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1 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



OF 



ENGLAND, 



FROM EGBERT THE GREAT TO THE REVOLUTION. 



BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



OF 



ENGLAND, 

dFtrom HBqbtvt t^t Q&vtsit to t^t Utt^olution: 

CONSISTING OF 

CHARAGTBRS DISPOSED IN DIFFERENT CLASSES, 

AND ADAPTED TO 

A METHODICAL CATALOGUE OF ENGRAVED BRITISH H£ADS t 

INTENDED AS 

AS ESSAY TOWARDS REDUCING OUR BIOGRAPHY TO SYSTEM, AND 
A HELP TO THE KNOWLEDGE OF PORTRAITS: 

IMTKRSPKRSBO WITH 

A VARIETY OF ANECDOTES, 

AND 

MEMOIRS OF A GREAT NUMBER OF PERSONS, 

MOT TO BE FOUND IN ANT OTHER BIOGRAPHICAL WORK. 

WITH A PREFACE, 

SHEWING THE UTILITY OF A COLLECTION OF ENGRAVED PORTRAITS TO SUPPLY THE 
DEFECT, AND ANSWER THE VARIOUS PURPOSES, OF MEDALS. 



BY THE REV. J. GRANGER, 

VICAR OF SHIPLARE, IN OXFORDSHIRE. 



Animam pictar& pasoit inani. — Virg 
Celebrare domestioa facta. — Hor. 



FIFTH EDITION, 

WITH UPWARDS OF FOUR HUNDRED ADDITIONAL LIVES. 

IN SIX VOLUMES: 

VOL. VL 



LONDON: 

PRINTED FOR WILLIAM BAYNES AND SON, 

PATEBNOSTER ROW : 

AND SOLD BY W. CLARKE, NEW BOND STREET; J. MAJOR, FLEET STREET; J. AND J. ARCH, 

CORNHILL: J. PARKER, OXFORD: DEIGHTON AND SONS, CAMBRIDGE : 

H. S. BAYNES AND CO. EDINBURGH ; AND R. M. TIMS, DUBLIN. 

1824. 



D/ 



U,n55 



Q 






I^Hiitecl by J. F, Dots, St. John's Square. 




i^.&m^M,(^ i^oti€:<?veli'. (^Sc 



r- 



/ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



HISTORY OF ENGLAND. 



REIGN OF CHARLfiS II. CONTINUED. 



CLASS XII. 



PERSONS REMARKABLE FROM A SINGLE CIRCUMSTANCE 

IN THEIR LIVES, &C. . 

William PENDERELL, M. 84 ; an oval; suspended 
in an oak; twenty-two verses ; dated 1651 ; rare: this is 
well copied by Claussin ; Woodbuni esc. 

William Penderell, of Boscobell, ^t. 84 ; in an 
oval. W. Richardson. 

William Penderell > %vo. R. Cooper sc. 

RICHARD PENDERILL (or Penderell). Zoust 
p. R. Houston/, h. sh. mezz. 

Trusty Dick Penderell. Lavibornf. 8w. This 
print appears to me not to be genuine. 

Richard Penderell; ovaly in a square frame. 
John Scott exe. 

vol.. VI. B 



2 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Trusty Dick Penderell ; in a square^ with his mo 
nu7)ient ; J. Cauljield; 1796. 

Richard Penderell, and his brother William, were chiefly instru- 
mental to the escape of Charles II. after the fatal battle of Worces- 
ter. There were six brothers of this family, who rented little farms 
on the borders of Staffordshire, and were frequently employed as 
labourers in cutting down timber. The king took shelter, the first 
night after his escape, at White Ladies, a house belonging to the 
Giffards, about twenty miles from Worcester. Here he put on a 
leather doublet and a green jerkin, cut his hair short, and threw his 
clothes into a privy. Richard went with him into a wood, where 
he was concealed the whole day ; during which time he had no- 
thing to eat or drink. He afterward attended him many miles on 
foot, and came back with him to one of his brother's houses, where 
he found Major Careless, who accompanied him in Boscobel Wood, 
where they concealed themselves in an oak. The Penderells and 
Mrs. Lane were among the small number of loyalists who were re- 
warded afler the restoration. Richard died 8 Feb. 1671, and lies 
buried in the church of St. Giles's in the Fields, London, where a 
monument is erected to his memory. Tlie author of his epitaph 
styles him '^ the great and unparalleled Penderell.'' See particulars 
in an " Account of the Preservation of Charles H. after the Battle 
of Worcester ; drawn up by himself, and published from the Ma* 
nuscript in the Pepysian Library, by Sir David Dalrymple."* 

JOHN OGLE ; in Waterman's Lane^ in White Friars; 
Svo. 

John Ogle. Caulfield and Harming; 8vo. 



* It appears, from the notes on this account, that Richard was the third brother ui 
the Penderells, and that he was commonly called Trusty Richard. Pie and his fiv( 
brethren lived at or near White Ladiet, in a little farm within the wood. Thej wen 
employed in cutting down timber and watching it to prevent its being stolen. The^ 
subsisted chiefly upon tlie pro6t of some cow-grass. All the brothers were privy t< 
the secret of the king's concealment; but Richard went many miles with him ti 
assist him in his escape. t 



t " Charles the Second's Account of his Escape/' p. 7, 6i.c, 



OF ENGLAND. 3 

Jack Ogle, who some time rode privately in the first troop of 
guards, was notorious for his frolics and low humour. He inherited 
a small estate, which he presently dissipated ; and had afterward 
recourse to the gaming-table, with various success. . It is said, that 
in a run of ill luck he lost his cloak, and borrowed his landlady's 
red petticoat to carry with him to a muster ; and that the Duke of 
Monmouth having a hint of it, ordered the whole troop to cloak, on 
purpose to expose him.* One of his frolics had like to have cost 
him his life. Having a quarrel in the streets with a French officer 
of the foot-guards, who was a man of humour like himself, a chal- 
lenge ensued, and they agreed to go into the fields to fight. A rab- 
ble followed tliem in great expectation of a duel. ^ Before they got 
thither the quarrel was made up ; but they ran with precipitation, 
as if they were eager to engage, and leaped into a saw-pit. Here 
they were discovered in a very ridiculous posture, as if they were 
easing themselves. The disappointed mob presently saluted them 
with a shower of stones and brickbats. Hard drinking, and an in- 
famous distemper, are supposed to have hastened his death, which 
happened in the d9th year of his ::ge. His sister, who waited on 
the Countess of Inchequin, was said to have been one of the Duke 
of York's mistresses. 

JOHN BAREFOOT, &c. Guil. Crowne del'm. M. 
Burghers sc. h. sh. 

John Barefoot, letter-doctor to the university of 
Oxford. 



u 



Upon this table you may faintly see 

A doctor, deeply skilFd in pedigree ; 

To ne plus ultra his great fame is spread, 

Oxford a more facetious man ne'er bred. 

He knows what arms old Adam's grandsire bore, 

And understands more coats than e'er he wore. 

So well he's vers'd in college, schools, theatre, 

You*d swear he'd married our dear alma mater. 

As he's our index, so this picture's his, 

And, superscription like, just tells whose 'tis. 

But the contents of his great soul and mind 

You'll only by his conversation find." 

• See the " Tatler," No. 132. 



4 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

^tat suce 70, 1681. E. Lutterel ad vivum del. M, 
Burghers sc. A letter in his hand; h. sh. 

Good impressions of these prints are scarce. 

John* Barefoot; 9>vo. Caulfield. 

This facetious man was many years a letter-carrier in the univer- 
sity of Oxford. It appears from the above inscription, that his me- 
mory was extraordinary : I am informed, from wiquestionabU au- 
thority,* that his invention was as extraordinary as his memory* 
He was a coiner of what the people call white lies ; and as his fictiooi 
were rather of the probable than the marvellous kind, they were 
sometimes verified. — Most, if not all, of the following group of 
witnesses dealt in lies of the blacke&t hue. 

TITUS GATES; anagramma, ''Testis ovat:' R. 
White ad vivum del. et sc. 

Titus Gates, D. D; the first discoverer of the 
horrid plot; k. sh. 

Titus Gates, Bob Ferguson,f or the raree shew 
of Mamamouchee Musty. J A cap and a turban on his 
head, a Jlail in one hand, and a sword in the othevt 
Under the portrait are twenty-one English verses; h. sh. 

Titus Gates; in the sheet with his Vindication^ 
T. Dudley f. Ato. 

* James West, esq. who had it from the mouth of Mr. Hearue. 

t Robert Ferguson was a great dealer in plots, and a prostitute political writer 
for different parties ; and particularly for the Earl of Shaftesbur j. His persoPf 
which is perhaps represented in some print, is thus deacribed in a proclaniatio0 
published in Uie year 1683: ** A tall lean man, dark brown hair, a great Koroai^ 
nose, thin jawed, heat in his face, speaks in the Scotch tone, a sharp piercing ej6» 
stoops a little in the shoulders, he bath a shuffling gait that differs from all men* 
wears his periwig down almost over his eyes, about forty-five years of age.** H^ 
approached nearer to a parallel character with Oates than any of bis contemporaries* 
and was rewarded with a place in the reigu of William, though- it was well knowl^ 
that he merited a halter. See more of him in " Athen. Oxon.** ii. col. 743. Se^ 
also the Indexes to Echard and Burnet; Calamy, ii. p. 383, iii. p. 544,&c.aiMf 
Dalrymple*s " Memoirs,** 

X Mamamouchi is a character in the <' Citizen turned Gentleman,** from Moliere^ 



OF ENGLAND. 5 

Trrus Oates. Tkos. Haukerp. Tompsonexc. h.sh. 

lezz. 

Titus Oates ; in a square cap, gloves in his hands, 
nezz. 4tto. no inscription. 

Titus OateSrWho Was restrained by no principle human or divine, 
md tike Judas would have done any thing for thirty shillings^ was 
)Qe of the most accomplished villains that we rezd of in history. 
He was sikcce^sively an Anabaptist, a Conformist, and a Papist ; 
and then became a Conformist again. He had been chaplain on 
board the fleet, whence he was dismissed for an unnatural crime, 
and was known to be guilty of perjury before he set up the trade of 
witnessing.* He was successful in it beyond his most sanguine 
expectation: he was lodged at Whitehall, and had a pension as- 
signed him of 1200/. a year. He was a man of some cunning, 
more effirohtery, and the most consummate falsehood. His im- 
pudence supported itself under the strongest conviction, and he 
suffered for his crimed, with all the constancy of a martyr. The 
era of Oates's plot, was also the grand era of Whig and Tory ; 

and he has the peculiar infamy of being the first of incendiaries, as 
ke was the first of witnesses. — See the next reign. 

# 

CAPTAIN EDWARD PANTON,&c. who first dis- 
covered to Sir Edmund Bury Godfrey this now horrid 
conspiracy ; in armour; with a cockatrice , and two 
English verses; Ato. rare. 

Captain Edward Panton ; i?i Caulfield's '^ Re- 
Mrkable Persons.'' 

Captain Edward Panton was an adventurer, and professed 
gunbler; he is said to have won the whole of Panton-street, near 
4e Haymarket, in one night, after which fortunate hit, he never 
tould be prevailed on to play again. • 

CAPTAIN WILLIAM BEDLOE, discoverer of 
Ae Popish plot; h. sh. 

• Quaestum accepit, 1678. 
VOL. VI. C 



6 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

I 

Captain William Bedloe; emblems of his loy- 
alt\)y 8^c. Ato. In a sheet with verses. 

. Captain William Bedloe. R. White sc. snuilL: 
8vo. A copy hy Cole. ■'•.:■. Jii 

■ «tS - 

William Bedloe, who assumed the title of captauiy wctf oil uK^' 
famous adventurer of low hirth, who had travelled over a jpiMpfl^ 
part of Europe under different names and disguiseB, tad-:hii|*!^ 
passed upon several ignorant persons for a man of rank aad^lw.; 
tune. Encouraged by the success of Oates, he turned evufinJSi^'. 
gave an account of Godfrey's murder, and added many' drbifH: 
stances io the narrative of the foriner. These villains lukd tti| • 
boldness to accuse the queen of entering into a conspifacy agaMV- 
the king's life. A reward of 500/. was voted to Bedloe 1>]rl^ 
commons. He is said tahave asserted the reality of the piti-^ 
his death-bed: but it abounds with absurdity, coutfadictioiiy 'iuAl 
perjury; and still remains one of the greatest problems iv H9lii| 
British, annals. CH?. Aug. 20, 1680. — Giles Jacob informs Us, Itiaft 
he was author of a play called '* The Excommunicated Prince, vir 
the false Relick j'' 1679h. :.^ 



-.1 



MILES PRANCE, discoverer of the horrid plpt^ 
and the murderers of Sir E. B. Godfrey, R.White 
del. et sc. h. sh. 

Miles Puance, &c* oval; long wig^ laced neek^ 
cloth; h. sh. . 

. ■ . . ^ 

Miles Prance; 8vo. J. Caul/ield, 1793. 

Miles Prance, a silversmith, was accused by one Wren, and alio 
by Bedloe, of being' ^n accomplice in the murder of Sir Edmund 
Bury Godfrey. This he at first strenuously denied. But he wieui 
said to be so powerfully wrought upon by the Earl of Shaftesburyii 
as not only to confess himself guilty, but also to accuse two popish 
priests, together with Green, Berry, and Hill, of being concerned 
in the same crime. His testimony was, in some instances, con- 
tradictory to Bedloe's, and even to itself. He was tried, and con- 
victed of perjury; but having retracted his evidence in several 
particulars relative to the plot, hi? punishment was remitted. It 




,'fOSI AH 
bcifi// '/mfZ^tf in C'finsctenr 






J0rSm„ 

(Saf efim/in o/n/ t^/u/if^nft(t/ iJ'trot: 



InpOjyiiaJjy.Wnir-h HI 



n.Ca»l«c SSA.c^c. 



OF ENGLAND. 7 

Qarkable that Mr. L'Estrange, who had been accused by him 
secret disaffection to the government, received the sacrament 
•ntly after him, fVom the hands of Dr. Sharp, rector of St. 
)'s in the Fields; and that he then '' solemnly declared, before 
congregation, that he wished that sacrament might be his 
lation, if what that man had sworn or published concerning 
was not totally and absolutely false.*** Prance, though chal- 
d in this solemn manner, did not speak a word in his own 
cation. 

rEPHEN DUGDALE, discoverer of the horrid 
. R. White sc. h. sh. 

rEPHEN DuGDALE, &c. copicd fvom the former. 

TEPHEisr Dugdale; 8vo. in Caul/ield's ^^ Remark- 
Persons." 

»phen Dugdale, who had beeii a servant of Lord Aston, be- 
: an evidence against that nobleman, the Earl of Stafford, and 

persons of distinction. It appeared that the latter was at 
, at the time in which he deposed that he saw him at Tixal. 
man was not altogether so infamous as Oates and Bedloe; 
lis testimony was equally contradictory and incredible. Tur- 
tle was another witness of the same stamp. iThe d^ing as- 
ations of the persons condemned upon the oaths of these 
:hes, hav^ no inconsiderable weight, when thrown into the 

against their personal characters. 

JOSIAH KEELING, who, being touched in 
science, was the first man that came* in, and vo- 
:arily discovered the late hellish conspiracy of the 
itics against the life of his sacred majesty, and of 
royal highness ; designed to have been executed 
the Rye-house, in Hertfordshire, in April, 1683. 
White ad vivum sc. h. sh. 

osiAix Keeling; &mall; 4to. W. Richardson. 



»■ 



• Echard III. b. 3. c. 2. p. 1081. 



8 BIQGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

JosiAH Keeling; in Gaulficld's ^^ Remarkable 
Persons'' 

Josiah Keeling, a Salter in London, having unadvisedly arrested 
the lord- mayor at the suit of Papillon and Dubois, the two ex- 
cluded sheriffSfthought it prudent to make a discovery of the Rye- 
house plot, to screen himself from the law. This plot, whether 
real or fictitious, occasioned the shedding of some of the best blood 
in the kingdom, and completed the triumph of the royal party. 
We are told, that upon this discovery of Keeling, " a new evidence 
office was erected at Whitehall,"* and that care was taken to 
select such judges and juries as would answer the purposes of the 
court. t An elaborate account of the Rye-house conspiracy, of 
which the Duke of York had the garbling,! was written by Dr. 
Sprat. The author has been so ingenuous as to retract the enor- 
mous falsehoods with which he had charged Lord Russel, in that 
book.§ Many more retractions are required, to make it an au- 
thentic history. The " Secret History of the Rye-house Plot," 
written by Ford, lord Grey, is worth the reader's notice. 

STEPHEN COLLEDGE (or. College), com^ 
monly called the Protestant Joiner, 

** By Irish oaths, and wrested law I fell 
A prey to Rome, a sacrifice to hell ; 
My bleeding innocence for justice cries, 
^ Hear, hear O heav'n, for man my suit denies!" 

death's head before him; 8ro. 

Stephen College ; in an oval. W. Richardson. 
Stephen College; mezz. 

Stephen College was accused of being concerned in a conspiracy 
to seize the king's person, and detain him in prison, till he should 
yield to the exclusion of the Duke of York, and make such other^ 

■ • • . • ■ 

♦ WeIwood*s "Memoirs," p. 137. 

t See more of htm in DalrympIe'^B " MerooirB," i. p. 87. 

X See the Bishop of Rochester's " Letters to the Earl of Dorset," p. IS. 

$ Ibid. p. 15, edit. 8to. 










: Ml^-'OJt,, 



/ fll Wl 
Jletl fc 

■man my suit dtKyes- ..^ 



) iiiilililliiiii , iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

en Gdlea^ 



iti^/iid.a.thtA:U'"^lt.JulyiJJ^i.tymL^k.rJ,miacHtS^tt^LiurltrSjtuire 



OF ENGLAND. 9 

coDcessions as the commons might require of him. When the par- 
liameDt sat at Oxford, he went about armed with sword and pistol, 
which furnished a pretence for his accusation. The court party» 
vho watched for an opportunity to retaliate a plot upon the ex- 
clasionistSy persecuted him with unrelenting, violence. Dugdale 
and other infamous witnesses, who had been informers against the 
Papists, were retained against him. He defended himself with 
^t spirit and ability, to the confusion of his adversaries : but the 
jury, who were all zealous royalists, brought him in guilty. He 
behared with a becoming fortitude at the place of execution, and 
persisted in asserting his innocence to the last. He was executed 
at Oxford, 31st August, 1681. — He was a man of a more enlarged 
understanding than is commonly found in mechanics. His in* 
genuity in his trade procured him employment among persons of 
rank; some of whom he was afterward permitted to visit upon the 
foot of a friend. His faults were, being too pragmatical, and in- 
discreetly zealous for his religion. — His daughter was seamstress 
to King William, a place worth 300/. a year. Dr. Swift informs 
Q8, that ^' this noble person'* and himself were brought acquainted 
by Lady Berkeley. See Swift's " Letters,'* vol. iv. p. 336, edit. 
1768. 

THOMAS VENNER ; a helmet on his head, holding 
ahalbert; small. In Pagifs ^^ Heresiographyy" p. 280. 

Thomas Venner. Caulfieldy 1794. 

Thomas Venner, a wine-cooper, who acquired a competent 
estate by his trade, was reputed a man of sense and religion, before 
bis understanding was bewildered with enthusiasm. He was so 
strongly possessed with the notions of the Millenariant , or Fifth 
Monarchy Men, that he strongly expected that Christ was coming 
to reign upon earth, and that all huinan government, except that 
of the saints, was- presently to cease.' He looked upon Cromwell 
and Charles H. as usurpers upon Christ's dpminion, and persuaded 
his vtak brethren, that it was their duty to rise and seize upon the 
kingdom in. his name. Accordingly a rabble of them, with Venner 
at their head, assembled in the streets, and proclaimed King Jesus. 
They were attacked by a party of the militia, whom they resolutely 
engaged; as many of them believed themselves to be invulnerable. 
They were at length overpowered by numbers, and their leader, 



10 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

with twelve of his followers, was executed in January, 1660-1* 
They '' affirmed to the last, that if they had been deceived, the 
Lord himself was their deceiver."* 

JOHN, the Quaker, (John Kelsey). M. Laur(m\ 
delin. P. Tempest exc. h. sh. One of the set of the 
Cries of London, drflwn after the life. The set consists 
of upwards of seventy.'^ 

John Kelsey. M. Lauron; G.Walker so. 

John Kelsey went to Constantinople, upon no less a design than 
that of converting the Grand Signior. He preached at the corner of 
one of the streets of that city, with all the vehemence of a fanatic: 
but as he spoke in his own language, the people stared at him, bat 
could not so much as guess at the drift of his discourse. They soon 

» 

• Smollett 

The roost signal instance of pare enibasiasra, that Iiatli ever occurred to me, is 
that of Mr. John Mason, minister of Water Stratford, near Backingliam. He was 
a roan of great stroplicity of behaviour, of the roost unaffected pietj, and of learning 
and abilities far above the cororoon level, till he was bewildered bj the mysteries 
of Calvinism, and infatuated with millenary notions. This cakii ai)d grave enthu" 
siast was as firmly persuaded as he was of his own existence, and as strongly per' 
suaded others, that he was the Elias appointed to proclaim the approach of Christy 
who was speedily to begin the millennium and fi\ his throne at Water Stratford* 
Crowds of people asserobled at this place who were fully convinced that this gfcat 
era would presently coromenoe ; and especially after Mason had, in the most solemn 
manner, affirmed to his sister and several other persons, that, as he lay on his b^d, 
he saw Christ in all his majesty. - Never was there a scene of more frantic I'ov, ex- 
pressed by singing, fiddling, dancing, and all the wildness of enthusiastic gestures 
and rapturous vociferation, than was, for some time, seen at Stratford ; where a 
mixed multitude assembled to hail the approach of King Jesus. Every vagabond 
and village fiddler that could be procured bore a part in the rode concert at tins 
tumultuous jubilee. Mason was observed to speak rationally on every subject thai 
Lad no relation to his wild notions of religion. He died in 1695, soon after he 
fancied that he had seen his Saviour, fiilly convinced of the reality of the vision 
and of his own divine mission. See a particular Account of bis Life and Character 
by H. Maurice, rector of Tyringham, Bucks, 1695, 4to. pamphlet 

t It should be observed tliat M. and L. the initials of this painter's name arc 
generally united in the engravings from his works: hence it is that he has beea 
miscalled Manroiu 

X I have described as many of them in this work, as Mr. Secretary Pepys bu 
taken into his collection. We are beholden to that gentleman for the names ol 
several of the persons, which are written under the portraits. 



OF ENGLAND. II 

rluded bim to be out of his senses, and carried him to a mad« 
se, where he was confined for six months. One of the keepers 
pening to hear him speak the word EngUsh, informed Lord 
Qchelsea, who was then ambassador to the Porte, that a mad 
intryman of his was then under confinement. His lordship sent 
bim ; and he appeared before him in a torn and dirty hat, which 
could not, by any means, be persuaded to take off. The ambas- 
dor thought that a little of the Turkish discipline would be of ser- 
ce to him, and presently ordered him to be drubbed upon the feet, 
his occasioned a total change in his behaviour, and he acknow- 
tdged that the drubbing had a good effect vpon his spirit. Upon 
marching his pockets a letter was found addressed to the gpreat 
'urk, in which he told him, that he was a scourge in the hand of 
rod to chastise the wicked ; and that be sent him not only to de- 
ounce, but to- execute vengeance. He was put on board a ship 
ound for England, but found means to escape in his passage, and 
eturned to Constantinople. He was soon after sent on board an- 
ither ship, and so effectually secured, that he could not escape a 
•econd time.* 

The London QUAKER. M. Lauron del. S. Savage 
Jc, One of the set of Cries, published by Pierce Tempest. 

This woman was known by the name of " Rachel of Covent- 
garden.*^ I have seen her portrait in one of Hemskirk*s Quakers' 
i&eetings. 

LODOWICK MUGGLETON; Ob. Mar. 12, 
16%, JSf. 90 ; large Ato. mezz. 

LoDowicK MuGGLETON. G. V. Cassell ; Ato. 

» 

LoDowiCK MuGGLETON. Caulfieldy Sgc. 

Lodowick M uggleton, who was by trade a tailor, was a notoriousr 
ichismatic, and father of the sect called after his name. He was a 
great pretender to inward light, which was to answer every pur- 
!)ose of religion. He regarded himself as above ordinances of every 
uod^ not excepting even prayer and preaching. He acknowledged 

* See the " Life of Sir Dudley Nofth.'' 



12 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

bat one person in the Godhead, rejected creeds, and all church- 
discipline and authority ; but expected the greatest deference to be 
paid to what he taught and enjoined himself. He estejcmed the 
Scripture a dead letter, and resolved every thing into his own pri- 
vate spirit. He, like other enthusiasts, made no scruple of damiiing 
all the world that differed from his own mode of faith. His dinaxfUei 
are said to have recorded many of his prophecies^. He begafl fo 
distinguish- himself about the year 1650.* His books, for wtitngf 
which he was pilloried and imprisoned^ were burnt by the common 
hangman. 

OLIVER C. PORTER ; un insens^ pour la re|i- 
gion.t M. Lauron del. P. Tempest exc. One of the 
set of Cries; h. sh.X 

Oliver Cromwell's Porter. M.Lauron; W.J- 
Taylor sculp. 1793. 

This man, whose christian name was Daniel, was porter to OliTer 
Cromwell, in whose service he learned much of the cant that pre- 
vailed at that time. He was a great plodder in books of divinity, 
especially in those of the mystical kind, which are supppsed to have 
turned his brain. • He was many years in Bedlam, where his libnry 
was, after some time, allowed him ; as there was not the least pAh 
bability of his cure. The most conspicuous of his books was ft 
large Bible, given him by Nell Gwynn.^ He frequently preached, 

* George Fox, a joamejman shoemaker, and one of the great apoitlef o^ Af 
Quakers, began to exert himself about the sajne time. He was a frieixl apd v$^ 
ciate of Muggleton ; and they are said to have been " so deeply seized with dcipiir> 
that, like the possessed man in the gospel, they forsook all human convenation^wil 
retired into deserts and solitary places, whf re they spent whole dayi md tA^ 
alone."— Leslie's '* Snake in the Grass," edit. 1698, p. 351. S«e <lao fufk 
"Journal." .■.; 

t The gloom which religion too often spreads over the human mind, ii g^oenllj 
the effect of narrow conceptions of the Deity, " whose mercy is ovef all liw%WfMi." 
This has frequently filled the cells of Bedlam and St. Luke's hoipitsi, with thsisMl 
wretched of all patients. To represent the best of beings as the worst of tjisttlii 
which some religionists have done, drives men of melancholy tempen dimetly to 
despair, and is worse, in effect, than Atheism itself. 

X He was remarkably tall, as appears by a large O, the standard of his height, oo 
the back of the terrace, at Windsor. 

$ See '• State Poems," edit. 1705, p. 447. 




'Jacob Ha.ll 



OF JBNGtAND. 13 

tod sometimes prophesied ^ and was said to have for^tdld several 
remarkable eyents, particularly the fire of London.* One would 
think that Butler had this frantic enthusiast in Tiew> where he says^ 

" Had lights where better eyes were blind, 
As pigs are said to see the wind ; 
FiU*d Bedlaiii with predestination/' Acc^Hud. 

Mr. Charles Leslie, who has placed him in the same class with Fox 
and Mnggleton, tells us> that people often went to hear him preach, 
And "would sit many hours under his window with great sigiks of 
devotion." That gentleman had the curiosity to ask a grave inatront 
Who was among his auditors^ '* what she could profit by hearing 
that madman ?" She, with a composed countenance, as pitying his 
^orance, replied, '^ That Festus thought Paul was mad/'f 

JACOB HAliL, a femous tope-danc^r ; capj his 
(mi hair, comb. L. Van Oost pinx. P. de Brunne fecit; 
^uaforti.X 

Jacob Hall. W. Rickdrdson. 

Jacob Hall* Freeman sc. In " Grammmt;'^ 8w. 
1809. 

There Was a symmetry land elegance, as w^ll as strength and 
^dity, in the person of Jacob Hall, which was much admired by the 
ladies, who regarded him as a due composition of Hercules and 
Adonis. The open-hearted Dutchess of Cleveland was said to hare 
Wn in love with this rope-dancer and Goodman the player at. the 
same time* The former received a salary from her grace .§ 



* Leslie's «^ Snake id the Grass,^ edit. 1698, ^. 530. 

tlbid.p.3«7. 

t The original pictnre was sold some years ago, bj Mr* Christie, in Pall-mall. 

$ " Memoires de Grammont." 

Mr. Wjcherly's intimacy urith the Datchfcss of Cleveland was so far from being a 
*%Ket, that it seems to have been known to every body hot the king. This cor- 
KspQiidence was began by her grace, who called to him as their coaches passed by 
eack other in the streets of London, and told him that be was « son of a wh»re* 
^ was only telling him in other words that he was a wit, as it plainly atfoded to 
tbe last gtaBza of a song in his " Love in a Wood, or St. James's Park." The story 
is cntamstantially told in Dennis's Letters. 
VOL. VI. D 



14 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

HENRY JENKINS,* who lived to the surprising 
age of 169 ; taken from an original painting done by 
Walker, t. Worlidgef. 1752; h.sh. This has hem 
copied in mezz. 

Henry Jenkins ; an etching. J. Caulfiild., 

Under the head \& an account of this old mein^ by Mf s. Anae 
Savile, which is also printed in the third T<^ume of the '^ Phih)60- 
phical Transactions/' p. 308.-— This lady informs us, thiit he remem- 
bered the battle of Flodden Field, which was fought the 9th of 
September, 1513; that he had "sworn in Chancery and other 
courts to above one htmdred and forty years inemoi^yf' anddiat 
there is a record preserved in the king's remembrancer's office, in 
the Exchequer, by which it appears, that " Henry Jenkins^ of Eller- 
ton upon Swale, labourer, aged 157, was produced, and deposed as 
a witness." In the last century of his life he was. a fisherman ; aad 
when he was no longer able to follow that occups^ion, he Vjsnt 
begging about Bolton, and other places in Yorkshire. He died m 
December, 1670, and lies buried at Bolton, where, in 1743ra monu- 
ment was erected to his memory. He was one of the oldest men of 
the postdiluvians, of whom we have any credible aocoQi^t 



TURNER ; in a cloak ^ a stick in his left hand; 9iV0, 

'^ Turner soe famous for his shifting arts, 
Fragmatick buslings, turns, and Protean parts, 

V Through city, camp, and country, to t'he ^ate. 
Took his last turn from y* full swing of f&te. 



» 



Turner ; on the ladder previous to his ex'eciUion; 
crowd of spectators. D. Loggan sc. 

* He » called Simpson by Mr. Eveljo, in bis " Nuinismata,*' p. 267. 

t Lord B^con, in his " Uistoria Vit® ct Mortis," mentions Johannes de Tempos 
ribus, who followed the wars under Charlemagne, and who is said to have lived tcF 
the age of 300 years. Bat this is equally incredible with many other particulars \m 
the history of that princ^. See more concerning long-lived persons In the bool^ 
above-cifed. .See also some more credible instances of old men, in Dr. JehnCamp-^ 
bell's anonymous book, entitled " Hermippus redivivus." 



OF ENGLAND. 15 

TuKK£R, &c. J. CaulfUid. 

James Tamer, a goldsmith, in London, and lieutenant-colonel of 

the citj militia, was, for some time, esteemed a man of a genteel 

spirit, which was always ohsenred to carry him far heyond the limits 

of his fortone. His vices and extravagancies not only exhausted 

lus patrimony, which was very considerable, but also involved him 

in debt. Hence he betook himself to the lowest arts and most 

villanous practices to maintain the figure of a gentleman. He was 

executed for robbing the house of Mr. Francis Tryton, a merchant, 

of jewels, and other things of value, to the amount of about 6000iL 

He was ea^ecuted for this burglary in Lime-street, London, 22 Jan. 

1663^. He expressed a true sense of his guilt at the place of 

execution, and desired the minister who attended to read to him 

the fourteenth, fifteenth, sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth 

verses, of the second diapter of the Epistle to the Hebrews. He 

left forty shillings to be distributed among the poor of the parish 

wbere he suffered, and eighteen shillings and sixpence only to his 

wife. See the '' Relation," &c p. 25. 



COL. BLOOD.* G. White f. Ato. mezz. 
Col. BLOot); mezz. Kingsbury; Ato. 
Col. Blood; same plate reduced ; 8vo. 

■ • • 

Col. Blood ; own hair; neckcloth. 

This daring ruffian was notorious for seizing the person of the 
Duke of Ormond, with an intention to hang him at Tyburn, and 
for stealing the crown out of the Tower.f He was very near being 

* He was not of the rank of a colonel. 

t Blood, that wears treason in his face, 
Villain complete in parson's goum;^ 
How mnch he is at court in grace. 

For stealing Ormond and the crown ! 
Since loj^alty does no man good, 
Let's steal the king and outdo Blood. 

Rochester's "Hbtory of Insipids.*' 



^ His disguise wheA he stole the crown. 



16 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

lucoessful in both these enterprises : it was with no small difficulty 
that the duke escaped, and the crown was wrested from his hands. 
The cunning of this boldest of all thieves was equal to his intre- 
pidity. He told the king, by whom he was examined, that he had 
undertaken to kill him ; and that he went, with that purpose, to a 
place in the river where he bathed ; but was struck with so profound 
an awe upon sight of his (naked) majesty that his resolution failed 
him, and he entirely laid aside his design : that he belonged to a 
band of ruffians e(|ually desperate with himself, who had bound 
themselves by the strongest oa&s to revenge the death of any of 
their associates. Upon this he received the royal pardon, and had 
a handsome pension assigned him. He was now no longer con- 
sidered as an impudent criminal, but as a court favourite ; and ap- 
plication was made to the throne by the mediation of Mr. Blood.* 
Ob. 24 Aug. 1680. See the '' Biographia f see also the '' Life of 
Baxter ;" fol. part HI. p. 88 ; and Strype's Stow, book i. p. 94, 
edit. 1720, where we are told, as we are sJso in Carte's '^ Life of the 
Duke of Ormond,'' that this fellow, <* who thought small villanies 
below him," was the son of a blacksmith in Ireland. The best ac? 
count of stealing the crown extant is that in Strype's book : it was 
communicated to the editor by Edwards, keeper of the Regali^ tQ 
(3harles tlie Second. 

SIR HENRY MORGAN; Ato, 

Sir Hen. Morgan, Van Hove sc. 12mo, 

Sir Henry Morgan j small Ato. J. Cauljield, 

Captain Morgan, commonly called Sir Henry Morgan, the most 
infamous of all pirates, w^s the son of a substantial yeoipan in, 
Wales. His inclination leading him eaily to the sea, he entered into 

• Dr. Walter Pope, in his "Life of Bishop Ward,"t ^nforips us, "that Blood, 
being of a sudden become a great favourite at court, and the chief agent of the dis? 
senters, brought the bishop a verbal message from the king not to molest them ; upon 
which he went to wait on his majesty, and humbly represented to him, that there 
wens only two troublesome nonconformiists in his diocess, whom he doubted not, 
with his majesty's permission, but that he should bring to their duty : and then he 
named them. Theu are the very men, replied the king, you must not meddU with: to 
which he obeyed, letting the prosecution against them fall." 

t p. 69, 70. 



OF ENGLAND. 17 

\e sevvice of a master of a yessel bound for Barbadoes, who 
reacberously sold him soon after h^ landed on that shore. When 
le bad obtained his liberty^ he went to Jamaica to seek his fortune, 
iere be fell in with some freebooters, and entered on board one of 
lieir' ships ; and having displayed his courage on several occasions, 
le, in a short time, became a captain. He was afterward vice- 
aidmiral under Mansvelt, an old pirate of prime notoriety, who died 
soon after he engaged himself in his service. If the courage of 
Morgan had been properly directed, it would have done him the 
greatest honour : it was perhaps not inferior to that of Monck or 
Itppert ; and several of his stratagems were as extraordinary as his 
courage. But be was rapacious, cruel, and debauched, in the same 
degree that he wa^ valiant. The cruelties exercised on the Indians 
by the Spaniards were not equal to what that people suffered by his 
orders, to make them discover their hidden treasures, after he had 
taken and plundered their towns. The greatest of his exploits was 
taking Panama, which he burnt and pillaged, after he had, with 
twelve hundred men, defeated the governor, at the head of two 
squadrons of horse, four regipients of foot, and a great number of 
wild bulls, driven by Indian slaves.* One hundred and seventy-* 
five beasts of burden were laden with the gold, silver, ai^d other 
valuables which he took in that city. See a circumstantial account 
of him in the " History of the Buccaneers," to which is prefixed 
his head. 

" MRS. MARY DAVIS, of Great Saughall, near 

* A little before his expedition to Panama, he settled the following rewards for 
bis men, which were to be paid out of their first spoil : For the loss of both legs, fif- 
teen hundred pieces of eight, or fifteen slaves; for the loss of both hands, eighteen 
bandred pieces, or eighteen slaves ; for one leg, or one hand, six hundred pieces, or 
six slaves; and for an eye, one hundred pieces, or pne slave. — ^The character of 
Sir Henry Morgan appears in a much more favourable light in Edward's " History 
of the West Indies," vol, iii. p. 136, &c. ** This very man (who by the way acted 
under regular commissions and letters of reprisals from government), after he had 
quitted the sea, was recommended by the Earl of Carlisle to be his successor in the 
goveroiDent of Jamaica, and was accordingly appointed lieutenant-govenior, with 
tbehonour of knighthood, from King Charles II. and passed the remainder of his 
life on his plantation in Jamaica. By the kindness of a friend in that island, I have 
bad an opportunity of perusing some of Sir Henry Morgan's original private letters; 
)uui this I will say, that they manifest such a spirit of bumaoity, justice, liberality, 
and piety, as prove that he has either been grossly traduced, or that he was the 
■ greatest hypoaite living.*' 



18 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Chester, Anno 1668; ^tatis 74. Wh^n she was 
twenty-eight years of age, an excrescence grew upon 
her head, like to a wen, which continued thirty years, 
and then grew into two horns/' Done from the original 
paintings in the collection of the Honourable Sir Ham 
Shane, bart. h. sh. mezz. 

Mrs. Mary Davis. /. Caulfield. 

There is a print of this woman m Dr. Charles Leigh's ** Natural 
History of Lancashire, Cheshire, and the Peak of Derbyshire/* 1700; 
foL tab. VII. The inscription signifies that her portrait was taken in 
1668, in the 72d year of her age : that the excrescence continued 
thirty- two years before it grew into horns : that after four years she 
cast them ; then grew two more ; and in about four years she cast 
these also : that the horns which were upon her head in 1668^ were 
of four years' growth, and then loose. Her picture, and one of her 
horns, are in Ashmole's Museum. 

In the university library at Edinburgh is preserved a horn» which 
was cut from the head of Elizabeth Love, in the 50th year of her 
age. It grew three inches above her ear, and was growing seven 
years.* 

MOTHER LOUSE ; an old woman, in a ruff; David 
Loggan sc. very scarce. 

" Is it at me, or at my ruff you titter ? 
Your grandfather, you rogue, ne'er wore a fitter," &c. 

There are two copies of the same size. 
Mother Louse. J. Caulfield. 

This print, which is well executed, and much like the person repre- 
sented, gained the engraver a considerable share of his reputation. 
It was drawn from the life, at Louse Hall, an alehouse near Oxford, 
which was kept by this matron, who was well known to the gentle- 
men of that university, who called her Mother Louse. She was pro- 

• See a particular account of Mary Davis in " Phoenix Britanuicus/' 4to. p. 248 ; 
and of Elizabeth Love, in Sir Robert Sibbald's ** Scotia illustrata," pars i. p. 60. 



OF ENGLAND* 19 

Mbly the hM woman in England that wore a rofP!:— -Louse Hall 
teems to be now quite forgotten.* Kidney Hall, which a facedons 
andKH^f tells us was formerly a seminary, is well known. Cabbage 
Hall, which is said to have been built by a tailor, is in as good 
lepote as ever. 

MOTHER GEORGE, in the 1204 year of her age. 
M. Powell p. B. Lensf. h. sh. mezz. 

Mother George ; small 4to. Lydekker sc. 

Mother George, who was contemporary with Mother Louse, lived 
ia Black Boy Lane, and afterward in the parish of St. Peter's in 
the Bailey, at O2(ford« She retained the use of all her faculties to 
the age of a hundred and twenty years, and was much resorted to 
by company, from a motive of curiosity. She: used to thread a fine 
needle, as a proof of the goodness of her eye-sight, before her visit- 
ants, who generally gave her a gratuity towards her support She 
died from, the effects of an accidental fall that injured her back4 
A genuine picture of her was in the possession of Mr. George Hud- 
desford, late of New College, in Oxford, who, in pursuit of his ge- 
nius for painting, was under the instruction of Zoffanij, the celebrated 
Italian painter. 

MADAM CRESWEL. M. Lauron del P. Tempest 
txc. h. sh. One of the set of Cries.\ 

Mrs. Cre&well. M, Lauron; G. Barrett. 

I * There was a Loaie Hall in the neighbomhood of Brigewater-sqnare. 

tMr.T.W-. n. 

t See Wood's •* Life/' edit 2. p. 253, 254, where we are informed, that Mr. 
Shirie3r the Teme Fiiins of Trinity CoHege, in his speech, spolcen at Oxford, the 
Uth of July, 1673, made some reflections npon the studies and parsnits of Anthony 
Wood, the famous Odbrd antiquary, in which his malice and scurrility were much 
iQoie conspicuous than his wit. As the Latin edition of the " History and Anti- 
quities of the University of Oxford" was then preparing for the press, he said, among 
other things, that Wood " intended to put two old wives. Mother Louse and Mother 
Geoige, into his hook ; and that he would not let it be printed because he would 
M Imve it new and eommon, 

$ It is probable that some of the drawings for this set Of prints were taken 
>n the latter end of the reign of Charles II. as Mother Creswell is said to have been' 
<^ famous hatod of thirty years ago, in the " State Poems,^ printed 1705. See 
P* 555, notes. 



r. 



20 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORt 

This infamous woman was, from the natural effects of proBtitaiio& 
in faer youth, far advanced in the decline before she had arriyedat 
the meridian of her life. Her great experience in her former occu- 
pation qualified her for a procuress ; and she soon became an adept 
in all the diabolical arts of seduction. She lived in town in the 
winter, and sometimes/retired into the country, where she provided 
convenient lodgings for her customers, some of whom were penons 
of distinction. Though she appeared in her real character in the 
stews, she could assume a very decent behaviour upon proper occa- 
sions ; and frequently decoyed young unsuspecting girls to London, 
in hopes of preferment. She kept a very extensive correspondence, 
and was, by her spies and emissaries, informed of the rising beauties 
in different parts of the kingdom. The trade which she professed 
was perhaps carried to a greater height at this period than any other. 
This is plainly hinted at by a man of wit and pleasure, who some- 
times dealt with her : 

** To an exact perfection they have brought 
The action love, the passion is forgot"* |2 

Mother Ross, Mother Bennett, Mother Mosely, and Mother Beaii- 
lie,t flourished, or rather decayed, in this reign : but of thes^ 

* She desired, by will, to have a sermon preached at her funeral, for which tbe 
preacher was to have 101. ; but upon this express conditjon, that he was to say no^ 
thing but what was well of her. A preacher was, with some difficulty, found, who 
undertook the task. He, after a sermon preached on the general subject of mortality^ 
and the good uses to be made of it, concluded by saying, By the tnll of the deceaxd, 
it is expected that I should mention her, and say nothing but what was well of her, AS 
that I shall say of her therefore is this : She was born well, she lived well, and she died 
well; for she was' born with the name of Creswell, she lived in Clerkenwell, and she 
died in Bridewell. I have seen this story in print, with some spurious additions. 

Dr. Fuller, in his " Appeal of injured Innocence,''^ tells us, that " When one was 
to preach the funeral sermon of a most vicious and generally hated person, all woD' 
dered what he would say in his praise ; the preacher's friends fearing, his foes hoping 
that, for his fee, he would force his conscience to flattery. For one thing, said the 
minister, this man is to be spoken well of by all ; and for another thing, he is to be 
spoken ill of by none. The first is because God made him ; the second, because be 
is dead.'' 

^ t The dedication of the " Plain Dealer," which is an admirable piece of nSOmf 
on women of this character, is addressed to Madam B — , L e. Bennet. See " SpcC' 
tator," No. ^66, See also " Tatler," No. 84. 

X Betty Beaulie, a bawd of figure, lived in Durham-yard, in the Strand. Charles 
Maurice Tellier, archbishop and Duke of Rheims, who came to England, together 

$ Part iii. p. 75. 



OF ENGLAND. 21 

latrons we have no portraits. Nor have we any of Mother Need- 
am, Mother Rawlins, of Deptford, Mother Douglass,* Mother 
^tmeady Mother Ph — ^1 — ^ps, and several other mother strumpets, 
vho deserve to be remembered as well as Mother Creswell. 

MRS. RUSSEL, inscribed '' London Courtezan:' M. 
Lauron del. P. Tempest exc. In a tawdry scarf of flow- 
ered gauze: patches on her face: a mask in her right 
hand, and a fan in her left; h. sh. One of the set of 
Cries. 

Mrs. Russel. Lydekker sc. 8vo. 

Though the daughters were much more numerous than the mo- 
thers of iniquity, I have met with only the names of three of those 
who were contemporaries with Mrs. Creswell ; viz. Mrs. Russel, 
Mrs. Foster, and Betty Morrice.f. Oblivion is entailed on the ob- 
scene practices of these creatures, as well as rottenness on their 
bones. Their whole biography is contained in the six prints pub- 
lished by Mr. Hogarth. Few and evil are the days, or, to speak with 
precision, the nights of harlots. These harpies in borrowed plumes 
are birds of darkness, and appear at the same time with bats and 
owls. They were dispersed through every quarter of the town ; but 
Moorfields, Whetstone's-park, Lukener*s-lane, and Dog and Bitch- 
yard, were their capital seraglios.J 

« The trae original picture of MARY CARLETON, 
also called by the name of the German Princess ; as it 
was taken by her own order, in the year 1663." Jo. 
Ck. (Chantry) sc. Before her " Life,'' 1673 ; l2mo. 



^Ui Creqai, to treat concerning a marriage of the dauphin tvith the Lady Mary, 
daughter of the Dake of York, is said to have gone to her house. See Wood's 
"Life/' edit, 2. p. 263> 966, where therie are some verses m which this fact b men- 
tiwed. 

* Characterized in the ** Minor." 

1 The two last are mentioned in *• A Letter from Artemisia in the Town, to Chloe 
in the Country," by Lord Rochester. 

\ Manuscript State Poems, written in this reign, in the possession of the Dutchess- 
dowager of Portland. 

VOL. VI. E 



22 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Clavel, in his " Catalogue,*' mentions a narrative of her life, di^ 
ferent from this. 

Mart Carleton, called the German Princess; 
^. su(E 38. J. Caulfield. 

This woman, who had more aliases to her name than any rogue in 
the kingdom, was the daughter of a musician at Canterbury. Her 
first husband was a shoemaker of that city, from whom she eloped 
after four years' cohabitation. In a year or two after her elopement, 
she married one Day a surgeon, whom she soon forsook, and went 
into France and Germany, where she learned the languages of those 
countries, and robbed and cheated several persons. Soon after her 
return to England, she was married to John Carleton, the son of a 
citizen in London, who pretended to be a nobleman. This man, as 
well as many others, is said to have taken her for a German princess, 
at least a woman of quality. She was soon after tried at the Old 
Bailey, for bigamy, and acquitted : upon this she published an art- 
ful vindication of herself, to which was prefixed her portrait. Sh^ 
was afterward an actress in one of the theatres. The rest of hei 
life is a continued course of theft, robbery, and imposture ; in whicb 
as she had a quick invention, great cunning, and an insinuating ad 
dress, she was, perhaps, never exceeded. — If Mary Carleton ha< 
actually been a princess, she had parts sufficient to have thrown * 
kingdom into confusion ; and might have done as much mischief a 
Catharine de Medicis did in France, or Henrietta Maria in England 
Executed 1672. 

MOLL FLANDERS^^i«i«^, watch in her hand. 

Moll Flanders, an unfortunate female, although born in Newgate 
(from whence her mother was transported for theft), does not seem t4 
have had by nature any extremely vicious qualities. She was thre( 
times married ; once to a highwayman, but as they were deceived ii 
each other, they soon parted. At last she was transported for a theft 
with, her husband the highwayman. The latter part seemed th< 
most comfortable of their lives. She died in London near the ag< 
of 77, probably about 1680, as Dan. de Foe wrote her life in 1683 

MOTHER DAMNABLE, of Kentish Town, sit 
ting in a hovel by a fire, in a covering like a blanket 



OP CN6LANP. ^ 

% in. a scroll; two cats suspended^ md fastened Ah 
jr by the tail; twenty-two English verses/^ finely 
aved. In the collection of James Bindley^ esq. 

OTHER Damnable ;/r(w» the above. In Caul- 
s ^^ Remarkable Persons^ 1793. 

s not improbable that she was keeper of &e publtc-iiouse in 
>ad to Kentish Town, well-known as the sign of the Mother 
;ap. 

NNA MACALLAME, bome in the Orkneys in 
land, in the year 1615, being presented to the 
's majesty's sight, October, 1662. 

Tho' my portraicture seemes to be, 
A man's, my sex denies me so ; 
Nature has still variety, 
To make the world her wisdom know. . 

• MOTHER DAMNABLE. 

Y* have often seen (from Oxford t|pling-hoase) 

Th* effigies of Shipton faoM MotW Louse, 

Whose petty pranks (thongh some they might excel)^ 

With this old trot's ne'er gallop'd parallel; 

'Tis Mother Damnable! that roonsl'rous thing, 

UnmatchM by M acbeth's wayward women's ring. 

For cursing, scolding, fuming, fHnging fire 

I' th' face of madam, lord, knight, gent cit, s(^uire; 

Who (when but ruffled into the least pet), 

Will cellar-door key into pocket get. 

Then no more ale; and now the fray begins! 

Wace, heads, wigs, hoods, soarfe, shoalder9> sides, and shins! 

While these dry*d bones, in a Wcstphalian bag, 

(Through th* wrinkled weasan of her shapeless crag) 

Sends fortli such dismal shrieks and uncouth noise. 

As fills the town with din, the street with boys ; 

Which makes some think, this fierce she-dragon, fell. 

Can scarce be match'd by any this side hell. 

So fam'd, both far and near, is the renown 

Of Mother Damnable, of Kentish Town. 

Wherefore, this symbol of the cats we'll give her, 

Because, so curst, a dog would not dwell with her. 

uondon^ printed in the year 1676. • ' 



24 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

She is represented in a fur cap and a man's gotvti ; her 
beard is very large j and like an old man's; small h. sh. 

1 saw, in the year 1750, at the palace of St. Ildcfonso, in Spain, 
a portrait of a Neapolitan woman, with much such ano&er beard 
as Anne Macallame's. I also saw, about four years ago, a woman, 
at Rotherhithe, with a masculine beard. The largest of these is 
by no means comparable to that of Barbara Vanbeck, mentioned 
in the Interregnum. 

WILLIAM HOULBROOK ; small whole length, 
8vo. prefixed to a Narrative of his Sufferings, 1744. 

William Houlbroqk ; Svo. J. Caulfield. 

• f 

Comet Joyce, visiting Marlborough in 1 659, and having cause 
to suspect the sheriff of disaffection to the republican interest, dis- 
guised himself and followers, and passed for friends of Charles II. 
Having occasion for a farrier to shoe some of their horses, Houl- 
brook was applied to for tliat purpose ; being of a loquacious turn, 
and a friend to the royalists, he boasted so much of his conse- 
quence, that the party trepanned him to an adjacent village, se- 
cured his person, and conveyed him a prisoner to London, where he 
underwent many examinations before Bradshaw. Being found, 
however, more fool than knave, he was discharged on giving secu^ 
rity for his future behaviour. 

WILLIAM OXMAN, or Orsingham, preacher 
at the conventicles of the Fifth Monarchy Men, and 
seducer of libertines; captain of the seditious Ana- 
baptists and Quakers in the city of London, beheaded 
and quartered 19th Jan. 1661. From a unique prini 
in the collection of Alexander Hendras Sutherland, esq* 
F. S.A. Jt. S. Kir by exc. 8w. 

William Oxman was one of the deluded followers of Thomas 
Venner, the wine-cooper, and well-known Fifth Monarchy Man, in 
whose cause he rendered himself very conspicuous by disputing 
with and fighting the life-guards and trained bands, when Venner 
demanded, at Wood-street Compter, the prisoners to be let loose^ 



OF England: 26 

and i^r his leader was knocked down, he continued to fight along 
Wood-strtetand Cripplegate, to the Blue Anchor alehouse, by the 
Postern, where the party defended themselves most desperately, 
some being shot, and others taken. But the most singular instance 
of frantic enthusiasm, was in one James Ball, a small-qoal-man, 
who, although he was not engaged in the rencontre, after the execu- 
tion of those concerned, came forward, and publicly held a con- 
ventide on the same doctrine, and ceased not until he was appre- 
hended, tried, convicted, and executed at Tyburn Nov. 27, 1661 : 
some of his followers throwing themselves into the same sledge, 
and embracing him on his way to the gallows, so highly were these 
men esteemed, and held in veneration by those whom they deluded* 

BEAU WILSON; whole length , in a court dress, 
hat and feather j leaning against a pillar ; 4to. mezz. 

Beau Wilson; copied from the above. Sold hy 
Dicey ; 4to. 

' litis rery mysterious person was a younger brother of a respect- 
able family, and having through friends procured a commission in 
the army, went to serve in Flanders ; where he had not long con- 
tinued, before he was broke'for cowardice, and became so reduced in 
circumstances, as to accept forty shillings from a friend, to pay hia 
passage back to England. Here, within a short time after his arri* 
val,he appeared, to the astonishment of the public, the brightest star 
m the hemisphere : his coaches, saddle, hunting, and race-horses, 
equipage, dress, and table, were the admiration of the world, and 
Qontinued so while they saw him maintain such profuse an expense, 
without any visible means to support this glory. He never played, 
or but inconsiderably, entertained with profuseness all who visited 
him, drank himself liberally ; but at all hours, as well sober as 
otherwise, he kept a strict guard upon his words ; though several 
were either employed by the curiosity of others, or their own, to 
take him at his looser moments, and persuade hira to reveal his 
secret : but he so inviolably preserved it, that even their guesses 
were but at random, and witliout probability or foundation. He 
was not known to be an admirer of ladies ; and what added to the 
surprise, was, that he was at all times to be found, and ever with 
some of his own people, seemingly opeii in conversation, free from 
spleen or shagrin ; in a word, he had that settled air, as if he were 



20 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

tunuTed hk good fortuae would Gontinue for ever. One of his fiieotds 
ftd?i3ed him to purchase an estate while he had vieiiey : Mr. Wikoa 
thanked him, bat said, he did not forget the future in the preset^ : 
he was obliged to him for his counsel, but whilst he lived, it would 
be ever thus, for be was always certain to be. master of such a sum 
of money. This more and more confounded the world, for if they 
would say he derived his good fortune from the ladies, there was 
scarce any rich enough to support him,* neither did he bestow any 
of his time unaccounted for ; and it was not to be believed the 
fair sex would not exact attention and service for their money, 
especially for such considend[>le sums. Those who pretended to 
guess better, had recourse to chymistry, and said he had found the 
grand secret, and was master of that invaluable transmuting stone^ 
or powder, which could convert meaner metals into gold. Some 
blasted his reputation with the report, that he must once have 
robbed a Holland mail of a considerable quantity of rough dia- 
monds ; though another person suffered for the offence, denying the 
fact to the last. Others would have it, that the Jews kept him, 
with many other idle and ridiculous reports, which were circulated 
concerning him, until the time he was found killed, going to fight a 
duel with a Mr. Law, who it is reported ran him through the body, 
before he could draw his sword in his own defence. Mr. Wilson 
lived in unabated splendour to the last, and the mystery rather 
augmented than diminished, when a very inconsiderable sum of 
money being all that could be found after his death, left the world 
to conjecture from what source or funds he had derived means to 
support his state and magnificence. 

HALE THE PIPER ; 4to. In Caulfield's « Re^ 
inarkable Persons ;" slv English verses : 

Before three monarchs I my skill did prove,. 
Of many lords and knights I had the love; 
There's no musitian e'er did know the peer. 
Of Hale the Piper in fair Darbyshire ; 
The qonsequence in part you here may know. 
Pray look upon his hornpipe here below. 

J. N. 

* See R very tntcresting account of Beau Wilson's intrigue with a couft lacljr 
(su|iposed to be the Dutchess of Cleveland), in <' The Lady's Pacquet of Letters/* 
written by the Countess P'Aqnoia, 



OF ENGLAND. 27 



REMARKS ON DRESS. 

The Monmouth, or military cock of the hat, was much worn in 
this reigOy and continued a considerable time in fashion. 

The periwig, which had been long used in France, was intro- 
duced into England soon after the restoration. 

There is a tradition, that the large black wig which Dr. R. (aw- 
linson) bequeathed, among other things of much less consideration, 
to the Bodleian Library, was worn by Charles XL* 

Some men of tender consciences were greatly scandalized at 
this article of dress, as equally indecent with long hair; atid more 
culpable, because more unnatural. Many preachers inveighed 
against it in their sermons, and cut their hair shorter, to express 
their abhorrence of the reigning mode. 

It was observed, that a periwig procured many persons a respect, 
and even veneration, which they were strangers to before, and to 
which they had not the least claim from their personal merit. The 
judges, and physicians, who thoroughly understood this magic of 
the wig, gave it all the advantage of length, as well as size. 

The extravagant fondness of some men for this unnatural oma<^ 
meat is scarce credible : I have heard of a country gentleman who 
employed a painter to place periwigs upon the heads of several 
of Vandycks's portraits. 

Mr. Wood informs us, that Nath. Vincent, D. D. chaplain in 
ordinary to the king, preached before him at Newmarket, in a long 
periwig . and Holland sleeves, according to the then fashion for 
gentlemen; and that his majesty was so offended at it, that he 
commanded the Duke of Monmouth, chancellor to the university 
of Cambridge, to see the statutes concerning decency of apparel 
put in execution ; which was done accordingly .f 

* '* As to the king's more priyate ordering his family, in the beginning of October, 
1666, bis majesty, to promote frugality and decency in habit, and to discourage the 
extravagancy of French fashions, made a solemn and peremptory declaration of the 
fashion of bis apparel, which he resolved to Mrear for the future. It was strain 
Spanish breeches ; instead of a doublet, a long vest down to the mid-leg; and above 
Uiat a loose coat, after the Muscovite or Polish way ; the sword girt over the vest ; 
snd instead of shoes and stockings, a pair of buskins or brodekins. Which habit 
was found to be very decent and becoming to his majesty, and was for a considerable 
time ased and followed by the chief of his courtiers." — Eachard's " Hbtory of 
England," ii. p. 836. 
t " Athen, Oxon." u. coi. 1033. 



28 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

The satin cap was no longer worn, and the formal screwed-ap 
face was, for the most part, chained for a more natural and uncon* 
strained aspect* 

The lace neckcloth became in fashion in this, and continued to 
be worn in the two following, reigns. 

Open sleeves, pantaloons, and shoulder knots, were also worn 
at this period, which was the era of shoe-buckles : but ordinary 
people, and such as affected plainness in their garb, continued for 
a long time after, to wear strings in their shoes. 

The clerical habit which, before it is grown rusty, is a very 
decent dress, seems not to have been worn in its present form 
before the reign of Charles Il.f 

The ladies' hair was curled and frizzled with the nicest art, and 
they frequently set it off with heartbreakers.t Sometirties a string 
of pearls, or an ornament of riband, was worn on the head ; and, in 
the latter part of this reign, hoods of various kinds were in fashion. 

Patching and painting the face, than which nothing was more 
common in France, was also too common among the ladies in Eng- 
land.§ But what was mucb worse, they affected a mean betwixt 
dress and nakedness ; which occasioned the publication of a book, 
entitled *' A just and seasonable Reprehension of naked Breasts 

* Dr. Eachard tells us, that we had a great plenty of religiouifaee'mahers in the late 
nealous time8,\\ ** Then it was/' says lie, " that godliness chiefly consisted in the 
management of the eye ; and he that had the least pupil was the most righteous, 
because most easily concealed by the rolling white. Then it was that they would 
scarce let a round-faced man go to heayen ; but if he had but a little blood in his 
cheeks his condition was counted rery dangerous i and it was almost an iniaiiible 
sign of absolute reprobation." Nothing is more certain than that black satin caps, 
tipped and edged with white, were then worn by some divines to give au appear- 
ance of languor and mortification to the countenance. 

It has been gravely asserted by some presbyterian writers that the cloak is apos- 
tolical, as we read that St Paul left his cloak at Tn)as.1[ But^ for this very reason, 
it may be concluded, that he did not constantly preach in it. 

t As to the form of the ancient clerical habit, see in Jo. Johnson's " Collection of 
Ecclesiastical Laws,*' &c. the second constitution of Archbishop Stratford, in 1343. 

Thiers, in his " Treatise of Perukes," informs us, that no ecclesiastics wore a 
band** before the middle of the last ceutury, or a peruke before the restoration. . 

X Artificial curls. 

§ See the prologue to Lee's " Lucius Junius Brutus." 

I Works, vol. i. p. 151, 153, edit. 1774. 
% See '* Scotch Presbyterian Eloquence," 4to. p. 80. 

** The clerical band, which was first worn with broad lappets, apparently had its 
origin from the falling band, which is divided under the ohin. 



OF ENGLAND. 29 

ind Shoulders, with a Preface by Richard Baxter." — I scarce ever 
see a portrait of a lady by Sir Peter Lely, but I think of the follow- 
Qg passage of Seneca : " Video sericas vestes, si vestes vocandse 
sunty in quibus nihil est quo defendi aut corpus, aut denique 'pudor 
)ossit: quibus sumptisy mulierparum liquido nudam se non esse 
urabit."* 

It appears from the '^ Memoires de Grammont," that green stock- 
ings were worn by one of the greatest beauties of the English court. 

If any one would inform himself of the dresses worn by our 
ancestors, he should make his observations in country churches, 
in the remote parts of the kingdom ; where he may see a great 
variety of modes of ancient standing. It is not unusual among 
people of the lower classes, for a Sunday coat to descend from 
father to son ; as it is put on the moment before the wearer goes 
to church, and taken off as soon as he returns home. I have seen 
several old women in beaver hats, which I have good reason to 
believe were made in the reign of Charles the Second.t 

• Seneca. De Benef. 7, 9. 

t If the reader be particalarly inquisitive into the English dress, at different 
periods, I would refer him to Barrington's *' Observations upon the Statates/' the 
third edit. 1769, pag. 217, note 383 : Heame's '* Occasional Remarks," at the 
ndoT RopePs <' Life of Sir Thomas More,'* p. 271 : *' Philosophical Transactions," 
No. 475. p. 237 : Holinshed's " Chronicle," vol. i. second edit. p. 171 : " Of their 
iipparel and Attire," being chap. 7, of " The Description of England :" Dugdale's 
" Qrigines Juridiciales," cap. 64. under the head of " Orders for Government : 
Adndttances," &c. Samuel Butler's " Genuine Remains," vol. i. p. 323, but espe- 
QtUj to Hall's « Chronicle/' and to the tract on appareli in Camden's " Remains." 



VOL. VI. F 



30 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



APPENDIX 



TO 



THE REIGN OF CHARLES H 



FOREIGN PRINCES, KNIGHTS OF THE 

GARTER, &c. 

BERNARD DE FOIX, de la Valette, Due d'Es 
pernon. Mignard p. P. Van Schuppen sc. I66I : moti 
of the Garter about his arms ; h. sh. 

Bernard de Nogaret de Foix, duke of Espernon and Valett 
knight of the orders of St. Michael and of the Holy Ghost, wa 
in April, 1 66 1, installed knight of the Garter.* He was descende 
from one of the most illustrious families in France, and added gre: 
lustre to his house. The reader is referred for a particular accoui 
of him, to <' The Life of the Duke of Espernon, Englished b 
Charles Cotton, esq." and published in folio, 1670. 

CAROLUS XL Suec. Got. et Vaad. rex; 4to. 
Charles XL la. fol. R.White; 1683. 

Charles XL king of Sweden, was son of Charles Gustavu 
cousin and successor to the famous Christina. He succeeded 1 
the crown in 1660, and was invested with the ensigns of the Gart 
by Charles Howard, earl of Carlisle, and Henry St. George, es< 

* He was tbe last kni^t elected in the reiga of Charles L ia which his portn 
may be placed. 



OF ENGLAND. 31 

Richmond herald. He was a good tfoldier; of which he gave 
some signal proofs in his wars with the Danes, the Marquis of Bran. 
denburgh, and the Duke of Brunswick Lunenburg. He was a 
prince of great penetration, frugality, and industry ; but proud, 
selfish, and tyrannical. He deprived the senate of the share in the 
government which they had formerly possessed, and erected an' 
arbitrary court called ** the Chamber of Liquidations,*' by which 
multitudes of his subjects were reduced to extreme poverty and 
distress. His haughty and severe treatment of his queen, who was 
one of the best of women, threw her into a distemper that hastened 
her death. He died the 1 5th of April, 1687, and was succeeded 
by his son Charles XII. The queen-regent, his mother, buried 
him with more pomp than had been seen in Sweden, and obliged 
her subjects to mourn for him three years. 

Christian, king of Denmark, and Frederick. William, marquis of 
Brandenburg, sumamed the Great, were^also elected knights of the 
Garter, in this reign. 

There is a very characteristic print of the Great Elector by 
Masson. 

COSMUS III. magnus dux Etruriee, &c. Tern- 
pestiy FlorentinuSy del. 17 17* /. Simon f. k. sk. 

CosMus IIL &c. Plass ; A. Haelwegh ; folio. 

Cosmo de Medicis(or Medices), prince of Tuscany, having made 
the tour of Spain and France, came into England in the beginning 
ofthe year 1669, where he was treated with great ceremony and 
respect, especially by the two universities. He was shewn what- 
ever was curious, and visited several persons of rank and eminence, 
particularly Mr. Hobbes, who made him a present of his works, 
together with his picture; and the same year, dedicated to him 
Wsbook, " De Quadratura Circuli." — In 1670 be succeeded his 
father, Ferdinand II. in the dukedom. He married Margaret 
Uuise, daughter to Gaston John Baptist, of France, duke of 
Orleans ; by whom he had two sons, and one daughter, namely, 
Ferdinand, John Gaston, and Mary Magdalen. 

JEAN FRANCOIS PAUL DE GONDI, cardinal 
deRetz, &c. Duflos sc. asmallh.sh. This has been 



32 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

copied for the Amsterdam edition of his '^ Memoirs! 
There is also a head of him by Nantueil. 

Jeax Francois Paul de Gondi, &c. V. Schup- 
pen; 1662. 

The Cardinal de Retz, who, in the early part of his life, affected t( 
be the beau, the gallant, and the duellist, entered into holy order 
with reluctance, and purely in obedience to the commands of hi 
father. He was a man of an insinuating address, persuasive elo 
qtience, and vehement thirst of power. Many of the greatest mei 
and women in France were the tools of his wanton ambition, ant 
helped to place him at the head of a faction that expelled Mazarin 
from the kingdom. He proceeded so far as to set a price upon hi 
head. But his triumph was of short duration : his great and lofb 
spirit was presently humbled, and Mazarine triumphed in his turi: 
He was, in the latter part of his life, after the fervour of his passion 
had spent itself, a truly good and amiable character. He ha 
drawn his own portrait in his " Memoirs," which are numbered witl 
the classic writings of his age and country.* The Earl of Claren 
don informs us, that he was so ingenuous as to tell Charles II. tha 
if he changed his religion, he would never be restored to his king 
doms.f Yet it is sufficiently evident that he applied to the pop' 
in that prince's behalf, to entreat his holiness to lend him sonx 
assistance towards his restoration.]: It is certain that the cardina 
was in England incognito, soon after that fortunate event.§ 01 
Paris. Aug. 24, 1679 ; ^t. 66. 



* Voltaire speaks thus of tbo author and his work : " Get bomme singuller s'es 
peint lui-mdme, dans ses memoires ecrits, avec un air de grandear, nne impetuosii 
de gcuifi, et une inegalit^, qui sont Timage de sa conduite." Siecle de Louis XI V 
vol. i. p. 61. 

t Clarendon, iii. p. 512. 

t See the Series of Letters in Carte's " Life of the Duke of Ormond," vol. ii 
p. 118, et seq. 

$ Burnet, i. p. 194. 



Of ENGLAND. - 33 



AMBASSADORS, TRAVELLERS, &c. 

HANNIBAL SEHESTED ; a small head. A. F. 
(olkema)f. in Hofman. 

Hannibal Sehested, lord of Tybierg, and grand treasurer of Den- 
marky is celebrated in the history of that country, for his valour and 
conduct as a general, and his knowledge, ability, and address, as a 
statesman and ambassador. In the reign of Christian IV. he was, 
for his eminent services, rewarded with the vice-royalty of Norway, 
where he led the king's forces against the Swedes, with such signal 
success, that this war is in the annals of Denmark distinguished by 
the appellation of The War o/HannibaL In the reign of Frederic III. 
he, for secfet reasons, was deprived of his government of Norway, 
forbidden to appear at court, and degraded from his rank ; and the 
bulk of his fortune was confiscated. In 1655, he retired with his 
family to Antwerp, where he entered into the service of Charles 11, 
who employed him in several negotiations.* He was afterward 
taken prisoner by the Swedes, and was some time with their army 
which was to act against Denmark. During his captivity, he did 
Frederic such eminent service, that, when a peace was concluded 
with Sweden, he was received by him with open arms, and perfectly 
reinstated in his confidence and favour. He was afterward sent in 
quality of ambassador extraordinary to the courts of England and 
France. 06. 1666. 



MARCUS GIOE, conseiller prive, &c. Yver sc. 
1744 ; in Hofman. 

