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Full text of "The Young Ladies' Journal Complete Guide to the Work-Table Sixth Edition 1888"



N 



II 



.1 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Baldwins Walkers 

IITTING 




EAncy 



Special malces for 
Machine Kiilters 



SOLD BY ALL LEAD/NQ DRAPERS L HOSIERS. 



i HIGHLAND WOOLS y^ 
FINGERING WOOLS f 

VEST WOOL [^ 
SHETLAND WOOLS (I 



I 



Wools 



tsTABJ^oTsse WEST CROFT MILLS, Halifax, Yorkshire. ^ 



HARRIS 



I 



NOVELTY IN NEEDLEWORK. 

The only Flax Embroidery Threads used at the Royal School of Art 
Needlework, South Kensington, and obtainable there. 

For the Bedroom, Drawing-boom, Panels. Curtains, Screens, Table Cloths, 
Ladies* & Children's Dresses, Ecclesiastical, & all High-Class Needlework. 

ART SHADES AND BRILLIANT COLOURS. 

^___^__ 5 Exceeflinj? in Artistic Effect the Finest Silk at One-third the cost of Filoselle. 

WILL WORK ON ANY MATERIAL. COLOURS TRUE TO SHADE. EXACT MATCEINQ- GUARANTEED. 

CAUTIOJ^.— Beii-are o/iu- 
ferior and thoroughly unre- 
liable imitations, and see 
tliat EVEtiY SKEIN heavs 
the Signature, J. HARRIS 



Sign 
SO^ 



FLAX EMBROIDERY 

THREADS. 



a7id SUNS, CocUYmwth. 

Highest Awards wherever Exhibited. 
Thread Cards of 250 Shades (Fast Dried Washing Colours) in 14 sizes ; and 
washing instructions Free. Kept in stock in every size and shade, by the Manu- 
facturers, from the heaviest COUCHING and ROPE FLA:^ to the FINEST 
ETCHING. If you cannot obtain tlie sizes and shades you require at the shops, 
write direct to the Mills. Samples of Work on Approval. • ^ 

J. HARRIS & SONS, Derwent Mills, COCKERMOUTH,^°f.d°^/J^^f-:;l°^y- 



2>yfcs 



KNnnHGiiniOLS 

-3^'j\(^,^0M THE FACTORS .f)/-*^- 

i.cMllis % son.Wakereld 

WHO SUPPLY THE CELEBRATED YARNS MANUFACTURED BY 

ISAAC BRIGGS 8f SONS, RUTLAND M!LLS,WAKEF1ELD. 

BEST SCOTCH _ 
FINGERING % 
PLY-FINE. 
_^ PLY-STOUT 

APPLYto THE FACTORS FOR PRICE LISTS SSAMPLCS. 





ADVFJITISEMENTS. 



Needles, Sewing Machine Needles 

PENELOPE CROCHET HOOKS, and KNITTING PINS of ALL KINDS, 

AND or THS 

riANUrAGTUili::D BY 



Kaiiufactupep by Special Appointment to HEH MOST GHACIOnS MAJESTY QDEEN VICTORIA 
Of the "QuBBN'3 Own" Ridgbd-Byed Needles, Etc. Etc, 

Holesale Only, 53, Gresliam Street, London. Manufactory-Redditcli, 

H WALKER'S '* BIDGED-BYBD NEEDLES " have a wide reputation for superior 
Quality and Finish, and his PENELOPE CEOOHET HOOKS are invariably used in prefereoce 
to all others. 

H, WALKER'S " BELL GAXTG-E " will be found useful to Needleworkers and Knitters. 

A ny of the above Goods can be obtarmdai Berlin Reposi tories or of the usual Wholesale Houses^ 

Two Gold Medals obtained at the Paris Exhibition, 1878, and the 
ONLY Gold Medal awarded for Needles^ 






exQUisixe 

ill all Colours am ^ 
M'i Shades ^<^ 



SPECMLLV ^Di^PTED 
FOR MAKING 

EMBROIDERY, SHAWLS, 

A/so Bmld, Corded - 

Pearl Barley, Granulated- -^ . ^ -2- 

Crewel ma Ice wools and all kinds of^ knitting urns. ^ 7ne use of 
these greatly facilitates the making of Bedutifui Designs in Meedlmork 

MANTLES %. SHAWLS SUPPLIED-from -the- ABOVE. 

;\LL GOODS POST FRES AT WHOLESALE PRICES DIRECT FROM THE WORKS 

Mterns, Sijcw'e €ards and Full Particulars Free en Applicahm. 



CSMfilTI CTIBI m Til WilK-TAJil. 



003^TJk.IUIl^a- IITSTI^TTOTlOlsrS 



IN 



BERLIN WORK, CROCHET. 

DRAWN»THREAD WORK, 



EMBROIDERY, KNITTING, KNOTTING OR MACRAME, 
LACE, NETTING, 



|i;um^i[0us Jllmtpli0ns nnd (!{0lom[ud S^^iinjj. 



Bcc eecc eo oea ij uii 



London s 
E. HARRISON, MERTON HOUSE, SALISBURY SQUARE, FLEET STREET. 



INDEX. 



BERLIN WORK. 

Brocart de Bourgoyne , 
Cheiiiiile • , , ... 
Pesign on Java . • 
Diaper Pattern , , 
Fancy Stitches . , • 
Framed Cross Stitch , , 
Framed Star .... 

Fringe 

Fringe of Wool through Canvas 

Gobelin . , . , . 

Introduction .... 

Leviathan and Cross Stitch . 

Plait, Cross, and Long Stitches 

Plait Stitches, A Variety of . 

Point de Fantasie . 

Point Reprise on Java Canvas 

Raised Berlin Hook 

Satin, Cross, and Back Stitches 

Satin Stitoh , , , , 

Sofa Cushion , , 

Star Pattern, Raised or Plush Stitch 

Vandyke and B^ok Stitohes. • 



CROCHET. 



Basket' Pattern, Tricot 
Chain Stitch .... 
Cro88 Treble . , . . 
Design for Shawls 
Directions for Holding Work 
Doable . • . , . 
Doable Foundations • 
Doable and Treble |. , 
Doable Treble , 
Edging, Crochet and Hairpin Hoc k 
Edging, Crochet and Mignardise. 
Fringe. Fork Work , , « 
Hairpin Work . .' , , 
Half Treble ..... 
Insertion, Crochet and Fancy Gimp 
Insertion, Boll Fioota and MignaiKliso 
Introda(ki>A«i 



PAGE 

. 120 

. 120 

. 120 

. 115 

. 120 

. 115 

. 115 

. 120 

. 120 

, 115 

. 115 

. 114 

. 114 

. 115 

. 115 

. 115 

. 120 

. 115 

. 114 

. 114 

. 120 

. 114 



14 
11 
14 
15 
11 
11 
11 
14 
14 
10 
10 
14 
14 
11 
10 
15 
II 



Materials , , 


• • • ( • 


. V, 


Muscovite Tricot . 




li 


Shell Pattern 




. 14 


Single Crochet , 




11 


Treble . , , 




14 


Tricot . 




. 14 


Tricot and Treble . 




14 


Trimming 




, 14 


Trimming, Crochet and Honiton iiiaid , 


15 


Trimming, Crochet 


and Waved Braid • 


15 


Trimming, Hairpin Work . , • ♦ , 


15 


Tuft Stitoh . 




14 


Wool BaU . . 


t f • • 1 


. 14 



DRAWN-THREAD WORK, OR POINT 
COUPE. 

Armenian Lace Trimmings . . . . , 111 

Border, Drawn Threads and Reticella Work . 106 
Border or Insertion, Drawn Threads and Spun 

Stitches Ill 

Border, Interlaced 107 

Border, Pyramid, Cross, and Armenian Stitohes 111 

Borders ....,..,. 107 

Cane Pattern 107 

Feather or Coral Stitch Ill 

Herringbone Pattern ♦,.,.. Ill 

Insertion or Stripe 107 

Introduction 107 

Reticella Lace , .111 

Simple Design • , 107 



EMBROIDERY. 




Appliqnfi 

Arrasene «»•••• 
Beading ..•.,., 

Chain Stitch 

Choice of Designs . • . , 
Cording Stitoh . . • • • 


. . 8 

: :^'f 

. * 7 
. . 3 



INDEX. 



iU 



PAGK 

Cotton k la Croix # > t f . • . • 6 

Conohin^ Stitoh • . . . , • . 7 

CoTering Joins of Foundations • • • i 7 

Crewels » » » 6 

Desoription of Coloured Supplement . • 8 

DotStxtoh ........ 7 

Feather or Coral Stitoh . . , » . 7 

Gold and Silver Thread 6, 7 

Herringbone Stitoh ,».»». 7 

Interlaced Ground •.•... 7 

Introduction • « 3 

Italian Stitoh ,7 

Knot Stitoh . 6 

Materials used for Embroidery .... 6 

Materials for Foundations . . , . , 3 

Mode of Sttetohing Embroidery .... 8 

Needles « 6 

Paste for Appliqu6 Embroidery .... 8 

Satin Stitch 6 

Silks .6 

Traoingr 3 

Twisted Stitches 7 

Washing Crewel Work 8 



KNITTING. 

Bed Best . • 

Bodice, Infant's • 

Boot, Infant's . 

Border for Counterpane 

Brioche or Patent 

Cable . 

Cane Work . 

Casting Off . 

Casting On . 

Coral Pattern. 

Cord 

Counterpane, Borders for 

Counterpane, Diamond Stripe for 

Counterpane, Hexagon 

Counterpane, Square for 

Counterpane, Stripe for 

Description of Stitches 

Diamond 

Diamond with Open Trellis 

Double Knitting . 

Doable liose Leaf . 

Edging . . ♦ . 

Escallops • . » 

Fancy Pattern for Socks and Stockings 

Feather Pattern . 

General Directions . 

Glove, Infant's , , 

Herringbone Stripe 

Implemonta t , • 

Insertions • « . 

Introduction • • 

Jacket for Lady . 

Knee Cap . . . 

Knickerbocker Stockings 

Knit at the Back . 

Knit in the Bound 

Knitting 

Knit Two in One , 

Knit Two Together 

Leaf and Trellis . 

Make a Stitch 

Mat. Brioche • « 

Materials . • . . 

Mitten . , . . 

Oval and Diamond Pattern 

Pass Slip Stitch Over . 

latent or Brioche i 



43, 



36 
55 

47 
ai, 63 
58 
43 
48 
62 
7,38 
48 
48 
38 
55 
43 
64 
54 
56 
35 
55 
38 
35 
48,51 
35 
56 
42 
42 
38 
37 
37 
38 
38 
50 
37 
56 
35 
39 
47 
38 
38 











PAGE 


Pence Jug . ^ • • • • . - . 34 


Petticoat, Child's . 






. 54,62 


Petticoat, Infant's . , « 






. , 61 


Petticoat in Stripes . , • 








, 5K: 


Purling or Ribbing , « . 








. 3^ 


Ribbing with Two Pius 








. 39 


Shawl, Design for . • 








. 62 


Shawl, Half Square , 








. 51 


Slip a Stitoh • . « i 








, 37 


Sock, Child's . . • , 








. 46 


Sock, Gentleman'i . . • 








60 


Stitches, To Raise . . , 








. 38 


Stocking, Ladies' Winter . 








. 63 


Stripe for Hem, Top of Stocking, 


Ac. 






. 51 


Stripe with Crochet Edge . 








. 47 


Tobacco Bag 








. 47 


Triangular Kilted Pattern , 








. 39 


Trimming for Chemise . , 








. 54 


Twisted Bar Stripe . . , 








38 


Vandyke Pattern . . • 








, 38 


Vest, Infant's , 








. 39 


Wave Pattern . , , . 


, . . 62 


KNOTTING OR MACRAMB. 


Bar with Knots 94 


Cross Knot for Open Diamonds , 






95 


Fringe of Two Colours , 






90 


Fringes , 






94,95 


General Hints 






91 


Glass-Hoaded Pins 






91 


Heading Ribs and Diamonds , 






94 


Heading with Slanting Ribs 






94 


Knotted Heading of Fringed Threads 






95 


Lead Cuslnon .... 






94 


Leading Bar with Solomon Knots 






95 


Maorame Knot . • . • 






94 


Materials ....«< 






91 


Picot Heading . « . * • 






95 


Rich Knot with Eight Strands . 






95 


Simple Chain , . . . 






, 95 


Spherical Knot , . . . . 






94 


Spiral Cord 






95 


Steel Crochet Hooks 






91 


Tools Required . , . • 






91 


Waved Bar . . , . 






95 


Waved Loop , , 








95 



LAOB. 

LIMOGES. 

Instruotioni • • 79 

Stitches used in Limoges , . • « .80 

OLD POINT. 

Materials for Old Point . . . . • 75 

Old Point, Directions for 75 

POINT AND HONITON. 

Bar Rosette , . . 72 

Buttonhole Bars 72,74 

Buttonhole Stitch Backwards, Point de Venise . 71 

Buttonhole Stitoh Looped, Point Turo . . 71 
Buttonhole Stitch, Point d'Anvere and Point de 

Malines ........ 71 

Buttonhole Stitch, Point de Bruxelles . , 71 

Buttonhole Stitches, Point de Sorento . , 71 

Cravat End , . 66 

Cross Rosette ....»•• 74 

Directions for Tracing « , . • . 66 

Double Leaf with Vein 72 

Festoon Joini^int, Point d'Esyrit , • • » 71 



^l)Et. 



PAGE 
Jjuce Border . . • • i • t 72 

Jjoaf Ornamentation ,,..•« 72 
Ix)08e and Twisted Bars, Point d' Alec 900 . • 71 

Materials 66 

Mode of Tracing and Sewing on Braid • « GQ 
Open Wroath Boeetto .••••• 74 
Otals in Point Alen9on • • • • .74 

Pioots for Bars • • 72 

Pyramid Pattern, Irish Stitch . , • ^ 72 
Pyramid Roaettes and Ovalfl , . , , 74 
Rosette Pattern, Point d'Angleterre ... 72 
Rosette Squares •...,, .^ 74 

Spinning Wheels 72, 74 

Squares with Pyramid Scallops, Point d*Eaprib 

Rings, &c. 75 

Square with Rings in Point d'Esprit and Open 

Scallops . • . . . . . 74, 75 

Trefoils. . , 72 

Trefoil Rosette , , 74 

T mated liaco Stitch, Point d'E=>pagne • . 72 
Various Designs for Filling in Squarer • « 74 
Washing, Directions for • • • • # 80 

Wheels with Thread Bars 74 

VENETIAN POINT. 
Directions for Working . • • . SO 

Materials for Venetian Point • • • .80 
Trimming • i # • • . 80 



FANCY NETTING. 
n order. Cross Netting, and Twisted Loops 
Border, Honeycomb and Rose • 
Border, Rose and Sheaf , » 
Border, with Bandies of Loops . 
Border, with Double Loose Loops 
Border, with Round Loop Heading 
Border, with Tufts and Scalloped Edge 
Circle, Mode of Beginning , . 
Common Netting * • • • 
Gross Netting , . , . 
Curtains , , . . . 
Design for Antimncapsars, Fiehua, &c, 
Design witli Long and Crossed Loops 
Design with Twisted Loops • 

Diagonal . . » t » 
Diamond Pattern .... 
Diamond Pattern and Round Netting 

Doily 

Edging, Double Fan or Sheaf • 

Pan Pattern 

Foundation, Interlaced 
Foundation, with Holes for Embroidery 
Foundation, with Needlework . 
Fringe ,,.... 

Honeycomb 

Insertion, Rose and Plain Netting 
Introduction . • • • » 
Lappets for Caps . <« • • 
Loop Nettinsr , . , . 
Loose Loop Pattern . » • 
Mitten ... ^ - 

Neckerchief « . . • • 

Night Net 

Open and Darned Stripe 

Rose Netting .... 

Rose Netting, Plain and Striped 

Scallop 

Square Pattern . . . 
Star Netting . t • • 

Stripe Netting " , • , 
IftgBdi ana Frixifica • 1 • 



135 
126 
134 
131 
131 
134 
134 
127 
123 
126 
135 
135 
134 
134 
126 
134 
123 
127 
131 
131 
127 
123 
127 
135 
126 
126 
123 
130 
123 
127 
135 
135 
135 
127 
122 
126 
131 
126 
126 
126 
135 



Trimming, Thick Loops and Fan Edge 
Trimmings .... 

GUIPURE NETTING. 
Angular Edge . , , 
Circular Foundation • • 
Cravat End .... 
Double Cross ... 
Festoon and Trellis Combination 
General Remarks . • 
Guipure in Relief . . 
Implements • • • • 
Introduction . • • • 
Knot for Joining • , 

Mesh 

Mushroom Stitch , • 
Needle, To Fill . 
Netting, Directions for , 
Oblong ..... 

Picots 

Points Croise, Cross Stitch . 
Point d'Esprit, Festoon Stitch 
Point de Reprise and Festoon 
Point de Toile, Trellis Stitch 
Point Evantail, Fan Stitch 
Point Reprise or Darning Stitch 
Pyramid. . , , • 
Quarter Sqnare • • • 
Scallops, . • . . 
Slanting. .... 
Spinning Stitch and Wheels 
Square . . . • , 
Square Fonndations , 

S Stitch 

Star or Radii .... 

Stirrup 

Trellis and Wheels Combination 
Tufted Buttonhole • 
Wire Frame « • . . 



18, 



FAOH 
127 
127 



23 

22 
26 
31 
23 
23 
31 
19 
19 
20 
19 
30 
19 
22 
22,30 
27 
27 
23 
23 
23 
30 
23 
30 
31 



22 
27 
22,31 
22 
31 
31 
19 
23 
30 
22 



POONAH PAINTING. 

Diagram of Coloured Design for Damask Rose 

Directions, General 

Directions for Painting on Silks and Satins of 

Light Shades 
Formulas 
Mixing Colours • 
Painting on Paper 
Painting on Velvet 
Preparations for Painting on Wood 
Varnish ...... 



TATTING 
Design for Sqnare Dollys, &o. 
Edging with Beads 
Edging with Two Threads 
Insertion^ 

Insertion and Trimming 
Introduction . , . 
Josephine Knot • • 
Picot . , , • 
Ring and Pin . , 
Rosette • . . • 
Rosette in Progress . 
Shuttle .... 
Square # , . . 
Stitches .... 
Tatting with Two Shuttles 
To Wash 
Work Basket, Ornamented 



82 
82 

88 
83 
85 
88 
86 
88 
8^ 



103 
102 
103 
102 
103 

99 
102 
102 

99 
103 
102 

09 
103 

99 
102 
104 

da 



COLOURED SUPPLEMENT 
TO THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL. 

COMPLETE GUIDE 
TO THE WORK TABLE. 




ALPINE PRIMULA IN EMBROIDERY, 





HE 



COMPLETE mmi T§ TIE W§K-TigiE, 

EMBROIDERY. 

^miT^ ;■ eoixonijED •:• iiiLiiST^/iTioi}.4> 




ALSO FULL DIRECTIONS FOR 



"SILK CREWEL, AND ARRASENE WORK, 



WITH 



B-IA^EiMS ^f SflT^SSS. 



^P^EB?I(5E.<- 



|j^|AYING received so many compliments from our subscribers on the usefulness of the Supple- 
st ments entitled ^^THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE" and so many 
ll earnestly-expressed wishes that these Supplements, when completed, should be issued in a 
Volume, bound, we have complied with these requests, knowing that the little book will at all 
times be serviceable to ladies who desire to understand the elementary parts of Fancy Work. 

In addition to plain Directions and perfect Illustrations of the various Stitches and Instructions 
in different kinds of Fancy Work, " THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE W^ORK-TABLE" con- 
tains an immense number of useful and elegant Designs for a great variety of articles which are not 
affected by changes of fashion. 

"THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE'* will be especially useful to readers 
©f The Yotjng Ladies* Journal, as we shall frequently refer to it. In order to save repetition, 
ai>4 thereby utilize spac^. 'm our pages, this Edition has been carefully revised. 

LondoUf JamMfy^ iSB8, 



»THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNALS- 
COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



--«Hi>»tc> 



EMBROIDERY. 



INTRODUCTION. 

It is about seven ye.ars since embroidery once again 
became the favourite work of English ladies; for 
many years previous to that time, only the professional 
embroiderers dared to venture upon work, which was 
by most ladies regarded as extremely difficult. 

We believe embroidery is indebted for its revival to 
the specimens of old work which have been exhibited 
from time to time at the South Kensington Museum ; 
and for its present popularity to the favour it lias 
found with Royalty and Nobility, who have done so 
much in establishing the Royal School of Art Needle- 
work, at South Kensington, where embroidery is to 
be seen in perfection. 

The Supplement of Crewel-work which we issued in 
1877 did very much in popularizing this elegant and 
artistic needlework ; crewel led the way to the mani- 
pulation of silk and other more costly materials, and 
at the present time we find embroidery a subject of 
very general interest to our subscribers. 

Embroidery is not at all difficult ; and we cannot 
wonder at it being especially interesting work to all 
ladies possessing artistic taste, because, from the 
pliant character of the stitches, almost everything 
that can be painted can be imitated— flowers, fruit, 
birds, animals, and even landscapes — while the articles 
of dress and furniture which may be ornamented by 
its means are very numerous. 



CHOICE OF DESIGNS. 
Perhaps the first thing that should be borne in 
mind, is, that the choice of designs is an important 
feature ; they should be selected as well drawn, and 
as open, as possible ; crowded designs are not suited 
to the production of artistic embroidery. 

MATERIALS USED FOR FOUNDATIONS. 

The foundations generally employed for embroidery 
are unbleached linen of a good even make— that known 
as Bolton sheeting is a material much in use for 
doilys, toilet-sets, nightdress-sachets, chair-backs, and 
one-yard square table-covers. Bolton sheeting being, 
inexpensive, we recommend its use to beginners. 
There are other materials which are employed for 
foundations for various purposes, such as Roman satin, 
twilled silk, broccatine, honeycomb tapestry, oat-cake 
cloth, platted linen, serge, diagonal cloth, felt of 
various colours, cricketing flannel, Holland, nainsook 
muslin, satin, plush, and velvet. 

Very elaborate pieces of embroidery are better worked 
in a frame; but for all ordinary purposes, such as 
chair-backs, doilys, small table-covers, &c., it is best 
to work in the hand. Some materials, such as thin 
satin, need lining before j^ou begin to work— a thin, 
open kind of Irish linen is the best thing we know of 
for the purpose. .It should be tacked very evenly to 
the foundation at the edges, and a stitch here and 
there may be put in and drawn out before you work ' 
\¥here the tacking stitch is. 



TRACING. 

The following method of tracing is the siir.plest am' 
easiest we can give : — Place tracing-paper over the 
design, and trace with a coloured pencil the outlines 
and veins of the design. Turn the tracing over, and 
trace over its back with a B.B. black lead pencil. Next 
place the tracing, the black side next the material ; 
fasten the material and tracing upon a drawing-board 
ordeal table with drawing-pins. Having stretched the 
material, and made it smooth, draw over the coloured 
outline with a sharp, short-pointed H.H.H. pencil, 
holding the pencil as upright as possible. This will 
transfer to the material (if white or light-coloured) a 
fine, firm line. The advantage in using the coloured 
pencil for the first tracing is this : that when you are 
making the final transfer with a black pencil, you can 
see exactly how you progress, so that no portion of 
the drawing will be found unfinished when the tracing- 
paper is removed. It may here be well to caution 
ladies in the purchase of drawing-pins to obtain only 
those with solid heads, because no danger is incurred 
by the thumb in pressing them down. Sometimes the 
steel of the commoner kinds of drawing-pins comes 
through the head and inflicts a wound. 

Another mode of transferring more rapidly than the 
former is intended for those who have learnt to draw. 
Make a tracing of the design with a fine r^encil. Lay it 
on the material, and pin down firmly. With a strong 
darning-needle .or stiletto prick the outline of tlHi 
tracing well through the paper. Then remove the 
tracing-paper, and, with the original design before 
you for your guidance, draw over the lines outlined 
on the material, the complete design. 

Another plan, which will also answer very well, is 
to place carbonic paper upon the material, place the 
design over it, and with an agate, or any other point, 
trace c>ver every part of the design. You must be 
careful that neither the material nor the design be 
shifted during the process of tracing. You can get 
the carbonic paper either in blue or red. The blue is 
useful for white or light-coloured materials ; the red 
answers best upon black or dark colours. 

Francis' patent transfer cloth is specially prepared 
for tracing on either light or dark coloured, materials. 
The light colour is sold at Is. 6d. per sheet, the dark 
at Is. This is very valuable where much tracing is 
required, as it can be used a great number of times, 
and is so very clean that there is no fear of soiling the 
foundation in its use. All these things are worth 
knowing where ladies design for themselves — where 
they desire to copy outlines of such designs as ave 
frequently produced in The Young Ladies' Journal or 
in other publications. Since embroidery has become 
popular, several manufacturers have produced patent 
transferring-papers which save ladies the trouble of 
tracing. Messrs. Briggs and Co.'s designs are trans- 
ferred to the material by placing them on it, and 
passing over them a hot iron. Poirson's patent 
transfer papers are first wetted on the back, and are 
then laid on the foundation, and the design is trans* 
f erred to it by slight pressure with a paper or palette 
knife. 



TiiE irou:xa ladies jouknal 




:ID. X.'—COBpINa- STITCH, 





KO 3 — RATSiD IL3»\i:.B 
W0RK£I> LENGTHWISE. 




NO. 3.— CORDI\G-STITeH:> 







ui-ox^^ I> OLILU>£ 


EMBROIDEU 


w'-^ ^:^w^'\ 




v\^% 


jj,.. 


vs^^^^i^u^r^^'H^^r^ 


* 


^P? 


Bl^i^^ 


L 





NO. 5.— RAISED FLOWEB 
1 WORKED CROSSWISE, 




NO. 6,— :&XOT-STITCH, 



NO. 7.— FUiT PETALS. 



NO, 8.— E^-OI-s■^IiCH, 



:ssg ^(^ i^;?^ 





2rO, lO.—MONOGRAM ? 

catsKoiPEBr. 



NO. X2,— MONOXJRAM; 
SMSROIDSB^X- 



Co5rPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 




^STD COVLAJL- 
STITCH* 






THE YODNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



For the reasoh that embroidery is extremely dura- 
ble, it is best to select materials of the best quality to 
embroider with. 

It is not advisable to wind crewel, or embroidery 
silk ; the skein should be cut twice, and either put 
into thread papers or drawn through stitched cases 
made for the purpose ; the latter are neat and durable, 
and keep the materials free from being soiled or dis- 
coloured by the effect of the atmosphere. 

SILK. 

Silks should be those of the best makers, and should 
not be chosen for their cheapness, but for their soft- 
ness and freedom from an admixture of cotton, as 
the brilliancy of good silk is so much longer retained 
than that of a common make. 

The silks mostly employed are embroidery silk, 
crewel embroidery silk, and fast-dyed embroidery 
silk. 



CREWEL. 
The word "Crewel," according to Johnson, comes 
from the Dutch word Xleicel, which he defines as yarn 
twisted and wound on a knot or ball. The crewel that 
was in use for ladies' embroidery at the beginning of 
this century was in tightly- twisted small skeins. The 
crewel at present in use is a loosely twisted yarn, or 
worsted, and is in much larger skeins than formerly. 
It is now sold in all shades and colours. To the soft 
blending of shades the beauty of the work is in great 
measure due. Crewel is sold in two sizes, fine and 
coarse. 

ARRASENE. 
Arrasene is a newly-invented material for embroi- 
dery, resembling in appearance fine chenille, but is 
flat instead of round. Arrasene is made in both silk 
and wool, in a great number of beautiful colours and 
shades. It produces very effective work, and wears 
extremely well; it is especially suited for working 
large flowers and foliage plants. Arrasene should be 
used in short lengths, as long needlefuls become im- 
poverished by being drawn through and through the 
foundation. A very mistaken idea exists with some 
persons respecting arrasene, which is, that it cannot 
be used for working through thick materials ; it is 
quite as easy to embroider velvet, plush, or felt with 
arrasene as with silk or crewel, and the work can be 
done in very much less time. 

GOLD AND SILVER THREAD. 
Gold and silver thread is a good deal used for out- 
lining embroidery of both silk, arrasene, and crewel. 
Ladies should be especially careful to purchase this 
material of the best quality, otherwise it so very soon 
becomes tarnished, that it is not worth working ; it 
should bo kept closely wrapped in tissue paper. 

/ 

COTTON A LA CROIX. 
There is no make of cotton that produces a better 
effect upon embroidery muslin, mushn, or Hnen than 
cotton a la croix. 

NEEDLES. 
For embroidery in silk, crewel, or cotton a la croix, 
Walker's Elliptic needles are the best we know of. For 
arrasene or thick wool embroidery chenille needles 
should be used. They resemble a Berlin needle in the 
are, but differ from it in having a sharp point. 



^J{lt§^$ «$^tr in '^tnhm^xtl. 



CORDING-STITCH. 

In cording-stitch begin with the stalk of your design, 
and work as shown in illustrations Nos. 1 and 2 
(page ^), working towards the right and left. Wlier- 
ever it is practicable work in curved lines. When 
you have reached the top of your work, turn it round, 
and work towards tlie bottom, then again upwards, 
so as always to work from you. 

If you begin with the central vein of a leaf, continue 
to work from the centre to the edge. Never work be- 
tween two lines of stitches, so as to fill up, as it were, 
between work, as this plan will entirely spoil the effect 
of the stitch. Keep the coloured design before you, 
and shade according to it. Two kinds of stitches are 
generally used in crewel embroidery. The principal is 
the cording-stitch, to which we have already called 
attention ; the other is the knot-stitch, sliown in illus- 
trations 6 and 8. The vase shown in No. 4, Outline 
Embroidery, is nearly all worked in cording-stitch, and 
therefore affords a good specimen of the effect whicli 
can be produced by this useful stitch. Wo may here 
observe that where the cording-stitch is practicable 
it is the best to use, especially where the articles are 
intended to be washed. 



KNOT-STITCH. 

To work the knot-stitch your needle and silk must 
be pulled through to the front of the work exactly 
where you desire the knot to be. Hold the silk down 
with the thumb of the left hand, and twist the needle 
twice or thrice, according to the size of the knot re- 
quired, through the part of the silk which is tightened 
by the left thumb, (see illustration No. 6). Continue 
to hold the silk with your left thumb, and turn the 
needle quite round towards the left with your right 
hand. Insert it the distance from the place it was 
brought up (shown by a small cross in No. 8). Con- 
tinue to hold the silk with the left thumb until you 
have drawn the knot to its proper degree of tightness. 
If you have followed exactly our instructions, vou 
will have a knot Hko the one shown in the designs 
Nos. 6 and 8. "^ 



SATIN-STITCH. 

In more elaborate embroidery designs the satin- 
stitches shown in Nos. 3 to 5 and 7 may be used. 
The mode of working these is so clearly shown that, 
there is no need of much description. Whei-e a rich 
raised effect is desired it can be produced by running 
between the outline more or less thickly (see Nos. 3- 
and 5). If a flat appearance is desired, work without 
running under (see No. 8). The embroidered crest 
shown on the outer leaf of Supplement comprises 
cording, long, satin, and dot stitches: 3atin-stitch 
is much used in working monograms or initial letters, 
also for working generally on embroidery muslin or 
linen ; if for white embroidery, there is no better 
cotton for the purpose than cotton a la croix. Examples 
of satin-stitch will be found in monograms Nos. IDs 
and 12. ; 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



"1 



DOT-STITCH. 

Dot-stitch is a very short stitch, worked like back- 
stitch, with the exception that the needle is not put 
back to the place it is drawn out from, but an interval 
of about the length of the stitch remains unworked. 
Dot, cording, and satin stitches are shown in No. 10. 



FEATHER OR CORAL STITCH. 

The feather or coral stitch may sometimes be in- 
troduced with good effect for the light parts of 
embroidery. Make a knot, and draw the silk through 
the work. Hold the silk down with your thumb, 
keeping it towards the right hand. Put the needle in 
about the eighth of an inch from where the silk is 
drawn tlirough, take a stitch slanting downwards 
towards the left about the eighth of an inch in length, 
and draw the silk up. For the next stitch your thread 
must be turned completely round towards the left, 
and the stitch must be taken slanting towards the 
right. These two stitches are repeat^ alternately. 
(See centre of illustration No. 19). The feather-stitch 
is shown in this design, on a groundwork of stitches, 
aad running between two lines of chain-stitch. 



CHAIN-STITCH. 

For chain-stitch, make a knot, draw the silk through 
the material,' hold the silk down with the thumb, work 
a short stitch in a straight line, and draw it up. For 
the next stitch, continue to hold the silk down as 
described for the first stitch, put the needle through 
the lower part of the last stitch, make a stitch of the 
same length, and draw through. (See illustrations 
Nos. 17, 19, and 22). No. 17 shows a finished outline of 
chain-sfeitch. Nos. 19 and 22 show chain-stitch in the 
process of working. 



HERRINGBOI^ E-STITCH. 

This stitch comes effectively into some kinds of 
IBmbroidery ; when worked, it resembles the letter X 
placed in continuous lines. The great point is to work 
in even parallel lines. Put the needle in from right 
jto left at the bottom line, take up a few threads, and 
4raw out the needle quite straight with the place you 
put it in. Then at an angle work another stitch in 
the same way at the upper line, keeping your thread 
.over the little finger of the right hand. Herringbone- 
stitch is shown unequally worked in monogram No. 
12, which also shows cording and satin stitches. A 
good illustration of herringbone-stitch is shown in 
illustration No. 9, where it presents the even appear- 
ance which is generally needed. 



BEADING-STITCH. 

Illustration No. 11 shows the exact mode of work- 
ing the stitch, which is used sometimes where very 
light sprays are introduce4 into a desigQ, 



ITALIAN-STITCH. 
This work is now pretty well known as Holbein em- 
broidery, for the reason that Holbein introduced it in 
some of his paintings. Illustration No. 11 gives an 
exact though small specimen of the work, and showf 
more clearly than any description the mode of work 
ing ; this work is quite as neat on the wrong as o«*; 
the right side ; it is worked in back-stitch. In our 
illustration the lower part of the design is worked in 
herringbone-stitch. Italian-stitch is frequently intro- 
duced into cross-stitch designs. 



COUCHING-STITCH. 
Couching-stitch is frequently employed for covering 
joins ; it consists of a strand of cord, or of several 
strands of silk or wool, laid together and caught down 
by stitches of the same or some other material at equal 
distances. No. 18 shows an example of using cord; 
No. 20 is a couching-stitch with wool. This stitch is 
at present much used in embroidery on plush. 



GOLD AND SILVER THREAD EMBROIDERY. 
This is the most costly style of embroidery, and is 
more used for ecclesiastical or church work than any 
other; it is generally mixed with coloured embroi* 
dery-silk or filoselle. In some cases gold thread em- 
broidery is worked over slips of parchmant cut a trifle 
smaller than the outline of the design ; over this the 
gold thread is worked closely ; a specimen of this is 
shown in illustration No. 13. Illustration No. 15 shows 
a spray outlined with gold thread sewn down with 
fine silk stitches. The inner part of the designs are 
filled up with coloured embroidery-silk. Spangles are 
very frequently introduced into gold and silver em- 
broidery; they are sewn over with silk, or gold, oi* 
silver thread. 



TWISTED-STITCH. 
Broad arabesque designs are sometimes filled ii? 
with this stitch. Silk or wool of one colour is held 
down and worked through with a second colour (see 
illustration No. 16). This design would be outlined 
with a couching-stitch. 



INTERLACED GROUND. 
No. 18 shows an effect produced by couching and 
ground; the work has the appearance of applique 
when finished. The design is traced on the material, 
a ground is worked to the outline; filoselle is the 
material mostly employed for this grounding. The 
stitch resembles cording-stitch, but is worked straight. 
In working, the needle is put through the middle <of 
the silk (see illustration No. 18) ; the cord-couching 
is put on after the ground is finished. 



COVERING JOINS OF FOUNDATIONS. 
It is now usual to combine materials in working 
embroidery, and in some cases ornamental stitchei? 
are employed for the purpose. We give a very pretty 
joining in illustration No. 22 ; it is worked partly in 
silk and partly in arrasene. The lower edge, which 
is silk, is worked with three long-stitches into a point 
The arrasene upper edge is worked with two stitches i 
a line of gold cord is laid alon^ the centre of t±ie twc 
materials, and is sewn down at intervals with arrasen© 



THE YOUNa LADIES' JOURNAL 



APPLIQUE EMBROIDERY. 

Appliqu6 embroidery is very fashionable at present. 
The foundation for it is usually plush or velvet ; and 
satin is more often the material applied. Arabesque 
designs are mostly used for applique work. Unless 
the foundation is very firm it will require lining, and 
this is effected by pasting linen at the back, taking 
care not to wet the material too much. The design to 
be applied must be traced, then cut with scissors and 
pasted to the foundation, which should also be traced 
roughly for the different parts to be fitted to. When 
thus applied it must be allowed to dry. The founda- 
tion is best put into a frame, or it must be held down 
very firmly by weights in order to keep it quite flat 
whilst the applique is drying. 

The various stitches described for embroidery gene- 
rally are used on most applique designs ; the edges of 
the applique are sometimes buttonholed, sometimes 
worked in chain, and sometimes in cording stitch ; 
and in some cases gold or silk cord is sewn over the 
edges. Illustration No. 14- gives an example of velvet 
applique on a silk foundation with the edge worked 
over in chain-stitch. Illustration No. 18 shows a mode 
of edging applique with couching in cord. Illustra- 
tion No. 21 is a picot edge for applique worked with 
fine gold or silver thread ; it will be quite easy to 
tAvist the gold or silver thread into the picots as the 
stiffness will allow them to retain their form. Two 
strands of cord are sewn down with a third strand of 
the same. Illustration No. 22 shows another mode 
which is very rich ; it is a line of rich cord couched 
over a double line of chain-stitches. 



PASTE FOR APPLIQUE EMBROIDERY, 
To three tablespoonfuls of flour allow half a tea- 
spoonful of powdered resin, mix smoothly with half a 
pint of cold water, let it boil five minutes, stirring all 
the time ; if the paste is to be kept some time, it will 
be found advisable to add a teaspoonful of essence of 
cloves into it whilst it is boiling 



ARRASENE EMBROIDERY. 

We strongly recommend arrasene to the attention 
of our subscribers for its extreme beauty, as well as 
for its novelty and durability. We give a few hints 
on the working of arrasene, which we trust will bo 
useful to our readers. The design must first be 
traced upon the material to be worked upon in the 
same way as for crewel or silk embroidery. 

Arrasene may be worked on plush, velvet, cloth, 
Utrecht velvet, satin, Roman satin, Java canvas, or 
crash. If on furniture-satin, it wiU not be necessary to 
line it ; it thin satin be used, a lining of muslin, thin 
linen, or some material of the kind will be needed. Arra- 
sene may be worked either in the hand or in a frame. 
If the piece of work be large, or the foundation be satin, 
a frame is convenient to prevent the work from 
puckering or shrinking, but there is no fear of that 
with a small piece of work. The needle used for 
working should be what is called a chenille needle ; it 
is like a Berlin-wool needle, with one exception— it 
has a sharp point; it must have a very large eye. 
Wool and silk arrasene are used separately or together ; 
the silk relieves and brightens the wool very much 
in the same way as filoselle is used to improve Bei'lin- 
^'/Qol work. 

The stitcii Txiostly employed i^ arrasene is the ^ame 
^ cotdln^-^titc^, but it IS worked r^jJaer hx^s^ei-. ' Care 



must be taken not to twist the arrasene in working : 
as before mentioned, it is not well to use a very long 
needleful of arrasene, as it becomes somewhat im- 
poverished in working when used too long. The arra- 
sene requires to be drawn steadily through the material, 
so as to prevent roughening it too much. When the 
work is finished, a soft brush may be used to raise 
the pile and equalize the surface. Where a stitch of 
the arrasene does not quite fall in its place with other 
stitches, put the needle under it, and give it one twist, 
which will sometimes greatly improve the work. Arra- 
sene is shown in the upper edge of illustration No. 22. 



MODE OF STRETCHING FINISHED EMBROIDERY. 

When the work is finished it will be found that it 
has become much drawn and puckered. To remedy 
this a clean cloth must be wetted in clear cold water, 
wring it out tightly, and place it on a deal board or 
table, then put the work upon it face upwards. With 
drawing or other pins pin out the work and strain it 
as much as possible ; leave it for twelve hours in dry 
weather, and longer in damp weather ; if it has been 
properly stretched it will be perfectly smooth when 
taken off the board. If it has not been tightly strained 
repeat the process, again wetting the cloth. 



WASHING CREWEL-WORK, 

We have previously said that crewels of the best 
quality should be purchased. The shades are better, 
and they wash well, if the following simple plan be 
observed : — Make a lather of the best primrose soap or 
curd soap, and rub the article to be washed in it. Do 
not put a particle of soap on the work. I^nse in clean 
warm water, and squeeze ; do not wring, ^hake well, 
and stretch till dry, as directed for new work. Another 
mode is to tie a handful of bran in a muslin bag, and 
make with it a lather in warm water ; wash the crewel 
in this lather without using soup. 

Crewel embroidery worked with the brightest co- 
lours may be safely washed if previously immersed in 
a solution made by dissolving a pennyworth of sugar 
of lead in a quart of hot water ; di7, then wash in the 
usual way, using as little soap as possible. 



|)^$5ripttxtit rtf ^tdttttr^ f ttppt^^tth 



DESIGN IN EMBROIDERY FOR ALPINE PRIMULA. 

This design has been printed from the worked flower 
to give an exact idea of the proper length and place of 
stitches, also the mode of shading silk or crewel em- 
broidery ; it will be found a good guide for beginners, 
as few colours are needed to produce the proper 
effect. 



SPECIMENS OF CREWEL-WORK. 

A specimen of crewel or arrasene work can t^ 
sent from tl^e London Pi^blisliing O&c^ of th^s 
Jouftiul on recait>t of Sd. 



OMfLITE mim Jn tie Wail-TABiE. 



CROCHET, 




NO. 2.— INSERTION : CROCHET AND FANCF GIMP. 



rULL DIRECTIONS FOK 



NO. 3.— edging: 
CROCHET AlfD 
HAIKPIN-WORK. 



PLAIN AND FANCY CROCHET, TRICOT, 



HAIRPIN-WORK, ETC. 



3D 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



DESCRIPTION CJF ILLUSTRATIONS ON PAGE 9. 



ns a mOQ Q QQ QO Orri^ 



No. 1.— EDGING : CROCHET AND MIGNARDISE. 

1st Row : To form the scallops work one single into 
each of seven successive picots, pass the cotton at the 
back of mignardise, and work one single into each of 
seven successive picots on the other side. Repeat. 

2nd Row . ,jne single into the first picot worked into 
of the fir."i: row, one chain, one half treble into centre 
of scallop, one chain, one single into last stitch of scal- 
lop, pass the cotton ^t the back of mignardise ; work 
the samo in next scallop. 

3rd Row : One double treble into two picots together 
at right-hand side of scallop, two chain, one single into 
each of three next successive picots, two chain, one 
double trebb into tw^ next picots together ; keep the 
top loop of double treble on the hook. Repeat from 
the beginning of- the ro^r, drawing the top loops of the 
two double trebles together. 

4th Row : One treble separated by one chain into 
each alternate stitch of last row. 

This edging is an example of working mignardise 
and crochet. 



