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Full text of "A Catalogue Raisonné of the Works of the Most Eminent Dutch, Flemish, and French Painters: In ..."

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CATALOGUE RAISONNE 



OP 



THE WORKS 



OP THE MOST BMINENT 



Bttt($ onti ifTemisil^ ^aintem* 



PART THE SECOND. 

CONTAINING THE LIFE AND WORKS 



OP 



PETER PAUL RUBENS. 



A CATALOGUE RAISONNE 

OF 

THE WORKS 

OF THE MOST EMINENT 

DUTCH, FLEMISH, AND FRENCH PAINTERS; 

In to)ir) 10 tncluMr a siort Bfograpltiral Notice of tie flrtiftf. 

WITH A COPIOUS DESCBIPTIOK OF 

THEIR PRINCIPAL PICTURES; 

A 8TATEKENT OF THE PRICES AT WHICH SUCH PICTURES HATE BEEN SOLD 
AT PUBLIC SALES ON THE CONTINENT AND IN ENGLAND; 

A REFERENCE TO THE 

GALLERIES AND PRIVATE COLLECTIONS, 

IN WHICH A LARGE PORTION ARE AT PRESENT; 
AND THE NAMES OF THE ARTISTS BT WHOH THET HAVE BEEN EN6RAYBD; 

TO WHICH 18 ADDED, 

A 8BZSF HOTZCE OF THE SCHOLARS & ZMZTATOR8 

OP THE 

GREAT MASTERS OF THE ABOVE SCHOOLS: 

BT 

JOHN SMITH, 

DEALER IN PICTURES. 



PART THE SECOND. 



9rOiiIioit : 

PUBLISHED BY SMITH AND SON, 1S7> NEW BOND STREET. 

.MDCCCZZX. 



* lokdok: 

printfd bt t. brettell, rufbrt steeet| hatkarkit. 




ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 



With the difficulties, trouble, and expense, 
attending the compilation and publication of a 
Wori^ of this nature, the public generally are un- 
acquainted ; these can only be fiilly known to the 
Author, or to those who have been engaged in a 
similar pursuit. Without any intention of a&> 
suming more merit than is due to the completion 
of the work, the Writer candidly owns, that, had 
he foreseen the pains and penalties which have 
attended its progress, he would have assuredly 
declined the undertaking. Having encountered 
and overcome these difficulties, he is enabled, 
from a keen recollection of them, to appreciate 
the numerous acts of kindness received in the 
prosecution of his labours ; and he feels it to be 
one of the most agreeable duties, now distinctly 
to acknowledge them. He is more especially 



VI 



induced to perform the duty on the present 
occasion, lest another opportunity may not be 
afforded him ; for the continuation of the Work 
will depend upon the encouragement he may 
receive by the number of subscribers — ?l source 
too uncertain to rely on in a work, the readers 
of which are necessarily very limited. 

To the numerous noblemen and gentlemen 
on the Continent, the Author offers his warmest 
thanks; particularly to His Excellency the 
Baron Verstolk de Soelen, a gentleman distin- 
guished for his excellent taste and sound Judg- 
ment in the arts ; to Messieurs Six Van Winter, 
Van Loone, Schamps, Van Sasseghem, Van 
Lanckeren, and Francken, of Holland and Flan- 
ders ; and to Messieurs Perigaux, Valdou, and 
the Chevalier Erard, of Paris. The same thanks 
are due to the Directors and Custodi of the 
Public Galleries and Royal Collections in Hol- 
land, Flanders, Paris, Francfort, Dresden, Mu- 
nich, Vienna, Venice, Florence, Genoa, Turin, 
and Potsdam; many of whom^ in addition to 
assisting the Author with ladders to enable him 
to inspect pictures hanging above the reach of 



vu 



the eye, also furnished him with the measure^ 
of such as he desired to have, and whatever 
other information their registers possessed. 

The Author is equally impressed with a grate-, 
fid recollection of the kind and condescending 
attention shown, by numerous noblemen and 
gentlemen in this country, to his respectful ap- 
plications to. view their collections, for the 
purpose of noting correctly the several pictures 
necessary for this Work : but while he. thus offers 
his unfeigned thanks to those who . have so 
obliged him, he feels it but just to confes3rthat 
his respectfiil applications were, not, in one 
instance, equally successful ; and he has conscr 
quently been compelled to obtain, at the expense 
pf his pocket, that which should have, been 
granted him, on such an occasion, from that par- 
ticular quarter, as a matter of course, or at least 
conceded as a favour, and doubtless would have 
been, had those gentlemen, to whom the Writei 
applied, chosen to have made the object of his 
applications known to the illustrious individual 
whose collection it was indispensable that the 
Writer should inspect ; but, thanks to the good 



VIU 



1 

\ 



feelings of the gentlemen of the country, that 
is a solitary instance. 

In conclusion, the Writer begs to acknowledge 
the great satisfaction he has experienced during 
the progress of the Work, in the ready dispo- 
sition manifested by those concerned in the 
commerce of pictures to affi>rd him every infor- \ 
mation in their power. To an eminent collector 
»d skilftl connoi^w in prints, he is much 
indebted for the liberty given to refer, at all \ 

times, to his valuable collection of portraits \ 

after Van Dyck. He has also experienced the 
most obliging civility from several eminent print- 
sellers who have so frequently allowed him to 
inspect their portfolios. Such indeed has been 
the universal kindness experienced by him (with 
the exception already alluded to), that he has 
felt it a duty to persevere in rendering the Work 
as perfect as possible, and with that view has 
spared neither pains nor expense that might 
contribute to that end. 



/ 



THE 



LIFE 



OF 



PETER PAUL RUBENS. 



The seduded and traoquil life of an artist furnishes in 
general but few materials for the pen of the biographer ; 
and the casual anecdotes of the foibles and eccentricities 
that inquisitive curiosity may glean from his domestic 
habits, or his occasional connections with the world, are 
frequently too unimportant to entertain the judicious 
reader. To record drcumstanoes not really necessary 
to elucidate the character of the individual, is not only 
an insult to the judgment of the reader, but a detriment 
to the memory of the person to whom it relates, whose 
life, if it be worth writing, should present examples 
Worthy of imitation to those who wish to pursue u 
similar path to fame and distinction. 

The artist, whose history it is intended to record in 
the following pages, differs from almost every oth^ 
of the same profession — ^his life abounding in prcHni- 
nent events: at one time exercising bis art as a 
painter, at another engaged in the cabinet, or in exe- 
cuting some important diplomatic mission ; admired 



X LIFE OF BUBEKS. . 

and praised for the excellent productions of his pencil, 
honoured and dignified by sovereigns and potentates for 
his conduct as a statesman. Peteb Paul Rubens, 
the worthy object of these encomiums, descended from 
a respectable family, who dated their origin from Styrie, 
a province in the Austrian dominions ; his grandfather, 
Bartholomew Rubens, joined the suite of the Emperor 
Charles V. upon the occasion of his splendid coronation 
at Aix-la-Chapelle, in 1520; at the conclusion of 
which ceremony he accompanied the emperor to the 
Diet at Worms, and subsequently took up his residence 
at Brussels. The Court of Charles was then the most 
magnificent and brilliant in Europe; and the young 
Bartholomew, having the advantage of a good edu- 
cation and possessing all the fashionable accomplish-! 
tnents of the time, attracted the admiration of such a 
Court. He found no difficulty in forming an advan- 
tageous union with a lady of noble fatnily, named Barbara 
Arens, sumamed Sperinck. The commerce and opu- 
lence of the city of Antwerp, at that period, brought 
togiether a confluence of merchants from all countries, 
and consequently such gaiety and amusements as were 
well calculated to excite a disposition in the young 
couple to remove to that city ; to this they were further 
induced, by its being the residence of some of their 
relatives. Of this union, in the month of March, 1530, 
was bom John Rubens, the father of the artist. Gifted 
with a ready disposition to study, his acquirements in 
the knowledge of the sciences and polite literature were 
extensive : at the age of twenty-four he went to Italy, 
where, during a residence of six years, he perfected 
himself in the several universities for the profession of 



UF£.OF RUBENS: XI 

a civilian, and took the degree of doctor of civil and 
canon law at Rome. Soon after his return' to his native 
city he married a lady of distinguished family^ named 
Maria* Pypeling» daughter of Henry Pypeling and 
Clara Tolion, and established himself at Antwerp, in 
the profession of the law. His erudition and prudience 
shortly acquired him distinction, and, in May 1562, 
he was elected a counsellor of the senate. About this 
period the Low Countries were agitated by the Icono- 
clasts, whose zeaLfor the destruction ' of images was 
attended by persecution, pillage, and every species of 
disorder, creating dissension and - misery among ' all 
classes. These disasters, continuing for some time, 
induced John Rubens to quit the official situation 
which he ' had held six years, and to remove with his 
family to Cologne, preferring peace and tranquillity to 
the prospect of wealth*. 

After ten years of calm enjoyment in domestic occu* 
pations, he was blessed with the :birth of a seventh 
child (the subject of these memoirs), who was bom on 
the '29th of June, 1577; aiid this (being the day on 
which, the feast of St. Peter and St. Paul was solein- 

» 

* His residence at Cologne was in the Rue de TEtoile, in the 
parish of St. Peter. A stone tablet, inserted in the front wall of 
this house, bears an inscription, signifying that Peter Paul Rubens 
was bom there the 29th day of June, 1577, and that John Rubens, 
his father, died there in 1587, and was buried in the. church of 
St. Peter. Another tablet, placed on the opposite side of the door, 
records that Marie de Medicis, Queen of France, occupied the 
same house, and died in the same room -in which Rubens was born* 
in 1642, aged sixty-eight. This house was subsequently the resi- 
dence of a Monsieur Jabach, and is now in the occupation of a wine 
merchant and publican. , 



XU LIFE OF RUBEKS. 

nized, the infiint was baptized, in the name of both 
saints, at the church of St. Peter. His natural 
capabilities were manifested from the commencement 
of his studies, by his surpassing all his juvenile com- 
panions ; and he showed an extraordinaiy predilection 
for the acquirement of languages. This aptitude for 
learning was cultivated with great care bj his father, 
whose whole attention had been directed to the edu- 
cation of his children ; but this worthy man was sud- 
denly seized with a malady, which, in March 1587^ 
terminated fatally, leaving to his widow the chaige 
and care of five sons and two daughters*. 

The death of John Rubens, and the restoration of 
order in the Low Countries, induced the widow, in the 
commencement of the following year, to quit Cologne 
and return to Antwerp. One of her motives for this 
removal was the recovery of her husband's property^ 
which had been seized imd confiscated^ at one time by 
the Royalists and at another by the Iconoclasts, under 
pretence that his emigration, without a regular per-> 
mission, was suflBfient to implicate him in the con-* 
spiracies which then prevailed ; and h^ presence at this 
period was extremely fortunate to the family, as she 
was enabled, by the assistance of her powerful friends, 
to remove the imputation cast upon her husband's cha- 
racter, and thereby to recover the greater part of his 
property. 

* Biographers erroneously state that John Rubens, the father of 
the artist, retimied to Antwerp, and resumed his official situation. 
The inscription already quoted, and a second one on a tablet in 
St Peter's churth, at Cologne, confirm his death and burial in 
that city. 



LIFE OF BUBEKS. xiu 

Rubens (then eleven years of age) resumed his studies 
in the several branches of learning, m each of which he 
distinguished himself by a fudlitj that denoted his 
future excellence ; and, by the time he approached his 
sixteenth year» he had made such progress in Latin^ 
and other useful languages, that he was considered 
qualified to commence the study of the law, for which 
profession he was intended. At this period an oppor- 
tunity occurred of introducing him to the noble family 
of the Countess de Lalain, in quality of page, in which 
he would have the advantage of observing the manners 
of polished society, and obtaining that patronage which 
would tend to promote his future interests. His good 
sense and docility rendered a conformity to the rules 
of the establishment an easy task, and his quick appre^ 
hension enabled him to familiarize himself readily with 
the ceremonious style of the lofty Spanish nobility who 
figured at that period. This situation, however, was 
not to his taste ; his predominant inclination for draw- 
ing, which had hithato been indulged in only as an 
amusement, bc^n to develope itself more decidedly ; 
he beoune disgusted with the servility of the situation, 
and reserved to quit it and pursue the study of the arts 
and polite literature. This resolution he took an early 
q>portunity of communicating to his indulgent motheie, 
who expressed unwillingness that he should follow a 
profession which she considered to be unworthy of his 
birth, observing, that he was yet too young to choose 
fi>r ^imgplfj and that his superior education entitled him 
to higher distinction than J^ pursuit oi painting could 
proouref. Notwithstanding this admonition, his natural 
attachment to the arU accompanied by a ^nrit of i^- 



XIV LIFE OF EUBENS. 

dependence, induced him to reiterate his solicitations to 
his mother — ^to open to her his thoughts and anxious 
wishes, and in conclusion, emphatically to declare, that 
the situation of a page accorded so little with his taste 
and feelings, that, however it might lead to honours 
and distinction, the summit of his. ambition was to 
be a great painter, and in the pursuit of thb object 
he should enjoj a life of liberty dearer to his heart 
than all the charms which his present situation might 
promise. 

This declaration made a suitable impression upon his 
parent, who was well acquainted with the predilection 
of her son for the arts ; and it was agreed, after consult- 
ing the rest of the family, that he should be permitted 
to pursue the bent of his inclination. Having decided 
upon this, their next object was to find a suitable in* 
structor for him, when a painter (whose only recom- 
mendation probably was an acquaintance *with the 
-fkmily) of the name of Tobias Verhaest was accepted ; 
but the penetrating scholar soon discovered his master's 
deficiencies, and quitted him to enter the school of Van 
Oordt, or Noordt, an artist at that period of some ce- 
lebrity, but whose works, consisting of familiar subjects 
and portraits, have, like those of many others of that 
date, long since been forgotten. 

The young artist, eager to acquire knowledge, 
•entered this school buoyant with gay expectations, and, 
'doubtless, resolving in his mind to compete with his 
-two fellow pupils, Henry Van Baelen and Sebastian 
Francks ; these intentions were, however, blighted by 
the morose dispositicm of his instructoc The temper 
of Van.Oordt,'so oppositeto the mildness and affability' 



LIFE OF KUBENS. XV 

of Rubens, soon produced dissatisfaction in the mind of 
the latter — a feeling more readily excited from the 
previous buoyancy of his hopes. Complaints of the 
bnitaUty of hb master reached the ears of a friend of 
the family, who, having satisfied himself of the truth, 
recommended him to enter the school of Octaviiis Van 
Veen, called Otho Voenius, of whose character for ur- 
banity he spoke in high terms of praise, and as one fully 
qualified to give the aspiring genius of Rubens a proper 
direction. Otho was the most celebrated painter of his 
day, having studied and improved his taste in Italy, 
where he resided many years in the service of the Duke 
of Parma; his superior talents had also procured him the 
notice of, and the appointment of painter to, the Arch- 
duke Albert and hb consort Isabella. Such an ac- 
compUshed instructor revived the langubhing ardour of 
the young artist. 

The amiable dbposition and accomplishments of the 
pupil, now in the nineteenth year of his age, soon at- 
tracted the esteem of Otho Voenius, who felt a pleasure 
in -communicating his lessons to a mind so admirably 
formed to receive them; nor were these merely con^ 
fined to painting, for the taste of the scholar for 
literature was encouraged and assbted by the master, and 
the arts and belles-lettres were mutually cultivated by a 
mind so peculiarly adapted for learning. The grateful 
pupil was sensible of these acts of kindness, and 
pursued hb studies with such ardour and delight, that, 
at . the expiration of four y eiars, hb friendly Mentor 
declared him in possession of aU that he could com- 
municate in art, and that the time was then arrived 
when at became indbpensable, for fiirther acquirement, 
•to visits Italy. The younjg student had long, anticipated 



XVI LIFB OF RUBENS. 

this pleasure, and had been looking forward to it with 
anxiety, doubtless created by the glowing descriptions 
of the glanes of the great Italian masters, whose praises 
he had heard so frequently jM^nounced by his master. 
The value and importance of the desired journey 
to Italy were duly laid before his mother, and her 
pernussion respectfully solicited ; which) after some de- 
liberation, was granted. Otho Voenius being informed 
of this, and feeling anxious to contribute his friendly 
assistance to promote the interest and secure the suc- 
cess of one whom he so highly esteemed, procured an 
audience of the Archduke Albert and Isabdla^ for the 
purpose of obtaining for his young friend letters of 
introduction to the various Courts in Italy. On this 
occarion the master and the scholar were received by 
their highnesses in the most flattering manner, and the 
generous Otho commended in the hi^est terms the 
talents of his disciple, both as an artist and an ac- 
complished scholar : of the truth of the latter, Rubens 
gave ample proofs by his eloquent address in returning 
thanks for the several letters with which he was 
furnished by their order, and on taking leave of them 
previous to his departure. 

The last interview between the master and the 
scholar showed their mutual satis&ction — af^robation 
on the one side, and gratitude on the other^ 

Rubens quitted Antwerp on the 9th of May, in the 
year 1600, taking the road to Italy through Franoe. 
It would not be difficult to imagine whiat was the 
subject of the thoughts of the young traveller during 
his long journey from Antwerp to Italy: they were 
doubtless on the bright prospect befcnre him; he was 
hastening to that classic country whose riches in art aH 



LIFE OF BUBKNS. XVU 

concurred in praising, and which his imagination dwelt 
upon with delight. Plans were laid and resolutions 
formed for the regulation of his future conduct ; — ^these 
all related to his beloved art, the idol of his constant 
adoration. 

At Venice, his first object was to visit and con- 
template the works of Titian, Paul Veronese, and other 
masters of that school, which at that period were seen 
in all their glory; from these, after due reflection, 
he commenced making copies and detached studies. 
While thus engaged, an accidental circumstance in- 
troduced him to the notice of an amateur, who was so 
highly jdeased with his performances, that, on his 
arrival at Mantua, he mentioned them in such terms of 
conunendation as induced the duke to engage him in 
his service. 

The duke's invitation was most flattering and ac- 
ceptable to the artist, as he instantly foresaw that it 
would not only be the means of opening to his view 
the treasures of art in the palaces and cabinets at 
Mantua, but would also introduce him into the highest 
order of society. His introduction to the duke was 
followed by a conversation on the subject of the arts, 
and a reference to his country and family ; upon this 
Rubens presented his letters of recommendation from 
the Archduke Albert, with which the duke was so 
well satisfied that he instantly named him one of the 
gentlemen of the court. 

He had now ample opportunity of indulging in his 
favourite studies, from which neither the pleasures of a 
gay court nor the polite invitations which he received 

VOL. II. b 



XVlll LIFE OF &UBEKS. 

could seduce hiiD» his time being constantly employed 
in drawing, painting, or reading. 

His first interview with the duke had left an im* 
pression ou that prince's mind highly favourable to 
him ; and subsequent conversations, in which. literature 
and the arts formed the chief topics, augmented that 
impression. Gifted with an extraordinary quickness of 
comprehension, an eloquent manner of delivering his 
3entiments, possessing an extensive acquaintance with 
languages, and these advantages being aided by a 
handsome person and graceful manners, he rivetted the 
esteem of the duke, who frequently honoured him with 
his pi»ence. On one occasion, when passing near the 
door of the artist's apartment, who was then engaged 
on a subject relating to ^£neas, and reciting to himself 
some lines from Virgil, the duke suddenly entered 
his room, exclaiming — ** Bravo ! Rubens, the subject is 
excellent." 

Some time after, the duke, desirous of cultivating 
the friendship (tf Philip III. of Spain, proposed sending 
to him a spl^sdid carriage, drawn by eight superb 
Neapolitan horses ; and to the Duke of Lerma, his prime 
minister, a suitable jM'esent. As the estimation of these 
gifts might be greatiy enhanced by the quality of the 
agent chosen to present them, the duke, to give them 
their full efiect, selected Rubens, justiy considering that 
his talents as an artist would be highly agreeable to 
the king, and add lustre to the present. The artist 
was therefore honoured with the appointment, and in 
1604 left Mantua in the character of envoy to the 
court of Spain. 



hlVR OP RUBENS; XIX 

HUr i^eceptlon at the court of Madrid was very ilat« 
teiing. The king, in an audience, co&viersed with 
him on the subject of his mission, the m<^ve of hia 
joQiney to Italy, and glanced at the state of ai&irs in 
the Low Countries, then agitated by disturbances ; and 
on each subject the artist delivered his sentiments with 
such propriety that His Majesty, in his letters to the 
Duke of Mantaa, expressed his high satisfaction of 
the envoy. 

During his residence at Madrid, the king sat. to him 
finr his portrait, as did also Several of the nobilky ; and 
upon the occasion of his taking leave. His Majesty 
gave him assurances of his high satisfaction, and sent 
bim presents by the hand of the Duke of Lerma. 

The skill with which he had conducted the secret 
commission entrusted to his care, had prepared for him 
;in honourable reception from the duke, on his return 
.to Mantua ; to which were added several costly presents. 
These advantages and honours, however flattering, did 
Aot detach the artist from the primary object of his 
joomey : iiaiving already, passed more than three years 
at this court, and painted many pictures for the duke 
and other distinguished persons, he now felt desirous 
of visiting other cities in Italy, particularly that of 
Rome. 

The works of RaffaeUe, Michael Angelo, and the 
other distinguished painters that enriched the city of 
Rome, had such an overpowering effect upon his mind, 
that it required the deliberation of several days before 
he was sufficiently composed to commence any studies 
whatever ; and no sooner was his pencil employed ip 
.copjring, than his reputation, which had long preceded 



XX LIFE OF RUBENS. 

him, procured numerous applications for pictures*. 
The Archduke Albert, having heard that Rubens was 
at Rome, sent an order for three pictures to adorn the 
church of Santa Croce della Gerusalemme in that city, 
the prince having borne the title of cardinal of that 
church previous to his marriage with the Infanta of 
Spain. The subjects of these pictures were, *' St. Helena 
discovering the real Cross," '* Christ crowned with 
Thorns,** and " the Crucifixion." 

This engagement detained Rubens considerably 
longer at Rome than he had originally intended, and 
his departure from thence left some promises unfulfilled, 
and rendered necessary his declining many solicitations 
for pictures. His appearance in Florence was hailed 
with pleasure by many distinguished persons ; but none 
expressed more satisfaction at his arrival than the Duke 
of Tuscany, who honoured him with a long audience, 
and concluded by requesting a portrait of the artist, 
to be plaoed in the public gallery of the cityf . While 
here, he painted several capital pictures for the Grand 
Duke^f and was also much engaged by many of the 

* That he deeply felt and appreciated the grandeur of the Italian 
school is evinced by the numerous drawings and other studies done 
by him after Rafiaelle, Michael Angelo, Lionardo da Vinci, Giulio 
Romano, Polidoro, and other eminent artists. Several of these draw- 
ings are in the collection of the late Sir Thomas Lawrence, P.R. A. ; 
and many more may be found in the folios of amateurs. The 
knowledge he imbibed by these studies may be traced in those 
wonderful productions — ** the Fall of the Damned," Triumphal Pro- 
cessions, and Lion Hunts. 

f It has been the custom for upwards of two centuries to place 
the portrait of every distinguished painter, done by his own hand, 
in this gallery. % See pp. 14S — 150. 



LIFE OF BUBENS. XXI 

nobility. The splendid gallery of pictures and antique 
statues (particularly the latter) which forms the chief 
attraction, of this city, excited his enthusiastic admi- 
ration, and engaged his frequent studies. The grace 
and beauty of the Venus de Medids, and the grandeur 
of Michael Angelo's works, were the theme of his 
highest encomiums; and although the appropriation 
of the beauties of the antique is not very apparent in 
his subsequent productions, his ideas of form having 
been vitiated, in a measure, by previous impressions, yet 
there is occasionally in his works sufficient to prove 
that he was not insensible to the grace and majesty 
of the Greek sculptures. The success which he had 
experienced on similar occasions, in other cities, at- 
tended his engagements here; and, on hb departure 
for Bolognot he received expressions of the highest 
satisfaction from the Grand Duke, accompanied by the 
gift of that prince's portrait attached to a gold chain, 
and several other presents of considerable value. 

His stay at Bolc^a was short, as he had already 
seen numerous examples of this school at Rome, and 
was desirous of hastening to Venice ; probably the 
solemn grandeur of the Carracci school possessed but 
few charms to arrest his progress on his second visit to 
the works of the Venetian painters, whose splendid 
colour had excited in him enthusiastic admiration. It 
is not improbable that this journey was the result of 
premeditation, the artist having, on a former occasion^ 
quitted Venice at the invitation of the Duke of Mantua,, 
since which period he had passed through the principal 
cities in Italy and spent some time at Madrid, where 
he had viewed everything that was excellent in art in 



XXii l.IFfi OF RUBENS. 

those places ; and was therefore naturally deshrous of 
passing a few months in the extlusive study of the 
works of Titian, Paul Veronese, and other eminent 
Venetian painters. 

• Satisfied with his observations here he again returned 
to Rome, to fulfil some previous engagements and to 
complete unfinished woiics. The style of the Flemish 
school, either for its colouring or novelty, appears to 
have been exceedingly admired in this city. By com- 
mand of Pope Paul V. he painted a picture for the 
oratory of the church of Monte. Cavallo, representing 
the Virgin and St. Anne worshiping the infant Siividur. 
Various palaces of cardinals, princes, and nobles, wete 
also enriched by the productions of his pencil. 
' The continual occupation of his time had hitherto pre* 
vented him gratifying his desire to see Milan and Genoa: 
to accomplish this, he was under the necessity of declin- 
ing further engagements in Rome, which be quitted 
about the commencement of 1607 for Milan, where, as 
in other cities, he executed many capital works. For 
the Ambrosialft library he painted a picture of the Virgia 
with the Infant Jesus in- her arms, which his friend 
Breughel encircled with a garland of flowers* ; he- alsa 
copied the celebrated picture of the Last Supper, by 
Leonardo da Vinci. He then proceeded to Genoa/ pur- 
suing with the same industry his researches in sM and 
his pictorial labours ; his reputation at all times preceded 
him, and his arrival was welcomed by invitations and 
orders from the most distinguished persons in the city. 
For the Jesuits' Church he painted two large pictures 

• Page 69, No. «05. 



LIFE or BUBENS. XxilZ 

fepTesenting the Circumcision, and Si. Igilatius healing 
the diseased*. 

The extraordinary number of portraits and historical 
compositions which he painted in thb city detained him 
there much longer than at any other place, excepting^ 
Mantua ; as, in addition to his usual pursuit, his atten- 
tion being taken with the beauty and magnificence 
of its edifices, he made plans and drawings of the eleva- 
tions ^d decorations of several palaces and public 
buildings f. While thus engaged, intelligence arrived 
that his mother was dangerously ill ; upon the receipt 
of this news he instantly set off for Antwerp, and while 
on his journey thither he received the announcement of 
her death : the shock was rendered more severe in con-« 
Sequence of an absence of eight yea^ and five months 
from her to whom he owed so much. On his arrival at 
Antwerp he centered the Abbey oi St Michael, where 
his parent was buried, and remained th^re many weeks» 
devoted to filial sorrow. A tomb in the church, erected 
by the family, records that she died the 14th of Novem- 
ber, 1608, aged seventy years. 

The honours and celebrity which Rubens had acquired 
in Italy had long been proclaimed among his country- 
men, who, as soon as he appeared in public, were eager 

* Pages 153 and 154. 

"f These were subsequently engraved under his own direction, and 
published at Antwerp, in 1622, entitled Falazzi AtdicJn e Modemi 
di GenoUf raccoUi e designaii da Pieiro Paulo Rubens. A second part 
appeared in 1652, folio, 189 plates. Colonel Bentinck has in his 
possession a thick book containing numerous sketches of parts of 
buildings, with detached portions of altars, terndai^ and other archi- 
tectural objects, most of which are iiiterspersed with niuncrduft 
memoranda in various 



XXIV LIFE OF RUBENS. 

to congratulate him on his return, and to do homage to 
his talents : but notwithstanding the flattering reception 
he met in all quarters, and the kindnesses of friends and 
relations, he felt a languor and depression of spirits, a 
dissatisfaction with every thing around him ; so much 
so that he determined upon returning to Italy. The 
Archduke Albert and the Duchess Isabella, to whom 
the character and conduct of the artist during his 
absence in Italy and Spain were well known, being 
informed of his intentions, and considering him too 
valuable an ornament to their court to lose, commanded 
his presence at Brussels ; on which occasion the duke 
entered into familiar conversation with him relative to 
the occurrences in the various courts which he had 
visited, particularly that of Madrid, and concluded the 
conference by expressing a wish that he would paint the 
portraits of himself and the archduchess. In order to 
induce Rubens to relinquish the idea of quitting Flan- 
ders, the duke appointed him painter to the court with 
a considerable pension, and finally honoured him with 
the gold key. Thus distinguished by marks of high 
favour from their highnesses, and civilities from the 
nobility, his meditated return to Italy was abandoned ; 
but in order to be enabled to pursue his profession free 
from the interruptions of a court, he solicited and ob- 
tained permission to establish himself at Antwerp. In 
that city he shortly afterwards purchased a spacious 
house, which he greatly embellished, and rendered in 
every respect commodious for his art*. 

* Views of this house, with its courts and gardens, are engraved, 
in two plates, by Harrewyns, 1684. 



LIFE OF RUBENS. XXV 

In the early part of the following year, 1610, Rubens 
married Elizabeth Brant, daughter of John Brant (a 
doctor of laws and municipal secretary of Antwerp), 
and of Dame Clara de Moy, sister to his brother Philip's 
wife. Hitherto the painter had not exhibited any of 
his works at Antwerp, although many applications for 
that purpose had been made by amateurs and others 
interested in matters of art. Among the most eager to 
see his productions were Cornelius Jansens and Wen- 
ceslaus Koeberger, painters of some eminence. The 
former had the temerity to send him a challenge for a 
trial of skill in the art, the decision of which was to be 
submitted to the connoisseurs of the Pays Bas. Rubens 
good-humouredly replied, ** that his pictures had long 
*' since passed the ordeal of the connoisseurs of Italy 
** and Spain, and that Jansens was at liberty to expose 
** his in the same way, when and wherever he pleased." 

The archduke and duchess shortly after summoned 
Rubens to court ; he was then nominated a councillor, 
and held his first conference with the ministers in the 
presence of their highnesses, who, at the conclusion, were 
pleased to express their warmest approbation of the 
wisdom and eloquence he had displayed in the cabinet : 
at the same time they signified a desire that he would 
paint a picture of the Holy Family to decorate the 
oratory of their private chapel *. This picture raised 
the painter exceedingly in their estimation, and its 
exhibition in the apartments of the palace excited 
universal approbation ; confirming what fame had pre^ 
viously announced. The nobles of the court, and 

«Seejp. 2S1, No. 812.; 



XXVi I.IFE OF RUBErNS. 

several' other distinguished persons, members of the 
Order of St. Ddefonso*, being struck with the extraor- 
dinary beauty of the picture, requested the artist to 
paint one for the altar of their chapel, in the church of 
St. Jacques de Caudenberg, the subject of which should 
represent some passage in the life of their tutelar saint. 
The picture was shortly after produced (a sketch 
hiring been previously made and submitted to the 
farotherfaood) ; it represented the Virgin investing 
St. Ildefonso with the chasuUef of his Order^. The 
taleiits and genius of Rubens were now universally ac- 
knowledged. Patronized by the Court, and honoured 
in a particular manner by the Archdiike Albert,—^ 
esteemed by the noUes atid courted by the clergy 
and other wealthy individuals, he found such numerous 
demands for the eniplo3rment of his pencil, that it was 
quite impossible that his individual exertions could 
satisfy them; he therelbre recdved into his studio 
several talented youths, whom his ready manner of 

* An order originally instituted in Portugal during the vice* 
royalty of tbe archduke, and through his interest transferred, with 
all its privileges, by a special bull, to Brussels, in 1596. Of this 
distinguished order the archduke- cardinal was chief, and among its 
members were found the names of nineteen Knights of the Golden 
^eece, and nearly the whole of the nobles of the court. The solemn 
respect in which this institution was held induced a friend of the artist 
to advise him to register his name for election as one of its members, 
lo whieh he prudently replied, that he desired nothing more sincerely, 
quoting at the same time the proverb, jRe^tf ad exemplum toius com* 
ponitur orbis. 

f Chasuble, a term frequently used in this work, signifying the 
splendid mantle worn by a Catholic priest. 

X For description seep. 91, No. 295. 



X^IFE OF aUBENS. XXtU 

iiiBiructibD sbdn made competent to cotamence and 
even to fortrard his laige pictures : some of these 
became excellent painters, and were employed by him 
on' bU his great works. The wealth of the bishops 
and priests, and the zeal which at that period actu-^ 
ated all classes to enrich aisd embellish th^ir churches, 
brought an immense demand for pictures; and during 
the space of ten years he was constantly engaged in 
designing and completing many of those grafid attar- 
fxiec^ which are described in the following catalogue ; 
besides these, he produced numerous sketches and 
smdl pictures, painted wholly by his own hand. 

The history of his life now approaches tiiat xnemo* 
rable epoch when he undertook the celebrated serii^ of 
twenty-one pictures, illustrative of the important evteta 
in the life of Marie de Medids; for this princely 
order he was indebted to the Baron de Vicq, then 
amVassador from the Archduke Albert and Isabella to 
the Ooart of France, wlio being, among others, con-^ 
suited by tiie Queen respecting an artist capable of 
sudi an undertaking, mentioned his countryman; at 
the same time eulogizing his merits not foigetting to 
mention the high esteem in which he was held hy his 
royal uasti^.^ The queen, satisfied with this reoom- 
aiendation, requested the baron to write to the artist, 
and invite him to her court. 

Rubens lost no time in presenting himself at the 
residence of the ambassador, by whom he was in- 
troduced to the queen, who honoured him with instruc- 
tions relative to the pictures required. The artist, on 
his part, promised to use every exertion to expedite 
them ; and added a request that, for the greater con- 



XXTiii LIFE OF RUBENS. 

▼enience of study and painting, he might be allowed to 
execute them in his painting-room at Antwerp, which 
was readily granted. 

A grateful acknowledgment of the friendly service 
of the ambassador was the first object of the artist, on 
his return to Antwerp; and the best efforts of his 
pencil were employed on a picture representing the 
Virgin and child, which he instantly sent as a present 
to the baron, at Paris. On a subsequent occasion 
he painted the portraits of the baron and his lady, in 
his most finished manner. 

Having thoroughly acquainted himself with the 
history of the life of Marie de Medicis, and arranged 
all the principal events in due order, he made spirited 
sketches of each subject* ; these he gave to his pupils 
to work fromf, under his constant superintendence; 
by which means this prodigious work was completed in 
less than two years |. While engaged in this profitable 
undertaking, a miserable painter, of the name of 
Brendel, whose mind was affected by the pursuit of 
alchymy, proposed to Rubens to associate with him in 
the search of the philosopher's stone; to which he 
replied, ** My friend, you are come too late. Twenty 

years ago I might have been tempted to listen to 

your offer, but I am now in possession of the object 






* Now in the Munich Gallery. 

"I- At this period he had, as assistants or pupils, Van Dyck, 
Justus Van Egmont, Jacques Jordaens, Peter Van Mol, Cornelius 
Schut, Jan Van Hoeck, Simon de Vos, Deodato Dehnont, Nicholas 
Vander Horst, Snyders, Mompers, and Wildens ; the three latter 
being exclusively occupied in painting animals and landscapes. 

X For description see pp. 121 to 127| inclusive. 



LIFE OF RUBENS. XXIX 

** of your researches ; " and, showing his pencils, ob- 
served, *^ these have long since obtained the magic 
** povirer of turning all they touch into gold.'* 

As soon as these pictures were completed, the artist 
accompanied them to Paris, in order to finish the 
portraits of several of the principal characters, and 
superintend the placing of the pictures in the Palace 
of the Luxembourg: while thus engaged, he was 
firequently honoured with visits from the queen, who 
took a particular pleasure in his conversation, and 
would sometimes place herself by his side and forbid 
him to rise from his seat. The completion of these 
pictures was succeeded by an order for four portraits, 
rik that of the Queen, in the character of Bellona, the 
Grand Duke and Duchess of Tuscany, and of the 
artist himself. When the series was finished, the 
queen entered the gallery on the day they were 
arranged, attended by many distinguished persons, and 
was conducted by the painter through the apartment, 
when he explained to her majesty the meaning of the 
numerous allegories introduced by him for the purpose 
of pictorial illustration. The great satisfaction ex- 
pressed by her majesty at the manner in which he 
had performed his task, and the praises she bestowed 
on the several pictures, were reiterated by the com- 
pany ; many pressing invitations were given to him to 
reside at Paris and attach himself to the court : to all 
which he replied, " That, being engaged by every tie 
of gratitude to his own sovereign, to whom he owed 
his best services, he was under the necessity of 
declining the honour proposed.'! A few days after 
he obtained an audience of the queen, when her 






XXX LIJC OF EUB£KS« 

majesty honoured him with manj splendid presents, 
and he quitted Paris on the 19th of September, 
1622. 

During his residence in Paris, he was acddentally 
introduced tQ the Duke of Buckingham, then in France 
upon some political affair* ; and the conversation that 
ensued, being also of a political nature, was the cause of 
Rubens's visit to the English Court. A second ictec- 
view occurred between them at the hotel of tfa^ duke, 
when the subjects of the misunderstanding between 
the Courts of England and Spain was the topic of their 
conference. 

On hi$ return to Brussels, the nature of these con- 
versations was faithfully detailed in an audience with 
the Archduchessf, when the princess expressed her 
high satisfaction at the disclosure of the conciliatory 
dispositioiji of the English Court, and desired Rubens 
to cultivate the friendship of the Duke of Buckingham 
by continuing the correspondence, the result of which 
should be communicated to the Court of Spain. In 
some of the letters which subsequently passed between 
.th/eni, the duke proposed to purchase the splendid 
coUectiop of pictures, st;ati|es, bas-^lieft, and gems, 
which composed the cabinet of the a}*tist, for the ac- 
qui^tion of which the cU&ka was so anxious^ that he 

« 

* Michel, in bis Life of Rubens, says, that the PifJ&e of Biicl^- 
iqgham was th^n in France, with other EQglish nohlem^n, vpon the 
occasion of the proposed marriage of Prince Charles with Henrietta- 
Maria ; but as this event did not take place until two years later, 
either some other business, must have called him to Paris, or there 
is a considerable ecror in the dates. 

j- The ^'^chduke Albert di^ the preceding year*. 162*1. 



LIFE OF EUBENS. XXxi 

sent an agent, named Blondel*, conversant with the 
value of objects of a;rt, who took an inventory of every 
article, an.d gave his opinion of the value. An offer of 
lOOfOCjOjhrins was made for the whole collection ; this 
sum was accepted, on condition that the purchaser 
shoulds at his own expense, leave casts of all the finest 
statues, busts, and bas-reliefs, to fill the^ vacant places ; 
these terms being mutually agreed upon, the whole 
were sent to England, in 1.685f . 

This friendly understanding between the Duke of 
Buckingham and Rubens, which commenced at Paris, 
was shortly after renewed by a visit from his Grace 
to the house of the artist, at Antwerp, where it is 
probable that the duke sat to him for his portrait (and 
not 9t Paris, as stated by Michel) ; and the duke's 
frequent visits .to the artist's house afforded him oppor* 
tunitie^ of examining the extensive collection which 
he aiterwvdi purchased; for it is not reasonable to 
rapppse that he, the duke, would have consented tp 
pay so large a sum of money for what he had never 
seen. Sych an intercourse also enaUed him to judg^ 
of the diplomatic talents of the artist, and to acquaint 
himself with the influence which it was said he pos- 
sessed at court. This intimacy probably led to his 

* The portrait of this gentleman is painted by Van Dyck. 

f In this capital collection were nineteen pictures by Titian, 
twenty-one by Bassan* thirteen by P. Veronese, eight by Palma, 
seventeen by Tintoretto, three by Lionardo da Vinci, three by 
Ra£Bielle, and thirteen by Rubens. Previous to the sequestration 
of the Buckingham estate, in 1649, a great part of this oollectioa 
was sent to Antwerp for sale, and were purchased by the Archduki^ 
Leopold for his collection at Prague ; they are now in the Belvide^ 
Gallery, at Vienna. 



XXXii LIFE OF RUBENS. 

accompanying the duke and Prince Charles the fol- 
lowing year (1623) to Madrid*. During his residence 
in this city, on that occasion, Rubens, by the desire of 
Philip IV., copied several fine pictures of Titianf , which 
Prince Charles had particularly admired: when these 
copies were finished, it was expected that Philip would 
present them to the prince ; but the generosity of the 
monarch towards his guest scarce knew any bounds; 
— he kept the copies for himself, and sent Charles 
the originals : these were afterwards returned to the 
king, when the prince, at the instigation of Bucking- 
ham, broke his engagements with the Infanta^. Philip 
having completed his hunting-seat in the neighbour- 
hood of Madrid, applied to Rubens for a series of 
suitable pictures to decorate it; and sent him, at the 
same time, the sizes and a description of the situations 
in which it was intended to place them. The pic- 
tures were executed at Antwerp, and represented 
hunting subjects ; the animals being painted chiefly by 
Snyders and Paul De Vos, and the landscapes by Wil- 
dens, Mompers, or Van Uden$. His majesty, desirous 

* Michel, in his Life o/RubenSf takes no notice of this journey, 
and several subsequent events render this statement doubtful. 

f See pp. 136 and 137. 

]; Vide Cumbeeland's Anecdotes of Spanish Painters, Vol II., 
pp. 168 — 172. 

§ These auxiliary painters were once vain enough to think that 
their assistance was indispensable to Rubens, and boasted of this at 
a dinner among themselves. Their imprudent vaunting reached 
his knowledge, and, to convince them of their arrogance, he soon 
after painted two magnificent pictures of Hunts, done wholly by his 
own hand ; he then good-naturedly observed to them, that their as- 
sistance was no further necessary to him than to forward his works. 



LIFE OF BUBEN8. XXXIU 

of conferring a mdrk of distinguished r^ard on his 
fiivourite, the Duke of Olivarez, and at the same time 
to merit the esteem of the Order of Carmelites, for 
whom the duke had recently erected a convent at 
Loeches, commissioned Rubens to paint some pictures 
to adorn the hall of that Order ; and these he executed 
in his grandest style and richest glow of colour*. The 
same year (1623) he painted the altar-piece for the 
church of St. Rombout, at Malinesf , and at the com- 
mencement of the following year produced the capital 
picture of *^ the Adoration of the Magi," for the church 
i5f St. John in the same city t« 

His tranquillity suffered a painful interruption by the 
loss of his wife, Elizabeth Brant, who died the 29th of 
September, 1626, leaving him two sons, Albert and 
Nicholas^. She was buried in the tomb of his revered 
mother, in the abbey church of St. Michael, and Rubens 
decorated the altar with a picture which he had exe- 
cuted in Rome for the church of Sante Croce, but which, 
when done, was found too large for the place originaUy 
intended for its reception ||. 

' Th6 death of his beloved partner interrupted his 
favourite pursuits, and rendered his home uncomfortable. 
In order to dispel his grief, and divert his attention, 
from objects which incessantly renewed the remem« 
brance of his loss, he quitted his residence on a tour 

* For descriptions, see pp. 19S — 141. 

t See p. 4S, No. 125. % See pp. 4S— 44. 

§ Albert, for whom the archduke stood sponsor, became secre- 
tary to the privy council ; and Nicholas, Lord of Ramyen and other 
places. 
^ II Seep. 10, No. IS. 

VOL. J I. c 



XXXIY LIF« OF RUBKKS. 

through Holland* with an intention of visitiiig m hi9 
route every arti$t of eminence. His first stay was at 
Ooudat where he called upon a painter, named Jacob 
B(^r Block, eminent in architectural subjects, of whom 
he bought several pictures; at this place he had the 
pleasure of meeting Sandrart» an artist of consid^aU^ 
talentSi with whom he had been on intimate terms 
at Rome : the encounter was mutually agreeable* and 
ended in a proposition flrom Sandrart to acccmtipany him 
in hJs intended tour, an offer which was gladly ac* 
cepted, as bis amiable manners and learned conver* 
sation rendered him a valuable companion, Theiir 
first visit at Utrecht was to Cornelius Poelembuig*, 
with whom they had become acquainted in Italy, when 
be was in the school of Elsheimer: his productions 
in art, representing tasteful landscapes* embellished with 
the ruins of temples and groups of nymphs and othev 
figures, were greatly admired by Rubens, who became 
the purchaser of several^ They spent the foUow-r 
ing day with Gerard Honthorst, whose works had 
often attracted the admiration of Rubens by their 
singularly-powerful effect, Gerard was at the time 
engaged in putting the last touches to a picture, the sub« 
ject of which was — ^Diogenes at mid-day, with a lanterq 
in bia hand, looking for an honest man : of this Rubena 
nbo became the purchaser. In this manner* during ^ 
fortnight, were the two firiends engaged visiting every 

* Poeleinburg has commemorated this erent, by paintiiig the 
portraits of himself in conversation with his friend Rubens ; they 
are represented standing together in the fore-ground of a landscape. 
The hitter is seen in a profile view, without his hat, habited in a 
scarlet mantle ; the wife of the former is seated on a bank be&re 
them. Size of the picture 18 in. by 26 in. — P. 



XIFE OF BUBEN& ^OXT 

vtiflt of repute at Amsterdam and other cities^ con-t 
versing with them in the most friendly manner^ and 
never quitting their painting-rooms without purdiasing 
some of their works. Whether his visit to Holland had 
any olgect of a political nature, as Michel insinuates^ is 
not easy at this time to determine ; although it is pos^ 
sible that his sagacity as a politician might have com-r 
bined the two motives. The candour, generosity, and 
noble-mindedness of Rubens were manifest on all occa** 
dons towards his brother artists ; an. instance of thii^ 
in addition to those already stated^ occurred on hia 
return to Antwerp. Van Dyck» who had recently 
FBCnmed from Italy, complained that the productions of 
his pencil did not furnish him enough tor his mainte* 
nance : this declaration most sensibly affected Rubeuau 
who went the next day and bought every picture he 
had finished. This and similar acts of generosity did 
not, however, secure him from the jealousy and males 
▼olence of Cornelius Schut» who took every opportunity 
to decry his works. Rubens, thou^ informed of this» waa 
determi9ed, by an act of kindness, to make Schut his 
friend : he called upon him» and, in a fiimiliar converw* 
tion, passed some handsome compliments upon his pio* 
tures, at the same time inquiring if he were disposed to 
sell them, to which Schut readily consented. Rubens^ 
UberaUy took them at the price demanded ; and, before 
be left Schut, added, that if at any time he was disen<* 
g^ed, be would be glad of bis assistance- These acta 
oi urbanity had but little; influence upon the morosQ 
and envious mind of Schut. 

The correspondence between Rubens and the Duke.of 
Buckingham, being occasionally of a political nature, wasi 



XXXn XIFE OF BUBEK8. 

regularly communicated to the King of Spain ; and m 
secret disposition existing in both courts io terminate latt 
differences, it was arranged, by the advice of the Marquis 
Spinolai then prime minister to the Archduchess Isabella^ 
to send Rubens to Madrid, to lay before the king all 
matteais relative to the aforesaid correspondence, and to 
receive instructions for a proposed mission to the En<« 
^lish Court. Rubens arrived at Madrid in September 
l627*f and was received with much distinction by the 
king, with whom and his minister, the Duke of Olivarez, 
he had frequent conferences, in all of which he gave the 
most satisfactory proofs of his diplomatic talents. The 
king was further confirmed in his high opinion t>f 
Rubens, by his wise and prudent observations in an 
affair of difficulty, on which His Majesty purposely 
soiinded hiifi; and the Duke of Olivarez emphatically 
declared, that he knew no one more capable of con-^ 
ducting an affair of state. 

A singular event, which excited much conversation 
at the time, occurred during the residence of Rubend 
in this cityi. John, Duke of Braganza, afterwards 
King of Portugal, hearing repeatedly of the extraordi- 
nary merit of the artist, and of the high esteem in 
which he was held at Madrid, expressed a strong 
desire to see him, and sent an invitation for that pur- 
pose from his hunting-seat at Villa Vizzosa. The 
honour was readily accepted, 'and permission leing 
bbtldned of Philip, Rubens made suitable prepara- 
ixoni for the journey ; many gentlemen of distinction 



* Cumberland makes it Aprfl 1628; but this statement is not 
ImiJSrmed by subsequent events^ 



<« 

• » 

ft 



LIF£ OF |tUB£NS; .XXXTli 

l^ueMed that they might be allowed to escort fainii 
lieiiig curious to see the Portuguese Court. When th^ 
^valcade reached the environs of Villa Vizzosa, the 
duke, heing informed of the approach of Rubens with 
a laige retinue, became apprehensive of the expense^ 
and dispatched a gentleman to meet them, and 
apolc^ize to Rubens for his unavoidable absence on 
affairs of state at Lisbon, and at the same time to 
present him a purse, containing fifty pistoles^ to defray 
the expenses of his journey. The company was ex*- 
ceedingly surprised at the ungracious message; but 
Rubens, with becoming dignity, replied : " I beseech 
you. Sir, to assure the duke of my humble duty, and 
that having, in obedience to his wishes, made this 
jourqey, I am exceedingly mortified in being de- 
*^ prived of the honour of offering my services to l& 
commands ; and I trust his highness will deign 
to believe, that the object of this journey was niot 
the expectation of fifty pistoles, having myself pro- 
^' vided one thousand pieces of the same money for the 
*• expenses pf the visif 

The tedious delays of court politics had already 
detained Rubens at Madrid eighteen months* ; during 
.which time (although confined some weeks with the gout 
in his feet) he completed eight pictures for thelai^ 
.saloon of the palace ; among these were the *' Rape of the 
3abines," and the companion. He also painted several 

* Cumberland saj^ nine months, a period far too short for the 

artist, even with all his miraculous expedition^ to have executed the 

great number of works which this writer attributes to his pencil, 

-among which is a capital altar-piece of the Martyrdom of St. 

^Andrew. 



€€ 
€€ 



XXXTUl LIFE OF RUBEK8. 

portraits of Philip IV., one of which v(rBB half-length 
size, done as a companion to a portndt of the Infanta» 
for the Archduchess Isabella. In addition to these were 
five or six portraits of illustrious persons. Towards the 
latter end of August 16899 he received his final in- 
structions ; and being also furnished with his creden* 
tials for the British Court, he was honoured with an 
audience by the king previous to his departure, when 
his majesty, in token of his high satisfaction, and the 
<x)nfidence he entertained of his prudence and ability, 
presented him with a valuable diamond ring and 
six Andalusian horses; he also nominated him, by 
letters patent, secretary to the privy council, with a 
vevernon of the same to his son Albert. Immediately 
on his return to Brussels, his instructions were laid 
before the archduchess, who, having examined them 
with her minister Spinola, signified her entire approba- 
tion of their contents, and an order was issued for his 
immediate departure for England. 

The arrival of Rubens in London, on this secret 
mission firom the Courts of Spain and Flanders, oc- 
curred in October 1629* His great friend, the Duke 
of Buckingham, had been dead upwards of a year ; and 
the object of his arrival being then a profound secret, 
dt was necessary to procure an introduction to the 
Chancellor, Lord Francis Cottington. In this he sue* 
ceeded a few days after ; and, in the first conference he 
held with that nobleman, had the good fortune so to 
ingratiate himself, that he informed the King of the 
artist's arrival. His Majesty, to whom the merits of 
the painter had long been knovm and highly appredatedt 
desirous of learning the motive of his journey, named 



XjIFc of bubeni). xxxist 

an esrlf day for his admission to an audience^ In thii 
interriew, the King interrogated him on a variety of 
subjecto^-of his family, the Spanish Court, his trav^ 
and profession — ^to which his replies were given with 
to much candour and eloquence, that the King was 
(surprised to find such an union of talents in one person^ 
His Majesty^ desirous also of seeing the productions of 
>fais art, appointed a day when he would honour him 
by sitting for his portrait*, which took place soon 
afttf ; while thus engaged, the subject of the pre^ 
•vious convenation was renewed, which, gradually 
assuming a more definite character, ultimately gave th^ 
Mgadous artist an opportunity of explaining himself 
tnore fully, concluding with the observation, ^* that 
^ if the two Courts were reciprocally disposed to atv 
.^ range their differences, the means were at hand.** 
To which Charles replied : " If the King of Bpain is Of 
^ this opinion (as you seem to indicate) why does he 
^ not send some one to open a negodation ?" Thii; 
was the expected question; to which the following 
iready answer was given : ** Sire, if I might presume to 
^ the honour of being acceptable to your Majesty \h 
•^ that capacity, I could explain myself more openly 
'^ M the intentions of the king my master, in virtue of 
^ the credentials with which his majesty has fhmished 
^ meT The King was much pleased with this disco^ 

* 

* There is no reason to doubt that His Majesty sat to him 
fiir his portrait ; yet it is not a little remarkable, that no notice 
JDOCttra in any of the royal catalogues, or by writers of the period, of 
4he existence of such a portrait, and it surely could not be that in 
twhidi th« ardst has represented the King in the character of 
.8t*Oeorge. 



xl LIFE OF BUBKK8. 

very, and having inspected his appointment, returned 
it with compliments of the most agreeable and flat* 
tering description, bidding him place his papers in the 
hands of Lord Francis Cottington, who would receive 
his propositions. In this interview there does not 
appear any recognition of Rubens on the part of His 
Majesty, which, in all likelihood, would have been the 
case, had he accompanied the King and Buckingham to 
Spain in 162S, as stated by Cumberland. In all their 
subsequent conferences, the prudence and ability of 
Rubens in negociation were attended with so much suc- 
cess that, by the end of December in the same year, the 
differences between the two countries were satisfactorily 
arranged, and, in November 1630, the conditions ratified 
by the contracting powers ; the plenipotentiaries being 
Lord Francis Cottington, on the part of Great Britain, 
and Don Carlos Colonna, on that of Spain. 

The preceding negociation was conducted to a con- 
tusion so much to the satisfaction of King Charles, that 
he rewarded Rubens with the honour of knighthood, on 
the 21st day of February, 1630*, presenting him, at 
the same time, the sword with which he had performed 
the ceremony ; and, as a further mark of distinction^ 
added to the quartering of his arms, on a dexter canton, 
gules, a lion passant, or. Shortly after, when the dig- 
nified artist paid the usual homage to His Majesty, 
previous to his departure, the King gave him a diamond 

* Michel states, that this oerenjony was performed in full Par* 
liament ; while other writers allege that it took place in the Palace 
of Whitehall. The latter appeals to he the most probable, although 
Michel takes his account from the writings of Gevartius, to whom 
Rubens is said to have communicated the principal events of his lifiL 



LIFE OF EUBEKS; XU 

ring fiom his finger, the loop from his ' hat (worth 
10,000 crowns), and his portrait attached to a gold 
chain*. Pending the n^ociations, the artist, by the 
desire of His Majesty, painted nine huge pictures for 
the ceiling of the Hall of the Ambassadors, at White* 
hallf , representing, by a variety of allegorical figures; 
the prosperity and the good government of James 14; 
for which splendid work he was paid SOOO/. He also 
painted the portrait of the King, in the character of 
St. George § ; an allegorical composition, representing 
Peace and War|| ; and a design, en grisaille, for a mag^ 
nificent silver salver. For the Earl of Pembroke he 
executed an altar-piece, the Assumption of the Virgin**. 

* There is still an honour due to the memory of the artist, whicli 
this country must ever gratefully acknowledge. To his recommend 
dation and assistance England is indebted for the possession of those 
invaluable treasures in art, the Seven Cartoons, by Raffaelle, bought^ 
in Flanders, by Charles I., for a mere trifle. These pictures are 
iww equal (if not superior) in value to any seven produced by that 
divine painter. 

f Sometimes styled the Banqueting-Rooip, and at present the 
ehapeL 

X Basan states, that Rubens painted the sketches only in Englandt 
and that the large pictures were done at Antwerp, as was his usua} 
custom in all large works. For description, see p, 2S4« 
§ Page 162. II Page 161. 

*^ There is a letter extant, in the Museum, dated March 6, 1630, 
iriuch states, that '^ My Lord of Carlisle hath twice in one weel^ 
'* most magnificently feasted the Spanish Ambassador, and M. Ru* 
*' bens also, the agent who prepared the way for his coming, and 
who, in honour of our nation, has drawn with his pencil the 
*^ history of St George, wherein (if it be possible) he hath exceeded 
himself; but the picture be has sent home into Flanders, to re- 
main as a monument of his abode and employment here." Thi|i 



-«c 



41 



Xlii UFB OF RUB£KS: 

A council was held immediatelf on his ftturn to 
Brussels^ when, after some preliminary arrangements, it 
was determined that he should proceed forthwith to the 
Spanish Court, to assist in the formation of a treaty of 
commerce, as well as the adjustment of some differenced 
between Flanders and the States of Holland, and to give 
explanations of the various articles comprised in the 
recent negodations. On this occarion his appearance at 
Madrid assumed a more distinguished character than it 
hitherto had done ; and his reception from the king, 
the ministers, and the court, was accordingly more 
dignified and imposing. His majesty, at the conclusion 
of tills affair, honoured him with the Order of the Gold 
Key*; he also confirmed, by letters patent, dated 21st 
of August, 16S0, the title of knighthood bestowed hy 
Charles I. of England ; and before his departure Rubens 
received from the Duke of Olivarez, on the part of 
his majesty, presents of considerable valuef • 
. Rubens, having successfully accomplished the several 

eaimot have been a oopj of tb6 oae which he p^esentied to His 
Majesty, as stated by some writers, as no such picture appears ia 
th^ catalogue of the artist's efl^ts ; nor indeed is sny second picture 
of the subject known to the Writer. It is| therefore, highly probable 
that it was the original, which was subsequently purchased of the 
artist by Mr. Endymion Porter, for the King. 
' * In the oolleetion of the Right tlon. Earl Spencer is a mag* 
fiificent whole*length portrait of Rubens, painted by Van Dyck i 
he is habited in black, having a gold key, the emblem of that Order, 
placed in his girdle. 

f A period rendered additionally memorable by the arrival of 
Marie de Medicis at Brussels, who, in the month of July in that 
yeaf, took refuge there, in consequence of the misunderstto&i^ 
between her and Louis XltL 



LIFE OP BUBSNS. XlUi 

diplomatic nussions in which dtmng three years he had 
heen consecutively engaged, returned to his residence at 
Antwerp^ to enjoy the wealth and honours which his 
flserits had acquired^ In the following year (16S1) he 
married a second wife^ named Helena Forman, a lady 
43£ great personal beauty and accompUshments, then in 
her sixteenth year. His long absence from home had 
occasioned a suspension among his countrymen of that 
£eal for the arts wluch had previously prevailed ; and it 
might have been expected that, returning as he did from 
the splendour and luxury of courts, he would rather be 
disposed to indulgence than to resume the arduous 
^although deligfatM) pursuit of painting : but the con- 
trary was the fiEurt, his love of the art bebg paramount 
to every other indination. This was verified by his 
accepting the same year the office of Director of the 
Academy, in conjunction with Wautier Snayers, a 
duty he p er for med voluntarily, being, by virtue of his 
privil^e as councillor, exempt from all dvic services. 
In compliance with an ancient custom, he presented the 
academy with a chair covered in morocco leather, on 
the back of wlndh was inscribed '* Pstrus Faulxju 
RtJBENB, 16S1,*' and which is still carefully preserved 
in the Academy. He also gave an inauguration picture, 
representing the Viigin with the youthfid Jesus and 
St Joseph*. 

His first grand work, on resuihing his pencil, was a 
magnificent ahar -piece for the aUbey church of 
Affl^hem, representing Christ bearing his Cross tb 
Calvaryf : this glorious production, an inoontestibfe 

• Page «4, No. S3, f P«g« 5^- 



xUy tIFE OF BUBEN8. 

proof of hiB undiminished powers, was followed' bjr 
the celebrated picture of St Roch healing the Disv 
eased*. In this manner he continued for some months, 
in domestic tranquillitj and the uninterrupted enjoy«> 
ment of the arts. From this state he was siiddenlj 
summoned to Court, in consequence of hostilities be«- 
tween Flanders and Holland, in 1633, to receive iur 
structions from the Marquis d'Aytona, then prime 
minister to the Archduchess Isabella, relative to pror 
positions for a truce, in order to gain time to obtain 
succours from Spain. Rubens, on this mission, using 
his customary precautions to conceal the object, arrived 
at the Hague, by a drcuitbus route, in the disguise of 
an ordinary traveller. His ingenuity soon contrived 
means of opening a negodation with the leaders of the 
council ; and he had made considerable advances in the 
object of his mission, when the sudden death of Prince 
Maurice of Orange put. an end to the treaty. Soon 
after the war was carried on with increased vigour to 
the advantage of the Dutch ; the Court at Brussels^ 
alarmed at the success c^ their enemies^ and fearful of 
the consequences, again dispatched Rubens on a secret 
commission to the Hague ; the result was, that the 
States-General expressed a willingness to treat with ac* 
credited ministers from the Courts of Madrid and 
Brussels for a permanent peace, which was speedily 
-accomplished through the judicious arrangement pre- 
viously made by Rubens. Scarcely had he returned to 
Jiir family and resumed his fisiial occupations, wh^ 
news reached hinv of the dangerous illness of the Arcb- 

• Page 4ft. 



LIFE OF BUBENS. jclir 

* 

duchess Isabella, wluch terminated in her death, on the 
1st of December, 16SS, in the sixtj-seventh yest of her 
age. Her loss was severdjr felt and deplored by the 
grateful artist, who was sensible that he owed much to 
her patronage and protection as well as that of the Arch- 
duke Albert ; for, under thar joint auspices, his talents 
had been fostered, and to them he was, in a great mea* 
sure, indebted for the honours and distinctions he had 
attained. 

. The government of the Low Countries having been 
settled conditionally, by Philip 11. of Spain, on hi? 
daughter Isabella, at her marriage with the Archduke 
Albert of Austria, by their deaths, in default of heirs, 
it reverted again to the crown, and became vested 
in Philip IV., who, at the commencement of the fol- 
lowing year, appointed his only brother, Ferdinand, 
governor-general. At that period a misunderstanding 
had arisen between the Swedes and Hungarians ; and 
previous to the prince taking possession of his govern- 
ment he was sent by the king, his brother, at the head 
of ^ powerful body of Spanish troops, to assist the 
Austrian and Hungarian forces, assembled under the 
command of Ferdinand III., King of the Romans and 
Hungarians, and brother to the Emperor Ferdinand 11. 
The enemy's troops, composed of Swedes and Germans, 
were commanded by Gustavus Horn. Scarcely were the 
combined forces, under the command of Ferdinand, as- 
sembled on the heights in front of the city of Nortlingen, 
when, ma the morning of the 5th of September, l6S4s' 
they were furiously attacked by the enemy, and a san-, 
guinaiy battle ensued, which ended in the defeat of the 
Swedes and Germans ; among the numerous prisoners was 



XM lilFE OF BCBENS. 

the cominander4n-chief. Immediately after, PriiDoe 
Ferdinand ateumed the reins of government at Brus^ 
sds, and Rubens appeared at his court 

The major of the city of Antwerp, being informed 
that it was the intention of the prince to visit that dty 
in the ensuing May, resolved, with the consent of the 
authorities, to grace bis entrance with dignity and 
splendour by the erection of eleven triumphal arches, 
placed at the entrances of the principal streets. la 
order to accomplish this intention in a suitable manner, 
the senate requested Rubens to make the necessary 
plans, and compose the decorations, setting forth, in a 
series of allegorical pictures, tiie virtues and heroiG 
actions of their new governor. The numerous skctdiei 
and studies made by the artist fiar this work, and the 
completion of the immense pictures under his direction 
(in many instances terminated by his own hand) prove 
Ms prodi^^ous powers of invention and his inde&tigahle 
application. 

Prince Ferdinand, accompanied by a numeroua 
suite, quitted Brussels early in May, and proceeding 
by the canal in a splendid baige, arrived the same 
evening at the suburbs of Antwerp. The fisUowing 
morning a splendid cavalcade, composed of Spanish 
noUes, ministers of state, the mayor and senate, with 
tiie various companiea and religious orders of the city, 
accompanied the prince in procession through all the 
triumphal arches, and, in the absence of Rubens» who 
was then unfortunately confined by the gout, tb^ aUe<* 
gories were explained to the prince by the buigomaster» 
Chevalier Robert Tucher. Rubens wa8> however*; 
oonsded finr the disappointment he suffered^ in cause-. 



LIFE or RUBENa. xlvii 

quence of his maladj, by the kindims of the prince^ 
who oHidesGended to visit him at his house» where he 
remained a qonsiderable time in Conversation with 
him, and examinii^ the rich collection of pictures^ 
statues, and other olgeets of art with which his 
mansion abounded. 

He now hsde adieu to the' Court asnd all pcditical 
affairs; the few remaining years of his life were 
devoted to the enjoyment of domestic peace, and the 
agreeable pursuit of his favourite studies. Occasionally 
he passed a few months at his ch&teau of Stein, near 
Malines, where he amused himself in painting those 
de%ht|ul landscapes which exdte the admiration of 
eveiy connoisseur, and are alone sufficirat to immor<* 
talize his name : many of these were probably the last 
e^brts of his pencil. He still had abundance of ocgu«» 
pation for himself and assistants, as appears by letters 
dated 1637 and 1638, written to a Mr. Geldorp, in 
answer to an order for an altar-piece representing the 
nmrtyrdoqi of St. Peter, destined for the church dedi* 
cated to that saint at Cologne*. From various causes 
(perhaps his declining health was one) this picture was 
not completed for three years, and H remained in hii 
possession until his decease. His increasing debility 
during the last two years of his life confined 1dm 
entifely to easel pictures, sketches, and dra^rtrii^ ; his 
attention was also much engaged in superintending the 
engraving of his works f , which were executed in a 

* For description see p. lU. 

f To thifl he appears to We always paid the most rigilant atten^ 
tjon, aa is maai&st by most of the prints diffisring nK>re or less 
from the pictores ; omissions, additions, and alterations, in fixrnui 



Xivili iLIFE OF RUBENS. 

style tiiat must immortalize the painted and engravers: 
The names of Pontius, Bolswert, and Soutman, will 
ever be connected with that of Rubens, and partake of 
the radiance of his glory. Many severe attacks of the 
gout embittered the last y^ars of his life, and left him 
but short intervals of repose ; in these moments he 
would amuse himself with his folios of drawings, or 
trace with his feeble hand the subjects of his still fertile 
imagination. The increasing severity of the malady at 
last deprived him of these solaces, and he sunk under 
its effects, on the 30th of May, 1640, in the sixty- 
third year of his age. 

His funeral was performed with solemn pomp. The 
procession consisted of the clergy of the collegiate 
church of St. Jacques, in which the body was interred, 
and several orders of the poor, to whose comfort he 
was a liberal contributor. On each side of the bier 
were sixty orphan boys with torches ; these were 
followed by the chief officers of the city, many noble- 
men, merchants, and citizens of Antwerp, and the 
members of the Academy of Painting. 

The person of Rubens is described to have been of 
just proportions ; his height about five feet nine inches 
and a half; his face oval, with regular and finely-formed 
features; dark hazel eyes ; a dear and ruddy complexion^ 
•contrasted bj curling hair of an auburn colour, with 

or effect, were made by his own hand, in chalks, on the prints in 
their progressive state — drawings having been previously made for 
the engravers either entirely by bis own hand, or commenced by 
his best pupils under his direction, and finished by himself. By 
these means the truth and spirit of the pictures were given by the 
engravers* 



I.IFE OF RUBENS. xlix 

k 

inustacheos and beard ; his carriage was easy and noble ; 
his introduction and manners exceedingly graceful and 
attractive; his conversation was facile and engaging; 
and, when animated in discourse, his eloquence, delivered 
with full and clear intonation of voice, was at all times 
powerful, and persuasive. He would converse freely 
with those who visited him, and at the same time pursue 
the operations of the pencil, or attend to the reading of 
some claissical author ; a practice to which he had much 
accustomed himself. His habits, were to rise early, 
attend the service of the church, and afterwards employ 
himself in sketching or drawing ; having breakfasted, he 
would enter his painting-room and examine the prepress 
of his scholars, correct their works, and direct their 
farther proceedings ; his lessons, conveyed with perspi- 
<;uity, were illustrated by such excellent examples that 
his pupils soon became capable of forwarding all his 
large works. In the evening he frequently rode on 
'horseback, or walked on the ramparts of the city. He 
seldom visited, but was always happy to receive those 
who came to his house. The supper-hour was generally 
cheered by the society of some friends, chiefly of learned 
«men or eminent painters; among the former were 
Nicholas Rockox, the burgomaster of the city, and Gas- 
pard Gevartius *. 

The goodness of his disposition is manifested in various 

* GaspardGevartkiB was born at Antwerp, in 159S; he was a 
jurisconsult, councillor, and historian, to the Emperor Ferdinand III.» 
-and author of a learned description, in Latin, of ancient triumphal 
arches. His portrait, hy Rubens, when about the age of forty- 
live, is now in the possession of the Baron de Roos, of Brussels.*- 
Seep. 264*. 

VOL. II. d 



1 LIFE OF RUBENSL 

parts of his memoirsy and his nobleness of mind is appa* 
rent on all occasions : witness his kindness to the orphan 
children of his friend Breughel^ who found in him a 
parent and protector ; also his urbanity and munificence 
towards contemporary artists, in aiding them in their 
profession, and purchasing their works. The arrogance 
of Jansens and the envy of Schut were punished only by 
kind advice and generous assistance, and the imprudent 
vaunting of Snyders and Wildens was silenced by a can* 
did and unequivocal conviction. His collection showed 
that every artist of merit in his time found in him a 
friend or a patron. The works of Breughel, Brauwer *, 
Van Dyck, Jordaens, Snyders, Honthorst, Podembui^, 
De Vos, Wildens, Snayers, formed a considerable part of 
hi3 cabinet ; nor is his modest and conciliating disposi- 
tion less evinced by the fi[^uency vnth which he en* 
riched the pictures of other artists with figures. 

His works being in constant demand, might have 
justified the exaction of a higher remuneration than he 

• When this painter fled from the severity of his master/ Franc 
Hals, he was arrested as a spy, and confined in a prison at Antwerp^ 
from which he was released hy the interference of Rubens, who re- 
ceived him into his house, gave him employment, and recommended 
his works ; but the depraved mind of Brauwer was insensible to gra- 
titude, and he quitted his benefactor in a disgraceful manner, obi- 
serving, that " the well-regulated house of Rubens was more insup- 
portable to him than the prison of a citadel." A few years after he 
returned to Antwerp in a deplorable state, and died in the hospital 
two days after. As soon as Rubens was informed of the event, he 
caused his body to be transferred from the obscure place of its ior 
terment and placed with due ceremony in the church of the Carr 
melites ; and, had his own life been spared, he would have erected » 
monument to his talents, for which he had already composed a modeL 



LIFE OF RUBEXS. li 

Was in the habit of requiring ; but he never suffered him- 
self to be swayed by mercenary motives. If the price 
demanded was readily paid, he frequently compli- 
mesied his employer with an additional picture, or per- 
haps his portrait. His attention to the education and 
future welfare of his children is shown in the choice of 
bis amiable and learned friend, Gevartius, as their in- 
structor ; and the distinction to which his sons arrived 
proves that he made a judicious selection. 