Mark Gioe, lord of Brahesborg, who had formerly visited Eng- 
land as a traveller, was sent hither as an ambassador from Denmark, 
in the reign of Charles the Second. He was afterward employed 
in the same character, at the courts of France and Spain. During 
his residence in England, which was about ^even years, he became 
enamoured with Elizabeth Mary Thomson, a lady of distinguished 
beauty, wit, and modesty, whom, in 1676, he espoused, but left no 

* Seven of hia letters are at the end of the first volume of Thurloe*s "State 
Papers." 



34 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

issue by her. This polite scholar and able minister died in 1698. 
He left several poems^ speeches, and memoirs of his embassies, in 
manuscript. Some of his writings are in print : the most con- 
siderable is his ^' Disputatio de optime^ gerendee Reipublicee For- 
ma/' Seroe, 1653 ; 4to, 



JOHANNES FREDERICUS A FRIESENDOREF, 

Baronettus Angliae, Liber Dominus in Heerdicke, Do- 
minus in Kyrup, Eques auratus, S. R. M. SueciaB Con- 
siliarius, et ad S. ll. M. Magnae Britanni^e Extraordi- 
narius Ablegatus, Plenipotentiarius, &c. P. Williamsen 
sc. h, sh, 

H AMET, &c. ambassador from the King of Morocco, 
1682. iJ. White sc. large h. sh. 

Ha MET, &c. ambassador from the King of Morocco; 
mezz. J. Lloyd ; scarce. 

Ha MET, &c. mezz, E.Lutterel. 

His portrait, by Kneller, is at Chiswick. The horse and back- 
ground were painted by Wyke. 

Hamet, ambassador extraordinary from the King of Morocco and 
Fez, made his public entry through London the 5th of January^ 
1681-2 ; had his public audience on the 11th,* and a private audi- 
ence of the king on the 17th of the same month. On the 30th of 
May following, he was entertained at Oxford. About the same 
time he dined with Mr. Ashmole, who made him a present of a 
magnifying-glass. On the 14th of July, he took his leave of his 
majesty ; and on the 23d of the same month, embarked for his own 
country. 



* Sir John Reresby infonns us, that this ambassador was admitted to his audience 
with more than ordinary ceremony ; as the king was of opinion, that a coromerc< 
established with Morocco would be very advantageous to the kingdom. " The am 
bassador's present, says that author, consisted of two lions, and thirty ostriches, a 
which his majesty laughed ; and said, he knew nothing more proper to send by waj 
of return than a flock of geese/' — *' Memoirs," 4to. p. 75, 76. 



OF ENGLAND; 35 

PUNGEARON NIA PARA, ambassador from the 
King of Bantam, 1682. Overton; (vend.) h. sh. 

The Ambassador Extraordinary from the King of 
Santam, with a boy holding an umbrella over his head. 
Jt. Preek exc. h. sh. mezz. 

PuxGEARON NiA Paea, &c. with Kaja Nebbe; 
^nezz. E. LuttereL 

PuNGEARON NiA Paba, &c. with KajaNebbe; by 
-Nic. Yeates. 



KAIA NEBBE (or Keay Nabee), &c. Catktt sc. 
V)hole length ; \2mo. 

Keay Nabee, ambassador from the King of Suro- 
soan, formerly called Bantam. Printed for William 
Davis, 1682. 

Two of the Bantam ambassadors. Lutterelf. large 
ito. mezz. 

Two of the Bantam ambassadors. H. Peart Pictor; 
Nic. Yeates sc. 1682 ; large h. sh. 

Kaja Nebbe, &c. mezz. R. Preek exc. 

Kaja Nebbe, &c. R. White sculp. 

Kaja Nebbe, &c. with inscription in the English 
and Bantam languages ; tux) slaves holding spears, and 
umbrella over his head. Delineata per H. Peart ; P. N. 
Yeates and T. Collins sculp, sheet; rare. 

The portraits here described, represent the two principal of the 



36 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

eight* Bantam ambassador8,t who arrived in the port of Loiido^ 
the 28th of April, 1682, attended by a train of aboat thirty persors^ 
On the 9th of the following month, they made their public entry 
On the 13th they went to Windsor, and had their audience the ne:?^^ 
day. On that day month, they took their leave of the king : wh^i 
Pungearon Nia Para, and Keay Nabee, were knighted, and had tl3.< 
swords given them with which the honour of knighthood was cotx- 
ferred. The English East-India company, had, at this time, a facto x^ 
at Bantam ; but the king of that place was deposed, ^d the factoir^ 
expelled by the Dutch, in the next reign. 

PETER JOHN POTEMKIN, ambassador from the 
czar of Muscovy, 1682. R. White sc. large h. sh. 

Peter John Potemkin, &c. mezz. KneHeVyA. B. 

This envoy had his audience of the king the 16th of November, 
1682. Mention is made, in the '' Memoires de Grammont," of 
seven or eight Muscovite ambassadors, who had audience at court 
some years before. The state of commerce between England and 
Muscovy, in the beginning of this reign, may be seen in the Earl 
of Carlisle's Embassy, printed in Harris's ^' Voyages.** 



"WILHELMUS CURTIUS, Eques, Baronettus, 
Prolegatus in Germania/' 



Sir William Curtius,, with armsy in an oval. 
M. Rosa pinxit. W. Richardson. 

WiLHELMUs Curtius, Eques, Baronettus, a M. 



• See "The Hi»torian*s Guide," p. 14S. 

t Drjdeii» in bis poem addressed to Sir Godfrey Kneller, where he mentioiis un- 
couth Gothic figures, paiuted without knowledge of the dare obscure, has, in the 
following Hoes* described the persons of these ambassadors, of whom he was a 
spectator: 

Flat fiices, sodi as would disgrace a screen. 
Such as in Bantam's embassy were seen, 
Unraised, unrounded, were the rude delight 
Of bmtal nations onJy bom to fight. ' 






'» 






V 










.Sir William Curtius. 



OF ENGLAND. 37 

Britanniarum Rege, per 19 Annos continuos, in Ger- 
mania, Prolegatus. M. H. M. Rosa p. Thelott fecit, 
whiskers^ grey hair. ' 

The print, which is thus inscribed, may be placed here, or in the 
hterregnum. 

Sir William Curtius, who was created a baronet the 2d of April, 
1652, by Charles IL* was probably an envoy from Sweden to that 
prince daring his exile. It is certain, that he was, in this reign,f 
dected a fellow of the Royal Society. 

CORNELIUS VAN TROMP ; inscription in manu- 
^^ript;^ large h. sk. 

Admiral Tromp, kn\ and bar\ Lely p. Sold by 
Browne; mezz. 

■ ■ . ■ . 

CoRirEi:.ius Van Tbomp. P. Lely; A. Blooteling, 
le76;kt.fol. 

CoBKEUus Van Tromp ; hat and feather ; mezz. 
f,G6k. 

GoBKELius Vak Tromp. F. Boll ; L. Visscher; 
hea. 

G0BNXLIU8 Van Tromp. V. Eckhout; Goulds^ 

Cornelius Van Tromp. R. de Hooghe; sheet. 
Cornelius Van Tromp. Houbraken; 6vo. 
Cornelius Van Tromp. J. Munnekhuysen. 

Cornelius Van Tromp ; four Dutch lines, 1786; 
l^ge 4to: 

Cornelius Van Tromp was son of the famous Martin Van Tromp, 
who was shot through the heart with a musket ball, in an engage- 

• " Baronetage," ▼. p. t68, edit. 1741. t October 3, 1677. 

VOL. VI, O 



33 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Jaly%9, ment with Monck. He did not at all degenerate from his heroie 
1653. father, who seemed to live over again in his no less heroic son. In 
the first engagement with the English, in 1665, he continued to fight 
after several of the Dutch admirals were killed, and fought retreat- 
ing. In the battle between the English and French^ and the Dutch 
fleets, in 1672^ De Ruyter went to his assistance, after he had 
shifted his flag to four different ships. This put an end to the ani- 
mosity which had before subsisted betwixt these great commanders. 
His father never fought or acted more like a hero, than he did in 
that memorable engagement with Sir Edward Spragge, on the 11 th 
of August, 1673.* He was created an English baronet 25 March, 
1674. 

JOHANNES HEVELIUS, consul of Dantzick, in 
Poland, a celebrated astronomer, F. R. S. 

Joannes Hevelius, i. e. Hevelke; mezz. J^ 
Faber. 

Joannes Hevelius. Juvenhusen; J, Falcke. 

John Hevelius ytzs born at Dantzic^ in 1611. He studied under 
Peter Crugerius, and in 16^0, set out on his travels, which took up 
four years. On. his return to Dantzic he built an observatory, which 
he furnished with instruments, and he made some excellent telle- 
scopes himself. With these he directed his attention chiefly to the 
moon, whose phases and spots he noted with accuracy ; after which 
he published the result of his observations, in a work entitled 
*' Selenographia, sive Lunce descriptio ;'' folio, 1647. He was 
author also of several other learned and useful works. Ob, Jan. 21, 
1687. 



CHRISTIANUS HUYGENS, de Zulichem, &c. Mo. 
Chrjstianus Huygens; fol. F. Ottens.. 

. Christian Huygens, who applied himself to the mathematics frotft 
his infancy, exhibited a wonderful specimen of his genius in hi* 

^ - 

• See the article of Spragoi, Class VII. 



OF ENGLAND. 39 

obV entitled, ** Theoremata de Qaadratura Hypeil>6le8, Ellipsis, 

tCireiili, exdato Portionum Grovitatis Centro;" 1651. I^ 1657, 

le imFtnted the clock^ndiilum, of which he published an account ; 

18 he did also of the use of clocks, in the discovery of the longitude; 

In 1059, came forth his ^' Syste^a Saturnium.'' He, by the help 

of hit brother Constantine, brought telescopes to a much greater 

perfection than any astronomer had done before him. He was also 

a great improyer of the air-pump. In 1660, he came into England, 

where he was chosen fellow of the Royal Society. In 1663, he was 

bvited to Paris by Lewis XIV. who appointed him a handsome 

6tipei)d. He continued at Paris from 1666 to 1681, where he had 

a noble apartment near the royal library. He grew insane some 

years before his death, of which he discovered the ifirst symptoms 

by playing with a tame sparrow, and neglecting his mathematical 

studies.* He died at the Hague, June 8, 1695, in the 67th year 

of bis age, while his famous book of the Plurality of Worlds 

was printing.f See Ward's ** Lives of the Gresham Professors,** 

p.l79. 

MARGELLUS MALPIGI, &c. Before his ''Opera 
fosthuma,'^ two volumes, folio. 

Marcellus Malpigi, a very eminent physician and naturalist of 
Bol(^a, was a great improver of science. He was elected an 
lionorary member of the Royal Society, the 4th of March, 1668-9. 
He was author of various anatomical treatises ; he also wrote ** De 
Fonnatione Pulli in Ovo," Lond. 1673. " De Bombyce," &c. He 
and the excellent poet Vida illustrate ^ach other on the last men- 
tioned subject. A collection of his works, in two volumes folio, 
with cuts, was published at Lond<», 1686. Ob. 1694, M. 67. 

ANTHONY VAN LEEUWENHOEK ; mezz. Ver- 
kolie ad vivuniy 1686. 

Anthony Van Leeuwenhoek ; oval. Verkolie; 
4. de Bkis ; Ato. 



• Lister's " Journey to Paris," p. 110, 

1 lliere is exceUeiit reasoning from analogy in this book. 



40 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

. Anthony Van Leeuwenhoek was bom at Delft, in 1632, and die 
in 1733. He was celebrated for his microscopical improvemen 
and discoyeries, the particulars of which were published in tl 
'' Philosophical Transactions,'' and the ^* Memoirs of the Acadeiz 
of Sciences." His works haVe been translated into English, j 
three vols, quarto. 

"CAROLUS JOANNES KONINGSMARK, come 
in Westerwicky et Stegholm ; dominus in Rotembourg 
et Neuhousen ; et in exercitu regis Christianismi, Gei 
manonim legionis dux," 8cc. M. Dahl p. i. Cossin Si 
Ato. 

" Charles John, lord Koningsmark, &c. who wa 
tried and acquitted from being an accessary to th 
murder of Thomas Thynne, esq. the 21st of Februarj 
1682." R. White sc. 1682 ; large h. sh. 

Charles John, count Koningsmark, &c. mez*' 
M. Dahl; J. Smith. 

Charles John, lord Koningsmark, &c. W. Ricl 
ardson. 

Count Koningsmark was a native of Dresden, in Saxony, and tl 
youngest of several sons, though he assumed the titles of the eldes 
He served in the army, hoth in France and Italy, hefore he cam 
into England ; where his handsome person and genteel addres 
soon rendered him acceptahle to the ladies. He was a great fre 
quenter of the Dutchess of Mazarine's, where he won considerabl 
sums at play, at which he was remarkably dexterous. He sough 
the Lady Elizabeth Ogle, heiress of the house of Northumberland 
in marriage ; and is supposed to have suborned three assassins 
Uratz, Borosky, and Stem, to murder Thomas Thynne, esq. t 
whom she was contracted. William, earl of Devonshire, who wa 
firmly persuaded of his guilt, sent him a challenge soon after bi 
trial, which he accepted. They agreed to fight on the sands < 
Calais, but the count never met his adversary. He is said to ha' 
been killed in a quarrel in Hungary, in 1686, in the 3 1st year 







^.?^- £&r^ A- 






\ 



OF ENGLAND. 41 

\aM age ; but we are, with more probability, informed^ that when 

King George II. made some alterations in his palace at Hanover, 

his body was found under a floor.* The three assassins were hanged 

in Pall^oBaU, March 10, 1681-2. Uratz, a weak man, said, that he 

befiefvd God would forgive him, in consideration of his being a 

SEAN BAPnSTE DE SEIGNELAY, &c. Des- 

■r 

** ' _■ ■ 

JkAir- Baptists deSeignelat, &c. Mignard; 
If. EdeHncki in FerrauU's " Horn. Illustr 1700. 

1 i • • ^ ..- 

J||l|giiBAFTisTB D£ S£iGN£LAT,&c. DeLarmessiui 
*"* W BAPTiaTE DE Seignelay, &c. a. Bloem; 

jnilHt Baptist Colbert, marquis of Seignelay, eldest son of the 
gntlCkAyert, was formed under his father, and succeeded him in 
flMt^BMrtHBt office of secretary of state, to which he seemed en- 
titliM mn'his natural and acquired abilities. Before he was pre- 
fened to Ais office, he paid particular attention to the marine, which, 
mjfsr.Jbis management, became respectable, at least, throughout 
KyvqJM^ One of the first and most memorable of his exploits was 
the^boinbaTding of Genoa, upon a false and frivolous pretence of 
I^npu.'JUV. This is one of those actions which impartial posterity 
Jlj^ weigh in the same equitable scale with the invasion of the 
United Provinces and the burning of the Palatinate, and conse- 
fUmOy regard it with horror and detestation.| He particularly 
himself at the battle of Bantry Bay,§ in which the £ng- 



'/'^H&ii obrioos to obierre here, that his sister, the beautifal Coantess of Koningii- 
irfik mistros to Augustas IL king of Pulaud, by whom she was mother of the 



.BCsnhal Saxe. 

vas nacb laiighed att but it seems to be no veiy uncommon sophism. 
X I have heard it remarked, by several persons who have lately seen tlie Palati- 
nate, that it is one of the must melancholy scenes of devastation that they ever be- 
held. Upon tliis spot, at least, every humane traveller must curse the memory of 
Lewis Uie Fourteenth. 

§ In the reign of William III. 



42 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

fish fleet was defeated. He afkenraid fanned a project of bunuog 
the English shqis in their prnts, and flattered himself that he should 
hare the gloij of fixing King James on ihe throne; bat illness pie- 
Tented his embarkation with the fleet commanded by Tonrnlle, 
which, when King William was in Ireland, spread terror tfaronghoot 
the kingdom.* Seignelaj was foil of indignation at the ill success 
of his project, which was soon after effisctnally defeated by the de- 
cisiTe Tictorj gained bj fbe English fleet at La Hogne. He died 
of a consmnpdon, at Versailles, in 1690, aged thirty-nine years. 
He is mentioned here as baring been in England in the course of 
his trayels, in the reign of Charles IL 



PHILIBERT, comte de Grammont T. Chambers 
sc. 4to. engraved far the new edition of the " JHenwires 
de Gramnumt^ printed at Strawberry-hill: from an 
authentic portrait in the collection of Mr. Walpole. It 
was copied, by a good hand, from the original at the grand 
AugustinSj at Paris j where are heads of all the knights 
of the Holy Ghost. 

Philibert, comte de Grammont ; in " Memoirs of 
Grammontf 1809; %vo. 

The Count de Grammont, who had served as a yolunteer under 
the Prince of Cond^, and Turenne, came into England about two 
years after the restoration. He was under a necessity of leaving 
France, as he had the temerity to make his addresses to a lady to 
whom Lewis XIV. was known to have a tender attachment. H^ 
possessed, in a high degree, every qualification that could render 
him agreeable to the English court. He was gay, gallant, and per- 
fectly well bred ; had an inexhaustible fund of ready wit, and told 
a story with inimitable grace and humour. Such was his vivacity, 
that it infused life wherever he came ; and, what rarely happens, it 
was so inofiensive, that every one- of the company appeared to be as 
happy as himself. He had great skill and success in play, and 
seems to have been chiefly indebted to it for his support. Several 
of the ladies engaged his attention upon his first coming over ; but 

* Dairy mple's " Memoirs," p. 428, &c. 



OF ENGLAND. 43 

Ae amiable Mrs. Hamilton^ whom he afterward married, seems to 

hm been the only woman who had the entire possession of his 

ikeart. His elegant '' Memoirs" were written from his own infor- 

Otttion by Count Hamilton/ and probably in much the same Ian- 

j^uage in which they were related. 

CAROLUS PATIN, Doct. Med. Par. Numismatum 
Impp. Interpres egregius. 

CflBsareos qui non patitur vanescere vultus, 

Effigie notus'debuitesse sua: 
Hie est qui geminas Phoebi complectitur artes ; 

Arte juvat Musas, et levat arte febres. 

" Franc. Ogerius." 

A. Masson sc. h. sh. 

Carolus Patin ; l2mo. Fabure; J. Boulanger. 

CaroLus Patin ; M. 30, 1663. Le Febure ad 
vivum. 

Carolus Patin. F. Gucht; prefixed to his " Tra- 
veU;' 1696. 

Carolus Patin ; 8vo. J. L. Durant ad vivum. 

Charles son of Guy Patin, doctor of physic at Paris, was an emi- 
int physician and antiquary. He was one of the most considerable 

ittdalists of his age, and a lover and collector of portraits. He 
^ iMois to have entertained as strong prejudices against the English, 

'toys &ther did if he scarce mentions them in his '' Travels," though 

^ k'vui certainly in England, but for breaking one another's heads 

> iiplayiiig at cudgels.t He died at Padua, where he was professor 

'it pimic, the 28th of October, 1 693. He was author of << Thesau- 
[Iptjffifkuiiliatum,'' 4to. *' Numismata Imperatorum Romanorum," 

[fiL ^ FalI^UiBe Romanee,*' which is also in folio ; '' An Introduction 

^Uithe History of Medals ;" "Historical Relations;" "A Treatise 

r Vcoifibustible Turf," &c. 

* Brother-in-law to the Count de Grammont. 
' t See the note to the article of Uarcourt, in the Appendix to the reign of 
Qiarles L 

X English Translation of his " Tra¥els/* p. 280. 



44 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

JEAN DE LA FONTAINE, de Facademie Fran- 

coise. Hiacinte Rigauli (ou Rigaud)p. Edelinch sc. 

Jean DE la Fontaine. Hiacinte Rigault p, FiC" 
quet sc. highly finished ; l2mo. copied from Edelinch 

Jean de la Fontaine. H. Rigaud; J. G. WUle* 

Monsieur de la Fontaine was certainly in Enghmd, and, I belief^) 
in the reign of Charles XL He is well known for his Fables and 
Tales, which abound with elegance and native humour. He is not 
free from obscenity ; but it is far from being of the grossest kind. 
Though his genius was truly comic, it was not adapted to the stage. 
He wrote one comedy, which had no success in the action ; and, 
what is worse, was universally thought to have deserved none. He 
was very awkward at displaying his talent in conversation. He coold 
easily disco? er other men's characters, though they could not see 
his ; and often laughed inwardly at the fools that laughed appar- 
ently at himself. Ob. 1695, M. 74. 

DANIEL GEORGE MORHOF. C. Fritzch sc. 
Before his " Polyhistor;' 1732 ; Ato. 

Daniel George Morhof, a celebrated German writer, who is by 
Menage styled the best poet of his country, was in England in tit 
reign of Charles the Second.* His learning was exte&sivei 1«! 
judgment sound, and his taste perfectly re^ed. Few have beeftfl« 
well acquainted with the various parts of learning, with the medMip 
of attaining them, and the authors ancient and modern, who kail 
written with approbation and applause on the different branches if 
science. This is abundantly exemplified in his methodical, dabor 
rate, and well-written work, entitled *^ Polyhistor Literarius, FU« 
losophicus, et Practicus," in three tomes. The first was publishflA 
in 1687; the other two after his decease. The third e^tion vfl^ 
printed in 4to. in 1732; and the fdurth in 1747. It is worth dip 
reader's while to see what John Albert Fabricius says of this anlholf 
in his second preface to the third edition of the <' Polyhistor.'^ * 

GREGORIUS LETI, historicus, &c. J. Gole sc. 4to. 

i 

• Birch's " History of the Royal Societj," vol. ii. p. 450. 



OF ENGLAND. 45 

This print, which may be placed here as a memorial 
ofhimy was done in the reign of William III. It is in 
his " Poema Hero-estorico.''* 

Greg. Leti, M. 63, 1693 ; 8vo. 

Gregorio Leti, a native of Milan, came into England in the reign 
of Charles II. by whom he was graciously received. He had a pro- 
i&ise of being made the king's historiographer ; but as his manner 
of writing did not please, he received orders to leave the kingdom, 
and in 1682 retired to Amsterdam. His works, especially his his- 
tories and lives, are numerous, and said to be equal in number to 
the years of his life.f I shall mention only such as relate to Eng- 
land ; viz. " II Teatro Britannico,"t printed at London, in two 
volumes 4to. and reprinted at Amsterdam, in five volumeis l2mo. 
"UVita della Regina Elizabetta ;'* " La Vita di Cromwell;" 
" Poema Hero-estorico, sopra miracolosa, intrapresa d'lnghilterra^ 
del Real Principe d'Orange." Leti, in his historical works, has 
much true and interesting history blended and debased with fable. 
He is one of those writers to whom we know not how to give credit, 
unless his facts verify themselves, oi arc supported by much better 
anthoritj than his own. Ue, on some occasions, assumes all the 
dignity of conceited ignorance, and relates his fictions with all the 
confidence of a vain man, who thinks he cannot be contradicted. 
His aim, indeed, was to please rather than to instruct, and he has, 
vith his anecdotes, frequently amused and misled his readers. En- 
|8ging talents in a faithless historian are as dangerous, in the repub- 
Ic of letters, as the agreeable manners of a profligate are in civil 
society. See more of him in Morery's Dictionary.} Ob. 1701, 
JEt.7l. 

. * There are several oilier heads in thb book. 
t " Spectator/' No. 659. 
dayatC 
iting the 

^ preparing materiab forsueltahistory. 

Uag, " that your work give no oflFence." " Sir," replied Leti, " I will do what I can; 
bat if a man were as wise as Solomon, be would scarce be able io avoid giving same 
oBeace" " Why then," rejoined the king, " be as wise as Solomon ; write proverbs* 
not histories." 

■ $ Leti't " Life of Sixtns V." in which are some memorable anecdotes relative to 
Ifae reign of Elizabeth, was translated by Ellis Fameworth, M. A. and published in 
folio, 1754.— In March, 1758, Leti's daughter died in Mount-street, Grosvcnor-square, 
VOL. VI. H 



46 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

1 

SAMUEL SORBIERE, &c. Audran sc. Roma ; 
1667. This has been, copied. 

Samuel Joseph Sorbiere was born of obscure parents in France, 
where he was some time private tutor to a younger son of the Count 
de la Suze, and afterward an usher to a school. He was educated 
in the Protestant religion, but reconciled himself to that of Rome, 
and obtained considerable preferment in the church. He studied 
physic, history, and philology; was a profbssed admirer of Mr. 
HobbeSy whose '' Politics^ he translated. He also translated Sir 
Thomas More's ** Utopia,'* and part of Camden's " Britannia," for 
the great '' Atlas," printed in Holland. He travelled into Italy, 
Germany, and the Low Countries, where he insinuated himself into 
the acquaintance of the literati, of whom Lewis XIV. styled him the 
Trumpeter. His Elogies of Gassendus, and De Marca, archbisbop 
of Paris, are among the most considerable of his works, and helped 
to gain him the office of historiographer-royal. He was ever of a 
rambling disposition, and had a strong propensity to pleasure. He 
came into England in this reign ; and it is observable that he tra- 
velled from Dover to London in a common stage- waggon. He was 
graciously received by the king, \raa elected fellow of the Royal 
Society, and had many civilities paid him by persons of distinction 
and eminence. He, in his '' Voyage to England,*' does justice to 
the characters of some of our learned men ; but is frequently par- 
tial, false, and injurious in his representations of persons and things. 
It can scarcely be supposed, that the metropolis, with all its inha^ 
bitants, nor indeed Great Britain itself, should make a very cobb^ 
derable figure, when seen through the medium of that vanity whid 
was extremely natural to a French pedant, and one who was then I 
pensioner to the vainest prince in the world. He died the 9th of 
April, 1670. The author of his " Life" tells us, that finding his end 
approaching, he took a large dose of laudanum, on purpose to 
die in a state of stupefaction. Df.. Sprat has well lashed this con- 
ceited pedant with his own rod* See his spirited '' Observatiosf 
on Monsieur Sorbiere's Voyage into England/' subjoined to tbafc 
book. 



ill the 86lh year of her age. Her will was long, and was- aU in hec own hatid*oriliiig» 
which waaremarkablj good : it was in Fieuch : Mthe end of it, she says it was writtet 
with her own hand, in the 86lh year of her ags. 



OF ENGLAND. 47 

THEODORE UAAK; from an original picture in 
the Bodleian Gallery y Oxford. E. Harding sc. 4to. 

Theodore Haak was bom in the year 1605, at Wormd, in the Pa* 
iatinate ; but urged either by a thirst of knowledge, or the troubled 
state of affairs in his own country, he came to England when only 
twenty years of age, and remained a short time at the universities of 
Oxford and Cambridge. From these he proceeded to visit the 
several seats of learning in other countries ; and having passed three 
yeafs in travelling, he entered himself a commoner of Gloucester- 
hall, Oxford, ia 1620, where be resided till 1632, but did not take a 
degree, though he was admitted into deacon's orders by Dr. John 
Hall, bishop of Exeter. 

During the German wars, he was appointed a procurator to receive 
die benevolence-money raised in several diocesses in England, to 
be transmitted to the seat of war. He was afterward invited by 
the elector palatine to accept the office of his secretary, which si- 
tuation he declined, as well as that of resident at London, for the 
city of Hamburgh. But in consequence of the various opmions 
which were entertained on questions of religion, and of the expe- 
diency which Cromwell saw of directing the national attention to a 
setded form of worship, a favourable opportunity offered of display- 
ing and employing the talents and industry of Haak. 
. The Assembly of Divines, which met at Westminster in 1 643, having 
resolved that no better confession of faith could be presented to the 
people than that declared by the synod of Dort» known by the title 
of the Dutch Annotations ; an ordinance was passed March 30tb, 
1M9, forbidding all persons, except Theodore Haak, or his assignees, 
to publish any translation of the said work, on penalty of 1000/. 
There is also an entry on the Journals, about the same time, '' That 
Ok services of Theodore Haak in Denmark, should be taken into 
consideration on that day three weeks." 

To the translation (which was published intwo volumes fol. in 1637) 

^■1 attestation was prefixed from the Assembly of Divines, com- 

taiding Haak for his '^ faithfulness in many public employments, 

ted his dexterity in translating many English books of practical 

; divinity in German." — Having passed his life in pursuit of learning, 

&Qd contributed by his endeavours to the edification of mankind, he 

I died in the house of a kinsman, in an obscure alley near Fetter-lane, 

Oft Sunday, May 9, 1690 ; and was buried in a vault under the 

chancel of St. Andrew's church, Holborn, lamented by the most 



48 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

lesirned and eminent men- of his time. He who could number amon^ 
his friends, Prince Rupert; Dr. Usher, archbishop of Armagh; 
Selden ; Dr. Hall, bishop of Norwich ; Dr. Prideaux ; Dr. Walton, 
and Dr. Wilkins, both bishops of Chester; and William Alabas- 
ter, the celebrated Latin poet, could have been no inconsiderable 
man. 

JOBUS LUDOLFUS, serenissimorum Saxoniae Du- 
cum Consiliarius intimus. Bernigeroth sc. Before his 
" LifCy' in Latifiy by JunckeVy 1710, small 8w. 

Job Ludolf, who was descended from a good family, at Erfurt, 
in Thuringia, was a privy-counsellor to Frederic, duke of Saxony, 
whose education he superintended. He also bore several honour- 
able employments under the Emperor Leopold and some of the 
electors of the empire. He was a master of music and other ele- 
gant accomplishments^ had a strong and clear head for business, 
and acquitted himself with uncommon address as a public minister. 
But his knowledge as a linguist is almost beyond credibility. He is 
said to have understood five-and-twenty languages,* and had un- 
doubtedly a more exact knowledge of the Ethiopic and old Abyssi- 
nian than any learned man of his age. He was personally known 
to Dr. Pococke, Dr. Hyde, and Dr. Edward Bernard, with whom 
he contracted an acquaintance at Oxford. He also visited Mr. 
Boyle, Isaac Vossius, Dr. Castle, Sir William Dugdale, Sir John 
Chardin, and Mr. Ashmole,t in London. He was able to hold a 
conversation with these eminent persons in English, having been 
three times in this country. He came hither twice in the year 1683; 

* If we may credit his biographer, he learned the Hebrew, Chaldee, Samaritan,S;- 
rtac, Armeniao, and surmounted almost all the difficulties of the Arabic in one jear4 
That he spoke the Ethiopic with a proper accent is an acknowledged fact. It is no less 
certain, that the aptness and facility of his genius for this kind of learning was to the 
highest degree astonishing. If what u said of him be true, it gives credibilitj to the 
story of Mithridates, who must, however, be deemed his inferior as a linguist But 
if he had well understood ^v« only of these languages, he would perhaps have been 
unrivalled by any andent or modem. It has, with great appearance of truth been 
observed, that no man was ever a per/ect master of iuore than one language, which 
must have been that in which he has long been accustomed to write and converse. 

t Sec Ashmole's " Diary," p. 70. 



}«' Vita Ludolphi," p. 18,19. 



OF ENGLAND. 49 

once, at least, in pursuit cf a scheme which he seems to have had 
mach at heart, and which was greatly approved of by Leopold. 
This was to engage several of the European princes in a treaty of 
commerce, and a league offensive and defensive with the King of 
Ethiopia against the Turks, who threatened the empire ; and con- 
sequently the liberties of Europe. Charles IL received him gra- 
ciously, paid attention to his proposal, and referred him to the East- 
India company, from whom he met with no encouragement. He 
died the 8th of April, 1704, in the 80th year of his age. Be- 
sides an Ethiopic Grammar and Lexicon, he published a '' His- 
tory of Ethiopia,'* which was translated by J. P. gent, and printed 
in folio, in 1684. See more of him in his remarkable " Life,*' by 
Christian Juncker, subjoined to which is a curious specimen of the 
language of the Hottentots. 

ANTOINETTE BOURIGNON; in Cauljkld's'' Re- 
markable Persons r 8w. 

Antoinette Bourignon ; preji.ved to her " Life /' 

Antoinette Bourignon was one of those devotees who imagine 
themselves to be conducted by some particular inspiration. She was 
bom at Lisle in 1616, and was very much deformed. Her father 
had promised her in marriage to a Frenchman ; but she determin- 
ing not to marry, went away on Easter-day, 1636. Her design was 
to retire into some desert; she clothed herself therefore like a her- 
mit, and got forward as fast as she could ; but in a village of Hain- 
ault, somebody suspecting her to be a young woman, stopped her ; 
and it being mentioned to the archbishop of Cambray, he came to 
ermine her, dissuaded her from a hermit's life, and obliged her 
to return to Jier father. She was soon afterward persecuted with 
proposals of marriage, which occasioned her to run away once more. 
Among other places she resorted to in her wandering, she visited 
Scotland in the reign of Charles II. She afterward was governess 
of a hospital, and there locked herself up in a cloister, having taken 
the order and habit of St. Augustin. — She published several books ; 
and died at Franeker, in the province of Frise, Oct. 30, 1680. 



50 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 






JAMES 11. 



BEGAN HIS REIGN THE 6th OF FEBRUARY, 1664..5. 



CLASS L 

THE ROYAL FAMILY. 

JACOBUS Secundus, &c. rex. G. Kneller p. ?. 
Vandrebanc sc. 1685 ; large sheet. 

James IL &c. Kneller p. R. Wkite sc. 1686 ; sk. 

Jacobus IL &c. Kneller p. Becket f. in armour; 
whole length ; large h, sh. mezz. 

Jacobus IL &c. Kneller p. Becket f. a head, h.sh. 

inezz. 

James IL &c. a half length by Smithy after Kneller; 
ships, S^c. See an account of this print in the pre- 
ceding reign^ Class L 

Jacobus IL &c. Kneller p. Smith f 1697; h. sh. 

wiezz. 

Jacobus IL &c. Kneller p. Smith f 1719; 4/o. 
wezz. 

Smith's small heads are generally copies from his large ones. Great 
numbers of them were sold to paint upon glass, which was formerly 
a practice at boarding-schools. 



OF ENGLAND. SI 

James IL Knellerp. Van Somerf. in armour ^ h. sh. 

mezz. 

JAcoBtJS IL Knelkr p. Faberyjunioryf. Ato. mezz. 

James II. Knelkr p. Vertue sc. From an original 
dmefor Secretary Pepys.^ 

It is remaxkaUe that the Idng was sitUng for this picture whea he 
leceiyed the news that the Prince of Orange was landed. 

James II. Knelkr p. Edelinck sc. \2mo. 

Jaques II. Knelkr p. Picartsc. direx. 1724 ;4to. 

Jaqu£8 IL Thomassin sc. 1703 ; copkdfrom Ede- 

linck. ^ 

Jacobus Secundum. Largilliere p. «/. Smith/, h. sh. 

mzz. 

Jacobus IL &c. N. de LargUlkre p. Picart f. 
^Tgt h. sh. mezz. 

Jacobus IL Williams f. mezz. 

Jacobus IL J. Oliver/, large h. sh. mezz. 

James IL P. Tempest exc. h. sh. mezz. 

Jacobus IL P. Tempest exc. mezz. 4to. 

Jacobus IL Edward Rlvon /. large h.sh. mezz. 

James IL Becket exc. 4to. mezz. 

James IL Cooper exc. Ato. mezz. 

Jamjcs IL Zoggan sc. 

• One of die set of Kingfc 



62 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

James II. R. White sc. large h. sh. 
James II. crowned. R. White sc. 
James II. Van Hove sc. 
James II. Vandergucht sc. 
Jacobus II. &c. J. Munnekhuysen f. et exc. 
James II. whole length, richly dressed. Arnoult. 

4 

James W. two prints; no name of painter or en- 
graver. 

James II. playing on a harp like King David; small 
Ato. mezz. 

Jacobus II. P. Landry del. et exc. Parisiis; ccro- 
nation robes ; whole length ; large h. sh. 

Jacobus II. P. a Gunst sc. oval; foliage; large 
h. sh. 

Jacobus II. a large medallion ; Thomassin sc. 1703; 
Ato. 

James 11. sitting on his throne, Abp. Sancraft and the 
Lord-chancellor Jefferies standing. R. White sc. l2mo. 
Before Chamberldyne's *^ Present State of England.'' 

James II. on his throne; on the right and left are 
those that presented their addresses of thanks to him, upon 
his declaration for liberty of conscience. Sold by Is. OH" 
ver, on Ludgate-hill ; sh. 

There is a scarce set of historical prints, twenty in number, whicl 
exhibit the most interesting scenes of the life of James II. The^ 
were engraved by Schoonebeck (or Schoonebeek) a Dutchman. 



OF ENGLAND. 53 

Jacobub IL Sec* 8vo, in a sheets with his dying wards. 

The history of this reign consists of little more than the weak and 
irregular efforts of a bigoted and tyrannical prince to introduce 
popeiy ; an attempt so big with absurdity, that it did not meet with 
tbe least encouragement from the pope himself. The capacity of 
James was by no means equal to the subversion of those deep and 
solid foundations which supported the civil and religious liberties 
of his people. The share which he had in his father's su£ferings 
had not sufficiently taught him, ihBi jealousy of the royal prerogative 
is a fundamental principle in the English constitution. He was so 
violent and precipitate in his conduct, that he never failed to coun- 
teract his own purposes.* Every step he took to advance his 
power, helped greatly to destroy it ; and he establishe(]^ the Pro- 
testant religion on a firmer basis than ever, by his wild attempts to 
introduce that of the church of Rome. Though he ascended the 
throne with almost every advantage, he could never sit easy in it : 
and having taught even the advocates of non-resistance to resist, he 
was forced to relinquish a crown which he was absolutely unfit to 
wear. He fled into France, where the palace of St Germain was 
assigned him ; but the convent of La Trappe would have been a 
mudi more suitable retreat. t He died 6 Sept. 1701. His body 
was deposited in the monastery of the Benedictines at Paris, his brain 
in the church of St. Andrew, belonging to the Scotch College, in 
that city, and his heart in the nunnery of Chaillot. It is well known 
that he supplied father Orleans with materials to write his history. 
See the two former reigns. 

MARIA, D. G. &c. Wissing p. Williams /. 4to. 

mzz. 

Maria, &c. Wissing p. Smith/. Ato. mezz. 

* The Dake of Backiogbam gave this character of the two royal brothers, Charles 
and James : That the elder coold'see thhigs, if he would ; and the younger would 
see things, if he could. The preposterous conduct of King James no where appears 
>n i stronger light than in the circumstantial account of his behaviour at Oxford, 
in the ** Life of Anthony Wood/' lately published. 

t He is said to have " frequently visited the poor monks of La Trappe, who 
were mucb edified by his humble and .pious deportment."^ Several miracles were 
reported to have been wrought at his tomb. 



% See Smollett's " History. 
VOL. VI. I 



f» 



54 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Maria Beatrix ; tnezz. Largilliere; P. Picart. 

Maria Beatrix ; crvumed 23dAprily 1686 ; mezz. 
P. Tempest. 

Marie Eleonor D'Este ; in ** Larrey'' 

Maria, &c. Wissing p. P. Vandrebanc sc. large sh. 

Maria Beatrix ;&c. Kneller p. Smith f. (17 02f); 
h. sh. mezz. 

Maria Beatrix, &c, Knellerp. Smith/. (1719); 
Ato. mezz. 

Maria, &c. Kneller p. Vandrebanc sc. large h. sh. 

Maria Beatrix. Largilliere p. Smith/. (1686); 
h. sh. mezz. 

Maria, &c. R. White sc. 

Maria, &c. M. Lauron del. R. Williams /. whole 
length, h. sh. 

Mary Beatrix, &c. Nich. Visscher/. h. sh. 

Maria Beatrix, &c. P. Stephani sc. large 
h. sh. 

This princess, who descended from the ancient house of Este, 
was adopted daughter of Lewis XIV. who presented her with a 
suitable portion upon her marriage with James, when duke of York. 
The graces of her person and behaviour gained her all that popu- 
larity which usually attends beauty on the most elevated station* 
But her haughtiness, her bigotry, and her busy and intriguing 
spirit, sunk her greatly in the popular esteem, after she became a 
queen. Wheb she fled ihto France, she was kindly received b$ 



OF EN&LATSD. ' SB 

Lewis, who treated her with a generosity Ani did him much 
honour.* She died at 6t. Germains, 26 April, 1718.t 

The Prince of Great Britain, an infant, Kneller p. 
Smith f. h.sh, mezz. 

The young Prince, in the cradle;, nurse rocking. J8. 
Uns del. etf. h. sh. mezz. This was afterward inscribed 
" The Duke of Gloucester J^ 

The Prince of Wales, an infant, sitting on a 
cushion. Becket exc. Ato. mezz. * 

The. revenge of the Earl of Soiithesk on King James, when duke 
of York, who is said to have caught a virulent distemper, which 
that nobleman communicated with design to his lady, was supposed 
to be the occasion of the death of several of the children that he 
had by both his queens,^ and gave credit to the report of the prince 
being a supposititious child. In 1696, was published a pamphlet, 
entitled, " A Brief Discovery of the true Mother of the pretended 
Prince of Wales, &c. by William Fuller, gent, some time Page of 
Honour to the late Queen, in France.'' The author t^Ils us, that 
the pretended prince was son of one Mary Gray, an Irish woman-, 
who, in May 1688, was brought over to England, in the Mon- 
mouth yatch, by the Countess of Tyrconnel. That she was deli- 
vered of a child at St. James's, on the 10th of June following; and 
about the middle of July was, against her inclination, conveyed to 
the content of Benedictine nuns at Paris, whence she soon after 
made her escape. That he was commanded by the queen to go to 
England, with letters to Lord Montgomery, and others, in relation 
to this woman ; and that they were *' ta take care to place people 
on the coast of England, that might inform them when she landed^ 



♦ " Siecle de LouU XIV/' 

tSee a remarkable anecjdote concerning this princess, in the " Account of 1h^ 
Conduct of the Dowager-Dutchess of Marlborongh/' p. 116. 

When Lord Stair was ambassador at Parb, h6 made bis coach stop at the ap^ 
proAch of Queen Mary, shewing the same respect to her as to a ^queen of Gi^at 
Bri^ldn ;• she sent to thank him with this obs^nration, that ^e had receired Xess 
attention where she had reason to expect more. — Loan Uailes. 

X Queen Anne^s children were supposed to hare died from the same cause. 



66 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

and then they were positively commanded to use all endeavours to 
get her dispatched, to prevent whatever design she might pretend 
to/' But being, as he informs us, soon apprehended in France, 
and effectually secured, he believed that she was murdered ; as he 
could not get the least intelligence of her, though he had made the 
strictest inquiry. The well-known story of conveying the child to 
the queen's apartment, in a warming-pan, is attributed to Fuller. 
But it should be observed, that Mrs. Margaret Dawson, one of the 
gentlewpmeii of the queen's bed-chamber deposed, that '^ she saw 
fire carried into the queen's room, in a warming-pan, to warm the 
bed ; after which the queen went into her bed ; and that the depo- 
nent jstirred not from the queen, until her ms^esty was delivered of 
a^on."* Fuller, who was a great dealer in plots, and was der 
tected in several gross falsehoods, in some of his pretended disco- 
veneSf wsus declared an impostor by the House of Commons* 



JAMES II. his Queen, and two of their Children; 
in four ovals ^ arms at the four corners , proof scarce^ 
h. shf 

KATHARINE^ queen^do wager, Lely p. Bowles ;'\ 
h. sh. mezz. 

If th^ original were painted when she was a dowager, it could 
not have been done by Sir Peter Lely,'whp died in 1680. Some 
of the portraits mentioned in the " English Connoisseur,-'! and 
other printed lists of pictures, are attributed to Vandyqk, Lely, and 
others, though painted long after their decease. 

The Queen-dowager. Wissing p. Smith f h. sh, 
mezZf 

* See ** The several Declarations, together with the several Depositions made in 
Coancil, on Monday the 23d of October, 1688, concerning the birth of the Prince 
of Wales;" Lond. 8vo. See also Birch's «* Life of Tillotson," second edition, p, 
150 ; and Bamet's *f History of his own Time," p. 753. 
t The name of the printseller. ' 

t The mistakes in this book are not owing to any want of care and industry iq 
the ingenioos compiler, but the inaccoracy of some of the owners of the picture^ 
lAeationed in the work. 



OF ENGLAND. 57 

The Queen-dowager. Smith exc. Ato. 

The Queen-dowager. E. Cooper exc. Ato. mtzz. 

The Queen-dowager ; small oval. J. Becket. 

The Queen-dowager ; mezz. Jordan arc. Ato. 

Catharine, queen-dowager; large Ato. mezz. J. 
Becket. 

The queen-dowager resided at Somerset-house, during this, and 
part of the next reign. In 1692, she returned to Portugal, and car- 
ried with her several valuable pictures belongbg to the royal col- 
lection.* 

The Princess of ORANGE. Wissing p. R. Wil- 
liams f. h.sh. mezz. 

Mary, princess of Orange. Wissing p. Vatidrebanc 
«c. large sh.Jine. See the preceding reign. Class L 

The Princess ANNE. Wissing p. Becket /. h. sh. 

mezz. 

Anne, princess of Denmark. Wissing p. Becket f. 
^vo. mezz. 

The Princess Anne. Wissing p. R. Williams f. 
k sh. mezz. 

Anne, princess of Denmark. Wissing and Vander- 
vaartp. Smith/. (1687) whole length mezz. 

Anne, princess of Denmark. Faithornef. oval^ Ato. 

mzz. 

* Sec " Anecdotes of Painting," II. p. 71. 



SB BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

The PrincQof ORANGE, &c. Wming p. R. Wil- 
liams/, h. sh. mezz. 

William, prince of Orange. Wissing p. Vandre- 
banc sc^ large sh. companion to the princess. 

It appears from the life of Wissingy in Graham's ** Essay towards 
an English school," subjoined to De Piles's '' Lives of the Paioteis/' 
that that artist was sent over to Holland, by King James, on purpose 
to draw the portraits of the Prince and Princess of Orange. 

William, prince of Orange. B. Lens exc. in an 
oval of palms; h. sh. mezz. 

GuLiELMus et MARIA, Arausionensium princeps 
et principissa. C. Danckers exc. large h. sh. See the 
preceding reign. 



GEORGE, prince of Denmark. Wissing p. P. a 
Gunst sc. large h. sh. 

Prince George. Wissing p. Becketf. in armour; 
mezz. 

George, prince of Denmark. R. White sc. sh. 

Georoe, prince of Denmark. Loggan ad vivum del. 
et sc. large h. sh. 

Gjborge, prince of Denmark ; oval; mezz. J. Bee- 
ket exc. 4to. 

George, prince, &c. R.White ; R. Sheppard; foL 

George, prince, &c. oval;^mezz. M. Dahl; J, 
Simon; fol. 



OP ENGLAND. 59 

Geoege, prince^ &c; f , in armour; mezz. J. Sknoriy 
fol 

I George, prince, &c. in a square. P. v, Somer. 

\ George, prince, &c. in an oval; mezz. R.Wil- 

^ Hams. 

George, prince, &c. in an oval of oak-leaves. Log- 
gan ad vivum ; half sheet, scarce. 



; CLASS 11. 

I 

. GREAT OFFICERS OF STATE, AND OF THE 

HOUSEHOLD. 

GREAT OFFICERS OF STATE. 

GEORGE, lord JEFFERIES, lord high-chan- 
cellor. See Class III. and VI. 

LAURENCE, earl of Rochester, &c. Kneller p. 
Smith f. h. sh. mezz. 

Laurence, earl of Rochester &c. Wissing p. Wih 
liamsf 4to. mezz. 

Laurence Hyde, earl of Rochester, (lord high- 
treasurer). Kneller p. Houbraken sc. 1741. In the 
collection of the (late) Earl of Burlington; Illust. 
Head. 



60 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Laurence/ earl of Rochester; in his robes; m%z, 
G.Kneller; J. Becket; scarce. 

Laurence Hyde, earl of Rochester. Bocqudsc, 
In " Noble Authors,'' by Mr. Park; 1806. 

At Amesbury is a half length of him by Sir Peter Lely. 
Laurence Hyde, second son of the Lord- chancellor Clarendon, 
was employed in the late reign, in several important embassies and 
negotiations ; in which he acquitted himself to the king's satisfac- 
tion. In 1679, he was appointed first commissioner of the trea- 
sury, upon the resignation of the Earl of Essex. About the same 
time, he, with Mr. Sidney Godolphin, was admitted into the 
privy council ; and they both shared the confidence of the Earl of 
Sunderland. This triumvirate had, for some time, the principal 
management of the king's affairs. He appeared at the head of that 
party, in the House of Commons, who opposed the exclusion of the 
Duke of York. This occasioned an address from that house to the 
king, to remove him from his presence and council for ever : but he 
Created was soon after created baron of Wotton Basset, viscount Hyde, 
^^^^' and earl of Rochester. In the last year of Charles H. he was 
made president of the council ; and upon the accession of James, 
lord high-treasurer of England* .Though he was one of the eccle- 
siastical commission, he refused to comply with the king's request 
of changinjg his religion, which occasioned the resignation of his 
office of treasurer, in lieu of which he had a pension assigned him of 
5000/. a year. He had much of the elevated spirit of his father, but 
was greatly inferior to him in capacity. King William, who seems 
never to have had any cordial affection for him, declared, that the 
year, in which he had the management of his afiairs, was the most 
uneasy of his whole life. Upon the change of the ministry in 1710, 
he succeeded Lord Somers, as president of the council. Ob. 2 May, 
1711.* 

• 

*'Lanrence, earl of Rochester, and Henry, earl of Clarendon, his brother, were 
the undoubted editors of their father's " History of the Rebellion." This will, per- 
haps, sufficiently appear from the preface to that work; but it is fully confirmed 
in Dr. John Burton's " Genuineness of Lord Clarendon's Historj."t The follow- 
ing passage, in the same tract,t is too much to the honour of the Earl of Rochester 

tP. 18. ; P. 111,112. 



N 



OP ENGLAND. 61 

GEORGE SAVILE, marquis of Hallifox, (lord-pre- 
sident of the council). J. Houbraken sc. 1740. In the 
possession of Sir George Savile^ bart. Illust. Head. 

Re is Mpresented in the ornaments, making a tender of the 
crown to the Prince and Princess of Orange. 

Georoe Savile, marquis of Hallifax. Harding sc. 

George Savile, marquis of Hallifax. Bocquet sc. 
In '' Noble Authors;' by Mr. Park ; 1806. 

George Sayile^ marquis of Hallifax, who for his eminent abilities Created 
was ennobled by Charles II. was by that prince made a privy- JJ^^igg 
Goansellor; and afterward, lord privy-seal.* He was offered the 
post of secretary <^ state, and that of lord-lieatenant of Ireland ; * 
hut these he. declined in disgust ; as Charles, towards the close of 
his reign, refused to perform his promise of summoning a parlia- 
inent. Upon the accession of James, he was appointed president 
of the council ; but as he could not be persuaded to give his con- 
sent to the repeal of the tests, he was told by his miyesty, that 
" though he could never forget his past services, yet since he could 
not comply in that point, he was resolved to have all of a piece ;'' 
ftnd was therefore dismissed from his public employments.f In the 
convention parliament, he was chosen speaker of the House of Lords ; 
vhere, with his usual eloquence, he pleaded for the necessity of 
supplying the vacant throne with the Prince and Princess of 
Orange ; upon whose accession, he was again made lord privy- 



ti ptM nnobseTTed. The author, speaking of Edward, earl of Clarendon, says, 
" 1 cannot omit Uiis remarkable circamstance in favour of his innocency, Uiat when 
^ tamaltaoos perplexed charge of accumulated treasons was preferred against him 
V the commons, his son Laurence, then a member of that house, stept forth with 
^bfive defiance to his accusers, that if they could make out any proof of any one 
ib^ article, he would, as he was authorized, join in the condemnation of his 
(kther. It appears that this challenge was not given in vain ; and the general good 
opinion of the world ever since has vindicated the innocency of the unpopular mi- 
nister, and, in a manner, reversed the effect of that arbitrary injurious sentence." 

* Frequent mention is made of him, under the appellation of lord privy teal, in 
Sir John Reresb/s *' Meinoirs." 

t He was succeeded in hiy post of president of the council, by the Earl of San- 
lerland. 

VOL. VI. K 



69 BIOGRAPHfPAL HISTORY 

6^al. lo i$89, hp 9i|ittfii4 that voffic^, and digtingiiulied Unmdt by 
his opposiUo^ to the meastises of th^ goyernment. He was a mai^ 
of unsettlet} principles, and of a lively imaginatiop, which some- 
times got the better of his judgment. He woidd never lose his jest, 
thpi^h it spoQed his argument in the gravest debate ; ^pr though 
it brought his sincerity^ or eyen his religion, jn qgeM#OQ* He w^^ 
deservedly celebrated for his parliamentary talents ; and in the fa- 
mous contesjt about the bi|l of exchision^ was jthougbt to }>e a match 
for his uncle Shaftesbury. The pieces which he has left us, shew 
Uoi 4x> have been an ingeoious, if oot a so^t^dy, wriU^. His 
** Advice to a Daughter'' coatains mo^e gopd 8em^> in fewer words, 
than is perhaps to be found in any of his contemporary authors 
Ke^ ^ l^iff deaths proft^ssed hiinself a slacer^ Christtan, and tK 
pxe^^d jthe truest f;opcern fof hip n^isp^n^ l\§4,. Ob^ 4pnl» 1^95, 

HENRY, dukfi of Norfolk, &c. Becket / <§• dW 

Henry^ ^xjkQ of Norfplk^ hereditary ^arl-marsh^l, and Qrst peei; 
of the realm y was so^ of Henry« duke of Norfolk, mentioned m 
^he pr€iced|Qg reign* He supceede^d bis faUier in the dukedom» 
1683^ ^d dyipg without issue the 2d of April, 1701, was himself 
sjucceeded by Thomas Howard, his nephew, eldest son of the Lor4 
Tl^pmp Hp\f ardy his brpther. The most remarkable circumstaiMXi 
in Xhe life of thjf peer, is bis diyprce from the Lady Mary Mordaqpti 
his dutchess, whq w^ afterw^nd married to Sir J^dm Germaine, 
See the *f ^tate TrjaU." . 



GREAT OFFICERS OF THE HOUSEHOLD. 

ROBERT, earl of Ailesbury, &c. lord-ehamberlainr 
of his majesty's ho.useliold, &c.. Key and white stc^ 
Jjely p.^ R. White ^c. h. sh. The key and staff wem 
added to the plate in this reign. ■ 

* I am informed, that there is a mezzotioto piinl, inscribed " The Dul^ of llq|^ 
folk,'* Kneller p. R. While, exQudit. Aa^. h(i is uepr^i^^ mUlf wtH^^jeo, I m 
inclined to think» that though it is done after a paintiDj^ of ki^l|ei^ >^M9MFff 
the cei^n of Charles IL and is the portTiU^ 9J[ H«nr^, thC; fiitber of. tliiB.duke^ 

f The original portrait was painted in the reign of Charles II. 



OF CN6LANIX 63 

p. Sntttkf. 1687; staff, S^c. h. sH. 

RoBEB^, en*! ^ AilesWy, &c. Lely p. large h\ sh: 
netz. rkhhf drest. 

RoKEfinr, etffl of Ailesbtrry: Faithorfie sc. h. sh. 
scarce. 

' Rob^ VftLCef e&A of AflesbuYy, was son of ThotiTas', earl of Created 
Elgin, in Scotland ; of whom raention has been made m the former ^^^^' 
reign. He was gentleman of the bed-chamber, and one of the 
privj council to Charles II. On the 30th of Jul^, l<686y he was^ by 
JameSy constituted lord-chamberlain of the household, and^ dying 
the 20tii of October following, he was' succeeded in- title aud 
estate, by Thomas Bruce, his son and heir ; and in his office of 
knrd-chailkb6rlain*, by John Sheffield, earl of MulgraVe. He was 
well read in English history and antiquities, on which subjects* he 
Blade a^ curious and* useful collection of manuscripts. 

•TdflTNf, earl* of Mulgrave, loFd-chamberlain of his 
majeslj^'s household, &e. Kneller.p. Becketf. staff in 
his riffhi^ hand:;: lu.sh\.mezz.. 

. iotiviy earl of Mulgmi^e, &c. Knelterp. Becketf. 
gtaffbyhifH; h\ sh. mezz. 

John, earl of Mulgrave, &c. lord-chamberlain. J. 
Smith f.. h. sh.^ mczz. 

Hie Earl- oT Mulgrave, better known^by hitr title of Duke of Great, ii 
Bnckinghaui, wa9.aman of uncommon wit and .8pirit,ra&d of no* ^^^^^ 
kis gallantry and politeness. He cultiyated-an early acquaintance lain. so 
with Dryden, and other men of genius ; to whom he was indebted ^^^^• 
bra much greater- share of his reputation than was derived from 
Ul personal- merit; He lived in great familiarity with' Janfes II« 
^* tben-duke of York ; and served hira* with the sincerefst attachment, 
dter lie ascended'the *throne. Though he wias, in some respects, 

! t inah of nice honour, he went greater lengths to serve the.kiog: 

I 



/ 



64 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

than were congistent with that, or any other social principle. He 
was not only an advocate for the dispensing power, but he sat in 
the ecclesiastical commission ; not with a view of introducing po- 
pery, as he seems to have been at least indifferent to all religions, 
but purely from a zeal of serving his sovereign. It must, however, 
be acknowledged, that he was far from being inclined to join the 
inquisitors of that arbitrary court in all their illegal proceedings. 
Hence it was, that his pardon was with less difficulty procured at 
the revolution, by the friendly mediation of Dr. Tillotson, the 
worthy dean of Canterbury. There are several portraits of him, 
which belong to the reign of Anne, 

GEORGE (LEGGE), lord Dartmoutli, master of the 
l^orse, &c. P. Vandrebanc sc. large sh. very scarce. 

George, lord Dartmouth ; in an oval. Shipster sc. 
1797. 

'"^^ba- This gallant nobleman distinguished himself in several naval 
engagements, in the Dutch wars, in the reign of Charles II. In 
1Q83, he was sent admiral of the English fleet to demolish Tangier;* 
and soon after his return, had a grant from tlie king of 10,000/!. 
In the reign of James, he was constituted master of the horse, and 
a privy-counsellor ; and was preferred to several' other considerable^ 
employments. In 1688, he was made admiral of the fleet sent out 
against the Prince of Orange. In 1691, he was sent to the Tower, 
where he died the 25th of October, 1^691, in the 44tb year of his 
age. 



HENRY ARUNDELL, third Lord Arundell, of 
Wardour, and Count of the Sacred Rom^ji Empire ; 
engraved by R. Cooper^ frain a miniature painting in 
enamel.— Private plate. 

* He demolished the fortifications, blew ap the mole, and brooght the garrison to 
England. A considerable number of new coined crown«pieces were buried in the 
ruins of this fortress, that posterity might be iiubrmed that it once belonged (o 
Charles II. There u a set of views of it by Hollar, who was sent thither .by, 
Charleston purpose to take the drawings; and he received only lOOi. for bit 
labour. 



, 1682. 



OF ENGLAND. 65 

Henry ArtUndeU, third lord Arondelly of Wardour, succeeded his 
ather Thomas, the second lord, in his honours and titles, in 1643. 
In 1678, he was with William Herbert, earl of Powis; William 
Howard, yiscount Stafford; William, lord Petre; and John, lord 
Bellasisy committed prisoner to the Tower, upon the information of 
flke ndtorions Trtus Oates, and other abandoned' miscreants, and 
afterward impeached by the House of Commons, of crimes and 
offisnces without being brought to trial. He remained in confine, 
menty with the other unjustly aspersed lords, till the year 1683^ 
when they were admitted to bail. 

X)n King James the Second's accession to the throne, he was sworn 
of his privy-council in 1685 ; was constituted lord-keeper of the 
privy-seal March 11th, 1686, and also knight of the Bath. When 
that king began his journey towards Salisbury, he committed the 
administration of affairs in his absence to the lord-chancellor^ the 
Lords Arundell, Bellasis, Preston, and Godolphin. 

At the revolution in 1688, this nobleman retired to Breamore, in 
Wilts, (a seat afterward belonging to Sir Edward Hulse, bart.) 
where the family resided after the destruction of Wardour Castle, 
md where he lived with great hospitality. He died, much respected, 
December 28th, 1694, and was buried in the family mausoleum, at 
Tisbory, about two miles from Wardour Castle. 



GREAT OFFICERS OF SCOTLAJ^D. 

ALEXANDER MORAVLE, comes, &c. pro regno 
ScotiaB prorex, &c. A. D. 1686. Knelkr p. P. Van- 
drebanc sc. h. sh. 

m 

In 1686, the parliament of Scotland was summoned by the king Created 
to assemble ; and they accordingly met on the 29th of April, ear' ^^^ 
%tyear. . His majesty wrote a letter to them; in which he re* 
commended his Roman Catholic subjects to their especial care. 
the Earl of Murray, lord high-commissioner, seconded this letter 
%ith a speech ; which he concluded by these words : *^ By this, 
you will shew yourselves the best and most affectionate subjects, 
to the best, the most incomparable, and most heroic prince in the 
Vrorld.'' The chief power in Scotland, at this period, says Sir John 
Dalrymple, ^ was committed to Lord Murray, a weak, Chancellor 



66 BIOGRAPHICAL ttiSTORY 

Pertfay 41 timidy and the diaiieellor's brother^ Lord MeUforl, an in- 
popular man, aR of whom were Roman GatholictJ'* 

JACOBUS^ Comes Perthanus, &c* Magnus Scoti» 
Cancellariu^-; ptsrse and macCy as hrd-cbanceUor. Blon- 
deatc 3C. h. shn 

Jame5^ earl of Perth. i?iA?yj». R^White sff. l(i&&; 
h. sh. 

James, earl of Pertfi, witR Ids titles m French. 
Riley p., R. White sc^ — ^This is. one of White's, bcist 
he&ds:., 

James, earl of Perth, JEif, S4. Kneller p.. Wfdtesc. 
h. sh» 

James, earl of Perth. Kneller; Smith. 

James;^. earl of Perllt*. Knelkrpi. VandreboM- se. 

eat. earl James Drummond, earl of Perth^ lord-chancellor of Scotland, wai 

05^ ' a man of an excellent disposition, till it was warped and perverted by 

ide lord- the violence of ambittonif The loudest^ . and indeed the justest, cla- 

^4^ ^^ mours were r^sed' against his flagitious conduct ; and he was in 

danger of being called to an account for male-administration, when 

he thought it prudent to turn Roman Catholic : npon^ which- Ihe 

Marquis of Hallifax observed, that his faitk Imd made kirn wkkn 

He followed the fortunes of King James, by whom he was. created, 

a duke, and appointed governor to his son. He died at St. Ger- 

. maina^ in 17 1&. 

ARCHIBAU5US, Comes Argathelii9e,,&c. J;jB. (/c 
Medina P' If.VanderJbanh sc.sk.. 

' Archibaldus,, Comes Argatheliae. D. Logganci 
vivum scJi.sh. 



* " l^emoiis/ p . .153. . &1 edit. t See BuraeV L {k 587. 



I 



OP ENGLANt). er 

AacHiBAiD GhraafTan Argjrl. Adrian Haetweghf. 
h. sh. 

Arch IB A tD^ earl of Argyle, (hereditary justice- 
general^ and great hereditary master of the household). 
Savage sc. Xn a large half -sheet, with seven other heads. 

AacHXBAX.i>, earl of Argyle^ &c. Harding. 

The Eigrl of Argyle was a man of probity and virtue, who saw, 
wbp felty and deplored the miseries of his country ; the liberties of 
which were openly invaded, or secretly undermined, by Lauderdale 
aod the Duke of York. He was, during the rigorous administra-. 
tion of the Earl of Middleton, condemned to die, only for a just 
complaint of the injuries and injustice which had been done him, in, 
s^ letter to Lord DuffuSi his friend.* This worthy patriot, because 
be would not blindly concur with all the measures of the duke, and 
was scrupulous of taking contradictory oaths, was, after a most 
illegal trial, condemned, by as unjust a sentence, for treason, leasing- 
making, and leasing-telling. He found means to escape from prison^ 
and rose in arms against his capital enemy, soon after his accession 
to tfa^ throne. This insurrection was concerted with the Duke of 
Honmou.th, who entered upon hostilities in England about the same 
time. The earl was presently taken, and carried prisoner to Glas-r 
gow, and afterward to Edinburgh, where he was beheaded in pur- 
suance of his former sentence, 30th of June, 1685. After the re« 
Tolqition, this sentence was> in the Claims of Rights, declared to be 
iTqvroaeh to the nation.. See more of him in the '^ Biographia, 
Dtiela C^MPBiux. 



JOHN HAMILTON, second lord Belhaven, 167{>. 
Birrel sc. 8vo. 

John Hamilton, of Biel, eldest son of Lord Pressmennan, was 
born July 5th, 1656; and married Margaret, eldest daughter of 
Sir Robert Hamilton, of Silverton-hill, bart. grand-daughter of 



* Tlns.leUei a^dreued bjr the Carl of Argyfe to Lord Duffu, was intercepted^ 
and carried to the Earl of Middleton. 



•f 



68 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

John, first lord Belhaven. His Lordship resigning hia hondunf 
into the hands of King Charles the Second, they were, the lOtb 
of February, 1675, settled on him for life, to descend to John Ha^ 
milton, of Biel, husband of his grand-daughter, who accordingly 
became second lord Belhaven, on the death of the first lord, in 
1679. 

His lordship soon distinguished himself by his opposition to 
ministers in the parliament of 1681. When the act for the test was 
brought in, Lord Belhaven said, that he saw a vety good act for 
securing our religion from, one another among the sul^'ects themselvesj 
but he did not see an act for securing our religion against a popish or 
fanatical successor to the crown. For these words he was committed 
prisoner to Edinburgh Castle, and the king's advocate declared, 
that there was matter for an accusation of treason against him; 
but some days afterward his lordship was, on his submission, 
restored to his seat in parliament. 

Ijord Belhaven attended the meeting of the Scottish nobility in 
London, Jan. 1689, where he concurred in the address to the 
Prince of Orange to assume the government, and to call a convention 
of the estates. He was present at the convention, and contributed 
much to the settling of the crown upon King William and Queen 
Mary, who constituted him one of their privy council, and a com- 
missioner for executing the office of lord-registrar.' He com- 
manded a troop of hok'se at the battle of Killycrankie, July 27th, 
1689, and was one of the farmers of the poll-tax, in 1693.. 

On the accession of Queen Anne, he was continued a privy- 
counsellor; but when the Pretender, assisted by the French, at- 
tempted to invade Scotland in 1708, he was taken up on suspicion 
of favouring the invasion, and sent prisoner to London. Thus was 
the kingdom insulted with the spectacle of its most distinguished 
patriot, led in triumph through the English capital. His high 
spirit burst at the disgrace ; and he died of an inflammation of the 
brain, June 21st, 1708, immediately on his release from prison, 
in the 52d year of his age. 

A GREAT OFFICER OF IRELAND, 

TALBOT, duke of Tyrconnel; from an original 
picture in the collection of Lord Beaulieu, at Ditton 
Park. W. N. Gardiner sc. 4to. 



■!■ 



ar ENcriAND. 69 

Richard Talbot, earl of Tyrdonnel. Jollain 

Richard Talbot, earl of TyrconneL N. Larmis- 
sin, 1689. 

Richard Talbot, earl of Tyrconnel, viceroy 
in Ireland; in armour; right hand on a truncheon; 

Ato. 

Richard Talbot, on King James the Second's accession to the 
throney was created earl of Tyrconnel, and placed as lieutenant- 
general at the head of the Irish army, where his conduct was so 
agreeable to his sovereign, that he made him viceroy of Ireland. 
To this popish delegate of a popish prince, Henry, earl of Claren- 
don, the eldest son of the chancellor, and then lord-lieutenant 
of Ireland* resigned the sword of state, Feb. 11, 1686-7, amidst 
a gimeral and violent agitation of the kingdom. That nobleman 
embarked at the port of Dublin, in order to return to England, 
attoded by fifteen hundred Protestant families of that city; '^ who 
abandoned a country where the peace, the property, and the lives 
of Protestants^ were exposed to the malice of the meanest and most 
malignant of a party, now exulting in the fulness of their triumph, 
with their friend and patron in supreme authority, attended by 
pcqpish ministers and officers of state." 

After the Prince of Orange's invasion, he at first refused all the 
ofiJEhrs that weire made by that prince to induce him to submit. 
ytbea Ejng James landed in Ireland, in 1688, Tyrconnel appeared 
at Cork to cotigratulate. his master, and* expressed his zeal by or- 
deriilg' a magistbite to execution, who had declared for the Prince 
Of O^ge.— Jfames ini»tantly created him a duke. From the time 
(>f the battle of the Boyne, he lost the little estimation which he 
had enjoyed, having become as irresolute hi*insamnd, as unwieldy 
hi his person. He died at Limerick during the siege of that town, 
Aug. 5th, 1691. Thevtilgar Irish imputed his death to poisouj, 
adniinistered by those who detested his measures. 

The Duke of Tyrconnel married Frances, daughter of Richard 
Jennings, of Sundridge, in the county of Heilford, esq. widow of 
Sir George Hakhilton, brother to the author of the *' Memoirjs of 

VOL. VI. L 



70 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Graromont.** By this lady^ who was elder sister to the celebrated 
Sarah, dutchess of Marlborough, he had no issue^ 



CLASS III. 

P E E R S, &c. 

(CHARLES), duke of Somerset. Vandervaart p. 
Smith/. (1688); fnezz. 

The Duke of Somerset, who was one of the lords of the bed- 
chamber to the king, was dismissed from his office for refusing to 
assist at the public reception of Count D'Ada, the pope's nuncio, 
at Windsor.* We are told by Sir John Reresby, that the Duke 
pf Somer3et, the. Earl of Burlington, the Earl of Scarsdale, and 
some other lords, who had been active in the cause of the Priuce 
of Orange, seemed in some measure to repent of their activity ; as, 
" they never could have believed the prince would have contended 



* There b a niezzotinto of Count, afterward Cardinal, d'Ada, of whom Dr. Mead 
had an original picture. Echard, in his " History of the Revolation,"t where be 
meatious the precipitate conduct of James, which naturally produced that great 
event, speaks thns of the reception of the nuncio : ** While these strange proceed- 
ings were depending, the king thought fit to make a step of another kind, and 
give an unusual spectacle to his subjects, which was a solemn reception of an apo- 
stolical ntincio from Rome, a sight which had not been seen in England for a hondred 
and fifty years before. This was Signior D'Ada, domestic prelate and assistant to 
the pope, to complete whose character he was consecrated archbishop of Aiaasia, 
in the royal chapel at Whitehall, by three select Romish bishops. And tboogii 
it was high-treason in England for any to assume the character of the pope's nuodo, 
that law was dispensed with at this time ; and he made bis public entry at Wiodsort 
with the highest pomp and ceremony." The same author tells us, that '< the Duke 
of Somerset, then lord of the bed-chamber in waiting, was expected to assist in the 
ceremony ; but he told the king he could not serve him npoa this, occasion, beiog 
assured it was contrary to law. The king asked him if he did not know he wis 
above the law. The other replied, if the king was, he himself was not above the 
law ; for which he was dismissed from all employments."! 



t P. 84. ' ! Echarj], ubi supra. 