No. 2.--INSERTI0N : CROCHET AND FANCY GIMP. 

Commence v/ith the crochet rosette, work fifteen 
chain, join round. 

1st Row : Twenty-four doubles under the chain. 

2nd Row : Oik double treble into a stitch, five chain, 
one doublo treble into the same stitch, pass over one 
stitch, and repeat from the beginning of the row eleven 
tiroes more. * 

3rd Row: * Three doubles under the chain, four 
chain ; take a length of cotton gimp, one single into 
the second picot, four chain, three doubles under same 
chain the last were worked into, repeat from * five 
times more, work alternately into the second and fifth 
picots on each of three patterns of gimp, then take 
another length of gimp, and work the same on three 



patterns (see design). Cross the lengths of gimp be» 
fore commencing the next pattern. 

For the sides, one triple treble into the second picot 
of a pattern of gimp, work off all but the last two 
loops, one double treble into the same picot, two double 
trebles into the fifth picot on the next pattern of gimp ; 
then work off the rest of the loops on the hook as for 
a treble, ten chain, two double trebles into the centre 
1 bar of gimp between two patterns (see design No. 2 
on first page), six chain, one single into second picot 
on next pattern, * two chain, one single into next picot, 
repeat from * twico more, six chain, two double trebles 
into the bar between two next patterns of gimp, ten 
chain. Repeat from beginning of row. 

2nd Row : One treble separated by one chain into 
each alternate stitch of last row. 

3rd Row : One treble under a stitch, one chain, pass 
over one stitch, one treble under each of two next 
stitches, one chain, pass over one stitch, and repeat. 

The other cido is worked in the same way. 

This is an example of crochet and fancy gimp. 

No. 3.— EDGING : CRuCHET AND HAIRPIN WORK. 

Make a«piece of hairpin-work the length required, 
(for illustration and description of hairpin- work, see 
No. 25). 

For the edge : — 

1st Row: Work two doubles into three loops of 
hairpin- work together, three chain. Repeat from the 
beginning of the row. 

For the edge : — 

One double, three half trebles, and one double under 
each three chain of last row. 

For the heading : — 

1st Row : One double into three loops of hairpin- 
work together, three chain. Repeat. 

2nd Row : One treble separated by one chain into 
each alternate stitch of last row. 

This is an example of crochet and hairpin work. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



U 



CROCHET, 



INTRODDOi'ION. 

The application of crochet for useful and orna- 
mental purposes is so varied, that it is work 
which will remain popular, in one form or other, 
for years to come. Nevertheless, there is a diffi- 
culty sometimes experienced by the uninitiated in 
finding elementary instructions in crochet and 
tricot. This fact has come to our knowledge 
through correspondents having written to us from 
time to time, asking us to give directions for the 
various stitches. It is almost impossible to make ele- 
mentary instructions really useful without illustrating 
them, as we have done in the clearest possible man- 
ner in the succeeding pages. We trust that this 
Crochet Supplement will be as much appreciated as 
our Embroidery Supplement has been. 

Crochet of a very tine quality was worked by nuns 
on the Continent in the sixteenth century, but was 
not popular work in England until about 1840, when 
for quite twenty years it was very fashionable ; and 
exceedingly beautiful designs— copies of Kose point 
and Venetian lace were much worked. This more ela- 
borate kind of crochet comes to England still in large 
quantities as Irish point. The work is veiy inexpen- 
sive as to cost of material ; a handsome collar may be 
made for sixpence, but skill and patience is needed 
to work well. 



MATERIALS. 

Good crochet-hooks are of tho utmost importance in 
forming nice even work. They should be very smooth 
and selected of a size suited to the material to be 
worked. Crochet and tricot hooks are made of steel 
for fine work, and of ivory, bone, wood, and vulcanite 
for coarse work. They should be measured like a 
knitting-pin, by inserting them in the round hole of 
a gauge. For measuring hooks we use Walker's bell 
gauge. 

We take the opportunity of cautioning ladies never 
by any chance to put an unprotected steel crochet- 
hook into their pockets ; accidents have been the fre- 
quent result of so doing. It should be remembered 
that it is scarcely possible to remove a steel hook from 
the flesh without the aid of a surgeon. 

Crochet cotton is much better to use than knitting 
cotton for crochet, as the twist being tighter adds 
much to the good appearance of the work. Wools of 
all descriptions, purse-silk, braid, chenille, arrasene, 
and gold and silver threads may all be worked into 
different crochet articles. Fancy and plain braids, 
gimp and mignardise, are also frequently introduced 
into crochet designs. 

DIRECTIONS FOR HOLDING THE HOOK 
AND MATERIAL. 
When working crochet, the hook should be held lightly 
III the r'^ht hand between the thumb and t^;o first 



fingers; it should be kept in a horizontal position. 
The work is held in the left hand ; the last worked 
stitches should be between the thumb and forefinger ; 
/the thread passes over the first and second finger, 
under the third, and over the little finger. A chain 
foundation is required for all the stitches forming 
crochet patterns. 



No. 1.— CHAIN-STITCH. 
Make a slip-knot, and pass it over the hook, put the 
thread over the hook, by a slight movement of the 
hands, draw the thread that is over the hook through 
the slip-loop. 

No. 2.— DOUBLE FOUNDATION. 
Work a chain as described for No. 1, break off the 
thread when the chain is the length required, make a 
slip-loop, pass it over the hook, insert the hook into 
the first chain-stitch, taking up both loops, draw 
through the stitch worked into and the loop on the 
hook together. 



No. 3.— DOUBLE FOUNDATION, WORKED WITH 
ONE THREAD. 
Make a slip-loop, pass it over the hook, one chain, 
draw up a loop through the slip-loop, draw through 
both loops on the hook, * draw up a loop thaough the 
left loop, draw through both loops together. Repeat 
from *. 

No. 4.— DOUBLE FOUNDATION, WORKED WITH 
TWO THREADS. 
Make a slip-knot and pass it over the hook, make 
another slip-knot on a second length of thread, pass it 
over the hook, draw through both loops with the left- 
hand thread; work one chain with the right-hand 
thread, and one with the left alternately ; the alter- 
nate threads must be tightened after each stitch. This 
makes a pretty guard, if worked with coarse purse 
silk. 



No. 5.— SINGLE CROCHET. 
Put the hook through the first stitch, draw the 
thread through the stitch worked into and the loop on 
the hook together. 



No. 6.— DOUBLE CROCHET. 
Put the hook through a stitch of foundation, twist 
the thread over the hook, draw through the founda- 
tion, then draw through both loops on the hook 
together. 



No. 7.— HALF TREBLE. 
Turn the thread over the hook, pass the hook 
through a stitch of foundation, draw through, turn 
the thread again over the hook, and draw through aU 
three loops on the book together. 



12 



THE YOUNGr LADIES* JOURNAL 




NO. 8.— TEEBLE. 



xNO. 9.— DOUBLE TREBLE. 



NO. 12.— TRICOT. 




0. ic^poTOT^s Ar^v rtmujii 



If*-* V>r^^<^9 TBEBi:?. 



KO. 13.— BASKET P^TTE^K : Tv^t^OI'- 



COMPLETE aUIDK TO THE >TUxiK-TABLi£ 




>0, 14.— TRICOT AND TREBLK. 




h'O. 17.— CAKD FOH BALLS 




NO. 18.— WOOL WOUND OVER 
CARD FOR BAXLS. 



NO. 15.— TXJTT-STITCH. 




:<Q. 1 6. --MUSCOVITE TRIC03'. 




NO, I9.--TIED BALL, 



SO. 20.— SHELL P/ITTERN. 




KO. 21— FRI>'GE rORK. 



»t f « \t » ♦ » « 





^Q. 23,— I>ETAJtL 07 FRINas. 



VO, 33.— -rBINGB: FORE-WORK AND CROCHET, 



1^ 



THE YOUNG -LADIES' JOURNAL 



No. 8.— TREBLE. 
Put the thread once over the hook, insert the hook 
into the foundation, draw a loop through the 
foundation ; you will then have three loops on the 
hook, turn the thread again over the hook, draw 
through two loops, turn, the thread again over the 
hook, and draw through the two next loops together. 

]^o. 9.— DOUBLE TREBLE. 
Put the thread twice over the hook, insert the hook 
into the foundation, turn the thread over the hook, 
draw through the foundation, turn the thread over 
the hook, draw through two loops, turn the thread 
over the hook a second time, and draw through two 
loops, turn the thread a third time over the hook, and 
draw through the two last loops on the hook. 

jS"o. 10.— DOUBLE AND TREBLE. 

The 1st and 2nd Rows are worked in double-stitches 
throughout. 

3rd Row : Work five doubles, then work two trebles 
into the first row (see arrow). Repeat throughout the 
row. 

4th and 5th Rows r Like first and second rows. 

6th Row : Like third row, but work the two treble 
stitches into the third row to commence with ; this 
alternates the pattern. Repeat from first row. 



No. 11.— CROSS TREBLE. 
Turn the thread twice round the hook, insert the 
hook into a stitch, turn the thread over the hook, draw 
through the stitch, turn the thread over the hook, 
draw through two loops together, turn ^he thread over 
the hook, pass over two stitches, insert the hook into 
the next stitch, draw through, pass the thread over 
the hook, draw through two loops, pass the thread 
over the hook, draw through two loops, pass the thread 
over the hook, draw through all the loops on the hook 
together, two chain, one treble into centre of cross 
treble. Repeat from the beginning. 

No. 12.— TRICOT. 

Make a foundation chain the length required, 
allowing one chain over for the forward row. In 
tricot a row consists of working up and off the loops. 

Insert the hook. into the second stitch of chain, draw 
up a loop, keep it on the hook, and continue to draw 
up a loop through each of the following chain-stitches. 
In working off put the thread over the hook, draw 
through the last loop, * put the thread again over the 
hook, and draw through two loops on the hook 
together. Repeat from * to the end of the row. 

In the second and following forward rows work up 
the loops through the front perpendicular loop of each 
stitch of previous row, commencing with the second 
perpendicular loop. The last loop of a tricot row 
appears to lie somewhat at the back of the work. 
Care must be taken to work it, or a straight edge 
cannot be obtained. 



No. 13.— BASKET-PATTERN TRICOT. 

Make a chain the length required. 

1st Row : Work up a loop through the first stitch, 
work one chain through the loop. Repeat until all 
the loops are worked up. In working off, work 
through a loop, slip each alternate loop off the hook, 
work three chain between the loops worked through. 

2nd Row : Pass the slipped-off loop at the back of 
the chain, draw up a loop through it, then work one 
chain through the loop, draw up a loop through the 
next loop, and under the chain, work one chain 
through the loop. Repeat from the beginning of the 
row until all the loops are worked up ; the loops are 
Worked off as described for the first row. 



The second row is repeated throughout. ^t<, 
Observe. — The working up and off is reckoned in 
tricot as oif' ,?ow. 



iVo. 14.— TRICOT AND TREBLE. 

1st and 2nd Rows : Plain tricot (see No. 12). 

3rd Row : Work up one loop, * work one treble into 
the first row, work up four loops. Repeat from * to 
the end of the row ; work off in the usual way. 

4-th Row: Plain tricot. 

5th Row : Work up three loops, * one treble into 
the third row, work up four loops. Repeat from * to 
the end of row ; work off in the usual way. 

6th Row : Plain tricot. Repeat from the third row. 



No. 15.— TUFT-STITCH CROCHET. 

1st Row : One double into each stitch. 

2nd Row : One double into a stitch, draw up a loop 
through the next stitch, draw the right side of the 
loop with the finger and thumb of left hand, over the 
left side of loop (see arrow), insert the hook into tlie 
loop thus held by the finger, draw up a loop, turn the 
thread over the hook, draw up another loop through 
the same loop, draw through five loops on the hook 
together, work up a loop through the last stitch worked 
into, draw through both loops on the hook together. 

These two rows are repeated throughout, arranging 
the tuft-stitches so that they lie between each other in 
alternate rows ; this is done by commencing one pat- 
tern row with the double, and the other with a tuft- 
stitch. 

No. 16.— MUSCOVITE TRICOT. 

1st Row : Work up the loops as for ordinary tricot, 
work off the first loop, * three chain, work oft' the two 
next loops. -Repeat from * to the end of row. 

2nd Row : Work up the loops like last row, * three 
chain, work off two loops. Repeat from * to the end 
of row. These two rows are repeated alternately. 



Nos. 17 TO 19.— WOOL BALL. 

In making wool balls the size of the circles of card 
must be regulated by the size you wish the ball to be ; 
two circles of card must be cut to exactly the same 
size, with a hole in the centre, as shown in No. 17. 
With a needle and wool sew evenly over both cards, 
as shown in No. 18 ; continue to sew over and over 
until the centre hole is quite filled; cut the wool 
between the cards with a sharp penknife or scissors, 
and tie the wool tightly in the centre between the 
cards (see No. 19), remove the cards, rub the ball in 
the hand, steam it over boiling water, and trim the 
edges with a pair of scissors. 

A ball made over a circle of card measuring four 
inches in diameter, with a hole in the centre one and a 
half inch in diameter, and a variety of colours of 
Berlin wool tied strongly between the discs with fine 
twine, makes a capital ball for children to play with in 
the house. 

No. 20.— SHELL-PATTERN CROCHET. 

Make a chain the length required, draw up a loop 
through each of five successive stitches, draw through 
all the loops on the hook, close the cluster with one 
chain, * draw up a loop under the last chain, another 
through the back perpendicular loop of last stitch, 
and one through each of two next stitches, draw 
through all the loops on the hook together, close with 
one chain. Repeat from * to the required size. 

For the edge : — 

1st Row : One double into every stitch, 

2nd Row : One double into a stitch, * pass over two 
stitches, eight trebles under next stitch. Repeat 
from *. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



15 



3rd Row : One double into each stitch of last row. 
A ball as described in Nos. 17 to 19 is tied between 
each scallop. 



Nos. 21 TO 23.- 



-FRINGE : FORK-WORK AND 
CROCHET. 



The fork-work for this fringe is made on a fork, as 
will be seen in Illustrations Nos. 21 and 23. No diffi- 
culty will be found in working it if attention be paid 
to these illustrations. Make a loop of Andalusian 
wool, pass it over the narrow side of the fork, turn 
the fork, and you will have a loop over the wide side ; 
draw up a loop through the first loop on the hook (see 
Illustration No. 21), turn the fork, draw up a loop 
through the wide loop (see No. 23), draw through both 
loops together, turn the fork, draw up a loop through 
the narrow loop, draw through both loops on the hook 
together. Repeat from * for the length required. 

For the crochet heading, which is worked with a 
lighter colour of wool : 

1st Row : One double into two of the wide loops of 
fork-work together, turning the loops as shown in 
Illustration No. 22, two chain. Repeat. 

2nd Row : One double under two chain, three chain. 
Repeat. 

For the edge: 'Work one double into two of the small 
loops together (see design), five chain, repeat ; strands 
of wool about one and a half inch deep are knotted 
into the loop of five chain to form tassels ; a little ball 
of the lightest shade of wool is sewn under the head- 
ing at equal distances. The ball is made according to 
directions in Nos. 17 to 19. 



. No. 2*.— TRIMMING : CROCHET AND WAVED 
BRAID. 

For the edge : — 

1st Row : One treble into the right-hand side of a 
scallop of braid, two chain, one treble into the top of 
same scallop, three chain, one treble into braid (see 
design), two chain, one treble into braid. Repeat from 
the beginning of the row. 

2nd Row : One treble into second treble of last row, 
three chain, one treble into first of three chain, three 
chain, one treble into the next stitch, three chain, one 
treble into tlie same stitch, three chain, one treble into 
the next stitch, three chain, one treble into top of 
treble of last row, one double into the first treble 
worked into top of next scallop of braid, nine chain, 
one double into next treble. Repeat from the begin- 
ning of the row. 

3rd Row: One double under first three chain of 
second row, * five chain, one treble into the first, 
one double under next chain; repeat from * three 
Umes more, four chain, one double into fifth of nine 
.^hain, four chain. Repeat from the beginning of the 
row. 

For the heading :— 

1st Row : Like first row of edge. 

2nd Row : One treble under first three chain of last 
row, five chain, one double under next chain, five 
f'hain, one treble under next chain. Repeat from the 
beginning of the row. 

3rd Row : One double under five chain of last row, 
five chain. Repeat. 

The stitches in the braid are worked with coloured 
cotton. 

Example of crochet and waved braid. 



No. 25.-^HAIRPIN-WORK. 
Make a slip lo^, pass it over one side of tb^ Vn, 



turn the pin round, and you will have a loop on each 
side. Draw up a loop through the first loop, one 
chain, *, take out the hook, turn the pin, and insert 
the hook in the loop from which it was withdrawn ; 
one double under the left-hand loop. Repeat from "* 
for the length required. 



No. 26.— TRIMMING : CROCHET AND HONITON 
BRAID. 

For the heading : — 

1st Row : One double treble into a bar between two 
patterns of braid, five chain, one treble into third hole 
at the edge of the braid, five chain, pass over five 
holes, one half treble into the next, five chain, pass 
over four holes, one double into the next, five chain, 
pass over four holes, one ?ialf treble into the next, 
five chain, pass over five holes, one treble into the 
next, five chain. Repeat from the beginning of row. 

2nd Row : One treble into centre of first chain, * 
five chain, one half treble into centre of next tivr 
chain, repeat from * three times more, five chain, one 
treble into centre of next five chain, five chain. Re* 
peat from the beginning of the row. 

3rd Row : One half treble into centre of five chain 
of last row, three chain. Repeat. 

4-th Row : One treble separated by one chain into 
each alternate stitch of last row. 

For the edge : One treble into the bar between two 
patterns of braid, two chain, one treble into the second 
hole on the edge of next pattern of braid, three chain, 
pass over two holes, one treble into the next hole * 
three chain, one single into first, repeat from * twice 
more, one treble into top of last treble, pass over two 
holes, one treble into the next, three chain, pass over 
two holes, one treble into the next, repeat from first 
* twice more, two chain. Repeat from the beginning 
of the row. 

Example of crochet and Honiton braid. 



No. 27. — TRIMMING: CROCHET AND HAIRPIN 
WORK. 

Make a piece of hairpin-work the length required, 
according to directions given for No. 25. 

For the edge of trimming : One single into a loop 
of hairpin-work, three chain, one single into the first, 
one chain, one single into each of fifteen loops of hair- 
pin-work, three chain, one single into first picot, one 
chain, one single into second of three chain, one chain, 
* one double into a loop of hairpin-work, five chain, 
one double into the second, one chain, repeat from * 
six times more, then repeat from the beginning of the 
row. 

For the heading : — 

1st Row : One chain, one single, separated by one 
chain, into each of threa loops of hairpin- work in the 
depth of a scallop, one single into each of nine 
loops, one single separated by one chain into each 
of three next loops, one chain, one single into first 
chain, fasten the cotton off securely, and work the 
same in the depth of each scallop. 

2nd Row : One triple treble under the chain in the 
depth of scallop, three chain, one double treble 
through* the next two loops of hairpin-work toge- 
ther, throe chain, one treble through two next loops 
together, three chain, one treble through two next 
loops together, three chain, one double treble through 
two next loops together, three chain. Repeat from 
the beginning of the row. 

3rd Row: One treble separated by one chain into 
each alternate stitch of last row. 



16 



THE YOUjhU LADIES^ JOUiiNAL 






KO- 26.— cR0CH£i a:ni> 



NO. 24- 



-TRIMMI^'Q : CROCHET AliD 
WATED BRAID, 



NO. 3^— HAIRPIN WORK, 






NO. 37.— TRIMMINa : OROCHiT AND 
HAIRPIN WORK, 



NO- 38.— CROCHET DESIGN TOR 
SHAWLS, &C. 



NO- 29.— INSERTION : CROCHET, ROIL 
PIC0T9, AND MIQNABDISE. 



Ko- Z$,-^CROCHET DE3IGN FOR SHAWLS, &o, ^ No. 29 

1st Row ; Make a chain the length required, work 
one double into a stitch, five chain, pass over five 
stitches, and repeat, 

2nd Row : One double into the third of five chain 
of last row, five chain, one double into the third of 
next five chain, five double trebles into the double of 
last row between the loops of five chain, * one double 
into the third of next five chain, five chain. Repeat 
from * twice more ; then repeat from the beginning 
of the row. 

3rd Row : Like first row, 

4th Row: Like second, working the five double 
trebles into the chain between the two clusters of five 
double trebles of last row to form the pattern. 

The shawl may be made any size; it should be 
finished with a baU friri^e or a crochet lace abou^ 
thr«e inches deep. 



-mSERTION: CROCHET ROLL PICOXS, 
AND MIGNARDISE. 

ist Row : One double into two picots of mignardisa 
together, one chain, one double into the two next 
picots of Diignardise, one chain, four roll picots each 
separated by one chain into the two next picots 
together, one chain. Repeat. A roll picot is worked 
thus: Turn the cotton six times round the hook, 
insert the hook in the picot directed, draw up a 
loop, then draw through all the loops on the hook 
together. 

2nd Row : One treble separated by two chain under 
«ach of the one chain of last row over the roll picots, 
pass over the one chain between the two single, and 
repeat from the beginning of the row. 

3rd Row: One double under every stitch of lust 
sow^ The other side is worked the same way. 



ff 

mwfim mim m tie w§iK-TiBtt 

GUIPURE NETTING 




FULL DIRECTIONS FOR 



OTJII»XJItB KTBTTJClXrCt. 



46 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



DESCRIPTION OF JLLUSTRATION ON PAGE 17. 



SQUARE IN GUIPURE NETTING. 

This square is suitable for mixing with squares of 
another pattern in netting, or with squares of other 
material, for chair-backs, counterpanes, bassinette- 
Tuilts, &c. The square shows a number of the most 
elaborate stitches used in guipure netting. As these 



can only be learned by a study of the various stitches 
contained in these Supplements, the following hints 
will be all that are needful here :— The close flat-stitch 
embroidery worked upon the foundation covered with 
point de toile must be worked before the guipure in 
relief. Buttonhole-stitch completes the inner part ol 
the embroidery to make the edge appeap even. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



59 



GUIPURE NETTING, 



o>^<y 



INTRODUCTIOISr. 

This beautiful work has long been fashionable, and 
the varied purposes for which it can be used, its 
strength and durability, will continue to keep it 
fashionable for many years to come. These Supple- 
ments are a revise of those given some years since 
with this Journal, with additional directions and illus- 
trations for netting foundations ; and as our " Complete 
Guide to the Work-table" would not answer to its name 
were these omitted, we trust those ladies who have 
preserved the original issue will be pleased to see 
these in a form which will enable them to have them 
bound with the rest of the Supplements forming the 
** Complete Guide to the Work-table." 

Some of the uses to which the work can be put we 
will enumerate : — For household purposes : window- 
curtains, toilet-covers, toilet-cushions, antimacassars, 
and doilys. For articles of dress : parasol-covers, 
borders for handkerchiefs, caps, cravats, chemisettes, 
collars, cutfs. Insertions and lace of all widths for 
trimming underlinen ; and also, worked fine and in the 
more elaborate patterns, the lace c^n be used for trim- 
ming dresses of the richest material, such as velvet, 
satin, &c. 

Guipure Netting, Guipure d'Art, Filet Guipure, and 
Filet Erode are one and the same work, which has gone 
under a great many r^iore names since its introduction 
in the middle ages. The word " Guipure " comes from 
Guipe—a, kind of thick cord or thread, round which 
threads of gold, silver, and silk were twisted. 



IMPLEMENTS REQUIRED. 

^J"otting-needles and meshes of various sizes. These 
are made of steel for fine work, and of ivory, bone, and 
boxwood for larger and coarser work. The needles 
must be chosen of a suitable size for the mesh — not too 
large, or they will be difficult to get through the work ; 
and not toe small, or they will not hold enough of 
material without joining in frequent and perhaps 
inconvenient parts of tho foundation. A good stirrup 
is requisite if a lead cushion is not at hand, as it is 
very needful to keep the work firm. The lead cushions 
are shown Li the next page. We consider the lead 
(jushion has an advantage over the stirrup, as ladies 
need not stoop to their work. We will, however, give 
directions for a good stirrup for those who may prefer 



to use one. Linen thread is the material used for the 
foundation and for the stitches of guipure netting. A 
wire frame is also essential for working in. Care must 
be taken to have tho working material quite smooth 
and even, without knots. The proper thread and 
implements for guipure netting are suppUed ^^ 
Mr. Bedford. 



Nos. 1 AND 2.— TO FILHi A NETTING-NEEDLE. 

Tie a little loop over one of the forked ends, and 
wind the thread from end to end firmly on the needle ; 
when the needle is filled press the prongs togethet 
quite close. For very fine netting, which will noj 
admit the filled needle uhrough the holes, a long blu# 
darning-needle mist be used. 



No. 3.— NETTING-MESH. 

For fine work knitting-pins are generally used for 
meshes; but for larger work boxwood, bone, and 
ivory meshes ; both flat and round are sold at all 
fancy-work shops. 

To know the size mesh you should use, you must 
measure one side of a square, and select a mesh the 
exact size of it. 



STIRRUP. 

We have elsewhere stated that we consider the 
weighted cushion better than a stirrup for netting, as 
it prevents the need of stooping over the work, which 
is desirable ; but there are ladies who have so accus- 
tomed themselves to work with a stirrup, that they 
find It more convenient tlian the cushion, therefore we 
insert the following directions for a very good stirrup : 
Materials : A pair of wood or bone pins, No. 12 ; two 
small pieces of scarlet worsted braid. 

Cast on nine stitches, knit three rows plain. 

3rd Row : Knit two together throughout the row. 

4th Row: SHp the first stitch, * take up the loop 
between the stitches and knit it, knit a stitch, take up 
the loop, &c., from * to the end of the row. 

5th Row : Plain knitting. 

6th Row; Purl. 

The third, fourth, fifth, and sixth rows are to be 
repeated sixteen times ; work the plain rows as at 
the commencement. 



20 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



XO. I.— NETTING-NEEDLE. 



NO. 3.— MODE or THREADING NEEDLE, 




COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



21 




NO. 13. 
OBLONG NETTING. 




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IfO, I ^.— MODE OF FASTENING SQUARE 
INTO FRAME. 



«o. J3. 



r'^. 34. 



KC»- 2$, 



TO. a?- 



22 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



Cover a thin piece of wood three inches long with 
ribbon or silk of the colour of the braid, and line tlie 
braid with ribbon ; then sew the knitted ends to the 
ribbon covering the wood. To make a. foundation to 
net upon, net two or three stitches, and continue until 
you have a piece about a yard long, which you can 
net upon at any part suitable to the length of your 
work. The two ends of the foundation can then be 
fastened together to the top of the stirrup. 



Nos. 4 AND 5.— KNOT FOR JOINING. 

The knot represented in No. 4 needs no description, 
being simply the usual knot-loop with the two ends 
placed over each other, firmly drawn (see No. 5) and 
the ends cut aff . This knot is considered as secure as 
the complicated weaver's knot. 



Nos. 6 TO 8.— DIRECTIONS FOR NETTING. 

The foundation : Netting, — ^is commenced in various 
WAys. We recommend a piece of thread tied in a 
knot and fastened to a heavy cushion, as shown in 
Nos. 6 to 8, which forms a foundation for the first 
row. When the work is finished the thread is taken 
out. 

Take the thread-loop, fasten it to the cushion, tie 
the working-thread to the loop, take the filled needle 
hi the right hand and the mesh in the left; hold the 
latter horizontally between the thumb and forefinger, 
as shown in No. 6 ; lay the working-thread over the 
mesh downwards round the middle finger of the left 
liand, and then between the mesh and the forefinger, 
a little towards the left, where the left thumb encloses 
the thread, and by that means the loop laid round the 
mesh and finger is firmly held; then, according to 
No. 7, the needle is carried again towards the right, 
and pushed from underneath through the thread-loop 
lying round the left hand, forming a wide scallop with 
the thread ; then the needle is placed under the loop, 
and between the finger and mesh again through the 
foundation-stitch; keeping the left hand quite still, 
draw the needle quite through with the right hand ; 
then with the help of the left hand draw the knot 
quite tight, which completes the stitcli. This is done 
by taking the two middle fingers of the left hand out 
of the loop in taking up the needle with the right 
hand (see No. 8), and only directing the knot to the 
top of the mesh with the right hand, where all the 
knots are placed in a line close togetlier. The loop 
must be quickly and firmly drawn up with the little fin- 
ger of the left hand over which the thread is carried 
slowly — and by that means the stitches are evenly 
drawn up. It is better, if possible, to avoid making 
knots except at the outer-side stitches. Having once 
learnt the stitch, netting a ground presents no diffi- 
culty, as the stitches are all worked like those of the 
preceding row. When the whole line is finished the 
mesh is carefully taken out, the work turned round, 
and the mesh placed again to commence another row, 
which is worked in the same manner. Every stitch 
is commenced by pushing the needle into a stitch of 
tha preceding line. After refilling the needle ar knot 
must be tied, as shown in Nos. 4- and 5, and as before 
explained. 



Nos. 9 AND lO.—SQUARE NETTING. 

For netting in straight lines, begin always at one 
corner with two stitches, and work rows forwards and 



backwards. At the end of each row increase one 
stitch by making two stitches in one at the last stitch 
until the netting is the required width. No. 9 shows 
the commencement of the corner. The straight net- 
ting is either in squares, in an oblong form, in stripes, 
or in angular edges. 

For the square : Work as many holes in the length 
as in the breadth, increasing at the end of each row 
until there is one stik'h more than the finished square 
of holes must contain in one line. For the five holes 
of the square represented in No. 10, there must be six 
stitches ; then net one more row over this with the 
same number of stitches plain, and decrease in the 
same proportion, for which the two last stitches in 
each row must be netted together with one knot. 

Having by this means reduced the number again to 
two, unite the two last stitches with one knot in the 
middle. This is, however, no stitch ; simply carry the 
thread tight across to the joining knots. 



Nos. 11 AND 12.— SQUARE FOUNDATIONS OF 
TWO SIZES. 

These foundations are made by putting the thread 
once round for the small hole, and twice for the large 
hole of the square. No. 12 shows the style of work for 
which this foundation is required. 



No. 13.— OBLONG NETTING. 

For an oblong form or shape, as shown in No. 13, the 
increasing for the corner must be continued until 
there are two more stitches than are required for the 
breadth. This increasing must be continued without 
interruption on one side ; but on the opposite side it 
will be necessary always to decrease, so that the num* 
ber of stitches always remains the same. When the 
netting is the required length, the last corner must be 
worked by decreasing, as in the square. 



No. 14-.— SLANTING NETTING. 

For the slanting netting, commence with the re- 
quisite number of stitches for the length, and work 
rows forwards and backwards, as shown in No. 14-. 
These slanted stripes are used for collars, cuffs, cravat- 
ends, the separate gored parts of parasol-covers, &c., 
and in all cases where there is a deviation from the 
square, and where the foundation has to be cut.' In 
this case work the separate parts in the whole foun- 
dation rather close to each other, and cut them out of 
each other, and fasten the outlines with buttonhole- 
stitch. 



No. 15.— WIRE FRAME FOR GUIPURE NETTING. 

For the guipure work the netted foundation must, 
for small things, be placed in a strong wire frame sol- 
dered by a tinman. It must be large enough to stretch 
the work tightly. No. 15 shows the work nearly 
placed in the frame, and ready for the darning, which 
must be done carefully, and the threads evenly drawn. 
The wire frame is covered with a narrow sarsnet rib- 
bon, to which the work is sewn (see Illustration). 



CIRCULAR FOUNDATIONS. 

Circular foundations for doilys, circular cushions, 
mats, &c., are worked precisely tlie same as square 
netting. The circle must be formed by running a 
thread round to the size r6i»uired, and working over 
it with close buttonhole-stitch. Cut away the super- 
liuous Dart. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



23 



GENERAL REMARKS ON GUIPURE NETTING. 

The size of the cotton must be regulated by the 
holes of the netted ground, so as to blend nicely, and 
to be neither too close nor too loose. 

Generally the same size of thread may be taken as 
that used lor the foundation ; sometimes the pattern 
.requires different parts to be worked with different 
cotton — some fine, some coarse. A common darning 
or tapestry needle may be used. Very nice needles 
are made for the guipure work without points. The 
greatest care and accuracy are required in working 
all stitches in guipure; the thread must be always 
carried alternately over and under the netted threads ; 
the work must always be uninterrupted, and the thread 
fastened with a firm knot (see Nos. 4 and 5) ; and 
when it is impossible to pass immediately from a filled- 
up part to the next hole of the netted ground, the 
thread must be wound round the threads between 
that and the next hole, to bo worked as carefully as 
possible, s© as to be almost imperceptible. 



Nos. 16 TO 19.-P0INT DE REPRISE: DARNING- 
STITCH. 

rhis is a stitch which is employed in n«arly all 
patterns ; in some it is used alone, in others alternated 
with other stitches. The principle of the stitch is 
that of ordinary darning. 

The holes must be entirely filled up, placing the 
needle over one thread of the netting and under the 
other. The darning must be always in the same direc- 
tion. Any deviation in the pattern will be seen in the 
designs. We can give no description of these stitches 
which could be half as useful to the worker as a care- 
ful observation of the Diagrams Nos. 16 to 19. 



Xt-s. 20 TO 27 AND 32.— POINT DE TOILE: TRELLIS- 
WORK STITCH. 

In working this stitch great care must be taken to 
make the threads cross each other evenly. Different 
patterns may be worked in this stitch. The number 
of threads in a square must be regulated by the size 
of the square ; but there must be the same number of 
long and cross threads, and the numbers must be even 
— two, four, six, &c. ; an odd number of threads 
would spoil the work. All the designs show where the 
patterns commence and where the thread is wound 
round to continue the pattern. 



Nos. 28 TO 30, AND 33 to 35.— POINT D'ESPRIT : 
FESTOON-STITCH. 

Work rows forwards and backwards. In this pat- 
tern the alternate over and under stitches are 
Kot regularly observed, but by attention to the designs 
the deviations may be seen and the stitch easily 
worked. Sometimes the whole netted ground is 
covered with this stitch. 



No. 31.— ANGULAR EDGE FOR HANDKERCHIEF- 
BORDERS, &c. 

For an angular edge round pocket-handkerchiefs, 
covers, or the outer edge of a square with a thick 
middle piece of linen, &c. (see No. 31), it is ad- 
visable to place the design before one. The commen- 
cing corner mav bo easily known by the commencing 
thread which forms the upper point of the square. 
Beginning with a cornor, increase until there are two 
more than double the number of stitches that are re- 



quired for the breadth; therefore, for the edge of 
square No. 31, v^/hich is three stitches broad, eight 
stitches will be required. Then the part marked with 
dotted lines a 1 to a 2 must be worked with four 
stitches as far as the half of the corner ; and then turn- 
ing round with these stitches, continue the stripe, 
always increasing at the outer and decreasing at the 
inner edge. For the next corner at the inner edge, 
where until now the decreasing has been carried on^ 
following the row marked b 1 and b 2, after the decreas- 
ing, make one more stitch in the outermost edge stitch, 
and with this begin the increasing for the second side 
of the inner edge ; at the outer edge decrease in the 
same proportion. Having arrived at the third (the 
opposite one to the beginning) corner, cut off the 
thread at the last row at the inner edge (see cl to c2) 
according to the knot d 1, the thread is then put on 
again at the upper corner ; and according to the dotted 
line the first row of the side edge as far as d 2 is to be 
worked. The work is then continued as at the first 
half of the edge as far as the under corner, and on 
arriving there the thread is again cut off at the innei 
side. Put the thread on afresh at the knot marked g ; 
and, according to design, in the next row enclose thtt 
two inner stitches where the cut-off thread hangs, 
together with ono knot which forms thei comer, and 
must now be completed as for a square by decreasing 
at the end of each row. This is the last corner. 



No. 32. 



Is another example of point de toile. The direc- 
tions for working will be found under No. 20. 



Nos. 33 to 35. 

Further examples of point d'esprit or festoon-stitch. 
No. 34- shows a ground entirely covered with i^r^ 
stitch. For directions for working see No. 28. 



No. 36.-COMBINATION OF FESTOON AND 
TRELLIS STITCHES. 

This design gives the festoon (point d'esprit and 
trellis-stitch) joined together in one pattern. The 
latter is worked like common darning (point de ro- 
prise). 

No. 37.— COMBINATION OF TRELLIS - STITCH 
AND WHEELS. 

The trelHs-stitch has already been explained ; each 
row of trellis should be worked first, and afterwards 
the rows of wheels, spun-stitches, or spider-webs, as 
they are sometimes called. These stitches will be 
illustrated and described in our next Supplement-. 



Nos. 38 AND 39 —COMBINATION OF POINT DE 
REPRISE AND FESTOON. 

Each of these stitches have already been illustrated 
and explained. A combination of the two in fine 
work will make a pretty lace for trimming dresses, &c^ 
They will also make a very pretty doily or antima- 
cassar. If space will admit of our doing so in a 
future Supplement, we will give a design for these 
patterns in a proper size. Nos. 38 and 39 are shown 
in a greatly increased size to facilitate copying them. 
We need hardly say that the letters sho¥>' whera*** 
repeat tlie pattern ; a must meet a, and h v.j 



24 



THE YOLinG LADIES' JOUKiV.ii> 




NO. 38. 



tio. 39: 




MfflETE mmi T© TIE W8IK-TAB1E. 
GUIPURE NETTING 





FULL DIRECTIONS FOR 



CS-TTIX^TTX^S NSWIZycS-. 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



DESCRIPTION OF ILLUSTRATION ON PAGE 25. 



CRAVAT-END. 
This design is worked in some of the most elaborate 
stitches, tha directions for all of which will be found 
m these Supplements. The cravat-ends are finished 



by a pearl lace edge, which must be taoked on to the 
scallop of the cravat-end, and worked over with 
fine buttx)nhole-stitch. The finished ends may bo 
tacked iip a silk, net, or muslin cravat. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



27 



GUIPURE NETTING (CoTttin-uiedh 



Nos. 40 TO 46.~POINT CROISE : CROSS-STITCH. 

These stitches may be used as a whole or half 
pattern for separate squares, or an entire surface with 
either single or double threads ; the second thread is 
wound round the first. 

I*fo. 40 shows the mode of working a single thread 
crossed with a tied knot, which fastens all the threads 
at the crossing - point. This stitch resembles the 
common buttonhole-stitch, with this difference only, 
that the stitch is put in over instead of next to the 
starting- thread. 

The double- thread cross IVo. 41 requires the crossed 
thread to be once more tied in a separate hole of 
the square. For this double cross stretch the first 
loose thread for two bars of the cross lying near 
each other, then return as far as the middle only. 
Twist the thread round the latter, from here going 
always forwards and backwards to form the third 
and fourth bars ; then unite all the four bars by one 
stitch, and then twist the thread a few times round 
the first bar with a single thread and finish. After 
uniting the four cross-bars, it will be easy to make 
a little round pattern in the middle by drawing the 
thread round the cross. No. 42 shows clearly the 
mode of working half cross-stitch in rows. 

No. 43 shows a simple mode of making a cross- 
stitch with a thread. 

Work the first line of this cross-stitch by looping 
a simple thread cross-stitch round the thread of the 
netted foundation (as in working with a needle), 
then in the returning row, which completes the 
cross ; the knot must be always made in the middle. 

Twisted crosses may be made in the same manner 
by first stretching the single thread across, and then 
twisting the thread round in returning. This is 
clearly shown in No. 44, with little round patterns 
added at the cross points (spinning patterns), by- 
working round the tied knots in the twisted lines. 

The next variation of ^e cross-stitch, which also 



forms the ground of the spun-stitch, and which f^ 
the thread-cross interwoven with the 'point d^espn 
in No. 45, may also have a loose thread circle as ih 
No. 46. 

The interwoven cross of No. 41 may now be com- 
pleted by the point d'esprit^ for which stick always 
through the winding of the cross-bars, as shown in 
No. 45. 



Nos. 46 TO 49.— SPINNING-STITCH AND 
WHEELS. 

These patterns are generally worked over four holes 
of the netted square at the crossing-point of the cross- 
bars stretched across, and either unite the eight radii 
or meet over these in the centre of a netted hole with 
the thread wound round. This winding round is so 
contrived that the wound bars lie underneath the 
threads of the foundation, and the stitch is on thi? 
account called a web. No. 46 represents one of the^ 
patterns with a loose thread circle ; No. 47 a web witf 
a looped circle, and it forms the middle of the patterL 
represented in No. 50. A wheel differs from a web m 
the mode of weaving it ; in the former the threads, 
appear to be reversed. 

No. 49 represents a finished wheel surrounded with 
very pretty picots. 



Nos. 50 AND 51.— PICOTS. 



These picots consist of buttonhole-stitches worked 
close tctf'ether, as is?hown in No, 50. The number of 



NO. 40. 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 




:?o. 41. 



NO. 43. 



170. 42* 



NO. 45. 




NO. 46. 



m, 47. 



NO. 48. 



NO. 49. 




NO. 52. 



NO. 54. ^ 




NO. 56. 



NO. 57- 



NO. 58. 



NO. 59. 




NO. 61. 



NO. 63. 



NO. 60. 



NO. 64. 



NO. 62. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLii- 




m. IS. 



1(0. A 



KO. 77. 



■^0 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



buttonhole-stitches must be regulated by the quality 
of the cotton and the size of the picot. 

No. 51 shows another very effective picot, which 
may be worked either round the threads that cross 
each other in the netting for the middle of a cross 
(cross-stitch), or round a little spinning-stitch or 
wheel ; this kind may also be used for flowers. These 
owisted picots are worked in the well-known hroderie 
d la minute (see No. 51). For tliis kind of picot make 
flrst a buttonhole-stitch round the netted cross, push 
the needle in it, and wind the cotton ten or twelve 
times round for one picot ; then carefully draw ano- 
ther buttonhole-stitch round the netted cross to fasten 
the finished picot and to prepare for the next. 



Nos. 52 TO 55.— PYRAMID-STITCH. 

This stitch is made with sometimes one, two, or 
more divisions. 

No. 52 gives a design with patterns of pyramid- 
stitch in three divisions, which are worked according 
to No. 53. This stitch differs only so far from that m 
two divisions, in that from the middle hole when the 
triangle is stretched across, the thread stretched 
across is carried to the middle of the netted bar, and 
rises from there to the point. 

No. 54 shows the mode of working this. Tie the 
thread on with a knot, carry it as far as the middle of 
the outer netting thread of the pattern, fasten it for a 
triangle again to the middle hole returning. 

By winding the last thread backwards the point of 
the pyramid is again reached, a»d the bars must now 
be closely worked in point de reprise, as shown in the 
design. 

No. 55 shows a little finished pattern with one 
division between the bars of a web. 

These pyramid-stitches may be made stronger and 
more effective by twisting several stretched threads 
together, which form a kind of frame. 



Nos. 56 TO 58 AND 61.—MUSHR00M-STITCH. 

This is worked in a kind of point de reprise in a 
corner of a netted square, a twisted thread having 
been previously drawn across obliquely (see No. 56). 

Nos. 56 to 58 show the usual modes of placing these 
patterns together. No*. 61 gives a little square pattern 
containing double point d'esprit between the diffe- 
rent arrangements of the mushroom-stitch. 

The double point d'esprit is merely a second worked 
inside the first. 



Nos. 59 AND 60, 62 to 65.— POINT EVANTAIL : FAN- 
STITCH. 

