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Full text of "Virginia Beach sun"

I ■ ■ II 



T< 



Just A Chat 



Marge Kelly Was 

Named Teacher Assistant 

Of The Year 




Photo Feature 



Highlights Of The Pungo Strawberry 
Festival; Miss Virginia Beach/ 
Tidewater Pageants And More! 



rsonatity Proflte 



Barbara Collins 

Loves Working With 

Children 



*i 



The V/rt/n/d 



| June 7,1989 63rd Year, No. 24 

Beach Cleanup 

More Than 3,000 People To Participate In "Clean 
The Bay Day;" 5,000 Trash Bags Expected To Be 
Filled 



i " i . ' ' . 

Virginia Beach's Community Newspaper 



By Karen Daltymple 

Staff Writer 



"It's not that the beach is dirty. 
We need to understand that the 
plastics and stuff that we throw out 
there is killing our sea life," said 
Commander Robert Brich, 
executive officer at NAVMASSO. 

Brich, along with 33 volunteer 
military organizations, is taking 
part in the "Clean the Bay Day" 
this Saturday from 9 a.m. to noon. 
The day is aimed at not only 
picking up trash, but identifying 
pollution sources and heightening 
public awareness. 

More than 3,000 people have 
volunteered to participate in 
cleaning the beaches, bays and 
rivers, including Lynnhaven, 
Linkhorn and Broad Bays, Seashore 
State Park and Crystal Lake. 

"I've got all waterfronts broken 
into one mile zones," said Robert 
Dean, organizer of the cleanup. 
"We're talking about a major 
impact statement for the whole 
area." 

Brich said 75 percent of the zones 
will be occupied by the military, 
including the Navy, Coast Guard 
and the Army. Dean particularly 
praised the cooperation from the 
Navy. 



Dean said the "Clean 
the Bay Day" will be- 
come an annual event 
In fact, Mayor Meyera 
Obemdorf recently is- 
sued a "Clean the Bay 
Day" proclamation. 



"I've seen a lot of trash floating. 
Seeing the folks in the military 
gain an awareness made it an easy 
thing to get into," Brich said. 

Among the other volunteers 
who will be participating are 
Virginia Beach residents, Council 
of Civic Organizations, Scout 
troops, Back Bay*WildIife Refuge, 
Virginia Beach Jaycees, Virginia 
Beach Audobon Society and the 
Virginia Marine Science Museum. 

"I'm very ecology minded. I just 
like to be involved. It's a major 
concern of mine since I've grown 
up all of my life at the beach," said 
Charlie Hurd, member of the 
cleanup steering committee and 
employee at the Marine Science 
Museum. The museum is in charge 
of sweeping the Owl Creek area. 

Dean said 5,000 trashbags are 
being supplied by GLAD. He hopes 

Pfease see Cleanup, page 14 



Pothole Patrol 

Highway Division's Pothole Patrol Repaired 200 
Holes In One Month; Promises To Fix Reported Holes 
Within Three Days 



By Karen Dairy mple 
SOU Writer 



The call themselves the Pothole 
Patrol and they're making promises 
to the citizens of Virginia Beach. 
And they're keeping them. 

"We have not run beyond our 
three-day promise and hopefully we 
won't," said Joe Russell, the city of 
Virginia Beach highway division's 
highway administrator. 

Russell is referring to the three- 
day limit the patrol has to repair 
any pothole that has been reported. 
During an average year, the division 
repairs more than 4,000 potholes. 
Since the Pothole Patrol was 
formed a month ago, 200 potholes 
have already been fixed 

"The patrol is aimed at getting 
citizens to call-in their favorite 
pothole," Russell said. 

He said the division receives 15 



"The patrol is aimed 
at getting citizens to call 
in their favorite pot- 
hole, " Russell said. 



to 20 reports per day, which is 
higher than normal because of the 
recent publicity on the patrol. 

There are more potholes in Vir- 
ginia Beach this year because of the 
wet winter and spring. Potholes are 
caused by water and traffic, ac- 
cording to Russell. Water seeps 
into the pavement and pockets, and 
the freeze-thaw weather system in 
the area causes the top layer to 
break apart Although there are no 
specific problem areas in the city, 
Russell said the major four lane 
roads where there is a lot of truck 
traffic are hit the worst 

'Those are constant problems for 
Please see Pothole, page H 



ft 's A Hit! 





Jellyfish 



Five Species Of Jellyfish To^ Found In \tfflmia 
Beach Waters; Marine Science W^^0pening 
Exhibit In July 



By Karen Daltymple 

Stall ■Writer 



The amusement park provided thrills for all ages. 

Fest Success 

Sixth Annual Pungo Strawberry Festival Attracts 
157,000; Plans Already Being Made For Next Year 



By Karen Daltymple 

Stall Writer 



Although the temperatures 
soared well into the 90's, the 
Pungo Strawberry Festival still 
attracted 157,000 people over the 
course of the hot Memorial Day 
weekend. 

The festival, in its sixth year, 
was created to promote both the 
Pungo community and its most 
popular crop - strawberries. Last 
year's Strawberry Festival con- 
sumed 1,200 strawberry pies, 100 
gallons of ice cream, 7,650 
strawberry shortcakes, 475 cans 
of whipped cream and 2,850 
quarts of fresh strawberries. Stu- 
art Cake, the festival's publicity 
chairman, said although the total 
number of strawberry items sold 
have not yet been calculated, var- 
ious vendors reported selling 800 
fresh pies, 3,000 strawberry 
crepes, and 2,400 quarts of fresh 



"I do feel this year's 
was belter organized 
and ran more 
smoothty," Cake said. 
"We'll be able to make 
some very nice contri- 
butions next year." 



strawberries. 

"Overall it was a very success- 
ful festival. I was very, very 
pleased with the turnout and with 
the fun people were having," 
Cake said. 

He added that all the festival's 
activities went over very well. 
The 14 carnival rides, as well as 
the arts and crafts booths, pony 
rides and pie eating contest, were 
all popular events. Cake said the 
highlight of the festival, which 
has received many complimentary 
Please see Fttlvel, page 6 



"They're right in your back yard. 
Since it's a local animal, it's got a 
bad reputation, but it's actually an 
interesting animal," said Lynn 
Clements, Virginia Marine Science 
Museum's education coordinator. 

Clements is referring to the five 
species of jellyfish that inhabit and 
sometimes infest the Chesapeake 
Bay. 

Although the jellyfish 
constituency usually doesn't reach 
its peak until July or August, a few 
globs have already been sighted in 
the Lynnhaven area. 

Clements said that there was an 
exceptionally large amount of 
jellyfish in Virginia Beach waters 
last year, and the heat determines 
how long the jellyfish stay. They 
usually leave to pass through 
another life cycle in mid to late 
August, but if the weather isn't too 
hot, they may stay through mid- 
September. They will then spend 
the winter reproducing in the 
Chesapeake Bay. 

"They are pretty much a pest. 
They are a problem so much that 
people are trying to contain them. 
People go to great lengths to avoid 
them. They may not seem good to 
us, but they're a part of the big 
picture," Clements said. 

There are 200 species of jellyfish 
all over the world, but the lion's 
mane, man-of-war, mushroom cap, 
moon jelly and the sting nettle will 
most likely be found in the area. 

"So many people come in here 
and ask<ns about them," Clements 
said. "It came from the fact that so 
many people ask us in the 
summertime. Have respect for 
them. We feel if people are educated 
about them more they'll understand 
them more." 

Not only are jellyfish thought of 
as pests, but also as a meal. In 
different parts of the world, such as 
China or Japan, jellyfish are dried 
and salted and cooked by steaming 
or stir frying. Described as being 
crunchy or chewy, jellyfish may be 
used as a salad ingredient. 

"The most common are the 
stinging nettle and the moon jelly," 
Clements said about local jellyfish. 

The stinging nettle, which grows 
to an average length of 7 1/2 
inches, is otherwise known as the 
chrysaora quinquencirha. The 
jellyfish, which is 90 percent water, 
sheds sperm and eggs that unite to 
form free-swimming larvae. The 




A local jellyfish. 

larvae then becomes a polyp, which 
produces cups that pop off and 
begin floating. 

A jellyfish stings with its 
trailing tentacles and may continue 
stinging even when it's on the 
beach and presumed to be dead. 
According to Clements, the 
jellyfish releases a little harpoon 
that enters the skin and releases 
poison. 

"You pretty much have to come 
in contact with the tentacles. That's 
where the danger lies," she said. 

Jellyfish stings, although not life 
threatening, may be aggravating. 
Depending on the person, a 
jellyfish sting may cause several 
different reactions. A sting can 
range from a mild prickling 
sensation to a burning pain which 
lasts for days. In some cases, a 
sting can even cause swelling or 
shortness of breath, which may 
require medical attention. 

"What we suggest is to rinse the 
area off with sea water, but don't 
rub it," Clements said. She added 
that ice, meat tenderizer, rubbing 
alcohol and cortizone creams will 
also relieve the sting and reduce 
swelling. 

The Portuguese man-of-war may 
have tentacles up to 40 to 50 feet 
long and a poison that can be as 
strong as a cobra's venom. The 
man-of-war is most frequently seen 
after strong summer storms. 



Please see JelfyfUi, page U 




L - 



Personality Profile 




Teacher Assistant Barbara Collins Works 
For The Love Of All Of The Children 



By Karen Dairy mple 

Stat Writer 



Barbara Collins loves children 
and it shows through in her work at 
Newtown Road Elementary School. 
No, she's not a teacher, but she's 
the closest thing to one - a general 
teacher assistant. 

"I was going to become a secre- 
tary," she said, but her involvement 
.with the PTA is what peaked 
Collins' interest in working with 
the school system. 

Born and raised in Maryland, 
Collins graduated in 1961 from 
Aberdeen High School in Aberdeen, 
Md. She then went on to study 
business at the University of 
Maryland for two years. She lived 
up to her desire to become a secre- 
tary when she went to work for a 
shoe company as a private secre- 
tary. 

In 1964, Collins got married and 
moved to Connecticut, where she 



"We'reallin it for the children. 1 guess I feel like I can 
give them something they can 'tget at home. I guess 
that's ft - those kids. " Collins said. 



began doing volunteer work at 
schools. In fact, she said she held 
every office in the PTA. 

"I worked in the library reading 
stories to children," the Aragona 
Village resident said. When the 
Collins' made their move to Vir- 
ginia Beach in 1971, she continued 
to volunteer at the schools. She 
helped the children register, helped 
out the nurse in the clinic and as- 
sisted classroom teachers. She did 
volunteer work until 1974 when 
she went to work for the school 
system as a half-day kindergarten 
aid. 

"The principal just stopped roc 
one day," Collins said about how 
she got the job. "It's just what the 
teacher assistants do now." 

Collins worked with the kindcr- 



gartners for one year until she be- 
came a general assistant at New- 
town Road Elementary. 

"I run all the dittos and papers 
and notes to go home. Reproduc- 
tion is mainly what I'm in charge 
of," she said. "You don't introduce 
work to them, you reinforce work 
that has already been introduced." 

Collins is one of two general 
teacher assistants in the school and 
she said her job never gets 
monotonous. She said what she 
likes most about her work is "the 
contact with the children and get- 
ling involved differently with them 
than I would if I was in the class- 
room. You see a different side to 
the child." 

Although she doesn't work out of 
a classroom, Collins said the 



thought of going back to school 
and becoming a teacher has crossed 
her mind. She's still giving serious 
thought to teaching third grade, 
which to her, is the ideal grade. 

"It's a very impressionable age," 
she said. 

In her spare time, Collins enjoys 
knitting, reading, and dancing. She 
is also a member of the Virginia 
Beach Education Association, 
chairman of the State Committee 
for Educational Support, chairman 
of the Teacher Association Steering 
Committee of the VBEA and has 
recently been elected to the Virginia 
Education Association board of di- 
rectors. 

"I am representing all the educa- 
tional support members that belong 
to VE A," Collins said. 

As for the future, Collins said 
she plans on staying right where 
she is. 

"I'd really like to get more in- 




Barbara Collins 



volved in it and finish school. I 
want to make educational support 
people realize that teachers and as- 
sistants are one big group. I'd like 
to see that go on to the state and 
national (level)," she said. 
For the time being, Collins will 



continue to help children at New- 
town Road Elementary. 

"We're all in it for (he children. I 
guess I feel like I can give them 
something they don't get at home. I 
guess that's it - those kids," Collins 
smd. 



2 71m Vftyinto BeacJi Sun, June 7, 1989 




Editorials 



Clearing Up Myths 
About Jellyfish . 

As much as we all love to enjoy our Virginia Beach beaches, 
the minute a dreaded jellyfish comes into sight, it's out of the 
water and onto the sand! Well, there are several myths about the 
stingers that many of us didn't know. 

First of all, when stung by a jellyfish, don't panic. You've 
probably learned to rub sand on a sting to relieve a pain. Don't. 
If any stinging cells are left on the skin, sand simply spreads them 
around, causing more pain. The affected area should be rinsed 
with sea water, but don't rub it. 

Ice from a cooler, which probably would be the, closest 
solution at hand, may help to relieve the sting and reduce the 
swelling. Rubbing alcohol may also fix the stinging and be a 
soothing balm. Although you may not have it in your beach bag, 
meat tenderizer may also help reduce swelling. 

Remember when you'd see a jellyfish swim by and you'd grab 
the crab net and scoop it up? Enough shaking of the net will cause 
the jellyfish to split into lots of little pieces. That means the 
jellyfish is dead, right? Wrong. Each one of those little pieces is 
capable of stinging because the stinging cells can continue to 
release their poison on their own, unattached to the jellyfish. 

Of course we were all petrified of the big red jellyfish that we 
thought were bloodsuckers. Actually, they don't sting any harder 
than a normal summer jellyfish. Now, the Portugese man-of-war, 
the very colorful jellyfish with long tentacles, is dangerous. Stay 
away from them if possible. 

Although summer doesn't officially begin until June 21, tte 
weather has proven that summer is here. And so are the jellyfish. 
They may not be the most pleasant creatures, especially if they 
sting you. But don't let them get in the way of your summer fun. 
Boating, swimming and water skiing should remain on your list 
of summertime activities. - K.L.D. 



Keep Our Beaches Clean 

Because Virginia Beach is such a tourist mecca, keeping our 
beaches in top shape is a must. Who would ever return to our 
city if they found trash and debris along the shoreline? Actu- 
ally, the local beach itself is pretty clean. It's the water that 
could use an overhaul. 

Thanks to a group of concerned citizens, a beach cleanup will 
take place this weekend. More than 3,000 people will sweep 
our beaches for trash. The main point of the cleanup is to make 
people more aware of the problems caused by littering the wa- 
ter. 

Because of careless people who throw aluminum cans, plas- 
tic bags and other trash into the water, sortie of our precious sea 
life is dying. Turtles are being washed ashore from eating plas- 
tic bags which they thought were jellyfish. 

Thanks to the .U.S. Coast Guard, there is a $25,000 fine for 
anyone caught littering in our waters. Maybe now people will 
be more considerate and take the time to throw their trash in a 
trash bag, not the ocean. $25,000 is a high price to pay for 
laziness. 

It is very important that the city participates and supports the 
"CleaTt the Bay Day." In fact, Mayor Meyera Oberndorf has is- 
sued a proclamation for "Clean the Bay Day." 

Hopefully We can all become more aware of the dangers of 
littering our waters so there can be a safer place to swim and 
fish. The oceanfront is the most important part of the city and 
we can't afford to let it go to pot. - K.L.D. 



Report Annoying Potholes 
To Pothole Patrol 

One thing a motorist can't stand is dodging potholes. 
Whether they are big or small, they still can damage a car. And 
they are such an unsightly thing, especially in this beautiful re- 
sort city in which we live. 

Now, thanks to the city of Virginia Beach highway division's 
Pothole Patrol, many of the potholes we encounter day in and 
day out, will disappear. Citizens of Virginia Beach are welcome 
to report any annoying holes in the road and the patrol guaran- 
tees it will be fixed within three days. Not a bad deal. 

The patrol will do the best they can to provide satisfaction to 
residents, but they can only do so much. It might be a little im- 
possible to catch every single pothole out there, but they cer- 
tainly will try. 

So, be patient and if there's a pothole in your neighborhood 
or on the way to work that you can no longer tolerate, call Pot- 
hole Patrol and report it. Someone at highway division will 
surely be able to help you. - K.L.D. 

Mindless Cannibalism 

Before a House full of colleagues last week, disgraced Con- 
gressman Jim Wright of Texas blamed his leadership fall on 
"mindless cannibalism." In Wright's situation, cannibalism 
means that politicians are eating their own kind. Wright thinks 
that it must stop. "There's been enough of it," he declared. 
. Wright is wrong. If cannibalism can halt the growing barter- 
ing of Congressional integrity for honorariums and contribu- 
tions, then it is right. 

An overwhelming pattern of bending, the ethical rules has 
turned off the public and is approaching a national scandal. The 
problem continues to be the huge wads of money being spent to 
try to influence lawmakers to pass or kill legislation. 

Always good for a chuckle these days is the story about the 
politician who took $5,000 to introduce a bill from one group 
and then took $10,000 to kill it from an opposing group to 
Washington to do good and ending up doing very well. 

Because of this public skepticism and the recent roar over 
controversial financial dealings, sweeping reforms on Capitol 
Hill are all but inevitable. If Congress can toughen rules to keep 
special-interest money out of members' pockets, it is all 
worthwhile. Let the cannibalism continue. - H.B. 




Lee Cahill Report 



Mayor Meyera £ Oberndorf speaks at the Tourism Week Awards Luncheon. 

Mayor Proclaims Tourism Week 

"The tourism industry seems to have the best ot the best! Those dedicated to 
Ms field are enthusiastic, hard-working, vital human beings who are committed in 
one way or another, to serving others and demonstrating in a host of different 
ways - that ours Is the finest city In the state! Everyone here Is responsible - no 
matter what role you play - for providing not only comfort to travelers, jobs to 
the unemployed, an expanded tax base for our city, but the best thing of all - 
pride In our community! Each one of you Is responsible for adding to the economy of 
this nation, a part of the $313 billion spent by travelers In the U.S. in one year. 
Each ol you Is responsible for creating or serving in one of the 5 1/2 million jobs in 
this Industry; an Industry that generates $37 billion in tax revenues. According to 
the US Travel and Tourism Administration, tourism is destined to become, by the 
year200Bi the largest income producer in the United States," Oberndorf said. 



— 



Letters To The Editor 



A Few Words On Overman 



Editor: 

Virginia Beach Sheriff Billy Ray 
Overman is steaming full ahead de- 
spite rough and turbulent weather 
during this past year. 

I have been employed in the Vir- 
ginia Beach Sheriffs Office for 
nearly 1 3 years, therefore, I feel it 
incumbent to report pertinent facts 
and information as I have person- 
ally observed. Since I do not have 
an ax to grind and am not seeking 
regards of any kind let us begin. 

It is my belief that under the 
leadership of Sheriff Overman, the 
overall morale at this office has 
greatly improved. All departments 
are professionally staffed with qual- 
ity supervisors which in turn en- 
ables more efficiency and less cost 
to the city. The first mark of good 
administration is the delegation of 
authority which our sheriff has 
done. Also, the sheriff is an equal 
opportunity employer. , 

It is regrettable that a few people 
in the Republican Party have de- 
cided not to support the incumbent 
in his bid for re-election. 

At least one ranking member 
should take a good look at himself 
in a full length mirror when casting 
stones. It could very well come 
back to haunt him. 

Our sheriff has surrounded him- 
self with top flight supervisors 
qualified, experienced administrative 
people of culture. Captain Tom 
Rollins heads our Investigative Di- 
vision. Because of the work of 
Captain Rollins and his staff, the 



Sheriffs office now has better 
qualified and professional personnel. 

Major Donald Cottrell, CO. 
Corrections, is doing an outstand- 
ing job in an overcrowded facility, 
working 12 hour shifts. 

Captain Willard Smith, Assistant 
CO. Corrections, is also doing an 
admirable job. Captain Smith is 
responsible for coordinating an art 
class for the inmates in the Correc- 
tional Center through die sponsor- 
ship of Norfolk State University. 

These art classes have proven to 
be very popular with the inmates, 
and at present there is a waiting list 
for vacancies in this class. This is 
just another innovative program 
sanctioned by Sheriff Overman to 
assist inmates in becoming produc- 
tive citizens when released from the 
Correction Center. 

We arc fortunate to have Captain 
Jack Pallett assigned to courtroom 
security because of his experience 
in this area and his ability to work 
well with others. 

Sandy Wiese is administrator of 
our Medical Department. This lady 
is almost indispensable and handles 
her office in a most professional 
manner. Sandy is recognized 
throughout the state for her profes- 
sional sense of pride and integrity, 
as well as her overall proficiency. 

Captain James Moore, supervisor 
of the Civil Process Division, 
keeps complaints to an absolute 
minimum while dispatching 20,000 
legal documents monthly. His de- 
Please see Letter, page U 



The Virginia Beach Sun Deadlines 

News deadlines for The Virginia Beach Sun are: 5 p.m. Friday for the 
upcoming Wednesday's issue. 

/ Articles must be legible, preferably typed, and double spaced 

on standard size paper. 
/ Pictures must be sharp, clear and accompanied with complete 

information. (All persons in picture must be identified.) 
/ News may be brought or mailed in and should include the name 
and telephone numbers of die persons submitting it. 
The Virginia Beach Sun welcomes and encourages letters from its readers 
on topics of general interest. * 
All letters must carry the name and address of writer. 

• Letters should be addressed to: Editor, The Virginia Beach Sun, 
138 Rosemont Road, Suite 217, Virginia Beach, VA. 23452. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 



Publisher 

Hanes Byerly 



Assistant to the Publisher 

Managing Editor 

Greg Goldfarb 



Staff Writers 

Karen Dalrymple 
Deanna Johnson Keim 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

138 Rosemont Road 
Virginia Beach, VA 23320 
Telephone: 1-804-486-3430 



Letters to the editor are encouraged. 
They should be typed in paragraph form, 
double spaced and include the sender's 
name, address and the phone numbers. 
News deadline is Friday noon for each 
upcoming week's issue. Mail all letters and 
correspondence to The Virginia Beach 
Sun, 138 Rosemont Road, Virginia Beach, 
Va„ 23452. Telephone: 1-804-486-3430. 

The Virginia Beach Sim is published 
every Wednesday by Byerly Publications, Inc., 
Franklin, Va. Second Qui Pottage (USPS660- 
140) is paid at Lynnhiven Station, Virginia 
Beach, Va. Subscription Rates: By mail ad- 
dresses within 40 miles of Virginia Beach, Va., 
one year, $12,85, two yean, $22.50. Virginia 
and North Carolina, one year, $14.85, two 
yean, $26.50. All other stales one year, $17.85, 
two yean, $32.50. Payable in advance. 



Officials Seek New Fence Ordinance 

The poet said that "good" fences make good neighbors, but some of the 
fences in Virginia Beach are the other kind, causing city officials to look 
for new ordinances. 

When William Macali, assistant city attorney, presented the latest cre- 
ation of the law department, Councilman John D. Moss said he didn't 
"know whether we can afford that much government or if the people want 
that much help. (The ordinance is) more than I anticipated." 

Moss asked whether the city can address the fences that line major high- 
ways without getting into permits. 

City Manager Aubrey V. Watts Jr. explained that the permits are needed 
"to catch them before they put them up." 

Director of Inspections Robert Loher added, "We don't hear about viola- 
tions until after the fact." 

Moss said he was interested in how the city looks but wondered whether 
more inspectors would be needed to enforce more laws. 

Council sent the ordinance back for another makeover, along with 
Councilman Albert Balko who volunteered to work with the staff. 

The proposed ordinance would control fences built within 30 feet of die 
public right -of-way. Like non-conforming signs the non-conforming fence 
would have to be replaced and to come into compliance with the new laws 
if repairs were in excess of 50 percent of the original cost 

The ordinance also would have a $20 permit fee plus one dollar for each 
$100 of the cost excluding the first $200. 

I 

Water And Sewer Rates Go Up 

After July 1 the average single-family residence will be billed $1.98 a 
month more for water and sanitary sewer service which is based on water 
consumption. 

After July 1, 1990, that residence will be billed an additional $1.08 a 
month for a total monthly charge of $31.35. The figures are based on water 
consumption of 6000 gallons of water a month. 

The higher charges result from increases in the water usage rates ap- 
proved by city council. New rates will be $2.51 (from $2.18) per 1000 
gallons usage effective July 1 and $2.69 per 1000 gallons effective July 1, 
1990. 

The first increase is attributed to two factors - the Lake Gaston water 
supply project (19 cents) and the City of Norfolk wholesale water rate in- 
crease (14 cents). 

The 18-cent increase for next year is the fourth increase scheduled to fi- 
nance the Lake Gaston project, for a total of 75 cents, recommended by the 
city's consultant, Alvord, Burdick and Howson. 

Although Norfolk has increased its wholesale water rate from $.938 per 
1000 gallons to $1,069 per 1000 gallons, an increase of $.131 per 1000 
gallons, the 14 cent increase is recommended to make up for the difference 
between the quantity of water purchased and the quantity of water sold to 
retail customers - lost and unaccounted for. 

Council Approves Revenue Bonds 

City council has approved the issuance of $4 million in industrial 
development revenue bonds to Hermes Abrasives, Ltd., 524 Viking Drive, 
for their funding of a $5 million IRB issued in 1979. 



Council Meets With School Board 

City Council will have a workshop with the School Board in the School 
Administration Building Monday at 11 a.m. to discuss the Board's revised 
projections of capital needs. The revisions represent a $225 million in- 
crease over the School Board requests in the present Capital Improvement 
Program. 

English Co. Awarded Contract 

English Construction Company, Inc., has been awarded the contract for 
Ferrell Parkway Phase IB for $7,175,453.60, the low bid of seven. 

The project will provide a four-lane divided arterial with future expansion 
to six lanes for a distance of approximately 1.4 miles from Pleasant Valley 
Road to Princess Anne Road. Three bridge structures are included in the 
project. 

Four of the bids were below the engineer's estimate of $7,959,732. 

Marriage License Location Needed 

The Wedding Chapel at 972 Laskin Road bills itself as 'Tidewater's Full- 
Service Wedding Chapel." 

But one thing it can't do is issue wedding licenses. That's always been the 
province of City Hall. The Trouble with that is that same couples may de- 
cide to get married on the weekend but have to wait until city hall opens for 
business on Monday. 

The chapel has requested city council to consider an additional location for 
issuing licenses, and maybe additional times. 

The request was a little puzzling for Mayor Meyera Oberndorf because she 
figured that people would want to wait a few days before they decided to get 
married. 

Flora And Fauna Inventory 



Virginia Beach and Chesapeake 
have been identified as the number 
one and number two priorities in a 
state program which will create an 
inventory of unique flora and fauna 
in the state. 

Michael L. Lipford, program 
manager/ecologist with the De- 
partment of Conservation and His- 
toric resources, at a work session 
asked the city council for $84,000 
to finance an inventory in Virginia 
Beach, the number one priority 
"because of its unique habitat." 

Lipford said that Chesapeake, 
which is second on the list, may be 
approached next year. 

The beach council by consensus 
directed City Manager Aubrey V. 
Watts Jr. to prepare the necessary 
contracts with the state after Coun- 
cilwoman Barbara Henley said she 
hoped "we go ahead with it" 

Lipford said that the state, 
through the Virginia Natural Her- 
itage Program, wants to concentrate 



on areas, like Virginia Beach, where 
"if we don't gel good information 
soon," it will be too late because of 
development. 

Priorization is determined by the 
amount of natural diversity in an 
area, the threat from development, 
and knowledge of the area. 

Lipford said that a method for 
inventorying land was established 
in 1974 and that 49 states partici- 
pate in the program using the same 
methodology. 

The General Assembly formally 
became part of the program in 1988 
and has made $2 million available 
to acquire properties throughout the 
state. Lipford said that so far eight 
properties have been acquired in- 
cluding the recent purchase of 600 
acres on the North Landing River. 
Lipford pointed out that most of the 
properties in which the State is in- 
terested in are not suitable for de- 

Please see Cah/f, page 3 



Correction 

An article in last week's Sun in- 
correctly stated that the Chesapeake 
Beach polling location had been 
moved to Bayside Baptist Church. 
The polling will not be moved 



from the Chesapeake Beach Fire 
Stauon until November. The June 
primaries will still be held at the 
■station. 



■M 



_i- 



■■ 



■■ 



The Virginia Beach Sun, June 7, 1989 3 




Op-Ed 




Lake Gaston Project Is A Step Closer To Completion 




The 
Mayor's 
Report 

Virginia Beach Mayor 

The Honorable 

Meyera Oberndorf 



The Virginia Beach City Council recently took another step towards 
making the Lake Gaston Project a reality. 

To ensure that the citizens of Virginia Beach will have an adequate 
public water supply, the financing plan for construction of the Lake Gaston 
Project moved closer to completion. Two water rate increases were 
authorized consistent with the Lake Gaston financial plan and the bond 
referendum held November 8, 1988. 

The adoption of these two increases represent the last two of four 
increases previously identified for construction of the Lake Gaston Proj- 
ect. 

The water rate increase of $.33 per 1,000 gallons effective July 1, 1989 
is comprised of two elements: 

• Lake Gaston water supply, rate increase #3, $.19 per 1,000 gallons; 

• City of Norfolk wholesale, water rate increase, $. 14 per 1 ,000 gallons. 
An increase of $. 1 8 per 1 ,000 gallons effective for July 1 , 1990 is the 

Lake Gaston rate increase #4. 

Since 1984, the city has been methodically working to make the Lake 
Gaston Project a reality. Work has been focused in principally five areas. 
These areas are: 

• Federal permit litigation. 



To ensure that the citizens of Virginia Beach wilt 
have an adequate public water supply, the financ- 
ing plan for construction of the Lake Gaston Project 
moved closer to completion. 



• Engineering design. 

• Local consent process. 

• Right-of-way acquisition. 

• Financial planning. 

Success must be achieved in each of the five areas; implementation of 
the Lake Gaston financial plan is critical to the Lake Gaston Project. 

In January 1986, new water connection charges (Water Resource 
Recovery Fee) were adopted by the city to help pay a portion of the cost 
associated with the Lake Gaston Project; this fee is assessed against new 
connections to the water system. Revenues from the Water Resource 
Recovery Fee and revenues generated through increased water rates will 
pay the cost of the Project. 

In June 1987 the city's rate consultant, Alvord, Bufdick and Howson, 

Please see Mayor, page 14 



VBEA Recognizes Excellence In Education At Meeting 




The 
Report 



By Claire Polley, 

President of the Virginia 

Beach Education Association 



Every year at the June Association Representative meeting excellence in 
education is recognized by the Virginia Beach Education Association. The 
Friend of Education Awards, Academic Freedom and Excellence Award and 
the Distinguished Leadership Award are presented. 

Given by the VBEA for outstanding contributions to education and the 
public school system, this year's Friend of Education Award winners are 
truty exemplary. 

Ann Meade Simpson, winner of the individual award has served as chair 
of the Community Involvement Team this past year. It has been her job to 
coordinate the subcommittees and prepare the presentations for the school 
board on the proposed Family Life Education. She has most ably conducted 
the hearings and listened attentively and actively to the wide range of opin- 
ions of citizens, parents and educators. A mother of four, she is currently 
working in real estate. Before moving to Virginia Beach where her husband 
is a judge, she taught in Newport News and Henrico County. She was one 
of the founders of the Court Docent program and was asked to speak before 
the Convention of Chief Justices of the State Supreme Courts in 
Williamsburg at the National Center for State Courts. She has always been 
active in the community and is a true Friend of Education. 

In the Adopt-a-School category, there were many great nominees. 



VBEA Is pleased to salute Its award winners and is 
proud of their commitment to excellence In educa- 
tion in the City of Virginia Beach. 



*UdiuiuililitfliUMiW 



Kcmpsville High School's partner, Talbot & Associates, Ltd., won this 
year's award. In the letter of nomination, this company was cited for its 
fully committed partnership exemplified by three projects: redesign of the 
foyer, grounds beautification, and the East Asia project. On all three pro- 
jects, students, faculty and Talbot employees worked cooperatively to im- 
plement the jointly developed plans. Talbot's dedication, enthusiasm, and 
commitment to excellence in education deserves recognition and commen- 
dation. 

The third award was given to an individual and the newspaper he repre- 
sents. Michael DeSisti has spent the last two years covering education is- 
sues at the Beach Bureau of The Virginian-Pilot. He has been both critic 
and admirer. He has used the power of the press to raisethe serious issues 
facing public education. He has examined Virginia Beach and informed the 
citizens about the school system's weaknesses but also its great strengths. 

Please see VBEA, page 14 



June Is The Month Of Love And Marriage 





By Lillian Youell, 

Virginia Beach Constitution 

Celebration Commission 

Consultant 



In the spring, a young man's fancy turns to love and sometimes mar- 
riage. Doris Gregory, Virginia Beach deputy clerk in charge of marriage li- 
censes, concurs, "There is a sudden spurt in the sale of marriage licenses 
issued in Virginia Beach as June approaches." 

During the past three months, over 1,260 marriage licenses have been 
issued in the city. To obtain a marriage license, residents of Virginia must 
apply at the residence of the bride or groom. Non-residents may apply at 
any clerk's office. The cost of a license is a mere $20, but is only good for 
60 days. 

Marriage, though sometimes called a "civil contract," is rather a status 
in the sense of the relation of husband and wife. It is actually more than a 
contract, either religious or civil. Traditionally, it has been considered an 
institution, founded upon mutual consent. 

It is the state, not the federal government, that has the power to regulate 
marriage. Thus, the legislature determines who may marry, the age at 
which they may marry, the procedure and form essential to constitute mar- 
riage and other related issues. 

Under Virginia law, one may marry at age 16 with parental consent or at 
18 without parental consent. The Commonwealth no longer requires a 
physical examination or a blood lest and there is no waiting period. 



During the past three months, over 1,260 marriage 
licenses have been Issued here: 



Virginia does mandate a "ceremony," though it is undefined. In our city, 
there are some 150 churches and synagogues if one chooses a religious 
ceremony. As an alternative, our city has two marriage commissioners, 
Mary Cooper and Ivan Mapp, who have been appointed by the circuit court 
to perform civil ceremonies. 

In some states, mutual consent alone without formal celebration is suf- 
ficient to constitute a valid marriage, known as a common law marriage. 
Such a marriage is not legal in Virginia, but, under the Constitution, must 
be recognized if consummated in a state where common law marriage is 
valid. 

Further, legitimacy is said to be the strongest presumption in the law. 
Because the state is vitally interested in the family as an institution for the 
carE and training of children, the courts do not indulge in capricious 
guesses regarding gestation to determine legitimacy. 

Please see LK's Quit, page 14 



Lee Cahill's City Council Report 



n 








Mayor 
Meyera Obemdort 



Vice-Mayor 
Robert Fentress 



AlBalko 



JohnBaum 



Harold Helschober 



Barbara Henley 



Rtba McClanan 



John Moss 



Nancy Parker 



John Perry 



miSettoms 



Council Wants Public's Input On Ocean Park Beach 



The city has spent millions of 
dollars at Ocean Park Beach and the 
adjoining spoil site at Lynnhavcn 
Inlet. But before spending any more 
money, council wants some imput 
from the public. 

At a recent workshop council di- 
rected City Manager Aubrey V. 
Watts Jr. to come up with 
"specifics" on the joint use of the 
area as a day-use beach and a boat 
ramp. 

The staff had requested $40,000 
for a study for a multi-use facility 
or $30,000 for an individual study 
of the boat ramp or beach facility. 
Already allocated in the Capital 
Improvement Program is $15,000 
for a boat ramp study. 

Councilman Harold Heischober 
said that the city needs a boat ramp 
and its needs better use of the Ocean 
Park beach. He suggested, however, 
that the staff come up with 
specifics without spending 



$40,000, and then have a public 
hearing. 

He said that not everyone who 
lives in Ocean Park is enamored of 
the idea of a boat ramp. He said that 
concerns have been expressed about 
traffic and the activity in the inlet. 

Robert Matthias, assistant city 
manager, said that the construction 
of a boat ramp would cost $1.31 
million. The ramp would be located 
on the 16 acre spoil site, last used 
as a spoil site in 1987 when the 
Lynnhavcn Inlet was dredged. 

The Lynnhaven Boat Ramp 
Committee recommended the site as 

an appropriate location for a ramp. 
The committee also recommended 
that the facility be open 24 hours a 
day and that a fee be charged. The 
fee considered at the time was $5, 
Matthias said, but since then com- 
parable fees have gone up to $6 and 
$7. 



Matthias said that the facility 
should be built so that six boats 
can use the ramps at one time and a 
total of 200 parking spaces would 
be available. He said that some 
commercial boatmen have asked 
that they also have access to load 
and unload, but that this activity if 
permitted should be controlled 
strictly. 

Included in the price of the pro- 
ject arc traffic improvements such 
as a traffic signal, turn lane and ac- 
celeration lane. 

Matthias said that Council al- 
ready has paid $1.8 million for the 
site, $462,500 for beaches and 
rights of way in Ocean Park and 
$1 10,000 to the Corps of Engineers 
for extra fill yardage. He said that 
the replenished beach at Ocean Park 
has held up exceptionally well. 

Councilman John D. Moss sug- 
gested that some differential be 
considered in the fee structure for 



residents. 

Matthias said that some 
consideration is being given in this 
area. He said that 12,000 boats are 
expected to use the ramp bringing 
in $60,000 a year which should pay 
for the operating cost. 

Because of the site's proximity to 
the Bay, Councilman Albert Balko 



said that if the city is going to have 
a ramp, this is it. 

Barry Frankcnfield said the 
Chesapeake Bay beaches are under- 
used. To extend day use of the 
beach, he said, a study would have 
to include parking, resirooms and 
fees. Under tentative plans the spoil 
site area would be used as a parking 



area for both uses. 

The Ocean Park Beach extends 
4,800 feet from Lynnhaven Inlet to 
Woodlawn Avenue. While it has 
many access points, public parking 
is virtually non-existent. The total 
cost of dredging the Lynnhaven In- 
let and placing the fill on the beach 
was approximately $1 million. 



Cahill 



continued from page 2 



velopment anyway. 

Lipford said the inventory would 
take three years. He said at 
$84,000, it will cost less than half 
of what it would cost if done by a 
private firm and that conservation 
measures could range from a 
"handshake" with a property owner 



to zoning. He said that the program 
wants to protect the best examples 
of the state's flora and fauna. 

Noting that Virginia is at an 
ecological crossroads, Lipford said 
that among the objects of the in- 
ventory are rare animals, rare 
plants, communities (of trees), wa- 



terfalls, champion trees, significant 
non-tidal wetlands, and tidal 
marshes. 

Both Lipford and Chris Pague, 
staff zoologist, who presented the 
program with Lipford, are natives 
of Portsmouth. They used slides to 
illustrate their presentation. 



■^^^" 



4 The Vkgtola Beach Sun, June 7, 1989 




A.R.E. Announces Free Lectures 



I nc Association for Research and 
Enlightenment has announced its 
schedule of free lectures for the 
week of June 1 1 through 17. 

Sunday, Dreams by Alice 
Moeller at 3 p.m. 

Monday, Death: Passing 
Through God's Other Door, by Rob 
Grant at 3 p.m. 

Tuesday, ESP: Awareness 
Through Intuition by Nancy Pohle 
at 3 p.m. 



Wednesday, Dreams: Information 
on Dreams from the Readings, by 
Mae Gimbert St. Clair at 3 p.m. 

Thursday, Relationships: Feeling 
Comfortable with People, by Kevin 
Todeschi at 3 p.m. 

Friday, Fear. Overcoming Life's 
Fears, by Pat Hamilton at 3 p.m. 

Saturday, Reincarnation: Cycle 
Riding, by David Osborne at 3 
p.m. For more information call 
428-3588. 



Dance Slated For Special People 



A prom night dance for physi- 
cally and mentally handicapped 
people Will be held Saturday, June 
17, from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the 
Bow Creek Recreation Center, 3427 
Clubhouse Road. 

The dance will be sponsored by 
the parents and friends of residents 
of Southeastern Virginia Training 
Center, the Virginia Beach Depart- 
ment of Parks and Recreation and 



CLASP (Citizens Loving All Spe- 
cial People). 

Participation is free. Refresh- 
ments will be served and door prizes 
will be given. The latest hits will 
be played. Parents and guardians are 
welcome, however, chaperones are 
present at all times. 

For further information call 
Harry Baird at 486-3 110. 



Fishing Clinic At Marine Science Museum 



The Virginia Marine Science 
Museum is holding a hands-on 
fishing workshop for eight to 12 
year-olds on Wednesday, June 14 
from 4 to 6 p.m. This popular 
clinic teaches youngsters the fun- 
damentals of fishing with a rod and 
reel. 



Participants should bring their 
own rod and reel if they have one. 
Program fees are $4 for members 
and $6 for non-members. 

The Virginia Marine Science 
Museum is located at 717 General 
Booth Boulevard. For more infor- 
mation, call 425-3476. 



CLASP Holds Business Meeting 

CLASP (Citizens Loving All this meeting. All voting members 



Special People) will hold its 
monthly business meeting Tuesday, 
June 11, at 7:30 p.m. at the home 
of Harry and Juanita Baird, 3900 
Rum ford Lane. 
New officers will be elected at 



are encouraged to attend. All other 
interested persons are also invited to 
attend. 

For further information call 
ilarry Baird at 486-3 110. 



Upcoming Pavilion Events Announced 



The following events will be 
held at the Pavilion Convention 
Center 

Friday, June 9, Auction Liquida- 
tors oriental rug sale at 7 p.m.; and 
the livestock banquet at 6:30 p.m. 

Saturday, June 10, Bern's School 



of Dance recital at 7 p.m. 

Sunday, June 11, Virginia Sym- 
phony Pops at 7:30 p.m.; PC Fest 
computer show from 10 a.m. to 4 
p.m. and Atlantic Coast Conserva- 
tion Association membership drive 
from 2 to 7 p.m. 



Data Processing Management Assoc. Meets 



The Tidewater Chapter of the 
Data Processing Management As- 
sociation will hold its monthly 
dinner meeting on Thursday, June 
8, at 6 p.m. at the Diamond Club 
at Met Park in Norfolk. 



Maxwell Moon, systems engi- 
neer with AT&T, will speak. His 
topic will be Unix International. 

The fee is $12 for members and 
$14 for guests. For more informa- 
tion call 486-1900. 



Easter Seals Sponsors Yard Sale 



The Easter Seal Society of Vir- 
ginia's Adult Day Care is sponsor- 
ing a yard sale to benefit its pro- 
grams on Saturday, June 10, be- 
tween 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. at the 



Easter Seal Center. 

The Easter Seal Center is located 
off Lynnhaven Parkway at 3101 
Magic Hollow Blvd. 



DAV, Ladies Auxiliary Meet 



Disabled American Veterans, 
Virginia Beach Chapter 20, and the 
ladies auxiliary will hold their 
monthly meeting on Tuesday, June 



20 at 7:30 p.m. at the Chapter 
Home, 117 Sykes Avenue. 

Call 481-5577 for more 
information. 



Wellness Workout At Great Neck Jr. 



Wellness Workout, a health fair 
sponsored by Blue Cross and Blue 
Shield of Virginia, will provide a 
variety of diagnostic measures to 
assess total health and conditioning. 

Happening in conjunction with 
the Blue Cross and Blue Shield of 
Virginia East Coast Triathlon, the 
Wellness Workout is scheduled for 
Saturday, June 10, from noon to 3 
p.m. at Great Neck Junior High. It 
is open to the general public. 

Lifestyle and stress appraisals as 
well as body-fat ratio analyses will 
be offered, measuring an individ- 
ual's conditioning levels. Glau- 
coma, vision, blood pressure and 
cholesterol diagnostic screenings 
will also be available for the health 
minded. All screenings, with the 
exception of cholesterol tests, are 
free of charge. A nominal fee of $5 



will be charged for the cholesterol 
test. 

Registration for the East Coast 
Triathlon is also headquartered at 
Great Neck Junior High School on 
the same day. The actual race will 
be held the following day, Sunday, 
June 1 1, at 7:30 a.m. at Fort Story. 

The Triathlon consists of a 1.5K 
(.9 mile) open bay swim, a 20 mile 
bike ride and a 10K (6.2 mile) run. 
Over $2,000 in cash prizes will be 
awarded to the top three finishers. 
Between 400-600 top triathletes 
from the U.S. and abroad are ex- 
pected to compete. 

Additional information on the 
Wellness Workout is available by 
calling Kim Cosner at 625-1985. 
Contact Sandy Doyle at 340-1435 
for more information on advance 
registration for the triathlon. 



Youth Triathlon Held At YMCA 



The McDonald's/YMCA Hamp- 
ton Roads Youth Triathlon will be 
held on Saturday, June 10 at the 
South Hampton Roads YMCA (by 
Mount Trashmore). 

These running, biking and 
swimming races test stamina, 
strength and overall speed. Cate- 
gories are ages eight to nine run- 
ning a half mile, biking one mile 
and swimming 100 yards; ages ten 
to 12 running three fourths of a 
mile, biking two miles, and 
swimming 150 yards; ages 13 to 15 
running one mile, biking three 
miles, and swimming 200 yards; 



ages 16 to 18 will have the same 
lengths as the 13 to 15 age group. 

The entry fee is $5 for these spe- 
cial scaled down versions of the 
popular adult triathlons, and all 
proceeds go to the YMCA Youth 
Fund Entry forms are available at 
any local McDonald's or the 
YMCA. 

All entrants will receive food 
prizes and t- shirts. Olympic style 
medals will be awarded to the top 
finishers in each category. 

For further information contact 
James Sweeney, South Hampton 
Roads YMCA, at 499-23 11. 




Marge Kelly 

Just A Chat 

Name: Marge Kelly. 

Occupation: Teacher assistant in special education for emotionally 
handicapped children at Bayside High School. 

Neighborhood: Lake Christopher. 

Age: 44. 

Marital status: Married. 

Biggest accomplishment in your life: Raising my family 
successfully. 

Biggest mistake in your life: Not going to college right out 
of high school. 

What do you really like about your job: I love the kids. 

If you could write a national newspaper column, what 
would your message be: To really listen when a child's speaking. 
*What do you consider the meaning of success: To be able 
to do the things you want to do and not feel you're neglecting some- 
thing. 

If you received a million dollars tomorrow, what would 
you do with it: Start with a new Ferrari and share it with family and 
friends. 

What's your idea of a fun evening: Barbecuing and swim- 
ming with friends and family. 

What's your idea of a fun weekend: Going to Atlantic City. 

What is your best personality trait: I'm friendly. 

What is your worst personality trait: I get grouchy. 

What is your dream vacation: A slow cruise all around the 
Virgin Islands. 

What is your favorite time of the year and why: Summer 
- school's out. 

What is your favorite day of the week and why: Friday - I 
look forward to the weekend. 

What's your favorite magazine: Southern Living. 

What is your favorite pet: I have an Irish Setter at home. 

Your dream car: A red Ferrari. 

Your favorite sport: Swimming. 

Your favorite sports team: The Mets. 

What is your pet peeve.' I can't really think of one. 

What do you like to do to relax after a hard day's work: 
I usually enjoy a good novel. 

What is your favorite TV program: War and Remembrance. 

Your favorite movie: On Golden Pond. 

Your favorite entertainer: Barry Manilow. 

What is your favorite food and drink: Mexican and straw- 
berry daquiris. 

What is your favorite restaurant: Chi-Chi's. 

What do you think is one of the biggest problems fac- 
ing the world: Lack of communication. 

What do you think is one of the biggest problems fac- 
ing Virginia Beach: Overpopulation. 

What do you like most about Virginia Beach: .The beach 
and the ocean. 



Parents Without Partners Meet 



Parents Without Partners, Chap- 
ter 216, is hosting a dance at Holi- 
day Inn, Greenwich and Newtown 
Road on Saturday, June 10 from 9 
to 1 p.m. Dance to the music of DJ 
Bill Holland. Proceeds help finance 
the family and children program. 
Admission is $5 per person. 

An orientation for membership 
will be conducted at 8 p.m. just 
before th dance for single parents of 
the area. Call 497-8112/471-6672 
for more information on each of 
these activities. 

Also, Parents Without Partners, 



Chapter 216, is hosting a chapter 
night. The speaker will be from 
STRAIGHT, a drug rehabilitation 
program for adolescents ages 12 to 
24. It will be held at the Virginia 
Beach Central Library, Room A, on 
Virginia Beach Blvd. on Thursday, 
June 15 at 7 p.m. 

The public is invited to attend. 
For more information, call 497- 
81 12 or 471-6672. 

An orientation for membership 
will be conducted at 6:30 p.m. just 
before the meeting. All eligible 
single parents are invited to attend. 



Library 



Children Storytime At Bayside 



Children ages three to nine-years- 
old are invited to a special story- 
time featuring animals on Tuesday, 
June 20 at 11 a.m. at the Bayside 
Area Library, 936 Independence 
Boulevard, Virginia Beach. 



Children will take part in a dis- 
cussion about zoo animals and how 
they protect themselves. Touch 
table items will be available. Reg- 
ister by calling the library at 464- 
9320. 



Toddler Storytime At Central 



Toddlers and parents are invited 
to attend a special storytime on 
Thursday, June 15 at 11 a.m. at the 
Central Library, 4100 Virginia 
Beach Boulevard. Participants will 



be introduced to what library and 
children's literature offers to young 
children. 

Register by calling the library at 
431-3070. 



School News 



Public Relations Projects Wins Awards 



Five public relations projects and 
activities established last year in 
Virginia Beach City Public Schools 
have earned awards from the Na- 
tional School Public Relations As- 
sociation. (NSPRA). 

Each year NSPRA gives a 
Golden Achievement Award to 
schools and school divisions across 
the country who develop exemplary 
public relations activities, pro- 
grams, and projects. Five of the 
seven NSPRA Golden Achievement 
awards in Virginia went to Virginia 
Beach. 

Projects receiving a 1989 Golden 
Achievement Award were: 

• "Coalition for Students at Risk; 
Professionals and the Community," 
Lynnhaven Junior High School, 
developed by teachers Gail Coston 
and Angie Evans, assistant princi- 
pal William L. Johnson, and prin- 
cipal George E. McGovem. 

• "Handbook for Children Whose 
Dad is in the Navy and Goes Out to 
Sea," Thoroughgood Elementary 
School, developed by librarian 



Mary Ann Ganzel and guidance 
counselor Mary T. Kerr. 

• "Business-Military/Student 
Commitment," Bayside Junior 
High School, developed by guid- 
ance counselor Rosalyn H. 
McDonald and principal Donald L. 
Harvey. 

• "Adopt-A-School City Staff 
Development," Office of Commu- 
nity Relations, developed by 
school-business partnership 
specialist Ann W. Ege and director 
Dorothy N. Barber. 

• "A Crisis Defused at Bayside 
Junior High School," Office of 
Community Relations and Educa- 
tional Planning Center, developed 
by director Dorothy N. Barber and 
director Dr. K. Edwin Brown, re- 
spectively. 

Each winner has received a letter 
of congratulations and a special 
certificate from NSPRA executive 
director John H. Wherry, ASPR. 
They will be recognized at the 
NSPRA national seminar in San 
Francisco, Ca., in July. 



ECU Announces Local Graduates 



The following students recently 
graduated from East Carolina Uni- 
versity: Stephen Allen Ward, son of 
Henry and Patricia Ward; Michelle 
Elise Williams, daughter of Mr- 
Anderson J. Williams and Marion 
E. Williams; Laura Ann Holbert, 
daughter of William and Patricia 
Holbert; Richard Blair Nuckols, son 
of Kenneth B. Nuckols and Nancy 
W. Underwood; Susan Marie To- 
bin, daughter of Jerome A. and 
Elsie Tobin; Mary Belle Parsons, 
daughter of Belle F. Parsons; Kat- 
rina Marie Quintana, daughter of 
Ricardo and Arlene J. Quintana; 
William Joseph O'Connor, son of 
Frank J. and Anne W. O'Connor; 
and Bruce Allen Mayhue, son of 
Bruce A. Mayhue and Emily Wol- 
szozenski. 

Also, Michelle Lee Werhan, 
daughter of Kenneth R. and Vir- 
ginia V. Werhan; Teresa Ann Kloc, 
daughter of Stanley P. and Nancey 
E. Kloc; Barbara Ann Lamb, 



daughter of Catherine H. Lamb; 
Stephanie Keller Jacobson, daughter 
of Sidney L. Jacobson and Linda L. 
Longman; Jaqueline Pearce John- 
son, daughter of William T. John- 
son and Betty J. Fuller, Elaine 
Frances Jones, daughter of Donald 
and Shirley Jones; Jill Alisa Jordan, 
daughter of James and Judith Jor- 
dan; Leigh Kathryn Hannah, 
daughter of Mary A. Hannah; Bon- 
nie Jean Fulton, daughter of 
William J. Fulton and Joan E. 
Fulton; Laura Ann Connolly, 
daughter of Robert and Christine 
Connolly; Mary N Elizabeth Davis, 
daughter of Robert C. and Betty 
Davis; Natalie Diane Brown, 
daughter of Russell A. and Sharon 
M. Brown; Michael Louis Bernier, 
son of Paul and Betsy Bernier; Ami 
Wynne Bannerman, daughter of 
Benny L. and Jackie R. Bannerman; 
and Margaret Kathryn Beavers, 
daughter of Priscilla Beavers. 



VWC Hosts Cheerleading Clinic 



Virginia Wesleyan College will 
be hosting summer clinics for ju- 
nior and senior high school cheer- 
leaders sponsored by Eastern 
Cheerleaders Association on June 
27 through 30 and July 21 through 
24. 

These clinics will include several 
junior and senior high school 
squads from the area. They will 
learn new cheers, chants, sideline 
cheers, dance routines, jumps, and 
partner stunts/pyramids. They will 
also participate in various work- 
shops such as spirit boosters, pep 
rallies, squad unity, and captain. 



There will be daily sessions for 
cheerleader coaches and sponsors. 

The emphasis for Eastern's, 
summer camp is crowd motivation 
and involvement. Eastern's Personal 
Instructor Program guarantees 
squads individual assistance 
throughout the camp. 

Ribbons and spirit sucks will be 
awarded daily. Trophy awards will 
be presented the final day of the 
clinic. 

For additional information, con- 
tact Eastern Cheerleaders Associa- 
tion, P.O. Box 475, South Hill, 
VA 23970, (804) 636-2000. 



Narcisco Graduates From ECU 



The East Carolina University 
School of Medicine has graduated 
its fifth student from its three-year- 
old medical dosimetry program of- 
fered through the Department of 
Radiation Oncology. 

Jane P. Narcisco completed the 
nine-month certificate program 
which trains individuals to plan ra- 
diation treatment, calculate and 
measure appropriate radiation 
dosages and assure treatment qual- 



ity. 

Prior to enrolling in the ECU 
program, Narcisco received her 
radiation therapy technology train- 
ing at the University of Virginia in 
Charlottesville and had worked in 
radiation therapy at DePaul Hospi- 
tal in Norfolk. She has accepted a 
position as medical dosimetrist at 
the Medical College of Virginia in 
Richmond and will take certifica- 
tion boards later thi« mnnth 



McColley Graduates From U Of South 



Laura Anne McColley, daughter 
of Mrs. Beverly McColley, was 
among 296 students receiving de- 
grees at recent commencement cer- 
emonies at the University of the 
South. 

McColley received a bachelor of 
arts degree in political science cum 
laude from the College of Arts and 
Sciences. 

While at Sewanee, McColley 
played women's varsity soccer, par- 



ticipated in the Big Brother/Big 
Sister program and was involved in 
Student Christian Fellowship. She 
held a summer internship with 
Senator Warner (R-VA), and she 
received the 1988 Tennessee Politi- 
cal Science Association's award for 
best undergraduate paper. Academic 
honors include membership in the 
university honor society, the Order 
of Gownsmen. She was also on the 
Dean's List. 



Beach Students Graduate From Wake Forest . 



Four Virginia Beach residents 
have graduated from Wake Forest 
University. 

Receiving bachelor of arts de- 
grees were Michael Peter Baiocco of 
Admiration Drive, Jennifer Winn 
Clarke of Holly Point Road and 
Michael Bernard O'Connor of W. 



Holly Road. 

Robert Dwayne Stevens of S. 
Parliament Drive received a 
bachelor of science degree. 

Washington Post Executive Edi- 
tor Benjamin Bradlee was com- 
mencement speaker. He addressed 
the largest graduating class in the 
school's history. 



Siebert Named To Chowan's Dean's List 



Frances Deborah Siebert, a grad- 
uate of Kempsville High School, is 
one of 19 students named to the 
Dean's List for academic achieve- 
ment during the spring semester at 



Chowan College. Students were 
named who maintained a grade 
average between 3.50-3.99 on a 
4.00 system. 



Brookes Graduates From Sweet Briar 

Kimberly Ann Brookes, the Brookes, recently graduated from 
daughter of Joan and Wilson Sweet Briar College. 



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— — — - —^— — — 



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Randolph-Macon College Grads Announced 



The following Virginia Beach 
residents recently graduated from 
Randolph-Macon College: 

Tucker Freeman Smith 
(English); Anne Marie Standing 
(Psychology); Charles Paul Ryan 
(Economics and Business); Michael 
Thomas Trafton (Economics and 



Business); Amy Lynn Francisco 
(Political Science, minor in 
French); Kalrina Michelle Komuves 
(Sociology); Todd Anthony Sher- 
man (Political Science, minor in 
Sociology) and Douglas Keith 
Baxter (Chemistry). 



Hampden-Sydney Graduates Announced 



The following students recently 
graduated from Hampden-Sydney 
College: 

Jeffrey A. Lawson of East 
Bayshore Drive; David H. Clark II 
of Linkhorn Drive; Michael E. 



Moore of Kittiwake Court; Nathan 
C. Haynie of 59th Street; LeRoy 
Davis of Susan Constant Drive and 
Christopher Savvides of Southwick 
Road. 



Neary Graduates From Providence 



Maureen D. Neary of Prince 
Charles Drive was among the 941 
graduates of Providence College 
who received their undergraduate 
degrees during the college's 71st 



commencement exercises recently. 

Neary was awarded a bachelor's 
degree in finance from the liberal 
arts college. 




New Economic Development Director Named 



W. Andrew Burke has been 
named director of the Department of 
Economic Development for the city 
of Virginia Beach. 

Burke is currently general man- 
ager of marketing for Sierra Pacific 
Power Company in Reno, Nevada. 

"This announcement ends a na- 
tionwide search to fill the position 
vacated by A. James DeBellis who 
recently retired," said Virginia 
Beach Manager Aubrey V. Watts, 
Jr. "Andrew Burke has 24 years of 
experience and a proven track record 
in locating new business and 
industry and in implementing 
retention programs for existing 
businesses," Watts added. 

Mayor Meyera E. Oberndorf said, 
"I am delighted with the energy and 
dynamics Mr. Burke brings to Vir- 
ginia Beach in this important posi- 
tion." She stated, "The appointment 
of an individual of Mr. Burke's cal- 
iber will have a positive effect on 
the city's efforts to expand our tax 
base." 

A native of Dallas, Tx., Burke, 
45, held various sales, marketing 
and business development positions 
with Texas Power and Light Com- 
pany. In 1971 he joined Santee 
Cooper, Moncks Corner, South 
Carolina, where he became vice 
president of economic development. 





The graduating police recruits. 

Police Recruits Sworn In As Officers 

Twenty-one police recruits graduated from the Police Academy recently at 
a ceremony held at Green Run High School. The recruits, who still have more 
training ahead of them, were sworn In as police officers. 



Police Seek Two Abductors 



Burke joined Sierra Pacific Power 
Company in January 1988. 

Burke graduated from the 
University of Texas in 1965 with a 
bachelor's degree in marketing. He 
received a master of business ad- 
ministration from The Citadel. In 
1984, he graduated from the Eco- 
nomic Development Institute at the 
University of Oklahoma. Recently 
he has developed and implemented a 
strategic marketing and business 
development plan for Sierra Pacific 
Power Company in its 50,000 
square-mile northern Nevada service 
territory. 



In his work with local and re- 
gional associations, Burke has had 
extensive dealings with local gov- 
ernments. He currently serves on 
the board of directors of Western 
Industrial Nevada, and the Eco- 
nomic Development Authority of 
Western Nevada. In addition, he is a 
member of the Reno Chamber of 
Commerce, American Economic 
Development Council, the Western 
States Economic Development 
Council and other professional and 
civic organizations. 

Burke is married and has two 
children. 



On April 17, a 14-ycar-old Vir- 
ginia Beach teenager was abducted 
as he was walking home from 
school. Crime Solversiis offering a 
cash reward of up to $1,000 for in- 
formation that will lead to his ab- 
ductor's arrest. 

On that Monday afternoon about 
3 p.m., the boy was walking on 
South Lynnhaven Road near Lee 
Highlands Boulevard when two men 
grabbed him from behind and forced 
him into the back of a camper shell 
on a pickup truck. He was able to 
escape by jumping out of the truck 
on General Booth Boulevard near 
South Birdneck Road. 

The truck is a red Toyota, 1980's 
model, with a white camper shell 
with no side windows, and an au- 
tomatic transmission. The driver 



was described as white, early 20's, 

6' tall, with a thin build, and long 

wavy, brown hair to his shoulders. 

He was wearing a blue t-shirt, blue 

jeans, black tennis shoes, and a ring 

with a green stone on his right 

hand. 

The passenger was also white, in 

_ his 20's, about 5' 6" tall, with a 

■> medium build, short reddish hair 

combed straight back, and was 

wearing a blue baseball cap with a 

white emblem. 

Anyone with information about 
this abduction or any other crime in 
Virginia Beach can call Crime 
Solvers at 427-0000. If the infor- 
mation provided leads to an arrest, a 
cash reward will be received and 
callers will not have to give their 
name or testify in court. 



Medical 



Beach General Hosts RN Courses 



Virginia Beach General Hospital 
is cooperating with RN Magazine 
and The Medical College of Penn- 
sylvania to offer two courses to 
prepare graduate nurses to success- 
fully take the NCLEX-RN exam. 

The courses will be offered June 
20, 21 and 22 in Room 104 of the 
Tidewater Health Care building, ad- 
jacent to Virginia Beach General 
Hospital. 

The first course, RN/MCP 
PREP for the BOARDS, will be 
held June 20 and 21 and will teach 
vital thought-processing skills that 
will help answer questions correctly 



Beach General Offers Screenings 



Virginia Beach General Hospital 
will offer the following cholesterol 
screenings throughout June: 

Tuesday, June 13 - 4:30 to 6:30 
p.m., Virginia Beach YMCA. 

Wednesday, June 14 - 1 to 3 
p.m., Peoples Home Health Center, 
Haygood. 

Friday, June 23 - 9 to 1 1 a.m.. 
Peoples Drug Store, Hilltop. 



Church 



Charity United Celebrates Homecoming 



Mayor Meyera Oberndorf recently proclaimed May 14-20 as Nursing Home 
Week and urged all citizens to join In the observance by visiting nursing home 
residents and learning about long-term care and the tradition of caring that 
nursing homes have established. 

Mayor Proclaims Nursing Home Week 

Members of the Tidewater District Virginia Health Care Association, front 
row, left to right, Loren King, Mayor Oberndorf, Betty Wills and Charles Weiden. 
Back row, left to right, Lynn Mulr, Joe Clcatko, Tom Orslnl and Tom Clements. 



Charity United Methodist Church 
will cerebrate its "Bicentennial 
Homecoming" on Sunday, June 1 1. 

Bishop Thomas B. Stockton will 
deliver the sermon at the 1 1 a.m. 
worship service. He is the current 
presiding resident bishop serving 
the Virginia Conference of the 
United Methodist Church, and lives 
in Richmond. 

Dr. Lee B. Sheaffer, Norfolk's 
district superintendent, will also 



take part in the service. Following 
this service there will be a dinner 
on the grounds and an afternoon 
program of music and reminiscing. 
Many former ministers will be 
there. 

An invitation is extended to all 
who have been associated with 
Charity to join in this day of fel- 
lowship with old friends. 

Call 426-6035 for more 
information. 




St. Michael Lutheran Holds Dedication 



Police Seek Rapist, Robber 



Virginia Beach Crime Solvers 
would like help locating two people 
who are wanted on warrants for 
separate crimes. Anyone providing 
information that leads to the arrest 
of either of these or anyone who is 
wanted by the police, will receive a 
cash reward of up to $1,000. 

Marvin Mays has warrants on 
file for two counts of rape. Mays, 
who uses several different names, is 
black, 38, 5' 11" tall, and weighs 
175 pounds. He has short black 
hair, brown eyes, and a mustache. 

Luther McKinnley Jones has 
warrants on file for armed robbery, 
abduction, and use of a firearm. 
Jones is black, 23, 6' tall, and 
weighs 180 pounds. He has short 
black hair, brown eyes and a mus- 
tache and goatee. 

Anyone with information about 
any wanted persons, stolen prop- 



erty, drugs or any other crime, can 
call Crime Solvers anonymously at 
427-0000. Court appearances are 
not required to collect a reward. 



The sanctuary of St. Michael 
Lutheran Church, 2208 Princess 
Anne Road, will be dedicated on 
Sunday, June 1 1, at a special wor- 
ship hour at 4 p.m. 

Bishop Richard Banscmer of the 
Virginia Synod, Evangelical 



GUN SHOW 



JUNE 17-18, 1989 

NORFOLK SCOPE 

Sat. 9-5 Sun. 9-4 

Admission $3.00 Under 10 FREE when accompanied by adult. 



The Virginia Beach Sun, June 7, 1989 5 



State News 



Abortion Issue Discussed At 
Virginia State Bar Meeting 



The Rev. Jerry Falwell, founder 
of the Moral Majority, and Kathryn 
Kolbet, a women's right lawyer 
who has litigated major challenges 
to restrictive abortion laws, will 
discuss both sides of the abortion 
issue at the Virginia State Bar's 
5fst annual meeting on June 16. 

The program, entitled "Roe vs. 
Wade Revisited: The Right to 
Abortion vs. the Right to Life," 
will be held at 11 a.m. at the 
Cavalier Oceanfront Hotel. 

The discussion, sponsored by the 
Commission on Women and Mi- 
norities in the Legal System, will 
focus on the future of abortion in 
America. Falwell's and Kolbert's 
comments will take into considera- 
tion the potential effects of the 
pending United Slates Supreme 
Court Case, Webster vs. Reproduc- 
tive Health Services, which asks 
the Court to reverse its decision in 
Roe vs. Wade. 

Moderating the discussion be- 
tween Falwell and Kolbcrt will be 
Timothy J. Sullivan, dean of the 
Marshall-Wythe Law School, Col- 
lege of William and Mary. 

Roe vs. Wade is the landmark 
U.S. Supreme Court decision 
which declared in 1973 that a 
woman's constitutional right to 
privacy encompasses her decision to 
terminate her pregnancy. The Court 
said that the abortion decision must 
be made within the doctor-patient 
relationship, that abortions per- 
formed within the second trimester 
are subject to state regulations made 
out of concern for maternal health, 
and that abortions in the third 
trimester may be performed only if 



and efficiently. The course targets 
the areas most frequently tested. 
The second course, RN/MCP 
PHARMACOLOGY for the 
BOARDS, offered June 22, will 
examine major drug groups. The 
course will help graduate nurses 
tackle pharmacology-related ques- 
tions with increased understanding 
and confidence. 

These courses are offered nation- 
wide. Locally, Virginia Beach Gen- 
eral Hospital is supporting graduate 
nurses by hosting these courses. 
For more information, call 1-800- 
666-PREP. 



Wednesday, June 28 - 1 to 3 
p.m. Health Education Center, Vir- 
ginia Beach General Hospital. 

The screenings cost $5 to cover 
materials. The test consists of a 
simple finger prick and results are 
provided in three minutes. 

For more information, call the 
HealthQuest Line to Better Health 
at481-8141. 



Lutheran Church in America, will 
preside at the dedication hour. St. 
Michael congregation is the first 
Lutheran church in the southern 
part of Virginia Beach. 

Organized on January 12, the 
membership has grown to over 
200. 



the pregnancy jeopardizes the 
woman's health. 

Since Roe vs. Wade was decided, 
the U.S. Supreme Court has reaf- 
firmed its position on the right to 
abortion in several cases, including 
the 1985 case of Thornburgh vs. 
American College of Obstetricians 
and Gynecologists, which Kfolberi 
successfully argued. 

Kolbcrt, of Philadelphia, 
presently is a consultant for the 
American Civil Liberties Union, 
Reproductive Freedom Project, and 
Planned Parenthood Federation of 
America, which are working to de- 
fend the Roe vs. Wade decision. 
Kolbert is coordinating the "friend 
of the Court" (amici curiae) briefs 
in Webster vs. Reproductive Health 
Services. 

Falwell addresses his concerns 
about abortion through the political 
platforms of the Liberty Federation 
and Moral Majority Inc. 

Falwell is the founder-pastor of 
the 21,000-membcr Thomas Road 
Baptist Church in Lynchburg and 
the founder-chancellor of Liberty 
University and its related schools 
and programs. 

All lawyers who practice in Vir- 
ginia are invited to attend the Vir- 
ginia State Bar's annual meeting. 

The Virginia State Bar .is the ad- 
ministrative arm of the Virginia 
Supreme Court. The bar, to which 
all lawyers practicing in Virginia 
must belong, regulates the legal 
profession, seeks to maintain high 
standards among Virginia lawyers 
and sponsors public service events : 
that improve society's access to i 
justice. 



> 



I 



Lawyers Celebrate State Bar Memberships 



Forty-three lawyers will be hon- 
ored for their 50 years of member- 
ship in the Virginia State Bar at a 
special ceremony during the 50th 
Annual Meeting of the Virginia 
State Bar June 15 through 18. 

Each will be awarded a 50-year 
Certificate of Appreciation at 11:45 
a.m. June 17 in the Coral Reef 
Room of the Cavalier Oceanfront 
Hotel. 

To be eligible for the half-cen- 
tury honor, a lawyer must have 
been a member of the Virginia 
State Bar, the administrative arm of 
the Virginia Supreme Court, for 50 
consecutive years. 

The bar, to which all lawyers 
practicing in Virginia must belong, 
regulates the legal profession, seeks 
to maintain high standards among 
Virginia lawyers and sponsors pub- 
lic service events which improve 
citizens' access to justice. 

Recipients of the golden 
anniversary certificates will be: 

Hon. V. Cassel Adamson, 
Richmond, VA; Mr. H. Max Am- 
merman, Reston, VA; Hon. R. 
William Arthur, Wytheville, VA; 
Mr. W.P. Bagwell Jr., Richmond, 
VA; Mr. J. Vaughan Beale, 
FrahTclin, VA; Mr. Frank M. Clar, 
Orange City, FLA; Mr. Kenneth 
Gordon Cumming, Hampton, VA; 
Mr. William P. Dickson Jr., Nor- 
folk, VA; Mr. Junius Rodes Fish- 
burne, Charlottesville, VA; Hon. 
Hansel Flemina, Clintwood, VA; 
Hon. Vance M. Fry, Orange, VA; 
Mr. Philip M. Grabill, Woodstock, 
VA; Mr. S. Page Higginbotham, 



Orange, VA; and Mr. Robert F. 
Hutcheson Jr., Emporia, VA. 

Also, Mr. Edward L. Jackson, 
Broomall, PA; Mr. Adelbert R. 
Kennett, Roanoke, VA; Mr. James 
Clopton Knibb, Goochland, VA; 
Mr. Flournoy L. Largent Jr., 
Winchester, VA; Mr. George Wal- 
ter Mapp Jr., Accomac, VA; Mr. 
Beverley R, Marshall, Gloucester, 
VA; Mr. J.H. Tyler McConnell, 
Wilmington, DE; Mr. James L. 
McLemore Jr., Suffolk, VA; Mr. 
W. Browft'Mortdrfi'JfP.^WtpsttW, 
VA; Mr. Alexande^'W. -T<KiW'**i 
Richmond, VA; Mr. Geroge Hin- 

son Parker Jr., Franklin, VA; Hon. 
Harold G. Potts, Berryville, VA; 
Mr. James E. Quisenberry, 
Roanoke, VA; Mr. Ambrose 
Alexander Rucker, Bedford, VA; 
Mr. John H. Rust, Fairfax, VA; 
and Mr. Charles Hill Ryland, War- 
saw, Va. 

Also, Hon. Lester E. Schlitz, 
Portsmouth, VA; Hon. Arthur W. 
Sinclair, Haymarket, VA; Hon. 
J.C. Snidow Jr., Christiansburg, 
VA; Mr. U. LeRoy Sweeney Jr., 
Richmond, VA; Mr. W. Carrington 
Thompson, Chatham, VA; Ms. 
Esther S. Weinberg, Richmond, 
VA; Mr. E.E. Wells, Char- 
lottesville, VA; Mr. David Meade 
White, Richmond, VA; Mr. Ernest 
H. Williams Jr., Richmond, VA; 
Hon. T.A. Williams Jr., Rich- 
mond, VA; Mr. John M. Wilson 
Jr., Troutville, VA; Hon. Earl W. 
Wingo, Lynchburg, VA; and Mr. 
Mervin Allen Ziegler, Colorado 
Springs, CO. 





Redwing's *^ made in us a 
SuperSoIe take them in stride. And, 
it's sure-gripping, flexible and light. 



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Dashiell's Half Round 
Showroom 

1436 Holland Rd. 539-7854 Suffolk 



Auction - Persian Carpets 

These Goods contracted and Imported From Iran Before the 
Trade Embargo In Accordance with U.S. Gov't Regulations. 
THE SHIPMENTS WERE NOT ACCEPTED BY THE DIS- 
TRIBUTORS WHO HAD ORDERED THE MERCHANDISE OF 

THESE BALES OF PERSIAN RUGS 

AND OTHER VALUABLE HANDMADE ORIENTAL 
CARPETS rONSIRTOF 



Pure Silk Quime, Hereke, Esfahan, Turkish 
Kashan, Kerman, Sereke, Hamaden, Bokhara 



ALL SIZES - SMALL & LARGE 

THE RUGS WILL BE AUCTIONED IN SINGLE PIECES IN ORDER TO 

RELEASE IMMEDIATE CASH TO FULFILL THE OBLIGATION AND 

LIABILITIES, WERE NOT MET PROMPTLY AS AGREED. 

Note: Due to urgency of realization 
of immediate cash we are under 
strict instructions to ensure all 
merchandise to be liquidated. 
Terms: Cash, Check, Visa orM.C. 
All payments to authorized recipi- 
ents at Fidelity Bank 
Oriental Rug/Dryus 
Each rug comes with a certificate of 
authenticity 




- ^ - - - - * — 







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^^^^^V^W^WWWI 



■ ■ ■ 



^^^^^■" 111 



6 The Wrg/n/a Beach Sun, June 7, 1989 



PhotoFeature 




1989 Pungo Strawberry Festival A Success 



A»? 




Thousands of people strolled the streets of Pungo and enjoyed the many activities. 



Miss Strawberry Festival Casey Ivey, left, poses with the 1989 Little Miss Strawberry Festival Rachel Eiban and her 
predecessor, Amanda Weller. 




Festival goers take a lunch break on the grounds of a house in Pungo. 




Photos by Janice Harris 



Festival 



. continued from page 1 



phone calls, was the handicapped 
cart rides sponsored by Humana 
Bayside Hospital for handicapped 
people. 

Cake said he was "stunned at 
the tremendous turnout with the 
5K race." In the past, the race has 
attracted approximately 140 run- 
ners, while this year 320 partici- 
pants entered. 

Aside from a few cases of heat 
stress on Saturday, Cake said 




Both parents and their children aot a kick out of the rides. 



there were no problems or 
complications. He said there was 
ample parking and there was not 
a wait to get into the festival. 
The Virginia Beach Rescue Squad 
was on haiHi ui case any accidents 
occurred. 

"Many people told me it's the 
only festival they attend during 
the year. They like the relaxed 
atmosphere and surroundings and 
the friendliness," said Cake. 



According to Cake, plans are 
being set forth now for next 
year's festival. The 100 to 120 
volunteers who ran the festival 
will spend many months coordi- 
nating next year's festival. 

"I do feel this year's was better 
organized and ran more 
smoothly," Cake said. "We'll be 
able to make some very nice 
contributions next year." 



TRT buses shuttled people from the Virginia Beach Municipal Center to the festival 




Festival volunteers give out information at the Information booth. 



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The Virginia Beach Sun, June 7, 1989 7 






Photo Feature 



— ___ ^— _— _ 



1 989 Pungo Strawberry Festival A Success 




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Children eagerly waited In Hne tor their chance to ride the merry^o^ound. 



Pungo festival chairman Kelly Wolfe presents Rachel Eiban with a bouquet of flowers while the other Little Miss 
Strawberry Festival contestants look on. 




various booths were present at the festival selling anything from strawberries to hot dogs. 



This Model A Ford cruised the streets of Pungo in the festival parade. 





The Pungo stage was the place to be for entertainment of all kinds, Includina the Old Dominion Cloggers. 



Nancy Eaton, left, Introduces Little Miss Strawberry Festival 1988, Amanda Weller. 




Little Miss Strawberry Festival 1989 Rachel Eiban enjoys 9k festival after being crowned 



The Spider was a popular ride for all festival goers. 



- 



8 The Virginia Beach Sun, June 7, 1989 



Photo Feature 






Miss/Little Miss Virginia Beach/Tidewater Crowned 




Kneeling: Miss Tidewater 1989 and swimsult winner, Kathy Newbern. Left to right: Katie Arbelaez, first runner-up, 
Tidewater; Terri Walsh, non-finalist, talent; Melanle Daniels, Miss Tidewater 1988; Tracy Higgerson, fourth runner-up; 
Lisa Muhlenbruch, third runner-up; Yvette Freeman, Angie Mann and Kimberly Hester, second runner-up. 



Leftto right: ElayneLutz, Future Little Miss Virginia Beach 1989; Angela Torres, Future Little Miss Virginia Beach 1988 
mdJoy Miller, Future Little Miss Tidewater 1989. 





Kneeling: Cindy Setnick, swimsult winner. Left to right, Michala Sumnlck, Michelle Averette, Patti Cooper, fourth 
runner-up; Gillian Johnson, first runner-up; Bonnie Lambert Miss Virginia Beach 1988; Nancy Eaton, second runner- 
Left to right: Karrie Powell, second runner-up, Virginia Beach pageant; Andrea Devin, first runner-up, Tidewater; U P> ^ Matthews, non-flnalist talent and Joyce Perry, third runner^p. 
Elayne Lutz, Future Little Miss Virginia Beach; Deborah DINardo, first runner-up, Virginia Beach; Joy Miller, Future Little 
Miss Tidewater; Ruthie Jones, photogenic, Virginia Beach. Second runner-up, Tidewater, Rachael Cutthrell Is not 
pictured. 




Left to right: Miss Virginia Beach 1989, Cindy Setnick and Miss Tidewater 
1989, Kathy Newbern. 




And The Winners Are... 



The Miss Virginia Beach/Miss Tidewater and the Little Miss 
pageant was held recently at the Virginia Beach Pavilion. About 
650 people attended. 

Cynthia Lynn Setnick, 24, was crowned Miss Virginia Beach. 
She is a graduate of Radford University and daughter of John and 
Gloria Setnick of Virginia Beach. 

Katherine Lynn Newbern, 19, was crowned Miss Tidewater. 
She attended Tidewater Community College and plans to enter 
UCLA. She is the daughter of Leonard Thomas Newbern and 
Gail Garrington of Virginia Beach. 

Future Little Miss Virginia Beach was Elayne Ann Lutz, 6, 
daughter of Joseph and Judy Lutz. She attends Salem Elemen- 
tary. 

Diana Joy Miller, 5, was crowned Future Little Miss Tidewa- 
ter. She is the daughter of Harry and Charlene Miller of Suffolk. 

Miss Virginia Beach and Miss Tidewater will compete for the 
Miss Virginia title in Roanoke on July 15 and the winner will go 
to Atlantic City for the Miss America pageant in September. 

Little Miss Virginia Beach and Tidewater will compete in the 
Future Miss America pageant in October. 

Two thousand dollars in scholarships were awarded in these 
pageants. 






An on stage Interview with Miss Virginia Is Ruthie Jones. 



Umbers of Beth's School of Dance perform a dance routine. 




Special entertainment was provided by Bobby Lewis and Melanle Daniels, 
Miss Tidewater 1988. 



The Virginia Beach Sun, June 7, 1989 9 



Photo Feature 




Ground Is Broken For New Visitor Info Center 

The new 6,300 square-foot facility will be about twice as large as the current one and is designed for future expansion. There will ; . 

be entrances on both sides and a one-way, circular parking lot with spaces for 65 cars and recration vehicles. The building will feature 
a spacious lobby with abundant literature available on attractions, events, historic landmarks and recreational facilities. Special 
displays, maps and a video presentation will provide the visitor with an orientation of all the things to see and do in the area. . 

A new Automatic Call Distribution telephone system will have the capability of efficiently handling the over 75,000 calls received 
annually from the city's tourism advertising program. 

The center will be in the median of Route 44 (Virginia Beach-Norfolk Expressway), at Parks Avenue. The project is part of the 

city's Captial Improvement Program. The Virginia Department of Transportation and the Toll Road Commission transferred the six- - , 

acre site for the center to the city at no cost. 