OF ENGLAND. 71 

fbr die crown ; bat all agreed in the optnkm it was to be set on the 
liQsd of the prinoesSy and so descend in a right course."* There 
sre several other portraits of him, which belong to the reign of 
Anne. 

CHRISTOPHER, duke of Albemarle, earl of Tor- 
rington, Sec. chancellor of the university of Cambridge, 
one of the lords of his majesty's most honourable 
privy council, and knight of the Garter. T. Murray p. 
/. Becketf. large h. sh. 

Christopher, duke of Albemarle. Sherwin sc. sh. 

Christopher, duke of Albemarle ; mezz. W. Ri- 
chardson; 4to. 

Christopher, duke of Albemarle ; coat of armsj 
^c. R. Cooper sc. Ato. 

"niere is a portrait of him at Welbeck. 

Christopher^ duke of Albemarle, was a generous, indolent, good- 
natnred man, who sunk a considerable part of the estate which' 
Us father left him, and shortened his own life, by indulging him- 
self in his pleasure^, especially those of the bottle. He was the 
diief promoter of Captain Phipps'sf famous scheme of fishing on' 
a Spanish wreck off Hispaniola, by which 300,000/. in silver were 
recdvered from the*bottom of the sea, where it had lain forty-four 
years. He had 90,000/. to his share, and the captain 20,000/.' 
In 1687, a medal was struck on this occasion, of which there is a P. 151. 
print in Evelyn's ** Numismata." The duke was the same year 
qipointed governor of Jamaica,;^ wher^ he died in 1688* See 
Class VII. 

* Rcresby, p. 179. 

t Afterward Sir 'William Pliipps. See his " Life by Increase Mather, among 
the lives English and Foreign." 

^' Sir Hans Sloane, who attended bira in the quality of his physician, with great 
indasCry «tfd jodgnent coHeefed materials fur his << Natural History of Jainaicfi,'' 
doring bis residence in that island. As this curious and valuable wor1[ is become 
very scarce, and consequently sells at a high price, a second editioi| of it would be 
very acceptable to the world, and especially to the lovers of botany. Tlie numerous 
plates of Uie plantSf which are in general finely eiecuted, are, I think, in the British 
Museum. 



74 BIOGRAPHICAI^ HISTORY 



to court upon tbe diange of the ministry in'1710y and told Ui 
queen, that '* he was extremely glad that he could now salute 1m 
queen in reality." 

The LORD EUSTON. Kmllerp. 1685. J. Smith f 
1689; mezz. whole length; a child* in a cap am 
feather^ with a parrot. 

Charles, son of the first Duke of Grafton, mentioned in the pre- 
ceding reign* He succeeded his father in the dukedom, and wai 
lordfchamherlain to George I. and II. The other portraits of bin 
belong to the reigns of Anne and George II. See Noble's Cod 
tinuation. 

THEOPHILUS, earl of Huntingdon, &c. 1687 
Kneller p. R. Williams/, h. sh. mezz. 

The Earl of Huntingdon was chief justice in eyre of all the king' 
D<r^i5!^ forests, &c. north of Trent; captain of the band of pensioners 
colonel of a regiment of foot ; and one of the privy council. E 
was so active in the service of James, that he, together with th* 
Earl of Melfort, was in 1690 excepted from pardon by the acto 
indemnity .f He died the 30th of May, 1701, and was succeedei 
by his son Theophilus. 

WILLIAM CAVENDISH, duke of Devonshire 
in *' Noble Authors" by Mr. Park; 1806. 

* Though tbe practice of painting the portraits of children has been censured i 
trivial, jet few subjects are more pleasing, considered merely as ornaments. Sevefi 
of the children by Vandyck are among tbe roost charming productions of hispeod 
Charies I. loved to be drawn with his children about him ; and it greatly heigbtei 
our idea of the domestic character of that prince. 

t The pious, the benevolent, and the amiable Lady Elizabeth Hastings, wbo « 
universally esteemed, revered, and admired, and is characterised by Congrevr,; 
tbe « TatIeT,"4 under the appellation of ** The Divine Aspasia," was daughter 
this Earl of Huntingdon, by Elizabeth, his first wife, daughter and coheir of S 
John Lewis, knight and baronet. Her charities, private and public, which we 
perhaps never equalled by any of her sex, do her the highest honour. Sce'i 
•plendid list of them, together with a detail of her character, in Wilford*s " Men 
rials,** &c. p. 779, et scq. 

t No. 4S. 



OF ENGLAND. 75 

William Cavendish, earl of Deyonshire, \9ho had the wannest Created 
fnendship for that worthy, but unhappy patriot, the Lord Russel, ^^^^' 
and whose political principles were entirely the same, could 
We but little inclination to serve King James. Besides, he had 
been fined 30,000/.* for striking Colonel Culpepper within the 
verge of the court. After he had felt the weight of the king's 
hand, he retired into the country in disgust; where he amused 
Umself with rebuilding the south front of his house at Chatsworth; 
apiece of ardiitecture that does great honour to his taste. f He 
was perhaps the only anti-courtier of prime note who escaped the 
lash of Dryden. Indeed the laureat well knew that he would 
never tamely put up an affront, though it were given him in the 
king's presence.^ 

LEWIS, earl of Feversham. J. Riley p. J.Becketf. 
h. ih. mezz. 

iPhe Earl of Feversham; 8w. 

Lewis Duras, earl of Feversham,^ commanded that part of the Created 
land's forces which defeated the Duke of Monmouth at Sedficemore. ^ ^P*^* 
As soon as he had g^iued that important victory, he hung up 
twenty of the enemy's prisoners without trial. His uncle, the 
ramous Marshal Turenne, who knew and practised every part of 
^neralship, never treated his prisoners in this manner. When the 
ting was alarmed with the Prince of Orange's design to invade the- 
kingdom, he made the Earl of Feversham general of the army; 
cirhieh he afterward took care to disband with all possible expe- 
dition, to prevent its revolting to the prince. He was for this, and 
kome other matters laid to his charge, confined for a short time to 



* Cibber, in his life, records an anecdote, that just before the revolution, James 
IL sent E messenger, and offered to discharge the fine of 30,000/. for present pay- 
bent of 15,000/. The answer was, " My humble duty to his majesty, I rather 
Gloose to play double or quits." He won qvaXi. 

\ There is a print of it in the " Vitruvius Britannicus.'' 

% He led Col. Culpepper by the nose out of the presence chamber, and then 
CMiedhim. 

{ He was Marquis of Blanquefort in France, and was naturalized here, by act of 
parliament, 1665 ; and on the 19th of January, 1672, was created a baron, by the 
title of Lord Duras, of Holdenby. He was, in the late reign, lord-chamberlain to 
Queen Cstharine. 



7^6 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

« 

Windsor Castle. He was a man of a supple and insinuating cha. 
raictef^ tod paid great attendance at court in the two foUo^g 
reigns. As he had the principle management of the queens 
dowager's afiairs, after she retired to Portofgal, he sometimes weni 
by the nickname of ** King-Dowager." 

GEORGE (JEFFERIES), earl of Flint, viscounl 
Weikham, baron of Weim, &c. G. K^lkrjp: E, 
Cooper e.vc. 1686 ; Ato. mezz. very scarce. 

I have placed this print here, on account of Jefferies^s title ol 
Earl of Flinty which never occurred to me in any of our histories 
It is well known that Edward of Windsor, eldest son of Edward II 
was summoned by his father to parliament by the appeliatjiqii o 
Earl of Chester and Flint ; and that this title has since bdo^^^ U 
the Princes of Wales. I was once inclined to think that :lti|fetitli 
of Earl of Flint might be a ridiculous sarcasm on Jefferiea^ %^' 
sioned by his extreme hardness of heart, till a learned waAfttilnxnu 
gentleman in my neighbourhood communicated to me the >dedica- 
tion of the following book : ** Dissertatio Lidiologica. Ataciorc 
Joanne Groenevelt, Transisalano, Daventriensi, M. D. E'^GoI 
Med. Lond." Editio secunda. Londini, 168*7; 8vo. 

*^ Honoratissimo domino, D. Georgio, comiti Flintensi; vice- 
comiti de Weikham, baroni de Weim ; supremo Anglin cancellario 
et serenissimo Jacobo Secundo« regi Angliee, a secretioribus consi- 
Fiis." See Class VI. 

WRIOTHESLEY, lord RUSSEL; a boy, whok 
lengths Kneller pinx. J. Becket eo'c. mezz. very scarce 

Wriotheslcy, lord Russel, was son of the unfortunate patriotic 
lord, by Rachel, second daughter of Thomas Wriothesley, earl o: 
Southampton, and widow of Francis, lord Vaughan, eldest son o' 
Richard, earl of Carbery. He, in 1693, espoused Elizabeth, onN 
daughter and heir of John Rowland, of Stretham, in Surrey, esq. 
by Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Josiah Child, of Wansted, in Essex 
baronet. On the 6th of September, 1700, he succeeded his grand 
father, the 6rst duke of Bedford, in that title. He was one of th^ 
gentlemen of the bed-chamber to King William, and was lord high 
constable of England at the coronation of Queen Anne. He diec 



OF ENGLAND. 77 

of the small-pox, on the 26th of May, 171 1» in the Slst year 
of bis s^e. Hu eldest son Wriothesley was the third duke of 
Bedford.* ' 

The LORD BURLEIGH, with a gun and a dog. 
W. Wissingf. J. Smith f. (1686); whok length ; h. sh. 
mezz. 

The original ia at Burghley-house, near Stamford. 

John Cedl, lord Barghley* son and heir to John, earl of Exeter, 
succeeded his father in 1700. In the third volume of Prior's 
** Poems,'* 12mo. is a genuine copy of verses, addressed " to the 
Coontess-dowager of Devonshire, on a {»ece of Wissen*s (Wis- 
ung*s)y wherein her grandsons are painted." The following lines 
relate to Lord Burghley: 

*' If in dear Budeigh's gen*roas face we see 
ObligSng troth, and handsome honesty ; 
With ail that world of charms which soon will move 
Rev'renoe in men, and in the fair ones love ; 
His every grace, his fair descent assures 
He has his mother's beauty ; — shet has yoar*s." 

See BuBLEioH, earl of Exeter, in the preceding reign, Class III. 
and Noble's Continuation. 



HENRY BOOTH, lord De la Mer. Knelkr p. 
1685. Smith f. (1(589) ; h. sh. mezz. 

Heney Booth, lord De la Mer, &c. W. Richard- 
son. 

Henry Booth, lord Delamer and earl of War- 
riDgton ; in " Noble Authors^' by Mr. Park; 1806. 

Henry Booth, lord Delamer. Harding. 

His portrait is at Dunham Massey, in Cheshire. 

• CoUins's «< Peerage," i. 274, 275, edit. 1768. 
t Anne, eldest diangbter of the countess. 

VOL. VI. M 




.,t che. C^u..^ JiU.ii/ CAejUr- 



1 



78 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Created Lord Delainer wag son of the loyal Sir George Booth, who rose. 
Id arms for Charles II. a little before the restoratioo. H^ was a 
man of a generous and noble nature, which disdained, upoi^ anj 
terms, to submit to servitude; and whose passions seemed to 
centre in the love of civil and religious liberty. He was accused 
of '' coQspiruig to raise a rebellion, a^dtoaubvertthe govenuntnt, 
in conjunction yritb tjtie Duke of Monmouth^ and jpther traitors ;*^ ] 
for which he was tried by his peers. The Lords Howard and.Qrejr 
appeared in court against him ; but they said little of nothing to 
the matter in (j^qestion. The principal evidence wiew oi^ Saxton, 
an obscure fello^. of an infamous character.* Bat ^ lords gave 
no credit to this evidence, and the pirisoner was wianimoosly 
acquitted. The king was very desirous of his being tried before 
another tribunal, where even the testimony of such a wretch as 
Saxton would have.beeii admitted. Tbis iiobleman had a principal 
hand in the revolution, f and was sent, together with the Maiqais- 
of Hallifax and the Earl of Shrewsbury, to infoxm Kipg- Ja,piea, that 
tl^e Prince of Orange des^ired he would quit WhitebalL Another 
would have delivered sucli a message, with an air of triumph, or 
insult; but he did it with a '' generous decency."- Several of his 
'' Speeches, his Advice to his Children,'* and other pieces, are • 
in print ; of which see an account, in the " Catalogue of Royal 
and No^e Authors." Hfi was created earl of Warrington, and 
died in 1693." 

FOIID, lord Grey; froTj;^ an original pictur,€{^ in the 
collection of Lord Brdybrqohe ; in *' The Rf^al <md* 
Noble Authors^' by Mr. Park. 

Ford, the eldest son of Ralph, lord Grey, was a great opposer of 
King James II. and concerned in the rebellion of the Duke of Mon- 
mouth, in whose army he was general of the horse; butl^e^is 
accused olf havmg treacherously deserted his post at the battle of 
Sedg^inore, and qf running s^wa^. at the first charge. He afters 

• Rapin. 

t We are informed by a late aiifbor, that " At Wbittlngton, a village on the edge 
of Scartdale, in Derbjshire, the £arb of Devonshire aad Da^l^y,' and the. X<ord 
Delamer, privately concerted the plan of the revolution. The hoose in wl^ch they 
net is at present a farm-house \ and the country people distinguish the room wliere 
they sat, by the name of the plottiog-parlour."— Dr. Akeittid.e> '^ Ode, addiesied 
to the Earl of Huntingdon/' p. 2$. 







^<iorac <^M ^- ''r// . 



t^yiu/i/^u . 



0aM-u/r^a/^ Sdf-7U'uraA . na ■'c/i-SO./OA^. 



•uro/i 



OF B^GLAJ^b. ^^ 

■vard compounded' for hii fife at H very hIgK rate, and upoii iiiglo- 
iou8 conditions ; for be was a witness for the conviction o£ 6th4k, 
hough it. is said a promise was made him, that none should idie 
ipon his evidence.' He got into favour with William III. who 
tealed him ei^l of Tankerville, and viscount Grey, of Glendale, 
] 1695 ; and soon after he was appointed first lord cbihmiissioner 
f the treasury and lord prlvy-seal. Ob. 1701. fie lef£ in iiSS. 
The secret History of the Rye-house Plot," which was published 
» 175^. See " Royal and Noble Authors." 

JOHN, lord CHURCHIL^U who was raised from a page to. the 
uik of a baron of England, by James II. and afterward raisecL 
imself to much greater honours than could be conferred by any 
ties, deserted his royal benefactor, and went over id the PAftce of 
Grange* But this* was not to be wondered at, when the king's 
vn children forsook him. He had before rent asunder the ties 
^government and religion, which were stronger than those of gra- 
tude or filial afiection. There are many portraits of him, which 
elong to the reign of Anne. See Noble's Continuation. 



SGOTGH PEERS. 

GEORGE, marqiiis of Huntly (first duke of Gor^ 
on) ; in a large oval ; with arms.. J. Sauve sculp. 

Offerebat Jacobus Gordon ;" very rare; in 
4e cotleciion of Alexander Sutherldridy esq. 

George, the fourth marquis of Huntly, waa restored to his estate, 
hiisli had been forfeited during the time of the civil' war, and in 
361 was, by King Charles II. created duke of Gordon. His ^ace, 
-sideg other employments, was governor of Edinburgh Castle,jand 
le of the twelve knights of the most noble and ancient order of 
'e Thistle. At the revolution, the duke held out the castle for 
ing James ; but Burnet says, " He had neither the spirit, nor the 
>urage, which such a post required at that time." He at last 
lou^t it advisable to commit himself and the garrTsbii toKing 
William's discretion. His grace married the Lady Elizabeth 
oward, daughter of Henry, dukd of Norfolk. Ob. 1716. 



80 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

PATRICK, earl of Strathmore, M. 42. KneUer ji 
R.White sc. h.sh. 

Created This nobleman, who with the consent of Charles II. changed his 
idofi"^^' title from Kinghorn to Strathmore, was one of the privy council in 
this and the preceding reign. In 1695, he was succeeded by bis 
son John, who was one of the privy council to Queen Anne. 

KENNETH, earl of Seaforth, lord Mackenzie, and 
Kintail, &c. one of his majesty's most honourable 
privy council, and knight of the most ancient and 
most noble order of the Thistle.* JR. White ad vivum 
del. et sc. large A. ^A.f 

Created The Earl of Seaforth followed King James into France, at the 
1623.^ revolution, and afterward into Ireland. He was by that prince 

created a marquis ; an honour never ratified in these kingdoms. 

He died in 1701, and was succeeded by his son William, who was 

very active in the rebellion in 1715. A reward of 6000/. was 

offered by proclamation for apprehending him. 

JOHN, earl of Melfort. Kneller p. VanderbankX sc 
There is a print of him by the same engraver, afitr the 
same painter, which was done when he was Laird of 
Lundin. JEt. 34- 

The Earl of Melfort. Kneller p. Becket f. large 
4to. mezz. 

• John Drummond, earl of Melfort, was secretary of state, and 
privy-counsellor, in the reign of James. . Soon after the acce^to 
of that prince, he, together with his brother, the E^fl of Perth, and 
the Earl of Murray, became a convert to the Roman Catholic reli- 
gion. He adhered to the king in his exile, and was sent ambas* 

* This order was reviTed by the king, in 1687. 
.' t Mr. Pennant, at p. 141, of his '* Tour in Scotland/' 8to. mentioos " apoidiit 
of the Earl of Seafortb, called from his size, Kenneth More," at Cattle Braao, tie 
seat of Lord Fortrose. 

t He generally spelt his name Vandrebanc. 



i 



OF ENGLAND. 81 

sador by him to the pope. He died abroad, in 1713, in the rixty- 
foiirth year of his age. His relict, who survived him many years, 
lived to near ninety. She had the privilege of a faro-table granted 
her by the King of France, which was thought to be worth about 
eight hundred pounds a year.* There were but two more privi- 
leged tables of this kind in that kingdom. There were in the 
possession of the late Philip Carteret Webb, esq. three volumes in 
$)lio, of the earl's letters, written during his embassy to the pope ; 
among which are several addressed to Robert Nelson, esq. who at 
tbat time corresponded with him. These letters were bought at 
Paris, in 1744, of the Countess of Melfort, who married the earl*8 
grandson, by Mr. Barbutt, late secretary of the post-office. 

JOHN LOWTHER, viscount Lonsdale. Rivers 
direst. From a picture at Lmgkat. 

Sir John Lowther, grandson and heir to Sir John Lowther (who, 
in 1640, was created a baronet of Nova Scotia), possessed great 
accomplishments, and eminently distinguished himself by his zeal 
for the Protestant interest at the time of the revolution. He was 
^atly in favour with King William and Queen Mary ; who consti- 
toted him vice-chamberlain, and made him likewise lord privy-seal. 
He was twice one of the lords justices for the government of the 
Ungdom, during the king's absence; and, in 1696, was advanced to 
the dignity of a peer, by the title of Baron Lowther, of Lowther, 
and Viscount Lonsdale. He died July 6th, 1700, and was buried 
in the church of Lowther; where a monument, descriptive of his 
^irtues, &c« is erected to his memory. 

JOHN, viscount Dundee. R. Williams f. in ar- 
fnour ; h.sh. mezz. 

The Viscount Dundee. Smith f^ small ; mezz. 

John, viscount Dundee, in armour ; h. sh. 

John, viscount Dundee ; foL Drapentier ; pr^xd 
his " Memoirs'' 

* JTroni^ the mlbrmatioii of a Ud j who knew her. 



82 BIOGRAPHICAL HtSTORY 

Viscount Dundee. R. Smith, tn Hhm Brnnt^n's 
Works. 

His head is prefixed to the '^ Memoirs of Lot d Viscount Dundee, 
the Highland Clans, and the Massacre of Glenco/' 

His portrait is at Longleat. 

John Graham, who was created viscount Dundee by King Jam«^, 
was major-general of the Scottish atmy, and a privy-^counsellor in 
the reign of Charles II. He v as then employed in reducing tbie 
west of Scotland, atod in forcing the dissenters to 6om]^ly itltb this 
constitution of the established church, by in^^oisiiig heary Ui^ 
upon them, which was one of the methods of making proselytes in 
that kingdom. But he was a man of too noble a nature to exe- 
cute his orders in their full rigour. At the time of the Prince of 
Orange's inya'sion, he was commanded to ita^r<::h with his regiment 
into England. He advised the king to three things. 6ne was, to 
fight the prince ; another^ to go to him in person^ and demand his 
business; and the third, to make his way into Scotland. James 
had once resolved to pursue the last advice; but that, in the fluc- 
tuating state of his mind, was soon followed by another resolution. 
Upon the king's departure, Dundee applied himself to the Piince 
of Orange, to whom he spoke with all that frankness which was 
natural to him ; but met with a very cool reception. He afterward 
sat in the Scottish convention, from which he suddenly absented 
himself, declaring that he had discovered a plot against his own 
life. He soon after retired into the Highlands, with about forty 
horse, which he had formerly commanded, and presently assembled 
a numerous army. He marched to Gillicranky,* where he engaged 
a large body of forces commanded by General Mackay, but was 
mortally wounded in the engagement. The Highlanders, animated 
by their commander, gained a signal victory; Upon his asking how 
things went, he was told that all was well : " then,** said he, " I 
am well," and presentiy expired. He "was a man of an enterpris- 
ing genius, and his conduct was equal to his courage. He had a 
good deal of the spirit of his uncle, the famous James Graham, 
marquis of Montrose. Ob. 27th July, 1689. See ar chal^cteristic 
account of him, and an excellent description of the battle of 
Gillicranky, in Sir John Dalrymple's •« Memoirs," i: p " 342, &c, 
2d edit. 

* Otberwise Killikranky. 



OF ENGLAND. S3 



AN IRISH PEEEL 

ROGER PALMER, earl of Casdemain, kisswg 
Innocent the Eleventh's foot. Gio. Battista Ltnardi del. 
Arnaldo Van Westerhout Fianf. ^c. foi. Frontispiece 
to a pompous account of his embassy^ published in //./* 
&m, and afterward in English^ 6y Michael Wright^ 
pmnteTj and major-domo to the sarL The prints in this 
took are well executed. 

The Earl of Castlemain, in open violation of the law, was sent 
on ftn extraordinary embassy to the pope, *' to reconcile the king^ 
doms of England, Scotland, and Ireland, to the holy see ; from 
wUdi they had more than an age fallen o£Pby heresy." Innocent, 
who was a better politician than James, and well kbew that he had* 
undertaken what he could not possibly perform, received his am- 
bassador with great coldness. The generality of the cardinals 
treated him with no less disregard, which occasioned his hastening 
from Rome as soon as possible, to avoid the slights and mortifica- 
tiops which he daily received at that court.* 06. 1705. See the 
reign' of Charles II. 

* '* Castleniain, says Dr. Welwood, had several aadiences of the pope, bilt to 
little purpose; for whenever he began to talk of business, the pope was seasonably 
•tticked with a fit of coagbing, which broke off the ambassadors discourse for that 
tiine, and obliged hiin to retire. These audiences and fits of coughing contiiiurd 
firom time to time, while Castleroain continued at Rome, and were the subject of 
diventon to all bat a particular faction at that couft.*'— Welwood's *' Memoin,** 



84 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



CLASS IV. 

THE CLERGY. 

ARCHBISHOPS AND BISHOPS. 

GULIELMtrS SANCROFT, &c. archiepiscopus 
Cantuariensis. JR. White sc. Ato. 

GuLiELMus Sancroft. Ob. 24 Nov. 1693; 
M. 77. 

William Sancroft, &c. One of the seven bishops* 
D. Loggan sc. 

William Sancroft, &c. Elder sc. 8vo. 

William Sancroft, &c. Vander Gticht ; %vo. 

William Sancroft, &c. ILoggan ad vivumyl619. 
The date was afterward altered to 1680, with the ad- 
dress of Overton. 

William Sancroft, &c. Sturt. 

Consec. Dr. Sancroft^ who, according to Bisbop Burnet, made a mttch 
1677 °' ^^^^ considerable figure in his college than in thcf chair of Canter- 
bury, was promoted from the deanery of St. Paul's to that dignity, 
upon the demise of Archbishop Sheldon. He had several good^ 

* There are prints of the seven bishops engraved altogether by White, Vandre- 
banCft Sturt, Robinson, Smith, Gribelin, and Vander Guest. The two last, with 
the seven candlesticks, have a reference to the Apocalypse, Ch. I. rerae 90. Theie 
venerable prelates were sent to the Tower the 8tb of Jane, 1688, for refbsinglo 
distribute the king's declaration for liberty of conscience, in their respectiTe dio- 
cesses, in order to be read by the inferior clergy. 

i Sold by Loggan. It is copied from White's print. 



OP ENOLAKD* 66 

^at sems to httte iMd feir of no aiiti^e qualities* Hb piety did 
^ Bk easy ofi hm; and his reservedn^ss made hie ieamiag appear 
^ be much less than it was in reality. He was slow, timid, and 
'Resolute; though he acted with firmness in refusing to read the 
declaration for liberty of conscience, and to take the new oaths 
^joined at &e revolution. He was placed at the head of the 
ibiirch, becautfe he was like to do no great service to it It waa 
easonabily 8upg09ed> that a man of so recluse aad spe^^ulatiTe a 
Urn, was yery unlikely to disturb the court in their designs upon 
W religions liberties of* the people. His deprivation was probably 
matter of no great mortification to him ; as he had raised an 
state in the see of Canterbury, which was more than sufficient for 
ne of his retired disposition. Such is the character of thid pre- 
ite, as drawn by a contefenporary wiit^y who would have consi- 
erably seined the harshness of the features, if he bad been more 
ike B^uieroft, who bad a generous and enlarged heart to objects of 
enevoience* He was highly respected, and great deference wai» 
aid to his judgment by the prdates, his feUow-sufferiersi, in that 
Lifficult and dangerous conjuncture for the church which preceded 
be revolution: his conduct was indeed judicious and exemplary 
ipon that trying, occasion.* He gave 100(M. towards rebuilding 
be deanery house of St. Panl-s, and was very assiduous in 
voeuring the coal act for rebuilding, the cathedral. He be- 
ineatbed his V8l^able library, which he once intended to leave to 
KB successors in the arohbishopric, to Emmanuel College, in Cam- 
Hidge, where he received his education, and of which he had been 
Hasten Some of these pieces will set his character, as a writer^in 
I fair point of Ught. Such are, ^' Mod^a Policies;" but such 
nooie paiticttlarly, his *^ Familiar Letters to Mr. North ; both be- 
ki«,but principally after his Deprivation, and his Retirement to 
the place of his Nativity in Suffolk,'' IfOnd. 1757, an octavo pam- 
phlet See the Index to the- State Letters of Henry, , earl of Cla- 



* Afker the archbishop had left Lambeth, and retired to a private hoase in town, 
"niomu, earl of AUesbary, w«nt thither to make bim a visit The prelate reoeived 
bin at the door of his apartment, which was opened by himself. The earl, struck 
*ith this circumstance of humiliation, and the total change of the scene in whicft 
he had frequently seen him at his palace, bursty into tears. As soon as he reco- 
vered the power of speech, he told him how deeply he was affected with what he 
Mw, and* of his inability to suppress his grief. " Oh, my good Lord," replied the 
veoerable confessor, *' rather rejoice with me; for now I live again." This anec- 
dote was communicurted by John Loveday , esq. wh9 luui it from the earl himself. 

VOL. VI. N 



86 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Tcadoa, tub. roc. Canterbury. Se% mord of him in Burnet g 
" History;' i. p. 392, and in Birch's " Life of TiUotson," 2d edit 
p. 147, et seq. 

THOMAS LAMPLUGH, archiepiscopus Ebora- 
ceusis, Sec. JEt. 74. Knellerp, Vandrebanc sc. large h.sh. 

The face of this print was rubbed outy and that of 
Archbishop Tennison was substituted. 

Thomas LamplugHj &c. in the " Oxford Alma- 
nacK 1748. 

His portrait is at Queen's College, in Oxford* 

Dr. Lamplugb, who was a native of Thwing, in the East Riding 
of Yorkshire, was some time a taberder of Queen's College, of 
Oxford. In 1672, he was preferred to the deanery of Rochester; 
and^ in 1676, advanced to the bishopric of Exeter. Upon the 
landing-of the Prince of Orange in the West, he, in a public address 
to the olergy and gentry of his diocess, exhorted them to adhere to 
King James : but, upon the approach of the Prince of Orange, he fled 
with precipitation from Exeter to London, and was presently after 
from made archbishop of York. It was with great probability supposed, 
that the see had been kept vacant for Father Petre,* die king's con- 
fessor ; and especially as *^ a dispensation of the Jesuits order to 
Father Peters to enjoy a bishopric" had, at his majesty's request, 
been actually granted by thie pope.f This prelate, who set the 
crown upon the Prince of Orange's head, died*May 5, 1691. Mr. 
Wood telU us, that he iat several i/ears, with due commentlaticmSi 
in the see of Exeter. There is nothing extant of his writiug but a 
. Sermon on Luke ix. 56 , 56 ; preached the 5th of Nov. 1678. The 
curious reader may see an anecdote of him in *^ Baxter's life," fol. 
part iii. p. 178. 

HENRY, bishop of London. ,J. Riley p. J. Becketf 
h. sh. mezz. 

Henry Compton, Sec. an etching (Claussin). 

9 

• Vulgo Peters. t Wclwood, p. 186. 



Bter 
c. 1688. 



OF ENGLAND. 87 

Henky CoMPTOK, &c. mezz. Hargrave ; J. Si- 
mon sc. 

Hbnry Compton, &c. mezz. J. Smith; 4to. 

Henry Compton, &c. in the ^* O^tford Almanack/' 
1742. 

Henry Compton, youngest son of Spencer, earl of Northampton, 
who was killed in Uie civil war, was educated at Queen's College, 
in Oxford. Having stayed about three years at the university, he 
made the usual tour of Europe. After the restoration, he became 
a comet in the royal regiment of guards, commanded by Aubrey de 
Vere, earl of Oxford : but a military life not suiting his disposition, 
he entered into holy orders, and was, in a few years, advanced to the 
bishopric of Oxford, and afterward to that of London. He strongly Translau 
expected to be promoted to the see of Canterbury ; and was greatly f^j^^j 
disappointied when it was given to Dr. Bancroft, but more, when i675. 
Dr. Tillotson was preferred to it. His learning was superficial, but 
Us great diligence in discharging the duties of hia function was 
tnily exemplary. He is said to have been ^* an humble, modest, 
generous, and good-natured man; but weak, wilful, much in the 
power of others, and strangely wedded to a party/'* He was em^ 
phatically called The Protestant Bishop, for the noble stand he 
niade in defence of the rights of the church in this reign, when, 
spirit and resolution were much more necessary than learning. f He 
patronised converts from popery, and was a generous friend to the. 
French Protestants who fled hither from the persecution of Lewis 
XIV. He appeared in arms at Nottingham, a little before the 
revolution, and declared his readiness to fight for the Prince of 
Orange. He was a true son and brave champion of the church, 
and a most munificent benefactor to it. Whatever imperfections 

• See Birch's " Life of Tillotson," second edit. p. 185. 

t The follo«nng is a remarkable instance of his spirit. King James discoorsing 
with him on some tender point, was so little pleased with his answers, that he told 
him, " He talked more like a colonel than a bishop." To which he replied, "that 
bis majestj did him hononr in taking notice of his having formerly drawn his 
sword in defence of the constitution ; and that he should do the same again, if he 
lived to see it necessary.*' Accordingly, when matters were coming to extremity, 
he carried off the Princess Anne to Nuttiugham, and marched into that town at the 
head of a fine troop of gentlemen and their attendants, who had formed a guard 
for her highness. 



9$ BIOGRAPHICAL HI8TORY 

there tm^hk b« in bis eharactAr, he was allowed to be much a gen- 
tleman, and no less a Christian. Ob. July 7, 1713, ^/. 81. 



NATHAN AEL CRlEW, Dunelmensis episcopus, 
kc> Kneller p. Loggan sc. large h. sh. Another by 
Francis Place ; large h. sh. mezz. There is also a 
mezzotinto of him without the engraver's name. 

Nathaniel Crew; Ato. Dorrell sc. 

iiislatc4 Dr. Nathaniel Crew, bishop of Durham, was considerable for his 
^ ^^' birth/ and more considerable for his preferments ; but vainf and 
L 1674. ambitious, unsteady and insincere. He was of all the prelates the 
most eompliaht with the king's measures, and was justly esteemed 
the grand inqvititor of the ecclesiastical commisdon. He expressed 
great satisfaction upon hifr admission into this court, that his name 
would be recorded in history ;t and so indeed it will to his dishonour, 
eren as long as his munificence to the university of Oxford is com- 
memorated. He was hospitable, generous, and charitable ; but his 
charity was sometimes observed to be too ostentatious » He offered 
to resign his bishopric to Dr. Burnet, and trust to his generosity 
for the payment of 1000/. a year out of it : but he Mras of too scru- 
pulous a conscience to accept it upon any such terms. Dr. Cren^ 
was excepted by the act of indemnity ; but found means by his 
1690. submission, by l^e mediation of Dr. Tillotson> and by parting with 
some of the appendages of his bishoprio, to procure hid pardon. 
He died 18 Sept.§ 1721, aged eighty- eight, having been upwards 
- of fifty years a bishop. 

PETER MEWS, bishop of Winchester, who had borne arms for 
Charles I. in the civil war, acted once more in a military character 
against the rebels in the West, under the command of the Duke of 
Monmouth. After the Prince and Princess of Denmark had de- 

^ Hie was fifth son of John, lord Crew, of Stebe, in Northamptonshire ; and, 
upon the dea^i of lus elder brotlier in 1691, he became Baron Crew. 

t He gave Dr. IkCmgey, a prebend of Durham, £or a flattering dedicaUon pre*. 
fix^ to a Seirmaii, wfaicb> as Dr. Richard Grey, then his domestio chaplain, assured. 
Mr; George Ashby he never read. He was fully satisfied with the dedicatiott. 

% Eiiftet, i. p. 676. 

$ ** Bfographia :" according to Dr. Birch, iu his ^* Life of Tillotson," %% Sept. 



OF ENGLAND. 89 

arted the king, and he was in the utmost perplexity end distrest» 
lot being aUe to diitingiiiih his friends from his foes, be was in- 
dmed to pvt himself into the hands of the archbishop of Canter- 
bvryy or the bishop of Winchester. He accordingly sent a certain 
kdj, in whom he oonld con6de, to diese prelates* to know if they 
99M receive ami uaax km; bat they neither accepted nor rgected 
the motion.* See the reign ci Charles II. 

THOMAS BARLOW, S.T.D. episcopus Lincolni- 
ensis. Henne p. R. White sc. Be/of^ his " Cases of 
Conscience j'' 8vo. 

** Herculeas ultra quern jactat rauca cdumnas 
Fama, (nee officio par tamen ilia suo) ; 
En tibi Barloum potuit qu^ sculptor, at ipsa, 
Arte licet claram, vincit ut umbra manum ! 
Ora yenusta vides ; at nobilis atria mentis, 
Qood nitet intenus, nulla tabella dabit." 

Tuo. TuLLiE, D. D. 

Thomas Baelow, &c. in the " Oxford Abnanack^' 
1762. 

His portrait is in the Bodleian Library, of which he was chief 
librarian, and at Queen's College, in Oxford, of which he was pro- 
vost. The above print is not like these portraits : that by Loggan 
has a nearer resemblance of him. 

This learned prelate, whom nature designed for a scholar, and Consec. 
who acted in conformity with the bent of nature, was perhaps as 1575""^* 
great a master of the learned languages, and of the works of the 
celebrated authors who have written in these languages, as any man 
of his age.t The greatest part of his writings, of which Mr. Wood 
has given us a catalogue, are against popery ; and his conduct, for 
some time, like that of other Calvinists, appeared to be in direct 
opposition to the church of Rome. But after James ascended the 

* See Rereab/s *< Memoin/' 4to. p. 178. 

t The ^m\ of An^eaey* in hb " Memoira/' p. SO, saitli, " I never think of this 
^shop, and his incomparable knowledge both in theology and church history, and 
'd the eodeaiastieal law, without applying to him in my thoughts the character that 
vicero gare Crassus; ¥is* * Non unus e roulUsy aed unus inter omnes^ prope 
•ingularis.' " 



90 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

throne, he seemed to approach much nearer to popery than he ever 
did before. He sent the king an address of thaiiks for his dedara" 
Hon for liberty of conscience; and is said to have written reasons for 
reading that declaration* His compliances were much the same after 
the revolution. His moderation, to call it by the softest name, was 
yery great; indeed so great as to bring the firmness of his character 
in question. But casuistry, which was his most distinguished 
talent,* not only reconciles seeming contradictions, but has also 
been known to admit contradictions themselves. He was, ab- 
stracted from this laxity of principles, a very great and worthy 
man.f Oh. 8 Oct. 1691. 



WILLIAM LLOYD, &c. one of the seven bishops, 

WiLiELMus Lloyd, episcopus Asaphensis. Log- 
gan sc. h.sk. 

Consec. William Lloyd, bishop of St. Asaph,]: was son of Richard Lloyd, 
1680.* vicar of Sunning, and rector of Tiiehurst, in Berkshire. He was 
master of as much, and as well digested knowledge, as any clergy- 
man of his time. Whatever be knew, he generally knew better 
than other men ; and was better able to display it to advantage. 
He was never desultory in his studies, but always mastered one 
branch of science before he applied himself to another. His memory 
was prompt, his imagination was lively, and his judgment exact. He 
seemed to be as great a proficient in philology, history, philosophy, 
and divinity, as if each of these had been the sole object of bis appli* 
cation. He was a principal reformer of the language and method 
of sermons ; and was an admirable master of the historic style. It 
is much to be regretted, that so excellent a pen should have been 
chiefly employed in subjects of controversy, the most perishable 

* So John Dunton informs us, in his " Own Life," p. 1^24. 

t Circamstances, in themselves trivial, become interesting when they^are a part 
of the personal history of men of eminence. J shall therefore be excused when t 
mention his smoking tobacco, in which he was almost as regular as in his meals. He 
had a very high opinion of its virtues, as had also Dr. Barrow, Dr. AMrich, and 
other celebrated persons who flourished about this time, and gave much into that 
practice. 

I There were two bishops, of both names, contemporary with this prelate ; one 
was successively bishop of Landaff, Peterborough, and Norwich ; and the other of 
Killala and Achonry, in Ireland. 



OF ENGLAND. 91 

>f all writingt. He supplied a great part of the materials for Dr. 
BttToet*8 ** History of the ReformatioD/' and had a great hand in 
polisiuAg that excellent work. His ** Chronologia Universalis/' in 
folio, which was the most laborious of all his performances, was 
ptrtly printed, but never published.* It hath already been re- 
marked, that his Index to Bishop Wilkins*s '^ Real Character'' is a 
masterpiece in its kind. It should, also be observed, that his 
various studies never broke in upon his parochial or episcopal 
duties, in which he was remarkably conscientious and exemplary. 
His prophecies^ which were but his dotages, have been the suhject 
of much ridicule. There are several portraits of him, which be- 
long to the reign of Anne. He was then bishop of Worcester. 
06. 30 Aug. 1717. 



FRANCIS TURNER, bishop of Ely ; one of the 
seven bishops before described. 

Francis Turner, was son of Dr. Thomas Turner, dean of Can- Coiwec. 
terbury, by Margaret, daughter of Sir Francis Windebank, prin- i^ Nov. 
cipal secretary of state to Charles I. He received his education at Transiat 
New College, in Oxford, was some time chaplain to the kii^, when Crooi Ro- 
duke of York, and a resiJentiary of St. Paul's. In 1670, he was Aug!?68^ 
preferred to the mastership of St. John's College, in Cambridge; 
ia which preferment he succeeded Dr. Peter Gunning, and was 
himself succeeded by Dr. Humfrey Gower. He was afterward 
preferred to the deanery of Windsor, which he held together with 
the bishopric of Rochester. He was deprived for not taking the 
new oaths, 1 Feb. 1689-90. The next year he was accused of 
being a conspirator in a plot of nonjurors for restoring King James, 
for which some of that party were imprisoned ; but he thought it 
pnident to abscond. A proclamation was soon after issued for 
apprehending him, Graham, and Penn, as traitors. — Dr. Turner, 
who was an affected writer, was author of '^ Animadversions on a 



* I shall mentioQ it here, as a fact scarce known, that he was concerned in (he 
magnificent work caJled by (he name of ** Pitt's Atlas •" which, according to th(i 
pniposals, was to be printed in eleven volumes in folio, at forty shillings a volume 
to the subscribers. I ihink only four were printed. This laborious and expensive 
work not meeting with f nconiagement, was the ruin of Moses Pitt, the printer and 
bookseller, who was before one of the most thriving and intelligent persons of bia 
profession in London. 



^2 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



Pamplilety entitled. The Naked Truth i* of se¥eral iMinnons \ aa 
*' Letters to the Clergy of the Diooesg of Ely/' Bat the fiiost ra 
markable of hi» pieces is bis '* Vindication of the late Ar<Mi>i^ 
Sanoroft and his Brethren, the rest of the deprived Bishops, fiom 
the Reflections of Mr. Marshall, in hii^ Defence of obt Consti- 
tution.'' He maintained the strictest intimacy widi die folkmiog 
pious person, who was his school-f^low. 

THOMAS KENN, bishop of Bath aad Wells ; m 
tf the seven bishops. 

There is a portrait of him at Longleat, but unlike bis bead in any 
of the plates of the seven bishops. The prints engraved by Vertue 
are not so just a resemblance of him as they ought to be. 

Thomas Kenn, &c. Dundas. 

Thomas Kenn, &c. M. 73. T. Scheffer; G. Ver 
t%ie. Prefh^d to his ^' Lifay' by Hawkins^ VJ\Z\ 8w. 

Thomas Kenn, &<5. G. Vertue. Prefixed to hi< 
** Works,'' 1721 ; 8w. 

Thomas Kenn, &c. \2mo. 

Consec. Thomas Kenn, a man respected in the court of Charles II. for 
^L^^"' ^^ unaffected piety, was sometime chaplain to that {»:ince, as he 
had been before to the Princess of Orange.* The openness of bis 
countenance corresponded with the simplicity of bis character* 
His sermons and his other writings bad a good effect, as they were 
well known to be the genuine effusions of his heart. Almost all 



* While he was chaplain in the Prince of 0range*s eoint, he obliged 4»e of hif 
highness's faToorites to perform his contract, by marrying a young lady of the prin* 
cess's train, whom he had sedoced by means of that contract. This gave great 
offence to the prince. Bat Charles II. was not offended at his religious intrepidity, 
in peremptorily refusing to admit Nell Gwynn into his lodgings, when the coarl 
was at Winchester : on the contrary, he soon after made him a bishop. The 
I^itig's good sense told him, though the Prifice of Orange's did not, that if a nan is 
really a Christian, his conduct ought to be uniformly consistent with that character ; 
and that principles of conscience are of too stubborn a nature to yield, even in 
courts, to modes of complaisance. 



OF ENGLAJTD. 93 

bis works have % tendency to promote practical religion. He lived, 

after his depriyation, with Lord Weymouth^ at Longleat ; where he Sospende 

spent the gpreatest part of his time in retirement, which he well ?.^q^q^ 

knew how to ei^joy. When he was afflicted with the colic, to which 

he was yery subject, he frequently amused himself with writing 

Terses. Hence some of his pious poems are entitled ** Anodynes, 

or the Alleviation of Pain." There is a prosaic flatness in his 

heroic poem called ** Edmund;'' but some of his Hymns, and 

other compositions, have more of the spirit of poetry, and give us 

sm idea of that devotion which animated the author. Ob, 1 9 M ai'ch, 

1710-11. 

JOHANNES LAKE^ Cicestrensis episcopus. Log- 
gan 8C. 1688. 

John Lake, bishop of Chichester ; one of the seven 
bishops. 

John Lake:, &c. Sturt. 

John Lake ; a cifcle. Overton. 

Dr. John Lake^ who for several years bore arms for Charles f . 
in the civil war, was educated at St. John's College, in Cambridge.* 
He rose, by the usual gradations, to the bishopric of Man; to which 
he was nominated by William, earl of Derby, in 1682, and conse- 
crated in December, the same year. He had not sat two years in 
dus see, before he was removed to thajt of Bristol, whence he was Tr. to Bri 
translated to Chichester. Thoueh he was imprisoned with the tol,l«Aii 
Other bishops, for refusing to cause the declaration for liberty of Xr. from 
conscience to be read in his diocess, he is said to have entertained Bristol, 
tery high notions of regal power ; and to have *^ declared upon suspendc 
Us death-bed, that he had been educated in, and also taught others, 1689. 
tte great doctrine of passive obedience ; which ^he looked upon as 
fte distinguishing character of the church of England ; and liiat he 
^Id not have taken the oathy though the penalty had been loss or 
fte." Upon this declaration, a person of quality in the North, 
M>Ushed " A Letter concerning Bishop Lake's Declaration of his 
4}ing in the Doctrine of passive Obedience." 06. 30 August, 1689. 

^ Hit portnut if %t that college. 
VOL. VI. Q 



94 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

THOMAS SPRAT, episcopus Roffensis, &c. Log- 
gan sc. large h. sh. Anothef, a small oval, wUhoat tht 
engraver's name. 

Thomas Sprat, &c. in the " Oxford Almanack," 
1738. 

C^sec. Thomas Sprat, bishop of Rochester, was a man of wit, and a 
1684. * polite scholar; and one of the most generally admired of our £Dg-> 
lish writers. It appears from his writings, as well as his conduct, 
that his principles were far from being stubborn. He has. repre- 
sented Cromwell as a finished hero,* and Charles I. as a glorified 
saint, t He sat in the ecclesiastical c9mmission, and was by no 
means ayerse from die reyolution. His ** Account of the Rye House 
Plot*' is little better than a romance ; but his <' History^ of the 
Royal Society," his Charge to his Clergy, his Sermons, and his 
Account of Cowley, are excellent performances. His style in ge- 
neral, which has been greatly applauded, has neither the classic 
simplicity of Hobbes, nor the grace of Sir William Temple. His 
poetry is unequal, and sometimes inharmonious. He has, however, 
been justly ranked with the best writers in the reign of Charles the 
Second. See the article of Sorbiere in the Appendix to that 
reign. 

THOMAS WHITE, bishop of Peterborough; owe 
of the seven bishops, engraved in one plate. Yonder. 
Banc. Sold by Loggan. 

Thohas White, &c. J. Drapentier ; la.fol. 

Thomas^ White. J. Golc 

Thomas White ; with the candlestick. S. Gribe- 
tin ; la. Ato. 

The first impression was published by P. Yamomtr^ 
with English and French quotations from the Revela- 

• See his pindaric Ode to the memory of Oliver Cromwell. 

t See his Sermon on the 50th of Jan. where he styles him " a godlike man.*' 



OF ENGLAND. 96 

tim: these wire erased, and the address of Jeffrey and 
Herbert put at the bottom. 

Thomas White; with Dutch verses, Mortier; 
A. Haehoeg. 

Thomas White ; mezz. J. Oliver, 

Thomas White, &c. mezz. Robinson. 

Thomas White, &g. with the candlestick; mezz. 
J.Smith; 1688. 

Thomas Whitjs, &c. J. Start; fol. 

Thomas White. R.White; 16S8; la. fpL 

Thomas Whjte, &c. small Jbl. ij. White. Pre- 
fived to their '' Trial:' 

Tbomas White, bishop of Peterborough^ was, together with Nar Consec. 
thaniel Crew, bishop of Durham, and Thomas Sprat, bishop of ?^^^' 
Rochester, appointed to exercise ecclesiastical jurisdiction in the 
diocess of London, upon the suspension of Dr. Henry Compton. 
He was one of the seven « bishops who were tried at the King's 
Beach, for petitioning the king against distributing and reading his 
dechuration for liberty of conscience. He was deprived for lefusing Deprived 
the oaths, in Ae next reign^ 1689^90 

JONATHAN TRELAWNEY, bishop of Bristol; 
one of the seven bishops. 

Jonathan Trelawniiy^ &c. 4to. 

His portrait is at Christ Church, in Oxford, where he received his 
eduoatioo. 

Jonathan Treiawney was a younger son of Sir Jonathan^ Tre- Coomc. 
hwney, of Pelynt, in Cornwall. But his elder brother dying m l^^J* 
1680, he inherited the title of baronet He was a man of polite 
manners, competent learning, and uncommon knowledge of the 
world. He was a true son and friend of the church ; and exerted 



17 Oct. 
1686. 



OB BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

* 

himself with courage and alacrity^ with magnanimity anid addreti, 
in defence of her just rights and privileges. He waa friendly and 
open, generous and charitable ; was a good companion,' and a good 
man. He was successively bishop of Bristol, Exeter^ and Win- 
chester. He had as much personal intrepidity as his predecessor 
in the last of these sees,* and was, in all other respects, much htf 
superior. The masterly dedication before Dr. Atteibury's Sermons, 
is addressed to this prelate. The reader may see it in some traits 
of his character, without the exaggerations which are too oftea 
found in compositions of this kind ; and which bring the sincerity 
of authors in question, before we have read the first page of their 
works. 06. 19 July, 1721. 



THOMAS C ARTWRIGHT, episcopus Cestriensis. 
Socst p. J. Becketf. large h. sh. mezz. 

Consee. Thomas Cartwright, who had been a forward and confident 
preacher at the time of the Interregnum, and proceeded in exact 
conformity with the powers then in being, struck in with the royal 
party at the restoration, and wasmo less forward upon all occasions 
to express his loyalty. He was made one of the king's chaplains; 
was successively a prebendary of St. Paul's and of Durham, and 
had a hard struggle with Dr. Womack, for the bishopric of St 
David^s. In the reign of James, he enlisted himself on the side of 
the prerogative,t and was made bishop of Chester for boldly 
asserting in x>ne of his sermons, that the king's promises to his 
parliament were not binding. It is probable, that on such slavish 
terms he might have been made archbishop of Canterbury, if that 
prince had continued on the throne. He sat in the ecclesiastical 
amnmnoH, and was one of the ju<]^es sent by the king to intimidate 

* Bishop Mews. 

t Dr. Welwood tells us^ that «' Chcries II. was the fint krag of EBgland that 
ever aimed at any thing like a dispensing power.*' Bot it is certain that Sir 
Edward Coke allowed that there is a dispensing power in the erown. Perhaps he 
durst not have asserted the contrary in the reign of a prince so jealoot of his pie- 
rogative as James L was. Bot« he that as it maj, the comtUutioa was visiblj 
changed on the side of liherty, since that period. See Unroe's " ifistorj," under 
the reign of James 11. 

t P. i?r. 




D"" John Hall ^A^A^^/CS) 

' < ii/Tmwy/miii. a// /hrnnirilM'hin- 
\ 7 I I 




OF ENGLAND. 97 

4be fellows of Magdalen College, in Oxford, in the affair of Dr. 
Jpirker, whom they had refused to elect their president, according 
.the royal mandate. Upon the. revolution, he fled into France^ 
he officiated as minister to the Protestant part of tlie king's 
liehold. Upon the death of Seth Ward, he became titular 
of Salisbur^r. James, who looked upon him as neither Pro- 
it por Papist, had little or no esteem for him. He died of the 
Irelandy whither he had followed the royal adventurer, the 
r'.j^ April, 1689. His '* Speech spoken to the Society of 
Imlen College," and several of his sermons, are in print. He 
jpin^resented in Richardson's ** Godwin," as having publicly 
id' the faith of the church of Rome. See the contrary, in 
L-Oxon." ii. col. 830. 





IRISH PRELATES. 

ICHAEL BOYLE, &c. Armaclianus archiepis- 
>us, &c. Loggan sc. h. sh. 



«. 



Michael Boyle, archbishop of Armagli, pri- 
IDiate, and metropolitan of all Ireland, lord high-chan- 
cellor for twenty years, and several times one of the 
lord'justices of the said kingdom. Ob. 1702, Mt. 93." 
Zmst p. R.Purcellef.h.sh. mezz. 

Michael Boyle, &c. oval; mezz. without the 
engravers name. 

Michael Boyle was son of Richard Boyle, a cousin-german of 
die great Earl of Cork,* and some time archhishop of Tuam. He 
wceired part of his education at Christ Church, in Oxford, whence 
he removed to Dublin, where he took the degree of doctor of 
£viiiity. In January, 1660, he was preferred to the bishopric of 
Cloyne, Cork, and Ross. In 1663, he was advanced to that of Transi 
Dublin, ani in 1678, was translated to Armagh. He was lord- y^i^ 
almoner, and one of the privy council, in this, and the preceding 
reign. He expended a large sum in repairing and adorning the 

♦ See hi» genealogy, in Birch's ** Life of IT. Bojie/' paragraph 2d. 



as BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

archbishop*8 palace at Dublin, aiid gave 20<M. towards erecting 
the front gate of Trinity College, near that city. Murrough, his 
son, who was created viscount Blessington by Charles II. was one 
of the privy council in ibis reign, and in the reigns of Anne and 
George I. 

NARCISSUS MARSH, bishop of Ferns, 1682; 
Cashel, 1690; Dublin, 1694; Annagh, 1701 : intk 
'' Oxford Almanack;' 1738, 1748. 

Narcissus Mar$h was bom at Hunnington, in Wiltshire, in 1638. 
He was made principal of St. Alban's Hall, Oxford, 1673, but 
removed to the provostship of Dublin College, and promoted to 
the bishopric of Ferns, and successively to Cashel, Dublin, and 
Armagh. He was learned and accomplished ; built a noble library, 
and furnished it with valuable books, and settled a provision for 
two librarians. He repaired, at his own expense, several decayed 
churches; presented a great number of oriental MSS. to the Bod- 
leian Library, and performed other munificent acts. Ob, 1713. 

EZEKIEL HOPKINS, episcopus Derensis. Before 
ff,is WorkSf foL 

EzEKiEL Hopkins, &c. jR. White sc. Before ki$ 
" EjeposUion of the Ten Gommandments ;" 4/o. 

EzjBitiEL HopKiKr3, &c. . ^urt sc. 6vo. Before his 
Sermons. 

EzEKiEL Hopkins, &c. M. Vandergticht sc. 8vo. 

Ezekiel Hopkins, who wa» son of an obscmre clei^yman m 
Devonshire, was some time a chorister of Magdalen College, in 
Oxford, and usher of the adjoininjg scbooL He was, in the eiiriy 
part of his life, inclined to the Presbyterians, among whom be was 
extolled as an excellent preacher; a character which he well d^ 
served, and in which he had very few equals; John, lord Rpberts, 
happening to hear hini preach, was so taken with his discourse, his 
person and his manner, that he retained him as his chaplain, when 
he was sent in quality of lord'^lieutenimt into Ireland ; and pre- 



OF ENGLAND- 00 

kned }iim. .to the deanery of Raphoe. When that nobleman was 

lecaUed^be so strongly recommended Mr. Hopkins to Lord Berke^ 

-ley, his successor, that he was soon preferred to the bishopric of 

Hsphoe» whence he was translated to Derry. During the war 

under the Earl of Tyrconnel, at the revolution, he withdrew into 

England, and was chosen minister of St. Mary Aldennanbury, in 

London; where he died on the 19th of June, 1690, and lies 

bstied in that church. His " Sermons," his ^* Exposition of the 

Ten Commandments," and that on the ** Lord's Prayer," were in 

good esteem. His works were printed together, in 1710, fol. He 

was fother of Mr. Charles Hopkins, several of whose poetical 

pieces are in Dryden's '' Miscellanies." See more of him, in 

Prince*s ** Worthies of Devon." 



DIGNITARIES OF THE CHURCH, &c. 

JOHN TILLOTSON, dean of Canterbury,* who had distin- 
Kttished himself by his polemical writings in the latcv reign, helped 
to carry on the war against popery in the present. The greatest 
dJTiaes that ever appeared in controversy were formed about this 
period. Such were Tillotson, Stillingfleet, Patrick, Sherlock, and 
Vake. These were more than sufficient for a whole army of 
Jesuits; but the king thought that a well-appointed army of sol- 
diers, and a vigorous exertion of his prerogative, was a surer and 
a more expeditious method of opposing the enemies of his religion. 
Re, in a letter addressed to the archbishop of Canterbury, enjoined 
the clergy to preach a good life, and never to meddle with con- 
trofersy in their sermons. At this time, popish books were pub- 
licly sold, and much holy trumpery was imported from Italy. 
See the reign of Churles II. Almost all the portraits of him be- 
long to that of William III. 

RICHARDUS MEGGOT, S. T. P. decanus Wih^ 
toniensis. Knellerp. Loggansc. large h.sh. 

^ TlMf9 ii »^go6^ pictate oC biiD« by Mrs. Besle* among the portraits of the deans, 
at the Deanery House, at Canterbory, Habere there is a series of these dignitaries, 
from Dr. Nicholas Wotton, the fint dean, to the present time. Dr. George Eglionby 
only excepted* 



100 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

RiCHARDUs Meogot, &c. Kfidler p. Wh\ 
large h. sh. Idem: White sc. Svo. 

Richard Meggot, who received his education at Queen's ( 

• in Cambridge, was some time canon of Windsor, rectoi 

Olave'sy in Southwark, and vicar of Twickenham, in Middles 

Installed 1679, he vas preferred to the deanery of Winchester, in w 

^ ^^^- succeeded WilUara Clark. , He died Dec. 7, 1692, and waa 

at Windsor. Ten of his sermons were published in Svo 

Several others are mentioned in Letsome's *' Historical Reg 

SYMON PATRICK, decanus Petroburgensis 
White sc. Before his " Paraphrase on the b 
Mr 1685; %vo\ 

Installed Dr. Patrick, who was a consummate master of the popi 
\^^' tFOversy, and had distinguished himself by his writings s 
discreet zeal against the church of Rome, was sent for 
king, who did his utmost to mollify him, and prevail wi 
to lay down his pen. But he told his majesty, with a 
tion that never failed him when he thought his duty w 
cem^ed, " that he could not give up a religion so well pr 
that of the Protestants." He and Dr. William Jane had af) 
a conference in the king's presence with Gifiard, a doctoi 
Sorbonne, and Mr. Tilden, who went by the name of Dr. C 
The subject of this dispute was, *< The rule of faith, and the 
judge of controversy." The popish doctors were pursued 1 
all the intricacies of sophistry, and so closely pressed t 
antagonists, that they were fairly put to silence. The ki 
them very abruptly, and was heard to say, that '' he neve 
bad cause so well, nor a good one so ill maintained." 

Dr. WILLIAM SHERLOCK, who was justly esteemed 
the greatest ornaments of the London clergy at this time, 
posed to have written more pieces gainst popery than an; 
contemporaries. His adversary. Dr. South, who afterwe 
gaged with him in a very warm dispute concerning the Trin 
forced, in an indirect manner, to acknonrledge his merit 

• He was afterward bishop of Chichester, whence he was translatedvlQ 6 



OF ENGLAND. 101 

popish controTeny, though he would allow it in nothing eUe.* 
He was a more vehement writer than Dr. Patrick. See Noble*8 
Continuation. 

• 

JOHN HOUGH,t afterward bishop of Worcester. His por- 
trait belongs to several of the succeeding reigns. 

I shall only observe here, that one Farmer, a man of little nbte, 
and less honesty, but a new convert to popery, was, by the king, 
proposed as president of Magdalen College, in Oxford ; and that 
the feUows of that society, in direct opposition to the royal mandate^ 
which was never before heard of in any election, chose Mr. Hough; 
who asserted his own right, and that of the university, with a firm« 
ness and spirit conformable to that dignity of character which he 
sustained through the whole course of his life. He was removed 
by the ecclesiastical commissioners, 22d June, 1687, the day on 
which he was admitted to his doctor's degree, to make room for 
Or. Samuel Parker, bishop of Oxford. See Noble's Continuation, 

vol. in. 



GILBERTUS BURNET, S- T. P. M. 44, 1687. 
R.White sc. h. sh. 

. Gilbert Burnet, some time chaplain to Charles H. incurred the 
resentment of the court} in the latter end of that prince's reign, by 
the openness of his conduct in regard to popery. This resentmeint 
was much increased by a sermon preached at the Rolls chapel, 
5th Nov. 1684, on Psalm xxii. 21, ** Save me from the lion's 
mouth ; thou bast heard me from the horns of the unicorns.'* The 
text was thought to be a bold allusion to the supporters of the 
royal arms, though the conceit, as he tells us, was never intended. 
The sermon was also thought to be in as bold a strain ; and espe- 
cially where he mentioned the famous wish of James I. against any 
of his posterity that should endeavour to introduce the Roman 
Catholic religion. Upon the accession of James II. he very pru- 
dently left the kingdom, and travelled over Italy, Switzerland, and 
part of Germany. He returned to Enigland with the Prince of 

' * His words are, " This character I shall give of him, as a writer, that there is 
hardfy any one sobject which he has wrote opon (that of popery only excepted), 
hot be has wrote for and against it too.*'— South*8 " Animadversions,'' &c« p* 18. 
t PronooDced HdL 

vol*. VI, p 



102 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Orange, and had no inconsiderable share in the revolatkm. Set 
Noble's Continuation. f- 

THOMAS BURNET, doctor of laws, the celebrated theorist, ^ 

resolutely opposed an illegal attempt of Jameft IL to impose one ,i 

Andrew Popham, a Papist, as a pensioner upon the Charter-house, z 

of which he was master. His portraits belong to the next reigB.* i 
See Noble's Continuation. 



Tlie Reverend SIR GEORGE WHELER, knt. 
of Charing, in Kent. Engraved by William Bromlej/f 
front a painting in the possession of Granville Hast- 
ings Wheler, esq. In Surtees " History of Durham^' 
folio. 

Sir George Whaler was descended from an ancient family, 
who had been possessed of property in the counties of Kent and 
Middlesex ; his father. Col. Charles Wheler, of the guards, suf- 
fered for his loyalty to King Charles I. and Sir George was bora 
whilst his parents were, on that account, in exile at Breda, in Hol- 
land. In 1667 he became a member of Lincoln College, in Oxford, 
but before he had taken a degree, he went abroad with Dr. James 
Spon, of Lyons, and, embarking at Venice, sailed to Constauti- 
iiople, and travelled through Lesser Asia and Greece. On his 
return he received the honour' of knighthood, and in 1683, the 
degree of A. M. from the university of Oxford; he published an 
account of his travels, and of several antiquities in Greece and 
Asia Minor, in 1682, and presented several pieces of antiquity 
which he had collected to the university; his valuable casket of 
■Greek medals he afterward gave by will to the Dean and Chapter 
Library of Durham. About 1683, Sir George entered into holy 
orders, contrary to the wishes of several powerful friends, who 
would wilKngly have supported his interest at court. In 1684^ 

* In a' tract, written by Br. Thomas Comberi entitled *' Frequent and fenreni 
Plrayer, according to Scripture and primitiye Usage, as it is now practised by th^ 
pious Members of the Church of ^gland," 1687, the author at p. 31, informs u»y 
tha^ the prayers pf the church were " better frequented than ever f* and t)iat the 
dissenters went to their places of worshjp with ** diligence and zeal.** Thisaocowit 
of the state of religion is confirmed by Bishop Atterbury, in one of his Sermons^ 
▼ol. i. p. %6Qt &c. 



OF ENGLAND. 103 

h was collated by Bishop Crewe to the second stall in Duiiiam 
€atliedni) ; aod in 1708, being then vicar of Basingstoke, in Hants, 
was promoted by the same patron to the rectory of Hoaghton-le- 
%mg. An unworthy person, of Sir Qeorge's own numerous 
^Uikly, endeavonred to bring his ren^rable kinsman into disgrace 
•a&d danger for some unguarded expressions of attachment to the 
.imfbrtunate house of Stuart Bat, whatever might be Sir George'^ 
feelings of compassion for the banished descendants of a prince, 
for whom his ancestors had fought and suffered, his sincere at- 
tachment to the church of England preserved him steady in his 
sdl^isBce to that establishment, under which religious liberty had 
ifaond shifter from the attacks of arbitrary power, and '' the in- 
■^egrity of liis heart and the innocence of his hands" defied sus- 
^on. - 

Sir George Wheler died at Durham, Jan. 18, 1723, and was 
buried In the Galilee of Durham Cathedral, where a handsome 
monument was erected to his memory by his only surviving son 
^Iranville Wheler. 



JEREMIAH WHITE, chaplain to Oliver Crom- 
well; miall quarto. 

Jehemiah White; copy from the above. R. 
Grave sc. Bvo. 

' Jeremiah White received a liberal education, and was brought 
op At Trinity College, Cambridge, of which house he became fel- 
low, in the troublesome times of the war, Mx» White's politics 
M him to join the prevailing powers, and in time procured him to 
4)6 3Dade preacher to the council of state, and domestic chaplain to 
^highness, Oliver, lord-protecitor. He was a very sprightly and 
AUsetious man^ despised the cant and hypocrisy of the puritanical 
p8i^ of his time, and was considered one of the chief wits of the 
l^jotector's court* — Possessing all the advantages of youth, and a 
fine person, he had the ambition to aspire to the hand of Crom- 
Wel!!s youngest daughter, the tady Frances. The young lady 
appears by no means to have discouraged his addresses, but, in ap 
i!e)igiQUS a Court, :tbis gallantry Could not be carried on without 
being taken notice of. The Protector was informed of it; and, 
Mhving no inclhiation for sucKan alliance, was so miuch concerned, 



104 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

I 
I 

tbat be ordeied the person who told him to keep a strict look-oot, j 
promisiDg, 4f he could give him any sobstantial proofe, he should i 
be well rewarded, and White severely piumbed. The spy followed • 
bis business so close, that in a litlkf time be dogged Jerry White JE 
(as he was generally called) to the lady's chamber, and ran im- 
mediately to the Protector, to acquaint him that they were together. . 
Oliver, in a rage, hastened to the chamber, and going hastily in, 
found Jerry on* his knees, either kissing his daughter's hand, or 
having just kissed it. CromweU, in a fury, asked what was the 
meaning of that posture before his daughter Frances ? White, 
with a great deal of presence of mind, said, ** May it please your " 
highness, I have a long time courted that young gentlewoman * 
there, my lady's woman, and cannot prevail; I was, therefore, 
humbly praying ber ladyship to intercede for me." Oliver, turning 
to the young woman, cried, ^' What's the meaning of this, hussy? 
Why do you refuse the honour Mr. White would do you? He is 
my friend, and I expect you would treat him as such." My lady*s 
woman, who desired nothing better, with a very low courtesy, re- 
plied, ** If Mr. White intends me that honour, I shall not be against 
him." " Sayest thou so my lass,*' cried Cromwell, " call Good- 
wyn, — this business shall be done presently, before I go out of the 
room." — Mr. White had gone too far to recede from his proposal; 
his brother parson came, and Jerry and my lady's woman were 
n\arried in the presence of the Protector, who gave the bride 
500/. to her portion, to the secret disappointment and indigna- 
tion of the enraged dupe of his own making, but entire gra- 
tification and satisfaction of the fair Abigail, the moment they were 
made one flesh, who, by this unexpected good fortune, 6btained a 
husband much above her most sanguine hope or expectation. 

The restoration deprived White of all hope of preferment, if he 
refused to take the oaths, and offered him but faint prospects if he 
did; he, therefore, prudently chose to remain quiescent, for he was 
too pleasant a man to take up his abode in a prison, for preaching 
in a conventicle. — His wit and cheerfulness gained him many 
friends, but he would have found himself more at home in the pa- 
lace of Charles II. than in that of Oliver. He survived not only 
the restoration and revolution, but the union, and died in 1*^07, 
aged seventy -eight. 

When the story of his marriage was mentioned before Mrs. 
White (who survived her husband), she always simpered her assent 
to* its truth. Jeremiah White printed the funeral sermon of Mr. 



OF ENGLAND. 105 

s Fuller, preached by him; but his *' Persuasive to.Mode- 
and Forbearance in Love, among the divided Forms of 
ans/' was published after his death. Others of his works 
romisedy but have not yet appeared. 



A SCOTCH DIVINE. 

!NRY SCOUGAL, Theol. Prof, author of " The 
)f God in the Soul of Man." From the original 
College Hall, Aberdeen. Trotter so. 8vo. 

ry Scougal was the son of Patrick Scougal, bishop of Aber- 
1664 to 1682, and has the merit of being the first Scottish 
, it is believed, who wrote a book of practical piety. Ec- 
tical disputes, so inconsistent with the meek spirit of Chris- 
, had first prevailed between the Catholics and reformers, 
Btween the Presbyterians and Independents. Sermons and 
intaries on Scripture were sometimes interposed; but the 
bject, the practice of the Christian virtues, was unaccount- 
3glected; Durham's curious work, on Scandal, being rather 
ission of ecclesiastic discipline and polity, and a defence of 
ssbyterians against the independent Jacobins of the day, 
1 ethical production. 

lenry Scougal little is known. It is said that, being of an 
IS complexion, he sometimes loved God, and sometimes 
vomen ; and that having unfortunately become enamoured 
irried lady at Aberdeen, he died in the struggles of virtue 
ssion. But he had grown so corpulent in his retreat in the 
of the cathedral church of St. Machin's, at Old Aberdeen, 
s executors were forced to extract the body through a window, 
traditions seem rather inconsistent, as love is generally sup- 
*ather to belong to the class of consumptions, than of drop- 
nd it is rare that the amorous swain pines away into ple- 

igaFs '* Life of God in the Soul of Man" was published by 
Burnet, in 1691, 8vo. and has since passed through many 

s, being a work of eminent piety, without enthusiasm, and 
in a clear, neat style. 



