge 

OVER 35 YEARS COMBINED EXPERIENCE 



420-7705 



S-T-R-E-TC-H 
YOUR TRAVEL DOLLAR 



ugEES 



2005 Old Greenbrier Road - Suite 102 



LAWN & GARDEN 



LAWN BUSTERS 

• Lawn care, service, designs and planting 

• Hedge trimming ind removal 

• Fall clean up 

• Guttere also cleaned 

NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! 

Ask about our sp«3al rates for Senior Citizens 

BEST PWCES IN TOWN 

4W-3140 



COIN-STAMPS-HOBBIES 



Norvlew Coin Shop 
Buving and Selling Gold 

stamps. 
42 Soutliem Shopping Center 

IVorfolk 853-8118 



ENTERTAINMENT 



Disc Jockey 

Jhp Mioht Crawl'^'' 
Can do Wolf man Jack' 

For All Occasions 

For more information Call 

431-0077 



INSTRUCTIONS 



$2.50 OFF PER WEEK 

Piano lessons - Kultar. bass, piano. 

Call 490-1653 

Peei&TollisonWhse. 



HOME REPAIRS 



BATHROOM REMODELING 

Vanity, Vinyl Floors, Shower 
Enclosure. Repairs of all types. 
Quality Work. 
486-1377 



RICARDO, INC. 
REALTORS 

W«'r« #1 In •rMrt Brid«« 
S47-45S5 

3S 1 JOHNSTOWN BOAB 

CHISAnAKI,VA 

Albemarle Aeres: $74,900. Va ap- 
praised. Super 3 BR brick on corner 
treed lot, fenced, new central heating 
and air conditioning. Priced to sell. 
Jack Bateman. 

Great Bridge Gardens: $86,900. Roomy 
5 BR 3 bath home near schools on large 
lot. Shirley Clayton. 482-3646. 

Mt. Pleasant HeighU: $98,000. Owner 
tilransferred - must sell! Almost new 5 
BR with 2 car garage just reduced. 
Ralph Gates, 482-3418. 
Centerville Farms: il07,000. On 'A 
acre. Huge 4BR Dutch Colonial with 1 
car garage - owner anxious. Beverly 
Cornell, 547-1133. 

NEW HOME SPECIALS 
EVA GARDENS: From $62,9001 
Brand new homes going fast now <Mtit 
lot&ofoutomleatures. Dennis Register 
f»7.3015. 

ETHERIDGE MEADOWS: $89,900! 
Super value. Custom 4BR brick ranch 
by He^ht Construction, energy saving 
features, move in now. Closing Costs 
paid less PPDS Irene Capps 421-7350. 

POPLAR RIDGE SOUTH: From the 
$89,000! Popular Hearndon built 
homes in this fast growing area. 
Wooded section open. Model open 
daily 1-5. Tom Seddon 547-1616. 

ETHERIDGE WOODS: From 
$112,900. New section now open. 
Executive 4 BR homes, several styles 
available, choose your lot and home, 
now. Only 2 left.. Open weekends 1-5. 
Ken Bowden 482-4737. 
FOXGATE QUARTER: $124,900. 2 to 
choose by Wynn Const. Unique ranch 
and 2 story, 2 car garages, lots of 
amenities Less closing costs paid less. 
PPDS. Pam Biittner 482-3335. 

MT. PLEASA>T HEIGHTS: 102,900. 
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14 The Virginia Beach Sun, January 29, 1986 



Cahiirs City Council Corner 



Joint cable center 
approved by council 

A Joint Cable Center under 
the City and the School Board 
has been established to more ef- 
ficiently produce programming 
for Channel 29, the local 
government access channel, and 
Channel 28, the educational ac- 
cess channel which will soon be 
activated by Cox Cable. 

A center manager will be ap- 
pointed to administer the studio 
which will be operated as a 
cooperative unit. 

Councilwoman Barbara 
Henley asked, facetiously, 
whether that meant Council can 
decide whether the School 
Board meetings should be 
televised. 

Councilman John Baum 
replied that council "shouldn't 
tell them what to do, but it 
would be in their own best in- 

:ieresf.';t:7:: 

The School Board has not 
favored having the meetings 
televised. 

Condemnation 
action deferred 

City Council fias deferred 
condemnation proceedings in 
connection with the extension 
of Elbow Road to decide 
whether a part of a homesite 
containing 120-year-old oaks 
can be saved. 