By his second wife, Helena Forman*, who survived 
him, he had five children, viz. Francis, who was a coun- 
cillor ; Clara Eugenia, married to Philip Van Parys ; 
Elizabeth, married to Nicholas Lundens ; Constantine 
Albertine, who took the veil ; and Peter Paul, who be- 
came a priest. 

By a memorandum in his will, he ordered that, in case 
either of his sons should adopt the profession of painter, 
or any of his daughters marry an artist, then they, or 
any of them, should become possessed of the whole of 
his drawings, sketches, prints, and painting apparatus. 
As this did not occur, the whole of the collection was 
dispersed. 

His friend Gevartius was requested by the family to 
compose an inscription for his monument ; with which he 
complied : but^ to their disgrace, it remained neglected 
until a century afterwards, when Jean Baptiste Van 
Parys, a descendant of the family and a canon of the 
church in which Rubens was buried, caused it to be in- 

« A very erroneous opinion has frequently existed, that the artist 
Had three wives, and pictures have in consequence obtained the ap- 
pellation of "Rubens's three Wives;" but his second partner sur- 
viving him, effectually contradicts this opinion. 



lii LIFE OF RUBENS. 

scribed, thereby removing from himself the reproach of 
foi^etfulness, which will ever be affixed to his prede- 
cessors. 

The attachment of Rubens to works of art led him in 
early life to form a lai^ collection, which he continued 
to the last to augment ; even in the year previous to his 
decease he wrote to his friend Quesnoy (called Flamingo), 
the celebrated sculptor, then at Rome, to send him casts 
from various figures by his hand ; he had also agents who 
bought for him in other parts of Italy. By these means, 
and the produce of his own pencil, he had amassed im- 
mense treasures ; the catalogue of his effects enumerated 
three hundred and nineteen lots of pictures, besides carv- 
ings in ivory, ancient and modem medals, curiosities in 
agates, crystal, onyx, and other rare stones. It was 
originally the intention of the family to dispose of the 
whde of 4;his collection by public sale, and catalogues 
were distributed for that purpose: but this project, 
however, was not acted upon; and a value having 
been affixed to the several articles by Francis Snyders, 
Jean Wildens, and Nicholas Moermans, they were sold 
in detail. Several purchasers soon after appeared, being 
the agents of the King of Spain, the Emperor of Ger- 
many, the Elector of Bavaria, the King of Poland, and 
of Cardinal Richelieu, who purchased a large portion 
of the finest of the pictures. The whde of the 
medals, carvings, and gems, were, bought for the King 
of Spain. 

In the private drawers of the artist were found six 
massive gold chains, to which were appended medals 
and portraits of various sovereigns and other distin- 
guished persons, who had presented them to him ; also 



LIFE OF RUBENS. liu 

a loop composed of diamonds and gems of great value ; 
ti^ether with several costly rings and articles of jew- 
ellery. 

As Fuseli has remarked, that ^^it is better to say 
nothing than little on the wide range of Rubens," the 
Writer will conclude this succinct account of his Life 
without an attempt at a critical dissertation on his per- 
formances. If Fuseli shrank from the task, who shall 
accomplish it ? The range, indeed, is wide ; none but 
a painter's and a poet's eye can take in the vast cir- 
cumference, — and none but the pen of one gifted with 
both qualities can give, with just discrimination, the 
characteristic marks of a genius so excursive and uni- 
versaL The catalogue which follows will show the 
universality of his powers as a painter; but will the 
mere enumeration and description of his works convey 
to the reader a just idea of the originality of conception, 
the vigour of execution, the boldness of expression, the 
intensity of feeling, the splendour of colouring, the 
magnificence of arrangement, and the daring deviations 
of genius, as exhibited in the productions thus classified ? 
No : it requires eloquence, equal to the pictorial repre- 
sentations, to produce these to the mind's eye ; and if 
Fuseli, and the Author of the Elements of Art ^ have 
abandoned the attempt, the world must wait for the 
elucidation until some one arises gifted with equal 
powers, bat with greater temerity. With these im- 
pressions upon his mind, the Writer begs to close the 
history of the life of this great man by a few short 
observations on the most prominent characteristics of 
his genius and works, and endeavour to present them 
in the same succession to the view and mind of. the 



liv LIFE OF RUBENS. 

reader as he has seen and felt th6m himself: for it 
cannot but be supposed that, having been some years 
engaged in a research for the materials which compose 
the present volume, he has had abundant opportunities 
of acquiring an extensive acquaintance with the master's 
various productions : therefore, whatever his reluctance 
may be to such an undertaking, he feels convinced that, 
in offering a Work containing exclusively a history of 
the life, and a description of the pictures, of so eminent 
an artist (being the first of the kind attempted), some- 
thing of the nature of the following summary will be 
expected from him. 

The numerous observations which occur upon pictures 
in the course of the following Work, renders it necessary 
to be brief in reviewing the pictorial powers of this 
mighty genius — this universal painter, from whose 
prolific pencil proceeded, with a spontaneous facility, 
an inexhaustible variety and abundance in every class 
of the art — history, poetry, and familiar life; por- 
traiture, animals, landscape, fruit, and flowers— -each 
possessing such excellence, as though he had made that 
particular branch the exclusive object of his study. 
But though he could thus successfully adapt himself to 
every department of his art, his powers and genius 
appear to expand in proportion to the difficulty of the 
subject. When the vastness of the composition and 
the action required energy in the figures — when the 
passions, violently excited, were to produce terror or to 
excite horror in the spectator — in such scenes he had 
full scope and could range at large, displaying profusely 
the riches of his invention and the inexhaustible stores 
of his poetic imagery. These mighty powers are 



LIFE OF BUBENS. 1^ 

exemplified in those prodigious works representing ** the 
Fall of the Damned," " the Day of Judgment,** " the 
Resurrection of the Just,** and ** the Conversion of 
SauL" The fervour of his genius is displayed with the 
iame success in " the Overthrow of Sentaacherib and 
his Host," *' the Murder of the Innocents," and the 
agonizing sufierings of ** the Impenitent Thief on the 
Cross." A similar spirit pervades all those subjects in 
which the representation depends on the imagination ; 
such are *^ the Battle of the Amazons," ** the Rape of 
the Sabines," " the Death of Hyppolitus," ** the Brazen 
Serpent," and the Hunts of Wild Animals. His poe- 
tical taste is admirably depicted in Bacchanalian Scenes, 
the Loves of the Centaurs, and other mythological 
subjects. " The Horrors of War," " the History and 
Apotheosis of James I.," " the Triumphs of the Church," 
and the Luxembourg series, evince his transcendent 
powers in allegory. It must, however, be admitted, 
that an equal d^ree of excellence is not discernible in 
those compositions where the predominant expression 
should arise from an emanation of the soul, or the 
supposed operation of invisible agency — such inspi-» 
ration as should illumine the countenance of holy 
persons, or radiate that of the sufiering martyr, who 
glories in being thought worthy to die for his faith. 
In all these his expression is purely human, occasiondly 
elevated, but seldom dignified, and never divine. As 
his mind imbibed a strong impression of objects, so his 
pencil faithfully transferred them to the canvas, where 
their material forms, texture, and expression, are always 
depicted with a strength and energy that must ever 
delight the connoisseur. But that which has won all 



Ivi LIFE OF aUBENS. 

eyes to admiration is his resplendent colour, the super- 
lative beauty of which has become proverbial ; even 
Titian is compelled to divide with him the palm of 
superiority. From that master he acquired his know- 
ledge of the harmony of colours^, although he retained* 
the Flemish manner of using them; from his pre- 
dilection to the taste he acquired in the school of Otho 
Voenius, we may trace why his pictures are deficient in 
the chaste and solemn breadth of colour which dis- 
tinguish those of his prototype, whose tints blend- 
insensibly into each other; while those of Rubens, 
although brought together with equal propriety, being 
left pure, or only tenderly united with the pencil, re- 
quire to be viewed at a suitable distance to conceal the 
manoeuvre of the palette ; when so viewed, they present 
a rich and perfect union, and such brilliancy and force 
as bear down all competition. His compositions, al- 
tiiough frequentiy overcharged with objects, arising 
from the fertility of his invention, are always skilfully 
grouped, and united by intermediate links, presenting^ 
to the eye a curved line or the volution of a wreath; 
the whole being judiciously governed by due proportions 
of light and shade, and exhibiting the efiect of a rich 
cluster of flowers. 

* Watelet, in his Dictiannaire des Arts (a work of great erudition 
and useful knowledge), has very ingeniously laid down a scale of 
the comparative degrees of merit of each eminent artist, dividing 
the necessary qualities into four, viz. composition, drawing, co- 
louring, and expression. Of the first, that is composition, he 
estimates Rubens at 18 and Titian at I ft; in drawing, Rubens at 
19 and Titian at 15 ; in colouring, Rubens 17 and Titian 18 ; and 
in expression, Rubens at 17 and Titian only 6. 



LIFE OF RUBENS. Ivii 

To' a profound knowledge of all the principles of the 
art, he added that of being the most accomplished 
adept in its machinery of any one that ever painted ; 
and his rapidity of execution was only equalled by 
his extraordinary powers of invention. It is recorded 
of him, that he performed as inuch in three days 
as another could complete in so many weeks ; this 
astonishing rapidity was the cause of the frequent 
incorrectness in his drawing, observable in many 
of his productions: the fervour of his genius not 
allowing leisure for reflection. These defects, how- 
ever, did not arise from a deficiency of knowledge, 
as may be instanced in numeroys pictures, whpre 
the human frame is portrayed with most admirable 
correctness, the articulations being given with a pre» 
cision that shows an accurate knowledge of anatomy ; 
neither are his female figures devoid of grace, although 
they often present what may be more properly styled 
the comely, than the beautiful. These defects, un- 
questionably proceed from early impressions, uncor- 
rected by a due study of the antique, until those 
impressions were so fixed in his mind that no after 
study could remove them. It is sufficient, however, to 
be able to say, that Rubens possessed a more universal 
genius, a more extensive knowledge of all the principles 
of the art, and a greater power in the practice of 
them, than any other painter who has hitherto existed. 

The Writer is happy to conclude his remarks by 
quoting the following beautiful eulogium on the genius 
and talents of Rubens, which presents in one view the 
essence of all that can be said on the subject, and 
conveys it to the mind in such eloquent language, that 



Iviii LIFE OF RUBEN9. 

it resembldi one of the artist's spirited sketches, which 
comprehends all the beauties of composition, character^ 
and colour, to be found in his larger and more finished 
productions. 

But lo ! from climes less genial, where the muse 
With pride her Belgic trophies still reviews; 
Rubens, with spoils enrichM, with honours gnioed, 
Completes the great triumvirate of taste ; 
High waves proud competition's flag unfurPd, 
And claims to share the homage of the world. 
The powers of painting in his praise combine, 
And wreaths unfading round his temples twine ; 
For him invention opens all her springs, 
And fancy wafts him on her wildest wings ; 
Her ma^c haild light execution lends, 
And colouring her rich tissued robe extends. 
Whether, to Heaven devote, his skill divine, 
Adorns, widi sacred themes, the hallow'd shrine ; 
Or learn'^d, in Allegory's mystic maze. 
The acts of kings and heroes he displays ; 
Whether, with nymphs and satyrs lured to rove. 
He frolics, wild, in Pan's laugh-echoing grove ; 
The landscape spreads with light, luxuriant grace. 
Or hunts, in sylvan scenes, the savage race ; 
Whatever shape the graphic Proteus wears. 
The full magnificence of art appears ; 
All that the head can plan, or hand perform. 
Delight in theory, or in practice charm. 
Yet genius, oft unequal found, by turns. 
Now blazes fierce, and now as feebly bums ; 
In Rubens' course we trace each wide extreme. 
Its dazzling lustre, and its doubtful gleam : 
But tho', like Avon's bard, his orb displays 
Some darker parts amid the general blaze, 



LIFE OF RUBENS. lix 

Struck by his splendours, each rapt eye admires, 

For while we see his spots we feel his fires. 

As petty chiefs fall prostrate, and obey, 

While monarchs move their strength in proud array ; 

But when the pomp is past, the peril o^er. 

Rebel against the rod they kissM before. 

So cavilling tribes, who roam the graphic waste 

Scarce rescued from the savage state of taste. 

Assail the rights of Rubens, grudge his praise. 

And talk high treason Against the state he sways ; 

But, when triumphant crowned in every part. 

He moves in some vast enterprise of art ; 

His lawful praise licentious critics own. 

And wondering painters bend before his throne. 

Vide Shee's ElemetUi vf Art^ Canto III. line 227, €t uq. ; 
also the excellent note to line 230. 



PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS- 



The perusal of the Catalogue Raisonni of the works 
of Rubens will doubtless frequently excite in the mind 
of the reader surprise, if not incredulity ; for he - will 
naturally be inclined to doubt the possibility of one man 
having been able to produce such an immense number 
of pictures, many of which are of large dimensions, and 
offering such variety of subjects, and diversity in the 
compositions. These doubts the Writer of the Cata- 
logue has often heard expressed, and to meet the ques- 
tion has been one of his endeavours ; with this view he 
has inserted throughout the work all the authentic in- 
formation he has been able to collect. Notwithstanding 
this, he thinks that he shall place the matter more intel- 
ligibly before his readers, by giving a brief account of the 
manner and the ingenious methods adopted by Rubens 
to vanquish this apparent impossibility. Presuming 
that the reader has gone through the account of the life 
of Rubens, in which the energies of his mind and physi- 
cal powers are largely noticed, he will have perceived 
that he was able to perform, in the space of a few days, 
as much work as would cost other artists so many weeks ; 
that numerous sketches, designs for the models of large 
pictures, were frequently the result of a few hours' 
amusement, or, at most, the efforts of two or three days* 
application. 



PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS, Ixi 

« 

Let the reader, then, imagine such a- genius, such t a 
phenomenon in art» to have under his controul $ix or 
eight clever pupils, well versed in the facile system of 
painting peculiar to the school ; and that each of these 
was furnished with a model,* or sketch, to work from on 
an enlarged scale, by the unerring medium of lines ; 
and that, having correctly drawn in the subject, for- 
warding their several pictures under the continual, in- 
spection, and with the occasional assistance of their 
instructor ; that, lastly, he passed over them his brpad 
rapid pencil, infusing life and spirit in every figure^ 
and harmonized the piece ;-r-he will perceive how, 
by the labour of a day or two, Rubens rendered 
the work his own, and worthy of his distinguished 
name. But, in addition to his regular pupils, it should 
also be remembered, that he had the aid of Francis 
Snyders and Paul de Vos, to introduce animals, fruit, 
and objects of still life, into such subjects as required 
them ; and Wildens, Van Uden, and Mompers, to paint 
the landscape department : by such means the work of 
eight or ten persons was accomplished daily. Nothing 
short of such auxiliaries could have produced in less than 
two years the sketches and finished pictures representing, 
in a series of twenty-one allegories, the life of Marie de 
Medicis, besides portraits and other smaller works, done 
exclusively by his own hand. The same means were 
doubtless used to execute the immense pictures for the 
convent at Loeches, in Spain (as these were also painted 
at Antwerp), the ceiling of the Jesuits' Church, the Life 
of Decius, and the numerous pictures which formerly 
adorned the altars of the churches in the Low Countries. 
It must further be observed, that these skilfiil assistants, 



Ixii PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS. 

in the absence of large works» were ud questionably 
employed in copying pictures, frequently introducing 
in such copies certain variations from the originals, 
either in subject or size, so as to give them the appear- 
ance of new compositions ; this may account, in some 
measure, for the great number of pictures of Holy Fa«* 
milies, and other favourite subjects. The entries in the 
Catalogue are much increased by descriptions taken from 
prints engraved from parts of pictures, and sometimes 
from others improperly ascribed to the master by the 
engraver. 

There are^ no doubt, many pictures also inserted 
in the Catalogue which, if the Writer had seen, he 
might have rejected as spurious works; but the de- 
scriptions of them being inserted in catalogues of cele- 
brated collections, it formed one of the objects of the 
Work to record them. Nor must it be supposed, 
however great the number of entries may appear, that 
the whole of the pictures by the master are inserted 
in the present volume ; there are yet many which have 
never come under the eye of the Writer, or been 
noticed in any catalogue, or commemorated by the 
hand of the engraver, although the enumeration of 
{Hints after his works exceed fourteen hundred. — Vide 
Observations, p, 27, in the Introduction to Part L 



THE WORKS 



OF 



PETER PAUL RUBENS. 





< 



THE 



WORKS 



OF 



PETER PAUL RUBENS 



1. iHE Elevation of the Cross. The composiuon of this 
splendid picture is so rich and varied that any description, 
however elaborate, must fiEul to convey a correct idea of its 
grandeur and magnificence. The outlines of its arrangement 
are nearly as follows : In the centre is represented the suffering 
Saviour attached to a lofty cross, the weight of which requires 
the united efforts of eight powerful men to elevate ; their va- 
rious attitudes and exertions are finely depicted. To the right 
of the cross is a company of five women, three children, and 
St John ; the latter stands by the Virgin, whom he appears to be 
consoling. Among the group of females is one (nearest the 
spectator) seated on the ground (with an infant in her arms) 
falling backwards with terror ; on the opposite side of the cross 
are four Roman soldiers on horseback, one of whom (without a 
helmet) is extending his hand, in which he holds a war club, 
apparently giving orders. The crucifixion of the two thieves, 
and the presence of numerous spectators, are subordinate parts 
of the composition. 

This immense altar-piece is formed of three divisions ; the 
groups on each side of the cross are painted on the interior of 
the covers, which, when open, exhibit the whole complete. 

Uft. by 15 ft. 

Engraved in three plates by Witdouc. 

VOL. II. B 



2 RUBENS. 

Upon the exterior of the covers are painted : — 

Saint Catharine, with a palm branch in one hand and a 

sword in the other; her attention is directed upwards, from 

whence two angels are descending. 

Engraved by Bolswert, and again Mariette ex. 

Saint Eloy, whose figure is truly apostolical, adorns the 
other cover. 

This splendid production was painted in the year 1610, for the 
sum of 2600^., 334/. It is said to have been the first public 
work of the artist afler his return from Italy ; but this opinion is by 
no means borne out either by its style or colour : judging firom these, 
it appears to have been a very subsequent production. Its ex- 
hibition in the church of St. Widburge (for which it was painted) 
attracted immense crowds, and excited the most enthusiastic 
applause. In the year 16£7, Rubens retouched this picture, and 
introduced a dog, of the Newfoundland kind, in the right-hand 
comer. 

This picture was added by the French to the overwhelming 
riches of the Louvre, and restored to Antwerp in 1815. It now 
adorns the church of Notre Dame, in that city. 



S. A finished Study for the preceding picture, of the highest 

excellence and beauty, is in the valuable collection of Jeremiah 

Harman, £sq. 

2/t. 3 1 in. by 4 ft. 3i in.— C. 

Exhibited at the British Gallery, 1815. 

Formerly in the collection of the Prince de Conti, and was with- 
drawn in the sale of 1777. 



3. A second Sketch, with considerable variations, painted 
with a bravura freedom and a rich impasto of colour, is in the 
possession of J. T. Batts, Esq. 

Exhibited at the British Gallery, 1818. 



4. A Pen Drawing, tinted, said to be the first study for the 
Elevation of the Cross, — 

Was sold in the collection of M. Lempereur, 1783, 404 y>. 16/. 



RUBENS. 3 

5, The Descent from the Cross. The subject is composed 
of nine figures, and represents the body of the Saviour being 
lowered from the cross, by the means of a sheet, by two men, 
who are mounted on ladders, and bending over its transom; 
one of them holds the linen in his mouth, while he lowers the 
body with his right hand. They are assbted by Nicodemus 
on one side, and Joseph of Arimathea on the other ; both of 
whom are also on the ladders. St. John, who is clothed in a 
scarlet robe, stands below, receiving the body in his arms ; on 
his left are Mary Magdalen and Salome, on their knees, 
extending their hands to aid him ; the former is attired in a 
dark green vest, the latter in a purple one. Beyond them 
stands the Virgin Mary, clothed in a blue mantle ; her gesture 
and expression mark her anxious solicitude. The gloom of 
evening prevails, the multitude has departed, and none remain 
but those performing the mournful duty, and whose love and 
sorrow were mutual. 

IS ft. by 9/^6 in.— P. 

Engraved by Lucas Vosterman, and in mezzotinto by Val-Green. 

Upon the interior of the doors which cover the preceding 
are painted : — 

The Visitation of the Virgin to Elizabeth. The afiPec- 
tionate interview is exhibited as taking place on the summit 
of a flight of steps, which form the entrance to a house, from 
the door of which the aged Elizabeth is advancing ; and, by 
the movement of her hands, and the animation of her coun- 
tenance, appears Co be uttering the prophetic words — ^^ And 
whence is this to me, that the mother of my Lord should come 
to me ?^ To this mysterious salutation the Virgin, who stands 
before her, leaning on the balustrade, is ^ving meek and pious 
attention ; behind her are Zacharias and Joseph, grasping 
each other^s hands; and near them is a female attendant, 
mounting the steps, with a basket of linen on her head. A 
man-servant, unloading an ass, is close to the front. 

Engraved by P. de Jode. 



4 RUBENS. 

The Presentation in the Temple. '^ And when the days 
of her purification, according to the law of Moses, were accom- 
plished, they brought him to Jerusalem, to present him to the 
Lord.^ The Virgin (seen in a profile view), clothed in a blue 
mantle, stands in the left, her arms extended, and her attention 
directed to the venerable Simeon, who holds the infant Saviour 
in his arms, and, looking upwards, seems to be uttering, in 
pious rapture, the devout prayer — ^^ Lord, now lettest thou 
thy servant depart in peace, according to thy word,^ &c. The 
prophetess Anna stands on his right, and close to the front is 
Joseph, bending on his knees with the ofiPering of two young 
pigeons, as commanded by the law of Moses. 

Engraved by P. Pontius, Holhenmels, Visscher, and Val-Green. 

On the exterior of the doors are painted : — 
A colossal figure of St. Christopher, bearing the infant 
Saviour on his shoulders through a river. 

Engraved by Eyndhouedts and Van Tiennen. 
A Hermit, with a lantern in his hand. 

These pictures were painted for the chapel of the brotherhood 
of Arquebusiers (who acknowledged St. Christopher as their patron), 
as a compensation for a piece of ground which they had ceded to 
the artist, when he rebuilt and enlarged his house at Antwerp. 
The history of this event is related by the author of the Life of 
Rubens as follows : — " When the artist decided upon establishing 
himself at Antwerp, he purchased a large house, the greater part 
of which he pulled down for the purpose of increasing its size, and 
rendering it more commodious for his art. In digging the new 
foundation, on a site which separated his ground from that of his 
neighbours, some slight encroachment was unavoidably made upon 
the premises of the company of Arquebusiers ; in consequence of 
which, a meeting of that brotherhood was held, and a deputation 
waited upon Rubens, to inform him that he was trespassing upon 
their ground. They were received by the artist in the most polite 
manner, who, in his turn, explained to them what he conceived to 
be his right, on the justice of which he had the fullest reliance. 
The difference at length became so serious, that both parties were 



BUBENS. 5 

determined to appeal to a court of law. Things were in this 
situation when the burgomaster, Rockox, who was then the chief 
of the company and a friend of Rubens, interposed as mediator, 
and, in a mild and friendly manner, convinced him of his error : 
this produced a proposition for an arrangement. The chief ac- 
cordingly communicated the wishes of the painter to the company, 
who readily resolved that their president should return, with full 
power to terminate the business ; the conditions of which were, 
that the artist should present to the company a picture, with covers, 
the subject of which should represent some passage of the life of 
their patron, . St. Christopher. This saint is said to have carried 
the infant Saviour upon his shoulders through a river, his legs and 
staff increasing in length in proportion to the depth of the water. 
The learned painter treated this legend allegorically, and produced 
the preceding picture, which, when completed, he invited the 
company to inspect ; but no sooner did these learned Arquebusiers 
enter the gallery, than they eagerly sought for their patron saint, 
whom, not finding, they, with emotions of surprise and disappoint- 
ment, inquired, ' Where, Sir, is our St. Christopher ? ' Rubens, 
who was fully prepared for such a result, pointing to the picture, 
replied, ' There, gentlemen, is what you required of me ; only, 
as an acknowledgment of our good fellowship, instead of one 
St. Christopher, I have given you several ;' at the same time, he 
fully explained the allegory of the legend. This answer by no 
means satisfied the gentlemen, who were quite unable to understand 
the allusion, and expressed openly their dissatisfaction at these 
pretended St. Christophers (so they styled them) ; and the com- 
plaisant artist, unwilling to offend them, painted their patron of a 
colossal size, on one of the exterior covers, and a hermit, with a 
lantern in his hand, on the other." 

The exhibition of this altar-piece is said to have excited the most 
Intense curiosity, and to have attracted crowds of admirers from all 
parts. Such was the universality of its reputation, that it long 
continued to be an object of lucrative importance, both to the 
church and the city. 

It was transferred to the Louvre during the war, but restored in 
1815, and now adorns the church of Notre Dame, at Antwerp. 



IIUB£NS. 



A copy, in small, of the Descent from the Cross, done in the 
school of Rubens, is in the Academy of the city ; and a drawing, 
carefully finished in chalks, commenced by a pupil and perfected 
by Rubens for the engraver, is in the Musee at Paris. 



6. The Assumption of the Vir^n. Seated on clouds, and 
surrounded by light, the Vir^n ascends gracefully through the 
refulgent air, and is apparently approaching the presence of 
Divinity, indicated by a celestial radiance. Her countenance 
is directed upward, and appears glorified by the beatific vision ; 
her right hand is extended, and the left placed on her bosom ; 
her ample robes of blue and pink are agitated by a gentle 
breeze. A host of angels accompany her ascent, some of whom 
officiously bear the skirt of her robe and mantle, while others 
have wreaths and palms in their hands ; and two are soaring to 
place a chaplet on her head. In the lower part of the picture 
are the twelve apostles and three females, assembled at the 
deserted tomb, placed in front of a sepulchre in the left ; five 
of the apostles are close to its side, two of whom are bending 
over it and looking within ; the three women are also at the 
tomb, with the winding sheet in their hands ; one of them, 
wearing a crimson robe, is kneeling on a step in front, with 
her back to the spectator, holding up a handful of fresh flowers, 
which the apostles (who are in the right side) view with devout 
surprise ; and one of them, clothed in a light gray vest and a 
scarlet robe (seen in a profile view, looking up), is raising his- 
hands in adoration. 

ISfi. 6 in. by Sft, 6 m. ( about )-—¥, (arched top.) 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

Of the many pictures representing the Assumption, this is 
decidedly the best. The composition is an example of per- 
fection in art : its base is earth, its termination heaven ; and 
all the intermediate parts blend and unite to form one sweep- 
ing line; it is equally distinguished by appropriate dignity 



RUBENS. 7 

and grace. The seraphic expression of the Virgin, and the 
elegant beauty of her form, merit the highest commendation. 

This superb altar-piece is recorded to have been the produce of 
sixteen days' labour, for which the artist received 1600^., 140/. ; 
now worth 5000/. or 6000/. 

This treasure in art was added to the superabundant riches in the 
Louvre, from whence it was transferred in 1815, and, with other 
pictures, placed with suitable ceremony in the church of Notre 
Dame, for which it was originally painted. 



7. The Resurrection of our Lord. The Saviour, witli a 
palm branch in one hand and a banner in the other, is 
triumphantly quitting the tomb ; and the centinels, overcome 
with fear, are falling in confusion before him. 

4tft. 6 in. by Sft. 10 in P. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

The same subject is engraved by Galle and Punt, and in small, 
anonymous. 

On the covers of the preceding were painted : — 
St. John the Baptist, standing erect, with his left hand in an 
attitude of address. 

^ft. 6 in. by 1^. 8 1«.— P. 

And St. Martine, clothed in a crimson vest and a scarlet 
mantle, bearing in her hand a palm branch. 

4yi. 6 in. by ly^.Sm.— P. 

The above decorated the tomb of J. B. Moretus, whose portrait 
(also by Rubens), in an oval form, was at the top of the picture. 
These, by the date on the portrait, were painted in the year 1610. 

They are now in the Academy at Antwerp. 



8. The Portraits of Alexander Goubau and his Wife, in one 
picture. The apparition of the Virgin is seen in the clouds. 

This picture ornamented the tomb of the family whose portraits 
are represented. Cathedral of Notre Dame. 



8 EUBENS* 

9. Christ triumphant over Sin, Death, and the Grave. 
The Saviour, attended by angels, is represented sitting on the 
tomb, treading Sin and Death under his feet 

Engraved by Eynhouedts. 
' This picture was painted to adorn the tomb of the family of 
Cockx, in the church of St. Walburge ; but it has long since dis- 
appeared from its depository. 



10. Saint Walburge, in a boat tossed by a tempestuous sea. 
She is on her knees at prayer ; about a dozen persons are with 
her, several of whom are labouring at the oar. A slight and 
hastily-painted picture. 

Itjt. by ^Jt. 7 tn.— P. 

Now in the collection of M. Schamps, Ghent. 



11. Angels bearing St. Catherine to the tomb. 



IS. Christ upon the Cross. 



IS. A representation of the First Person of the Trinity. 



14. Two Angels. These and the preceding one were cut 
out to the contours of the figures. 

The whole of the above five small pictures were included with 
the grand altar-piece, in the sum of 2600^. The latter pictures 
were sold in 1739, for 993/o., 89/. 



15. The Virgin and infant Saviour, with Saints. The com- 
portion exhibits the Virgin seated in a bower, with the infant 
Saviour in her arms, before whom St. Bonaventura is kneeling 
in adoration; behind him are three females and St. George, 
the latter, clad in armour, holds a banner in his hand, and the 
vanquished dragon is lying at his feeU On the opposite side. 



BUBENS. 9 

close to the front, are St Jerome kneeling on a lion, and an 
angel assisting him to hold a large book ; four angels^ flying 
over the head of the infant, bear a chaplet of flowers and a 
branch of palms in their hands. The St George is a portrait 
of the artist, and most of the others are supposed to represent 
members of his family. 

Sft. 6 in. by 7^^.— P. (about.) 

Engraved by Pontius, Eynhouedts, and Aubert 

This picture was placed by the widow of Rubens in the chapel 
of his tomb, in the church of St. Jacques, at Antwerp, where it now 
remains ; respect to the memory of the artist has hitherto prevented 
its removal. 



16. The Martyrdom and Miracle of St. Justus. The Saint 
is represented, in conformity to the legend, carrying his head in 
his hands, and approaching two men, who behold the super- 
natural eight with surprise and fear. 

Engraved by Witdouc. 

This picture is said to have been painted at the time the artist 
was in the school of Otho Voenius ; it formerly adorned the church 
of the Annunciation, at Antwerp, and was sold in the 

Sale of suppressed convents at Brussels , 1786. • 1 300 Jio. 117 L 

AgaininthecollectionofM. Horion,i>t</o, 1788 1125 Jlo. 101/. 



17. The Adoration of Magi. In the composition of this 
picture, which consists of eighteen figures, the Vir^n is placed 
in the left, holding the infant Saviour on a pillow, before whom 
one of the Magi and a youth are kneeling; behind these is 
another of the wise men (with a vase in one hand and its cover 
in the other), whose bonnet a servant is lifting off; near these 
are a man on horseback and several other persons looking on. 
St Joseph stands behind the Vir^n, and the head of a cow 
(lying down) fills up the front comer. 

UJl.6in.hj liyif.— C. 

Engraved by Lommelin and Eynhouedts. 



10 RUBENS. 

This picture was painted for the abbey church of St. Michael^ at 
Antwerp, at the express request of the abbot, who, upon its com- 
pletion, desiring to know the price, was answered by the artist, 
*' that, having employed thirteen days to paint it, his demand was 
1300^., 117//' The abbot no less suprised at the rapidity of his 
pencil than the amount of his claim, endeavoured to reduce the sum 
required, which Rubens would by no means allow ; but, as a mark 
of friendship for the abbot, he consented to paint his portrait and 
present it to the abbey. This portrait is mentioned by writers in 
high terms of commendation. The former is now in the Academy 
at Antwerp. 

18. St Gregory, with St. Clara and other sunts, assembled 
near an archway, surmounted by a picture of the Virgin 
and Child. 

Engraved by Eyndhouedts. 

Painted for the abbey church of St. Michael. 

A picture of a similar subject, composed of seven figures and a 
globe, with the inscription S. P. Q. R. on it, over the archway, is 
engraved, anonymous. 



19. A Portrait of Philip Rubens, brother to the artist. 
Engraved by Galle. 

This picture was painted to adorn his tomb, erected by his 
widow, in the abbey church of St. Michael, from whence it has 
long since disappeared. 

20. The Entombment. The body of the Saviour, placed 
upon a stone in an inclined portion, is supported behind by 
Joseph of Arimathea, while the Virgin, who stands on the 
other side of the body, is holding the drapery behind the head; 
the Magdalen is by her side, and St. John behind. This is a 
highly-studied production. 

4 ft. 1 in. by Sjl. S m.— P. 

Engraved by Ryckman, and in the Musee Fran9ais. 
Painted for the tomb of Michelsens, in the church of Notre 
Dame. 



RUBENS. 1 1 

It was removed from the Louvre in 1815, and is now in the 
Academy at Antwerp. 

The Virgin, with the infant Saviour in her arms. The 
composition represents the Vir^n holding the naked infant 
erect on a table. The babe is seen in neai4y a profile view, 
with its left hand on his parentis left hand, while her right 
hand encompasses its middle. The Virgin wears a scarlet 
mantle, and is viewed nearly in front ; her head inclmes a little 
forward. A slight picture. 

St John the Evangelist. He is sitting on a bank, clothed 
in a gray vest and a scarlet mantle, holding a large book in 
his right hand, and is looking up at an eagle. The head of 
the saint is remarkably fine and expressive. 

4yi. 1 in. hjlfi.5 fw.— P. 

The last two pictures were formerly doors to the preceding 
altar-piec6, and are now in the Academy at Antwerp. 



SI. A Council of Cardinals, Bishops, Doctors of the Church, 
and Monks, assembled in Synod, to deliberate upon the mys- 
teries of the Eucharist. The Divinity, with a globe, and 
a group of four angels, bearing large books, are seen above. 

Engraved by Snyers. 

Painted for the church of the Dominicans, at Antwerp. 



22. A Portrait of Breughel, surnamed Velvet. 

This picture was painted by Rubens to adorn the tomb of 
Breughel, in the church of St. George, at Antwerp. Rubens had 
so great a friendship for Breughel, that he undertook the care and 
education of his two orphan daughters. 



93. The Flagellation. The sufiPering Saviour is represented 
with his back to the spectator, and naked all but the kins ; he 
is surrounded by four men, one (standing on his left) has a 
cord ; and two others (in the opposite ^de) have Tods ia theu: 
hands ; the fourth figure is on the farther side of the group. 



12 KUBENS. 

holding his left hand over his eyes. This is a brilliant and 
highly-finished production. 

Engraved hy P. Pontius. 

The preceding picture was transferred, during the war, from 
the church of the Dominicans, at Antwerp, to the Louvre, and 
restored in 1815. Visitors to the church should be careful to see 
the original, which is always kept covered, and a copy hanging near 
exposed. This copy was obtained from a young artist some few 
years ago (18J8), as a condition for allowing him to paint one 
from the original, for an English gentleman. 



24. The Adoration of the Shepherds. This composition, 
conasting of eight figures, represents the Vir^n seated on the 
farther side of a crib, on which the infant Saviour is repo^ng ; 
her right arm is under the pillow, and the left raising up the 
covering of the babe, while a shepherdess kneels in adoration 
before him, having her simple ofiering of a basket of eggs and 
two fowls on the ground by her side ; two shepherds rendering 
their homage are on her right ; and a third (leaning on a staff ), 
and a female, with a can on her head, are behind them. 
St. Joseph stands on the right of the Vir^n, and three cherubs 
are above. An ox and an ass are in front. 

Engraved by L. Vosterman, and etched by Spruyt. 

Painted for the church of the Dominicans, at Antwerp, from 
which it has long since been taken. A highly-wrought drawing of 
the preceding, by a pupil, and perfected by Rubens for the en« 
graver, done in chalks, washed in India ink, and heightened with 
white, is in the Mus^e at Paris. 



25. Christ descending, armed with thunder, to destroy the 
world, and the Virgin on her knees in the clouds, interceding 
for the Human Race. In the lower part of the picture are 
St Dominick (kneeling by the side of a globe, which he partly 
covers with the skirt of his mantle), St. Francis d^ Assise, 
bishops, cardinals, and a great many saints, imploring 
the divine clemency. Among the latter may be observed 



RUBENS. 13 

St Catherine (on her knees in front), St. Sebastian, St. Jerome, 
St. Cedlia, and other celebrated saints and monks ; and beyond 
them appear multitudes of people. The First and Third 
Persons of the Trinity are seen above, enthroned in light. 
16 ft. by 10 Jt. C^bout.J—C. (arched.) 

It was painted for the church of the Dominicans, at Antwerp, 
and is now in the public gallery at Lyons. 

The author of the Life of Rubens very properly expresses an 
opinion that the composition of this picture never could have 
originated from so learned a man as the painter, but that it pro- 
ceeded from some pious enthusiast. The composition is done in 
outline in the Annales du Musee. 



26. A Portrait of Michael Ophovius, the last bishop- of 
Bois-le-Duc, and confessor of Rubens. This picture adorned 
one of the rooms of the monastery of St. Dominick. 

Engraved by Vanden Bergh. 

Now in die Musee at the Hague. 



S7. The Crucifixion on Mount Calvary. In the represen- 
taUon of this awful subject, the artist has chosen the evening 
of the day and the close of the aifecting scene. In the right 
are two soldiers on horseback, one of whom is piercing with a 
spear the side of the Saviour, who has already yielded up the 
ghost and bowed his head upon his breast ; on his right is the 
beheving malefactor, ^hose countenance, expressive of faith and 
pious resignation, is directed towards him ; the other sufferer is 
on his left, undergoing the punishment of having his legs broken 
by the executioner, and in his agonizing struggles has torn his 
foot from the nail which attached it to the cross. Close to the 
front are Mary, the mother, with Mary, the wife of Cleophas, 
and St. John ; and at the foot of the cross is Mary Magdalen, 
imploring the soldier (who is piercing the Saviour) to spare her 
Lord. — Vide St John, chap, xix, v. 32 — 84. 

14yi. by 10/r. 2fn.— C. 

Engraved by Bolswert and Aubert. 



14 RUBENS. 

This magnificent altar-piece was presented to the church of the 
RecolletSy at Antwerp* by Nicholas Rockox, in the year 1620, he 
being at the time burgomaster of Antwerp. 

The writer observes with regret, that this glorious work of art 
has suffered most lamentably from unskilful cleaning and lavish 
restoration ; it has, however, recently been judiciously improved by 
the removal of some of its repaint, and new varnished. Sir Joshua 
Reynolds, in his Tour through Flanders, gives a detailed description 
of this picture, and concludes by remarking, that " It is certainly 
one of the first pictures in the world for composition, colouring, and 
correctness of drawing. 

It was transferred to the Louvre during the war, and restored in 
1815, and is now in the hall of the Academy at Antwerp. 



28. The Sketch for the preceding picture, done en grisaiUe^ 
exceedingly spirited and beautiful, was formerly in the mo- 
nastery of the Recollets. 

2/Mj in. by 1^^. 7 J w.— P. 

Now in the collection of Monsieur Schamps, at Ghent. Worth 
150 guineas. 

And a Drawing eh grisaiUey possessing extraordinary power 

and energetic expression, done by the artist for the engraver to 

work from. 

23|tfi. by 17 tn. 

Now in the splendid collection of drawings of Sir Thomas Law- 
rence, P.R.A. 



29- Stunt Francis d"* Assise lunking under approaching dis- 
solution, supported by the brethren of his order, while kneeling 
at the altar to receive the communion from the hand of a priest. 
A composition of thirteen figures, and three angels above. This 
is a work of the highest excellence, possessing extraordinary 
force of colour and effect; its style and character bear con- 
siderable affinity to the works of the Caracci, which the painter 
appears to have had in view. 

isyif. 8 in, by 7 ft, 3 w.— P. 

Engraved by Snyers, and in small, anonymous. 



JdUBENS. 15 

This picture was painted for the church of the RecoUets, at 
Antwerp ; and, according to the receipt preserved in the archives of 
the family of M. Charles, the donor, it cost hut 900 f4>. • 81/. 

It adorned the Louvre until 1815, when it was restored to 
Antwerp, and is now in the hall of the Academy, formerly the 
church of the Recollets, for which this and the preceding were 
painted. 



SO. The Incredulity of St. Thomas. The Saviour, clothed 
with a scarlet mantle round the loins, stands in the right, 
extending his left hand towards St. Thomas, who is accom- 
panied by two disciples. A composition of four figures, seen 
to the knees. This picture is distingubhed for delicacy of 
finishing and beauty of colour. 

^fi, 7 in. by Zfi. 1 1 in.— P. 

Engraved hy Chataigne. 

Upon the covers of this picture are the portraits of Nicholas 
Rockox and his wife Adriana Perez. The former (seen in a 
profile view), habited in a black silk vest, a full rufi*, and a 
gray cloak lined with fur, in an attitude of prayer ; the right 
hand placed on his breast, and the left holding a book. The 
lady is in a similar position ; she is attired in a black figured 
silk robe and a full white rufi*; a double row of pearls is sus- 
pended round her neck, and a cornelian rosary in her hands. 

^fi. 7 in. by \fl. 9 in.— P. 

Engraved in the Musee Napoleon. 

The above pictures were painted to adorn the chapel of the noble 
family of Rockox, in the church of the Recollets, at Antwerp. 
They were taken from the Louvre in 1815, and are now in the 
haU of the Academy of that city. 

There is a bust portrait of N. Rockox, engraved in an oval form, 
by P. Pontius. 



31. The Coronation of the Virgin, by the Holy Trinity. 
The Virgin is represented kneeling upon an inverted crescent. 



16 RUBENS. 

with angels flying in the clouds under her, and the First and 

Second Persons of the Trinity are placing a crown on her 

head ; the former is clothed in a white vest and a broad yellow 

mantle, and is seated with a globe under his feet, and a sceptre 

in his left hand. The Saviour stands in the opposite side, 

covered with a scarlet mantle; and the Virgin is attired in 

a purple dress and a dark blue robe. A free and hasty 

production. 

I2jt.n in. by 8^^. 2 tn.--C. 

Engraved by P. Pontius, and also anonymous ; Vanden Enden ex. 

The same subject, differently composed, is engraved by Jegher 

and Fauci ; by the latter, from a picture then in the collection of 

the Marquis Guerini, at Florence. 

The preceding was painted for the church of the RecoUets, and is 

now in the Musee at Brussels. 



The following are the subjects of thirty-six pic- 
tures WHICH adorned the CEILINGS AND GALLERIES 

OF THE Jesuits^ Church, n at Antwerp. These, to- 
gether WITH the greater FART OF THAT SPLENDID 
EDIFICE (built AFTER DESIGNS BY RuBENs), WERE DES^ 
TROYED BY LIGHTNING, ON THE 18tH OF JuLY, 1718. 

32. St. Michael driving before him the rebel Angels. 

38. The Nativity. 

34. Queen Sheba before Solomon. 

35. The Adoration of the Kings. 

36. David cutting off the Head of Goliah. 

This subject, differently composed, was engraved by 
. Panneils. 

37. The Temptation in the Desert. 

Engraved by Jegher. 

38. Abimelech giving the sacred Bread to David. 
89. The Last Supper. 

40. Moses with Aaron and Urr. 

41. The Elevation of the Cross. 






RUBENS. 17 

42. Abraham about to sacrifice his Son Isaac. 
4f3. The Resurrection of Christ. 

44. The Promotion of Joseph in Egypt 

45. The Ascension of Christ. 

46. The Transladon of Elijah. 

47. The Assumption of the Vir^n. 

48. Esther before Ahasuerus. 

49. The Coronation of the Virgin. 

50. St. Athanasius. 

51. St Ann and the Virgin. 

52. St Baal. 

5S. St. Mary Magdalen. 

A print of this saint is engraved, anonymous. 

54. The Name of Mary surrounded by Angels. 

55. St. Cecilia. 

56. St. Gregory. 

57. St Catherine. 

58. St. John Chrysostom. 

59. St Jerome. 

60. St. Lucie. 

A print of this saint is engraved, anonjrmous. 

61. St. Augustin. 

There is also a print of this saint engraved, anonymous. 
Vanden Enden ex, 

62. The Name of Jesus surrounded by Angels. 

63. St Margaret 

A print of this saint is engraved, anonymous. 

64. St. Ambrose. 

65. St Eugenia. 

66. St Gregory. 

67. St Ann and St Mary. 

Fortunately the compositions of these splendid works have been 
preserved through the medium of drawings in red chalk, by De 
Wit, from which prints have been engraved by Preisler, and also 
by Punt. That these prints are sadly deficient in the characteristics 

VOL. II. c 



18 KUBKNS. 

of the prototypes is entirely owing to the imperfections of the 
drawings, which partake of the style and manner of the Dutch 
painter rather than that of Rubens. 



68. St Francis Xavier ridang the Dead. This distinguished 
missionary of the church of Rome is represented standing on 
a high pedestal in the left of the picture ; he is habited in the 
black robes of his order, his right hand extended and the left 
pointing upwards ; behind him is a youth, similarly dad, hold- 
ing a book under his arm, and around him are assembled a 
multitude of persons composed of various nations, among whom, 
and in front, is seated a resuscitated man ; on whose left are 
three females, one of them is removing the linen from his &ce, 
the other two are looking up with gratitude to the saint ; nearer 
the side are two men with spades, and beyond them is a 
mulatto female holding forward her dead infant with an im- 
ploring look for its restoration ; a little retired from this group, 
and upon an elevation of stone work, is a Hindoo rising from 
the bed of death, and from whom a negro is removing the grave 
clothes. These supernatural events have produced correspond- 
ing effects upon the beholders. At the base of the pedestal, in 
the left, is a group, composed of a young man, a woman, and a 
negro, on their knees ; and behind them are a blind mulatto, 
and a tall man in a scarlet vest, who seems to be deeply affected. 
Beyond the multitude rises a magnificent temple adorned with 
idols, one of which, in front of the building, is tumbling from 
the pedestal upon its afirighted worshippers ; in the clouds is seen 
the Virgin, leaning on a globe and holding a chalice in her hand ; 
before her are angels bearing a cross, and other angels floating 
in a stream of celestial light, which descends and illumines the 
temple — a beautiful allusion to the doctrines of Christianity 
dispenang the darkness of ignorance and idolatry. 

The composition of this magnificent picture, although vast 
and varied, is united and disposed with such consummate skill, 
and every part so admirably governed by due proportions of 



RUBENS. 19 

light and shade, and aided by a rich diversity of colour, that 
its general effect is indescribably powerful and splendid, and 
may not unaptly be compared to the glorious brilliancy of the 
setting sun after rain, where intervening and surrounding 
douds present an innumerable variety of tints. To these fascia 
nating charms are united what may justly be considered its 
highest excellence — ^the grand and energetic manner in which 
the artist has exhibited the operation of the miracle, and the 
effects produced on the surrounding spectators. To the move- 
ment and general excitation produced, is opposed the calm and 
dignified attitude of the saint, whose gesture and expression 
denotes him to be uttering the emphatic sentence ^' non meo 
meritasy in excelds gloria deo^ 

17 ft. hy 12 ft. e in.—C. Worth 5000 gs. 
Engraved by Marinus, and anonymous, and in the Vienna Gallery. 



69* St. Ignatius Loyola healing the sick and the possessed. 
The august miracle is displayed in the interior of a magnificent 
temple, on the left side of which, and on the summit of the 
st^ of an altar, stands the saint, attired in a gorgeous 
chasuble; his right hand is extended towards the people, and 
at his side are several monks wearing the dress of the order ; 
around the base of the altar appear the assembled crowd, 
several holding a raving female, and others assisting a maniac 
who lies prostrate in front ; to the left, and at the foot of the 
altar, are two women ; one, elegandy dressed in a purple silk 
vest (her back to the q)ectator), is presenting her afflicted infant 
for relief; the other, clad in a blue robe, is kneeling with two 
children by her ade. Anxiety and agitation prevail throughout 
the throng; some are pressing forward to participate in the 
healing power manifested, while others are sedulously tending 
the afflicted. A group of admiring angels soar aloft, and the 
demons of evil are seen escaping from die presence of the 
saint. 

This noble production, though abounding in strength of 
character and expression, is greatly edipsed by its companion 



20 BUBENS. 

in the attractions of colour and effect ; the subject is also less 
agreeable to the eye. This picture was originally painted for 
the church of St. Ambrose, at Genoa, but being found too 
large for the altar, was taken by the artist to Antwerp, and 
another one, representing the same subject, painted in its stead. 

17/^ by 12 ft. 6w.— C. 

Engraved by Marinus, and anonymous, and in the Vienna Gallery. 

These pictures adorned the Jesuits' church at Antwerp, until its 
destruction by lightning, after which it is probable they were sold to 
the Emperor of Germany, together with the original sketches, and 
are now in the Belvidere Palace at Vienna. 

lift, by l$ft.—C. 

Drawings of the above pictures, carefully executed in black chalk 
heightened with white, evidently the work of a scholar, and re- 
touched by Rubens for the engraver, are in the Mus6e at Paris. 

ZO\in. by 16|m. 



70. The Assumption. The Virgin, clothed in light blue 
garments of various tints, has the right hand raised, the left 
extended, and her countenance directed upwards ; a company 
of twelve angels are floating among the clouds beneath her, and 
numerous cherubim are paying her homage above. In the 
lower part are represented the apostles and holy women visiting 
the deserted tomb ; one of the former, habited in a gray vest 
and a light-coloured mantle, is kneeling in front, and before 
him is a second, in a green vesture, raising up the stona 
covering of the tomb, in which he is assisted by another apostle 
and a young woman ; two other females are by the side of the 
sepulchre, one of them holds a sheet while her companion 
gathers up the fresh flowers that are on it ; behind them are 
three apostles, the one nearest the front extends his right arm 
and is looking up. This splendid composition is not equally 
excellent in the execution, and the hand of the scholar is 
evident in many of the subordinate parts. 

nfi. 2 in. by 10 Jt. 11 in C. 

Engraved by Bolswert, and in small by Loemans. 



RUBENS. 21 

Painted for the high altar of the cathedral of Notre Dame, hut 
being foond too small it was purchased by the Jesuits for their 
church. The French transported it to the Louvre during the war, 
at the conclusion of which it was restored, and is now in the Musie 
at Brussels. 

The finished study of the preceding, of great excellence, is in the 
collection of His Majesty. 



71. The Virgin and St. Joseph leading the child Jesus by 
the hand, on their return from Egypt. The First and Third 
Persons of the Trinity are represented above. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

There is another print by the same, in which a company of angels 
attend the Deity. The same subject, with variations, is engraved 
by Vosterman and S. Voet, and in mezzotinto by Mac Ardell. — 
See Marlborough Collection. 

Painted for the Jesuits' church at Antwerp. 

Sold in the CoDection of Mons. Danoot, 

BrusseU, 1829. . 8200 Jfo. 738/. 

This is merely the nominal price at which it was put up at the 
sale, and no advance was made. 

It is now m the possession of Mr. Buchanan, an eminent dealer in 
pictures, to whom the country is indebted for many capital works of 
art, and also an iiiteresting and useful work, in 2 vols. 8vo., entitled 
Memoirs of Painting, ^c. ^c. Published by R. Ackerman, 1824. 



72. The Annunciation. The celestial messenger is on the 
left of the picture, bending on one knee before the Virgin, who 
is kneeling on the step of a small altar, with her left hand 
on a book, near which stands a lamp burning ; a company of 
five angels, and a dove descending in a glory of light, are 
above. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

There is also a print of this composition, with variations, by 
Drevet, in which there are six angels. 



22 BUBENS. 

This picture waa painted immediately after the artist's return 
from Italy, for the chapel of married men, in the Jesuits' church* 
Now in the Marlborough collection at Blenheim. 



78. A Portrait of the Artist, admirably drawn in pen and 
ink, in 1630 ; formerly in the rich library of the Jesuits. 

It is finely engrayed, of the same size, by P. Pontius. 

The plans for the church and chapels, and sketches for the altar 
and choir, and various decorations by the hand of Rubens, were 
also in the same library. 

74. The dead body of the Saviour (in a fore-shortened posi- 
tion}, lying on the knees of the Father ; two angels, bearing the 
instruments of the Sayiour^s sufferings, stand on each side. 

5 ft. 1 in. hy 4 ft. S tn.— -P. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

Painted for the church of the Great Carmelites at Antwerp ; 
taken to the Louvre during the war, and restored in 1815, and is 
now in the hall of the Academy at Antwerp. 

A picture representing the same subject was sold in the collection 
of M. Robyn Brussels, 1758. . 1000 Jlo. 901. 



75. Christ appearing to St Theresa, who is on her knees in- 
terceding for the delivery of souls from purgatory ; many are 
seen writhing in that ima^nary region of misery. A slight and 
freely-painted picture. 

eft. 2 in. by 4 ft. 6 »n.— C. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

Painted for the church of the Minor Carmelites at Antwerp ; 
taken to the Louvre during the war, and restored in 1815. Now in 
the Academy at Antwerp. 



76. The finished Study for the preceding, of exquisite beauty 
kd perfection, is in the collection of M. Van Sasseghem. 

2 ft. 2 in. hy I ft. 7 in.— P. 
A duplicate Sketch is in the Stafford Gallery. 



RUBENS. 8S 

77. St Ann instructing the Virgin to read. The saint is 
seated by the side of a balustrade, on the terrace of a house, 
with one hand placed on the child's shoulder, who has a book 
in her hand ; St. Joachim stands behind, observing them ; and 
two angels, with a chaplet, are above. 

7y^. 4 in. by 4 ft. 6 ta.— P. 

Engraved by Bolswert, Caukerken, and anonymous. Vanden 
Enden ex. There is a print of St. Ann and the Virgin, engraved by 
Aubert, which is evidendy taken from the same, with omissions and 
alterations. 

Painted for the church of the Minor Carmelites at Antwerp ; 
taken to the Louvre during the war, restored to the city in 1815, 
and now in the hall of the Academy at Antwerp. 



78. The body of the Saviour, supported by the Virgin, 
St John, and the Magdalen, after its descent from the cross. 
A small picture. 

This production, which is highly commended by the author of the 
Life ofRubeui, was formerly in the church of the Minor Carmelites 
at Antwerp. 

79. The Crucifixion of the Saviour between the two Thieves. 
The Saviour is represented in a front view, with his head bowed 
on his breast; and the two malefactors are seen in a profile 
view ; the unbeheving one is on his left. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

Painted for the church of the Capuchins at Antwerp. 



80. St Peter and St Paul. The former holds a key in each 
hand ; and the latter has both hands placed on the hilt of a 
sword, the point of which rests on the ground. The figures 
are full length and above the size of nature. 

Engraved in one plate by Ejrnhouedts. 

These two pictures formed the doors of a little chapel in the 
church of the Capuchins at Antwerp. 



24 BUBEMS. 



A picture of the preceding ApoBtles, in similar positions, attended 
by an angel and a boy, is in the Munich Gallery. 



81. The Vir^n with the infant Saviour in her arms, appear- 
ing on a doud to St Francis, who is bending on one knee to 
take the child. 

Engraved by Soutroan, and the head of the saint by Visscher. 
This excellent production was painted for the church of the 
Capuchins, at Antwerp. 

82. The Marriage of St. Catherine, in the presence of nu- 
merous saints. The composition of this magnificent altar-piece 
exhibits the Vir^n seated on a throne, holding the infant 
Saviour, who is bending forward to place a ring on the finger 
of St. Catherine ; St. Joseph stands behind the Virgin ; St. Peter 
and St Paul are on her right; and St John and two infants 
with a lamb on her left ; upon the steps, in front of the throne, 
are a large assemblage of saints, among whom may be dis- 
tinguished St. Sebastian, St Lawrence, St. Augustin, and St 

George. 

IS/t.hj iiy^.— -C. 

Engraved by Snyers and Eynhouedts. 

Painted for and now in the church of the Augustins, at Antwerp.' 

Sir Joshua Reynolds, in his Tour through Flanders, observes of 
this picture, that he was " so overpowered with the splendour of the 
colouring, tliat he thought he had never seen such great powers 
exerted in art.'* This picture is, however, £eu: from being wholly by 
the hand of Rubens. 

The original Sketch for the above is in the collection of Earl 

Mulgrave. 

25 in, by 18 tn. — P. 



88. The Virgin with the infant Saviour and St Joseph. 
The Vir^, clothed in a scarlet vest and a blue mantle, is seated, 
with the child (who is naked) standing and resting one leg on 
his parentis knee ; he has an apple in his left hand, and the 



BUBENS. 25 

right band is placed on the back of bis mother'^s band, a cradle 
is placed near him ; St. Joseph is behind the Virgin redinmg 
bis head on his hand, contemplating the scene before him ; and 
a parrot, perched on the base of a column, is pecking a vine- 
branch. 

5 ft. 2 in. by 6^^. 1 in.— P. Worth 700 gs. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

This picture was presented by the artist, in 1631, to the Academy 
at Antwerp, he being tliat year one of the directors, on which occasion 
(as was usual) he also gave a chair covered with red leather, on the 
back of which is inscribed his name and date. This curious relict is 
now carefully preserved in a glass case. 

There is a print of the Virgin and Child of the preceding picture, 
omitting the rest, engraved by Lasne ; the same plate was afterwards 
altered, and the name of £• Quilenus ex. appears on the print. 



84. A Cook-maid, occupied at a large table, on which is an 
abundance of dead game, fruit, and vegetables. The woman 
only was painted by Rubens ; the accessories are the work of 
Snyders. 

Now in the hall of the Academy. 



85. Christ expiring on the Cross. The countenance of the 
Saviour is directed upwards, and the expression denotes him to 
be uttering his dying words ; the dty of Jerusalem is faintly 
seen through the prevailing gloom. 

eft. 1 1 in. by 4^ ft. 1 m.— C. 

Engraved by Snyers and Bolswert. 

This picture was presented by Cornelius de Winter to the church 
of the BecoUets. 

Now in the Academy at Antwerp. 



86. A repetition of the precedmg, of a smaller size, and 
most admirably painted, is in the possession of M. Steenkruys, 
of Antwerp, who asks HOOl. for it. 

9ft. 5 J in. by flft. 3j in P. 



26 RUBENS. 

87. A third picture, with slight deviations from the pre- 
ceding, is in the collection of M. Schamps. 

^Jt. 10 tn. by St ft. 6| •«.— P. 

In the house of M. Moretus, a descendant of the celebrated 
printer of that name, are a suite of fourteen Portraits, attributed 
to Rub^s by the connoisseurs of Antwerp, and affirmed as 
such by tradition ; they are, however, so inferior to his usual 
works, that the writer thinks a detailed description of them 
unnecessary. Among them are-— 

Justus Lep^us. 

Pic Mirandola, a copy from an Italian picture. 

The Wife of Moretus. 

25 tfi. by 20 tn. — P. 

The following Pictures formed the peincifal deco- 
rations OF VARIOUS TRIUSiPHAL ARCHES ERECTED AT 

Antwerp, in honour of the entry of Prince Fer- 
dinand, IN THE YEAR 1635, AFTER THE BATTLE OF 
NORTLINGEN, GAINED IN 1634. ThE DESIGNS AND 

SKETCHES FOR THESE WORKS WERE MADE BY RuBENS, 
AND THE FINISHED PICTURES WERE PAINTED BY HIS 
SCHOLARS, UNDER HIS DIRECTIONS, AND, IN SOME IN- 
STANCES, RE-TOUCHED BY HIS HAND. 

88. A Portrait of Prince Ferdinand (seen in a three- 
quarter view), wearing a tumed-up hat and feathers, a broad 
pendant frill with lace edge round the neck, and a scarf over 
the left shoulder ; the right hand poises a baton on the edge of 
the frame, and the left hand is placed on the hip. 



89- The frontispiece exhibits a grand architectural elevation, 
with four termini of Mars, Mercury, Peace, and Plenty, sup- 
porung a tympanum, on the entablature of which is represented 
Philip IV. presenting to Prince Ferdinand the baton, as 
commander-in-chief; behind the latter is a figure indicating 



RUBENS. 27 

• 

Fortitude and Prudenoe. A medallion of the king, seen in 
profile, surmounts the top, supported at the side by Cybele 
and Neptune. 

Engraved by Neefs. 

90. Ferdinand on horseback, conducted by Prudence, re- 
caving the homage of Bel^um, represented by a female 
wearing a mural crown and having a lion couching at her 
feet; the nymph Hygeia stands behind the latter; and two 
soldiers follow the prince, under whose horses^ feet lie the 
bodies of slain enemies. 



91* An allegorical composition, allusive to the prosperous 
voyage of the Cardinal Ferdinand of Austria. Neptune, 
mounted on a car drawn by sea-horses and attended by Ne- 
rddes and Tritons, commanding his ministers of storms and 
tempests to depart This picture is entitled Quoa Ego. 

Now in the Dresden Gallery. 



9S. The meeting of the Three Ferdinands, and the union 
of their armies, previous to the battle of Nortlingen. In the 
fore-ground are three all^orical figures. 

This picture is now in the Vienna Gallery. 
The original sketch is in the coDectioD of Sir Abraham Hume, 
bart. 



93. Philip IV. of Spidn, seated on his throne, investing 
his brother Ferdinand with the command ci the army destined 
agunst Sweden and Germany. 



94. The Alliance of the Archduke Maximilian with the 
Princess Maria oi Burgundy, whose marriage porticm was the 
Low Countries. A composition of seven figures. 

This picture is now in the possession of Mr. No£, a dealer in 
pictures. 



28 BUBENS. 

95. The Archduke Ferdinand on horseback, followed in 
his train by Victory, Mercy, and Reli^on, and received by a 
female, the emblem of Belgium, who is bending in submission 
before him, while the harpies of war are escaping from his 
presence. 



96. The Union of the Houses of Austna and Spain, by the 
marriage of the Archduke Philip with Jean, Infanta of Austria. 
The distinguished couple stand with their hands united before 
Juno, who is presenting them a globe (the symbol of govern- 
ment), and Time, with an inverted scythe, appears to promise 
them a long and happy reign. 

This picture is now in the possession of Mr. No6, and the 
orginal Sketch is in the Academy at Antwerp. 



97. The Apotheoms of the Infanta Isabella. The prin- 
cess, descending on a doud, is pointing to a young prince (the 
Infant of Spain), who is descending the steps of a temple, and 
turning to take leave of the king his brother. Several alle- 
gorical figiures are also introduced. 



98. The Archduke Ferdinand of Austria and In&nt of 
Spain, accompanied by the King of Hungary, mounted on 
spirited chargers, commanding their forces in the battle of 
Nortlingen in 1634. 

Syi. 6 in. hj II ft. e in. (ahoui.J^C. 

This picture is now in His Majesty's collection at Windsor, and 
was exhibited in the British Gallery in 1822. The original Sketch 
is in the Academy of Antwerp. 



99. The triumphal entry of Ferdinand into Antwerp. 
The prince, mounted in a superb car, drawn by four horses, b 
accompanied by several soldiers bearing trophies of war. 
Victory flies behind him, holding a wreath over his head. 



RUBENS. 29 

100. The Temple of Janus. The harpies of Discord 
are represented forcing open the gate of the temple, from 
whence is issuing the demon of Destruction with a sword in 
one hand and a flaming torch in the other ; on the opposite 
ade are three females, personifying Commerce, Piety, and the 
Infanta Isabella, two of them are endeavouring to close the 
gate of the temple. Ferdinand, in the character of Hercules, 
is conducted by Minerva up the difficult ascent to the temple 
of Fame, from the pursuit of which Love and Wine are en- 
deavouring to seduce him. 



101. The Combat of Bellerophon with the Chimaera. 
The original Sketch of this is in the collection of WiUiam 
Beckford, Esq. 



Besides the preceding compositions, the arches were adorned 
with numerous portraits of Kings and Princes of the Houses of 
Spain, Austria, and Hungary. Several of these pictures are now in 
galleries, and are noticed in this work. 



The following three Sketches were designs for portions of 
the preceding arches :— 

102. A magnificent Car, guided by a double-faced female 

(Prudence), on which is a pedestal surmounted by genii, 

bearing a wreath and a medallion, and above them is a large 

trophy of military weapons, &c. ; three captives are at the base 

of the pedestal, and several allegorical figures are suitably 

introduced. A number of detached sketches are also on the 

paneL 

syj. 5 in. by 2/t. 2| in. 



10S. A rusticated Portico, surmounted by Hercules slaying 
the Hydra, while a female, personating Antwerp, gathers the 
golden fruit of the Hesperides ; in niches above the arch are 
seated females representing Justice and Prosperity (or Abun- 
dance). Other emblems are also introduced. 

Sfi. 5 in. by t/t. 2j tn.— P. 



30 EUBENS. 

104. A similar erection, surmounted by a figure of Jason 
stealing the golden fleece ; and a female with the emblem of 
commerce. Seven other allegorical figures are in the com- 
position* 

$fi. 5 tn. by 2/t. Z\ in. — P. 

The preceding tiiree Sketches are in the Academy at Antwerp, as 
are also two others for the same work, done by Van Thulden, 
which show how nearly he approached his master, and how ciqaable 
he was of conducting the work in question. 



The whole of this splendid suite are engraved in a set of forty- 
three plates, by Van Thulden, and the portrait of Ferdinand, which 
forms the frontispiece, is engraved by J. NeeiFs. The work is 
entided' Pompa Introitus Fenumdi^ in folio, of 189 pages. 



The following Pictures by Rubens are inserted in 
THE Catalogue of his Effects taken after his 
DECEASE, IN 1640, a;nd sold by private hand in 
detail. The descriptions are in general too brief 
to identify them with correctness. 

LOT 

81 Cupids fighting. A subject said to be taken from Phi. 

lostratus. 

There is a print in which a cupid and a sat3rr are wrestling ; 
two cupids are looking on; and two others are in the 
opposite side, one of them blowing a trumpet, the other 
holding wreaths to reward the victor. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

82 Shepherds and Shepherdesses travelling. 

83 Nymphs and Satyrs. 

84 The Holy Family, with St Geoige and other Saints, in a 

Landscape. 

This picture the artist's widow presented to the church of 

St. Jacques, to adorn the chapel of the tomb of her 

husband. 



KUBENS. ' SI 



Catalogue qfihe AriUfs Effects continued. 

85 Adiomeda chained to a rock ; the figures are of the aze 

of life. 

Now in the Marlhorough conection. 

86 The Magdalen ; the size of life. 

87 Bathsheba at a fountain. 

88 Three Nymphs with Satyrs. 

89 A Man and a Woman, accompanied by Satyrs ; an un- 

finished picture, painted on paneL 

90 A troop of Banditti jnllaging Peasants. 

91 Bacchus, with a goUet in his hand. 

92 The Three Graces. 

Sold privately to an agent from the King of England. 

93 Saint Cedlia. 

94 A Shepherd and Shepherdess. 

95 A Portrait of Philip, Duke of Burgundy. 

96 A Ditto of Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy. 

97 A Ditto of Lord Arundel. 

98 A Ditto of the Marquis Spinola. 

99 Susanna and the Elders ; painted on panel 

100 A Portrait of Doctor Maiema. 

101 A Ditto of a Prince Cardinal. 

lOS A Ditto of a young Female, with flowers in her hand and 
a black bonnet on her head. 

103 A dance of Italian Peasants. 

104 A Tournament in a Landscape. 

Now in the Louvre. 

105 An Italian Landscape, with the ruins of a temple ; painted 

on canvas glued on panel. 

106 A Landscape ; canvas on panel. 

107 A Portrait of Charles the Bold. 

108 A woody Landscape, represented under the effect of day- 

break, with huntsmen and dogs passing through it. 
Engraved by Bolswert. 

109 A Partrait of lionardo da VincL 

110 A Ditto of a French Lady. 



32 BUBENS. 



Catalogue of the Jrtisfs Effects continued. 

111 A Landscape; painted on canvas glued on panel. 

112 A Ditto with a flock of sheep. 

113 A Portrait of the Cardinal Infanta of Spain. 

114 A Ditto of the Empress of — 

115 A Ditto of the Queen of Spain. 

116 A Ditto of the King of Spain. 

117 A Ditto of the Duke de Neubourg. 

118 Mercury lulling Argus with the sound of a pipe ; on paneL 

119 A Sacrifice ; done after Elshiemer. 

120 A Portrait of the Queen, consort of Louis XIII. 
ISl Angelica and Erminia. 

122 A Portrait of a young Lady, with her hands crossed in 

front. 

This picture has since acquired great celebrity, and is 
known by the appellation of " Le Chapeau de Pailk" 
Imported by the writer. 

Now in the collection of the Right Honourable Robert Peel. 
(See description in this Work.) 

123 A Portrait of Philip IV. of Spain. 

124 A Portrait of an English Lady. 

125 An old Woman and a Boy ; a candle-light piece. 

126 A Portrait of a Lady. 

127 A Ditto of the Duke of Buckingham. 

128 A Portrait of an old Man. 

129 A Warrior, clad in armour, and wearing a red scarf. 

130 A Portrait of a Lady with a hat. 

131 A Landscape, with an extenave forest, in which is in- 

troduced the subject of Atalanta and Meleager pursuing 
the boar. 

132 A View of the Escurial and the surrounding country. 
138 A Landscape. 

134 .A Ditto. 

135 A large Landscape, enlivened with a variety of figures. 

136 A Ditto, represented under a cloudy sky and the effect 

of rain. 



RUBENS. 33 



Catalogue of the Artisfs Effects continued. 

137 A grand mountainous Vievr, with a devastating deluge 

rushing through the country. This subject alludes to 
the story of Baucis and Philemon, who are seen on the 
declivity of a hill in the right, under the protection of 
Jupiter and Mercury. 

138 Christ discovering himself to his Disciples at Emmaus. 

139 Romulus and Remus ; a Sketch. 

Afterwards in the collection of M. Danoot, and mentioned 
by Sir Joshua Reynolds in his Tour. 

140 A Portrait of a Gentleman, in a Turkish dress. 

141 Roman Charity. 

142 Peasants fighting ; done from a drawing by old Breughel. 

Engraved by Vosterman. 

143 Bacchus, Venus, and Ceres, disposed round a fire. 

144 Christ upon the Cross. 

145 A Portrait of a young Lady, habited in the German 

costume, and holding a little dog in her arms. 