* 




Photos by Carole Arnold 




Photo by Helen Spore 

Breaking ground for me new Virginia Beach Visitor Information Center are 
(left to right) City Manager Aubrey V. Watts, Jr., Mayor Meyer a £ Oberndorf, 
Timothy E Barrow, chairman, Resort Area Advisory Commission, and James B. 
Ricketts, director, Department of Convention and Visitor Development 

The new facility, expected to open in May 1990, will be located In the median 
strip of Route 44 between the Pavilion Convention Center and the new Virginia 
Beach Center fa me Arts. The land for the new center was donated to the city of 
Virginia Beach by the Commonwealth of Virginia. The new center will be 6,500 
square feet, almost doubling the size of the current facility located at Pacific Av- 
enue and 19th Street 




Giving an overview of the new Virginia Beach Visitor Information Center and 
Its Importance to tourism In the area Is James B. Ricketts, director, Department 
ofConventonaridVlsliaDevetopmenL 

Since 1973, toe overnight tourist population m Virginia Beach hasgrownfrom 
1.4 million to an estimated 2.5 million visitors, it Is estimated that during 1988 
Virginia Beach tourists and convemortem spent over $500 rrilSon in the city. 



Star. 



Work 



Information HEntry]" 



.Worn. 






Chairman of the Resort Area Advisory Commission Timothy E Barrow, speaks 
at the ground breaking ceremony for tf?e new Virginia Beach Visitor Information 
Center. _ 

77m Commission recommended a new center to oner visitorsj& residents an 
Information facility at the gateway to the Virginia Beach nsortwa. m 1988, 
150,000 visitors came to the existing center withJOO peeple per hour served 
during thereto of the summer tourist season. 



Virginia Beach Information Center 



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JO The Ifrgtife Seac/i Sun, June 7, 1989 

First Choice 




37th Street Goal 
May Be Returning 

Jay B. Scott, a North End man of the North Virginia 
resident and basketball lover, Beach Recreation League, to 
has been meeting recently find a location for a new bas 



with Billy Boyce, area chair- 



Top; The First Presbyterian Church parking lot where a goal was removed last 

winter 

Below: Boyce, on left, and Scott discuss the site and what Improvements could 

R$tt- The jagged baseline which would probably be repaired It the goal were to 
return to the parking lot 



Second Choice 





Top: A grassy area of 38th Street between Atlantic and Pacific Avenues Is 
Scott's second choice for a goal, if It cannot be replaced at 37th Street. 
Right: Boyce and Scott survey the area. 



Third Choice 




Top: The Beach Garden Park offers plenty of room, is city-owned but is lo- 
cated too far away from the location of the old goal, and Is too isolated for young- 
sters, Scott said 

Right: Boyce and Scott at the Beach Garden Park. 
Below: Boyce and Scott chat at the Galilee Episcopal Church parking kit at 
4m and Pacific. This lot was considered, but rejected because of Its slope. 




ketball goal in the city's resort 
section, also known as the 
Virginia Beach Borough. 

There had been two goals 
in the First Presbyterian 
Church's parking lot at 37th 
Street and Pacific Avenue. 
The goal farthest from the av- 
enue and closest to people 
was removed years ago, 
leaving one in the parking 
lot's northeast corner. Last 
, winter, the remaining one was 
removed following complaints 
from local residents about the 
noise created by players 
bouncing basketballs. 

According to a parks and 
recreation department study, 
Virginia Beach's oceanfront 
study area is short two bas- 
ketball courts, based on the 
ratio of one court for every 
3,000 people, according to 
Jan Bella, administrative an- 
alyst, Virginia Beach De- 
partment of Parks and Recre- 
ation. 

Department director Harold 
Whitehurst recently told The 
Virginia Beach Sun that a new 
goal "is needed" in that area, 
and is awaiting a proposal 
from Scott. 

Scott has recommended in 
writing that the goal be re- 
turned to its original spot at 
37th Street, or if not there, in 
a small grassy area at 38th 
Street between Atlantic and 
Pacific Avenue. A third option 
is the Beach Garden Park at 
30th Street and Baltic. 

Boyce said he would sup- 
port Scott's recommenda- 
tions. Whitehurst is expected 
to make the final decision. 

A final decision has yet to 
be made. 



L 



Public Notice 



J 



Auction: 1977 Ford Granada 
#4767 
Serial Number #7EE81F238068 
Auction date: June 28, 1989 
Time: 11 a.m. at Norfolk Motor 
Company, 7000 N. Military High- 
way, Norfolk, Virginia 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company Re- 
serves the right to Bid. 
23-8 
116-7 



Public Notice 



] 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC 
HEARING 

The Board of Zoning Appeals 
will conduct a Public Hearing on 
Wednesday, June 21, 1989 at 2:00 
p.m., in the City Council Cham- 
bers of the City Hall Building, 
Municipal Center, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. The staff briefing will be 
held at 1:30 p.m. in the City Man- 
ager's Conference Room. The fol- 
lowing applications will appear on 
the agenda. 

PLEASE NOTE: IF NO ONE 
APPEARS BEFORE THE 
BOARD TO REPRESENT THE 
APPLICATION, THE VARIANCE 
COULD BE DENIED!! 

REGULAR AGENDA: 

Case 1: William C. EvereU by 
Graver C. Wright, Jr., Attorney re- 
quests a variance of 20 feet to a 10 
foot setback from Myrtle Avenue 
instead of 30 feet as required for side 
yard adjacent to a street (proposed 
residential addition) on Lot 163, 
The Hollies, 301 48th Street Vir- 
ginia Beach Borough. ZONING: R- 
7.5 

Case 2: George and Katherine 
Delioakis requests a variance of 6 
feet to a 14 foot setback from Old 
Virginia Beach Boulevard instead of 
20 feet as required for side yards ad- 
jacent to a public street (proposed 
duplex) on Lot I, Oceana Gardens, 
467 North Oceana Boulevard. 
Lynnhaven Borough. ZONING: R- 
5D 

Case 3: Jesse C. Swoope re- 
quests a variance to allow 50 per- 
cent maximum lot coverage instead 
of 40 percent maximum lot cover- 



age as allowed (proposed multiple 
family dwellings) on Parcel C, 
Section 4, Lake Edward West, 
Pickering Street. Bayside Borough. 
ZONING: A-12 

Case 4: Marsha Lynn Building 
Corporation requests a variance of 3 
feet to a 27 foot setback from 
Lynnhaven Parkway instead of 30 
feet as required for side yards adja- 
cent to a street (proposed single 
family dwelling) on Lot 1, Block 
F, Section 21, Salem Woods, 
Round Hill Drive. Kempsville 
Borough. ZONING: R-10 

Case 5: Charles C. Williams re- 
quests a variance of 13 feet to a 2 
foot setback from the south and east 
property lines instead of 15 feet 
each as required (proposed accessory 
building - 10 foot by 12 foot stor- 
age shed) on Lot 34, Thalia Gar- 
dens, 640 Greentree Drive. 
Kempsville Borough. ZONING: R- 
20 

Case 6: Mr. and Mrs. John W. 
Mapes requests a variance of 2 feet 
to a 6 foot fence in height instead 
of a 4 foot fence in height as al- 
lowed in a side yard adjacent to a 
street (Counselor Lane) on Lot 1, 
Block 36, Section 4, Windsor Oaks 
West, 645 Hastings Court. 
Kempsville Borough. ZONING: A- 
12 

Case 7: Mr. Jose P. Carvalho 
requests a variance to allow a fence 
to be erected on a property which 
adjoins a public street (Marlwood 
Way) where prohibited and to waive 
the Category I landscaping between 
a fence and the right of way where 
required on Lot 55, Block E, Phase 
II, Kempsville Lake, 4701 Woods 
Edge Road. Kempsville Borough. 
ZONING: A-12 

Case 8: Dana L. and Gloria M. 
Kelley requests a variance of 3 feet 
to a 2 foot side yard setback (west 
side) instead of 5 feet as required 
(proposed addition and attached 
garage) on Lot 10, Block 42, Sec- 
tion 4, Pembroke Manor, 4421 
Paul Jones Lane, Bayside Borough. 
ZONING: R-7.5 

Case 9: George May requests a 
variance of 5 feet to a 5 foot rear 
yard setback (west side) instead of 
10 feet as required (proposed acces- 
sory building - storage shed) on Lot 
11, Block 6, Section 3, Windsor 
Woods, 3800 William Penn Boule- 
vard. Lynnhaven Borough. ZON- 
ING: R-7.5 P 

Case 10: Newtown Associates by 
T.W. Palatini requests a variance of 
5 feet to a 10 foot setback from the 
southwest and southeast property 
lines instead of 15 feel each as re- 
quired ^nd to waive the Category IV 
landscape screening where required 
when a residential or apartment dis- 
trict adjoins a commercial district 

(proposed auto repair establishment) 
on Parcel 045, Newsome Farms, 
Southeast Comer of Newtown Road 
and Connie Lane. Bayside Borough. 
ZONING: B-2 

Case 11: Hallah J. and Gail B. 
Hupman requests a variance 5.1 feet 
to a 24.9 foot setback from Salk 
Street instead of 30 feet as required 
for side yards adjacent to a street 
(covered porch) on Lot 14, Block 5, 
Section 2, Lake Shores, 5140 Lake 
Shore Road. Bayside Borough. 
ZONING; R-20 

Case 12: Kelley Law by Polyne- 
sian Pools requests a variance of 5 
feet to a 5 foot rear yard setback 
(north side) instead of 10 feet as re- 
quired and of 5 feet to a 3 foot side 
yard setback (east side) instead of 8 
feet as required (proposed pool 
equipment) on Lot B-l, Block 14, 
Section D, Cape Henry, 211 81st 
Street. Lynnhaven Borough. ZON- 
ING: R-5R 

Case 13: Ronald W. and Mary S. 
Tilley requests a variance of 4 feet 6 
inches to a 5 foot 6 inch rear yard 
setback instead of 10 feet as required 
and of 4 feet 4 inches to an 8 inch 
side yard setback (north side) instead 
of 5 feet as required (proposed ac- 
cessory building - storage shed) on 
Lot 367, Cape Story, 2237 Maple 
Street. Lynnhaven Borough. ZON- 
ING*-^ 

Case 14: Robert D. and Dorothy 
A. Hilliard by Richard Power re- 
quests a variance of 1 foot 5 inches 
to a 3 foot 7 inch side yard setback 
(south side) instead of 5 feet as re- 
quired (Heating and Air Condition- 
ing Unit) on Lot 87, Section 1, 
Cape Story by the Sea, 2121 Wake 
Forest Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 
ZONING: R-7.5 

Case 15: James Lurbis Vest and 
Theresa M. Colangelo requests a 
variance of 3 feet to a 7 foot side 
yard setback (west side) instead of 
10 feet as required (proposed resi- 
dential addition) on Lots 10 and 12, 
Block 51, Shadowlawn, 710 10th 
Street. Virginia Beach Borough. 
ZONING: R-5S 

Case 16: Dailin Outlaw requests 
a variance of 20 feet to a 10 foot 
setback from Old Donation Park- 
way instead of 30 feet as required 
(through lot - inground swimming 
pool) on Lot 30, Block 0, Section 
Three, Great Neck Meadows, 2006 
Regatta Circle. Lynnhaven Bor- 
ough. ZONING: R-10 

Case 17: New Light Baptist 

MjHfl 



~~^^^^^m^^m 



^»^^"""" 



cenlkHMd from pap 1 

Church by Rudolph B. Lewis re- 
quests a variance of 11 feet to a 19 
foot setback from Indian River 
Road instead of 30 feet as required 
(proposed additions - towers) on Lot 
23, Newlight, 5549 Indian River. 
Kempsville Borough. ZONING: R- 
5D 

Case 18: Maynard D. West re- 
quests a variance of 6 feet in build- 
ing height to 46 feet in height in- 
stead of 40 feet in height as previ- 
ously approved by the Board of 
Zoning Appeals on May 17, 1989 
(proposed single family dwelling) 
on Lot 59, Section I, Broad Bay 
Point Greens, 2385 Haversham 
Close. Lynnhaven Borough. ZON- 
ING: R-30 (OP) 

Case 19: Contel of Virginia, Inc. 
requests a variance of 400 square 
feet in building area to 800 square 
feet in area instead of 400 square 
feet in building area as allowed 
(proposed unmanned utility facility) 
on Parcel A, Back Bay Area, Mill 
Landing Road. Pungo Borough. 
ZONING: AG-2 

Case 20: Richard P. and Kather- 
ine K. Williams by Polynesian 
Pools requests a variance of 20 feet 
to a 10 foot setback from Silverleaf 
Drive instead of 30 feet as required 
(through lot - proposed inground 
swimming pool) on Lot 16, Sec- 
tion 2, Larkspur, 504 Mossycup 
Drive. Kempsville Borough. ZON- 
ING: PDH-1 

Case 21: W.R.Walker and Cam 
of Virginia by Alaric Corcoran re- 
quests a variance to waive the 
Category VI landscaping where re- 
quired for an automobile repair es- 
tablishment on Lot I, London 
Bridge Gardens, 521 London Bridge 
Road #101 and #102. Lynnhaven 
Borough. ZONING: B-2 

Case 22: Judith C. and James R. 
Land, Jr. requests a variance of 18 
feet to a 32 foot setback from Mill 
Dam Road instead of 50 feet as re- 
quired (through lot proposed deck- 
ing) on Lot 93, Section 2, Part 1, 
Baycliff, 1905 Crestview Landing. 
Lynnhaven Borough. ZONING: R- 
20 

Case 23: Robert W. Zabot re- 
quests a variance of 560 square feet 
of building floor area to 1440 
square feet of building floor area 
instead of 880 square feet of build- 
ing floor area as allowed for a de- 
tached accessory building (proposed 
2 story detached accessory building 
30 foot by 24 foot) on Lot 12, 
Block 3, Section C, Thoroughgood 
Estates, 1313 Dunstan Lane. Bay- 
side Borough. ZONING: R-30 

Case'24 Coventry Associates by 
' 'S J:>MagWtf '(Pre*ident)'i^eSts 
a variance of 1 foot to a 9 foot side 
yard setback (south side) instead of 
10 feet as required (proposed porch) 
on Lot 138, Section 4, Coventry, 
1612 Brampton Court. Kempsville 
Borough. ZONING: R-7.5 

Case 25: Preston Greene by 
Wayne Beagle requests a variance of 
10 feet to a "0" side yard setback 
(west side) and of 5 feet to a 5 foot 
side yard setback (east side) instead 
of 10 feet each as required and to 
allow a 48 percent maximum lot 
coverage instead of 35 percent 
maximum lot coverage and to allow 
a maximum building floor area to 
be 237.5 percent of the 35 percent 
lot coverage instead of 200 percent 
of the lot coverage as allowed 
(proposed duplex) on Lot 36, Block 
8, Chesapeake Park, 4400 Block of 
Oceanview Avenue. Bayside Bor- 
ough. ZONING: R-5R 

Case 26: Edwin B. Lindsley, Jr. 
by Moody E. Stallings, Jr. requests 
a variance of 630 feet to a 30 foot 
setback from Virginia Beach-Nor- 
folk Expressway instead of 660 feet 
as required and of 49 feet to a 1 foot 
setback from the north property line 
and of 44 feet to a 6 foot setback 
from the west property line instead 
of 50 feet each as required 
(reposition existing billboard) on 
Parcel B, Kempsville Area, Morris 
Avenue. Kempsville Borough. 
ZONING: 0-2 
DEFERRED AGENDA: 

Case D-l: The Southland 
Corporation by Charles M. Salle' 
requests a variance to waive the 
Category VI landscaping where re- 
quired for an automobile repair 
garage on Lot 1, Kempsville 
(Greene Property) 1342 Kempsville 
Road. Kempsville Borough. ZON- 
ING: B-2 

Case D-2: James and Cynthia 
Parker requests a variance of 5 feet 
to a 5 foot side and rear yard set- 
backs instead of 10 feet each for an 
accessory building (garage) and of 
100 square feet of floor area in the 
accessory building to 600 square 
feet of floor area instead of 500 
square feet of floor area as allowed 
(proposed 24' x 25' garage) on Lot 
36. Macdonald Park, 3308 Pattie 
Lane. Kempsville Borough. ZON- 
ING: R-10 

.. PLEASE NOTE: IF NO ONE 
APPEARS BEFORE THE 
BOARD TO REPRESENT THE 
APPLICATION, THE VARIANCE 
COULD BE DENTED!!! 

James A. Wood 

Secretary 

23-7 
216-14VBS 



The Virginia Beach Sun, June 7, 1989 11 



Public Notice 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEAR- 
ING 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City 
Council of Virginia Beach will be 

held in the Council Chambers of 
the City Hall Building, Municipal 
Center, Princess Anne Station, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, on Mon- 
day, June 26, 1989, at 6:00 p.m. at 
which time the following applica- 
tions will be heard: 
SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

1. Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard to 
certain elements of the Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision for Frank 
A. Martin. Property is located at 
3146 Inlet Road. Plats with more 
detailed information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH; 

2. Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard to 
certain elements of the Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision for Clyde 
R. & Betty Jean Helton. Property 
is located at 4533-4537 Old 
Princess Anne Road. Plats with 
more detailed information are avail- 
able in the Department of Planning. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

CHANGE QF ZONING PIS- 
TMCTaASSIFICATlON; 

KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

3. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Murray Wholesale Drug 
Corporation for a Conditional Zon- 
ing Classification from R-7.5 
Residential District to O-l Office 
District on Lot 29, Thalia Village. 
Said parcel is located at 4353 Bon- 
ney Road and contains 3.0239 
acres. More detailed information is 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE BOR- 
OUGH. 

VIRGINIA BEACH BOROUGH: 

4. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion' of Hilda W. Archbell for a 
Change of Zonin g District 
Classification from R-5S Residen- 
tial Single Family District to R-T3 
Resort Tourist District on Lots 1 
and 2, Block 18, Shore Acres. Said 
parcel is located at 406 Winston 
Salem Avenue and contains 
16,988.4 square feet. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

5. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of TA Associates for a Change 
of Zoning District Classification 
from R-5D Residential Duplex 
District to O-l Office District on 
Lot 10 and a part of Lot 9 and Lots 
23-26, Block 23, Property of G.W. 
Deal. Said parcel contains 24,393.6 
square feet. KEMPSVILLE BOR- 
OUGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of TA Associates for a Change 
of Zoning District Classification 
from B-2 Community Business 
District to O-l Office District on 
certain property located at the 
southwest comer of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard and N. Fir Avenue on 
Lots 11, 12 and 13, Block 23, 
Property of G.W. Deal. Said parcel 
contains 12,632.4 square feet. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

tNDrnONAL USE PERMIT: 



Highway, Norfolk, Virginia 23518. 
Norfolk Motor Company Re- 
serves the right to Bid. 

23-2 
H6-7VBS 



Public Notice 



TAKE NOTICE THAT ON June 
12, 1989 AT 10:00 AM, at the 
premises of Tidewater Imports, 
Inc., DBA The Hall Auto Mall, 
3152 Va. Beach Blvd., Va. Beach, 
Va. 23452; the undersigned will 
sell at public auction, for cash, re- 
serving unto itself the right to bid, 
the following vehicles: 

Description 1986 Pontiac 2000 

Seiial#_lG2JB6908G75 17587 
(Tolver) 

Tidewater Imports, Inc., DBA 

The Hall Auto Mall 

T.J. Nowak 

Sec/Treasurer 

23-4 
U6-7VBS 



gat 



EMPSVIIXE BOROUGH 

7. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of T A J Partnership for a 
Conditional Use Permit for a nurs- 
ing home on the north side of In- 
dian River Road, 200 feet more or 
less west of Thompkins Lane. Said 
parcel is located at 2055 Indian 
River Road and contains 5.496 
acres. Plats with more detailed in- 
formation are available in the De- 
partment of Planning. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH; 

8. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Michael & Veronica Jen- 
nings for a Conditional Use Permit 
for a residential kennel on Lot 12, 
Block 5, Princess Anne Plaza. Said 
parcel is located at 3237 Lark Street 
and contains 7,500 square feet. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC/AAE 

City Clerk 

23-1 
2t6-14VBS 



Public Notice 



BY RAYMOND W. BJORK- 
MAN, D,C. 
WILLIAM L. PERKINS 
PRICE, PERKINS & LARKIN 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 
LYNNWOOD PLAZA SUITE 

621 LYNNHAVEN PARKWAY 
VA. BEACH. VA., 23452 
23-5 
4t6-28VBS 



[ 



Public Notice 



VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF VIR- 
GINIA BEACH 

This the 26th DAY OF MAY, 
1989 

ELIZABETH WRIGHT 
STALLINGS and JOHN H. 
WRIGHT Petitioners 

v. 

WILBERT WRIGHT and UN- 
KNOWN GRANDDAUGHTER 
OF GEORGEANA WRIGHT 
PARKER Defendants 

IN CHANCERY NO. CH89-568 

QRPER 

This cause came on to be heard 
upon the petition praying that 
Wilbert Wright and the unknown 
granddaughter of Georgeana Wright 
Parker be declared legally dead and 
that the fact of descent and their 
heirs at law be determined. 

In accordance with Section 64.1- 
109 of the Code of Virginia, it is 
ORDERED that the notice which is 
attached to and made a part of this 
Order be published once a week for 
four successive weeks in The Vir- 
ginia Beach Sun, a newspaper pub- 
lished in the City of Virginia 
Beach. 

May 26, 1989 

H. Calvin Spain, Judge 

A Copy Teste: J. Curtis Fruit, 
Clerk 

By Raymond W. Bjorkman, 
D.C. 

I ASK FOR THIS 

WILLIAM L. PERKINS 

PRICE, PERKINS & LARKIN 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 

LYNNWOOD PLAZA SUITE 
350 

621 LYNNHAVEN PARKWAY 

VA. BEACH., VA. 23452 * . 
23-6 
4I6-28VBS 



Auction: 1978 MERCURY 
COUGAR #4954 
Serial Number. #8H92H541788 
Auction date: June 21, 1989 
Time: 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Motor Company. 7000 N. Military 
Highway, Norfolk, Virginia 23518. 
Norfolk Motor Company Re- 
serves the right id Bid. 

23-3 
H6-7VBS 

Public Notice 1 

Auction: 1981 DODGE 

CHARGER #5136 
Serial Number: 

#1B3BL24B3BD299360 
Auction date: June 21. 1989 
Time: 11:00 a.m. « Norfolk 

Motor Company, 7000 N. Military 



L 



Public Notice 



Public Notice 



] 



VIRGINIA: IN THE CLERKS 
OFFICE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 

THE 26th DAY OF MAY 1989 

ELIZABETH WRIGHT 
STALLINGS and JOHN H. 
WRIGHT Petitioners ■> 

v. 

WILBERT WRIGHT and UN- 
KNOWN GRANDDAUGHTER 

OF GEORGEANA WRIGHT 
PARKER Defendants 

IN CHANCERY NO. CH89-568 

NO TIC E 

To: Wilbert Wright, if living, or 
if he be dead, then the widow and 
heirs, devisees next of kin, legatees, 
and successors in title of Wilbert 
Wright. 

To: Unknown granddaughter of 
Georgeana Wright Parker, if living, 
or if she be dead, then the spouse 
and heirs, devisees, next of kin, 
legatees, and successors in title of 
the granddaughter of Georgeana 
Wright Parker. 

A petition has been filed in the 
Circuit Court of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach alleging that Wilbert 
Wright has disappeared and has been 
missing for over 50 years and re- 
questing that he be declared dead and 
that the fact of descent and the heirs 
at law of Wilbert Wright, if de- 
ceased, be established; and alleging 
that the granddaughter of Georgeana 
Wright Parker, whose name is un- 
known, has disappeared and been 
missing for over 20 years and re- 
questing that she be declared dead 
and that the fact of descent in the 
heirs at law of the granddaughter of 
Georgeana Wright Parker, deceased, 
be established. 

Notice is hereby given that a 
hearing will be held in the Circuit 
Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Municipal Center, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, on the 7th day of 
July, 1989 at 10:00 a.m. for the 
purpose of hearing evidence con- 
cerning the alleged absence of 
Wilbert Wright and the 
granddaughter of Georgeana Wright 
Parker and the circumstances and 
duration thereof; and also for the 
purpose of determining the fact of 
descent and the heirs at law of 
Wilbert Wright and the 
granddaughter of Georgeana Wright 
Parker in the event that they should 
be declared to be legally dead. 

A Copy Teste: J. Curtis 
Fruit, Clerk 



VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 25th day of 
May, 1989. 

In re: Adoption of SIOBHAN 
BRITTANY SARGENT and 
Change of Name to SIOBHAN 
BRITTANY FOLEY. 

By: JOSEPH PATRICK FOLEY 
& MAUREEN L. FOLEY, Peti- 
tioners 

IN CHANCERY #CA89-86 

To: JEFFREY W. ALPAUGH 

P.O. Box 166 

Oldwick, New Jersey 08858 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

This day came JOSEPH 
PATRICK FOLEY and MAU- 
REEN L. FOLEY, Petitioners, and 
represented thSt, the object of this 
proceeding is to effect the adoption 
of the above named infant, SIOB- 
HAN BRITTANY SARGENT, by 
JOSEPH PATRICK FOLEY and 
MAUREEN L. FOLEY, husband 
and wife, and affidavit having been 
made and filed that JEFFREY W. 
ALPAUGH, a natural parent of said 
child, is a non-resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: P.O. Box 166, 
Oldwick, New Jersey 08858. 

It is therefore Ordered that the 
said JEFFREY W. ALPAUGH ap- 
pear before this Court within ten 
(10) days after publication of this 
Order and indicate his attitude to- 
ward the proposed adoption, or oth- 
erwise do what is necessary to pro- 
tect his interest in this matter. 

It is further Ordered that a copy 
of this Order be published once each 
week for four successive weeks in 
THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN, a 
newspaper of general circulation in 
this city. 

A copy teste: 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 

By: Linda D. Jones D.C. 

Edward J. Sargent p.q. 

1157 S. Military Hwy., Suite 
104 

Chesapeake, VA 23320 

(804) 523-9553 

22-9 
4t6-21VBS 

| Public Notice | 

NOTICE OF PUBLIC 
HEARING 

The Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission will hold a Public 
Hearing on Tuesday, June 13, 1989 
at 12:00 Noon in the Council 
Chambers of the City Hall Build- 
ing, Princess Anne Courthouse, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. A brief- 
ing session will be held at 9:00 
a.m. in the Planning Department 
Conference Room, Operations 
Building. PLANNING COMMIS- 
SION ACTION IS NOT A FINAL 
DETERMINATION OF THE AP- 
PLICATION, BUT ONLY A 
RECOMMENDATION TO THE 
CITY COUNCIL AS THE VIEW- 
POINT OF THE PLANNING 
COMMISSION. FINAL DETER- 
MINATION OF THE APPLICA- 
TION IS TO BE MADE BY CITY 
COUNCIL AT A LATER DATE, 
AFTER PUBLIC NOTICE IN A 
NEWSPAPER HAVING GEN- 
ERAL CIRCULATION WITHIN 
THE CITY. 

THOSE MEMBERS OF 
THE PUBLIC INTERESTED 
IN ATTENDING THE PUB- 
LIC HEARING SHOULD BE 
ADVISED THAT, FOR 
REASONS THE PLANNING 
COMMISSION DEEMS AP- 
PROPRIATE, CERTAIN 
ITEMS ON THE AGENDA 
MAY BE HEARD OUT OF 
ORDER AND THAT IT 
SHOULD NOT BE AS- 
SUMED THAT THE ORDER 
LISTED BELOW WILL BE 
EXACTLY FOLLOWED 
DURING THE PUBLIC 
HEARING. 

The staff reviews of some or all 
of the items on this agenda suggest 
that certain conditions be attached 
to approval by City Council. 
However, it should not be assumed 
that those conditions constitute all 
the conditions that will ultimately 
be attached to the project. Staff 
agencies may impose further condi- 
tions and requirements during ad- 
ministration of applicable city 
ordinances. 

RF.fiin.AR AGENDA: 
a mmvisiON VARIANCE: 
1. Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard to 
certain elements of the Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision for James 
& Barbara Cando. Property is lo- 
cated at 4373 Southern Boulevard. 
Puns with more detailed informa- 
tion are available in the Department 
of Planning. KEMPSVILLE 
BOROUGH. 



2. Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard to 
certain elements of the Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision for 
Domingo Tan. Property is located 
at 1117 Thompkins Lane. Plats 
with more detailed informatics) are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. KEMPSVILLE BOR- 
OUGH. 

3. Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard to 
certain elements of the Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision for Kettle 
Restaurants, Inc. Property is located 
at 5716 Northampton Boulevard. 
Plats with more detailed informa- 
tion are available in the Department 
of Planning. BAYSIDE BOR- 
OUGH. 

CHANGE OF ZONING DIS- 
TRICT CLASSIFICATION: 

4. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Kettle Restaurant, Inc., for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from B-2 Commu- 
nity Business District to H-l Hotel 
District on the north side of 
Northampton Boulevard, 1170 feet 
more or less east of Baker Road. 
Said parcel is located at 5716 
Northampton Boulevard and con- 
tains 1.43 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are available in 
the Department of Planning. BAY- 
SIDE BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Hazel S. Oliver for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-7.5 Residen- 
tial District to B-2 Community 
Business District on the north side 
of Haygood Road, 630 feet more or 
less east of Crossborough Road. 
Said parcel contains 39,204 square 
feet. Plats with more detailed in- 
formation are available in the De- 
partment of Planning. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH 

6. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Littleton F. Parks for a 
Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-40 to R-30 
on certain property located on the 
north side of Wishart Point Court, 
350 feet more or less east of Battle 
Royal Circle. Said parcel contains 
8.56 acres. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in the 
Department of Planning. BAYSIDE 
BOROUGH. 

7. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of William W. Chandler and 
William Drinkwater for a Change 
of Zoning District Classification 
from R-7.5 Residential District to a 
A- 12 Apartment District on Site F, 
Linkhom Park. Said parcel is lo- 
cated at 3609 Holly Road and con- 
tains 10,672 square feet VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

8. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of 3 R & W, Inc., for a 
Conditional Zoning Classification 
from R-5D Residential Duplex 
District to A- 18 Apartment District 
on the west side of Centerville 
Turnpike, 1400 feet more or less 
south of Kempsville Road. Said 
parcel is located at 2001, 2013 and 
2023 Centerville Turnpike and 
contains 11.6 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are avail- 
able in the Department of Planning. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

9. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Indian River Country Club 
Estates, L.P., for a Change of 
Zoning Dis mrt Classification from 
AG-2 Agricultural District to R-20 
Residential District on the follow- 
ing parcels: 

Parcel 1 : Located on the north 
side of Indian River Road, 5403.35 
feet more or less west of West Neck 
Road. 

Parcel 2 : Located at the north- 
west intersection of Indian River 
Road and West Neck Road. 

parcel 3 : Located on the west 
side of West Neck Road, north of 
Indian River Road. 

Said parcel contains 7.91 acres. 
Plats with more detailed informa- 
tion are available in the Department 
of Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH 

10. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Indian River Country Club 
Estates, L.P., for a Change of 
Zoning Dis trict Classification from 
AG-1 Agricultural District to R-20 
Residential District on certain 
property located 600 feet north of 
Indian River Road and 600 feel west 
of West Neck Road. Said parcel 
contains 211.8 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are avail- 
able in the Department of Planning. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 

11. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Indian River Golf Club, 
Inc., for a Conditional Use Permit 
for a recreational facility of an out- 
door nature (golf course) on certain 
property located at the northwest 
intersection of Indian River Road 
and West Neck Road. Said parcel 
contains 180.8 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are avail- 
able in the Department of Planning. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH 

12. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Kempsville Baptist Church 
for a Conditional Use Permit for a 

church, religious education build- 
ing, additions and renovations at the 



northwest corner of Princess Anne 
Road and Overland Road. Said par- 
cel is located at 5204 Princess Anne 
Road and contains 7.03 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 

Planning. KEMPSVILLE BOR- 
OUGH. 

13. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of The Congregation of Hope 
Lutheran Church for a Conditiona l 
Use Permit for a church & related 
facilities on the north side of 
Providence Road, 651 feet east of 
Balfor Drive. Said parcel is located 
at 5350 Providence Road and con- 
tains 5.25 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

14. An Ordinance upon Applica- ' 
lion of Mark R. Jesperson for a 
Conditional Use Permit for a resi- . 
dential kennel on the west side of 
Charity Neck Road, south of Gum 
Bridge Road. Said parcel is located 

at 4231 Charity Neck Road and 
contains 11.35 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are avail- 
able in the Department of Planning. 
PUNGO BOROUGH. 

15. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Wayne R. & Mary 
Glidewell Eiban for a Conditional 
Use Permit for a duplex in the AG- 
2 Agricultural District on Lot 9, 
Nawney Creek. Said parcel is lo- 
cated at 4525 Three Pines Lane and 
contains 1 acre. PUNGO BOR- . 
OUGH. 

16. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Rick G. & Anne B. 
Spalenka for a Conditional Use 
Permit for retail sale of garden and 
nursery supplied on the west side of 
Princess Anne Road, south of 
North Stowe Road. Said parcel is 
located at 1057 Princess Anne Road 
and contains 3.74 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are avail- 
able in the Department of Planning. 
PUNGO BOROUGH. 

17. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Thomas A. Potter/Japanese 
Auto Masters Inc., for a Condi- 
tional Use Permit for an automo- 
tive repair facility on the west side 
of Sykes Avenue, 830 feet south of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard. Said 
parcel is located at 129 Sykes Av- 
enue and contains 16,000 square 
feet. Plats with more detailed in- 
formation are available in the De- 
partment of Planning. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

18. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of the Trustees, Eastern Shore 
Chapel for a Conditional Use Per- 
mit for church additions on the 
north side of Laskin Road, 150 feet 
southwest of Bratten Avenue. Said 
parcel is located at 2020 Laskin 
Road and contains 8 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOR- 
OUGH. 

19. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of The Virginia Beach School 
Board for a Conditional U se Permit 
for a communication tower on the 
south side of North Landing Road, 
3000 feet west of West Neck Road. 
Said parcel is located at 2925 North 
Landing Road and contains 40 
acres. Plats with more detailed in- 
formation are available in the De- 
partment of Planning. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

20. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Robert W. White, Jr., for a 
Conditional Use Permit for a single 
family dwelling in the AG-1 Agri- 
cultural District on the north side of 
Seaboard Road, 1721 feet west of 
Princess Anne Road. Said parcel 
contains 5.69 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are avail- 
able in the Department of Planning. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

AMENDMENT: 

21. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and 
reordain Article 2, Section 211 of 
the City Zoning Ordinance pertain- 
ing to temporary signs. More de- 
tailed information is available in 
the Department of Planning. 

nFFPRRFD 60 DAYS BY 
PLANNING C OMMISSION ON 

4-11-89; 

22. Application of Jerry C. Seay 
for the discontinuance, closure and 
abandonment of a portion of Wind- 
sor Crescent beginning at the 
northern boundary of Jefferson 
Boulevard and running northwest- 
erly along the boundary of Lot 6, 
Block 57, Ocean Park, Section C. 
Said parcel contains 3527 square 
feet BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

pF.FF.RRED 30 DAYS BY 
PLANNING COMMISSION ON 

5-9-89; 

23. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and 
reordain Article 1, Section 107(h) 
of the City Zoning Ordinance per- 
taining to conditional zoning. More 
detailed information is available in 
the Department of Planning^ 

24. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Reed Associates for a 

Change of Zoning District 
deification from R-15 Residen- 
tial District to R-10 Residential 



Ul ■■ l ll i ».....«■ 



I«pp« 



12 The Virginia Beach Sun, June 7, 1989 



continued from page 11 

District on the following parcels: 

Parcel 1 : Located at the north- 
west intersection of Reedtown Road 
and Sir Jones Lane. 

Parcel 2 : Located at the north- 
eastern extremity of Reedtown 
Road. 

Parcel 3 : Located on the west 
side of Reedtown Road at the inter- 
section with Old Reedtown Road. 

Parcel 4: Located on the south 
side of Old Reedtown Road at the 
intersection with Reedtown Road. 

Said parcels contain 5.213 acres. 
Plats with more detailed informa- 
tion are available in the Department 
of Planning. BAYSIDE BOR- 
OUGH. 

All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 

Robert J. Scott 

Planning Director 

22-2 
2t6-7VBS 



MAN, D.C. 



21-7 
4T6-14VBS 



Public Notice 



Public Notice 



1 



VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF VIR- 
GINIA BEACH CHANCERY DI- 
VISION 

CH89-1440 

In re: ALFRED E. MENNELL, 
Deceased. . 

SHOW CAU SE AGAINST 
DISTRIBUTION 

IT IS ORDERED that the credi- 
tors of, and all others interested in, 
the above estate show cause, if any 
they can, on June 23, 1989 at 
10:00 a.m. before this Court, at ITs 
Courthouse, Virginia Beach Circuit 
Court, Municipal Center, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, against the pay- 
ment and delivery of the estate to 
the legatees without requiring re- 
funding bonds. 

It appearing to the Court that re- 
ports of the account of Sovran 
BanK, N.A., Executor of the estate 
and of the debts and demands 
against the estate have been pre- 
pared by the Commissioner of Ac- 
counts and that six months have 
elapsed since the qualification, and 
upon motion of the personal repre- 
sentatives, it is FURTHER OR- 
DERED that the foregoing portion 
of this Order be published once a 
week for two successive weeks in 
the Virginia Beach Sun, a newspa- 
per of general circulation in Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia. 

ENTER: May 23, 1989 

A Copy Teste: J. Curtis Fruit, 
Clerk 

By Jeanette L. Jones D.C. 

I ASK FOR THIS: 

Susan C. Alper, Esquire 

LYLE, SIEGEL, CROSHAW & 
BEALE, P.C. 

One Columbus Center 

Post Office Box 61888 

Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 

(804) 490-6000 

22-4 
2t6-7VBS 



Public Notice 



Virginia Beach City Council, 
6:00 PM, June 26, 1989, will 
RECONSIDER the application 
of BACK BAY SPORTING 
CLAYS, INC. for a Conditional 
Use Permit for recreational facility 
of an outdoor nature (denied 
5/22/89), at Campbells Landing 
Road/Morris Neck Road (Pungo 
Borough). 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC/AAE 

City Clerk 

22-3 
2t6-7VBS 

| Public Notice 

SCOTT ALAN DAILEY, Plain- 
tiff, against PATRICIA JEAN 
DAILEY, Defendant. 

In the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, on the 19th day of May, 
1989. 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
Docket #CH89-1066 

The object of this suit is for the 
plaintiff to obtain a divorce from 
the bonds of matrimony from the 
said defendant, upon the grounds of 
six months separation with an 
agreement. And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the defen- 
dant is not a resident of the slate of 
Virginia, the last known post office 
address being, 507 TREETOP 
DRIVE, Apartment 202, Va. 
Beach, Virginia, and that due dili- 
gence has been used by and on be- 
half of the plaintiff to ascertain in 
what county or corporation the de- 
fendant is, without effect it is or- 
dered that Patricia Jean Dailey do 
appear on or before the 1 1th of 
JULY, 1989, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her interest in 
this suit. It is further Ordered that a 
copy of this Order be published 
once each week for four successive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper of general circulations in 
this city. 
FRANK E. BUTLER, IV 
BIRDNECK SQUARE SUITE 
110 1092 LASKIN ROAD 
VA. BEACH. VA., 23451 
A copy Teste: J. Curtis Fruit, 
Clerk 

By: RAYMOND W. BJORK- 



] 



4. 



/IRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 12th day of 
May, 1989. 

In re: Adoption of Mark Aaron 
Perrin and Change of Name to mark 
Aaron Johnson IN CHANCERY 
#CA89-95 

BY: Wayne William Johnson and 
Lorraine Perrin Johnson, Petition- 
ers 

To: Mr. Michael Sanders 

26 Winan Street, Apt. B 

East Orange, New Jersey 07017 

ORDER OF 

PUBLICATION 

This day came Wayne William 
Johnson and Lorraine Perrin John- 
son, Petitioners, and represented 
that the object of this proceeding is 
to effect the adoption of the above 
named infant, Mark Aaron Perrin, 
and change of name to Mark Aaron 
Johnson, by Wayne William John- 
son and Lorraine Perrin Johnson, 
husband and wife, and affidavit 
having been made and filed that 
Michael Sanders a natural parent of 
said child, is a non-resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being: 26 Winan 
Street, Apartment B, East Orange, 
New Jersey, 07017. 

It is therefore Ordered that the 
said Michael Sanders appear before 
this Court within ten (10) days after 
publication of this Order and indi- 
cate his attitude toward the proposed 
adoption, or otherwise do what is 
necessary to protect his interest in 
this matter. 

It is further Ordered that a copy 
of this Order be published once each 
week for four successive weeks in 
The Virginia Beach Sun, a newspa- 
per of general circulation in this 
city. 

A copy teste: 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 

By: Linda D. Jones D.C. • 

Mary Ann Snow p.q. 

Heather A. Mullen 

Williams, Worrell, Kelly, Greer 
& Frank, P.C. 

600 Crestar Bank Building 

P.O. Box 3416, Norfolk, VA 
23514-3416 

(804)624-2600 

20-10 
4t6-7VBS 
| Public Notice | 

VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 8th day of 
May, 1989. 

In re: Adoption of Billye Jo- 
Marie Webb 

IN CHANCERY #CA89-37 

By: Sheila Ann Tondreau and 
Allan William Tondreau, 
Petitioners 

To: Paul Joseph Clark 

General Delivery 

Poway, California. 



ORDER OF 

PUBLICATION 

This day came Sheila Ann 
Tondreau and Allan William 
Tondreau, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object of this 
proceeding is to effect the adoption 
of the above named infant, Billye 
Jo-Marie Webb, by Sheila Ann and 
Allan William Tondreau, husband 
and wife, and affidavit having been 
made and filed that Paul Joseph 
Clark, a natural parent of said child, 
is a non-resident of the State of 
Virginia, the last known post office 
address being: General Delivery 

Poway, California 

It is therefore Ordered that the 
said Paul Joseph Clark appear 
before this Court within ten (10) 
days after publication of this Order 
and indicate his attitude toward the 
proposed adopuon, or otherwise do 
what is necessary to protect his 
interest in this matter. 

It is further Ordered that a copy 
of this Order be published once each 
week for four successive weeks in 
The Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper of general circulation in 
this city. 

A copy teste: 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 

By: Linda D. Jones D.C. J 

Frank E. Butler II p.q. * 

1092 Laskin Road, Suite 1 10 

Virginia Beach, V A 23451 
20-1 
416-7VBS 



Public Notice 

In the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, on the 11th day of May, 
1989. 

SAMUEL LAWRENCE 
FIELDS, Plaintiff, against TERRI 
LYN FIELDS, Defendant. 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

Docket #CH88- 1052 

The object of this suit is for the 
said plaintiff to obtain a divorce a 
vinculo matrimonii from the said 
defendant, upon the grounds of one 
year separation. And an affidavit 
having been made and filed that the 
defendant is not a resident of the 
State of Virginia, the last known 
post office address being 5000 Har- 
bour Lake Drive, #A-59, Goose 
Creek, South Carolina. 

It is ordered that Terry Lyn Fields 
do appear on or before the 3rd of 
July, 1989, and do what may be 
necessary to protect Her interest in 
this suit. 

It is further Ordered that a copy 
of this Order be published once each 
week for four successive weeks in 
The Virginia Beach Sun, a newspa- 
per of general circulation in this 
city. 

A copy - Teste: 

Kevin M. Brunick p.q. 

316 Office Square Lane, 

Suite 102 

Virginia Beach, VA 23462 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 

By: Linda D. Jones D.C. 
20-9 
4t6-7VBS 



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The Virginia Beach Sun, June 7, 1989 13 




} AKE MONEY 
WITH THE 
CLASSIFIEDS 



THE CLASSIFIEDS 



CALL 
547-4571 



pets 



CHOWS - AKC home raised. Ex- 
cellent temperament, championship 
bloodlines. All inquiries welcome. 
See ours first! Terms available. 
421-4304 tfh 

HORSE FINDERS - Looking for a 
horse? If we don't have it, we will 
find you the right one. Call 421- 
4304. tfn 



WEARING APPAREL 



USED WORK UNIFORMS - 
State-length, waist and shirt size, 
shirt $2.75 each, pants $2.75 each. 
Shipping $3. Send money order to: 
Hilton Detoatche's Referral Service, 
Inc., 319 Newport Street, Suffolk, 
VA 23434. tfh 




GOVERNMENT OWNED - $500 
down. Tidewater area, 10% below 
appraised value, free listing, Va 
broker.499-2798 tfn 

INDIAN LAKES TOWNHOUSE - 
For sale by owner. End unit, 3 BR, 
2.5 BA, great room with fireplace. 
$4000 down and assume payments 
of $682 per month. (PITI) 495- 
0514. 4t6-7b 

GOVERNMENT HOMES from $1 
(U repair). Foreclosures, Repos, 
Tax Delinquent Properties. Now 
selling. Call 1-315-736-7375. Ext 
H-VA-C16 current lists. 24 hrs. 
3t6-7P 

GOVERNMENT HOMES from $1 
(U repair), delinquent tax properties 
and repos. For current lists call I- 
800-242-4944. Ext 4979 also open 
evenings. It6-7P 






RENTALS 



COLONIAL MANOR APTS. 1 
bedroom apt. available im- 
mediately. Most utilities, furnished. 
Call 393-2111. tfn 

COUNTRY LIVING!! Spacious 
mobile home lots for rent. Storage 
sheds furnished $100 per month. 
No deposits. Call (804) 562-2800 
or (804) 562-2103. 13t6-21b(tn) 

KILL DEVIL HILLS, N.C. One 
year old cottage, 6 mp 3 br, 2 ba, 
sleeps eight, A/C, cable, one block 
to sound and boat ramp. 
$425/week. 547-885 1 . 4t6-7b 

OUTER BANKS, Duck to South 
Nags Head. 1-5 bedroom. Cottage 
and condos. Weekly rentals. Free 
Brochure. Call Atlantic Realty. 1- 
800-334-8401. 5t6-28b 

GREENBRIER - 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 
baths den with fireplace, garage, 
living room, dining room on cul- 
de-sac. Excellent schools $625 547- 
7497 or 488-4704. 4t6-28b 



MSC. FOR SALE 



12,000 GALLON Aluminum stor- 
age tank. Upright, in excellent 
condition. Call 562-5282. tfh 

SEARS 10 sp. bicycle light grey 
stirrup pedals, pouch in back of 
seat. Has small water bottle. $100 
or best offer. 491-8959 tfh(F) 



Quality Rototilling 

Most Gardens 




Rick - 547-4823 4A.it, 



PERSONAL 




AUTOS FOR SAU 



1986 CHEVROLET IROC 305 
Tune Port. 190 watt Sony stereo. 
Sheepskin covers, burglar alarm. 
Radar detector. Call 425-5446 am 
or 428-4362 pm. tfh 

2 DR. HARDTOP, AM/FM 
cassette, good tires, excellent 
condition. $2000 firm. Owned by a 
mechanic. Call 482-7433. 4t6-7b 




♦♦Stump Busters" 






We grind any stump" below ground 
for 75* per Inch. Machine will fit 
thru any backyard gate and will 
not damage lawn. Tree Stump or 
Shrub Removal. 

Reasonable Rates«Insured 
Free Estimates 

"Stump Bustin' Bob" 
463-1574 TFN 



HAPPINESS IS A HEALTHY MOUTH 

•Albert P. Solomon D.D.S. 
•Alan G. Forbes D.D.S. 

General & Family Dentistry 

Greenbrier Sq., Suite 2E 
1 324 N. Battlefield Blvd. 
Office 547-2171 Ans. Service 625-0561 






••••••• 

pooLsra 

Additional Discount 

*f The big, amazing 1989 family sized pools, 
J including huge deck, fence, filter and war- 

* ranty are now available for only $878. 

* Installation optional and extra. Full fi- 
% nancing available. First come first served. 
At Call HOLIDAY POOLS 

at 1-800-627-SWIM. 



MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE 



ADOPTION Loving couple unable 
to have children seek to adopt. We 
will pay all your medical and legal 
expenses. Please call Karen and 
John. 703-893-2428. tfh 

WANT TO LOSE WEIGHT 
GUARANTEED? Join Slim and 
Trim Diet Class. Mondays, Wesley 
Center, Portsmouth. If interested 
call Dot Morgan 398-9 1 56. 4t6-7b 

LOVING COUPLE unable to have 
children of our own would like to 
adopt. Let's help each other. Call 
collect 804-541-0807. Ask for Liz 
or Jay. tfn 

ADOPTION - Happily married 
white Christian couple wish to 
share our life and home wit your 
infant. All calls confidential. Please 
call Chris or John (804) 456-2583. 
4t6-7b 

PREGNANT? Let us help. We'd 
love to adopt your newborn. 
Assist/pay medical/legal. Call 497- 
1664, 4t6-14b 

HAPPILY MARRIED 

CHILDLESS couple seeking infant 
to adopt. We can help with medical 
and legal expenses. Call Tom and 
Linda collect 703-347-7207.4t6-14b 

WOULD LIKE TO ADOPT. 
Loving couple can not have 
children of our own, has lots of 
love to give. Would like to adopt 
baby. Call collect l-(804)-541- 
0807. tfn 

FINANCIALLY SECURE 
CHILDLESS COUPLE married 12 
years would like to adopt an infant. 
Can pay for legal and medical 
expenses. Lets help each other. Call 
collect Evelyn and Dan (703) 754- 
0654. 4t6-21p 

ADOPTION: Loving childless 
couple seeks to adopt. We can pay 
your legal and medical expenses. 
Please call Deborah and Ira collect 
at 1-703-532-4722. 8t7-19p4 

ADOPTION - Loving, childless 
couple wishes to adopt. We will 
pay your medical and legal 
expenses. Please call Pam and Van 
collect (703) 379-7031. 4t6-28P 

PREGNANT? - Please consider 
adoption instead of abortion. Let us 
hejp you, We'd love to adopt your 
newborn. Secure, loving home. 
Will help with medical/legal 
expenses. Call collect (804) 481- 
2671 after 6 p.m. weekdays, 
anytime weekends. 4t6-28b 



SOUTH HAMPTON MEADOWS 
MOBILE HOME SERVICES - 
We move and set up mobile homes. 
We buy tires and axles. We do re- 
pairs and service. We build decks. 
No job too small or large. Financ- 
ing available. Lots for rent. Call 
(804) 562-2800 or (804) 562-2103. 
13t6-21b(tn) 

ROCKFORD - 1985 12x60 2 
bedrm, 2 bath with fireplace. Call 
393-3402. 4t6-28b 



PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 



ii 




FLEA MARKET - Lynnhaven 
Colony Congregational Church. 
2217 W. Great Neck Rd. Sat. June 
10, 9:00 am. Bake sale crafts, 
plants, clothes & refreshments. 

2t6-7b 



CHILD CARE 



LOVING GRANDMOTHER would 
like to babysit in her Oceanfront 
home. Ages 2 and up. Meals and 
snacks incl. Monday-Friday, 6 
a.m.-6 p.m. Call 428-2325. 8t7-5b 



SHIPYARD 

Pipefitters 

Shipfitters 

Outside Machinist 

Structural Welders 

Pipe Welders 
Inside Machinists 
Marine Electronics 

Riggers 
Insulators/Laggers 

CALL NOW 

1-855-9402 

1-800-874-8465 

CISCO 

EOE 



INSTRUCTION 



HELP WANTED 



PIANO LESSONS - Professional 
musician with BME now accepting 
new students of all ages. Call Craig 
Wesselman. 547- 1 56 1 . 4t6- 14b 



NOTICES 



AMERICANS FINEST HOME 
improvement, roofing & remold- 
ing. Satisfied guaranteed, senior 
citizen discount. 456-1381, 485- 
4446. £n 

HASIE'S PARTY PONY'S 
Offers pony rides for birthdays, 
schools, picnics, fairs. 464-0953. 5 
yrs. exp. & insured. tfn 

BALLOON BOUQUETS - birth- 
days, weddings, anniversaries, chi- 
dren's parties. Special rates, deliv- 
ered in costume. Will beat all other 
advertised prices. 853-0769 tfn 

I WILL PAINT any room for $65, 
the second one 1/2 price. Residen- 
tial & commercial. Also call about 
our special on exteriors. Call on 
Mon. Sun. between 8 & 12. J & M 
Seashore Painting, 428-7116 Ext 
208. tfn 

BIRTHDAY CLOWN - Animal 
balloons, face painting, magic and 
puppet. 467-2380. tfn 

LITTLE PONIES PARTY EX- 
PRESS - offers pony rides and pet- 
ting zoo. Childs pony pictures done 
with covered wagon. Experienced 
and insured. 421-9286. tfn 

CUSTOM MADE CURTAINS - 
dust ruffles, pillow shams, 
bathroom accessories, ect. Call 
Donna anytime. 424-026. 4t6-7b 

RELAX - We can solve your 
Spring & Summer roofing & 
painting problems. Free est., 
commercial & residential. Licensed 
and insured. 1 1 yrs. in Chesapeake. 
Call Crown Hi-Tech Roofing and 
Painting Co. 421-7007. 4t6-21b 

HEAVENLY BALLOON 
BOUQUETS - Get well," 
anniversary, births and birthdays 
thinking of you grand opening. We 
deliver serving all Tidewater (804) 
482-3371. 416-28P 



ANTIQUES FOR SALE 



100 PIECES of Cut glass and hard 
glass, Lalique, Stubin, Tiffany, 
Cameo glass signed. 70 sterling 
silver souvenir spoons. 2 antique 
music boxes circa, 1880. Clocks, 
Bisques & China Dolls. Ivory Net- 
sukes and Miniature paintings. 
Open 10:00-5:00 19th Century 
Antiques, 1804 Granby St. Nor- 
folk. 622-0905. tfn 

OLD ORIENTAL RUGS Wanted 
Any size or condition/Call toll free 
1-800-342-7847. 4t6-21p 



FARM EQUIPMENT 



STEEL BUILDINGS Must sell two 
steel buildings from cancellation. 
One is 40 x 40 BRAND NEW, 
NEVER ERECTED. Will sell for 
balance owed. Call Bill at 1-800- 
552-8504. H6-7P 



BUS. PROPERTY FOB SALE 



PORTSMOUTH - Downtown, 
large buildings with off street park- 
ing, to use for retail or offices. Call 
399-8390, 484-1275 or 399-3298. 

tfn(D 



BUSINESS OPPORWNTTES 



1000 WOLFF SUNBEDS 
TONING TABLES 
Commercial-Home Tanning Beds 
Save to 50%-Prices From $249- 
Lamps-Lotions, accessories. Call 
Today FREE Color Catalog. 1-800- 
228-6292. (VAioiwo>4t6-7P 

HOW TO SELL INFORMATION 
by mail. No gimmicks. $$$ Send 
$5.00 plus $1.00 handling charge 
to P.E. Morgan, P.O. Box 2054, 
Portsmouth, VA 23702. 4t6-7B 

I. D. -TAGS Child safety, 
community service business. No 
competition using official military 
tags. $400 working 15 hours per 
week. $2000 investment. 1-800- 
726-8307. It6-7b 



REPORTERS - All beats. Weekly 
newspapers. Photography and lay- 
out. Newspaper experience, either 
in college or professional, preferred. 
Entry level. Call 547-457 1 . tfn 

AUTO SALES PERSON - needed 
immediately. Hilton Deloach Mar- 
keting and Sales Training School. 
539-9420. tfn 

EARN $500 or more weekly 
stuffing envelopes at home. For 
free information, send self-addressed 
envelope to: Document Mailers, 
26028 Greenfield Br,., Suite 462, 
Oak Park, MI 48237. 4t6-7b 

ANYONE CAN APPLY! 
Guaranteed Visa/MC, US Charge. 
Even with bad credit. No One 
refused. Call (213) 925-9906 ext. 
U3747. 4t6-14(P) 

EARN UP TO $339.84 PER 
WEEK Assembling our products at 
home. Amazing recorded message 
reveals details. Call today! (202) 
898-6047 Dept. 9t7-19b 

$350/DAY PROCESSING phone 
orders. People call you. No 
experience necessary. Call 
(refundable) 315-733-6063 ext. P- 
2023. 4t6-14P 

NOW HIRING DEMONSTRA- 
TORS! Free kit, supplies, training! 
No collecting or delivery. Work 
own hours. Beautiful merchandise. 
Great hostess plan. (804) 440-5703. 
4t6-21b 

WORK AT HOME - Earn up to 
$375 a day! People call you to order 
our directories. 813-497-5248 
extension Bl. 4t6-21b 

CRUISE SHIP JOBS $300 - 
$925 per week. Now Hiring. (813) 
497-5248 extension C2. 4t6-21b 



NEED MONEY? When Banks 
Stop. . .We Start. . .No credit 
checks, collateral or co-signers. For 
application write: Global, Box 1 12- 
Q, Verbena, Alabama 35091-0112. 
Enclose envelope. tfn 

BORROW $100-$ 100,000! Instant 
reply! Rush stamped addressed en- 
velope: Global, Box 112-Q7, Ver- 
bena, Alabama 36091-01 12. tfn 

MAJOR BANK credit card in- 
formation. Send self-addressed, 
stamped envelope: National Finan- 
cial Services, 804-08 Old Thorsby 
Road, Clanton, Alabama 35045- 
2459. tfn 

VISA-MASTERCARD! 
without investigation! Immediate 
reply! Financial-Q3, 804 Old 
Thorsby Road, Clanton, Alabama 
35045-2459. Enclose envelope! tfn 

SICK AND TIRED of feeling sick 
and tired? Barley Green, herbal 
combinations, weight control and 
more. Wholesale available. 487- 
4010. 4t6-7b 




TRAIN FOR CAREERS IN 
•AIRLINES 
•CRUISE LINES 
•TRAVEL AGENCIES 

HOME STUDY/RES. TRAIN1N 



•FINANCIAL AID AVAILABLE 
•JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE 



1-800-327-7728 

A.C.T. TRAVEL 

SCHOOL TTNCBR) 
Nat'l hdqtrs. Pompano Bch FL 



BYERLY PUBLICATIONS 

Creator* and producer! of quality, low co*t 

OFFSET NEWSPAPERS 
And CIRCULARS 

627-5020 




Bathroom Remodeling 

All Phases 

547-4774 

tin 




#A* 



FQR SALE 



~\ 






RE/MAX IS HERE 

Lovely, treed, 2.5 acres with 1,000+ Sq. FT. 

Mobile Home on Permanent Foundation - 

2 car detached garage. $52,000, 

Start country living now! 

Call Joyce Bruce 436-4500 or 436-9696 



AFFORDABLE 
MOYOCK, N.C. 

RE*MK® 



REALTORS • 
RE/MAX Advantage Realtors 
Su«# 100, 100 Volvo Parkway 
Chesapeake, VA 4364500 
tfn 



GREEN RUN - In Virginia 
Beach, all adults, 1, 2, and 3 
bedroom apartments. 
Heat and hot water In- 
cluded. Pines Apt. 468-2000 

TFN 



Train to be a Professional 

•SECRETARY 

•EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

•WORD PROCESSOR 

HOME 8TUOY/RES. TRAINING 






•FINANCIAL AID AVAILABLE 
•JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE 



1-800-327-7728 

THE HART SCHOOL j 

a Div. of A.C.T. Corp. 
Natl hdqtrs. Pompano Bch FlJ 



YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO LEARN A TRADE~~| 



Tidewater Builders Association in cooperation with the Jobs Training Part- 
nership Act is seeking applicants for its Pre-Apprenticeship Training Pro- 
gram. 
All interested applicants APPLY IN PERSON: 

MONDAY, JUNE 19, 1989 9:00 A.M. 

OR 

MONDAY, JUNE 19, 1989 1:00 P.M. 

APPLY AT: TIDEWATER BUILDERS ASSOCIATION 

21 17 Smith Avenue 

Chesapeake, Virginia 

Equal Opportunity Employer 

Directions: From Interstate 64 take Greenbrier North exitonto Greenbrier Parkway; 

turn right at Military highway; proceed approximately one mile to Smith Avenue 

and turn right. Continue on Smith Avenue two blocks to Tidewater Builders 

Association, Building A. ^ 6 ' 7b 



CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



11 



Luxurious Adult 
Apartments & Hbtonhouses 

fitness Center, 
fear round Spa & Sauna 

andTennis Courts. 

Open Qaiiu 9-6; Sun 11-6 

l&its start at $450 

On Providence Road 2 Mi. 
W. of Military Highway 

424-7867 



4 
I 



tfn 



amssMSHASf i 



ft 

II 



"THE DU-MAN DO IT FOR LESS' 

SALES ■ SERVICE • RENTALS • PARTS • LEASINC 




SERVICE • RENTALS • PARTS 
BODY SHOP 



a 



FORD 

TRUCKS 



FORD LINCOLN MERCURY 

*1 IN SUFFOLK 

-Heurt- 

8.-30 To S.OD Daily • So. 9 To 5 




?*********; 




,— SUFFOLK -f-| 

1 539-1595 j 



1600 N. MAW. SUFFOLK 
NEAR OBCI HOSPITAL 

I— NORFOLK— ! 

627-8944 



FORD TRUCK CENTER 

TIDEW ATER EXCLUSIVE 
#flp TRUCK DEALERSHIP 

-H0Uf»- c 

S To 9 Daily • Sal 9 To 5 *t3 
2432 PRUDEN BLVD.. SUFFOLK 
1 M1E NORTH OF AUTO SHOWROOM 

r— SUFFOLK — i r- NORFOLK— | 



I 
I 

» 



PERSONAL 
RATES 

ltime 
2 times 
4,-Jimes 



20 Words 
or less 

$7 
$12 
$15 



Additional 
words 

.35 
.60 
.75 



Run your personal Classified Ad four times for only $15. You can 
cancel your ad at any time, however, there can be NO REFUNDS 
AND NO CHANGES. 

All Classified Ads run in three newspapers (The Virginia Beach Sun, The 
Chesapeake Post and The Portsmouth Times). No additional charge. 



Please print clearly using only one word per box. 


































\ 






20 words 



Run my personal ad for 
Payment is enclosed $ 



issues. 



Make check payable to Byerty Publications 

MAIL TO: Classified, Box 1327, Chesapeake, Va. 23320 

Name ^^_________ 

Address 

City 



State 



Zip 



925-0316 



& 



397-9055 



2*. 14b 



LARGE USED CAR AND TRUCK INVENTORY 
NO CASH OR TRADE NEEDED WITH APPROVED CRED 



f! FOR HELP with your Classified Ad, please call 547-4571 

A| PERSONAL ADS mu«t b. pacad fcy art- CO»«Wt»J OW RA1C frm 8* HW tm 

M «at* indMduahL CamnanM and feu* *MWp4gfiM mlm * niyjw ■»« 

■I r»iraiaMaM*ttqiaaytorMmt ow j^tt^a w mw ST »»■• *>■»■ 

and 4-tlma perianal ram. FajnMai, Cmfcaria. (avjamwfa, and I 

L 



S474STlt«< 




■Baa 



■ nwmp; 



^m^^^H^^tm^m^^r^m^ 



14 The Virginia Beach Sun, June 7, 1989 



Jumps 




Lil's Quill 



continued from page 3 



Cleanup 



continued from page 1 



Letter 



. continued ™n page 2 



In Poor Richard's Almanac, Ben Franklin observed, "Where there's mar- 
riage without love, there will be love without marriage." One can only 
conclude that there are many marriages without love today, as statistics re- 
veal that one-fourth of the marriages in this country end in divorce. 

Several years ago, a popular song proclaimed, "Love and marriage, love 
and marriage, go together like a horse and carriage!" Love and marriage are 
not going together the way they did in (hose horse and buggy days. 

Even then there were problems. Emerson wrote, "Is not marriage an 
open question, when it is alleged, from the beginning of the world, that 
such as are in the institution wish to get out, and such as are out wish to 
get in." 

In Virginia Beach, from January to the end of April, 859 couples have 
gotten out of this "institution," according to Matt Bencfiel, court opera- 
tions supervisor. Figures are not in for May, but will possibly take the 
total to 1,000. 

Yet, marriage is often solemnized with this vow, "To have and to hold 
from this day forward, for belter, for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sick- 
ness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death us do part." 

Alas, many part before they depart! 

For your information, telephone numbers for marriage licenses: 427- 
8827; for Marriage Commissioners, Mary Cooper: 426-6580 and Ivan 
Mapp: 428-3969. 



Mayor's Report 



continued from page 3 



(AB&H) completed a "Water and Sanitary Sewer Lost ot Service Study." 
The Cost of Service Study included a five year projection of revenues, 
expenditures, and the estimated debt service associated with the construc- 
tion of the Lake Gaston Water Supply Project. The consultant recom- 
mended that water rates be increased over a four year period to ensure that 
sufficient revenues would be available to pay the cost associated with the 
construction of the project. 

The projected water rate increase over a four year period was determined 
to be $.75 per 1,000 gallons. The required water rate increases were 
published as part of the city's information program on the Lake Gaston 
Bond Referendum held November 8, 1988. 

A summary of the four Lake Gaston water rate increases are shown 
below: 



Lake Gaston Water Supply Project Construction 


Water Rate Increases 


Effective Date 


Estimated Amount 




cents/1. 000 gallons 


August 1, 1987 (#1) 
July 1,1988 (#2) 
July 1, 1989 (#3) 
July 1, 1990 (#4) 


$.19 
i $.19 
$.19 
$.18 
$.75 



The impact on the average residential customer due to the Lake Gaston 
Rate Increase #3 is $1. 14 per month; the impact due to the Lake Gaston 
Rate Increase #4 is $1.08 per month. The impact due to the four Lake 
Gaston rate increases is $4.50 per month (6,000 gallons @ $.75 per 1 ,000 
gallons). 

The rate increases are needed to ensure that water - a most precious 
resource - will be available to the citizens of Virginia Beach. 

Norfolk Wholesale Treated Water Rate 

The City of Norfolk provides wholesale treated water service to Virginia 
Beach. The City of Norfolk increased the wholesale water rate by 14% 
effecuve July 1 , 1989; the new rate is $ 1 .069 per 1 ,000 gallons. 

It was necessary that the Virginia Beach retail price of water be 
increased $.14 per 1,000 gallons to offset the increased cost to purchase 
wholesale treated water. This increase in the retail water rate was necessary 
to ensure sufficient revenues would be received by the Water and Sanitary 
Sewer Utility Fund to pay the increased cost for purchased water. The 
impact due to the increase in the wholesale price of water is $.84 per month 
for the average residential customer (6,000 gallons @ $.14 per 1,000 
gallons). 

SUMMARY 

The current Virginia Beach retail water rate is $2.18 per thousand 
gallons. 

The new water rates are: 

$2.51 per 1,000 gallons for 1989/90 effecuve July 1, 1989; $2.69 per 
1,000 gallons for 1990/91 effective July 1, 1990. 

The chart below illustrates the impact on the monthly water and sanitary 
sewer billing (including the city's utility tax) due to the recommended 
water rate increases. 

Virginia Beach Water and Sanitary Sewer Average Monthly Billing 

Prior to July 1,1989 

Water and sanitary sewer charges for a single-family residence having 
a 5/8-inch meter are: 

Water Supply $2. 18 per 1 ,000 gal.; 

Minimum Service Availability Charge $3.35 per month; 

Sanitary Sewer Service $9.46 per month. 

Based on the above rates, a family consuming 6,000 gallons for one 
month would incur charges of: 

Water Supply, 6 x $2. 1 8 $1 3.08 
Minimum Service Availability 

Charge $3.35 

Utility Tax $2.40 

Sanitary Sewer Service $9.46 

Total Monthly Charges $28.29 

After July 1, 1989 

Water and sanitary sewer charges for a single-family residence having 

a 5/8-inch meter are: 

Water Supply $2.51 per 1 ,000 gallon 

Minimum Service Availability $3.35 per month 

Sanitary Sewer Service $9.46 per month 

Based on the above rates, a family consuming 6,000 gallons for one 

month would incur charges of: 

Water Supply, 6 x $2.51 $15.06 

Minimum Service Availability Charge $3.35 
Utility Tax $2.40 

Sanitary Sewer Service $9.46 

Total Monthly Service $30.27 

Increase - monthly billing $1 .98 

Increase - percent 22k 

The long term water supply problems in southside Hampton Roads will 

not diminish overnight. The City of Virginia Beach has made a firm 

commitment towards alleveating its long term water supply problems 

through the Lake Gaston Project. Lake Gaston is environmentally safe. 

and will reliably provide the adequate quality and quantity of water to 

meet the city's water needs. 
This article was compiled through the courtesy and assistance of 

Clarence Warnstqff. director. Public Utilities, City of Virginia Beach. 



that will be enough. All trash that 
is collected will be weighed on a 
bathroom scale and logged on a 
debris data card. 

"It's all very well organized. 
We're capturing all the debris on 
debris data cards," Dean said. Those 
cards will be sent to the Marine 
Center for Conservation in 
Washington, D.C. for the study of 
marine debris. 

Dean said "there's no telling what 
we're going to pick up," or how 
much. Brich is convinced there 
won't be much trash found on the 
beach. 

"We'll get several hundred pounds 
if we're lucky," he said. 

In a cleanup attempt in Texas in 
1987, 309 tons of debris filling 
17,000 trash bags was reported. 
Dean said the first beach sweep 
took place in Oregon in 1986, 
which is where he got the idea to 
establish the cleanup in Hampton 



Roads. Volnnfeers will begin 
cleaning up at False State Park and 
will work their way up to 
Willoughby Spit in Norfolk. The 
shorelines at Buckroe Beach and 
Fort Monroe in Hampton will also 
be sweeped. 

"It's my way of contributing 
something to future generations," 
Dean said. ' 

Brich added, "The people are so 
aware of the pollution. If we don't 
develop that awareness it will be a 
never-ending batde." 

Dean said the "Clean the Bay 
Day" will become an annual event. 
In fact, Mayor Meyera Obefndorf 
recently issued a "Clean the Bay 
Day" proclamation. 

"I'm so very proud of the steering 
committee, zone captains and the 
hundreds of organizations that feel 
this is something their conscience 
is guiding them to do," Dean said. 



Pothole 



. continued from page 1 



us," he said. 

Currently, there are four to six 
patching crews working on filling 
reported potholes. In addition, six 
superintendents have assigned areas 
that they routinely patrol. 

"We try to seal as many cracks as 
we can, but we can't do all of 
them," Russell said. 

Russell said that they try to catch 
a pothole at an early date because 
the worse it gets, the more costly it 



is to repair. For an average repair, it 
costs the city $35. A permanent re- 
pair, which takes about one hour, 
means breaking out die area around 
the pothole and taking it to the next 
layer. Then the edges are tacked 
with hot tar and filled with hot as- 
phalt. 

Some concrete roads, such as In- 
terstate 64, don't contain any pot- 
holes because asphalt is more of a 
problem than concrete. 



Jellyfish 



. continued from page 1 



"They are pretty much a pest. They are a pro, 
$0 much that people are trying to contain them. 
Lynn Clements, education coordinator, 
Marine Science Museum. 




Clements said the museum has 
put together a two month long 
special exhibit which opens July 15 
to answer the many questions asked 
about jellyfish. 

The "Discovery Room" will 
feature a six foot long aquarium 
with live jellyfish swimming in it. 
Also on hand will be information 
on stings, remedies and jellyfish 



containment, as well as a scale 
model of a jellyfish, 10 feet in 
diameter, with velcro on it so 

children can get caught in the 
tentacles. A laboratory corner where 
"you can view immature jellyfish 
and different parts of a jellyfish 
under a microscope," will also be 
an attraction. 



Hazardous Chemical Emergency 
Information Available To Public 



The Virginia Beach Local Emer- 
gency Planning Committee (LEPC) 
has made its Hazardous Chemical 
Emergency Response Plan and re- 
lated information available for pub- 
lic viewing. Reference copies of the 
plan are available at each Virginia 
Beach area library and at the Office 
of Emergency Management in the 
Municipal Center. 

This emergency plan was com- 
pleted in response to Title III of the 
Superfund Amendment and Reau- 
thorization Act (SARA) of 1986. 
This legislation established re- 
quirements for government and in- 
dustry regarding emergency plan- 
ning and community-right-to-know 
reporting on hazardous and toxic 
chemicals. 

The SARA Title III right-to- 
know provisions help to increase 
the public's knowledge of hazardous 
chemicals present in their commu- 
nities. Under Title III, certain 
facilities are required to file infor- 
mation with the LEPC and the lo- 
cal fire department. This informa- 
tion concerns specific hazardous 
chemicals that are produced, used or 
stored at die facilities. 

Required records include: 

• Material Safety Data Sheets 
(MSDS) containing facts about 
health and physical hazards associ- 
ated with specific hazardous chemi- 
cals; 

• Emergency Hazardous Chemical 
Inventory Forms containing spe- 
cific information about amounts 
and locations of various categories 
of hazardous chemicals; and 

• Information concerning releases 
of these chemicals into the envi- 
ronment. 

These records are available to the 
public upon written request, unless 
the files are. specifically exempt 
from disclosure requirements. 

Requests for any of the above 
information must be made in writ- 
ing and must reasonably describe 
die records sought in a way that 
will permit their identification and 
location. Some restrictions and fees 
apply to the release of these records. 
For further information, contact 
Emergency Management Director 
Lee Eskey at 427-4192. 



The Local Emergency Planning 
Committee membership list is as 
follows: 

Local Elected Officials 
(minimum of 2), Albert W. Balko, 
councilman, Lynnhaven Borough; 
and Nancy K. Parker, council- 
woman, At-Large. 

Owners/Operators of 
SARA - Title III Identified 
Facilities, Renato V. Madarang, 
Control Corporation of America 
(CONCOA) and Mardane R. 
McLemore, P.E., Hampton Roads 
Sanitation. 

News Media Representa- 
tives, Patty Garrett, Advertising 
manager. The Beacon and Jay 
Mitchell, assignment editor, 
WTKR-TV3. 

Community Representa- 
tives (minimum of 2), James O. 
Hertz, John J. Kelly and Walter 
Vargo. 

Local Government Staff 
Representatives, G. Dwight 

Blankenbaker, safety administrator, 
city of Virginia Beach; Linda A. 
Champion, executive assistant for 
development, deputy city manager's 
office, city of Virginia Beach; 
James W. Carter, deputy fire chief, 
city of Virginia Beach; Louis E. 
Cullipher, director, department of 
agriculture, city of Virginia Beach; 
Harry E. Diezel, fire chief, city of 
Virginia Beach; Bruce W. Edwards, 
director, division of emergency 
medical services, city of Virginia 
Beach; R. Lee Eskey, coordinator, 
office of emergency management, 
city of Virginia Beach; Gary L. 
Jones, assistant director, department 
of public utilities, city of Virginia 
Beach. 

Also, P. Wade Kyle, waste man- 
agement administrator, department 
of public works, city of Virginia 
Beach; Pamela M. Lingle, director, 
office of public information, city of 
Virginia Beach; C.H. Payne, com- 
manding officer/police uniform ser- 
vices division, city of Virginia 
Beach; Paul J. Pokorski, Jr., 
battalion chief, fire prevention of- 
fice, city 0/ Virginia Beach; Sharon 
K. Prescott, director of 
environmental services, department 
of public health, city of Virginia 
Beach. 



partment has only 16 assigned 
deputies, a most formidable feat 

1 would like to comment further 
about Sheriff Overman's 
administrative staff. Our Chief 
Deputy, A.L. (Sally) Rodgers, is 
the most capable and qualified jail 
administrator that I have met during 
my employment in this office. His 
coordinated efforts through Over- 
man has initiated plans for a work 
release facility which is scheduled 
to come on line towards the latter 
part of 1989. The cost factor for 
this building will be paid for by the 
Work Release Program. Col. 
Rodgers initiated a food service 
contract, approved by the city man- 
ager and his fine staff, and sanc- 
tioned by city council. This action 
will save our city and the taxpayers 
upwards to $100,000 annually. 

Colonel Rodgers renewed our 
inmate healthcare program on a 
yearly basis through Aubrey Watts, 
city manager and city council. This 
arbitration will also make possible 
a substantial savings to the city. 

Another innovative idea by 
Overman, through die chief deputy, 
is a proposal to have a Central 
Process and Booking Center. This 
center is designed for incoming in- 
mates and would have approxi- 
mately $1,000,000 yearly. Our po- 
lice department, Virginia Beach's 
finest, would be a major benefactor 
of this unit. A savings would also 
be passed along to the city and the 
taxpayers. 

A position was established in our 
Inmate Classification Department 
to assist the courts and public de- 
fenders to ensure the right of legal 
counsel for all inmates. 

The Sheriffs Office Community 
Work Force is currently using un- 
skilled inmate labor to work with 
the city's Landscape Division. 
Eventually, this program will be 
expanded in the community and 
will save the city a substantial 
amount of money. 

Overman has cooperated with the 
Compensation Board in Richmond 
and has received additional emer- 
gency personnel for our Correc- 
tional Center. We are still about 31 
employees short in the jail, nine in 
the civil process section and five in 
the courts for security purposes. 

Deputies in the Correctional 
Center are working 12-hour shifts 
to handle the security, feeding, 
medical, recreational and general 
welfare of those incarcerated. 

The Correctional Center is certi- 
fied by the state to house 166 in- 
mates. As of this writing we are 
housing 470. Most every available 
square foot in the building is being 
used to house inmates. At best we 
are sitting on a timebomb that 
could explode at anytime. 
In our general offices it is 



mandatory that the general public, 
attorneys and clients receive the red 
carpet treatment. 

Now about the cars that were 
turned in to the city. Aubrey Watts, 
our city manager was absolutely 
correct in this action. The city's li- 
ability is the issue here and unfor- 
tunately one to the city offices had 
an accident with a settlement re- 
ported of over $1,000,000. This is 
the crux of the matter. The sheriffs 
vehicles traveled over 500,000 
miles in 1988 transporting inmates, 
delivering subpoenas, etc. with 
only four minor accidents. These 
accidents totaled less than $2,400 
with no third parties involved. 

Overman is in full accord with 
the concept of a regional jail. 

We have 176 employees which 
include deputies, clerks, and secre- 
taries. I am pleased to report that 
morale is at an all time high. We 
truly have some of the finest em- 
ployees that I have had the privilege 
of working with. 

Lt. Dick Retterer, our training 
officer, is state certified and super- 
vises all of our deputies in all the 
sheriffs office In-Service Program 
which is mandatory for all deputies. 
Lt. Retterer's able assistant, 
Sergeant Ed Mello, supervises and 
conducts all firearm range activities. 
The professionalism displayed at 
the Virginia Beach sheriffs office 
would amaze you. You only hear 
negative criticism about Overman 
and this office, mostly from dis- 
gruntled former employees. Under- 
standably, some personnel that were 

terminated for justifiable causes 
could feel this way. 

We hear very little about the 
positive projects that were accom- 
plished this past year. Our Food 
Fest which was held in June raised 
money for ZONTA to provide 
shelter for battered spouses. Our 
Christmas food and toy drive helped 
to make the season brighter for 55 
needy families. We were able to 
provide a ham and turkey as well as 
canned goods and toys for these 
families. Financial assistance from 
area businesses as well as individu- 
als made this worthwhile endeavor 
possible. 

All is well at this office because 
of the positive leadership of our 
Sheriff Bill R. Overman. It would 
really be nice if he were re-elected 
and allowed to pursue more of his 
projects for the benefit of all con- 
cerned. The sheriff is an 
administrator. A politician he is 
not 

The above is from my observa- 
tions and the way I perceive them. 
Major M.M. Nash 
CO. Administration 
Virginia Beach 
Sheriffs Department 



. continued from page 3 



VBEA Report 

His five part series in the Beacon on the Virginia Beach City Public 
Schools raised not only eyebrows but consciences. A native of Rochester, 
N.Y., and a graduate of the University of North Carolina, Mike Desisti is 
an advocate for Virginia Beach and a Friend of Education. 

The Award for Academic Freedom and Excellence was given to Dr. 
Kelsey Edwin Brown who is currenUy director of the Educational Planning 
Center. Prior to that position he was a teacher, an assistant principal, a 
curriculum coordinator, an evaluate* of Federal Programs and the first 
principal of the Old Donation Center for the Gifted and Talented. On July 
1, he will assume the job of executive director 10 the superintendent. In all 
of his actions and leadership rotes, he has exhibited a real concern for 
teaching personnel and students. He and his staff at the Educational Plan- 
ning Center have provided statistical data, evaluations and visions of what 
a great school system could be. He is currently chairing the Strategic 
Planning Committee which will set goals for the school system for the 
next five years. Because of his strong commitment to educational excel- 
lence we know academic freedom will continue (0 be championed. 

At the Association Representative meeting, the VBEA was also very 
pleased to recognize Sue Glasco, past president of the city council of 
PTA's. Sue has worked closely with the VBEA while in office and was in- 
strumental in the success of the Partners in Learning Conference. Recently 
recognized at the PTA annual dinner with a meritorious award for leader- 
ship, Sue received praise upon praise by fellow volunteers and profession- 
als. Her contributions and commitment to the schools has been outstand- 
ing. 

VBEA is pleased to salute its award winners and is proud of their com- 
mitment to excellence in education in the City of Virginia Beach. 



"Personals" Run Dates Changed 



Run dates for "Personals," the 
adult musical about finding love in 
the newspaper classifieds, have been 
changed as follows: 

The show opens on Friday, June 
9 at 8 pjn. 

Succeeding performances at 8 
p.m. (except for matinee) are as 
follows: 

Saturday, June 10; Friday and 
Saturday, June 16 and 17; Friday 
and Saturday, June 23 and 24; Sun- 



day, June 25 • one matinee - 3 p.m. 
only; and Thursday. Friday and 
Saturday, June 29, 30 and July 1. 

