(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Yankee Station 1966"

I 



Yankee Station 

1966 

Off North Vietnam 
in the 
D ,„ of Tonkin 






In Memory of 

Commander 

John Anthony 

Feldhaus 



A U.S. Navy Pilot 

Killed in Action in 

North Vietnam 

8 October 1966 



Compiled by his older brother, Larry Feldhaus 

February 3, 2009 



Table of Contents 

Cover 2 

In Memory of 3 

Introduction 7 

CDR John (Jack) Anthony Feldhaus 9 

U.S. Navy Record 10 

Biography at a Glance 11 

Jack's Children 21 

Memories of Friends 22 

Joe Shea 22 

John Lunn 23 

Gordon D. Pickett 23 

Larry Feldhaus 24 

Scotty Wilkes 25 

Gordon H. Smith 25 

Bud M.Watson 26 

Fred M. Guenzel 26 

Douglas Skyraider 28 

Skyraiders Lost in Vietnam 29 

Cockpit Pictures 32 

USS Oriskany CVA34 33 

May 17, 2006 33 

History of USS Oriskany 34 

Oriskany 1966 WestPac Log 38 

Memories of the Fire 41 

Fire in Alpha 107 48 

Mike 55 

Operation Rolling Thunder 57 

1965 Westpac Losses 57 

Combat Losses 61 

Operational Losses 62 

1966 Westpac Losses 62 

Combat Losses 66 

Operational Losses 69 

VA-152 71 

VA-152 Aircraft 71 

VA-152 Commanding Officers 72 

VA-152 1965-1966 Events 73 

VA-152 Pilot's Pictures in 1965 73 

VA-152 Pilot's Pictures in 1966 74 

Skyrader Jack Feldhaus was flying 75 

LTJg Beene's Skyraider Picture 76 

VA-1 52 Westpac 1966 Plaque 76 

Gordon Smith 76 

John Joseph Nussbaumer 77 

AlHeadly 78 

Jack Feldhaus 78 

Jim Harmon 78 

EricSchade 78 

Don Zambori 78 

Jerry Garvey 78 

Jim Beene 78 

Bud Watson 79 

Larry Lewis 79 

Bob Tank 



Table of Contents 

Butch Boose 79 

Bill Dolny 79 

Fred Guenzel 79 

PeteSelkey 79 

Tom Lull 79 

Mike Ramsey 79 

Darwin Joel Thomas 80 

Sidney (Sid) Lawrence Grueser 80 

John Spiegel 80 

Robin (Rob) Bern Cassell 80 

J.J.Buterbaugh 81 

VA-1 52 Frame-Power Crew 1966 81 

USS Oriskany 1965 Westpac Cruise 82 

LCDR Eric Shade 82 

Bowling, Roy Howard, "Hap" 82 

Jesse J. Taylor 85 

Distinguished Flying Cross 86 

Rescue of Tiff Hawks 88 

Evasion and Recovery Report 89 

Vann Goodloe 95 

Bill Roy 96 

Sitko 96 

Sprague 96 

Combat SAR Operations 97 

1966 Deployment 98 

The Mission 103 

Crash Site Located 104 

Vietnam War MIA Identified 104 

Identification Report 104 

Summary Report 108 

43 rd JAF Report 111 

51 st JAF Report 122 

59 th JAF Report 132 

60 th JAF Report #1 144 

60 th JAF Report #2 150 

Maps Attached to JAF Reports 158 

Additional Maps Added by Me 160 

My Drawing of the Crash Site 165 

Pictures With the Report 166 

VFW Magazine re DNA Testing 173 

Skyraider 20 mm Magazines 178 

20 mm Cannons on the Left Wing 179 

Left Wheel Well Access to 20 mm Magazine 180 

Location of the Outboard 20 mm Magazine on the Right Wing 181 

Air Medal - Three Gold Stars 182 

November 2001 191 

Newspaper Story 1 191 

Newspaper Story 2. 193 

Going Home Picture 195 

TN House Joint Resolution 196 

Arlington Funeral Pictures 197 

Memorial Sites 205 

Vietnam Veteran's Memorial Wall. 205 

Tennessee Vietnam Veteran's Memorial. 207 

Jack's Dad at TN Memorial. 208 



Table of Contents 

USS Midway CVA-41 209 

San Diego Carrier Museum 209 

Chuck Muhl. 211 

Photo of Jack & Suzzanne in Ready Room 212 

Ready Room 3 Greenie Board. 212 

Appendex. 214 

Wespac 1961 Cruise Book. 215 

Navy and the Cold War. 219 

Contents 226 

The Air Group Primary Mission 227 

Ship Officers 231 

Carrier Division Five Officers 233 

VF-21 236 

VA-22. 237 

VA-23. 238 

VF-24 239 

VA-25. 240 

Jack's Pitcure with VA-25. 242 

VAH-8. 243 

VAW-11 244 

In Memoriam 245 

Westpac 1962 Cruise Book. 247 

Cruise Stops 248 

The Mission 249 

HU-1 253 

CVG-Two 254 

VA-22. 258 

VA-23. 260 

VA-24 262 

VA-25. 264 

Jack's Pitcure with VA-25. 267 

VAH-8. 269 

Commander ComCarDiv Three 273 

Chief of Staff ComCarDiv Three 274 

Old Commanding Officer. 275 

New Commanding Office 276 

Executive Officer. 277 

ComCarDiv Three Staff. 278 

VAW-11 279 

VA-13 281 

VFP-63 282 

In Memoriam , 283 

Westpac 1966 Cruise Book 284 

Air Wing Commander 285 

Commanding Officer 286 

Former Executive Officer 288 

Present Executive Officer 289 

VA-62 290 

VA-163 294 

VA-164 296 

VA-152 297 

VAW-11 303 

Hatron Four 304 

Helo Pilots 305 

In Memoriam 306 



Introduction 



Yankee Station was a point in the Gulf of Tonkin off the coast of 
Vietnam used by the U.S. Navy aircraft carriers of Task Force 77 to 
launch strikes in the Vietnam War. While its official designation was 
"Point Yankee/' it was universally referred to as Yankee Station. 
Carriers conducting air operations at Yankee Station were said to be 
"on the line" and statistical summaries were based on days on the 
line. 

The name derived from it being the geographic reference point "Y", 
pronounced "Yankee" in the NATO phonetic alphabet. In turn the 
term Point Yankee derived from the launch point for "Yankee Team" 
aerial reconnaissance missions over Laos conducted in 1964. It was 
located about 190 km due east of Dong Hoi, at 17° 30' N and 108° 
30' E. [1] 

During the two periods of sustained air operations against North 
Vietnam (March 2, 1965-October 31, 1968 and March 30, 1972- 
December 29, 1972) there were normally three carriers on the line, 
each conducting air operations for twelve hours, then off for twelve 
hours. One of the carriers would operate from noon to midnight, 
another from midnight to noon, and one during daylight hours, 
which gave 24-hour coverage plus additional effort during daylight 
hours, when sorties were most effective. However at the end of May, 
1972, six carriers were for a short period of time on the line at 
Yankee Station conducting Linebacker strikes. 

The first aircraft carrier at Yankee Station was USS Kitty Hawk, 
which was ordered there in April 1964 for the Yankee Team 
missions. Kitty Hawk was joined by Ticonderoga in May and 
Constellation in June, two months prior to the Gulf of Tonkin 
Resolution. Ticonderoga and Constellation launched the first 
bombing missions from Yankee Station on August 5, 1964. 
Constellation was also the last carrier conducting operations at 
Yankee Station on August 15, 1973. 



My younger brother, Commander John Anthony (Jack) Feldhaus was 
a 28 year old Navy Lieutenant flying a prop driven Skyraider when 
he was shot down in North Vietnam on 8 Octoberl966. The aircraft 
had no ejection seat and he was not seen after the crash. However, 
since there was no solid evidence he had perished in the crash, his 
commanding officer was able to get him qualified as missing-in- 
action. This enabled his pay checks to keep coming to support his 
ex-wife and children. 

On 31 October 1977, eleven years after he was shot down, he was 
reclassified as killed-in-action. 

On 30 October 2001, thirty five years after his plane crashed, a final 
report was issued identifying the location of the crash and the 
remains that had been recovered. 

On 30 November 2001 he was laid to rest in Arlington National 
Cemetery, having been given a Military funeral, complete with horse 
drawn caisson, missing man flyover, and 21 gun salutes. 

It was shortly after that Jack's oldest daughter, Pam, asked me to 
document a few things about Jack and his family. Pam was only 
seven years old when Jack died. She and her three siblings hardly 
remembered anything about him and really didn't know much about 
his family. 

This ebook is the result of my efforts to compile information about 
Jack and his family life growing up, along with information about his 
service in the US Navy. 

This ebook is dedicated to my brother Jack Feldhaus and all the 
service men and women who have lost their lives in the service of 
our country. 

Even though the Vietnamese war took place years ago, anyone 
reading this ebook will quickly recognize the enormity of the 
sacrifice made by all of the participants in that war. 

It is my hope that in remembering, we can be guided in our future 
actions in dealing with international crises. 



CDR John (Jack) Anthony Feldhaus 

was a Navy Pilot who was killed in action October 8, 1966 when his Skyraider was 
shot down by 37mm anti-aircraft fire in North Vietnam. 




U.S. Navv Record 



John Anthony Feldhaus Commander United States Navy 



PERSONAL DATA 

Home: Lawrenceburg, Tennessee 

DOB: Monday, 10/03/1938 

Sex: Male 

Race: Caucasian 

Married? No 

Religion: Roman Catholic 

MILITARY DATA 

Service: United States Navy 

Comp: Regular 

Grade: 05 

Rank: Commander 

ID No: 409627945 

MOS: 1310 - Unrestricted Line Officer (Pilot) 

LenSvc: 9 years; Began Active Duty 03 April 1957 

Unit: ATKRON 152, CARRIER AIR WING 16, USS ORISKANY 

Note: LT (0-3) at loss; promoted while MIA 

CASUALTY DATA 

Start Tour: 26 May 1966 

Loss Date: Saturday, 10/08/1966 



Chg Status: 



Monday, 10/31/1977 
MIA to KIA/BNR 



Age at Loss: 28 

Remains: Body Not Recovered 

Remains identified 30 Oct 2001 
Buried Arlington 20 Nov 01 

Location: Thanh Hoa, North Vietnam 

Type: Hostile, Died While Missing 

Reason: Air Loss, Crash - Land - Fixed Wing - Pilot 



Last Update: November 1978 



ON THE WALL 



Panel HE Line 060 



John Anthony Feldhaus 

Commander 
ATKRON 152, CARRIER AIR WING 16, USS ORISKANY 

United States Navy 

03 October 1938 - 08 October 1966 

Lawrenceburg, TN 

Panel HE Line 060 




Jack's Biography at a Glance 



Date of Birth: October 3, 1938 

Killed in Action: October 8, 1966 

Home Town: Lawrenceburg, Tennessee 

Aircraft Carrier: USS Oriskany CVA-34 

Squadron: VA 152 

Aircraft: Douglas A-1H Sky raider 



Jack (between his mother Margaret and 
his brother Larry in the picture on the 
right) was born October 3, 1938 in the 
small town (population 3,000) of 
Lawrenceburg located in southern middle 
Tennessee. He was the second child in a 
family of four boys and two girls. He spent 
his pre-school years moving from place to 
place across the south as his dad worked 
as a brick mason building residential and 
commercial buildings. 

At about two years of age he fell out of 
the second story window of the house 
where he lived. Fortunately, he fell onto a 
roof and rolled into a bush suffering only 
bruises. 





His Dad helped build Reynolds Aluminum 
plant in Sheffield Alabama about 1940 
and when the plant opened he was 
employed as a brick mason working on 
the maintenance of the brick-lined 
furnaces. Soon he was promoted to 
Foreman over that area where he spent 
the rest of his working career, 
commuting back and forth daily forty-five 
miles to Lawrenceburg. He passed 
away in 

December of 1987 and Jack's mother 
passed away in May of 2001. 




Life in Lawrenceburg during the 
early forties was a lot like living in 
Mayberry. Most houses were 
heated with wood stoves. Just 
outside town few houses had 
electricity or running water. The 
public square had two hitching 
yards behind the stores where 
horses and wagons could be left 
while shopping. There were 
several blacksmith shops in town 
with one just down the street 
from Jack's home. And there was 
a war going on. 

Every Saturday Larry and Jack 
would go to the cowboy movie at 
the Princess Theater on the 
square. Before the movie the 
newsreels gave reports on the 
progress of the war. There were 
lots of pictures of fighter planes in 
action. Every kid who watched 
these newsreels wanted to be a 
fighter pilot. 



Jack attended Sacred Heart School for grades one through eight, 
walking to school with his brother Larry every day. It was a three 
room school, with three Sisters of Mercy teachers. He took his turns 
as an altar boy at the Catholic church next oor. 







He and Larry joined the Cub 
Scouts as soon as old 
enough and remained 
members of the Scouts 
through high school. In 
addition to caving, camping, 
swimming, and all the things 
Scouts do, Jack was active in 
organized sports. When he 
moved on to Lawrence 
County High School in 1952 
he was on the baseball team 
and the football team. In 
October of 1955 he broke his 
arm in a football game at 
Columbia. 

While in high school Jack 
and several friends traveled 
by rowboats down Shoal 
Creek from Lawrenceburg to 
the Tennessee River near 
Sheffield Alabama. Jack and 
other friends also traveled 
over a thousand miles by 
bicycle across several 
southern states. In his 
sparetime, he explored 
caves with the rest of the 
Explorer Scouts. 




i 



It 



5 






ii'i Lots of Fun . . . If You Ore For ThH Kind 

[Explorer Scouts 
Wind Thro Caves 



havii dc-bunk^d kgmdj ^|jp U i 

'b&lEDrcUtuss pita"" J1IM3 *^ndJM(| 

passaged M 1J 1<:> - pkp1 DC¥ Mv - M 

they call th™ ^p^uni™"] 
ar* member* oi Pp4 31, E&. 
Flflnsp S«kilr. antl sJioy've been 
aom S B Lhnnou^h job uji anv 
and all cavw Lhcy cjih ii c ,d 
JT.ercgbo.litg, 

LaFt Saturday mORlij^ along ■ 
WLth AxKisUuai EkjpJarer Afi- 

vikjp Roy Mq^Mfl, thqy veined 
two -esivGB in the SyinjHfrrtpwri " 
area. The Q n t bad h™ «_ 
POlELd to hnre Tlw -lat^nV 
cut UbPy Jet tn-emaeivBS down 

WLth ropes Jiad SaUTA thr GCor 
- aboul 4& feflt ^ - dLL , nd 



whtfii (hay reached ill* bcLUjm 
Lhey ffrutjd fbiii- HHa» b-anrh- 
.JW of| la diHezvnt diiftrtlwia 
Tb^e- wen? jH,pLu3|y ckpEwtkL 
Tram Summertrwil the boys 
wjnt to a fobted en™ chJJW 

N,.1,-:,,.i TVae*. TJlLi ™ ono rf 
the bt*fc they say, artf [3k;7 „-, 
plorcd J43 pRiaajjes frr aboul 
half a mile wJiW flndinf the 
fijrf. They pla^ f Q ff o into it 
more tfr*™£bjjr iat*r whim 
ih.y «ct ftHfc priiJ> n F ^ 
rniGJlt. 

HidED- in thn party gatuirl^iv 
jn uddrtloti Lg Advhor Md™ 
VrKfr Fxphir^r ScjjLf. KL-j-.nolh 
jlciDrns, QMFlfif Hoiert^ j.j-,_ 
tuy Moan?, Jackie FcJcHuiieb 
:'-nd KejinoLh EccJihhln. 



On graduating from high school 
in 1956 Jack entered Tennessee 
Tech University in Cookeville 
Tennessee majoring in 
Engineering. After one year, he 
went on active duty in the Naval 
Reserves and attended boot 
camp at Bainbridge Maryland. 
After finishing boot camp he 
applied for and was accepted for 
the Naval Aviation Cadet 
program. While waiting for the 
next class to begin, Jack was 
stationed at Willow Grove Naval 
Air Station north of Philadelphia 
where he met and married 
Susanne Culligan. 





Left to right. Larry Feldhaus, 
Jack's wife, Suzanne Colligan 
Feldhaus, Frank Feldhaus, Kim 
Holthouse (cousin), Jack 
Feldhaus, B.G. "Pop" 
Holthouse (grandfather), Bob 
Holthouse (uncle). 




Jack and Susanne went to Pensacola 
Florida where Jack learned to fly while 
Suzanne lived off base because marriage 
wasn't permitted for cadets. Following 
graduation and receiving his wings, Jack 
was assigned to VA-122, a Pacific Fleet 
Training Squadron at NAS North Island in 
San Diego. There he flew Skyraiders on 
bombing, rocket, and gunnery missions 
from Brown Field (south of San Diego), 
NAS El Centro and MCAS Yuma. 

Following requalification for carrier 

landings on board the USS Oriskany CVA- 

34 in the first week of March 1960 Jack 

was transferred to VA-25 at Mofitt Field 

near San Francisco, still flying Skyraiders. 

He was on WesPac cruises aboard the USS Midway CV-41 from 

February 16 to September 28, 1961 and from April 6 to October 20, 

1962. 

When his tour of duty was up, Jack had to make a decision. Should 
he leave the Navy and fly commercial jets or stay in the Navy? He 
was offered regular Navy status to stay in and that was the only 
inducement he needed. 

Jack's next assignment was with VT-30 in Corpus Christi Texas as an 
instructor of AD pilots. From July 1960 until the late 1960's VT-30 
was the source of Skyraider pilot training for the US Navy and 
foreign nations. He was the instructor for a class from April to 
August 1963 consisting of the following: Glen Kalember (deceased), 
Charlie Clydesdale (deceased), Jim Bean (deceased), one name not 
remembered, and Scotty Wilkes. The death in combat of his 
students had a major impact on Jack and ultimately led him to 
request a tour of duty in Vietnam. 

In 1965 as the Vietnam War was heating up, Jack requested an 
assignment that would get him to Vietnam and was assigned to VA- 
152 in Alameda California, also near San Francisco. By this time Jack 
and Susanne had four children, two boys and two girls. One day 
Susanne had enough of Navy life and loaded the children in the car 
and drove them to her parent's home in New Hope Pennsylvania, 
above Philadelphia. They attempted reconciliation, but divorced 
later that year. Suzanne never remarried and passed away in 1990. 




Jack departed the US in May of 
1966 aboard the USS Oriskany, 
CVA-34, with VA-152. 

On August 20 1966 a U.S. Air 
Force RF-4C Phantom aircraft 
took a direct hit from ground 
fire during a night photo run 
while dropping flares in North 
Vietnam. The pilot, Edwin Tiffany Hawks ejected. Jack and his 
wingman were in the area and heard his distress signal. Jack 
made contact with the pilot, Tiff Hawks, who was taking fire 
from ground troups. Ignoring anti-aircraft fire, Jack provided air 
cover for Tiff until he could be rescued by a Navy helicopter. 



Jack and his wingman escorted the 
helicopter to the safety of the ocean 
and then returned to search for the other 
crewman while heavy anti-aircraft fire 
continued. The explosion from the 
ground fire may have incapacitated the 

other crew member, Richard M. Milikin III, who was in the rear seat. 

He was never recovered. 





Jack received the Distinguished Flying Cross for his part in this 
rescue 



On October 8, 1966, five days after his twenty eighth birth day, Jack 
was shot down over North Vietnam when his A-1H Skyraider was hit 
in the right wing by 37mm antiaircraft fire. He was listed as missing 
in action for almost ten years before being declared killed in action. 
He was a Lieutenant when he was shot down and was promoted to 
Commander by the time he was declared KIA. 

Between 1993 and 2001 several joint U.S. /Socialist Republic of 

Vietnam teams attempted to 
locate Jack's crash site and 
recover remains. The crash site 
was tentatively located in 1996 
and remains recovered in 2000. 
After positive identification of the 
remains a funeral, with full 
military honors, was held at 
Arlington National Cemetery on 
November 20, 2001. It was 

attended by thirty seven friends and family. 




Growing up... 



Jack with Relatives 



Cousin Jimmy Boulie is on the 
left standing up and his 
brother Charles Boulie is in 
the middle standing up. 





Jack's 8th Birthday 

The arrow points to Jack. The boy on the right 
with the hat on is a neighbor Jack grew up with, 
William Bundrant. William was a C-130 pilot in 
Vietnam and is a retired Eastern Air Lines 



Captain. 



Larry's Birthday 
Jack was two years and three months old when these pictures were taken. 




/*■*■ ^j 1% ?/ 









iff 



Jack, Mother, and Larry - 1941 



Jack learning to play croquet 




Larry, Frank, Jack and Steve. 



Larry, Jack, Steve and Frank at home on 
first street in Lawrenceburg 




Jack, Larry, and Steve at home on 
first street in Lawrenceburg 



Jack and Larry in a 1949 school play 



Jack's Children 



Jack's oldest child was only eight years old when he was shot down. 




Pam and Robbie Smith with one of their 
three daughters, Amy. 



John Feldhaus 




Jeff Feldhaus 



y Rose with her two sons, Eric 
and Kyle. 



Memories of Friends 

From Joe Shea, a fellow pilot: 

I flew a bunch of missions with Jack while in a Fleet Training 
Squadron at San Diego, around 1960. We dropped bombs near Yuma 
and landed on carriers off San Clemente Island. We only saw each 
other infrequently after we went to the fleet. He was a good stick 
and a really nice guy. ALWAYS HAD A GREAT SMILE FOR ALL. 

Joe recalled he and Jack were based at NAS North Island in the 
southern most hangar, nearest the O Club. They re-qualified for 
carrier landings on board the USS Oriskany CVA-34 in the first week 
of March 1960. His log shows landings at Brown Field (south of San 
Diego), NAS El Centro and MCAS Yuma. It is very likely that Jack also 
landed there as they often flew wing on each other. From Yuma they 
flew a lot of bombing, rocket, and gunnery missions. As a diversion 
they would play chicken with a railroad train running North/South 
hauling gypsum between the mountains and Plaster City, CA. Joe 
reported the engineer loved it. He always waved and never reported 
us. It was good practice. 

They went to Moffitt field together, but to different squadrons. Later 
they served together in VT-30 in Corpus Christi and flew together 
many times. 

Joe had forgotten that he and Jack had also served as 
flight instructors at VT-30 in Corpus Christi, Texas. He dug out some 
old records of his and found Jack noted on some. They flew some 
AD's to NAS Jacksonville just before Christmas in 1964. He recalled 
it was a grueling challenge because we had to deal with some very 
bad weather from New Orleans to Pensacola. 

Joe and Jack also were part of a 35 plane gaggle of T-34 aircraft that 
we were returning to Pensacola in August 1965. Joe and Jack also 
flew the T-34 from Pensacola to Corpus in 1963. 

In Vt-30 they usually flew the AD-6 (Al-H) and they used the T-28 
as an instrument flight trainer. In the summer they flew a 
midshipmen indoctrination program using the navy's very basic 
trainer the T-34. 

Jack went with Joe to VT-31 as a loaner pilot to help them get 
started. They were there for about 6 months instructing in the TS-2A 
a twin engined Anti-submarine plane stripped of all ASW gear and 
used for training. VT-31 was at the same base just a different 
hangar. 



Joe also found a copy of their orders to the USS Oriskany at the end 
of February 1966. 



From John Lunn who served as an instructor with Jack in 
VT-30 in Corpus Christi Texas: 

Sure do remember Jack.... Super Pilot!! 

I was in VT 30 for little over 2 years. Enjoyed every minute of the 
tour. 

I knew that Jack was lost over Vietnam, but I never did know the 
story of the crash. I would attribute the hit on his aircraft as pure 
luck by the Vietnamese gunner, because Jack was too good a pilot to 
have someone shoot him down, due to skill. Therefore, I know it was 
a lucky shot from the ground. 

Sometimes, when we were instructing in Texas, we would go up 
alone and just look around. Often when that happened, "someone" 
from the squadron would be looking around too. Then the "hassle" 
would begin. Not that it lasted that long, but Jack and I did aerial 
battle on occasion, and I tell you he was good, very good at what he 
did. Won't tell you who "won" the "encounters", but each would hold 
his own, and did win the respect of the other. 



LCDR Gordon D. Pickett, USN(Ret): 

I was in VT-30 March '60 to January '61 as Maint. Off. and Instructor 
pilot. Then I was assigned as Academic Training Officer on the 
CINAVANTRA Staff at NAS Corpus Christi till February '64. 

I recognized the name Feldhaus, and the minute I saw his picture it 
came back to me. I cherish the memory of Jack and recall that he 
was one of the icons when it came to flying and delivering ordnance 
with the Spad in VT-30. 

It seems to me I recall he was also pretty fair with a bowling ball, 
and that we had some great times at the O'Club. He was destined to 
be a hero and I am proud to have known him. 



From Larry Feldhaus: 

About 1964 Jack was an 

instructor in Corpus Christ! 

and I was living in Miami, 

Florida. Jack flew down to 

see me in a Grumman S2F. 

He was going to land at the 

Homestead Air Force Base 

below Miami, however the 

weather turned sour and 

he was forced to land in 

Tampa. The weather didn't 

clear and he flew back to Corpus Christi without making it to Miami. 




Conceived in 1950, when jet aircraft were rapidly replacing propeller 
driven aircraft in the Navy, the Tracker nevertheless went on to have 
a remarkably long service life. The first Tracker flew in December 
1952 and it was the first aircraft design to combine the detection 
equipment and armament to hunt and destroy submarines - and 
operate from an aircraft carrier. Before Trackers went into service in 
1954, the U.S. Navy had been using single-engine Grumman AF-2 
Guardians, working in hunter-killer pairs, with one plane detecting 
and locating enemy submarines and the other actually attacking it. 
Individual twin-engine Trackers could do it all, as they were 
equipped with radar, searchlights, sonobuoys and Magnetic Anomaly 
Detectors (MAD) for detection and location, and sub-killing 
weaponry that included depth charges, homing torpedoes and 
bombs. The outboard wing panels also folded to the rear to facilitate 
movement and storage on board aircraft carriers. 

Production deliveries began in 1953 and eventually 1342 Trackers 
were built for the Navy in 16 different versions. An enlarged torpedo 
bay, enhanced passenger and cargo capacity, longer range radar 
detection capability, and continual upgrading of electronic 
capabilities marked the development of the S-2 series. Deliveries to 
foreign nations totalled 342 Trackers as they served with the armed 
forces of Canada, Australia, The Netherlands, Brazil, Argentina, Italy, 
Turkey, Peru, Chile, Norway, Germany, Columbia, Spain, Japan, 
Korea, Thailand, Uruguay, Venezuela and Taiwan. S2F's also saw 
service during the Vietnam War where they performed naval gunfire 
spotting duty. Today Trackers are still being flown by many foreign 
air forces and as firefighting water bombers in the Pacific 
Northwest. 



From Scotty Wilkes who was a student of Jack's when he 
was an instructor in Corpus Christi: 

Jack was my intructor pilot in VT-30 from Apr 63-Aug 63 and is 
directly responsible for my being able to terrorize the fleet for years 
to come. We shared the same hangar at Alameda but they went on 
cruise as we came off. 

For your historical purposes this particular class consisted of the 
following: 

Glen Kalember deceased 

Charlie Clydesdale, deceased 

Jim Bean, deceased (Shot down from VA-152 just before Jack) 

I have forgoten another name 

Scotty Wilkes 

I can only add that he was a fine aviator and occasionally he would 
buy the drinks at the club, although not nearly often enough. 

From Gordon H. Smith, Rear Admiral, retired, USN: 

I was Jack's Commanding Officer and I can tell you that he was very 
highly respected and had great leadership potential. He possessed 
exactly the right blend of humor, focus, independent thinking and 
respect for authority. 

I've had a couple of phone conversations with Admiral Smith. He 
was instrumental in the classification of MIA for Jack, knowing he 
had a family that was dependant on his income. 

Admiral Smith told me that Jack came to him the night before he 
was shot down and told him he had a premonition that he was going 
to be shot down. This was very uncharacteristic for Jack. They talked 
for several hours and when Jack left, the Admiral called the duty 
officer and instructed him to take Jack off the flight roster the next 
day. He was concerned that Jack may not be mentally ready to fly. 

I believe the Duty Officer was Fred Guenzel who ended up as Jack's 
wingman the next day. Fred and the Admiral both remember Fred 
and Jack being launched in response to a beeper signal indicating a 
downed airman in North Vietnam. Fred remembers the beeper 
signal stopped before they arrived in the area from where the signal 
initiated. This was often used as a ruse by the North Vietnamese to 
lure rescue aircraft into the area where antiaircraft guns were 
located. 



It was after aborting this rescue mission that Jack and Fred began 
searching for truck parks and other targets, and Jack was hit by AAA 
fire. 



From Bud M. Watson who was a member of VA-152 during 
the Westpac 1966 cruise: 

Fred Guenzel and I joined VA-152 in San Diego as it was leaving for 
the Westpac 1966 cruise. Jack took us under his wing and helped us 
transition into the A-1H. We had been trained in jets. He was an 
excellent pilot and we were lucky to have him take and interest in us 
and help us prepare for the combat flights we would see during that 
cruise. 

From Fred M. Guenzel who was Jack's wingman when he 
was shot down over North Vietnam on October 8, 1966: 

After we arrived off the coast of North Vietnam in the summer of 
1966 VA-152 flew daily missions over North Vietnam. An average 
mission lasted about three hours. 

The mission of VA-152 was to search and destroy and assist in the 
rescue of downed pilots. The range and slow speed of the A-1H made 
it ideal for these jobs. 

The morning of October 6, 1966 Jack and I took off from the 
Oriskany and proceeded to a location south-west of the town of 
Thanh Hoa in southern North Vietnam. By this time, the North 
Vietnamese had suffered enough damage to their convoys to restrict 
the convoys to forest covered roads during daylight hours. We made 
a bombing run to drop bombs onto a tree covered road with the hope 
we might hit trucks concealed under the trees. 

We came out going different directions to avoid possible ground fire. 
With no evidence we had hit anything below the trees, Jack flew in 
the direction of Thanh Hoa at about 4,000 feet and I followed some 
distance behind, unable to see him because of the clouds. 

Jack radioed that he was going down to see what he could see. A 
short time later he radioed that he was receiving heavy anti-aircraft 
fire. He radioed that he had been hit and in a garbled transmission 
said he was getting out. I broke through the clouds in about thirty 
seconds and saw a fireball on the ground that appeared to be the 
impact site of an airplane. I didn't see any sign of a parachute and 
didn't hear any beeper or emergency radio transmission. 

I headed down toward the deck looking for signs of Jack, just as he 



had so strongly advised me to do in a situation like this. I radioed for 
rescue assistance and continued to make passes in search of any 
signs of life. 

I happened to be looking at my right wing when a 37mm anti- 
aircraft shell blew a hole in the wing. About this time, two Al-H 
aircraft arrived and took over the search and rescue and I limped 
back to the Oriskany. 

The damage assessment revealed the 37mm shell had hit the wing 
between two bombs in an empty bomb hanger where a bomb had 
been dropped earlier. I told the Chief that it was lucky the 20 mm 
magazine under my wing had not been hit by the shrapnel. He told 
me that shrapnel had hit the magazine and set off three 20mm 
rounds. 

When shrapnel hits the 20mm magazine it can set off a chain 
reaction and blow off the wing. If the shrapnel hits one of the bombs 
under the wing, the same thing can happen. I believe that's what 
happened to Jack based on the speed with which his plane hit the 
ground. When a wing is blown off it's impossible to fly the plane. It 
goes into a spiral straight down. 

Jack was an excellent pilot and knew how to avoid getting hit. We 
weren't doing anything that day that increased our risk of being hit. 
Jack was just hit by a lucky shot. 



Douglas Skvraider 



Also know as Spad, Able Dog, AD, Sandy.... 



The following was taken from the story "The Sandy Spad" by Robert 
S. DeGroat. 




Squadron A-1H Skyraiders 011 the deck of Coral Sea (CVA 43) in J 966 during their deployment to Vietnam. 



In June 1944, Douglas began developing an heir to the successful 
SBD Dauntless. Their first try resulted in the mediocre BTD-1 
Destroyer. The second submission, designed virtually overnight in 
the Statler Hotel in Washington D.C., was the BT2D Dauntless II, 
later to be known as the Skyraider The first flight of the Dauntless II 
was Sunday, 18 March 1945 out of Mines Field (now the site of LA 
International) by Douglas test pilot LaVerne Brown. 

In April 1946, the U. S. Navy changed the way planes were 
identified, as if it wasn't complicated enough already. Douglas 
aircraft would be identified by the "Sky-" prefix for nicknames. The 
BT2D-1 Dauntless II therefore became the A (for Attack) D (for 
Douglas) "Sky"raider. The first variant was now called the AD-1 (and 
we all know the AD really means "Able Dog"). 

Almost throughout its long career, the Skyraider has also been 
dubbed the "Spad". Originally only a reference to an earlier era, 
some wag even made "SPAD" an acronym, as in "Single Place 
Attack, Douglas". 

U. S. Air Force Skyraiders flew rescue escort missions identified by 
the call sign "Sandy". 




This is the Skyraider Jack was flying when he was shot down and I 

believe that's him in this picture. Courtesy of Andy Thomas, brother 

of Darwin Thomas who took this picture. He lost his life during the 

1966 Westpac cruise while flying a Skyraider off the USS Oriskany. 

Skyraiders Lost in Vietnam 

Following is a list of A-1H/J, EA-1E, EA-1F Skyraiders, by Bureau 
Number, that were lost in action in Vietnam. The list includes the 
date lost, the type Skyraider, the Bureau number, the squadron, the 
Carrier, the name of the pilot and crew, the their status. 



1965/9/28 


A-1 H 134482 VA- 


1968/2/14 


A-1 H 134499 VA- 


1966/9/13 


A-1 H 134534 VA- 


1966/8/3 


A-1 H 134586 VA- 


1965/8/29 


A-1 H 13461 9 VA- 


1967/3/17 


A-1 H1 34625 VA- 


1967/3/17 


A-1 H1 35225 VA 


1965/4/11 


A-1H 135226 VA- 


1966/8/28 


A-1 H 135231 VA- 


1966/8/25 


A-1 H 135236 VA- 


1966/9/22 


A-1 H 135239 VA- 


1965/11/17 A-1H 135244 VA- 


officer 




1965/9/24 


A-1 H 135274 VA- 


1967/7/15 


A-1 H 135288 VA- 


1967/3/17 


A-1 H 135297 VA- 


1 966/1 0/1 2 A-1 H 1 35323 VA- 


1965/8/7 


A-1 H 135329 VA 


1966/11/27 A-1 H 135341 VA- 


1967/5/25 


A-1 H 135366 VA- 


1965/3/15 


A-1 H1 35375 VA- 


Clydesdale (KIA) 



-196 USS BON HOMME RICHARD AAA LCDR Carl Julius Woods (KIA) 

25 USS CORAL SEA NL404 Chinese MiG LTJG Joseph Patrick Dunn (KAI) 

■165 USS INTREPID AK-208 AAA LTJG T J Dwyer (SURVIVED) 

■145 USS RANGER NK-515 Small arms fire LT O Franz (SURVIVED) 

■152 USS ORISKANY AH-586 AAA LT Edd David Taylor (KIA) 

■115 USS HANCOCK Collided with A-1H (135225) of VA-115 Unknown (SURVIVED) 

■1 1 5 USS HANCOCK Collided with A-1 H (1 34625) of VA-1 1 5 LTJG Gene William Goeden (KIA) 

-95 USS RANGER NG-5xx AAA LTJG William Edward Swanson (KIA) 

152 USS ORISKANY AH-506 AAA CDR Gordon H Smith CO VA-152 (SURVIVED) 

■152 USS ORISKANY Faulty catapult shot Unknown (SURVIVED) 

■176 USS INTREPID AK-401 AAA LT Charles Allen Knochel (KIA) 

■152 USS ORISKANY AH-588 Ground fire LCDR Jesse Junior Taylor (KIA) Air Wing operation 

-196 USS BON HOMME RICHARD Small arms fire CDR J Gallager (SURVIVED) 

-152 USS ORISKANY AH-504 Automatic weapons fire LTJG Robin Bern Cassell (KIA) 

■115 USS HANCOCK NF-51 4 Automatic weapons fire LCDR A H Henderson (SURVIVED) 

■25 USS CORAL SEA NE-572 AAA LT Robert Deane Woods (POW) 

■25 USS MIDWAY 37mm AAA LCDR Harold Edwin Gray (KIA) > 

■52 USS TICONDEROGA NM-309 Automatic weapons fire LTJG W H Natter (SURVIVED) 

-215 USS BON HOMME RICHARD NP-572 AAA ENS Richard Campbell Graves (KIA) 

■95 USS RANGER NG-512 Flew into the sea while returning the carrier LTJG Charles F 



1967/8/30 A-1H 135390 VA-25 USS CORAL SEA NL-412 Ground fire LTJG L E Gardiner (SURVIVED) 

1966/4/17 A-1H 135398 VA-115 USS KITTY HAWK NH-511 SAM LTJG William Leslie Tromp (KIA) 1967/3/21 A-1H 137516 

VA-215 USS BON HOMME RICHARD NP-572 Crashed into the sea LT Paul Claude Charet (KIA) 

1965/6/10 A-1H 137521 VA-25 USS MIDWAY Ground fire LTJG Carl Louis Doughtie(KIA) 

A-1H 137523 VA-25 USS MIDWAY NE-573 Technical fault Unknown (SURVIVED) 
A-1H 137534 VA-165 USS INTREPID AK-206 AAA CDR William S Jett (SURVIVED) 
A-1H 137545 VA-215 USS HANCOCK Ground fire LTJG S B Wilkes (SURVIVED) 
A-1H 137566 VA-152 USS ORISKANY Ground fire LCDR Paul G Merchant (SURVIVED) 
A-1H 137575 VA-25 USS CORAL SEA Engine problem LCDR Frederick Horatio Gates (KIA) 
A-1H 137576 VA-215 USS HANCOCK NP-567 Small arms fire LCDR William Patrick Egan (KIA) 
A-1H 137584 VA-215 USS HANCOCK NP-5xx Ground fire LTJG Gerald Wayne McKinley (KIA) 
A-1H 137589 VA-215 USS HANCOCK NP-5xx AAA CDR Robert Charles Hessom (KIA) 
1965/11/16 A-1H 137590 VA-52 USS TICONDEROGA Hydraulics failed Unknown (SURVIVED) 
1966/10/5 A-1H 137610 VA-152 USS ORISKANY AH-513 Gyro failure LTJG James Alvin Beene (KIA) 
A-1H 137621 VA-52 USS TICONDEROGA Engine failure Unknown (SURVIVED) 
A-1H 137627 VA-145 USS RANGER NK-506 Ground fire KIALT Gary Douglas Hopps (KIA) 
A-1H 137629 VA-152 USS ORISKANY AH-510 Ground fire LT John Anthony Feldhaus (KIA) 
A-1H 139616 VA-215 USS HANCOCK NP-570 Ditched into the sea LCDR C W Sommers (SURVIVED) 
A-1H 139636 VA-152 USS ORISKANY Engine failed Unknown (SURVIVED) 
A-1 H 1 39692 VA-52 USS TICONDEROGA NF-381 CDR John Clement Mape CO of VA-52 (KIA) 
A-1H 139693 VA-165 USS CORAL SEA NL-203 AAA LTJG Edward Brendan Shaw (KIA) 
A-1H 139701 VA-152 USS ORISKANY AH-501 Small arms fire LT Charles Wigger Fryer (KIA) 
A-1H 139708 VA-152 USS ORISKANY Engine failed Unknown (SURVIVED) 
A-1H 139720 VA-152 USS ORISKANY AH-592 AAA LTJG Edward Anthony Davis (POW) 
A-1H 139721 VA-215 USS HANCOCK AAA LCDR James Joseph Evans (KIA) 
1966/10/14 A-1H 139731 VA-152 USS ORISKANY AH-511 Hit the ground and exploded during dive to the target ENS Darwin 
Joel Thomas (KIA) 

1967/1/18 A-1H 139748 VA-52 USS TICONDEROGA NM-306 Crashed into the sea LTJG Marlow Erling Madsen (KIA) 
A-1H 139755 VA-196 USS BON HOMME RICHARD NM-512 Ground fire LCDR Gerald Ray Roberts (KIA) 
A-1H 139756 VA-25 USS CORAL SEA NE-580 SAM CDR Clarence William Stoddard CO of VA-25 (KIA) 
A-1H 139760 VA-145 USS CONSTELLATION AAA LTJG Richard Christian Sather (KIA) 
A-1H 139768 VA-115 USS HANCOCK NF-504 Automatic weapons fire LT R B Moore (SURVIVED) > 
A-1H 139772 VA-165 USS CORAL SEA NL-206 Ground fire LT R J Hyland (SURVIVED) 
A-1H 139790 VA-215 USS HANCOCK NP-5xx AAA LTJG C E Gudmunson (SURVIVED) 
A-1H 139805 VA-115 USS HANCOCK Engine failed LT Robert Clarence Marvin (KIA) 
A-1H 139806 VA-145 USS RANGER NK-502 Crashed into the sea after lounched LCDR John Wallace Tunnell 



1965/6/24 

1966/9/2 

1965/4/27 

1965/11/9 

1967/8/19 

1966/4/29 

1965/3/31 

1966/3/5 



1965/12/1 

1966/2/10 

1966/10/8 

1966/5/9 

1965/7/21 

1966/4/13 

1965/9/4 

1966/8/7 

1965/6/30 

1965/8/26 

1965/4/2 



1965/12/2 

1966/9/14 

1964/8/5 

1967/3/17 

1965/8/13 

1965/3/26 

1967/2/14 

1966/6/20 

(KIA) 

1965/4/19 A-1H 139818 VA-215 USS HANCOCK NP-5xx Crashed into the ground during night attack mission LTJG James 

Patrick Shea (KIA) A-1 J 

1965/8/10 A-1 J 142012 VA-152 USS ORISKANY LTJG Lawrence Scott Mailhes (KIA) 

1966/2/1 A-1 J 142031 VA-145 USS RANGER NK-504 Ground fire LTJG Dieter Dengler (POW - Escaped) 

1966/4/18 A-1 J 142032 VA-52 USS TICONDEROGA NF-391 Automatic weapons fire LT A D Wilson (SURVIVED) 

1966/2/1 A-1J 142038 VA-115 USS KITTY HAWK NH-513 Ground fire LTJG B S Eakin (SURVIVED) 

1966/5/14 A-1 J 142050 VA-215 USS HANCOCK Crashed into the sea after launched Unknown (SURVIVED) 

1966/5/19 A-1J 142051 VA-115 USS KITTY HAWK NH-513 Engine failure Unknown (SURVIVED) 

1965/9/14 A-1 J 142057 VA-196 USS BON HOMME RICHARD NM-6xx Own bombs detonated upon release LCDR James 

Thomas Kearns (KIA) 

1966/3/11 A-1J 142071 VA-115 USS KITTY HAWK NH-505 Catapult bridle separated before the launch completed 

Unknown (SURVIVED) 

1966/1/3 A-1 J 142081 VA-52 USS TICONDEROGA NF-387 Automatic weapons fire LT J W Donahue (SURVIVED) EA-1E 

1965/4/15 E A-1E 139603 VAW-11 DET-T USS YORKTOWN RR-7XX Engine failure 3 crew, Unknown (SURVIVED) EA-1F 

1965/6/2 E A-1F 132540 VAW-13 DET-A USS MIDWAY VR- Ground fire LTJG M D McMican LTJG Gerald Michael Romano 

P03 William Harry Amspacher ATN3 Thomas Lee Plants All crew KIA 

1966/9/10 E A-1F 132543 VAW-13 USS F.D. ROOSEVELT Suffered an instrument failure and lost navigation aids 4 crew, 

Unknown (SURVIVED) 

1967/9/25 E A-1F 133770 VAW-13 Ditched into the sea during logistics flight from Cubi 4 crew, Unknown (SURVIVED) 

1966/6/20 E A-1F 135010 VAW-13 USS HANCOCK VR- Catapult bridle failed and diched in the sea LT John Richard 

McDonough (KIA) and 2 crew (SURVIVED) 



My brother Jack told me the Skyraider could carry its weight 
in armament with an engine powerful enough to fly straight 
up into the air. It also could stay in the air a long time. Jack 
once flew a Skyraider from San Francisco to Jacksonville 
Florida without stopping or refueling. He told me the only 
modification necessary to make the flight was adding an oil 
reservoir to replenish oil for the engine. 





The following cockpit pictures are of a Skyraider that was 
built in 1 952. While they differ from the cockpit of the A1 -H 
Skyraider, they provide a glimpse into the general 
configuration of the cockpit area. 




The wires in the photo at the right are used on this aircraft to hold 
the stick in place when the aircraft is parked. 



USS Oriskanv CVA34 




May 17, 2006 

As hundreds of veterans looked on solemnly, Navy divers blew holes in a retired 
aircraft carrier, the "Mighty O", and sent the 888-foot USS Oriskany to the bottom 
of the sea Wednesday, forming the world's largest deliberately created artificial 
reef. The "Mighty O" went down in 212 feet of water, about 24 miles off Pensacola 
Beach. 




The Oriskany, commissioned in 1950 and named after an American Revolutionary 
War battle, saw duty during the Korean War and was home to John McCain when 
the Navy pilot and future senator served in Vietnam. McCain was shot down over 
Hanoi in 1967 after taking off from the Oriskany and was held as a prisoner of war 
for five years. 



It was also among the ships used by President Kennedy in a show of force during 
the 1962 Cuban missile crisis. It was decommissioned in 1976. 

The Oriskany became the first vessel sunk under a new Navy program to dispose 
of old warships by turning them into reefs that can attract fish and other marine 
life. 

Local leaders hope the reef brings a long-awaited economic infusion from sport 
divers and fishermen. A 2004 Florida State University study estimated Escambia 
County would see $92 million a year in economic benefits 




USS ORISKANY was the 17 th ESSEX - class aircraft carrier and the first of nine 
carriers modernized under Project 27A. The USS ORISKANY was 
decommissioned on September 30, 1975. 

History of USS ORISKANY 

USS ORISKANY was laid down 1 May 1944 by the New York Naval Shipyard, 
launched 13 October 1945; and sponsored by Mrs. Clarence Cannon. While still 
incomplete, her construction was suspended 12 August 1947. She remained in a 
state of preservation until after the outbreak of hostilities in Korea in June 1950, 
then was rushed to completion. She commissioned in the New York Naval 
Shipyard 25 September 1950, Capt. Percy H. Lyon in command. 

ORISKANY departed New York 6 December 1950 for carrier qualification 
operations off Jacksonville, Fla. followed by a Christmas call at Newport, R. I. She 
resumed operations off Jacksonville through 11 January 1951, when she 
embarked Carrier Air Group One for shakedown out of Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. 

After major modifications at New York Naval Shipyard 6 March through 2 April 
1951, she embarked Carrier Air Group Four for training off Jacksonville, then 
departed Newport 15 May 1951 for Mediterranean deployment with the 6th Fleet. 



For the next few months she added her far-reaching air arm to the strength of the 
6th Fleet, the silent, flexible, and controlling weapon of deterrence to overt Soviet 
aggression in the Mediterranean and the Near East. The mobile 7th Fleet was 
deeply committed to a shooting war to help restore the independence and 
freedom of South Korea. ORISKANY was part of the affirmative answer to the 
crucial question as to whether the Korean War would have an affect upon the 
Navy's ability to maintain the status quo in the Mediterranean. 



Photo # KN- 1508 1 LJSS Oriskany en route to the Western Pacific. 23 June 1967 




Having swept from ports of Italy and France to those of Greece and Turkey, 
thence to the shores of Tripoli, ORISKANY returned to Quonset Point, R. I. 4 
October 1951. She entered Gravesend Bay, New York, 6 November 1951 to offload 
ammunition and to have her masts removed to allow passage under the East 
River Bridges to the New York Naval Shipyard. Overhaul included the installation 
of a new flight deck, steering system, and bridge. Work was complete by 15 May 
1952 and the carrier steamed the next day to take on ammunition at Norfolk 19-22 
May. She then got underway to join the Pacific Fleet, steaming via Guantanamo 
Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Cape Horn, Valparaiso, and Lima, arriving San Diego, Calif. 
21 July. 

Following carrier qualifications for Air Group 102, ORISKANY departed San Diego 
15 September 1952 to aid UN forces in Korea. She arrived Yokosuka 17 October 
and joined Fast Carrier Task Force 77 off the Korean Coast 31 October. Her 



aircraft struck hard with bombing and strafing attacks against enemy supply lines 
and coordinated bombing missions with surface gunstrikes along the coast. Her 
pilots downed two Soviet-built MIG-15 jets and damaged a third, 18 November. 

Strikes continued through 11 February 1953, heaping destruction upon enemy 
artillery positions, troop emplacements, and supply dumps along the main 
battlefront. Following a brief upkeep period in Japan, ORISKANY returned to 
combat 1 March 1953. She continued in action until 29 March, called at Hong 
Kong, then resumed air strikes 8 April. She departed the Korean coast 22 April, 
touched at Yokosuka, and then departed for San Diego 2 May, arriving there 18 
May. 

Following readiness training along the California coast, ORISKANY departed San 
Francisco 14 September 1953 to aid the 7th Fleet watching over the uneasy truce 
in Korea, arriving Yokosuka 15 October. Thereafter she cruised the Sea of Japan, 
the East China Sea, and the area of the Philippines. After providing air support for 
Marine amphibious assault exercises at Iwo Jima, the carrier returned to San 
Diego 22 April 1954. She entered San Francisco Naval Shipyard for modernization 
overhaul; completed 22 October when she stood out to sea for the first of a series 
of coastal operations. 







ORISKANY arrived at Yokosuka from San Francisco 2 April 1955, and operated 
with the Fast Carrier Task Force ranging from Japan and Okinawa to the 
Philippines. This deployment ended 7 September and the carrier arrived Alameda, 
Calif. 21 September. 

The attack carrier cruised the California coast while qualifying pilots of Air Group 
9, then put to sea from Alameda, 11 February 1956, for another rigorous Westpac 
deployment. She returned to San Francisco 13 June and entered the shipyard for 
overhaul, 1 October. She decommissioned there 2 January 1957 for 
modernization work that included a new angled flight deck and enclosed 
hurricane bow. New, powerful steam catapults were installed by the Puget Sound 
Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Wash. 

ORISKANY recommissioned at the San Francisco Naval Shipyard, 7 March 1959, 
Capt. James Mahan Wright in command. Four days later, she departed for 
shakedown out of San Diego with Carrier Air Group 14 embarked. Operations 



along the west coast continued until 14 May 1960, when she again deployed to 
WestPac, returning to San Diego 15 December. She entered San Francisco Naval 
Shipyard 30 March 1961 for a five-month overhaul that included the first aircraft 
carrier installation of the Naval Tactical Data System (NTDS). 

ORISKANY departed the shipyard 9 September for underway training out of San 
Diego until 7 June 1962 when she again deployed to the Far East with Carrier Air 
Group 16 embarked. She returned to San Diego 17 December 1962 for operational 
readiness t raining off the west coast. 

The carrier again stood out of San Diego 1 August 1963 for Far Eastern waters, 
with Carrier Air Group 16 embarked. She arrived Subic Bay 31 August 1963; 
thence to Japan. She stood out of Iwakuni, Japan, the morning of 31 October 
enroute the coast of South Vietnam. There, she stood by for any eventuality as 
word was received of the coup d'etat taking place in Saigon. When the crisis 
abated, the carrier resumed operations from Japanese ports. 

ORISKANY returned to San Diego 10 March 1964. After overhaul at Puget Sound 
Naval Shipyard, she steamed for refresher training out of San Diego, followed by 
qualifications for Carrier Wing 16. During this period her flight deck was used to 
test the E-2A Hawkeye, the Navy's new airborne early warning aircraft. She also 
provided orientation to senior officers of eight allied nations. 

ORISKANY departed San Diego 5 April 1965 for Westpac, arriving Subic 27 April. 
By this time more United States troops had landed in South Vietnam to support 
Vietnamese troops against increased Viet Cong pressure to destroy the 
independence of that nation. ORISKANY added her weight to the massive 
American naval strength supporting the freedom of South Vietnam. In combat 
operations that brought her and embarked Carrier Wing 16 the Navy Unit 
Commendation for exceptionally meritorious service between 10 May and 6 
December 1965, she carried out over 12,000 combat sorties and delivered nearly 
10,000 tons of ordnance against enemy forces. She departed Subic Bay 30 
November and returned to San Diego 16 December. 

ORISKANY again stood out of San Diego for the Far East 26 May 1966, arriving 
Yokosuka 14 June. She steamed for "Dixie Station" off South Vietnam 27 June. 
Wearisome days and nights of combat shifted to "Yankee Station" in the Gulf of 
Tonkin 8 July. In the following months there were brief respites for replenishment 
in Subic Bay. Then, back into the action that saw her launch 7,794 combat sorties. 

The carrier was on station the morning of 27 October 1966 when a fire erupted on 
the starboard side of the ship's forward hanger bay and raced through five decks, 
claiming the lives of 44 men. Many who lost their lives were veteran combat pilots 
who had flown raids over Vietnam a few hours earlier. ORISKANY had been put in 
danger when a magnesium parachute flare exploded in the forward flare locker of 
Hanger Bay 1, beneath the carrier's flight deck. Her crewmen performed fantastic 
feats in jettisoning heavy bombs which lay within reach of the flames. Other men 
wheeled planes out of danger, rescued pilots, and helped quell the blaze through 
three hours of prompt and daring actions. Medical assistance was rushed to the 
carrier from sister aircraft carriers USS CONSTELLATION (CVA 64) and USS 
FRANKLIN P. ROOSEVELT (CVA 42). 



ORISKANY steamed to Subic Bay 28 October 1966, where victims of the fire were 
transferred to waiting aircraft for transportation to the United States. A week later, 
the carrier departed for San Diego, arriving 16 November. San Francisco Bay 
Naval Shipyard completed repairs 23 March 1967 and ORISKANY, with Carrier Air 
Wing 16 embarked, underwent training. She then stood out of San Francisco Bay 
16 June to take station in waters off Vietnam. Designated flagship of Carrier 
Division Nine in Subic Bay 9 July, she commenced "Yankee Station" operations 
14 July. While on the line, 26 July, she provided medical assistance to the fire- 
ravaged attack carrier USS FORRESTAL (CVA 59). 

ORISKANY returned to the Naval Air Station pier at Alameda Calif., 31 January 
1968, and entered San Francisco Bay Naval Shipyard 7 February for an eight 
month overhaul. Upon completion of work, the carrier underwent refresher 
training and flight qualifications before deploying to the Far East in April 1969. 

Following twenty-five years of service, ORISKANY was decommissioned 30 
September 1976. She was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register in July 1989, 
and sold for scrapping on 9 September 1995. The contractor defaulted and the 
ship was repossessed by the Navy, with the contract terminated 30 July 1997. The 
spent the following years at the Beaumont Reserve Fleet in Beaumont, Tex., and 
was finally sunk as an artificial reef on May 17, 2006, making the ORISKANY the 
largest ship ever sunk for this purpose. 

ORISKANY received two battle stars for Korean Service and five for Vietnamese 
service. 



Oriskany 1966 WestPac Log 

USS Oriskany CVA-34 departed San Diego, California, May 26, 
1966, enroute for Pearl Harbor. In Hawaii, the Mighty "0" 
underwent her operational readiness Inspection to determine 
her readiness for over seas deployment. Steaming from Pearl 
Harbor on June 6, Oriskany proceeded to the U.S. Naval Air 
Station, Yokosuka, Japan, for a brief visit. 

Arriving in Yokosuka on June 14, she remained in this Japanese 
port until June 21, 1966, once again observing the Ship's 
tradition of hosting children from the Oriskany Home, an 
orphanage under the care of Catholic Salesian nuns in 
Kusanagi, Japan. Oriskany men donated the funds with which the 
home was built in 1952 and still continued their support. 

Leaving Japan, the ship steamed southward to the fleet support 
base at Subic Bay, Philippine Islands where two days were spent 
before Oriskany joined other Seventh Fleet units making up Task 
Force 77, in the South China Sea. 

Oriskany's first operational period was spent on "Dixie Station" 
from June 30 to July 7, then moving up to "Yankee Station", 
from July 8 through July 28. 



This first sea period proved indicative of the vigorous pace 
Oriskany would maintain throughout her deployment, with air 
operations beginning before dawn and continuing far into the 
night. 

On July 13 and 14, Oriskany was honored by a visit on board by 
the Secretary of the Navy, the Honorable Paul H. Nitze. On July 
16 and 17, Vice Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Horatio M. 
Rivero, paid Oriskany a visit. 

After 34 days at sea, Subic Bay was a welcomed site, for a little 
rest and recreation, but arriving on July 30, Oriskany departed 
again on August 4 and was back on Yankee Station, in the Gulf 
of Tonkin on August 7. 

Under the adverse conditions of extreme tropical heat, shortages 
of fresh water and other comfort commodities, Oriskany 
accomplished her assigned tasks without missing a single day's 
combat mission. Work days of 15 hours or more were normal 
routine, seven full days a week. 

The famed radio and television personality, Author Godfrey was a 
guest on board Oriskany, August 11 to the 14, during which visit 
he inaugurated the ship's new closed circuit television station, 
KRIS-TV. 

Not content with flying ordnance off the ship at record rate, 
Oriskany men set a new underway ordnance replenishment 
record with the ammunition ship, USS Mt. Katmai AE-16 at the 
unbelievable rate of 437.5 tons per hour. Underway 
replenishment is the tricky operation of receiving ordnance, food, 
fuel and other supplies from support ships, while underway at 
sea. 

From the 9th until the 14th of September, after 30 days "on the 
line", Oriskany was back in Subic Bay once again for another brief 
respite. Departing Subic, September on her way to Hong Kong, 
Oriskany participated in "Operation Crossdecks" with HMS 
Victorious, in which planes from Oriskany flew over and landed 
on board Victorious, with her planes flying to the Oriskany. 

Oriskany performed a daring rescue operation, via her 
helicopters, on September when she moved the 44 man crew of 
the SS August Moon, a merchant ship of British registry, aground 
on Pratas Reef, 175 miles southeast of Hong Kong. A near tragedy 
resulted, when one of Oriskany's helicopters was engulfed by a 
gigantic wave and crashed into the water, but all three 
crewmembers were picked up by other helos and returned to 
safety. 



Oriskany put into the port of Hong Kong, on September 17, 
spending from the 17th until the 22nd in this exotic British Crown 
Colony. 

On September 24, the Mighty "0" was back again on Yankee 
Station, carrying out her tight and exhausting operational 
schedule. 

Oriskany set two records, on October 1st, with the 116,000th 
fixed wing landing on board and her 6,000th helicopter landing. 
Sunday, October 9, saw Richard M. Bellinger, Commanding 
Officer of Fighter Squadron 162 "Hunters" , "Day of Retribution" 
downing of a North Vietnamese Mig 21, evening the score, 
after having been shot down by a Mig three months before. 

Oriskany was honored by the visit of Secretary of Defense, Robert 
S. McNamara, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs, 
Author Sylvester, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General 
Earle G Wheeler, Commander in Chief Pacific Adm U.S.G Sharp, 
and other high ranking military leaders, on October 12th and 
13th. During his visit on Board, Mr. McNamara presented CDR 
Bellinger with Silver Star medal for his Mig kill. 

Movie and television personality John Gavin paid a visit to 
Oriskany, on October 21 and was interviewed over the ship's 
television station, KRIS-TV during his tour of the carrier. 

On the morning of October 26, Oriskany's combat operations in 
the Gulf of Tonkin came to a sudden and tragic termination when 
her morning launch was halted by the disastrous fire which 
erupted on board this proud combat veteran. Erupting in the 
vicinity of the starboard aircraft flare locker, in hangar bay one, 
the fire spread rapidly forward, extending over five decks, 
trapping many officers in their staterooms. Before the fire was 
brought under control, some three hours later, 44 shipmates, 36 
officers and 8 enlisted men, had lost their lives. Many of this 
number were veteran combat pilots, who hundreds of times had 
survived the flak and missiles over North Vietnam. 




"My Memories of that Day" 

"We had just gone to flight quarters on the morning of October 26, 
1966. It was a beautiful sunny day and the ship had turned into the 
wind to begin the morning launch of aircraft. We had already launched 
one or two A4 aircraft before the fire broke out. We were also running 
side by side with an ammunition ship, I think it was the USS Katmire. 
Not sure on the name. We were taking on ammunition, side winders, 
gravity bombs and flares. The hanger deck was lined with gravity 
bombs that had been highlined over from the other ship. I remember 
the first sign of fire, to the busy flight deck was the smoke bellowing 
up from the starboard side, just forward of the island. The fire alarm 
was called over the ships communication system. The ammunition 
ship did an emergency break away. 

At the time the ship was still running into the wind and the smoke had 
engulfed the flight deck. It was almost impossible for a time to even 
see any distance or breathe, because there was so much smoke. The 
ship finally tuned so that the smoke was blowing away from the 
starboard side of the ship. For a while this really hampered the fire 
fighters and rescue workers in there attempts to rescue and put out the 
fire. As you know from your Navy fire fighting training, that a 
magnesium fire cannot be put out with water, it virtually has to be 
smothered. 