146 A Portrait of the Archduke Maximilian. 

147 A drunken Bacchus. 

1481 

1 JXJ I ^''^^ Portridts of the King of Tunis, after Antonio Moro. 

150 A large Landscape; painted on canvas glued on panel. 

151 1 

^ I.A r Portraits of the Archduke Albert and Isabella. 
15% j 

153 A Man and Woman, with a quantity of dead game ; the 

latter is introduced by De Vos. 

154 A Stag Hunt. 

155 St. George on horseback. Engraved by Panneels. 

156 Victory crowning a Warrior. Munich. 

157 Hercules. 

158 St. Peter and St. Paul. 

159 The Mud of Orleans. 

160 The four Penitents. 

161 Susanna and the Elders. 

162 Ditto Ditto. 

n 



34 KUBENS. 



Catalogue of the ArtisCs Effects continued. 

16S Atalanta and Meleager ; a hunting subject 

164 Three Nymfdis with a Cornucopia. 

165 The AdOTation of the Magi. 

166 A Portrait of Marie de Medicas* 

167 A Portrait of the Queen, consort of Louis XIII« 

168 Pythagoras, with a great abundance of fruit The latter is 

the work of Snyders. 

This is probably the picture notioed in this Catalogue as 
. Numa Pompiliusy with other figures. 

169 The Interior of a Stable and Cow-house, with the subject 

of the Prodigal Son. 
Engraved by Bolswert. 

Now in the coUection of William Wilkins, Esq. — See des* 
cription in this Work. 

170 A drunken Silenus, accompanied by nymphs, satyrs, 

and boys. 

This is probably the picture now in the collection of the 
Right Honourable Robert Peel. — See description. 

171 A Landscape ; pabted on panel 

172 A Ditto. 

178 A Ditto, representbg moonlight 

174 A Satyr and a Njrmph ; the former is seen in a front view, 

carrying a basket of grapes and other fruit before him, 
and the latter is by his dde, with one arm round his 
neck and the other raised to take some of the fruit 
Engraved by Alexander Voet 

175 The Death of Dido. 

S48 The Marriage of St Catharine, in the presence of numerous 

saints; a sketch for the picture in the church of 

St Augustin.-— iSiff^ p. 24. 
249 The Virgin, encompassed by a wreath of flowers. The 

latter are by another hand. 
269 Diana and Nymphs hunting. The figures by Rubens, 

and the landscape by Breughel. 



RUBENS. 35 



Catalogue of the ArHafs Effects continued, 

294 A Landscape, with cattle and figures. The landscape is 

by another hand* 
905 A Peasant 8 Cottage, with figures. The latter only are by 

Rubens. 

296 A Peasant with Cattle. 

297 A Landscape, in which are introduced a couple courting ; 

the man has a bagpipe attached to his girdle. The 
figures only are by Rubens. 

This subject is engraved by Avril, Boel, and in mezzotinto 
by Smith. 

298 A Landscape, with a woman on a hill. 

299 A Peasant feeding his Dog. The figure only by Rubens. 

800 A Landscape. 

801 A Ditto. 

815 A triumphal Procesaon of Julius Cassar, painted from the 

designs of Andrea Mantegna ; done on three pieces of 
canvas glued on panel. 

This beautiful production is now in the collection of Samuel 
Rogers, Esq. — See description, 

816 Six large unfinished Pictures, containing various Studies 

of sieges of towns, battles, and triumphs of Henry IV. ; 
designs for a second series of pictures for Queen Marie 
de Medicis. 

817 A great number of Sketches and unfinished Pictures of 

Heads, both on canvas and panel, done by Rubens and 
Van Dyke. 

818 A large quantity of Dravongs and Sketches ; studies for 

many of the distinguished pictures by Rubens. 

819 A great number of Copies done by Rubens; after pictures 

by celebrated masters. 

The author of The Life of Rubens observes that, although the 
number of pictures inscribed in the preceding catalogue may appear 
very considerable, that there were aldo a great many which the 
painter's widow had previously selected from the collection, some of 



36 RUBENS. 

them for her own pleasure, and others which, with a becoming 
delicacy of mind, she considered improper compositions, on account 
of their display of nudity. Amongst the latter were Diana and her 
nymphs at the bath (the figures half the size of nature) ; and a 
picture of the Three Graces. The former painting was afterwards 
purchased by the Duke of Richelieu for 3000 Jlo, ; its size is stated 
to be 4 ft. high by 6jt, wide. The same writer speaks of this 
picture in terms of the highest commendation. 

A second picture of the Three Graces is also mentioned, the figures 
being of the size of life : this is stated to have been subsequently 
sold to the King of England. 

A note at the conclusion of the catalogue states, that the total 
amount of the sale of Rubens's collection of pictures was tSOfiOOflo.f 
about 25,000/. 

105. St. Bavon distributing Alms to the Poor. The saint 
(represented as standing at the side of. a flight of steps) is 
attended by two servants with bowls of money ; before him 
are two females (one of whom has two infants in her arms), 
kneeling upon some steps, supplicating for relief, and behind 
them is a mendicant, reaching over their heads for the same 
purpose; on the opposite side of the picture are three ladies 
looking on. In the second distance the same saint, followed bj 
a page and another person, is seen ascending a flight of steps to 
the entrance of a church, at the door of which are two bishops 
and several monks attending his arrival. This once superb 
picture has been so infamously injured by cleaning, that its 
beauties are irreparably lost. 

16 ft. by 9ft. (about.) 

Engraved by F. Pilsen. 

Sir Joshua Reynolds, in his Tour through Flanders, highly com- 
mends this picture. 

Now in the cathedral of St. Bavon, at Ghent. 



106. A very capital finished Study, representing the same 
subject, but of a more extended compoation, is in the collection 
of the Rev. H. Carr.—- iSir^ description. 



BUBENS. 37 

107. The Martyrdom of St, Lieven. The saint, who appears 
to have been waylaid on a journey by a company of armed 
men, is on his knees in front, surrounded by three assassins, 
one of whom has pulled out his tongue, which he holds with 
pincers to a dog ; a second is pulling his beard ; and a third 
has the knife of execution between his lips. The rest of the 
party, with their horses, are thrown into confusion by the 
appearance of two angels, who are descending, armed with 
thunder and lightning, to avenge the martyred saint; two 
other angels, bearing a chaplet and a palm, hover over his 
head. In conveying the representation of this painful event, 
the artist has doubtless rather consulted the taste of his em- 
ployer than his own sound judgment, and has most injudidously 
exercised his ingenuity to render it ghastly and horrible. The 
action and expression of the figures are also in unison with 
this appalling sentiment — they are violent and outri; the 
handling is remarkably broad and free, and the colour rich and 

glowing. 

Uft. Sin. by liyiJ. Sin C. 

Engraved by Caukerken, 1657. 

Painted for the Jesuits' church at Ghent, and now in the Musee 
at Brussels. 



108. Christ descending in wrath, armed with thunder to 

destroy the world, restrained by the Virgin, who b kneeling on 

a cloud, showing him her breast ; beneath them is St. Francis, 

raising one hand in supplication towards the Saviour, and with 

the other throwing the skirt of the mantle of his Order over a 

globe. 

) 3 ft. by 9ft. 6 in C. 

Engraved by Panderen. 

This absurd allegory was painted (no doubt to gratify some 
religious enthusiast) for the church of the R^collets at Ghent, and 
is now in the Musee at Brussels. 



109- The Magdalen expiring in the arms of an angel; 



88 RUBENS. 

another angel stands by her side, holding her hand. They are 
represented near a hovel in a desert 

Engraved by Baillu. 

Painted for the church of the Recollets at Ghent. 



110. St Francis d'*Asase receiving the Stigmates. The saint, 
habited in the dress of his Order, is kneeling on a bank at the 
entrance to his cell, his arms extended, and his countenance 
directed to the apparition of the Saviour upon a cross in the 
heavens, the dazzling brightness from which has overpowered 
another monk, who has fallen backward, and is holding his 
hand to shade his eyes. 

Engraved by Vosterman. 

Painted for the church of the Recollets at Ghent ; now in the 
Academy of that city. 

There is a print of the precedii^ subject, in which the saint is 
seen in a front view, and the second figure is on the farther side of 
the bank on which the former kneels, engraved by Pilsens. 

A Drawing of the preceding picture, commenced by a scholar 

and perfected by Rubens for the engraver (in chalks), is in the 

Musee at Paris. 

20|tfi. by Urn. 



111. Purgatory. The Virgin is represented interceding with 
the Holy Trinity for the deliverance of souls from purgatory ; 
in the lower part of the picture are angels raising unhappy 
beings from this imaginary limbo. 



112. The Martyrdom of the Maccabees. 

This and the preceding picture were painted for the cathedral 
church at Tournay. Michel, in his Life of Rubens^ observes, that 
both these altar-pieces are destroyed, they having undergone two 
ordeals by ignorant picture cleaners, and lastly repainted ; thereby 
making bad worse. 



SUBENS. 39 

lis. The Adoration of the Magi. The composition of this 
qdendid aitar-^peoe is formed of about twenty-four figures. 
The Yiigin stands near the centre,, in the left, with St Joseph 
bdmid her; she is seen in nearly a profile view, holding the 
infant Saviour erect on a crib, while he recdves the homage of 
one of the wise men, who is kneeling and embracing his feet ; 
the infant at the same time places his hand dn the worshipper'^s 
bdd head ; the offering, connsting of a cup of gold, is on the 
crib. An Eastern king, wearing a turban and a gorgeous 
robe (the train of which is held by a page), stands in front, and 
two youths, one of whom carries a gift of money, are on his 
left ; behind these are an Ethiopan king (standing in a front 
view), attended by a n^ro slave bearing a casket, and a 
mulatto boy with an incense pot ; beyond these are a number 
of persons presring forward towards the infant On the op- 
posite ride, and in front, is a dog, only part of which is seen ; 
and in a remote part of the stable are an ox and an ass feeding 
at a manger. 

Engraved by L. Vosterman. 

This capital picture was painted for the church of the Capuchins 
at Toumay, and during the siege of that city was severely injured 
by a cannon ball. 

A highly-finished Drawing of the preceding, done in India ink, 
tinted with bistre, terminated with the pen, and heightened with 
white, is now in the Musee at Paris. It is the work of a scholar, 
hut perfected by Rubens for the engraver. 

2ft in, by 28| in. 



114. St Joseph presenting the infant Saviour to the Deity. 
This picture is highly commended by the same writer for 
grandeur of character and beauty of execution. The infant 
Jesus is particularly noticed for striking expression, and for 
the fredroess of the carnations. 

This picture was painted for the Hermitage near Namur, and 
was the gifl, together with the building, of the Archduke Albert 
and Isabdla. 



40 BUB£NS. 

115. The Martyrdom of St. Catherine. The subject ib re- 
presented as passing on the summit of a flight of steps, in front 
of a heathen temple ; and the saint, with her hands bound, is 
kneeling preparatory to her execution. She is attended by 
four females and a priest ; the latter, standing on the steps in 
front, is apparently urging her to recant and worship an image, 
to which he points his left hand ; at the same time, two of the 
women are binding up her long hair, and the two others are 
addressing the executioner, who stands on the farther side of 
the saint, with his back to the spectator. A company of angels 
are seen descending, bearing the rewards of martyrdom. A 
sacrificial ram, a censor, and the Roman fasces, lie on the 
ground in front. 

Engraved by W. Leeuw ; and again by G. Huberti ex. 
Painted for the church of St. Catherine at Lille. 



116. The Descent from the Cross. In the compomUon of 
this picture, St. John is represented standing with one foot 
on a ladder, receiving the body of the Saviour in his arms, 
which is lowered by three men, who are above ; two women 
are at the foot of the cross, ready to assist. 

Engraved by Meyssens. 

Painted for the church of the Capuchins at Lille, 



117. The Adoration of the Shepherds. This picture is 
composed of eleven figures ; the infant Saviour is represented 
recumbent in a manger on the right, with the Virgin standing 
by his side, uncovering the face of the sleeping babe to the 
view of the worshipping shepherds, among whom are a man 
and a woman kneeling ; behind them are a woman, with a basket 
on her head, another pouring out milk from a can, and two 
shepherds, one, having a poultry basket under his arm. These 
figures are brilliantly illumined by a light, supposed to emanate 
from the divine infant. Close to the left side are a man and. 



BUBENS. 41 

a woman approaching, the former bears a lighted candle ; an 
ox and an ass are in front of the manger. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

Painted for the church of the Capuchins at Lille. 



118. St. Frands receiving the infant Saviour in his arms 
froni the Virgin. 

This is either a duplicate picture or an error in the entry, as the 
same subject occurs in page 24, the churches having the same 
appellation : this at Lille and the other at Antwerp. No picture of 
the kind is in either at the present day. 



119. The Adoration of the Magi. The Vir^n, with the 
infant Saviour in her lap, is seated on the right, and St. Joseph 
stands behind her, leaning on a sUok, and observing with 
emotion one of the magi, who is on his knees, presenting the 
child a bowl of money ; behind the latter stands a Moorish 
king with a gold vase in his hand (his head is turned from 
the spectator), the train of his splendid robe is supported by a 
negro boy ; near these is one with an incense pot, and another 
extending his arms towards the holy persons; nine figures, 
chiefly soldiers, are beyond the two latter magi. The place 
exhibits the exterior of a stable, mth the broken shaft of a 
column lying in front. 

9ft. 6 in. by 7ft. 6 in C. 

Engraved by Ryckman. 

This capital production formerly adorned the church of Berg- 
Saint- Vinox, from whence it was sold to defray the expenses of 
repairs, and was purchased by M. Randon de Boisset, in 1766, for 
the sum of QOfiOOfs., 2400/. — a most extraordinary price for that 
period ; but as this statement is made by Le Brun, in a catalogue of 
1791, when the picture was put up for sale, some doubt of its 
correctness may justly be entertained. 



42 BUBXKS. 

Collection of M. Randon de Boisset 1777. . 10,000^. 400L 
(bought in.)" 

■ LeBnin .... 1791. . 9,500 ft. SSOl. 
M. Robit • . . . 180L . 7,950/r, 320/. 



120. A Sketch for the preceding picture, with slight vari- 
iitions and omisfiions. 

14 m. by 18f«. — P. 

Collection of M. Le Brun . . • 1791. . . SOOfs. 32/. 



121. St Roch interceding with the Saviour for a cessation 
of the Plague. The saint is represented bending on one knee 
upon the top of a large arch, turning his face towards the 
Saviour, who, in answer to his prayer, has descended upon a 
cloud of glory, and is pointing to an inscription on a tablet, 
(Eris pesH patronus), held by an angel, who stands behind 
the saint. The lower part of the picture, and in front of the 
arch, is occupied by groups of the afficted, who are looking 
upwards for succour. 

12 /!?. 6 »n. by Sft 6 in. (about.)— V. (arched top.) 

Engraved by Paul Pontius and Audran. 

And also in the Musee Fran^ais. Worth 3000 gs. 

This splendid altar-piece merits the highest commendation for its 
several beauties in expression, colour, and chiaro-scuro. It is stated 
by Michel to be the result of eight days' labour, at the usual charge 
of 800^., 72/., which the deputies of the canfririe of St. Roch 
paid the artist shortly after, wid>out an attempt at diminution, which 
so pleased the liberal painter that he presented their church with 
three small pictures ; namely, — 

122. Christ on the Cross. 

128. An Angel healing St. Roch of the Plague. 
124. St Roch in Prison. 

This grand picture attracted the admiration of the French, who 
transferred it to the Louvre. It was restored in 1815, and replaced 
in the church of St. Roch, at Alost. 



RUBENS. 48 

125. The Last Supper. In the interior of a lofty hall are 
asflembled the Saviour with his twelve disciples; the former 
(seen in a front view), seated on the farther side of a lai^ table, 
with the bread in one hand and the cup of wine standing brfoie 
him, raiang his eyes upwards, appears to be in the act of 
blesnng these elements; St John is seated on his right and 
St Peter on the left, and the rest of the disciples are disposed 
round the table. The subject is illumined by two candles, 
placed on pedestals at the nde, between which is an open hock* 

Engraved by B. Bolswert 

The history of this large altar-piece explains clearly the means 
which Rubens pursued to produce the numerous pictures, for 
churches and other public buildings, which are ascribed to his 
penciL The deacons of the cathedral church of St Rombout, 
desirous of an altar-piece to decorate their church, bespoke one of 
the artist, of the above subject; and, for the convenience of the 
painter, they ofiisred him the use of a large room adjoining the 
church to work in. Rubens, as usual, having made a finished 
sketch, sent his pupil, Justus Van Egmont, to commence and 
proceed with the picture as far as he was able. This excellent 
scholar had nearly completed the dead colouring, when their re- 
verences intimated to him that they had agreed for the picture to 
be painted by the master and not by his scholar. They accordingly 
ordered him to desist, and wrote to Rubens to express their dis- 
pleasure, who, in reply, assured them that he oonstandy employed 
his pupils to commence his pictures, and that he afterwards cor- 
rected and finished them himself, adding a request that his pupil 
might be allowed to continue the work, and that he would, on his 
first visit to his country seat at Steen, call and perfect the picture 
to their entire satis&cdon." 

This large altar-piece has disappeared, and all the endeavours of 
die writer to ascertain where it now is have been unsuccessful. 



IS6. The Adoration of the Magi. The subject is composed 
of about twenty figures, and represents the Virgin, clothed in a 
light blue robe and a dark blue mantle, standing on the right, 



44 KUBENS. 

holding forward the infant Saviour on a pillow to one of the 
worshippers, who is on his knees offering a bowl of money, 
which the Virgin guides the infantas hand to take ; he is attired 
in a splendid mantle of yellow silk, embroidered in gold, and 
an ermine cape; at his »de, but nearer the front, stands 
another, clad in an ample robe of a scarlet colour, who holds 
an incense vase in his hands; behind them are two pages 
bearing their train ; on the right of the one kneeling stands a 
Moorish king with a casket in his hands; beyond this group 
are a man in armour and a negro, looking anxiously at the 
babe ; and behind these are eleven other persons, two of whom, 
descending some steps, bear torches. . Su Joseph stands behind 
the Virgin. 

Uft. by loy^.— C. 

Engraved by L. Vosterman, 1620, and again by Nolpe. 

This splendid picture may be considered the chef-d'oeuvre of the 
many representing the same subject which have proceeded from the 
painter's studio ; an opinion entertained by the artist himself, who 
was accustomed to refer those who complimented him on the excel- 
lence of his works to the church of St. John, at Mailines. In addi- 
tion to the usual beauty of colour, it exhibits more elaborate finishing 
than is usual in his larger works. 

The interiors of the covers of the above picture were 
decorated with the following subjects, in allusion to the church 
being dedicated to St. John :— 

St. John the Evangelist being plunged into a cauldron of 
boiling oil. The compoation consists of four figures, and two 
angels descending with the palm of martyrdom. 

The DecoUation of John the Baptist. The body of the saint, 
seen in a fore-shortened position, lies on the fore-ground, and 
the executioner is putting the head in a charger, held by 
Herodias and her daughter. 

These are indifferendy etched by Spruyt. There is also a small 
print, of an oval form, of the decollation of St. John, by P. de Jode. 

The outside of the covers exhibits : — 

John baptizing the Saviour. The Baptist stands on a bank, 



BUBENS. 45 

pouring water from a shell on the head of the Saviour, who 
stands in the stream. 

St John the Evangelist in the Island of Patmos. He is 
clothed in a pink vest and scarlet mantle, and is seated on a 
bank, with a pen and an open book in his hands ; his attention 
is directed upwards, where a dragon with seven heads appears 
in the heavens, and an eagle is above his head. 

l%ft. by Zft. 9 til.— P. 

Three small pictures were placed above the altar table, these 
represented :— 

187. The Adoration of the Shepherds. 

1128. The Crudfixion of the Saviour. 

1S9. The Resurrection. 

These three have disappeared from the church. 

The whole of the preceding eight pictures (several of which are 
finished with unusual care and neatness), were painted in eighteen 
days, for the sum of 1800 Jlo*y 162/., according to a receipt in 
Hubens's own hand, dated 1624, preserved in the records of the 
church ; a/ac-nmtfe of which is inserted in this work. 

The above pictures (with the exception of the three last) are now 
in the church for which they were painted. 

The original Sketch for the Adoration of the Magi is now in the 
collection of the Marquess of Bute, at Luton. 

20tn. by 14j in. — ^P. 

An excellent Drawing, in black and red chalks, washed in India 
ink, heightened with white, the work of a scholar, finished by 
Rubens for the engraver, is in the Musee at Paris. 

22|fR. by 16|tn. 



ISO. The Miraculous Draught of Fishes. The view ex- 
hibits a wide expanse of sea ; close to the beach (in front) 
are two boats, and in the one nearest the spectator stands the 
Saviour, clothed in a scarlet mantle, addressing Simon Peter, 
who, deeply affected by the miracle, is bending before him, and 
apparently exclaiming, ^* Depart from me, for I am a sinful 
man, O Lord ; ^ two other men are in the boat, one of whom 
holds the nets, and the other is turned rounds apparently calling 



1 

\ 



46 RUBENS. 

to his oompanums in the second boat to come and help them ; 
one of the fishermen, wearing a red jacket and gray hose, stands 
on the margin of the sea; and two others are in the water 
exerting their united efforts to pull the laden nets to shore. 

Iftft, by 10ft.— F. (dbofU.) 

It is finely engravedy in three plates, by Bolswert. 

This excellent altar-piece is remarkable for the luminous day* 
light effect which pervades it, and the force and bold relief of the 
figures. 

On the interior of the covers of the above are painted: — 

St. Peter finding the tribute-money in a fish. This picture is 
composed of five men and a woman ; among them is the saint, 
holding the fish in one hand and in the other the money, 
which the whole of them axe examining with emotions of 
surprise. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

Tobit and the Angel. The latter holds a staff in his left 
hand, and is pointing with the right to the fish which the 
youth has in his hands, and apparently directing him what 
to do. 

On the exterior of the covers are painted : — 

St Peter, with the keys in his hand ; and 

St. Andrew leaning on a cross, holding a fish in his left 
hand. 

The Louvre possessed the above pictures until 1815, when they 
were restored to the church. 

Three small pictures formerly adorned the altar, namely : — 

181. Christ walking on the Sea. 

ISS. Jonas cast into the Sea. 
Engraved by Tassaert. 

188. Christ on the Cross. 

The three last have long since disappeared. 

The preceding eight pictures were painted to adorn the chapel of 
the Fishmongers' Company, in the church oi Notre Dame, at Ma- 
lines, and were done by the artist at his ch&teau of Steen, near 
Malines, in the short space of ten days, at his usual charge of 
100^ per dtem, according to the receipt deposited in the ardiives 



RUBENS. 47 

of the Company. This statement can only be rendered credible by 
aapposing that the ajctiat's scholars had forwarded them to his hand. 



184. The Marriage of St Catherine. The Virgin is repre- 
sented pladng a ring on the finger of St Catherine, who is 
prostrate at her feet ; St Agnes, St Christina, St. Margaret, 
and other female saints, are in the composition ; and a company 
of angels are descending, bearing crowns and pahns in their hands. 

9y3t. by 4/1. (about.) 

Engraved by P. de Jode. 

This picture was sold by the masters of the Order of St Au- 
gustinesy at Malines, in 1766, to the Chevalier Verhulst, for the 
smn of 9500 Jh.y about S55L ; it having been bought in at a previous 
sale for 12,100 /fo. In the sale of the Chevalier's collection it was 
sold for l2J05Jio., 1148/. 

Now in the possession of the Duke of Rutland, at Belvoir 
Castle. 

A Drawing, the study for the preceding, was sold in the collection 
of R. D. Boisset, 1776 481/«. 19/. 



1S5. The Martyrdom of St George. The martyr is re- 
presented on his knees, his bosom bared to the executioner, and 
his countenance, which is seen in profile, directed upwards. 

Engraved by Panneels. 

eft. 6 in. by 5 ft.— P. (aboiU.) 

Although the artist employed but a few days in painting this 
picture, its merit for composition, expression, and colour, entide 
it to a place among his best productions. 

In the account-book of the brotherhood of the church of St 
Gommaire, at Liere, is a memorandum, that only 15fio. were 
charged for the above picture ; with which the Order were so well 
satisfied, that they gave a good supper on the occasion. 

The distinguished amateur, the Chevalier Verhulst, desirous of 
possessing this picture, agreed with the chief of the Order for its 
purchase, in 1768, for the sum of 600 flo.^ but the burgomaster of 
the city interposed, and prevented it 



48 RUBENS. 

On the covers of the above were painted : — 

St. George, with the vanquished dragon under his feet ; and 

St Agnes, with a palm branch in her hand and a Iamb by 

her side. 

6 ft. 6 in. by ^ft. 4 in.— P. (about.) 

There is an etching of this Saint, with a lamb, by Panneels, and an 

engraving by Voet. 

These latter pictures were in the collection of Edward Gray, Esq. 



136. The Virgin, with the infant Saviour in her arms, 
accompanied by two angels, appearing, on a cloud, to St 
Francis d^ Assise. 

Engraved by Lasne. 

Upon the doors of the above picture were painted : — 

St. Francis receiving the stigmates ; a single figure, looking 
upwards at a winged figure on a cross. 

Engraved by Galle. 

St. Clara. This is highly recommended by Michel for 
its grace, and is every way superior to the other pictures ; the 
centre one was probably a duplicate, or perhaps a copy. The 
same subject occurs twice before in this Catalogue. 

Painted for the Church of St. Gommaire, at Liere. 

The sale of the above pictures was prevented by the chapter of 
the college ; and the priests, afler having sold them for 4000^. to 
four picture dealers from Brussels (in 1727), were compelled to pay 
all expenses and secure them to the church. 

Now in the Musee at Brussels. 

There is a print of St. Clara engraved, anonymous. 



1S7. A Drawing of the first picture, done in bistre, for the 
engraver to work from. 

12 in. by Sin. 
In the collection of Sir Thomas Lawrence, P.R.A. 



188. The Descent from the Cross. The figures in this 
composition, being too large for the panel on which they are 
painted, have the appearance of being crowded together, and 



BUBENS. 49 

although the colour is very brilliant, the geheral effect is far 
from agreeable. 

Engraved by Lauwers. 

Painted for the church of the Capuchins at Liere. 



139- The Entombment. This composition represents the 
body of the Saviour placed in a recumbent position on a stone, 
the forepart supported by the Virgin, whose sorrowful counte- 
nance is directed upwards ; St Francis, with his hands clasped, 
stands on one nde of her, and two angels on the other ; one of 
the latter has a spear in his hand, the other is removing the 
linen and pointing to the wound in the Saviour^s side; the 
affectionate Magdalen is prostrate at the feet of her Lord, 
weeping over the instruments of his sufferings. St. John and 
two of the Maries are behind the Virgin. 

12 ft. 11 in. by lOy^. 7 in.— C. 

Engraved by Bolswert and P. Pontius. 

This picture was presented hy the Due d'Aremberg to the 
church of the Capuchins at Brussels, in 1616. It was among the 
rich spoils which adorned the Louvre until 1815» when it was 
restored, and is now in the Musee at Brussels. 

The distinguished beauties which this piece once possessed have 
been sadly blighted by the injudicious cleanings that it has un- 
dergone. 

A beautiful Drawing in chalks, tinted in colour, a study for the 
preceding picture, is in the Musee at Paris. 

18f tn. by 14| in. 



1 40. The Adoration of the Magi. In the arrangement of this 
jncture the Virgin stands on the left, habited in a red vest with 
white sleeves, a light scarf, and a blue mantle ; she is holding 
the infknt Saviour in a recumbent poation on a pillow ; two of 
the wise men are on their knees ; the nearest to the spectator 
holds his body upright, and is dressed in a scarlet robe, with an 
ermine cape and border ; the other is bowing in adoration, and 
presentmg a bowl full of gold to the child ; a Moorish king, 
with a casket m his hands, stands on the farther side of the 

VOL. II. E 



50 BUBENS. 

{^oup ; an armed soldier and three other men are entering at 

a door behind the Moorish king. The composition is formed 

of ten figures; the gorgeous colour of Paul Veronese was 

evidently in the artisfs view when he painted this glorious 

picture. 

%ft. 6 in. by ^ft. 8 in C. 

Engraved by Bolswert and Panneels in 1630, and also anonymous* 

This picture was the gift of the Archduchess Isabella, about the 

year 1612, to the church of the Annunciation at Brussels. 

Valued by the Experts du Musee, in 1816, at 150,000/r., 6000& 

Now in the Musee at Paris, 



141. The Assumption of the Virgin. The composiuon of 
this picture is distinguished from others of the same subject 
by the introduction of the Saviour, who is seen above the head 
of the Virgin, descending with open arms to rec^ve her into 
glory ; and among the host of angels who attend the Virgin, is 
one approaching to place a chaplet on her head. The twelve 
apostles surroilnd the tomb below, and the three Maries are on 
the farther ade of it. 

\$ft. 6 in. by \Oft.—C. (about.) 

Engraved by Pontius, and in reverse by C. Jegher, and again by 
Masson. 

This altar-piece was the gift of the Archduke and Duchess 
(Albert and Isabella) to the Notre Dame de la Chapelle, Brussels, 
in the year 1614. A picture, corresponding with the preceding 
description, is now in the public gallery at Augsburg, and another 
at Munich. 



142. The Apparition of the Saviour to St Theresa, in her 
cell ; two angels are behind the smnt, one of which has a 
flaming arrow in his hand. 

Engraved by Bolswert, 

There is also a print of this subject, by Deroy, in which the 
angel is piercing the heart of the saint with an arrow. 

This picture was the gift of the Due de Bournonville, and his wife 
the Princess d'Ar^mberg, to decorate an altar (constructed at their 
expense) in the church of the Barefoqted Carmelites at Brussels. * 



BUBENS. 51 

The preceding picture was sold in the collection of Mr. Delahante, 
in 1814, lor 290 g#. 



14S. Saint Ignatius Loyola, habited in a splendid cope, 
standing before an altar, with his hand placed on a book. 
Engraved by Bolswert. 

144. Saint Francis Xavier, clad in a white surplice, standing 
at an altar, on which is a cruci6x ; his hands are crossed on his 
breast The figures are full length, and above the size of 
nature. 

Engraved by Bolswert ; they ar^ also engraved by Marinus, and 
repeated in small, anonymous. 

These formerly decorated the Jesuits' church at Brussels. 



145. Christ^s charge to Peter. The Saviour, in the presence 
of three of his disciples, is represented delivering the keys to 
St. Peter, to whom he appears to be addressing the charge, 
** Feed my sheep,** in allusion to which are introduced two of 
those animals (the heads only are seen) near the Saviour. 
The figures are what is termed half-lengths of the size of Hfe. 

^Jt. 7 in. by Sjt.—P. 

Engraved by Kraaft, Van Eisen, and Winstanley. The last 
engraved his print from a picture then in the possession of the 
Earl of Derby, at Knowsley. 

The above picture was painted to adorn the chapel of the tomb of 
M. d'Amant, a viscount and chancellor of Brabant, and merits 
the highest commendation for the dignity which characterises the 
figures, and the divine expression of the Saviour. The drawing of 
the figures, and the casting of the draperies, are models of ex- 
eellence. It is painted in a smooth and highly-finished manner. 
Several writers concur in expressing regret, that this fine work of 
art has been robbed of its pristine beauty by injudicious cleaning. 
It was probably owing to this, that Sir Joshua Reynolds speaks 
slightingly of it in his Tour through Flanders. It was imported to 
England some years back, by an eminent dealer, and passed 
through several hands, at the price of S500L ; the last possessor, 
Mr. Champion, is said to have paid the liberal sum of 5000L finr it ; 



5% RUBENS* 

and after remaining on sale for many months, it was ultimately 
disposed of by Mr. Pinny, in 1824, for 2500 gs., and was bought 
by an agent for the present possessor, the Prince of Orange. 



146. Christ delivering the keys to Peter, in the presence of 
four other Disciples. The composition of this picture differs 
very materially from the preceding; the Saviour is here 
represented with his left hand raised above his head, and Peter, 
while receiving the keys, looks up in his master^s face. The 
position of the figures is also reversed. 

eft. 1 1 in. by 5ft. 3 in.— C. 

Engraved by P. de Jode. 

This picture was painted for the chapel of the tomb of John 
Breughel and his family, in the Chartreux at Brussels, from whence 
it was sold in 1 765, to defray the expenses of repairing the church, 
to M. Braamcamp, for 5000^., 450/. ; at the sale of his splendid 
collection, at Amsterdam, in 1771, it sold for . 4000^. . 360/. 

Deschamps, in noticing the above work, observes, '* il est lourd 
de cQuleur^ et parmt ftitigue et peine; " the writer regrets to say, that 
this is the fact, and has probably been occasioned by injudicious 
cleaning and bad restoration. There can be little doubt but tfaia 
picture would greatly improve in skilful hands. 

Now in the collection of M. Van Lankeren, at Antwerp. 



147. The Martyrdom of St. Thomas the Apostle. The 
venerable saint is represented embracing a cross with one arm, 
while the other is extended upward; from whence are seen 
descending a company of angels bearing the emblems of im- 
mortal life. The saint is surrounded by seven of his malidous 
persecutors; one of them is stabbing him with a spear, a 
second holds a dagger to his neck ; and the rest have large 
stones in their hands to cast at him. In the back-ground is a 
handsome heathen temple, near which is placed an idol upon 
the summit of a spiral column. Painted in the artists broad 
and sketchy manner. 

\$ft. by lOft. (about)— C. 

Engraved by Need. 



RUBENS. 53 

14& The Assumption of the Vir^n. The difference of 
this, compo^tion from others of the same subject are, that 
the ascending Virgin kneels upon a cloud, and is looking 
upwards, with her arms extended ; her clothing consists of 
a-white robe and a purple mantle; seven angels attend her, 
and two cherubim are at her feet. In the lower part of 
the picture are the twelve apostles and two females; two of 
the former, St. Peter and St. John, and one of the latter, are 
kneeling in front of the tomb. 

15 ft. 10 in. by Uyif.— C. (arched. J 

Engraved by Witdouc. 

This picture is painted in a free and hasty manner, possessing the 
usual richness of colour ; but the principal 6gure is sadly defiqient in 
grace and dignity of character. 

Painted for the church of the Chartreux at Brussels. 

Now in the Lichtenstein Gallery at Vienna. 



149. A free Sketch, a study for the preceding picture. 

22 in. by 16jm.— P. 
In the coDection of Peter Ranier, Esq. 



150. The Martyrdom of St. Lawrence. This affecting 
subject is composed of thirteen figures and an angel, who is seen' 
descending with the palm and crown, the reward of martyrdom. 

Engraved by Vosterman. 

The disastrous bombardment of Brussels in 1695, by the French 
army under the command of the Due de Villeroy, was so des- 
tructive to the city that, in less than forty-eight hours, six thousand 
houses and fourteen churches were ruined ; with these many fine 
pictures by Rubens, Van Dyke, and other painters, were either' 
seriously injured or destroyed. In the general devastation was 
included the parish church of the Chartreux of Notre Dame de la 
Chapelle, for which the two preceding pictures were painted ; and 
in order to defray part of the expenses of its repairs, the curates 
and masters of the church were induced to sell them to the Elector > 
Palatine, for the sum of 4000 crowns. 

Now in the Munich Gallery. 



54 BUBEXS. 

151. Job) in the extremity of his sufferings, seated upon a 
dung heap, teazed by the importunity of his wife, and 
tormented by demons. 

Engraved by Vostennan. 

This picture was destroyed in the church of St. Nicholas, by the 
bombardment before noticed. 



15S. A finished Study for the above subject. 
In the Munich Gallery. 

153. A fine Drawing, in black chalks heightened with white, 
done by a scholar, and perfected by the master for the engraver. 

16 in. by llftn. 
In die Musee at Paris. 



154. The Adoration of the Magi. This superb altar-piece 
exhibits a splendid display of colour, skilful grouping, and the 
most masterly freedom of handling. The compoation consists 
of twenty figures; near the centre stands the Virgin, seen in 
a front view, holding the infant Saviour erect on a crib, with a 
pillow under his feet ; while one of the sages, clothed in a 
gorgeous yellow robe, is bowing before him and embracing his 
foot; a second of the number, wearing a scarlet mantle, stands 
on the farther side ; and on his right is an Ethiopian king 
paying homage, by uniting his hands together; behind these 
is a page, bearing a vase full of money, another youth, in 
a white robe, bearing a nmilar offering, is on the opposite nde, 
bending on one knee ; and beyond him are a negro and a boy, 
bearing candelabra and lights; St Joseph is dose to the 
Virgin. In the left of the picture is an armed soldier, pre- 
venting with his shield the entrance of a number of persons, 
who are on the stairs of the building. 

loy^. 5in.hy9ft.—C. 

Engraved by Lauwers. 

This is probably the picture which was painted for the church of 
the Capuchins at Tournay, and not for that of the White Sisters at 
Lou vain, as stated by Michel. 

Now in the Musee at Brussels. 



AUBEMS. 55 

165. St. Ivon, habited in a scarlet robe and bonnet, giving 
some papers to a female, who is kneeling before him with a 
child in her arms, and another by her side ; an angel with a 
chaplet of laurels flies over the sainf s head. 

Painted for the Jesuits' church at Louvain. 



156. The Adoration of ihe Magi. The fertility of the 
paintei^s invention enabled him to repeat successfully the same 
iBubjects with increased variety. In the present picture the 
Virgin (who is placed on the left) has risen fix>m her seat, and, 
asasted by St. Joseph, is holding the infant Saviour towards 
iwo of the wise men, who are rendering homage ; one of them, 
the nearest to the spectator, is on his knees, and has an incense 
vase in his hand ; the other presents an offering of a bowl of 
money; behind the latter is a page bearing his tnun, and 
beyond this group stands a Moorish king with a casket in his 
hands. Eleven figures, and two angels above, compose the 
jncture. 

lOy^. 9 Ml. by Sji. 1 i».--C. 

Engraved by Witdoac. 

Painted for the church of the White Sisters at Louyain, at the 

usual price of 100 florins per diem 800^. 72/. 

Sold at the suppression of convents, 

Bnmels, 1786. . 8400^. 7561. 
Collection of M. Horion • . . • 1788. . 8000^. 7iOL 

' Marquis of Lansdowne 1806 840/. 

Now in the collection of Earl Grosvenor. 



157. An ori^al Sketch for the preceding picture. 

19iin. by 14 m.— P. 
In the collection of M. Van Sasseghem. 



158. St Peter and St Paul. Heads. 

Both Descamps and Michel state, that these were of the greatest 
beauty sad exceDence, and so highly prized that they were only 



56 BUBENS. 

exposed on extraordinary occasions. They were painted for the 
church of St. Donat, at Bruges. 

Of these heads, so much prized, Sir Joshua Reynolds observes, 
*' They appear to have nothing to recommend them but clearness of 
colour and lightness of pencil." 



159. The Procession to Calvary. This magnificent altar- 
piece is composed of about twenty figures. The Saviour, 
clothed in a dark gray vest and a scarlet mantle, is represented 
in the centre, bowed to the ground by the weight 6f his cross, 
which a powerful man, assisted by Cymon, the Cyrenian, is 
removing from his back, and the affectionate Magdalen, on her 
knees, is wiping his brows with a napkin ; behind her is the 
wife of Cleophas, with two children ; at whose side stands the 
afflicted Virgin, supported by St. John ; and in the left of the 
picture is another female with an infant in her arms. In the 
lower part of the [Hcture are the two thieves, with their hands 
bound (their backs toward the spectator), guarded by two soldiei? 
in armour, who are seen to the middle only. This group is 
omitted in the print, and two children playing on the ground 
are substituted. The procession is led by three horse-soldiers, 
who are mounting with difficulty the steep ascent of Calvary, 
accompanied by others, indicated by the appearance of spears 
and banners. This superb production is one of the grandest 
and most successful works of the master. The composition is 
remarkably bold and imposing, and the figures abound with 
strong and energetic expression. 

I5fi. Sin. by 11//. 3tn.— C. 

Engraved by P. Pontius. 

This once glorious work has lost much of its original beauty, and 
presents, comparatively, but gleams of its former splendour. It has 
recently been repaired, and its appearance much improved from 
what it was a few years back. 

The rapidity with which the artist painted the above picture 
(being the work of only sixteen days), induced the provost and 
masters of the college of the abbey church of Affleghem, to hesitate 



BUBENS. 57 

at paying the usual sum of 100 florins per diem. In answer to their 
objections, Rubens replied, ** That if the picture did not suit them, 
it was of no consequence, as he had every day applications for 
pictures from those who would feel themselves obliged in having it." 
This answer produced a ready payment of the sum required, 
1600^., about 144/. Now worth 4000/. 

Now m the Musee at Brussels. 



160. A Sketch for the preceding. 

3fi. 1 in. by 2ft 2 in,— P. 
Sold in collection of M. Horion, ^rtM«e/#, 1788. . 165^. 14/* 
Now in the Mus6e at Amsterdam. 



161. The Miracles of St. Benedict in the presence of Totila, 
King of the Goths. The subject is exhibited near a convent, a 
noble edifice, placed on the right, and entered by a long flight 
of steps from the opposite side. J^t the portal of the monastery 
is seen the reverend saint in the habit of the Franciscan order, 
and attended by two monks; he appears to be advancing 
towards an attendant of the king, who is on the summit of the 
steps in the disguise of his sovereign, but the impostor is 
instantly detected by the saint, and, struck with awe, is retro- 
grading before him ; his page also, and armed followers, who 
are on the steps behind him, are equally affected with terror ; 
several persons of distinction, habited in various coloured robes, 
are at the foot and side of the steps. In the centre, and near 
the front, is a large group of persons, several of whom have 
brought their rick and diseased for cure ; in the midst of them 
is one lying nearly naked on a couch; three others of the 
afflicted are ritting on the ground ; and a fourth, in a state of 
pbrensy, is held by two men ; to the right of this group is King 
Totila, mounted on a bay horse, holding a sceptre in his hand; 
and nearer the ride are two horses, one of which (a gray) is held 
by a servant, while the rider, ^rho is clad in a red mantle, 
ascends some steps, accompanied by another person. and two 



{(8 RUBENS. 

children ; these are met at the summit by several monks. 
The SaTiour, accompanied by St Peter, St. Paul, the Virg^, 
and angels, is seen in the clouds* 

5jt. 4 in. by 8^^. 6 in — C. 
' This splendid picture, although only a finished sketch, is a noble 
display of the genius of the artist. It was done by order of the 
prebends of the abbey of AfBeghem, as a design for a second 
picture to adorn their church, but by some accident was never 
executed ; the sketch remained in the refectory of the abbey until 
its dissolution. 

Now in the collection of M. Schamps, at Ghent. 



16S. The Adoration of the Shepherds. This picture is 
composed of nine figures, and exhibits the Virgin seated at the 
head of the Infant, lifting up its covering with the left hand; 
and St Joseph standing by, viewing with emotion the approach 
of a group of three shepherds and three women to worship and 
offer their gifts to the child ; one of the females is kneeling in 
front, holding an egg in her hand, a portion of her humble 
offering, which conmsts also of a can of milk and a couple of 
fowls. An ass and an ox are near the crib, and three angels 
hover above. 

Engraved by Vosterman, Jeaurat, and anonymous. 

Painted for the church of the Capuchins at Aix-la-Chapelle. 



163. A Drawing of the preceding, done by a scholar (per- 
fected by Rubens for the engraver) in chalk, washed in India 
Ink, and heightened in white. 

22tn. hy 16|tA. 

In the Mus^e at Paris. 



164. The Entombment The body of the Saviour b borne 
to the tomb by Joseph of Arimathea and Nioodemus, ac- 
companied by St. John and three females, who are on the 
right, and two others in the opposite side ; one of these is Mary 
Magdalen, kneeling and weeping by the tomb, into which the 
other is putting straw. 



BUBBN& 69 

Engraved by Witdouc. Another of the same subjecti in which 

_ _ # 

the Virgin holds a napkin, is engraved by Ryckman, and also by 
Pontius, Bolswert, Galle, and Landry. The same subject, in which 
the Virgin is closing the eyes of the Saviour, composed of nine 
figures, is engraved by Soutman. A similar composition, with the 
omission of two figures, is engraved by Prenner. 

Painted for the church of the Capuchins at Cambray. The 
original Sketch for this picture is in the possession of Mr. Norton. 

14 m. by 32 J tn.— P. 



165. The Martyrdom of St. Stephen. The saint, habited 
in his deacon'^s robes, is kneeling, with his hands bound behind 
him, and his inspired .countenance directed upwards; among 
the executioners who surround him is one caising a large stone 
and striking him with his foot; three angels are descending 
bearing the emblems of martyrdom ; and the First and Second 
Persons of the Trinity are seen above in glory. 

Painted for the abbey church of St. Amand, in Flanders. 
This picture was subsequently in the possession of the Count de 
Cobenzt, when it was engraved by T. T. Tassaert. 
Exhibited in the British Gallery, 1823. 
Now in the collection of Prince Leopold of Saxe Coburg. 



166. The Four Elements. The figures in these pictures are 
ascribed to the pencil of Rubens ; and the game, fish, fruit, 
and vegetables are by the masterly hand of Snyders. These 
pictures were painted for the Bishop of Trieste ; they after- 
wards decorated the Goldsmiths^ Hall at Brussels, and were 
subsequently sold to a picture dealer from London* 

These are probably the pictures engraved by Earlom^ when in 
&e Houghton collection, and are now in the Hermitage at St. 
Petersburg. 



60 RUBENS. 

THE MUNICH GALLERY. 

The Munich Gallery possesses the following Pic- 
tures, THE GREATER PART OF WHICH WERE FORMERLY IN 

THE Gallery at Dusseldorf, and are engraved in 
THE Catalogue of that Collection. 

167. The Last Judgment. In this vast composition the 
Saviour is represented si(^ting on clouds, pointing upwards to 
the First and Third Persons of the Trinity, who are seen above 
enthroned in light. The Virgin, with the patriarchs, prophets, 
and apostles, form a large company on the right and left of the 
Saviour, beneath whose feet are angels sounding trumpets — the 
call to judgment; and Michael, armed with thunder, driving 
down the condemned to perdition, while the just are ascending 
under the guidance of angels to beatitude. The figures are 
above the aze of life. 

18^35. 5 in. by l$ft. lOin.— C. 

Engraved by Visscher and C. £. Hess. 

In the painting of this immense picture, the artist has been 
considerably assisted by his pupils. 

Schleishem Gallery, near Munich. 



168. Diogenes, with a lantern in his hand, looking amidst a 
multitude in search of an honest man. 

5/t. 10 in. by 7Jt. Sin.— C. 



169. A duplicate of this subject, but of very inferior merit, 
is in the Louvre. 



170. The Adoration of the Shepherds. The Virgin stands 
on the right, with her back to the shepherds, lifting the 
covering from the infant, who lies upon some straw on a crib ; 
one of the shepherds is kneeling in front, his hands united in 
adoration ; another, expressing the same feeling, stands by his 
^de with bagpipes stuck in his girdle ; and a third, who has a 



BUBENS. 61 



Munich Galiery. 



lamb under his arm, is lifting off his hat ; two women are with 
them, one of whom carries a can on her head. A company of 
nine angels are above, two of them bearing a scroll, on which 
is written, Gloria in excelsis Deo, ^c, ^c. 

Sft, 7 in. by 14^^. 9 in.— C. 

Engraved by P. Pontias. 



171. Peace procured between the Romans and Sabines, by 
the interposition of the Sabine women. 

eft. 8 in. by S/t. 9 in.—C. 

Engraved by H. Sentzenick. 



172. The Assumption of the Virgin. The Saviour, with 
open arms, is seen above welcoming the ascending Virgin, and 
numerous angels attend around her ; the apostles and holy 
women surround the forsaken tomb below. — See p. 50. 

13 ft. 1 tn. by Sft. 9 in C. 

Engraved by P. Pontius and Nfasson. 

Formerly in the church of Notre Dame de la Chapelle, at 
Brussels. 



173. Michael, armed with thunder, and aided by four 
Angels, driving down Lucifer and his horrid crew to ** bottom- 
less perdition.^ The composition, consisting of eleven figures 
and an enormous single-headed dragon, exhibits a single group 
of prodigious power and imposing effect ; and the forms of the 
fallen angels are distinguished by their bold and gigantic 

proportions. 

IS ft. 7in.hy9ft.—C. 

Engraved by Vosterman, 1621 ; and in reverse by Ragot. 



174. A wild Boar Hunt. A party of seven men on foot 
and two gentlemen on horseback, with numerous dogs, attack- 



68 RUBENS. 

Munich Gallery. 

ing a furious boar near the trunk of a fallen tree. The 
enraged animal has knocked down one of the huntsmen and 
wounded several of the dogs. 

eft. 4 in. by 9yi. 4 m C, 

Engraved by Soutman. 

This is die joint production of Rubens and Snyders. 



175. The Descent of the Holy Ghost upon the Apostles on 
the Day of Pentecost. '* And there appeared onto them cloven 
tongues, like as of fire, and it sat upon each of them.'' The 
composition consists of sixteen figures of the size of life. 

14yi. 10 in. by Sft. 7 in.—C. 

Engraved by P. Pontius, and by Galle, with variations. 



176. A very admirable Drawing, en grisaille, the original 
study for the preceding picture. 

^Sin. by 16 in. 
Now in the collection of Sir Thomas Lawrence, P.R.A. 



177. Fame crowning a Warrior. The hero is represented 
clad in armour and holding a spear in his hand, while Fame, 
personified by a female, stands by his side placing a chaplet on 
his head. The powerful influence of ambition is strikingly 
illustrated by the God of Wine lying prostrate under the waiv 
rior's feet, and the Goddess of Love with Cupid placed neglected 
at the side* A splendidly-coloured picture. 

6 ft. 9 tfi. by 6 ft. S m.— C. 
The same subject occurs in the Dresden Gallery, and is en- 
graved by Tanje. 

178. Beauty rewarding Valour. Venus standing by the 
side of an armed warrior, placing a chaplet on his head, while 
Cupid is gathering a branch of palm to present to him. A 
quantity of armour and warlike weapons lie on the ground. 

7ft. 9 m. by loyif. 1 1 1«.— C- 
A similar picture occurs in the Dresden Gallery. 



&UB£Ns: €3 



Munich Gallery, 



179. A baochanalian subject, represendog a drunken Sile* 

nu8 supported on the left by a satyr, and followed by a negro, 

who is pinching his thigh. Close to the front is a female 

satyr redimng forward on the ground, suckling two young 

ones. Twdye iSgures, two goats, and a tiger, compose the 

picture. 

eft. 6 tn. by B/t. 6 tn— C. 

Engraved by Bolswerty Panneels, and Van Orley. 



180. Castor and Pollux carrying off by violence Hilaria and 
Phoebe, the daughters of Leucippus. One of the youths, 
mounted on a noble steed, the reins of which is held by Cupid, 
is lifung up one of the females, who appears to have exhausted 
her strength by resistance, and is appealing to the gods for 
help ; his efforts are seconded by his brother, who, while sup- 
porting her on his shoulders, is holding the other female on 
his knee with his hand under her arm. During the violence of 
their struggles, their raiment has fallen off and left them 
exposed. It would be difficult to adduce a more complete and 
beautiful composition than this picture presents, or for art to 
express with more animation and truth the accidental positions 
and movements of the individuals which such an event must 
naturally produce. The spirited acUon of the terrified horses, 
and the ineffectual efforts of feminine strength against the 
muscular powers of men, are depicted with incomparable skill 
and force. The purity and the brilliancy of the colouring, 
and the careful finishing observable in every part, are indu- 
bitable proofs of the studious attention bestowed on this 
excellent work. 

7 ft. 4 in. by 6^^. 10 in. Worth 1500 gi. 

Engraved by VaL Green. ^ 



181. Rubens and his Wife, Elizabeth Brant. The lady is 
about twen^i-three years of age, ot fair comj^xion and oaall 



64 KUBENS. 



Munich Gallery, 



features ; her elegant dress oonasts of a straw hat turned up at 

the side, a pale yellow silk vest embroidered with silver, a 

black striped silk robe, a white satin bodice, also richly 

embroidered, and a broad lace ruff; she is seated in a bower 

of honeysuckle, with a fan in her left hand and her right 

placed on that of her husband, who is seated by her side, 

richly habited in the costume of the period, composed of 

satins and figured velvets, and has on a taper crowned hat. 

The elaborate care bestowed in the finishing of the picture 

renders it very unlike the usual works of the master at that 

period. 

Sft.Q in, by ^ft, 3 in. — C. 

Engraved by Hess. 

182. A Portrait of Doctor Van Thulden, dressed in black, 
:seated in an arm-chair with a book in his hand. 

Engraved by Coelmans* 



183. The Virgin, seated, holding the infisint Saviour naked 
in an erect poation on a table, which is partly covered with 
some drapery. 

Sft. 3 in. by Zfi. 5 in.— P. 

Engraved by Spruyt. 

A duplicate oi the preceding picture is in the Marlborough 
^collection. 



184. The Bier of the Roman General Decius, adorned 
with military trophies, composed of banners and weapons 
of war. A finished sketch. 

%ft. 8 in, by $fl. 10 in.— P. 



185. Diana and Nymphs reposing after the Chase. The 
goddess and three njrtnphs are represented naked, recumbent 
upon a bank under the' shade of a thick wood, from whence 



HUBENS. 65 



Munich Gallery, 

three satyrs are issuing and cauUously observing the sleeping 
beauties. The landscape is by the pencil of Breughel, and 
the dogs and dead game by Van Kessel. 

2Jl. 1 in. by 3 ft. 5 in.— P. 

Engraved by Soutman. 

Bought from the collection of Van Loo, 1713. 1875^. 172/. 



186. Samson and Delilah. A composition of nine figures, 
representing the moment when the Philistines rush in and seize 
Samson, whose arms they are binding behind him ; the strug- 
gling Nazarite has one knee upon the couch on which his artful 

betrayer reclines. 

3 ft. 5 in. by 4ft. 1 in.— C. 

Done in lithography by Piloti. 

A very similar composition to the preceding, painted by Van 

Dyke, is in the Vienna Gallery. 



187. A group of seven beautiful Children, naked, and dis- 
posed in various graceful attitudes, playing with a large festoon 
of fruit. The latter painted by Snyders. A highly-finished 
and very beautiful production. 

3ft. 9 in. by eft. 4 tn.— C. Worth 700 gs. 

Drawn in lithography by Piloti. 



188. The Fall of the Damned. Michael, armed with flaming 
thunder and accompanied by a number of angels, driving down 
to perdition multitudes of the condemned, who are falling in 
** horrible confusion,^ and in their frightful rout are dragged 
by faiinisters of vengeance to regions of woe, where ^* doleful 
shades^ and fiery gulphs surround them. 

Sft. 8 tn. by 4 ft. 10 in.— P. Worth 4000 gs. 

Engraved by Suyderhoef, 1643. 

This, like other pictures of the same subject contained in this 
overpowering collection of Rubens, teems with awful sublimity and 
terrific grandeur. 

VOL. II. r 



66 BUBENS. 



Munich Gallery. 

189. St. Christopher carrying the infant Saviour upon his 
shoulders through a river. A sketch for one of the pictures 
on the doors of the ^^ Elevation of the Cross.^ 

Stfi. 5 in. by 2 ft. 2 in.— P, 
Engraved by Eynliouedts. 

190. Christ appearing to the four Penitents. The Magdalen 
is in front, her hands crossed on her bosom, and bowing in 
adoration before the Saviour; St. Peter and the other two 
penitents are on the farther »de of the Saviour. 

4JI. 7 in. by 4 ft. 1 in.— P. Worth 2000 g*. 
Engraved by Natalis ; and in mezzotinto by Val. Green. 
This is a beautiful and interesting picture, finished with extra- 
ordinary care, and very brilliant in colour. 



191. Silenus accompanied by a negro, a satyr, an old woman, 
and a faun ; the last is drinking. 

4ft. 4 in. by 4//.— P. 
Engraved by Soutman. 

192. The Conversion of Saul. The Saviour, surrounded 
by light, and attended by cherubim, appears to Saul on his 
journey to Damascus. This supernatural appariuon has terrified 
the horses, and thrown the whole of the armed band into con- 
fusion ; the persecutor is prostrate on the ground in front, and 
his fiery steed, which is seen in a hinder view, has fallen back 
on his haunches ; the rest of the horses and figures are similarly 
disposed to the large picture described in the ccdlection of 

P. Miles, Esq. 

SJt. by SJt. 10 tn.— P. Worth 800 gs. 

Done in lithography by Piloti. 



198. The Overthrow of Sennacherib and his Host '^ And 
it came to pass that night, that the angel of the Lord went out 
and smote in the camp of the Assyrians one hundred and 



RUBENS. 67 



Munich Gallery. 



dgbty-five thousand ** men. — II. Kings, chap, xtx., v. 35. A 
group c£ four angels, armed with thunder, are seen in the 
heavens, descending in a stream of light, the effect of which 
illumines the camp of the Assyrians, and excites terror and 
confusion throughout the host Among a mass of cavalry 
thronged together in front is a fine mottled war-horse rearing 
up, and from which the rider is falling backwards; several 
horses are kicking and plungmg ; numbers of men lie dead, 
«nd others are fleeing in all directions. 

3 ft. by 3 ft. 10 t».— P. Worth 800 gs. 

Soutman has engraved a print after the principal group in the 
centre, and the whole is drawn in lithography by Piloti. 



194 A Drawing in bistre and India ink, tinted with colours^ 
of the above. picture. 

Sold in the collection of M. Mariette, 1775. 150 ft. 6/. lOs. 



195. The Battle of the Amazons and Greeks. The com- 
batants, mounted on spirited horses, are hotly engaged in a 
sanguinary conflict on a bridge which extends across the 
picture ; and amongst them is a Greek seizing a banner from 
an Amazon, who, in struggling to retain it, is nearly pulled 
backwards from her horse ; at each end of the bridge is a 
confused mSUe of horses and their riders rolling down A steep 
bank into the rapid stream, on whose agitated waters are 
several of the vanquished Amazons drowning and dead ; two 
of them lie naked on the bank. 

3fi. 9 in. by 5ft. % in.—V. Worth 1000 gs. 

Engraved by L. Vostennan, 1623. Size of the plate %ft. 9 in. 
by 3 ft. 11 til. ; also by Duchange, and in smaU by Depuis. 

This and the two preceding pictures are most perfect examples 
of the extraordinary power of Ruben^ in invention, execution, and 
aU the other elements of art* They are wholly by bis own hand. 



68 RUBENS. 



Munich Gallery. 

196, Portrut of Elizabeth Brant, the first wife of Rubens, 
tastefully dressed as a shepherdess ; her right hand is placed on 
her naked bosom, and a crook reclines against the left shoulder. 

2 ft. 5 in. by 2/t.—C. Worth 500^*. 

There is a print by Elliot, which closely resembles this picture. 



197. Portrait of Helena Fonnan, the second wife of the 
artist, attired in black silk, and wearing a black velvet cap 
surmounted with a ball and tassel ; the face is seen in nearly a 
front view, with light bushy hair, and the bosom is exposed. 

Sjlt. by 2 ft. 1 tn.— .p. Worth 500 gs. 

Drawn in lithography by Piloti. 



198. Latona and her Children refused water by the Carian 

peasants, for which cruelty the latter are being metamorphosed 

into frogs. 

$ft. 10 til. by 2ft. 7 in.— C, 



199> Soldiers attacking and pillaging Peasants. Painted in 
a loose hasty manner. 

I ft. 11 in. by 2 ft. 9 tVi.— P. 



200. A Shepherd and Shepherdess, in a Landscape. The 
rustic is represented with his arm round the neck of the shep- 
herdess, who is struggling to free herself from his embraces. 

5 ft. 4 in. by ^ft. 6 in.— -C. 



201. The MeeUng of Jacob and Esau. Esau, clad in armour 
and wearing a mantle over his shoulder, has dismounted from 
his horse, and is approaching his brother with open arms, while 
Jacob, habited in a shepherd^s garb, has taken his hand and is 
bending meekly before him. Esau is attended by two armed 
followers, and a page holding his horse; and Jacob is accom- 
pained by his wives, children, servants, and cattle. 

lOyi. 4 in. by Sft. 7 in.— C. Worth 2000 gs. 

Engraved by L. Vogterman, Balliu, and Gifiart. 



BUBENS, 69 



Munich Galiery. 



90S. Venus dissuading Adonis from the Chase. This is a 
broad and slight production. 

^fi. 6 in. by eft. 6 in.— C. 
Engraved by Panneels. ^___^^_ 

203. Christ on the Cross. The Saviour has bowed his head 
on his breast, and yielded up the ghost ; the sky is darkened to 

obscurity. 

^Jt. 5 in. by 2fi. 10 in. 

Engraved by B s wcrt. 

204. Portrait of a Lady Abbess. 

3 ft. 2 in. by 4ft. 



205. The Virgin and Child. The infant Saviour is standing 
naked upon a table, supported by his mother, and surrounded by 
eleven angels, disposed in the most graceful posiUons, encircling 
them with flowers. The latter are by the hand of Breughel. 

5ft. 9 in. by eft. 7 in P. Worth 600 gs. 



206. The ResurrecUon of the Just Tn this sublime pro- 
duction, thousands of the blessed are seen rising from the earth, 
soaring under the guidance of angels and approaching their 
Saviour and Judge, who is seated on high upon a luminous 
bow; above appears the Godhead enthroned in light; the 
Virgin and a company of saints are beneath the Saviour^s feet: 
In the lower part of the picture is seen a vast space covered 
with multitudes of resuscitated beings, and the deputed angels 
separating the ^^ just from the unjust.*" The figures in this 
transcendent work of art are small (probably about six inches), 
but are painted with admirable delicacy, attractive grace, and 

beautiful colour. 

Sfi. 9 in. by 2ft. 1 1 in.— P. Worth 4000 gs. 

9ff7. Portrait of Don Ferdinand, Cardinal Infant of Spain, 

habited in his canonical dress, and holding a book in his hand.' 

Sft. 8t». by ift. Jin. 
Engraved by Galle. 



70 BUBENS. 



Munich GoUery. 



908. A Sketdi for the above picture. 



209- Portrait of St. Ignatius. The face is seen in nearly a 
front view, and a glory surrounds the head. 

ly^. lltn. byiyi. 6i».— P. 



SIO. Portraits of Lord and Lady Arundel and Son. The 
lady, attired in black satin, lace ruff, gold bracelets, and pearls, 
is represented sitUng on the left, her right hand placed on the 
head of a large dog, and his lordship stands behind her chair ; 
he is dressed in an olive-colour vest, a brown mantle lined with 
crimson, and a white rulF; the youth, also standing, is more in 
front, holding a hawk on his hand; a favourite dwarf, the 
usual accompaniment of nobility at that period, is introduced 
on the farther side of the dog ; a beautiful portico, adorned 
with a curtain, forms the back-ground. 

^ft. by syif. 4 m.— C. Worth 1500 g$. 

This capital picture was painted in 1627, for the Earl of Arundel. 
Previous to the confiscation of the Earl's property, in 1649, it was 
sent to Antwerp, and bought by the Elector of Bavaria. 



21L A Priest blessing Decius previous to the battle in which 

he devoted his life to accomplish the prediction of the sooth- 

sayers. A composition of seven figures. A finished sketch for 

a large picture. 

Zft. 4 in. by ZfU 10 in.— P. 

Engraved by Schmuzer, and anonymous. 



212. Portrait of a Monk holding a skull in one hand and a 
book in the other. 

Sfi. 3 in. by ZfL 8 in, — C. 



218. Portrait of a Gendeman, habited in the Spanbh costume, 
represented in nearly a front view, with his left hand placed on 
his hip, and the right on the head of a dog. 

Zjt. 8 in. by 2 ft. 7 in.— C. 



RUBENS. 71 



Munich Gallery, 

S14. Pmtrut of a Lady, seen in a fiont Tiew, with light 
curly hair, dressed in a black robe and white kerchief. 

\Jt. 6 in. by \ft. 4ttt.^P. 



215. Diana, accompanied by her nymphs and dogs, de- 
parting for the chase. 

%ft. by Zft. 4 in.— P. 

The landscape is the work of Breughel. 



216. The Fall of the Great Dragon, and the Punishment 
of the Seven Mortal Transgressions. Description, however 
detailed, can convey but a faint idea of this terrific and as- 
tounding scene, in the contemplation of which the mind shrinks 
aghast, and the eye turns from it with horror. A space, as far 
as '^ angels ken*", in height and depth, appears filled with 
countless numbers of the condemned, *^ hurled headlong in the 
wasteful deep,^ pursued by the archangel Michael, armed with 
thunder ; the ministers of wrath and an enormous dragon with 
seven heads torment them falling. Below is seen a " dungeon 
horrible, on all sides round as one great furnace flaming,^ 
where frightful demons are dragging the wretched to misery 
and woe, and where multitudes are writhing in agonizing pain. 
In this wonderful producdon the vast powers of Rubens are 
displayed in overpowering splendour, and in such bold and 
daring imagery as almost equals the poeUc fervour of Milton 
in the exhibition c^ such " hideous ruin and combustion ;^ for 
nothing short of the most consummate skill in art, joined to the 
highest poetic feeling, could have conceived and executed, with 
such matchless grandeur and sublimity, a subject so vast, so 
truly awful and appalling, as the fall and punishment of millions 
of wretched beings. 

5 ft. 9\ in. by Sft. 9 J in.— P. Worth 5000 g$. 

Engraved by Van Orky. Soutman has also engraved one of 
prindpa] groi^, 1642. 



72 BUBEN5. 



Munich Gallery., 

Four Studies of the principal groups in the preceding picture, 
done in chalks, are in the collection of Sir Thomas Lawrence, P.R.A. 

2/^6 in. by Ift.Ql'm. 

A fifth Study, for a group representing Gluttony, done in crayons 
and washed in India ink, was sold in the collection of the Puke de 
Tallard in 1756, for 85/^. This, together with a valuable collec- 
tion of drawings, was bequeathed to the British Museum by 
R. Payne Knight, Esq. 



217- A View in the gardens at the back of the artisf s house, 
in which are introduced, in small whole-length figures, portraits 
of himself, Helena Forman, and their son, habited in the tasteful 
Spanish costume of the period ; on the right is an old female 
domestic feeding some peacocks. 

^Jl. 6 in, by 4/f. 0\ in.— P. Worth 600 gs. 

This interesting production is painted in a free and sketchy 

manner. 

318. The Murder of the Innocents. In viewing this affect- 
ing scene, the writer is led to observe, that although every- 
department of the art was subservient to the genius of Rubens, 
yet his powers never appear so conspicuous as in those subjects 
where the passions are most strongly actuated, and where 
corresponding energy and impetuosity are the result of the 
excitation of those passions. Many artists of the highest 
celebrity have painted this and other subjects of cruelty ; but 
when placed in comparison with similar works by Rubens, there 
is an evident artificial and studied expression of the passions, 
giving an academic stiffness and theatrical air to the figures. 
Not so with this picture; every part appears to have been 
struck off at once, active and vigorous from his creative ima- 
gination, and in strict accordance with nature. The appalling 
scene exhibits the passions excited to the greatest degree ; the 
cruelty of the soldiers appears to be increased by the natural 
resistance of the bereaved mothers, whose agonized feelings 



BUBENS. 73 



Munich Gallery. 

are strongly marked by revenge, grief, and despair ; and the 
efforts to protect their beloved offspring are strikingly depicted 
in the contorted positions into which their violent but unavailing 
struggles have thrown them. This very excellent picture is 
painted in the arUsf s free or bravura manner. 

4/f. 3 in. by 9//. 3 m.— P. Worth 1500 g*. 

Engraved by P. Pontius and Depuis. 



SI 9. Helena Forman, when about 25 years of age. Her fair 
countenance is seen in a front view, and her light frizzled hiur 
is decked with an orange flower ; she is elegantly attired in a 
yellow silk skirt and bodice beautifully embroidered, a black 
silk robe, and a rich lace ruff, which stands up round the 
shoulders, leaving the bosom exposed ; the neck is adorned 
with pearls, and a splendid chain of jewels is suspended in front, 
one end of which is attached to a costly cluster of diamonds on 
the bosom ; she is seated, leaning gracefully on her right arm, 
and holding a plume of feathers in her left hand. This portrait 
is of the most splendid description. 

eyi. by ^ft. 3 in. (about. J—'C. 



220. Susanna and the Elders. Susanna has her back to 
the elders, and is concealing her bosom with both her hands ; 
the old men are removing her covering, and one of them is 
extending his hand to touch her back. A fountain, sculptured 
with a boy pouring water from a vase, is at the side. 

2 ft. 5 in. by Sjt. 6 J in. — P. 

Engraved by P. Pontius ; and with slight variations, but evidently 
from another picture, by Querinus Marc. This subject is also 
engraved by Vosterman, Lasne, Jegher, Spruyt, and Simon ; in die 
print engraved by the latter, one of the elders is pulling off her 
drapery with both his hands. 

An excellent Drawing of the preceding, done in chalks, washed in 
bistre, and terminated in oils, is in the Musee at Paris ; this, like 



74 BUBENS. 



Munich GaMery. 



many others, is the work of a scholar, but perfected by the master 

for the engrayen 

14^ tn. by 9\in. 



SSI. An Ex VotOy representing St 3 (Am introducing the 

donor to the Saviour, who is seated near a table with six of his 

disciples. 

ejl. 3 J in. by 4fft. 6 J in.— P. 



522. St George slaying the Dragon. A finished sketch. 

%/t. by \Jt. 6i tfi P. 

Etched by Panneels. 

523. St. Peter and St Paul ; whole-length figures, above the 
size of nature. The former, with the keys in his hand, stands in 
a front view, and has an angel bearing a mitre close to his head ; 
the latter stands by his side with both his hands placed on the 
hilt of a sword, the point of which rests on the ground ; a boy, 
with a book, is behind him ; and the dove hovers over them* 
Fainted in the grand style of the Italian school. 

7ft. 7 in. by QJl. \Q\ in.— P. 
Eynhouedts has engraved the above apostles in nearly the same 
positions, after two pictures which formed the doors of an altar- 
piece. {Seep, 23.) Drawn in lithography by Piloti. 



SS4. The Portrait of an elderly Woman, said to represent 

the painter^s mother. 

lyj. 6 in. by lyit.— P. 

Michel has engraved a print of an old woman at a window, entitled 

the Mother of Rubens. 



225. Portrait of a Youth. 

IJi. 4 tfi. by I ft. 1 m.^P. 



226. The Trinity. This mysterious subject is personified 
by two majestic figures xvepresenting the First and Second 



KUBENS. 75 



Munich GaMery. 



PersoDs of the Tiinhj ; the former, of renerable aspect, is clad 

in ample drapery, and holds a sceptre in his right hand ; the 

other sastuns a cross; they are both seated on clouds with 

tbeir feet placed on a globe, which is borne up by three angels ; 

a do^e, completing the triune, hovers above in a flood of light. 

An exeeHent production, grand in design, and resplendent in 

edour. 

9ft. S in. by Bjl, S in. — C. 

Engraved by Vosterman, and repeated anonymous* Drawn in 
lidiography by Piloti. 