This is the first time "Personals" 
has been produced in Hampton 
Roads. It ran in 1985 off-Broadway 
in New York. 

Tickets are $5 for adults; $4 for 
students and matinees. The Litde 
Theatre of Virginia Beach is located 
at 24th Sl and Barberton Drive. 
Call 428-9523 for reservations. 



- *- 



m 



mmmmmmmmmmmm 



Just A Chat 



Gerald Tyler Calls 
Himself A 
Workaholic 




Photo Feature 



Central Business District 

Association Celebrates 

Its Third Birthday 



Personality Profile 



Kevin Cosgrove 

Appointed Interh 

City Attorney 



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Seniors Oniy 



125 To 150 Seniors Expected To Participate In 
Sugar Plum Tree Craft Fair; Hope To Sell Over 
$32,500 Worth Of Homemade Crafts 



By Karen Dairy mple 

Slat Writer 



Seventeen years ago, Mary 
Russo, member of the Cape Henry 
Woman's Club, had a brainstorm 
and today that brainstorm is still 
making senior citizens happy. 

Beginning Friday, July 7 and 
running through July 13, the 
Woman's Club will be helping se- 
niors supplement their income 
through the Sugar Plum Tree. This 
craft fair is organized solely for the 
elderly and is co-sponsored by the 
Virginia Beach Department of Parks 
and Recreation. 

According to Evelyn Willard, 
member of the club's publicity 
committee, approximately 125 to 
150 seniors will participate in the 
fair. They will supply homemade 
crafts such as woodwork, Christmas 
ornaments, ceramics, knitting, baby 
gifts, quilts and paintings for the 
113 club members to sell for them. 



"They took forward to 
H every year. It's a ther- 
apy for them. It gives 
mem motivation, some- 
thing they can look for- 
ward to," Wltlard said. 



"They're just delighted when they 
come pick up their checks. That's a 
big help for them," Willard said. 
, She added that the "beautiful 
work" sells for very reasonable 
prices. The seniors like to keep the 
prices down so the items will sell 
so they can replenish their supply. 

"It has grown from $500 to last 
year's receipts of $32,500," Willard 
said. "Hopefully we'll do a little 
more this year." 

The fair will be held at 
Lynnhaven Junior High School, 
1250 Bayne Drive, from 10 a.m. to 
5 p.m., except on Friday, July 7 

when it will stay open until 9 p.m. 

Please see Seniors, page a 



That's Entertainment 

Local Entertainment Agency Books Well Known 
Acts For Corporate Parties, Night Clubs; Currently 
Sending Clients To Japan And Europe 



By Karen Dairy mple 
Stan mm 



If hot entertainment is what you 
need, than Robert W. "Sonny" 
Morris is the man to call. Morris, 
who is president of National Artists 
Corporation, spends his days book- 
ing entertainment for Ocean Occa- 
sions, night clubs, theme parties 
and corporate parties up and down 
the east coast. 

"We go from a local 
singer/pianist up to major names 
for corporate parties and conven- 
tions," Morris said. 

One of the biggest entertainers 
Morris is responsible for bringing 
to the area is Wayne Newton, who 
frequently performs at Virginia 
Beach builder R.G. Moore's corpo- 
rate get togethers. Newton, who 
usually does one show for a little 
over two hours, may cost up to 
$100,000 to book. 

Morris has also had contracts 
with Bill Deal and Fat Ammons, 
Gentlemen and Their Ladies, the 
Four Tops, The Spinners and the 
Mandrells. When attempting to 
book an act, he said he usually 



"We go from a local 
singer/pianist up to 
major names tor corpo- 
rate parties and con- 
ventions, * Morris said 



deals directly with their personal 
manager. Sometimes he has to go 
through a major agency. 

"We're not a promotion com- 
pany. We're not interested in stick- 
ing our heads out for ticket sales," 
he said. 

Morris, who grew up in the en- 
tertainment business, opened the 
South Independence Road agency 
last November. His company is one 
of five of its kind in the area. 

"The business in general is an 
extremely competitive industry. It's 
more competitive than real estate in 
this area," Morris said. "It's (the 
business) gotten much cleaner. It's 
due to the good solid companies." 

Morris said out of all the other 
entertainment agencies, his is the 
only one that provides theme par- 
ties such as a casino night, and a 

Please see Agency, page I 



More Sand 




Bulldozers dig collection pools to contain the sand as it is being pumped, 
and then arrange It on the beach. 

Operation Big Beach 

One Million Cubic Yards Of Sand To Be Pumped 
Onto Beach; Project Should Take Three To Five 
Months 




'89? 

Hurricane Season Began June 1; Residents Should 
Be Prepared To Evacuate And Seek Shelter 



By Karen Dairy mple 

Staff Writer 



By Helen Spore 

Special To The Sun 



Operation Big Beach is under- 
way! This exciting project which 
is increasing the size of the resort 
beach began on May 5. Before 
the project is completed, close to 
one million cubic yards of sand 
will have been pumped onto the 
beach at no cost to the city of 
Virginia Beach. 

The sand is from the dredging 
of Cape Henry Channel of the 
Chesapeake Bay. The channel is 
being deepened as part of the 
Baltimore Harbor Improvement 
Project. 

Two hopper dredges, the Dodge 
Island and the Sugar Island, 
owned by North Atlantic Trailing 
Arm Company, are working si- 
multaneously on the project. In 
alternating six-hour cycles, they 
dredge sand from the channel with 
vacuum pipes, filling their hop- 
pers with a load of about 1,700 
cubic yards or 2,500 tons of sand. 

After the dredging operation is 
complete, the ship travels about 
seven miles south to an offshore 
pump-off station called a SCOTS 
(Self-Contained Offshore Trans- 
portation System) buoy. This 
buoy is now located about 2,000 
feet off 16th Street. It will be 
moved northward several times 



"In, pit, otlh* minor 
dlstrvpthn we ore ex- 
periencing now, every- 
one should keep in 
mind how wonderful our 
beach will be when the 
project is completed, 

M 




during the project. 

The dredge hooks up to a flex- 
ible pipe attached to the SCOTS 
buoy. The sand is offloaded in 
slurry form through the buoy to a 
submerged pipeline which runs 
along the ocean floor and up onto 
the beach at 16th Street. The sand 
is pumped from the dredges 
through this pipeline onto the 
beach. As the work, progresses, 
30-inch pipeline extensions in 
fifty foot sections are added. 

As the sand is coming out of 
the pipeline, it looks like black 
water and is composed of about 
20 percent sand and 80 percent 
water. Bulldozers on the beach 
dig collection pools to contain 
the sand. As the water washes 
away, the bulldozers arrange the 
remaining sand. The beach can be 
used almost immediately. 

Virginia Beach lovers will 
have no trouble hitting the beach 
Plese see Besch, page I 



It's been 29 years since Virginia 
Beach has been struck by a hurri- 
cane but that doesn't mean the city 
will never be the victim of a tropi- 
cal cyclone again. 

"We were overdue last year. 
Hopefully well be overdue this year 
too," said Lee Eskey, emergency 
services coordinator for the city of 
Virginia Beach. 

Hurricane Donna threatened Vir- 
ginia Beach in 1960 and produced 
relatively mild 75 mph winds, 
barely hurricane force with tides of 
7.7 feel above normal. In 1964, the 
city felt the post hurricane effects 
from Hurricane Cleo. Hurricane 
Gloria, which hit in 1985, a cate- 
gory three hurricane with 135 mpn 
winds, "had the potential for 
changing the face of our ocean- 
front," but the city only received its 
fringe effects. In 1986, Hurricane 
Charlie hit, but only the post 
stages. 

Eskey said, to his knowledge, 
there have been no deaths from 
hurricanes in Virginia Beach, but, 
"the city is ripe for loss of life be- 
cause of our experience level." 

A hurricane is a large storm 
which rotates counterclockwise 
around a calm center called the 
"eye." As the hurricane spins, the 
weather systems are thrown out of 
the center. Hurricane winds range 
from 74 miles per hour and up and 
affect the Atlantic Coast from June 
1 to November 30. 

"August, September and October 
are our worst months," Eskey said. 




Lee Eskey 



There are five categories of 
hurricanes, five being the most se- 
vere. A hurricane becomes a major 
one when it hits category three. 
According to Eskey, "we have never 
been struck by a major hurricane." 

Eskey said during a hurricane, 
residents of the inland part of the 
city will most likely be more safe 
than those who live on the ocean- 
front or Chesapeake Bay. Mobile 
homes, as well as condominiums 
should be evacuated in the event of 
a hurricane. 

He added that on the onset of the 
hurricane "season, people should 
prepare themselves for the worst, 

Please see Hurricane*, page i 



Host Chinese? 

Virginia Beach Expected To Host Chinese Busi 
nessmen; Councilwoman Henley Having Second 
Thoughts 



ByLeeCahill 

City Council Reporter 



Virginia Beach had expected to 
join other Hampton Roads cities in 
hosting 37 Chinese businessmen 
the week of June 17, but now, after 
the Beijing uprising. Council- 
woman Barbara Henley wonders 
whether the city should be in- 
volved. 

"I know we need money; I know 
we need industry," she told city 
council at the informal session, 
"but ..." 

She said that "everybody thought 



(the visit) was so great, I bit my 
tongue," but with all the things 
that have occurred in China, she 
said, "I would not want to be in- 
volved ... I found the whole 
situation to be so deplorable." 

Eastern Computers, Inc., in Vir- 
ginia Beach and the Norfolk World 
Trade Center in Norfolk sponsored 
the visit which was to extend from 
June 17 through 21. The city had 
reserved 18 rooms at the Radisson 
Hotel for the Chinese and were to 
host a reception on June 18. 

City Manager Aubrey V. Watts 

Jr., said, however, that council may 

Please see CaNI, page I 






'MM If! -'. : 



■'•, :: : . ■:# i .,::'.. ' ' ' . 



... 

Personality Profile 



: :''■'. : :. : *:/ : : 
: ' ■■■'■■:' :..,. : : 



. 








Interim City Attorney Kevin Cosgrove 
Always Had Dreams Of Being A Lawyer 



By Karen Dairy mple 

Staff Writer 



For as long as he could remem- 
ber Kevin Cosgrove wanted to be a 
lawyer. Now, at age 35, the assis- 
tant city, attorney for the city of 
Virginia Beach has been appointed 
interim city attorney until Septem- 
ber 30. 

Shortly after he was bom in 
Brooklyn, NY., Cosgrove's parents 
relocated to Long Island where he 
attended school and dreamed of be- 
coming an attorney. He made it 
through St. Martha's Grammar 
School, St. Mary's High School 
and Hofstra University, from where 
he graduated in 1976. After 
graduating with honors and double 
majoring in English and History, 
Cosgrove went on to Washington 
and Lee Law School in Lexington, 
Va. 

"1 pretty much always wanted to 
,be a lawyer. Ever since I can re- 



"I pretty much always wanted to be a lawyer. Ever 
since I can remember It's the profession I wanted to 
be," Cosgrove said 



member it's the profession I wanted 
to be," Cosgrove said. 

He said he read about becoming a 
lawyer as a child and then partici- 
pated on the high school debate and 
forensics teams. In college, he re- 
mained active in forensics and pub- 
Ik speaking because he knew it 
would help him with his career as 
an attorney. 

Cosgrove thought about 
returning to New York, where his 
parents still live, after graduation in 
1979, but be decided he liked 
Virginia. He landed his first job as 
an assistant commonwealth's 
attorney for the city of Portsmouth. 
There were 10 to 12 other lawyers 
in the office as well as then 
Commonwealth's Attorney James 
A. Cales and the deputy 



commonwealth's attorney. 

Cosgrove remained in 
Portsmouth until 1982 when he 
went to work for the city attorney's 
office for the city of Virginia 
Beach. 

"Every day when I get up to go 
to work it's going to be something 
completely different. I really look 
forward to it. You never know 
what's going to happen," he said. 

In 1985 Cosgrove was promoted 
to deputy city attorney and then be- 
came assistant city attorney. City 
Attorney Dale Bimson recently re- 
signed from his position to assume 
a district court judgeship, so Cos- 
grove will take his place until the 
city decides on a new city attorney. 
Cosgrove has placed his name in 
the running for the position. 



As interim city attorney, Cos- 
grove is the chief legal officer for 
the city. His responsibilities in- 
clude "giving advice to city council, 
the city manager and various city 
departments." He is also responsi- 
ble for administering the budget. 

"It's a pretty wide range job," he 



When he's not advising city offi- 
cials, Cosgrove likes to spend time 
with his wife Sharon and their two 
sons, Brent Joseph, 3 1/2, and 
Ryan Bradley, 11 months. The 
Greenbrier resident said he plays 
golf, if only twice a month, and is 
a member of his office softball 
learn and a baseball league. 

Cosgrove said he had thoughts of 
establishing his own private law 
practice but he decided against it. 
He said, not being from this area 
that it would be harder for him to 
establish himself. 

"I'm motivated by my desire to 




Kevin Cosgrove 



do a good job and provide for my 
family in the best way I can," he 



said "You always strive to do the 

best you can every day." 



- - - 



^■^ 



^^ 



2 The Virginia Beach Sun, June 14, 1989 




Editorials 



Let's Hope For A 

Safe And Calm 

Hurricane Season 



With all the raining and high winds that have hit Virginia 
Beach lately, it's no wonder they're calling for a hurricane 
sometime in the near future. Seeing how the city is surrounded 
by water, it could be in danger if a strong hurricane comes 
along. 

Hurricanes are tropical cyclones in which winds may reach 
74 miles per hour or more and blow in a large spiral around a 
relatively calm center called the eye. Some people are fooled 
when they see the eye pass over their area because the winds 
die down and the skies are partly cloudy. As soon as, the eye 
passes, the winds turn around at the same velocity as before. 
Many people have been killed when the calm eye lured them out 
of shelter. 

Fortunately, hurricanes today can be detected and tracked by 
radar, satellites, and aircraft long before reaching Virginia 
Beach, giving us ample warning time to react and prepare as 
best we can. A proper response to a hurricane is the most im- 
portant means of protecting your life and property. 

A few safety rules in the event of a hurricane are important to 
know. For instance, keep the radio or television on for the lat- 
est advisories and evacuation recommendations for the National 
Weather Service or the city of Virginia Beach, Office of Emer- 
gency Management. Also, board up or tape windows shut, 
have flashlights and spare batteries handy, store a supply of 
safe drinking water in sterilized jugs as well as extra food and 
cooking utensils. 

If a hurricane should strike, there will be shelters all across 
the city for those who need to seek it. Most of the city's high 
schools, as well as elementary schools will be providing shel- 
ter. 

Hopefully, we'll have a safe and calm hurricane season. But 
should a tragedy occur, we should all be prepared. - K.L.D. 



Support The Seniors' 
Craft Fair 



All our lives we work to support ourselves and our families, 
but what happens when it's time to retire and there's not a 
steady income flowing in each week? 

There are probably many senior citizens in Virginia Beach 
who could use a little extra cash even though the children are 
grown and have kids of their own. The Cape Henry Woman's 
Club came up with an idea several years ago that both supple- 
ments their income and gives them the opportunity to be cre- 
ative. 

Each year the club holds a crafts fair that is strictly for se- 
niors. All they have to do is supply the homemade craft of their 
choice and the club takes it from there. For one week, club 
members will sell the seniors' items and then present them with 
a check from the profits. If any items are left over, the senior 
gets them back. 

Aside from receiving extra money, the seniors get the chance 
to show off their talents such as wood working, quilting, ce- 
ramics, Christmas ornaments, and knitting, just to name a few. 
The items are probably worth much more than they are sold 
for, but they are going for very reasonable prices. 

Help support our city's seniors and do a little gift shopping. 
It's never too early to start looking for Christmas presents and 
remember Father's Day is this weekend. - K.L.D. 



Don't Forget Dad On 
Father's Day 



Mother's Day has past and how it's time to honor the other 
half of the people who brought us into this world. Yes, Fa- 
ther's Day is this Sunday and we should all be grateful for the 
things our fathers have done for us. It's been said that mothers 
do all the work, but what about dad? 

Who came home tired at the end of the day so there would be 
food on the table and clothes on our backs? Many of us 
wouldn't have attended college if it wasn't for dear old dad. 

Who taught us how to ride a bike and fixed everything when 
it was broken? Dads seem to know how to do everything. They 
even know how to calm mom down when she was on the verge 
of a nervous breakdown! 

Many of us take our fathers for granted and it's not really 
fair. They deserve at least this one day out of the year to be ap- 
preciated. Some people are less fortunate than others; either 
they've lost their father or aren't very close. Those of us who 
still have dad around should feel privileged. 

This Sunday, don't forget to pick up the phone or send a 
card. It will mean the world to a father to know that his child 
cares. - K.L.D. 



Local Agencies Offer Valuable 
Help In Battle Against Drugs 



By Congressman 

Owen B. Pickett 



Last month, parents, teachers and 
community leaders from around the 
Second Congressional District par- 
ticipated in a special drug preven- 
tion workshop, which I organized 
to help area residents understand 
how they can effectively counsel 
young people against drug and al- 
cohol abuse. The workshop also 
served to highlight the many drug 
prevention resources that arc avail- 
able to parents in our schools, in 
our police departments, and in our 
local social service agencies. 

Families who are confronted with 
a drug problem, or who think they 
are, should know about these pro- 
grams and the kind of services they 
offer. 

This year's workshop again fea- 
tured presentations by Trish Jack- 
son and Kjersti Lee, two profes- 
sional counsellors from the Vir- 
ginia Beach Comprehensive Sub- 
stance Abuse Program. Their pre- 
sentation, which is called "Parent 
Empowerment," clearly showed the 
vital role that parents must play in 
keeping their children away from 
drugs. 

The program seeks to instill in 
parents those communication skills 
which have been proven effective in 
helping children resist the peer 
pressure to use drugs. It alerts par- 
ents to the warning signs that 
might indicate a substance abuse or 
other psychological problem, such 
as a sudden drop in grades, a change 
of friends, defensiveness, and abu- 
sive behavior. The counsellors also 
reviewed a list of resources and so- 
cial service agencies that are avail- 
able to help families when a prob- 
lem arises. 

We were also very fortunate to 
have at our workshop Mrs. Pat 
Dillard, a drug education specialist 
with the Norfolk Public Schools. 
Mrs. Dillard reviewed the standard 

anti-drug curriculum presently be- 
ing offered in the Norfolk and Vir- 
ginia Beach public schools. She 
also shared with us the ways in 
which educators arc working with 
parents and their teenagers to help 
get drugs out of the classroom and 
away from school activities. 

In some communities, for exam- 
ple, parents have formed groups to 
sponsor and chaperone teenage par- 
ties in order to insure that there are 
no drugs or alcohol present. We can 
be very grateful that educators and 
PTA groups in South Hampton 
Roads are spearheading these ef- 
forts. 




Owen Pickett To Speak 
At Sandbridge Civic League 



Second District Congressman 
Own Pickett will be the featured 
speaker at a meeting Saturday, June 
17 of the Sandbridge Civic League. 
The meeting will be held at 11 a.m. 
at Sandbridge Community Church, 
3041 Sandpiper Road. 

Pickett said he will discuss 



legislation pending in Congress as 
well as issues specific to the Sand- 
bridge Community. Saturday's 
meeting is part of a continuing se- 
ries of talks which Pickett has 

given to area civic leagues this 
year. 



The Virginia Beach Sun Deadlines 

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upcoming Wednesday's issue. 

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on topics of general interest 
All letters must carry the name and address of writer. 

/ Letters should be addressed to: Editor, The Virginia Beach Sun, 
138 Rosemont Road, Suite 217, Virginia Beach, VA. 23452. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 



Publisher 

Hanes Byerly 



Assistant to the Publisher 

Managing Editor 

Greg Goldfarb 



Staff Writers 

Karen Dal rymple 
Deanna Johnson Keim 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

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Telephone: 1-804-486-3430 



Letters to the editor are encouraged. 
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News deadline is Friday noon for each 
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Lee Cahill Report 



Moss Fails To Control PD-H2 



Congressman 
Owen Pickett 



And finally, parents were told 
about the D.A.R.E. (Drug Abuse 
Resistance Education) Program, 
which is by now familiar to many 
school children in our area. This 
very exciting program was origi- 
nally developed in Los Angeles as a 
cooperative effort between the Po- 
lice Department and the city's 
school system. It consists of 17 
lessons, taught once a week over 
the course of a semester, on sub- 
jects including drug use and misuse, 
resistance techniques, assertive re- 
sponse styles, decision making and 
risk taking. Independent research 
shows that the D.A.R.E. program 
has successfully helped young peo- 
ple resist drugs and has contributed 
to improved performance in school. 

This workshop was organized to 
help families in South Hampton 
Roads deal with drug problems 
more effectively and to demonstrate 
the outstanding programs being of- 
fered in our community to bring the 
drug epidemic under control. 

If you missed the meeting, but 
would like to receive a copy of the 
instructional materials, you may 
call or write to any one of my three 
constituent service offices. I would 
be pleased to share these materials 
with you: 

1429 Longworth H.O.B., Wash- 
ington, D.C. 20515, 202-225- 
4215; 

2710 Virginia Beach Blvd., Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia 23452, 804- 
486-3710; 

815 Federal Building, 200 
Granby Street, Norfolk, Virginia 
23510,804-624-9124. 



Councilman John D. Moss failed 
in a recent attempt to place stricter 

controls on PD-H2 (planned devel- 
opment) land use plans. 

City council by a 6-4 vote de- 
feated a resolution proposed by 
Moss which would have sent ordi- 
nances related to PD-H2 projects to 
the planning commission for con- 
sideration and recommendation. 
Following the vote, Moss remarked 
that he hoped the public is in- 
formed, that "the voters will know 
who is accountable." 

The two alternatives offered by 
Moss were intended to avert a 
recurrence of the Kempsville Greens 
incident where Planning Director 
Robert Scott had administratively 
approved changes in the PD-H2. 

Residents complained that the 
changes, since they were approved 
administratively, were not made 
public. They said the changes al- 
lowed Dragas Companies to change 
the type of housing stipulated in 
the original PD-H2 concept and re- 
sulted in the loss of green space. 
Built too close to the city-owned 
golf course, they said, the homes 
threatened the integrity of the 
course. 

The current ordinance allows the 
planning director to approve 
changes in a PD-H2 plan if the 



changes are keeping with the origi- 
nal concept approved by council. 
Residents, and council members as 
well, fell that the Kempsville Green 
changes should have been brought 
to city council. 

One of the alternative ordinances 
proposed by Moss would require all 
changes to be approved by council. 
The other would require changes of 
a substantia] nature to be made by 
council. 

Voting to send the ordinance to 
the planning commission were 
Moss, Mayor Meyera Obemdorf, 
Councilman Nancy Parker and 
Councilman Albert Balko. Coun- 
cilman John L. Perry was absent. 

Councilwoman Rcba McClanan 
said her reason for voting against 
the resolution appeared to be differ- 
ent from the reasons of other coun- 
cil members. She said that she 
could not understand that the staff 
has not understood what the coun- 
cil's directions are. 

"We can talk over and over and 
put it in writing. The same thing 
(that happened in the Green Run 
PD-H2) has happened again. There 
is no way you can interpret that the 
changes were the original intent (of 
council). If the staff has not under- 
stood this I don't know what good 
(another ordinance) will be. Enough 
is enough," she said. 



Are Bingo Parlors Assembly Halls 



Did the framers of the city's 
Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance 
mean that bingo parlors would 
qualify as "assembly halls." 

Former Mayor Robert G. Jones 
doesn't think so. 

He, therefore asked city council 
for clarification. 

The question came up when the 
board of zoning appeals approved a 
request from a bingo parlor to lo- 
cate in a B-3 Central Business Dis- 



trict zone where the CZO permits 
assembly halls as a conditional use. 
Council adopted a resolution di- 
recting the planning commission to 
investigate and make recommenda- 
tions to the city council concerning 
amendments to the CZO designat- 
ing the business zoning district 
classifications in which bingo halls 
shall be allowed as a conditional 
use. 



Council Wants Burrow Pit Denied 



Virginia Beach City Council is 
asking the Currituck County Plan- 
ning Board to consider denying an 
application for a 56-acre borrow pit 
which will impact the back roads of 
Virginia Beach and Chesapeake. 

Councilman John A. Baum said 
that he is not against borrow pits in 
agriculture areas, but not such big 
ones. He said that '\\ roads which 
would be used by the pit operation 
can barely handle the traffic now. 
He said the trucks would use the 



country roads of Black water and 
Chesapeake. People in the area are 
concerned, he said. 

Baum pointed out that the city of 
Chesapeake denied a borrow pit 
permit close to the Virginia Beach 
city line where Hungarian Road, 
which is mostly in Virginia Beach, 
would have been impacted. 

Council adopted the resolution 
making the request to the Currituck 
County. 



Mock Council Meeting Held At Omni 



City council will get the low- 
down on the new Freedom of In- 
formation Act at a seminar June 15 
sponsored by the Attorney General's 
office at the Omni Hotel in Nor- 



folk. 

Mayor Meyera Obemdorf said 
that a mock council meeting will 
be part of the presentation showing 
how violations can occur. 



September 25 Council Meeting Cancelled 



The Sept. 25 council meeting 
has been cancelled and both admin- 
istrative and planning issues will be 
combined on the agendas for the 
two remaining meetings of the 
month of Sept. 11 and 18. 

The action was taken by a vote 
of 9-1 with Councilwoman Reba 
McClanan dissenting, so that Vice 
Mayor Robert V. Fentress and 
Councilwoman Barbara Henley can 



attend an American Public Trans- 
portation Association meeting in 
Atlanta, Ga., Sept. 25 through 28 
without missing a council session. 
Henley who is chairman of the 
Tidewater Transportation District 
Commission said that she would 
miss the Atlanta meeting rather 
than a council meeting. What 
would have been the first meeting 
of the month falls of Labor Day. 



Cockrell Appointed To Planning Commission 



E.R. Cockrell, former director of 
the Department of Agriculture, has 
been appointed to the Planning 
Commission to fill the unexpired 
term of Thomas A. Amnions who 
resigned to assume a general district 



court judgeship. The term expires 
Dec. 31, 1989. 

Council voted 9-1 to approve the 
appointment with Councilwoman 
Reba McClanan dissenting. Coun- 
cilman John L. Perry was absent. 



Council Approves Revenue Bonds 

City council has approved the issuance of $4 million in industrial 
development revenue bonds to Hermes Abrasives, Ltd., 524 Viking Drive, 
for their funding of a $5 million IRB issued in 1979. 



Smoking Prohibited By City Code 



A 



Smoking in certain public places is now prohibited by city code 
Chapter 28.5). 

TTisrow unlawful to smoke in the following public places: elevators, 
retail ami service establishments, indoor service lines, cashier areas, counter 
service areas, public restrooms, health care facilities, rooms in which a 
public meeting or hearing is being held, places of entertainment, art gal- 
leries, libraries, museums, educational facilities, child care facilities, indoor 
recreational facilities and skating rinks. 

Restaurants, bowling alleys and bingo halls, with 50 or more seats, 
must provide adequate sealing areas for non-smoking patrons. 

Violation of this ordinance is a Class 4 misdemeanor. Any questions 
concerning this ordinance or its enforcement, or a copy of the ordinance 
may be provided by calling 427-4262. 



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The Virginia Beach Sun, June 14, 1989 3 






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Op-Ed 




Asian/Pacific American Heritage Celebration Held 




The 
Mayor's 
Report 

Virginia Beach Mayor 

The Honorable 

Meyera Oberndorf 



The Virginia Beach Employee EEO Advisory Committee on May 10 
sponsored a reception to honor the 57 city employees of Asian and Pacific 
Islands ancestry. The employees represented Departments of Budget and 
Evaluation, City Attorney, Convention and Visitor Development, Data 
Processing, Finance, Fire, General Services, Housing and Community 
Development, Parks and Recreation, Planning, Police, Public Libraries, 
Public Utilities, Public Works, Sheriff, Social Services, and the Virginia 
Marine Science Museum, 

Paulette Braithwaite, chairperson, EEO Advisory Committee, kicked off 
the celebration by welcoming the approximately 40 guests and introducing 
City Manager Aubrey V. Watts, Jr. Watts spoke on the contributions the 
employees have given to the city and how he looks forward to their con- 
tinued working relationship. 

The President of the United States earlier had proclaimed May 7 through 
13 Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week. Mayor Meyera Oberndorf .es- 
tablished Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week in Virginia Beach and 
dedicated May 10 as Asian/Pacific American Employee Day. 

She recited the proclamation to the employees: 

WHEREAS: We would like to salute the Americans of Asian and 




Mayor Oberndorf and several of the honored employees. 
Pacific Islands ancestry for their accomplishments and for their forefathers 
who, through the decades have offered our community their talents, their 

Please see Mayor, page 8 



How To Have A Successful Summer With Kids 




The 
Report 



By Claire Polley, 

President of the Virginia 

Beach Education Association 



This week's Sun article was written by Cheryll Tokac, VBEA vice pres- 
ident. 

Each year without fail, every car was taken to the local service station 
for its "check-up." Growing up in the country was an experience for me, 
but it was not without its hazards. One was a great fear on the part of both 
my father and grandfather that we would be stranded on the way between 
home and town with car trouble. So, all the cars were made ready for the 
season ahead. 

I often use this analogy when parents ask what they should "do" with 
their children for the summer months. Just as it is important for us to pre- 
pare our cars for each new season, it is important that we think about what 
we need to do to "summer-ize" our children. 

We must remember that most importantly, all that precious knowledge 
that is so carefully instilled during the school year, can be affected if it is 
not reinforced during the summer. Reading skills are an important aspect of 
learning. I often suggest to parents that they take their children to the li- 
brary and have them apply for and receive their own library card. I can still 
remember the day that I received mine at the tiny library at home. It was a 
very important responsibility for me and I looked forward to the family 



Hobbies are great to i 
teach systematic planning and create pride in chil- 
dren. 



excursions to the library each week. It was also a privilege for me to be 
able to pick out my own books. Of course, picking out my own books 
also meant that the choices had to be approved by my parents. Often the 
questions had to be about the readability level of the book. The staff at the 
local libraries in our city are quite capable of providing that information. 
And do not forget to check the library schedule for when there will be a 
story time provided. 

Another great resource at the library, and one that I have enjoyed taking 
advantage of, has been the books that are on tape. There are a variety of 
children's books presently on tape as well. This not only will strengthen a 
child's ability to listen and retain information, but it will also provide the 
children the opportunity to visualize in their own minds what is occurring 
in the story. Television, for all the benefits it has provided us, has also 
robbed us of the opportunity to use our minds to visualize events as they 
v Please see VBEA, page 8 



History Of The American Flag And "Father Of Flag Day" 




There are two national celebrations this week. With Rag Day on the 
14th and Father's Day on the 18th, it seemed appropriate to remember the 
man, now known as the "Father of Flag Day." 

Our American Flag is ten years older than the Constitution, for the 
Continental Congress adopted the following Resolution on June 14, 1777, 
but our Founding Fathers did not sign the Constitution until September 
17, 1787. 

"Resolved, that the Flag of the thirteen United States be thirteen stripes, 
alternate red and white: that the union be thirteen stars, white on a blue 
field, representing a constellation." 

Congress then appointed three men to design a national flag. They were 
General George Washington, Robert Morris and Colonel George Ross. 
According to tradition, they went to the home of Mrs. Betsy Ross, the 
widow of a nephew of Colonel Ross and a fine seamstress who had made 
flags for the Colonial troops. 

The men showed her a square flag with the stripes and with six-pointed 
stars. She snipped out a five-pointed star with her scissors and next sug- 
gested an oblong flag, saying it would not flutter so much. 

Washington was pleased and has been quoted as saying of this Flag, "We 
take the stars and blue uniform from Heaven, the red from our mother 



By showing respect tor our flag, we salute our 
nation, our founding fathers, and our fellow country 
men. ___________ 



country, separating it by white stripes, thus showing we have separated 
from her, and the white stripes shall go down to posterity representing lib- 
erty." 

Unfortunately, Congress did not specify how the thirteen stars were to 
be arranged. Thus, the Betsy Ross Flag haD them in a circle, but other 
flags of the period had them arranged in a square or randomly. 

After Vermont and Kentucky joined the Union, Congress passed another 
Flag Resolution, making the flag one of fifteen stars and fifteen stripes. 
Realizing that the flag would become unwieldy and require higher and 
higher flag poles, a Navy captain suggested that the stripes remain thirteen 
and that a star be added as each new state joined the Union. 

Congress concurred and passed a law on April 4, 1818 to this effect, 
specifying that a star be added for each new state on the 4th of July 
following its admission. The last of our 50 stars was added in 1960. Al- 
though Hawaii joined the Union August 21, 1959, its star was not added 

until the following 4th of July. 

Please see Lift Quill, page S 



' -... 



Lee Cahill'sCity Council Report 





Mayor 
Meyera Oberndorf 



Vice-Mayor 
Robert Fentress 



City Doesn't Really Need $312,888 Million For Schools 



The $312,888 million the 
School Board said, less than a 
month ago, would be needed for 
capital projects during the next few 
years was the wrong figure. 

The new figure, which would 
have to be raised through referen- 
dums in 1989 and 1992, is 
$138,293 million based on new and 
more accurate enrollment projec- 
tions. Even so, the money which 
the school Board needs to meet 
school needs through 1997 is still 
$50,933 million more than the al- 
locations in the Capital Budget. 
And if the gymnasiums for older 
schools are included, the total 
amount could be increased by 
$10,956 million. 

City council and the School 
Board heard the news at a joint 
meeting in the School Administra- 
tion Building Monday when Dr. K. 
Edwin Brown, director of education 



planning for the School Board, said 
that figures from the consultant, 
GeoBased Systems, were not avail- 
able when the first projections were 
compiled. 

The new projections, the 
weighted average of the city's (30 
percent) and GeoBased Systems; (70 
percent), ranged from an enrollment 
of 69,311 in 1989 to 85.809 in 
1997. These figures compair with 
the previous estimates from the 
Educational Planning Center from 
August 1988 of 69,807 in 1989 to 
106,384 in 1997. 

James Fletcher, chairman of the 
School Board, said that he, too, 
when he first heard the higher fig- 
ures, "sat there in utter shock. I was 
very uncomfortable with them." He 
said, however, that they were "the 
best we had to work with." 

The announcement, he said, came 
within a few days of the proposed 



mammoth increase in the Operating 
Budget for the schools. He said that 
he realized the estimates were not in 
line with city projections. 

He said he apologized for the first 
figures, but that he may have to 
apologize for the second. He said 
that the military situation is indefi- 
nite, more houses are on the market 
(Councilman Harold Heischober pu' 
this number at 10,000, and that in- 
terest rates and availability of 
money and a number of other 
things would affect the projections. 

But, he said, "this is the way it 
looks today." 

Brown said that no model is ac- 
curate and that projections beyond 
three to five years are suspect. He 
said that consultants merely added 
two and a half percent after the first 
five years. 

Brown also said that in Virginia 
Beach the elementary school popu- 



lation grows faster than middle or 
junior high school population, that 
40 percent of the students are in the 
city's schools for eight years or 
more while another 30 percent are 
in the schools for less than two 
years. 

The estimates, said Brown, do 
not take into account any changes 
the State may make in its require- 
ments for schools, such as a further 
reduction in class size. 

Councilwoman Barbara Henley, 
who had remarked when the higher 
projections were released that the 
city would not have money to do 
anything else if the schools received 
all the money requested, asked, 
"How are we going to say that now 
we're right?" 

Superintendent of schools James 
Melvin said that in July of 1988 
the School Board set five priorities 
which initiated a study. The 



GeoBased data did not arrive until 
last Tuesday. He said that one of 
the shortcomings of the schools 
was that "we did not do a good job 
of planning." Planning beyond 
three years, he said, is witchcraft. 
School needs have to be updated 
each year. 

The revised list of capital pro- 
jects for the 1989 referendum 
($69,293,000) includes Bayside 
High School modernization, 
$4,484,000; Kellam High School 
modernization, $2,050,000; London 
Bridge Road area elementary school, 
$8,1 16,000; Farmers' Market/Green 
Run Area middle school, 
$17,040,000; Farmers' Mar- 
ket/Green Run area elementary 
school, $8,116,000; various 
schools site acquisition, $2 mil- 
lion; high school site in West 
Kempsville area, $3,050,000, and 
high school in West Kempsville 



area, $25,538,000; and for the 1992 
referendum ($60,900,000), General 
Booth corridor elementary school, 
$8,603,000; Ocean Lakes High 
School, $28,694,000; various 
schools site acquisition, 
$3,025,000, and three elementary 
schools, $29,578,000. 

Board member John Fahey said 
that the gyms for the elementary 
schools should be included in the 
1989 referendum. He said that the 
gyms will amount to less than 10 
percent of the total. He said that the 
people in the neighborhoods of 
these older schools will be asked to 
give money for new schools. 

Mayor Meyera Oberndorf said 
that the city council is as commit- 
ted as the School Board to do what 
is appropriate in the November ref- 
erendum. She said council wanted 



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4 The Virginia Beach Sun. June 14, 1989 




Civic 



DAV, Auxiliary install New Officers 



At' an installation dinner in their 
chapter home, the Virginia Beach 
Disabled American Veterans and 
their Ladies Auxiliary installed 
newly elected officers to govern for 
the 1989-90 year. 

Outgoing Commander Vincent 
Cassana officiated at ceremonies at 
which the following officers were 
installed: Commander Gary Barto, 
Senior Vice-Commander Joseph 
Danilowicz, Junior Vice Comman- 
der Gary Underwood, Treasurer Bob 
Arnold, Chaplain Dave Weeks, Ad- 
jutant Vincent Barresi. . 

For the Ladies Auxiliary the fol- 
lowing officers were installed: 
Commander Betty Dispennette, Se- 
nior Vice-Commander Fern 
Danilowicz, Chaplain Lois Sutav- 
em, Treasurer Ruth Hold, Adjutant 
Jean Allen, Assistant Chaplain and 
Sunshine Chairman Fern Danilow- 



icz. 



In appreciation for their yearlong 
service and dedication, Cassano 
presented gifts of appreciation to 



outgoing officers and committee 
chairpersons. Cassano also provided 
an overview of the chapter's active 
involvement and accomplishments 
during the past year which included: 
income tax assistance to the elderly; 
high school scholarship awards; 
participation in junior Olympics; 
refugee resettlement assistance to 
Asian families; donation of 
approximately $5,000 in Farm 
Fresh receipts for the resettlement 
of Asian teenagers; forget-me-not 
drives to fund Veteran's 
Administration hospital activities 
and services; POW recognition; re- 
freshments and entertainment for 
veterans in hospitals and nursing 
homes; planning; and fund raising 
for the Tidewater Veterans Memo- 
rial. 

Incoming Commander Gary 
Barto pledged to continue the mo- 
mentum and accomplishments 
achieved by his predecessor and so- 
licited the support of the member- 
ship in reaching his goal. 



Shriners Hold 26th Annual Circus 



Khedive Temple's 26th Annual 
Kamid-Morton Shrine Circus will 
be presented at the Union- 
Kempsville Stadium (Center for 
Effective Learning - GEL School), 
Virginia Beach Blvd. at Witchduck 
Rd., Thursday, June 22 through 
Sunday, June 25. 

Two performances daily at 2:30 
and 8 p.m. on Thursday and Friday. 
Three performances on Saturday at 
12:30, 4 and 8 p.m. and two per- 
formances on Sunday at 4 and 8 
p.m. 

Benefitting Shrine activities in 
the Tidewater area, this all-new 3- 
ring circus is family entertainment 
with no side-shows or added attrac- 
tions. The general admission of $5 
for adults and $2.50 for children is 
all required for the entire perfor- 
mance which is presented within 
the stadium infield. 

Each year Khedive Temple, with 
the generosity of local merchants, 
make available free tickets to de- 
serving children, disabled persons 
and senior citizens. Over 59.000 



free tickets are being distributed this 
year by Tidewater police and fire 

departments, civic organizations, 
radio and television stations and 
members of Khedive Temple's Cir- 
cus Daddy's Club. 

Headlining this years all-new 
Shrine Circus will be "Hannefords 
Elephants," Miss Catherine 
(Hanneford) and her "Liberty 
Horses" and Kay Rossir with her 
spectacular tiger act 

For the young, David Zoppe 
with his Rhesus Monkey Revue 
and Susan Sheryll with the "Royal 
Afgan Canines." 

From South America, a high 
wire trapeze thriller, "The Flying 
Cortez" and a high wire motorcycle 
act, "The Lemoines" will be fea- 
tured. 

The circus general chairman is 
George T. Stagg (home phone 428- 
4747; office 422-2237). The circus 
telephone number may be obtained 
from the Temple's Recorders Office 
- 622-5206. 





At left, newly Installed president of the Suffolk Chapter, Colonial Dames of 
the 17th Century, Lucy Weisheit. On her right, Frances Knight, Immediate past 
president 

Suffolk CDXVIIC Installs Officers 



This article was submitted by the 
Suffolk Chapter, CDXVI/C. 

The Suffolk Chapter, Colonial 
Dames of the 1 7th Century, held 
their annual meeting recently at the 
Princess Anne Country Club, with 
Mrs. Pritchard Knight, outgoing 
president, presiding. The hostesses 
were Mrs. James Bennett, Mrs. 
Edgar Tugman, and Mrs. Frank T. 
Williams. 

The group enjoyed the program, 
"A Conversation with Alice Quin 
Grant." Joan Reynolds portrayed an 
18th Century Sea Captain's wife in 
an informative and charming pre- 
sentation sponsored by the Life- 
Saving Museum of Virginia and 
supported by the Virginia Founda- 
tion for the Humanities and Public 
Policy. 

Then, the officers for 1989-1991 
were installed by Mrs. Robert Harry 
Bennet, a former state president of 
the organization and an officer on 
the national board. Some years ago, 
Mrs. Bennett was selected as the 
outstanding junior member of the 
Nation Society. 

The following officers were in- 
stalled. Mrs. Burton A. Wisheit, 
president; Mrs. Larry Dean 
Aasheim, first vice president; Mrs. 
Wilmer Turner Carter, second vice 
president; Mrs. Henry Stroupe, 
chaplain; Mrs. Ernest O. Partridge, 
recording secretary; Mrs. Edgar A. 
Tugman, corresponding secretary; 
Mrs. Charles F. Campbell, 
organizing secretary; Mrs. Willie 
Stone, Treasurer; Mrs. Frank Tay- 
lor Williams, registrar; Mrs. Eu'-* 
gene E. Mihalyka, historian; Mrs. 
Marilyn Chelbourg, librarian; and 
Mrs. David Bailey, curator. 

Mrs. Weisheit presented a past 
president's pin to Mrs. Knight and 



expressed the club's appreciation for 
her service. She announced that 
Mrs. Robert Bruce Smith should 
act as parliamentarian. She then 
introduced those who would serve 
as chairman of the various chapter 
committees. 

Bylaws, Mrs. R.H. Bennett; 
colonial research and records, Mrs. 
Gerald Williams; flag custodian, 
Mrs. Margaret P. Joyal; grave 
markers, Mrs. Dean R. Johnson; 
heraldry and coats of arms, Mrs. 
Otis L. Shumate; insignia, Mrs. 
Richard H. Knight; junior 
membership, Mrs. Larry D. 
Aasheim; marking and preservation 
of historic sites, Mrs. Dean R. 
Johnson; membership, Mrs. 
William E. Dryden; national de- 
fense,, Mrs. M.G. Eftimiadi; Poca- 
hontas projects, Mrs. Joshua Pret- 
low; public relations, Mrs. Rice M. 
Youell, Jr.; scholarships, Mrs. 
Rudolph Chelborg; veterans ser- 
vice, Mrs. Murl Estes. 

The National Society Colonial 
Dames of the 17th Century was 
founded in 1915, and the Virginia 
Stale Society was organized forty 
year ago in 1949. The Suffolk 
Chapter, which draws its member- 
ship from the Peninsula throughout 
the South Hampton Roads area, 
was organized June 17, 1950. 

The major goal of the organiza- 
tion is to aid in the preservation of 
records and historic sties and to 
foster interest in historical, colonial 
research. Any American woman, 
age 18 or over, is eligible, if she 
can prove lineal descent from an 
ancestor who lived and served prior 
to 1701 in one of the original 
colonies, but admission is by invi- 
tation. An officer or chairman will 
be pleased to provide additional in- 
formation. 



Gerald Tyler 



Just A Chat 



Name: Gerald Tyler. 

Occupation: Director of University relations at Norfolk State 
University. 

Neighborhood: Indian Lakes. 

Age: 43. 

Marital status: Married. 

Biggest accomplishment in your life: Being perceived by 
some as "least likely to succeed" in high school and now serving in this 
position. 

What do you really like about your job: I like challenges 
and I love working with people. 

If you could write a national newspaper column, what 
would your message be: The problems of the world are thin-rooted 
and we have turned away from God. 

What do you consider the meaning of success: The result 
of a number of failures. 

If you received a million dollars tomorrow, what would 
you do with it: Invest a good portion and allow it to earn me more 
money and buy another home. 

What's your idea of a fun evening: An evening without the 
kids. Taking a walk on the beach and then dinner at a nice restaurant. 

What is your idea of a fun weekend: Taking a three day 
weekend and going to Atlanta, Houston or Dallas. 

What is your best personality trait: I'm very outgoing and 
friendly. 

What is your worst personality trait: I'm a workaholic. ' 

What is your dream vacation: Two months in Australia. 

What's your favorite time of the year and why: Summer - 
I like to enjoy fun things. 

What is your favorite day of the week and why: Sunday - 
I look forward to going to church and it gets me away from the job. 

What's your favorite magazine: The Plain Truth, Jet, and 
Ebony. 

What is your favorite pet: I like animals in general. 

Your dream car: A Cadillac or Lincoln. 

Your favorite sport: Boxing. 

Your favorite sports team: Washington Redskins. 

What is your pet peeve: Bumper to bumper traffic. 

What do you like to do to relax after a hard day's work: 
I work out at a Living Well three times a week. 

What is your favorite TV program: Matlock, Midnight 
Caller and The Cosby Show. ? 

Your favorite movie: I'll watch a- television movie. 

What is your favorite entertainer: Sugar Ray Leonard. 

What is your favorite food and drink: Scallops and Canada 
Dry ginger ale. 

What is your favorite restaurant: Scale ode Whale, Red Lob- 
ster and the Circle Restaurant. 

What do you think is one of the biggest problems fac- 
ing the world: Drugs - it's international. 

What do you like most about Virginia Beach: The friend- 
liness and peace and quiet. 



Genealogical Society Program At Central 



On Thursday, June 22* the Vir- 
ginia Beach Genealogical Society 
will present DewayneUrter and the 
Heritage Quest Road Show at the 
Virginia Beach Central Library at 
6:30 p.m. 

Lener is a professional genealo- 
gist and the foremost authority on 
genealogical preservation and con- 
servation in the country today. He 
is the author of the first preserva- 
tion book ever printed dealing 
specifically with genealogy: Paper 



Preservation: Conservation Tech- 
niques and Methodology, published 
in 1988. 

Lener has written on the subject 
of preservation for many publica- 
tions including Heritage Quest 
Magazine. Lener lectures on such 
subjects as: document cleaning and 
deacidification, document repair and 
mylar encapsulation and genealogi- 
cal techniques from the Heritage 
Quest Files. 



Farmer's Market Announces Events 



The Virginia Beach Farmer's 
Market has announced the follow- 
ing events: 

From June 13 to June 17 a 
country carnival and second annual 
Kids Fest will feature food, live 
music, clowns, pony and carnival 
rides and more. Hours are Tuesday 
through Thursday, 3 to 10 p.m. and 
Saturday, noon to 10 p.m. 

A craft festival will be held June 
16, 17, and 18 from 10 a.m. to 5 
p.m. Crafters from all over will be 



there to demonstrate their skills. 

On June 24, the Farmer's Market 
will have pony rides from 1 1 a.m. 
to3 p.m. The cost is $1 per ride. 

Each Friday night in June from 7 
to 1 1 p.m., the Pure Country Band 
plays country music. The Country 
Kitchen is also open from 7 to 1 1 
pjn. The event is free. Also being 
featured is New Traditions, Thalia 
Thumpers and the Chesapeake Bay 
Cloggers and the Stewart Brothers 
Band 




Kids Fest Benefits Easter Seals 



The Easter Seal Society is spon- 
soring a summer kids fest on 
Thursday, June 15 from 3 to 9 p.m. 
at Farmer's Market. 

Kids fest will feature children's 
games, prizes and a "Moohwalk" 
ride. Admission is a $2 donation 
per child which will go to benefit 



Easter Seals' many programs and 
services provided for disabled peo- 
ple. 

Farmer's Market Country Carni- 
val will run from June 13 through 
June 17. Kids fest is a special fea- 
ture of the Country Carnival. 

For more information call the 
Easter Seal Center at 468-3140. 



Stepfamily Association Holds Meetiftg 



The Tidewater Chapter, 
Stepfamily Association of America, 
Inc. will hold its monthly meeting 
Monday, June 19, at 7:30 p.m. at 
the Life Savings Bank Community 
Room, 1756 Laskin Road, in the 
Hilltop section. 

The room is located behind the 
bank. The charge is $2 donation per 
person. 



The Tidewater Chapter, 
Stepfamily Association of America, 
Inc. is a non-profit educational and 
support organization for families in 
which at least one adult is a step- 
parent or in a stepparent role. 

For further information, contact 
Carolyn Moskowitz, LCSW, at 
496-0100, or Paul C. Cole, 
LCSW, at 468-0550. 



Museum Sponsors Boat Tours 



The Virginia Marine Science 
Museum summer boat trips aboard 
the Miss Virginia Beach. Trawl for 
fish and other sea creatures, tow for 
plankton and test the quality of our 
water with Museum Education 
Specialist, Chris Mast. 

The outings will leave each 
Thursday at 12:45 p.m. from the 



Virginia Beach Fishing Center at 
Rudee Inlet and return at 2 p.m. 
The trips run June 22 through Au- 
gust 31. 

The cost is $7 for adults and $5 
for children under 12. To register, 
call 425-3476 or visit the Virginia 
Marine Science Museum at 717 
General Booth Boulevard. 



Kempsville AARP Holds Meeting 



Kempsville Chapter #4212 of 
AARP will hold its monthly meet- 
ing on Wednesday, June 14, at 10 
a.m. at the Kempsville Recreation 
Center. 

The program will be on 



"Nutrition for Older Persons." 

All persons 50 years of age and 
over are invited to attend. For addi- 
tional information, call Lanny 
Lancaster, president, at 474-9277. 



Parents Without Partners Meet 



parents Without Partners, Chap- 
ter 216, is inviting single parents 
of South Hampton Roads to a 
membership orientation on Satur- 
day, June 24 at noon at Thunderbird 



Lanes on Laskin Road. 

Those who want to know more 
about PWP and are considering 
membership can call 497-81 12/471 - 
6672 for more information. 



Marine Science Museum Extends Hours 



Beginning Friday, June 16, the 
Virginia Marine Science Museum 
will extend its hours for the sum- 
mer season. The new hour& will be 
Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. 
to 9 p.m. and Sundays 9 aun. to 5 



p.m. 

In addition, the Museum has 
scheduled an exciting line-up of 
summer programs to entertain 
throughout the season. 




Libraries Hold Summer Reading Club 



The Virginia Beach Public Li- 
brary's 29th annual Summer Read- 
ing Club which begins Monday, 
June 26, will feature two programs 
this year. 

The Adventures with Paddington 
Bear Reading Club is designed for 
pre-school and young school-age 
children. The "Read-to-me" option 
allows pre-schoolers to be included 
with older brothers and sisters while 
learning the sound texture of the 
written language through being read 
books by their parents or care- 
givers. 

To add fun to reading, different 
games are distributed each week, 
and all participants can display their 
Paddington Bear coloring pages in 
their local library. 

The Catch the Wave Summer 
Reading Club is designed for chil- 
dren in the middle grades and fea- 
tures a beach and surf board theme. 
Prizes and a drawing for t-shirts 
from a local surf shop are some of 
the activities scheduled for the 
Catch the Wave Summer Reading 



Club. 

The Summer Reading Club is 
designed to reinforce reading skills 
taught in school and creates an as- 
sociation in children's minds, not 
only between reading and pleasure, 
but also between libraries and read- 
ing. Studies have shown that 
school-age children who read 
through the summer progress in 
language skills development Those 
who do not read actually lose read- 
ing skills from June to September. 

Children who are interested in 
joining the Paddington Bear Read- 
ing Club can register at their most 
convenient library and the 
bookmobile in Virginia Beach. 
Registration for the Catch the Wave 
Summer Reading Club is being 
held at the bookmobile. 

For information on the Catch the 
Wave Club, call the bookmobile at 
340-7798. For information on the 
Paddington Bear Club, call your 
neighborhood library or the book- 
mobile. 



Read-Aloud Roundup At Great Neck 



The Great Neck Area Library, 
1251 Bayne Drive, will feature 
videos on Wednesday nights for 
kids in grades one through six. Two 
programs are scheduled for June 21 
and June 28 at 7:30 p.m. 



Kids can see their favorite books 
come to live through videos. Sug- 
gested reading for each week will be 
given. For a complete listing of 
videos and for more information 
call 481-6094. 



Wednesday Night Videos At Great Neck 



A storytime program for kids in 
grades four through six will be 
given c <g the month of June at 
the Gres.i iNeck Area Library, 1251 
Bayne Drive. 



The program dates are June 19 
and June 26. Both programs start at 
7:30 pjn. Call 481-6094 for more 
information. 



Family Storytime At Central 



A family storytime program will 
be held at the Central Library, 4100 
Virginia Beach Boulevard, on 
Thursday. June 22 at 7 p.m. The 
theme of the storytime program 



will be Australia. 

Hear stories of the people, ani- 
mals and life in The Land Down- 
Under." Register for the program by 
June 22. Call 431-3070 for more 
information. 



P&R Schedules Family Entertainment Adult Reading Club At Central 



The Department of Parks and 
Recreation has scheduled a variety 
of family-oriented entertainment in 
city parks this summer. All 



performances are free and open to 
the public. For additional 
information, call 495-1892. 



The monthly meeting of the 
Adult Reading Club will be held on 
Thursday, June 15 at 7 pun. at the 
Central Library, 4100 Virginia 



Beach Boulevard. 

Registration retjuired. Call 431- 
3070 for more information. 



¥■ 




SchoolNews 



deGruy Finalist For RespecTeen 
National Youth Forum 



12-year-old Ann deGruy is one 
of the more than 200 finalises for 
the RespecTeen National Youth 
Forum. deGruy, a seventh grader at 
Our Lady, Star of the Sea, is the 
daughter of Charles and Judy de- 
Gruy, 1576 Bay Point Drive. 
^ The RespecTeen National Youth 
Forum finalist were selected from 
more than 5,300 seventh- and 
eighth-grade students across the 
country who entered letters they 
wrote to their U.S. Representatives 
in the RespecTeen Speak for Your- 
self contest. deGruy's letter to Rep. 
Owen Pickett referred to the prob- 
lem of teens using and being vic- 
tims of firearms. 

From among the finalists, a stu- 
dent from each of the 50 states has 
been chosen to speak to Congress 
on behalf of our nation's youth at 
the RespecTeen National Youth 
Forum in Washington, D.C. 

In Washington, the Youth Fo- 
rum representatives will discuss 
public policy issues with ramifica- 
tions for their generation now and 
in the future. The Forum will cul- 
minate with the students presenting 
their concerns and ideas to 
Congress. 



The National Youth Forum and 
letter writing contest are part of the 
RespecTeen Speak for Yourself ed- 
ucation program offered to social 
studies classes nationwide in April 
and May. The program encourages 
students to examine issues that af- 
fect their lives and teaches how they 
can play a role in government deci- 
sion-making. The letters were 
judged on quality and clarity of 
thought, argument, supporting data, 
expression, sincerity and original- 
ity. 

The RespecTeen National Youth 
Forum is part of a nationwide pro- 
gram sponsored by Lutheran Broth- 
erhood called "RespecTeen: Helping 
Parents and Teens Respect Each 
Other and Themselves." The Re- 
specTeen program includes three 
primary components: 1) public ser- 
vice announcements addressing 
youth issues at the family level; 2) 
needs assessment research and edu- 
cational materials addressing youth 
issues at the community level; and 
3) the National Youth Forum, ad- 
dressing youth issues at the na- 
tional level. 

Lutheran Brotherhood is a frater- 
nal benefit society with nearly one 
million members nationwide. 

^M ... 



William And Mary Announce Graduates 



The following' students recently 
graduated from the College of 
William and Mary: 

Bachelor of Arts - Maribel 
Keh Abenir, Margaret Ida Arrigoni, 
Cynthia M. Bray, Karla Jane 
Campbell, Melba Dean, Larissa 
Dawn Galjan, Anthony Scott 
Grasso, Sallic Jo Hanbury, Jon 
David Harden, Jr., Melissa Chris- 
tine Houser, Lara Idsinga, Kara 
Elizabeth Knickerbocker, Ellen 
Marguerite Kraft, Mark Joseph 
Leech, Daniel George Maiello II, 
Marianne Teresa Mannschreck, 
Kristen Elizabeth Master, Scott 
David McElvin, Patrick Robert 
Edward Parodi, Antigone Potami- 
anos, Michael Charles Schroeder, 
Lisa Kay Thomas, Kimberly Anne 

Vaughan and Richard Thomas 

WbtidS. r, ' ; oi n*oi i . . , 

Bachelor of ** Business 
Administration - Robert Lee 
Clark, Kevin Andrew Dibona, Terri 
Lynne Drake, Elizabeth Louise 
Gagliano, David Scott Lutz, Kristin 
Lynne May, Caryn Joyce McBride, 
Lisa Courtenay Khine and Susan 
Victoria Strobach. 

Bachelor of Science - Ashley 



Noel Anders, Jon Peter Davison, 
Alan Paul Fontanares, Bernard 
Frederick Koelsch, Robert Edward 
Kuhn, Mary Elizabeth Martin, 
Dana Lynne McBride, Margaret 
Jean Mitchell and Shelley Hun- 
nings Smith. 

Doctor of Education - Bill 
CarlDeweese. 

Education Specialist - Ry- 
land Cornelius Amnions and Betsy 
O. Barefoot. 

Doctor of Jurisprudence - 

Donald Wayne Redmond, and 
Brenda Cheryl Spry. 

Master of Laws - Valerie 
Lynn Howell, Rodney Craig 
Lundy, Mark Edward Slaughter, and 
Richard Norris Swanson. 

Master of Arts - Kevin James 
McCarthy. 

Master of Education - Patri- 
cia Ann Jacoby, Amy Marie 
Larsen, Theresa Lee Leftwhich, 
Kathy Ann Livesay, Gaye Gibson 
Reid, and Susan Renee Stauffer. 

Master of Arts in Educa- 
tion - Leanne Kay Self. 

Master of Business 
Administration - Peter Mark 
Reynolds. 



VWC Announces Dean's List Students 



The following students were on 
the Dean's List at Virginia Wes- 
leyan College for the spring 
semester 

Heather Leigh Baker, Barbara 
Beazle, Carolyn Ann Berry, John F. 
Biver, Julia Vaughan Brown, Diane 
M. Buckley, James Arthur Byrd, 
Jr., Dianne Chadwick Clayton, 
Sharon Kay Cole, Lori Denise 
Daughtridge, Laurie J. Davis, 
James Kelly Dyer, Catherine Ann 
Eastwood, Ann Carol Ernesti, 
Cheryl Peyton Keck Ferguson, 
Kerry Barbara Flanagan, Andrew 
Eric Frogel, Amy Frances Gallup, 
Kellee Dawn Greene, Lori Ann 
Grubbs, Marion Harrigan, Michelle 
Lee Hill, Michael Owen Hockey, 
Heidi Linda Hoppe, and Anne Marie 
Morin Howell. 

Also, Mark Christopher Hug- 
gins, Susanne Marie Jasper, Barbara 
Ann Jennings, Sarah Sherman Jett, 
Kimberlea Kelle Jordan, George 



Raymond Karabinos, Mary Frances 
Lambert, Stacy Landon, Thomas 
Max Lansford, Judith Ann Laster, 
Patricia Manuel Lehner, Susan 
Lingon, Amy Lynn Marknjan, 
Windee Mae McCullin, Pollie 
Wright Morrison, David Bryan 
Morse, Catherine Lynn Myers, 
Virginia Nehring, Kathryn Nichols, 
Kimberly Ann Noble, Susan Teresa 
Nootnagle, Leslie Lee O'Donald, 
Linda Payne and Rosemary Plum, 
Dina Paulette Porter, Donald 
Douthat Pursell, Karen Allison 
Putnam, Corie Lynn Rockett, Jill 
Spense Brumley Sarver and Adri- 
enne Selleck Schlenkermann. 

Also, Linda Smith, Cherry 
LeFever Spruill, Pamela Leigh 
Stoudt, Joyce Caroline Tait, 
William Harmon Trafton, Judith 
Lee Vinson-Klein, Sharon Beth 
Vogel, Jean Watts, Tina Michelle 
Wijlis, Erich Dierks Wolfgang and 
Cheryl Zeigrang. 



Lowe Is R.A. At Chapel Hill 



Lissa Lowe, daughter of Douglas 
and Mary Lowe, has been selected 
to serve as a resident assistant at the 
University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. 

Resident assistants work within 
the residence halls with immediate 
responsibility for approximately 50 
residents. In this role they work 
closely with students as peer coun- 



selor, administrator and resource 
person. 

One hundred thirteen resident as- 
sistants were selected from among 
261 applicants after a complex 
search process. They are chosen 
based on experience and leadership 
potential. Candidates must have a 
grade point average of 2.3 or 
higher. 




The Virginia Beach Sun, June 14, 1989 5 




hool News 



i Parker On Chowan's Honor's List 



Scott Frederick Parker, a graduate 
of First Colonial High School, is 
one of 59 students named to the 
Honor's List for academic achieve- 
ment during the spring semester at 



Chowan College. 

The students earned the honor by 
achieving a B average with no grade 
lower than a C. 



Mosley On Mississippi's Honor Roll 



Noting that a retirement ceremony is a bitter-sweet occasion, NAS Oceana 
Commanding Officer Captian Michael N. Matton, left, presents a retirement cer- 
Iflcate to Jaqueline Conrad. 

Conrad Retires From AMg Oceana 



Richard Alan Mosley has been 
named to The University of 
Mississippi Chancellor's Honor 
Roll for the 1989 spring semester. 



A grade-point average of 3.75 
through 4.0 is required of full-time 
students carrying at least 12 
semester hours for listing on the 
Chancellor's Honor Roll. 



TCC Hosts Videoconference 



Jacqueline Conrad, an accounting 
technician for the Comptroller De- 
partment at Naval Air Station 
(NAS) Oceana, recently retired from 
12 years federal service during a 
ceremony conducted by NAS 
Oceana Commanding Officer Cap- 
tain Michael N. Matton. 

He expressed his appreciation to 
Conrad for being "a part of the 
Oceana family" these past four 
years. 

Dozens of friends and well-wish- 
ers attended a luncheon in her honor 
at Tandom's the day before. Co- 
workers in the accounting division 
each gave Conrad beautifully 
crafted, handmade momentos of 
their affection. 

Conrad began working at the age 
of five as a circus performer. She 
traveled with her mother and be- 



came part of the water show until 
she became school age. Conrad's 
career includes employment with 
the Mutual Broadcasting System, 
Rockefeller Center, Inc., the Corps 
of Engineers, Visiting Nurse Ser- 
vice of N.Y. and the City Univer- 
sity of N.Y. 

A New Yorker for 45 years, 
Conrad moved to Virginia Beach in 

1979. She re-entered federal service 
in January 1980 at the Norfolk 
Naval Shipyard in Portsmouth. She 
transferred to NAS Oceana in 
March, 1985. 

"The relationships that were 
formed are among the most enjoy- 
able that I have known," says Con- 
rad of her "Oceana family." Retire- 
ment plans include volunteer tutor- 
ing in reading programs. 



Tidewater Community College 
Virginia Beach Campus will host 
videoconference on "Commercial 
Joint Ventures" on Thursday, June 
15 from noon to 4 p.m. in the 
Bayside Building, room B201. 

The national seminar, sponsored 
by the American Law Institute, will 
examine the potential uses for the 
commercial joint business venture 



and the problems which must be 
addressed in connection with such 
an arrangement. 

Program materials will be dis- 
tributed to registrants on the day of 
the program. Time will be reserved 
to address questions to the faculty. 
For registration information, call 
toll free 10800-CLE-NEWS. 




Saunders Holds Free Skin Screenings 



Greenberg To Do Washington Internship 



University of Tennessee senior 
Andrew Greenberg, son of Anne 
Greenberg, 4124 Ewell Rd., was 
recently selected as one of 12 jour- 
nalism students nationwide to par- 
ticipate in the Washington Center 
for Politics and Journalism intern- 
ship. 

The new internship, designed to 
give experience to future political 
journalists, provides students with a 
job at a major news bureau in 
Washington, D.C. The program 
includes twice- weekly seminars pn 
national political issues, featuring 
national political reporters, elected 

Bragg Graduates 
From Samford 

Laurence Dickerson Bragg re- 
cently graduated from Samford 
University. R. Clayton McWhorter, 
chairman and chief executive officer 
of Healthtrust, Inc. delivered the 
commencement address. L. Stanley 
Chauvin, Jr. of Louisville, Ky., 
spoke at graduation for Samford's 
Cumberland School of Law. 

Alabama's only private compre- 
hensive university, Samford enrolls 
4,100 students from 43 states and 
39 nations. 



Rose On Methodist 
College Dean's List 

Sarah K. Rose has been named to 
the 1989 Spring semester Dean's 
List at Methodist College in 
Fayetteville, N.C. 

To be included on the Dean's 
List, a student must achieve a 3.2 
(B) average on a 4.0 scale while 
taking an academic load of 12 or 
more semester hours, with no grade 
of D, F, or incomplete. 



Shao On Stetson's 
Dean's List, Honors 

Patricia Sue Shao, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Shao, has 
been named to the spring semester 
Dean's List and Honor Roll at 
Stetson University. 

Academic honors are announced 
at the close of each semester. About 
550 of the 2,500 undergraduates 
earned honors for the spring 
semester. 



party officials and political consul- 
tants. 

Greenberg will spend the fall 
1989 semester in Washington. He 
is an honor student and Bickel 
Scholar at the University of Ten- 
nessee, Knoxville. He has been en- 
tertainment editor of The Daily 
Beacon and a member of the debate 
squad 

He has worked part-lime for 
United Press International in Rich- 
mond and for The Virginian-Pilot 
and The Ledger-Star, Norfolk. 



Dr. Saunders, a board certified 
dermatologist and board certified 
cosmetic surgeon will offer his ser- 
vices free and without obligation on 
selected Monday evenings each 
month at 6:30 p.m. to examine 
skin growths of concern, to the 
public. 

Saunders will provide such inter- 
ested individuals with an examina- 
tion clinical opinion on the 
diagnosis, prognosis, and recom- 
mended therapy, if any. 

A free lecture and slide show 
demonstration of "Signs to Look 
for to Nip Trouble in Time" will be 



provided as well as a list of all 
members of the Tidewater 
Dermatologic Society qualified in 
this area. 

Screenings will take place at the 
Virginia Beach Dermatology and 
Cosmetic Surgery Center, Inc. 762 
Independence Blvd. 

Dr. Saunders feels that early 
detection and treatment is one of the 
most effective and practical methods 
of reducing the threat of skin can- 
cer. (Methods of prevention of sun 
damage and sun induced skin cancer 
will also be discussed.) 



Beach General Holds BP Screenings 



Virginia Beach General Hospital 
will offer free blood pressure and 
diabetes screenings on Tuesday, 
June 20, from 1 to 8 p.m. in the 
hospital's main lobby. 

Participants will receive 
information about hypertension and 



diabetes as well as a record card of 
their blood pressure and blood sugar 
readings. 

For more information, call the 
HealthQuest Line to Better Health 
at 481-8141. 






1 




Montgomery Professional 
Underwriters, Ltd. 




Welcomes Attorneys to 

their 51st Annual Virginia 

State Bar Meeting 






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'Mantkwlla' by Rotert Llewellyn 



GUN SHOW 



JUNE 17-18, 1989 

NORFOLK SCOPE 

Saturday 9-5 Sunday 9-4 

Admission $3.00 Una tccompanied b 



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SOUND O RELIABLE 



Insurance Products for the 

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Telephone (804) 346-9500 Facsimilie (804) 346-9562 



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6 The 



Beach Sun, June 14, 1989 




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CBDA Holds Third Birthday Celebration At Omni 




Councilmen All Balko and Will Sessoms were among the guests at this table. 



The Central Business Dis- 
trict Association recently cel- 
ebrated its third birthday at 
the Omni Virginia Beach 
Hotel. Approximately 130 
people attended the luncheon, 
including council members 
and television personalities. 
The luncheon was open to the 
public, however, most of 
those in attendance were 
members of CBDA. 



Photos by Karen Dalrymple 




vanous city officials and dignitaries attended the CBDA birthday luncheon 



At the head table are left to right, Counciiwoman Barbara Henley, Channel 13 *** * m nead table wer *> lett t0 "0 W » GmU Divaris, CBDA president; 
news anchor Barbara Clara, Peart Smith of the CBDA and Jim Klncald, also of Jose P h Rala > postmaster of Virginia Beach; Neel Sutton, owner of Executive 
Channel 11 Shopping and her photographer Patricia Heike. 




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Employees at the Omni Virginia Beach Hotel prepare to serve those who at- 
tended the CBDA luncheon 




Passersby admire the merchandise from Executive Shopping of Newport News. 



—.^^m 



MH« 



^m+wmmmmmm*mmm*mm^mm~m*mmm~*~~m^^^^^^^^^mmmmmmmmmmammmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 




' The Virginia Beach Sun, June 14, 19897 



4-H Livestock Show And Sale Earns $120,000 





Professional auctioneer, Jack Peoples donated his services to the 40th annual 
4-H Livestock Show and Sale. 



Laura Cany, a 12-year-old seventh grader at Princess Anne Junior High 
School, exhibited the Grand Champion market lamb. Her lamb was purchased by 
Don Walker for Earie's Markets. Laura is the daughter of Lee and Maggie Carey of 
Blackwater. 



Kelli Kovacs, a 15-year-old tenth grader at Kellam High School, raised the Re- 
serve Champion market lamb, which was purchased by Don Walker for Earie's Mar- 
kets. Kellieis the daughter of James and Susie Kovacs of Blackwater. 



The Awards Went To... 




Roy Flanagan, a 14-year-old ninth grader at Princess Anne Junior High 
School, raised the Reserve Champion pen of three hogs They were sold to Don 
Higgerson of Higgerson - Buchanan Inc. Roy Is the son of David and Susan Flana- 
ganofPungo. 



A record setting $120,000 was 
earned by 100 Chesapeake and Vir- 
ginia Beach youths at the 40th an- 
nual 4-H Livestock Show and Sale 
held in conjunction with the 
Chesapeake Jubilee. 

The most coveted award of Grand 
Champion steer was won by Billy 
Vaughan of Virginia Beach. His 
animal was purchased by Be-Lo 
Markets. 

Chris Aumock of Chesapeake, 
earned the Reserve Champion sto H 
title and sold his animal to Earle s 
Markets. Other first place priae 
winners in the market beef division: 

were Bryan Rountree and Alle 
Johnson of Virginia Beach 
David Pilch of Chesapeake. Se 
place prize winners in the divisic 
include Rusty Lee, James Kovac 
and Anthony Austin of Virgini 
Beach and Marc McPherson of, 
Chesapeake. 

Amanda Bailey and Melanie 
Brown, both of Chesapeake, were 
honored with the Grand and Reserve 
Champion breeding ewe titles. 
Missy Marrow of Virginia Beach 
also won first prize in the breeding 
ewe division. Second place winners 
in the division include Ren Stencil, 
Stephanie Stevenson and Aimee 
Fraile of Chesapeake. 

Laura Carey and Kelli Kovacs, 
both of Virginia Beach earned the 





Billy Vaughan, a 17-year-old senior at Keflam Ugh SchooLexhiMed the Grand Chanpw 4-H stm. The animal was uur- 
'Mased by Doug Stewart tor Be-Lo Markets. Billy Is the son of Robert and Donna Vaughan of Back Bay. 



Grand and Reserve Champion mar- 
ket lamb awards. Both lambs were 
purchased by Earie's Markets. 
Justin Creamer of Virginia Beach 
also received a first place award for 
his market lamb. Second place 
winners in the division were 
Christopher Cartwright of Chesa- 
peake and Lisa Donney and Jeremey 
Bigelow of Virginia Beach. 

Shane Horsley of Virginia Beach 
won both the market hqg and pen 
of three hogs Grand Champi- 
onships. His single hog was pur- 
chased by Earie's Markets and his 
pen of three were sold to Ralph 
Frost. Matt Paxson and Roy 
Flanagan, both of the Beach, earned 
the Reserve Champion market hog 
and pen of three hogs titles. Pax- 
son's hog was purchased by Earie's 
Markets and Flanagan's were sold to 
Higgerson - Buchanan Inc. 

Crystal Atwood and Billy 
Vaughan of Virginia Beach and Ge- 
offrey Farley of Chesapeake also 
won first place awards in the market 
hog division. Second place division 
winners include Cathy Talley and 
Brian Carlson of Chesapeake and 
Robert Kovacs, Floyd Waterfield 
and Jeremey Bright of Virginia 
Beach. 

First place winners in the beef 
fitting and showmanship division 
were Hollie Kovacs, Missy Mar- 
row, Adam Bonifant and Chris 
McClenny of Virginia Beach and 

Mark Markham of Chesapeake. 
Second place division winners in- 
clude Allen Johnson and Billy 
Vaughan of the Beach and Kelly 
Hopkins, Anita Jarvis and Tracy 
Wealherly of Chesapeake. 

Trade Rodgers, Amanda Bailey 
and Joyce Knowles of Chesapeake 
and Missy Marrow of the Beach 
were first place winners in the 
sheep fitting and showmanship 
classes. Terra Baiss, Aimee Fraile 
and David Scott of Chesapeake and 
Amy Wilkins of Virginia Beach re- 
ceived second place division awards. 

First place swine filling and 
showmanship winners were Mike 
Boykin, Shane Horsley and Kim- 
berly Atwood of Virginia and Brian 
McPherson and Melissa Wealherly 





Shane Horsley, a 12-year-old sixth grader at North Landing Elementary 
School, received the Grand Champion market hog award His hog was purchased by 
Don Walker for the Earie's Markets. Shane Is the son of Don and Dime Horsley of 
Blackwater. 



Photos Courtesy Of Chesapeake Extension Service 



of Chesapeake. Anthony Austin,, 
Heather Austin, Amy Flanagan^ 
Pete Powers and Billy Vaughan of 
Virginia Beach won second place 
division awards. 
In celebration of the 40th an- 



niversary^©/ the 4-H Livestock 
Show and Sale, a 4-H alumni beel 
fitting and showmanship was held. 
William Sawyer, who raised the 
Grand Champion steer in 19S9, 
won first place. 




I 



Shane Horsley also raised the GrandChampton pen of thm hogs. Ralph Frost pim^ased his prize wMng stock 



The Reserve Champion market hog was exhtolied by Matt Paxson, a 17-year-oM junk* at Kelmhty School and t*r 
chased by Don Walk* for Earie's Markets. Mans parents are John and Violet Paxson of Cnmjs. ^' 



—«—■—■ 



— — — — • 



1 " ■ ■ ■ • •■— «»nwam— ■■—■»— a*agp—n— ■— 



a— a— — ■— — 



g77 » Virginia Beach Sun, June 14, 1989 



— ._.. . . _ 



Lil's Quill 



continued from page 3 



Apparently, the first suggestion of flying the flag on all public build- 
ings was made by a newspaper editor in Connecticut in 1861, But it was 
not until the centennial anniversary of the first Flag Resolution that 
Congress made this request official on June 14, 1877. 

A young school teacher earned the title, "Father of Flag Day." This is 
the way it happened. On June 14, 1885 in the Stony Hill school in 
Waubeka, Wisconsin, Bernard J. Cigrand placed a flag of 38 stars on his 
desk and asked his students to write themes and give recitations on the 
American Flag to celebrate the Flag's birthday. 

He later moved to Chicago and began giving speeches and writing arti- 
cles about honoring the Flag. On June 14, 1894, the city of Chicago held 
a Flag Day observance and this former teacher was chosen president of the 
newly formed American Flag Association. 

On June 13, 1916, President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed National Flag 
Day, stating, 'This Flag, which we honor and under which we serve is the 
emblem of our unity, our power, our thought and purpose as a nation. It 
has no other character than that which we give it fROm generation to 
generation. The choices are ours. It floats in majestic silence above the 
hosts that execute those choices, whether in peace or in war. And yet, 
though silent, it speaks to us - speaks to us of the past, of the men and 
women who went before us, and of the records they wrote upon it" 

Seven years later, on June 14, 1923, a conference of sixty-eight patriotic 
and civic organizations adopted a uniform code of flag etiquette. These 
groups began observing Flag Day annually and planned patriotic programs 
to teach the citizens hoW to show proper respect to the flag. 

Forty years ago in 1949, Congress adopted a joint resolution, perma- 
nently designating June 14th as Flag Day. By Act of Congress, rules gov- 
erning the Flag are now a part of the United States Code. AH changes and 
additions to these rules must be made by Congress. 

The complete and current Flag Code may be found in the Wahab Law 
Library, or in the book, Our Flag; Its Proud History, Its Proper Display 
and its Honorable Retirement, published last May by the Virginia Beach 
Public Schools and the Constitution's Celebration Commission, available 
in all branch libraries. 

On June 14, 1988, in an impressive ceremony, the city of Virginia 
Beach dedicated "Flag Square" between City Hall and the Operations Build- 
ing at the Municipal Center. The American, State, and City Flags now fly 

there majestically from tall flagpoles. The public is invited to join the 
Daughters of the American Revolution in a brief program at the city's Flag 
Square on Wednesday, June 14, at 9 a.m. The Honorable Meyera Obern- 
_ dorf, mayor of the city, will speak and the audience will participate by 
reciting "The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag." 

Carolyn Scullion, regent of the Lynnhaven Parish Chapter DAR, is the 
program coordinator. The planning committee consists of Louise Wicker, 
regent, Adam Thoroughgood Chapter; Bunny Walsh, regent, Princess Anne 
County Chapter and Roberta Smith, regent Francis Land Chapter. Al- 
though the public schools close the next day, it is hoped that some school 
children will be able to take part. 

The flag represents our national heritage and is a standard of honor. 
Thus, We the People should learn the customs and traditions which sur- 
round its proper display, and teach them to our youngsters. By showing 
respect for our flag, we salute our nation, our founding fathers, and our 
fellow countrymen. 



VBEA Report 



continued from page 3 



occur. When I was growing up, there was a radio station that would present 
re-broadcasts of the original radio programs of shows such as the "Green 
Hornet," "The Shadow," and so forth. I can still remember the Sunday rides 
we would take while we listened to the stories. 

Reading, without a doubt, is an activity which should be encouraged. It 
is equally as important for us, as adults, as it is children. Your child will 
gain an appreciation of the printed page by watching you read. Reading the 
newspaper or a magazine of interest will show children that reading is vital 
in obtaining information as well as entertainment. Also, take some time, 
no more than about 15 minutes for younger children, to read to your child 
at night. Better yet, take turns with your child and have the child read to 
you as well. You'll be pleasantly surprised by the results. 

I am still discovering what an interesting area this is. It would always be 
fun to take Sunday side-trips to places like the Marine Science Museum, 
the Chrysler Museum, Williamsburg, Jamestown, or Yorktown. In addi- 
tion, taking walks in areas such as Seashore State Park or Sandbridge can 
be fascinating experiences. Children can begin to collect "memorabilia" 
from each trip and then form their own personal scrap album to chronicle 
each event 

Hobbies are great to instill a sense of responsibility, teach systematic 
planning and create pride in children. I can remember learning to draw with 
my parents, playing the piano with my grandmother, and building things 
with my grandfather in his workshop. Granted, I had my mishaps, but I 
came away with a feeling of pride and confidence in knowing that I can 
handle almost any project if I plan for it. Younger children usually enjoy a 
shoe box which is filled with scissors, tape, glue, crayons, markers and so 
forth. With such a box of "treasures," almost anything could emerge. 

The summer is also a good time to think about your child's health. Vis- 
its to the doctor and dentists are musts. It is also important that your child 
obtain a comprehensive eye examination. We so often overlook such an 
examination until the school phones and expresses concern about the 
child's difficulty in seeing the board. We often find in school that what the 
child is seeing is as important as how well the child sees. 

These are just a few suggestions about what may be helpful for a suc- 
cessful summer with your child. Besides the benefits mentioned earlier, 
these suggestions could provide parents the opportunity to have strength- 
ened the greatest thing of all - the bond between parent and child. 



Mayor's Report 



continued from page 3 



Hurricanes 



continued from page 1 



just in case. Keeping extra food, 
masking or duct tape, prescription 
medicine and sterile containers on 
hand are just a few safety precau- 
tions. 

"People who are the most pre- 
pared for a hurricane are the people 
who camp. They're used to rough- 
ing it," Eskey said. 

Hurricanes today can be detected 
and tracked by radar, satellite and 
aircraft, 'Wnich can fly directly into 
a hurricane. Eskey said the aircraft 
is currently in jeopardy because of 
the cost it takes to operate them. 
Local radio and television stations 
usually provide the latest weather 
advisories. 