The men who were assigned to the flight deck operations went 
immediately to their fire stations, manning fire hoses on the flight 
deck. Pumping water over the starboard side onto the heated area. I 
remember donning the OBA (Oxygen breathing apparatus) and being 
tied to other sailors by a lanyard and being sent into the lower deck 
spaces from the port catwalk to rescue sailors that were trapped or lost 
in the passage ways. The heat was intense. It felt like we had entered 
into a 350 degree oven. It was so hot, even after walking only 10 or 20 
feet into the passage ways, you could feel the intense heat coming from 
the fire. 

There were no lights, and lot of smoke, you could hardly see your way, 
only feel. On the flight deck, at elevator number 1, forward, between 
the catapults, the rubber caulking around the elevator and the pad 
eyes was bubbling from the intense heat below. This area was real 
close to the core of the fire, I would say 

almost right below. Just starboard of the elevator 1 and a little aft is 
the location of the flare lockers. I believe there were three flare 
lockers. I remember the unidentifiable, charred remains of sailors 
being brought up to the flight deck and being laid out next to the 
island of the ship. A space just inside of the island, were the yellow 
and blue shirt flight deck crew used for there coffee locker, was set up 
as a place for the dead to be placed into body bags. We fought the fire 
for hours, we pushed A4's laden with bombs over the side from the 
hanger deck, elevator 2, that had been readied for launch for that 
mornings flight quarters. We rolled the gravity bombs over the side 



that had been laid out on the hangar deck, to get them out and away 
from the intense heat of the fire. 

A lot was going on everywhere. No time for anyone to give 
commands, it was a time when every man had to think for them 
selves and act on what ever they could do to help save lives and 
extinguish the fire. After the fire was brought under control, the 
Oriskany steamed slowly back into Subic Bay, Phillipines. The ship 
was heavily list by taking on so much water to cool and extinguish the 
fire. Some were afraid that it may even sink. The thought had 
definitely crossed my mind and others as well. I hope that this will be 
of some use to you. 

As you know I can't verify any of this information, only recant my 
memories. I hope that you and others will enjoy reading this. Thanks a 
lot for giving me the opportunity to write my memories down and let 
other people know how it was from the view point of a 19 year old 
American sailor. " 

Thanks again, Larry LeFoy. 

Having extended her own time "on the line" a number of times 
previously to "pinch hit" for other carriers suffering unfortunate 
engineering casualties now the majestic pace setter herself was 
forced to withdraw, due to her extensive fire damage. 

Oriskany steamed solemnly into Subic Bay, early on the morning 
of October 28 with her colors at half mast, in honor of her dead, 
unloaded the flag draped bodies of her departed shipmates to fly 
them home for burial. Upon the request of his family, one body 
was retained on board for burial at sea. 

After a few major repairs at Subic Bay, Oriskany departed on the 
morning of November 3, for her return to the United States and a 
yard period to repair her fire damage and return her to her former 
"combat readiness" once again. 

On November 6, 125 miles east northeast of Iwo Jimo, memorial 
services for Oriskany's 44 fire victims were held and the body of 
LCDR Omar R. Ford, of Chula Vista, California, a native of Lincoln, 
Nebraska, was committed to the deep. 

Oriskany was deployed just short of six months, spending 142 
days of this time at sea, steaming over 75,000 miles and dropping 
6,272 tons of ordnance on communist targets in North Vietnam. 




Amid controversy over the Warren Report 
Governor Connalfy examines for LIFE 
the Kennedy assassination film 
frame by frame 



DID OSWALD ACT ALONE 



A MATTER 



IT 



REASONABLE DOUBT 



w- 




• - « 



Wv 



FRAME 230 



From the film; 
A key moment in the controversy 



NOVEMBER 25 • 1966 ■ 35C 




The on-board drama of the fire that racked 'Oriskany' 




Hell Afloat 



t stations just below Oris- 
k&ny\? flight deck, crewmen 
turn to see a pink ~ white jirelit 
vhutt (left) ballooning out from 
the hangar deck three levels be- 
low. On the hangar deck Itself t 
desperate sailors (above) wheel 
a l^OQO-pound bomb on its dolly 
toward the side to jettison it. 






^ 





fn smoke-laced flight deck (above), 
fire fighters get a high-pressure hose into 



position. Others (lower left) manhandle 
a jet out of danger. Below, crewmen keep 



a safety line on saihr who is inside 
trying to rescue trapped shipmates. 




Un station off North Vietnam in 
the Gulf of Tonkin, the 42,000-ton 
U.S. carrier Oriskany was in mortal 
danger from the second a magnesi- 
um flare somehow exploded on her 
hangar deck. The fire spread to other 
flares and then to combat-ready air- 
craft, and in its path lay rockets and 
bombs of all sizes. "If the bombs 
had gone off," said an officer after- 
ward, "we would have lost the ship." 
Amid choking clouds of acrid white 
smoke, which swirled down through 
the forward third of the ship and 
suffocated those trapped there, 
brave crewmen reached the bombs 
and heaved them over the side. But 
in less than three hours, 43 officers 
and men died. And some of those 
who survived had harrowing tales to 
tell of endurance, luck and heroism 
{see article beginning on next page). 



At tragic cost, 

cold courage 
saves the ship 

CONTINUED 107 




Pardon me... 
but your lips are showing. 



Use 'Chap Stick' 

before 

you need it. 




Look at your lips. Are they as smooth 
as they can be? Or aren't they kinda 
dry . . . kinda wrinkled? 'Chap Stick* 
lip balm helps you prevent all that. 
Keeps your lips comfortably moist 
and smooth. And keeps away chap- 
ping, cracking, roughness. Wherever 
you are, your lips are showing. So 
put on 'Chap Stick' protection, and 
smile like you mean it! 

Use 'Chap-ans' for hands 

BOTH ARE FAVORITES IN CANADA 



toa 



0R1SKANY 

CONTINUED 



by DON MOSER 

Tar down in the complex in- 
nards of Oriskany there is a com- 
partment called Damage Control 
Central, and in this room is a panel 
covered with scores of small am- 
ber lights, each one of them con- 
nected to a heat sensor somewhere 
in the ship. At 21 minutes after 7 
on this morning— just as the air- 
craft carrier is getting ready to 
launch her first strike of the day 
— the tight blinks on beneath a 
label reading: A107M. Simulta- 
neously a bell begins to ring. The 
sailor on duty immediately picks 
up the telephone, dials 222 and 
tells the bridge, "1 have a fire alarm 
indication for Alpha 107 Mike." 

On the bridge the bosun's male 
clangs Oriskany* s shining, chrome- 
plated fire bell and his voice rings 
out in loudspeakers throughout the 
ship. "Fire, fire, fire in frame 42! 
This is no drill! This is no drill!" 

Aboard any aircraft carrier on 
extended operations lire alarms 
arc commonplace and nothing for 
most people to panic about. Bui 
the Damage Control Officer wor- 
ries about all of them. "Every time 
I hear that alarm I die a little," 
Lt. Commander Mel Berg says. 
Seconds after hearing this alarm 
he has made it from the ward- 
room, where he has just finished 
breakfast, across the ship to Con- 
trol Central. When he walks in, the 
man on duty says, "Sir, we have a 
fire in Alpha 107 Mike," and Berg 
knows immediately that this one 
will be bad. "Alpha" means only 
that the fire is in the forward part of 
the ship; "107" indicates that it is 
on the starboard side of the hangar 
deck, beneath the great flight deck. 
But "Mike" means magazine. 

Deep in Oriskany v s ample belly 
in Elevator Pumproom No. l-»- 
at the sixth teveE, about as far 



'Fire in 

Alpha 

107 

Mike!' 



down as a man can get at that 
particular point — 19-year-old 
Fireman Claude Harper hears the 
alarm and the call to general quar- 
ters that follows it. But since the 
pumproom — servicing the giant 
hydraulic elevator that lifts planes 
from the hangar up onto the flight 
deck — is his general quarters sta- 
tion, Harper makes no attempt to 
leave, not even when thick, acrid 
smoke begins blowing into the 
room through the three 14-inch air 
vents. He moves to close them, 
but they are jammed — tight. 

Ilarper happens to be a bug on 
physical culture. He can lie on his 
back and raise a 170-pound bar- 
bell three times on a single breath. 
But now, for all his well-trained 
muscles, he cannot get the vents 
shut. The smoke keeps billowing 
in on him, each lungful like a 
breath of acid, and Harper begins 
coughing like a consumptive. He 
grabs list fu Is of rags and stuffs 
them into the vents, but the pow- 
erful draft simply blasts them back 
into his face. 

Gray-haired Lt. (j.g.) Bob Wil- 




liamson, the ship's fire marshal, 
sprints down the deck. Williamson 
has been around fighting fires a 
long time— 17 years as an enlisted 
man before he was commissioned 
last year—and as soon as he gets 
forward in Hangar Bay 1 he knows 
what Berg already knows. This 
one is going to hurt. Somehow 
a magnesium parachute flare has 
gone off in the forward Rare locker 
where several hundred other flares 
are ranged in racks beside it, ready 
to go at any minute. 

Already the fire— some 5,400° F 
hot — has burned clear through a 
steel bulkhead and out where the 
aircraft are parked. Men on the 
hangar deck have broken out a 
pair of hoses and, standing just 
behind the nozzlcmcn, William- 
son guides them forward into the 
flame. Water will not put out 
the burning magnesium—virtually 
nothing will— but his only chance 
now is to use plenty of water to 
cool things down and try to keep 
anything else from catching fire. 

For a few minutes Williamson 
and his men press ahead. Then a 
huge fireball explodes from the 
locker as most of the rest of the 
flares ignite in a chain reaction. 
The fireball races down the long 
hangar bay at ceiling height* over 
the heads of Williamson and his 
men. They are knocked flat but, 
astonishingly, no one is hurt. Un- 
perturbed, Williamson picks him- 
self up and moves forward again 
with the hoses. As more flares keep 
exploding, great gouts and balloons 
of fire burst from the locker and 
suddenly bits of white-hot mag- 
nesium are coming down on Wil- 
liamson like rain, setting his gray 
hair afire. Aircraft parked in the 
bay begin to burn. The fire is bare- 
ly live minutes old. 

The internal geography of a great 
aircraft carrier is incoherent — a 



! 2 3 4 5 



^ 



in this diagram <?/ Oriskany, the 
levels below the flight deck are 
shown and the relative positions of 
many of the characters in the ac- 
companying article can be seen. 
(I) is Hangar Bay One, where 
the fire started at (2), the flare 
locker. (3) is the aircraft elevator 



pit. (4) and (5) show the ap- 
proximate locations of the rooms 
of Commander Bel finger and Lt. 
Commander Reynolds. (6) is 
Damage Control Central. (7) is 
the pumproom where Harper was 
trapped and (8) is the '"void" in 
which 15 men escaped saffocat fan, 



T 



m 

m 

7 8 



W 



'«' 



IF YOU 

LIVE TO BE 100 
THE MOVEMENT 
PARTS OF YOUR 

WALTHAM 

in Internttionil product of Wilthim of Chkigo 

WILL BE 
GUARANTEED 
EVERY DAY 
OF YOUR 

LIFE 



(all it costs you is $1 for 
postage, handling and 
insurance, and, after one 
year, cleaning and oiling 
charges, if necessary. 
Watt ham does the rest!) 



Any watch is great when 
it's new. But WALTHAM 
stays great year after 
year after year. 

Because Waltham is built 
to last— and guaranteed 
to last. 

Waltham— for yourself 
or your favorite people. 



A Diamond Moonbeam 
B Calendar Dater 



Waltham Watches are priced 
from $31.50 to $1400.00. 



WA 



HAM 



an international product of Waltham of Chicago 

Be sure to see Waltham companion jewelry . . . Hallmark Diamond Ring* 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS • LOS ANGELES. CALIFORNIA • NEW YORK. NEW YORK 

AVAILABLE IN CANADA 



110 



Deadly fireballs kill 
men in their tracks 



QRISKANY CONTINUED 

three-dimensional maze of com- 
partments, hatches, ladders, store- 
rooms, passageways and cul-de- 
sacs, liven under ordinary circum- 
stances it takes a man a long time 
to learn his way around, and on 
this Wednesday morning smoke 
from the burning magnesium in 
Alpha 107 Mike, sucked through 
the ship by the ventilating system, 
strikes men blind, chokes them, 
sends them aimlessly stumbling 
through the labyrinth of the tor- 
ward section, groping helplessly in 
the darkness. Some, unable to see 
where they ;ire, suffocate within 
feet of hatches that would lead 
them to safety, Fireballs shoot 
down the forward passageways. 
Those men who arc caught in them 
die instantly, their lungs burned 
out. 

Quartermaster Second Class Da- 
vid Willis. 22, finds an ordinary 
electrical extension cord, tells the 
10 young sailors with him in his 
compartment to grab hold at inter- 
vals and then leads them through 
the twisting passages until they 
come to a turning they all recog- 
nize. There they drop the exten- 
sion cord and tumble out onto 
the deck. Willis linds an O.B.A. 
— ox} gen breathing apparatus — 
and charges back inside to sec if 
he can help anyone else. He soon 
gets lost himself as the passages 
clog with smoke. Then his oxygen 
gives out. Cool as ice, Willis sits 
down on the spot, thinks things 
over carefully, finally searches out 
the extension cord where it had 
been dropped. He knows now 
where he is and once again makes 
his way out to safely. 



Okyraider pilots Commander 
Gordon Smith and Ll. Command- 
er Jim Harmon, who had escaped 
to the deck from their quarters, 
return again and again to the peril- 
ous corridors, getting down on 
their hands and knees to see under 
the smoke, groping about on bunks 
until they touch bodies of men 
who are perhaps dead, perhaps 
alive— they cannot tell which- and 
hauling litem up to light and air. 
They stay down until their O.B.A, s 
give out and then somehow make 
it back ro safety. On deck the) lake 
a few gulps of straight oxygen from 
a bottle. Each time one of them 
feels about to give out, the other 
says, "Well, ready to go again?" 
And off they go, back down into 
the smoke and hre. 



Lt. Commander Marvin Reyn- 
olds, clad only in skivvies and a 
T-shirt, choking and half-blinded 
from the smoke in his personal 
quarters, somehow linds a wrench 
that will open his porthole. He 
starts to work frantically, "Now 
just take it easy/' he tells himself. 
"If you let this wrench slip and 
lose it in the smoke, you've bought 
the farm." t venluallv he wrestles 
the port open and sticks his head 
out. But no sooner has he taken 
a couple of breaths than his T-shirt 
and skivvies catch on lire. So does 
everything else in the room, in- 
cluding the fishnets and plastic 
flowers with which he's tried to 
make the place homey. Reynolds 
grabs a blanket, soaks it in the 




why raider pilot Commander 

Gordon Smith got out of his quar- 
ters safely ami then returned time 
ami again to the ship's burning 
interior to find other stirrivvrs. 



washbasin, wraps it around his 
body and ducks back to the port- 
hole. Five minuter later the blan- 
ket is smoldering. 

For a white there is this cra?y 
thing between Reynolds and the 
lire. Fire keeps blasting into the 
room through the louvers in the 
door, but Reynolds, who has been 
risking his neck against MiGs and 
flak every day of his life, is damned 
if he's going to die this way. He 
keeps dashing to the washbasin, 
welling down sheets and blankets, 
wrapping himself up in them and 
sticking his head out the porthole 
to breathe till he starts catching 
(ire again. Then he sprints back to 
the washbasin. 

At last during one of the periods 
when he has his head out the port- 
hole he looks up and there, on the 



Naked, the gunfighter 
bails out of his porthole 



OR IS KANT CONTINUED 

catwalk above him, is big old 
Bosun's Mate Noel Hartford. 

"What arc yog doing?" Mart- 
ford asks. 

"Well, right now I'm burning 
up." Reynolds replies. 

"Hold on," says Hartford and 
goes otT to see what he can find 
that might he of help. 

Meanwhile Commander Rich- 
ard Bellinger, skipper of the car- 
rier's Crusader squadron, is hav- 
ing a problem down in hisquarters. 
Bellinger's recent life has been full 
of problems, as a matter of fact. A 
few months ago lie was shot down 
by a MiG and had to he rescued 
from the water. Then, a few weeks 
ago. he got into a light with a 
MiG -2 1, faster than his own ship. 
Bellinger evened his personal score 
by putting a Sidewinder up the 
MiG's tailpipe. He likes to talk 
about himself and his men as "the 
last of the gun lighters/* Now the 
problem is what to do about the 
lire. 

He has his porthole open and 
can breathe a little, but the pas- 
sageway outside his door is full of 
flames and his room is soon going 
to be incinerated, no doubt about 
that. So Bellinger does the only 
thing he can do. He takes off all his 
clothes and starts s< u ^c/ing his 
205 pounds through ihe porthole. 
There is a covered v alkway out- 
side so there is no C anger of his 
going overboard. But the porthole 
is small and Bellinger is not. Reach- 
ing out, he grabs a heavy cable and 
pulls and pulls and pulls against 
it. His chest gels through and his 
bell> — and then he is stuck. He 
makes one more mighty effort and 
pops out of the porthole like a 
cork out of a bottle — safe, and 
naked as a jaybird. 



F„ 



live minutes after the outbreak 
of the fire, a knot of men gathers 
in the choking passages of Olliccrs* 
Country on the second deck just 
below the exploding flares in Alpha 
107 Mike, The senior oilicer is Com- 
mander Charles A, Lindbergh 
iCai) Swanson, the l-xec for Gun- 
lighter Bellinger's squadron. Most 
of the other men are junior of- 
ficers. They are joined right away 
by two enlisted men: Bosun's 
Mates Third Class David Cox and 
Jerry Robinson. 

These two are normally in charge 
of shipboard repairs, but for the 
last few minutes they have been 
bursting into officers' rooms and 



trying to get people out. Cox finds 
an O.B.A. locker, pulls out the 
masks and starts to show people 
how to use them. Meanwhile Rob- 
inson turns around and sees an 
apparition moving toward him 
through the gloom an officer 
stumbling down the passageway, 
caroming from one bulkhead to 
another like some kind of human 
billiard balk Blood is running from 
a deep gash in his head. A moment 
later he sees Robinson, stops, then 
turns and careens back down the 
passageway. 

The man is obviously in deep 
shock and Robinson, reacting 
quickly, runs after him and grabs 
him by the arm. When he does, the 
officer's skin simply sloughs oil' 
in Robinson's hand, and Robinson 
realizes that the man is horribly 
burned , "Sailor. Tin dying," the 
officer says. 

A few yards down the passage- 
way Cox climbs up a ladder, opens 
a hatch leading to the hangar deck 
and sees a fireball go booming past 
over his head. When he climbs 
back down. Cox tells Commander 
Swanson, k *The only place we can 
go now is down/* 

From the passageway there is a 
hatch leading down into what the 
men on the ship call a "void" but 
which is really a cramped rectangu- 
lar trunk that drops straight down 
from the second deck to the sev- 
enth. A ladder runs down one side 
and small platforms jut out at each 
level of the ship. At each level 
there is a storeroom used for oc- 
casional supplies. 

For Cat Swanson it is a nasty 
decision. If the ship is in danger 
of sinking, trapping himself and 
his men at the bottom of a blind 
shaft could be disastrous. But if 
they stay where they are much long- 
er, men will begin to drop from 
asphyxiation, Swanson gives the 
order to go down into the void and 
seal the hatch behind them. 

Soon there are 13 of them in 
there, including the poor burned 
devil whom they somehow lowered 
down, all corked up tight in their 
well . The men distribute themselves 
on the platforms at different levels 
in order to equalize the demands 
on air. Somewhere Cox and Rob- 
inson have found a heavy wrench 
and now they are working their 
way systematically down the void, 
knocking off the padlocks on the 
storerooms and opening the doors 
to make the extra air inside the 
storerooms available. 

But the brass locks are solid and 
it takes almost 10 minutes of steady 



The 

difference 

is the grape 

that grows only 

in Eden 




A Sliltui Grfipe Grows in the Eden Vi 



T„ 



here's a grape that is grown for The Vintners of Eden Roc that's 
grown for no other champagne in the world. 

It is grown in Eden ... on fifty idyllic acres of our fertile, 
sun-drenched loam. It is a rare, almost unknown variety /f 4 % 
of grape whose magic virtues for champagne-making 
were first discovered by The Vintners of Eden Roc 
nearly a decade ago. 

It is Still our secret. 

It is the heart of the joyous flavor you 
taste in the special blend of grapes 
that create The Vintners of Eden 
Roc Champagne. 

It's a pity some people 
will wait for a wedding 
to enjoy this great 
champagne. 

We hope you 
won't. 



the flavor 
bubbles. 




Sfc VINTNERSy" 

EDEN ROC 

CALIFORNIA 

CHAMPAGNE 

tJfttirMfftfj ff hi* 1 (jfi*/r//iff/ r />&//• (JP6CC61 

,s \/fM/'/t//u t/brittenied 

Eden Roc Cali'ornio Champagne Ij made by © The Vimner* of Eden Roc, Modeiio, California 



A gutsy sailor hoses 
down a red-hot bomb 



ORISKANY CONTINUED 

hammering lo break each one, so 
it requires about an hour to reach 
the seventh -and bottom -level. 
There Robinson finds an old tele- 
phone sol. 1 1 is badly corroded, but 
he plugs it in, pushes the talk but- 
ton and asks, "Can anyone hear 
me? Can anyone hear me?" 

No one can. 

Methodically Robinson starts to 
take the phone apart and clean it 
just as he gets the pieces all spread 
out in front of him, the light bulbs 
in the void go out. It is a minute 
or so after 8:30. 

In No.l Pumproom young Claude 
Harper is getting nervous. For 




bf. 
olds 
to bl- 
and 



Commander Marvin Reytt- 

stuck It is head out a porthole 
e it the — the room behind him 
everything in it caught fire. 



an hour and !0 minutes lie has 
kept from suffocating by soak- 
ing rags in water and covering his 
face with them, but the smoke at 
his station is getting worse and 
worse. He picks up a phone and, 
coughing and shouting over the 
static, finally gels hold of his su- 
perior. Machinist's Mate hirst 
Class J. B. Tupper. "Get me an 
O^B.A. down here." Harper says, 
and Tupper promises to try. Harper 
lies down tlat with a wet rag over 
his face. A minute later his lights 
go out, loo. 

Up on the hangar deck William- 
son faces a scene out of Dante. Two 
helicopters and four fueled, com- 
bat-ready Skyhawks are on lire. 
Williamson has forgotten his 
burned scalp and is everywhere at 



once, getting his hoses where they 
will do the most good. MiG-killer 
Bellinger, having found a lircrnan's 
suit to cover his nakedness, is or- 
ganizing O.B.A.s and lire- lighting 
equipment. 

On another part of the deck Li. 
(j.g.) Bob Davis is on hand, too. 
Davis is well-known on O risk any 
as a great believer in life insurance. 
He has S6u\0(>0 worth of it. which 
is a lot on a junior officer's salary. 
Right now he is thankful for every 
penny. Davis is a qualified Navy 
diver but on Oriskany his job is 
ordnance disposal. At the mo- 
ment he is standing in the middle 
of enough explosives to blow Oris- 
kany clear out of the water, all of 
it ready to go at any minute. A 
tanker plane loaded with aviation 
fuel is parked near the lire. Fifty 
five-gallon drums of il am triable 
paint are down in the elevator pits, 
500 gallons of liquid oxygen are 
in the fire area, and bombs are ev- 
erywhere. Crewmen swarm over 
the deck shoving planes on ele- 
vators to get them up out of the 
hangar. Two men pick up a 500- 
pound bomb between them, stag- 
ger to the side, toss it over and go 
back for another. A man stands 
calmly playing a hose on a l ( 000- 
pounder so hot it turns the water 
into steam. Next to a flaming chop- 
per one pint-sized young sailor 
wrestles a 2Vi -inch fire hose so heav- 
ily charged with pressure thai it 
lifts him right up olF the deck. 

Boats Hartford, meanwhile, has 
found what he was looking for. He 
has a fire hose and is out on the cat- 
walk again, trying lo swing it down 
into the outstretched hand o\" poor 
Marv Reynolds, who is still breath- 
ing out of his porthole while the 
room behind him keeps catching 
on fire. The hose whips back and 
forth, back and forth, until Reyn- 
olds finally snags it and pulls it 
inside his porthole with him. From 
then until it is all over, Reynolds 
and that fire in his room are on 
something like even terms. 



Uown in the void Cal Swan son 
is trying to stanch the flow of 
blood from the badly burned of- 
ficer's head with the handkerchief 
he'd been using to breathe through. 
His original group has been in- 
creased by some other survivors, 
one of whom while descending slips 
off the ladder, jack-knifes, and 
winds up wedged unconscious be- 
tween the ladder and the bulkhead. 
Now there arc two injured men 
down there. 




Trim-looking "Fritz" in brushed leather. Women's "Gigi" in brushed and smooth leather. 




Girls lave l 'Jody" in two-tone brushed leather. "Rufus" in brushed leather rates with boys. 




Golf partners mi< brushed and smooth leather. "Putter" for gals, "Blarney" for men. 

Six of many new ways to 

make it a comfortable Christmas. 




Look for our puppie in the shoe. 



A jvodutlot 
t1966 r WOLVERINE WORLD WIDE, INC., ROCKFORD, MICH.-makers of Hush WOLVERINE 
Puppies* casuals and Wolverine* brand shoes and boots, ski products and gloves, www wa«L» »» 









Need more nasal relief? 



4 



Dial it! 







^nahis* 



"DECONGESTANT 



§ 



I 

y 

£*> col«» cm*-"** 



I5cc 



Ulcll 1 ...for heavy congestion, New Super Anahist Spray ad- 
justs the dosage to your actual need. The extra medication gives 
you instant nasal-sinus relief. Helps you breathe easier for hours. 
Available in both mentholated or regular. 

LJlcil Z,.,for mild congestion. Again as a doctor would do, the 
dial adjusts the dose — but in a finer mist spray! Decongestant, anti- 
histamine, mucolytic in a clinical-strength formula no other spray 
offers! New Super Anahist Dial-Controlled Nasal Spray! 

Super Anahist-first nasal spray 

with a special dial 

for heavy congestion. 



©1966, Warner-Lambert Pharmaceutical Company 




ORISKANY 



CONTINUED 

The burned officer is intermit- 
tently conscious. "Don* I anybody 
touch me*" he moans, and then, 
"DorTl worry, Cal, I believe tied 
is watching," 

At a bom 9 o'clock down in 
Pumproom No, I Claude Harper, 
choking and coughing worse than 
before, gets T upper on the tele- 
phone again, "I don't know what 
you tm\ ^ are doing." he shouts, 
"but if you'll jus I get mean O.B.A. 
down here I'll be all right." Harper 
adds a few adjectives that he 
wouldn't normally use. Once again 
Tapper sa\s that he's trying. 

It makes no sense to Claude Har- 
per, no sense at all. Why ha\en't 
they got him out of there"? He gels 
to his feel, wet rags across his face, 
makes his way by the light of his 
cigaret lighter to a ladder and 
climbs up to the hatch, which has 
been shut and dogged down as 
part o( the general quarters drill. 
The hutch seems to be leaking wa- 
ter. Now Harper starts to undo 
the scuttle, the smaller opening in 
the middle of the hatch: and when 
he forces ii open, water cascades 
through, a I most knocking him 
from the ladder. A solid waterfall 
keeps coming down on him through 
the scuttle, but if there's anybody 
around by now who has learned 
about breath control, it is Claude 
Harper, 

The young sailor simply starts 
climbing straight up into the tor- 
rent. He forces his head up through 
the scuttle, then his shoulders and 
chest. He thrusts his arm up above 
his head. All he can feel up there 
is more water, as high as he can 
reach. Carefully lie backs down the 
waterfall and closes I lie scuttle. 
Now Claude Harper knows what 
Tup per had not had the heart to 
tell him: tons of water from the 



ommQitder Charles A. Limi* 
bergh Swanson, fighter squadron 
Exec, led a chain of men to safety. 



fire hoses five decks above have 
drained down and sealed him in. 

In the hot, smoky dark at the 
very bottom of the void Robinson 
and Cox are tying quietly, waiting, 
thinking, talking only a little. Rob- 
inson thinks about Murphy. North 
Carolina. Ins lit lie home low n back 
in the Smok) Mountains where he 
used to go out early on crisp Octo- 
ber mornings wiih his ,22 and pick 
the gray tails and ihe fox squirrels 
neatly out of the high brandies of 
the oaks, and where, on the last 
4th o\ July before he joined the 
Navy, he rode with a great train of 
500 mounted men and 96 covered 
wagons over the pass from Tellico 
Plains. Tenri. into North Carolina 
and they camped in the woods 
near Murphy and stayed up all 
night making music and square 
dancing. 

"1 ih ink we're going to die down 
here," Cox says in the darkness. 

"I'm going to tight it out till the 
last minute," Robinson says. 

"Anyway." Cox says after a 
while, "I'm glad ihe two of us are 
together." 

Iliroughoul the morning bits of 
information from all over the ship 
pour in to Damage Control Cen- 
tral. In ihe cramped room 24 men 
work in an eerie, disciplined si- 
lence, for Mel Berg insists on quiet. 
The room is as yet unaffected by 
smoke. At a long tabic young 
phone talkers lake calls on special 
telephones, scribble symbols on 
small chits, wordlessly hand them 
to the plotters who mark the data 
on their charts of the ship. The 
plotters then hand the chits to 

CONTINUED 



Twice, a human chain to 
safety comes apart 



ORISKANY CONTINUED 

Berg himself. Berg reads and passes 
the papers lo the status- boa id 
keeper, who. standing behind a big 
sheet of Plexiglas. posts the data in 
mirror writing. 

The lire has been expanding, 
cropping up here and there all over 
the forward pari of the ship, and 
Berg is dialing. He'd like to be up 
there lighting it instead of buried 
away down here merely keeping 
track of things, moving men and 
equipment from place to place. 

After a while water begins seep- 
ing into the room through the 
escape scuttle above. The young 
phone talkers look at it apprehen- 
sively as it runs down the bulk- 
head. They are a long way down 
in the ship. Then reports come in 
that a man is overboard. Are peo- 
ple abandoning ship? "What the 
hell's going on up there?** one of 
the talkers bursts out. 

Berg wheels on him: "Hey, hey, 
settle down, fellows!" 



■ he void has become oppressive- 
ly close and Commander Swan son 
has the tingly feeling he knows 
comes from lack of oxygen. He's 
got to get his men out of here. 
Young Co\ opens the hatch and 
goes out with an Q.B.A. He does 
not get far, but when he comes 
back he's got two men from a res- 
cue party. The first problem is go- 
ing to be getting the wounded offi- 
cer — a big man — up the ladder 
and out the hatch. 

"You've got lo help," Swanson 
tells the hurned man. 

"O.K.. Gal, I'll do it," he says, 
but lie gets only one fool on the 
ladder and passes out. Swanson 
and the rescue men go about the 
grim, almost impossible business 
of lifting the man. clutching him 
by the clothes when his skin keeps 
coming off. Once through the 
hatch I hey lash him into a basket 
litter. A short way along the pas- 
sageway they bit a sharp turn, and 
it takes them a few minutes to ne- 
gotiate it with the litter. 

Then Swanson goes back down 
the void and tells the other men 
to follow, He grabs the lieuten- 
ant who'd knocked himself out 
in falling from the ladder. "I don't 
think i can make it." the man 
gasps. "Goddammit, you've got 
to make it!" Swanson roars at 
him. Grabbing the lieutenant with 
one big arm. Swanson leads him 
through the hatch, shouting at the 
others to follow. Choking, Swan- 



son and the lieutenant stumble 
through the smoke and dark until, 
finally, there is dim gray light 
ahead, and a moment later they 
sUigger out into the light, into the 
air clean, honcst-to-God air. 

Elated. Swanson turns around- - 
to realize that there is nobody be- 
hind him -nobody. The men who 
were supposed lo be following are 
still back in the \oid somewhere. 
So Swanson grabs two stretcher- 
bearers and an O.B.A. and starts 
back in again. 

He finds the men slill in the void 
where they have retreated after los- 
ing track of Swanson. One of them 
has passed out. Swanson can see 
that they'll all start dropping soon. 
He organizes them quickly but 
somehow the two stretcher-bearers 
he has brought back leave the void 
first, carrying the unconscious man, 
and when Swanson starts off with 
his human chain, he finds that the 
litter is jammed up again at the 
same bad corner. The smoke is 
even worse now. and a lieutenant 
right behind Swanson starts get- 
ting faint. Holding the lieutenant 
up and helping I he stretcher-bear- 
ers at tlie same time. Swanson 
finally negotiates the corner and 
makes it out onto the deck for 
the second lime. And once again 
he looks around and finds that, 
except for the lieutenant he's been 
helping, there is no one behind 
him. 

For the third time Swanson goes 
back. This time he gels his human 
chain moving in the passageway. 
At the sharp corner he runs smack 
into two rescue men carrying a 
dead body. "Get out of the way!" 
Swanson yells through his mask. 
"I got people here who can walk!" 
At 10 a.m. Swanson once again 
stumbles out into the light, looks 
around, and there -thank God — 
there they are behind him. young 
Robinson bringing up the rear with 
the flashlight. 

The telephone rings in the pump- 
room. The st Hind reaches Claude 
Harper's fogged brain. He fumbles 
for the instrument. Imally gets it 
to his ear. "Take it easy, take it 
easy," T upper says. "They're on 
their way." Harper says nothing. 
He cannot speak now. He tries to 
put l he phone back on ils cradle 
but it's no use. He doesn't have the 
strength to reach it. He slumps 
down again, lies there in the dark- 
ness and tries to keep his mind 
busy. "Everything's going to be all 
right," he tells himself again and 
again. But everything is not all 

CONTINUED 



XpfCWK 

phase H stereo 

# l in sound 




WHY? 



Because phase 4 stereo is a new point 
of view in recorded sound. All stereo 
from planning to production. The music 
selected, the arrangement it receives, 
the very placement of the instruments 
are all planned solely for stereo. With 
phase 4 stereo London Records has 
achieved a spacious clarity and bril* 
Nance of sound never before heard! And 
with unsurpassed musical integrity! To 
accomplish this, an electronic marvel 



was built- A twenty channel console 
mixer that combines and blends twenty 
different directional sounds into one pre- 
cise musical perspective. The result... 
fresh live sound. The phase 4 stereo li- 
brary offers Broadway and Hollywood 
spectaculars. Latin tempos, sound 
extravaganzas, piano favorites, big 
band performances and concert clas- 
sics. Stereo truly becomes of age with 
phase 4 stereo. 



U~4— 


WW 1 


ALL TIME 
PIANO HITS A 


%% 


IrarlckH 

N*i-,in:j 

Hi 

AiImh Intti 

Ml -f :-,:r, 
It 


. ( ■ 


^ 


LK^ 


Swift 

0-ffi 


■r..;,'-:.; 




RONNIE ALDRICH WOm 

P.HG HIS TWO PUN 84 if- i 












1 *.,«4 ii *"'° 


jTfl-ffffl. 


PJISS to *Emw y 


Hill* F-.'lir j 


m swims -*& 


MttiMi 




l,',Mj-ltr,. 

Mi 




Mtidtwlintf 




£twi ini 








Oliin 




B 





ITTTEK ami THE WtHF 

THEXX^'l'EKBJN? 
GUljjCTmHE CtfCHEsTkA 

wni ihiiiui si*\ miKKElf 

£6 




For complele London phase 4 stereo caialog please write: 
London Records Inc.. Dept.M . 539 w L 25th St. New York, NY. 10001 

Number 1 in sales because it's Number l in sound 



Scuba divers get to 

the last trapped man 



ORISKANY 



CONTINUED 



right. He has been in there with 
the smoke for hours. And after a 
while Harper does not think any- 
more. 

At 10:30 a.m. Fire Marshal Bob 
Williamson passes the word to 
his phone talker, who passes it 
over the telephone to the talker in 
Damage Control Central, who 
writes it down on a chit of paper 
and passes it to the plotter, who 
hands it to Mel Berg: The lire is 
under control. 

Half an hour later, Bomb Dis- 
posal Man Bob Davis runs into Lt. 
(j.g. ) Jim Nunn and Machinist's 
Male 1 upper. Tapper has franti- 
cally been trying to get help for 
his man Harper who has been 
trapped for hours down in No. 1 
Pumproom beneath God knows 
how many Hooded compartments. 
Tupper has rustled up some seuba 
gear, and now he, Davis, Nunn 
and another sailor start down. Still 



three decks a hove Harper, they 
find live feel of water and face a 
difficult decision. If they let all 
the water drain down, they might 
drown the man the\ are trying to 
save, But there is no real choice. 
If they do not try. Harper will cer- 
tainly die of suffocation. He may 
already be dead. Carefully. Nunn, 
Tupper and Davis work their way 
down through the third and fourth 
levels lo the fifth. On the fifth lev- 
el, in the vertical trunk above the 
hatch that leads to Harper, there 
is 10 or 12 feet of water. Now it's 
Davis" turn. In his scuba gear the 
well -insured Davis climbs slowly 
down the ladder into the dark wa- 
ter. He can see nothing. His battle 
lantern is worthless. 

Bottom. Davis feels around care- 
fully, finds the hatch in the murk. 
With his knife he bangs on it sev- 
eral times, waits for an answer 
from the pumproom. Nothing. 
He starts cracking the dogs that 
fasten the hatch and suddenly air 
bubbles stream from the edges, 
Davis dogs the hatch down again 




quickly, climbs hack up the lad- 
der. "There's air inside," he tells 
Tupper. What lie wants to know 
is whether the pumproom is big 
enough to accept all ihc water 
in the vertical trunk above it 
without drowning the man. Tup- 
per assures him that it is — un- 
less the pumproom is almost lilled 
with water now — so Davis kicks 
back down into the dark again 



fireman Chunk* Harper, who 
nearly suffocated at hh tpost , was 
Semiconscious when hi'ip arrived. 



and starts undoing the hatch. 
In a few moments, down in 
No. 1 Pumproom. something pen- 
etrates the fog of Harper's mind, 
something at last. A voice say- 
ing "He's alive, he's alivei"" and 
I hen a hand. 



The 




* 



The 
Soother 




Every razor removes more than just splash on an after shave that dries your 

your beard. Because no matter how care- face even more. 

fully you shave, or how good the razor is, So every time you shave you make 

it scrapes away skin and natural oils that your face dry, irritated, and sore, 
keep your face comfortable. Then you It's time you met the soother. 



Mennen Af ta, 
the after shave that 
soothes, protects, and helps heal*.. 
It replace s oils shaving scra pes away * 

What other oiler shave con make that statement? 



119 



Operation Rolling Thunder 



This section is excerpted from a thesis written by Peter Fey, LCDR, 
USN BA, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 1995. 

In an effort to convince the North Vietnamese government to 
abandon its support of the insurgency in South Vietnam, President 
Johnson began a new bombing campaign beginning in March 1965, 
known as Operation Rolling Thunder. 

Lasting from 2 March 1965 until November 1968, Rolling Thunder 
was the longest bombing campaign in United States history. It 
involved tactical aviation assets from the 7th Air Force in Thailand 
and South Vietnam, as well as aircraft from 7th Fleet and Marine 
Corps assets. 

The campaign was marred by disputes between senior military 
leaders and the civilian administration from the outset. Military 
leaders argued for decisive strikes in order to isolate North Vietnam 
and to destroy their production capabilities and transportation 
systems. 

President Johnson and Secretary McNamara sought the graduated 
use of force, choosing a cycle of bombing halts followed by 
escalation in an effort to persuade the North Vietnamese to 
negotiate for peace with the United States and South Vietnam. 

During the three years of Rolling Thunder, Johnson and McNamara 
instituted seven bombing halts. 

The three basic objectives of Operation Rolling Thunder under the 
Johnson administration were: 

(1) strategically deter North Vietnam from supporting the 
insurgency in South Vietnam; 

(2) raise the morale of military and political elites in South 
Vietnam; 

(3) interdict North Vietnam's support of the communist insurgency 
in the South. 

Johnson and his staff continually sought a middle ground that would 
demonstrate American resolve without raising the ire of the 
international community. Ironically, by seeking this middle ground, 
the administration guaranteed that Rolling Thunder would 
fail to meet any of its objectives. 



Rolling Thunder went through five phases. 

During Phase I, from March to June 1965, a variety of targets were 
struck in an attempt to persuade North Vietnam to negotiate for 
peace. The air strikes served little purpose, other than to harden the 
resolve of North Vietnam and to solidify the sanctity of their cause. 
Most importantly, it led to the creation of the world's most complex 
and lethal air defense networks. 

Phase II from July 1965 to January 1966 was primarily an 
interdiction campaign aimed at roads, bridges, boats, and railroads. 
These attacks destroyed an estimated 4,600 trucks, 4,700 boats, and 
800 railroad cars. At the urging of Admiral U. S. Grant Sharp, 
CINCPAC, the focus of Rolling Thunder shifted from interdiction to 
petroleum products. 

Admiral Sharp realized that the interdiction campaign was not 
achieving the desired results and believed that by focusing the 
campaign on energy resources, North Vietnam might be forced to 
negotiate for peace. 

Phase III from January to October 1966, focused on North Vietnam's 
petroleum, oil, and lubricant (POL) resources. Before this phase 
began, North Vietnam required only 32,000 tons of oil a year to 
supply their needs. By the time Rolling Thunder began to 
target POL resources, North Vietnam had 60,000 tons of POL stocks 
in reserve. 

While the attacks destroyed an estimated 70 percent of the North 
Vietnamese supply, the North dispersed the remaining stock in fifty- 
five gallon barrels throughout the country. This proved more than 
adequate to supply the infantry and guerrilla forces fighting in South 
Vietnam and did little to affect the war in South Vietnam. 

Phase IV from October 1966 to May 1967, concentrated the 
campaign's efforts on the industry and power-generating capabilities 
of North Vietnam. For the first time, targets in Hanoi were struck, 
but as with Phase III the new tactics failed to have much impact on 
a non-industrialized country. Because North Vietnam's ports still 
remained off limits, the strikes did not impede North Vietnamese 
ability to receive and distribute supplies destined for South Vietnam. 

Phase V, the final phase, from May 1967 to October 1968, 
concentrated on isolating Hanoi from Haiphong, and both cities from 
the remainder of the country, as well as the destruction of remaining 
industrial infrastructure. United States aircraft over 13,000 sorties a 
month and destroyed over 5,600 trucks, 2,500 rail boats during this 
final phase of Rolling Thunder. 



As during earlier phases, Vietnamese air defense network grew. By 
1967, pilots confronted the most comprehensive air defense network 
in the world. North Vietnam fired over AAA ammunition from 10,000 
anti-aircraft guns and hundreds of missiles twenty-five SAM 
battalions during any given month of 1967. 

USS Oriskany 1965 Westpac 

Homeport departure/return: Alameda, 5 April 1965-16 December 

1965 

In-chop / out-chop: 27 April 1965-6 December 1965 

Line Periods: 8-31 May; 11 June-18 July; 10 August-10 September; 

30 September-18 

October; 29 October-25 November 

Total: 141 days on the line 

Squadrons: Squadron Aircraft Call Sign 

VMF(AW)-212 F-8E Sea Grape 

VF-162 F-8E Super Heat 

VA-163 A-4E Old Salt 

VA-164 A-4E Magic Stone 

VA-152 A-1H/J Locket 

VAH-4 Det G A-3B Holly Green 

VFP-63 Det G RF-8A Cork Tip 

VAW-11 Det G E-1B Over Pass 

HU-1 Det 1 Unit G UH-2A 

Combat Losses 

26 August 1965: A-1H (139720, AH592) of VA-152; LT(jg) Davis, 

POW. 

A flight of A-ls was on a night armed reconnaissance mission, 
looking for trucks along coastal roads in the southern portion 
of North Vietnam. Near Xuan Noa, fifteen miles from the DMZ, 
the flight lead spotted what looked like a truck park and 
initiated a dive bombing attack. LT(jg) Davis' aircraft was hit in 
the fuselage by AAA and he bailed out. His wingman saw no 
chute or post crash signal and reported that it was unlikely that 
Davis had survived. LT(jg) Davis was reported KIA, though he 
had survived and was captured. Davis was repatriated in 1973. 

29 August 1965: A-1H (134619, AH 586) of VA-152; LT Taylor, KIA. 
LT Taylor was shot down by intensive AAA while providing a 
CAP for a downed F-105 pilot near Son La in Route Package V. 



29 August 1965: RF-8A (146828, PP 919) of VFP-63; LT McWhorter, 
KIA 



Shot down on the same day as LT Taylor, LT McWhorter was 
killed while flying North of Vinh. At about 8,000 feet, he and his 
wingman encountered heavy AAA. After taking evasive action, 
his wingman reported McWhorter's aircraft flying wings level, 
but without the canopy and ejection seat. Damage in the 
vicinity of the cockpit area indicated that AAA may have fired 
the seat and probably killed the pilot. The landing gear came 
down as a result of damage to the hydraulic systems, and the 
aircraft entered a gentle glide until it hit the ground. LT 
McWhorter's remains were returned in February 1987. 



6 September 1965: A-4E (152042, AH475) of VA-164; LT Burton, 

recovered. 

LT Burton's Skyhawk was hit by 37mm AAA while on a strike 
against the Hai Yen naval base near Thanh Hoa. Burton climbed 
immediately so as to reach the relative safety of the sea before 
the engne failed. Ninety seconds later, with fuel streaming and 
his aircraft on fire, his 

hydraulics failed, causing him to lose control of the aircraft. He 
ejected less than one mile from shore and was picked up by an 
Air Force HU-16 amphibian. 

8 September 1965: RF-8A (146825, PP 918) of VFP-63; LT(jg) 
Rudolph, KIA. 

The Oriskany lost its second photo reconnaissance Crusader of 
the cruise, when LT(jg) Rudolph was hit by AAA while looking 
for SAM sites near Thanh Hoa. Soon after crossing the coast he 
and his wingman were targeted. His wingman watched him roll 
inverted and the canopy fall away, but lost sight due to his own 
evasive maneuvering. He was unable to see if Rudolph ejected 
prior to the aircraft impacting 15 miles Southeast of Thanh 
Hoa. Though SAR efforts were launched, they were 
unsuccessful. LT(jg) Rudolph's remains were returned in 
December 1988. 

9 September 1965: A-4E (151134, AH352) of VA-163; CDR 
Stockdale, POW. 

CDR Stockdale was the carrier air wing commander of CVW-16 
and was shot down on his 175th mission. He was leading a 
strike against the Thanh Hoa Bridge, but weather obscured the 
target. Stockdale then ordered his aircraft after secondary 
targets. He and CDR Wynn Foster, the XO of VA-163 decided to 
bomb railroad sidings fifteen miles south of Thanh Hoa. After 
making one pass, he pulled up to make a second. During his 
pull up, he was hit by 57mm fire. With the aircraft diving at 
great speed in close proximity to the ground, he had little 
choice but to eject. He landed in the village of Ti Gia and was 
immediately captured. CDR Stockdale became the senior 



American POW and was later awarded the Congressional Medal 
of Honor for leading the American POW resistance. 

October 1965: F-8E (150848, AH 227) of VF-162; LT(jg) Adams, 

recovered. 

CDR Bellinger and his wingman, LT(jg) Adams were part of a 
BARCAP on a bridge at Kep. While crossing the coast at 30,000 
feet, east of Haiphong, CDR Bellinger saw two SAMs streaking 
towards them. Although he radioed a warning, Ada never heard 
it and was unable to take evasive action. One of the missiles 
exploded just behind Adams' aircraft causing damage to the 
tail surfaces and a fire in the fuselage. LT(jg) Adams then flew 
his damaged aircraft forty miles back out to sea. His aircraft 
eventually exploded and he ejected through the inferno to be 
picked up by a helo and flown to the USS Galveston for medical 
attention. 

31 October 1965: A-4E (151173, AH 466) of VA-164; LCDR Powers, 

KIA. 

The ever increasing SAM threat caused the Air Force and Navy 
to cooperate in an effort to find a solution. The Oriskany 
detached a number of A-4s to Korat to fly as pathfinders for F- 
105 Wild Weasels. LCDR Powers led eight F-105s on a strike 
again near Kep as part of a larger strike package involving 65 
Air Force and Navy airplanes. While bombing the SAM site, his 
aircraft was hit by AAA and burst into flames at 150 feet. He 
climbed and banked suddenly, ejecting at less than 200 feet. 
Although he was seen waving to his wingman, and his SAR 
beeper was briefly heard, attempts to contact him via radio 
were unsuccessful. His remains were returned by the North 
Vietnamese November 1987. LCDR Powers was awarded the 
Navy Cross for this mission. 

5 November 1965; F-8E (150665, WD 106) of VMF(AW)-212; Capt 

Chapman, POW. 

(AW)-212 the only USMC squadron on the Oriskany lost its first 
pilot while striking a bridge at Hai Duoung, 30 miles east of 
Hanoi. Suffering a direct hit by 57mm AAA during his dive on 
the target, Capt Chapman's aircraft exploded. Although he was 
able to eject, he was immediately captured, becoming the first 
USMC POW in North Vietnam. He was repatriated in February 
1973. 

7 November 1965: A-4E (150071, AH 343) of VA-163; LCDR Wack, 

recovered. 

A flight of Oriskany A-4s was attacking a SAM site 10 miles 
southwest of Nam Dinh. LCDR Wack assumed lead after the 
original strike leaders aircraft developed problems. LCDR Wack 
was hit by AAA during his roll-in on target. He successfully 



continued his bombing run and eventually managed to fly 
twelve miles out to se a before ejecting. LCDR Wack was picked 
up by an Air Force HU-16 amphibian. LCDR Wack was awarded 
the Silver Star for this mission. 

9 November 1965: A-1H (137566, AH 590) of VA-152; LCDR 

Merchant, recovered. 

A section of Oriskany A-ls were on a night armed- 
reconnaissance mission when they as found trucks thirty-five 
miles southeast of Vinh. During the attack LCDR Merchant was 
hit by AAA that damaged his engine. He was able to jettison his 
ordnance and fly the aircraft towards the sea. After his engine 
failed, he was able to glide the remainder of the distance and 
ditch his aircraft in the dark just off the coast. He was rescued 
by a Navy helicopter as North Vietnamese boats were 
approaching to capture him. 

13 November 1965: A-4E (151067, AH 340) of VA-163; CDR Jenkins, 

POW. 

CDR Jenkins, the CO of VA-163, and his wingman were 
searching for supplies on a river near Dong Hoi. As the river 
appeared not navigable, they decided to bomb a road junction 
south of Dong Hoi. While enroute to their new target, they flew 
over the village 

of Xuan Noa and spotted signs of recent vehicle activity. While 
flying low in an attempt to inspect the area, CDR Jenkins was 
shot down by 37-millimeter AAA. He im mediately lost control 
and electrical power and ejected just short of the coast. 
Though SAR efforts 

were attempted, he was captured almost immediately. CDR 
Jenkins was repatriated in February 1973. 

17 November 1965: F-8E (150675, WD 103) of VMF(AW)-212; Capt 

Chaimson, recovered. 

A-4E (151083, AH 350) of VA-163; LCDR Bowling, KIA. 
A-1H (135244, AH 588) of VA-152; LCDR Taylor, KIA. 
On 17 November, the Oriskany along with other carrier air 
wings went back to the Hai Duong Bridge east of Hanoi with 
disastrous results. Within thirty minutes, CVW-16 hadlost three 
planes of the first aircraft lost on the raid. Hit by 37mm AAA 
during his bomb run, his electrical system failed and he was 
unable to release his bombs. Even though he deployed his 
emergency back-up generator, it failed to work. As he flew 
back alone, he attempted to land on the USS Bon Homme 
Richard but ran out of fuel before he was able to. Capt 
Chaimson was recovered by a Navy helicopter. LCDR Bowling 
was second aircraft lost by the Oriskany on this mission. The 
Operations Officer of VA-163, he had just dropped a load of 
snakeye bombs on the bridge and was flying a low-level high- 



speed egress when his aircraft was hit by AAA. The horizontal 
tailplane departed his a ire raft rolled to the right and impacted 
the ground. Amazingly enough, LC Bowling managed to eject, 
but likely did not survive the ejection. Twenty-five minutes 
later, a section of A- Is from the Oriskany arrived to perform 
RESCAP for LCDR Bowling. One of these A-ls piloted by LCDR 
Taylor, the CVW-16 Operations Officer was struck by AAA while 
making a low-level search for LCDR Bowling. LCDR Taylor 
attempted to fly back to sea, but crashed in coastal marshes 
southwest of Haiphong. LCDR Taylor's remains were returned 
by North Vietnam in December, 1975. LCDR Bowling's remains 
were returned to a Presidential commission that was visiting 
Hanoi in March 1977. 

Operational Losses 

25 May 1965: A-3B (138947) of VAH-4; all four crewmembers 

recovered. 

The Oriskany lost her first aircraft of the 1965 cruise on 25 May 
1965 when this A-3 crashed after suffering structural failure on 
the catapult shot. The A-3 was launching as tanker in support 
of strike operations. 

30 June 1965: A-1H (139708) of VA-152; pilot recovered. 

The engine failed on this pilot's A-l as he was being catapulted 
off the ship for a strike mission. 

18 July 1965: A-4E (151089) of VA-163; LT Avore, KIA. 

As LT Avore's Skyhawk was catapulted off the Oriskany for a 
mission over South Vietnam, his engine failed and he was 
forced to ditch the aircraft. The aircraft sank within seconds 
and he was unable to escape. This accident occurred on the last 
day of the line period for the Oriskany. 

21 July 1965: A-1H (139636) of VA-152; pilot recovered 

During a post maintenance check flight, the engine failed and 
the pilot was forced toabandon the aircraft. 

10 August 1965: A-1J (142012) of VA-152; LT(jg) Mailhes, KIA. 
LT(jg) Mailhes failed to return from a night RESCAP mission 
over the Gulf of Tonkin. The cause of his loss was never 
discovered. 

17 October 1965: F-8E (149198) of VMF(AW)-212; pilot recovered. 
This was the first of four aircraft lost by VMF(AW)-212 during 
the 1965 cruise. The struck the ramp while attempting to land 
following a BARCAP mission at night and in bad weather. 



17 November 1965: F-8E (150875) of VMF(AW)-212; lLt Peil 

recovered. 

In addition to the terrible losses incurred by CVW-16 on their 
Hai Duong raid, the air wing lost one more aircraft while 
returning from the raid. On final approach to the carrier, Lt 
Peil's F-8 struck the ramp and was destroyed. Lt Peil luckily 
survived the accident. 

USS Oriskany 1966 Westpac 

Homeport departure/return: Alameda, 26 May 1966-16 November 

1966 

In-chop / out-chop: 11 June 1966-8 November 1966 

Line Periods: 30 June; 8-27 July; 6 August- 7 September; 24 

September-26 October 

Total: 87 days on the line 

Squadrons: Squadron Aircraft Call Sign 

VF-111 F-8E Old Nick 

VF-162 F-8E Super Heat 

VA-163 A-4E Old Salt 

VA-164 A-4E Magic Stone 

VA-152 A-1H/J Locket 

VAH-4 Det G A-3B Holly Green 

VFP-63 Det G RF-8A Cork Tip 

VAW-11 Det G E-1B Over Pass 

HU-1 Det 1 Unit G UH-2A 

Combat Losses 

12 July 1966: F-8E (15092, AH 203) of VF-162; LT(jg) Adams, 

recovered. 

During a strike on Dong Nham twenty miles northeast of 
Haiphong, LT(jg) Adams part of a TARCAP for the POL strike. 
SAM warnings forced the strike force to dive into small arms 
range and his aircraft was hit in the tailpipe by small arms fire. 
The fire spread quickly through the entire aircraft and he was 
forced to eject. He was picked up by a Navy helicopter escorted 
by four A-ls after spending forty-five minutes on the ground. 
LT(J9) Adams had been shot down by a SAM during the 1965 
cruise and thus became the first aviator to survive being shot 
down twice. As a result he was reassigned to stateside duty. 

14 July 1966: F-8E (150908, AH 202) of VF-162; CDR Bellinger, 

recovered. 

CDR Bellinger, the commanding officer of VF-162 was shot 
down by a MiG-17 while escorting a strike against storage 
facilities at Nam Dinh. His flight of three F-8s was engaged by 
two MiG-17s twenty-five miles South of Hanoi. His Crusader 



was hit by cannon fire which badly damaged the starboard 
wing. When his hydraulics failed, he decided to divert to Da 
Nang rather than attempt landing aboard the Oriskany. Due to 
the lack of hydraulics, he was unable to in-flight refuel when 
his refueling probe would not extend. He was forced to eject 
when he ran out of fuel sixteen miles from Da Nang and 
was rescued by an Air Force helicopter. Zalin Grant's book 
Over the Beach gives a detailed account of this mission. 

19 July 1966: F-8E (150919, AH 210) of VF-162; LT Dennison, KIA 
LT Denison was flying as part of the CAP assigned to protect 
strikers attacking the Co Trai Bridge when he was hit by an SA- 
2. The bridge was one of the main crossings South of Hanoi 
and was heavily defended with AAA and SAMs. Over thirteen 
missiles were fired during the raid. His aircraft was hit at 
12,000 feet and was immediately destroyed. The wreckage 
came down near Hoang Xa, eighteen miles south of Hanoi. This 
mission and LT Dennison's loss are described in great detail in 
Zalin Grant's book, Over the Beach. 

23 July 1966: A-4E (152100, AH 301) of VA-163; CDR Foster, 

recovered. 

CDR Foster, the CO of VA-163 was leading a strike against a 
POL storage site seven miles North of Vinh, when his aircraft 
was hit in the cockpit by a 57-millimeter shell. Shrapnel from 
the shell destroyed the cockpit and severed his right arm just 
below the shoulder. Bleeding profusely and on the verge of 
losing consciousness, CDR Foster managed to fly his crippled 
aircraft out to sea and eject over the SAR destroyer, USS 
Reeves. He was picked up by a boat from the destroyer, which 
fortunately had a doctor on board. He was evacuated from 
there to the USS Oriskany and eventually stateside. A full 
accounting of his remarkable story can be read in his personal 
narrative, Captain Hook. 

28 July 1966: A-4E (152077, AH 407) of VA-164; ENS McSwain, 
POW. 

ENS McSwain was on an Iron Hand mission to destroy a SAM 
site reported at the mouth of the Song Ca River near Vinh. 
After firing his Shrike missiles at the site, McSwain began 
climbing to regain altitude. After reaching 12,000 feet, his 
airspeed had diminished to less than 200 knots, when a SA-2 
exploded near his aircraft. The aircraft fell out of control, 
possibly as a result of its stalling. ENS McSwain was released 
from captivity in March 1973. 

7 August 1966: A-1H (139701, AH 501) of VA-152; LT Fryer, KIA. 



LT Fryer was hit in the port wing by small arms fire while 
strafing trucks on an armedreconnaissance mission thirty-five 
miles north of Vinh. Although he was able to reach the 
coast, LT Fryer did not survive when he ditched his aircraft a 
few miles off the coast. 

11 August 1966: F-8E (150880, AH 112) of VF-111; LT(jg) Balisteri, 

recovered. 

LT(J9) Balisteri was on an armed-reconnaissance flight over 
coastal islands in the vicinity of Haiphong when his F-8 was hit 
by ground fire ten miles south of Hon Gay. The aircraft 
immediately caught fire and Balisteri ejected as the aircraft 
rolled out of control. He was picked up by a Navy helicopter. 

13 August 1966: F-8E (150866, AH 113) of VF-111; LCDR Levy, 

recovered. 

LCDR Levy was also shot down in the same area as LT(jg) 
Balisteri, while on an armed reconnaissance mission. He was 
pulling up from his second attack using Zuni rockets against a 
barge, when hit by AAA. With no hydraulics, the nose of his 
aircraft pitched up and he was forced to eject. He was rescued 
five miles east of Dao Bat Ba by a Navy helicopter. 

18 August 1966: F-8E (150300, AH 211) of VF-162; LCDR Verich, 

recovered. 

LCDR Verich was hit while on an armed reconnaissance mission 
fifteen miles northwest of Vinh. He was pulling up from his 
third bombing run on a bridge and barges on a river, when he 
was hit by small arms fire. Though he began losing control of 
his aircraft, he was able to fly towards the coast. His aircraft 
became uncontrollable forcing him to eject five miles offshore. 
He was rescued by a Navy helicopter. 

28 August 1966: A-1H (135231, AH 506) of VA-152; CDR Smith, 

recovered. 

CDR Smith, the commanding officer of VA-152 was hit by AAA 
while flying along the coastline near Van Yen, 25 miles south of 
Thanh Hoa. His A-l was hit in the fuselage and began to burn 
rapidly. He was able to bailout just offshore and was recovered 
by a Navy helicopter. 

31 August 1966: RF-8G (146874, AH 602) of VFP-63; LCDR Tucker, 

recovered. 

The officer-in-charge of VFP-63's detachment was shot down 
while attempting to photograph a foreign oil tanker and other 
ships in Haiphong harbor. As he approached Quang Yen, five 
miles northeast of Haiphong, his aircraft was hit by 37 
millimeter ground fire. LCDR Tucker lost all his flight controls 



with the exception of his rudder and was forced to eject only 
1,500 feet over Haiphong harbor. He landed in a shipping 
channel less than 150-yards from the shore and several junks 
began attempts to capture him. An SH-3 off the USS Kearsarge 
arrived within minutes to attempt a rescue. It was piloted by 
the commanding officer of HS-6, CDR Vermilya, and was 
escorted by LCDR Tucker's wingman, LCDR Teague. While 
Teague strafed junks in the area, the helicopter flew at less 
than fifty feet and under constant fire from vessels and shore 
batteries. The rescue attempt was successful and LCDR Tucker 
was recovered in one of the most dangerous rescue missions of 
the war. 