This is a kind of continuation of the mushroom- 
stitch, and may be easily worked from Nos. 59 and 60. 
Nos. 62 and 65 show how they may be arranged in 
patterns. Tlie flat fan-stitch in No. B9 forms an 
almost exclusive pattern of itself, but the corner fan- 
stitch in No. 60 serves also as a finish to the trellis- 
'^^'ork pairts, s^ p^wwd ia /^Tos, 63 and 64. A variety of 



this pattern is called the twisted fan-stitch, anri 
answers the same purpose, as shown also in a square 
pattern in No. 76. 



Nos. 66 TO 70.— SCALLOPS. 

Tliese are numerous in their arrangement and modes 
of working. In order to make two of these pointed 
scallops in a hole of the netting, work always two 
buttonhole-stitches on the thread of the netting 
intended for the long side of each scallop (according 
to No. 66), one buttonhole-stitch on the thread in- 
tended for the short side of the scallop at the middle 
point of the threads turned towards the star, so that 
the latter seems only half filled when the side thread 
is covered with stitches. No. 66 shows one scallop 
with loose threads finished; the second laid on. 
Having finished the latter, carry the thread at the 
foot of the finished scallops as far as the next dis- 
engaged hole to work the next two scallops, or by 
means of a bar of the thread cross in the middle of 
the star ; continue the w^ork. 

The. thick button scallops (Nos. 67 and 68) are 
worked in rows forwards and backwards in common 
buttonhole-stitch, as shown in No. 67, For thick but- 
tonhole scallops with picots, see No. 68. 

The thick pyramid scallop is like the pjramid-stitch, 
but according to No. 68, it hes loose upon the ground, 
and the frame of stretched threads is worked in point 
de reprise. In working these large scallops, in which 
the threads are closely interwoven, and which has the 
effect of pyramid-stitch in five divisions, it is very 
necessary that the five threads of the frame should be 
firmly stretched. They all unite in the point — not all 
together round the knots of the netted foundation, 
but after the looping are placed perpendicularly on 
the straigltt netted bar, and closely wound round. 
This twisted bar may be completed with a thick pat- 
tern, spun-stitch, a wheel, or a picot. The threads on 
the foot of the frame joined to the trellis-stitch may 
be easily worked from No. 69. The loose corner 
scallop which serves for filling up this, as well as the 
slanting half of a hole of the netting in the mushroom- 
stitch, is worked the same as No. 70, without a sup- 
porting middle thread, and like the loose star scallop 
worked with buttonhole-stitch in No. 66. For every 
triangle two buttonhole-stitches must be made over 
each thread of the netting. 



No. 71.— TUFTED BUTTONHOLE-STITCH. 

This stitch will be very easily worked from the 
design. It forms the border to the square No. 75. 



No. 72.— OBLONG PATTERN. 

These patterns are formed by drawing the thread 
loosely round the netting. They are used for orna- 
menting larger patterns. No. 72 shows how they are 
used with other stitches to ^-^^m a pattern. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



31 



No. 73.— THE LETTER " S " STITCH. 

This ia a sort of combination of the mushroom- 
stitch, and is used in square No. 77. 



No. 74.— THICK SQUARE. 

This simple stitch needs no description — it will be 
seen in the finished square No. 77. 



Nos. 75 AND 77.— SQUARES IN GUIPURE NETTING. 

These squares may be used alternately, and will 
make a pretty insertion, a heading for guipure lace, or 
joined for pincush'^n-tops, doilys, &c. 



No. 76.— QUARTER OF SQUARE. 

All the stitches in this design have been already 
described, except the stalk-stitch which crosses the 
point de toile. They are worked according to Nos. 85 
and 86. This square will make a pretty doily, or, com- 
bined with other squares, will serve for antimacassars, 
&c. 



No, 78.— PATTERBT IN FAN, OBLONG, AND 
SPINNING STITCHES. 

This shows the mode of working a combination of 
the above stitches. 



Nos. 79 TO 81 AND 90.— STAR OR RADII. 

For the mode of working the star represented in No. 
79, see No. 80. The star requires cross-bars placed in 
the same manner as for a wheel, the ends of which 
must again have crossbars for the rounding of the 
star. Round the interwoven wheel in the middle the 
separate radii are arranged, which are formed, accord- 
ing to the previous directions, of loose threads round 
the bars of netting, and placed together in a bunch at 
the under part with two buttonhole-stitches upon the 
wheel. The little stars, arranged in a pretty pattern 
with cross-stitch and point d'esprit in No. 90, consist, 
as shown in No. 81, of loose threads stretched across 
and joined by being twice firmly interwoven in the 
middle. 



No. 82.— DOUBLE CROSS. 

Th ? pattern is very effective for the middle of a 
•\^uare, or even for a comer. The loose threads must 



be first stretched across from one side over the hole of 
the netting, and a bar woimd round in the opposite* 
direction, interweaving it with the first bar, as ^h^^vo 
in design. 



Nos. 83 TO 85 AND I 



9.— GUIPURE IN RELIEF. 



These very effective patterns may be placed upon a 
ground of point de toile, or even upon plain netting. 
They present no difficulty, but require practice and 
the greatest accuracy. They consist of loose threads 
stretched over the foundation, and worked in like the 
point de reprise — for small patterns, over two threads, 
with one division; for broad patterns, leaves, &c., 
with two or three divisions over three or more threads. 
Leaves should be graduated. Stalks on leaves, or 
sometimes raised veins (see No. 76), are formed, accord- 
ing to the thickness required, of threads stretched 
across, wound once or several times round, and closely 
corded in returning. The large patterns, in filling up 
the stretched threp.ds of which the frame of bars is 
composed, require a thread of the foundation to be 
worked in here and there lightly, which causes the 
guipure to keep its place better. No. 83 gives a 
finished cross in relief upon a netted foundation, 
covered with point de toile. 

No. 84 shows the mode of working this. Nos. 85 
and 89 show the mode of placing the large and small 
leaves and stalks so clearly that no description is 
necessary. No. 88 shows a combination of these 
stitches. 



Nos. 86 AND 87.— BUTTONHOLE-STITCH EDGE. 



The buttonhole-stitch makes a very pretty scallop 
border, lliis edge may be either plain or ornamented 
with picots. It is advisable to work it in a frame. It 
is important that it should be carefully traced, so that 
when the threads of the netting are cut away the 
stitches remain in their places. 

For this stretch the thread firmly round the netted 
thread, and tie it always with- the loop described for 
the cross-stitch (see No. 40). Returning it must be 
closely twisted again, and then fastened with button- 
hole-stitch, as shown in No. 86. No. 87 shows the 
mode of working the picots ; they are formed by 
simply making another separate buttonhole-stitch, 
which lies free underneath, and is fastened to the next 
in continuing the row. 



CONCLUSION. 

From the descriptions and illustrations of stitches 
which we have given in these Supplements we believe 
our readers will find no difficulty in working any of 
the guipure netting designs which we have already 
given, and shall continue to give, in our Journal. ThQ 
designs on pages 17 and 25 of our Guipure TTc^tingf 
Supplements are each somewhat difficult, and shouiu 
not be attempted until the stitches have all been 
well practised ; but they are ver}^ beautiful designs, 
and show what very nice work may be produced in 
guipure netting. 



32 



THE YOrNG LADIES* JOURNAL. 




NO. 86. 









NO. 87. 




KO. 88. 



NO. 89. 



fiO»99» 




, . m. 




Til WSttTABife. 



KNITTING. 




KNITTED BORDER FOR COrNTEEPANE. 



FULL DIRECTIONS FOR 



PLAIN AND FANCY KNITTING. 



34 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



DESCRIPTION OF 

ILLUSTRATION ON PAGE 33 AND COLOURED SUPPLEMENT. 



KNITTED BORDER FOR COUNTERPANE. 

a 

Materials Hequired : Strutts' knitting cotton No. 8, 
two knitting pins No. 14- (Walker's bell gauge). 

Knit the long way. Each pattern requires twenty- 
one stitches. You must cast on 3, 6, or 9 patterns. 

1st Row ; Furl three, knit three, knit two together, 
make one and knit one eight times, knit two together 
at the back, knit throe. Repeat. 

2nd Row : Purl two, purl two together at the back, 
purl sixteen, purl two together, purl two, knit three. 
Repeat. 

3rd Row : Purl three, knit one, knit two together, 
knit sixteen, knit two together at the back, knit one. 
Repeat. 

4-th Row : Purl two together at the back purl six- 
teen, purl two together, knit three. Repeat. 

Repeat each of these four rows five times more. 
Knit the two next rows, purl the 27th and knit the 
28th. 

For the 1st Row of the raised pattern, make one, knit 
one, make one, purl eight. Repeat from the beginning 
of the row. 

2nd Row : Knit eight, purl three, knit eight. Repeat. 

3rd Row : Knit one, make one, knit one, make one, 
Isait one, purl eight. Repeat. 

4th Row : Knit eight, purl five. Repeat. 

5th Row : Knit two, make one, knit one, make one, 
knit two, purl eight. Repeat. -•• 

6th Row : Knit eight, purl seven. Repeat. 

7th Row : Knit three, make one, knit one, make one, 
knit three, purl eight. Repeat. 

8th Row : Knit eight, purl nine. Repeat. 

9th Row : Knit two together at the back, knit five, 
knit two together, purl eight. Repeat, 

10th Row : Knit eight, purl seven. Repeat. 

11th Row : Knit two together at the back, knit three, 
knit two together, purl eight. Repeat. 

12th Row : Knit eight, purl five. Repeat. 

13th Row : Knit two together at the back, knit one, 
knit two together, purl eight. Repeat. 

14-th Row : Knit eight, purl three. Repeat. 

15th Row : Slip one, knit two together, pass the 
slipped stitch over them, purl eight. Repeat. 

16th Row : Knit. 

17th and 18th Rows : Purl. 

19th Row : Make one, knit two together at the back. 
Repeat throughout the row. 

20th Row: Purl. 

21st Row : Knit one, ^ make one, knit two together 
at the back. Repeat from *, end the row with knit 
one. 

22nd Row: Purl. 

23rd Row : Like nineteenth row. 

24th Row : Purl. 

25th and .26th Rows : Knit. 

27th Row: Purl. 

28th Row : Knit, then cast off the stitches. 

For the crochet edge : — 

1st Row: Work one double into every stitch of 
border. 

2nd Row : One double into a stitch in^the depth of 
scallop, * four chain, one treble into the first, pass over 
two stitches, one double into the next. Repeat from 
* eight times more, then repeat from the beginning of 
the row. 



COLOURED SUPPLEMENT. 

DESIGN FOR KNITTED PENCE-JUG. 
Materials Required: Three skeins each of throe 

shades of Berlin wool, four pins No. 17 (Walker's 

bell gauge). 

Begin with the darkest shade, cast on three stitches 
on each of three pins, knit one round. 

2nd and all following Rounds : Knit one stitch in 
the front of a loop, and one in the back, of the first and 
last stitches on each pin, until you have twenty-one 
stitches on each pin. 

Knit two rounds without increase or decrease. Purl 
three rounds, knit three rounds. 

With the second shade purl three rounds and knit 
three rounds. 

With the lightest shade, purl three rounds and knit 
three rounds. 

With the second shade purl three rounds. 

With the lightest shade knit two rounds, and purl 
two rounds. 

For the raised pattern work with the lightest shade 
of wool for the ground, and the darkest for the leaves. 
The light wool being carried at the back of the leaves, 
care must be taken not to draw it at all tight in 
crossing the leaves at the back, or the effect of the 
pattern will be very much spoilt. 

For the 1st Row of raised pattern, make one, knit 
one, make one, purl eight. Repeat. 

2nd Round : ^nit eight, purl three. Repeat. 

3rd Round : Knit one, make one, knit one, make 
one, knit one, purl eight. Repeat. 

4th Round : Knit five, purl eight. Repeat. 

5th Round : Knit two, make one, knit one, make 
one, knit two, purl eight. Repeat. 

6th Round : Knit seven, purl eight. Repeat. 

7th Round: Knit three, make one, knit one, make 
one, knit three, purl eight. Repeat. 

8th Round : Knit nine, purl eight. Repeat. 

9th Round : Knit two together at the back, knit 
five, knit two together, purl eight. Repeat. 

10th Round : Knit seven, purl eight. 

11th Round : Knit two together at tlie back, knit 
three, knit two together, purl eight. Repeat. 

12th Round : Knit five, purl eight. Repeat. 

13th Round : Knit two together at the back, knit 
one, knit two together, purl eight. Repeat. 

14th Round : Knit three, purl eight. 

15th Round : Shp one, knit two together, pass the 
slipped stitch over the two knitted together, purl 
eight. Repeat. 

16th to 18th Rounds : Purl. 

After finishing the pattern, work two plain and 
three purl rounds with the second shade of wool ; then 
take the darkest shade and work six ribbed rounds of 
knit two and purl two alternately, nine round's 
are ribbed with the second shade and six with the 
lightest. 

For the lip : Knit seven rounds, increasing one stitch 
in each round. Above one point of the triangle, purl 
one round, then cast off all the stitches except five 
exactly opposite the increased stitches; these are 
knitted plain for the handle, which is two inches in 
length ; to shape the end, decrease by knitting two 
stitches together at the end of each row, until one 
stitch only is left ; this end is sewn to the jug upoq 
the rib of the second shade above the raised patterns. 




PENCE JUG KNITTING 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



31^ 



KNITTING 



INTRODUCTION. 



Knitting is a very useful and amusing employment 
both for ladies and children, and should be tauglit 
generally, for the reason that the plainer sorts of 
knitting can be taken up at any time. Knitting is 
work alike suited to young and old. The invahd and 
the blind person find in it occupation with which to 
wliile away many hours that would otherwise pass 
wearily. In tlie gloaming work requiring strong light 
must be put aside, and a piece of knitting at liand — 
such as a sock, stocking, or mitten — can be taken^up 
and worked at until it is thought time to draw the 
curtains and light up. Knitting in Italy and Spain 
was general long before its introduction into England. 
One of the wives of Henry VIII. had a present of a 
pair of knitted stockings. In the early part of Queen 
Elizabeth's reigtt knitted stockings must, however, have 
been rare, as the Queen is said to liave had a pair of 
woven stockings presented to her, when she declared 
she would not again wear stockings made of cloth. 
Stocking-knitting must, towards the end of her reign, 
have become a work of some importance, as the stock- 
ing-knitte-rsof Nottingham drove away from their town 
Lee, who invented a machine for weaving stockings. 
Lee retired to Paris, where disappointment and grief 
caused his death. The vScotch and GermaTa women 
and children surpass the English in the quantity, and 
general!}^ in the quality, of their knitting. The Ger- 
mans are acknowledged to be the best knitters on the 
Continent, and they "take their knitting with them to 
the tlieatre. It is so much a habit with them to knit, 
that it in no way distracts their thoughts from what 
is going on around them. The word " knit " is from 
the Anglo-Saxon cnytan^ or cnyttan. The Icelanders 
and Swedes call it knytay and the Danes knytte. 



IMPLEMENTS. 



No. 1.— THE GAUGE. 

First of all comes the gauge with which to measure 
accurately the knitting-pins. We give an illustra- 
tion of the gauge, which is of white metal, and advise 
ladies who knit to procure one. Walker's ^auge is the 
one we illustrate, an4 with which we measure. 



KNITTING-PINS. 

Knitting-pins, or needles as they are sometimes 
called, are made of steel for finer kinds of work, and 
wood, ivory, bone, and vulcanite, when coarser mate- 
rials are knitted. 



KNITTING-SHIELDS. 
Knitting-shields may be purchased in bone and ivory ; 
they are very necessary when steel pins are used, as 
they preveHt the possibility of tlie work escaping from 
the pins. Shields are made both in plain and fancy 
forms, and are held together by a piece of fine elastic. 

MATERIALS KNITTED. 

Beginners should use knitting-cotton, as its smooth 
surface admits of its slipping more freely from the 
pins than wool can do. Strutts' knitting cotton can 
be thoroughly recommended for its smoothness, soft- 
ness, and even texture. Strutts' summer merino, both 
in white and colours, will make excellently strong 
summer socks and stockings for children and gentle- 
men. 

P"or ladies' stockings, Messrs. Strutt manufacture a 
very fine cotton called best knitting. For knitting 
trimmings, antimacassars, &c., their crochet cotton is 
very good. 

For woollen socks and stockings, Messrs. Faudel, 
Phillips, and Sons manufacture the finest qualitj' of 
knitting wools in their peacock fingering, fleecy, Shet- 
land, Andalusia, and eider yarn. They also make a 
very fine quality of knitting silk, called ice silk. 
Messrs. Pearsall supply a very strong and good quality 
of knitting silk, called imperial knitting silk. These 
materials are all supplied by Messrs. Bedford, 186, 
Regent Street, and 23, Goodge Street, W. 



GENERAL DIRECTIONS. 

To knit well, the pins must be held lightly in the 
hands rather close to the points, and there should be 
very little movement of the hands for knitting easily 
and rapidly. 

In winding wool, merino, cotton, or silk, care should 
be taken not to wind too tightly, as the material id 
impoverished thereby. It should be borne in mind 
that the size of the work is ruled more by the qualitjjf 
of the material than b^ tl;^e size of th© pins. 



36 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 




To learn knitting, coarse cotton — say Strutts' No. 8, 
and pins No. 12 or 14— should be selected. 



No. 2.— CAST ON WITH ONE PIN. 

Twist the cotton once round the forefinger of the 
left hand (see diagram), hold one end of wool between 
the thumb and second finger of the left hand. Hold 
the pin lightl3% much the same way as you would hold 
a pen, in the right hand, keep the other part of the 
wool over the forefinger of the right hand, under the 
second and third fingers, and over the little finger, 
pass the pin under the wool on the left forefinger from 
left to right. With a shght movement of the right- 
hand forefinger pass the wool in the right hand round 
the pin, draw the pin with the wool round it to the 
left so as to bring it under the loop on the finger in 
which it was inserted, slip the thread off the left 
forefinger, and tighten it to form the stitch. Repeat 
from th^ beginning. 



It is undesirable to cast on with one pm if you 
have many stitches in length, as you are apt not to 
have enough of the short end of the wool, unless you 
are v good judge of the length needed. 



Nos. 3 AND 4.-T0 CAST ON WITH TWO PINS. 

Pass a loop over the left-hand pin near the end of 
the cotton, hold the right-hand pin as already; de- 
scribed for casting on with one pin ; put the right- 
hand xnn into the loop, passing the pin through from 
left to right, keeping the right-hand pin under the 
left pin ; * pass the wool over this pin, between it and 
the left-hand pin, pull the loop up towards the right ; 
now draw the right-hand pin up, and pass the stitch 
on it on to the left-hand pin, by putting the left 
pin through the left side of the loop, keeping the 
right-hand pin in the loop ready to begin the next 
stitch. RepfWv fr^JH * for tho required number of 
stitches. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE VVORK-TABLS:. 



37 



1 



No. 5.— KNIT- 
TING. 

Aftei having 
cast on the num- 
ber of stitches 
needed, hold the 
pin with the 
cast-on stitches 
in the left hand, 
* pass the right- 
hand pin into the 
first stitch from 
left to right, put 
the cotton round 
between the two 
pins, pull the 
loop thus made 
through the loop 
on the left pin, 
and slip that 
loop off the left 
pin. Repeat 
from ♦. 



No. 6. — PURL- 
ING OR RIB- 
BING. 

Keep the cot- 
ton in the front 
of the work, * 
put the right- 
hand pin into a 
stitch from right 
to left, passing 
it upwards 
through the 
front loop of a 
stitch, the right- 
hand pin resting 
on the left ; pass 
the cotton round /"/ 

the front of the /\/4 
pin, bring it 
back between ^ " 
the two pins, 
pull the right- 
hand pin slight- 
ly back, so as to 
secure the loop 
on the right- 
hand pin, and 
drawoff the loop 
on the left pin. 
Repeat from *. 



No. 7.~T0 KNIT 
IN THE ROUND 

Four and even 
five pins are 
sometimes used 
for knitting in 
the round. Cast 
on a third or 
fourth of the 
number of 
stitches required 
on each of the 
three or four 
pins ; then, with 
the fourth or 




NO. 7.~FNITTINC} im THE ROUND. 



fifth pin, join 
round by knit- 
ting into the 
first stitch that 
was cast on, and 
continue round. 



TO SLIP A 
STITCH. 

To shp a stitch 
pass it from one 
pin to the other 
without knit- 
ting it at the be- 
ginning of a row^ 
in knitting with 
two pins, the 
first stitch of a 
row should al- 
ways be shpped 
to make the 
work even ; un» 
less otherwise 
directed, put the 
pin into the 
stitch you are 
about to slip 
from left to 
right. 



TO MAKE A 
STITCH OR 
COTTON FOR- 
WARD. 

m knitting, 
pass the cotton 
from the back to 
the front of the 
work, and knit 
the next stitch 
as usual. In 
purhng, pass the 
cotton complete- 
ly round the 
pin. 



TO MAKE TWO 
STITCHES. 

Pass the wool 
to the front, 
then round the 
pin. If three 
stitches are to 
be made, the 
cotton must 
again be passed 
round. In knit- 
ting off two 01' 

more made 
stitches, the 
first you can 
knit in the 
usual w^ay; the 
second you 
must put the 
pin into the 
back loop, then 
knit off as usual 



38 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



TO KNIT TWO STITCHES IN ONE. 
i*lrst knit the front loop, and without removing the 
left-hand stitch from the pin, knit the back loop, then 
Blip tho stitch off the left-hand pin. 



TO RAISE A STITCk 

the threaa xnat lies 



Pick up and knit a stitch in 
crosswise between two stitches. 



TO KNIT AT THE BACK. 
Put the pin through tlie back loop on the left-hand 
needle, and knit as usual. 



TO KNIT TWO TOGETHER. 

Put the loft-hand pin through two stitches toge- 
ther, and kSi' as one stitch. 



TO KNIT TWO TOGETHER AND PASS A SLIP- 
STITCH OVER. 

'ass a stitch from the left to the right hand pin 
f .bhout knitting it, knit two stitches together as 
a.lready described, then, with the left-hand pin, draw 
V« slip-stitch off the right hand over the last stitch , 
^j:nitted, which is still on the right-hand pin. ^ 



ro CAST OFF. 

Knit two stitches, pass the first stitch over the 
second, knit a third stitch, and pass the second over 
It. Continue in this way until all the «titches are 
worked off. 



doujble knitting. 

In casting or., for this pattern allow three stitches 
to knit plain at each end. 

1st Row : Knit three, * bring the wool forward, slip 
a stitch as if for purling, pass the wool back, knit one, 
putting the wool twice over the pin. Repeat from * 
until within three stitches of the end of row, knit 
these three. 

In tiie next Row the stitch that was knitted is 
slipped, and the slipped stitch knitted. 



No. 8.— CANE- WORK PATTERN. 

Cast on any number of stitches divisible by four. 

1st Row : Make one, knit one, make one, knit three. 
/Repeat. 

2nd Row : Purl. 

3rd Row : Knit three, make one, slip one, knit two 
together, pass the slip-stitch over the two knitted to- 
(■^ther, make one. Repeat. 

4th Row : Purl. 

5th Row: Make one, slip one, knit two together, 
^9 the slip-stitch over, make one, knit three. Repeat. 

6th Row : Purl. 

Tth ilow : Like third row. 

a^lj Kcw: Purl. 



9th Row : Make one, slip one, knit two together, pass 
the slip-stitch over, make one, knit three. Repeat. 
10th Row : Purl. Repeat from the third row. 



No. 9.— VANDYKE PATTERN. 

Cast on nine stitches for each pattern. 

1st Row : Knit three, * make one, knit two together 
at the back, knit four. Repeat from *. 

2nd Row : Purl. 

3rd Row : Knit one, knit two together, make one, 
knit one, make one, knit two together at the back. 
Repeat. 

4th Row : Purl. 

5th Row : Knit two together, * make one, knit three, 
make one, slip one, knit two together, pass the slip- 
stitch over. Repeat from *. 

6th Row : Purl. Repeat from first row. 



No. 10.— HERRINGBONE STRIPE. 

Cast on any number of stitches divisible by three. 

1st Row : Knit one, knit two together, make one. 
Repeat. End the row with knit two. 

2nd Row : Purl one, purl two together, make one. 
Repeat. End the row with purl two. 

These two rows are repeated throughout. 



No. 11.— STRIPE WITH TWISTED BARS. 

Cast on any number of stitches divisible by six. 

1st Row : Knit one, cotton forward, knit one, knit 
three together, knit one, make one. Repeat from the 
beginning of the row. 

For the 2nd and every alternate row the single 
stitch between the two made stitches is purled ; the 
rest of the row is knitted. These two rows are re- 
peated for the required length. 



No. 12.— PATENT KNITTING, OR BRIOCHE 
KNITTING. 
Cast on any number of stitches divisible by three. 
Cotton forward, slip one, knit two together. Every 
row is worked the same. 

The edge shown in illustration No. 12 is in crochet, 
and merely consists of one row of double and the 
second row, which is three chain, one double into the 
first. Repeat. 



No. 13.— CABLE PATTERN. 

Cast on eighteen stitches for a stripe, thus for six 
plain stitches on each side of the cable, for two pat- 
terns thirty stitches will be required, and so on. 

1st Row : Purl six, knit six, and purl six. 

2nd Row : Knit six, purl six, knit six. 

3rd Row : Like first row. 

4th Row : Like second row. 

5th Row : Like third row. 

6th Row : Knit six, take a third pin and purl three ; 
with the first right-hand pin purl the next three 
stitches, and knit six. 

7th Row : Purl six, knit the three stitches on the 
third or additional pin, knit the three stitches on the 
left-hand pin, purl six. 

8th Bow : Like second row. Repeat from first row- 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE 



^ 



No. 1^.— KNITTED MITTEN. 

The border which is worked round the top, and the 
finished mitten, are shown on page 40. 

This mitten is suitable for a Imnd that will take a 7 
or 7i ladies' glove. It is to wear over the glove. If a 
small size is required, Andalusian wool and pins 
No. 15 may be used in place of the Berhn wool. 
Double BerUn wool and pins No. 14- will work out a 
large size for a gentleman's mitten. The directions 
are very simple, and the mitten is a particularly easy 
one to knit. 

Materials Required : 1^ oz Berlin wool ; two pins 
No. U and four pins No. 15 (Walker's gauge). 
For the left-hand mitten : Cast on fifty-five stitches 
with the No. 14 pins, forty of which form the hand, 
and fifteen the ribbed wrist. Always slip the first 
stitch of each row. 
1st Row : Knit. 

2nd Row : Knit forty, purl fifteen. 
3rd Row : Knit. 

4th Row : Knit forty, purl fifteen. 
5th Row ; Purl fifteen, knit forty. 
6th Row: Knit. 

Repeat from the first row till you liave 101 rows. 
Tlien begin the thumb : , ^ ^ 

102nd Row : Cast off from the top of the hand four- 
teen stitches, knit twenty-five, leave the ribbed wrist 
stitches on the pin until the mitten is finished. 

103rd Row : Knit twenty-six, cast on the same pin 
ten stitches. 

104th Row : Knit twenty-five, make one, knit two 
together at the back, turn. 

105th Row : Knit one, knit the made stitch at the 
back, knit the remaining stitches of the row plain. 

106th Row : Knit twenty-foui; make one, knit two 
together at the back, leave the other stitch on the ^^Xt 
pin, turn. ^ , ., 

The 105th and 106th Rows are now repeated alter- 
nately, with this difference, you knit one stitch less 
in each row until you have ten stitches to knit before 
the make one knit two together at the back, and 
leave one on the left-hand pin. 
136th Row : Knit thirty-six. 
137th Row : Knit thirty-six. 

Cast off, sew up the thumb as far as the opening, 
then sew the sides of mitten together. With three 
pins (No. 15) pick up the between stitches round the 
top of hand of mitten, and purl for six rounds, cast off . 
Any small embroidery pattern may be worked in 
these rounds, and up the back of mitten if preferred. 

For the right-hand mitten: Cast on fifty-one 
stitches, knit two plain rows. 
3rd Row : Knit ten. 

4th Row : Turn and knit the ten stitches. 
5th Row : Knit nine, make one, knit two together 
at the back, taking the second stitch of the two toge- 
ther from the left-hand pin. 

6th Row: Knit one, knit the made stitch at the 
back, knit the rest. 

The 5th and 6th rows are repeated alternately, 
knitting one stitch more in each alternate row pre- 
vious to the make one, until you have increased to 
twenty-five stitches in the 35tli row, when you make 
one, knit two together at the back, and knit nine 
from the left-hand pin. 
36th Row : Knit back plain. 
37th Row : Cast off ten stitches, knit twenty-six. 
38th Row : Knit back the twenty-six stitches, cast 
on fourteen stitches. 

39th Row : Knit. . ^, ... 

40th Row : Repeat from the first row of the lett- 
hand mitten until you have 101 rows at the wrist. 

Finish the right-hand mitten as described for the 
\eft. 



No. 15.-TRIANGULAR KILTED PATTERN. 
Cast on any number of stitches divisible by nino. 
1st Row : Purl eight, knit one. Repeat. 
2nd Row : Purl two, knit seven. Repeat 
3rd Row : Purl six, knit three. Repeat. 
4th Row : Purl four, knit five. Repeat. 
5th Row : Purl four, knit fire. Repeat. 
6th Row : Purl six, knit three. Repeat. 
7th Row : Purl two, knit seven. Repeat. 
8th and 9th Rows : Like first row. Repeat irom 

second row. , , , • x -uu 

For the crochet edge: Work one double into th& 
first stitch— that is knitted throughout— pass over 
three stitches, three trebles, three double trebles, and 
three trebles into the next stitch, pass over three 
stitches, and repeat. 



No. 16.-RIBBED KNITTING WITH TWO PINS. 

In knitting with two pins to produce a rib, joxl 
must knit two and purl two alternately. In the alter- 
nate rows you must reverse the work by purling tlifc. 
knitted and knitting the purled stitches. fe?metime.^ 
ribbed knitting is worked alternately, one stitch knit 
and one purl. For wide ribs three knit and thiec 
purl are Sometimes worked. No. 16 shows a rib o^ 
one knit and one purl, alternated after every sixt>^ 
row ; the rib is reversed by repeating the sixth row. 



No. 17 —INFANT'S VESTo 

Materials Rfquirbd ; 2 oz Lady Beti^ or whit- 
Berlin wool, three bone pins No. 10 (A^'alker'j^ bel] 
gauge)- 

cast on one pin 100 stitches, knit three ribs, Thur; 
knit two rows, purl two rows, knit two rows. Ther* 
knit forty stitches, and with the third pin continue t^ 
work on these forty stitches until you have twenty^ 
two rows— that is, eleven ribs. Leave these stitches 
on the pin. With the third pin cast off twenty 
stitches for the shoulder (by passing one stitch over 
the other) of the sixty stitches left on the first pm. 
Knit on the remaining forty stitches twenty-two rowa 
for the back the same as for the front. 

In the 23rd Row, cast on twenty stitches for the 
other shoulder, and knit them on one needle with the 
forty stitches left from the front. You will now have 
100 stitches again, on which knit six rows as at the 
beginning. , •■, ^ 

Cast off the stitches, and sew up the sides under 
the arm, leaving the armhole open. 

A crochet edging is worked round the neck and 
sleeves. 

1st Row : One single into the edge of knitting, two 
chain, pass over one stitch of knitting, one single into 

the next. , , . /. , ^ 

2nd Row : One double under two chain of last row, 
three chain, one double under next two chain. R^' 

^^A tape or ribbon is run through the first row oi' 
crochet round the throat. 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL. 







NO. 17 —INFANT'S VEST, 



NO. 12.— PATENT OR 
BRIOCHE PATTERN. 



isr 



NO. 13.— CABLE TWIST. 




mm. 



















NO. 14.— EDGE C 
aUTTi^N, 



NO. lir-TRIANGULAR KILTED 



NO. It).— RIB8K© 
BOBBER. 



c8M»iTi mim n tie w^ik-tabil 



KNITTING. 




NO 1 8a KNICKERBOCKBR STOCKINGS. 



IHO. l8C 




NO. 19.— KNKii-CAP. 



XiL^ZIX'^E'X^O^. 



*12 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



DESCRIPTION OF ILLUSTRATIONS ON PAGE 41, 



No. ]8a ^KNICKERBOCKER STOCKING FOR BOY 
F/<:)M TEN TO TWELVE YEARS OF AGE. 

Materials Required : 4 oz fine gray and 2 oz fine 

black peacock fingering, four pins No. 15, and two 

No. 16 (Walker's gauge). 

Cast on ninety-six stitches with black wool on three 
pins. No. 15. Knit two, purl one alternately for three 
inches, which will be about thirty-four rounds. 

With gray wool continue as before until you have 
worked the sixteenth stitch of the third pin, pick up one 
stitch for the seam — that is the loop lying between the 
sixteenth and seventeenth stitches, purl this stitch in 
every succeeding round. To mark it, draw a piece of 
bright-coloured silk or cotton^ through it. Work off 
as before to the end of the rounds. 

Work eleven more rounds of gray. 

With black wool, work one round. 

2nd Round : Increase one stitch on each side of the 
seam-stitch by picking it up as described for the seam- 
stitch, and working it to continue the rib. 

Work five rounds without increase. 

In the 8th Round increase as described for the second 
round. 

9th to 12th Rounds without increase. 

With gray wool, work twelve rounds without in- 
crease or decrease. 

With black wool, work one round. 

/n the 2nd Round work two together before and 
after the seam, then work four rounds without de- 
crease. 

In the 7th Round decrease as described. 

8th to 12th Rounds without decrease. 

Work three stripes of twelve rounds each, alter- 
nately gray and black, decreasing as described for the 
last stripe. Work five stripes without increase or de- 
crease. Work five rounds gray, then commence the 
heel. Divide the stitches thus :— Place twenty -one 
each side of the seam, that is, forty-three on the heel 
pin, leaving forty-two for the instep. Take a second 
ball of gray wool, so as to knit the heel with double 
wool and No. 16 pins. Continue the rib working on 
the heel stitches only for twenty-eight rows. 

29th Row : Knit two past the seam, knit two to- 
gether, knit one, turn, purl nine, purl two together, 
purl one, turn, knit eleven, knit two together, knit one ; 
continue these last two rows, taking in two stitches 
more at each turn till all the side stitches are taken 
in. At each side of the heel pick up neatly, with a 
crochet-hook, thirty stitches ; work with pin No. 15. 
Then take in the forty-two stitches left before com- 
mencing the heel, but let them remain on a separate 
pin, as they must continue to be ribbed. Decrease in 
every round until forty stitches are left at the sole. 
To decrease, knit two together at the right side and 
slip one, knit one, pass the slip-stitoh over at the left 
side of the sole. To know left from right, imagine 
sock on right foot. 

When the foot measures about six inches, commence 



the decrease for the toe thus : decrease one stitch at 
each side of back and each side of front stitches, 
always making the decrease the second stitch "from 
the side. Work the next round plain. The two last 
rounds are to be worked alternately until you have 
twenty-eight stitches, when cast off, and sew up on 
the wrong side. 

No.lS^^KNICKERBOCKER STOCKING. 
Materials Required: 6 oz fine fingering, four pins 

No. 15, and two pins No. 16 (Walker's gauge). 

The shaping and all directions for No. ISawill serve 
for this stocking. 

For the top knit one, purl two for three inches. 

For the leg and top of foot work two rounds knit, 
and two purl, throughout the stocking. 

For the heel, working with two pins. No. 16, and 
double wool, one row knit, one row purl. The sole 
and gusset are knitted throughout. 



No. 19.— KNEE-CAP. 
Materials Required : 3 oz Berlin wool or four-thread 
fleecy, four steel pins No. 13 (Walker's gauge). . 

Cast on eighty-eight stitches — that is, twenty-nine 
on each of two pins, and thirty on the third, knit two 
and purl two alternately all round for fifty-two rounds. 

In the 53rd Round knit twelve, cast off twenty-eight, 
knit twenty, cast off another twenty-eight. The twenty 
stitches form the part at the back of the knee, and are 
left on a separate pin. On the twelve stitches knit 
plain, pick up one of the cast-off stitches from the 
twenty-eight at the end of each row to increase the 
size of the gusset. Continue working thus till you 
have sixty-eight stitches on the pin. Now commence 
the decrease by knitting the last two stitches to- 
gether until only twelve remain. Pick up the side 
stitches of the second half of gusset and knit round 
with the twenty left on the separate pin, then continue 
the rib for fifty- two rounds and cast off. 

For tlie band cast on ten stitches, work for 112 rows. 
To make the point, decrease one stitch by knitting 
two together at the end of each row until one stitch 
remains. 

For the wider band cast on twenty-two stitches and 
knit 112 rows. Buttonholes are worked in this band 
as follows : Knit to the centre of the twenty-two 
stitches, take a third pin, work five rows on the eleven 
stitches, work the same number of rows on the other 
eleven stitches, then knit on all the stitches, work 
eight plain rows between each of the buttonholes, 
which are worked over with wool in the ordinary way. 

The bands are sewn to the back of the knee-cap by 
a needle and wool. The narrow band is sewn three 
ribs in front of the wide band, and is passed through 
the middle of it. 

For the crochet edge work one double into a stitch 
at the edge of knitting, four chain, pass over two 
stitchesi and repeat. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



e/6 



KNITTING (ConUTLTLecL). 



o>i^o 



No. 20.-EDG1NO. 

Materials Required: Two pins No. 17 (Walker's 

gauge), Strutts' crochet cotton No. 10. 

Cast on eleven stitches. 

1st Eow: Knit nine, turn the cotton twice over the 
pin, knit two. 

2nd Row: Knit two, knit one and purl one in the 
made stitch, knit nine. 

3rd Row: Knit nine, shp one knit one pass the 
slipped stitch over, knit two. 

4tli Row : Knit two, cotton twice over the pin, knit 
ten. 

5th Row : Knit six, slip one knit one pass the 
slipped stitch over, knit two, knit one, and purl one in 
the made stitch, knit two. 

6th Row: Knit two, slip one knit one pass the 
slipped stitch over, knit three, cotton twice over the 
pin, knit six. 

7th Row : Knit six, knit one and purl one in the 
made stitch, knit four, cotton twice over the pin, knit 
two. 

8th Row : Knit two, knit one and purl one in the 
made stitch, knit four, slip one knit one pass the 
slipped stitch over, knit six. 

9th Row: Knit four, slip one knit one pass the 
slipped stitch over, knit one, slip one knit one pass 
the slipped stitch over, knit two, slip one. knit one 
pass the slipped stitch over, knit two. 

10th Row : Knit two, cotton twice over the pin, 
knit three, cotton twice over the pin, knit three, cotton 
twice over the pin, knit four. 

11th Row : Knit four, knit one and purl one in the 
made stitch, knit three, knit one and purl one in the 
made stitch, knit three, knit one and purl one in the 
made stitch, knit two. 

12th Row : Knit two, slip one knit one pass the 
slipped stitch over, knit three, slip one knit one pass 
the slipped stitch over, knit three, slip one knit one 
pass the slipped stitch over, knit four. 

13th Row: Knit six, slip one knit one pass the 
slipped stitch over, knit three, knit two together, 
cotton twice over the pin, knit two. 

14-th Row : Knit two, knit one and purl one in the 
made stitch, knit two together, knit three, cotton 
twice over the pin, knit six. 

15th Row ; Knit six, knit one and purl one in the 
made stitch, knit two, knit two together, slip one 
knit one pass the slipped stitch over, knit two. 

16th Row : Knit two, cotton twice over the pin, 
knit four, slip one knit one pass the slipped stitch 
over, knit six. 

17th Row : Knit nine, knit two together, knit one 
and purl one in the made stitch, knit two. 

18th Row : Knit two, slip one knit one pass the 
slipped stitch over, knit ten. 

19th Row : Knit nine, knit two together, cotton 
twice over the pin, knit two. 

20th Row : Knit two, knit one and purl one in the 
made stitch, knit two together, knit eight. 

21st Row: Knit nine, slip one knit one pass the 
slipped stitch over, knit two. 

22nd Row : Knit two, slip one, knit one, pass the 
slipped sf-'tch over, knit eight. Repeat from first row. 



No, 21.--INSERTI0N. 
Cast on fifteen stitches. 
1st Row : Knit two, cotton twice over the pin, knit 



two together, knit nine, knit two together, cotton 
twice over the pin, knit two. ^ 

2nd Row : Knit one, knit two together, purl one, 
knit ten, knit two together, purl one, knit two. 

Repeat the first and second rows alternately three 
times more. 

9th Row : Knit two, cotton twice over the pin, knit 
two together, knit four, slip one knit one pass the 
slip stitch over, knit three, knit two together, cotton 
twice over the pin, knit two. 

10th Row : Knit one, knit two together, purl one, 
knit five, cotton twice over the pin, knit four, knit 
two together, purl one, knit two. 

11th Row : Knit two, cotton twice over the pin, 
knit two together, knit four, knit one and purl one in 
the made stitch, knit four, knit two together, cotton 
twice over the pin, knit two. 

12th Row : Knit one, knit two together, purl one, 
knit three, ^ slip one, knit one, pass the slip stitch 
over. Repeat from * twice more, knit two, knit two 
together, purl one, knit two. 

13th Row : Knit two, cotton twice over the pin, knit 
two together, knit two, cotton twice over the pin, 
knit three, cotton twice over the pin, knit two, knit 
two together, cotton twice over the pin, knit two. 

14-th Row : Knit one, knit two together, purl one, 
* knit three, knit one, and purl one in the made stitcli, 
repeat from * once more, knit two together, purl one. 
knit two. 

15th Row : Knit two, cotton twice over the pin-, 
knit two together, knit two, slip one knit one pass 
the slip stitch over, slip one knit one pass the shp 
stitch over, knit one, slip one knit one pass the slip 
stitch over, knit two, knit two together. 

16th Row : Knit one, knit two together, purl one, 
knit five, cotton twice over the pin, knit four, knit 
two together, purl one, knit two. 

17th Row : Knit two, cotton twice over the pin, kni6 
two together, knit four, knit one and purl one in the 
made stitch, knit four, knit two together, cotton twice 
over the pin, knit two. 

18th Row : Knit one, knit two together, purl one, 
knit five, slip one knit one pass the slip stitch over, 
knit four, knit two together, purl one, kiiit two. 

Repeat from first row. 



Nos. 22, 23, AND 31.— COUNTERPANE. 

Materials Required : Strutts' knitting cotton, No. 13 

three-thread super, and two pins No 19 (Walker's 

gauge). 

We may here mention that Walker's knitting pins 
are very nice to knit with, as they are particularly 
well made, with long tapering points, and will be 
found much better for this pattern than pins at all 
blunt at the point. 

The finished counterpane is shown in No. 22, and is 
trimmed with fringe made of fork-work with lengths 
of cotton tied in and knotted. The hexagons and their 
six separate parts are sewn together witii a needle and 
cotton. The star in the centre of each hexagon is 
worked with long-stitches. It is not possible to state 
the quantity of cotton, as this must be ruled by the 
size of the counterpane. 

Cast on thirty-seven stitches. 

1st Row: Purl. 

2nd Row: Knit. 



THE YOUNG LADIES* JOURNAL 



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NO. 28.— DETATX 01 NO. 20. 



yO. 27.— DO' AIL OF NO. 2t). 



NO. 39. —infant's BOWCK 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



45 




NO. 3^. —DIAMOND ATIIH CF£N lEELLIS. 



j,0. ai.— TiUMONP PATTED". 