"There's no reason why anyone 
should be caught with their pants 



"There's no reason 
why anyone should be 
caught with their pants 
down with a hurricane 
coming " said Eskey. 



down with a hurricane coming," 
said Eskey. 

In the event of a hurricane, the 
city will provide various shelter lo- 
cations. Information on what to do 
if a hurricane strikes is available at 
Virginia Beach Public Libraries and 
through emergency services by 
calling 427-4192. 

"We have just as much to worry 
about this season as we did last 
season," Eskey said. 



Seniors 



continued Irom page 1 



"We're fortunate to have this air 
conditioned school," Willard added. 

The fair is held once a year, but 
the Woman's Club does not benefit 
from it at all. Willard said seniors 
from all over Tidewater come to 



participate as well as purchase 
items from their fellow seniors. 

"They look forward to it every 
year. It's a therapy for them. It 
gives them motivation, something 
they can look forward to," Willard 
said. 



Cahill 



continued from page 1 



not have to make any decision. He 
said that the United States govern- 
ment was not issuing visas. Watts 
said he would discuss the problem 
with the economic development di- 
rector. 

Following the Beijing demon- 
strations, Councilwoman Nancy 
Parker said that she, too, had con- 
cerns, but that she "looked at the 
thing as people to people instead of 
government to government," 

From what she read, said Henley, 
economic development is a priority 
of the Chinese government. "We 
(would be) inadvertently supporting 
that government. I don't think Vir- 
ginia Beach needs to get involved. I 
wouldn't want to be supporting that 
government. I have no problem 
hosting these folks but to giving 



tacit support to that government." 

Councilman John A. Baum said 
that he remembered the grain em- 
bargo (against Russia). "The only 
people hurt were the farmers and the 
athletes (who were not permitted to 
participate in the Olympics)." 

Henley suggested the visit be 
placed on hold for the time being, 
until more is learned about what is 
going on. 

Councilman Harold Heischober 
said that "they probably don't know 
themselves. He referred to a "60 
Minutes" program when references 
were made to "Communist capital- 
ism," "socialist capitalism," and 
"democratic capitalism." 

Henley said that she felt the city 
was being used. 



Beach 



. . . continued horn page 1 



this summer during Operation 
Big Beach. Only a small portion 
of the resort area beach between 
10th and 48th Streets will be 
cordoned off at any given time. 
All sections of the beach outside 
the yellow caution tapes are open 
to the public. 

The immediate work area will 
occupy less than two percent of 
the nearly thirteen miles of pub- 
lic beach available to visitors, 
leaving more than 98 percent of 
the beach wide open for fun in 
the sun. Any inconvenience will 
be limited to the immediate work 
area and will last only a day or 
two. 

When Operation Big Beach is 
completed, the size of the beach 
will be doubled in some places.^* 
The beach will be about 2 1/2 
times larger immediately after the 
sand is added 

When it reaches its designed 
size, the beach will be one to 1 
1/2 times larger in some places. 
Roughly a three to one overfill 
ratio of sand will be placed on the 
beach. This will erode to the des- 
ignated size in a year to a year 
and a half under ideal conditions. 

The flat part of the beach is 
now 60 feet wide. It will be 80 
feet. The portion of the beach 
that inclines to mean tide is now 
55 feet wide. It will be 120 feet. 
The boardwalk drop-off of 5 to 6 
feet will remain to do drainage 
requirements. 

Work would progress 100 to 



300 feet per day, barring equip- 
ment malfunctions or inclement 
weather, and move north to 48th 
Street until all 964,000 cubic 
yards of sand have been deposited 
on the beach. The project is ex- 
pected to last from three to five 
months. 

Visitors to Virginia Beach 
have found Operation Big Beach 
an interesting attraction. They 
line up along the boardwalk to 
watch the sand being pumped 
onto the beach. 

Lifeguards and other resort area 
employees answer many ques- 
tions from curious visitors. 

"I hope many people will take 
the time te walk down to the 
beach between 10th and 15th 
Streets to see how really beauti- 
ful the beach looks," said Flo 
McDaniel, executive director of 
the Virginia Beach Hotel/Motel 
Association and coordinator of 
Operation Big Beach. 

"In spite of the minor disrup- 
tions we are experiencing now, 
everyone should keep in mind 
how wonderful our beach will be 
when the project is completed," 
she added. 

A model of the project will be 
on display in the Virginia Beach 
Visitor Information Center lo- 
cated at 19th Street and Pacific 
Avenue. 

For further information, con- 
tact Flo McDaniel, project coor- 
dinator, at 425-3760. 



continued from page 3 



determination, and a truly measurable gift, the treasure of their ancient 
heritages; 

WHEREAS: The contributions of Asian and Pacific have won distinc- 
tion in every field and continue to strengthen our community with industry 
and initiative; that is cause for rejoicing among all citizens of the city of 
Virginia Beach during Asian/Pacific American Week and the entire year. 

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Meyera E. Oberndorf, mayor of the city of SChOOIS 
Virginia Beach, in honor of our local Asian/Pacific Americans, proclaim vwllWW 
the week of May 7 through 13 as Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week 
and May 10 as Asian/Pacific American Employee Day in Virginia Beach 
and welcome the opportunity to share in this cultural experience with our 
Asian/Pacific Americans, friends, and employees of the city of Virginia 
Beach. 

Refreshments were provided by Bessie B. Bell, director of Community 

Corrections and a member of the EEO Advisory Committee. As guests 
mingled, new acquaintances were made and pictures taken. 

The proclamation and pictures can be viewed in the lobby of the City 
Hall Building for the next week. 

This article was compiled through the courtesy and assistance of Cathy 
B. Foussekis, EEO AC coordinator, Personnel Department, city of Vir- p/gm/7?0 S6leCt6Cl FOt" GtBBt R3CB 
ginia Beach. 



to offer an acceptable menu. 
The School Board has proposed 



eliminating permanent additions 
representing a total savings of 
$14,066,000. 



Agency 



continued worn ptQe 1 



1950s party. His agency provides 
the decor, carsor jukeboxes, as well 
as the entertainment. 

"I've always been somewhat di- 
versified compared to other agencies 
in the area," Morris said. 



Morris, who also has an office in 
the Washington, D.C/Baltimore, 
Md„ area, does not limit himself to 
local bookings. He is currently 
booking acts in Japan and Europe. 



Bill Fleming, 1061 Bobolink 
Drive, has been selected for a key 
post in this year's Interstate Batter- 
ies Great American Race, the 
world's greatest old car race, i 
International Motor Sports 
Association (IMSA) in Bristol, CT, 
which sanctions the Great Race, has 
named Fleming IMSA Observer. 

In this rote, he will accompany 



the race across the USA certifying 
that it is conducted in accordance 
with IMSA standards and guide- 
lines. 

People from all across the coun- 
try seek to serve as Great Race 
staffers. Only about 50 are selected 
to go with the race. They are cho- 
sen on the basts of character, com- 
munity standing and temperament 



Arts And Culture 



iii i ,:: " "' •' ' ""•■ 



Boardwalk Show Gets New Look 



There's a new look at the Vir- 
ginia Beach Boardwalk Art Show 
- this year: for its 34th season, Vir- 
ginia Beach's longest-running festi- 
val will change its location to 18th 
through 30th Streets and will ex- 
hibit art only on the rail side of the 
boardwalk. 

"Moving from the llth-20th 
Streets location will make the show 
more accessible to local residents as 
there are several municipal parking 
lots nearby at 19th and 30th streets, 
and trolley cars run along this route 
ever ten minutes," said Art Show 
Chairman Ann Davis in a press re- 
lease. "We want to dp everything 
we can to encourage Hampton 
Roads residents to come out and 
enjoy this popular event." 

Davis notes that exhibiting on 
the rail side of the boardwalk was 
made necessary by the city's re land- 
scaping the area and elevating the 
bicycle path. 

Sponsored by the Virginia Beach 
Center for the Arts, the 34th An- 
nual Boardwalk Art Show will take 
place Thursday, June 15 through 
Sunday, June 18, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
Attendance is expected to exceed 
300,000 with sales estimated at just 
under $1 million. 

Adding to the new look of the 
show will be new faces: of the 
artists participating, 123 are doing 
so for the first time, and 340 were 
selected from one pf the largest 
groups of applicants in the show's 
history. 

Each year the show's popularity 
and competitiveness increase. Ac- 



cording to Center for the Arts Di- 
rector Michael Marks in a press re- 
lease, "This has resulted in a high- 
quality show, one in which artists 
are very pleased to be included and 
where visitors to the show can find 
the kind of art they have come to 
expect over the years." 

Artists come from 34 states, 
Canada, Great Britain, and Australia 
and will be exhibiting in 10 differ- 
ent categories of art. 42 of the 
artists are Hampton Roads residents 
and six are returning Best-In-Show 
winners. 

A juried exhibition, the Board- 
walk Art Show will award $15,000 
in cash prizes including a top prize 
of $2500 for Best-In-Show. 

Judges for 1989 are Margo 
Machida, an artist and critic who 
serves as grant coordinator for the 
New Museum of Contemporary 
Arts in New York; James Meyer, 
an associate professor of crafts at 
Virginia Commonwealth Univer- 
sity; and Komei Wachi, director of 
Gallery K in Washington, D.C., 
one of the leading galleries in the 
nation. 

The Virginia Beach Boardwalk 
Art Show is one of the top selling 
shows in the Mid-Atlantic. It was 
recently nominated to be included in 
Piedmont Airline's "Southeast's 
Top Ten Events." 

Supported by the efforts of 400 
volunteers, the Boardwalk show is 
sponsored by the Virginia Beach 
Center for the Arts, with all pro- 
ceeds form the show going to the 
Center's general operating budget 



Henry Wins Art Show Poster Contest 



The winner in the 1989 Virginia 
Beach Boardwalk Art Show poster 
contest is Tom Henry, a junior at 
Norfolk Academy. Coincidentally, 
Henry's art teacher, Leonette Adler, 
won Best-In-Show in 1956, the 
first year of the oceanfront 
competition. 

Henry's winning entry was an 
acrylic painting featuring a stylized 
design of a half-dozen brightly col- 
ored boats with overlapping sails. 
His artwork will be featured on the 
cover of the art show's program and 
poster. This is the fifth year of the 
poster competition; Henry's design 
as well as the four previous posters 



in the series will be available tor 
purchase at the Boardwalk Art 
Show, June 15 through 18. 

This year, students at area private 
schools as well as Virginia Beach 
public schools were invited to take 
part in the poster competition. In 
addition to Henry, another Norfolk 
Academy student, Jennifer Mos- 
quera, won recognition, taking third 
place. Second place winner was 
William Bryant, a student at First 
Colonial High School, whose art 
teacher is Claudia Spencer. 

The poster contest as well as the 
Boardwalk Art Show is sponsored 
by the Virginia Beach Center for 
the Arts. 



Neptune Fest Art Applications Accepted 



Applicants are now being ac- 
cepted for the 1989 Neptune Festi- 
val Art and Craft Show. Every 
September over 300,000 people 
join in 10 days of festivities on the 
oceanfront and throughout the city 
of Virginia Beach. 

During the final weekend, King 
Neptune leads the grand parade and 
crowds flock to the boardwalk to 
enjoy the art and craft show, per- 
forming arts, sandcastle-building 
contest sports, food, and fun. 

The artists and craftsmen will be 
exhibiting along the boardwalk, on 
the oceanfront, from 18th to 27th 



Streets. Show dates are scheduled 
for Friday, September 29 through 
Sunday, October 1. All applicants 
must submit $75 per space and a $5 
non-refundable entry fee along with 
slides or photographs of their work. 
Acceptance will be on a first-come, 
first-served basis. All artists and 
craftsmen are encouraged to apply. 
Accepted applicants will be eligible 
for $2,000 in cash prizes. 

For further information and an 
application, contact the Virginia 
Beach Center for the Arts at 2200 
Park Avenue, Virginia Beach, Vir- 
ginia, 23451, telephone 425-0000. 



.::: .-,-.. ' 



Barker, Campbell & Farley Win Award 



"Dancer," a 30-second television 
spot produced by Barker Campbell 
& Farley Advertising and Public 
Relations, is a finalist in the 1989 
Clio Awards competition. 

The commercial, created for 
Mary view Medical Center, 
Portsmouth, combines the visual of 
a dancer's graceful, yet strenuous, 
workout with audio detailing "the 
world's most intricate creation . . . 
made up of more than 60,000 miles 
of blood vessels. Propelled by 600 
muscles. Protected by 3,500 square 
inches of waterproof covering." 

The narration, by actress Sally 
Kellerman, emphasizes that "in 
Portsmouth, there is a group of 
people whose sole job it is to keep 
this machine in top form. To fix 
when it's broken. With experts for 
every part, from the heart, to the 
eye, to the mind." 



The agency's creative team for 
the television spot, included senior 
copywriter Lynn Smith and broad- 
cast producer Leslie Green Legum. 



[ 



Public Notice 



J 



Bowman & Assoc. 
Appoints Cortani 
And Morrison 

Frank Bowman, president of 
Francis D. Bowman and Associates 
has announced the appointment of 
Cortani & Morrison Advertising as 
agency of record 

The agency will help market the 
firm's certified public accounting 
and financial planning services. 



OFFICE OF THE COMMIS- 
SIONER OF ACCOUNTS 

CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 
CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH, 
VIRGINIA 

JUNE 9, 1989 

SYLVIOZAJDAN 

NOTICE is hereby given, pur- 
suant to Section 64.1-171, as 
amended. Code of Virginia, that the 
undersigned Commissioner of Ac- 
counts, having been requested by C. 
Grice McMullan, Jr. Executor of 
the Estate of Sylvio Zaidan, de- 
ceased, has appointed the 28th day 
of June. 1989, at 3:00 P.M., at 129 
South Great Neck Road, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia 23454, as the time 
and place for receiving proof of 
debts and demands against the dece- 
dent or her estate 

Stanley A. Phillips 

Commissioner of Accounts 
24-7 
U6-14VBS 



L 



Public Notice 



NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC 

The Board of Gtme and Inland Rih- 
eriei, at a meeting held in Richmond, 
Virginia, on May S, 1919, adopted the 
following new and amended regulation! 
punuant to Seclioni 29.1-501 and 29.1 
502 of the Code of Virginia, to become 



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'. effective July 1, 1989. 

VR 325-02-* 
*, Deer 

| 8. Bag limit - One * day, two i It- 
cenie year, either sex last three days, in 
certain counties and areas. 

Amended this section by substituting 
"three a license year, one of which must 
be an antlerless deer" for "two a license 
year" in both the title and the text of the 
section; by adding the counties of Bote- 
tourt, Clarke, Craig, Frederick, Mathews, 
Middlesex and Warren; and by deleting 
the Fort Pickett and Leesville Wildlife 
Management Areas. 

BOARD OF GAMB AND INLAND 
FISHERIES 

Henry A. Thomas, Chairman 
24-2 
1I6-14VBS 

\ Public Notice | 

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC 

The Board of Game and Inland Fish- 
eries, at a meeting held in Richmond, 
Virginia, on May S, 1989, adopted the 
following new and amended regulations 
pursuant to Sections 29.1-501 and 29.1- 
502 of the Code of Virginia, to become 
effective July 1, 1989. 

VR 325-02 

GAME 

VR 325-02-01. 

In General. 

I 6. Hunting with dogi or possession 
of weapons in certain locations during 
closed season. 

Amended subsection A of this section 
to include National Forest lands east of 
the Blue Ridge Mountains. 

§ 11. Hog Island Wildlife Management 
Area - Possession of loaded gun prohib- 
ited; exception. 

Amended this section to correct the 
name of this area from that of a "refuge" 
to a "wildlife management area;" 
identifying that portion of the wildlife 
management area where possession of a 
firearm is permitted for deer and 
waterfowl hunting; and clarifying any 
confusion relating to the lawful hunting 
of game on the remaining portions of 
this wildlife management area. 

VR 325-02-6. 

Deer. 

§ 10. Bag limit - One a day, three a 
license year, either sex, one of which 
must be an antlerless deer, in certain 
counties, cities and areas. 

Amended this section by adding Cale- 
don Natural Area, Fort Lee, Fort Pickett, 
Northwest Naval Security Group, Sky 
Meadows State Park and York River State 
Park; by deleting the City of Suffolk and 
its exception west of the Dismal Swamp 
Line; and by changing the name of 
Dahlgren Surface Warfare Center. 

§ 11. Bag limit - One a day, two a 
license year, either sex last day, in 
certain counties and areas. 

Amended this section by substituting 
"three a license year, one of which must 
be an antlerless deer" for "two a license 
year" in the title and text of the section; 
by adding Chickahominy Wildlife Man- 
agement Area; and by deleting the coun- 
ties of Mathews and Middlesex and the 
i i/n 7i 7!t.->Ji/TT>t:,iV5T 

Chester F. Phelps Wildlife Management 
Area. 

§ 12. Bag limit -• One a day, two a li- 
cense year, either sex last six days, in 
certain counties, cities and areas. 

Rescinded this section in its entirety. 

S 13. Bag limit - One a day, three a 
license year, one of which must be an 
antlerless deer, either sex lut six days, 
in certain counties. 

Amended this section to read as fol- 
lows (underlining indicates added mate- 
rial, strikethrough indicates deleted mate- 
rial): 

"The bag limit for deer shall be one a 
day, three a license year, one of which 
must be an antlerless deer, either sex lut 
six days, in the counties of Accomack 
(except on Chincoteague National 



Wildlife Refuge), 

Bedford, Brunswick fcx.cgn m fen Pick 

ett) . Caroline, Charles City fexcept on 
Chidt.hnminy Wildlife Management 
A real. Charlotte. Culpeper (except on 
Chester F. P»»fr. Wildlife Mmhmm 

Anil) ftinffiddie (agent m ftm Pintail), 

Gloucester . Halifax, James City. Kyig 
William Lunenburg. Mecklenburg, New 
Kent, Northampton (except Eastern Shore 
of Virginia National Wildlife Refuge and 
Fisherman's Island National Wildlife 
Refuge), Nottawav (except on Fort Pyk- 
cttl. Orantte. Pittsylvania ( eas t a f N ns f alli 
Sauihans Railroad, except on White Oak 
Mountain Wildlife Management Area), 
Powhaten (except on Powhiten Wildlife 
Manaaement Area!. Prince Edward (except 
on Prince Edward State ForestV Prince 
George (except on Fort Leel. Prince 
William (except cm Harry Diamond l f hn- 
rainrv and Quantico Marine Reservation^. 
SH/Joid. (except gn Quamjco MtrillC 
Reservation! and York (except on Camp 
Pearv Cheatham Annex and Naval 
Weapons Station!: and in the cities of 
Chesapeake (except on Dismal Swamp 
National Wildlife Refuge and on the 
Northwest Naval Security Group). Hamp- 
ton (except on Lanalev Air Force Base!. 
Newport News (except on Fort Eustiil and 
Virginia Beach (except on Back Bay Na- 
tional Wildlife Refute. Dam Neck Am- 
phibious Trainina Base and False Cape 
SW Pa rk )." 

VR 325-02-9. 

Grouse. 

{ 3. Continuous closed season. 

Added a new section to provide for a 
continuous closed season for the hunting 
or shooting of grouse in all counties and 
portions of counties lying east of U.S. 
Route 1-95. 

VR 325-02-16. 
Pheasant. 

5 1. Open season -- Counties east of 
Blue Ridge Mountains, 

Amended this section to provide an 
open hunting season for pheasant from 
the second Monday in November through 
the second Saturday in February in all 
counties and portions of counties east of 
the Blue Ridge Mountains and east of 
U.S. Route 1-95; and from the second 
Monday in November through January 31 
in all counties and portions of counties 
east of the Blue Ridge Mountains and 
west of U.S. Route 1-95. This section 
formerly provided for an open hunting 
season from the third Monday in Novem- 
ber through January 31 in all counties 
east of the Blue Ridge Mountains. 

VR 325-02-17. 

Quail. 

( 2. Open season - Counties east of 
U.S. Route 1-95. 

Added a new section to establish an 
open season for hunting quail in all 
counties and portions of counties east of 
U.S. Route 1-95 from the second Monday 
in November through the second Saturday 
in February, both dates inclusive. 

VR 325-02-19. 

Raccoon. 

Part IL 

Hunting and Trapping. 

§ 2.1. Open season for hunting --' 
Counties east or the' Blue Ridge' Moun- 
tains. Amended this section to change 
the opening date for the raccoon hunting 
season east of the Blue Ridge Mountains 
from November 1 to October 15, 

BOARD OF GAME AND INLAND 
FISHERIES 

Henry A. Thomas, Chairman 
24-3 
1I6-I4VBS 

| Public Notice | 

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC 

The Board of Game and Inland Fish- 
eries, at a meeting held in Richmond, 
Virginia, on May 5, 1989, adopted the 
following new and amended regulations 
pursuant to Sections 29.1-501 and 29.1- 
502 of the Code of Virginia, to become 
effective July 1, 1989. 

VR 325-01. 



Definitions and Miscellaneous 
| 10. Prohibited use of vehicles on 
department-owned lands. 

Amended this section by adding the 
following thereto: "Any motor-driven 
conveyance shall conform with all state 
laws for highway travel; provided, that 
this requirement shall not apply to the 
operation of motor vehicles for adminis- 
trative purposes by department-authorized 
personnel on department-owned lands." 

f 14. Structures on department-owned 
lands. 

Added the following new section rela- 
tive to structures on department-owned 
lands: 

A. It shall be unlawful to construct, 
maintain or occupy any permanent struc- 
ture, except by permit, on department- 
owned lands. This provision shall not 
apply to structures, stands or blinds pro- 
vided by the department 

B. It shall be unlawful to maintain any 
temporary dwelling on department-owned 
lands for a period greater than 14 con- 
secutive days. Any person constructing 
or occupying any temporary structure 
shall be responsible for complete re- 
moval of such structures when vacating 
the site. 

C. It shall be unlawful to construct, 
maintain or occupy any tree stand on de- ' 
partment-owned lands; provided, that 
portable tree stands which are not perma- 
nently affixed may be used. 

VR 325-02. 

GAME 

VR 325-02-01. 

In General. 

§ 3. Recorded wild animal or wild bird 
calls or sounds prohibited in taking 
game; coyotes and crows excepted. 

Amended this section by deleting ref- 
erences to "wild" animal and "wild" bird 
calls or sounds, and changing the sunset 
provision relating to the taking of coy- 
otes by means of electronic calls from 
June 30, 1990, to June 30, 1991. 

5 21. Use of deadfalls prohibited; re- 
stricted use of snares. 

Amended this section to provide that 
all snares must be of a nonlocking type; 
increase the allowable diameter of snare 
loops from 8 inches to 12 inches and in- 
crease the maximum height of the top of 
the snare loop from 10 inches top 12 
inches; and require the written permission' 
of the landowner before snares may be 
used. 



VR 325-02-9 

Grouse. j 

t 1. Open season. 

Amended this section by changing the 
closing date of the general statewide' 
grouse hunting season from January 31 
to the second Saturday in February. 

VR 325-02-17 

Quail. 

S 1. Open season -- Generally. 

Amended this section to change the 
opening date for the general statewide 
quail hunting season from the third Mon- 
day in November to the second Monday 
in November. Closing date remains Jan- 
uary 31. 

VR 325-02-18. 
Rabbit and Hares. 

§ 6. Continuous closed season for 
Varying hare. 

Added a new section to provide for a 
continuous closed season for the hunting, 
shooting or trapping of Varying 
(snowshoe) hare (Lepus americanus). 

VR 325-02-22. 

Turkey. 

I 3. Open season - Spring season for 
bearded turkeys. 

Amended this section to change the 
spring open season from the second Sat- 
urday in April through the second Satur- 
day in May to the Saturday nearest April 
15 and for 30 consecutive hunting days 
following; and to change the closing 
hour from 11 a.m. to 12 noon. 

VR 325-02-25. 

Firearms. 

) 7. Use of shotguns with rifled bar- 
rels. 

Added a new. section to read as follows: 




NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING 

CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH, VIRGINIA 

FOR THE 1989-1990 FISCAL YEAR 



Pursuant to Chapter 2, Section 2-187.1 of the City Code.apuWic hearing will beheld by the City CouikH 
in Council Chambers in the City Hall Building on Monday, June 19, 1989 at 2:00 pm. to discuss proposed 
increases in the Operating Budget for FY 1989-90 as follows: 

1. To appropriate the FY 1989-90 budget for the School Textbook Fund in the Amount of $1,642,000. The 
appropriation will be financed from the following sources: 

BookRentals $ 

Book Purchases 

Interest on Deposit 

Transfers from Operating Budget 

State Revenue — 

TOTAL TEXTBOOK RENTAL FUND I $_ 



1,278,000 

34,000 

10.000 

130,000 

190-000 



1,642,000 

2. To appropriate the FY 1989-90 budget for the School Grants Fund in the amount of $8363.985 for 
instructional activities to supplement regular programs. Financing for the appropriations will be from the 
following source: 

Revenue from the Federal Government $ 8363.985 

TOTAL SCHOOL CATEGORICAL GRANTS FUND $ 8363,985 



3. To appropriate the FY 1989-90 budget for the School Cafeteria F%idm the amoum of $11^02^1. The 
appropriations will be financed from the following sources: 

Meal Sales $ 

State and Federal Reimbursements 

Donated U.S.D.A. Commodities 

Miscellaneous Revenues — 

TOTAL SCHOOL CAFETERIA ENTERPRISE FUND $ 



7,163,653 

3,080,613 

827.235 

431.000 

11,502,501 



4. To appropriate the FY 1989-90 budget for the School Athletic Fund in the amount of $334,450. The 
appropriations will be financed from the following sources: 

Revenue from Ticket Sales to Games $ 266,000 

Interest on Deposits ?>500 

Retained Earnings 59,450 

Other L50Q 

TOTAL SCHOOL ATHLETIC FUND < 334,450 

Individuals desiring to provide oral or written comments may do so by contacting the City Clerk's office 

at427-43()3«by registering in tJieCleik'softiw^ 

begins. 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC 

24-1 
U6-14VBS 



"Where the use of shotguns with slugs 
is permitted, shotguns with barrels that 
are partially or entirely rifled may be 
used unless otherwise prohibited by local 
ordinance." 

BOARD OF GAME AND INLAND 
FISHERIES 

Henry A. Thomas, Chairman 
24-4 
H614VBS 

| Public Notice | 

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC 

The Board of Game and Inland Fish- 
eries, at a meeting held in Richmond, 
Virginia, on May 5, 1989, adopted the 
following amended regulation pursuant to 
Section 29.1-701 of the Code of Vir- 
ginia, to become effective July 1, 1989. 

VR 325-04. 

WATERCRAFT 

VR 325-04-4, Sec. 3. Written casualty 
or accident reports required; time for 
making. 

Amended subdivision 3 following the 
first paragraph of this section by substi- 
tuting "$500 or complete loss of the 
vessel" for "$200" as the amount for 
which a written report is required. 

BOARD OF GAME AND INLAND 
FISHERIES 

Henry A. Thomas, Chairman 
24-5 
H6-14VBS 

I Public Notice 

NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC 

The Board of Game and Inland Fish- 
eries, at a meeting held in Richmond, 
Virginia, on May 5, 1989, adopted the 
following new and amended regulations 
pursuant to Sections 29.1-501 and 29.1- 
502 of the Code of Virginia, to become 
effective July 1, 1989. 

VR 325-02-6 

Deer. 

§ 2-3. Open season - Back Bay Na- 
tional Wildlife Refuge and False Cape 
State Park. 

Added a new section to read as 

"It shall be lawful to hunt deer on the 
Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge and 
on False Cape Sute Park from October 1 
through October 31." 

BOARD OF GAME AND INLAND 
FISHERIES 

Henry A. Thomas, Chairman 
24-6 
116-14VB S 

Public Notice 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC 
HEARING 

The Board of Zoning Appeals 
will conduct a Public Hearing on 
Wednesday, June 21, 1989 at 2:00 
p.m., in the City Council Cham- 
bers of the City Hall Building, 
Municipal Center, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia. The staff briefing will be 
held at 1:30 p.m. in the City Man- 
ager's Conference Room. The fol- 
lowing applications will appear on 
the agenda. 

PLEASE NOTE: IF NO ONE 
APPEARS BEFORE THE 
BOARD TO REPRESENT THE 
APPLICATION, THE VARIANCE 
COULD BE DENIED!! 

REGULAR AGENDA: 

Case 1: William C. Everett by 
Grover C. Wright, Jr., Attorney re- 
quests a variance of 20 feet to a 10 
foot setback from Myrtle Avenue 
instead of 30 feet as required for side 
yard adjacent to a street (proposed 
residential addition) on Lot 163, 
The Hollies, 301 48lh Street. Vir- 
ginia Beach Borough. ZONING: R- 
7.5 

Case 2: George and (Catherine 
Delioakis requests a variance of 6 
feet to a 14 foot setback from Old 
Virginia Beach Boulevard instead of 
20 feet as required for side yards ad- 
jacent to a public street (proposed 
duplex) on Lot I, Oceana Gardens, 
467 North Oceana Boulevard. 
Lynnhaven Borough. ZONING: R- 
5D 

Case 3: Jesse C. Swoope re- 
quests a variance to allow 50 per- 
cent maximum lot coverage instead 
of 40 percent maximum lot cover- 
age as allowed (proposed multiple 
family dwellings) on Parcel C, 
Section 4, Lake Edward West, 
Pickering Street. Bayside Borough. 
ZONING: A-12 

Case 4: Marsha Lynn Building 
Corporation requests a variance of 3 
feet to a 27 foot setback from 
Lynnhaven Parkway instead of 30 
feet as required for side yards adja- 
cent to a street (proposed single 
family dwelling) on Lot 1, Block 
F, Section 21, Salem Woods, 
Round Hill Drive. Kempsville 
Borough. ZONING: R-10 

Case 5: Charles C. Williams re- 
quests a variance of 13 feet to a 2 
foot setback from the south and east 
property lines instead of 15 feet 
each as required (proposed accessory 
building - 10 foot by 12 foot stor- 
age shed) on Lot 34, Thalia Gar- 
dens, 640 Grecntree Drive. 
Kempsville Borough. ZONING: R- 
20 

Case 6: Mr. and Mrs. John W. 
Mapes requests a variance of 2 feet 
to a 6 foot fence in height instead 
of a 4 foot fence in height as al- 
lowed in a side yard adjacent to a 
street (Counselor Lane) on Lot 1, 
Block 36, Section 4, Windsor Oaks 
West, 645 Hastings Court. 
Kempsville Borough. ZONING: A- 
12 

Case 7: Mr. Jose P. Carvalho 
requests a variance to allow a fence 
to be erected on a property which 
adjoins a public street (Marlwooa 
Way) where prohibited and to waive 
the Category I landscaping between 
a fence and the right of way where 
required on Lot 55, Block E, Phase 
JJ, Kempsville Lake, 4701 Woods 
Edge Road. Kempsville Borough. 
ZONING: A-12 

Case 8: Dana L. and Gloria M. 



Kelley requests a variance of 3 feet 
to a 2 foot side yard setback (west 
side) instead of 5 feet as required 
(proposed addition and attached 
garage) on Lot 10, Block 42, Sec- 
lion 4, Pembroke Manor, .4421 
Paul Jones Lane. Bayside Borough. 
ZONING: R-7.5 

Case 9: George May requests a 
variance of 5 feet to a 5 foot rear 
yard setback (west side) instead of 
10 feet as required (proposed acces- 
sory building - storage shed) on Lot 
11, Block 6, Section 3, Windsor 
Woods, 3800 William Penn Boule- 
vard. Lynnhaven Borough. ZON- 
ING: R-7.5 

Case 10: Newtown Associates by 
T.W. Palatini requests a variance of 
5 feet to a 10 foot setback from the 
southwest and southeast property 
lines instead of 15 feet each as re- 
quired and to waive the Category IV 
landscape screening where required 
when a residential or apartment dis- 
trict adjoins a commercial district 



(proposed auto repair establishment) 
on Parcel 045, Newsome Farms, 
Southeast Corner of Newtown Road 
and Connie Lane. Bayside Borough. 
ZONING: B-2 

Case 11: Hallah J. and Gail B. 
Hupman requests a variance 5.1 feet 
to a 24.9 foot setback from Salk 
Street instead of 30 feet as required 
for side yards adjacent to a street 
(covered porch) on Lot 14, Block 5, 
Section 2, Lake Shores, 5140 Lake 
Shore Road. Bayside Borough. 
ZONING; R-20 

Case 12: Kelley Law by Polyne- 
sian Pools requests a variance of 5 
feet to a 5 foot rear yard setback 
(north side) instead of 10 feet as re- 
quired and of 5 feet to a 3 foot side 
yard setback (east side) instead of 8 
feet as required (proposed pool 
equipment) on Lot B-l, Block 14, 
Section D, Cape Henry, 211 81st 
Street. Lynnhaven Borough. ZON- 
ING: R-5R 

Case 13: Ronald W. and Mary S. 
Tilley requests a variance of 4 feet 6 
inches to a 5 foot 6 inch rear yard 
setback instead of 10 feet as required 
and of 4 feet 4 inches to an 8 inch 
side yard setback (north side) instead 
of 5 feet as required (proposed ac- 
cessory building - storage shed) on 
Lot 367, Cape Story, 2237 Maple 
Street. Lynnhaven Borough. ZON- 
ING:R-7.5 

Case 14: Robert D. and Dorothy 
A. Hilliard by Richard Power re- 
quests a variance of 1 foot 5 inches 
to a 3 foot 7 inch side yard setback 
(south side) instead of 5 feet as re- 
quired (Heating and Air Condition- 
ing Unit) on Lot 87, Section 1, 
Cape Story by the Sea. 2121 Wake 
Forest Street. Lynnhaven Borough. 
ZONING: R-7.5 

Case 15: James Lurbis Vest and 
Theresa M. Colangelo requests a 
variance of 3 feet to a 7 foot side 
yard setback (west side) instead of 
10 feet as required (proposed resi- 
dential addition) on Lots 10 and 12, 
Block 51, Shadowlawn, 710 10th 
Street. Virginia Beach Borough. 
ZONING: R-5S 

Case 16: Dailin Outlaw requests 
a variance of 20 feet to a 10 foot 
setback from Old Donation Park- 
way instead of 30 feet as required 
(through lot - inground swimming 
pool) on Lot 30, Block 0, Section 
Three, Great Neck Meadows, 2006 
Regatta Circle. Lynnhaven Bor- 
ough. ZONING: R-10 

Case 17: New Light Baptist 
Church by Rudolph B. Lewis re- 
quests a variance of 1 1 feet to a 19 
foot setback from Indian River 
Road instead of 30 feet as required 
(proposed additions - towers) on Lot 
23, Newlight, 5549 Indian River. 
Kempsville Borough. ZONING: R- 
5D 

Case 18: Maynard D. West re- 
quests a variance of 6 feet in build- 
ing height to 46 feet in height in- 
stead of 40 feet in height as previ- 
ously approved by the Board of 
Zoning Appeals on May 17, 1989 
(proposed single family dwelling) 
on Lot 59, Section I, Broad Bay 
Point Greens, 2385 Haversham 
Close. Lynnhaven Borough. ZON- 
ING: R-30 (OP) 

Case 19: Contel of Virginia, Inc. 
requests a variance of 400 square 
feet in building area to 800 square 
feet in area instead of 400 square 
feet in building area as allowed 
(proposed unmanned utility facility) 
on Parcel A, Back Bay Area, Mill 
Landing Road. Pungo Borough. 
ZONING: AG-2 

Case 20: Richard P. and Kather- 
ine K. Williams by Polynesian 
Pools requests a variance of 20 feet 
to a 10 foot setback from Silverleaf 
Drive instead of 30 feet as required 
(through lot - proposed inground 
swimming pool) on Lot 16, Sec- 
tion 2, Larkspur, 504 Mossycup 
Drive. Kempsville Borough. ZON- 
ING: PDH-1 

Case 21: W.R.Walker and Cam 
of Virginia by Alaric Corcoran re- 
quests a variance to waive the 
Category VI landscaping where re- 
quired for an automobile repair es- 
tablishment on Lot 1, London 
Bridge Gardens. 521 London Bridge 
Road #101 and #102. Lynnhaven 
Borough. ZONING: B-2 

Case 22: Judith C. and James R. 
Land, Jr. requests a variance of 18 



The Virginia Beach Sun, June 14, 1989 9 
feet to a 32 foot setback from Mill 
Dam Road instead of 50 feet as re- 
quired (through lot proposed deck- 
ing) on Lot 93, Section 2, Part 1, 
Baycliff, 1905 Crestview Landing. 
Lynnhaven Borough. ZONING: R- 
20 

Case 23: Robert W. Zabot re- 
quests a variance of 560 square feet 
of building floor area to 1440 
square feet of building floor area 
instead of 880 square feet of build- 
ing floor area as allowed for a de- 
tached accessory building (proposed 
2 story detached accessory building 
30 foot by 24 foot) on Lot 12. 
Block 3, Section C, Thoroughgood 
Estates, 1313 Dunstan Lane. Bay- 
side Borough. ZONING: R-30 

Case 24 Coventry Associates by 
S.J. Magula, Jr. (President) requests 
a variance of 1 foot to a 9 foot side 
yard setback (south side) instead of 
10 feet as required (proposed porch) 
on Lot 138. Section 4, Coventry, 
1612 Brampton Court. Kempsville 
Borough. ZONING: R-7.5 

Case 25: Preston Greene by 
Wayne Beagle requests a variance of 
10 feet to a "0" side yard setback 
(west side) and of 5 feet to a 5 foot 
side yard setback (east side) instead 
of 10 feet each as required and to 
allow a 48 percent maximum lot 
coverage instead of 35 percent 
maximum lot coverage and to allow 
a maximum building floor area to 
be 237.5 percent of the 35 percent 
lot coverage instead of 200 percent 
of the lot coverage as allowed 
(proposed duplex) on Lot 36, Block 
8, Chesapeake Park, 4400 Block of 
Occanvicw Avenue. Bayside Bor- 
ough. ZONING: R-5R 

Case 26: Edwin B. Lindsley, Jr. 
by Moody E. Stallings, Jr. requests 
a variance of 630 feet to a 30 foot 
setback from Virginia Beach-Nor- 
folk Expressway instead of 660 feet 
as required and of 49 feet to a 1 foot 
setback from the north property line 
and of 44 feet to a 6 fool setback 
from the west property line instead 
of 50 feet each as required 
(reposition existing billboard) on 
Parcel B, Kempsville Area, Morris 
Avenue. Kempsville Borough. 
ZONING: 0-2 

DEFERRED AGENDA: 

Case D-l: The Southland 
Corporation by Charles M. Salle' 
requests a variance to waive the 
Category VI landscaping where re- 
quired for an automobile repair 
garage on Lot 1, Kempsville 
(Greene Property) 1342 Kempsville 
Road. Kempsville Borough. ZON- 
ING: B-2 

Case D-2: James and Cynthia 
Parker requests a variance of 5 feet 
. to a 5 foot side and rear yard set- 
backs instead of 10 feet each for an 
accessory building (garage) and of 
100 square feet of floor area in the 
accessory building to 600 square 
feet of floor area instead of 500 
square feet of floor area as allowed 
(proposed 24' x 25' garage) on Lot 
36, Macdonald Park. 3308 Pattie 
Lane. Kempsville Borough. ZON- 
ING: R-10 

•• PLEASE NOTE: IF NO ONE 
APPEARS BEFORE THE 
BOARD TO REPRESENT THE 
APPLICATION, THE VARIANCE 
COULD BE DENIED!!! 

James A. Wood 

Secretary 

23-7 
216-14VBS 



Public Notice 



H 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEAR- 
ING 

Virginia: 

The regular meeting of the City 
Council of Virginia Beach will be 
held in the Council Chambers of 
the City Hall Building, Municipal 
Center, Princess Anne Station, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia, on Mon- 
day, June 26, 1989, at 6:00 p.m. at 
which time the following applica- 
tions will be heard: 

SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

1. Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard to 
certain elements of the Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision for Frank 
A. Martin. Property is located at 
3146 Inlet Road. Plats with more 
detailed information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

KRMPSVILLF. BOROUGH: 

2. Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard to 
certain elements of the Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision for Clyde 
R. & Betty Jean Helton. Property 
is located at 4533-4537 Old 
Princess Anne Road. Plats with 
more detailed information are avail- 
able in the Department of Planning. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

CHANGE OF ZONING P1S- 

TBirr CLASSIFICATION: 
KFMPSVnXE BOROUGH- 

3. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Murray Wholesale Drug 
Corporation for a Condhinmil 7^. 
in g Classification from R-7.5 
Residential District to 0-1 Office 
District on Lot 29, Thalia Village. 
Said parcel is located at 4353 Bon- 
ney Road and contains 3.0239 
acres. More detailed information is 
available in the Department of 



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**» 



^ 



■ ' ^^^^^^^^mr^—^awawm^ama^ma^ammamammmmmmmm 



10 The Virginia Beach Sun, June 14, 

Cortinu$dtnmpage» 

Planning. KEMPSVILLE BOR- 
OUGH. 
VIRGIN^ ftF.nCH P"P"1 '^H 
4. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Hilda W. Archbell for a 

Change Of Zoning Dislrin 
Classification from R-5S Residen- 
tial Single Family District to R-T3 
Resort Tourist District on Lots 1 
and 2, Block 18, Shore Acres. Said 
parcel is located at 406 Winston 
Salem Avenue and contains 
16,988.4 square feet. VIRGINIA 
BEACH BOROUGH. 

KEMPS VII. I .K BOROUGH: 

5. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of TA Associates for a Change 
of Toning District Classification 
from R-5D Residential Duplex 
District to 0-1 Office District on 
Lot 10 and a part of Lot 9 and Lots 
23-26, Block 23, Property of G.W. 
Deal. Said parcel contains 24,393.6 
square feet. KEMPSVILLE BOR- 
OUGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of TA Associates for a Chang e 
of 7nninp District Cla ssification 
from B-2 Community Business 
District to 0-1 Office District on 
certain property located at the 
southwest comer of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard and N. Fir Avenue on 
Lots- 11, 12 and 13, Block 23, 
Property of G.W. Deal. Said parcel 
contains 12,632.4 square feet. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

rONDrnONAL USE PERMIT: 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH: 

7. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of T & J Partnership for a 
Conditional Use Permit for a nursl- 
ing home on the north side of In- 
dian River Road, 200 feet more or 
less west of Thompkins Lane. Said 
parcel is located at 2055 Indian 
River Road and contains 5.496 
acres. Plats with more detailed in- 
formation are available in the De- 
partment of Planning. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH: 

8. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Michael & Veronica Jen- 
nings for a Conditional Use Permit 
for a residential kennel on Lot 12, 
Block 5, Princess Anne Plaza* Said 
parcel is located at 3237 Lark Street 
and contains 7,500 square feet. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

All interested persons are invited 
to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC/AAE 

City Clerk 

23-1 
2t6-14VBS 



1989 . 
.Vnght. 

To: Unknown granddaughter of 
Georgeana Wright Parker, if living, 
or if she be dead, then the spouse 
and heirs, devisees, next of kin, 
legatees, and successors in title of 
the granddaughter of Georgeana 
Wright Parker. 

A petition has been filed in the 
Circuit Court of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach alleging that Wilbert 
Wright has disappeared and has been 
missing for over 50 years and re- 
questing that he be declared dead and 
that the fact of descent and the heirs 
at law of Wilbert Wright, if de- 
ceased, be established; and alleging 
that the granddaughter of Georgeana 
Wright Parker, whose name is un- 
known, has disappeared and been 
missing for over 20 years and re- 
questing that she be declared dead 
and that the fact of descent in the 
heirs at law of the granddaughter of 
Georgeana Wright Parker, deceased, 
be established. 

Notice is hereby given that a 
hearing will be held in the Circuit 
Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Municipal Center, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, on the 7th day of 
July, 1989 at 10:00 a.m. for the 
purpose of hearing evidence con- 
cerning the alleged absence of 
Wilbert Wright and the 
granddaughter of Georgeana Wright 
Parker and the circumstances and 
duration thereof; and also for the 
purpose of determining the fact of 
descent and the heirs at law of 
Wilbert Wright and the 
granddaughter of Georgeana Wright 
Parker in the event that they should 
be declared to be legally dead. 

A Copy Teste: J. Curtis 
Fruit, Clerk 

- BY RAYMOND W. BJORK- 

MAN, D.C. 
WILLIAM L. PERKINS 
PRICE, PERKINS & LARKIN 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 
LYNNWOOD PLAZA SUITE 
350 
621 LYNNHAVEN PARKWAY 
VA. BEACH. VA., 23452 
23-5 
4t6-28VBS 



c 



Public Notice 



1 



VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF VIR- 
GINIA BEACH 

This the 26th DAY OF MAY, 
1989 

ELIZABETH WRIGHT 
STALLINGS and JOHN H. 
WRIGHT Petitioners 

v. 

WILBERT WRIGHT and UN- 
KNOWN GRANDDAUGHTER 
OF GEORGEANA WRIGHT 
PARKER Defendants 

IN CHANCERY NO. CH89-568 

ORDER 

This cause came on to be heard 
upon the petition praying that 
Wilbert Wright and the unknown 
granddaughter of Georgeana Wright 
Parker be declared legally dead and 
that the fact of descent and their 
heirs at law be determined. 

In accordance with Section 64.1- 
109 of the Code of Virginia, it is 
ORDERED that the notice which is 
attached to and made a part of this 
Order be published once a week for 
four successive weeks in The Vir- 
ginia Beach Sun, a newspaper pub- 
lished in the City of Virginia 
Beach. 

May 26, 1989 b 

H. Calvin Spain, Judge 

A Copy Teste: J. Curtis Fruit, 
Clerk 

By Raymond W. Bjorkman, 
D.C. 

I ASK FOR THIS 

WILLIAM L. PERKINS 

PRICE, PERKINS & LARKIN 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 

LYNNWOOD PLAZA SUITE 
350 

621 LYNNHAVEN PARKWAY 

VA. BEACH., VA. 23452 
23-6 
4t6-28VBS 



Public Notice 



VIRGINIA: IN THE CLERKS 
OFFICE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 
THE 26th DAY OF MAY 1989 
ELIZABETH WRIGHT 
STALLINGS and JOHN H. 
WRIGHT Petitioners 

WILBERT WRIGHT and UN- 
KNOWN GRANDDAUGHTER 

OF GEORGEANA WRIGHT 
PARKER Defendants 
IN CHANCERY NO. CH89-568 

£KBK£ 

To: Wilbert Wright, if living, or 
if he be dead, then the widow and 
heirs, devisees next of kin, legatees, 
and successors in title of Wilbert 



Public Notice 



VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 25th day of 
May, 1989. 

In re: Adoption of SIOBHAN 
BRITTANY SARGENT and 
Change of Name to SIOBHAN 
BRITTANY FOLEY. 

By: JOSEPH PATRICK FOLEY 
& MAUREEN L. FOLEY, Peti- 
tioners 
IN CHANCERY #CA89-86 
To: JEFFREY W. ALPAUGH 
P.O. Box 166 

Oldwick, New Jersey 08858 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
This day came JOSEPH 
PATRICK FOLEY and MAU- 
REEN L. FOLEY, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object of this 
proceeding is to effect the adoption 
of the above named infant, SIOB- 



HAN BRITTANY SARGENT, by 
JOSEPH PATRICK FOLEY and 
MAUREEN L. FOLEY, husband 
and wife, and affidavit having been 
made and filed that JEFFREY W. 
ALPAUGH, a natural parent of said 
child, is a non-resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: P.O. Box 166, 
Oldwick, New Jersey 08858. 

It is therefore Ordered that the 
said JEFFREY W. ALPAUGH ap- 
pear before this Court within ten 
(10) days after publication of this 
Order and indicate his attitude to- 
ward the proposed adoption, or oth- 
erwise do what is necessary to pro- 
tect his interest in this matter. 

It is further Ordered that a copy 
of this Order be published once each 
week for four successive weeks in 
THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN, a 
newspaper of general circulation in 
this city. 

A copy teste: 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 

By: Linda D. Jones D.C. 

Edward J. Sargent p.q. 

1157 S. Military Hwy., Suite 
104 

Chesapeake, VA 23320 

(804)523-9553 

22-9 
416-21VBS 

| Public Notice 

SCOTT ALAN DAILEY, Plain- 
tiff, against PATRICIA JEAN 
DAILEY, Defendant 

In the Clerk's Office of the Cir- 
cuit Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, on the 19th day of May, 
1989. 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
Docket #CH89- 1066 

The object of this suit is for the 
plaintiff to obtain a divorce from 
the bonds of matrimony from the 
said defendant, upon the grounds of 
six months separation with an 
agreement. And an affidavit having 
been made and filed that the defen- 
dant is not a resident of the state of 
Virginia, the last known post office 
address being, 507 TREETOP 
DRIVE, Apartment 202, Va. 
Beach, Virginia, and that due dili- 
gence has been used by and on be- 
half of the plaintiff to ascertain in 
what county or corporation the de- 
fendant is, without effect it is or- 
dered that Patricia Jean Dai ley do 
appear on or before the 11th of 
JULY, 1989, and do what may be 
necessary to protect her interest in 
this suit. It is further Ordered that a 
copy of this Order be published 
once each week for four successive 
weeks in the Virginia Beach Sun, a 
newspaper of general circulations in 
this city. 

FRANK E. BUTLER, IV 

BIRDNECK SQUARE SUITE 
110 1092 LASKIN ROAD 

VA. BEACH. VA., 23451 

A copy Teste: J. Curtis Fruit, 
Clerk 

By: RAYMOND W. BJORK- 
MAN, D.C. 

21-7 
4T6-14VBS 



HOW TO SUBSCRIBE TO 
THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN 



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Please mail this coupon with your check to: 

Sun, 138 Rosemont Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 

RATES: Within 40 miles of Virginia Beach: 

Done year $12.85 []Two years $22.50 

Elsewhere in Virginia and North Carolina: 

□ One year $14.85 []Two years $26.50 
All other states: 

□ One year $17.85 fj Two years $32.50 

Name 

Address 

City. 



State 



.Zip. 



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Circulation Hot Line 



Any Problems Receiving Your Newspaper 

can 627-5020 





Nancy Debbie 

We're Here To Serve You 




When you have a 

need for 

professional 

help. . . pick one 

of these 

businesses! 

AWQQP&UX 

GOSPORT AUTOMOTIVE 
CENTER 

Complete Body & Paint Shop 

Mechanical Repairs, 

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24 Hr. Wrecker 

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Call 393-4021 

- AUTO imiOLSTLW 

UPHOLSTERY 

Trucks, Cars, Boats, 

RVs, Custom Carpet 

Headllners, Inserts 

1 35-D Tilden Ave., Chesapeake 

(Behind Be-Lo) 

Call 547-0376 

CARPET REPAIR 

Install & Restretch 

18 years experience 

JACK BEASLEY 
Call 482-1564 

COWjpRFTE 

BLANTON'S CONCRETE 
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Driveways, Patios, Foundations, 

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Commercial & Residential 

Licensed & Insured. 

Free Estimates 

Call 420-4751 



G & L ENTERPRISES 

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And Complete Landscaping service 

•Tree Pruning. Surgery, and Flrewwod 

• Call For Estimates 

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or 595-0169 



TAH^TI^G- 



PAINTING SALE 

Average exterior $399 

Average interior $299 

Free Estimates 

Ref. 24 hours 



Call 428-2616 

— t&cycLixg 

CASH PAID 

For Aluminum 

and Steel Beverage Cans 

Newspapers Tool 

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To And out how to 

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V.P.S. AD NETWORK 



1000 WOLFF SUNBEDS TON- 
ING TABLES Commerical-Home 
Tanning Beds Save to 50%-Prices 
from $249 Lamps-Lotions-Acces- 
sorics Call Today FREE Color 
Catalog. 1 -800-228-6292. Van 24 

KAYAK SWIMMING POOL Get 
rid of your old car, boat, ordinary 
pool or just about anything 
valuable - trade in on a beautiful 
Kayak Award Winning Pool. Yes, 
low prices and your trade-in means 
this is your year for carefree quality 
swimming. Call now toll free at 1- 
800-843-7665. Van24 

LAKE GASTON - Over 75 Lake, 
front lots. FREE Lake Map and 
Buyer's Guide, call or write Tan- 
glewood Realty (804) 636-2204, 
P.O. Box 1 16, Bracey, VA 23919. 
Van24 

WORLDWIDE selection of vaca- 
tion properties. Receive $2 on all 
inquires. Call Resorts Resale today. 
1-800-826-7844 NATL 1-800-826- 
1847 in Fla. or 1-305-771-6296. 
Van24 

DAIRY MILKER - Fringes include 
housing, major med insurance, 
utilities - Have work for spouse so 
could use a couple - No racial or 
sex preference - Cumva Farms, Rt. 
1, Box 1340, Farmville, VA 804- 
392-4332 or 392-6447. Van24 

TEACHING & ADMINISTRA- 
TION JOBS: 1989 Openings. All 
levels available across the U.S. 
Write to: NESC, P.O. Box 1279, 
Dept. SVA, Riverton, WYO. 
82501. Phone 307-856-0170. Van24 

TRUCKING SCHOOL GRADU- 
ATES: J.B. Hunt, America's 
fastest-growing trucking company, 
needs OTR drivers for our expand- 
ing fleet If you've graduated or are 
about to graduate from an accredited 
driving school, you may qualify for 
paid co-driver training that could 
lead to high pay, excellent benefits 
and guaranteed weekly mileage. 
Must be 23 or older. Call toll-free 
to apply, 1 -800-643-333 1 . Van24 

SALES ADVERTISING - Enjoy 
traveling the East Coast staying at 
prestigious hotels/resorts earning 
$40,000 plus annually. Hart Pub- 
lishers, Inc. represents top names in 
the lodging industry with directo- 
ries, guides and maps. A career op- 
port unity for mature, independent 
people with reliable auto, free to 
travel. We offer top commis- 
sions/bonuses, professional train- 
ing, unlimited potential. Sales ex- 
perience helpful, not required. Call 
1-800-444-6505 (In Richmond 804- 
741-1776). Van24 

FOR SALE, Used, Reconditioned- 
Bulldozers - Backhoes - Loaders - 
Gradalls - Pavers - Compactors - 
Motorgraders - Beltloaders - 
Highlifts - Tree Shear and more. 
Watson Equipment Sales. 
Sutherlin, VA. 804-753-2497. 

Van24 

AIRCRAFT MECHANIC CA- 
REER TRAINING - Train for an 
exciting and secure career in avia- 
tion. Day/Night classes financial 
aid job placement available. Call 
today 1-800-359-7423. Van24 

ADVERTISING / MARKETING 
DIRECTOR - Outstanding position 
for real pro with strong background 
in ad sales management, marketing, 
recruiting, and bottom line empha- 
sis on sales production. 260,000 
circulation weekly in Washington 
metro area. Excellent salary & 
bonus plan. Write P.O. Box 1050, 
Germantown, MD 20874, Mr. 
Moore, 301-258-7434. 

Van24 



V.P.S. AD NETWORK 



STEEL BUILDINGS 40x100x12 - 
$2.70 Sq. Ft., 50x100x12 - 2.52 
Sq. Ft., 60x100x12 - 2.44 Sq. Ft., 
70x100x12 - 2.42 Sq. Ft., 
80x100x12 - 2.35 Sq. Ft., 
100x100x12 - 2.32 Sq. Ft. Allied 
Steel 1-800-635-4141. Van24 

TRUCK DRIVERS - A major 
truckload carrier needs experienced 
drivers and graduates of approved 
truck driver training schools. If you 
have no experience, we can help ar- 
range for training. Must be 21, 
with a good driving record and work 
history. Company-paid physi- 
cal/drug screen. Call 804-572-8996 
or 1-800-225-5000, Dept. D-50. 

Van24 

OWNER-OPERATOR - Join 
Schneider National Carriers. Lease- 
on your tractor, or take advantage of 
our new tractor purchase program. 
We offer excellent revenue, top 
miles, discounts on insurance, fuel, 
tires, and maintenance. 1-800-334- 
1178. Van24 

OTR DRIVERS: Hornady Truck 
Line requires 1 year experience, 23 
years of age. Start 23 cents-26 
cents/mile based on experience. 
Excellent benefits. Convention- 
als/Cabovers. 1-800-343-7989 

Van24 

WANTED: Generous loving fami- 
lies to share their home with a Eu- 
ropean or Japanese high school ex- 
hange student for 89/90 school 
year. Call Aise 1-800-SIBLING. 
Van24 

WANT TO EARN ALOT OF 
MONEY? Yes you can. It's easy. 
Millis Transfer Inc. a Wisconsin 
based carrier is now hiring 
experienced O.T.R. Truck Drivers 
from your area. Become part of the 
team that has one of the best pay 
and benefit packages in the trucking 
industry. Call Millis Transfer Inc. 
today 1-800-937-0880. Van24 

ARTS AND CRAFTS 
EXHIBITORS 4th of July 
Extravaganza Craft Booths. $35 fee. 
Inside/Outside. Applications now 
available. Ms. Marcus, Godwin 
High School, 2101 Pump Rd., 
Richmond, VA 23233. 804-741- 
3358. Van24 

BE ON T.V. many needed for 
commercials. Now hiring all ages. 
For casting info. Call 615-779- 
7111 Ext. T505. Van24 

GOOD FAMILIES NEEDED 
NOW! Share your home with an 
international high school student 
for school year. Fully insured/bring 
own spending money. For 
information call: 1-800-447-4273. 
Van24 

Eagle International Marketing Co., 
a 10 year old diversified marketing 
Co. is seeking to fill management 
positions in Virginia. If you have 
previous multi-level experience in 
perfume, automotive or nutrition, 
call Buck Campbell, 1-800-673- 
2222. (*) Star Button, ext. 4305 
(Mailbox). Van24 

ROCKINGHAM COUNTY, 
VIRGINIA - spacious 4 bedroom 
Antebellum brick home with bank 
barn, developing spring, 3000 Ft. 
frontage on 77 acres. $389,000 or 
55 acre tract with improvements, 
$349,000. 703-433-8062 evenings. 

Van24 

INSURANCE - Now hiring reps 
interested in working with 
businesses and executive level 
clientele for Disablility, Executive 
Benefit Plans, Private Pensions and 
Payroll Deduct Universal. Call 359- 
1486. Outside of Richmond: 1-800- 
476-3805. Van24 



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The Virginia Beach Sun, June 14,1989 11 



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WITH THE 
CLASStFi&S 



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547-4571 



PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 



ANTIQUES FOR SALE 



CHOWS - AKC home raised. Ex- 
cellent temperament, championship 
bloodlines. All inquiries welcome. 
See ours first! Terms available. 
421-4304 tin 

HORSE FINDERS - Looking for a 
horse? If we don't have it, we will 
find you the right one. Call 421- 
4304. tfh 



12,000 GALLON Aluminum stor- 
age tank. Upright, in excellent 
condition. Call 562-5282. tfh 

SEARS 10 sp. bicycle light grey 
stirrup pedals, pouch in back of 
seat. Has small water bottle. $100 
or best offer. 491-8959 tfn(F) 



CHESAPEAKE'S NEWEST 
JEWELRY STORE - 14 Kt. 
Jewelry, Gifts, Precious Gems. The 
easiest Layaways in town. 
Parkview Shopping Center. 420- 
8465. tfn b 










USED WORK UNIFORMS - 
State-length, waist and shirt size, 
shirt $2.75 each, pants $2.75 each. 
Shipping $3. Send money order to: 
Hilton Deloatche's Referral Service, 
Inc., 319 Newport Street, Suffolk, 
VA 23434. \ tfh 



1986 CHEVROLET IROC 305 
Tune Port 190 watt Sony stereo. 
Sheepskin covers, burglar alarm. 
Radar detector. Call 425-5446 am 
or 4284362 pm. tfh 





CLEANING 



DEPENDABLE/HONEST person 
will do housecleaning. Has 
references. Five years experience. 
Call after 5 p.m. 421-9771. 4t7-5b 



HOMES FOR 




GOVERNMENT OWNED - $500 
down. Tidewater area, 10% below 
appraised value, free listing, Va 
broker.499-2798 tfh 

GREENBRIER - Just like new - 
twnhme priced affordably for you. 
Perfect inside & out in a great 
location. Carol May 465-1248/399- 
2401. Century 21 First Colony 
Realty. lt6-14b 

SUFFOLK & CHESAPEAKE 
TOO Let me help you find the land 
you've always wanted to build on. 
Linda Evans 465-8895, 399-2401. 
Century 21 First Colony Realty. 

It6-14b 



SOUTH HAMPTON MEADOWS 
MOBILE HOME SERVICES - 
We move and set up mobile homes. 
We buy tires and axles. We do re- 
pairs and service. We build decks. 
No job too small or large. Financ- 
ing available. Lots for rent. Call 
(804) 562-2800 or (804) 562-2103. 
13l6-21b(tn) 

ROCKFORD - 1985 12x60 2 
bedrm, 2 bath with fireplace. Call 
393-3402. 4t6-28b 




ttT i W i ' i V i V i V iit ■ ' « ' **»«*«■ ■■* « * ' ■ n >.. 



RENTALS 



COLONIAL MANOR APTS. 1 
bedroom apt. available im- 
mediately. Most utilities, furnished. 
Call 393-2111. tfn 

COUNTRY LIVING!! Spacious 
mobile home lots for rent. Storage 
sheds furnished $100 per month. 
No deposits. Call (804) 562-2800 
or (804) 562-2103. 13t6-21b(tn) 

OUTER BANKS, Duck to South 
Nags Head. 1-5 bedroom. Cottage 
and condos. Weekly rentals. Free 
Brochure. Call Atlantic Realty. I- 
800-334-8401. 5t6-28b 

GREENBRIER - 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 
baths den with fireplace, garage, 
living room, dining room on cul- 
de-sac. Excellent schools $625 547- 
7497 or 488-4704. 4t6-28b 



NEED MONEY? When Banks 
Stop. . .We Start. . .No credit 
checks, collateral or co-signers. For 
application w/ite: Global, Box 112- 
Q, Verbena, Alabama 35091-01 12. 
Enclos e envelope. tfn 

BORROW $100-$100,000! Instant 
reply! Rush stamped addressed en- 
velope: Global, Box 112-Q7, Ver- 
bena, Alabama 36091-0112. tfh 

MAJOR BANK credit card in- 
formation. Send self-addressed, 
stamped envelope: National Finan- 
cial Services, 804-08 Old Thorsby 
Road, Clanton, Alabama 35045- 
2459. tfn 

VISA-MASTERCARD! 
without investigation! Immediate 
reply! Financial-Q3, 804 Old 
Thorsby Road, Clanton, Alabama 
35045-2459. Enclose envelope! tfh 



I ■■ ■■■ ■■»!■■ II 




VFHbV W^JiSm 







LOVING GRANDMOTHER would 
like to babysit in her Oceanfront 
home. Ages 2 and up. Meals and 
snacks incl. Monday-Friday, 6 
a.m.-6 p.m. Call 428-2325. 8t7-5b 

BABYSITTER NEEDED for two 
boys 9 and 11, needed approxi- 
mately four hours a day Mon-Fri- 
day. Blackwater - Fentress area. 
421-9771. 4t7-5b 




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..Hi l l. HI ' 

PERSONAL 



A BABY TO LOVE IS OUR 
DREAM. Will provide a secure 
happy home. Expenses paid. Leave 
number on machine. Confidential. 
Ask for Liz or Jay. Call collect. 
804-541-0807. Jlh 

CHILDLESS COUPLE married 8 
years can provide loving, secure 
home for your baby. Can pay 
legal/medical expenses. Please call 
Chris & Susan collect. (703) 276- 
9751. 517-12P 

PREGNANT? Let us help. We'd 
love to adopt your newborn. 
Assist/pay medical/legal. Call 497- 
1664. 4t6-14b 

ADOPTION Loving couple unable 
to have children seek to adopt We 
will pay all your medical and legal 
expenses. Please call Karen and 
John. 703-893-2428. tfn 

LOVING COUPLE reaching out 
for a white newborn to make our 
lives complete. Medical/legal paid. 
Call Chris/John 460-2935. 

, 4t7-5b(tn) 

HAPPILY MARRIED 

CHILDLESS couple seeking infant 
to adopt We can help with medical 
and legal expenses. Call Tom and 
Linda collect 703-347-7207.4t6-14b 

WOULD LIKE TO ADOPT. 
Loving couple can not have 
children of our own, has lots of 
love to give. Would like to adopt 
baby. Call collect l-(804)-541- 
0807. tfn 

FINANCIALLY SECURE 
CHILDLESS COUPLE married 12 
years would like to adopt an infant. 
Can pay for legal and medical 
expenses. Lets help each other. Call 
collect Evelyn and Dan (703) 754- 
0654. 4t6-21p 

ADOPTION: Loving childless 
couple seeks to adopt We can pay 
your legal and medical expenses. 
Please call Deborah and Ira collect 
at 1-703-532-4722. 8t7-19p 

ADOPTION - Loving, childless 
couple wishes to adopt. We will 
pay your medical and legal 
expenses. Please call Pam and Van 
collect (703) 379-7031. 4t6-28P 

PREGNANT? - Please consider 
adoption instead of abortion. Let us 
help you. We'd love to adopt your 
newborn. Secure, loving home. 
Will help with medical/legal 
expenses. Call collect (804) 481- 
2671 after 6 p.m. weekdays, 
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REPORTERS - All beats. Weekly 
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12 The Virginia Beach Sun, June 14, 1 989 




Falwell, Kolbet To Discuss Abortion 
Issue At Virginia State Bar Meeting 



Davis Speaks At Beach Briefs 



The Rev. Jerry Falwell, founder 
of the Moral Majority, and Kathryn 
Kolbet, a women's right lawyer 
who has litigated major challenges 
to restrictive abortion laws, will 
discuss both sides of the abortion 
issue at the Virginia State Bar's 
5 1st annual meeting on June 16. 

The program, entitled "Roe vs. 
Wade Revisited: The Right to 
Abortion vs. the Right to Life," 
will be held at 11 a.m. at the 
Cavalier Qceanfront Hotel. 

The discussion, sponsored by the 
Commission on Women and Mi- 
norities in the Legal System, will 
focus on the future of abortion in 
America. Falwell's and Kolbert's 
comments will take into considera- 
tion the potential effects of the 
pending United States Supreme 
Court Case, Webster vs. Reproduc- 



tive Health Services, which asks 
the Court to reverse its decision in 
Roe vs. Wade. 

Moderating the discussion be- 
uween Falwell and Kolbert will be 
Timothy J. Sullivan, dean of the 
Marshall-Wythe Law School, Col- 
lege of William and Mary. 

Roe vs. Wade is the landmark 
U.S. Supreme Court decision 
which declared in 1973 that a 
woman's constitutional right to 
privacy encompasses her decision to 
terminate her pregnancy. The Court 
said that the abortion decision must 
be made within the doctor-patient 
relationship, that abortions per- 
formed within the second trimester 
are subject to state regulations made 
out of concern for maternal health, 
and that abortions in the third 
trimester may be performed only if 



the pregnancy jeopardizes the 
woman's health. 

Since Roe vs. Wade was decided, 
the U.S. Supreme Court has reaf- 
firmed its position on the right to 
abortion in several cases, including 
the 1985 case of Thornburgh vs. 
American College of Obstetricians 
and Gynecologists, which Kolbert 
successfully argued. 

Kolbert, of Philadelphia, 
presently is a consultant for the 
American Civil Liberties Union, 
Reproductive Freedom Project, and 
Planned Parenthood Federation Of 
America, which are working to de- 
fend the Roe vs. Wade decision. 
Kolbert is coordinating the "friend 
of the Court" (amici curiae) briefs 
in Webster vs. Reproductive Health 
Services. 

Falwell addresses his concerns 
about abortion through the political 



platforms of the Liberty Federation 
and Moral Majority Inc. 

Falwell is the founder-pastor of 
the 21,000-member Thomas Road 
Baptist Church in Lynchburg and 
the founder-chancellor of Liberty 
University and its related schools 
and programs. 

All lawyers who practice in Vir- 
ginia are invited to attend the Vir- 
ginia State Bar's annual meeting. 

The Virginia State Bar is the ad- 
ministrative arm of the Virginia 
Supreme Court. The bar, to which 
all lawyers practicing in Virginia 
must belong, regulates the legal 
profession, seeks to maintain high 
standards among Virginia lawyers 
and sponsors public service events 
that improve society's access to 
justice. 



The Hampton Roads Chamber of 
Commerce- Virginia Beach will fea- 
ture Mr. S. John Davis, 
superintendent of Public Instruction 
for (he Commonwealth of Virginia, 
as the speaker for the next Beach 
Briefs breakfast forum, Monday, 
June 19, at the Radisson Hotel- 
Virginia Beach, beginning at 7:45 
a.m. 

Davis will address the relation- 
ship between economic develop- 
ment and education. 



Beach Briefs is a quarterly break- 
fast forum sponsored by the Past 
Presidents of the Hampton Roads 
Chamber of Commerce-Virginia 
Beach to inform Chamber members 
of current activities of local and re- 
gional interest. The cost for the 
Beach Briefs breakfast is $10 for 
Chamber members and $12.50 for 
non-members. For more informa- 
tion, contact Connie Long, 490- 
1221. 



Greater Creators Promotes Morris 



Greater Creators Advertising has 
announced the promotion of Mari- 
lyn Morris to director of media ser- 
vices. She will be involved in the 
planning and placement of media 
services for the agency's clients. 

Morris attended Virginia Com- 



monwealth University in Rich- 
mond, where she studied mass 
communications with a concentra- 
tion in advertising. She joined 
Greater Creators in 1988 as traffic 
coordinator. 



Beachtowne Leases Office Space 



Forty-Three Virginia Lawyers To Be 
Honored For Their 50 Years In Bar 



Beachtowne Realty Corporation 
has leased 1,000 square feet of of- 
fice space in the Witchduck Office 
Court located at 258 N. Witchduck 
Road, Suite B-102 to Eagle Sys- 
tems Incorporated, a government 



contract corporauon. 

National Security and National 
Limosine has leased 700 square feet 
of office space at Arrowhead Office 
Court, 5701 Princess Anne Road, 
Suite E. 



Forty-three lawyers will be hon- 
ored for their 50 years of member- 
ship in the Virginia State Bar at a 
special ceremony during the 50th 
Annual Meeting of the Virginia 
State Bar June 15 through 18. 

Each will be awarded a 50-year 
Certificate of Appreciation at 11:45 
a.m. June 17 in the Coral Reef 
Room of the Cavalier Oceanfront 
Hotel. 

To be eligible for the half-cen- 
tury honor, a lawyer must have 
been a member of the Virginia 
State Bar, the administrative arm of 
the Virginia Supreme Court, for 50 
consecutive years. 

The bar, to which all lawyers 
practicing in Virginia must belong, 
regulates the legal profession, seeks 
to maintain high standards among 



Virginia lawyers and sponsors pub- 
lic service events which improve 
citizens' access to justice. 

Recipients of the golden 
anniversary certificates will be: 

Hon. V. Cassel Adamson, 
Richmond, VA; Mr. H. Max Am- 
merman, Reston, VA; Hon. R. 
William Arthur, Wytheville, VA; 
Mr. W.P. Bagwell Jr., Richmond, 
VA; Mr. J. Vaughan Beale, 
Franklin, VA; Mr. Frank M. Clar, 
Orange City, FLA; Mr. Kenneth 
Gordon Cumming, Hampton, VA; 
Mr. William P. Dickson Jr., Nor- 
folk, VA; Mr. Junius Rodes Fish- 
burne, Charlottesville, VA; Hon. 
Hansel Flemina, Clintwood, VA; 
Hon. Vance M. Fry, Orange, VA; 
Mr. Philip M. Grabill, Woodstock, 
VA; Mr. S. Page Higginbotham, 



Orange, VA; and Mr. Robert F. 
Hutcheson Jr., Emporia, VA. 

Also, Mr. Edward L. Jackson, 
Broomall, PA; Mr. Adclbert R. 
Kennett, Roanoke, VA; Mr. James 
Clopton Knibb, Goochland, VA; 
Mr. Flournoy L. Largent Jr., 
Winchester, VA; Mr. George Wal- 
ter Mapp Jr., Accomac, VA; Mr. 
Beverley R. Marshall, Gloucester, 
VA; Mr. J.H. Tyler McConnell, 
Wilmington, DE; Mr. James L. 
McLemore Jr., Suffolk, VA; Mr. 
W. Brown Morton Jr., Warsaw, 
VA; Mr. Alexander W. Neal Jr., 
Richmond, VA; Mr. Geroge Hin- 

son Parker Jr., Franklin, VA; Hon. 
Harold G. Potts, Berryville, VA; 
Mr. James E. Quisenberry, 
Roanoke, VA; Mr. Ambrose 
Alexander Rucker, Bedford, VA; 



Mr. John H. Rust, Fairfax, VA; 
and Mr. Charles Hill Ryland, War- 
saw, Va. 

Also, Hon. Lester E. Schlitz, 
Portsmouth, VA; Hon. Arthur W. 
Sinclair, Haymarket, VA; Hon. 
J.C. Snidow Jr., Christiansjburg, 
VA; Mr. U. LeRoy Sweeney Jr., 
Richmond, VA; Mr. W. Carrington 
Thompson, Chatham, VA; Ms. 
Esther S. Weinberg, Richmond, 
VA; Mr. E.E. Wells, Char- 
lottesville, VA; Mr. David Meade 
White, Richmond, VA; Mr. Emest 
H. Williams Jr., Richmond, VA; 
Hon. T.A. Williams Jr., Rich- 
mond, VA; Mr. John M. Wilson 
Jr., Troutville, VA; Hon. Earl W. 
Wingo, Lynchburg, VA; and Mr. 
Mervin Allen Ziegler, Colorado 
Springs, CO. 



Teens Recognized For Community 
Service By Salesman Of Virginia 



Area teens were recently recog- 
nized for community service and 
successful salesmanship by Jr. 
Salesmen of Virginia according to 
team leader Vinny DcLongis. 

Approximately 35 teens were 
treated to an outing to Busch Gar- 
dens in Williamsburg. The group 
enjoyed an afternoon of amuse- 
ments, arcades, rides and shows. 
Those rewarded with the trip in- 
cluded Virginia Beach residents 
Keith Dessenberg and Gary Waf- 
ford. 

Teens associated with Jr. Sales- 
men of Virginia learn the true 

meaning of responsibility by 
working in a sales atmosphere. 
They report on time and display 



professionalism both in appearance 
and altitude, therefore, these young 
adults are rewarded with prizes. All 
prizes are in addition to monies 
earned by the youths. 

Jr. Salesmen of Virginia is dedi- 
cated to providing teenagers with 
job training, opportunities and 
recreation. The young adults are 
given a forum to earn money on 
their own for school, clothing and 
savings. Jr. Salesmen teaches 
salesmanship and citizenship 
through adult supervised door-to- 
door candy sales. 

Based in Virginia Beach and 
Norfolk, Jr. Salesmen of Virginia 
is a member of the Coalition for 
American Youth Opportunities 
(CAYO). 






Welcome To The Beach 

Virginia State Bar 
Members and Guests 




51st Annual Meeting 
June 15-18, 1989 



I p p» 



<•«......... p «««^^«»vp^«WP«HHp|||il91lll«|||MHIWpMi 
















flod/n Anderson 
Wants To Visit 
The Bahamas 




Photo Feature 



I*. 



F/ag Day Celebration 
Held At City Hall 




Personality 



Charley Garrison 

Tunes Pianos 

By Ear 



The Virginia Beach 




June 21, 1989 63rd Year, No. 26 



Virginia Beach's Community Newspaper 



Classroom Sex 



Virginia Beach Parents, The School Board, And Local Educators Are Still Busy 
Trying To Untangle The Controversial Web Of New Rules Concerning Exactly 
What Young Students Will Learn About Male And Female Sexuality 



By Karen Dairy mple 

Stall Wnter 



As the controversy over the 
family life education program 
continues, so does the battle be- 
tween the conservatives and the 
liberal members of the commu- 
nity. 

The Virginia Beach School 
Board has said, however, that it 
wants the most conservative ap- 
proach possible. 

Issues the center of the con- 
troversy are whether the classes 
will be co-educational and to 
what extent homosexuality and 
masierbation will be discussed. In 
addition to human sexuality, the 
program will discuss substance 
abuse, stress management and the 
development of positive self 
concepts and respect for others. 

"We should go sort of slow. 
There is a need for the family life 
education program but we could 
improve it as time goes on," said 
school board member John Fa- 
hey. 

Fahey said the proposals from 
the Community Involvement 
Team are too zealous and that the 
program should meet the man- 
dates of the General Assembly 
and not go any further. 

"We should do nothing that's 
not mandated in the program," he 
said. 

The General Assembly in 1987 
decided to implement a family 
life education program, but told 
the state board of education to 
come up with the guidelines. The 
Virginia Beach school board's 
discussions have centered around 
the CITs three recommendations. 

"The situation was that the 
CIT came up with the very best 
program. Some don't like the 
curriculum at all and they'll never 
like it," said Jamie Chapman, 
Uniserv director of the Virginia 
Beach Education Association. 

He added that the school board 
thought the program was entirely 
too liberal and was not some- 
thing with which the community 
would agree. 

One topic being considered too 
liberal is whether the family life 
education classes should be co- 
educational. The school board has 
already decided to separate the 
boys and girls, but only when 
dealing with sensitive topics. The 
definition of sensitive topics has 





John Fahey 

not clearly been defined, but will 
probably include explicit sex 
education. 

The school board voted 10-1 
on the separation of the students 
with board member Laura Tebault 
dissenting. Tebault, who is also 
on the involvement team, would 
not comment on her reasoning 
behind wanting co-educational 
classes. 

"I'd like to see our board sup- 
port the family life education. I 
feel it's a very important program* 
for our children," she said. 

Fahey, who voted against co-ed 
classes, said, "If they're not to- 
gether you can have more open- 
ness. It causes embarrassment il 
they're together." 

Chapman agreed but added that 
separating the sexes could cause 
complications such as the need 
for more teachers at the schools. 
As of right now, the school board 
is not hiring anymore teachers for 
the program. Elementary school 
teachers will conduct the program 
themselves and health and physi- 
cal education teachers will teach 
il on the secondary level. 

"Quite a few of the standards of 
learning are already in the health 
curriculum. Folks are going to 
have to go about that process of 
integrating it in," Chapman said. 

Before the family life program 
was presented, there was no sex 
education of any kind taught in 
the Virginia Beach public school 
curriculum, except for a volunteer 
program held after school. Fahey 
said the board of education be- 
came concerned with pregnancy 
and AIDS statistics and felt 
something had to be done. He 
added that there has been no evi- 



Jamie Chapman 

dence produced from other loca- 
tions which states that the family 
life education program has had 
any influence on the statistics. 

Another topic the school board 
is considering eliminating is the 

discussion of homosexuality and 
masierbation, which are not state 
mandated. Sexuality is not the 
main focus of the program. 
Positive self worth and esteem 
will be the main thrust on the 
students. 





five cents per issue 



The new basketball goal at the Beach Garden Park was erected last week. 

Beach Garden Park Gets 
New Goal; More Are Expected 



"It's been a trau- 
matic issue and tt'$ 
going to stay hot in 
some people's 
minds," Chapman 
said. 



"Our main mission is in the 
academic area in our schools," 
Fahey said. 

School Board Chairman James 
Fletcher must report to Rich- 
mond with a school system cur- 
riculum by July IS. The program 
was initially to begin at the be- 
ginning of the next school year. 

"It wouldn't be unusual if it 
went into effect the second half of 
the year. They know in Rich- 
mond it's a new issue and there's 
a lot of community involvement 
so I don't think they're going to 
press us on that," Fahey said. 

"It's been a traumatic issue and 
it's going to stay hot in some 
people's minds," Chapman said. 
"I think it's going to go forward 
and people aren't going to pay 
much attention to it. From most 
people's point of view they don't 
Please see Sex, page 10 



Less than 48 hours after the De- 
troit Pistons swept the Los Angeles 
Lakers and won the NBA crown, 
the city of Virginia Beach placed a 
new basketball goal at 30th street 
and Baltic Avenue at Beach Garden 
Park. 

Located in a cul-de-sac at the end 
of the main road leading into the 
park, the new goal post, backboard, 
rim and net were erected following 
several talks between local resident 



Jay Scott and Billy Boyce, recre- 
ation program coordinator, Virginia 
Beach Department of Parks and 
Recreation. Before the final decision 
was made to put up the hoop, de- 
partment director Harold Whitehurst 
met with Scott and Boyce at the 
site. They also looked at other po- 
tential sites for goals. 

The goal is open to the public 
seven days a week. The park closes 
Please see Goal, page 10 



Winners 

Dewan, Humphreys 
Prepare For Fall Cam- 
paigns 



By Karen Dalrymple 

Staff Writer 

Now that the Republican primary 
is over, former chief Sheriff's 
deputy Jack Dewan and former chief 
deputy commonwealth's attorney 
Robert Humphreys will prepare for 
their fall campaigns. 

Both men, who defeated incum- 
bent Sheriff Bill R. Overman and 
Virginia Beach police captain James 
W. Brazier, respectively, were 
pleased with the outcome of the 
city's first Republican primary in 
40 years. 



Both Dewan and 
Humphreys plan on run 
hfhg their fall cam 
paigns similar to the way 
tile primary was run . . 






Photo by Karen Dalrymple 

Flag Square at the Municipal Center was the setting tor the Flag Day 
Celebration held by the Daughters of the American Revolution. 

Flag Day Ceremony Held 

Approximately 40 people attended the event For more pictures see 
page six. 