5 September 1966: F-8E (150896, AH 106) of VF-111; Capt Abbott 
(USAF), POW 

Capt Abbott's section of F-8s was attacked by two MiG-17s near 
Ninh Binh. Although both Crusaders were damaged, Capt 
Abbott's aircraft was destroyed, forcing him to eject. Capt 
Abbott was an Air Force pilot on exchange duty with VF-111. 
His right leg was broken during the ejection and although it 
was operated on by the North Vietnamese, it took over two 
years to heal. He was repatriated in March 1973. 

6 October 1966: F-8E (150924, AH 201) of VF-162; LT Leach, 
recovered. 

LT Leach was the wingman for a RF-8 Crusader while on a 
reconnaissance mission over Hon Gay harbor. Midway through 
the mission, his low fuel light came on, as a result of a fuel 
leak. Both aircraft immediately flew towards the sea, but LT 
Leach was forced to eject after running out of fuel seventy 
miles South of Hon Gay. He was recovered by a Navy 
helicopter. 

8 October 1966: A-1H (137629, AH 510) of VA-152; LT Feldhaus, 

MIA/KIA. 

This is my brother, Jack Feldhaus. Jack was leading a two 
plane response to a beeper signal thought to be from a downed 
pilot. Such a signal was frequently used by the North 
Vietnamese to attract US aircraft into areas heavily fortified 
with AAA. Arriving on the scene, the beeper signals stopped 
and there were no reports of a downed aircraft. Jack decided 
to use the time they had left in the air to do an armed 
reconnaissance mission twenty-five miles southwest of Thanh 
Hoa. After attacking a truck park, Jack told his wingman that 
he was going down thorough low clouds to look for another 
truck park. After breaking out of the clouds at about 5,000 feet 
he reported to his wingman that he was experiencing heavy 
AAA fire. Shortly thereafter he reported that he had been hit 
and was getting out of the aircraft. The A-1H did not have an 



ejection seat, so he would have had to slide back the canopy 
and climb out of the cockpit to bail out of the aircraft. When 
the wingman broke out of the clouds he saw a fireball where a 
plane had impacted and never saw or heard anything else from 
Jack. The wingman, Fred Guenzel, took a hit in his wing while 
searching for signs of Jack and was forced to return to the 
Oriskany. Other aircraft continued the search but to no avail. 
He was classified as MIA and in 1975 was reclassified as KIA. 
His crash site was later found and his remains were buried at 
Arlington National Cemetery in 2001. 

12 October 1966: A-4E (152075, AH 411) of VA-164; LT Elkins, MIA. 
LT Elkins was on a night road reconnaissance mission when his 
section was engaged by a SAM site near Tho Trang, 45 miles 
southwest of Thanh Hoa. LT Elkins saw the missile launch and 
began evasive maneuvering. He was either hit by an SA-2, or 
struck the ground while trying to outmaneuver the SAM. In 
1973, his wife published his diary under the title "The Heart of 
a Man/' It provides an exceptional account of life aboard the 
Oriskany and of the air war over North Vietnam, n 1990, LT 
Elkins' remains were returned by the North Vietnamese. 

14 October 1966: A-1H (139731, AH 511) of VA-152; ENS Thomas, 

KIA. 

ENS Thomas was on a night road reconnaissance mission 25 
miles southwest of Thanh Hoa, when his section spotted trucks 
on a road. ENS Thomas dove to attack the target with rockets. 
However he failed to pull out of the dive and was killed when 
his aircraft struck the ground. 

Operational Losses 

29 July 1966: A-4E (152095) of VA-164; LT(jg) Ewoldt, KIA 

LT(J9) Ewoldt was killed in between line periods in a tragic 
accident. He was killed after flying into the water while 
attempting in-flight refueling in marginal weather. 

23 August 1966: F-8E (150907) of VF-111; LT(jg) Meadows, 

recovered. 

23 August began a string of five accidents in four days nvolving 
Oriskany aircraft. LT(jg) Meadows was on a BARCAP mission 
when his engine failed, forcing him to eject. He was recovered 
by a Navy helicopter. 

25 August 1966: A-4E (152084) of VA-164; LT(jg) Bullard, KIA. 
LT(J9) Bullard was killed when his aircraft flew into water 
following a night catapult shot. He was launching on a night 
armed reconnaissance mission when the accident occurred. 



25 August 1966: A-1H (135236) of VA-152; pilot unknown, 
recovered. 

On the same night LT(jg) Bullard was killed, a faulty catapult 
shot resulted in the loss of this aircraft. The pilot was 
recovered after ditching. 

26 August 1966: A-4E (152093) of VA-164; pilot unknown, 
recovered. 

While on an armed reconnaissance mission, an electrical failure 
over North Vietnam forced the pilot to eject in Gulf of Tonkin. 

27 August 1966: A-4E (150079) of VA-163; pilot unknown, 
recovered. 

In a repeat of the day before, a Skyhawk on an armed- 
reconnaissance mission suffered an electrical failure over North 
Vietnam, forcing the pilot to eject in Gulf of Tonkin. 

16 September 1966: UH-2B (152196) of HC-1; three crewmembers 
recovered. 

23 October 1966: A-4E (150072) of VA-163; mid-air collision during 
armed reconnaissance mission, the pilot who is unknown, ejected 
and was recovered. 

26 October 1966: Fire broke out on the hangar deck of the ship. 
Six A-ls and seven A-4s were on the flight deck having been 
readied for a night strike, but bad weather had postponed 
the launch. The ordnance on the aircraft had to be downloaded 
and stored until morning. The ordnance included magnesium 
parachute flares. As the flares were being stowed in a 
temporary storage compartment, one of the flares ignited due 
to mishandling. Flames and toxic fumes spread rapidly 
throughout the ship. A total of 36 officers and 8 sailors were 
killed in the fire, including 24 aviators of CVW-16. Three A-4s 
were damaged and one A-4E (151075) and two UH-2s 
(149774/150183) were destroyed 

Ships company casualties as a result of the hangar bay fire: 

LT(J9) Dewey Alexander Administration Department 

LT(jg) Ramon Copple Supply Department 

CDR Richard Donahue Medical Department 

JOSN Robert Dyke Administration Department 

LCDR Omar Ford Operations Department 

LT Frank Gardner Gunnery Department 

LCDR William Garrity Chaplain 

SN James Gray Deck Department 

AA Greg Hart Administration Department 

LT(jg)James Hudis Air Department 



CDR Harry Juntilla 
LT(jg) James Kelly Jr. 
SN James Lee 
LCDR Walter Merrick 
BM3 Donald Shanks 
BM3 Alvin Shifflet Jr. 
LT(jg) Frank Tunick 
FN William Wallig 



Operations Department 
Security Division 
Administration Department 
Chaplain 

Deck Department 
Deck Department 
Supply Department 
Administration Department 



Air Wing Sixteen casualties as a result of the hangar bay fire: 



LT(jg) Cody Balisteri 

LT Joselyn Blakely Jr. 

ENS Charles Boggs 

LT(jg) James Brewer 

CDR Rodney Carter Commander 

LT(Jg) William Clements 

CDR George Farris 

LT John Francis 

LT Julian Hamond 

LT Lloyd Hyde 

LT(Jg) William Johnson 

ENS Daniel Kern 

LCDR Norman Levy 

AZAN David Liste 

LT(jg) William McWilliams 

LT Clarence Miller 

LCDR Clement Morisette 

CDR John Nussbaumer 

LT(jg) Gerald Siebe 

LCDR James Smith 

LT(jg) Thomas Sptitzer 

LCDR Daniel Strong 

ENS Ronald Tardio 

CDR Clyde Welch 

LT(jg) James Welsh 



VF-162 

HC-1 

VF-162 

VA-164 

CVW-16 

VAW-11 

VAH-4 

VAW-11 

VA-164 

CVW-16 Flight Surgeon 

VA-164 

HC-1 

VF-111 

VA-152 

VF-162 

VA-163 

VA-163 

VA-152 

HC-1 

VAH-4 

VA-163 

VA-164 

VA-163 

VA-164 

HC-1 



VA-152 




The following members of VA-152 lost their lives in the service of 
their country aboard the USS Oriskany CVA-34 

LCDR. James A. Beene 

LTJG. Robin B. Cassell 

CDR. John A. Feldhaus 

LT. Charles W. Fryer 

A03 Dale A. Lash 

AZAN David A. Liste 

CDR. John J. Nussbaumer 

LT. Edd D. Taylor 

ENS. Darwin J. Thomas 

VA-152 Heritage 

• Fighter Squadron ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-TWO was established in 
1943. 

• Fighter Squadron ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-TWO was 
disestablished October 1945. 

• Fighter Squadron ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-TWO was re- 
established in 1946. 

• Fighter Squadron ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-TWO was 
disestablished October 1949. 

• Reserve Fighter Squadron SEVEN HUNDRED THIRTEEN (VF- 
713) was established sometime in the late 1940s. 



February 1, 1951, Reserve Fighter Squadron SEVEN HUNDRED 

THIRTEEN was called to active duty. 

February 4, 1953, was redesignated as VF-152 - Fighter 

Squadron ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-TWO. 

August 1, 1958, was redesignated as VA-152 - Attack Squadron 

ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-TWO. 

February 9, 1968, VSF-3 Chessmen were disestablished and 

assets transferred to the VA-152 Mavericks. 

January 29, 1971, VA-152 - Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED 

FIFTY-TWO was disestablished. 

VA-152 Home Ports 

□ Prior to 1951: Naval Air Station Denver 

D April 11, 1951 Naval Air Station Alameda 

D June 5, 1952 Naval Air Station Moffett Field 

D November 1963 Naval Air Station Alameda 

VA-152 Air Wings 

□ April 11, 1951 H CVG-15 

□ October 14, 1957 ND ATG-4 

□ February 1959 NL CVG-15 / CVW-15* 

□ October 1, 1964 AH CVW-16 

□ February 1968 AA CVW-17 

□ April 1969 COMFAIRALAMEDA 

□ December 1969 AJ CVW-8 

D *CVG-I5 was redesignated CVW-16 when Carrier Air Groups (CVG 
were redesignated Carrie Air Wings (CVW) on December 20, 1963. 

VA-152 Deployments 

□ 1943 - 1945 CVG-15 - Essex CV 9 F6F Pacific 

□ 1946 - 1949 CVG-15 - Boxer CV 21 F8F Pacific 

□ 1946 - 1949 CVG-15 - Valley Forge CV 45 - F8F Pacific 

□ 09-08-51 to 05-02-52 - CVG-15 - Antietam CV 36 F4U-4- - Korea 

□ 01-24-53 to 09-21-53 - CVG-15 - Princeton CVA 37 - - F4U-4- - Korea/WestPac 

□ 07-01-54 to 02-28-55 - CVG-15 - Yorktown CVA 10 F2H-3- - WestPac 

□ 04-23-56 to 10-15-56 - CVG-15 - Wasp CVA 18 F2H-3- - WestPac 

□ 01-06-58 to 06-30-58 - ATG-04 - Hornet CVA 12 F2H-3- - WestPac 

□ 08-21-58 to 01-12-59 - ATG-04 - Bennington CVA 20- - F2H-3 - -WestPac 

□ 08-01-59 to 01-18-60 - CVG-15 - Hancock CVA 19 AD-6 - - WestPac 

□ 09-19-60 to 05-27-61 - CVG-15 - Coral Sea CVA 43 - - AD-6 - - WestPac 

□ 12-12-61 to 07-17-62 - CVG-15 - Coral Sea CVA 43 - - AD-6 - - WestPac 

□ 04-03-63 to 11-25-63 - CVG-15 - Coral Sea CVA 43 - - A-1H/J - WestPac 

□ 04-22-64 to 08-01-64 - * * A-1H/J - South Vietnam 

□ 04-05-65 to 12-16-65 - CVW-16 - Oriskany CVA 34 A-1H/J - WestPac/Vietnam 

□ 05-26-66 to 11-16-66 - CVW-16 - Oriskany CVA 34 A-1H - - WestPac/Vietnam 

□ 06-16-67 to 01-31-68 - CVW-16 - Oriskany CVA 34 A-1H/J - WestPac/Vietnam 

□ 07-22-68 to 04-29-69 - CVW-17 - Forrestal CVA 59 - - A-4B - - Mediterranean 

□ 03-05-70 to 12-17-70 - CVW-08 - Shangri-La CVS 38- - A-4E - - WestPac/Vietnam 

□ *The squadron, along with 20 of its A-ls, was sent to Bien Hoa Air Force Base, South 
Vietnam, to train South Vietnamese pilots to fly the A-l. A detachment, VA-152 Det Zulu, 
was left at Naval Air Station Alameda. While operating in South Vietnam the squadron came 



under the control of Chief, Air Force Advisory Group, Saigon. On August 1, 1964 the 
squadron (VA-152) based at Bien Hoa was redesignated VA-152 Det Zulu and the 
detachment at Naval Air Station Alameda was designated VA-152. VA-152 Det Zulu 
continued to train South Vietnamese pilots until December 1, 1964 

VA-152 Aircraft 

D 1943 Grumman F6F Hellcat 

D 1945 Grumman F8F Bearcat 

D April 16, 1951 Vouaht F4U-4 Corsair I 

D June 12, 1952 Goodvear FG-1D Corsair I 

D October 1953 McDonnell F2H-3 Banshee 

D February 5, 1959 Douglas AD-6 (A-1H) Skvraider * 

D December 1962 Douglas A-1J Skvraider 

D February 1968 Douglas A4D-2 (A-4B) Skvhawk * 

D February 1968 Douglas A4D-2N (A-4C) Skvhawk * 

D 20 February 1969 Douglas A4D-5 (A-4E) Skvhawk * 

D 23 June 1969 Douglas TA-4F Skvhawk 

D * November 30, 1962 

• The AD-6 designation was changed to A-1H 

• The A4D-2 designation was changed to A-4B 

• The A4D-2N designation was changed to A-4C 

• The A4D-5 designation was changed to A-4E 

VA-152 Commanding Officers 

D February 1, 1951 LCDR Robert L. Doering was 

Commanding Officer of Reserve Fighter Squadron SEVEN HUNDRED 
THIRTEEN prior to activation. 

D May 2, 1952 LCDR B. M. Richards 

D July 4, 1952 LTW. M. Doss (acting) 

D August 5, 1952 LCDR Robert Stanek 

D September 1953 CDR Frank G. Edwards 

D Late 1954 or early 1955 LCDR F. X. Bushner (acting) 

D April 1955 LCDR Robert G. Nester 

D September 27, 1956 CDR Robert M. Soule 

D July 23, 1958 CDR Royce A. Singleton 

D February 16, 1959 LCDR V. E. Sanderson 

D February 8, 1960 LCDR R. M. Sullivan (acting) 

D March 4, 1960 CDR John A. Davenport 

D June 21, 1961 CDR John R. Bicknell 

D April 17, 1962 CDR Isaac N. Pell, Jr. 

D April 1, 1963 CDR R. B. Bergner 

D March 19, 1965 CDR Albert E. Knutson 

D March 16, 1967 CDR Gordon H. Smith 

D February 14, 1968 CDR Philip E. Johnson 

D January 17, 1969 CDR Elmer E. Sheeley, Jr. 

D January 28, 1970 CDR Gerard M. Sturm 



VA-152 1965-1966 Events 

D April 5 to December 16, 1965: 

the Friendlies with A-1H and A-1J Skyraiders embarked with CVW-16 

on United States Ship Oriskany CVA 34 to the South China Sea near 

Vietnam. 

D November 6 & 7, 1965: 

Commander Gordon H. Smith was awarded the Silver Star for his 

participation as Flight Leader in directing and assisting in the first 

night rescue of a downed aviator in enemy territory on 6 November. 

This was followed by an attempt to rescue another aviator the 

following day in the same area. 

□ November 7, 1965: 

Lieutenant Gordon C. Wileen was awarded the Silver Star for his 
participation in an attempted air rescue of a downed aviator deep in 
enemy territory. 

D November 13, 1965: 

Commander Albert E. Knutson was awarded the Silver Star for his 
attempt to locate and rescue a downed pilot in enemy territory. 
During the rescue attempt his aircraft sustained 26 hits. 

D May 26 to November 16, 1966: 

VA152 with A-1H Skyraiders embarked with CVW-16 on United 

States Ship Oriskany CVA 34 to the South China Sea near Vietnam. 

□ October 26, 1966: 

While on Yankee Station and preparing to launch her first strike of 
the day United States Ship Oriskany CVA 34 suffered a disastrous 
fire on the starboard side of the forward hangar bay. The squadron 
lost two personnel in the fire and the damage to the carrier was so 
extensive that it returned to the States for repairs. 




VA-152 in 1965 




VA-152 in 1966 





This is the Skyrader Jack Feldhaus was flying when he was shot 
down over North Vietnam on October 8 1966. I believe he is the 
pilot in this picture. 




The three pictures above are courtesy of Andy Thomas, brother of Darwin 
Thomas who lost his life during this cruise while flying a Skyraider 



4 




An A1-H of VA-152 from USS Oriskany taken from a USAF Grumman HU-16B air 
rescue amphibian over the South China Sea, Sept 1966. A Tom Hansen photo 
contributed by Wayne Mutza. 




The pictures of the two VA-152 Skyraiders above were taken in October, 1966 by 
Richard F. DeLesDernier who served aboard the USS Oriskany in 1966, 1967, and 
1968. The one on the right was 513-137610 which LTJg James Alvin Beene was 
flying when he was killed in action in 1966. 




VA-152 Personnel Listed on the Plaque 



The skipper (pictured at right) is Gordon Smith 
(Rear Admiral, retired) who now lives in 
southern California. 

The Executive Officer, Commander John Joseph 
Nussbaumer. After coming through 
unscathed in two wars as a Navy flier, Cmdr. 
John J. Nussbaumer of Vancouver died along 
with 42 other officers and men in the fire 
Wednesday aboard the aircraft carried USS Oriskany. 
Nussbaumer died the day after his 38th birthday. He had 20 




-v 



years of naval service, including over 80 combat missions in 
the Korean War. Nussbaumer, the father of three children, was 
a member of Navy attack Squadron 152 aboard the Oriskany 
when fire erupted shortly before dawn off the North 
Vietnamese coast. Nussbaumer was born in Portland on 24 Oct 
1928, but had lived in Vancouver until he entered the Navy. He 
attended Providence Academy and Central Catholic High School 
before being enrolled in the Navy ROTC program at the 
University of Washington and the University of California. 



Al Headlv became XO for the 1967 cruise. 

Allen B. Headley, age 80, passed away Monday, May 26, 2008 
at his home in Pensacola , FL. Allen was born in Rochester , NY 
, son of Robert T. and Barbara Allen Headley. CDR Headley and 
his wife resettled in Pensacola after his retirement from the 
Navy in 1976. 

A US Naval Academy graduate and aviator, his twenty-four year 
naval career included two combat tours in Vietnam aboard the 
USS Oriskany as Operations Officer and Executive Officer of an 
attack squadron during 1966 to 1967. He was awarded the 
Distinguished Flying Cross, 14 Air Medals, the Navy 
Commendation Medal with Combat "V" and 3 stars, Navy Unit 
Commendation twice, National Defense Service Medal, Vietnam 
Service Medal with 3 stars, Republic of Vietnam Campaign 
Ribbon , and the Republic of Vietnam Meritorious Unit Citation 
Gallantry Cross Color . He then served as the Commanding 
Officer of VT-6, NAS Pensacola, FL, and then for the remaining 
5 years of his career, served as the Air Operations Officer for 
NAS Key West, FL. 

Allen is survived by his wife of 56 years, Anne Wiggins Headley, 
his brother and sister-in-law Robert T. and Margie Headley of 
Ormond Beach, FL, daughter Ellen H. Parks and son-in-law 
Thomas C. Parks of Dothan, Alabama, daughter Barbara H. 
Jones of McDavid, FL, grandchildren Elizabeth Parks, T.C. Parks, 
Margaret Anne Parks, Allen Tanner Headley, and a great 
grandchild Catherine Elizabeth Headley. 

CDR Headley was a member of the US Coast Guard Auxiliary, 
Pensacola Big Game Fishing Club, Distinguished Life member of 
the Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch and Sheriffs Association, and 
NRA Benefactor. He enjoyed big game fishing with friends, 
boating with family, hunting, farming, community service, and 
many other hobbies during his life in retirement. Allen was a 
mentor to all who knew him, and will always be remembered 



for his kindness, generosity, and his life's example of service to 
others and duty to country. 

In lieu of flowers, please consider memorial gifts in his memory 
to the Naval Aviation Museum Foundation, 1750 Radford Blvd , 
Suite B, Pensacola , FL 32508 . 

Visitation was held on Sunday, June 1, 2008, at the Oak Lawn 
Funeral Home Chapel. Funeral services were held at All Faiths 
Chapel on NAS, Pensacola , at 12:00 PM, Monday, June 2, 2008. 
Burial followed in the Barrancas National Cemetery with full 
military honors. 



Jack Feldhaus was shot down over North Vietnam 
October 8, 1966. He was initially listed as missing-in- 
action and later as killed-in-action. 



Jim Harmon was the star of the 1967 cruise, later commanded the 
first EA-6B squadron at Whidbey Island, and now lives in the 
Fallon area. 



Eric Schade was living in Florida in 1988. (See related 
story below) 





Don Zambori died in a crash after his engine caught fire 
coming out of Lemoore in early 1967. 




Jerry Garvev flew for Pan American for many years. He 
died of cancer about six years ago. 






LTJG James (Jim) Alvin Beene was shot down on July 11 
1966 and his body was never recovered. He was 
born on July 11, 1939 and joined the Navy in 
Burbank California 




Bud Watson also made the 1967 cruise. He is an environmental 
lawyer working out of Ashland, Virginia. 

Larry Lewis worked for Sea Land on the West Coast for many years. 
He died in the early 1990s. 



Bob Tank lives in Boca Raton, Florida. 



Butch Boose should be a captain (or retired captain) 
with Northwest Airlines. 



Bill Dolnv is a 747 captain with Northwest, living in the 
Minneapolis suburbs. 



Fred Guenzel, Jack's wingman the day he was shot 
down, is a retired 737 captain with Delta, living in 
Berkeley, California. 



Pete Selkev, also a Delta captain, lives in St. Petersburg, Florida. 

Tom Lull flew A-7s, EA-6Bs and C-2s before retiring from the Navy. 
He lives near Charlottesville, Virginia. 

Mike Ramsey was the air intelligence officer, and no one has seen 
him since the squadron broke up in 1968. (It transitioned to 
A4s with a whole new cast of characters) 



ENS Darwin Joel Thomas took off from the USS 
Oriskany October 14 1966 on an armed 
reconnaissance mission over North 
Vietnam. Over the target area, ENS 
Thomas fired his rockets at a suspected 
target and then, as his wingman watched, 
ENS Thomass A-1H Skyraider crashed amid 
a fireball. The incident was designated 
REFNO 0495. Ensign Thomas was assigned 
to the same squadron as Jack Feldhaus and 
the recorded location for his crash site is 
approximately 18 kilometers from that of 
Jack Feldhaus. He entered the Navy in 
Santa Clara California. The Vietnam 
Vieteran's Association chapter 201 in Santa Clara/San Jose is 
named memorially for him. He was married. 




ENS Darwin Joel 
Thomas 



Sidney (Sid) Lawrence Grueser, CW04, was the maintenance officer 
in 1966. After leaving VA152 in 1967 he was transferred to 
Pensacola. He remained there until he completed his 30 years 
in the Navy in 1970 and retired. He and his wife resided in 
Pensacola until their deaths. He passed away after a harsh and 
fast onslaught of acute leukemia in December 1989 and his 
wife, Sammy Lee, followed in May 1991. 

The following two officers joined the squadron about the time Jack 
was shot down and their names aren't indued on the wooden 
plaque. 

John Spiegel is a retired Foreign Service Officer with the State 
Department. 



LTJG Robin (Rob) Bern Cassell was shot down on July 15, 1967 while 
leading a flight of Al-H aircraft on a daytime armed coastal 
reconnaissance mission over North Vietnam. While attacking 
water craft near Cua Dai and Thanh Hoa his aircraft was hit by 
automatic weapon fire and after radioing "I'm hit" crashed in 
the sea. He was listed as "Killed in Action, Body Not 
Recovered". He was born December 6 1941 in Little Rock 
Arkansas. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1964. 
His home of record was Ft. Huachuca Arizona. He was married. 



Others who were there in 1966 




J.J.Buterbaugh ADR2, served 1955-1975. On the 
U.S.S. Oriskany with VA-152 1965-1966. 



VA-152 Frame-Power Crew 1966 




3 



^ fr * *" ,t v '' 

if - 

Back row: 

J. L. Brown, T. J. Jourkos, J. VWirLtaker; 

C. A Beedie, S. F. Foster, J. F. Hall, D. L Lambert, 
J. E. Forsythe 

Middle raw: 

D. H. Bush, B. F. Welch, J. E. Grarwille, 
W. A. Delinsky, J. C. Garvin, D. J. Bowling, 

W. B. Lambrisky, B K McArlhur, J. A. Eck, H. J. Sharkey 

Front raw: 

J. F. Hum, W. H. Fleker, LT F. F. Howe, 

Q. E. Scaries, R. Canales, R. L Jensen 





From the USS Oriskany 1965 Westpac Cruise 

LCDR Eric Shade who was on the 1966 cruise had also been with VA- 
152 on the USS Oriskany the prior year. Following is the story of 
what happened on November 17, 1965. 

BOWLING, ROY HOWARD "HAP" 
Remains Returned 18 March 1977 

Name: Roy Howard "Hap" Bowling 

Rank/Branch: 04/US Navy 

Unit: Attack Squadron 163, USS ORISKANY (CVA 34) 

Date of Birth: 16 December 1929 (Cuba NM) 

Home City of Record: San Bernardino CA 

Date of Loss: 17 November 1965 

Country of Loss: North Vietnam 

Loss Coordinates: 205000N 1062700E (XJ509042) 

Status (in 1973): Prisoner of War 

Category: 1 

Aircraft/Vehicle/Ground: A4E 

Refno: 0194 

Other Personnel in Incident: Jesse Taylor Jr. (remains returned) 

Source: Compiled by Homecoming II Project 15 May 1990 from one 
or more of the following: raw data from U.S. Government agency 
sources, correspondence with POW/MIA families, published sources, 
interviews. Updated by the P.O.W. NETWORK 1998. 

REMARKS: SRV RET REMS TO PCOM 770318 

SYNOPSIS: The USS ORISKANY was a World War II-era carrier on 
duty in Vietnam as early as 1964. The ORISKANY at one time carried 
the RF8A (number 144608) flown by Maj. John H. Glenn, the famous 
Marine astronaut (and later Senator) flew in his 1957 
transcontinental flight. In October, 1966 the ORISKANY endured a 
tragic fire which killed 44 men onboard, but was soon back on 
station. In 1972, the ORISKANY had an at-sea accident which 
resulted in the loss of one of its aircraft elevators, and later lost a 
screw that put the carrier into drydock in Yokosuka, Japan for major 
repairs, thus delaying its involvement until the late months of the 
war. 

There were many strikes in the "Iron Triangle" area of Vietnam - 
Hanoi, Haiphong and Thanh Hoa - in the early weeks of ROLLING 
THUNDER operations in 1965. The Air Wing 16 commander, CDR 
Harry T. Jenkins, Jr. had been captured four days when when the 
Saints of Attack Squadron 163 launched on a strike on the Hai Duong 
Bridge halfway between Hanoi and Haiphong in North Vietnam on 
November 17, 1965. On that day, a number of aircraft launched from 



the ORISKANY inlcuding LCDR Roy H. "Hap" Bowling, the squadron's 
operations officer and the pilot of an A4E Skyhawk light attack 
aircraft. 

LTCDR Bowling was flying a high speed, low-level retirement after 
attacking the target near the city of Hai Duong, Hai Hung Province, 
North Vietnam, when his wingman, flying immediately behind him, 
observed the starboard horizontal stabilizer fly off the aircraft, 
having been hit by enemy fire. The aircraft then rolled to the right 
and flew into the ground. 

A third pilot in the flight momentarily observed a deployed 
parachute at an altitude of about 100 feet. A fourth pilot in the flight 
flying past the parachute a few seconds later stated he saw the pilot 
hanging in the parachute appeared limp, and was not wearing his 
helmet. About a minute later, two airborne pilots observed a 
collapsed parachute on the ground in the vicinity of a well-populated 
area. One pilot saw what he described as "an inert form" under the 
collapsed parachute. The pilot stated that within three minutes time, 
the parachute had disappeared. 

Although search and rescue efforts in Vietnam were the best history 
had seen, only one out of six Americans shot down in the Iron 
Triangle region who were alive on the ground were rescued. The 
area was heavily populated, and villagers were eager to seize "air 
pirates" who came their way. It was also common for entire aircraft 
to be carried away, piece by piece, in an amazingly short period of 
time to reappear as parts of huts, souvenirs, or melted into a variety 
of objects. 

Two A-1H pilots from VA-152, Eric Shade and Jesse Taylor, Jr., went 
in to reconnoiter Bowling's position to see if there was a chance he 
could be extracted by helicopter. 

Both A1H aircraft sustained battle damage from the AAA fire. One 
pilot, Eric Shade, was able to return safely to the USS Oriskany. The 
second rescue aircraft, piloted by Jesse Taylor, succeeded in 
crossing the coastline before crashing into marshy shoals less then a 
mile east of the coast line and 1 mile south of the mouth of a river 
that emptied into the Gulf of Tonkin. Other pilots believed Lt. Cmdr. 
Taylor was unable to exit his aircraft before it impacted the shoals. 
This crash site was located approximately 60 miles southeast of 
Hanoi, 29 miles southeast of the Hai Duong bridge, 16 miles south 
and slightly southwest of Haiphong and 13 miles south and slightly 
southeast of the Hai Phong Kien An MiG base. 

Rescue efforts continued until it became clear that neither downed 
pilot could be recovered. At the time formal SAR efforts were 
terminated, Roy "Hap" Bowling was listed Missing in Action. He was 



maintained in that status until the war ended. Jesse Taylor, was 
listed Killed in Action/Body Not Recovered. 

When 591 Americans were released from Vietnamese prisoner of 
war camps in 1973, Bowling and Taylor were not among them. The 
Vietnamese denied any knowledge of the two naval officers. 

Then in 1975, the Vietnamese, in a gesture of "good will" presented 
the remains of Jesse Taylor Jr. to the U.S. The U.S. gratefully 
accepted the "gift" of remains which should have been returned 
years before. 

Then on March 18, 1977, the remains of Hap Bowling were given to a 
U.S. presidentially-appointed commission visiting Hanoi. Roy 
Bowling's remains were accepted without question. 

A Vietnamese defector stated in Congressional testimony that 
Vietnam stockpiles hundreds of sets of American remains. Congress 
believed him. He also testified that Vietnam holds live American 
prisoners, that he had seen them. Congress says he is lying, 
although nearly 10,000 reports help substantiate that Americans are 
being held alive. The U.S. and Vietnamese "progress" at a snail's 
pace, while totally ignoring the tremendous weight of evidence that 
their priority should be those Americans still alive as captives. 
Meanwhile, thousands of lives are spent in the most tortured state 
imaginable - unable to grieve, unable to rejoice. They wait. 

Roy H. Bowling was promoted to the rank of Captain during the 
period he was maintained Prisoner of War. 



THE TAYLOR NAME 





IJ$$ TAYLOR {FFG.G&} i$ jr^rhi-eri 1 for f fro hue Cvuunu nderJosse Jim i or I'^-Jyi; U.S. Navy 
Co-uirmwder Taylor was bvtrt j>i- WicirtiA, Kansas, on .fcujunry i& r 1935. He en{j$tcd in the 
NitVym Qeiobe? l£tf£ and served as an Aviation Radioman until the end of Work! W&rlf with 
Jlvwliing SijvMfh tin Villi ulKntrd the carrier, U$$ IlOKNhT in the South Pacific. 

ilnt'irt*' t.he Kti/^iri Conflict he returned to Ihe Navy for tiaining as a Naval A viator and in 
&$&jr, 19$$ received JifS COfnrttissiOrt &S Ajj Ensign. Afzora tour with Composite Squad re-jt rour r 

lie Served as NROTC instructor at the University of 
CnJifur^jJi n£ Zcs Angeles. Further flight training 
and A tour with tlte staff of Chief Naval Air Training 
followed a t NAS Ponszcoia, Florida }?e l^S promoted 
to Lieutenant Commander while serving' with VF- 
174. He attended jr/ie Naval War College in Nowportt 
Rhode 7j5tan-iJ Aurt dir&cled llwlnghtTcst divisio2i of 
the Fivretiv ofNuval Weapons lit St. Louis, Missouri 
for two years. 

in July, 1965, LCDR Taylor was Designed io oir 
Wing 16 aboard the attack carriei' USS OI?r$KAN¥ r 
and sailed to the Western Pacific. He flew Jt$ mis- 
sions between September and Novemb^ earn fug an 
Ah? Medal and a Go2d Star in lieu of a seoond award. 
Advanced to the rank of Commander on 1 September 
1 $6$, he had not been cffiei&lfy given tlze rank at the 
time ofhisdetiih. 

On 1 7 November, J9ff5 P Commander Taylor was 
flying his Sltyrflider during attacks on a key bridge 
near eft* JVortia Vietnamese. Fort of Haiphong. 
Ground fire had downed one of the other Navy air- 
OTAft and m pilot had. ejected in n heavily defended 
area. Commander Taylor heard the radio transmis- 
sion about the pilot's plight. Realizing that time was 
of th o essence in any attempt to rescue the downed 
pilot, Commander Taylor made a courageous deci- 
sion. Although it was not his assigned mission, and 
hawing discovered that other rescue aircraft were oc- 
cupied elsewhere, he took command of the* rescue ef- 
fort. 

Commander' Tayloi- proceeded to the scone and 
round the downed pilot was- str IS /ri h?S ptirAelmto liu r- 
ness in ^hallow water. To GOver the xpproacii of the 
r&SOtt* helicopter* Commander Taylor attacked the 
anu-airerAftgtirt sights despite intense and Accurate 
auti-airOr&fl tire and tint fact that his own plane had 
su$ta\uicd damage. The storm of enomy fire made if 
impo&sib ie for the helicopter to rescue the man on the 
ground. Meanwhile,, because of lire in his am* Air- 
craft Commander Taylor was f breed to break oft his 
own persistent attacks, Rather than abandon his 
plane in enemy territory, he elected to fciyto ditch in 
the QulfofTonkin. However, the fire turned through 
the wtng of his plane Artrt it crashed before he had 
t i&m to leav# in 

Jb^orhis heroic determination to save a fellow pi- 
lot, open fti ^re^t risk W his own life. Commander 
Taylot w&$ awa\rdcd r posthumously. The r7avy Qross, 




Jesse J. Taylor 





Distinguished Flvina Cross 

Before his death, Jack received the Distinguished Flying Cross for his 
part in rescuing another aviator. 




The Distinguished Flying Cross is awarded to any officer or 
enlisted member of the United States Armed Forces who 
distinguish themself by heroism or extraordinary 
achievement while participating in an aerial flight, 
subsequent to November 11, 1918. 

This decoration was authorized in July 1926. 



During the Vietnam War 362 aviators were awarded the Distinguished 
Flying Cross. 

Jack's medal was awarded for the August 20 1966 rescue of a downed 
US Air Force pilot, Tiff Hawks, who went by the call sign of TORPEDO. 



The President of the United States takes great pleasure in presenting the 

DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS 

to 

LIEUTENANT JOHN A. FELDHAUS 

UNITED STATES NAVY 

for service as set forth in the following CITATION: 

For heroism while participating in aerial flight as a pilot attached to and serving 
with Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-TWO embarked in USS ORISKANY 
(CVA 34) on 20 August 1966. While conducting the successful search and rescue 
of a downed pilot 30 miles northwest of Dong Hoi, North Vietnam, Lieutenant 
Feldhaus, flight leader of a rescue combat patrol, overhearing on the radio that a 
pilot was down near his general area, immediately proceeded to the reported 
area. Courageously and skillfully transiting know areas of heavy enemy anti- 
aircraft positions the flight arrived at the rescue scene safely. Placing his 
wingman as high cover, Lieutenant Feldhaus, within three minutes, and with great 
expertise, narrowed down the search area to a one mile square, established radio 
contact with the downed pilot, and directed by the pilot, pinpointed his position. 
Directing his wingman to depart and return with the rescue helicopter, he 
maintained a protective cover over the downed pilot, staying low and 
courageously braving enemy ground fire in the area in order to be alert to any 
enemy movement toward the downed pilot. When the rescue helicopter arrived 
and attempted to approach, the downed pilot reported that he was drawing heavy 
ground fire from a nearby ridge. Ordering the helicopter to hold off, Lieutenant 
Feldhaus heroically attacked the ridge drawing the ground fire upon himself. 
Directing the helicopter to try another approach, he continued his attacks upon 
the ridge allowing the helicopter to make a successful pickup of the downed pilot 
and withdraw from the immediate area, drawing more enemy fire as he escorted 
the helicopter safely around and between enemy anti-aircraft fire. Upon reaching 
the safety of the water, he learned that another crewman was down in the same 
general area. Heroically transiting a now fully alert enemy anti-aircraft defense, 
Lieutenant Feldhaus and his wingman again entered the search area. After almost 
an hour of searching the flight was directed to abandon the mission. By his 
heroic actions, outstanding display of airmanship, and loyal devotion to duty, 
Lieutenant Feldhaus reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest 
traditions of the United States Naval Service. 







THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT 

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

HAS AWARDED THE 

DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS 




TO 

LIEUTENANT JOHN A. FELDHAUS, UNITED STATES NAVY 

FOR 

FOR HEROISM WHILE PARTICIPATING IN AERIAL FLIGHT ON 20 AUGUST 1966 




GivKN this 2 2ND bay <>*" FEB lo 88 







The rescued US AF pilot referred 
to in the DFC citation was Edwin 
Tiffany Hawks, aka Tiff Hawks. 
The aircraft, an RF-4C Phantom, 
took a direct hit from ground fire 
during a night photo run while 
dropping flares. The explosion 
from the ground fire may have 
incapacitated the other crew 
member, Richard M. Milikin III, 
who was in the rear seat He was 
never recovered. Hawks ejected 
and evaded the enemy until he 
was picked up by a rescue helicopter. 

Tiff Hawks grew up in Donaldson, Tennessee, a bedroom community outside of 
Nashville. Jack Feldhaus grew up in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee, eighty miles 
south of Nashville. Their paths never crossed until that day on August 20, 1966. 



On 6/4/02 Tiff Hawks wrote: "I was the downed pilot of the RF-4C, 
call sign, "TORPEDO", that Jack and his wing man located, 
identified and definitely created the rescue that saved my life. The 
chopper that picked me up was call sign, "Indian Gal 51", from the 
Kearsarge. I knew the A-1 Locket flight, was from the Oriskany. I 
never knew until this week that Jack Feldhaus was the one who led 
Locket flight "INDIAN GAL 51" was piloted by Lt. Bill Roy, co-pilot 
Lt Vann Goodloe and one of the specialists in the back that 
hoisted me up to safety was named Sitko, " 




PACAF EVASION AND RECOVERY REPORT 



PARTI 

Name: HAWKS, Edwin T. Jr. 

Grade: Captain, USAF 

Position: Aircraft Commander 

Experience in Acft: 200 hrs 

Previous Survival /E&E Experience: USAF Survival School, Stead 
AFB; 460 TRW Theater Indoctrination, Tan Son Nhut AB, RVN 

PART II 

"After ejection of our 7th or 8th cartridge it appeared that we 
were hit in the lower aft right center of the fuselage with a dull 
hollow piercing sound. Immediately upon hearing this sound the 
aircraft lurched forward, down, out of control and the entire aircraft 
burst into flames. Communications were impossible between the 
acft cmdr and the pilot, and nothing could be seen but fire. The acft 
was out of control, seemed to be going straight down or in a spin. I 
was pulling both negative and positive G's and I was bouncing 
around inside the cockpit. All this happened very quickly, probably 
within three seconds. 

"I reached for the face curtain handle and immediately realized 
I couldn't reach It, my left hand grasped the alternate handle and I 
pulled it upward. Before I left the acft, It seemed like I was falling 
straight down in a big bucket of flames I never thought I could get 
out. Behind me the fire was very intense. I don't see how the rear 
seat pilot could have gotten out; of course, this Is pure speculation. 
My reaction was quick and I just barely made it out In time. 



PART III 

"The ejection was good, and apparently normal. When I was 
conscious that I was out of the cockpit, descending in the chute I 
couldn't really believe that I got out of the cockpit. I had no vision 
for the first half of the decent, probably for 5 to 7 seconds, and then 
began to return but was blurred. A few seconds later my vision was 
almost normal. Loss of my vision was apparently from the G's and 
windblast during the ejection. When my vision cleared I was facing, 
I think, South, and could see what may have been the fire from the 
crash, however, there were some napalm strikes in this area. It 
seemed to encompass an area a half mile wide by a half to two miles 
long, all over the ground. My helmet was crooked on my head, the 
oxygen mask was choking me and the chinstrap was unfastened. I 
righted my helmet, adjusted the oxygen mask and fastened the 
chinstrap. I began try to focus on the horizon to see what little I 
could see. I never thought to deploy the seat kit because my first 
thought was that I'd be hitting the ground almost immediately. 

"So far I had been conscious about 12 to 15 seconds. I reached 
for the risers, put my feet together, buckled my knees and at that 
time I hit in a thicket. I could not see the ground as I went down. I 
did deploy LPU just before hitting the ground. I landed in a thicket 
approximately 5 ft. high; it was forest undergrowth which cushioned 
my impact with the ground. I landed on my back and was not really 
hurt at all. My right shoulder was sore and badly bruised, possibly 
from hitting the canopy rail during ejection, and my right instep was 
badly bruised. I had picked up some burns on my left wrist and the 
back of my neck and ears where the helmet had not covered, before 
ejection. 

PART IV 

"I had apparently landed 2-400 ft up from a valley and could see 
downwards. I could hear Vietnamese down in the valley. The voices 
seemed to be about one mile away; the crash site was approximately 
two miles away and I could see the flames, at times reflecting on the 
haze layer. I stayed on my back, tried to determine if I was injured, 
and. started to pull the parachute down below the thicket. I had 
difficulty getting out of the harness because my shoulder was, badly 
bruised. I disconnected the oxygen mask from the lead on the 
harness. This is very important; the oxygen supply from the bailout 
bottle was very noisy. The sound could be heard some distance 
away because the forest was very dark and quiet. I tried to cover it 
up, stuffed it with leaves and tried to stuff it, underground but the 
ground was dry and crumbly and it wouldn't stay put. I rolled up the 
chute, helmet, harness, seat survival kit, and LPU and put them 



under the thicket. My ejection leg straps were dangling and noisy so 
I removed them. I retained my anti-G suit and survival vest. 

"I sat for a few minutes trying to get my bearings. I knew 
where the crash site was and that I was beyond it to the West. I 
decided to walk in the opposite direction, away from the crash site, 
up the mountain. I had a little trouble walking at first through the 
thicket and dense undergrowth. I took my time and kept walking in 
the same direction all the time even if it was slowly. It was so dark, 
pitch black, that I didn't know what was out there. I took my 
flashlight out and at first covered it with my hand, just letting out a 
little light. I had to discipline myself from using it; due to my 
anxiety I used It twice before putting it away in a pocket of my G- 
suit. 

"I found my way through the thickets by pushing through the 
places of least resistance. I would pick out a direction in which I 
wanted to walk, try to find the point where I wanted to go, and then 
try to ease my way through. Whenever I had to go 180° away from 
the original point still I would work my way eventually toward the 
tree or target that I'd selected. Occasionally I heard the sound of 
animals, rats, snakes, all kinds of sounds. In survival school I had 
heard that we shouldn't be concerned about sounds in the jungle 
and so I ignored them. Whenever I'd come on to some obstacle 
such as a strange sound or something which looked like two eyes 
staring at me, I would vary my route, keeping the same objective 
and work my way around to It. All these systems were used going 
up the mountain. 

"I had a baby bottle, plastic, with water. I stopped to drink 
water probably 

5 minutes after I started up. After seeing that half the bottle of 
water was gone, I still had a half inch left at pickup. I tried to 
conserve It. 

"After I'd been' walking about 15-20 minutes I came on a 
jungle forest path. It was a hard dirt, slightly eroded path which 
appeared to go around the mountain and It had a lot of leaves and 
didn't appear to be much used. I heard no noise as the area seemed 
uninhabited. I was in a hurry to get as far away from my gear 
through the thicket as possible. I knew I was disobeying the E and E 
advice to stay off trails, but felt I had to take the chance. 

"I desperately needed jungle boots. The path which I thought 
went up the mountain eventually led down the NE side of the 
mountain, heading North. I appeared to be going between the 
saddleback of the mountain while trying to get to the top of the 
mountain which was on my left. Walking on the path was difficult 
and exhausting because I didn't have jungle boots with cleats on 



them. I started 90° off the path, down hill to divert anyone who 
might be following and made a big circle up the hill, crossing the 
path and continuing upward. The slope was pitched at about a 50 - 
70° angle. Since I had fallen numerous times on the path and in the 
thickets and despite having only been walking for 45 minutes, I was 
very tired and stopped to rest numerous times despite the voices 
heard behind me. I realized I had to rest or I couldn't make it. I 
continued straight up the hill, 900° to the ridge line, stopping every 
ten yards and leaning or sitting against the tree to relax. I tried not 
to sit down completely because I knew I'd get too sore and wouldn't 
be able to get up. I would have been too tired to continue. 

"At times throughout the climb around and up the hill I started 
to wonder about my family and occasionally thought about the 
Vietnamese. I could hear them down in the valley, with some dogs 
and with what sounded like a gong evidently used for signaling 
purposes. It was a very soft sound on the gong, which had a very 
methodical beat. 

"I transmitted on my radio from 
the time I left the landing site, all 
night long every fifteen minutes. At 
times I stopped transmitting for 30 
minutes or so because I didn't hear 
any aircraft. I tried to remove my 
family, personal situation, and 
emotional problems from my mind 
because they would only bother me 
emotionally. My enemy was that 
mountain. I didn't care about 
anything else; just getting to the top. 
I can't emphasize enough the 
necessity to concentrate on the job 
at hand. I must admit when I heard 
the VC talking, the gong and the 
dogs barking, I moved out smartly. 
Another thing in my favor was the 
cool breeze on the side of the mountain which gave me a bit of cool 
fresh air and covered the noise I was making going through the 
thicket and forest. When the wind stopped blowing, and I thought 
the Vietnamese could hear me, I would stop. When the wind blew 
and the trees and brush would move, I ran or crawled under 
thickets, trying to make any little progress I could. I was tired but 
just couldn't stop. I had no idea of the time because I lost my 
watch. 

"It was about 0530 local at this time, and with first light I 
could start to see bushes and gaps in foliage and walking was much 
easier. By that time I was 3/4 way up the mountain and from there 




to the top my morale was better. Walking was easier and very soon, 
within 45 minutes, I made it to the top. A few times coming up the 
mountain I fell on dry steam beds, rocks and other obstacles. A 
couple of times I got dirt in my mouth. I tried to clean my mouth 
with my tee shirt to conserve water. A few minutes before getting 
to the top I noticed that I had lost my weapon, a 38 pistol. I had 
taken it from my survival vest and put it in my GI holster, which did 
not have a positive means to secure the flap. 

"At this time I got rid of my anti-G suit, the web belt, holster 
and cartridges and took only what I needed. I folded up the excess 
and hid it under the brush. On the top I was near the South side of 
the top of the mountain. I could still hear the Vietnamese 
occasionally, with what began to sound like three dogs and a gong. 
It was very difficult to judge their distance. They seemed very close 
at times and made me a bit apprehensive. Birds and other forest 
animals became noisier with more light, which was a good thing. I 
thought the enemy troops were mostly on the SE side of the slope 
below me. 

"The mountain ridgeline got higher to the north, so I cut up the 
ridgeline, looking for an open clearing with nearby underbrush in 
which to hide. Between 0310 and 0745 no aircraft flew over at 
altitude to hear my beeper. About 0745 I heard two jets go over, 
which turned out to be TOMAHAWK flight, two FI05's. Under the 
thicket I couldn't tell what type of aircraft, and they went right over. 
After transmitting the beeper for ten seconds I gave a call. 

"Here I'd like to mention something. When I first started 
climbing, for the first hour I couldn't remember my call sign at all. 
All I could recall was TORNADO, which I knew was wrong, but was 
close. I almost panicked.because I couldn't recall it. So I tried to 
get hold of myself. I tried to recall how I'd used the call sign when 
talking to the GCI site. I recalled spelling it phonetically. 
Eventually, I remembered my comment to the GCI site, which was 
"TORPEDO, like submarine." 

"I called 'Aircraft flying overhead, this is "TORPEDO," they 
replied, 'Roger, TOMAHAWAWK.' Apparently they were in the area 
on an armed reconnaissance mission. They said 'Roger, have fixed 
your position. We'll get someone in right away.' About, 25 minutes 
later at 0810, LOCKET flight, two AlE's arrived. They had slight 
trouble locating me. I gave them the beeper signal. I didn't know 
No. 2 was flying high and No. 1 was flying low. No. 1 picked the 
wrong mountain. I gave directions to No. 2 which he followed, but I 
realized I was controlling the wrong aircraft. Eventually I directed 
LOCKET 1 over my position at 50ft. He said 'I have you, get back in 
thicket.' I told them the enemy was coming up the SE side of the 
mountain; I was just over the ridge on the NW side. I told LOCKET I 



didn't have my weapon, that I was trying to stay quiet and stay put 
because the Vietnamese were only 200 feet away over the ridge. 

"At this time I estimated that the choppers were about 45 
minutes away. Actually they were 120 miles away, taking another 
1:15 to get there. That last 20 minutes I didn't know if I'd get out of 
there. I had remained calm until then. The last 20 minutes really 
looked dark. I suggested LOCKET strafe the SE side of the mountain. 
He tried to divert the Vietnamese down the side of the mountain 
with maneuvers, circling as if I were there. About 20 minutes to go 
it was obvious they were 
coming up the hill. It was 
either that LOCKET would get 
them or they would get me, 

because they were not being fcfrl %$ l#^ % 

diverted. Then LOCKET really 
got down close to them. In 
return he started to get AAA 
from the south end of the 
base of the mountain, and 
getting AW and SA on the 
mountain. 

"About this time LOCKET told me to move out to a better 
clearing up the ridgeline to the north. I moved out, and found the 
clearing about 50 yards away, just as he said, with no difficulty. It 
was on a knoll, and I dropped behind some bushes on the north side. 
Every time the AlE's would go over the mountain top they would get 
a lot of AW and small arms fire, and It was getting heavier. The 
Vietnamese started firing across the knoll into the bushes apparently 
to get me flushed out and running and disrupt the rescue; I don't 
think they were trying to kill me. 




"Shortly before the rescue chopper, Indian Gal 51, was due I 
was told to let off my smoke flare. I went out into the middle of the 
clearing; for some reason the NVN troops didn't shoot me. The 
smoke blew off the mountain quickly, and so I lit the night end of 

the flare and threw it to the 
side of the clearing. I could 
see the chopper coming in 
from 6 miles out the NE at 
about 6000 ft. It was making 
a gradual descent to the top of 
the knoll. 

"With 5 minutes to go, 
LOCKET flight began constant, 
heavy strafing; they made 
numerous passes from NW to 




SE, driving the enemy back into the woods. As the chopper 
approached I ran down and around the north side of the knoll to the 
chopper. There was AW fire all around me. I grabbed the jungle 
penetrator seat, threw my legs around it, and held on. As I went 
airborne I remembered to put the harness on to keep me from 
falling off in case I got shot. They took off through the trees, 
hoisting me up; the pickup was made at 0925 local. The chopper 
climbed away from the mountain, receiving intense heavy AW fire. It 
had no armor plating/' 




On July 6, 2006 Vann Goodloe, CAPT,USN Ret wrote: 

"I have fond memories of that Locket Flight in 
August "66 as they kept the bad guys at bay while 
we went about the business of providing Capt Tiff 
Hawks a ride to haze gray & underway. Tiff had been 
evading the NVN for 36 hours when we plucked him 
from an area near Ron, N Vietnam. 

Without a doubt, one of the reasons we made it out 
alive was due to your brother and the Locket Flight's 
combat actions on that eventful day in August 1966. 

A NVN contingency of regulars were hot on the heels of Tiff when we 
pulled him by hoist through the treetops and the Locket flight kept 
the bad guys pinned down with bombs, rockets and guns. The spads 
provided unbelievable air cover for our lightly armed H-3 helicopter 
(two M60 machine guns), plus their constant radio directions 
("jinking") during the exiting flight out of North Vietnam always 
kept us at an altitude and direction just beyond the AAA targeting of 
our helicopter.. .and we were moving at about 135 knots. 

Only during our intel debrief aboard Kearsarge after the mission did 
we realize just how close the AAA airbursts were coming to our 
changing altitudes and direction. But that was the plan. ..stay ahead 
of the airbursts! 

Your brother was one hell of a Naval Aviator and most certainly one 
of my heroes. 

I retired from the Navy in 1993 after 32 years of active duty.. and 
would do it all over again in a heartbeat." 

Vann Goodloe added: 

"Jack flew cover for our H-3 helicopter when we participated in the 
rescue of USAF Capt. Tiff Hawks on August 20, 1966 near Ron, NVN. 
Our crew included LT Bill Roy and aircrewmen Sitko and Sprague. 



Thanks to Jack and his 2-plane Locket flight, they kept the bad guys 
at bay while we hovered over towering trees to extract Tiff from a 
large group of NVN regulars who were hot on his heels. 

As I recall, Tiff had been evading capture after his crash for about 36 
hours. Jack and his wingman laid down all kinds of firepower while 
we were sitting in the hover, and then gave us expert directions and 
altitude changes to avoid all the AAA coming our way.. .in a phrase, 
Locket Flight "saved our bacon" and helped us save an Air Force 
fighter pilot from the hands of the NVN. 

Bill Roy (aircraft commander) received the Silver Star, Sitko and 
Sprague the Air Medal and I received a DFC for Tiff's rescue. And on 
the way up to the helo via our rescue hoist, Tiff brought along a 9 
foot tree limb from the jungle canopy below jammed in the forest 
penetrator seat we lowered to him. We broke off pieces and gave to 
the crew as a memento of the occasion. 

Only after returning to the ship and undergoing a debrief by the 
Intel guys did we realize just how close the AAA was to our aircraft 
as we headed from the inland pick-up point out to sea. ..puffs of flack 
kept popping up at our last altitude and heading the entire egress to 
the sea. Thanks to Jack and his wingman, we can tell this story 
today and honor a courageous and superb Naval Aviator who 
"covered our six"...CDR Jack Feldhaus." 




H-3H Sea King is a multi-purpose helicopter. 

The H-3H is a twin engine, all-weather helicopter. The SH-3H is used to detect, 



classify, track and destroy enemy submarines. It also provides logistic support 
and search and rescue capability. The UH-3H and VH-3 are configured for combat 
support roles 

The first version of this workhorse helicopter was flown more than 20 years ago. 
The Sea King has been replaced by SH-60F Sea Hawk helicopters as an anti- 
submarine warfare helicopter. The transition took into the late 1990s. The Sea 
King was then converted to a search and rescue helicopter. 




Combat SAR Operations 

Introduction 



The fleet's search and rescue forces saved many American aviators from death or 
captivity. From 6 June 1964 to 1 November 1968, 458 of the 912 naval air 
crewmen downed as a result of combat or non-combat operations in North 
Vietnam, Laos, or at sea were recovered. While the retrieval of aviators from 
crash sites on land, when at all possible, took somewhat longer, the rescue at sea 
usually occurred within 20 to 30 minutes of the aircraft loss. The effort was not 
without cost, however, for 26 men were killed, wounded, missing, or made 
prisoner, and 33 aircraft were destroyed during SAR operations. This measure, 
however, returned valuable air crews to the fleet and improved the morale of 



naval aviators, who knew the Navy would do its utmost to rescue them from 
hostile territory or waters. 

This psychological support was crucial because the air units of Task Force 77 
carried out their missions in one of the world's most difficult operational 
environments. During the winter Northeast Monsoon from November to March, the 
weather in the Gulf of Tonkin and over most of North Vietnam is characterized by 
dense clouds and heavy rainfall. Conditions are especially harsh during a weather 
phenomenon known as the Crachin. Thick clouds with ceilings as low as 500 feet 
blanket the area and are accompanied by fog and persistent drizzle. Conversely, 
during the summer Southwest Monsoon from May to September, the skies are 
usually clear and dry. These general weather patterns are almost reversed in 
South Vietnam and Laos. This situation allowed shifting of air resources to more 
favorable areas. Still, throughout the year high temperatures and humidity, 
typhoons, tropical storms, and thundershowers increased the difficulty and danger 
of operating in Southeast Asia. 

Quoted from: By Sea, Air, and Land 

An Illustrated History of the US Navy and War in Southeast Asia 

Chapter 3: The Years of Combat, 1965-1968 

Department of the Navy -- Naval Historical Center 



1966 Deployment 
History of HS-6 SAR Detachment A - written by Ron Clarke 

RESCUE MISSIONS 

Uulv1966 - HS-6 SAR Det A arrives onboard USS Yorktown (CVS- 10) - Lt(jg) 

Rick Grant and AX3 Gary Smith fly a "Familiarization" flight to 
North SAR with Lt Reid Carlton of HS-4. The mission turns 
deadly when Cdr Charles H. Peters, CO of VA-1 55 flying off the 
USS Constellation (CVA-64) ejects from his crippled A-4E 
Skyhawk (BuNo. 1 5001 7) at extremely low altitude among the 
islands of the Fai Tsi Long Archipelago. As the helo crew 
searches for Cdr Peters among the islands, the helo is damaged 
in the tail pylon by enemy fire. A USAF A-1 Sandy from the 
602 nd ASC providing cover for the rescue effort is also struck by 
enemy fire and crashes into the Gulf of Tonkin, killing its pilot, 
USAF Maj Robert C. Williams. Neither Cdr Peters nor Maj 
Williams are ever found. 

Uuly 1966 - HS-6 assumes Combat SAR responsibilities in the Tonkin Gulf 

and takes custody of four SAR-configured, armored SH-3s from 
HS-4. 

2 July 1966 - SAR Det A transfers to USS Constellation (CVA-64) with 3 

armored SH-3A SAR helos; another SAR helo is at NAS Cubi 
Point, PI and an additional 2 are on board the USS Kearsarge 
(CVS-33) as it transits to Yankee Station with the remainder of 
HS-6 assets including 15 ASW configured SH-3As. 

5 July 1966 - Cdr Warren Lockwood/Ltfjg) Ollie Donelan/AX1 Tom Goen/ADJ1 

Vincent "Vic" Vicari - Lt Neal E. Holben of VA-1 55, pilot of an A- 



4E Skyhawk (BuNo. 151026) off the USS Constellation (CVA-64), 
is downed by AAA from a NVN gunboat in the vicinity of the Fai 
Tsi Long island chain. Lt Holben is unable to leave his raft due 
to injuries. Crew lands helo in water - Petty Officer Goen 
enters water to assist Lt Holben after his raft capsizes. Petty 
Officer Goen is swept away from helo while Lt Holben is being 
hauled aboard. Helo lifts from water, re-locates Petty Officer 
Goen and returns to recover him. Crew draws small arms and 
mortar fire during rescue. 
7 July 1966 - Lt Ron Clarke/Ltd'g) Jerry Smith/AX3 Jimmy Conrad/ ADJ 2 

George Armstrong - Lcdr William Isenhour of VA-216, pilot of an 
A-4C Skyhawk (BuNo. 148456) off the USS Hancock (CVA-19), 
was shot down during a low pass over the outskirts of Haiphong 
Harbor. Helo crew skillfully and rapidly affects rescue from 
Haiphong Harbor while under enemy fire. Heavy SARCAP 
support suppresses enemy fire. 

12 July 1966 - Lt Bill Waechter/Lt(jg) Bob Wildman/ ADJ2 Harley Olsen/AX1 

Michael Brantly - penetrate 35 miles northwest of Haiphong to 
rescue VF-162 pilot Lt(jg) Richard F. Adams from a high 
altitude karst mountain area. Lt Adams was flying a F-8E 
Crusader (BuNo. 150902) from the USS Oriskany (CVA-34) when 
he was downed by small arms fire. RESCAP is provided by four 
A-1 Skyraiders (Callsign: Locket) from VA-152, also flying from 
the Oriskany. Crew draws fire during ingress and egress. Read 
about Lt Adams second shoot down and rescue. 

13 July 1966 - SAR Det A transfers to USS Ranger (CVA-61 ). 

15 July 1966 - Cdr Warren Lockwood and crew penetrate the Grand Norway 
Island group to rescue 388 th TFW pilot Capt C.L. Hambry, 
USAF, from the water. Capt Hambry's F-105D Thunderchief 
(#59-1 761 ) was hit by AAA in the vicinity of Cam Pha, east of 
Haiphong. He was able to get "feet wet" before ejecting. 