106 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



NONCONFORMISTS. 

RICHARD BAXTER was Uied by the Lord Chief-justice Je^ 
feries for reflecting upon bishops, in his '* Paraphrase on the New 
Testament ;*' for which he was fined five hundred marks> to lie ia 
prison till the fine should be paid, and to give fiecurity for his good 
behaviour for seven years. See the preceding reign. 

r 

CRESCENTIUS MATHERUS, M. 49, 1688. 
Sturt sc. Svo. The date ah this print has been alterei 

There are, at least, two more prints of him ; one hy 
White, another by Faber, both in 8w. 

Increase Mather, minister of the Old Church, and president of 
Harvard College, at Boston, in New England, was an independent 
minister of considerable eminence. He was author of ^* Eplstola 
ad Joannem Leusdenum, de Successu Evangelii apud Indos in 
Nova Anglia," 1688, 8vo. ** Some important News about Con- 
version, delivered in sundry Sermons," 1674, 8vo. A " History 
of the Wars of New England," 1676, 4to. « An Essay for the 
recordiog of illustrious Providences," 1684, Svo. " The Wonders 
of free Grace, or a complete History of all the remarkable Peni- 
tents executed at Tyburn, &c. for. thirty years last past," 1690, 
8vo. The writings of this author, and Cotton his son, relative to 
the New England Witches,* made a great noise in the world, and 
are, to this day, matter of astonishment to those who read the 
history in detail, with the various attestations of the facts.f 



* The people of New England became (though late) sensible of the delusion, am! 
;diat so much so, that a fast and humiliation was instituted to deprecate tlie vengeance 
of God from the shedders of innocent blood. The tide of this strange persecudon 
was turned by the following singular incident: The wife of a clergyman bein| 
lacjcosed of witchcraft, the wives of all the clergy became alarmed, and aeon con^ 
vinced their husbands that they and their flocks had erred. See Nuble.'s ** Con* 
^inuation." 

t «The Wonders of the Invisible World," &c. written by Cotton Mather, 
contains an account of the trials of several witches executed in New England, to- 
gether with nialiy strange ^anecdotes concerning them. In this book, which is non 
before me, the author tells us, that the witches,' according to 4beir own -coofessioii, 



OF ENGLAND. 107 



CLERGYMEN OF THE CHURCH OF ROME. 

There is a print, by Claude du Bdsc, of BONAVENTURE GIF- 
PARD, w¥ieh was done in 1719, and in the 77th year of his age. 
rhough. it properly belongs to the reign of George I. it may, as a 
nemorial of a person of merit, be placed in the reign of James, as 
16, during that period, was consecrated bishop of Madaura, a city 
>f Africa,* and was appointed, by royal mandate, president of Mag- 
lalen College, in Oxford, and accordingly took possession of his 
itall by proxy.t He was much esteemed by men of different reli- 
gions, and especially by those who were most intimately acquainted 
with his character. It is certain, that he died at Hammersmith, in 
the reign of George the Second, aged about ninety. The dates of his 
age assigned by Dod and others, at the time of his death, differ 
considerably from the era on his print, which is very probably right. 
See Noble's "Continuation." 



*' fbrtn tliemsclves moch after the manner of congregational churchest and they ha?« 
a baptum and a supper and officers among them, abominably resembling those of onr 
I^rd." "In ^ the witchcraft/' saith he, *'.which now grievously vexes as, I 
Imowjiot whether any thing be more unaccountable than the trick which the witchea 
have to render themselves and their tools invisible."^ '* One of our bewitched 
people was cmelly assaulted by a spectre that, she said, ran at her with a spindle, 
though nobody else in the room could see either spectre or spindle. At last, in her 
nuseries, giving a snatdi at th^ spectre, she pulled the spindle away, and it was no 
sooner got into her hand, but the other people then present beheld that it waa 
indeed a real, proper, iron spindle, belonging they knew to whom ; which, wheu 
tBey locked up very safe, it was, nevertheless, by demons unaccountably stole 
away to do farther mischief." He mentions a similar instance of a woman who tore 
from the back of a spectre a piece of an ininsible sheet, which immediately became 
visible before a room full of spectators.) The same author saith, " Nineteen witches 
bve been execnted at New England; one of themVas a minister, and two mi* 
niiten more are accused. There are a hnndred witches more in prison, which broke 
priaoB, and about two haadred more are accused : some men of great estate in 
Boston, have been accused for witchcraft. Those hundred now m prison, accused 
for witches, were comm i tted by fifty of themselves, bemg witches ; some of Boston, 
N most about Saiem and the towns adjacent.**! 

* In partibfu lofiddiara. 

f " Atben. Oaon.'' ii. coL 8M. 



t *' WoMkn of the invi«ble Worid," latter part, p. 44. 
§ P. 45. I P. 51. 



108 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

FATHER PEl'RE, with the devil tempting him to 
hang himself; Achitophel is representing hanging at a 
distance : a Dutch mezzotintOy small h. sh. 

There is a print of Hugh Peters^ with a wind-millf 
Sgc. over his heady inscribed " Father Peters.** 

2%ere are many prints, published at the time by R.de 
Hpoghe, Sgc. in which Father 'Piltri^ is introduced, 

Edward Petre, a man of an easy and insinuating address, was at 
the head of the Jesuits who frequented the court in this reign. He 
was not destitute of parts ; but his vanity and ambition, rather than 
his bigotry, were much an overpoise for his judgment, and helped 
greatly to precipitate the king's ruin, especially after he was sworn 
of the privy council. This step was absolutely against the consent 
of the queen and the most judicious of the Catholics. James, iira 
letter to the pope, made it his request, that his holiness would raise 
him to the episcopal dignity, or bestow on him a cardinsfl's hat* 
He was at this time the kmg's confessor. 

. The Letters of Father Petre, La Chese (Chaise) and another Je- 
suit, concerning the affairs of England, appear to be apocryphal. 

D. JOSEPHUS CARRERAS, Hispanus. Pictura 
originalis in cedibus Johannis Roberts armigeri. Knel- 
ler p. 1686; Faberf. 1735; bald head ; writing ; mets^ 

The original was at Houghton in 1755. 

This person was secretary and chaplain to Catharine of Braganza, 
the queen-dowager. He sometimes amused himself with poetry, in 
which he made a considerable proficiency. 

There were other noted clergymen of the same communion at this 
period, but I have seen no portraits of them ; particularly Father 
Fitzgerald, who was sent by James to convert the Duke of Buck- 
ingham in his sickness. The duke published an Account of the Cm' 
fennce betwixt them, in which the doctrine of Tran substantiation is 



* See what is said of liim by Dod, iii. p. 422, Ai^yvnA bj Dalrymple, i. 
p. 151, 164, &c. 



OF ENGLAND. 109 

loBoroariy. ridiculed. I latdy met with ^ The &it Sermon 
jMeached beibie their MiyeitieB in English, at Windaoi'^on the firit 
Sondty of October, 1685, by the Rev. Father Dom. P« B. Monk Of 
tbe holy order of St« Benedict, and of the Enghah congregation; 
paUished by his Migesty'e Command,'^ 1686 ; 4to. The next ia 
](att zziL 37. There are at Jeaet four more such sermonsy preached 
m Engjuih befiMre the king and queen, by Philip Ellii. Dr. Welbore 
Ellis, who died bishop of Meath, and was father to Welbore Elli% 
esq. now living, was brother to this Philip Ellis. Justice Ellis of 
Westminster was another of the brotherii. Philip Ellis is mentioned 
m " Athen. Ozon." u. 362. 896.* 

FRANCIS COUPLET ; a whok length. KjielkrpL 
Faberf. 1736, mezz. Under the print is this inscrtp- 
(JMi.*f "*' HancFrancisci Couplet, Societ. Jesu ad Fidem 
Christianaiii inter Sinenses propagandam missij Ima- 
gmem, Aiino 1687, a Gothofredo Kneller, Equite^ 
pictam, et ex ipso Archetypo, in Arce Vindesoriana; 
deposito, ezpressioa, Richardo Mead. M. D. B. R. S. 
publicum suae erga Virum clarissimum Observantise 
Testimonium, D. D. D. Johannes Faber." 

The original, at Windsor, was, by the painter himself, esteemed 
the- best of all his works^ Mr. Walpole thinks, the portrait of Gib- 
Boos, the canrer, at Houghton, a more capital performance. 

Falfher Cdnplet, erroneously called '' The converted Chinese,'' 
wai a Jesuit who was sent as a missionary to China, where several 
of his fraternity had met with toleration, if not with encouragement. 
In the '' Diary of Henry, earl of Clarendon,"| is the following arti- 
de, dated the 10th of February, 16S7-8. 

** Le Pere Couplet supped with me : he is a man of very good 
conversation. After supper, we had tea, which, he said, was really 
u good as any he had drank in China. The Chinese, who came 

* For ft teOer accoimt of the Ellis family, and, among tliem, of this Father EOis, 
afias Jolly Phil, lee the " Gentleman's Magazine/' for 1769, p. 398. The acooont 
waa coawniicated by tlie Rer. Mr. Duncombe, of Canterboiy, whose father le- 
oaved it from Jottice EUis. 

t This print may be placed here wiih the other Catholics, or at tbe end of the 
R^, when tint of Coi^ Dads may also be placed. 

tP.fa. .. 

VOL. VI. Q 



110 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

over with him» and Mr. Fraser, supped Gkewise with us.*' In the 
Bodleian Library is ^^ Tabula Chronologica Monarchifle SinicsBi jnxta 
Cyclos Aniionim LX. ab Anno ante Christum MMDCCCCLIL ad 
annum post Christum MDCLXXXIII. Par. 1686." Also *' Disser- 
tatio Prooemialis Confucii Scientise Sinensi prafixa.*' Both these 
folios are ascribed to PkUip Couplet. This is most probably the 
same person with the missionary, as the date appears to coincide 
with his return from China. 

A MENDICANT FRIAR. 

FRATER MENDICANS. M. Lauron delin. P. 
Tempest exc. cord^ rosary ^ Sgc. One of the set of Cries. 

This plump Franciscan went begging about the streets in the 
reign of James^ He was generally looked upon as a fore-runner of 
his brethren pf the cord. Some would perhaps think him more pro- 
jMerly placed in the twelfth class, together with the other vagrants 
that infested the metropolis. 

A LAY PREACHER. 

JOHN BUNYAN. Sadler p. 1685. Spilsbury f. 
h. sh. mezz. 

JoHK BunYan; mezz. 4to. Sadler; J. Haid, 1762. 

. The. painting, to which the engraver has done justice, and which 
uppears to be ^n original is now in the possession oi Mr. Fidd, a 
liratchmaker at Bath. . See the reign of Charles II. 



CLASS V. 

COMMONERS IN GREAT EMPI^OYMENTS. 

SIJl STEPHEN FOX. /. Baker; R. Earlm; 
mezz. Ato. 

t 

Sir Stephen Fox, who. never hurt his conscience by acquiring his 
fortune in the late reign, and scorned to increase it in the present, 



OF ENGLAND, 111 

bj betia]fing^the interests of his country, was, for Voting contrary 
(oAeking'sinclination in the House of CommonSyforfoidhis majesty's' 
presence, and diimissed from his place of pay-master to the army, 
wUch was valued at 10,000/. per annum.* His portrait was piunted 
ttihe reign of William HI. 



CLASS VI. 
MEN OF THE ROBE. 

GEORGE, lord JEFFERIES, &c. lord high-chan- 
cellor, 1686. Cooper; large Ato. mezz. 

QIeorge, lord Jefferies, &c. inscribed^ " The 
Lord'Chancell cr'' J. Smith exc. large Ato. mezz. ' 

The Lord-chancellor taken in disguise at Wapping. 
He is surrounded by the mob; h. sh. 

There is a portrait ]of Um in the possession of the earl [of Win* 
cbelsea. 

Sir John Reresby informs us, that he cut off his eyebrows to P* i^' . 
^ i« • • i_ 4to. «ai( 

preT^nt his bemg known. 

Law never wore so terrible an aspect, as when the pert^f the in- 
solent, and cruet Jefferies sat upon the bench; who was, without 
exception, the worst judge that ever this, or perhaps any other 
nation was cursed with4 In the western assizes, after the defeat of 



^ Reietb/s " Memoirs/' 4to. p. 1S7. 

t '< Thaa sharp I/Estrange m more admired prater. 

Wittier on bench, Uian he in OAseroator.**— Stats Poms. 
■ % Howerer Moody an instmment he was of arbitrary power; yet that ho was no 
ftind to popery wiU appear from the foUowing anecdote, oommonicated by the 
Rev. Mr. Gosling, of Caoterbory, whidi I gife the reader m tliat gentleman's own 
words: 

" One day,. while be was chancellor, he invited my father home with him from 
the kmg's chapel, and inquiied whether theie were not a butiding at Canterbnry 



113 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Moomoiitlvluxies WjBie OTerbonie, judgment was given with pifeci* 
pitation ; even the common legal fonns were neglected, arid the lavs 
themselvesopenly trampled upon, by a murderer in the robes of a lord 
cbief-justice.* He returned triumphantly to London, and was received 
with open arms by the king,f who soon after placed him at the head 
of the highest tribunal in the kmgdom.t He was taken in disguise 
at Wapping, 12th Dec. 1668. It was with difficulty that the mob 
were restrained from tearing him to pieces. He died soon after in 
the Tower. His seat, well known by the name of Bulstrode, was 
purchased by William, f ari of Portlsnd, in the reign of Anne. 



0ftlled ibe Sermon-hoiue, 9ii4 what use wm m^icle of it. Mf^ther said it was the 
(Ad Chapter-bouse, where the dean, or his representatives, night convene the cboir 
imce a fortnight, and hear the chanter's account how well the duty had been at- 
tended in that tim*. * This/ said lie, « will not do^" and e^plaiacd fainseir by 
Myhig* that the Presbyterians bad then a petition before the kiiig and eomicil 
asking it, as a thing ef no use, for their meeting-honse. On this, ro j father told himi 
that, if it were made a chapel for the early prayers* and the choir reserved pi|ieij 
ftr cathedral service, tins would be a great Gonyemence, and the SermoB-boiise 
would be in daily use. « This will do,' said the chancellor. • F^y, let fte desn 
and chapter know as soon as possible, that I advise them to put it to this use 
without delay,' adding, 'if the I'resbyterians do not get n g^ant of it,, others 
peihapB wiO, whom you may like still worse.' Wn adfice was taken, and it has 
l>een th^ morning-prayer chapel ever since." 

* I have seen an old woman, who kept a little alehouse in the West, kindle into 
lage* and melt into pity, upon relating the cruelties of Jefferies, and the catastrophe 
of Monmouth. I jcpncluded that she caught both thes<5 passions from her motheri 
who, she told me, " was an eye-witaess of the shocking barbaritiea of those lament- 
ifUe tines." It is remarliable that the laie Counteu of Pomfiet net with my mde 
insults from the populace on the western road, only became die was gniMl-daa||hlBr 
fiC tiie inhuman Jeffeiies. . ■ 

t King Ji^mes called the western circuit Jeffmes** eampaignm 
t His behaviopri both in private and public» was very inconsistent with the cht- 
ncter f»f a lord-chanoellor. Sir Jo|)n Reresby infoAus us, that he once dined «^ 
Mm, when the lord major of London and several other gentlemen were his goeslii 
aind having drank deeply at dinner, he gave a loose to that inclination to frolic which 
was natural to him. He called for Mountfoft his domestic, who was an ezpelleot 
mimic; and be, in a sham-cause, took off,9fi^ modem phrase ii» tdi th6 giMl Unr 
yen of t^e age, in the n^Ost ridiciiloiaa manlier^ Tbe- same aatfamr adds, that he htd 
like to have died of a fit of the vtooc^ iciiipb he braugM vpon himself by a fnrioiu 
debauch of wine at Mr. Alderman Pmicpnb's ; where h^» the IprdptfeasMo; snd 
Others, dmik themselves Id such a ^leh of frensy, *^ that among friepda il was iriiifr 
^esed that th^ had stripped into th^ shirts; and thathadnotanac^^oalpiftfeale' 
them, they had got up on a sign-rpost to drink the king's health ; which wai ths 
Bttbjcpt of mofh dpAttotk, to aay ao wonie*"-- iUfeiby'a *^ Ifeinf^/' 4lo. p. 15Q» 

lai. - . • : 



OP ENGLANfi. : ! Ul 

Sir Gkorg* Jeffries, lord chief-jurtice of the 

King^s Bench, 1684. R. White sc. large h. sh. ^ 

» 

He was made lord chief-justice of the King's Bench in Septem-; 
l)erl683»andlord-chancd[lor^onthe 28th of that month, 1685. 
The neit year he was appointed one of th^ ecclesiastical conimis- 
sion,* 

JOHN, lord JEFFRIES ; whole lefigth, in his robes ; 
from a drawing in the collection of Thomas Thompson, 
esq. M. P. In " Nohk Authors,' by Mr. Park. 

I Jobny lord Jefferies was the son of the noted chancellor, and suc- 
ceeded to his title on thci death of his father in 1689. He married 
the Lady Charlotte, daughter and hefress of Philip, earl of Pem- 
broke, by whom he had a son, Herbert, who died an infant, and a 
daughter, Henrietta Louisa, who married Thomas, earl of Pomfret; 
On his lordship's death in 1703, the title became extinct: . He was 
author of a Fable, &c. Vide ** Noble Authors,'' by Mr. Park. 



- 4 



SIR ROBERT WRIGHT, lord chief-JHstice> of 
England, who tried the seven bishops, in 1668* 
J. Riley, p. R.White sc. large h.sh. 

• 

Sir Robert Wright, who descended from a good family at Thet* 
&fd, m Norfolk, was handsome in his person, of a voluUe tongue^ 
t&d plausible behaviour ; huXi voluptuous, extraTagant, and abaa- 
^ned. .Though he had much practice, he was but superficial ii\ 
the knowledge, of bis profession^ He mortgaged his. estate for 
1500/. to Mr. North, afterward lord-keeper, and again to Sir Walter 
Plummer, fo^ 500/. before \i& had pidd off the former mortgage; 
and made no scruple to swear, that the same estate walt^ clear from 
all encumbrances. He was made a judge by the interest of Jefferies') 
thoi^ th^ lord-keeper had before told the king, that he wa& the 



* Hw death of Jefferies, was aaoeleiatcd in cansaqaence of the blows and bruise^ 
he bad received when taken by the mob. He had previously resided \n Alder- 
nianbary, and his body was there privately hiterred by his family. ' In ISlO^^id^ 
workman employed to repair the church of St Mary, discovered his remains, in a 
vault, witkiT^^ naia» of Chancellor Jefferifis on a plate on the lid of the coffin. 



114 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

most unfit person in the kingdom to act in that character.* As 2i< 
was the creature, so he was the tool of Jefferies, He had his share 
of the western massacre, in the visitation in Magdalen College, in 
the ecclesiastical commission, and other arbitrary and tyrannical 
proceedings; He died miserably in Newgate, in the beginning of 
the retgn of William ; having been confined ** for endeavouring to 
subvert the government.*' 



NICHOLAS LECHMERE, knt. baron of the Ex- 
chequer, bom 1613, difed 1701 ; from a?i original pic- 
ture. V. Green sc. 4to. mezz. 

Baron Lechmere was appointed to his post in the Exchequer al 
the revolution! He was called to the bar as seijeant, May 4th, 
1689, and made a judge the same day. One of his daughters was 
married to Mr. Neale, an eminent merchant of London, by whom she 
had, in 1668, Mr. Edmund Smith, the author of *' Phsedra and Hip- 
politus,'' who assumed the name of his maternal uncle, in gratitude 
for his care of him after his father's death. 

SIR THOMAS JONES, lord chief -justice, &c. 
R. White sc. 1685. See the reign of Charles II. 

It appears from Salmon's " Chronological Historian/' that Sir 
Thomas Jones was appointed lord chief-justice of the Common 
Pleas, upon the accession of James. But there is a print of Sir 
Henry Bedingfield, knt. in which he is styled '^ lord chief-justice 
of the Common Pleas," though it is of the same date with that of 
Sir Thomas Jones. It was engraved by Robert White. 

. The bishops counsel. Sir Francis Pembertonj ha. 
lord chief 'justice of England^ anno 1681; Creswell 
Levinz, justice of the Common Pleasy 1684 j Sir Robert 
Sawder, attorney-general, 1687 ; Henry Polkafeuj esq. 
counsellor at law ; Sir George Treby, recorder of Lon^ 
don, 1683; the Honourable Heneage Finch, esq. soli* 

* See North's " Ufe of the Lord-keeper Guildford,*' p. 247, ^48. 



OF ENGLAND. 116 

itor-generalj 1686; John Somers^ esq. counsellor at 
law. Sold by S. Baker; large h. sh. 1689. -R. White. 

The bishops counsel, &c. mezz. R. Williams. 



SIR FRANCIS PEMBERTON. 

See some account of him in the reign of Charles II. 

CRESWELL LEVINZ. 

The portrait of Sir. Creswell Levinz belongs to the reign of Wil. 
liam III. See Noble's Continuation. 

SIR ROBERT SAWYER. 

Sir Robert Sawyer, one of the ablest of his contemporaries in his 
profession, formed himself after the Lord Chief baron Hale,* under 
whom be practised, and of whom he was a just admirer. He, like 
that excellent person, was a man of general learning, and of an in- 
tegrity that nothing could corrupt. His reputation in the Court of 
Exchequer, the business of which he perfectly understood, was 
superior to that of any other counsel. He was attorney-general 
from the year 1681, to 1687; during which period, he approved 
Umself in some very delicate points, and upon many important 
Occasions, a most judicious and expert lawyer, and a no less useful 
>Qan. He was continued in his office by James, but was soon set 
^ide by that prince, who presently perceived that he could not be 
prevailed with to mould the laws to such purposes as were never 
intended by the legislature. He has been justly censured for hia 
harsh treatment of Lord Russel on his trial. Pemberton, on the 
(^ntrary, treated him with a gentleness and candour that did him 
much honour. He died at Highcleer, in Hampshire, 1692. His 
only daughter married the Earl of Pembroke. She died the -17th 
>f November, 1706. 

• Sec North's «* life of the Lord-keeper Guildford," p. 287. 



110 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



HENRY POLLEXFEN. 

His portrait belongs to the next reign, when he Was lord chm< 
justice of the Common Pleas. See Noble's Continuation. 



SIR GEORGE TREBY 

Was lord chief-justice of the same court, in the latter end of the 
reign of William^ in which his portrait should be placed^ tSee 
Noble*s Continuation. 



The HON. HENEAGE FINCH. 

Heneage Finch, who was younger brother to Daniel, eaxt ot 
Nottingham, was made solicitor-general, the 13th of Jannaryy ^678; 
from which office he was rempVed by King Jamesi in Aparil;'t6S6; 
and " one Powys was appointed in his stead, who was ready and 
willing to do what the other refused."* He was, in this reign, 
member of parliament for Guildford, in Surrey. On the SMi of 
October, 1714, soon after the accession of George I. he was 
created earl of Ailesford. Ob. 22 July, 1719. See Ndble't 
Continuation. 



JOHN SOMERS, esq. 

It should be observed, that all the lawyers who pleaded as eonik* 
sel for the bishops, weve men of uncommon eminence in their pro-* 
fession. Mr. Somers, in particular, displayed an eloquence -Mi 
that occasion, worthy of Athens or Rome, when they produced 
their most finished orators ; and an honest zeal for liberty , no less 
Worthy of those republics, when tiiey produced their most diRtin<* 
guished patriots. See the next reiglit; Noble, vol. i. 
' The judges, Powell and HoUoway, (^>po8ed the diiptaBingf 
power; in the trial of the bishops, with a spirit worthy of the CMte 
hi ivhich ^they were* concerned. They had the hononr of being 
dismissed from their employments, the next day after thoee vener-j 
able confessors were acquitted. 

• Reresbj's «« Memoirs/' p. 133. 




'"Iilllii ILillO 

J" Ich n If I ^ I III -J 

V. 'v Il« 



OF ENGLAND. 117 

THOMAS STREET, miles, justiciarius communis, 
banci, ^at. 63. R. White ad vivum del. et so. 1688 ; 
large h. sh. 

Thomas Street, miles, &c. Mtatis 63. W. Rich- 
ardson. 

Sir Thomas Street was one of the twelve judges who gave his 
opinion against the king's dispensing power. The singularity of 
his being 

—— faithful found 
AiDong the faithless * — ^ 

18 recorded on his tomh.f To say any more of his integrity in his 
public charactert would be superfluous ; to say any thing greater 
is impossible. He continued in his employment during the short 
reign of James. 

SIR JOHN HOSKINS ; a bust in a niche. R. White 
sc. 4to. 

Sir John Hoskins. Harding. 
Sir John Hoskins. W. Richardson. 

Sir John Hoskins was grandson of Judge Hoskins, a noted poet 
and critic in the reign of James I. He was well known as a 
tnaster in Chancery ; was perfectly skilled in the knowledge and 
practice of that court, and. deservedly esteemed for his invincible 
integrity in the discharge of his office. But he was much better 
known to the world as a philosopher than a lawyer; and especially 
in the latter part of his life, when he devoted the greatest part of 
his time to experiments. He was much admired for his general 
knowledge, and his ease and openness in the communication of it. 
Tbere was nothing at all promising in his appearance: he was 
hard-favoured, affected plainness in his gari>, walked the street 
with a cudgel in his hand, and an old hat over his eyes. He was 
often observed to be in a reverie : but when his spirits were ele« 

• Milton. 

t In the cloisters of the cathedral church of Worcester. 

X He was nuMle a jostice of the Common Pleas« t9 Oct. 1684. 

VOL. VI. R 



118 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

rated over a bottle, he was remarkable for his presence of mind, 
and quickness of apprehension, and became the agreeable and in- 
structive companion. He was some time president of the Royal 
Society.* 

An anonymous head of a Lawyer, JEt. 55, 1685. 
At the bottom of the oval, " Viderit utilitas.'' R. White 
delin. et sc. Said to be the portrait of the Rev. Mark 
Hildesley. 

The portrait is prefixed to the following book, ** Religio Jnris- 
prudentis ; or the Lawyer's Advice to his Son ; in Counsels, Es* 
says, and other Miscellanies ; 1685;'' 8 vo. 

A SCOTCH ADVOCATE. 

GEORGIUS MACKENZIUS, a valle Rosarum, 
causarum patronns. Knellerp. White sclQQQ; hi sh. 
See the reign of Charles II. 



f ■ ' ' 



' . • 



CLASS VIL 
MEN OF THE SWORD. 

CHRISTOPHER, duke of Albemarle, who made no fig^nn^an a 
soldier, was made captain of the life-guard, upon the disgrace of 
the Duke of Monmouth. When that rash and unfortunate adven- 
turer appeared in arms in the West, he raised the militia of Devon- 
shire and Cornwall, at the head of which he marched to Axroinster : 
but when Monmouth approached he withdrew. It is probable that 
he never acted afterward in a military character. 

* £lected| 168S. He presided only one year. 



\ 




5^7«[/^ Oiw^md ffii!^.tfe m-^(/^i^{m.tf/C'M:'^^M/iar^n. 



OF ENGLAND. 119 

The Portsmouth Captains. The Hon. CoL John 
Beaumont; the Hon. Capt. Thomas Paston; Capt. 
&mon Pack ; Capt. Thomas Orme ; Capt. John Port ; 
Capt. William Cooke ; R. White sc. In six ovals^ joined 
bj/ as manjf hands ^ expressive of their union; lar^e h.sh. 
very scarce. 

The king, wben he had resolved to iqtroduce popery, thovght it 
expedient to be in a military posture ; and that the army should be 
aagmented with men of that religion. Great numbers of soldiers 
Were accordingly brought over from Ireland. On the 10th of Sep- 
tember, I6889 Lieutenant-colonel Beaumont, Captain Paston, and 
Tour other captains of the Duke of Berwick's regiment, were 
cashiered, by a council of war held at Windsor, for refusing to 
Btdmit Irishmen into their companies. They soon after retired to 
Portsmouth, where they unanimously declared for the Prince of 
Orange. 

JOHANNES CUTTS, armiger, de Childerley, &c* 
W Wissing p. R. Williams/, in armour ; mezz. h. sh. 
scarce. 

John Cutts, lord Cutts. Harding. 

JoHNi lord Cutts; in a reclining posture, sup- 
posed to be dead: Apollo, Minerva, and Cupid weq^ing, 
%c. " Laurinda Tumulus ;" mezz. rare. 

This gallant person, who is well known by his title of Lord 
Cutts, signalized himself in a very extraordinary manner at the 
^Dg of Buda, by the Imperialists. That important place had I68d. 
been, for near a century and a half, in the hands of the Turks. 
iKr. Addison, in a Latin poem, worthy of the Augustan age,* 
plainly hints at Mr. Cutts's distinguished bravery at the siege. 

*' Hie, ubi saxa jacent dispeno Infecta cerebro, 
Atque ioterruptis hiscont divortia muris, 
Veiillum intrepidus fizit, ct» tempora dudum 
Budeiuei palnut, peregrinaquM laurut obumbrat,** 

MusB Angllcatf. toI. ii. p. f . 

** It was occasioned bj the peace of Ryswick, 1697. 



120 BIOGRAPHICAL BISTORT 

He returned to England with the Prince of Orange, at the r^o- 
lution, 

ANDREW FLETCHER, lord justice-clerk, aad 
keeper of his majesty's signet, in Scotland ; fro/m an 
original 'picture by Aikmariy in the collection of the 
Earl of Buchan. Birrel sc. 8vo. 

Andrew Fletcher, of Saltonn, in East Lothian, was bom in the 
year 1650 ; and in his early youth, having the misfortune to lose Us 
father, was placed under the care of Dr. Gilbert Bumet, then rector 
of the parish of Saltoun, afterward bishop of Salisbury, from whom 
he received a most liberal and excellent education ; aiter which he 
was sent to travel on the continent. He was, from his in&ncy, of 
a fiery and uncontrollable temper ; but his disposition was noble and 
generous. He became first known as a public speaker, and a man 
of political energy, from being one of the commissioners in the 
Scotch Parliament, when the Duke of York was lord high-commis- 
sioner ; connecting himself with the Earl of Argyle in opposition 
to the Duke of Lauderdale's administration, and the arbitrary de- 
signs of the court ; which obliged him to retire^ first into England, 
and afterward into Holland; on which he was summoned to appear 
before the lords of the council at Edinburgh ; which not thinking 
it prudent to do, he was outlawed, and his estate confiscated. 

He afterward joined the Duke of Monmouth in his ill-judged 
expedition ; but haying the misfortune to kill a man, whose horse 
be had taken for his own use, was compelled to quit the army, in 
order to stop complaintsf of the duke's English followers against 
him : this circumstance, however, was the means of preserving his 
life ; as^ had he continued in England but a few days longer, he 
must inevitably have shared the fate of the unfortunate duke, and 
that of many of his deluded followers. 

Afber passing through a variety of adventures, Fletcher returned 
to England with the Prince of Orange, afterward William IH. and 
filled a number of important situations in Scotland under the reign 
of that monarch, and his successor Queen Anne. Ob. in the 
year 1716. 

VICE-ADMIRAL BENBOW, bom 1650, died 
1702. Z). Parks delin. 1818; from the original paint- 



OF ENGLAND. 121 

ing in the Grand Jury Room^ in the Guildhall, Shrews- 
bury. J. Basire so* In the " Gentleman's Magazine,'' 
July, 1819. 

John Benbow, who was bom at Shrewsbury, became, at the age 
of thirty, master and part owner of the Benbow frigate. When at- 
tacked by a Salee rover, he defended himself bravely, though very 
inferior in number ; at last the Moors having boarded him, were 
beat out of the vessel with the loss of thirteen men.^ Oq his re- 
turn, James II. gave him the command of a ship in the royal navy. 
After the revolution, he rose to the first rank in his profession by 
pore merit, and had the command of the West India squadron, 
when he fell in with the French fleet commanded by M. de Casse. 
Several of his officers had taken some disgust, and permitted him 
almost alone to sustain the whole fire of the enemy. For four 
da^s did this intrepid seaman, assisted only by one ship, pursue 
and engage the fleet, while his cowardly officers behind remained 
spectators of his activity and bravery. In the engagement his leg 
was shatCered by a cannon ball, and he soon after died of his 
pounds. Two of his officers, Kirby and Wade, were tried by a 
court-martial, and shot. 



CLASS VIIL 



SONS OF PEERS WITHOUT TITLES, 
KNIGHTS, GENTLEMEN, &c. 

WILLIAM CECIL, esq. Wissing p. J. Smith f. 
(1686) whole length; mezz. sittings with a dog and a 
parrot. 

* The men's heads he ordered to be cut off, and thrown into a tub of pork pickle, 
^pimhis arrival at Cadiz, he refused to have his Iugg«ge examined by the custom- 
ise officers, asserting that the bag contained only salted provision ; but upon the 
magistrates insisting on seeing the contents, Benbow ordered his servant to empty 
tbemon Ihfe table, adding, " I told you they were salt provbion, and, gentlemen^ 
rf yott like them, they arc at your service." 



122 BIOGRAPHICAL HI8T0RT 

I take this gentleman to be brotherto Lord BurgU^, p 
in the third Clacs. Wissing died at Burghley-houMt in l^ 
or James II. soon after he had paiated this, tmd atf 
rnkta of the fomily. See Noble's Contlouatiou. 



MR. CHARLES TOWNSHEND (a cluld); 

rot on his left hand. Kneller p. Smith f. h. ah. 7 

He was afterward Lord Townshend, and was secretny oCH 
in the reign of George I. There is another print of bin a' 
pointinv of Kneller, which beioo^ to that reign. 

SIR CHARLES COTTERELL. knight, and n 
of the ceremonies to three kings, from 1641, to ] 
Mtat, 72. Rilofp. Williams f, h. sh. mezz. 

His portrait by Dobson, together with the portrait of the painter 
bimself, and that of Sir Balthazar Gerlrier, is at Northumberiand- 
house. 

Sir Charles Cotterel was son of Sir Clement Cotterel. of Wyli- 
foid, in laocolnshire, groom-porter lo James the First. He was, in 
the time of the Interregnumi steward to the Queen of Bohemia; 
and ia 1670, when he was created doctor of laws in the muTenity 
of Oxford, it appears tiiat he was master of the Reqno^ to 
Charles II. He possessed, in an extraordinary degree, Ae Tariooi 
ftccomplishDKDta of a gentleman ; and particnUrly excelled in Aa 
knowledge of modem languages. During the exile of bit rtijtX 
master, he translated from the French " Cassandra, tbe bmed 
Romance," which has been several times printed.' He hod a 
principal hand in translating D'Avita's " History of tha Ciril Wan 
of France," from the Italian, and several pieces of less nota from 
the Spanish. In 1686, he resigned his place of master of the cere- 
monies, and was sncceeded by his son Charles Lodowick Cot- 



•nSt roouBce, utd thu of " CtulU," «Uch wu wriltni 
will hue it, b; Msdune dc Scudcrj, ««rc luRBttlf auch md kiMl wlniired- 
tller lold, fur ■ comidcnble time, at ■ liigh |iricc. TUejr ve medlcji uC ti!i- 
■nd fibl« ; vid kn u much bcjood gidinirj' liTv ud wtaota, U tbe Fill- 




'JoznaA C/ulJf Ija 



'^A^J ^1 d. A.'lJ.T«h AjhrJ I iyo!!./.jW.Pu.-A=rJ>-cna,ti^S!'^Al:u 



OF ENGLAND. 123 

t«l, etq.* He is celebrated by Mrs. Catharine Philips, under the 
of Poliarchus. See more of him in " Athen. 6xon." 



SIR JOSIAH CHILD, mercat. Lond. Riley ; M. 
Vr.Gucht. 

Sir Josiah Child, bart. W. Richardson. 

Sir Josiah was son of Sir Richard Child, a merchant of London. 
He distinguished himself as a commercial writer in *^ A new 
Discourse on Trade f to which is added a small Treatise against 
^mj, and which has passed through several editions. He was 
created a baronet, 1685. Ob. 1699, and was buried at Wansted, 
rtere is a superb monument to his memory. 

SIR JOHN COVENTRY ; from the collection at 
^Jmgkat, in Adolphus's British Cabinet. Harding sc. 
to. 

John Coventry was grandson of Thomas, first earl of Coventry, 
id nephew to Henry and Sir William Coventry. He was son of 
le Honourable John Coventry, by Elizabeth, daughter of John 
oiks, esq. of Barton, in Somersetshire, and widow of Herbert 
'oddington. 

John Coventry was made knight of the Bath at the coronation 
r King Charles II. was a member in the Long Parliament, and in 
11 the other parliaments in the reign of Charles II. for Weymouth. 

He was distinguished for wit, and being often in opposition, a 
iolent and cruel attempt was made on his person, on the 21st of 
December, 1670. Bishop Burnet gives the following account of 
he transaction: 

" Sir John Coventry was one of those members who violently 
>ppo5ed the giving money; and it being then usual, after such bills 
lad failed in the main vote, to lay the money on fdnds unaccept- 
able and deficient, it was prbpbsed to lay a tax on playhouses, 
^hich were then deemed nests of prostitution. This was opposed 
^y the court ; it was said, * The players were the king's servants, 
md a part of his pleasare.' Upon which Sir John asked, ' Whether 

* The iamcdUte predecetsor of Sir Cliarles Cotterel was Sir John FJnet. 



124 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

did the king's pleasure lie amongst the men or women that acted T 
This was carried with great indighation to the court. It was said, 
' This was the first time that the king was personally reflected on : 
if it was passed over, more of the same kind would follow; and it 
would grow a fashion to talk so. It was therefore fit to take such 
severe notice of this, that nobody should dare to talk at that rate 
for the future.' The Duke of York told Bishop Burnet, ' He said 
all he could to the king to divert him from the resolution he took; 
which was to send some of the guards, and watch in the streets 
where Sir John lodged, and leave a mark upon him.' The fact, 
by bills of indictment, was found to be committed by Sir Thomas 
Sandys, knight, Charles 0*Bryan, esq. Sir Simon Parry, and Miles 
Reeves, who were fled from justice, not daring to abide a legal 
trial. — As Coventry was going home, they drew about him ; he 
stood up to the wall, and snatched the flambeau out of his ser- 
vant's hands ; and with that in one hand, and his sword in the 
Other, he defended himself so well that he got credit by it. He 
wounded some of them, but 'was soon disarmed, and then they cut 
his nose to the bone, to teach him (as they said) to remember what 
respect he owed to the king ; and so they left him, and went back 
to the Duke of Monmouth's, where O'Bryan's wound was dressed. 
The matter was executed by orders from the Duke of Monmouth; 
lor which he was severely censured, because he lived then in pro- 
fessions of friendship with Coventry ; so that his subjection to the 
king was not thought an excuse for directing so vile, an attempt oa 
his friend, without sending him secret notice of what was designed* 
Coventry had his nose so well needled up, that the scar was scared 
to be discerned. This put the House of Commons in a fil»rioos 
uproar: they passed a bill of banishment against the actors of it; 
and put a clause in it, that it should not be in the king% power to 
pardon them ; and that it should be death to maim any persoo* 
This gave great advantages to all those that opposed the court; 
and was often remembered, and much improved by all the angiy 
men of those times." The act thus obtained is still called '' Tbt 
Coventry Act." j 

Sir John Coventry died unmarried, and endowed an hospital st j 
Wiveliscomb, in the county of Somerset, for twelve poor people. 

HENRY COVENTRY;/ro»i the collection at Long- 
leat, in Adolpkm's *• British Cabinet." Harding sc. Ato, 



OF ENGLAND. 125 

Hie Honourable Henry Coventry was third son of Thomas, first 
earl of Coventry, by his second wife Elizabeth, daughter to John 
Aldersey, of Spurstow,.in the county of Chester, esq. and widow 
of William Pitchford, esq. He was educated at All Souls College, 
Oxford, where he received the degrees of bachelor of laws and 
master of arts. On account of his loyalty he was a great sufferer 
in the rebellion, and soon after the restoration of Charles Ih was 
made a ^oom of the bed-chamber. 

The king entertained the highest sense of Coventry's integrity* 
who possessed his entire friendship ; he therefore sent him envoy 
extraordinary to Sweden, on the 4th of September, 1664. He met 
with a very honourable reception ; the Swedes testified a sincere 
a&ction for the king, and the utmost willingness to unite in any 
thing which would not be destructive to themselves. Coventry re- 
mained in Sweden two years, and returned the 2l8t of June, 1666. 

In the year following it was judged expedient to send ambas- 
sadors to Breda, for the purp<^e of treating for peace. Mr. Co- 
ventry had given so much satisfaction in his former embassy, that 
the chancellor proposed him as one of the properest persons to 
iGt in the treaty, and he was appointed with Denzil, lord Hollis, 
aoibassador extraordinary. They were fitted out in a style worthy 
of the station they were to fill, and of the master for whom they 
acted. At Breda they concluded a peace with France, Denmark^ 
and the States General. 

In the year 167 1 , Mr. Coventry went again ambassador to Sweden, 
find returning the following year, was constituted secretary of 
state, and privy-counsellor. This office he filled with the strictest 
Melity and honour upwards of six years ; but his health no longer 
Hrmitting him to undergo the fatigue, he requested leave to 
retire. 

His resignation was announced by the following public notice 
m the Gazette: "Whitehall, February 11, 1679. -His majesty 
was this afternoon pleased to declare in council, that Mr. Secre- 
tary Coventry has long solicited him, on account of his infirmity of 
hody, for his leave to resign his place as one of his principal secre* 
taries of state ; that his majesty has at last been prevailed upon to 
grant it, though with some unwillingness, because of the great 
satisfaction his majesty has always had in his services ; and that 
^ intention was he should ever continue in his privy council." 

"After this time he never accepted of any public employment, but 
fived in a very retired manner till his death, which happened at his 

VOL, VI. S 



f 



126 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

house iu the Hay-market, near ChariDg-^cross, the 7th of December, 
1686y in the 68th year of his age ; he was unmarried. 

SIR WILLIAM COVENTRY ; from the collection 
atJjongleat^ in Adolphus's *^ British Cabinet.^ E. Hard- 
ing sc. 4to. 

William Coventry was the younger brother of Henry Coyentry. 
At the age of sixteen he was a gentleman commoner of Queens 
College, Oxford. He went to the university in 1642, and, after 
continuing some time, commenced his travels. 

On his return he was appointed secretary to the Duke of York, 
and also to the Admiralty, and elected member of parliament for 
Yarmouth in 1661 : he was also returned for the same town to the 
parliament summoned in 1678. In 1663, he was created a doctoi* 
of laws at the university of Oxford. He was sworn of the privy 
council, and had the honour of knighthood conferred on him, 
June 26, 166^. In 1667, he was made one of the commissioners 
of the Treasury. 

Bishop Burnet observes, that he was ** a man of great notions 
and eminent virtues; the best speaker in the House of Commons, 
and capable of bearing the chief ministry, as it was once thought 
he was very near it, and deserved it more than all the rest did.'' 
He engaged in a personal dispute with the Duke of Buckingham, 
which, terminating in a challenge, he was forbid the court, and he 
retired to Minster Lovel, in Oxfordshire. There he lived pri?atelyi 
devoting himself to religion ; and though considerable offices were 
afterward tendered to him, he constantly declined accepting them. 
He died unmarried, at Somerhill, near Tunbridge Wells, where he 
went for the benefit of the waters, the 23d of June, 1686, aged 60 
years, and was buried at Penshurst, in Kent, where a monument is 
erected to his memory. 

By his will he left 2000/. for the relief of the French Protestants," 
who had lately quitted their country from religious motives, and 
3000/. for the redemption of captives from Algiers.' 

CHARLES C^SAR, of Gransden, in the Co. 
of JHuntingdon, esq. second son of Sir Charles Caesar, 
master of the Rolls ;^ bom Feb. 7th, 1636, died in 
August, 1707. jR, Wilkimon exc. Ato. 



OP ENGLAND. 127 

Mr. Charles Ccesar was born at Tottenham^ inliliddlesex, Feb. 7, 
16d5-6y and was an infant under six years of age at the time of 
the death of his father, the unfortunate circumstances attending 
which, not allowing time for deliberate arrangements, left him to 
tiie guardianship of the law, and the affection of a most kind mo- 
ther. He was entered on the 3d of September, 1651, a fellow 
commoner of Jesus College in the university of Cambridge, and 
remained there upwards of five years. When he came of age he 
took possession of his estate of Great Gransden, in Huntingdon- 
shire, which had been g^ven to him by his father's hasty will ; but, 
preferring a residence in his native county, disposed of the savings 
ofhismraority, March 17, 1659-60, in the purchase of lands at 
Msch Hadham, in Herts, on which, not long before, had been 

erected a fair seat by Tompson, esq. For this property Mr. 

Ccesar paid 1700/. He kept it not long, for, his mother dying in 
the house within two years after, he conceived a distaste to it, and 
sold it to William Allen, esq. a neighbouring gentleman; and 
retired to Great Gransden, wisely preferring the calm respect- 
ability of the life of an honourable country gentleman to the 
tmc^lrtainty of public splendour, and the inevitable solicitudes 
which attend it. He remained there for thirty years, improving his 
estate by neighbouring purchases, and in 1692 relinquished his 
priocipal seat, with its demesne, to his eldest son, and removed to 
the town of Stamford, in Lincolnshire, where he died in August^ 
1707, leaving three children, Charles, Henry, and Dorothy. 

SIR EDWARD SEYMOUR; from his monument 
dt Maiden Bradley. Harding sc. Ato. in Adolphus's 
^^ British Cabinet.'' 

Sir Edward Seymour, the Ghh of that name in lineal succession, 
was bom in 1633. In the reigns of Charles H. James H. William 
and Mary, he was very conspicuous in all political transactions, 
sod particularly in the House of Commons. He constantly served 
in parliament for the city of Exeter, except once for Hindon, and 
once for Totness. 

In 1667, he distinguished himself in the impeachment of the Lord- 
chancellor Hyde, earl of Clarendon. In the House of Commons 
lie made a long and severe speech against him, recapitulating all 
the supposed crimes and errors of his administration, and urged the 
propriety of arraigning him for high-treason; and he attended, in a 



128 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

few days after, at the bar of the House of Lords-with the aecusatiox 
t)f the lower house, and there requested the lord-chancellor mighl 
be sequestered from that house, and his person Secured, 

On the resignation of Sir Job Charlton, Feb. 15th, 1672-5, U 
was unanimously chosen speaker of the House of Commons, anc 
aa the 9th of April following, made treasurer of the navy. On th< 
6th of March, 1678, he was again chosen speaker, but the king 
having occasion for his services, in a manner which he considered 
incompatible with that appointment, refused to confirm the election. 
The commons made three representations in Seymour's favour, bat 
at length having been prorogued, and fearing dissolution, tbey 
elected Serjeant Gregory. 

Seymour gave so much offence to the house by his attachment to 
the constitution, and his opposition to their extravagant views, that 
on the 20 th of Nov. 1680, they voted his impeachment, and a 
motion was made for addressing the king to dismiss him from his 
presence and councils for ever; but the motion vysis abandoned, 
and no articles of inipeachment exhibited. He opposed tlie bill of 
exclusion, and was a great promoter of the Habeas Corpus Act. 
. After the accession of James II. Seymour was a strenuous opposer 
of the Puke of Monmouth and his rebellious adherents in 1685. 
Afterward, considering the church of England in danger from the 
united efforts of the Catholics and Presbyterians, he joined in invit- 
ing the Prince of Orange, though he expected that he would only 
interpose as a generous mediator, and not attempt to seize the 
throne or change the succession. When William landed in 1688, 
such was the terror of the people, and their tardiness in joining 
him, that he would probably have been compelled to return, but 
Seymour waited on him at Exeter, and proposed forming an asso- 
ciation to adhere to him till the religion, laws, and liberties of 
the kingdom, were secured by a free parliament. This candid 
declaration soon procured the Prince of Orange a great number of 
adherents. 

Seymour disliking the subsequent proceedings, particularly the 
dethroning of King James, and disinheriting his son, opposed 
those measures and resisted the bill for forming the convention into 
a parliament. His efforts being over- ruled, he submitted and took 
the oaths of government. He continued his parliamentary exer- 
tions till the period of his death, which happened Feb. 17, 1707-8, 
at Maiden Bradley, where he was interred, and a beautiful monu- 
ment erected to his memory. 




\j4^^c 



Mrva/n. 



lypty/yn^Aj^ 



Ea-rcuiet/ Ocf' i3 '' y^if,}' 



-,7^ Ri,n.,rajon Jur.-.Ya^^ .Yo«« Jfra^a 



OF ENGLAND. 129 

OLING, in a full bottomed wig and laced neck- 
mezz. In the Pepysian Collection. 

ord Cooling, or Coling, was for a time secretary to Ed- 
sarl of Manchester, and afterward served in the same 
f to Henry, earl of Arlington, while lord-chamberlain. He 
one of the clerks of his majesty's privy council in ordi- 
He was originally of All Souls' College, and was created 
of arti, 1665-6. See Ant. Wood's " FastL Oxon." 

IJAMES WORSLEY, &c. The painter's name 
f. Robinson f. h. sh. mezz. 

ranfes.Worsley, of Pilewell, in Hampshire, was third and 
si son of Sir Henry Worsley, of Appledorecombe, la the 
ounty. Re married Mary, eldest daughter of Sir Nicholas 
t, of Hartley Mauduit, Hants, bart. by whom he left issue 
of Pilewell, and Charles, who was bred to the law. — There 
izzotinto. print of Thomas Worsley, esq. by Becket, after a 
gof Kneller. This gentleman was probably of Hovingharo, 
uhire, and ancestor to the present surveyor-general of the 
if works. 

OMAS COULSON, esq. Ob. 20 Junii, 1713; 
18, Kneller p. 16S8. Smith f. 17 U; h. sh. 



DERM AN CORNISH; in a large half-sheet, 
seven others. Savage sc, Edxcuted Oct. 23,* 

NRY Cornish ; Svo. W. Richardson. 

ry Cornish, who in the year 1680, was sheriff of London, 
iT with Slingsby Bethel, and had then been very active in the 
iry of the popish plot, was sacrificed to the king's resentment 

* Rnpin, by mistake, says the twenty- first. 



130 BIOGRAPHICAL BISTORT 

soon after the death of Monmouth. He was apprehended while ^^ 
peaceably pursued the business of his profession ; and was, to h^ 
great astonishment, accused of conspiring against Charles 11. to^ 
^ether with Lord Russel, of whose party he undoubtedly was. - H^ 
had scarce time to recover from his surprise, before he wasbrougbt 
to his trial, where he convinced every unprejudiced person of his 
innocence. The prosecution was carried on with such precipita- 
tion, that he was tried, condemned, and executed within a week. 
He behaved to his death with a decent fortitude, and persisted in 
denying the crime of which he stood convicted. The perjury of 
Goodenough and Rumsey, the witnesses against him, appeared so 
flagrant after his death, that, in 1688, they were committed to pri- 
son by order of parliament,* and his estate was restored to his 
relations*! 

BENJAMIN HEWLING, without his name; ml 
frame^ laced band; small 4to. 

I am informed that the print is very like him. 

Benjamin Hewling, son of an eminent Turkey merchant in 
London, was a man of a good education, graceful person, untainted 
morals, and unaffected piety ; and therefore of great popularity 
among his political brethren, the staunch Whigs in the city. He 
had the command of a troop of horse in the Duke of Monmouth's 
army, and behaved in several skirmishes with more courage and 
conduct than is usually seen in raw soldiers. He was sent with a 
detachment of his own troop, and two more, to fetch cannon from 
Minehead, in Somersetshire, a little before the battle of Sedgemore. 
As the best of Monmouth*s men were in this detachment, the loss 
of the battle was supposed to be owing to their absence. He was 
executed for rebellion at Taunton, the 30th of Sept. 1685^ in the 
twenty-second year of his age. He declared, a little before his 
execution, that he was not ashamed of the cause in which he was 
to suffer, and died with all the alacrity of a martyr. His brother 
William, a man of a similar character^ was executed about the same 
time. 

* These fellows, who were witnesses by profession, had been retained before Id 
the business of the Rye-house plot. 

t Mr. Hume sajs that Cornish was an Independent. This is fully coalradicted 
in the account of hb trial. See the " Stete Trials," or Uie <* Biographia," p. 1108, 
note (C). 



OF ENGLAND. 131 

Vbat bas been related by several writers, of the ill treatment of 
Ae asters of these gentlemen, particularly of Hannah Hewlrng,* 
tt contradicted by Mr. Hewling Luson, in the third volume of the 
letters by John Hughes, esq. and other eminent Persons de- 
OBued," published by Mr. Duncombe.f Mr. Luson's account of 
fleCromweU family, in this volume, should be compared with that 
nitten by Dr. Gibbons, and subjoined to his Sermon on the death 
of William Cromwell, esq. July 9, 1772. 

MR. WILL. RICHARDS, in his own hair; collar 
cpm. Knellerp. Smith f. (1688); Ato. mezz. 

The original picture was in the collection of Sir Joshua Reynolds. 

A person .of the name of Richards, who had been governor of 
Wexford in Cromwell's time, was placed at the head of a regiment- 
by King James, when the Prince of Orange invaded the kingdom. 
This person is mentioned in Ludlow's '* Memoirs/' p. 300, 302, 
folio4 Qusere if the same. It is possible that the portrait was 
&ne only because he was a fine figure of an old man. He appears 
to be about sixty years of age. 



GENTLEMEN IN INFERIOR CIVIL 
EMPLOYMENTS. 

SAM. PEPYS,§ Car. et. Jac. Ang. regib. a secretis 
^dmirallias. G. Kneller p. R. White sc. 8vo. 



* Major Richard Cromwell, son of Henry, and grandson of Oliver, married 
Haimah, sister of Benjamin and William Hewling. William Kyffin, father of Mrs. 
Hewling, their mother, was a merchant of eminence. This person, who was thought 
1o have considerable influence in London, was therefore sent for to court by King 
JameSf who told liim, that '* he had put down his name as an alderman in bis new 
charter.** " Sir," replied Kyffin, " 1 am a very old man; I have withdrawn myself 
from all kind of business for some years past, and am incapable of doing any 
service, in such an affair, to your majesty or the city. — Besides, sir,'' the old man 
went on, fixing his eyes steadfastly upon the king, while the tears ran down his 
cheeks, " the death of my grandsons gave a wound to my heart which is still bleed- 
bg, and never will close but in tbe grave." — Hughes*s " Letters," ili. p. 214, 315. 

t P. «11. 

I He b alto nentioiied in Swift's «< FMsbyterian's Flea of Merit." 

$ Commonly pronounced Pepes. 



132 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Samuel Pepys, &c. Knetter p. R. White sc. 
Motto over his heady viz. ** Mens cujusque, is est quis- 
que''* The former of these portraits represents him in 
the manner of a paintings in a carved oval frame; the. 
latter is a print upon a piece of paper : this is not com- 
mon. They are both toell ejcecuted. 

Samuel Pepys, secretary to the admiralty in this and the former 
reign, was descended from the ancient family of that name, seated 
at Impington, near Cottenham, in Cambridgeshire. He was, in the 
early part of his life, introduced into the service of the state by 
his kinsman the famous Earl of Sandwich. It is well known that 
the naval history of Charles II. is the most shining part of the 
annals of his reign ; and that the business of the pavy was con- 
ducted with the utmost regularity and prudence; under Charles 
and James, by this worthy and judicious person. He first reduced 
the affairs of the admiralty to order and method; and that method 
was so just, as to haVe been a standing model to his successors in 
hisL important office. His ^ Memoirs," relating to the navy, is a well 
written piece ; and his copious collection of manuscripts, now re- 
maining, with the rest of his library, at Magdalen College, iu Cam- 
bridge, is an invaluable treasure of naval knowledge. He was far 
from being a mere man of business ; his conversation and address 
had been greatly refined by travel. He thoroughly understood and 
practised music; was a judge of painting, sculpture, and architec- 
ture ; and had more than a superficial knowledge in history and 
philosophy. His fame among the virtuosi was such j that he was 
thought a very proper person to be placed at the head of the Royal 
Society, of which he was some time president, f His prints have 
been already mentioned. His collection of English ballads, in five 
large folio volumes, begun by Mr. Selden, and carried down to the 
year 1700, is one of his singular curiosities ;t as is also the pedl- 
giee of Edward IV. from Adam. That of Charles V. has been 



♦ Cicero. 

t He was elected president Dec. 1, 1684, and presided two yean. 

X "Tlie Reliqties of Ancient English Poetry/' published by Dr. Thooiai 
Percy, in three volumes, l^mo. 1765, are, for the most part takeo from this 
collection. Several of these ballads illastrate Shakspeare, Had «lb«r oelebrate<l 
authors. 



OF ENGLAND. 133 

febo dedaoed from Adam by a Spanish genealogist.* It would be 
veiy amusing to compare the works of these capital triflers. Ob. 
26 May, 1703. See more of him in Evelyn's << Numismata/' p. 291. 

JAMES BONNEL, esq. before his " Life;' by 
William Handlton ; ^vo, J. Nutting sc. 

James Bonnel, esq. R. White sc. 

James Bonnel was accomptant general of the revenue in Ireland, in 
fte reign of Charles II. James II. and William III. He was a man of 
QQConunon knowledge, of amiable manners, and a just pattern of 
private and public virtue. He was charitable without ostentation, 
religious without bigotry; and so acquitted himself in the several 
dnties and relations of life, as not only to avoid evil, but even the 
appearance of it ; not only to escape censure, but to gain and 
di^rve praise and honour. Such a character may perhaps be 
oyerlooked by some, because there is nothing remarkahly striking in 
it But the man who is uniformly good, and that to such a degree 
as Mr. Bonnel was, ought to stand high in our opinion, and to be 
esteemed what he certainly was, a great man, Ob. 28 April, 1699. 
See his life in the '* Biographia." 

SIR JOHN JOHNSTON ; a wood-cut, prefixed to 
his « Life;' 1690 ; 8vo. 

Sir John Johnston ; copied from the above; Svo. 

Sit John Johnston was born at Skickaldy, in Fifeshire ; but his 
father* who had a good estate, having diminished it by a too gene** 
nms way of living. Sir John went young into the army to raise his 
fortune ; and, being at the siege of Maestricht, under the command 
of the Duke of Monmouth, he so behaved as to obtain a captain's 
commission, but both that and his personal estate were too scanty 
for his way of Uving. While he was at Utrecht, in Holland, he 
was charged with committing a rape on a young woman, and like- 
wise of a similar offence near Chester, while in England. 

* It was allegedf. in lionour .of this pedigree, that Adam was a king as well as 
Charles V. and that his reign commenced at the birth of his eldest son. 
VOL. VI. T 



134 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

« 

After this he went to Iirelan3, where he thought to better Us eh** 
cumstances by marriage; and getting acq«aintfed with a gentleramn 
named Magrath, in the county of Clare, he, by the manner <^ hh 
conversation, so gained his good opinion, that he frequently invited 
him to dinner. This gentleman having a daughter who had 10,000il 
to her portion. Sir John took every opportunity to insfnnate himself 
into her company, and so far gained upon her affections as to 
obtain her consent to elope with him ; but the father having some 
hints given him of their private courtship, kept a tery watchful 
eye over their actions, and at last being confirmed in his suspi- 
cions, forbade Sir John his house, and kept bis daughter close. She 
being very uneasy under her confinement, and being deprived of 
the sigbt of Sir John, whom she loved to distractioiiy made a kins- 
woman her confidant, and intrusted her with a letter to Sir John, 
to let him know how uneasy her life was ; and that if he would 
come to such a place, at such a time, s1ie would endeavour to 
make her escape, and meet him; but the lady, thinking she should 
gain most by obliging her uncle, delivered the letter to him,in^ad 
of Sir John : Mr. Magrath having read it, sealed it up again, and 
sient it to Sir John, who received it with a great deal of satisfac- 
tion^ and Immediately wrote an answer, and sent it back 'by the 
siaiue messenger. But oh repairing to the place of rendezvous, in- 
stead of meeting the lady, he fell into an ambuscade of fellows with 
sticks and clubs, who beat him so unmercifully that he promised to 
relinquish his pursuit — Leaving those parts, he repaired to Dublin, 
where, having before contracted some debts, he was arrested and 
thrown into prison; he however effected a composition with hift 
creditors, obtained a discharge from his debts, and returned 
shortly after to England. 

Haviiigbeen here some small time, «hd spent the remainder of 
-hi» money, he was obliged to be beholden to some of his countiy- 
men for support: when Captain James Campbell, brother to the 
£arl of Argyle, having a design to steal an heiress, Miss Mary 
Wharton,* he engaged Sir John Johnston and a Mr. Montgom^ 



*3riss Wbarton Was daagbter of Philip Wharton, esq.-snd iBt the' age of thTkteen, 
tij-bis death, inherited IdOOf. per annara, besides a persoaal property to the- 
amount of 10002. This young lady resided with her mother in Great Queeu-street; 
wlien Captain James Campbell, brother to the Earl of Argjle, wishing to possess so 
rich a prize, determined to marry her per force, and for that purpose prevailed npon 
Sir John Johnston and Archibald Montgomery to wast him in conveying Miss 
Wharton from her liome. The enterprise succeeded but too well, to Johnstoe^ 



OF ENGLAND. 135 

lo assist him in ihe enterprise, which wa» accomplished to their 
wish. But a reward of 100/. heing o£fered for the apprehending 
Captain CampheU, and 50/. each for Sir John and Mr. Mont- 
gomery, when Sir John being betrayed by the person with whom 
he lodged, was apprehended and indicted for the share he had in the 
transactioiiy on thQ 11th of December, 1690. The evidence was in 
sabstance, timt Miss Mary Wharton, being an heiress of consider- 
able fortune, and under the care of her guardian (Mr. Bierly), was 
decoyed out on the lOtl^of November, and being met by Sir John 
iduutfon, Captaia Campbell, and Mr. Montgomery, in Queen- 
street, .was forced into a coach with six horses (appointed to wait 
there hj Captain Campbell), and carried to the coachman*s house, 
and ttiefe married to Captain Campbell, against the consent of her- 
mitf or knowledge of her guardian. The jury finding the prisoner 
guilty, he received sentence of death. 

At the .place of execution, he addressed the spectators in a long 
8pee<A, in which he qot only endeavoured to make it appear he 
was blameless in the transaction for which he suffered, but that he 
Had b^n greatly wronged by printed papers, in which he was 
cbarfi;ed with a rape at Chester, and a similar crime at Utrecht, in 
Rolhnd. |Ie was executed at Tyburn the 23d of December, 
1690. 



out CampbeU, ^rfao was ike real calprit, escaped punishment, and married Mar- 
SH^ tfisi^^ ^agbter of David, lord Newark, after parliament had dissolved his 
Sol marriage ; but every effort to save Jfobnston proved ineffectual. Miss Whartoa 
afterward married Colonel Bierlj, who commanded a regiment of horse in the ser- 
vice of William lU. 

Prevloei to this unpleasant aflBur, an act for preventing clandestine marriages 
had been introduced into the House of Commons, which met vrith considerable op« 
poiiUiin J aii4> although Campbell's viplefice was a strong argument in fiivour of the 
loeasnre, the house rejected it, but annulled hh marriage* much against the wish of 
^ £ari of Argyle, who earnestly petitioned that it might be confiirmed. 



136 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



CLASS IX. 

MEN OF GENIUS AND LEARNING, &c. 

PHYSICIANS. 

FRANCIS BERNARD, M. D. in an oval, laurel 
foliage y h. sk. ' The plate ^ which was never finished^ 
and has neither the name of painter or engraver^ is sup- 
posed to have been done by Robert White. I should 
rather think Vandrebanc. 

Dr. Francis Bernard, who was physician to King James, was a 
man of learning, and well versed in literary history. He had the 
best private collection of scarce and curious books that had been 
seen in England, and was a good judge of their value. He died 
on the 9th of February, 1697, in the 70th year of his age. The 
catalogue of his books, which were sold by auction, is dated 1698. 
The amount of this auction, clear of all expenses of sale,* was up- 
wards of 1600/. a large sum at that time, when the passion for 
rare books was much more moderate than it is at present. If all 
Dr. Mead's books were now to be resold, they would fetch an in- 
comps^rably greater sum than they did soon after bis death. Mr. 
Charles Bernard, brother to Francis, and surgeon to the Princess 
Anne, daughter of King James, had also a curious library, which 
was sold by aiu^tion, in 1711. The '' Spaccio della Bestia triom- 
fante,'' by Jordano Bruno, an Italian Atheist, which is said, in 
Numb. 389 of the " Spectator," to have sold for 30/. was in this 
sale. The late Mr. James West is erroneously said to have pos- 
sessed the individual copy* An English edition of it was printed 
in 1713.t 

* These expenses were about four sbillings in the pound. 

t See Ames's " Typographical Antiquities/' p. 356. We are there assured, that 
the book was sold, at Mr. Charles Bernard's sale, to Walter Clavel, esq. for <8/. 
It also appears in the same page» that Mr. West had not the copy which was sold 
at Mr. Bernard's auction. Ames, at p. 352, informs us, upon, the authority of Mr. 
Thomas Baker, that Jordano Bruno's book was printed iu England, by Thomas 
Vautrollicr, in the year 1584. 



OP ENGLAND; 137 

SIR WILLIAM PETTY, knt. F. R. S. ab. \6 Dec. 
1687, Mat. 63. /. Closterman p. Smith f. (1696) ; 
h. sh. mezz. 

This head may be placed in the preceding class. The original 
was very probably painted by Gosterman in this reign. See the 
reign of Gharies II. 

EMPIRICS. 

DANIEL KENRICUS, medicus; JS. 32; 1685. 
R.White so. small 4to. 

The plate was in the possession of John Ives, junior ^ 
esq. of Great Yarmouth, Norfolk. 

Dr. Kenrick practised as a physician at Worcester. He seems 
to have been no graduate, nor very able in his profession ; but 
was esteemed a man of wit, and a jolly companion. These lines, 
** Upon a Giant angling/' printed in the fifth volume of Dryden's 
** Miscellany/' are said to have been written by him : 

" His. angle rod made of a stivdy oak. 
His line a cable that in storms ne*er broke. 
His hook he baited with a dragon's tail. 
And sat upon a rock and bob'd for whale."* 

The Effigies of GEORGE JONES, to whom God 
hath given the gift of healing. Drapentierf. Ato. 

' George Jones. W. Sherwin; ^vo. scarce. 
George Jones ; wood-cut. 

I have heard different accounts of Jones, which I know not how 
to reconcile, and therefore shall not attempt it. It is certain, that 

* From the information of Dr. JolmWall. — Kenrick, like many others, seems to 
have fathered some lines which he, li^ver wrote, and probably borrowed wit as 
freely as be did receipts. He appears to have adopted the two last verses, which 
are dins printed, in a poem called '" The Mock Romans/' pobl'ished \vith several 
others, at London, in 1653 : 

** His hook was baited with a dragon's iail. 
And then on rock he stood to bob for whale." 



)98 BIOaHAPBICAI^ SI8T0RY 

hia head is prefixed ta a long account of Ut ** F^rtendlj PiHs,*^' 
wliiclH as he t^ us, are ^< the true Tineture of the Sun," and make 
patients of all complesdons laugh at the time of taking them, and 
cure all curable distempers* 

JOHANNES CASE, M.D. natus lirm in com. 
Dorset. 

Johannes Case, M. D. in a sexangular frame. 

John Case, a native of lime IftegiSy h Dorsetshire, was siany 
years a noted practitioner in physic and astrology. He was looked 
upon as the successor of the famous Lilly, whose magical utensils 
he possessed. These he would sometimes expose in deridion to his 
intimate friends; and particularly ^ the dark chamber and pictures, 
whereby Lilly used to impose upon people, under the pretence of 
shewing them persons who were absent.^ Th^ dQctor is said to 
have got more by this distich than Dryden did by all hi$ works; 

** Witbia thii plaM 
livM Poctor Cm^" 

He was doubtless very well paid for ttompoftiDg that which he 
affixed to his pill-boxes : 

^ H«re*9 foarteen pills for thirteen penccj^ 
Enough in any man's own con-sci-ence.** 

I tliink he was living in the reign of Amie« He was author of 
^' The Angelical Guide, shewing Men and Women their Lot and 
Chance in this elementary Life/' in four books, 1697, Svo.f 

• " Biographia," p. 2968. 

t This is one of the most profound astrological pieces that t^e world ercf law. 
The diagrams would probably have puzzled Euclid, diougfa he had studied astro- 
logy. I have seen the doctor's head pasted Into a portfel]o» amidst these straage 
diagrams with tie followlog motto : 

" Thron'd in the centre of his dark designs." 

Immediately after the unintelligible bieroglyphvp, inacri)>e4 " Adam in Part^dWt 
U tins passage, which 1 have selected as a specimen of the work : 

" Thm Adam was created in that pleasant place Poradtst, about the year bsfne 
Christ 4002, viz* on April 24, at twelve o'cloc)^ pr midnii^t. Now, this pl«^e P(i- 



X The " philosophical figMre« deduced by an angeji9al h^d astrologicaliy/' 
seems to be equally «niAt«l^glbIe• $ee this figure at p, f54. 



OF ENGLAND. 139 



I»OETS, HISTORIANS, &c. 