Selma ToUe, speaking on 
behalf of her husband Elmer 
Tolle who owns the property, 
said that the site contains a 128- 
year-old home where 120-year- 
old trees would have to be 
removed to make way for the 
road. 

She said that she did not 
think it fair that all the land for 
the road was coming from the 
Tolle property and asked that 
the road be moved over to save 
the trees. 

Roger Melick, of 732 Harris 
Point Drive, read Tolle's 
statement when Tolle was over- 
come by tears. He said that 
every builder knew about the 
road extension but the Toties. 

He said Tolle also suffered 
when his farm land was rezoned 
from agricultural use to com- 
mercial in 1954 without his 
knowledge, forcing him to get 
rid of all his farm animals. 

Councilman Louis R. Jones 
asked whether the road could 
be designed further up Princess 
Anne Road so that it would not 
interfere with the trees. 

IRD bonds 
approved 

City Council has approved 
Industrial Revenue Develop- 
ment (refunding) bonds for 
George S. Hazzis, for a manu- 
facturing, warehouse, 
distribution, communications, 
ttaining and office facility for 
$640,000 at 529 Viking Dr. The 
money will be used to refund 
the currently outstanding prin- 
cipal balance of formerly ap- 
proved bonds. 



River declared 
nothing but filth 

Declaring that the Lyn- 
nhaven River was "nothing but 
filth," Darrell' Hughes, chair- 
man of the Lynnhaven River 
Water Quality Task Force, has 
named as two top priorities. 
First, to get the sedimentation 
traps in place and, second, to 
make a study of the septic tanks 
in the Lynnhaven area. As a by- 
product of the study, he said, 
the city cou'd have a public 
awareness and education 
program. 

Hughes also said that it was 
feasible to build a canal bet- 
ween Lynnhaven ancT lu'dee 
Inlet. He said that the land 
which needs to be acquired has 
already been condemned by the 
Navy in implementing its Air 
Impact Compatible Use Zone 
(AICUZ) study. He said the 
project would pay for itself. 

Hughes said the flushing ac- 
tion has to be increased; oysters 
are smothered in the silt. He 
said that septic tanks are not 
working property, that the city 
should associate itself with the 
Chesapeake Bay program, and 
that a private coAsultant should 
be hired to discuss the 
feasibility of implementing all 
the recommendations in the 
report from a cost standpoint. ■« 

Game Commission 
contributes funds 

The State Game Commission 
has agreed to contribute 
$150,000 a year for three years 
to the pumping project in the 
Back Bay Management Plan. 
The Back Bay report recom- 
mended the installation of 
pumps at three locations rather 
than one to pump salt water in- 
to the Bay. Councilwoman 
Barbara Henley recognized at- 
torney Glen Croshaw, a mem- 
ber of the Game Commission, 
and City Planner Jack Whitney 
for their help in the project. 

Insurance 
costs increase 

Robert Esenberg, of the Risk 
Management Division, Finance 
Department, forewarned City 
Council that insurance costs 
will probably increase tremen- 
dously. 

Councilman H. Jack Jen- 
nings Jr., who is in the insuran- 
ce business said that the rates 
are the "price we have to pay 
for having low interest rates." 

Councilman Robert G. Jones 
also noted that his malpractice 
insurance rates have doubled. 

"It's a tough time in the in- 
surance industry," said Esen- 
berg. 

Outside auditor sought 

Vice Mayor Reba McClanan 
and Councilman Louis R. 
Jones were named by Mayor 
Harold Heischober as the coun- 
cil committee to select an out- 



side auditor who will serve over 
the next three years. 

Council kills plan ' 
for transit center 

City Council killed plans for 
an Oceanfront Visitor's and 
Travel Center for the Beach 
Borough. 

Councilman J. Henry Mc- 
Coy, Jr., a member of the 
Tidewater Regional Transit 
Authority which proposed the 
center said Council's action was 
a "real shame," and means the 
loss of $11 million for Virginia 
Beach — $3 million outright 
from the Federal government 
and another $8 millio» »« TRT-'- 
botids which would free the 
city's bonding authority for 
other needed projects. 

Council rejected by a vote of 
5-6 McCoy's motion to adopt 
Jjne of three proposed options. 
Crucial to the success of the 
project was the closing of 19th 
Street, the feature of the plan 
most criticized by business in- 
terests in the Beach Borough. 

The whole thing, McCoy 
said, was predicated on the 
closing of 19th Street. 