The same subject (and unquestionably by the master), with 
additional figures, occurs in this Work. 



227. Portrait of a Gentleman with a book in his hand. 

Sft. 5 in. by 2ft. 1 1 tn.— P. 



228. Soldiers carousing in front of a country inn. Thirteen 
figures, in the centre of whidi is seated a soldier with a sword 
in one hand and a goblet in the other ; he a^^ars to be giving 
the health of a stout female, who is seated on the ground near 
him ; on the opposite side are a man in armour and a couple 
courting. Every figure is actively engaged, and the whole 
presents a scene of jollity, done in imitation of old Breughel. 

2 ft. 6 in. by 3 ft 6 in.— P. (about.) 

Engraved by W3mgaerde* 



Portrait of Philip IV., King of Spain. The face 
is presented in a three-quarter view, widi light bur turned 
up in front ; the dress consists of black silk, a velvet mantle, 
and a plain white stiff collar round the neck ; a broad belt, 
formed of jewels, is suspended over the right shoulder, and 
crosses the body in front, and the order of the Golden Fleece is 
attadied to a massive gold chain round the neck ; the left hand 
rests on the hilt of his sword, and the right holds up the skirt 
of the cloak* 



76 RUBENS, 



Munich GaUery. 

230. Portrait of Elizabeth de Bourbon, consort of Philip IV, 
The face is seen in a similar portion to the preceding ; the hair 
full and curling, with a knot behind, decked with pearls. The 
dress is composed of black silk, attached by gold buttons, a 
broad 'full white ruff surrounds the neck, and the bodice is 
adorned with a double row of pearls, to which is suspended a 
large diamond. The right hand, in which is held a fan, rests 
upon a covered table; and the left, holding a handkerchief, 
falls negligently at the side. 

Sjt. 7 in. by 2 ft. 8 1«.— C. Worth 1000 gs. 

The above portraits are engraved without the hands, by P. 
Pontius and Louys ; and in small, by Viennot. 

Duplicates of the above, purchased of Lord Bentinck, at his 
Chateau of Varrell, in Oldenburg, were imported by Mr. Murch, in 
1827. 



2S1. Portrait of Sigismond, King of Poland, represented 
sitting on his throne, habited in royal robes, with a crown on 
his head, a sceptre in his right hand, and a ball in his left. 



S32. Constantia, queen consort of the preceding, who is 
also seated, splendidly attired in silk robes, adorned with 
jewels, wearing a royal crown on her head, and the symbols of 
sovereignty in her hands. The figures are entire. 

eft. 10 in. by 4 ft. 1 in C. Worth 1000 gs. 

Engraved by P. Pontius. 



233. Portrait of Don Ferdinand, Infant of Spain, and 
brother of Philip IV., mounted on a bay charger, clad in 
armour, and wearing a Spanish hat turned up ; his right hand 
holds a baton poised upon the saddle, and his left the reins of 
his steed. A skirmish of cavalry is depicted in the back- 
ground. 

Sjt. 4 in. by eft. 9 in.— C. Worth 1500 gs. 



BUBENS. 77 



Munich GaHery* 

Engraved by P. Pontius. 

There is a duplicate of the above in the Royal Museum at Madrid, 
which is ascribed to Vandyke, and is probably a copy from the 
above. 

There is a print of this prince, represented without his hat, 
mounted on a noble charger, galloping over the bodies of the slain, 
and a figure of Fame flying behind him holding a wreath over his 
head, engraved by Vander Does. 



234. A Satyr, with a bunch of grapes in his hand, and his 
brows bound with ivy. Behind him is a faun wearing a lion^s 
skin on his head, drinking with avidity out of a shell. Half- 
length figures. 

4ft. 6 in. by 2 ft. 8 tn.— P. (about.) 

Drawn in lithography by Piloti. 



S35. A Boar Hunt The composition connsts of five hunts- 
men on foot, and seven dogs, attacking an infuriated boar in 
his lair. Among the former is one on the right, who has 
pierced the animal in the throat with such violence that the 
shaft of the weapon is broken, and the huntsman falling for- 
wards on a wounded dc^. The animals are by the hand of 
Snyders. 

Sjt. 6 in. by 11//. 6 in. — ^C. (about.) 600 gs. 

Drawn in lithography by Piloti. 



236. The Adoration of the Shepherds. A study for a large 

picture. 

12| tn. by 9| tn.— P. 



237. Cupid shaping his Bow. A copy by Rubens after 
Coreg^o. Signed, and dated 1614. 

4Jt. 4i in. by Sft. 5^ m.— C. 



78 BUBENS. 



Munich GaUery. 



S38. A Hunt of the Crocodile and Hippopotamus. Three 
huntsmen, mounted on spirited horses, and armed with a 
spear, a javelin, and a sword, asidsted by several dog% 
attacking a furious hippopotamus and a crocodile ; under the 
latter he two men, one of whom appears to be severely 
wounded. The animals are by Snyders. 

\Ofi. by 13^2. 6 in.— C. (tAouU) Worth 600 g*. 

Engraved by Soutman, Vander Leenw, and in small by Le Bas. 

Now in the Palace of Schleiahems^ near Munich. 



£39. The Death of Seneca. The philosopher is represented 

in a front view, sitting naked, with his feet in a bath ; on his 

left is seated a young man recording his last sayings ; and on 

the opposite side stands a doctor watching the effect of his 

operation. Two soldiers are behind, waiting the termination of 

the sentence. 

5 ft. 4 m. by ^fi. 9 in.— P. 

Engraved by Alexander Voet, jun. C. Galle has also engraved 

a single figure of Seneca in the bath. 



S40. A Forest illumined by the rays of the sun. A slight 

study. 

9 in. by 11 J m.— P. 



S41. A series of eighteen Studies, the original sketches for 
the pictures illustrative of the life of Mary de Medicis. These 
are executed in a slight and sketchy manner, in brown and 
white. The compositions of several of them differ materially 
from the finished pictures. — For description^ see Louvre. 

2jt.hjlft. 6jm.— P. 



S42. A Sketch illustrative of a Romish legend. 

2jt, hylft.e m.— P. 



S4S. Portrait of a Gentleman. A head only. 

I ft. S\ in. by 1^. ${ iit.— P. 



BUBENSL 79 



Munich Gallery. 



244. Job, in the extremity of bis sufferings, seated on a 
dung-heap, importuned by his wife, and tormented by demons. 
A finished sketch for the large picture, vhich was burnt 
during the bombardment of Brussels. — See p. 54. 

\ft. 1 m. by 9 J in.— P. 

Engraved by Vosterman and KrafFt. 



245. Saint Ambrose refumng the Emperor Theodosius 
admittance into the Church. A study for the finished picture 
at Vienna. 

Engraved by Schmuzer. 



246. Christ discovering himself to the two Disciples at 
Emmaus. The Saviour (seen in a profile view) is seated at the 
end of the table, blessing the bread ; one of the disciples sits 
oppo^te to him, and is also represented in profile ; the other 
has risen from his seat, and is taking off his hat to his Lord ; 
the fat host stands behind them. — See p. 33. 

Engraved by 'Witdouc. This subject is also engraved by 
Swanenberg and Sompelin. 



247. A Lion Hunt The subject consists of seven hunts- 
men, four of whom are mounted on spirited horses. The 
group is thrown into confusion by an enraged lion, which has 
fastened on the abdomen of one of the hunters, who is falling 
head foremost from his rearing horse, while the rest (their 
terrified animals kicking and plunging in all directions) are 
attacking the lion with spears and swords ; close to the front is 
a man lying on the ground, defending himself with a sword 
agunst a young lion that has sprung upon him ; at the same 
moment one of bis companions, armed with a sword and 
shield, is cautiously advancing to his assistance ; on the oppo- 
ate side lies a dead man. This capital production appears to 
be whoUy by the pencil of Rubens ; his powerful handling 



80 BUBENS. 



Munich Gallery, 

and energetic expression are conspicuous in every part. In 

the composition, he has evidently borrowed largely from the 

fine group of the Battle of the Standard, by Lionardo 

da Vinci. 

%ft. 8fn. by liy^. 8| m.— C. Worth 8000 gi. 

Engraved by Bolswert and Le Tellier. 

A Drawing of the preceding, done in India ink and bistre, 
terminated with the pen and heightened with white, is in the 
Mus^e at Paris. 

15| in. by 23|iii. 



248. A View in Flanders, exhibiting the usual scenery of 
woodlands intersected by meadows and corn-fields. The fore^ 
ground is diver^fied by a herd of fourteen cows, one of which 
a wonian is milking, while a man and another woman are occu- 
pied with the milk cans. This is an excellent production. 

%ft. 6 in. by Zft. 3| in.— P. Worth 800 gi. 



249. A Landscape, representing a beauuful and fertile 
country, diversified with clusters of trees, and intersected by a 
high road ; sunshine and shade vary the pleasing scene, and 
the freshness of a recent shower (indicated by a bright rainbow 
in the heavens) pervades the vegetation ; in the fore-ground are 
two women and a man with a herd of nine cows ; on the right 
is a waggoner riding on the fore-horse of a team (part only of 
these appear), and in the opposite side are a number of ducks 
basking on the bank of a pond. This admirable picture is of 
first-rate excellence. 

8 A by 9ft. loin.— P. Wortli 1200 ^f. 

Neither this nor the preceding is engraved. 



The Catalogue of this magnificent collection contains eighty-eight 
pictures, but those by the hands of scholars are (nnitted. 



KUBGNS. 81 



DRESDEN GALLERY, 

S50. A Lion Hunt This powerful and energetic production 
exhibits a group of four men mounted on spirited horses, 
which a sudden and impetuous attack of lions has thrown into 
confuiaon; one of the hunters, wearing a Turkish dress and 
riding a tall mottled gray horse, is seized on the shoulder by a 
furious lion, which has sprung on the back of his steed; 
another enraged lion has fixed his talons in the back of a 
huntsman who lies prostrate on the ground, while a moor, 
wearing a scarlet mantle and mounted on a plunging horse, is 
turning round to attack the animal with a javelin. On the 
c^posite side are a Uoness with a cub in her mouth, and a dead 
tiger. This admirable performance is only surpassed by one 
representing the same subject, at Munich. 

IJt. 8 in. by 10^^. 3 tn C. Worth 2500 g9. 

Engraved by Snyderhoef and Le Tellier. 



251. A very excellent Sketch, the original study for the 
preceding, done en grisaUle, 

2 ft. 5 in. by S/t. 5|tn. — P. 
Sold by the writer, 1826, to the Right Hon. Robert Peel, 
for 100 gs* 

252. Diana, accompanied by three Nymphs, returning from 
the Chase. The goddess is lightly covered with a red mantle, 
in which she carries a quantity of game, and has a spear in her 
right hand; behind her are three females, one of whom has a 
hare slung over her shoulder; before these are three satyrs, 
one of them has a variety of fruit in his hands, another is by 
his side with his hand on his companion's shoulder, and the 
third has a basket of fruit on his head, some of which he is 
presentmg to Diana. Whole-length figures. The game and 
dogs are by the hand of Snyders. 

7ft. 10 in. by 8^^. 4^ tn ^C. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

VOL. II. G 



82 RUBENS. 



Dresden Gallery. 



This is a picture of great exceUence and beauty, and worth 

A repetition of this picture, with the figures seen to the knees, 
the work of a scholar assisted by Rubens, is in this collection. 

4/i. 11 in. by eyi. 5 in.— C. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

A picture similar to the preceding was sold in the collection of 
M. d'Angelis, Brussels, 1763. . lOOO/o. 90^ 

253. A View of the Escurial, situate on the side of a lofty 
mountain, looking over an extensive valley enclosed by rugged 
hills. In the fore-ground is a gentleman on horseback, pre- 
ceded by a servant with dogs. 

4//. by iift. 1 1 tn.— C. Worth 500 gs. 

This subject occurs several times in this Catalogue. 



254. A Wild Boar Hunt, in a woody landscape. A beau- 
tiful sketch for a picture in the collection of His Highness the 
Prince of Orange. — See description. 

4ft. 10 Ml. by 5 ft. 10 tn P. 



S65. Portrait of a Lady, about twenty-five years of age, 
seen in a three-quarter view; light hur; the dress composed of 
black figured silk with light gray sleeves, a white kerchief, and 
a full ruff round the neck ; the right hand holds a gray 
mantle, and the left some roses. 

ftjt. 9J in. by ^fi.—V. 



256. Portrait of Helena Forman when about twenty-six 
years of age, seen in a three-quarter view, the head inclining 
to the right, attired in black silk, with a scarf of the same 
over her head, which is held on the shoulder by the left hand 
and on the bosom with the right. 

%fi. ft in. by lyi. 9 tit ^P. Worth 600 gs. 



HUBENS. 83 



Dresden GaUery, 



257. The Day of Jadgment. A beautiful sketch for the 
magnificent picture in the Munich Gallery. — See p. 60. 

4y?. 4 in. by Sft. 4^ w.— P. 



258. The Judgment of Paris. This very admirable little 
picture is a repetition (with slight variations) of a large one 
which was formerly in the Orleans Gallery. 

\fi. by \fi. 4 in.— P. Worth 500 gs. 

The subject is engraved by Lomnielin, Dambrun, Moitte, and 
Couche. 



259. Whole-length Portraits of two Youths, sons of the 
artist by his first wife ; the younger is amusing himself with 
a bird attached to a string, and the eldest stands leaning on his 
brother^s shoulder with a book in his hand. 

5 ft. 7 in. by 3 ft. 3 in.— P. 

Engraved by Tanje and Daulle. 

A duplicate of this picture, of very superior quality, occurs in 
the Licht^BStein Collection. 



260. Ambition persomfied by a Warrior (apparendy intended 
for Charles V.) ; he is clad in armour, holding a spear in his 
hand, and treading under foot the Grod of Wine ; a naked figure 
of Fame stands by his side placing a wreath of laurel on his 
head ; and Venus, with Cupid weeping by her side, and the 
demon of Envy are behind him. This is a remarkably bril- 
liant and very masterly production. 

7 ft. 2 in. by 7 ft. 10 in.— C. Worth 500 gM. 
Engraved by Tanje. 

261. Portrait of a young Lady, dressed in black silk and 
wearing a black veil on her head. 

2ft. 2 in. hjlft.9 in.— P. 



262. An old Woman and two Boys; one of the latter is 
blowing some embers in a chafing dish held by the woman, the 



84 RUBENS. 



Dresden Gallery. 



light from which ilhimines the subject ; the other youth has a 
fagot in his hands. 

A^ft. \\in. by Sft. If in.-«P. Worth 300 gs. 
Eng aved by Boece, and also by Basan. 



868. Portrait of a Lady, said to represent Helena Forman. 
She is seen in a front view, with her hair falling in tresses on 
her shoulders. 

2 ft. 3 in. by \ft. 9 in.— P. 

Engraved by Zucchi. 

964. Meleager presenting the Head of the Calydonian Boar 
to Atalanta. The nymph is seated on the right, having a 
scarlet mantle cast over her knees, her left hand placed on her 
bosom, and the right extended to take the present from the 
youth, who stands by her side with his right arm round her 
neck ; a Cupid is between them, and the body of the boar lies 
at his feet. On the opposite side is a dog jumping up on the 
knee of the nymph ; the harpy of Envy is seen in the back- 
ground. A brilliant and freely-painted picture. 

Qft. by 4, ft. 4 in.— C. Wordi 600 g». 

Engraved by Bartsch, and in reverse by Meyssens. 



Jt65. An Apostle, represented in a profile view, with his 
hands on the edge of a book. A bust. 

2ft. 8 in. by \ft. 8 in.— P. 



'866. St. Peter, with the keys in his hand. A bust 

2 ft. 3 in. by lyi. 8 in.— P. 



S67. A Satyr squeezing the juice of a bunch of grapes into 
a vase held by a young satyr; behind whom is an infant 
Bacchus holding a bunch of grapes to his mouth ; and in front 
lies a tigress suckling her cubs. 

1ft. 6 in. by Sft. 1 in.— C. Worth 500 gs. 



RUBENS. 85 



Dresden Gallery. 



968. Neptune standing erect in his car, drawn by sea-horses 
and attended by Nereides ; the deity grasps a trident in one 
hand, and extends the other in the act of commanding the 
harpies of storms and tempests to quit the elements. This 
all^ory alludes to the prosperous voyage of the Cardinal Fer- 
dinand of Austria from Bel^um to Spain, in 16S9, and is 
entitled Qmos ego. It formed part of the embellishment of one 
of the triumphal arches so frequently aUuded to in this Work. 

Uft.7 in. by XSft. 8 tn.— C. 

Engrayed by Van Thulden. 

The original Study for the preceding picture is in the collection of 
the Duke of Grafton. 

I ft. 6|tn. by 2/t. Oitn.— P. 



269. The Glorification of a Saint A masterly sketch. 

2 ft. 2 in. by 2 ft. 6 in.— P. 



570. Mercury lulling Argus to sleep with the music of his 

pipe. 

ft ft. 2 J m. by 2 ft. lOj tn.— P. 

A picture of this subject occurs in the Catalogue of the artist's 

effectSy p. S2. 

571. Portrait of an elderly Lady, wearing a cap, and a 
broad ruff round her neck. 

2 ft. 4 tn. by I ft. 9 in ^P. 

Engraved by Tanj6. 

572. Portriut of a Spanish Gentleman, represented in a front 
view, having short bur, a bushy beard, and wearing a full ruff 
round his neck. 

Engraved by Daull6. 

S7S. A Landscape, with a tigress lying in the fore-ground 
suckling three cubs, and a lion standing near her. In the dis- 
tance are seen huntsmen with dc^s, in pursuit of a lion. 

7ft. 4t in. hyl5ft. 5 in.' 



86 BUBENjS. 



Dresden GaUery, 



Engraved by Ridenger. 

This picture is chiefly by Mompers. 



274. The Garden of Love. 

^fi. 3 in. by 4 ft. 2 in.— P. 

The composition of this celebrated subject is described in a sub« 
sequent page of this Work ; and although the present picture differs 
in many of the subordinate parts from either of those (particularly 
in the back-ground), and possesses beauties worthy the pencil of 
Rubens ; yet, after a careful examination, the writer considers it to 
be the work of a scholar, retouched by the master's hand. The 
arrangement of the figures corresponds with the print engraved by 
Lempereur. 

S75. A Larder well stored with provisions, consisting of 
game, peacocks, a wild boar, swans, &c. &c. At the side of 
a dresser (on the left) is a fine woman, dressed in a black 
kerchief over a scarlet bodice, and a blue apron ; her attention 
appears to be attracted by the entrance of a man, who has 
caught hold of her arm, and appears to be saying something 
gallant. A bitch and puppies are in front The game and 
animals are by Snyders. 

7ft. 2 in. by liyi?. 7 in.— C. Worth 400 gs. 



276. Hercules overcome by Wine, supported by a nymph 
and a satyr ; his left arm is round the neck of the latter, in the 
hand of which he holds a gold vase ; he is fallowed by a dancing 
nymph, and accompanied by a satyr wearing his lion^s skin, 
and a cupid playing with his club. 

7 ft. 2 in. by 7 ft. 10 m.— C. 



277. Portrait of a Gentleman about forty years of age ; his 
face is seen in nearly a front view, with mustachios and a small 
tuft of beard ; he is dressed in black striped silk, and a full 
white ruff. His hands are engaged pulling on gloves. 

3 ft. 9 in. by 2 ft. 8 in.— P. Worth 250 gs. 



RUBENS. 87 



Dresden Gallery. 



X18, Pprtrsdt of a Lady of a fair complexion and small 

features, seen in a three-quarter view, habited in a black striped 

ulk dress, with the bodice richly embroidered with gold lace ; a 

gold chain is suspended from her neck, and held by the right 

hand. 

$Ji. 2 in. by 2ji. 7 in P. Worth 250 gs. 



279. Portrait of a Gentleman about forty years of age, 
seen in nearly a front view, habited in black figiu'ed silk and 
a large full ruff; his right hand placed on a table, which is 
covered with a Turkey carpet. 

3 ft. 8 in. by ^ft. 7 in.— P. 



280. Portraits of a Lady and her infant Child. The lady 
appears to be thirty-two years of age, and is seen in a three- 
quarter view ; the child is seated on her knee, looking towards 
the spectator ; his parent holds his arms with her right hand, 
and the left is placed on the skirt of his dress. 

3 ft. 10 in. by 2 ft. 9 in.— P. Worth 400 gs. 

Several pictures in this gallery, being erroneously ascribed to 
Kubens, are omitted. 

VIENNA GALLERY. 

281. Saint Ignatius Loyola healing the ^ck and exorcising 
the Possessed. — For description see p. 19. 

Engraved by Marinus. Worth 5000^1. 

282. Saint Francis Xavier healing the Diseased and raising 
the Dead. — For descripHon see p. 18. 

\7ft. by \2ft. 6 in. Worth 8000 gs. 

Engraved by Marinus. 
These were formerly in the Jesuits' church at Antwerp. 



28S. Tbe original Sketches for the above pictures. 

3 ft. 4 in. by 2 ft. 3 in.~P. Worth 450 gs. 



88 RUBENS. 



Viefvna Gallery. 



284. The Assumption of the Virgin. The reduplication of 
this subject, each varying in compoation from the others, is an 
unequivocal proof of the artiste's fertile genius. In the present 
picture the Vir^n is clothed in white raiment; her right hand 
is raised and the left extended ; her countenance, beaming with 
beatitude, is directed upwards ; and a vast company of angels 
gracefully float around her. In the lower part are the twelve 
apostles surrounding the tomb ; at the side of which are three 
females, two of them are shewing the flowers taken ofi* the 
winding sheet, while the third, intended for Mary Magdalen, 
is leaning on the shoulder of one of the former, looking at one 
of the astonished apostles, who is seen in a profile view clad in 
a scarlet robe ; on his left is another, in a yellow vest and a 
white mantle, kneeling and looking upwards. Close to the left 
is a third apostle, seen in a hinder view, wearing a green vest; 
near to him is one in a bluish gray robe» removing the stone 
from the sepulchre ; and on the farther side of the females are 
an elderly female and a man bearing a torch. 

U/t. 6 in. by 9Ji. 8 in.— P. 

This capita] altar-piece was bought with another picture at 
Antwerp in 1774» for the sum of 18,000/o., 1620/. 



285. St. Andrew with a Cross. A sketch. 

I ft. Bin. by I ft. 10 in.— P. 



286. Atalanta and Meleager attacking the Calydonian Boar. 
The enraged an'unal is at bay by the nde of a fallen tree, and 
beset in front by a group of hunters, amongst whom are the 
nymph Atalanta (who has just let fly an arrow and wounded 
him in the head) and Meleager by her side armed with a spear ; 
two horsemen with javelins are galloping up to th^ assistance. 
On the opposite side and in front are two men, one of them 
blowing a horn, the other preparing to throw a javeUn ; several 
dogs are wounded, and a man lies dead at the feet of the beast. 

loy^. 4 m. by isy^. 



BUBEKS. 89 



Vienna GaUery. 

This picture is remarkably dear and brilliant, and the females 
unusually graceful. The animals are by Snyders, and the land- 
scape by Wildens. 

Etched by Prenner. A similar composition is engraved by Van 
Kessel. 

Pictures representing the above subject occur several times in this 
Catalogue. — See pp, S2 and 34. 



287. St Ambrose refusing the Emperor Theodosius admi&- 
aon into the Church after the Massacre at Thessolonica. The 
bishop, dressed in a splendid pontifical robe and wearing a 
mitre on his head, stands at the door of the church opposing 
the entrance of the emperor, who is bending before him in the 
attitude of entreaty; three Roman soldiers are behind the 
latter, and six persons attend St Ambrose ; among them is a 
youth, in a white surplice, with a torch in his hand, and a man 
resembling the known portrait of St. Charles Borromeo. 

liyi. 5 in. by 7 ft. 10 in,— C. Worth 1500 gs. 

Engraved by Schmuzer and Prenner. 

The Study for. the above picture was formerly in the Munich 
Gallery. 

Vandyke has also painted a similar composition, in which he has 

borrowed freely from the preceding picture. 



288. The Meeting between Ferdinand II. King of Hungary, 
and Ferdinand, Infant of Spain and Grovemor of Belgium, 
previous to the Battle of Nortlingen, in 16S4. In the fore- 
ground is a river god reclining upon a vase (emblem of the 
Danube), and two females, one of whom, habited in black and 
bending in grief over the imperial arms, personifies Germany. 
This picture formed part of the first triumphal arch erected in 

16S5. 

liyi. 5tii. by Ujt. 2tn.— C. 

Engraved by Van Thulden ; by whom it was probably painted 
after a sketch by Rubens. 



90 ItUBENS. 



Gallery, 



The original Sketch for the preceding is in the collection of Sir 
Abraham Hume, Bart. ; and a fine Study in chalk, for one of the 
females, is in the collection of Sir Thomas Lawrence, P.R.A. 



089' Pepin, Duke of Brabant, with his Daughter St. Begue, 
the founder of the Beguine Nuns. She is attired in a scarlet 
dress, with full sleeves lined with fur, and a white linen cover- 
ing on her head ; her right hand is raised to her bodice, holding 
her pearl necklace. The duke is on the farther ^e of his 
daughter, and wears a fur cap. The figures are shown to the 
middle. An excellent and highly-finished picture. 

Sfi. by 2 ft. 3 m.— P. Worth 600 gs. 

Engraved by Vanden Stein and Premier. 



290. A repentant Magdalen renouncing the vanities of the 
world. She is seated on the left of the picture ; her counte- 
nance and streaming eyes are directed upwards, and her clasped 
hands express the agony of her mind. Her long flaxen hair 
falls negligently on her shoulders, the white saUn robe and 
blue vest in which she is attired seem to have tost their charms, 
and her casket of jewels she is tramjding under feet The 
peace and tranquillity of a reli^ous life is allegorically repre- 
sented by a female habited in black, composedly seated in the 
back-ground. A brilliantly-coloured and highly-finished pro- 
duction. 

eft. S in. by 4ft. 7 in.— C. Worth 1000 gs. 

Engraved by Vosterman. 



9&1. A Bust Portrait of the Archduchess Anne of Austria, 
consort of Louis XIII. 

lfi.6 in. hylft.S in.— P. 

There is a print by Louys, in an embellished oval, of this lady ; 
and another of an octagon shape, anonymous. 



BUBENS. 91 



Vietma GaUery. 



292. A Bust Portrait of Elizabeth de Bourbon, cpntott of 
Philip IV. of Spain. A duplicate, apparently by a scholar, c^ 
the Munich picture. 

I ft. 6 in. by IJt. $ in P. 



293. The Entombment. The Virgin and St John, with the 

body of the Saviour ; the Vir^n, clothed in a blue mantle, is 

seen in a profile view, standing on the right of the body, the 

arm of which she supports with her right hand, and her left is 

raised to remove a thorn from the brow of her dead son. 

St. John is on the opposite side, holding the arm near the wrist 

Half figures. Painted in the artistes smooth and finished 

manner. 

3 ft. 4 in. by $/t. 7 in.— P. 

Etched by Prenner. 

294. The Four Quarters of the Globe, represented by four 
river deities, and the same number oi females. In the fore- 
ground are a tiger suckling her cubs, and a crocodile with which 
cupids are sporting. A broad and slightly-piunted picture. 

eji. 7 in. by 9/^.— C. 
Etched by Prenner. 

295. The Virgin, seated on a splendid throne, clothed in 
scarlet and blue, investing St. Ildefonso with the chasuble of 
his Order ; the saint rec^ves the gift on his knees, and is 
bowing his head to embrace it ; four female saints are present, 
two on each side of the throne, and three angels hover above 
in celestial light This is a work of great excellence and beauty. 

llft.hY7ft.ein.—F. 
Engraved by Witdouc» Watelet has engraved a print firom a 

drawing, being a study by Rubens for the group on the left of the 

Virgin, 

The interiors of the covers are decorated with : — 

The Portraits of the Archduchess Infanta Isabella and the 



92 RUBENS. 



Vienna Gattery, 

Archduke Albert The former represented on her knees in 
prayer, accompanied by her patroness St. Clara., who is offering 
her, on a book, a crown entwined with roses. The latter is also 
on his knees, in the presence of his patron St Albert. 

liy^. bySy^.6Mi.— P. 

Engraved by Harrewyns. 

The exteriors of the covers were adorned with : — 

A Repoao of the Holy Family. The composition exhibits 
the Virgin, clothed in a scarlet vest and blue mantle, ntting at 
the foot of a tree, with the infant Saviour in her arms, before 
whom is the child St John, held by his mother Elizabeth, at 
whose left stands Zachariah, offering the Saviour a branch with 
fruit on it A thinly-painted jncture. 

liy^. byryi. 4tn.— P. 

Engraved by Deroy. Earlom has engraved a print of the above 
composition from a pictmre then in Lord Chesterfield's collection. 

This altar-piece was painted for the chapel of the confrerie of 
the Order of St Ildefonso^ in the parish church of St. Jaques de 
Caudenberghy near Brussels ; and when completed gave such uni- 
versal satisfaction, that the Archduke Albert and the Archduchess 
Isabella, in concurrence with the chiefs of the Order, sent the artist 
a present of a purseful of Spanish pistoles, which he politely 
declined to accept, observing that he was deeply sensible of the 
kindness and liberality of the lords of the confrme^ but that he 
considered himself highly recompensed by the honour of being ini- 
tiated one of the members of so iUustrious an Order, and that he 
should never desire other gratification than the opportunity of con- 
tributing to its service. 

A Drawing of the preceding picture of St. Ddefonso, done in 
India ink, heightened with white, was sold in the collection of 
M. Marriette 1775 . 251/r. 10{. 

And a Study in oils for the same was sold in the collection of the 
Elector of Cologne 1764 . Z^%fs. 16/. 



296. A Landscape, with a large castle surrounded by water 



RUBENS. 93 



Vienna Gallery. 



standing in the middle distance. On the right are clusters of 
trees upon an abrupt hill, round the base of which flows a stream, 
crossed in front by a rustic bridge ; the pleanng effect of a 
summer^s evening pervades the scene. A company of thirteen 
ladies and gentlemen have assembled on a fine grassy fore-ground 
to partake of the beauties of the season. This group appears 
to have been engaged in a concert, and now sporting ; one of 
the gentlemen is endeavouring to throw a lady down, another 
holds the skirts of the dress of his female companion, and has a 
handful of flowers to cast at her, while a third is pursuing three 
ladies who are running away. A slightly-painted production. 

I ft. 9 in. by Sft.^V. Worth 660 g$. 

Engraved by Bolswert 

897. A grand mountainous Landscape, the greater part of 
which is overwhelmed by a cataract of water, spreading deso- 
lation through the country; intended to represent the fabled 
inundation of Phrygia. Upon the declivity of a hill, on the left, 
are Jupiter and Mercury taking the hospitable Baucis and 
Philemon under their protection, while the elements of des- 
truction (thunder, lightning, and run) are discharged upon the 
devoted inhabitants for their ingratitude and disobedience. A 
splendid production. 

4tft. 7 in. by 6ft. 6 in.— P. Worth 1500 gs. 

Engraved by Bolswert 

A duplicate of the above is in the collection of Sir Thomas 
Baring, Bart 

298. Philip, Duke of Burgundy, sumamed the Good. His 
strong-featured countenance is seen in a three-quarter view, 
looking to the left, with short dark hair ; he is clad in armour 
over a buff coat, and wears a rich yellow silk mantle em- 
broidered with gold and jewels, to which is attached an ermine 
cape ; these cover the left side and are fastened by a clasp of 
jewels on the right shoulder ; the right hand grasps a baton, and 



d4 RUBENS. 



Vienna Gallery, 



the left is placed behind the hip. A vigorously-painted por- 
trait, possessing a dignified and military air. 

Sft. 8 in, by ^ft. 2| in.— P, Worth 400 g$. 

Engraved. In the Vienna Gallery. 



299. Two Portraits of Old Men. 

ly^. 7m. by ly^. Sin.— P. 



800. A full-length Portrait of Helena Fonnan, repre- 
sented in an erect position, prepared to enter the bath. A 
brown fur mantle is wrapped negligently round her waist, 
and held by her left hand ; the right arm crosses the bosom and 
holds the mantle on her shoulder ; the upper part of the body 
and the legs are exposed ; a scarlet carpet is under feet. This 
picture is painted with extraordinary care, and possesses such 
dazzling brilliancy of colour that every picture near it is eclipsed 
by its superior splendour. 

5ft. 8 in. by ^ft. 1 in.— P. Worth 1200 g$n 
Engraved by Prenner. 



801. A youthful Faun or Bacchanalian Boy. His brows 
are crowned with ivy, and he holds a pipe with both hands, 
which he appears to have just ceased playing. 

\ft. 9 in* by I ft. S in.— P. 

Engraved by Prenner. 



802. St. Peter and St. Paul, in one picture. One of them is 
seen in a profile view, the other in a three^uarter position ; 
both their countenances are directed upwards. A finished study. 

I ft. lOin.byiy*. 6in.— P. 



RUBBNS. 95 



GcMtry, 



303. A venerable Priest (probably intended for St. Augus* 

tin), with a gray beard, and habited in a rich chasuble. A 

finished study. 

ly^. 10 m, by \ft, 6f«.— P. 



804. The Bust of a venerable old Man, with a bald head 
and a gray beard. The face is seen in profile. A study for 
a head of Joseph of Arimathea. 

ftft. 1 in. by 1 y^. 9 m.— P. 



805. St. Jerome, in the habit of a cardinal, with a scarlet 

cap on his head. His venerable appearance is increased by a 

long gray beard. 

%ft. lin.hy\'ft. 9in.--F. 



806. A Bust Portrait of a Man of middle age, represented 
in a profile view, with a bald head, a plain black dress, and a 
bvdad full ruff round his neck. 

Engraved by Premier. 

807. The Companion. A Portrait of a Gentleman. The 

face shown in a three-quarter view ; mustachios and short hair ; 

a broad full ruff adorns the neck, and a fur mantle covers the 

shoulders. 

l/t. 7 in. hy I fi. 3 m.— P. 

Engraved by Prenner. 

808. A whole-length Portrait of Charles Ferdinand, Gover- 
nor of Bel^um, clad in armour, with a scarf over his shoulder, 
and wearing a cap decked with feathers. 

Etched by Prenner. There is also a print very like this portrait 
engraved by Jegher. 

809* The Companion. A Portrait of Ferdinand, King of 
Hungary, richly habited ; wearing a cap on his head, and a 



96 RUBENS. 



Vienna GaUery. 



mantle with a fur cape ; his right hand holds a baton, and the 
left is placed on the hilt of his sword. 

8/f. 2 in. by 3^?. 6 xn.—C, 

Etched by Prenner. 

These portraits formed part of the decorations of the triumphal 
arches erected at Antwerp, in 1635, in honour of Ferdinand. 



SIO. Maximilian I., when about fifty years of age, with 
the face seen in a three-quarter view. He is clad in bril- 
liant armour, richly embossed with ornaments in gold, and 
wears a morion set with pearls and other costly gems, and a 
turban, surmounted by a crown adorned with rubies, is placed 
on the top of the helmet ; the left hand holds a massive sword 
in its scabbard, and the right rests on a war-club ; the bases of 
his jerkin are splendidly emblazoned with heraldic designs. 
A highly-finished and energetic work of art. 

4tft. 4 in. by 3/3?. « tn.—P. Worth 500 gs. 

Engraved in the Vienna Gallery. 



Sll. A Portrait of the Artist, when near sixty years of age, 
with the face turned above three-quarters from the spectator. 
He wears a large hat turned up in front, and is dressed in a 
black coat and mantle, with a full pendant ruff; the left hand 
is placed on the sword hilt, and the right leans on a staff. 

^ft. 6 in. by %ft. 8 in.—C. 

Etched by Prenner. Engraved — in the Vienna GaDery. 



812. A Group of four naked Infants playing with a Lamb. 
The centre one is seated with his back to the spectator ; the one 
on his right has wings, and is stooping to lift up the animal ; 
the oppomte infiemt is also seated on the ground; behind him 
lies a quantity of fruit 

%fi. 5 m. by Zfi. 10 in.— P. 



RUBENS. 97 



Vienna Gallery. 

Etched by Prenner, and engraved in xnezzotinto by John 'Dean, 
after a picture in the Pembroke collection. 

Walpole speaks in high terms of praise of the one now at Wilton, 
and describes it as " representing Christ, St. John, an angel, and a 
girl, personifying the church." 



313. An old Man approaching with caution a bed on which 
a naked female is lying asleep. 

1 Jl. 4 in. by 2/t. 2 in.— P. Worth 60/. 



31 4i. A Warrior clad in armour, grasping a sword in his 
right hand and bearing a shield on his arm, seated on the bodies 
of slain enemies and broken weapons of war ; he is supported 
by the goddess Bellona, and crowned by Victory. 

I ft. 7 in. hyi ft. I in.— P. 

Drawn in lithography. 

315. The Entombment The body of the Saviour, pre- 
sented in a fore-shortened position, is extended on the ground, 
the head resting on the knees of the Virgin, who is closing the 
eyes, while Mary Magdalen, kneeling by her side, supports 
his right arm. On the opposite side are St. John and three 
females ; one of the latter, clothed in black, is on her knees 

weeping. 

1ft. Sin. by I ft. 5 in P. 

Etched by Prenner. A picture of a very similar composition is 

engraved by Soutman. 

316. Portrait of a young Lady, habited in a Spanish dress, 

holding her gloves in her right hand and her handkerchief in 

the other. 

. 2 ft. 7 in. hy I ft. 10 in.— P. 



817. A Fete in honour of Venus, in the Island of Cythera. 
The statue of the goddess is elevated in the centre near a grov9 

VOL. II. H 



98 RUBENS. 



Vienna Gallery. 



of trees, and several votaries are paying homage and pre- 
senting their offerings, while numerous cupids are sportively 
dancing around it, and others are playing wantonly among the 
trees, or floating through the air with clusters of fruit ; two 
beautiful females are advancing from the left with their 
offerings, and on the opposite side is a company of nymphs 
and satyrs dancing in lascivious movements. The temple of the 
goddess stands on a hill in the distance, from whence flows a 
cascade of water, in which cupids are slaking their thirst. 
Piunted with a hasty freedom of handling, a brilliant glow pf 
colour, and a rich redundancy of expression. 

7 ft. by 1 ly^.— C. Wordi 1200 gt. 

Engraved by Prenner. 

818. Portrait of a Lady known under the appellation of 
Titian''s mistress. She is dressed in white satin worked with 
flowers and embroidered with gold, holding in her hand a fan 
in the shape of a small flag. 

S ft. hy St ft. 3 m.— C. 

This is a copy by Rubens after Titian. 



819- iBneas escaping (with his father Anchises on his 
shoulders, and accompanied by his son Ascanius and his wife 
Creusa) from the Destruction of Troy. A sketch. 

Engraved by Prenner. 

820. Christ with his Cross. This represents the Saviour, 
after his resurrection, embracing his cross. 
Engraved by N. Ryckman and Premier. 



821. Three Nymphs reposing on a bank after the Chase. 
The scene is a landscape, with a fountain and a grove of trees 
«n the right, near to which lie three beautiful nymphs asleep ; 
and under the shadow of a tree beyond them stands a shepherd 



RUBENS. 99 



Vienna Gallery. 



kaning on a staff, gazing in admiration at their charms ; while 
a youth, who should have guarded their sleeping hours, stands 
by the «de of the fountain asleep, with his head reclining on 
his hand ; a monkey and a quantity of fruit are on the ground 
in front, and a pheasant is drinking at the fountain. This 
elegant production is distinguished by the graceful forms of 
the females, and the purity and freshness of the colouring. 
The landscape appears to be the work of Mompert and the 
animals and fruit are by Snyders. 

7fi. by 9y^.— C. Worth 1200^*; 

Etched by Prenner. 



822. The Annunciation. The Vir^n, seen in a profile 
view, clothed in a white vest and a large blue mantle, is 
kneeling by the side of a small table in the centre ; one hand is 
placed on an open book, and the other raised towards her face. 
Her attention is directed towards the celestial messenger, who 
is bending on one knee before her, his hands extended, and his 
head slightly bending forward (his face is also seen in profile) ; 
he is clothed in a gray vest, and a yellow and red mantle floats 
behind him. The Holy Spirit, in the form of a dove, is 
descending in a stream of light, attended by five angels (three 
of them casting flowers from thdr hands) and four cherubim. 

6 ft. 6 in. by 4/f. 6 in.— C. (about.) 

Engraved by Diepenbeke. 

The greater part of this picture appears more like the work of 
Diepenbeke dian Rubens. 



LICHTENSTEIN COLLECTION. 

828. Smnt Ann arranging the Virgin^s Hair* St. Joachim 
present, and several angels are flying above. A sketch. 

«y3?. byiy?. 6 m.— P. 



100 KUBENS. 



Lichtenstein Collection. 



S24. The Assumption of the Virgin. A slight and hasty 
production.— For description^ see p. 63. 

15 /If. 10 in. hyW ft, (arched top.) 
Engraved by Witdouc. 
Painted for the church of the Chartreux at Brussels. 



S25. The Daughters of Cecrops (Aglauros, Herse, and 

Pandrosos) opening the fatal basket which enclosed the infant 

Erichthonius. One of the females has a purple mande round 

her loins, and kneels on the left by the side of a balustrade ; 

another bends inquisitively over the basket, and is merely 

covered with a blue robe over her knees ; at her side stands an 

infant looking up at the third daughter, who has only a 

crimson scarf over her right arm, and in her hand she holds a 

piece of drapery; her left arm is over the shoulder of an 

elderly female. 

eft. 10 in. by 10/3?. 1 in C. Worth 1500^*. 

Engraved by Van Sompel. 

This picture was painted about the year 1614, a period when the 

artist finished his works with studious care and attention. 



8S6. Venus arranging her Hair at her Toilet, attended by a 
Negress, and a Cupid holding her looking-glass. A copy after 
Titian, with variations : an indifferent work. 

S/r. 11 in. by ^ft. 1 in P. 



• SS7. W^hole-length Portraits of two Youths, the Sons of 
Rubens. They are habited m the elegant Spanish costume of 
the period ; the youngest, who wears a blue vest with slashed 
sleeves and gold buttons, is amusing himself with a bird ; the 
elder is habited in black silk, and stands with his left arm over 
his brother^s shoulder, and holds a book under his right arm. 
This is a picture of the highest excellence and beauty, and 
well deserves the admiration and pruse so constantly bestowed 
upon it by every beholder. 

^ft. 6 in. by 5 ft P. Worth 1 500 gt. 



BUBENS. 101 



Lichtenstein Collection. 



Engraved by Pichler, of a large size, in mezzotinto. 
A duplicate of the above is in the Dresden Gallery. — See p. S$» 
Engraved by Daulle and Danzel. 

The following six Pictures illustrate the life and noble 
actions of Decius : — 

328. Decius consulting the Priests, previous to the Battle 

with the Gauls and Samnites. The general, clad in armour, 

over which is cast the scarlet paludamentum, stands before the 

priests awaiting the result of their divinations; one of the 

latter, habited in splendid sacerdotal robes, is by the altar; 

and the second priest stands on his right, holding a silver salver 

containing the entrails of the victim ; a stag lies on the ground 

in front ; on the left are two men bringing forward a white 

heifer. 

SJI. 4 in. by IS ft. 1 tn.— C. 

Engraved by Schmuzer. 

8^. Decius haranguing his Soldiers previous to the Battle. 
The noble warrior is on an elevation on the right, in the atti- 
tude of addressing his troops, five of whom, chiefly officers, 
bearing the Roman banners and ensigns, stand before him 
with profound attention. The time appears to be indicated by 
the sun breaking forth in the east. 

9 ft. 3 in. by Sjt. 10 m.— C. 

Engraved by Schmuzer. 

A Study for the preceding picture was sold in the collection of 
Randon de Boisset 1777 . 1200 fs. 48/. 



S30. Decius receiving the; Benediction of the Priests, when 
swearing to devote himself for die Success of his Army. 
The hero, completely enveloped in his scarlet paludamentum, 
is bending humbly before the priests, one of whom has laid his 
hand on the head of the consul ; the second priest, of im aged 
and venerable aspect, is a little behind the former, clothed in 



lot RUBENS. 



Lichtenstein CoUedion. 



an ample mantle of a gray colour ; on the left are three soldiers, 
witnes»ng with deep emotion the solemn ceremony. 

9ft. 4 in. by loyi. 7 i«.— C. 

Engraved by Schmuzer. There is also a print, in aquatinto, done 
from a sketch formerly in Mr. Cosway's collection. 

The Sketch for this picture is in the Munich Gallery. 



SSI. Decius sending the Lictors away previous to the 
Battle. He is represented caparisoned for the battle, standing 
by the side of a spirited gray charger, which he is about to 
mount; his attention is directed to three lictors, who are in 
the opposite ade, with the fasces on their shoulders. 

9 ft. Sin. by lOft. U in.— C. 

Engraved by G. A. Muller. 



S82. The Death of Decius. In the midst of the battle and 
confusion of an obstinate and sanguinary conflict between horse 
and foot soldiers, is seen the noble Decius falling backwards 
from his plunging charger, pierced by a spear in the neck ; 
while one of his valiant troops, mounted on a spirited piebald 
horse, is avenging his death. Among the dead and dying, 
with which the field is covered, is one lying prostrate on hia 
back in the fore-ground, with a spear broken in lus breast. 

9ft. 5 in. by left. 4tfi.— C. 

Engraved by G. A. Muller. 



8S3. The Obsequies of Decius. The dead soldier is ex- 
tended on a couch, on each side of which are several of his 
companions in arms ; among these, on the left, is a subaltern 
rudely holding a female by the skirt of her dress with one hand, 
and a captive by the hair of the head with the other; the 
former has an infant in her arms and another infant by her 
ode ; near these is a second soldier dragging forward a young 
woman by the hair of the head; three prisoners lie bound 
in front, and the rich spoils of victory, consisting of gold and 



BUBENS. 108 



Lichtenstein Cc/lection, 



▼aaes, &c., are distributed on the right. The head of the 
couch is decorated with trophies composed of arms, bannersi 
and the heads of enemies. 

9y». 3 in. by Ufi. 11 tn.— C. 

The set is worth 6000 gi. 

This splendid set of pictures does honour to the name of the au- 
thor ; and although it is evident diat the auxiliary hands of the artist's 
scholars have contributed largely to their completion, yet the creative 
mind of Rubens reigns throughout in the grandeur and simplicity 
of the compositions. The conception and designs are his alone ; 
the life and expression of the whole owe their existence to his 
master spirit* 

The original Sketch of the last picture is in the Munich Gallery ; 
and a finished Study for the captives, who lie bound in front, was 
exhibited in the British Gallery, in 1829, and is now in the col- 
lection of Sir Abraham Hume, Bart. 

12tn. by 20m. — ^P, 



834. A Head of St Paul. The face is seen in a front view, 
with black hair and beard. 

\ft. 8 in. by \ft. 4 tn.— P. 



885. A Female, seated on the ground, weeping over the 
bodies of simn warriors, two of whom lie prostrate near her ; 
implements of war are scattered about, and a battle of cavalry 
is seen in the distance. A spirited sketch. 

14 tn. by 19 tn.— P. Worth 60 ^i. 



886. An Allegorical Subject, representing a warrior extend- 
ing his arm towards a female, who stands in the centre with a 
cupid at her nde, bearing a comuco|na, and on whose right is 
Time bringing forward a female. In the lower part of the 
picture is seated a youth, with an eagle by his ride. A sketch. 

%ft. by \fi. 7 m.— .p. 



104 KUBENS. 



Lichtenstein CoUection, 



S37. Jupiter and other Deities. The Three Graces are on 
the right, and on the opposite side is Mercury clasping a 
goddess round the waist A sketch for a ceiling. 

2 A by I A Sin.— P. Worth 50^*. 



838. The Fall of Phaeton. A sketch. 

3A hy I ft. 9 m.— P. 
There is an etching by Panneels of this subject 



339. The Entombment Joseph of Arimatheaand St John 
bearing the body of the Saviour to the tomb, attended by the 
three Maries. A finished study. 

2 ft. 9 in. by 9ft. 1 m.— P- Wordi 70 gs. 



340. Portrait of a Gendeman about twenty-eight years of 
age, seen in a three-quarter view, with dark hair, a tuft of 
beard, and mustaches. His dress is composed of a black striped 
silk vest and hose, a dark cloak and a full white ruff; his right 
hand holds his bonnet, and the left his gloves ; dated 1615. A 
well-finished and powerful picture. 

4 ft: 4 in. by 3 ft. 2 in.— P. Worth 350 gs. 



341. Apollo, attended by numerous cupids, advancing from 
the east in his chariot drawn by fiery coursers; and Night 
retiring with her weary steeds within a veil of clouds. An 
unfinished study. 

I ft. 10 in. by Sft.^V. Worth 60^*. 



342. Anf Allegorical Subject The composition exhibits a 
youth {(probably intended for Augustus) whose brows are 
bound with laurel ; he is seated on the right, holding a wand 
in one hand and a cornucopia in the other ; and on the opposite 
side is Minerva, in a similar position, with her foot on a lion. 



BUBENS. 105 



GMery, 



A decorated oval is in the centre above them, encompassing aii) 
armed warrior, under whose feet are slain enemies ; two angels^ 
are above. An unfinished sketch, probably intended for a 
frontispiece to a book. 

2ft. by Ifi. 7 in.— P. Worth 60 gs. 



S48. Ajax offering Violence to Cassandra before the Altar .of 

Minerva. A very indifferent picture, and probably the work 

of a scholar. 

7 ft. 2 m. by 9 ft. 2 in.— C. 



The following Pictures are in the Sans Souci at 

POTSDAM. 

844. Susanna and the Elders. Susanna is represented with 
one 1^ over a high stool, and concealing her bosom with both 
hands; the elders are behind, removing her covering, and 
one of them is touching her back with his hand. This is 
a repetition, by a scholar, of the Munich picture. 

eft. 7 in. by eft. 11 in.— C. 

Engraved by P. Pontius. The same in reverse, with slight 
variations, is engraved by Querinus Marc. The subject is also 
engraved by Vosterman, Simon, and Jegher. 



S45. The Virgin with the Infant Saviour in her arms, 
encircled by a multitude of angels, two of whom are pladng a 
chaplet on her head. 

4ft. 9 in. by Sft. 6 in. — C. 

Engraved by Visscher. There is also a spirited etching of this, 
with some slight variations in the figures, anonymous. 

This is a duplicate of the one in the Louvre, painted by a scholar. 



S46. Abraham about to sacrifice his Son Isaac. The youth, 
with his hands bound behind him, is on his knees at the ade 



106 RUBENS. 



Potsdam Gallery. 



of the altar ; and his father stands by with a knife in his hand, 
which he is restrained from using by an angel holding his arm. 

7ft. 9 in. by 5y^.— C. 
Engraved by Stock. The same subject, differently composed, 
is engraved by Galle, and also by an anonymous engraver. 



347. The Adoration of the Magi. 

9 ft. 6 in. by 7^—0. 



84f8. Christ triumphant over Sin, Death, and the Grave. 

^ft. by ^ft. 6 in. — C. 
Engraved by Bolswert 

849. The Holy Family. The Virgin is seated, holding the 
infant Saviour erect in her lap; St John stands before her, 
and St Joseph is at her side. The divini^ of the infant is indi- 
cated by a dove hovering over his head; on the left of the Virgin 
is placed a cradle. 

5ft. 5 in. by Aft. 1 in.—?. 



S50. St Cecilia dng^ and playing on the harpsichord. The 
Saint is attended by four angels, two of whom stand at her 
ade, and the third is seated on the back of a sphynx. 

5ft. 7 in. by 4ft. 9 in. ; or 5 ft. 10 tn. by Aft. 6 in. — C. 

Engraved by Witdouc. The same subject, with only two angels, 
is engraved by Panneels ; and again by Lommelin. 

This picture was formerly in the collection of Prince Carignan, 
and was sold in that of the Due de Tallard, in 1 766, %0fi50fo. SOU. 



S51. St Barbara. The saint is standing in front of a prison, 
holding a branch of palm in her hand, and a sword lies at her 
feet ; two angels are descending, with a chaplet and a sprig of 
hly in their hands. 

6 ft. 6 in. by Sft. 10 in. 

Engraved by Bolswert, omitting the angels. 



BUBBNS. 107 



Poisdam Gailery. 



S5S. The Exaltatim <x Ascensicm of the Virgin. The 
Vir^D, with the infaat Saviour in her arms, is ascending upon* 
a doud ; and a company of saints are in adoration beneath. 

Bft. 5 in. hj 5 ft. 10 m.- 



853. The Elevation of the Brazen Serpent in the Wilderness. 

Bft. 9 in. by 7/^.-0. 

This is a duplicate (chiefly by a scholar of Rubens) of the* 
magnificent picture in the collection of J. B. Owen, Esq., and 
described in this Work. 



354. An allegorical subject, allusive to the Government of 
Marie de Medicis. 

5ft. 1 in. by Qft. 8 tn C. 



355. Flora, Ceres, and Pomona, holding a cornucopia erect 

full of fruit; the nearest of them is seen in a profile view, 

seated in front, giving a monkey some fruit ; a parrot is perched 

on the top of the cornucopia, and another parrot is flying 

towards it. 

7ft. by ^ft. 5 m C. 

Engraved by Van Kessel. 



856. The Bhrth of Venus. The goddess, buoyant upon the 
waves, is arranging her beautiful hair, while the Nereides 
and Tritons attend upon her with pearls and other gems of the 
ocean ; the Loves sport in air around her ; and near the side, a 
little retired from the front, are Neptune and Amphitrite 
observing her. 

%ft. 10 in. by 9ft. 8 tVi.— €• 

Engraved by Soutman. The same subject, with three cupids 
bearing festoons of shells, is engraved by P* de Jode. Schmuzer 
has also engraved a print of a similar composition, from a picture 
then in the possesion of the Count of Schoenbom. 



108 RUBENS. 



Potsdam GaUery. 



857. Christ rai^ng Lazarus from the dead. The composition 

of this splendid production consbts of seventeen figures ; in 

the centre stands the Saviour, with extended arms, apparently 

addressing the reausdtated man, who is quitting the tomb, 

assisted by a female and a man, who are removing the grave- 

clothes from him. 

%ft. 6 m. by 6^^. 6 in. — C. 

Engraved by Bolswert. This picture was exhibited in the Louvre 

in 1814, and restored in 1815. 



858. The Apotheods of Psyche. 

^ft, 4 in. by 5ft. 7 m.— C. 



859- The Assumption of the Virgin. A sketch. 

2ft. 5 in. by Ijl. 10 tn.— P. 



860. Perseus and Andromeda. 

5 ft. 11 in. by 4ft. 11 in.— P. 
There is a print of this subject, in which the hero has dismounted 
from Pegasus, and is taking Andromeda by the hand to release her, 
engraved by Tardieu. ^_^^_^ 

861. Hercules strangling the Nemaean Lion. The hero has 
seized the animal by the head, and is compressing it with both 
arms round the neck ; the gasping beast in his struggles has 
fixed his talons in the arm and leg of Hercules. A dead tiger 
lies extended on the ground in the front. 

Engraved by F. F. Freidhof in 1801, from a picture in the 
collection of the King of Prussia. 

A Drawing in red chalk, a study for the preceding, was sold in 
the collection of M. Mariette, in 1775, for dO/«. 



86S. The Virgin, seated on a throne, with the infant Saviour 

in her arms; before whom a great number of saints are 

assembled. 

$ft..lin.hj2ft.~T. 

This is a masterly Sketch for an altar-piece. 



RUBENS. 109 



Potsdam Gallery. 



S6S. The Marriage of St. Catherine. 

7 ft. 1 in. by 8^^. 3 1«.— C. 



864. Portraits of a Lady and Gentleman ; the former is 
seated on the left, with a large dog by her ade, resting its head 
upon her knee. 

4 ft. 4 in. by $ft. S in.— C. 



865. The Holy- Family. The Virgin is seated, hdding the 
infant Saviour in her lap, while the child bends forward to 
embrace St. John ; St. Joseph is a little retired from the group, 
leaning on both arms, observing them. 

5 ft. $ in. by 4 ft. 9 w.— P. 



866. The infant Saviour and St John playing with a Lamb, 
in a landscape; the former has his hand on. the head of the 
lamb, and the laii& is embracing its neck. 

3ft. 7 in. by 5^^.-0. 

Engraved by Galle ; and on wood by J^her. 



867. Romulus and Remus, suckled by a wolf. A sketch. 

2ft. 3 in. by 3 ft. 1 tn P. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

Formerly in the collection of M. Pasquier, at Rouen. 



868. Four Infants playing with a Lamb, in a landscape. 

4ft. 4 in. by 4 ft. 2 in.— -P. 
A duplicate of the picture in the Vienna Gallery. — See p. 26. 



869* A Portrait of a Youth, dressed in the Spanish costume. 

2 ft. 8 in. by 2ft.^F. 



870. A Portrait of a young Lady. 

2 ft. 8 in. by 2 ft.— P. 



110 BUBENS. 



Potsdam GaUery. 

871. A Choir of Angels. 

^ft. 3 III. by %fL 8 in.— P. 
This beautiful production was formerly in the collection of M. 
Lormier of the Hague. 

872. A young Man and Woman sitUng together, in a land- 
scape. 

itJU 6 in. by 3^^. 8 in. — P. 



873. Two Children playing with % Lamb. A sketdi. 

\ft. 6 in. by ly^ 11 in.— P. 



874. Charity. A beautiful woman crouching down to suc- 
kle three infants. 

^ft. 3 in. by lyi. 8 in. — Cop. 

Engraved by Galle and Surugue, 



875. Orpheus and Eurydice. A sketch. 

\ft. 10 in. by %ft. 6 in.— P. 
This subject in engraved by Dickenson and Desplaces. 
Formerly in the collection of M. Pasquier, at Rouen. 

876. Melchizedeck, King of Salem, supplying Abraham with 
Bread and Wine. The kingly priest, habited in full robes and 
wearing a cope over his head, encompassed by a wreath, is 
receiving Abraham with open arms ; the latter, clad in armour 
and a helmet on his head, stands erect before him, holding a 
8ta£P in one hand and the bther hand placed on his breast ; on 
his left are three soldiers taking bread from the hands of 
attendants; and behind him is a youth holding his horse; only 
parts of these are seen. A man with a basket full of bread on 
bis back, and another bending down with a vase of water, are 
close to Melchizedeck. The back-ground is composed of a 
stone building with an arch-way. 

Engraved by Witdouc This subject is also engraved by Neefs. 
Now in the gallery at Hesse-Cassel. 



BUBEN8. Ill 

877. The Martyrdoin of St. Peter. The wot is fastened 
to a cross with his head downwards, and one of the execu- 
tioners is on the left nde, bending on one knee, exerting himself 
to fix the cross in the ground ; another, on the opposite side, 
holds one of the martyr's hands, and three other men are 
engaged in tying and nailing the saint's feet ; an angel is seen 
descending with a palm and a wreath. 

12 ft. by Sft. 6 in.— (about.) 

There is a very indifferent print of diis by Ernst Thelott. 

This capital altar-piece is painted with unusual care and studious 
attention. The body of the saint is admirably drawn and coloured, 
and may be cited as a model of excellence. The whole possesses a 
breadth and power of expression which entitle it to the admiration 
of every connoisseur. Michel, in his Life of RubefUy says, that this 
picture was painted on commission, for an inhabitant of the city of 
Cologne, and that it was bespoke by M. Geldorp, in 1636, a 
painter, at that time residing in London. To this order it appears 
that little attention was paid, and the year following the artist 
received a letter from the agent, requesting to know if the picture 
was finished; and to this application Rubens replied by letter in 
the following terms : — 

" Sir, — ^I cannot conceive by what accident an altar-piece is 
required at London ; if it is for Cologne, why have you not sent 
me the measure, without which I cannot commence ? And when I 
am in possession of this, let me have the honour of repeating, that 
the stipulated time for its completion must be extended to eighteen 
months, in order that I may be able to do justice to the person for 
whom it is destined." AfVer some observations upon the suitability 
of the subject, the arrangement of the composition, &c. &c., he 
goes on to say, " I have a particular affection for the city of 
Cologne, it being the place of my birth and residence until my tenth 
year, and I have often wished to revisit it ; but I fear that, what 
with the difficulty of travelling and my constant engagements, there 
is litde hope of my being able to fulfil this inclination." 

This letter is signed, and dated July 25, 1637. 

A second letter, dated April, 1638, addressed to the same 
person, commences by saying, — " I have just learnt from M. Limens 
(the gentleman for whom the picture was ordered) that you wish 



112 RUBEXS. 

to be informed in what state of progress the picture is in which I 
hsve in hand' for your friend at Cologne ; to which I have the 
honour to reply, that it is already considerably advanced, and I 
hope to make it one of the best pictures that ever came from my 
hands, of which intention you may freely assure your friend. But 
I must not be pressed to finish it ; and I request you to leave its 
completion to my discretion and convenience, that it may be done 
with due taste and care ; for although I am inundated with orders, 
yet this subject pleases and invites my attention more than any 
othc^r I have in hand." 

By whatever accident it occurred, this picture remained in the 
artist's possession until his decease, in 1640, when it was valued at 
1200 Jlo. (108/.), and purchased by a gentleman of the name of 
Jabach, of Cologne, who is said to have presented it to the church 
of St. Peter, in that city *• Report, however, gives the painter 
'the honour of having presented it to the church in which he was 
baptized; but the preceding statements completely nullify this 
account. 

Travellers should be informed, that this picture is not visible to 
the public but upon extraordinary occasions, the guardians of the 
church's property having caused a copy to be attached to the back 
of the original, which turns on a pivot. The object of this is, to 
obtain a trifling fee for the sight of it. 

The preceding picture was exhibited in the Louvre in 1814, and 
restored to the church at Cologne in 1815. 



878. Venus endeavouring to detain Adonis from the Chase, 

and Cupid seconding her endeavours by holding the spear of 

the huntsman and embracing his thigh ; the car of the goddess, 

and her milk-white swans in playful action are behind her. 

Three sporting dogs on the oppo»te side complete the com- 

pouUon. 

fi/t. 6 in. hjlft.9 in.— P. Worth 550 gs. 

Engraved by Tassaert, and also in the Musee Fran9ais. 

Taken from the Louvre in 1815, and restored to the Hague 

Gallery. 

* This opinion is in some measure confirmed by an inscription on the altar, 
which states that it (the altar) was erected and endowed by M. Jabach. 



JIUBENS. lis 

ST9. Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. 

tft. 6 m. by Sft.—V. 

This and the preceding are beautiful examples of exquisite 
finishing, with brilliancy and purity of colour truly enchanting. 
The landscapes are by the hand of Breughel, who in this picture 
appears to have exerted his best talents to exhibit in the most 
splendid and glowing colours the riches of the garden of Eden, by 
the almost infinite variety of animal and vegetable productions ; 
yet, notwithstanding such an accumulation of objects, the figures 
by Rubens stand forth pre-eminent. 

This matchless production of the two masters was sold in the col- 
lection of Madam Backer, at Leyden, 1766, for 7S50jh. 661/. 

Now worth litOO gs. 
Now in the Hague Gallery. 



880. Portrait of Elizabeth Brant, first wife of Rubens. 

Sjt. by 2jt. 4 •»•— P. ( about.) 
Now in the Hague Gallery. 



881. Portrait of Helena Forman, the artistes second wife. 

Zft. by %ft. 4 in.— P. (about.) 
Now in the Hague Gallery. 



88S. Roman Charity. The venerable prisoner, whom age 
and abstinence have rendered feeble, is represented crouching 
down with his legs under him and his hands chained behind his 
back ; his affectionate daughter (who is seated on the ground) 
ia endeavouring to sustain his life by nourishment from her 
own breasts, and whilst engaged in the pious act looks round 
with watchful anxiety. 

4y>. 8 J III. by bft. 9 m.— C. 

Engraved by A. Voet. 

CoUecUon of M. Stiers d' Aertselaer Un . SSOOjlo. 477L 

Now in the Hague GaDery. 



888. A Portrait of R. P. Michael Ophovius, a Dominican 
Monk, habited in the costume of his Order. The face, which is 
that of a robust man, is seen in a front view, and the action of 

VOL. II. I 



114 BUBEN8. 

the hands indicates that he is speaking to some one. This 
priest was the friend and confessor of Rubens, through whose 
interest he was promoted to the bishoprick of Bois-le-Duc. This 
excellent production in portraiture is distinguished for its 
powerful effect and energetic expression. 

9 ft. 6 in. by ft ft. 7 tn.^C. 

Engraved by Vanden Bergh. There is also a bust portrait of this 
person engraved, oval, anonymous. 

Collection of M. de Vinckde Wesel; Antwerp, 1814, SSOOflo. d42/. 
— — • M. Stiers d'Aertselaer, Antwerp, lSfi2, ^G50jh. 410/. 

Now in the Hague Gallery. 



864. Christ bearing his Cross to Mount Calvary. 
2 ft. 2 in. by I ft. 6 tn.— P. (about.) 

An excellent Sketch for the altar picture formerly in the abbey- 
church of Affleghem and now in the Musee at Brussels. — See 
p. 56. 

Now in the Musee at Amsterdam. 



885. The Annundation. 

Now in the Music at Amsterdam. 



The following Pictures are ill the 

LOUVRE. 

886. Elijah fed by an Angel in the Desert The prophet, 
dad in a vesture of the skin of animals and a large mantle Wrapt 
loosely round him^ stands before the angel, ftom whom he ia 
taking a loaf of bread and a cup of drink. The figures are of 
a colossal size. Fainted by Rubens and scholars, for the oon^ 
vent of Loeches, near Madrid. 

Uft. ein. by lift. Sin.— C. (ahoui.J 

Engraved by Lauwers, and etched by Panneels. 

Valued by the Experts du Mus^e, in 1816, at 30,000/«. 1200/. 



887. The Triumph of the Christian Law; allegorically rejpte^ 
Aented h^ A iimiale stan^Dg in a splendid car, holding up a^ 



BUBENt. 115 



Ijouvrt. 



cbalice in her hand, with an angd at her side supporting a cross; 
near them is placed a globe, and many other figures. — Fat 
description see series in the convent of LoecheSj p. 139- 

Uft. 9 in. by 18^^. 3tfi.— G. 

£iignived by N. Lauwers. 

Valued by the Experts du Musie, in 1816, at 160,000/«. 6400/. 



S88. The Adoration of the Magi ; a composidon of eleven 
figures. Painted in the artistes early manner. 

8^^. 6 in. by 5 ft. 8 m.— C. 
Engraved by Bolswert and Panneels. — For description see p, 49. 
Valued by the Experts du Mus6e, in 1816, at 150,000/«. 6000/. 
A duplicate of the preceding is in the Marlborough Collection* 



889. The Flight into Egypt by Night The Vh-gin» cbthed 
in a scarlet vest and a greenish mantle, is mounted on an ass, 
and holds the infant Saviour in her arms; they are attended 
by two angels, one of whom leads the beast, and the other is 
flying over them with a torch ; St. Joseph, in a yellow mantle^ 
follows them. The view exhibits a woody landscape, with a 
large stream of water on the left, in which the moon is brightly 
reflected; and at some distance in the opposite side are seen 
some figures round a fire, but the light of both these objects is 
eclipsed by the radiance from the divine InfiEint 

ft ft. 4 in, by Sft, 4 in. — C. 

Valued by the Experts du Mus^e, in 1816, at . IftfiOOfo. 480/. 

A picture of a very similar composition to the preceding was 
exhibited in the Louvre in 1814, and claimed and restored in 1815. 



S90. The Virgin, with the infant Saviour in her arms, 

Burrounded by a wreath of flowers. The latter are the work 

of Breughel. 

15 m. by 12 w. — P. 

Valued by the Experts du Mus^e, in 1816, at . 9000/t. 1201. 



116 RUBENS. 



Louvre, 



891. The Yir^ with the infant Saviour in her arms, borne 
upon clouds, and surrounded by numerous naked infants. 

A>ft. 1 in. hy SJl. 2 in.— P. 

Engraved by Visscher. 

Pictures representing the same subject occur in pages 69 and 105. 

Valued by the Experts du Musie, in 1816, at 75000/5. 3000/. 

A duplicate of the preceding, of larger dimensions, done by one 
of the artist's scholars, occurs in the gallery at Potsdam. 



892. The Tribute-Money. This is chiefly the work of a 
scholar. 

Valued by the Experts du Mus6e, in 1816, at 50,000 /«• 2000/. 
The original Picture is described in a subsequent page of the Work. 



898. Christ on the Cross. The Saviour has yielded up the 

ghost, and the multitude have departed; the Virgin, with St. 

John and the Magdalen, alone remun. The first, suffering 

intense grief, stands on the right, her hands clasped and her 

countenance directed towards the Saviour. On the opposite 

side stands St. John, clad in an ample scarlet vest, also looking 

at his crudfied Lord ; and at the foot of the cross is Mary 

Magdalen, embracing his feet. Fainted chiefly by the ardst^s 

scholars. 

liyi. Sin. by 8^^. 8m.— C. 

Valued by the Experts du Mus6e, in 1816. • 8000/r. S201. 



894». Queen Thomyris commanding the Head of Cyrus to be 
immersed in Blood. The queen, richly attired in a light satin 
robe, embroidered in gold, and a mantle lined with ermine, is 
seated on a throne on the right, with the royal sceptre in her 
hand. On her left stand two female attendants, one of whom is 
dressed in a satin vest of lemon colour and a light blue scarf; 
behmd them is an elderly female ; their attention is directed to 
the executioner, who is on the opposite side, holding the head 
of Cyrus over a brazen vase filled with blood. Close to the 



BUBENS. 117 



Louvre. 



fiont is a thin man, standing with his hands behind his back, 
observing the ceremony; he has on a fur cap, and wears a 
crimson robe. A yenerable minister of state is on the right of 
the queen, and two soldiers are behind him. Painted in the 
artistes firee and florid manner. 

Sjt. 1 in. by ^ft. 1 tn.— C. 
Valued by the Experts du Mus^e, in 1816, at 100,000/«. 4000/. 



895. Diogenes, surrounded by a crowd of people, searching 

with a lantern in his hand, by daylight, for an honest man. 

Two children are close by his side mocking at his folly. Done 

in the school of Rubens, and possibly touched upon by his 

hand. 

Qft. 1 tn. by 1ft. 8 in.— C. 

Valued by the Experts du Mus^e, in 1816, at 70,000 /«. 2800/. 

A duplicate of the preceding is in the Munich Gallery. — See p. 60. 



896. A Tournament of six armed Knights, near the walls of 
a fortified town ; they are attended by a herald and two pages. 
The landscape is beautifully illumined by the rays of the setting 
sun. This is a masterly-finished sketch, of extraordinary beauty. 

%ft. 3 tn. by 9 ft. 8 m. — P. 

Valued by the Experts du Musee, in 1816, at 20,000/«. 800/. 