46 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURI^Mj 



Srd Row : Knit two, * make one, knit two together, 
repeat from * seven times more, make one, knit three 
together, * make one, knit two together, repeat from ^ 
six times more, make one, knit two. 

4th Row: Knit. 

5th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
^ knit two, purl two, repeat from * twi^^^ more, knit 
two, purl one, * knit two, purl two, repeal ^ 'om last * 
twice more, knit six. , 

6th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 

* purl two, knit two, repeat from * twice more, purl 
one, knit three together, * purl one, knit two, purl 
two, repeat from last * twice more, knit four. 

7th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
^ knit two, purl two, repeat from * twice more, knit 
three, * purl two, knit two, repeat from last * twice 
more, knit four. 

8th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, * 
purl two, knit two, repeat from * twice more, purl 
three together, * knit two, purl two, repeat from last 

* twice more, knit four. 

9th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 

* knit two, purl two, repeat from * twice more, hnit 
one, purl two, knit two, purl two, knit two, purl t ''O, 
knit six. 

10th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two togetlicr, 
purl two, knit two, purl two, knit two, purl two, knit 
one, knit three together, knit one, purl two, knit two, 
purl two, knit two, purl two, knit four. 

11th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
knit two, purl two, knit two, purl two, knit two, purl 
three, knit two, purl two, knit two, purl two, knit 
six. 

12th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
purl two, knit two, purl two, knit two, purl two, knit 
three together, purl two, knit two, purl two, knit two, 
purl two, knit four. 

13th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
knit two, purl two, knit two, purl two, knit two, purl 
one, knit two, purl two, knit two, purl two, knit six. 

lith Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
purl two, knit two, purl two, knit two, purl one, purl 
three together, purl one, knit two, purl two, knit two, 
purl two, knit four. 

15th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
knit two, purl two, knit two, purl two, knit three, purl 
two, knit two, purl two, knit six. 

16oii Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
purl two, knit two, piirl two, knit two, purl three to- 
^'ether, knit two, purl two, knit two, purl two, knit 
four. 

17th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
knit two, purl two, knit two, purl two, knit one, purl 
two, knit two, purl two, knit six. 

18th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
purl two, knit two, purl two, knit one, knit three to- 
gether, knit one, purl tw^o, knit two, purl two, knit 
four. 

19th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
knit two, purl two, knit two, purl three, knit two, purl 
two, knit six. 

20th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
purl two, knit two, purl two, knit three together, purl 
two, knit two, purl two, knit four. 

21st Row : Knit* two, make one, knit two together, 
knit two, purl two, knit two, purl one, knit two, purl 
two, knit six. 

22nd Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
purl two, knit two, purl one, purl three together, purl 
one, knit two, purl two, knit four. 

23rd Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
knit two, purl two, knit three, purl two, knit six. 

24-th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
purl two, knit two, purl three together, knit two, purl 
two, knit four. 



25th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
knit two, purl two, knit one, purl two, knit six. 

26th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
purl two, knit one, knit three together, knit one, purl 
two, knit four. 

27th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
knit two, purl three, knit six. 

28th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
purl two, knit three together, purl two, knit four. 

29th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
knit two, purl one, knit six. 

30th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
purl one, purl three together, purl one, knit four. 

31st Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
knit seven. 

32nd Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
purl three together, knit four. 

33rd Row : Knit two, make one, knit two togetlier, 
knit five. 

34-th Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
knit one, knit two together, knit two. 

35th Row : Knit two, make one, knit three together, 
knit three. 

36th Row : Knit two, make one, knit three together, 
knit two. 

37th Row : Knit two, make one, knit three together, 
knit one. 

38th Row : Knit one, knit three together, knit one. 

39th Row: Knit three together, draw the cotton 
through the loop on the pin. 

No. 24.— CHILD'S SOCK. 
Materials Required : One ball silk or 1 oz Strutts' 

knitting cotton No. 16, three-thread super, four 

pins No. 20 (Walkers gauge). 

Cast on sixty-eight stitches, twenty-two on each of 
two pins and twenty-four on the third pin, knit two, 
and purl two for two and a quarter inches, keep the 
pin with twenty-four stitches for tlie back of the 
sock, knit twelve stitches from this pin, pick up and 
knit a stitch for the seam, tie in a piece of coloured 
cotton, and purl this stitch throughout, knit plain for 
six rounds. 

l^br the fancy pattern, either the stripe with twisted 
bars, or the herringbone stripe in No. 10, (page 40), or 
the oval and diamond pattern. No. 30. (page 45), will 
be suitable. Of course in knitting in the round the 
purled rounds must be knitted instead of purled, 
as the patterns are described for working on two 
pins. 

Keep the back pin in plain knitting throughout and 
work the fancy pattern on the two front pins. Con- 
tinue for two inches before beginning the heel, or 
longer if preferred. 

For the heel: Work on thirty stitches, one row 
knit, and one row purl, for one and a halt inch. 
For the centre of hool, work sixteen plain, knit two 
together, knit one, turn, purl four, purl two toge- 
ther, purl one, turn, knit live, knit two together, 
knit one ; continue in this way, knitting one more 
stitch before the two together until all the stitches 
are knitted. Pick up twenty-four stitches on each 
side of the heel (keep the front stitches on one pin 
and the sole stitches on two pins) ; continue the pat- 
tern on the front pin. 

To shape the foot, decretise two stitches at the 
beginning of one sole pin and at the end of the other 
until thirty stitches remain on the two sole pins, 
work one and a half inch without increase or decrease, 
knit all roimd plain for three rounds ; in the fourth 
round, at the beginning of the front pin, knit one, 
slip one purl one pass the slip stitch over. At the 
end of the same pin knit two together, knit one. At 
the beginning of the first sole pin knit one, slip one 
knit one pass the slip stitch over ; at the end of the 



COMPLETE GUIDE TC ySE WORK-TABLE. 



4*1 



second %oIq pin knit two together, knit one. The 
next round is plain knitting without decrease. Con- 
tinue to work the last two rounds alternately till 
twenty-six stitches remain, cast off, and sew up the 
toe on the wrong side. 



No. 25.— CORD. 

Cast on five stitdies. 

1st Row : Slip one, knit four. 

2nd Row : Slip one as if for purling, knit three, purl 
one at the back. 

These two rows are repeated alternately. 

This is suitable for passing through a row of holes 
to draw up pelerines, petticoats, &c., or will make a 
good garter by casting on fifteen stitches. 

Nos. 26 TO 28.— INFANT'S GAITEK. 
Materials Required: 4 oz white Berlin wool, four 
pins No. 14 (Walker's gauge). 

Cast on seventy-two stitches, that is twenty-four on 
each of three pins. Knit two and purl two for two 
and a half inches ; for the first to fourth rounds of 
calf (see design No. 27), knit with the exception of the 
centre stitch of one pin, which is purled in every round 
to form the seam. Mark the stitch by drawing a piece 
of coloured wool through it, so that you may observe 
to purl it in every round. 

5th Round: Knit one, purl two, repeat. Increase by 
knitting the back, as well as the front of the loop, be- 
fore and after the seam in each fourth round three 
times, repeat from the first to the fifth rounds four 
times, then commence the decrease in the same propor- 
tion as you increased (by taking two together) until 
you have worked eight patterns ; purl two rounds, 
then commence the pattern shown in No. 28. 

1st to 3rd Rounds : Knit, decrease two in the first 
round. 

4th to 7th Rounds : Purl three, knit three, decrease 
two in the fifth round, repeat from the first to the 
seventh rounds twice more, then divide the stitches as 
you would for the foot of a stocking, that is, take the 
same number for the heel as there are for the front of 
foot. Continue the pattern on the back half of stitches 
for twenty-eight rows. Cast off. 

Pick up" the stitches at each side of the heel and knit 
them on the pin with the front stitches. Decrease by 
knitting two together at the beginning and end of 
every row until twenty-six stitches remain. Cast off. 

Sew a strap of leather to each side of the front to 
pass under the foot. The simulated buttonholes are 
made (see design), by working one treble into a stitch 
at the side of gaiter, three chain, pass over two stitches 
and repeat ; a bone button is sewn in each scallop. 



No. 29.— INFANT'S BODICE. 

Materials Required: 5 oz white Berlin wool, four 

pins No. 14 (Walker's gauge). 

Commence with the band for the waist. Cast on 
twenty-eight stitches, work backwards and forwards 
in plain knitting until you have worked eighteen or 
twenty inches ; now commence the decrease for the 
pointed flap by — 

1st Row : Knit two stitches together at the begin- 
ning of the row, knit six, slip one knit one pass the 
slip stitch over, knit to within ten stitches of the end, 
slip one knit one pass the slip stitch over, knit six, 
knit two together. 

2nd Row : Knit seven, cotton twice over the pin, 
knit to within seven stitches of the end, cotton twice 
over the pin, knit seven. 

3rd Row : Knit two together, knit five, knit one and 
purl one in the made stitches, and knit the two last 
stitches of the row together. 

4th Row : Knit six, slip one knit one pass the slip 
stitch over, knit across to the other stitches worked 



in the made stitch, slip one knit one pass the slip 
stitch over, knit six. ' 

The holes thus formed are for buttonholes, which 
should be worked over in buttonhole-stitch. Continue 
the decrease at the beginning and end of every other 
row until you have sixteen stitches on the pin, when 
make another hole as before described ; when only 
twelve stitches remain cast off. 

Fold the band as shown in the illustration, pick up 
the back half of stitches, knit one and purl one alter- 
nately for tliree inches. The purl and knitted stitches 
must be reversed in every other row to keep the rib 
on the right side ; cast off. 

The fronts are worked in two parts ; pick up the 
stitches for one side, knit one and purl one alternately 
for three inches, cast off all but the six stitches nearest 
the arm, on these work four more rows and cast off. 
The other half of front is worked in the same way. 
Sew the back and front together at the shoulders. 
With three pins pick up the stitches round the arm- 
hole for the sleeve, knit two, and purl two alternately 
for two inches. Cast off. 

A crochet edge is worked round the neck and sleeves. 

1st Row : One treble into a stitch at the edge of 
knitting, one treble into the next stitch, two chain, 
pass over two stitches and repeat. 

2nd Row : One double under two chain, three chain. 
Repeat. 

A ribbon is run through the row of trebles and is 

tied in front. 

No. 30.-OVAL AND DIAMOND PATTERN. 

Cast on any number of stitches divisible by six. 

1st Row : Knit one, make one, knit two together at 
the back, knit one, knit two together, make one. Re- 
peat from the beginning of the row. 

2nd Row: Purl. 

The first and second rows are repeated alternately 
twice more. 

7th Row : Knit two, make one, knit three together, 
make one, knit one. Repeat from the beginning of the 
row. 

8th Row : Purl. 

9th Row : Knit one, knit two together, make one, 
knit one, make one, knit two together at the back. 
Repeat from the beginning of the row. 

10th Row: Purl. 

11th Row : Knit two together, * make one, knit 
three, make one, knit three together. Repeat from *. 
At the end of the row omit the made stitch and knSt 
one. 

12th Row : Purl. Then repeat from the first row. 



No. 31.— See No. 22. 



No. 32.— STRIPE WITH CROCHET EDGE. 

Cast on as many stitches as are needed for tns 
length of your work. 

1st Row : Knit. 

2nd Row: Purl. 

3rd Row : Knit. 

4th Row : Purl. 

5th Row : Make one, knit two together throughout. 

6th Row : Purl. Repeat from the first row. 

For the crochet edge : — 
_ 1st Row : Work one treble into a stitch of the knit- 
ting:, two chain, pass over two. Repeat. 

2nd Row : One double, one half treble, one treble, 
one half treble, and one double under each two chain 

throughout. 

No. 33._TOBACCO-BAG. 

Materials Required : One ball red, and one ball black 

knitting-silk, four pins No. 18 (Walker's gauge). 

With red silk cast on 180 stitches, that is sixty 
stitches on each of three pins, knit eighteen rounds 
plain. 



^8 

21st Round, with black silk : Make one, knit two 
together. 

22nd Round, with the same colour : Knit. 

With red silk continue to knit and purl alternately 
for one inch. Work one round like the twenty-first, 
then continue one round knit, and one round purl for 
five inches. 

To commen.ce the decrease for the bottom : — 

1st Round : Knit two together, knit five. Repeat 
all round. 

2nd to 4th Rounds : Knit. 

5th Round : Like first. 

7th to 10th Rounds : Knit. 

8th Round : Knit four, take two together. 

9th to 11th Rounds : Knit. 

12th Round : Like eighth round. 

13th to 15th Rounds : Knit. 

16th Round : Knit three, knit two together. 

17th to 19th Rounds : Knit. 

20th Round : Like sixteenth round. 

21st Round : Plain. 

22nd Round : Knit one, knit two together. Repeat 
the two last rounds until you can decrease no more, 
draw up the loops that are left with a needle and silk. 

Hem the top of the bag so that the hem comes just 
above the second row of holes, the first row forming 
the top edge. Line the bag witli wash-leather ; make 
a crochet chain of black silk, and pass through the row 
of holes to close the bag up ; tie silk tassels on to the 

chain. 

No. 34.— INSERTION. 

Cast on twelve stitciies. 

1st Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together 
twice, cotton twice over the pin, knit two together, 
knit two, make one, knit two together. 

2nd Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
knit two, purl one, knit three, make one, knit two 
together. 

3rd Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together, 
knit six, make one, knit two together. 

4th Row : Like third row. Repeat from the first 

row. 

No. 35— SQUARE FOR COUNTERPANE. 

Mateeials Required : Strntts' cotton No. 12, super 

three-threads, five pins No. 19 (Walker's gauge). 

Cast on 184 slitches, that is forty=six stitches on each 
of four pins. 

1st Round : Knit. 

2nd Round : Purl. 

3rd Round : Make one, knit two together throughout. 

4th Round : Knit. 

5th Round : Purl two together at the beginning and 
end of each pin, purl the remaining stitches. Repeat 
the fourth and fifth rounds alternately, until only one 
stitch remains on each pin. Break o-ff the cotton and 
draw through all the stitches on the pins with a needle 
and the end of the cotton. 

No. 36 — DIAMOND WITH OPEN TRELLIS. 

Cast on any number of stitches divisible by fourteen. 

1st Row : Knit one, make one, knit two together at 
tho back, make one, knit two together at the back, 
knit five, knit two together, make one, knit two toge- 
ther, make one. Repeat. 

2nd Row: Purl. 

3rd Row : Knit two, make one, knit two together at 
the back, make one, knit two together at the back, 
knit three, knit two together, make one, knit two toge- 
ther, make one, knit one. Repeat. 

4th Row : Purl. 

5th Row : Knit three, make one, knit two together 
At the back, make one, knit two together at the back, 
knit one, knit two together, make one? knit two toge- 
ther, make one, knit two. Repeat. __ — 

6th Eow ; Purl. 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



7th Row : Knit four, make one, knit two together at 
the back, make one, knit three together, make one, 
knit two together, make one, knit three. Repeat. 

8th Row: Purl. 

9th Row : Knit three, knit two together, make one, 
knit two together, make one, knit one, make one, knit 
two together at the back, make one, knit two toge- 
ther at the back, knit two. Repeat. 

10th Row : Purl. 

11th Row : Knit two, knit two together, make one, 
knit two together, make one, knit three, make one, 
knit two together at the back, make one, knit two 
together at the back, knit one. Repeat. 

12th Row : Purl. 

13th Row : Knit one, knit two together, make one, 
knit two together, make one, knit five, make one, knit 
two together at the back, make one, knit two toge- 
ther at the back. Repeat. 

14th Row : Purl. 

15th Row : Knit two together, * make one, knit two 
together, make one, knit seven, make one, knit two 
together at the back, make one, knit three together. 
Repeat from *. At the end of the last pattern in this 
row there will be only one stitch to knit instead of 
three together. 

16th Row : Purl. 

Then repeat from the beginning of the row. 



No. 37 — DIAMOND PATTERN. 

Cast on any number of stitches divisible by four- 
teen. 

1st Row : Knit four, * slip one knit two together pass 
the slipped stitch over the two knitted together, mako 
one by knitting the horizontal loop before the next 
stitch, knit seven. Repeat from *. End the row with 
knit two. 

2nd Row : Purl. 

3rd Row : Knit three, * knit two together, make 
one, knit two together at the back, knit five. Repeat 
from *. End the row with knit two together at the 
back. 

4th Row: Purl. 

5th Row : Knit two, * knit two together, make one, 
knit one, make one, knit two together at the back? 
knit three. Repeat from *. End the row with kniti 
one. 

6th Row: Purl. 

7th Row : * Knit one, knit two together, make one, 
knit one, make one, knit one, make one, knit one, 
make one, knit two together at the back. Repeat 
from *. End tlie row with knit one. 

8th Row : Purl. 

9th Row : Knit two togetlier, * knit seven, slip one, 
knit two together, pass the slipped stitch over the two 
Ivnitted together, make one by knitting the horizontal 
loop. Repeat from *. End the row with knit eight. 

10th Row : Purl. 

11th Row : Make one. * knit two togetlier at the 
back, knit five, knit two together, make one, knit one. 
Repeat from ♦. End the row with knit five. 

12th Row : Purl. 

13th Row : * Knit one, make one, knit two togethei- 
at the back, knit three, knit two together, make one. 
Repeat from *. End the row with knit one. 

14th Row : Purl. 

15th Row : Knit one, make one, knit one, make one, 
knit two together at the back, knit one, knit two 
together, make one, knit one, make one. Repeat from 
the beginning of the row. End the row with knit one. 

16th Row : Purl. Then repeat from the first row. 

The two designs, Nos. 36 and 37, are suitable •:>r 
either window-curtains or shawls ; if for the former 
use 'knitting cotton No. 18, and bone pins No. 10 
(Walker's gauge) . For shawls, Andalusian or Shetland 
wool, and bone pins No. 11 (Walker's gauge). 




HE 

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KNITTING. 




NO. 38.— LEAF AND TBELLIS. 



ISLBJITTIKTO 



BO 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



DESCRIPTION OF ILLUSTRATION ON PAGE 49. 



No. 38.--LEAF AND TRELLIS PATTERN. 

This is a very beautiful pattern for shawls, curtains, 
&;c. 

In working a shawl or curtains it is best to cast on 
suiBcient stitches to work six stitches plain at the 
Beginning and end of each row. This applies both to 
the purl and knit rows ; and to make the square com- 
plete, six rows of knit and purl alternately must be 
::>^orked before beginning, and at the end of the work. 

Twenty stitches are needed for each pattern. 

Knitters must not expect to find that they can work 
to the end of the pattern described in the last repeat 
of a row, in consequence of the pattern waving a 
great deal. It is always begun from one side and will 
work out perfectly correct, as anyone will find after 
trying it through. 

1st Row: Purl. 

2nd Row : Knit six, ^ make one and knit two to- 
gether three times, make one, knit two, knit two to- 
gether, knit ten. Repeat from * (there will be only f our 
out of ten stitches to knit before the border stitches 
of this row in the last repeat). 

3rd Row : Purl. 

4th Row : Knit two, * knit two together, knit two, 
make one, knit one, make one and knit two together 
five times, knit five. Repeat from *. 

5th Row : Purl. 

6th Row : Knit one, ^ knit two together, knit two, 
make one, knit three, make one and knit two together 
three times, make one, knit two, knit two together, 
knit three. Repeat from *. 

7th Row i PurL 



8th Row : Knit two together, knit two, make one, 
knit five, make one and knit two together three times, 
make one, knit two, knit two together, knit one. Re- 
peat from beginning of row. 
9th Row : Purl. 

10th Row : Knit three, * make one, knit seven, make 
one and knit two together three times, make one, knit 
two, slip one, knit two together, pass the slip stitch 
over the last stitch, knit two. Repeat from * (in the 
last repeat there will be but one stitch to.pass the slip 
stitch over, before the edge stitches, which must be 
kept straight). 
11th Row : Purl. 

12th Row : Knit two together, knit five, * knit two 
together and make one five times, knit one, make one, 
knit two, knit two together, knit five. Repeat from *. 
13th Row : Purl. 

14th Row : Knit five, * knit two together, knit two, 
make one and knit two together three times, make 
one, knit three, make one, knit two, knit two toge- 
ther, knit three. Repeat from *. 
15th Row : Purl. 

16th Row : Knit four, * knit two together, knit two, 
make one and knit two together three times, make 
one, knit five, make one, knit two, knit two together, 
knit one. Repeat from *. 
17th Row: Purl. 

18th Row : Knit three, knit two together, knit two, 
* make one and knit two together three times, make 
one, knit seven, make one, knit two, shp one, knit two 
together, pass the slip stitch over the last, knit two. 
Repeat from *. 
Repeat from the third row for the required length. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



m 



KNITTING (CoTttzTZTzed). 



o^e^o 



Nos. 39 AND 40.— HALF-SQUARE SHAWL. 
Materials Required: 3 oz blue Berlin wool, eight 

bal]s Messrs. Faudel, Phillips, & Son's white pom- 
padour wool, two bone pins No. 9 (Walker's gauge). 

This prett}^ and effective shawl is easily worked, 
and will be found a most comfortable opera-wrap ; it 
measures If yard across the top from point to point. 

Cast on with Berlin wool 300 stitches. Decrease to 
shape the shawl by knitting two together at the end 
of each row ; work in plain knitting throughout. 

1st Row : With Berlin wool. 

2nd to 9th Row: With pompadour wool. 

10th Row : With Berlin wool to form the lozenge- 
shaped pattern. When working the first and second 
stitch pick up and knit the corresponding stitches of 
the last Berhn row with them, bnit eight stitches, then 
pick up the two next stitches and so on (see design 
No. 40). ^ ^ 

11th Row : With Berlin wool, knit plain. Repeat 
from the second row, reversing the pattern formed in 
the tenth row by picking up the stitches between 
those picked up in the tenth row. The two sides are 
finished by tying in lengths of wool to form tassels. 

The straight edge is finished by crochet scallops of 
pompadour wool. 

1st Row: One double into each of the cast-on 
stitches. 

2nd Row: One double into a stitch, pass over two 
doubles, five trebles into the next. Repeat. 



No. 41.— STRIPE WITH HEMMED TOP FOR 
STOCKING. 

Cast on three pins any number of stitches divisible 
by eight. 

1st to 6th Rounds : Knit. 

7th Round : Make one, knit two together through- 
out. 

8th to 13th Rounds : Knit. 

When the work is finished, the first six rounds are 
turned down and hemmed, leaving the seventh round 
to form the points at the top. 

14th and 15th Rounds : Purl. 

Now commence the pattern. 

1st Round : Knit one, make one, knit two, slip one, 
knit two together, pass the slip stitch over the two 
knitted together, knit two, make one. Repeat from 
the beginning of the round. 

2nd Round : Knit. These two rounds are repeated 
alternately. 

No. 42.-INSERTION. 

Cast on twenty-eight stitches. 

1st Row: Slip one, make one, knit two together 
tiwice, make one, knit two together, knit five, knit two 
together, make one, knit two together, knit five, knit 
two together, make one, knit two together, knit one, 
make one, knit two together. 

2nd Row: Slip one, make one, knit two together, 
knit one, knit one and purl one in the made stitch, 
knit seven, knit one and purl one m the made stitch, 
knit seven, knit one and purl one in the made stitch, 
knit two, make one, knit two together. 

3rd Row : SHp one, make one, knit two together, 
knit seven, knit two together, make one, knit two 
together twice, make one, knit two together, knit 
eight, make one, knit two together. 



4th Row : Slip one, make one, knit two together, 
knit eight, knit one and purl one in the made stitch, 
knit two, knit one and purl one in the made stitch, 
knit nine, make one, knit two together. 

5th Row Slip one, make one, knit two together, 
knit five, knit two together, make one, knit two toge- 
ther twice, make one, knit two together twice, make 
one, knit two together, knit six, make one, knit two 
together. 

6th Row : Slip one, make one, knit two together, 
knit six, knit one and purl one in the made stitch, 
knit two, knit one and purl one in the made stitch, 
knit two, knit one and purl one in the made stitch, 
knit seven, make one, knit two together. 
7th Row : Like the third row. 
8th Row : Like the fourth row. 
9th Row : Like the first row. 
10th Row : Like the secoiad row. • 
11th Row : Slip one, make one, knit two together, 
knit two, knit two together, make one, knit two toge- 
ther, knit ten, knit two together, make one, knit two 
together, knit three, make one, knit two together, 

12th Row : Slip one, make one, knit two together, 
knit three, knit one and purl one in the made stitch^ 
knit twelve, knit one and purl one in the made stitch> 
knit four, make one, knit two together. 

13th Row : Slip one, make one, knit two together 
twice, make one, knit two together twice, make one, 
knit two together, knit six, knit two together, make 
one, knit two together twice, make one, knit two toge- 
ther, knit one, make one, knit two together. 

14th Row : Slip one, make one, knit two together, 
knit one, knit one and purl one in the made stitch, 
knit two, knit ©ne and purl one in the made stitch, 
knit eight, knit one and purl one in the made stitch, 
knit two, knit one and purl one in the made stitch^ 
knit two, make one, knit two together. 
15th Row : Like the eleventh row. 
16th Row : Like the twelfth row, then repeat froi^ 
the first row. 



Nos. 43 AND 47.— INFANT'S PETTICOAT. 
Materials Required : 8 oz white and 2 oz pink j3er- 

lin wool or peacock fingering, four pins No. IG 

(Walker 's gauge) . ' 

Commence with the bodice. Cast on sixty stitches, 
knit six rows, knit twenty stitches on these with the 
third pin, knit ten rows, cast off (this is for the first 
half of front) ; cast off twenty stitches of the forty left 
on the first pin (that is for the shoulder). Knit on the 
remaining twenty stitches for twenty rounds for the 
back of bodice, cast on with the third pin twenty 
stitches for the other half of front and knit ten rounds-, 
then on the same pin cast on twenty more for the 
other shoulder, knit on one pin with the twenty for 
the back ; you will now have sixty stitches on the pin, 
on these knit six rounds and cast off. Sew up under 
the arms with a needle and wool. Pick up the stitches 
round the armhole with three pins and knit with a 
fourth six plain rows. Pick up the stitches at the 
waist. For the band, make one, knit two together 
throughout, this forms the holes at the waist through 
which to run the ribbon to tie round the waist. Next 
row knit plain. 

For the pattern shown in No. 47. 

1st Row : Knit one and purl one in the first and last 
stitches, knit the rest plain. 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 




so, 43.-nreEJP.IJC; 



KO. 43 — INTANX'S TSStlGOA^' 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 




NO. SO.r— DOITBLB ROSE LKAT. 



NO. 5I.~C0RAL PATTERN. 



64 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



2nd Row: Knit. 

3rd Row: Purl. 

4th R«)w : Purl one, knit one in the first and last 
j.titches, purl the rest. 

5th Row : Enit one, purl one. 

6th Row : Knit one, slip one. 

7th Row : Purl. 

8th Row : Knit. 

9th Rovv : Knit. Itepeat from the first row five 
times more and cast olf . 

The lower half of skirt is worked separately in cable 
pattern, directions for working which will be found 
jn No. 13, (page 38). 

Cast on fifty-four stitches, this will allow for six plain 
stitches at eacn edge, and twelve stitches between 
each of three patterns. This is sewn to the skirt with 
a needle and wool ; the pink stripes are worked in 
crochet on the sixth row of plain stripes between the 
cable patterns. 

At the bottom of petticoat and round the sleeves 
work one double into a stitch of knitting, pass over 
one stitch, five trebles into the next, pass over one 
stitch, and repeat from the beginning of the row. 

For the crochet edging round the neck : — 

1st Row : Work with white wool one double into a 
stitch of knitting, one chain, pass over one stitch, and 
repeat. 

2nd Row : One double under one chain, three chain. 
Repeat. A ribbon is run through the first row and is, 
tied in f rontc 



Nos. U AND 48.— TRIMMING FOR CHEMISE. 

Materials Required : Crochet cotton No. 20, and two ' 
pins No. 20 (Walker's gauge). 

Cast on twenty-four stitches. 

Ti&l and 2nd Rows : Knit. 

ii^rdRow: SUp one, knit two together, make one, 
rv;.i/.u; two together, knit fourteen, knit two together, 
Kt^^Ha one, knit two together, knit one. 

v..iia Row: Knit one and purl one in the made 
»tf«j^hes, knit the rest. 

{'ih Row : Knit. 

M.ih Row : Like the third row. 

»5th Row : Like fourth row. 

ath Row : Like fifth row. 

9th Row : SUp one, knit two together, make one, 
knit two together, knit five, knit two together, make 
one, knit two together, knit five, knit two together, 
make one, knit two together, knit one. 

10th Row: Knit one and purl one in the made 
stitches, knit the rest plain. 

11th Row : Slip one, knit seven, knit two together, 
make one, knit two together twice, make one, knit 
two together, knit eight. 

12th Row : Slip one, knit two together, make one, 
knit two together, knit four, knit one and purl one in 
the made stitch, knit two, knit one and purl one in 
the made stitch, knit four, knit two together, make 
one, knit two together, knit one. 

13th Row : Slip one, knit one, knit one and purl one 
in the made stitch, knit two, knit two together, 
make one, knit two together twice, make one, knit 
two together twice, make one, knit two together, knit 
two, knit one and purl one in the made stitch, knit two. 

14-th Row: Knit one and purl one in the made 
stitches, knit the rest plain. 

15th Row : Slip one, knit two together, make one, 
knit two together, knit three, knit two together, make 
one, knit two together twice, make one, knit two toge- 
ther, knit three, knit two together, make 006, knit two 
together, knit one^ 



16th Row: Knit one and purl one in the made 
stitches, knit the rest plain. 

17th Row : Slip one, knit nine, knit two together, 
make one, knit two together, knit ten. 

18th Row: Knit one and purl ono in the made 
stitches, knit the rest plain. 

Repeat from the third row for the length required 
round the neck. 

The sleeves are worked separately, just the length 
for round the arm. 

For the crochet edge : — 

1st Row : One double into a stitch of knitting, one 
chain, and repeat all round. 

2nd Row : One double under one chain, one chain. 
Repeat. 

3rd Row : One double under one chain, three chain, 
bne double into the first, one chain, pass over one 
chain of last row, and repeat. 

A ribbon is run through the rows of holes in the 
knitting and is tied in bows, which shapes the top of 
the trimming. 

No. 45.-DESIGN FOR STOCKINGS, SOCKS, &;c. 

This pattern is knitted in the round. 

Cast on any number of stitches divisible by ten. 

1st Round : Purl three, make one, slip one, knit one, 
pass the slipped stitch over, knit five. 

2nd Round t Purl three, knit two, make one, slip 
one, knit one, pass the slip stitch over, knit four. 

3rd Round: Purl three, knit two, make one, slip 
one, knit one, pass the sUp stitch over, knit three. 

4th Round : Purl three, knit three, make one, slip 
one, knit one, pass the slip stitch over, knit two. 

5lh Round: Purl three, knit four, make one, slip 
one, knit one, pass the slip stitch over, knit one. 

6th Round : Purl five, knit five, make one, slip one, 
knit one, pass the slip stitch over Repeat from the 
first round. 



No. 46.-DESIGN FOR CHILD'S PETTICOAT. 

Materials Required : 6 oz white peacock fingering, 

and two pins. No. 13 (Walker's gauge). 

With the wool and pins named nine stitches measure 
an inch. 

Cast on any number of stitches divisible by four. 

1st Row : Knit. 

2nd and 3rd Rows : Purl. 

4th Row : Knit. 

5th Row: Make one, slip one, knit one, pass the 
slip-stitch over, knit two. 

6th Row : Purl. 

7th Row : Knit one, make one, slip one, knit one, 
pass the slip-stitch over, knit two. End the row with 
knit one. 

8th Row : Purl. 

9th Row : Knit two, make one, slip one, knit one, 
pass the slip-stitch over. 

10th and 11th Rows : Purl. 

12th Row : Knit. 

13th Row : Knit three, purl one. 

14-th Row : Knit one, purl three. 

15th Row : Purl one, ^ knit one, purl three, repeat 
from ^ ; end with purl two. 

16th Row : Knit two, purl one, knit three ; end with 
knit one. 

17th Row : Knit one, ^ purl one, knit three, repeat 
from ^ ; end with knit two. 

18th Row : Purl two, * knit one, purl three, repeat 
from * ; end the row with purl one. Repeat from the 
thirteenth row fbr the length required. 

For the edging cast on seven stitches : — 

1st Row : Slip one, knit two, make one, knit two 
together, cotton twice over the pin, knit two toge- 
ther. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



55 



2nd Row : Slip one, purl one knit one and purl one 
in the stitch made by passing the cotton twice over 
the pin, knit two, make one, knit two together, knit 
one. 

3rd Row : Slip one, knit two, make one, knit two 
together, knit four. 

4th Row : Slip one, knit five, make one, knit two 
together, knit one. • 

5th Row : Slip one, knit two, make one, knit two 
together, cotton twice over the pin, knit two together, 
cotton twice over the pin, knit two together. 

6th Row : Slip one, purl one, knit one, and purl one 
in the made stitch, knit one, purl one, knit one, and 
purl one in the next made stitch, knit two, make one, 
knit two together, knit one. 

7th Row : Slip one, knit two, make one, knit two 
together, knit eight. 

8th Row : Cast off six stitches, knit three, make one, 
knit two together, knit one. Repeat from the first 
row. 

This edging is sewn to the bottom of petticoat with 
a needle and wool. 



No. 47.— See No. 43. 



No. 48 .—See No. 44. 



No. 49.— INFANT'S GLOVE. 

Materials Required for a Pair : 1 oz white Berlin 

wool, one skein blue, two knitting-pins No. 10, and 

two No, 14 (Walker's bell gauge). 

Cast on fifty-seven stitches with pins No. 10. 

1st to 14th Rows : Make one, slip one, knit two 
together. Repeat to the end of row. 

15th to 18th Rows : With No. 14 pins, like first to 
fourteenth. 

19th Row : Knit one, knit two together. Repeat. 

20th Row : Knit one, * make one, knit two together. 
Repeat from * to the end of row. 

21st Row : Knit. 

22nd Row : Knit one, purl one. Repeat. 

23rd Row: Purl the knitted and knit the pm-1 
stitches of last row. The t-wenty-second and twenty- 
third rows are repeated three times. 

30th Row : Make one, slip one, knit one. Repeat to 
the end of row. 

31st to 37th Rows : Make one, slip one, knit two 
together. Repeat to the end of rows. 

38th Row : Make one, slip one, knit two together, 
repeat five times more; turn, leaving the other 
stitches, and knit the eighteen stitches in the same 
pattern for thirteen rows more. 

52nd Row : Knit one, knit two together t© the end 
of row. 

53rd Row : Knit two together to the end of row, 
then cast off. This forms the thumb. 

Now, with the stitches that are left on the pin, com- 
mence the thirty-ninth row of hand by knitting 
three stitches together to decrease one rib, "then make 
one, sHp one, knit two together to the end of row. 

40th Row : Make one, slip one, knit two together to 
the end of row, knitting the three last stitches toge- 
ther. Repeat the two last rows once more, but you 
will have only two stitches to knit together at the end. 

43rd Row : Knit three together ; to decrease as be- 
fore, * make one, slip one, knit two together. Repeat 
from *. 

44th Row t Make one, slip one, knit two together, 
knitting three together at the end; repeat thwj last 



row fourteen times more, knitting two instead of three 
together at the end of the rows. 

59th Row : Knit one, knit two together to tl.ie end. 

60th Row : Knit one, purl one. Repeat. 

61st Row : Like sixtieth row. 

62nd Row : Knit two together, repeat, then cast off, 
sew the ends and inside of the thumb together, and 
the edge-stitches of the hand ; a narrow sarsnet ribbon 
may be run through the holes at the wrist if preferred, 
or a row of crochet chain may bo worked round it to 
draw the wrist in a- little. This glove is for the right 
hand. Commence to knit the hand part first instead 
of the thumb for the left hand. The little pattern on 
the cuff is made by working diagonally about four 
chain-stitches with a needle and blue wool. 



No. 50.— DOUBLE ROSE-LEAF PATTERN. 

Cast on three stitches for each close stripe, and 
seventeen stitches for each open stripe. As many 
stripes can be worked as the width of article requires ; 
the open stripe must have a close stripe on each side 
of it. 

1st Row : * Knit one, purl two, knit one, make one, 
knit one, slip one, knit one, pass the slipped stitcli 
over, purl one, knit two together, knit one, puri one, 
knit one, slip one, knit one, pass the slipped stitch 
over, purl one, knit two together, knit one, make one 
knit one, repeat from * ; end the row with nml two , 
knit one. 

2nd Row : * Purl one, knit two, purl four, knit ontj 
purl two, knit one, purl two, knit one, purl four, re^ 
peat from ^ ; end the row with knit two, purl one. 

3rd Row : "^ Knit one, purl two, knit one, make one, 
knit one, make one, slip one, knit one, pass the stipped 
stitch over, purl one, knit two together, purl one, slip 
one, knit one, pass the slipped stitch over, purl one^ 
knit two together, make one, knit one, make one, knit 
one, repeat from * ; end the row with purl two, knit 
one. 

4th Row : * Purl one, knit two, purl five, knit one, 
purl one, knit one, purl one, knit one, purl five, repeat 
from * ; end with knit two, purl one. 

5th Row : ^ Knit one, purl'two, knit one, make one. 
knit three, make one, slip one, knit two tegether, pass 
the slipped stitch over, purl '>ne, slip one, knit two 
together, pass the slipped stitch over, make one, knit 
three, make one, knit one, repeat from '^ ; end with 
purl two, knit one. 

6th Row : * Purl sne, knit two, purl seven, knit one, 
purl seven, repeat irom * ; end with knit two, purl 
one. 

7th Row : * Knit one, purl two, knit one, make one, 
knit five, make one, slip one, knit two together, pass 
the slipped stitch over, make one, knit five, make one, 
knit one, repeat from ^ ; end with purl two, knit one. 

8th Row : * Purl one, knit two, purl seventeen, re- 
peat from * ; end with knit two, purl one. 

There are eight rows to a pattern. Sixteen rows 
must be worked before whole pattern is seen 



No. 51. -CORAL PATTERN. 

Cast on any number of stitches divisible by twenty- 
one. 

1st Row : Knit two together, knit three, knit two 
together, knit one, make one, knit one, make one, knit 
one, knit two together, knit three, knit two togethi 
knit one, make one, knit one^ make one, knit two. 

2nd Row : Purl. 

3rd Row : Knit two together, knit one, knit two to- 
gether, knit one, make one, knit three, make one, kniti 
one, knit two together, knit one, knit two together 
knit onot make one, knit threei make onei knit i^iro^ 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



4th Row: Furl. 

5th Row : Slip one, knit two together, pass the slip 
stitch over, knit one, make one, knit five, make one, 
knit one, slip one, knit two together, pass the slip 
stitch over, knit one, make one, knit five, make one, 
knit two. 

6th Row : Purl. 

7th Row : Knit two, make one, knit one, make one, 
knit one, knit two together, knit three, knit two to- 
gether, knit one, make one, knit one, make one, knit 
cne, knit two together, knit three, knit two together. 

8th Row : Purl. 

9th Row : Knit two, make one, knit three, make one, 
knit one, ^{^nit two together, knit one, knit two toge- 
ther, kni one, make one, knit three, make one, knit 
one, knit iwo together, knit one, knit two together. 

10th Row: Purl. 

nth Row : Knit two, make one, knit five, make one, 
knit one, slip one, knit two together, pass the slip 
stitch over, knit one, make one, knit five, make one, 
knit one, slip one, knit two together, pass the slip 
stitch over. Repeat from the first row. 



FEATHER-PATTERN KNITTING. 

Cast on any number of stitches divisible by twenty- 
five, allowing three extra stitches at each edge to be 
knitted plain, to form a straight edge. 

1st Row : Knit the three first stitches, knit two to- 
gether four times, * knit one, make one, and knit one 
eight times, knit two together eight times, repeat 
from *. End the row with knit two together four 
times, knit three. 

2nd Row: Purl. 

3rd Row: Knit. 

4th Row : Purl. 

i^epeat from the first row. 



KNITTED JACKET FOR LADY. 
^Iateeials Requieed: 6 oz each scarlet and gray 

double Berlin wool, two bone knitting pins, No 6 

(Walker's gauge), a tricot hook No. 7. 

This jacket is very easy to make ; it is knitted in 
three stripes, two gray and one scarlet. The stripes are 
joined by a needle and wool. For the gray stripes, 
which are made long enough to pass over the shoulder 
and form both the front and back stripe, cast on 
twenty-one stitches, knit three and purl three alter- 
nately ; always slip the first stitch ; continue to knit 
thus until you have made the stripe the length re- 
quired, purling the knitted and knitting the purled 
stitches in each alternate row. About 174 rows will 
be required. These stripes compose the two sides, 
shoulder-pieces, and fronts. The stripe for the back 
is knitted with scarlet wool in the same way, making 
it half the length. The light stripes are sewn one each 
side of the back, then each is folded and sewn up 
under the arm, leaving a sufficient space for the arm- 
hole. With scarlet wool work a stripe of tricot on 
eight stitches. For the edge of the stripes work one 
double*into a stitch, four chain, one treble into first 
of four chain, pass over two stitches of tricot and re- 
pea^ This stripe is sewn to the jacket as shown in 
th9 illustration. A similar stripe serves for the 



sleeves, working on six instead of eight stitchei. Th^< 
jacket is fastened by pearl buttons. 



PETTICOAT KNITTED IN STRIPES. 

Materials Required : | lb Berlin or three-thread fieeoy 

wool, two bone knitting-pins No. 9, and two pins 

No. 11 (Walker's gauge). 

This petticoat is simply and quickly made ; it is 
composed of twelve stripes, each knitted separately. 

Commence at the bottom ; cast on with white wool 
forty-one stitches. 

1st Row : Make one, knit nineteen, slip one, knit two 
together, pass the slipped stitch over the two knitted 
together, knit nineteen. 

2nd Row : Make one, knit to the end of the row. 
These two rows are repeated throughout. 

The 3rd, 4th, 7th, 8th, 11th, and 12th rows are 
knitted with blue wool, all the rest with white. To 
decrease the size of the petticoat towards the waist, 
knit with No. 11 pins after two-thirds of the length 
has been worked. The length of the petticoat must 
be regulated according to the size required. When all 
the stripes are worked, they are joined together on the 
right side with single-stitches worked in crochet. 

For the crochet edge, work with blue wool one 
double into the edge of knitting, four chain, one treble 
into first of four chain, one double into petticoat. Re* 
peat all round. 

The top of the petticoat is sewn to a deep band oi": 
white linen ; put the points into the linen band. Tha 
bottom is finished by a kilting of muslin, edged witi? 
lace, put in under the points. 



BRIOCHE MAT. 

Materials Required: 1 oz each of two colour* 

double Berlin wool, two pins No. 8 (Walker's gauge). 

Pale blue or coral pink with bronze-green will make 
a pretty mat. 

Cast on eighteen stitches. 

1st Row : Put the pin into a stitch, wind the wool 
three times over first two fingers of the left hand and 
over the pin, pull the three thicknesses through and 
knit off the stitch, repeat from beginning three times 
more, * make one, slip one, knit two together, *- You 
will now have seven stitches on right-hand pin. 

2nd Row : Turn, * make one, slip one, knit two to- 
gether, * knit four, taking the loops of fringe with 
each stitch. 

3rd Row : Repeat from beginning to end of first row, 
repeat from * to * once more. You will now have ten 
stitches on your right-hand pin. 

4th Row : Like second row, repeating from * to * 
twice. 

