(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "A Book of Cooking and Pastry: A Collection of Original Receipts Gathered ..."

Google 



This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for general ions on library shelves before il was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 

to make the world's books discoverable online. 

Il has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 

to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 

are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often diflicult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other marginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 

publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing this resource, we have taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parlies, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 
We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the plus We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attribution The Google "watermark" you see on each file is essential for informing people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a b<x>k is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 

countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means il can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's hooks while helping authors ami publishers reach new audiences. You can search through I lie lull text of this book on I lie web 
at |http : //books . qooqle . com/| 






Schlesinger Library 
Radcliffe College 



Culinary Collection 

From the Collection of 
Sophie Coe 




\y£, 



^ 






/ KL^ <£,<•* ' * e * L ' 



■/ t' / 



/ 



* 



C't 0t *-»?*** ** - ' c ^ 



act,C {--"' 






/>«• 






/ - /■•/^ 



V 



^ 



/, 



.-/• 



/ 



'?r/.' / .. 



5" •'••  '.£ i- 




*>■ ^ '.. 



' .* 



,/ 



V / 



,*« ' ■' >f 



o; 



' x - 



j. 



/• ^ 



I 



/ 



/ 



/ 



■^ 



> 



> 



!» 



A BOOK OF 



COOKIN G^P A S T R Y 



A Collection of Original Receipts Gathebbd Dubing a 
Life Time and Especially Arranged 

FOR FAMILY USE 



PROF. 0. F. PPAU, 

Professional and Practical Caterer. 
Authob of The Pbaotioal Pastby Cook and Designs for 

Table Obnaments and Pyramids. 



Fobmebly Professional Caterer with Rhetnhardt, Paris; 

Marquardt, Studtgard; Maillabd, New York; 

John Wright and Kinsley, Chicago, and 

Blbinau Bros,, New Orleans. 



QUINCY, ILL.: 

CADOGAN & HATCHER, PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

1887. 



WI.5 



OOPYBIGHTED, 1887, 

o. p\ f: 



^r 1 



v. ' -* • < 



INDEX. 



PAGE. 

ALMONDS, to blanche and macerate 18 

BEEF Stock •. 27 

Baked Calves Brains 40 

BREAD 73 

Soft ginger bread 77 

Almond Bread 77 

Corn Bread 86 

Steamed Brown Bread 86 

Boston Brown Bread 86 

Breaded Spring Chicken 39 

Bisquit Glace 71 

Blancmange 68 

Blancmange, Cream or Milk 68 

Butter, Cooking 17 

Butter, to Cream 17 

Butter, to Keep 17 

Butter, Maitre D'Hotel 17 

Butter, Plain 17 

CAKES, PASTRY AND BREAD 73 

Plain Coffee Cake 74 

Fine coffee cake 74 

Light coffee cake 74 

Streusel coffee cake 74 

Apple cake 75 

Roll coffee cake 75 

Savarin cake 75 

Tea Cakes, Remarks on 75 

Plain sugar cake or cookies 76 

Tea cakes 76 

Shrewsberry cakes 76 

Butter Tea S 77 

Cup cakes 77 

Queen cakes 77 

Strawberry short cake 82 

Loaf and Layer Cakes, Remarks on 82 

Directions for making cake 82 

Vienna cake 83 

American pound cake 83 

Fruit cake 83 

White cake, lady cake, silver cake 83 



[6] 



PAGE. 

Filbert cake 84 

Almond cake 84 

Chocolate cake. 84 

Bread Cake 84 

Light Sand cake 84 

Punch cake 84 

Portugese cake 86 

Regent cake 85 

Fried cake 86 

Fine fried cake 86 

' Griddle cake, (self-rising) 86 

Ginger snaps 76 

Nelson Tart 85 

Angel Food, (original) 85 

Fine Waffles 85 

Snow Waffles 85 

Ginger nuts 77 

Almond snaps 76 

Jumbles 76 

Yeast, Remarks on 73 

Wafers % 77 

Almond Croquet % 78 

Cocoanut Drops 78 

Plain Macaroons 78 

Chocolate Macaroons 78 

Cinnamon Strips 78 

Almond cornets 78 

Shavings 78 

Cream puffs 79 

Eclaires 79 

Merengue or Kiss Batter 79 

Puff Paste 79 

Patty Shells 79 

Cream Patties 80 

Turnovers 80 

Sweet short crust 82 

Fancy Apple Tarts 82 

Raised Muffins 86 

Muffins 87 

Buns and Rolls 74 

COLD FRUIT DISHES 34 

Almond Milk 34 

Mazitana from Mixed Fruit 84 

Oranges, Cake Croutons 84 

Pine Apple 34 

Strawberries 84 

Color for Soups, Brown Sugar 17 

CREAMS 68 

Almond 71 

Chocolate 70 

Charlotte Russe 69 



[7] 



PAGE. 

For Charlotte Russe 69 

Coffee 70 

Caramel 70 

Flavored 69 

Ice 69 

Lemon Orange 69 

New York or European 71 

Nesselrode 71 

Macaroni 71 

Punch 69 

Vanilla 69 

Whipped 68 

Crouton 18 

Currants and Sultana Raisins . . . 19 

Chicken Croquets 37 

Chicken Ragouts 38 

Chicken a la Vilroy 40 

Curled Omelette 39 

Crab Patties 35 

Crab Croquettes 35 

Croquettes of Sweetbreads 36 

Croquettes of Potatoes 37 

Crab Coquilles 37 

Coquilles 37 

DUMPLINGS 20 

Apple 20 

Apple (wine sauce) 20 

Bread 20 

Calves Liver 21 

Egg 21 

Marrow 21 

Ounce 21 

Oyster 20 

Suet 22 

Veal or Poultry 21 

ENTREES 35 

Baked Calves Brains 40 

Breaded Spring Chickens 39 

Chicken Croquettes 37 

Chicken Ragouts , . . 38 

Chicken a la Vilroy , 50 

Curled Omeletts 39 

Crab Patties 35 

• Crab Croquettes 35 

Croquettes of Sweetbreads 36 

Croquettes of Potatoes 37 

Crab Coquilles 37 

Coquilles 37 

Escallopped Oysters 36 

Entries in Crust Cups 38 

Fried Oysters 39 



[8] 



PAGE. 

French Omelettes 39 

Filled Noodles 36 

Fondus of Edam Cheese 35 

Fondus of Breast of Chicken 35 

German Pancakes 39 

Italian Polenta Noodles 36 

Macaroni in Crust Cups 38 

Oyster Patties . . 38 

Oyster Patties, dry 58 

Oyster Coquilles 37 

Sweetbreads in Crust Cups 38 

Spring Chicken, a la Horley 39 

Veal Tongue, Crust Cups 38 

Welsh Bare Bit 40 

EGGS, Filled with sauce 59 

Poached 60 

Scrambled 59 

Soft Boiled 59 

Escalloped Oysters 36 

yC Entrees in Crust Cups 38 

FISH 40 

Boiled Salmon 40 

Baked Salmon 40 

Broiled Salmon 40 

Brook Trout , 41 

Carp, Sauce Ramolade 41 

Carp en Matelotte 42 

Cod Fish, Cream Sauce 42 

Cutlets of Fish. ." 42 

Codfish Balls 42 

Gratin of Salmon 41 

Salmon a la Bechemal 41 

To Fry 41 

Trout in Jelly or Aspic 41 

To Cook Mackerel 42 

FLAVORING, Almond 70 

Banana 70 

Caramel 70 

Chocolate 70 

Pineapple 70 

Vanilla 70 

Frappee 72 

FROSTING 87 

To make from the whites of eggs 87 

Water Frosting 87 

Water Frosting 87 

Warm Cooked Chocolate Frosting 87 

GRAVIES, Remarks on 22 

German Pancakes 39 

ICES. Water 71 

Lemon 71 



[9] 

PAGE. 

MAYONNAISE, Remarks on 22 

Macaroni in Crust Cups 38 

Meat Glaoee 20 

NEAPOLITAN OREAM 72 

X Noodles, for Soup 18 

^Noodles, filled 36 

OYSTER PATTIES 88 

Oyster Patties, dry 38 

Ouster Ooquilles 37 

)PIE CRUST 80 

' Cnstardfor Pies 80 

Lemon Pies 80 

Grated Apple Pie 80 

Coooannt Pie 81 

Cottage Cheese Pie 81 

Peach Pie , 81 

Mince Meat for Pies 81 

Gooseberry Pies 81 

Cream Pies 81 

Plain Apple Pie. 81 

Apple Custard 81 

Cabinet Pie 82 

POULTRY AND GAME 42 

Pepper for Sauces and Gravies 19 

Practical Hints for the Kitchen 17 

Puddings 60 

Apple 61, 62 65 

Almond 63 

Bread 60 

Corn Starch, boiled 60 

Cherry 61 

Chocolate 61 

Cabin e t 62 

Donna Gloria 62 

Flour, scalded 60 

Lemon 64 

Lemon, cold 65 

Napoleon 63 

Nesselrode 63 

Noodle, baked 64 

Nut ; 64 

Plum, English 61 

Plum, No, 2 61 

Potato 60 

Rice 62 

Rice and Apples 62 

Rose Leaf 63 

Spanish 65 

Yorkshire 64 

Punches 72 



[10] 



PAGE. 

REMARKS, on Sauces, Mayonnaise and Gravies 22 

On Soups 29 

Rice, to clean 19 

* SAUCES, Remarks on 22 

Beef Tongue 24 

Boiled Eggs 24 

A la Bechamel 24 

Bernaise 26 

Caper 23 

Diable 26 

Holland 23 

Holland, for Fish 23 

Mustard 23 

Onion 24 

-Oyster . 23 

Parsley 23 

Mint 24 

Mayonnaise, plain 26 

Mayonnaise, Ferrara 26 

Mayonnaise, Hamburg 26 

Mayonnaise, Supreme 26 

SAUCES, for Puddings 65 

Apricot 66 

Bishops 66 

Chodeaux 66 

Cream 65 

Milk 65 

Raspberry 66 

Strawberry 66 

Water 65 

Bordelaise 24 

A la Ravigotte 25 

Mustard 23 

Robert 25 

Tartar 25 

Tomato 25 

Vinaigrette 25 

Remolade 26 

Spatzen 21 

Stuffings and Farces 19 

Stuffing, Cold Meat 19 

Chicken 19 

Fine Meat 19 

Fish 19 

Game 19 

Turkey 19 

Sugar, to clarify 18 

Sherbets 72 

Sweetbreads and Calves' Brain, to prepare IB 

Soups, Remarks on 27 

Apple. 34 



[11] 



PAGE. 

Barley 29 

Beef Stock 27 

Bisque of Crab 31 

Bisque of Lobster 32 

Bread 32 

Celery Puree 31 

Clam Chowder 32 

California Apricot 33 

Egg 29 

Giblet 29 

Gumbo 29 

Julien 28 

Lintel Puree 31 

Milk, with Sago 32 

Milk, with Dumpling 33 

Mock Turtle 30 

Muligatawny 30 

Noodle 29 

Prune 33 

Puree of Cauliflower 31 

Puree of Beans 31 

Potato 32 

Rice, with Apples 32 

Red Currant 33 

AlaReine 28 

Sago with Wine 33 

Stock, 27 

Strawberry 33 

Tomato 31 

Oyster 30 

Ox-Tail 30 

Vegetable 29 

Wine 33 

Salads 55 

Asparagus 57 

Breakfast 57 

Cauliflower 57 

Celery 56 

Cucumber 57 

Chicken 58 

Endive 56 

Herring 57 

Italien 58 

Lettuce 56 

Lettuce, Bacon Dressing 56 

Lamb 59 

Lobster 59 

String Beans 57 

Salmon 58 

Stalk Celery 57 

Sardine. 59 



[12] 

PAGE. 

Shrimp 58 

Oyster 59 

Ox Snout 58 

Red and White Cabbage 56 

Plain Salad Dressing 56 

Potato 55 

Water Cress 56 

Veal 58 

Sweetbreads in Crust Cups 38 

Spring Chicken, a la Horley 39 

Veal Stock 28 

Veal Tongue, Crust Cups 38 

Welsh Rarebit 40 

White Sauee 22 

Orange 72 

Pineapple 72 

Strawberry 72 

JELLIES, Sweet 66 

To Clarify 66 

Fancy 67 

Filled Orange 67 

Fresh Fruit ± 67 

Lemon, Plain 7 67 

Orange 67 

Orange 68 

Orange Flower 67 

Rose Leaf 67 

Russian 67 

Violet 67 

Wine, Brandy and Rum 67 

Fruit Jelly 87 

Marmalade or Fruit Jams 88 



DEDICATED TO THE LADIES AND HOUSE- 
KEEPERS OF AMERICA, 

And especially those who have attended the practical 
lessons given by me. 

Thanking those ladies for their kind patronage, and 
[ hoping the lessons received in the Cooking School will 

be an everlasting source of happiness and content in 
their homes, I remain, 

Your Obedient Servant, 

C. F. PFAU. 



METHOD AND ORDER IN THE KITCHEN. 



It is absolutely necessary to be clean and tidy in the 
kitchen, and have all the tools and utensils in the right 
place, ready and clean for use. Before beginning to 
cook or bake, make out your " bill of fare; " see what is 
needed and have all materials necessary for your 
"menu" on hand, and when making pastry or cake, 
have the different quantities weighed before you com- 
mence mixing, especially if you are alone. Always have 
hot water, and plenty of it handy. Make your dishes 
in such a way so those which can stand the longest are 
made first. Never let a dish stand after it is ready to go 
to the table, and if dished up too long it loses in taste. 

In presenting dishes for the table use both judgment 
and taste. A little ornamentation will set a dish off. 
The eye as well as the palate must be satisfied. A piece 
of nice cheese looks more tempting served on a fresh 
grape leaf, then on a white plate. 

The buying ot material in its proper time should al- 
ways be observed, and the best is the cheapest. Select 
yourself the most important materials and examine 
everything that comes in the kitchen for use. 



REMARKS ON COOKING UTENSILS. 



Cooking utensils comprise stew-pans in block tin 
and granite ware, double pan to roast meats, dripping 
pan to bake fish and meats, strainer, skimmer, sieves, 
spice box, meat board, paddles, good and sharp knives, 
and small cleaver. 

Pastry utensils comprise vessel with round bottom, to 
beat white of eggs, a Common Sense egg beater, paddles, 
cutters, flat sheet-iron pans, wash brushes, lady finger 
bag and tubes, bowls of wood and china, rolling pin, 
grater, a small mortar, and last, but not least, a scale 
which will weigh from one-half ounce to two pounds, 
and the necessary patience and good will to produce 
good results. 

A good sized kitchen table at least six feet long and 
three feet wide will come very handy and will be found 
a great help when there is only one table in a kitchen. 



PRACTICAL HINTS 

FOR THE KITCHEN. 

TO KEEP BUTTER. 

Mix well four parts of fine salt, two parts of powdered 
sugar and one part of saltpeter. To each pound of well 
washed butter use one ounce ot the above, press well 
in a clean jar and cover with a light brine. Keep in a 
cool place. 

PLAIN BUTTER. 

One-quarter pound of butter, one tablespoon of flour, 
melt the butter, add the flour, mix smooth, add a gill of 
hot water, pepper and salt, boil up. 

COOKING BUTTER. 

One pound of kidney suet, rendered slowly, one pound 
of melted butter, pour together in a stone jar, and use 
tor frying in place of lard. 

MAITRE D'HOTEL BUTTER. 

For steaks, cutlets or stews, melt one-half pound of 
fresh butter, pinch of salt and white pepper, -juice of 
one lemon and small handful of chopped fresh parsley, 
keep it cold until want to use. 

TO CREAM BUTTER. 

If too salty, wash in cold water, melt enough, stir 
with paddle or egg beater until light and white, then 
slowly add the balance of the material. 

BROWN SUGAR COLOR FOR SOUPS. 

GRAVIES, SAUCES, FRICASSEES AND STEWS. 

Slowly melt in an iron glazed stew pan one-half 
pound powdered sugar, stirred briskly; when brown, 
add one gill of hot water, let it boil until smooth ; keep 
in bottles. 



[18] 

TO PREPARE SWEETBREADS AND CALVES' 

BRAIN. 

Soak in cold water until the blood is drawn out, then 
add warm water three or four times, boiling up each time 
until they become white, then skin and cut. 

TO BLANCH AND MASCERATE ALMONDS. 

* 

Boil until the skin comes off easily, then throw them 
into cold water, skin and wash well, then dry under the 
stove until hard. To make them fine for cakes, use the 
same quantity of powdered sugar, add the sugar by 
handfuls and roll with rolling-pin on table until fine, 
then pass them through the sieve with your hands, add 
more sugar to the almonds until all have passed through. 