24 July 1966 - Lcdr R. D. Nichols/Ltfjg) Rick Grant/ AX3 Gary Smith/AMH2 

Royce Roberts are vectored to search for and rescue a downed 
pilot A-4E Skyhawk (BuNo 150040) pilot from the USS Ranger 
(CVA-61). Lt E. L. Foss from VA-55 is eventually located and 
rescued approximately 1,300 yards off the NVN coast in an area 
known to be heavily defended by AAA and automatic weapons. 

27 July 1966 - Lt Ron Clarke/Lt(jg) Jerry Smith/AX3 Jimmy Conrad/ ADJ 2 
George Armstrong - conduct a successful night rescue of 
downed USAF RF-4C (#64-1040) pilot Capt Marvin V. Mayfield 
approximately 3 miles inland near Dong Hoi, North Viet Nam. 
Crew is under continuous fire but lands helicopter within 15 
feet of survivor, effects rescue and departs rapidly seaward 
continuing to evade heavy enemy fire. A USAF Jolly Green HH- 
3 attempts to rescue Capt MayfiekTs backseater, 1 st Lt R.D. 
Clark, at daybreak but is heavily damaged by enemy fire and 
retreats seaward. Lt Clark is eventually rescued by a USMC 
helo. 

11 August 1966 - Lcdr R. D. Nichols/Ltfjg) Rick Grant/ AX3 Gary Smith/AMH2 

Royce Roberts are vectored among Fai Tsi Long island chain to 
locate and rescue VF-1 1 1 pilot Lt(jg) Cody A. Balisteri, the 



13 August 1966 



20 August 1966 



27 August 1966 



27 August 1966 



29 August 1966 



31 August 1966 



2 September 1966 



downed pilot of a F-8E Crusader (BuNo 1 50880) off the USS 
Oriskany (CVA-34). He was finally located on Isle Des L'Union at 
base of a steep 400' cliff. Petty Officer Smith enters the water 
and swims to shore with a life raft to affect the rescue since 
Lt(jg) Balisteri had abandoned his Mae West and raft. Once 
Petty Officer Smith and Lt(jg) Balisteri swim clear of the surf 
line the helo is landed in the water to rescue both men after 
the rescue hoist jams. Tragically, Lt(jg) Balisteri was killed in 
the fire aboard the Oriskany on 26 October 1966. 
Lcdr George Tarrico/Ltfjg) Rick Grant/ AX3 Gary Smith/ATR2 
Arnie Hardin make an unopposed rescue of VA-163 Crusader 
pilot Lcdr N. S. Levy flying off the USS Oriskany (CVA-34). His F- 
8E (BuNo 150866) went down in approximately the same area 
as Lt(jg) Balisteri did on 1 1 August. 
Lt Bill Roy/Lt Vann Goodloe/AX3 Rodger Sitko/ AX3 Russell 
Sprague - Indian Gal 51 (non-armored SH-3) to the rescue of 
RF-4C pilot Captain Tiff Hawks (Callsign "Torpedo"), USAF. 
SARCAP by an A-1H "Locket" flight from USS Oriskany (CVA-34) 
led by Lt John A. Feldhaus, USN. 

Unidentified HS-6 crew makes unopposed, routine rescue of 
USAF Capt Norman Wells well clear of the coast after his F-105 
Thunderchief was hit by AAA fire over Kep Airfield. 
Cdr Bob Vermitya/Ltd'g) Vern Von Sydow/ AXC Tom Grisham/AX3 
Rodger Sitko flying a night ASW training mission in an 
unarmored SH-3A respond to a "Mayday" call from a USAF F-4C 
from the 497 th TFS that successfully made it "feet wet" after 
being hit over NVN. Maj J.E. Barrow and 1 st Lt T.H. Walsh were 
eventually located and rescued approximately 3 miles off the 
NVN coast. It is unclear which pilot Cdr Vermilya's crew 
rescued. 

Lcdr Dave Humphreys/LtQg) Dick Lynas/AX3 Dave Hannum/ AX 1 
Kenneth White also flying in an unarmored SH-3A as part of the 
same night ASW training exercise as Cdr Vermilya's crew, 
rescued the second downed USAF pilot close to the NVN 
shoreline. 

Lt Bill Roy , his crew and Lt Bob Stemsrud (the HS-6 Flight 
Surgeon), MEDIVAC the two USAF survivors to hospital in Da 
Nang in an unarmored SH-3A. Approaching the hospital helo 
landing pad enemy fire ruptures the aft fuel cell - fortunately 
helo lands safely. 

Cdr Bob Vermilya/Ens Bill Runyon/ AWC Tom Grisham/ADR2 
Jerry Dunford - perform a daring rescue of RF-8C pilot Lcdr 
of VFP-63 under heavy enemy fire near the 
mouth of the Haiphong River. Lcdr Tucker's Photo Crusader 
(BuNo 146847) off the USS Oriskany (CVA-34) was hit by 37mm 
ground fire as he was attempting to photograph a foreign 
tanker in the harbor. PH-2 Mike Delamore was aboard the helo 
and recorded the rescue. . 

SAR Det B transfers to USS Intrepid (CVA-1 1 ). 



12 September SAR Det B returns to USS Kearsarge. Squadron now has 6 



1966 - 

13 September 
1966 - 

14 September 
1966- 



1 7 September 
1966- 



22 September 

1966- 

28 September 

1966- 

2 October 1966 



7 October 1966 
9 October 1966 



12 October 1966 



13-16 October 
1966- 



armored SH-3A SAR helos on board the Kearsarge. 

SAR Det C assumes SAR duties. 

Lt W. P. Matthews/Lcdr Leon Houghlum/AX3 Don Stanford/ AX3 

Chester Wood - vectored to position deep inside the Fai Tsi 

Long island chain to rescue USAF F-105 Thunderchief pilot 1 st 

Lt John Casper of the 421 st TFS. Heavy enemy fire drives off 

USAF UH-16. A-1 RESCAP suppress enemy fire. 

Lcdr Bob McCaffery and crew rescue VA-22 pilot Lt(jg) R. A. 

Hegstrum from the water at 1 9 ° 50' N, 1 06 ° 1 5' E. His A-4C 

Skyhawk (BuNo. 148488) off the USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) was 

downed by AAA fire on a mission over NVN. 

SAR Det C transfers from USS Kearsarge to USS Constellation 

(CVA-64). 

SAR Det C returns to USS Kearsarge. 

Lt(jg) Gale Prickett/Dick Lynas and crew while on a logistics 
flight in one of the squadron's ASW configured SH-3As, rescue 
AMH3 Harrison (flight deck crewman) after he is blown off the 
USS Oriskany's (CVA-34) flight deck 
SAR Det C transferred to USS Intrepid (CVA-1 1) 
Lt Bob Burnand/Lt Ross Mordhorst/ AX3 Roy Powell/AMH2 Royce 
Roberts attempt to rescue Lcdr Charles Tanner and Lt Ross 
Terry of VF-1 54. Flying off the USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) their F- 
4B was shot down about 30 miles south of Hanoi and 
approimately 50 miles in from the coast. Indian Gal 66 is 
cleared to go "feet dry" even though the downed airmen had 
not been precisely located. RESCAP is provided by VA-176 A-1 
Skyraiders from the USS Intrepid (CVA-1 1). During the course of 
the rescue attempt all aircraft draw heavy fire and four MIG- 
1 7s tangle with the RESCAP force. Lt(jg) Tom Patton shoots 
down one of the MIGs. The rescue attempt is ultimately called 
off when the SAR helo runs dangerously low on fuel. The helo 
crew jettisons everything in an attempt to decrease weight as 
it heads seaward. USS Wiltsie (DD-716) steams into extremely 
shallow water close to shore to provide HIFR. 
Lt Bob Burnand/Ltfjg) Doug Heggie/ AXC Kenneth White/AX3 
Rodger Sitko attempt to rescue the A-1H SPAD pilot of "Canasta 
572" (BuNo 1 35323). Lt Dean Woods from VA-25 flying off the 
USS Coral Sea (CVA-43) had ejected ejected 25 miles inland 
after being hit by ground fire. Radio contact is established with 
Lt Woods but the helo crew is unable to establish visual 
contact. Crew persists in search efforts despite dangerously 
high main gear box temperatures and heavy enemy fire which 
riddles the helo and wounds AXC Kenneth White. Crew 
continues rescue efforts until nightfall forces them to 
withdraw. 

Lt Bob Burnand/Lt Ross Mordhorst/ AX3 Roy Powell/AMH2 Royce 
Roberts resume efforts to rescue the A-1 SPAD pilot of "Canasta 
572", Lt Dean Woods shot down on 12 October. The crew again 
persistes in rescue efforts despite being subjected to intense 



enemy fire. The mission eventually evolves into a multi- 
day/multi -sortie mission until 16 October when a 16 member 
"Shining Brass" Special Ops team is inserted on the ground to 
locate Lt Woods. The team almost immediately engages in a 
fire fight with a North Vietnamese patrol and has to be 
extracted. 

12-16 October Lcdr Dave Murphy/Ens Ed Marsvla/ ADJ1 "Vic" Vicari/AX2 William 

1966 - Caple participate in the multi-day/multi -sortie "Shining Brass" 

Special Ops effort to rescue Lt Dean Woods shot down on 12 
October after being hit by ground fire. While hovering to 
extract the "Shining Brass" on 16 October, Indian Gal 69 has the 
#1 engine shot out by enemy fire after boarding only three 
team members - the crew successfully flies out of the hover on 
a single-engine and heads toward the beach - the helo is again 
heavily damaged by AAA fire as it goes "feet wet" - the tail 
rotor flight controls are severely damaged but crew manages to 
reach the open sea and successfully ditches. During the egress 
to the safety of the sea, all crewmembers and "Shining Brass" 
teams members are wounded. 

14 October 1966 - Lt Vann Goodloe/Ltfjg) Buck Carlton/ AX3 Ted Williams/ADJ2 
George Armstrong penetrate the heavily defended coast and 
proceed 60 miles inland over North Viet Nam in support of 
rescue efforts to recover downed USAF pilot Maj R. P. Taylor of 
the 354 th TFS. This is the deepest penetration of NVN air space 
by a Navy CSAR helo at that time. Maj Taylor is eventually 
rescued by a Jolly Green . Crew also draws fire on egress. 

24 October 1966 - Lcdr George Tarrico/Ltfjg) Rick Grant/ ATR2 Arnie Hardin/AX3 
Gary Smith locate and rescue downed pilot from among heavily 
defended enemy islands. Crew successfully avoids drawing 
enemy fire with low level evasion tactics. 

1 November 1966 Lcdr Gerry Griffin/Lt(jg) Bill Hobdy/and crew attempt to rescue 
VA-72 pilot Lt Allen Carpenter from Haiphong Harbor. Lt 
Carpenter, in his A-4E Skyhawk (BuNo. 1511 38) was flying an 
Iron Hand SAM suppression mission off the USS Franklin D. 
Roosevelt (CVA-42) when he was hit by AAA. He ejected over 
water but was captured by a small boat before the SAR helo 
could reach him. 

Indian Gal Airways Going Out of Business Notification as Kearsarge leaves Yankee 
Station on 23 November 1966 



HS-6 was awarded the Navy Unit Commendation for the above "exceptionally 
meritorious service" 



The Mission 



On 08 Oct 1966, then Lieutenant Feldhaus launched from the carrier 
USS ORISKANY in an A-1H SKYRAIDER on an armed reconnaissance 
mission over Thanh Hoa Province, North Vietnam. As he and his 
wingman entered heavy clouds, Feldhaus radioed that he had been 
hit by enemy ground fire and his right wing was on fire. His 
wingman never saw Feldhaus' aircraft again, but he did report 
seeing a fireball on the ground which he believed to be an aircraft 
crash. 

The wingman and another aircrew searched the area of the crash 
without success. They saw no parachute and heard no emergency 
radio signals. The visual search was hampered by enemy ground fire 
and deteriorating weather. Electronic surveillance continued on the 
succeeding days, but revealed nothing. 

Jack Feldhaus was classed as Missing in Action. None of the POWs 
repatriated in 1973 were able to provide information about him, and 
on 31 October 1977 the Secretary of the Navy approved a 
Presumptive Finding of Death. LT Feldhaus was promoted to 
Commander while carried in MIA status. 

In October 1993, a joint U.S. /Vietnamese team led by Joint Task 
Force-Full Accounting conducted an investigation in Thanh Hoa 
Province where they believed the crash occurred, but they found no 
aircraft debris or remains. 

Between 1996 and 2000, another four investigations or excavations 
were conducted in Vietnam, yielding aircraft debris, pilot-related 
artifacts, personal effects and remains. The Army's laboratory in 
Hawaii announced positive identification of the remains recovered 
from the crash site on 30 October 2001, just over 35 years after his 
loss. 




Crash Site Located 



U.S. Department of Defense 

Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs) 

News Release 



On the Web: Public contact: 

http://www.defenselink.mil/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=3180 http://www.defenselink.mil/faq/comment.html 
Media contact: +1 (703) 697-5131/697-5132 or +1 (703) 428-0711 +1 

IMMEDIATE RELEASE No. 622-01 

December 06, 2001 








VIETNAM WAR MIA IDENTIFIED 

The remains of an American serviceman missing in action from the Vietnam War have been identified and returned to 
his family in the United States. Identified is Navy Cmdr. John A. Feldhaus, of Lawrenceberg, Tenn. 

On Oct. 8, 1966, Feldhaus took off from the carrier USS Oriskany in an A-1H Skyraider on an armed reconnaissance 
mission over Thanh Hoa Province, North Vietnam. As he and his wingman entered heavy clouds, Feldhaus radioed 
that he had been hit by enemy ground fire and his right wing was on fire. His wingman never saw Feldhaus' aircraft 
again, but he did report seeing a fireball on the ground which he believed to be an aircraft crash. 

The wingman and another aircrew searched the area of the crash without success. They saw no parachute and 
heard no emergency radio signals. The visual search was hampered by enemy ground fire and deteriorating weather. 
Electronic surveillance continued on the succeeding days, but revealed nothing. 

In October 1993, a joint U.S.A/ietnamese team led by Joint Task Force-Full Accounting conducted an investigation in 
Thanh Hoa Province where they believed the crash occurred, but they found no aircraft debris or remains. Between 
1996 and 2000, another four investigations or excavations were conducted in Vietnam, yielding aircraft debris, pilot- 
related artifacts, personal effects and remains. 

Among the forensic tools used by the U.S. Army Central Identification Laboratory Hawaii (CILHI) to confirm the 
identification was that of mitochondrial DNA, in which DNA from a skeletal fragment was matched to that of a 
Feldhaus family member. 

There are currently more than 1 ,900 Americans unaccounted-for from the war in Southeast Asia. 

Identification Report 

29 June 2001 

Depart of the Army 

United States Army Central Identification Laboratory, Hawaii 

310 Worchester Avenue 

Hickam AFB, Hawaii 96853-5530 

1. Background and Acquisition 

a. On 8 October 1966 Lieutenant John A. FELDHAUS took off from the 
USS Oriskany on an armed reconnaissance mission over Thanh Hoa 
Province, North Vietnam. As LT FELDHAUS descended to get a better 






view of a secondary road, his wingman lost sight of his A-1H 
Skyraider as it entered cloud cover. Shortly after, the wingman 
reported receiving a radio transmission from LT FELDHAUS saying 
that his aircraft had been struck by enemy ground fire and that his 
right wing was on fire. The wingman never saw him again, but he 
did report seeing a fireball on the ground which he interpreted as an 
aircraft crash. Visual and electronic searches of the area turned up 
no evidence to suggest LT FELDHAUS survived the incident. The 
incident was designated REFNO 0489, and LT FELDHAUS was placed 
in the status of Missing-In-Action. While in MIA status he continued 
to be promoted, ultimately reaching the rank of Commander, until a 
military review board amended his status to presumed Killed-In- 
Action. 

b. On 14 October 1966 Ensign Darwin L. Thomas took off from the 
USS Oriskany on an armed reconnaissance mission over North 
Vietnam. Over the target area, ENS Thomas fired his rockets at a 
suspected target and then, as his wingman watched, ENS Thomass 
A-1H Skyraider crashed amid a fireball. The incident was designated 
REFNO 0495. Ensign Thomas was assigned to the same squadron as 
CDR FELDHAUS and the recorded location for his crash site is 
approximately 18 kilometers from that of CDR FELDHAUS. 

c. On 26 October 1993 a joint U.S. /Socialist Republic of Vietnam 
(S.R.V.) traveled to Thanh Hoa Province and investigated the area 
reported in U.S. records as CDR FELDHAUSs crash site. The team 
found no evidence of aircraft wreckage and no evidence of a crater 
and concluded that no aircraft had crashed at that location. 

d. On 26 and 27 November 1996 another joint U.S. /S.R.V. team 
traveled to Nghe An Province (located adjacent to Thanh Hoa 
Province) to investigate REFNO 0489. The team interviewed several 
local Vietnamese villagers who recalled a U.S. aircraft crashing and 
burning during the war. One of the men indicated that the incident 
occurred in 1966 and that he was told by other villagers that the 
aircraft was an AD-6. [The AD-6 was redesignated the A-1H in 
1962.] The team was then led to the site where they found scattered 
aircraft wreckage. The site was recommended for excavation. 

e. From 26 June through 4 July 1998 a joint U.S. /S.R.V. team began 
excavating the crash site surveyed in November 1996. The team 
unearthed life-support equipment and aircraft wreckage before 
suspending the recovery on account of inclement weather. 

f. From 28 February through 18 March 2000 another joint U.S ./S 
.R.V. team continued the excavation begun in June 1998. The team 
recovered human remains, pilot-related artifacts, and personal 
effects amid aircraft wreckage before suspending the operation due 
to time constraints. The remains and personal effects were 



transported to Hanoi where the members of the 54th Joint Forensic 
Review (JFR) selected them for repatriation to the United States. 
The remains and artifacts were transferred back into U.S. custody at 
Noi Bai airport in Hanoi on 25 April 2000 and were received at the 
CILHI on 26 April where they were accessioned as CLLHI 2000-041. 

g. From 27 April through 16 May 2000 a joint U.S./S.R.V. team 
completed the excavation begun in June 1998. The team unearthed 
additional aircraft wreckage and life-support items as well as 
personal effects and human remains. The remains and personal 
effects were transported to Hanoi where they were selected during 
the 55th JFR for repatriation to the United States. The evidence was 
then transferred back into U.S. custody at Noi Bai airport in Hanoi on 
26 June 2000 and was accessioned at the CThHI on 27 June 2000 as 
CLLHI 2000-063. For administrative purposes, CILHI 2000-063 was 
consolidated into CJLHI 2000-041. (The remains were further 
amended to CILHI 2000-041-1-01, representing a single individual; 
the material evidence was assigned as CILHI 2000-041 -A-0 1.) 

h. On 26 June 2000 a sample (Sample A) taken from a long bone 
fragment designated CILHI 2000-041 was submitted to the Armed 
Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL) for mitochondrial DNA 
(mtDIMA) analysis. On 31 October 2000 a second sample (Sample B) 
taken from a left femur fragment was submitted. 

2. Summary of Analysis 

a. Analysts from the JTF-FA confirm that wreckage found at the 
crash site is consistent with that of an A-1H Skyraider. A squadron 
pin found amid the wreckage correlates to Attack Squadron 152, 
which was assigned to the USS Oriskany. Pilot-related items found 
at the site indicate that the pilot was on board at the time of impact. 
A review of U.S. records indicate that there are two A-1H Skyraiders 
from the Oriskany's Attack Squadron 152 lost within 30 kilometers 
of the excavated crash site, the one flown by CDR FELDHAUS and the 
one flown by ENS Thomas. The excavated site is located 
approximately 10 kilometers from the recorded grid coordinates of 
CDR FELDHAUS's crash and 25 kilometers meters from the recorded 
location of ENS Thomas's loss. 

b. Anthropological analysis reveals that the skeletal remains consist 
of cranial and post cranial fragments of an adult male. There is 
evidence of possible healed trauma to the left arm. There is also 
evidence of possible perimortem trauma. A review of CDR 
FELDHAUS's personnel records indicate that he was a 28-year-old 
Caucasian male at the time of his death. The records also indicate 
that he fractured his left arm in 1955 (no further details are 
available). 



c. The dental remains consist of a maxillary right second molar (#2) 
restored with an occlusal amalgam. Unfortunately, the antemortem 
dental records available for CDR FELDHAUS do not include any 
radiographs; however, the written records do document an occlusal 
amalgam on tooth #2. Conversely, the treatment exhibited by the 
tooth is inconsistent with the restorative treatment graphically 
illustrated in ENS Thomass dental records. (Ensign Thomass records 
also do not include dental radiographs.) 

d. The AFDLL reports that mtDNA obtained from one of the bone 
samples matches mtDNA from a maternal relative (brother) of John 
A. FELDHAUS. The sequence data are unique to the mtDNA database 
used by the AFDIL and can thus be assumed to be relatively rare 
within the general population. Furthermore, the sample data do not 
match mtDNA obtained from a maternal relative of Darwin L. 
Thomas. (The other bone sample yielded inconclusive results.) 



3. Summary and Conclusions 

Available evidence, including the accounts given by U.S. personnel 
who witnessed the incident, establishes that CDR John A. FELDHAUS 
died when his A-1H Skyraider crashed in [then] North Vietnam, after 
being damaged by enemy ground fire. Remains recovered from the 
crash site of an A-I H by a CILHI team in 2000 are circumstantially 
linked to CDR FELDHAUS by a unit crest from the USS Oriskanys 
Attack Squadron 152. Dental remains recovered from the crash site 
are consistent with the antemortem dental records of CDR 
FELDHAUS. Furthermore, some of the remains yielded a relatively 
rare mtDNA sequence that matches mtDNA obtained from CDR 
FELDHAUS's brother. Laboratory analysis and circumstantial 
evidence allows for the individual identification of these remains to 
CDR John A. FELDHAUS. 

4. Finding 

In my opinion, the results of laboratory analysis and the 
circumstantial evidence made available to me establish the remains 
designated CILHI 2000-041-1-01 as those of: 

CDR John Anthony FELDHAUS, 409-62-7945, US. Navy 

THOMAS D. HOLLAND, PhD 
Scientific Director 



Summary Report 

17 July 2000 

CASUALTY DATA RESEARCH/ANALYSIS CONCERNING 
REFNO 0489 

On 8 October 1966, Lieutenant (LT) John A. FELDHAUS departed the 
USS Oriskany in the first of two A-1H aircraft on an armed 
reconnaissance mission over North Vietnam. The two pilots attacked 
two bridges and a suspected truck park. After determining that the 
truck park held no lucrative targets, LT FELDHAUS descended in 
order to visually inspect an apparently well-used secondary road in 
the immediate vicinity. Shortly thereafter, while heading south, LT 
FELDHAUS disappeared from his wingmans view behind a cloud. He 
reported that he was drawing automatic weapons fire and was 
breaking right. Immediately thereafter, he transmitted that he was 
hit and his right wing was on fire. There followed one last garbled 
transmission, which sounded like he was preparing to exit the 
aircraft. His wingman attempted to spot his aircraft but was unable 
to do so until 15 to 30 seconds after the last transmission, at which 
time he saw a fireball on the ground in the vicinity of grid 
coordinates (GC) WG 524 542. No parachute was seen. The wingman 
and another flight of A-is searched the area without success. The 
visual search was hampered by ground fire and deteriorating 
weather. Electronic surveillance continued in the succeeding days, 
but revealed nothing. (See Table 1 for additional information.) 

Subsequent to the incident and while carried in the status of 
missing-in-action (MIA) LT FELDHLAUS was promoted to 
Commander (CDR). 

On 26 October 1993, during the 26th Joint Field Activity (JFA), a 
joint U.S. /Socialist Republic of Vietnam (S.R.V.) team conducted an 
investigation of REFNO 0489 in Xuan Binh Village, Nhu Xuan District, 
Thanh Hoa Province. The team surveyed the reported incident 
location in the vicinity of GC 48Q WG 524 542. There were no 
remains, personal effects, or any evidence of a plane crash in the 
area. Local residents were unable to provide information on any 
incidents involving the loss of U.S. personnel. 

On 1 November 1995, during the 38th JFA, a joint U.S. /S.R.V. team 
conducted another investigation of REFNO 0489 in Xuan Binh Village. 
The Vietnamese contingent canvassed villagers for possible 
witnesses with negative results. 

On 27 November 1996, during the 43rd JFA, a joint U.S. /S.R.V. team 
traveled to Nghia Phu Village, Nghia Dan District, Nghe An Province 
to investigate REFNO 0489. The team interviewed three witnesses 



with possible information correlating to this incident. Witness One 
led the team to a crash site in the vicinity of GC 48Q WG 592 438, 
and stated he saw burning flesh five meters west of the crash site. 
However, during the teams site survey Witness Three informed the 
team the aircraft had crashed ten meters west of Witness Ones 
location. The team recovered and received numerous pieces of 
aircraft wreckage. The team recommended this site for excavation. 
Subsequent analysis of material evidence indicated the items 
recovered could not be correlated to a specific aircraft type or 
incident. 

From 26 June through 4 July 1998, during the 51st JFA, a joint 
U.S./S.R.V. team excavated a crash site believed to be associated 
with REFNO 0489 located in the vicinity of GC WG 59492 44009 near 
Nghia Phu Village, Nghia Dan District, Nghe An Province. The team 
opened three of 12 5-x-5-meter grid units. The team recovered 
numerous pieces of aircraft wreckage and two pieces of life-support 
equipment. The team did not recover or receive remains or personal 
effects. The Recovery Leader, in consultation with the Team Leader, 
suspended the excavation on 4 July 1998 due to inclement weather. 

From 28 February through 18 March 2000, during the 59th JFA, a 
joint U.S./S.R.V. team continued excavation of the aircraft crash site 
believed to be associated with REFNO 0489 near Nghia Phu Village. 
The team recovered possible human remains, one 1964 US dime, a 
unit crest from Attack Squadron 15?, numerous pieces of life support 
equipment, and multiple fragments of aircraft wreckage. The 
Recovery Leader, in consultation with the Team Leader, suspended 
the excavation on 18 March 2000 due to time constraints at the close 
of the 59th JFA. The U.S. Army Central Identification Laboratory 
(CILHI) received the remains on 26 April 2000 and assigned them 
accession number CILHI 2000-041. JTF-FA analysis indicated the 
recovered items correlated to an A-i aircraft, but they could not be 
correlated to a specific model or the REFNO 0489 aircraft. 

From 27 April through 16 May 2000, during the 60th JFA, a joint 
U.S./S.R.V. team continued excavation of a crash site believed to be 
associated with REFNO 0489 near Nghia Phu Village. The team 
recovered possible human remains, multiple pieces of life support 
equipment, and numerous fragments of aircraft wreckage. JTF-FA 
analysis indicated the recovered items correlated to an A-i aircraft, 
but they could not be correlated to a specific model or the REFNO 
0489 aircraft. Recovered life preserver or raft material indicated that 
one individual was in the aircraft at the time of impact. The Recovery 
Leader closed the site on 16 May 2000. The CILHI received the 
remains on 28 June 2000 and assigned them accession number 
2000-063. 



LCDR FELDHAUS is currently carried in the status of dead, body not 
recovered. 



Table 1 

LOSS INFORMATION (TIME OF iNCIDENT) 

AIRCRAFT: A-1H BUREAU NUMBER: BuNo 137629 

MISSION DATE: 8 October 1966 

LOCATION: UTM GC 48Q WG 524 542 CALL SIGN: Locket 510 

DISTRICT: Nhu Xuan 

PROVINCE: Thanh Hoa 

COUNTRY: North Vietnam 

UNIT: Attack Squadron One Fifty-Two (152) onboard 

DUTY POSITION: USS Oriskany (CVA 34) 

NAME AND RANK: FELDHAUS, John A. LT/03, USN 

SN/SSN: 632728/409-62-7945 

STATUS: MIA 

Robert C. Maves 
Causalty Data Analyst 

Richard B. Huston, 
Casualty Data Officer 



43 rd JAF Report 
6 November to 6 December 1996.... 

FM CDR JTF-FA HONOLULU HI//J3// 

SUBJ/DETAILED REPORT OF INVESTIGATION OF CASE 0489// 
REF: CDR JTF-FA, HONOLULU, HI, 161700Z JAN 97 

1. THIS IS THE SUMMARY REPORT OF THE 43RD JOINT FIELD 
ACTIVITY (JFA) CONDUCTED IN VIETNAM FROM 6 NOVEMBER TO 6 
DECEMBER 1996. 

2. SUMMARY OF INVESTIGATION. 

A. ON 27 NOVEMBER 1996, INVESTIGATION ELEMENT ONE (IE1) 
INVESTIGATED CASE 0489 IN NGHE AN PROVINCE. 

B. THIS CASE INVOLVES THE 8 OCTOBER 1966 LOSS OF AN A-1H 
AIRCRAFT DURING AN ARMED RECONNAISSANCE MISSION OVER 
NORTHERN VIETNAM, RESULTING IN ONE UNACCOUNTED-FOR 
INDIVIDUAL. 

C. ON 27 NOVEMBER 1996, IEJ. TRAVELED TO NGHIA PHU VILLAGE, 
NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, NGHE AN,PROVINCE AND INTERVIEWED TWO 
WITNESSES WITH POSSIBLE INFORMATION CONCERNING CASE 
0489. WITNESS ONE LED IE1 TO A CRASH SITE; IE1 SURVEYED THE 
SITE AND RECEIVED NUMEROUS PIECES OF AIRCRAFT WRECKAGE. 

D. IE1 DID NOT RECOVER OR RECEIVE ANY REMAINS WHILE 
INVESTIGATING CASE 0489. 

E. RECOMMENDATION: EXCAVATE. 

3. DETAILS OF INVESTIGATION. 

A. PURPOSE: 

(1) LOCATE FOR INTERVIEW FQPMER MEMBERS OF BATTALION 15, 
280TH PEGIMENT (ACCOMPLISHED; SEE PARA 3H, BELOW). 

(2) CANVASS.BU LAN (BU LAANX) HAMLET, NGHIA.PHU (NGI{IAX 
PHUS) VILLAGE, NGHIA DAN DISTRICT FOR VILLAGERS WITH 
INFORMATION PERTAINING TO CASE 0489 (ACCOMPLISHED; SEE 
PARA 3D, BELOW). 

B. ON 25 NOVEMBER 1996, THE JOINT U.S./SRV INVESTIGATION 



TEAM ARRIVED IN VINH (VINI{J) CITY, NGHE AN PROVINCE, TO 
INVESTIGATE TWO CASES. 

C. TEAM COMPOSITION. 

(1) U.S. CONTINGENT. 

MAJ Blacked out TEAM LEADER 

MSGT Blacked out ASSISTANT TEAM LEADER 

TSGT Blacked out TEAM MEMBER 

SSG Blacked out TEAM MEMBER 

SSGT Blacked out TEAM MEMBER 

CTI Blacked out TEAM MEMBER 4., 

SFC Blacked out TEAM MEDIC 

(2) VIETNAMESE CENTRAL GOVERNMENT CONTINGENT. 

LE THANH TUNG (LEE THANH TUNGF) TEAM LEADER 

LE XUAN TINH (LEE XUAAN TINHJ) TEAM MEMBER 

NGUYEN BA DU (NGUYEENX BAS DU) TEAM MEMBER 

TRAN DANG THAO (TRAANF DDAWNG THAOR) TEAM MEMBER 

DAO DUC TIEN (DDAOF DDWCS TIEENS) TEAM MEMBER 

(3) NGHE AN PROVINCE TASK TEAM. 

LUONG ANH LAP (LWOWNG ANH LAAPJ) TEAM LEADER 
HOANG DUC CUONG (HOANG DDWCS CWOWNG) TEAM MEMBER 
NGUYEN MI~H LAM (NGUYEENX MINH LAAM) TEAM MEMBER 
NGO SI HAU .(NGOO SIX HAAUJ) TEAM MEMBER 

(4) NGHIA DAN DISTRICT TASK TEAM. 

TRAM LOI (TRAANF LOWIJ) TEAM LEADER 

VI KIM BUNG (VIX KIM BWNGS) TEAM MEMBER 

(5) NGHIA PHU VILLAGE REPRESENTATIVE. - 

PHAM QUANG TOA2N (PHAMJ QUANG TOANR) VILLAGE CHAIRMAN 

TRUONG NIIEI TRI (TRWOWNG NHW TRIJ) VILLAGE VICE 

CHAIRMAN 

LE VAN TUY (LEE VAWN TUY) VILLAGE SECURITY 

D. ON 26 NOVEMBER 1996, THE JOINT TEAM MET WITH THE 
PROVINCE TASK TEAM IN THE HUU NGHI (HWUX NGHIJ) HOTEL IN 
VINH CITY, NGHE AN PROVINCE TO DISCUSS THE TEAMS 
INVESTIGATION PLANNING AND STRATEGY. THE PROVINCE TASK 
TEAM AND THE JOINT TEAM REVIEWED. THE INVESTIGATION 
REQUIREMENTS FOR EACH CASE AND ESTABLISHED AN 
INVESTIGATION SCHEDULE. THE PROVINCE TEAM MEMBERS TOLD 



IE1 THEY HAD COMPLETED ADVANCE REPARATIONS FOR CASE 0489. 

E. ON 27 NOVEMBER 1996, THE JOINT TEAM TRAVELED TO NGHIA 
PHU VILLAGE, NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, NGHE AN PROVINCE, AND MET 
WITH VILLAGE AND DISTRICT OFFICIALS AT THE NGHIA PHU 
VILLAGE. PEOPLES COMMITTEE OFFICE TO DISCUSS THE TEAMS 
INVESTIGATION OF CASE 0489 IN THE DISTRICT. IE1 INTERVIEWED 
TWO WITNESSES AND OBTAINED THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION: 

(1) WITNESS ONE: 

(A) NAME: PHA1~T PHU (PHAAN PHUJ). 

(B) AGE: 70 YOA. 

(C) CURRENT RESIDENCE AND LENGTH OF TIME THERE: 

NGHIA PHU VILLAGE, NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, NGHE AN PROVINCE; 
LIFELONG RESIDENT. 

(D) CURRENT OCCUPATION: RETIRED. 

(E) RESIDENCE AT TIME OF INCIDENT: TEAM 7, 1ST OF MAY TREE 
FARM, NGHIA PHU VILLAGE, NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, NGHE AN 
PROVINCE. 

(F) OCCUPATION AT TIME OF INCIDENT: FARM WORKER. 

(G) BACKGROUND INFORMATION: A JOINT TEAM HAD NOT 
PREVIOUSLY INTERVIEWED MR. PHU. 

(H) STATEMENT: 

((1)) AT 1430, ON AN UNRECALLED DATE IN 1966, MR. PHU WAS 
COLLECTING VINES FOR ROPE WHEN HE HEARD TWO SHOTS FIRED. 
HE LOOKED UP AND SAW AN AIRCRAFT ON FIRE FLYING FROM EAST 
TO WEST. THE AIRCRAFT CRASHED 500 METERS SOUTHEAST OF 
WHERE HE WAS STANDING. MR. PHU STATED THE AIRCRAFT WAS 
AN AD-6, BUT HE COULD NOT RECALL WHETHER THE AIRCRAFT WAS 
A JET OR A PROPELLER TYPE AIRCRAFT, WHAT KIND OF WINGS THE 
PLANE HAD, NOR IF IT HAD ONE OR TWO SEATS. MR. PHU THEN 
CLARIFIED THAT HE HEARD FROM LOCAL VILLAGERS THAT THE 
AIRCRAFT WAS AN AD-6. 

((2)) MR. PHU WENT TO THE SITE WITH TWO OTHER VILLAGERS. 
UPON ARRIVAL, HE SAW THE AIRCRAFT HAD PLUNGED INTO THE 
GROUND TO A DEPTH OF APPROXIMATELY FOUR TO FIVE METERS. 
THE COCKPIT OF THE AIRCRAFT WAS NOT VISIBLE. MR. PHU SAW A 
BURNING LEG FIVE METERS WEST OF THE AIRCRAFT. HE LATER 
CLARIFIED THAT IT WAS A PIECE OF BURNING FLESH AND NOT A 



LEG. HE STATED THE PILOT PROBABLY DIED DURING IMPACT AND 
WAS PROBABLY STILL IN THE AIRCRAFT. MR. PHU SAID THE 
VILLAGERS WHO WENT WITH HIM TO THE SITE WERE NOW 
DECEASED. 

((3)) HE DID NOT KNOW WHICH UNIT SHOT DOWN THE AIRCRAFT, 
BUT STATED AN ARTILLERY UNIT HAD MOVED INTO THE AREA THE 
NIGHT PRIOR TO THE INCIDENT. HE DID NOT KNOW THE LOCATION 
OF THE UNIT IN THE AREA NOR WHAT. KIND OF WEAPON SHOT 
DOWN THE AIRCRAFT. 

((4)) MR. PHU HAD RETURNED TO THE SITE TWICE SINCE THE 
INCIDENT; THE LAST TIME WAS THE DAY PRIOR TO THE INTERVIEW. 
HE WENT TO THE SITE IN ORDER TO FIND PIECES OF THE AIRCRAFT 
TO GIVE TO IE1. HE SAID ALL OF THE LARGE PIECES OF THE 
AIRCRAFT HAD BEEN SCAVENGED AND THE VILLAGERS HAD MADE 
THE PIECES INTO OTHER THINGS. HE THEN GAVE IE1 A SMALL 
PLASTIC BAG CONTAINING PIECES OF WRECKAGE HE HAD 
COLLECTED THE PREVIOUS DAY. MR. PHU KNEW OF NO ONE WITH 
REMAINS FROM THE INCIDENT LOCATION. 

((5)) MR. PHU KNEW OF NO OTHER CRASH SITES, AMERICAN 
REMAINS, OR BURIAL SITES. HE KNEW OF NO POW CAMPS OR POW 
TRANSPORTED THROUGH THE AREA. HE ALSO KNEW OF NO 
AMERICANS REMAINING IN VIETNAM AFTER 1975. 

2) WITNESS TWO: 

A) NAME: NGUYEN THANH .(NGUYEENX THANH).. 

B) AGE: 74 YOA. 

C) CURRENT RESIDENCE AND LENGTH OF TIME THERE: KHU LAI 
KHU LAIS) HAMLET, NGHIA PHU VILLAGE, NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, 

NGHE AN PROVINCE; LIFELONG RESIDENT. 

D) CURRENT OCCUPATION: RETIRED. 

E) RESIDENCE AT TIMEOF INCIDENT: SAME AS ABOVE. 

F) OCCUPATION AT TIME OF INCIDENT: RURAL ECONOMIC CADRE. 

G) BACKGROUND INFORMATION: A JOINT TEAM HAD NOT 
PREVIOUSLY INTERVIEWED MR.. THANH. 

H) STATEMENT: 

(1)) ON A UNRECALLED DATE, MR. THANH SAW A BURNING 
AIRCRAFT CRASH IN THE VICINITY OF NGHIA PHU VILLAGE. HE 



COULD NOT DESCRIBE THE AIRCRAFT OR THE INCIDENT LOCATION. 
MR. THANH COULD NOT RECALL ANY DETAILS ABOUT THE INCIDENT. 
LATER IN THE INTERVIEW, HE STATED HE HAD ONLY HEARD OF THE 
CRASH FROM LOCAL VILLAGERS. 

((2)) MR. THANH STATED HE KNEW OF TWO ADDITIONAL AIRCRAFT 
SHOT DOWN AROUND NGHIA PHU VILLAGE. HE SAID ONE WAS A 
DRONE, BUT HE DID NOT KNOW THE OTHER TYPE OF AIRCRAFT. 
DURING THE DRY SEASON ON AN UNRECALLED DATE, HE WAS 
FARMING AND SAW THE SECOND AIRCRAFT, ON FIRE, FLYING FROM 
THE DIRECTION OF ThE OCEAN INLAND. HE SAID THE AIRCRAFT 
WAS APPROXIMATELY TEN KILOMETERS AWAY, IN THE VICINITY OF 
PHU VINH (PHUS VINH) HAMLET, THANH KY (THANH KYS) VILLAGE, 
NHU XUAN DISTRICT, THANH HOA PROVINCE. MR. THANH SAW A 
PARACHUTE DEPLOY FROM THE AIRCRAFT PRIOR TO IMPACT. HE 
NEVER WENT TO THE SITE AND HAD NO OTHER DETAILS OF THE 
AIRCRAFT OR INCIDENT LOCATION. 

((3)) MR. THANH KNEW OF NO OTHER CRASH SITES, AMERICAN 
REMAINS, OR BURIAL SITES. HE KNEW OF NO POW CAMPS OR POW 
TRANSPORTED THROUGH THE AREA. HE ALSO KNEW OF NO 
AMERICANS REMAINING IN VIETNAM AFTER 1975. 

F. WITNESS ONE THEN LED IE1 TO THE ALLEGED CRASH SITE. THE 
TEAM DROVE APPROXIMATELY 20 MINUTES TO A NEARBY STREAM 
AND THEN PRQCEEDED ON FOOT. THE SITE WAS A 20 MINUTE WALK 
FROM THE STREAM (48Q WG 58301 43461) OVER ROLLING HILLS 
AND CULTIVATED FIELDS. 

G. THE WITNESS POINTED TO THE AREA HE BELIEVED TO BE THE 
CRASH SITE (48Q WG 59210 43864). DURING IE1S INITIAL SITE 
SURVEY, A LOCAL VILLAGER INFORMED IE1 THE AIRCRAFT HAD NOT 
CRASHED IN THAT EXACT LOCATION, BUT TEN METERS WEST. IE1 
INTERVIEWED THE INDIVIDUAL AND OBTAINED THE FOLLOWING 
INFORMATION: 

(1) WITNESS THREE NAME: DO TAN HOA (DDOOX TAAN HOAS). 

(2) AGE:. 39 YOA. 

(3) CURRENT RESIDENCE AND LENGTH OF TIME THERE: HUU LOI 
(HWU LOI) HAMLET, NGHIA PHU VILLAGE, NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, 
NGHE AN PROVINCE; LIFELONG RESIDENT. 

(4) CURRENT OCCUPATION: FARM WORKER. 

(5) RESIDENCE AT. TIME OF INCIDENT: SAME AS ABOVE. 

(6) OCCUPATION AT TIME OF INCIDENT: STUDENT. 



(7) BACKGROUND INFORMATION: A JOINT TEAM HAD NOT 
PREVIOUSLY INTERVIEWED MR.HOA. 

(A) MR. HOA STATED THE ACTUAL CRASH SITE WAS TEN METERS 
WEST OF WHERE MR. PHU INDICATED. HE POINTED TO A SMALL 
GROVE OF TREES AND SAID THE CRASH CRATER WAS IN THE GROVE; 
HOWEVER, THE GROVE HAD NOT BEEN THERE PRIOR TO THE CRASH 
AND THE AREA AROUND THE CRATER HAD NOT BEEN CULTIVATED 
SINCE THE INCIDENT DUE TO THE SIZE AND DEPTH OF THE HOLE. 
MR. HOA DID NOT WITNESS THE CRASH, BUT HAD DUG UP 
NUMEROUS SMALL PIECES OF WRECKAGE FROM THE CRATER. 

(B) MR. HOA KNEW OF NO OTHER CRASH SITES, AMERICAN 
REMAINS, OR BURIAL SITES. HE KNEW OF NO POW CAMPS OR POW 
TRANSPORTED THROUGH THE AREA. HE ALSO KNEW OF NO 
AMERICANS REMAINING IN THE AREA AFTER 1975. 

H. ON 27 NOVEMBER 1996, THE VIETNAMESE OFFICE SEEKING 
MISSING PERSONS (VNOSMP) PROVIDED IE1 WITH A STATEMENT 
CONCERNING FORMER MEMBERS -OF THE 15TH BATTALION, 280TH 
REGIMENT. THE TRANSLATION IN ITS ENTIRETY FOLLOWS: 

(BEGIN TRANSLATION) 

INVESTIGATION TEAM 1 

VIETNAMESE OFFICE SEEKING MISSING PERSONS 

43 RD ITERATION 

CASE 0489 

DATE: 22-111996 

THE ADVANCE INVESTIGATION ELEMENT OF INVESTIGATION TEAM 
1 OF THE 43RD ITERATION HAS WORKED AT NGHIA LAM (NGHIAX 
LAAM) VILLAGE, NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, NGHE AN PROVINCE. 

I. MEMBERS CONSISTED OF: 

LE XUAN TINH: CENTRAL MIA TEAM 

NGO SY HAU: NGHE AN PROVINCE TEAM 

VI KIM BUNG: NGHIA DAN DISTRICT CADRE 

PHAN THANH NGHI (PHAN THANH NGHIJ): NGHIA LAM VILLAGE 

CHAIRMAN. 

II. THE TEAM MET WITH MR. LOC XUAN THANH (LOOCJ XUAAN 
THA.NHF), 56 YEARS OLD, DA HAMLET. HE WAS THE VILLAGE 
CHAIRMAN FROM 1965 TO 1973. CURRENTLY HE IS COMMITTEES 
PARTY SECRETARY. HE CONFIRMED THAT BU LAN (BU LAANX) WAS 
A TERRITORY OF NGHIA LAM VILLAGE DURING ,THE TIME OF THE 
WAR. HE DID NOT HAVE AIRCRAFT CRASHES, CAPTURED PILOTS, OR 



DEAD PILOTS BURIED AT THE VILLAGE. ALL THE MEMBERS 
CONFIRMED THE ABOVE CONTENTS TO BE TRUE. 

4. MATERIAL EVIDENCE: 

A. MATERIAL EVIDENCE RETAINED BY JTF-FA: 

(1) TWO 20 MM ROUNDS WITH THE FOLLOWING MARKINGS: 20MM 
M97. 1 53 PDM75 KOP 48953. 

(2) ONE .38 MM CASING WITH THE FOLLOWING MARKINGS: .38 SPL 
REM UMC. 

(3) ONE FUSE CAP WITH THE FOLLOWING MARKINGS: 3/2 3AG 1A 
25 OV. 

(4) ONE METAL CAP WITH THE FOLLOWING MARKINGS: C22780802 
CTS 221. 

(5) ONE PIECE OF POSSIBLE INSTRUMENT PANEL WITH THE 
FOLLOWING MARKINGS: BRT, NON-FL*, INST. 

(6) ONE POSSIBLE. FUSE WITH THE FOLLOWING MARKINGS: *E IN 
U.S.*. 

(7) ONE POSSIBLE FLIGHT SUIT SNAP WITH THE FOLLOWING 
MARKINGS: DOT DOT. 

(8) ONE POSSIBLE METAL FASTENER WITH THE FOLLOWING 
MARKINGS: 

RAV* CO. PROV. R.I. 

(9) ONE UNKNOWN PIECE OF SCRAP METAL WITH THE FOLLOWING 
MAI7XINGS: CLOSED. 

(10) ONE UNKNOWN COMPOSITE MATERIAL WITH THE FOLLOWING 
MARKINGS: MICAM BROOKLYN * Y PAT. NO. 1973**. 

(11) ONE POSSIBLE SWITCH WITH THE FOLLOWING MARKINGS: 
AN32203. 

(12) TEN PIECES OF POSSIBLE COCKPIT GLASS. 

(13) FIVE PIECES OF CLOTH MATERIAL. 

(14) ONE POSSIBLE FASTENER FOR PERSONAL EQUIPMENT. 

(15) VARIOUS PIECES OF WIRE WITH THE FOLLOWING MARKINGS: 
A39X2**, A2**RN43**20, **53V2**. 



B. MATERIAL EVIDENCE PHOTOGRAPHED AND LEFT IN PLACE: NONE. 

C. REMAINS: NONE. 

5. SITE SURVEY RESULTS: ON 27 NOVEMBER 1996, IE1 SURVEYED 
ONE POSSIBLE CRASH SITE ASSOCIATED WITH CASE 0489. 

A. PROJECT LOCATION. 

(1) VICINITY OF GRID COORDINATE 48Q WG 59157 43808. 

(2) MAP DATA: MAP NAME - NGHIA HUNG, MAP NO. - 6047 I, MAP 
SERIES L7014, PRINTED 1967. 

B. OUTSTANDING FEATURES: INCIDENT SITE IS ON THE WESTERN 
EDGE OF A 300 BY 200 METER, FLAT, DRY.RICE FIELD.. A STREAM 
RUNS NORTH TO SOUTH 20 METERS WEST OF THE SITE. A LARGE 
HILL IS 100 METERS EAST OF THE SITE AND A SMALL RIDGE IS 
SOUTHWEST OF THE SITE. 

C. TERRAIN: ROLLING HILLS. 

D. SOIL CONDITIONS: HARD PACKED SOIL. 

E. VEGETATION: CULTIVATED DRY RICE FIELDS. 

F. METHOD OF.SEARCH: IE1 CONDUCTED A SURFACE SEARCH OF A 
50 BY 50 METER AREA OF THE SITE. IE1 ALSO RAN A METAL 
DETECTOR OVER THE CRASH CRATER AND 20 METERS AROUND THE 
PERIMETER OF THE CRATER. THE TEAM THEN DUG TWO TEST PITS 
IN THE CRATER AND TWO ADDITIONAL TEST PITS AROUND THE 
OUTSIDE OF THE CRATER. THE METAL DETECTOR SCAN YIELDED 
SEVERAL CONTACT POINTS, BUT THE TEST PITS DUG IN THESE 
AREAS 

YIELDED NOTHING TO A DEPTH OF ONE FOOT. 

G. HAZARDS: THERE ARE TWO LARGE HORNET COLONIES LOCATED 
IN TREES SURROUNDING THE CRATER. 

H. RESULTS: 

(1) REMAINS SEEN: NONE. 

(2) IDENTIFICATION MEDIA SEEN: NONE. 

(3) PERSONAL EFFECTS SEEN: NONE. 

(4) AIRCRAFT WRECKAGE SEEN: SEE PARA 4. 



I. LOGISTICS: A STANDARD SIZE RECOVERY ELEMENT WITH 
STANDARD EQUIPMENT CAN EXCAVATE THIS SITE IN 20 TO 25 
DAYS. THE RECOVERY ELEMENT. SHOULD BRING EXTRA TARPS DUE 
TO THE LACK OF SHADE IN THE AREA. WET SCREENING MAY BE 
AVAILABLE AT THE SITE WITH THE SMALL STREAM 20 METERS 
SOUTHWEST OF THE SITE AND A LARGER STREAM APPROXIMATELY 
200 METERS WEST OF THE SITE. A TEAM MAY NEED TO TAKE EXTRA 
LONG HOSES AND SANDBAGS TO DAM STREAMS IF WET SCREENING 
IS REQUIRED. THE SITE IS A TWO HOUR DRIVE FROM VINH CITY, A 
20 MINUTE DRIVE FROM NGHIA PHU VILLAGE AND A 20 MINUTE 
WALK FROM THE LARGE STREAM. THE SITE WAS IN A LARGE OPEN 
FIELD WITH VARIOUS PLACES FOR A LANDING ZONE. THE LOCAL 
OFFICIALS NFORMED IE1 THAT THERE IS A DISTRICT GUEST HOUSE, 
NHA DAN (NHAF DDAN), 20 KILOMETERS EAST OF THE SITE. 
NUMEROUS BASE CAMP SITES ARE AVAILABLE AT THE SITE, BUT 
COORDINATION WITH THE DISTRICT WILL BE REQUIRED. 

6. PERTINENT LOCATION OR DATA CHANGES: NONE. 

7. AREAS OR CASE FILE INFORMATION NOT INVESTIGATED: NONE. 

8. ANALYST COMMENTS: 

A. WITNESS STATEMENTS: 

(1) WITNESS ONE: THE WITNESS PROVIDED HIS INFORMATION IN 
A STRAIGHTFORWARD MANNER. 

(2) WITNESS TWO: THE WITNESS WAS VERY OLD AND APPEARED TO 
PROVIDE HEARSAY INFORMATION. HE WAS UNSURE ABOUT ALL 
DATES AND DETAILS. WITNESS TWO WAS NOT CREDIBLE. 

(3) WITNESS THREE: THE WITNESS PROVIDED HIS INFORMATION 
IN A STRAIGHTFORWARD MANNER. 

B. CANVASSING RESULTS: NONE. 

C. INCIDENT LOCATION SURVEY: NONE. 

D. ANALYTICAL CONCLUSION: 

(1) WITNESS ONE PROVIDED INFORMATION THAT POSSIBLY 
CORRELATES TO CASE 0489 BASED ON APPROXIMATE DATE, 
GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF AIRCRAFT (AD6), AND CIRCUMSTANCES 
OF LOSS. THE MATERIAL EVIDENCE IE1 RECEIVED, SITE SURVEY 
RESULTS, AND WITNESS ONES AND WITNESS THREES STATEMENTS 
INDICATE THAT .AN AIRCRAFT CRASHED AT THE SURVEYED CRASH 
CRATER. SINCE WITNESS ONE OBSERVED FLESH AT THE SITE, THE 



PILOTS REMAINS ARE PROBABLY STILL AT THE CRASH SITE. NO ONE 
BURIED ANY REMAINS NOR SAW ANY OTHER REMAINS. 

(2) WITNESS TWO PROVIDED INFORMATION CONCERNING A 
SECOND AIRCRAFT CRASH SITE IN THE AREA THAT POSSIBLY 
CORRELATES TO A VNAF A-l OPERATIONAL LOSS AT GRID 
COORDINATE 48Q WG 524 563 ON 12 FEBRUARY 1967. A COMPUTER 
DATA BASE SEARCH OF A 15 KILOMETER AREA AROUND THANH KY 
VILLAGE, NHU XUAN DISTRICT, THANH HOA PROVINCE INDICATES 
THAT THE VNAF A-i AND THE CASE 0489 AIRCRAFT WERE THE ONLY 
AIRCRAFT SHOT DOWN IN THAT AREA. 

9. SEARCH AND RECOVERY SPECIALIST COMMENTS,: NONE. 

10. TEAM LEADER COMMENTS: 

A. WITNESS RELIABILITY: 

(1) WITNESS ONE APPEARED CREDIBLE AND RELIABLE. 

(2) WITNESS TWO PRESENTED HIS INFORMATION IN A VERY 
DISJOINTED MANNER. HE APPEARED TO PROVIDE HEARSAY 
INFORMATION. ONLY. HE WAS NOT RELIABLE. HE HAD TOLD THE 
VNOSMP DURING ADVANCE WORK THAT HE HAD WITNESSED THE 
0489 AIRCRAFT CRASH. DURING IE1S INTERVIEW HE COMMENTED 
THAT HE FIRST VISITED THE SITE WITH WITNESS ONE A FEW DAYS 
BEFORE OUR INVESTIGATION. 

(3) WITNESS THREE APPEARED CREDIBLE. HE COMMENTED THAT 
MANY LOCAL OFFICIALS AND VILLAGERS HAD COME TO SCAVENGE 
THE CRASH CRATER FOR AIRCRAFT WRECKAGE. 

B. ANALYTICAL CONCLUSIONS: 

(1) THE IE1 SITE SURVEY YIELDED SMALL PIECES OF METAL AND 
POSSIBLE AIRCRAFT COCKPIT COMPONENTS. WITNESS ONE AND 
THREE PROVIDED ACCOUNTS THAT SUPPORT AN AIRCRAFT 
CRASHED AT THE IE1 SURVEY SITE. 

WITNESS ONE PROVIDED INFORMATION THAT CORRELATES TO 
CASE 0489 BASED ON APPROXIMATE DATE, TIME, LOCATION, 
GENERAL DESCRIPTION OF AIRCRAFT AND CIRCUMSTANCES OF 
LOSS. 

(2) CONCUR WITH ANALYST. 

C. HOST GOVERNMENT COOPERATION/SUPPORT: HOST 
GOVERNMENT COOPERATION WAS EXCELLENT WHILE 
INVESTIGATING THIS CASE. THE HOST GOVERNMENT AT ALL LEVELS 



COMPLETED ALL OF THE ADVANCE WORK WHICH GREATLY 
ASSISTED IN THE SUCCESSFUL INVESTIGATION OF THIS CASE. 

D. DETACHMENT COMMANDERS COMMENTS: NONE. 

11. RECOMMENDATION: EXCAVATE 



51 st J AF Report 
26 June to 4 July 1998.... 
08/25/1998 
SUBJ/ DETAILED REPORT OF EXCAVATION OF CASE 0489 

1. SUMMARY REPORT OF 51ST JOINT FIELD ACTIVITY (JFA) 
CONDUCTED IN SOCIALIST REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM (SRV) FROM 23 
JUNE THROUGH 24 JULY 1998. 

2. SUMMARY OF EXCAVATION. 

A. CASE 0489: FROM 26 JUNE THROUGH 4 JULY 1998, DURING THE 
51ST JFA, RECOVERY ELEMENT ONE (RE1) BEGAN THE EXCAVATION 
OF AN AIRCRAFT CRASH SITE BELIEVED TO BE ASSOCIATED WITH 
CASE 0489 IN NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, NGHE AN PROVINCE, 
SOCIALIST REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM (SRV). RE1 

OPENED THREE OUT OF 12 5 X 5-METER GRID UNITS. THE TEAM 
CLOSED NONE OF THE GRID UNITS. RE1 RECOVERED NUMEROUS 
PIECES OF AIRCRAFT WRECKAGE AND TWO PIECES OF LIFE- 
SUPPORT EQUIPMENT. THE TEAM ANTHROPOLOGIST, IN 
CONSULTATION WITH THE TEAM LEADER, SUSPENDED THE 
EXCAVATION ON 4 JULY 1998 DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER AND 
THE BEGINNING OF THE RAINY SEASON IN NGHE AN PROVINCE. THE 
SITE IS NOT CLOSED AND REMAINS OPEN. RE1 DID NOT RECOVER 
OR RECEIVE ANY REMAINS, OR PERSONAL EFFECTS. THIS PROJECT 
AREA IS RECOMMENDED FOR FURTHER EXCAVATION DURING THE 
DRY SEASON, ON EITHER THE 53RD OR 54TH JFAS. 

B. TEAM COMPOSITION: 

(1) U.S. CONTINGENT: 

CPT NAME BLACKED OUT TEAM LEADER 

SFC NAME BLACKED OUT TEAM SERGEANT 

DR. NAME BLACKED OUT TEAM ANTHROPOLOGIST 

SSG NAME BLACKED OUT ANALYST! LINGUIST 

SSG NAME BLACKED OUT MORTUARY AFFAIRS SPECIALIST 

SSG NAME BLACKED OUT MORTUARY AFFAIRS SPECIALIST 

SPC NAME BLACKED OUT MORTUARY AFFAIRS SPECIALIST 

TSGT NAME BLACKED OUT TEAM MEDIC 

GYSGT NAME BLACKED OUT EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE DISPOSAL 

TECHNICIAN 

PRC NAME BLACKED OUT LIFE SUPPORT TECHNICIAN 

RMCS NAME BLACKED OUT COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST 

MSG NAME BLACKED OUT TEAM PHOTOGRAPHER 



(2) VIETNAMESE CENTRAL GOVERNMENT CONTINGENT: 
COL LE KY (LEE KYR)TEAM LEADER/MINISTRY OF DEFENSE 
MR. DAO TAM CHAU (DAOF TAAM CHAAU) TEAM MEMBER 
MR. NGUYEN DUC THANG (DWCS THAWNGS) TEAM MEMBER 
MR. NGUYEN TAM SON (TAM SOWN) TEAM MEMBER 

MR. TRAN THANH MINH (TRAANF THANH MINH) TEAM MEMBER 

(3) NGI-IE AN PROVINCE TASK TEAM: 

MR. NGO SI HAU (NGOC SIX HAAUJ) TEAM LEADER 

MR. HCANG DUC CUCNG (HOANGF DWCS CWCNGF) TEAM MEMBER 

MR. TRAN CONG (TRAANF CCONG) TEAM MEMBER 

MR. TRAN VAN PHUC (TRAANF VAWN PHUCS) TEAM MEMBER 

MR. VO VAN THAO (VOX VAWN THAO) TEAM MEMBER 

(4) NGHIA DAN DISTRICT TASK TEAM: 

MR. HO CONG SON (HOOF COONG SOWN) TEAM MEMBER 
MR. LE NGOC SANG (LEE NGOCJ SANG) TEAM MEMBER 
MR. VI VAN DINH (VI VAWN DINHJ) TEAM MEMBER 

(5) NGHIA PHU VILLAGE TASK TEAM: 

MR. LE VAN TRUNG (LEE VAWN TRUNG) TEAM MEMBER 

MR. PHAM QUANG TOAN (PHAMJ QUANG TOANR) TEAM MEMBER 

3. BACKGROUND. 

A. THIS CASE INVOLVES THE 8 OCTOBER 1966 LOSS OF A-1H 
AIRCRAFT ON AN ARMED RECONNAISSANCE MISSION RESULTING 
IN ONE UNACCOUNTED-FOR AMERICAN. 

B. ON 26 OCTOBER 1993, 1E2 INVESTIGATED CASE 0489 IN XUAN 
BINH VILLAGE, NHU XUAN DISTRICT, THANH HOA PROVINCE. 1E2 
SURVEYED THE INCIDENT LOCATION FOR CASE 0489. THE TEAM 
RECOVERED NO REMAINS, PERSONAL EFFECTS, AND DID NOT FIND 



ANY EVIDENCE OF A CRASH SITE IN THE AREA (REF B). 