Voting against the motion 
were Vice Mayor Reba Mc- 
Clatian, Councilmen Robert 
Fentress, H. Jack Jennings, Jr., 
Robert G. Jones and Louis R. 
Jones, and Councilwoman 
Barbara Henley. Voting for the 
project were McCoy, Mayor 
Harold Heischober, Coun- 
cilwomen Nancy Creech and 
Meyera Oberndorf, and Coun- 
cilman John A. Baum. 



Student athletes 
awards presented 

The two outstanding par- 
ticipants in Virginia Beach's 
Youth Recreation League have 
been chosen to receive this 
year's Maury Riganto Student 
Athlete Award. 

This award is named in 
memory of the late chairman of 
the Parks and Recreation 
Commission and his many 
years of service to the city. 

The 1985 female award win- 
ner is Robin Markland from the 
Arrowhead Recreation League. 
She is 17 years old and has par- 
ticipated in the Parks and 
Recreation community leagues 
since she was 10. 

She excelled in softball as a 
pitcher. Now she is sharing the 
knowledge she acquired while 
participating in the leagues by 
helping the younger children iii 
her area. 

Markland attends Kempsville 
High School. She is the 
daughter of Robert and Ruth 
Markland. 

Chris Armentrout from the 
Stumpy Lake Recreation 
League is this year's male 
Maury Riganto Award winner. 
He is 13 years old and par- 



ticipates in baseball, basketball 
and football. 

He carried starting positions 
in all three sports and is cited 
for his hard work and positive 
attitude. Armentrout attends 
Brandon Junior High School 
and is the son of Charlie and 
Carol Armentrout. 



Budget hearings, 
workshops set 

City Council has scheduled a 
series of workshops and public 
hearings on the proposed 1986- 
ITopefatTfig budget which will 
be presented to Council on 
April 1. 

The first Council workshop 
will be held April 17 from 4 to 7 
p.m. Others are set for April 22 
from 4 to 7 p.m. and May 8 
from 4 to 7 p.m. All will be held 
in the conference room . 

Public hearings will be held 
on April 29 at 7 p.m. at the 
Pavilion and on May 12 at 2 
p.m. in the Council Chambers, 
when Council will consider the 
budget on first reading. 

Consideration of the or- 
dinance on second reading is 
scheduled for May 15. 

Council requests 
inclusion of river 

City Council has asked the 
state to include the Lynnhaven 
River in the Virginia 
Chesapeake Bay Initiatives 
program adopted by the general 
Assembly to address water 
quality degradation in the 
Chesapeake Bay. 

The request is made in a 
resolution proposed by Couun- 
cilman H. Jack Jennings Jr. 
and adopted by City Council at 
the last meeting. 

Inclusion of the river in the 
Chesapeake Bay Initiatives was 
recommended by the Lyn- 
nhaven Water Quality Task 
Force. 

Awards given 
for contributions 

The Virginia Beach Mayor's 
Committtee on the Handicap- 
ped has recognized an in- 
dividual, an organization and a 
business for their contributions 
to local handicapped citizens. 

Jeff Hansen, a chief petty of- 
ficer in the Navy, was commen- 
ded for his work at the King 
Richard Residence group home, 
where he has been a volunteer 
since April of 1984. 

Endependence Center, Inc., a 
Norfolk organization,^ was cited 
for the services it provides to 
the handicapped throughout 
Hampton Roads. 

The business/corporation 
award went to the Virginia 
Beach Department of parks and 
Recreation's Therapeutic 
Recreation Unit, which serves 
over 400 disabled individuals 
each year. 



More revising planned 



Jaycees have a new home 



Continued from Page 1 



experience -and learn how to run 
an organization," Roth said. 
"When older people are in an 
organization they naturally tend 
to be in charge. When I first 
joined the organization I had 
some problems with this concept 
but now I understand the value of 
it." 

The addition of women to the 

Jaycees has resulted in some 
positive improvements, he said. 
It has been about one-and-one- 
half years since a Unit«l States 
Supreme Court ruling opened 
membership in the Jaycees to 
women. Already there are four 
women serving on the board of 
the Virginia Beach Jaycees. 

"At first there were some 
mixed feelings about having 
women in the Jaycees," Roth 
said. "Some of the older mem- 
bers viewed Jaycee activities as 
the 'mens' night out.* The 
women have b«n very beneficial. 
They come up with ideas and are 
^ doinglhings the men woulrfnever 
think of doing. I would say our 
new membership is split about 
50-50 men and women. " 

Roth said the age of the 
average member in the Jaycees 
has changed somewhat since he 
first joined the organization. 
While it used to be mostly people 



in their late 20s and early 30s who 
joined, many of the new mem- 
bers are people 22 or 23 coming- 
right out of college, he said. 