The almonds can be pounded in a mortar with water 
or white of eggs until fine. 

No cakes can be made of almonds until this process is 
understood, the sugar will prevent them from getting 
oily. 

NOODLES FOR SOUP— in place of macaroni. 

To one egg and two yelks add enough sifted flour un- 
til the dough is rather hard, let the dough rest for ten 
minutes before rolling it, then dry for one-half hour, 
roll up and cut fine for soups, and coarser to fry or bake. 
Any shape desired can be cut out of the dough, round, 
square or diamond. 

CROUTONS OR DICE FOR SOUPS AND 

DUMPLINGS. 

Cut dices of stale bread of one-half inch square, fry 
brown and hard, in cooking butter. 

TO CLARIFY SUGAR. 

To one-half pint of water take one pound of "A" 
sugar; when melted add one white of an egg well 
beaten in a teaspoonful of water, beat this in the syrup, 
let it boil up five minutes, then skim. 

It can be used for ices, pancakes and batter-cakes. 
For maple syrup add one-half maple sugar. 



[19] 

CURRANTS AND SULTANA RAISINS 

Are befit cleaned by rubbing them in a cloth with a hand- 
ful of flour until all the stems are off, then wash three or 
four times in water; spread out to dry. 

STUFFINGS AND FARCES. 

All farces or stuffing should be made so the bread 
comprises one-third, and the other two-thirds meat, 
add butter or suet, season with pepper and salt ; it too 
hard, soften with cream or milk. 

FINE MEAT STUFFING. 

Half pound lean veal, half pound lean pork, two ounces 
salt pork, well chopped, half pound stale bread without 
crust soaked in milk; set on the fire, stir until a moist 
paste is produced, add meat, season to taste, add three or 
four eggs; if too dry, add milk or cream. 

PEPPER FOR BROWN SAUCES AND GRAVIES. 

Mix well powdered, one ounce of ginger, one-half 
ounce of cinnamon, one-half ounce of black pepper, one- 
half ounce of allspice, one-half ounce of nutmeg and ten 
cloves; keep well corked. 

TO CLEAN RICE. 

Rub well in cold water, set to boil with fresh water, 
let it boil up and strain, put in cold water, dry and then 
pick clean. 

STUFFING OF COLD MEATS. 

CHICKEN AND TURKEY. 

Chop the meat without the skin very fine, then add 
one-half pound of butter, three eggs, season to taste, add 
four ounces of soaked bread. The livers of turkeys or 
chickens can be used, but should not be cooked before. 

STUFFING FOR GAME 

Should have a few onions well chopped and a tablespoon 
of Worcestershire sauce added to it. 

STUFFING FOR FISH. 

Same as poultry. Season with lemon juice. 



[20] 

MEAT GLACEE 

Is made by boiling rich soup stock of veal or chicken 
until it is a dark brown jelly. It is used for coloring 
soups and gravies. It must be kept in a cool place in a 
stone jar. 

DUMPLINGS. 

Dumplings are very nice for soups or side dishes. 
They are easy to make, nourishing and inexpensive. 
Meat left over can be used to the best advantage. They 
can be used for soups or side dishes with sauce or gravy, 
or fried in butter. Don't make dough too stiff, boil in 
salt water from five to ten minutes, according to size, 
and strain before putting in soup or frying. 

APPLE DUMPLINGS, Wine Sauce. 

Bake ten sour apples in oven, rub through strainer, 
add, beaten to cream, two ounces butter, the yelks of four 
eggs, two ounces of sugar, two ounces of bread soaked 
in water and squeezed dry, a few almonds and a little 
lemon peel ; cook in boiling water. If they come apart 
in cooking, add a little flour. See Wine Sauce. 

APPLE DUMPLINGS. 

Peel, core and cut in square pieces six sour apples, 
add four eggs, six ounces soaked bread, one gill milk, 
one-half ounce butter and a little salt. Try them in 
boiling water; if they fall apart, add a little flour. 

OYSTER DUMPLINGS. 

Simmer in two ounces butter twenty-four oysters, cool 
and chop fine, add four eggs, four ouuces soaked bread, 
salt, pepper, a little powdered mace, parsley, juice of 
half a lemon, and boil in soup stock. Put one in the 
boiling soup stock to see if they hold together; if not, 
add a little flour. Use in oyster soups. 

BREAD DUMPLINGS. 

Put on the fire three ounces of butter, one gill of 
milk ; when boiling, add six ounces dry rubbed bread 



[21] 

crumbs, stir well ; when cold, add two or three eggs, wait 
and a little powdered mace. If for soup, boil in soup 
stock. 

OUNCE DUMPLINGS. 

One ounce of water, equal to three tablespoonfuls, one 
ounce butter ; when boiling, add one ounce of flour, stir 
well; when cold, add a little salt, two eggs; boil in 
water or fry in hot butter or lard. 

EGG DUMPLINGS. 

Beat well three eggs, add one gill of milk, enough 
sifted flour to make stiff batter, a little salt, drop into 
boiling water with a teaspoon, dip the spoon in the boil- 
ing water each time before taking up the batter, so they 
don't adhere to the spoon. If the batter is too stiff, they 
will not be light. 

SPATZEN. 

Beat three eggs, add half teaspoonful of salt, small 
pint of milk, add flour, beat well; when smooth, drop 
them from a plate with a knife into boiling salt water, 
strain dry and fry in butter, add a few bread crumbs. 

DUMPLINGS OF VEAL OR POULTRY. 

Cooked or raw meat can be used. Take one-half 
pound of lean veal chopped fine, two ounces butter, two 
eggs, two ounces soaked bread, salt and pepper. The 
whites of the eggs may be beaten separate to make them 
very light. Boil in soup or salt water. 

MARROW DUMPLINGS. 

Grate the crust of a roll, soak the balance, squeeze 
dry, add two ounces of flour, three eggs, salt, pepper and 
six ounces of marrow chopped fine, form into small balls 
and boil half hour in the soup. 

CALVES' LIVER DUMPLINGS (side dish). 

Three-fourths pound finely chopped liver, four ounces 
butter, five eggs, parsley, salt, pepper and onions, if 
agreeable, handful of dry bread crumbs, seven ounces of 



[22] 

soaked bread, drop into boiling water with a tablespoon, 
drain and fry in butter; pour over, when ready to take 
out, two beaten eggs, and let them get light brown. 

SUET DUMPLINGS. 

Chop two ounces of suet, add two eggs, one-quarter 
pound bread, salt and pepper, little parsely, drop in 
soup and boil ten minutes. 

REMAKES ON SAUCES, MAYONNAISE, AND 

GRAVIES. 



Meats, boiled or roasted, poultry or fish are not com- 
plete without sauce. Even vegetables should be finished 
with a sauce. The sauce should always be made after 
the me^jt is tender, skim off all the grease from the 
gravy, as it will always come on top and not combine 
with your other ingredients. Sauce should not be too 
thin and well flavored. Three distinct colors can be 
made, and as a rule white sauce is used for stewed meats, 
fish and oysters, yellow or light brown for veal or chick- 
en, and brown sauce for roast meats and game Vinegar 
or wine can be used for sauces. All sauces should be 
strained before using. To make the sauce smooth, stir 
into it, after removing from the fire, the beaten yelk of 
an egg and a tablespoonful of water. Do not return to 
the fire or the egg will curdle.. Sauces should be served 
in a sauce bowl with the meats. Brown sauces can be 
colored with the sugar color. If you have soup stock, 
use it in preference to water. In boiling or stewing 
meat or poultry enough liquid should remain to make 
the sauce. 

PLAIN WHITE SAUCE FOR ASPARAGUS, ETC. 

Melt slowly one-half ounce of butter, add two table- 
spoonfuls of flour; when well mixed, add one-half pint 
soup stock, or the water from the vegetables, and season 
with pepper and salt. 



[23] 

CAPER SAUCE. 

Melt one-half ounce butter, add two teaspoonfuls flour; 
when smooth, add the necessary stock or water, boil un- 
til smooth, season with pepper and salt, add a cupful of 
capers with some of the vinegar. When mushrooms are 
used instead of capers, the flour should be browned. 

PARSLEY SAUCE. 

Same as caper sauce, using chopped parsley. If a 
green sauce is desired, boil a handful of parsley in watery 
press out, chop fine, pass through a sieve, mix with 
sauce. Use ior chicken stew. 

OYSTER SAUCE. 

In place of soup stock add the strained liquor ot the 
oysters, add a little water and a few chopped oysters. 
Use for turkey. 

HOLLAND SAUCE. 

Yelks of three eggs, one teaspoonful flour, one gill of j- J- , ;> 
water, stir until smooth, add a little mace, set on fire; ^ ^ ^ 
when about to boil, add one-half pound butter, table-U v v 
spoonful of vinegar, lemon juice and salt and pepper. 
(Jan be changed to oyster, mustard and caper sauce. 

HOLLAND SAUCE FOR FISH. 

Beat the yelks of three eggs, one teaspoonful of flour, 
some mace, a little sugar, one gill of white wine, one 
gill of water, juice of one lemon, pepper and salt. Let 
it come to a boil, then stir in one-quarter pound of 
butter. 

MUSTARD SAUCE WITH GREEN GHERKINS. 

One teaspoonful of butter, two of flour, melt on the 
stove without coloring, add one pint of soup stock or 
water, boil up, add one teaspoonful mustard, cupful 
gherkins, cut up, pepper and salt. Finish with the 
yelks of two eggs. 





[24] 

ONION SAUCE. 

Peel and cut up six small onions, fry in butter, add 
flour and milk, pepper and salt, boil not too long, and 
finish with the yelk of an egg. 

MINT SAUCE FOR MUTTON OR LAMB. 

Same as above, using mint in place of onions. 

SAUCE FOR BEEF TONGUE. 

After boiling tongues, skin them while hot, return to 
the water in which they were boiled and cool; when 
cold, slice thin. Let a small onion simmer in a table- 
spoon ot butter, add a teaspoonful of flour and brown, 
add one and one-half pint of water, two bay leaves, a 
little mace, pepper, but no salt if tongues are pickled, 
one lemon ; when smooth, add slices of tongue and 
thicken with yelk of an egg. 

SAUCE FOR HARD BOILED EGGS. 

Yelks of three eggs, one teaspoonful of flour, one-half 
pint of milk, pepper and salt, add the eggs cut length- 
wise. Let it boil up, then add one tablespoonful of 
vinegar and serve. 

FRENCH ART SAUCE. 

SAUCE, A LA BECHAMEL. 

Put in a saucepan one-half ounce butter, one-half 
small onion, one-half pound chopped lean veal, one car- 
rot, fry for a few minutes without coloring, add two 
tablespoonfuls of flour, stir well, add three pints of water, 
one pint boiling cream, salt and white pepper, half tea- 
spoonful each, let simmer one hour and strain. Measure 
and add to each pint a glass of sweet cream and beat un- 
til cold; when wanted for patties or stews, add to eaeh 
pint one ounce of butter, heat, beat well and pour over 
meat. 

SAUCE BORDELAISE. 

One tablespoonful of chopped white onion, tablespoon- 
ful of butter, salt, white pepper, one-half pint white 



[25] 

wine^reduce by boiling to one-quarter pint, add small 
pint of dark gravy, a little chopped parsley, spoonful of 
capers, boil up and finish with the yelk of an egg. 

SAUCE TARTAR. 

Half pint mayonnaise, one tablespoon of salad herb, 
one teaspoon of dry mustard, one of capers and onions; 
mix all together and serve. 

SAUCE VINAIGRETTE. 

Chop fine a small onion, a spoonful capers, one-half 
teaspoonful of parsley, one-half teaspoon black pepper 
and salt, three tablespoonfuls vinegar, five tablespoon- 
fuls olive oil; mix well and serve cold, 

SAUCE A LA RAVIGOTTE. 

Boil in salt water a handful of parsley, celery tops, 
leak and estragon about ten minutes, then chop with a 
little butter, pass through a sieve; make a pint white 
Holland sauce, add the herbs, pepper salt, and the juice 
of one lemon. Use for lobster and fish. 

SAUCE ROBERT. 

Cut up two medium sized onions, brown in a table- 
spoonful of butter, two of flour, add one pint of brown 
meat juice, two teaspoonfuls of mustard, a little vinegar, 
pass through a sieve, add a little brown sugar color. 
Use for venison cutlets. 

TOMATO SAUCE. 

Pass half can pulp of tomatoes, through a strainer, add 
a little cayenne pepper, salt, mace, one tablespoonful of 
butter, half tablespoonful of flour, stir and boil up; if 
too thick, add a little water. 

SAUCE BERNAISE. 

Beat up the yelks of four eggs, add a tablespoonful of 
melted butter, then slowly add a pint of very strong 
boiling hot soup stock, beat in a little vinegar, a little 
juice of garlic, juice of one lemon and beat briskly. 



.*>/- 



[26] 

PLAIN MAYONNAISE. 

Pass the yelks of four hard boiled eggs, two raw ones 
and four fresh boiied potatoes, through a strainer, add 
white pepper, salt, juice of lemon, beat up with one gill 
of olive oil, and last two tablespoonfuls of vinegar. 

FERRARA MAYONNAISE. 

Beat on ice the yelks of six eggs with half gill of 
olive oil, add three more eggs, beat until smooth, add 
teaspoonful mustard, salt, and last three tablespoonfuls 
vinegar. Keep cold until ready to use. 

HAMBURG MAYONNAISE. 

Pass the yelks of eight boiled eggs through the 
strainer, add five ounces olive oil, juice of two lemons, 
two ounces vinegar, salt, pepper, half gill of soup stock, 
half gill madeira wine. Keep cold. 

ni MAYONNAISE SUPREME (without oil). 

^ u -*■ [Introduced by Prof. Pfau in hie Cooking Schools since 1885.] 
- ]f r - Beat up the yelks of eight eggs, two teaspoons dry 
v mustard, one-half of white pepper, add one pint very 
'^/rich sweet cream, beat well together, then boil by plac- 
ing dish in boiling water and stir until quite thick, re- 
move from stove, stir until cold, add two or three spoon- 
fuls of vinegar. Will keep on ice two or three weeks 
and will not spoil in winter. Use for any salad or cold 
meat by adding more vinegar, about one part of vinegar 
to six of dressing. 

SAUCE REMOLADE. 

Mix well eight boiled eggs, two raw ones, one gill of 
oil, chop fine two tablespoonfuls onion, two of parsley, 
two of capers, one of mustard, pinch of white pepper, 
last three tablespoonfuls vinegar. Use for cold meats, 
fish or game. 

SAUCE A LA DIABLE. 

Make a mayonnaise of yelks ot six boiled eggs, two 
spoonfuls of oil, salt, two ounces powdered sugar, juice 



[27] 

of one lemon, one gill of port wine, a pinch of pepper, 
boil up, pass through a strainer. Cut up two peeled 
apples, two onions,^ two mustard pickles, four Sardelles, 
some parsley, add ttiree spoons vinegar and mix with the 
mayonnaise when cold. Use for game. 



REMARKS ON SOUPS. 



Soups are divided in four classes: Clear, thick, puree 
or bisque and chowder. Clear soups are the juices of 
the meat and water; thick soups are made by adding 
various ingredients to the stock; purees or bisque by 
rubbing the cooked ingredients through a strainer; 
chowders are made of fish, oysters and clams, not so 
thick as puree, and without straining the ingredients. 
Dumplings can be served in different soups: They can 
be used in clear, white or brown soup. Vegetables, rice, 
peas, lintels, sago, etc., should always be boiled soft be- 
fore putting in the soup, as the soup will have a better 
appearance and will keep clear. Eggs should be well 
beaten with a little water and be stirred into soup after 
it is strained and removed from fire. Milk and cream 
must be boiled and stirred in while hot. 

SOUP STOCK. 

Soup stock is the foundation of all soups, except 
such soups as are made from flour and butter and are 
called (soup magre,) or lean soups, they are delicious 
when properly made, are best to use in summer time, 
as not much cooking is required. 

BEEF STOCK. 