5th Row : Like first row ; repeating from * to * three 
times, you have thirteen stitches on right-hand pin. 

6th Row : Like second row, repeating from * to * 
three times. 

7 th Row : Like first, repeat from * to * three timos, 
knit five, you have now all the stitches on your pin. 

8th Row : With the second colour, knit five, make 
one, slip one, knit two together three times, knit four. 
Repeat from the beginning fifteen times more. Cast 
off, sew up, and draw the centre closely together. 



MPiiTi mim m tie 

KNITTING. 



W@IK-TiBM. 




NO. 52.— COITNTERPAXK WiTH DIAMOND STRIPE. 



JK.Ti!rTTTXlKCh. 



^ 



56 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



KNITTING (Conttn-cLecL). 



No. 52.— DIAMOND STRIPE FOR COUNTERPANE. 
Materials Required: Strutts' best three-thread knit- 
ting cotton No. 16 ; two knitting pins No. 16 (Walker's 
1 bell gauge). The quantity of cotton must depend 

on the size of quilt. 

For the wide stripe cast on fifty-three stitches. 

1st Row: Purl one and knit one ten times, purl 
three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl three ; knit 
one and purl one ten times. 

2nd Row : Knit one and purl one ten times, knit 
three, purl three, knit one, purl three, knit three, purl 
one and knit one ten times. 

3rd Row : Like first row. 

4-th Row : Purl one and knit one nine times, purl 
one, knit three, purl three, knit one, purl one, knit one, 
purl three, knit three. Purl and knit alternately to 
the end of the row, 

5th Row: Purl the knitted and knit the purled 
stitches of last row. 

6th Row : Like fourth row. 

7th Row : Purl and knit alternately nine times, purl 
three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl one, knit 
three, purl three, knit and purl alternately to the end 
of the row. 

8th Row : Like the fifth row. 

9th Row : Like the seventh row. 

10th Row : Purl and knit alternately eight times, 
puri one, knit three, purl three, knit one, purl five. 
knit one, purl three, knit three. Purl and Imit alter- 
nately to the end of the row. 

11th Row : Like eighth row. 

12th Row : Like tenth row. 

13th Row: Purl and knit alternately eight times, 
purl three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl one, 
knit three, purl one, knit three, purl three. Knit 
and purl alternately to the end of the row. 

14-th Row : Like eleventh row, 

15th Row : Like thirteenth row. 

16th Row : Purl and knit alternately seven times, 
purl one, knit three, purl three, knit one, purl three, 
knit three, purl three, knit ©ne, purl three, knit 
three. Purl and knit alternately to the end of the 
row. 

17th Row : Like fourteenth row, 

18th Row : Like sixteenth row. 

19th Row : Purl and knit alternately seven times, 
purl three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl five, 
knit three, purl one, knit three, purl three. Knit and 
purl alternately to the end of the row. 

20th Row : Like seventeenth row. 

21st Row : Like nineteenth row. 

22nd Row : Purl and knit alternately six times, purl 
one, knit three, purl three, knit one, purl three, knit 
seven, purl three, knit one, purl three, knit three. 
Purl and knit alternately to the end of the row. 

23rd Row : Like twentieth row. 

24th Row: Like twenty-second row. 

25th Row : Purl and knit alternately six times, purl 
three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl nine, knit 
three, purl one, knit three, purl three. Knit and purl 
alternately to the end of the row. 

26th Row ; Like twenty-third row. 

27th Row : Like twenty-fifth row. 

28th Row : Purl one and knit one alternately five 
times, purl one, knit three, purl three, knit one, purl 



three, knit eleven, purl three, knit one, purl three, knit 
three. Purl and knit alternately to the end of the 
row. 

29th Row : Like twenty-sixth row. 

30th Row : Like twenty-eighth row. 

31st Row : Purl one and knit one alternately five 
times, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl 
six, make one, knit one, make one, purl six, knit three, 
purl one, knit three, purl three. Knit and purl alter- 
nately to the end of the row. 

32nd Row : Knit the purl and purl the knitted and 
made stitches. 

33rd Row : Purl on© and knit one alternately five 
times, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl 
six, knit one, make one, knit one, make one, knit one, 
purl six, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl three. 
Knit and purl alternately to the end of the row. 

34-th Row : Purl one and knit one alternately four 
times, purl one, knit three, purl three knit one, purl 
three, knit seven, purl five, knit seven, purl three, knit 
one, purl three, knit three. Purl and knit alternately 
to the end of the row. 

35th Row : Knit one and purl one alternately four 
times, knit one, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit 
three, purl seven, knit twe, make one, knit one, make 
one, knit two, purl seven, knit three, purl one, knit 
three, purl three. Knit and purl alternately to the 
end of the row. 

36th Row : Purl the kni,t and made stitches, and knit 
the purl stitches of last row. 

37th Row : Purl one and knit one alternately four 
times, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl 
eight, knit three, make one, knit one, make one, knit 
three, purl eight, knit three, purl one, knit three, 
purl three. Knit and purl alternately to the end of 
the row. 

38th Row : Like thirty-sixth row. 

39th Row : Purl one and knit one alternately four 
times, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl 
eight, knit two together at the back, knit five, knit 
two together, purl eight, knit three, purl one, knit 
three, purl three. Knit and purl alternately to the end 
of the row. 

4-Oth Row : Purl one and knit one alternately three 
times, purl one, knit three, purl three, knit one, purl 
three, knit nine, purl seven, knit nine, purl three, knit 
one, purl three, knit three. Purl and knit alternately 
to tlie end of the row. 

4-lst Row : Knit one and purl one alternately three 
times, knit one, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit 
three, purl nine, knit two together at the back, knit 
three, knit two together, purl nine, knit three, purl 
one, knit three, purl three. Knit and purl alternately 
to the end of tlie row. 

4-2nd Row : Purl the knit and knit the purl stitches 
of last row. 

4-3rd Row : Purl one and knit one alternately thren 
times, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl 
ten, knit two together at the back, knit one, knit two 
together, purl ten, knit three, purl one, knit three, 
purl three. Knit and purl alternately to the end of 
the row. 

4-4-th Row ! Like forty-second row. 

4-5th Row : Purl one and knit one alternately three 
times, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



59 



ten, slip one, knit two together, and pass the slip 
stitch over them, purl ten, knit three, purl one, knit 
three, purl three. Knit and purl alternately to the 
end of the row. 

46th Row : Purl one and knit one alternately twice, 
purl one, knit throe, purl three, knit one, purl three, 
knit twenty-three, purl three, knit one, purl three, 
knit three. Purl and knit alternately to the end of 
tlie row. 

47th Row : Knit one and purl one alternately twice, 
knit one, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit three, 
purl twenty-three, knit three, purl one, knit three, 
purl three. Knit and purl alternately to the end of 
the row. 

48th Row : Knit the purl and purl the knit stitches 
ot last row. 

49th Row : Purl one and knit one alternat^y twice, 
nurl three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl six, 
mBKe one, JKnit one, make one, purl eleven, make one, 
knit one,- make one, purl six, knit three, purl one, knit 
three, purl three. Knit and purl alternately to the 
end of the row. 

50th Row : Purl tlie knitted and made stitches and 
knit the purl stitches of last row. 

51st Row : Purl one and knit one alternately twice, 
purl three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl six, 
knit one, make one, knit one, make one, knit one, purl 
eleven, knit one, make one, knit one, make one, knit 
one, purl six, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl 
three. Knit and purl alternately to the end of the 
row. 

52nd Row : Purl one, knit one, purl one, knit three, 
purl three, knit one, purl three, knit seven, purl five, 
knit eleven, purl five, knit seven, purl three, knit one, 
Durl three, knit three. Purl and knit alternately to 
twe*© end of the row. 

D3rd Row : Knit one, purl one, knit one, purl three, 
knit three, purl one, knit three, purl seven, knit two, 
make one, knit one, make one, knit two, purl eleven, 
knit two, make one, knit one, make one, knit two, 
purl seven, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl 
three. Knit and purl alternately to the end of the 
row. 

54th Row : Like fiftieth row. 

55th Row : Purl one, knit one, purl three, knit three, 
purl one, knit three, purl eight, knit three, make one, 
knit one, make one, knit three, purl eleven, knit three, 
make one, knit one, make one, knit three, purl eight, 
knit, three, purl one, knit three, purl three, knit one, 
purl one. 

56th Row : Like fifty-fourth row. 

57th Row : Purl one, knit one, purl tliree, knit three, 
purl one, knit three, purl eight, knit two together at 
the back, knit five, knit two together, purl eleven, 
knit two together at the back, knit five, knit two 
together, purl eight, knit three, purl one, knit three, 
purl three, knit one, purl one. 

58th Row : In this row the decrease of the diamond 
is commenced. Purl one, knit one, purl one, knit 
three, purl three, knit one, purl three, knit seven, purl 
seven, knit eleven, purl seven, knit seven, purl three, 
knit one, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit one, 
purl one. 

59th Row : Knit one, purl one, knit one, purl three, 
Jcnit three, purl one, knit three, purl seven, knit two 
together at the back, knit three, knit two together, 
purl eleven, knit two together at the back, knit three, 
Icnit two together, purl seven, knit three, purl one, 
knit three, purl three, knit one, purl one, knit one. 

60th Row : Like forty-eighth row. 

61st Row : Purl one, knit one alternately twice, purl 
three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl six, knit 
t wo together at the back, knit one, knit two together, 
purl eleven, knit two together at the back, knit one, 



knit two together, purl six, knit three, purl one, knit 
three, purl three, knit one, purl one, knit one, purl 
one. 

62nd Row : Like sixtieth row. 

63rd Row: Purl and knit alternately twice, purl 
three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl six, slip 
one, knit two together, pass the slip stitch over them, 
purl eleven, slip one, knit two together, pass the slip 
stitch over them, purl six, knit three, purl one, knit 
three, purl three, knit one, purl one, knit one, purl 
one. 

64th Row : Purl one and knit one alternately twice, 
purl one, knit three, purl tliree, knit one, purl three, 
knit twenty- three, purl three, knit one, purl three, 
knit three. Purl and knit alternately to the end of 
row. 

65th Row : Like sixty-second row. 

66th Row : Like sixty-fourth row. 

67th Row : Purl one and knit one alcemately three 
times, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl 
ten, make one, knit one, make one, purl ten, knit 
three, purl one, knit three, purl three. Knit and purl . 
alternately to the end of the row. 

68th Row : Like fiftieth row. 

69th Row : Purl one and knit one alternately three 
times, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl 
ten, knit one, make one, knit one, make one, knit one, 
purl ten, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl three. _ 
Knit and purl alternately to the end of the row. 

70th Row : Purl one and knit one alternately three 
times, purl one, knit three, purl three, knit one, piirl 
three, knit nine, purl five, knit nine, purl three, knit 
one, purl three, knit three. Purl and knit alternately 
to the end of the row. 

71st Row : Knit one and purl one alternately three 
times, knit one, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit 
three, purl nine, knit two, make one, knit one, make 
one, knit two, purl nine, knit three, purl one, knit 
three, purl three. Knit and purl alternately to the 
end of the row. 

72nd Row : Purl the knit and made stitches, and knit 
the purl stitches of last row. 

73rd Row : Purl one and knit one alternately four 
times, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl 
eight, knit three, make one, knit one, make one, knit 
three, purl eight, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl 
three. Knit and purl alternately to the end of the 
row. 

74th Row : Like seventy-second row. 

75th Row : Purl one and knit one alternately four 
times, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl 
eight, knit two together at the back, knit five, knit two 
together, purl eight, knit three, purl one, knit tliree, 
purl three. Knit and purl alternately to the end of the 
row. 

76th Row : Purl one and knit one alternately four 
times, purl one, knit three, purl three, knit one, purl 
three, knit seven, purl seven, knit seven, purl three, 
knit one, purl three, knit three, purl one and knit one 
alternately to the end of the row. 

77th Row : Knit one and purl one alternately four 
times, knit one, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit 
three, purl seven, knit two together at the back, knit 
three, knit two together, purl seven, knit three, purl 
one, knit three, purl three. Knit and purl alternately 
to the end of row. 

78th Row : Like forty-eighth row. 

79th Row : Purl one and knit one alternately five 
times, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl 
six, knit two together at the back, knit one, knit two 
together, purl six, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl 
three. Knit and purl alternately to the end of the 
row. 

80th Row ; Like fotty-eighth row* 



eo 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



81st Row: Purl one and knit one alternately five 
times, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl 
six, slip one, knit two together, pass the slip stitch 
over them, purl six, knit three, purl one, knit three, 
purl three. Knit and purl alternately to the end of the 
row. 

82nd Row : Purl one and knit one alternately five 
times, purl one, knit three, purl three, knit one, purl 
three, knit eleven, purl three, knit one, purl three, knit 
three. Purl and knit alternately to the end of the row. 

83rd Row : Like forty-eighth row. 

84th Row : Like eighty-second row. 

85th Row: Purl one and knit one alternately six 
times, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl 
nine, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl three. Knit 
and purl alternately to the end of the row. 

86th Row : Like eighty-third row. 

87th Row : Like eighty-fifth row. 

88th Row : Purl one and knit one alternately six 
times, purl one, knit three, purl three, knit one, purl 
three, knit seven, purl three, knit one, purl three, knit 
three. Purl and knit alternately to the end of the 
row. 

89th Row : Like eighty-sixth row. 

90th Row : Like eighty- eighth row. 

91st Row : Purl one and knit one alternately seven 
times, purl three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl 
fivp, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl three. Knit 
and purl alternately to the end of the row, 

92nd Row : Like eighty-ninth row, 

93rd Row : Like ninety-first row. 

94th Row : Purl one and knit one alternately seven 
times, purl one, knit three, purl three, knit one, purl 
three, knit three, purl three, knit one, purl three, knit 
three. Purl and knit alternately to the end of the 
row. 

95th Row : Like ninety-second row. 

96th Row : Like ninety-third row. 

97th Row : Purl one and knit one eight times, purl 
three, knit three, purl one, knit three, purl one, knit 
three, purl one, knit three, purl three. Knit and purl 
alternately to the end of the row. 

98th Row : Like ninety-fifth row. 

99th Row : Like ninety-seventh row. 

100th Row : Purl one and knit one alternately eight 
times, purl one, knit three, purl three, knit one, purl 
tive, knit one, purl three, knit three. Purl and knit 
alternately to the end of the row. 

101st Row : Like ninety-eighth row. 

102nd Row : Like 100th row. 

103rd Row : Purl one and knit one alternately nine 
times, purl three, knii three, purl one, knit three, purl 
<3ne, knit three, purl three. Knit and purl alternately 
to the end of the row. 

104th Row : Like the 101st row. 

105th Row : Like the 103rd row. 

106th Row : Purl one and knit one alternately nine 
times, pm-1 one, knit three, purl three, knit one, purl 
one, knit one, purl three, knit three. Purl and knit 
alternately to the end of the row. 

107th Row : Like 104th row. 

108th Row : Like 106th row. 

Now repeat from the first row for the length required. 

These stripes are alternated with a feather-pattern 
stripe, for which cast on twenty-five stitches. 

1st Row : Purl four, knit three, knit two together, 
make one and knit one seven times, make one, knit 
two together at the back, knit three, purl four. 

2nd Row : Knit four, purl two, purl two together at 
the back, purl fifteen, purl two together, purl two, 
knit four. 

3rd Row : Purl four, knit one, knit two together, 
knit fifteen, knit two together at the back, knit one, 
purl four. 



4th Row : Knit four, purl two together at the back, 
purl fifteen, purl two together, knit four. 

Repeat these four rows for the required length. The 
finished stripes must be sewn together. 

The border is the same as that shown on page 33. 
This border must be knitted in pieces and sewn toge- 
ther ; it will not show the joins if neatly sewn ; cast 
on on the same plan for which we gave directions. 
The number of stitches cast on must be divisible by 
twenty-one for the feather pattern, and by nine for the 
raised leaf pattern above it. Therefore you must cast 
on for three, six, nine, or twelve repeats of the feather 
pattern illustrating this principle. Three times twenty- 
one are sixty-three, and seven times nine are sixty- 
three. If this is not kept in mind the pattern will be 
throwTi out. 



No. 53.-GENTLEMAN'S SOCK. 

Matehuls Needed : Four pins No. 14 (Walker's 
gauge), four cocoons of knitting wool, or 5 oz Scotch 
fingering. This «\'ill leave a little for mending when 
the stockings become worn. 

Cast on twenty-eight stitches on each of three pins 
with double wool ; for this, allow about two yards cf 
wool, and begin at the folded-over end. 

Knit two and purl two alternately until your work 
measures three and a half inches in depth. Then 
commence to knit plain, with the exception of the 
seam stitch, which must be purled in every row ; for 
this pick up an additional stitch level with the end of 
the wool left from casting on, which in working will 
remind you of the seam stitch when you come to it. 
When you have knitted seven inches divide the 
stitches : put half of the stitches on one pin to work 
the heel upon, thus twenti^-one stitches on each 
side of the seam stitch; divide the front stitches 
equally on two pins, the front stitches are now left 
until the heel is worked. Work the heel with double 
wool (if the socks are intended for hard wear) ; knit a 
row, decreasing by knitting two together eight times, 
that is, at every fifth stitch. Do not interfere with 
the seam, but continue it by purling it in the knitted 
rows and knitting it in the purled rows throughout 
the heel, continue to purl and knit the heel alternately 
for about twenty-eight rows or two and a quarter 
inches. 

For the gusset heel : Work twenty plain, knit two 
together, knit one, turn, purl nine, purl two together, 
purl one, turn, knit eleven, knit two together, knit 
one, continue these two last rows, taking in two 
stitches more at each turn until all the side stitches 
are taken in. At each side of the heel pick up neatly 
thirty stitches, then take in the forty-three stitches 
left before commencing the heel, in the round, but let 
them remain on a separate pin, decrease in every 
round until forty-two stitches are left at the sole. To 
decrease : Knit two together the right side and slip 
one, knit one, pass slip stitch over the left side (tc 
know left from right, imagine sock on right foot). 
When the foot measures seven and a half inches 
or eight inches, according to size wanted, for the toe, 
knit five plain rounds. 

6th Round: Decrease one stitch on each side of the 
front and each side of back stitches, always making 
the decrease in the second from the outside. 

7th Round : One plain round. 

Continue 6th and 7th Rounds until twenty-eight 
stitches are left, cast off all round and sew up on the 
wrong side. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE 



61 





wail.— DESIGN FOR SHAWLS. 




NO. s 7. -child's petticoat. 



NO. ^4.«-C0tmTEBPANE. 




KO. s6--WAJ» .^IMSKW. 









"miW'uM 



Kd 58.— BORCIB FCR PETTICOAT. 



62 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



No. 54.— DESIGN FOll COUNTERPANE. 

Two pins No. 15 (Walker's gauge) ; Strutts' cotton, 
N©. 16 three-thread super. 

This counterpane must be knitted in stripes of 100 
stitches, or cast on any number of stitches divisible by- 
five. 

1st Row : Knit three, purl two. 

2nd Row : Knit two, purl one, knit one, purl one. 
Repeat these two rows fourteen times. 

For the diamond pattern : — 

1st Row : Knit one, make one, knit two together at 
the back, knit three, knit two together, make one, re- 
peat from the beginning of row ; end the row with 
make one, knit one. 

2nd Row : Purl. 

3rd Row : Knit two, * make one, knit two together 
at the back, knit one, knit two together, make one, 
knit three, repeat from * ; end the row with make one, 
knit two. 

4th Row : Purl. 

5th Row : Knit three, * make one, k^iit three toge- 
ther, make one, knit five, repeat from * ; end the row 
with make one,^knit three. 

6th Row: Purl. 

7th Row : Knit two, knit two together, * make one, 
knit one, make one, knit two together at the back, 
knit three, knit two together, repeat from * ; end the 
row with knit two. 

8th Row : Purl. 

9th Row : Knit one, knit two together, * make one, 
knit three, make one, knit two together at the back, 
knit one, knit two together, repeat from * ; end the 
row with make one, knit two together, knit one. 

10th Row : Purl. 

11th Row : Knit two together, ^ make one, knit five, 
make one, knit three together, repeat from * ; end the 
row with make one, knit two together. 

12th Row: Purl. 

Repeat from the first row of diamond pattern once 
more ; then repeat the ribbed stripe for eighteen rows, 
w^ork this and the diamond stripe alternately till your 
work is the length you desire it to be ; finish each stripe 
with twenty-eight rows of the ribbed pattern. The 
crochet edge is worked with one treble into a stitch 
of knitting, two chain, pass over two stitches. Re- 
peat. 

No. 55.— DESIGN FOR WOOL SHAWLS. 
Shetland wool ; pins No. 10 (Walker's gauge). 

Cast on any number of stitches divisible by four, 
and allow three additional stitches for each edge. Knit 
three plain rows for an edge. 

1st Row : Slip one as if for purling, slip one, knit 
one, pass the slip stitch over, * wool twice over the 
pin, knit two together twice, repeat from ^ ; end the 
row with wool twice over the pin, slip one, knit one, 
pass the slip stitch over, knit one. 

2nd Row : Slip one, knit one, * knit one and purl 
one in the made stitch, knit two, repeat from ^ ; end 
the row with knit two. 

3rd and 4th Rows : Knit. Repeat from first row. 

Finish by knitting three plain rows. 

No. 56.— WAVL. PATTERN. 

This pattern is suitable to be used as a border for 
counterpanes, shav/ls, petticoats, &c. 

Cast on any number of stitches divisible by twelve, 
and two extra stitches for the end. 

1st Row : Purl two, make one, knit three, knit two 
together at the back, knit two together, knit three, 
make one. Repeat from the beginning of thn row ; 
finish the row with/»url two. 



"In the 2nd and each alternate Row: Knit the 
purled and purl the knitted and made stitches of the 
previous row. 

3rd Row : Purl two, knit one, make one, knit two, 
knit two together at the back, knit two together, knit 
two, make one, knit one. Repeat from the beginning 
of the row ; finish with purl two. 

4th Row : Like second row. 

5th Row: Purl two, knit two, make one, knit one, 
knit two together at the back, knit two together, knit 
one, make one, knit two. Repeat from the beginning 
of the row ; finish with purl two. 

6th Row : Like second row. 

7th Row : Purl two, knit three, make one, knit two 
together at the back, knit two together, make one, 
knit three. Repeat from the beginning of the row ; 
finish with purl two. 

8th Row : Like second row. Repeat from the first 
row. 

For the crochet edge: Work one double into the 
first stitch in the depth of scallop, four chain, one 
double into the first, one double into next stitch, * 
four chain, one double into the first, pass over one 
stitch, one double into the next. Repeat from * four 
times more, then repeat from the beginning of the 



Nos. 57 AND 58.— CHILD'S KNITTED PETTICOAT. 
Materials Required: 6 oz white and 1 oz scarlet 

Berlin wool, two knitting pins No. 10^ and two No. 

14 (Walker's bell gauge). 

Cast on 200 stitches with scarlet wool, and com- 
mence the border shown in Illustration No 58 

1st Row : Knit. 

2nd Row : Purl with white wool. 

3rd Row: Knit. 

4th Row : Knit one, make one, knit two, knit three 
together, knit two, make one. Repeat from the 
beginning of the row. 

The 5th, 7th, and 9th Rows are purled ; the 6th, 8th, 
and 10th Rows are like the fourth row ; after the tenth 
row, repeat from the first row three times more. 

The skirt of the petticoat is worked in ribbed knit- 
ting of purl three and knit three alternately. The 
stitches that are purled in one row must be knitted in 
the next to keep the ribs. When you have worked 
about half the length of the petticoat, take the pins 
No. 14, and knit for the length required. The change 
of pins will make the petticoat narrower at the top : 
cast off the stitches, sew the two sides together until 
within three inches of the top, then sew to a linen band 
in which must be worked buttonholes, in order to 
button the petticoat to the stays. 

The border of this petticoat makes a very pretty 
antimacassar knitted in shades. 



INFANT'S BOOT. 
Materials Required: | oz white AndaJusian wool, 

four pins No. 14 (Walker's gauge), and 1 yard of 

ribbon. 

Commence with the leg. Cast on fifty -three 
stitches. 

1st and 2nd Rows : Knit. 

3rd Row: Purl. 

4th to 48th Rows : Slip one, * make one, slip one, 
knit two together, repeat from *. End the rows with 
knit one. 

49th and 50th Rows : Knit. 

51st Row : Knit two together, make one, * knit two 
together, knit two, make one. Repeat from *. 

52nd and 53rd Rows : Knit. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



63 



54th Row : Knit thirty-five, leave seventeen on the 
pin, turn, take a third pir; knit eighteen, turn, take a 
fourth pin, and on these last eighteen stitches knit the 
front of the foot in herringbone stripe. 

1st Row : Knit one, knit two together, make one, 
repeat. End the row with knit three. 

2nd Row : Purl one, purl two together, make one, 
repeat ; end the row with purl two. Repeat these two 
rows ten times more. 

23rd to 38th Rows : Knit. 

39th to 46th Rows : Knit, decrease by knitting two 
together at the end of every row. There should be 
ten stitches for the front of toe. 

Now work on the seventeen stitches of the side of 
leg for seven rows, and pick up in each forward row 
one stitch of the front and knit it. This makes four 
stitches picked up. Now pick up twenty-seven 
stitches of the side of the front. 

Work the second side like the first. 

With the ten stitches of the toe you will have 106 
stitches, which may now be worked off equally on the 
three pins. 

Work ten plain rows. 

11th Row : Knit forty-eight, knit two together, knit 
six, knit two together, knit forty-eight. 

12th and each alternate rows to the end, knit with- 

13th Row : Knit forty-seven, knit two together, knit 
six, knit two together, knit forty-seven. 

15th Row : Knit forty-seven, knit two together, knit 
four, knit two together, knit forty-seven. 

17th Row : Knit two together, knit forty-four, knit 
two together, knit four, knit two together, knit forty- 
four, knit two together. 

19th Row : Knit two together, knit forty-two, knit 
two together, knit four, knit two together, knit forty- 
two, knit two together. 

21st Row : Knit two together, knit forty, knit two 
together, knit four, knit two together, knit forty, knit 
two together. 

23rd Row: Knit two together, knit thirty-eight, 
knit two together, knit four, knit two together, knit 
thirty-eight, knit two together. ^ 

25th Row : Knit two together, knit thirty-six, knit 
two together, knit four, knit two together, knit thirty- 
six, knit two together ; cast off, sew up on the wrong 
side. , ., - 

The holes round the ankle are to run the ribbon 
through. Any small pattern, of which we have given 
several, may take the place of the herringbone pattern 
for the front. ^ , .^, 

The top of the boot may be ornamented with a 
crochet edge worked into it : — 

1st Row : Si^ trebles into a stitch of knitting, pass 
over two stitches. Repeat. 

2nd Row : One double into every stitch. 

The second row of crochet may be worked in pink 
or blue silk or wool. 



BORDER FOR COUNTERPANES. 

Cast on forty-six stitches. 

1st Row: Knit thirty-four, purl two; leave the 
lemaining ten upon the pin, turn, purl thirty-six. 

2nd Row : Same as first. 

3rd Row : Knit thirty-four, purl two, * make one, 
knit two together ; repeat from * three times more ; 
knit two. 

4fch Row : Knit ten, purl thirty-six. 

5th Row: Knit thirty-four, purl two, turn, purl 
thirty-six. 

6th Row : Same as fifth. 



7th Row: Knit thirty-four, purl two, krait eight, 
purl two. 

8th Row: Purl ten, knit thirty-six. Repeat from 
the beginning, knitting instead of purHng, and purHng 
instead of knitting the ribbed part only—iov instance, 
where it specifies knit thirty-four, purl two, you must 
purl thirty-four and knit two. This occurs in every 
alternate rib. Th e heading remains the same through- 
out. 



KNITTED FRINGE FOR COUNTERPANES, &c. 

Cut the cotton in lengths rather longer than double 
the length you wish the fringe to be ; put four strands 
of cotton together. 

Cast on on steel pins. No. 13 (Walker's gauge), nine 
stitches. Knit three rows plain. 

4th Row : Slip one, knit five, take a set of the cotton 
and pass over the right-hand pin, knit a stitch, keep- 
ing the set at the back of the pin, bring the set for- 
ward, knit a stitch, put the set back, knit the last 
stitch. 

5th Row : Knit two, take the head of the set and 
the third stitch and knit them together, knit the rest 
plain. 

6th Row : Slip one, knit one, ^ put the cotton twice 
over the pin and knit two together, repeat from * once ; 
put on the set as before. 

7th Row : Knit two, knit the third stitch and the 
head of the set together, * knit one, knit half the made 
loop, cotton forward, knit the other half of the loop, 
repeat from * once more, knit to the end of row. 

8th Row : Slip one, knit nine, put on the set as 
before. 

9th Row : Same as fifth row. 

10th Row : Cast off four, knit one, ^ cotton twice 
over the pin, knit two together, repeat from * once 
more ; put on the set as before. 

Repeat from seventh row. 



BED-REST FOR INVALID. 

With the coarsest knitting-cotton and two No. 12 
bone pins, cast on thirty-six stitches. Knit half a 
yard plain ; then increase by knitting two stitches in 
one at the beginning of each row wntil you have 120 
stitches on the pin, knit one yard plain. 

In the following rows decrease by knitting two 
together at the end of each row until you have thirty- 
six stitches. Cast off. 



LADIES' WINTER STOCKING. 

Materials : Eight balls cocoon wool, or 8 oz peacock 
fingering ; four pins No. 15 (Walker's gauge). 

Cast on 113 stitches ; that is, 38 on each of two pins, 
and 37 on the third. 

1st Round : Purl one, knit two all round. 

2nd Round : Purl one, knit two till you come to the 
nineteenth stitch ; knit this stitch instead of purling 
it to form the seam ; knit two and purl one to the end 
of the round. 

Continue these two rounds till you have 120 rounds. 

121st Round : To form the calf, knit till within one 
stitch of the seam, continuing the rib; increase a 
stitch by knitting two in one ; knit one, purl the seam- 
stitch, knit one, increase one by knitting two in one, 
and continue the round as usual. 

122nd Round : Same as the second round, with the 
exception of knitting the increased stitch on each 
side of the seam, which keeps the rib correct. 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



64 ^ 

123rd Round : Same as the last, excepting that you 
purl the seam-stitch. 

124th Round : Same as 122nd round. 

125th Round : Same as 123rd round. 

126th Round : Same as 122nd Round. 

127th round : Increase in the same manner as 121st 
/ound, continue till the 132nd round without increase, 
always knitting the increased stitches. 

133rd Round : Increase the same as the 121st round ; 
at this increase another rib is formed on each side of 
the seam. 

Work as before, increasing three times in the like 
manner — that is, working in each instance five rounds 
between each increase. 

151st Round completes the sixth increase, and forms 
Jiiiother rib on each side of the seam stitch. 

Then work seven rounds without increase. 

159th Round : Decrease by working as usual till 
within th?®e stitches of the seam ; knit two together, 
knit one, purl the seam stitch, knit one, knit two to- 
gether ; continue the remainder of the round as usual. 

Five rounds more without decrease. 

165th Round : Decrease the same as 159th. 

Continue decreasing every sixth round till you have 
101 stitches on the pins, then knit seventy rounds 
w ithout decrease. 

To commence the heel : Divide the stitches in half, 
beginning from each side of the seam stitch ; take 
another ball of wool, as the heel should be knitted 
with double wool. The stitches for the heel may be 
slipped on to one pin, and knitted with the loose pin. 
Forty rows should be knitted with these two pins, 
leaving the instep for the present. The rib in the 
heel must be kept by purling two and knitting one 
alternate rows ; the seam stitch all through the heel is 
knitted plain. 

4-lst Row: Work as usual to six stitches beyond 
the seam ; turn back and knit to six beyond the seam 
on the other side ; turn back and work twelve stitches 
as usual. Decrease by taking the remaining stitch 
9,nd the first stitch on the other pin together ; turn 
back and repeat the row, decreasing in the same way 
iintil only nineteen stitches remain, then break ofE one 
ball of wool. 

Pick up the stitches along the heel towards the in- 
step, and as you knit back pick up each between 
stitch and knit it, as it makes the sides firmer. The 
under part of the foot is knitted plain, and the rib 
continued along the front. Take two together at the 
beginning and end of the under part every row till 
you have decreased to the same number as across the 
instep. Continue without decrease till you have sixty- 
two rows, counting from the commencement of the 
plain knitting. Purl the first and last stitch of the 
front of the stocking every row to form a seam. Begin 
to decrease the front by purling one, knitting three, 
knitting two together, knit plain till within six of the 
other side, knit two together, knit three, purl one. 
The front part should be all on one pin. Knit three, 
knit two together, knit till within five of the other 
side, knit two together, knit three ; knit four rounds 
without decreasing, keeping the purl stitch as directed, 
then decrease as before ; work four rounds between 
the decrease three times, then three rounds twice, then 
two rounds once, then decrease every round till you 
hav» twelve stitches on each side. P^e the two pins 



together, and finish by taking a stitch from each pin 
and casting them off. When this is done fasten the 
end, and your stocking is complete. 



ESCALLOPS FOR QUILTS OR TOILET COVERS. 

These escallops are very convenient to knit, as they 
are knitted separately and joined by a needle and 
thread. 
Materials Required : Two knitting pins No. 15 

(Walker's gauge) ; Strutts' knitting cotton No. 8. 

Cast on forty-one stitches. 

In all the rows slip the first stitch to make an even 
edge. 

1st Row : Knit. 

2nd Row: Knit three, take two together, knit 
thirty-one, take two together, knit three. 

3rd Row : Knit. 

4th Row : Like the second, with the exception that 
you knit twenty-nine stitches instead of thirty-one. 

5th, 7th, 9th, and 11th Rows : Knit plain. 

6th Row : Like fourth, with the exception that you 
knit twenty-seven stitches instead of twenty-nine. 

8th Row: Knit three, knit two together, purl 
twenty-five, knit two together, knit three. 

10th Row : Knit three, knit two together, purl 
twenty-three, kiiit two together, knit three. 

12th Row: Knit three, knit two together, knit 
twenty-one, knit two together, knit three. 

13th Row: Knit three, purl twenty-three, knit 
three. 

14th Row : Knit three, knit two together, knit 
nineteen, knit two together, knit three. 

15th Row : Knit three, purl twenty-one, knit three. 

16th, 18th, and 20th Rows : Knit plain. 

17th Row: Knit three, knit two together, purl 
seventeen, knit two together, knit three. 

19th Row : Same as seventeenth, purling fifteen 
instead of seventeen. 

21st Row: Knit three, knit two together, knit 
thirteen, knit two together, knit three. 

22nd Row : Knit five, purl eleven, knit five. 

23rd Row : Knit three, knit two together, knit 
eleven, knit two together, knit three. 

24th Row : Knit three, purl thirteen, knit three. 

25th Row : Knit three, knit two together, knit nine, 
knit two together, knit three. 

26th Row : Knit three, knit two together, purl seven, 
knit two together, knit three. 

27th Row : Plain knitting. 

28th Row : Knit three, knit two together, purl five, 
knit two together, knit three. 

29th Row : Plain knitting. 

30th Row : Knit three, knit two together, knit 
three, knit two together, knit three. 

31st Row : Knit three, purl five, knit three, 

32nd Row : Knit three, knit two together, knit one. 
knit two together, knit three. 

33rd Row : Plain knitting. 

34th Row: Knit three, knit three together, knit 
three. 

35th Row : Plain knitting. 

36th Row : Knit two, knit three together, kwit two. 

37th Row : Knit two together twice, knit one. 

38th Row: Knit two together, knit one, pass cn<* 
stitch over the other. 




'HE^ 






OMfilTI mim T§ TIE WSIK-TAJiil 

POINT LACE. 





ga^VAT-KNU : FOrKT AJiX) EOKITON l,4,0Cl, 



66 



THE YGUXG LADIES' JOURNAL 



POINT LACE. 




MODE OF TRACING AND SEWING ON BKAID. 



DESIGN ON PAGE 65. 
OiUr AT-END: POINT AND HONITON LACE. 

UUATERiALs FOR One Pair : 4-§ yards po nt braid, 4^ 
yards cord, 1| yard Honiton braid, 1| yard pearl 
edge, one skein of thread. — Price of materials in- 
cluding postage, Is. 3d. ; tracing on transparent 
linen, 6d. ; materials, tracing, and work begun, 2s. 9d. 
All materials for lace are supplied from the London 

Publishing Office of this Journal on receipt of P.O.O. 

for the amount. All Post-office Orders should be made 

payable at Ludgate Circus. 



1 lace cord and pearl edge are also needed for some 

I patterns ; transparent tracing linen for copying the 

': designs upon, and toile ciree for putting beneath the 

i linen to work upon. Some ladies, however, work so 

: lightly, that the toile cir6e is not needed. The best 

workers use ordinary sewing-needles. These should 

be chosen of a suitable size to the thread employed, so 

that it is not made rough and injured by being drawn 

through too small an eye. 



MATERIALS USED IN POINT LACE. 

Materials used in point lace are braids of various 

qualities, widths, and patterns suitable to the design 

for which they are required ; cotton for tacking on 

^ braid, and thread for working the stitches : point- 



DIRECTIONS FOR TRACING. 

The design must be placed upon a drawing-board 
with the tracing-linen over it, and the two must be 
firmly fasten'fed to the board with drawing-pins. Then, 
with a good pen and Japan ink. trace the outline of 
the braids, also the twisted and buttonhole-bars, and 
the circles for the rosettes or spinning- wheek ; it ia 
unnecessary to trace the lace-stitches. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 




WO. 15. 



68 



THE Yomre^ ladies' joukj^ al 






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COMPLETE OuiUK TO THE WORK-TABLE 




ZJO. $o. 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 




SO. 62 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



n 



DESCRIPTION OF THE VARIOUS STITCHES EMPLOYED 

IN 

WORKING POINT LACE. 



[Illustrations Nos. 1 to 64 show more plainly than 
ar^y^ written description the mode of working ,i great 
variety of stitches employed in point lace. These 
illustrations are considerably enlarged, and are ren- 
dered so clearly that it is scarcely possible not to see 
at a glance the correct i^iode of working them.] 



Nos. 1 TO 5.— COMMON BUTTONHOLE-STITCH : 
POINT DE BRUXELLES. 

This simple lace-stitch consists of buttonhole-stitch 
worked in lines forwards and backwards. 

No. 1 shows the mode of wording it. No. 2 repre- 
sents the common net pattern, rather open, whicli is 
given much closer in No. 3, and may be graduated 
from the most open net to the thickest parts. No. 4- 
gives an open pattern, which may be greatly varied 
for other patterns. No. 5 : Stretch a thread from 
right to left across the arabesque pattern, and work 
single buttonhole-stitches in this thread returning. 



Nos. 6 TO 11.— CORDED BUTTONHOLE-STITCH : 

POINT D'ANVERS, POINT DE MALINES. 
No. 6 gives a pattern in wliich, in returning, the 
thread is twisted through the buttonhole - stitch 
(corded), and is enclosed by the fresh buttonhole- 
stitches. This variation is a near approach to the 
point de Malines. No. 7 is a slight variety of the same 
stitch. The buttonhole-stitch is worked between the 
cording-stitch. Nos. 8 and 9 show leaves in point de 
Bruxelles and point d'Anvers, and are worked in but- 
tonhole-stitch, with and without the thread being 
drawn through ; and, in No. 9, filled up as shown, by a 
cross-stitch. Nos. 10 and 11 give the variations of 
these patterns, as seen in the large and small patterns 
of the Antwerp lace, and known to many ladies as the 
point d'Anvers. No. 10 belongs to the order of button- 
hole-stitches, all the patterns of which, being worked , 
by drawing the tliread through, may be classed 
amongst the Antwerp stitches (point d'Anvers). 

It need scarcely be mentioned that the long threads 
between the spaces are wound round with several 
stitches. 

Nos. 12 TO 18.— PATTERNS OF MORE BUTTON- 
HOLE-STITCHES : POINT DE SORRENTO. 
For this stitch, several buttonhole -stitches are 
worked close together, and in the next line, as belong- 
ing to each other, and are not separated by any stitch. 
No. 13 represents this stitch as worked for an edge ; 
this, as well as the single stitch (No. 12), makes a very 
firm edge ornament. No. 14- gives a single-dotted 
pattern of two buttonhole-stitches. Nos. 15 to 17 give 
more varied patterns. No. 18 gives this Sorrento pat- 
tern with buttonhole-stitches over the thread placed 
across, and from which many other effective stitches 
may be made. 



Noe. 19 TO 21.— LOOPED BUTTONHOLE-STITCH : 
POINT TURC. 
This stitch, although not diflBcult, requires a little 
practice to work it well and evenly. No. 19 represents 



it on one line, which would make a verj- pretty outer 
edge. No. 20 gives a pattern of it over threads placed 
across. No. 21 represents the dotted pattern, consist- 
ing of one plain and one looped buttonhole-stitch» 
which is a pretty variation of No. 18, and might b© 
also worked ever threads placed across. 

Nos. 22 TO 32.— BUTTONHOLE-STITCH BACK- 
WARDS : POINT DE VENISE. 

This effective buttonhole looping consists of, first, 
a common buttonhole-stitch, as a kind of footing, and 
then a second looped into it, as shown in No. 22. No, 
23 gives this stitch worked forwards and backwards 
as a pattern, with a line of plain buttonhole-stitch, 
forming a stripe pattern. No. 24- shows, in large size, 
the mode of working very beautiful point de Venise, 
either for an outer edge or for patterns, by looping 
three or four stitches into the first large buttonhole' 
stitch, which makes a thick scallop. No. 25 gives the 
edging in the size it would generally appear ; No. 26, 
with the stitches farther apart ; consequently the pat- 
tern is more open. No. 27 is formed by joining the 
single buttonhole-stitch line in returning. No. 28 
gives a pattern, with the same thick scallops worked 
forwards and backwards, and is very pretty as a gui- 
pure ground between thick arabesque patterns. By 
working downwards in the large buttonhole scallop, 
the pattern vepresentod in No. 29 is formed, which is 
equally pretty worked in single lines, for enclosing 
large patterns. The three patterns represented in Nos. 
30 to 32 are very similar ; about two or three button- 
hole-stitches are worked close together, downwards, as 
shown in the design. These also serve for enclosing* 
patterns, or they may be arranged in the corded pav^ 
tern, as the point d'Anvers, for thick patterns. 



Ncs. 33 TO 39.— LOOSE AND TWISTED BARS ; 
POINT D'ALENCON. 

No. 33 is a fine herringbone-stitch. The single cross- 
stitch, in very narrow spaces, must be worked into 
the braid. No. 34- represents the double cross-stitch 
consisting of two lines lying over each other. No. 3^ 
gives the same stitch, fastened by a buttonhole-stitch 
made across it. In No. 36, the thread, which is carried 
plain across to the opposite side, is for the joining ; in 
returning it is twisted several times, according to the 
breadth, and these bars are repeated singly, or in 
groups of two or three and four in the large spaces. 
According to No. 37, these bars are worked, like tht^ 
cross-stitch, along both sides. No. 38 gives loose bard 
in bunches, worked in the buttonhole edge, which are 
also very effective arranged at greater distances. No. 
39 represents the same bars twisted. This mode of 
joining is particularly desirable when the spaces sud- 
denly increa or decrease in distance. 

No. /^O.— FESTOON JOINING : POINT D'ESPRIT, 

Simple buttonhole-stitches are looped for festoons 
into each other, and where the braid opens wider, the 
spinning-stitch, wheels, &c., may be inserted. 