897. A Landscape, represented under a singular efiect of the 
sun upon a fog, which is seen rolling in volumes over the banks 
of a stream. The view presents on the right a cluster of trees 
rising from a rugged bank, from one of these trees a net is ex- 
tended across an opening, and attached to another tree nearer 
the front ; the owner of the net sits on the bank, watching the 
approach of some birds ; and two ladies and a gentleman are 
reposing on the ground in front, observing him. In the centre 
of the fore-ground are two men sawing a piece of timber ; and 
upon an emmence in the middle-distance is a windmill. 

\ft. 5 in. by Zft, 7 tn.— C. 



118 BUBENS. 



Louvre. 



Eogriiyed by Bolt wert ; and in the Muaie Fran^aia, by Dupare. 
Valued by the Experts du Mii8<e» in 1816, at . 8000/«. 9£0L 



898. A Village Wedding, or Festival. The scene is an open 
landscape, with a country inn on the right, before which are 
numerous groups of peasantry covering the whole of the fore- 
ground ; many of them are dancing in couples, to the music of 
a bagpipe and fiddle ; others are drinking and carousing, or 
seated on the ground embracing. A large group, chiefly com- 
posed of mothers suckling their infants, is near the front ; and 
close to the right nde are two females, one of whom a peasant 
is inviting to dance ; the other, standing with her hands crossed 
in front, represents a portrait of Helena Forman. The whole 
company consists of about eighty persons, exhibiting a scene of 
festive jollity and rapturous mirth. It is, perhaps, imposdble 
to cite an example possessing greater freedom and energy of 
execution, briUiancy and vigour of colour, or force of expres- 
sion, than is found in this picture. 

4y]f. 11 w. by IJi. U in P. 

Engraved by Fessard ; and in the Mua^e Fran^ais, by Dugreel. 

Valued by the Experts du Musee, in 1816, at 100,000/r. 4000/. 

A sheet of paper, containing on both sides near thirty studies for 
groups in the preceding picture, done in outline with a masterly 
free pen, is in the collection of Sir Thomas Lawrence, P.R.A. 



899* Portraits of Helena Formau and her two Children. 
The lady, who is apparently about twenty-two years of age, is 
attired in a light dress, and wears a large straw hat decked with 
feathers ; her face, which is turned above three-quarters from 
the spectator, is suffused with a tender shadow from the pro- 
jection c^ the hat; the youngest child is seated on her lap, 
and the other stands by bar side, holding something in its 

pinbefore. 

3yi. 5 in. by tft. 6 in.— -P. 



mUBSNS. 119 



Louvre* 



(IngraTed m the Mus^e Fran^us, .and by M. Cosway; io Iha 

latter, one of the children is omitted. 

Of the numerous pictures by the master in this gallery, this, 

although little more than a finished study, possesses so much truth 

of niiture and sweetness of expression, that it is by far the most 

attractive and engaging. 

CollectionofM.de la LiyedeJully, 1769 . 20,000/«. 800/. 

Randon de Boisset . 1777 . 18,000/«. 7%0L 

Count de Vaudreuil . 1784 . 20,000/*. 800 1 

Valued by the ^zperU du Mus6e, in 1816 . S5,000/r. 1400/. 



400. A Landscape, representing a hilly country intersected 
by a river, with buildings on its banks, adjoining which is a 
stone bridge ; a second bridge, formed of planks, crosses the 
river near the front ; in the fore-ground are a flock of sheep, 
and several figures ; the latter consist of a shepherd seated at 
the foot of a tree on the right, who appears to have just ceased 
playing his pipe, and is looking earnestly at a beautifiil rain- 
bow, which crosses the heavens in the opposite ride; near him 
stands a peasant directing the attention of a female to a happy 
couple who are reclining on the ground together. 

$ft. 9 in. by 5 ft. 3 in.— P. 

Engraved by Bolswert, with the omission of some of the sheep, 
and other slight variations ; and also in the Mus^e Fran^ais. 

Valued by the Experts duMus6e, in 1816, at 10,000/*., 400/.; 
but worth 800^*. 



401. A Portrait of a Lady, said to be of the family of 
Boonen, but would probably be taken for that of the artistes first 
wife. She appears to be about twenty-;sii( years of age, and b 
seen in a threerquarter view ; her dark brown hair is adorned 
with a crown of jewels, and her dress composed of Uaok rilk, 
the bodice of which is bnuded with gold lace and flowers ; a 
gold chain is round the neck, and a triple chaiA of thQ sam^ 
metal, of an antique farm^ set with jewels, is suspended iq front 



ISO RUBENS. 



Louvre, 



and held by the right hand. A brilliantly-coloured and highly- 
wrought picture. 

\fi. llift. by lyiJ. 5 m P. 

Collection of Baroness de Boonen, at Brussels, 1 776, 2025 Jh. 1 82/. 
Sold in the collection of the Due de Praslin, 1793, 7750 fo. SIOL 
Valued by the Experts du Mus^e • . 1816, 10,000/r. 400/. 



408. A Portrait of the President Richardot — See Vandyke. 



403. The Flight of Lot and bis Daughters. Lot, haUted 
in a light crimson mantle, is advancing under the guidance of 
an angel, followed by his reluctant wife, who is dressed in a 
bluish robe, and behind whom is an angel ur^ng her on; 
these are followed by the daughters ; one of them, dressed in a 
scarlet gown, is leading an ass, laden with household utensils 
and vessels of gold and nlver ; the other carries a basket of 
valuable objects on her head. The party has just quitted the 
gate of the devoted city, towards which die demons of destruc- 
tion are hastening through the idr. 

The superior excellence of this beautiful production is strongly 
confirmed by the artist himself, who has signed and dated it P£. PA. 
RVBENS, 1625, a mark of distinction which the writer has observed 
but thrice on his pictures, and but very few are marked even with 
his initials. 

2/t. 4J in. by 3 ft. 9 J m.— P. 

Valued by the Experts du Mus^e, in 1816, at 60,000/;. 2400/. 

The same subject, differently composed, is engraved by Lucas 
Vosterman; dated 1620. — See Marlborough Collection, 

The following twenty-one pictures, forming a series iUustrative 
of the principal events of the life of Marie de Medicis, were 
painted by her express order in the year 16S0, for the purpose 
of decorating the Luxembourg Palace,and were completed at 
Antwerp, in the short space of two years ; to accomplish which 
arduous task, Bubens necessarily had recourse to the asastance 
of his skilful pupils. In these magnificent productions the* 



BUBENS. 121 



Laavre. 



amsty freely indulging in the poet'^s and painter*s licence, has 
richly embellished each subject with allegorical figures and 
fiibulous deities, enhandng the luxuriance of his creative powers 
in composition with the lustre of his resplendent colouring. — 
They now adorn the Louvre. % 

404. The Destiny of Marie de Medids. The Fates, personi- 
fied by du'ee beauuful females, represented spinning the thread 
which involves the destiny of the queen, under the auspices of 
Juno, who, leaning affectionately upon Jupiter, is supplicating 
his benign interference. 

\%fi. 9 in. by hft. % in.— C. 
Engraved by Chastillon. 

405. The Birth of the Queen. Lucina is committing the 
infant princess to the care of the city of Florence ; the last is 
personified by a female with a castle on her head ; three genii 
bearing the emblems of felicity and honours fly over her head, 
and a river deity is recumbent on the fore-ground. 

\%fi. 9fn. by 1 fi. 9 tn.— C. 
Engraved by Dachange. 

406. The Education of the Queen. Minerva is instructing 
the young princess in the arts and sdences, asristed by Apollo, 
Mercury, and the Three Graces. 

\%fi. 9m. by IJt. 9in.— C. 
Engraved by A. Loir. 

407. Henry IV. deliberating upon his Marriage. The king 
is represented viewing with admiration the portrut of the 
princess Marie de Medids, which is held before him by Hymen, 
and, under the influence of Minerva and Love, makes choice of 
her for his consort ; Jupiter and Juno look down with appro- 
bauon on his election. 

12yi. 9.by ryi. 9 m.- 
Engraved by J. Audran. 



1S2 KUB£MS. 



Louvre. 



408. The Marriage of the Queen. The princess, splendidly 
attired, is recaving the token of her union from the hands of 
the Grand Duke Ferdinand of Tuscany, proxy for Henry IV. ; 
die august ceremony is performed by the Cardinal Aldobrandini, 
in the church of Santa Maria del Fiore. The grand duchess 
apd the principal ladies of the court attend the queen, and the 
Marquis de Sillery aqd other gentlemen are in the opposite side^ 

Uft. 9 in. by IJt. 9tn.— C. 
Engraved by Trouvain. 

409. The Debarkation. The queen, attended by her suite, 
is quitting her magnificent yacht to land at the city of Marseilles, 
and the supposed tutelar deities of the city await her approach 
with open arms, Fame, with a double trumpet, b proclaiming 
her arrival ; and the Nereides and Tritons sporting around the 
yessel indicate the favour pf the marine deities, who have beeu 
propitious to the voyage. 

uyj. 9tii.by7yi. 9 m,— C. 
Engraved by Duchange. 

410. The Marriage of Henry IV. with Marie de Medids, 
consummated at Lyons, Decemb^ 9, 1600. The city pf Lyons 
is personified by a female with a tower on her head, seated in 
a car drawn by two lions, conducted by two cupids, bearing 
lighted torches; her attention is directed upwards, where the 
newly-married couple appear under the forms of Jujater and 
Juno ; tlie former, seated on an eagle, with a thunderbolt in 
his hand, is receiving the homage of the queen ; Hymen and 
the Loves preside at the interview. 

\%ft. 9 m. by 7 ft. 9ifi. 
Engraved by Duchange. 

411. The Birth of Louis XIII. The queen, r^uiyibent 
on a couch, is looking affectionately at the new-born infant, 
whom Justice is placing in the arms of Health, personified by 



BUBEN8. ISS 



Louvre, 



a young man with a serpent ; on the other nde of the queen 
b the n jmpb Fruitf uhiess, presenting her a coniuco|na, in which 
am seen five other infants, the destined future offspring of the 
aoarriage. Phcebus commencing his course indicates the time 
af the birth of the prince. 

1 «yi. 9 •». by Ifi. 9 in.— C. 

EngvaTed by Audran* 

A Study for the portrait of the Queen in the preceding picture is 
in the collection of the Duke of Buccleugh. 

%Ji. % in. by ly*. 10 in.—C. (ahoui.) 



41S. The Prelude to the Departure of the King for the War 
in Germany. The king is represented placing in the hands of 
the queen a ball (the symbol of government), in the presence 
of the dauphin, who stands between them. The king is 
attended by several anqed soldiers; and two females (Prudence 
and Generodty) stand behind the queen, 

\%ft. 9 i«. by 7ft. 9 tn.— C. 

Engraved by J- Audran* 

418. The Coronation of the Queen. This august and 
splendid ceremony is represented in the church of St Denis. 
The queen, habited in royal robes, and accompanied by the 
dauphin on her left and the princess on her right, is kneeling 
before the altar, receiving the crown on her head from the 
hands of the Cardinal Joyeiise, who is as^sted by the Cardinals 
Gonde aqd Sourdis, and several bishops; behind the queen 
are the Due de Yendome, bearing the royal sceptre, the che- 
valier, his brother, with the hand of justice. Queen Margaret, 
and the princesses of the court, all of whom are magnificently 
atured, the ladies wearing crowns on their heads. The king 
ii observing the ceremony from a little window above, and 
numerous persons of distinction are present 

It ft, 10 ta. by %%ft.^'r-C. 

Sagraved by Doohange. 



124 BUBENS. 



Louvre. 



414. The Apotheoos of Henry IV. Time is represented, 
bearing the king up to Heaven, where he is received by 
Jupiter, to be placed among the gods ; two females, emblems, 
of Victory and Peace (the latter seated on armour and weapons 
of war), are bewailing the decease of the monarch. On the 
opposite side of the picture is the queen, habited in mourning, 
seated on a throne, weeping for her recent loss ; Minerva and 
Prudence stand by her nde, and two emblematic figures are 
presenting to her a ball and a prow, the symbols of govern- 
ment ; at the foot of the throne are several senators, the 
representatives of the French nation, kneeling to offer their 
condolence and allegiance. 

12/^by21/f. bin C. 

Engraved by Duchange. 



416. The Government of the Queen. In this compontion 

the artist has treated the subject wholly allegorically, and it 

requires a considerable stretch of imaginaUon to make the 

intended application. The picture represents Oljrmpus, with 

an assembly of the gods ; France, under the symbol of a globe, 

lies at the feet of Juno, her protector, who has risen from her 

throne to place a couple of doves on its surface, committing 

them to the care of Love, who stands by its side, playing with 

two other doves ; the surrounding deities behold the beneficent 

intentions of Juno with approbation. Apollo and Minerva are 

in front, actively engaged driving away the fiends of Discord, 

Envy, Fraud, and Malice; and Venus is restraining Mars 

fix>m interfering. 

\^fi. by 22yi.— C. 

Engraved by Picart. 

416. The Journey of the Queen to the Bridge of C^. The 
queen, splendidly attired, and wearing a helmet surmounted 
by a plume of feathers, personatmg the goddess Bellona, 
mounted on a beautiful white horse, is on her journey to C^, 



BUBENS. 1S5 



Louvre. 



accompanied by Fame and Victory , who are flying over her 
heady and followed by Strength, personified by a female with 
her hand on the head of a lion. 

\%fi. 1 in. by 9^^- 4m.— C. 
Engraved by Simonneau. 



417. The Exchange of the two Queens. The event is 
supposed to occur on a bridge of boats, across the river 
Andaye, being the boundaries of the two kingdoms. The 
young queens, splendidly attired, stand together, with thdr 
hands united. Isabella de Bourbon is received by the repre- 
sentatives of Spain, and Anne of Austria by those of France ; 
cupids and genii shed wealth and honours on their heads, 
and the Nereides and Tritons present the riches of the ocean. 

\%fi. 1 in. by ^fi. 4 m.— C. 

Engraved by B. Audran. 



418. The Happiness and Prosperity of the Regency. 

Represented by the queen elevated on a throne, holding the 

sceptre and the balance of Justice in her hands, and, under the 

influence of Wisdom and Love, governing the nation. On the 

right of the throne are two females, personifying Abundance 

and Liberality, dispensing the bounUes of the queen to the 

rising generation, indicated by four infants, emblems of the Arts 

and Sciences. On the right is Time introducing France to the 

fruition of the golden age. Ignorance, Envy, and Slander, lie 

bound in front. 

\%fi. 1 m. by %fi. 4 m.— C. 

Engraved by Picart. 

419. The Majority of Louis XIII. Figured by a splendid 
vessel (an emblem of the nation), with the young king standing 
at the helm, and the queen by his side, committing her dele- 
gated power into his hands and aiding him with her counsel ; 
the rowers consist of four females, personifjring Strength, Re- 



126 BtTB£K6. 



Louvre, 



ligion, Jastice^ and Truth; and other emblematical figutes 
manage the sails. 

12/1. 1 in. by 9 ft. 4fii.— C. 
Engraved by A. Trouvain. 



4S0. The Flight of the Queen to the dty of Blms. The 
queen, having descended from a window of her ch&teau in the 
middle of the night, is accompanied in her flight by Minerva, 
and attended by the Due d'Epemon and a few armed men. 

\%ft. 1 in. by 9ft. 4iii.— C. 

Engraved hy Vermeulen. 

421. The Queen deciding in favour of Peace. The queen, 
counselled by Cardinal RocheJEEiucaut, accepts the olive brandi 
of peace presented by Mercury, contrary to the advice of 
Cardinal Valette, who stands by her side, advising her to refuse 
it, while Prudence on her right is admonishing her to be 
guarded against bad counsel. 

l%ft. 1 in. by Oft. 4 tik— C. 
Engraved by Nattier* 

422. Peace concluded. The queen, having consented to 
accept the proposals of the king, is represented entering the 
temple of Peace, under the guidance of Mercury and the im- 
pulse of Innocence. Peace is personified by a female, who 
stands in front with a flaming torch in her hand, setting fire 
to some implements of war which lie on the ground ; behind 
the figure of Peace are the harjnes of Contention and other vices. 

It ft. Itn. hy 9ft. 4 m.— €• 
Engraved by Picart. 

488. Peace ratified in Heaven. In the oompoittioii of th» 
allegory the painter has placed the king and queen in dottdii 
in the supposed presence of the Deity, indicadDg thereby the 
uprightness and siocmty of their intentiDns attd xvoonoUsiioo ; 



RUBBN8. 127 



Louvre. 



Hope and Charity appear in theclouds^ and Courage or Power, 
perBonified by a female armed with a thunderbolt, is driving 
down the hydra of Rebellion. 

It ft. 1 in. by 9fi. 4 tii.--C. 
Engraved by Duchange. 

484. Time disclosmg Truth. In this picture the artist has 
intended to represent, that the misunderstanding which had 
occurred between the king and queen arose from the vices of 
Slander, Envy, and Malice, whidi Time had disclosed, and the 
venerable monarch is seen bearing up Truth in his arras, and 
exhibiting her naked to the world ; above these are the queen 
and her son, holding between them the wreath of Peace, endr^ 
ding the symbols of Unity and Love. 

\Stfi. lm.by 4y^. lit*. 

Engraved by A. Loir. 



405. A whole-length Portrait of Marie de Medicis in the 
dress and chluacler of Bellona, holding a sceptre in one hand 
and the genius of France iik the other; two ctt]»ds suspend • 
chaplet over her head. 

I ft. 7 in. by 9 ft. 6 m.— C. 

Engraved by Mass^. 

Valued by the Experts du Mus^e, in 1816, • 10,000/«. 400/. 

A beautiful Sketch, the original study for the preceding portnut, 
is ia the collection of Sir Abraham Hume, Bart. 

ISm. by 10 m. — P. 



496. A whole-length Portrait of Frands de Medids, Grand 
Duke of Tuscany, represented in a front view^ wearing i 
mantle lined with ermine over a black silk dress, a double row 
of jewels is suspended round the neck, to which is attached a 
cross, the right hand holds a walking stick. 

7yif. 7«i. byS^6ti 

Engraved by Edelinck. 



128 RUBENS. 



Louvre. 



427. A whole-length Portrait of Jean of Austria, Grand 
Duchess of Tuscany, daughter of the emperor Ferdinand and 
mother of Marie de Medicis. She is magnificently apparelled 
in silk, richly embroidered with gold and jewels. 

7A 7 m. by 3/f. 6i«.— C. 

Engraved by Edelinck. 

The preceding suite of twenty-three pictures were valued by the 
Experts du Musee» in 1816, . . . . 5,190»000/r. 207,600/. 

This valuation is, of course, merely imaginary. 



428. A Portrait of Elizabeth de Bourbon, daughter of 
Henry IV. of France, and consort of Philip lY. of Spain ; 
her countenance, denoting twenty-six years of age, is seen in a 
three-quarter view ; fair complexion, with light hair, decked 
with a crown of pearls ; she is dressed in blue satin, embroidered 
with gold ornaments, ribbon sleeves, and a triple white ruff with 
serated edges ; a massive chain, composed of pearls and other 
jewels, is suspended in front, and a bow is attached with a brooch 
of diamonds and pearls on her bosom. She is represented 
sitting in an arm chair, covered with crimson velvet, holding a 
bunch of roses in her right hand ; part of a temple, of Grecian 
architecture, forms the back-ground. A delicate and highly- 
finished production. 

%fi. 4 in. by 9.fi. 10 in.— P. 
Valued by the Experts du Mus^e, in 1816, at 25,000/«. 1000/. 
A duplicate of the preceding, also by Rubens, is in the collection 
of Madame Hoffman, at Haerlem. 

syi. 4 in. by %fi. 6 in.— P. 
A portrait of the same lady, very similar to the above, is in the 
Marlborough Collection. 

429. Portraits of Francis Snyders (the painter of animals), 
and his Wife. 

This picture was exhibited in the Louvre, in 1 8 1 4, and was claimed 
and restored in 1815. 



BCBENS. 199 



Louvre. 



The following drawings and sketches in chalks, tinted in 
odour and washed in Indian ink, are also in the Louvre : — 

430. Two Studies for Triumphal Arches. 



431. A Design for a magnificent Car. 



432. Pallas defending a Woman and her Children from the 
fury and desolation of War. A spirited sketch in oil colours, 

on paper. 

14| tn. hy 21|tn. 



438. The Archduke Albert on horseback, seen in a front 

▼iew, bare headed, holding a baton in his right hand. A pen 

drawing, washed in bistre. 

12 in. by 8^ta. 



434. Pluto passing sentence on souls brought before him by 
Mercury. A drawing in colour, done from a jncture by 
Primaticcio. 



435. The Holy Family. The Virgm is seated, and the 
infant Saviour stands in a cradle by her side, extending his 
arms to embrace St John, who is held by Elizabeth. A study 
in red chalks, after RafPaelle. 

1 Of til. by 9|tn. 



486. Silenus, supported by a Satyr and a Faun. Done in 
bistre wash, and finished with the pen. 

14^ in. by ld| ta. 



437. A Female bending on one knee, and extending her hands 
in the attitude of supplication. A hasty free drawing, in chalks. 



The remainder of the drawings contained in this rieh collection 
are noticed under the pictures to which they severally refer. 

VOL. II. K 



130 



488. The Bape of the Sabines. 



4d9* The Reconciliation of the Romans and Sabines, through 
the interposition of the Sabine Women. A companion to the 
former. 

These magnificent pictures were painted at Madrid, about the 
year 1628, and are now in the Escurial. 

The original Sketches for the above were sold in the collection of 
M, Danoot, and are now in the collection of Alexander Barings Esq. 
^^See description in this Work, 



440. The Martyrdom of St Andrew. The compoation 
represents the saint naked, all but the loins, attached by the 
legs and arms to a lofty cross, and one of the executioners, on a 
ladder, binding his arm ; while another, standing at the foot of 
the cross, is pulling the end of a cord which passes round his 
body ; close to the front is a beautiful female on her knees, 
supplicating an officer, who is on horseback^ to have compasaon 
on the martyr, and her entreaties are seconded by two other 
SnnBles and an elderly man ; the gesture and expression of the 
officer denote his willingness but inability to serve then. A 
number of spectators are seen on the farther side of the hill on 
which the cross is erected, and three angels appear to be 
descending with the rewards of martyrdom. 

Engraved by Alexander Voet, jun., and anonymous, J. Dirckx ex. 

Painted to adorn the altar of the Flemish chape^ at Madrid. 

Cumberland, in his Anecdotes of Spanish Painters, speaks highly 
of this production. 

Now in the Escurial. 



441. A capital Drawing of the preceding picture, commenced 
in chalks and terminated en grisaiUe, of superlative beauty ; 
done by the artist for the engraver to work from. 

£3|m. by 17^ in. 

Collection of M. Mariette, . 1775. . . 1650/«. 66/. 

ofR-deBoisset, . 1777. . . UOO fs. 60/. 

Now in the collection, of Sir Thomas Lawrence, P.R,A« 



KUBEN8. 181 



Escurial. 



442. St. Jerome. A single figure. 



448. Christ discovering himself to his IMsdples at Emmaiis. 
In this composition is a female with a glass of liquor in her 
hand, and a servant holding a plate is attending upon the 
Saviour and his disciples. 

Engraved by Van Sompelin, and in reverse by Swanenburg. 

In the Parada Palace. 



444. The Judgment of Paris. The figures are of the size 
of life. 

Engraved by Lommelin. 

This picture is nearly a repetition of the one described in another 
part of this Work. 

Formerly in the palace of Buenritiro. 



445. The Virgin with the infant Saviour in her arms. 
Formerly in the convent of the king's apartments at Madrid. 



446. The Immaculate Conception. 

There is a print engraved by Bolswert, which Basan in his 
catalogue places under this title ; it represents the Virgin with the 
infant Saviour in her arms, standing upon a globe, treading upon the 
head of a serpent which encircles it ; two angels support the skirts 
of the Virgin's robe. 

In the King of Spain's Collection. 



The following Pictures are in the 

ESCURIAL. 

447. A Satyr ; of the oze of life. 

44& Two Nymi^ 

449. A Bacchanalian Revel. 



132 RUBENS. 



EscuriaL 



450. Mercuiy and Argus. 



451. The Rape of Proserpine. The figures of the oze 
of life. 

The same subject occurs in the Marlborough Collection. — See 
description. 

452. Venus binding Cupid. After TiUan. 



453. Progne and her sister Philomela showing Tereus, 
King of Thrace^ the Head of his Son, on whose Body he had 
just been feasting. The horrifying sight has caused the 
monarch to kick over a table at which he was seated r^aling. 

Engraved by Galle. 

454. A Head of Flora, surrounded with flowers. 



455. Vulcan working at his forge. 



456. Perseus and Andromeda. 



457. The Garden of Love. A company of fourteen, ladies 
and gentlemen, assembled in a flower garden ; most of them are 
seated on the parterre, engaged in conversation and muac ; the 
prevailing sentiment of the subject is indicated by the intro- 
duction of eight cupids, several of whom are at play with the 
ladies, and others sporUng in the air and among the flowers ; 
most of the figures personate portraits of the artist and his wife, 
with his scholars and their wives. — See another description. 

Engraved by Lempereur. 

Now in the collection of the Duke del Infimtado, at Madrid. 

Two Drawings (18 in, by 27 m.), studies for the preceding, done 
in bistre with the pen, heightened with white, were sold in the col- 
lection of M. Mariette 1775 . 980/f. 89/. 



RUBENS. 13S 



Escurial. 



' Engraved by Jegher. This print differs considerably from the 
one by Lempereur, there being in it three couple on the farther side 
of a balustrade, amusing themselves with SLJet-fVeau, 



468. The Virgin with the infant Saviour, attended by Angels, 
in a landscape. There is a print in which the infant is sleeping 
in the bosom of his mother, who is seated at the foot of a tree, 
and three angels playing with a lamb are near them : the view 
terminates with a grove, by the side of which St. Joseph is 
repoong and the ass feeding. « 

Engraved on an outline of Rubens, by Jegher ; also anonymous ; 
and a similar subject is engraved by A. Voet. 



459- Adam and Eve in Paradise. A copy by Rubens, after 
Titian. 



460. St. George, on a spirited charger, slaying the Dragon. 

Cumberland, in his Anecdotes of Spanish Painters, styles this 
picture the " very quintessence of colouring, and the most capti- 
vating example of extravagance which the art of painting can 
perhaps exhibit." 

461. The Elevation of the Brazen Serpent. 

Engraved by Bolswert. — See description in a subsequent page. 
This is probably a copy by a scholar, and re-touched by Rubens. 



462. Neptune in his Car, drawn by sea-horses. 

A similar subject occurs in the Dresden Gallery. — See p, 85. 



463. Olympus, with a Council of the Gods. 



464. Philip IV. of Spam, mounted on a beautiful charger. 

There is a print of this monarch on horseback, represented passing 
under an archway, engraved by P. de Jode ; and a second print, in 
which are introduced four angek flying over the king's head; two 



184 BUBEN8. 



Esairial. 



of them support a globe, and another (indicating Religion) has a 
wreath and a cross in her hands ; and behind the king is a black 
page bearing a helmet Engraved, anonymous* 

Cumberland (in his Anecdotes) observes, that Rubens painted five 
portraits of Philip IV., one of which was equestrian, and grouped 
with several other figures, and for which the painter received the 
honour of knighthood, naturalization, and the golden key, as a 
gentleman of the bed* chamber ; in addition to which, the Duke of 
Olivarez presented him a ring worth 2000 ducats. 



466. A Study for an equestrian Portrait, apparently intended 
for Charles Y. It represents a person fifty years of age, his 
head uncovered and the face seen in a front view ; he is dad 
in armour and grasps a baton in his right hand, which he poises 
on his thigh ; his noble charger is also presented in a fore- 
shortened position, full of action and spirit 

S7m. by 16 m. 

This is a superb drawing in bistre, done for a design, of which 
there can be little doubt but that the finished picture exists in Spain, 
from whence the drawing came, and is now in the collection of Sir 
Thomas Lawrence, P.R.A. 



466. A Portrait of Sir Thomas More. The face is repre- 
sented in a three-quarter view ; a black cap covers the head, 
and the dress consists of a dark cloak with a broad fur cape and 
edging, and a red vest ; the hands are united in front, one of 
which holds a paper. 

sy>. 9 in* by 9/t. 7 in, (Spanish measure.) — P. 

This portrait was done by Rubens, by desire of the king, after a 
whole-length picture by Hans Holbein. 
Now in the Royal Museum, at Madrid. 



467. The Rape of Ganymede. A small picture. 
This subject occurs in another part of this Work. 



RX7BENS. 185 



EscHrial, 
468. Henniles reposmg from his Labouri. 



469* Apollo conducting his Chariot. 



¥10. Orpheus charming the Brutes. A capital compoation. 

Cumberland (in his Anecdotes) observes, " this is truly an ines-. 
timable picture, giving such a display of colouring as can hardly be 
conceived." It was painted by him in his best age and manner. 



471. A magnificent Landscape, in which is introduced a 
religious Procession. The priest who conducts it is mounted 
on horseback carrying the viaticum, and his horse is led by a 
Count of Augsburg. 

Cumberland notices this as being " one of the many pictures 
wliidi had conspired to impress him with the highest veneration for 
the talents of the Artist." 



47S. The Adoration of the Magi. 

The same writer, in reference to this picture, says» ** that it is 
the standard work of the master. It was commenced in Flanders ; 
enlarged, re-touched, and finished, during the painter's embassy in 
Spain ;" and, after very highly commending it, he adds, " that 
Rubens, in putting the finishing band to it, has inserted bis own 
portrait on horseback among the group of magi." Mr. W. Wood* 
bum, who has frequendy seen the picture, confirms this opinion of 
its excellence. 



473. Two Heads of Old Men. These are painted in a free 
and masterly manner. 

474. Two small Landscapes, in one of which is introducad 
the subject of Diana in the Chase. 



475. The Judgment of Midas. A capital {rieture. 



476. Saturn devouring his Ofikpring. A small picture. 



196 BUBENS. 



Escurial. 



477. Phaeton and ApoUa 



478. Narcissus pining over his own Reflection. 



479. Cupids and Bacchanals. A copy by Rubens, after 
Titian. 

480. Hercules killing the Hydra. 



481. The Bath of Diana. A copy by Rubens, after Titian. 



482. Paris carrying ofi^ Helen. The figures are of the size 
of life. 

488. Orpheus redeeming Eurydice. The scene represents 
a view of the infernal regions ; Pluto grasping his trident and 
seated on his throne, with Proserpine, habited in black, by 
his side, apparently enforcing obedience to the conditions of 
the ^ft ; the dog Cerberus lies at their footstool. On the 
opposite side are Orpheus and Eurydice; the former, with 
his lyre, is retiring cautiously from the presence of the deities, 
followed by his beautiful wife, who is naked all but the loins, 
her long dark hair floating on her fair shoulders. The portal 
of the gloomy region stands open before them, and beyond it 
is seen the river Styx. 

^ft. by syi. (Spanish measure.) — C. 
. Done in lithography. 

There is a print, engraved by Desplaces^ of the preceding subject, 
in which Proserpine is seated on the farther side of Pluto (being 
the opposite to the above) ; and the dog Cerberus is dose by his 
side. Orpheus has his arm round the shoulders of Eurydice, and 
is incautiously turning to look at her. Two figures, representing 
Malice and Discord, are also introduced. 



484. The Fall of the Giants. 



RUBENS. 137 



Escurial. 



485. The Three Graces. 



486. Europa. 



487. Venus and Adonis. 

The preceding three pictures are copies hy the artist, after Titian. 



488. The Flagellation. A finished sketch for the picture 
in the church of the Dominicans at Antwerp. 



489. Nymphs surprised by Satyrs. 



490. The Triumph of Bacchus. A composition of six 
figures of the size of life. 



491* A grand Lion Hunt. 



49S- A large Picture, with several figures and a great 
quantity of vegetables and fruit It exhibits, in an allegorical 
manner, the retirement of Numa Pompilius, who is represented 
sitting at the foot of a tree on the right, and three Roman 
citizens standing near him ; Numa is nearly in a state of nudity, 
intended perhaps to indicate the simplicity of his manners and 
his sylvan retirement, which is further indicated by the intro- 
duction of three wood nymphs and two satyrs, distributed among 
the trees on the left On the fore-ground lie piles of fruit and 
vegetables; these are by the hand of Snyders. The figures 
only are by Rubens. 

Sft. 8 in. by Uft. 6 in.— C. 

This is probably the picture which was imported into England 
in 1825, and with many others was put up to sale by Mr. 
Stanley, having been the property of the ex-king of Spain, Joseph 
Buonaparte. It is now in the hands of Mr. Buchanan, for sale. 

A picture, corresponding with the preceding, is noticed in the 
catalogue of the artist's efiects after his decease.-^^ee fi. 34. 



188 EUBENS. 

498* The Rape of Hippodamia. Amidst the confusion of 
the conflict between the Centaurs and Lapithas, is a youth who 
has sprung over an altar and seized Hippodamia round the 
waist, to snatch her from the embraces and back of a Centaur. 

Engraved by P. de Balliu. 



4f94. The dead Saviour lying in the Tomb, surrounded by 
the Virgin and several Disciples. 

Cumberland, in noticing this production, observesy " I have never 
yet found any picture that speaks so strongly to the passions as 
this last ; " — that Rubens, in this affecting piece, " has touched the 
passions with something more than a painter's — with a poet's hand/' 



The following pictures are said to have been painted by 
order of Philip IV., who presented them to his minister, the 
Duke of Olivarez, to decorate a convent of Carmelites founded 
by him at Loeches. These pictures descended by inheritance 
to the Duke of Alva, who (about the year 1807) soM four of 
them to M. de Bourke, minister from the court of Denmark to • 
Spain, by whom they were subsequently brought to England, 
and exhilnted in a large room in Piccadilly ; they were soon 
after purchased by the present noble possessor, for the sum of 
10,000 gs. W^hen the French entered Madrid, in 1808, they 
transferred two others of the set to the Louvre; and a$ 
they still continue in that gallery, it may justly be inferred that 
they were legally acquired. These magnificent pictures ara 
unquestionably the joint production of Rubens and his excellent 
scholars, in the same proportion as those which exemplify in 
allegory the life of Marie de Medicis, now in the Louvre, and 
many other noble gallery works. 

495. The Triumph of Charity. Exemplified by a female 
standing in a car drawn by two lions, bearing an infant on her 
arm and extending her friendly hand to protect two odier 
children clinging to her side ; a circle of angels are buoyant in 



EUBBNS. 189 

two olher angels, one with a Uazing 



heart the other with a torch, follow the car. 
Engraved by Lommelin. 
Now in the possession of Joshua Taylor, Esq. 



496. The Triumph of the Church. Represented by a 
female seated in a magnificent car drawn by three white horses, 
holding in her hands a pix contaimng the consecrated host ; two 
angels are behind her, one of whom holds the train of her robe, 
the other a mitre over her head ; three females (emblems of 
Justice, Mercy, and Truth) guide the sjnrited animals, on the 
nearest one of which is an angel bearing the symbolic keys ; 
three other angels float in air above their heads ; two figures, 
personifying Ignorance and Superstition, are chained to the 
car, the wheels of which are passing over die bodies of Envy 
and Falsehood. Numerous other figures contribute to perfect 
the allegory. 

Ufi. 9 in. by 18/1?. 3 ia.— C. (about.) 

Engraved by Bolswert. 



497. The finished Study for the preceding, entirely by the 
hand of Rubens, of the rarest excellence and beauty. 

Collection of M. de hi Hante (by Mr. Phillips), 1814. 410 g$. 

In a subseqaent sale 1816. 300 g«* 

If it remains in the same pure state it was in when first sold, 
600 g»m would be a reasonable estimation of its worth. 



498. The Triumph of the Christian Law. This beautiful 
allegory is composed of a female standing in a car, with a 
chahce in her hand, and having an angel by her ade supporting 
a cross, with a globe placed between them ; two jrouthful angeb 
draw the car ; over whose heads are flying two infant angels, 
bearing the instruments of the Saviour^s suffmngs and death ; 
a group of figures are behind, towards whom the female in the 
car is turning with benign looks of invitation : these perMXiify 
Philosophy (halting on a crutch, and is a portrait 61 Socrates) ; 



140 RUBENS. 

Astronomy, with a sphere ; and Nature, with triple breasts. 
Asia and Africa are in the rear. 

Uji.9 in. by IB ft. 3 in.—C. 

Engraved by Lauwers. 

Valued by the Experts du Musee, 1816. . 160,000 /f. 6400/. 

Now in the Louvre. 



' 499* The Triumph of the Christian Religion over Paganism 
and Idolatry. Represented by an angel descending in glory, 
bearing, with extended arms, in one hand a chalice with the 
sacred host, and in the other the flaming sword of the law ; 
the celestial appearance has created terror and confusion among 
the sacrificators, who were preparing to immolate an ox, and 
who in their fright have overturned the altar of sacrifice. 

Uft. 9 in. by ISjt. Sin.—C. (about.) 
Engraved by Bolswert. 



500. The Israelites gathering Manna in the Desert. The 
compontion, conmsting of seven figures, exhibits Moses standing 
on the left, with a rod in one hand and the other nused 
upwards, in an attitude of grateful acknowledgment to Heaven 
for the miraculous bread ; in the centre is a young man stoop- 
ing to gather the manna, and two females are carrying baskets 
full on their heads, one of whom is leading a fine child. 

16/f. by 13/<. 7tii.— C. 

This picture is not engraved, but there is an indifferent oudlne 
of it in Young's Grosvenor Gallery. 

Now in the collection of Earl Grosvenor. 



501. The Fathers of the Church. These distinguished 
individuals are represented walking in procession, accompanied 
by Thomas Aquinas carrying a book under his arm, and the 
Archduchess Isabella Clara Eugenia, in the character of her 
tutelar sunt (Clair), bearing the consecrated host in a pix ; 
these are in the centre of the group; Pope Gregory, 



BUBENS. 141 

St Ambrose, and St. Augusdn precede them, and St. Jerome 
and St Norbert follow. 

UJt. by Ufi.e in.— C. 

Engraved by Eynhouedts and Bolswert. 

Now in the collection of Earl Grosvenor. 

The original Study for the preceding picture, admirably painted, 
was sold in the collection of John Webb, Esq., in 1821, for 100 gs. 

A picture, designated *' The Fathers of the Church,*' was sold by 
Mr. Christie, in 1807, for 195 gs,; and again, in 1808, for ft55L 



502. The Four Evangelists. In this compo»tion the artist 
has evidently intended to represent the divine characters per- 
forming the command of their Lord — '^ Go, preach the gospel 
to every creature;^ and has accordingly exhibited them walking, 
attended by their various attributes. St Mark carries a large 
book open, to a page of which an angel, flying by his side, is 
pointing ; St. Matthew and St Luke are before, and St John 

follows behind. 

I4jt. by Ujt. 6 in C. 

Engraved by Eynhouedts and Bolswert. 

Now in the collection of Earl Grosvenor. 



503. The original Study for the preceding picture. 

2jt. Ijin. by 2 ft. 3tn.— P. 
Sold in the collection of A. de la Hante, Esq., 1814, for 100 gs. ; 
worth double that sum. 
Now in the collection of Edward Gray, Esq. 



504. Abraham receiving Bread and Wine from Melchizedeck. 
The compoation is formed of about seventeen figures, in the 
centre of which is Abraham, clad in armour and wearing a 
crimson mantle over his shoulders; he is bowing before the 
King of Salem, and receiving the bread from his hand ; the 
latter is clothed in a yellow robe, lined with ermine, the train 
of which is held by a page. Close to the front are two men 
with vases of wine; and behind Abraham are a group of 
armed soldiers, and the patriarch^s horse; three angels are 



14S BUBENS. 

abcnre, attaching the drapery of the picture to a cornice, sup- 
ported by pillars. This is by far the most inferior picture of 
the series ; the eye here looks in vain for the free and masterly 
handling of Rubens. 

Ufi. 4 in. by 19 Jt. 

This subject, very differently'composed, is engraved by Witdouc ; 
and also by Neefs. — Seep. 110. 

Now in the Grosvenor Collection. 

A finished Study for the preceding picture, of superlative ex- 
cellence, is in the collection of the Right Honourable Dowager Lady 

Stuart. 

ftjt. 2 tfi. by Zft. 8^ ta.~-P. Worth 500 gs* 



505. Elijah fed by an Angel in the Desert The prophet, 
clad in a vesture of the skins of animals and a large mantle 
put loosely round him, stands before the angel, from whom be 
is receiving a loaf of bread and a cup of drink. The figures 
in this and the eight preceding {»ctures are considerably above 
the size of life. 

Engraved by Lauwers, and etched by Panneels. 

Now in the Louvre, — Seep. 114. 



The original Sketches for the above nine pictures were formerly 
in the Palazzo Nuovo, at Madrid ; several of these, together with 
many others (noticed in the collections of this country), are now in 
England. 

The preceding series of pictures were evidendy painted for the 
express purpose of being executed in tapestry ; and they imitate 
that material in all the upper parts, where angels are represented 
attaching it to a handsome cornice, interwoven with festoons of 
fruit : the sides also, as is usual in such decorations, are terminated 
by beautiful spiral and other columns, and the lower parts tastefully 
finished with various fanciful ornaments, amongst which the fringe 
of the tapestry is frequendy intermixed. 

Michel, in his Life of Rubens^ p. 365, says* " That when the 
old palace at Brussels was burnt, in 1731, several pictures by this 
master were destroyed, and amongst others some cartoons repre- 






EUBENS. 14S 

Mating the triumpbs of the church* These," he addi , " were 
executed in tapestry at Brussek, hy order of the Infanta Isahdla, 
for PhOip IV. of Spain, and the original sketches of these car- 
toons were in the Palazzo Nuoro, at Madrid *" and, in continuation, 
he ohsenres, ** in the church of the Barefooted Carmelites are to 
he seen several copies of these pictures," In a work entitled 
Le Pemtre curieux, hy Mensaert, published in 1763, is reiterated 
the same statement : " That the originals perished in the fire of the 
palace, in February, 1731." Both these writers evidently refer to 
the same pictures, and these may have been the copies made on 
paper (cartoons) from those above described, for the tapestry 
workers ; and of the existence of the originals at Loeches both 
writers were doubtless ignorant, for Michel, in p. 326, merely 
notices, " That in the church of the Minor Carmes, at Loeches, are 
four cartoons by Rubens, which have been executed in tapestry," 
but does not give the subjects of them. It is singular that both 
these writers mention a tenth picture, representing, in allegory, 
Religion overcoming Heresy. 



5D6. Venus endeavouring to detain Adonis from the Chase. 
The goddess is seated on a bank at the foot of a large tree, with 
her arm round the young huntsman, whom she appears to be 
dissuading from the dangerous pursuit ; while Cupid, embracing 
his knees, seems to aid her entreaties ; at the same time the 
Three Graces are drawing aside the crimson mantle which con- 
ceals her charms. In the opposite Ade are five cupids amusing 
dienseives with the huntsman'^s dc^. A highly-finished and 
brilUantly-ooloured picture* 

9 ft. 2 m. by 2 ft. 8 m.— P. Worth aOO gs. 

Ei^aved by Patas and Lorenzini. 

Now ia the Florence Gallery. 



507. The Holy Family. The infant Saviour is represented 
veoumboit in a cradle, caressing St John, who stands at the 
nde of it; and the Virgin, clothed in a scarlet vest and a blue 
mantle, is seated near, with her hand on the cover of the cradle. 



144 EUBENS. 

looking with paternal affection at the children. St Elizabeth 
is on her left, and St Joseph is behind her. A briUiandy- 
coloured and very powerful production. 

Sft. 10 in. by Zft. 7 in P. Worth 1 500 gs. 

Engraved by L. Vosterman and Mogalli, and in the gallery by 
Langlois ; and also in the Musee Fran^aii. 

This picture adorned the capacious Louvre until 1815, when it 
was restored to the Palazzo Pitti, at Florence. 



508. A Landscape, offering an extensive view over a flat 
country, of a richly-fertile aspect, diverufied with clusters of 
trees, and the appearance of hamlets in the distance. A wind- 
ing road passes through the country, on which is a waggoner 
riding the fore-horse of his team, and at a little distance before 
him is a large flock of sheep. More to the left, and close to 
the front, are three women with rakes and a fork, and two 
others with bundles of turnips and grass on their heads, and 
beyond them a man with a fork ; and in an adjoining meadow 
are several horses grazing. In various parts are seen people 
hay-making, and otherwise occupied in agricultural pursuits. 
The beauty of a summer^s sun gives lustre to the agreeable 

scene. 

Sjt. 10 in. by 6 ft. 3 m.— P. Worth 1500 g#. 

Engraved by Bolswert, Guyot, and Vivares. 

Now in the Palazzo Pitti, at Florence. 



609. A grand mountainous Landscape, in which is intro- 
duced the subject of Ulysses thrown on the Phseadan coast*. 
The view exhibits on the left a lofty rocky mountain, whose 
bold and broken forms sink gradually to the opporite ade and 
sweep along the front, jutting upon a plain ; on its side is 
seen the palace and pleasure-grounds of Alcinous, approached 
by terraces and a road of difficult ascent, and beyond are several 
temples ; these recede in succession to the summit of the moun- 

• Odyssey, Books V. and VI. 



RUBEXS. 145 

tain, from whence gushes a stream of water, which, rolling down 
its rugged ade, falls foaming at its base. On the opposite side^ 
and beyond the jutting hills, is seen the city of Phaeacia, occu- 
pying a gentle elevation on the coast, from whence appears the 
open sea, whose angry biUows, subsiding, still beat along the 
strand and shelving shore. In the centre of the fore-ground 
stands the wise Ulysses, whose naked form is in part concealed 
by a bush ; his attitude and gesture denote him to be imploring 
the succour of Nausicaa, the daughter of Alcinous, who stands 
some distance off raising the veil from her face; an elderly 
female is by her, and three of her timid maidens a little remote 
from the scene. The princess appears to have already com- 
miserated the heroes sufferings, and to have ordered two of her 
attendants, who are on the opposite side, to supply him with 
raiment; this they are taking from a splendid car, the mules of 
which are grazing near. In the upper regions is seen Minerva, 
the protector of Ulysses, complaining to Jupter of the perse- 
cution of Neptune. The beams of Aurora already gild the 
hemisphere, and shed their bright influence over the landscape 
beneath, and the ra^ng storm of the night is succeeded by the 
gentle breezes of a fine summer'^s morning. It may justly be 
said of this admirable picture, that painting and poetry have 
united to form a perfect work. 

4jt. 1 in. by ejt. 6 in.— P. Worth 2500 gs. 
It was exhibited in the Louvre in 1814, and restored the following 
.year to the Palazzo Pitti, at Florence. 



510. Portrait of the Artist when about forty-five years of 
age. The lace is seen in a three-quarter view, looking to the 
right ; dark auburn hair, with mustacheos and a small beard ; 
he wears a large hat adorned with a gold loop, and is habited 
in a Spanish mantle, which conceals the greater part of a frill 
and a gold chain. A highly-finished and admirable {Mcture. 

ft ft. 6 in. by ^ft.^F. Worth 1000 g»* 

Engraved by Meulmeester and Gregori. 
• Now in the Florence Gallery. 

VOL. II. I* 



14S 






511. Portrait of the Artist when aboiit i&y years of age^ 
with the fiice seen in a thiee-quarter view, turned towards the 
left ; the fore-part of the head is bald, and the hair of an auburn 
colour, with mustadieos and pointed beard; a black cloak 
envelopes' the body, and a gcid chain (a small portion only of 
which is seen) adorns the neck. 

ft ft. 6 in. by ft ft. —P. 

Engraved by Townley* 

The head only of this picture is painted by Rubens, the rest has 
been added to match die siae of others in the collection. 

Now in the Florence Gallery. 



51S. Bacchus with Nymphs and Satyrs. The jovial (rod of 

Wine is represented sitting naked on the ude of a cask, with a 

gold cup in his hand, into which a bacchante is pouring wine 

from a vase, and a young satyr is under it, catching in his mouth 

the overflowing juice. On the opposite ade is a satyr quaffing 

the delightful beverage from a large vase; another young satyr 

stands by the ocisk, and a leopard lies at the feet of the god; 

This picture is quite unworthy the high name and reputation of 

Biibensy and po$sesses no charm to recommend it besides its 

glowing colour. 

4fft. 10 in. by 5 ft. 10 m.— C. 

Engraved by Pieroliri. 

Now in the Florence Gallery. 



518. Nymphs surprised by Satyrs. Painted by a scholar of 
Rubens. 

Engraved by Lorenzmi. 

This subject, composed of four nymphs and thvee satyrs, is 
engraved by Soutman. 

Now in the Florence Gallery. 

514. A Portrait of Eliadbeth Brant, tbe artist's first wife, 
when about thirty years of age. Her smiling countenance is 
seen in a front view, with dark hair decked with a band of 
jewels; the dress is composed of dark gray $Sik unth small 



EUBENS. 147 

gold buttmis in front, a lace frill round the bosom, and laoe 
ruffles; the neck is adorned with pearls, and a double festoon 
of gold chain set with jewels is suspended in front The left 
hand is raised to the bosom, holding the hem of a dark silk 
scarf; and the right hand contains a small bocd^. A carefully-* 
finished production. 

%ft. 9| fit. by %ft. 1 1».— P. Worth 500 gs. 
Now in the Florence Gallery. 



615. Christ triumphant over Sin and the Grave. The 

Saviour is seated on the tomb, holding the staff of a banner in 

his left hand; a white mande is round his loins, which an angel, 

who stands by bis side with one knee on the tomb, holds with 

both hands ; on the opposite ade are two angels. This picture 

possesses great effect, from the opposition of the white mantle 

held behind the Saviour, and an overcast sky, indicating thunder 

and lightning. 

bft. 4 tn. by 4ifi. 3 in. — C. 

Now in the Palazzo Pitti, at Florence. 



616. A beautiful Drawing of the Assumption of the Vir^, 
commenced by a scholar, in chalks, and finished by the master, 
for the engraver to work from. 

2Stfi. by 15 tn. 

Now in the Florence Crallery. 

£17. A Portrait of the Artistes second Wife. A free and 
spirited drawing in chalks, slighdy washed with the pencil. It 
represents her in a three-quarter view, with her head uncovered, 
and one hand placed on her bosom* 

16 tn. by 12 ni. 

Now in the Florence Gallery. 

518. A grand Batde, representing Henry IV. of France 
defeating his enemies at the field of Ivry. The view exhibits a 
scene of yast extent, covered with numerous combatants^ both 



148 RUBENS. 

horse and foot ; and among the confusion and tniUe of the con- 
flicting annies is a group of three warriors near the centre ; 
one of them, dad in armour, and wielding a short sword, is 
mounted on a spirited white horse, and appears to be severely 
wounded bj the spear of his antagonist, whose fiery charger has 
seized the enemy^s horse in the neck ; to the right of these, and 
nearer the front, is the king riding full gallop towards them on 
a bay horse, over heaps of slain, grasping a thunderbolt in his 
hand ; beyond these is seen a severe shock of cavalry, in which 
numbers are obstinately strugglmg together; on the opposite 
side lies a slmn warrior, whom a miscreant is stripping; and a 
little distant from these is a standard-bearer riding up towards 
the centre, preceded by a body of infantry. The result of the 
battle appears to be indicated by the descent of Bellona, bearing 
her sword and aegis ; and Victory, with the palm of peace in her 
hand. The greater part of this immense picture is merely 
sketched in, and not any figure is completely finished ; but the 
whole appears to be by the masterly hand of Rubens. 

12^^. 7 in. by Ufi C. 



519* The Companion. The triumphal Procession of 
Henry IV., after the Battle of Ivry. The king is represented 
standing in a gorgeous car embossed with ornaments in gold ; 
he holds an olive-branch in his band, and is clad in splendid 
armour, with a gray mantle over his shoulder floating behind ; 
Victory and Peace attend him, the former is placing a wreath 
upon his uncovered brows. Four beautiful white coursers are 
attached to the car, and are led by females and guided by 
Minerva. While numerous soldiers with banners, trophies, and 
instruments of music, accompany the car, a train of captives 
follow it; and the victorious troops, leading the van, are 
entering the gates of the city. Close to the front are an aged 
man and woman, and several fine young females with th^r 
children ; most of these are seated, and appear to hail the 
victor as he passes. This and the preceding exhibit a rich 



RUBEXS. 149 

display of the exaberant genius of the artist, and are examples 
of his ^gantic powers in colour and execution. 

12 ft. 7 in. by 24 ft.— C. 

Engraved by Lorenzini. 

There is litde doubt but these were part of a set commenced by 
order of Marie de Medicis, to illustrate the life of Henry IV:, and 
of which subsequent events prevented the completion. 

Now in the Florence Gallery. 



520. The Choice of Hercules. The hero is placed by the 
nde of Venus, who embraces his right arm, and is looking 
enticingly in his face ; at the same time her attendant, Cupid, 
embraces his knees ; on his left stands Minerva, bending with 
persuasive gesture towards him, and pointing to some armour 
lying on the ground, in allumon to the glorious deeds to be 
achieved by arms; behind the goddess is a page holding a 
white charger, the head only of which is seen ; a little retired to 
the right of the fair goddess are two beautiful nymphs, and 
behind the group appears Time, bearing the usual emblems of 
monition and destruction in his hands, while Cupid, in the air, 
seems to have discharged his dart in vidn. 

3 ft. 11 m. by 5 ft. 6 in.— C. Worth 600 gs. 

This picture was evidently painted in Italy, at a period when fhe 
rich and mellow tones of Titian were in his view ; but the drawing 
and expression are purely his own. 

Now in the Florence Gallery. 

621. The Portraits of the illustrious Hugo Grotius, Justus 
Lipsius, Philip Rubens, and the Painter himself. The three 
first are seated at a table covered with a Turkey carpet, and 
on which are several books ; the modest artist stands behind his 
brother^s chair ; Grotius, dressed in black figured silk, is seated 
on the right, turning over the leaves of a book, and a favourite 
dog is jumping against his knee ; Lipaus is on the farther ride 
ct the table, with a book open before him ; and Philip Rubens 
holds a pen in his hand. 

5 ft. by 4 ft. % m P. WorA 2500 g: 



150 BUBKN8. 

EngraTed by Morel and Gregori. 

The interesting characters portrayed in this picturCi combined 
with the excellence of the painting, render it a treasure in art of 
high value. Judging from the age of the artist, it was done about 
the year 1623. 

Exhibited in the Louvre in 1814, and restored in 1815. Now in 
the Palazzo Pitti, at Florence. 

There is a portrait of Justus Lipsius, engraved (oval), embellished 
with ornaments, by GaDe. 



522. The Three Graces. Represented standing, with their 
arms entwined, and two cupids are crowning the centre one 
with a chaplet of flowers; a basket of fruit, and two figures, 
slightly sketched, are in the back-ground. This is a carefully- 
finished picture, painted en grisaiOe. 

I ft. 7 in. by I ft. 4 in.— P. WorA 350 gs. 

Engraved by Massard. The same subject, without the cupids, is 
engraved by P. de Jode. 

Now in tlie Florence Gallery. 



623. The Horrors of War. Exhibited by the Temple of 
Janus thrown open, and Mars, clad in armour, bearing a sword 
and shield, rushing forward to the work of desolation, over- 
turning in his progress the arts and sciences (denoted by 
suitable figures and emblems, which lie prostrate at his feet), 
and spreading terror and dismay around. Ndther the beauty 
or allurements of Venus, who is clinging fondly to his side ; the 
persuasions of the Loves, embracing his knees ; nor die piteous 
lamentations of the bereaved mother (personified by Cybele), 
retard his furious progress. The harpies of Discord and 
Revenge drag him on, and lead the way to scenes of devastation 
and horror. 

eft. 5 in. by 9ft. 8|iff.— C. Worth 5000 gi. 

Of the numerous allegories noticed in this work, the one just 
described is decidedly the best; its figurative characters are 
strikingly appropriate and expressive, and illustrate the sentiment of 
the subject in the most forcible and aflfecting manner. The impetno- 



BUBENS. 151 

rity designated in the action of Man, and the . consequent simul- 
taneona effibcta. cm all around, are indescribably fine and energetic ; 
its gorgeous cokmring contributes no less to the prevailing spirit 
of die piece and to the development of its prospective horrors. 

The sword of war transferred this estimable production to the 
Louvre about the year 1808, and the same means restored it to the 
Florence Gallery in 1815. 

524. The finished Study for the preceding picture, of the 
highest excellence and beauty. 

lyi. 8 in. by 2 ft. 6jm.— C. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1815. Sold in the collection 
of A. Champemowne, Esq., in 1820, for 200 gs.^ and is well worth 
double that sum. 

Now in the collection of Samuel Rogers, Esq. 



5S5. The Virgin with the in&nt Saviour in her arms. 
Represented in a picture which is borne by groups of cherubim : 
in the lower part of the composition are a . number of angels 
and saints in adoration. 

Painted for the Chiesa Nuova at Rome, by order of the Archduke 
Albert, about the year 1605. 

A pen Drawing, washed in bistre, the first thought for the 
preceding, was sold in the collection of M. MariettCi 1 775, for 40/«. 



526. The Martyrdom of a Female Saint. 

There is a print of this subject, representing the saint pierced with 
^ 9word in the breast, and two angels commiserating, her sufienngs, 
engraved by Vander Leuw. 

Formerly in the Chiesa Nuova at Rome. 



527. Two Pictures, representing Maiioe Deities at table, 
served by Nerektes with firoit and fish ; iand : 

Veituamus and Pomona in a Garden. 

The figures only ave by. the band of Rnbcns. 

These formerly deeoKaled* the cnpola of the paUoe of the Princess 
Scalamare. 



152 BUB£NS. 

588. St Frauds, habited in the mantle of his Order, kneelinjr 
on the farther nde of a bank ; his hands crossed on his breast, 
and his countenance directed upwards, from whence a stream 
of light descends. A skull, a crucifix, and a scourge, lie on the 
ground. Painted in imitation of the Bolognese masters. 

^fi. by 9ft. 2 in.— C. 

Engraved by Mogalli. 

Now in the Palazzo Pitti, at Florence. 



5S9. An Allegory of the Tiber. Represented by a river god 
reclining on a vase, and a nymph by his »de with a cornucopia ; 
these are attended by tritons and cupids. 

Formerly in die Palazzo Ghigi. 



580. Twelve Pictures of the Aposdes. 

There are prints of diese saints, engraved by Bolswert. 

Formerly in the Palazzo Rospigliosi. 



531. The Virgin and St Ann adoring the infant Saviour. 
Formerly in a house on the Monte Cavallo. 



58S. Romulus and Remus being suckled by a Wolf. A 
large picture. 

Formerly in the gallery of the Capitol. 



6SS. Saint Helena discovering the true Cross* This picture 
is disUnguished for the expression of devout pety in the 
saint, and the graceful beauty of the choir of angels who 
surround the cross. 

Sold by Mr. Squibb, by auction, in 1812 380 gx* 



584. Christ crowned with Thorns. The malignant crudty 
of the executioners, tiiie commiserating expression of a youth, 
and the meek and lowly submisaon of the Saviour, are the 
peculiar characteristics of this excellent production. 

This subject is engraved by Bolswert, Lauwers, and Aubert. 

Sold by Mr. Squibb, by auction, in 1812 760 gx. 



£UB£NS. 15S 

SS5. The Cnuafixion. A composition of seyeml figures, of 
the nze of life. 

Michel, in his Life of Rubens^ states, that this pictyre and the 
two preceding were painted for the church of Sante Croce della 
Gerusalemme, by command of the Archduke Albert, he having 
formerly been cardinal of that church ; and that they were executed 
at Rome, during the artist's residence there to complete his studies. 
They are also noticed by several other writers. The three pictures 
were imported to England in 1811. 

The Crucifixion was sold by auction by Mr. Squibb, in 1812, 
for ftSOgs.; again, in 1820, for 200 g5., bought by Mr. Bryan; 
and again, in 1821, for Zl5gs., bought by Messrs. Woodbum, 
firom whom it was purchased by Count Woronzo, and lost with 
other pictures at sea. 

686. The Circumcision. The subject is composed of twelve 
figures, and represents the Virgin sitting in front, clothed 
in a scarlet vest and a blue mantle; she is accompanied 
by two female friends, who are seated on her left; one of 
them holds the infant, while the priest, who is seated in the 
opposite nde, performs the ceremony; a second, holding a 
book, is near him, and two others are looking on ; a young 
woman with a child by her side stands behind the Virgin, and 
two female spectators are beyond her ; a company of seven 
angels, paying homage to the infant, are above. This altar- 
piece is so very unlike the usual style and colour of the artist, 
that were it not in a measure authenticated as his work, 
both by church record and tradition, the writer would have 
hentated to notice it; not from any deficiency in merit, but 
solely from its resemblance to the Italian school. 

Uft. by 9ft. 6 in.-^(ah(nU.) 

Engraved by Lommelin. 

This picture was painted by order of the Society of Jesuits, for 
the high altar of the church of St. Ambrose, at Genoa, where it now is. 

A capital Drawing, in red chalk, apparently the first design for 
the preceding picture, is in the collection of Sir Thomas Law- 
rence, P.R.A, 

26tn. by 16 m. 



154 SUBENS. 

587. Saint Ignadus Loyola healing the Sick and the 
Possessed. The saint, habited in a splendid chasuble, stands 
before an elevated altar on the right ; his hands are extended, 
and his countenance directed upwards ; he is attended by mx 
monks on his left, and a seventh, holding his book, is on his 
right. Among the afflicted, who are assembled at the base of 
the altar, is a maniac woman, whom a powerful man holds in 
his arms, while her anxious parents are on their knees suppli- 
cating for her restoration ; near the centre and front stands a 
handsome female, in a purple varied silk dress, holding a 
sickly infant on her arm, and leading two other children by 
her side ; behind these is a bereaved mother bending in agony 
over her dead babe. On the farther side of this group are an 
old man supported on crutches, and an elderly female, both of 
whom look with the eye of entreaty towards the saint. A red 
curtain extends over a large portion of the t^nple on the right, 
and in the upper part are two angels. This excellent work is 
painted in the artistes free ^nd florid' manner ; it abounds with 
powerful exj»«8sion, and is brilliant and effective. 

Ujt. 6 in. by Oft. 6 tVi.— C. (about. J 

Painted for the Society of Jesuits, for their church of St« 
Ambrose, at Grenoa, whose side altar it now adorns. 

A picture of the same subject, but of a more extended compo- 
sition, is described in pp. 19 and 87. 



588. A full-length Portndt of Philip III. of Spain, baUted 
in black silk adorned with- numerous small gold buttons, a 
plain stiff collar round the neck, a gold chain bearing the Order 
of the Golden Fleece, and a dagger stuck in his belt; he is 
represented erect, his left hand placed on the hilt of hb sword, 
and the right hanging down at hb side. 

eft. 6 in. by 4ft. (about. J 

Now in the Durazzo Palace at Genoa. 



639* Love and Wine. In the composition of this allegory 
the artist has introduced, the portraits of himself and his wife 



&X7BEKS. 155 

Hdena. The painter, who is apparently about forty-three 

years of age, is seen in a profile view, has on a fur cap, clad in 

armour, and weanng a scarlet mantle over his shoulders, and 

red hose ; he is seated on the left, supporting his wife on his 

knee, whom he embraces with his right arm round her neck : 

her fair countenance is turned towards him, and she h(Jds with 

both hands a silver vase, which he is about to take with hb 

left hand. On the farther side of a table on the right stands 

Bacchus, his brows bound with ivy, with a goblet of wine in 

his hand, while Cupid, who is close to the front, is removing 

the sword of the warrior from his side. The uncertainty of 

sublunary bliss is denoted by a figure of Envy, advancing from 

the shadowy back-ground, and bearing the torch of discord in 

his hand. The reality of the characters destroys the poetical 

allusion of the subject; in other respects it is an excellent 

picture. 

4ft. « tn. by 4fft. 6 i».— P. (about.)] Worth 500 gt. 

Cochin, in his Voyage d^ItaUe^ mentions this picture in high 

terms of praise. 

Now in the Brignogli Palace at Grenoa. 



540. A Portrait of the Artist when about fifty years of age, 
seen in a three-quarter view, with long mustacheos and a small 
beard ; a large hat, turned up on the left mde, decked with a 
loop and feather, covers his head, and his dress consists of a 
dark silk vest adorned with small gold buttons, and a dark 
blue mantle embroidered with flowers in gold ; the Order of the 
Grolden Fleece is suspended to a chain round his neck. 

28 tn. by 24 in, (ovahj 

In the Brignogli Palace at Genoa. 



541. Vincent Gonzaga, Duke of Mantua, imploring the 
Benediction of the Holy Trinity upon the newly-built Church 
of the Jesuits at Mantua. 

This picture is said to have been painted about the year 1611. 



54S. St. Jerome, with a Lion. 
This picture was formerly at Modena. 



156 RUBENS. 

543. The Virgin and Child, and St. Joseph. The Virgin, 
seen in a three-quarter view, habited in a scarlet vest, a dark 
blue mantle, and a light gray kerchief, is seated, holding the 
naked infant in an erect posidon in her lap, with her ri^t 
hand round his waist and her left hand under his foot ; St. 
Joseph, leaning his head on his breast, is seen behind. This 
picture appears to be the joint work of Rubens and scholars. 

Syif. 4t«. by 2 ft. lOin.— C. 

In the Royal Palace at Turin. 



544. A Cavalier endeavouring to embrace a Female, who is 
struggling to escape from his arms. He is habited in a dark 
dress with slashed body, and her attire is composed of a black 
bodice with scarlet sleeves ; these are apparently portraits of 
Bubens and his second wife. A carefully-painted picture, but 
possessing very little of the spirit of the master. 

Sft. by 3ft.— P. (enlarged.) 

There is a print which closely resembles this composition, engraved 
by Persyns ; Mariette ex. 

In the Royal Palace at Turin. 

The same subject as the preceding picture, the figures represented 
full length in a landscape, is engraved by Avril.— jS^^e description. 



545. Christ appearing to the four Penitents. 

5 ft. 6 in. by ^ft. 6 ««.— C. (about. J 
This is a duplicate, with variations, of the Munich picture, done 
by the master and scholars. — Seep. 66. 
Now in the Royal Palace at Turin. 

546. The Holy Family. The Virgin is seated on the 

ground, holding the infant Saviour, who is caresang a lamb, 

across the neck of which St John is standing, playfully holding 

its ear ; while St. Elizabeth stands behind the latter, observing 

the two children with looks of affection. 

ISJ in. by 9 J in.—F. 
Engraved by Earlom. 

This was formerly in the Houghton Gallery, and is now in the 
Imperial Gallery, in Russia. 



RUBENS. 157 

A duplicate picture, but of larger dimensions, is engraved by 
Bolswert; and a similar composition is engraved on wood, by 
Jegher ; and also anonymous ; Galle ex. It is also etched by Pan* 
neels, with the addition of an angel presenting the Virgin a basket of 
fruit, and St. Joseph seated near an old tree ; Elizabeth is omitted. 

547. A Landscape, with some lofty rugged rocks occupying 
the middle of the second distance, surmounted with trees and 
bushes ; a rough road passes along the fore-ground and de- 
scends into a dell, towards which a waggon, drawn by two 
horses (on one of which the driver rides), is descending, while 
a man pushes at the nde of the team to prevent its upsetting. 
A twilight effect, produced by the departure of the sim and the 
rismg of the moon, pervades the scene. 

Zft. 10 in. by 4ift. 1 in.— P. 

Engraved by Bolswert ; and in the Houghton Gallery, by J.Browne. 

This picture was formerly in the collection of the Marquis de 
Lassay, and is now in the Hermitage at St. Petersburg. 

There is a very indifferent print, a copy from Bolswert, in the 
fore-ground of which is introduced the subject of the bears devouring 
the scoffing children. Visscher ex. 

548. Meleager and Atalanta, asnsted by numerous dogs, 
attacking the Calydonian boar ; two of the huntsmen, mounted 
on horseback, are seen arriving at full gallop. 

10 ft. 7 in. by tOft. 9j in.—C. 

Engraved in the Houghton Gallery, by Earlom. 

This composition differs from others of the same subject : Me* 
leager is here represented on the left and Atalanta on the right of 
the picture, and the enraged beast is rushing towards the front, 
between them. 



549. Jesus at the House of Simon the Pharisee. The 
Saviour is represented in a profile view, sitting on the left ; his 
gesture and expresaon indicate him to be replying to the obser- 
vations of Simon, in reference to Mary Magdalen, who b 
prostrate, anointing his feet and wipmg them with her hur: — 
^* And Jesus answering, said unto him, Sunon, I have some- 
what to say unto thee ; and he saith, Master, say on. There 



158 BUBENS4 

was a certain creditor, which had two debtors : the one owed 
five hundred pence, and the other fifty. And when they had 
nothing to pay, he frankly forgave them both. Tell me, 
therefore, which of them will love him most?^ This appeal 
and interrogatory has exdted surprise in the countenance of the 
Pharisee and his four friends, who are on his left ; while the 
three disciples of our Lord, who are placed on his rightj^ 
appear to be pondering his words. Four domestics are enter- 
ing from behind, bearing dishes and viands for the table. 
This admirable picture is painted in the artisfs finished manner, 
and is of first-rate excellence both in colour and expression. 

eyif. of in. by 8^^. Oj in.— C. Worth SOOOgs. 

Etched by Panneels ; and engraved by M. Natalia, and Monaco ; 
and in the Houghton Gallery, by R. Earlom. 

Now in the Hermitage, in Russia. 



550. Silenus and Satjnrs. In the centre of the composition 
is a drunken Silenus, with a jug in his hand, supported by a 
female satyr on one side and a negress on the other ; in front 
of these are two female satyrs lying on the ground, one of 
them is suckling two young satjrrs; and among a cluster of 
trees, beyond them^ are two other sylvan figures. 

ift,llm. by 3 ft. 6 m.— P. 

Engraved by Soutpian ; and in the Houghton Gallery, by Earlom. 

Now in the Hermitage, in Russia. 

A Drawing, tinted and touched in oil-colour, a study for the above, 
was sold in the collection of the Duke de Tallard, in 1756, for 60 fs. 



551. A Bust Portrait, said to be that of Helena Forman, seen 
in a front view, with her hair hanging in ringlets round her face. 

2ft. Ijin. by \ft. Sjin P. 

Engraved by Michel, in the Houghton Gallery. 
Now in the Hermitage, in Russia. 



5fi% Th^ De^tb pf the Elk. The s^ne exhibits a rocky 
]ancl9Pi(p^9 ^th a stream of wnter in fronts into whicb the 
e3(b^uste4 apimal has made its last bound, md where he is 
leLifd on aU sides by his mmalesa enemies, the dc^gs. 



BUBENS. 1^ 



Engraved by Ward, in the Houghton Crallery. 
Now in the Hermitage, in Russia. 



553. Three young Lion8» at the entrance of their den ; the 
centre one extending itself playfully oa a fragment of rock, 

5 ft. 6 in. by SfL—C. 
Engraved by Walker, in the Houghton Gallery. 
Now in the Hermitage, in Russia. 