DRYX)1&N» who had a panegjrric for all characters, and religion 
for all changes of the times, turned Roman Catholic upon the ac- 
cession of James. He displayed all the zeal of a new conyert in 



ndm is Mi BfttopOiania, wbare the pole is elevttled 34 deg.-SO diin. and the sua 
riseth four hoors sodiier than under the eleTation of the pole at London. Now, our 
corioos reader maj be inqiiisHhre -concerning this -matter. If yon will not credit 
ikmnaaant laid down, pray read Josephas; there yon will see something of this 
mtter, ▼!& oiihefint primnm mobile, or moving potture df 4he world, and place of 
Puidise, and elevation of its pole* Many controveiiieB have been about the time 
Md season of the year, therefore I shall not trouble my reader any farther with 
Ite. Let the Scripture be our guide in this matter : Let there be (saith the word), 
•Mttlfrs sAos; and also the fifth day's work of the creation, when the grasshoppers 
were, and the trees sprang out ; this may give us to understand that the time of the 
CKstioD most have its beginning in the spring. Now for the place or centre of the 
earth, ftom whence we may observe the poles as aforementioned in Mesopotamia, 
vhne Qod piaoed Adam : so the spring is two months sooner there tliaii heke with 
Qi, nnder the elevation of the pole at London.'** 

This passage is unconnected with any thing else, except we suppose some ab- 
Hrme meaning in the liierbglyphic, that it must be presumed tol>e self-evident, or 
(he file -author most have atted lilLe James Moore,t as it is intimated in the fot> 
lowbg dialogue between' that aothor and his reader : 

^. Wliat malLes yon write and trifle so ? 
M. Because Tve nothing else to do. 
fR. But there's no meaning to be seen. 
M. Why that's the very thmg I mean. 

tt is certain that his book suited some men of an heterbclite genius, who fancied 
that they dltedvefed strange mysteries In many pafts of it The following authentic 
inecdote of Case was communieated to me b^ the Rev. Mr. Goslmg, in these 
terns: 

" Dr. Maundy, formerly of Canterbury, told me, that, in his travels abroad, some 
eminent physician, who had been in England, gave him a token to spend at his 
■etnm with Dr. RadclilTe and Dr. Case. They fixed on an evening, and were very 
merry, when Dr. Radcliffe thus began a heai<h: < Here, brother Case, to all the 
fools, your patients.' < I thank you, good brother/ replied Case; ' let me have all 
tile fools, and, you are heartily welcome to the rest of the practice.' "f 



•P. 47, 48. 

t Author of «<aiie Hival Modes." 

t It is ol>servabI«, that, in Mr. Pope's account of the frenay of John Dennia, 
^. Case is sent for to attend him. It should also be observed, that, as his name 
as Latinised to Cossus, it was, upon no slight ground, supposed by some foreigners 
> have been C&eeie. 



140 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

his ** Hind and Panther," in which he paid extravi^nt compile- 
ments to the church of Rome, and spoke altogether as coutemptUr« 
ously of the church of which he lately professed himself a member. 
It was remembered at this time, that he, but few years.before, wrote 
the tragi-comedy of the " Spanish Friar." See the preceding 
reign. 

An anonyTnous portrait ^ to the knees, of a man crowmd 
with laurelj writing at a table. On his forehead is a 
maggot. Underneath are these verses : 

'' In*s own defence the author writes; 
Because, when this foul maggot bites^ 

He ne'er can rest in quiet ; 
Which makes him make so sad a face, 
He'd beg your worship, or your grace, 

Unsight, unseen, to buy it." 

This print represents SAMUEL WESLEY, who was, in early 
life, possessed with the spirit of poetry, as he, in 1685, published in 
8vo. a collection of his juvenile compositions, entitled ** Maggots, 
or Poems on several Subjects never before handled." He after- 
ward entered into holy orders, and was rector of South Ormesby, 
in Lincolnshire, when he published '< The Life of our Blessed 
Saviour Jesus Christ,** an heroic poem, 1693, fol. with various cuts, 
said to have been engraved by Faithome. He, in 1695, published 
Elegies on the death of Queen Mary and Archbishop Tillotson.* 
It is to be regretted that his vein of poetry was not exhausted 
when he published his " Maggots," as he incurred the censure of 
Garth in his *^ Dispensary," who severely lashes him in these lines: 

'* Had Wesley never aim'd in verse to please. 
We had not rank'd him with our Ogilbys. 
Still censures will on dull pretenders fall : 
A Codrus should expect a Juvenal." 

He, however, made ample amends for his bad poetry, by his good 
life, and his Dissertations upon the Book of Job in Latin, which 
were published after his decease. He was father of John Wesley^ 
Ivell known to the world by his preaching and writings. 

• See " Alhen. Oxon." ii. col. 963. 



OF ENGLAND. 141 

[R PAUL RYCAUT, many years consul at 
ma, and his late majesty's resident at Hamburgh, 
F. R. S. M. Vafidergucht sc. 9vo. See the reign 

HAELES JL 

R ROGER L'ESTRANGE, M. 69, 1686. 
&r jp. R. White sc. Another in 8vo. See the 
1 of Charles IL 

)HANNES CHARDIN, miles, nafus -h Nov. 
I. Loggan sc. Before his " Travels,'^ 1686 ; fol. 

HAKTNEs Chardin, miles. J. Gole sc. Before 
^ Travels,^' in French^ 12mo. This is copied from 
vrmer. There is another head of him in an oval, 
arted by two Eastern figures. S. Tho9nassin sc. 

>HANNES Chardin ; \2mo. Penninge. 

in Chardin, a French Protestant, sheltered himself in £ng« 
soon after the revocation of the famous Edict of Nantz by 
} XIV, He was treated here with uncommon respect, an^ 
red the honour of knighthood from Charles II. His '' Travels 
Tsia," of which there are abstracts in Harris's and other Coi- 
ns of Voyages, are well worth the reader's perusaL He died 
ndon, the 5th of January, 1 7 13. 

?1LLIAM WINSTANLEY ; a bust betwixt two 

mids. Before his " Lives of the PoetsJ' 1687; 

See an account of him in the preceding reign. 

R. BRADY. E. Harding sc. \to. in Adolphus's 
ntish Cabinet.'' 

ibert Brady was born in the county of Norfolk, and admitted in 
J College, in Cambridge, Feb. 20, 1643, He took his degree 
^helor of physic in 1653, and was created doctor in that faculty 

•L. VI. u 



142 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Sept..5tliy 1660, by virtue of the yngi mandatory letters. On the 
Ist of December the same year, he was, in pursuance of King 
Charles's mandate, elected master of his college, upon the resigna- 
tion of Dr. Bachcroft. About the year 1670, he was appointed 
keeper of the records in the Tower of London ; in which office, how- 
well he employed himself in perusing those valuable documents in 
his possession, is obvious . from his historical works. Some time 
after he was chosen regius professor of physic in the university of 
Cambridge. In 1679, he wrote a letter to Dr. Sydenham, which is 
published among that learned person's works. But his largest and 
most considerable performance was, *' An Introduction to the old 
English History," and " A Complete History of England, from the 
first entrance of the Romans, unto the end of the reign of King 
Richard II.'' in three vols, folio ; about which he was employed 
several years. It is asserted by Dr. Gilbert Stuart, that this work 
formed the basis of Hume's " History."^ Dr. Brady also wrote a 
treatise on Burghs, in thin folro. In the year 1681, he was chosen 
one of the representatives for the university of Cambndge, m tiat 
parliament which met at Oxford ; and again, in 1685, in the parlia- 
ment of King James II. He was likewise physician in ordinary to 
that king ; and| on the 22d of October,. 1688, was one of those who 
gave in their depositions concerning the birth of the pretended 
prince of Wales. 

He died on the 19th of August, 1700. He was an accnrate 
writer, and a curious and diligent searcher into our ancient records. 



WILLIAM MOLLINEAUX. P. Simms sc. Pre- 
Jijced to his '' Treatise on Ireland,^' 1725. 

, William Mollineaux, or Molyneux, a gentleman of great leamiog 
and accoipplishments, was bom April 17th, 1656. He was joint 
engineer and surveyor-general of Ireland, with William Robinson, 
esq. member of parliament for the university of Dublin ; and com- 
missioner for stating the accounts of the army, and for inspecting 
into all forfeitures, with a salary of 400/. a year. He was also a 
master in ..Chancery . Ob, 1 698. See a list of hts writings in Harris's 
" History of the Writers of Ireland," page 259. 



OF ENGLAND. 143 



PHILOSOPHERS. 

ISAAC NEWTON, whom that innate modesty which usually 
attends on true genius had restrained from displaying his mighty 
talents, broke forth from his obscurity in the reign of James 11. 
Then it was that he published his '' Principia/' a work that occa- 
sioned the greatest revolution that ever was made in the world of 
sdence. This performance is an illustrious proof of the power of 
the human mind; it being the highest instance that can, or probably 
ever will be given of the exertion of it. His portrait belongs to the 
reign of Anne. 

There is a print of him engraved by Bickham, which may be 
placed as a memorial in this reign : it is a head radiated like the sun, 
in the midst of a planetary system* The following lines of Lucre- 
tius may without pedantry be affixed to it; they are much better 
suited to this character than to that of Epicurus. 

" Qui genas humanam ingenio superavit, et omnes 
Pentrinxit Stellas, exortus ut letberius sol." 

JOHN LOCKE, who was in metaphysics what Newton was in 
the higher mathematics, finished his ** Essay on the Human Un- 
derstanding" in the reign of James IL Newton led mankind to the 
knowledge of the material world with which they were surrounded ; 
Locke to the J^nowledge of the ideal world within themselves.* His 
portrait belongs to the reign of William IH. 



THOMAS COWEL, M. 63, Nov. 1688; oval 
frame, wigj neckcloth. 

I think he was author of a book on gardening : qnsere. — There 
ixrere several other authors who flourished in this reign, but their 
heads would be more properly placed in the next. 

* The Cartesian philosophy began visibly to decline from this era. 



144 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



CLASS X. 

ARTISTS. 

A HISTORY PAINTER. 

CHARLES DE LA FOSSE. A.Walker sc. Int 
" Anecdotes of Painting ;" 4lo. 

Charles de la Fosse. H. Rigaudp. JJu Chm 
sc. 1707. 

Charles de la Fosse, a celebrated French artist^ was a disciple 
Le Bruiu He painted two ceilings for Ralph, duke of Montagu 
ill which he represented the apotheosis of Isis, and an assembly of 
gods. He was esteemed a better colourist than the generality 
the French school. He returned to his own country at the re 
lution. 

PORTRAIT PAINTERS. 

JOHN RILEY. The portrait of thb artist belon 
to the reign of William. See Noble, vol- !• 

THOMAS MURRAY. A. Bannerman sc. In W 
pole's '* Painters J*' 

Thomas Murray. T.Murray; M. Corsi; 
^*Mus. Florentr 

Thomas Murray; mezz. T.Murray; J. Smi 
1696. 



* The nagnificent bouse where these ceilings are, is now the British Musei 
the plan of it was brought from Paris, where his grace was ambassador. It give: 
a good idea of the finest French hotels. 







TIJJ^jW H'iW.RirKu^an Cd' .Slrc^ Uir-^.t^r Krh-f:,. 



OF ENGLAND. 145 

..Thomas Murray, a native of Scotland, bom about 16C6, was a 

^bolar of John Riley. He was one of the most eminent painters of 

Us time, and employed by the royal family, and many of the 

Mobility. His pictures are said to have been faithful resemblance 

^d diastely coloured. He died in 1 724, aged 58. 



HENRY TILSON ; ipse p. Ckambars sc. In the 
•* Anecdotes of Painting;'' 4to. 

Henry Tilson. H. Meyer so. 

Henry Ulson, a scholar of Sir Peter Lely, was esteemed a good 
pamter of portrsuts both in oil and crayons ; especially in the latter. 
He was about seven years in Italy, where he studied the works of 
tlie most celebrated masters. He was rising in reputatiou, when he 
conceived a violent passion for a woman who slighted him. This 
unhappy afifair disordered his senses, and he, in a fit of frenzy, shot 
Umself with a pistol. He died in the 36th year of his age. 



PAINTERS IN VARIOUS BRANCHES. 

JOHN SYBRECHT. N. Largilliere p. Cham- 
bars so. Ato. In the " Anecdotes of Painting J' 

John Sybrecht, a noted painter of landscapes^ was invited into 
England by the Duke of Buckingham, who employed him at Clive- 
in in this reign* He did several views of Chatsworth. Ob. 1703, 
St, 73- 

WILLIAM VANDE VELDE, junior, a celebrated 
painter of sea-pieces. See the reign of Charles IL 

JOHANNES WYCK, &c. Kneller p. 1685. Fa- 
^rf 1730; h. sh. mezz* See the reign of Charles IL 

^ HENRY GYLES; thus inscribed ; " Glass-painting 
for windows, as arms, sundials, history, landscape, 



146 BIOGRAPHICAL HrSTORY 

&c. done by Henry Gyles, of the city of York/' 
F. Place f. \2mo. mezz* 

Henry Gyles; in Walpoles ^^ Painters,^^ with 
John Rowel. 

Henry Gyles. W. Richardson. 

This artist painted a wiDdouv' at University College, in Oxford, in 
the year 1687. It is well known that the art of painting on glass 
was commonly practised in England befbre the reformation ; and it 
appears from a series of dates taken by Mr. Walpole from windows 
now in being, that it has been also practised in every age since that 
period. Peter Oliver painted on glass in the reign of Charles IL 
and Uie two following reigns ; John Langton,t in the reign of Anne; 
Price and Rowell^Jwere practitioners of late years ; and the art is 



* Mr. Thoresby, in tbe Catalogae of bis Masenm, numbers among bis rarities 

the picture of Mr. Henry Gyles, the famous glass-painter, of York, wrought ia 
mexzotinto, when that art was known to few others, by the celebrated Mr. Francis 
Place." This, he says, he bought, with other curiosities, of Mr. Gyles's executors. 
Among Dr. Lister's papers, in Ashmole's Museum, is a letter written by Gyles, in 
which he complains with great sensibility of having been defrauded by some of the 
English nobility. He was once inclined to leave his country , which, as he say s» had 
" spit in his face for forty years together." 

t John Langton was an ingenious writing-master at Stamford, in Lincolnshire. 
In 1713, he presented a most curious piece of writing, in the ancient and modern 
hands, to Queen Anne. There is a fine copy of this at Burgbley-house. It is said 
in a manuscript note belonging to this piece, that he retrieved the art (f glau-painUng, 

i John RowelJ, who was by ' profession a plumber, practised glasa-paintihg at 
High Wycomb, in the county of Bucks, and afterward at Reading, in Berkshire 
He was eroplojed by the late Duke of Richmond at Goodwood, and executed many 
pieces for Dr. Maddox, late bishop of Worcester; particularly a history of Christ 
praying in the garden, after a design of Dr. John Wall, of Worcester.} He painted 
a set of windows for Dr. Scawen Kenrick, in the church of Hambledon, in Bucking* 
bamshire. He did the nativity of Christ, and the Roman charity, in two large 
windows : the former was purchased of his widow by Mr. Chute, of the Vine, in 
Hampshire ; tbe latter by the late Lord Viscount Fane. The colours, in some of 
bis paintings, stand very well ; in others they have been observed greatly to faiL 
He discovered the beautiful red which is so conspicuous in our old windows; but 
this secret is supposed to have died with him, in the year 1756. 



4t 



§ Dr. Wall informs me, that his design is strangely altered in the execution. The 
truth is, that Rowcli was very deficient in drawing. 



I 



OF ENGLAND. 147 

now professed by W. Peckitt, of York.* This kind of painting is 
admirably adapted to some Scripture histories. I can easily ima- 
gine, that the glory of the Transfiguration painted on glass by Ra- 
phael, must have had a much more astonishing effect, than the same 
subject, executed by the same hand, on an opaque ground.f 



AN ENGRAVER, &c. 

PEARCE TEMPEST, engraver and printseller ; 
inscribed, ^^Cavete vobis principes f' small Ato. mezz. 

cPearce Tempest ; in the habit of a nonconforming 
divine^ without his name. One of the set of Cries by 
Lauron ; h. sh.% 

Pearee Tempest received some instructions in the art of engraving 
from Hollar, and assisted him in several of his works.§ But few of 
his performances are extant, though his name, with the word excudif^ 
is often affixed to the prints which he sold, particularly to Lauron*s 
CrieS| and Barlow's Birds and Beasts. His name has been fr&- 



* I b«v« seen varioas materials used in glass-paintmg, and seTcral pieces of 
painted glass, more or less finished, from the lading on of the colours, to the last 
operadoB of running them in the stove or furnace. I have also seen the process of 
enamelling at Biraiingliam ; and am assured that the two arts are so much the same, 
that tbe formcv could never have heen lost. 

t This art has been brought to great perfection by Mr. James Pearson and his 
wife. ^ Among other capital works, she executed the celebrated cartoons of Raphael, 
on seven large squares of glass, the colours entirely vitrified in the fire. They were 
sold to tiie Marquis of Lansdown for 600/. She has since painted another set much 
saperior in style, which were sold to Sir Gregory Page Turner for lOOOf. Mr. 
Pearson has executed some superior to any other artist : a window at Salisbury 
cathedral ; the brazen serpent, after Mortimer ; the Nota, after Corregio ; the smiths, 
sijter Wriglit, of Derby ; a view of the piazza, Covent*garden ; a pier of ruins; and 
a pair of flowers, are in the best style of the art. Mr. Beckford, of Fonthill, has 
some very fine specimens of Mr. Pearson's painting, &c. 

X There are very few who knew, or even supposed, that this was the portrait of 
Tempest. A man, whose face is familiar to us, may j^asily escape us unknown in 

Ansqaerade. The dress to which we are accustomed adds greatly to the resein- 

Uanee; it is therefore absurd to be drawn in foreign habits, and assumed characters. 
$ See the " Life of Hollar," by Vcrtue. 



148 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

quently Italianized to Tempcsta, in T. Osbonie'a " Catalogue," 
"which has occasioned his being confounded with AntoniQ Tempeflta» 
a famous painter and engraver, who flourished about a century before 
him. He was living in the reign of Anne. 



MUSICIANS. 

DR. JOHN BLOW, organist of his majesty s chapel 
royal. W. Reader p. Becketf. 4tQ. mezz^ 

Dr. John Blow, organist, composer, and master of the children of 
the chapel royal, in the reign of Charles II. and the three following 
reigns. His portrait was painted in that of William III. 



Hi 



GODEFRIDUS FINGER, Olmutius, Moravus, Re- 
giae Capellse Musicus. S. Gribelin sc. He is repre- 
sented kneeUng, and holding out a piece of music in a 
scroll. The bust of James II. is in the upper part of 
the print; ornaments; large AtQ. Before his XIL So- 
tiatce, Lond. 1688. 

A writing-master^ 

N. STRINGER, writing-master, 1686. 

** Nature writes short-hand too, for here we find 
True characters of an ingenious mind : 
In every feature of his modest face. 
Symbols of wit and industry we trace/' &<;. 

Before his book of short-hand. 

Nathaniel Stringer was author of " Rich redivtvus, or Mr, Jere- 
miah Rich's Short-Hand improved ;" 8vo.* 



* The curious in Calligraphy may see an accoimt of the niosteiiiinflsi£ii§J|iih 
writing-masters, in R. More*s " Essay on the Invention of Writinf^" &c.pcefiiied^ 
Iiif copy-book, 1725, and Mas8ey*is new accoimt of them. 






OF ENGLAND. 149 



ACTORS. 

THOMAS BETTERTON. R. WUliams exc. k.sL 
mezz. scarce. 

Thomas Betterton. Prefixed to his ^^ LifeJ\ 
V\,Guchtsc, 8wi 

llioinas Betterton was bom in TothiH-street, Wdstminster, in 
1635, ahdy after having left school, is said to hkve been put a|H 
prentice to a bookseller. The particulars of his early life, however, 
are not ascertained, but it is generally thought that he made his 
frst appearance! dn the stage in 1656, at ttie opera-tiouse in Char- 
ter-house-yard, under the direction of Sir William Davenant, and 
continued to perform here till the restoration. When King Charles 
granted patents to tWo companies, the one called the kihg^s coin<h 
pany, and the other the duke's. The former acted at tiie theatre 
royal, in Drury-Iaiie; arid the latter at the theatre in Lincoln*s-Inn- 
fields. Betterton went over to Paris, kt the cbmmahd of King 
Charles II. to take a view of the French scenei'y, and ai his return 
made such improvements s(S added greatly tb the lustre of the 
English stage. 

For several years both companies acted with the greatest 
applause, and ihe taste for dramatic entertainments was never 
stronger than whilst these tWo coiiipanied played. The two com- 
panies virere, however, at length united, though the time of this union- 
is not precisely knoWn; Oildon placing it in 1682, and Cibber fn 
1684, and then it was that Betterton first shone forth with the 
greatest degree of lustre ; for having survived the famous actors 
iipon whose model he had fdrmed himself, he was now at 
liberty to display his genius in its^ full extent. — His merit as an 
actor cannot now be very accurately displayed ; but Cibber informs 
us, ^' fietterton was an actor, as Shakspeare was an author, both 
without cOnipetitors, formed for the mutual assistance and illustra^ 
tion of each other's genius I How Shakspeare wrote, all men who 
have a taste for nature may read and kiiow ; but with what higher 
rapture would he i^till b^' read, could they conceive how Betterton 
played him ! Then might they know the one was born alone to 
sp^ what the other only knew to write J Pity it is that the mo- 
mentary beauties, flowing from an harmonious -elocution, cannot^ 

VOL. VI. z 



150 BIOGJIAPHICAL HISTORY 

• 

like those of poetry, be their own record! that the animated 
graces of the player can live no longer than the instant breath and 
motion that present them, or at best can but faintly glimmer 
through the memory or imperfect attestation of a few surviving 
iipectatort I Could how Betterton spoke be as easily known as 
What he spoke, then might you see the muse of Shakspeare in her 
triumph, with all her beauties in her best array, rising into real 
life, and charming her beholders. But alas! since all this is so far 
out of the reach of description, how shall I shew you Betterton? 
Should I therefore tell you that all the Otheilos, Hamlets, Hotspurs, 
Macbeths, and Brutuses, you have seen since his time, have fallen 
short of him, this still would give you no idea of his particular ex* 
cellence/' 

This admirable performer contidoed to play after he had reached 
the age of seventy, when the public remembering the pleasure he 
had given them, would not allow so deserving a man, after fi% 
years' service, to withdraw without some marks of their bounty; 
and in the spring of 1709, a benefit, which was then a very un- 
common favour, was granted to him, and the play of Love for 
Love was acted for this purpose. He himself performed Valentine; 
Mrs. Bracegirdle, and Mrs. Barry, though they had quitted the 
stage, appeared on this occasion ; the former in the character of 
Angelica, and Mrs. Barry in that of Mrs. Frail. After the plagr 
was over, these two actresses appeared leading on Betterton ; and 
Mrs. Barry spoke an epilogue, written by Mr. Rowe. 

Mr. Betterton died April 28, 1710, and was interred in West- 
minster Abbey. Sir Richard Steele attended the funeral, and two 
days after published a paper in the '^Tatler^ to his memory. 



EDWARD KYNASTON ; f?om an original pic^ 
ture by Sir Peter Lely. R. Cooper sc. Ato. 

Edward Kyuaston, a very handsome youth, at the time of the 
restoration of Charles the second^ in the year 1660, was engaged 
by Sir William Davenant to perform the principal female characters 
at that time represented on the stage, which he is reported to hare 
done with extraordinary success, and was so much in vogue that 
the ladies of quality prided themselves in taking him with them in 
their coaches to Hyde-Park, in his theatrical habit after the play$ 
which in those days they had sufficient time, to do,. as plays tbei 



OF ENGLAND. 151 

used, to begin at four o clock. Kynaston continued to perform* ii| 
femdeattue, long after he had reached manhood; and the occasion 
of his giving np that cast of characters was in consequence of the 
Idng^s €00111^ a little before his usual time to a tragedy, who founds 
the acton not ready to begin ; when his majesty, not choosing to; 
hate as mndi patience as his good subjects, sent to learn the cause 
of the delay;, upon which the master of the company went to the 
loyal box, and rightly judging that the best excuse for the defauU 
vould be the true one, fairly told his msyesty that the queen was 
Qotytet riiaTed, Charles, whose good humour loved to. laugh at a 
jest, as well as to make one, accepted the excuse, which served to 
divert him, till the msde queen could be efieminated. 

After resigningthe petticoats, Kynaston assumed the male pasts 
i& Uie first line of tragedy* His handsomeness was very little abated, 
even at th& age of sixty ; his> teeth were all sound, white, and eveni 
as a rtigninjg tooH of twenty* He had something of a. formal gm* 
vity ia hia mien, which was attributed to the stately step he had 
been ao early confined to, in female characters. But even that, inr 
diaracters (^ superiority, had its proper graces; it misbecame hua» 
not in the part of Leon, in Fletcher's Rule a Wife, and heme a Wifil 
which her executed with a determined manliness, and honest autho«<^ 
lity, well worth the best actor's imitation. He had a piercing eye,; 
and in diaracters of heroic life, a quick impeiious vivacity, in hia 
tone of voice, that punted the tyrant truly terrible. There wer» 
two plays of Dryden in which he shone with uncommon lustse % 
\tk Afgrengt'-Zebe h^ plftyed Morat; and in Don Sehastianf Mnley 
Molodi; ftk both these parts, he had a fierce, lion-like majesty ia 
his port AhA utterance, tJiat gave the spectator a kind of treml^ing^ 
admiration I 

He continued on the stage until the latter end of the reign of 
King Willfaim,'dr the beginning of the reign of Queen Anne, thsi 
lime of his death is uncertain. 



CAVE UNDERHILL, in the character of Obadiah 
in Ben Jonson's Play of the Alchymist. Faber fecit; 
9w. mezz. 

Cave Underbill; copied from the above. R. 
Grave sc. 8vo. 



152 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Cave Underbill, a low comedian, contemporary with Betterton/ 
played the principal Orave-dig:ger to that excellent performer's 
Hamlet. GoUey Gibber, who knew him personally, commends him* 
highly for his acting in several characters of a very different cast, 
and requiring a versatility of talent to fill them widi propriety and 
with effect. He continued on the stage a long time ; Icmger indeed 
than he should have done, as his powers were- considerably di-' 
minished during the last years of his performance, there: this, 
appears evident from the following severe critique on his ieicdng,' 
given by Tony Aston in his brief Supplement to Gibber's Life;' 
where, noticing Gave Underbill, he says, ^'Though not the best', 
actor in precedency, was more admired by the actors than the 
audience ; there being no rivals in his dry, heavy, downright vray. in 
low comedy. His few parts were, the first Grave-digger in Hamletf. 
Sancho Pancha, in the first part of Don Quxxote^ Ned Blunt in 
the Rwer^ Jacomo in Htk^IAbertintj and the Host in the Villain: 
all whicl| were dry, heavy characters, except Jacomo, in whidi 
when he aimed at any archness, he fell into downright insignifiri 
cance. He was about fifty years of age, the latter end oi King- 
William's reign; about six feet high; long^ and broad-faced, iind 
Hither corpulent, his face very like the Homp Sj/lvpiirU, ot Ciam^ 
panxa: for his nose ¥ras fiattish and short, and his iipper.lip very^ 
long and thick, with a wide mouth and short chin, a churli#b voice»; 
and awkward action (leaping often up with both bis legs at a time». 
wlien he conceived any thing waggish, and afterward hugging; 
liimsdf at the waggish thought). He could not enter into any. 
serious character, much less into tragedy; could scarce be broag^ 
to qpeak a Latin sentence in Dan Qmxoie, and was the moat 004* 
fined actor I ever saw." 

Gave UaiderhiU lived for a short time a pensioner on the ^e- 
ttltical su^rannuated fuii4>.and died at a very great age; but tb^ 
particular ti|ne is not ascertained : his la9t benefit^ wan announced^ 
in Steele's popular paper *' The Tatler.** 



OF ENGLAND. 153 



CLASS XI, 






> • * 



LADIES, &c. 

tKfe Diitchess of MONMOUTH, the Earl of Don- 
iter, and the Lord Henry Scot, her sons; whole' 

5gtA. Knelkrp. Smith/. (1688); large h. sh. mezz. 

■ ■ ^ 

The Dutchess of Monmouth and her sons; without- 
vriptian; large h. sh. mezz. 

Siee an account of the Dutcbess of Monmouth, in the reign of 

AftLCB II. 

fames Scot, earl of Doncaater, who, after the attainder of his 
ilir, was* called earl of Dalkeith, espoused Henrietta, second 
igfater of Laurence Hyde, earl of Rochester. He died in 1705,* 
I left issue three sons and two daughters ; of whom Francis, the 
estt beoame duke x>f Bucdeugh, upon the demise of his grand- 
tfaer, the Dutchess of Monmouth. 

Henry Scot, the younger of the two surviving sons of the Duke 
BdQnmouth, was, in the reign of Anne, created earl of Deloraine. 
was, in the next reign, register of Scotland, captain and colonel March 99, 
the second troop of horse-grenadier guards, and colonel of a ^^^* 
iment of foot. He was also gentleman of tlie bed-chamber to 
t Piftitpe of Wales, and one of the sixteen peers for Scotland. 
marne4» in 1706, Anne, daughter to William Duncomb, .of 
ttleaden, in tbe county of Bedford, esq. by whom he had issue 

»80Di« 

• ■ * 

The Countess of DERBY. Wissing p. R.Williams f.^ 
^ge Ato, mezz. 

rhis. lady is. most probably. Elizabeth Butler, Who was daughter 
Thomas, ^arl of Ossory, wife of William Richard George, the. 
th eari of Derby, and.Hs^rtO.J^iBes, duke ofprmond. . ..^ 



^64 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

The Countess of LICHFIELD. G. Kneller jk J. 
Becketf. a whole length; her right hand is held out to 
a dog; mezz. 

The Countess of Lichfield. Kneller p. J. Becketf. 
4to. mezz. 

The Lady Lichfield. S. Varelstp. P. Vandrebancfc. 
large h,sh. 

Charlotte, natural daughter of Charles II. by Barbara, countess, 
of Castlemain, who became aflerward dutchess of Cleveland. 
She was married to Sir Edward Henry Lee, of Ditchley, in Oxford- 
shire, who, in 1674, was created earl of Lichfield. He was lord 
of the bed-chamber to James II. and colonel of his majesty's first' 
rpgiment of foot-guards. . He died the i4tb of July, 1716, and 
was survived by his countess, by whom he had twelve sons, and^ 
six daughters.* She died February 17, 1717-^18. She was much 
handsomer than her sister Barbara, who became a nun at Pontoise^ 
in France. 



The Countess of DORCHESTER. Kneller p. /. 
Smith exc. (1688); h. sh. mezz. 

Catharine Sedley, countess of Dorchester. 

• 

Ob. 1717. W. Richardson. 

Her portrait, by Dahl, is at Strawberry-hill. 
«ted 2 Catharine Sedley was a woman of a sprightly and af^eeable i;i4t, 
L 1685-6 ^iiicb could charm without the aid of beauty, and longer niaintain 
its power. She had been the king's mistress, before he ascended 
the throne'; and was, not long after, created countess of Dorches^ 
ter. Sir Charles Sedley, her father, looked upon this title as a 
splendid indignity, purchased at the expense of his daughter's 
honour.f ' The king continued frequently to visit her, which gave 

• Collinses "Peerage," edit 1768. - 

t sir Charles, who -was very active against the king about tb^ time the revo- 
latioo; said, that in gratitude he should do his utmost to msk^^ lAi ncjiett^s' 
daughter a qtieeii, a^ he had made hi^ own a comtess* ^ 



OF ENGLAND. 15S 

p!eat QiDeasinets to the queen, who employed her frienclii, %tid 
especially the priett3» to persuade him to break off his amorous 
correspondence. They remonstrated to him the guilt of such a 
commerce^ and the reproach it would bring on the Catholic religion. 
She, on the contrary, employed the whole force of her ridicule 
against the priests and their counsels ; but without success. They, 
at lengthy prevailed with him to forsake her ; and he is said to have 
** sent her word, either to retire into France, or to have her pension 
of 4000/. a year withdrawn."* It was then, probably, that she 
lepented of havmg been the royal mistress: 

" Yet Vane coold tell what ills from beanty spring ; 
And Sedlejr conM the form that pleased the king." 

S. JoHNsofr. 

She understood dress, and was expensive in it to a degree of 

extravagance. She had by the king a daughter named Catharine, 

who was first married to James, earl of Anglesey, and afterward 

to John Sheffield, duke of Buckinghamshire and Normanby. This 

lady has drawn her own character to as great advantage as that of 

the duke her husband is drawn in the dedications of Dryden, and 

other panegyrics of his contemporary poets, t The countess, her 

mother, who Was " a spy to government," and in danger of being 

impeached for treason in the reign of William,t espoused David^ 

earl of Portmore, by whom she had issue two sons. >She died at 

Bath, 26 Oct. 1717* 

LADY HENRIETTA BEIlKfiLEY ; from an orU 
ginal picture by Sir Godfrey Knellery at Strawberry '^ 
hill. H. /?. Cooke so. Ato. 

This Unfortunate lady, whose beauty and attractions proved hef 
^in. Was fifth daughter to George, first earl of Berkeley. MarjTi 
^er eldest sister, was married iti the reign of Charles II. to Fordj 
lord Grey, of Warke; who became so notorious by his treacherotti 
desertion of the Duke of Monmouth, at Sedgemore, though h|{ 
himself had invited the duke to this rash attempt to dethroned 
•Barnes II. and had accompanied hiiu from tiollatid on his fatal 
Enterprise* 

» 

• l^resb^'B *« Memoin/' 4to« p. 131. 

t Sec this character in vol. VIII. of Mr. Pope's Works, published by Dr. War^ 
IrartOD. 

% Appendix to Dahymple's ** Memoirs," part ii. p. 108, 186< 



156 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

From the ^vi^ecice that wi« given On Lord Grey's trial tot ^ 
dueing the Lady Henrietta Berkeley, it appeared that he had ea* 
couraged a passidn for her when she was a girl, and hi^sely taking 
advantage of the opportunities which his alliance with her familj 
Bffbrded, had succeeded in seducing her when she was but little 
moire than seventeen. After she had acknowledged an affection for 
him, the intrigue was continued about a twelvemonth without dis- 
covery, but with great risk; and on one occasion, as he himself 
•confessed, he '* was two days locked up in . her closet, n^ithout 
food or drink, but only a little sweetmeats.'' At length, the sus- 
picions of the Countess of Berkeley being excited by some trivial 
accident, she commanded her third daughter, the Lady Arabella, 
to search her sister's room, on which the latter delivered up a letter 
she had just been writing to Lord Grey^ to this effect : — " My sister 
Bell did not suspect our beitig together last night; for she did not 
hear the noise. Pray come again Sunday or Monday ; if the last, 
I shall be very impatient." This disclosure took place at Berkeley- 
house, in London ; and every precaution was taken to prevent any 
correspondence or clandestine meeting between the parties ; not- 
withstanding which. Lady Henrietta contrived to elope firom Bnr- 
dants (a seat of the Berkeleys, near Epsom), and to join Lord 
Grey in London, with whom she resided for a short time in a 
lodging-house, at Charing-cross. 

The Earl of Berkeley indicted him, and several other persons, 
for conspiring to ruin his daughter, by seducing her from her fa- 
ther's hoiise, and soliciting her to commit whoredom and adultery 
with the said Lord Grey. The trial came on in November, 1682, 
at Westminster Hall ; and after a most affecting scene, the Lady 
Henrietta being herself present, and making oath that she had left 
bome of her own accord, the jury were preparing to withdraw to 
consider of their verdict, when a new turn was given to the pro- 
ceedings, by the lady's declaring, in opposition to her fxither's claim 
of her person, '^ that she would not go with him ; that she wal 
married, and under no restraint, and (hat her husband was then vtL 
court." 

Sir Francis Pemberton, the lord chief-justice, then desired t<l 
see her husband : on this a Mr. Turner came forward, and statiiig 
himself to be *' a gentleman, sometimes resident^in town and pftea 
in Somersetshire," claimed her as his wife, and afSrmed that he 
had two witnesses present to testify the marriage. Under thes^ 
circumstances Lord Grey was admitted to bail ; but Lord Berkekj 



OF ENGLAND. 157 

again claiming his daughter, and attempting to seize her by force 
in the hall, a great scuffle ensued, and swords were drawn on both 
sides. At this critical moment the court broke up, and the judge 
passing by, ordered his tip-stafiPto take Lady Henrietta into custody, 
and convey her to the King's Bench; whither Mr. Turner accom^ 
panied her. On the la^t day of term, she was released by order 
of the court ; and the business being in some way arranged among 
the parties, during. the vacation, the law-suit was not persevered in. 
Lady Henrietta, herself, is stated to have died, unmarried, in the 
year 1710; consequently, the claim of Turner must have been a 
mere coUasion to save Lord Grey. 

The LADY ELIZABETH WILMOT. Wissing and 
Vandervaart p. Smith f. (1688); h. sh. mezz. 

This lady was the second of the three daughters and coheirs of 
John Wilmot, earl of Rochester. She was married to Edward, the 
third earl of Sandwich, who dying in 1 729, left her a widow. She 
lived to a very advanced age, and died, not many years since, at 
Paris, where she spent the latter part of her life. I was told by 
m honourable person who knew her well, that she inherited a large 
portion of her father's wit and vivacity.* The Earl of Rochester 
bad a son named Charles, who died 12 November, 1681 ; upon 
which the title became extinct. It was afterward conferred upon 
Laurence, viscount Kenelworth, a younger son of Edward, earl of 
Clarendon. 

The LADY HENRIETTA, and the LADY MARY 
HYDE, daughters of the Right Honourable the Earl of 
Rochester. Wissing p. Smith f. whole lengths; large 
h. sh. mezz. They are represented young. 

The Lady Henrietta Hyde was second daughter of Laurence, 
earl of Rochester. She espoused James, earl of Dalkeith, eldest 
surviving son of James, duke of Monmouth. See the Dutchess of 
MoKMOUTH, &c. in this Class; and the Earl of DoNCASTERin 
Noble. 

• 5hc is mentioned tn Pope's Works by Warburton, VII. p. 1«1, 6dit. 1751. 
VOL. VI. Y 



158 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Lady Mary Hyde, with her sister Lady Hen- 
rietta Hyde. mezz. Wissing pbijcit. J. Smith sc. 

Lady Mary was third daughter of Laurence Hyde, earl of Ro- 
phester; she married Francis Seymour, earl of Conway, 1703, and 
died 1709, leaving four daughters. 



HENRIETTA MARIA, LADY WENTWORTH, 

baroness of Nettlestead, the only daughter and heir 
of Thomas, lord Wentworth, grandchild and heir of 
Thomas, earl of Cleveland. Kneller p. R. Williams f. 
whole length ; large h. sh.* 

Henrietta Maria, Lady Wentworth. P.Lelyy- 
1 675. W. Richardson. From an original picture. 

Lady Harriot Wentworth, a woman of an elegant person and 
engaging manners, was well known to the world as the mistress of 
the Duke of Monmouth. This criminal attachment was, for a con- 
siderable time, supposed to have been maintained with constancy, 
at least on her side. The duke acknowledged, just before, his ex* 
ecution, to two prelates and other divines who attended him, that 
** he had an affection for Lady Harriot, and prayed that if it were 
pleasing to God, it might continue ; otherwise, that it might cease; 
and God heard his prayer." When he addressed himself to the 
people from the scaffold, he spoke ** in vindication of the Lady 
Harriot, saying, she y^as a woman of great honour and virtue, a 
religious godly lady." He was told by some of the divines '^ of his 
living in adultery with her." He said, " that for these two years 
past he had not lived in any sin that he knew of, and that he was 
sure, when he died, to go to God, and therefore he did not fear 
death, which they might see in his face."t 



* I do not believe this was the Ladj Harriot Wentworth, who was mistress to the 
Duke of Monmouth, who was alwajrs called Lady Harriot and not Ladj Went- 
worth. I remember an old Lady Wentworth so called , wlio probably was niece to 
Lady Harriot, and who I suppose to be represented by this print. — Lord Obpord* 

t Bishop Lloyd's Letter; for an account of which see the note subjoined to the 
article of the Dutchess of Monmouth, in the reign of Charles II. 



or ENGLAND. 159 

Tlie LADY BRANDON. Wissingp. Smith/. (1687); 
h. sh. mezz. 

The Lady Bbandon. Wissi?ig p. Soldby Cooper; 
h. sh. mezz. 

liut lad; was the wire of Charles Gerard, lord Gerard, of Bran- 
Hon, son and hen of Ctiarles, earl of Macdesfield. Lord Brandon, 
iage&etwith the Earla ofHuntin^on and Shanesbury, the Lorda 
OfeyofWerk, Ru&sel, and Carendish, and aeveral gentlemen of 
dh^tctiOBi in the late rui^. presented the Diilce of York as a 
"Ji^ab tecusant, at the King's Beach bar in Westminster HalL 
.fiH*aa one of the partisans of the Duke of Monmouth, and was 
(ftiilailA condemned for ths coaeem he had in his rebellion: but 
Wi,TOpricved by the king -the 2d of December, 1685: the 5th 
tPthflt month had been nsigfned for his execution. This was 
m most signal, if not the only act of James's clemency. He ma 
titefl and condemned but few years before, for breaking a boy's 
neck in a drunken fit ; but found means to procure the lung's 

ftfetORD CHURCHILL'S two daughters. Knel- 
f'p. Smith/. (1688); whole lengths ; mess. 

.-H'SNHiETTA and Anne Churchill, Sic.' Paulut 
Jlpgrtard Avertioncfisisp. Londim; Van Somer/. whole 
If^h*; h. sh. mezz. 

ttM^e two eldest of the torn beauteoas daughters of the Lord 
Bmcfaill, better known by the title of the Duke of Marlborough, 
tte peraona] charms of these ladies were afterward deservedly 
t^ebrated. They were indeed powerful eaough to subdue as great 



>fecoes 



as their father. 



LADY MARY OSBORNE, with her brother Wil- 
Btt*" Henry, lord Osborae; mezz. J. Hill; R.Williams. 

Lady Mary waa daughter to Peregrine, duke of Leeds. She was 
first married to Henry, duke of Beaufort, 1711, and seconiUy ta 
John Cochrane, fourth earl of Dundoumld. 

* 3ee Rerubj'i " Mcmain," 4to. p. 116, itT. 



160 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

MADAM ELIZABETH BROWNLOW, a child. 
Wissing p. Smith f, whole length; h.sh.mezz. 

Lady Elizabeth Brownlow ; with a flower-pot; 
mezz. Browne, 

Lady Brownlow; mezz. whole length; with a 
dog. J. Smith. 

The Lady Brownlow, a child. Soust p. Becket f. 
whole length; h. sh. mezz. 

The original portrait is in the possession of Sir Brownlow Gust, 
and is now at Belton, near Grantham, in Lincolnshire. 

Elizabeth Brownlow was eldest daughter and coheir of Sir John 
Brownlow, of Belton, bart. She espoused John Cecil, earl of Ex- 
eter, by whom she was mother of Brownlow Cecil, who succeeded 
his father in title and estate. 



MADAM JANE SKEFFINGTON. W.Wissingp. 
J. Smith f. (1687); h. sh. mezz. 

This young lady was descended from an ancient family, long 
seated at Skeffington, in the county of Leicester. She was, as I 
am informed, daughter of Sir William Skeffington, bart. and sister 
to Sir John, who was created viscount Massareen, of the kingdom 
of Ireland, by Charles IL* He was one of the privy council to 
King James, who made him governor of the county of Londonderry, 
and the town of Colerane. 



MADAM ANNE WINDHAM; a girl sitting by a 
vase of flowers. W. Wissing p. J. Becket f. mezz. 

Quflere if a daughter of Sir William Windham, who was ad- 
vanced to the dignity of a baronet by Charles IL Thii^ gentleman 
was father of Sir Edward, and grandfather of Sir William, who was 

* I saspecty from her youthful appearance, that she might be a daughter of Lord 
Massareen: quaere. 



OF ENGLAND. 161 

desenredly celebrated for his parliamentary talents. I have heard 
it remarked by a person who was well acquainted with the history 
of the family, that he never knew a poor man, or a plebeian, of the 
name of Windham. 

It has been conjectured, that the lady represented by the print 
may be a daughter, or of the family of Mrs. Anne Windham, who, 
in the latter end of the reign of Charles II. published an account 
of that prince's concealment, at the house of Colonel Wyndham, 
her husband, at Trent, in Somersetshire, soon after the battle of 
Worcester. The relation was written by the colonel, and is sub- 
joined to " Boscobel, or the compleat History of his Sacred Majes- 
tie's most miraculous Presenration," &c. the third edition, 1680. 
I mentioa these circumstances as some of them may, perhaps, lead 
to a discovery of the person. 

DOROTHY, second wife of Charles, viscount 
Townshend. W. N. Gardiner del. From an original 
at Rainham. E. Harding sc. In Coxes " Memoirs'^ 

DoROTHT, sister to Robert, earl of Orford; Ob. 
1726, JEt. 40. 

MADAM SOAMS. G.Kmllerp. J.Becketf. h. sh. 
mezz. 

hi the Pepysian Collection this print is inscribed in MS. '' Lady 
oomes :" if this was her proper title, it makes it almost certain that 
the was Joan, daughter of George Shute, of Stockwell, in Surrey, 
vife of the second Sir Pet^^ Soames, who died in 1709; because 
she would only be titled ** ^.ladam" during the life of his father, 
when probably the print was done; and became lady before the 
death of Mr. Pepys in 1703. From a note hy Sir JVilliam Mus- 
iraoCf hmrt. 

MADAM BAKER. Kneller p. Becketf. Ato. ^mexz. 

Probably of the family of Sir George Baker, of Crooke, near 
Durham ; from which family the learned and ingenious Mr. Tho- 
loas Baker, of St. John's College, in Cambri(]^e, was descended. 



f 



162 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

There is very little probability of her being' a descendaat of Sir 
Richard Baker, the historian, as he left his children in very raean 
circumstances. 



MADAM DOROTHY MASON. Wissiag p. SmUh 
(1686); h.sh. mezz. Afterward Lady Brandoik 



CATHARINE DARNLEY, daughter of King 
James H. and of Catharine Sedley, countess of Dor- 
chester and Portmore, married first to James Annesley, 
third earl of Anglesea, and secondly to John Shef- 
field, duke of Buckingham and Normanby. R, Grave sc. 
!dvo. 

Catharine Damlej was married to James Annesleiy, third earl of 
Anglesea, in King Henry the Seventh's chapel in Westminster Ab- 
bey, on the 28th of October, 1699, by whom she had a daughter, born 
Jan. 7, 1700, who was married in Sept. 1718, to William Phipps,esq. 
son and heir to Sir Constantine Phipps, lord-chancellor of Ireland, 
in the reign of Queen Anne. Lady Anglesea lived a very unhappy 
life with her husband, from whom she was separated by consent 
of parliament, for his cruelty and causeless ill-treatment. She 
married secondly John Sheffield, first duke of Buckingham of that 
name, by whom she had issue a daughter, Sophia, who died very 
young ; a son, John, who lived but a few weeks ; Roberty bom Dec 
11th, 1711, and another son, Edmund, born in 1716, who became 
second duke of Buckingham, who died in his minority in 1735, and 
with him ended the honours of the Sheffield family. 

ARABELLA CHURCHILL; from the collection of 
the Right Hmi. Lord Falmouth. J. J. Vanden Berghe 
sculpt. InAdolphus's ^^ British Cabinet i' 4to, 

Arabella Churchill was daughter of Sir Winston Churchill, of 
Wotton Basset, in the county of Wilts, and sister of the renowned 
John Churchill, duke of Marlborough. She was born the 16th of 
Marchj 1648. Miss Churchill was maid of honour to the Dutchess 
of York; and the duke had for some time made his addresses to 



OF ENGLAND. 16J 

^1*, notwithstanding the ridicule of the court. A party of pleasfore 
Wing been formed into Yorkshire by the duke and dutchess, Miss 
Churchill, as maid of honour, attended; tlie duke persevered in his 
suit; but his {Passion was thought to be on the decline, when it was 
revived and strengthened by the following incident. 

The royal party went out a coursing ; the dutchess was in a car- 
nage, and all the ladies on horseback. The maids of honour, in 
general, were indifferently mounted ; but Miss Churchill, in com- 
pliment to the duke, was provided with a spirited horse, a prefer- 
ence which afforded her no satisfaction, as she was a very bad 
horse-woman. The duke, who rode by her side, expressed discon- 
tent at her awkwardness, and terror had so increased her natural 
paleness, that hi^ disgust was complete. ' He spurred his horse for- 
ward, intending to have joined some other ladies, when Miss 
Churchill's palfrey, animated at the example, and impatient of the 
rein, sprang forward at a full gallop. The lady screamed out, and^ 
after some awkward efforts to retain her. seat, fell just as the duke 
came up to her assistance. She sustained no injury from the acci- 
dent; but the derangement of her dress discovered a figure so 
exquisitely proportioned, as to make ample compensation for the 
want of a more beautiful face. The duke renewed his attentions 
with the redoubled ardour, and it was soon perceived that his assi- 
duities were not unsuccessful. 

The offspring of this attachment were two sons and two daughters. 

The eldest son was the celebrated James Fitz-James, duke of Ber- 

I ' 

wick ; the younger, Henry Fitz- James, was grand-prior of France, 
and after the revolution in England was, by his father, created 
duke of Albemarle. Henrietta, the eldest daughter, married Lord 
Waldegrave; and the younger daughter, whose name is not pre- 
served, took the veil. 

Miss Churchill was afterward married to Colonel Charles God- 
frey, comptroller of the household, and master of the jewel-office, 
by whom she had two daughters. She died in May, 1730, at the 
age of eighty-two. 

JOANNA CiESAR, wife of Ch». Caesar of Great 
Gransden, in the county of Huntingdon, esq*^. second 
daughter of Sir Thomas Leventhorpe of Shingey-hall, 
in Herts, bart. married June 26th, 1662. R. Wilkinson 



1G4 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Joanna Ceesar was the second and youngest daughter of 8fa| 
Thomcts Leventhorpe, of Shingey (or Shingle) Hall, in the parish e# 
Sabridgeworth, in Herts, by Dorotliy, second daughter of Sir Gihf 
AUington, of Horseheath, in the county of Cambridge, bart. She 
was married to Mr. Charles Csesar, second son of Sir Charles' 
Cssar, master of the Rolls, in the reign of Charles I. June 2Gtli, 
1662. He with his lady retired to Great Gransden, in Huntfoj^ 
donshire, wisely preferring the calm respectability of the life of an 
honourable country gentleman, to the uncertainty of public splen* 
dour, and the inevitable solicitudes which attend it. He remained 
there for thirty years improving his estate by neighbouring pur- 
chases, and in 1692 relinquished his principal seat, with its de- 
mesne, to his eldest son, and removed to the town of Stamford, in 
Lincolnshire, where he died in August, 1 707. By his lady, of whose 
virtues and charms, both of mind and person, he speaks of in the 
highest terms in the diary which he left in MS. he left three chil- 
dren ; Charles, Henry, and Dorothy. The time of Mrs. Caesar's 
death is not recorded. 

MRS. TURNOR, (first inscribed Madam Turner). 
Kneller pinxit. (1686); Ato. mezz. by Becket. 

This lady was the only daughter, and sole heir of the Honourable .' 
Algernon Cecil (sixth son of William, second earl of SalisburyV 
l)y Dorothy, daughter of Sandford Nevile, of Chevet, in Yorkshire. 
She married John, the eldest son of Sir Edmund Tumor, of Stoke 
Rochford, knight, and suriving her husband, she resided at her , 
relations the Dacres, of the Church-house at Ltcatlierhead, where 
she died in 1736, aged seventy-three, and was buried in the porch 
of that church. Her descendant, Edmund Tumor, esq. of Stoke 
Rochford, is in possession of the original portrait by Kneller, in 
which the flowers in the hands are painted by Verelst. 

DOROTHY, wife of John Wentworth, Esq. of 
Somerly-hall, in Norfolk ; eldest daughter of Sir Tho- 
mas Leventhorpe, bart died Jan. 13, 1723. R. Wil- 
kinson exc. 4to. 

This lady was eldest sister to Joanna, the wife of Charles Csesar, 
of Gransden, in the county of Huntingdon, esq. and became the 



OF ENGLAND. 166 

wife of John Wentworth, of Somerley Hall, in Suffolk, near Yar- 
lOQth, in Norfolk, esq. She died, aged above ninety, on the 
13th of January, 1722-3, and left by Mr. Wentworth a daughter, 
Mary, who was married on the 27th of February, 1686-7, in Henry 
tfe Seventh's chapel, in Westminster, to Charles Musters, esq. 
Km of Sir John Musters, of Hornsey, in Middlesex, knight. See 
a Poem to her memory by Mr. Charles Cssar, in Lodge's Life of 
Sir Julius Caesar, with Memoirs of his Family and Descendants. 
4(0. loffcfoii, 1810, 



IRISH LADIES. 

The Countess of KILDARE. Wissing p. Smith f. 
(1686); 4to. mezz. 

The Countess of Kildare ; mezz. C. Allard. 

The Lady Elizabeth Jones, eldest daughter of Richard, earl of 
*^anelagh, and second wife of John Fitzgerald, the eighteenth* 
^1 of Kildare. She was one of the most amiable women of her 
^e, and is deservedly celebrated by Lord Lansdown, in his 
** Progress of Beauty.' 



» 



MADAM LOFTUS. J. Smith /. Sold by Becket; 
^*sh. mezz. 

This lady was second wife of Adam Loftus, lord Lisburne, in the 
kingdom of Ireland, and motherin-law to Lucy, lady Wharton. 

MADAM LUCY LOVTUS ; without the name of 
fainter or engraver ; h.sh. mezz.^ 

Lucy, daughter of Adam Loftus above-mentioned. She was the 
econd wife of Thomas, marquis of Wharton, by whom he had one 



* Perhaps the seventeenth : quaere. 

t There is a mezzotinto of Lord Wharton*s first wife from a painting of Sir Peter 
c\y, which belongs to the preceding reign. 

VOXi. VI. z 



166 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

json, Philip^ afterward duke of Wharton; and two daughters, Jane, ' 
married first to John Holt, of Redgrave, in Suffolk, esq. and after* ; 
ward to Robert Coke, esq. and Lucy, married to Sir William i 
Morice, bart. Dr. Swift, in his character of Lord Wharton, tells j 
us, ^^ that he bore the gallantries of his lady with the indifference j 
of a stoic ; and thought them well recompensed by a return of : 
children to support his family, without the fatigues of being t ; 
father." 



ELIZABETH ELSTOB; a small head; in theini-i 
tial letter G. for her •* Translation of an Anglo-Saa:<m ) 
Homily, on the birth of St. Gregory'' S. Gribelin sc. 
(1709). The same letter is in the Efiglish Saxon Gram- 
mar. 

Elizabeth Elstob was born at Newcastle-upon-Tyne, in 1683, 
Her mother, who was a great admirer of learning, especially in her 
own sex, observed the particular fondness which her daughter had 
for books, and omitted nothing that might tend to her improve- 
ment ; but having, the misfortune to lose this indulgent parent, - 
when about eight years of age, she was left to the care of a guardian, ■ 
who imagined one tongue was sufficient for any woman^ With som^ , 
difficulty, however, she obtained leave to learn French ; and ia .; 
time, by incessant study, became an excellent linguist, being not 
only mistress of her own and the Latin, but also of seven other : 
languages. 

Mrs. Elstob translated from the French, Madame Scudery^fc : 
** Essay on Glory." — ^In 1713, she published " Some Testimomet > 
of learned Men, in fieivour of an intended edition of the Saxoi ^ 
Homilies." A few of these homilies were printed at Oxford, in . 
folio ; but she did not find encouragement to go on with the work. 
In 1715 she published a Saxon Grammar; but on the death of her 
brother she was reduced tp poverty, and kept a school at Evesham. 
Queen Caroline gave her a pension, which ceased at the death of 
her majesty. After this she vras taken into the family of the 
Dutchess of Portland as a governess. She died of a cancer in 17M. 




l//'f>/// ff I'll ff I'i n ti( 



iii^Ad March nS ,i 



OlF ENGLAND. W7 



CLASS XII. 

PERSONS REMARKABLE FROM A SINGLE 
CIRCUMSTANCE IN THEIR LIVES. 

TITUS OATES, in the pillory ; over his head is the 
anagram of his name^ " Testis ovat^' sarcastically ap- 
plied; h.sh. 

There are two prints of him in the pillory. At the 
bottom of one is a vignette^ in which is a representation 
of the whipping of him at the carfs tail: about him are 
the Jesuits whom he caused to be executed. In the other ^ 
which is a half sheet mezzotinto^ is the gallows with the 
devil on it J at a little distance from the pillory. 

Titus Oates, in the pillory. W. Richardson. 

Testus Ovat, standing in the pillory ; twenty-four 
iMin and English verses; very scarce. Hindmarshy 
1695. 

Testis Ovat ; sia? English verses : 

** Behold ye heroe, who has done all this. 
In a small triumph stand, such as it is, 
A kind of an ovation only, true, 
But those for bloudlesse victories are due ; 
His were not such ; he merits more than egs, — 
Let him in triumph swing and ease his legs." 

h its first state ; very scarce. 

The notorious Titus Oates was, soon after the accession of 8Maj, 
James, conyicted of perjury, upon the evidence of above sixty re- ^^^* 
Potable witnesses, of whom nine were Protestants. He was sen- 
tenced to pay a fine of two thousand marks, to be stripped of hi^ 






168 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

canonical habit, to be whipped twice in three days by the common 
hangman, and to stand in the pillory at Westminster Hall gate, and 
at the Royal Exchange. He was, moreover, to be pilloried five 
times every year, and to be imprisoned during life. The hangman 
performed his office with uncommon rigour. The best thing 
James ever did, was punishing Oates for his peijury ; and the 
greatest thing Oates ever did, was supporting himself under the 
most afflictive part of his punishment with the resolution and 
constancy of a martyr. A pension of 400/. a year was conferred 
upon this miscreant by King William. He was, for a clergyman, 
remarkably illiterate ; but there have been published under his 
name, "A Narrative of the Popish Plot;" ** The Merchandise of 
the Whore of Rome ;'* and " Eikon Basilike, or a Picture of the 
late King James." ^-^Ms well known that he was the son of an 
Anabaptist; and he'^i^i-inbly died in the communion in which be 
had been educated.* 



The Squire of Alsatia. M. Lauron del. Tempest ere. 
a whole length ; in a hat and feather ^ and laced neckcloth, 
sword, cane, S^c. The print belongs to the set of Cries, 
published by Tempest. 

The Squire of Alsatia ; in Caulfield's " Remarkable 
Persons.'" 

The 'Squire oi Alsatia, which was very probably done from the 
life,t means one of the gamesters of White Friars, which was 
notorious for these pests of society, who were generally dressed to 
the extremity of the mode. Their phraseology abounded with such 
words as are sometimes introdjuced by pretenders to politeness and 
** dunces of figure,'* whom Swift reckons among the principal 
corrupters of our language. The reader may see much of this 
jargon, which indeed requires a glossary tO; understand it, in Shad- 
well's comedy, entitled "The 'Squire of Alsatia/' which was 
brought upon the stage in this reign. 

* See Z. Grey's " Examination of Neale*s fourth vol. of the History of the Fori; 
tans," p. 378. 

t This portrait (from the information of the late George Steevens) is sud to re- 
j>re9ent Bully. Dawson, a ootorioas gambler and black-leg of hb time* 



OF ENGLAND. 160 

HANS RULING, inscribed, ''Mountebank;' &;c. 
Af. Lauron detin. P. Tempest exc. One of the set of 
Cries; h. sh. 

There is a poor mezzotinto of him, with verses at the 
bottom of the print. 

Haks Buling, M. Lauron; G. Walker. 

Hans Billing, a Datchman, was well known in London as a 
mountebank in this and the succeeding reign. He was an odd 
figure of a man, and was extremely fantastical in his dress. He 
was attended by a monkey, which he had trained up to act the part 
of a jack-pudding ; a part which he had formerly acted himself, 
and which was much more natural to him i that of a professor 
of physic. 

Merry Andrew, with a prominent belly, and large 
huttons to his doublet; arch look, and antic posture. 
M. Lauron delin. P. Tempest exc. One of the set of 
Cries ; h. sh. 

" Major subnectit fibula vestem, 



Et referunt vivos errantia lumina motus : 
In ventrem tumet immodicum/' &c. 

Addison de Homuncione, vulgo diet. Punch, 

Merry Andrew on the stage; playing on a bass- 
^iol; hood with ass's ears. M. Lauron delin. P. Tem- 
^t exc. h. sh. One of the set of Cries. Both these 
Prints represent the same person. 

PHILIPS, the merry-andrew. M. Lauron ; W. J. 
Taylor sc. 

This man, whose name was Philips, was some time a fiddler to a 
Puppet-show; in which capacity he held many a dialogue with 
E^unch, in much the same strain as he did afterward with the 
lector his master upon the stage. As this zany was regularly edu- 
cated, he had confessedly the advantage of the generality of his 



170 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

brethren. — I shall take the liberty to observe here, diat some saga- 
cious critics have discovered very evident traces of the anciesQ.t 
drama in the dialogue betwixt Punch and thejiddler: in which the 
former answers to one or more of the actors, and the latter to the 
chorus. The origin of farce has been attributed to the " eoter- 
^ tainment exhibited by charlatans and their buffoons in the opep 
street, to gather the crowd together."* 

HUGH MASSEY, inscribed « T/ie Mernf Fiddkr: 
M. Lauron delin. P. Tempest CtVC. h. sh. One of the 
set of Cries. 

Hugh Massey. Caulfield. 

This fellow, who was a vile scraper upon as vile an instrumeDi, 
picked up a much better subsistence by playing about the streets 
of London, than several of his brethren of the string. There are 
many to whom bad music is accommodated : it is no more necessary 
to play well to please the ears of the common people, than it is to 
write well to hit the level of their understandings. 



CLARK, the English posture-master ; standing on 
one legy his heel touching the hind part of his head; his 
monfcey in the same position. M. Lauron del. P. Tem- 
pest exc. h. sh. One of the set of Cries. 

JosEPHUs Clertcus, posture-masterius. M. Lau- 
ron p. P. Tempest exc. h. sh. One of the set of Cries. 
He is represented extremely distorted. 

Joseph Clark^ the posture-master. M. Lauron; 
W. J. Taylor. 

Joseph Clark, of Pall-mall, was undoubtedly the most extraor- 
dinary posture master that ever existed. Though a well-made 
man, and rather gross than thin, he exhibited, in a most nataial 

* See Chambers's Dictionary, article Farca« 



OF ENGLAND. 171 



pumer, almoil efary ipeciet of defbimity and didooalion. He 
finquently made himielf merry with the tailon, whom he eaiployed 
to take measare ^ him in one postare, which he changed for 
VBOther when his dories were brought home.* He dislocated the 
vertebrm of his back, and other parts of his body, ia such a maQner» 
^ M4dinayt the famous surgeon, before whom he appeared as a 
patient, was shocked at the sight, and would not so much as at« 
tempt his cure. He often passed for a cripple upon persons with 
whom be had been in company but a few minutes before. Upon 
these occasions he would not only change the position of his limbs, 
bat entirely alter the figure of his counteDance. The powers of 
his face were more extraordinary than the flexibility of his body. 
He would assume all the uncouth faces that he saw at a Quaker's 
meeting, the theatre, or any other public place. He died about 
the be^nning of King William's reign.t 

The famous Dutch Woman ; two prints; one repre^ 
mts her dancing on a strained^ the other vaulting on a 
slack rope. M. Lauron del. P. Tempest exc. h. sh. One 
(if the set of Cries. 

When the Dutch woman first danced and vaulted on the rope in 
Undon, the people beheld her with pleasure mixed with pain ; as 
she seemed every moment in danger of breaking ber neck. She 
was afterward exceeded by Signora Violante, who not only exhi* 
hited many feats which required more strength and agility of body 
than this woman was mistress of, but she had also a stronger bead, 
aCB she performed at a much greater distance from the ground than 
^ny of her predecessors. Signora Violante§ was no less excellent 
^ a rope*dancer.|l The spectators were astonished, in the late 

* See the " Gaardian/' No. 102. See also the " Philosophical Transactions/' 
^o. 242, for July, 1698, Art. iv. 

t Or Mullens. 
' % It appears iiom Evelyn's *' Numismata/' p. 277, that he was dead in 1697. 

§ I have seen the performance of tliis woman ; she was of an athletic form, but 
[nitted the stage, and kept a dancing-school at Edinburgh, where she died.*- 
JORD Hailxs. 

II ** Signora "Violante," says an author who wrote in the roign of George I. " lias 
ikeii possession of the king's own parish church, iu order to blicw her skill to mul- 
tudcs of admiring spectator8."-^Touch8tone, p. 1 U). 



17i EIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

reign, at seeing the fateous Turk dance on the rope, balance him- 
self on a slack wire without a pole, and toss up oranges alternately 
with his hands; but their admiration was considerably abated when 
one of the oranges happened to fall, and appeared by the sound to 
be a ball of painted lead. Signer and Signora Spinacuta are not 
inferior to the Turk. The former danced on the rope not long 
since,* at the Little Theatre in the Hay-market,t with two boys tied 
to his feet. But what is still more extraordinary, a monkey has lately 
performed there, both as a rope-dancer and an equilibrist, such 
tricks as no man was thought equal to, before the Turk appeared 
in England.^ 

" The portraiture of JOHN WORMBERGH, by 
birth a Switzer, by religion a Protestant ; his height 
not exceeding two feet seven inches, aged thirty-eight 
years ; who had the honour to be exposed to view of 
most princes in Europe, and since to the king of Great 
Britain^ and chiefest of the nobility : the like^ not 
hitherto seen, being the strangest prodigy in nature, 
and great astonishment of all beholders. He is at pre- 
sent to be seen in Fleet-street," Sold by Jssac Oliver^ 
on Ludgate-hill ; h. sh. 

John Wormbergh, JSf. 38; with Dutchy English^ 
and French verses. J. Drapentier. 

John Wormbergh, Ml. 38, (1688); a small etching* 

John Wormbergh, Mt. 39 ; mezz. J. Gole, 

John Wormbergh, Mt, 39, (1689); standing with 
James Hanson, eight feet high. 

Hans Wormbergh, w. L mezz. P. Schenkfec. rf 
excud. 

* In 1768. 

t Now called a Theatre Rojal. 

t In tbe reign of James II. there was a very noted rope-dancer in London, whom 
Mr. Evelyn calls> " the famous Funamble Turk." Sec " Numismata/' p. 277. 



OF ENGLAND. 173 

COLLY MOLLY PUFF. M. Lauran del. P. Tem- 
pest ejpc. h. sh. One of the set of Cries. 

Colly Mollt Puff. M. Lauron; W. J. Taylor. 

Hub little maoi who had nothing at all striking in his appearance, 
and was bat just able to support the basket of pastry which he 
\ canted upon his head, sung, in a yery peculiar tone, the cant 
words which passed into his name.* This singularity was very ad- 
rantageous to him, as it rendered him one of the most noted of 
die cries in London. 

The Cryer of poor JACK, attended by his lame wife, 
supported by two sticks. M. Lauron del. P. Tempest 
txc. h. sh. One of the set of Cries. 

Ilie wife of this man, who was scarce able to limp after her 
kssband, and never carried any fish, was, for many years, his 
constant attendant through the streets. I have been informed 
that jealousy was the reason commonly assigned for her at- 
tendance. 









' The merry Milk Maid. M. Lauron del. P. Tempest 
wr. A. sh. One of the set of Cries. 

%^ This pretty sprightly girl, whose name was Kate Smith, is repre- 
aented dancing with her milk-pail on her head. The pail is hung round 
"With cups, tankards, porringers, and other pieces of borrowed plate. 

i- ^ is dressed in a white hood ; oyer which is a narrow-brimmed 
black hat; on each shoulder is a knot, and she holds a white 
Wdkerchief in her right hand. The London milk-maids still con* 
tiuue to decorate their pails in this manner, on the 1st of May; 

^ when they generally receive small contributicms from their cus« 
tomers, 

ROGER TEASDELL, and MRS. PARKER, bal- 
W-singers ; inscribed " A merry new song.'' M. Lau-- 
^on del. P. Tempest exc. h.sh. One of the set of Cries. 

* He wu called Colly Molly Puff. See the " SpecUtor/' No. 25. 
vol. VI. 2 a 



174 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

Roger Teasdell and Mrs. Parker were many ye$urs inseparable 
companions,, and partners in trade. Mrs. Parker wore her hat ex- 
actly horizontal ; Roger's hung so much to one side, that it seemed 
every moment to be falling off bis bead. This was the only in- 
stance in which this harmonious couple disagreed. Each is repre- 
sented singing, and holding out a single ballad. 

*' _-_^ Jam poscunt undiqoe chartas 
Protensffi emptorad dextraB, qoas Hie vel ilia 
Dbtribuit, cantatqae simul : neque ferreus iste 
Est Qoquam auditor, dulcis coi lene canuena 
Non adhibet tormentum, et furtiTom elicit assem." 

V. BOURNB. 

SEYLEY, the chimney-sweeper and his boy; the 
print is inscribed, " Chimney-sweep.^' M. Lauron del. 
P. Tempest exc. h. sh. One of the set of Cries. 

The bass and treble voices of Seyley and his boy were generally 
heard in the streets, about six o'clock in the morning. None of our 
diurnal novelists or biographers have yet given us any real or imagi- 
nary memoirs of chimney-sweepers. But they have given us the lives 
of persons who, in the eye of reason, were of a much lower rank. 
Devil Dick was, in the strictest propriety of speech, of a much 
blacker, and consequently a meaner character than any chimoey- 
sweeper.* There is one of this occupation now living in Great 
Windmill-street, who keeps his one-horse chaise : I expect every 
day to hear that he has purchased a country house. 

The true Effigies of JAMES WHITNEY, the no- 
torious highwayman; whole length; seated in irons; 
scarce; small h.sh. 

The true Effigies of James Whitney, &c. copy; 
8vo. 

James Whitney was born at Stevenage, in Hertfordshire, and, 
when fit for servitude, was apprenticed to a butcher, With whom he 

* See " The Adventures of William B— ds—w, commonly staled Devil Dick;" 
two vols. 12mo. 1754. 



OF ENGLAND. 176 

continued until the erpimtion of his time ; but no sooner did he 
become his own master, than he gave way to a very irregular course 
of life ; and committed numerous depredations on the public pre- 
vious to commencing a confirmed highwayman. 