A half pound of meat to a pint of water, or six pounds 
of meat to five quarts of water, will make sufficient soup 
lor a family of six for two days, meat from the breast 
called brisket makes the best soup. Cut up the 
meat; put on the fire with cold water, adding 
two ounces of salt, bones improve the soup, but 



[28] 

without meat, no good soup can be made. Remove 
the scum as fast as it rises, boil three hours/ cut up two 
carrots, two turnips, one stalk of celery, an onion, half 
teaspoon whole pepper, add to the soup when skimmed, 
when the vegetables are cooked take them out, strain 
the soup in a saucepan and keep hot. Chop up one 
pound raw beef, half pound lean veal, add the whites of 
four eggs, salt, pepper, a little parsley and mix well for 
twenty minutes without putting on the fire, then add the 
soup and let it simmer for one hour, then taste for 
seasoning and strain into a jar. This is called Consomme 
or Bouillon, and all soups are made out of the same by 
adding the different vegetables, dumplings, etc. 

VEAL STOCK— Brown or Clear. 
Slice a few pieces of bacon, lay them in the frying 
pan, on top of these lay two or three pounds of lean 
veal, cut up, let simmer until all is nice brown and ad- 
here to the pan without burning, then pour over one- 
half gallon water and boil for two hours, adding the 
necessary seasoning and vegetables. Clear it with the 
whites of a few eggs, and it is ready for soup. 

JULIEN SOUP. 
Cut up in small fancy shape the following vegetables: 
Two carrots, two turnips, two celery roots and the ends 
of leaks; let these simmer in the frying pan with one 
ounce of butter, salt, a little sugar, when soft, add 
one cup of stock. Heat two quarts of veal stock, add 
the vegetables, a little parsley and fresh sorrel, taste for 
seasoning and serve. 

SOUP A LA REINE. 

Out of two pounds of beef, two of veal, two chickens 
and five quarts of water, the necessary herbs and vege- 
tables, make a clear stock by boiling three hours; when 
the chickens are soft, take away the breast, out of which 
dumplings are mad*, remove vegetables when tender 
and cut in square pieces. For the dumplings take six 
ounces of soaked bread and one chopped chicken breast, 
two ounces of butter, three eggs, a little parsley, melt 



[29] 

the butter, add chicken finely chopped, eggs and bread, 
gait and pepper, boil the dumplings in salt water ; when 
done strain, lay in soup tureen with the vegetables and 
other chicken breast cut up, stir one egg with a little 
water, take soup from stove, strain, add the egg, pour 
over dumplings and serve. If no dumplings are de- 
sired, slice chicken, dip in egg and cracker and fry. Lay 
a piece in each plate. 

NOODLE SOUP. 

See receipt for noodles. Heat two quarts of soup 
stock, add two handfuls of noodles, boil for ten minutes, 
and add a little parsley before serving. 

EGG SOUP. 

Boil up two quarts of soup stock, take from the fire, 
pour in tureen, add three eggs beaten with three spoon- 
fuls of water and serve. 

VEGETABLE SOUP— Plain. 

Boil soft in salt water the vegetables you like in the 
soup, then strain, add to soup stock and boil up ; serve 
with a few croutons in each plate (see croutons or fried 
bread dice). 

BAELEY SOUP. 

Out of one knuckle of veal and two pounds of lean 
mutton, four quarts of water, make a stock, salt, pepper, 
a little mace, wash one gill of barley, soak in milk half 
hour, strain, put in soup, let boil one hour, before serv- 
ing add chopped parsley. 

GIBLET SOUP. 

Boil the necks, wings, hearts, livers and gizzard of 
the chickens; when soft, cut them up, add two quarts 
of soup stock, a few spoonfuls of rice season with pepper 
and salt. 

OKRA OR GUMBO SOUP. 

CREOLE RECEIPT. 

Out of two chickens, two slices of lean ham, two 
onions, make about three quarts stock, frying the 



[30] 

chickens in a little butter first, then cooking about 
three hours. Soak in cold water a pint and a half of 
gumbo, cut them up and add to soup stock when 
strained; also one-half can strained tomatoes, a cupful 
of boiled rice, season. Of the cooked chicken make 
fricadelles by adding to the chopped meat three eggs, 
two ounces butter, six ounces soaked bread, turn in egg 
and fry, serve two with each plate of soup. 

MULIGATAWNY SOUP. 

One good sized chicken, cut in pieces, add a knuckle 
of veal, tour quarts of water, salt, boil three hours until 
reduced to one and one-half quarts, fry two red onions 
in one ounce of butter; into a pint of stock put one 
ounce of curry powder, to this add the onion and 
balance of stock, season to taste, add to each plate a 
slice of lemon and serve hot. 

OYSTER SOUP (Creole). 

Parboil two dozen oysters in their own liquid, heat 
two quarts of clear soup stock, add some celery tops, 
salt, pepper and oysters, serve at once. 

OX TAIL SOUP. 

Cook in two quarts of water the thick parts of two ox 
tails, cut off the meat when soft in nice slices, add two 
quarts of stock, season, add a few marrow dumplings. 

MOCK TURTLE SOUP. 

Take out the tongue and brain of a calf 's head, put 
on the fire with cold water, salt and the necessary season- 
ing; when soft, cut off the meat in small pieces, add to 
the above stock two more quarts of stock, season highly 
with pepper, cloves, allspice, mace, lemon juice, make 
small bread dumplings. The brain and tongue dip in 
egg and cracker and fry brown. Out of three hard 
boiled eggs make round balls for the turtle eggs. Put 
in the tureen the the dumplings, meat, eggs, two glasses 
of Madeira wine, a little Worcestershire sauce, and last 
the strained soup stock. 



[31 | 

TOMATO SOUP. 

Pass one can of tomatoes through the strainer, melt 
one spoonful of butter, add two of flour, one pint of soup 
stock, salt, pepper, mace and a few bread croutons. 

PUEEE OF CAULIFLOWER. 

Cut up a cauliflower in small pieces and cook in salt 
water until tender, lay aside half of it, the other pass 
through a strainer, make a white sauce out of one spoon- 
ful of butter, two of flour, salt, pepper and enough stock 
to make it smooth, add the pulp, then the pieces and 
serve with toast. 

CELERY PUREE, with Toast. 

Six stalks of celery, one small onion, salt, pepper, 
mace, put on the fire with one quart of soup stock ; when 
soft, pass through strainer, add another quart of stock 
and keep hot. Boil one quart of cream, add to it one 
spoonful of butter, one of flour, boil and add the pulp, 
let it come to a boil and serve with croutons. 

PUREE OF BEANS. 

Soak over night one quart of small white beans, 
change the water and boil for six hours, adding hot 
water; before done add one pound of salt pork, some 
herbs; when soft, pass through a strainer, add more 
soup stock if too thick. Slices of ham are preferable to 
pork. Serve with toast. 

LINTEL PUREE. 

Use lintels in place of beans; use three quarts of 
stock and a few bread dice fried on top when serving. 

BISQUE OF CRAB. 

Boil twelve hard shell crabs ; when cold, pick out 
the meat, save the top shell tor deviled crabs, out of the 
balance of the crab cook a stock, pound them up with one 
quarter pound of butter, salt, pepper, one gill of rice and 
one quart of stock, cook one hour, pass through a 



[32] 

strainer, set aside and keep hot. Beat up the yelk of 
one egg, add one quart of hot milk and add this to the 
first stock ; lay the meat in the tureen, pour over the 
hot soup and serve. 

BISQUE OF LOBSTEE. 
Same as above, except thicken soup stock with butter 
and flour, adding a little cream. * 

CLAM CHOWDER. 
Chop up two dozen clams, four potatoes cut up in 
small squares; keep in water until wanted. Fry brown 
half pound larding pork and one large onion, then add 
half the clams, one pint of cracker, salt half can of 
tomatoes, a little red pepper and the potatoes, add 
enough water and boil three hours ; should it become 
too thick, add more water. Don't stir the chowder until 
ready for seasoning. Serve hot with a little celery. 

BREAD SOUP. 
Brown a few onions and carrots in a tablespoon of 
butter, add enough water, then a cupful bread crust, boil 
up, pass through strainer, season with salt, parsley and 
pepper, finish with an egg. 

POTATO SOUP. 

Cook soft six large potatoes, pass through the strainer, 
add a tablespoonful of butter, salt, pepper, spoonful of 
flour, one and a half quarts of soup stock or water, boil 
until smooth. 

RICE SOUP, with Apples. 

Ten ounces of rice, cook until soft in four quarts of 
water, add a little cinnamon ; when soft, pass through a 
strainer ; six good sized apples cooked to a pulp and 
pass through strainer, add a little salt, sugar and butter 
and serve 

MILK SOUP, with Sago. 

Boil two quarts of sweet milk with a little cinnamon 
and lemon peel, add, stirring quickly, six ounces of 
sago, boil for twenty minutes, slowly adding sugar and 
salt. 



[33] 

MILK SOUP, with Dumplings. 

Boil half pint of milk for each person, add salt and 
any kind of dumpling out of bread, suet or rice. 

WINE SOUP. 
Boil one pint of wine, the same of water, a little cin- 
namon and lemon peel, a few cloves and last a cupful of 
bread crumbs brown and rolled. 

SAGO SOUP, with Wine. 

Set on the fire three ounces of sago, half pint ot water, 
boil until clear, add a little lemon peel, cinnamon, one 
pint of wine, six ounces of sugar and thicken, after re- 
moving from fire with the yelks of four eggs. 

STRAWBERRY SOUP. 
Cook with three quarts, ot water, three pounds of 
strawberries, adding cinnamon and lemon peel ; when 
soft, pass through a strainer. To one pint of pulp add 
three-quarters of a pint of sugar; when boiling, add 
half pound of berries, let them boil up, take out and 
strain, lay berries in tureen, add to the pulp one pint of 
red wine, thicken with one ounce of corn starch and 
serve with sponge cake. 

RED CURRANT SOUP. 

One and one-half pounds of red currents with three- 
quarters of a pound of sugar, a little lemon peel, pass 
through strainer, then thicken with sponge cake, crumbs 
or starch, add sugar, cinnamon, lemon peel, thicken 
with yelks of four eggs. Serve with lady fingers. 

FRENCH PRUNE SOUP. 
Stew a pound of French prunes in a quart of water; 
when soft, pass through a strainer, add half pound sugar, 
some cinnamon, thicken with bread crumbs, add one 
glass of wine, boil up. Nice for invalids. 

CALIFORNIA APRICOT SOUP. 

Stew until soft one can of apricots, pass through a 
sieve, enough sugar to sweeten, a little corn starch, one 
glass of white wine, a little water, add a little orange peel. 



[34] 

APPLE SOUP. 

Nine peeled apples, stew with water and a few bread 
crumbs, pass through strainer, add sugar, cinnamon, 
lemon peel, yelks of four eggs. Serve with cake. 



COLD FRUIT DISHES. 



STRAWBERRIES. 

One quart of berries, pick out the large ones, the 
small ones stir with four ounces of sugar and pass 
through the strainer, add one glass of white wine, lay 
large berries in a glass dish and pour over them the 
sauce. Serve with cake. 

ORANGES, with. Cake Croutons. 

Peel two or three oranges, cut in slices and sprinkle 
sugar over them, melt eight ounces of sugar, the grated 
rind of one orange in half pint of water, a quarter of 
pint oi wine, the juice of one lemon and of two oranges, 
let boil up; when cold, pour over the slices, take lady 
fingers, dip them in water frosting and lay them on 
small dishes and some of the above around lady fingers. 

PINE APPLE— cold. 

Grate the outside of a pine apple, or use canned, cut 
in slices and sprinkle with sugar, the rind boil with 
half pint of wine, half pound of sugar, strain, and when 
cold, pour over the fruit and serve with macaroons. 

MAZITANA FROM MIXED FRUIT. 

Fresh cherries, strawberries and currents in equal 
quantity, mix, sprinkle with sugar, boil half pound of 
sugar with a quarter pint of wine ; when cold, pour over 
the fruit. Serve with sponge cake. 

ALMOND MILK, with Snow Dumpling. 

To a quarter pound almond paste add half pint of 
sweet milk, flavor with Vanilla and boil a few minutes, 
pass through $ strainer, add six ounces of sugar, beat 



[35] 

the whites of four eggs, add six ounces of sugar, with a 
teaspoon form balls and drop into the boiling milk, boil 
a few minutes and cool in a sieve; when cold, serve 
with almond milk and lady fingers. 

ENTREES. 



CRAB PATTIES, 

Make shells of puff paste as directed elsewhere, take 
half ounce of butter, small onion, small carrot, put on the 
fire and heat without coloring, add two spoonfuls of flour, 
stir well, then add three pints of hot water, a pint of 
cream, salt and white pepper, simmer one hour and strain 
in saucepan ; to each quart of crab meat, or lobster, or 
shrimp add one pint of sauce, a tablespoon of butter and 
a few mushrooms, toss up and fill shells, heating them 
well before filling. 

CRAB CROQUETTES. 

To each pound of crab meat take two ounces of butter, 
three spoonfuls of flour, one gill of cream, salt, pepper, 
melt the butter, add flour, then gill of hot water, boil, 
add cream and seasoning, last the meat. Set to cool on 
ice, then shape and dip in egg and rolled crackers, and 
fry in hot butter or lard. 

FONDUS OF EDAM CHEESE. 

IN LITTLE PAPER CASES. 

Scald one pint of milk with two ounces of corn starch 
until thick enough so it comes off the saucepan, add 
slowly yelks of eight eggs, two ounces of grated cheese, 
some salt, the whites of eight eggs well beaten ; let cool, 
then fill in small paper cases, which can be bought at 
any confectioners; bake twelve minutes and serve with 
soup. 

FONDUS OF BREAST OF CHICKEN. 

Skin a good sized chicken, pick oft all the white meat 
and chop fine, then scald two ounces of butter, half 



[36] 

pint of milk four ounces of bread, until all comes from 
side of saucepan, add the yelks of four eggs, salt, mace, 
pepper, the whites of the eggs beaten stiff, last the meat 
of the chicken, fill cases, bake, and serve with soup. 

E8CALLOPED OYSTERS. 

To a two-quart pan three cans of oysters, set them on 
the fire in their own liquor, and swell them, that is, 
heat them, until the little scallops open, then strain. 
Butter a dish, sprinkle rolled crackers in the bottom, 
add one-third of the oysters, salt, pepper, butter, alter- 
nate layers of crackers and oysters witn seasoning until 
the dish is full, the last layer being crackers, moisten 
each layer of crackers with the liquid of the oysters and 
put about a dozen small lumps of butter on top; bake in 
a quick oven until brown on top. Serve hot. 

FILLED NOODLES. 

Make a good noodle dough and roll out in pieces 
about three and a half inches square; fill with the follow- 
ing: Eight ounces of chopped chicken, three ounces of 
butter, two eggs, three ounces of soaked bread, pepper, 
salt, parsley; put a teaspoon ful of the mixture in the 
center of each piece of dough, wash with egg, double 
over the corners, press them down well, drop into boil- 
ing water, boil fifteen minutes, drain. Serve with soup. 

ITALIAN POLENTA NOODLES. 

Cook a quarter of pound of polenta rice in good soup 
stock, add when cold two eggs, mace, and salt; fill in 
noodle dough and drop in boiling water; cook ten 
minutes. 



•*•»*»-**-••■»•**•*""-*•* 



CROQUETTES. 



TO BE SERVED AFTER SOUP. 



CEOQUETTES OF SWEETBEEADS. 

Prepare one pound of sweetbreads and chop fine, 
make sauce of four ounces of butter, three spoonfuls of 



[37] 

flour, a quarter of a pint of soup stock, a quarter of a 
pint of rich sweet cream, pepper, salt, parsley; when well 
cooked and rather stiff, add the sweetbreads, set on ice 
to coo}^ shape in any desired form, dip in egg and rolled 
crackers twice and fry in lard or cooking butter. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

Boil soft one chicken, pick all the meat from the 
bones, chop fine and make same as above. Lobster, fish 
and shrimp croquettes are made the same. 

CROQUETTES OF POTATOES. 

Pass two pounds of boiled potatoes through the 
strainer, add a quarter of pound of butter, two ounces of 
flour, three eggs, a little cream and stir well on the fire 
a few roinntes; when cold, shape and dip in eggs and 
cracker dust; fry in butter. 

COQUILLES 

Are made and baked in their own shells, such as crabs, 
clams, oysters and mussels. The shells are washed and 
dried with bran after they are used, and the coquilles 
form a very attractive dish for lunch. 

CRAB COQUILLES. 

Boil two dozen crabs, pick out the meat of one dozen, 
lay it aside and keep the top shells. The balance of 
the meat pound up with a little butter, warm the mixture, 
add a little water and strain; mix with the chopped crab 
meat equal quantity of bread or cracker crumbs, season 
to taste, fill the shells and sprinkle on top some crackers 
and a tablespoon of liquid and a few lumps of butter; 
bake in a quick oven. Serve hot. 

OYSTER COQUILLES. 