C. ON 1 NOVEMBER 1995, THE PROVINCE TASK TEAM INFORMED 
INVESTIGATION ELEMENT ONE (IE1) THAT THEY HAD CANVASSED 
BO LAN (BOO LAAN) HAMLET, XUAN THAI (XUAANS THAIR) VILLAGE 
AND THANH KY (THANH KYS) VILLAGE WITH NEGATIVE RESULTS. 
THE PROVINCE TASK TEAM AND THE VNOSMP TEAM MEMBERS GAVE 
IE1 A REPORT OF THEIR CANVASSING EFFORTS. IE1 DID NOT 
RECOVER OR RECEIVE ANY REMAINS OR MATERIAL EVIDENCE 
WHILE NVESTIGATING THIS CASE (REF C). 

D. ON 27 NOVEMBER 1996; IE1 TRAVELED TO NGHIA PHU VILLAGE, 
NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, NGHE AN PROVINCE, AND INTERVIEWED 
THREE WITNESSES WITH POSSIBLE INFORMATION CONCERNING 
CASE 0489. TWO OF THE WITNESSES LED TEI TO AN ALLEGED CRASH 
SITE. TEI SURVEYED THE SITE AND RECEIVED NUMEROUS PIECES OF 
AIRCRAFT WRECKAGE. TEI DID NOT RECOVER OR RECEIVE ANY 
REMAINS WHILE INVESTIGATING CASE 0489 (REF D). 

4. PROJECT LOCATION. 

A. VICINITY OF NGHIA PHU VILLAGE, NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, NGHE 
AN PROVINCE, SRV. 

B. GRID COORDINATE: THE PROJECT AREA IS AT 48Q WG 59492 
44009, AS DETERMINED BY A GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS) 
RECEIVER TRACKING FIVE SATELLITES ON THE INDIAN SPECIAL 
DATUM. 

RMKS/ 

C. MAP: NAME: PHONG BAT; SHEET: 6147 IV ; EDITION: 2AMS; 
SERIES: L7014; SCALE: 1:50,000; HORIZONTAL DATUM: INDIAN 
DATUM 1960. 

5. DESCRIPTION OF PROJECT AREA. 

A. THE PROJECT AREA ASSOCIATED WITH CASE 0489 IS LOCATED IN 
A CULTIVATED PEANUT FIELD. TO ACCESS THE SITE, THE TEAM 
TRAVELED BY VEHICLE FOR TWO HOURS AND THIRTY MINUTES 
NORTH AND WEST OF VINH. THE SITE IS BORDERED ON THE NORTH, 
SOUTH, AND EAST BY RECENTLY PLANTED CORNFIELDS AND ON THE 
WEST BY THREE BOMB CRATERS. SURROUNDING THE SITE ON ALL 
FOUR SIDES ARE CULTIVATED HILLS OF RICE, CORN, AND PEANUTS. 

B. THE SOIL OF THE PROJECT AREA CONSISTS OF A RICH BROWN 
HUMUS LAYER OF APPROXIMATELY 20 CENTIMETERS FOLLOWED BY 
A 25 CENTIMETER LAYER OF REDDISH/BROWN SOIL MIXED WITH 
SMALL GRAVEL. BENEATH THIS LAYER IS A REDDISH BROWN SHALE 



BASE OF VARIOUS DEPTHS. 
6. FIELD METHODS. 

A. UPON ARRIVAL AT THE SITE, THE TEAM RE-INTERVIEWED TWO 
PRIMARY WITNESSES THAT AN IE INTERVIEWED DURING THE 43RD 
JFA. BOTH WITNESSES HEARD FIRING FROM A LOCAL ANTI- 
AIRCRAFT UNIT AND SAW THE AIRCRAFT IMPACT STRAIGHT DOWN 
(90 DEGREES) INTO THE GROUND, EXPLODE AND CATCH FIRE, 
CREATING AN IMPACT CRATER RANGING IN DEPTH FROM THREE TO 
FIVE METERS AND APPROXIMATELY 20 METERS IN CIRCUMFERENCE. 
BOTH WITNESSES ALSO RECOUNT THAT A LEFT HUMAN FOREARM 
WITH A WATCH WAS RECOVERED BY A MEMBER OF THE ANTI- 
AIRCRAFT ARTILLERY UNIT. THEY DO NOT KNOW THE DISPOSITION 
OF THESE REMAINS. BOTH HAVE NO KNOWLEDGE OF ANY OTHER 
HUMAN REMAINS OR PERSONAL EFFECTS BEING RECOVERED 
DURING LOCAL SCAVENGING OPERATIONS OF THE SITE. EACH 
WITNESS WAS ASKED TO PLACE A WOODEN STAKE WHERE THEY 
BELIEVE THE CENTER OF THE IMPACT CRATER WAS 

LOCATED. 

B. RE1 EXCAVATED THE SITE USING STANDARD ARCHAEOLOGICAL 
PROCEDURES. SINCE THE LOCAL INDIGENOUS POPULATION 
EXTENSIVELY SCAVENGED THE IMPACT CRATERAND BACK FILLED IT 
WITH THE DIRT FROM THE SURROUNDING AREA, THE TEAM 
OBSERVED NO APPARENT SURFACE DISTRIBUTION OF AIRCRAFT 
WRECKAGE OR A NOTICEABLE IMPACT CRATER. THE TEAM 
EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE DISPOSAL (EOD) TECHNICIAN CONDUCTED 
METAL DETECTOR SWEEPS FOR APPROXIMATELY 20 METERS 
AROUND THE IMPACT CRATER. THE TEAM PINFLAGGED ALL METAL 
DETECTOR SIGNALS. 

C. BASED ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF METAL DETECTOR SIGNALS, 
THE APPROXIMATE SIZE DXMENSIONS OF AN A-i SERIES AIRCRAFT, 
AND WITNESS INFORMATION, THE TEAM PLACED A 20 X 15-METER 
ARCHAEOLOGICAL GRID AROUND THE IDENTIFIED IMPACT CRATER 
AND GRIDDED IT INTO 12 5X5 METER GRID UNITS. THE TEAM 
ANTHROPOLOGIST DESIGNATED THE PROJECT DATUM TO BE 
N500/E500, WHICH IS LOCATED IN THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF 
THE GRID WITH A GC OF 48Q WG 59492 44009. 

D. RE1 EXCAVATED ALL GRID UNITS WITH PICKS, SHOVELS, AND 
TROWELS. VIETNAMESE WORKERS TRANSPORTED THE FILL TO A 
DRY SCREENING AREA WHERE VIETNAMESE WORKERS SCREENED 
ALL FILL THROUGH A ONE-QUARTER INCH WIRE MESH UNDER THE 
SUPERVISION OF AMERICAN TEAM MEMBERS, WHO EXAMINED THE 
SCREENS FOR PHYSICAL AND MATERIAL EVIDENCE. RE1 COLOR- 
CODED ALL GRID UNITS AND SCREENS TO MAINTAIN PROVENIENCE. 



E. RE1 RETAINED ALL MATERIAL EVIDENCE AND POSSIBLE AIRCREW 
AND COCKPIT RELATED EQUIPMENT IN ZIP-LOCK BAGS LABELED BY 
CASE NUMBER, GRID UNIT, AND DATE RECOVERED FOR FURTHER 
ANALYSIS BY THE JTF-FA LIFE-SUPPORT SECTION AT CAMP SMITH, 
HAWAII. 

F. THE TEAM PHOTOGRAPHED THE SITE BEFORE, DURING AND 
AFTER THE EXCAVATION. 

7. ARCHAEOLOGICAL FINDINGS. 

A. RE1 DID NOT RECOVER OR RECEIVE ANY HUMAN REMAINS OR 
PERSONAL EFFECTS. 

B. RE1 RECOVERED NUMEROUS PIECES OF SMALL UNIDENTIFIABLE 
AIRCRAFT WRECKAGE AND FRAGMENTS OF LIFE-SUPPORT 
EQUIPMENT AT A DEPTH OF APPROXIMATELY 40 ENTIMETERS 
BELOW THE GROUND SURFACE. 

C. PRELIMINARY FIELD ASSESSMENT BY THE TEAM LIFE-SUPPORT 
TECHNICIAN OF THE MATERIAL EVIDENCE RECOVERED BY THE TEAM 
DOES NOT PROVIDE CORRELATION TO AN A-i SERIES AIRCRAFT OR 
IF THERE WAS ANYONE IN THE AIRCRAFT AT THE TIME OF IMPACT. 

8. MATERIAL EVIDENCE: 

A. THE TEAM RECOVERED THE FOLLOWING PIECES OF LIFE-SUPPORT 
EQUIPMENT ITEMS: 

(1) ZIPPER CHAIN APPROXIMATELY 3 INCHES LONG (POSSIBLY 
FROM SV1 VEST). 

(2) TWO SNAPS 

(3) NUMEROUS PIECES OF CANOPY PLASTIC. 

(4) BLACK NYLON MATERIAL POSSIBLY FROM COCKPIT. 

(5) SMALL PIECE OF YELLOW LIFERAFT OR PRESERVER MATERIAL. 

(6) 1-INCH BLACK BLOCK WITH FOLLOWING MARKINGS (MADE IN 
USA). 

B. THE TEAM RECEIVED TWO UNIDENTIFIABLE PIECES OF AIRCRAFT 
WRECKAGE FROM WITNESS TWO, WHICH THE TEAM 
PHOTOGRAPHED AND LEFT IN-PLACE AT THE SITE. THE SMALLER 
AIRCRAFT PIECE HAD THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION STAMPED ON 
IT: 20 FRANCE. 



9. LIFE SUPPORT ANALYST COMMENTS. PRELIMINARY FIELD 
ANALYSIS OF THE RECOVERED LIFE SUPPORT ITEMS IS 
INCONCLUSIVE TO ESTABLISH WHETHER ANYONE WAS ABOARD THE 
AIRCRAFT AT THE TIME OF IMPACT. PRELIMINARY FIELD ANALYSIS 
OF THE RECOVERED AIRCRAFT WRECKAGE IS INCONCLUSIVE TO 
ESTABLISH THE SERIES OF AIRCRAFT. 

10. ANALYST/ LINGUIST COMMENTS. 

A. ON 25 JUNE 1998, RE1 INTERVIEWED TWO WITNESSES 
CONCERNING THE ALLEGED CRASH SITE ASSOCIATED WITH THIS 
CASE. THE WITNESSES PROVIDED THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION: 

1) WITNESS ONE: 

A) NAME: MR. PHAN PHU (PHAN PHUJ). 

B) AGE: 72 YOA. 

C) CURRENT RESIDENCE AND LENGTH OF TIME THERE: TEAM 7 
000IJ 7), 1ST OF MAY TREE FARM, NGHIA PHU VILLAGE (XAX 

NGHIAX PHUJ), NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, NGHE AN PROVINCE; 
LIFELONG RESIDENT. 

D) CURRENT OCCUPATION: RETIRED. 

E) RESIDENCE AT TIME OF INCIDENT: SAME AS ABOVE. 

F) OCCUPATION AT TIME OF INCIDENT: FARMER. 

G) BACKGROUND INFORMATION: A JOINT TEAM INTERVIEWED MR. 
PHU DURING THE 43RD JFA (REF D). 

H) STATEMENT: 

(1)) ON AN UNRECALLED DATE DURING THE WAR, MR. PHU 
WAS GATHERING VINES FOR ROPE ON A NEARBY HILL TO THE 
NORTH OF THE VILLAGE AREA WHEN HE WITNESSED AN AIRCRAFT 
CRASH. THE AIRCRAFT HAD BEEN FLYING IN A SOUTHWESTERLY 
DIRECTION WHEN HE HEARD TWO SHOTS FROM THE WEST AND 
WITNESSED THE AIRCRAFT CRASH SOUTH OF HIM. AT THE TIME OF 
THE INCIDENT, HE WAS NOT CERTAIN OF THE TYPE OF AIRCRAFT, 
BUT LATER HEARD THE LOCALS IDENTIFY IT AS AN AD-6, WHICH HE 
RECALLED WAS 

A PROPELLER-TYPE AIRCRAFT THAT DID NOT CARRY BOMBS, BUT 
HIT TARGETS WITH ITS GUNS. MR. PHU COULD NOT REMEMBER THE 
COLOR OF THE AIRCRAFT. 

((2)) THE AIRCRAFT CRASHED STRAIGHT INTO THE GROUND (90 



DEGREES) BETWEEN 1000 AND 1100 HOURS ON THAT UNRECALLED 
DATE. MR. PHU ARRIVED ON THE SITE APPROXIMATELY 15 MINUTES 
AFTER THE INCIDENT AND NOTICED THE COCKPIT WAS BURIED IN 
THE GROUND APPROXIMATELY FOUR TO FIVE METERS AND THE TAIL 
OF THE AIRCRAFT WAS STICKING IN THE AIR. THE FORCE OF THE 
IMPACT HAD FOLDED THE WINGS OF THE AIRCRAFT ALONG ITS 
SIDE. ALTHOUGH HE DID NOT SEE ANY BOMBS AT THE SITE, HE DID 
SEE TWO BOMB CRATERS WEST OF THE SITE AND MANY 
AMMUNITION ROUNDS SURROUNDING THE WRECKAGE. FIRE ALSO 
SURROUNDED THE SITE AND A TRAIL OF FIRE APPROACHED THE 
IMPACT CRATER FROM SEVERAL METERS AWAY IN THE DIRECTION 
FLIGHT. MR. PHU DID NOT SEE ANY PARACHUTE MATERIAL OR A 
PILOT HELMET AT THE SITE. 

((3)) MEMBERS OF THE NGUYEN VIET XUAN (NGUYEENX VIEETS 
XUAAN) AIR DEFENSE BATTALION WERE AT THE SITE WHEN HE 
ARRIVED. HE WITNESSED ONE MEMBER (NFI) LEAVE THE SITE WITH 
A SEVERED LEFT FOREARM AND HAND. HE NOTICED A WATCH WAS 
STILL ON THE WRIST AND THE ARM HAIR WAS BLOND. MR. PHU DID 
NOT KNOW WHAT HAPPENED TO THE HAND, BUT PRESUMED THE 
REMAINDER OF THE PILOTS REMAINS WERE STILL IN THE COCKPIT, 
WHICH WAS BURIED IN THE GROUND. HE DID NOT SEE ANY 
ADDITIONAL REMAINS AT THE SITE. 

((4)) SEVERAL YEARS AFTER THE INCIDENT, MR. PHU SAID 
LOCAL RESIDENTS SCAVENGED THE SITE MANY TIMES, EVENTUALLY 
USING DIRT FROM THE IMMEDIATE AREA SURROUNDING THE 
IMPACT CRATER TO RESTORE THE SITE. HE NEVER HEARD OF 
ANYONE RECOVERING REMAINS OR PERSONAL EFFECTS FROM THE 
SITE. HE ALSO DOES NOT KNOW OF ANYONE CURRENTLY HOLDING 
WRECKAGE ASSOCIATED WITH THIS SITE NOR DOES HE REMEMBER 
ANYONE SPECIFICALLY WHO SCAVENGED THE SITE. 

((5)) MR. PHU KNEW OF NO OTHER CRASH SITES, AMERICAN 
REMAINS, OR BURIAL SITES. HE NEVER HEARD OF ANYONE 
CAPTURING ANY AMERICANS OR TRANSPORTING AMERICAN 
PRISONERS IN THE AREA. 

(2) WITNESS TWO: 

(A) NAME: MR. DO VAN HOA (000X VAWN HOAF). 

(B) AGE: 41 YOA. 

(C) CURRENT RESIDENCE AND LENGTH OF TIME THERE: PHU LOI 
HAMLET (XOMS PHUS LOWIJ), NGHIA PHU VILLAGE, NGHIA DAN 
DISTRICT, AN PROVINCE; LIFELONG RESIDENT. 

(D) CURRENT OCCUPATION: FARMER. 



(E) RESIDENCE AT TIME OF INCIDENT: SAME AS ABOVE. 

(F) OCCUPATION AT TIME OF INCIDENT: STUDENT. 

(G) BACKGROUND INFORMATION: A JOINT TEAM INTERVIEWED MR. 
PHU DURING THE 43RD JFA (REF D). 

(H) STATEMENT: 

((1)) ON AN UNRECALLED DATE WHEN MR. HOA WAS 
APPROXIMATELY NINE OR TEN YEARS OLD, AN AMERICAN AIRCRAFT 
CRASHED IN 

THE AREA OF HIS VILLAGE. HE WENT TO THE CRASH SITE ABOUT 
ONE HOUR AFTER INCIDENT AND WAS HALTED TO WITHIN 20 
METERS OF THE SITE BY MEMBERS OF THE NGUYEN VIET XUAN AIR 
DEFENSE BATTALION BECAUSE OF THE FIRE SURROUNDING THE 
SITE. THEY ALSO EXPRESSED A CONCERN FOR PROBABLE 
MUNITIONS IN THE AREA. MR. HOA WAS NOT CERTAIN OF THE 
AIRCRAFT TYPE, BUT LOCAL RESIDENTS CALLED IT A FLAT-WING 
AIRCRAFT (MAYS BAY CANHS BAWNGF), WITH A NOSE PROPELLER 
AND WINGS COMING OUT OF ITS SIDES. VEGETATION AT THE SITE 
AT THE TIME OF INCIDENT CONSISTED OF WILD BANANA TREES. 
MR. HOA ALSO RECALLED TWO BOMB CRATERS NEAR THE CRASH 
SITE. 

((2)) THE AIRCRAFT HAD APPARENTLY CRASHED STRAIGHT INTO 
THE GROUND BECAUSE THE NOSE OF THE AIRCRAFT WAS BURIED 
ABOUT THREE METERS IN THE GROUND. ALTHOUGH HE COULD NOT 
SEE MANY DETAILS OF THE CRASH SITE, HE NOTED THE AIRCRAFT 
WAS DARK GREEN. MR. HOA ALSO SAW A MEMBER OF THE AIR 
DEFENSE UNIT CARRY A SEVERED HAND AWAY FROM THE SITE. THE 
HAND STILL HAD A WATCH ON ITS WRIST. HE DID NOT KNOW THE 
DISPOSITION OF THE SEVERED HAND AND DID NOT SEE ANY 
ADDITIONAL REMAINS AT THE SITE. 

((3)) ALTHOUGH MR. HOA DID NOT PARTICIPATE IN THE 
SCAVENGING OF THE CRASH SITE UNTIL 1991, AND LOCAL 
RESIDENTS HAD SCAVENGED IT HEAVILY BEFORE THEN, HE NEVER 
HEARD OF ANYONE REdOVERING REMAINS OR PERSONAL EFFECTS 
FROM THE SITE. LOCAL FARMERS RESTORED THE SITE TO ITS 
PRESENT DAY CULTIVATED STATE IN 1994, USING DIRT 
IMMEDIATELY SURROUNDING THE IMPACT CRATER TO LEVEL IT. HE 
ESTIMATED THE SIZE CF THE CRATER WAS APPROXIMATELY 20 
METERS IN DIAMETER. 

((4)) MR. PHU DID NOT KNOW CF ANY OTHER CRASH SITES, 
AMERICAN REMAINS, OR BURIAL SITES. HE NEVER HEARD OF 
ANYONE CAPTURING ANY AMERICANS OR TRANSPORTING 



AMERICAN PRISONERS IN THE AREA. 

B. FOLLOWING EACH INTERVIEW, EACH WITNESS INDICATED THE 
APPROXIMATE CENTER OF THE IMPACT CRATER, DIFFERING FROM 
EACH OTHER BY ONLY A COUPLE OF CENTIMETERS. 

C. DURING THEIR PREVIOUS INTERVIEW ON THE 43RD JFA, 
NEITHER WITNESS PROVIDED ANY INFORMATION CONCERNING THE 
SEVERED HAND RECOVERED FROM THE CRASH SITE. IT IS POSSIBLE 
THEY GATHERED THIS INFORMATION FROM ADDITIONAL LOCAL 
SOURCES AFTER THEIR INITIAL INTERVIEW, THEREFORE 
RENDERING IT HEARSAY. NEITHER WITNESS COULD PROVIDE ANY 
ADDITIONAL DETAIL CONCERNING THE SEVERED HAND 
PURPORTEDLY REMOVED FROM THE SITE BY THE NGUYEN VIET 
XUAN AIR DEFENSE BATTALION NOR THE DISPOSITION OF IT. 

11. EOD TECHNICIAN COMMENTS. THE TEAM RECOVERED THE 
FOLLOWING ORDNANCE ITEMS ON SITE: 

A. FIVE 20MM HE (LOT#~ KJA-1952-HE20MM-M97 ON ROTATING 
BAND AND LOT# PD-M-75 K0P48882-11 ON PROJECTILE FUZE) 

B. TWO 20MM AP, AND TEN 20MM CARTRIDGE LINKS. THE 20MM 
PROJECTILES WERE IN POOR SHAPE WITHOUT CARTRIDGE 
CASINGS. ALL HAZARDOUS COMPONENTS WERE MOVED BY EOD 
TECHNICIAN TO A SAFE HOLDING AREA. 

12. ANTHROPOLOGIST CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS. 

A. THIS CASE SHOULD NOT HAVE BEEN SCHEDULED FOR 
EXCAVATION DURING THE RAINY SEASON, WHICH IS ONGOING AT 
THE PRESENT TIME IN THE NORTHERN AND SOUTHERN PROVINCES 
OF THE SRV. HENCE, RE1 SUSPENDED THE EXCAVATION OF CASE 
0489 DUE TO INCLEMENT AND RAINY WEATHER, POOR ROAD 
CONDITIONS, WHICH LIMITED ACCESSIBILITY TO THE SITE, AND 
THE FACT THAT THE SOIL OF THE PROJECT AREA COULD NOT BE 
SCREENED. 

B. THERE WAS NO WATER SOURCE PRESENT FOR WETSCREENING 
OPERATIONS DESPITE THE FACT THAT THE IE REPORTED A CREEK 
PRESENT APPROXIMATELY 20 METERS FROM THE PROJECT AREA 
DURING THE INVESTIGATION OF THIS CASE DURING THE 43RD JFA 
(REF D). EXAMINATION OF THE CREEK BY THE TEAM FOUND THE 
CREEK TO BE A DRY RUN OR WASH. THE LOCAL FARMERS INFORMED 
THE TEAM THAT THE ONLY TIME THERE IS WATER IN THE CREEK IS 
AT THE END OF THE RAINY SEASON DURING LATE AUGUST AND 
EARLY SEPTEMBER. THE WATER AVAILABLE FROM THE CREEK 
DURING THIS TIME IS A VERY SMALL QUANTITY THAT IS USED FOR 
CROP IRRIGATION AND THE CREEK WILL SOON GO DRY VERY 



QUICKLY AS A RESULT. IF EXCAVATION IS SCHEDULED DURING THE 
DRY SEASON, WET-SCREENING WILL NOT BE REQUIRED. 

C. RECOMMEND THE EXCAVATION BE CONTINUED DURING THE DRY 
SEASON, AT THE EARLIEST, THE 53RD OR THE 54TH JFA. 

D. RECOMMEND THE NEXT RECOVERY TEAM AND ANTHROPOLOGIST 
CONTINUE WITH THE EXCAVATION OF A TWO METER WIDE TRENCH 
THROUGH THE WITNESS IDENTIFIED AREA OF THE IMPACT CRATER, 
TO DETERMINE THE DEPTH AND EXTENT OF THE CRATER AND 
IDENTIFY SIGNIFICANT SOIL STRATA. AT THE TIME THE TEAM 
SUSPENDED WORK, THE SOIL STRATA IN THE CENTRAL GRID UNITS 
INDICATED THE BEGINNING CF THE IMPACT CRATER. ONCE THIS 
HAS BEEN DETERMINED, THEN THE EXCAVATION CAN PROCEED 
FROM THE IMPACT CRATER OUTWARD. 

E. RECOMMEND THAT DURING FUTURE INVESTIGATIONS BY IES, ALL 
WATER SOURCES BE PHOTOGRAPHED WHICH WILL AID IN 
CONTINGENCY PLANNING AND EXECUTION OF A SEARCH AND 
RECOVERY OPERATION. WOULD ALSO RECOMMEND SCHEDULING OF 
SEARCH AND RECOVERY OPERATIONS IN LINE WITH FAVORABLE 
WEATHER CONDITIONS. 

13. TEAM LEADER COMMENTS. 

A. CONCLUSIONS: CONCUR WITH ANTHROPOLOGISTS CONCLUSIONS 
AND RECOMMENDATIONS. 

B. HOST GOVERNMENT COOPERATION/SUPPORT: THROUGHOUT THE 
JOINT EXCAVATION, THE TEAM RECEIVED EXCELLENT COOPERATION 
FROM VIETNAMESE COUNTERPARTS (CENTRAL, PROVINCIAL, 
DISTRICT, AND VILLAGE). COL LE KY SHOULD BE OFFICIALLY 
COMMENDED. 

C. ALTHOUGH GUEST HOUSE ACCOMMODATIONS WERE REPORTED 
BY THE IE DURING INVESTIGATION OF THIS CASE, THE GUEST 
HOUSE WAS FULL REQUIRING THE TEAM TO TRAVEL OVER 2 HOURS 
FROM VINH INSTEAD OF 20 MINUTES FROM THE GUEST HOUSE. 
RECOMMEND VNOSMP SECURE BILLETING DURING ADVANCE 
PROVINCE COORDINATION. 

14. DETACHMENT COMMANDERS COMMENTS. NONE. 



59 th JAF Report 



28 February to 18 March 2000.... 
FM CDR JTF-FA HOMOLULU 

SUBJ/ DETAILED REPORT OF EXCAVATION OF CASE 0489. 

1. SUMMARY REPORT OF 59TH JOINT FIELD ACTIVITY (JFA) 
CONDUCTED IN SOCIALIST REPUBLIC OF VIETNAME (SRV) FROM 22 
FEBRUARY THROUGH 23 MARCH 2000. 

2. SUMMARY OF EXCAVATION. 

A. CASE 0489: FROM 28 FEBRUARY THROUGH 18 MARCH 2000, 
DURING THE 59TH JFA, RECOVERY ELEMENT FOUR (RE4) 
CONTINUED EXCAVATION OF AN AIRCRAFT CRASH SITE 
ASSOCIATED WITH CASE 0489NEAR NGHIA PHI) VILLAGE, NGHIA 
DAN DISTRICT, NGHE AN PROVINCE, SRV. RE4 OPENED 14 OUT OF 

29 4-X-4-METER GRID UNITS. RE4 CLOSED ONE UNIT. RE4 
RECOVERED POSSIBLE HUMAN REMAINS, TWO PERSONAL EFFECTS, 
NUMEROUS PIECES OF LIFE SUPPORT EQUIPMENT, AND MULTIPLE 
FRAGMENTS OF AIRCRAFT WRECKAGE. THE TEAM 
ANTHROPOLOGIST, IN CONSULTATION WITH THE TEAM LEADER, 
SUSPENDED THE EXCAVATION ON 18 MARCH DUE TO TIME 
CONSTRAINTS AT THE CLOSE OF THE 59TH JFA. THE SITE IS STILL 
OPEN. IN ADDITION, RE4 PLACED ONE UNIT OUTSIDE THE SITE 
BOUNDARY ON 12 MARCH, DUE TO WITHESS INFORMATION 
RELATING TO POSSIBLE REMAINS. RE4 EXCAVATED THE UNIT TO 
STERILE SOIL. RECOMMEND THE PROJECT AREA FOR FUTURE 
EXCAVATION IN THE DRY SEASON. 

B. TEAM COMPOSITION: 
(1) U.S. CONTINGENT: 

CPT NAME BLACKED OUT TEAM LEADER 

SFC NAME BLACKED OUT TEAM NCOIC 

MS. NAME BLACKED OUT TEAM ANTHROPOLOGIST 

SSGT NAME BLACKED OUT ANALYST/ LINGUIST 

SSG NAME BLACKED OUT MORTUARY AFFAIRS SPECIALIST 

SGT NAME BLACKED OUT MORTUARY AFFAIRS SPECIALIST 

SSG NAME BLACKED OUT MORTUARY AFFAIRS SPECIALIST 

HM1 NAME BLACKED OUT TEAM MEDIC 

SSG NAME BLACKED OUT EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE DISPOSAL 

PR2 NAME BLACKED OUT LIFE SUPPORT TECHNICIAN 

ET2 NAME BLACKED OUT COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST 

sPc NAME BLACKED OUT TEAM PHOTOGRAPHER 



(2) VIETNAMESE CENTRAL GOVERNMENT 

MR. THAN MANH NGOC (TRA.ANF MANHJ NGOCJ) TEAM 
LEADER/MINISTRY OF DEFENSE 



TRUONG CONG HOACH (TRWONG COONG HOACHJ) TEAM MEMBER 
NGUYEN THE HUNG (NGUYEENX THEES HtJNGF) TEAM MEMBER 
LE CONG TAM (LEE COONG TAAM) TEAM MEMBER 
NGUYEN KHANH HOA (NGUYEENX KHANHS HOAR) TEAM MEMBER 

(3) NGHE AN PROVINCE TASK TEAM: 

MR. NGO SI HAU (NGOO SIX HAAUJ) TEAM LEADER 

MR. DO CUONG (DOOx CWONGF) TEAM MEMBER 

MR. TRAN CONG (TRAANF COONG) TEAM MEMBER 

MR. TItAN VAN PHUC (TRAANF VAWN PHUCS) TEAM MEMBER 

MR. VO VAN THAO (VOX VAWN THAO) TEAM MEMBER 

(4) NGHIA DAN DISTRICT TASK TEAM: 

MR. HO CONG SON (HOOF OOONG SOWN) TEAM MEMBER 

MR. TRAN NGOC DUNG (TPAANF NGOCJ ZUNG) TEAM MEMBER 

MR. NGUYEN SI THUG (NGUYEENX SIX THUYR) TEAM MEMBER 

(5) NGHIA PHU VILLAGE TASK TEAM: 

MR. PHAU QUANG TOAU (PHAUJ QUANG TOANR) TEAM MEMBER 
MR. LE VAN TUY (LEE VAWN TUY) TEAM MEMBER 

3. BACKGROUND. 

A. THIS CASE INVOLVES THE LOSS OF AN A-1H AIRCRAFT SHOT 
DOWN DURING AN ARMED RECONNAISSANCE MISSION OVER 
NORTHERN VIETNAM ON 08 OCTOBER 1966, RESULTING IN ONE 
UNACCOUNTED-FOR 

INDIVIDUAL. 

B. ON 26 OCTOBER 1993, INVESTIGATION ELEMENT TWO (IE2) 
INVESTIGATED CASE 0489 IN XUAN BINH VILLAGE, NHU XUAN 
DISTRICT, THANH HOA PROVINCE. IE2 SURVEYED THE LOCATION 
FOR CASE 0489. THE TEAM DID NOT RECOVER ANY REMAINS OR 
PERSONAL EFFECTS, NOR ANY EVIDENCE OF A PLANE CRASH IN THE 
AREA (REF B). 

C. ON 1 NOVEMBER 1995, THE PROVINCE TASK TEAM INFORMED 
INVESTIGATION ELEMENT ONE (IE1) ThAT THEY CANVASSED BO 
LAN (BOO LAAN) HAMLET, XUAN THAI (XUAANS THAIR) VILLAGE 
AND THANH KY (THANH KYS) VILLAGE WITH NEGATIVE RESULTS. 



THE PROVINCE TASK TEAM AND THE VIETNAMESE OFFICE FOR 
SEEKING MISSING PERSONS (VNOSMP) TEAM MEMBERS GAVE IE1 A 
REPORT OF THEIR CANVASSING EFFORTS. IE1 DID NOT RECOVER OR 
RECEIVE ANY REMAINS OR MATERIAL EVIDENCE WHILE 
INVESTIGATING THIS CASE (REF C). 

D. ON 27 NOVEMBER 1996, IE1 TRAVELED TO NGHIA PHU VILLAGE, 
NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, NGHE AN PROVINCE, AND INTERVIEWED 
TWO WITNESSES WITH POSSIBLE INFORMATION CONCERNING 
CASE 0489. WITNESS ONE LED IE1 TO A CRASH SITE. IE1 SURVEYED 
THE SITE AND RECEIVED NUMEROUS PIECES OF AIRCRAFT 
WRECKAGE. (REF D). 

E.FROM 26 JUNE TO 4 JULY 1998, RE1 BEGAN EXCAVATION OF AN 
AIRCRAFT CRASH SITE BELIEVED TO BE ASSOCIATED WITH CASE 
0489 IN NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, NGHE AN PROVINCE, SRV. RE1 
OPENED THREE OUT OF 12 5-X-5-METER GRID UNITS. THE TEAM 
CLOSED NONE OF THE UNITS. RE1 RECOVERED NUMEROUS PIECES 
OF AIRCRAFT WRECKAGE AND TWO PIECES OF LIFE SUPPORT 
EQUIPMENT. THE TEAM ANTHROPOLOGIST, IN CONSULTATION WITH 
THE TEAM LEADER, SUSPENDED THE EXCAVATION ON 04 JULY DUE 
TO CONTINUED INCLEMENT WEATHER THAT OCCURRED IN 
CONJUNCTION WITH THE RAINY SEASON. RE1 RECOMMENDED 
FURTHER EXCAVATION DURING THE DRY SEASON (REF E). 

4. PROJECT LOCATION. 

A. VICINITY OF NGHIA PHU VILLAGE, NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, NGHE 
AN PROVINCE, SRV. 

B.GRID COORDINATES: THE PROJECT AREA IS AT 48Q WG 58842 
44122, ELEVATION 154 METERS, AS DETERMINED BY A GLOBAL 
POSITIONING SYSTEM (GPS) RECEIVER TRACKING SEVEN 
SATELLITES ON THE INDIAN SPECIAL DATUM. 

CC. MAP: NAME: PHONG BAI; SHEET: 6147 IV; EDITION: 
2-AMS; SERIES: L7014; SCALE: 1:50,000; HORIZONTAL DATUM: 
INDIAN DATUM 1960. 



5. DESCRIPTION OF PROJECT AREA. 

A.TO ACCESS THE CASE 0489 PROJECT AREA, THE TEAM TRAVELED 
BY VEHICLE FOR TWO HOURS AND THIRTY MINUTES NORTH AND 
WEST OF VINH CITY. THE SITE IS IN A CULTIVATED SUGARCANE 
FIELD, AND IS BORDERED ON THE NORTH, SOUTH, AND EAST BY 
RECENTLY PLANTED SUGARCANE FIELDS. DIRECTLY ADJACENT TO 
THE SITE ON THE WEST SIDE ARE THREE BOMB CRATERS. 
SURROUNDING THE SITE ON ALL FOUR SIDES ARE CULTIVATED 



HILLS OF RICE, CORN, AND PEANUTS. 

B. SOIL STRATIGRAPHY OF THE PROJECT AREA CONSISTS OF 
A RICH ORANGE-BROWN TOPSOIL OF APPROXIMATELY 20 
CENTIMETERS ABOVE A LAYER OF A DARKER ORANGE-BROWN SILTY 
CLAY OF VARIABLE DEPTH AND THICKNESS. WITHIN THIS STRATUM 
IS A DISTINCT GRAVEL LAYER, PRESENT THROUGHOUT THE SITE IN 
UNDISTURBED AREAS, WHICH MAY REPRESENT AN OLD FLOOD. 
BENEATH THIS LAYER IS DECOMPOSING REDDISH BROWN SHALE 
BEDROCK OF VARIOUS DEPTHS. 



6. FIELD METHODS. 

A. INITIAL INVESTIGATION AT THE SITE INCLUDED RE- 
INTERVIEWING TWO PRIMARY WITNESSES WHO PROVIDED 
INFORMATION TO THE IE TEAM DURING THE 43RD JFA AND RE1 
TEAM DURING THE 51ST JFA. BOTH WITNESSES CONFIRMED 
EARLIER STATEMENTS, INCLUDING THE ALMOST 90 DEGREE ANGLE 
OF AIRCRAFT IMPACT, APPROXIMATE DEPTH OF IMPACT OF THREE 
TO FIVE METERS, AND APPROXIMATE WIDTH OF 10 METERS. BOTH 
INDICATED THE AREA THEY BELIEVED TO BE THE LOCATION OF 
IMPACT. BOTH WITNESSES CONFIRMED THE EXISTENCE OF BOMB 
CRATERS TO THE WEST OF THE SITE PRIOR TO THE CRASH. BOTH 
WITNESSES ALSO RECALLED HEARING THAT THE ANTI-AIRCRAFT 
ARTILLERY UNIT REMOVED A LEFT FOREARM WITH BLONDE HAIR 
AND A WATCH FROM THE SITE. NEITHER KNEW OF THE 
DISPOSITION OF THE REMAINS. RE4 LATER 

RE-INTERVIEWED ONE OF THE ORIGINAL WITNESSES, AS WELL AS A 
NEW WITNESS, TO CONFIRM NEW INFORMATION ABOUT 
SCAVENGING OF HE SITE BY THE PEOPLE FROM HUE IN 1981/1982. 
IN ADDITION, DURING EXCAVATION RE4 RECEIVED INFORMATION 
FROM AN ADDITIONAL WITNESS WHO CLAIMED HE RECOVERED AND 
RE- INTERRED REMAINS TO THE WEST OF THE SITE. 

B.PRIOR TO EXCAVATION, RE4 CONDUCTED A PEDESTRIAN SURFACE 
SURVEY AND METAL DETECTOR SWEEP. VERY LITTLE WAS VISIBLE 
ON THE SURFACE DUE TO EXTENSIVE AGRICULTURAL USE OF THE 
PROJECT AREA. THE TEAM EOD TECHNICIAN CONDUCTED METAL 
DETECTOR SWEEPS FOR EACH GRID UNIT AND PINFLAGGED ALL 
METAL DETECTOR SIGNALS. THE EOD TECHNICIAN MARKED WITH 
FLAGGING TAPE AND PHOTOGRAPHED SEVERAL AREAS OF METAL 
CONCENTRATION. 

C.BASED ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF METAL DETECTOR SIGNALS, THE 
FINDINGS FROM THE 51ST JFA, AND WITNESS INFORMATION, THE 
TEAM PLACED A 20X-12-METER ARCHAEOLOGICAL GRID AROUND 
THE IDENTIFIED IMPACT CRATER AND SEPARATED IT INTO 15 4-X- 
4- METER GRID UNITS. DUE TO THE RECOVERY OF POSSIBLE HUMAN 



REMAINS DURING EXCAVATION, THE TEAM ANTHROPOLOGIST 
EXPANDED THE GRID TO INCLUDE 14 MORE 4-X-4-METER UNITS TO 
TOTAL 29 UNITS. THE TEAM ANTHROPOLOGIST DESIGNATED THE 
PROJECT DATUM TO BE NSOO/E500, WHICH IS IN THE SOUTHWEST 
CORNER OF THE GRID AT 48Q WG 59250 43872. IN ADDITION TO 
THE 29 GRID UNITS, ONE 2-X-2-METER UNIT WAS APPROXIMATELY 
10 METERS WEST OF THE SITE TO INVESTIGATE WITNESS FOURS 
CLAIM THAT HE BURIED POSSIBLE HUMAN REMAINS IN THAT AREA. 
THE TEAM EXCAVATED THE GRID, LOCATED ON THE NORTHWEST 
RIM OF A BOMB CRATER, DOWN TO ONE METER BELOW GROUND 
SURFACE. 

D.RE4 EXCAVATED THE SITE ACCORDING TO STANDARD 
ARCHAEOLOGICAL PROCEDURES. THE TEAM EXCAVATED GRID UNITS 
WITH PICKS, SHOVELS, AND TROWELS, WITH SOIL TRANSPORTED 
TO TWO DRY SCREENING AREAS BY VIETNAMESE WORKERS. THE 
VIETNAMESE WORKERS SCREENED ALL FILL THROUGH A ONE- 
QUARTER INCH WIRE MESH UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF 
AMERICAN TEAM MEMBERS, WHO EXAMINED THE SCREENS FOR 
PHYSICAL AND MATERIAL EVIDENCE. EACH SCREENING STATION 
WORKED ON SEPARATE UNITS TO MAINTAIN PROVENIENCE. 

E.RE4 RETAINED ALL MATERIAL EVIDENCE AND POSSIBLE AIRCREW 
AND COCKPIT RELATED EQUIPMENT IN ZIP-LOCK BAGS LABELED BY 
CASE, GRID UNIT, AND DATE RECOVERED FOR FURTHER ANALYSIS 
BY THE JOINT TASK FORCE-FULL ACCOUNTING (JTF-FA) LIFE- 
SUPPORT SECTION AT CAMP SMITH, HONOLULU, HAWAII. 

F. THE TEAM PHOTOGRAPHED THE SITE BEFORE, DURING AND 
AFTER THE EXCAVATION. 

7. ARCHAEOLOGICAL FINDINGS. 

A.RE4 RECOVERED POSSIBLE HUMAN REMAINS FROM 
APPROXIMATELY 10-20 CENTIMETERS (CM) BELOW SURFACE, AND 
TWO PERSONAL EFFECTS FROM 80 TO 100 CM BELOW SURFACE. THE 
TEAM RECOVERED THE PERSONAL EFFECTS FROM WITHIN THE 
IMPACT CRATER. RE4 RECOVERED ALL FRAGMENTS OF POSSIBLE 
HUMAN REMAINS FROM WITHIN THE TOPSOIL STRATUM, 
APPROXIMATELY ONE TO EIGHT METERS SOUTH OF THE CRATER. 

B.RE4 RECOVERED MULTIPLE FRAGMENTS OF LIFE-SUPPORT 
EQUIPMENT FROM SURFACE TO 120 CM BELOW THE GROUND 
SURFACE, AS WELL AS NUMEROUS PIECES OF SMALL 
UNIDENTIFIABLE AIRCRAFT WRECKAGE. 

C. PRELIMINARY FIELD ASSESSMENT BY THE TEAM LST OF THE 
RECOVERED MATERIAL EVIDENCE DOES NOT PROVIDE 
CORRELATION TO AN A-i SERIES AIRCRAFT; SPECIFIC LIFE 



SUPPORT PIECES INDICATE AT LEAST ONE PERSON WAS IN THE 
AIRCRAFT AT THE TIME OF IMPACT. 

D. SIGNIFICANT DISTURBANCE OF THE IMPACT CRATER WAS 
VISIBLE IN THE STRATIGRAPHIC SEQUENCE OF THE NORTHERN 
HALF OF THE CRATER, PROBABLY DUE TO MULTIPLE EPISODES OF 
SCAVENGING BY LOCAL VILLAGERS AND THE PEOPLE FROM HUE. 
THE SOUTHERN HALF APPEARS INTACT WITH CLEAR, UNDISTURBED 
STRATIGRAPHY. 

E. RE4 DID NOT RECOVER ANY REMAINS OR MATERIAL EVIDENCE IN 
THE ISOLATED 2-X-2-METER UNIT LOCATED TO THE WEST OF THE 
SITE NEAR THE BOMB CRATER. THE TEAM CLOSED THIS UNIT. 

8. MATERIAL EVIDENCE. 

A. THE TEAM RECOVERED THE FOLLOWING PIECES OF LIFE-SUPPORT 
EQUIPMENT ITEMS: 

1) TWO LOCKING CONES WITH A RIPCORD PIN. 

2) THREE .38 CALIBER ROUNDS. 

3) NUMEROUS PIECES OF LIFE PRESERVER OR RAFT MATERIAL. 

4) SEVERAL ZIPPERS AND ZIPPER TEETH. 

5) ONE PIECE OF FLIGHT HELMET WITH NUMBERS AND LETTERING. 

6) SEVERAL SNAPS AND GROMMETS. 

7) ONE DATA PLATE WITH: AD -6 (DWG ON PART NO 5254070- 
3R,CONT #AS)51630,SER# A45-212, FA228 ?US) 

8) ONE UNIDENTIFIED D-RING WITH WEBBING ATTACHED. 

9) ONE RESTRANT BUCKLE. 

10) PIECES OF UNIDENTIFIED METAL. 

11) PIECE OF UNIDENTIFIED WEBBING. 

12) UNIDENTIFIED MATERIAL. 

13) TWO SPRING OPENING BAND EYELETS AND ONE HOOK. 

B. THE U.S. ARMY CENTRAL IDENTIFICATION LABORATORY, HAWAII 
CILHI) RETAINED THE FOLLOWING PERSONAI EFFECTS: 



(1) 1964 US DIME. 

(2) AN AIR FORCE UNIT CREST; ATTACK SQUADRON 15?. IN 
THE CENTER OF THE CREST INSIGNIA THERE IS A BLACK 
ACE OF SPADES ON A WHITE PLAYING CARD. A PAIR OF 
AVIATOR WINGS FLANKS THE PLAYING CARD. THERE IS 
AN ARROW COMING INTO THE CARD ON THE RIGHT SIDE 
POINTING TO THE ACE OF SPADES. 

C. THE TEAM PHOTOGRAPHED AND LEFT IN PLACE SEVEN BUCKETS 
OF GENERIC AIRCRAFT WRECKAGE. 

9. LIFE SUPPORT ANALYST COMMENTS. FIELD ANALYSIS OF THE 
ITEMS RECOVERED FROM THE CRASH SITE INDICATE THERE WAS AT 
LEAST ONE INDIVIDUAL IN THE AIRCRAFT UPON IMPACT. THE DATA 
PLATE WITH AD-6 IDENTIFIES THE CRASH SITE AS AN A-1H 
AIRCRAFT. JTF-FA FILES INDICATE THERE ARE NO OTHER A-i CRASH 
SITES WITHIN FIFTEEN KILOMETERS OF GRID COORDINATES 48Q 
WG 58842 44122. THE UNIDENTIFIED PIECES OF METAL, WEBBING 
AND MATERIAL REQUIRE FURTHER RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS BY 
JTF-FA. THE PRESENCE OF PARACHUTE LOCKING CONES WITH THE 
PINS STILL IN PLACE SUGGESTS THAT THE PILOT DID NOT DEPLOY 
THE PARACHUTE PRIOR TO IMPACT. 

10. ANALYST/LINGUIST COMMENTS. 

A. ON 26 FEBRUARY 2000, RE4 RE-INTERVIEWED TWO WITNESSES 
CONCERNING AN ALLEGED AIRCRAFT CRASH SITE IN NGHIA PHU 
VILLAGE, NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, NGHE AN PROVINCE. IN ADDITION, 
ON 12 MARCH 2000, RE4 RE-INTERVIEWED THE SECOND WITNESS 
CONCERNING AN UNIDENTIFIED GROUP FROM HUE THAT 
ALLEGEDLY REMOVED REMAINS FROM THE SITE. THE WITNESSES 
PROVIDED THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION: 

(1) WITNESS ONE: 

(A) NAME: MR. PHAN PHU (PHAAN PHUJ). 

(B) AGE: 75 YOA. 

(C) CURRENT RESIDENCE AND LENGTH OF TIME THERE: 
LIFELONG RESIDENT OF TEAM 7 (DOOIJ 7), 1ST OF MAY TREE FARM, 
NGHIA PHU VILLAGE (XkX NGHIAN PHUJ), NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, 
NGHE AN PROVINCE. 

(D) CURRENT OCCUPATION: RETIRED. 

(E) OCCUPATION AT TIME OF INCIDENT: FARMER. 



(F) BACKGROUND INFORMATION: A JOINT TEAM INTERVIEWED MR. 
PHU DURING THE 43RD AND 51ST JFAS (REFS D AND E). 

(G) STATEMENT: MR. PHIIS STATEMENT AGREED WITH 

HIS PREVIOUS STATEMENTS WITH ONE EXCEPTION. MR. PHI) 
STATED HE DID NOT WITNESS ANYONE FROM THE NGUYEN VIET 
XUAN AIR DEFENSE BATTALION (TIEEUR DOANF PHAOS PHONGF 
KHOONG NGUYEENX VIEETS XUAAN) REMOVE A SEVERED FOREARM 
FROM THE SITE BUT HAD ONLY HEARD THIS INFORMATION FROM 
OTHER VILLAGERS. 

(2) WITNESS TWO: 

(A) NAME: MR. DO VAN HOA (DOOX VAWN HOAF). 

(B) AGE: 43 YOA. 

(C) CURRENT RESIDENCE AND LENGTH OF TIME THERE: 
LIFELONG RESIDENT OF PHI) LOI HAMLET (THOON PHUS LOWIJ), 
NGHIA PHI) VILLAGE, NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, NGHE AN PROVINCE. 

(D) CURRENT OCCUPATION: FARMER. 

(E) OCCUPATION AT TIME OF INCIDENT: STUDENT. 

(F) BACKGROUND INFORMATION: A JOINT TEAM INTERVIEWED MR. 
PHU DURING THE 43RD AND 51ST JFAS (REFS D AND E). 

(G) STATEMENT: MR. HOA REITERATED HIS PREVIOUS STATEMENTS 
AND ADDED THAT THE CRATER WAS SIX METERS DEEP. MR. HOA 
STATED DURING THE 51ST JFA THAT ON AN UNRECALLED DATE IN 
1981 OR 1982, TWO SEPARATE, UNIDENTIFIED GROUPS FROM 
HANOI AND HUE CAME TO THE SITE AND USED PICKS AND SHOVELS 
TO ATTEMPT RECOVERY OF REMAINS. THE DIAMETER OF THE HOLE 
THE GROUP FROM HUE DUG WAS APPROXIMATELY TEN METERS. 

HE NEITHER SAW NOR HEARD OF ANYONE RECOVERING REMAINS 
FROM THE SITE. THREE MONTHS LATER, LOCAL RESIDENTS PUSHED 
THE SURROUNDING DIRT BACK INTO THE CRATER. LOCAL 
RESIDENTS DID NOT BEGIN CULTIVATING THE AREA UNTIL 1995. 

B. FOLLOWING THEIR INTERVIEW, EACH WITNESS INDICATED 
THE APPROXIMATE CENTER OF ThE IMPACT CRATER, DIFFERING 
FROM 

EACH OTHER BY ONLY A COUPLE OF CENTIMETERS. BOTH 
WITNESSES CONFIRMED THEY DID NOT SEE ANY REMAINS BUT HAD 
ONLY HEARD THERE WERE REMAINS REMOVED FROM THE SITE. 
NEITHER WITNESS COULD PROVIDE ANY INFORMATION 
CONCERNING THE SEVERED HAND PURPORTEDLY REMOVED FROM 
THE SITE BY THE NGUYEN VIET XUAN AIR DEFENSE BATTALION NOR 



THE DISPOSITION OF IT. 

C. ON 6 MARCH AND 12 MARCH 2000, RE4 INTERVIEWED TWO 
ADDITIONAL WITNESSES CONCERNING THE DISPOSITION OF 
REMAINS ALLEGEDLY FOUND AT THE SITE. THE WITNESSES 
PROVIDED THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION: 

(1) WITNESS THREE: 

(A) NAME: MR. TRUONG MINH CHI (TRWONGF MINH CHIS). 

(B) AGE: 43 YOA. 

(C) CURRENT RESIDENCE AND LENGTH OF TIME THERE: 
LIFELONG RESIDENT OF TEAM 7, NGHIA PHU VILLAGE, NGHIA DAN 
DISTRICT, NGHE AN PROVINCE. 

(D) CURRENT OCCUPATION: FARMER. 

CE) OCCUPATION AT TIME OF INCIDENT: MILITARY RECRUITEE. 

(F) BACKGROUND INFORMATION: NONE. 

(G) STATEMENT: ON AN UNRECALLED DATE IN 1981, WHILE ON 
LEAVE FROM THE MILITARY, MR. CHI HEARD FROM LOCAL 
RESIDENTS (NFI) THAT AN UNIDENTIFIED GROUP FROM HUE CAME 
TO THE VILLAGE THREE MONTHS PRIOR TO HIS ARRIVAL AND HAD 
SCAVENGED AN AIRCRAFT CRASH SITE IN THE AREA. HE BELIEVED 
THEY HAD DUG APPROXIMATELY FIVE METERS BELOW SURFACE, 
AND COULD NOT RECALL IF ANYONE FOUND OR REMOVED ANY 
REMAINS FROM THE SITE. 

(2) WITNESS FOUR: 

(A) NAME: CHU VAN CUONG (CHUS VAWN CWONGF). 

(B) AGE: 36 YOA. 

(C) CURRENT RESIDENCE AND LENGTH OF TIME THERE: 

LIFELONG RESIDENT OF TEAM 7 , P1113 LOI HAMLET, NGHIA PHU 
VILLAGE, NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, NGHE AN PROVINCE. 

CD) CURRENT OCCUPATION: FARMER. 

CE) OCCUPATION AT TIME OF INCIDENT: STUDENT. 
(F) BACKGROUND INFORMATION: NONE. 



(G) STATEMENT: 

((1)) ON AN UNRECALLED DATE, APPROXIMATELY FIVE TO SIX 
YEARS AGO, WHILE REMOVING TREES TO CULTIVATE THE LAND FOR 
FARMING, MR. CUONG FOUND, AMONG THE ROOTS OF A TREE, A 
LARGE BONE HE BELIEVED TO BE A SECTION OF THE THIGH BONE. 
HE THREW THE BONE IN AN 80-CENTIMETER LONG BY 60- 
CENTIMETER WIDE BY ONE-METER DEEP HOLE ADJACENT TO A 
LARGE BOMB CRATER. HE THEN FILLED IN THE HOLE WITH DIRT 
AND PLACED SEVERAL MEDIUM SIZED ROCKS ON TOP OF THE GRAVE 
AND CONTINUED WORKING. 

((2)) MR. CUONG DID NOT KNOW OF ANY OTHER CRASH SITES, 
AMERICAN REMAINS OR OTHER BURIAL SITES. ((3)) MR. CUONG 
POINTED OUT A TWO METER BY TWO METER AREA HE BELIEVED TO 
BE THE GENERAL LOCATION HE BURIED THE BONE FRAGMENT. THE 
AREA IS ADJACENT TO A BOMB CRATER ON THE NORTHWEST SIDE. 

11. EOD TECHNICIAN COMMENTS. THE TEAM RECOVERED FIVE 20MM 
AP PROJECTILES, FIVE 20MM HE PROJECTILES WITHOUT FUZING OR 
READABLE MARKINGS, ONE 20MM HE PROJECTILE WITH M75 PD 
FUZE (LOT * KOP 48-888-11-52), AND TEN CARTRIDGE LINKS. THE 
PROJECTILES WERE BADLY RUSTED AND WITHOUT CASINGS. TWO 
GENERAL PURPOSE LOW DRAG BOMBS (MK 81 OR 82) WERE 
PARTIALLY EXCAVATED. THE EOD TECHNICIAN DISCOVERED THE 
BOMBS NOSE DOWN, APPROXIMATELY 18 INCHES APART WITH 
SNAKE EYE FIN ASSEMBLIES STILL IN THE FOLDED POSITION. THE 
CLOSE PROXIMITY OF THE TWO BOMBS IS CONSISTENT WITH 
BOMBS WHICH WERE STILL ATTACHED TO THE AIRCRAFT AT THE 
MOMENT OF IMPACT. ALTHOUGH BOMB POSITIONS AND FIN 
CONFIGURATIONS INDICATE AN UNARMED CONDITION, TIME 
CONSTRAINTS PREVENTED A COMPLETE ORDNANCE 
RECONNAISSANCE TO VERIFY FUZING TYPE AND CONDITION. 
VIETNAMESE EOD OFFICIALS PROVIDED A SIMILAR ASSESSMENT 
AND ASSUMED RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE ORDNANCE AT THE SITE. 
IT IS IMPORTANT TO NOTE THAT DESTROYING THE BOMBS IN THEIR 
CURRENT LOCATION WOULD CAUSE SEVERE DAMAGE, SUCH AS A 
LARGE, DEEP CRATER AND BURNT, BLACKENED SOIL, OVER A LARGE 
PORTION OF THE SITE. IF FURTHER EXAMINATION REVEALS THAT 
THE ORDNANCE CAN BE SAFELY MOVED THEN AN ALTERNATE 
DEMOLITION SITE WOULD BE PREFERABLE. THE FACT THAT BOMBS 
ARE OFTEN LOADED BILATERALLY TO AVOID INSTABILITY OF THE 
AIRCRAFT IN FLIGHT SUGGESTS A HIGH LIKELIHOOD THAT 
ADDITIONAL BOMBS ARE PRESENT NEAR THE LOCATION OF THE 
OTHER WING OF THE AIRCRAFT. 

12. ANTHROPOLOGIST CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS. 
A.DUE TO THE HIGH CLAY CONTENT AND MOISTURE OF THE DENSE, 



COMPACT SOIL WITHIN THE IMPACT CRATER, RECOMMEND WET- 
SCREENING FOR A FUTURE EXCAVATION. AS NOTED BY PREVIOUS 
JFA TEAMS, THERE IS NO WATER SOURCE IN CLOSE PROXIMITY; 
HOWEVER, THE BOMB CRATERS DIRECTLY ADJACENT TO THE SITE 
WOULD PROVIDE A RESERVOIR IN WHICH TO STORE AND RECYCLE 
WATER FOR WET-SCREENING. IF WET-SCREENING IS NOT 
AVAILABLE, RECOMMEND THE EXCAVATED CRATER SOIL BE PUT 
UNDER TARPS TO DRY FOR 24 TO 48 HOURS TO ALLOW SUFFICIENT 
TIME TO DRY BEFORE DRY-SCREENING. 

B. AT THE TIME OF THE 59TH JFA THERE WERE REPORTS OF A 
GUESTHOUSE IN THE VICINITY OF THE SITE THAT WAS IN THE 
PROCESS OF BEING BUILT WHICH COULD HOUSE A FUTURE TEAM. 
RECOMMEND CONFIRMING THE STATUS OF THIS GUESTHOUSE AS 
AN ALTERNATIVE TO TRAVELLING FROM VINE, AS THE DRIVE TIME 
OF FIVE HOURS REDUCED THE TIME FOR EXCAVATION TO ONLY 
FOUR AND 

A HALF HOURS EACH DAY. 

C. ALL POSSIBLE HUMAN REMAINS RECOVERED FROM THE SITE 
WERE WITHIN 20 CM OF THE GROUND SURFACE, AND MOST OFTEN 
IN THE TOP 10 CM. ALL THE RECOVERED REMAINS CAME FROM OUTS 
IDE OF THE IMPACT CRATER BY AS MUCH AS EIGHT METERS TO THE 
SOUTH 

D. RECOMMEND THAT THE NEXT RECOVERY TEAM AND 
ANTHROPOLOGIST RELOCATE THE CRATER BOUNDARIES AND 
CONTINUE EXCAVATION. HOWEVER, EQUAL PRIORITY SHOULD BE 
GIVEN TO COMPLETION OF THE FOUR-METER REQUIREMENT 
AROUND AREAS WHERE POSSIBLE HUMAN REMAINS WAS 
RECOVERED, DUE TO THE LARGE AMOUNT OF POSSIBLE HUMAN 
REMAINS RECOVERED SOLELY FROM 

OUTSIDE THE IMPACT CRATER BOUNDARIES. 

E. THE BOMBS EXPOSED DURING EXCAVATION ARE UNDER THE 
JURISDICTION OF PROVINCE OFFICIALS, WHO WILL BE 
RESPONSIBLE FOR THEIR REMOVAL AND DISPOSAL. AT ONE TIME 
THE PROCEDURE OF DETONATING THE BOMBS IN PLACE WAS 
PRESENTED AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO REMOVAL WITH DISPOSAL AT 
AN ALTERNATE LOCATION. IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT THIS OCCUR 
ONLY AS A LAST 

RESORT AS THE ADVERSE IMPACT TO THE SITE WOULD BE 
SIGNIFICANT, IF NOT RESULTING IN TOTAL DESTRUCTION OF SITE 
INTEGRITY. IF REMOVAL OF THE BOMBS IS NOT POSSIBLE, THEN 
EXCAVATION AROUND THE BOMBS SHOULD BE AS MINIMAL AS 
POSSIBLE, AS ThE CENTER OF THE IMPACT CRATER IS 
APPROXIMATELY TWO METERS EAST. IN ADDITION, THERE IS A 
POSSIBILITY THAT ADDITIONAL BOMBS MAY BE IN CLOSE 
PROXIMITY TO THE OTHER WING (TO THE EAST). FUTURE 



EXCAVATION TEAMS SHOULD EXERCISE CAUTION IN THIS AREA. 

F. RECOMMEND TO CONTINUE ThE EXCAVATION DURING THE DRY 
SEASON. 

13. TEAM LEADER COMMENTS. 

A. CONCLUSIONS: CONCUR WITh THE ANTHROPOLOGIST. THE TEAM 
SUSPENDED EXCAVATION ON THE SITE DUE TO THE END OF THE JFA. 
THE SITE REQUIRES FURTHER EXCAVATION IN ORDER TO COMPLETE 
THE SITE. 

B. HOST GOVERNMENT COOPERATION/SUPPORT: RE4 RECEIVED 
EXCELLENT COOPERATION FROM CENTRAL, PROVINCIAL, DISTRICT, 
AND VILLAGE OFFICIALS. RECOMMEND OFFICIALLY COMMENDING 
MR. TRAN NGOC. 