Meeting a gentleman on Bagshot-heatb, he commanded him to- 
stand and deliver, to which the other replied, '' 'Tis well you 
spoke first ; for I was just going to say the same thing to you.'' 
'•Why, are you a gentleman thief, then V quoth Whitney. ** Yes," 
said the stranger, •' but I have had very bad success to-day.'' 
Whitney upou this wished him better luck, and took his leave, 
really supposing him to be what he pretended. — ^t night it was 
the fortune of Whitney a^d this person to put up at the same inn, 
when our gentleman told some other travellers, by what stra- 
tagem he bad escaped being robbed on the road. Whitney had so., 
altered his habit and speech, that the gentleman did not know him 
again; so that he heard all the story, without being taken notice' 
of. Among other things, he heard him tell one of the company 
softly, that he had saved 100/. by his contrivance. The person 
to whom he had whispered this, was going the same road the next 
morning, and said, he had also a considerable sum about him, and 
if he pleased, should be glad to travel with him for security. 

When morning came, the travellers set out, and Whitney in 

about ft quarter of an hour, after them ; all the discoiurse of the 

gentlemen was about cheating the highwaymen, if they should meet 

any. When Whitney, at a convenient place, had got before them, 

and bid them stand, the gentleman whom he met before, not know- 

bg him, he having disguised himself in another manner, briskly 

cried out, '^ We wore going to say the same thing to you. Sir." 

" Were you so ?" quoth Whitney, *' and are you of my profession, 

then?" *' Yes," said both. " If you are," replied Whitney, « I 

suppose you remember the old proverb, ' two of a trade can never 

agree,' so that you must not expect any favour on that score. But* 

to be plain, gentlemen, the trick will do no longer ; I know you 

very well, and must have your 100/. Sir; and your considerable 

sum, Sir, turning to the other, let it be what it will, or I shall make 

bold to send a brace of bullets through each of your heads. You, , 

Mr. Highwayman, should have kept your secret a little longer, and 

not have boasted so soon of having outwitted a thief; there is no- . 

thing for you to do, but deliver or die." — These terrible words put 

them both in a sad consternation ; they'were loath to lose their money, 

but more loath to lose their lives ; so, of two evils they chose the 



176 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 

least; the telltale coxcomb disbursing fais 100/« and the other 
a somewhat larger sum, professing that they would be careful for 
the future not to count without their host. 

Whitney always affected to appear generous and noble : meeting 
one day with a gentleman on Newmarket-heath, whose name was 
Long, and having robbed him of 100/. in silver, which was in his 
portmanteau, tied up in a great bag, the gentleman told him he had 
a great way to go, and, as he was unknown upon the road, should 
meet with many difficulties, if he did not return as much as would 
bear his expenses. Whitney opened the mouth of the bag, and 
holding it to Mr. Long, *^ Here,*' says he, ** take what you have 
occasion for.'' Mr. Long put in his hand, and took as much as he 
could hold: to which Whitney made no opposition, but only said with 
a smile, ** I thought you would have had more conscience, Sir." 

After running a course of adventures on the road for upwards of 
thirteen years, he was apprehended on the information of Mother 
Cozens, who kept a house of ill-fame in MiHbrd-lane, near St. Cle- 
ment's church. The magistrate, who took the information, committed 
him to Newgate, where he remained till the next sessions at the Old 
Bailey, when he was brought to trial and found guilty. The recorder 
in passing sentence of death on him, exhorted him to a sincere re- 
pentance, as it was impossible for him to hope for any reprieve, after 
such a course of villanies ; and, on Wednesday, the 19th of Dec. 
1694, he was carried to the place of execution, which was at Por- 
ter's Block, near Smithfield, where he hung, being about thirty- 
four years of age. 

A 

m 

WILLIAM FULLER ; prejiaed to his ''Lifer Svo. 

William Fuller; copied from the above; in ''Me- 
moirs of Remarkable Persons /' Svo. 

William Fuller was the son of Robert Fuller, the second son of 
Dr. Tliomas Fuller, and was bom at Oxford in the year 1634 His 
mother was the daughter of the Honourable Charles Herbert, esq. 
of Montgomeryfihire, in Wales. 

Being of an intriguing and ambitious nature, he was guilty of 
iBiany tricks and frauds, to obtain those expensive habits, which 
fortune had not enabled him honestly to acquire ; the most remark- 
able of which was a pretended correspondence with King James 
the Second, after his abdication ; for which he was censured hy 



OF ENGtAND. 177 

the TOlet of botb houses of pariiament, and ordered to be prose- 
cuted; on which he was tried, found guilty, and sentenced, 
'' That he should go to all the courts in Westminster, with a paper 
pained on his hat, expressing his crime ; that he should stand three 
times in the pillory, two hours at a time, on Friday following, at 
Charing^*cross ; on Saturday, at Temple-bar; and on Monday, 
before the Royal Exchange ; that he should be sent to Bridewell 
the Friday after, and there be whipt ; and afterward kept to hard 
Uboar, notil the second day of the next term ; and be fined a thou- 
sand marks.'' 

Whatever might have been the extent of his guilt, his punish- 
ment bore pace with it; being, according to the following account 
(written by himself), far worse than death itself. '' All this was 
eiecoted; and at my standing in the pillory, never was man, amongst 
Turks or Barbarians, known to be worse used. I was sadly abused 
at Charing^-oross ; but at Temple-bar I was stifled with all manner 
of dirt, and rotten eggs ; and my left eye was so bruised, with a 
I itone flung, that it swelled out of my head immediately ; the blow 
deprived me of my senses, and I fell down and hung by the neck. 
Three times was I served in that kind, losing all manner of sense, 
though I fell down but twice ; and being almost dead, I was by 
order taken out, but felt not my release ; nor was I sensible of any 
thbg for some hours after. I was a miserable object to behold, 
and hardly any that saw me thought it possible for me to survive. 
I was all over bruised from head to heel ; and on the small of my 
back, as I was stooping, a stone struck me, which being taken up. 
Was found to weigh more than six pounds. On Monday, in the 
city, I was more tenderly used ; after having made a complaint to 
Sir James Bateman, then sheriff. 

The days of punishment were, Friday the 25th, Saturday 26th, 
and Monday the 28th of June, 1702. 



RICHARD DUGDALE; awood-cut; Ato. prefia^ed 
to a tracts entitled^ " The Surey Demoniacky or the 
wonderful dealings ofSatariy about the person of Richard 
Dugdale/'^x. 

In a very artful narrative, drawn up by several confederated Pu- 
ritans, it appears that Richard Dugdale, by profession a gardener, 
at a merry-making, called the Rush-burying, or Rush-bearing, held 



178 BIOGRAPHICAL fflStORY 

on the James-tide, at Whalley, in Lancashil-e, in the year 1688; 
had offered himself to the devil, on condition of his becoming an 
expert dancer ;— -from which time he was dreadfully troubled with 
strange fits ; dancing in a most ancommon manner on his knees, 
and in other ways, greatly superior to the most expert dancers ; at 
which times he would be so light in weight, as to be lifted from the 
ground by the buttons of hi& clothes ; and the next instant so heavy, 
that seven men couM not stir him. 

Every physical method was tried on him, without effect ; and it 
was not until one year after, that he obtained relief, from the united 
efforts pf a Mr. Jolly, and five other puritan divines. The account 
of which, together with the affidavits of many witnesses, was pub-' 
lished in the year 1697, in a tract, entitled, " The Surey Demoniack, 
or the wonderful dealings of Satan, about the person of Richard 
Dugdale." — In the same year, Zachary Taylor answered it in a 
tract, called " The Surey Impostor," in which he most clearly 
proves the whole to be a cheat, and compares the story to that of 
William Summers and the Boy of Bilson. This produced a third 
tract by T. Jolly, called " A Vindication of the Surey Demoniack,> 
as no Impostor," which is little more than a revisal of the first ;' 
with an addition of Richard Dugdale s confession, sworn nine years' 
after his being first afflicted ; but the whole is too weak in all its 
evidences not to be seen through as a contrivance to raise the re- 
putation of the Puritans. 



NAN MILLS, and her two Children ; one of whom 
hangs at her back. The print is inscribed^ " The London 
Beggar'' M. Lauron del. P. Tempest e.vc. h.sh. One 
of the set of Cries. 

Nan Mills was not only a good physiognomist; she was also an 
excellent mimic. She knew who were the likeliest persons. to 
address herself to, and could adapt her countenance to every cir- 
cumstance of distress. 

MARY HOBRY, French midwife ; in the act of 
cutting off the limbs of her husband. 



A copy by J. Caul/ield. 



OF ENGLAND. 17D 

She was arraigned at the Old Bailey, Feb. 22, 1687-8, pleaded 
guilty of the murder of her husband Dennis Hobry, and was sen* 
tenced to he burnt. The print is prefixed to " A Hellish Murder, 
committed by a French Midwife on the body of her Husband ;" 4to. 
1688. 

I shall conclude this reign, with observing, that Lord Bacon has 
somewhere remarked, that biography has been confined within too 
narrow limits; as if the lives of great personages only deserved 
the notice of the inquisitive part of mankind. I have, perhaps, in 
the foregoing strictures, extended the sphere of it too far : I began 
with monarchs, and have ended with ballad-singers, chimney- 
sweepers, and beggars. But they that fill the highest and lowest 
classes of human life, seem, in rnaiiy respects, to be more nearly 
\ allied than even themselves imagine. A skilful anatomist would 
I find little or no difference, in dissecting the body of a king and that 
:' of the meanest of his subjects; and a judicious philosopher would 
discover a surprising conformity, in discussing the nature and qua- 
lities of their minds.* 



* The print of Coant Dada, mentioned in a note subjoined to tlie article of tfia 
Doke of Somerset, in the diird class, and that of Father Couplet, in the fourth, maj 
cotne in here, hy way of Appendix to this reign. 



180 BIOGRAPHICAL BISTORT 



turn 



FOLLOWING LIST 



or 



CURIOUS PORTRAITS, 

Some of whicby at least* it is hoped, will be engraved, was com- 
municated by Mr. Walfole to the author, who has taken the 
liberty to methodize it according to his own plan. 



ARTICLE L 

JAMES the Third, king of Scots, and his Queen ; 
ancient originals, at Kensington palace. 

ROBERT VERE, duke of Ireland ;* at Penshurst, 
in Kent. 



GEORGE, duke of Clarence, is at the same place. 
The Earl of Huntingdon has another. 

The great TALBOT, earl of Shrewsbury, and his 
Countess ; two most ancient pictures on board, at the 
Earl of Northampton's, at Castle Ashby, in Northamp- 
tonshire. 



* Created by lUchard II. See his article in the hbtory of the.Vcre family, in 
the '* Biographia Britannlca," vi. p. 4024. 



OF ENGLANDl 181 

The fiist Duke of Norfolk, who was kiHed at Bos- 
worth-Field; at Woiksop, the seat of the Duke of 
Norfolk. 



REIGN OF HENRY VIII. 

QUEEN CATHARINE PARR; at the Earl of 
Benbigh's, at Newnham, in Warwickshire. 

At the Queen's House, in the library, are the curious 
portraits of the Court of Henry VIII. &c. by Holbein.* 

The whole of these inimitable drawings, by Holbein, have been 
exquisitely engraved by ^artoloaod, in the stune size as the onginals, 
and published by the late Mr. Chiemiberlain. There is likewise a 
set done by several eminent engravers, quarto size« 

JAMES V. king of Scots, and his Queen ; at the 
Duke of Devonshire's^ at Hardwick. Mr. Walpole 
hra a copy of it in water-cdlours^ 

CHRISTIANA, dutchess of Milan, who refused to 
marry Henry Vlll.t at Worksop. 



* Some of these have been mentioned in ahother place, as having been etobed 
and published by Mr. Daltou. Among those which are not yet pabliahed4 *x^ 
Qseen Anne Bolen ; Queen Jane Seymour ; the Lady Mary, afterwttrd'Qoeen ; the 
Lord-cbancellor Rich; the Earl of Smrrey; John Colet, dean of St Paari; Sir 
Tbcwias Wyatt) John More, son of Sir Thomas; the Dutchess of Suffolk; the 
Countess of Surrey ; and Lady Elyot. 

t A^ the dutchess w^ never in England, her portrait, in strict propriety, cannot 
be plf^sed in the English series. When a marriage with Henry was proposed to 
her» she declined the oviertore, declaring, that if she had two heads* one of them 
shonld be at his higbnesl's service. 

I i- - - ^^^~~"~ 

t May 12, 1774. 
VOL. TI. 2 B 



183 fitOGRAPHICAI^ HISTORY 

PRINCE ARTHUR ; at Mr. Slieldon's, Weston, 
Warwickshire. 

The Duke of Richmond^ natural son of Henry VIIL 
at Strawberry-hilL 

SIR THOMAS WYATT ; at Mr. Walpole's. 



REIGN OF EDWARD Vl. 
The Marquis* of Winchester ; at Mri^. Pawlet's. 

ANNE stanhope, dutchess of Somerset, ik 
Protector's wife; at Strawberry-hilL 



ItEIGN OF MARV. 

JOHN CtJDLEYj the great duke of Nottkumtef- 
land ; at the Duke of Dorset's, at Knowle, in Kent^ 

ELINOR, countess of Cuinlberlandi sister to th^ 
Dutchess of Suffolk, mother of the Lady Jane Grey ; 
at Lord Strafford's^ at Wentwdrth Castle^ in Yorkshire^ 

CATHARINE GREY, sister of Lady Jane; tA 
Warwick Castle^ 



* Create hy Edward the Sixth, ifr. tyion \mi tkM UU p(>rindt ^m aootber 
]^ietore» Aont when be wu hi Mhrinoed m jrears. The firint it not told hi tiMi 
^hdpsi 



OF BNGLAND. ^83 



REIGN OF ELIZABETH. 

Mr. Walpole has seen a picture of Lord-treasurer 
BURGHLEY, and three other Lords, playing at cards, 
which would make a large print ; bat does not fiecol*^ 
lect where he saw it 

SIR JOHN PERROT, lord-lieutenant of Ire- 
knd^ supposed natural son of Henry the Eighth ; at 
Strawberry-hilJL The original is at Sir Henry Packr 
higton% 

THOMAS, earl of Southampton, Lord Essex's 
friend; at the Dutchess.4owager's of Portlaiid; at 
Bulstrode, Bucks^'*^ 

M>4RY, tbie learned countess of Arundel; fiX Mr, 
iSheidon s, aJ; Wesjton, in Warwicksbire.f 



REIGN OF JAMES I. 

HENRY HOWARD, earl af Northampton ; at Lord 
Carlisle's, Castle-Howard, Yorkshire. There is an- 
i^er at Ki^owle, }gi i^ent^ 



* In the ^liCUire is represeijijleid tiis catt<wltiich went 'with him to the Tower. 

t Wife of Henry Howi^d. The reader is referred to Ballard's *' Memoirs" for 
an acopwit of her transitions from Greek into English, and from English into Latin. 
Hie tame muthor roentioos her ooBectioBS from Plato, Aristotle, and Seneca. These 
pieces, which were never prtaled» aie, as he informs us, prestrred hi the rojal 
library. 



184 BIOGRAPfilCAIi HISTORY 



The great Earl of Clare;* at the Duke of Portland's, 
at Welbeck. 

. ■ - rf" 

CECIL, viscount Wimbledon; at Lord Craven's. 
There i$ a print of him, but it is very scarce. 

SIR THOMAS CHALONER, governor of Prince 
Henry ; at Lord Orford's, at Houghton, Norfolk. 

SIR HENRY SAVILE; at Mr. Sheldon's, at Wes- 
ton, in Warwickshire.! 

The Countess of Suffolk ; at Gorhambury. 

* LADY ARABELLA STUART; at Welbeck, Mr. 
Walpole ha§ a copy in water-colours. There is a very 
scarce print of her. 



REIGN OF CHARLES I. 

The PRINCESS ELIZABETH, daughter of Charles 
the First ; at the Duke of Northumberland's, at Sion. 

LADY ALICE EGERTON, countess of Carberry; 
the lady in " Comus," at Ashbridge-abbey, Bucks. 

THOMAS, youngest son of the first earl of Bridge- 
water. He died young. The second brother in *^ Co- 
mus," at Ashbridge-^bbiey. 



' * Created 32 Jao. I. See ap aocoont of him, under Ihp jifune of Hollss, in U^ 
^^* Bio^raphia Bnipnica.*' 

t There is another portrut of him in the picture gallery at Oxford. 



ENGLAND. IflS 

PRINCE RUPERT, and PRINCE MAURICE, 
in one picturje ; at Lord Craven's, at Cojpibe, in War- 
wickshire. 

Th^ C^ueen of BoheaoEiia, and all hdf Ch^ldxen, in 
different pictures, are at the same place. 

HENRY DANVERS, earl of Danby ; at Lord Or^ 
ibrd%, «t Hougfaion, Noi4blk. 



LORD BROOK, who was killed in the civil war; 
at Warwick Ca3tle. 

SIR GEORGE VILLIERS, father of the first duke 
of Bi^c^dnghanpi fX^^ Clarendon's G)iost) ; at Straw- 
berry-hill. 

SIR SAI^PEI, |.UKE (tfip Hudibras of Butler); 
at Mr. Barber's, at Adderbury, ;n Oxfordshire. 

The Countess of Derby, who defended Latham- 
house ; at Mr. Walpok-s. 

ANNE, countess of Dorset, Pembroke, and Mont- 
gomery; at Mr. Waipole's, in Arlington-street. There 
is a very scarce print of her, which represents her 
young. 

The Countess of Buckingham, mother of the duke ; 
at the Duke of Montagu's. 



1S6 BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY 



REIGN OF CHARLES II. 

HENRY JERMYN, earl of St. Alban's, supposed 
husband of Queen Henrietta Maria ; at Strawberry-hill. 

SERJEANT MAYNARD; at Strawberry-hill. 

The £Etmous Countess of Shrewsbury, mistress of the 
second duke of Buckingham of the name of Villers ; at 
the Duke of Montagu's. 

The Beauties of Windsor, except two or three at 
most, have not yet been engraved. 

Lady Chesterfield and Lady Southesk ; at the late 
Sir Andrew Fountain's, at Narford, Norfolk. 

MRS. LUCY WALTERS, mother of the Duke of 
Monmouth ; at Strawberry-hill. 



REIGN OF WILLLAM HL . 

The Countess of Newburg, Lord Lansdown's Mira ; 
at the Duke of Montagu's. There is an juncommon 
mezzotinto of her. 



REIGN OF ANNE. 

DR. ARBUTHNOT ; at the Earl of Bristol's, in 
St. James*s-square. 



OP ENGLAND. 187 



REIGN OF GEORGE I. 

The Dake of Wharton ; at the Queen's House. There 
is a print of him by Simon, which has been copied by 
Vertue.* 

^ At Lord Paget's, at Bcavdttert* in Staffordshire, is a whole length pictare» bj 
Holbein, of WiUiam, lord Paget, who floarished in the reign of Vlhry. Lord Dart- 
iBODth has • good portrait of Charles Bloant, earl of Devonshire, which answers to 
FjnesMoijson's description of hisperson.t 1 bear that it is now engraving odder the 
Erection of Mr. BoydelL I have lately seen a most rare print of him in the king's 
libraiy. At Magdiden College, in Oxford, are two paintings of the pious and mani- 
ikent Dr. John Warner, bishop of Rochester.} . At the same place is a portrait of 
the excellent Dr. Henrj Hammond. At the King's Arms, in Reading, is, or was 
nrj lately, an original picture of the charitable and pablic-spirited Mr. John Kyrle^ 
tbe Mm of Ross. 



t See p. 45» of Moryson's " Joamal of the Irish Rebellion, in the Reiga of 
Elisabeth." « 

I See ** Adien. Ozon." 



•^* Moit of the Pictures in the foregoing List, which was commu- 
nicated to Mr. Granger f by the Honourable Horace Walpole, soon after 
the pubUcatioH of the first edition of this work, in 1769, have since 
been engraved, and the Prints introduced in their proper places 
throughout the vfork. 



Index. 



INDEX. 



\rt. L signifies the First Article, or that part of the work which precedes the reign 

VIII. App. the Appendix to any Keign. Int. the Interregnum ; and N. the 

FersoDS and things incidently mentioned, are distiogoished bj Italic Characters,* 



or Abboty Robert* 
, George 



derman 
, James 



JoaoDes. See Hawkwood. 

Bernard 

Jack • 

)r HadriaDy IV. • • • • • 

— ,V. 

, See Alfred. 

Hefiry Cornelius* • • 

f, Robert, earl of 

enry • 

See Ayscue. 

r, William 

illiam .•.•.••••••.•....• 

fohn * • ....•- 

le, George Monck, duke of 



-, Anne, dutchess of • • • 
-, Christopher, duke of* 



Vol 


Reign f 8^c. 


Class, ^*c. 


Page, 


II. 


James I. 


IV. 


55 


II. 


James I. 


iv. 


44 


III. 


Cha. I. 


XII. 


248 


I. 


Eliz. 


IV. 


267 


V 




. 


249 
59 


IT. 


James I. 


IV. 


V. 


Cha. 11. 


IX. 


305 


I. 


Art. I. 


IV. 


55 


I. 


Art. I. 


App. 


92 


I. 


Hen. VIII. 


App. 


157 


VI. 


, James II. 


II. 


62 


II. 


James I. 


IV. 


64 


ir. 


Cha. T. 


IV. 


351 


I. 


Eliz. 


IV. 


270 


I, 


Ed. vi. 


IV. 


176 


IV. 


Cha: 11. 


II. 


145 


V. 


Cha. IL 


VII. 


157 


IV. 


Cha. 11. 


III. 


145 


V. 


Cha. II. 


XI. 


355 


iv: 


Cha. 11. 


III. 


156 


VI. 


James 11. 


I"- 


71 


VI. 


James II. 


VII. 


118 


V. 


Cha. 11. 


XI. 


357 



-, Elizabeth, dutchess of 

futhor has paid great attentjon to tlie correctness of this Index : but if after all 
y number slioujd be misprinted, the article sought for, may be found by attend- 
reign and class. 



VI. 



o 



Albert II. king of the Rotnaas ■ ■ • . I. 

, prince, count Aremberg 11. 

Albius. See White. 

Alcock, John I. 

Alencon, Francis, duke of I. 

Alexander I. king of Scstland I. 

II. &c. I. 

III. &c • ■ I. 

Sir William. SeeSterling, 

William, earl of. 

Alfred •• • I. 

Alien, William. See Alan. 

~ , Thomas II. 

, of Merton College.. II. 

-^-, Eiias m. 

, sir Thomas... V. 

Allestry, Richard V. 

Allejn, Edward • III. 

AllingloD, sir Gile I. 

. III. 

AUatia, the '.Squire of - VI. 

Abop, Gewge V, 

Alva, Ferdinand Alvares, duke of. • I. 

Ambrose, Isaac V. 

Ames, William ■•■ • II. 

'Anderson, Sir Edrouud I. 

Andrews, Lancelot- • • - II. 

Ancram, Robert Kerr, earl of IT. 

Andrews^ Richard II. 

— , Eusebius III. 

Atigel. father '■ H. 

. Auglesey, Arthur, earl of IV. 

Angns, Archibald Douglas, earl of . I. 

Anieur, father H. 

Anne, queen of Richard II. • • ■ . . ■ I. 
, queen of Riclutrd III. ....... I. 



flrijn, Sfc. 


Choi. S;«. 


P-P. 


Art. I. 


A pp. 


M 


Jdmes I: 


App- 


223 


Art. I. 


ly. 


6« 


Eliz. 


App. 


351 


Art. I. 


I. 


33 


Art. I. 


I. 


34 



Cto. I. 


X. 


Cliii.ll. 


VII. 


Clii. II. 


IV. 


Cha. I. 


X. 


Hen. VIII. 


VIII. 


Cha. I. 


VHI. 


James 11. 


X. 


Cha. U. 


IV. 


Mars 


App. 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


Cha. I. 


IV; 


Eliz,, 


VI. 


James I. 


IV. 


Cha. I. 


III. 


James I. 


VIII. 


Cha. I. 


vn. 







Cha. II. 


III. 


Hen. VIII. 


III. 


James I. 


IV. 


A.t. I, 


I. 



INDEX. 



191 



VoL Reign, ^c. Clou, fy. Page, 



►len. See Bolen ...»..•• 

Clevcs I. Hen. VIII. 

Denmark II.' James I. 

lady II. Cha. I. 

IV. Cha.II. 

ncess of Denmark IV. Cha. II. 

• VI. James II. 

Jede, &c. I. — 

„ I II. James I. 

Francis 3 

tnons.de*** II. r- 

1, father II. James I. 

Vrchy)* 111. Cha. I. 

ohn • • • V. Clia. II. 

y. See Albert. 

2d, comes. See Argyle. 

Archibald Campbell, mar- 

• , III. Int. 

: , earl of VI. James II. 

Lnne, countess of III. Cha. I. 

1, Henry Bennet, earl of • • IV. Cha. II. 

-,lady V. Cha.II. 

ig, sir Thomas • • V. Cha. II. 

lady Mary V. Cha. II. 

ames Hamilton, earl of • • • • I. Eliz. 

lith, Edmund II. Cha. I. 

prince of Wales • . . • . I. Art. I. 

^Richard Fitz-Allau,fifth earl 

I. Art. I. 

, Henry Fitz-Allan, earl of- I. Eliz. 

, Philip Howard, earl of- • • I. Eliz. 

', Thomas Howard, earl of* • II. James I. 

-^ • II. James I. 

. II. Cha. I. 

. II. Cha. I. 

-, Anne Dacre, countess of • III. Cha. I. 





100 




7 




259 




132 




137 




67 




54 


IX. 


120 




240 


IV. 


82 


XII. 


241 


IX. 


^11 



ni. 


314 


n. 


66 


XI. 


236 


II. 


144 


XI. 


369 


vin. 


174 


XI. 


376 


III. 


247 


IV. 


383 


I. 


97 


n. 


45 


II. 


236 


HI. 


245 


II. 


20 


III. 


32 


II. 


274 


VII. 


34 


XI. 


207 



* His name was Archibald ArmslroDg. 



Arundel, Alatbea Talbot, countess of III. 

. I , Henry, earl of. II. 

-T-. , the countess of V. 

■ , Blanch, lady III. 

Arundell, Thomas, first lord of War- 
dour L 

-, second lord of 

Wardour •.. 11. 

, Cicely, lady V. 

, Henry, 3d lord of Wardour VI. 

Ascbani, Roger I. 

, Anthony IV. 

Asb, Simeon V. 

Asheiis. Jacobus '. III. 

Ashbumh^m, Bertram I. 

Ashley, lord IV. 

, lady -. V. 

Asbmole, Elias IV. 

.-_ , Mri. V, 

Asbton, col. Edward •".... IV. 

Astley, Jacob, lord Ul. 

.sirBemard • , III. 

Astrological Doctors HI. 

\ —■ V. 

Astrop Wells, an anecdote concern- 
ing them V. 

Atkyns, Richard ■ V.. 

Aubigney, lady • III. 

Aubrey, William - • • ■ I. 

Aubrey, John V. 

Audley, Thomaa, lord -cbancel lor • ■ . I. 

Audhii'^End II. 

Augustinus (Austio) Gulielmus • ■■• . VI. 

Aumerle, Edward Langlcy, duke of I. 

Aurelius, Abrabamus II. 

Aurlacus, vol Arausionensium, priu- 
ceps. See Orange. 

\ustiii, William III. 



Cba. I. 
Cha. I, . 
Cha. H. 
Cha. I. 



Cha. I. 


III. 


Cha. II. 


. XI. 


Jam<?s H. 


II. 


Efe. 


IX. 


lot. 


VIII. 


Cha. 11. 


IV. 


Cha. I. 


..VIII. 


Art. I. 


HI. 


Cha. II. 


III. 


Cha. II. 


XI. 


Int. 


IX. 


Cha. II. 


VIII. 


Int. 


VII. 


Cha. I. 


. VII. 


Cha..I.. 


VII. 



Cha. II. 
Cha. I. 
. ElJs-. 



Art. L 
James I. 



VI. 


110 





ai 


IX. 


S8 


II. 


4! 


IV. 


77 








B 


IX. 


143 



INDEX. 



193 



Vol. 

Daniel V. 

Robert III. 

r, John • . • • I. 

?, sir George V. 

. sir Robert III. 

IGTON, Gervase II. 

-r-> John in. 

r, Jacopo III. 

ousBy William • • V. 

ell, Edward V. 

, Roger I. 

, sir Nicholas I. 

, sir Nathaniel I. 

, Francis, lord II. 

-" •. II. 

I, Anna, lady IL 

\, Cecilia, marchioness of. See 
;iUa. 

ell, William IV. 

,Pr. IIL 

le, captain William V. 

•, Augustin II. 

, sir Richard HI. 

, sir George I. 

, Charles V. 

•, madam • • • VI. 

or Balasus I. 

ur, sir William • HI. 

— III. 

I, or Balliol, John I, 

-, Edward i. 

lam, Hugo de • •. I. 

nore, Cecil Calvert, baron of. . Ill, 

, George Calvert, lord- • • • II. 

roft, Richard II. 

I, the clerical VI. 



Reign, ^c. 

Cha. II. 
Cha. I. 
Eliz. 
Cha. II. 
Cha. I, 

James I. 
Cba. I. 
Cha. I. 



Class, ^p. Pdge. 

VII. 143 



VI. 

IV, 

VII. 

VIII. 

• 

IV. 

IX. 

X. 



Cha. II. 


VIII. 


Art. I. 


IV. 


Eiiz. 


VI. 


Eliz. 


X. 


James I. 


VI. 


James L 


IX. 


James I. 


XI, 


Int. 


IX. 


Int. 


IV. 


Cha. I. 


IV. 


Cha. I. 


IX. 


Eliz. 


IX. 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


James IL 

• 


XI. 


Ed. VI. 


IV. 


Cha. I. 


VII. 


Cba. I. 


VIII. 


Art. I. 


I. 


Art. I. 


I. 


Art. I. 


IV. 


lot. 


III. 


James I. 


III. 


James I. 


IV. 



29 
252 
158 

00 

52 
162 
182 
231 
184 

59 
281 
330 

91 
139 
179 



59 

339 

336 

380 

147 

309 

95 

160 

172 

68 

109 

35 

37 

57 

315 

41 

43 

28 



194 



INDEX. 



Vol Sagn, Sfe, Clau, 

BandintUi, Baeda .11. James I. 

BsdI), John III. Cba. l. 

Bantam ambassadors VI. Clia. II. 

Barbara, daughter of Charles 11. • • . V. Cha. II. 

Barberini, cardinal II. James f. 

Barclaius. See Barclay. 

Barclay, William I. Eliz. 

■ , John 11. James I. 

, Alexander I. Hen. VIII. 

Barebone, Praise God III. Int. 

Barefoot, John VI. Cba. 11. 

Bargrave, Isaac II. Cba. I. 

Barillon, Mons. IV. — 

Batkley. See Berkeley. 

Barkstead, Joha V. Cha. II. 

Barlo (Barlow), Ambrose II. Cha. I. 

Barlow, Thomas V. Cha. II. 

VI. James II. 

, Lucy (alias Waters) V. Cha. II. 

. Barnard Tlieodore. See Bernard. 

Bamardis ton, sir Nathaniel III. Cba. I. ' 

Barnevelt, John Oden--- •• II. James I. 

BaningtoD, lady Anne, &c. V. Cba. II. 

BaHffe, William IV. Int. 

Bams, sir George I. Ed. VI; 

Baron, Robert III. Cba. I. 

, Booaventure V. Cha. II. 

Banow, Isaac V. Cha. II. 

Bartas, William du I. Eliz. 

Barwick, John V. Cha. II. 

, Peter V. Cha. II. 

Bussompierrc, Francis de, &c. III. Cha. I. 

Bastwick, John III. Cha. I. 

Bate. John III. Cha. I. 

Batemaii, William I. Art. I. 

Bates. William V. Cha. 11. 

, Thooius ••• II. ■ -James 1. 



bo, Ifc. 


Pnf. 


IV. 


27» 


App. 


»» 


App. 


« 


XI. 


m 


App. 


m 



IX. 


133 


IV. 


133 


V. 


360 


XII. 


3 


IV. 


340 


- 


197 


VII. 


13a 


IV. 


381 


IV. 


41 


IV. 


69 


XI. 


391 


VIII. 


8« 


App. 


SS5 


XI. 


378 


IX. 


61 



VIH. : 

IX. 136 

IV. B! 

IV; « 

App. 354 



IV. 
IV. 
XII. 



INDEX. 



195 



u See Bates. 

V. 

t, Ralph y^ 

, Francis m^ 

(^ Dominicus I, 

of Notoriety/ VI. 

Kicliard y ^ 

VI. 

f chevalier I, 

J, Robert jy^ 

9 Thomas j^ 

Mary, and her son Charles • y. 

Thomas n^ 

f cardinal j^ 

aire, James, lord • . jy, 

)rt, Henry, cardinal-bishop of 

Chester j^ 

— , Mary Sackville,dutchess of y . 

— , Henry, duke of ly, 

— , Mary, dutchess of y, 

i>, Betty yi^ 

lont, Francis « U^ 

— , Joseph y, 

, John y, 

^ col. John. See Portsmouth 

aptains. 

» Mr , . . . 11. 

I>avid HI. 

Cave III. 

t, Thomas • I. 

-, Isaac • • • • • y. 

lus. See Beacon. 

rd, John, duke of I. 

— , John Russel, first earl of. . I. 

—, Francis Russel, 2d earl of I. 
— , Lucy Harrington, countess 

f 11. 



Vol. Reign, S^c. Clau,8ic. Page. 



Cha. II. 



IV. 



Cha. I. 


xn. 


£liz. 


App. 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


James II. 


IV, 


Hen. Vin. 


App. 


Int. 


IX, 


Eliz. 


IV. 


Cha. II. 


X. 


Cha. I. 


IV. 


Hen. Vni. 


IV. 


Cha. II. 


III. 


Art, I. 


IV. 


Cha. II. 


XI. 


Cha. II. 


III. 


Cha, II. 


XL 


James I. 


IX. 


Cha. II. 


IV. 



Cha. I. 
Cha, I. 
Int. 
Art. I« 
Cha. 11. 

Art. L 
Ed. VL 
Eliz. 

James I. 



IV. 

X. 
IV. 
IV. 

X. 

I. 

IL 
III. 



221 

24 

246 

358 

20 

80 

106 

154 

33 

260 

325 

375 

118 

187 

62 
365 
163 
364 

20 
126 

44 

37 



355 
177 
329 
56 
332 

28 
165 
244 



IX. 171 



196 



INDEX. 



Vol. Reign, ^r. 

Bedford, Francis Russel, earl of • • • II. Cha. I. 

, William Russel, earl of- • • II. Cha. I. 

, Anne, countess of III. Cha. I. 

, Anne Carre, countess of* • III. Cha. I 

Bedingfield, sir Henry VI. James II. 

Bedloe, William VI. Cha. II. 

Beeverwaerde, Charlotte de V. 

Beggar, the London VI. James II. 

Behn, Aphara - V. Cha. II. 

Belcamp, John Van • III. Cha. I. 

Belhaven, John Hamilton, 2d lord* » VI. James JL 

BelUJohn I. Ed. VI. 

, Francis • • • 11. Cha. I 

Bellasyse, Thomas. See Falconberg* 

, John, lord IV. Cha. II. 

Bellasis, (Bellasyse), lady V. Cha. II. 

Bellievre, Pompone de I. Eliz. 

Beloman, le V. Cha. II. 

Benbow, admiral VI. James II. 

, col. -, IV. Int. 

, vice-admiral VI. James II. 

Bendish, Bridget IV. 

Ben Israel, Manasseh IV. Int. 

— Abdalah. See Jaurar. 

Benedict, father • • • II. James I. 

Benedictus. See Bennet. 

Benlowes, Edward IV. Int. . 

Benn, William • • • HI. Int. 

Bennet, Christopher • • • • • IV. Int. 

^ , mother • • • • VI. 

Benson, William * * III. 

. , Mr IV. Int. 

Bergdvenny, lady I. Eliz. 

Berkeley, sir Robert • III. Cha. I. 

, George, earl of IV. Cha. II. 

. , sir William V. - Cha. II. - 

, lady Henrietta VI. James II. 



Class, S^c. 


Page, 


in. 


293 


III. 


294 


XI. 


211 


XI. 


212 


VI. 


114 


XII: 


5 


— 


400 


XII. 


178 


IX. 


260 


X. 


18i 


II. 


m 


IV. 


170 


IV. 


385 

1 


m. 


20S 


XI. 


375 


App. 


352 


X. 


346 


vn. 


120 


vir. 


a 


vn. 


in 



App. 105 



IV. a 



IX. 


» 


IV. 


sit 


IX. 


4 


vir. 


i 


XI. 




VI. 


iH 


III. 


!«• 


VII. 


1<» 


XT. 


l» 



h 



INDEX. 

VtL Bmpi. Sit. 

rd.Ricbard II. Cln. I. 

— , Theodore or Bemtrd . . • - I. Heo. VIII. 

—.Nathaniel II. Cha. I. 

— , Frmscu ...■ VL Jamea II. 

is,Peter I. Eli«. 

le.Pelcrde III. Cha. I. 

ck, James, duke of VI. James II. 

I. Sliogtby V. Cha. II. 

y, John IV. Int. 

too, Thomas VI. Jam. II. 

land, Adrian V. Cha. II. 

, the EnglUk trmuUtiim of it I- 

Kuae II. James I. 

^y, Hartin II. James I. 

t, T^omoM II. 

ag, Thomas V. Cha. II. 

•tphif, tord Bacon't obterva- 

I eoncermingit VI. 

i, Francesco II. Jamea I. 

WUliam . ■ 1. Elix. 

, Cfaarlea, due d 1. Ms. 

p, WUIiam « II. Jamea 1. 

ps, the seven VI. James II. 

— , counsel VI. James 11. 

bunt, Michael IV. Int. 

erby, Richard II. Cba. I. 

•^otu, sir William I. — ^— ■ 

well, sir Ralph I. Art. I. 

wood (or Blacuodeus) Adam • 11. James I. 

Bve, John - I. Elis. 

■— ,Jos^ V. Cha.iII. 

.Robert IV. Int. 

eJD; William - i. GJia. 

, c<A VI. Cba. II. 

t, lord Mountjt^ 4-*. 11. Cha. I. 

■~—~—~ See Newport. 

-,sirHeniy V. Cha. 11. 

L. VI. 2 D 



c-l«.v. 


r-f 


IV. 


309 


X. 


148 


IV. 


SMS 


IX. 


190 


App. 


367 


App. 


MS 


III. 


m 


VIII. 


U4 


VII. 


8 


X. 


149 


IX. 


994 


— 


149 


XI. 


189 


X. 


168 



— 


179 


IX. 


160 


IX. 


909 


App. 


368 


IV. 


77- 


VI. 


84 


VI. 


114 


VII. 


9 


IV. 


876 


— 


7t 


VII. 


78 


VJ. 


m 


IX. 


816 


IX. 


989 


VII. 


14 


IV. 


968 


XII. 


,16 



198 



INDEX, 



Blount, sir Thomas Pope 
-, lady... 



Blow^ John .• • • . . . . 

Bluck, William, esq. • 

Blundell, Peter- 

Blunt|the lord Mountjpy. See Blount. 

Bobarty Jacob) the elder*. 

■ * ' , the younger, his fa- 

mous imposture ............... 

Bochart, Samuel 

Bodius. . See Boyd. . 

Bodley, sir Thomas 



Bodye, John ....••••.•••• 

Bolen, Anne 

, Catharine - 

Bolingbroke, Oliver, earl of « 

Bolton, Robert • • * 

, .Samuel • • r • • 

Bond, Mary 

, Tom 

Bonoel, James. • • ^ * • 

Bonner, Edmund '••* 



Booker, John ••.......•. 

Books in the black letter • • • • 

Books of enormous length* ••«••.. 

Boon, Daniel 

Booth, sir George 

Borde, Andrew 

Bossuet, bishop of Meaux •...•••• 
Bosworth, William . • • • -....*.... 
Botany y remarks on it* •••••*•••• 

Botley, Samuel *........ 

Boufchier,' George 

B6urdeille,Pierre de* See Brant6me. 
Bourignon, Antoinette , 



Vol, Reign, S^e. 

V. Cha.II. 

III. Cha. I. 

VI. . James 11. 

V. Cha. II. 

I. Eliz. 

V. Cha.II. 



I. 

I. 

I. 

I. 

I. 

II. 

II. 

II. 

II. 

III. 

VI. 

I. 

I. 

IV. 

I. 

V. 

Y. 

V. 

I. 

. V. 

III. 

I. 

V. 

III. 



Class, 8^c. 

IX: 

XL 

X. 

VIII. 

VIII. 



Eliz. 
Eliz. 
Eliz. . 
Hen. VIII. 
Hen. VIII. 
Cha. I. 
James I. 
Cha. I. 
James I. 
Cha. I. 
James. II. 
Ed. VI. 
Mary . . , 
Int. . 



' V. 

IX. 

XII. 

I. 

XI. 

III. 

IV. 
IV. 
XI. 
X. 
VIII. 
IV. 

ly. 

IX. 



Cha. II. - 
Cha. II. 
Hen. VIII. 



■ ^ ^ r •'. 



Cha. I. 

Cha. n. 
Cha. I. 



X. 

vm. 

IX. 
IX. 

VIII. 



231 
148 
182 

303 



IX. 287 



V. — — 287 

II. James. I. App. 229 



27a 



VI. Cha. II. App. 



49 



Vtl. IUlpi,i!c. Ci 

Itovea, lir Robert I. Ed. VI. 

, WUliam II. James I. 

Boyd, Aleiander • I. Elii. 

■ — , Robert II. Janes I. 

, Zachariah II. Cha. I. 

Bojle, Robert V. Cha. II. 

, Michael VI. James 11. 

Boyi, JcAn • ' II. James I. 

.Edward V. Cha. II. 

— ;,iirJohn III. Cha. I. 

Bndrord, John I. Ed. VI. 

I. Mai^' 

Bradihaw, John III. Cha. I. 

III. Int. 

Brady, Henry V. Cha. II. 

, Dr. Robert VI, James II. 

Bramball, John II. Cha. I. 

Bramston, sir John III. Cha. I. 

Brandon, Charles I. Hen. VIII. 

_: , Jady VI. 

Bnnil6m^, Peter Bourdeille, abb6 of I, 

Bnthwilt, Richard III. 

Brereton, sir William- III. 

Bretterg,- Catharine ■ ■' I. 

Briant, Alexander ■ I. 

Bridge, William -.^ III. 

lbidges,Noah IV. 

V. 

Btidgtnan, sir Orlando V. 

- Bridgemaii, John II. 

Bridgewater, John Egerton, earl of . IV. 

.Elixabeth, countess of. III. 

Brie, Theodore de I. EUe. 

Brightman, Thoma* I. Elia. 

Bristol, John Digby, earl of II. - - Jamei 

,, George Digby, earl of III. -Int. 



James II. 
Eliz. 
Cha. 1. 
Cha: I. 
Elis. 
Eliz. 
-Int. 
Int. 

Cha. II. 
Cha. II. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. II. 



App. 



T99 

177 
162 
318 



172 
200 



141 
945 

20 
103 
159 
854 
167 

74 
336 
374 
S34 

77 
207 
116 
342 



III. 
III. 



Bristow. Richard II. 

Brocket!, »r John ■ I. 

Brog, sir William ■ III. 

Brome, Richard * III. 

, Alexander V. 

Brook, R^e, or Ralph I. 

-,Mki.... V. 

Brooke, Fulke Greville, lord ■ II. 

, Robert, lord II. 

, IV. 

, (Elizabeth) lady ' V. 

Brooks, Thomas II. 

firoughlon, Hugh • i--- II. 

Brounker, William, lord* •••• V. 

fironershaviua, Jacobus Gats IV. 

Browne, sir Anthony I. 

— ■ , Thomas III. 

, sir Thomas : : V. 

Brown, Richard ■ HI. 

, John IV. 

V. 

, Alexander • V. ' 

Brownlow, Richard III. 

iHizabeth. VI. 

,thelady VI. 

Brownrig, Ralph ■ . • . ? II. 

Bruce, Robert. See Robert. 
Bnteghel, the painter, whg called 

Hettith V. 

Broen, John 1. 

Brugis, Thomas > V. 

Brtato, Jordano, hie infamoru book VI. 

Bncer, Martin I. 

Buchan, James Erskine, earl of ... . II, 

Buchanan, George I. 

Buckingham, Henry Staffi>rd,duke of I. 



Wl-.H.. 


ajM.ifc. 


Pw 


JlDin I. 


IV. 


» 


Elii. 


VIII. 


sw 


Cba. I. 


VII. 


81 


Cbi. I. 


IX. 


131 


Cba. II. 


IX. 


SM 


Elii. 


IX. 


31» 


Ch>. II. 


XI. 


m 


Jineil. 


III. 


« 


Cb.. I. 


III. 


3U 


Cba. II. 


in. 


301 


Cha. II. 


XI. 


317 


Cba. I. 


IV. 


m 


Jamea I. 


IV. 


71 


Cba. II. 


IX. 


m 


Int. 


App. 


lU 


Hen. VIU 


III. 


114 


Cba. I. 


IX. 


111 


Cba. II. 


IX. 


9U 


Cba. I. 


VIL 


71 


Int. 


X. 


77 


Cba. II. 


IX 


Ol 


Cha. II. 


X. 


3a 


Cba. I. 


VI. 


» 


lanes n. 


XI. 


w 


Jamas II. 


XI. 


im 


Cba. I. 


IV. 


ut 



Elii. 


VIII. 


303 


Cha. II. 


IX. 


384 
183 
173 


Ed. VI. 


IV. 


Cba. I. 


III. 


331 


Elii. 


IX. 


313 



INDEX. 



ItckiiigliaDi, Hampbrej Stafford, 

duke of 

«^ -, Edward Stafford* duke 

of- .•••? 

•^-^ , George Villiers, duke 



of« 



', CatlHirine, marchioness 



of. 



■ ■ , Geof;ge Vttliers, duke of 
I I, George, duke of, and 

his brother Francis 

^, George Villiers, the 



joaoger duke of • 

, Mary, dutchess of • 

— , Marj Beaumont, coun- 



• • • • 



less of ' • • • • 

Bockridgej John • 

Btffon^ Mons. hi$ limitation of 

temty 

Buifinch, John 

Bvliog, Hans 

Balkely, Sophia • • • • • • • 

Boll, John 

— ^, and Famam, his associate • • • • 
BvUaker, John • • 

• 

Bnilen, or BuUeyn, William 

— : — , Anne. See Bolen. 



— , Margaret • • • • • • 

Bolttngbrooke. See Bolingbroke. 

Bolwer, John 

I Banyan, John • • 



' 



Borford, Charles Beauclaire, earl of 

Burgh, sir John • * 

Burgundy, Margaret, dutchess of • • 

Bartu/ Office^ in our. Ldtwrgy, its 

^ect on a company of fanatics • • 



/ 



Vol, Heigii, Sfc. 

I. Art. I. 



IV. 

V. 

VI. 

IV. 

III. 

I. 

V. 



201 

Clan, jfc. Pagf 
II. 42 



I. Hen. VIII. II. lOS 



II. James I. 

II. James I. 

II. Cha. I. 

II. Cha. I. 

IV. Cha. II. 

V. Cha. II. 

III. Cha. I. 
II. Cha. I. 

VI. 

V. Cha. II. 

VI. James II. 

V. Cha.IL 

II. James I. 

III. Cha. I. 
II. Cha. I. 

I. Eliz. 

I. Eliz. 



Int. 

Cha. II. 
James 11. 
Cha. II. 
Cha. I. 
Art. I. 



II. 



XI. 
IV. 

I. 

X. 

XII. 

XI. 

X. 
XII. 

IV. 

IX. 



IX. 
IV. 
IV. 
III. 
VII. 
XL 



23 



XI. im 

n. 277 

III. 288 

II. 147 

XI. ad6 



223 
837 

106 
347 
169 
386 
166 
248 
384 
305^ 



XI. 838 



32 
97 
110 
187 
33 
84 



— 10 



eta.,*,. 


rv 


11. 


« 


III. 


71 


VIII. 


8S 



202 INDEX. 

Vti. Btign. lie. 

Burieigh, William Cecil, lord 1- Eliz. 

, John Cecil, lord VI. James !I. 

, captain HI. Cha. I. 

Bamet, Gilbert VI. James II. IV. 

, Thomas • VI. James I!. IV. 

Burroughes. Jeremiah H- Cha. I. IV. 

Burton, Robert H. James I. IV. 

, William de Palde II. James I. IX. 

.Henry H. Cha. I. IV. 

, William IV. Inl. IX. 

, He«kiah V. Cha. II. IV. 

Bushel, captain Brown IV. Jnt. VII. 

Bulclier, Richard HI- Cha. I. IX. 

Butler, William '- II. James I. IX. 

, Samuel V. Cha. II. IX. 

V. Cha.ll. X. 

Batls, William. Dr. I. Hen. VIII. IX. 

Byfield, Nicholas H- James I. IV. 

, Adoniram H. Cha. I. IV. 

Byron. John, lord H- Cha. I. |I1. 

.sirThomas "^ Cha. I. -VII. 

.Richard V. — 

Caernarvon, Robert Dormer, 

earl of HI. Cha. I. VII. 

— Anna Sophia, 

countess of HI. Cha. I. XI. 

Caesar, sir Julius H. James I. VI. 

, Henry, dean of Ely 11. Cha. I. IV. 

.sirCharles III. Cha. I. VI. 

,sirJohn III. Cha. I. VIII. 

. -.ladyJane IV. Int. ■ XI. 

.Charles VI. Jamesll. VIII. 

• , Joanna VI. James II. XI. 

Cains, Jo - I. Mary IX., 

Calamy.Edmund II. Cha. I. -IV. 

V. Cha.II. IV. 



INDEX. 



203 



VoL Rtign, S^e. 

Benjamin V. Cha. IL 

', James Leringston, earl of III. Cha. I. 

e, James III. Cha. I. 

idirard III. Cha. I. 

, Sir James III. Cha. I. 

William 11. James I. 

I, Sir Ewen IV. lot. 

V. 

sOi...-* r III. 

IPr^se V. 

I, Edmund I. Eliz. 

, or Cavendish, Thomas • • • . I. ■ Eliz. 

my arehH$kop$,painting$ of 

I. 

style in sermons, 3fc. III. -. 

I. Art. I. 

;, William I. Art. I. 

Arthur, lord II. Cha. I. 

s, Ludovicas ^ . . . . . II. . . James L 

Jerome*.. -... I. Ed. VI. 

8» David Erskine, second lord II. Cha. I. 

{, major III. Int. 

sir Nicholas I. Hen. VIII. 

Thomas III. Cha. I. 

John • V. Cha.II. 

or Carlisle, Christopher .... I* Eliz. 

If George • .II. James I. 

-y sir Dudley II. James I. 

-, Mary * VI. Cha, 11. 

, Lucy, countess • • . . III. Cha. I. 

, Margaret, countess of HI- Cha. I. 

, Charles, earl of IV. Cha. IL 

, Isabella^ countess of •••••* . V. — 

on. See Caernarvon. 
. See Charles. • 

ter, Richard II. Cha. I. 

. ■ , , •••,*••••••.. III. • Int. 



(Am. tie. 


Page. 


IV. 


32 


VII. 


79 


VIII. 


101 


VIII. 


lOtf 


VIII. 


91 


IX. 


141 


VIII. 


13 




253 




232 


— 


335 


IV. 


273 


VIII. 


296 


w 


192 




334 


I. 


3 


VIII. 


79 


III. 


319 


App. 


228 


App. 


184 


III. 


323 


I. 


286 


VIII. 


138 


IX. 


131 


VIII. 


• 194 


VII. 


288 


IV. 


57 


V. 


85 


XII. 


21 


XI. 


217 


XI. 


218 


III. 


180 


— 


335 


IV. 


381 


IV. 


347 



204 



INDKX. 



Fol. KdfD.V- CJoM, l[c> 

Carpenter. Richard V. Cha. II. IV. 

Camrai, Joseph VI. Jameill. IV. 

Carler.Jofan II- James I. IV. 

CarterC. V. — 

Cartktuimtatet, or Pwr Clare$ ■•■ V. — 

Cartwrigfat. Thomai I- Eli«. IV. 

.William II. Cha.I. IV. 

_ -.sirHogh IV. Int. VIII. 

. , William V. Cha. II. X. 

-.Thomaa VI. James II. IV. 

Carve. Thoma V. Cba.II. IV. 

Carg, SSrftifert IV, —^ — 

Caryl, Joa. V. Cha. II. IV. 

CisMN^oii. Itaac y. -^ 

— .Meric V. Cha. II. IV. 

Case.Thoma*--" V. Cha. H. IV. 

, John VI. JamesII. IX. 

Caatellui. See Castle. 

Ca.lle, Edmund V. Cha. 11. IV. 

CasliehBTen, Mervio, etrl of H. Cha. I. III. 

, Elizabeth, countess of. lU. Cha. I. XI. 

CBBllemain, Barbarab. counless of. 
See Cleveland. 

■> — , Roger Palner, eari of- ■ VI. James II. III. 

Catesby, Bobert, Ac. H. James I. XII. 

Catharine, queen of Hen; V; I. Art. I. I. 

• — of Arragon I, Hen. VIII. I. 

Howard I. Heo. VIII. I. 

^Parre- • I. Hen. VIII. I. 

1~, queen, &c • - - • IV. Cba. H. I. 

=-. See Katharin*. 

Cats, Ac. See Browersharius. 

Cavtndiih, lord Jama IIT. '■- — • 

CfflTTton, Thomas III. Int. IV. 

Caxlon, William I. Art. I. X. 

Cecil, Sir Robert 'II. JamesT. II. 

. — . . See Salisbury. 



205 



ir Edward • u, 

Charles y_ 

i^illiam -yi . 

marchioaess of Baden* • • • ■ I. 

Thomas , m, 

er, sir Thomas I, ■ 

-, sir Thomas, the youDger> ■ ' II. 

.Mr. ni. 

en (Chaaiber)i Dr. I. 

«rlain, William IV. 

erlaine, Robert ; V. 

♦rieyn, Robert J; 

an, George. H; 

■len mitrtprtttnted by Pr^n- ' 

mtdPartuUity V. 

D, tir John • VI. 

S'Ihe Bold, duke of Burgundy I. 

-V. emperor I. 

-IX. kingof France... I. 

-j prince H. 

-, ion of the elector Palatine • fl. 
-i See Charles Lewis. 

-flie First.. n. 

-^- III. 

■ — and his queen. ■ ■ ■ II. 

-, prince .......; H. 

-, Lewis, count Palatine II. 

... III. 

-the Second in. 

IV. 

- XI. of Sweden VI. 

itoiT, Walter IV. 

ock, Stephen V. 

er, Geoffirey I, 



B.if.,4.. 


Cta,*,. 


P'J.. 


J.™ I. 


Til. 


89 


Ch». II, 


VIII. 


165 


James II. 


VIII. 


121 


Eliz. 


App. 


3&2 


Cha. I. 


X. 


197 


Ed. VI. 


VII. 


im 


Ed. VI. 


IX. 


IBJ 


Janiei I. 


VIII. 


IM 


Cha. I. 


VIII. 


111 


Ed. VI. 


IV. 


»» 


lot. 


IX. 


30 


Ch>. II. 


IX. 


299 


Art. I. 


VII. 


7lt 


Janle^ I. 


IX. 


129 




■ 


S7 


James II. 


IX. 


HI 


Art. I. 


App. 


90 


Hen. VIII. 


App. 


1S2 


Eliz. 


App. 


347 


James I. 


I. 


12 


James I. 


I. 


W 


Cba. I. 


I. 


237 


Cha. I. 


IX. 


114 


Cha. I, 


I. 


2S2 


Cha. I. 


I. 


253 


Cha. I. 


I. 


2«7 


Int. 


I. 


238 


Int. 


■ J. 


285 


Cha. 11. 


I. 


-111 


Cha. II. 


App. 


30 


Int. 


IX. 


31 


Cha. n. 


IX. 


27 


Chi. 11. 


IV. 


83 


Art. I. 


IX. 


80 



206 



BcigniV- Ciau, Sfc. Pag*. 



Cliaworlh, Patrick, viscount 

Cbecus. See Cbeke. 

Cheke, sir John ■ • • I. Ed. VI. 

I. Ed. VI. 

Chester, Hugh Lupus, earl of •••• ■ I. ■ 

Chesterfield, Philip, earl of IV. Cha. II. 

-I , Eliiabelh Butler, coun- 

tessof V. Cha. II. 

: — , Anne (CBtharine), 

countess of ■ ■ • • • V. 

Cbevrense, mons. le due de> •■••,-■ III. 

, madame la duchesse de • III. 

, their dauf hter- ■ • ■ III. 

Ghicheley, Henry • . I. 

-n , sir John V. 

Chichester, Arthur, lord II. 

••••• IV. 

Cbiffinch, Mr. • V. 

Child, sir Josiah VI. 

Ciiillirigwortb, WiJiiam II. 

ChimDey-s weepers VI. 

Chisenhale, Edward • - • • IV. 

Chiverton, sir Richard IV. 

Cbristian IV. of Deomai^ ........ II. 

, duke of Brunswick ...... .II. 

Chronology, difficulties in it, occa- 
sioned bi/ almanack-makeri V. — 

Churchill, John, lord VI. James II. III. 

' his two daugh- 
ters VI. . James II. XI. 

, ArabeHa VI. James II. XI. 

Cibber, Cuius Gabriel .V. Cha. II. X. 

'.Collty V. ~ _ 

Clanricbard, Ulick du Burgh, ntar-. 

quisof. II. Cha. I. III. 

Clare, John riolles, earl of •••>■•■. II. James 1. IIL 

, ^, sir Ralph V. Cha. II. V, 



Cha. II. 


XI. 


Cha. I. 


App. 


Cha. I. 


App- 


Atl. I. 


ly. 


Cha. II. 


VII. 


Jamas 1. 


VII. 


Cha. I. 


VII. 


Cha. II. 


VIII. 


Janiej II. 


VIII, 


Cha. I. 


IV. 


James II. 


XII. 


Inl. 


X. 


Int. 


VIII. 


James I. 


App. 


James I. 


App. 



INDEX. 



207 



Vol. 

i, George, duke of I, 

OD, Edward, earl of V. 

V. 

= . See 

• 

sirWilKain III. 

Samuel, senior • • V. 

f junior V. 

-, theOrieniaiist* • • • V, 

Catharine • V. 

Joseph • VI. 

n, David V. 

John III. 

I, sir Robert • V. 

and, John • • • III. 

— , the dutchess of. See 
eland. 

, Joas Van • • I. 

it, Gregory V. 

e, John I. 

nd, earl of IL 

— :-, the dutchess of V. 

le, John IV. 

., Elizabeth • IV. 

Francisco****** III. 

Mr. IV. 

j, Rosamond • * * * I. 

-, Thomas, 1st lord IV. 

-, lady Anne II. 

-, Martin V. 

'oWy sir Christopher V. 

1, sir Richard I. 

if Charles • • * • I. 

, Philip II, 

s. See Knox. 

and post-chaise^ hy whom tn- 

hiced • • • I. 



Art. I. 
Cha. II. 
Cha- II. 



Clau, ^c. 
I. 

VI. 
IX. 



Cha. I. 
Cha. II. 
Cha. II. 



VII. 
IV. 
IV. 



Fage. 

26 

113 

265 



47 
73 
74 



Cha. II. 


XI. 


390 


James II. 


XII. 


170 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


64 


Cha. I. 


XII. 


251 


Cha. II. 


VIII. 


170 


Cha. I. 


IX. 


120 


Mary 


X. 


208 


Cha. II. 


VIII. 


196 


Eliz. 


VI. 


284 


Cha. I. 


III. 


306 


Cha. II. 


XI. 


359 


Int. 


VIII. 


23 


Int. 


XL 


82 


Cha. I. 

• 


X. 


176 






33 


Art. I. 


XI. 


86 


Cba. II. 


III. 


15 1 


James I. 


XI. 


176 


Cba. II. 


IX. 


2i93 






373 
302 


Eliz. 


VIII. 


Eliz. 


App. 


362 


James I. 


App. 


280 

9«U| 



ao8 



IKDEX. 



Vol. Btlgu, tie. 

Cobbam, lir John Oldcaslle, lord - ■ I. Art. I. 

-jHeniy Brooke, lord- II. James I. 

Coekaip, sir Aston V. Cha. II. 

Cocker, Edward IV. lot. 

V. Cha.Il. 

Cocksbuit, or Cocksbut, John • ■ ■ • • V. Cba. II. 

Coelson, Lancelot V. Cba. II. 

Coke, sir Edward 11. Jamei I. 

, air John- • • • ■ HI- Cba. I. 

, Roger II. 

Coker, sir Henry V. Clia. II. 

Cole.Abdiab ■ III. Cba. I. 

,Tbonws V. Cha.Il. 

— :-,BirRalpb ■ V. Cha.Il. 

Colbert, Jobn foptist • IV. Cba. 11. 

■■ . , ambattador to England • • • IV. — 

Colerane, Henry, baron of IV, Cba. II, 

, Conslanlia Lucy, lady ■ ■ ■ V. Cha. II. 

Colet,Jobn I. Hen. VIIL 

Coley, Henry V. Cha. II. 

CoUege, SUphen. • ;• • ■ • VI. Cba. IL 

Colleredo, Lazarus and Baptists • • • III. Cha, I. 
Collet. SeeColet. 

Colley, Anthony V. Cha. IL 

CoUings, John- •■■•■. - V. Cba. IL 

Collins, Dominic I. 'EMt. 

1 Peter ■ II. Cba. I. 

_ , fiamuel V. . Cba. IL 

. .Richard. V. Cha. IL 

Colly Molly Puff- • VI. James IL 

Coleman, Thomas •_ II, Cha. I. 

Cdlburst, Henry UL Cba. L 

, Colwal, Daniel • V. Cha. IL 

Comenius, Amos- .• • • • IIL Cha. I. 

Comines (or Cominez) Philip de< . • L Art. L 

Cvmpaniont of Charles the Second- • V. — ;— r- 

ComptOQ, sir Henry, i^ IL James J. • 



Clan, fy. 
III. 



X. 

IL 



XIL 
XII. 



XII. 

IV. 

VII. 

VIIL 

App. 
App. 

VIIL 



INDEX. 



209 



VoL Reign, i^e, Clau,fy, Page. 

B, Henry V. Cha. 11. IV. 4 

VL James 11. IV.^ 86 

John..... V. Cha. II. IV. 28 

m septem nobiliiim Anglo- 
onjurantium, &c. See Gutt- 
er Plot. 

lonal, the author of the •**• V. -. — p 

$€ur8 in prints, their caprice V. 

no, Aloysius II, James I, App, 

ohn • V, Cba. II. VI. 

James V. Cba. IJ. IX. 

Mr, of Norfolk, bis family* . V. Cba. II. XI. 

:,Richard VI, James II. VIII. 

» Samuel V. Cba. II. X. 

, Edward V. Cba. II. X. 

,Elizabelb V. Cba. II. XI. 

in painting, and translations 

etry V. ^ 

d, Robert I. Henry VIII. X. 

, Miles V. Cba. II. VIII. 

, Ricbard, bisbop of Norwicb \h Cba. L IV. 

ta, Francesco. V. Cba. II. X. 

/Rodolpb II. Cba. I. IV. 

R^icbard Boyle, 1st earl of . . • II. Cba. L III. 

!i, alderman . ^ VI. James II. VIII. 

allisy sir Cbarles and sir Wil- 

• • III. Cba. I. IX. 

e, Tbomas II, James I. IX. 

Jobn , V. Cba.II. IV. 

III. Grand Duke of Tuscany VI. Cba. II. App. 

I, Tbomas.... I, Eliz, IV. 

el, sir Cbarles VI, James IL VIII. 

gton, Francis, lord II. Cba. I. II. 

, Robert » II. James I. . IX. 

- Bruce, Jobn V. Cba. 11. VIII. 

-, Cbarles V. Cba. II. IX. 

ry, Tbomas, lord III. Cba. I. VI. 



8 
310 
226 
126 
281 
890 
129 
314 
346 
399 

257 
147 
201 
341 
342 
386 
327 
129 

158 

149 

4 

31 
274 
122 
273 
146 
177 
252 

12 



210 



INDEX. 



Vcl. Stip,,lft. Cfcm, Jfc. Pagt. 

Coveirtry, air John VI. James II. VIII. 123 

-: , Henry VI. James II. VIII. 124 

-^ , sir William VI. James II. VIII. 128 

Conlson, Thomas • VI. James II. VIII. 129 

Couplet, Francis, called the convert- 
ed Chinese VI. James II. IV. lOfl 

CourtoftVardt «.... HI. _ jo8 

Cowcl, Tliomaa VI. James II. IX. 1« 

Cowley, Abraham HI. Cha.I. IX. ' 123 

•••■ V. Cha. II. IX. 243 

Cox, Richard, bishop of Ely ■•.... I. Eliz. IV. 253 

Crab, Roger IV. Int. XII. ' 86 

Cradock, Samuel V. Cha. II. IV. 64 

Ctaig, air Thomas II, James I. VI. ffj 

Cranmer, Thomas '• I. Hen. VIII. IV. I21 

I. Ed. VI. IV. 189 

— ' I. Mary IV. IM 

CrichtoD, James I. Eliz. IX. 316 

Craven, William, lord 11. Cha. I. Ill, 317 

— — ~ , earl of IV. Cha. 11. lU. lai 

Cray, William V. Cha. II. IV. 56 

Creswell, madam vi. Cha. II. XII. 18 

Crtw, air Randolph '.. m. Cha.I. VI. 15 

, Nathaniel vi. James II. IV. 88 

Crichlon, John, surnamed the Ad- 

"•irabl I. Eliz, IX. 316 

Crispe, sir Nicholas V. Cha. 11. VIII. 17s 

Crisp, Tobias II. Cha. I. IV. 360 

Critouius. See Crichton. 

Crilopulus, Metrophanes II, James I. App. 227 

Croke, sir George Il|. Cha.I. VI, 17 

CromploD, Hugh iv. Int. IX. 41 

Crbmwell, air Thomas } , „ .,„ 

— , earl of Essex i *• Hen.VUI. II. IM 

Cfomwell, Robert n, jame* I. VIII. 116 

, Henry i HI, Ini. i. 303 



INDEX. 



211 



V0I. 
\\, Eliz. mother of the Pro- 

IV. 

—, Dorothy IV. 

-,Oliver..... III. 

III. 

••••• m. 

'- — •: m. 

• IV. 

— , Elizabeth, wife of the Piro. 

^ • • III. 

— , Richard lU, 

— , Oliver, his porter VI. 

piece of Cromwell ••••••••• i v. 

Villiam de • I. 

rthy Ralph • V. 

., sir Thomas V. 

er, Nicholas • • • • . III. 

• • IV. 

irland, George Clifford, earl of I. 

Tiaod, Margaret, countess of II. 

IS, Peter n. 

igham (or Cunningham) Wil- 

••• I. 

Walter.. 11. 

I, Humphrey III. 

, Diana* V. 

s, sir William • . . • VI. 

Lirse, Moll • III. 

John IV. 

• 

A, count VI. 

iisie, Jocosa, countess of V. 

I, Michael • • • • • H. 

-, Richard. ...••• VI. 

I (or Dalyell) Thomas II. 

ible. Mother ......••. VI. 

, Henry D'Anvers, earl of . . . II. 



Rmgn,ifc. C/aif,^c. Page* 



Int. 


XI. 


80 


Int. 


XI. 


80 


Cha. I. 


V. 


10 




VII. 


M 


• 


Int. 


I. 


289 


Int. 


IV. 


SdO 


Int. 


VII. 


1 


Int. 


I. 


208 


Int. 


I. 


300 


Cha. IL 


XII. 


12 
73 




• 


Hen. VIII. 


App. 


155 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


4a 


Cha. II. 


VIII. 


205 


Cha. I. 


IX. 


121 


Int. 


IX. 


34 


Eliz. 


III. 


24a 


James I. 


XI. 


169. 


James I. . 

• 


■ App. 


283 


Eliz. 


IX. 


306 


Cha. I. 


IV. 


335 


Cha. I. 


IX. 


164 
325 




. 


Cha. II. 


App. 


36 


Cba. I. 


XII. 


252 


James II. 


vn. 


119 


James II. 




170 


Cha. II. 


XI. 


381 


James I. 


VI. 


96 
181 
155 


Cba. II. 


VII. 


Cha. II. . 


XII.. 


23 


Cba. I. 


III. 


311 



Daoby, Tbomu Oiborne, earl of> • • IV. 

Dandulo, Rigep IV. 

Daniel, Samuel * II. 

DaoTen, sir John • • • • IV. 

Itarnly, HeuTy, lord- • • • • I. 

Darnley, Catharine • . . . . VI. 

Darssie, Abraham > II. 

Darfmoulb, George, lord VI. 

Daveaant, sir William Ill; 

— — IV. 

'■ V. 

— ,Churlei V. 

David I. king of Scollaod I. 

II.&c. I. 

Davidson, sir William V. 

Davics, Jobn II. 

11. 

Davis, madam (Mary) v. 

, Mary VI. 

DaviioD, William V. 

Day, Jobn I, ' 

Dedicationt of Books, hicrathe •••• HI. 

Deane, Riebard • - V. 

De Domiois Marc Atttonio- ••••••• H, 

Dee, Jobn I. 

De Grey, Tbomas< ••••^' V. 

Dela Fone, Charles VI. 

De la Mefi or Delamer, HenryBoolh,' 

lord ■" VI. 

Delainore, sir William < ■ I. 

Democrilus, junior. See IturtOD, 

Robert. 

Denbigb, William Fielding, eail of • ■ - 11. 

, Basil Fielding, earl of- - • • II. 

Deahan, tit John - V. 

DenitoB, Jobn - * 11; 

Dfeamaii, George,- pritfce of*'<- IV,' 



INDEX. 



213 



Vol, ReigVf ^C' 

irk, George, prince of VI. James II. 

, lord (sir Auf.) I. Hen. VIII. 

, Edward Stanley, dd earl of I. Eliz. 

, 4th earl of I. Eliz. 

-, Ferdinando Stanley, dth earl 

I. Eliz. 

-, James Stanley, earl of III. Int. 

-, Alicia Spencer, countess of II. James I. 