"I think it's just great Especially 
the margin. That surprised even 
me," Dewan said. Overman could 
not be reached for comment. 

"I thought Jim Brazier ran a great 
campaign. He made it a very credi- 
ble campaign. I think he'll be 
around in politics for a long time," 
Please see Wlnnm, page 10 



Crime 



Crime Rate Increases 
From 1987 To 1988 

During the 1987-1988 year, the 
crime rate in Virginia Beach in- 
creased from 5,632.15 crimes re- 
ported to 5,252.94 per 100,000 
people. The city's population has 
also increased however, from 
332,490 to 342,530. 

The Uniform Crime Reporting 
Program, conducted by the Virginia 
Department of State Police, has 
broken down crime index offenses 
in order of seriousness as well as 
the rate of increase or decrease. 
Murder/non-negligent manslaugh- 
ter, the willful killing of one hu- 
man being by another, has gone up 
in Virginia Beach from 1 1 to 27. 
Rape, on the other hand, has de- 
creased from 125 to 108. 

The third most serious crime, 
robbery, has increased from 323 to 
327 reported cases. Aggravated as- 
sault, the unlawful attack by one 
person upon another for (he purpose 

of inflicting severe bodily injury, 
nease see Crime, page 10 



Personality Profile 





I 



Timberlake's Charley "The Tuner" Garrison 
is Proud Of His Piano Tuning Reputation 



By Karen Dalrymple 

Stall Wnter 



Charley "The Tuner" Garrison 
isn't the only talented one in his 
family. His mother, as well as his 
two sisters and brother were all ac- 
tive in the local theater, but Garri- 
son's skill for tuning pianos came 
directly from his musically inclined 
father. 

"I've been tuning pianos since I 
was about 15. My father taught my 
brother and I the basics," said 
Garrison. 

Garrison tuned his fust piano at a 
church "out in the country." His 
father would drop him off for the 
day, check on him occasionally, 
then critique his work. 

"I had to compete with the 
birds," he said. 

Garrison grew up in Virginia 
Beach and worked part-time at his 
father's piano shop. He graduated 



"At one point I thought I wanted to be an electron - 
ics technician. I really didn t know t was going to be 
a piano tuner, " Garrison said, 



from Princess Anne High School in 
1967 and went on to Brevard Junior 
College in Cocoa Beach, Fla. to 
pursue his interests in music and 
surfing. 

A year later, Garrison traveled 
cross country to San Diego, where 
he enrolled in college and lived with 
friends. In 1973 he made his move 
back to the Beach to once again 
work for his father. 

"At one point I thought I wanted 
to be an electronics technician. I 
really didn't know I was going to be 
a piano tuner," Garrison said. 

In his younger years, 40-year-qkl 
Garrison performed with several lo- 
cal bands. His talent of playing the 
upright bass, electric bass, 
harmonica, trumpet and even the 



piano even had him filling in for 
members of his father's band. 

Garrison's piano tuning career 
really look off in 1977 when "feilly 
Joel's people" called and asked him 
if he'd go on tour with them and 
tune. Garrison agreed and was flown 
to Salt Lake City and didn't return 
home until the tour was over. 

"He had a brand new German 
Bcckstein piano that had gotten 
bounced around in the back of the 
truck. It was in bad shape," he said. 

Garrison took another excursion 
in 1984 when he submitted a bid to 
tune pianos for the Navy Exchange 
in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Upon 
arriving in Cuba, he tuned 32 pi- 
anos in three days at churches, 
schools and homes. 



Garrison has tuned for such 
celebrities as Elton John, Ronnie 
Milsap, Frank Sinatra's orchestra, 
Neil Young and Elvis Presley. He 
also tunes for any acts that perform 
at the Scope and Hampton Coli- 
seum. 

"I meet a lot of good musicians," 
he said. 

Although he was taught to tune 
pianos with a tuning fork. Garrison 
said he also has an electric machine 
that he doesn't use very often. 

"I use a tuning fork and my ears. 
Anybody that wanted to start it 
should start as a hobby and take 
iheir time. You either have it or 
you don't. You have to have an ear 
for music," Garrison said. 

Garrison tuned pianos part-time 
until about five years ago when he 
started his own business. The Tim- 
berlake resident charges $45 per pi- 
ano, which takes approximately one 
to two hours to tune. His goal is lo 



own his own piano shop, similar to 
his father's. 

"I go on my reputation and try to 
do a good job for everybody. I try 
lo ask people to tune them twice a 
year," he said. 

In his spare time Garrison also 
enjoys silversmithing, making 
jewelry out of turquoise and silver 
ware. He has recently taken up 
photography and won an honorable 
mention in the first contest he en- 
tered. Garrison also tries to fish as 
often as he can. 

"Trying to make a living is my 
main hobby. I'm just a regular guy 
out to make a living. I try to make 
it and take life easy," he said. 

Garrison will continue trying to 
make a living although the new 
electrical pianos may stand in the 
way. Some pianos may be tuned by 
hand, many of them are already pre- 
tuned. 

Garrison even gives advice to 




Charley 
Garrison 



those shopping for a piano. Because 
there are many different kinds of 
oianos, he suggests consulting with 
a qualified technician before making 
a choice. 

Looking towards the future, Gar- 
rison said he will continue doing 
what he does best 

"I'd like to go on a world tour 
with a big Star and make a lot of 
money!" he said. 



■•••»■■"•»« 



pnppi* 



tmmmm^m 



2 The Virginia Beach Sun, June 21, 1989 




Editorials 



The Goods And Bads 
About Sex Ed 



It took them long enough but the school board has finally de- 
cided to teach family life education to our Virginia Beach stu- 
dents. 

Sex education should have been a mandatory part of the 
health curriculum a long time ago. The children of today seem 
to be growing up faster than they used to and the teenage preg- 
nancy and abortion rate is probably higher than it's ever been. 

The family life education program, which was designed by a 
group of concerned parents, was created to implement the Vir- 
ginia Board of Education regulations as well as meet the desires 
of the Virginia Beach community. 

So why all the conflict? 

The major complaints of some parents, teachers and the 
community, are whether the family life education classes 
should be co-educational; grouping sensitive topics together in 
the curriculum so parents who object can more easily exempt 
their children; and considering eliminating the discussion of 
homosexuality and masterbation from the program entirely. 

The decision to separate the boys from the girls has already 
been approved. That decision has its good and bad points. Dis- 
cussing topics such as menstruation and body parts may be 
awkward, especially for the junior high and high school level 
students. At that age, such subjects may be embarrassing to talk 
about in mixed company. On the other hand, the program's 
main purpose is to make children more aware of their sexuality. 
Maybe discussing sensitive topics in a co-educational class 
room will help students understand the opposite sex better. 

As for teaching, about homosexuality and masterbation, that 
should be left to the parents. The program should stick to the 
basics that were mandated by the General Assembly. 

The good thing about the program is that it teaches more than 
just sex education and reproduction. It also covers such areas 
as stress management and resistance to peer pressure, child 
abuse and substance abuse and the development of positive self 
concepts and respect for others. Children need to be taught all 
these aspects to make them more well-rounded people. 

Hopefully the family life education program will cause the 
number of teenage pregnancies to decline. Making sure kids are 
aware of the facts is the first step to a healthier and more re- 
sponsible child and community. - K.L.D. 




LeeCahillRep 




June Is Motorcycle 
Safety Month 



Many Virginia Beach residents may not know this, but June 
is Motorcycle Safety Month. It has officially been declared so 
by Governor Gerald Baliles. 

Many times as we're driving we fail to see motorcyclists. 
This is how so many accidents and fatalities occur; the mo- 
torists violates the cyclist's right of way. Efforts are finally be- 
ing made to reduce the number of motorcycle injuries and 
deaths on our roadways. 

The focus of Motorcycle Safety Month is to increase public 
awareness of the need to look for motorcycles and share the 
road with them. Not only do motorists have to be careful of the 
cyclists, but the cyclists also have to be aware of the cars. Be- 
cause motorcycles are small and easy to maneuver, some 
drivers tend to weave in and out of traffic. That can be very 
dangerous. 

There are several safety tips that motorists should follow to 
help prevent motorcycle crashes: 

Expect to see motorcycles on the road. Look twice before 
you pull out, change lanes, turn, proceed through an intersec- 
tion or back up. 

When trying to determine the speed of oncoming motorcy- 
cles, remember that their small silhouettes often make them 
seem further away than they actually are. 

Give motorcycles plenty of room to maneuver. A motorcycle 
needs the entire lane for visibility and safety. 

Be prepared for motorcyclists to make sudden changes in 
position and direction. Minor obstacles for automobiles, such 
as potholes, railroad tracks or roadside debris, can be major 
problems for motorcycles. 

We all need to be careful on the road whether in a car or on a 
motorcycle. Although we may think we're good drivers, 
sometimes we have to look out for the other guys. - K.L.D. 



Stop Crime In Our 
Great City 



During the course of one week, three rapes were reported to 
Virginia Beach police. All the rapes supposedly took place at 
the oceanfront. The same resort oceanfront where families are 
vacationing and children are playing on the beach. 

What is this place coming to? Virginia Beach is supposed to 
be a friendly, resort city. Who is going to want to visit the 
Beach if these unnecessary attacks keep occurring? Hopefully 
these reported rapes will be the last. But who are we kidding? 

Two of the rapes allegedly took place right out in the open on 
two of the oceanfront's busiest streets. Is it now unsafe to walk 
to your car without a body guard? Granted, women should not 
be walking alone anyway. 

We should all be proud of our city and what it has to offer. 
Tourism grows more and more each year because the city keeps 
on improving. It's a shame that a few demented people could 
give our great city a bad reputation. - K.L.D. 



R.G. Moore Requests Deferred 



Obemdorf and Lillian Vernon employee. 

Mayor Tours Lillian Vernon Qorp. 

Mayor Meyera E. Obemdorf 's tour ol the Lillian Vernon Corporation plant's 
first anniversary. Maria Heyden operates a press that monoarams Items from the 
catalog. 



Letters To The Editor 



CBDA Appreciates Luncheon Coverage 

Editor: 

Thank you for the fantastic coverage of the Central Business District 
Association's birthday luncheon! 
You were most supportive to give us a full page! 

Pearl Smith, 

executive director, 

Central Business District Association 




Ft. Story To Sponsor Concert 
By Continental Army Band 



The United States Continental 
Army Band, Fort Monroe, Va. will 
perform a "Music By the Bay" con- 
cert on Wednesday, June 21 at 7 
p.m. at Fort Story. The perfor- 
mance will be held on the Post Pa- 
rade Field located in front of Head- 
quarters Fort Story (Guadualcanal 
Road and Atlantic Avenue). 

The Continental Army Band 
consists of S3 musicians under the 
direction of Commander and Con- 
ductor Captain James W. Allison, 
of Hampton. The band can trace its 
history back to the first formation 
of America Military musical orga- 
nizations in 177S. 

Some of the nationwide events in 
which the band has participated in- 
clude die Orange Bowl Parade, die 
Cotton Bowl Festival Parade, the 
1981 Presidential Inauguration Pa- 
rade, die Yorktown Bicentennial 
Celebration, the 1982 World's Fair 
and the 1983 Pasadena Tournament 
of Roses Parade. 

Additionally, in 1987 and 1988 



the band served as the official 
representative of the Army in a 
presentation of a multimedia salute 
to the Bicentennial of the 
Constitution throughout many 
parts of the country. The band is 
best known locally for their per- 
formances of weekly concerts dur- 
ing die summer known as "Music 
Under the Stars" held at Fort Mon- 
roe. 

The Fort Story concert will fea- 
ture patriotic, popular and tradi- 
tional music and is the first such 
concert to be held at Fort Story. 
The event is free and open to the 
public. Attendees are encouraged to 
bring lawn chairs and blankets. 
Military Police will provide park- 
ing and traffic control information. 

In the case of inclement weather 
the concert will be cancelled. For 
additional information contact the 
public affairs office at 422-7755 or 
after duty hours the staff duty office 
at 422-7454. 



Navy Awarded $8.05 Million Contract 



Second District Congressman 
Owen Pickett announced that the 
U.S. Navy has awarded an $8.05 
million contract to Metro Machine, 
Inc., of Norfolk for the drydocking 
and overhaul of the USS Estocin 
(FFG-15). 

Pickett said work on the 445-foot 
long vessel would consist of struc- 
tural, mechanical, and electrical 



maintenance, as well as blasting 
and painting. He said work on the 
vessel is expected to be completed 
by June of next year. 

"I am very pleased that the Navy 
has again selected Metro Machine 
of Norfolk to perform vital mainte- 
nance work on a ship of the At- 
lantic fleet," Pickett declared in an- 
Please see Contort, page 10 



The Virginia Beach Sun Deadlines 

News deadlines for The Virginia Beach Sun are: 5 p.m. Friday for the 
upcoming Wednesday's issue. 

/ Articles must be legible, preferably typed, and double spaced 

on standard size paper. 
/ Pictures must be sharp, clear and accompanied with complete 

information. (All persons in picture must be identified.) 
/ News may be brought or mailed in and should include the name 
and telephone numbers of the persons submitting it. 
The Virginia Beach Sun welcomes and encourages letters from its readers 
on topics of general interest 
All letters must carry the name and address of writer. 

/ Letters should be addressed to: Editor, The Virginia Beach Sun, 
" 138 Rosemont Road, Suite 217, Virginia Beach, VA. 23452. 



■fc 



The Virginia Beach Sun 



Publisher 

Hanes Byerly 



Assistant to the Publisher 

Managing Editor 

Greg Goldfarb 



StorT Writers 

Karen Dalrymple 
Deanna Johnson Keim 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

138 Rosemont Road 
Virginia Beach, VA 23320 
Telephone: 1-804-486-3430 



Letters to the editor are encouraged. 
They should be typed in paragraph form, 
double spaced and include the sender's 
name, address and the phone numbers. 
News deadline is Friday noon for each 
upcoming week's issue. Mail all letters and 
correspondence to The Virginia Beach 
Sun, 138 Rosemont Road, Virginia Beach, 
Va., 23452. Telephone: 1-804-486-3430. 



The Virginia Beach Sew it pubbthed 
every Wednesday by Byerly Publication!, he, 
Franklin. Va. Second Clui Postage (USPS660- 
140) is paid at Lynnhaven Station, Virginia 
Beach, Va. Subscription Rater By mail ad- 
dieiiei within 40 miles of Virginia Beach, Va., 
one year, $1185, two years, $22.50. Virginia 
and North Carolina, one year, $14.85, two 
yean, $26.50. All other ttaiei one year, $17.85, 
two yean, $32.50. Payable in advance. 



The R.G. Moore Building Cor- 
poration's request to lift restrictive 
covenants on golf courses in the 
Glenwood and Cypress Point sub- 
divisions was deferred to July 10 by 
a city council still smarting from 
the public reaction to changes ap- 
proved for the Kempsville Greens 
PD-H2 (planned development) af- 
fecting another golf course. 

When zoning for the Glenwood 
and Cypress Point subdivisions was 
approved by council, restrictive 
covenants offered by Moore pro- 
vided that the courses should not be 
made available to the general public 
and that the courses cannot be sold 
or conveyed to another owner with- 
out the council's approval. 

The item was before council un- 
der the sponsorship of Councilman 
Harold Heischober. 

R J. Nutter, attorney for Monroe, 
said that public use of the golf 
courses makes the projects more 
viable and that the restriction on the 
sale of the courses makes it impos- 
sible to borrow money on the 
courses. 

Vice Mayor Robert V. Fentress 
added that the problem with the 
transfer provision is that it elimi- 
nates the ability of the developer to 
borrow money on the golf course 
and that the courses have already 
been open to the public. The 
courses are available first to resi- 
dents and members of the subdivi- 
sion's country club, who are al- 
lowed to have guests. 

Councilwoman Barbara Henley 
said however, that she has become 
cynical because applicadons agree 
to something at the time of rezon- 
ing only to return later to have re- 
strictions removed. 

She said that the developer has 
been granted density credits because 
of the open space provided by the 
golf course. She said she wondered 
whether the people who live in the 
houses on the smaller lots will be 
denied the open space. If the course 
is used by the public, she said, she 
could not see it as open space. "Just 
how much recreation area is in the 
two developments," she asked. 

Henley said she was concerned 
about the non-golfers among the 
residents with no open space. She 



added that she did not think a future 
purchaser of the course would be 
happy to have children playing on 
the golf course. 

Councilman John A. Baum made 
motion to reach a decision. Coun- 
cilwoman Reba McClanan said, 
however, that she was not in 
agreement. "We may be setting a 
precedent. This is related to land 
use." 

Baum withdrew his modon. He 
said, however, that the golf course 
was not marketable, that the devel- 
oper "made a couple of agreements 
that didn't hold up very well." 

He said that the owner should 
have a right to use his land or to 
sell it. 

McClanan said her concern was 
that "we're using one piece of land 
for open space (and a golf course). I 
still have a problem because of 
what we agreed to. If none of the 
people are concerned maybe we 
should not be," she added. 

In the Kempsville greens inci- 
dent, Planning Director Robert 
Scott administratively approved 
changes at the request of one of the 
builders in Kempsville Greens 
which changed the housing type 
and, said other residents, moved 
construction closer to the golf 
course, impacting the course. The 
residents complained that they were 
unaware of the changes until it was 
loo late to object. 

Councilman John D. Moss 
moved to defer the Moore request so 
that the public would have a chance 
to respond. He said that if the 
courses were transferred to owner- 
ship by the Home Owners 
Association, the city might end up 
with the courses. "Maybe that's 
why the condition was put in. A lot 
of issues have to be dealt with," he 
said. "I don't think the residents 
have been given the proper notice," 
he said. 

Heischober made a substitute 
motion to consider the request. The 
modon was defeated by a 6-5 vote 
with those voting in favor includ- 
ing Baum, Fentress, Heischober, 
John L. Perry, and William D. 
Sessoms, Jr. 

Moss' motion was then passed 
unanimously. 



Bay Preservation Comment Period Ends 



The public comment period on 
the regulations of the Chesapeake 
Bay Preservation Act ends on Fri- 
day with the Local Assistance 
Board, established under the Act, 
expected to complete its work by 
July 1. The Board will establish 
performance criteria to be used by 
the localities in updadng their plans 
and ordinances to comply with the 
Act 

Jack Whitney, director of envi- 
ronmental management for the city, 
presented council with an update on 
the Act and what will be required of 
Tidewater localities. 

He said that the criteria being set 
up by the Board have been contro- 
versial and novel. For the first 
time, he said, the state government 
will have an active role in the con- 
tent of local plans and ordinances 
aimed at implementing a state-wide 
initiative. 

Much of the conflict over the Act 
has revolved around traditional 
property rights philosophies in 
relation to the preservation of the 
Chesapeake Bay. 

Localities are being directed to 
amend city ordinances to implement 
objectives of the Act. Localities 
must be in full compliance with the 
Act by July of 1991. 

Whitney said that the Act man- 
dates stale assistance to localities 
although no financial allocations 
have been made to dale. Whitney 
said that Virginia Beach has proba- 
bly already done much to alleviate 
impact on the Bay "although we 
don't call it preservation." 

One of the concerns in Virginia 
Beach has been the possible inclu- 
sion of lands which drain into the 
Currituck Sound rather than the 
Chesapeake Bay such as Back Bay 
and North Landing River areas. 
Whitney said that the provisions 



will not apply to these areas. 

This means, he said, that in Vir- 
ginia Beach, the shorelines of the 
eastern branch of the Elizabeth 
River and the Lynnhaven would be 
the only areas subject to new regu- 
lations. The entire issue of non- 
tidal wetlands and hydric soils 
which has been the object of so 
much discussion may be a moot 
point since the watersheds of the 
North Landing River and Back Bay 
contain all of the non-tidal and hy- 
dric soils in Virginia Beach. 

Virginia Beach, however, said 
Whitney, may want to develop per- 
formance criteria for these areas and 
apply a purely local management 
overlay to those watersheds. 

Localities in the area with shore- 
lines along the Bay have requested 
special consideration be given for 
developed shorelines where oppor- 
tunities to establish naturally vege- 
tated buffer zones and resource pro- 
lection areas are severely limited, 
Whitney said. Whitney said that 
since the criteria attempt to manage 
water quality through the manage- 
ment of shorelines, that can only be 
successful to the extent of shore- 
lines in Tidewater which are unde- 
veloped. 

The local program must contain 
a zoning map designating Chesa- 
peake Bay preservation areas, per- 
formance criteria applying in 
Chesapeake Bay preservation areas, 
a revised comprehensive plan 
showing Chesapeake Bay Preserva- 
tion areas, a revised zoning ordi- 
nance embodying performance 
criteria, a revised subdivision ordi- 
nance assuring compliance by all 
subdivisions, a revised erosion and 
sediment control ordinance requiring 
compliance, a revised building per- 
mit process. 



Council Approves Revenue Bond 



City council has approved the 
issuance of a $1.8 million indus- 
trial development revenue bonds to 
Hermes Abrasives, Ltd., 524 
Viking Drive, for the purchase of 



equipment for the manufacture of 
coated abrasives and the conversion 
of coated abrasives into belts and 
discs. 



Cromwell, Howard Reappointed 



Barbara Cromwell has been reap- 
pointed to the Tidewater Commu- 
nity College Board and Howard M. 



Williams has been reappointed to 
the Social Services Board. 



-P-P 1 



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Op-Ed 



The Vir ginia Beach Sun, June 21, 1989 3 

— — — ■•■■— ^ ««^^— — —a 




l//rg/n/a Seac/7 /s Qu/ef/y Assisting The Homeless 




"The 

Mayor's 

Report 

* 

Virginia Beach Mayor 

The Honorable 

Meyera Oberndorf 



Susan H. (not her real name) and her children are living al Samaritan 
House, a shelter for the homeless operated by Virginia Beach Ecumenical 
Housing, Inc. Susan is a single parent who became homeless when she 
lost her job and was then evicted from her house. The Samaritan House 
staff are helping her with counseling, obtaining benefits, transportation to 
job interviews, and getting her children to school while she looks for 
work. 

The shelter itself is owned by the city and leased to Samaritan House for 
$1 per year. The shelter was rehabilitated with federal funds that the city 
provided to Samaritan House. The lease and rehabilitation grant make it 
possible for the shelter to operate without having to raise money to make 
mortgage or rent payments. It is part of a range of services our city is qui- 
edy providing to the homeless. 

Right now, we are involved with several efforts to assist homeless peo- 
ple, to develop long-term solutions for homelessness and to prevent 
homelessness. We have used the resources available to us to provide funds 
and in-kind assistance to non-profit organizations that already have exper- 
tise in assisting the homeless. Here are some of the highlights of our ac- 
tivities. 



me shelter itself is owned by the city and leased 
to Samaritan House far $ J per year. 



Over $63,000 in grants has been provided to organizations that provided 
services and temporary shelter to women who are forced into homelessness 
due to domestic crises or domestic violence. Another $78,000, and four ad- 
ditional rent-free houses, has been provided for longer-term "transitional 
housing" for these families, and others in similar situations. In this pro- 
gram families receive reduced rent and support services to enable them to 
rebuild their lives and regain economic self-sufficiency. City financial sup- 
port for this program has helped obtain an additional federal grant- of 
$278,000 to purchase and rehabilitate four townhouses to expand this pro- 
gram. 

The city has provided a van at no cost to two non-profit organizations 
which used it to transport homeless persons to emergency shelters during 
winter months. The city's share of Federal Emergency Shelter Grant funds 
($77,000) has been allocated to help rehabilitate and operate shelters and to 

Please see Mayor, page 10 



J 



School Divisions Need Greater Financial Help From The State 




The 
Report 



By Claire Polley, 

President of the Virginia 

Beach Education Association 



Virginia is in an enviable position in many ways. Where some states 
have stagnant or declining economies, Virginia's economy is growing 
faster than about 43 of the other states and what is referred to as the golden 
crescent- the area from Washington, D.C. through Richmond to Virginia 
Beach-is growing faster than any other area in Virginia. We see the evi- 
dence of this rapid growth each day as massive new subdivisions spring up 
and it seems like every road is under construction. 

While all this growth may spark envy in the eyes of other city councils, 
it is creating enormous'problems for a city budget that is stretched to the 
length of the Lake Gaston pipeline. Not only must the city provide roads, 
streets, and public services, but it must also provide schools for the new 
children who seem to be arriving each day. 

The problem of more students than there are classrooms was the major 
agenda of a recent meeting between the board of education and the city 
council. The school division estimates it will need $139 million in bond 
referendums to build nine schools and renovate two others over the next 
eight years. Right now there are about 1,350 more students than the 67 
buildings and portables were designed to hold. By 1997, the school divi- 
sion estimates a student population of about 85,809 which is 18,837 more 
than the 66,972 students enrolled this year and this is a conservative esti- 



The problem of more students than there are class- 
rooms was the major agenda of a recent meeting 
between the board of education and the city coun- 
cils, 



mate based on the assumption that the economy and growth will slow 
down. 

Conservative estimate or not, the fact is that rapid growth has brought 
extreme overcrowding to the schools and it must be dealt with. The ques- 
tions in the minds of our city council and all the other rapidly growing ar- 
eas in the golden crescent is how does a city pay for the services required 
without taxing its citizens beyond all reasonable means. Since the schools 
are the special interest of the Virginia Beach Education Association, we are 
especially concerned about the need to eliminate the continued overcrowd- 
ing and the means by which the school division will finance its building 
program. School divisions in Virginia need more than just one way to fi- 
nance school buildings. 

If the education of the children of Virginia is a state requirement and if 
the state is going to mandate building size and acreage, which it does, and 

Please see VBEA, page 10 



Toast Virginia's Birthday On The 25th Of June 





By Lillian Youell, 

Virginia Beach Constitution 

Celebration Commission 

Consultant 



On June 25, 1788, Virginia ratified the Constitution by the narrow vote 
of 89 to 79, and became a part of the Union. On June 25, 1988, the 
Constitution's Celebration Commission and the Princess Anne County- 
Virginia Beach Historical Society celebrated the bicentennial of this event 
at Upper Wolfsnare with the traditional thirteen toasts, using apple cider. 

This June 25 seems an appropriate time to reflect on our state's heritage. 
The first settlers came ashore on American soil in our city before 
establishing the first permanent settlement in Jamestown, which was also 
the site of the first "representative" legislative body in the New World. 

Virginia became the "Mother of Presidents" as eight United States 
presidents were born in our state. The first, George Washington, became 
known as the "Father of his Country." The others were Thomas Jefferson, 
James Madison, James Monroe, William Henry Harrison, John Tyler, 
Zachary Tyler and Woodrow Wilson. 

The Old Dominion is also known as the "Mother of States," as all or 
part of eight other states were formed from western territory once claimed 
by Virginia - Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, 
West Virginia and Wisconsin. Only three other states - Kentucky, Mas- 
sachusetts and Pennsylvania - are designated a Commonwealth. 

In 1776, Virginia adopted its first Constitution, its seal and its flag. 



Virginia became the "Mother of Presidents" as 
eight United States presidents wembpm inour state. 

__^^_ -__U—J u^__ n____i.ini i- ^^^^^^l^^^^^±^^^^^^^j^^^ 



Most are familiar with the obverse side of the Great Seal, which bears the 
Latin motto, Sic Semper Tyrannis. "Virtus, the genius of the Common- 
wealth, dressed as an Amazon, resting on a spear in her right hand, point 
downward, touching the earth; her head erect and her face upturned; her left 
foot on the form of Tyranny represented by the prostrate body of a man . . 
. " The reverse side of the Seal has three maidens and the word Perse - 
verando. 

The Lesser Seal is simply a smaller copy of the obverse side of the 
Great Seal and is centered on the deep blue field of the flag of the 
Commonwealth, which has white silk fringe on the outer edge, furthest 
from the flag-staff, in accordance with Section 7-32, Code of Virginia. 

Following Virginia's entrance into the Union as the 10th State, the 
General Assembly has approved a number of state emblems and symbols. 
One of the best known is the dogwood. A Senate Joint Resolution desig- 
nated the flowering dogwood as the floral emblem for the State in 1918. 



The Virginia creeper lost out by one vote! 



Please see lit* Quill, page 10 



Lee Cahill's City Council Report 




Mayor 
Meyera Oberndorf 



Vice-Mayor 
Robert Fentress 



AlBalko 



John Baum 



Harold Heltchober 



Barbara Henley 



RebaMcClanan 



John Most 



NancyParker 



John Perry 



WU Season* 



Fees, Taxes Needed For New Judicial Center 



If the city decides to go ahead 
with its Judicial Center project it 
will have to generate additional lo- 
cal fees or taxes after the first sev- 
eral years for debt service and oper- 
ating costs. 

The additional revenue, equiva- 
lent to a .6 or .7 cent increase in 
the real estate tax would not be 
necessary, however, if the General 
Assembly removed the sunset pro- 
vision on the state deed tax. 

But, City Manager Aubrey V. 
Watts, Jr. told city council at a 
work session, there is no indication 
that the General Assembly would 
make a dramatic change in the leg- 
islation. The 1989 General Assem- 
bly approved the distribution to lo- 
calities from the slate tax on deeds 
for the next five years. Virginia 
Beach's share is estimated to be 
$2.5 million, Giles Dodd, assis- 
tance city manager/finance, said. He 



said that although the money is 
earmarked for highway and school 
purposes, the additional state fund- 
ing would free up an equal amount 
of local funds for use in funding the 
Judicial Center. 

But the city would have to turn 
to new local revenues for debt ser- 
vice and operating costs beyond the 
five years. 

Dodd presented council with three 
scenarios - phased option, acceler- 
ated option and delayed option, The 
Center, he said, would cost more 
than the $31,903,679 in the Capital 
Improvement Program to include 
infrastructure changes not in the 
original project. They are a new 
sewer pump station and modifica- 
tions to the central heating plant 

The project will be on a July 
Council agenda for consideration. 

In any of the options, Dodd has 
recommended certificates of partici- 



pation (CUHs) or a combination of 
COPs and cash to finance construc- 
tion costs and the $2.5 million 
from the slate deed tax for the next 
five years. 

The Center will include a Juve- 
nile and Domestic Relations Courts 
Building of 54,500 square feet, and 
a circuit and general district courts 
building of 190,000 square feet, and 
a court support building of 74,000 
square feel. 

The phased option, which would 
begin in November of 1989 and 
finish December of 1993, would 
cost $37,522,073 with a 
$58,099,292 debt service, requiring 
a additional revenue equivalent to a 
,7 cent real estate tax increase dur- 
ing fiscal years 2001-2007. 

The accelerated option would 
have the construction of the entire 
Judicial Center begin in September 
of 1989 and finished August of 



1991. It would cost $34,767,000 
with a $53,744396 debt service and 
would require additional revenues 
equivalent to a .6 cent real estate 
tax increase during fiscal years 
1997-2008. 

The delayed option would cost 
$37,902,945 with a debt service of 
$58,595,230 and would required ad- 
ditional revenue equivalent to a .6 
real estate tax increase. The project 
would begin September 1989 and 
finish June 1993. 

The city also has ihe option to 
postpone indefinitely the project, 
which has been in the Capital im- 
provement program since 1986. In 
this case the city would continue 
adding modules to meet the court 
needs which, Dodd said, run to 
$100,000 and $200,000 a piece. 

Financing resources outlined by 
Dodd include pre-paid fines, recently 
approved, estimated at $700,000 in 



1990 and expected to increase 3.6 
percent annually; rentals for state 
offices which will move into the 
new Judicial Center with the stale 
paying $10 per-square-foot the ini- 
tial year with a 3 percent increase 
each year; the $2.5 million annu- 
ally from the deeds tax; interest on 
surpluses during the project financ- 
ing, invested at a 7.03 percent in- 
terest rate; the State's assumption 
of financial responsibility for the 
office of Juvenile Probation's ad- 
ministrative costs, saving the city 
$900,000 annually, and the juvenile 
probation rental cost savings. 

Watts said that the project is 
"dead in the water" without some 
direction from council. The city is 
not doing anything, he said, but the 
architectural work which has been 
contracted for. He said that to delay 
the project with the expectation that 
the General Assembly would re- 



move the sunset provision is a 
gamble. 

Added Councilman John A. 
Baum, "If you wait to see what the 
General Assembly is going to do is 
like saying you're not serious." 

Watts said the scenarios are pre- 
dicted on whether council wants to 
use the $2.5 million. 

The presentation hit council 
shortly after a presentation of the 
Constitution Drive Flyover - a $52 
million project, and a weak follow- 
ing a presentation by the School 
Board on the additional millions 
needed for capital school projects. 
To Councilwoman Nancy Parker, it 
looked like first schools, then the 
road, and now this! 

"The public says we should be 
doing more about crime," Coun- 
cilman John A. Baum countered. 

With the imposition of the sun- 
set provision. Watts said, the city 
i see Judicial Center, page 1 • 



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4 The Virgin* Beach Sun, June 21, 1989 



Civic 



i— _ 




Miss E.C.S.C. Contest Date Set 



The Virginia Beach Jaycees will 
host the Miss E.C.S.C. beauty 
contest on July 2 at the 24th Street 
Stage, oceanfrom. 

As the kickoff to the 27th An- 
nual East Coast Surfing Champi- 
onships, this beach event will fea- 
ture girls, ages 16 or older, who 
will vie for the honor of reigning 
queen and her court at the 27th An- 
nual E.C.S.C. which will be held 
on August 25 through 27 at the 
ocean front. 

Judging will be based on formal 
and casual wear, swimsuit 
competition and a brief interview. 
The queen and her court will appear 
at promotional events prior to and 
during the weekend of the E.C.S.C. 



On Sunday, July 2, from 1 to 4 
p.m.. The Killer Neighbors and The 
Boneshakers will kick-off, the 
contest with live performances. The 
beauty pageant will begin at 4 p.m. 

All activities are free to the pub- 
lic. 

This year's Miss E.C.S.C. con- 
test is hosted by the Virginia Beach 
Jaycees in cooperation with Ocean 
Occasions. 

Those who are interested in being 
a contestant in the beauty pageant 
may pick up entry forms at local 
surf shops and modeling agencies. 
For further information, contact 
Ana Nahra on the E.C.S.C. Hotline 
-456-1600. 



Cancer Society Holds Beach Music Fest 



The Virginia Beach Unit of the 
American Cancer Society will hold 
a Beach Music Festival on Sunday, 
July 9 from 1 to 7 p.m. 

Anyone who loves "Beach Mu- 
sic" is invited to attend. This in- 
cludes those who were bom during 
the "Big Chill" era to college stu- 
dents who have just discovered this 
sound! 

Shaggin' will be done to the 



tunes of The Chairmen of the 
Board, the "Embers, the Band of 
Oz, and the "Breeze Band. Tickets 
are $12 before July 1 and/or $15 at 
the gate. 

All proceeds of this event will go 
to the American Cancer Society. 
This is the first beach festival that 
has ever been held in Virginia 
Beach. The theme is Shaggin' in 
the Sand to benefit the American 
Cancer Society. 





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Eric Stevens 

Stevens Performs On The Boardwalk 



Singing-pianist Eric Stevens, 
accompanied by his rhythm-ma- 
chine, will perform from 7 to 9 
p.m. on Friday, June 30 at 20th 
Street Stage on the boardwalk, 
sponsored by Ocean Occasions. 

He will play mostly blues- 
drenched rock classics, boogie 
woogie, and pop-jazz, including 
songs identified with Fats Domino, 
Ray Charles, Little Richard, Ram- 
sey Lewsi, Jerry Lee Lewis, Mose 
Allison, Cannonball Adderly, Louis 
Jordan, Muddy Waters, Booker T & 
the MGs, the Honeydrippers, 
Drifters, and Dominoes. 



Stevens had the honor of singing 
the National Anthem for President 
Reagan. His band played twice for 
Governor Robb. He played on the 
R&B hit, "The Preachcrman." Eric 
appeared three times on Merv Grif- 
fin's show, and made ten acting ap- 
pearances on "Another Life." He is 
not affiliated with any radio station, 
but has appeared on countless TV 
commercials. 

Eric is a member of the Nalchel 
Blues Network, Hampton Roads 
Jazz Society, and Hampton Roads 
Chamber of Commerce. 



Polo Match Benefits Operation Smile 



The Virginia Beach Polo Club 
meets the University of Virginia 
Alumni polo team in a charity 
match October 7 to benefit Opera- 
tion Smile, a volunteer plastic 
surgery medical mission. 

The match is at Alpha Omega 
Farm in Pungo, home of Virginia 
Beach Polo Club member D.B. 
Frye Jr. 

Operation Smile, founded in 
1982, is a volunteer medical mis- 
sion which travels to the Philip- 
pines, Africa and South America 



providing those who need il most 
with medical and surgical care, as 
well as health and education assis- 
tance. 

In 1988, the proceeds from the 
match went to the Cystic Fibrosis 

Foundation Virginia Chapter and 
the University of Virginia, and in 
1987, the contest's first year, dona- 
tions were made to the Cape Henry 
Collegiate School in Virginia 
Beach and the University of Vir- 
ginia. 



Khedive Temple And Sheriff's Office 
Sponsor Old Fashioned Pig Picking 



The Khedive Temple and the 
Virginia Beach Sheriffs Office will 
sponsor a food fest on Wednesday, 
June 28 (raindaic June 29) at Taylor 
Farms (formerly Aldo Farms), 
London Bridge Rd., from 3 to 7 
p.m. 

Music will be provided by Fat 
Amnions Band and there will be 
doggers to entertain as well as 
units from Khedive Temple. 



All proceeds from this old fash- 
ioned pig pickin' will be donated to 
Zonta to help in their efforts to 
build a home for battered spouses 
and the Khedive Sunshine Fund for 
transportation for burned and crip- 
pled children. 

Tickets for this charitable event 
are $10 and may be obtained by 
calling the sheriffs office at 427- 
4555 or purchased at the entrance. 



E.C.S.C Sponsors Sought By Jaycees 



The Virginia Beach Jaycees are 
seeking local and national busi- 
nesses interested in sponsoring ac- 
tivities during the 1989 East Coast 
Surfing Champio-iships. 

The 27th anm.a' event is sched- 
uled this year for August 25 
through 27 at the southend of the 
beach. It is sponsored by the Vir- 
ginia Beach Jaycees. 

More than 30,000 spectators are 
expected to attend throughout the 



weekend. The three day event will 
feature surf.ng, skateboarding, 
skimboarding, windsurfing, and a 
weekend-long beach volleyball 
to rrnament. Other activities fea- 
tured will include a kick-off party 
and concert August 25, bikini con- 
tests and live entertainment. 

For more information about be- 
coming a sponsor of an E.C.S.C. 
activity call Brooks Gearhardt at 
456-1600. 



PA AARP Holds Its Meeting 



The Princess Anne Chapter of 
AARP will meet on Monday, June 
26, at 7:30 p.m. at the Kempsville 
Greens Golf Clubhouse. This will 



be a "Special Entertainment Night" 
by Shu-ley Dcchaine. 

For more information, call 497- 
8830. 



Robin Anderson 



Just A Chat 



Spring, 
Sunday, 



Name: Robin C. Anderson. 

Occupation: Fire inspector. 

Neighborhood: Windsor Oaks. 

Age: 37. 

Marital status: Single. 

Biggest accomplishment in your life: Graduating from Old 
Dominion University. 

What do you really like about your job: Teaching fire 
safety to different groups ranging from pre-schoolers to senior citizens. 

If you could write a national newspaper column, what 
would your message be: The greatest gift we can give the ones we 
love is our time. 

What do you consider the meaning of success: Being 
known for your ability to impower and affirm others. 

If you received a million dollars tomorrow, what would 
you do with it: Invest wisely, travel, set up a scholarship fund and 
help the homeless. 

What's your idea of a fun evening: A night at the theater. 

What's your idea of a fun weekend: Playing volleyball and 
visiting with friends at Nags Head. 

What is your best personality trait: Idealistic. 

What is your worst personality trait: Impatience. 

What is your dream vacation: A trip to the Bahamas. 

What is your favorite time of the year and why: 
the weather is invigorating. 

What is your favorite day of the week and why: 
because I can attend church and visit with family and friends all day. 

What's your favorite magazine: Consumer Reports. 

What's your favorite book and author: The "Good Book" is 
first, but in the secular realm, one favorite is The Arrogance Of Power, 
by Senator William Fulbright. 

What is your favorite pet: Sparky, the fire prevention dog. 

Your dream car: Any car that gets 200 miles to the gallon and has 
a reliable air-conditioner. 

Your favorite sports team: Minnesota Vikings. 

What is your pet peeve: Cars that change lanes without using 
blinkers! 

What do you like to do to relax after a hard day's work: 
Watch a video/movie. 

Who is the most interesting person you know and their 
occupation: Mrs. Peg Bartolotta, music director and teacher. 

What is your favorite TV program: It's the Garry Shandling 
Show. 

Your favorite movie: Breaking Away. 

Your favorite entertainer: Dustin Hoffman. 

What is your favorite food and drink: Shrimp/steak and tea 
(iced). 

What is your favorite dessert: Strawberry shortcake. 

What is your favorite restaurant: Captain George's. 

What do you think is one of the biggest problems fac- 
ing the world: The ever increasing gap between the haves and have 
nots. 

What do you think is one of the biggest problems fac- 
ing Virginia Beach: Traffic. 

What do you like most about Virginia Beach: It was a 
great place to grow up. I've lived here since I was 12 and the people are 
so personable. 



N-PALSA Holds Summer Social 



The Norfolk-Portsmouth Area 
Legal Secretaries Association will 
hold its annual summer social on 
Thursday, July 6, at 6 p.m. A pic- 
nic/pool party will be held at the 
home of member Mary Hartman. 

The cost of the picnic will be $5 
which includes fried chicken from 
Pollard's and beverages. Everyone is 



asked to bring either a salad or a 
dessert, as well as a lawn chair. 

Call Mary Hartman at 628-5540 
no later than 5 p.m. on Monday, 
July 3, to make reservations and to 
gel directions to her home. 

For further information concern- 
ing the association, contact Ginger 
Boykin at 628-5583. 



Crawdad Cafe Holds Wine Festival 



The Crawdad Cafe, in association 
with Alexander's on the Bay, 
Alexander's in Ghent and The 
Country Vintner, will hold a 
Chilean Wine Festival to benefit 
the Virginia Beach Center for the 
Arts on Sunday, June 25 from noon 
to 5 p.m. at Alexander's on the 
Bay. 



The festival will feature a 10 
piece Salsa band, donkey rides, arts 
and crafts exhibitions and auctions, 
a buffet, Chilean wines and prize 
raffles. A $25 fee includes all you 
can eat buffet plus five tickets to 
sample wines. 

For further information call the 
development office, Virginia Beach 
Center for the Arts at 425-0000. ' 



Aragona Garden Club Officers Installed 

Aragona Garden Club officers 
were installed recently at Little 
Creek Officers Club by Kathleen 
Kinlaw, first vice-president of the 
Virginia Beach Council of Garden 
Clubs. 

Incoming officers are Darlene 
Halvorsen, president; Irene Brown, 
first vice-president; Jean Wilherow, 



second vice-president; Betty 
Bloxom, recording secretary; Kath- 
leen Murphy, corresponding secre- 
tary; and Shirley Smith, treasurer. 

A check for $500 was presented 
by Aragona Community Recreation 
Center to further garden club 
community projects. 



Aragona Garden Club Officers Installed 

The Auxiliary of Humana ™°y d E - KeJlam high School and 
Hospital- Bayside presented two 



$1,000 scholarships at their May 
general meeting. The recipients 
were Mamie Malaya Denina from 



John Stephen Sargent, III from 
Bayside High School. 

They bom are planning to pursue 
a career in the health field at col- 
lege. 




P&R Forms Summer Tennis Leagues 



The Virginia Beach Department 
of Parks and Recreation is now 
forming tennis leagues for the 
summer. 

The leagues are for adult recre- 
ational tennis players. These are all 



singles leagues and players may 
sign up for level one or two. Reg- 
istration is underway and play be- 
gins on Monday, June 26. 

For further information contact 
the parks and recreation athletics 
office at 47 14884. 



"A Dancer's World" At The Pavilion 



Riverton On-The-Elizabeth 
School of Performing Arts presents 
"A Dancer's World," at the Virginia 
Beach Pavilion, Saturday, June 24, 
at 7:30 p.m. 

Tickets will be on sale at the 
Pavilion Box Office beginning one 



hour prior to the performance. 

The program is choreographed, 
produced and staged by Jo-Anna 
Smelser, BA, DMA. 

Dances include lap, jazz, Hawai- 
ian-Tahitian, and classical ballet. 



Big Hands Unlimited Hosts Party 



Big Hands Unlimited, an auxil- 
iary group of Big Brothers/Big Sis- 
ters of Tidewater, Inc., is hosting 

»is first annual "Summer Beach 
Party" on Saturday, July 22, from 8 
p.m. until 1 a.m. at the Fort Story 
Officer's Club. 

Tom Tuite and Associates will 
be spinning dance tunes and a cash 



bar will be available. Door prizes 
will be presented. 

Tickets are $5 per person and 
only 1,000 will be sold. They may 
be purchased at the door. Make 
payments to "Big Hands Unlim- 
ited." Contact Cheryl Bonneville 
(473-8188) or Jim Lambert (671- 
8261) for further information. 



Arts And Culture 



Summer Session Art Courses To 
Be Held At Center For The Arts 



Art educational programs devel- 
oped for teenagers and adults will be 
held throughout the months of 
June, July and August at the Vir- 
ginia Beach Center for the Arts. 

Registration has begun for nine 
studio art courses and three work- 
shops, which comprise the Center's 
summer schedule and provide the 
public with quality, hands-on studio 
experiences. Registration deadlines 
are one week prior to the start of 
any class or workshop, and are 
specified in the Center for the Arts' 
Summer Studio School brochure. 

The school stresses education for 
both the amateur and the more ex- 
perienced artist in a creative, sup- 
portive environment. 

The summer session includes the 
following courses: "Fabric Paint- 
ing," (using Thai and Malaysian 
batik methods); "Handbuilt Ceram- 
ics," (creating clay forms off the 
wheel); "Concentration on Form 
II," (wheel-throwing studies 
continued from the spring); 
"Drawing for the Total Beginner," 
(stressing simple, enjoyable draw- 
ing lessons); "Open Studio: Live 
Model," (artists draw from a live 
nude model with no instruction); 
"Xerox: Personal Images," 
(discovering the copier machine as 
an expressive art medium); "Oil 
Painting: Methods and Messages," 
(relying on established techniques 
used throughout the history of oil 



painting); and "The Visible Story," 
(portraying a narrative, or 
meaningful "series" in painting and 
drawing). 

These courses are offered in four 
to six week evening sessions. Sev- 
eral begin the week of June 26. 
Others begin the first week of July 
and the first week of August. 

The following workshops are 
also available: "Silverpoint Draw- 
ing," (a fascinating introduction to 
an ancient drawing technique using 
handmade silver tools); "Preparing 
an Artist's Canvas," (step-by-step 
demonstration from which students 
stretch one canvas); and "Stained 
Glass Boxes," (designing and 
building an original object). These 
workshops are scheduled during 
July in the evenings and Saturdays. 

All instruction takes place in the 
Center for the Arts' painting, 
printmaking and ceramics studios 
housed in the spacious, new facility 
at the corner of 22nd Street and 
Park Avenue. The Center's studio 
school is held four times a year for 
seasonal, eight-week sessions that 
usually include 15 to 30 class 
selections. The school is open to 
the public. 

For further information on adult 
art education at the Center for the 
Arts, or to receive the current 
brochure or register for the summer, 
call 425-0000. 



Marine Science Museum Summer Programs 



The Virginia Marine Science 
Museum has expanded its summer 
program schedule and has added the 
following: 

SUMMER BOAT TRIPS - 
Trawl for fish and other sea crea- 
tures, tow for plankton and test the 
quality of the water on this sum- 
mer boat trip. Trips leave from the 
Virginia Beach Fishing Center at 
Rudee Inlet each Thursday, June 22 
through August 31 at 12:45 and re- 
turn at 2 p.m. 

"THE BIG STING: A JEL- 
LYFISH DISCOVERY 
ROOM" - A jellyfish tank, ex- 
hibits, story hour, games and other 
programs revolving around jellyfish 
will be held July 15 through 
September 4. 

SCUBA AND TANK 
CLEANING - Guests will be 
treated to a narrated SCUBA pro- 
gram from the Chesapeake Bay 
Tank on Thursdays at 7 p.m. They 
will also receive a behind-the-scenes 



look at how the tank is cleaned. 

CARVING ON MARSH 
DECK - Each Wednesday from 10 
a.m. until 3 p.m. duck and wildlife 
carvers will share the art of carving 
with visitors. 

COASTAL RIVER ROOM 
PROGRAM - Discussion ori- 
ented program acquaints visitors 
with marine life found in the 
coastal river area. Fish and turtles 
are hand fed each day at 1 1 a.m 

FISH FEEDING PRO- 
GRAMS - The fish of the Chesa- 
peake Bay will be fed each day at 3 
and 7 p.m. Tropical fish in the 
Ecological Processes Hall are fed at 
2 p.m. each day. At 6 p.m. horse- 
shoe crabs and other shallow water 
marine life will be hand fed. 

This is just a sample of the new 
and innovative pograms the Vir- 
ginia Marine Science Museum has 
scheduled for the summer season. 

To participate in a summer boat 
tour contact Jeri Guarracino at 425- 
3476. 



Marine Science Museum's Boat Trips 



The Virginia Marine Science 
Museum is offering boat trips 
aboard the Miss Virginia Beach ev- 
ery Thursday from June 22 to Au- 
gust 31 from 12:45 to 2 p.m. 

Trips will leave from the Vir- 



ginia Beach Fishing Center at 
Rudee Inlet. Cost is $5 for children 
under 12 and $7 for adults. 

To register call the museum at 
425-3476. 



Medica 




Beach General Holds S.H.A.R.E. Group 



Virginia Beach General Hospita 
will hold a S.H.A.R.E. support 
group meeting on Tuesday, June 
27, at 7:30 p.m. in the hospital's 
West Wing Conference Room. 

This support group is to nelp 
parents recover from the loss of a 
child through miscarriage, stillbirth 



or early infant death. Parents are 
welcome to share their feelings, or 
just listen to others who understand 
and care. 

For more information, call the 
HealthQuest Line to Better Health 
at 481-8141. 



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Medical 




Diabetes Class At Beach General 



Virginia Beach General Hospital 
will hold a free diabetes outpatient 
class on Tuesday, June 27, from 7 
to 8:30 p.m. in Room 104 of the 
Tidewater Health Care building at 
1080 First Colonial Road. 

The class is for people with dia- 
betes, their caregivers or family 
members. The class will introduce 



the concept of controlling diabetes ' 
through diet, exercise, proper medi- 
cation and home blood glucose 
testing. 

Pre-registration is required and 
class size is limited to IS. For 
more information, call the 
HealthQuest Line to Better Health 
at 481-8141. 




Library Instruction Program At Central 



The staff at the Central Library, 
4100 Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
will give a lecture/demonstration on 
the newest technology for patron 
use that the library has to offer. The 
program will be held on Tuesday, 



June 10 at 10 a.m. 

Bring note-taking supplies to the 
program. Registration is being ac- 
cepted through the day of the pro- 
gram. Call 431-3070 for more in- 
formation. 



Storytime Program At Bay side Library 



Children ages four to eight years 
old and their parents are invited to 
attend an evening storytime pro- 
gram on magic wishing rituals 
from childhood days on Thursday, 
June 22 at 7 p.m. at the Bayside 



Library, 936 Independence Boule- 
vard. 

Registration accepted through the 
day of the program. Call 464-9320 
for more information. 



Children's Movies At Oceanfront Library 



"Walter the Lazy Mouse," 
"Remarkable Riderless," "Runaway 
Tricycle," "Seven With One Blow" 
and "The Wizard's Son" will be 
shown to children apes three and up 



at the Oceanfront Library, 1811 
Arctic Avenue on Saturday, June 17 
at 11 a.m. For more information, 
call the library at 42841 13. 



Great Neck Holds "Read-Aloud Round-Up 



J? 



The weekly Tuesday "Read-Aloud 
Round-Up" program begins on 
Tuesday, June 20 and ends Tuesday, 
July 25. Registration is not re- 



quired, however, the program will 
be on a first-come-first-serve basis. 
For more information, call 481- 
6094. 



1 



School News 



in 



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Heading Scores Big In MS READaTHON 



Students from Centerville Ele- 
mentary School, Trinity Lutheran 
and 68 additional schools stacked up 
the books in the Fall '88 and 
Spring '89 edition of the MS 
READaTHON. Fourteen hundred 
youngsters read 17,585 books and 
raised $51,723 to aid the National 
Multiple Sclerosis Society, Hamp- 
ton Roads Chapter in the fight 
against multiple sclerosis. 

The MS Society presented an 
exciting challenge to elementary 
and junior high school students: 
"Join the MS READaTHON and 
read for the need of others." 

The MS READaTHON is a 
unique motivational reading pro- 
gram which improves children's 
reading skills and at the same time, 
generates necessary funds for MS 
research and chapter service pro- 
grams. During a four to six week 
period, children read as many books 
as they can and obtain sponsors 
who pledge money for each book 
real 

Centerville Elementary was the 
top fundraising and reading school 
for the Fall '88 program, raising 
almost $9,000 and reading 5,666 
books. This is an outstanding 
achievement for Centerville as no 
school in the last 14 READaTHON 
programs has raised this amount of 
money or read that many books. 

Trinity Lutheran in Norfolk has 
been the top fundraising and reading 
school for the Spring program and 
this year proved no different with 
students raising over $3,633 and 
reading 5,164 books. Trinity 
Lutheran and Centerville Elemen- 
tary were both awarded an MS 
READaTHON Achievement Banner 
and received ice cream parties cour- 
tesy of Pet Dairy. 

Other top schools were College 
Park Elementary, Rosemont Ele- 
mentary and Baylake Pines 
Elementary. Because of McDonald's 
commitment to reading they gener- 
ously provided scholarships to the 
above schools for their achieve- 
ments.. 



Becky Cooper from Trinity 
Lutheran was the top reader in the 
READaTHON reading 631 books. 
Other top readers included Jenny 
Cooper from Trinity Lutheran (527 
books), Sara Posery from Trinity 
Lutheran (410 books), Michelc 
Clark from Centerville (202 
books), Kimberly Anderson from 
Centerville (157 books) and Joy 
Mossman from College Park (105 
books.) 

The top fundraiser was Jay Hast- 
ings from Warwick River Christian 
School who raised $1,010. Other 
top fundraisers were Ben Pritchard 
from Bruton Heights ($451), Rad 
Davenport from Trinity Lutheran 
($369), Brenna Santoro from Cen- 
terville ($366), Anthony Santoro 
from Centerville ($354) and Mary 
Lynn Jansak from Rosemont 
($223.50). 

Every child who read at least one 
book and raised at least one cent re- 
ceived a completers package includ- 
ing McDonalds free food coupon, 7- 
Eleven Slurpee and Big Bite, a free 
game of Putt-Putt, Billy Bob Buck 
for four free game tokens at Show- 
biz Pizza, coupon to Chrysler Mu- 
seum Historic Houses, coupon to 
Virginia Zoological Park and a cer- 
tificate of appreciation from the MS 
Society. Many students also re- 
ceived special achievement awards 
based on books read and the amount 
of money raised. These included 
tickets to Busch Gardens, Water 
Country USA and Virginia Living 
Museum. A special honor for this 
year's top fundraisers and readers 
will be a chance to appear in the 
year's READaTHON commercial 
sponsored by WVEC TV 13. 

All proceeds from the MS REA- 
DaTHON will go toward research- 
ing the cause and Finding a cure for 
MS, a disease of the central nervous 
system affecting over 800 families 
in Hampton Roads. The funds also 
provide local services such as ac- 
quatics therapy, monthly newslet- 
ters, support groups and equipment 
loan programs. 



Russ Awarded $500 Scholarship 



Mark James Russ of Shearwater 
Cove, has been awarded a $500 
college scholarship by the Reserve 
Officers Association of the United 
States. 

The award was one of 100 given 
to college students in the Henry J. 
Reilly Memorial Scholarship Pro- 
gram, in honor of the late Army 
Reserve Brigadier General, a founder 
and the first President of ROA, 
1922-23. 

This is the eighth year that the 



Rouleau On Babson's Dean's List 




_ — _ — 



77* Virginia Beach Sun June 21, 19885 



School News 



Summer School Begins June 26 



Myers and Salah. 



PA Students Top Bridge Builders 



Matt Myers and Joe Salah flank 
the first place trophy that their 
miniature bridge won in the 1989 
Virginia Technology Student 
Association competition in Rich- 
mond recently. The Princess Anne 
High School technology education 
students, along with fellow student 
John Gross, designed and built the 
structure which supported 38 
pounds to win the competition. 



The three students also placed 
second in the association's problem 
solving competition by building a 
battery-powered device which picked 
up a sugar cube and moved it ten 
feet without damage. Myers, Salah, 
and Gross will take their bridge to 
the national technology education 
competition in Winston-Salem, 
N.C. this month. 




Photo by Cathy L. Sli woski 

Career Development Center geography teacher John McLaughlin uses many 
tools, such as whirligigs and boats, to teach geography concepts. For his 
creative efforts, McLaughlin was chosen 1989 Virginia Beach "Teacher of the 
Year." 

John McLaughlin Named VB 
1989 Teacher Of The Year 



Summer school for secondary 
students in Virginia Beach City 
Public Schools will begin Monday, 
June 26, at five centrally-located 
schools and end August 11. The 
1989 elementary summer programs 
will be held July 3 through 31 at 
four locations. 

Registration for secondary stu- 
dents (grades 7 through 12) will be 
held Wednesday and Thursday, June 
21 and 22, at the summer school 
centers. Tuition for each full year 
course will be $80 for Virginia 
Beach residents and $120 for non- 
residents; a semester course will be 
$40 and $60, respectively. Tuition 
must be paid at the time registra- 
tion. 

In addition, a text- 
book/instructional fee of $6.50 will 
be charged for each yearly course, 
and selected courses may require ad- 
ditional fees. 

The five summer school centers 
are Kempsville, Cox, and Green 
Run high schools, and Plaza and 
Salem Junior High Schools. Senior 
high and ninth grade students will 
attend senior high centers, based 
upon junior high attendance zones. 
All seventh and eighth grade stu- 
dents will attend either Plaza or 
Salem Junior High. School bus 
transportation Will not be provided 
for summer school. 

Students to attend the 
Kempsville High summer school 
center line in the attendance zones 
of Bayside Junior High, Indepen- 
dence Junior High (only those stu- 
dents from the Bayside High atten- 
dance zone), Kempsville Junior 
High, and Brandon Junior High. 

The Cox High summer school 
center attendance zone includes 
Great Neck Junior High, 
Lynnhaven Junior High, Virginia 
Beach Junior High, and Indepen- 
dence Junior High (only those stu- 
dents from the Cox and Princess 
Anne High attendance areas). 

The Green Run High summer 
school center attendance zone in- 
cludes all of the attendance zones of 
Plaza, Princess Anne, and Salem 
Junior High Schools. 

Seventh and eighth grade students 
living in the Great Neck, Indepen- 
dence, Lynnhaven, Plaza, and Vir- 
ginia Beach Junior High attendance 
zones will attend the Plaza Junior 
High summer school center. Sev- 
enth and eighth grade students liv- 
ing in the Brandon, Bayside, 
Kempsville, Salem, and Princess 
Anne Junior High attendance zones 
will attend the Salem Junior High 
summer school center. 

Only the Cox High summer 
school center will offer morning 
and afternoon classes; the rest of the 
centers will have morning classes 



scholarships have been given and is 
the fifth year that awards were made 
to graduate students. Fifteen of the 
100 scholarships were tendered 
members of ROA who are studying 
for advanced degrees. The 100 total 
represents a gradual increase from 
the initial 25. 

Russ is a lieutenant in the Navy. 
He is pursuing an MBA in 
aerospace engineering at Duke 
Uuniversily, Durham, N.C. 



Michelle M. Rouleau, daughter 
of Mr. Michael Rouleau of 77th 



Street, has made the Dean's List at 
Babson College. 



By Cathy L Sliwoski 

Special To The Sun 

Whirligigs, bathtubs, cross-stitch 
patterns, and sandboxes have ap- 
peared this year in John McLaugh- 
lin's world geography classroom at 
the Career Development Center. 
While these items are not normally 
used for educational purposes, 
McLaughlin considers them as es- ' 
sential to the learning process when 
studying maps and globes. 

For example, McLaughlin used 
the whirligigs (a propellor mounted 
on a stick) and cross-stitch patterns 
to leach students the concept of 
latitude and longitude. It is this 
kind of creativity that earned 
McLaughlin the honor of Virginia 
Beach "Teacher of the Year" for 
1989. 

"Kids appreciate a teacher who 
works hard for them," said the Vir- 
ginia Beach native. "Students are 
not harder to motivate today, but a 
teacher must be willing to try new 
ideas to improve learning." 

McLaughlin said this year, his 
fifteenth in the classroom, was 
truly a magical year. Everything 
seemed to come together for the 
benefit of all. "So many of the 
things I put into practice this year 
were the result of ideas I had ten or 
15 years ago, but couldn't imple- 
ment as successfully as I did this 
year." 

Because of his innovative teach- 
ing methods, McLaughlin has kept 
the interest of his CDC students 
piqued with hands-on projects that 
integrate math, science, and inter- 
personal skills. He received national 
recognition from the Federal Avia- 
tion Administration for his unit 
called "Sky School of Geography," 
based on the award-winning science- 
oriented workshop held last summer 
in Virginia Beach. Students built 
model aircraft, made hot air bal- 
loons, and constructed a 48-foot 
map of the United States. 

After completing the Sky School 

focus, McLaughlin kept the theme 



only. Students may enroll in only 
one course during the summer 
school session, except for graduat- 
ing seniors who will be eligible to 
take two courses. Courses which 
are only offered at one center will 
be open to all students. 

Morning classes will start at 
7:30 a.m. and end at noon. After- 
noon classes will be from 12:30 to 
5 p.m. All schools will be closed 
for the July 4 holiday. 

All secondary course offerings are 
subject to having sufficient enroll- 
ment and certified staff to teach 
them, but the probable course 
offerings for summer school are: 
English 9, 10, 11, and 12; geogra- 
phy; world history (at Cox and 
Kempsville only); Virginia and 
U.S. history; Virginia and U.S. 
government; general mathematics 9 
and math applications (Cox only); 
algebraic foundations; Algebra I; 
geometry; Algebra II; Algebra 
Il/trigonomctry; earth science; 
biology; chemistry (Cox only); 
health and physical education 9 and 
10 (Cox only); art appreciation, and 
Typing I. 

Probable seventh and eighth 
grade summer courses will be En- 
glish 7 and 8, mathematics 7, gen- 
eral mathematics 8, pre-algebra 8, 
principals of science 7, principals 
of science 8, social studies 7, health 
and physical education 7 and 8, and 
special education 7, 8, EH, EMR, 
andLD. 

The four centers for elementary 
summer school classes will be lo- 
cated at Brookwood. Bavside, 
Lynnhaven, and Pembroke elemen- 
tary schools. 

Classes in basic reading, compo- 
sition/grammar, mathematics, pri- 
mary reading, and most special 
education courses will be offered at 
Brookwood Elementary. Intensive 
English classes for non-native 
speakers will be at Lynnhaven El- 
ementary, and special education 
classes for the hearing impaired and 
for autistic students will be at 
Pembroke Elementary. 

Basic read- 

ing/composition/grammar, mathe- 
matics, and primary reading classes 
will be held at Bayside Elementary. 
In addition, Bayside Elementary 
will also offer a Writing- to-Read 
class open only to identified stu- 
dents from Bayside, Shelton Park, 
Hermitage. Thoroughgood, New- 
town Road, and Williams Elemen- 
tary Schools. 

Specific information about the 
1989 summer school programs is 
available at all Virginia Beach pub- 
lic schools. Should a student or 
parent have particular questions 
about summer school operations, 
contact the student's guidance 
counselor. » 



Beach Students On Longwood's List 



going with Sea School and finished 
out the year with Land School. 

Students' creativity was challenged 
with projects such as designing 
boats that could float the most 
bricks in a bathtub and playing 
Monopoly to study the geography 
of cities. McLaughlin is already re- 
fining the curriculum for next year. 

"I want to really unify the 'across 
the curriculum' approach for next 
year," said. McLaughlin. "I also 
want to decorate the entire room 
like the inside of a cargo plane for 
Sky School, a ship for Sea School, 
and a log cabin for Land School." 

McLaughlin said one of the 
greatest challenges of working with 
the students at CDC is the different 
maturity and ability levels in each 
class. Connecting with the students 
on a personal level helps to build 
self-esteem and respect. This is an- 
other of his goals. 

In his application for Virginia 
"Teacher of the Year," McLaughlin 
wrote, "I sincerely believe that my 
students feel better about them- 
selves as they experience success in 
my class. For me, there is no 
greater accomplishment than help- 
ing many of my teens discover their 
latent talents." 

McLaughlin said he believes it 
takes a number of years to become 
a good educator. For beginning 
teachers, he offers this advice: "Be 
persistent in your work and patient 
with yourself and your students." 

McLaughlin said one benefit of 
his teaching style over the "book 
and pencil" method is that often 
students are learning without 
realizing it. In a recommendation 
letter, student Lisa Matthews wrote 
". . .we were actually learning and 
having fun at the same time. Be- 
sides teaching world geography, he 
has taught us self-respect." 

McLaughlin was recognized as 
the school division's Teacher of the 
Year at the May School Board 
meeting. He will represent Virginia 
Beach in the Virginia Teacher of the 
Year competition this summer. 



Stacey L. Noona, Mary E. An- 
drews, Laura E. Vollrath, Carla L. 
Voorhees, Pam L. Hinman, Laura 
L. Ratcliffe, Cheryl L. Selig (4.0), 
Kirsten R. Baum, Bonnie J. Buck- 
ner (4.0), Linda T. Dees (4.0), 
Wilita Aguirre Darang, Suzanne M. 



Pellegrino (4.0), James M. Brown 
(4.0), Kimberly M. Brumley, Car- 
ole R. Propster and Patricia E. 
Smith (4.0), have all been named to 
the Dean's List at Longwood Col- 
lege for the spring semester. 




Henry Ford (center) and Dawn Breathwalte (right), both of Virginia Beach, 
returned recently from a semester of study at the University of the Andes In 
Merida, Venezuela. 

Longwood Students Return From Venezuela 

They and nine other students were the first participants m Longwood 
College's new "Spanish in the Andes" program. Shown with them at the airport 
In Merida Is Jenny mar, of Medford Lakes, NJ. Ford and Breathwalte an 
Longwood students; Miller Is a student at the College of WttHam and Mary. 



King Brass At Beach Chapel 



The King's Brass will be appear- 
ing in concert at The Virginia 
Beach Community Chapel, 1261 
Laskin Road, on June 25 at 6:30 
p.m. 

The King's Brass consists of 
three trumpets, three trombones, 
and a tuba. This January, their 
twelfth anniversary, they will be 
touring from New York to Chicago 
and from Philadelphia to Florida. 

Through their instrumental con- 
certs of worship and praise, the 



King's Brass blends the favorite 
hymns of old with a love for the 
classics and the technology of the 
synthesizer. This year's tour will 
again feature concert artist Jim Al- 
lison. 

The 1989 King's Brass tour, di- 
rected by Tim Zimmerman, will 
introduce selections from their 
newly released album. Steadfast 

A nursery is provided. For further 
information call Dr. Al Lundc at 
428-1881. 



M 



Mvmpw 



««Mav* 



"^ 



4 The Virginia Beach Sun, June 21, 1989 




WIC 



Miss E.C.S.C. Contest Date Set 



The Virginia Beach Jaycees will 
host the Miss E.C.S.C. beauty 
contest on July 2 at the 24ih Street 
Stage, oceanfront. 

As the kickoff to the 27th An- 
nual East Coast Surfing Champi- 
onships, this beach event will fea- 
ture girls, ages 16 or older, who 
will vie for the honor of reigning 
queen and her court at the 27th An- 
nual E.C.S.C. which will be held 
on August 25 through 27 at the 
oceanfront. 

Judging will be based on formal 
and casual wear, swimsuit . 
competition and a brief interview. 
The queen and her court will appear 
at promotional events prior to and 
during the weekend of the E.C.S.C. 



On Sunday, July 2, from 1 to 4 
p.m., The Killer Neighbors and The 
Boneshakers will kick-off the 
contest with live performances. The 
beauty pageant will begin at 4 p.m. 

All activities are free to the pub- 
lic. 

This year's Miss E.C.S.C. con- 
test is hosted by the Virginia Beach 
Jaycees in cooperation with Ocean 
Occasions. 

Those who are interested in being 
a contestant in the beauty pageant 
may pick up entry forms at local 
surf shops and modeling agencies. 
For further information, contact 
Ana Nahra on the E.C.S.C. Hotline 
-456-1600. 



Cancer Society l/folds Beach Music Fest 



The Virginia Beach Unit of the 
American Cancer Society wimhold 
a Beach Music Festival on Sunday, 
July 9 from 1 to 7 p.m. 

Anyone who loves "Beach Mu- 
sic" is invited to attend. This in- 
cludes those who were bom during 
the "Big Chill" era to college stu- 
dents who have just discovered this 
sound! 

Shaggin' will be done to the 



tunes of The Chairmen of the 
Board, the "Embers, the Band of 
Oz, and the "Breeze Band. Tickets 
are $12 before July 1 and/or $15 at 
the gate. 

All proceeds of this event will go 
to the American Cancer Society. 
This is the first beach festival that 
has ever been held in Virginia 
Beach. The theme is Shaggin' in 
the Sand to benefit the American 
Cancer Society. 




Eric Stevens 

Stevens Performs On The Boardwalk 



Singing-pianist Eric Stevens, 
accompanied by his rhythm-ma- 
chine, will perform from 7 to 9 
p.m. on Friday, June 30 at 20th 
Street Stage on the boardwalk, 
sponsored by Ocean Occasions. 

He will play mostly blues- 
drenched rock classics, boogie 
woogie, and pop-jazz, including 
songs identified with Fats Domino, 
Ray Charles, Litde Richard, Ram- 
sey Lewsi, Jerry Lee Lewis, Mose 
Allison, Cannonball Adderly, Louis 
Jordan, Muddy Waters, Booker T & 
the MGs, the Honeydrippers, 
Drifters, and Dominoes. 



Stevens had the honor of singing 
the National Anthem for President 
Reagan. His band played twice for 
Governor Robb. He played on the 
R&B hit, "The Preachcrman." Eric 
appeared three times on Merv Grif- 
fin's show, and made ten acting ap- 
pearances on "Another Life." He is 
not affiliated with any radio station, 
but has appeared on countless TV 
commercials. 

Eric is a member of the Natchel 
Blues Network, Hampton Roads 
Jazz Society, and Hampton Roads 
Chamber of Commerce. 



Polo Match Benefits Operation Smile 



The Virginia Beach Polo Club 
meets the University of Virginia 
Alumni polo team in a charity 
match October 7 to benefit Opera- 
tion Smile, a volunteer plastic 
surgery medical mission. 

The match is at Alpha Omega 
Farm in Pungo, home of Virginia 
Beach Polo Club member D.B. 
Frye Jr. 

Operation Smile, founded in 
1982, is a volunteer medical mis- 
sion which travels to the Philip- 
pines, Africa and South America 



providing those who need it most 
with medical and surgical care, as 
well as health and education assis- 
tance. 

In 1988, the proceeds from the 
match went to the Cystic Fibrosis 

Foundation Virginia Chapter and 
the University of Virginia, and in 
1987, the contest's first year, dona- 
tions were made to the Cape Henry 
Collegiate School in Virginia 
Beach and the University of Vir- 
ginia. 



Khedive Temple And Sheriff's Office 
Sponsor Old Fashioned Pig Picking 



The Khedive Temple and the 
Virginia Beach Sheriffs Office will 
sponsor a food fest on Wednesday, 
June 28 (raindate June 29) at Taylor 
Farms (formerly Aldo Farms), 
London Bridge Rd., from 3 to 7 
p.m. 

Music will be provided by Fat 
Ammons Band and there will be 
doggers to entertain as well as 
units from Khedive Temple. 



All proceeds from this old fash- 
ioned pig pickin' will be donated to 
Zonta to help in their efforts to 
build a home for battered spouses 
and the Khedive Sunshine Fund for 
transportation for burned and crip- 
pled children. 

Tickets for this charitable event 
are $10 and may be obtained by 
calling the sheriffs office at 427- 
4555 or purchased at the entrance. 



E.C.S.C. Sponsors Sought By Jaycees 



The Virginia Beach Jaycees are 
seeking local and national busi- 
nesses interested in sponsoring ac- 
tivities during the 1989 East Coast 
Surfing Championships. 

The 27th anniiu' event is sched- 
uled this year for August 25 
through 27 at the southend of the 
beach. It is sponsored by the Vir- 
ginia Beach Jaycees. 

More than 30,000 spectators are 
expected to attend throughout the 



weekend. The three day event will 
feature surf.ng, skateboarding, 
skimboarding, windsurfing, and a 
weekend-long beach volleyball 
to /moment. Other activities fea- 
tured will include a kick-off party 
and concert August 25, bikini con- 
tests and live entertainment. 

For more information about be- 
coming a sponsor of an E.C.S.C. 
activity call Brooks Gearhardt at 
456-1600. 



PA AARP Holds Its Meeting 



The Princess Anne Chapter of 
AARP will meet on Monday, June 
26, at 7:30 p.m. at the Kempsville 
Greens Golf Clubhouse. This will 



be a "Special Entertainment Night" 
by Shirley Dechaine. 
For more information, call 497- 

8830. 



Robin Anderson 



Just A Chat 



Name: Robin C. Anderson. 

Occupation: Fire inspector. 

Neighborhood: Windsor Oaks. 

Age: 37. 

Marital status: Single. 

Biggest accomplishment in your life: Graduating from Old 
Dominion University. 

What do you really like about your job: Teaching fire 
safety to different groups ranging from pre-schoolers to senior citizens. 

If you could write a national newspaper column, what 
would your message be: The greatest gift we can give the ones we 
love is our time. 

What do you consider the meaning of success: Being 
known for your ability to impower and affirm others. 

If you received a million dollars tomorrow, what would 
you do with it: Invest wisely, travel, set up a scholarship fund and 
help the homeless. 

What's your idea of a fun evening: A night at the theater. 

What's your idea of a fun weekend: Playing volleyball and 
visiting with friends at Nags Head. 

What is your best personality trait: Idealistic. 

What is your worst personality trait: Impatience. 

What is your dream vacation: A trip to the Bahamas. 

What is your favorite time of the year and why: Spring, 
the weather is invigorating. 

What is your favorite day of the week and why: Sunday, 
because I can attend church and visit with family and friends all day. 

What's your favorite magazine: Consumer Reports. 

What's your favorite book and author: The "Good Book" is 
first, but in the secular realm, one favorite is The Arrogance Of Power, 
by Senator William Fulbrighi. 

What is your favorite pet: Sparky, the fire prevention dog. 

Your dream car: Any car that gets 200 miles to the gallon and has 
a reliable air-conditioner. 

Your favorite sports team: Minnesota Vikings. 

What is your pet peeve: Cars that change lanes without using 
blinkers! 

What do you like to do to relax after a hard day's work: 
Watch a video/movie. 

Who is the most interesting person you know and their 
occupation: Mrs. Peg Bartolotta, music director and teacher. 

What is your favorite TV program: It's the Garry Shandling 
Show. 

Your favorite movie: Breaking Away. 

Your favorite entertainer: Dustin Hoffman. 

What is your favorite food and drink: Shrimp/steak and tea 
(iced). 

What is your favorite dessert: Strawberry shortcake. 

What is your favorite restaurant: Captain George's. 

What do you think is one of the biggest problems fac- 
ing the world: The ever increasing gap between the haves and have 
nots. 

What do you think is one of the biggest problems fac- 
ing Virginia Beach: Traffic. 

What do you like most about Virginia Beach: It was a 
great place to grow up. I've lived here since I was 12 and the people are 
so personable. 



N-PALSA Holds Summer Social 



The Norfolk-Portsmouth Area 
Legal Secretaries Association will 
hold its annual summer social on 
Thursday, July 6, at 6 p.m. A pic- 
nic/pool party will be held at the 
home of member Mary Hartman. 

The cost of the picnic will be S5 
which includes fried chicken from 
Pollard's and beverages. Everyone is 



asked to bring either a salad or a 
dessert, as well as a lawn chair. 

Call Mary Hartman at 628-5540 
no later than 5 p.m. on Monday, 
July 3, to make reservations and to 
get directions to her home. 

For further information concern- 
ing the association, contact Ginger 
Boykin at 628-5583. 



Crawdad Cafe Holds Wine Festival 



The Crawdad Cafe, in association 
with Alexander's on the Bay, 
Alexander's in Ghent and The 
Country Vintner, will hold a 
Chilean Wine Festival to benefit 
the Virginia Beach Center for the 
Arts on Sunday, June 25 from noon 
to 5 p.m. at Alexander's on the 
Bay. 



The festival will feature a 10 
piece Salsa band, donkey rides, arts 
and crafts exhibitions arid auctions, 
a buffet, Chilean wines and prize 
raffles. A $25 fee includes all you 
can eat buffet plus five tickets to 
sample wines. 

For further information call the 
development office, Virginia Beach 
Center for the Arts at 425-0000. 



Aragona Garden Club Officers Installed 



Aragona Garden Club officers 
were installed recently at Little 
Creek Officers Club by Kathleen 
Kinlaw, first vice-president of the 
Virginia Beach Council of Garden 
Clubs. 

Incoming officers are Darlene 
Halvorsen, president; Irene Brown, 
first vice-president; Jean Witherow, 



second vice-president; Betty 
Bloxom, recording secretary; Kath- 
leen Murphy, corresponding secre- 
tary; and Shirley Smith, treasurer. 

A check for $500 was presented 
by Aragona Community Recreation 
Center to further garden club 
community projects. 



Aragona Garden Club Officers Installed 

The Auxiliary of Humana F'°yd E. Kellam high School and 
Hospiul-Bayside presented two Jonn Stephen Sargent, III from 

Bayside High School. 
$1,000 scholarships at their May They both are planning to pursue 
general meeting. The recipients a career in the health field at col- 
were Mamie Malaya Denina from lege. 




P&R Forms Summer Tennis Leagues 



The Virginia Beach Department 
of Parks and Recreation is now 
forming tennis leagues for the 
summer. 

The leagues are for adult recre- 
ational tennis players. These are all 



singles leagues and players may 
sign up for level one or two. Reg- 
istration is underway and play be- 
gins on Monday, June 26. 

For further information contact 
the parks and recreation athletics 
office at 4714884. 



"A Dancer's World" At The Pavilion 



Riverton On-The-EIizabeth 
School of Performing Arts presents 
"A Dancer's World," at the Virginia 
Beach Pavilion, Saturday, June 24, 
at 7:30 p.m. 

Tickets will be on sale at the 
Pavilion Box Office beginning one 



hour prior to the performance. 

The program is choreographed, 
produced and staged by Jo-Anna 
Smelser, BA, DMA. 

Dances include tap, jazz, Hawai- 
ian-Tahitian, and classical ballet. 



Big Hands Unlimited Hosts Party 



Big Hands Unlimited, an auxil- 
iary group of Big Brothers/Big Sis- 
ters of Tidewater, Inc., is hosting 

us first annual "Summer Beach 
Party" on Saturday, July 22, from 8 
p.m. until 1 a.m. at the Fort Story 
Officer's Club. 

Tom Tuite and Associates will 
be spinning dance tunes and a cash 



bar will be available. Door prizes 
will be presented. 

Tickets are $5 per person and 
only 1,000 will be sold. They may 
be purchased at the door. Make 
payments to "Big Hands Unlim- 
ited." Contact Cheryl Bonneville 
(473-8188) or Jim Lambert (671- 
8261) for further information. 




Summer Session Art Courses To 
Be Held At Center For The Arts 



Art educational programs devel- 
oped for teenagers and adults will be 
held throughout the months of 
June, July and August at the Vir- 
ginia Beach Center for the Arts. 

Registration has begun for nine 
studio art courses and three work- 
shops, which comprise the Center's 
summer schedule and provide the 
public with quality, hands-on studio 
experiences. Registration deadlines 
are one week prior to the start of 
any class or workshop, and are 
specified in the Center for the Arts' 
Summer Studio School brochure. 

The school stresses education for 
both the amateur and the more ex- 
perienced artist in a creative, sup- 
portive environment. 

The summer session includes the 
following courses: "Fabric Paint- 
ing," (using Thai and Malaysian 
batik methods); "Handbuilt Ceram- 
ics," (creating clay forms off the 
wheel); "Concentration on Form 
II," (wheel-throwing studies 
continued from the spring); 
"Drawing for the Total Beginner," 
(stressing simple, enjoyable draw- 
ing lessons); "Open Studio: Live 
Model," (artists draw from a live 
nude model with no instruction); 
"Xerox: Personal Images," 
(discovering the copier machine as 
an expressive art medium); "Oil 
Painting: Methods and Messages," 
(relying on established techniques 
used throughout the history of oil 



painting); and "The Visible Story," 
(portraying a narrative, or 
meaningful "series" in painting and 
drawing). 

These courses are offered in four 
to six week evening sessions. Sev- 
eral begin the week of June 26. 
Others begin the first week of July 
and the first week of August. 