For twelve large oyster shells take three dozen oysters, 
boil in their own liquid, spread a few cracker crumbs in 
each shell, cut the oysters in half, lay three in each shell, 
sprinkle with salt and pepper, add one tablespoonful of 
the liquid, some crackers and butter on top; bake quick. 
Serve hot. 



[38] 

ENTREES IN CRUST CUPS. 

Id making crust cups, forms are used like pattie moulds 
of tin. They are lined with puff paste or pie crust, made 
and filled with dry beans, peas, or bran, and baked; 
when done, brush out and fill with the following receipts. 

CHICKEN RAGOUTS IN CRUST CUPS. 

Stew until tender a good sized chicken, pick the meat 
off the bones, cut into small pieces, make a sauce, a la 
Bechemal or white cream sauce, toss up the meat in it 
and fill the cups. Serve with fresh salads. 

SWEETBREADS IN CRUST CUPS. 

Same as above, except use caper sauce and sweat 

nrpftds 

MACARONI IN CRUST CUPS. 

Boil half pound macaroni in salt water until well done, 
fill cups, sprinkle a little Edam cheese over them, then 
pour over a sauce made of two spoonfuls of butter, one 
of flour, two eggs, half pint of milk, a little salt, bake 
tor a few minutes in a quick oven until custard is set, 
or make white cream sauce; pour over macaroni and 
serve. 

VEAL TONGUE IN CRUST CUPS. 

Boil tender two veal tongues; chop fine, make a brown 
mushroom sauce, fill cups and serve hot. 

OYSTER PATTIES. 

Prepare shell as directed for patties, toss up oysters in 
their own liquid until well swelled, strain, make white 
sauce with parsley, boil oysters in it for a few minutes; 
fill patties and serve hot. 

OYSTER PATTIES— dry. 

Cut out of puff paste or good pie crust with a round 
cutter about three inches in diameter, lay them on bak- 
ing tins, lay on this two or three oysters, boiled up and 
strained, a little pepper, salt, parsley; wash the edge of 
the dough and cover with another piece of dough, press 
down, wash and bake quick. 



L 39 ] 

CURLED OMELETTES, WITH HAM. 

Chop fine half pound of lean ham, stir well six eggs, 
one spoonful of cream, melt in a frying pan a quarter of 
a pound of butter; when hot, pour in the eggs, stirring 
until it begins to thicken, add the ham, set on the stove 
until brown at the bottom, put in the oven for a few 
minutes; serve at once. Season to taste, using parsley. 

FRENCH OMELETTES. 

Beat up one tablespoonful of starch with two of cream, 
add the yelks of six eggs well stirred, beat the whites 
until stiff, add to the other, season with salt, pepper and 
parsley, fry in butter on both sides; serve at once with 
currant jelly. 

GERMAN PAN-CAKES. 

Beat to a smooth batter four eggs, one gill of sweet 
milk and enough sifted flour to make smooth batter, 
pepper, salt and fry in butter; serve at once with fresh 
lettuce. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Select the largest oysters, dry them well on a towel; 
beat up one or two eggs, roll some crackers, not too fine) 
dip oysters in the eggs and crackers several times, fry 
brown quickly in cooking butter, season last with salt 
and pepper. Pieces of meat fried this way will be found s 
very nice. Qi.AJ <' <i$l <f . +'- *,-*' ,i ( r JX < ^"''"'L' 
BREADED SPRING CHICKEN. 

Cut up the chicken before cooking, sprinkle with salt 
and pepper; beat up two eggs, quarter of a pint of milk, 
two spoonfuls of flour, dip the phicken in this, then in 
bread crumbs; bake in hot oven. Serve with cream and 
parpley. 

SPRING CHICKEN, A LA HORLEY. 

Cut up the chicken, dip in melted butter, sprinkle 
with pepper and salt, dip in the beaten whites of eggs, 
dust flour over it and bake brown in butter; serve with 
rings of onion fried in butter. 




[40] 

CHICKEN, A LA VILLROY. 

Boil in good beef stock some chickens, cut up when 
tender, boil down the gravy until rather thick, add 
a little flour; dip the chicken in this, sprinkle with bread 
crumbs, fry quickly in butter; serve with fresh lettuce. 

BAKED CALVES' BRAINS. 

After washing, cook the brains in salt water, dip in 
egg and cracker and bake quickly, or slioe and dip in 
egg and crackers and fry in butter. 

WELSH RARE BIT. 

Toast some slices of bread, put in a frying pan some 
slices of cheese with butter; when cheese is melted, 
spread on buttered toast and serve. 



*.»**»**W**% ***»***.•"*.*•%**•»** 



FISH. 

BOILED SALMON. 

Leave the bead on if for a dinner or party, roll in a 
napkin, boil in salt water, with a few sweet herbs, from 
twelve to twenty-five minutes, according to size, roll on 
the dish, decorate with parsley. Should not be cooked 
too long, or it will fall apart. Holland sauce. 

BROILED SALMON. 

Cut up in pieces to suit, melt butter, add pepper and 
salt, turn the pieces of fish in the butter, broil quickly, 
squeeze lemon joice on each piece; serve with sauce Tar- 
tar or Parsley sauce. 

BAKED SALMON. 

Small fish are preferable. Cut through the long way, 
along the back bone, lay in a dripping pan, skin down, 
salt and pepper, and dust flour, some butter and a little 
?ater; bake in oven. Serve with tomato sauce. 



[41] 

SALMON, A LA BECHAMEL. 

Bake of puff paste some diamond shaped pieces, about 
three inches long; cook a salmon as in other receipts; 
make a sauce a la bechamel; lay the fish in the middle 
of the dish, lay arovnd the pieces of puff paste, pour 
over the sauce, decorate with lemon and parsley. 
Serve hot. 

GRATIN OF SALMON. 

Divide a large fish in the middle, out of one side make 
a filling by scraping the meat, adding two eggs, four 
ounces of butter, four ounces of soaked bread, salt, 
pepper, lemon juice; spread the filling in the bottom of 
the pan, lay on the other half of the fish cut up, and on 
top the balance of the filling, add a little fish water and 
cracker and butter; bake in oven twenty-five minutes, 
serve hot. 

TO FRY FISH. 

Clean and cut in pieces to suit, and wipe dry, pepper 
and salt, dip in egg, roll in cracker dust; fry brown in 
cooking butter. 

BROOK TROUT. 
Dip in flour and fry in butter. 

CARP, SAUCE REMOLADE. 

Boil the fish in soup stock for twenty or twenty-five 
minutes, lay on a dish, add part of the sauce, decorate 
with capers, or green gherkins on the edge of the dish. 
Serve cold. 

TROUT IN JELLY, OR ASPIC. 

Boil the trout as they come from water in salt water 
and a little vinegar, about fifteen minutes. They must 
not fall apart, Then make very clear calf's foot jelly, 
well flavored, fill a mould with the jelly, and before it 
gets cold hang the fish on a wire in the middle of the 
mould and let cool. Only the white meat is used in 
eating, the skin is shafed off. By cooking trout in this 
manner the color is preserved. 



[42] 

CARP EN MATELOTTE. 

Cut up the carp, take out the back bone, and boil the 
pieces in salt water, flavored with sweet herbs; make 
some pieces of toast, lay a piece of fish on each piece of 
toast. Serve Holland sauce with it while hot. 

FISH CUTLETS. 

Cook the fish in salt water, pick out all the bones; to 
each pound of meat add a quarter of a pound of butter, 
three eggs, a quarter of pound of soaked breads salt, 
pepper, a tomato pressed through strainer; mix well; 
shape oval pieces, like cutlets, dip in egg and cracker, 
and fry in butter or lard. 

COD FISH, Cream Sauce. 

Boil fish until tender, pick out the bones, and make a 
white sauce, using cream in place of soup stock. 

COD FISH BALLS. 

Equal quantity of fish and mashed potatoes, two eggs 
to each pound, two ounces of butter, salt, pepper and 
parsley; make round and bake in the oven. 

TO COOK MACKEREL 

Salt a fresh mackerel before broiling; if salted, lay in 
plenty cold water, wipe dry, dip in melted butter, and 
turn over twice over the coals. 



POULTRY AND GAME. 



Poultry is larded to impart a fine flavor and to make 
it look attractive. Salt pork or bacon can be used. The 
larding should always be done very even. 

TO BONE FOWLS. 

Few understand the process, and I think there is 
less waste when fowls are boned. The bones and car- 
cass of a turkey can be used after the fowl is boned, 
and the turkey will go farther and be easier to carve, 



[43] 

when boned. Select good fat fowls, not drawn; should 
be killed two days before using. Begin by cutting off 
the neck and the first joint of the wings and thigh bone. 
Make a clean straight cut along the back bone and slowly 
cut the meat away from the bones and ribs. Separate 
the joint and work from the tail to the breast. The 
carcass is taken out first. The wing and thigh bone 
are pushed in and trimmed off; the craw pulled out 
whole. When done, lay flat on the table, the breast 
from you; trim the fillets and put them where there is no 
meat; lay the stuffing in layers, add some strips of pork 
or ham, laid the long way. Do not fill too much; fold 
over and sew up. It is ready for the oven to roast 
or t0 boil. 

TURKEY STUFFING. 

//Take one pound 9f fiijely chopped veal, three-quarters 
►fa pound cnoppecLpork^ add half pound of butter, six 
eggs, twelve ounces of bread, salt, pepper, mushrooms 
and sweet herbs; mix well. Oysters, chestnuts or apples 
can be used if desired. After a turkey is stuffed it should 
be tied two or three times with twine; not too tight, if 
for roasting. If boiled, it should be wrapped in a towel. 
Put a little water in the pan, a Aw slices of bacon, jjif 
top. It will take three hours to roast, and should be 
basted often. If boiled, put on with cold water, laying 
the carcass at the bottom; must boil three hours. When 
done, take out and press between two boards, so it will 
lay^at in the jelly. 

JELLY FOR FOWLS AND GAME. 

CALF'S FOOT JELLY. 

Get three or four knuckles of veal; also four feet and 
one head; wash well and set on fire with four gallons of 
cold water, half ounce of whole pepper, two ounces of 
salt, two onions, two bay leaves, one carrot, one stalk 
of celery; boil all day, adding hot water when necessarry; 
boil down to about five quarts, strain into a stone jar; 
let it stand over night. Next day skim all the fat off. 
If the jelly is stiff enough, it can be used, if not, 



[44] 

add a few ounces of well soaked isinglass and boil 
half hour. Taste for seasoning. Use six sliced lemons, 
half pint of vinegar, one pint of sour wine and six whole 
beaten eggs, shell and yelk; beat this up before pouring 
in the jelly; then boil and skim as the scum rises. 
Boil slowly for twenty-five minutes, then pour into a 
flannel jelly bag; run through until clear as sirup. If 
not dark enough, use sugar coloring. 

TO DECORATE A TURKEY IN JELLY. 

After the turkey, fish and tongue is cold, take a tin 
mould large enough to hold what you want to make; 
cover the bottom a quarter inch thick with liquid jelly 
and set on ice to cool. Cut up some raw vegetables, such 
as carrots, red and white beets, in different designs, 
names or monograms, and lay them in the jelly in the 
bottom of the dish; pour over a little liquid jelly to 
make the design stick; pour over another quarter of an 
inch of jelly and cool. When cold, lay in your turkey, 
whole or in slices, and fill up the remaining space with 
jelly. These dishes can be made several days before 
using. Chicken, tongue, or any game is made the same 
way. 

SPRING CHICKEN, Asparagus, Cream Gravy. 

Two good sized chickens cut in two; boil the first 
wing joint, neck, giblet, with salt, pepper, and one 
lemon in water until soft and about one quart of 
stock is left, add one pint of hot water, lay in the 
chicken and cook until tender. Boil four bunches of 
asparagus in salt water; when tender, lay aside. When 
the chicken is done, taste for seasoning and make of the 
stock a cream sauce by adding half pint cream; add the 
asparagus and boil up. Lay the chicken on a platter, 
around it the asperagus and over all the sauce. Serve 
with toast. 

CHICKEN, with Mushroom Sauce. 

Fry the chicken brown in butter; when done, pour 
over one pint of water; let it simmer until done, strain 



[45] 

the gravy and make brown mushroom sauce, for which 
brown the flour in the butter, add the gravy, a little 
water and last the mushrooms; season to taste; strain 
and finish with the yelk of an egg. Serve hot with 
pieces of piecrust. 

CHICKEN PIES. 

, The foregoing filled in pie crust and baked in the 
oven will make chicken pie, or keep out the gravy, 
line your pan with crust, lay in the chicken, cover with 
crust, and bake quickly; then pour in the gravy through 
a hole in the top crust. A meat pie made in this way is 
always flakey. 

MAYONNAISE OF CHICKEN. 

Cook the chicken tender in hot water, salt, pepper 
and a few herbs; let cool; cut the meat in pieces; lay 
them in a sauce for five hours made of five spoonfuls of 
oil, three of vinegar, salt and pepper; make a rather 
stiff mayonnaise and arrange the pieces of chicken in the 
shape of a pyramid; smooth over with mayonnaise and 
decorate. 

SPRING CHICKEN, in Jelly. 

Cook chicken tender in butter, seasoning and a very 
little water, cut in four pieces. Prepare nice meat jelly 
and put each piece in a separate mould and pour jelly 
over it. Serve with lettuce. 

PIGEON PIE. 

Take half dozen squabs or young pigeons; clean well, 
cut in two, boil soft in water, salt and pepper; when 
done, drain off the juice and set aside. Prepare some 
pie crust, line the dish, lay in the pigeon, cover up with 
crust, cut hole in the center and bake quickly. Finish 
the sauce and pour in when baked. Serve. 

FRICASSEE OF YOUNG GOOSE. 

Clean and cut up a young goose, fry the breast brown 
in butter, then pour in some water; put in the balance 



[46] 

of the goose and simmer until tender. Out of the gravy 
make brown sauce, and serve with small baked potatoes. 

ROLLED YOUNG GOOSE. 

Bone a young goose, make a stuffing after any re- 
ceipt preferred, lay the goose flat, sprinkle with pepper 
and salt, spread the stuffing on the inside, roll, and bake 
in oven. Serve with baked apples. 

TAME DUCK ROASTED. 

Clean and lard the duck, stuff and roast in the oven, 
cover with a paper so they don't brown too fast at first; 
when tender, take off paper and brown. 

SALMI OF TAME DUCK. 

Cut up and simmer in some butter a duck; when nice 
brown, pour over some stock, and let it get tender; then 
strain off the gravy and finish rather thick and brown; 
add a little lemon juice and a small glass of wine. Have 
some nice designs of pie crust ready and decorate the dish. 

Salmi of prairie chicken and wild duck prepare the 
same way. 

PRAIRIE CHICKEN, in Jelly. 

Make first nice meat jelly of the liver and a little 
lean veal, make a filling, shape the same into about a 
dozen cutlets, dip them in egg and cracker dust and fry. 
Prepare the chicken by cooking them with a few vege- 
tables, spice, salt and pepper; when cold, cut in pieces 
and lay in the jelly; when cold, turn out on a dish and 
decorate with the cutlets. Serve cold. 



/ 



/ TO MAKE MEAT, a la BRAISE. 



Cut up a few carrots, onions, celery roots; add a few 
pieces of ham or bacon, a little butter, and stew until 
tender, but not brown, then add some soup stock, whole 
pepper, few cloves, allspice, thyme, bay leaf and some 



[47] 

salt; boil a few minutes, lay the meat in a stew pan on a 
few slices of bacon, pour over the braise; add the juice 
of a lemon, slowly simmer until tender; strain off the 
juice and use for gravy. 

LOIN OF BEEF, a la BRAISE, 
lyepare as above; use rib roast or rump of beef. 

COLD BEEF a la DAUBE. 

Cook a few calves' feet in water until tender, prepare 
the meat by taking out the bones, tie up in good shape, 
lay in the pan, pour over the stock, add a cup of vine- 
gar, pepper, salt; boil a few minutes, then finish covered 
up in the oven for about three hours. When done take 
out the meat, strain the juice, add some lemon juice and 
boil down rather thick; lay the meat in a mould and 
pour the sauce, which will get stiff like jelly, set on ice. 
Decorate with gherkins and lemon. 

BEEF MARECHAIL. 

Lard a fillet of beef, (tenderloin,) make a stuffing of 
six ounces butter, two eggs, a spoonful of cream, one 
pound of chopped lean beef, six ounces of bread; salt, 
pepper, pinch of cloves and mace; mix well and add a 
handful of mushrooms. Make a cut along the inside of 
the fillet where it is not larded, fill in the stuffing, cover 
with slices of bacon. Roast or finish a la Braise; when 
done strain the gravy, boil down, pour over the meat. 
Decorate with slices of onion dipped in egg and crackers, 
fried in butter. 