-, Charlotte, countess of . • • . Ill, Cha. I. 

• •••• VI. James II. 

-, Charles, earl of IV. Cha. II. 

itz, cardinal VI. Cha. 11. 

5, Edward I. Eliz. 

-, sir Edward III. Cha. I. 

V. Cha. II. 

►rgilla I. Art. I. 

)rough, John III. Int. 

irtes, Renatus III. Cha. I. 

ond, the countess of II. James I. 

ck, John III. Cha. I. 

nsliire, Edward Courtney, earl 

I. Ed. VI. 

, Edward Courtney, earl 

I. Mary. 

, Charles Blount, earl of II, James I. 

, Christian, countess of- III. Cha. I. 

, Elizabeth, countess of III. Cha. I. 

, William, earl of VI. James II. 

, sir William III. Cha. I. 

enbeke, Abraham van III. Cha. I. 

y, sir Everard II. James I. 

-, George, lord II. Cha. I. 

-, sir Kenelm • III. Cha. I. 

III. — 

V. Cha.II. 

-, Anastasia (Vene tia) lady • • • III. Cha. I. 

:es, sir Dudley III. Cha. I. 

>L. I. 2 F 



aUt ^c* 


Page. 


I. 


58 


nil. 


137 


II. 


231 


II. 


231 


II. 


232 


III. 


309 


XI. 


178 


XI. 


220 


XI. 


163 


III. 


165 


App. 


31 


IV. 


262 


V. 


9 


VIII. 


166 


I. 


35 


VI. 


366 


App. 


280 


XI. 


188 


IX. 


164 


III. 


169 


III. 


190 


III. 


33 


XI. 


216 


XI. 


215 


III. 


74 


VIII. 


104 


X. 


178 


XII. 


198 


III. 


314 


vn. 


58 


IX. 


l64 


IX. 


284 


XL 


230 


VI. 


22 



214 



INDEX. 



Dillenius, Dr, 

Dingley, Robert • • • • 

Disbrew. See Desborough. 

Dixie, sir Wolstan 

Dixon, Robert 

Docwra, Thomas • • • • 

DobsoD, William* • • • • 

Dod, Johu • • 

Dolben, Jobn • • 

Donald Bane, king of Scotland 
Donne, John* .............. 



Vol. Reign, ^c. Cla$s, 6^c. Page^ 

V. ^ — 336 

III. Int. IV. 326 



• • • • 



Doncaster, James Scot, earl of • • • • 
Dpnnegal, Arthur Chichester, earl of 

J lord • 

Doolittle, Thomas • • • • 

Dorchester, the countess of- 

Dorislaus, Isaac 

Dorset, Richard Sackville, fifth earl 

of 

, Thomas Sackville, earl of • 



-, Richard Sackville, earl of* • 



-, Edward Sackville, ^arl of* 



Dover, Robert* • • • • • 

Douglas, Rupert • * • • 

Dousa, Janus * • • # -^ 

Drake, sir Francis . . • * • 

, Samuel, D. D. * 

Drayton, Michael • 

Dress, English. See the end of the 

reign cf Henri/ VII.* S^c. Sfc. 
Drogheda, the countess of 



I. 
III. 

I. 
III. 

II. 

V. 
L 
I. 

II. 

II. 
VI. 

IL 
IV. 

V. 
VI. 
III. 

IV. 

IL 

II. 

II. 

II. 

III. 

III. 

I. 

I. 

V. 

II. 



IV. 



Eliz. 
Int. 

Hen. VIII. 
Cha. I. 
James I. 
Cha. II. 
Art I. 
Eliz. 
James I. 
James I. 
James II. 
James I. 
Cha. II. 
Cha. II. 
James II. 
Cha. I. 

Cha. II. 
James I. 
James I. 
James I. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
Eliz. 
Eliz. 
Cha. IL 
James I. 



VIIL 
IV. 

VIIL 

X. 

IV. 

IV. 

I. 

IX. 
IV. 
IX. 

III. 

VII. 
IIL 
IV. 
IX. 
VI. 

IIL 
IL 

IX. 

III. 

IL 

XII. 

VII. 

A pp. 

VIL 

IV. 

IX. 



300 
326 
138 
174 - 

74 

13 : 

33 7 
312 

60 
126 
153 

98 
225 

67 
•154 

30 



183 
18 

127 

32 

i>85 

240 

80 

359 

291 

47 

127 



— 140 - 



> 4 

. * See aoDie curious remarks concerning dress in the reign of Richard II. by Chaucer, in 
his " Parson's Tale," at p. 191, col. 1. of Urry's edition of his wprks. 



INDEX. 



215 



lond, Winkm III. 

Elizabeth II. 

Sy JofaD L 

I, Jofao V. 

VI. 

/, fir Robert • 1. 

le, WUIiam IV. 

-9 Stepfaeo VI. 

", Richard VI. 

rline, Charles Seaton, earl of IV. 

n, king of Scotland •••••••• I. 

e, John, viscount- • VI. 

John, Scotus I 

'" i! 

II, John • y 

I, Brian y^ 

^Jo^>n III. 

woman, the famous y]^ 

sir James • j^ 

William • • • • • y ^ 

rdy John • . . « y^ 

I, Gerard y^ 

I. 

king of Scotland • . • i, 

nds, sir Thomas • n. 

dus. See Edward. 

d the Confessor I^ 

-I. I. 

-"•^ I. 

-ni I. 

-, the Black Prince I. 

-IV I. 

-V. L 

-vi. I, 

-, prince of Wales, sod of 

"^y VI. I, 



Cha. I. 
James I. 
Eiii. 
Cha. II. 
James II. 

Int. 

Cha. II. 
James II. 
Cha. II. 
An. I. 
James II. 

Art. I. 
Art. I. 
Cha. II. 
Cha. II. 
Int. 

James II. 
Eliz. 
Cha. II. 



Cha. II. 
Art. I. 
Art I. 
James I. 

Art. I. 
Art. I. 
Art. I. 
Art«L 
Art. I. 
Art«I. 
Art. I. 
Ed. VU 

Art. U 



\1. 

App. 
1\. 
IX. 

IX. 
XII. 
XII. 

III. 

I. 

III. 

IV. 
IV. 
X. 
IV. 
IV. 
XII. 
VI. 
IV. 



X. 

I. 
I. 

V. 

I. 
I. 
I. 
I. 
I. 
I. 
1. 
I. 



141 

uu 
ssi> 

ISO 

IttO 

M 

7 
177 

aao 

Ul 

00 

54 

07 

4 

031 

171 

2U9 

60 

88 

310 

2 

30 

00 

8 
10 
11 
1ft 
13 
24 
91 



U 20 



Vol. 

EdniD the monk -. i ' I. 

Effiogham, WUIiniD Howard, lord • • I. 

— ■ , Elizabeth, baroness of • • I. 

Egbert tbc Great I, 

£gglesfiel<t, Robert I. 

Elder, William V. 

Ele;i»or, queen of Henrj III I. 

Elgin, Thomas, earl of IV. 

Elis, or EljFs, Edmund V. 

Elilabelh, queen of Edward IV.- ■• I. 

, queen of Henry VII, - • ■ I. 

, princess I. 

, queen I. 

■ , princess II. 

— , queen of Bohemia II. 

11. 

, daughter of the prince 

Palatine II. 

, the lady II. 

, daughter of (he king of 

Bohemia II. 

, princess III. 

Ellesmere, Thomas ^gerlon, baron of II. 

Ellis, Clement V. 

, Pkilip VI. 

Elslob, Elizabeth VI. 

Elton, Richard • • • • IV. 

Emmet, William V. 

Englefield, sir Francis- ■■...., IV. 

£nglh/f language, abatei of it- ■ • • III. 

^gravtri of topographical printa • II. 
Engravers who practised for amu»e- 

. weni V. 

Eat, sir George V. 

Erasmus, DesidcHui I. 



Stign, V. C 
Art. I. 
Eliz. 
Elis. 
Art. I. 
Art. I. 
Cha. 11. 
Art. I. 
Cha. II. 
Cha. II. 
Art. I. 
An. I 

Hen. VIII. 
Eliz. 

James I. 
James I, 
Cha. I. 

Cha. I. 



Cha. II. 



INDEX. 



217 



Vol. 

us» Tbomas 11. 

D, Alexander III. 

aly remarks on it • • I, 

le, John de HI. 

on, Bernard de Foix, duke of VI. 

William Parr, earl of I. 

Frances, countess of II. 

Thomas Cromwell, earl of. . 
Cromwell. 

Walter Devereux, earl of • • • . I. 

Robert Devereux, earl of- • • I. 

————— ... I, 

11. 

... III. 
Margaret (Elizabeth), countess 

III. 

, Arthur Capel, earl of IV. 

, the countess dowager of • • • . V. 
ng practised hy several gen- 
len and ladies. See Engravers. 

le, chevalier I. 

idge^ sir George y 

, Philip y^ 

'•^^^» III. 

, Dr. an anecdote of him • ... y^ 

D, John y 

V. 

-y Mary y 

rd, Dr. jy 

n, lord yj 

T, John Holland, duke of • • . . j^ 

— , Frances Bridges, countess 

III. 

—, the countess of ••••...• . y 

— , the earl of jy 

cus. See Peiresc, 



James I. 
Int. 

Int. 

Cba. IF. 
Eliz. 
James I. 



Class, ^c. Page, 

App. 233 



Eliz. 
Eliz. 
Eliz. 
James I. 
Cha. I. 

Cba. I. 
Cha. II. 
Cha. II. 



Art. I. 

Cha. II. 
Cha. I. 

Cha. II. 

Cha. II. 
Int. 

James II. 
Art. I. 

Cha. I. 
Cha. II. 
Cha. II. 



V. 

IV. 

App. 

II. 

XI. 



II. 

II. 

VII. 

^ III. 

VII. 

XI. 
III. 
XI. 



App. 

IV. 
IX. 

• 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 

IX. 

III. 
II. 

XI. 
XI. 

iir 



358 
189 
347 
30 
234 
174 



212 

234 

288 

32 

^9 

212 
176 
369 



93 

250 

95 

165 

374 

284 

335 

388 

34 

74 

43 

214 
366 
167 



Paoius, Paul - 1. 

Pairclougfc, Smnuel III. 

Pairfes, William II. 

— , lady III. 

, Ferdinaodo, lord III. 

, Bir Thomas HI. 

—_ ^ IV. 

, Thomas. lord III. 

V. 

FaiHiorne^ William V. 

.Junior V. 

Fakonberfj, lady IV. 

, Thomas Bellasyse, vis- ■ 

count ■ IV. 

Falkland, Henry Cary, lord .II. 

, Lucius Cary, viscount - • H- 

. HI. 

-,lady HI. 

Falkner, William • V. 

Faoshawe, sir Richard V, 

: V. 

, lady V. 

Farrar, Eobert ,■•••■ I- 

Fastolff, sirJobu I. 

Fauconberg, Thomas, lord H. 

Fawkes, Guy H- 

Feally, Daniei '• H. 

, joim n. 

Fell,Jolin V. 

Felton, lieutenant John HI. 

Fenner, William H. 

Fenwick, John V. 

Ferdinaod, emperor . . - I- 

II. grand duke of Tus- 
cany t HI- 

Fa-gtaon, Robert VI. 



Eriin. V. 


Cfcul, V- 


Erf. VI. 


IV. 


IDI. 


IV. 


Jam.! I. 


VII. 


Cta. I. 


XI. 


Cbs.I. 


II. 


ChiLl. 


VII. 


Int. 


VII. 



Cln. II. 


III. 


191 


Ch..I. 


III. 


'321 


CIia.1. 


III. 


S22 




IX. 


143 


Cln. I. 


XI. 


230 


Ch>. 11. 


IV. 


4» 


Cfan. II. 


V. 


103 




IX. 


253 


Cha. II. 


XI. 


378 


Mary 


IV. 


108 


Art. I. 


VII. 


77 


Cht. I. 


III. 


3U 


Jameil. 


XII. 


104 


Cha. I. 


IV. 


338 


Cha. I. 


IV. 


370 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


10 


Cln. I. 


XII. 


253 


Cha. I. 


IV. 


303 


Cha. 11. 


IV. 


03 


Hen. VIII. 


App, 


153 



INDEX. 



219 



le duke of I. 

on-Haugh, sir Timothy- • • • . IV. 

Eiio, Lewis, earl of VI, 

'laude le V. 

idell, Thomas III. 

;. Robert V. 

-, lady Mary • V. 

-, Nathaniel III. 

y'Roger ••-.• •• I. 

Edward 11. 

ohn, lord- ••••••• HI. 

leneage VI. 

See Nottingham. 

ady Essex • • V. 

nr John •••• HI. 

Godfrey VI. 

John • • • • • I- 

Payne IV. 

n, Thomas, archbishop of Can- 
ary I- 

Ian, or Alwine I. 

raid, father • VL 

rs, Moll - VI. 

m, Thomas V. 

V. 

John V. 

ood, Charles, lord-deputy* • • HI. 
^ 1 ... IV. 

ig, Richard • I. 

er, John • • . • • II. 

— , Andrew VI. 

I, Eve ..•. II. 

George, earl of VI. 

, sir John V. 

s, or Florio, Jo. II. 

, Robert • II. 

Bernard. See Espernon. 



Eliz. 
lot. 

James II. 
Cha. II. 
Int. 

Cha. II. 
Cha. II. 
lot. 
Eliz. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
James II. 

Cha. II. 



Class, fy, 

App. 

VII. 

III. 

X. 

VI. 

VIII. 

XI. 

II. 

IV. 
IV. 
VI. 
VI. 

XL 



James II 
Hen. VIU. 



Art. L 
Art. I. 

Cha. IL 
Cha. IL 
Cha. IL 
Cha. IL 
Int. 

r I 

Art. i. 
James I. 
James IL 
James I. 
James IL 
Cha. IL 
James I. 
Jarne^ I. 



X. 

IV. 



IV. 
VII. 

XII. 

IX. 
X. 

IV. 

IL 
VII. 

IV. 

IX. 
VII. 
XII. 

III. 

VIII. 
IX. 
IX. 



Page. 

352 

10 

75 
316 
366 
178 
401 
304 
276 
366 

13 

116 

371 
102 
148 
119 
37 

62 
75 

108 

22 
256 
314 

83 

306 

1 

67 
126 
120 
209 

76 
207 
152 
119 



220 



INDEX. 



Foley, Thomas 

FoDtaiue, Jean de la 

Forbes, Patrick 

, James • 

, William, first bishop of 



Edinburgh ....... 

Forman, Simon 

Fortescue, sir John • • 

, sir Edmund 

Foster, William 

Fox, Richard 

' , John 

, George 



-, sir Stephen . 
Francis I, of France 



II. &c, 



Frank, Mark • 

Frater, Mendicans • 

Frauds of printsellers, medalists, 
Sfc. • •• •••• 

Frederic III. of Denmark • • 

Frederick- Henry, §on of the Pals- 
grave • 

— , elector Palatine • 

— VI. duke of Wirteraberg. 

Friar, a i^endicant. See Frater Men- 
dicans. 

Friesendorff, John Frederick • • • • 

Frith, Mary, or Molf Cut-purse- • • • 

Friis, Christian i • -^ 

Frobisher, or Frobiser, sir Martin • 

Froissard, John 

Frost, John 

Fulco. See Fulke. 

Fulke, William 

Fuller, -Thomas 



II. 

II. 

I. 



VI. 
III. 

I. 

I. 

I. 
III. 



Reign, S^c. 

Cha. II. 
Cha. II. 
James I. 
Cha. II. 

Cha. I. 
James I. 
Art. I. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
Hen. VIII. 
Eliz. 



Vol. 

V. 
VI. 

II. 

V. 

II. 

II. 

I. 

III. 

III. 

I. 
I. 

IV. 

vi: 
I. 
I. 

V, 
VI. 

in. 

II. James I. 



Class, S^c. 

VIII. 
App. 

IV. 

IV. 

IV. 
IX. 
VI. 
VIII. 
IX. 
IV. 
IV. 



James II. V. 

Hen. VIII. App. 



Cha. II. 
James II. 



Cha. I. 
James I. 
Eliz. 



Cha. II. 
Cha. I. 
Eliz. 
Eliz. 
Art. I. 
Int. 



IV. 
IV. 



App. 

I. 
App. 
App. 



I. Eliz. 
II. Cha. I. 



App. 
XII. 

App. 

vn. 

App. 
IV. 

IV. 
IV. 



INDEX. 



221 



Thomts V, 

, Isaac • • • • • • . lY^ 

, William* • • • • • vx, 

I, William, s^fpoted author 

5 *' Whole Duty of Man " . III. 

, William. See Beoedict. 

JRT, John • • • IV. 

-• • V. 

(ir John j, 

lir Henry ;., m. 

sir John • jjl, 

lady Penelope IV. 

sir Edward • v. 

arough, Humfrey HI. 

Thomas • • t I. 

e, John* • IV. 

on^ Leonardus • • • • • V. 

er, Stephen* • • • * I. 

—yCOl. VI. 

^ •• I. 

cieres, Theophiius V: 

t,Henry II. 

d, Mark • I. 

: HI. 

A:, David IL 

'yorder of, Rastel's account of 

origin I. 

ign, George I. 

igne^ sir William *••• * I. 

— , sir Bernard .......... HI. 

rs, John Baptist V. 

, John ....... ^ • • . . • v. 

n, John IIi^ 

^ohn V« 

rp .•••• HI, 

M VI, 2 G 



Bsign, fy, 

Cha. II. 
Int. 
James II. 



IV. 
X. 

XII. 



PagB. 

36 

71 

176 



lot 


IX. 


66 


Cha. II. 


IX. 


300 


Mary 


V. 


202 


Cba. I. 


VII. 


52 


Cha. I. 


VIII. 


87 


lot. 


XI. 


OT 


Cha. II. 


VIII. 


191 

308 

307 


EUz. 


IX. 


lot. 


X. 


7& 


Cba. II. 


VIII. 


187 


Ed. VI. 


IV. 


170 






196 


Mat; 


IV. 


Cha. II. 


IX. 


226 


James I. 


VI. 


80 


Eliz. 


X. 


330 


Cha. I. 


X. 


168 




— 


126 




1 


12 


Elic. 


IX. 


314 


Art. I. 


VI. 


72 


Cha. I. 


vn. 


51 


Cha. II. 


X. 


317 


Cha. IL 


IV. 


95 


lot. 


IV. 


820 



Cim. I. 



X. 183 



Oemara, Stephen de 

GeningeB. See JeDnings. 

Gentilesclii, Honlio 

, Artemisia ■ ■ • 

George, prioce of Hanover 

, Mother 

Gerard, col. Joha 

, Charlei, lord 

Gerarde, John • - 

Oerbier, sir Balthasar, or Balthazar 

Gethioge 

Gibboni, Orlando • • • • 

,Mr. 

, Christopher 

■ Gibson, sirA!e»ander . 
— — , Rjchard • • • • • 

— — ,Mrs. 

OiS&rd, BoDftTeDtiifc • • 
Gilbert, sir Humphrey • 

, »r. William • ■ 

, Samuel ..-•-• 

GiHy, Sarah '• 

Gilmour, sir Johu 

Gilpin, Bernard ■••••• 

,Wmiam L 

Gioe, Mark ■ • ' VI. 

■Glaronrgan, lord. See Worcester, 

Edward, marquis ot. • ' 

Ghibbesius, Ghibbes,or Gibbes • ■ • V. 

«l«nvil, Jos. ■ V. 

fllanvillc, sir John HI. 

4ilattonh9ry Wateri V. 

GUsEOD, Francis- •• - '^• 

Gloucester, Thomas, duke of I- 



. INDEX. 

.... Ill 


Cha. I. 

Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. n. 
Cha. II. 
Int. 

Cha. il. 
EKi. 
Cha. I. 

Cha. II. 
Cha. I. 
jHBesI. 
Int. 

Cha. II. 
Cha. h 
Cha. II. 

James 11. 
Elii. 
Eliz. 
Cha. 11. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. IL 
Mary 


App. 
X, 








.... IV. 


I. 




VII. 










hazar III. 


V. 










II. 


X. 








X. 


III. 


VI. 










I 


VIII. 










.... HI. 


IX. 


..... V 


VI. 


I. 


IV. 



App. 



Cbi. U. 


IX. 


Clii. 11. 


JV. 


ClHkl. 


yi. 


On. IJ. 


IX. 


Art. I. 


IL 



164 I 



CHoaceiUr, Humphrey, duke of ■ ■ I. 

-—, Jaqueliue, dutches! of- I. 

-— — , Henry, duke of II, 

— IV. 

Olovcr, G. " • ■ ■ III. 

QtyuBV, sir John • III. 

Goad, lohn V. 

Oo«Urcy> sii £<lmund Bury V. 

Gwlolphin, Sidney III. 

GcNdaalTC, sir John I. 

Godwin, Fran'ci II, 

Gofle, col. William IV. 

Ooldamith, Francis IV. 

, Oliver IV. 

Oomams, Francis -• I. 

Oondamor, count 11. 

Gondy, John Franci| Paul dtr. See 
De Retz. 

Gmualtt, Domingo II, 

Gobdrick, or Goodrich, Thomas-'* ■ I, 

Goodwin, Arthur Ill, 

-,Jane • III. 

^.John Ill, 

, Thoma V. 

Gordon, sir Robert IV. 

Goring, George, lord ' III. 

Gosnold, "John •' • ■ • V. 

Gothic citirchef, J)fc. V. 

G<tuge, William ■ - II. 

;, Thomas ■ V. 

Gonter, James III. 

Oower, John - ■ • I. 

Grafton, Riobard I- 

, Henry, duke of IV. 

■ , Isabella, dutcbCH of V. 

Graham, madam V. 

Grammont, Phllihert, count TI. 



Btign, tie. 
Art. I. 
Art. I. 
Cha. I. 
Cha, II. 
Cha. I. 
Int. 

Cha II. 
Cha. II. 
Cha. I. 
Ed. VI. 
James I. 



S65 
130 



Eliz. App. 

James I. App. 



222 



Ed. VI. 


IV. 


ITO 


Ch..I. 


Tin. 


96 


Cha. I. 


XI. 


SM 



Cha. I. 


VIL 


s? 


Cha. !1. 


IV. 


ee 




— 


u 


Cb.. I. 


IV. 


369 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


66 


Cha. 1. 


X. 


182 


Art. I. 


IX. 


82 


Han. VIII. 


X. 


1« 


Cha. II. 


III. 


169 


Cha. II. 


XI. 


90S 


Cha. n. 


XI. 


S66 


Cha. n. 


App, 


. 42 



224 -INDtX. 

Fill. Ri'pi.lte. Clau.tst- F'l'' 

Granmiont, lady V. Cha. II. XI. 400 

Gramlison, Wiliiam Villiera, vis- . 

couDt H. Cha. I. III. 810 

Grant, John 11. . James I. XII. 201 

GraoTille, sir BeTil III. Cha. I. VII. 39 

Graves, John II. James I. VIII. lie 

- — — jRichard V, Cha. II. VI. 130 

Graunt, John V. — 218 

Gray, lady Jane. See Grey. 

Grealraks, Valeuline V. Cha. II. IX. 233 

Greayes,John IV. Int IX. 67 

. Gregory, Edmund ..■ II. Cha. I. IV. 31« 

Greek language, iti introduction 

intif England I. ■ ■ — 130 

GreenhUI, Henry V. Cha. II. IX. 283 

.John V. ^ X. ai7 

Grenvile, sir Richard I. Elia. VII. 394 

Greenviltus. See Greenvile. 

Gresham, sir Thomas I. Eliz. VIII. 298 

GrevUe, tedy Louita V. — — 33S 

Grew, Nehemiah V. Cha. It. IX. 2B6 

Grey, la^y Jane I. Ed. VI. XI. 182 

I. Mary XI. 209 

.lord IV. Cba.II. III. 198 

,rord,lord ■ VI. Jameill. III. TO 

.lady V. XL 872 

, Thomas de. (See De Grey.) V. Cha. II. IX. 2»7 

Griffier, John V. Cha. II. X. 320 

Griffilh.Mary III. Cha. I. XI. 234 

^.George V. Cha. 11. IV. 80 

Grindq], Edmund I- Eliz. IV. 250 

GroK, Francit V. — 11 

Grotins, Hugo • 11. James I. App. 226 

Grove, col. Hugh III. Cha. I. VII. 62 

GruleTUs(Gniter), Janus,. •• >. I. Eliz. App. 361 

Gryifitfa, Margaret Vergh- ■ ■ 1. Eliz. XII. 340 

CryDKUi, Synuffl I. Hen. VIII. App. IM 



INDEX. 



225 



VoL Bsign,fy. ClaUtS^e, Page. 

d, Francis, lord V. Cha. II. VI. 118 

censuredhy Dr.Braum^*^^ V. • — 343 

it$ vogue in the reign of 

lesIL V. — 392 

brde, sir Henry L Hen. VIII. 11. 100 

, lady, his wife I. XI. 148 

ft, Elizabetha Bridgetta* • • • V. . — 335 

us Adolphus III. Cha. I. App. 205 

mor. See Gondamor. 

wder Plot, the conspirators 

II. James I. XII. 101 

ig, Peter V. Cha. II. IV. 16 

I, Eleanor V. Cha. II. XI. 393 

Henry • VI. James II. X. 146 

, Theodore VI. Cha. II. App. 47 

5don, Thomas • II. James I. VIII. Ill 

, Mary II. James I. XL 181 

r, col. Francis V. Cha. II. VIL 137 

t, John V. Cha. II. IV. 10 

ill, Dr. George II. Cha. I. IV. 349 

ons. See Adrian. 

Matthew III. Int. VI. 365 

sir Matthew V. Cha. II. VI. 110 

hePiper VI. Cha. II. XII. 26 

John... 11. Cha. I. IV. 354 

ohn I. £liz. IX. 308 

oseph II. Cha. I. IV. 336 

ohn III. Cha. I. IX. 168 

acob VI. Cha. II. XII. 13 

IX, George Savile, marquis of. VI. James II. II. 61 

I, Timothy V. Cha. II. IV. 41 

sn, or Hampden, John I^'* Cha. I. V. 5 

:, ambassador VI. Cha. II. App. 34 

ton James, marquis of H* James I. II. 25 

— — — II. Cha, I. II. 286 

— , William, duke of III. Int. III. 313 



226 



INDEX. 



Vol. 

Hamiltofi, Anthony, ooarit V. 

Hammond, Dr. Hipnry **.... III. 

Hanneman, Adrian Hi. 

Hanny, Patrick- . * •• * • * . . . • H, 

Hanover, the prinee of. See George. 

Harcott, dr Harconrt, Thomas* • • • • V. 

Harcourt, Henry, count de HI. 

ttarley, Thomas ••.*... H. 

--, sir Robert III. 

— , sir Edward V. 

Harmer, Thomas H. 

Harold, king I, 

Harper, sir William I. 

Harrington, sir John I. 

, John, lord, the father* • IL 

■ — -' the son 11. 

— , James IV. 

, Catharine • • •••• IV. 

Harris, Joseph • V. 

Harrison, major-general HI. 

-, John in. 

Hart, John i. H. 

Hartgil, George I. 

Hartley, miss V. 

Hartman, Adam Samuel V. 

Harvey, William', herald ^ . . . . I. 

', Elizabeth. See Hervey. ', 

— , William ' II. 

III. 

, Gabriel III. 

, Gideon ......' V. 

Haslerigge, sir Arthur • • •' HI. 

Haslewood, George • • • II. 

Hastings Henry III. 

Hastings, lady lEliz. the Aspasia of 

. Congervey in the *' Tatter*^ VI. 

fjatfield'house • • • • II. 



"Rtign, 5fc. 

Cha. 11. 
Int. 

Cha. i. ^ 
James I. 

Cha. 11. 
Cha. L 
James I. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. II. 

Art. I. 
Eliz. 
Eliz. 
James I. 

Int. 

Cha. II. 
Cha. r. 
Cha. I. 
Jdmes I. 
Eliz. 

Cha. II. 
Eliz. 

James 'I. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. r. 
Cha. II. 
Int. 

Cha. 1. 



C\au.\ S^c. Page, 

IX. 271 

IV. 822 

X. 175 

IX. 133 



IV. 
App. 

vni. 

V. 
VIII. 

I. 
VIIL 
IX. 
III. 
HI. 
IX. 
XI. 

X. 

Vll. 

VIII. 

IV. 

IV. 

IV. 
Till. 

IX. 
IX. 

IX. 
IX. 

V. 

vni. 



93 
27t 

109 

88 
188 

88 

4 

301 

SU 

37 

3d 

80 1^ 

350 h 

85 'k 
98 jb 

267 • 

336 ^ 

49 . 

802 . 

118 ■ 
115 
133 
222 
354 
219 
96 



_ 74 
_ 20 



INDEX. 



227 



VoL 

Martha jy 

ir Christopher • . f 

sirJohn**** j 

Francis jji 

•d, sir John • j 

Samuel y 

Richard I 

^y V. 

sir John • • • • jl 

shard • • • • y 

Fhomas jjj 

' Robert jU 

^°T^- II. 

various readings in !/•••• n^ 

Daniel • • » ^ 

ladam • y - 

:,Egbert.. y^ 

n, Humphrej • . . . y^ 

n, Alexander* jj^ 

lobert ••p jy 

See Henry. 

'•••••••• f. 

f. -•••• 1. 

n. I. 

^•- -•• i. 

^ I. 

^i- 1. 

^"-••- I. 

^-, his three children i, 

— , son of Henry VII. .... f , 

^I«. •-• — • i. 

— I. 

I. of France. • • • I, 

!II. of France ••.••. j, 

[f . of Fmnce- .«...• I, 

pfince .•..•'.4. ••••-...•.. Jl 



Int. 
EK2. 
Elis. 
Cha. I. 
Art. I. 
Cha. II. 
Eliz. 
Cha. II. 
James I. 
Cha. II. 



CUut, ^c. 

XII. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

VII. 

IX. 

IX. 
X. 

IX. 

IX. 



Cha. I. 


VI. 


Cha. I. 


IV. 


Eliz. 


App. 


Cha. II. 


X. 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


Cfaa. I. 


IV. 


Int. 


VIII. 


Art I. 


I. 






























Hen. VIII. 


I. 




IX. 

App. 


Ed. VI. 


Eliz. 


App. 



James I. 



I. 



Page. 

95 
282 
293 
107 

74 
225 
206 
317 
142 
258 
282 

15 
885 

850 

401 

821 

8 

877 
28 

6 

8 

9 

17 

18 

21 

29 

89 

97 

95 

140 

184 

847 

846 

9 



Henrietta, Maria- • • • • II. 

III. 

IV. 

— } IV. 

Heashaw, Joseph III. 

Herbert, air Edward n. 

-^ Edward, lord n. 

m. 

. , Philip, lord JI, 

• , George * II. 

. , air Edward II, 

~, sir Thomas V. 

■ , Penelope, lady IV. 

Hericke, sir William • Ill, 

, Joan, ladj HI. 

Heriot, George • II. 

Herit, Richard ■ III. 

Herrick, Robert III. 

Hertford, the countess of. . • • 11. 

, William Seymour, marquis . 

of .-. H. 

Hertocks, A. V. 

Hervey, William •■ III. 

.Elizabeth III. 

.John V. 

Heslerigge, sir Arthnr • • HI. 

Hetou, Martin II. 

Hevelius, John VI. 

Hewit, John III. 

Hcwiing, Benjamin- ; VI. 

HewUng family VI. 

Hewse, roadmn. See Hughs, 

Hewson.John IV. 

Heydon, John V. 

Heylio, Peter V. 



Cha. I. 
Int. I. 
Cha H. 

Cha. H. 

Int. 

James I. 
Cha. I. 

Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
James I. 
Cha. II. 
Int. 

Cha. I. . 
Cha. I. 
James I, 
Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
James I. 

Cha. I. 
Cha. II. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. II. 
Int. 

James I. 
Cha. II. 



IV. 
V. 
HI. 



V. 
XI. 

VIII. 

XI. 
VIII. 
XII. 

IX. 



App. 



James II. VIII. 



Int. 

Cba. II. 
Cha. II. 



INDEX. 



229 



Vol, 

, William lU. 

d, John I, 

» Henry V. 

Villiam IV. 

#, Thomas, or sir Thomas • . III. 

,fother IL 

re Nathaniel V, 

mid, lord AUio^on ••••••. IV. 

Thomas • m. 

mm, Arthur II. 

y. Mark VI. 

lomas I. 

*>eTt II. 

lery V. 

traham V. 

^ V. 

y Nicholas I. 

John UL 

ames IV, 

eai style, the corruption of it II. 
', Mrs. See Curtis, 

, sir Henry .' II. 

\, or Hobbs, Thomas V. 

Mary VI. 

i,Mr. III. 

r, James ••••••.» V. 

sdon, John ••••• IV. 

1, William ^ III. 

igle, George IL 

th, William V 

a, Hans I. 

I. 

, William V. 

d,Mrs. V. 

e, Robert -#.... I. 

d, Thomas •<•••• I. 

. vi. 2 H 



Cha.I. 
Alary 
Cha. II. 
Int. 



Clan, 4c. 

X. 
IX. 
IV. 
IX. 



James I. 


IV. 


Cha. II. 


IX. 


Cha. II. 


III. 


Int. 


IV. 


James 1. 


IV. 




VI. 
TX, 


EUz. 


James I. 


IV. 


Cha. II. 


VIII. 


Eliz. 


X. 


Cha. I. 


X. 


lot 


XII. 


James I. 


VI. 


Cha. II. 


IX. 


James II. 


XII. 


Cha. I. 


XIL 


Cha. II. 


IX. 


lot. 


IX. 


Cha. I. 


IX. 


James I. 


X. 


HeiuVUL 


X. 


Ed. VI. 


I. 


Cha.IL 


IV. 



Mary 
Eliz. 



IV. 
IV. 



103 
267 

49 

46 
218 

79 
221 
229 
342 

74 

lie 

327 
67 
194 
227 
836 
828 
194 
99 
140 

95 
289 
178 
242 
298 

48 
144 
164 
824 
145 
168 

27 
252 
195 
263 



Hollaad, Thomas II. 

.Hugh 11. 

— .Pliilemon -.' III. 

.Hezikiab III. 

, HcDry Rich, earl of II. 

1- III. 

Hollar, Wioceslaui III. 

. V. 

Holies, or Hnllis, Deozil III. 

,lord IV. 

, sir Tretswell (Fretcheville) • V. 

BoUowai/, Judge VI. 

Holt.John IV. 

Hommicis, Feslusi.... 11. 

Hondius, Henry II. 

, Abraliam V. 

— , Jodocus II. 

Honeywood, Mary • II. 

Hunthorst, Gerard HI. 

Hoolter, Richard I. 

Hooper, John I. 

Hope, sir Thomas III. 

Ho|iion, Ralph, lord ■■■ III. 

Hopkins, iMaltliew, the witch-finder III. 

~ .William... V. 

.Ezekiel TI. 

Hopwood.John V. 

Bm»j>, CAoriu IV. 

-jl HorMi impTuoned for lUabolieal 
practicet by crier of the in^tUtt- 

tion in Spai» -• IV. 

Hoskins, sir John V. 

VI. 

.John V, 

Holham, ait John • III. 

iCaptainJohn III. 



Cha.I. 



James I. 

Cha. II. 

James I. 
Cha. I. 
Eliz. 

Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. II. 
James II. 
Cba. II. 



IX. 

rv. 

III. 



III. 
VII. 

VIII. 

App. 

X. 

X. 

X. 

XI. 

X. 

IV. 

IT. 

VI. 

VII. 

XII. 

X 

IV. 

IV. 



Ch..ll. 


VI. 


James H. 


VI. 


Cha. II. 


X. 


Cha. I. 


V. 


Cha. L 


vn. 



197 
17S 



INDEX. 



231 



Vol 

John VI^ 

-ook» William VI. 

fosias V. 

d^ Charles, lord-admiral, &c. 

in Pine's tapestry I. 

"y lady Catharine III. 

-, Thomas Philip V. 

John V. 

ly James • • . ly. 

nyJohn*-** H. 

rfard, William I. 

ii,Jeffery IJI. 

, Margaret V, 

Id, Harrald I. 

e, George II. 

irey, Laurence I. 

, John HI. 

on, Henry, lord I. 

-,lady. I. 

— y the last lord I. 

William V. 

r, James Peter ...••.>. HI. 

igdon, Henry Hastings, third 

of I. 

-, earl 

n. 

, Elizabeth, countess of III. 

, Theophilus, earl of. . • VI. 

jT, George, fourth marquis of • VI. 
insofifFrancis, bishop of Down 

Connor, an anecdote of him* . I. 

inson, col. John •••.••••••• V. 

B, Matthew II. 

-, sir Richard * • « "•*' HI. 

fns, Constautine * * ' II. 

— y Christian •.. VI. 

Edward III. 



BtigHf ife, 

James 11. 
Cha. IL 



IV. 
XII. 



Page. 

110 

24 



Eliz. 


VII. 


290 


Cha. I. 


XI. 


224 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


B9 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


05 


Int. 


IX. 


51 


Cha. I 


IV. 


334 






35 
245 


Cha. I. 


XII. 


Cha. II. 


XI. 


397 


Eliz. 


App. 


352 


James I. 


VIII. 


114 


Eliz. 


IV. 


258 






83 
239 


Eliz. 


ii. 


Eliz. 


XI. 


336 
!i39 
281 


Cha. II. 


IX. 


Cha. I. 


VIII. 


114 


Eliz. 


II. 


230 


Cha. I. 


III. 


292 


Cha. I. 


XI. 


210 


James II. 


III. 


74 


James II. 


III. 


79 



Cha. II. 
James I. 
Cha. I. 
James I. 
Cha. II. 
Cha. I. 



V. 

IV. 

VI. 

App. 

App. 

V. 



150 
46 
16 

235 

38 

3 



232 



INDEX. 



VoL Reign, S^c. CUus,8^c, Page, 

Hyde, Edward. See Clafendou. 

— , sir Henry IV. Int. VHI. 25 

, Thomas V. Cha. II. IV. 28 

, the lady Henrietta, and the 

lady Mary ^ VI. James H. XI. 167 

Hypogeum at Albury, and at Park 

Place IV. — — 141 

Hyperias, Andreas Gerardus I. Hen. VIII. App. 157 

Jack (Jacchaeus) Gilbert ........ II. James I. IX. 121 

Jackson, Arthur ... 4 ^ III. Int. IV: 335 

Jacobus. See James. 

Jaconib, Thomas ^ V. Cha. II. IV. 62 

Jamaica, " The Natural History of VI. — — 71 

James I. king of Scotland I. Art. I. I. 38 

tl. &c. . . . i I. Art. I. I. 39 

m. I. Art.I. I. 39 

IV. I. Art.I. I. 40 

v.. I. He\i.Vm. I. 104 

-VI. I. Eliz. I. 226 

— — I. of England . • • • 11. James I. I. 1 

his family . ^ II. James I. I. 16 

JI. James r. fX. Ill 

— his antipathy to a stoord* II. — — ^— " -^-^ 7 

his verson of the Psalms • • H. — ^ — 117 

— , duke of York 11. Cha. I. I. 254 

• , captain Thomas * • r . lit: Clia. I. iX. 14S 

, duke of York * III. Int. I. 287 

— — ^.. IV. Cha.ll. L 124 

— . See York. 

II • •• VI. James n. I. 60 

Jamesone, George ....... * II. James I. X. 161 

Jane, queen of Scotland I. Art. I. L 3S 

, Seymour ;....... L Hen. VIII. I. 99 

Janeway, James V. Cha. 11. IV. 76 }. 

Jansen, Cornelius . . * '• H. James I. X. 161 

Jagues. See James. 



INDEX. 



233 



I, lord. See Jermyn. 

, John • 

', Ben Abdallah* 

t or Juel, John >* 

es, sir George • • ' 

— , George, lord 

— , John, lord - 

f John- •••< 

i, William • • 

IS, David ••••«••• 

— , sir Leoline 

-,Mr. 

-, Henry 

igs, Edmund ••• 

— , Francis • 

rn, lord • • • 

^, Henry 

Books * 

trices *^ 

'amuSf the ortgifud ttctor of that 

ledy 

Uwe^ a remarkabk one in a 

%l €t common lam 

quin, Murroch O'Brien, first 

'of -V 

tions oj importance often casual 

iim, Albert •••••«• 

princess of Wales 

mes. See John. 

VHI. pope 

, king of England • • 

, king of France 

son,- Thomas «•••<• ««•••■ • 

— , or Jonson, Benjamin 



•'••••• 



Vol. 
I. 

HI. 

I. 

V. 
VI. 
VI. 

H. 

V. 
HI. 

V. 

V. 
VI. 

I. 

V. 
IV. 

II. 
ni. 
II. 

n. 

II. 

IV. 

V. 
HI. 

I. 

I. 
L 
I. 
I. 
II. 
HI. 



Rtign, ^c. Class, ^r Page, 



Eliz. 
Cba. I. 
Eliz. 
Cha. n. 
James II. 
James 11. 
James I. 
Cha. II. 
Cha. I. 
Cl>a. II. . 

Cha. 11. 
Eliz. 
Ciia. 11. 
Cha, 11. 
Cha. I. 



Cha. II. 

Clia. L 
Art. I. 

^rt I. 
Art. I. 
Art. I. 

James I. 
Cha.L 



XII. 
App, 

IV. 

VI. 

VI. 

VI. 

IV. 

IV. 

VL 
V. 

XII. 
IV. 
XI. 

11. 

IV. 



III. 

App. 
I. 

IV. 

I. 

App. 

IX. 

IX. 



342 
274 
254 
122 
111 
113 

69 

25 
101 
342 

14 
275 
384 
143 
373 
24t 

82 



— — 138 



— «l 



227 

273 

274 

15 

53 
9 

92 
326 
124 
125 



— », Cornelius'. See Jainen. 
— ', Robert • • • • - • • • 



V. Cha. II. 



IX. . 225 



234 



INDEX. 



VoL 

Johnstou, Arthur HI, 

,John V. 

r-, sir John VL 

Jolliffe, lady Mary V. 

Jone, remarks on that name I- 

* , pope. See John VIII. 

Jones> sir William HI. 

, col. John V. 

, Inigo in. 

, Richard ^^« 

, sir Thortas V.. 

VI. 

— : , George • • • • VI. 

Jordan, sir Joseph V. 

Joyce, Cornet ^"» 

Irby, Mr. • V, 

Ireland, William V. 

Jreton, Henry ^^^ 

III. 

Isabella, the lady • ^V. 

Isham, sir Thomas V. 

Islip, John, abbot of Westminster . I. 

Jull, James . • • •. V. 

Junius, Hadrianus J- 

, Francis • • "*• 

Juicon, William •* H- 

11. 



Ri^n, ofc. 


CUm, 8se. 


Pag€. 


Cba. I. 


IX. 


140 


Cha. 11. 


IX. 


227 


James II. 


vin. 


133 


Cha. II. 


XI. 


371 






39 


Cha. I. 


VI. 


17 


Cha. II. 


VII. 


138 


Cha. I. . 


X. 


186 


Eliz. 


X. 


333 


Cha. II. 


VI. 


123 


James II. 


VI. 


114 


James II. 


IX. 


137 


Cha. II. 


VII. 


161 


Cha. I. 


VII. 


76 






335 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


94 


Cha. I. 


VII. 


72 


Int: 


II. 


305 


Cha. IL 


I. 


130 


Cha. II. 


VIII. 


167 


Hen. Vllf. 


ly. 


124 


Cha. II. 


IX. 


306 


Mary 


App. 


213 


Cha. I. 


App. 


276 


Cha. I. 


II. 


272 


Cha. I. 


IV. 


334 



Katharine, queen dowager • • • • VI. 

. See Catharine. 

Keay Nabee. See Bantam Ambas- 
sadors. 

Keeling, Josiah. • VI. 

Keies, Robert II- 

Kelleway, Jane • • • V. 

Kelly, Edward I* 

;, Samuel • i • • . • III. 



James II. 



I. 



56 



Cha. II. 


XII. 


7 


James I. 


XII. 


SOI 


Cba. II. 


XI. 


.886 


Eliz. 


IX. 


8S4 


Int.. 


IV. 


Stf 



INDEX. 



235 



VoL 

Thomas y . 

VI. 

ck, John, esq V. 

-, Scawen V. 

-, Daniel ,VI. 

y, Mr. IV. 

Elizabeth, countess of III. 

y, John V. 

, Cornelius • I. 

swell, John • • • V. 

John. See Caius. 

minster, Thomas III. 

rne, Richard IV. 

re, the countess of • • • VI. 

;rew, Thomas III. 

, madam IV. 

, Thomas V. 

V. 

,Tew, Anne V. 

rt. (See Abel.) III. 

•ofton, lord. See Manchester. 

, John II. 

sir John • V. 

. sir Edmund V. 

, lady Mary V. 

s of England, varioui prints 

them I. 

— of Englandj paintings of 

m I, 

— of Scotland^ prints of them • I. 
(ton, Robert Pieri>oint, earl of* III. 

, Richard V. 

>ss, Edward Bruce, first lord • • II. 

Anne III. 

»Mary V. 

Kirkman, Franeb V. 

}tan, Mr. ^ III. 



Cha. II. 
James II. 
Cha. II. 



IV. 

IV. 

VIII. 



James II. 


IX. 


Int. 


VIII. 


Cha. I. 


XI. 


Cha. II. 


IX. 


Eliz. 


X. 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


Cba. I. 


IX. 


Int. 


IX. 


James II. 


XI. 


Int. 


V. 


Int. 


XI. 


Cha. 11. 


VIII. 

TY 



Cha. II. 
Cha. I. 

James I. 
Cba. II. 
Cha. li. 
Clia. II. 



X. 

XII. 

IV. 
VI. 
IX. 
XI. 



Page. 

20 

92 
185 
185 
137 

26 
209 
280 
329 

51 

163 
57 
165 
352 
91 
189 
249 
325 
250 

48 
126 
209 
379 



— 4 





^■^ 


17 
32 
46 


Cha. I. 


VII. 


Cba. II. 


IV. 


62 


James I. 


III. 


42 


Cha. I. 


XI. 


281 


Cha. II. 


XI. 


882 


Cha. II. 


IX. 


259 




_ 


188 



Vol. 

Kneller. Godfrey • V. 

Knight, Tkomiu : III. 

, Mri. ; V. 

KDiTerlon, Daniel IH. 

Knpllis, Hausard V. 

Knox, John • • • • I. 

, the younger • I. 

KoniDgsmark, count •• VI. 

Krabbe, Oregers ■ ^ HI. . 

Kyffin, William '■ ' VI. 

KynastoD, Edward VI. 

Kytson, sir Thomas 1. 

Laighton. See Leighton. 

Lake, Arthur U. 

- — , Edward V, 

. .John .-. IV. 

Lambarde, William I. 

Lambe, Dr. John II. 

Lambert, Jolin IV. 

Lamplugb, Thomas ■ VI. 

La Motle, John , III. 

Lancaster, John of Gaunt, duke of- I. 

, Henry of Monmontb, 

duke of L 

Lane, Dorcas Brabazou IV. 

, Jane IV. 

Langdale, sir Marmaduke IV. 

Langham (Mary), lady V. 

Langhom, Richard V. 

Langtcn, John . VI. 

Laniere, Nicholas- ••• • IIL 

Lant, Thomas L 

LargilHere.Nicholasde- •• • - V. 

IiArkkaB, Thomas HL 



Cha.IL 




InL 


XI. 


Cba. 11. 


III. 


Cta. II. 


XL 


Cha.II. 


VI. 




— 


Cha.1. 


X. 


Elii. 


X. 


Clw.II. 


X. 



INDEX. 



237 



lur, Hubert HI, 

, Oriaodus I, 

^Hugh I, 

I. 

I. 

spine, Charles de HI. 

Willuim Il] 

r, William y^ 

rdale, JobD, duke of IV. 

9 the datcbefB of V. 

'Heory HI. 

-, William HI. 

ncc, Henry HI. 

•n, sir Jobn**-*.* ••••• y, 

^reaehers ^••m IH^ 

V. 

. alderman •■• • • n^ 

on, Michael- •- HI. 

aere» Nicholas •• VI, 

Edipard, archbishop of York • • I. 

sii Henry •-• I, 

sir Thomas • • • • |. 

William* • HI. 

venhooky Anthony van VI. 

zvve, Claude V. 

i, Thomas- • • I. 

star, Robert Dudley, eaiiof. • I. 

-.. I. 

— — , Robert Sidney, earl of. . II. 

I, Edward IV, 

.-.. V. 

iton, Dr. Alexander II. 

— , Robert III. 

id, John I. 

Peter ♦ IV, 

, sir Peter V. 

•L. VI. I 



Cfaa. I. 
£lix. 

Htm. VIII. 
Ed. VI. 
Maty 
Cha. L 
Cha. I. 



X. 

IV. 
IV. 
IV. 
App. 
IV. 



1» 



Cha. II. 


III. 


Cha. II. 


XI. 


CIm. I. 


X. 


Int 


V. 


Cha. II. 


VII. 


Int. 


IV. 


Cha. II. 


— . 


James I. 


VIII. 


Cha. I. 


App. 


James II. 


VI. 


Hen. VHI. 


IV. 


Etis. 


V. 


EKz. 


VHI. 


Cha. I. 


VIII. 


Cha. II. 


App. 


Cha. II. 


X. 


Hen. VIII. 


IX. 


Eliz. 


II. 

VTI 



Jame» I. III. 

lot. IX. 

Cha. II. IX. 

Cha. L IV. 

Int. IV. 

Hen. VIII. IV. 

Int. X. 

Cha. II. X. 



171 
19T 



aao 



S08 



191 
191 
363 

leo 

350 

97 

118 

878 

114 

181 

880 

301 

104 

39 

316 

148 

337 

385 

33 

46 

264 

368 

346 

126 

71 

311 



238 



INDEX. 



VoL Ifeign, Jfc. 

Lemon, Margaretr«v«* •••••• •• HI. Cha. I. 

Lennard, Samson II. James I. 

Leuo5c, or Lennox, Matthew Stuart, 

earl of I- £*>«• 

, Margaret, countess of L Eliz. 

. See Richmond. 

Lenthall, William . • • V. Cha. IL 

Le Piper, Francis V. Cha. IL 

Le Soeur. See La Soeur. 

Lesley, John I. Eli2. 

Leslie, or Lesley, Alexander • UI. , Cha. I. 

■ ; — ; J David ••..••.•• I V • Int. 

-, count IV. Cha. II. 

L'Cstrange, Roger V. Cha. IL 

... •••.••.... VI. James II. 

Lethieullier, Catharine • IV. Int. 

Let!, Gregorio- • • - VI. Cha. II. 

LeveUj Alexander Leslie, earl of ••• • HI. Cha. I. 

Levens, Peter • • !• Eliz. 

, Dr. . • - • . - III. Int. 

Leventhorpe, sir Thomas III« Cha. I. 

Leverettt Johuj the Stroker V. ' ' ' ■ 

Lewis VII. king of France I* Art. I. 

Ley, sir James* • • • II« James I. 

IL Cha. I. 

Leybourn, William V. Cha.. IL 

Lichfield, Bernard Stuart, earl of • • H* Cha. I. 

— , the countess of VI. James II. 

Lightfoot, John V. Cha; II. 

Liiburne, Robert V. Cha. II. 

, John III. Cha. L 

.. IV. Int. 

Lilly, Williara, schoolmaster I' Hen. VIII. 

, William IV. Int. 

V. Cha. II. 

Lindsay, sir David I. Ed. VI. 



Class, ^e. 


Page. 


XL 


234 


IX. 


151 


IL 


2.39 


XL 


339 


V. 


113 


X. 


322 


IV. 


257 


VII. 


77 


VII. 


13 


III. 


219 


IX. 


269 


IX. 


141 


App. 


109 


App. 


44 


vn. 


77 


IX. 


308 


VI. 


365 


VIII. 


84 




233 


App. 


92 


II. 


95 


IL 


272 


IX. 


276 


III. 


307 


XL 


154 


IV. 


37 


VII. 


144 


IX. 


162 


VII. 


12 


IX. 


144 


IX. 


62 


IX. 


299 


IX. 


180 



INDEX, 



239 



Vol, Reign, S^-c. Clast, ^c. Page, 

Lindsey, Robert Bartue (Bertie), 

earlof HI. Cha I. VII. 43 

, Montagu, ear! of III. Cha. I. VII. 44 

Liou, sir Patrick. See Lyon. 

Lisle, Robert Siodey, viscouDt--- II. James I. III. 33 

, sir George III. Cha. I. VIII. 87 

Lister, sir Martin III. Cha. I. VIII. 90 

, sir Matthew III. Cha. I. IX. 117 

, Dr. Martin III. ^ — "228 

Litchfield. See Lichfield. 

Lithgow, William II. James I. IX. 164 

Little men of great eminence III. — 320. 

Littleton, or Lyttleton, judge I. Art. I. VI. 72 

, sir Edward III. Cha. I. VL 14 

Livens, John • IIL Cha. L X. 176 

Uewlyn ap Griffith 1. — 11 

Lloyd, Humphrey I. Eliz. IX. 321 

, William, bishop of St. Asaph VI. James II. IV. 90 

Lobel, Matthias de I. Eliz. App. 362 

Lock, Matthew V. Cha. II. X. 343 

Locke, John VI. James II. IX. 143 

Lockhart, general IV. Int. VII. 4 

Lockyer, Nicholas • • • III. Int. IV, 326 

, Lionel V. Cha. IL IX. 229 

Lodge, William V. Cha. IL X. 336 

Loftus, madam VL James II. XL 166 

, Lucy VL — 166 

Logic of a Dog II. — 367 

Lombart Peter V. Cha. II. X. 336 

Long Hair IL — 183 

Long, Jane V. Cha. IL XL 386 

Longland, John, bishop of Lincoln • I. Hen. VIII. IV. 122 
Longueil (or Longolius)) Chrbtopher 

de I. Hen. VIII. App. 159 

Longueville, Henry, duke of IV. Int. App. 104 

Lousdale, John Lowther, viscount • VL James II. IIL ^18 



240 



Vol. 



Btign, J[e. Claa, ifc. Page. 



Xarit Prager turned into an 

execration II-. 

Lome, lady V. 

Lortie, Andrew ^■ 

LothiaD, William Kerr, earl of- • • . - IV, 

Love, Cbristopher HI- 

, Richard V. 

Loveday, Robert IV. 

Lovelace, Richard HI. 

Lovet, father • H. 

Loudon, John Campbell, earl of ■ • • IV. 

Louisa, the princess H. 

m. 

Louse, mother VI. 

Low, Edward V. 

Lower, sir WUliam IV. 

, Richard V. 

Lowtk, Robert I- 

Lowtlier, sir JoUn V. 

Loyola, Ignatius I- 

Lucas, sir Charle HI. 

III. 

,JohD IV. 

Lucasta. See Sacheverel. 

Lucy, William HI- 

Ludolf,Job - VL 

Ludlow, Edmund •••• V. 

Lumley, John, lord II. 

Limtford, col. •,- • • HI- 

LnptOD, Dr. II. 

Lurtice, father II. 

Lydgate, John I- 

Lye, Thomas V. 

Lynacre, Thomas, M. D. I. 

Lyadewode, William I. 

Lyon, sir Patrick V. 




Ch.. II. 


VIII. 


167 


Htn. VIII. 


App. 


160 


Cb>. I. 


VII. 


36 




VIII. 


82 


Int. 


X. 


73 


Im. 


IV. 


317 


Cba. II. 


App. 


48 


Inl. 


V. 


333 


June! I. 


III. 


37 


CJia. I. 


VII, 


73 


CI... I. 


IV. 


361 


Junes I. 


IV. 


78 


Art. I. 


IV. 


68 


Cba. U. 


IV. 


73 


Hen. VIII. 


IV. 


131 



Ljitlletoi; air Cbarlei • • • V. 

, Muriel . . - : III. 

Habusb, or Maburiui, John I. 

Macallame, Anne VI, 

Mac ArieU, Jamu V. 

Macaulay, Catharine n. 

Hace, Tbomas • v. 

ifaKken^, sir George V, 

VI. 

Madeleine (Magdalen) de Ftapce, 

queen of James V. [, 

Maiawaring, sir WiHiam Ill, 

: . See Maynwaring. 

Uailland, Richard, lord IV. 

Uahio, pi Makins, Batkaua Ill, 

UWcolm 111. king of Scotland I. 

-IV.&c I, 

Marines, Samuel • V. 

KaUet, sirThomas • ■ ni. 

Mal[Mgi, Marcettus VI. 

Hwiasseh, &c. See Bw Israel. 
Manclii'ster,Hent7HiHiUgue,earlof H. 
, Hcary Montague, earl 

«f. See Montagu*;, sifHeqty. 

— ■ • , Edward, earl of Ill, 

IV. 

Mapdey, Venter v. 

4fiM/r«, BUiue ^ ^ , . iv. 

Uanley, Thomas \]^^ 

Uinafield, Ernest^ coual H, 

— , Charl«ji, vkcount, ftc. . . \U. 

Uanton, Thomas * . ■ . . v. 

Mar, Maty, countess of H. 

T— , John, Erskiije, earl of II. 

HurceUo ,,^. ._ V. 

Marcband, Floram .......j m. 



Be^,*r. Clau.tlic. 



241 



On. II. 


V. 


102 


Cka. I. 


XI. 


339 


Art. I. 


X. 


83 


Cha. 11. 


XII. 


S3 




— 


400 




— 


306 


Ch.. II. 


X. 


Ml 


Cto. II. 


VI. 


131 


JmiiǤII. 


VI. 


Its 


H.11. VIII. 


I. 


lOS 


Ch.. I. 


VII. 


47 


Cha. II. 


III. 


918 


Cha. I. 


XI. 


338 


Art. I. 


I. 


33 


Art. I. 


I. 


34 


Cha. 11. 


VIII. 


187 


Cha. I. 


VI. 


18 


Cha. II. 


An- 


88 



Cha. I. 


VII. 


88 


Cha. II. 


II. 


14» 


Cha. 11. 


IX. 


381 


IH. 


App. 


110 


Cha. I. 


IX. 


164 


JimnL 


App. 


330 


Int. 


HI. 


308 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


6» 


JamMl. 


XI. 


188 


Jam,, I. 


II. 


38 




— 


S4« 


Cha. I. 


XII. 


3fi« 



Mareschal, Oeor^, fifth earl of • • ■ 11. 

Margaret, Saint, queen of Scotland I, 

, queen of Henry VI. • • •• I, 

, niolher of Henry VII. • ■ • I. 

, queen of James IV. of 

Scotland I. 

Maria, See Mary. 

Markham, Gervase- III. 

Marlborough, James Ley, earl of- • • ll. 

Marmion, sir Edmund Ill, 

Harriot IV. 

Marsh, Narcissus VI. 

Marshall, William III. 

, StepAen III. 

Marsham, sir John V. 

Marten, Henry V. 

Martin, Richard II. 

Martyr, Peter • I. 

Marvell, Andrew-."* V. 

V. 

Mary, princeES I. 

■: , queen of France I. 

■ , queen I. 

■- .., of Lorraine, queeu of James V. I. 

. , queen of Scots I. 

, princess V. 

■ ' , of Medices, or Medicis III. 

, princess of Orange IV. 

. VI. 

, or Maria Beatrix, dutcbess of 

York ■ IV. 

'■ , queen-. •• VI. 

Masfall Edward IV. 

Mason V. 

, Dorothy VI. 

-, William V. 

, John, the enthm$iait VI. 



James I. 
Art. I. 

Art. I. 
Art. L 



Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
Cba. I. 
Int. 

James II. 
Cha. I. 



Clan, tie. Page. 
II. 27 



IX. 
II. 



Ma>qae> 

Htssarine. See Mazarine. 

Muaey, Edward III. 

— ' , Hugh. See Men^ fiddler. 

Mnssingberd, Henry IV. 

Maisioger, Philip • HI. 

Master, Martin • V. 

Mather (Crescentias), Increase • • • • VI. 

Matilda, queen of Henry I I. 

Matoaka, or Matoaka If. 

HatoQ, Robert HI. 

Matthew, Tobie, or Tohias Mat- 
thews*. IT. 

: , sir Tobie II, 

III. 

Maurice ofNanam II. 

II. 

• • ■ ■■ II. 

, prince • H, 

MauTois, Thomas H, 

Hazfietd, father II. 

Maxwell, Tkomai V. 

Maximilian, emperor I. 

-H I. 

Ufry.-Tboma IV. 

, Bt^titt V. 

, Robert IV. 

Mayerne, sir Theodore HI. 

IV. 

Maynard, John '. IH. 

Mayne, Cntbbert I. 

, John V. 

Maynwaring, sir Philip III. 

, Everard V. 

Mayow, John V. 

Mayors (lord) of London, in the 

reign of Elizabeth I. 



Vot. Reip,, fy. ciau, tfe. 



123 



Int. 


IX. 


61 


Ch.. I. 


IX. 


129 


Cba. II. 


IX. 


sni 


Jamt! II. 


IV. 


ion 


Art. I. 


I. 


7 


James I. 


XI. 


191) 


iDt. 


IV. 


»1 


Jamn I. 


IV. 


62 


Cba. I. 


IV. 


382 




X. 


183 




— 


217 




— 


21» 


Janesl. 


App. 


217 


Cha. I. 


I. 


S70 


Ch.. I. 


IV. 


378 


James I. 


IV. 


79 




■ — 


361 


Art. I. 


App. 


80 


Elia. 


App. 


346 


Int. 


IX. 


38 


Cha. II. 


VIII. 


170 


Int. 


IX. 


68 


Cha. I. 


IX. 


116 


Int. 


IX. 


30 


Int. 


VI. 


364 


Eiii. 


. IV. 


273 


Cha. II. 


IX. 


297 


Cha. I. 


VIII. 


91 


Cha. 11. 


IX. 


222 


Cha. 11. 


IX. 


. 220 



Mazarine, Horleiue Mancini, 

dutcbessof V. Cha. II. XI. 

Mead, Matthew V. Cba. II. IV. 

Mealb, the countess of V. Cba. II. . XI. 

Mede, Joseph IV. — — — — 

Meeke.JohQ V. Cha.II. VIII. 

Meggot. Richard V. Cba. II. IV. 

— VI. XamesII. IV. 

Meidrun, sir John lU. Cba. I. VII. 

Melfort, Jobn, eari of VI. ' Jamet II. HI. 

Mennis, sir Johu IV. lot. VII. 

Mentelb, Robert IV. iDt. IX. 

iiercator,\Gerard : II. — -^ 

Merrick, Rowland, bishop of Ban- 
gor ^ I. Mary IV. 

Merrick, James i......... V, — 

Merry Aiidrew VI. 

baUad-singerg VI. 

^ fiddler VI. 

- — - milkmaid ■ • VI. 

Merlon. Walter de - - - I. 

Mcrula, Paul .•..•••.. 1. 

Metcalf, tbeopbilug ^ UI. 

Meteren, Emanuel dc II. 

Menlen, Peter Vander V. 

Mews, Petet V. 

VI. 

MtBuotinto, its origin V. 

Middlesex, Uonel Cranfleld, eul of U. 

. , Racbael, countess of • • ■ " IV. 

Middleton, Richard II. 

, sir Hugh n. 

.. , Thomas HI. 

•, Margaret I. 

.John V. 

, Jane V. 

■, Udy. See HiddletoD Jane. 



Jauo II. 


XII. 


188 


James II. 


XII. 


173 


teuis II. 


XII. 


vn 


Jaine> II. 


XII. 


m 


AtLL 


IV. 


58 


EUs. 


App. 


su 


Cba. I. 


X. 


IH 


Jaonl. 


App- 


228 


Cha. II. 


X. 


993 


Cba. II. 


IV. 


8 


Jam.) II. 


IV. 


68 




-~ 


338 


Cba.L 


UL 


297 


Int. 


XI. 


W 


Jama I. 


IV.- 


83 


James I. 


VHI. 


103 


Cba. I. 


IX. 


13) 


Eliz. 


XI. 


833 


Cba. II. 


IX. 


881 


Cba. It. 


XI. 


383 



r.f. RtigH. Iff. 

HUdoMy, sir Walter I. Elis. 

Hill.Humphr; III. Cha. L 

Milton Jofan II. James I. 

III. Chfl.I. 

IV. lot. 

IV. ■ 

V. Cba.II. 

Hiniu, or Hiagb, lir Christopher. • V. Cha. II. 

Mocket, Thomu III. Int. 

Hohao, Michael V. Cha. II. 

Holet, Francis V. Cba.II. 

M^Ineai. See Moulin. 

Hollineanx. WiUiam VI. Janes 11. 

Mom pesson, sir Giles .-•*•-' III. Cha. I, 

Honck. Nicholas V. Cha. II. 

Monktg, tke/tmtMU VI. 

Honmoath, Robert Carey, earl of- • H- Cba. I. 

, Henry Cary, earl of . . . IV. Int. 

. James, duke of ■ . " - - . IV. Cba. II. 

VI. James II. 

~i Anne, dntcbess of. V. Cba. II. 

.... VI. lames II. 
Hontagn. See Montague. 

Montague, Walter HI. Cha. I. 

, sir Henry • II. James I. 

,ttalpk,iiikeef. V. 

.bdyAnn V. Cba.II. 

Monteage, Stephen ...-■. V. Cba. II. 

Montgomery, Philip, earl of H, Cha.' I. 

Hontroee, James Graham, marqnis 

of- III. 

. III. inj. 

MooDe,'Joshna V. Cba.II. 

Moor, urJobn V. tha. II. 

Moore, or More, sir Francis " 11. James I. 



IX. 


189 


IX. 


121 


IX. 


IJS 


VIII. 


n 


IX. 


86 


IX. 


'386 


VII. 


163 


IV. 


840 


X. 


848 


X. 


8» 


IX. 


14S 


XII. 


961 


IV. 


8 


— 


172 


in. 


81S 


IX. 


61 


II. 


148 


III. 


78 


XI. 


867 


XI. 


168 



_ 


867 


XI. 


878 


IX. 


287 


III. 


383 



IV. 
VIII. 



Moore, Jonu 

^, Samuel ■ 

Moorelaod. See Moriaiid 
Mtiray, ot Moravite, Oomes> See. 
Murray. 

Hordaunt, JohD, viscount 

Hare, sir Anthony 

' ■^- , sir Thomaa • 

_-i- — p— .^ , his iamily ...... 



Clia. II. 



aau,llc. 

IX. 



■■i i , Ji^n, son of sir Tkomaa 

— — ,' John 

^~^, nefrancig: Sec Uoort. ' 

-p-^, Gerttnde •••■"••■■•? 

— _, (o( Morus). Alexander • 

— r-, Henry • • • • 

Moiett, Mr. .■■-..• t .. J 

MorganySylvanus ••., Ji--- 

*t*-i ,Bir Henfy..-^.."? 

... , mtijoT-gtiieraLsii; Thomas • 
' Horhof, Daniel G^orfjt-- ■-,'..•• 
Morlce, sir Williiii -----i. . . ,. i . .. 

Morison, Robert 

Morland, sir Samnd-.f •••!••:• •• 

Horley, George • .....<.... 

Horse, Henry....;. ,.;..■.... 

, Horton, James, earl oft ■ • • • r 

trr-. ,ThomaB. . . • - • -.•••■• 

, Anne, countess of 

tt: ,Dr. • 

Moulin, P^lerdn ■••■ •.:"'• 

HouDtagyc, sir Henry • . r • • • ■ 



-^ James • - 



1S3 
1S& 



Uonntaigne, George ■•':■• ■■" 
Hountjoy, lord. See Blount. , 



Hen. VIII. 
Eli2. 

Cha,I. 

Int. 

Cba. n. 

Hen. VIIL 

Cba. IT. 

Gfaa. H. 

Cha. 11. 

Cha. II. 

Cha. 11. 

Clia.Jl. 

Int. . 

Cha.n. 
. Cba.H. 

Cba. I. 

,EU«. , 

Cha. I. ; 

Cha,.I* , 

Cha. I. 

Eli«. 
. Jjimes I, 

. Jjfiiiea |. 
. Janes 1., 



XII. 16 

VII. 152 

App. 44 

V. 101 

IX- .2ia 

V. 367 

XI. 978 

. IV. & 

IV. 386 

II. 240 

IV. S36 

XI. 23S 

jx. . m 

App. 368 

II. 21 

VI. » 

.: IV. 4» 

IV. 49 



INDEX. 247 

VaL tUigH,lfc. Clau,lit. Page. 
Mowbray uh) Haltnven, Henry, 

baron ttf II. Chs. I. lU. 814 

HoxoD, Jbtepb V. Cha. II. IX. 278 

Moyser, John V. Cba. TI. VIII. 187 

Mmckk^John III. — 94S 

Muggleton, LodowJck VI, Cha. 11. XII. II 

Mvlgnit, Edrnand, Mil of. II. Cha. L UI. 301 

— ^ , John, earl of VI. JaiD«s XL II. 88 

Marcot,iohii •' III. lat IV. «S8 

Horrord IV. Ist. IX. . 43 

Hurray, Alexander, earl of VI. Jamet II. II. - «5 

.Thomas VI. Jsmei II. X. 144 

MutgroM. tir WilUam V. — ^ ^ SS6 

HyddlctOD, sirUagh. SeeMiddletoa 

Hytens, Daniel • III. Cbi. I. X. 1«8 

Nailob, James. See Naylor. 

Nalton, James HI. Int. IV. 8Se 

Hornet tf author* ngnified by final 

Utten II. — — : 143 

Nspter, or Neper, lord II. James 1. IX. .US 

-^ , Archibald, lord 11. Cba. I. III. 3S4 

Narbona, Dontbea. See Kanlins. V. Cha. II. XL 898 

Nash, Thomas I. Elic. IX. 314 

.John IV. Int. VIII. «9 

Naunton, sir Robert H. James I- VIII. U4 

Maylor,James IV. Int. XII. 04 

Aiuil, nr Patd, a BumorabU atory 

o/him V. — 143 

Ncale, Thoma III. Cba. I. IX. 161 

Nesse, Christopher V. Qha. II. IV. 78 

NetKher, Catper V. — 323 

Neville, sir Henry 11. James I. V. 87 

Neucl, lady. See Nevile. 