55^4. A Portrait of a Lady, of middle age, seen in nearly a 
front view, wearing a cap and a black' silk dress ; she is repre- 
sented sitting in an arm-chur, with a muffin her lap. 

Engraved by Watson, in the Houghton Giallery. 

The preceding nine pictures formed part of a splendid ooUectioD, 
which was sold by the Earl of Orford to the Empress Catherine of 
Russia, about the year 1795. 



555. A Picture, entitled ^' Our Lady with the Bosary,^ for- 
merly an altar-piece in one of the churches in Flanders. 



556. Roman Charity. 



557. Venus and Adonis. 

The preceding three pictures are also in the Hermitage. 



558. A Portnut of the Artist. This el^ant [ncture presents 
the face in a three-quarter position, looking towards the left ; 
the head is covered with a large hat decorated with a tassel, 
and the dress conasts of a black Spanish mantle, an em- 
broidered frill, and a gold chain round the neck ; the coun- 
tenance indicates about forty-two years of age. This excellent 
production in portraiture has always excited the admiration 
and pndse of every beholder, and to the connoisseur is of the 
highest interest and value. 

ft/L 9| tfi. by 2/^. 1 M.— P. Worth 2000 gs. 

Exhibited m the British Gallery, in the years 1826 and 1827. 

No^ in the collection of His Migesty. 

The catalogue of the jnctures of Charles I. (No. IL, p. 126) sUtea 
it to have been presented to that monarch by my Lord Danby. 



160 RUBENS. 

Paul Pontius has given a fine print from it in reverse, which is 
copied by Savery ex. It is also engraved by Worlidge, Chambers, 
Facius, and Pelham, and recently by J. H. Robinson. The same 
portrait, without the hat, is engraved by Meyssens. 

There is a duplicate (also by Rubens), of an oval form, in the 
Florence Gallery, engraved by Meulmeester ; and the picture from 
which Facius made his print was then in the possession of the Duke 
of Norfolk. Dickenson has engraved a small portrait of Rubens. 



659- Helena Forman. The portrut is exhibited in a three- 
quarter view, looking towards the right, and the bands cross 
each other in front ; her auburn hair b decked with pearls 
and a few flowers; the dress is composed of a black silk 
nigUgi over a yellow satin gown and bodice, the sleeves are 
slashed and underlined with white satin, a richly-worked laoe 
frill surrounds the bosom and stands up behind the head, and 
a string of pearls adorns the neck. 

This admirable portrait is said to have remained in the family of 
Rubens from the time it was painted until 1819, forming a pendant 
to the celebrated Chapeau de Paille^ then in the collection of the 
Baron Siers d* Aertselaer, at Antwerp, of whom it was purchased pri- 
vately by a dealer and sent to Paris, from whence it was consigned 
to the writer, who sold it to His Majesty, in 1820, for 800 ^x. 

It is highly commended by Sir Joshua Reynolds, in his Tour 
through Flanders, for the excellence of its colouring and drawing. 
At the period he wrote it was in the collection of M. Van Parys, 
who was related by marriage to the family of Rubens. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery, in the years 1826 and 1827. 

Now in His Majesty's Collection. 

At the back of the panel of this picture is a slight but very 
spirited Sketch, in brown (also by Rubens), representing the 
Continence of Scipio. 

The portrait of this elegant lady occurs so frequently in the 
catalogue, that it is difficult to give credence to all of them being 
the work of Rubens. The writer, however, begs to state, that, as 
the greater part of them have come under his inspection, he has no 
hesitation in answering for those he has seen being from that 
master's hand. Other pictures are noticed in consequence of their 



RUBENS. 161 

having been engraved ; and the descriptions, in some instances, are 
taken from those prints. It should also be kept in mind, that the 
attachment of Rubens to this lady (she being his second wife, and 
only sixteen when he married her), together with her extraordinary 
beauty, must have been great inducements to the artist to repeat her 
portrait so frequently, and also to introduce it in most of his com- 
positions. Facius has engraved a print of Helena Forman, from a 
picture then in the possession of the Duke of Norfolk. 

660. A Portnut of the Duke of Mantua^s brother, repre- 
sented dad in armour. — Vide Catalogue of Charles /., 

No. XL, p. 127. 

2 ft. 1 in. by I ft. 10— P. 

561. An Allegorical Subject, allunve to Peace and War. 
In the centre of the composition, which consists of fourteen 
figures, is a beautiful female naked, presdng milk from her 
breast into the mouth of an infant ; on her right, and nearer 
the firont, is a satyr bending on his knee, and casting from 
a cornucopia a quantity of fruit (with the twigs of which a 
leopard is playing) towards three children who are approaching, 
under fixe guidance of two cupids ; one of whom holds a torch, 
and is placing a chaplet on the head of the eldest child ; behind 
the satyr are two nymphs, one bearing vessels of gold and 
silver, and the other playing a tamborine. In the rear of this 
group, which represents Harmony, Peace, and Plenty, is seen 
Minerva protecting them from the intrusion of War, personified 
by an armed man, accompanied by two harpies. A landscape 
forms the back-ground. This capital production is more dis- 
tinguished for the splendour of its colour and the display of 
masterly execution, than for the excellence of its compodtion 
or the propriety of the allegory. 

eft. 5 in. by 9ft. 8 tn.— C. 

The history of this picture states, that Rubens presented it to 
Charles L, about the year 1630; and in the catalogue of that 
monarch's pictures, made m 1649, it is inserted under the title of 
Peace and Plenty (No. I., p. 3) ; and again under that of Peace 
and War (No. XIII., p» 86), and is there valued at 100/. It subse*- 

VOL. II. H 



162 RUBEN9. 

quently became the property of Prince Doria, in whose palace* 
in Italy, it was exhibited, and called " The Family of Rubena.*' 
Political events in that country was again the cause of its removal 
from the Doria family ; and Mr. Irvine, a gentleman distinguished 
for his taste and judgment in the fine arts, became the purchaser, 
and sent it to England in 180S, and the same year it was sold by 
Mr. Buchanan to tlie Marquis of Stafford, for the sum of 3000 gi* 

Engraved in the Stafford Gallery, by J. Heath. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery, 1815. 

This excellent picture (the value of which is greatly enhanced by 
the interestmg events attached to its history) was presented to the 
National Gallery, by the Marquis of Stafford, in 1827. 



562. Daniel in the Den of Lions. The prophet is repre- 
sented sitting naked in the middle of the den, his hands clasped, 
and bis countenance directed upward with an expres^on of 
earnest prayer. Nine lions are prowling around hiim. 

7y^. 6 in. by 10/^. 10 in.—C. 

Engraved by Blooteling, Vander Leuw, and Lamb ; and in mezzo- 
tinto by J. Ward. There is also an etching of it, by Street, extremely 
rare. 

This picture is inscribed in the catalogue of Charles I. (No. XIV,, 
p. 87), which states, that it was presented to that monarch by my 
Lord Dorchester. 

Now in the coUection of the Duke of Hamilton, at Hamilton 
Palace. 



563. St. George. A Landscape, intersected in the distance 
by a river (said to be the Thames, with Windsor seen beyond 
it). Near, the centre, and extremity of the fore-ground, 19 
St. George, with his right foot on the neck of the vanquished 
dragon, and presenting to the daughter of the King of Seline 
the end of the girdle which she gave him to bind the monster. 
These two figures are portr^ts of Charles I. and Henrietta- 
Maria, his queen. Nearer the spectator, and on the right side^ 
is a group of four females, bewailing the ravages of the beasts 
exhibited on the dead bodies lying near them, from the sight 
of which two infants are recoiling with horror. The knights 



BUBENS. 168 

altendaat upon the ssdnt are om the left ; one of them, mounted 
on a gray charger, is armed cap-a-pie ; the other stands on 
the farther side of his horse, holding its rein ; beyond them are 
about nine figures, posted upon a high bank, overlooking the 
pas^ng scene. Three females are at the extremity of the com- 
position embracing each other, and beholding, with astonish- 
ment, the exploits of the saint. Two angels, each bearing a 
chaplet, are flying towards the conqueror. 

4jt. 5 in. by T/t.—C. 

Engraved in the Orleans Gallery, by Lienard. There is also a 
print which appears to have been engraved afler a picture by 
Teniers, in which several of the figures in the original composition 
are omitted. 

This picture is described in the catalogue of Charles I.'s Col- 
lection (No. I., p. 166) as the great St. George ; and, if it be the same 
picture, it it stated in that catalogue, that the king bought it of Mr. 
Endymion Porter. Rubens, however, is said to have presented it 
to that monarch, in order to testify his gratitude for the many dis- 
tiBgniihed fiivours he had received from the royal hands ; and the 
subject was selected in compliment to the English nation. At the 
distribution of the royal collection it was taken to Paris, and sub- 
sequendy became (he proper^ of the Duke of Orleans, at the sal^ 
of whose collection, in 1798, it was valued at 1000 gs,^ and bought 
by Mr. Morland, from whom it has passed into the royal collection. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1826 and 1827. 



564. A Triumph of Silenus. The composition consists of 
eight figures, in the centre of which is Silenus supported 
by two satyrs ; one of them, with his mouth open, appears t<i 
be straining with the weight, while the other bends under it 
On the farther side of Silenus is a beautiful nymph, whose wild 
and sparkling eyes, smiling face, and uplifted hands, indicate 
the effects of the exhilarating beverage, and in playful wan«^ 
tonness is squeezing the juice of a bunch of grapes on the 
temples of the demi-god ; this group is preceded by a faun, 
playing on a double pipe, and followed by an old bacchante 
bearing a torch, whom a satyr is embradng ; in front of these 
are two infants, one of them taking a branch of vine from the 



164 RUBENS. 

hand of gilenus. The figures are of the size of life, and seen 

to the knees. 

Atfi. 7 in. by ^Jt. 6 in.— C. 

The writer Tentures to direct the attention of the connoisseur to 
this productioni as an example of the most perfect description in 
its kind. The luxuriance of the expression is finely characteristic 
of the fiibled beings of ancient allegory ; its colour is rich and 
luminous, and the handling highly accomplished. 

Engraved by Delaunay, with the addition of a goat's head ; and 
again by Folo, omitting the goat. 

This picture is inscribed No. 170 in the catalogue of the collection 
of Rubens, made after his decease, and was bought privately, for 
Cardinal Richelieu, in 1642. It subsequently passed into the pos- 
session of M. de Tartre. 

Collection of Lucien Buonaparte, 1816, by Mr. Stanley, 950 ^«. 

Chevalier Bonnemaison, 1827. . 21,000/«. 840/. 

Sold by the writer to the Right Hon. Robert Peel for 1100/. 



565. The Bath of Diana. The figures are above half the 

size of nature. 

^ft. by 6y».— C. 

Michel, in his Life of RuhenSf commends very highly thb pro- 
duction ; and observes, that it was with some difficulty purchased 
of the artist's widow for Cardinal Richelieu, in 1642, for 3000 crofpiw, 
about 600/. 



566. The Three Graces. The figures are of fixe size of 
nature. 

The same writer states, that this picture was bought of the 
executors of the artist's widow for the King of England. 

Peter de Jode has engraved a print of this subject ; and the same, 
with the accessaries, is repeated, anonymous. 

There is a small picture en grisailk of the Three Ghraces, in the 
Palazzo Pitti, at Florence, engraved by Massard. 



567. Hero and Leander. 

Collection of Sir Peter Lely, 1680, bought by Mr. Creed for 85/. 



566. A Landscape. 
Same collection, 27/. 



RUBENS. 1^5 

569. * The Last Judgment 

Same coDection, 101/. 

The above was copied from a curious manuscript catalogue of the 
collection and entire efiects of Sir Peter Lely, in the possession of 
Messrs. Molteno and Graves. 



570. The Battle of the Amazons. This is stated to be the 
original study for the picture now in the Munich Gallery, dif- 
feiwg in some instances in the disposition of the groups. In 
this sketch the battle b represented raging at the Jhoi of the 
bridge; and in the finished work the combatants are upon 
the bridge. 

9,fi. %\ in. by Sjt. 9 m.— P. 

Collection of the Duke of Orleans, 1749. 



571. The Entombment The composition represents Joseph 
of Arimathea supporting the body of the Saviour, and the 
Virgin stands by the ade with a linen napkin in her hands; 
the Magdalen and another figure are seen behind the Virgin. 

Engraved by Ryckman. 

Collection of M. d'Angelis, Brussels, 17 6S. 1000^. 90/. 



572. Roman Charity. 

4>Jt. 4 tfi. by 6 ft.— C. 

Collection Jan Agges, Amsterdam^ 170)^. • 5l0flo. 46/. 

Panneels has griven an etching of this subject, in which the old 
man is represented seated in prison, and his daughter, kneeling on 
the bench by his side, giving her father the breast. 

The same subject, in which the father is on his knees, and his 
daughter seated by his side looking round with anxious inquietude, 
is engraved by Alexander Voet This is now in the Hague Gallery. 

There is a third print, by J. Smith, very similarly composed, 
with the difference, that the face of the daughter is seen in a profile 
view, looking down. Now in the Marlborough Collection. 



573. The Coronation of the Virgin. The Virgm, with the 
infant Saviour recumbent on her lap, is seated in the clouds 



166 RUBENS. 

surrounded by cherubim; two- angels, bearing a oelestial 
crown, hover over her head ; and two others ore at her feet. 
' Engraved by Bolswert. 

Collection of Jasper Lodkart, Amst, 1709. lOOOy^o. 901. 



574. Joseph and Mary returning to Jerusalem in search of 
their Son, Jesus. 
- Engraved, anonymous ; Hendriex ex. 

Collection of M. Chevalier Domburg, Amst, 1710. 840^. 75L 

. 575. A Landsci^, with a Shepherd and Shepherdess, and 
other figures. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

Collection of M. Chevalier Domburg, Amst. 1710. 4i00jlo. S6L 

This is probably the one now in the Louvre. 



576. The Garden of Love. In this compoation the artist 
has introduced portraits of himself and his scholars, Van Dyck, 
De Vos, and others, with a company of beautiful females. 

ejt. 6 in. by 7jt. 9 in.— C. 

Collection of Van Loo, . . AmsU 1713. . 3600^. 5Z4L 

Again M. de Rens 1777. . 8OOO/5. S201. 

The preceding subject is well known by the numerous copies, 
many of which have been sold as the genuine works of Rubens ; 
but although the writer has seen at least a dozen of them, he has 
not yet had the good fortune to meet with the original picture. 

There are three prints of the Garden of Love, each of which has 
evidently been engraved after different pictures. The earliest of 
the three is one done by Jegher, on an oudine by Rubens ; in this 
composition part of the company are amusing themselves with a 
jet'd'eau. The second print is engraved by Clouwet, from a picture 
composed of seven females, four gentlemen, and six cupids ; two of 
the latter are flying down from a fountain adorned with a statue of 
Venus seated on a dolphin. The third print exhibits a composition 
of nine females, five gendemen, and ten cupids ; six of the latter 
are sporting amongst shrubs near a fountain, composed of a statue 
of Venus erect. This is engraved by Lempereur after a picture 
'then in the cabinet of M. de Piles, entitled Le Jardin d'Amotif, 



SUBENS. 167 

There is also an indiffereot print of it by Malbour^. 
The original Drawings (studies for the groups in the preceding 
picture) were sold in the splendid collection of Monsieur Mariette, 

1775. . 980/*. 39/. 
. Since, writing the above descriptions, the author has been informed, 
|>y Mr. D. Wilkie and Mr. W. Woodbum, that the original picture, 
corresponding with the print engraved by Lempereur, is now in the 
collection of the Duke del Infantado,.at Madrid. 

bfi. by Qft. 6 m.— C. (about,) 



Sn. The Tribute-Money. The picture represents the mo- 
ment when the Saviour utters the injunction — ^^ Render to 
Csesar the things that are CaesarV^ The piece of money is in 
the Saviour^s left hand, and the right is raised above his head, 
in allusion to the second part of the sentence — ^^ and to God the 
things that are God^'s.^ This just reply to the inquiry of the 
Jews has excited in their countenances surprise and dismay. 
Among the group is one with a bald head, at whose side stands 
the inquirer, pointing his finger to the piece of money. The 
composition consists of nine figures of the aze of life, seen to 

the knees. 

5 ft. by Qfi.—V. 

Engraved by Landry, Visscher, and Vosterman. The sise of 

two of the prints is 28 in. by 37 tn. 

Collection of M. Van Loo, . ^mx/. 1713. . WSOflo. 103/. 

Lord Courtenay, . . 1816. . . . . 490 g«, 

John Webb, Esq. . . 1821 441 gs. 

There is also a print, representing the Tribute-Money, composed 

of twelve figures, engraved by Dankerts, of a very large size ; and 
again in small, anonymous. 



57& A Landscape, in which are introduced Meleager and 
Atalanta killing the Calydonian Boar. 

2 ft, 4 tn. by Sy^. 4 tn.— P. 
Collection of M. Amory, . Anut. 1722. . . 720^. 65/. 
, Anonymous, . JmsL 1732. . . 1030/o. 93/. 



168 BUBENS. 

579* Samson slaying a Lion. He is re p re s en ted, tearing the 
animal'^s jaws asunder. A finished studj. 

\fi. 1 m. by \fi. 4 tn.— P. 

Engraved by Quilenus. 

Collection, anonymousy . • . • 1732. • dOO^. tlU 

^—^^^ Thomas Emmerson, Esq. 1829. • • . 91 \ gs. 

There is a Drawing in chalk, washed in Indian ink, of the pre- 
ceding, in the British Musevnn. 

A picture representing the same subject as the preceding, also 
a finished sketch, is engraved by Wyngaerde. 

Cochin mentions a picture of Samson combating a lion, and a 
dead tiger lying at his feet, as being in the Casa Avoyadri, at 
Brescia. 

This subject is engraved in meszotinto by Fredhof, after a picture 
in the possession of Von Sachsen, and is probably the one mentioned 
by Cochin. 

680. David slaying a Lion. 

ft ft. S in. by fift. 7 in.— P. 
Collection, anonymous, • AmsU 1732. . . $00 Jlo. 27 L 
The original Drawings, studies for the above two pictures, are in 
the collection of Sir Thomas Lawrence, P.R*A. 



581. The Fall of the rebel Angels. 

loyi. by syi.— C. 

Felibien mentions a picture representing this subject, then in the 
collection of Cardinal Richelieu. 

Collection of M. Bout, . Hague, 17 S3. . 1110^. 100/. 

The above is probably the one now in the gallery at Schleisheims. 

A picture representing the preceding subject was sold in the 
collection of Sir Peter Lely, 1680, for lOll. 



588. The Ascension of the Virgin, accompanied by Angels. 

The apostles and holy women surround the tomb bdow. 

A finished sketch. 

Sft. S in. by ft ft. 2 in P. 

Collection of M. Adrian Bout, . 1733. . . 909^. 81/. 



BUBEK8. 169 

688. The four Penitents in the presence of the Saviour. 

^ft* 7\ in, by ^ft* 2 m. 

This subjeet is engraved by Lauwers ; and also by Green, in 
mezsotintOy from a large picture in the Munich Gallery. — See 
pp. da, 66, and 156. 

Collection of M. Adrian Bout, • • 173S. • 590^. 5d/. 

584. Pan and Syrinx, in a Landscape. This is probably a 
sketch for the picture in His Majesty^s collection. 

15 in. by 23 tn. — P. 
Cdllectionof M.Adrian Bout, • . 1783. . 700^. ^ZL 

685. The Nativity. A compodtion of dght figures. 

Zjt. \\ in. by Sft. 1} m.— C. 
Collection of the Count de Fraula, Bnus. 1 738. 595 Jlo. ifSL 

686. The Ascension of the Virgin. 

Collection of the Count de Frank, 1738. • 900^. 81/. 



587. Mercury conveying Psyche to Olympus. A com- 
position of seventeen figures. This excellent production is 
remarkable for the purity and splendour of its colour, and the 
admirable finishing which pervades every part 

2 ft. 4 til. by SJt. 1 in.— P. 

Engraved by Finden. 

Collection of the Count de Fraula, 1738. • 500^. 45/. 
MadUe. Regans, Brtus. 1775. . 1700^. 153/. 

Now in the collection of the Marquis of Stafford. Worth 500 gs. 

A Picture, representing the same subject as the preceding, was 
sold in the collection of M. Oeldermeester, 1800. V(5fio. 43/. 



588. Perseus and Andromeda. 

Zfi. 6tft.by 9 ft. 9iii.- 

Collection, anonymous, . • Avut. 1738. • 630^* 57/. 

There is a print of this subject, taken from a picture then in the 
collection of the Count de Bruhl {^fi* by 5f\. — C.), in which 
Perseus has dismounted from Pegasus, and is taking Andromeda by 
the hand ; they are attended by seven cupids, &c. Engraved by 
Tardieu. 



170 EUBENS. 

A. picture repretenttng the preceding subject (6yif. 5m. by 
^ft. 7 in,) was sold in the collection of Robert Udney^ Esq. 1804. 

A picture of Perseus and Andromeda is introduced in a view of 
the interior of the apartments of the artist's house. Engraved by 
Harrewyn. 

589. Yertumnus and Pomona. The landscape is painted 

by Breughel. 

SA by 4Jt. 

Collection of Van Loo, .... 1713. . 2825/o. 254/. 

of M. Valkenburg, . . 1733. . 1700^. 153/. 



590. Cymon and Iphigenia. 

3/t. by 3/t. 6 in. 
Collection of Van Loo, . . . . 1713. . lOOO/o. 90/. 



591* Sophonisba. 

5/t. 6 tit. by ft ft. 6 in. 

Collection of Van Loo, . . . . 1713. . 700 Jlo. 63/. 



v«JMit • :i|ir»ji 



592. Abigail meeting David with presents. The 
exhibits Abigail alighted from her beast, and bending on one 
knee before David ; her left hand is placed on her breast^ and 
her right extended .towards the present brought to appease his 
anger against her husband Nabal ; her attendants consist of 
two fenudes, who stakid on her farther side (these are, probably, 
portraits of the artistes wives), and three men servants. David, 
clad in armour and wearing a scarlet mantle, has also dis- 
mounted from his horse, which is held by a youth behind him, 
and is bending forward to raise Abigail ; a company of two 
horse and three foot soldiers attend the future king of Israel. 
This capital production is*admirably composed and splendidly 

coloured. 

5 ft, 9 in. by Sft. ft in. — C. 

Engraved by Lommelin. 

Collectionof M.Meyer, Rotterdam, 1722. . 1400/o. 126/. 
Now in the collection of Paul Methuen, Esq. Worth 1500 gs. 
Another Picture of Abigail meeting David was sold in the col- 
lection of W. Agar Ellis, Esq. 1806. 



KUBENS. 171 

59s. Four Children playing with a Lamb, in a landscape. 

$ft. 2 in. by St ft. 1 in C. 

Engraved by Spruyt. 

Colleetion of M. Meyers, .... 1722. . 870^. 78/. 

Now in the Vienna Gallery. — See pp. 96 and 109. 



594. Venus and Adonis, attended by cupids. 

Sft. 7 J t«. by Sft. 1 tn. 
Collection M. Schuylenburg, Hague^ 1735. . 840^. 751. 

M. da Costa 1764. . 1035^. 93/. 

Tassaert has engraved a print of the above subject 



595. Bathsheba at a Fountain, attended by a female and a 

negro. 

4ft. 9 tn. by 6ft. 5 in. — C. ; or Sft. 6 in. by 4 ft. 

Collection Count Van Plettenburg, Anut. 1738. lOOO^o. 90/. 

M. Van Zwieten, . Hague, 1741. 700^. 6Sl. 



696. Christ expiring on the Cross. The countenance of 
the dying Saviour is directed upwards. 

4ft. 1 in. by Sft. 3 in. 

» 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

Collection of M. de Witt, . . ^9?m/. 1741. . 500 Jlo. 45L 



597. Christ triumphant over Death and the Grave. The 
Saviour, attended by two angels, one of whom is placing a 
wreath on his head, the other sounding a trumpet, is repre- 
Koted atting on his tomb treading Sin and Death under his 
feet ; a third angel, bearing a palm branch, is winging its way 
towards the Saviour. 

6ft. by 4ft. 6 1».— C. 

Engraved by Eyndhouedts. The same subject is engraved by 
Galle ;• by anonymous ; and also in a small sixe. 

Collection of Count Domburg, Hague^\745. • 700 Jlo. C$1. 

The preceding picture was painted for the tomb of the famfly 
of Cockxy in a chapel of the church of St. Walbmige, at Antwerp. — 
oee p. 6* 



172 BUBEKS. 

698. Susanna and the Elders. 

3 A by Sfi. 6 in.— C. 

Collection of Count Domburg . . 1745. . 400^. d6/. 

There are several prints of the preceding subject, one of which 
is engraved by Jegher, on an outline by Rubens ; in this composition 
Susanna is seated, seen in a front view, and the elders are by her 
side removing her drapery. Jegher has repeated the subject, 
differently composed. It is also engraved by Vostennan, Pontius, 
and Simon. 

There is a mezzotinto print of this subject in which one of the 
elders is behind Susanna, pulling off her drapery. 

Felebien mentions a picture of Susanna and the Elders, then in 
the collection of the Duke de Richelieu. Etched by Spruyt. 



599. St Walburge in a Ship. — See p. 8. 

2ji. 6 in. by Sft. % in.— P. 
Collection of M. de Roore, . Hague^ 1747. . 160 Jlo. 14/. 
M. Schamps, at Ghent. 



600. The Burial of St WalhuTge.—See p. 8. 

ft ft. 6 in. by Sft. St in.— P. 
Collection of M. de Roore, • Hague, 1747. • 250/o. 22/. 
These were painted for the church of St Walburge, at Antwerp. 



601. A dead Christ A finished study. 

12in. by 19 in.— P. 
C6llection of M. de Roore, . Hague, 1747. . 280 jfo. 25/. 



602. Christ discovering himself to his Disciples at Emmaus. 

Engraved by Witdouc. There is also a print by Sompelin, in 
* which are introduced, a woman with a glass of liquor in her hand,' 
and a boy with a plate. The same, in reverse, is engraved by 
Swanenburg. 

Collection, anonymous, . . MaUne9,\766. . 1250^. 112/. 

Ni>w in the Munich Gallery. 



608. The Daughter of Herodias showing the Head of John 
the Baptist to Herod. The tetrarch, habited in a rich mantle 



RUBENS. 178 

decked with ermine, and a cap of the samemateiml, is seated 
at the head of a long table, with Herodias on bis right; his 
attention is directed to the head of the saint, which is held in 
a charger by the young female who had requested it; and 
behind whom is a boy playing with a monkey. A company of 
seven guests are at the table, and scTeral servants are entering 
the room bearing viands for the banquet. 

Engraved by Bolswert ; and also by Clouwet. 

Collection of M. Sybrechts^ Anut. 1754. 

A very capital Drawing, of superlative excellence, commenced 
in chalks and terminated en grisaille^ done by the artist for the 
engraver to work from, is in the collection of Sir Thomas Law- 
rence, P.R.A. 

18|m. by 28|tii. 



604. Hagar and Ishmael in the Desert. 

tft. 6 in. by 2ft. 7 in.— P. 
Collection M. deSteenhault, ^rtwfe^, 1758. . 440/t). Sdl. 



606. A Landscape, in which are introduced nine figures. 

3 ft. by 5 ft. 2 in. 
Collection of P. J. Snyers, . Brtuiets,i756. . 401^. SQL 



606. A Wild Boar Hunt. The figures are by Rubens, the 
anim^U by Snyders, and the landscape by Wildens. 

5ft. 9 in. hy 9 ft. U^ in. 
CoUec^on otF. J. Snyen, . Brussels, 17 58. . S^Ojio. SOl. 



607. Joshua overcoming the Amalekites. A sketch. 

23 m. by 28 in. — P. 
Collection of P. J. Snyers, . . . 1758. . 78^. 71* 



608. Infants adorning a niche (in which is a statue of the 
Virgin and infant Saviour) with festoons of fruit 

2 ft. 10 in. by ft ft. 1 in.— P. 
Engraved by Galle. 
Collection of M.Hoet,. . Hague, 1700. . 1210/o. 1091. 



174 BUBEN8. 

609. The Virgin wmtobhig her akeping Infant The Saviour 

lies asleep on a couch in front, covered with a blanket, and the 

Virgin, with her hands umted, stands by his side, bending 

affectionatelj over him; she is seen in nearlj a front view» 

dressed in a scariet robe, and a dark blue mantle on the left 

shouldar. A pleaong example of the master^ painted in a light 

free manner. 

2//. by I ft. 7\ in.— P. Worth 300^*, 

Engraved hy Vosterman. 

Collection of Cardinal Valentini, ^fiuM 763. • 570 flo. Bll. 

This picture has, within a few years past, been presented to the 
church of St. Nicholas, at Brussels, to adorn the epitaph of Henry 
Ausroos. 



610. A Landscape, in the fore-ground of which are intro- 
duced a cart laden with vegetables^ several figures, cows, and 

sheep. 

23 m. hy 33 tn. — P. 

A print corresponding with this description is engraved hy Van 

Kessel, and another by Browne. — Ste (Uscriptious, 

Collection of Cardinal Valentini, . 1763. • Idfijfe. 18/. 



611. Christ expiring on the Cross. The city of Jerusalem 
is seen in the distance. 

S/L 10 in. hySjl. 

Engraved by Sompelin and Galle. 

Collection of Cardinal Valentini, . 1763. . l^ZSfio. 110/. 

Leindert de Neuville, . 1765. . 4000^. 360/. 

A picture corresponding with the above is in the collection of Sir 
Simon Clarke, Bart. 



612. The Rape of the Sabines. After a cursory view of the 
bustle and confusion, the inevitable consequences of such an 
event, the eye rests on a prominent group in the centre of the 
scene of action, composed of six figures, one of which, mounted 
on a chesnut horse, and wearing a red mantle over his armour, 
has sdbsed a young Sabine wonmn, whose white dress and 



EUBENS; 175 

appearance indicate her to be of superior rank, and, with the 
asfibtance of a young man, is endeavouring to raise her on his 
horse ; nearer the spectator, a stout Roman, clad in armour, 
his helmet surmounted with a plume of feathers, is clasping a 
struggling female round the waist, while an elderly woman, who 
has fallen in the tumult, has seized the leg of the man with her 
teeth. On the left, and dose to the front, b a young female, 
who has thrown herself into the arms of her mother for pro- 
tection against the violence of a youth, on whose face the mother 
is imprinting her nails; a little removed from these is another 
discordant pair, struggling together at the side of a covered 
platform, on which is a company of elegant young females, 
several of whom are seized by soldiers ; among them is one in 
a light blue dress, with her back to the spectator, apparently 
greatly agitated by the threatening atutudes of several men 
before her. On the opposite side is a pretty female, whom a 
young warrior is pulling by the clothes towards him, and whose 
resistance is aided by an elderly man ; beyond these is seen a 
display of the military games near the gate of the city. A 
building, resembling the Pantheon, terminates the view. 



618. The Reconciliation of the Romans and Sabines. The 
treachery and violation of confidence, represented in the pre- 
ceding picture, naturally excited the most indignant feelings in 
the breasts of the Sabines ; and the following year brought an 
army, composed of the fathers, brothers, and other relations of 
the violated females, breathing slaughter and revenge against 
the Romans. In the arrangement of the composition, the 
artist has supposed the two armies prepared for instant battle ;. 
this is indicated by a few soldiers of each nation being placed 
on opporite ffldes of the picture; those of the Romans, on the 
right, consist of five soldiers, the head of a cohort, whose 
banners and arms appear approaching ; the nearest of these tQ 
the spectator is a foot soldier clad in armour, whose eagerness 
to advance to the combat is restrained by a female holding him 
by the sword-arm ; beyond him is a cavalry soldier riding a fine 



176 RUBENS. 

gray chai^ger, the bridle of which is held by a beautiful youi^ 
Sabine; on her left stands another, whose countenance and 
gesture strongly deduct her mental anxiety ; still farther on are 
four other interesting young females, one of whom carries a fine 
babe in her arms, a second is on her knees, and a third holds 
up to view the pledge of the conjugal union ; these form a line 
in the centre of the oomposiuon, and face the Sabine army. 
The Sabines are represented by three infantry and two cavalry 
soldiers, the advance of the column ; one of the former, and the 
nearest to the spectator, armed with a sword and shield, who, 
bearing defiance in his looks, and showing by his action eager- 
ness to rush upon his opponent, is suddenly arrested in hb 
purpose by a young female, who has thrown herself at his feet, 
clasping his arm with nervous energy, and with imploring looks 
pleading for reconciliation ; a fine infant, lying on the ground 
by her side, adds force and effect to the moving appeal ; such 
an unexpected interposition appears to have paralyzed the mov^ 
ments of the soldiers ; the horseman suspends the intended cast 
of his spear, and a soldier stands motionless with his half-drawn 
sword. . Symptoms of hesitation are exhibited on both udes. 

I ft. 10 in. by 2Jt. 10 in P. 

To expatiate on the many beauties which these pictures possess 
would exceed the limits allotted to this work ; it may, however, be 
observed, that the artist has, with consummate judgment, griven to 
the first picture a richness of colour, and force of effect, which 
accord with the action and energy of the subject, while dehcacy and 
tenderness of tone pervade the latter. It may also be noticed, that 
the positions and forms of the females are graceful and elegant, and 
free from the defects so firequently censured in Rubens by cridcs. 
Tliese pictures are what is termed finished sketches, or, more 
properly, matured studies for the large pictures now in the Escurial, 
and are of rare excellence and beauty. 

Sir Joshua Reynolds, in his Journey through Flanders, observes, 
'' that few pictures by Rubens, even of his most finished works, give 
a higher idea of his genius ; all the parts are more determined than 
is usual in sketches. The latter picture (he says) has more novelty, 
and is the most interesting of the two." 



BUB£NS« 177 

Collection of Prince Rubempre, • • 1765. » 2400^. £16/. 

1 — M. Danoot, .... 1829. l4,l7Sjo. 1280/. 

In the latter sale, the price stated is merely nominal, the pictures 
having been previously bought, with many others, the elite of the 
collection, by a speculator, subject to the condition, that they should 
pass through the sale, in order to promote the disposal of those of 
an inferior class. 

Sold by Mr. Buchanan to Alexander Baring, Esq., in April the 
same year, for 1000/. 



614. The Descent from the Cross. A sketch. 

28tii. by 18m P. 

Collection of Prince Rubempre, . . 1765. . 510^. 46/. 



615. A Man and a Woman in a Larder, stored with game, 
fruit, and vegetables. The latter are painted by Snyders. 

ejt. 7 m. by liy^. 6 in. 
Collection of M. Lormier, . Hagtte^lTSS, . 780^. 70/. 



<i 



616. The Death of Hippolytus. This grand and terrific 
subject is depicted in this admirable production with such a 
psunter^s hand and poet^s fire, that the writer feels it impossible 
for him to do justice to it but by quoting the description of the 
subject from Racine : — 

L'onde approche, se brise, et vomit a nos yeux, 
Parmi les flots d*ecume, un monstre furieux. 
Son front large est arm6 de comes mena^antes ; 
Tout son corps est couvert d'ecailles jaunissantes ; 
Indomptable taureau, dragon impltueux, 
Sa croupe se recourbe en replis tortueux : 



Ses coursiers. 



La frayeur les emportes ; et, sourds a cette fois, 
lis ne connaissent plus ni le frein ni la voix ; 
En efforts impuissans leur maltre se consume ; 
lis rougissent le mors d*une sanglante 6cume. 



VOL. II. 



ITS RUBENS. 

A travers les rochers la peor les precipite, 
L'esBieu crie et se rompt : Tintrepide Hippdyte 
V<Mt Toler en eclats tout son char fracaise ; 
Dans les r^nes lui-n)6me il tombe embarrasse. 



TraSn^ par les chevaux que sa main a nourris. 

20 in. by 25 in.— P. 

Engraved by M. Cosway. 

Now in the collection of Sir Abraham Hume, Bart. 

A Study, in chalks, of the Hippolytus is in the Musee at Paris. 

His Grace the Duke of Bedford possesses a Duplicate of the pre^ 
ceding picture, having the addition of two figures, who are seen 
escaping from the tetrific scene. For this example, the writer has 
'been informed, his Grace paid the liberal sum of 900/. The 
difference between the two works is, that that of Sir A. Hume is 
painted with a free, loose, and masterly pencil, and this ia a dry 
and careful manner. The sea-shore is also covered with a variety 
of little shells, very- neatljf painted, but quite inappropriate to the 
grandeur and sublimity of the subject. 

Engraved by Earlom and Anker Smith. 

Exhibited in the British GaUery, 1823. 



617. The Death of Hippolytus. 

20 in. by 27 in. — ^P. 

Collection, anonymous, • . Amsi. 1738. 

M. de Roore, .... 1747. . 290^. 26/. 

This is probably one of the above pictures. The lowness of the 
price is no criterion, as this master's works were never very highly 
appreciated in Holland. 



618. A Milkwoman. 

This picture is cited by Deschamps, in La Fie des Peintres, as 
then in the collection of tlie Count de Vence, 1 753. 



619. A Portrait of Helena Forman, with the face seen in a 
three-quarter podtion. 

25 in. by 19 in. — P. 



BUISEKS. 179 

Collection of M. Pasquier, Rouen, 175$, 

the Due de Praaliiit . • 1793. • 1001/jr. 40/. 

M. Robit, .... 1801. . 1500/*. 60/. 

Now in the collection of Sir Simon Carke, Bart. Worth 200 g«. 



620. Banditti pilling a Village. 

Collection of M. Chatagneraye, . 1730. • 1037/«. 41/. 



621. Venus and Adonis. 

23| in. by 82 ii*.— C. 
This subject is engraved by Tassaert, Lorenzini, and Panneels, 
and is in the Florence Gallery. 

Collection of Prince Carignan, . . 1742. . 1200/*. 48/. 



• 623. A River God reclining on an urn, suirouoded by 
bulrushes and other water plants. 

4/f. 8 in. by 3/f.— C. 

There is a print of a nver god and a nymph reclining on an urn, 
engraved by VangelisU. 

CoUectiim of Prince Carignan, . . .1742. • 1600/p. 64/, 



623. Venus returning from the Chase. The beautiful 
goddess occupies the centre of the composition, carrying a lance 
against her shoulder, and a quantity of small birds in her lap ; 
two satyrs .precede her, one of whom carries fruit before him, 
some of which two boys are taking ; the other has a basket of 
fruit on his head ; five nymphs compose her train, one of which a 
bagpiper is embracing, each of the othdrs carry game and 
hunting implements. Several dogs accompany the party. The 

figures are entire. 

e/t. by 7fi.—C. 

Engraved by Launay. 

Collection of the Due d*Orleans, 1749 (bought for the family). 

Orleans Gallery, brought to England, 1798, and valued at 400 gs, 

A very spirited Sketch for the preceding picture is now in the 

collection of the Earl of Radnor, at Longford Castle. 

12 tn. by lltn. 



180 RUBENS. 

624. The Last Supper. 

6X5. The Companion. The Resurrection of Lazarus. 

\ft. 7 in. by 2ft. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

These are masterly sketches, done en grisaille for large pictures. 

Collection of M. Tonneman, Anut. 1754. . 1350^. 1221. 

M. Braamcamp, Amst. 1771. . 1700^. 153/. 

in a public sale at Mr. Christie's, 1826. 100 gs. 



626. An Allegorical Subject, allusive to the Life of Henry IV. 
of France. A spirited sketch. 

CoUectionofd'Argenville, . . . 1756. . SOO fs. S2l. 



6S7. St Cedlia, singing and playing on the harpsidbord. 
The saint is attended by angels, one of whom is seated on the 
back of a sphynx. 

5/t. 7 in. by 4jt. S in.— C. 

Engraved by Witdouc. This subject, with two angels, is also 
engraved by Panneels, and again by Lommelin. The above came 
from the collection of Prince Carignan. 

Collection of the Due deTaUard, . 1756. . 20fi50fs. 802/. 

Now in the gallery at Potsdam. 



628. St. Cecilia, &e. &c., attended by two angels. 

7 ft. by 5ft 2 in.— C. 

Engraved by Panneels, Lommelin, and Wyngaerde. 

Collection of M. Sonsot, BnuseU, 1739. . UOOjlo. 126/. 

The preceding saint, seen in profile, pla3ring on an organ, is 
engraved, anonymous ; and again, with the face presented in a three* 
quarter view, anonymous. 



629. The Adoration of the Kings. This picture is composed 
of fourteen figures, and is disUnguished from others of the 
same subject by the Virgin holdmg the infant Saviour in a 
sitting posture, on a pillow, before whom a ma^ (seen in a 



BUBEK8. 181 

profile view) is bowing aa his knees, presenting a bowlful of 

monej. 

5jt. 4 in. by 7 ft. 10 m C. 

This picture is roentiooed by Descarops. It was formerly in the 
ccAecdon of M. Godefroy, a banker at Brussels, and previously in 
that of Moretusy the celebrated printer at Antwerp. 

Collection of the Due de Tallard, . 1756. . 7500/«. 3001. 



680. The Watering Place. The view exhibits a landscape, 
characterized by its bold forms and wild appearance ; a broken 
and diversified fore-ground is intersected by a stream of water 
extending along the front, and traversed at a little distance by a 
rustic bridge; beyond which rises a mass of rocks, whose 
summits are clothed with lofty umbrageous trees and rich 
underwood. Thb sequestered scene is enlivened by cattle and 
figures ; among which, and close to the front, is a man in a 
scarlet jacket watering two horses ; another man is in the stream 
driving out a cow ; a woman with a can on her head and three 
other cows are on the bank, and a fourth cow is crossing the 
bridge ; to the left are three more of the herd, and near these 
is a youth seated on a bank playing a pipe ; in the opposite side 
are flocks of sheep browzing on the hills, from whence the view 
ppens to the distant country. A dear and brilliant daylight 
efiect, and the verdant freshness of summer, pervade this 
admirable picture. 

3 ft. $ in. by 4^ ft. 4^ tn.--C. 

Engraved by Van Uden, Brookshaw, and also by Brown, under 
the above tide, when in the collection of the Duke of Montague. 
Collection of the Due deTaUard, . 1756. . 9905 fs. 4001. 
Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1815. 
Now in the possession of the Duke of Bucdeugh. Worth 1 500 gs. 



681. The Assumption of the Virgin. A grand altar-piece. 

loyi. by 7ft ^C. 

Collection of M. Pauwels, Brussels, 1S0$. . 4666^. 420/. 



182 nuBENa. 

SBSL The Centaur Nesnis carrying off Dejantfa. 

Zjt. 7 in. by 4Jt. 

Engraved anonymous. 

Collection Vanden Graira de Fnmla, Bruis, 1 7SS. 575^. 51tl, 

Madlle. Regaus, . • Bruss. 1775. 3550^. dl9t 

There is also a print of the preceding subject, engraved by 
Schultze, in the Le Brun Gallery, from a picture (J^fi. 8 1». by 2y).). 
In this the centaur is represented at the moment of his receiving a 
mortal wound from the arrow shot by Hercules. This picture was 
sold by Le Brun to Count StrogonofT, at St. Petersburg. 

Another picture of the same subject was sold in the oolleetion of 
William Young Otley, Esq., 1811. 

There is also an etching of this subject, which represents the 
centaur galloping off with the struggling female in his arms ; she 
has- one arm round his shoulders and one hand under his anoDu 
Engraved by Panneek. 

633. Four large Cartoonsy representing the most distinguished 
feats of the Consul Dedus, done for patterns to be executed in 
tapestry. 

Collection of M. Bertells, Brussels, 1779. . 1 500 Jlo. 135/. 

See Lichtenstein Collection, p. 101. 



634. A Landscape, in which is introduced the subject of 
Hagar and Ishmael. 

26 in. by 27 tn.— P. 
Collection of M. Boremans, Brussels, 17 SI. . 790 Jh. 701. 



635. The Head of expiring Seneca. 

19 tn. by 17 in. (oval.) 
Collection of R. Strange, Esq., 1769. 



636. The Martyrdom of St. Ursula and the eleven thousand 
Virgins. An angel is seen descending from the clouds, bearing 
a wreath to crown the martyr saint. A brilliant and beautUul 
sketch. 

19in. by 15ia,— P. 



IUJBEX& lO 

Etched by Spniyt. 

ColleetioiiofM.Braaiiicamp, 1771. 495^. 45/. Worth 150/. 

Now in the collection of M. Van Sasseghero, ad Ghent. 



637. A portrait of a Lady Abbess. 

26 in, by £1 m. — P. 
Engraved in the Choiseul Gallery. 
Collection of the Due de Choiseul, . 1772. . 550 fs. 22/. 



638. A Landscape, exhibiting a view of an open and richly* 
wooded country, illumined by a bright sunset. 

17 in, by 25 «i. — ^P. 
Engraved by Maille in the Choiseul Gallery. 
Collection of the Due de Choiseul, . 1772. (not put up,) 



639. The Reconciliation of Jacob and Esau. The former 
is accompanied by his wives, children, servants, and cattle. 
An excellently-finished sketch for the large picture now in the 
Munich Gallery. — Seep, 68. 

ISin. by 15t«.— P. 

Engraved by Balliu. 

Collection of M. Lempereur, . . 1773. . .3660/^. 146/. 

Prince de Conti, . • . 1777. . 2620/r. 105/. 

M. Beaujon 1787. . l5S0f$, esi, 

M. de St. Victor, . . . 1822. . 810/*. 52/. 

In the latter sale it was exceedingly disguised with dirt ; the 
writer has since given 100/. for it, and sold it for I SOL 



640. Roman Charity. In the composition of this picti^re 
the old man is represented sitting on the ground, with his legs 
under him and his bands tied behind his back ; his affectionate 
daughter is on her knees, looking round with anxious inquietude, 
and her child, covered with a linen cloth, lies on scxne straw. 
The same subject occurs in p. 165. 

2//. 4 in. by 5 ft, 4tii.— C. 

Engraved by Smith in messotinto. 



184 RUBENS. 

Collection of M. Julienne, . . . 1767. . 5000/f. 200/. 

Prince de Conti, . . . 1779. • 1600/t. 64/. 

M. Robit, 1801. . 2400/#. 96/. 

A picture, representing the same composition as the preceding, 
but of larger dimensions, is in the Marlborough Collection. 



641. Melcbizedeck giving bread and wine to Abraham and 
bis Soldiers. The compodtion consists of about dghteen figures. 
This is a finished study, of superlative beauty, for the large 
picture in the collection of Earl Grosvenor.— For description 
see p, 141. 

24 tfi. by 30 in. — ^P. 

Collection of M. Julienne, . . . 1767. • d840/f. 154/. 
Now in the collection of the Dowager Lady Stuart, and worth 500gs. 



643. The Queen of Sheba appearing before Solomon, with 
presents of gold and silver vessels. Close to the front are a 
negro page with a parrot and a monkey, and two men-servants 
laden with part of the treasure. 



643. The Companion. Esther approaching the throne of 
Abasuerus, to supplicate him on behalf of her people. The 
king has risen from his throne, and is extending the sceptre of 
clemency over the fainting Esther. A composition of eight 
figures. These are vigorous and masterly sketches for the two 
pictures done for the ceiling of the Jesuits^ church at Antwerp. 
— See pp. 16, 17. 

19|tii. by I5iin.—P. 

Engraved by Preisler and Punt. 

Collection of M. Julienne, .... 1767. • 8d0/#. SSL 

M. DeBois, 1785. . 526/#. 21/. 

M. De Calonne, . . . 1795. . . • lOOgt. 

M.Brian, . . . . . 1798. . . . 70^*. 

Now in the possession of Mr. Norton. 



KUBENS: 185 

644. The Pope causing the Holy Gate to be opened. A 
composition of several figures, and two angels in the clouds. 

ft^in. by 16f tn. 
Collection of M. Julienne, . . . 1767. . 605 fo. ftAL 



645. A Lion Hunt. Composed of three men, mounted on 
spirited horses, attacking two lions, one of which is receiving 
the spear of one of the huntsmen in its mouth. 

Engraved by Moyreau, when in the collection of M. Julienne, 
1767, 

A Sketch, probably the picture from which the print was taken, 
is in the collection of Lord Damley, at Cobham. 

17jiii.by24tn.— P. 



646. The Marriage of St Catherine, in the presence of a 
great number of Saints. 

22|m. by 17 in. — ^P. 

Engraved by Sneyers and Eynbouedts. 

A masterly sketch for the altar-piece of the church of the 
Dominicans, at Antwerp. — See p, 24. 
Collection of M. Julienne, .... 1767. . 1000/f. 40/. 
Now in the collection of the Earl of Mulgrave. 



647. The Virgin with the infant Saviour in her arms, 

seated in a niche surrounded by dght persons, among whom 

are a bishop on one ude and the Magdalen on the other. A 

sketch. 

12im. by 194 m.— P. 

Collection of M. Julienne, . • • 1767. • 480/f. 19/. 



648. Saint Cecilia, singing and playing on the harpsichord. 

15 tn. by lO^tfi — P. 

A sketch in gray, probably for one of the pictures noticed in 
p. 180. 
Collection of M. Julienne, . • . 1767. . 50/s. 2/. 



186 BUBENS. 

649* The AjBaumption of the Virgin. A free sketch. 

19 in. by llts.— P. 
Collection of M. Julieone» . . . 1767. • 200/<. 8^. 



650. The Conversion of St. Paul. A sketch. 

19t». by 13mi,— P. 
Collection of M. Julienne, . • • 1767. • 128/f. 5L 



651. Same Subject 

17tn. by 10 m. — P. 
Collection of M. Lempereur, . . 1773. . 611/*. 24/. 



65S. Same Subject 

17 m. by 19 m.— P. 
Collection of Prince de Conti, . . 1777. . 800/f. 3ZL 



653. Cambyses compelling a Judge to at upmi a Cushioii 
made of the Skin of the late Judge, his Father, whom Cam- 
byses had caused to be flayed for Injustice. A finished study. 

17 m. by 17 m.— P. 

Engraved by Eynhouedts. 

Collection of M. Lormier, Hague^ 1763^ • 640^o. SSL 



654. A Landscape, beautifully varied with hills, dales, 
wood, and water; and enlivened with figures, horses, cows, 
and ducks. In the front-ground are two women and a man ; 
one of the former has a milk-can on her head, the other carries 
a can on her arm ; a waggon drawn by two horses, on one of 
which the driver rides, is close to the right side. 

$ft. by 3 Jl. 11m.— P. 
Collection of M. Potter, . Hague, 1723. . 1000^. 90/. 

M. Wierman, . Amst. 1762. . \570flo. 141/. 

A picture corresponding with the preceding description is in the 
Munich Gallery. 

655. A Landscape, with a grove of trees. This Arcadian 
scene is enlivened by a large assemblage of nymphs and youths. 



BUBBIfa. 187 

attended by cupidfi flying and sporting amongst the trees. The 
composition is probably intended to represent the island of 
Cy thera, with the games instituted in honour of Venus. 

%Jt. 1 tn. by %fi. 1 1 tfi.— P. 

Engraved by Qouwet and Prenner. 

Collection of Prince Trevulzio^ AmsU 1764. t960^. 266/. 

Now in the Belvidere Palaoe,.-^re p* 97. 



656. Four Huntsmen with Dogs attacking a Stag. Thp 
animals are painted by Snyders. 

^Jt. 4| in. by eft. 5 in C. 

Collection of M. da Costa, • . . 1764. . 510^. 46 A 



657. Ceres and a Satyr. The latter bears a horn of abundance. 

4fft. by eft. 2 in.— C. 
The landscape is said to be by the hand of Breughel ; but, judging 
from its size, it is much more likely to be by Wildens. 

Collection of M. Horion, BrusseU^ 17 SS. . 2600^. 234/. 



658. The Four Doctors c^ the Church. A sketch. 

24iii. by 17 m.— P. 
There is a print by Van Dalen, representing St. Ambrose, St. Gre- 
gory, St. Jerome, and St Anguatin, consulting together over a book. 
Collection of M. Horion, . . . 1788. . 1210^. 1091. 



659* Abimelech, with Abraham and Sarah. 

2/r. by ^ft. 6 in.— P. 
Collection of M. Horion, Brussels, 17 SB. • S2lOJ!o. 289/. 



560. A Magdalen. A sketch. 

1 7 tn. by 22 ta.— P. 
Collection of M. Horion, . . . 1788. . d70/o. 891. 



661 . VillageiB merry-making. A landscape, in the for^-ground 
of which are introduced a Gc»npany of sixteen peasants, of both 
sexes, habited in their gayest attire, dancing in a ring, which 
their frolicsome bounds have broken, and thrown into pic- 
turesque confusion. Among those in front may be observed a 



188 EUB£N8(. 

fine comely female, wearing a scarlet dress, whom her partner 
is embracing, and another in a blue gown is invited by her 
companion to imitate them; every countenance and gesture 
indicate the joyousness which pervades all hearts; in a cluster 
of trees beyond them is seen the merry piper plajdng his in- 
strument This beautiful production may be compared to a 
cluster of the gayest flowers sparkling in the noon-day sun ; it 
is no less admirable for the natural expression which animates 
the figures, and the free and masterly handling of the execution. 

tft. 5\ in. by Zft. 6\ tn.— -P. 

Etched by Van Hiel ; and engraved by Bolswert. It is inserted 
No. 103, p. 31, of the catalogue of Rubens's efi*ect8 ; and it is also 
noticed by Descamps in his Lives of the Painters. 

Collection of Le President de Tugny, 1751. . 1 1 /# . 40/. 

M. Julienne . . . 1767. . 1361/*. S5l. 

■ ThomasEmmerson, Esq. 1829. . • • 950 gi» 



662. St. Theresa on her knees, interceding with the Saviour 
for the delivery of souls from purgatory, two of whom are 
being delivered by angels from this imaginary place of punish- 
ment. This is a finished study, of uncommon force and rich- 
ness of colour, and the figures are animated with true pathetic 

expression. 

2ft. 2 in. by 1ft. 7 tn.— P. Worth 300 gs. 

Engraved by Bolswert. — See p. 22. 

Collection of Prince Rubempre,£rM«e/f, 1765. • 760 flo. 68/. 

M. Braamcamp, . Amst. 1771. . 835^. 75/. 

Now in the collection of M. Van Sasseghem, at Ghent. 



668. A Duplicate of the preceding picture, but of inferior 
quality. 

Sold in the collection of J. Maybew, Esq. 1812. . . 350 gt. 
Now in the collection of the Marquis of Stafford. 



664. The Seven Wise Men of Greece. A sketch. 

Hi in. by 18^ m.— P. 
Collection of M. Julienne, . . . 1767. . 601 /<. 24/. 



HUBENS. 189 

665. Nymphs and Satyrs. A sketch. 

CollectionofM. Julienne, • . • 1767. . 180/f. 7L 



666. The Rape of Proserpine. A sketch for the large 
jncture in the Marlborough Collection. 

llta. by 25 tn. — P. 
Engraved by Soutroan. 

CoUection of M. Trouard, . . . 1769. . 600 fs. t4l. 

M. Le Brun, . . . 1791. . 778/*. 31/. 

M. Castlemore, . . 1791. . 840 ^f. 34/. 



667« A Lioness, with three Cubs, extended on the ground. 

2jt. 10 in. by 4yi. 5 J in.— C. 
Collection of M. Van Schorel, . . 1774. 



668. An Historical Subject, relating to the life of' Dedus. 

A sketch. 

2/t. 6 in. by 2Jt. 8 in.— P. 

Collection of M. Aubrey, • . . 1778. . 1600/f. 64/. 



669* Two Females, emblematical of Peace and Plenty. 

23 in. by 1 7 in. — P. 
Collectionof M. Trooard, • . . 1769. . 802 /#. 32/. 
M. LeBrun, . . • 1791. . 300 /#. 12/. 



670. Grovemment, or Commerce. Represented by a female 
wearing a mural crown seated upon a pedestal, holchng the prow 
of a vessel in one hand, around the arm of which is entwined 
a snake, and resting the elbow of the other hand on a ball. 

23 in. by 16 in. — P. 

Engraved by P. Pontius. A similar subject is engraved by 
Vostennan. 



671. The Companion. Power, or Strength. Represented by 
a female in a blue vest, girded with a hone's skin, seated, with 
one hand on the shaft of a column and holding a jnllar with 
the other. 

Collection, anonymous, • . Pant, 1780. • 1201 ySr. 48/. 



190 BUBEHS. 

672. The Adoration of the Shepherds. 

14J in. by lOj- in.— P. 
A free sketch for an altar-piece, formerly in the church of the 
Dominicans at Antwerp. 

Engraved by L. Vosterman and Spruyt. — See p. 12. 
Collection of M. Van Schorel, Anlwerp, 1774. 



67S. Cadmus sowing the Dragon^s Teeth, from which spring 
up armed men. A free and spirited sketch. 

10^ in. by 16|tn. 
Collection of M. Van Schorel, 1774. 

Mr. Panne 1819, (at Mr. Christie's) .... 9 ^*. 

Now in the collection of Sir Thomas Baring, Bart. 



674. A Pair of Allegorical Subjects.' One represents the 

city of Paris, under the figure of a female, holding Louis XIII., 

when an infant, in her arms ; to whom Mars is presenting a 

sword and armour, and Cupid (flying above) bears him a 

buckler. 

9 in. by 4 5 in. — P. 



676. The Companion. Henry IV., with an olive-branch in 
his hand, conducting his Queen under the auspices of Hymen, 
who is flying over their heads. These are free sketches. 

Engraved by Martinasie. 

Collection of M. Van Schorel, Antwerp^ 1 774. 

Now in the collection of the Hon. Gren. Fhipps. 



676. The Daughters of Cecrops opening the basket in which 
was concealed the infant Erichthonius. A composition of six 
figures. A sketch for the large picture in the Lichtenstein 
tollection.— 5^^ p. 100. 

15tnwby 18|m.^P, 

Engraved by Van Sompel. 
• Collection of M, Van Schord, Antwerp^ 1774. 



BUBENSS. 191 

677. The Death of Frocris. She is represented reclining 
her dying head on the lap of Cephalus. 

16|tfi. by 22 m. — P. 
Collection of M. Van Scborel, 1774. 



678. Vulcan forging the Arms of Achilles. A sketch for 
part of one of the triumphal arches erected in honour of Fer- 
dinand, at Antwerp, in 1635. 

9 J in. by 7 in, — P. 

Collection of M. Van Schorel^ 1774. 



679. Two Females, one <^ whom is seated with a cornucopia. 
An allegorical subject, allusive to Peace and Plenty. A sketch. 

5 in. by 6 J in, — P. 
Collection of M. Van Schorel, 1774. 



680. A Bacchanalian Subject The principal group in this 
compoation consists of Silenus, with three satyrs and an ass ; 
two of the latter are lifting the jolly god on the heast, and the 
third supports his head. On the left is a bacchante seated, and 
a satyr behind her pouring wine from a vase into a cup which 
she holds ; a naked infant lies at her side with a bunch of 
grapes in its hands, which a little satyr is endeavouring to take 
away. Beyond these figures are some children with panthers 
and tigers; and still farther is Bacchus, crowned with vine 
branches. 

A similar subject, composed of twelve figures, is engraved by 

Popels. 

4Jt. by 7Jt. 

CollectionofM. Cauletd'Hautevilte, 1774. . 6000 /«. 240/. 



681. A beautiful Infant sittmg naked on a jnllow. In the 
back-ground is introduced a rainbow, the emblem of promise. 
A well-coloured and pleasing example. 

ly^. 10 in. by IJt. 5 ta.— P. 
Collection of RandondeBoisset, . 1777. . ISOOfs. 60/. 

Now worth 150 gi. 
Now in the collection of Baron Steengracht, at the Hagne, 



192 BUBENS. 

682. An Allegorical Subject, allusive to the Life of Marie de 

Medicis. A sketch. 

17jtn.by 19 J in.— P. 

Collection of M. PaUlet, . . . 1777, . 600 fs. 24/. 

M. de Boeuf, . . . 1782. . 1200/#. 48/. 



683. Venus, wounded by a Thorn, receiving the Condolence 
of the Loves. A sketch. 

2jt. 5itn. by Ijt. 10^ in. 
Collection of M. Thellusson, . . 1777. . 600 fs. 24/. 



684. The Annunciation of the Virgin. A sketch. 

4ft. 1 in. by Sjt. 4 in. — C. 
Engraved by DreveL 
This picture has been enlarged. 
Collection of the Prince de Conti, . 1777. . 1700 fi. 68/. 



685. The Fates weaving the Destiny of Marie de Medicis, 
under the auspices of Jupiter and Juno. A study. 

18 in. by 22 1 in. — C. 
Collection of the Prince de Conti, . 1777. . 1401 /#. 561. 



686. A Landscape, exhibited under the aspect of a stormy 
sky, through which a transient gleam of sunshine illumines the 

middle grounds. 

16 m. by 24 tn. — P. 
Collection of the Count de Vaudreuil, 1784. . 1 80 1 /# . 72/. 



687. The Deluge of Phrygia. — For description seep. 98. 

4jt. 6 in. by 6/i. 4 tn.— C. 
Engraved by Bolswert. 
Collection of M. Montribloud, . . 1784. . 2401 /#. 96/. 

Henry Hope, Esq. . 1816 iOO gs. 

Philip Panne, Esq. . 1819 157 gf. 

Now in the collection of Sir Thomas Baring, Bait. 

A Duplicate of the preceding, of very superior excellence, is now 
in the Vienna Gallery* 



JtUBENS. 19$ 

688. A Portrut of the Duke of Buckingham, clad in armour 
and wearing a red scarf. 

23 fn. by 18 tn.— P. 
This is probably the picture inserted No. 127 in the catalogue of 
the artist's effects, p. 32. 
Collection of M. Godefroy, . . . 1785. . 4800/*. 192fc 
M. du Clos, . . . 1812. . 9500/jr. 380^. 



689. Ulysses and his Friend discovering Achilles among the 
Daughters of . Lycomedes. The youthful hero, clothed in a 
scarlet robe, stands in a masculine attitude in the centre of the 
composition; his right hand grasps a sword and the left its 
scabbard, while his attention is directed to his father, who 
expresses his recognition by placing his hand on his son^s arm. 
The females consist of six young ladies and an elderly one, 
amongst whom is one of the former dressed in white satin (seen 
in a profile view) ; another, in a yellow robe with blue sleeves^ 
kneels in front, examining a basket of jewels ; and a third, in a 
gray vest, is stooping by her side, engaged in the same object. 
Painted in a free and spirited manner. 

4/^ 6 in. by Sjl. 1 1 m.—C. 

Engraved by Visscher, Ryckman, and anonymous. 

Collection of M. Nouri, .... 1795. . 3200/*. 128/. 

Now in the collection of Sir Abraham Hume, Bart. 



690. Two Angels bearing the dead Body of a Child to 
Heaven. One of them has a palm-branch in his hand, and a 
third angel carries a wreath of flowers. 

17^ tn. by 23^171. 
Collection of Van Slingelandt, Z)or^ 1785. . 410 Jlo. S7L 

Mrs. Harritz, London, 1810; . . . . SOgs. 

Recently in the collection of Edward Gray, Esq. 



691- A Landscape, exhibiting a view over a flat country, 
beautifully varied with trees and hedgjes, and enlivened by a 

VOL. II. o 



194 EUBENSr. 

transient ray of eunshine passing over the middle grounds and 

extending to a watering place, at which are several figures with 

cattle. 

ift. 9 J in. by ^ft. 9 in.— P. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

Collection of M. Proley, . . . 1787. • 4400/*. 176(. 



692. A composition of four figures, as large as life, consisUng 
of a Man and a Woman with two Children. 

^fl. by Sft. 6 in.—Q. 
Collection of M. Proley, . • . 1787. . 4100/*. 164/. 



693. Christ with Martha and Mary. They are represented 
in the court of a house, enclosed by a balustrade of black 
marble, from which the eye looks over a richly-wooded land- 
scape, enlivened with deer and poultry. The Saviour is seated 
in the centre of the court, looking towards Martha, who stands 
on his right, and by her attitude and expression appears to be 
reproaching her sister Mary for neglecting the household 
affairs ; the latter is seated on the left of the Saviour, with a 
book in her lap. A table, with fruit on it, stands at the ade, 
and through an open door near it are seen the interior of a 
kitchen, and a man-cook engaged at a dresser; a monkey 
with a bunch of apricots, a dish of grapes, and a variety of 
small birds, are distributed on the pavement in front, and a 
greyhound stands by Martha'^s ^de. 

\Jl. n\in. by I ft. 10tn.-.P. 

This picture is the joint production of Rubens, Breughel, and 
Van Kessel ; the figures are eleven inches high, are painted in a broad 
free manner and in the richest tones of colour, with an expression 
which it is impossible for art to surpass. 

Collection M. de Calonne (bought in), 1788. . 4800/f. 192/. 

Same collection . . , London, 1795 830 ^«. 

> Mr. Bryants, .... 1 798 250/. 

M. Rynders, BntsseU, 1821. . 1350^. 121/. 

Count Pourtales, London, 1826 151/. 

— — Mr. Smith (by Mr. Stanley), 1828. • • . • 170 gs. 



BUBEN8. 195 

694. The Nativity^ and Adoration of the Ma^. A sketch 

for a large picture. 

18 tn. by 14tn.— P. 

Collection of M. le Bnin, . . . 1791. • SOO fs. 521. 



695. The Falconer. A portrait of a gentleman, represented 

in the character of a falconer, with a fine hawk on his hand ; 

his dress consists of a black mantle bordered with fur, a white 

pendant collar, and a black hat turned up at the side. A 

landscape forms the back-ground, on the left of which is a 

large tree entwined with ivy. This excellent production is 

distinguished for the masterly freedom of its execution, the 

brilliancy of its colour, and the apparent natural character of 

the portrait 

4JI. 6 in. by 3jt. 5 in.— P. 

Collection of die Due de Praslin, 1793. . 1 0,001 /r. 400/. 

M. Geldermeester, 1800. . 4,050^. 364/. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1826. 

Now in His Majesty's Collection . . • • . Worth 800 gs. 



696. A Portrait of a young Lady, with the face seen in a 
three-quarter position; light hair, and a cap decked with 
feathers; a necklace of pearls, which falls on her bosom, and 
a red corset dress with large sleeves. 

ft ft. by I ft. 7 m.— C. 

The writer of the catalogue states that this picture has sustained 
injury by cleaning. 

Collection of the Due de Praslin, . 1793. 



697. Two Studies of Children's Busts, with coral ornaments 

round their necks. 

16im. by 11 in.— P. 

Collection of M. Destouches, . . 1794. 



698. The Assumption <^ the Virpn. The Virgm, attended 
by angels, appears to be mounting aloft, while the astonished 
apostles surround the vacant tomb below. A beautiful and 
Ughly-finished study fiyr a large picture. 

Sft. 4 in. by %ft. 1 m.— P. 



196 RUBEXI^. 

Collection of M. de Caionne, . • London^ 1795. . IJHO/. 

H. Hope, Esq. (by Mr. Christie), 1816. . 2501 

J. Knight, Esq. (by Mr. Phillips), 1819. 130^*. 

John Webb, Esq. (by Ditto), . 1821. . 110/. 



699. An Allegorical Subject, representing Justice, Peace, 
and Plenty, personified by three nymphs, one of whom is 
emptying a cornucopia of fruit, which three cupids are 
gathering. A sketch for a group in one of the Luxembourg 
pictures. 

Engraved by Eynhouedts. 

Collection of M. de Caionne, . . . 1795 42/. 

700. St. George and the Dragon. — See pp. S8 and 48. 
Collection of M. de Caionne, . . . 1795 7lL 

701. The Vir^n, with the infant Saviour in her arms. A 
small but very beautifully-finished picture. 

Collection of M. de Caionne, . . . 1795 165/. 

702. An Allegorical Subject, representing Rome triumphant. 
A finished sketch. 

Collection of M. de Caionne, . . . 1795 42/. 

703. Groups of Children with festoons of Fruit, and Animals. 
A study for the ceiling at Whitehall. 

CollectionofM.de Caionne, . . . 1795. . . . 220 gf. 



704. Mars, Venus, and Cupid. The goddess is represented 
in nearly a front view, naked, sitting on a couch ; her right 
hand presses her bosom and the left crosses the body, to hold 
a blue drapery which covers the loins; her flaxen hair is 
decked with pearls. Her attention is directed to the young 
god of love, who, while climbing upon her knee, looks archly 
in her face ; a little retired beyond him is Mars, standing near 
a table, oh which is mounted a cupid, to unbuckle his aJrmour ; 
a brilliant shield stands against the table and a quiver lies oik 
the ground ; some architecture and a red curtain compose the 



&UBENS. 197 

-back-ground. The attractions of this capital picture consist 
^exclusively in the beauty and freshness of the colouring, the 
judicious arrangement of light and shade, and the agreeable 
harmony of tints and general effect. In reference to the 
figures, it must be owned that they are sadly devoid of those 
ideal forms- of beauty and expression so indispensable to ^ve 
value and interest to classic and poetical subjects. 

Qfi. 4 in. by 4//. 2 in.— C, 

Collection of AL Vandergucht, • 1796 ISO gs. 

Mr. Bryan, . . • 1798 90^*. 

Now in the Dulwich Gallery, Worth 500 gs. 

There is an etching of Mars and Venus, anonymous. 

705. Nature unveiled by the Graces. The subject is com- 
posed of a number of nymphs and satyrs sporting, with fruit 
and flowers ; in the centre of these are the Three Graces, in 
lovely and elegant attitudes, unveiling nature. The fruit and 
flowers are attributed to the pencil of Breughel. 

^Jt. 6 w. by %ft. 4 in.— C. 
Engraved by Van Dalen. 
Collection of Sir Lawrence Dundas, 1794« • « • « SOO gs. 

706. Tigers in a Landscape. 

Collectionof Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1795 110 ^ii. 

There is a mez2otinto print of a tiger suckling three cubs in a 
landscape, engraved by Rhien. 

707. A woody Landscape^ represented under the aspect of 

Moon and Star light. The solemn and silent scene is relieved 

by the introduction of a solitary horse browsing on the margin 

of a river. 

2jt. 1 J tn. by Sft. 2 in.—V. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

Collectionof Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1795 BOgs. 

— Earl of Besborough, 1801 SI gs. 

-— — — Willett Willett, Esq. 1813 300^*. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1815. 
Now in the coUection of the Earl of Mulgrave. 



198 BUBENai 

708. A Sketch for the altar-pieioe of the church of St Au- 
gustiDy at Antwerp. If this statement be correct, the subject 
represents the marriage of the infant Saviour to St Catherine, 
in the presence of a great number of saints. 

The finished picture is engraved bj P. de Jode. — See jp« 47. 

CoUectionof Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1795 ^^hs^ 



^ 



709- Silenus and Bacchanalians. 

Collection of Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1795. . • • .' 4&gs. 

710. Venus recumbent on a bank asleep, and Cupid alarmed 
by the approach of Satyrs. 

CoUection of Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1795 t5gs. 

711. The Holy Family, with St Elizabeth. 
Collectionof Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1795 66 g«. 

71 S. Studies for various subjects, particularly the Rape of 
the Sabines. 

Collectionof Sir Joshua Re3molds, 1795 5gt. 