The following workshops are 
also available: "Silverpoint Draw- 
ing," (a fascinating introduction to 
an ancient drawing technique using 
handmade silver tools); "Preparing 
an Artist's Canvas," (step-by-step 
demonstration from which students 
stretch one canvas); and "Stained 
Glass Boxes," (designing and 
building an original object). These 
workshops are scheduled during 
July in the evenings and Saturdays. 

All instruction takes place in the 
Center for the Arts' painting, 
printmaking and ceramics studios 
housed in the spacious, new facility 
at the corner of 22nd Street and 
Park Avenue. The Center's studio 
school is held four times a year for 
seasonal, eight-week sessions that 
usually include 15 to 30 class 
selections. The school is open to 
the public. 

For further information on adult 
art education at the Center for the 
Arts, or to receive the current 
brochure or register for the summer, 
call 425-0000. 



Marine Science Museum Summer Programs 



The Virginia Marine Science 
Museum has expanded its summer 
program schedule and has added the 
following: 

SUMMER BOAT TRIPS - 
Trawl for fish and other sea crea- 
tures, tow for plankton and test the 
quality of the water on this sum- 
mer boat trip. Trips leave from the 
Virginia Beach Fishing Center at 
Rudee Inlet each Thursday, June 22 
through August 31 at 12:45 and re- 
turn at 2 p.m. 

"THE BIG STING: A JEL- 
LYFISH DISCOVERY 
ROOM" - A jellyfish tank, ex- 
hibits, story hour, games and other 
programs revolving around jellyfish 
will be held July 15 through 
September 4. 

SCUBA AND TANK 
CLEANING - Guests will be 
treated to a narrated SCUBA pro- 
gram from the Chesapeake Bay 
Tank on Thursdays at 7 p.m. They 
will also receive a behind-the-scenes 



look at how the tank is cleaned 

CARVING ON MARSH 
DECK - Each Wednesday from 10 
a.m. until 3 p.m. duck and wildlife 
carvers will share the art of carving 
with visitors. 

COASTAL RIVER ROOM 
PROGRAM - Discussion ori- 
ented program acquaints visitors 
with marine life found in the 
coastal river area. Fish and turtles 
are hand fed each day at 1 1 a m 

FISH FEEDING PRO- 
GRAMS - The fish of the Chesa- 
peake Bay will be fed each day at 3 
and 7 p.m. Tropical fish in the 
Ecological Processes Hall are fed at 
2 p.m. each day. At 6 p.m. horse- 
shoe crabs and other shallow water 
marine life will be hand fed 

This is just a sample of the new 
and innovative programs the Vir- 
ginia Marine Science Museum has 
scheduled for the summer season. 

To participate in a summer boat 
lour contact Jeri Guarracino at 425- 
3476. 



Marine Science Museum's Boat Trips 



The Virginia Marine Science 
Museum is offering boat trips 
aboard the Miss Virginia Beach ev- 
ery Thursday from June 22 to Au- 
gust 31 from 12:45 to 2 p.m. 

Trips will leave from the Vir- 



ginia Beach Fishing Center at 
Rudee Inlet. Cost is $5 for children 
under 12 and $7 for adults. 

To register call the museum at 

425-3476. 




Beach General Holds S.H.A.R.E. Group 



Virginia Beach General Hospita 
will hold a S.H.A.R.E. support 
group meeting on Tuesday, June 
27, at 7:30 p.m. in the hospital's 
West Wing Conference Room. 

This support group is to help 
parents recover from the loss of a 
child through miscarriage, stillbirth 



or early infant death. Parents are 
welcome to share their feelings, or 
just listen to others who understand 
and care. 

For more information, call the 
HealthQuest Line to Better Health 
at 481-8141. 



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Medica 




Diabetes Class At Beach General 



Virginia Beach General Hospital 
will hold a free diabetes outpatient 
class on Tuesday, June 27, from 7 
to 8:30 p.m. in Room 104 of the 
Tidewater Health Care building at 
1080 First Colonial Road. 

The class is for people with dia- 
betes, their caregivers or family 
members. The class will introduce 



the concept of controlling diabetes 
through diet, exercise, proper medi- 
cation and home blood glucose 
testing. 

Pre-registration is required and 
class size is limited to IS. For 
more information, call the 
HealthQuest Line to Better Health 
at 481-8141. 




Library Instruction Program At Central 



The staff at the Central Library, 
4100 Virginia Beach Boulevard, 
will give a lecture/demonstration on 
the newest technology for patron 
use that the library has to offer. The 
program will be held on Tuesday, 



June 10 at 10 a.m. 

Bring note-taking supplies to the 
program. Registration is being ac- 
cepted through the day of the pro- 
gram. Call 431-3070 for more in- 
formation. 



Storytime Program At Bay side Library 



Children ages four to eight years 
old and their parents are invited to 
attend an evening storytime pro- 
gram on magic wishing rituals 
from childhood days on Thursday, 
June 22 at 7 p.m. at the Bayside 



Library, 936 Independence Boule- 
vard. 

Registration accepted through the 
day of the program. Call 464-9320 
for more information. 



Children's Movies At Oceanfront Library 



"Walter the Lazy Mouse," 
"Remarkable Riderless," "Runaway 
Tricycle," "Seven With One Blow" 
and "The Wizard's Son" will be 
shown to children apes three and up 



at the Oceanfront Library, 1811 
Arctic Avenue on Saturday, June 17 
at 11 a.m. For more information, 
call the library at 428-41 13. 



Great Neck Holds "Read-Aloud Round-Up" 

The weekly Tuesday "Read-Aloud quired, however, the program will 

Round-Up" program begins on be on a first-come-first-serve basis. 

Tuesday, June 20 and ends Tuesday, For more information, call 48 1 - 

July 25. Registration is not re- 6094. 



••■■■■ 



School News 



Heading Scores Big In MS READaTHON 



Students from Centerville Ele- 
mentary School, Trinity Lutheran 
and 68 additional schools stacked up 
the books in the Fall '88 and 
Spring '89 edition of the MS 
READaTHON. Fourteen hundred 
youngsters read 17,585 books and 
raised $51,723 to aid the National 
Multiple Sclerosis Society, Hamp- 
ton Roads Chapter in the fight 
against multiple sclerosis. 

The MS Society presented an 
exciting challenge to elementary 
and junior high school students: 
"Join the MS READaTHON and 
read for the need of others." 

The MS READaTHON is a 
unique motivational reading pro- 
gram which improves children's 
reading skills and at the same time, 
generates necessary funds for MS 
research and chapter service pro- 
grams. During a four to six week 
period, children read as many books 
as they can and obtain sponsors 
who pledge money for each book 
read 

Centerville Elementary was the 
top fundraising and reading school 
for the Fall '88 program, raising 
almost $9,000 and reading 5,666 
books. This is an outstanding 
achievement for Centerville as no 
school in the last 14 READaTHON 
programs has raised this amount of 
money or read that many books. 

Trinity Lutheran in Norfolk has 
been the top fundraising and reading 
school for the Spring program and 
this year proved no different with 
students raising over $3,633 and 
reading 5,164 books. Trinity 
Lutheran and Centerville Elemen- 
tary were both awarded an MS 
READaTHON Achievement Banner 
and received ice cream parties cour- 
tesy of Pet Dairy. 

Other top schools were College 
Park Elementary, Rosemont Ele- 
mentary and Baylake Pines 
Elementary. Because of McDonald's 
commitment to reading they gener- 
ously provided scholarships to the 
above schools for their achieve- 
ments. 



Becky Cooper from Trinity 
Lutheran was the top reader in the 
READaTHON reading 631 books. 
Other top readers included Jenny 
Cooper from Trinity Lutheran (527 
books), Sara Posery from Trinity 
Lutheran (410 books), Michele 
Clark from Centerville (202 
books), Kimberly Anderson from 
Centerville (157 books) and Joy 
Mossman from College Park (105 
books.) 

The top fundraiser was Jay Hast- 
ings from Warwick River Christian 
School who raised $1,010. Other 
top fundraisers were Ben Pritchard 
from Bruton Heights ($451), Rad 
Davenport from Trinity Lutheran 
($369), Brenna Santoro from Cen- 
terville ($366), Anthony Santoro 
from Centerville ($354) and Mary 
Lynn Jansak from Rosemont 
($223.50). 

Every child who read at least one 
book and raised at least one cent re- 
ceived a completers package includ- 
ing McDonalds free food coupon, 7- 
Eleven Slurpee and Big Bite, a free 
game of Putt-Putt, Billy Bob Buck 
for four free game tokens at Show- 
biz Pizza, coupon to Chrysler Mu- 
seum Historic Houses, coupon to 
Virginia Zoological Park and a cer- 
tificate of appreciation from the MS 
Society. Many students also re- 
ceived special achievement awards 
based on books read and the amount 
of money raised. These included 
tickets to Busch Gardens, Water 
Country USA and Virginia Living 
Museum. A special honor for this 
year's top fundraisers and readers 
will be a chance to appear in the 
year's READaTHON commercial 
sponsored by WVEC TV 13. 

All proceeds from the MS REA- 
DaTHON will go toward research- 
ing the cause and finding a cure for 
MS, a disease of the central nervous 
system affecting over 800 families 
in Hampton Roads. The funds also 
provide local services such as ac- 
quatics therapy, monthly newslet- 
ters, support groups and equipment 
loan programs. 



Russ Awarded $500 Scholarship 



Mark James Russ of Shearwater 
Cove, has been awarded a $500 
college scholarship by the Reserve 
Officers Association of the United 
States. 

The award was one of 100 given 
to college students in the Henry J. 
Reilly Memorial Scholarship Pro- 
gram, in honor of the late Army 
Reserve Brigadier General, a founder 
and the first President of ROA, 
1922-23. 

This is the eighth year that the 



Rouleau On Babson's Dean's List 




The Virginia Beach Sun, June 21, 19695 




Summer School Begins June 26 



Myers and Salah. 



PA. Students Top Bridge Builders 



Matt Myers and Joe Salah flank 
the first place trophy that their 
miniature bridge won in the 1989 
Virginia Technology Student 
Association competition in Rich- 
mond recently. The Princess Anne 
High School technology education 
students, along with fellow student 
John Gross, designed and built the 
structure which supported 38 
pounds to win the competition. 



The three students also placed 
second in the association's problem 
solving competition by building a 
battery-powered device which picked 
up a sugar cube and moved it ten 
feet without damage. Myers, Salah, 
and Gross will take their bridge to 
the national technology education 
competition in Winston-Salem, 
N.C. this month. 




Photo by Cathy L. Sliwoski 

Career Development Center geography teacher John McLaughlin uses many 
tools, such as whirligigs and boats, to teach geography concepts. For his 
creative efforts, McLaughlin was chosen 1989 Virginia Beach "Teacher of the 
Year." 

John McLaughlin Named VB 
1989 Teacher Of The Year 



Summer school for secondary 
students in Virginia Beach City 
Public Schools will begin Monday, 
June 26, at five centrally-located 
schools and end August 11. The 
1989 elementary summer programs 
will be held July 3 through 31 at 
four locations. 

Registration for secondary stu- 
dents (grades 7 through 12) will be 
held Wednesday and Thursday, June 
21 and 22, at the summer school 
centers. Tuition for each full year 
course will be $80 for Virginia 
Beach residents and $120 for non- 
residents; a semester course will be 
$40 and $60, respectively. Tuition 
must be paid at the time registra- 
tion. 

In addition, a text- 
book/instructional fee of $6.50 will 
be charged' for each yearly course, 
and selected courses may require ad- 
ditional fees. 

The five summer school centers 
are Kempsville, Cox, and Green 
Run high schools, and Plaza and 
Salem Junior High Schools. Senior 
high and ninth grade students will 
attend senior high centers, based 
upon junior high attendance zones. 
All seventh and eighth grade stu- 
dents will attend either Plaza or 
/ Salem Junior High. School bus 
transportation will not be provided 
Nor summer school. 

Students to attend the 
Kempsville High summer school 
center line in the attendance zones 
of Bayside Junior High, Indepen- 
dence Junior High (only those stu- 
dents from the Bayside High atten- 
dance zone), Kempsville Junior 
High, and Brandon Junior High. 

The Cox High summer school 
center attendance zone includes 
Great Neck Junior High, 
Lynnhaven Junior High, Virginia 
Beach Junior High, and Indepen- 
dence Junior High (only those stu- 
dents from the Cox and Princess 
Anne High attendance areas). 

The Green Run High summer 
school center attendance zone in- 
cludes all of the attendance zones of 
Plaza, Princess Anne, and Salem 
Junior High Schools. 

Seventh and eighth grade students 
living in the Great Neck, Indepen- 
dence, Lynnhaven, Plaza, and Vir- 
ginia Beach Junior High attendance 
zones will attend the Plaza Junior 
High summer school center. Sev- 
enth and eighth grade students liv- 
ing in the Brandon, Bayside, 
Kempsville, Salem, and Princess 
Anne Junior High attendance zones 
will attend the Salem Junior High 
summer school center. 

Only the Cox High summer 
school center will offer morning 
and afternoon classes; the rest of the 
centers will have morning classes 



scholarships have been given and is 
the fifth year that awards were made 
to graduate students. Fifteen of the 
100 scholarships were tendered 
members of ROA who are studying 
for advanced degrees. The 100 total 
represents a gradual increase from 
the initial 25. 

Russ is a lieutenant in the Navy. 
He is pursuing an MBA in 
aerospace engineering at Duke 
Uuniversity, Durham, N.C. 



Michelle M. Rouleau, daughter 
of Mr. Michael Rouleau of 77th 



Street, has made the Dean's List at 
Babson College. 



By Cathy L Sliwoski 

Special To The Sun 

Whirligigs, bathtubs, cross-stitch 
patterns, and sandboxes have ap- 
peared this year in John McLaugh- 
lin's world geography classroom at 
the Career Development Center. 
While these items are not normally 
used for educational purposes, 
McLaughlin considers them as es- ' 
sential to the learning process when 
studying maps and globes. 

For example, McLaughlin used 
the whirligigs (a propellor mounted 
on a stick) and cross-stitch patterns 
to teach students the concept of 
latitude and longitude. It is this 
kind of creativity that earned 
McLaughlin the honor of Virginia 
Beach "Teacher of the Year" for 
1989. 

"Kids appreciate a teacher who 
works hard for them," said the Vir- 
ginia Beach native. "Students arc 
not harder to motivate today, but a 
teacher must be willing to try new 
ideas to improve learning." 

McLaughlin said this year, his 
fifteenth in the classroom, was 
truly a magical year. Everything 
seemed to come together for the 
benefit of all. "So many of the 
things I put into practice this year 
were the result of ideas I had ten or 
15 years ago, but couldn't imple- 
ment as successfully as I did this 
year." 

Because of his innovative leach- 
ing methods, McLaughlin has kept 
the interest of his CDC students 
piqued with hands-on projects that 
integrate math, science, and inter- 
personal skills. He received national 
recognition from the Federal Avia- 
tion Administration for his unit 
called "Sky School of Geography," 
based on the award-winning science- 
oriented workshop held last summer 
in Virginia Beach. Students built 
model aircraft, made hoi air bal- 
loons, and constructed a 48-foot 
map of the United Slates. 

After completing the Sky School 

focus, McLaughlin kept the theme 



going with Sea School and finished 
out the year with Land School. 

Students' creativity- was challenged 
with projects such as designing 
boats that could float the most 
bricks in a bathtub and playing 
Monopoly to study the geography 
of cities. McLaughlin is already re- 
fining the curriculum for next year. 

"I want to really unify the 'across 
the curriculum' approach for next 
year," said McLaughlin. "I also 
want to decorate the entire room 
like the inside of a cargo plane for 
Sky School, a ship for Sea School, 
and a log cabin for Land School." 

McLaughlin said one of the 
greatest challenges of working with 
the students at CDC is the different 
maturity and ability levels in each 
class. Connecting with the students 
on a personal level helps to build 
self-esteem and respect. This is an- 
other of his goals. 

In his application for Virginia 
"Teacher of the Year," McLaughlin 
wrote, "I sincerely believe that my 
srfdents feel belter about them- 
selves as they experience success in 
my class. For me, there is no 
greater accomplishment than help- 
ing many of my teens discover their 
latent talents." • 

McLaughlin said he believes it 
takes a number of years to become 
a good educator. For beginning 
teachers, he offers this advice: "Be 
persistent in your work and patient 
with yourself and your students." 

McLaughlin said one benefit of 
his teaching style over the "book 
and pencil" method is that often 
students are learning without 
realizing it. In a recommendation 
letter, student Lisa Matthews wrote 
". . .we were actually learning and 
having fun at the same lime. Be- 
sides teaching world geography, he 
has taught us self-respect." 

McLaughlin was recognized as 
ihe school division's Teacher of the 
Year at the May School Board 
meeting. He will represent Virginia 
Beach in the Virginia Teacher of the 
Year competition this summer. 



only. Students may enroll in only 
one course during the summer 
school session, except for graduat- 
ing seniors who will be eligible to 
take two courses Courses which 
are only offered at one center will 
be open to all students. 

Morning classes will start at 
7:30 a.m. and end at noon. After- 
noon classes will be from 12:30 to 
5 p.m. All schools will be closed 
for the July 4 holiday. 

All secondary course offerings are 
subject to having sufficient enroll- 
ment and certified staff to teach 
them, but the probable course 
offerings for summer school are: 
English 9, 10, 1 1, and 12; geogra- 
phy; world history (at Cox and 
Kempsville only); Virginia and 
U.S. history; Virginia and U.S. 
government; general mathematics 9 
and math applications (Cox only); 
algebraic foundations; Algebra I; 
geometry; Algebra II; Algebra 
ll/trigonomctry; earth science; 
biology; chemistry (Cox only); 
health and physical education 9 and 
10 (Cox only); art appreciation, and 
Typing I. 

Probable seventh and eighth 
grade summer courses will be En- 
glish 7 and 8, mathematics 7, gen- 
eral mathematics 8, pre-algebra 8, 
principals of science 7, principals 
of science 8, social studies 7, health 
and physical education 7 and 8, and 
special education 7, 8, EH, EMR, 
andLD. 

The four centers for elementary 
summer school classes will be lo- 
cated at Brookwood. Bavside, 
Lynnhaven, and Pembroke elemen- 
tary schools. 

Classes in basic reading, compo- 
sition/grammar, mathematics, pri- 
mary reading, and most special 
education courses will be offered at 
Brookwood Elementary. Intensive 
English classes for non-native 
speakers will be at Lynnhaven El- 
ementary, and special education 
classes for the hearing impaired and 
for autistic students will be at 
Pembroke Elementary. 

Basic read- 

ing/composition/grammar, mathe- 
matics, and primary reading classes 
will be held at Bayside Elementary. 
In addition, Bayside Elementary 
will also offer a Writing-to-Read 
class open only to identified stu- 
dents from Bayside, Shelton Park, 
Hermitage, Thoroughgood, New- 
town Road, and Williams Elemen- 
tary Schools. 

Specific information about the 
1989 summer school programs is 
available at all Virginia Beach pub- 
lic schools. Should a student or 
parent have particular questions 
about summer school operations, 
contact the student's guidance 
counselor. 



Beach Students On Longwood's List 



Stacey L. Noona, Mary E. An- 
drews, Laura E. Vollrath, Carla L. 
Voorhees, Pam L. Hinman, Laura 
L. Ratcliffe, Cheryl L. Selig (4.0), 
Kirsten R. Baum, Bonnie J. Buck- 
ner (4.0), Linda T. Dees (4.0), 
Wilita Aguirre Darang, Suzanne M. 



Pellegrino (4.0), James M. Brown 
(4.0), Kimberly M. Brumley, Car- 
ole R. Propster and Patricia E. 
Smith (4.0), have all been named to 
the Dean's List at Longwood Col- 
lege for the spring semester. 




Henry Ford (center) and Dawn Breathwalte (right), both of Virginia Beach, 

returned recently from a semester of study at the University of the Andes in 

Merida, Venezuela. 

Longwood Students Return From Venezuela 

They and nine other student* were the first participants m Longwood 
College's new "Spanish in the Andes" program. Shown with them at the airport 
In Merida Is Jenny Miller, of Medford Lakes, NJ. Ford and Breathwalte an 
Longwood students; Miller Is a student at the College of milam and Mary. 



King Brass At Beach Chapel 

King's Brass blends the favorite 
hymns of old with a love for the 
classics and the technology of the 
synthesizer. This year's tour will 



The King's Brass will be appear- 
ing in concert at The Virginia 
Beach Community Chapel, 1261 
Laskin Road, on June 25 at 6:30 
p.m. 

The King's Brass consists of 
three trumpets, three trombones, 
and a tuba. This January, their 
twelfth anniversary, they will be 
touring from New York to Chicago 
and from Philadelphia to Florida. 

Through their instrumental con- 
certs of worship and praise, the 



again feature concert artist Jim Al- 
lison. 

The 1989 King's Brass tour, di- 
rected by Tim Zimmerman, will 
introduce selections from their 
newly released album. Steadfast 

A nursery is provided. For further 
information call Dr. Al Lunde at 
428-1881. 



- - - 



• ■ ■ ^MM^WW*^^^M«fOT«|MPBB« 



^^mmm^mmmmmm 



6 The Virginia Beach Sun, June 21, 1989 





hotoFeatu 



Flag Day Celebrated At Municipal Center 




Public Information Officer Beatrice Kitchen sings the Star Spangled Banner. 



Lillian Youell, Daughters of the American Revolution member, shakes Oral Lambert's hand after the ceremony. 



Approximately 40 people attended the Flag Day celebration at Rag Square at the 
Municipal Center. The celebration was hosted by the Daughters of the American 
Revolution. 

After the Pledge of Allegiance was said, Beatrice Kitchen of the public information 
office, led the crowd in the National Anthem. The American's Creed was then read by 
Mrs. R. Fenton Wicker, regent, Adam Thouroughgood chapter, DAR. Mrs. Harvey T. 
Walsh, Jr., regent, Princess Anne County chapter, then explained the history of Flag 
Day. 

Assistant City Manager for Administration Giles G. Dodd made a few remarks in the 
absence of City Manager Aubrey Watts. Mayor Meyera Oberndorf spoke to the crowd 
and then the ceremony came to a close. 

Photos by Karen Dalrymple 






lembers of DAR, as well as city officials, were present at the Flag Day ceremony. 



Oral Lambert director of Public Works and Assistant City Manager for Human Services Hector Reven listen to the 
remarks of Mayor Oberndorf. 




School News 



National Teacher Of The Year Wishes High School Graduates Well 



I 



The following is a message to 
seniors graduating from the public 
schools of Virginia from Mary V. 
Bicouvaris, the 1989 National 
Teacher Of The Year. "Mrs. Bic," 
as she is affectionately known to 
hundreds of students, teaches gov- 
ernment and international relations 



l 



at Bethel High School in Hampton. 
The National Teacher of the Year 
program is sponsored by Good 
Housekeeping Magazine, the 
Council of Chief State School Of- 
ficers, and Encyclopaedia Britan- 
nica. Mrs. Bicouvaris will represent 
America's teachers during the year, 
traveling the nation for appearances, 
lectures, consultations and other 
activities. 

Through its public schools and 
its public school teachers, the 
Commonwealth of Virginia has 
given you the best it has to give - a 
free public education. For the past 



12 or 13 years of your life, my 
colleagues and I have done our best 
in classrooms across Virginia to see 
that you were given every opportu- 
nity to develop and achieve as hu- 
man beings, learners, and citizens 
of Virginia and the world. 

We did our part If we didn't suc- 
ceed with each of you at every turn, 
perhaps it was because our hope for 
you was greater than your hope for 
yourself. Teachers, you see, can 
only do so much. For successful 
learning to take place, students 
must be willing to learn, and they 
must want to assist in their own 
education. 

Through the combined efforts, 
then, of many people - your par- 
ents, your teachers, and yourselves - 
you have come to one of the mile- 
stones in your life - high school 
graduation. Now that everything is 



up to you, where will you go from 
here? 

I hope that you will continue to 
educate yourselves. There are, after 

all, two real purposes for education. 
The first is to become a well- 
rounded, well-informed human be- 
ing. The second is to acquire the 
skills that will enable you to make 
a living. While some of you may 
not ever need to improve, expand or 
further develop the skills that allow 
you to make a living, I hope none 
of you will deny yourselves the 
learning which will allow you to 
become complete human beings, 
and to accept your rightful place as 
involved citizens in our society. 

I believe that America is the 
greatest country on the face of the 
earth. I hope you believe that too. 
And I hope you know that if you 
want to make a difference in Amer- 



ica, you can only hope to do it 
from within the mainstream. If you 
really want to make your commu- 
nity, your state, or your nation 
better, you must work within the 
system. I also hope that when you 
become taxpayers, you will feel a 
responsibility to support public ed- 
ucation the way that earlier genera- 
tions of Americans supported it, 
making your basic education possi- 
ble. 

In your lifetime, the world will 
move from the 20th century to the 
21st. The skills needed by you and 
your children to succeed and excel 
in the 21st century will be different 
- more difficult, more technical, 
more precise - than those your par- 
ents needed. Be aware of that. Pre- 
pare yourselves for a different and 
possibly more difficult future than 
you have yet imagined. 



In the 200-plus years since the 
Revolutionary War freed us from 
Great Britain, it has taken the vi- 
sion, work, and sacrifice of count- 
less millions of Americans to get 
the United States to its current po- 
sition of leadership in the world and 
to keep it there. It will take the vi- 
sion, work, and sacrifice of count- 
less more millions of Americans in 
the 21st century to go beyond the 
status quo. You will be among 
those countless millions. Try to 
make a difference. 

The place to begin is in your 
own family. Strive to be the best 
men or women your parents could 
have raised. Live for yourselves, 
but never forget that the apple 
doesn't fall far from the tree. What- 
ever advantages you have had are 
the result of your parents' and many 
other people's efforts. When you are 



parents yourselves, remember that 
self-esteem is first and best devel- 
oped in the home which provides a 
strong tradition of support. 

As you go about your life, learn 
to give. Volunteer a little of your- 
selves and your services so that our 

world will be a better place to live 
in. President Bush has asked us to 
be a kinder, gentler nation, and we 
must take this wish as a command, 
because the quality of life available 
to us depends on the commitment 
we are willing to make to each 
other, to our nation, and to the 
world. 

Your school and your commu- 
nity send you off with pride and the 
fervent wish that you, the hope of 
this nation, will walk the narrow 
path to a good, honest, and full life. 

I salute you on your graduation, 
and I wish for you a good life. 



- 



■ ■ »»»•*»»! 



The Virginia Beach Sun, June 21, 1989 7 



. 



Business 




Glenn Named Senior Bank Manager 



CBDA Holds Wine Tasting Party 



Virginia Beach Federal Savings 
Bank has promoted Marcia E. 
Glenn, assistant vice president, as 
senior branch manager. She will 
oversee the operation of the Bank's 
five branches, including the sav- 
ings, mortgage and consumer lend- 
ing functions, and the business de- 
velopment activity at each branch. 
She will supervise approximately 
30 employees, responsible for im- 
plementing new programs and 
training personnel. 

Glenn joined Virginia Beach 
Federal in 1982. She has served the 
Bank as a branch manager for the 
past Ave years, most recently at the 
Lynnhaven Branch. Prior to joining 



the Bank, she was associated with 
Baeumel & Associates, a national 
recruiting firm. 

Glenn holds a bachelor's degree 
from the University of the state of 
New York. She also has completed 
coursework with the Institute of 
Financial Education. 

She is a member of the Princess 
Anne Rotary Club and the Cape 
Henry Chapter of die American 
Businesswomen's Association. In 
addition, she serves on the board of 
directors and as education chair- 
person for the Tidewater Chapter of 
the Institute of Financial Education. 

Glenn resides in Virginia Beach. 



The Central Business District 
Association is sponsoring a wine 
tasting party at Wesley's Restau- 
rant, 32nd Street and Holly Road, 
Thursday, June 22 at 6 p.m. Heavy 
hors d'oeuvres will be served. The 



fee is $20 per person. 

Mail checks to: One Columbus 
Center, Suite 667, Virginia Beach, 
VA 23462 or call 490-7812 for 
further information. Open to the 
public. Reservations are requested 
by Friday, June 16 



Channel 29 Broadcasts Call-In 



Dailey Named Vet College Professor 



The Municipal Cable Network 
Channel 29 will broadcast a live 
call-in on hurricane survival on 
Wednesday, June 21 at 9 p.m. 

Mayor Meyera E. Oberndorf, di- 
rector of emergency management, 
Lee Eskey and National Weather 
Service representative Terry Ritter 
will discuss hurricane preparedness 



and answer questions from viewers. 
The number to call with questions 
will appear on the screen during the 
broadcast of this segment of "City 
Dialogue." 

"City Dialogue" will be rebroad- 
cast Thursday, June 22 through 
Sunday, June 25 at noon. 



Richard S. Dailey of Pembroke 
Veterinary Clinic is one of eighteen 
veterinarians from Virginia and 
Maryland named adjunct faculty 
members in the Virginia-Maryland 
Regional College of Veterinary 
Medicine for the 1989-90 academic 
year. 



As clinical preceptors, these vet- 
erinarians will supervise fourth-year 
veterinary students conducting four- 
week private practice clerkships. 
Students serve as part of a partici- 
pating veterinarian's professional 
staff during the clerkships. 



Master Gardener Training Program Held 



Carson Receives Pharmacist Award 



The Virginia Beach Department 
of Agriculture/Cooperative Exten- 
sion Service is currently distribut- 
ing applications for its fall volun- 
teer training program. 

Master Gardener trainees receive 
45 hours of home horticulture in- 



struction, in return, volunteers 
must give 45 hours back to the 
city's horticulture program. Only 
Virginia Beach residents are eligi- 
ble. 
Call 427-4769 for an application. 



Olympia Announces New Tenants 



Olympia Development Corpora- 
tion announces Essex First Mort- 
gage Corporation, Sovran Com- 
mercial Mortgage Corporation, 
Wilhemsen Lines USA, Inc., 
Commonwealth Information Ser- 
vices and Mobile Ripening Corpo- 
ration as new tenants in Reflec- 
tions - The Corporate Park at 
Lynnhaven. Together these leases 
represent an additional 8,864-square- 
feet of leased space at Reflections. 



Reflections is a master planned 
four phase office park located at the 
intersection of Lynnhaven Parkway 
and Route 44. Total build out is 
planned for 275,000-square-feet of 
Class A office space. 

Olympia is a full service devel- 
opment, construction and manage- 
ment company focusing on com- 
mercial development in southeast 
Virginia. 



Robert W. Carson of Atlee has 
been honored by the Virginia 
Pharmaceutical Association as its 
1989 recipient of the A.H. Robins 
"Bowl of Hygeia" Award for out- 
standing community service by 



pharmacists. 

Carson, owner of Atlee Cardinal 
Pharmacy at 722 South Leadbetter 
Road, received the award this 
evening during the association's 
annual meeting in Virginia Beach. 




Law Enforcement 



Crime Solvers Seek Arsonists 



Streepy Promoted By Brown-Forman 



Can Joins GSH Residential 



Josephine Carr, former owner and 
broker of Jo Carr Realty and Cen- 
tury 21 -Seaboard, both of Tidewa- 
ter, has joined GSH Residential 
Real Estate Corporation. Carr, a 
prominent figure in the Hampton 
Roads real estate industry, will 
work out of GSH's Norfolk Sales 
Center as a sales associate. 

The experienced associate actu- 
ally re-joins GSH after a lengthy 



absence. She previously worked as 
a GSH sales associate for 15 years. 

Carr is a past president of the 
Metro Multiple Listing Service and 
is a member of the Million Dollar 
Sales Club. Can has received a 
broker's license, as well as Graduate 
of Realtors Institute (GRI) and 
Certified Residential Specialist 
(CRS) designations. 



Daniel Streepy has been pro- 
moted by Brown-Forman Beverage 
Company to spirits market 
supervisor for Virginia. He is based 
in Virginia Beach. 

Streepy joined the company last 
year as a sales representative in 
Jackson, Miss, he earned a bachelor 
of science degree from the Univer- 
sity of Kansas. 



Brown-Forman Beverage Com- 
pany is a division of Brown-For- 
man Corporation, Louisville, KY. 
It markets more than 20 brands of 
wines and spirits, including Jack 
Daniel's Tennessee Whiskey, 
Canadian Mist Canadian Whiskey, 
Southern Comfort, and Korbel 
California Champagnes. 



SATCOM Expands Its Operations 



Arson investigators in Virginia 
beach would like help in solving 
eight arsons that occurred in a mo- 
bile home park near the beachfront. 
A cash reward of up to $1,000 is 
being offered by Crime Solvers for 
information that will lead to an ar- 
rest 

Between January 29, and May 30 
eight trailers have been set afire in 
the Colony Mobile Home Park at 
913 Virginia Beach Boulevard. Two 
of the fires were reported in Jan- 
uary, one in March, four in April, 
aril) one in May. All the fires were 



set at night and the trailers were 
vacant. Two of the homes were de- 
stroyed. Three were heavily dam- 
aged and three others had minor 
damage. 

Anyone with information about 
these or any other arson can call 
Crime Solvers anonymously at 
427-0000. All calls are confidential 
and are not recorded. A code number 
will be assigned and will not have 
to give a name or testify in court to 
collect a cash reward. 



SATCOM, Inc. a Virginia Beach 
based computer software developer 
has opened two regional offices. 
The offices are located in the 
Greater Atlanta and San Francisco 



Bay areas. 

SATCOM, Inc. is a privately- 
held developer of software for the 
Hewlett Packard 3000 computer 
system. 



Police Seek Christie's Murderer 



Crowley Selected Chairman Of Agents Council 



John F. Crowling, CIC, of 
Brown-Arris-Langhorne, Inc., has 
been selected to serve as chairman 
of the 1989 agents council of the 
Shelby Insurance Group. 

Crowling begins his term with 
two years experience as a Shelby 
agents council member. The coun- 
cil officially meets twice annually 



with Shelby executives to review 
company performance, critique new 
programs, offer input and make 
recommendations about major is- 
sues affecting agencies today. 
Members are also called upon 
throughout the year to lend Shelby 
management their advice and coun- 
sel. 




? /f 



Growth Potential 

Thev have it... Does your Qgrgei? 




Council Approves Transfer Of 
Some School Board Funds 

City council, which appropriated foumJ itse j f Monday approving 
funds to the School Board by major u^fas f some of the funds to 
categories for the current fiscal year, ther categories. 

_ Councilwoman Barbara Henley 

said that she was not sure council 
accomplished anything by approv- 
ing the appropriations by categories 
and added that she hoped the School 
Board does things differently next 
year. 

Henley approved the transfers, 
however, in a 7-3 vote. Voting 
against approval were Council- 
women Reba McClanan and Nancy 
parker, and Councilman John D. 
Moss. Mayor Meyera Oberndorf 
absent. 



Sometime during the night on 
Friday, June 15, 1988, 83-year-old 
Anastasia N. Christie was mur- 
dered. Virginia Beach Crime 
Solvers would like help and is of- 
fering a cash reward of up to $1 ,000 
for information that will lead to an 
arrest An additional $10,000 reward 
is being offered by her family and 
friends. 

Christie was found by her son in 
her home in the 300 block of 25th 
1/2 Street at the Oceanfront about 
12:30 p.m. the next day. She had 



been sexually assaulted and died as a 
result of being beaten. The man re- 
sponsible for the murder is believed 
to have entered (he house through a 
window and attacked Christie as she 
slept. 

Anyone with information about 
this murder should call Crime 

Solvers at 427-0000. Both rewards 
can be collected without giving a 
name or testifying in court. Callers 
will be assigned a confidential code 
number to assure anonymity. 



Ecological Inventory Of City Developed 



The city has agreed to spend 
$83,716 for a three-year study by 
the Virginia Natural Heritage Pro- 
gram of the Virginia Department of 
Conservation and Historic Re- 
sources to develop an inventory of 
the ecological resources of the city. 

Council appropriated $13,867 for 
the first year of the study which 
will consist of data collection. A 
field inventory will be made during 



the second year at a cost ot 
$54,624, and the final report will 
be completed the third year with the 
last payment of $15,225. 

The program ranks Virginia 
Beach first among 50 localities on 
the priority list for an inventory 
because of its high concentration of 
rare species and unique natural areas 
and the rapid urbanization and de- 
velopment which may destroy these 
resources. 



Moss was concerned that part of - - 

the $1,590,000 in transferred funds ^ cor)t Development Project Coordinator 



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If you want to grow with a growing industry - 

If you're willing to invest in career training today 
for a brighter career future - 

Then Discover the 

Swine Management Technology 

Program at 
James Sprunt Community College 

For more information contact: 

James Sprunt Community College 

Post Office Box 398 

Kenansville, NC 28349 

(919)296-1341 

JSCC Is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Collage 



was being used for remodeling the 
Court House Elementary School. 

Capital outlay accounted for 
$1,010,000 of the money trans- 
ferred, which was needed, according 
to Fred G. Benham, assistance su- 
perintendent for financial services, 
for unexpected expenses for build- 
ing renovation and capital outlay, 
specifically for equipment and fur- 
nishings for expansion on the sec- 
ond floor and furnishings and 
equipment for the administrative 
sections of the school. Included was 
$220,000 for shelving, a telephone 
system for the Butler building con- 
taining the Media Center on 
Witchduck Road School plant site. 
The Governor's technology initia- 
tive, said Benham also was 
unanticipated. The cost of the com- 
puters was $705,000 and the cost of 
the satellite dishes, approximately 
$70,000 installed. 

Another transfer, of $280,000 
was to the textbook rental fund. 
Benham said that die rental rates are 
set as high as the School Board 
wants them so as not to exclude 
any of the students. He said that the 
schools needed the additional funds 
to cover students who cannot pay 
and for the higher cost of text- 
books. 

Other unanticipated costs have 
been absorbed within the operating 
budget, Benham said. These include 
the asbestos removal program, 
($300,000); the increase in health 
insurance premiums ($700,000), 
and a payment to the textbook fund 
of an additional $150,000. 

The categories from which the 
money was transferred includes in- 
struction, $1370,000; pupil trans- 
portation, $100,000; summer 
school, $50,000; general adult edu- 
cation, $40,000, and other educa- 
tional programs, $30,000. 



A new position of economic de- 
velopment project coordinator has 
been established to coordinate the 
work of professionals and consul- 
tants contracted by the Develop- 
ment Authority, city agencies and 
private developers. 

City council has transferred 
$50,440 from the reserve for con- 
tingencies to the Department of 
Economic Development to fund the 
position for the 1990 fiscal year. 
The salary and benefits come to 
$45,960 and the capital outlay as- 
sociated with the position, $4,480. 

The Development Authority re- 



quested (he funds. 

In establishing the position, 
council made it clear that it ex- 
pected results from the investment. 
Councilwoman Reba McClanan 
said that she expected some results 
and soon. She said that expansion, 
of economic development should 
pay for the coordinator's salary. 

Among the projVcjs^ror which 
the coordinator would be needed, 
according to the staff, are the exist- 
ing commercial industrial parks and 
the proposed Corporate Landing 
Business Park, as well as resort in- 
dustry development 



Improper Boating Considered Reckless 



The city has added the designa- 
tion of "improper" boating to its 
reckless boating ordinance to cover 
incidents where the boater, surf- 
boarder or water skier is culpable 
more of inattention and negligence 
than if recklessness. 

Council also adopted an ordi- 
nance making it unlawful for a 
moped rent business to require or 



accept as security or surety any op- 
erators' license, military identifica- 
tion card of other permit or pass is- 
sued by any state or federal agency. 
The ordinance was precipitated by 
complaints to police that the rental 
agency held the cards for "leverage" 
when a dispute arose over costs and 
fees upon return of the moped. 



Council Considers Athletics Grants 



It would be nice, mused Coun- 
cilwoman Barbara Henley, if all 
school activities had the financial 
support available to athletics. 

Council was considering appro- 
priations for the School Board 
grants and enterprise funds when 
Henley remarked that athletics has 
more money because people pay to 
see the sporting events. The appro- 
priation for the School Athletic 
Fund was $334,450 which included 
$266,000 from admissions to ath- 
letic events and $59,450 from re- 



tained earnings. 

Other programs, she said, don't 
have that kind of money. "Other 
programs fall by the wayside," she 
said, and have to raise their own 
money like the bands, "selling band 
turkeys," a reference to the comic 
strip Funky Winkerbean which fea- 
tures a tireless money-raising band 
director. 

Henley specifically mentioned 
the two-man Bayside High School 
debate learn which recently came in 

iff 



MMMM 



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■* v * %••*■ • 



•^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^■^^wr^ 



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8 The Virginia Beach Sun, June 21, 1989 

heirs at law be determined. 



Shao On Stetson's 
Dean's List, Honors 

Patricia Sue Shao, daughter or 
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Shao, has 
been named to the spring semester 
Dean's List and Honor Roll at 
Stetson University. 

Academic honors arc announced 
at the close of each semester. About 
550 of the 2,500 undergraduates 
earned honors for the spring 
semester. 



Bragg Graduates 
From Samford 

Laurence Dickerson Bragg re- 
cently graduated from Samford 
University. R. Clayton McWhorter, 
chairman and chief executive officer 
of Hcalthtrust, Inc. delivered the 
commencement address. L. Stanley 
Chauvin, Jr. of Louisville, Ky., 

spoke at graduation for Sam ford's 
Cumberland School of Law. 

Alabama's only private compre- 
hensive university, Samford enrolls 
4,100 students from 43 states and 
39 nations. 



Rose On Methodist 
Coitege Dean's List 

Sarah K. Rose has been named to 
the 1989 Spring semester Dear^s 
List at Methodist College in- 
Fayetteville, N.C. 

To be included on the Dean's 
List, a student must achieve a 3.2 
(B) average on a 4.0 scale while 
taking an academic load of 12 or 
more semester hours, with no grade 
of D, F, or incomplete. 



Public Notice 



MECHANICS LIEN SALE 
By virtue of section 43-34 of the 
Virginia Motor Vehicle Code, the 
undersigned will sell at public auc- 
tion on Thursday, June 30, 1989 at 
10:00 A.M. at 3904 Colley Ave., 
Norfolk, Va., reserving unto itself 
the right to bid, the following mo- 
torcycle to satisfy liens for storage 
and/or repairs. 1986 HONDA 
ID#JH2PC1709gm006522 The 
Motorcycle Co. Inc. 

25-4 
H6-21VBS 



Public Notice 



Take notice, that on June 26, 
1989, at 10:00 o'clock A.M., at the 
premises of 4753 Virginia Beach 
Blvd., Virginia Beach, Virginia 
23462, the undersigned will sell at 
public auction, for cash only, re- 
serving the right to bid, the 
following motor vehicle. 

1979 Ford Thunderbird 

Serial #9G87F257541 
25-3 
U6-21VBS 



Public Notice 



Auction: 1980 OLDS CUT- 
LASS SUPREME #4889 

Serial Number: #3R47AA24 
75713 

Auction date: July 7, 1989 

Time: 11:00 am. at Norfolk 
Motor Company, 7000 N. Military 
Highway, Norfolk, Virginia 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company Re- 
serves the right to Bid. 

25-2 
K6-21VBS 



Public Notice 



Auction: 1981 DODGE CHAR- 
GER #5107 

Serial Number: #1B3BL24BD 
33732 

Auction date: July 7, 1989 

Time: 11:00 am. at Norfolk 
Motor Company, 7000 N. Military 
Highway, Norfolk, Virginia 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company Re- 
serves the right to Bid. 

25-1 
U6-21VBS 

| Public Notice 1 

VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF VIR- 
GINIA BEACH 

This the 26th DAY OF MAY, 
1989 

ELIZABETH WRIGHT 
STALLINGS and JOHN H. 
WRIGHT Petitioners 

v. 

WILBERT WRIGHT and UN- 
KNOWN GRANDDAUGHTER 
OF GEORGEANA WRIGHT 
PARKER Defendants 

IN CHANCERY NO. CH89-568 

QJUXK 

This cause came on to be heard 
upon the petition praying that 
Wilbert Wright and the unknown 
granddaughter of Georgeana Wright 
Parker be declared legally dead and 
that the fact of descent and their 



In accordance with Section 64.1- 
109 of the Code of Virginia, it is 
ORDERED that the notice which is 
attached to and made a part of this 
Order be published once a week for 
four successive weeks in The Vir- 
ginia Beach Sun, a newspaper pub- 
lished in the City of Virginia 
Beach. 
May 26, 1989 
H. Calvin Spain, Judge 
A Copy Teste: J. Curtis Fruit, 
Clerk 

By Raymond W. Bjorkman, 
D.C. 
I ASK FOR THIS 
WILLIAM L. PERKINS 
PRICE, PERKINS & LARKIN 
ATTORNEYS AT LAW 
LYNNWOOD PLAZA SUITE 
350 
621 LYNNHAVEN PARKWAY 
VA. BEACH., VA. 23452 
23-6 
4t6-28VBS 

I Public Notice I 

VIRGINIA: IN THE CLERKS 
OFFICE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 

THE 26lh DAY OF MAY 1989 

ELIZABETH WRIGHT 
STALLINGS and JOHN H. 
WRIGHT Petitioners 

v. 

WILBERT WRIGHT and UN- 
KNOWN GRANDDAUGHTER 

OF GEORGEANA WRIGHT 
PARKER Defendants 

IN CHANCERY NO. CH89-568 

NOTICE 

To: Wilbert Wright, if living, or 
if he be dead, then the widow and 
heirs, devisees next of kin, legatees, 
and successors in title of Wilbert" 
Wright. 

To: Unknown granddaughter of 
Georgeana Wright Parker, if living, 
or if she be dead, then the spouse 
and heirs, devisees, next of kin, 
legatees, and successors in title of 
the granddaughter of Georgeana 
Wright Parker. 

A petition has been filed in the 
Circuit Court of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach alleging that Wilbert 
Wright has disappeared and has been 
missing for over 50 years and re- 
questing that he be declared dead and 
that the fact of descent and the heirs 
at law of Wilbert Wright, if de- 
ceased, be established; and alleging 
that the granddaughter of Georgeana 
Wright Parker, whose name is un- 
known, has disappeared and been 
missing for over 20 years and re- 
questing thai she be declared dead 
and that the fact of descent in the 
heirs at law of the granddaughter of 
Georgeana Wright Parker, deceased, 
be established. 

Notice is hereby given that a 
hearing will be held in the Circuit 
Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Municipal Center, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, on the 7th day of 
July, 1989 at 10:00 a.m. for the 
purpose of hearing evidence con- 
cerning the alleged absence of 



Wilbert Wright and the 
granddaughter of Georgeana Wright 
Parker and the circumstances and 
duration thereof; and also for the 
purpose of determining the fact of 
descent and the heirs at law of 
Wilbert Wright and the 
granddaughter of Georgeana Wright 
Parker in the event that they should 
be declared to be legally dead. 

A Copy Teste: J. Curtis 
Fruit, Clerk 

BY RAYMOND W. BJORK- 
MAN, D.C. * ' 
WILLIAM L. PERKINS 
PRICE, PERKINS & LARKIN 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 
LYNNWOOD PLAZA SUITE 

350 

621 LYNNHAVEN PARKWAY 
VA. BEACH. VA., 23452 
23-5 
4t6-28VBS 



[ 



Public Notice 



VIRGINIA: In the Clerk's Office 
of the Circuit Court of the City of 
Virginia Beach, on the 25th day of 
May, 1989. 

In re: Adoption of SIOBHAN 
BRITTANY SARGENT and 
Change of Nairie to SIOBHAN 
BRITTANY FOLEY. 

By: JOSEPH PATRICK FOLEY 
& MAUREEN L. FOLEY, Peti- 
tioners 

IN CHANCERY #CA89-86 

To: JEFFREY W. ALPAUGH 

P.O. Box 166 

Oldwick, New Jersey 08858 

ORDER OF PUBLICATION 

This day came JOSEPH 
PATRICK FOLEY and MAU- 
REEN L. FOLEY, Petitioners, and 
represented that the object of this 
proceeding is to effect the adoption 
of the above named infant, SIOB- 
HAN BRITTANY SARGENT, by 
JOSEPH PATRICK FOLEY and 
MAUREEN L. FOLEY, husband 
and wife, and affidavit having been 
made and filed that JEFFREY W. 
ALPAUGH, a natural parent of said 
child, is a non-resident of the State 
of Virginia, the last known post 
office address being: P.O. Box 166, 
Oldwick, New Jersey 08858. 

It is therefore Ordered that the 
said JEFFREY W. ALPAUGH ap- 
pear before this Court within ten 
(10) days after publication of this 
Order and indicate his attitude to- 
ward the proposed adoption, or oth- 
erwise do what is necessary to pro- 
tect his interest in this matter. 

It is further Ordered that a copy 
of this Order be published once each 
week for four successive weeks in 
THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN, a 
newspaper of general circulation in 
this city. 

A copy teste: 

J. Curtis Fruit, Clerk 

By: Linda D. Jones D.C. 

Edward J. Sargent p.q. 

1157 S. Military Hwy., Suite 
104 

Chesapeake, VA 23320 

(804) 523-9553 

22-9 - 
4t6-21VBS 



HOW TO SUBSCRIBE TO 
THE VIRGINIA BEACH SUN 



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Please mail this coupon with your check to: 

Sun, 138 Rosemont Road, Virginia Beach, Va. 23452 

RATES: Within 40 miles of Virginia Beach: 

□ One year $12.85 []Two years $22.50 
Elsewhere in Virginia and North Carolina: 

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Nancy Debbie 

We're Here To Serve You 



PICK 
A PRO 




When you have a 

need for 

professional 

help. . . pick one 
of these 

> businesses! 

GOSPORT AUTOMOTIVE 
CENTER 

Complete Body & Paint Shop 

Mechanical Repairs, 

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24 Hr. Wrecker » 

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— mho iiwiorsrExy— 

UPHOLSTERY 

Trucks, Cars, Boats, 

RVs, Custom Carpet 

Headllners, Inserts 

1 35-D Tilden Ave., Chesapeake 

(Behind Be-Lo) 

Call 547-0376 

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CARPET REPAIR 

Install & Restretch 

18 years experience 

JACK BEASLEY 
Call 482-1564 

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Commercial & Residential 

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Free Estimates 

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• Garden Tling, Lawn Maintenance 

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PAINTING SALE 

Average exterior $399 

Average interior $299 

Free Estimates 

Ref. 24 hours 



Call 428-2616 

l&CyCLI'XQ 

CASH PAID 

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To And out how to 

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Can 547-4571 





B Virginia 

Press l^liJ 



Services 




V.P.S. AD NETWORK 



V.P.S. AD NETWORK 



OWNER-OPERATOR - Join 
Schneider National Carriers. Lease- 
on your tractor, or take advantage of 
our new tractor purchase program. 
We offer excellent revenue, top 
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OTR DRIVERS: Hornady Truck 
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Excellent benefits. Gonvention- 
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WANTED: Generous loving fami- 
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ARTS AND CRAFTS 
EXHIBITORS 4th of July 
Extravaganza Craft Booths. $35 fee. 
Inside/Outside. Applications now 
available. Ms. Marcus, Godwin 
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BE ON T.V. many needed for 
commercials. Now hiring all ages. 
For casting info. Call 615-779- 
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Number 1 in service, number 1 in 
satisfaction 1-800-423-5967. Van25 

FOR SALE, Used, Recondilioned- 
Bulldozers - Backhoes - Loaders - 
Gradalls - Pavers - Compactors - 
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Watson Equipment Sales. 
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1000 WOLFF SUNBEDS TON- 
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from $249 Lamps-Lotions-Acces- 
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KAYAK SWIMMING POOL Get 
rid of your old car, boat, ordinary 
pool or just about anything 
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STEEL BUILDINGS 40x100x12 - 
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INCREDIBLE INFORMATION - 
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SEWING MACHINES: Due to 
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largest manufacturer offers New zig- 
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ADOPTION: Loving Childless 
Couple wishes to adopt. We will 
pay your medical and legal 
expenses. Please call Pam and Van 
Collect 703-379-7031. Van25 

AIRCRAFT MECHANIC CA- 
REER TRAINING - Train for an 
exciting and secure career in avia- 
tion. Day/Night classes financial 
aid job placement available. Call 
today 1-800-359-7423. Van25 

ADVERTISING / MARKETING 
DIRECTOR • Outstanding position 
for real pro with strong background 
in ad sales management, marketing, 
recruiting, and bottom line empha- 
sis on sales production. 260,000 
circulation weekly in Washington 
metro area. Excellent salary & 
bonus plan. Write P.O. Box 1050, 
Germantown, MD 20874, Mr. 
Moore, 301-258-7434. 
Van25 

WORLDWIDE selection of vaca- 
tion properties. Receive $2 on all 
inquires. Call Resort Resale today. 
1-800-826-7*44 NATL 1-800-826- 
1847 in Fta. or 1-305-771-6296. 

Van25 



TRUCK DRIVERS: Start at 23 
cents per mile. 2,100 miles per 
week guaranteed. Minimum 1 year 
OTR experience, 23 years old. 
Inexperienced? Ask about driving 
school. Call J.B. Hunt 1-800-643- 
3331. Van25 

FREE REAL ESTATE CATALOG 
- Listings of Rural America 
"American Land & Home 
Publication" Call Toll Free 1-800- 
245-4003 9-5, Monday-Friday 
Central Time. Vah25 

Medical PORTAMEDIC Health 
Surveys - R.N.'s-L.P.N's-EMT's 
with Venipuncture, EKG, Body 
Experience, needed statewide for 
Insurance exams - Call Now 1-804- 
288-2801 or 1-800-227-4032 
EOE/MF. Van25 

ATTENTION VETERANS, Home 
Loans to buy or build 100% 
financing. 90% on refinances. 
Pjhonc Clarence Phillips Mortgage 
Company, 615-684-1029, also 
conventional loans. Van25 

ATT: ASSEMBLY WORKERS: 
Earn excellent income for light 
assembly work. Call 504-646-1700 
Dept. P919. Van25 

CABLE TV, ELEC. TECH 
Converter repair. Trbl. shoot, 
repair, align, QC, pekg. Set top 
converters. Experience required. 
DAVI 703-248-3400 EOE. Van25 

CABLE TV, FS Supcrv, test, 
repair, install, splice, balance truck 
& distrib systems. Some travel. 
Own vehicle for to/from job sites. 
DAVI 703-248-3400 EOE. Van25 

TRAVEL HOLYLAND '90 Feb. 
19-27, 1990. Jordan & Israel with 
Egypt option only $1299. Free 
Brochure. Write Dr. Lindsay 
Howan, 318 Forest Springs Drive, 
Stuarts Draft, VA 24477. Phone 
703-337-4200. Van25 

CAMPBELL'S JUICE BOWL - 
Juice Machines. Earn up to 
$1500.00 per month and more with 
our company expansion program. 
Total investment $13,975.00 
secured by equipment. Guranteed 
locations. Call 1-800-365-8423. 
Van25 

JOBS IN AUSTRALIA - Hiring 
Construction Manufacluring- 
Mining-Secretaries-Etc. Will train. 
Transportation, Excellent Pay, 
Benefits. Call Now! 1-206-736- 
0775 Ext. 135A. (Call Refundable) 
Van25 

TANNING BEDS: WOLFF 
SYSTEM. SUMMER 
CLEARANCE! Home Units from 
$1595. Commercial Units from 
$2295. Save Thousands! Immediate 
delivery. Call Today! 1-800-223- 
6743. Van25 

TRUCK INSURANCE - Local and 
long haul, dumps and tractor trailers 
all filings. (800)274-7450 (Toll 
Free) (703)667-6945 (fax) 
Associated Benefits and Insurance 
Services, Inc. 107 Featherbed Lane, 
Post Office Box 3410, Winchester, 
Virginia 22601. Van25 

CANDY VENDING - Big $/HR 
operating from home part-time. 
Own a route of America's leading 
candy/nut machines. Packages from 
$3,000. Locations provided. 1-800- 
333-2506 for literature. Van25 

EVINRUDE OUTBOARDS - New 
Evinrude Outboards & Trolling 
Motors In Box - 1988 & 1989 
Models-Dealer Invoice 100% 
Financing Available GBM Sales 1- 
800-544-2850 Days 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 
CST Van25 

HOMES OF QUALITY, Built on 
your lot, Brick, Cedar or Vinyl 
Ranchers, 2 Stories & Capes 
Starting as low as $36,450. No 
down payment required, excellent 
financing, free color brochures call 
loll free Richmond 1-800-468-7310 
Fredericksburg 1-800-468-7320 
Harrisonburg 1-800-468-7330. 

Van25 



FARM EQUIPMENT 



STEEL BUILDINGS Must sell two 
steel buildings from cancellation. 
One is 40 x 40 BRAND NEW, 
NEVER ERECTED. Will sell for 
balance owed. Call Bill at 1-800- 
552-8504. U6-21 



Got something you 

want the whole state 

to know about? 

Reach over 4 million families 

In 78 Virginia 
Newspapers for just $175.°°! 

Virginia Press Services Ad 
Network Classifieds 

547-457 1 



•~~ 



tmm 



WWVI 



Ba«MH 



77w Virgfrito Beacft Skin, Juoe2t, 19899 



MAKE MONEY 

WITH THE 
CLASSIFIEDS 




■»"i"™" 



E CLASSIFIEDS 



CALL 
547-4571 



PETS 




CHOWS - AKC home raised. Ex- 
cellent temperament, championship 
bloodlines. All inquiries welcome. 
See ours first! Terms available. 
421-4304 tfn 

HORSE FINDERS - Looking for a 
horse? If we don't have it, we will 
find you the right one. Call 421- 
4304. tin 

English bulldog pups AKC 
Registered. Champion bloodline 
wormed, all shots $600. Call 
(919)830-1975 leave message. 

2t6-28P 



CLEANING 



DEPENDABLE/HONEST person 
will do housecleaning. Has 
references. Five years experience. 
Call after 5 p.m. 421-9771 . 4t7-5b 



WEARING APPAREL 



USED WORK UNIFORMS - 
State-length, waist and shirt size, 
shirt $2.75 each, pants $2.75 each. 
Shipping $3. Send money order to: 
Hilton Deloatche's Referral Service, 
Inc., 319 Newport Street, Suffolk, 
VA 23434. tfh 



APARTMENT TO SHARE 



GREAT NECK AREA - 
Professional female looking for 
same. Two bedroom, two bathroom 
condo washer/dryer, pool. Must see. 
$350 includes all. 463-2625 
"evenings. 2t6-28b 



HOUSE TO SHARE 



CHESAPEAKE - Looking for a 
mature person to rent a room. $300 
a month with kitchen privileges. 
Call 487-7105. lt6-21b 

CHESAPEAKE - Near 
Greenbrier Responsible 
professional male with same, non- 
smoker. 3 bedrm. house $350 mo. 
424-7972. 4t7-12b 



RENTALS 



+^ . , r,x . , 



COLONIAL MANOR APTS. 1 
bedroom apt. available im- 
mediately. Most utilities, furnished. 
Call 393-2111. Uh 

OUTER BANKS, Duck to South 
Nags Head. 1-5 bedroom. Cottage 
and condos. Weekly rentals. Free 
Brochure. Call Atlantic Realty. 1- • 
800-334-8401. 5t6-28b 

GREENBRIER - 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 
baths den with fireplace, garage, 
living room, dining room on cul- 
de-sac. Excellent schools $625 547- 
7497 or 488-4704. 4t6-28b 

COUNTRY LIVING!! Spacious 
mobile home lots for rent. Storage 
sheds furnished $100 per month. 
No deposits. Call (804) 562-2800 
or (804) 562-2103. 13t6-21b(tn) 



A BABY TO LOVE IS OUR 
DREAM. Will provide a secure 
happy home. Expenses paid. Leave 
number on machine. Confidential. 
Ask for Liz or Jay. Call collect. 
804-541-0807. tfo 

CHILDLESS COUPLE married 8 
years can provide loving, secure 
home for your baby. Can pay 
legal/medical expenses. Please call 
Chris & Susan collect. (703) 276- 
9751. St7-12P 

PREGNANT? Let us help. We'd 
love to adopt your newborn. 
Assist/pay medical/legal. Call 497- 
1664. 4t7-12b 

ADOPTION Loving couple unable 
to have children seek to adopt We 
will pay all your medical and legal 
expenses. Please call Karen and 
John. 703-893-2428. On 

' LOVING COUPLE reaching out 
for a white newborn to make our 
lives complete. Medical/legal paid. 
Call Chris/John 460-2935. 

fr 4t7-Sb(tn) 

WOULD LIKE TO ADOPT. 
Loving couple can not have 
children of our own, has lots of 
love to give. Would like to adopt 
baby. Call collect l-(804)-541- 
0807. tfn 

FINANCIALLY SECURE 
CHILDLESS COUPLE married 12 
years would like to adopt an infant. 
Can pay for legal and medical 
expenses. Lets help each other. Call 
collect Evelyn and Dan (703) 754- 
0654. 4t6-2tp 

ADOPTION: Loving childless 
couple seeks to adopt. We can pay 
your legal and medical expenses. 
Please call Deborah and Ira collect 
at 1-703-532^4722. 8t7-19p 

ADOPTION - Loving, childless 
couple wishes to adopt We will 
pay your medical and legal 
expenses. Please call Pam and Van 
collect (703) 379-703 1 . 4t6-28P 

PREGNANT? - Please consider 
adoption instead of abortion. Let us 
help you. We'd love to adopt your 
newborn. Secure, loving home. 
Will help . with medical/legal 
expenses. Call collect (804) 481- 
2671 after 6 p.m. weekdays, 
anytime weekends. 4t6-28b 



AUTOS F0RSALE 



1986 CHEVROLET IROC 305 
Tune Port. 190 watt Sony stereo. 
Sheepskin covers, burglar alarm. 
Radar detector. Call 425-5446 am 
or 428-4362 pm. tfh 



: m&i 



" — 






IMSCFORSALE 



12,000 GALLON Aluminum stor- 
age tank. Upright, in excellent 
condition. Call 562-5282. tfh 

SEARS 10 sp. bicycle light grey 
stirrup pedals, pouch in back pf 
seat Has small water bottle. $100 
or best offer. 49 1 -8959 tf n(F) 



C^l FORD LINCOLN MERCURY 



"THE DU-MAN DO IT FOR LESS" 

SALES • SERVICE • RENTALS • PARTS • LEASING 
BODY SHOP 







#1 IN SUFFOLK 

-Houre- 

8:30 To 8:00 Dally • Sat. 9 To 5 



I 
I 



r— SUFFOLK— | 

539-1595 



1600 N. MAIN, SUFFOLK 
NEAR OBCI HOSPITAL 

NORFOLK 



FORD 

TRUCKS 



FORD TRUCK CENTER 

TIDEW ATER EXCLUSIVE 
*£P TRUCK DEALERSHIP 

-HOW*- m 

9 To 9 Daily -Sat 9 To 5 t3 

2432 PRUDEN BLVD.. SUFFOLK 
1 MILE NORTH OF AUTO SHOWROOM 

•SUFFOLK— | i— NORFOLK' 



i 



." ' "". 

HELPWANTE0 



PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 



REPORTERS - All beats. Weekly 
newspapers. Photography and lay- 
out. Newspaper experience, either 
in college or professional, preferred. 
Entry level. Call 547-457 1 . tfh 

AUTO SALES PERSON - needed 
immediately. Hilton Deloach Mar- 
keting and Sales Training School. 
539-9420. tfh 

EARN UP TO $339.84 PER 
WEEK Assembling our products at 
home. Amazing recorded message 
reveals details. Call today! (202) 
898-6047 Dept 9t7-19b 

NOW HIRING DEMONSTRA- 
TORS! Free kit, supplies, training! 
No collecting or delivery. Work 
own hours. Beautiful merchandise. 
Great hostess plan. (804) 440-5703. 
4t6-21b 

WORK AT HOME - Earn up to 
$375 a day! People call you to order 
our directories. 813-497-5248 
extension Bl. 4t6-21b 

CRUISE SHIP JOBS $300 - 
$925 per week. Now Hiring. (813) 
497-5248 extension C2. 4t6-21b 

PHLEBOTOMIST - Part-time 
position available for someone to 
collect blood from infants/adults. 
Must be experienced in pediatric 
phlebotomy. $10 an hour. 21 1 a 
mile. Call Dawn Gilmore at 1-800- 
247-9540. 4t7-12P 

EARN EXCELLENT MONEY at 
home. Assembly work. Jewelry, 
toys, others. Call 1-619-565-1657 
exL T4382VA. 24 hrs. 3t7-12P 



i cytri^ i>toww i 



- NORFOLK— 1 r— SUFFOLK — i i— NOHKXK— i 

627-8944 1 1 925-031 6 | 1 397-9055 1 



LARGE USED CAR AND TRUCK INVENTORY 
NO CASH OR TRADE NEEDED WITH APPROVED CREDI 



Friendly Home 



Parties 



HAS OPENINGS IN THIS AREA FOR MANAGERS 
AND DEALERS. 

FREE TRAINING. COMMISSION UP TO 25%, OVER- 
RIDE UP TO 7%, NO PAPER WORK, NO DELIVERING OR 
COLLECTING. HIGHEST HOSETESS AWARDS.. 

NO HANDLING OR SERVICE CHARGE.. OVER 800 
DYNAMIC ITEMS - TOYS, GIFTS. HOME DECOR AND 
CHRISTMAS DECOR. 

For Free 1989 Catalog Call 
1-800-227-1510 

2fc5-28P 



■■ ■■ — ■ i — ■ ■ 

CHtLOCARE 



AMERICANS FINEST HOME 
improvement, roofing & remold- 
ing. Satisfied guaranteed, senior 
citizen discount 456-1381, 485- 
4444 tfh 

HASLE'S PARTY PONY'S 
Offers pony rides for birthdays, 
schools, picnics, fairs. 464-0953. 5 
yrs. cxp. & insured. tfh 

BALLOON BOUQUETS - birth- 
days, weddings, anniversaries, chi- 
dren's parties. Special rates, deliv- 
ered in costume. Will beat all other 
advertised prices. 853-0769 tfh 

I WILL PAINT any room for $65, 
the second one 1/2 price. Residen- 
tial & commercial. Also call about 
our special on exteriors. Call on 
Mon. Sun. between 8 & 12. J & M 
Seashore Painting, 428-7116 Ext 
208. tfn 

BIRTHDAY CLOWN - Animal 
balloons, face painting, magic and 
puppet 467-2380. tfh 

LITTLE PONIES PARTY EX- 
PRESS - offers pony rides and pet- 
ting zoo. Childs pony pictures done 
with covered wagon. Experienced 
and insured. 421-9286. tfh 

RELAX - We can solve your 
Spring & Summer roofing & 
painting problems. Free est., 
commercial & residential. Licensed 
and insured. 1 1 yrs. in Chesapeake. 
Call Crown Hi-Tech Roofing and 
Painting Co. 421-7007. 4t6-21b 

HEAVENLY BALLOON 
BOUQUETS - Get well, 
anniversary, births and birthdays 
thinking of you grand opening. We 
deliver serving all Tidewater (804) 



482-3371. 



LOVING GRANDMOTHER would 
like to babysit in her Oceanfront 
home. Ages 2 and up. Meals and 
snacks incl. Monday-Friday, 6 
a.m.-6 pm. Call 428-2325. 8t7-5b 

BABYSITTER NEEDED for two 
boys 9 and 11, needed approxi- 
mately four hours a day Mon-Fri- 
day. Blackwater - Fentress area. 
421-9771. 4t7-5b 

DEEP CREEK - Mother of two. 7 
a.m. to 6 p.m. Mon-Friday. Ages 1 
year and up. Reasonable rates. 
References required. 487-9467. 

H6-21b 



REAL ESTATE FOR SAlM 



GOVERNMENT OWNED - $500 
down. Tidewater area, 10% below 
appraised value, free listing, Va 
broker.499-2798 tfh 



i i i . i . ■■'■'■ ■ ■ ■ ", ' . ■ - 

JEWELRY 




CHESAPEAKE'S NEWEST 
JEWELRY STORE - 14 Kt. 
Jewelry, Gifts, Precious Gems. The 
easiest Layaways in town. 
Parkview Shopping Center. 420- 
8465. tfn b 



TRAIN FOR CAREERS IN 
•AIRUNES 
CRUISE LINES 
•TRAVEL AGENCIES 

HOME STUDY/RES. TRAIN* 



•FINANCIAL AID AVAILABLE 
•JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE 



1-800r327-7728 

A.C.1VTRAVEL 

SCHOOL TfN(BR) 
Natl hdqtrs. Pompano BchFL. 



HAPPINESS IS A HEALTHY MOUTH 

•Albert P. Solomon D.D.S. 
•AlanG. Forbes D.D.S. 

General & Family Dentistry 
Greenbrier Sq., Suite 2E 
1324 N. Battlefield Blvd. 
Office 547-2171 Ans. Service 625-0561 




TFN 



» 
I 
I 
I 
I 



6a 



MoA Up "Above the Crowd" 

JOIN THE 

Team of Professionals 

RE/MAX Advantage Realtors 

In Chesapeake 436-4500 

" REftttK® 

REALTORS* 

RE/MAX Advantage Realtors 
Suite 100, 100 Volvo Partway 
Chesapeake. VA 43&4500 ttn. 



NOTICES 




NEED MONEY? When Banks 
Stop. . .We Start. . .No credit 
checks, collateral or co-signers. For 
application write: Global, Box 112- 
Q, Verbena, Alabama 35091-01 12. 
Enclose envelope. tfh 

BORROW $100-$ 100,000! Instant 
reply! Rush stamped addressed en- 
velope: Global. Box 112-Q7, Ver- 
bena, Alabama 36091-01 12. tfn 

MAJOR BANK credit card in- 
formation. Send self-addressed, 
stamped envelope: National Finan- 
cial Services, 804-08 Old Thorsby 
Road, Clanton, Alabama 35045- 
2459. tfn 

VISA-MASTERCARD! 
without investigation! Immediate 
reply! Financial-Q3, 804 Old 
Thorsby Road, Clapton, Alabama 
35045-2459. Enclose envelope! tfh 



4t6-28P 



BLACKBERRIES - 480 per pound. 
U-Pick. Large and plentiful G.W. 
Henley Farms at Pungo in Virginia 
Beach. From stoplight at Pungo go 
east 1 1/2 miles to Muddy Creek 
Rd. Turn left, go 1/4 mile turn 
right on Charity Neck Rd. Field 
one mile. 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday 
9-6426-7501. 4t7-12b 




BUSINESS OPPORTUNtTES 



$10 - S15/HOUR processing mail 
at home. Weekly check guaranteed. 
For details write. Mailing Enter- 
prises 13659 Victory Blvd., Suite 
298-K Van Nuys, Calif. 91401. 
4t7-5P 

GET VISA OR MASTERCARD 
regardless of credit - bad credit' no 
problem - amazing recorded 
message reveals details! (202)-3 1 0- 
1193. 2t6-21b 



100 PIECES of Cut glass and hard 
glass, Lalique, Stubin, Tiffany, 
Cameo glass signed. 70 sterling 
silver souvenir spoons. 2 antique 
music boxes circa, 1880. Clocks, 
Bisques & China Dolls. Ivory Net- 
sukes and Miniature paintings. 
Open 10:00-5:00 19th Century 
Antiques, 1804 Granby St. Nor- 
folk. 622-0905. tfn 

OLD ORIENTAL RUGS Wanted 
Any size or condition. Call toll free 
1-800-342-7847. 4l6-21p 



" 



BUS. PROPERTY FOR SALE 



PORTSMOUTH - Downtown, 
large buildings with off street park- 
ing, to use for retail or offices. Call 
399-8390, 484-1275 or 399-3298. 

«fh(f) 



SOUTH HAMPTON MEADOWS 
MOBILE HOME SERVICES - 
We move and set up. mobile homes. 
We buy tires and axles. We do re- 
pairs and service. We build decks. 
No job too small or large. Financ- 
ing available. Lots for rent. Call 
(804) 562-2800 or (804) 562-2103. 
13t6-21b(tn) 

ROCKFORD - 1985 12x60 2 
bedrm, 2 bath with fireplace. Call 
393-3402. 4t6-28b 



PAINTING INTERIOR- 
EXTERIOR Reasonable rates; 
free estimates; Fully licensed and 
insured. 484-0725, 488-6397. 

4t7-12b 



Bathroom Remodeling 

All Phases 

547-4774 



GREEN RUN - In Virginia 
Beach, all aduHa, 1. 2. and 3 
bedroom apartments. 
Heat and hot water In- 
cluded. Pines Apt. 468-2000 
TFN 




We grind any stump" below ground 
for 75* per Inch. Machine will fit 
thru any backyard gate and will 
not damage lawn. Tree Stump or 
Shrub Removal. 

Reasonable Rates'Insured 
Free Estimates 

"Stump Bustln' Bob" 
463-1574 TFH 




Train to b* • ProlMsional 

•SECRETARY 

•EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

•WORD PROCESSOR 

HOME STUDY/RES. THAWING 



-FINANCIAL AID AVAILABLE 
•JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE 



1-800-327-7728 

THE HART SCHOOLS 

a Div. of A.C.T. Corp. 
Natl hdqtrs. Pompano Ben FL." 



Luxurious 

Apartments & IJovmkousts 

Jitness Center. 

fear round Spa & Sauna 

andTennis Courts. 

Open Daily 9-6; Sun 11-6 

fynts start at $4$0 

On Providence Road 2 Mi. 

W. of Military Highway 

424-7867 



tfh 



Sale! Sale! Sale! 





THE MARINER 
NOW $Qr7Q* 
ONLY X5#0 

•imUll* ti«n optimal * oUn 

ALL NOW! 



TOLL FREE 

1-800452-7665 



Free Home Survey 

24 hr. Service Dally i Sun. 

3t7-5b 



$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 

<£ • BAD CREDIT? ^ 

</> • NO CREDIT? "££ 

2 «/ STILL PAYING RETAIL? <% 

NOT ANYMORE! % 

J, OUR FRESH START PROGRAM NOW MAKES IT ^ 

jr\ POSSIBLE FOR YOU TO. //■ 









'V END HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS TO {/> 

HE CREDIT YOU DESERVE </> 

-cry 



U) t ALL (804) 363-8700; ■ 

% (804) 363-0469 NOW! 



</>YOUR APPROVAL IS GUARANTEED! <J> 
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ 



CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



£1 

ll 



PERSONAL 
RATES 

ltime 
2 times 
4 times 



20 Words 
or lest 

$7 
$12 
$15 



Additional 



.35 
.60 
.75 



Run your personal Classified Ad four times for only $15. You can 
cancel your ad at any time, however, there can be NO REFUNDS 
AND NO CHANGES. 

/Ul Classified Ads run In three newspapers (The VkgWa Beach Sun. The 
Chesapeake Poet and The Portsmouth Times). No additional chaige. 



Please print clearly using only one word per box. 








































20 words 



Run my personal ad for Issues. 

Payment is enclosed $ _• 

Male* ch#ch Myafaia to Bynty PmMmHom 

MAIL TO: Classified, Box 1327, Chesapeake, Va. 23320 

Name — 

Address . 

City. 



State 



Zip 



FOR HELP with your Classified Ad, please call 547-4571. 

,*■». coMwmnow hate mm wt i 

■•"MS" 

MMantwei 




"»■*• 



^^ 



IPWWWVWWWWWW^W 



mmmmmmmmm^mmmm 



i u ine Vir ginia Beach Sun. June 21, 1989 



Jumps 




continued from page 3 



Mayor's Report 

provide transportation, counseling and support services to the homeless. 

Every day, our city staff in the Departments of Social Services, Housing 
and Community Development and Menial Health work with people who 
are homeless or about to become homeless. We have some unique pro- 
grams which are designed to prevent families and individuals from becom- 
ing homeless. One of the newest of these is the Home Help program. A 
generous local apartment owner has agreed to provide reduced rents for 
homeless people referred by city staff. In exchange, the Department of 
Housing and Community Development provides counseling and referrals to 
assist them in obtaining employment and/or benefits so that they can af- 
ford the regular rent after a certain time. Home maintenance and financial 
counseling is also provided to enable these newly-housed families to 
maintain their self-sufficiency. 

Our Homesharing Program has assisted people with limited income to 
find others who are willing to share their home, in exchange for rent or 
work. This program provides low cost housing resources to many persons 
who might otherwise be homeless. 

We have also used a small amount of Federal funds to provide homeless 
prevention services. This allows us to prevent families from being evicted 
due to short-term financial or other crises beyond their control. Thereafter, 
housing staff work with them to help them avoid another crisis and to 
maintain self-sufficiency. This is a very promising program which we 
hope to continue and to expand with the support of new state funding. 

All of these activities reflect the city's commitment to making the max- 
imum use of available resources and expertise to assist the homeless, and 
especially, to preventing homelessness. We plan to continue to work 
closely with the non-profit organizations who are operating shelters and 
providing services to the city's homeless and at-risk homeless persons. We 
hope you will join in this effort by volunteering your lime and, if you can, 
by making a contribution to their very important work. 

This article was compiled through the courtesy and assistance of Hector 
A. Rivera, assistant city manager for Human Resources, city of Virginia 
Beach. 




Goal 



The new goal at Beach Garden Park. 



continued from page 1 



at sunset. 

Another goal will be located at 
either 37th or 38th and Pacific Av- 
enue, according to Whitehurst, after 
the situation there has been further 
researched, Whitehurst said. 

There used to be two goals at 
37th Street in the First Presbyterian 
Church parking lot before citizens' 
complaints precipitated their re- 
moval. If a goal cannot be relocated 
there, it may be located across the 



street between Atlantic and Pacific 
Avenues in a small grassy area at 
38lh Street. 

Before a goal is erected at either 
area, however, Boyce is expected to 
meet with church officials, business 
people and others who may be af- 
fected by the new goal. 

Whitehurst said he'll like to see 
the new goal up within 30 to 40 
davs. 



Lil's Quill 



continued from page 3 



Winners 



\ 



By House Joint Resolution #10, "Carry Me Back to Old Virginia," be- 
came the official song of the Commonwealth, when adopted February 22, 
1940. Efforts to replace or rewrite the state song were deferred by the 1988 
General Assembly. 

On January 25, 1950, the General Assembly unanimously passed House 
Joint Resolution #9, making the cardinal the official bird emblem of Vir- 
ginia. This action was taken as a result of efforts by the Federated Garden 
Clubs. It interested me that Jefferson, while serving as minister to France 
in 1786, asked James Madison to send him a pair Of "Virginia redbirds." 

Through lobbying by the garden clubs, the General Assembly next se- 
lected the dogwood as Virginia's official tree. This House Joint Resolution 
was passed in 1956. 1 was unaware that the dogwood was often used by In- 
dians for arrows so was called the "Indian arrow-wood," or that it was also 
known as the bird cherry or spindle tree. 

Now, you may have known about Virginia's flag, flower, bird and tree, 
but did you know that Virginia had an official dog? On April 5, 1966, the 
Commonwealth so designated the American fox hound. It seems that 
George Washington imported fox hounds into the state for hunting pur- 
poses and Virginians, who love to trace heredity, claim that all American 
fox hounds are descendents of these dogs. This should justify another tide 
for Virginia - "Mother of the American Fox Hounds!" 

Virginia also has an official shell. In 1974, the General Assembly des- 
ignated such. As you must have guessed, the choice was "Crassostraea vir- 
ginica" - the oyster shell. 

But can you believe that in 1982, milk was designated as Virginia's 
official beverage? I was unaware that Virginia was a dairy state, and would 
have guessed apple juice or bourbon. Well, now that we know, perhaps we 
should remember Virginia's birthday with a milk toast! 



VBEA Report 



continued from page 



said Humphreys. Brazier also could 
not be reached for comment. 

Dewan, who won about 60 per- 
cent of the vote, said he thought the 
race was run fairly, although Over- 
man had to overcome a series of 
politically damaging incidents 
which surfaced during his term in 
office. 

'There was so much bad public- 
ity as far as the negative campaign- 
ing thing. I just pointed out a fact. 
We stayed away from slanderous 
statements and we will in the fall," 
Dewan said. "My experience is a 



huge factor in the election." 

Both Dewan and Humphreys plan 
on running their fall campaigns 
similar to the way the primary was 
run, although both will be oppos- 
ing different candidates. Dewan now 
faces police Lt. Frank Drew for 
sheriff and Humphreys will run 
against former city prosecutor An- 
dre Evans for commonwealth's 
attorney. « 

"I expect to run a positive cam- 
paign based on the issues. I don't 
expect to run it much differently," 
Humphreys said. 



Crime 



continued from page 1 



and burglary, the unlawful entry of 
a structure to commit a felony or 
theft, are both declining from 269 
»o 261 and 4,046 to 3,808, respec- 
tively. 

Larceny, the unlawful taking or 
stealing of property or articles of 
value without the use of force, is 
on an uprise with 14,012 cases re- 
ported in 1988, 814 more than 
1987. Also increasing is the num- 
ber of reported motor vehicle thefts. 



The amount has risen from 761 to 
820. 

Arson, the willful or malicious 
burning or attempt to burn, with or 
without intent to defraud, a 
dwelling house, public building, 
motor vehicle or aircraft or personal 
property of another, did not change 
over the year. One-hundred fifty two 
cases of arson were reported both in 
1987 and 1988. 



continued from page 3 



Contract 



if the state is going to set guidelines for class size and programs, the state 
should accept a greater responsibility for helping school divisions finance 
their capital improvement programs. The education of the children of Vir- 
ginia is to benefit all the citizens of Virginia and is the responsibility of 
the governing body of Virginia. 