Ne»ile. Catharine V. Cha. 11. XI. 375 

Newburgh, lord II. Cha. I. III. 316 

Newcastle, William CftTCiidisb, earl of II. Cba. I. HI. 390 



Newcastle, William Cavendiib, mar- 
qaii of- 



Vtl. R^, Ifc. aa$, Ifc. Pigi. 



III. 

III. 

, and bis family *• III. 

. carl of II. 

, duke of IV. 

__ , Henry Cavcndisb, duke of IV. 

, — , Margaret, dutcheu of • •■ V. 

Newcorae, Henry • • • V. 

Newnkmt, G, S. Harcoitrt, viicotmt V. 

Newport, Moun^oy Blount, carl of II, 

, Cbarlea, earl of IV. 

Newton, John V. 

., Iiaac VI. 

Nicfaolai, sir Edward • - • ■ ■ III. 

'. V. 

HickoUt, WiUiam HI. 

N^ellul. SeeNeale. 

Nim orNym IV. 

Nisbet, sir John V. 

Nixon, Robert - II. 

Norden, Joba • II. 

Norfolk, ThomasPlanlageael, earl of I. 

, Jobn Howard, first duke of I. 

, Tbomas Howard, 2d duke of I. 

— — , lliomas Howard) duke of • .1. 



', Henry Howard, duke of- • 



IV. 



, Margaret Brotberton, 

dutcbess of • • • 

, Catharine Molines, dutcfaess 

of 

— — , Agnes Tylney, dulcheti of 

* , Bdargaret Audley, dntcbess 

of • 

— , Jane, dntcbeas of 



Cha. 1. 


VIII. 


Int. 


IX. 


Int. 


III. 


Chn.I. 


III. 


Cbi. II. 


III. 


Ch>.II. 


III. 


Cta. II. 


IX. 


Cbi.II. 


If. 


Cba. I. 


III. 


Cba. II. 


IIL 


Cbi. II. 


IV. 


James II. 


IX. 


Int. 


V. 


Cba. II. 


V. 



Cba. n. 


VI. 


JanKi I. 


XII. 


James I. 


iX. 


Art. I. 


II. 


Art. I. 


II. 


An.I. 


II. 


Hen. VIII. 


II. 


Elii. 


II. 


Cba. IL 


II. 


James II. 


II. 



All. I. 
Att. 1. 



Elii. 
Cba.II. 



XI. 
XI. 



XI. 

XI. 



INDEX. 



249 



IV. Ragn, tic. Claa, tfc. Pagt. 

North, fint Dudley, lord iv. Cha. II. III. 199 

, KGond Dudley, lord IV. Cha. II. III. |9B 

, sir Dudley V. Cha. II. V. 105 

.Roger • V. Cha. II. VI. 126 

NortbamptDU, Heury Homrd, earl 

of- II. Jamesl. III. 36 

. the earl of II, Cha. I. III. 29S 

Norlhamberland, John Dudley, duke 

of' I. Ed. VI. II. lee 

1 Henry Percy, first 

Mtlof I. Art.I. II, 4a 

, Henry Percy, earl 

of- • • II. James I. III. 31 



, Alj^eraon Percy, 



eariof II. Cha.I. II. 279 

■ , George Fitzroy, 

duke of IV. Cha. II. III. 1«2 

, Joiceline, earl of IV. Cha. II. III. 166 

.Elizabeth, coun- 

tcMof V. Cha. II. IX. 3e& 

Norton, Richard V. — ^ 160 

.John V. Cha. II. IX^ 206 

Nntradamtu, Mkkael V. — 227 

Nott, sir Thomas 11. Cha. II. VIII. l&O 

NoltinghBin,CharlesHoward.earlof >• Eliz. VII. 26a 

— IL James I. II. 2-2 

—, Heneage Fioch, earl 

of. V. Cha. II. VI. 117 

See Finch. 

Nowel, Alexander I. Eliz. IV. 257 

Nov, sir Wmiam III. Cha. I. V . 22 

Nye, Nathaniel III. Cha. I. IX. 162 

, Philip III. — 388 

Oatbs, Titus V. Cha. II. IV. &0 

VI. XII. 4 



Gates, Titus > VI. 

Ogilby, John • V. 

Ogilvius. See Ogilby. 

Ogle, sir John I. 

,Jaek VI. 

Okey, John 111. 

Oldcorn, Edward ••■: II. 

Oldbani, Hugh, bishop of Exeter • ■ I. 

. -, John , V. 

Oliver, Isaac I. 

, Peter lU 

Onebye, Maria Johannes V. 

Orange, Maurice, piiace of. See 

Maurice. 
■ MeDry Frederic, prince 

of III. 

, William, prince of 111. 

. L- ^_- ^. ._ III. 

- IV. 

VI. 

, the princess of Vl. 

. Sec Mary. 

Orde, Mr. V. 

Ormond, James, duke of IV. 

Orrery,- Roger Boyle, earl of IV. 

Orlelius, Abrabam 1. 

Osborn, lady Mary VI. 

Ossbry, Thomas, earl of IV. 

— _ V. 

, the countess of V. 

OToole, Arthur, &c. FI. 

Otway, Thomas • • •. V. 

Overwll, John I'-- 

Overbury, sir Thomas ■ H- 

Ougbtred, William H- 

, . - ^ III. 

Owen, John • • i ■ H. 



Rtign.Stc. Cliia,i!t. 

James II. XII. 
Cha. 11. IX. 



Elie. 
Cha. II. 
Cha. h 
James I. 
Hen. VIII. 
Cba; II. 
Elis. 

James I. - 
Cha. II. 



VU. 
XII. 



X. 
X. 

XI. 



Ch>.I. 


App. 


Cha. I; 


App 


im. 


I 


Cha. 11. 


I 


Jamti II. 


I 



Cba. II. 


II. 


Cha. II. 


III. 


Elii. 


App. 


JaiDO II. 


XI. 


Cha. II. 


n. 




VII. 


Cha. II. 


XI. 


Jaain I. 


VII. 


Cha. II. 


IX. 


James I. 


IV. 


James 1. 


IX. 


Cha. I. 


IV. 



INDEX. 



251 



John / 

sir John ••••••• 

Ti, William • 

en, sir Henry 

[, Robert Vere, earl of 
-, Henry Vere, earl of* 

-, Robert Vere, earl of« 
I, William ........... 



B, sir Christopher ••••••»••• 

igtob, sir John • 

. -I -, Dorothy ••••••.•••••• 

Francis •••*••••«••••• ^ •• • 

^^g 9f ^ AncUntSj classic 
hors who have treated ofit"* 

ing on glass 

ledessen, Palamede 

!r, father . • ►^ • • 

-, Herbert • • 

— , Geoffry • • • •■ • . . 

}hletSy the grand, collection by 

nlinson • • • • • 

n, captain Edward ...••...• 
, Matthew - • 
ieiisis. See Paris. 
!r,lifatthew •«••• 

— , sir Philip 

—, Catharine, his lady 

nson, John***** •.•.••• 

a, Margarety datchess of • • • • • 

Thomas • 

, th^ younger* * • • • • 

, Catharine 

, Edward «•••••• .^. ... • 

n, madam •••..4.... 



. . • '• •-• .. •••••• 



.••«..• 



Vol. 

V. 

III. 

V, 
V. 

I. 
11. 
II. 
II, 

VL 

IV, 

L 

V. 

I. 

III. 
VI. 
III. 

n. 
II. 

V. 

. v. 

VI. 
L 



Reign, 8ic» 

Cha. IL 
Cha. L 
Cha. II. 
Cha. II. 
Art. I. 
James L 
Cha. L 
Cha. I. 
Cha. II. 

Int. 
Eli£. . 
Cha> II4 
•Eliz. 



Cha; I. 
•James L 
Cha; I. 
Cha. II. 



Cha. II. 
Art L- 



IV. 

vn. 

IV. 
IX. 

n. 
III. 

VII. 

m. 

XII. 

vm. 

VIII. 
XI. 
IV. 



' ' I. -Eliz. 

II. . Jaoies 1. 

. II. . . Jam«s I. ■ 

III, CkaiL ; 

-I. Muy ■ ■ ■ 

III. Cha; I. 

XLk^ • I . 

I. Hen. VIII. 

III. Int. 

V* Cha^IL 



X. 

IV. 
IV. 

vr. 



XII. 
. IV, 

* » 

.IV. 

vni. 

XI. 
IXi 

xu. 
I. 

IV. 
XL 



Page. 

66 

48 

41 

260 

47 

22 

291 

291 

24 

2g 

297 
377 
276 

277 
146 
174 
78 
9® 
124 

266 

5 

68 

248 
106 
179 
168 
212 
243 
244 
100 
318 
386 



PanOKi, Jama IV. 

, Robert 11. 

Partridge, Nathaniel V. 

,John V. 

Patfield, Robert I. 

Paior. Gwrge IV. 

Pasae, Simon de III. 

, Magdalen de III. 

Paston, sir William IV. 

—.lady IV. 

Patekt$ IV. 

Patenson, Heniy I. 

PatesoD, father • 11.- 

Patin, Charles VI. 

Patrick, Symon VI. 

Patriotum, gentraUs a proiUma- 

tical virtue IV. 

Panle, Rachel V. 

, Watiam V. 

Pauw, Regnems II. 

Payne, John Ul. 

Pearse, Iklward V. 

Peanon, John V. 

Peake, sir Robert. V. 

Pecke, Thomas IV. 

Pedantry II. 

Peeke, Richard H. 

Pieresc, Nicolaua Clandius Fabri- 

ciua, loid of • 11. 

Pemberton, sir Francis V. 

Pemble, William II> 

Pembroke, Mary of St. Paul, conn- 
less of '. . . I- 

. William Herbert, earl of '• 

■ I. , 

~, Henry Herbert, earl of. ■ I. 



Stign.ije. Ctau,tp!. figi. 



J.me. I. 


IV. 


81 


Cha. 11. 


IV. 


M 


Cbi. II. 


IX. 


aw 




— 


m 




— 


140 


Ch.. I. 


X. 


198 


Cb«. I. 


X. 


1S9 


Int. 


VIII. 


17 




XI. 


88 







102 


Hen. -VIU. 


VI. 


in 


James I. 


IV. 


88 


Cba.II. 


App. 


43 


Jama II. 


IV. 


180 




_ 


1« 


Cba.II. 


XI. 


973 




IV. 


m 


Jamn I. 


App. 


226 


Cba.1. 


X. 


28« 


Cba. II. 


IV. 


ai 


Gba. 11. 


IV. 


18 


Cba. II. 


X. 


3!« 


lol. 


IX. 


44 



James I. 


App. 


2M 


Cba.II. 


VI. 


Ml 


James 1. 


IV. 


78 


Alt. I. 


XI. 


8J 


Ed. VI. 


II. 


m. 


Ma,, 


VII. 


SOS 


Ella. 


III. 


«i 



INDEX. 



^53 



Vol Reign, S^c, ClaUti^c. Pag€, 



oke, Mary Herbert, countess 

» • • • II. James I. 

— , Mary, countess of II. James I. 

, William, earl of H. James I. 

11. - Cha. I. 

— , Philip, earl of IL Cha. I 

-' — , the elder* • *^^' I'^^» 

— , the younger 

of. See Herbert, lord. 

Villiam IV. Int. 

V. Cha. II. 

the legislator, a story of 

IV. 

rell, or Penderill, William ... VI. Cha. II. 

— , Richard • yi. Cha II. 

igton, sir John .^ HI. Cha. I. 

. Isaac III. Cha. I. 

jdock, John IV. Int. 

Samuel VI. James II. 

al, Alice.. I, Eliz. 

— , Richard n. James I. 

— , sir Philip, i III. Cha, I. 

— , Catharine, lady . . • ^ m. Cha. I. 

— , sir Philip V. Cha. II. 

—, sir John V. Cha. II. 

— , George V. Cha. II. 

— , Robert. i V. Cha. II. 

— (Catharine South well), lady y. Cha. II. 

— (Catharine Dering), lady . . y. Cha. II. 
~, sir Philip. See Perceval. 

, Thomas II, James I. 

^Dr, Thomas • I. — — — 

, lady Lucy ... i ..... i H. James I. 

D, lady i II. James I. 

OS, William. . .••'.• I. Eli«. 

L.vi. 2l 



XI. 
IX. 

II. 

II. 

II. 

V. 



vn. 

VII. 



XII. 

XII. 

VII. 

VIII. 

VII. 

VIII. 

XI. 

V. 

V. 

XI. 

V. 

vni. 

VIII. 
VIII. 

XI. 

XI. 

XII. 

XI. 
XI. 
IV. 



176 
137 
28 
282 
283 
859 



15 
150 

16 
1 

1 

58 

92 

5 

131 

337 

89 

2 

225 

108 

203 

204 

205 

401 

402 

190 
87 
175 
181 
265 



254 



INDEX. 



Vol. 

Perkins, Mr. • • V. 

, Richard Ill, 

iPerrot, sir John* • • • • • * . . . • I, 

m 

, sir Herbert . « . .^ . . . • V. 

PerroHj cardinal, lus method of 

printing his works I* 

Perth, James, earl of • • IV. 

'^ VI. 

Perwich, Susanna IV. 

Peters, Hugh • III. 

— V, 

Petitot, John III. 

Petre, Edward VI. 

Petrucci, Ludovisio .........*... II, 

Pettus, sir John y. 

Petty, sir William V. 

VI, 

Petyt, WUliam ; V, 

Philaras, Leonard • • IV. 

Philip the Good. I, 

, II. consort of queen Mary • • }• 

Philippa, queen I. 

Philips, (father) II, 

, Fabian. • • V, 

^, Catharine • • • IV, 

Pickering y sir William I^ 

__.^ Thomas , • • . • Y? 

Pictures, their sizes II» 

Pierce, Edward, sen. r • • • JIJ* 

— , jun. JII. 

Pindar, sir Paul ., • • • • IIJ? 

Pinson, Richard J, 

Pitcher, major ? III. 

Pitt, Dr. ft.. ................ . III. 

Pitfs Atlas VI. 

Place, Francis ^. . . V. 



Reign, 3fc. 

Cha. 11. 
Cha, I. 
Eliz. 
Cha. Ii: 



Cha. II. 


III. 


James II. 


II. 


Int. 


XI. 


Int. 


IV. 


Cha, II. , 


IV. 


Cha. I. 


3f. 


Jaro^s II. 


IV. 


James I. 


IX. 


Cha, JI. 


IX; 


Cha, II. 


IX. 


James JI. 


IX. 


Cha, II. 


IX. 


Int 


App. 


Art. I. 


App. 


Mary , 


I. 


Art. I. . 


I. 


Cha. I. 


IV, 


Cb^. II. 


VI. 


Iflt. . 


IX, 


.Cha,H. 


t 

IV. 


?ha. I. 


X. 


C^a. I, 


X. 


Cha, I, 


VIII. 


H^n, Vm. 


X, 


ell?,!, 


VII, 







Cha. II. 



Class, S^e. Page, 

IX. 281 

X. 205 

II. 241 

VIII. 109 



272 

213 

66 

90 
34? 

88 
184 
108 
135 
289 

2ie 

137 
«74 
108 

89 
187 

13 
379 
1^ 

44 
247 
. 92 
168 
180 
186 

9i 

147 

55 

m 

91 



X. 



INDEX. 



255 



Vol. Reign, 8^c, CUm,8^c. Page. 

Plantagenety Edward, son of George 

duke of Clarence I. Art. I. II. 42 

Plaet, William III. Cha. I. VIII. Ill 

Playford, John V. Cha. II. X. 341 

Play9^ gupprtssed IV. — 36 

Plot, Robert V. Cha. II. IX. 283 

Plowden, Edmund I.' Eliz. VI. 284 

Ployden, or Plowden, father ...... II. James I. IV. 79 

Plukenet, Leonard V. Cha. II. IX. 220 

Plunket, Oliver V. Cha. II. IV. 90 

P^oiith, don Carlos, earl of IV. Cha. II. III. 187 

Pococke, Edward V. Cha. II. IV. * 82 

Poet Laureat, remarks on that 

title II. — 125 

Pointz, mfyor-general III. Cha. I. VII. 71 

Pole, Reginald I. Mary IV. 192 

, or Poole, Matthew V. Cha. II. IV. 66 

Poleroburg, Cornelius III. Cha. I. X. 179 

Polemical^ divinity II. — 60 

, Divines VI. — 99 

Polyander, John * III. Cha. I. App. 273 

Poor Robin V. — 806 

— — Jack, the crier of VI. James II. XII. 173 

Pope, sir Thomas I. Mary V. 204 

, sir William II. James II. III. 42 

, Alexander V. — 267 

Popping, Christian 11. James I. XI. 182 

Pordage,John III. Int. IV. 344 

Porter, father II. James I. IV. 80 

-^ , Endymion III. Cha. I. VIII. 109 

Portland, Jerom Weston, earl of • * . . II. Cha. I. III. 303 

-, Frances Stuart, countess 

of III. Cha.. I. XI. 221 

Portman, sir William • V. Cha. II. V. 107 

Portrait-painting, its supposed an- 
tiquity I. Preface — xiii 



256 INDEX. 

Vol. R^.ttc. Ctau, Ifc. 

Portraits, painted and tngraved, 

remarks on Ikem and their utilitt/* I. Pre&ce — 

, ideal ■ • I. — 

1 — , ideal, censured I. — 

, arrangement of them- ' • I. — 

. , of children I. — 

. — , in foreign dreisei, and 

assumed characters censured VI. — 

Portsmouth, Louise, dutcbesa of- • - V. Cba. II. XI. 

• , caplaina. . ^ VI. James II. Vll, 

Potemkin, Peler JoIid VI. Cba. U. App. 

Ponlelt, sir Amias I. Eliz. V. 

Powel, alias Morgan H.- Cba. I. IV. 

Judge VI. — 

Po^Dfz. See Pointz. 

Pojer, col. III. Cba. I. VII. 

Prance. Miles VI. Cha. II. XII. 

Preferment, remarks on it I. — 

Preston, Jobn II. Cba. I. IV. 

Price, Hugb I. Eliz. IV. 

, John.. III. Cba. I. IX. 

IV. Int. IX. 

Price, lady, (Mrs.) V. " Cba. II. XII. 

Prideaujt.Jolm II. Cha. I. IV. 

Primerose, Gilbert * II. James I. IV. 

Prince, the young VI. James II. 1. 

Prints, various methods of ranging _ 

them II. , ——— — 

Prynne, William ' III. Cba. I. VI. 

III. Int - , V. 

III. Iql. VI. 

IV, Cba. II . VI. 

Pialm Ciy, various translation! of 

it by Scotsmen 1. — 

* 'Sm wbtt Di. Jobiuon uyi of poitnuti. In " The Idler," No. 45. 



xviii 



INDEX. 

Vol, 

PuDgearon» Nia Para VI. 

Purcell, Henry V. 

PurchaSy Samuel II. 

Puritans in the reign of Elizabeth I. 

Pym, John HI. 

Quaker, John the VI. 

, the London VI. 

Quarles, Francis • • • r III. 

^, John IV. 

Queensbury, William, duke of IV. 

Quesnel, Francis II. 

QuemOf Camillo III. 

Quinquarticular Controversy V. 

Radnor, John Roberts, earl of. . • IV. 

Rainbow, Edward V. 

Rainolds, John I. 

Rainsford, sir Richard V. 

Ralegh, or Raleigh, sir Walter I. 

II. 

Ramryge, Thomas, abbot of St. 

Alban's I. 

Ramsay, sir James III. 

, William IV. 

• V. 

Ramsey, lady Mary I. 

Randolph, Thomas III. 

Rantzau, John I 

7, Frederick 11. 

Raphelengius, Francis I. 

Ratcliife, lady Mary V. 

Rathborne, Aaron • II. 

Ravius, Christian • IV, 

Raulins (or Rawlins), Dorothy V. 

Rawdon, Robert • III. 



257 



^^gn» ^c. 


Class^ 6^c. 


Page. 


Cba. II. 


App. 


35 


Cha. II. 


X. 


340 


James I. 


IV. 


68 
251 




~ 


Cha. I. 


V. 


4 


Cha. II. 


xn. 


10 
11 






Cha. I. 


IX. 


134 


Int. 


IX. 


40 


Cha. II. 


II. 


150 


James I. 


X. 


162 
127 










40 
139 


Cha. II. 


II. 


Cha, II. 


IV. 


11 


Eliz. 


IV. 


258 


Cha. II. 


VI. 


121 


Eliz. 


VII. 


293 


James I. 


IX. 


139 


Art. I. 


IV. 


67 


Cha. I. 


VII. 


80 


Int. 


IX. 


67 


Cha. II. 


IX. 


210 


Eliz. 


XI. 


337 


Cha. I. 


IX. 


128 


Hen. VIII. 


App. 


159 


James I. 


App. 


231 


Eliz. 


App. 


360 


Cha. II. 


XI. 


371 


James I. 


IX. 


146 


Int« 


App. 


106 


Cha. II. 


XI. 


398 


Cha. I. 


vin. 


110 



258 



INDEX. 



Vol, BMgn, 6^c. 

Rawdon, sir George ;..••* V. Cha. II. 

. , Marmaduke V. Cha. II. 

, La^wrence III. Cha. I. 

-^ , Thomas V. Cha. II. 

^ sir Marmaduke V. Cha; II. 

, William V. Cha. II. 

', lady Elizabeth - V. Cha. II. 

, Elizabeth. . • V. Cha. II. 

. , Catharine • V. Cha. II. 

, Sarah- V. Cha. II. 

Rawlet„John. ,•.... V. Cha. II. 

Ra\vlinsy Richard IV. Int. 

Rawlinson, Robert IV. Int. 

, Curweo V. Cha. II. 

, John • . II. James I. 

— , Elizabeth V. Cha. II. 

Raynolds, col. John • • • IV. Int. 

Reade, Alexander III. Cha. I. 

Reede, John de • • • HI. Cha. I.^ 

Reeks, Jane I. 

Reetz, Peter IV. Int. 

Religious melancholy and despera- 
tion VI. — 

Rembrandt, Van Rhyn V. Cha. II. 

Jleshury^ Dr. an anecdote of him* • • IV. 

Retz. See De Retz. 

Reynell, Carew. • V. Cha. II. 

Reynolds, Edward III. Int; 

•^ V. Cha.II. 

Rich, sir Henry II. James I. 

". , Jeremiah IV. Int. 

Richard L- • I. Art. I. 

'- II. I. — 

III. I. 

Richards, Nathaniel* • • • • III. Cha. I. 

', William VI. James II 



Class, &^c. 


Page. 


yii. 


164 


VIII. 


182 


VIII. 


106 


VII. 


154 


viii. 


182 


VIII. 


183 


XI. 


379 


XI. 


385 


XL 


385 


XL 


385 


IV. 


60 


IX. 


62 


VIII. 


2a 


VIII. 


180 


IV. 


72 


XL 


385 


VII. 


6 


IX. 


120 


App. 


274 




35 


App. 


.104 


V 


12 


X. 


310 


" — 


148 


IX. 


296 


IV. 


319 


IV. 


9 


VII. 


100 


X. 


77 


L 


8 




16 




27 


IX. 


139 


VIII. 


131 



INDEX. 



269 



Vol, Rfign, ^c. Class, S^c. Page. 

lson,John HI. int. IV. 318 

►nd, Henry Fitzroy, duke of i Hcd. VIII. H. 110 

— , Margaret, countess of. 

Margaret. 

— , Lodowic, duke of n, James I. II. 24 

—, Frances, dutchess of ... . n^ James I. XI. 168 

— , James Stuart, duke of . . h Qj,a. I. II. 281 
— , Elizabeth (Mary), Villiers, 

hessof ^ III. Cha.I. XL 207 

— ^ Frances Stuart, dutchess 

V. Cha.II. XI. 353 

— , Charles Lenos, or Lenox, 

;of IV. Cha.IL IIL 166 

:, Josiah IIL Cha. 1. IX. 140 

, Nicholas L Ed. VL IV. 170 

L Mary IV. 195 

-,Mark L Eliz. IX. 307 

John • VL James 11. X, 144 

, Anthony Widvaie, earl of. • L Art 1. IIL 52. 

, Mary Darcy, countess of • • . II. James 1. XL 173 

Andrew II. James 1. App. 229 

, David L Eliz. X. 334 

ty duke of Normandy •• 1. — 7 

t Bruce, king of Scotland ... I. Art. I. 1. 36 

IL-.-.- L — 37 

-IIL • L — 37 

-, prince. See Rupert. 

ts, John, lord IIL Cha. L VIL 73 

—, Francis ; IL Cha. L IV, 369 

•• IIL Int. VL 331 

—, Lewis IIL Cha.L IX. 159 

— ,Jane V. Cha.IL XL 395 

IS (or Robinus), John. • • H. James L IX. 152 

ison, Henry ....^ n, James 1. IV. 53 

ester, John, earl of IV. Cha. IL IIL 172 

—^ V. r- IX. 251 



Rochester, Laurence, earl of VI. 

. iady ■■.... V. 

, Henry Wilmot, earl of • • 11. 

, Heitrietta Boyle, coanless 

of. V. 

Rodolph II. emperor I. 

Roe, sir Thomas II. 

Roelatu, Jamtt HI. 

Roestraien, Peter V. 

Rogers, John I, 

— , Richard I. 

, John II. 

III. 

■ , M. D. V. 

Rogiers, Theodore III. 

RoHe, Henry HI. 

Romancti of the heroic kind IV. 

, VI. 

RoDcalli, Cbristophano • • • • ; II, 

Ronsard, Peler I. 

Rookwood, Ambrose II. 

Roper, Margaret I- 

Roscommon, Wenlworth Dillon, earl 

of. IV. 

Rose, gardener to the dutcfaess of 

Cliveland V. 

Rosenkranta, Palle II. 

.Holger II. 

-.Erie IV. 

Rosetli, Charles HI. 

Botewell, «iV Samuel V. 

Rosni, Maximilian de Bethune, mar- 

qub of- II. 

Ross, Alexander III. 

, Richard, lord II. 

Roasiter, gen. V. 



Rtign, 4>. CIm, 1st. fagl: 

James II. II. 69 

Cha. II. XI. S70 

Cha. I. III. 311 



Cha. II. 
Eliz. 



XI. 
App. 



James I. X. 

Hen. VIII. App. 
James I. XII. 



Ch». U. 


X. 


James I. 


App. 


Jamii I. 


App. 


Int. 


App. 


Ch.. I. 


App. 


James I, 


App. 


lot. 


IV. 



INDEX. 



261 



Vol, 

eraoi, Thomas de • • • • I. 

r, Joseph, V. 

, Philip V. 

;s, John Leslie, duke of IV. 

dheed, the origin of that appeU 

ron.»« III. 

John or Ross I. 

Francis IV. 

U.John VI. 

md, William V. 

ey, old V. 

/ Society - V. 

ns, sir Peter Paul III. 

III. 

erd, sir Benjamin • •' III. 

Uy Ralph II. 

[us, John IV. 

Din, Ely nor* - I, 

rt, prince • • • • II. 

— II. 

II. 

III. 

V. 

worth, John III. 

V. 

b1, John, lord .............. I, 

-, William, lord IV. 

-, lady Elizabeth II. 

-, lady Frances IV. 

-, col. John ...•••••• V. 

-, lady Rachel . . . • • V. 

-,Mrs. VI. 

-, Richard V. 

-, Wriothesley, lord VI. 

at, Tobias V. 

n, or Ruthven, lady Mary * * • * III* 

OL. VI. 2 M 



Art. I. 
Cha. II. 





4r 


Cha. II. 


III. 


Art. I. 


IV. 


Int. 


IX. 


Cha. II. 


IX. 


• 




Cha. I. 


X. 




App. 




Cha. I. 


VIII. 


Int. 


App. 


Hen. VIII. 


XIL 


James I. 


I. 


Cha. L 


I. 


Cha. II. 


I. 


Cha. II. 


VII. 

V 



Int. 

Cha. II. 
Hen. Vni. 
Cha. II. 
James I. 
Int. 

Cha. II. 
Cha. II. 
Cha. II. 
Cha. IL 
James II. 
Cha. II. 
Cha, I. 



Clau,Sic, Page, 

IV. 68 

X. 339 

339 

209 



90 

69 

47 

146 

226 

252 

245 

168 

275 

108 

133 

107 

150 

15 

268 

167 

36 

333 

365 

266 

137 

196 

178 

84 

153 

387 
21 

01 

76 

191 

23t 



VI. 

IX. 

VII. 

III. 

XI. 

XL 

VII. 

XL 

XIL 

IV. 

III. 

VIIL 

XI. 



262 



1N"DEX. 



Ruten^ Coorad ....#..•.•••• 

Jlutland, Francis Maonens, duke of 

Rutter, Do^pthy- 

Ruz€, Anthony • • • ♦ 

Rycaut, sir Paul • 



Ryves, Pr. Bruno < 



Sacheverel, Lucy-« •••••. 

Sack, iViulled, a chitnney-swe^per so 

called • 

Saints of the church of Rome 

Saley. .See Sawley, 

Salifibury, John de Montacute, third 

earl of • • • 

, Thomas de Montacute, 

fourth earl of •••••••••••.•••• • 

-r-, Robert Cecil, earl of • • • 

, Williaoi Cecil earl of • • • 



Salmon, William ••• 
Saltoustall, Charles 
Sancroft, William* • 
Sandt#»« Laurence • 

— r: , Thomas • • 

, Anthony • 

Sanderson, William 
— -, Robert^ 



Ssiqdwiqh, Edward Montague, earl of 



, the second earl of 



$andys, Edwin • •. 

-! ^ George ..< 



Satires and lampoon^ on the. court y 
in thfi reigns, of EUiahetK and 
James L »....» « 

Smmderjs^ lord chief -justice* • * jt • • • 



Vol, Reign, S^c, 

III. Cha. I. 

II. James. L 

V. Cha. IL 

II. James I. 

V. Cha. II. 

VL . James U. 

V. Cha. IL 

JIL Cha. I. 

II. James- 1. 

I. 



• I. Art. I« 



I. 

II. 

II. 

V. 

III. 

YI. 

I. 

IV. 

V, 
IV. 

V. 

lY. 

v.. 

IV- 

I. 
III. 



Art.I. 
Jaipes- 1. 
Chaw Iv 
Cha. IL 
Cba.L 
James IL 
^ary 
Int. 

Int. 

Cha. IL 
Cha. II. 
Cha. IL 
Cha. IL 
Eiiz. 
Cha. I. 



Class, fy. 

YIIL 

III. 

XL 
App. 

IX. 

IX. 

IV. 



IL 

IL 

IL 
IIL 
IX. 
IX. 
IV. 
IV. 
VII. 

IX. 
W. 
MI. 

yiL 
III. 

LV. 
IX. 



Page. 

118 
39 
3S7 
222 
26a 
141 
35 



XL 233 

XII. 20& 
— 57 



47 

47 
294 

'USA 

84 
201 

«d 

7 
ITS 

m 

17& 

m 



II. 
v. 



ji I ■ ii » > 






INDEX. 



263 



Jers, Richard • • • • . 

, William 

—, Philadelphia* 

e. sir Henry 

ridge, George 

;y, James Hay, baron of • • • . . 

er, sir Robert* • • * . . • . 

— , Elizabeth • 

md Sele, William Fines (Fien- 

0> viscount 

its. Old 

borough, sir Charles 

zius. See Shelley. 

, Thomas ••#••• 

» sir Thomas 

, lord Henry^ mih his mother 

us (Scot) Thomas 

gal, Henry • « • • • 

^g9,sir William 

op, Adrian • 

pe, Adrian* • • 

der, Henry ^ • « . . 

^etus, Abraham • • 

>rth, Kenneth, earl of 

)n, sir John 

wick, Obadiab 

zy, Catharine 

r, sir William 

ers, Gerard • 

sted,[ChristiaQ Thomson 

, Mogens • • . . 

, Hannibal . • . • • 

lelay, John Baptist Colbert, mar- 
liss of • 



Vol. 

V. 
V. 
V. 

11. 

V. 

II. 

VI. 

n. 



en,John*« •« 
r, Abednego 
an, John • • 



V. 

h 
VI. 

IL 
VL 

V. 

V. 
III. 

11. 

IL 
VI. 
III. 
III. 

V. 

II. 
HI. 
III. 

m. 

VI. 

Vi- 
lli. 

V. 

II. 



Beign, S^e. 

Cha. IL 

Cha. IL 
James I. 



II. Cha. I. 
I. Elie. 
VI Cha. II. 



Cha. IL 
Eliz. 

James IL 
James L 
James II. 

Cha. IL ' 
Cha. I. 
Cha. L 
James L 
James IL 
Cha. I. 
Int. 

Cha. II. 
James L 
Cha. I. 
Cha. L 
Cha. I. 
Cha. IL 

Cha. IL 
Cha, L 



IX. 

XL 
VHL 



James I. III. 

James IL VL 
James L XII. 



IIL 

XIL 

IX. 

VII. 

VIL 
XL 
IV. 
IV. 

vn. 

VIII. 
IV. 

App. 
IIL 
VII. 
IV. 
XL 
IX, 
X. 

App. 

App. 

App. 

App. 
VL 



James I. JKIL 



Page. 

302 
279 
3B6 
107 
346 
39 
115 
203 

312 
341 
208 

148 
289 
153 

69 
106 
121 
146 
112 
363 
282 

80 

74 
337 
381 
148 
173 
272 
273 

33 

41 

26 

216 

209 



264 



INDEX. 



Vol, Reign, ^c. 

Sennetere, Henry de* • • • III. Cha. I. 

Sermon, William • V. Cha. II. 

Sermons and preaching • . . . - 1. 

I. 

II. 

— : III. 

: III. 

Sermon printed in red letters • V. 

Serre, John Puget de la *•••*•••• II I« 

Seymour, Jane I. Hen. VIII. 

— -, Thomas, lord admiral ... I. Ed. VI. 

— — — , lady Catharine V. Cha. II. 

— , lady Frances III. Cha. I. . 

, sir Edward - VI. James II. 

— ' -, Francis, first lord IV. Cha. II. 

Shaftesbury, Anthony, earl of. ... . V. Cha: II. 

• , in Dorsetshire V. - . 

Shakspeare, William I> Eliz. 

— II. James I. 

Sharp, James V. Cha. II. 

Sharpe(or Scharpus), George HI* • Cha. I. 

yGregory V. . ' 

Sheffield, Edmund, baron of II. James I. 

Sheldon, Gilbert V. Cha. 11. 

• 

Shelley, sir Richard I* Eliz. 

Shelton, Thomas III. Cha. I. 

IV. Int. 

Sherley. See Shirley. 

Sherlocke, Richard V. Cha. II. 

Sherlock, William VI. James II. 

Sherman, Alice. See Perceval.' 

Sherwin, William V. Cha. II. 

Shirley, sir Anthony II. James I. 

f sir Robert II. James I. 

IV. Int. 

, James • . . • • • . . . . III. Cha. I. 

, lady (Tcresia) III. Cha. I. 



CUm, fy. 


Pagt. 


— 


271 


IX. 


210 




172 


— 


249 


— 


51 




17 


— 


343 




70 




262 


I. 


99 


II. 


166 


XI. 


372 


XI. 


224 


VIII. 


127 


ni. 


207 


VI. 


116 




100 


IX. 


310 


IX. 


122 


IV. 


20 


IX. 


120 


— 


336 


III. 


37 


IV. 


1 


VIII. 


296 


X. 


195 


X. 


76 


IV. 


48 


IV. 


100 


IV. 


85 


V. 


88 


V. 


88 


VII. 


17 


IX. 


129 


IX. 


228 



INDEX. 



265 



Vol. 

Sacks ; the occasion of that 

cllation V, 

► Jane I. 

sbury, John Talbot, earl of. . I. 

, George Talbot, earl of I, 

— — • , sixth 

lof I. 

, Anna Maria, countess 

V. 

, Elizabeth, countess of II. 

, Josiah II. 

;se Priest HI. 

s, Richard • II. 

ham, Cuthbert • HI. 

addles, their origin I. 

/. See Sedley. 

y, sir Henry I. 

-, sir Philip I. 

I. 

--, Henry V. 

-, or Sydney, Algernon. HI. 

III. 

— — V. 

-, Robert and Dorothy V. 

tphel V. 

[uund, the emperor * I. 

, Don Diego Guzman de L 

n, Thomas IV. 

-, Abraham V. 

nds, Thomas, &c. &c. See 
mon. 

ison, Edward • • • 11. 

, Sydrach HI. 

, Christopher . • IV. 

V. 

ington, Jane • « VI. 

ton, John ••••••• t I. 



^gn, ^c. C/aSf,^c. Pagt. 







70 


Art. I. 


XI. 


86 


Art. I. 


III. 


51 


Hen. VIII. 


III. 


116 


Eliz. 


H. 


236 


Cha. 11. 


XI. 


370 


James I. 


XI. 


170 


Cha. L 


IV. 


350 


Ch^. I. 


App. 


283 


Cha. I. 


IV. 


357 


Int. 


IV. 


335 






151 
240 


Eliz. 


II. 


Eliz. 


VH. 


286 


Eliz. 


IX. 


313 


Cha. II. 


VIII. 


165 


Cha. I. 


VII. 


81 


Int. 


V. 


358 


Cha. II. 


IX. 


292 


Cha. II. 


VIII. 


165 
243 






Art. I. 


App. 


89 


Eliz. 


App. 


352 


Int. 


X. 


73 


Cha. II. 


X. 


328 


Cha. L 


IV. 


361 


Int. 


IV. 


325 


Int. 


X. 


74 


Cha. II. 


X. 


341 


James IL 


XI. 


160 


Hen. VIII. 


IV. 


130 



266 



INDEX. 



VoL JReign, S;e. 

SkippoD, Philip III. Cha. I. 

Slade, John I. Eliz. 

Slanning, sir Nicholas III. Cha. I. 

Slater, William • II. James I. 

Sleidan, John I. Hen. VIII. 

Slingsby, sir Henry IV. Int. 

Smart, Peter II. Cha. I. 

Smith, sir Thomas I. Ed. VI. 

• I. 

I. Eliz. 

, Henry I. Eliz. 

, sir Thomas II. James I. 

, captain John* II. James I. 

, Margaret • • . • III. Cha. I. 

, Richard • II. James I. 

V. Cha. II. 

, Henry • III. Cha. I. 

— '■ — , Erasmus • V. Cha. II. 

, madam V. Cha. 11. 

Smokers of Tobacco VI. 

Smyth, William I. Hen. VIII. 

Snape, Andrew V. Cha. II. 

Snell, John V. Cha. II. 

Soams, madam VI. James II. 

Soeur Hubert le. See La Soeur. 

Soly, Arthur V. Cha. II. 

Somers, John VI. James II. 

Somerset, John Beaufort, earl of* • • I. Art. I. 
— • • • I. Art. I. 

, first duke 

of I. Art. I. 

, Edward Seymour, duke 

of I. Ed. VI. 

I. 

— , Anne Stanhope, dutchess 

of I. Ed. VI. 

, Robert Carr, carl of* • . • 'II» James I, 



Clau, Sfc, 


Pagt. 


VII. 


69 


XIL 


341 


VII. 


40 


IV. 


65 


A pp. 


156 


VIII. 


19 


IV. 


352 


V. 


177 


IX. 


181 


V. 


277 


IV. 


264 


V. 


84 


VII. 


102 


XI. 


231 


IV. 


79 


VIII. 


186 


VIII. 


107 


vni. 


179 


XI. 


385 




90 


IV. 


123 


IX. 


296 


VIII. 


194 


XI. 


161 


X. 


333 


VI. 


116 


I. 


38 


II. 


48 



II. 46 

II. 164 

VII. 178 

XI. 183 

n. 36 



4NDEX. 



267 



VoLu 

ety Frances, countess of • • • • 11. 
— , William Seyoiqur, chikc 

IV, 

— , Sarah, dutchess of V. 

— » the dutchess of* ••-••• •• V. 

— -^ Charlesy duke of. • VI. 

;rs, Will. I. 

r, William III. 

, princess ^ . . . . If. 

re, Samuel VL 

Robert V. 

impton, William FifzwilUam, 

of L 

, Thomas Wriothesley, . 

of I. 

— , Henry Wriothesley, 

o^ 11. 

-— , Elizabeth, countess 

^ III. 

— , Rachel, countess of ' III. 

— ' , Thomas Wriothesley, 

of IV. 

well', sir Robert* V, 

eim, Frederick III. 

, Edward V. 

5W, John . . • .' • IV. 

I, John III. 

Samuel • . V. 

lan, sir Henry HI, 

:er, Edmund I. 

— , sir Richard* .•..•••..... II. 

— , Benjamin III. 

-, John V. 

— , Robert, first baron* II. 

swoode, John • • • • II. 

;ge, sir Edward • * • * V. 



Reign, Sic 

James P. 

Cha. II. 
Cha. II. 
Cha. II. 
James II. 
Hen. VIII. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. II. 



Cloit. 

XI. 

HI. 
XI. 
XI. 

in. 

XII. 
IX. 

I. 

App. 
IV. 



Hen. VIII. H. 



Ed. VI. 



James I. 



in. 



Page. 

173 

155 

352 

353 

70 

149 

15a 

272 

46 

35 



II. 168 



30 



Cha. I. 


XI. 


210 


Cha. I. 


XI. 


211 


Cha. II. 


n. 


138 
205 
278 


Cha. I. 


App. 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


47 


Int. 


IX. 


48 


Cha. r. 


m. 


146 


Cha. H. 


IX. 


258 


Cha. I. 


IX. 


150 


Eliz. 


IX. 


309 


James I. 


VIII. 


106 


Int. 


IV. 


328 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


26 


Cha. I. 


ni. 


328 


Cha. I. 


IV. 


342 


Cha. II. 


vn. 


167 



2G8 INDEX. 

Yd. Rii^, 4e. Clam, Iff. Vff. 



An. I. 


VII 


Cba. II. 


VIII 


Cha. II. 


III 


Cba. 1. 


X 


Cba. I. 


HI 


Cha.JI. 


XI 


Hen. VIII. 


IX. 


Cha. II. 


XI 



Spral, 

HiRcy, Edward ■ ■ ■ • IV 

Slacpoule, sir Richard I 

Hlafford, Robert V, 

, William, viicouut •■ IV. 

Sfalbeiit, AdritD • Ill, 

Stamford, Henry Orey, earl of ■ ■ ■ • II 

— -•, the couDteu of- • • • V. 

SiiMil.ri.lKr. John ■■ ■.-•. I. 

81hii1io|ic (CathariDe), lad)' V. 

Suiiier, lir ftichurd IV. Inl. 

UlBiiicr, Jainos Ill, Cha. I. 

Stanley, Tliuiiius IV. lot. 

Stanhg, William, and Stavclg, Tko~ 

mat eoi^o»nded V. 

Slaplcdon, or Slapyledon, Walter- • I. Art. I. 

Sl«|ilelon, Tliomaa I. Eliz. . 

, «r Philip III. Cha. i, 

, «r 7%o«Mr< V. ^— 

S(a|>ylton, «lr Robert III. Cha. I. 

: IV. Int. 

Staveley, Thomas V. Cba. II. 

Sleenwyrk, Henry III. Cha. I. 

Sk-iiuy thrmigii' ellkatappetUtiam 

t^lAtAtkrt/Bmckimskam 11. 

Slephen, king I. Art. I. 

Nh^Am*.#>rfrr V. 

$leveii««n. Matthew V, Cha. II. 

Sttpmrit/mmit], III. 

Slerliuf, WilKam AleuMler, eari 



SM'rae, Rtchafd 

Sieamrt. Wy Abeia 

SivMard. RMnnl. D. D. 

$ltU. JiIm. fatUH>t> oT Balk aW Wclb 
SKutmn. TMat 



cb..n. 


IV 


EIU. 


XI 


Cta-L 


IT. 



INDEX. 



269 



Vol, Reign, ^c. Class, 3fc. Page, 



\g, William Alexander, earl of. 
Sterling. 

, Richard II. 

5, William HI. 

, Nicholas, sen. •» II. 

— : , jun. • • III. 

—*——-, Henry III. 

r family y. 

Jpha I. 

ling^ George* « • • • V. 

ord, Thomas Wentworth, earl 

•• II. 

3;ewaj8, Giles* « V. 

— ^-^..v III. 

ler, Allen I, 

ter, or Streeter, Robert V. 

:, sir Thomas* ••*.•.... i ... . VL 

imore, Patrick, earl of VI. 

rer, Nathaniel VI. 

e, sir George IV. 

t, Joseph* • . • k • . • • I. 

t^Anbella •• v*^***.***.** IL 
•, the lord Jolin, and the lord 

mard* • • « • . • • JI. 

>es, Henry III. 

— ................. V. 

ay,, Samuel •••••••.•.•«...• . Y. 

, the historical, its corruption II. 

ling, sir John* * HI. 

III. 

ury, Simon ..jft**-**^.. •••••• I, 

Ik,. Charles Brand0D; duke of.* I. 

— , Frances, dutchess of • • • • • L 

— , Dorothy, countess of III. 

— , Thomas Howard, earf of • * II. 

— » countess of •••« ••*• , II. 

»L. VI. 2 N 



James I. 


IV. 


71 


Cha. I. 


X, 


197 


James I. 


X. 


163 


Cha. I. 


X. 


186 


Cha.L 


X. 


177 






2» 
820 


£liz. 


IX. 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


26 


Cha. I. 


III. 


304 


Cha. II. 


V. 


134 




VII. 
X. 


40 
83 


Art. L 


Cha. II. 


X. 


300 


James II. 


VL 


117 


James II. 


in. 


80 


James II. 


X. 


143 


Int. 


IX. 


49 

15 

187 


James I. 


XL 


Gba. I. 


IIL 


310 


Int. 


IV. 


331 


Cha-U. 


IV. 


77 


Cha.IL 


IX. 


280 

140 

60 


Cha. I. 


VII. 




IX. 


127 
65 


Art. I. 


IV. 


Hen. VIII. ; 


I. 


J03 


Eliz. 


XI. 


396 


Cha. I. ' 


XL 


214 


James I. \ 


11. 


20 


James L 


XI. 


181 



270 



INDEX. 



VoL 
Sully. See Rosni. 
Sunderland, Henry Spencer, first 

earl of II. 

, Robert, earl of • • • • • • IV. 

^^ , Dorothy, countess of III. 

— : , Anne, countess of • • • V. 

Surplice III. 

Surry, Thomas Holland, duke of • • • I. 

, Henry Howard, earl of* • • • • I. 

Sussex, Robert Ratcliffe, earl of • • • I. 
, Frances Sidney, countess 

of I. 

, Henry Ratcliffe, earl of • • • I. 

Sutton, sir Richard I. 

— '■ , Dr. Thomas • • II. 

, Thomas • • • • • II. 

Sweet, father • • • • U. 

Sybrecht, John VI. 

Sydenham, Thomas V. 

Sydney.. See Sidney. 

Sylvester, Joshua II. 

Sylvius, ^neas - I; 

Sym, John • IK 

Symonds, Joseph III. 

Tadlow.Dr. V. 

Talbot, John I. 

, sir Gilbert I, 

Tallis, Thomas I. 

Tapestry of the house of lords with 

various heads I. 

Tarlton, Richard . . • I. 

Tastey remarks on it** V. 

Tatham, John • IV. 

Taylor, Thomas II. 

, Jeremy • III. 

V. 



Mgn, 3ff . 


CUm, fy. 


Pap. 


Cha. I. 


IIL 


308 


Cha.IL 


III. 


178 


Cha. I. 


XI. 


218 


Cha. II. 


XI. 


367 






260 


Art. I. 


II. 


46 


Hen. VIII. 


III. 


113 


Hen. VIII. 


II. 


111 


Eliz. 


XL 


335 


Mary 


III. 


191 


Hen. VIII. 


VIII. 


138 


James I. 


IV. 


66 


James I. 


VIII. 


110 


James I. 


IV. 


79 


James II. 


X. 


145 


Cha. II. 


IX. 


212 


James I. 


IX. 


130 


Art. I. 


App. 


93 


Cha. I. 


IV. 


tm 


Int. 


IV. 


840 






374 
51 


Art. I. 


III. 


Art. I. 


V. 


70 


Eliz. 


X. 


333 






SfiO 


£lis. 


IX. 


327 






311 


Int 


IX. 


42 


Cha. I. 


IV. 


359 


Int 


IV. 


319 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


21 



INDEX. 



271 



VoL 

»r, John II, 

lell, Roger, &c. VI. 

lest, Pearce VI, 

lie, sir Alexander 11. 

-— , Susannah, lady Thornhurst, 

y Lister III. 

— , sir Peter IV. 

— , Eleanor, lady IV. 

— , sir William V, 

V. 

;, Henry V. 

', Edward III. 

lie, or Tisdale, Thomas I. 

estane, John Maitland, lord* • • I. 

las, Lambrook • • • • • III. 

ison, John III. 

— r— , George • V. 

, Richard V. 

iuSf Ralph II. 

nhill^ Cooper HI. 

r, Tage 11. 

kmorton, Sir Nicholas I. 

gmorton, Anne I. 

low, or Thurloe, John • III. 

ne, Thomas V. 

[)orne, Robert • • . • V. 

sley, sir Thomas IV. 

Ison, John V. 

VI. 

n, Henry VI. 

ale, or Tindall, William I. 

I, sir Henry I. 

\,col III. 

IV. 

xco, king Jame8*s apophthegm 

ueming it II. 



James I. 
James II. 
James II. 
James I. 

Cha.I. 
Int. 
Int. 
Cha. II. 



Clou, S;c. 

IX. 

XII. 

X. 

VUI. 

XI. 

VIII. 

XL 

V. 



Cha. H. 


VII. 


Int. 


IV. 


James I. 


VI n. 


Eliz. 


III. 


Int. 


IV. 


Cha. I. 


IX. 


Cha. II. 


IX. 


Ch^a. II. 


X. 






James I. 


App. 


Eliz. 


V. 


Eliz. 


XI. 


Int. 


V. 


Cha. IL 


VUI. 


Cha. II. 


VIII. 


Int. 


VII. 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


James II. 


IV. 


James II . 


X. 


Hen. VIIL 


IV. 


Eliz. 


VIII. 







Pagi. 

134 
173 
147 
109 

228 
22 
88 
104 
291 
164 

327 
112 
247 
324 
163 
224 
347 
235 
106 
234 
279 
338 
352 
176 
171 
3 
22 
90 
145 
126 
301 
295 
197 

117 



Vol. BtigH, ftc. 
TobtKco, when mmck mted by tun of 

eminetut VT. — ^^ 

Tomkini, Mr. III. Clia. I. 

Tomliosoa, Richard IV. Int. 

Tonson, Jacob V. Cha. II. 

Tooke, George HI. Cha. I. 

TonslatI, Clithberl • • • • • I. Hen. VIII. 

Topkam, Richard •••■■ V. 

Torreulius, John • - III. Cha. I. 

Totnes, George Carew, earl of* II. Cha. I. 

Townley, Mr.... V. - — — 

ToWnshend, Charles VI. James II. 

. , George, lord HI. 

. -, Dorothy, lady VI. James II. 

Tttdescaot, John, the etderr HI. Cha; I. 

•-" , the younger . * . . . IIL Cha. 1. 

, Heslber V. Cha. II. 

Trail, Rohert V. Cha. 11. 

lytmsftttienof the Mood ".••'■ .•. HI. 

Trapnel, Hannah -■.... IV. Int. 

Trtpp, John • III. Int. 

~r- — .Joteph HI. - — — 

Traquatr, John Stewart, earl «f • • • . ■ H- Cha. 1. 
Travels, hook* oj, useful to illuthrate 

the Scripture ■ H. 

TrChearne, John k . . . . H. Jatnea I. 

Trelawney, Jonathan * . . ■ VI. James H. 

Trelcatiuti, Lucas .....<.... I, Eljjg. 

Tremouille, Henry Charles de IV. int. 

Trench, Edmund V. Cha. II. 

Tresliam, Francis II. James I. 

Treslon, John de ■ H. Cba. I. 

Trevannion, col. John HI. Cba. 1 ' 

TYiera o/minitten ■ V. ■ — 

Trillick, Thomas, dean of St. Paul's I. Art. I. 

Trivet, Nicholas I. Art. I. 



VIII. 


97 


IV. 


181 


_ 


274 


X. 


180 


HI. 


»00 





Hi 


VIII. 


i«j 



XI. 

IV. 



App. 
App. 



INDEX. 



273 



Vol, Reign, Sfc. ClaUfS^e, Page* 



). See Van Tromp, 

jull, William 11. James I. 

ley, Anthony V. Cha. IL 

sh rope-dancer III. Cha. II. 

r, Anthony V. Cha. IL 

-, Anne* • ^ II. James I. 

-, sir James V. Cha. II. 

-, Robert ♦... V. Cha. IL 

-, Turner James # • . . . VI. Cha. IL 

-> Francis * VI. James IL 

)r> sir Christopher • • • . V. Cha. IL 

— j sir Edmund- • •*.••. V. Cha. IL ^ 

— , Mrs VL James II. 

ill. See Tindaie. 

»nnel> Richard Talbot^ earl 

• VL James IL 

innel, Frances Jennings, dutch- 

of V. Cha.IL 

len, sir Thomas V. Cha. IL 

J, Michael • . . . . V. • — — — 

LANT, Warrer * . . . . V. Cha. IL 

-— , Mrs. *.... V. 

eck, Barbara* •• i..... IV. Int. 

ZJleeve, Joas ••...• I. Maty 

erbor(;ht, Henry • HI. Cha. I. 

IIL Cha. L 

erdort, Abraham IIL Cha. I. 

e Velde, William, sen. ..*.... V- Cha. IL 

■■■ -, WiUiam V. Cha. IL 

.«...., VL James IL 

Diest, Adrian V. Cha. IL 

lerbanc, or Vandrebanc, Peter . V, Cha. IL 

lun, Cornelius • « • • L Eliz. 

lyck, sir Anthony IIL Cha. L 

, sir Henry, the younger III. Cha. L 



V. 


OT 


IV. 


61 


XII. 


267 


IV. 


96 


XII. 


208 


VII, 


138 


IX. 


286 


XII. 


14 


IV. 


91 


VI. 


126 


V. 


111 


X. 


164 



II. 



68 



XL 


384 


VL 


128 


— 


336 


X. 


334 


XL 


398 


XII. 


98 


X. 


208 


X. 


177 


X. 


182 


X. 


181 


X. 


318 


X. 


319 


X. 


145 


X. 


818 


X. 


331 


VIIL 


302 


X. 


171 


V. 


8 



VcL lUgn.Sie. Clau, tfe. Pagi. 

VnDe, sir Henry, (be youi^er IV. Int. IX. 49 

, .the elder III. Cfca. I. V. 6 

Vansomer, Paul 11. James I. X. 160 

V. Cba.II. X. 388 

Van Son, or VaniooD V. CUa. II. X. 821 

Van Tromp, Cornelius VI. Cba.II. App. 37 

Van Voerst. See Voerst. 

Varin, JohD HI. Cba. I. X. 186 

Vaughao. Richard H- James I. IV. 48 

.sir John V. Cha. U. VI. 123 

.Robert IV. Int. X. 74 

Vaux, Nicholas, lord I- Hen. VIII. II. Ill 

Veer, sir Horace. See Vere. 

Venn, John V. Cha. II. VIII. 200 

Venner, Tobias IV. Int. . IX. 33 

. .Thomas VI. .-Cba.II. XII. » 

Venning, Ralph V; Cba.II. IV. 76 

Vere, sir Horace II. James I. VII. 99 

, sir Francis I. Elii. VII. 288 

, (Mary) lady II. James I. XI. 180 

Vemey, sir Edmund HI. Cha. I. VII. 46 

.William V. Cba.II. VIII. 168 

.sirGrevile V. Cba-II. VIII. 168 

Verrio V. Cba.II. X. 810 

l^enbaeh, Conrad ^ I. Preftce — %mi 

Vien-Ville, marquis de III. Cba. I. App. 271 

Villiers, lord Francis. SeeBuking- i 

bam. 

— , sir George H. James I. VIII. lOS 

Vincent, Nalbaniel V. Cha. II. IV. 78 

, Tftoauu V. — 79 

Viner, sir Robert V. Cha. II. VIII. 168 

Violamte, Signer and Signorm VI. — 171 

Virgil, Poljdore I. Hen. VIII. IV. ISO 

riri,tlieecMHUude III. — 147 

Vitus. See White. 



INDEX. 



275 



Vol. 

John Lewis *• • • • • I. 

; Elizabeth of Clare, countess 

I. 

•hill.Cave VI. 

t, Robert Van III. 

re, Vincent III. 

erman, Luke • III. 

linous authors censured V. 

js, Gerard John II. 

his method of 

ting MSS.for the press II. 

t, Simon • II. 

1, Peter ^..... IV. 

Uy Henry Cornelius I. 

liart, or Urchard, sir Thomas III. 

rin, Barbara •• IV. 

•, James » . • • . II. 

— in. 

ncky Christopher, D. D. • • • • • I- 

loviuSy Charles • I. 

D, or Waad, sir William II« 

lam^ Nicholas ••••••••• II. 

— , Dorothy • II. 

worth, Thomas* •••••••' V. 

'^ sir Isaac I. 

; Anne • • III. 

5, the prince of • • • • VI. 

er, sir Edward III. 

— , Robert IV. 

— , William V- 

— , sir Edward • • . • V. 

, Dr. John V. 

ace, William • I. 

er, sir William • . . III. 

V. 

— , Edmund ••••••••••••••• III. 



Reigti, ^c. Clou, ^c. Page. 

Hen. Vni. IX. 144 



Art. I. 


XI. 


85 


James II. 


X. 


151 


Cha. I. 


X. 


189 


Cha. I. 


App. 


279 


Cha. L 


X. 


188 

355 

356 
236 


Cba.L 


IV. 


James I. 


App. 


Int. 


X. 


78 


Eliz. 


X. 


330 


Cha. I. 


IX. 


160 


Int. 


XII. 


98 


Cha. I. 


IV. 


343 


Int. 


IV. 


317 


Hen. VIII. 


IV. 


127 


EUz. 


App. 


355 


James I. 


VIII. 


108 


James I. 


VIII. 


112 




XI. 
IV. 


182 
75 


Cha. II. 


, 


— 


259 


Cha. I. 


XL 


232 


James 11. 


I. 


55 


Cha. I. 


IX. 


148 


Int. 


X. 


72 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


51 


Cha. II. 


V. 


109 

336 

73 


Art. I. 


vn. 


Cha. I. 


VII. 


66 


Cha. IL 


IX. 


264 




IX. 


125 



276 INDEX. 

Fill. Reign, Ift. CJou.V- P<V- 

Waller, Edmimd IV. Int. ' IX: M 

V. Cha. II. IX. 248 

Wallingford, William Knollea, vis- 
count II. Jmnes I. III. 9S 

Wallis.John V. Cha. 11, IV. 46 

WaJpole, sir Eilward V. Cha. II. VIII. 188 

— . — -., Horace I. — 28 

Waisingham, sir Francis I. Eii'z. V. 877 

Walter,, Lucy, or WoUtm V. Cha. 11. XI. 391 

Walton.Brian HI. Inf. IV. 819 

Walworth, sir William I. Art. I. VITI. 75 

WaJwyn, Robert V. Cha. II. TV. M 

— ", William V. Cha. II. IX. «8 

Wmndermg Jew I. ■ — — 68 

Ward, Seth V. Cha. II. IV. 18 

Wards, the court of HI. — 106 

Ware, sir James • - ■ IV. 

Warham, William I. 

WariDg, William V. 

Warner; John HI. 

, lady Trevor V. 

, Mrs. Anne V. 

Warren, Edwardus de Poynton* • ■ ■ 11: 

Warwick, Henry Beaucfaamp,ddce of I. 

— , Thomas Beaoehamp, earl 

of. I. 

■' — , Richard Beanchamp, eari 

of I. 

^-~ , Richard Neyrlle, eari of- • I- 

— — - — , John Dudley; earl of. • 



Int 


IX. 


Urn. VIII. 


IV. 


Ch^ II, 


IV. 


Int. 


IV. 


Cha. II. 


XI. 


Cba. II. 


XI. 


Junes I. 


IX. 


Art. I. 


II. 



I; 

— -, Ambrose Dudley, earl of- !■ ' 
— , Robert Rich, ear! of- . • • H. 

— ,slrPhilip V. 

, Edward Rich, earl of • . • IV. 

— , Mary, coontesi dowager of V. 



, Elizabeth, conntesa of.. 



Art. I. 


n. 


49 


Art. i. 


n. 


49 


EJ.Vl. 


n. 


1« 




Vll. 


171 


EBa. 


ni. 


24S 


Cba. I. 


II. 


an 


Cba. II. 


IX. 


an 


Cba. 11. 


m. 


170 


Cba. II. 


XI. 


36B 


Cba. I. 


XI. 


S18 



ngton, Elizabeth IV. 

, Christopher IV. 

bouse, Edward V. 

■a, Thomas V. 

, Richard I. 

fleet, William 1. 

er, captain Thomas HI. 

e, George II. 

ler, John III. 

— , sir John .V. 

eriin> George Rodolph ■ III. 

er, John III. 

f.Henry III. 

north, Darcy • r II. 

, lady Henrietta Maria VI. 

ly, Samuel VI. 

norelaod, Ralph Neville, earl of I. 

^ -, Mildmajr Fane,earlaf II. 

on, Thomas V, 

>haliug, Herbert I. 

nhall, Edward V. 

ton, Philip, lord II. 

— , Philadelphia and Elizabeth HI- 

— , George III. 

V. 

IV. 

tonus. See Wharttin. 

eUe^ 'William.. II. 

er^ sir George. ............. VI. 

bcot, Benjamin*. • V. 

:aker, William 1. 

, Tobias V. 

e, sir Thomas I. 

-, Francis 11. 

-,Jobn 11. 

-, Thomas II. 

-.Robert V. 

IL. VI. 2o 



Int. 
Int. 

Cha. II. 
Cha. II. 
Ed. VI. 
Art. I. 
Cha. 1. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. II. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
James I. 
James II. 
Jaoies II. 
Hen. Vill. 
Cla. I. 
Cha. II. 
EJiz. . 
Cha. II. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. 1. 



IV, 

VIU. 
IV. 
IX. 
IV. 

vni. 

Vlll. 
VIII. 

IX. 
VIII. 
VIII. 

XI. 

IX. 

n. 
III. 



37 

274 



17a 
67 



167 
107 
152 
102 
109 
158 
140 
112 
289 
34& 
266 
22 
31& 
220 



Cha. I. 


IV. 


370 


James II. 


IV. 


102 


Clia. U. 


IV. 


43 


Elii. 


IV. 


260 


Cha. 11. 


IX. 


312 


Mary 


Vlll. 


306 


James I. 


IV. 


61 


James I. 


IV. 


62 


Cha. I. 


IV. 


382 


Ctia. 11. 


X. 


331 



Val, lUign, lie.' 

White, Tliomas VI. Jamei U. 

— — , Jeremiah VI. James II. 

Whitehead, David I. Eli«. 

Whitgift, John I. EMe. 

Whitinglon, Richard I. Art. I. 

Whitlock, Bulstrode HI- Int. 

V. Cha. II. 

Whitoey, James VI. lamei II. 

"WhoU duty of Mim." SeeFu/own. 

Whyte, Richard I. El'«- 

Wickham, William of I. Art. I. 

Wickliffe, John I- Art. I. 

Wight, John I- El'«- 

Wightwick, Richard "• Jamei I. 

Wild, Jonathan^ <m anecdote of him II. 

WlldmaD, msgor IV. Int. 

Wilkios.John V. Cha. II. 

Wilkinson, Henry H- Cha. I. 

Willan, Leonard - IV. Int. 

Willet, Andrew "• ^amw I. 

William tlie Conqueror I* *"• I- 

~ king of Scotland." I- Art. I. 

Wiliiams,John "• James I. 

, II. CJm.1. 

_: -^—.William.. • IV- Int. 

.Martha V. Cha. II. 

,lady{Mr8.) • V. Cba, II. 

Willis, sir Richard V. Cba. II. 

.Thomas V, Ch«. II. 

Willoughby, lord, of Eresby IH- Cha. I. 

.ofParham HI- Cha- 1. 

Willisford, Thomas ^V- I"'- 

Willughby, sir Francis •••■ IV. Int. 

Wilmot, lady Elisabeth VI. JamesU. 

Wilson, Thomas H- '""" I- 

, John V. Cha. II. 



INDEX. 



279 



Vol, Reign, S^c, Class, S^c, Page, 

Wilson, Beau • VL Cha.II. XII. 25 

Wilton, Penelope, countess of IV. Int. XI. ^78 

Winchester, Williaoi Paulet, marquis 

of I. Eliz. II. 227 

— , John Paulet, marquis of II. Cha. I. III. 288 

, Charles^ marquis of • • • VI. James II. III. 73 

Wind, Holger III. Cha. I. App. 279 

Windebank, sir Francis .......... III. Cha. I. V. 1 

Windham, Thomas V. Cha.II. VIII. 19a 

, Anne VI. James IL XL 160 

Wiodwood, sir Ralph •• • II. James I. V. 83 

Wing, Vincent V. Cha. II. IX. 277 

Winstanley, William V. Cha. II. IX. 270 

VI. James II. IX. 141 

Winter, Thomas II. James I. XII. 193 

«—, Robert II. James I. XII. 194 

Wirtemberg, Frederick, duke of. 
See Frederick. 

Wiieheart^ George III. — 

Wissing, William V. Cha.II. X. 

Witches of New England VI. — 

Wither, George II. James I. IX. 

K III. Cha. I. IX. 

— — ' IV. Int. IX. 

Witherington, Francis, lord m. Int. HI. 

Witness^ tf fraudulent testimonj/ of 

one II. — 

Witt, Nat. III. Cha. I. XII. 

Wittie, Robert .. - V. Cha.II. IX. 

Wodenote, Theophilus • II. James I. IV. 

Wolf, Reynold I. Hen. VIII. X. 

Wolsev, Thomas I. Hen. VIII. IV. 

Wolveridge, James • • V. Cha. II. IX. 

Women of the town • - • * • VI. — 

Wood, sir William V. Cha.II. IX. 

Woodall,John III. Cha. I. IX. 

Woodcock, Martin II. Cha. I. IV. 



280 



INDEX. 



Vol. 

Woofe, Abraham . . . • • IV. 

Woodlarke, Robert I. 

Wooley , Hannah V. 

Woolrich, Philip V, 

Worcester, Charles Somerset, first 

earl of -i ••••^ • ' I. 

Worcester, Edward Somerset, earl 

. of ••. II. 

, Henry, marquis of II. 

, Edward Somerset, mar- • 

' qiiis of III. 

, Charles, marquis of • • • • VI. 

Worde, Wynkeu de • I. 

Wormberg, John • VI, 

Wormius, Olaus III. 

Worsley, sir James ..••••.. VI. 

Worthington, father • II. 

Worlley, sir Francis III. 

Wotton, sir Henry HI. 

Wouters, Francis •*••• III. 

Wray, sir Christopher I. 

Wren, Matthew • II. 

, Christopher, D. D. II. 

, sir Christopher • V. 

Wright, Dr. II. 

^, Robert • •• II. 

, John II, 

, Christopher H. 

, Peler HI. 

, sir Robert • • • • VI. 

Writings of various kinds and in 

different ages II. 

W. T. (T. Weaver) captain III. 

Wulfstan, archbishop of York I. 

Wyatt, sir Thomas ' I. 

, sir Thomas^ the younger • • • • I. 

Wycherley, William V, 



Reigttt ^c. 
Int. 
Art. I. 
Cha. II. 
Cha.II. 

Hen.VIH. 

James I. 
Cha. I. 

Int. 

James II. 
Hen. Vin. 
James II. 
Cha. I. 
James II. 
James I. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
Eliz. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. I. 
Cha. II. 
James I. 
James I. 
James I. 
James I. 
Int. IV. 
James II. 



Claa, S^c. 

' XII. 

IV. 

IX. 

VHI. 



P^ge. 
100 

68 

308 

187 



Cha. I. 
Art. I. 
Hen. VIII. 
Mary- 
Cha. II. 



II. 112 



II. 

in. 

III. 

in. 

X. 
XII. 
App. 
VIII. 

IV. 

IX. 

IX. 
X. 

VI. 

IV. 

IV. 
X. 

IV. 

IV. 
XII. 
XII. 

IV. 

VI. 



IX. 
IV. 
IX. 
IX. 
IX. 



21 
292 

307 

73 

146 

172 

281 

129 

80 

136 

156 

179 

283 

338 

348 

827 

78 

51 

196 

197 
348 
118 

166 
139 
65 
142 
206 
248 



Wyck, Thomas'. V. 

.John VI. 

Wyghte. See Wight. 
WykeUam. See Wickham. 
Wj/ket, nomas, dean of Burien, a 

Mtory of km V, 

Wynne, sir John II, 

. sir Richard II. 

Yarmouth, Robert earl of IV. 

YarrantoH, Andrew' V. 

Yelvis, sir Jervis II. 

Yeomsns, Robert III. 

York, Edoiunil de Langley, duke of I- 

, Richard Plantagenet, duke of I- 

, Cecily Nevil, dulchess of . • • I. 

, James, duke of II. 

. : II. 

■■''-■ ^— —- . See James. IV. 

, Anne Hyde, dulchess of • . • . IV. 

, James III. 

Yonng, John V. 

Zebelika V. 

Zoucb, Edward, lord II. 

Zonal, Gerard V. 

Zucchero, Frederic I. 

Znrch, Hans van • . I. 



Cha. II. 
James 11. 



148 
144 



James I. 


XII. 


S04 


Ch.. I. 


VIII. 


lis 


Art. I. 
Art. I. 




23 
24 


Art. 1. 




25 


Cha. I. 




254 




VII. 


150 


Cha. II. 




124 


Cha. II. 




127 


Cha. I. 


IX. 


168 


Cha. II. 


IV. 


82 


Cha. II. 


X. 


346 


Jamei I. 


III. 


40 


cm. II. 


X. 


315 


Eliz. 


X. 


829 


Hen. VIII. 


X. 


146 



Printed by J. F. Dov i, St. John's Squa