/ BEEF a la MODE. 

// Use short rfB T ]rf£ces; bones taken out, well rolled up, 
lard it through, rub with pepper, salt, lay in the pan a 
few slices of bacon, a few onions, carrot, celery, a little 
butter, and let it brown slowly; when brown, add 
enough stock or water to half cover, add a few cloves, a 
bay leaf, slice of lemon. Cook two hours and a half, 
add small cup of vinegar. When the meat is tender 
take out. Finish the gravy and serve with roast po- 
tatoes. 



[48] 

FILLET OF BEEF, a la NELSON. 

Take a good-sized tenderloin, lay it in the following 
pickle for twenty-four hours: In three quarts of water 
put a handful of salt, the same of sugar, half ounce of 
cloves, half ounce of whole pepper, one sliced lemon, 
one onion, four bay leaves, thyme, boil up; add two cups 
of vinegar, when cold, lay in the meat. Next day take 
out the meat, strain the pickle, boil down, lard the 
* meat, lay in a pan, pour over half pound of butter and 
roast in the oven until brown, about three hours, gradual- 
ly adding the strained pickle. While the meat is roast- 
ing, prepare the following stuffing: Twenty-four small 
carrots, twenty-four onions, cook soft in salt water, 
stuff* one dozen onions with the stuffing, by cutting out 
the center, simmer in butter with some olives, decorate 
the plate, lay beef in the middle and lay the onions and 
vegetables around with the olives and parsley. Can be 
used cold. 

FILLET OF BEEF, a la JARDINIERE. 

Finish a fillet by larding and roasting and decorate 
with all kinds of vegetables; cut in fancy designs and 
boil in salt water, select at least three colors; make a 
sauce entree to it and use parsley to decorate. 

BEEF WITH CREAM. 

Make the day before needed the following cream: 
Six ounces of butter, browned, with a spoonful of 
flour, one chopped shalotte; add to it one and a quar- 
ter quarts of milk and let boil; remove from the fire, 
add white pepper, some salt, half of a nutmeg and pour 
over the meat; use either a short rib roast or a piece of 
the loin, or a nice piece of the round. Next day put the 
meat in the oven, strain the cream, and use for basting; 
strain fhe gravy, add one quart cream; trim the edge 
of dish with flowers made of pie crust. 

FRESH BEEF TONGUE, with Mushroom Sauce. 

Boil a fresh tongue in enough water to cover it, 
adding a little salt; when tender, pull off the skin 



[49] 

while hot; make a mushroom sauce and boil up the 
tongue in it. Can be served whole or cut in slices, 
with roast potatoes. 

BEEF TONGUE IN JELLY. 

Boil a fresh tongue cut 'in slices and lay in mould. 
Pour over clear meat jelly. 

BEEF TONGUE AND SPATZEN. 

Boil until tender a tongue, skin while hot; put back 
into the water to cool and it will be juicy. Make a 
dishful of spatzen, fry them; cut up the tongue, make 
a brown sauce, lay the tongue in the middle of the 
dish and around the spatzen: pour over the sauce and 
serve. 

BEEF GULASH. 

Cut up in square pieces three pounds of lean beef, add 
one quart of stock or one quart of water and a quar- 
ter of pound of butter, three spoonfuls of vinegar, salt 
and a little cayenne pepper, a few bay leaves; when 
soft, make the sauce of brown flour. Serve hot with 
toast. 

HASH OF BEEF. 

Cut boiled soup meat in small square pieces, the same 
quantity of raw potatoes, a little onion, pepper and salt; 
put in a dish, add a little butter and a cup of water; set 
in the oven until done. 

BEEF FRICADELLES. 

Cold beef chopped fine, the same of soaked bread, two 
or three ^ggs, salt and pepper, parsley; shape in flat 
pieces and fry in cooking outter. 

FILLED OX TAILS. 

Take two ox tails, use the large part, take out the 
bones, stuff them and roast slowly in the oven; baste 
often and add a little butter. 



[50] 

ROAST VEAL a la BECHEMAL. 

Trim and lard a hind quarter, lay it in butter, add 
pepper and salt; roast brown; make sauce a la Bechemal 
and serve with small peeled baked potatoes. 

STUFFED BREAST OF VEAL. 

Get a good sized breast of veal, have the bones taken 
out, cut a pocket in, make a good stuffiug, fill in the 

{>ocket; sew up and roast in the oven with butter and a 
ittle water; when done strain gravy and make sauce. 

SIMMERED VEAL. 

Get a piece of the ribs or breast; cut in pieces; salt 
and pepper; lay in hot butter; brown and add a quart of 
hot water, two bay leaves; simmer until tender; strain 
and make cream sauce; serve with dumplings. 

O ' , . •, ^ JfEAL FRICANDAUX. 

Out of the hind quarter cut nice clean pieces, no bone 
or skin; lard them on one side; from the bones and trim- 
mings cook a nice brown sauce, adding a little spice, 
carrots and onions, heat some butter, lay in the pieces of 
meat, larded side up; add a little sauce of the above, and 
finish nice brown, until all the sauce is used; if slowly 
cooked the sauce will form a brown glase over the Fri- 
candaux; serve with spinach or endive salad. 

VEAL CLOPS. 

, . , Take two pounds of lean veal; chop fine; add a little 
veal suet, salt, pepper, four ounces of bread, a little but- 
ter and a few eggs; shape in little sausage shape; dip in 
egg and cracker dust, and fry brown; serve with caper 
sauce and mashed potatoes. 

VEAL STEW, with Capers. 

Take small rib pieces and cook until tender in water, 
salt and butter;finish sauce with a little parsley or capers. 
This can be used for a pie, or if bones are taken out, for 
small patties. 



[51] 

CHOPPED VEAL CUTLETS. 

r Get a halt dozen rib chops; do not crack the ribb; ^ 
take off all the skin, chop off all the ribb about three 
inches from the meat, scrape the meat down and chop 
fine, without chopping from the bone; salt and pepper, 
dip in egg and cracker and fry in butter. 

CHOPPED VEAL CUTLETS, in Paper Cases. 

Get some lean veal, take off all the skin, chop fine, 
season and make the size of the cases, turn in egg and 
cracker; fry and serve in cases with salad. 

LEG OF MUTTON. 

Lard well and rub with salt; lay in the pan, add a 
little water, vinegar, vegetables, salt and a little spice; 
boil and take off the scum, cover with a piece of pa- 
per and set in the oven until tender and brown; strain 
the gravy and make the sauce; can be used cold. 

GERMAN MUTTON WITH CABBAGE. 

Piece of the breast or ribs; set on the fire with 
enough water to cover; add salt, pepper, bay leaves, and 
on top a head of cabbage cut in two; cover up and sim- 
mer slowly; when done take out the cabbage; without 
breaking lay on the dish, finish the sauce and lay the 
meat around the cabbage; pour over the sauce and serve. 

VEGETABLES. 

Should first be put on the fire with cold water; when 
they come to a boil pour off the water and put back with 
fresh water and a little salt. The water in ordinary 
canned goods should be poured away, unless they are 
already cooked and needed only to be warmed. Veg- 
etables should be finished with a sauce made of flour and 
butter and the liquid which remains when the vegeta- 
bles are finished. Dry beans cook better in soft water. 

POTATOES IN THE SKIN. 
Wash them, set on fire with cold water and salt; cover 
up and boil, when done pour of the water and cook dry 
a few minutes. 



[52] 

PEELED BOILED POTATOES. 

Peel, put on with cold water and salt, take off the first 
water. When done pour off the water and let them on 
the fire for a few minutes, or strain in a seive, and set 
in the oven for five minutes. 

PEELED POTATOES WITH PARSLEY. 

Same as above. When done chop fine some well 
washed parsley, set on the fire, with a spoonfull ot but- 
ter. When hot add the potatoes. Shake the potatoes 
so the sauce cooks smooth, and serve. 

MASHED POTATOES. 

Peel and boil the potatoes. When done drain off the 
water, and set on the fire to steam. Mash while hot ; 
add butter and milk slowly, beat well to make them 
white. 

POTATO BALLS. 

Mashed potatoes left over can be used. Pass through 
the strainer, add a little parsley, white pepper ; stir well, 
shape into balls the size of an egg. Bake brown in a 
dripping pan, in butter. Do not turn. 

POTATOES FOR ROAST BEEF. 

Peel round, even, small potatoes, throw them in cold 
water ; melt some cooking butter, lay the potatoes in 
and brown on both sides, on top of the stove. 

CREAM POTATOES. 

Boil small potatoes, peel and cut in round slices; make 
a sauce of cream, add a little parsley ; boil up the po- 
tatoes, and when done serve hot. 

POTATO NOODLES. 

Boil potatoes and pass through the strainer, or mash 
fine. To one platefull add four eggs, four spoonfulls of 
milk, salt, and enough flour to form a stiff batter. Roll 
with the rolling pin and cut in round or flat pieces ; drop 
into boiling water, boil five minutes, strain, and fry in 
butter. 



[53] 

POTATO PUFFS. 

Grate a plate full of raw, peeled potatoes ; press them 
out and add two eggs, salt, and a little cream, and drop 
into the frying pan in boiling butter, and brown on 
both sides. 

SPINACH. 

Clean, and pick well. Set on the fire with cold water 
and salt. When tender, strain, and chop fine ; set on 
the fire a quarter of a pound of butter to each plate full 
of spinach ; let it brown with a spoonfull of flour, make 
smooth, add the spinach. If too thick add a little soup 
stock ; boil up, season with pepper and salt, and serve. 

YOUNG STRING BEANS. 

Clean, and cut in pieces, boil up in cold water; 
finish until tender in fresh water; when done add a little 
butter and flour well mixed to the sauce. Add the 
beans, boil up and serve. 

SWEET PEAS. 

Wash and set on the fire with just enough water, a 
little butter and salt. When soft add a tablespoonfull 
of butter well worked with a little flour. Keep hot, but 
do not boil any more. 

SWEET PEAS AND CARROTS. 

Cut the carrots in nice pieces, and set them on the 
fire. When soft add peas, and finish as above. 

LINTELS. 

Pick and soak over night in water; set on the fire 
with plenty of cold water; when not quite done add a 
small onion chopped; finish with butter and flour. 

CARROTS. 

Scrape and cut in slices; boil until tender; finish with 
salt, pepper, butter and flour. 

ASPAREGUS. 

Wash and tie them in bundles of nine stalks; 
set on the fire with cold salt water and a little butter; 



[54] 

wheii done melt a spoonful of butter, add a little flour 
and enough of the water from the asparegus to make 
sauce; finish with the yelk of an egg. 

CAULIFLOWER. 

Cut and wash well in salt water and boil until soil, 
add salt and a little butter; when done make a cream 
sauce; season to taste. 

BAKED CAULIFLOWER. 

Boil as above, make sauce very thick; dip each piece 
in the sauce and in bread crumbs and bake in the oven. 

PLAIN CABBAGE. 

Cut each head in four pieces; take out the core and 
lay in water; boil up and straiu; put in fresh water and 
boil until tender; strain again and cut up; out of the 
juice make a sauce by adding butter, flour, salt and 
pepper. 

STUFFED CABBAGE. 

Select a small solid head and cut out the core; fill the 
space with a stuffing and boil slowly, keep whole; make 
extra sauce. 

RED CABBAGE. 

Wash well, cut up, take out the core, set on the 
stove and stew until soft; add butter, flour, salt and pep- 
per. A little lean ham cooked with it gives it a good 
flavor. 

CELERY, with Cream. 

Boil until tender six celery roots in salt water; peel 
and make a cream sauce. 

RED BEETS. 

Boil until tender, peel and slice; pour over vinegar 
and a few cloves. 

PARSNIPS. 

Boil in salt water, clean, and cut lengthwise ; fry in 
cooking butter. 



[55] 

TURNIPS MASHED. 
Wash, cook soft and strain ; add salt, pepper. Butter. 

TURNIPS WITH CREAM. 

Boil soft, slice, make cream sauce, adding a little 
parsley. 

CUCUMBERS. 

Peel and cut in slices. Salt them well and l6t them 
stand awhile. Press out ; brown a spoonfull of flonr in 
some butter, add a little milk and water, pepper, Boil 
until smooth, add the cucumbers ; boil up and serve ; a 
spoonfull of vinegar can be added if desired. 

MUSHROOMS. 
Can be fried in butter, or cooked and finished with a 
sauce. 

SALADS. 



Salads are a very important feature of the menu, aud 
should be made with care. Make plain salads first be- 
fore attempting any elaborate ones. Never mix until 
ready to use, or your salad will become watery. Use 
none but the best ingredients. Good virgin oil should 
have a greenish tint ; yellow oil is generally adulterated. 
Use good taste in decorating. In winter use designs 
cut of beets, turnips, carrots, etc. The mayonese with 
cream will be found very useful where oil is objected to. 
Fragrant herbs are very much used in France for salads, 
the taste cultivated for them. They are called pimpernal, 
chives, chervil, borage and tarrigon, and can be bought 
in any drug store, if called for. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Peel small solid potatoes 'hot, cut in even slices, not 
too thin. Add to each quart four spoonsfull of olive oil. 
Onions can be used if desired ; pepper and salt. Mix 
this, and last add one spoonfull of vinegar. If too dry 
add a little soup stock or water. Do not let stand long 
after mixing. 



[56] 

PLAIN SALAD DRESSING. 

A compound of three parts of oil, one of vinegar, pep- 
per and salt. Use oil, salt and pepper first, then add 
the vinegar to the salad, and use at once. 

LETTUCE. 

Wash and wring dry two heads of lettuce, separate 
the leaves and break them apart. Put them in a bowl, 
add oil, pepper, salt, a teasspoonfull of chopped herbs, 
toss up, add vinegar, toss up and serve. 

LETTUCE, WITH DRESSING OF BACON. 

Cut two ounces of sweet bacon in small dice, fry 
slowly, pour over the salad ; pepper, salt, and last two 
spoonfulls of vinegar. 

RED AND WHITE CABBAGE SALAD. 

Cut up a small hard head of each, leave them sep- 
arate, salt each, let stand half an hour. Press out, and 
prepare the dressing. Boil hard four eggs, cut them 
the long way in two, lay the red cabbage in the middle 
ot the dish, the white around it and the eggs on the edge, 
and when ready to use mix with dressing, on the table. 

ENDIVE SALAD, /^^^/iy* 

y Pick the salad and use mostly the white. Cut in pie- 
ces one and a half inches long. Add a little onion ai 
serve with plain dressing. 

LETTUCE AND EGGS. 

Boil four eggs hard, lay one head of lettuce in the 
bowl. Slice the eggs, chop up a few capers, and use 
plain dressing. 

WATER CRESS SALAD. 

Wash and pick; add a little onion and plain dress- 

1Dg ' CELERY SALAD. 

Four celeryac roots, boiled soft, peel and slice; add two 
sliced potatoes, salt, pepper, a few celery leaves and use 
'lain dressing. 



[57] 

ASPARAGUS SALAD. 

Boil two bunches, after cutting off two inches of the 
hard end, and scrape off skin; drain and lay in the 
bowl; use plain dressing. 

CAULIFLOWER. 

Pick the Cauliflower in small pieces, wash and boil in 
salt water; drain and arrange in the bowl; use plain 
dressing. 

STRING BEANS. 

String and cut them; boil tender; add a. little onion; 
plain dressing. 

CUCUMBER SALAD, German. 

Peel and slice solid cucumbers, salt and let stand for 
twenty minutes; press out, use plain dressing, onions if 
desired. 

BREAKFAST SALAD. 

Scald three large smooth tomatoes, skin them and lay 
on ice, when cold slice them; cut up a gherkin in slices 
and one head of lettuce and use plain dressing. 

STALK CELERY SALAD. 

Cut the root off, and wipe each piece; cut in pieces an 
inch long; use plain mayonese. 

HERRING SALAD, German Style. 

Get four milt Holland herrings and soak in water over 
night, pound them with the back of a knife, and pull off 
the skin, beginning at the tail, take out the milt and cut 
up in small square pieces; slice one and one half quart of 
potatoes while hot; lay in a dish and moisten with a little 
water and vinegar; add the herring, one onion well 
minced; stir up the milt of the herring in a bowl, take 
out the stringy part and mix in six spoonfuls of oil; stir 
until smooth, add pepper and mix with the salad, using 
last four spoonfuls of vinegar; if the oil is objected to a 
dressing can be used of hard boiled eggs. (See receipt). 