14. DETACHMENT COMMANDER'S COMMENTS. NONE. 



60 th JAF Report #1 

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY 

UNITED STATES ARMY CENTRAL IDENTIFICATION LABORATORY, 

HAWAII 

310 WORCHESTER AVENUE, 

HICKAM AFB, HAWAII 96853-5530 

TAPC-PED-H (638-2) 
17 July 2000 

MEMORANDUM THRU S-3, U.S. Army Central Identification 
Laboratory, Hawaii 

FOR Commander, U.& Army Central Identification Laboratory, Hawaii 

SUBJECT: Search and Recovery Report 2000/CIL/029, An A-1H 
Aircraft Crash Site believed to be associated with REFNO 0489, Nghia 
Phu Village, Nghia Dan District, Nghe An Province, Socialist Republic 
of Vietnam, 27 April through 16 May 2000 

1. BACKGROUND (Enclosure 1): 

a. This case (REFNO 0489) involves the loss of an A-1H aircraft shot 
down during an armed reconnaissance mission over northern 
Vietnam on 8 October 1966, resulting in one unaccounted-for 
individual. The pilot, LT John A. FELDHUAS is unaccounted for and is 
currently carried in the status of dead, body not recovered. 

b. From 26 June through 4 July 1998, during the 51St Joint Field 
Activity (JFA), a joint United States/Socialist Republic of Vietnam 
(U.S ./S.R.V.) team conducted an excavation of an aircraft crash site 
believed to be associated with REFNO 0489 near Nghia Phu Village, 
Nghia Dan District, Nghe An Province, S.R.V. The team opened three 
out of 12 5-x-5-meter units and closed none. The team recovered 
numerous pieces of aircraft wreckage and two pieces of life support 
equipment. Excavation at the site was suspended on 4 July 1998 due 
to rain and poor field conditions. 

c. From 28 February through 18 March2000, during the 59th JFA, a 
joint U.S. /S.R.V. team continued excavation of the REFNO 0489 site. 
The team opened 14 out of 29 gridded 4-x-4-meter units and closed 
one. The team recovered numerous pieces of aircraft wreckage, 
multiple pieces of life support, two personal effects, and possible 
human remains. In addition, the team excavated to sterile soil one 
2-x-2-meter unit approximately 10 meters west of the site datum 
with negative findings. Excavation at the site was suspended on 18 
March 2000 due to time constraints at the close of the JFA. 



2. PROJECT AREA (Enclosures 3-4): 

a. Legal location: Vicinity of Nghia Phu Village, Nghia Dan District, 
Nghe An Province, 

b. Grid coordinate: 48Q WG 59492/44009 determined by a Global 
Positioning System (GPS) receiver tracking six satellites. 

c. Topographic map: Title: Phong Bai; Edition: 2-AMS; Series: L7014; 
Sheet: 6147 IV; Scale: 1:50,000; Horizontal Datum: Indium Datum, 
1960. 

3. DESCRIPTION OF PROJECT AREA (Enclosure 7: Photographs 1- 
18): 

a. To access the project area believed to be associated with REFNO 
0489, the team traveled by vehicle for approximately one hour from 
a guesthouse in Nghia Dan followed by a five-minute walk. The 
project area is located in a cultivated sugar cane field. It should be 
noted that the project area had been filled in, cultivated and 
replanted with sugar cane between the 59th and 60th JFA leaving 
very little evidence of past excavations. Directly adjacent to the 
project area on the west side are three bomb craters. Surrounding 
the site on all four sides are cultivated bills of sugar cane, corn and 
peanuts. 

b. Soil stratigraphy of the project area consists of a rich orange- 
brown topsoil of approximately 20 centimeters above a layer of 
darker orange-brown silty clay of variable depth. Within this stratum 
is a distinct gravel layer which is present throughout the site in all 
undisturbed areas. Beneath this layer is reddish-brown shale 
bedrock of variable depth which is sterile. 

4. FIELD METHODS: 

a. The 51th JFA team re-interviewed two primary witnesses that 
were interviewed by the Investigative Element (IE) during the 43rd 
JFA. Both witnesses stated that they heard firing from a local anti- 
aircraft unit and saw the aircraft impact straight down (90 degrees) 
into the ground, explode and catch fire; this created an impact crater 
ranging in depth from three to five meters and approximately 20 
meters in circumference. Both witnesses also recounted that a left 
human forearm with a watch was recovered by a member of the 
anti-aircraft artillery unit. They did not know the disposition of these 
remains. The witnesses had no knowledge of any other human 
remains or personal effects being recovered during local scavenging 
operations of the site. After the interview, each witness was asked 
to place a wooden stake where they believed the center of the 
impact crater was located. 



b. The site had been extensively scavenged and the impact crater 
had been allegedly backfilled with dirt from the surrounding area, 
therefore there was no apparent surface distribution of aircraft 
wreckage or a noticeable impact crater observed. A metal detector 
sweep of the area was conducted and all metal detector signals were 
pinflagged. Due to inclement weather, the team was only able to 
partially excavate an approximate 15-x-2-meter trench. The team 
recovered numerous pieces of aircraft wreckage and two pieces of 
life-support equipment. The site was recommended for further 
excavation. 

c. During the 59th JFA, the team re-interviewed the same two 
primary witnesses. Both witnesses were consistent with earlier 
statements and further confirmed the existence of bomb craters to 
the west of the site prior to the crash. The team later re-interviewed 
one- of the original witnesses, as well as a third witness, to confirm 
new information about scavenging of the site by the people from 
Hue in 1981 or 1982. In addition, during excavation of the site the 
team received information from a fourth witness who claimed he 
recovered and re-interred remains to the west of the site. 

d. Based on the distribution of metal signals, the findings from the 
51th IEA, and witness information, the team placed a 20-X-12 meter 
archaeological grid around the identified impact crater. Due to the 
recovery of possible human remains during excavation, the recovery 
leader expanded the grid. In addition, the team placed one 2-x-2- 
meter unit approximately 10 meters west of the main project area to 
investigate witness fours claim that he buried possible human 
remains in that area less than a meter deep. The team excavated the 
grid, located on the northwest rim of a bomb crater, down to one 
meter below ground surface with negative results. The team opened 
14 4-x-4-meter grid units and closed one. Human remains were 
recovered from between four and eight meters to the south of the 
impact crater. All human remains were recovered approximately 10- 
20 centimeters (cm) below ground surface within the topsoil 
stratum. Two personal effects were recovered from within the 
impact crater at a depth of approximately 80-100 cm below ground 
surface. Two general-purpose low drag bombs (500 lb) were 
partially excavated two meters southwest of the center of the impact 
crater. The bombs were nose down and approximately 18 inches 
apart. The bombs were left in place and the Nghe An Province 
officials were notified of their location for later removal and disposal 
by the S.R.V. government. Excavation was not completed by the end 
of the IEA and further excavation was recommended. 

e. The project area was completely backfilled, cultivated and 
replanted with sugarcane during the approximate one month down 
between the 59th and 60th JFA. In addition, the Vietnamese had 
removed and allegedly detonated the two 500 lb bombs discovered 



and left in place during the 59th JFA. Due to the backfilling of the 
entire project area, the extent of disturbance caused by removing 
the bombs was unknown prior to beginning excavation on the 60 
JFA. A remnant of the southeast corner from the 59 JFA excavation 
was still visible. The 59th JFA team left no permanent datum marker, 
therefore the southeast corner was used to build the north-south 
and east-west baseline for the 60th JFA excavation. A grid system 
was put in place that fully encompassed and expanded to the north, 
east and south on the project area defined during the 59th JFA. The 
expansion of the project area was necessitated in some locations by 
the recovery of human remains and life support during the 59th JFA. 
The southwest corner (N500/E500) was designated the project area 
datum. During the excavation, walls of the 59th JFA were revealed 
and it was possible to map the exact overlay of the two excavations. 
The grid units were found to be off approximately 40 centimeters 
north-south and 70 centimeters east-west. 

f. The explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) technician conducted a 
metal detector sweep of the project area. Based on the crater 
definition established during the 59th JFA, the area where the 
second wing would most probably be located was concentrated on in 
attempts of locating any additional 500-lb ordnance. Several strong 
hits were obtained in this area. It should be noted that the project 
area soil has inclusions of manganese and iron that were also picked 
up by the metal detector and compounded the detection process. 

g. With the aid of local laborers, the project area was excavated 
using shovels, pickaxes, hoes and trowels stripping the ground to 
culturally sterile soil. All excavated soil was screened through 
quarter-inch (1/4) wire mesh. U.S. team members examined the 
contents of each screen. The Anthropologist/ Recovery Leader 
inspected all materials believed to be osseous m origin. The Life 
Support Technician (LST) examined all recovered aircraft materials, 
and retained for further analysis all life support equipment and 
significant aircraft wreckage. 

h. The team photographer photographed the site prior to, during and 
upon completion of the project 

5. ARCHAEOLOGICAL FINDINGS: 

a. During the 51th JFA, approximately 30 square meters were 
excavated. The team did not recover any human remains or personal 
effects. They recovered fragments of life-support equipment at a 
depth of approximately 40 centimeters below the ground surface 
and numerous unidentifiable fragments of aircraft wreckage at 
various depths. The material evidence recovered by the team was 
not conclusive as to the type of aircraft or if there was anyone in the 
aircraft at the time of impact. 



b. During the 59th JFA, approximately 220 square meters were 
excavated. The team recovered multiple human remains from 
approximately 10-20 cm below ground surface. Two personal effects 
were rcovered at a depth of approximately 80-100 cm below ground 
surface from within the impact crater. All fragments of bone were 
recovered from within the topsoil stratum in an area between one 
and eight meters south of the impact crater. Analysis of recovered 
life-support materials and aircraft wreckage identified the crash site 
as an A-ill aircraft and indicated that at least one person was in the 
aircraft at the time of impact. 

c. Approximately 288 square meters were excavated to culturally 
sterile soil during the 60th JFA. Human skeletal and dental remains 
were recovered. The dental remains were recovered from within the 
impact crater boundaries at a depth of approximately 1.1 meters. 
The skeletal remains were recovered from within the topsoil 
stratum, at a depth of approximately 20 cm, in close proximity to 
where human remains were recovered during the 59th JFA 
approximately eight meters south of the impact crater. Analysis of 
recovered life-support materials and aircraft wreckage were 
consistent with an A-i aircraft, but could not be correlated to a 
specific model or the aircraft involved in the REFNO 0489 incident. 
The recovery of life preserver or raft material further supported the 
59" JFA assessment that at least one individual was in the aircraft 
at the time of impact. 

d. No additional 500-lb ordnance was discovered during the 60th 
JFA. It should be noted that according to witness testimony the 
aircraft approached from the east and impacted in an almost vertical 
manner. The last transmission from the aircraft was that the right 
wing was on fire. The orientation of the crash crater and the location 
of the ordnance discovered on the 59th JFA (southwest aspect of the 
impact crater) would be indicative of a left wing and the second 
wing (presumably northeast aspect of the impact crater) would 
therefore be configured as the right. It is my opinion that the 
ordnance were either scavenged or possibly detonated at the time of 
impact. 

6. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: 

a. The area of excavation is associated with the loss of one U.S. 
service member, LT John A. FELDHAUS, the pilot of an A-1H aircraft. 
No exclusive association with the REFNO 0489 individual has been 
made based upon material evidence recovered from the project area 
during any of the three excavations. 

b. The recovered life-support items are consistent with one 
individual being aboard the aircraft at the time of impact. 



c. Multiple human remains and one restored tooth were recovered 
from the project area. 

d. Possible personal effects recovered from the project area include 
a 1964 U.S. dime and an Air Force unit crest believed to be from 
Attack Squadron 15(?). 

e. Excavation was completed on 16 May 2000 and the site was 
subsequently closed. No further excavation of this site is 
recommended. 



60 th JAF Report #2 

25 April to 24 May 2000 dated June 2000.... 

FM CDR JTFFA HONOLULU HI//J31// 

SUBJ/ DETAILED REPORT OP EXCAVATION OF CASE 0489 

1. SUMMARY REPORT OF THE 60Th JOINT FIELD ACTIVITY (JFA) 
CONDUCTED IN SOCIALIST REPUBLIC OF VIETNAM (SRV) FROM 25 
APRIL THROUGH 24 MAY 2000. 



E IS THE AW~LYSIS OF MATERIAL EVIDENCE ASSOCIATED WITH 
CASE 0489 CONDUCTED DURING THE 43RD JFk. 

F. REF F IS THE DETAILED REPORT OF EXCAVATION OF CASE 0489 
CONDUCTED DURING THE 51ST JFk. 

G. REF IS THE CORRECTED COPY OF THE DETAILED REPORT OF 
EXCAVATION OF CASE 0489 CONDUCTED DURING THE 59Th JFA - 

H. REF F MAP DATA: NAME: PHONG BAI; SHEET: 6147 IV SERIES: 
L7014; EDITION: 2-AMS; SCALE: 1:50,000: INDIAN DATUM 1960. 

2 - SUMMARY OF EXCAVATION. 

A. CASE 0489: PROM 27 APRIL THROUGH 16 MAY 2000 DURING TEE 
60TH JFk, RECOVERY ELEMENT FIVE (R25) CONTINUED EXCAVATION 
OF A CRASH SITE ASSOCIATED WITH CASE 

0489 NEAR &GHIA PIIU VILLAGE. NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, NGHE AN 
PROVINCE, 5kV. RES EXCAVATED APPROXIMATELY 288 SQUARE 
METERS - RES RECOVERED POSSIBLE "HUMAN REMAINS MULTIPLE 
PIECES OF LIFE SUPPORT EQUIPMENT, AND IWMEROtIS 
FRAGMKNTS OF AIRCRAFT WREC1CAGE - THE TEAM 
ANTHROPOLOGIST. IN CONSULTATION WITH THE TEAM LEADER, 
CLOSED THE SITE ON 

16 MAY 2000. ON 31 MAY 2000, THE JOINT FORENSIC REVIEW TEAM 
SELECTED THESE REMAINS FOR REPATRIATION TO THE UNITED 
STATES. 

B. TEAM COMPOSITION: 
(1) U.S. CONTINGENT. 

NAME BLACKED OUT U.S.. CONTINGENT: 
CPT NAME BLACKED OUT TEAM LEADER 



SSC NAME BLACKED OUT TEAM SERGEANT 

MS NAME BLACKED OUT TEAM ANTHROPOLOGIST 

SSGT NAME BLACKED OUT ANALYST/ LINGUIST 

SSG NAME BLACKED OUT MORTUARY AFFAIRS SPECIALIST 

SSG NAME BLACKED OUT MORTUARY AFFAIRS SPECIALIST 

SSG NAME BLACKED OUT MORTUARY AFFAIRS SPECIALIST 

SSG NAME BLACKED OUT TEAM MEDIC 

MSGT NAME BLACKED OUT EXPLOSIVE ORDNANCE DISPOSAL (EOD) 
TECHNICIAN 

TSGT NAME BLACKED OUT LIFE SUPPORT TECHNICIAN 

SGT NAME BLACKED OUT TEAM PHOTOGRAPHER 

SSGT NAME BLACKED OUT COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST 

(2) VIETNAMESE CENTRAL GOVERNMENT CONTINGENT: 
DO VAN MINH (DDOON VAWN MINH) TEAM LEADER 
NGUYEN HONG NAM (NGUYEEN HOANG NAM) TEAM MEMBER 
NGUYEN CHI LIEN (NGUYEEN CHIS LIEEN) TEAM MMEMBER 
NGUYEN TEI THOA (NGUYEEN THIV THOA) TEAM MEMBER 
LE THANH DONG (LEE THANH LONG) TEAM MEMBER 

(3) NGHE AN PROVINCE TASK TEAM: 

NGO SY HAW (NGOO SYX HAAUV) TEAM LEADER 

HOANG DUE CUONG (HOANG DUUES CUWOWNG) TEAM MEMBER 

TRAN CONG (TRAANF COONG) TEAM LEADER 

VO VAN THAO (VOX VAWN THAO) TEAM LEADER 

VI KIM BUNG (VI KIM BUWNGS) TEAM LEADER 

(4) NGHIA DAN DISTRICT TASK TEAM" 



HO CONG SON (HOOF COONG SOWN) TEAM LEADER 

HOANG VAN DUNG (HOANGF VAAN DUNG) TEAM LEADER 

LE VAN TlilEU (LEE VAWN THIEEV) TEAM LEADER 

(5) NGI{IA PEU VILLA.GE TASK TEAM: 

PHAM QUANG TOAN (PHAMV QUANG TOAN ) TEAM LEADER 

IIOANG VAN THIEU (HOANGF VANH THIEUV) TEAM LEADER 

3. BACKGROUND. 

A. THIS CASE INVOLVES THE LOSS OF AN A-1H AIRCRAFT SHOT 
DOWN DURING AN ARMED RECONNAISSANCE MISSION OVER 
NORTHERN VIETNAM ON 8 OCTOBER 1966, RESULTING IN ONE 
UNACCOUNTED- FOR INDIVIDUAL. 

B. ON 26 OCTOBER 1993, INVESTIGATION ELEMENT TWO (IE2) 
INVESTIGATED CASE 0489 IN XUAN BINH VILLAGE, NHU XUAN 
DISTRICT, THANH HOA PROVINCE. 1E2 SURVEYED THE INCIDENT 
LOCATION FOR CASE 0489. THE TEAM DID NOT RECOVER ANY 
REMAINS OR PERSONAL EFFECTS, NOR FIND ANY EVIDENCE OP A 
PLANE CRASH IN THE AREA (REF B) - 

C. ON 3. NOVEMBER 1995, THE PROVINCE TASK TEAM INFORMED 
INVESTIGATION ELEMENT ONE (IE1) THAT THEY CANVASSED BO 
LAN (BOO LAAN) HAMLET, XUAN THAI (XUAANS THAIR) VILLAGE 
AND THANH KY (THANH KYS) VILLAGE WITH NEGATIVE RESULTS. 
THE PROVINCE TASK TEAM AND THE VIETNAMESE OFFICE FOR 
SEEKING MISSING PERSONS (VNOSMP) TEAM MEMBERS GAVE IE1 A 
REPORT OF THEIR CANVASSING EFFORTS. IE1 DID NOT RECOVER OR 
RECEIVE ANY REMAINS OR MATERIAL EVIDENCE WHILE 
INVESTIGATING THIS CASE (REF C). 

D. ON 27 NOVEMBER 1996, IE1 TRAVELED TO NGHIA PHU VILLAGE, 
NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, NGHE AN PROVINCE AND INTERVIEWED TWO 
WITNESSES WITH POSSIBLE INFORMATION CONCERNING CASE 
0489. WITNESS ONE LED IE1 TO A CRASH SITE. IE1 SURVEYED THE 
SITE AND RECEIVED NUMEROUS PIECES OF AIRCRAFT WRECKAGE 
(REF D). 

E. ON 27 NOVEMBER 1996, A JOINT U.S../SRV TEAM INVESTIGATED 
A SUSPECTED A-IH CRASH SITE AT GRID COORDINATES 48Q WG 592 
438 IN NGHE AN PROVINCE, SRV. JTFF-FA ANALYSIS INDICATES 
THE ITEMS RECOVERED CAN NOT BE CORRELATED TO A SPECIFIC 
AIRCRAFT TYPE OR CASE (REF E). 



F. FROM 26 JUNE THROUGH 04 JULY 1998, DURING THE 51ST JFA, 
RECOVERY ELEMENT ONE (RE1) BEGAN EXCAVATION OF AN 
AIRCRAFT CRASH SITE BELIEVED TO BE ASSOCIATED WITH CASE 
0489 IN IN NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, NGHE AN PROVINCE, SRV. RE1 
OPENED THREE OUT OF 12 5X5 METER GRID UNITS. THE TEAM 
CLOSED NONE OF THE UNITS. EEI RECOVERED NUMEROUS PIECES OF 
AIRCRAFT WRECKAGE AND TWO PIECES OF LIFE SUPPORT 
EQUIPMENT. THE TEAM ANTHROPOLOGIST, IN CONSULTATION WITH 
THE TEAM LEADER, SUSPENDED THE EXCAVATION ON 04 JULY DUE 
TO INCLEMENT WEATHER AND THE BEGINNING OF THE RAINY 
SEASON IN NGHE AN PROVINCE. THE TEAM RECO)Y4ENDED THIS 
PROJECT AREA FOR FURTHER EXCAVATION DURING THE DRY 
SEASON (REF F). 

G. FROM 28 FEBRUARY THROUGH 18 MARCH 2000, DURING THE 
59TH JFA, RECOVERY ELEMENT FOUR (RE4) CONTINUED 
EXCAVATION OF AN AIRCRAFT CRASH SITE ASSOCIATED WITH CASE 
0489 NEAR NGUIA PHU VILLAGE, NGHIA DAN DISTRICT, NGHE AN 
PROVINCE, SRV. RE4 OPENED 14 OUT OF 29 4-X-4-METER GRID 
UNITS. RE4 CLOSED ONE UNIT. RE4 RECOVERED POSSIBLE HUMAN 
REMAINS, TWO PERSONAL EFFECTS, NUMEROUS PIECES OF LIFE 
SUPPORT EQUIPMENT, AND MULTIPLE FRAGMENTS OF AIRCRAFT 
WRECKAGE. THE TEAM ANTHROPOLOGIST, IN CONSULTATION WITH 
THE TEAM LEADER, SUSPENDED THE EXCAVATION ON 18 MARCH 
DUE TO TIME CONSTRAINTS AT THE CLOSE OF THE 59TH JFA. THE 
SITE WAS LEFT OPEN. IN ADDITION. RE4 PLACED ONE UNIT 
OUTSIDE THE SITE BOUNDARY ON 12 MARCH, DUE TO WITNESS 
INFORMATION RELATING TO POSSIBLE REMAINS. RE4 EXCAVATED 
THE UNIT TO STERILE SOIL. THE TEAM RECOMMENDED THE PROJECT 
AREA FOR FUTURE EXCAVATION IN THE DRY SEASON. 

4. PROJECT LOCATION. 

A. VICINITY OF NGHIA PHU VILLAGE, NGHIA DAN DISTRICT. NGHE 
AN PROVINCE, SRV. GRID COORDINATES: THE PROJECT AREA IS AT 
48Q WG 595 440, AS DETERMINED BY A GLOBAL POSITIONING 
SYSTEM (GPS) RECEIVER TRACKING SIX SATELLITES ON THE 
INDIAN SPECIAL DATUM. 

C. MAP: NAME: PHONG BAI; SHEET" 6147 IV ; EDITION: 2-AMS; 
SERIES: L7014; SCALE: 1:50,000; HORIZONTAL DATUM: INDIAN 
DATUM, 1960. 

5. DESCRIPTION OP PROJECT AREA. 

A. TO ACCESS THE CASE 0489 PROJECT AREA, THE TEAM TRAVELED 
BY VEHICLE FOR APPROXIMATELY 1 HOUR FROM A GUESTHOUSE IN 
NGHIA DAN FOLLOWED BY A 5-MINUTE WALK. THE SITE IS LOCATED 
IN A CULTIVATED SUGAR CANE FIELD. IT SHOULD BE NOTED THAT 



THE PROJECT AREA HAD BEEN FILLED IN, CULTIVATED AND 
REPLANTED WITH SUGAR CANE IN THE INTERIM BETWEEN THE 
59TH AND 60Th JFA LEAVING VERY LITTLE EVIDENCE OF PAST 
EXCAVATIONS. DIRECTLY ADJACENT TO THE SITE ON THE WEST 
SIDE ARE THREE BOMB CRATERS. SURROUNDING THE SITE ON ALL 
FOUR SIDES ARE CULTIVATED HILLS OF SUGAR CANE, CORN AND 
PEANUTS. 

B. SOIL STRATIGRAPHY OF THE PROJECT AREA CONSISTS OF A RICH 
ORANGE-BROWN TOPSOIL OF APPROXIMATELY 20 CENTIMETERS 
ABOVE A LAYER OP DARKER ORANGE-BROWN SILTY CLAY OF 
VARIABLE DEPTH. WITHIN THIS STRATUM IS A DISTINCT GRAVEL 
LAYER WHICH IS PRESENT THROUGHOUT THE SITE IN ALL 
UNDISTURBED AREAS. BENEATH THIS LAYER IS REDDISH-BROWN 
SHALE BEDROCK OF VARIABLE DEPTH WHICH IS STERILE. 

6. FIELD METHODS. 

A. THE PROJECT AREA HAD BEEN COMPLETELY BACKFILLED, 
CULTIVATED AND REPLANTED WITH SUGARCANE SINCE THE 
EXCAVATION ON THE 59Th JFA. IN ADDITION, THE VIETNAMESE 
HAD REMOVED AND ALLEGEDLY DETONATED THE TWO 500 LB 
BOMBS DISCOVERED AND LEFT IN PLACE DURING THE 59TH JFA. 
DUE TO THE BACKFILLING OF THE ENTIRE PR03ECT AREA, THE 
EXTENT OF DISTURBANCE CAUSED BY REMOVING THE BOMBS WAS 
UNKNOWN. 

A REMNANT OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER PROM THE 59TH JFA WAS 
STILL VISIBLE. NO PERMANENT DATUM MARKER WAS LEFT BY THE 
59TH JFA THEREFORE THE TEAM USED THE SOUTHEAST CORNER TO 
BUILD THE NORTH-SOUTH AND EAST-WEST BASELINE FOR THIS 
EXCAVATION. 

B. RE5 PUT IN PLACE A GRID SYSTEM COMPOSED OF 33. 4X4- 
METER UNITS WHICH FULLY ENCOMPASSED AND EXPANDED TO THE 
NORTH, EAST AND SOUTH ON THE PROJECT AREA DEFINED DURING 
THE 59TH JFA. THE EXPANSION OP THE PROJECT AREA WAS 
NECESSITATED IN SOME LOCATIONS BY THE RECOVERY OF 
POSSIBLE HUMAN REMAINS AND LIFE SUPPORT DURING THE 59TH 
JFA - THE TEAM ANTHROPOLOGIST DESIGNATED THE PROJECT 
DATUM TO BE N500/ES00, WHICH IS IN THE SOUTHWEST CORNER 
OF THE PROJECT AREA. DURING THE EXCAVATION, WALLS OF THE 
59TH JFA WERE REVEALED AND IT WAS POSSIBLE TO MAP THE 
EXACT OVERLAY OF THE TWO EXCAVATIONS. THE TEAM 
ANTHROPOLOGIST FOUND THE GRID UNITS TO BE OFF 
APPROXIMATELY 40 CENTIMETERS NORTH-SOUTH AND 70 
CENTIMETERS EAST-WEST. 

C. RE5 CONDUCTED A METAL DETECTOR SWEEP OP THE PROJECT 
AREA BY THE EXPLOSIVES ORDNANCE DISPOSAL (HOD) 



TECHNICIAN. BASED ON THE CRATER DEFINITION ESTABLISHED 
DURING THE 59TH JFA. THE TEAM CONCENTRATED ON THE AREA 
WHERE THE SECOND WING WOULD MOST PROBABLY BE LOCATED IN 
ATTEMPTS OP LOCATING ANY ADDITIONAL 500 LB ORDNANCE. 
SEVERAL STRONG HITS WERE BTAINED IN THIS AREA. IT SHOULD 
BE NOTED THAT THE PROJECT AREA SOIL HAS INCLUSIONS OF 
MANGANESE AND IRON WHICH ARE ALSO PICKED UP BY THE METAL 
DETECTOR AND COMPOUND THE DETECTION PROCESS. 

D. RE5 EXCAVATED THE SITE USING PICKAXES, SHOVELS, HOES, 
AND TROWELS BY STRIPPING THE TOPSOIL TO CULTURALLY 
STERILE SOIL. THE TEAM SCREENED ALL EXCAVATED SOIL THROUGH 
QUARTER-INCH (1/4-INCH) WIRE MESH SCREENS. AMERICAN TRAM 
MEMBERS EXAMINED THE CONTENTS OP EACH SCREEN. THE TEAM 
ANTHROPOLOGIST INSPECTED ALL MATERIALS BELIEVED TO BE 
OSSEOUS REMAINS AND RETAINED THE SAME FOR FURTHER 
ANALYSIS. THE LIFE SUPPORT TECHNICIAN(LST)EXAMINED ALL 
POSSIBLE LIFE SUPPORT EQUIPMENT AND RETAINED THE SAME FOR 
FURTHER ANALYSIS. 

E. THE TEAM PHOTOGRAPHED THE PROJECT AREA PRIOR TO, 
DURING, AND UPON COMPLETION OF EXCAVATION. 

7. ARCHAEOLOGICAL FINDINGS. 

A. RE5 EXCAVATED APPROXIMATELY 288 SQUARE METERS TO 
CULTURALLY STERILE SOIL DURING THE CURRENT PROJECT AND 
RECOVERED POSSIBLE SKELETAL AND DENTAL REMAINS FROM TWO 
GRID UNITS (N508/E508 AND N500/E512 RESPECTIVELY. RE5 
RECOVERED THE POSSIBLE DENTAL REMAINS PROM WITHIN THE 
IMPACT CRATER BOUNDARIES AT A DEPTH OF APPROXIMATELY 1.1 
METERS. THE TEAM RECOVERED THE POSSIBLE SKELETAL REMAINS 
FROM WITHIN THE TOPSOIL STRATUM (APPROXIMATE DEPTH OF 20 
CENTIMETERS) IN CLOSE PROXIMITY TO WHERE THE TEAM 
RECOVERED HUMAN REMAINS DURING THE 59TH JFA 
APPROXIMATELY EIGHT METERS SOUTH OF THE CRATER. 

B. RE5 RECOVERED MULTIPLE FRAGMENTS OF LIFE-SUPPORT 
EQUIPMENT AS WELL AS NUMEROUS PIECES OF SMALL 
UNIDENTIFIED AIRCRAFT WRECKAGE - 

8. MATERIAL EVIDENCE: 

A. THE TEAM RECOVERED THE FOLLOWING AIRCREW RELATED 
ITEMS: 

(1) PIECES OF LIFE PRESERVER OR RAFT MATERIAI,.. 

(2) TWO .38 CALIBER CASING. 



(3) ONE POSSIBLE RESTRAINT ATTACHMENT BUCKLE. 

B. THE TEAM RECOVERED THE FOLLOWING AIRCRAFT RELATED 
ITEMS: 

(1) DATA PLATE WITH THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION: 

PEERLESS ?TIT. PROD. 

DIVOF 

ALTER LANSING CORP. 

LOS. ANGELES, CALIF. 

TRANSFORMER 

SPEC. 5878 

SER. NO. 3884 

D.A.C. 3384179 

(2) DATA PLATE WITH THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION: 

WARNING 

SIMULTANEOUS INSTALLATION 
OF PULLOUT CABLES ON 
FWD & AFT STRA??ES DISC 
RECPS MAY CAUSE FEEDBACK. 
UNUSED PULLOUT CABLES 
MUST BE REMOVED 
DATAPLATE - 2674478 

(3) ONE PIECE OF UNIDENTIFIED METAL WITH NUMBERS: 
4261663-500 

(4) ONE PIECE OF METAL WITH NUMBERS: 7-1555912 

9. LIFE SUPPORT ANALYST COMMENTS; FIELD ANALYSIS INDICATES 
THE ITEMS RECOVERED ARE CONSISTENT WITH AN A-I AIRCRAFT, 
BUT CANNOT BE CORRELATED TO A SPECIFIC MODEL OR THE CASE 
0489 INCIDENT AIRCRAFT. THE RECOVERY OF THE LIFE PRESERVER 
OR RAFT MATERIAL INDICATES AT LEAST ONE INDIVIDUAL WAS IN 
THE AIRCRAFT AT THE TIME OF IMPACT. 

10. ANALYST/ LINQUIST COMMENTS. NONE. 

11. EOD TECHNICIAN COMMENTS. THE TEAM RECOVERED EIGHTEEN 
20MM HE PROJECTILES. SEVEN OF THE PROJECTILES STILL HAD THE 
FUZES ATTACHED. THE OTHER ELEVEN HAD THE FUZES BROKEN OFF. 
THE PROJECTILES WERE RUSTED AND NO MARKINGS WERE VISIBLE. 
THE FUZE TYPE APPEARED TO BE POINT DETONATING. THE TEAM 
MOVED ALL 18 PROJECTILES TO A SAFE AREA APPROXIMATELY 100 
METERS FROM THE SITE AND IDENTIFIED IT TO THE VIETNAMESE 
OFFICIALS. 



12. ANTHROPOLOGIST CONCLUS ION AND RECOMMENDATIONS. 

A. THE AREA OF EXCAVATION IS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF 
AN A- 1H AIRCRAFT SHOT DOWN DURING AN ARMED 
RECONNAISSANCE MISSION OVER NORTHERN VIETNAM ON 8 
OCTOBER 1966, RESULTING IN ONE UNACCOUNTED-FOR 
INDIVIDUAL. 

B. R35 RECOVERED POSSIBLE HUMAN SKELETAL AND DENTAL 
REMAINS DURING THE CURRENT PROJECT. 

C. POSSIBLE LIFE-SUPPORT AND AIRCRAFT RELATED ITEMS 
RECOVERED CANNOT BE CORRELATED, BASED ON FIELD ANALYSIS, 
WITH THE CASE 0489 AIRCRAFT OR INDIVIDUAL. 

D. THE TEAM DISCOVERED NO ADDITIONAL 500 LB ORDNANCE 
DURING THE 60TH JFA. IT IS PROBABLE THAT THE ORDNANCE WERE 
EITHER SCAVENGED OR POSSIBLY DETONATED AT THE TIME OF 
IMPACT. IT SHOULD BE NOTED ThAT ACCORDING TO WITNESS 
TESTIMONY, THE AIRCRAFT APPROACHED FROM THE EAST AND 
IMPACTED IN AM ALMOST VERTICAL MANNER. THE LAST 
TRANSMISSION PROM THE AIRCRAFT WAS THAT THE RIGHT WING 
WAS ON FIRE. THE ORIENTATION OF THE CRASH CRATER AND THE 
LOCATION OF THE ORDNANCE DISCOVERED ON THE 59TH JFA 
(SOUTHWEST ASPECT OP THE IMPACT CRATER) WOULD BE 
INDICATIVE OF A LEFT WING AND THE SECOND WING 
(PRESUMABLY NORTHEAST ASPECT OF THE IMPACT CRATER) 
WOULD THEREFORE BE CONFIGURED AS THE RIGHT. 

E. ON 16 MAY 2000, THE TEAM ANTHROPOLOGIST, IN 
CONSULTATION WITH THE TEAM LEADER. COMPLETED THE 
EXCAVATION AND SUBSEQUENTLY CLOSED THE SITE. NO FURTHER 
EXCALVATION IS RECOMMENDED. 

13. TEAM LEADER COMMENTS. 

A. CONCLUSIONS: CONCUR WITH TEAM ANTHROPOLOGISTS 
COMMENTS. 

B. HOST GOVERNMENT COOPERATION/SUPPORT: EXCELLENT ON ALL 
LEVELS. 

14. DETACHMENT COMMANDER'S COMMENTS. NONE. 

Maps Attached to JAF Reports 



SHEtT 6147 W 










FNCLOSUf>C A - APPROXIMATE 
TOPOGRAPHIC POSITION OF PROJECT A Fie A 



m 



Additional Maps Added by Me 




Crash site in the vicinity of GC WG 59492/44009 near Nghia Phu Village, Nghia 
Dan District, Nghe An Province. Determined by a GPS receiver tracking six 
satellites. 



\i Strung *^\{* 




The actual crash site location is UTM GC 48Q WG 59492 44009 based 
on the location excavated. 



The location reported when Jack's plane went down was UTM GC 
48Q WG 524 542. The longitude and latitude reported when Jack's 
plane went down was longitude 192900N, lattitude 1053000E. You 
will see on this map the location 19 degrees 30 minutes north and 
105 degrees 30 minutes east. 

Find the intersection of longitude 19' 30" and 105' 30". Below that 
location is the intersection of UTM grids 5 and 4,near the border of 
Thanh Hoa province and Nghe An province. The crash site is just 
inside the Nghe An province in that general vacinity. 





Crash site in the vicinity of GC WG 59492/44009 near Nghia Phu Village, Nghia 
Dan District, Nghe An Province. Determined by a GPS receiver tracking six 
satellites. 



Me 



Jong 
Van 



^Jingxi 



Gmxian 



Jhx 



^irv t 



Cai 



Giang 



Wanning . 



iv 






>' 



Cao Ba 



:\S 



Phongsalf 



Bon La«U ' 






CHINA 



Tngjtiang 



Qiruhou 



Yen I 



| 



: TriJ 



Giang 



•j 



Hai Ninh 



Beihai 



r 



>' Uati Cat Sao 



/AOS 

■ Louangphr abang 



/ Xiangkhoang* 

■, 

IMuang 
I/angvitng 



ftnliaiif t 



Xim Nua* 



Ban 



B.nh 



\ 



.Ban 



Ky Son 



>v 



Juong Duong 






Muang 
Pakxan 



Hanori 

Nan,0 


Q Hai tyionn ..Hjtfg Gai 
/^Haiphong 

nJ^g&Ttiai Binh 


\ /^~* LongVt 

J {VIETNAMJ 

w Thanh 


x/. 

/ 


of 


iDien Chau 


Tonkin 


VrnhjB 




Y\HaTinh 




^\\jf 7* 





Huangliu 




Sanya 




My Drawing of the Crash Site 




SKETCH MAP OF REFNO 0489 EXCAVATIONS 



59th JFA 2-X-2 METER UNIT 
APPROX. 10 METER'S WEST 







THIRD BOMB CRATER 
APPROX. 10 METERS WEST 
OF BOMB CRATER #2 






NOT TO SCALE 



▲ 


= 


N500/E500 (DATUM) 


B 


= 


BONE 


T 


= 


RESTORED MOLAR 


LS 


= 


LIFE SUPPORT 


PE 


= 


PERSONAL EFFECT 


00 


= 


500 LB BOMBS (2) 


□ 


= 


51 ST JFA EXCAVATION 


□ 


= 


59TH/60TH JFA EXCAVATION 


□ 


— 


59TH JFA ADDITIONAL 
EXCAVATION AREAS 


D 


= 


60TH JFA ADDITIONAL 
EXCAVATION AREAS 




Pictures With the Report 




Area prior to excavation on the 51th JFA, looking north. 




Stakes placed by two witnesses during the 51th JFA indicating the center of the 

impact crater 




Project area prior to excavation on the 59th JFA, looking north. 













'i 




Project area with units in place prior to excavation on the 59th JFA (view is grid 

east). 




:&sttJL.- -It 



&t 





Project area prior to excavation on the 60th JFA, view west. 




Project area prior to excavation on the 60th JFA, view north. Southeast corner of 

the 59th JFA excavation is visable. 




Bomb crater #1 south of the project area. 





12 



x~ 



Project area with units in place prior to excavation on the 60th JFA (looking 

north). 











Work in progress on the 6oth JFA. 




Work in progress on the 60th JFA 




■ - 



■ . 







Profile of the north wall of N512/E512 on the 60th JFA with wall from the 59th JFA 

visible 








Final photo of completed excavation on the 60th JFA (looking north). 




Final photo of completed excavation on the 60th JFA (looking grid south). 




Photograph of total material evidence collected on the 60th JFA. 



/VW.VFWOHG • SEPTEMBER 2002 





£Hpk i.N(i n i c ; trfpfr*, r. e c; ( ) ( ; 



|A N D REMEMBRANCE 



•> 



tf>* 



\&\>* 



W^ t 




v Letups 

A full tribute 
to Americassdead 

LL\L LlUSSL/A 
Search for US. war 

casualties in the 

former Soviet Unioty 

SULH^GLlVLKLG: 
VFW Posts in action 




The Armed Forces DNA 

Identification Laboratory 

helps solve the riddle 

of the missing 



AM U!|J|UBJJ 

OiVd 

6jq U|Oj[Iuon 



mw owom 

laanS Mlf £ Aft 90fr 
3iijzi?*»niAI AftdA 



WITH THE HELP OF DNA 

TESTING, A SET OF REMAINS 

IS CONFIRMED AS THAT OF 

VIETNAM NAVY PILOT 

JOHN ANTHONY FELDHAUS 










BRADLV J- 80NER t THE TENNESSEAN. AP WIDE WORLD 




DNA is the crucial key to identifying 
the remains of American MIAsfrom 
past wars. And the Armed Forces DNA 
Identification Laboratory is using that 
key to unlock the mystery of their fates. 



I I 



no Ion 




by Gary Turbak 



On Dec. 11, 1944, 1st Lt 
Henry Lewis piloted a B- 
24 on a bombing run over 
Germany* then headed back to his 
squadron's base in England. Over 
France, the bomber collided with anoth- 
er plane and nose-dived into the woods, 
killing Lewis and his crew of eight. The 
government notified the families of the 
apparent deaths, but with the war raging 
and the crash area occupied by German 

t2 • VFW ♦ September 2002 



troops, no attempt was made to recover 
the bodies. Until recently. 

In 1999, relic hunters discovered the 
wreckage, which contained multiple 
sets of human remains. Using DNA 
samples, U.S. investigators eventually 
identified eight of the nine airmen. On 
Aug, 25, 2001, Lt. Lewis was finally laid 
to rest in his hometown cemetery at 
Centreville, Md. — 57 years after he gave 
his life for his country. 



Above: Larry Feldhaos holds a report from 
the U.S. Army Central identification 
Laboratory identifying the remains of his 
younger brother, Vietnam War Navy pilot 
John Anthony Feldhaus. DNA testing 
positively confirmed his identity. 

It happens in every war — and even 
when there is no war: An American in 
uniform is killed, but the remains are 
lost or cannot be identified. The griev- 



ing family gets no closure, and the 
deceased veteran has no proper burial. 
But thanks to new DNA technology, 
this great sadness may soon become a 
thing of the past. "Our ultimate goal is 
to never again have an unknown 
deceased American service member" 
says Jim Canik, deputy director of the 
Defense Department's DNA registry. 

'Cellular Dog Tag' 

Each human carries around a cellular 
dog tag called nuclear DNA, genetic 
material inherited in equal shares from a 
person's mother and father at the 
moment of conception. It is unique to 
each individual and a sure-fire identifi- 
er. Civilian authorities use nuclear DNA 
to convict criminals, and military inves- 
tigators use it to identify current battle- 
field and accident victims. Usually, this 
is done by comparing a known sample 
of the victim's DNA to DNA taken from 
the bodily remains. But first there must 
be a sample on file. 

In 1990, with war in the Persian Gulf 
imminent and U.S. forces expecting 
many casualties, American military 
leaders launched a major DNA collec- 
tion project. Although the United States 
suffered relatively few casualties in the 
Gulf War, the Defense Department 
forged ahead with the creation of the 
Armed Forces DNA Identification Lab- 
oratory ( AFDIL) and the Armed Forces 
Repository of Specimen Samples for 
the Identification of Remains (both 
located in Maryland). 

The goal of these and affiliated orga- 
nizations is to attach a name to every 
fallen soldier, sailor, airman and Marine. 
''Identification is extremely important 
to the families" Canik says. "We Ye here 
to help bring them closure." 

The first step was to create a database 
containing the DNA of all members of 
the military, active and reserve. Vacuum- 
sealed with a drying agent, these 3.6 mil- 
lion blood samples are now stored at -20 
C (-4 degrees Fahrenheit), ready to be 
matched to DNA from a soldier killed in 
battle, accident or terrorist attack. 

An identification cannot be made, 
however, solely by comparing DNA 
from human remains to millions of 
stored samples. Instead, investigators 
must first use medical x-rays, dental 
records, personal effects and anthropo- 



logical information to narrow the possi- 
bilities. With a short list of potential vic- 
tims in hand, authorities then turn to 
DNA to confirm the identification. 

AFDIL has used these stored DNA 
samples to identify casualties in Afghani- 
stan as well as the uniformed victims of 
the Sept. 11 terrorist attack on the 
Pentagon. Thanks to DNA testing, all 
victims at the Pentagon and the Pennsyl- 
vania aircraft crash site were identified. 
Without DNA, perhaps only half might 
have been. 

But giving names to current casualties 
is easy compared to the task of identify- 
ing the thousands of GIs who died 



anonymously in past conflicts. Incred- 
ibly, more than 88,000 Americans who 
died in World War II, the Cold War, 
Korea and Vietnam have yet to be locat- 
ed and identified. But military sleuths 
are tackling this problem, too, albeit 
with a different DNA weapon. 

Nuclear DNA is usually not much 
help in identifying older remains. For 
one thing, a sample of the MI As own 
DNA is almost never available. In addi- 
tion, no human cell contains more than 
two copies of its nuclear DNA, and this 
limited amount of genetic material 
often gets lost, especially if the remains 
are severely fragmented, very old or 




David Boyer, operations director at the Defense Department's DNA repository, checks out 
a storage tray containing 400 stored DNA samples. The two-story walk-in freezer holds 
4,000,000 DNA samples. 



September 2002 • WWW-VFW.ORG • 13 




The Task of Identification 

To positively identify the remains of casualties from past wars, 
investigators need mtDNA (in (lie form of a blood sample) from one 
or more of I he MIA's maternal relatives. Here's the current status of 
the collection effort. i lAFDfi 



APPROXIMATE NUMBER OF FAMILY NUMBER OF FAMILIES 

NUMBER OF MIAS SAMPLES COLLECTED REPRESENTED 



Vietnam 


1,946 


1,417 


Korea 


8,100 


4,170 


World War II 


78,000 


286 


Cold War 


125 


69 



You Can Help 

If you are a 
maternal relative 
of a missing 
service member, 
investigators 
might like to add 
your mtDNA to 
their repository. 
Depending on the 
MIA r s branch of 
service, more 
information is 
available from: 



Air Force: 

USAF Missing Persons Branch 

HQ AFPC/DPWCM 

55 C Street West Suite 15 

Randolph AFB, TX 78150-4716 

1-800-531-5501 

http://www.afpc. randolph. af.mil/powmia/ 

Army: 

Department of the Army 

Total Army Personnel Command 

TAPC-PER 

2461 Eisenhower Avenue 

Alexandria, VA 22331-0482 

1-800-892-2490 

https://www.perscom.army.mil/tagd/cmaoc/ 

cmaoc.htm 



Marine Corps: 

Headquarters US Marine Corps 
Manpower and Reserve Affairs (JVIRC) 
Personal and Family Readiness Division 
3280 Russell Road 
Quantico,VA 22134-5103 
1-800-847-1597 

Navy: 

Department of the Navy 

Navy Personnel Command 

POW/MIA Section (PERS-621P) 

5720 Integrity Drive 

Millington,TN 38055-6210 

1-800-443-9298 

http://wvvw.persnet.navy.mii/pers62/pow- 

mia/62p.htm 



otherwise degraded — all common war- 
time conditions. 

Mitochondrial DNA 

Fortunately, another kind of DNA — 
called mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) — 
is of great help in identifying older 
remains. This material is extremely 
abundant, with most bodily cells con- 
taining thousands of copies. With so 
much more mtDNA available, some of 
it almost always survives, no matter how 
old or degraded the remains (teeth and 
bones can be good sources). Scientists 
have even extracted mtDNA from a 
100,000-year-old cave man. 

Unlike nuclear DNA, mtDNA is not 
unique to the individual in question. For 
starters, only a few hundred thousand 
different variations of mtDNA exist 
among the world's billions of people. In 
addition mtDNA comes solely from a 
person's mother, and it is shared by all 



maternal relatives, which means that sib- 
lings as well as maternal aunts, uncles, 
and cousins have identical mtDNA, 
Consequently, mtDNA is not a precise 
identifier and would be worthless in a 
criminal case. But this apparent short- 
coming also is mtDNA's greatest asset. 

"For past conflicts, we don*t have a 
nuclear DNA specimen from the lost 
service member, which makes mito- 
chondrial DNA from family members 
very important,'* Canik says. Since 1992, 
investigators have been collecting 
mtDNA from the maternal relatives of 
MIAs and using these samples to identi- 
fy remains. Thanks to the mtDNA 
repository, more than 600 families have 
experienced the bittersweet closure of 
MIA identification. 

As with nuclear DNA, however, 
mtDNA comes into play only after 
other means have been used to narrow 
the identity possibilities. Perhaps inves- 



tigators know which unit (and there- 
fore which individuals) was in an area 
at the time of a battle. Or, in the case of 
a crashed plane, there may be a roster of 
crew members. Or dog tags or personal 
effects might be found near the 
remains. With the list of possibilities 
sufficiently narrowed, investigators can 
then use a relative s mtDNA to confirm 
(for all practical purposes) the identity 
of the remains. 

In July 1950, Pfc. Nick Garza was cap- 
tured by North Korean forces near Osan 
and interned at a POW camp. He died 
there and was buried with other POWs 
in a mass grave. Although the burial 
location remains a mystery, Garza's two 
sisters still hope their brother's remains 
might be located and — with the help of 
the mtDNA they have provided — iden- 
tified. "If Nick's remains are ever discov- 
ered," says his sister Florence Garza 

Continued on page 16D 



14 * VFW • September 2002 



Unknown no longer 

D Continued from p*ge 14 

Nieto, *we would very much like to 
bring him home for fturiaL* 

Home, like Michael Blassie, On May 
14, 1998, workers at Arlington National 
Cemetery carefully set aside the marble 
cover on the tomb of Vietnam's un- 
known soldier, and respectfully re- 
moved the remains within. 

By comparing that soldier's mtDNA 
with DNA from two families (each 
believing one of its members was the 
tomb's occupant), scientists were able 
to give the previously anonymous hero 
a name: Air Force 1st Lt. Michael 
Blassie, who had been shot down over 
Vietnam in 1972. 

On July 11, 1998, Blassie went home 
for the last time, as his remains were 
returned to the earth with full military 
honors — and beneath a proper head- 
stone — at Jefferson Barracks National 
Cemetery, near his hometown of 
Florissant, Mo. 

CILHI 

Much of the work of identifying 
remains from past conflicts falls to the 
200 military and civilian personnel of 
the Central Identification Laboratory, 
Hawaii (CILHI). Not surprisingly, DNA 
technology has given C1LH1 a valuable 
new tool. "Thanks to DNA, we're able to 
go back and solve cases that have been 
in our files for decades" says CILHI's 
scientific director Tom Holland. 

CILHI currently identifies about two 
sets of remains per week, many more 
than would be possible without DNA 
techniques. 

Each past conflict presents investiga- 
tors with a different mix of challenges 
and opportunities (see table for the 
number of service members unac- 
counted for from each era). "For 
Vietnam, we have the best medical and 
dental records — big keys to identifica- 
tion — but Southeast Asia is probably 
the worst place on the planet for the 
preservation of bones," Holland says. 

Vietnam's acidic jungle soil and its 
warm, wet climate can completely 
destroy human remains in relatively 
short order. In addition, the high popu- 
lation density of this region virtually 
guarantees that any site (of a plane 
crash, for example) has been disturbed 



by scavengers or the curious. "In 
Vietnam, we're really in a race against 
time" Holland says. 

Identifying casualties from Korea 
presents different problems. Following 
Blassie's identification, authorities 
turned their attention to the hundreds 
of Korean War GIs buried at the 
National Memorial Cemetery of the 
Pacific in Hawaii. After the war, North 
Korea returned to American authorities 
the remains of 865 unidentified U.S. 
soldiers, who were respectfully interred 
at the Oahu cemetery (commonly 
called the Punchbowl because of its 
location inside an extinct volcano}. 

In 1999, with mtDNA now in their 
toolbox, authorities enthusiastically 
decided to start exhuming Korean War 
remains from the Punchbowl for possi- 
ble identification. But the project 
quickly ran into a serious snag when the 
scientists failed to glean any useable 
DNA from the remains. u The bones arc 
in excellent shape, but there seems to be 
something in them that either has 
destroyed the DNA or is binding it up 
and preventing us from chemically 
releasing it " says Holland. 

One possibility is that the U.S. Army 
treated the remains with embalming 
pow T der containing formaldehyde before 
interring them. Research continues, but 
so far only four sets of Korean War 
Punchbowl remains have been ex- 
humed, and none has been identified. 
Until this problem is solved, there will 
be no more exhumations. 

But GIs buried at the Punchbowl are 
just the tip of the Korean War MIA ice- 
berg. When that war ended, more than 
8,000 American personnel were unac- 
counted for, which means that thou- 
sands more sets of remains are still 
somewhere on the Korean Peninsula — 
and thousands more American families 
wait to give proper burial to a loved one. 

In some ways, the Korea situation is 
the flip side of Vietnam. In Korea, the 
physical conditions — a colder, drier cli- 
mate with less acidic soil — are con- 
ducive to bone preservation. "The bones 
we recover from Korea are among the 
best that we see " Holland says. The bad 
news, however, is that a 1973 fire at the 
National Personnel Records Center in 
St. Louis destroyed many of the paper 
records that might aid in identification. 



Numerically, the WWII situation — 
with about 78,000 American combat- 
ants still unaccounted for — is bleak. But 
some casualties from this long-ago con- 
flict — like Lt Lewis and his crew — are 
being identified, too. In August 1942, 19 
Marines died in battle with Japanese 
soldiers on Butaritari Island in the 
Pacific and were buried in a mass grave. 

Some 57 years later, in 1999, a CILHI 
team located this burial site and recov- 
ered the men's remains. Thanks to DNA 
testing, each of these Marines has been 
returned to his family for proper burial. 

In general, paper records for WWII 
MIAs are good, and bone preservation 
is often adequate as well The weak link 
here, however, may be the relatively few 
MIAs whose families have been able to 
provide a sample of mtDNA* 

Painstaking Process 

Successes notwithstanding, DNA iden- 
tification is no cure-all. It can take weeks 
or months to complete an identifica- 
tion, which means it could be decades 
before all unidentified remains can be 
processed. And it's likely that no 
remains will ever be found for thou- 
sands of MIAs. Consequently* many 
deceased American military personnel 
will never be identified. 

But for any given individual, there is 
always hope. "We never say never" 
CanLk says. "We have the responsibility 
to those service members who gave 
their last full measure to this country to 
make as many identifications as we can 
— and to return their remains to their 
families with honor." 

Going forward, the outlook is much 
brighter. Certainly, brave uniformed 
Americans will continue to die for their 
country, (In Afghanistan, all the 
Americans killed have been identified. ) 

But thanks to DNA identification 
techniques, it just may be that no future 
military veteran will ever again be buried 
beneath the inscription, "Here Rests In 
Honored Glory An American Soldier 
Known But To God. 11 Henceforth, our 
nation may know the names of all its 
defenders killed in war. O 

GARY turbak is a free-lance writer liv- 
ing in Missoula, Mont, and an Air Force 
veteran of Vietnam. 



Skyraider 20 mm Magazines 



Jack's wingman 
suspected the cause of 
Jack's crash was a 
37mm anti-aircraft 
round hitting one of his 
20mm ammunition 
magazines, exploding 
the 20mm shells, and 
blowing off a large part 
of the wing. 

I went to the U.S. Naval 
Air Museum to see 
exactly where the 
magazines were located 
and how big they were. 





The Skyraider aircraft had four 20mm 
cannons and four magazines, two in each 
wing. I can easily see how a 37mm shell 
could penetrate the wing and detonate the 
20mm shells. Most likely this is what 
happened to Jack's aircraft. 

This particular Skyraider has VA-25 
markings along with "Coral Sea" on the 
side of the aircraft. Coincidentally, Jack 
served aboard the Coral Sea while assigned 
to VA-25 on his previous WestPac cruise. 




20 mm cannons on the left wing 




20 mm cannons on the right wing 




Left wheel well access to 20 mm magazine 




View into the 20 mm magazine from the left wheel well 




Location of the outboard 20 mm magazine on the right wing 




Location of the inboard 20 mm magazine on the right wing 



Air Medal - Three Gold Stars 



The Air Medal is awarded to any member of the 
Armed Forces of the United States who distinguishes 
themself by meritorious achievement while 
participating in aerial flight. It is given for combat or 
non-combat action, and conferred in recognition of 
single acts of heroism or merit for operational 
activities against an armed enemy. Additionally, it is 
given for meritorious services, or for sustained 
distinction in the performance of duties involving 
aerial flight. 

This decoration was established in May 1942. 



¥* 



THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY 

WASHINGTON 



The President of the United States takes pleasure in 
presenting the AIR MEDAL to 

LIEUTENANT JOHN A. FELDHAUS 
UNITED STATES NAVY 

for service as set forth in the following 

CITATION: 

For meritorious achievement while participating in 
aerial flight as a Pilot flying fixed wing aircraft 
attached to Attack Squadron ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-TWO 
embarked in USS ORISKANY (CVA 34) in combat operations 
in Southeast Asia from 30 June 1966 to 10 July 1966. In 
the successful completion of ten strikes against the 
enemy on combat missions in an active combat area, 
Lieutenant Feldhaus contributed substantially to the 
success of the United States efforts in Southeast Asia. 
By his professional skill, noteworthy achievements, and 
complete dedication to duty under hazardous conditions, 
Lieutenant Feldhaus reflected great credit upon himself 
and upheld the highest traditions of the United States 
Naval Service. 



For the President, 




Secretary of the Navy 




the united states of America 

THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT 
THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

HAS AWARDED THE 

AIR MEDAL 



TO 

LIEUTENANT JOHN A. FELDHAUS, UNITED STATES NAVY 

FOR 

MERITORIOUS ACHIEVEMENT IN AERIAL FLIGHT 
FROM 30 JUNE 1966 TO JULY 1966 



GIVKN THIS 22ND DAY OK FEB w 88 





ECHETARY OF THE ?fc 




THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY 

WASHINGTON 



The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the 
AIR MEDAL (Gold Star in lieu of the Second Award) to 

LIEUTENANT JOHN A. FELDHAUS 
UNITED STATES NAVY 

for service as set forth in the following 

CITATION: 

For meritorious achievement while participating in 
aerial flight as a Pilot attached to Attack Squadron ONE 
HUNDRED FIFTY-TWO embarked in USS ORISKANY ( CVA 34) in 
combat operations in Southeast Asia from 11 July 1966 to 
23 July 1966. In the successful completion of nine 
strikes against the enemy and two flights on combat 
missions in an active combat area, Lieutenant Feldhaus 
contributed substantially to the success of the United 
States efforts in Southeast Asia. By his professional 
skill, noteworthy achievements, and complete dedication 
to duty under hazardous conditions, Lieutenant Feldhaus 
reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the 
highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. 

For the President, 



/' 




(k&$\ 



(, 
fecretary of the Navy 




THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT 
THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

HAS AWARDED THE 



AIR MEDAL 

(GOLD STAR IN LIEU OF THE SECOND AWARD) 

TO 

LIEUTENANT JOHN A. FELDHAUS, UNITED STATES NAVY 

FOR 

MERITORIOUS ACHIEVEMENT IN AERIAL FLIGHT 
FROM 11 JULY 1966 TO 23 JULY 1966 



given this 22ND I)AY OK FEB in 88 





0az$g 



SBOKBTAHV OF THE NAVY 



NAVPERS 1650/11 (12-67) 



^ 



THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY 
WASHINGTON 



The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the 
AIR MEDAL (Gold Star in lieu of the Third Award) to 

LIEUTENANT JOHN A. FELDHAUS 
UNITED STATES NAVY 

for service as set forth in the following 

CITATION: 

For meritorious achievement in participating in 
aerial flight as a Pilot attached to Attack Squadron ONE 
HUNDRED FIFTY-TWO embarked in USS ORISKANY (CVA 34) in 
combat operations in Southeast Asia from 24 July 1966 to 
16 August 1966. In the successful completion of nine 
strikes against the enemy and two flights on combat 
missions in an active combat area, Lieutenant Feldhaus 
contributed substantially to the success of the United 
States efforts in Southeast Asia. By his professional 
skill, noteworthy achievements, and complete dedication 
to duty under hazardous conditions, Lieutenant Feldhaus 
reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the 
highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. 



For the President, 

iry of the Navy 





THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT 
THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

HAS AWARDED THE 



AIR MEDAL 

(GOLD STAR IN LIEU OF THE THIRD AWARD) 

TO 

LIEUTENANT JOHN A. FELDHAUS, UNITED STATES NAVY 

FOR 

MERITORIOUS ACHIEVEMENT IN AERIAL FLIGHT 
FROM 24 JULY 1966 TO 16 AUGUST 1966 



givkn this 2 2ND day of FEB in 88 





SECRETARY OF THBfNAVY^ 



NAVPERS 1650/1 t (12- 



¥* 



THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY 

WASHINGTON 



The President of the United States takes pleasure in presenting the 
AIR MEDAL (Gold Star in lieu of the Fourth Award) to 

LIEUTENANT JOHN A. FELDHAUS 
UNITED STATES NAVY 

for service as set forth in the following 

CITATION: 

For meritorious achievement in participating in 
aerial flight as a Pilot attached to Attack Squadron ONE 
HUNDRED FIFTY-TWO embarked in USS ORISKANY ( CVA 34) in 
combat operations in Southeast Asia from 18 August 1966 
to 2 September 1966. In the successful completion of ten 
strikes against the enemy in an active combat area, 
Lieutenant Feldhaus contributed substantially to the 
success of the United States efforts in Southeast Asia. 
By his professional skill, noteworthy achievements, and 
complete dedication to duty under hazardous conditions, 
Lieutenant Feldhaus reflected great credit upon himself 
and upheld the highest traditions of the United States 
Naval Service, 

For the President, 




9 h 

ecretary of/ the Navy 




THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT 
THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 

HAS AWARDED THE 



AIR MEDAL 

(GOLD STAR IN LIEU OF THE FOURTH AWARD) 

TO 

LIEUTENANT JOHN A. FELDHAUS, UNITED STATES NAVY 

FOR 

MERITORIOUS ACHIEVEMENT IN AERIAL FLIGHT 
FROM 18 AUGUST 1966 TO 2 SEPTEMBER 1966 



GIVEN THIS 2 2ND DAY OF FEB 19 88 





U2<3 



SECRETARY OF TH03 NAVY 



November, 2001 




Newspaper Story 1 

35 years after his death, Navy pilot to rest in peace at 
Arlington 

By LEON ALLIGOOD 
Tennessean Staff Writer 



Friday, 11/16/01 

His name was John Anthony Feldhaus. 