Delegate Tom Forehand, of Chesapeake, with the help of other members 
of the Delegate Assembly, has been seeking a way to allow school divi- 
sions to borrow larger sums of money at lower, rates of interest That 
would certainly be a savings to the taxpayers. Our local school board has 
repeatedly lobbied the General Assembly to find a way for the state to fund 
portions of the building programs. Both the Virginia Education Associa- 
tion and the VBEA are in support of a statewide funding program to assist I* Ifjinjol 
local school divisions in meeting school construction and debt service vUlmllflGI 
needs. If all these groups continue to work together, perhaps a means can 
be found to help school divisions like the Virginia Beach finance the multi 
building program they will need for their expanding population. 



continued Irom page 2 



nouncing the contract. 

'Today's contract reflects well on 
the entire work force of Metro Ma- 
chine, and is also a real boost to 
our regional economy," he added. 



Metro Machine, Inc. employs 
approximately 650 people. 

The Estocin is a Perry-class 
guided missile frigate that was 
commissioned in 1981. 



.continued horn page 3 



could not proceed on its original 
plans. He said he would get back to 



Council with more information on 
the impact of the 2.5 million. 



Athletics 



continued trom page 7 



tenth in the nation. The debaters 
had to raise their own expenses and, 
Henley said, she understood the 
coach volunteered his services. 

"I wish there were some way we 
could create equity," although, 
Henley said, athletics also are a 
wonderful program. Perhaps the 
School Board can have some cre- 
ative thoughts on how to support 
the other activities, she suggested. 

Councilman John L. Perry said 
that there was a time when football 
supported everything else, but now 
it is a case of "the more football 
needs the more football gets." 

"This amount of money is 
tremendous," said Henley. "Perhaps 
it would take sharing." 



He remembered one high school 
graduation, said Councilman John 
A. Baum where the football star 
was cheered when he was presented 
with a scholarship to the University 
of Tennessee while the girl who re- 
ceived the highest grades received a 
subscription to Readers Digest. 

In addition to the Athletic Fund 
appropriation, council also appro- 
priated: 

• $1,642,000 for the School 
Textbook Fund. 

• $8,363,985 from the Federal 
government for instructional 
activities supplementing regular 
programs. 

• $11,502,501 for the School 
Cafeteria Fund. 



Fire Safety 



Welcome To The Fire Line 



By Robin Anderson 

Special b The Sun 



Sex 



contmmd torn pagti 



know what everyone's getting so 
worked up ibouL" 

Tebault agreed and said she'd 
like to see the school board "help 
accept the program rather than 



further divide the community." 

"In a political system be who 
works the most and loudest will 
•prevail," added Chapman. 



In the weeks to come, I will be 
talking about various fire related 
subjects such as smoke detectors, 
residential sprinkler systems, juve- 
nile fire setters, home fire hazards 
and arson awareness, just to name a 
few. Although much of the infor- 
mation will be beneficial to the 
public in general, how each issue 
effects Chesapeake in particular will 
be addressed. 

From time to time, I will actu- 
ally recount a fire incident which 
has occurred in our city so that we 
might learn from past events. 

Throughout the course of these 
articles, it will be apparent that the 
fire service in Chesapeake, and 
across America, has developed a 
pro-active approach to its fire prob- 
lem. Thus, greater emphasis is be- 



ing placed on fire prevention educa- 
tion and training to better prepare 
us to handle fire emergencies. 

It is interesting to note, as little 
as twenty years ago, fire prevention 
activities in our country consisted, 
primarily, of having an occasional 
parade or fire station open house. 
Now, just two decades later, fire 
fighters and inspectors visit schools 
and businesses to educate the public 
on a multitude of topics ranging 
from fire evacuation drills to the 
proper way to stop, drop and roll if 
your clothes catch fire. 

In closing, please keep in mind, 
Chesapeake's Fire Department 
continually stands ready to spread 
the fire prevention message to oth- 
ers. Simply stated, we are always 
willing to speak to any group or 
assist any citizen regarding a fire 
related matter. 

Remember, "Learn Not To Burn 
- Practice Fire Prevention." 



Constitution Drive Flyover To 
Relieve Three Busiest Roads 



The Constitution Drive Flyover 
will cost approximately $52 mil- 
lion to build and should relieve 
three of the busiest roads in the city 
of the 26,900 daily traffic volume 
projected for the year 2010. 

Without it, city council was told 
at a workshop, Witchduck Road, 
Rosemont Road and especially In- 
dependence Boulevard will be hope- 
lessly overcrowded. 

Even with the flyover and the 
upgrading of both Rosemont and 
Witchduck Roads beyond four 
lanes, the two roads will be operat- 
ing at their capacity, according to 

Lewis G. Grimm, associate vice 
president of Frederic R. Harris, Inc. 
of Fairfax, consultants. 

But Councilwoman Reba Mc- 
Clanan challenged Grimm's figures. 
She said that Rosemont Road was 
not useable now. She said she sits 
through four or five lights. She said 
that council has been told it is ade- 
quate. "Adequate for what'/' 

McClanan also said that Bonney 
Road is one of the few streets that 
moves traffic. She said she has no 
desire to create another Independence 
Boulevard on Rosemont Road. She 
said that the flyover plan will turn 
Bonney Road into a business corri- 
dor. 

Public Works Director Oral 
Lambert said that the Department of 
Transportation is recommending an 
alignment, tagged alternate four, 
and proposed by Harris. The align- 
ment shifts the bridge across Lake 
Trashmore at a narrow point. 

Council will decide Monday at 
its 7 p.m. meeting whether to adopt 
a resolution to request the State to 
proceed with the design of the pro- 
ject J 

Lambert said that DOT district 
engineer Al Nash said that the 
alignment meets needs, provides for 
a buffer zone, is least damaging to 
the commercial and industrial 
community and is more aestheti- 
cally pleasing as well less disrup- 
tive to Mount Trashmore. 

In today's dollars alternative four 
will cost $40.6 million, but infla- 
tion will bring the figure closer to 
$52 million, Lambert said. 

The other alignments would cost 
$39.2 million for alternate one; 
$40.2 million for one A, $37.8 
million for alternate two, and $50.8 
million for alternate three. 

The high cost for alternate three 
results from the extensive right of 
way cost of $16 million, Bob 
Morris of Harris said. 

Morris also said that these are 



only preliminary costs. 

Constitution Drive was on the 
1982 comprehensive road plan as an 
extension of Edwin Drive. In 1985 
the city asked the DOT to include 
the plan in its program. 

Alternate four is a combination 
of one and one A, Lambert said. 

After a scries of public hearings 
DOT reviewed all the alignments 
and recommended alternate four. . 

Lambert said that the staff recog- 
nizes the importance of the visual 
impact of the bridge and feels that a 
moderately-curved structure cross 
the lake will be more attractive than 
a straight bridge across the widest 
point. 

The Larkspur community, he 
said just wants the road as far away 
from the community as possible 
and to have the least impact on 
Mount Trashmore. 

Because of the build-up in the 
area, alignments are limited, he 
said. 

Lambert said that the State is 
willing to do something different to 
make the project blend in with the 
park. The State is willing, even, to 
engage a bridge architect and may 
consider creating small islands 
with trees. The Slate is open to be- 
ing as creative and innovative as it 
can," Lambert said, "to provide an 
enhancement to the park." 

If the flyover is not created, 
Brimm said, the daily traffic vol- 
umes by the year 2010 for Indepen- 
dence Boulevard will be 93,900 
against 70,500 with the flyover; for 
Witchduck Road, 45,300 against 
44,800, and for Rosemont Road, 
44,600 against 41,800. 

The total volume of traffic carried 
by the four roads will be 184,000 
with the flyover and 183,000 with- 
out. 

Figures are bawed on present 
densities in the city's comprehen- 
sive plan and on the city's trans- 
portation plan. 

Brimms also said that the 
projections assume the 
implementation of the adopted plan 
for the Pembroke area. 

Windsor Oaks residents also are 
concerned about the noise factor, 
McClanan said. But Lambert said 
that sound attenuation has not been 
considered yet 

City Manager Aubrey V. Watts 
said that the project can have a sig- 
nificant impact on the Capital Im- 
provement Program and that the 
State needs to know how to pro- 
ceed. 




Who Actually Wears The 
Designer Clothes In Malls 



By Eric Shaffer 

Special Id The Sun 



Do you ever find yourself won- 
dering just who wears all the de- 
signer clothes that are carried in the 
local malls? 

As the father of two teenagers, I 
find myself spending a lot of time 
at the local malls and have had 
plenty of time to see the latest 
fashion trends. 

I am also making a sizable con- 
tribution to several foreign coun- 
tries who produce these goods and 
am sure that by the time my 
daughter graduates from high school 
I will have paid off the national 
debt of Italy merely by buying 
Bendleton clothing. 

During ever trip to the mall, I 
see literally hundreds of fashion 
conscious young people trying on 
clothes or laden with packages of 
clothing but I never see anyone 
wearing these clothes. I have seen 
young men laboriously chose th 
latest in footwear carefully match- 
ing colors to some imaginary finery 
but when I look at their feet they 
are all wearing combat boots or 
good old U.S. Keds high top tennis 
shoes. 

Observing the amount of time 
the young ladies spend in trying on 
clothes I assumed that fit must be 



an important factor in designer 
clothing. However, judging from 
the apparel I see on them it can't be 
for everything looks two sizes too 
large on them. 

As a rather old fashioned father, I 
always enjoy the display windows 
made up with mannequins espe- 
cially wearing the formats. I swear I 
have even seen some young women 
purchase these items but I have 
never seen any of them worn in 
public. In fact I'm beginning to 
think that these clothes are pur- 
chased to keep them off the market 
so that baggy sweaters, torn jeans 
and well worn sneakers will remain 
the uniform of the young. 

It wasn't like this when i was a 
teenager. We actually bought and 
wore madras ties, and girlfriend- 
boyfriend shirts and poodle skirts. 
Stylish then and foolish looking 
now or maybe even foolish looking 
then. 

If that is the truth then perhaps 
our youngsters are smarter than we 
if they realize these fads are foolish 
and merely buy them to get them 
out of sight without wearing them. 
In a few years I will ba able to test 
this theory by going to the yard 
sales hosted by our children for It 
will be here that I will know for 
certain what happened to all the de- 
signer clothing purchased by today's 
teenagers. 



Travel Show At Lynnhaven Mall 



The Virginia Travel Council 
presents the first annual Lynnhaven 
Mall Travel Show, on Saturday, 
June 24 from 10 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. 
and Sunday, June 25 from 12:30 to 
5:30 p.m. 

The council, is a statewide non- 
profit organization uniting the di- 
verse components of Virginia's 
travel and tourism industry, devel- 



ops and implements programs de- 
signed to encourage and promote 
travel to and within Virginia. 

The council's latest promotion is 
a travel show where display booths 
featuring the Commonwealth's 
most exciting attractions and 
localities will be on view for shop- 
pers in Virginia Beach's Lynnhaven 
Mall. 



mrm^^m 



wm^^m^ 



^^^^^^mmmmmammmmmmmmmm* 





1 


Clyde Hoey Likes 

The Beach's 

Relaxed Atmosphere 










1 1 



"Up With People" Seeks 

Families To Host Members 

Of Its Cast 



—m*mmmmmm» 



Personality Profile 



Jeff McCreary Is 

Walking His 
Weight Right Off 



The Virginia Beach 



Flyover 

Constitution Drive 
'Flyover Decision De- 
layed; Fifth Alignment To 
Be Studied 



ByLeeCahlll 

City Council Reporter 



A decision on the Constitution 
Drive Flyover alignment has been 
deferred until July 10 to give citi- 
zens more time to study a fifth 
alignment which had not been pre- 
sented at earner public hearings. 

Generally, however, the response 
at a council session was mixed. The 
business community strongly sup- 
ported just about any alignment so 
long as the project is built fast. The 
nearby residents preferred an align- 
ment different from the one pre- 
sented by the Virginia Department 
of Transportation and also sug- 
gested improving other road sys- 
tems in the area before tackling the 
flyover., 

Consultant Frederic R,. Harris, 
Inc., proposed the fifth alignment 
to address concerns of speakers at 
the public hearings. The map 
showing the alignment therefore 
was not available at the public 
hearings, a fact that prompted the 
deferral. 

The recommended alternate would 
follow the same routes as two oth- 
ers, one of which (1 A) seemed to be 
preferred by most of the speakers. 
But instead of crossing the Mount 
Trashmore Lake in a straight line at 
the center the recommended route 
(known as Alternate 4) wontd cross 
at a more narrow section. Speakers 
objected that the bridge would also 
cross over the picnic and parking 
area of the park. A sixth alternate 
suggested by Councilman John D. 
Moss is similar but not identical to 
1A. 

George B. DcLano, representing 
the Larkspur Civic League, said 
that the community did not want a 
flyover until it was absolutely nec- 
essary. He suggested instead that 
the project be delayed and the city 
make other improvements in the 
corridor, such as the widening to 
eight lanes of Independence Boule- 
vard, adding a grade separation at 
Bonney Road and other improve- 
ments, and installing proper sig- 
nals. "Then see how the traffic 
goes." 

He said that the president of the 
Princess Anne and Windsor Woods 
Civic Leagues support this pro- 
posal, when and if the flyover is 
built, he said, Larkspur preferred 
1A. 

He said that Alternate 4 passes 
over or close to the park land and 
that a large part of the public may 
Please see Flyover, page 3 



Project Underway 





Neptune Race 



Entries For Neptune FestivaP&aMPRace And 
Sailing Regatta Being Accepted; Festival Begins 
Sept. 21 



By Karen Dalrymple 

Stan Writer 



me Dodge Island hopper dredge hooks up to the SCOTS (self-contained onshore transportation system) buoy to 
unload sand onto the beach at 16th Street 

Operation Big Beach Update 



If you live near the beach or 
have friends that do, you've 
probably gotten barraged with 
questions about the new sand re- 
plenishment program. The fol- 
lowing update will help you an- 
swer questions the next time they 
ask. 

Operation Big Beach is under- 
way. This project will replenish 
more sand than the city normally 
replaces in three years and will be 
completed at no cost to the city. 

The sand is from the dredging 
of Cape Henry Channel in the 
Chesapeake Bay. The channel is 
being deepened as part of the 
Baltimore Harbor Improvement 
Project. The Army Corps of En- 
gineers determined that it was in 
the federal as well as local inter- 
est to enlarge Virginia Beach for 
shoreline protection. 

The project is being funded by 
the Army Corps of Engineers and 



money paid by the state of 
Maryland for the dredging. It 
normally costs Virginia Beach $1 
million to replenish a much 
smaller amount of sand each year. 

Operation Big v Beach will not 
keep beach lovers from enjoying 
the beach this summer. In fact, 
the dredging operation is some- 
thing of tourist attraction. Only 
several hundred feet of the resort 
area beach between 10th and 48th 
Streets will be cordoned off at 
any time. Any inconvenience 
will be limited to the immediate 
work area and will last only a day 
or two. 

The beach will be about 2 1/2 
times larger immediately after the 
sand is added but will eventually 
diminish to one and 1/2 times 
larger over the next year or so. 

Two dredges are currently be- 
ing used and a larger dredge will 
take over around July 1. The 



dredges load up with sand from 
the Cape Henry Channel and 
travel to the resort beach. They 
stop at a pump-off station that is 
connected to a transportation 
buoy about 2,000 feet offshore. 
The buoy is currently located off 
16th Street and will be moved 
several times as the project pro- 
ceeds. 

A pipeline comes ashore at 
16th Street and extends north and 
south for six blocks. Bulldozers 
are used to spread out the sand. 
When sand is coming out of the 
pipeline, it looks like black water 
arid is composed of about 20 per- 
cent sand and 80 percent water. 
The water washes away in about 
five minutes. The beach can be 
used almost immediately, but it 
takes several weeks to a month 
for the grey sand to bleach out. 

The project will take from 
Please see Sand, page 10 



What would the Neptune Festival 
be without its share of water sport 
competitions? 

Entries are now being accepted 
for the 1989 festival's Trans- Vir- 
ginia Beach Canoe Race and the 
Sailing Regatta. Both events will 
take place the weekend of Septem- 
ber 23, just three days after the fes- 
tival begins. 

Originated by Chris and Mike 
Worrell in the late 1970's, the 
Chesapeake Light Race has been a 
part of the Neptune Festival for five 
years. This year, however, there's 
an added feature. A second race, the 
Chesapeake-Atlantic Race, will also 
be a part of the regatta. 

"We're doing the race differently 
this year. We're running it as two 
races," said Kent Glover, race 
committee chairman. 

Glover said approximately 50 
boats are expected to participate in 
this year's race, 30 more than last 
year. With an average of six people 
per boat, he said about 300 people 
will be entered. 

"The race has gained stature in 



£ n tries are now being 
accepted tor the 1989 
festival's Trans-Virginia 
Beach Canoe Race 
and the Sailing Regatta. 



the fact that the races are considered 
sanctioned by the Chesapeake Bay 
Yacht Racing Association. It gives 
them additional status," Glover 
said. 

The Chesapeake-Atlantic Race 
will begin Saturday, Sept. 23 at 10 
a.m. at the Thimble Shoals Light. 
The 21.5 mile course will end at 
the Life-Saving Museum of Vir- 
ginia on 24th Street. 

The Chesapeake Light Race will 
be held the next day at 9:30 a.m. 
and will begin at the Life-Saving 
Museum and end at Thimble Shoals 
Light. Glover said the second race 
will be a tad longer than the first. 

Although most of the entrants 
hail from Hampton, Glover said 
many of the participants are from 
Portsmouth arid Virginia Beach. 

The cruising yachts, which will 

range in size from 20 to 43 feet, 

will be racing under two systems, 

Please see Festival, page 10 



Kids Having Babies 

1,271 Teenage Pregnancies -Reported In 1987, 
643 Were Aborted; Many Teens Don't Know About 
Birth Control 



By Karen Dalrymple 

Stall Writer 



Light Rail Project May Result In Referendum 



ByLeeCahlll 

City Council Reporter 



The light rail project between 
Virginia Beach and Norfolk, which 
failed to get enough support on city 
council, may be placed before the 



voters in an advisory referendum on 
Nov. 7. 

The schedule for the referendum 
would parallel the school bond ref- 
erendum which will be on the bal- 
lot. 

At the request of Councilman 
John D. Moss, who had voted 



against participating in the project 
proposed by the Tidewater Trans- 
portation District, Interim City At- 
torney Kevin Cosgrove has 
submitted a schedule for the 
referendum process based on the 1st 
feasible date by with the require- 
Please see LtyifR«/{ page JO 



The statistics are eye opening. In 
1987, 1,271 teenage girls became 
pregnant, and not by choice. 

According to Angela Savage, 
nurse manager at the Virginia Beach 
Health Department, out of the 
1,271 pregnancies, 643 of them 
were aborted. There were five live 
births by girls under the age of 15 
and 585 births by girls in the 15 to 
19 age group. Thirty-eight of the 
girls miscarried. 

"The numbers honestly for the 
past few years have ranged that. 
They're staying about the same," 
Savage said. 

Of the reported pregnancies in 
1987, 28 of them were girls under 
15; 480 were age 15 to 17 and 763 
were 18 and 19 years old 

'That many pregnancies is a sig- 
nificant number. They're the high 
school aged kids," Savage said 

She added that the reason so 



lavage said she feels 
parental involvement 
could help decrease 
the number of un- 
wanted teen pregnan- 
cies. 



many unwanted pregnancies are oc- 
curring is because teenagers are 
learning about sex from their peers. 
Many of them don't know about 
birth control methods. 

"It's still that adolescent thinking 
'I'm invincible, it's not going to 
happen to me,'" said Savage. She 
added that it takes bravery and 
maturity for a teenager to seek birth 
control. 

"People have always been sexu- 
ally active. They get so much in- 
formation from the media and TV 
movies. Kids are just experiment- 
ing earlier and more, it seems," she 
said. 

Although a lot of pregnant teens 
Please see Tetnt. oaoe 10 



: : : : : ; : : :-X : > ; 




ersonality Profile 



Kempsville Library's Jeff McCreary Is 
Walking Circles Around His Co-Workers 



By Karen Dalrymple 

Stag Writer 



Kempsville area Library 
Information Specialist I Jeff Mc- 
Creary has a broad background in 
reading. And eating. But the Cardi- 
nal Estates resident has lost close to 
100 pounds since January. 

Born in southwest Texas, xlose 
to the Louisiana boarder, McCreary 
grew up along the banks of the 
Johnson Bayou on a "simple, quiet, 
back-country farm." 

There were plenty of farm ani- 
mals and there was also plenty of 
food. His Cajun mother fed him 
well so when McCreary joined the 
Navy in 1972, after receiving a draft 
notice, he tipped the scales at more 
than 200 pounds. McCreary spent 
six years touring countries such as 
Spain and Africa. During those 
years he gained another 100 pounds. 

"As I got older, the appetite 
stayed, but the ability to work if off 



Aside from reading, McCreary's other favorite 
pasttime is walking. He became involved with the 
sport when he visited a doctor for his weight problem. 



didn't It eventually caught up with 
me," he said "I was just plain fat." 

In 1976 McCreary was transferred 
to Oceana Naval Air Station, where 
he worked as a warehouseman and 
technical librarian for two years. In 
1978, he was discharged from the 
Navy and left without a job. 

McCreary held several jobs in- 
cluding working in a music store 
and even performing folk music in 
bars and pubs. His wife Dreda, a 
biologist for Mosquito Control for 
the city of Virginia Beach, began 
singing with him and they were 
soon playing the the circuits. They 
eventually made an album, but the 
fun didn't last. 

"Our music was rousing but not 
drink indusive," McCreary said. 

In 1986, McCreary quit his job 



to stay home with his first bom 
son. It was during his time at home 
that a friend noticed the more than 
7,000 books McCreary kept in his 
house. He has an extensive back- 
ground in reading, from classic lit- 
erature to Cajun folklore, which is 
his specialty. 

McCreary's friend arranged an in- 
terview with the library system and 
in 1987 he began working a part- 
time aid position at night. Mc- 
Creary said the military "laid the 
ground work for working in the li- 
brary system. It never occurred to 
me mat military library work would 
transfer." 

McCreary has moved up to his 
current position since his part-time 
days. His job duties are answering 
patron's questions, aiding children 



with books, helping out with 
storytime and giving children tours. 

"It gives me great satisfaction for 
me to be able to suggest books, 
knowing what patrons like to read," 
he said. 'The kids also really enjoy 
it. You have to be a kid yourself. I 
never really grew up completely." 

Aside from reading, McCreary's 
other favorite pastime is walking. 
He became involved with the sport 
when he visited a doctor for his 
weight problem. The doctor told 
him one way to lose weight was to 
eat six meals a day and walk. Mc- 
Creary, who is not on a strict diet, 
walks two miles everyday, which 
increases his metabolic weight. 

"I'm really not in a good mood if 
I don't get in my two miles a day. 
It's easy to gel bored with it if 
you're not careful," he said. 

McCreary walks a two-mile route 
around the library either before 
work or on his lunch break. During 
his walks he has discovered fishing 




Jeff McCreary 



holes and sections of the city that 
he never knew existed. 

"The patrons around Kempsville 
have noticed what I'm doing. It 
makes me feel like part of the 
neighborhood," McCreary said 

McCreary said he still has about 



50 more pounds to lose before he 
reaches his goal. But once he does 
he's not going to stop walking. 

"My goal is to be somewhere 
below 200. If you don't walk you 
don't lose it," he said "Low and 
itmHBCHtry.pagelO 



m^^^m^^^ 



! The Vlrgiila Beach Sun, June 2B, 1989 




Itorials 





First Row: Heather Ruff In, Tiffany Brock, Melissa Armstrong, and Stephanie 
Muscovac. 

Second Row: Denlse Connelly, Heather Wilkinson, Jerralyn Jorge, Yvonne 
Frances Washington, and Melissa Bott. 

Mayor Meets Pageant Semi-finalists 

man^,m K imu,o,Quet^ : uiy m «,Sunoelmm,:«»tBe m e m myor Heym Oeemdori MM «to me *■ MUM Pre-Teen Sen* 



of Austin, Texas. 

"Up With People" Need 
A Place To Stay 

"Up With People," an international educational and cultural 
exchange organization, is coming to town and they need a place 
to stay! Anyone with an extra bed - read on! 

For the fourth of July weekend, 130 members of Up With 
People will be arriving in Tidewater. The organization, which 
is dedicated to promoting understanding among people of all 
nations, races and backgrounds, consists of students between 
the ages of 18 and 25. The group is coming to town to help 
celebrate America's independence at the seventh annual Great 
American Picnic July Fourth Celebration at Town Point Park. 

The only problem is that not all students have been placed in 
a host home yet. This year it seems they are a little short on 
volunteers. Hosting an international or American student offers 
a unique opportunity to learn about other cultures and other re- 
gions of our country. The July fourth holiday is an excellent 
opportunity to share America at its best during our indepen- 
dence celebration. 

To hose one or more of the cast members, you will need to 
provide a bed for four nights, breakfast each day and one or 
two evening meals. You will also need to provide limited 
transportation to a central drop-off and pick-up point each day. 
The cast will be involved in activities during most of the day 
and Up With People will provide their meats during that time. 

The cast will be performing two one-hour shows at the cele- 
bration free to the public. Aside from performing, the students 
involve themselves in cultural and educational activities as well 
as participating in community service. 

Althougn tne cast won't arrive for another few days, three 
advance members of Up With People are already in the area 
trying to find host families for their group. Marc Lefleur from 
Quebec, Vibeke Leirvaag from Norway, who is also taking 
scuba diving lessons while she's in town, and Barry Gore from 
Austin, Texas, are available to answer any questions concern- 
ing the organization or hosting a member. They can be reached 
at the Airport Hilton at 466-8000, room 124. - K.L.D. 

Teen Should Be At Proms, 
Not Pregnant 

The high school years are ones that should be spent at foot- 
ball games, parties and proms. Instead, many girls today are 
spending what are supposed to be the happiest years of her life, 
at home trying to take care of a baby. More and more unwanted 
pregnancies are occurring these days and most of them are 
teenage girls. 

It's only normal for boys and girls at the high school and 
even junior high level to become interested in the opposite sex. 
The kids today are not only dating through, they are experi- 
ments with sex. The unfortunate part is that they are experi- 
menting without even knowing the facts. 

Teenagers learn from each other. Girls talk about boys with 
their girlfriends and boys do the same and they think that what- 
ever they hear from their peers is the correct information. 
Teenagers should be told by their parents about sex, not from 
each other. Many families don't discuss sex at home and the 
children are suffering from it. 

Parents, don't wait until your child is in high school though 
to talk about the birds and the bees. There are young girls under 
the age of 15 who are becoming pregnant, so the sooner they 
know, the better off they'll be. 

Although kids will probably be too embarrassed to discuss 
sex with their parents, it's best to get it out in the open. Parents 
should not feel uneasy about discussing the subject with their 
kids either. It's better that they tell them than to let them hear it 
on the streets. - K.L.D. 

Sand Project Benefits Beach 

If you've been down to the oceanfront lately you'll notice a 
lot of strange looking equipment out in the water. Don't worry 
though, that machinery is helping our beach, not hurting it. 

Virginia Beach has one of the cleanest, prettiest beaches on 
the east coast and now it will be one of the biggest. Thanks to 
Operation Big Beach our beach will be 2 1/2 times its current 
size. More beach means more room for more visitors! If we 
think tourism is booming now, wait„until the sand replenishing 
is completed. 

Beach goers may be a little leary of jumping into the water or 
sunbathing on the beach where the dredging equipment is lo- 
cated, which is currently at 16th Street. Don't let the dredgers 
stop you from enjoying the beach; they will be moving on to 
another location before you know it. 

The project will last throughout the rest of the summer, but 
when it's dl done, we'll be able to see why it was such an im- 
portant operation. Our beach will be bigger and better than 
ever. Anyone who hasn't seen the operation in action may want 
to take a stroll down the boardwalk one day. Bring your camera 
along, it's something you wouldn't want to miss! - K.L.D. 



finalists. 




m 



House Armed Services Committee 
Rejects Controversial Test Program 



A controversial administration 
plan to establish a test program of 
user fees at certain military hospU 
uils and clinics was rejected by the 
House Armed Services 
Subcommittee on Military Person- 
nel and Compensation. 

Second District Congressman. 
Owen Pickett, a member of the 
House panel and a strong opponent 
of the fees, praises the decision 
saying "the nation's military fami-i, 
lies have already suffered through 
enough difficulties with medical 
care without having to pay fees for 
these services." 

"The medical care benefit has al- 
ways been a major recruiting tool 
for the United States armed forces," 
he continued, "and the subcommit- 
tee was obviously concerned that 
these unfair fees would damage re- 
cruiting, morale and retention." 

Although the fees were proposed 
as a test program for non active 
duty beneficiaries only, Pickett said 
he was concerned that the adminis- 
tration's proposal would "open the 



door" to a much broader program of 
user fees at the nation's military 
hospitals and clinics. 

Rejection of the proposal came 
during consideration of the fiscal 
year 1990 defense authorization act. 
The full House Armed Services 
Committee will take up the bill 
next week. 

In other action, Pickett said the 
subcommittee approved a 3.6 per- 
cent pay raise for military personnel 
as well as a major expansion of the 
Defense Department's child day care 
program. 

He said the day care provisions 
would put a $157 million floor on 
funding for child care and mandate 
improvements in the training and 
compensation of the department's 
child care providers. The $157 mil- 
lion figures is almost double what 
is currently spent on child care. 

In May, Pickett announced his 
cosponsorship of military child care 
legislation almost identical to that 
approved recently. 



Pickett Amendment Prevents Flag-Burning 



Saying that the U.S. Supreme 
Court erred in its decision striking 
down a Texas law prohibiting dese- 
cration of the American flag, U.S. 
Representative Owen Pickett (D- 
Va) introduced a Constitutional 
amendment effectively reversing the 
decision. 

Pickett's proposed amendment 
would give Congress the power to 
enact laws prohibiting acts that 
desecrate the flag. 

In a recent speech on the House 
floor, Pickett declared, "With this 
decision, the court cloaks die most 
offensive behavior as political ex- 
pression. I submit that burning the 
flag is not expression. It conveys I 
no real ideas, no political thoughts. 
It is an act that is designed solely to ' 



shock the moral sensibilities and 
patriotic impulses of our people. 

"We have been told," he contin- 
ued, "that under our law free speech 
does not extend to such acts as 
yelling 'fire' in a crowded theatre. 
This amendment will make sure 
that it does not extend to such acts 
as setting fire to the American 
flag." 

Pickett's amendment came in re- 
sponse to a recent 5-4 decision of 
the Court nullifying flag desecra- 
tion statutes in 48 states. The spe- 
cific case before the court involved 
the conviction of a protester at the 
1984 Republican National 
Convention. 

Pickett's resolution was referred 
to the House Judiciary Committee. 



The Virginia Beach Sun Deadlines 

News deadlines for The Virginia Beach Sun are: 5 p.m. Friday for the 
upcoming Wednesday's issue. 

/ Articles must be legible, preferably typed, and double spaced 

on standard size paper. 
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information. (All persons in picture must be identified.) 
/ News may be brought or mailed in and should include the name 
and telephone numbers of the persons submitting it. 
The Virginia Beach Sun welcomes and encourages letters from its readers 
on topics of general interest. 
All letters must carry the name and address of writer. 

/ Letters should be addressed to: Editor, The Virginia Beach Sun, 
138 Rosemont Road, sjite 217, Virginia Beach, VA. 23452. 



The Virginia Beach Sun 



Publisher 

Hanes Byerly 



Assistant to the Publisher 

Managing Editor 

Greg Goldfarb 



Staff Writers 

Karen Dalrymple 

Deanna Johnson Keim 



The Virginia Beach Sun 

138 Rosemont Road 
Virginia Beach, VA 23320 
Telephone: 1-804-486-3430 



Letters to the editor are encouraged. 
They should be typed in paragraph form, 
double spaced and include the sender's 
name, address and the phone numbers. 
News deadline is Friday noon for each 
upcoming week's issue. Mail all letters and 
correspondence to The Virginia Beach 
Sun, 138 Rosemont Road, Virginia Beach, 
Va, 23452. Telephone: 1-804-486-3430. 

The Virginia Beach Sua ii publiihed 
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and North Carolina, one year, $14.85, two 
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two yean, $32.50 Payable in advance. 



Lee Cahill Report 



Clay Pigeon Shooting Range 
Finally Approved By Council 



A clay pigeon shooting range 
opposed by Pungo residents was 
approved by a narrow 5-4 vote of 
city council during a second 
consideration of a use permit appli- 
cation. 

A tic vote (3-3) on May 22 led to 
the deferral of the application filed 
by Back Bay Sporting Clays, Inc., 
for th range on the south side of 
Campbell's Landing Road, east of 
Morris Neck Road. The parcel con- 
tains 20 acres and is next door to 
the Virginia Beach police firing 
range. 

Both Pungo Councilwoman Bar- 
bara Henley and Blackwater Coun- 
cilman john A. Baum abstained on 
both votes because they do business 
with the owner of the property. 

Moody S tailings, attorney for the 
applicant presented proffers includ- 
ing: 

•No shooting on Sundays. 

• Restriction of shooting to be- 
tween the hours of noon and 6 p.m. 

• No alcohol on the premises 
during the hours of operation. 

• The use of only 12-gauge shot- 
guns. 

• The use of steel shot, rather 
than lead, pellets. 

• Review of the permit after one 
year. 



• Use of biodegradable wadding or 
the use of a net to catch wadding. 

Thomas Padric, attorney repre- 
senting the residents asked, "How 
many ranges do we have to live 
with? . . . Rural citizens have 
rights, too." 

He said that the police range has 
better control with instructors 
coming from the National Rifle 
Association. 

Retorted Stallings: "What a big- 
ger bunch of lunatics than the 
NRA?" 

Councilwoman Reba McClanan 
said that the police have had all 
kinds of complaints from activities 
on that road caused by outsiders. 

Added Mayor Meyera Oberndorf, 
the residents of Campbells Lane are 
not new residents and deserve con- 
sideration and protection. 

Councilwoman Nancy Parker 
moved to deny the application sec- 
onded by McClanan. 

Councilman William D. Ses- 
soms made a substitute motion to 
approve. He said he went along 
with the staff which recommended 
approval and felt strongly "it will 
be well operated." 

Voting against approval were 
McClanan, Oberndorf Parker and 
Councilman John D. Moss. 



May Oberndorf Impressed By 
Charleston, S.C. City Police 
Force And Homeless Provisions 



Mayor Meyera Oberndorf was 
especially impressed during her re- 
cent U.S. Conference of Mayors in 
Charleston, S.C. by the city's dy- 
namic police force and the city's 
provisions for the homeless. 

At a workshop, she reported to 
council members that the forceful 
police chief has developed a "flying 
squad" of track-show wearing police 
officers (t chase down criminals) to 
make the streets safe for law abid- 
ing citizens. 

The police there have also 
clamped down on criminal in public 
housing projects where they have 
found that the residents are the vic- 
tims. 

Oberndorf also talked about the 



cottage program for the homeless. 
A combination of the public and 
private sectors has built cottages 
which sell for $10,000. She said 
also that over 65 different organiza- 
tions rotate duty at the homeless 
shelter and that even the police de- 
partment participates in feeding and 
boarding people for the night. 

She said that houses protected by 
historic designations from demoli- 
tion are rehabilitated to provide 
public housing at scattered sites 
throughout the city. 
"* Because 6T the influence of the 
historic preservation board there, 
Oberndorf said that there was no 
way to tell parking garages were in 
Charleston. 



Fentress Asks City To Move 
Elderly's Tax Relief Rograms 
Up To The State Maximums 



Vice Mayor Robert E. Fentress 
has asked that the city move the 
real estate tax relief program for the 
elderly and handicapped up to state 
maximums. He told city council 
that many cities have already done 
this and that Virginia Beach ought 



to be there also. 

He said that the increased relief is 
especially needed in areas where 
properties are appreciating rapidly 
although incomes remain the same. 

Council will consider the matter 
on July 3. 



Stallings Feels That Lawyers, 
Especially His Client, Are Hated 



"I never realized until tonight," 
remarked Lawyer Moody Stallings, 
"just how hated lawyers are." 

Stallings was representing one, 
William Drinkwater, who wanted to 
rezone property in the Virginia 
Beach Borough from R-5D 
Residential Duplex District to R-T3 
Resort Tourist District at 500 23rd 
Street. Drinkwater wanted to place 
his law office on the 7150 square- 
foot parcel. 

Residents from across the street, 
next door and down the street turned 
out in mass against the rezoning 
because, they said, it would com- 
prise spot zoning and start a 
deterioration of the neighborhood 
into commercial uses. 

Drinkwater had offered a condi- 



tion that the building be used only 
for a law office. 

Stallings said that, according to 
the speakers, his client was respon- 
sible for the open ditches the iron 
pipes, and other detrimental features 
in the neighborhood. He said that 
there is nothing detrimental about a 
one-man law firm which would be 
50 feet away from a 7 -Eleven. 
"They want to take all the evils in 
the neighborhood and dwell it on 
this use." 

But council was not swayed and 
by what Attorney Thomas Padrick 
called, Stallings' eloquence, and de- 
nied the application by a 8-3 vote 
with Councilmen Albert Balko, 
John L. Perry and William D. Ses- 
soms dissenting. 



Council ApprovesRevenue Bond 



City council has approved the 
issuance of a $1.8 million indus- 
trial development revenue bonds to 
Hermes Abrasives, Ltd., 524 
Viking Drive, for the purchase of 



equipment for the manufacture of 
coaled abrasives and the conversion 
of coaled abrasives into belts and 
discs. 



Cromwell, Howard Reappointed 



Barbara Cromwell has been reap- 
pointed to the Tidewater Commu- 
nity College Board and Howard M. 



Willjams has been reappointed to 
the Social Services Board. 



••MW* 



The Virginia Beach Sun, June 28, 1989 3 













. . -. ■ ■■.-: 























Op-Ed 




Municipal Reference Serves The City In A Unique Way 




<lhe 
Mayor's 
- Report 

Virginia Beach Mayor 

The Honorable 

Meyera Oberndorf 



Tucked away in the Virginia Beach Municipal Center there is a special- 
ized library that serves the city in a unique way. 

The Municipal Reference Library provides data, resources, and access to 
information related to local government operations and services* The li- 
brary primarily serves the information needs of the city council, the city 
manager, and all municipal departments and employees. But it is also a 
"gold mine" of information for anyone interested in knowing about the 
city, its past, present and future. J 

My colleagues and I use the library to help us study issues and«to inves- 
tigate new approaches to meeting the needs of our city. City departments 
use the library in much the same way. Within the last year, many initia- 
tives and decisions have been based on the research materials that the staff 
provides. A good example is the city's new smoking ordinance. We ob- 
tained copies of sample ordinances from cities across the United Slates 
through Municipal Reference. It was based on this information that our 
ordinance was written. 

Municipal Reference is part of the public library system. Established in 
1972, it is the smallest public service unit and yet one of the most fully 
automated. Through microcomputer networks the library is linked to cities 
and local government organizations throughout the country. It provides the 



But it is also a "gold mine" of information for any- 
one interested in knowing about the city, its past, 
present and future. 



city with invaluable information about how other cities deal with certain 
issues and lets us share our successes with others. It also has access to over 
400 electronic databases that help with background information for city 
projects or services. 

The library contains a collection of books and materials related to public 
administration, personnel, municipal finance, planning, citizen participa- 
tion in government, etc. They also maintain a collection of Virginia Beach 
city documents. Special and annual reports are collected by the library. One 
of the most interesting parts of Ifieir collection is the Virginia Beach in- 
formation files. These contain historic and background information on 
topics related to Virginia Beach, such as the organizational structure of the 
city. Most of the items in these Hies are news clippings, although certain 
ones contain photocopies of information from a report or a book. The ma- 
jority of these materials supplement another service that the division pro- 

Please see Mayor, page 10 



Pressures Felt By Our Children And Youth 




Report 



By Claire Polley, 

President of the Virginia 

Beach Education Association 



Today's student is in many ways a superior one. Because of new 
teaching methods and attitudes, students are rising to intellectual heights 
probably never reached before. Yet, adolescent suicide is at a higher rate; 
many young people turn to drugs to turn off reality; some are victims of 
child abuse; others develop eating disorders; others feel alienated and lost 
because they are latchkey children; many, too many, just give up and drop 
out. 

These are disturbing effects of today's pressures on children and youth. 
They show that the pressures can be so intense as to cause a significant 
portion of young people to crack under them. 

Throughout time the individual at every age of life has experienced 
pressure, anxiety, and fear, to some degree. When they occur in reasonable 
amounts, these conflicts can stimulate growth and learning. The 
emotionally healthy individual finds ways to deal with conflicts as they 
arise and become more mature through each experience. 

It is when the pressures are too many, or when they come before the 
. child is able to cope with them, that they result not in learning but in 
varying degrees of mental or physical disturbance. 

Children learn better when they are self-confident and have a good self- 
image than when they are unsure and fearful about themselves. While 



Throughout time the individual at every age of 
life has experienced pressure, anxiety, and tear to 
some degree. 



routine learning can survive quite a bit of pressure, creativity and 
originality can quickly be stifled by relatively small amounts of tension. 

What Are The Signs? 

Generally, the clue children give that they are being overpressured is a 
change in their behavior. Some common signs are: 

• temper tantrums; 

• cheating in school; 

• delinquent behavior, 

• inability to study, or conversely, total absorption with studies to the 
exclusion of any diversion; 

• sudden dullness or apathy in a normally bright, alert child; 

• secretive behavior or staring into space by usually carefree, boisterous 
child; and 

• unusual restlessness, agitation, poor eating, nail biting, twitching, or 

Please see VBEA, page 10 



Celebrate Our Freedoms On July 4 And Every Day! 



i 




the choice of the 4th of July as Independence Day is historically ques- 
tionable. The Resolution of Independence was passed by the Congress on 
the 2nd of July, not the 4th, and at least one of the founders, John Adams, 
believed that was the event to be commemorated. He expressed his senti- 
ments in a letter, dated July 3, 1776, to his wife Abigail. 

"The second day of July, 1776, will be the most memorable epoch in 
the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by 
succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival. It ought to be 
commemorated as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to 
God Almighty. 

It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, 
sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations, from one end of this con- 
tinent to the other, from this time forward forever." 

At least one of his predictions came true. Here in America our Indepen- 
dence Day does not commemorate a great battle, nor do we celebrate with 
tanks and guns. Instead, our nation's freedom day is a family day. It is, as 
Adams thought it should be, a time for parades, flag-waving, fireworks, 
ballgames and picnics. 

Some erroneously believe the 4th of July was the date that the Declara- 
tion was signed. Tom Burnam in his delightful book, 77ie Dictionary of 



What we celebrate is one of our great docu- 
ments of freedom - the Declaration of Independ- 



ence. 



Misinformation, points out that it is misleading to refer to the 56 "original 
signers" of the Declaration of Independence. The signing actually dragged 
on for weeks with six signatures attached after the 6th of August. One 
signer, Thomas McKean, did not sign until 1781! 

Burnam writes, "Some of those who signed were not even in Congress 
when the Declaration was adopted, and some who voted for it in Congress 
never did get around to signing it. Robert R. Livington was one of the 
committee of five; he helped frame it; he voted for it; and he never signed 
it!" 

But at least one resident of Virginia Beach is a direct descendant of one 
of those who did sign the document, and who was, in fact, the last surviv- 
ing signer before his death. Virginia Pennington McCrone, explains why 
her ancestor, Charles Carroll of Maryland, signed in the fashion he did. 

"His was the only signature with an added phrase. By signing the 

Please see LU'$ Quit, page 10 



Lee Cahill'sCi 






Mayor 
Meyera Oberndorf 



Vice-Mayor 
Robert FenUeaa 



AlBalko 



Btfbmt Htjiiby 



N$ncy Phafktf 



New FOIA Isn't Much Different From Present Act 



1 ne new Freedom of Information 
Act which goes into effect on July 
1 isn't too different from the present 
act, city council members were told 
at a workshop by Interim City 
Attorney Kevin Cosgrove. 

Next to the Chesapeake Bay 
Preservation Act, Cosgrove said, 
the FOIA was the most widely 
talked-about act that came out of 
the General Assembly. Rumors 
were that city councils would never 
be able to go into executive 
session, but, said Cosgrove, mere's 
not that much difference. 

But there are differences, mainly 
that more details will be required 
and actions that come under the act 
will have to be more precise. 

'The more thinks change the 
more they will not change," or 
"Chicken Little the sky is not 
falling down," were the way 
Cosgrove described the changes. 

Citizens who want copies of 



records may have a shorter time to 
wait under the new act. 

From the time the request is 
delivered, the public body will have 
five working days instead of 14 
calendar days to make the copies 
available. If an extension is needed, 
the city would have an additional 
seven working days instead of the 
present ten. 

Otherwise, Cosgrove said, the 
method of meeting requests is 
already handled in Virginia Beach 
the way it's stipulated in the new 
act That is, the records are provided 
to the requester, if the records are 
not provided the reason has to be 
given; the city also can provide 
some of the records, stating the 
reason the others are not provided; 
or request an extension from the 
Circuit Court 

The various public agencies 
would have records "custodians" and 
a person in the city attorney's office 



would be an "overseer." 

Cosgrove also said that just 
because a document is given to all 
council members it is not 
necessarily a public record under the 
FOIA. 

Cosgrove said that the General 
Assembly did a good thing by 
inserting the clause that the public 
agency is no longer required to 
prepare a document if it does not 
exist. 

And Council will still have the 
perogative to go into executive 
session for the same reasons as 
now, but that the motion has to be 
more explicit. 

A major change in the executive 
session procedure is a certification 
of the executive session. The public 
body must reconvene and take a 
recorded vote of members present 
that the members in the executive 
meeting discussed only public 
business matters lawfully exempted 



from statutory open meeting 
requirements and public business 
matters identified in the motion to 
convene the executive meeting. 
Members who cannot certify these 
items indicate this prior to the vote 
with specific details. 

The motion to go into executive 
session is the same as required by 
the current Act except that a clause 
has been added - that the motion 
reasonably identifies the substance 
of the matter to be discussed. 

As an example, Cosgrove said 
that the motion, if discussing 
public acquisition of property will 
not have to say which property is 
being considered for a school site, 
but would have to say that property 
was for a school site. If personnel 
is the matter of discussion, council 
will be required to say which officer 
is being discussed. Mayor Meyera 
Oberndorf said that while names of 
persons are not required, the 



information that is required would 
identify the person. She said thai 
the potential privacy is not there 
anymore. 

The only exception, said 
Cosgrove, is that the hiring of a 
chief executive officer. 

The only matters that can be 
discussed in the executive session 
are those specifically addressed in 
the motion. 

If litigation is to be discussed, 



again, the motion has to be more 
specific. The "actual or probable," 
and the name of the case will have 
to be specified in the motion. 

This requirement, said 
Councilman John A. Baum, will 
put the public at a disadvantage. 
"We have had leaky council before." 

Oberndorf also pointed out that 
the attorney general said that there 
is now law saying that is incorrect 
to give out information from an 
executive session. 



Flyover 



, continued from page 1 



not have been able to review the 
alignment He said that the curved 
portion of the bridge over the picnic 
and playground would create a traf- 
fic hazard 

Al Bcnnis, also representing 
Larkspur, said that the project 



should be delayed and other im- 
provements in the road system 
made first. He said that Mount 
Trashmore is "a very unique play- 
ground," and white Alternate 4 will 
take the bridge father from the heart 

its 



«*MMMM 



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4 The Virginia Beach Sun. June 2b) 1989 

Civic 




The "Up With Family" cast 



Host Families Needed For Three 
Nights For Up With People Cast 



By Lillian Youel I 

Special To The Sun 



My brother, J. Blanton Belk, is 
founder and president of "Up With 
People," an international educa- 
tional and cultural exchange 
organization dedicated to promoting 
understanding among people of all 
nations, races and backgrounds. 

Tidewater residents will be able 
to see one of the five international 
casts perform their show, "Time for 
Music," in Norfolk as a part of 



Fcstevents on the Fourth of July. 
Cast B arrives on the first to help 
celebrate the Great American Picnic 
at Town Point Park. 

Host families for cast members 
are needed for four nights - July 1, 
2 and 3 & 4. On Wednesday, July 
S, at 7 a.m., they head back to 
homes all over the world. 

Their farewell banquet will be in 
Virginia Beach. 

For details regarding hosting, call 
the Up With People advance team 
at 466-8000, room 124. 



July Happenings At Farmer's Market 



Friday Night Hoedowns will be 
held every Friday night in July 
from 7 to 10 p.m. at the Farmer's 
Market. 

There will be bluegrass music 
and country music doggers. Bring a 
lawn chair or blanket and enjoy the 
show. Admission is free. The 
Country Kitchen Restaurant will be 
open each Friday night to service 
homestyle cooking. # 

On the 4th of July the Farmer's 
Market will celebrate with an art 
show, live band, parade, karate 
demonstration, talent show and 
pony rides. The celebration starts at 
10 a.m. and runs until 4 p.m. There 
will be pony rides at the Farmer's 



Market on July 15 and 22 from 1 1 
a.m. to 3 p.m. 

On July 14, 15, and 16, the 
Farmer's Market will host a Craft 
Festival from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Crafters from all over Tidewater 
will demonstrate their skills. Ap- 
plications are available. 

The Farmer's Market is also 
selling advertising space in its 
newsletter to local businesses or 
merchants who would like to 
advertise. 

The Farmer's Market is located at 
1989 Landstown Road at the inter- 
section of Princess Anne Road. For 
more information on any of these 
events, call 427-4395. 



CLASP Holds Picnic At Bayville 



CLASP (Citizens Loving AH 
Special People) is having a picnic 
on July 29, at the Bayville Recre- 
ational Park, Shelter #3, from 4 to 
7 p.m. The park is located adjacent 
to Bayville Farm on Shore Drive. 
In the event of rain, the picnic will 
still be held. 

This is a family get-together, so 
bring every member of the family 
along. CLASP will furnish the 
hamburgers, hot dogs, chips, 
drinks, condiments, eating utensils 
and plates. Each family is requested 
to bring a covered dish or dessert to 



share. A special Liability Release 
Form, which was mailed out in the 
July newsletter, will be required for 
this event. If CLASP does not have 
this form by July 17 the person 
will not be allowed to stay at the 
picnic. 

Transportation to the picnic is 
available through TRT at $5 per 
roundtrip per individual. Call Car- 
olyn Wismer at 545-8041 weekdays 
after 7 p.m. or anytime weekends. 

For further information call 
Harry E. Baird, Jr., at 486-31 10. 



Jung Society Sponsors Kledzik Lecture 



In view of the recent upheaval in 
China, the C.G. Jung Society of 
Tidewater will sponsor a special 
lecture by Dr. Ronald B. Kledzik.; 
who, in 1988, spent two weeks in 
Shanghai as a guest of the Shang- 
hai Psychiatric Institute on Friday, 
June 30 at 7:30 p.m. at the VWC 
Science Auditorium. 



Dr. Kledzik will discuss his ex- 
periences there as well as his per- 
ception of the issues underlying 
China's present crises. All proceeds 
from this presentation, for which an 
$8 donation will be requested, will 
be used to establish a scholarship 
fund to be given annually to a Chi- 
nese student in Tidewater. 



Parents Without Partners Hold Dance 



Parents Without Partners, Chap- 
ter 216, is hosting a dance at Beach 
Quarters Motel, 5th and Atlantic 
and the public is invited to attend. 
This event will be held on Satur- 
day, July 1, from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. 

Dance to the music of Willie 
Sykes. Proceeds help finance the 



family and children program. Ad- 
mission is S5 per person. 

An orientation for membership 
will be conducted at 8 p.m. just 
before the dance for single parents 
of the area. Call 497-81 12 or 471- 
6672 for more information on each 
of these activities. 



Dance For Special People Held 



A dance for physically and men- 
tally handicapped people will be 
held Saturday, July 15, from 6:30 
to 9:30 p.m. at the Bow Creek 
Recreation Center, 3427 Clubhouse 
Road. The dance will be sponsored 
by Harry and Juanita Baird, the 
Virginia Beach Department of Parks 
and Recreation and CLASP 
(Citizens Loving All Special Peo- 
ple). 

Participation is free. Refresh- 



ments will be served and door prizes 
will be given. The latest hits will 
be played. Parents and guardians are 
welcome, however, chaperones are 
present at all times. 

Transportation is available 
through TRT at $5 per roundtrip 
per individual. Call Carolyn Wis- 
mer at 545-8041 after 7 p.m. 
weekdays or anytime weekends. 

For further information call 
Harry Baird on 486-31 10. 



Fil-Am Picnic Held July 4th 



The Philippine American Com- 
munity of Tidewater, Inc. invites 
all Filipino Americans in the 
Hampton Roads area to join them 
in the celebration of the "Glorious 
Fourtir on July 4 from 1 1 a.m. to 
sunset 

The picnic will be held at 



Princess Anne Park, Shed #1. 
Family and friends are welcome. 
Senator Emmanuel Pelaez, Philip- 
pine Ambassador to the U.S. will 
be joining the picnic. 

For information contact Tessie 
D.Serrano at 420-5647. 




Clyde Hoey 



Just A Chat 



Name: Clyde R. Hoey, II. 

Occupation: President, Grimsley & Grimsley, Inc. 

Neighborhood: Birdneck section. 

Age: 49. 

Marital status: Married. Wife's name is Betty. 

Biggest accomplishments in your life: The merging of the 
chambers of commerce into the regional chamber. 

Biggest mistake in your life: Not going fishing when I need 
to. 

What do you really like about your job: Solving problems 
for people. 

If you could write a national newspaper column, what 
would your message be: Mak| Congress understand it needs to 
work in a prudent fiscal manner. 

What do you consider the \ meaning of success: Satisfac- 
tion of a job well done, while helping your fellow man. 

If you received a million dollars tomorrow, what would 
you do with it: Go fishing; pay some bills; give some to my 
church and charities; invest it wheijs it would help my family. 

What's your idea of a fun evening: A cruise down the river; a 
good seafood meal somewhere I Scan tie along side; and be with my 
family. 

What's your idea of fun weekend: Staying home with the 
chores done, play golf and go fishing. 

What is your best personality trait: I'm outgoing and 
friendly. 

What is your worst personality trait: Procrastination. 

What is your dream vacation: Two weeks of playing some of 
the finest golf courses in the world. 

What is your favorite time ,«f the year and why: Spring - 
things aqj waking up and you get a fresh start. Fall - the vibrant colors 
and fresh crisp air. 

What is your favorite day of the week and why: They're 
all great! 

What's your favorite magazine: National Geographic. 

What's your favorite book and author: Management By 
Chaos, by Tom Peters. 

What is your favorite pet: My schnauzer. 

Your dream car: One that gets about 80 miles per gallon. 

Your favorite sport: Participation - golf, speciating - football 
and basketball. __, 

Your favorite sports team: Washington Redskins. 

What is your pet peeve: Insubordination. 

What do you like to do to relax after a hard day's work: 
Get my wife and take a cruise down the river; or, watch a good televi- 
sion program. 

Who is the most interesting person you know and their 
occupation: Ernest Grimsley, the man from whom I bought my 
business. He never quits and stays very busy. He has a very active 
mind. 

What is your favorite TV program: Matlock. 

Your favorite movie: M*A*S*H. 

Your favorite entertainer: Anyone who puts on a good perfor- 
mance and is good at his craft, as exemplified by Neil Diamond. 

What is your favorite food and drink: Exquisitely prepared 
fish, such as dolphin, and a good bottle of wine. 

What is your favorite restaurant: Scoma's in San Francisco. 

What do you think is one of the biggest problems fac- 
ing the world: Total disregard for the environment. 

What do you think is one of the biggest problems fac- 
ing Virginia Beach: The internal growth. 

What do you like most about Virginia Beach: The relaxed 
atmosphere. * — - 



CLASP Holds Business Meeting 



CLASP (Citizens Loving All 
Special People) will hold its, 
monthly business meeting Tuesday j 
July 11, at 7:30 p.m. at the home 
of Harry and Juanita Baird, 3900 
Rumford Lane. 



AH voting members are highly 
encouraged to attend. All other in- 
terested personal are also invited to 
attend. 

For further information call 
Harry Baird at 486-3110. 



CLASP Selects New 1990 Officers 



CLASP (Citizens Loving All 
Special People) held its business 
meeting, recently and new officers 
were chosen for the coming year 
and will take office on July 1 . 



Elected were Harry E. Baird, Jr., 
president; Adrian ZinkI, vice-presi- 
dent; Donna Zerbian, secretary; and 
Juanita Baird, treasurer. 



ROWS To Hold Luncheon 



The Retired Officers Wives 
Society of Tidewater will hold a 
luncheon Thursday, July 13, at; 
Little Creek Officers Club. The so-! 
cial hour will begin at 11 JO a.m.! 
with lunch served at 12:15 p.m. 



Doug Williams will speak on 
"Money." Reservations must be 
made by Monday, July 10 by 5:15 
p.m. by calling 464-0905 or 464- 
6733. 




Beach General Offers Pregnancy Fitness 



Virginia Beach General Hospital 
will offer "Pregnancy Fitness," a 
four-week exercise program, begin- 
ning Monday, July 3, from 5:30 to 
6:30 p.m. in the health education 
center, located across from the hos- 
pital emergency center. 

Designed for women after their 
12th week of pregnancy, classes 



focus on strengthening and control- 
ling muscles, increasing flexibility 
and improving posture. They are 
taught by a certified instructor. 

Classes are held Mondays and 
Thursdays and pre-registration is 
required. For more information, call 
the HealthQuest Line to Better 
Health at 481-8141. 



"Hearty Arteries" At Beach General 



Virginia Beach General Hospital 
offers "Hearty Arteries," an adult 
fitness program, every Monday, 
Tuesday and Thursday from 6 to 7 
p.m at the Tidewater Psychiatric 
Institute Gymnasium. July pro- 
grams will begin on Monday, July 



"Hearty Arteries" is designed to 
help individuals achieve personal 
physical fitness and healthy 
lifestyle habits conducive to cardiac 
disease prevention. 

Pre-registration is required. For 
more information, call * the 
HealthQuest Line to Better Health 
at 481-8141. 






••■v-V • • : 



Tabernacle Baptist Holds Rally 



Tabernacle Baptist, Church 717 
N. Whitehurst Landing Road, will 
hold a Sons of Religious Liberty 
Rally on Sunday, July 2 at 3 p.m. 

Retired Master Sergeant Timothy 
A. Crawford (USMC) will be guest 



speaker. The community is invited 
to attend this rally held for the pur- 
pose of alerting Americans of the 
need to defend our religious liberty. 
A nursery will be provided. For 
further information call 420-5476. 



St Cecilia Announces Final Concert 



The St. Cecilia Performing Arts 
Association announces its final 
concert of the 1988 - 198? season. 
Two performances will be given, as 
follows: 

On Friday, June 23 at 8 p.m. at 
Oak Grove United Methodist 



Church, North Battlefield Blvd., 
Chesapeake, and Saturday, June 24 
at 8 p.m. at Broad Street United 
Methodist Church, Portsmouth. 

The program contains a balanced 
repertoire of melodic Baroque and 
Classical selections. 




Water Safety Day Held At Museum 



The Life-Saving Museum of 
Virginia will hold Water Safety 
Day on Wednesday, July 5 from 1 1 
a.m. to 3 p.m. at the 24th Street 
Oceanfront Park. 

The following exhibitions will 
be featured: Feet First, head and 
spinal cord injury prevention unit; 
United States Coast Guard Auxil- 
iary; Volunteer Surf Rescue Team, 
Ocean Park Rescue; American Red 
Cross; United States Lifeguard As- 
sociation; 17th Street Surf Shop 
and the Life-Savings Museum. 

Demonstrations will begin at 
11:30 a.m. The Virginia Beach 
Lifesaving Service guards will 
demonstrate lifesaving through the 
surf and the Volunteer Surf Rescue 
Team will demonstrate lifesaving 
rescue through the surf using their 
inflatable rescue boat, "The Zo- 
diac." 



The USCG Air-Sea Rescue, 
USCG Station, Elizabeth City, 
N.C. and the USCG Station, 
Portsmouth, will simulate the 

medical evacuation of an injured 
person by helicopter from a vessel. 

Their, nex^ demonstration will 
simulate {he retrieval of a person in 
the water after his boat has appar- 
ently caught fire and he has jumped 
overboard. The helicopter will 
hover over the person in the water 
while the rescue swimmer jumps 
into the water and rescues the per- 
son. 

The first 200 visitors to the wa- 
ter safety tent at 24th Street will 
receive a free bumper sticker, 
"Think (PFD) Don't Sink." 

For more information contact 
Anne Dearman at 422- 1 587 or 49 1 - 
8608. 



Life-Saving Museum Receives Grant 



The Life-Saving Museum of 
Virginia has received a grant from 
Boat/U.S. Foundation for Boating 
Safety to develop a mini course in 
basic boating safety for use in the 
public schools. 

The course will consist of lesson 
plans, overhead transparencies, a 
video and hands on materials such 
as PFDs, horns, emergency markers 
and other safety equipment. The 
goals of the course are to help chil- 
dren develop positive attitudes to- 
ward boating safety and to make 
them aware of the importance of 
safety equipment needed on the 
small boat • especially the Personal 
Flotation Device (PFD). The lesson 



plans were developed by Peggy 
Ames, a fifth grade teacher at 
Windsor Woods Elementary 
School. 

A slogan has been developed, 
"Think Don't Sink." This slogan 
includes a bright orange PFD after 
the word "Think." This slogan is 
on a poster with Sam the Surfman. 
Bumper stickers will also be avail- 
able with the slogan. 

The Life-Saving Museum hopes 
to create safety awareness for the 
young people of Virginia Beach in 
the hopes that it will spread 
throughout their families and 
friends. 



Ellsworth On Exhibit At Life-Saving Musuem 



The Life-Saving Museum of 
Virginia opens its newest exhibi- 
tion of art with works by Bill 
Ellsworth on Tuesday July 4 
through August 31. 

Bill Ellsworth is a 30-year vet- 
eran of the U.S. Navy, serving as a 
Naval aviator. Upon retirement, he 
became a full time artist, depicting 
that which he had seen and done. 
The etching medium was under- 
taken seven years ago and for 
Ellsworth has been a best medium 
for the action and the texture of the 
sea, naval aviation, and marine life. 



He has pieces in the Experimen- 
tal Aviation Association Museum 
in Wisconsin and in the Naval 
Aviation Museum in Florida. He is 
currently a part of the Marine Art 
Exhibit sponsored by the American 
Society of Marine Artists and 
hosted by the Maryland Historical 
Society Museum in Baltimore. 
Ellsworth is a familiar face at the 
Virginia Beach Annual Boardwalk 
Art Show. 

For more information and mu- 
seum hours, call 422-1587. 



wmmm^mmmmrmu 



Marine Science Museum 




P&R Forms Summer Tennis Leagues Marine Science Museum's Boat Trips 



The Virginia Beach Department 
of Parks and Recreation is now 
forming tennis leagues for the 
summer. 

The leagues are for adult recre- 



ational tennis players. These are all 

singles leagues and players may 
sign up for level one or two. Reg- 
istration is underway and play be- 
gins on Monday. June 26. 



The Virginia Marine Science 
Museum is offering boat trips 
aboard the Miss Virginia Beach ev- 
ery Thursday from June 22 to Au- 
gust 31 from 12:45 to 2 p.m. 

Trips will leave from the Vir- 



ginia Beach Fishing Center at 
Rudee Inlet Cost U $5 for children 
under 12 and $7 for adults. 

Tb register call the museum at 
425-3476. 



^^^^mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



The Virginia Beach Sun, June 28, 19895 

















1 ihrarv 






L.1U1 ai y 



Summer Visitors Invade VWC 



Lynchburg Announces Beach Grads 



The annual "summer invasion" 
of the Virginia Wesleyan College 
campus began this week with the 
arrival of 200 young day campers, 
students auditioning on piano, a 
public school leadership workshop, 
women soccer players, and police 
working dogs and their handlers. 
Befqre the summer is over, the 
College will have hosted more than 
5,500 persons from ages 6 to over 
70. 

The YMCA Day Camp is 
beginning the first week of its four 
two- week sessions. Each of the four 
sessions enrolls 200 girls and boys 
ages 6 through 12 from all over 
Hampton Roads. The youngster ar- 
rive on campus at 8:30 a.m. and 
leave at 5 p.m. each day, Monday 
through Friday. The camp runs 
through August 11. 

The first of two Elderhostel ses- 
sions hosted by the College began 
on June 25 and run through July 1. 
The second Elderhostel week will 
be July 9 to July 15. Elderhostel is 
a worldwide travel/study program 
held on college campuses for senior 
citizens 60 and over, with more 
than 160,000 participating in 1988 
at over 1,000 colleges and 
universities. 

Four cheerleading groups will 
/isit the campus. Those scheduled 
nclude Eastern Cheerleaders Asso- 
:iation, June 27 through 30; a sec- 
>nd National Cheerleaders group, 

July 5 through 8; and a second 
Eastern Cheerleaders Camp, July 21 
through 24. 

A number of sports camps are 
scheduled, including the Tidewater 
soccer camp, June 26 through 30; 
junior high basketball and girls' 
softball camps, July 24 through 28; 
boys' baseball camps, July 10 



through 14 and July 31 through 
Aug. 4. 

Other groups of special interest 
include "Think Tank for Super 
Thinkers," a program for gifted 
ninth- through twelfth-graders in 
Virginia Beach Public Schools, 
covering issues in new technology 
and ethical approaches to handling 
those issues; the Lions Club Inter- 
national Youth Exchange Camp, 
with 30 foreign college students, 
July 9 through 22; the Virginia 
Beach Public Schools' Activities 
Conference, July 27 through 28; 
and their Leadership Workshops for 
Junior High (July 24 through 26) 
and Senior High (July 31 through 
Aug. 4) student leaders. 

A special group meeting for the 
second time will be a Church Mu- 
sic Summer Session, sponsored by 
Virginia Wesleyan and running July 
31 through Aug. 4. A faculty of 
well-known musicians from Vir- 
ginia, Tennessee and South Car- 
olina will teach courses in all areas 
of church music. Ann Howard 
Jones, director of choral activities at 
the University of Illinois at Urvana- 
Champaign, will work with a choir 
of 200 local choir singers and will 
present a performance of the Mozart 
Requiem and music of Vaughan 
Williams, Britten and Rutter at 
Christ and St. Luke's Church in 
Norfolk at 8 p.m. on August 5. 

In addition to the workshops and 
camps already mentioned, there will 
be numerous church retreats, pic- 
nics, piano recitals, baseball and 
softball tournaments and other 
groups using the Virginia Wesleyan 
campus this summer. There are also 
students attending classes in the 
regular Virginia Wesleyan College 
summer school program. 



Three Virginia Beach students 
recently graduated from Lynphburg 
College. 

Jeffrey Alan Burns graduated 
magna cum laude with a BS in 
chemistry, Kimberly Lynn Sereno 
received a BA management, and 
Evarista Marie Speckhart graduated 
cum laude with a BS in biology- 
chemistry. 

In addition, Burns was awarded 
the James Lewis Howe Outstanding 
Chemistry Student award at the an- 



women for scholarship, leadership, 

and service. 

nual Academic Awards Banquet 

Burns is a member of Cold Key, 
an honor society for graduating se- 
niors who have a cumulative grade 
point average of at least 3.5, and 
Blue Key, an honor fraternity rec- 
ognizing junior and senior men for 
scholarship, leadership, and service. 

Sereno and Speckhart are mem- 
bers of Cardinal Key, an honor so- 
ciety recognizing junior and senior 



Mosquito Info At Bay side Library 



A mosquito information program 
consisting of a slide presentation 
and lecture will be presented at the 
Bayside Library, 936 Independence 
Boulevard on Thursday, July 6 at 7 
p.m. 

Biologists from the city of Vir- 
ginia Beach's Mosquito Control 
Biology Lab will inform partici- 
pants about the mosquito's role in 
disease transmission, mosquito bi- 
ology and habits, methods of 
mosquito control, and information 



on pesticides used. 

Visual aids such as live mosquito 
eggs, larvae, pupae and adults and 
an insect collection with different 
species of mosquitoes will also be 
displayed. 

A question and answer period 
will follow the presentation and in- 
formational pamphlets will be dis- 
tributed. Registration is required. 
Call 464-9320 for more informa- 
tion. 



Trustees Join Board At VWC 



Four new members were elected 
to the Virginia Wesleyan College 
Board of Trustees at a recent session 
of the Virginia Annual Conference 
of the United Methodist church 
meeting at Scope in Norfolk. A 
fifth trustee joins the board by 
virtue of his appointment as super- 
intendent of the Virginia Peninsula 
District. 

The five new trustees are George 
Y. Birdsong of Suffolk, executive 
vice-president of Birdsong Peanuts; 
James D.^ Blood, president of 



Blood's Hammock Groves, Inc., 
Delray Beach, Florida; Rev. Robert 
T. Casey, superintendent of the 
Peninsula District of the United 
Methodist Church; E. George Mid- 
dleton of Norfolk, president of E.G. 
Middleton, Inc.; and D. Henry 
Waits of Virginia Beach, executive 
vice president-marketing of Norfolk 
Southern Corporation. Birdsong and 
Middleton have both served as 
chairman and vice chairman of the 
College's President's Advisory 
Council. 




Financial Survival In Navy Workshop 



Navy Family Services Center 
Oceana will offer "Financial Sur- 
vival in the Navy" on Monday, 10 
July, from 0930-1130, at the 
Wadsworth Branch office, 924 
Newburgh Court. 

This workshop will cover bud- 
geting and cost-cutting strategies, 



and military and community re- 
sources, that can help military 
families cope with the fluctuations 
in income and living expenses 
typical of Navy life. 

For more information or to 
register, call 433-2912. 



Gibbings Receives Psychology Doctorite Navy Family Services Investing Program 



Hughes Wins President's Scholarship 



Jonathan Wolff Hughes, of 840 
Deary Lane, has been selected a 
winner in the Georgia Tech Presi- 
dent's Scholarship Program. 
Hughes, the son of Raymond J. and 
Paula J. Hughes, has been awarded 
a Recognition Scholarship. 

Hughes is one of 74 of the na- 
tion's brightest high school seniors 
who hive been selected as 19$9 re- 
cipients in the President's Scholar- 
ship Program, the most prestigious 
award a George Tech freshman can 
achieve. 

The awards given this year in- 
clude 20 full President's Scholar- 
ships, each worth $6,250 per year 
(three quarters) for in-state students 
and $10,100 for out-of-state stu- 
dents; 29 Tuition Scholarships, 
worth $1,971 per year (three quar- 
ters) for in-state students and 
$5,820 per year (three quarters) for 
out-of-state students; and 25 
Recognition Scholarships, worth 



$1,300 per year (three quarters). 

Students selected for the Presi- 
dent's Scholarship Program must 
possess several qualifications in- 
cluding a superior high school 
record, outstanding evidence of 
leadership potential, and Scholastic 
Aptitude Test scores of at least 
1350 for in-state students and 1400 
for out-of-state students. 

The scholars will have several 
"perks" on campus, including early 
registration times, guaranteed 
housing, a study room equipped 
with PC's and computer terminals, 
and an additional computer account 

The President's Scholarship Pro- 
gram is funded by the M&W Ferst 
Foundation (Robert H. Ferst 
Scholarship), Southern Railway (D. 
William Brosnan Scholarships), 
Boeing Commercial Airplane Co. 
(David C. Garrett Jr. Scholarship), 
and the Reginald S. and Julia W. 
Fleet Foundation (Reginald S. Fleet 
Scholarship). 



Peck, Wolfe Graduate From Emerson 

University of Massachusetts; 



Ellen Peck of 1519 Duke Of 
Windsor Road was one of 583 stu- 
dent' to graduate from Emerson 
ColLge. Peck received a bachelor of 
science degree in communication 
disorders. 

Also, Daniel Wolfe of 3709 Pine 
Grove Lane, was one of 583 stu- 
dents to graduate from Emerson 
College. Wolfe received a master of 
arts degree in mass communication. 

About 3,500 guests attended the 
commencement ceremony, held at 
the Wang Center for the Performing 
Arts in Boston. Governor Michael 
Dukakis delivered the commence- 
ment address and received an hon- 
orary doctor of laws degree from the 
college. Also receiving honorary 
degrees at the ceremony were David 
Curtis Knapp, president of the 



Vinson Graduates 

CBN University conferred a 
Master of Arts degree in Public 
Policy upon David Allen Vinson in 
commencement exercises recently. 

CBN University, founded in 
1978, graduated 253 graduate stu- 
dents in a ceremony attended by 
over two thousand guests. Reinhard 
Bonnke, international evangelist, 
interrupted a crusade in Germany 
attended by hundreds of thousands 
to address the graduate students in 
this memorable ceremony. 



George Gerbner, professor and dean 
of the Annenberg School of Com- 
munication; and Steven Bochko, 
writer and executive producer of 
Hill Street Blues and L.A. Law. 

Located in the Back Bay of 
Boston, Emerson College is the 
only four-year and graduate college 
in the nation solely devoted to the 
communication arts and sciences. 



Elisabeth N. Gibbings of 
Philadelphia (19131) recently re- 
ceived a Doctor of Psychology de- 
gree in clinical psychology from 
the Hahnemann University Graduate 
School, Philadelphia. ^ 

Dr. Gibbings is a 1980 graduate 
of Kempsville High School, and a 
1984 graduate of the University of 
Virginia, Charlottesville, where she 
received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 

Kennedy Graduates 
From Johnson & 
Wales Universtiy 

Johnson and Wales University, 
Providence, Rhode Island, awarded 
the Doctor of Business Administra- 
tion Degree to Joseph A. Kennedy, 
at the June commencement 

Kennedy was cited for his leader- 
ship and contributions as president 
of the Commonwealth College 
System in Virginia. 

The Commonwealth College 
System has campuses in Norfolk, 
Virginia Beach, Hampton and 
Richmond. A new campus will 
open in Portsmouth in the fall of 
1989. 

Russ Awarded 
Scholarship 

Mark James Russ of Shearwater 
Cove, has been awarded a $500 
college scholarship by the Reserve 
Officers Association of the United 
States. 

The award was one of 100 given 
to college students in the Henry J. 
Reilly Memorial Scholarship Pro- 
gram, in honor of the late Army 
Reserve Brigadier General, a founder 
and the first President of ROA, 
1922-23. 

This is the eighth year that the 
scholarships have been given and is 
the fifth year that awards were made 
to graduate students. Fifteen of the 
100 scholarships were tendered 
members of ROA who are studying 
for advanced degrees. 



psychology. 

She is the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. W.R. Gibbings, who reside in 
Virginia Beach. 

While at Hahnemann, Dr. Gib- 
bings participated in the United 
Way Homeless Families Initiative. 




Has Vacation Homes 

Exceptional Values 

Near Ocean 



Lands End 



Sea Pines Square 



$57,500. 
$59,900. 
$61,000. 
$61,900. 
$77,950. 
$79,200. 
$79,900. 

$84,000. 




8 Blocks to Ocean 



2 Blocks to Ocean 



Newt 



Lake Holly Villas - 



$105,000. 
$114,000. 



New! Lakefront! 
3 Blocks to Ocean 



Pacific South 



$140,000. 




Ocean's Condo #1104 - $155,000. 
#802 $177,000. 



Magnificent View of Ocean 



Cove Point - 
Croatan Woods - 
Birdneck Point - 
8200 Oceanfront - 



$198,500. 

$325,000. 

r 
$635,000.- 

$650,000- 



— 5 Blocks to Ocean 
Deep Water Boat Sup 

— 1 Block to Ocean 



Deep Water Boat Dock 
— Oceanfront Elegance! 



Allen Pyle 

Local 491-1600 Of 1-80O458-1777 

Night* 422-5187 



Navy Family Services Center 
Oceana will offer "Investing on a 
Budget" on Thursday, 27 July, from 
1900-2200. This program will 
cover CD's*, money market and 
mutual funds, government and mu- 



nicipal bonds, and other invest- 
ments available for as little as $25 
a month. 

For more information or to 
register, call 433-2912. 



Easy Ways 
Earn Good Money 

The Virginia Beach Sun, The Chesapeake Post 
The Portsmouth Times 

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(For every 10 new paid-in-advance subscriptions turned In, you get $50) 

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(For every 25 new paid-in-advance subscriptions turned in, you get $125) 

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A one-year subscription is only $12.85 for 52 Issues 
mailed to your home or business 

1 . All subscriptions must be paid In advance. , 

2. Subscriptions must be brought or mailed to Byerly 
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5. This opportunity Is open to all Individuals and 

groups. 

6. Subscriptions may all be sold to one newspaper or arty 
combination of the Sun, Post or Times. 

Bring or mail new subscriptions, in groups of 

10, 25 or 50 along with money or checks to 

Byerly Publications, 1024 North Battlefield 

Boulevard, Chesapeake, Va., 23320. 

Call 547-4571 For More Information 

Byerly Publications, Inc. 






s 



Publisher of The Chesapeake Post, The Virginia Beach 
and The Portsmouth Times 



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6 The Virginia Beach Sun, June 28, 1989 




Military 



Petty Officer's Wives Club Meets 



The Chief Petty Officer's Wives' 
Club is extending an open invita- 
tion to all wives of the different 
branches of the military. 

Any spouse of an E-7, E-8, or E- 
9 (Active, Retired, Widowed) are 
invited to attend meetings on the 
second and fourth Wednesday of 
each month. The next meeting is 
scheduled for Wednesday, July 12, 
and all meetings are held at the 
N.A.B. - CP.O.'s Club (Gate 4). 

The organization has been in ex- 
istence since 1963 and just recently. 



the club held its annual installation 
dinner for the 1989-90 club year. 
The newly elected executive board 
members are: President, Ellie 
Campbell; First Vice-President, 
Patricia Knott Chapman; Second 
Vice-President, Jackie Simmons; 
Treasurer, Mary Spoonamore; Sec- 
retary, Lil Benoit; and Chaplain, 
Wanda Honeycutt. 

For further information, contact 
Jackie at 497-6599 or Ellie at 499- 
2187. 




Left to right Raymond Mervlcker, John Cobb, Robert Pipkin, Mary Taylor, 
Darlene Washurn, Mayor Meyera Obemdort, Robert Mastros, 



Credit And Bankruptcy Program Held Restaurant Employees Honored By Mayor 



Navy Family Services Center 
Oceana will offer a program on 
"Credit and Bankruptcy" on Thurs- 
day, 17 August, from 1900-2200. 

Topics will include establishing 
credit; interest, minimum pay- 



ments, and late charges; collection 
and credit reporting practices; 
bankruptcy; and how to clean up a 
bad credit record. 

For more information or to 
register, call 433-2912. 




Business 



Pyle Realty Makes Announcements 



Pyle Realty, Inc. has announced 
that three of its agents, Allen Pyle, 
Carole Emerson and Pat Roper 
McGee, have earned the company's 
"Ben Franklin Award" for the 
month of May. 

The "Ben Franklin Award" is a 
$100 bill (on which Ben Franklin's 
picture appears) given to any agent 
who writes three or more sales 
contracts within the month. Four or 
more homes sold entitles the agent 
to an additional $100 bill. This 
award is separate from being named 
the top agent of the month and may 
be earned by as many agents as 



meet the above criteria. 

Also, Pyle Realty has an- 
nounced, its top sales and listing 
associates for the month of May. 

Pat Roper McGee is the firm's 
top sales associate. McGee is the 
relocation director for Pyle Realty 
and has been with the firm for two 
years. She was previously associ- 
ated with Realty Consultants. 

Mary Oleynik is the firm's top 
listing associate. Oleynik recently 
joined the firm and is a ten year 
veteran of the real estate industry. 
She was previously associated with 
Long & Foster. 



National Tourism Week was cel- 
ebrated in Virginia Beach with lun- 
cheon at the Pavilion to honor 
front-line employees in hospitality 
field. 

Out of 48 nominees, six restau- 
rant employees were presented ex- 
emplary performance of their vari- 
ous jobs. 

The Host/Hostess award went to 
Duck-In's Mary Taylor. Taylor be- 
gan working at the Duck-In in 
1965. Busperson of the year is also 
a Duck-In employee Robert Pipkin. 
Pipkin has followed in his mother's 
footsteps as she has been employed 
at the Duck-In for 26 years; he has 
been working there for 20 years. 

Darlene Washburn received the 
honor of waitress of the year. Her 
friendliness and professionalism are 



Mulderrig, Riley Awarded By Ramada 



Craig W. Mulderrig, front office 
manager at the Ramada Oceanside 
Tower located at 57th & Ocean- 
front, has been awarded the Certified 
Rooms Division Executive 
designation by the Educational In- 
stitute of the American Hotel & 
Motel Association (AH&MA). 

This announcement comes from 
John J. Clark, Jr. CHA, chairman 
of the Institute's Certification 
Commission and dean, School of 
Hotel Administration, Cornell 
University. 

Mulderrig has been with the Ra- 
mada Oceanside Tower as front of- 
fice manager for the past seven 



Riley has been with the Ramada 
Oceanside Tower for the past six 
years as assistant to the food and 
beverage director and just this past 
winter was promoted to her current 
position as food and beverage direc- 
tor. 

years. 

Also, Kyle Riley, director of 
food and beverage at the Ramada 
Oceanside Tower located at 57th & 
Oceanfront, has been awarded the 
Certified Food and Beverage Execu- 
tive designation by the Educational 
Institute of the American Hotel & 
Motel Association (AH&MA). 



LeFevre Elected To Jewelers Board 



Mary Jo LeFevre, owner of 
Facets Jewelry stores, was recently 
elected to the board of directors of 
the Virginia Jewelers Association. 

Facets Jewelers, located in 
Pinewood Square and the Selden 
Arcade in Norfolk, is a member of 
the American Gem Society (AGS). 