72 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



Nos. 41 AND 43.— BUTTONHOLE-STITCH BARS. 

Stretch a thread across, work it over, returning with 
a few buttonhole-stitches, and then wind the thread 
again through, according to No. 41. Where loose and 
firm bars are placed alternately — according to No. 43 — 
there are always at least three, if not five, threads 
stretched across, and worked over very closely with 
the buttonhole-stitch (point d'esprit) ; in working 
M^ese, the cross-bars branch off from the principal 
bars, and may be ornamented with picots. 

Nos. ^2 AND 44— PICOTS FOR THE BARS, 

These are called picots a la minute, and are worked 
as follows : — Put the needle through the last button- 
liole-stitch, loop, and twist the thread round three, 
four, or more times, according to the thickness of the 
picot, and fasten by putting the needle through. For 
the buttonhole-stitch picot represented in No. 44, take 
the loop-thread of a buttonhole-stitch, so as to make a 
long loop downwards, iix it with the help of another 
needle, and then with the working - thread, going 
backwards, cover this loop with buttonhole-stitch 
worked very closely, and then cany the thread back 
through the picot from the point to the bar, to con- 
tinue the buttonhole-stitch, 



'Bo= 45=— BAR ROSETTE. 

'Ihis rosette has a pretty effect in joining , it belongs 
to the class of rosettes or spun-stitches 



Nos 46 AND *7.— TWISTED LACE-STITCH WORKED 
AS A BUTTONHOLE'STITCH : POINT D'ESPAGNE. 

The single-stitch line in No. 46 shows how to work a 
buttonhole-stitch, and at the same time wind the 
thread round by putting the needle through several 
times. 

The twofold buttonhole-stitch shown in No. 47 is 
that peculiar stitch that encloses the work on the 
opposite side ; the needle, as shown, is alwp.ys put in 
underneath, and the thread is twisted once, twice, 
or more times round it before the needle and thread 
are drawn through, in the same manner as in the cord- 
ing-stitch before described. 



Nos. 48 TO 52.— POINT D'ESPAGNE, 

Leaf : Point d'Espagne. — Tliis leaf will be easily 
kvorked from No. 48. Nos. 49 to 52 give varieties of 
rilling-in in corded stitch, arranged at different inter- 
vals. No. 49 is a tw^ofold twist. No. 52 shows how 
the length of the stitch and the number of the twists 
may be increased to suit the fiUing-in of an irregular 
^pace. 



^©s, 53 TO 56 ROSETTE PATTERN POINT 
D'ANGLETERRE (ENGLISH-STITCH), 

'There are several kinds of rosette patterns, which, 
according to the number of threads stretched across, 
require a looser or closer spinning-stitch for the wheels, 
The spaces must be most regularly and evenly ar- 
/•anged. For the rosettes in No. 53 the threads must 
be first of all stretched in one direction, then plaited 
through in the opposite direction ; they are then 
worked in lines, according to design. The rosettes in 
the double trellis pattern, No. 54, have at first only 
one of the diagonal threads stretched across ; the 
second slanting thread is placed in the working of the 
wheels, as shown in No. 54. Rosettes with loose 
thread-squares, represented in No. 56, are particularly 



intended for leaves. No. 55 shows the laying on 
of the threads. No. 56 represents the work farther 
advanced. 

The pattern is arranged over the first thread, 
stretched across, which forms a kind of vein through 
the leaf ; these rosettes may be used in their varieties 
for separate, middle, or joining patterns. 

Nog. 57 and 64,— SPINNING-WHEELS, 
These are very useful for filling the empty spaces in 

foundations or patterns. 
No. 57 gives a wheel in which the thread is twisted 

over six thread bars in a line (point de Venise). This 

wheel is repeated in the border in No, 64 

Nos. 58 AND 59. — PYRAMID PATTERN- IRISH- 
STITCH, 

No. 58 represents a thick pyramid pattern. First 
work the horizontal threads^ and over these weave in 
the two diagonal threads, crossing each other, and 
forming regular slanting squares, which are filled up 
with darning-stitch (point de reprise), nccording to 
design. Commence each pyramid at the point, ana 
work from that in separate lines, from the top to the 
bottom, and carry the thread again through the 
finished lines upwards. 

For the open pyramids in No. 59, loose stitches are 
worked over the horizontal threads stretched across, 
which are corded (twisted), and the loose stitches are 
firmly placed in in regular order. 



No. 60.— LEAF ORNAMENTATION. 
A row of point d'Espagne, enclosed by a very thick 
stripe of point de Bruxelles always four buttonhole- 
stitches in one (point d'Espagne). A line of point do 
Venioe in thick scallops forms the inner edge. 



No. 61.— DOUBLE LEAF WITH VE1^^ 

These patterns make a beautiful variety, and may 
be placed in various wa5^s. The pattern of the leaf en 
the left is in point d'Espagne ; that on the right is in 
loose point de Bruxelles, and has a vein. Such pat- 
terns, without reference to the kind of stitcheS; are 
called point de Valenciennes. 



Nos, 62 and 63.— TREFOILS WITH SEVERAL 
PATTERNS, 

These are only guides to show how the separate 
divisions of large leaves may bo filled up with various 
lace-stitches, and joined together in the middle with a 
wheel, star, &c. Such stars or wheels may be worked 
in any of the various lace-stitches of the designs 
already explained. 

No. 64.— SIMPLE LACE BORDER 
Materials Required for a Yard ; Four yards braid, 
one skein of thread, 8d.; tracing, 4d.— Price of mate- 
rials, tracing, and work" begun, including postage, 
Is. 8d. 

The mode of tracing, also directions for tacking on 
the braid, are explained. In this border the wheel 
given in No. 57 is used ; it also gives the interwoven 
wheel. For this latter wheel, the twisted bars are 
worked with a common spinning-stitch, and then the 
threads drawn round are carried through the wind- 
ings of these bars, so that the wheel-winding is ex- 
tended, and the weaving appears light and pretty. 

The inner part of border is the same as that shovm 
in No. 24, 



^QMfllTI mim T§ Til W8«'TABM.. 

POINT LACE. 




ZMBROIDERED NET (SEE I iGE 8o), 



74 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOUEKAL 



LACE STITCHES FOR ORNAMENTING AND FILLING UP VARIOUS KINDS 
OF WORK-ROSETTES, SQUARES, OVALS, &c. 



Nos. 1 TO 6.— BUTTONHOLE-STITCH BARS. 

The principal part of a great number of laoe 
stitches consist of the common and the twisted 
buttonhole-stitch (point d'Espagne), in which more or 
less close, short, or long bars are worked, and round 
these one or more patterns are looped for a finish. 
The buttonliole-stitch bars of an open edge must be 
short and rather tightly twisted, that they may be 
worked round by any lace pattern. 

No. 1 shows the working of this edge ; No. 2 the 
cording; at the finish of this the thread must be 
tightly drawn and fastened. Upon this inner edge 
the lace work is again carried on ; in every case, how- 
ever, the thread is at last looped on to the first 
single bar, and is wound back to the edge, where it is 
fastened. No. 4- is a rosette with bars, with an open 
ring, and a buttonhole edge round the ring ; the 
buttonhole-stitch loops are drawn rather long, and 
the thread is wound several times through. No. 3 : 
Treble rosette (twisted buttonhole-stitch), with the 
ring filled up. Work two lines of the bars ascording 
to No. 5, and then work buttonhole-stitch round the 
middle edge. No. 6 shows No. 3 finished. 



Nos. 7 AND 8.~SPINNING-STITCH OR WHEELS. 

These are made by drawing the thread round 
through the lengthened middle point of the stretched 
threads. The mode of weaving in the thread is clearly 
shown in No. 7. No. 8 shows the finished wheel. 



Nos. 9 AND 10.— OPEN WREATH ROSETTE. 

The rosette is shown in a greatly increased size in 
No. 9, so that the mode of working the spinning- 
wheels over the foundation of corded buttonhole bars 
is very apparent, and will be found to be very easy to 
work. 



Nos. 11 TO 15.-~PYRAMID ROSETTES AND OVALS. 

The foundation for the rosettes is shown in No. 13. 
They are worked in point de reprise. Nos. 11 and 12 
show finished pyramid rosettes ; Nos. 14 and 15 pyra- 
mid ovals. 



Nos. 16 TO 21.~0VALS IN POINT ALENCON. 

These ovals give varieties for filling in, and will be 
readily worked from the ovals in increased size, which, 
if carefully studied, will be found to be much easier 
than working from directions. 



Nos. 22 TO 24.— W^HEELS WITH THREAD BARS. 

A single thread is stretched across, and the work is 
carried on ov&r the opening, and by cording along the 
edge, No . ji^^shows the mode of stretching the threads 



across. After having stretched the thii d thread across, 
which gives six thread bars, carry the last thread only 
as far as the middle, and there bend out the cross 
threads, and draw them round once or twice more 
with the working-thread, in order to be able to work 
a firm open ring in point d'esprit, as shown in No. 23. 
The thread that is wanting is supplied at the last. 
No. 24- : The wheel with the thick round pattern in the 
centre has fourteen single-thread ba.vs, and the raiseci 
round in the centre may be either in chain-stitch or a 
litt' 3 woven wheel. In the middle of the space to be 
fiU jd work a stitch or a cross upon the plain under 
ground. These centres serve to stretch the loose 
thread loops. 

Nos. 25 AND 2d.— TREFOIL ROSETTE. 
No. 25 shows the foundation for trefoil and bow 
rosettes. By winding the thread round the bar of the 
last bow the middle is reached, where all three bows 
are firmly drawn together before the leaf is filled up 
with the common point de reprise. 



Nos. 27 TO 29.— CROSS ROSETTE. 
After the stretched thread bows, according to No. 27, 
are united by a thread ring, the helping cross in the 
middle must be taken away, and the rosette completed 
with darning and thick cross-stitches. 



No. 30.— ROSETTE SQUARE. 
For this, two bows are required, which are corded 
and then joined with close cross-stitches, in the form 
of a little square. 

No. 31.— ROSETTE WITH SQUARE, FASTENED 
WITH BUTTONHOLE-STITCH. 
The outline of the square is worked with four 
buttonhole-stitches in the open edge, and this is filled 
up in point d'Anvers, in which the square is again 
corded all round, and ornamented in the comers with 
little thick rounds. 



Nos. 32 TO 42.— VARIOUS DESIGNS FOR FILLING 
IN SQUARES. 
These patterns are only a repetition of all the stitclies 
before described placed together. We give for each 
separate one a design representing the work in detail, 
in rather large size. No. 32 may serve as a giiide for 
stretching the threads in an open treble 'ge in all the 
five squares. 

Nos. 33 AND 40.— SQUARE, WITH RINGS IN POINT 

D'ESPRIT, AND PATTERNS OF CROSS-STITCHES. 

The stretched thread must be fastened with the 

thread drawn through, without the first loop row 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



75 



shown in No. 32 ; the second inner row is stretched 
across, and worked inside, with thick patterns of 
cross-stitches. At the outer edge are rings in point 
d'esprit, which join the working- thread. These rings 
extend from one to the other, forming a circle. 



Nos. 34 AND 35.~SQUARE, WITH PYRAMID SCAL- 
LOPS AND INTERWOVEN WHEELS. 

The threads are stretched across as before de- 
scribed, and the wheels are interwoven into the inner 
triangle (No. 34). - 

The outer edge consists of large and small pyramids 
-interwoven, as shown in design. 



Nos. 36 AND 37.— SQUARE, WITH PYRAMID SCAL- 
LOPS, POINT D'ESPRIT RINGS, AND PATTERNS 
OF CROSS-STITCHES. 

The threads are stretched across according to No. 32, 
then worked according to No. 36 ; with the same 
thread is worked a thick pattern of eight or twelve 
cross-stitches, lying over each other in each of the 
little middle triangles, as shown graduated in No. 36. 
The thread must be laid on afresh for the outer edge, 
and then a pyramid and a ring worked alteriiately. 
The finished square is shown in No. 37. 



Nos. 38 TO 40.-SQUARE, WITH PYRAMID S^^-Afi- 
LOPS AND POINT D'ESPRIT RINGS. 

For this, two single loop-lines, with the thread 
drawn once through for a firm edge, must be worked 
into each other, exactly according to No. 32, and then 
according to No. 36, the middle triangles are filled up 
with single, and the large corner openings with three 
pyramid scallops. In the four spaces of the outer edge 
between the corners, adjoining the corner pattern, the 
rings are worked in point d'esprit. For the mode of 
working these, see No. 40. 



Nos. 41 AND 42.— SQUARE, WITH RINGS IN POINT 
D'ESPRIT AND OPEN SCALLOPS. 

The stretching of the thread differs from No. 32 in 
the second row, in adding which the inner space is 
narrowed off to a ring, which is closely worked in 
point d'esprit, uniting eight radii, forming a star. 

As shown in design, the outer edge consists of alter- 
nately point d'Espagne scallops and rings in point 
d'esprit. These maybe easily worked from No. 42, and 
must be corded with the thread after they are looped 
on, so that the next ring may be joined on imme- 
diately. 

DIRECTIONS FOR OLD POINT. 

Old point differs from modern point in tliis respect : 
it consists entirely of work. Braid is not used in it. 
The materials used are coarse crochet cotton and 
Nunn's thread Nos. 1 and 2. 

A tracing of the outline of the pattern must be made 
on transparent linen. The tracing must then be 
tacked upon toile ciree. The work is begun by tack- 
ing on the cord, made by twisting the crochet cotton, 
as seen in Nos. 1 and 2. These threads are made firm 
by a stitch taken through the foundation, and then 
twisted between the thumb and first finger of the left 
hand, and basted on at short distances, following the 
tracing with single stitohes. The basting-thread is 
shown in black on all the single illustrations, so as to 



be distinguished from the other stitches. The cord is 
most conveniently twisted from the outside to inside, 
as seen in Nos. 1 and 7. No. 3 shows one of the sim- 
plest shapes : a single-flower petal from a petal circle 
of the lace shown on the first page of this Supplement ; 
the six petals, each resting on a transparent button- 
hole ground, are enclosed in a cord-curved edge. The 
thick edge with which some of the patterns are worked 
on the outside, and shown in No. 4, is of cord, and 
finished with open rows of buttonhole-stitch, standing 
apart, and w^orked backwards (with No. 2 thread). 
The thick raised edge (thread No. 2), which catches 
into the cord, must have in the first row of stitches 
the thread laid in, as in No. 6, marked out in black. 
In the row going back, this thread is left out, but for 
this reason every stitch must loop in this black thread. 
No. 7 shows one finished petal to one of the small 
flowers, and the others in different stages of execution. 
The five petals of this flower have a row of wide- 
worked lace-stitches. In order to make the lace-stitch 
edge stand out as a thick ring, the thread is wound 
round several times at first, and then worked closely 
w ith buttonhole-stitch. 

The leaf shown in No. 1 illustrates veining. Two or 
more threads are twisted together according to the 
thickness you desire the vein to be, and are held to 
the required length by the thumb and first finger of 
the right hand, twisted from left to right, and fas- 
tened with one stitch at the point. The open ground 
iig made afterwards with fine thread in buttonhole- 
stitch, as seen in illustration. For the thick filling 
up of the middle rib, which is made like the thick leaf- 
stalks. No. 1 is a safe guide. This shows the two 
rows of buttonhole-stitcli going backwards and for- 
wards with and without thread laid in, and the way 
these are joined to the second cord edge. The needle 
and thread are to be drawn through the cord before 
beginning the next stitch. 

The way of making the leaf- veins is exceedingly in- 
teresting. No. 2 shows one of the two leaves joining 
on to the middle flower with a thick edge like the 
petal (No. 5), and open veins. These are made in the 
simplest possible manner, by winding over the dif- 
ferent thread parts. The first thread of the large vein 
is stretched the whole length, and then slung into the 
point of the leaf wound over, going back as far as the 
first side vein ; again catching into the edge, and going 
down to the large vein, the work is continued further. 
The thread used for this purpose is No. 2. No. 8 
shows another leaf with open vein part, which would 
make a pretty" variation. It only remains to explain 
the open arabesques. No. 4 shows the open-work 
parts as a straight border, with the small open edge 
on one side, which all the patterns must have, and 
on the other side an edging lx)rder worked in the 
same way, but formed to larger points by making a 
few buttonhole-stitches more. The way of making 
the arabesques is illustrated in No. 4. The buttenliole 
bars and fiUing-in lace-stitches are the same as those 
used in ordinaiy point lace. 



MATERIALS REQUIRED FOR OLD POINT LACE 
ON PAGE 7o. 

JMateeials Required fob One Yard : One skein cro- 
chet cotton, and four skeins of thread No. 2. — Price 
of materials, including postage, Is. 4d. ; tracing, 
from which any length may be worked. Is. ; mate- 
rials, tracing, and work begun, 3s. lOd. 
All materials for lace are supplied from the London 

Publishing 0£&ce of this Journal on receipt of P.O.O 

for the amount. All Post-office Orders should be mad©. 

payable at Ludgate Circus, 



76 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



Foiisra? Lj^ob. 




NO. 9, 



0,8. 



NO. 13, 




J^O. 14, 



zro. 22* 



NO. 16. 







JfO, s?o. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WCBE-TABLE. 



77 




|fO. 40. 



m^ 4^« 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 




HO. a. 



NO. 1. 

NOS. I TO S.—ILLUSTP-AXiONS OF DETAIL OF OLD -PAriffTt. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



79 






M 




NO, r»— LIMOGES LACE. 





INSTRUCTIONS FOR 

WORKING LIMOGES 

POINT LACE. 

This lace was invented for 
and brought out in Thh 
Young Ladies' Journal. 
Since its publication and 
popularity other persons 
liave imitated it» and thought 
lit to give the name to lace 
made with point braid, which 
cannot be properly called Li- 
moges lace. The peculiarity 
of Limoges lace consists in 
its being made with plain 
braid, and the edge is all 
worked to it. The braid is 
shown very greatly increased 
in size in the diagrams 2, 3, 
and 4, which also show the 
proper mode of working the 
lace, and the braid in the pro- 
per width is shown in No. 1> 

In working Limoges lace it is very important that 
the braid be soft and well made, and that the thread 
be of the size and quality mentioned. To meet any 
difficulty which might be found in procuring the 
materials, we have made arrangements for a constant 
supply from Paris, and are always able and happy to 
send them to our subscribers on receipt of the amount 
in stamps. For six extra stamps a small specimen of 
the work will be added to the materials. With every 
design we publish the quantity required and the 




NO. 3.- 

price. In black (silk) mate- 
rials it is equally beautiful 
as in white, and better adap- 
ted for some purposes. 
Materials for One Yard 
OF Lace shown above: 
Two knots of braid No. 13 ; 
two skeins of thread. — 
Price of materials and pos- 
tage, 9d. In black silk, 
8 yards of braid and 8 
yards of silk. — Price of ma- 
terials and postage, 2s. Id. ; 
tracing on paper of one 
yard, 8d.; beginning, Is. 
extra. 

Trace the pattern upon blue 
paper, or cut out the design 
from the Number, and paste 
it upon thin calico. Tack the 
braid upon the paper, holding 
it rather loosely, as the semi- 
transparency thus secured 
adds much to the beauty of the lace. Then run a very 
fine cotton through the whole length of the braid, care- 
fully keeping it inside the curves, crossing from one 
edge of the braid to the other wherever the pattern 
demands it. The curves will then retain their exact 
shape when taken off the paper. When you come to 
a. corner where the braid folds over a few extra 
stitches will be required to make it neat and firm. 
Then commence the edge, which consists only of a 
loose butt^Bbole-stitch, with a tight one of the same 



80 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



kind in every loose one, so that the edge is entirely- 
finished in one row. When you are edging the braid 
nearest to that already done, the bars must be intro- 
duced to connect them. This edge, with the bars, is 
also done in one row, thus : — Having arrived at a spot 
where a bar is to be made, carry the thread from the 
stitch you have just finished, and pass the needle 
through the stitch you desire to connect with it ; then, 
in returning, twist the thread two, three, or more 
times round the bar till the two threads form a little 
cable, and continue the edge you are working until it 
becomes necessary to make another bar. "When the 
braids so nearly touch as to leave no room for a bar, 
they should be joined by a herringbone-stitch. 

When the space is so large that it must be filled up 
with a netwerk of bars, instead of passing the needle 
through an opposite stitch, pass it round the middle 
of a neighbouring bar, m^aking a tight buttonhole- 
stitch upon the perfect bar to secure the one in pro- 
gress in its proper place. 

Several bars may be made, when desired, by taking 
the single thread from bar to bar, or stitch to stitch, 
work the twisting round the already half- made bars 
as you return. To fasten off the thread, make half 
a stitch — that is, the loose buttonhole-stitch; and 
then run the thread through the braid for half an inch 
and cut it off, then bring your new needleful through 
the braid at tlie point where you left off, leaving the 
knot at the back of the braid, and finish the stitch. 
The extra edge is only the same stitch as the ordinary 
edge, worked with three tight stitches instead of one. 

The little spot introduced in several places is made 
thus : — Make one bar across the space, and complete 
the second one (which crosses it) as far as the centre, 
where the two bars touch each other; then darn 
round, under one thread and over another, until the 
spot is large enough, then finish the twisting round of 
the imperfect bar. 



THE STITCHES USED IN LIMOGES POINT. 

The illustrations of the mode of making the stitches 
wo think will render the work very simple for our 
readers. No. 2 shows the first loose buttonhole-stitch ; 
No. 3 the second or tight stitch, which makes the first 
secure ; and No. 4 the twisted bar. In working the 
tight stitch. No. 3, some beginners do not draw the 
stitch tight enough. This may be done without drag- 
ging the braid by placing the thumb of the left hand 
upon the knot while drawing tight, 



EMBROIDERED OR DARNED NET. 
The design shown on the cover illustrates the beauty 
of this work. A number of most ' effective patterns 
can be worked in it. 

Upon black, white, or coloured silk net, worked with 
fioss silk, they make a good imitation of blond. A 
tracing must be made on transparent linen or paper, 
and the net placed over it ; both tracing and net are 
next tacked upon toile ciree. The pattern is then 
worked in common darning-stitch. The insertions, if 
worked upon Brussels net with flossette, wash well, 
and are useful for placing over coloured ribbons as 
trimmings for dresses, fichus, &c. 

Some patterns are finished with pearl edges ; others 
are buttonholed ; occasionally lace stitclies are intro- 
duced, which can be copied from those given in these 
Supplements. 

Materials Required for One Yard of Embroidered 
Net shown on Page 73: 1 yard net, two skeins 
fiossette, 1| yard pearl edge.— Price of matorialSj 
including postage, Is. ; tracing on transparent linen, 
from which any length may be worked, 6-d. Mate- 
rials^ tracing, and work tegun, 2s. 6d. 



VENETIAN POINT. 

Venetian point is useful, strong," and suitable for 
many purposes, such as trimmings, collars, cravat- 
ends, &c. 



MATERIALS USED IN VENETIAN POINT. 

Venetian point should be worked upon Irish linen 
or embroidery muslin with nun's thread. Cotton a la 
croix is needed where there are raised patterns, to re- 
quire throwing up for effect, and fine crochet cot* on 



DIRECTIONS FOR WORKING 
The tracing upon linen is easily done by the use of 
cOpying-paper, which can be had of any stationer. 
Place the paper upon the linen, and the design over it, 
and mark over every part of the design witli a stiletto 
or some other rather blunt point ; the tracing will re- 
main upon the linen when the design is removed. 
When the tracing is ready, tack it upon a piece of 
paper or toile ciree, to prevent puckerings in working : 
run the outside edges with the crochet thread in small 
stitches, carefully observing the delicate turns of the 
pattern; work over this thread in neat buttonhole- 
stitches, making the point-lace dotted bars as you go 
on, taking pains not to catch the linen underneath. 
Where the linen is to be cut away inside the leaves, 
&c., a second buttonhole line must be worked towards 
the part to be cut away to make a neat edge to work 
the point-lace stitches upon, which are worked with 
Hnen thread Hke the buttonhole edge. 

Thick rounds must be first padded with soft em- 
broidery cotton to the necessary thickness, and then 
buttonholed. Take the \Aork off the paper, and cut 
away the linen from beneath the bars and from the 
inside of the leaves, pines, &c. ; then tack it on a fresh 
piece of paper, and work the point-lace stitches. 




TRniMING t VENETIAN POINT. 

Materials for a Yard : Two skeins cotton a la croix 
No. 10, one skein nun's thread No. 2. — Price of ma- 
terials, including postage, and pattern traced upon 
muslin ready for workinir, Is. ^d. Materials, tracing, 
-and work begun, including postage, 2s 9d. 



DIRECTIONS FOR WASHING LACE. 

Lace is easily spoiled, both in washing and getting 
up, if not cnrefully mannged. If the following rules 
are observed, it will look equal to now after it has 
been washed many times : — Put two quarts of rain^ 
water, 2 oz best yellow soap cut very thin, and 2 oz 
soda into a jar ; when quite dissolved, put in the work, 
and place the jar in a cool oven, and let it stand all 
night. Take out the lace, and put into clear water, 
and let it remain for a few hours ; tli-en take it out 
and pin out on a doth or board to dry. 

If the lace i?equires to be rather stiff, dissol\^ m tii& 
rinsing- water a lump or two of white sugar. Starcb 
should never be used: 




HE 

csMFiiTi mim » TIE 




TABW, 



IlTSTK.TJ0TI03<rS 



POONAH PAINTING 



VELVET, SATIN, SILK. CARD, PAPER, OR WOOD, 

CONTAINING DIRECTIONS FOR CUTTING AND VARNISHING FORMULAS, 

WITH ILLUSTRATED DIAGRAMS. 

Also Full Instructions to enable Ladies, whether they have a knowledge 

of Drawing or not, 

ipio :]i>AiNT :b{lowers, :b{oljage, mTC, 



A NEW COLOURED DESIGN, 



DAMASK ROSE AND FOLIAGE FOR PRACTICE. 



m 



THE YOUNG LADIES" JOURirAL 



CfmduJ!Xc^^(n^ 




diagraivj op coloured design for damask rose. 



DIRECTIONS FOR POONAH PAINTING 

ON VELVET, SATIN. SILK, &c. 

To make the directions for Poouab Painting as 

useful and practical as possible, we %ave prejjared 

4 t'amask Rose aud Foliage in Colours, as being a 



simple design for a beginner to practise with. 
The diaerrams for formulas for the rose will also 
give a correct idea ot preparing a more complicated 
design, such as a group of flowers like our June. 
Roses, &c. 



COLOURED SUPPLEMENT To The 
YOUNG LADIES' 
JOURNAL. 

COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE 
Work Table. 




DAMASK ROSE. 

POONAH PAINTING. 



11 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



98 



9l/^/ 




FORMULAS. 

The first thing is to prepare the formulas. For 
chis, lay tracing-paper over the picture, and with 
a tine pencil trace evenf linCy showing the shape of 
every leaf and stallv ; then number every space 
which represents a leaf or stalk, taking care that 
leaves with the same number upon them shall not 
be very close together. Choose a small part of 
two leaves nearly opposite each other, and mark 
them df for " Conducting Points." {See Diagram 
of Coloured Design.) When you have numbered 
every leaf, you will know how many Forms yau 
will require for the group, and you must provide 
as many sheets of cartridge-paper, which you 



will number 1, 2, 3, &c. Now UiV^ cartridge- 
sheet No. 1, and lay over it a piece of carbonized 
paper th© same size, and over both lay the trac- 
ing ; take an ivory stiletto, or other blunt-pointed 
instrument, and with it go over the outline of 
each leaf, &c., which is marked No. 1 on Dia- 
gram of Coloured Design. Repeat this proce.*" 
with each of th{\ succeeding Forms. The Cove- 
ducting Points must be put in ever;^ Form, aa 
they are the only guides for keeping each Form , 
in its right plact^ ; they do not show, as such, ic 
Diagram No. 1, V)ecau8e they are parts of thft 
leaves which are cut in that Form. See that you 
Imv© a sufficient niimber of Formsj that the part* 



84 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



^ 
^ 




cut out may be at a convenient distance from each 
other, that in using the colours they may not run 
into each other, and also that the Forms may not 
"be weakened by being cut too much in one part. 
Leaves and flowers of various colours may be cut 
in the same Form, provided the different^ colours 
\e far enough apart not to interfere with each 
other. Each green leaf (except very small ones) 
must be cut in two Forms— th^nt is, one side of it 
*a one Form and one in another, by which means 
the space is divided so as to get a line for the 
middle vein. A small and very sharp pair of 
scissors must be used for cutting the apertures in 
the Form&^ The instructions here given are abso- 



lutely carried out in the Diagram of Coloured 
Design, and in the Diagrams of Formulas Nos. 1 
to 5.° When the diagrams have been traced and 
cut, they must be varnished twice over. 

TO MAKE THE VARNISH. 

1 Gz. resin, 1 oz. shellac, 4 oz. methylated spirit. 
Break the resin and shellac up small, and put them 
with the spirit into a bottle; shake^ frequently, 
and the varnish will be ready for use in two days. 
This varnish will so strengthen the cartridge- 
pa'^r that the Forms will last for years, and, by 
wiping them after use with a damp sponge, you 
may remove the colour which ha» accumulated 



.-^xMrLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



85 



^3 







apon them during tbe process, so that in repro- 
ducing the group many variations may be made 
in the colours used. 

If the cartridge-paper is sufficiently sized by 
the maker, it will take the varnish. This should 
be tested previous to cutting the formulas. If 
insufficiently sized, it will be necessary to purchase 
some size. Iiilute it, and brush over both sides 
of the paper with it. 

MIXING COLOURS. 

lilix the powder colour and a little water to per- 
fect smoothness with a palette-knife. All shades 
of green for foliage may be produced by mixing 
Prussian blue and gamboge (gamboge cannot be 



powdered), with sometimes a little burnt sienna, 
and sometimes a little carmine, one or other of 
the colours predominating according to the shade 
of green wanted. Beautiful varieties of gray may 
be made by mixing infinitesimal quantities of many 
colours with plenty of Chinese white. In a 
general way, water alone is sufficient with which 
to mix the colours; bat when pure scfcrlet and 
Chinese white are used, they must be mHed with 
weak gum-water, or they are apt to rub after 
they are dry. Whenever pure scarlet is used as 
a grounding colour (as in scarlet geraniums, &c.), 
it should be shaded with carmine. For very dark 
red flowers, mix a little black u;Jitl? red for tbe 
intense shading. 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL, 




'^) 



POONAH PAINTING ON VELVET. 

Place the Form upon the velvet, or other 
groundwork to be ornamented, using paper- 
weights, or anythino; small, heavy, and smooth, to 
keep it steady. The brush, which is made ex- 
pressly for this work, has no point, and is to be 
held perpendicularly, the colour being gently 
rubbed in by moving the brush round and round. 
The brush should be only just moistened equally all 
over with the colour, and then applied to the 
aperture in the Form, and the colour worked into 
the velvet, close up to the edges of the opening in 
the Form, so as to ensure the exact shape upon 
the velvet. A brush must be devoted to each 
colour. The two small apertures nearly opposite 



each other, which ocetir hi every Form, are called 
" Conducting Points," which, having been painted 
through Form No. 1, will show through the cor- 
responding apertures of Forms Nos. 2, 8, &e., and 
if these are made to fit exactly, all the other parts 
of the picture will fit too. 

When all the parts in one Form are finished, 
the succeeding Forms will cover up the parts 
done, and open new spaces to be painted. All 
stalks and touches which are too fine to be intro- 
duced into the Forms must be put in with a small 
sable brush. 

As the picture can only be produced upon the 
groundwork by successive shades of colour, let the 
iirst f*hade be always of the palest tint in the leaf ; 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WOIIK-TABLE 



87 



^ 



J" 



X 




With it fill the whole of the aperture, then the 
darker shades may he worked over it, one after 
the other, in their proper places, according to the 
copy. If painting on velvet, it is best to finish 
each leaf as you go on, because, after the first 
shade is washed in, the velvet will take the suc- 
ceeding shades better while still damjj. 

In leaves, more especially the larger sorts, with 
strongly-marked veins, the veins and shading are 
prod-uced by the aid of veining papers, which are 
made by cutting one edge of a piece of varnished 
paper to the shape of the vein, and laying it over 
the aperture in the place where the vein should 
be, after the Form is laid upon the velvet, begin- 
ning with a shade not much darker tlian the 



lio-htest, and this should be carried to the very 
t^ud of the vein, but not quite to the edge of the 
leaf, the darker shades receding more and more 
towards the darkest part of the leaf, then work, 
ing in the darker shade used for the vein upon 
the little veining paper, just letting one edge of the 
brush touch the velvet ; this will make the veir 
very quickly, and produce a soft and beautiful 
effe'ct ; more and more shade can be put on accord- 
ing to the colour of the leaf, always beginning to 
work the colour in at the darkest point. 

When we supply Forms, pieces of varnished 
paper for this purpose accompany each set requir- 
ing them. Though the Forms are numbered!, 2, 3, 
<Jcc. \i.\f not at all necessary to obsarve their 



88 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOUKNAL. 



order, so long as care is taken to paint the " Con- 
ducting Points'* first of all. 

The delicacy or xae veiTes may, in some in- 
stances, be considered a drawback, but this objec- 
tion may be successiully obviated. 
, Those accustomed to laying ferns upon white 
wood, and sprinkling in the shadow, will under- 
stand how very beautiful and more permanently 
useful these pictui'es may be made by that pro- 
cess after the velvet is soiled by wear. The 
process consists in mixing a good quantity of 
wlour, and after dipping in a tooth-brush, take 
)he brush thus charged with colour in the left 
Aand, and holding a knife in t'le right hand, 
draw the blade over the bristles of the brush 
away from the velvet, having previously covered 
the picture by a Form made on purpose. The 
«hade should be put on very sparingly next the 
lowers, and increased in depth towards the edge 
f the velvet. All the small spaces among the 
-eaves in the middle of the picture may be easily 
and quickly dotted in afterwards with the finish- 
ing sable. 

Black, indigo, or brown make excellent shading. 
The price of the Form and the colour (whichever 
is preferred) for shading, must be in accordance 
with the size of the group. 



POONAII PAINTING UPON PAPER. 

The process must be slightly varied ; the brush 
must be as nearly dry as possible when applied to 
the surface, and after each application the paper 
must be allowed to get quite dn/ before you touch 
the same spot again. If you are in any doubt about 
the proper dryness of the brush, it is a good plan 
to begin each application, after washing in the 
first shade, by dabbing the brush gently straight 
down upon the paper ; the result of this action 
will be a number of minute dots. If you, by 
;his means, find the brush is in proper condition, 
you may then rub the colour in, or the picture 
nay be finished with the dotting process, which 
has a very pleasing effect, provided the dots be 
'^}e)'t/ small, and each succeeding shade very slightly 
larker than the last ; thus the shades may be 
made to blend as beautifully as if rubbed in. 



PREPARATIONS FOR POONAH PAINTING 
ON WOOD. 

In Poonah Painting upon wood it is necessary 
Jirst to cover every part which is to be painteH 
with Chinese white mixed with gum-water, and 
hiid on rather thickly; and upon this prepared 
white surface the colours will preserve their own 
proper hue, but unless this is done the tint of the 
•^^ood^. although it may be as near white as wood 



can naturally be, will spoil the effect of the 
(^oloura. The dotting process is particularly ap- 
plicable to wood-painting, because the rubbing is 
ant to disturb the grounding of Chinese white. 
Many useful and pretty articles are made in white 
wood for the purpose of being ornamented with 
floral designs, such as boxes, hand-screens, &c., 
and even a plain deal gipsy table, which any 
country carpenter can make, looks exceedingly 
well when painted, and it can be easily varnished 
with best copal varnish, which before being applied 
should be warmed, as well as the brush, and the 
saucer into which it is i)oured. Fill the brush 
with varnish, and beginning at the top, take a 
firm, straight, and rather quick stroke down- 
wards, tlie loay of the grain; begin every stroke at 
the top, and never take the brush off until it 
reaches the bottom. When you have gone over 
all the surface, let it remain for two days (out of 
the way of dust) to get dry, when it will require 
a second coat of varnish. 



DIRECTIONS FOR PAINTING UPON SILK 
OR SATIN OF LIGHT SHADES. 

When the colour of the ground to be painted 
upon does not accord with the colours of the 
flowers, the first wash of each colour must be 
mixed with a little Chinese white and gum- 
water, so as effectually to hide the ground ; the 
darker shades may afterwards be worked in with 
the pure colour. 

In some cases Chinese white is not required for 
the leaves, as on a pale blue ground ; they need 
only be made a little yellower, as blue is a part 
of green ; a yellow ground will take green in the 
same way, adding a little more blue. In this case 
all flowers but blue will require the first shade of 
colour to be mixed with Chinese white. 

Formulas and copies can be had of the follow- 
ing and other designs : 

Dahlia Group 12 by 11 inch. 

Tulip Group ]1 „ n ,, 

Summer Flowers 14 „ 14 „ 

Convolvulus „ 6 „ 

Iris 6 „ 4 ,. 

Coial-Pink Geranium 8 „ „ 

Wild Rose 5 „ 6 „ 

Azalea 7 „ G ^, 

Primula and Solanium . . 7 „ 7 „ 

Geranium Fuchsia \ 

Yellow Jasmine and I 7 „ 7 .. 

Yellow Rose J 

Simple Pink Rose 5 „ 5 ,„ 

Cross with Roses II „ 8 ,^ 

Spray of Damask Roses . , 8^ „ 4i |^> 



rillTI miM T§ TIE 




Tiiii, 



KNOTTING OR MACRAME. 




FRINGE IN TWO COLOL^HS. 



ZS-nrO^TTI^CS- OZS. ]VC.A.OI2,.^^nXE< 



90 



THE YOL^NG LADIES' JOURNAL 



DESCRIPTION OF ILLUSTRATION ON PAGE 89. 



• FRIXGE OF TWO COLOURS. 

This fringe is worked with twenty-four str<ancls 
of one colour, and eight of the otlier. ' They are put 
f»ver a single leading bar, and l^notted as shown in 
No. 4. A sncond bar is then laid on close to the first, 
and the strands are worked closely over it (see No. 5, 
in progress and finished). The slanting bars are 
shown in progress in Nos. 7 and 8. They are ar- 
ranged to form a square at the top, and two bars 
v/orked closely with spaces, alternating for six times, 
then the second square. 

The work must be continued row by row. After 
beginning with the square of bars of the dark colour 
work a line of six Solomon knots with the light 
colour, then a second square of bars with the dark, 
continue for the length of the cushion. 

For the second and following lines work the bars 
"Wer the" first and secMid outer strands of tlie light 



colour, and then five 8olomon knots witli the light 
colour. In this row the light, colour is worked once 
between the bars. 

After this explanation we think it will be easier 
to work from the design than from description. The 
raised circular balls, forming the diamond in the 
centre of the bar diamond, are worked \v'ith four 
Solomon knots, after finishing which, take the two 
centre strands, pass them together between the 
second and third strands at the top of the knot, and 
draw them down at the back, and work one Solomon 
knot ; when the heading is worked the threads must be 
strongly tied together at the bottom, to form a loop 
in which to pass the tassel strands through, whicli 
are afterwards bound round with a needle and 
thread; tlie thread is wound evenly round five or 
six times, and the needle is passptl from the top to 
the bottom to fasten it. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



91 



KNOTTING OR MACRAME. 



Kivottlng or macrame work has recently revived in 
interest, therefore we repeat our elementary directions 
which were produced some years since, but have long 
been out of print. To those directions we add very 
considerably, in order to make the working of the 
various designs as simple to our readers as they can 
be made. 

The origin of knotting is very remote. A book of 
designs was printed in Venice as" long ago as 1530 ; it 
was then known as punto a gruppOy or gruppino. In 
Italy it was used for trimming priests' vestments. 
The name macrame was given to the work by the 
Genoese, who employed it for trimming bridal-dresses. 
The word macrame comes from an Arabian word 
which signifies a large serviette or cloth, which had a 
fringed border. Our English name knotting is the 
more correct one, as the worlv is formed entirely by 
knots in varied groupings. 



TOOLS REQUIRED. 

Tiie lead cushion is the first thing. Our design 
shows a German cushion for the purpose ; we, how- 
ever, prefer to use one without a handle. The cushion 
may be fitted into a box. The box should be 15 inches 
long and 4 inches in height, and 5 inches in width ; it 
should hp;ve a lead weight running the entire length 
not less than | fnch in thickness. The box can be 
covered with Berlin work or an embroidered band. 
The lead must be enclosed by a cushion filled with 
bran, and covered with a piece of satin or velvet, or 
even better, a piece of good, finely-striped ticking. 
The covering should be a fast colour, so that the dye 
does not come off to soil the work. The cushion 
should be fully 2 inches above the wooden box, in 
order tliat the leaders may be easily fixed to it. If it 
is not easy to get lead for the cusliion to fill it with 
sand is the Bext best tiling. 



CLASS-HEADED PIXS. 

Two sizes of these pins may be procured for knot- 
ting. They are very convenient to use, as the large 
heads prevent the loops from shpping. 



STEEL CROCHET HOOKS. 

The crochet hook is often very convenient for draw- 
ing the knots through ; these must be chosen of a size 
to suit the material to be worked with. A sharp pair 
of scissors will be found needful for cutting the 
lengths evenl}' . 



iMATERIALS. 

Macrame cords arc now to be had in several sizes 
both in plain and mixed colours. Crochet cotton, 
linen thread, silk twist or cord, and gold and silver 
thread, are all suitable materials for knotting, and 
make more or less elegant fringes, laces, insertions, 
and headings for trimming articles of dress, furniture, 
and fancy-work. Knotting can be worked into linen, 
&c., by drawing the threads intended to be made into 
lace or fringe through the material, and looping once ; 
the material can then be fixed to the lead cushion, and 
the threads knotted. Java canvas and crash, or strong 
Irish linen or huckaback, may be ornamented with 
knotting by drawing the threads one way out, and 
leaving the others to be knotted. 



GENERAL HINTS. 

The great beauty of knotting rests in the evenness 
of the work, and as no tracing or outline of any kind 
can be used, clever manipulation is needed and cor- 
rect distances must be fe^ept: these can onlv be mea- 



9^ 



THE '5?OTNG LADIES'^ JOURNAL 




S9» t3i 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABL\ 



93 




NO. 17 



NO. 19* 



NO. 31^ 



9^ 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



sured by the eye, added to which you must be quite 
certain to keep the threads in the order they are at 
tirst looped on so as not to twist or turn them. Be- 
ginners must before tryino- patterns practise the 
varied knots whicii form them, and be sure that they 
can tie them firmly and evenly. Try a pattern pre- 
vious to working it, measure the length of the strands 
needed to form it, and cut your strands into the 
lengths required before beginning the work. 



No. 1.— FKINGE. 
After learning the mode of laying on the heading, 
working the macrame knot and slanting ribs, this 
fringe may be attempted as it is but a simple pattern ; 
threads about a yard long will bo needed for it, and 
the entire mode of working each detail is clearly given 
in :Nos. 4- to 9. We abstain from further description, 
knowing that with the assistance of continued refe- 
rence to the diagrams the work is more likely to be 
correctly done than it could be from description. 



No. 2.— FKINGE. 
The heading is like that shown finished at the end 
of No. 5. The slanting ribs are the same as those 
shown in Nos. 6 to 8, but are worked with eight instead 
of four strands ; the double Solomon knots are worked 
in the same way as shown in No. 10, but with four 
instead of eight Solomon knots- 



No. 3.— LEAD CUSHION FOR KNOTTING. 