718. Studies for groups in the ceiling at Whitehall. 
Collection of Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1795 ^^ig'* 

714. The Wise Men's Offering. A sketch. 
Collectionof Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1795 41 gt. 

715. Children blowing Bubbles. The nearest infant is re- 
presented naked, with its back to the spectator. A finished 
study, painted with a rich impasto of colour. 

24 in. by 20 in. — P. (about,) 

Collection of Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1795 175 gs. 

Willett Willett, Esq. 1813 136 gs. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1828. 
Now in the collection of the Earl of Damley. 



BUBENS. 199 

716. St. Matthew. A bust, painted with extraoidinaiy 
force and glow of dolour. 

Collectionof Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1795 70 ^f. 

717. A P^r. Allegorical Subjects; being studies for the 
prindpal groups in the ceiling at Whitehall. 

26 in. by 21 in. — C. (about.) 
Noticed in Sir Joshua Reynolds's Tour through Flanders ; at that 
time in the collection of M. Danoot. 

Collection of M. Horion, Brussels^ 17SS. • 9\0 Jio. SiL 
' Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1795. • . • • ISO^t. 
Now in the possession of Colonel H. BaiUie. 

718. The Holy Family. A finished sketch. 
CoUectionof Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1795 71 ^t. 

719. A wild Boar Hunt 

Collectionof Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1795 165 gM. 

720. Hercules and Omphale. A composition of several 
figures. 

Collectionof Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1795 160^f. 

Philip Panne, Esq. 1819 USgs. 

Now in the collection of Thomas Emmerson, Esq. 

721. TheUs supplicating Jupiter on behalf of her son 
Achilles. 

Collectionof Sir Joshua Reynolds, 1795 ^5gi. 

722. A Hunt A sketch. 

Collection of Sir Simon Clarke, Bart and George Hibbert, Esq. 

1802 44 gf. 

728. The Companion. A similar subject 
These were fbrmerly in the collection of Mr. Delm. 
Collection of Sir Simon Clarke, Bart and George Hibbert, Esq. 

1028 4dgs. 



200 nuBENs. 

7S4. Christ on the Cross. 

Zfi. 8 in. by \ft. 9 in.— P. (ahonU) 

A beautiful example of this frequendy-repeated subject, which 
has been engraved several times by Bolswert. 
CoUection Sir S. Clarke, Bart., and G. Hibbert, Esq. 1802, \60gs. 

Now in the collection of Sir Simon Clarke, Bart. 



7^. A Landscape, with a hill on the right covered in part 
with trees ; a rivulet flows in front which is crossed by a rustic 
bridge, and near it is a shepherd playing a pipe, while liis 
cows and sheep browse around him. The centre of the view 
shows a rich pasture receding to the distant mountains ; a few 
young trees and an old willow are on the left of the composi- 
tion ; a faint gleam of sunshine breaks through the clouds of a 
rainy sky, in which are indicated two rainbows. 

Desenfans states that this picture is engraved under the tide of 
" The Two Rainbows," and that it was formerly in die collection of 
Prince Rupert, but the writer has never seen such a print. 

Collection of Noel Desenfans, Esq. 1802. , « . 105 ^f, 

Now in the Dulwich Gallery. 



726. A Portrait of Mary de Medicis, represented with a faA 
in her hand. Her dress is composed of the richest materials 
abundantly adorned with jewels; a lace frill surrounds the 
shoulders, leaving the bosom exposed, and a diadem of pre- 
cious stones covers the head. Painted by a scholar. 

4yif. 2 in. by 3^^. 4 in.— C. 

Collection of Noel Desenfans, Esq. 1802. . . . 100 ^f. 

Now in the Dulwich Gallery. 



727. A Portrait of Sir Theodore Mayne, Physician to 
James I. 

Engraved In Dr. Mead's Collection. 

Collection of the Earl of Besborough, 1801. . . . 60/. 15f. 
Marquis of Lansdowne, . 1806. . . . 77^f. 



728. A Portrait of Ferdinand of Medici, Grand Duke of 

Tuscany*. 

«« m. by 22 in. — P. 



|tUB£N& SiOl 

. Collection of Robert Udney, Esq. . 1802. 

This picture is said to have been painted at Florence, and to 
have belonged to the Salviati Collection. 

729* The good Samaritan. A cabinet picture 

Collection of Lord Rendlesham, . 1806. « , ^ • 189/. 



730. A Landscape, representing a forest, through which is 
passing a huntsman on foot, preceded by six dogs. The 
gloomy and sequestered scene is enlivened by the cheering rays 
of the setting sun, whose vivid beams sparkle between the 
trunks of two trees, which cross each other on the right and 
front. 

This excellent production is finely engraved by Bolswert. 

This picture was lot 108 in the catalogue of the artist's coUec* 
tion. — See p, SI, 

Collection of the Marquis of Lansdowne, 1806. » , ^ S05g»» 



7S1. A Landscape, corresponding in composition with the 
preceding, but of a smaller ^ze. 

Collection of Lord Clanbrassils, « 1813, . . . • 95 gs. 
Exhibited, in the British Gallery in 1815. 
Now in the collection of the Earl of Mulgrave. 



732. The Continence of Scipio. The composition repre- 
isents the Roman warrior seated upon an elevation on the right, 
^extending his hand towards the affianced couple, who Are ap- 
|>roacbing the foot ci his throne ; the young man is seen in .a 
hinder view, bending on one knee and holding his bride^s right 
hand, at whose side are her father and mother; and behind her 
are four females, two of whom hold up her train ; in the oppo- 
site nde are soldiers, yrith vessels of gold. The subject is 
composed of fifteen figures of the size of lif& 

7 ft. by 12yi.— C. 

Engraved by Bolswert ; and by Dambrun, in the Orleans Gal- 
lery. There is also an etching by Spruyt, which has evidently 
been done from a sketch, probably for the picture. 



203 BUBENS. 

Collection of the Due d'Orl&ms, 1798, valued at SOO^t., bought 
by Lord Berwick. 

Lord Berwick (sold by Mr. Phillips), 1825, bought in at 15 00^. 
Again (by Ditto), 1826, Mr. Yates, 660 ^f. 

The following twelve Pictures are finished sketches, forming 
a series of the history of Constantine; they were formerly in 
the Orleans Collection, and are engraved with the rest of that 
gallery. 

733. The Marriage of Constantine with Fausta, the daughter 
of the Emperor Maximien. The ceremony is represented taking 
place before an altar in the temple of Jupiter and Juno ; and 
the artist htis introduced in the compo»don a second marriage, 
supposed to be that of Licinius with Constantia, the sister of 
Constantine, which, however, took place at a subsequent period. 
Two youths are at the altar, one playing a double pipe and 
the other carrying the torch of hymen ; close to the ade are 
two men waiting to sacrifice a white heifer. 

17jm.by20im.— P. 

Engraved by Tardieu and Godefroy. 

Valued in the Orleans Collection, in 1798, at 150 gs. 



734. The Miraculous Cross. Constantine, in the presence 
of his army, beholding the apparition of a luminous cross and 
inscription in the heavens, which he afterwards adopted on his 
banners. The Emperor, accompanied by a friend, stands upon 
a pedestal in front, extending his arms in adoration of the 
supernatural appearance. 

17i«n. by20i»ii.— P. 

Engraved by Tardieu and Leinard. 

Valued in the Orleans Collection at 100/. 



735. The Labarum. Constantine committing the labarum 
(a banner bearing the insignia of the cross) to the care of two 
of his bravest soldiers. A composition of three figures. 

lSjOT.by 10im.^P. 



BUBSKS. 20S 

Engnred by Tardieu and Leinaid. 

Valued in the Orleans Gallery at 100g«. 

Put up to sale at Mr. Stanley's, in 1823, and bought in at 41 gt. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1828. 

Now in the possession of Henry Brooksbank* Esq. 



7S6. The Battle between Constantine and Maxentius. Th6 

picture represents the moment when the two heroes, mounted 

on fiery chargers, meet in front, and Constantine is poi«ng a 

spear to cast at his adversary, who is approaching him sword in 

hand ; the rush of troops, both horse and foot, exhibits a scene 

of obstinate conflict Close to the front are two dead soldiers, 

one of whom is pierced by a spear in the breast, the other lies 

under him, with his broken weapon in hb hand ; and in the 

distance is seen the cavalry of Maxentius escaping over the 

bridge Melvius. 

14^ tfi. by 25 in. — P. 

Engraved by Lorieux, Tardieu, and Moncomet 

Valued in the collection at 200 gs. 

Put up to sale at Mr. Stanley's, in 1828, and bought in at lSOg$. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1828. 

Now in the possession of Henry Brooksbank, Esq. 



7S7. The Death of Maxentius. The emperor, while en- 
deavouring to escape over the bridge Melvius, is precipitated 
through a broken part of the bridge, which he had destined as 
a snare for his enemies, and is falling headlong into the Tiber, 
crushed by the accumulation of his own men and horses ; two 
other of his soldiers, one riding a dark horse the other a white 
one, are on the brink of the chasm, and behind them are two 
more, who, in wheeling their steeds round to avoid the danger, 
are encountered by the enemy ; the shock of battle on the 
bridge has thrown a number of the combatants into the river, 
two of these are seen suspended at the side of the bri<i^. 
This is a most enviable example of the master, possessiog, in a 



e04 AUBENS. 

small compass, the same admirable spirit and energy which 
animate his largest productions. 

15^ in. by 25 in. — P. 

Engraved by Hubert, Tardieu, and anonymous, Drevet ex. 

Valued in the Orleans Collection, in 1798, at 200 gs, ; and bought 
by Sir Philip Stephens, in whose sale, in 1810, it was knocked down 
at 430g«. 

Collection of Lord Ranelagh (by Mr. Christie) . 1822 . ISOgs. 
(bought in.) 

Same collection 1829 • 165 ^«. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1818. 

Now in the possession of Wm. Rogers, Esq. 



738. Victory, personified by a winged female placing a 

chaplet on the head of Constantine. Two captives lie bound 

at his feet, and beyond this group rises a magnificent trophy^ 

composed of the head of Marentius, and the banners and arms 

of Rome. 

Hi in. by 14tn.— P. 

Engraved by Cathelin, Tardieu, and Moncomet. 

Valued in the Orleans CoUection at 200 gs. 

Put up to sale at Mr. Stanley's, in 182d, and bought in at 61 gs. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1828. 

Now in the possession of Henry Brooksbank, Esq. 



7S9. Constantine^s triumphant Entry into Rome. The con- 
queror, clad in armour and mounted on a noble gray charger, 
is approaching the gate of the city, where the genius of Rome 
and several priests and senators await his arrival ; behind him 
are the advance of a body of cavalry soldiers, and a lictor 
bearing the fasces. Fame, flying before, is proclaiming with her 
double trumpet his heroic deeds ; and Victory is crowning him 

with laurels. 

20 in, hy 25 J in.— P. 

Engraved by Lorieux and Tardieu. 

Valued in the Orleans Collection at 150 gs. 



ttUBENS. 20^ 

Collection of the Earl of Liverpool (by Mr. Christie), 18)S9, 42 gs: 
(bought by the writer.) 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1815. 

Now in the collection of the Hon. G. J. Vernon. 



740. Constantine restoring Liberty to the Roman Senators: 
The Genius of Rome, personified by a female with the palladium 
in her hand, is seated on a throne in the centre, with a figure 
of Peace on her left, placing a chaplet on her head, and Victory 
on her right, holding a number of triumphant banners; near 
her are two captives (a Dacian and an Albanian), and on the 
opposite side stands Constantine, clad in armour and grasping 
a thunderbolt (emblem of power) in his hand ; three prisoners 
lie bound at his feet, and the figurative representation of the 
origin of Rome is introduced near them. This masterly sketch 
is one of the most brilliant of the set 

20 in. by 25 J in. — P. 

Engraved by Cathelin and Tardieu. 

Valued in the Orleans Collection at 150 gs. 

Collection of the Earl of Liverpool, 1829, 100 gs. (bought by the 
writer.) 

Now in the collection of the Hon. GL J. Vernon. 



741. Constantine investing hb son Crispus with the com- 
mand of the fleet. The former is placing in hb son^s hand a 
globe, and a winged genius is giving him a prow, the symbols 
of government; a figure of Neptune, reclining on the sea 
shore, completes the illustration of the subject* 

14|m. by 11 J in.— P. 

Engraved by Bosq and Tardieu. 

Valued in the Orleans Collection, in 1798, at 100 gs. 

Put up to sale at Mr. Stanley's, in 1823, and bought in at 41 gs. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1828. 

Now in the possession of Henry Brooksbank, Esq. 



74S. Constantine approving of the Draught for the Flan of 



SI06 BUB£NS« 

the City of Constantinople. The emperor, wearing the Roman 
toga, stands in the left of the picture with a friend behind him, 
extending his hand in approbation of the plan, ^ich a work- 
man is holding, while the architect, bending on one knee, is 
measuring a portion of the design with compasses ; the bird of 

Jove hovers above. 

16|fn. by 16itn.— P. 

Engraved by Hubert and Tardieu. 

Valued in the Orleans Collection at 70 gs.^ and bought by Sir 
Philip Stephens ; in whose collection it was knocked down, in 1810, 
for 111 gs. 

Again in Lord Ranelagh's sale (bought in) . 1822. 

Again in the same collection ..... 182d. . . 4Sgs. 



743. Constantine worshipping the Cross. A composition of 
four figures, one of which, standing in the centre (characteristic 
of Faith), is directing the emperor^s attention to the cross. 

14 m. by 13 in. — P. 

Engraved by Delignon and Tardieu. 

Valued in the Orleans Collection at 80 gt. 

Put up to sale at Mr. Stanley's, in 1823, and bought in at S5gs. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1 828. 

Now in the possession of Henry Brooksbank, Esq. 



744. The Baptism of Constantine. A magnificent temple, 
decorated with spiral columns, in which are assembled a number 
of priests and persons of distinction; one of the former is 
administering the sacrament of baptism to the emperor, who 
is kneeling by the ride of the font to receive it 

17jtn. by20jm.— P. 

Engraved by Delignon and Tardieu. 

Valued in the Orleans Collection, in 1798, at lOOgf. 

A picture representing the same subject, difierently composed, is 
engraved by Baroni. 

746. Thomyris causing the Head of Cyrus to be immersed 
in 'Human Blood. This spkndid production of art is com- 



SUBENS. 807 

posed of seveDteen figures, assembled in a magnificent vestibule ; 
the queen, richly attired in a white satin robe embroidered 
with gold, and a yellow mantle, accompanied by a lady on her 
left, stands on an elevation of two steps on the right, observing 
the executioner fulfil her orders ; the latter is bending on one 
knee, holding the head of Cyrus over a golden charger, filled 
with blood ; behind lum are several persons of distinction and 
aoldiers witnessing the scene; among these is one wearing a 
fur cap.and a red dress, with his hands behind him, near whom 
is a stout man in a purple robe and a furred cloak ; three men 
in armour are behind these, and a dog is in front ; two pages 
bear the train of the queen, and three females are in attendance 
behind her. 

6Ji. 8 in. hy 11 ft. 9 in.—C. 

Engraved by P. Pontius, Ragot, Duchange, and Launay. 

This capital picture is of the first order and excellence, and was 
evidently painted afVer the master had maturely studied the works 
of Titian, whose solemn, deep tones of colour are imitated with the 
happiest effect, and add a grandeur and majesty which well accord 
with the subject 

Collection of the Due d'Orleans, 1798; bought privately by the 
Earl of Darnley, for 1200 gs,; at present worth 2500 gs. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1822. 

Now in his Lordship's collection at Cobham. 



746. An admirably-finished Drawing by Rubens, the original 
study for the preceding picture, commenced in chalks, and 
washed in Indian ink and colours. 

Now in the valuable collection of Sir Thdmas Lawrence, P.R.A. 
It waa formerly in the collection of M. Mariette, a distinguished 
amateur of drawings, at whose sale, in 1775, it sold for 1201 fs, 48/. ; 
and would now probably be estimated at 200/. 



747. A Picture, representing the same subject, and amilarly 
composed, but with fewer figures, and of smaller dimensions, 
in the I«ttTre«— jSIec p. 116. 



SOS AUBENfi;. 

748. The Judgment of Paris. The young shepherd is repre* 
sented sitting at the foot of a tree on the left, in the act of pre- 
senting the apple to Venus, ^ho stands fronting him, between 
Juno and Minerva, while Mercury, who is on his farther side, 
appears to be watching the result of the shepherd'^s decision* 
The deities are distinguished by the several emblems of the 
peacock, Cupid, and the owl ; and the faithful dog is couched 
At his master^s feet. The figures in this capital picture are 
finished with unusual care ; the landscape is painted in a broad, 
free, and sketchy manner ; as a whole this production offers the 
most engaging effect, with the richest tones of colour. 

^ft. 5 in. by 5jt. 11 in C. 

Engraved by Lommelin, Couche, and R. Woodman. 

Collection of the Due d'Orleans, 1798, valued at . . 2000 ^f. 

Lord Kinnaird . 1813, passed at . . • SOOO gs. 

It was subsequently purchased by T. Penryce, Esq., of Great 
Yarmouth, who has constituted it a heir-loom. 

There is a print, engraved by Moitte, after a picture (18 in, 
by 23 in,)j which embraces the same composition as the preceding, 
with the addition of two cupids, and the heads of three sylvan 
deities peeping from behind a high bank. Paris is not offering the 
apple as in the former picture, but is deliberating in his election. 
This print was done from a picture then in the collection of the 
Count de Bruhl, and is probably the one now in the Dresden Gallery, 
which is so highly prized that it is very deservedly protected by a 
plate glass. 

A second picture, being a repetition in small of the first picture, 
was sold in the collection of the Countess of Holdemess,ln 1802, 
for 305 gs^ 

J. Neefs has engraved two prints, afVer sketches by Rubens, re- 
presenting the Judgment of Paris and the Triumph of Galatea^ 
which were done for designs to decorate a sUver salver and ewer for 
Charles I. 



749. The Rape of Ganymede. The beautiful youth is repr^ 
sented in Olympus, reclining on one of the wings of Jupiter'*s 



RUBENS. 209 

eagle, and bendiDg forward to take a cup from the hands of 
Hebe. 

ifi, by ey^.— c. 

Engraved by Henrique. 

Collection of the Due d'Orleans, 1798, . . valued at 400 g«. 



750. Fhilopcnnen, the Achaean General, chopping Wood for 
the Cook-maid at an Inn. On the left side stands a large table, 
on which are piled an abundance of provisions, consisting of a 
dead fawn, a swan, a peacock, and a boards head, intermixed 
with fruit and vegetables ; these are by the pencil of Snyders. 

^ft. by %ft. 2 in.— C. 

Engraved by N. Varin, in the Orleans Gallery. 

Collection of the Due d'Orleans, 1798, . . . valued at 600/. 



751. The Death of Adonis. This composition consists of 
six figures of the size of life. On the fore-ground of a woody 
landscape lies extended the pale corpse of Adonis, at whose head 
is the goddess Venus, bending on one knee, bewailing her lover^s 
death ; beyond this group are three nymphs and a cupid, each 
deeply affected with grief; two of the huntsman^s dogs are in 
the left ; a thick grove of trees forms the back-ground. The 
figures are panted in the artisf s smooth and finished manner, 
most admirably drawn, particularly the body of Adonis ; and 
the landscape is by the free pencil of Wildens. 

7 ft. 6 in. by lO/i,— C. (about.) 

A picture of this subject was put up to sale in the collection of 
Mr. Bryan, 1798, and knocked down at 1407/. 

Now in the collection of Tbomas Hope, Esq. 

A Sketch for the preceding picture is in the Dulwich Gallery. 

19 m. by 25|tn. — P. 

Panneels has etched a print, representing Venus kneeling by the 
side of Adonis, her hands extended, and her countenance directed 
upwards, apparently complaining to the gods of the loss of her lover ; 
her car drawn by swans is on one side, and the dogs of the hunts- 
man on the other. 

VOL. II. p 



210 RUBENS. 

75S. Diana departing for the Chase. The goddess, dad in 
a mantle, and the skin of a tiger, which covers the body and 
left shoulder, leaving the right arm, breast, and legs exposed, 
and bearing a spear apparently in her left hand (which is con- 
cealed behind her), is advancing towards the front, caressing 
with her right hand a fine hound which is jumping up against 
her ; two other hounds are on the left and beyond these are 
two nymphs, one of them is looking at a female struggling in 
the embraces of a satyr, behind whom is another satyr, extending 
his arm to pull him away ; the head and arm of the latter only 
are seen. This capital production exhibits pre-eminently the 
powers of Rubens in this class of subjects, to which he never 
fails giving that peculiarity of expression suited to the fabulous 
-mythology it represents, and a splendour of colour truly 

enchanting. 

7 ft. hj 6 ft. lOtn.— C. 

Engraved by J. Ward, R.A. 

Collection of M. Wouter Valckenier, Amst. 1796, 6100^. 5401. 

■ Mr. Bryan, . . Zondon, 1798, . . . 1000 ^f. 

Sir S. Clarke, Bart & G. Hibbert, Esq. 1802, 1850 g#. 

Now in the collection of Sir Simon Clarke, Bart. 



75S. Ceres and Pomona. The catalogue states, that this 
picture is painted in Rubens^s finest manner ; adding, *^ that the 
composition is unusually grand, the design graceful, and the 
colouring splendid.^ 

Collection of Mr. Bryan, .... 1798 490g«. 



754. St Peter holding the Keys. 

Collection of Mr. Bryan, .... 1798 402. 



755. The Companion. St. Paul. The same catalogue 
observes, that ^^ this and the companion were presented by the 
painter to one of the confriries at Antwerp.**^ 

Collection of Mr. Bryan, .... 1798 40/. 



766. The Holy Family. A composition of four figures, as 



BUBENS. 211 

large as life, seen to the knees. The Virgin is seated in the 
middle, with the infant Saviour in her arms, whose feet she has 
just finished washing in a basin; his head reclines on his 
mother^s breast, and his attention is directed to an angel, who 
IB presenting him a basket of fruit; St. Joseph (seen in a 
profile view) is in the oppoate side. The back-ground repre- 
sents a landscape. 

6fl. by 4/1. 2 m C. 

This capita] picture is stated to have been painted for a M. 
Grouin, in whose family it continued until it was purchased for the 
Presle Collection, from whence it was transferred to the present one. 

Collection of M. Robit, .... 1801, . 12,000/jr. 480/. 

Now in the collection of Sir Simon Clarke, Bart, valued at 1 £00 gs. 



757. The Resurrection of Christ The compontion exhibits 
the Saviour seated in the middle, with his right hand on a 
oross and the left placed on a globe, which is supported by an 
angel; two other angels (one holding a palm-branch) are 
at his nde, and the emblems of sin and death are under his feet 

5fi. 6 in. by ^ft. S in.— P. 
Engraved by Eynhouedts. 

This excellent picture was purchased of an English nobleman, in 
1784, for the cabinet of M. Donjeux. 

Collection of M. Robit, . . . . 1801. . 8420/^. 3S7L 

758. The Portrait of a Lady, with her head inclining a 
little forward, and the face seen in a three-quarter position. 

Zfi. Im. by lyi. 9 in.— P. 
Collection of M. Robit, . . . . 1801. . 1500/^. 60/. 
Now in the collection of Sir Simon Clarke, Bart. 



759. The Four Fathers of the Church, Saints Gregory, 

Ambrose, Augustin, and Jerome. These venerable persons 

are seated, and three of them are attending to St Jerome, 

who appears to be expounding the scriptures. Three angels, 

bearing a crosier, a burning heart, and a bee-hive, hover above 

their heads. 

27 in. by 24 in.— C. 



212 RUBENS. 

Ei^aved by Galle, and also by Van Dalen. 

Collection of M. Tronchien, r , . 1801. » 1900/r. 76^ 

Picot has engrayed a print, entitled " Les Evangelistes." 



760. A Portrait, said to be that of Rubens. The face i» 
seen in a front view, and th^ figure inclines forward ; a broad 
frill surrounds the neck, and a gold chain crosses the body* 

24 J in. by 21 in. — P. (oval.) 

Engraved by Wollett, from a picture ascribed to Van Dyck, then 
in the collection of Earl Godolphin. 

Collectionof John Purling, Esq. • 1801 79 gs» 

• Mr. P. Coxe, . . . 1815.. . . • 65 gs. 

Now in the coUection of Edward Gray, Esq. 



761. The Vir^n and Child, with Joseph and St. John. 
Said to have formerly been in the collection of Lord Scarborough. 
Collection of John Purling, . • • 1801. • • • • $00 gi^ 
A picture, styled '* A Holy Family," was sold by Mr. Christie, 

1807, for 800 g#. 

762. The Assumption of the Virgin. 

Sft. 4 in. by 2 ft. 1 in.— P. 

Engraved by Bolswert, and in small by Loemans. 

This is an admirably-finished study for the large picture painted 
for the Jesuits' church at Antwerp, and now in the cathedral of 
that city. — Far description see p. 20. 

CoUection of Count d'Arcy, 

John Purling, Esq. . 1801 565 gs. 

Sir Simon Clarke, Bart. 1802 ^10 gs. 

Exhibited in the British GaUery in 1826 and 1827. 

Now in the collection of His Majesty. 



768. The Virgin, with the infant Saviour sleeping in her 
arms ; near them are St. Elizabeth and St. Joseph. 

Sft. 4 in. by 2 ft. 6 tn.— P. (abauUj 

Collection of Crauford, Esq. (by Mr. Christie), 1801, 140 gs. 

Now in the collection of Abraham Robarts, Esq. 



RUBENS. 218 



764. The Holy Family. In this composition the infant 
Saviour is caresring St John. 

^ft. 5 in. by 4^^.— P. 
Tassaert has engraved a print which resembles this description. 
CoUectionofSir George Yonge, Bart. 1806. .... 510/; 



765. The Loves of the Centaurs. This clasnc scene repre- 
sents the fresh and verdant groves of Arcadia, in which is 
introduced the poetic fiction of the centaurs ; two of which are 
fondly embracing in the fore-ground, and a second pair is seen 
sportively bounding over the meadows at a little distance. 
The enchanting beauty of the landscape, and the spirit and 
energetic expresaon displayed in the imaginary animals, render 
this a production of matchless excellence. 

\fi. %%n. by 9. ft. 4 in.— P. 

Collection of a gentleman in Grafton Street, 1802. . . 260 ^#. 

the Hon. T. Greville (by Mr. Christie), 1810, 61 g#. 

Now in the collection of the Duke of Hamilton, Scotland. 



766. Jupiter and Andope. The nymph Antiope is on the 
left of the picture, bending down in the attitude of the antique 
Venus accroupSef with her naked back to the spectator, and 
her face turned towards him in a three^uarter position; in 
front of her is Cupid, covered with a thin veil, crouching close 
to her knees, to shelter himself from an impending . storm ; 
beyond this group is seen Jupiter, under the form of a satyr, 
issuing from a grove, bearing a cornucopia of fruit ; the scarlet 
mantle of the nymph lies on the ground in front. The oppoate 
side of the picture displays a grand hilly landscape finely 
diversified with trees ; a dark cloudy sky casts a gloomy aspect 
over the scene, and adds surprising lustre and brilliancy to the 
.figures, which are painted with studious care, combined with 
admirable drawing and a rich impaata of colour. It is signed 
and dated P.P. RVBENS, 1614. 

4, ft. 8 in. by 6 ft. 1 in.— P. 

Collection of M. Peytier de Merchten, Ani. 1791, U02 Jlo. 396/. 



314 RUBENS. 

Now in the possession of Mesdames Ae Knyff, at Antwerp. The 
Writer is credibly informed that these ladies have recently refused 
the sum of 40,000/o. for it, 8400/. 

The same subject, in which the nymph Antiope is represented 
sitting asleep on a bank, and Jupiter, under the form of a satjrr, 
cautiously removing her drapery, is engraved by Panneels. Ravenet 
has also engravied a print of this subject from a picture then in the 
possession of Marquis Felino. 



767. A magnificent Landscape, presenting a view over an 
immense tract of country, varied with gentle hills, finely wooded 
and intersected on the left by edges and deep ravines, enclodng 
arable and pasture lands, in which cattle are grazing ; on the 
right, at some distance from the front, stands a noble country 
mansion (the residence of the artist), flanked by a tower; in 
front of the house are some lofty trees, standing on a knoll, 
at the side of which is a stream rippling over stones to the 
fore-ground ; through which a waggon, drawn by two horses, 
is passing ; a woman in a scarlet cloak, a calf, a cask, and other 
objects are in the waggon, and the driver is mounted on one of 
the horses ; still nearer the front is a sportsman with bis dog 
and gun, creeping towards a covey of birds on a hill in the 
centre. This part of the picture is composed of bold broken 
ground, divided by chasms, and beautifully diversified with 
bushes, brambles, wild plants, and the stump of an old tree ; 
the variations of sun and shade play alternately over the wide 
expanse of country, conducting the eye by the most agreeable 
transitions to the extreme distance, where a city (probably 
Malines) and several hamlets are indicated by the appearance 
of the steeples and towers of churches. 

4, ft. 6 J in. by 7 ft. 9 in P. 

In contemplating this superb picture, and calling to mind others 
of similar excellence, it must surely be admitted, that, to conceive 
and to execute were one with this incomparable painter. Nothing 
in nature was too fleeting for his eye, or too vast for his compre« 
Kension ; and his pencO, ever subservient to bis wOl, appears to have 



BUBENS. 215 

played rapidly over the surface of his canvas, embodying forms, and 
giving to every object in nature its " form and pressure." A print, 
which promises to be a faithful transcript of the picture, is now 
engraving by Mr. George Cooke. 

This and the following picture were purchased from the Balbi 
Collection in 1802, and imported into England by Mr. Buchanan ; 
of whom the one above described was bought for the sum of 1500 gs, 
by Sir George Beaumont, Bart., whose zeal for the prosperity of 
the arts influenced him to present it, with many others of great ex- 
cellence, to the British nation, in 1826, the whole forming A GIFT 
TO THE VALUE OF UPWARDS OF SEVEN THOUSAND 
FIVE HUNDRED GUINEAS. 



768. A grand Landscape, exhibiting an extensive view 
over the flat open country in Flanders, with all the varieties 
which nature shows in a cultivated state, and adorned with 
clusters of lofty trees and the picturesque intersections of 
roads and hedges. This scene of nature is enlivened by a 
party of peasants returning at evening from harvest- work ;* 
beyond these are others still occupied in agricultural labours ; 
some cattle are at a pond on the left, towards which several 
ducks are hurrying. The general aspect of vegetation presents 
the beauty and freshness arising from recent showers, which is 
finely indicated by a rainbow in the heavens, the purity of the 
atmosphere, and the transient bursts of sunshine. 

4 ft. 6 J in. by 7yi. 9 in.— P. 

This production of the pencil is of equal excellence with the pre- 
ceding, to which it formed a companion in the Balbi Palace, and 
was also imported in 1802, and was soon after purchased by 
George Watson Taylor, Esq. for the sum of 1500g«., at whose sale, 
in 1823, it was sold for ft600gs. 

Now in the possession of the Earl of Orford. 



769. The Elevation of the Brazen Serpent This splendid 
composition exhibits Moses and Aaron standing on the right ; 
the latter is pointing to an elevated serpent, towards which 
many of the Israelites^ who are suffering from the tormenting 
bite of venomous reptiles, are looking for relief; among these 



216 RUBENS: 

is a woman with two children in her arms, whose faith in the 
typical erection has preserved her and the infants from the 
punishment of the disobedient. 

Qjt. 4 in. by 8^^. 1 1 in.— C. 

Engraved by Bolswert and Galle. 

This and similar subjects are those which display in the strongest 
characters the incomparable powers of Rubens ; here the fervour of 
his mighty genius could revel uncontrolled, and with an energy 
almost appalling depict the violent contortions of the agonizing 
sufferers. 

This glorious work of art formerly adorned the Marano Pdlace, in 
Italy. 

Collectionof A. Wilson, Esq. . . 1807 1200;. 

Wm. Champion, Esq. . 1810 1000/. 

Well worth S000^«. 
Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1815. 

Now in the possession of T. B. H. Owen, Esq. 

Duplicates of the preceding, done by the artist's scholars, and 

probably retouched by his hand, occur in the galleries of Potsdam 

and Madrid. 

A beautiful Drawing of the preceding picture, done in black 

chalk heightened with white, is in the Mus6e at Paris, and the 

original Sketch was sold in a collection at the Hague, in 1749. 

500/o. • 45/. 

Size of the latter, 16 in. by 22 m. — P. 



770. An old Woman, of a good-humoured and interesting 
countenance ; seen in a front view, looking down. She has a 
basket on her arm and a lighted candle in her right hand, the 
flame of which she is screening from the wind with her left ; 
while a youth, who is looking over her shoulder, reaches out 
his hand to light a candle at the one she is holding. It is im- 
posfflble for art to effect a more perfect illunon of candlelight 
than is produced in this excellent picture. 

^ft. 4 in. by Zft. 8 in.— P. 

Etched by Rubens ; and also by Jacob Stahl, in 1645. 

Engraved by Visscher ; and in mezzotinto by Joshua London ; and 
again, anonymous. 



I 

\ 



RUBENS. 217 

Collection of Hastings Elwyn, Esq. 1806 950 ga. 

Now in the colleetion of Lord Feversham. 

Panneels has etched a print, entitled Cursus Mundi, representing 
an old woman, with a broken pitcher in one hand and a lighted 
candle in the other, at which a boy is about to light a whole one. 
A skeleton is seen in the back-ground. 

There is a picture of a similar subject to the preceding, but of 
very inferior merit, in the Dresden Gallery, which was engraved by 
Wyngaerde, in 1631 ; and also by Basan and Boece. 

The same subject, with the addition of two boys, is engraved in 
roezzotinto by Smith. 

771. A Sketch for a Portnut of Helena Forman. 

Collection of Sir William Hamilton, 1801 521. 



Tl% A spirited Sketch of a Boar Hunt, and the Death of 
Meleager. 
Collection of Edward Coxe, Esq. . 1807 65 g«. 



778. Abraham sending away Hagar. Sarah, who is repre- 
sented as the chief mover in this dismissal, stands at the door 
of the house, with her left hand placed on her hip and the 
right raised in an atutude of addressing herself forcibly to 
Hagar, who is quitting the presence of her offended mistress. 
The patriarch stands within the door of the house. 

2yi. 4t». by 3y^. 4i».— P. 

Engraved in Young's Grosvenor Gallery. 

Collection of Welbore Ellis Agar, Esq. 1807. 

Now in the collection of Earl Grosvenor. 



774. The Conversion of St. Paul. This magnificent pic- 
ture o£Pers a composition of extraordinary grandeur. The 
prindpal group consists of four horsemen, and six figures on 
foot, the whole of which are thrown into confusion by the super- 
natural appearance of the Saviour in the heavens. Saul, the 
object of this vmtation, struck with terror, lies prostrate and 
senseless on his back in the for&>ground, with one leg on the 
horse^s back, which has fallen forwards upon its knee ; at the 



218 BUBEN8. 

same instant one of his attendants is stooping at his head to 
assist him ; a little retired from these is another of his escort, 
mounted upon a terrified horse rearing upri^t ; and beyond 
him is an armed standard-bearer. On the right of the picture 
is a third soldier, clad in armour, riding a fiery charger, which 
is kicking up behind ; those of SauPs attendants on foot are 
equally afiected with terror and dismay. A brilliant light, 
emanating from the Saviour, is diffused over the centre group, 
producing an effect at once awful and sublime. In whatever 
view this superb production is conmdered, whether with re- 
gard to the composition and drawing, the richness and glow of 
the colouring, or the masterly boldness and freedom of the 
handling, the mind and eye of the connoisseur will dwell upon 
it with real delight, and confess it to be a work of the highest 

real excellence. 

syi. by UJI. 6tn.— C. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

This noble gallery picture was formerly the property of M. de 
Montesquieu, of whose family it was purchased by Mr. Delabante, 
to whom the country is indebted for the importation of many first- 
rate pictures. Mr. Hastings Elwyn became the possessor of it in 
1806; from him it passed into the collection of Hart Davies, Esq. 
at the sum o£ 4000 gs. It was put up to auction at Mr. Christie's, 
in 1810, and knocked down at 2550 gs. 

Now in the collection of J. P. Miles Esq., Bristol. 



775. The Conversion of St Paul. A beautiful study, of the 

choicest quality, probably the first idea for the preceding 

picture. 

161 in. by 11 m.— P. 

CoUection of Welbore Ellis Agar, Esq. 1807. 

Now in the collection of Earl Grosvenor, and worth . 200 gs. 



776. The Adoration of the Magi. — For description see 

p. 55. 

10 ft. 9 in. by Sjt. 1 tn.— C. 

Engraved by Witdouc, and in Young's Gallery of the Grosvenor 
Collection. 



RUBENS. 219 

Michel, in his Life of Rubens^ states this picture to have been 
the work of only eight days, at the usual price of 100^. per dienu 

• 

It was painted to adorn the altar of the church of the White Nuns 
at Louvain. 

Collecdonof Marquis of Lansdowne, 1806. • . . 840/. 

Now in the collection of Earl Grosvenor. 



T77- Portraits of the Artist and his first Wife. They are 
represented sitUng on a bank ; Rubens has his left arm on her 
shoulder, and his right hand holds a folio upon its edge ; it 
appears, by his attitude, that he is directing the lady^s attention 
to some distant object ; a vase and a basket containing flowers 
are by the side of the lady. These accessaries and the land- 
scape are attributed to the pencil of Breughel. 

7ft. by eft. 2 m.— C. 

Collection of Sir Gregory Page Turner, Bart. 
Welbore Ellis Agar, Esq. 1807. 

Now in the collection of Earl Grosvenor. 



778. Christ appearing to Mary Magdalen after his Resur^ 
rection, called Noli me tangere. The Saviour, clad in an 
ample mantle, girt round his loins and cast over the right arm, 
leaving his breast and feet exposed, and holding a spade in his 
left hand, is bending forward, with his right arm extended to 
Mary, who is bowing on one knee before him. A vase of 
ointment stands on the ground between them. 

eft. 6. in. by 5ft. 9 in.— C. 

Engraved by Lommelin and Wyngaerde. 

Collection M. Smeth Van Alpen, Rott. 1810. ZlOOfo. 243/. 

Now in the collection of M. Six Van Winter. 

The artist has introduced the same subject as the preceding in a 
small landscape painted by Breughel. 

2 ft. by 2 ft. 8 in.— P. 



779* Hygeia, Goddess of Health. A beautiful young female, 
nearly naked, with a serpent entwining her arm, and holding a 



220 RUBEN& 

cup in her hand. The figure is of the size of life, seen to the 

knees. 

9ft. 5 J in. by Zjt. 5 in.— P. 

Collection of M. Smeth Van Alpen, 1810. . SOOjlo. 721. 

Now in the collection of M, Franken, of Lokeren. 



780. A Portrait of Rubens^s second Son, at the age of 
fifteen months. The infant, dressed in the sti£F costume of the 
period, his chubby face seen in a front view, is seated in a 
green chair, playing with sweetmeats on a board before him. 
This picture (which shows the whole figure) is remarkable for 
its careful finishing and its striking resemblance to nature. On 
the side of the chair is inscribed ^^iEtatis suae 15 Maenden; 

2/t. 7 in. by I ft. 9itn.— P. 

Engraved by Salvador. 

Collection of M. Sereville, ... 1811. . 4225 ft. 169/. 

It was consigned from Vienna to the writer for sale in 1828, 
at 600/. 

The Prince of Monaco is said to have paid 1000 ducats for it — 
about 450/. 

Now in the public gallery at Francfort. 



781. The Adoration of the Shepherds. The subject is 
composed of nine figures, and two angels above, bearing a 
tablet, on which is written Gloria in exceUis. 

2 ft. 5 in. by I ft. 1 1 in.— P. 

This is probably a finished sketch for a large picture, which is 
engraved by P. Pontius. 

Collection of M. de Preuil, . . . 1811. . 6000/r. 2401. 



782. Pan pursuing Syrinx. The subject is represented in 
a woody landscape, exhibiting a beautiful sylvan scene ; in the 
fore-ground is Pan bounding down a rugged bank in pursuit 
of the nymph Syrinx, who is seeking shelter among a cluster of 
reeds in a stream. An excellent production, possessing ex- 
traordinary effect and brilliancy of colour. 

20 in. by 26 in.— P. 



RUBENS. 221 

Collection of Walsh Porter, Esq. . 1810. • . . 1000 gs. 
Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1826 and 1827. 
Now in His Majesty's Collection. 



783. A Portrait of Grotius. His portly countenance, 
denoting him to have been about fifty years of age, is seen in a 
front view, with a small beard and mustacheos ; a broad full ruff 
surrounds the neck ; the dress consists of black figured silk. 

2JI. 4 in. by 2^^.— C. 

Collection of Sir Richard Sullivan, Bart. 1808. ... 95 gs. 



784. The Holy Family. The Vir^n is seated on the left, 
the infant Saviour standing naked in her lap, with his right 
arm round her neck ; the infant St. John stands close to the 
Virgin, extending his hands to the Saviour, before whom 
St Francis is bowing in adoration; St. Elizabeth is behind 
the Saviour, and St Joseph on the left 

7Jt. 3 in. by 6/t.— C. 

Collection of M.Paillet, . . . . 1814. . 6000/#. 240/. 

Now in the collection of His Majesty, at Windsor. 

A Duplicate of the preceding is in the collection of J, P. Miles, 

E^q. at Bristol. 

5JI. 8 in. by 6 ft. 7 in. — C. 

The latter is probably the one sold by Mr. Christie, in 1820, for 

240/. 



785. Three Servants, presenting to a nobleman a large 

quantity of fruit, a fawn, and other game. The latter are by 
the pencil of Snyders. 

7 ft. 11 in. by 8^1.— C. 

Collection of M. Paillet 1814. . 41 00 /jr. 164/. 



786. A Bust of Plato (seen in nearly a profile view), with 

long hair and beard; a light-coloured mantle covers the 

shoulders. 

2 ft. Oi in. by I ft. 7 in.— P. 

Engraved by Vosterman. 

Collection of M. de Vinck de Wesel, Antwerp, 1814. 200^. 18/. 



222 RUBENS. 

787. A Landscape, representing a woody scene with a pond 
in front, in which a traveller is refreshing his steed, and cattle 
are drinking. 

The catalogue states this picture to be the first thought for the 
fine picture known as " The Watering Place." 

Collectionof Hart Davies, Esq. . 1814 SOO gs. 



788. Saint Sebastian, tied to a tree, transfixed with arrows. 

Mr. Hill*8 sale, 1811 120 gM. 

There is a print of this subject in which an angel is crowning the 
dying martyr, engraved by Panneels ; and a second, which repre- 
sents an angel extracting an arrow from the martyr's side, engraved 
by Ragot. The latter is repeated in small, reversed ; Marin ex. 



789. An equestrian Portrait of Ferdinand of Austria. A 
finished study, on paper, for the large picture. 
Engraved by P. Pontius. 
Collection of W. Y. Odey, Esq. 1811. 



790. A Monk, in the dress of the Order of Benedictines ; 
his hand is on a skull, which is placed on a covered table at the 
dde. This is said to be the portrait of F. J. Vanden Linden^ a 
knight of the Order of Jerusalem. 

Engraved by Vanden Berg. 

Collection, anonymous (at Mr. Christie's), 1813. • . 300 gs. 



791. Three Goddesses, Flora, Ceres, and Pomona, with a 
great variety of fruit and flowers. Two of the figures are said 
to be portraits of the artistes wives. 

Collection of Willett Willett, Esq. 1813, bought in at 340 g«. 

Same collection (at Mr. Christie's), 1819 100 gs. 

There is a print of a similar subject to the preceding, composed of 
three nymphs, one of whom holds a cornucopia with a parrot perched 
on the top ; another of the nymphs is giving a bunch of apricots to 
a monkey. Engraved by Van Kessel. 



79S. A Larder, in which are a Female and a Sportsman in 



BUBENS. SSS 

conversation. The place is stored with a great variety of 
game, poultry, and fruit 

Collection of Willett WiUett, Esq. . 1813 2S0L 

Now in the possession of Charles Baker, Esq. 



793. A Portrait of a Spanish Officer. The face is repre- 
sented in a three-quarter view, having mustacheos and a small 
tuft of beard on the chin ; the dress consists of black silk with 
slashed sleeves, relieved with white satin ; a broad lace frill 
adorns the neck, and a large hat turned up in front covers 
the head. 

Engraved by Fitler. 

Collection of Lord Kinnaird, 1813, sold under the name of 
Velasques 599 gs. 



794. The Virgin and Child. The Virgin, clothed in a 
scarlet vest and a dark mantle, is seated with the infant So- 
viour standing naked in her lap, her right hand round his loins. 
This is a production of the first order ; the form and expression 
of the figures are beautiful, the colour rich and glowing, and 
the finishing highly accomplished. 

4ft. 4 in. by Sft.-'F. (about.) 

A very similar composition to this is engraved by P. Pontius and 
A. Voet ; and a picture, with the figures entire, and the addition of 
St. Ann and St. Joseph, is finely engraved by Bolswert. 

In the catalogue it is styled, " A Mother and her Child/' 

Collection of Hart Davies, Esq. • 1814. (bought in) 1000 gs. 

It was afterwards sold to Sir Mark Sykes, Bart, for 1100 ga. 



795. The Union of Navigation and Commerce. A finished 
sketch. 

Collection of Mr. P. Coxe, . . . 1815 ^7 gs. 

Purchased by Lord Mulgrave. 



796. The Woman taken in Adultery. The composition 
consists of five principal and seven subordinate figures, of the 



224 RUBENS. 

size of life, seen down to tbdr middles. The accused woman, 
with a countenance expressive of deep repentance, stands in the 
centre, and her two chief accusers are on her left ; the nearest, 
in a sacerdotal habit and wearing a phylactery on his fore- 
head, is said to have been intended for a portrait of Calvin ; 
the other for that of Luther. The former, with a peculiar 
archness of expression, accompanied by suitable action, appears 
to have made the charge, and is reciting the law laid down by 
Moses, *^ that such should be stoned : but what sayest thou ?^— « 
whilst the latter, with a stoical calmness, has his eyes fixed 
on the Saviour, who stands in the oppo»te side in an atti- 
tude of appeal to these accusers. The head of a venerable 
man, seen on the woman'^s right, is considered to be a portrait 
of Rubens*s master, Otho Venius. Great expresinon and splendid 
colouring are the chief characteristics of this capital picture, 
which is said to have been painted for the fieunily of Enuyf, of 
Antwerp, and devolved by inheritance to the celebrated col- 
lector, the Canon Enuyf. 

^ft. 8 in. by 7ft. 4 in.— P. 

Engraved by Madlle. Simons and Tassaert ; in Tresheim's British 
Gallery, by Cardon ; and by W. Bromley, in the Forster Gallery. 

Collection of the Canon Knuyf, AnU 1780. 

Henry Hope, Esq. . 1816. . . . 3000 g«. 

Bought by Mr. Norton. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1818. 

Now in the collection of J. P. Miles, Esq., at Bristol. 



797. Christ bearing his Cross. A masterly sketch, en 
gruaiUe^ for a large picture. 
Collection of M. Thellusons, 
Duke d' Albert, • . 1817 S5gs. 



798. Salvator Mundi. 

Painted for the Duke of Mantua, and subsequently in the col- 
lection of M. Veluvi. 
Sale at Mr. Christie's, . . . 1818. , . • . ftS5g$. 



RUBENSr. 225 

799- A Magdalen. 

Collection of John Knight, Esq. • 1819. . . . . 180^«. 



800. Portrait of a Lady, seen in a front view, with her 
hair in bushy curls decked with a flower ; a chain of jewels is 
suspended round her neck and attached to a cluster of the 
same, adorning the front of her bodice ; the bosom is exposed, 
and a suff lace frill stands up round the shoulders. 

%Jt. 6 in. by Stjt. 1 in. 
Etched in the collection of Lucien Buonaparte, 1816 ; sold 
privately. 

801. An Allegorical Subject, alludve to the Commerce of 
Antwerp. The dty of Antwerp is represented under the 
figure of a beautiful female, whom Pallas (having put Sedition 
under her feet) is embracing. 

This is probably a study for part of one of the triumphal arches 
so often noticed in this Work. 

Collection of the Earl of Ossory, . 1819 120 g«. 

A picture corre;;iponding in description with the preceding was 
put up at a sale in 1 804, and knocked down for 550 ga. 

Again in a sale at Mr. Christie's, . 1807 950 gs. 



802. Esther, accompanied by two females, appears fidnting 
on her knees in the presence of Eing Ahasuerus, who has 
arisen from his throne and is extending his sceptre over her ; 
a page holding his robe, and two of his ministers, are behind 
him. 

Engraved by F. Vanden Wyngaerde. 



803. A grand Procession to a Sacrifice. In the centre of 
the composiuon is a priest clothed in scarlet, preceded by 
muridans playing on instruments, and leading a white bull ; in 
advance of these are four females bearing baskets of flowers ; 
two youths, leading heifers, follow the priest, and in the rear 
are five elephants, adorned with rich trapfmigSy carrying 

VOL. II. Q 



8S6 KUBENS. 

baskets of fruit on their heads, and gold candelabra and 
censors on their backs, these are directed by suitable attendants ; 
a lion and a tiger contribute to the grandeur of the processicm, 
which appears to be slowly advancing to a temple seen on a 
hill, the ndes of which are occupied by numerous spectators. 

Sft. by 5jt. 5 in. — C. on P. 

The artist, in the composition of this splendid sketch, has 
borrowed freely from a cartoon of Andrea Mantegna; but in the 
energy of the expression, colour, and masterly handling, has made 
it his own. It was inserted as Lot S15 of the catalogue of the 
collection of Rubens. — See p. 35. 

This excellent production was purchased from the Balbi Palace ; 
and, on its importation, was correctly valued at 800 ^«. 

CoUectionof A. Champemowne, Esq. 1820. • . . SSSgi. 

Exhibited in the Bridsh Gallery in 1815. 

Now in the collection of Samuel Rogers, Esq. 



804. The Prodigal Son. The interior of a stable and cow- 
house, in which are two horses, one gray the other of a ches- 
nut coloiur, standing in a stall on the right ; in the centre are 
several cows, the nearest one to the spectator is lying down ; a 
great variety of objects common to a stable are distributed 
about the place ; three men are near the horses, one of them 
appears to be occupied at the manger, another has a candle in 
his hand, and a third is pladbg provender in the rack. Thb 
prodigal is on the left side, near the entrance to the stable, 
bending on one knee, his hands placed on his breast, and 
looking with an expression of entreaty at a maid-servant who 
is dose to him, feeding some pigs that are rushing with eager- 
ness to the trough ; beyond these are seen a waggon near a 
farm-house, and two men watering horses in a pond; the 
general effect denotes sunrise. Tlus picture is painted with 
extraordinary care, and great attention to detail ; the animals 
are correctly drawn, and possess the true characteristics of 
nature ; but the great charm of this production consists in the 
truly affecting and pathetic expresrion of the prodigal, whose 



KUfiENS. 227 

poaitioD, oouQtenanoe, and gesture, strongly mark the com* 
punctuous workings of his mind. 

Sfi. 4 •». by 4y». 9 m P. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

Sir Joshaa Reynolds, in bis Tour throngb Flanders, mentions 
this picture, which was then in the collection of M. Pieters, 1781* 

Collection pfM.Stiersd'Aertselaer, 18SS. • 8400^ 306/. 

It was in the Writer's possession, for sale, in 182d~4, at 8002. 

Now m the possession of W. Wilkins, Esq. Exhibited in 1829. 

A beautiful Study in chalks, for die shed and cows of the pre- 
ceding, is in the possession of Sir Thomas Lawrence, P.R JL. 

28 tfi. by ft\ in. 



805. Portrait of Philip Rubens, the artist's brother. He 
b about twenty-five years of age^ and seen in a three^juarter 
vi^w; auburn hair ; the body enveloped in a mantle. 

• I24tii. by 19^fii. 

There is a print of this gentleman, taken from a bust portrait, 
engraved by Galle. 

Collection of M. Stiers d'Aertselaer, 1822. . \\7^flo. 105/. 

Now in the possession of Baron Mecklenburg. 



806. Portrait of Helena Forman, when about twenty-six 
years of age. The face is represented in a profile view, with 
short auburn hair, decked with a crown of pearls and rubies ; 
a plain brown and red dress, leaving the bosom exposed. The 
bust is enclosed in an oval. 

Z5%n. by 19 m. — P. 

Collection of M. Stiers d'Aertseker, 1822. . 620^. 56/. 

Now in the collection of Edward Gray, Esq. 



807. Belleropbon, mounted upon Pegasus, destroying the 

monster Chimasra. This spirited sketch was done for one of 

the designs of the numerous pictures which decorated the 

triumphal arches erected at Antwerp in honour of Ferdinand, 

in 1635. 

ISm. by 10 in. — P. 

Engraved by Van Thulden. 



228 KUBENS. 

- CoUection of M. Su Victor, . . . 1822. . 761 fs. 901. 
(bought by the writer). 

Now in the collection of William Beckfordy Esq* 



808. A Lioness stretching herself in a playful manner on 
the ground. Had Rubens confined his studies exdunvely to 
animals, this production would have placed him in the first rank 
of painters in that class of art 

4s ft. 6 in. by 6 ft. 6 tn.— C. (about.) 

CoUecdonofG. Watson Taylor, Esq. 1823 ^lOgs. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1818. 



809. An Allegorical Composition, representing a triumphal 
Procession of Henry IV. of France, after the Battle of Ypr^ 
A spirited sketch, said to be the original design for a lai^ 
picture at Florence. (Seep. 148^ In the upper part <^ the 
panel are studies of detached groups. 

19tn. by25|tff.— P. 

Collection of M. Schamps. 

G. Watson Taylor, Esq. 182S 51^*. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1821. 

Now in the coUection of Lord Whamdifie. 



810. Portrait of one of the Artistes Children. Painted 
with great energy of expression and a rich impasto of colour. 

17tn. by 12 !».—?. 

There is a print of Rubens's eldest son, Albert, when an infant, 
engraved by Schiavonetd. 
. CoUection of G.Watson Taylor, Esq. 1828 1^7 gs. 

Re-purchased for that gentleman, and now in his coUection. 

Exhibited in the ^ntish GaUery in 1821. 



811. THE CHAPEAU DE PAILLE. A portrait of a 
young lady (said to be a MademoiseUe Lundens), wearing a 
black Spanish hat, adorned with black and white feathers, and 
elegantiy attired, according to the costume of the time, in a 
black velvet bodice and skirt, with scarlet sleeves and white 
epaulettes, tied with rose-colour ribbons, and a tawny-oolour 



RUBENS. 229 

scarf, thrown in a negligent manner over the shoulders; the 
hands are passed over each other in front, the left one holding 
the scarf. Her complexion is most delicately fair, but the hat, 
inclining forward, throws a shade over the upper part of the 
face, which, by the reflex from the white bosom, is rendered 
beautifully transparent. She is represented passing before the 
exterior of a window on a fine sunny day, the efl^ect of which 
is strikingly denoted in the brilliancy of the colouring. 

%ft. 7 in. by lyi. 10 in.— P. 

Tradition states that this beautiful picture was so highly priied 
by the artist, that he never could be induced to part with it. At 
his death, in 1640, it was inserted in the Catalogue of his Pictures 
(lot l^i) which were sold privately in detail (see p. Sfi), and, when 
his widow died, passed into the family of Lundens, with whom it 
remained as a joint property until a few years back, when it was 
purchased by the late proprietor. Baron Stiers d'Aertselaer, of 
M. Van Haveren, for 50,000/«., 2000/. On the decease of the 
Baron, it was sold for the benefit of his children, in a collection of 
other valuable pictures, at Antwerp, on the 29th of July, 1822, and 
was purchased by the Writer, in conjunction with another person, 
for SZJGOjlo.f which, with the addition of 10 per cent, and other 
incidental expenses, is about dOOO gs. 

Insinuations having been thrown out, that this picture was bought 
privately, at a reduced sum, previously to the sale, and was afler- 
wards run up in price, for the purpose of giving it a fictitious value, 
the Writer feels it due to himself most solemnly and unequivocally 
to declare, that no such thing took place; indeed, had he been 
inclined to have acted in so dishonourable a manner, he could not 
have succeeded, the laws of HoUand enforcing a public sale of all 
minors' property. Shordy after the picture arrived in England, it 
was sent by His Majesty's express desire to Carlton House, whei^ 
it remained for a fortnight. The Writer has been most credibly 
informed, that the King was gready delighted with the picture, and 
would have bought it, had not his advisers expressed an opinion 
that the price was too high, although the Writer, anxious to see so 
distinguished a specimen of the art in the royal collection, offered to 
accept such remuneration upon the prime cost as those gendem^n 



<230 KUBENS. 

might think fit to Tecommend* A proposition was then made; that 
some other pictiureB should be taken in part exdiange, but they 
proved to be of such very indifferent quality, that the Writer'was 
under the necessity of refusing them : thus the a£fair terminated. 

The writer thinks it proper to state, that, influenced by an ardent 
desire to sell it to His Majesty, he was induced to refuse an ofl^ 
of 500/. profit, a few days afler its arrival in England. 

In the month of March foUowing (1823), it was exhibited at Mr. 
Stanley's Rooms, Old Bond Street, and never did any other picture 
receive such universal admiration and applause : the public papers 
and periodical works teemed with long paragraphs in its praise, and 
it continued to excite, for some months, the most lively interest, 
attracting such numbers of spectators that the room was constantly 
crowded. During the four months of its exhibition nearly twenty 
thousand persons visited it. 

The picture was sold by the Writer, the same year, to the Right 
Honourable Robert Peel, in whose possession it now is, forming the 
nucleus of his choice collection. 

Mr. Reynolds has engraved a print of it, in mezzotinto ; and 
there is also one in line, by Tayler, done from an old black chalk 
drawing. 

In closing the history of this distinguished picture, the Writer 
begs to make a few observations upon its prominent beauties as a 
work of art; its claims to superiority over every other picture of the 
same class ; and, lastly, its consequent value, and great utility, in a 
public view, as regards the improvement of the arts in this country. 
In noticing the first, namely, its prominent beauties, the writer would 
refer to its deceptive roundness and apparent flexibility, produced 
almost entirely without shadow, or any violent opposition ; to these 
is added the charm of the most perfect purity and transparency of 
colour, of such truth and reality, that the interesting object seems 
to be animated with the genial warmth of life and health ; another 
of its attractions is the graceful carriage, or lady-likepo^ of attitude, 
which give action and movement to the figure, and contributes greatly 
to the imposing and delightful effect ; to these incomparable qualities 
is united expression, the very soul and consummation of art — ^that 
Promethean fire, that indescribable something, which few attain and 
none can teach. 



BUBBNS. SSI 



u a aistingubhiiig chanKrterifldc of the EngKah icfaooH 
the aoquirition of a picture possessing the imique beauties of the 
CKaptau de PaiUe would therefore be a public desideratum ; not 
only as a model for young and rising artists, but also for those who 
stand at the head of the profession. This opinion is confirmed most 
unequivocallyi first, by the repeated visits of eminent artists, when 
the picture was publicly exhibited ; and, secondly, by the strong 
desire which many expressed for permission to copy it ; and, lastly, 
by the very visible improvement which some have since made in 
portraiture. It would be invidious to name those who have had the 
good taste to incorporate some of its beauties in their works ; nor is 
it indeed necessary, as the discerning connoisseur must have observed 
them. 

If, then, a transient sight of this picture has produced such bene- 
ficial effects, how much good might be expected, if it were con- 
stantly at the service of artists to study and copy. 



812. The Holy Family. In this composition the Virgin is 
phiced in the centre, wearing a dark scarf on her head, which 
casts a tender shadow over her face; the infant Saviour stands 
naked, all but his loins, on a pedestal, covered in part by 
her mantle, and is sustained by his mother with both hands, 
while his left band is extended, and his attention directed to 
St. John, who is seated naked on the knee of Elizabeth, bis 
hands joined, and his countenance, expresflive of fervent affection, 
is towards the Saviour; St. Joseph is behind the Virgin, with 
his left hand placed on the base of a column, observing with 
emotion the interesting scene. This superb production is en- 
titled to the highest commendations for the excellence of its 
oompoffltion, the beauty of its colour, the finishing, and the 
adariable sentiment which pervades the subject; but that which 
chums the wannest admirauon is the naked St John, than 
wUdi noduag in art can be more beautiful, for colour, sweet* 
ness, and expresrion : the Vii^ ia distinguished by elevatioD of 
character, and a luminous effect over thd countenance, similar 
to that which is so much admired in the Chapeau de PaiBe; 
the infiBuit Saviour, however, is by no means equal to the rest 



ass BUBENS; 

of die picture, and it is here very evident that the artist laboured 
under the trammels of painting a portrait, probably that of die 
son of the party for whom the picture was done. 

^fi. % in. by syj. 1 in P. 

This picture formerly adorned the Imperial Gallery at Vienna, 
and is inserted in the catalogue of that collection, in 1784, page 122, 
from whence it was removed by order of the Emperor Joseph II., 
and presented to the Chevalier Bortin, at Brussels, as an acknow- 
ledgment for some services which he had rendered that monarch* 
During the late war this picture was obtained of the Chevalier for 
the sum of dOOO/., by Mr. de la Hante, who imported it to England, 
where it met with the same cold reception that many other fine 
works have occasionally experienced ; and, instead of recompensing 
the spirited purchaser with a fair profit, it remained some time on 
his hands, and he ultimately sold it to an impostor, through whom 
he lost all the money. It afterwards became the property of Mr. 
Huybens, a picture dealer; at whose failure, in 1823, it again passed 
into the hands of Mr. de la Hante, through Mr. H. Phillips, for the 
sum of 1500/. (a sum gready below its value), and was immediately 
sold to M. Lapeyriere ; and in his collection it was for the last time 
sold, in 1825, at Paris, for 64,000/ir., 2560/. 

Now in the collection of M. Boursault. 



813. Minerva, with her ^gis, repelling the Harpies of 
War and Discord from the Throne of James I. A masterly 
sketch for part of the ceiling at Whitehall. 

2yi. 3| m. by tft. 9 in.— P. 

Collection of Benjamin West, Esq. 1820 155 g«. 



814. An Allegorical Subject, allusive to the Union and 
establishment of Peace between England and Scotland, re- 
presented under the amilitude of two females holding a triple 
crown, which Britannia has brought them, over the head of an 
infant (Charles I.) ; two angels, bearing the arms and crown 
of Wales, soar above their heads ; and under the foot of the 
child is a pile of armour and warlike weapons, to which Zephyr 



RUBENS. 33.^: 

is putting a blazing torch. This is a free braxmra sketch, 
deagned for part of the ceiling at Whitehall. 

2 ft. 8 in. by 4ft. 4 in.— P. 

Collection anonymous, at Mr. Stanley's, 1822. . • . 60 gs. 

Now in the collection of Edward Gray, Esq. 



815. The Rape of the Sabines. This bold political 
event is with great propriety represented in the Forum of 
the newly^rected city of Rome. Romulus, the chief, is 
seated upon an elevation on the left, giving the previously- 
concerted signal to his soldiers ; the fore-ground is occupied by 
three disdnct groups : that in the centre is composed of two 
females; one of them, by her attitude, expresses despair, the 
other is calling upon the gods for succour against the violence of 
three soldiers, one of whom has turned round to assist a com* 
rade, who is encountering the struggles and reastance of two 
other women. The third group connsts of a soldier on horse- 
back, who is exerting his utmost strength to nuse a fine lusty 
Sabine woman on his horse, and is seconded in his efforts by a 
soldier on foot, while a third holds his spirited charger. The 
second distance on the right exhibits an assemblage of about 
fourteen young women, mounted on a platform, whom the 
sudden assault has thrown into confusion. The detail of this 
group presents a variety of interesting expressions and graceful 
forms, from amongst these several Romans are rudely select- 
ing wives. In the distance the artist, anticipating as it were the 
splendour of the city, has introduced a triumphal arch, and a 
building in the form of the Pantheon ; and in this part also the 
military games, which, together with other ceremonies and 
exhibitions were the plausible pretexts for inviung the young 
Sabine women to the city, appear to be going on. This 
excellent production, although but a matured study, is painted 
in the artistes most attractive and delightful manner, com- 
bining a sufficiency of detail with the most masterly freedom 
and sjnrit, and such a redundancy of expression as leaves it 
without a parallel, excepting in his own works. The fastidious 



234 BUBENS. 

critic may censure the propriety of the costume, and the bulky 
nze of the females in the fore-ground ; but these are trifling 
objecdons, too inconaderable to deserve notice, when compared 
with the beauties which pervade every part of the picture. 
The ardent genius of Rubens rendering rajndity of execution 
indispensable, hurried him far beyond the trammels of dull 
calculation or critical correctness. 

Sjt. 6 in. by 7ft. 9 1».— P. 

Martinasi gave an indifferent print afler this picture in 1770, at 
which time it was in the possession of Madame Boschaerts, at 
Antwerp. The distinguished comioisseur, Chevalier Verhult, was 
so desirous of obtaining it, that he offered the owner 1000 double 
sovereigns^ or 17,850/Zo. (1696/.), for it. 

Sir Joshua Reynolds, in his Tour through Flanders, in 1781, 
observes that this picture was then for sale at the price of 212,000^., 
2200/. It subsequendy became the property of J. Julius Anger- 
stein, Esq., from whose representatives it was purchased with his 
entire collection for the National Gallery. Now worth 8,000 gs. 



WHITEHALL. 

816. The C^ling of the Chapel of Whitehall, formerly the 
Banqueting-House, was painted by Rubens in 1630. It is 
divided into nine compartments, each <^ which is adorned with 
a picture alluding to the prosperity and good government of 
King James I. The subjects are as follows : — 

The centre piece, which is oval, represents King James 
seated on clouds, with a globe under his feet borne up by an 
eagle, the symbol of power; on his left is a female typifying 
Jusdce, whom he is receiving under his protection ; on his right 
is another female, probably intended to personify Scodand, with 
a smoking censor in her hands, emblemaUcal of the offerings 
of a grateful people; a third female with a book, allegori- 
cally represendng the Law, is bdiind her ; ten infant and two 
youthful angels float in the air above, two <^ the former are 
descending with the symbols of royalty, others of them are 



BUBEiNS. 235 



WhiUhaa. 



Bounding trumpets or bearing wreaths, while the two lattar 
haye the emblems of Peace and Commeroe in their bands. 
This piece is termed the Apotheoms of King James. 

The second centre compartment exhibits King James, 
habited in royal robes, seated on a throne ; on his kPt is Bel. 
lona, graspng a thunderbolt; and before him an armed 
figure, with the torch of Discord in his hand, is kneeling} 
from these the king is turning with horror and disdain towards 
two females who are embracing, and personify Peace and 
Abundance; in front of them is Mercury padfying the 
demons of war, Envy and Mischief, by the touch of his 
caduceus ; two angels, bearing a chaplet, are floating buoyant 
in the air over the king^s head. 

A Sketch for the above was sold in the collection of Sir Joshua 
Reynolds. — See p. 199. 

The third centre compartment The king, advanced in 
years, is represented atting on a throne with a sceptre in his 
hands, which he extends towards an infant (intended for 
Charles I.), who is supported by two females, personifying 
the two kingdoms of Scotland and Ireland ; while Britannia, 
who is behind, holds, in conjunction with the two former, a 
regal crown over his head. A quantity of armour lies in 
front, to which Cupid is applying a lighted torch, and on this 
ride of the king are two allegorical figures. Two angels, 
fljdng above, bear the royal arms of the United Kingdom. 

A Sketch for the above was sold in the collection of Sir Joshua 
Reynolds. — Seep. 199. 

On each ride of the centre picture are friezes, composed of 
numerous cupids with cars, one of which is drawn by lions, 
the other by a bear and a ram ; these are preceded by angels, 
bearing clusters of fruit and sheaves of oom^ while others are 
loading the cars with fruit, or guiding the savage animals ; all 
these exemplify the prosperity and good government of 
England. 



236 BUBENS. 



Whitehall. 



The Femaining four pictures allegorically represent the 
Virtues of Kingly Power. Good Government is repre- 
sented by a female with a bridle in her hand, and Sedition 
under her feet; Wealth and Honours by Apollo (bearing a 
likeness of the king), with a comucojna in his arms, from 
whence the regal symbols, and abundance of gold, are showering 
forth ; Avarice, with her bags of money, is under his feet ; 
Strength is indicated by Hercules, destroying the monster 
Envy with his dub; and Wisdom is personified by Minerva, 
driving away Sedition* 

The whole of the preceding series was engraved in 1720, by 
S. Gribelin. Lucas Vosterman, jun. has also engraved the centre 
part of the Apotheosis, and the two friezes. 

The figures in these pictures are of a very colossal size, the infants 
in the friezes being above nine feet high, and the rest, of necessity, 
are of progressively similar proportions. These capital works of 
Rubens were painted at such a period of his life, and under such 
favourable circumstances, as to leave little doubt that they once pos« 
sessed all the beauties of his best productions ; but whether these 
beauties have been swept away by the ignorant cleaner, or concealed 
by the pencil of the presumptuous painter, it is impossible, in the 
situation in which they now are, to decide ; if, however, by good 
fortune, they are only obscured by the dirt that has accumulated 
from smoke and dust, and are in a state capable of being restored to 
any thing like what they must once have been, they Would form a 
glorious set to augment the national collection. 

Mr. J. T. Smith, in his history of Nollekens and his Times^ in 
reference to these pictures, observes, '* I consider it but fair, for the 
high reputation of Rubens as a colourist, to state, that this picture 
has been restored, repainted, and refreshed, not fewer than three 
times. In the reign of King James II., 1687, Parry Walton (a 
painter of still life, and keeper of the king's pictures) was suffered 
to retouch this grand work of art, which then had been painted sixty 
years, as appears by the Privy Council book, in which Mr. Parry 
Walton's demand, of 212/. for its complete restoration, was considered 



RUBENS. 2S7 



His Mafesty's CoOecium. 

by Sir Christopher Wren a^ very moderate and reasonable* Mr. 
Cipriani retouched it a second time ; and, hut of all, Mr. Rigaud 
was employed to refresh it." 

The original Designs for the ceiling pictures above described was 
formerly in the collection of Charles I., and are notedin the catalogue 
of that monarch's effects, No. V., p. 161. 

I ft. S^in. by I Jt. lOtn.— C. 



HIS MAJESTY'S COLLECTION. 

817. La Prairie de Lacken. A hilly landscape, beautifuUy 

diversi6ed with clusters of trees, a pool of water, cattle, and 

figures; most of the latter are distributed on the riight and 

front, and consist of two women, one of whom has a basket of 

fruit on her head, the other is busy with a milk-can ; near them 

are a cow lying down, and a number of pigeons feeding on the 

ground ; a little redred from these are a bull and four cows, 

one of which a woman is milking ; in the opposite ade stands a 

barrow full of vegetables, and beyond it is a man watering bis 

horse in a pond ; a church is seen on a hill in the distance. 