/ 



[58] 

IT ALIEN SALAD. 

This salad can be made out of beans, cauliflower, as- 
paragus, celery, potatoes and red beets; cut up after they 
are cooked in square pieces, each of the vegetables being 
kept seperate, also green gherkins, silver onion, capers, 
chicken, lobsters, shrimps cut, and a plain dressing used; 
in laying the salads in the bowl aim to have a variety of 
colors; lay them in rings in the dish and a hard boiled 
egg in the middle; decorate with parsley, and mix when 
ready to serve. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

Mix cut chicken and celery with 6orae fine mayonese, 
use more celery than chicken, and spread the mayonese 
over the salad in the bowl before adding the vinegar; 
when making a large quantity keep the chicken moist 
by adding a little of the stock, and when ready to mix 
drain off. 

SALMON SALAD. 

Put in a dish two pounds of Salmon, add pepper, salt 
and the juice of two lemons; fill the bowl with lettuce, 
add fish and decorate with stoned olives and hard boiled 
eggs. 

OX SNOUT SALAD. 

Boil a well cleaned ox snout in salt water until tender; 
take off the skin and cut up in pieces; add a few cold 
sliced potatoes, one onion and plain dressing. 

VEAL SALAD. 

Can be made the same as above, using veal instead of 
ox snout. 

TOMATO SALAD, with Mayonese. 

Scald and peel six large tomatoes and lay on ice, when 
cold slice, add a little taragon, use mayonese for dress- 
ing. 

SHRIMP SALAD. 

One quart of clean shrimps; line a salad bowl with 
one head of lettuce; add two sliced fresh tomatoes, next 
the shrimps and last the mayonese. 



[59] 

OYSTER SALAD. 

Boil three dozen oysters five minutes in a little water, 
drain and cool, chop three hard boiled eggs, the center 
of two heads of cabbage, a few anchovies and last the 
mayonese. 

LAMB SALAD. 

The center of two heads of cabbage chopped fine, one 
pound of cold roast lamb, also chopped fine, one cup of 
capers, plain dressing. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

Two cans lobsters, pick over, add more celery than 
lobster, mix with mayonese and decorate with eggs. 

SARDINE SALAD. 

Two boxes small sardines in oil, two heads of fresh 
lettuce, a few chopped olives and plain dressing. 



EGOS. 

SOFT BOILED EGGS. 

Set on the stove in cold water. When the water boils 
they are done. 

SCRAMBLED EGGS. 

Beat up well four eggs, pepper and salt, four spoons- 
full of milk, two ounces of butter in the pan. When 
hot pour in the eggs, stir slowly until done. Chipped 
ham or beef can be added. 

FILLED EGGS WITH SAUCE. 

Boil hard one dozen eggs ; take off the shell and cut 
lengthwise. Take out the yolks, chop up with a hand 
full of lobster meat, a few capers, seasoning, add a little 
bread, fill the eggs, place in a pan, bake in an oven. 
Serve with cream sauce. 



[60] 

POACHED EGGS. 

Break each egg slowly into boiling salt water ; boil 
slowly ; pour boiling water over them. Serve on hot 
battered toast. 



«..-■■ .•*»_** 



PUDDINGS. 



Can be baked, steamed or boiled, and served with a 
sweet sauce. Flavors should be natural fruit, such as 
lemon, orange, vanilla beans as the extract is rarely pure. 

BOILED CORN STARCH PUDDING. 

One pint of milk, six ounces of butter, set on the 
stove. When boiling add, stirring briskly, four ounces 
of sugar, six ounces of corn starch mixed in a little cold 
milk. Stir until smooth. When cold add two eggs, 
ten yelks, a little salt, grated lemon, and last the white 
of the eggs beaten stiff. Boil an hour and a half in a 
mould, and serve with cream sauce. 

POTATO PUDDING. 

Pass one pound of potatoes through a strainer ; beat 
up six ounces of butter, four ounces of sugar, the yolks 
of eight eggs, two whole eggs, lemon flavor. When 
light add the potatoes, half pint of cream, four ounces 
of bread, salt a few currants, and last the white of the 
eggs beaten stiff. Boil one hour and a half; serve with 
apple sauce. 

SCALDED FLOUR PUDDING. 

One quart of milk, a piece of vanilla bean, six ounces 
of butter; when boiling add six ounces of flour, stir well; 
when cold add two ounces of butter, six ounces of sugar, 
two whole eggs, the yelks of ten, salt, mace and the 
whites beaten stiff. Boil an hour and a half. Serve 
with wine sauce. 

WHITE BREAD PUDDING. 

1 WTwelve ounces of bread, one quart of milk, a quarter 
of a pound of butter, set on fire, stir until smooth, add 



t61] u* 

five ounces of sugar, two eggs, the yelks of eight eggs, / * 1 ^-^*^""^ 
a quarter of a pound of cut figs, lour ounces of citron, jf^^^/lU 
cinnamon, add the whites ot the eggs beaten stiff. fte*J- ^/**^ fc 
one and one-half hour. Serve with cream sauce. £*%£*& 



r Q ' l "e i 



FRESH CHERRY PUDDING. fa 

Two pounds of rolls, soak in three pints of milk, add 
on the fire five ounces of butter, when smooth and set 
to cool, add six ounces of sugar, the yelks of twelve 
eggs, salt, lemon flavor, cinnamon, one quart of fresh 
stoned cherries^ last the whites of the eggs beaten stiff. 
Boil or bake one hour and a half. Serve with sauce. 

APPLE PUDDING. 

Same as above, use peeled apples, cut in dice instead 
of cherries, and serve with lemon sauce. Can be boiled 
or baked. 

DELICIOUS CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

Beat until light six ounces of butter, add four ounces 
of sugar, the yelks ot twelve eggs, three ounces of 
sweet chocolate grated, eight ounces bread, cinnamon, 
and last the whites of the twelve eggs beaten stiff. Boil 
one hour and a half. Serve with cream sauce. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 

Beat up the whites of four eggs, one pint of sweet 
cream; add half pound of flour, half pound of chopped 
suet, two ounces of sugar, half pound of raisons stoned, 
half pound currents washed, one ounce citron and 
orange peel, cut up, and a little grated nutmeg. Boil 
three hours; when serving pour over rum or brandy 
and light. Serve with hard sauce. 

ENGLISH PLUMB PUDDING, NO 2. 

Beat up foftr eggs, add half pound of sugar, half 
pound of suet, half pound roasted bread, well rolled 
and sifted, half pound currents, lemon flavor. Boil 
three hours. Hard sauce. 



[62] 

APPLE PUDDING. 

Mix half pound flour, half pound suet, a little ginger 
with some milk, so it can be rolled out; roll with rolling 
pin, fill with peeled half apples, dust well with sugar and 
cinnamon; fold over, boil two hours, and serve with 
hard sauce. 

RICE PUDDING. 

To prepare rice for any dish follow these directions. 
Wash, pick and clean the rice in cold water; pour on 
each half pound of rice one quart of water and milk; set 
in the oven until soft. If dry before it is done, add 
more water, but do not stir. Take a pound and a half 
of soft rice, a pint and a half of milk, a quarter of a 
pound of sugar, a quarter of a pound of butter, eight 
eggs, lemon flavor, or almond flavor, cook or bake. 
Serve with cream sauce. 

RICE AND APPLES. 

Prepare half pound of rice, soft, but rather dry, add a 
quarter of a pound of sugar and butter, a little milk; 
spread half of this in a pan, then a layer of half apples 
peeled and cored, rolled in cinnamon and sugar, then the 
balance of the rice and one pint of custard on top. See 
custard receipt. 

, CUSTARD. 

One pint of milk, two ounces of sugar, one teaspoon- 
ful of corn starch and three eggs. Beat all together. 

CABINET PUDDING. 

Make one quart of custard, fill a pan three-quarters 
fuli with stale cake or bread and one handful of currents 
or berries; pour over the custard and bake. 

DONNA GLORIA PUDDING. 

Soak half pound of rice in the oven in milk until soft; 
when done, add a quarter of a pound of sugar, some salt, 
a quarter of a pound of rolled almonds, six ounces of 
sugar, the yelks of twelve eggs; beat up together, add 



[63.| 

one glass Madeira wine, one ounce chopped orange peel; 
add this to the rice, and last the whites of the twelve 
eggs beaten stiff. Bake in a mould. Serve with fruit 

J ell y- /p * • , o 

ALMOND PUDDING. \ A !^?&y *?!*"' 

Macerate one pound of blanched almonds with one 
pound ot sugar, add slowly four whole eggs, the yelks of 
twelve eggs, the rind of two lemons grated. Beat thorough- 
ly; soak in milk one pound of stale bread, without crust; 
add a quarter of a pound of melted butter; mix this with 
the almonds. Beat the whites of the twelve eggs stiff, 
add slowly to the above mixture and bake in a mould. 
Serve with wine sauce. 

NESSELRODE PUDDING. 

Boil in milk until soft one pound of French chest- 
nuts, peel and stir to a paste, add fourteen ounces of 
butter, fourteen ounces of sugar, four whole eggs, the 
yelks of twelve; soak in milk one pound of bread, press 
out; four ounces of citron and four of orange peel and the 
rind ot two lemons grated, a quarter of a pound of 
sultana raisins; add the bread and last the whites of the 
twelve eggs beaten stiff; bake or boil. Serve with lemon 
or wine sauce. 

ROSE LEAF PUDDING. 

Four ounces of fresh rose leaves cut up fine, mix 
with six ounces of dry pounded rolls. Beat together six 
ounces of sugar, the yelks of twelve eggs, one gill of 
sweet cream; add the rose leaves and rolls, and last the 
beaten whites of the eggs. Boil or bake one hour and a 
half. Serve with cream vannilla sauce. 

NAPOLEON PUDDING. 

Stew in milk one pound of nice red carots, when done 
pasp through the strainer, pound fine eight hard boiled 
eggs, beat six ounces butter, a quarter of a pound of 
almonds, two whole eggs, the yelks of eight, have pre- 
pared twelve pieces of toast which have been dipped in 



[64] 

batter made of the yelks of tour eggs, three quarter of a 
pint of milk, well soaked and fried in butter; beat the 
whites of the eggs until stiff and mix in the batter; lay 
six pieces of the toast in the pudding pan, sprinkle with 
a handful of currants, add half of the pudding batter, 
six more pieces of the toast and the balance of the bat- 
ter, sprinkle with ehopped almonds; bake one hour and 
serve with Madeira sauce. 

NUT PUDDING. 

Macerate with the sugar any kind of nut, preferred; 
use half pound of nuts, half pound of sugar, beat six 
ounces of butter, two whole eggs, the yelks of eight with 
the nuts and sugar, add one pound of soaked rolls 
well pressed out, and last the beaten whites of the eggs 
and a little vanilla flavor; bake one hour and serve with 
vanilla cream sauce. 

YORKSHIRE PUDDING. 

Use with roast beef; beat well together tour eggs, six 
ounces of flour, two of butter, salt, mace; when the roast 
beef is nearly done pour the batter around it in the gravy 
and bake until done. 

BAKED NOODLE PUDDING. 

Boil in salt water a half hour one pound of noodles, 
pour into the strainer. Beat ten eggs, six ounces of 
sugar, the rind of a lemon grated, three quarters of a 
pint of cream; butter the pan and sprinkle with cracker 
dust; mix the noodles with the eggs; pour in the pan a 
layer of the noodles and sprinkle with currants, and 
continue until the pan is full and bake; serve with fruit* 

Je y ' LEMON PUDDING. 

Grate the rind of four lemons, squeeze the juice of one 
lemon. Beat three quarters of a pound of butter, four 
eggs, the yelks of twelve, a little mace, two ounces of 
citron, add the juice and rind of the lemons, a half pound 
of bread, and last the beaten whites of the eggs; bake 
and serve with lemon wine sauce. 



[65] 

APPLE PUDDING. 

Bake in the oven twelve nice apples ; pass through 
the strainer. Peel one and a half pounds of apples and 
cut in dice. Beat half pound of butter, six ounces of 
sugar, four eggs, the yolks of six eggs, eighteen ounces 
of bread and a pint of cream. Mix this with the apples, 
add the whites beaten stiff, flavor with lemon, serve 
with wine sauce. 

SPANISH PUDDING. 

Soak in two quarts of water one pound of rice ; when 
almost done add a little salt, two ounces of butter, the 
grated rind of six oranges. Add the juice when the 
rice is soft ; also four eggs, half pound of cut figs and 
let it boil, or set in the oven, stirring occasionally until 
rather dry. Then press into a mould and set on ice. 
Serve cold with chocolate sauce on orange jelly. 

LEMON PUDDING, COLD. 

Grate six lemons, squeezing out the juice. Add the 
yolks of ten eggs, six whole eggs, half pound of sugar, 
half pint of white wine. Heat this on the fire until 
about to boil, stirring constantly. Then add a quarter 
of a pound of stale sponge cake, and last the beaten 
whites of the eggs ; pour into a mould and bake one 
hour, set on the ice to cool. Turn out and serve with 
wine sauce. 

PUDDING SAUCES. 

All sauces made with eggs must be well beaten, on a 
moderate fire, in a double sauce pan until they 
are near boiling. Sauces should be smooth and not too 
Always strain before using. 

MILK, CREAM, OR WATER SAUCE. 

me pint of milk, two teaspoonsfull of corn starch, 
ounces of sugar, the yelk of four eggs, or twtfwBole 
eggs. Any flavoriug may be used, such as vanilla, 
orange, lemon, almonds blanched, chocolate. 




[66] 

CHODEAUX SAUCE. 

One pint of white wine, six ounces of sugar, three 
eggs, four yolks, lemon flavor, two teaspoonsfull of corn 
starch. Heat on the stove until smooth ; strain and 
heat after straining. 

BISHOP SAUCE. 

Two ounces of sago, one quart of water, half pound of 
sugar, the juice and grated rind of one orange; juice of 
two lemons, one pint of wine. Heat all together and 
strain. 

STRAWBERRY, APRICOT AND RASPBERRY 

SAUCE. 

Use fresh berries, pass through a strainer, then add to 
each pint one pint white wine, six eggs, eight ounces of 
sugar, one ounce of corn starch; heat until smooth. 



SWEET JELLIES. 



Jellies can be made of veal stock or isinglass. To 
prepare veal stock for jelly, boil veal knuckles with 
plenty of water four or five hours; use no salt or flavor- 
ing until strained; when the meat falls from the bones, 
strain and boil down; boil six quarts down to two; when 
cold, remove all the fat and clarify. 

TO CLARIFY JELLY. 

When using isinglass, soak at least three hours in 
plenty of water before using; take out the isinglass, add to 
the balance of the ingredients; set on the fire and pour in a 
little water to stop boiling; take off any scum that may 
arise; boil once more rather slowly for twenty minutes; 
if curdled and clear, strain. Jelly must always be 
strained or run through a flannel bag, and in winter, 
near the fire, poured back until it runs clear as 
water. The wine or liquor is not boiled, but poured in- 
to the jelly bag. Can be colored with carmine or brown 
sugar. 



J : C sk*<<l<^ )*' t [\ly' ■** A 




^ ( • . : 4 . * - > , i 



PLAIN LE^pN^JgLLY. 

To each quart of water use three ounces of isinglass 
In summer; in winter two ounces will be sufficient; add 
three-quarters of a pound of sugar, the rind of two 
lemons and the juice of tour or six to each quart, two 
whole eggs broken with the shell and beaten with a little 
water; boil as directed and strain through the bag. 

ORANGE JELLY. 

Same as above; use the rind and juice of two oranges 
and the juice of four or six lemons. 

WINE, BRANDY OR RUM JELLY. 

Same as lemon, adding one gill of liquor when in the 
bag. 

ROSE LEAF AND VIOLET JELLY. 

Same as above, adding fresh leaves of the flowers. 

ORANGE FLOWER JELLY. 

Add orange flower water. 

FRESH FRUIT JELLY. 

Fresh or preserved fruit can be added when jelly is 
ready for the mould, or can be put in layers, pouring 
jelly over each layer and allowing it to cool. 

RUSSIAN JELLY. 

Can be made of any clear Jelly; let the jelly cool, and 
before it is set beat with the egg beater until almost set; 
pour into moulds and let cool on ice. 

FANCY JELLIES. 

Can be filled in oranges, lemons, cups, eggs or paper 
boxes for lunches or parties. 

FILLED ORANGES. 

Oranges can be filled with ice cream, jelly or blanche 
mange. Select large oranges, cut a round piece off the 
top, scoop out the meat and juice, use the same for jelly; 



[68] 

care should be taken not to break the peel; set them in 
chopped ice, fill with jelly, ice cream or blanche mange 
and replace the top, or can be served in slices. 