But perhaps only his late mother and the 
nuns at Sacred Heart School in 
Lawrenceburg, Tenn., where he attended 
grade school, called him John Anthony. 



To everyone of a certain age — born 
before the Vietnam War — he was Jack or Jackie: second son of a 
brick mason, a give-it-all tackle on the county high school's football 
team, a firm-jawed young man with an eye for adventure. 

To a generation born after the war in Southeast Asia, he was a name 
on a marker, a grave containing no body. 

Feldhaus, a Navy lieutenant, was shot down over North Vietnam's 
Thanh Hoa province. His A-1H Skyraider was struck by enemy fire as 
he returned from a bombing mission. The plane went down on Oct. 
8, 1966, five days after his 28th birthday. 

There was no evidence that Feldhaus, a father of four, survived the 
crash, and he officially remained missing in action, until he was 
declared dead about a decade later. The pilot's remains lay in the 
field where the single-engine bomber drilled a 20-foot-deep crater. 

It appeared the rice field would be his permanent final resting place 
until last month, when the service informed Feldhaus' children and 
siblings that DNA testing had positively identified remains from the 
crash as the late Navy aviator. 

Tuesday morning, his children and siblings will bury their father and 
brother with full military honors in Arlington National Cemetery. 



"The Navy's going to do it right. There will be a 21-gun salute and a 
flyover of jets, if the authorities allow it/' said Larry Feldhaus, the 
oldest of the siblings, now retired and living in Hendersonville. 

"It's good that this is finally going to happen. We've waited a long 
time." 

With only 18 months separating them, the two oldest Feldhaus boys 
were good friends, most of the time. "People would say they'd see 
us walking to school and we'd be fighting on one block and laughing 
in the next block," Larry reminisced yesterday, a photo of his 
uniformed brother in his lap. 

"The last time I saw him was August of 1966. He had flown his plane 
into Dobbins Air Force Base outside of Atlanta, and I met him there," 
Larry said, a solemn look on his face. 

"He wanted to know if I would be executor of his will." 

Just in case something happened over there. 

Jack Feldhaus didn't have to go to Vietnam. He had been a Navy pilot 
for several years and was an aviation instructor in Corpus Christi, 
Texas, where he could have safely served out his Navy tenure and, 
perhaps, switched to a commercial airline after leaving. 

"He never wanted to be on the sidelines. He always liked being in 
the thick of things," said Jimmy Moore, a high school friend who also 
still lives in Lawrenceburg. Moore was one of five friends, including 
Jack, who were inseparable during their high school years. 

"The last time I saw him he said he wanted to go to Vietnam. He was 
a career man and wanted to make rank," said former Lawrenceburg 
City Commissioner Billy Helton, another of the group of five. 

In reality, he was promoted. During the period when the downed 
pilot was MIA, he was promoted to commander. 

Jack Feldhaus perished while returning to the USS Oriskany after a 
bombing mission over North Vietnam. 

"The reports state that he still had some bombs and he dipped down 
below cloud cover to attack some trucks. He radioed another plane 
that stayed up above that he had been hit. That pilot said that he 
saw evidence of a crash, smoke and fire," Larry Feldhaus said. 

Late on that early fall night, a Navy officer arrived in Lawrenceburg 
to inform the pilot's parents. 



The lieutenant's 7-year-old kid sister answered the door. 

"I remember it vividly/' said Mary Ann Sanders, now a math teacher 
at a junior high school in Katy, Texas, near Houston. 

"Him being missing was a big focus all the time I was growing up. 
Whenever there would be POWs on the television, the Navy would 
call us to see if we saw him. Then after he was declared dead, we 
always waited for them to make positive identification," Sanders 
said in a telephone interview. 

"My mother always wanted to know that he had been brought back." 

Margaret Feldhaus died in May, just days after the report on the DNA 
match was completed. The Navy did not compile all of its findings 
until last month, 35 years after the Lawrenceburg man's plane 
crashed on the other side of the globe. 

"It really would have been nice for her to know, but she knows 
now," Sanders said. "I'm very sure about that." 



Newspaper Story 2 



Tennessee hero from another war finally laid to rest 



By DENNIS CAMIRE Gannett News Service 

WASHINGTON Three Navy fighter jets 
thundering over the burial ceremony for 
John Anthony Feldhaus at Arlington 
National Cemetery yesterday were a far 
cry from the single-engine, propeller- 
driven bomber the late Navy pilot was 
flying when he was shot down over North 
Vietnam in 1966. 






mm» 



BILL PERRY 

A caisson carries the remains of 
Tennessean John Anthony Feldhaus to 

his final resting place in Arlington 

National Cemetery 35 years after he 

was shot down in Vietnam. 



But 40 of Feldhaus' relatives — including 

all four of his children — and friends 

attending his funeral with full military 

honors at the nation's premier military cemetery appreciated the 

sentiment. 



"It was exceptional — the best thing they could have done," said 
Jeff Feldhaus of Houston, one of John Feldhaus' sons. "He got 
everything he deserved." 



John Feldhaus of Lawrenceburg had just turned 28 when his A-1H 
Skyraider was hit by enemy fire over Thanh Hoa province as he was 
returning from a bombing mission. The military listed him as 
missing in action and promoted him to commander before 
declaring him dead after about a decade. 

His body remained in the 20-foot crater from the crash until it was 
recovered 35 years later, and his siblings and children were told 
earlier this year that DNA testing had positively identified the 
remains as the naval aviator. 

Feldhaus was the second Tennessean to be buried in Arlington 
National Cemetery in less than two months. Lt. Cmdr. Otis Vincent 
Tolbert, a Navy intelligence officer born in Millington, near Memphis, 
and killed in the Sept. 11 attack on the Pentagon, was buried Sept. 
27. 

Pamela Smith of Houston, the oldest of John Feldhaus' children, 
was 8 years old when her father was shot down. She said the funeral 
"brought back the loss." She and her siblings already are older than 
her father was at his death. 

"What I remember a lot is missing him and wondering where he was 
and what he was doing," she said. 

Amanda Rose, who was only 4 when her father died, said it was an 
honor to be at the funeral. 

"I really don't know much about my father — just what other family 
members have told me," she said. 

The services began yesterday with a Mass of Christian burial in a 
cemetery chapel and included a ceremonial honor guard of a 23- 
man Navy rifle platoon, a colors unit and a band. Six sailors were 
pallbearers and made a precision drill out of moving the flag- 
draped casket from the hearse to the chapel. 

After Mass, the mourners and honor guard accompanied a caisson 
pulled by six gray horses carrying the casket to a grave site under 
bright sun and brisk northern wind. The short service featured the 
band playing The Navy Hymn, the fly-over, three volleys from a 
seven-man rifle squad and a bugler playing taps. 

The folded American flag was presented along with a note of 
condolence from Navy Secretary Gordon R. England to Rose and 
John A. Feldhaus Jr., another of the late aviator's sons. Both now 
live in Trenton, N.J. 



Henry Feldhaus, a cousin and former mayor of Shelbyville, said the 
family had always held out some slim hope the naval aviator was 
alive until his remains were positively identified. 

"He basically helped preserve our freedom — like the boys are doing 
today/' he said. 

Going Home 









'G? hmmand r&mrniw ik?s& wiw hrJ if, fbught far //. < mddtedfer if , America. 



{inmir ns\v< . l\7 






v'-w »^i- rt,*T> J"Hi*it !1h 



This is the "Going Home" print that Jack's friend Jimmy Moore made 
after Jack became MIA. He told him that if anything ever happened 
to him he wanted to be carried to his grave in a wagon. He made the 
photo in memory of him. It is in places all over the world. There is 
also a painting made of it by Lynn King of Lawrenceburg. 



If you would like an 8 by 10 copy of this photograph suitable for 
framing you can order one from Jimmy Moore by emailing him at 
jmoore3d@bellsouth.net or writing him at PO Box 974, 
Lawrenceburg, TN 38464. 



House Joint Resolution 

HJR0606 

01034884 

-1- 

Filed for intro on 01/14/2002 

HOUSE JOINT RESOLUTION 606 

By White 

A RESOLUTION to honor the memory of Commander John Anthony Feldhaus and his 

meritorious service to the United States. 

WHEREAS, our nation was conceived by individuals who were willing to sacrifice their 

personal safety and concerns to ensure our individual and collective freedom, and the 

Volunteer State is especially proud to be the home of so many valiant men and women who 

have performed above and beyond the call of duty; and 

WHEREAS, thousands of Tennesseans have continued this time-honored tradition of 
volunteerism through service in the United States Navy; and 

WHEREAS, John Anthony Feldhaus was one such estimable Tennessean who served with 

courage and conviction; a native of Lawrenceburg, "Jack" Feldhaus was wholly devoted to 

his Nation and countrymen, and he made the ultimate sacrifice while serving as a Naval 

Aviator; and 

WHEREAS, having been a Pilot in the United States Navy for several years at the onset of 

the Vietnam War, Lieutenant Feldhaus could have completed his tenure as an instructor in 

a stateside flight school, but he made the patriotic decision to volunteer his vast talents to 

be utilized in Vietnam; and 

WHEREAS, while returning to the USS Oriskany after a bombing mission, Lieutenant 

Feldhaus, as was his nature, went above and beyond the call of duty to complete an elective 

attack, utilizing his excess ordinance; his A-1H was struck by enemy fire and went down, 

and Lieutenant Feldhaus was thereafter declared missing in action; and 

WHEREAS, promoted to Commander while classified MIA, John Anthony Feldhaus was 

eventually presumed lost; and WHEREAS, although it initially appeared that Vietnam 

would remain his final resting place, the body of Commander Feldhaus was recently 

located and positively identified by the Navy, allowing a return to his native land for 

burial; and 

WHEREAS, Commander Feldhaus has long occupied a revered position in the history of 

our Nation and its Armed Forces, and he now rests in the hallowed ground of Arlington 

National Cemetery among his fellow courageous patriots who gave the ultimate sacrifice in 

defense of current and future citizens of their Nation; and 

WHEREAS, Commander Feldhaus served with great bravery and ability and performed 

his duties with the utmost skill, dedication, and professionalism; his service could only be 

categorized as outstanding and he has earned all honor and recognition that we could 

possibly bestow; now, therefore, 



BE IT RESOLVED BY THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES OF THE ONE 
HUNDRED SECOND GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF THE STATE OF TENNESSEE, THE 

SENATE CONCURRING, 

That we join with the family of Commander John Anthony Feldhaus to honor 

his memory, reflecting fondly on his selfless devotion, unsurpassed moral courage, and 

meritorious service to the United States Navy, and we express our pride in, and gratitude 

for, his supreme contributions to this State and our Nation. 



Arlington Funeral 





Missing Man Fly-over 




nnwmwimir 



Memorial Sites 

Vietnam Veteran's Memorial Wall 

JOHN ANTHONY FELDHAUS 

is honored on Panel 1 IE, Row 60 of 

the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. 



Full Name: JOHN ANTHONY FELDHAUS 

Wall Name: JOHN A FELDHAUS 

Date of Birth: 10/3/1938 

Date of Casualty: 10/8/1966 

Home of Record: LAWRENCEBURG 

State: TN Branch of Service: NAVY 

Rank: CDR Casualty 

Country: NORTH VIETNAM 

Casualty Province: NZ 

Status: MIA 








Ai 



HARTLEY 
p&ST^FR/ 



[FRED J KIBLER • 

R. WILLIAM !. >N ' 

vV ADKI5S( )N • R( )BhS< T F CHAMBERLAIN •■ 
UARY W BRAASOi • ORMAN L CROSSLEY Jr • 
vUVA ,TMaiCHRi ST .JOSEPH TGlLE-lr .. 

TREE" 
AMPBELL 



ANKLl 



lAMES ATREECE -■ HA 

no German l cooler • john a eeluhau^ * 

SON cS 

Srk i MICHAEIS confer • GLENN w apple ♦ 

DHENSLEY ALFRED A KASPAUL . RON ALDD MILLER • 

RRm • ROBERT E BERRY • REGIS P DEBQLD_. ; 

TMAN .JOHN D GOOD I DOUGLAS L JONES • + 

&HLEDER J DENNIS E SPRINGSTEEN. MURRAY LKgg*^ , ; 

)X . ANTHONY J N1CRO • PHILLIP C FOX ^ CAW- b U *u jg 

ARRELL • EUGENE T MEADOWS * EMERY CMIKULA 

SaREL L SILLS • GEORGE M SMYRYCHYNSKI ' . 

tfS C DOBSON . PAUL E FLOYD Jr fFG G'P S S^i r ERT L PRU HS > 



4MRIO 

LYNNBACH/N 

1 GROV! 

! MARION LKI 

. LORENSREE 

1 DEEWSTOK 

ROYGALVIS 

KENNETH H . 

•ROGERJBRY 

OTIS S FISHEI 

KENT P FURP 

JAMES O HU 

RAYMOND L 

CECIL WALKE 

CLARENCE L 

ROBERT WH 

TERRENCE D 

I TRACY S TEN 

! S TERRY LEE Wl 

JOHN MAYO 

HARRY MRV 

JAMES WCAf 

BILLY RAY HU 

EDWARD A iV 

tfdWADA/v 




John Anthony Feldhaus 

Commander 

ATKRON 152, CARRIER AIR WING 16, USS ORIS KAN Y 

United States Navy 

03 October 1938 - 08 October 1966 

Lawrenceburg, TN 

Panel HE Line 060 




From the Vietnam Veteran's Wall Web Site 



Tennessee Vietnam Veteran's Memorial 

The two Vietnam Veteran's Memorials below are located in the 
Legislative Plaza in Nashville Tennessee. Also included is a wall of 
names of those from Tennessee who died in this conflict. 




Below, Jack's Dad, Lawrence Feldhaus, after receiving a medal in 
memory of Jack at the ceremony to open the Tennessee Vietnam 
Veteran's Memorial on November 10, 1985. 

Seated along side is Golda Henderson of McMinnville, one of the 
forty four relatives who received medals that day. Jack's Dad 
passed away two years later at 80 years of age. 




USS Midway CVA -41 



Jack made two Westpac cruises aboard the USS Midway, one in 1961 
and one in 1962. He was serving in VA-25 at the time. 




Early 1960s 



San Diego Aircraft Carrier Museum 



USS Midway 




Located downtown in San Diego at Navy Pier, Midway provides a 
dynamic and enriching experience "from boiler to bridge". A visit to 
Midway instills a greater appreciation for courage, freedom, and 
service to country. 










■ i "■■■■ 



-., ■ 





I received the following from Chuck Muhl who served with Jack in 
VA-25. 




"I flew with Jack in VA-25 aboard the Midway CVA-41 
from 1959 until I left the Navy in 1962. During that 
period personal call signs or handles like Top Gun's 
"Maverick" were not yet in vogue as they later were 
to become. 

As you most likely know the Midway is now a 
museum in San Diego and they will be opening up a tour of the 
carrier's Ready Rooms. VA-25 formed an association circa 1996 
called The Fist of the Fleet Association www.fistofthefleet.org and 
they in turn have joined with a Light Attack 
Group www.cv41.org/readvroom3/ to help support the display. 

Each Ready Room had a board attached to a wall that was a list of 
each pilot from the squadron CO. on down to the lowly "nugget" 
newbie. There followed each name a line of squares and each time 
the pilot made a carrier landing, the Landing Signal Officer would 
grade it and color in the square Green, Yellow or Red depending on 
how the pilot flew the pass and trap. Green OK to red hairy and 
yellow somewhere in between. It was there for all to see as the 
cruise progressed. Kind of like having your report card passed 
around for all to see. 

I wanted to memorialize Jack in a small way by having his name put 
on Ready Room 3's "Greenie Board" as we called it. There is a space 
along side his name for his call sign. If you knew what it was with 
VA-152 would you please e-mail it to me and I will have it added to 
his name." 

Later he sent the following: 

"I have attached the proposed "Greenie Board" that has been firmed 
up as far as names/squadron and call signs. This board will be 
displayed in Ready Room 3 aboard the USS Midway. It will be 
another memorial to Jack. 

I've attached a Polaroid of Jack standing up in our ready room with 
Lynn Hughes also standing who was Jack's T-28 instructor at North 
Whiting. That may be Susanne sitting down in front of Jack. It was 
a Midway Dependent's Day Cruise." 

Jack is standing in the back left and Susanne is sitting in front and to 
the left of Jack. 




Below is the proposed "Greenie Board" that will be displayed in 
Ready Room 3 aboard the Midway in San Diego. 



Light Attack Greenie Board 



Billet 


Pilot Name/Type Aircraft 


Call Sign 


Sqd 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


,7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


CO- 


Mo Peelle/A-4 


Warchiefl 


VA-23 






• 






• 


• 










• 








• 










• 










XO- 


Chuck Sweeney/A-4 


FlyingEagle 2 


VA-212 




• 






• 


• 










• 








• 










• 












OPS- 


Bob Kison/AD 


FOFA Pres 1 


VA-25 






• 




• 










• 












• 




















MAINT- 


John Burke hofder/A-7 


Burkee 


VA-56 




• 










• 








• 








• 










• 










ADMIN - 


Bill Gilchrist/A-4 


OK3 


VA-23 






• 


• 










• 












• 










• 












SAFETY - 


Chuck Muhl/AD 


Charlie 


VA-25 








• 






• 








• 
















• 














NATOPS - 


WilTrafton/A-7 


Benjo 


VA-56 






• 








• 






• 


• 












• 


















SKEDS - 


Bill Ashley/AD 


Bakabill 


VA-104 














• 










• 












• 
















WEPS- 


Steve Endacott/A-7 


Squat 


VA-56 






• 












• 


• 










• 






• 














QA- 


Jack Feldhaus/AD 


Locket 1 


VA-25 




• 








• 












• 










• 


















tso- 


MikeWebber/A-4 


Moon Pie 


VA-23 




• 








• 








• 








• 








• 








• 








UNE- 


Craig Cover/A-7 


Crash 


VA-153 








« 








• 








• 












• 
















PERS- 


Harry Najarian/A-7 


Nudge 


VA-153 








• 






• 








• 














• 
















A/C DIV - 


Lee Van Oss/A-7 


Beaver 


VA-153 








• 






• 


• 






• 































OK ■ Minimum deviations with good corrections. 
Fair - Reasonable deviations with average corrections. 
No Grade - Below average corrections but a safe pass 
Cut - Unsafe, gross deviations inside the wave off window 



Black dot indicates night pass 

No count, special case (Emergency) 

Wave Off 

Bolter - tailhook did not catch a wire, aircraft \ \ 

around for another pass 



The July 2008 Fist of the Fleet Association Newsletter had the 
following report: 



MORE ON THE MIDWAY READY ROOM 3 PROJECT 

So far, four ready rooms have been restored - although there will be 

continuing progress for quite a while. Ready Room 3 has been 



established as the "light attack" RR to depict the role that the A-l , 
A-4 and A-7 played in Midway's history. Our own squadron, The Fist 
Of The Fleet, has a very prominent display in the Ready Room with 
several pictures of our aircraft, several logo items, and three 
members of VA-25 are listed on the "greenie board" - Bob Kison, 
Chuck Muhl & Jack Feldhaus. 



Appendex 



Jack Feldhaus entered the US Navy on 3 Aprill957 and was shot 
down in North Vietnam on October 7, 1966, a period of nine years. 
During that time he was at sea for three Westpac cruises. 

USS Midway, CVA-41 

VA-25 

15 February 1961 to 28 September 1961 

Seven months and 14 days 

USS Midway, CVA-41 

VA-25 

6 April 1962 to 20 October 1962 

Six months and 14 days 

USS Oriskany, CVA-34 

VA-152 

26 May 1966 to 8 October 1966 

Four months and 14 days 

Following are excerpts from cruise books of those three cruises. In 
addition there are excerpts from the 1965 Oriskany cruise book 
since VA-152 was aboard and many of the pilots who were with VA- 
152 on the 1966 cruise were also on that cruise. These cruise books 
give details about the ship, crew, and aircraft squadrons aboard, 
including numerous pictures from that time. 



Heratb 



NEW 



YORK 




.MJt 



A European Edition U Published Dinly in Piirls 



STribune 



FRIDAY, MARCH 24, 1961 



Rerafd Tribune Inc. 



inc In srtis SO miles from New 
York CltT e*eepl 0* Long KUtid 



FIVE-CENTS 



Kennedy Bids Reds Halt 
In Laos or Face Action; 
Fleet Deploys in Area 



President 

Says U. S. 
Asks Peace 

By Warren Rogers Jr. 

WASHINGTON. Mar. 23 — 
President Kennedy declared to- 
night that unJess a peaceful 
solution is found to the Laos 
crisis the Umted States and its 
allies will consider taking other 
steps. 

In a strong statement couched 
in soft words, the President 
appealed to the American 
people and all the world to 
understand that "all we want 
in Laos is peace, not war " 

But, he told his press con- 
ference, which was telecast 
''live/' America is determined 
to abide by its commitments to 
keep Laos from going Com- 
munist. 

''Laos is far away from 
America but the world is small/* 
he said. 

The President described the 
situation in Laos, where Com- 
munist-backed rebels are stead- 
ily making advances, as the 
'most immediate problem" of 
his Administration. And then 
he laid down his terms, which 
he has sought to make clear to 
Soviet Premier Nikita 8. 
Khrushchev; 

"if there is to be a peaceful 
solution, there nust be a cessa- 
tion of the present armed at- 
tacks. If these attacks do not 
stop, those who respect a truly 
neutral Laos will have to con- 
sider their response, 

'The shape of this necessary 
response will, of course, be care- 
fully considered not only in 
Washington t*ut in the confer- 
ence of the SEATO allies which 
[begins next Monday. . . , 



U. S. Sends 3 Carriers, Marines, 
Transport Planes to Laos Area 



From the. Herald Tribune Bureau 

WASHINGTON, Mar. 23.— 
The United States is assem- 
bling a powerful force of three 
aircraft carriers, other war- 
ships and 1,400 Marines in the 
vicinity of Communist-threat- 
ened Laos. 

Additionally, lone - range 
C-130 and C-135 troop and 
cargo transports are being 
flown from bases in the United 
States to the area, The planes 
were dispatched to Clark Air 
Force Base in the Philippines, 
where they would be about five 
hours flying time from Vien- 
tiane, the administrative cap- 
ital of Laos. 

These were the principal 
military and naval movements, 
the New York Herald Tribune 
learned today, in President 
Kennedy's preparations to use 
force if diplomacy fails to stop 
the fighting in the Indochinese 
kingdom. 

There were ather movements 
in the Kennedy policy of "speak 
softly but carry a bi? stick," 
They included the sudden re- 
call to Okinawa of 2.000 Ma- 
rines who were in Tokyo making 
a movie, leaving the film com- 
pany without troops for a big 
combat scene. They also in- 
cluded the dispatch of about 
150 Marines to Udorn, Thai- 
land, fifty miles south of Vien- 
tiane, to service helicopters sup- 
plying the Royal Laos Army. 



In the United States, various 
units of the Strategic Army 
Corps were reported alerted for 
possible movement. A similar 
alert was said to have been 
given to 2.000 airborne troops 
on Okinawa, including hun- 
dreds of especially trained guer- 
rilla fighters. 

The White House and the 
Pentagon clamped a secrecy lid 
on all these developments as 
the President sought a diplo- 
matic showdown with the Rus- 
sians on the future of Laos. 
All questions brought a crisp 
"no comment," the like of 
which has not been known 
around here since the Korean 
War. 

While the Russians kept quiet 
and pro-Communist forces 
gained in Laos, the President 
ordered units of the 7th Fleet 
deployed to the South China 
Sea. He also ordered the re- 
deployment of aircraft and the 
alerting of limited -war combat 
troops. 

Carriers Under Steam 

The three aircraft carriers 
steaming toward waters near 
landlocked Laos include the 
U, S. s. Bennington, the U. S, S. 
Lexington and the U. S. 6, 
Midway. 

The Bennington and the Lex- 
ington were accompanied by 
the amphibious transport 
U. S. 5, Paul Revere and the 
landing ship U. S. S. Monti- 
cello, as well as four destroyers. 
The 1,400 Marines of the 3d 
Marine Division were aboard 
the Paul Revere and the Mon- 
ticello,. 



The Midway and two de- 
stroyers steamed out of Hong 
Kong a few hours after dawn 
to join the other 7th Fleet units 
already in the South China ^Jea 
and headed toward Indochina. 

The American units provide 
a powerful force, backing up the 
land elements of the South- 
east Asia Treaty Organization 
allies already in the general 
area. 

These include Thai, Philip- 
pine and Pakistani troops and 
aircraft, as well as 500 French 
officers and men stationed in 
Laos, mainly for training pur- 
poses. All told, the SEATO na- 
tions could throw about 4000 
battle-ready troops into Laos 
within a short time. 

They would bolster the 
29,000-man Laotian Army, 
which has been unable so far 
to cope with the 8.000 to 10.000 
Communist-backed Pathet Lao 
rebels. The Communists' guer- 
rilla tactics and the rugged 
terrain give them a formidable 
advantage. 

Thailand, meanwhile, charged 
that fourteen battalions of 
North Vietnamese are in Laos 
fighting alongside the rebels. 
This would considerably in- 
crease the size of the Commu- 
nist forces, indicating they may 
be planning a concerted drive 
to take over the whole of Laos 
before tlie United States and 
its SEATO allies can act- 



westpac i96i 



1 ::s^^^>4^-^r l '^>&„ 



Ayddi 



Uktrtc 

feym^o Mong J 
da law Tung* y^.Kft 



fci»a** CMangcV 
i 4pang* 



u tMuonq Bounv^LfcV 



ho**.* Tf'* un i -Salt* *V * ,d0 * Tor, 3 ¥-7 J 



''V 



gfthanh 
huy 



~Ha Gii 



A 



Pinf 



Tab** 



v *n ,, 



**&« Ca 



^ 



i«g! 



>Mui5fig 



NV 



ThatKhV 



-^Ch 



;rhsiei 



n ?^rk<^ 



-T* 



YenB 
aLo*" 



?Na 
Lang: 



A' Son La ' 



uLang 
uo-g 



.ShangV 



o*s 



LucK. 
Popar ' 



'sifX^itt 



Lohng 






L« 



ngSa 

jHoue*^ 3 ' #W«ong B*ng 



[Wg. 












nma rymmanai Wong p a \ [ _ • 



• Chr*Fi 



LM'.nvgPakTha 



*noj 









.ng 



' f*<u*£J! , ' t * 



Oti/.F OF 



ietchou PintiO 






stat 



f»o*ng* 



V"p* 



, ^>-l^»-s'"y '^dfcsPSf 






Kyrflkto 



miphof 



Insefn 

VTjubm, 



Hi^rigbw*' ' . 



" \ fUttaradi* 



Sla^ 



- . . 



• C^irt 



jl—J** j¥'t>h n £>jo S^tA to/ig W If.juu 

TONKfN 

Harl'o 






* Lot'oSh*(Shekif4kel$ 

k 'otl Chkfrou Ch'ti/itno 



* ^n a , Ph , *P^>> Cb'angk* 

■ ''^v fkBori Thu ^^ fKanen^Kanchan 

ShCim Yingkoh 

,e\ ^mXuyon b i 



H 



T'ungku Chiio iTankon Point) 
KuAOftan 

mfigtung r 



*0<>« 



TrAch 



L Tak 



W 



►Mi?W ^PrAnfcdtlrLo^ 



t.nulq 



IM Phiehit 



¥*&*£ 



JP^ 



a ' n 9 

3 



\\\Ky Ur >g 
(.amatngil ** * 

Hope Point Q % 

LA > 7?" ^ 

MigyaungJ 4t in, 



hSaer 



H 



D' 



Sa^* nf 






fa 



Lwannaphum* 






Bhani 



Ho' 



^Quan^Trf 



>« 



™N£ng.Pongj; 






RatchatSan 






^ 



Hill? *#4ucn(] T huy 

Loc IdiDa Nang (Tourane) 



pojnASar.Va 






Jhang Bmh 



Jam Ky 



chung 

i Tdchou Tao 

hu* 
gch'tao 
j ChtAQ (Ctpt Bdttitm} 



Iff* 1 

WeitSattdt. AmphttriU Group 
• Woody i 
ratt/ r / PAR ACE L *->ncQfaf„ 
Crescent Croup ' /5MN£>S PyrzmxtMoti 
Money J. 

Pauu Xtah 
fffton t 



._W5 



•To* 



A, »9 ^ 



»0f> 



* AyuttKAy^ 



2 



m Paiaulf? ^ 
*T CaAwj p *'»w j a J 

£^h.^ f -Tharrt*.^ W /BanPak»ehto« 

^ ATA* Te0 * ss * r i m * X^anKyjIfa. 

^aentmc* £^ Matron «J Khtri Kh2n 
2 Bokpyin. jKanoSaph™ 

if, l^Jtrt / W , , , 

V»cto^ V ^f .Phf, l!3,4r9L f7^ 



imp 

*AAO* 






Sur«n 






INDOCHINA 



*£ 



fftufn HoaJ ^ 



' nMi 



^f ? 



W 



BanR.tnrihJa* A - tu? 

>fo CW Sat h*fi( Ch aly.^ ^tt* 1 pf *o Sjmui 

*fa PAr,j nbwn;Afr«fl t , ^ JLwjiiATL - . ^ 

-*-*5ur«Thani iBan D 



cn 



r&Mra7Jb w » s A'Vta/ 1( ; 

Ban fl^g pfcj 

Ph.n, 
Ban fha NyT - 

Phuk 




^OFI 

ijVBdfiThaSa'a 

lLI khoo SiThammarat 

,w8«n Pak Phanang 

f 1' I if L.i 11 *"^ 



*ThirvgPhra(IUAW 
)afung 

Ban San am Ch*i 



'KhuKharLf^** 
fiiiiim Q dug R * e Jc q* 

/ Koulpn* v/T/ 

SlMpRaap .Ro viang 

• Kicmjnonq Kleanq 

A IB 9 CC" 

-«** f % Leach \> k I l l Y l a K-k 

fe04^1n: V^T* ngPWoch-X f°^^ Ch 

*ai ^a(- Kompong Spo^ //^h, % J*^ 

^■Y^^^^*^ Cao ^/^SAIGON LHam Tan ** 

Re »f™ H.Tte(W(" r ™ch! *Lanh \ >*Ta>» An VPhuot U (Bjna) Coi^oWon 

9 PhuQuoJ* cho ^ ^L**VS^ t"\& c ^^9 TauiCap.St. j. cqu-1> 

^N.nft! ft^ j ^ \ ^ABaDong 
Honfiinpng PhmcLonq^y Kfianh HunglSoc Trang) 

'C*Mi«iOuinl«naa^ i Bac Lieu 
Hon Chuoi 7 *->t* ^^ . 

*P HopBtwng I *DamDoi' _ n 

TNamCan ^on D^o Con Son IP**, Condor t) 

Hon Khan & °s> >% Y? S 4t c 

(PovlaOb,} ^^4^ '■"' 



i/(A /Vj«i Huirth 
n Rang 

Dinh 



s 



^ 



Coajifa /i/a« 



Bank_. v 

n-aS^^A Y6n 9 : ^«kj|6ongl<hla "S.ngora. 
BanPakBarIL 









PUIAU IAN6KA 




.^Ju. 



^OHL'rt TanyongMai 
T vr*j>aa^u ^tai Bhaj*u 
:/rMa*T^ 

> Geor9 &^^f^V^; r T 

larang 



^ 



* 



Sprttfy lifond 



Ambayn& Cny 






N> 



p*rtw5SSEi , pj n 9 ;o^ 

Kuala KaiJPf J *'* 2 ^t*^ 



^*»* 



Jipinq 
■ v ^'« #rOP H*ghUrrf* Bra^g 
' c ».i^ «»•♦ Tartan pj 



Ttnggol 

iKuila Ounguo 




ieierAh 
UAntan 



-a^brA^an o ^ /x ^-\,T, pa h S^^Upis ^T^ongP^,^ 

!* antar ^ K lankjA Kua V Umpar S,rAa/a 

Ti Ti_ ■■„■ y*%^ , ^ '^^ ■ Pe™*ngatl 




vaH?^'" 
% M *jf«mafl 



KZPULAUAN 
AHAKtBAS Mubur*, 
Trrampa^ 
Padang^ | r^ii 
0/e ma d/aFA-g, . ; TVm/anj 



/C£Py^t/a/v 

WArt/WA BBSAR , 

'BUHGUXAN UTAHAi 



j KepuhuAtt Natum Uun 

r*;Jl miun 






idjai 



ijt*k Indonesia 
Sfanea/( 

W'rf^L «.^ . , Si/ixKetj,! 



' s h V 0**nrfJr 



^da- „^ SubiKett,! 

totWANSELATm^Zjsvun 

Unjqrtg Out it. /*^ 



UK BRUNr 

^; 

Luton gj j 
Mir™ 



ft * /A Matu » United U A i * 



^^ao^oHe 



^ 



. aiiATteflft 



4 «-a*»^' it ' 



^arTujangpinang 
K6>ULAUAN RfAU 



Umaia 






\\ *"$ibu " 



5 ! ^ Pul *« ^ 



V- 



An^9 






K*p 




Wft*«Si < UCf • 3»3 L<*£KEPULAUAN i 

- * ^ * -.^■..... PuIaukidjAr,^/ | ^W^g^P 



r/jWawan?am6e;an Mon»e €d^" '' . i-<ng ' V>* , n9 * ibat,i ' ' * %- i- 

a , MampawaltL; %»Tl^J B^^P^k. Sd.mbau Nangaraun 

.' ■ » . Tt* - . • . »* ..»' '.■/[ ^"-.Sdnoaau »_..__ *l •««-...!... mot w.i..:*' r 



Pontiana 



XI 



2£Uk*i/ s,n, **9 * LD "99unt"i- ^ ,0T Kal«i" ! 









^w 



ipm 



TV'*' K T'i'^' I 

f, 0u ^wato*LT T'atnal 




Kaibhs'mn' 
iTungchii 



c ,. , (TAIWAN) 

iitting 

tung 






J 



\te& 



T 



/iii^.'n Channel 



iohungVou Ntii 



■ Maburfis BATAN 
LUZON #^ /JUMM 



STRAIT 



«*- 



Tjbt.fnj 



fttftntaiig 

Hiilitilntuf Chun/it I 

hnttft** « *^ B * kuy an 

C *' Jy *SS BMUWN KtANDS 
Difupirii _ DrAMiLWcaiio 

^tj i* '* k- -* -r Carwgum 
Btof^'flt '"» fta&uvafl Channel 
Ope Bo K ^«|(5gW bU i U „ 9 a M an Vi " ate 
San Niwlag^ ? ^K a b«A»3 i |* V 
CabugaM ed ^jfo/*Bag«*Awrf 



2- 




BuhjJuh Strait 

Mangfff 

Bttetnbipgin 

J^tiiwii 






&*B»ngkor »***»**■ !-«* .una* T^fi^™/? ^ 

^t £iN/Malal*p i 



BtW 

rum *"»*A*i 






Piritasan* 



.Li tang 






m pi .Sarangam kbnrff 



> r o~-R»<tf r#rr LrCP 3 



ft mbing a t^_ 

"° .i ^ 






Kalabakan, •TT"" % Bum Bum 

LjttiMMI **Wa*<i ^*"* u ^Voo 



Vr nA 



x;.gan ^ *D 



-^ 



'***?* 



j Taraian 

'Lingkas 
Lmbatu 



*»*,, 



Longsegah* °**/ci^ U* 
Rantaupandjangl**" 



nqs*tor 



fc O» ia1 



iff iakuia 



id jan5 






B 



, Mvort Aratanp* 

Keput*u*n jfamm* ^J«Gen 
K*wio M§K* 

Kjwa^tu e t\* KaraketongT 

^.Wahuna 
g & Sang' 

^, Tttiulandwg 









Muaraataft, *fl, Lembak* 






V 

• £ "S.LongbtehQ 

•Wam*haktebo ,U*^^-p» BDnU 
*Longiram^ r ■ 



--» Long i ram - 

otak/. , 
Ttnggarong. 



_I -htf**- i , a k^qfiJ 



t Sabanj 

TwdfUntf 

Allnd* 

Tand)ungK*r*"* 



isabambara ^» 







13.6 

Biaro 



< 







i.kupang -* 

Ke ma - *Maju h . 

< rf/onr Sic 
Ter ^ 



fDoho kaJa 1„_*4^-- -— *S>— — **tj/j -\- N/T 



M 



»'*' ..»»*»K** 



mJ-"*- Malik- 



^ MuJr 



SOUTHEAST ASIA, 
HOTSPOT IN 
THE COLD WAR 



In the Western Pacific of 1961, the 
focus of attention was clearly on the 
islands and peninsulas of Southeast 
Asia. 

A scant ten years ago, such names 
as Luzon and Indochina were only 
dimly familiar to most Americans. 
Economically backward, culturally 
diverse, geographically and politically 
confused and disjointed, Southeast 
Asia was traditionally a " low pressure 
area " ripe for penetration ranging 
from ancient Chinese migrations to the 
institution of Western colonialism in the 
early 1900V In fact for more than 40 
years before World War II, the region 
was little more than remote extensions 
of the British, French, Dutch and Ameri- 
can colonial empires. 

Change was in the offing, however. 
Fired by the temporary Japanese occu- 
pation during the war, hitherto dormant 
feelings of nationalism suddenly awoke. 
Instead of dealing with passive accep- 
tance, colonial powers were confronted 
with armed resistance. Some left 
peaceably. Others were ousted by 
force. 

After the fall of Dien Bien Phu and 
the French colonial empire in 1954, 
Southeast Asia entered a new era. 
Although divided efficiently by the 
Geneva Convention into distinct inde- 
pendent countries, the stability once 
provided by colonialism was now gone. 

Some countries such as the Philip- 
pines and Burma have made the tran- 
sition to independence easily. In 
other areas, notably Indochina, insta- 
bility continues to reign. 

The unfortunate result in Southeast 
Asia has been a severe power vacuum 
of quite sizeable proportions. Under 
normal conditions this would mean only 
an indefinite period of slow adjustment 
and possibly eventual organization. 

Normal conditions have never 
characterized Southeast Asia, however, 
and the post-war rivalry between the 
United States and the Soviet Union has 
catapulted the region into world promi- 
nence. As an uncertain, uncommitted 
group of small undeveloped countries, 
the area is an ideal playing field for 
the global conflict between Western 
Democracy and Communism, 

In the first half of 1961, Southeast 
Asia was the principal battleground for 
the Cold War. 



The Nationoi Geographic Society 



THE NAVY AND THE COLD WAR 



In the world of 1961 ,the Cold War is a distressing 
but inescapable fact of life. At a time when actual 
war consists only of occasional rifle shooting and 
guerrilla warfare in various "' hotspots ", the big 
struggle between East and West is carried on on a 
far larger scale and in far more subtle ways. The 
Cold War today is not merely military, but political, 
economic, psychological, and ideological. 

The Communist strategy in 1961 is clear. As long 
as all-out nuclear war remains unworkable as a 
means to world domination, the Soviet effort at 
present is to lessen United States prestige and 
influence abroad, foment discord between the United 
States and her allies, obtain political and economic 
control of uncommitted nations, and push this country 
and her ideology right back to her own borders. 

The methods available to the West for combating 
this strategy and maintaining peace are numerous, 
ranging from Radio Free Europe to the Organization 
of American States. Yet the sine qua non of an 
effective counter-strategy is strength — military 
strength. Not only can military strength prevent 
total war, but it is an inescapable foundation for 
foreign policy. It enables this country to speak with 
authority during periods of crisis. It acts as a 
deterrent to local military aggression by the Com- 
munists. It reassures American allies. In sum this 
backbone of military strength allows the United 
States to move decisively on both the military and 
non-military fronts of the Cold War. 



THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

An integral part of this country's military capa- 
bilities is the United States Navy. From the days 
of colorful and legendary sea battles between 
crusty men-of-war, the Navy has evolved today 
into a mammouth fighting force of over 800,000 
officers and men (including 175,000 Marines and 
860 ships on active duty armed with the most 
modern weapons and weapon systems. As Americas 
acknowledged First Line of Defense, the Fleet covers 
a front of some 10,000 miles all over the world. 

Although the great importance of the Fleet to 
United States military strategy is now generally 
accepted, it was widely thought after the develop- 
ment of so-called M ultimate " weapons that the era 
of the sea-going fighting force was at an end. Future 
wars, it was felt, would be total holocausts waged 
between opposing ICBM's launched from the Mother 



Country, and no ship could ever participate effective- 
ly in such a battle. 

MOBILITY 

Those who predicted the Navy's inevitable obso- 
lescence soon realized that a sea-borne force pos- 
sessed a tremendously valuable asset to modern 
warfare : mobility. 

In a defensive sense, mobility provides a military 
base with a greater degree of invulnerability to 
enemy attack. Dispersed at will anywhere on the 
millions of square miles of ocean, a moving naval 
task force is extremely difficult to locate. The location 
of a land missile base on the other hand must 
remain stationary and therefore much easier to 
pinpoint. Furthermore even a successful kill on one 
or a few sea bases would immediately alert all of 
the other deployed naval units. Thus to be com- 
pletely effective a surprise attack must destroy all 
of this country's mobile bases, and destroy them 
simultaneously— a feat of extreme difficulty. 

Offensively, mobility contributes great flexibility 
to a military policy. The mobile task force can 
move immediately to an area of crisis and move 
ashore quickly. If necessary, Army and Marine 
elements can then be brought in to participate in 
any protracted hostilities. In Lebanon, Suez and 
the Formosa Straits, the Navy has effectively 
demonstrated the advantage of introducing immedi- 
ate military strength into limited war situations to 
keep the peace. These small "brush fire" hostilities 
can thereby be contained and the threat of Soviet 
military expansion can be reduced. Moreover this 
initial counter force can be brought to bear with- 
out infringing on foreign soil, without directing 
enemy fire to our own country, without relying on 
friendly nations for logistic support, and without 
being hampered by the restrictions of neutral 
nations. It can be free, if necessary, of all foreign 
jurisdiction whatsoever. 

FLEXIBILITY 

With the intrinsic asset of mobility, the Navy has 
combined a man-made asset : flexibility* The 
deployed fleet consists of the attack carrier striking 
force, the amphibious landing force, the fleet marine 
force, and the mobile logistic support force. At the 
disposal of military planners are special duty units 
from anti-submarine hunter-killer forces to radar 
picket ships, and a variety of weapons from the 
Marine's M-l to the most destructive of nuclear 
weapons. 



Such diversity is a necessity. Contrary to beliefs 
circa 1950 J of several noted military strategists, 
the history of the last ten years has shown that not 
only are many types of limited war possible but 
are an ever-present and often recurring danger. 
It is clear that armed forces must be maintained 
which are capable of waging any kind of war 
anywhere. A one-weapon, one-concept strategy 
necessarily ties foreign policy to an inflexible 
strategic concept that permits no freedom of action 
and no capability to counter the numerous and 
devious sfrategems of the Communists. Today the 
United States Navy can fight an air and sea war, 
offensive and defensive, strategic and tactical, con- 
ventional and nuclear, limited and total. 

CONTROL OF THE SEAS 

Yet in spite of the radically changed nature of 
modern warfare and the new responsibilities of the 
fleet, the Navy nonetheless continues to retain its 
age-old mission : control of the seas. 



Geography does not change. Water still covers 
nearly three-quarters of the earth's surface. 99% 
of all Foreign trade is transported along the 100,000 
miles of primary ocean routes* As the United States 
increasingly becomes a "have-not" nation in terms 
of many important raw materials, she becomes 
more and more dependent on her economic ties 
with other countries. Firm control of the seas pre- 
vents the possibility of a fatal seizure of sea power 
by the Communists and maintains not only the 
economic, but also the cultural, political and ideolo- 
gical ties between the nations of the free world. 

THE NON-MILITARY 
COUNTER-STRATEGY 

In addition to its military mission, the Navy is 
also an active participant in the United States 1 non- 
military strategy to combat communism. An impor- 
tant goal of this counter-strategy is an atmosphere 






of friendship, mutual respect and understanding 
between this nation and the free nations of the 
world. 

It is clear that regardless of the widespread effort 
of American propaganda abroad, the impressions 
that foreign peoples form of US values and standards 
are largely influenced by the actions and behavior 
of Americans abroad, most of whom are military 
personnel. Impressions so gained may profoundly 
influence the patterns that these peoples adopt in 
their national policies vis-a-vis the Communist or 
the Free World. United States defense strategy is 
largely dependent on the extent to which Allied 
and friendly people are willing to support security 
arrangements with the US. 

The Navy, especially the sea-going Navy, is 
particularly adept in this non-military mission. A 
large impressive warship visiting a foreign port for 
a week; parties, receptions and public visiting where 
possible ; hundreds of happy sailors on the beach 
who are anxious to purchase foreign goods and 
enjoy the sights; publicized orphans' parties and 
other missionary activities; and then departure while 
the ship is still a popular novelty — oil can do much 
to improve foreign relations and show other coun- 
tries tangible evidence of America's military readi- 
ness. 

THE AIRCRAFT CARRIER 

In the above picture of the Navy's role in current 
military strategy, the aircraft carrier occupies the 
central position* Today it is the most versatile single 
weapons system on the face of the earth. For the 
job it does there is no replacement in sight. The 
Navy's 14 attack carriers operate several types of 
fighter and attack jet aircraft, extending the Navy's 
offensive capability over 1000 miles. As weapons 
these planes are configured to carry rockets, guided 
missiles, conventional bombs and nuclear weapons. 
Carrier capabilities include control of the air, support 
of amphibious landings, close air support to ground 
troops, offensive tactical strikes against enemy 
installations, and fleet air defense. In addition, the 
CVS class carriers are equipped to perform the 
anti-submarine warfare mission. 

In general the fast carrier striking force is able 
to apply the precise and discriminating force required 
for limited war, and until the Polaris missile sub- 
marine system is fully developed, the aircraft carrier 
with its potently armed planes will be, in conjunction 
with rtie Strategic Air Command and land based 
K3M s, this country's principal deterrent to atomic 



he words of Admiral James S, Russell, Vice- 
Naval Operations : ' The modern flexible 
power of our Navy, the ability to apply 
discernment, precise in location and 
ifi degree, lies in the manned aircraft 
of oar Qm w tk. The aircraft carrier is their base." 




SEVENTH FLEET 

To fulfill this military and non-military strategy, 
the Midway, when deployed, is a key part of the 
Seventh Fleet. 

The Seventh Fleet consists of 130 ships, including 
4 carriers, 650 aircraft, and 60,000 men continuously 
on station in the Western Pacific. The Fleet's area 
of responsibility covers 30 million square miles from 
the Bering Sea south to Antartica, from the Hawaiian 
Islands westward to the Indian Ocean, 

Few areas of the world possess a greater potential 
for instability, crisis, and open hostility than the Far 
East. In the Far East are three of the worlds four 
divided nations : Korea, Vietnam, and China. In 
such volatile countries as Laos, Indonesia and 
Vietnam, even a minor riot may precipitate into a 
major war. The last ten years have seen two shoot- 
ing wars— in Korea and the Formosa Straits— in 
which the Seventh Fleet has participated. With the 
awesome proximity of Russia and Communist China, 
who are always ready to test the West's strengths 
and weaknesses, nowhere are the United States 
armed forces face-to-face with the Communist threat 
over a larger area. 

Yet few areas are of greater importance to the 
Free World. Even notwithstanding the economic 
advantages of friendly relations with such stable 
countries as Japan and Australia, the maintenance 
of freedom in the unstable countries is paramount 
to successful deterrence of Communist expansion. 
Small hotspots such as Laos and South Vietnam are 
watched closely by the whole world, especially the 
1 neutral ,! nations, as a test of strength between 
two competing ways of life. 

MISSION 

Vice-Admiral F. N. Kivette, recent Seventh Fleet 
Commander-in-Chief, has described the mission of 
the Seventh Fleet in one phrase : ' We're a fire 
department/ 1 In other words, the fleet is ready 
to take action if — if a foreign military threat should 
arise against those countries with whom the LL S. 
has SEATO treaty obligations, and if the nation 
should request military assistance. If the Commu- 
nists take any overt action, the Seventh Fleet and 
other deployed armed forces may serve their pur- 
pose merely by their presence. But to be effective, 
the threat must be no mere bluff. 

THE MIDWAY 

For approximately ten months out of every two 
years, the Midway is one of three attack carriers 
that comprise Task Force 77, the fleet's attack 
carrier striking force. At least one of these carriers 
is at sea at all times. 

Most of the time before deployment is spent 
improving the ship's combat readiness and patrol- 
ling trouble areas. 

During her Western Pacific deployment, the 
Midway stands ready as a military and diplomatic 
weapon for the maintenance of peace. 




*'^';?*y&* 



a*H* 





N _t*J 



\ 






HP. 




H^ 










^>*xj» 






;£se*c">*$r- 



■.asses* -^r 



^;^Sii 






- >» 



w 



gl 






*m 






^L - X*>-&* ~&W 



• . 



\%^ r % 



fjK^a^lM^ 






COLD WAR 
CHRONOLOGY 



3 



22 March — While the Midway's crew is spending the 
third of seven scheduled days of rest and relaxation in 
in Hongkong, the ship is suddenly ordered to get under- 
way in the morning and move quickly to the South China 
Sea off the coast of South Vietnam. Taken by surprise, 
the crew is forced to leave in Hongkong over $ 13,000 in 
deposits, shirts and other clothes. (These deposits plus 
much laundry were later recovered by a special Supply 
Department task force.) The cause of the sudden departure 
is the rapidly deteriorating situation in the small, landlocked 
Indochinese country of Laos. In the dense, uncivilized 
jungles and rugged mountains, a rebel army, supported 
and supplied by Russia and Communist China, continues 
to move south, advancing against the poorly trained and 
in many cases poorly equipped Royal Laotian Army. At 
issue is possible military intervention by the US and/or 
SEATO, which has pledged aid to Laos. 

23 March — Underway early in the morning, the Midway 
moves south. Throughout the Far East, the complicated 
US military machine is alerted. Other units of the Seventh 
Fleet — the Lexington, Coral Sea, Bennington and smaller 
support ships — move to designated positions in the South 
China Sea. 

27 March — To increase her capacity to aid a limited 
ground war, the ship moves to Subic Bay for eight hours 
to onload VMF-311, a Marine F8U squadron. 

2 April — The day being Easter Sunday, holiday routine 
is observed. Many people turn out for Easter church ser- 
vices and later bask on the flight deck in the hot tropical 
sun. The weather continues hot, 
in the low nineties. The sea 
water injection temperature is 84 
degrees. In Laos and in Bang- 
kok, the two sides exchange 
offers of conditional cease-fires, 
but the fighting in Laos's steam- 
ing jungles continues. 

8 April— As hopes continue to 
rise for a cease-fire, the Midway 
is ordered to proceed again to 
Subic Bay, this time to offload 
the Marines. Rumors of a trip 
North are persistent, yet at sea 
the ship lives in ignorance. As 
day after broiling day passes, the 
average sailor feels like a pawn 
on a great chess board. He has 
no idea when a move is coming, 
nor to where or for what purpose. 
He is curious, anxious, bored. He 
reads the morning news of conferences, discussions, studies, 
proposals, plans, and wonders why we can't just fight it out 
and be done with it. Meanwhile the Midway steams in 
circles again around a stationary PIM in the South China Sea. 

9 April — To relieve the monotony, a gala Olympiad is 
held on the flight deck, featuring such events as a bridle 
drag race and a swab throwing contest. In the final 
event, a tug of war, the burly flight and hangar deck 
crew from the Air Department bests everyone including the 
hefty, ominous-looking chiefs. In the meantime the ship 
is at last ordered North. 






I 




u twm » lumao* * «"» «""*"■** 



Z itfff» yam* « mm * w m* 
„ «** tT4*wi oni mm jff«W» 



# WELCOME TOBSSAS $, 

W CUB) POINT. PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 





14 April — The Midway finally arrives in Yokosuka and 
the crew receives their first liberty in 23 days. Since 
leaving the States on the 15th of February, the ship has 
steamed 22 y 000 miles and spent nearly 90?6 of her time 
underway. 

28 April — Again the schedule is altered. Ten hours 
before the ship is to anchor in Buckner Bay, Okinawa, a mes- 
sage is received order- ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^_ 
ing the Midway again 
to the South China Sea. 
Although Russia and 
Great Britain have 
agreed in principle to 
a cease fire, no one 
seems sure of exactly 
when the shooting will 
stop. The rebel Pathet 
Lao, in an all-out effort 
to grab as much territory 
as possible before a 
cease-fire, commences 
its biggest drive to date 
and the Royal Laotian 
army suffers some of its 
worst defeats. In Peking, 
the Chinese demand that the US must withdraw all military 
advisors and supplies before a cease-fire can be agreed 
upon. 

30 April — As the Midway remains alert and ready at 
sea, on land the Cold War rages. Intervention or non- 
intervention is the question. Should the US commit her 
forces to a long costly war against guerrilla forces in a 
landlocked, principally jungle area with virtually no internal 
lines of communication? Or could the loss of Laos to the 
Communists be too great a setback for the West and 
would it result inevitably in a complete Communist takeover 
of Southeast Asia? Can a neutral, uncommitted govern- 
ment be peaceably agreed upon by both sides which will 
remain neutral and uncommitted ? In short : Can the US 
afford not to intervene ? 

4 May — After days of negotiation, the semblance of a 
cease-fire is finally signed by the Pathet Lao and the 
Laotian government. Fighting, however, continues sporadi- 
cally and there are immediate charges and countercharges 
of violation of the newly signed agreement. The Midway 
is dispatched North again and the Seventh Fleet begins 
to resume its normal routine. 

15 May — -Back on the original schedule, the Midway 
enters Kobe for five days. In Laos, Bangkok, and later 
Geneva, discussions between the waring factions and a 
special tri-power council work out the details of the cease- 
fire. Occasionally fighting flares, but overall the situation 
is calm. 

1 July The second half of 1961 sees a geographic shift 
of the Cold War focus to Berlin, and Laos and Southeast Asia 
fade from page one. It is quite clear, however, 
that Indochina has not seen the last of crisis. 

At best, peace in this area can only be tem- 
porary. Laos faces an uncertain and uneasy 
future as various factions vie for power and the 
Communists work towards an internal takeover. 
In the meantime, the Cold War is still very much 
in evidence in the surrounding territory. Nearby 
South Vietnam, especially, would be a valuable 
addition to the Communist camp, much more so 
than Laos. If President Ngo Diem loses his battle 
against the Communist Viet Cong from North 
Vietnam, neither the independence of Southeast 
Asia nor SEATO could survive. In any event, no 
one in the Seventh Fleet can say for sure that 
he has seen the last of the South China Sea. 









What is a cruise book ? Many are nothing more than a few random 
shots of sailors standing in front of or leaning against various pieces of 
gear or airplane wings smiling sweetly at the photographer. In the back 
section of such books are some pretty but unrelated color shots of Bud- 
dhas, shrines, Japanese girls and more smiling sailors, this time holding 
glasses of Asahi. 

In the 1961 Midway Cruise Book, " Westpac 1961/' we have attempted to 
avoid randomness by stating a theme at the outset and following it through. 
In the four Interludes, we have tried to present a serious and intelligent 
description of ports visited by the ship. 

Our theme is to show as comprehensively as possible what happens 
aboard an aircraft carrier in Westpac. What keeps 3700 men busy every 
day? Why does the ship operate airplanes 15 to 20 hours a day, almost 
every day at sea ? How is a ship of 62,000 tons propelled through the 
water at speeds up to 32 knots ? And : why have aircraft carriers at all ? 

The Book examines first in the Prologue the Midway's Westpac role in 
United States Cold War strategy. It then turns to the ship's primary 
mission : maintaining the readiness of the Air Group. However much of 
the book is spent on often neglected support functions : jobs and duties 
performed by men many of whom have never seen a launch. Flight 
operations may be the most spectacular part of carrier life, yet somebody 
has to cook the food- Somebody has to supply power to the ship* Some- 
body has to paint the sides. Somebody has to fix broken legs. 

The key to understanding the operation of an aircraft carrier is realization 
of the ways in which each division and department on board contributes 
to the working of the ship as a whole. For without the smooth connection 
and fitting of the parts, the whole could not exist. To provide this 
understanding is the purpose of this Cruise Book. 















j* : 






10 



-*3E 












ffl 




PROLOGUE 

Southeast Asia— Hotspot in the Cold War .^: 3 

The Navy and the Cold War 4 

Cold War Chronology * 8 

TITLE PAGE 

Concept . . • ■ 10 

Contents 11 

Deployment Schedule 12 









INTERLUDE ONE 
SAN FRANCISCO 



13 



PRIMARY MISSION 

The Air Group 36 

SUPPORT 

Tractors, Tiedowns and Towbars 46 



INTERLUDE TWO 
HAWAII 



57 



Control 66 

Radars, Radios and Routine ,72 

Fixes, Fathometers and Fog Signals > . 79 



Pumps, Power and Propulsion 



INTERLUDE THREE 
HONGKONG 



80 



91 



, 



Stocks, Stores and Staples 98 

Breech Blocks, Bombs and Bo'suns . j 106 

Reams, Reports and References (a) - 1 22 

Drugs, Drills and Diagnoses 126 



INTERLUDE FOUR 
JAPAN 



Rest, Recreation and Religion 

THE MEN 

SHIP'S COMPANY 

Command . . ■ ."n*--. 



V 



129 
152 



Administration 
Air . . . 
Dental . . 
Engineering 
Gunnery 
Medical 
Navigation 
Operations 
Supply . . 

FLAG 

COMCARDIVTHREE STAFF 



• 



158 
162 
167 
180 
182 
205 
223 
225 
227 
242 

252 



AIR GROUP 

CVG-2 Staff 255 

VF-21 mk . 257 

VA-22 Jdil . 262 

VA-23 MjL* . 267 

VF-24 MM. . 272 

VA-25 Wf. . 277 

VAH-8 . .281 

VAAA-311 . . . .«£>'. • 289 
VCP-63 flfi ■ ■ 293 



VAW-1 1 




IN MEMORIAM 
STAFF AND CREDITS 



. 




295 

298 
300 






11 



36 



THE AIR GROUP 

What is an Air Group ? In general, it is a separate organization of 
planes and men that embarks on an aircraft carrier during her deploy- 
ment. During the cruise, these planes are the ship's primary offensive 
weapon, and the primary mission of the Air Group is to maintain 
their readiness to act as such. 

The job requires not only trained pilots, but many more people 
as well. It requires skilled aviation technicians to maintain and 
repair the airplanes, as well as experts in air intelligence, ordnance, 
communications. 

Militarily, the Air Group is well rounded to perform a variety of 
roles, The A4D and the AD are equipped to carry out light attack 
missions, with the AD having an additional long range capability. 
The giant, four-man, twin engine A3D is a major weapons system 
designed for heavy attack. Two types of airplanes act as fighters: 
the supersonic F8U and the all-weather F3H. In addition the Air 
Group includes F8U photo planes for aerial reconnaissance, and WF 
and AD-5Q planes for airborne early warning. 

What do airplanes do when they're in the air? 

Each day, about 110 sorties or hops are scheduled. The 
attack planes, A4D's, A3D's, and AD's, simulate strike missions 
against some theoretical enemy target. In a wartime situation 
an attack plane, carrying ordnance ranging from rockets for 
close ground support to special weapons would attack enemy 
installations. In addition to this, A3Ds might be scheduled for 
a navigation or profile hop, giving them practice in finding 
their way to a land target (a designated atoll or small island), 
maybe 500 miles away, and then getting back to the ship. 
On the same day, the A4Ds and AD's may be practicing delivery 
techniques of ordnance on a target sled strung about a 
half mile astern of the ship. On the agenda are such techni- 
ques as low-level bombing and loft (over the shoulder^ 
maneuvers. 

Meanwhile the fighters are playing another sort of war. The 
job of the Crusaders and Demons is CAP (Combat Air Patrol). 
The CAP, as the ships first line of defense, attempts to intercept 
an incoming enemy strike against the ship and destroy it. 
During his time in the air, the fighter pilot will probably be practic- 
ing tactics, Armed with air-to-air Sparrows and Sidewinders, his 
problem Is to maneuver his jet to score a kill against the enemy. 
To simulate war, one plane may be designated the bogey, another 
the friendly. Guided by CIC on the Midway or on a nearby destroy- 
er, the friendly will attempt to M kill " the bogey. Then the roles 
will be reversed. 

Often the two types of aircraft will engage each other in a kind 
of aerial football scrimmage. As the attack planes return from a 
strike, they will assume the role as bogeys and the CAP will be vectored 
to intercept them. During a formal 
STRIKEX, the role of the enemy will 
be played by a force from the beach. 
In a STRIKEX, the war situation is quite 
realistic. While the ship exercises 
radio silence to remain undetected, 
the " enemy " (who may be aircraft 
or submarines or both) searches for 
the ship. When the war starts, the 
ship tries to get off as many strikes 
as possible before detection. As soon 
as the ship is discovered, the ready 
CAP are launched to defend the ship. 

After the STRIKEX everyone sits 
down to write mammouth, volumous 
reports and critiques. The big simu- 
lated war is over. And each daily version of a simulated war is over 
when the word is passed " Secure from Flight Quarters ". But the Cold 
War and the possibility of a real war still is very much in existence. 
All your practice is in vain is you aren't ready for the real thing. 
The Air Group is. Even at night, on Sunday, when everyone is 
sunbathing or sleeping or playing bingo, a certain key percentage of 
the Air Group is ready to launch at a moment's notice, to get 
into the air soon enough to carry out the ships primary mission. 