"I would characterize Jaycee 
members as two basic types," 
Roth said. "There are paper 
members, who join because being 
a Jaycee looks good on a resume. 



More importantly are the mem- 
bers who join because they want 
to be active in the community." 

Along with social and fund- 
raising activities, the Jaycees are 
involved in numerous community 
service projects in Virginia 
Beach. Among these are the 
Community Talent Show for the 



handicapped and sending local 
handicapped children to Camp 
Jaycee in Roanoke, which is run 
by the state Jaycee organizatioii. 
They also sponsor the Out- 
standing Young Citizen and First 
Citizen of the Year awards. 

The Virginia Beach Jaycees 
meet on the second and fourth 
Tuesday of each month. 




Continued from page 1 

Commandments?" asked one 
Ethics Cojnmittee member, 
Robert Krebs. 

•The deletion of candidates for 
election to City Council from the 
list of persons subject to the or- 
dinance. Neither the Virginia 
Constitution nor the State 
statutes appear to give the city 
power ^ bring candidates for 
election under the purview of a 
local conflict of interest ordinan- 
ce, according to Bimson. They 
are not public officials. 

•The appointment by the city 
attorney and city clerk of the 
legal advisor to the standing 
Ethics Committee. 

Council members were concer- 
ne4,,M .Jhs. TOQSl „Ear,t,with 
disclosures which would threaten 
the confidentiality of a client, 
sometimes required under other 
statutes. 

Rae LaSesne, president of the 
Council of Civic Organizations, 
said that the CCO endorsed the 
ordinance submitted by the 
Ethics Committee, but that it had 
no time for proper review of the 
attorney's changes. He said that 
acting on the ordinance last week 
would be "undue haste in a mat- 
ter of considerable importance." 

Councilman John A. Baum 
agreed that council as well as the 
public has had too little time to 
study the changes, that Council 
had only a brief discussion in 
executive session, and that he had 
the impression that council would 
have a workshop. 

Walt Vargo, president of the 
Citizens Action Coalition, said 
the coalition supports a stronger 
conflict of interest law, and the 
public indicated the same support 
when 15,000 persons signed 
petitions for an ordinance last 
November. He said he favored an 
ordinance like the one in Fairfax. 

Mayor Heischober said that he 
understood that the Fairfax law is 
bang revised. 

Tom Aiken, a committee 
member, said that the Council 
should act soon so the law would 
be in effect during the coming 
coiincil campaign. Council elec- 
tions are in May. 

Aiken said that no law would 
be perfect, but that the ordinance 
could be improved "as you go 
along." 

Irv Douglas, past president of 
the CCO, and a member of the 
Committee, objects to having the 
legal advisor appointed by the 
city attorney and city clerk, 
saying "that would smack of 
cronyism. He said that the stan- 
ding ethics committee should 
appoint the attorney with advice 
from the city attorney. 

Vice Mayor Reba McClanan 
also said the legal advisor should 
not be appointed by the city 
attorney or city clerk, but by 
someone like the chief of the cir- 
cuit court judges. 



Councilwoman Barbara 
Henley said that some words' 
need more definition like 
"relative." She said that since 
her family has lived here so long, 
she has "cousins and aunts and 
uncles I don't even know." She 
also sought better definitions for 
"close friends" and "close 
neighbors." ^ 

Henley also questioned a 
provision which makes it legal for 
a person with a conflii^t to vote 
"no" on an application, but not 
a conflict to vote "yes." 

McCoy pointed out that where 
a volatile issue is involved, an ab- 
stehtion often is a way out. 

R, Jones said of the ordinan- 
ce provisions of disclosing a con- 
fidence "this is a crime. This is 
serious business. YoiTfrtaikW" 
about people who may be 
prosecuted. I'm concerned about 
the seriousness of the ordinan- 
ce." He said that in saying let the 
court decide whether it is con- 
stitutional, "You're asking us to 
violate the only thing we swc)re to 
when we took office — the basic 
oath to uphold the Con- 
stitution." 

Jones' ordinace calls for the 
persons subject to' the ordinance, 
to declare their relationship prior 
to considieration of a matter and 
Council would decide whether 
they will be permitted to 
participate. 

Robert Galewski, another 
member of the Ethics Commit- 
tee, asked why people should 
know more about Council than 
about the people running for 
Council. He said that he liked a 
number of the attorney's 
changes, but that other things 
needed clarification. 