ORANGE JELLY, in Half Oranges. 
Cut the orange in half, scoop out and fill with jelly. 

BLANCMANGE. 

To each half pound blanched fresh almonds one pound 
sugar, one quart of water; take two or three ounces of 
isinglass. Blanche the almonds and pound well with 
the sugar, add the water; flavor with rose or orange 
flower water, strain and add the isinglass; by adding car- 
mine, burnt sugar, spinach or chocolate it can be colored 
to suit. 

CREAM or MILK BLANCMANGE. 

Use cream or milk instead of water, and follow direc- 
tions as above. 



CREAMS. 



Creams are served in bowls or moulds lined with cake 
or served in small glasses with cake, when made in 
moulds no isinglass is needed. Milk can be used for 
boiled creams, but are richer when cream is used. If 
cream is used it should be rich thick cream and whipped 
on ice with an egg beater. You can not whip cream 
that contains any milk. 

WHIPPED CREAM, Vanilla Flavor. 

Whip with the egg beater until thick, then add a 
quarter of a pound of sugar to each pint of cream, and 
any desired flavor. To this can be added fresh berries 
or fruits, almonds or nuts of any kind, cocoanut grated, 
chocolate, strong coffee, and is used for filling in layer 
cakes. 



[69] 

VANILLA CREAM, With or Witout Isinglass. 

One quart of cream, two eggs, the yelks of four, eight 
ounces of sugar; if no isinglass is used take two ounces 
of corn starch, beat on fire until thick, pour into small 
glasses or moulds; if isinglass is used soak one and one 
half ounces of isinglass, when melted stir into the warm 
cream, which has been thickened on the fire; when al- 
most cold pour into moulds and set on ice. 

LEMON ORANGE CREAM. 

Can be made same as above, using lemon or orange 
instead of vanilla; nuts can be used or any desired fresh 
or preserved fruit, or chocolate for chocolate cream. 

PUNCH CREAM. 

Add Jemon juice and brandy when ready to go on the 
Jire. 

CREAM for Charlotte Russe. 

teat one quart of rich cream, set it aside; soak one 
funce of isinglass, when melted keep warm; beat up half 
pound of sugar, the yelks of eight eggs, pour in the 
isinglass and this in the cream, then stir slowly until it 
begins to thicken; then fill into moulds or bowls lined 
with sponge cake. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE, of Chocolate. 

Can be made by adding chocolate, or nuts of any kind 
can be added by macerating with sugar, roast nuts or 
almonds before macerating. 

FLAVORED CREAM. 
Brown sugar can be used for coloring and flavoring. 

ICE CREAM. 

For good ice cream good cream is necessary. Custard 
ice cream must be cooked, and is more trouble than the 
cost of the cream. Ice should be pounded fine enough 
to pass around the freezer easily, and not too much salt 
should be used. Any patent ice cream fieezer can be 
used. Ices need not be beaten, as they do not increase. 




[ 70 ] 

Good cream will double itself. One gallon ice cream 
will make twenty-four portions. Use fresh lemon or 
orange for flavor. Press through a cloth with a little 
cream. Strawberries or fruit ot any kind should be 
ripe and pressed through a strainer. 

VANILLA FLAVORING. 

Take four long vanilla beans. (Tonqua beans are 
used to make the imitation, and look like a good sized 
lima bean.) To four vanilla beans take half a gill of 
boiling water, split and cut and throw in the beans, and 
when cold pour into a bottle holding twice the quantity, 
then pour in one gill of spirit of cologne — alcohol con- 
tains (usil oil. Shake once a day, and keep well corked 
in a|warin place ; in a few days it is ready for use. 
Four beans should cost about fifty cents. 

ALMOND, BANANA, or PINEAPPLE FLAVOR. 

Should always be made ot fresh fruit, as all flavoring 
extracts are made of butteric ether, and are very inju- 
rious. 

VANILLA, CHOCOLATE, CARAMEL, Etc. 

To each gallon of cream a pound and a quarter to a 
pound and a half of pulverized sugar, dissolve, strain, 
add the flavor, and freeze. 

CHOCOLATE CREAM. °h n .,^^ 

Melt four ounces of Baker's chocolate on a tin plate ; 
set over steam; when melted, add a quarter of a pound 
of melted sugar in gill of water, add slowly to the cream. 
It should be stirred and strained before freezing. 

COFFEE ICE CREAM, White. 

Take halt a pound of fresh roasted coffee to one gal- 
lon. When roasted and while hot put in the cream and 
let it cool. If brown cream is wanted grind while hot. 
Pour boiling water over it and strain into the cream. 

CARAMEL CREAM. 

Add enough brtfjvn sugar to color and flavor. 



[71 ] 

MACAROON CREAM. 
Add pounded macaroons. 

ALMOND CREAM. 

Add marcerated almonds or any nut desired. 

NEW YORK OB EUROPEAN CREAM. 

Put one gallon of sweet cream on the fire, stirring 
constantly to prevent from burning. Beat up twelve 
eggs, a pound and a half of sugar; add to the cream, set 
back on the fire, and when it rises, take off and beat un- 
til cold; strain flavor and freeze. 

BISQUIT GLACE. 

Beat up the yelks of eight eggs, half pound of sugar, 
vanilla flavor, beat light^one quart of rich sweet cream; 
then add the sugar and eggs well beaten, pour in a 
mould, set in ice and salt, and freeze for two hours; dip 
in luke warm water and turn out. 

NESSELRODE ICE CREAM. 

! To each gallon of sweet cream use one and a half 
pound of sugar, one and one-half lbs. of strained French 
chestnuts, vanilla flavor, half pound of chopped figs, 
half pound Sultata raisins, and freeze. A . . * * 

WATER ICES 

Are made by melting sugar and water, and the necessary 
flavoring; use lemon juice to counteract the sweetness. 
No isinglass or whites of egg are necessary. Mix, strain 
and freeze; use more salt in freezing. 

To one gallon of ice use two quarts of water, four 
pounds of sugar to make a syrup; set it to cool, then 
measure one quart of cold water to one quart of syrup, 
then add flavor and lemon juice. 

LEMON ICE. 

To each gallon grate the rind of four lemons, and the 
juice of eight or ten. 



•• «• 



[72] 

ORANGE ICE. 

To each gallon grate the rind of four oranges, also 
the juice of eight or ten lemons. 

STRAWBERRY ICE. 

To each gallon of ice strain one and one-half quart of 
ripe berries and the juice of four to six lemons. 

PINE-APPLE ICE. 

To each gallon of ice, use one pine apple grated, or 
two cans, and the juice of six to eight lemons; use good 
fruit, and don't make too sweet. 

NEAPOLITAN CREAM. 

Fill three or four kinds of cream or ices in one mould 
and put back in the ice for a few hours. 

SHERBETS. 

Are water ices flavored with red or white wine, and 
frozen; must be served in glasses; use one quart of wine 
to each gallon of ice. 

FRAPPEE. 

Are made by adding more water to the water ice, to 
two quarts of syrup, four quarts of water, enough lemons, 
and frozen not hard, just enough to serve in glasses with 
spoons; wine or any liquor desired may be added. 

PUNCHES. 

Are made by freezing lemon or orange ices, and when 
ready to serve; any preferred liquor is beaten in and 
served in glasses. Punches are served early in the even- 
ing at parties. 




[73] 
CAKES, PASTRY AND BREAD. 



No baking powder is used in any of these recipes; 
more eggs are required for them, but they will be found 
much healthier and more substantial. Those who wish 
to use powder can make it pure themselves, not making 
too much at one time. Use two parts of pure cream of 
tartar, one part of pure bi-carbonate of soda and one 
part dry powdered corn starch, well sifted together and 
kept dry. Carbonate of amonia can be used to raise 
cakes in small quantities; it leaves the cake and evapor- 
ates when in the heated oven, and not a particle remains 
after it does its duty, while baking powder remains in 
the cake, especially if not pure. Any of the following 
recipes can be made cheaper by adding milk and flour 
and leaving out some eggs, but it is better to eat good 
bread than a poor imitation of cake. 

REMARKS ON YEAST. 

Compressed yeast must be yellow white, be firm, and 
have a bitter smell. If any article is needed in a hurry 
an extra cake of yeast may be added without injury. 
Good bread can be made in three hours. Always set a 
sponge before making the dough, and it will work 
smoother and raise faster. Use patent flour made of 
winter wheat mixed with spring wheat tor bread, but 
for cakes and pastry winter wheat is preferable. 

/ BREAD. 

/ Dissolve in lukewarm water or milk one cake of yeast, 
sift flour into a bowl and stir the yeast into the middle 
of the flour, mix with some flour, make a stiff batter, sift 
some flour over it, and in winter time set in a warm 
place with a cloth thrown over it. In about thirty min- 
utes it will be raised; add a teaspoonfull of salt and 
enough flour to make a stiff dough. Work it until smooth, 
and make into loaves ; set to raise. If the pans are half 
full of dough when three-quarters full, put in the oven, 
not too hot, and it will raise in the oven to fill the 



[74] 

pan. Wash with milk before and after baking. Bolls, 
buns and coffee cake are made the same as bread, with 
the addition of butter, sugar and eggs. 

BUNS AND ROLLS. 

Add to each pound of bread dough two ounces of but- 
ter, work in well for rolls. For buns add a little sugar. 

PLAIN COFFEE CAKE. 

To each pound of bread dough add two eggs, three 
ounces of sugar, three ounces of butter and a little lemon 
rind grated. Add enough flour to make a stiff dough ; 
roll out and bake in a flat pan ; wash with a mixture of 
milk, when raised, and sprinkle with sugar and cinna- 
mon; bake in a quick oven. If cakes made with yeast 
are washed with beaten egg they will have a nice appear- 
ance when baked. 

FINE COFFEE CAKE. 

Two pounds of sifted flour, one pound of worked but- 
ter, two cakes of yeast, salt, six ounces of sugar, one pint 
of milk, grated lemon rind, eight eggs. Dissolve the 
yeast in the milk, set a sponge. When raised add sugar, 
butter and eggs, beat up well, put in a pan, let it raise. 
Wash and sprinkle with chopped almonds and sugar, 
and bake. 

LIGHT COFFEE CAKE. 

Sift one pound of flour, beat to a cream three-quarters 
of a pound of flour; add seven ounces of sugar, eight 
eggs and two pieces of compressed yeast dissolved in 
hike warm milk, a few currents, citron, and lemon rind; 
add flour last; pour into a cake mould and let it raise 
and bake. 

STREUSEL COFFEE CAKE. 

Make dough of two pounds of flour, set the sponge 
with two pieces of yeast cake; when raised, add six eggs, 
eight ounces of sugar, three-quarters of a pound of melted 
butter, flavor, roll out and put in flat pans; when raised, 



[75] 

put on top the streusel; made of two ounces of butter, 
two ounces of sugar, three ounces of flour, a teaspoonful 
of cinnamon; rub together and spread on the cake and 
bake. 

APPLE CAKE. 

Fresh apples, cherries, peaches, grapes, etc., can be 
layed on top of flat coffee cake; pour over a custard and 
bake. 

ROLL COFFEE CAKE. 

Make a dough of one and one-quarter pounds of flour, 
three-quarters of a pound of butter, eight ounces of 
sugar, four eggs, two cakes of yeast, a little milk, salt; 
mix half pound well washed currants, a quarter pound 
sugar, two ounces chopped citron; roll out the dough, 
spread with the currants and citron, roll up; let it raise, 
wash and bake. 

SAVARIN CAKE. 

Make a dough of one pound of flour, six ounces of 
butter, two ounces of sugar, six eggs, one cake of yeast, 
a little milk; make dough rather soft; fill in small tart- 
let moulds, let them raise and bake rather dry; when 
cold, dip in the following syrup: melt on the fire one 
pound sugar, half pint of water, add one gill of brandy, 
or the juice of six lemons and let the cakes soak; dust 
with sugar. 



REMARKS ABOUT TEA CAKES. 



All the cakes and pastry in this book are made by 
weight, and it is always best to weigh the ingredients, 
you can always know how much you will have and 
be sure of the result. The pans used should be made 
of sheet iron the size of the oven, and have a wire rim. 
If amonia is used, it should be well powdered and dis- 
solved in milk. A little on the point of a knife will 
be found sufficient, but it is not necessary if the dough 
is well made and beaten. 



[76] 

PLAIN SUGAR CAKE OR COOKIES. 

Sift one and one-half pound of flour on the moulding 
board, put into the middle half pound of butter, rub 
well together; add three-quarters of a pound of sugar, 
one gill of water or milk and a little amonia, mix 
smooth, roll and cut out, lay on tins, wash with milk 
and bake quickly; or, sugar and chopped almonds can 
be sprinkled on top before baking. 

TEA CAKES. 

Sift fourteen ounces of flour, beat up half pound of 
sugar, six ounces of butter, two eggs, half gill of water. 
Roll, cut out and bake. 

ALMOND SNAPS. 

Chop up a quarter of pound of almonds, one and a 
half pound of flour, three-quarters of a pound of sugar, 
two eggs, one-quarter pound of butter; mix sugar, butter, 
almonds, eggs, flavor, and last the flour. Cut round and 
sprinkle with sugar. Bake. 

JUMBLES. 

Mix in bowl half pound of sugar, half pound of butter, 
half gill of milk, three eggs, one pound and two ounces 
of flour. When smooth, roll out, cut in rings, lay on 
flat pans and bake. 

SHREWSBERRY CAKES. 

Sift a pound and a quarter of flour, beat three-quar- 
ters of a pound of sugar, six ounces of butter, three eggs, 
half a gill of water, a little amonia. Cut with a scalloped 
cutter, wash and lay in the middle a piece of citron in 
diamond shape. 

GINGER SNAPS. 

Half pint of molasses, mix with a quarter of pound of 
sugar, quarter of pound of butter, half a gill of water, 
a quarter of an ounce of soda, one pound of flour. Roll 
and cut out in small round pieces, lay on flat tins and 
bake quickly. 



[77] 

GINGER NUTS. 

One quarter of a pound of flour, half pint of molasses, 
quarter of pound of butter, a quarter of pound of sugar, 
vinegar, ginger, a quarter of an ounce of soda, half gill 
of water. Make little lumps on flat tins, press down and 
bake quickly. 

BUTTER TEA S. 

Mix half pound of sugar, six ounces butter, two eggs, 
three quarters of a pound of flour, lemon flavor; roll out 
in shape of an S ; wash and bake quickly on flat tins. 

CUP CAKES. 

Mix to a cream ten ounces of sugar, a quarter of a 
pound of butter, three eggs, half gill of milk, amonia, 
lemon flavor, ten ounces of flour; drop in small greased 
cups and bake quickly. 

QUEEN CAKES. 

Mix to a cream half a pound of butter, half pound of 
sugar, five eggs, three quarters of a pound of flour, half 
gill of milk, a little amonia; drop in cups and frost on 
top. 

SOFT GINGER BREAD. 

One pint of molases, one-half pound of sugar, half 
pint of water, six ounces of butter, one ounce of soda, 
two and Ja quarter pounds of flour; roll out in sheets, 
wash with milk, bake and cut up. 

WAFERS. 

Half pound of sugar, half pound of butter, three eggs, 
half pound of flour; roll out, cut in rings, put in flat 
greased pans and bake quickly. 

/ ALMOND BREAD. 

Chop a quarter of a pound of almonds, two ounces of 
^citron, a pinch of cinnamon and cloves, half pound of 
sugar, three eggs, three quarters of a pound of flour, a 
little amonia; roll the dough the length of the pan, about 
the size ef your rolling pin; wash and bake, cut in slices 
after it is baked. 



/T8 




[78] 

ALMOND CROQUET. 

Take three quarters of a pound of sugar, mix with one 
jgill of the yelks of eggs, beat well, add a half pound of 
whole almonds, ten ounces of flour; roll out and cut in 
pieces three inches wide and half inch thick Wash with 
egg; bake on flat tins. 

J ' / , COCOANUT DROPS. 

Grate one or two cocoanuts, weigh them whea grated, 
add half the amount of sugar, mix well, and shape into 
balls or hay-stacks; wet the hand in water when shaping. 

PLAIN MACAROONS../, V ' ' :; " 

'acerate one-half pound of almonds with pound of 
sugar J sift through the flour sieve, mix with white of 
eggs sufficient to make a stiff paste. If almond paste is 
used take same amount of sugar as paste and then the 
white of eggs.  ,, ' . , 

CHOCOLATE MACAROONS. 