The mode of making the cushion is described under 
tools used for knotting. We now call attention to the 
mode of laying on the threads or bar used for the 
foundation. The work on the cushion is No. 1 Fringe 
in progress. Observe the mode of placing the pins 
and of winding the strands into loops for continuation 
of heading bar, when the length on the cushion is 
finished. The foundation lines are also known as 
cross bars and leaders. 



No. 4.— LEADING-BAR ^VITH THREADS LAID ON 
AND MACRAME KNOT. 

No. 4- shows the manner of fastening on the threads, 
which should be done with a crochet-hook. Take tlie 
loop in the middle and hold it before the bar, pass tlie 
two ends upwards behind the bar, bring them down 
over it, and under the loop draw up tightly (see 4-rt). 

The two loops— which, one after the othei-, are 
knotted with the threads on the right; round the 
thread on the left hand only — must bo worked with 
the first loop knot for the beginning (see 4-i, and for 
the finished knot see 4c). 



No. 5.— BAR WITH KNOTS. 

No. 5 shows tlie knots in progress, also finished 
heading and the mode of laying on and working over 
a second leader-line or cross-bar. ba and 5.^ show 
knots worked over the under cross-threads, which are 
now laid on, and knots on knots, as descrit)ed in No. 
4, pkced in a line complete the heading of the trim- 
ming, as shown in No 5c. 



No. 6.— HEADING WITH SL ANTES G RIBS. 

The knots in No. 6 follow closely upon each other, 
forming slanting ribs, which are turned in two opposite 



directions, and are worked to form double and treble 
slanting ribs. 

The separate looping of the ribs of knots resemble 
each other exactly. In working from the right to- 
wards the left the knotting tln-ead is looped from 
underneath round the thread laid on ; whilst in goin^ 
from the left towards tlie right, the loop is formed by 
placing the knotting tliread over the thread laid on. 

To make the rib, always make a complete double 
knot round the outermost of the threads laid on with 
each of the remaining threads. 

Great care must always be taken to hold the thread 
that is laid on firmly with the left hand, whilst the 
right makes the loops round it. 

No. 6 also shows the cross-knot which completes 
the slanting rib (see 2-2). 



No. 7. -SLANTING RIB IN PROGRESS FROM LEFT 
TO RIGHT. 

No. 7 shows the number of threads, their position 
and gradual workino^ Follow 7a for the working of 
first slanting rib. Tb shows the changed position of 
the threads after working the first knot of rib; 76- 
shows the first slanting rib finished, and the position 
of threads after the first knot of second rib. 



No. 8. — SLANTING RIB IN PROGRESS FROM 
RIGHT TO LEFT. 

Now the worker must give attention to Ba, whicli 
shows the first looping and position of threads after 
it ; 8b shows the first looping and making of the first 
knot ; 86' a finished rib ; 8d second rib in progress. No 
amount of directions that we can give could by any 
possibility be so clear to the reader as tliese num- 
bered positions of the threads. 

It is generally considered that it is easier to leurn 
to make the knotted ribs from the right towards tiie 
left, as it is the more natural way of working. 



No. 9. — HEADING - RIBS A^'D DIAMONDS 
FINISHED AND IN PROGRESS. 

This diagram will materially assist the worker in 
executmg fringe No. 1, ns it is here shown in an in- 
creased size with the scallops in progress. Observe 
the length of threads left to form diamonds between 
the slanting ribs, also the knots finishing the diamonds 
before beginning two other slanting ribs. 



No. IG.-RIBS WITH EIGHT STRANDS kHiD DIA- 
MOND CENTRE, WITH TRIANGLE SIDE 
FORMED OF SOLOMON KNOTS. 



Nos. 11, 12, 13, Ax\D 14.— SPHERICAL KNOT. 
The spherical knot placed singly or in triangles, and 
diamonds between slanting ribs, gives a rich heading 
to a fringe. It is.begun with a flat Solomon knot, fdr 
which four strands are needed, the two centre strands 
hang straight, the right-hand thread is crossed hori- 
zontally over the two centre strands and under the 
left-hand strand. The left thread is crossed under tlie 
two centre strands and over the right-hand strand. 
The two centre strands are now drawn through to 
form the centre of spherical knot, and a pin is passed 
through the knot into the cushion (see No. 11). To 
complete the knot (see No. 12) pass the left-hand 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WOIIK-TABLK. 



95 



tlireitd over tiio two ceiiiie strands and under the 
right strand, and the right-hand strand under the two 
centre strands and over the left-hand strand; draw 
up. No. 13 shows a spherical knot with two Solomon 
knots worked under; No. 1* shows it with but one 
above and below. 

The irregular placing of the diagrams is unavoid- 
able because we are obliged to keep our Work-table 
Guide Supplements to one size on account of binding 
them. 



Nos. 15, 16, AND 24.-RICH KNOT WORKED WITH 
EIGHT STRANDS. 

This knot is composed of a Solomon knot at the top 
and bottom of two single chain together, worked with 
six strands. 



No. 17.— CROSS KNOT FOR OPEN DIAMONDS. 

This knot will only show well in coarse materials. 

Begin with two Solomon knots, as shown on 
the i-ight - hand side ; the centre and left strands 
show two finished cross knots, and the figures the 
mode of dividing tlie strands to form open dia- 
monds. After working the two Solomon knots 
cross the right-hand thread under the two cen- 
tre threads. The left-hand thread over the three 
strands, then pass it at the back through to the front 
between the top of the first and second strands, and 
work the riglit-hand thread in the same way through 
the top of third and fourth strands. Now cross the 
outer strands, slanting over the front of the knot, and 
pass them through the loop below the knot on each 
side. Begin again as shown in lower part of diagram. 



No. 18.— SPIRAL CORD. 

This cord can be made with any required number of 
centre strands, and is always worked with the two 
<xuter side strands. .Take the right-hand strand, pass 
it behind the centre strands and over the left-hand 
strand ; take the left-hand strand and put it over the 
centre strands and under the right-hand straiad, draw 
tight and repeat. 



No. 19.— FRINGE, WITH DOUBLE KNOT HEADING. 

Double loops are taken as described for the begin- 
ning of No. 17, and are formed into the open knot by 
working Solomon knots with two threads t>aken from 
each side alternately. This heading may be made of 
whatever depth you please. 



No. 20.— WAVED BAR. 

This bar is formed of four strands ; five singles are 
knotted over two strands in succession with the left- 
hand thread, then five singles with the right-hand 
thread alternately. 



No. 21.— FRINGE FOR JAVA CANVAS. 

Take eight threads, work two slanting ribs of six 
knots each ; cross all the threads with a Solomon 
knot worked with two threads of the canvas. Be 
careful to observe the correct distances, and work tk "^ 
second line of pattern alternating the threads. 



Nos. 22 AND 23.— PlCOr HEADING. 

The first diagram shows the mode of pinning on 
strands to form a picot heading. Two strands are fas- 
tened by a pin to the cushion ; two or more Solomon- 
knots are worked according to the height of the 
heading. No. 23 shows picot heading with the lead- 
ing bar laid on, and the threads of the picots knotted 
round it. 



No. 24.— See No. 15. 



No. 25.— WAVED LOOP. 

Tlie loop is composed of four strands, and three 
macrame knots worked with three strands ; the right- 
hand strand is left hanging until the third knot is 
worked, when it is used with tlie other three strands 
to form the Solomon knot closing the groups. 



No. 26.— SIMPLE CHAIN. 

Begin with a Solomon knot with the two centre 
threads ; work with the right-hand thread a single 
chain over the left, then with the left-hand thread a 
a single chain over the right. This is sometimes used 
in fringes. 



No. 27.— LEADING BAR WORKED OVER WITH 
SOLOMON KNOTS. 

Two strands of the length for the work must bo 
pinned through the middle for the bar, two working 
threads are required which must be three times the 
length of bar, with these cover the bar with Solomon 
knots, then draw strands througli eacli of two loops, 
pass over two and repeat, work each group with four 
Solomon knots. 



Nos. 28 AND 30.— KNOTTED HEADING OF FRINGED 
THREADS. 

This is useful for serviette, dinner-waggon cloths, 
kc. Separate the threads in six strands, pass the 
second right-hand strand round the left and draw it 
out between the two. The second tie is like the first 
part of a Solomon's knot, tie the third and fourth 
strand as described for the first and second, alternate 
the strands and tie in the same way in the second 
and following rows. 



No. 29.— FRINGE FOR KNITTED COUNTER- 
PANES, &c. 

The edge of the countei-pane is shown, through this 
the loops to work the strands into, must be drawn, 
passing over two stitches of the knitting draw up a 
single knot and leave the loop the length shown in 
the design, draw through every loop witli double 
strands fastened as described in No. 4. In every 
fourth loop draw through a double strand without 
knotting it (see design). Observe, two strands of this 
group are left unworked ; work a row of two Solomon 
knots together with two alternate strands from each 
cluster. In the next row two clusters of two Solomon 
knots, and in the third one Solomon knot to finish the 
scallop, twenty strands are knotted together once fo'' 
the fringe. 



No. 30.— See No. 28. 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 










TATTING, 




•P-A.TTPIIWCS' 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



DESCRIPTION OF ILLUSTRATIONS ON PAGE 97. 



WORK-BASKET ORNAMENTED WITH TATTING. 

The basket is of gilded wicker and is square in 
phape ; it is lined with peacock-blue satin, which is 
flrawn up to form a bag-like top ; each side is orna- 
mented with a deep-pointed drapery composed of 
tatted rosettes, one of which is shown in the second 
illustration of cover in the full size. The foun- 
dation for the rosette is a small steel ring mea- 
suring half an inch in width ; with peacock - blue 
Berlin wool crochet twenty-four trebles under the 
ring, join round, and fasten off. Fill a tatting shuttle 
"with the wool, Work four double knots, five picots 
•separated by one double knot, four double knots close, 
draw the wool through the top of one of the trebles, 
and repeat ; work twelve closed eyes, passing over one 
of the trebles each time, join to the preceding closed 
eyes by drawing the wool through the fjrst picot after 



working the fourth double knot. The tuft in the 
centre is made with Berlin wool and gold thread, as 
follows : Take a piece of mounting-wire, place one 
half upon a pencil, turn two lengths of wool and one 
of gold thread twice over it, cross the wire to fix the 
loop, repeat until you have made a piece eight inches 
in length, sew it to the centre of rosette with a needle 
and wool, as shown in the illustration. 

The drapery for each side is composed of three 
rosettes at the top rows, two in the second, and one 
at the point ; the drape is sewn to the basket with a 
needle and wool ; the corners and handles are orna- 
mented with clusters of woollen balls, directions for 
making which were given on page 14-. The largo 
balls are made over circles of card the size of a five- 
shilling piece, the smaller ones over card the size of a 
florin. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



GQ 



TATTING. 



INTRODUCTION. 

There are indications that this pretty and elegant 
work is Hkely to be revived in some forms; even 
\/ere it not so, our " Work-table Guide " would not be 
complete without full directions for it. The Work 
Basket design on the cover of this Supplement is one 
that we have just received as a novelty from Berlin, 
from which city comes many of our most beautiful 
fancy-work designs. 

The introduction of tatting as fashionable fancy 
work in England was due to Mademoiselle Riego as 
far back as 1850. She began to publish books on it, 
and to her we are indebted for many improvements 
in the mode of working it. We published her instruc- 
tions for tatting in our Journal in 1864. 

Until tatting was superseded by point laee, about 
1870, it was very fashionable and favourite work (and 
it deserved to be so) as pretty trimmings for dresses 
or mantles, insertions or trimmings for underlinen, 
and for cuffs and collars, doilys, cushion-covers, anti- 
macassars, and designs for ornamenting work or paper 
baskets, &c., can be made in it. Tatting is rather 
puzzling tc learn at first ; but when the stitch has 
once been acquired the work is of the simplest cha- 
racter It is well suited for drawing-room occupa- 
tion, as it needs few tools, and it can be taken up 
and laid down without injury to the work, and one 
can always tell exactly where one is in a pattern, as 
it is not mysterious in progress like knitting, nor does 
one stitch depend in any way upon another. Tatting 
is strong work ; indeed, when once done it is difficult 
to undo. The old-fashioned mode of tatting, called 
English tatting, consisted of a series of knots without 
purls or picots ; these were worked with one thread 
only, the helping thread not having been introduced. 
The helping thread strengthens the work very con- 
siderably, and assists in forming many variations of 
pattern. The Josephine knot is also a great improve- 
ment to many patterns. ^ 



IMPLEMENTS. 



Nos. 1 AND 2.— SHUTTLE. 

The tatting-shuttle is of the first importance ; tTi» 
may be had in ivoiy, pearl, bone, vulcanite, and to^' 
toise-shell ; for fine cotton or silk the latter is prefe** 
able to all others on account of its smoothness and 
lightness. The size of the shuttle must be regulated 
by the size of the material you work with. Attention 
should be paid to the shuttle being well made, so that 
the brass pins which fasten one part to the oth^** 
should not protrude and render the shuttle difficult ta 
draw through. To thread the shuttle, you will find 
there is a hole pierced through the centre piece ; pas§ 
the cotton through this hole, and tie a knot only jus"., 
sufficiently large to prevent the thread from slipping"^ 
then wind your shuttle full; but not too full, so astQ 
expand the ends over-much. 



THE RING AND PIN. 
This little implement is preferred by some workers 
to a pin or crochet-hook for drawing the material 
through the picots ; it is kept by some workers on tlv> 
thumb to have it in readiness and to save taking \jl 
the pin or hook. We think it is rather a hindrance 
than a help to the beginner. The rings are made ii> 
two or three sizes. 



MATERIALS. 

Silk, fine gold or silver twist, thin cotton, and th,. 
finer kinds of wool, such as Andalusian or singR 
Berlin wool, are the materials generally used for tatting 
Coarse materials fill the shuttle too soon to render it 
convenient to work with them. 



Nos. 3 TO 10.— STITCHES, AND HOW TO W^mF. 
THEM. 
The single and double knots are the only difficult 
parts to learn in tatting ; if you try for some time and 
fail, as is the case with some persons, it should not 
discourage you. as the stitch is really simple if pei» 



THE YOUNG LADIES'" JOUUNAL 




KO. 4 




COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



101 




KO. J&. 



fiai4* 



NO, J$. 



102 



THE YOUNa LADIES' JOUEKAL 



severed in. Our illustrations render it as clear as any 
explanation can do. 

Hold the shuttle between the thumb and forefinger 
of the right hand lightly, hcJd the thread between the 
tsnumb and forefinger of the left hand, leaving the end 
aboutl six inches long; pass the end downwards 
towards the palm, and the loop round the second and 
third fingers (see No. 3), hold the threads tightly, 
keeping the right hand lower than the left. No. 4 
shows the passing of the shuttle to form the first knot 
^1 and 2 in diagram). No. 4 also shows the thread held 
between the forefinger and thumb of the left hand ; 
3 and 4- of this diagram show the angle at which the 
thread is held over the third and fourth fingers of the 
left hand, the dotted line showing the way the shuttle is 
moved under the thread held out by the second and 
third fingers of the lefit hand ; pass the shuttle towards 
the back of the left hand, and downwards to the front, 
between the thread held over the left hand-fingers and 
the loop formed by the thread held over the right-hand 
fingers, indicated by the V. The mode of working 
the second half of the stitch is clearly shown in No. 5. 
The shuttle is passed over the thread from the back to 
the front, and brought out;between the thread on the 
fingers of the left hand and the shuttle thread ; the 
loop above 2 shows the first half of the knot worked. 
The position of fingers, shuttle, and thread is clearly 
shown in Nos. 6 and 7. No. 7 shows the raising of 
the finger to draw up the knot, which must slip easily. 
No. 8 shows the movement of the fingers in drawing 
up the knot. No. 9 shows knots with picots previoijsly 
to drawing up for a closed eye. No. 10 shows the 
closing of an eye without picots. 



TO MAKE A PICOT. 

Leave a loop of thread between the double kn^ts, 
the length of which you must regulate according to 
the design you are working to. 



No. 11.— JOSEPHINE KNOT. 

This is a pretty knot for filling up bars and patterns 
that would look rather poor with the straight thread 
only. The Josephine knot is formed by working four 
or five loops of the first stitch of a double knot succes- 
sively and drawing up. The space between the 
Josephine knots being regulated according to design. 
No. 22 illustrates the use of the Josephine knot. 



No. 12.— SIMPLE EDGING. 

Work three double knots, five picots separated by 
two double knots, three double knots close. Leave 
the loop the length shown in No. 12, and repeat the 
pattern, working through the first picot of each pat- 
tern ; this is done by drawing the thread that is over 
the first finger with a pin or crochet hook through the 
r '^^ot, and passing the shuttle through the loop drawn 
iurough, when you continue to work as usual. The 
pulling through of the loop is shown plainly in our 
illustration. 



Kos. 13 TO IB.— MODE OF TATTING WITH TWO 
SHUTTLES. 

In order to form eyes close or open, only one 
shuttle is required; but when a half-circle, &c., is 
to be added to the eyes, o, second thread will be 



necessary, and must be used in the following manner*. 
Lay a separate thread as a loop round the left hand, 
and work the knots with the shuttle thread. If the 
pattern require the knots to be worked with the threadi 
alternately, both threads must be wound upon shuttles. 
It must be remembered that in working a half-circle 
with two threads, the shuttle thread (the thread with 
which the knots are made) must lie between the two 
threads of the loop, so that the end of the thread laid 
round the hand hangs down free in front, only held 
by the thumb of the left hand. By this means an a pen 
plain line of knots is formed. No. 13 shows closed 
eyes and half-circles worked with a second colour. 
No. 14- shows the same design and the mode of work- 
ing the closed eye in progress with one thread only. 
The second thread being taken up after the eye is 
closed to continue the half-circles. 

iTi working with two threads, it must always be 
remembered that the scallops just finished should 
turn downwards. No. 15 shows another mode of work- 
ing with two threads. In this case, the helping thread 
laid round the left hand must have its two ends firmly 
held through the shuttle thread ; and the latter must 
lie in front of the two ends of tli^ loop (the thread 
round the left hand). The firmly held ends, before the 
loop of the shuttle thread is drawn together, must be 
drawn through the loop from the upper part down- 
wards, so that th& threads look twisted. 



No. 16.— TATTED EDGIJ^G WITH BEADS. 

Beads are tatted upon silk, or silver or gold thread ; 
the beads must first be threaded upon the silk, and 
the silk wound on to a piece of card ; tie the end of 
the silk with the beads to the end of shuttle thread, 
work three double knots, pull up a bead, put the 
thread with the beads to the back of the work, one 
double knot, put the bead thread to the front of the 
work, work another double knot, four more beads 
separated by two double knots, three double knots, 
close. The closed eyes worked alternately on each side 
will form a pretty trimming. 



No. 17.— TATTED ROSETTE IN PROGRESS. 

Work a closed eye for the centre of eight picots 
separated by two double knots ; without cutting off 
the thread commence the outer row. Draw the thread 
through the first picot, leave about a quarter of an 
inch of thread, work four double knots, five picots 
separated by two double knots, four double knots, 
close, draw the thread in a loop through the nex4 
picot, pass the shuttle through the loop, draw up 
tightly, and repeat, working eight closed eyes to com- 
plete the rosette ; to join the closed eyes draw through 
the last picot of last closed eye after working the 
fourth double knot of next closed eye. 



No. 18.— INSERTION: TATTING, MIGNARDISE, 

AND LACE STITCHES. 

Material Requiked : Cotton No. 20. 

Work five double knots, one picot, six double knots, 
one pioot, five double knots, draw through a picot of 
mignardise, then close, pass the cotton through the 
picot at the side of closed eye. Before working the 
next closed eye, which is worked the sane as the last, 
pass the cotton through the side picot, work ten 
double knots, one picot, ten double knots close ; leave 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



103 



half an inch of cotton before commencing the next 
eye. Work five^ouble knots, draw the cotton through 
the picot of second eye, six double knots, one picot, 
four double knots close ; leave about half an inch of 
cotton before commencing the next eye. Work five 
double knots, draw the cotton over the half inch left 
before commencing the eye, six double knots, one 
picot, five double knots, pass over four picots of mi- 
gnardise, draw through the next, and close the eye. 
Take another length of mignardise, work a row upon 
it like the last, with this exception, that instead of 
working the third closed eye you draw the cotton 
through the centre picot of closed eye of last row 
(see design), and continue as described. The spun- 
stitch in the centre is worked with a needle and cot- 
ton as in lace work. 



No. 19.— TATTED EDGING. 

No. 19 is worked with two threads. For the large scal- 
lops, work four double knots, one picot, eight double 
knots, one picot, four double knots. After finishing 
each scallop, place the thread from the separate reel 
round the hand, and work from that with the shuttle 
thread four double knots, one picot, four double knots 
round the thread of the shuttle. In the picots of the 
joining scallops, crochet one single in each picot, 
then five chain for the edge. 



No. 20.— EDGING WITH TWO THREADS. 

For the closed eyes work twelve double knots, one 
picot, twelve double knots, close, work another closed 
eye close to this last, leave rather more than half an 
inch of cotton, and repeat for length required. 

2ad Row; Pass the helping thread through the 
picot of first closed eye, fasten it, * three double 
knots, five picots separated by two double knots, 
three double knots, draw through two picots of closed 
eyes together. Repeat from *. 



No. 21.— TATTED SQUARE. 

Begin the square in the centre, and work the four 
leaves, each consisting of ten double knots, one picot, 
ten double knots. Fasten the thread, and loop it again 
on to the picot of a leaf, and work the eye, consisting 
of seven double knots, five picots separated by three 
double knots, seven double knots ; draw them toge- 
ther, fasten the thread again to the picot at the start- 
ing-point; then work the large scallop lying to the 
left ; eight double knots, ^-ve picots separated by three 
double knots, eight double knots- Leave the scallops 
sufficiently open, so that after the thread is fastened 
to the next leaf of the middle group the thread lying 
across may be tight without dragging. Repeat. 



No. 22.— DESIGN FOR SQUARE DOILYS, PIN- 
CUSHION, &c. 

1st Row: Work one Josephine knot (of six first 
stitches), three double knots, three picots separated 
by two double knots and three double knots, close, one 
Josephine knot. Repeat for the length required. 

2nd Row : Work as for first row, but join the top 
picot by passing it through the thread be^^ween two 
Josepliine knots. 



3rd Row : Work one Josephine knot, one closed eye 
as described for first row, ten double knots, one picoi, 
ten double knots, close, one Josephine knot, draw the 
thread of Josephine knot through the picot at the top 
of last worked closed eye, pass the shuttle through 
the loop to make it firm, work the second closed eye 
as last described ; continue the row by working three 
small closed eyes, each separated by two Josephine 
knots. 

4th Row : One Josephine knot, two large closed eyes 
as described in last row, join to the thread between 
the two large closed eyes of previous row, one Jose- 
phine knot, two small closed eyes separated by two 
Josephine knots. Repeat for length requii:ed, thei? 
repeat from first row, joining according to illustra* 
tion. 



No. 23.— TATTED ROSETTE. 

Begin this rosette from the middle with a ring of 
eight picots separated by two double knots. Fasten 
the thread, and, without cutting it off, begin the 
second row, viz., the little eyes joining the picots of 
the ring, including the joining scallops, which must 
have a picot in the middle to fasten them to the outer 
row. Now work with two threads. Each of the eyes 
worked with the shuttle alone contain twelve double 
knots, and are joined to a picot of the ring between the 
sixth and seventh double knots. For the joining seal . 
lops, place the second thread as a loop round the left 
hand, and work six double knots, one picot, six double 
knots. At the end of the row tie the beginning and 
end threads together, and begin the third row likewise 
with two threads, one of which must be looped on to 
the joining scallop. With the other thread alone work 
the eye lying above, containing six double knots, one 
picot, six double knots. Now lay the thread from 
this eye as a loop round the left hand, and work \yith 
the half of the tied-on thread the joining scallop, con- 
sisting of five double knots and three picots separated 
by three double knots, then five double knots. Fasten 
the thread running through the finished line of knots 
again on to the picot of the next joining scallop of the 
preceding row, working the eye with the other thread, 
and so on. At the end of the row fasten off the thread 
securely and carefully. 



Nos. ?A AND 25.— INSERTION AND TRIMMING IN 
TATTING AND CROCHET. 

With the first shuttle work a scallop of four double 
knots, one picot, four double knots, one picot, four 
double knots, one picot, four double knots. Then lay 
the second thread (from a separate reel) as a loop 
round the hand, and work close to the finished scallop 
with the first shuttle, four double knots, one picot, and 
again four double knots, which are tied with the loose 
thread round the thread coming from the shuttle. Re- 
peat. The first picot of each scallop must, however, 
be joined in the usual manner to the last picot of the 
preceding scallop. At the second line the middle 
picot of each scallop must be joined to the middle 
picot of a scallop of the preceding line. 

For the insertion shown in No. 24- crochet in each 
outer edge of the tatted trimming as follows :— 

1st Row : One single, four chain in the nearest picot, 
one single in the second of these, so as to form a little 
scallop, one chain. Repeat. •^ 

2nd Row: One double in the middle stitcn of each 
scallop of the preceding row, four chain. Repeat., ^^ 



104 



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NO* 20, 



aio;i9. 




KO. 31. 



NO. 22. 





tuo. H* 



TO WASH TATTTNCr. 

Sme tatting needs care in washing and must not be 
rubbed. The best plan is to sew a p'*«ce of flannel of 
two or three thicknesses over a bottle, tack the tatting- 
upon it, make a lather of curd soap and water, and 
lift the bottle up and down in it, working the lather 
well into the tatting with the hand ; then, when it 
appears clean, boil it in a saucepan of curd soap and 
water, with a dash of blue in it, for about twenty 
minutes ; rinse in clear water several times, remove 
%h% tatting from th*^ bottle, rinse in water with a 



f lump of sugar in it, and pin it out to diy, putting a 
I pin into every picot if you are very careful about rt ; 
if not, pull it well into shape, and put the right 
side of the tatting towards the blanket with a piece 
of fine rag over it a little damp, and iron, after- 
wards pull out the picots with a pin. Coarse tatting, 
such as antimacassars, should be laid in a lather of 
cold soap and water for a few hours, then squeezed 
out and put it into another cold clean lather in a sauce- 
pan and let it come to the boil, then rinse it and lay i| 
in some blue water ; when nearly dry pull into shapfi^ 
and iron as described for fine tatting. 



mmnm mmi 



« TIE W8IK-TiBi£ 



DRAWN THREAD WORK, &C. 




BOEDE? : DKAWN THREAD AND BSTICELLA-WOP.K. 



f.06 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



DESCRIPTION OF ILLUSTRATION ON PAGE 105. 



BORPER : DRAWN THREADS AND RETICELLA 
WORK. 

The design is suitable for ornamenting sideboard 
and dinner - waggon cloths. It is more effective 
worked on rather coarse Irish linen, which should 
be of good quality to ensure an even make. The 
pattern should be traced upon the linen, the threads 
for the open parts cut entirely away (see the right- 
hand side lower part of design where the reticella 
comes in). For these stitches only ordinary sewing 
over and buttonhole - stitches are employed. The 
crosses in centre of circles are formed by stretching 
bars of thread across and sewing over. 



For the drawn-thread work, the straight lines next 
the border are worked at a slight angle over four or 
more threads, according to the quality of the linen. 
The mode of working the next line of pattern is ordi- 
nary Italian-stitch, or a square formed by four back- 
stitches. In this design the threads must not be cut 
away too much in the centre because it is necessary 
to sew over some of them to strengthen the work. The 
bars are worked over six threads. Very sharp scissors 
must be used to ensure an even edge. Nun's thread 
(No. 1) will be the best for working both the reticella 
and drawn-thread work. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WOR^-TABLE. 



107 



DRA^WN THREAD WORK or POINT COUPE 



INTRODUCTION. 

This work dates very far back; it is among the 
earliest attempts at ornamental work known. Seme 
beautiful and very old specimens have been shown in 
both English and foreign museums. 

Irish linen, linen thread, a sharp pair of scissors, and 
a needle with a good eye, such as Walker's elliptic, will 
be needed for the work. 

The old work is frequently found in white linen, 
worked with gold, yellow, scarlet, or blue silk. 
Patterns more or less elaborate may be found in it, 
and it is very frequently accompanied by borders of 
reticella or Greek lace, which have for their founda- 
tions drawn threads. 

Very fine specimens of drawn work, having the 
effect of Honiton sprays on a net foundation, can be 
made ; but the work is of a character so undesirable, 
on account of injury to the sight, and requires, 
besides, so much time and patience, that we consider 
it unsuited to the age we live in, and do not therefore 
illustrate it. It is always well in fancy work to get a 
knowledge of detail before beginning elaborate pat- 
terns ; if this is not observed, the work is sure to bo 
unsatisfactory, and is often thrown aside in con- 
quence. 



Nos. 1 TO 5.— SIMPLE DESIGN IN DRAWN- 
THREAD WORK. 

Make a cc-reful inspection of the way in which No. 1 
is traced, running out with fine cotton ; next observe 
tlie mode of drawing the threads and cutting them. 
See to the sharp and clear cutting of the threads, as 
that is one of the most important things to attend to 
in beginning. The square openings are formed by 
drawing four threads each way. Nos. 2 to 5 show 
the stitches in progress. Two stitches being needed 
on each of the bars, and a cross-stitch at each corner, 
one straight stitch is first worked, then one half of a 
cross-stitch (see No. 1) ; the second straight stitch is 
formed when placing tlie needle for the second half of 
a cross-stitch, and the needle is left in place for the 
downward bar of square (see Nos. 3 and 4-). No. 5 
shows the mode of continuing the sewing over. Care 
should be taken not to draw the thread too tightly and 
to keep the work even. 



No. 6.— CANE PATTERN. 

This pattern is used for a groundwork ; Java can- 
vas is the most effective material for it ; two threads 
only are drawn crosswise and four lengthwise. In 
working over, tlie threads are somewhat di-awn toge- 
ther ; thread, silk, or crewel may be used for 'TV'orking 
the pattern ; all the upright stitches should first be 



worked, then the cross threads are worked. The 
arrows indicate the way the needle should be put in. 



Nos. 7 AND 8.— INSERTION OR STRIPE FOR ENDS 
OF TOWELS, &c. 
No. 8 shows the design of circles and bars, and No. 7 
the mode of executing the two patterns employed in 
the design. Three double strands of Java canvas are 
drawn each way ; the dark parts of the design are 
worked in the same way as illustrations No. 2 to 5 ; 
the light parts are worked in point de reprise or darn- 
ing-stitch with a second colour. The mode of working 
is very clearly shown in No. 7. 



No. 9.— BORDER : INTERLACED WORK. 

This border has a Java canvas foundation, but is 
equally suited to finer materials. Three-quarters of an 
inch of threads must be drawn one way. The warp 
threads are the best to draw, as the selvedge is 
strengthening to the work to leave on, and hem down 
or sew to the material to be ornamented. None of 
the weft threads are drawn, they are counted and 
evenly divided by working over in divisions of four ; 
a slanting stitch is sewn into the undrawn edge, tho 
needle is then put round the threads, as shown in 
No. 12 ; twelve of these stitches are worked for the 
short bars ; the mode of interlacing is shown in No. 12. 
The thread is then carried on and twisted round the 
threads that form the first half of the centre pattern ; 
fasten with one buttonhole-stitch exactly half way 
down, twist the thread round the same bar of threads 
to get it into place to work the lower twelve stitches 
of the same bar, four of these bars form the inter- 
lacing ; work one slanting stitch into the edge, and 
continue the interlaced stitches in the way shown in 
No. 12, working your pattern from No. 9. The little 
dots on the plain part of the material are worked in 
satin-stitch. 



Nos. 10, 12, 13, AND 15.— BORDERS. 

The finished border is shown in No. 15. The mode 
of working the two edges is shown in an increased 
size in No. 12. These edges will be more easy to work 
from No. 12 than from description. The principle of 
working over the foundation threads, after they are 
drawn for the centre pattern, is shown in detail in an 
increased size in No. 10. The appearance of the de- 
sign would at first give an idea that it is formed of 
guipure netting. The centre stars are shown in every 
detail of the work in No. 13 ; they are worked in 
twisted bars and darning-stitches; the twisted bars 
forming the foundation of the work are distinctly 



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COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



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fflE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL. 








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COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



Ill 



shown in No. 10, with the way they are fastened 
round the drawn threads to form the groundwork of 
the squares. ^ 

No. 11. — BORDER IN PYRAMID, CROSS, AND 
ARMENIAN STITCHES. 

This border is shown on Java canvas, and consists 
of drawings half an inch in depth, and of two threads 
between four threads twice, leave eight threads, and 
draw an inch and a quarter for the broad pai-t of the 
design. The interlaced stitches are worked as shown 
in No. 12 ; the cross-stitches are worked in the ordi- 
nary manner over four threads each way. The lines 
of slanting-stitches leave a tying or buttonhole stitch 
over six threads. The mode ot forming this stitch is 
clearly shown in the top line of 10. The Armenian 
stitches are described in Nos. 21 to 25. 



Nos. 12 AND 13.— See No. 10. 



No. U.— HERRINGBONE - PATTERN GROUND: 
DRAWN THREADS. 
Draw two threads, leaving three between each way ; 
work in a slanting direction over all the drawn open- 
ings (see lower part of No. 12). Herringbone-stitch 
is worked over every row of the pattern straight 
across (see upper part of design). 



No. 15.— See No. 10. 



Nos. 16 AND 17.— FEATHER OR CORAL STITCH. 
There are several varieties of these stitches, but the 
principle of working the patterns is apparent when 
one of them is learnt ; of this No. 16 is the most simple 
form. Draw the cotton through the material and hold 
the cotton under the left thumb (see position of needle 
and stitch in progress in No. 16, also the white dot in 
which the needle is to be placed for the second stitch) ; 
the loop has to be held down for each stitch in the 
same manner. No. 17 is worked in the same way, but 
two stitches are worked alternately on each side. The 
white dots correspond with the tops of the two 
stitches of one side, showing where the needle is to be 
put in. 

Nos. 18 AND 19.— RETICELLA LACE. 
This lace is so frequently used as an edging or ac- 
companiment to drawn-thread work that we think a 
specimen of it, and the mode of working it, will be 
useful here. As will be seen in No. 18, a tracing on 
paper or transparent linen is needed ; if the tracing is 
on paper, toile ciree must be placed under it. Tho 
stitches used in reticella lace will all tte found in paget 
S7 to 70 and 76 to 78. 



No. 20.— BORDER OR INSERTION : DRAWN 

THREADS AND SPUN-STITCHES. 
Draw all the threads of the material out one way to 
(!^e depth of three inches and a half; divide the 
rtrands into sixes by working over the edges of each 
jtrand with a slanting loop, for the entire length, 
fjien crossing this line of stitches with a second one 
("see top of design) ; next work the straight bars seven- 
eighths of an inch from the edge top and bottom, and 
one line straight across the centre for the entire length 
of your work ; these are foundation threads to work 
your pattern to. The knots and loops forming the 
oval are the next part to work, and the spun-stitches 
are made by interlacing these loops. . The arrow indi- 
cates the mode of forming the stitches. 



Nos. 21 TO 25.— TRIMMINGS : ARMENIAN LACE. 

The laces shown in N©s. 21 and 22 are for trimming 
coarse materials, such as Java canvas or linen. They 
may be made of fine twine, such as is prepared for 
macra-me work, of strong thread, cotton, or silk twist ; 
they can be made either with or without a heading. 
Nos. 23 and 25 give the details of working No. 22. No. 
23 shows the beginning of the stitch which forms the 
work ; a heading of cord with picots is here shown 
to work' into. Mignardise answers very well for a 
heading : if the picots of the mignardise are too close, 
work it into alternate picots. The next thing to ob- 
serve in No. 23 is that three strands of the working 
material are laid evenly together and worked over. 
The difficulty with beginners will be in the loops being 
kept even in depth. The stitch is perfectly simple. 
To begin, tie the end of the thread into a picot of mi- 
gnardise, put your needle into the picot to be worked 
into, lay the loop of thread round as indicated at a ; 
the needle is brought up at the back of this loop ; put 
the needle over the cotton and through the loop from 
the front to the back, and draw up the loop to the 
length shown in design ; continue for the length re- 
quired. 

To make the X pattern tie the thread to top of first 
worked loop; the first part of the X is formed by 
knotting into a stitch of previous row, and working 
one long loop as shown by the * ; carry the thread 
down to next loop of first row, and work a knot into 
it ; carry it up and work the knot immediately under 
the star, then work down into next loop and make the 
centre knot forming the third part of the X (see dot 
in No. 23), work the fourth from it up to Z*, which 
completes the pattern, and begin again. 

Into this row tlie Vandyke pattern is next worked, 
as shown in No. 25. 

The three first rows are worked exactly like the first 
row of No. 23, with the exception of omitting the 
three strands of tliread. 

For the three following rows, which are worked one 
stitch shorter each time, to enable you to work always 
from I'ight to left, you lay the working thread across 
from left to right, work three loops, lay the thread 
across, work two loops, again lay the thread 
across and work one loop, carry the thread down the 
left side of this vandyke to begin the next one; 
the edge is worked when all the Vandykes are com- 
pleted. 

To work No. 21, the stitch shown in No. 25 is 
employed. 

To begin : The heading is made by working a row 
over a straight line of thread, the thread is laid across 
from left to right, and worked over while working 
into the previous rows, as described in working the 
Vandykes shown in No. 25. 

3rd Row : Long loops are worked throughout, pass- 
ing over two loops of previous row. 

?th Row : Five loops are worked into each long loop 
of third row. 

5th Row : One loop into each loop of fourth row. 

6th Row: Work loops into three centre stitches of 
scallop, pass over two, leave a long loop (see design 
No. 21). Repeat. 

7th Row : Work into two loops of last row, leave a 
long loop. Repeat. 

8th Row : Work into short loop of last row, leave a 
long loop, and repeat. 

The mode of working No. 24 is a repetition of the 
X pattern illustrated in No. 23. When the requisite 
depth of these stitches has been worked they are 
crossed with straight lines, first worked lengthwise 
and then across (see No. 24). The edge is worked in 
open buttonhole, and twisted stitches are then worked 
through the open parts. 



112 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 




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THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 




DESCRIPTION OF DESIGN ON PAGE 113. 



SOFA-CUSHION. 

The quarter of design is shown on cover ; and com- 
plete design made up, with plush border and rosettes, 
is illustrated on this page. The design is worked en- 
tirely in cross-stitch, with silk or wool as preferred. 
The canvas should not be more than twelve stitches 
to the inch ; fourteen or sixteen stitches to the inch, 
being finer, will produce a better effect. We will take 
the blocks showing the colours in the order they ap- 
pear beneath the design. No. 1, dark blue; No. 2, 
lighter blue ; No. 3, moss-green ; No. 4, lighter moss- 
■yreen ; No. 5, Pompeian red ; No. 6, maize-colour. 

The cushion is made up with bright brown plush, 
with rosettes of the same at the corners, and cord is 
put round the euge. 



DESCRIPTION OF COLOURED SUPPLEMENT. 



1st design.— LEVIATHAN AND CROSS STITCH. 
The leviathan-stitch shown in the maize-colour is 
worked like a cross-stitch over four stitches, or eight 
threads of canvas from corner to corner. Next a 
»titch is worked from top to bottom in the centre of 
the square, and a fourth stitch crosses in the centre 
}Yom left to right, completing the stitch. The green 
* uuares are of four complete cross-stitches each way. 



2n-d DESIGN.— SATIN-STITCH. 

' This stitch is worked in various lengths, generally 
in diagonal lines across the canvas. This pattern is 
begun over two threads or one stitch of the canvas, 
and is increased to form squares equally on each side, 
one stitcli each time. 



3rd DESIGN.— PLAIT: CROSS AND LONG-CROSS 
STITCHES. 

The mode of workiT*^ plait- stitch is illustrated in 
No. 11. Another mode of working is like herring- 
bone-stitch over two stitches in breadth and one in 
height. 

The cross-stitch is worked m the ordinarv manner, 
and the long cross-stitch is worked over eight threads 
or four stitches in length, and over two threads or one 
stitch in width. 



4th DESIGN.— VANDYKE AND BACK STITCHES. 

The vandyke-stitch is worked in the same way as 
satin-stitch, of which it is a variety. In the Vandyke 
stitch the wool is carried in straight lines, first over 
one stiteh or two threads, next over two stitches or 
four threads of canvas ; and so on, until the pattern is 
the required size. The increase is always worked on 
one side only. In the open line of holes between the 
patterns back-stitches are worked over four threads at 
a time* 



SUPPLEMENT GKATIS to the Subscribers to 
The YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL. 




BERLIN DESIGNS AND ILLUSTRATIONS OF VARIOUS STITCHES. 



Kindly introduce the Young Ladies^ Journal to a Friend by the Gift 
of this SUPPLEMENT. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



llC' 



BERLIN "WORK. 



INTRODUCTION. 

Under the head of Berlin work are varieties of stitches, 
worked generally upon canvas with double or single 
Berlin wool or filoselle silk, or the two combined. The 
principal stitch now employed is the ordinary cross- 
stitch, worked over two threads of canvas each way. 
The introduction of the point patterns in Berlin at tiie 
beginning of this century gave the work the name of 
Berlin worlc. The plan of working previously to the 
introduction of these patterns was to have the design 
painted on canvas and work over it. Tent-stitch was 
quite as much employed for the work as cross-stitch ; 
but it is not used much at the present time, as it is 
very slow work, tiying to the sight, from its requiring 
very fine canvas. The illustrations which follow give 
dl the more difficult stitches at present in use and 
directions for working tliem. 



Nos. 1 TO 6.-~FRAMED CROSS-STITCH. 

This pattern is intended for coarse canvas ; it has no 
wrong side if properly worked, therefore is suitable 
to articles that are not to be lined. No. 1 shows the 
mode of beginning the stitch ; this is to make the wool 
firm, and the work neat on each side, and is in fact 
a diagonal darn of three threads. No. 2 shows the 
first stitch finished and the needle placed for the first 
frame-side of a square. (Workers must observe that 
each stitch covers three threads of the canvas each 
way.) No. 3 shows the position of the needle for the 
second side of frame. No. 4 the mode of working the 
second half of cross-stitch, and the third side of 
square on the wrong side, and is continued for the 
whole length of the pattern. No. 5 shows the pattern 
repeated on the right side, and No. 6 its appearance on 
the wrong side if correctly worked. 



perpendicularly. The light work surrounding th> 
squares is in cross and back stitches. 



No. 7.-FRAMED STAR. 

This stitch makes a pretty variety for a grounding. 
The mode of working it will be found quite easy after 
working the framed cross-stitch previously described. 



Nos. 8 AND 18.~DESIGN IN SATIN, CROSS, AND 
BACK STITCHES. 

No. 8 shows in an enlarged size the mode of working 
the squares in No. 18 ; they are worked over nine 
threads of canvas, one square horizontally and one 



Nos. 9 TO 11.— VARIETIES OF PLAIT-STITCHES. 

No. 9 is worked with four strands of wool or silk 
over six threads of canvas in depth and three in width; 
it is worked in single stripes, taking the needle down 
three stitches lower each time. No. 10 shows the same 
pattern worked over four threads in depth and two in 
width; it is worked two threads lower each time. 
No. 11 is worked over one stitch of Java canvas in 
depth and two in width. 

No. 12.— DIAPER PATTERN FOR aROUNDING. 