Councilman H. Jack Jennings 
Jr. said that he was pleased that 
the issue had been moved from a 
back burner to a front burner as 
he requested the previous week in 
executive session. He also said 
that no rules can be too strict, 
that he would have no problem 
following the requirements of the 
ordinance, and that he would 
have more problems as a citizen 
filing a complaint for fear the 
charge is labeled false. The 
citizens can then be subject to 
criminal charges. 

Jennings also sees no problem 
with revealing his IRS return and 
said that he would not be 
bothered if the set limit for 
business dealings over which a 
conflict can be considered is 
lowered to nothing. 

He said the proposed standing 
ethics committee should have no 
ties to City Council and that the 
committee should appoint its 
own attorney. 

The voting records of both 
Jennings and Councilwoman 
Nancy Creech have been under 
scrutiny for possible conflicts. 
Creech was absent at last week's 
meeting. 



New arrivals announced 
for Virginia Beach 



Mark Rolh, president of Virginia Beach Jaycees, receives proclamation for Jaycee Week from Mayor 
HaroW Heiscliober. 



Virginia Beacli General 
Hospital announced the arrival 
of 66 babies in Virginia Beach. 

Kimberly A. Amber, daughter; 
Regina C. Anderson, daughter; 
Melinda and Chartes L. Atkins, 
daughter; Donna and John W. 
Brown, son; Karen ^nd Michael 
T. Carey, daughter and Marie 
and Michael R. Carney, 
daughter. 

Liiida and Peter W. Cham- 
pion, son; Candace and David A. 
Cherry, daughter; Sherri and 
David V. Chowaniec, son; Anita 
and Andre B. Cosby, son; Katha 
and Robin O. Crocker, daughter 
and Deborah and Anthony 
Cuocco, son. 

Sandra and Oliver Davisi 
daughter; Connie and Joseph L. 
Denson, son; Jacqueline Dildy, 
daughter; Patti and Robert Duf- 
fy, son; Joan and James M. 
Duvall, daughter and Wendelene 
and Peter J. Eaton, son. 

Theryl and Michael W. Farber, 
daughter; Julie Fuqua, daughter; ' 
Lisa Gordon, daughter; Brenda 
Griffin, son; Debra Harrill, 
daughter and Suzanne C. Knorr, 
son. 

Suzanne and Kenneth N. Knut- 
son, Jr., daughter; Annette and 
Paul O. Lathem, daughter; 
Patricia and Kenneth J. Lilly, 
daughter; Kathy and Edward L. 
Lynch, daughter; Mary and 
Charles J. McClintic, daughter 
and Roseannc and Barry R. Mc- 
Donough, Jr., daughter. 

Cynthia and Terence— M^— 
McGuire, daughter; Noreen and 
Robert Mansfield, son; Joy R. 



May, son; Michele and Richard 
A. Midkiff, daughter and Bonnie 
and Jeffrey P. Morris, daughter. 

Sophie and James K. Nance, 
son; Connie and Thaddeus J. 
Nowak, son; Susan and Barry R. 
Orleans, son; Deborah Ann and 
M. Douglas Page, son; Tammie 
and Scott John Patriquin, 
daughter and Carol and John A. 
Piscitelli, daughter. 

Jeralyn and Kenneth B. Queen, 
son; Lynnae and Daniel K. Rea, 
daughter; Candace and William 
C. Reddy, son; PauHne and 
Michael P. Rolmap, daughter; 
Roxanne and Jame^ E. Rowsey, 
daughter; Rebecca and Michael 
C. Scott, daughter and Melanie 
and David A. Shortt, son. 

Melissa G. Simpson, daughter; 
Helen and Kirby A. Spain, 
daughter; Debra and James S. 
Speight, daughter; Louise and 
Roger Spence, daughter; Cheryl 
and Mark C. Spencer, daughter 
and Julie A. Stanton, daughter. 

Deborah D. and Forrest D. 
Stout II, son; Deborah and 
Donald R. Taylor, son; Toby L. 
Traub, son; Vicky and John 
Twyford, son; Chevelle 
Vaughan, son and Sharon and 
Richard K. Vogel, daughter. 

Pamela and Fredrick E. 
Waltermier, daughter; Judith 
and Martin Weickenmeier, son; 
Sharon and James E. Wheeler, 
daughter; Myra and Horace T. 
White, daughter; Dawn and 
"Thomas Woythal, daughter and 
Suzanne and Steven W. Wright, 
daughter.