Add a quarter of a pound of melted coco to the above 
mixture. 

CINNAMON STRIPS. 

Macerate a half pound of almonds, three-quarters of 
a pound of sugar; add enough white of eggs, to make a 
dough, a few teaspoonsful of cinnamon. Roll out, cut 
in strips four inches long and quarter of an inch thick, 
spread with egg frosting, cut in strips and bake slowly. 

ALMOND CORNETS. 

Six ounces of blanched almonds, macerate with nine 
ounces of sugar, sift and add three ounces of flour; add 
sufficient white of eggs to make a thin batter. Spread 
roll on buttered tins in round layers; bake quickly and 
while hot over a piece of wood, fill with sweet cream. 

SHAVINGS. 

Same as almond cornets, lay out in strips a finger 
wide; roll over a piece of round wood while hot. 



[79] 
CREAM PUFFS. 



* <" 



Scald one pint of water, half pound, of butter,' ti(n 

'^ounces of flour, add when cold six'' %gs, lay out with 

lady finger bag on greased tins. Bake in medium oven, 

fill with cream like for cream cakes. XCream to it one 

o^'pint of milk, six ounces of sugar, one and one-half 

ounces of flour, three eggs,) vanilla flavor. Stir on the f 
fire until thick. ^_. / v* A •• *^ " 1 .. % . / 

ECLAIRES. *f* - - - 

Same as above, laid out long and filled with chocolate 
creptn. 
y MERENGUE OR KISS BATTER.*' / « ' 

Beat up very stiff the whites of eight eggs, then stir 
in one pound of powdered sugar, lay out on paper with 
lady finger bag, dust with powdered sugar; bake slowly. 
All Merengue batter should be powdered with . sugar 
before baking, v. .. . : s ' i^/y '• 

/ PUFF PASTE. *^ ] '-"-** '' — 

Should be made in a cool place. Equal quantities of 
flour and butter, a little salt and water are used for puff 
paste. Wash the butter well in ice water, work it 
smooth and lay in ice water until wanted. Mix the 
flour and salt, a teaspoonful to each pound, with ice 
water, stiff and smooth, let it lay five minutes and it 
will not be tough. Roll out large enough so you can 
wrap the butter in it, fold it down and roll out about a 
halt inch thick ; then fold over twice so it will be four 
thicknesses. Repeat this five times, leave the paste 
about ten minutes each time after rolling, then your 
paste is ready to work up. 

/ PATTY SHELLS. 

[/ Roll out some puff paste an eighth of an inch thick, 
cut with a round cutter like for cookies. Cut a hole 
about an inch in diameter in half of them, and lay those 
with the hole on top of the others, stick the edges to- 
gether with egg and water beaten up; wash the top 



[80] 

with the same and bake in a quick oven for twenty-five 
minutes. Always heat before ready to serve, fill with 
oysters, sweet bread, chicken, etc.; with the necessary 
sauce. 

CREAM PATTIES. 

Are filled with sweet cream, chocolate cream or with 
same cream as cream cakes, or with fruit jelly, and some 
kiss batter layed on top and quickly baked. 

TURNOVERS. 

Square or round are filled with jelly, marmalade or 
cream, turned over, washed and baked quickly. 



/ 



PIE CRUST. 



One pound of flour, half pound of butter, rub the 
butter and flour together while dry: add enough ice 
water to make stiff dough; do not work the dough, roll 
with rolling pin three or four times, let it stand before 
using. This will make four pies with top crust. 

CUSTARD FOR PIES. 

For each pie use two eggs, a quarter of pound of 
sugar, one teaspoonful of flour, a halt pint of sweet 
milk. Beat th^s eggs, sugar and flour together, then add 
the milk and flavor. 




LEMON PIES. ; * <- 

s • 
i 

Grate the rind of one lemon and peel two, cut them 
up, remove all seeds, add four ounces of sugar, one tea- 
spoonful of corn starch and one gill of milk. Bake this in 
the crust; then out of a quarter of pound of sugar, two 
eggs, make nieringue top, and dust with sugar and 
bake. 

GRATED APPLE PIE. s , ... ^'^ 

Peel and grate four large sour apples; add three ounces 

of sugar, a teaspoonful of flour; a half pint of milk, two ^j 

eggs, a few currants; bake without upper crust. JU-> :<>' 



[81] 

COCOANUT PIE. 

One fresh eoeoanut makes two pies; peel and grate; 
add to one half of it four ounces of sugar, one teaspoon - 
ful of flou, two eggs, one gill of milk; no upper erust. 

COTTAGE CHEESE PIE. 

To a good cupful of well worked cottage cheese add 
three ounces of sugar, two eggs, a teasponful of flour, 
one gill of milk, a handful of currants, if desired; no 
upper crust. 

FEACH PIE. 

Cut the peaches in half, take out the stones, lay on the 
crust; pour over a custard and bake. 

MINCE MEAT FOE PIES. 

Boil until tender three pounds of lean beef, cool and 
cut in small pieces, half pound of chopped suet, three 
pounds of cut apples, one pound of sugar, half pint of 
molases, one pound stoned raisins, half pound currants, 
rind of one lemmon grated, one and a half ounces of 
cinnamon, three quarters of an ounce of cloves, a nut- 
meg grated, enough boiled cider to moisten, and a half 
pint of brandy if desired. 

GOOSEBERRY PIES. 

Gooseberry and pie-plant pies should have a table- 
spoonful of flour mixed with the sugar; this will prevent 
the juice from cooking out. 

CREAM PIES. 

Make a cream as for cream cakes, fill the pie and 
bake. When the pie is baked spread on top a merengue. 

PLAIN APPLE PIE. 

Fill the pie with apples, put on plenty of sugar, a 
little cinnamon and flour. 

APPLE CUSTARD. 

Cut the apples in six pieces, lay the pieces in nicely, 
sprinkle a few currants, pour over a custard and bake. 



[82] 

CABINET PIE. 

Fill the tfos with pie crust, pour in some stale cake 
crumbs an/ over this a custard; bake. 

SWEET SHOKT CRUST, x. c.,^l *' ' 

One pound of flour, rub dry with ten ounces of butter; 
mix six ounces of sugar with two eggs and then mix 
with flour and butter. Keep cool until wanted. Use 
for fruit tarts, strawberry short cake and small tartlets. 

FANCY APPLE TARTS. 

Bake of a sweet short crust in a round tin with a rim a 
bottom. Select six nice apples, peel, core and cut in half; 
simmer in water until soft, then lay in syrup over night 
(see syrup); next day make a cover of apple jelly. Boil 
a few apples; add to the juice some sugar; when cooked, 
pour in a paper form the size of the bottom crust; let 
it cool; lay the apples on the bottom crust, also some 
nice canned fruit, such as gages, and turn over all the 
apple jelly and serve. 

STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE. 

Out of sweet crust bake a sheet rather thick; when 
cold, put on a layer of fresh berries and on top of a 
merengue of one pound of sugar the whites of eight 
eggs; dust with sugar and bake. 



REMARKS ON LOAF AND LATER CAKES. 



In miring cake batters the whites of the eggs must be 
beaten until quite stiff and solid. Keep the whites of 
the eggs in a cool place, and they will beat easily. Use 
Common Sense egg beater, which can be obtained of me. 

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING CAKE. 

Weigh sugar, flour sifted and butter, count out the 
eggs, have the moulds and pans ready. Then 
divide the eggs, add the yelks to the sugar, the whites 
into the kettle in which you will beat them; if butter is 



[«8j 

used, stir to a cream, beat with the yelks and sugar for 
fifteen minutes, then add the whites beaten very stiff, 
slowly, and last the flour. No baking powder is re- 
quired, and these cakes will keep fresh longer than if 
baking powder is used. The batters can be baked in 
one loaf or in layers; if the cake is high, bake slowly. 
Layer cakes should be baked quickly. Use fresh fruit 
for flavoring and do not use more than one flavor for 
any cake. Use ordinary powdered sugar for all cakes. 

VIENNA CAKE. 

One pound of sugar; one pound of flour, fifteen eggs, 
half pound of melted butter. This makes a nice batter 
for small dessert, such as half moons, squares, cut cakes; 
must be baked in paper sheets an inch and a quarter 
deep, or may be used for jelly cakes or baked in one loaf. 

AMERICAN POUND CAKE. 

One pound of butter, one pound of sugar, twelve eggs, 
one pound of flour. By adding citron, currants, nuts, 
different cakes can be made. 

FEUIT CAKE. 

One pound of butter, one pound of sugar, twelve eggs, 
one pound of flour, add two pounds of washed currants, 
a pound and a half of stoned or Sultana raisins, one pound 
citron, cut in slices, half pound orange peel, a quarter of 
a pound of cinnamon, two ounces of cloves and alspice, 
the rind of two lemons grated, half pint of molases, and 
if desired a half pint of brandy; bake slowly with two or 
three layers of paper in the pans; three to four hours are 
required for an eight pound cake; should be baked be- 
fore needed, as it improves if a few weeks old. 

WHITE CAKE, LADY CAKE, SILVER CAKE. 

Cream, one pound of butter, one and a half pounds of 
sugar, one ana a half pounds best flour or half corn 
starch, one and a half pint of the whites of eggs, flavor 
with almond paste, or macerate a few almonds. 



[84] 

FILBERT CAKE, 

Roast and clean a half pound of filberts, macerate with 
half pound of sugar^ eight eggs, eight yelks, three ounces 
of flour; if for large cake fill with filbert cream and frost 
with vanilla frosting. 

ALMOND CAKE. 

Almonds and nuts of any description can be used in 
the above manner. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Half pound of unblanched almonds, three quarters of 
a pound of sugar; macerate the almonds, ten eggs, the 
yelks of eight, a quarter of a pound of melted chocolate, 
four ounces of flour; beat up the almonds, sugar and 
yelks of egg, chocolate, the whites of the eggs well beaten, 
and last the flour; if for larger cakes fill with chocolate 
cream and frost with chocolate frosting. 

BREAD CAKE. 

Roast six ounces of bread until it is a nice brown, 
roll and sift, soak in a little wine, macerate twelve 
ounces of almonds, eighteen ounces of sugar, beat up 
with the yelks of twelve eggs; add the bread and two 
ounces of grated chocolate, the whites of the twelve eggs 
beaten stiff, and last five ounces of flour; bake in one 
loaf or sheets, and frost with vanilla frosting. 

LIGHT SAND CAKE. 

Beat up one pound of sugar, the yelks of eighteen 
eggs, cream, melt half pound of butter, beat the white of 
twelve eggs, stir in the butter and last half pound of 
corn starch, and half pound of flour, lemon favor, and 
frosting. 

PUNCH CAKE. 

Make four layers of the sand cake, bake quickly, 
prepare apple jam, by adding lemon juice and a glass 
~ f brandy, fill the layers, and frost with water frosting. 



[85] 

PORTUGEES CAKE. 

Half pound blanched dry almonds, macerate with 
half pound of sugar, sixtecen eggs/ the whites beaten 
stift; when light, add half pound melted butter, eight 
ounces of* flour. 

EEGENT CAKE. 

Make a bottom of short sweet crust; bake not 
too hard, before it is finished make a border of maceroon 
dough, fill with almond cake batter, and bake; frost 
with lemon water frosting. 

NELSON TART. 

Make bottom of short sweet crust, on the edge 
lay out a rim with lady finger bag of four whites of 
eggs, halt pound of sugar, three ounces of chopped 
citron and a little cinnamon. Make one layer of almond 
cake one and a half inches thick, the same size round as 
the lower cake, spread jelly or cream on the lower one, 
lay on the almond cake, and cover all round with 
meringue, spread on with a knife, dust and bake quickly. , 

ANGEL FOOD, (original), a-^. A */■ f J£ X 

For three cakes sift three-quarters of a pound of sugaly /( , ^' % 
half pound of flour, a teaspoonful of cream tartar, beat / 
a pint and a half of the whites of eggs very stiff, then 
mix in sugar and flour smooth. Bake in a mould with a 
tube, frost when cold. 

FINE WAFFLES. 

Cream one pound of butter, add two ounces of sugar 
and slowly eight eggs, one pint of cream, one pound of 
flour, two pieces of compressed yeast, raise about one 
hour, and bake in waffle irons. 

SNOW WAFFLES. 

Cream half pound of butter, the yelks ot ten eggs, a 
little salt, two ounces of sugar, a pint of cream, two 
ounces of flower, and last the whites of the ten eggs 
beaten stiff; bake at once. 



ts\ 



[86] 

FRIED CAKE. 

One gill of eggs, one gill of milk, ten ounces of sugar, 
a quarter of a pound of bulter, a quarter of an ounce of 
soda, a half ounce cream of tartar; < mix in a pound and a 
quarter of flour; dissolve soda in the milk, add flour, roll 
out; fry in hot lard or butter. 

FINE FRIED CAKE. 

Can be made of cream cake batter; roll into balls, fry 
in butter and dip in sugar and cinnamon. 

GRIDDLE CAKE, self-raising. 

Wheat, corn or buckwheat, to each quart of flour add 
two teaspoons of baking powder; for buckwheat use 
half wheat flour; to corn meal one-third wheat; when 
mixing the batter use sweet milk, and to corn and wheat 
cakes two eggs to each quart of flour. They are made 
quickly and will be found sweet and light. 

CORN BREAD. 

To, one pint of prepared corn meal add a quarter of a 
pound of sugar, two ounces of butter, two eggs and 
and enough sweet mild to make the batter, not too stiff. 
Bake quickly. 

STEAMED BROWN BREAD. 

Add to one pint of milk a quarter of a pound of rye 
flour, half pound of corn meal, a quarter of a pound of 
wheat flour, a gill of molasses and one teaspoonful of 
soda; steam two and a half hours. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

Three-quarters of a pound of graham flour, same of 
rye flour; sift all together; one gill of molasses, salt and 
enough milk or water to mix, two pieces of compressed 
yeast; let raise and bake in high moulds. 

RAISED MUFFINS. 

Two ounces of butter, two eggs, one pint of milk, one 
piece of yeast, salt, and enough flour to make batter; fill 
in cups, let raise and bake quickly. 



[87] 



MUFFINS. 



Half pint of corn meal, half pint of flour, one table- 
spoonful of butter, two eggs, two small teaspoons of 
baking powder; mix with milk. 



FROSTING. 



t TO MAKE FROM THE WHITES OF EGGS. 

f/Sift through a Swiss muslin sieve ordinary powdered 
sugar twice, then use one or more eggs and add the 
sugar yithout beating the egg; until about the stiffness 
of griddle eake batter; stir with a paddle, add a little 
acidic acid in drops. Beat until light and white. 

WATER FROSTING. 

One pound of sugar, half pint of water, a very little 
cream of tartar; cook to a small ball; pour in tin, let it 
get cold, stir with paddle until white. 

WATER FROSTING. 

Made of fruit juice such as lemon or orange, rose 
water, vanilla flaver, are nicer and cut nicely as they do 
not get so dry. To make enough for a cake use four or 
five tablespoonsful of liquid, use no water for lemon or 
orange; grate the rind and use the juice, strain and press 
through a cloth, add fine sifted sugar until stiff enough 
to/ise, dry in gentle heat for a few minutes. 

WARM COOKED CHOCOLATE FROSTING. 

A quarter of a pound of Bakers' chocolate, fourteen 
ounces of sugar, half pint of water, cook to a string, 
cool, and stir until a crust forms, then use. 

FRUIT JELLY. 

All jellies are made of the juice of ripe fruit and 
sugar, boiled sufficiently; when you think it is done let 
a little run off the skimmer, and if it runs broad it is 
done. .The quantity of sugar varies for different fruits. 



[88] 

Use "A" sugar: To Currants, one pint of juice, one pound 
sugar; Strawberries, one pint of juice, three-quarters of 
a pound of sugar; Apples, one pint of juice, half pound 
sugar; Goosberries, one pint juice, one pound sugar; 
Grapes, one pint juice, one pound sugar; Raspberries, 
one pint juice, three-quarters of a pound sugar; Apricot, 
one pint juice, three-quarters of a pound sugar. 

MARMALADE or FRUIT JAMS. , 

All fruit must be ripe and passed through a strainer; i 
apples must be cooked solt; add the following quantities •' 
of sugared, apples, quinces, pears, peaches, three-quarters < 
of a pound of sugar for one pound of pulp, add the ] 
sugar, set on the fire and stir constantly to keep from 
burning; should be boiled as long as jelly or it will fer- 
ment; if boiled on a quick fire the jam will have a good 
color. 



I 






-K. *. 



"V 



/ 



/ 



'» 



1 



I.