PRIMARY MISSION 

f ' The Air Group Commander is responsible 
to the Commanding Officer of the ship for 
the group tactical training and operational 
readiness of the Air Group ; the coordination 
and supervision of all activities of the several 
squadrons and detachments in the execution 
of approved employment schedules ; and the 
material readiness, communications and intel- 
ligence functions of the Air Group. " 







Preparation for a flight may begin up to 
three hours before the launch. For a com- 
plicated profile hop, a pilot must plan his 
flight carefully by studying many charts and 
publications. An hour and a half before the 
launch, all pilots are briefed. Sitting in the 
ready rooms in their orange and brown 
flight suits, they listen intently to information 
on the concept of their mission and its 
specifics: the weather, nearest land, safety 
precautions and procedures for inflight emer- 
gencies. 




37 





With 25 minutes to go, the pilot climbs to the flight deck and inspects his aircraft. 
Even before this his plane captain and maintenance men have subjected the aircraft 
to a rigorous going-over. Ten minutes later, he is in the cockpit checking switches. Five 
minutes later his engine is started. Then he is wheeled into position on the catapult. 
At the signal he gives his plane full power and makes a final check. When he is 
ready he salutes the cat officer. In ten seconds he is half a mile from the ship. 



40 




\ 


\ \ 


\\\ 1 




CAPTAIN 

RALPH W. COUSINS 

June 1960 -April 1961 

Captain Ralph W. Cousins was born in Eldorado, 
Oaklahoma, on July 14, 1915. A graduate of the 
Naval Academy, he was commissioned as an 
Ensign on 3 June 1937 and designated a naval 
aviator in 1941. He subsequently advanced to 
the rank of Captain, to date from 1 July 1955. 

During his 23 years of naval service, Captain 
Cousins has served in a variety of assignments 
including a battleship, aircraft carriers, Naval Air 
Stations, and other shore based facilities. 

Highlights of his career include Executive 
Officer of Bombing Squadron ELEVEN; Executive 
Officer of the USS SAIPAN ; Commanding Officer 
of the Naval Air Facility at Severn River, Annapolis ; 
Operations Officer on the Commander Carrier 
Division FOUR Staff; and Operations Officer and 
Chief of Staff on the Commander SIXTH Fleet 
Staff. Before assuming command of the MIDWAY, 
Captain Cousins was Commanding Officer of the 
SIXTH Fleet oiler, USS NANTAHALA. 

He is married to the former Miss Mary G. 
McBride of Los Angeles, California. Captain 
Cousins is now in Washington at the assignments 
desk of the Bureau of Naval Personnel. 




COMMANDING OFFICER 




CAPTAIN ROBERT G. DOSE 
April 1961 - 

Captain Robert G. Dose was born on January 
9, 1915 in Saint Louis, Missouri. After graduating 
from Washington University in St. Louis with a 
degree in mechanical engineering, he entered the 
Navy as an aviation cadet in 1936 and was 
graduated a naval aviator in 1937. 

His first duty with the fleet was as a pilot in 
Torpedo Squadron THREE aboard the old SARA- 
TOGA. In early 1943 he joined VF-12 and six 
months later, as a Lieutenant Commander, assumed 
command of the squadron. 

During his long career in naval aviation, Captain 
Dose has been credited with many M firsts " in- 
cluding : the first mirror landing on an American 
carrier ; the first carrier landing of both the F3H 
"Demon" and F8U "Crusader"; and the first 
carrier-to-carrier cross country flight. Along with 
his wingman, LCDR Paul Miller, he flew his F8U 
from the flight deck of the BON HOMME RICHARD, 
steaming west of San Diego, to the deck of the 
new SARATOGA, east of Jacksonville, Florida in 
three hours and twenty-eight minutes. 

Prior to reporting aboard the MIDWAY, Captain 
Dose commanded the SEVENTH Fleet oiler, USS 
MISPILLION. He is married to the former Betty 
Curtis of San Diego and has four children. 




COMMANDER 
KENNETH E. GULLEDGE 
December 1960 -May 1961 

Commander Gulledge was born in Dalark, Arkansas, 
on November 2, 1918. In 1938 he received a B. A. 
degree from the Henderson State College, and then 
entered the U.S. Naval Academy from which he graduated 
in 1941. He attained the rank of Commander in 1954 
and has been selected for Captain. 

After duty aboard the USS BAINBRIDGE when that 
destroyer operated in the North Atlantic and Mediter- 
ranean on convoy and ASW duty during the early years 
of World War II, Commander Gulledge completed flight 
training and was designated a naval aviator in 1944. 

After varied aviation duties at the Fleet Airborne 
Electronics Unit, the Naval Air Development Center and 
the Aviation Personnel Division at the office of the DCNO 
(Air) and the Bureau of Naval Personnel, he attended 
the Armed Forces Staff College for six months in 1957 
and received instruction at the Jet Transitional Training 
Unit and Heavy Attack Unit, Pacific. 

In 1958 Commander Gulledge assumed command of 
Heavy Attack Squadron Two and in October of 1959 
reported for duty as Operations Officer and then Execu- 
tive Officer of the MIDWAY. 



EXECUTIVE OFFICER 



COMMANDER 

CLARENCE F. FROSSARD 
May 1961 - 

Commander Frossard was born in Greenfield, Missouri, 
on September 4, 1919. He attended St. Joseph Junior 
College and the University of Missouri, and in 1941 was 
appointed an Aviation Cadet in the Naval Reserve. Com- 
pleting his flight training at the Jacksonville, Florida, NAS, 
he was designated a naval aviator in 1942. He reached 
the rank of commander in 1954 having transferred to 
the Regular Navy in 1946. 

Commander Frossard then served in various instructor 
billets at the Naval Air Stations in Olathe, Kansas; 
Miami, Florida ; Pautuxet River, Maryland ; and Charles- 
town, Rhode Island. After duty as O & R Flight Test 
Division Officer at the Corpus Christi Naval Air Station 
and Operations Officer of Composite Squadron Thirty- 
three, he returned to Patuxet River for test pilot training 
and later as a project pilot. 

In 1956 he reported to Heavy Attack Squadron Three 
as Executive Officer and assumed command of that 
Squadron in 1957. Subsequent to serving on the staff 
of Commander Heavy Attack Wing One as Training and 
Readiness Officer, he reported to the MIDWAY first as 
Operations Officer and then as Executive Officer. 








COMMANDER 
CARRIER 
DIVISION 
FIVE 



REAR ADMIRAL 
FRANK B. MILLER 



He was designated a naval aviator in 
flight training at Pensacola Naval Air 

II, Admiral Miller commanded Scouting 
as Air Officer of the USS PRINCETON and 
USS MONTEREY which saw considerable 
he was awarded the Bronze 



Rear Admiral Miller was born on August 5, 1906, in Washington 
D.C, and appointed to the Naval Academy in 1926 from which 
he graduated in 1930. 
1931 after completing 
Station. 

During World War 
Squadron 1-D3, served 
Executive Officer of the 
action in the Philippines. In 1944 
Star for " heroic achievement." 

Highlights of Admiral Miller's post-war service include Head 
of the Research and Development Section for Aviation Ordnance, 
Bureau of Ordnance ; command of the USS PALAU and USS BOXER ; 
Chief-of-Staff to Commander Carrier Division Seven ; and Director 
of the General Planning Group at the Office of the Chief of 
Naval Ooerations. After selection as Rear Admiral \n 1958 he 
became Commander Carrier Division Three in 1960. 

Admiral Miller is married to the former Miss Dorothy Darrow 
Graham of Chevy Chase, Maryland, and has one son. 



160 



CHIEF OF 
STAFF 




Captain French Wampler was born in Fountain City, Tennessee. 
After graduation from the Naval Academy in 1931, he served for 
three years aboard the USS SARATOGA before entering flight train- 
In 9< He was designated a naval aviator in 1939. 

During the war, Captain Wampler received the Distinguished 
Flying Cross while attached to Torpedo Squadron Two aboard the 
USS Lexington and the Legion of Merit with Combat lf V " while 
serving as Air Officer on the escort carrier USS SANGAMON in the 
Southwest Pacific. 

After the war, Captain Wampler was Operation Officer of the 
USS SAIPAN, a student at the War College, advisor to the Chief 
of the United States Mission to Peru, and head of the Distribution 
Detail Branch and Assistant Director of the Aviation Personnel, 
at the Office of the Chief of Naval Personnel. 

He next commanded the seaplane tender USS GREENWICH BAY, 
served as Commander of United States Naval Activities at Rota, 
Spain, and commanded the USS BENNINGTON. He reported as Chief- 
of-Staff for Commander Carrier Division Three in 1960. 



CAPTAIN 
FRENCH WAMPLER 



161 




CDR R. J. SELMER 
AIR GROUP COMMANDER 






CDR F. D. BARTON 
OPERATIONS OFFICER 



CVG-2 STAFF 

TOP)= LTJG D.G. WALKER, LTJG J. L, DYER, LT W. A. LOTT, LT J. V, WALTERS, LCDR E. E. RILEY, CDR R.J. SELMER, CDR F. D. BARTON, LCDR S. W. WILLIAMS, LT W.J. DAVIS, LT L HURET, 
-T A. H. HOLMBOE, ENS, MP. PALMER (BOTTOM): ZEIGLER, J. F., HUMINSKY, L. F., NARSAVAGE, F. X , SPREEN, D. F., RYDER, G.E., MARKS, B. N., BURKHART, M.A., MAY, O. L. WALTERS, DM 





CDR D. D. ENGEN 
COMMANDING OFFICER 






CDR C. C. BUCK 
EXECUTIVE OFFICER 



257 





CDR J. D. KENDALL 
COMMANDING OFFICER 





CDR E. H. GUNTHER 
EXECUTIVE OFFICER 



262 




CDR S. G. GORSUNE 
COMMANDING OFFICER 






CDR M. A. ZESIGER 
EXECUTIVE OFFICER 



267 







CDR W. D. EMERSON 
COMMANDING OFFICER 



CDR W.N. SIMS 
EXECUTIVE OFFICER 



272 





CDR W. S. HERTIG 
COMMANDING OFFICER 





LCDR H. F. GRIFFITH 
EXECUTIVE OFFICER 



277 



(TOP): M. N. SCHMIDT, N.E. WHITFIELD, R. J. ALLEN, C, E. 
STUBBS, J. O. RICHARDSON (BOTTOM): M. HARVEY, A. H. 
CONLEY, L. FALCONI, E. A. TURNEY 






BACK): LTJG W. F. BEARDEN, LTJG L. F. WATSON, LTJG R. J. BOWERY, LTJG D. L. CLARKE, LT D. R. WEICHMAN, LT J. F. FRANCIS (MIDDLE): LT C. P. MUHL, LTJG J. A. FELDHAUS, LTJG B. M. 
WOODWORTH, CDR W. S. HERTIG, LT D. L. MOSS, LT L. D. HUGHES, LTJG G, T. McGRUTHER (BOTTOM LT R. KNIVETON, LTJG T. R. RANDALL, LTJG D. R. POSTLEWAIT, LTJG G. M. GALES, 

LT R. I. BOYLE, LTJG A. D. WISON, LT J. E. JONES, LCDR J. L. BRADY 





T OP): W, H. STEPHENS, D. W. STEPHENS, R. J. SLYVESTER, R. M. MILLER, J. Ft JONES, J. W. THOMPSON, L. F. HEDWALL, M. S. BATNICK T. J. HENNESSY , J. A. WEAVER 
SECOND), L. J. DALEY, J. D. SWIGERT, R. M, BAKERS, E, F. RICHARDSON, G. W. GINTER, M. W ROBERSON, J. J. SCHNE LL, W. E. BIVINS, F. L. GRAHAM '.BOTTOM): L. S. 
WILCOX, F. G.WELLS,L.W.ROSE,A.A.DUESI,L.P,GATRELK.D. LEMLEY , J. TRENTINI 



P7Q 





CDR C. F. FITTON 
COMMANDING OFFICER UNTIL JUNE 1961 






CDR J. D. KLEMAWESCH 
EXECUTIVE OFFICER 



CDR J. T. COCKRILL 
COMMANDING OFFICER 



281 





CDR G M. DONOVAN 
OFFICER-IN-CHARGE 







eMilm 



l^ BARBERspfiV^ 




IN MEMORIAM 



LTJG ROBERT J. HENDERSHOTT VF 21 



1ST LT JEROME S. ANDRE 



VMA 311 



JOHN R. BROWN. AN 



V-1 DIVISION 




X 






u 






F-A-Pt EAST OIRXTISE 



Depart Alameda 

Hawaii 
Yokosuka 
Sasebo 
Hoag Kong 
Subic Bay 
Buckner Bay 
Iwakuni 
Yokosuka 
>Sasebo 
Beppu 
Yokosuka 
Arrive Alameda 



6 April 

16 April to 23 April 

2 May to 7 May 

17 May to 27 May 

12 June to 19 June 

n June to 5 July 

13 July to 15 July 

21 July to 28 July 

10 August to 24 -'August 

7 September to 13 September 

25 September to 28 September 

4 October to 8 October 

20 October 






>%, 









■5. -ft: ■?■£<?:??' 

















WHY 



Almost before the ink was dry on the surrender documents signed aboard the USS Missouri, signifying to an 
anxious and hopeful world the end of World War II, the Cold War began. 

Now, 17 years later, the Cold War is still with us. The headlines scream " Major Red Push Seen in Vietnam " 

Surprise Deadline Perils Laos Pact ", fr No Progress on Berlin, JFK Reports " almost daily again and again to 
remind us that we are living with the phenomenon of the 20th Century Cold War, which may, at any given 
moment, at any number of given spots, ignite into a conflagration engulfing possibly all Mankind. 

The Midway, as a part of the powerful U. S. Seventh Fleet deterrent force in the Far East, has been, during 
her 1962 deployment, more naturally concerned with possible flare-ups in her sector of operations then with, 
for instance, Berlin, thousands of miles away, though it is wise to remember that the Cold War is properly seen 
as a world-wide struggle for the heart, mind and soul of Man. 

The chief sensitive area in the Western Pacific in 1962 has been that of Southeast Asia, centered in Laos and 
South and North Vietnam, all part of the old, pre- World War II French Empire, referred to at the time as 
French Indo-China. 

Land-locked Laos, agreed at the conference tables of Geneva to a neutrality pact between her three vying 
princes, and her neutrality has been termed "settled" by one of the princes, Prime Minister Souvanna Phouma. 

Laos is a very small country with 1,000 kilometers of common border with Communist countries, while also 
bordering with SEATO member Thailand to the west. The Laotian Prime Minister said that if Laos, situated as 
it is between East and West, is to avoid war she must remain non-aligned. 

For South and North Vietnam, with their eastern border on the South China Sea, the struggle between East 
and West, between North and South Vietnam, continues. 

At the Geneva Conference of 1954, Vietnam was divided at approximately the 17th parallel, the Communists 
occupying the northern half of the formerly-unified area with their capital at Hanoi, while the independent and 
pro-western government occupies the southern portion with its capital at Saigon. 

The Communists have not, however, been satisfied with this settlement, (though considered favorable to them 
at the time) and have, on an ever-increasing scale, sought to infiltrate, undermine and eventually take-over the 
pro-western Government of South Vietnam. 

To prevent this, as well as to prevent any Communists conquest in the vast and vitally important area of Asia, 
the Midway, for the greater part of 1962, was on station, ready, a friend of Freedom. 



It is, in fact, a measure of the success of the 
IX S. foreign policy of firmness, fairness and 
flexibility that, outside Korea, the Cold War has 
remained just that, a cold war, and has not 
erupted into a holocaust that almost surely 
would be named World War III, and which would 
almost as surely disfigure the face of the earth, 
throwing mankind back several centuries. 

That the U. S. can pursue such a foreign policy 
in a troubled and potentially-explosive world 
atmosphere can be explained, in part, by the 
overall strength of the United States. For a re- 
alistic foreign policy in 1962, must be based on 
strength, as well as justice, if it is to be succes- 
sful. 

In no vSmall way, the success or failure of 
this image of strength the U. S. projects 
throughout the world, depends upon the personnel 
of the Armed Forces of the United States, and 
in particular upon the Navymen of the Fleets 
because of their mobility and frequent contacts 
with the various peoples of the world. 




*Kl 



■?*<% 






The specific role of the U. S. Serviceman 
in the furtherance of his country's foreign 
policy is of a dual nature. He must be a 
professional fighter — ready and willing if 
called upon to fight and at the same time, 
he must represent his country abroad, in 
his sphere of influence, in the creditable 
manner of a true ambassador of good will- 
Nowhere is it more difficult for the 
Navyman to successfully perform both 
facets of his job than in the Orient where 
he meets people from markedly different 
environmental backgrounds than his own 
and with whom, somehow, he must com- 
municate and convey his country's message 
of friendship and hope. 

It is a challenging task, but one, because 
of the very challenges envolved, of vital 
importance for the Orient is an area of 
unsurpassed importance in the Cold War- 
Rich in natural as well as human resources, with one of the world's leading industrial complexes centered in Japan, 
the Orient is a worthy prize for the forces vying for the allegiance of the people living there. 

It is into such an atmosphere that a sailor on an attack carrier, such as the Midway, arrives when his ship is 
deployed to the Western Pacific for what is normally a seven-to-eight-month-long cruise. 

" Why ? " he may ask himself as his ship sails under the Golden Gate headed for an area that will not only be 
foreign to him but, as well, possibly dangerous. 

If he is aware of the world situation he will realize the dual nature of his role or mission on an individual level, 
but does he realize how his ship and its mission fit into the grand design of U. S. foreign policy across the globe ? 

Essentially, his ship, an attack aircraft carrier of approximately 62,000 tons, is a mobile air base or " home " for 
nearly a hundred assorted aircraft with their own varying, specific tactical roles to play in the continuing drama of 
the Cold War. 

The key to understanding the role of a carrier and the carrier task force is to comprehend fully the word mobility, 
as it is upon this word and what it means when translated into day-to-day action, whether in a cold or hot war, 
that all else depends and all else turns. 

A modern attack carrier, such as the Midway, is capable of living at sea for extended periods, capable, further, if 
need be, of operating anywhere within a 600,000 square mile area in any given 24-hour period; thus becoming an 
illusive target for an enemy in time of war, while being a roving, on-the-spot friend in time of peace. 

Thus, if trouble flares, as it so often does in this world of today, the carrier task force can be there in the classic 
show of force, its presence felt if not seen by friend and foe alike, comforting to the former, sobering, tempering 
to the latter. This, then, is the mission of the carrier and the carrier task force. 




For the Midway, having made seven deployments to the Mediterranean for duty 
with the Sixth Fleet and four such deployments to the Far East for duty with the 
Seventh Fleet, in her relatively short life, it is a familiar mission, and one the " Big M " 
has always performed with distinction. 

Launched and commissioned shortly after the conclusion of World War II, when 
the carrier's importance in modern naval thinking, was an already established fact* 
the Midway was named after the famous and crucial World War II "Battle of 
Midway", fought June 3-6, 1942, off the island of the same name, in which the 
Japanese were inflicted with a decisive defeat. 

After serving with the Second and Sixth Fleets intermittently for over nine years, 
the Midway on December 27, 1954, departed on a world cruise, ending, after an 
operational period of several months with the Seventh Fleet in the Western Pacific, 
at the Bremerton, Wash. Naval Shipyard, where she was de-commissioned for the 
purpose of extensive and pro-longed overhaul and modernization. 

Two years later, on September 30, 1957, a "new Midway " was recommissioned, 
ready soon to take her place with the operating Fleets as a carrier fully capable of 
embarking the Navy's latest and fastest jets. 

The Midway emerged from Bremerton as a 62,000-ton vessel, as against her original 
45,000 tons, due to a completely revamped structure. Further, the " new Midway " 
had a hurricane bow, an angled deck, island structure modernization, three steam 
catapults, new-type arresting gear, jet-blast deflectors and the largest aviation crane 
ever installed on a 'converted" ship. 

After post-yard sea trials and inspections, the Midway sailed to her new homeport 
of Alameda, California, where she is still homeported, and, after an operating and 
training period with the First Fleet off the West Coast, the Midway, in August of 
1958, sailed westward for the Orient on the first of her, to date, four such deployments. 

Since this initial cruise to the Western Pacific, the name Midway has become well 
known in Japan, the Philippines and other places in the Orient, and, it is a source of 
justifiable pride to the men who have served on her during these deployments, that 
the name Midway is a respected name in her ports-of-call in an area of such vital 
importance in the Cold War struggle as the Far East, 



LTjg. J. B. Morse 

Officer -in-Charge 



The " mission " of an Angel is to assist, and this is exactly 
what an HUP-3 ,f Angel" (the actual radio call for the Midway's 
helicopters) does in a variety of ways. 

Chiefly, these " Angels " hover off the starboard beam of the 
carrier during daytime flight operations, always ready to pick-up 
pilots and crew from a downed plane. (Therefore they could be 
called " instant life savers.") 

The helicopter, also referred to as the r ' Copter " or the 
" Gooney Bird/* came into its own and received world-wide ac- 
claim during the Korean Conflict where, on its many missions 
of mercy, it performed invaluable service. 

Somewhat less dramatic but still important missions of HU-1 
are: the at-sea transfers of mail and personnel to other ships in 
the task group, gunfire spotting, radar calibration, and many 
other miscellaneous missions which can only be performed by 
HU-l's versatile Angels* 






TOP : LTjg. LD. Presnell : Meehan, J. R. ; Cole, 
R. i) , ; Price, E, S. ; Vidder. J. D. : Ens. F. G. Hall; 
(BOTTOM;: Burnett. M. H. ; Shields, C. T. ; Hayes, 
K. G. ; Barnett, J. W. ; Condon. C. E. 





Cdr. B. D. Holder 



Commander B. D. Holder was born in 
Fort Worth, Texas. He attended the North 
Texas State Teacher's College at Denton, 
and the Texas Christian University at Fort 
Worth. 

A member of the Naval Reserve V-5 
program, he transferred to the regular 
Navy in 1944. 

Commander Holder has served with VC- 
78, VB-80, CASU-32, VU-7, VA-115, and as 
Commanding Officer of VA-55, plus several 
shore tours. 



cvg-two 



194 



There are two ways of making progress evolution and revolution. When the first boat 
floated into a lake it was a revolution. From there numerous evolutions perfected the boat 
to a mighty instrument of peace and warfare. Along the way this progress was boosted 
by more advanced revolutions. The sail, the steam engine and the development of the 
iron-clad ship were a few. But the latest revolution and the most important one in terms 
of modern warfare was the addition of the airplane to the striking force of the fleet— the 
birth of the aircraft carrier. 

But, as in the case of earlier revolutions, this innovation must " evolve " into a smooth, 
highly efficient organization before it would become the tool that it is today. Through 
such past experience, modern naval leaders have established the Air Group. This is a 
group of squadrons, under one head, which team up with an otherwise impotent ship, 
and together they form a nearly unstoppable team, VF-21, VA-22, VA-23, VF-24, VA-25, 
YAH-8, VAW11, VAW-13, VFP-63 provide reconnaissance, attack and fighter power to 
CVG-2. These various squadrons make the air group the potent lt main battery " it is, 
and CVG-2 in turn makes the modern carrier the potent force for peace and deterrent to 
war that it is today. 






^ UU«fo N0US coMBATTOV^ 



.STANDING) : Addna, F. G. ; Stoner, R. L. t PRCS ; Marks, B. ; May, D. L. ; (SITTING) : LTjg. J. B. Moore; LTjg. M. J. Darkowski .; LT. W, J. 
Davis; Lcdn H. C. Quitmeyer ; Cdn B, D. Holder; Lcdr. D.J. Sperling; LT. J. PL Dyer; LT. F.J. Svendson ; LT. D. R. Postlewait. 













i*t&H 





Cdr. R.E. Kuntz 

Commanding Officer, VF-21 




Formed in the waning months of World War II as Fighter Squadron Eighty- 
One, the "Freelancers" have been known as VF-134, VF-131 and VF-64 prior 
to being redesignated again as Fighter Squadron Twenty One on July 1, 1959. 

The name " Freelancers, " however, has remained constant since shortly after 
the squadron's formation and initial designation. 

In the course of their 17-year history, the flying " Freelancers M have flown 
the F6F Hellcat, F8F Bearcat, F4U Corsair, F9F Panther, the F2H Banshee and 
their present plane, the F3H-2 Demon, soon to be replaced by the F4H Phantom 
Two. 

This squadron's mission : long range air defense for the Midway, on which 
VF-21 is making her fourth WESTPAC deployment To accomplish its mission, 
this " Demon Team " is qualified for night and all-weather intercept work and 
is equipped with both the Sparrow III and Sidewinder missiles. 









. * A ..A . J\ . A 




TOP) : LT. T. F. Drumm ; Lcdr. J, D. Ward ; LT. F, M. Conklin ; Lcdr. W. W. 
Stoval) ; Cdr. G. M. Even ; LTjg. J, J, Newlin ; LT, R. A. Anderson ; LTjg, 
J, M. Donacky; LTjg, D. V. Hanna; (BOTTOM): LTjg. LL Belyea ; LT. R. 
Lewis; CW03, C. E, Schwinn ; LTjg. D. C. Dexter; Cdr. R. E. Kuntz; LTjg. 
J, A, Brantuas; LTjg. R. H, Lewis; LTjg. C,L. Barnes; CapL B, R. Battle, 
USAF. 





(TOP) : Leonard, D. K., ADJC ; Andrews, J. J., AQCA ; 
Riley, R. W. f ADJCA ; Prescott, W. E.. AQC ; Hughes, 
W. D.. AECA; (BOTTOM): Graham, J. P., AMCS; 
Hendrickson, W. F., ATCA ; Yarber, C. G., AMCS ; 
Lux, VV. IL. ADJC. 







m \ 



Cdr. W. T\ Laws 

Commanding Officer, VA-22 





Fourteen years ago a new unit designated as Fighter Squadron Sixty Three, made its first ship- 
board launches and recoveries of aircraft on the U. S. S. MIDWAY (CVB-41), a relatively-new, straight- 
decked carrier. 

This squadron, evolving in name from VF-63 to its present designation, in 1959, as VA-22, and in 
aircraft from the prop-driven, gull-winged F4U Corsair to its present plane, the A4D Skyraider, has seen 
its mission change from that of fighter-interceptor to that of attack bombing, either performed alone or 
with its " Buddy Bombing " partner, the A3D Sky warrior. 

As well, VA-22's "homes" have changed, the Midway is no longer a straight-decked, World War 
II-type carrier, but is now CVA-41, an angled-deck, modern attack carrier as a result of extensive 
modernization and, from its original CONUS Field at Oceana, Va. the squadron has moved to the ultra- 
modern, newly-commissioned Master Jet Station at Lemoore Calif. 



■■■ 



-• s 



v 



m 



iiWk 



*z~* 



fei>W^7 



# 



i i 



133/ h* 



3 



\jp I < I wjfer ^ vlc^l; > r$i 




(TOP): LTjg. B C Ertckson; LT. H. K. Wees; Lcdr, B. H. Shepherd; LTjg. C. E. Heffernan; LT. R. B. Holmes; Lcdr, W. II. 

LT, CD. Kehoe; LT, R, F. Hanna ; LTjg. L. H. Axtell ; LTjg. A. R, Peterson; (BOTTOM): LTjg. J, L, Edmunds; LT, M. G. Hoff 

Kirk; LT. R. H, Riordan ; LTjg. D. G. Hill; Ens. P. F, Selle; Cdr. W, T. Laws; LTjg. G. L, Moore; Lcdr. L. C. Chambers; LT. F.J. Peters 




Robinson ; 
LT. J. V. 

Peters. 




Mallin, H. R. ; Redwen, D. A. ; Taylor, H.J,; LTjg, A. C. Peterson; Rouse, 
L. M. ; Nunley, L. M. ; Boulette, R, A. 



(TOP); LTjg. C. F. Heffernan; Badger, J. C. ; Reddell, D. L ; Paden ; Paulson, M. H. ; LT. M. G, Hoff; (BOTTOM) 
Schmitz, N. C, AMCM. ; Crane, R. E. ; Barrett, F. C ; Phillips, B.C.; Schallawitz, L. E. ; Goforth, W. C. t ADJC. 




Planning, 

Quality 

Control, 

& Operations 




Cdr. G. M. Veling 

Commanding Officer, VA-23 




Originally a reserve fighter squadron, Attack Squadron Twenty-three was activated at the 
outbreak of the Korean War and served two combat tours there. Following the Korean Conflict, 
the squadron was permanently activated and deployed three times to the Western Pacific as a 
fighter squadron with ATG-1. 

After winning the Naval Aviation Safety Award in 1954, VA-23 became the first squadron 
to launch and fully utilize the ff buddy-tanker " system on a WESTPAC deployed carrier* 

Currently flying the Douglas light attack bomber, A4D-2 " Skyhawk/ J VA-23 has flown F4U 
Corsairs, F9F-2 Panthers, the F7F Cutlass, F9F-8 Cougars and the FJ-4B Fury— in which the 
squadron earned 28 E's in loft-bombing competion at Fallon, Nevada. 

The squadron is homeported at the recently-commissioned Naval Air Station at Lemoore, 
California, 




j > 



v&fWx ' 



JX>J-<-* x±±M* ^b 



&ti*.W£b. & 






£±T&s'. 






„* m. ■ ^ vX <r iv ^, 




K . *% . ^ . / > " f. 




ij 



TOP): LT. J, W. Weed; LTjg. L. W. Eyer ; LT. R. D. Echard ; LTjg. J. S. Kanuck ; LTjg. R. C. Macke;-LTjg, a R. Evans; LT. J.J. Van 
Demark; LT. R. W. Leonard; LTjg. R. D. Frazier ; (BOTTOM): Ens. J.N. Wadell ; LTjg. C H. Harrison; LTjg. H.N. Stover, Jr.; LTjg. 



A. F. Cianciotto ; LT, R.J. May; Lcdr. E. E. Riley, Executive Officer; Cdr. G. M. Veling, Commanding Officer; Lcdr. D. M. Trimble; Lcdr* 
W. C. Frith; LT. J.J. Fitzpatrick ; LT. R. A. Davis, 




Avionics 




(TOP) : Gibbons, B, I. ; Galloway, E. E. ; Wood, J. R. ; 
Storement, C, E. ; Baldwin, W, W. ; Haskell, P. F. ; 
Albrecht, L. H. ; LTjg. D,R, Evans; (^BOTTOM) : Pol- 
lock, C. E. ; Joslin. L. R. ; Reisinger, F. A. ; Borner, 
C. V, ; Esposito, E. ; Tandberg, D. E. ; Rowe, D. J. 



r 0&? 



i i 








Cdr. D. W. Henderson 

Commanding Officer, VF-24 





One of the M youngest M squadrons deployed with the Midway on her 
1962 Western Pacific Cruise is VF-24, known throughout the Fleet as 
the "Red Checkertails," 

Commissioned originally as VF-211 at Moffett Field, Calif, in June of 
1955, this squadron was redesignated as VF-24 on March, 9, 1959. 

From its formation, VF-24 has had the primary mission of air superi- 
ority in air defense, whether flying its first plane, the FJ-3 Fury jet or 
the super sonic F8U-2 Crusader. The latter is equipped with the air-to- 
air Sidewinder missile. 

The rr Red Checkertails/' who were awarded the Chief of Naval Opera- 
tion's Safety Award for Fighter Squadrons for fiscal year 1960 for 
being accident free for the entire year, have made three previous WEST- 
PAC deployments with the Midway. 




(TOP) : Carmack, L. ; Diehl, R, C. ; Blake, R. P. ; Militello, A. ; Green, C. A- ; Combs. J, H. ; Landmerer, R. W. ; Barnes, J. D. ; Fuller R. L. : 
Drebs, J.C; (MIDDLE): LT. R, W. Phillips; LT. T. H. Burns; Arnold. T,W,; Brooks, D. E. ; Lomas, J. A. ; LT, T D. Kelley ; Mclntyre, 
H. F. ; Davis, F, H. ; Priest, B. W. ; Ens. G, F. Bagshaw ; LT, W. A, Lott; (KNEELING): Bruha, D. G> ; Hardy, N, F. ; Wheeler, G L, ; 
Bechunas, P. J, ; Bauschingier, J. ; Bonsall, T. L, ; Morgan, H, F. Jr. ; Best, G. A. 



(STANDING): LT, M. M. Scott; LT. F. M. Wicke; 
LTjg, J, B. Lusk; LT. R. L, Hillyard ; LT. G. E. Sallee; 
LT. W. A. Abbott; LTjg. J. E. Waggener ; LTjg. L. M, 
Teboe; (SITTING): LT. G. Clark; Cdr. W.N. Sims; 
Cdr. D. W, Henderson; Lcdr. H. F. Tipton; LT. W. C. 
Sones. 





214 




** * I v y 







Cdt\ C R Bradford 

Commanding Officer, VA-25 




An offshoot of Torpedo Squadron Seventeen of World War II fame, VA-25, long- 
designated as VA-65, still flys the only combat prop plane on "active duty M in the Navy, 
the AD, Able Dog, Alpha Delta or just plain Spad. m 

As dependable in its mission of attack bombing as the physical impression of durability 
she gives, this veteran first caught the fancy of the world in Korea by delivering large 
loads of conventional weapons, which earned them the title of " workhorse of Korea." 

VA-25, designated as such on Julv 1, 1959, has made a total of fivt developments with 
the Midway, two being to the Mediterranean with the Sixth Fleet and three to the Orient 
with the Seventh Fleet after the Midway's re-commissioning in 1957. 





Reed, ADRCA ; Rose, AMHC ; Fitzgerald, AECA ; Hockaday, ADCM ; Conley, ATCA-P1 ; J. 0. Richardson, AOCA. 




(TOP): Robbins; Thronburg ; Roberts; Gobeli ; Duhon ; Hedwall ; 
Rost; Harriss; (MIDDLE): Conley, ATCA-P1 ; LTjg. Eads ; Ens, 
Stover ; LTjg. Bearden ; Richardson, AOC ; Brown ; Russell ; Stapp ; 
Ficklin; (KNEELING): Adams; Howe; Taylor; Parker; Ramsey; 
Cook ; Dennis ; Becker. 






(TOP): Hixson; Sula ; Ruffing; Miller, R t L, ; Foster; Jasper; 
Perkins; Sylvester: (MIDDLE): LTjg, Scoggm ; Marshall; 
Bivins; Miller, G, H, ; Curtis; Garrison; LT. Gales; (KNEEL- 
ING): Navarre; Cope; Millspaugh ; Fletcher; Smith. 



Shops & Hangars 





\ I 



*0?$fy 




v* >0\ 



\ ,, /^ .. &\ . 7 % 








(TOP): LT. Woodworth; LTjg. Feldhaus; Lcdr. Huff; LTjg. Kison LTjg. Bumgarnar ; LT. Clarke; Ens. Stover; LTjg, Bowery; LTjg. 
Bearden ; LTjg. Scoggin ; LT, McGruther; (BOTTOM): LT, Synder ; LTjg, Arnett ; LTjg. Eads ; Cdr, Bradford, Skipper; Ens, Palrnatier ; 
LTjg. Juan; Cdr. Presson, X. O, ; LT. Gales; LTjg. Beam; Lcdr. Smith. 




you belch once more, sister . 



Line 



(TOP): Dixon; Kent; Wilson; Wagner; Easlick ; Tice ; 
Grimsley ; (MIDDLE): LTjg. Burngarner ; Burns; DorreN ; 
Schulte; Sites; Wadley ; Korchma ; Batts ; Jensen; Rose, 
AMHC; (KNEELING); Thompson; Moulds; Zak ; Wilcox ; 
Weller; Abies; Weaver; Daley, 




j •* 



1 ~* 






Administration 



(TOP); Sekeres; Sloan; Beveridge ; Summerim ; Shear ; 
Church ; Poff ; Dohoney ; Durfee ; (MIDDLE: : Evans ; 
Zimmerman, AMCS; Lcdn Smith; LTjg. Juan; LTjg. 
Beam ; LTjg, Bowerv : Hockaday. ADCM ; Pimental ; 
(KNEELING^): Ricks; Richardson. E. F. ; Forbes; Grant; 
Wulff; Alconcher; McCleskey, 





Cdr. F.S. Haak 

Commanding Officer, VAH-8 




Born May 1, 1957, at the Naval Air Station, North Island, San Diego, Heavy Attack 
Squadron Eight has flown the same plane, the three-crewmember A3D Skywarrior, since 
its commissioning. 

When not deployed on the Midway as part of Carrier Air Group Two, " HATRON 
EIGHT " is based at NAS, Whidby Island, Wash. 

The "Hatters" have as their primary mission that of all-weather weapons delivery, 
which they accomplish by a wide range of bombing tactics. 

No longer a " loner " on all missions; for instance, the Heavy Eight Sky warriors often 
team-up with the A4D Skyraiders on " Buddy Bombing " training msisions in what is a 
relatively new concept of weapons delivery. 

The "Heavy Eighters," who have flown over 20,000 hours and eight million miles with- 
out loss of pilot or aircraft, have made three previous deployments to the Far East with 
the Midway. 




T&m 



Flight Crews 




Christian, B. F, ; Lcdr. A. E. Benton; McNutly, H. A. 




Boltz, W. H, ; Lcdr, J. P. Sundberg ; LTjg. W, R. Peters. 




Burroua, W. H ; Lcdr. P. A, Woodard ; LTjg. J. E, Sells. 



LT. F, F. Solomon; Thomas, R. T. ; - % 
Hornuny, C. A. f AQCS, 




LTjg. R.J. Flynn; LT. H. C Nickcrson; Carson, J. M. 





LT. D. R, McGraw; LT. F.J. Gloeckner ; McKibbon, J. L. 





McFall, H. A., ATC ; Cdr. F. S, Haak ; LTjg, J. M. Johnson 




.cdr. J. Q. Quinn; LTjg. R,G. English ; Marshal], K. J., ATC. 




Lcdr. L. H, Sherman; LTjg. R. A. Powell; Fagan, P. E. 



LT. J.W. Williams; LTjg, M, L. Bouchard; Hollowell, E W. 
226 LT * CE ' Siegwarth; LTjg. J. X. Murphy; Sutherland, M. L. 












TOP): LTjg, Johnson; Ens, Brown; Lcdr. Painter; Ens. Miller; LTjg. Glockner ; LTjg. Nite; LTjg. Flynn; Lcdr. Sandberg; (MIDDLE): 
LTjg, Casady; LT. McGraw; LTjg. Peters; CWO Punch; Lcdr. Sherman ; Lcdr. Woodard. 




TOP Walters, D, I : Norton, 
D. W. ; Bundies, R. T. ; Armstrong, 
J. K. v Ader, P, E. ; Stevenson, 
S, R. ; (BOTTOM): Qumones, J. ; 
Sasser, C. H. ; Hinsch, J. E. ; 
Jepson, L. W. ; Simmons, J. H, 




Commander 

Carrier 

Division 

Three 




Rear Admiral P. P. Blackburn 



Horn January 13, 1909 in Seattle, Admiral Blackburn graduated from the Naval Academy 
in 1930, and was designated a Naval Aviator in 1932, 

The Admiral served in various carrier, observation and patrol squadrons prior to 
World War II. 

In the early days of the war, Admiral Blackburn was Staff Aviation Officer for the 
Commander of the first U.S. task force deployed to the European Theater, 

The same year, he participated in covering operations for convoys making the dangerous 
" Murmansk run." 

Later in the war, while serving aboard the USS Randolph as Navigator and as Air 
Officer, Admiral Blackburn was awarded the Bronze Star with Combat V for meritorious 
service in action against the Japanese forces in 1945. 

In the post-war years, the Admiral has attended the Air War College and the National 
War College, and has served as the CO of both the USS Duxbury Bay and the USS 
Intrepid <CVA-11). 

Admiral Blackburn assumed command of COMCARDIV THREE September 22, 196J. 



i:t!> 




Capt. M.U. Beebe 
Chief of Staff 
CotnCarDiv Three 



Captain Marshall Ulrich Beebe initiated his military 
career with the California National Guard during his 
undergraduate years at Occidental College, where he 
received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1935. 

For heroism in action off Southern Japan, March 
1945, where he shot down five planes, destroyed two 
on the ground, and damaged two others, Captain Beebe 
gained the Navy Cross. 

After '* exceptionally meritorious conduct ts in combat 
operations during the Korean Conflict, Captain Beebe 
served in various assignments, including Commanding 
Officer of the USS PYRO (AE-24) and the USS BON 
HOMME RICHARD (CVA-31 ), before assuming his 
present duty in January 1962, as Chief of Staff to 
Commander Carrier Division Three. 

James Michener dedicated his best -seller, Bridges at 
Toko-Ri, to Captain Beebe. 



1 10 




,pt. R. M. Isaman 
Commanding Officer 
USS Midway 
April 1962 





Captain Isaman was born May 30, 1917 in Lewiston, 
Idaho. After graduating from high school in 1934, he 
attended the University of Idaho where he majored in 
science. 

The Captain began his Navy career in June 1940. Upon 
being commissioned in April 1941, he was assigned to 
Bombing Squadron Three, with whom he served when 
this Squadron was aboard the USS Yorktown during the 
Battle of Midway, after which his present command is 
named. 

It was during this famous World War II battle that 
Captain Isaman was awarded the Navy Cross for cour- 
ageous and successful action against Japanese ships. 

During the post-war years, the Captain has attended 
the General Line School and the Industrial College ; has 
served as Operations Officer on the Staff of COMCARDIV 
SIX, and as the CO of the USS Shasta (AE-6) immedia- 
tely prior to taking command of the Midway on April 
21, 1962. 





Capt. R. G. Dose 
Commanding Officer 
USS Midway 
April 1961 April 1962 



First naval aviator to make a mirror landing on an 
American carrier, first man to carrier land both the F3H 
Demon 1 and F8U "Crusader* and the first pilot to nego- 
tiate a carrier-to-carrier cross country flight, Captain 
Robert G. Dose brought his brilliant flying record plus 
years of carrier experience to the Midwav and guided 
her through over 80,000 steaming miles and 10,000 arrested 
landings during his command tenure. 

After studying mechanical engineering at Washington 
University in his birthplace, St, Louis, Missouri, Captain 
Dose entered the Navy as an aviation cadet in 1936. 

He first joined the fleet as a pilot with Torpedo Squadron 
Three aboard the old Saratoga, 

Before coming to the Midwav, the Captain commanded 
the Seventh Fleet oiler USS Mispillion. 

Presently serving in the Office of the Chief of Naval 
Operations, Captain Dose is married to the former Miss 
Betty Curtis of San Diego. 



I \2 











Cdr. W. L. Adams 
Executive Officer 





i 




Commander Adams was born June 28, 1919 in Husto- 
nia, Missouri. After graduating from high school, he 
attended the University of Florida, receiving his degree 
in 1940. 

The Midway's " X " entered the Navy in August 1941. 
He received his commission and his designation as 
Naval Aviator in June 1942. 

During World War II, the XO made the first raid on 
the Gilbert Islands in March 1944, and subsequently 
participated in all of the major Pacific battles up to 
and including the Battle of the Philippines, during which 
he received the Navy Cross. 

In the post war years, Commander Adams has at- 
tended the General Line School and the Naval War 
College, and served as Plans Officer on the Staff of 
COMCARDIV TWO in the Atlantic Fleet. 

The Commander reported aboard the Midway in March 
1962, to assume the billet as Executive Officer. 




Radm. P. P. Blackburn 

ComCarDiv Three 





Radm, BlacklrUrn welcoming aboard his 
relief, Radm, D. F. Smith, 



/* CARPI V 5 *\ 



(STANDING)* Capt. W. H. House; Cdr. R. S. Johnston; Cdr. A. R English; Cdr. G B. Ml Kinney ; Cdr. W. H. Hartles : Cdr, R. E. Traubel; 

Cdr. A. Vraciu; Lcdr. W. L, McDonald; LT. E, A. Morse; (MIDDLE : LT. V. G. Donnelly; LT. R. D. Thompson; LT. J. H, Kckart ; Ens. 

K. R. Frantz; Lcdr. E. B, Lee; Ens. W, R. Slay ton; Ens. L. T. Hook; Ens, A. F. Thornton; LT. J. T. Abercrombie ; [SEATED): Radm. 
P. P. Blackburn ; Capt. M. U. Reebe. 



'&*Jb**£tJt* 






Lcdr. F.J. Kovanic 

Officer-in-Charge 
VAW-11, Det, Alfa 





" Are you sure this is 
supposed to have 2 wheels?" 



Born of a need first noted during the 
latter part of World War II, Carrier Air- 
borne Early Warning Squadron Eleven, 
was commissioned on July 6, 1948 as 
VAW-1, and was re-designated VAW-11 
eight years later. 

From this need, the ability to detect 
early low-level bombing attacks against 
carriers, such as the Japanese Kamikaze 
attacks of WW II, VAW-11 has evolved 
to where it is today one of the Navy's 
largest squadrons. 

Now flving the WF-2 Tracer, also known 
as the "Willie Fudd," VAW-11 furnishes 
early electronic protection to the Fleet or 
Task Group. 

The "Willie Fudd " is due to be replaced 
in the future by the aptly-named W2F 
Hawkeye. described as a complete airborne 
combat information center (CIC). 



(TOP): LTjg, G, P, Stewart; LTjg. P. C. Schles&er ; LT. H, E, Taylor; LTjg. WW. Monk; LTjg. M.J. Svoboda ; Lcdr R. V. Maraszek 
LTjg. B. N. Westman. {BOTTOM) : LTjg. R, L. Mann; LTjg, B, D, Mansfield; LTjg. VV. J. Castellano ; Lcdr. F. J. Kovanic; LTjg. E, A, Wilson 1 
LTjg, R.J, Strickland; LT. P. E. Frederick; LTjg. M. D. Nass. 




h tb fi | fl i-i ■ * 



' 2G3S 




r t^™j?tyyx$** jit 5 



Ii.|-v r | : < 



N^ 



1 '• 1 



(TOP) : Griffith W. P. ; Frank, E. (I ; Ucckmeyer, J, A. ; Deboard, C. W. ; Hildum, M J. ; Shannon, S. L. ; Orick, D. A. ; Abeyta, C ; Burton, 
M. M. ; Lamont, C. J. L. ; (MIDDLE) : Matibag, D. ATC ; LTjg, P. C. Schlesser ; Ens, J. Castellano ; LTjg. B, N. Westman ; Lcdr. R. V Maraszek ; 
Lcdr. F.J. Kovanic; LT. P. E. Frederick; LTjg. M. D. Nass; LTjg. G. P. Stewart; LTjg, W. W. Monk; LTjg. H. E. Taylor; LTjg. M.J. 
Svoboda; LTjg. B. D. Mansfield; Ens. R. J. Strickland; LTjg. E. A. Wilson; LTjg. R. L. Mann; Ingle, E. L„ ADRC. ; (KNEELING) : Gold, J. C. ; 
Walker, L. ; James, R. E. ; Woessner, G. E, ; Etzrodt, C A, ; Dizon, J. B, ; Sotherden, D. ; Stephens, M. E. ; Doocy, A. ; Kelly, H. ; Matthews, 
P. H. ; Winans. R. K. ; Ackerman, R. A. ; Butler, W. E. 



ff How do you spell indefatigable ? " 




r and further more, 

do not flush while 

flying over . . " 



<TOP) : Heckmeyer, J. A. ; De Board, C. W. ; Hildum, M. J. ; Orick, D. A. ; Burton, M. M. ; 
Stephens, M. E. ; Lamount, C. J. L. ; Gault, D. R. ; Sotherden, D. ; (MIDDLE* : Matibag, D. ; 
Griffits, W. P. ; Woessner, G. E. ; James, R. E, ; Shannon, S. L. ; Etzrodt, C. A. ; Abeyta, 
C. ; Glasgow, M. M. ; Doocy, A. ; Butler, W, E. ; Ingle, E, L., ADRC. ; s ( KNEELING^ : Frank, 
E. G. ; Gold, J. G, ; Walker, L. ; Dtzon, J. B. ; Minge, T. A. ; Winans, R. K. ; Kelly, H. ; 
Matthews, P. H. ; Ackerman, R. A. 




I43ci 



NE 



*W} > 



• 



HTflfTffiVp- 



,.; 



m, 



■ x\ 






LT. J. V. Crouse 

Officer-in-Char^e 





VAW 13 



". . . Comin 9 for to carry me home . . ." 



(STANDING) : Tighe. D. C. ; LTjg. L. B. Massey ; LT. R. J. Pasersky ; Ens. B. P. Harger ; 
LT. J. V. Crouse; Ens. R. L. Mash; LT. B. H. McCart; Blum, H.E.; Logue, J. D. ; 
(SITTING): Masgrove, P. E. ; Lilly. G. W. ; Pritchard, K. ; Courts, R. ; Saxton, M, F. ; 
Stephens, L, ; Winslow, K. W. ; Neal, D. E ; Carroll, R. P. ; Andrews, J, F. ; Williams, 

M. E, ; (KNEELING); Buchanan. A. W. ; Monk. JR.; Quintana, F. D. ; Fitzsimmons, 
M. J, ; Jacobs, R. E ; Singleton, R. T. ; Casper. K D, ; Wright. J. W. 





K 



Lcdr. R. E. Sykes 

Qfncer-in-charge 



Though Light Photographic Squadron Sixty-Three has had 
several designations since the unit's original formation in the late 
forties, its primary mission of furnishing photographic intelligence 
in support of naval operations has remained constant. 

This squadron, designated as Light Photographic Squadron 
Sixty-Three on July 1 of last year, currently flys the F8U-1P 
super sonic jet Crusador, due to be replaced by the Phamtom Two 
F4H sometime in the near future. 

Home-based at NAS Miramar, the squadron placed a detachment 
aboard every carrier that participated in the Korean Conflict 
and today places a detachment with every West Coast carrier 
deploying to WESTPAC. 

These teams possess the capability of taking photographs of 
military objectives from 50 feet off the deck to altitudes above 
50,000 feet at speeds greater than the speed of sound, while also 
being capable of preparing first-phase photographic interpretation 
reports and rough maps. 



(STANDING): Chu, D. A. ; Renaud, T. A. ; Ellis, R. C. ; Hayncs, A.; LTjg. E. A. Forthrnans; LTjg. 
P. W. Crane; Lcdr. R. E, Sykes; LT. J, B, Miner; LTjg. D, D. Young ; Yaroeh, J. E. ; Mack, M. ; Sapp, 

W. M. ; Tong, R. N. ; (SITTING) : Smith, P, A. ; Keeler r D. A. ; Jenkins, J. L. ; Gross, F. L. ; Stcphans, 
S G ' Collins, P. E, ; Bower, M. A, ; McNair, J. R. ; Koontz, R. L, ; Seamon, J. S. ; Kemp. A. J, ; Umbel, 
W, M. ; (KNEELING) : McFee, D. E. ; Gardo, J. C. ; Felt, D, A. ; Miller, K. M. ; Reeves, VV. ; Calapp, 
U.K.; McCrown, G. N. ; Adkins, P. L. ; Littleton, T. L. ; Perez, J. B. ; Boose, G. G. 









n 







r 



w 



548 




In Memoriam 



Cdi\ George Morwood Veling 



Commanding Officer 



VA-23 



Maurice Eugene Hansen 



Seaman 



5th Division 



396 



AIR WING COMMANDER 




CDR R. E. Spruit 




114 



COMMANDING OFFICER 




Captain John H, larrobinn. 
The skipper presents a plaque to LCDR Yost. 



CAPTAIN JOHN H. IARROBINO 
COMMANDING OFFICER 

Captain John H. Iarrobino entered the Navy in 
1940 as an Aviation Cadet, He was commissioned 
Ensign and designated a NavaJ Aviator in September 
1941. 

During World War II he flew dive bombers from 
the carrier USS Ranger and from land bases in the 
South Pacific After tours with the Air Advanced 
Training Command in Florida, the carrier USS Box- 
er, the Quonset Point Naval Air Station, and study 
at the General Line School, Captain Iarrobino took 
command of Fighter Squadron 174 in 1952. He made 
a Sixth Fleet cruise with VF-174 aboard the carrier 
USS Roosevelt, 

Following duty with Commander Fleet Air, Jack- 
sonville, and a year of study at the Naval War Col- 
lege, he served two years in the office of the Chief 
of Naval Operations. He went aboard the carrier 
USS Forrestal in 1957 and in 1959 reported to the 
staff of Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet, In 1961, 
he returned to Washington D,C. as a student at the 
National War College and then became director of 
Anti-Air Warfare Systems in the Bureau of Naval 
Weapons followed by duty in the office of Naval 
Material, 

Before taking command of Oriskany in March 
1966, Captain Iarrobino was commanding officer of 
the attack transport USS Bayfield which operated in 
the Viet Nam theater during 1965. He is brother of 
Captain Charles A. Iarrobino who commanded Or- 
iskany in 1962. 

His decorations include the Air Medal and the 
Navy Commendation Ribbon* 





The Captain chats with Defense Secretary McNaimra. 




Captain larrobino congratulates CDR Bellinger after a "MIG kill". 



Charity begins at home. 





19 



OUR FORMER XO 




Captain Francis J, Murphy, 
USN, was born in Chicago, Il- 
linois on 1(5 February 1924 and 
attended Quincy College and the 
Illinois Institute of Technology. 
He entered the Navy as a Naval 
Aviation Cadet and has held 
numerous assignments including 
a tour as a team pilot with the 
famed Blue Angels, Executive 
Officer and Operations Officer of 
VF-14 and Commanding Officer 
of VF-I42 and VF-121. He is 
married to the former Nan Sears 
of Salinas, Kansas. The Murphys 
reside in Escondido, California 
and have six children. 



Captain F. J, Murphy. 




.'A 

Captain Murphy poses wiih ihe Captain's parents. 



OUR PRESENT XO 




Commander R T. Brown entered the Navy 
as an Aviation cadec in 1943. He was com- 
missioned an Ensign and designated a Naval 
Aviator in November 1945. Commander 
Brown has attended General Line School, 
Marquette University, and Empire Test Pilot 
School during his naval career. He was 
deployed to the Mediterranean, Korea, and 
the Far East during sea duty tours with 
Fighter Squadrons 171, 174, and 143. Assign- 
ments have included four and one-half years 
as a test pilot at the Naval Air Test Center, 
Patuxent River Maryland, and Commanding 
Officer of Carrier Air Wing Nine. In Feb- 
ruary of 1966, Commander Brown reported 
aboard Oriskany as Operations Officer and 
assumed dudes as Executive Officer in August 
of 1966. His decorations include three Dis- 
tinguished Flying Crosses, two Air Medals, 
and the Navy Unit Commendation. 



CDR Brown bids adieu ro re- 
tired Generals Sanagi and Ma- 
sumo to of Japan. 





120 









121 




LT Dick Wyman 
Assi. Operations 



LT Jack Kil pa trick 
Material and LSO 




ENS Charlie Bopgj 

Air Intelligence 

Killed in the line of duty 




124 



Before a mission the "Sain is" crew loads an aircraft* 



A "cat*' shot into the unknown. 




The Saints are on target. 



After a mission, the ride home. 





After a mission* a pilot relaxes. 



Enemy junks between the shore and the ship. 








125 




ATKRON 

164 



The pilot* of VA-iCA 







128 



VA 



152 




THE 



SPAD 




I 



AN OLD 




BUT PROUD 




PLANE 





CDR Smith, The Skipper, puses oui honors at the Awards Ceremony 




134 



Spads in flighc 







te* 



Over a familiar target 




135 



VF-1U 







VA-152 



LA . ** 

Isc Row L R GARNER, M, A.; LANIER, W. 5.; HINOJOSA, L, B.; KELLY, R.; BRADFORD, 
J. H.; WEAVER, J. H.; WOLL1EVER, R. O.; FRENCH, J.; SUTTMAN, R. L.; 2nd Row L-R 
MABRY, R, C; SCHOOLER, E. D,; OSTEY, T. M.; WORTH, N. A.; RHEA, R, T.; REISEN. 
W, E,; DILLION, D. G.; HILLIS, G, S .; STANDEE Y, R, A.; M.f.ort.H. R A.: BOWrFRHY, 
C. C; LEROUE, J, M.; STUDTS, J, R.; 3rd Row L-R THOMPSON. R. G,; DALLISANDRO, 
E; COLE, C. V.; KASIMATIS, J. P.; MORLEY, J. K.; BOARDMAN, C C; VICE, D. M. 




Top Row L-R SEAL, D. N + ; RHODES, O, V,; LANGLEY, J, W.; AARVEY, J„ R.j SAINT- 
PAUL, A.; McMAUGH, L. W, ; WALLACE, J. A.; McTHOMPSON A.; Bottom Row L-R 
LAY, R, E.; CHIEF WALTERS; LTJG J. R. TANK; LTJG F. M. GUENZEL; LT D. R ZAM- 
BORI; CHIEF SEARLES; CHIEF LAWSON; OLSON, R. A, 



VA-n2 




Top Row L-R OLDHAM, G.; CIMINO, C S.; VADER, E. C; ROBERTS, P.; GALLARDO, 
M. A.; KLINE, D. R.; CORSON, D. D.; MARCH!, J. B-; Middle Row L-R SCHOOLMAN, 
D. R.; FEAMSTER, A. T,; STUART, E, R.; TRAPANI, J. A,; McKEE, S. B.; BYO, B. E.; 
BLAYLOCK, T. L.; RAPP, J. A.; COHEN, S. R; Bottom Row L-R WATSON, R, G.; LAM- 
BRISKY, W. B-; CHIEF HULBERT; LTJG BOOSE; JENEN, R. L.; KARSTENSEN, L. L. 







fltfjfriiu 

Top Row L-R MENDOZA, R. J.; TACULAD, J- C; GIESEN, D. M.; BALOT, J. R.; HOYT, 
C. A.; DILL, J. E.; LISTE, D. A.; 5HARTZER, D. B.; WELCH, T. R.; LOVAN, D. L.; 
KEATHLY, C. H.; CUNNINGHAM, R. G.; BAKER, H. L.; DIVINAGRACIA, H, B<; Bottom 
Row L-R VILLAREAZ, C. G.; PARKER, L. D; SWITZER, R. E.; CHIEF BRACKIN; LT 
FRYER; FLORES, J, T,; REED, W. H,; BENNETT* A. S, 



Top Row L*R EVANS, D. W.; McMULLEN, R, E.; GREY, A. R.; LANGRIDGE. T, F, R 
JACQUES, L> O,; POLEN, T. D ; ARELLO, N. S.; MOON, H, T.; WITTSTRUCK, M. X. 
Middle Row L-R WADDINGHAM, J. A.; PEREZ, M. S.; NEWMAN, C. E.; BROWN, R F 
DAVIS, R. L.; LIEN, L. J.; HUFFMAN, J. W.; McCARY* J. E.; YARBROUGH, J.: COOK 
C C; Bottom Row L-R TIMMONS, J. L.; LEECH, B. J,; OLSON, H« G.; CWO GRUESER 
BUCHE, E> A.; CANNON, N. A,; HAWK, B, W.; HICKS, L. 



r? 



w 



w A vHk 



V* M^W^f*^ 



Top Row L-R HOCEUAR, D. C; CARVALHO, D. Q,; BROWN, J. L,; COOK, W, D.; 
FKITSCH, P. M.; LONG, J- H.; FOSTER, S. E.; SIMMONS, D. E.; IIJBI-K. L D.; RAYMER, 
T, C; STRUNK. D. A.; VANOVERBEKE, M. H.; DELINSKY, W. A.; ECK, J. A.; SHARKEY, 
H. J.; Bottom Row L R BUTERBAUGH, J, J.; HUM, J. F>; HOYLE, R. F.; LTJG BEENE; 
FELKER, W. H,; RENARD, R. J,; McARTHUR, B, K.; BOWLING, D. J. 




#X 





AIRBORNE EARLY WARNING 
SQUADRON ELEVEN 





136 





HE A VY FOUR 





140 






The men who fly Orlskany's Helo's 





Seen here with their commanding officer, Captain John larrabino, are the pilot* and co-pilots 
of the three helicopters which rescued the crew of the grounded orecarrier. From left to right 
arc Lieut-Commander Dale Barck; Ensign Daniel Kern; Ensign Sheldon Woodle; Captain 
larrabino; Lieut Dixon Anderson; Lieut James Welsh and Lieut Rowlyn Blakely Jr. 



145 




ME MORI AM 



Daniel O. Kern, ENS 
James A. Lee, SN 
Norman S. Levy, LCDR 
David A. Liste, AZAN 
William G. Mc Williams III, LTJG 
Walter F, Merrick, LCDR 
Clarence D. Miller, LT 
Clement J, Morrisette, LCDR 
John J. Nussbaumer, CDR 
Donald W. Shanks, BM3 



Alvin M. Shifflett Jr., BM3 
Gerald W. Siebe, ENS 
James A. Smith, LCDR 
Tli o mas R Spiuer, LTJG 
Daniel L. Strong, LCDR 
Ronald E. Tardio, ENS 
FrankJin M. Tunick, LTJG 
William (n) Walling, MMFN 
Clyde R. Welch, CDR 
James R, Welsh, LTJG 



Missing in Action 
Wilfred K, Abbott, CAPT, USAF 
James A. Beene, LTJG 

Terry A, Dennison, LT 

Frank C EI kins, LT 

John A, Feldhaus, LT 
George P. McStvain, ENS