LeFevre was also recently ap- 
pointed chairman of the Truth in 



Pricing Committee, a committee 
formed to prevent fraud in the pric- 
ing of jewelry. She attributes her 
success to honesty and hard work. 

Facets employs a certified 
gemologist who is qualified to do 
appraisals, and many of their pieces 
are custom designed by their own 
goldsmith and master jeweler. 



well water 
WELL? 



leve 



omeowrters with wells should have their water 
tested yearly. Your water could contain unhealthy 
s of coliform bacteria, and other toxic compounds. 

Find out if your water meets acceptable sanitary condi- 
tions with drinking water analyses: 

Bacteria $15.00 

Chloride $ 9.00 

Lead $11.00 

Nitrates $12.00 

Pesticides, Herbicides and PCBs . . . $98.00 

MasterCard & Visa accepted. Results in seven days. Resi- 
dential or commercial sites. 



LZ 



RIVERSIDE 



INDUSTRIAL LABORATORIES 

1300 Old Denbigh Blvd. • Newport News, VA 23602 

Return the coupon below or call today lor your free test kit: 
8*6-3900 or 1-800-M2-1019. 



'. Please send free test kit(s) lor drinking water analyses to: 



■ Name: _ 
I Address: 



City/State/Zip: 
Today's Date: _ 



No. kits requested . 



Mall coupon to: Drinking Water Analysis, Riverside Industrial 
Laboratories, 1300 Old Denbigh Blvd., Newport News, VA 23602^ 



some of her attributes placing her 
"on top." Wesley's Robert Girard 
Mastros won the bartender award, 
twenty-five years in the hospitality 
business has earned him a reputa- 
tion of always striving for perfec- 
tion. 

The Line Cook award went to 
John Cobb of Fogg's Seafood 
Restaurant. Beyond Cobb's ability 
to cook all stations, he is great at 
training new employees and always 
tried to make sure that all employ- 
ees and guests feel welcome. 

Raymond Mervicker of Rudee's 
On The Inlet was named Dish- 
washer ofthe Year. Always willing 
to go out of his way to do a good 
job he has been voted employee of 
the month at Rudee's. 




Final Back Bay Wildlife 
Refuge Environmental 
Assessment Now Available 
For A 30-Day Period 



The Final Environmental As- 
sessment (EA) on the proposed 
boundary expansion of Back Bay 
National Wildlife Refuge is avail- 
able for a 30-day public review pe- 
riod, according to Northeast Re- 
gional Director Ronald Lambertson. 

Lambertson noted that in re- 
sponse to public comments on the 
draft version, issues of concern have 
been addressed in detail in the re- 
vised document. In addition, the 
boundary has been modified to ex- 
clude several residences and suffi- 
cient acreage along Sandbridge Road 
to allow for future road and utility 
expansion, if desired. 

Lambertson stressed that if the 
proposal is approved and an 
acquisition boundary is established, 
there would be no additional 
regulatory controls placed on 
landowners. He also stated that 
landowners should be aware that the 

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 
(Service) would follow its long- 
standing acquisition policy of 
working with willing sellers at fair 
market value as funds become 
available. 

The EA addresses threats to im- 
portant fish and wildlife habitat 
within the southeastern portion of 
the City of Virginia Beach and out- 
lines four alternatives, including 
land acquisition by the Service. 
This effort has been undertaken be- 
cause of ongoing land use changes 
that will adversely impact impor- 
tant wildlife habitat 

The proposed action recommends 



a land acquisition boundary of ap- 
proximately 6,340 acres within 
which lands (or interest in lands) 
could be acquired for inclusion into 
the National Wildlife Refuge Sys- 
tem. The proposed boundary has 
been delineated within the original 
study area to incorporate brackish 
marsh, forested swamp, and low- 
lying agricultural fields and wood- 
lands important to wildlife. 

These lands provide migration 
and wintering habitat for a variety 
of waterfowl, particularly black 
ducks whose numbers have declined 
steadily over the past 30 years. Ac- 
quisition of black duck habitat 
along the Atlantic Coast is a high 
priority of the North American 
Waterfowl Management Plan, an 
international agreement between the 
United States and Canada. The Plan 
calls for protection and management 
of important waterfowl habitats to 
achieve specific population objec- 
tives for ducks, geese, and swans. 
The Plan establishes an Atlantic 
Coast Joint Venture Policy Com- 
mittee which fully endorses this 
project. 

As sufficient lands are acquired, 
the service would manage the area 
to emphasize protection and en- 
hancement of habitat for the benefit 
of fish and wildlife populations. 
Public wildlife-oriented recreational 
opportunities including wildlife 
observation, hunting, fishing, and 
trapping would be considered on 
these lands where consistent with 
wildlife conservation objectives. In 




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Open Membership Growth 
Management Adviory 
Committee Being Formed 



In an effort to involve citizens of 
Virginia Beach in planning the 
city's continuing development, a 
new advisory committee on growth 
management is being formed. The 
Open Membership Growth Man- 
agement Advisory Committee will 
hold an organizational meeting on 
Friday, June 30, at 2 p.m. in the 
city council chambers. The public 
is invited to attend and participate. 

"We don't want to preselect 
members for this advisory commit- 
tee,'' said Jack Whitney, director of 
environmental management for the 
city of Virginia Beach. "Rather we 
want everyone to have an equal op- 
portunity to serve on the committee 
and help to plan our city's future 
development." 

The advisory committee will 
meet once a month through the re- 
mainder of 1989 to help guide the 
city's growth management program. 
Virginia Beach has grown at a rapid 



pace in the last two decades. By the 
end of 1989, it is estimated that 
there will e 128,600 more people 
living in the city than in 1980. 
This is an increase of almost 50%. 
The purpose of the growth man- 
agement program is to improve the 
city's capacity to control the pace, 
density and location of land devel- 
opment so as to provide adequate 
services and protect its agricultural 
and natural resources. 

"We sincerely want a great deal 
of public involvement in the pro- 
gram," Whitney said. "I believe this 
committee will provide an unprece- 
dented opportunity for public 
participation in growth manage- 
ment We welcome that participa- 
tion." 

For additional information on the 
Open Membership Growth Man- 
agement Advisory Committee, 
contact Jack Whitney at 427-4801. 



Sixteenth Annual Neptune 
Festival Choses 1989 Theme 



i 

This article was submitted by the 
Neptune Festival Committee. 

The theme for the 16th Annual 
Virginia Beach Neptune Festival is 
"Neptune's Sea Horse Roundup." 
The announcement was made by 
Nancy Creech, who chairs the Board 
of Directors. 

"The theme each year is an inte- 
gral component of the Festival," 
said Creech. "It provides a unifying 
element for such diverse functions 
as the Sandcastle Classic, the Grand 
Parade, the motif for decorations, 
the Air Show, T-shirt and poster 
designs and other events. 

"Selecting a theme takes as much 
thought and care as who is selected 
to have the honor of serving as 
King Neptune," she added. 

The 1989 theme symbolizes the 
importance of water to Virginia 
Beach and the wide variety of sea 



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life found in the city. 

"This theme also is something 
that will be fun," said Mike Barrett, 
this year's chairman. 

"Neptune Festival is a fun event 
first and foremost. The theme must 
allow this primary purpose to be 
maximized. A sea horse roundup 
conjures images of fantasy, the ex- 
citement of a roundup, a party at- 
mosphere and the curious nature of 
sea horses' appearances as a combi- 
nation of water and land creatures," 
added Barrett. 

"Just as Neptune Festival pro- 
vides something for everyone who 
attends or participates, the theme 
must encompass the many offerings 
equally," said Creech. 

Virginia Beach Neptune Festival 
begins this year on September, 21 
and will continue through October 




Police Seek Armed Robber 



Virginia Beach police would' like 
help in solving two armed robberies 
that occurred on April 19, which are 
believed to have been committed by 
the same man. 

On that Wednesday morning at 
10 a.m., the man walked into 
"Styles for Men and Women" at 
3101 Virginia Beach Boulevard in 
the Rose Hall Shoppes, showed one 
of the employees a handgun tucked 
in his waistband, and demanded 
money. After getting the money he 
left 

The second robbery occurred that 
night at approximately 10:15 p.m. 
at Domino's Pizza, 368 Newtown 
Road. Again, the man showed the 
cashier a handgun in his waistband 
and demanded money. A car that 
was possibly used in this robbery is 



a newer model, a Chevrolet Nova, 
which was white with a dark stripe 
on the sides and driven by another 
white male with dark hair in a spike 
style. 

The man robbery investigators 
are looking for is described as 
white, in his twenties, approxi- 
mately 6 feet tall, with a thin build, 

I 
short blond hair, and blue eyes. He 
was wearing a brown leather jacket, 
a blue baseball cap turned back- 
wards, and blue jeans. 

Anyone with information about 
these robberies, wanted persons, 
stolen property, drugs or any other 
crime, call Crime Solvers at 427- 
0000. A reward of $1,000 wUl be 
awarded for information leading to 
an arrest in any crime. 



Police Seek Christie's Murderer 



Sometime during the night on 
Friday, June 15, 1988, 83-year-old 
Anastasia N. Christie was mur- 
dered. Virginia Beach Crime 
Solvers would like help and is of- 
fering a cash reward of up to $1 ,000 
for information that will lead to an 
arrest. An additional $10,000 reward 
is being offered by her family and 
friends. 

Christie was found by her son in 
her home in the 300 block of 25th 
1/2 Street at the Oceanfront about 
12:30 p.m. the next day. She had 



been sexually assaulted and died as a 
result of being beaten. The man re- 
sponsible for the murder is believed 
to have entered the house through a 
window and attacked Christie as she 
slept. 

Anyone with information about 
this murder should call Crime 

Solvers at 427-0000. Both rewards 
can be collected without giving a 
name or testifying in court Callers 
will be assigned a confidential code 
number to assure anonymity. 



Crime Solvers Seek Arsonists 



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Arson investigators in Virginia 
beach would like help in solving 
eight arsons that occurred in a mo- 
bile home park near the beachfront. 
A cash reward of up to $1,000 is 
being offered by Crime Solvers for 
information that will lead to an ar- 
rest. 

Between January 29, and May 30 
eight trailers have been set afire in 
the Colony Mobile Home Park at 
913 Virginia Beach Boulevard. Two 
of the fires were reported in Jan- 
uary, one in March, four in April, 
and one in May. All the fires were 



set at night and the trailers were 
vacant. Two of the homes were de- 
stroyed. Three were heavily dam- 
aged and three others had minor 
damage. 

Anyone with information about 
these or any other arson can call 
Crime Solvers anonymously at 
427-0000. All calls are confidential 
and are not recorded A code number 
will be assigned and will not have 
to give a name or testify in court to 
collect a cash reward. 



A**^«AiAaAaAM& 



^^^^■■■■•■■1 




Public Notice 



Will Japan Take The Lead In 

The Bureaucratic Nonsense Race? 



I take great pride in being able to 
brag about the accomplishments of 
my country. In fact I even derive a 
certain pleasure from the inane 
pronouncements and hairbrained 
schemes of our federal bureaucrats. 

After all, being number one is 
what is important regardless of the 
category and it has always seemed 
to me that America had cornered the 
market on foolishness in govern- 
ment But alas, it seems as if even 
here on the outer fringes of sanity 
America's greatness is being chal- 
lenged and challenged by that great 
economic rival, Japan. 

A recent newspaper article cap- 
tured my attention concerning the 
growing terrorist threat to Japanese 
tourists. According to the article, as 
the Japanese have become more 
prosperous and more widely trav- 
eled, terrorists have started to target 
them as a group. This article went 
on to say that a concerned govern- 
ment had begun to study the prob- 
lem and had developed some guide- 
lines. It is these guidelines that 
challenge the nonsense lead of our 
homegrown bureaucrats. 

Japanese travelers were advised 
not to put their Japanese names on 
their luggage as they travel, rather 
they were told to use common Euro- 
pean names like Smith or Jones. 
This will really make the reclaiming 
of your luggage easy. 

Cautioned against drawing at- 
tention to their wealth or their na- 
tionality in their dress they were 
warned to wear old clothes like 
American travellers and to travel in 
small groups so they could blend in 
with the natives of the country 
being visited. As I read these in- 
structions a mental picture began to 
grow of a Japanese traveller duti- 
fully following the advice of his 
government 

Am I the only one who wonders 
what is wrong with this mental pic- 
ture, of a four foot five Japanese 
traveller trying to claim his luggage 
from'a Norwegian easterns' agent 
while explaining that his name isn't 




Eric Shaffer 



really Smith? Finally clearing cus- 
toms, our stalwart traveller will 

emerge from a forest of six foot tall 
Nordic nationals and no one will 
notice. 

I imagine that feeling secure in 
his ability to blend in with the na- 
tives, that he will cease to feel self- 
conscious about his new travelling 
wardrobe. However the dinner 
plate size belt buckle complete with 
NRA emblem, may still trouble 
him. His ability to store quantities 
of film in his ten gallon hat will be 
an unanticipated benefit of disguis- 
ing himself as a Texan was proba- 
bly the reason he was able to slip 
unnoticed out of the forest of Nor- 
dic nationals. 

Any government that sponsors 
information handouts such as these 
is mounting a serious attack on 
America's lead in government 
sponsored foolishness and bum- 
bling. Or perhaps we are seeing the 
first signs of weakness in their 
competitive economic policies as 
banality creeps into their govern- 
ment bureaucracy. 

Perhaps we should challenge 
the Japanese to a vigorous competi- 
tion in developing self-defeating 
government regulations and poli- 
cies so that we could compete in the 
economic arena with similar handi- 
caps, bumbling bureaucrats. But 
until then, I would encourage our 
bureaucrats to respond to this chal- 
lenge to their lead in folly by con* 
ducting a study of pygmies if? the 
NBA. 



Smashing The Romance Of Fun In The Sun 



Sun, sand, and surf. How can 
something that is so painful be so 
much fun? People keep going back 
for more. They don't seem to mind 
any of the inconveniences. 

That sand is so hot it almost 
blisters your feet. If you decide to 
keep your sandals on, they only 
serve to sling hot sand all over you 
as your walk. Seashells are nice to 
collect, but step on one and your 
opinion changes quickly. Ouch. 

The sun is hot enough to bake 
your brains. So then you decide it is 
time to pull out the suntan lotion. 
Sandpaper is the word that comes to 
mind while you're applying this 
grease to your sand-covered body. 
Oh, what a feeling. 

Okay so you feel like a greased 
pig and it's time to hit the water. Up 
until now, your looks were passable 
but not for long. Your hair becomes 
a wet mop and your makeup (for 
those who wear it) hasbegun to look 




Phyllis Can Johnson 



like a real mess. What a bathing 
beauty. But wait, that's not all. If 
you're a contact lense wearer, 
there's more fun to come. 

Sand and sea don't mix with 
lenses, so out they come. Now you 
can't see a thing. You turn your 
back to the waves to blindly squint 
and locate your stuff on the beach 
and whammo. You're knocked out 
by a rolling curl of wet force. 



TWO AUCTIONS - 19 LOTS 

Saturday, July 15th 



****** 



"RIVER RUN" - 6 WOODED LOTS 

Meddlesex County, Virginia 

(Near Deltaville) 

10:30 a.m. 

Building Lots from 5 to 7 Acres 

Boat Ramp and Dock 
For Owners on Piankatank River 



****** 



"KNIGHTS LANDING" 
13 BUILDING LOTS-4 WATERFRONT 

Northumberland County, Virginia 
(Near Kilmarnock) 

1:30 p.m. 

From 2 to 6 Acres 

Boat Ramp and Dock 

For Owners on Great Wicomico River 

Terms: 10% Deposit Sale Day, 

Balance at Closing Within 30 Days 

(Sale to be heW on the property in Each Subdivision) 

Property Sells Subject to Mutually Beneficial 

Restrictive Covenants 

For Detailed Brochure Contact 

OWNBY AUCTION & REALTY CO., INC. 

1417 Brook Road, Richmond, VA 23220 
Telephone 804-644-LAND 

VA A.F. 86 



Virginia Bead- City Council, at 
its Formal Session, 2:00 P.M., 
July 10, 1989, will consider the 
request of JOHN and 
JOSEPHINE PARKER to 
RECONSIDER THE CON- 
DITIONS in the April 27, 1987, 
approved Conditional Use 
Permit granted INDEPEN- 
DENCE TIRE, INC. for auto- 
mobile repair and installation of 
tires at the Northwest corner of 
South Plaza Trail and Rosemont 
Road (LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH). 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC/AAE 

City Clerk 

26-1} 
2t7-5VBS 



Public Notice 



1 



TAKE NOTICE THAT ON July 
10, 1989 AT 10:00 AM, at the 
premises of Tidewater Imports, 
Inc., DBA The Hall Auto Mall, 
3152 Va. Beach Blvd., Va. Beach, 
Va. 23452; the undersigned will 
sell at public auction for cash, re- 
serving unto itself the right to bid, 
the following vehicles: 

Description 1988 Jeep Cherokee 
Serial #1JCHX7812JT150145 
(Graige Johnson) 

26-9 
It6-28VBS 



Public Notice 



Take notice that on July 3, 1989 
at 10:00 AM, at the premises of 
4747 Shore Drive, Virginia Beach, 
Virginia, the undersigned will sell 
at public auction, for cash, reserv- 
ing unto itself, the right to bid, the 
following motor vehicle. 

1979 Honda Prelude 

Serial #SNF1000255 

BAYSIDE MOTORS 

26-8 
It6-28VBS 



[ 



Public Notice 



] 



In the Clerk's Office of the Cir- ; 
cuit Court of the City of Virginia I 
Beach, on the 22nd day of JUNE, 
1989. 

KATHERINE FAY VOS- 
SETEIG, Plaintiff, against 
WAYNE JEROME VOSSETEIG, 
Defendant 
ORDER OF PUBLICATION 
Docket #CH89- 1659 
The object of this suit is for 
THE PLAINTIFF TO OBTAIN A 
DIVORCE A VINCULO MAT- 
RIMONII FROM THE SAID DE- 
FENDANT UPON THE 
GROUNDS OF ONE YEAR 
SEPARATION 

And an affidavit having been 
made and filed that the defendant IS 
NOT A RESIDENT OF THE 
STATE OF VIRGINIA, THE 
LAST KNOWN POST OFFICE 
ADDRESS BEING 14043 GAY- 
HEAD ROAD, APPLE VALLEY, 
CALIFORNIA, 92307 it is ordered 
that WAYNE JEROME VOS- 
SETEIG do appear on or before the 
14th of AUGUST, 1989, and do 
what may be necessary to protect 
his interest in this suit. It is fur- 
thered Ordered that a copy of this 
Order be published once each week 
for four successive weeks in THE 
VIRGINIA BEACH SUN, a news- 
paper of general circulation in this 
city. 

A copy Teste: J. Curtis Fruit, 
Clerk 

By: RAYMOND W. BJORK- 
MAND.C. 
THOMAS F. BETZ, JR., p.q. 
PEMBROKE OFFICE PARK 
PEMBROKE ONE-THE FIFTH 
FLOOR 
VA. BEACH, VA., 23462 
26-10 
4t7-19VBS 



L 



Public Notice 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC 
HEARING 

The Virginia Beach Planning 
Commission will hold a Public 
Hearing on Tuesday, July 1 1, 1989 
at 12:00 Noon in the Council 
Chambers of the City Hall Build- 
ing, Princess Anne Courthouse, 
Virginia Beach, Virginia. A brief- 
ing session will be held at 9:00 
a.m. in the Planning Department 
Conference Room, Operations 
Building. PLANNING COMMIS- 
SION ACTION IS NOT A FINAL 
DETERMINATION OF THE AP- 
PLICATION, BUT ONLY A 
RECOMMENDATION TO THE 
CITY COUNCIL AS THE VIEW- 
POINT OF THE PLANNING 
COMMISSION. FINAL DETER- 
MINATION OF THE APPLICA- 
TION IS TO BE MADE BY CITY 
COUNCIL AT A LATER DATE, 
AFTER PUBLIC NOTICE IN A 
NEWSPAPER HAVING GEN- 
ERAL CIRCULATION WITHIN 
THE CITY. 

THOSE MEMBERS OF 
THE PUBLIC INTERESTED 
IN ATTENDING THE PUB- 
LIC HEARING SHOULD BE 
ADVISED THAT, FOR 



REASONS THE PLANNING 
COMMISSION DEEMS AP- 
PROPRIATE, CERTAIN 
ITEMS ON THE AGENDA 
MAY BE HEARD OUT OF 
ORDER AND THAT IT 
SHOULD NOT BE AS- 
SUMED THAT THE ORDER 
LISTED BELOW WILL BE 
EXACTLY FOLLOWED 
DURING THE PUBLIC 
HEARING. 

The staff reviews of some or all 
of the items on this agenda suggest 
that certain conditions be attached 
to approval by City Council. 
However, it should not be assumed 
that those conditions constitute all 
the conditions that will ultimately 
be attached to the project. Staff 
agencies may impose further condi- 
tions and requirements during ad- 
ministration of applicable city 
ordinances. 
REGULAR AGENDA: 
SUBDIVISION VARIANCE: 

1. Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard to 
certain elements of the Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision for George 
C. Main, Jr., and H. Wayne Mc- 
Graw. Property is located at 1781 
& 1789 Indian River Road. Plats 
with more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PUNGO BOROUGH. 

2. Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard to 
certain elements of the Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision for David 
M. Lustig. Property is located at 
1605 Bluecher Court. Plats with 
more detailed information are avail- 
able in the Department of Planning. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

3. Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard to 
certain elements of the Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision for Joseph 
Nassi. Property is located at 8006 
& 8008 Atlantic Avenue. Plats 
with more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOR- 
OUGH. 

4. Appeal from Decisions of 
Administrative Officers in regard to 
certain elements of the Subdivision 
Ordinance, Subdivision for Robert 
W. Woodhouse, III. Property is lo- 
cated on the east side of S. Wood- 
side Lane southwest of the 
intersection with Adam Keeling 
Road. Plats with more detailed in- 
formation are available in the Dc- 
Dartment of Planning. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

CHANCE O F ZONING DIS- 
TRICT CLASSIFICATION: 

5. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of The Virginia Beach Devel- 
opment Authority for a Conditional 
Zoning Classification f rom AG-1 
Agricultural District to a 1-1 Light 
Industrial District on the following 
parcels: 

Parcel 1: Located 600 feet west 
of General Booth Boulevard begin- 
ning at a point 3200 feet more or 
less north of London Bridge Road 
Relocated. 

Parcel 2: L ocated 1200 feet more 
or less west of General Booth 
Boulevard beginning at a point 
1200 feet more or less north of 
London Bridge Road Relocated. 
Said parcels contain 75.6 acres. 
Plats with more detailed informa- 
tion are available in the Department 
of Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

6. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of The Virginia Beach Devel- 
opment Authority for a Conditional 

7rftling C la<!!sification fr 0111 AG-1 
Agricultural District to B-2 Com- 
munity Business District on the 
following parcels: 

Parcel 1: Located 600 feet west 
of General Booth Boulevard begin- 
ning at a point 1420 feet more or 
less northeast of London Bridge 
Road Relocated. 

Parcel 2: Located 600 feet west 
of General Booth Boulevard begin- 
ning at a point 3200 feet more or 
less northeast of London Bridge 
Road Relocated. 

Said parcels contain 12.2 acres. 
Plats with more detailed informa- 
tion are available in the Department 
of Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH 

7. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of The Virginia Beach Devel- 
opment Authority for a Conditional 
Zoning Classification from AG-2 
Agricultural District to B-2 Com- 
munity Business District on the 
following parcels: 

Parcel 1: Located on the west 
side of General Booth Boulevard 
beginning at a point 990 feet more 
or less north of London Bridge 
Road Relocated 

Parcel 2: Located on the west 
side of General Booth Boulevard 
beginning at a point 3100 feet more 
or less north of London Bridge 
Road Relocated. Said parcels con- 
tain 26.3 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH 

8. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of The Virginia Beach Devel- 
opment Authority tor a Conditional 
Zon in g Classification from AG-2 



The Virginia Beacn sun, June 28, 1989 7 
Agricultural District to 1-1 Light a Conditional Use Permit for a pri- 



Industrial District on certain prop- 
erty located on the west side of 
General Booth Boulevard beginning 

at a point 1800 feet more or less 
north of London Bridge Road Relo- 
cated. Said parcel contains 6.1 
acres. Plats with more detailed in- 
formation are available in the De- 
partment of Planning. PRINCESS 
ANNE BOROUGH. 

9. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Balance Properties for a 

Change of Zoning District 

Classification from AG-2 Agricul- 
tural District to 1-1 Light Industrial 
District on certain property located 
on the south side of Shipps Comer 
Road, 1300 feet more or less east of 
Holland Road. Said parcel contains 
21.7 acres. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

10. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Hubert L. & Mona H. Dail 
for a Change of Zoning District 
Classification from R-7.5 Residen- 
tial District to 0-2 Office District 
on the north side of Old Virginia 
Beach Road, 337.89 feet west of 
North Lynnhaven Road. Said parcel 
contains 10,643 square feet. Plats 
with more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOR- 
OUGH. 

11. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Racetrac Petroleum, Inc., 
for a Chanpe of Zoning District 
Classification from R-10 Residen- 
tial District to B-2 Community 
Business District on Lots 28, 29 
and 30, Fair Meadows. Said parcels 
are located at 5629 and 5633 Coliss 
Avenue and at 356 Newtown Road 
and contain 33,175.296 square feet. 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT; 

12. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Racetrac Petroleum, Inc., 
for a Conditional Use Permit for 
gasoline pumps in conjunction 
with a convenience store on Lots 
28, 29 and 30, Fair Meadows. Said 
parcels are located at 5629 and 5633 
Coliss Avenue and at 356 Newtown 
Road and contain 33,175.296 square 
feet BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

13. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of TALC Associates for a 
Conditional Use Permit for motor 

vehicle sales and rentals on certain 
property located on the west side of 
Broad Meadows Boulevard, 159.51 
feet north of Newtown Road. Said 
parcel contains 33,106 square feet. 
Plats with more detailed informa- 
tion are available in the Department 
of Planning. BAYSIDE BOR- 
OUGH. 

14. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Virginia Beach Christian 
Outreach Group, Inc., for a Condi- 
tional Use Permit for a group home 
(dining & cooking facilities) on the 
south side of Virginia Beach 
Boulevard, 540 feel east of N. Bird- 
neck Road. Said parcel is located at 
1049 and 1053 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard and contains 41,382 
square feet. Plats with more detailed 
information are available in the 
Department of Planning. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

15. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Christopher Ulman for i 
Conditional Use Permit for an auto 
permit establishment on certain 
property located 480.4 1 feet west of 
South Birdneck Road beginning at a 
point 500 feet more or less north of 
Beautiful Street Said parcel con- 
tains 21,736.44 square feet. Plats 
with more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOR- 
OUGH. 

16. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Vest & Sons Auto Sales, 
Inc., for a Conditional Use Permit 
for an auto repair & body work fa- 
cility on the south side of Virginia 
Beach Boulevard, 325 feet west of 
First Colonial Road. Said parcel is 
located at 1719 Virginia Beach 
Boulevard and contains 27,442.8 
square feel Plats with more de- 
tailed information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

17. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Tidewater Imports, Incorpo- 
rated for* Conditional Use Permit 
for a car wash facility on certain 
property located on the north side of 
Virginia Beach Boulevard beginning 
at a point 418.15 feet east of 
Cranston Lane. Said parcel contains 
32.670 square feet. Plats with 
more detailed information are avail- 
able in the Department of Planning. 
LYNNHAVEN BOROUGH. 

18. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Taylor Salt and Chemical 
Company Inc., for a Conditional 
Use Permit for a bulk storage yard 
on Lot 32, London Bridge Industrial 
Park II. Said pared is located on the 
south side of Central Drive, 1450 
feet west of London Bridge Road 
and contains 1.032 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information are 
available ia the Department of 
Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOR- 
OUGH. 

19. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Robert and Janet Kottke for 



vate school on the north side of In- 
dian River Road, 2486.23 feet east 
of Elbow Road. Said parcel is lo- 
cated at 4 100 Indian River Road and 
contains 1.5 acres. Plats with more 
detailed information are available in 
the Department of Planning. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

20. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of A.R.C. Inc., for a Condi- 

UanaJ Use Permit for a 

communications tower and equip- 
ment building on certain property 
located 1400 feet more or less 
northwest of the intersection of 
Kempsville Road and Centerville 
Turnpike. Said parcel contains 5.92 
acres. Plats with more detailed in- 
formation are available in the De- 
partment of Planning. 
KEMPSVILLE BOROUGH. 

21. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Edwin and Frances Nelson 
for a Conditional Use Permit for a 
duplex on the south side of Indian 
River Road, 2800 feet east of 
Princess Anne Road. Said parcel is 
located at 1825 Indian River Road 
and contains 1.9 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are avail- 
able in the Department of Planning. 
PUNGO BOROUGH. 

22. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of The Firestone Tire & Rub- 
ber Company for a Conditional Use 
Permit for an auto repair establish- 
ment on the west side of General 
Booth Boulevard, 141 feet north of 
Dam Neck Road. Said parcel con- 
tains 23,958 square feet. Plats with 
more detailed information are avail- 
able in the Department of Planning. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

23. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Econo Lube-N-Tube for a 
Conditional U se Permit for an au- 
tomobile service facility and car 
wash on Lots 4, 5. 6 & 7, Gibson 
Property. Said parcel is located on 
the west side of Lynnhaven Park- 
way, 656 feet south of Riverbend 
Road and contains 1.03 acres. Plats 
with more detailed information are 
available in the Department of 
Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. ^ 

AMENDMENTS; 

24. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and 
reordain Article 14 of die City 
Zoning Ordinance pertaining to the 
Wetlands Ordinance. More detailed 
information is available in the De- 
partment of Planning. 

25. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia, to amend and 
reordain Article 16 of the City 
Zoning Ordinance pertaining to the 
Coastal Primary Sand Dune Zoning 
Ordinance. More detailed informa- 
tion is available in the Department 
of Planning. 

26. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia, to amend 
Sections 111. 901, 1511 and 1521 
of the City Zoning Ordinance per- 
taining to bingo halls. More de- 
tailed information is available in 
the Department of Planning. 

27. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia, to amend 
Section 4.1B of the Site Plan Ordi- 
nance pertaining to information re- 
quired on site development plans. 
More detailed information is avail- 
able in the Department of Planning. 

28. Motion of the Planning 
Commission of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach, Virginia, to amend 
Section 6.1 of the Subdivision Or- 
dinance pertaining to preliminary 
plats and data-generally. More de- 
tailed information is available in 
the Department of Planning. 

DEFERRED 90 DAYS BY 

PLANNING COMMISSION ON 
4-11-89: 

29. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Pace Homes, Incorporated 

tnr • fifflHlitiOM 1 7nninB ' ""M'fi- 
cation from R-10 Residential Dis- 
trict To A- 12 Apartment District on 
certain property located on the 
southwest side of Reagan Avenue 
beginning at a point 400 feet more 
or less northwest of Busky Lane. 
Said parcel contains 10.979 acres. 
Plats with more detailed informa- 
tion are available in the Department 
of Planning. LYNNHAVEN BOR- 
OUGH. 
PRFKRREP 30 PAYS BY 

PLANNING COMMISSION ON 
6-13-89: 

30. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Rick G. & Anne B. 
Spalenka for a Conditional Use 
permjt for retail sales of garden and 
nursery supplies on the west side of 
Princess Anne Road, south of 
North Stowe Road. Said parcel is 
located at 1057 Princess Anne Road 
and contains 3.74 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are avail- 
able m the Department of Planning. 
PUNGO BOROUGH. 

All interested parties are invited 

ROBERT J. SCOTT 

Planning Director 

26-4 
217-5VBS 



<*m»* 



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^^^^^^^ 



it ine Virginia Beach Sun, June 28, 

Continued from page 7 



Public Notice 



Auction: 1981 CHEVROLET 
CHEVETTE #4983 Serial Number: 
1G1AJ0897BY221922 Auction 
date: July 12, 1989 

Time: 11:00 a.m. at Norfolk 
Motor Company, 7000 N. Military 
Highway, Norfolk, Virginia 23518. 

Norfolk Motor Company Re- 
serves the right to Bid. 
26-5 
U6-28VBS 



Public Notice 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Virginia Beach City Council, at 
its Formal Session, 2:00 PM, 
July 10, 1989 will 
CONSIDER the request of R.G. 
MOORE BUILDING CORP. 
to amend the restrictive covenants 
for the Golf Course in the 
CYPRESS POINT Subdivision 
so as to permit the general public 
to use the Golf Course and to 
permit the sale and conveyance of 
the Golf Course without the City 
Council's prior approval. 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC/AAE 

City Clerk 

26-6 
2t7-5VBS 



1989 

Bridge Road. Said parcel is located 
_jtt 4231 Charity Neck Road and 
contains 11.35 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are avail- 
able in the Department of Planning. 
PUNGO BOROUGH. 

5. An Ordnance upon Applica- 
tion of Wayne R. & Mary 
Glidewell Eiban for a Conditional 
Use Permit for a duplex in the AG- 
2 Agricultural District on Lot 9, 
Nawney Creek. Said parcel is lo- 
cated at 4525 Three Pines Lane and 
contains 1 acre. PUNGO BOR- 
OUGH. 

STREET CLOSURE: 
BAYSIDE BOROUGH: 

6. Application of Jerry C. Seay 
for the discontinuance, closure and 
abandonment of a portion of Wind- 
sor Crescent beginning at the 
northern boundary of Jefferson 
Boulevard and running northwest- 
erly along the boundary of Lot 6, 
Block 57, Ocean Park, Section C. 
Said parcel contains 3527 square 
feet BAYSIDE BOROUGH. 

All interested person are invited 
to attend. 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC/AAE 

City Clerk 

26-1 
2t7-5VBS 



29-6 
4I6-28VBS 



Public Notice 



Public Notice 



I Public Notice 

Take notice, that on July 6, 
1989, at 10:00 o'clock a.m., at the 
premises of 3416 N. Military Hwy. 
Norfolk, Virginia 23518. The un- 
dersigned will sell at public auc- 
tion, for cash only, reserving the 
right to bid, the following motor 
vehicle. 
1981 Oldsmobile Regency 98 
Serial #1G3AX69N9BM200579 
26-3 
H6-28VBS 



Public Notice 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEAR- 
ING 

Virginia: The regular meeting of 
the City Council of Virginia Beach 
will be held in the Council Cham- 
bers of the City Hall Building, 
Municipal Center, Princess Anne 
Station, Virginia Beach, Virginia, 
on Monday, July 10, 1989, at 2:00 
p.m. at which time the following 
applications will be heard: 

CHANGE OF ZONING DIS- 
TRICT CLASS IFICATION: 

PRINCESS ANNE BQRQUGH; 

1. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Indian River Country Club 
Estates, L.P., for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification from 
AG-2 Agricultural District to R-20 
Residential District on the follow- 
ing parcels: 

Parcel 1 : Located on the north 
side of Indian River Road, 5403.35 
feet more or less west of West Neck 
Road. 

Parcel 2 : Located at the north- 
west intersection of Indian River 
Road and West Neck Road. 

Parcel 3 : Located on the west 
side of West Neck Road, north of 
Indian River Road. 

Said parcels contain 79.1 acres. 
Plats with more detailed informa- 
tion are available in the Department 
of Planning. PRINCESS ANNE 
BOROUGH. 

2. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Indian River Country Club 
Estates, L.P., for a Change of 
Zoning District Classification from 
AG-1 Agricultural District to R-20 
Residential District on certain 
property located 600 feet north of 
Indian River Road and 600 feet west 
of West Neck Road. Said parcel 
contains 211.8 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are avail- 
able in the Department of Planning. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 

CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT: 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH: 

3. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Indian River Golf Club, 
Inc., for a Conditional Use Permit 
for a recreational facility of an out- 
door nature (golf course) on certain 
property located at the northwest 

in ection of Indian River Road 
ar 'est Neck Road. Said parcel 
cc. ns 180.8 acres. Plats with 
more detailed information are avail- 
able in the Department of Planning. 
PRINCESS ANNE BOROUGH. 
PUNGO BOROUGH: 

4. An Ordinance upon Applica- 
tion of Mark R. Jespersen for a 
Conditional Use Permit for a resi- 
dential kennel on the west side of 
Charity Neck Road, south of Gum 



Public Notice 



PUBLIC NOTICE 

Virginia Beach City Council, at 
its Formal Session, 2:00 PM, 
July 10, 1989 will 
CONSIDER the request of R.G. 
MOORE BUILDING CORP. 
to amend the restrictive covenants 
for the Golf Course in the 
GLEN WOOD Subdivision so as 
to permit the general public to use 
the Golf Course and to permit the 
sale and conveyance of the Golf 
Course without the City Council's 
prior approval. 

Ruth Hodges Smith, CMC/AAE 

City Clerk 

26-7 
2t7-5VBS 



VIRGINIA: IN THE CIRCUIT 
COURT OF THE CITY OF VIR- 
GINIA BEACH 

This the 26th DAY OF MAY, 
1989 

ELIZABETH WRIGHT 
STALLINGS and JOHN H. 
WRIGHT Petitioners 

v. 

WILBERT WRIGHT and UN- 
KNOWN GRANDDAUGHTER 
OF GEORGEANA WRIGHT 
PARKER Defendants 

IN CHANCERY NO. CH89-568 

ORDER 

This cause came on to be heard 
upon the petition praying that 
Wilbert Wright and the unknown 
granddaughter of Georgeana Wright 
Parker be declared legally dead and 
that the fact of descent and their 

heirs at law be determined. 

In accordance with Section 64.1- 
109 of the Code of Virginia, it is 
ORDERED that the notice which is 
attached to and made a part of this 
Order be published once a week for 
four successive weeks in The Vir- 
ginia Beach Sun, a newspaper pub- 
lished in the City of Virginia 
Beach. 
May 26, 1989 
H. Calvin Spain, Judge 
A Copy Teste: J. Curtis Fruit, 
Clerk 

By Raymond W. Bjorkman, 
D.C. 
I ASK FOR THIS 
WILLIAM L. PERKINS 
PRICE, PERKINS & LARKIN 
ATTORNEYS AT LAW 
LYNNWOOD PLAZA SUITE 
350 
621 LYNNHAVEN PARKWAY 
VA. BEACH., VA. 23452 



VIRGINIA: IN THE CLERKS 
OFFICE CIRCUIT COURT OF 
THE CITY OF VIRGINIA BEACH 

THE 26th DAY OF MAY 1989 

ELIZABETH WRIGHT 
STALLINGS and JOHN H. 
WRIGHT Petitioners 

v. 

WILBERT WRIGHT and UN- 
KNOWN GRANDDAUGHTER 

OF CEORGEANA WRIGHT 
PARKER Defendants 

IN CHANCERY NO. CH89-568 

NOTICE 

To: Wilbert Wright, if living, or 
if he be dead, then the widow and 
heirs, devisees next of kin, legatees, 
and successors in title of Wilbert 
Wright. 

To: Unknown granddaughter of 
Georgeana Wright Parker, if living, 
or if she be dead, then the spouse 
and heirs, devisees, next of kin, 
legatees, and successors in title of 
the granddaughter of Georgeana 
Wright Parker. 

A petition has been filed in the 
Circuit Court of the City of Vir- 
ginia Beach alleging that Wilbert 
Wright has disappeared and has been 
missing for over 50 years and re- 
questing that he be declared dead and 
that the fact of descent and the heirs 
at law of Wilbert Wright, if de- 
ceased, be established; and alleging 
that the granddaughter of Georgeana 
Wright Parker, whose name is un- 
known, has disappeared and been 
missing for over 20 years and re- 
questing that she be declared dead 
and that the fact of descent in the 
heirs at law of the granddaughter of 
Georgeana Wright Parker, deceased, 
be established 

Notice is hereby given that a 
hearing will be held in the Circuit 
Court of the City of Virginia 
Beach, Municipal Center, Virginia 
Beach, Virginia, on the 7th day of 
July, 1989 at 10:00 a.m. for the 
purpose of hearing evidence con- 
cerning the Alleged absence of 

Wilbert Wright and the 
granddaughter of Georgeana Wright 
Parker and the circumstances and 
duration thereof; and also for the 
purpose of determining the fact of 
descent and the heirs at law of 
Wilbert Wright and the 
granddaughter of Georgeana Wright 
Parker in the event that they should 
be declared to be legally dead. 

A Copy Teste: J. Curtis 
Fruit, Clerk 

BY RAYMOND W. BJORK- 
MAN, D.C. 

WILLIAM L. PERKINS 

PRICE, PERKINS & LARKIN 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 
LYNNWOOD PLAZA SUITE 
350 
621 LYNNHAVEN PARKWAY 
VA. BEACH. VA., 23452 
23-5 
416-28VBS 



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ies, logging, mining, construction, 
oil companies. Skilled and un- 
skilled. $600.00 plus weekly. Call 
now! 1-206-736-0777 ext. 135B 

Van 26 

80 MACK WRECKER U686T 750 
Holmes, 300 engine rebuilt 5 
speed, power steering, A/C, 
completely reconditioned. Chrome 
horns, bumper, bullet lights, 
polished buds. $24,500 359-4500 

Van 26 

AMERICAN RETIREMENT 
HOMES - $800-$2400 includes 
room, board, utilities, 24 hr. nurse 
assisted ambulatory/non ambulatory 
care. Charlottesville, Lexington, 
Norfolk, Clifton Forge, Emporia, 
Danville, South Hill, Tappahan- 
nock. 1-800-999-6637. Van 26 

EARN UP TO $339.84 per week 
assembling products at home! 
Amazing recorded message reveals 
details. Call now! (804) 253-2409 
or write: Jobs, P.O. Box 306, 
Williamsburg, VA 23 187 Van 26 

HERITAGE BUILDINGS: Tapered 
I-Beam, bolt-up construction steel 
buildings, engineer stamped con- 
struction "prints, 3,000 standard 
sizes, 30x40xl0x $3,485; 
40x60x12 $6,275; 50x75x12 
$9,186; 60x100x14 $13,895. Call 
for free brochures today. Phone 1- 
800-643-5555. Van 26 

PUBLIC NOTICE SUMMER 
SPECIAL Pioneer Metal Buildings 
30x40x10 $4350.00; 30x50x12 
$4941.00; 40x75x14 $8417.00; 
50x75x14 $9800.00; 50x1000x14 
$13,450.00; 100x100x14 
$23,850.00 all sizes 512-389-3664. 
Van 26 

EXPERIENCE EUROPE THIS 
SUMMER! Become a volunteer 
Host Family for European teenagers 
for 4 week summer stays. All speak 
English, have spending money and 

insurance. Contact: WEST PRO- 
GRAMS, INC., J. Ball, DC area 
703-931-9688, L. Hubert, Eastern 
VA 804-229-6316, L. Eary, 
Roanoke Valley 703-563-5640, or 
C. Massie, all other areas 804-295- 
5577. Vjtn26 

TRUCKING SCHOOL GRADU- 
ATES: J.B. Hunt, American's 
fastest-growing trucking company, 
needs OTR drivers for our expand- 
ing fleet. If you've graduated or 
about to graduate from an accredited 
driving school, you may qualify for 
paid co-driver training that could 
lead to high pay, excellent benefits 
and guaranteed weekly mileage. 
Must be 23 or older. Call toll-free 
to apply, 1 -800-643-333 1 . Van 26 

TRUCK DRIVERS NEEDED 
IMMEDIATELY: Best pay and 
benefits program in the industry. 
Start at 23 cents per mile with reg- 
ular increases to 27 cent. Minimum 
2,100 miles per week guaranteed. 
23 years old with 1 year OTR 
experience. Good record required. 
Call J.B. Hunt 1-800-643-3331. 
Van 26 

BATTERIES WANTED, will pick- 
up large quantities. Also buying 
scrap cast iron engines. Jeff Davis 
Battery, 224 Jeff Davis Hwy., 
Richmond, VA 23224. 804-230- 
9221. Van 26 

TANNING BEDS: WOLFF SYS- 
TEM. SUMMER CLEARANCE! 
Home Units from $1595. 
Commercial Units from $2295. 
Save Thousands! Immediate deliv- 
ery. Call Today! 1-800-223-6743. 

Van26 



Got something you 

want the whole state 

to know about? 

Reach over 4 million families in 78 Virginia 
Newspapers for Just $ 1 75. ! 

Virginia Press Service's Ad Network Classifieds 



Ideal for Resort Rentals, Realestate, Adopting, 

Business Opportunities, Vocational Education, 

Office Products and Positions Open or Wanted. 

(For more than 25 words, there Is an additional 
charge of $6.00 per word) 



547-4571 



The Virginia Beach Sun, June 28, 1989 9 




MAKE MONEY 

WITH THE 
CLASSIFlEi 



pets 




CLASSIFIEDS 



CALL 
547-4571 



— — 



TOSFORSALE 






___ 



PROPERTY FOR SALE 



HEW WANTED 



CHOWS - AKC home raised. Ex- 
cellent temperament, championship 
bloodlines. All inquiries welcome. 
See ours first! Terms available 
421-4304 ~ tfn' 

HORSE FINDERS - Looking for a 
horse? If we don't have it, we will 
find you the right one. Call 421- 
4304. tfn 

English bulldog pups AKC Regis- 
tered. Champion bloodline wormed 
all shots $600. Call (919)830-1975 
leave' message. 

2t6-28P 



GREAT NECK AREA - Profes- 
sional female looking for same. 
Two bedroom, two bathroom condo 
washer/dryer, pool. Must see. $350 
includes all. 463-2625 evenings. 



1986 CHEVROLET IROC 305 
Tune Port 190 watt Sony stereo. 
Sheepskin covers, burglar alarm. 
Radar detector. Call 425-5446 am 
or 428-4362 pm. tfn 



PORTSMOUTH - Downtown, 
large buildings with off street park- 
ing, to use for retail or offices. Call 
399-8390, 484-1275 or 399-3298. 

tfiKO 




MOBILE HOMES FOB SALE 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNfTES 



CHESAPEAKE - Near Greenbrier 
Responsible professional male with 
same, non-smoker. 3 bedrm. house 
$350 mo. 424-7972. 4t7-12b 



ROCKFORD - 1985 12x60 2 
bedrm, 2 bath with fireplace. Call 
393-3402. 4i6-28b 



MSC.FORSALE 



CLEANING 



DEPENDABLE/HONEST person 
will do housecleaning. Has refer- 
ences. Five years experience. Call 
after 5 p.m. 421-9771. 4t7-5b 

Cleaning - Don't have time to clean 
or financially can't afford it? Budget 
cleaning can be arranged! 1 room to 
whole house! 397-0529 lt6-28b 



12,000 GALLON Aluminum stor- 
age tank. Upright, in excellent 
condition. Call 562-5282. tm 

SEARS 10 sp. bicycle light grey 
stirrup pedals, pouch in back of 
seat. Has small water bottle. $100 
or best offer. 491-8959 tfn(F) 



PERSONAL 



WEARING APPAREL 



USED WORK UNIFORMS - 
State-length, waist and shirt size, 
shirt $2.75 each, pants $2.75 each. 
Shipping $3. Send money order to: 
Hilton Deloatche's Referral Service, 
Inc., 319 Newport Street, Suffolk, 
VA 23434. tfn 



nvmLv rA/n jmll 



iijj^imiiiiiimimm 



GOVERNMENT OWNED - $500 
down. Tidewater area, 10% below 
appraised value, free listing, Va 

broker.499-2798 tfa 

Government homes from $1.00 (U 
Repair) Foreclosures, Repos, Tax 
Delinquent Properties. Now selling. 
Call 1-315-736-7375 Ext. H-VA- 
C16 current lists. 24 hrs. 4t7-19p 



LOTSFORSALE 



Suffolk and Chesapeake too. Give 
me a call on a lovely 20 acre parcel 
in Suffolk or a 3 acre parcel in 
Great Bridge. Linda Evans 465- 
8895, 399-2401. Century 21 First 
Colony Realty. . l«6-28b 



RENTALS 



COLONIAL MANOR ACTS. 1 
bedroom apt. available im- 
mediately. Most utilities, furnished. 
Call 393-2111. tfn 

OUTER BANKS, Duck to South 
Nags Head. 1-5 bedroom. Cottage 
and condos. Weekly rentals. Free 
Brochure. Call Atlantic Realty. 1- 
800-334-8401. 5t6-28b 

GREENBRIER - 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 
baths den with fireplace, garage, 
living room, dining room on cul- 
de-sac. Excellent schools $625 547- 
7497 or 4884704. 4t6-28b 



C_— ^— — — — — 
GOOD THINGS TO EAT 



BLACKBERRIES -48* per pound. 
U-Pick. Large and plentiful G.W. 
Henley Farms at Pungo in Virginia 
Beach. From stoplight at Pungo go 
east 1 1/2 miles to Muddy Creek 
Rd. Turn left, go 1/4 mile turn 
right on Charity Neck Rd. Field 
one mile. 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday 
9-6426-7501. 4t7-12b 



JEWELRY 



CHESAPEAKE'S NEWEST JEW- 
ELRY STORE - 14 Kt. Jewelry, 
Gifts, Precious Gems. The easiest 
Layaways in town. Parkview 
Shopping Center. 420-8465. 



HAPPINESS IS A HEALTHY MOUTH 

•Albert P. Solomon D.D.S. 
•Alan G. Forbes D.D.S. 

General & Family Dentistry 

Greenbrier Sq., Suite 2E 
1324 N. Battlefield Blvd. 
Office 547-2171 Ans. Service 625-0561 




TFN 




$10 • S15/HOUR processing mail 
at home. Weekly check guaranteed. 
For details write, Mailing Enter- 
prises 13659 Victory Blvd., Suite 
298-K Van Nuys, Calif. 91401. 

4t7-5P 



A BABY TO LOVE IS OUR 
DREAM. Will provide a secure 
happy home. Expenses paid. Leave 
number on machine. Confidential. 
Ask for Liz or Jay. Call collect. 
804-541-0807. tfn 

CHILDLESS COUPLE married 8 
years can provide loving, secure 
home for your baby. Can pay le- 
gal/medical expenses. Please call 
Chris & Susan collect. (703) 276- 
9751. 5t7-12P 

PREGNANT? Let us help. We'd 
love to adopt your newborn. As- 
sist/pay medical/legal. Call 497- 
1664 collect. Ask for Debbie or 
Barry. 4t7-12b 

ADOPTION Loving couple unable 
to have children seek to adopt We 
will pay all your medical and legal 
expenses. Please call Karen and 
John. 703-893-2428. ttn 

LOVING COUPLE reaching out 
for a white newborn to make our 
lives complete. Medical/legal paid. 
Call Chris/John 460-2935. 
4t7-5b(tn) 

WOULD LIKE TO ADOPT. Lov- 
ing couple can not have children of 
our own, has lots of love to give. 
Would like to adopt baby. Call 
collect l-(804)-541-0807. 

ADOPTION: Loving childless 
couple seeks to adopt. We can pay 
your legal and medical expenses. 
Please call Deborah and Ira collect 
at 1-703-532-4722. 8t7-19p 

ADOPTION - Loving, childless 
couple wishes to adopt We will 
pay your medical and legal ex- 
penses. Please call Pam and Van 
collect (703) 379-7031. 4t7-26p 

ADOPTION: A happily married 
couple wishes to adopt newborn. 
Can give warmth, love and secu- 
rity. Call Marsha and Steven collect 
(703) 691-1953 call after 6 Mon.- 
Fri. All day weekends. 
4t7-19b 

Adoption: Childless professional 
couple (Doctor and nurse) married 
17 yrs. can provide loving and se- 
cure home for your baby. Legally 
allowed expenses paid. Please call 
Ed & Jean collect (703)951-0984 
tfn 

PREGNANT? - Please consider 
adoption instead of abortion. Let us 
help you. We'd love to adopt your 
newborn. Secure, loving home. 
Will help with medical/legal ex- 
penses. Call collect (804) 481-2671 
after 6 p.m. weekdays, anytime 
weekends. 4t6-28b 



AMERICANS FINEST HOME 
improvement roofing ft remold- 
ing. Satisfied guaranteed, senior 
citizen discount 456-1381, 485- 
4446. ttn 

HASE'S PARTY PONY'S 
Offers pony rides for birthdays, 
schools, picnics, fairs. 464-0953. 5 
yrs. exp. ft insured. ttn 

TIDEWATER'S PREFERRED 
Lawn service. Quality work, low 
rates. We do it all, give us a call. 
340-9052 

BALLOON BOUQUETS - birth- 
days, weddings, anniversaries, chi- 
dren's patties. Special rates, deliv- 
ered hi costume. Will beat all other 
advertised prices. 853-0769 ttn 

I WILL PAINT any room for $65, 
the second one 1/2 price. Residen- 
tial ft commercial. Also call about 
our special on exteriors. Call on 
Mon. Sun. between 8 ft 12. J ft M 
Seashore Painting, 428-7116 Ext 
208. tin 

BIRTHDAY CLOWN - Animal 
balloons, face painting, magic and 
puppet 467-2380. tfn 

LITTLE PONTES PARTY EX- 
PRESS - offers pony rides and pet- 
ting zoo. Childs pony pictures done 
with covered wagon. Experienced 
and insured. 421-9286. ttn 

HEAVENLY BALLOON BOU- 
QUETS - Get well, anniversary, 
births and birthdays thinking of you 
grand opening. We deliver serving 
all Tidewater (804) 482-3371. 

4t6-28P 

PAINTING INTERIOR-EXTE- 
RIOR Reasonable rates; free esti- 
mates; Fully licensed and insured. 
484-0725.488-6397. 

4t7-12b 




NEED MONEY? When Banks 
Stop. . .We Start. . .No credit 
checks, collateral or co-signers. Fof 
application write: Global, Box 112- 
Q, Verbena. Alabama 35091-0112. 
Enclose envelope. tfn 

I James E. Grelles II am not re- 
sponsible for Linda C. Grelles' 
debts or debts that may occur. 
4t7-19 

BORROW S100-S100.000! Instant 
reply! Rush stamped addressed en- 
velope: Global. Box 112-Q7. Ver- 
bena, Alabama 36091-0111 ttn 

MAJOR BANK credit card in- 
formation. Send self-addressed, 
stamped envelope: National Finan- 
cial Services, 804-08 Old Thorsby 
Road, Clanton, Alabama 35045- 
2459. tfn 

VISA-MASTERCARD! 
without investigation! Immediate 
reply! Financial-Q3, 804 Old 
Thorsby Road, Clanton, Alabama 
35045-2459. Enclose envelope! tfn 
* 



— — — — — ^^^— — 
CHILOCARE 



BABYSITTER NEEDED for two 
boys 9 and 11, needed approxi- 
mately four hours a day Mon-Fri- 
day. Blackwater - Fentress area. 
421-9771. 4t7-5b 

LOVING GRANDMOTHER would 
like to babysit in her Oceanfront 
home. Ages 2 and up. Meals and 
snacks incl. Monday-Friday, 6 
aon.-6 pjn. Call 428-2325. 8t7-5b 



REPORTERS - All beats. Weekly 
newspapers. Photography and lay- 
out Newspaper experience, either 
in college or professional, preferred. 
Entry level. Call 5474571. tfn 

AUTO SALES PERSON - needed 
immediately. Hilton Deloach Mar- 
keting and Sales Training School. 
539-9420. tfn 

EARN UP TO $339.84 PER 
WEEK Assembling our products at 
home. Amazing recorded message 
reveals details. Call today! (202) 
898-6047 Dept 9t7-19b 

NOW HIRING DEMONSTRA- 
TORS! Free kit supplies, training! 
No collecting or delivery. Work 
own hours. Beautiful merchandise. 
Great hostess plan. (804)440-5703. 
4t7-19b 

EARN $500 or more weekly stuff- 
ing envelopes at home. For free in- 
formation send self addressed 
stamped envelope to: Document 
Mailers 26028 Greenfield Rd., 
Suite #462 Oak Park, MI 48237 
3t7-21p 

$350 A Day! Processing phone or- 
ders. People call you! No experi- 
ence necessary. Call (refundable) 
(518) 459-8697 Ext. K 6908AB4t7- 
19p 

Attention - HIRING!! Government 
jobs - your area. Many immediate 
openings without waiting list or 
test $17,840 - 69,485. Call 1-602- 
838-8885 Ext. 2863. 4t7-19p 

Expand your income to match your 
dreams. Franchise income without 
franchise investment. Under $100 
startup. 487-4010. 4t-19b 

PHLEBOTOMIST - Part-time 
position available for someone to 
collect blood from infants/adults. 
Must be experienced in pediatric 
phlebotomy. $10 an hour. 210 a 
mile. Call Dawn Gilmore at 1-800- 
247-9540. 4t7-12P 

EARN EXCELLENT MONEY at 
home. Assembly work. Jewelry, 
toys, others. Call 1-619-565-1657 
ext T4382VA. 24 hrs. 3t7-12P 



mm. 

I'.#r.iT 



NEWSPAPERS 
H\nd CIRCULAR 

Call 

BYERLY 

PUBLICATIONS 



627-5020 

for Quotation 



Complete composition, camera, 
and layout services. 




I 



GREEN RUN - In Virginia 
Beach, all adults, 1, 2, and 3 
bedroom apartments. 
Heat and hot water In- 
cluded. Pines Apt. 468-2000 

TFN 



mmmmm^F^**^^ 



100 PIECES of Cut glass and hard 
glass, Lalique, Stubin, Tiffany, 
Cameo glass signed. 70 sterling 
silver souvenir spoons. 2 antique 
music boxes circa, 1880. Clocks, 
Bisques & China Dolls. Ivory Net- 
sukes and Miniature paintings. 
Open 10:00-5:00 19th Century 
Antiques, 1804 Granby St Nor- 
folk. 622-0905. tm 




TRAM FOR CAREERS IN 

•AIRLINES 

•TRAVEL AGENCIES 
HOME STUCMRES. TBAtflN 



• FINANCIAL AID AVAILABLE 
JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANC 



1-800-327-7728 

A.C.T. TRAVEL 
SCHOOL twcbr) 

Natl rtdqtrs. Pompano Bch FL 



Bathroom Remodeling 

All Phases 

547-4774 

tfn 



Roofing 

Free Estimates - 

Shingle and Roof 

Specialist ' 

Call Crown Hi-Tech Roofing 

421-7007 



417-1 Sb 



Train to baa 

•SECRETARY 

•EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

•WORD PROCESSOR 
HOME STUOWREa TRAMMQ 




NCIAL AID AVAILABLE 
lACEMENT ASSISTANC 



1-8Q0-327-7728 

THE HART SCHOOLS 

a Div. of ACT. Corp. 
Natl hdqtrs. Pompano Bch RJ 



-% 



We grind any stump" below ground 
for 75« per Inch. Machine will fit 
thru any backyard gate and will 
not damage lawn. Tree Stump or 
Shrub Removal. 

Reasonable Rates'Insured 
Free Estimates 

"Stump Bustin' Bob" 
463-1874 m 






Luxurious 

Apartments & Tbturuwuses 

fitness Center. 

year round Spa & Sauna 

andTcnnis Courts. 

Open 'Daiiy 9-6; Sun 116 

%pits start at $450 

On Providence Road 2 Mi. 

W. of Military Highway 

424-7867 



tm 



Sale! Sale! Sale! 





THE MARINER 
NOW $QI7Q* 
ONLY O/O 

*iiutalliU«n optinwl A extra 

' CALL NOW! 
TOLL FREE 

1-800-852-7665 
HOLIDAY POOLS 

Free Home Survey 

24 hr. Service Dally i Sun. 

3t7-5b 



64 



MoveUp 
I 



"Above the Crowd" 
JomwE 



.Team of Professionals 

RE/MAX Advantage Realtors 

l» Chesapeake 4364500 

REALTORS* 



RE/MAX Advantage Realtors 

Suite 100. 100 Volvo Parkway 

Chesapeake. VA 4364500 



ttBL 



I HnHBKRHtiSf I 



1 

I 

» 
I 
I 



"THE DU-MAN DO IT FOR LESS" 

SALES • SERVICE • RENTALS • PARTS • LEASING 
BODY SHOP 




FORD LINCOLN MERCURY 



ft IN SUFFOLK 

. Hours - 

830TolflOO»*»-S»l.«To5 

1*00 N. MAIN. SUFFOLK 
NEAR OBCI HOSPITAL 
. SUFFOLK— 1 r— NORFOLK 



FORD 

TRUCKS 



FORD TRUCK CENTER 

TIDEWATER EXCLUSIVE 
<JJP TRUCK DEALER**? 

* HOMH • g 

9ToiD»%'S* 9ToS 
2432 PRUOEN BLVD.. SUFFOLK 
1 MLE NORTH OF AUTO "" 

SUFFOLK 



liKSil l«5S] ESSel ESSE} 



LARGE USED CAR AND TRUCK INVENTORY 
NO CASH OR TRADE NEEDED WITH APPROVEDCREDJT. 



I 
I 

! 

I 



Friendly Home 
Parties 

HAS OPENINGS IN THIS AREA-FQR ^MANAGERS 
AND DEALERS. 

FREE TRAINING. COMMISSION UP TO 25%. OVER- 
RIDE UP TO 7%. NO PAPER WORK. NO DELIVERING OR 
COLLECTING. HIGHEST HOSETESS AWARDS,. 

NO HANDLING OR SERVICE CHARGE.. OVER 800 
DYNAMIC ITEMS - TOYS. GIFTS. HOME DECOR AND 
CHRISTMAS DECOR. 

For Free 1989 Catalog Call 



1-800-227-1510 



2a5-28P 



CLASSIFIED AD MAIL-IN FORM 



11 



PERSONAL 
RATES 

ltime 
2 times 
4 times 



20 Words 
or less 

$7 
$12 

$15 



Additional 
words 

.35 
.60 
.75 



Run your personal Classified Ad four times for only $15. You can 
cancel your ad at any time, however, there can be NO REFUNDS 

AND NO CHANGES. 

AH Classified Ads run In three newspapers (The vbginla Beach Sun. The 

Chesapeake Post and The Portsmouth Times). No additional charge. 



Please print clearly using only one word per box. 






« 


































| 

JO words 



Run my personal ad for 
Payment is enclosed $ 



issues. 



Make elMck payable to Brady PabUcattoaa 

MAIL TO: Classified, Box 1327, Chesapeake, Va. 23320 

Name '. — 

Address 
City 



State 



_Zip 



FOR HELP with your Classified Ad, please call 547-4571. 

■■ ifniHi &n* M*at b* i dan iii tw ml COMHNM10N RATE Hn ■■• •SUB personal ad m stv/ 

HJ> T > T:.37 - Tr *° ~ " oc tymy ruHotw r w « nr *x m wMMand » 

w«rw.lB>»«»nw.«rtTN>irtt»»t.w 



*M**imrTlTi J *r-- M*n> 



54T4STlfcr 



mmm 



mkwm 




^■^"^^"^^1 



l^^f^^ 1 



-■'- "' I ■ J ■ ■ ■ ^^P^»^^»^»^ 



tO 77w V'jrgjn^a Seacft Sun, June 28, 7989 




Lil's Quill 



Jumps 



continued from page 3 



revolutionary document, "Charles Carroll of Carrollton," he clearly identi- 
fied himself. This was his way of sparing his cousin, also named Charles 
Carroll, of being accused of treason should the revolution fail." 

It should be noted that he was one of the wealthiest men in the 
Colonies. When he placed his name on the Declaration of Independence, he 
had much to lose. Indeed, they all did. The final sentence in the document 
reminded them of the risk they were taking. . 

"And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm Reliance on the 
Protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our 
Lives, our Fortunes, and our sacred Honor." 

This same courage was displayed during the past month by the Chinese 
citizens, especially the young students, who risked everything, even losing 
their lives in an effort to bring more individual freedoms to their country. 
They have reminded us all of the sacrifices that were made before the 
establishment of our own system of government by those governed. 

What we celebrate is one of our great documents of freedom - the Decla- 
ration of Independence. This was a fuller statement than the Resolution, 
and the final draft was approved on the 4th, setting forth the theory of this 
new country's government and the justification for the separation from 
England. It could be considered the nation's "conception," as it stated our 
national intent. 

' The purpose of most nations had been to dominate - their subjects, their 
rivals, their neighbors, even the world. The American purpose was differ- 
ent It was and is to liberate, to free from domination. Government was to 
be the servant of the people, not the other way around. 

Just saying we were free didn't make it so. It took many battles over six 
long years to actually gain our independence. Some say the nation was re- 
ally "born" on Virginia soil in 1781 in the blood of the Yorktown cam- 
paign, and that we received our "birth certificate" (The Treaty of Paris) two 
years later. 

Although the Declaration of Independence is a cherished document, it 
remained for the Constitution to give body to the ideals and principles it 
proclaimed. Catherine Drinker Bowen, a distinguished lecturer and author, 
expressed it well. 

'The United States Constitution provided for neither class nor privilege. 
All was mobile, a man could move up or he could slip down. It was a 
wholly unprecedented departure, and to Americans both immigrant and na- 
tive-born, it gave extraordinary scope. Neither the Declaration of Indepen- 
dence nor the Constitution claimed to make timid men courageous, lazy 
men active or stupid men bright' they unlocked doors, let Americans walk 
through, each one to his own destiny." 

Since Americans are free from all restraints except such as are justly 
imposed by law, We the People could, and perhaps should, observe Inde- 
pendence Day every day of the year! 



VBEA Report 



continued from page 3 



stuttering. 

What Can Parents Do? 

Obviously, you cannot eliminate many of these pressures, even if you 
really wanted to. But you can help your child face them, and you can avoid 
adding to them to make them worse. 

• Provide guidance in dealing with pressure. Your child could take one of 
three general approaches - retreat, capitulation, or action - to reduce the 
stress. The last approach is most consistent with sound mental health. You 
can help your child determine what action would be most effective in a 
given circumstance. 

• Let your child know you care. Be available to help her or him work 
out difficulties. When a child has the security of parental love and respect, 
pressure can be met with self-confidence. 

• Be a positive force in your child's life, not a major pressure point. 
Throughout school years, avoid making unrealistic demands. Let them feel 
they are reaching for their own goals, not satisfying your needs. 

• Teach your child to live with limitations. No one excels in everything; 
no one is perfect. It is not your child's particular handicaps that are crucial, 
but his or her attitude toward them. 

• Help your child find lime to be alone - time to think, to dream, to plan 
to make decision. 

• Guide your child in forming good study habits as soon as steady 
homework assignments are received. Children become much better able to 

take on increasing loads if their basic study plan is workable and they have 
become used to it. 

• Ground your child in a system of values. Even if pressures become 
overwhelming, you do not want your child to seek ethically unacceptable 
means of dealing with them. Students who have cheated in school report a 
wish for more parental direction, firm rules, and guidance in determining 
right and wrong. 

• Encourage your teenager to develop self-responsibility. Volunteer 
service, such as community work, provide one of the few remaining 
outlets in adolescence for independence, cooperative rather than competitive 
activity, and useful and socially necessary work. 



Mayor's Report 



Continued IWH p8Q6 3 



vides, their Newslndex. 

Municipal Reference indexes and clip articles related to cjty operations 
from all of the local newspapers including The Virginia Beach Sun and the 
Beacon. This is done on a weekly basis and articles are cross-referenced un- 
der broad and specific subject headings. Editorials and letters to the editor 
are also included. If you were interested in wanting to know what my 
position is on a particular topic,' the library can investigate it by searching 
under the Office of the Mayor or under my name in their index. 

How do you benefit from such a special library? Everyday your requests 
for information on the city are sent to Municipal Reference from the cen- 
tral and area libraries and divisions. If these locations don't have the an- 
swer, Municipal Reference is their "City Hall" contact. They provide the 
link to specialists and information throughout the city. Over the last sev- 
eral months they've done research in such areas as, "Can I build a bulkhead 
of timber in Virginia Beach and how do I do it?, " "What's the most recent 
unemployment rate in Virginia Beach?" and "What steps do I have to take 
to become a city council member?" Their Newslndex is used quite a bit by 
high school and public administration students studying the issues involv- 
ing the city. 

Ultimately , every request that comes from a city department or a coun- 
cilmember to the library affects either a policy decision or a project or ser- 
vice that is directly related to you. Sometimes that request for information 
can be very specific. If you have a unique problem or issue and a city de- 
partment is trying to help you work through it, they often will contact the 

library for assistance. They will receive data or materials from othei 
municipalities that will support them in addressing your need. Other times 
requests for information can be very broad. For example, the library re- 
cently investigated tree protection ordinances, landscaping regulations foi 
public and private properties and light rail transportation. It was based on 
this research that reports and final recommendations were made to council. 

Everyday this specialized library helps us make Virginia Beach a better 
place to live. Why not check it out? Municipal Reference is located in the 
Municipal Center, on Princess Anne Road in the building across from the 
.Signet Bank parking lot. The library is open to the public for research as- 
sistance and it's helpful if you can call in advance. Their hours are 9 a.m. 
to S p.m., Monday through Friday and their telephone number is 427- 
4644. 

This article was compiled through the courtesy and assistance of Kath- 
leen G. Hevey, Municipal Reference library and Martha J. Sims, director, 
Public Libraries, City of Virginia Beach. 



Festival 



continued from page 1 



utover said the races are somewhat 
left out. 

"Up until now, I don't think the 
Neptune Festival knew it was there. 
I haven't seen the mutual influence 
yet, but I'm sure it adds something 
to the Neptune Festival," he said. 

Nancy Shelhorse, canoe race 
chairman, said her race is a big part 
of the festival. 

"I think it's one of the biggest 
sporting events. That and the 
triathlon. AH the sporting events 
are what makes the Neptune Festi- 
val neat," she said. 

The canoe race will also take 
place on Saturday, Sept. 23 at 9:30 
a.m. The race, which was originated 
by Shelhorse and Lillie Gilbert, 
will traverse the city of Virginia 
Beach for 28.5 miles beginning at 
Munden Point Park on the North 
Landing River heading north and 
finish near the west side of the 
Lesner Bridge at Lynnhaven Inlet 

Shelhorse said 100 to 12S ca- 
ncers are expected to participate in 
the race, which pulls in top canoe 
contestants from Canada, Michigan, 
Wisconsin, New Hampshire, New 
York and Pennsylvania. 

"We wanted to promote our 
scenic waterways and bring it to the 
attention of our local people as well 
as out of town folks," Shelhorse 
said. 

The race is also held to "promote 
the sport of canoeing," according to 
Shelhorse. "It's getting bigger and 
bigger. This is a wonderful way to 
enjoy our waters." 

There are several classes available 
for interested cancers. The racing 
class, or professional class, has a 
category for men, mixed and 
women, as does the recreational 
class. There is also a solo class for 
single seat canoes and a master's 
solo class. 



The registration fee for the race is 
$15 for recreational racers and $20 
for professionals* The fees for en- 
tries received after Sept. 18 are $30 
and $40. Shelhorse said the Vir- 
ginia Canoe Racing Association 
receives no benefits from the race; 
the proceeds go to the support of 
the PHRF handicap system and the 
IMS handicap system. Glover said 
the racer can select any system but 
they have to have the proper mem- 
bership to that class. He added that 
only a few boats are eligible to race 
in the IMS class. 

'The problem was, how to hand- 
icap the boats so all are equally 
scored," he said. 

There is a $50 fee to enter both 
races; $35 for one. Part of the pro- 
ceeds from the entry fees goes to- 
wards a donation; the rest covers 
refreshments, entertainment, tro- 
phies and plaques. T-shirts are also 
sold to raise more money. 

"We try to raise funds for the 
Life-Saving Museum of Virginia," 
Glover said. 

Last year the race donated $2,000 
to the museum but this year hopes 
to double that amount. 

Since the race is an amateur one, 
no cash prizes will be awarded. The 
first second and third place winner 
in each of the five classes will re- 
ceive a trophy. * 

Although the sailing regatta is a 
part of the Neptune Festival, 
the race and back to the Neptune 
Festival. 

Winners of the professional class 
will be awarded a cash prize and 
recreation class winners will receive 
a trophy. All contestants will re- 
ceive t-shirts. 

"It's a real neat event. It covers 
the whole city," said Shelhorse 



Teens 



. continued Iron page 1 



who opt to keep the baby drop out 
of school, some choose to continue 
attending their public schools. 
What many teens don't know is that 
there is an alternative to quitting 
school, just to avoid the 
embarrassment. 

The Thalia School, sponsored by 
the Virginia Beach public schools, 
is a school for pregnant teens. Ap- 
proximately 80 girls attend the 
school each year although they 
must provide their own transporta- 
tion. The classes are taught by Vir- 
ginia Beach teachers, but the school 
days are shorter than those in public 
schools. 

Savage said pregnant teens from 
lower income families are more 
likely to keep their babies because 
they cannot afford to have an abor- 
tion. According to statistics, more 



McCreary 



white teens have abortions. She 
also said that many times girls 
won't admit that they are pregnant, 
therefore they delay the care of the 
unborn baby and do not receive 
proper nutrition. 

"Teenagers are at a greater risk 
for having premature babies," Sav- 
age said. 

Savage said she feels that 
parental involvement could help 
decrease the number of unwanted 
teen pregnancies. She said kids need 
to not only learn the proper infor- 
mation about pregnancy, but also 
sexually transmitted diseases. 

"Kids need to understand their 
parent's values. They need to talk 
honestly and openly with them. 
That's not a reality in many homes 
in our city," Savage said. "It's cer- 
tainly a heartache." 



continued from page 1 



behold - it works. It works wonder- 
ful." 

McCreary has other goals, 
besides losing weight, that he 
would like to accomplish. He is 
interested in contacting Folks 
March and getting the whole 
community involved in walking. 
Several walking groups have 
already contacted him with lit- 
erature. 

McCreary said he would also like 
to move up in the library system. 
Because he doesn't have a degree he 

Light Rail 



can't work in the administration 
field, but he can become a Special- 
ist II or III. He plans on working 
on his story telling more and be- 
coming involved with children of 
all ages. 

"I'm an information junkie! Just 
knowing the old and new books are 
out there and being able to explore 
places through the books" is what 
drives McCreary to get up in the 
morning, take a walk, and go to 
work. 



continued horn page 1 



ments for the referendum can be 
completed. He suggested that the 
schedule parallel the school bond 
referendum where possible. 

Under the suggested schedule a 
public hearing on the referendum 
would be held on Aug. 14 follow- 
ing two published notices of the 
public hearing on July 30 and Aug. 
6. 

council would be scheduled to 
adopt the resolution requesting the 
special election for the referendum, 
with the resolution filed with the 
court, on Aug. 22. 

According to Cosgrove, bond 
counsel Harry Frazier recommended 
that the best way to address the is- 
sue would be to tie the question to 
a particular, concrete proposal for 
light rail transit. 

Council members defeated the 
original proposal because of the 
cost, which was to be shared by the 
cities of Norfolk and Virginia 
Beach, their impact on the adjoin- 
ing areas, and the absence of a con- 
nection to the Naval Base. Council 



members were also disappointed 
that the system, as proposed, would 
not relieve the city's transportation 
system to any great extent. 

The system would cost approxi- 
mately $1.02 million to build. Un- 
der the financing proposal, each city 
would issue $21.7 million in debt, 
with $5.37 million in bonds fi- 
nanced by $5 million a year in debt 

service funding from the Com- 
monwealth Trust Fund. 

Councilwoman Barbara Henley 
and Vice Mayor Robert V. Fentress 
who represent Virginia Beach on 
the Transporalion Commission, 
endorsed the project. Voting with 
them to forward with the light rail 
system were when it was previ- 
ously unconsidered were Council- 
men William D. Sessoms, John A. 
Baum and Harold Heischober. Vot- 
ing against the proposal were 
Mayor Meyera Oberndorf, Coun- 
cilwomen Nancy Parker and Reba 
McClanan, and Councilmen Moss, 
John Perry and Albert Balko 



Flyover 



. continued from page 3 



of the park, it will still be over the 
Edwin Drive entrance to the park 
and will pass over the people area. 

William Fleming, another resi- 
dent of Larkspur, told council he 
was concerned about the congestion 
and urged council to move on with 
the projecL He said that the cost to 
the public will be far greater if the 
project is delayed. He added that 
Alternate 1A will be more 
economical, safer and would have 
no adverse impact on the park. 

"Whatever you do. do some- 
thing," he said. He said that the 
grade separation at Bonney Road is 
essential but did not think the 
intersection at Holland Road needed 
to be as extravagant. 

The project was supported by 
Nick Economos, owner of the 
Omni on Bonney Road; Debra 
Steam, representing a development 
company; Pembroke area developer 
Gerald Divaris; Burrell Saunders and 
Christopher Anuswith, Central 
Business Center businessmen; and 
Donald Jellig, vice president of 



Sentara Health Systems which 
owns all four corners at the Bonney 
Road intersection. 

Curtis Catron said he supported 
the extension using the 1A alter- 
nate. 

Robert Engesser wanted more 
studies and a doon-to door canvass 
of residents. 

Councilman John D. Moss, in 
making the motion for deferral, said 
the he had received a number of 
calls over the week-end indicating 
that citizens have not had adequate 
notice on the recommended align- 
ment. He asked that the map show- 
ing the alignment be made available 
in the Central Library. He said, 
however, that the project was 
needed. 

The motion was approved by a 9- 
1 vote with Councilman Albert 
Balko dissenting. Councilman 
Harold Heischober abstained be- 
cause the property on which his 
automobile dealership is located 
may be involved in the right-of- 
way. 



Sand 



. continued from page 1 



three to five months to complete. 
Work can proceed during the day 
or night. Weather and sea condi- 
tions and specifically wave action 



may make spring and summer the 
safest times to conduct this oper- 
ation in the ocean. 




Graduates Take Note And 
Go Out And Get A Job 



By Raymond Jones 

Special To the Sun 



Hi there, graduates! You're prob- 
ably feeling pretty good right now. 
Twelve years of school and maybe 
four more for college, and you're 
finished. 

The world is your oyster. You 
can relax for a couple of weeks, 
maybe do Fort Lauderdale or the 
mountains, and you can let it all 
hang out. Then - brace yourself for 
reality. 

What we're talking about here is 
the world of work, the grind, the 
old salt mine, the daily routine. The 
name of the game: bread, dough, 
sheckles, scratch, mazuma, pesos, 
lettuce - or as the establishment 
calls it, money. 

Think mom and pop are going to 
provide the magic carpet forever? 
Get ready for the rug to get pulled 
out from under you. Heigh ho, 
heigh ho. . . it's off to work you 
go- 

Actually, the challenges and re- 
wards of the workplace may 
eventually become more exciting 
than your old school. New tests of 
your true intelligence, new chums, 
new surroundings - the workplace is 
a dynamo of potentiality. 

The trick is to get in the door. 
From one who has bagged groceries 
on one end of the scale and who has 
worked as an administrator hiring 
people on the other end, here are 
some free tips for you. 

Tip number one: the saying 
"you never get a second chance to 



make a first impression" is beyond 
dispute. Honk things up in round 
one and you may be down and out 
before round two. Keep this as a 
general principle for the other tips. 

Tip number two: with very 
few exceptions, people with good 
jobs in the workplace are clean and 
well dressed. Unless you're audi- 
tioning for a bit part in a punk rock 
video, dress up to seek the job. 

Tip number three: know 
what the job is about Applying for 
a job in a widget factory and not 
knowing what a widget even is 
spells doom at the outset. Care 
enough about a potential employer 
to know what their business is 
about. 

Tip number four: prepare a 
resume. Tell your employer about 
yourself . . . your education, your 
achievements, your ambitions. If 
you don't know how to prepare a 
resume, invest a few bucks in a 
book with samples. You should be 
able to find one at your local book- 
store. Make sure your resume is 
typed, and have a number of copies 
made. Make it neat and error-free. 

Tip number five: don't get 
discouraged. You probably won't 
get hired on the first try, maybe not 
even the fifth or tenth go at it. But 
eventually you will find an em- 
ployer with a need. 

With spit, polish and initiative, 
youll join the work force and will 
hopefully enjoy the feeling of 
importance and self-sufficiency that 
comes with the job. Good luck to 
you, and don't forget to polish your 
shoes! 



Being A Parent Is One Of 
The Toughest Jobs To Hold 



By Fred Batman 

I To The Sun 



Being a parent is not an exact 
science. In fact, it is far from it. 
One authority has described the role 
of parent as a cross between a circus 
ringmaster, a policeman, a 
psychiatrist, a social worker, and a 
teacher. 

Whatever it is, and however you 
see your role, there are always 
things to read regarding effective 
parenting. From a composite of re- 
cent articles on the subject, I can 
add to your reading list with the 
following ideas, especially designed 
for parents who have more than one 
child: 



• Don't saj everything you 
think. Sometimes a parent can 
alienate one or more children by 
blurting out emotional words, 
especially at a time of conflict. 

• Make your promises 
selectively, but keep the 



ones you make. This is a good 
way to be seen as fair, and to be 
trusted by your children. 

• Learn to praise. If a piece 
of good work has been achieved, 
speak specifically about it and give 
the achiever a good measure of 
recognition in a way that is appro- 
priate for that child. 

• Keep an open mind dur- 
ing a family discussion. 
Someone told me once, "Never say 
never." Eating your words and sav- 
ing face may be difficult to deal 
with later on when you find that 
you may have spoken too soon. 

• Treat everybody with 
importance. One of the most 
devastating things a family can ex- 
perience is for the children to per- 
ceive that there is favoritism. Be 
conscious at all times how the 
other siblings might be viewing 
your contact with one child. 

No, these suggestions are not 
intended to be all-inclusive. They 
do represent, however, some sound 
advice, unscientifically obtained, to 
be applied in our unscientific job as 
parents.