The wool is drawn in straight lines for the required 
length, first perpendicularly and afterwards hori- 
zontally ; it is then caught down with a tent-stitch in 
a different colour at each corner of a square (sea 
arrow). 

No. 13.— POINT REPRISE ON JAVA CANVAS. 

This is pretty for v/orking a border, as it may hb 
quickly and effectively worked in Vandykes; each 
stitch is worked over five and under one— the one 
stitch ahvays coming in straight lines. 



Nos. 14 AND 15.— GOBELIN-STITCHES. 

The wool for each of these designs must be laid 
horizontally over the entire width to be worked be- 
tween each thread of canvas. No. 14 is then v/orked 
over two strands of wool and over two threads o*' 
canvas in straight rows across ; and No. 15 over two 
threads in a slanting direction. 



No. 16.— POINT DE FANTASIE. 

This is very effective work ; but should not be used 
where strength is required. Trace the design on can- 
vas, and work the design in the necessary shades of 
wool in horizontal lines. When all the horizontal lines 
of flower or pattern are worked, work with the samo 
colour in straight lines in tent-stitch, leaving three 
threads of canvas between each line ; outhne with 
the same colour in cording-stitch over four threads in. 
length and two in width, taking the needle back two 
threads for each stitch. The ground is worked in on» 
colour. 



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No. 17.-.DESIGN ON JAVA CANVAS OF LONG, 
CROSS, AND SATIN STITCHES. 

The satin-stitches forming the diamonds are of dif- 
ferent lengths, showing the canvas between ; the long 
cross-stitxjhes are worked over four stitches in depth 
and two in width. 



No. 18.— See No. 8. 



No. 19.— FRINGE OF WOOL THROUGH CANVAS. 

Six strands of wool are drawn under two stitches 
of canvas, which can be afterwards worked over with 
cross-stitch, taking through a stitch of canvas and 
strand of wool together. 



Nos. 20 AND 21.— RAISED BERLIN WORK. 

This work is suitable for rugs or mats made with 
six or eight thread fleecy. The Illustration No. 20 
shows the mode of working No. 21— a simple pat- 
tern with one colour only cut, the remainder allowed 
p remain in loops. Take a mesh or strip of card, lay in 
A straight line on your work, draw the wool through 
above the mesh, put it round the mesh, and work a 
cross-stitch to the right. If more than one shade or 
colour has to be used in a row, do not cut off the last, 
but pass it to the back of the work, to be used again 
when required. 



No. 22.— RAISED WORK WITH DOUBLE WOOL. 

This stitch, if worked over a wide mesh, forms a 
pretty fringe for Berlin work, mats &c. Put the wool 
round the mesh and through two threads of canvas in 
a straight line to the left; put the needle through the 
loop on the mesh, and straight through the two next 
threads to the right (see arrow), repeat. This may be 
worked in shades, and afterwards cut with a sharp 
pair of scissors. . 



Nos. 23 AND 24.— FRINGE. 

This fringe may be made any depth, according to 
the size of the mesh. Have the wool wound in six 
balls ; take the six lengths together, turn them over a 
mesh ; take a needle threaded with very coarse cotton 
or thread, pass it round the six strands on the mesh 
and through the thread as for a buttonhole-stitch (see 
Design No. 23). Repeat. For cutting, see No. 24. 



No. 25.— STAR PATTERN : RAISED BERLIN WORK 
OR PLUSH-STITCH. 

Our design shows a star pattern and shaded stripe. 
Before beginning a pattern tha worker must practice 
the stitch, which is suitable for footstools, cushions, 
ii;c. ; it is worked with Berlin ^\»ool over strips of card- 
board. ^ The stars are worked "with one colour only ; 
the easiest plan is to mark " thiem out on the canvas 
either with needle and wool or with pen and ink ; 
commence in the narrowest pjurt. Work three cross- 
stitches each over two ondinairy stitches of canvas 
perpendicularly (see upper pairt Of desigli), place a 



strip of card a quartdr of an inch in width and an 
inch and a half in length over the stitches, fill into 
the shape of star, working over the card. The stars 
are separated by stripes of five shades- of wool worked 
horizontally over eighteen stitches of canvas in the 
longest part and twelve in the shortest. Work the 
stripe from the point of one star to the point of 
the next after working the stars. 

For the shaded stripe, begin with the darkest shade 
and work the row of cross-stitches and first row of 
plush-stitch with it. After working the cross-stitch, 
take a strip of card, place it over the row of cross- 
stitches, work over it for the plush-stitches as shown 
in the upper part of the design (25) in exactly the 
same way as you would work nerringbone-stitch, 
working through two threads of canvas in a straight 
Hne each time. Work the second shade over the first, 
working into the next row of canvas threads (see de- 
sign No. 25) ; continue working each shade over tlie 
last until the stripe is the width required. 

Count the stitches for the next stripe, commence 
in the centre, and work the second stripe as described 
for the first. When all the rows are worked, take a 
pair of sharp scissors, insert them under the stitches 
just above the cardboard in the centre of stripe, and 
cut through the wool. Great care must be taken in 
cutting the shape of the star, as the cutting may 
much improve it. When the cutting is finished (and 
there is great art in this to make the work look really 
well) hold over the steam of boiling water, and af tei«i 
wards hold by the four corners and paint the back 



.Nos. 28 AND 27.— DESIGN: BROCART-DE-BOUR- 
GOYNE. 

The foundation, which must«not be too firm a mate- 
rial, must be fixed tightly into a frame after the out- 
line has been traced upon it. The outline is worked 
with fine chenille in tambour-stitch, which is the same 
as chain-stitch in crochet ; the ball of chenille must 
be kept at the back of the work and each loop pulled 
through to the front. The loop-stitches are worked in 
gold or silver thread over a knitting-pin ; make a knot 
in the thread and put it through to the front of the 
work below the pin, round the pin from back to front, 
and through the loop made with the thread (see de- 
sign). 



r 



Nos. 28 TO 31.— FANCY STITCHES IN BERLIN 
WOOL AND SILK. 

These stitches are for working on foundations of 
cloth, satin, or velvet ; in No. 28 the pattern must be 
traced on the material, and wool is put over from edge 
to edge of the tracing : this is crossed at regular in- 
tervals with back-stitches and outlined with chain- 
stitches in silk. No. 29 shows a simple and effective 
way of working leaves. No. 30 shows the detail of 
No. 31, which for outline and filling consists of wool 
put the entire length of the design and worked over 
as shown in No. 30, which gives the effect of cording- 
stitch. 



No. 32.— CHENILLE WORK. 

This diagram shows the mode of working chenille 
without waste of this material, which is costly ; it is 
:?utlined with cording stitch in silk. 



CiMFILETI mim W TIE W§IK-TA1ILI 





FANCY NETTING. 




KOSE-yETTTKG WITH DARKED STRIPE. 



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THE YOUNO LAMES' JODBNAb 



DESCRIPTION OF DESIGN ON PAGE 121. 



EOSE-NETTING. 

This design is suitable for curtains, antimacassars, 
shawls, &c. It consists of stripes of rose -netting 



warked according to the directions given for No. 8. 
Four patterns of rose-netting are alternated with six 
rows of plain netting. Vie plain stripes are darned (se'» 
design). 



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COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLiS. 



123 



FANCY NETTING. 



INTRODUCTION. 

Netting has been practised for so many years that the 
date of its invention is unknown. Specimens of 
netting are still to be seen among Egyptian relics in 
some of the Continental museums, together with the 
tools that made them, and are said to be 3,000 years old. 
Mentions of it are made in the Bible. In tht thirteenth 
century it appears to have been introduced into Eng- 
land, and has been known under the different names 
of caul-work, net-work, lacis, and Keseau, &c. ^ That 
it can be, and is, put to many useful purposes is well 
known. Fishermen's nets are generally of their own 
make; and the more industrious of the craft spend 
many of their leisure hours in both making and mend- 
ing their nets. Netted articles of attire were made of 
rich silk and gold thread; and about fifty years ago 
netted window-curtains were quite a fashion. It is 
quite probable that a turn in the wheel of fashion will 
bring back into special favour work that has for some 
years past been very little practised ; although it is 
never entirely put aside, as the guipure netting, 
which is of a much more elaborate description, has 
been much used for window-curtains, antimacassars, 
drapes, trimming, &c. For the tools employed in net- 
ting, and the description of the stitches, we refer our 
readers to our Guipure iietting. 



No. 1.— COMMON NETTING. 

This is the most ordinary and simple form of net- 
ting, and only differs from the mode of square netting 
in this respect : the work is begun by netting the 
number of stitches needed for the whole length of 
the work, and netting into them in the following 
rows. The stitch is precisely the same as described 
for square netting, page 20. No. 1 is worked with 
one thread for all but the lower row, where two 
threads are introduced to form the edge. 

1^0. 2.--M0DE OF WORKING A NETTED FOUNDA- 
TION WITH HOLES FOR EMBROIDERING TRE- 
FOILS IN. 

The ground may be worked in ordinary slanting 
netting, or in the round netting shown in No. 3. The 
pattern is formed by leaving off and turning round 
in the middle of the rows. This pattern consists of 
three little holes which are afterwards worked round 
with flossette to form a trefoil pattern. No. 2 shows 
this in an increased size in order to show more clearly 
the mode of working the pattern. Work a plain row 
for the required length. 

1st Row: Net five stitches, draw the needle out, 
turn the work, and then go back as far as the begin- 
ning of the row, making one knot in each stitch ; then, 
returning, having arrived at the last of the five stitches, 
loop the thread for a long stitch on the next stitch of 
the upper plain row. 

Then work on for five more stitches in the same 



way as for the first five stitches, work back, then loop 
the working thread round the large stitch lying on 
the left, as shown in No. 2, in this manner forming the 
first line of holes. All the returning stitches are indi- 
cated in No. 2 by dots, so that the course of the work 
may be easily followed ; therefore the next plain row 
and the succeeding row forming the two holes for thf> 
trefoil need no explanation ; there are four rows be 
tween each pattern row. 

No. 3.— ROUND-NETTING. 

This netting only differs from the common netting 
in the mode of placing the needle into the stitches of 
the preceeding line. For this, put the needle through 
the loop without changing the place of the finger or 
loop, turn the needle round and put it into the stitch 
of the preceeding line from above downwards, as 
shown by the arrow in No. 3, the working thread must 
remain on the right hand of the needle, and the stitch 
is then firmly drawn up in the usual manner. By this 
means the stitches in the preceeding row are a little 
twisted, and a round-looking stitch is formed. 

No. 4.— LOOP-NETflNG. 
Work two rows of ordinary netting on a knitting- 
pin. No. 12 (Walkers' Bell Gauge). In the third row 
work two stitches into one, twist the thread twice 
round the pin. Repeat for the required length. 

4-th Row : Work two loops into the long-stitches of 
last row, twist the thread twice round. Repeat to the 
end of the row, and continue working only the fourth 

row. 

No. 5.- DIAMOND PATTERN IN ROUND NETTING. 

The number of stitches for this pattern is five, and 
one over. . , - j 

1st Row : Work four stitches as described for round 
netting (No. 3) . Work one long stitch by twisting the 
thread twice round the pin. Repeat for the length 
required. , ..^ , 

2nd Row : Two long stitches, * three round stitches, 
one long stitch into the centre of first long stitch, one 
long stitch into next round stitch. Repeat from *. 

3rd Row : One long stitch, * two round stitches, 
one long stitch into next long stitch, one round stitch 
into next long stitch, one long stitch into next round 
stitch. Repeat from *. 

4th Row: two round stitches, one long stitch, one 
round stitch, one long stitch. Repeat from beginning 
of row. , .^ , 

5th Row : One round stitch, * two long stitches, 
three round stitches. Repeat. 

6th Row: Three round, * one long, four round. 
Repeat from *. . , -, 

7th Row: Oie round, * two long, three round. 
Repeat from ^ 

8th Row : Two round, * one long, one round, one 
long, two round. Repeat from *. 

9th R^W : One long, two round, one long, one round- 
Repeat from the beginning of the row. 

10th Row : Two long, three round. Repeat. 

Now continiie workiner from the first row. 



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THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL. 



No. e.—SQUARE PATTERN. 

For this pattern : — 

1st Row : Work one plain row. 

2nd Row : One ordinary stitch, and twist the thread 
twice round for the large square. Repeat to the end 
of the row. The first and second rows are repeated 
alternately. Arrange the stitches so that a long stitch 
always comes under a short stitch. 

Nos. 7 AND lO.-CROSS-NETTING. 

1st Row : Plain netting. 

2nd Row : Net alternately one long and one common 
fjtitch. .^ - , . , 

3rd Row: Work entirely in short stitches, which 
naturally draw unevenly. -, u 4. 

4th Row consists alternately of long and short 
Stitches ; but instead of working them m the usual 
way, draw a stitch of last row through the long loops 
of the second row and net it, draw the following stitch 
through the same loop and net it ; continue to work a 
long and short stitch alternately in this way through 
the row. Repeat the third and fourth rows alter- 
nately. 

Nos. 8, 11, AND 21.-R0SE-NETTING IN PLAIN AND 
STRIPED VARIETIES. 

No. 8 shows the detail of the work. No. 11, rose- 
netting ; and No. 21, rose-netting, with ribbon velvet 
run in at each fifth pattern, and the rose-netting is 
darned with silk or wool of a contrasting colour to the 
netting. This pattern would make very pretty shawls 
netted with white Andalusianwool, darned with pink, 
maize, or blue silk, and narrow black ribbon velvet 
run in. 

Another variety of this design is illustrated on the 
cover of this Supplement. 

1st Row : Net quite plain over a mesh about a third 
of an inch in width. 

2nd Row : Net over a knitting pin (No. 12), thus : 
First draw the first long loop through the second and 
net it, then draw the second long loop through the 
first and net it. Repeat throughout the row. No. 8 
clearly illustrates the mode of working this row. The 
first loop is shown drawn through the second ready 
for netting, at the lower middle of illustration, and the 
arrow represents the needle inserted ready for work- 
ing the second loop. 

The first and second rows are repeated alternately 
for the required length, looping the stitches so that 
the pattern is reversed. 

Nos, 9 AND 12.~STAR-NETTING. 

Cross and star netting very much resemble each 
other ; after working the cross, little difficulty will be 
found in working the star-netting. 

1st Row : One double and one plain stitch alter- 
nately with knitting pin No. 12. .... 

2nd Row : Net plain with a mesh a third of an inch 

wide. , ., n 

3rd Row : Draw one stitch of second row through 
long loop of first row, net it with a short stitch, draw 
the next loop through the same long loop of first, and 
net it with a long stitch (z-e., cotton twice round the 
mesh). Repeat the second and third rows for length 
required. 

No. 10.— See No. 7. 
No. 11.— See No. 8. 
N'©. 12.— See No. 9. 



No. 13.— STRIPE-NETTING. 
This requires an even number of stitches. 
1st Row : Net a plain row. 

2nd Row : Miss the first stitch, net the second, the'O 
the first, and so on till the end of the row. 
These two rows form the pattern. 

No. 14.— HONEYCOMB-NETTING. 

An even number of stitches are needed for this pat- 
tern. 

1st Row : Plain netting. 

2nd Row : Net the second stitch, then tlio first, next 
the fourth, then the third ; work thus to the end of 
the row. 

3rd Row: Plain. . .. t. 

4th Row : Net a plain stitch ; begin the pattern by 
netting the third stitch, then the second, next the 
fifth, then the fourth ; end with a plain stitch, and 
continue to the end of the row. Repeat from first 

row. 

No. IS.-DIAGONAL-NETTING. 

The looping of the stitches is clearly shown in the 
design ; work with one size mesh throughout. Work 
a plain row. 

1st Row : Work two loops into each stitch of the 
row. 

2nd Row : Draw the second loop through the first 
in the direction of the arrow ; the a is drawn througli 
h (see right of illustration). The first stitch is worked 
in the loop marked a; the second in the one marked h. 
To mark the pattern and make it easier, the stitches 
drawn through might be drawn a little longer than 
the others. Of the two following stitches still hanging 
free, that marked a is the one through which the first 
stitch is to be made; besides the letters the point of 
the arrow shows the course of the stitches. The 
second row is repeated throughout. To keep the 
stitches in the right direction, cross them by drawing 
them through from left to right in each alternate row. 

No. 16.— BORDER : PLAIN, HONEYCOMB, AND 
ROSE NETTING. 

1st Row : Plain netting with small mesh. 

2nd Row : Work four plain stitclies ; work four loops 
into the fifth stitch. Repeat to the end of the row. 

3rd Row : Work three plain : work the clusters of 
two loops together. Repeat from the beginning of 
row. 

4th and 5th Rows : Plain. 

6th Row: Like second row, beginning with two 
plain stitches to alternate the position of the clusters. 

7th Row : Like third row, working the clusters in 
their proper places. 

8th and 9th Rows : Plain. 

Five rows of honeycomb pattern like No. 14 -are now 
worked ; the rows are alternately of fine and coarse 
material, or of silk and wool to give effect to the pat- 
tern. 

Work three rows plain netting. 

Two patterns of rose netting ; and for the edge one 
row with a larger mesh and the two strands of the 
working material. The scallop design is worked with 
a needle with silk two or three times thick. 



^o, 17.— INSERTION : ROSE AND PLAIN 
NETTING EDGED WITH CROCHET. 
Work four rows of plain netting with a small mesh. 
One pattern rose-netting as described in No. 8. 
Four plain rows. , 

For the edges work two double crochet stitches into 
each stitch of the netting. 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLE. 



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Nos. 18 AND 19.— NETTING FOUNDATION INTER- 
LACED WITH A NEEDLE AND THREAD. 
The foundation consists of plain rows of netting 
worked with a contrasting colour or material from 
end to end ; the mode of working is too clearly illus- 
trated to need description. The pattern is varied by 
each row being worked in No. 18, and alternate rows 
being worked in No. 19. 

Nos. 20 AND 22.— TRIMMINGS. 

or No. 20 work five rows plain netting over a knit- 
ting-pin (No. 12). Work two patterns of star-netting as 
described in Nos. 9 and 12. Work two plain rows. 
Work one row with a mesh half an inch wide, passing 
over one stitch of last row. For the last row work 
over the large mesh into every stitch. A row of 
darning-stitch is worked in scallops at each edge of 
the star patterns. No. 22 shows a variation of the 
same pattern, working more rows over the small mesh, 
and omitting the edge row described for No. 20. 

No. 21.~See No. 8. 



No. 22.— See No. 20. 



No. 23.--TRIMMING; NETTING. 

With thread of two sizes work four rows plain over 
a ]mitting-pin (No. 14). 

5th Row : With coarse thread and a half-inch mesh 
work into every alternate stitch of the row. 

6th Row : With fine thread and small mesh work 
two stitches into each stitch of previous row (see 
design). 

7th to 9th Rows : Plain netting. 

10th Row: Like fifth row. 

11th Row : Like sixth row. 

12th to 14th Rows : Plain. 

15th Row : Same as fifth row. 



Nos. 24, 26, AND 27.--DOILY : NETTING. 
No. 24 shows the mode of beginning a circular piece 
of netting, the first row of which is worked over a 
thread as shown in No. 26. When t\ie row has the re- 
quired number of stitches the thread must be tied as 
sliown in the centre of No. 24. Meshes of graduated 
sizes are used, as shown in No. 24 and in the centre of 
No. 27, where seven rows of graduated sizes are 
worked. In the eighth row of doily a fan pattern is 
made by working six stitches into one of the previous 
row over the largest mesh. Eleven plain rows are 
next worked over the second, and each qS two larger 
sizes of pins used as the meshes for the centre of doily 
in order to make the work flat. Next work three pat- 
terns of rose netting over meshes of three sizes. A 
plain row with the smallest mesh, working two stitcjies 
into one of the previous row, finishes this doily. The 
leaf pattern over the fan pattern is darned in. 



Nos. 25 AND 28.— MODE OF BEGINNING A CIRCLE. 

Make a loop, net one stitch into it, remove the mesh, 
net one stitch into the last, continue working rows of 
single stitches until you have the number required 
(you will find that the piece worked has the appear- 
ance of two rows of loops), pass a piece of cotton 
through tlie loops at one side, then tie the cotton, 
work into the loops at the other side in a circle. ' The 
increase for the circle shown in No. 25 is made by 
netting two stitches into each alternate stitch of the 
first round ; in the next and following rounds always 
net two into the made stitch of the previous round, 



this keeps the increase rows even and forms a kind of 
star. The clusters are worked like those described in 
No. 16. 

Nos. 26 AND 27.— See No. 24. 



No. 28.— See No. 25. 



No. 29.— FOUNDATION WITH NEEDLEWORK 
PATTERN. 

This design consists of rows of ordinary netting 
with crosses worked with a needle and thread into 
each alternate square ; the mode of working the cross 
will be easily seen in the design ; the thread is carried 
from square to square by twisting it round the right- 
hand foundation thread. 



No. 30.— OPEN-WORK AND DARNED STRIPE. 

Work seven plain rows over a small mesh. 

8th Row : With a mesh a size larger work one stitch 
into each stitch of previous row. 

9th Row : With the same mesh net two stitches to- 
gether throughout. 

10th Row: Net two stitches into one throughout. 
Repeat from the beginning of the pattern. 

The darning is worked with wool or silk of a con- 
trasting colour (see design). 



No. 31.— TRIMMING, WITH THICK LOOPS AND 
FAN EDGE. 

Work two rows plain netting. 

3rd Row : Work three stitches into one of previous 
row, one stitch into each of two successive stitches. 
Repeat throughout the row. 

4th Row: Plain working through the clusters of 
three stitches together as one stitch. 

5th Row : Plain. 

6th Row : Like third row, working the clusters of 
three stitches between those of the third row. 

7th Row : Like fourth row. 

8th Row : Work into two stitches together below 
the clusters of sixth row, work one into all the other 
stitches. 

9th Row : Work over a mesh rather more than half 
an inch in width four stitches into one stitch of last 
row, pass over three stitches, and repeat. 

10th Row : With the mesh first used work one stitch 
into each of the four worked into one stitch, take the 
next loop, pass it through the centre of the three 
stitches passed over in the previous row, work one 
stitch into it. Repeat from the beginning of the row. 

The mode of passing the long loop through the 
centre of the three stitches is clearly shown by the 
thin line in the design. 



No. 32.— LOOSE LOOP PATTERN. 

1st and 2nd Rows : Plain netting. 

3rd Row : Two plain loops, place the working thread 
as usual over the mesh, and pass the needle close over 
the nearest knot of the last row but one from under- 
neath perpendicularly, put the thread round the mesh 
again, and let the needle go again through the same 
stitch from underneath upwards, and then work a 
common stitch in the next stitch of the last row so 
that the thread is put three times round the mesh n^ 
shown in the lower right hand corner of illustration. 
Repeat from the beginning of the row. 

4th and 5th Rows : Plain. 

6th Row : Like third row, working so that the 
clusters of loops come between the clusters of third 
row. 



i28 



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CSMfilll mim « Til WilK-TMM. 



FANCY NETTING. 




^«. 33 J^«B 3».^XAl»rTO«, 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOUKNAL 



DESCRIPTION OF DESIGNS ON PAGE 129. 



LAPPET FOR CAPS, &c. 

"No. 33. — This lappet is composed of one stripe of 
the open worlc <and darned stripe shown in illustra- 
tion 30, (page 128), edged by a fan pattern. 

To form the point at the end. tie the cotton into the 
."^rst of the four loops, work one stitch into each of the 
other four stitches, turn, knot the cotton into the 
centre of last loop without working over a mesh, one 
stitch over the mesh into each of the three next loops, 
turn, knot the cotton into the first loop in the same 
way as last, one stitch into each of two loops, turn, 
knot the cotton into the first loop, one stitch into the 
next. 

Now work a row round both sides and the end. 

1st Row : In loop netting described for the stripe, 
*vorking quite round the end and along the other side. 

2nd and 3rd Rows : Plain netting. 

4>tt Row; Over the larger mesh work one stitch 



into a loop, six stitches into the next loop, and 
repeat. 

Over the small mesh work one stitch into each 
stitch of last row. 

No. 34. — This is in sheaf pattern, with bunches of 
loops. The sheaf pattern is described in No, o9 of this 
Supplement. Make a foundation of as many loops as 
you require for the length of lappet. 

1st Row : Plain over a mesh the eighth of ati inch 
in width. 

2nd Row : Sheaf netting, leaving one of the long 
loops without tying into a sheaf; for the end on one 
of these commence the 3rd Row ; Work over the small 
mesh, ten stitches into it, one stitch into each of the 
stitches worked with double cotton. Now work the 
4-th Row all round plain. 

5th Row: In the loop netting described for the 
stripe of No. 1. 

6th Row: Plain. 

7th Row : Bunches of loops described in No. 4 of 
this Supplement. 

8th Row : Plain. 



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131 



FANCY NETTING {ContinixecL). 



No. 35.— SCALLOP. 

These scallops make a pretty edge for curtains, anti- 
/nacassars, &c. ; they are worked separately and sewn 
to the curtain, or whatever they are intended to orna- 
ment, with a needle and thread. 

1st Row : Over a mesh three-quarters of an inch 
wide work twenty-seven stitches. 

2nd Row : Work with double thread and knitting- 
pin No. 12 for a mesh, one stitch into each stitch of 
last row. 

3rd to 5th Rows : Like second row, but with single 
instead of double cotton. 

6th Row : Rose nettin^^, with coarser cotton, direc- 
tions and illustrations for which will be found in 
Nos. 8 and 11, (page 124). 

8th to 10th Rows': Like third to fifth rows. 

9th Row : With double thread over the large mesh, 
one stitch into each stitch of last row. 

10th Row : One stitch into two loops together. Re- 
peat to the end of the row. 

Draw up the first row of loops with a needle and 
thread (see design). 

For the crochet heading, one double into last loop 
of tenth row, seven chain, one double treble into rose 
netting, seven chain, one double treble into fourth 
row, seven chain, one double treble into long loops, 
three chain, one quadruple treble into the centre 
of cluster of loops, three chain, one double treble 
into long loop, seven chain, one double treble into 
fourth row, seven chain, one double treble^ into rose 
netting, seven chain, one double treble into tenth 

POW. 



No. 3o.-B0RDER WITH DOUBLE LOOSE LOOPS. 

This will form a pretty border for neckerchiefs 
worked in Ice silk. After the foundation, which ma;^ 
be in plain netting, work with double silk over a meeh 
one-eighth inch in width. 

1st and 2nd Rows : Plain. 

3rd Row : Five plain, one loose loop (loose loops 
were described in No. 32, page 127), five plain. Now 
you must begin each row from tlie same side. 

4-th Row : One plain, one loose loop, six plain. ^ 

5th Row : Three plain, one loose loop, one plain, one 
loose loop, three plain. 

6th Row : Plain. 

7th Row : Two plain, one loose loop, three plain, 
one loose loop, two plain, repeat. 

8th Row : Plain. 

9th Row: One plain, one loose loop, two plain, one 
loose loop, two plain, one loose loop. 

10th Row : Plain. 

11th Row : One loose loop, seven plain, repeat. 

12th Row: Take a half-inch mesh, work three 
stitches in each loop of last row. 

13th Row : Take a knitting-pin No. 14. Work one 
stitch in each stitch of last row. 

14th Row : Like thirteenth over the thick mesh. 

15th Row ; Over the thick mesh net six loops toge- 
ther each timfr* 



No. 37.— FAN NETTING. 

This kind of netting is used for edgings, stripes, &c. 

1st and 2nd Rows : Plain netting over a quarter- 
inch me.6"h. 

3rd Row : Cotton twice over the mesh for each loop. 

4th Row : Plain netting. 

5th Row : Five stitches into one stitch of previous 
row, cotton twice over the mesh, pass over one stitch, 
and repeat. 

6th Row : One stitch into each of four loops worke't- 
into one loop, pass over the long loop, and repeat. 

7th Row : One stitch into each of the three loops ok 
last row, cotton twice over the mesh, pass over tha 
next loop, and repeat. 

8th Row : One stitch into each of the two loops ot 
last row, cotton twice over the m'^sh, pass over tha 
long loop, and repeat to the end of the row. 



No.^B.-BORDER WITH BUNCHES OF LOOPS. 

This forms a pretty border for shawls, curtains, &c. 
It is worked throughout with double cotton or double 
Andalusian wool, and a half-inch mesh. 

1st Row : Plain netting. 

2nd Row : Two plain, one bunch of loops. 

Each bunch of loops is worked in the following way: 
After a common stitch, which must be rather long, 
put the thread again loosely round the mesh and push 
the needle through without making a knot, then make 
another stitch-knot so that two loops remain in tho 
same stitch. As shown in the lower right corner, tlie 
loop bunch is fastened here, for which the needle is 
carried'from behind round the bunch and pushed m 
front from underneath through the loop, and is drawn 
up tightly ; now work one plain, one bunch of loops. 

3rd°Row: One plain, three bunches of loops sepi^, 
rated by one plain stitch. 

4th Row : Like second row. 

5th Row : Like third row. 

6th Row : Like second row. 

7th and 3f.h Rows : Plain. 

9-th Row : Tnree plain, one bunch. 

10th Row : Like second row. 

11th Row : Like third row. 

12th Row : Bunches of loops throughout. 

13th Row : One stitch into each plain stitch of last 



No. 39.— EDGING : DOUBLE FAN OR SHEAF. 

This forms a pretty edging for doilys, night nets, &c. 
1st to 3rd Rows: Plain netting over a quarter-mch 

mesh. -, -, 1.1 

4th Row : With a mesh an inch wide, and double 
cotton, work one stitch into each loop. 

5th Row : With the small mesh one stitch into each 
loop. The long-stitches are caught together in clusters 
of three by a needle and cotton ; each stitch must be 
firmly fastened at back and cut off. The heading is 
worked in crochet ; one double into a stitch, thraa 
^ cs^jain, and repeat to the end of the row. 



THE YOUNG LAMES* JOURNAL 




*ro. 35 



mo. 4ifi, 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WOBK-TABLE, 



]33 




NO- 4^. 



NO. 47. 



134 



THE YOUNG LADIES' JOURNAL 



No. 40.— BORDER WITH ROUND-LOOP HEADING. 

This design will make a pretty shawl or neckerchief , 
netted with Ice silk and Andalusian wool, and two 
round meshes one half the size of the other ; the plain 
netting with the silk and round loops in wool. The 
three rows would be repeated any number of times to 
form the foundation. 

1st Row : Work with double wool and the large mesh, 
one stitch into each stitch..of foundation, in the same 
way as described for round netting, No. 3, (page 123). 

2nd and 3rd Rows : Plain netting with a small 
mesh. 

4th Row : Like first row. 

5th and 6th Rows : Like second and third rows. 

7th Row: With double wool, and a mesh three- 
quarter inch wide, work threo stitches into a loop, 
pass over one loop, and repeat. 

8th and 9th Rows : With the small mesh and single 
silk plain netting. 

10th Row : With the largest mesh and double wool 
one stitch into a loop, one through tho next loop and 
that already worked into together (see arrow), and 
one stitch into the second stitch, pass over one stitch, 
and repeat to the end of row. 

11th Row : With the small mesh and single silk, one 
stitch into each loop of last row. 



No. 41.— DIAMOND PATTERN. 

This design is suitable for foundations of shawls or 
stripes for clouds, antimacassars, &c. 

1st Row: Plain. 

2nd Row : Work two loops into a stitch, draw the 
next loop rather longer, and repeat to end of the row. 

3rd Row : One stitch into each loop of last row. 
J 4th Row : Work a stitch through two loops together 
under the two loops worked into a stitch in second row. 
Repeat to the end of the row. Repeat from the first 
row. The double loops are worked across with a 
needle and cotton, as shown in the upper part of 
illustration. 



No. 42.— DESIGN WITH TWISTED LOOPS, 

This design is worked in wool, and is suitable for 
shawls, antimacassars, &c. 

1st and 2nd Rows : Plain over a mesh one-third of 
an inch in width. 

3rd Row : Plain over a mesh one inch in width. 

4th Row : Twist a loop twice and work through the 
lower part (as indicated by the arrow), one stitch into 
each loop over the small mesh. 

5th and 6th Rows : Like first and second rows. 

7th Row : With wool of two colours one stitch into 
a loop over the small mesh, turn the wool twice over 
the mesh, pass over one loop and repeat. 

The work is to be taken from the foundation, the 
knots picked out, and a row like the sixth worked 
into the first row. 



No. 43.— STRIPE FOR SHAWLS, &c. 

This design is worked with wool. 

1st and 2nd Rows : Plain over a small mesh. 

3rd Row : With a mesh double the size and double 
wool, one stitch into each stitch of last row. 

4th Row: With the small mesh and single wool, 
plain netting. 

5th Row : Like third row. 

6th and 7th Rows : Like first and second rows. 



No. 44.— BORDER : ROSE AND SHEAF PATTERN 

1st to 3rd Rows : With a knitting pin No. 11 for a 
mesh work in plain netting :— 

4th and 5th Rows : Rose netting (see page 128). 

6th and 7th Rows : Plain. 

8th Row : With treble cotton and a mesh rather 
more than an inch in width work one stttch into each 
loop. 

9th to 11th Rows : With the small mesh and single 
cotton work one stitch into each loop. 

I2th Row : In round netting (for which see mua* 
oration 3, page 124) work with double cotton ona 
stitch into a loop, cotton twice over the mesh, paaa 
over one stitch, and repeat. 

The sneats are caugnt togetner T^y crochet. Work 
one double over three triple loops, seven chain, repeat. 
A double length of cotton is darned in a straight lino 
above and below the two rows of rose pattern. 



No. 45.— BORDER WITH TUFTS AND SCALLOPED 
EDGE. 

This border is suitable for woollen shawls ; it may 
be worked with Berlin wool of two colours. 

1st Row : Plain netting with the dark shade over a 
quarter-inch mesh. 

2nd Row : With the light shade over a half-inch 
mesh work three stitches into one loop, draw the next 
loop very tightly, and repeat to the end of the row. 

3rd Row : One stitch through the three loops toge- 
ther over the small mesh. Repeat to the end of the 
row. 

4th Row : Like second row. 

5th Row : Like third row. 

6th Row : One stitch into each loop of last row. 

7th Row : Over the large mesh and with the light 
shade eight stitches into one loop, wool twice over 
the mesh, pass over three loops, and repeat to the end 
of the row. 

8th Row : With the dark shade and the small mesh 
one stitch over the long loop of last row into the 
second of the three stitches passed over, one stitch 
into each of the other loops. 

9th Row : One stitch into each loop of last row. 

Take the work from the foundation, pick out the 
knots, work with the dark wool and the large mesh 
one stitch into each loop. 



Xo. 46.— DESIGN: LONG AND CROSSED LOOPS. 

This design is worked with knitting silk and Anda- 
lusian wool. 

For the 1st and 2nd Rows : work in plain netting with 
silk and a mesh measuring a quarter of an inch in 
breadth. 

3rd Row : With double wool and a half-inch mesh 
work two stitches into ono loop, one stitch into each 
of the two next loops. Repeat from the beginning of 
the row. 

4th Row: Take the long loop at the left of a short 
loop, pass it through the short loop, and net it with 
silk and the smaller mesh ; take the next long loop 
and pass it through the same shorty loop and net it. 
Repeat to the end of the row. 

5th Row : One stitch into each loop of last row. 

6th Row : With double wool and the large mesh one 
slitch into each loop of last row. 

7th and 8th Rows : With silk and the smaU mesh/ 
like fifth row. 

9th and 10th Rows : Like third and fourth rows- 

11th Row : Like fif^ 'Vw, 



COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE WORK-TABLK 



135 



Is'o. 47.— BORDER: CROSS NETTING AND TWISTED 
LOOPS. 

1st and 2nd Rows : With a quarter-inch mesh one 
stitch into each loop. 

3rd and 4th Rows : Twisted loops as described for 
the third and fourth rows of No. 8. 

5th Row : One stitch into each loop. 

6th and 7th Bows: Gross netting. Cross iaei»aiig 
was described in Nos. 7 and 10, page 124. 

8th and 9th Rows : One stitch into each loop. 

10th and 11th Rows : Like third and fourth rowi. 



No. 48.— NECKERCHIEF. 

Materials Required : If oz black silk, a knitting-pin 
No. 12 (Walker's gauge), and a half-inch ivory mesh. 

Begin the neckerchief in the centre from point to 
point upon a foundation of 112 stitches, working over 
the smaller mesh two plain rows, but do not work the 
last stitch of each row. 

3rd Row : Work over the large mesh with double 
silk one stitch into each loop except the last ; do not 
work that. 

4th Row: With the smaU mesh and single sil^ 
work one stitch into each long loop, twisting the 
loops as described in No. 42, v&se 133 ; continue to 
repeat from the second row until you have worked 
eight repeats of the pattern ; take the work from the 
foundation, pink out the knots, run a thread through 
the second row, and work upon tlie first row ; for the 
second half as described for the first, commencing with 
the row of long twisted loops. 

For the border : — 

1st Round : Over the small mesh net one stitch into 
each stitch of foundation, except in the stitch at each 
end of the first row ; in these work two stitches. 

2nd Round : Like first round, 

3rd Round : Over the large mesh work four stitches 
into one stitch of previous round, pass over one stitch. 
Repeat all round. 

4th and 5th Rounds : Over the small mesh, one stitch 
into each stitch of last round. 

6th Round: Like third round. 

7th Round : With double silk one stitch into each 
Btitcn of last round. 

No. 49.— FRINGE. 

This fringe may either be worked with wool or 
cotton. 

1st Row : For the foundation, plain with a small 
mesh. 

2nd Row : Over a three-quarter inch mesh, with 
double cotton or wool, one stitch into each loop. 

3rd Row : Over a knitting-pin No. 13 net one stitch 
into the second loop, pass the first loop at the back 
of the second, and net it. Repeat, crossing the loops 
in this way throughout the row. 

3rd Row : Like second row, 

4th Row : Net one loop into the first, pass over the 
second, net into the third, pass the second at the back 
of third and net it, continue to cross the loops to the 
end of the row. Netting the first stitch plain in alter- 
nate rows causes the crossed loops to come between 
the upper row of crossed loops. 

5th Row : Over a quarter-inch mesh net one into 
each loop ef last row. Cut lengths of cotton or wool, 
and knot eight strands into each loop of last row. 



No. 50.— DESIGN FOR ANTIMACASSARS, FICHUS, 
&C.: DARNED NETTING. 
The foundation is netted plain over a knitting pin 
No. 14 ; any number of rows may be worked. 



For the border : — 

1st Row : 'W'ork two stitches in each loop of foun- 
dation over a quarter-inch mesh 

2nd Row: Over the small mesh work one stitch 
through the second stitch worked into one loop of last 
row, and into the next loop together, so that the dou- 
ble loop always slants to the right. 
3rd Row : Plain. 

4th Row : One stitch over the large mesh into a 
stitch of last row, pass over one stitch, six stitches 
into the next, pass over one stitch and repeat. 

5th Row : One stitch over the large mesh into each 
stitch of last row. 

6th Row : With the small mesh work into each looj 
of last row, twisting the long loops as described foi 
No. 42, (page 134). The pattern is darned in the foun- 
dation with soft knitting cotton. 

No. 51.— TASSEL FRINGE. 

Make a foundation with Berlin woOi over a knitting* 
pin No. 10 (Walker's gauge). 

Work six plain rows. 

7th Row : Net one into each stitch with double wool 
over a mesh two inches in width, cut all the loops in 
the centre, take two strands from each of two loops, 
bind them once round with silk of the same colour aa 
the wool, take three strands of wool two and a half 
inches in length, bind them in with the strands of the 
loop, fasten the silk securely, and cut off. 

Now bind the tassel round aboat a quarter of an 
inch below the last binding, comb out the v/ool, and 
cut the edges even for the tassel. 



NETTED MITTEN. 

Six or seven skeins of fine netting silk or black 
twist are needed for a pair of mittens ; and for the 
mesh use knitting pins Nos. 13 and 14 (Walker's bell 
gauge), and a small steel netting needle. Work twelve 
rows of diagonal netting (shown in No. 15, page 126). 
Net fifty rows plain netting on the smaller mesh ; 
then work two patterns of honeycomb netting (No. 14, 
page 126). This completes the arm, which join up ; 
and net round one plain row. 

2nd Round : Increase by netting two stitches in one 
in twelfth and fourteenth stitches to begin the thumb, 
the rest of the round is plain netting. Increase two 
loops to form the thumb in each of the two loops 
already mentioned in each alternate round for eigh- 
teen rounds. 

To finish the thumb, net round about ten rounds on 
the stitches of the thumb, and finish with a little fan 
pattern made by netting six stitches into one loop of 
previous round, pass over one loop, one stitch into the 
next, pass over one loop, and repeat. This round should 
be worked over a quarter-inch mesh. In the follow- 
ing round work one stitch into each loop of preceding 
round, using the small mesh. 

Now continue to work upon the hand until it is as 
long as you desire, and finish with the fan pattern 
given for the top of the thumb. Both hands are worked 
alike, as there is no right or wrong side until you darn 
a pattern on the back of the hand, which may be of 
stripes, diamonds, or any design you please. 

NETTED NIGHT-NET. 

This night-net is particularly recommended to per- 
sons who suffer from headache, as it keeps the hair 
closely together without any pressure on the head. 
, Materials Required : Crochet cotton No. 4, netting- 
needle, and mesh about quarter-inch wide. 



THE YOUNG LADifiS' JOURNAL, 




KO. 5^ 



»o. ^o . 



Commence with twenty-two stitches, and net back- 
wards and forwards fifteen rows, and then take out 
the foundation thread, draw it through the middle of 
the oblong. Now work round and make one knot in 
each stitch of the preceding row ; there must be 
eighteen rows netted round, or more if not large 
enough ; then follows the broad row for the ribbon to 
pass through. For this take a half-inch mesh, or put 
the cotton twice round the small mesh at every stitch. 
After this broad row work two rows over the first 
mesh, then follows the narrow lace for the outer eds:e <^ 
for this, net one row over the broad mesh, making 
always five knots in one stitch, passing over the next 
stitch. Now take again the small mesh, and pass over 
again in each row the same stitches that were passed 
over in the first row, whilst in the rest one stitch must 
be made in each stiteh of preceding row until there 
is only one stitch to work, and the next to pass over 
alternately. 

This ends the lace. 

Draw a ribbon through t'se broad row of netting, 
and tie it at the back, and sew on the bow at the top. 



NETTED CURTAINS. 



Netted curtains are generally preferred made of 
square netting. To begin, you must work as for the 
square and oblong netting described in Nos. 10 and 
13, in page 22. The size of cotton will of course rule 
the size of the mesh and the quantity of cotton re- 
quired. Evans' (Boar's Head cotton), about 0000, will 
make a nice curtain, worked quite plainly, and edged 
with a fancy border in netting or a row of ball fringe. 

For a coarser curtain, Strutt's knitting cotton No. 
10, mesh, knitting-pin No. 10 (Walker's boll gauge). 
A curtain about throe yards and a-half long would 
require 350 stitches. This could be worked with rows 
of plain netting, and any of tlie fancy stripes which 
we have illustrated and described in our Fancy Net- 
ting SupT:)lpments. The rosp nnd plain r^ttern shown 
on page 121 will make very beautiful curtains worked 
*in Strutt's crochet cotton No. 12, with a mesh knitr 
ting-pin No. 12 (Walker's bell gauge). 



[rWE END.] 



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UQIES MAY RELY UPON HAVIHC AMY SHADE IN THE WYVERM QUAUTIES 

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