This excellent production, which is deservedly reckoned one of 

the best works of Rubens in this class of art, was among the 

pictures left by the artist at his decease, and descended in the 

family, with the Chapeau de PaiUcy to M. Van Havren, at 

Antwerp, from whence it was imported into England by Mr. 

de la Hante, about the year 1821, and sold by him to His 

Majesty. 

2jl. 10 in. by 4Jl. 1 in.— P. Worth 1200 gs. 

Engraved by Van Uden, and also by J. Neefs. 

Exhibited in die British Gallery in 1826 and 1827. 



818. The Interior of a large open Cow*House, with a com. 
pany of ox peasants (consisting of three men, a woman, aQd 
two children) assembled round a fire in the middle of it ; in the 



2S8 BUBENS. 



His Mqfe9tj/*s Collection. 



left are two women, one of whom bai a basket the other a can, 
and beyond these asee nine cows standing in their stalls, and 
two women engaged in milking ; in the •<qfipo6ite ade is a man 
leaning on a stick, with his dog by bis side ; two horses and 
a colt are near him ; the open nde and end of the oow-house 
exhibit a view of some cottages and the adjacent country, seen 
under the effect of a snow-storm. 

Engraved by Clouet* 

This picture was formerly in the possession of Madam Spranger, 
at Antwerp. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1819. 

A picture, corresponding in description with the preceding (size 
ift, by 7Jt» — C.)| is inscribed in the catalogue of the Duke of Buck- 
ingham's collection. No. S^p* 15; published in 1758. 



819* Diana and two Nymphs, naked, repoong upon a bank 
after the fatigues of the Chase. The goddess recUnes her back 
against a tree, and one of the nymphs is recumbent by her side ; 
the remaimng one is more retired in the left ; a broad drapery 
suspended across the retired scene, serving for a shelter, is raised 
by the intruaon of two satyrs, who are gazing with avidity upon 
the sleeping beauties ; the implements of the chase, and a great 
variety of game, are distributed about the fore-ground. This 
picture is the joint production of Rubens and his scholars. 

It is finely engraved in mezzotinto by R. Earlom. 

Pictures representing similar subjects occur in the Munich, 
Vienna, and Madrid Galleries. 



820. A Landscape ; offering an extensive view over a fertile 
country, of a broken and undulating surface, enlivened with 
cottages and distant hamlets, and intersected by a winding road, 
and a stream of water flowing towards the front between rugged 
banks, from which rise clusters of trees. Among the various 
figures which are passing over a hilly road in front, are a man 
with a cart laden with vegetables, preceded by a woman on 



RUBENS. 2S9 



His Mqfegty'*s Collection. 

horseback and a man riding an ass, at whose side is a man on 
foot, carrying a fawn on his back. Several cows and a flock <^ 
sheep are in advance of them ; and in the right, and dose to the 
front, are a man and a woman descending a steep bank to the road. 

This picture is etched by Van Kessel ; and engraved by Browne, 
entitled, " Gomg to Market." 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1819. 

A picture, corresponding in description with the preceding, is 
inscribed in the catalogue of the effects of the Duke of Buckingham's 
collection, No. 1,|). 15; published in 1758. 

6 ft, by 7 ft. 7 in.— C. 



821. An Equestrian Portrait of Archduke Albert. The 
duke is represented uncovered, clad in armour, and wearing a 
broad white ruff round his neck, holding a baton in his right 
hand, and mounted on a beautiful gray charger, with long 
flowing mane and tail. This is a superb production* 

Uft. by 9y».— C. (ahmU) 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1821. 

There was an equestrian portrait, styled the Duke of Alva, sold 
in the collection of Sir Lawrance Dundas, Bart., in 1794, for \%Q g9. 

Bft. 4 in. by eft.^C. 



82S. St. Martin dividing his Cloak with the Destitute. The 
saint, clad in brilliant armour, and wearing a black cap decked 
with feathers, is mounted on a powerful gray horse, and is in 
the act of dividing with his sword a scarlet mantle between two 
poor men, one of whom is seated in front, with his back to the 
spectator, holding the garment; the other, seen in a profile 
view, clothed in a pale yellow vesture, is bending in gratitude 
for the gift; beyond these are a tall woman with long black 
hair, holding a child in her arms, and having another child by 
her ride. The saint is accompanied by two horsemen, who are 
on his right, a little retired ; the nearest of these has a fine 
military countenance and hbxk hair (uncovered), and rides a 



2r40 BUBENS. 



Majesty'' 8 Collection. 



bay horse; the head only of the second is aeen^ wearing a hehnet; 
beyond these is part of a building; the rest of the back- 
ground is composed of a clouded sky. 

Sft. 4 in. by 7Jl. 1 in.— C. Worth 3500 gs. 

Engraved by Chambers. 

This picture was brought from Spain by Mr. Bagnol. 

The approximation of some few of the early pictures by Van Dyck 
to those of Rubens, renders it almost an impossibility to define with 
certainty their several works ; and in the present instance it is ren- 
dered more difficult, in consequence of the existence of an altar- 
piece of precisely the same composition as the one above described, 
excepting that the woman and two children are omitted therein, 
which, irom the period of its production, has ever been considered 
a genuine work of Van Dyck. In reference to the present picture, 
which is, in truth, a noble effort of art, it is the writer's opinion 
that the composition and the greater portion of the figures are by 
the hand of Rubens, and that the horse, woman, and children are 
chiefly by Van Dyck. — Vide the same subject in the catalogue of that 
master's works. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 18i82. 



823. Portraits of Sir Balthasar Grerbier and his Family, con- 
nsting of his lady and nine children. 

7 ft. by loy^.— C. 

Engraved by Mac Ardell, R. Brookshaw, and W. Walker. 

This picture having formerly been attributed to the pencil of 
Rubens, has induced the Author to notice it in this Work ; but as he 
considers it to be by the hand of Van Dyck, it will be found more 
amply described in the catalogue of that master's pictures. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1820. 



824. Philip IV. of Spain, mounted on horseback. The 
monarch, apparently forty-five years of age, is seen in a three- 
quarter view; he wears a yellow hat decked with. a white 
feather, and is clad in brillant armour chased with gold, and a 
dark gray silk mantle; he has oni buff gloves, and holds a 



&UBENS. 241 



Marlborough CoUecHon, 



Wood in the right hand, while the left curbs the reins of his 
bay charger. A female, personifying Victory, bearing a chaplet 
of laurel over his head and a palm-branch in her hand, is 
flying behind him. The back-ground displays a wide open 
oouDUy> in a distant part of which is seen a conflict of cavalry. 

Sft. 4 in. by 7ft.— C. 
A capital Drawing of the preceding Monarch on horseback, 
probably a study for this portrait, was sold in the collection of M. 
Lempereur, 1785. • 620/^. 25/. 



MARLBOROUGH COLLECTION. 

826. The Rape of Proserpine. This splendid composition 

exhibits Pluto bearing ofi^ in his arms the naked struggling 

nymph Proserpine, pursued in his flight by four of her coin- 

panions, one of whom appears in the character of PaDas, 

wearing a helmet and bearing a spear and shield; another 

female has seized the skirt of Proserpine^s mantle, while the 

remaining two are behind; the beautiful car of the deity is 

drawn by four fiery coursers, which are rushing impetuously 

towards the ocean, on whose margin two naked nereides are 

sporting, while two cupids above attend the flight of the love^ 

smitten god. 

^ft. 8tn. by l^ft. Sm. — C. (about.) 

Worth 8000 gSi 
Etched by Soutman. 

This capital gallery picture is wholly by the hand of the master, 

and abounds with the several beauties peculiar to his surprising 

genius in this class of subject. 



826. The Flight of Lot and his Family from Sodom. Lot, 
clothed in a large dark gray mande^ his hands clasped, and his 
sorrowful countenance turned towards the spectator, appears* to 
be hurried on by an angel, who is holding his arm and pmnting 

VOL. II. R 



S4S EUB£K8. 



Morlborovgh Collection. 

to some distast object On the farther ude of Lot is his wife, 
shedding tears of regret at their departure ; and behind him 
are his two daughters, one of whom has a bundle on her head, 
while the other carries a basket of silver vessels before her : 
these are also accompanied by an angel. This excellent pro* 
duction is painted in the artistes careful or finished manner; the 
figures are full the size of life. 

eft. 8 in. by 7ft. 6 ta C. Worth 2000 gs. 

Engraved b j Vosterinan. 

Presented by the city of Antwerp to John, Duke of Marlborough. 

A carefully-finished Drawing of the preceding picture, done for 

the engraver by a scholar, and terminated by Rubens, in chalks, is 

in the Musee at Paris. 

13|m. by 16|tn. 



827* Portrait of Parcelsus, presenting a portly counte- 
nance, aeen in a front view, wearing a scarlet furred cap, and 
holding a book in bis hand. The landscape is by the hand of 

Wildens. 

2 ft. 6 in. by ft ft. 1 in.— P. (about.) 

There is a bust portrait of this person, engraved by Van Sompel. 



828. Portrait of Catherine de Medids This distinguished 
person is dressed in black silk, with a broad and richly-worked 
stiff frill round her neck ; she is seated in an arm-chair, with a 
small muff in her right hand, lying in her kp. 

4fi. 6 m. hy 4ft. S in. 

This is a picture of great merit and beauty, remarkable fiur the 
delicacy and sweetness of its colour and the graceful dignity of its 
character. 



829- A whole-length Portrait of Helena Forman. Bepre- 
sented in a walking position, dressed in a rich black silk gown 
with white, sarin sleeves adorned with pearls, a beautifully^ 
wrought kerchief round her shoulders, leaving the bosom 



RUBENS. 243 



Marlborough Collection, 



exposed ; a pearl necklace and other jewels and DmamenU 
embellish the neck and bosom; and a black velvet cap, sur- 
mounted with a tassel, covers the head ; a page, with his hat 
off, is following her steps. 

Qft. 6 «»• by ^ft. 6 ia.— C. Worth 1500 gi. 
This very admirable portrait is finely engraved by Earlom. 



830. The Return from Egypt. The Virgin, clothed in 
ample drapery and wearing a hat turned up at the ade, is 
advancing with the infant Saviour, whose hand she holds, on 
her right ; on the farther side of them is St. Joseph leading 
the ass ; a palm tree stands in the middle of the picture, and 
completes the pyramidal form of the composition. A carefully- 
studied picture, remarkably fresh in colour and luminous in 

its effect. 

^ft. 8 in. by ^ft. 6 in.— C. Worth 1200 g$. 

Engraved by Vosterman, 1620 ; also by Lowrie, Voet, and 
Mac Ardell ; and in reverse, anonymous. 

A highly-studied Drawing of the preceding, executed by a scholar, 
and perfected by Rubens for the engraver, done in chalks and Indian 
ink, is in the Musee at Paris. 

16|tn. by I2\tn. 



831. FuU-length Portraits of Rubens, with his Wife, Helena 
Forman, and ChUd, represented in walking attitudes. The 
nearest to the spectator is the lady, whose dress consists of 
black silk, relieved by a broad richly-worked white fnU, 
standing up round her shoulders and leavmg her bosom un. 
covered ; her hair is simply tied in a knot behind ; in her left 
hand, which hangs negligently at her side, is a fan ; and the 
right, resting on the arm of her husband, holds a silk cord, 
attached to the child who precedes her. Rubens is also suitably 
attired in a Spanish dress, consisting of black silk with slashed 
sleeves and body, relieved with white satin, and a cloak thrown 
loosely over his left shoulder; a large hat covers his head; 



244 RUBENS. 



Marlborough Collection. 

his right ann is extended, and his attention directed towards 
his wife. The back-ground of this superb and interesting 
picture is a garden, with a temple and a fountain, embellished 
with rose trees and other shrubs. 

ejt. 8 in. by 5jt. 2 in.— P. Worth 8000 gs. 

Engraved by Mac Ardell. 

This picture was presented by the city of Brussels to John, Duke 
of Marlborough. 

Studies for the preceding portraits, on three pieces of paper, done 
in a free manner, in chalks, are in the Musee at Paris. 



832. Andromeda chained to a rock. The beautiful daughter 
of Cepheus, king of Ethiopia, is represented nearly naked, in 
an erect position and front view, chained to a rock ; her lovely 
countenance strongly depicts the painful apprehension of her 
fate, and her fine form seems to be trembling with dread at the 
approach of the devouring monster. A cupid with a flaming 
torch flies over head, in allusion to love being the result of her 
deliverance; Perseus is seen in the distance, gliding swiftly 
through the air on the fleetly-winged Pegasus. 

6 ft. 6 tfi. by Sft. 1 in.— P. Worth 700 gs. 



8S3. A Bacchanalian Procession. In the centre of the 
group is Silenus, staggering between a negro and a satyr ; at 
his feet are three boys, with grapes and other fruit, one of them 
is taking some of the clusters from the relaxed hand of Silenus, 
while a playful tiger is catching at the vine-branch ; these are 
preceded by a fat faun playing on a pipe, and followed by two 
nymphs, the nearest of whom to the spectator, almost naked, is 
beating a tamborine, and at the same instant turning her wild 
looks towards a young satyr who is behind her, with his right 
arm encircling her waist and his left round the neck of the 
other female ; a naked bacchanalian boy precedes the steps of 
the nymph : a fine sylvan scene forms the back-ground. This 



BUBENS. 245 



Marlborough Collection. 



capital production is justly con^dered by all connoisseurs' to 
possess a rich union of the various beauties which characterize 
this dass of subject, and a redundancy of expression and splen- 
dour of colour which are not surpassed in any of his works. 

7ft. 8 in. by dft. 6 in.— C. Worth 5000 gs. 

Engraved in mezzotinto by Hodges. 

A Drawing of the preceding, in chalks, heightened in white, not 
wholly by the master, is in the Musee at Paris. 



884. Venus and Adonis. The beautiful goddess is seated 

on a bank, with her arms round the neck of Adonis, whom she 

is endeavouring to detain from the chase by the most seductive 

looks and alluring embraces; her entreaties are seconded by 

Cupid, who is clinging round the huntsman^s leg, while the 

latter, with a spear in his hand and his dogs by his side, seems 

eager to depart. 

eft. by 7ft. 6 in.— C. Worth 1200g#. 

A very similar composition is engraved by Tassaert. 

This picture was presented by the Emperor of Germany to John, 

Duke of Marlborough. 



885. The Vir^, wearing a scarlet dress and a blue mantle, 
with the infant Saviour, mtting naked on a pillow and reclining 
his head affectionately on her bosom ; St. Joseph, seen in a 
profile view, is on her left, a little retired from the front, view- 
ing the interesUng scene with lively emotion. This is a sUght 
picture, and very inferior to others in the collection. 

Syi. 5 in. by Zft. 6 in.— P. (about.) 

Ryckman has engraved a print which closely resembles this 
picture. 



886. The Virgin, seen in a front view, seated, holding the 
infant Saviour, who is standing naked on some drapery placed 
on a table; his face is seen in nearly a profile view, and his 
left hand is laid on the back of that of his mother, while her 



246 RUBENS. 



Marlborough CoUection, 



right touches the child^s foot. The infant is painted in the 

artist'^s most engaging manner, both in colour and expresnon. 

3ft. 5 in. by 2ft. 5 J m. — P. Worth 600 gs. 
Etched by Spruyt. 

A Duplicate of the preceding, of very superior quality, is in die 

Munich Gallery. — Seep. 64. 

837. The Holy Family. The Virgin, habited in a scarlet 
dress with blue sleeves, is seen in a profile view, seated, folding 
the infant Saviour, naked, in her arms, and at the same time 
fondly pressing him to her bosom ; the child is placing its hand 
on his mother's face ; St. John, wearing the skin of an aninml 
round his loins, stands in front of the Virgin^s knees, looking 
affectionately at the Saviour; St. Joseph, clad in a gray 
mantle, is on the farther side of this group, caressing a lamb ; 
and St. Elizabeth is behind the Virgin, leaning both hands on 
the top of a cradle, which is placed close to the front This is 
an example of the highest excellence. 

Gft. 6 in. by 4fft. 6 m.— C. Worth 2000 gs. 

Engraved by Vosterman, 16^0 ; and in reverse, anonjrmous. 

A Drawing in India ink, tinted in bistre, and finished with a pen, 

the work of a scholar, perfected by the master for the engraver, is 

in the Musee at Paris. 

10^ in. by Sin. 

A Duplicate of the preceding picture, of much smaller dimensions, 
was sold in the Poulain Collection, and is engraved in that Gallery, 

(No. 86) 1780. . ll,O00/#. 440/. 

3ft. 6 in. by 3ft. 9 tn.— P. (about.) 

This picture was brought to England a few years back, but did 
not find a purchaser ; it was again taken to Paris, and is now in the 
collection of the Chevalier Erard. 



8S8. Three beautiful Females, in a Landscape, engaged 
gathering Fruit. The centre figure, naked to the wust, is 
pulling down a branch of apjdes ; another is taking a branch 
of apricots from a cupid in the tree ; and the third has her lap 
full of fruit, a quantity of which lies also on the ground, and 



HUBENS. S47 



Marlbortmgh Collection. 



a basketful stands at the side. The latter are painted by 

Snyders. 

7 ft. 6 in. by 7 ft. 6 in P. Worth 600 gi. 

This picture is yery indifferently engraved by Michel. 



889. Lot and his Daughters. The composition represents 

Lot seated in front, seen in a profile view ; his eldest daughter 

is sitting by his side, with her arm round his neck, and holding 

a cup in her hand, which her sister, who is opposite to them is 

fillbg with wine. The figures are the full ffl^e of nature, and 

are punted in the artistes most careful and studied manner, 

combining correct drawing with admirable ccdour. 

eyif. by 7fi.—C. Worth 800 gs. 

Engraved by W. Leuw. 

This picture was presented by the Emperor of Germany to John, 

Duke of Marlborough. 

840. The Adoration of the Magi. A composition of eleven 
figures, admirabty grouped and possessing surpriang force and 
brilliancy of colour. A duplicate picture of the one formerly 
in the church of the Annunciation at Brussels, and now in the 
Louvre. — See pp. 49 and 115. 

Sjt. 6 in. by eft. 3 m.— C. Worth 1200 gs. 



841 . Meleager and Atalanta. The nymph is seated, looking 
a&cticmately at the young huntsman, who stands by her side, 
presenting to her the head of the Calydonian boar, which he 
is holding on her lap with one hand, while he is caressing a dog 
jumjMng up against him with the other; behind the female is 
a huntsman blomng a horn; and a litde retired from the 
group is seen the harpy Envy tearing off the snakes from her 
bur. The figures are seen to the knees. This .picture is 
painted in the artist'^s smooth and careful manner. 

4 ft. ft in. by 3 ft. 6 in. — P. (about.) 

Engraved by Bloemart. The same subject, differendy composed, 
is etched by Panneek. Worth 700 gi. 



248 RUBENS*. 



Marlborough CoUeciion. 



A Picture, representing the same subject and composition as the 

preceding, was sold in the collection of the Due de Tallard, in 1756, 

669/1. 29/. 
4 ft. lOj tn. by Sfi. 9| in C. 



842. Roman Charity. The venerable old man is represented 
on his knees upon some straw, with his hands bound behind 
him ; his pious daughter, habited in a scarlet and gray dress, 
Is bending down by his side ; and» wlule she is sustaining her 
parent's life with the nourishment from her breast, looks round 
towards the grating of the prison window with watchful in- 
quietude ; her infant lies asleep upon some straw, close to the 

front 

6 ft. by eyi.—C. Worth 1200 gs. 

Engraved by Smith. 

Of the several pictures of this subject noticed in this Work, the 

Writer considers the preceding one to be decidedly the best, and, 

indeed, entided to the highest commendation for the fine feeling of 

expression which pervades the figures. The eager cravings of 

nature in the debilitated old man, and the treipulous anxiety which 

agitates the afiectionate child, are depicted widi surprising fidelity ; 

the colouring and execution are also excellent 



843. The Vir^n, seated upon a lofty throne, with the infant 
Saviour in her arms ; before whom St. Catharine is bowing 
in adoration. On the Virgin^s left are St. Barbara and St. 
Dominick ; and on her right «re three monks ; four angels are 
about the throne, one of whom is receiving the offering of the 
Archduke Albert, who is kneeling in front, on the right ; his 
consort Isabella, also on her knees, is on the opposite side, with 
the Archduke Ferdinand of Austria kneeling at her right A 
beautifylly-finished study for a large picture. 

2 ft. % in. by 1/t 8 in.— P. Worth 200 g#, 

844. Portrait of Rubens, with a hat on. 

%ft, 6 tn. by 2/1. 1 in,— C, 



RUBENS. 249 



Marlborough Collection. 



This 18 a duplicate, by a scholar, of the excellent picture in the 
King's Collection. 

845. Christ blesnng the Children. The Saviour, habited in 
a scarlet mantle and seen in a profile view (placed about the 
centre of the compodtion), is putting his hand on the head of 
a boy, behind whom is a little girl ; and on his farther side is 
a woman of a fair complexion, with a babe in her arms; and 
beside her is a man with his hand placed on his breast On 
the oppoate side are three of the Saviour^s disciples. The 
figures are seen to the middle. 

4ft. S in. by 6 ft. 4 in. — C. 

This picture is erroneously attributed to Rubens, although worthy 
of his pencil : the Writer considers it to be the work of Diepenbeck. 



846. Ixion embradng a Cloud in the form of Juno. Ixion 
and the mmilitude of Juno are seated on clouds, on the right 
of the picture, while the goddess herself stands naked in the 
centre, with a peacock (the symbol of majesty) at her feet ; 
her back is towards the deluded king, and her countenance 
expresses the pleasure she feels at the deception. Behind her a 
winged female, with the skin of a fox (the emblem of cunning) 
over her shoulder, is raising a drapery to conceal the pair. 
Jupiter, seated on Mount Olympus, is seen in the opposite 
nde, far retired in light; towards whom Cupid, with his 
flaming torch, is hastening. 

5fi. 7 in. by Sfi. 1 in P. 

Engraved by Van Sompel. 

This picture is painted in the artist's most elaborate manner, 
exceedingly fresh and brilliant in the carnations ; and although the 
forms of the figures are heavy, yet the drawing is remarkably cor- 
rect and good. It is evidently one of his early productions, and 
forms a striking contrast to the free and florid style of the four 
large pictures in the same collection. 



250 ftUBENS. 

Sold in the collection of Van de Amory, AmiU 1 722« $S50jh. d46/. 
It was subsequently in the collection of Sir Gregory Page 

Turner, Bart. ; then in that of Welbore Ellis Agar, Esq. 1806 ; and 

now in the collection of Earl Grosvenor. 



847. A hilly Landscape. In the fore-ground are several 
harvest people ; and beyond them is seen a waggon, drawn by 
two horses, descending a hill towards the front. 

I ft. 6 in. by Ifi. 8 in.— P. 

This picture is etched in Young's Grosvenor Gallery, and it is 
there stated to have been the production of Rubens when he was 
only eighteen or twenty years of age ; but from what source such 
an opinion is derived the Writer is ignorant 

Now in the collection of Earl Grosvenor. 



848. The Birth of Venus. The beautiful goddess is repre- 
sented alighting on the shore from the element that gave her 
birth, accompanied by nymphs, tritons, and a number of cu- 
pids ; the latter playfully sporting in the ur, bearing chaplets of 
flowers. The surrounding border is decorated with Neptune and 
Amphitrite, Cupid and Psyche, sea nymphs, cupids, dolphins, 
vases, &c. This is a spirited and delightfully-painted picture, 
en griaaiUe^ done for a design for a silver salver (most probabl j 

for Charles I.). 

ly^. 11 in. by tft. 6 in — P. (wal) 
Now in the collection of the Duke of Hamiltim, at his palace 
in Scotland. 

The following series of dght pictures, illustrating, in suc- 
cession, the life and heroic actions of Achilles, were painted by 
the artist for his royal patron, Charles I., for models to be 
worked in tapestry. 

Engraved by Ertinger, in 1679 ; and by B. Baron, in 1724. 

849. Thetis plunging Achilles into the Biver Styx. The 
nymph, clothed ia a light vesture round her loins, stands on 
the bank of the stream, immerang the infiemt in its mystic 



RUBENS. S51 



waters, while Destiny, bearing a blazing torch in her hand and 
having the distaff stuck in her girdle, stands by her side, 
viewing the ceremony. On each side are tennini of Pluto and 
Proserpine, bearing a oomioe decorated with festoons. 

15 m. by U\m.—V. 



850. The Instruction of Achilles. The youth is mounted 
on the back of the centaur Chiron, who, while he teaches 
the art of riding, is also inculcating other lessons of useful 
knowledge. The termini at the sides represent Apollo and 
Esculapius ; they support a cornice adorned with flowers. 

15fn. by 12|tn.-.P. 



851. Achilles discovered with the Daughters of Lycomedes. 

The scene offers the court of a palace, near the entrance to 

which (on the right) is a company of six females ; the centre one 

of whom, el^antly attired in white satin, is struck with seeing 

her companion, Achilles, pladng on his head a helmet which he 

has taken from a basket, in preference to the jewels it contained, 

which the females are distributing among themselves: this 

marUal choice has discovered the disguised youth to Ulysses, 

who, with hb friend, stands at the side watching the effect of 

their stratagem. At the base of the termini are an owl and a 

fox, emblems of wisdom and cunning. The cornice above is 

decorated with festoons of fruit, among which four cupids are 

playing. 

1 7 in. by U\ in.— P. Worth 1 50 gs. 

This picture, which is a masterly- finished study, was purchased 

at Rome, in 1839, by the Hon. George-John Vernon, in whose 

possession it now is. 

852. The Anger of Achilles against Agamemnon. The 
hero, burning with indignation, stands in the left and front, 
in the act of drawing his sword to revenge the loss of his 
captive, Briseis; but is prevented from executing his purpose 
by Pallas, who is cautioning him to forbear. Agamemnon, 
equally enraged^ is attempting to rise from his throne, to en- 



252 RUfiEXS. 

counter the youth; but is restrained by the wise Neston 

Several other Greeks are present The iermini at the sides 

represent Envy and blind Passion, with other appropriate 

emblems ; the cornice is decorated with festoons of fruit and 

cupids. 

15 m. by 13|»». — P. 



858. Thetis receiving Arms from Vulcan for her Son. The 
marine daty, accompanied by Cupid and a nymph, is stepping 
from her watery element and receiving a shield from the hands 
of Vulcan ; a cyclops is seen bringing forward a cuirass in his 
arms, and a cupid is bearing off a helmet to a triton. The 
tools of the swarthy god of the forge lie along the front The 
termini at the sides represent Jupiter and Juno; they support 
a cornice adorned with festoons of fruit and two cupids. 

\5 in. by I7i in.— P. 



854. Briseis restored to Achilles. The venerable Nestor, 
clothed in a dark gray vest and a crimson mantle, is con- 
ducting the beautiful captive to the presence of Achilles, who 
is approaching from the left with extended arms to receive her ; 
in the intermediate space are four men, two of whom are de- 
positing the presents of gold and silver vessels; and a third, 
who is apparently Ulysses, superintends the ceremony; four 
young females, one of them having a basket on her head, 
accompany Briseis ; and near these is a page with three horses ; 
within a tent, in the opposite side, is seen the dead Patroclus, 
and two females bewailing over him. The termini at the ades 
support a cornice adorned with festoons of fruit and four cupids. 

1 7 in. by 25 J tn.— P. Worth 1 50 gs. 

This picture was also purchased at Rome, by the Hon. George- 
John Vernon, in whose possession it now is. 



855. Achilles vanquishing Hector. The Gredan hero, dad 
in the splendid armour forged for him by Vulcan, is represented 
combating with Hector, whom he has {uerced in the neck with 



RUB£NS. 259 

hifli spear, and the Trojan chief has sunk on his hand and knee 
to the ground ; the victor is accompanied by Minerra, his 
protectress and guide. The walls of Troy, with numerous 
warriors on the battlements, appear in the distance. The ter- 
mini are composed of Mars and Hercules, and they support a 
cornice enriched with festoons of fruit and two cupids. 

15 tfi. by 15^ in, — P. (about.) 



856. The Death of Achilles. The hero, wounded in the 
heel by an arrow from the bow of Paris, is sinking on his knees 
by the side of the altar at which he was espousing Polyxena ; 
he is supported behind by one of the attendants, who, as well 
as the high priest and a second attendant at the altar, is greatly 
agitated by the event. Young Paris, accompanied by Apollo, 
is seen at the entrance of the temple. Close to the front is a 
fox devouring an eagle, an appropriate emblem of cunning over- 
coming strength. The termini at the sides are Venus and 
Apollo, supporting a cornice decorated with festoons of fruit 
and two cupids. 

15 in, by \5\ in, — P. (about,) 



The preceding series were probably sold and taken abroad, on 
the distribution of the royal property in 1649. 



857. A Female, apparently about twenty-five years of age, 

seated in a solitary Landscape. She is clothed in a gray 

jacket, a white kerchief, and an ample silk skirt of a greenish 

colour ; her head is uncovered and her face turned towards the 

spectator ; her hands, clasped together, rest on her knee ; the 

countenance and position appear to denote abandonment of the 

world, and resignation to the secluded life of a Magdalen. An 

empty flask lies on the ground in front, and a rich mande is 

near an old tree behind her. An admirable study for a large 

picture. 

%ft. 6 in. by 2ft. 4^ in. Worth 60 gi. 

Now in the Dalwich Gallery. 



254 RUBENS. 

858. The Assumption of the Virgin. The ascending mother 
of Jesus is surrounded by cherubim, and nine angels are under 
her feet. 

In the Arundel Catalogue it is stated, that this picture was painted 
expressly for Lord Arundel. 

Now in the collection at Wilton House. 



859. A Landscape. 
In the same collection. 



860. The Flight into Egypt by Night The Virpn, with 

the infant Saviour in her arms, is mounted on an ass, led by an 

angel ; another angel soars over their heads, bearing a lighted 

torch; and St Joseph follows behind. A masterly-finished 

study. 

19tfi. by 24 tn.— P. 

Engraved by Marinus ; and in reverse by Galle* 

Now in the collection of Sir Abraham Hume, Bart 

A similar composition to the preceding occurs in the Louvre. — 

Seep. 115. 

lyi. 7tfi. by 2y» P. 

861. The Annunciation. A splendid sketch, represenUng 
in rich allegory the accomplishment of all the sacred prophedes 
by the immaculate conception of the Virgin, who is seen 
kneeling on the summit of a flight of steps recaving the annun- 
ciation from a celestial messenger, behind whom are the three 
Patriarchs, with Moses, Aaron, David, Solomon, and other 
precursors of our Lord; a dove, encompassed by angels, 
hovers over her head ; and in the clouds above is seated the 
First Person of the Trinity, at whose right hand are two 
females, the one bearing an inverted sword, the other an olive- 
branch, emblems of Peace and Reconciliation. On the left are a 
company of angels, with the ark of the covenant and other 
typical allusions ; and in the lower part of the picture are the 
Prophets Jeremiah and Isaiah, attended by two infant angels, 
one of whom is bearing a lighted lamp ; more to the right are 
seated the four Sibylhe, with their fabled bocJui of prophecies 



RUBENS. 255 

east under their feet, and their countenances, expressing faith 
«nd h(^, directed upwards. This abbreyiated description ia 
but an outline of the composidon of this magnificent design^ 
wiiich, so fStff as the Writer has had opportunities of Ifuming, 
was never executed in large. 

itjt. 1 m. by I ft. 6 in P. 

Now in the collection of Sir Abraham Hume, Bart 



862. An Allegorical Subject, representing the Genius of 

France with the emblems of Commerce^ Prosperity, and good 

Government. The principal figure is a female, seated, wearing 

a mural crown, and holding a sceptre in one hand and a pair 

of scales in the other ; a cornucopia is placed at her side, the 

prow of a ship at her feet, and the eye of Providence over her 

head, &c 

6/^ 4 in. by Aft. 6 in.— P. 

This picture is now in the possession of Mr. Henry. 

Paris, 1827. Valued at 10,000/#. 400/. 



863. The unbelieving Priest, and another Person, at an 
Altar. The figures are about half the size of nature. 

Vide Sir Joshua Reynolds's Tour through Flanders, 1781 ; then 
in the collection of Mr. Pieters. 



864. Seleucus bestowing Stratonice upon his Son. 

This picture, which is very highly commended by Sir Joshua 
Reynolds, in his Tour through Flanders, was then in the cabinet of 
M. Dasch, at Antwerp. 

865. Portrait of a Lady, wearing a black veil. 



866. Portndt of a Gentleman. 

These are mentioned by Sir Joshua Reynolds, in his Tour through 
Flanders, in 1781 ; then in the collection of M« Dasch, at Antwerp. 



867. A grand Composition, representing the Emperor 
Charles V., habited in a splendid robe, with the arms of 
Austria embroidered on the back, bending on one knee, and 



256 RUBENS. 

raising his hand in an attitude of devotion ; his crown, sceptre^ 
and ball lie by his aide; behind him, and also kneeling, are 
Philip IV. and his queen, Elizabeth de Bourbon. In the 
back-ground are two figures (one a portrait of the artist) bear^ 
ing standards ; two angels hover above. The ades of the pic- 
ture are bounded by large ornamented pillars, and the top by a 
rich massive cornice. This colossal production is painted on 
paper, in a broad free sketchy manner, and was evidently done 
for the purpose of being worked in tapestry. 

15^1!. by 11 /if C. 

Now in the possession of M. Perignon, Expert du Mus6e, 

Paris, 1827. Price 10,000/#. 4001. 



868. St. Bavon distributing Alms. This capital picture 
exhibits a compodtion of great extent and variety. In the 
fore-ground is a large group, consisting of women, children, and 
impotent mendicants; their . attention is directed to a man, 
probably intended for St. Bavon or his almoner, who stands 
before them commiserating their necessities ; behind him, and 
on the left of the picture, are an armed soldier on a gray horse^ 
and other figures. On the opponte side stand several females, 
who appear interested in the scene. The second distance is 
occupied by a noble building, with a flight of steps to its 
entrance, before which stands St. Amand habited in pontifical 
robes, widting to receive St. Bavon, who is seen mounting the 
steps, followed by his attendants ; these are merely the outlines 
of the grouping of this excellent production. This finished 
study was painted in Italy, and evidently while the modest 
beauties of VeneUan colouring were fresh in the artist's eye. 
Several of the figures possess uncommon dignity ; the handling 
throughout is large and free, yet well terminated and expressive. 

3/t. 7 in. by 5 ft. 5 im— -P. 

Purchased during the late war, from the Caregga Palace, at Genoa* 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1815. 

Now in the coUection of the Rev. William-Holwell Carr. 

Rubens afterwards painted an altar-piece, representing the samis 



BUBENS. S57 

subject as the preceding one, but rather difierently composed and 
with fewer figures* for the cathedral of St. Bavon, at Ghent. This 
is engraved by Pilsens. — See p. 36. 



869- Portrait of Helena Fonnan when about thirty years 
of age, seen nearly in a front view, with the head uncovered. 
The dress consists of black alk with slashed sleeves, showing the 
white silk linings; a lace frill standing up round the shoulders, 
leaving the bosom exposed ; a string of pearls hangs in a festoon 
in front, one end of which is attached to a black bow on the 
boaom, and a black gauze kerchief falls over the frill in the left. 

ftfi. 5 in. by ftjt C. (about.) 

Now in the collection of the Right Honourable Lady Stuart. 



870. Portrait of a Gentleman of middle age, with dark 
hair and beard. The face is presented in nearly a three-quarter 
view ; a full ruff adorns the neck, and a black dress covers the 
body. Painted in the artiste's finished manner. 

2 ft. 5in.hyljt.9 in.— P. Worth 800 gs. 

Now in the collection of the Right Honourable Lady Stuart. 



871. The Companion. Portrait of a Young Lady, of fair 
complexion and light hair, seen in a front view. The neck is 
adorned with a full broad ruff with a serrated edge ; she has on 
a black talk dress with slashed sleeves ; a rich cross, composed of 
jewels, adorns the front of the bosom, and a chain falls below it. 
An elegant portrait, of great purity and brilliancy of colour. 

ft/t. 5 in. by IJt. 9 in P. Worth SSOL 

Now in the collectbn of the Right Honourable Lady Stuart. 



87S. A Landscape, with a lofty square tower on the left ; 
and on the same side, and nearer the front, is a stone bridge 
over a moat In the oppodte part of the picture the view ex- 
tends over a diversified country, illumined by the last rays of 
a setting sun. This is a free masterly sketch, brilliant and 

beautifuL 

10 m. by 18 in.— P. Worth 100 gi. T or ^^svUw 

VOL. II. S 



258 AUBENS. 

Exhibited in the British GaUery in 1815. 

Now in the collection of die Right Honouimble Lady Stuart 



87Sw Two Friars, habited in the Order <^ Benedictines. 
Their thin spare yisages indicate abstinence; they are repre- 
sented looking over a book, which they are holding with their 
hands concealed under their mantles. 

Engraved in mezzotinto by J. Spflsbury. 



874. Peasants going to Market The oomposition connsts 
of four figures, of the size of life, seen below the middle ; the 
one nearest the centre is a strong man, said to be a portndt of 
Rubens, with a fawn slung across his shoulders; he is pre- 
ceded by a boy carrying a dead heron and a basket of fruit; 
a woman, bearing a basket of fruit on her head, and another 
full of vegetables on her arm ; and is followed by a second 
female, laden with a Hve swan and accompanied by two dogs. 
The game, fruit, vegetables, and dqgs, are by the hand of 
Snyders. 

Ifi. S in. by 9y».— C. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1818. 

Now in the collection of Alexander Baring, Esq* 

Sommerfield has engraved a print representing the principal 
figures in the preceding, done after a picture then in the possession 
of the Earl of Ailesford. 

4yt. 1 in. by ^ft. 



Vtl^ St Frands (having the signs of the stigmates in his 
hands) bending in rapture over the in&nts Jesus and St John, 
who are seated on the ground playing with a lamb. The 
landscape is by the penal of Snyders. A frog is introduced 
in the fore-ground. 

4yi. 3 in. by sy*. 2 in.— C. 

Exhibited in die British Gallery in \%%S. 

Now m the possession of Sir Alexander Creighton. 



RUBENS. 259 

876. Mercury, Argus, And lo, in a Landscape. Argus is 
irepreaented in profound sleep, on a bank, beneath a tree ; and 
..Mercury b seated near him, observing the somniferous power 
of his music, and seemingly meditating the fatal blow. 

I Jt. 10 m.hy 2jt. 7 m P. 

Collection of Lord Radstock (at Mr. Christie's), 1826. ^\Ogs. 

Boogbt by Mr. Emmerson, in whose sale (by Mr. Phillips), in 
1829, it was knocked down at 200 g«. 

A Duplicate of the preceding picture, of unquestionable originality, 
is in the collection of M* Van Bremen, at Amsterdam; and there is 
another in the Dresden Grallery. 



877. Time disclosing religious Truth. Time is represented 
bearing in his arms a female clad in white robes; her right 
hand points upwards, as if to the source of Revelation; and 
the left 18 extended towards two venerable men, St. Matthew 
and St. Mark, who follow her with their Gospels in their 
hands, treading under foot Worldly Wisdom, personified by 
Socrates; Idolatry, Superstition, Revenge, Obstinacy, and 
Controversy, typified by several figures, are falling prostrate, or 
flying before the power of Truth, under whose feet lies a 
vanquished dragon ; a lion, with a fox in his paws, denoting 
Strength and Cunning, is in the centre at the bottom of the 
pcture, which is bounded at the sides by spiral columns 
supporting a cornice. A free and spirited sketch for a design 
to be worked in tapestry. 

ft ft. 6 m. by S^^.— P. Worth 200 gs. 

Collection of Lord Saye and Sele, at fielvidere. 



878. Jupiter committing to Woman the Government of the 

Universe. Represented by that deity seated upon the clouds, 

with his arm round the neck of a female, who is clothed in 

ample drapery, and at whose feet is Cupid with a globe; an 

eagle, the symbol of the god, is hovering above. A free 

spirited sketch. 

20tn. by 15fn.— P. 

Collection of Lord Damley, Cobham Hall. 



260 EUBENS. 

879* A triumphal Procesnon, said to be that of Henry IV. 
The conqueror is mounted in a splendid car, drawn by four 
white horses, holding in his hand an olive-branch ; while Victory^ 
floating in the aii behind him» is about to place a wreath on his 
head ; the car is preceded by horsemen, who are approaching a 
triumphal arch, and followed by captives with thdr hands 
bound; a number of soldiers, with ensigns and banners, and 
mufflcians playing on instruments, accompany the car, and 
groups of women and children are in front of the composition. 
A beautiful sketch, apparently the first idea for the picture at 
Florence. — See p. 148. 

1 9 J in. by 33 in.— C. Worth 250 gs. 

Now in the collection of Lord Damley, 1829. 



880. Portndt of the Artist, when about fifty years of 
age. The face is seen in nearly a front view, with auburn 
hair, mustacheos, and pointed beard ; a large hat covers the 
head, and the dress is composed of a black alk vest, slashed on 
the breast, showing the white linen under it ; a dark cloak 
covers the right shoulder, and a plain white collar adorns the 
neck. Painted in an oval, which has subsequently been 
enlarged into a square. This interesting picture is painted 
with delightful purity of colour and careful handling, and the 
expression, although placid and agreeable, exhibits the high 
intellect of the painter. 

^Jl. S in. hy I ft. S tn.— P. 

Engraved by Hollar, and anonymous, D. Haut ex. 

The picture was originally in the family of a canon at Brussels, 
from whom it passed into the collection of the present proprietor, 
M. Schamps, at Ghent, a gentleman distinguished for his kindness 
and urbanity to those who visit his collection. 

Valued by the owners at 2000/. 



881. Portnut of Elizabeth Brant, when about thirty years of 
age. l^he countenance, seen in a three-quarter view, is of an 
oval form, and fur ; her flaxen hair is disposed in ringlets on 
the forehead, and falls in a large cluster through a plait of the 



BUBENS. 261 

same on die left shoulder ; the dress is of bkck mlk, anda white 
kerchief concealing the bosom. 

ftfi. ft til. by ^fi* S^ m. — P. (waly enlarged to a square.) 
In the collection of M. Scbamps, Ghent. 



882. Portrait of Helena Forman, in the character of a 
Shepherdess. The countenanee, denoting her to have been 
about twenty-five years of age, is seen in a three-quarter view ; 
her auburn hair is formed into two plaits, and falls on each »de 
of the neck ; a straw hat, lined with purple nlk and turned 
up on the left nde, is placed negligently on the head; the 
body, which is viewed in a ade position, is clothed in white, 
with a broad crimson band round the shoulders, and a muslin 
kerchief partly covers the bosom ; the right hand, only half of 
which is visible, holds a crook, the other is not seen. This 
portrait, as well as the preceding, is painted in a broad and 
smooth manner, remarkably dear and brilliant in colour. 

ft ft. 2 in. hjlft.S in.— P. 

Now in the coUectioD of M. Schamps, who values the three 
at 6000 gs. 

883. Portrait of Father Ruzzola, a Monk of the Order of 
Carmelites, and Confessor to the Archduchess Isabella. His 
animated countenance, the features of which are small, denote him 
to have been about sixty years of age ; seen in nearly a front 
view ; the scanty hair on his temples is gray, as are also his 
beard and mustacheos ; he is clad in the white robe of his 
order, and is seated in a cave, holding with both hands a 
crudfix. A vigorous and admirably-painted picture. 

Sft. 3 m. by 2ft. 6 in.— C. Worth SOO gi. 

Engraved anonymous, to illustrate an ancient history of the 
brotherhood. 

Collection of M. Schamps, Ghent. 



884. A beautiful Parrot of the macaw spedes, exceedingly 



262 RUBENS; 

brilliant in the plumage. It is represented perched on an 
ornamented stone bracket. A finished study, 

18|ffi. by 15tfi.— P. 

CoUection of M. Schamps. 



885. St Clotilda bestowing Alms upon a poor Boy, who is a 
cripple, and lies at her feet Her bead is adorned with a 
celestial crown, and she holds a book in her hand, on which is 
placed a temporal crown. A sketch. 

15^ta« by 12tn.— P. 

Collection of M. Scbamps. 



886. A Negroes Head. The countenance, which is animated 
and smiUng, is seen in nearly a profile view. A study. 

16tii. by 12}tn.— P. 

CoUection of M. Schamps. 



887. St John baptizing in the River Jordan. The Saviour 
is represented standing in the stream, naked all but the loins, 
and St John, clothed in a sheep^s skin, stands on the bank 
•pouring water from a shell on the Saviour^s head ; on his right 
are three angels floating buoyantly in the air, and holding his 
nument ; a second group, of three angels, is above ; and the 
Holy Spirit, in the form of a dove, is descending on his head. 
In the left of the picture are some lofty trees, and four men 
preparing to receive baptism, two of them are seated on the 
bank, taking off thdr clothing; retired from these are two 
women, one of whom has a child in her arms. 

13 ft. 6 in. by ftZjt. 3 in.— C. 

This immense picture is attributed to Rubens, and is said to have 
been done by him in Italy, in imitation of the Bolc^ese painters, 
and an attempt at the grandeur of Michael Angelo. 

It was brought to England in 1810, and knocked down, in a public 
sale, at SOOgt. 

Now in the possession of M. Schamps. 



BUBEN& S68 

There is a Drawing in Uack chalk of the precediQg compoftitiont 
with slighfc variatipnst in the collection of the Musee at Paris. 

17^ in. hy 30 m. 



888. Pan and Ceres. The goddess, flushed with rosy health, 
is seated in the right, nearly in a profile view; her golden 
tresses are adorned with ears of com ; a scarlet mantle partly 
covers her body, and a yellow robe is cast over her knees, on 
which she holds the horn of abundance ; the rural deity, Pan, is 
seated by her side, with a basket of fruit on his knees: a grove 
forms the back-ground, through an opening of which, in the 
left, are seen several nymphs and satyrs. The figures are seen 
to the ankles. The landscape and fruit are by Breughel. 

4fi. 4 in. hjejt.7 tn.— C. 

In the collection of M. Francken, at Loekeren. 



889. Portrait of a Grentleman about fifty years of age, of a 
strongly-marked countenance, seen in a three-quarter view, with 
shorthair. His dress oonsuts of a black figured silk vest, a white 
pendant ruff, and a dark doak, which, covering the left shoulder, 
is drawn across the body and twisted round the left arm ; the 
right hand is placed on the hip. 



890. The Companion. Portrait of a Lady, about thirty-five 

years of age. Her face is presented in a three-quarter view ; a 

small white cap covers her head, and a full ruff is round the 

neck; she is dressed in black oik with striped figured sleeves, 

qsaukttes, and lace ruffles; the bodice is richly embroidered 

with gold ornaments; a masave gdd chain encircles the waist, 

and is held by the right hand, while the other is placed on a 

covered table. These portruts are estimable examples of the 

master. 

Sft.5 in* by 2ft. Sin. — P. 

Now in the coDection of M. Van Sassegbem, at Ghent. 
Worth 800 gf. the pair. 



S64 RUBENS. 

891- Portrait of a Gendeman about fifty^five yean of age, 
geen in nearly a front view, with gray beard and mustacheoe, 
and scanty hair, turned back ; he is dressed in a black vest, a 
mantle, which is held in front by the right hand, and a plain 
white collar. 

26 m. by 20 in. — P. (oval.) 

Collection of the Chevalier Erard, at Paris. 



892. Portrait of Gevardus, a jurisconsult of Antwerp. His 
spare countenance, which is seen in a three-quarter view, 
denotes him to have been about forty-iSve years of age ; hia 
hair is dark and scanty, and he wears a small beard and mus* 
tacheos ; the dress is composed of a black vest, a silk robe, and 
a full white ruff; he is seated in an arm-chair, holding a pen in 
his right hand, while the iSngers of the left are between the 
leaves of a blank book lying open on a table before him, on 
which is a bust of Antoninus Pius : a portion of a library is in 
the back-ground The artist has evidently punted this picture 
under the influence of personal attachment; it is a highly- 
studied work, exhibiting the gendeman and the scholar. 

4ft. by S/t. 4 iii.~P. Worth SOOgs. 

Engraved by P. Pontius. 

Now in the possession of Baron Rooae, at Brussels. 



89S. Portrait of a Lady, about thirty years of age, of a fiiir 
complexion, seen in a three-quarter view. The dress is com- 
posed of black silk, with sleeves formed of ribbons, showing the 
white silk linings ; the bodice is splendidly adorned with pearla 
and gold, and a brooch of diamonds and other gems; a lace 
ruff, standing up round the shoulders, a pearl necklace, and a 
rich antique gold chain, complete her costly attire. 

2/t. 4m. by IJl. lljtn.— P. Worth«50g*. 

Now in the possession of Baron Roose, at Brussels. 



894. Portrait of a reverend Prelate, about fifty-five years of 
age. Represented on his knees, before a table covered with acariet 



4 



RUBENS. 265 

cloth ; his right hand is placed on his breast, and the left holds 
a small book ; he is dressed in a black silk robe, with a white 
lawn cope over it, and a pale yellow mantle hangs over the left 
arm. 



895. The Companion. A venerable Priest, about axty-five 
years of age, with gray hair and beard, of a portly countenance^ 
seen in a three^uarter view ; he is similarly dressed to the pre- 
ceding, with the addition of an ermine cape, and is also kneel- 
ing at a table covered with bright crimson cloth ; his right hand 
is raised in devotion, and the left holds a rosary. The arms of 
these dignitaries of the church are embroidered on the covers 
of the tables. These are clear and carefully-finished pictures. 

6yi. 4 in. by Zfi, 9 in. — C. 

Now in the collection of die Earl of Egremont. 



896. Portrait of a Monk, with a strongly marked countenance. 

Represented in nearly a front view, with gray hair and beard, 

dressed in the brown habit of a Cordelier, with a sun on his 

breast. 

21tR. by 16tii.— P. 

Collection of his Highness Prince d'Arenberg, at Brussels. 



897. An athletic Man, stooping to lift up a massive gold 
vase. A study. 

%Jt. 6 tn. by tfi. 4 m.— C. (about.) 
Collection of his Highness Prince d'Arenberg. 



898. A Bagpiper and Shepherdess. The female is represented 
in nearly a front view, seated on a bank, and struggling against 
the embraces of an athletic man, who has one arm round her 
waist while the other encircles her neck ; his brows are bound 
with vine foliage, and a fur mantle covers his Icnns, to the girdle 
of which b attached a bagpipe. The figures are full length, 
and were evidently intended for portraits of the artist and 
Helena Forman. In the fore-ground of the landscape are three 



266 AUBEN& 

«heep. The figures oolj are by Rubens ; the rest is apfMurently 
by the hand of Mompers. 

Ei^aved by Avril, 1781, entitled Le CtoC'en-jambe^ from a pic^ 
ture at that time in the collection of M. Gouffier* 

This picture is inserted at p. 35, being No. 297 in the catalogue of 
Rubens'^ effects. 



899. A Roman Soldier. lie 13 clad in armour, with a lion^s 
skin over his cuirass, a helmet on lus head, and a lance in his 
left hand. The figure is of the size of life, seen to the middle, 
with the back turned towards the spectator. 

2^. 7 tn. by 2/<.— P. 

Collection of M. Muller, . AmiU\%Z7. . 1550 flo. 140/. 

Now in the collection of Edward Gray, Esq, 



900. David stranglmg a Bear. The athletic youth, who is 
naked all but the loins, has seized the animal round the neck 
with both arms, and is compressing it with all his force. A dead 
lion lies on the left and front of the picture, and on the oppoate 
side is a flock of sheep, one of which lies dead. The compo»tion 
and drawing of this production are full of energy and character- 
istic expression, and the colouring is fresh and brilliant. It is 
not improbable but that the artist borrowed the idea of the 
design from an antique gem* The landscape is by the hand of 
Wildens, and the animals by Snyders. 

1ft. 4 in. by %ft. 8 in.— C, 

Engraved, with variations, by Panneels. 

Collection of Count Altimera, 1827 (by Mr. Stanley), 110 gs. 



901. The Annunwtion. The Virg^ is represented on her 
knees, before a little table with a book open on it, and appears 
to be suddenly diverted from her devotiws by the celestial 
messenger, who is floating buoyantly in the air behind her, 
announcing the behest of the Most Highy 'to which she attends 
with an expression of obedient humility, placing her right himd 
on her bosom ; th0 Tbild Person of the Trinity^ in the form of 



BUBENS. 9^7 

a dove, hovers over the Virgin; two angels showisr down 
flowers firom Aeir hauds, and a third holds up the ample golden- 
coloured drapery of the announcing messenger. The humble 
domesticated character of the Virg^ is indicated by a basket, 
in which are a cushion with a needle stuck in it, a piece of linen, 
and 1^ fair ol scissars; and a cat lies asleep by the side of the 

basket* 

10y>. 7 m. by 6Ji. 2jf».— C. 

This picture is painted in the artist's free or bravura manner, in a 
rich and harmonious tone of colour. It was done in Spain, for the 
friend and patron of Rubens, General Leganes, the ancestor of 
Count Altiroera, in whose collection it was sold, by Mr. Stanley, in 
1827, and bought by the Writer for 150^1. 

Now in the possession of Thomas Hamlet, Esq. 



002. The Holy Trinity, or an all^ory of the Christian Faith 
and Worship. The First Person of the Trinity b represented 
sitting on the clouds, with a sceptre in his hand ; and the Second 
is in the opposite ride, also seated, holding a cross; under thdr 
feet is a globe, borne up by three angels, and above are three 
other angels amidst numerous cherub'mn. In the lower part of 
the picture are St John, the evangelist, who holds a chalice in 
his hand and his gospel under his arm; and St Paul, the 
apostle of the Gentiles, with his right hand placed on the 
shoulder of a child, whose attention he is directing to the mys- 
teries of the godhead. The latter three.figures are seen to the 

middle. 

7ft. by 4/t. 8 tn.— C. 

Hiift capital picture was painted for the church of the Guardian 
Angel, at Madrid* 

Bought by the Writer, in a sale at Mr. Christie's, 1827. 170 g9» 

Sold in the Writer's collection, by Mr. Stanley, 1828, and bought 
by Mr. Norton, 250 gs. 

Now in the collection of D. Bailie, Esq. 

A Picture of a similar composition, but without the aposdes, 
occurs in the Munich Gallery. — See p, 74. 



268 BUBENS. 

90S. A Study of two Lions in spirited actum ; one of them is 
springing upon the back of the other. The upper parts only 
of the bodies are seen. 

Zfi* 6 in. by S/<. 6 in. — C, 

Engraved by Bloteling. 

Collection of die Duke of Bedford, 1827 (by Mr. Christie), 80g«b 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1822. 

Now in die possession of the Prince of Saxe Coburg. 



904. Portrait of a Gentleman, about fifty years of age, seen in 
nearly a front view^ with dark hair and beard ; he is dressed in 
black figured silk, a full white rufi^, and a belt round the body ; 
the left hand, holding a glove, rests on the back of a chair, and 
the right hangs down, with the hem of his cloak between the 
fingers. Dated 16S0. 

Sft. 5 in. by 2/t. 5 in.— P. Worth itSOgs. 

In the collection of Comte Zcemini, at Vienna. 



905. Portrtdt of Philip IV., habited in black, decorated 
with the Order of the Golden Fleece attached to a gold chain, 
and a splendid collar of jewels hanging below the wust ; the left 
hand is placed on the hilt of the sword. 

SJi. 10 in. by $Ji. 2 m.— C. 

Put up for ssle by Mr. Phillips, 1828, and bought in at 200 gx. 



906. The Companion. A Portrait of Elizabeth de Bour- 
bon, consort of Philip IV.; she is attired in blsck alk, adorned 
with rows of pearls and other jewels. The right hand, with a 
fan in it, rests upon a covered table, and the left holds a hand- 
kerchief. 

These pictures were purchased by Mr. Murch, of Count Ben- 
tinck, of Vaeel Casde, in Germany, in 1827t They are duplicates 
of the Munich portraits. Engraved by P. Pontius ; and in small, 
Viennot. — See pp. 75 and 76. 

Put up for sale by Mr. Phillips, 1828, and bought in at 150 g9. 



BUBEKS. 269 

907. Saint Michael» armed with a thunderbolt and a shield, 
treading Satan under his feet ; the prostrate enemy of mankind 
lies struggling on the brink of an abyss, graspng serpents in his 
hands. A slight but very masterly sketch. 

25 in. by ISjm. — P. 

Collection of the Earl of Liverpool, 1829, by Mr. Christie, 25 gs. 

Bought by Mr. J. Wooding. 

There is a print of the above subject, in which Satan is seen in a 
side view. In the preceding picture he is represented in a fore- 
shortened position. Engraved by Melan. 

908. The Fall of Phaeton. In the centre of the composition 
is the empty car of Phoebus, surrounded by figures emblematic 
of the hours, and accompanied by cupids ; these, with the fiery 
steeds of Apollo, are thrown into dire confusion by the mis- 
guided impetuoaty of the presumptuous youth. This mas- 
terly-finished study has evidently been done as a design for a 

ceiling. 

Sjt. 2 in. by 2 ft. 5 in. — P. 

There is an etching of this subject by Panneels. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1823. 

Now in the collection of the Earl of Mulgrave. 

A picture representing the same subject was formerly in the 

palace of Brignoletti, at Genoa. 



909. A Landscape abounding with trees, and traversed in 
fix>nt by a deep ravine ; towards which, and on the left side, is 
a waggon descending a steep place, behind a bank. This is a 
slight free sketch, on paper, probably the first idea for the fine 
picture known as the CharetU embourbie. 

I ft. 10 in. by 2 ft. 2im.—P. 

Collection of the Earl of Mulgrave. 



910. Inspiration. Represented by a female, clad in a yeUow 
and white mantle, seated, with a large book open on her knees, 
and a pen in her hand; she appears to have just ceased writing, 
and has turned her head to listen to the inspiring dictates of the 



270 BUBENS. 

Holy Spirit, who, under the form of a dove, is suspended on 

the wing at her ear; while an angel, bendmg at her ade, holds 

an inkstand. 

1 7 in. hy 14 in.— P. Wordi 150 gs. 

This is an admirably-finished study ; it was evidendy designed 
for the frontispiece of a book, and intended to be engraved, as the 
pen is put in the left hand of the female. 

Now in the collection of William Wells, Esq., at Redleaf. 



911. An Allegory of the Elements of Earth and Water. 

Represented by a male figure leaning on a vase, and a female, 

standing near him, with fruit in her lap. This is a spirited 

sketch. 

15 in. by 12t«. — P. 

Exhibited in the British GaUery in 1815. 

Now in the collection of the Earl of Mulgrave. 

There is a print of the preceding subject, composed of a river 
deity, seated, leaning on a vase from which water issues, and a naked 
female on the opposite side of the vase, with one arm round die 
neck of the river god, and a cornucopia in her hand; a triton, 
blowing a conch, is in a river in front ; and a satyr, bringing a basket 
of fruit, is seen beyond the female. Engraved by Vangelisti, pro- 
bably after a picture in the Ghigi Palace, at Rome. 

This subject is also engraved by P. de Jode, with considerable 
variations ; in this print the female holds the river god by the hand, 
and wears a mural crown, over which an angel holds a chaplet ; the 
satyr is omitted. A picture (probably a sketch) corresponding with 
this description was sold in the 

Collection of M. de Crozat, . . 1751. . 400 /«. 16/. 



912. Dead Abel. The figure is represented naked, all but 

the loins, which are covered with the skin of a beast, lying on 

the ground in a fore-shortened view, the head being towards the 

spectator ; a dog is approaching the body, with an expresaon of 

caution and concern : a woody landscape forms the back-ground, 

where is seen the fire still burning on the altar of the accepted 

sacrifice 

4/(f. 10 in. by 5ft. lOw.— C. 



RUBENS. 271 



Engraved by J. Heath. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1819. 

Now in the collection of the Duke of Bedford. 



913. Three Goddesses, Juno, Minerva, and Venus. They 
are represented descending on a cloud to appear in the pre- 
' sence of Paris. A brilliantly-coloured and vigorous sketch. 

13 tfi. by 1 1^ in.— P. Valued at 200/. 

In the possession of Mons. C. F. Windelstadt, at Francfort. 



914. Trophies emblematic of Peace and VtTar. The com- 
posidon exhibits a portico, the entablature of which is supported 
on the left by the harpies of Envy and Discord, and on the 
right by Amity and Peace ; two pedestals, which divide the arch, 
are surmounted by trophies, one of which is composed of the 
spoils and weapons of war, the other of the instruments of agri- 
culture and the fruits of the earth : various other objects allu- 
ave to the allegory are introduced. 

\fi. 8tn. by Zft. Ojin.— P. 

Engraved by Bickham, when in the collection of General Camp« 
bell ; and also by Van Thulden. 

This masterly-finished study was done for a design of part of the 
decorations of a triumphal arch, entided the ** Temple of Janus," 
erected at Antwerp, in 1635. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 18S2. 

Now in the collection of the Marquis of Bute. 



915. Rubens^s Son and Nurse, in a Larder. The female, 
dressed in a dark gown lined with gray, and a scarlet petticoat, 
carrying a large alver dish, held against her side with her right 
hand, is entering a larder, and extending her left to hold a 
beautiful little boy, who is seated on a dresser, reaching out his 
hand to take some grapes from a basket standing near him, and 
at the same instant looking round to his nurse, with an inquiring 
eye, for permisaon ; a dish of apricots is on the dresser, and a 



272 KUBENS. 

quantity of fruit and vegetables lies on the ground. The acces- 
saries are introduced by the hand of Snyders. 

bft. 6 tn. by bfi. 8 m. — C. 

Engraved by R. Earlom. 

Now in the collection of die Marquis of Bute. 



916. Silenus with Njrmphs and Satyrs. The demi-god is 

represented staggering between two nymphs, one of whom is in 

front, with her hand on his breast ; the other, dancing af his side, 

holds his left arm, and is gaily tossing up a tambour ; while a 

satyr, with his left arm round her waist, is endeavouring to 

embrace her ; two other satyrs, one of whom carries a cupid on 

his shoulders, are on the farther side of the group, preceded by a 

third bearing a nymph in his arms ; and on the opponte part is 

a female, on the ground, bending forward and suckUng two 

infant satyrs. 

1 8| w. by 26 tfi P. Wordi 1 00 gt. 

This 18 an excellent sketch, en grisaiUe^ probably the original 

study for a large picture in the Hermitage, at St. Petersburg. 

Now in the collection of Paul Methuen, Esq., Corsham House. 



917. Portrait of the Archduke Albert 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1815. 

In the possession of the Earl of Upper Ossory. 



918. Portrait of Greorge Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, on 
horseback. In the composition are introduced several aU^orical 
figures. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1815. 

Now in the possession of the Earl of Jersey. 



919- Negroes^ Heads. A masterly-finished study. 
Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1818. 
Now in the collection of the Earl of Derby. 



9S0. The Discovery of Calisto. 
Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1821. 
Now in the collection of the Earl of Derby. 



RUBENS. 273 

921* Christ journeying with the two Disciples of Emmaus. 
The subject is represented in a landscape, by Breughel. 

%ft. 3 tn. by ^fi. 7 in P. 

Collection De Wit, . . Antwerp^ 1741. . 265/o. 24/. 



92S. The Last Supper. A sketch en grisaiUe. 

2 ft. 2 in. by I ft. 8 in.— P. 
Same collection as the preceding, 265 flo* 24/. 



9S8. Philip IV. of Spun. He is represented in nearly a 
profile view, wearing a large full ruif, and havbg the body en- 
veloped in a mantle. A finished study. 

23 in. by 18 in. — P. 

Sold by M. Hens, at Brussels, to his Highness the Prince 
d'Arenberg. 

924. Portrait of a Young Lady, about thirteen years of 
age, of fair complexion and dark hair ; seen in a three-quarter 
view. She is dressed in a brown frock with ribbon sleeves, 
showing the white linings, a white kerchief, ruffles, and a pin-a- 
fore with a bib ; the right hand holds a fan, and the fingers 
of the left gently raise her apron. This is a pleanng picture, 
painted with great deamess, and possessing conaderable refine- 
ment in the drawing. 

7ft. 4 in. by 2ft. 6 in.— C. 

Now in die collection of the Prince Talleyrand. Worth 200 gs. 



9S5. A Wolf Hunt. This superb gallery picture is com- 
posed of three figures on horseback and five on foot, attacking 
two wolves and three foxes. The group presents, on the left, 
a gentleman habited in the elegant Spanish costume of the 
period, gracefully riding a prandng mottled-gray charger ; on 
his right is a lady, carrying a hawk on her hand, mounted on a 
brown horse (these two figures personate Rubens and bis wife, 
Elizabeth Brant) ; the third gentleman is seen in a front 
view, without his hat, armed with a javelin, and arriving on a 
spirited horse at full gallop ; on the same side, and nearer the 

VOL. II T 



274 RUBENS. 

front, are two men on foot, anned with spears, attacking an 
enraged wolf, which has reared upon its hind 1^8 and seized 
the point of one of the weapons in its mouth ; the other wolf is 
furiously beset by the dogs ; the remaining three huntsmen on 
foot, one of whom is blowing a horn, are on the farther ade of 
the animals ; a fox lies wounded near the horses^ feet, a second 
is killed, and the third is stealing off! 

Bft. 1 m. by IZfl. 5 in.— C. 

Engraved by Soutman and Vander Leuw. 

Energetic expression, the predominant characteristic of this 
master's works, is conspicuous throughout this splendid production, 
which, with the exception of the landscape (introduced by Wildens), 
the Writer considers to be wholly by the hand of Rubens ; or, at 
least, if Snyders assisted in the animals, the spirited and powerful 
penciling of Rubens has efiectually obliterated the peculiar handling 
of that artist, and given to them a spirit and animation which none 
but his inimitable genius could depict. In the performance of this 
picture, the artist was excited by the noblest feelings of gratitude 
and friendship, as it was done expressly for his patron, General 
Legranes, then commander of the artillery in Flanders, under the 
Marquis Spinola, in 1612 ; from whom it descended by inheritance 
to the Count Altimera, at Madrid, and from whose fiunily it was 
sequestered by the French during the late war in Spain, and trans- 
ferred to the Louvre, where it was exhibited in 1814, Similar events 
restored it again to the family in 1 8 1 5. It was subsequently returned 
to Paris for sale, and the sum of 80,000/5. was the required price. 
The Writer shordy after became the purchaser, at 50,000/5., or 
2000/. (1824.) 

Now in the collection of Alexander Baring, Esq. 

A Duplicate of the preceding, of smaller dimensions, in which the 
animals are by Snyders and die figures finished by Rubens, is in the 
collection of Paul Methuen, Esq., Corsham House. 

eft. 7 in. by 9ft. 2iii.— C. 



926. A Lion Hunt. The composition consists of four 
huntsmen mounted on fiery coursers, attacking a tion and 
lioness ; in the conflict one of the horses has fallen, and pitched 



RUBENS. 275 

its rider head foremost to the ground, and an enraged lion has 
s^ed him on the back with his fore-paws, and at the same 
instant has fixed the daws of one of its hinder feet in the face 
of a prostrate huntsman, who is plunging a sword into the 
animaTs belly ; another man lies under the horse, grasping a 
broken spear ; the lioness is cm the farther side of the group, 
springing up at the horsemen, and receiving the points of their 
weapons in her breast The whole presents a scene of extra- 
ordinary action, and strong excitation of the pasnons. 
Engraved by Soutmaki and Le Bas. 



927. A Boar Hunt The infuriated animal is encompassed 
in a narrow pass by numerous dogs and four huntsmen on foot ; 
two of whom, armed with spears, have pierced the animal in 
the head ; two ladies and three gentlemen, on horseback, appear 
on the opposite ade, one of them has stuck his sword into the 
boar''s head. The encounter is represented near a lofty bank, 
and among decayed trees. 

Engraved by W. V. Leuw. 

A picture of the preceding composidon, but in which very little of 

the hand of Rubens is visible, is in the collection of Lord Damley, at 

Cobham Hall. 

6Jt. 6 in. by 9ft. lOin.— C. 



928. Atalanta and Meleager pursuing the Calydonian Boar. 
This celebrated hunt is represented in the skirts of a forest, 
from the right of which two well-mounted sportsmen are arriving 
at full gallop towards the front, preceded by a number of dogs, 
several of which are scrambling over the trunk of a fallen tree, 
against which the njrmph Atalanta is leaning, in an attitude 
indicating that she has just discharged an arrow from her bow 
and wounded the boar in the head, while it was rushing through 
a pool of water ; on the opposite bank of which stands Meleager 
with a spear in his hand, ready to attack it 

S/t. 8 in. by 5 ft. 6 in.— C. Worth 1400 g$. 

Engraved by Bolswert 



276 RUBENS. 

This landscape, which is painted in a boldi free, or hravura 
manner, is inscribed No. 131, in the catalogue of Rubens's effects. 
Now in the possession of the Right Honourable Lady Stuart 



929. The Death of the Calydonian Boar. The composition 
consists of seven figures on foot and two on horseback ; consfn- 
cuous among the former is seen Atalanta, who has discharged an 
arrow from her bow, and is observing with delight that the 
weapon is fixed in the animal'^s head; while Meleager has 
sprung before her, and plunged a spear into its shoulder ; two 
huntsmen, mounted on spirited horses, and armed with jave- 
lins, are in the opposite side. 

Engraved by Van Kessel. 

A picture of a very similar composition to the preceding is in the 
Vienna Gallery. Engraved by Prenner. 



9S0. Figures and Dead Game. A fine woman, carrying a 
basket of fruit before her, is approaching the front, from the 
right side, accompanied by a sportsman with a hawk on his 
hand, who is helping himself to a couple of figs from the basket ; 
two dogs follow him ; one of them is by the side of the female, 
and the other is smelling the game, which, consisting of a wild 
boar, fawns, hares, pheasants, and other birds, lie in ample 
abundance in the left of the picture. 

eft. 8 in. by 7ft. 4iii.— C. Worth 700^*. 

. Engraved by R. Earlom, under the title of '* The Fig," from the 
original picture, at that time in the collection of the Earlof Thanet. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1821. 

Now in the collection of the Earl of Plymouth. 



931. A Wild Boar Hunt, in a woody Landscape. A party, 
consisting of seven huntsmen on foot and four on horseback, 
accompanied by a number of dogs, attacking a boar near the 
trunk of a fallen tree ; several of the dogs have seized the 
animal, and a party of men on foot, armed with javelins, spears, 
and a pitchfork, oppose his progress ; one of the latter, in a 



RUBENS. 277 

scarlet jacket, is clambenng over the trunk of the tree, and 
another is sounding a horn; these are seconded in their efforts 
by two horsemen, who are on the farther side of the boar, and 
one of them is piercing it in the head with a sword ; two of their 
companions are galloping up from the left to the attack ; and in 
the opposite ade is a boy holding two dogs in a leash ; through 
an opening in the forest is seen a second party of gentlemen in 
pursuit of wild boars. The figures and animals, although small, 
abound with action and spirited expresaon ; the gleams of the 
evening sunshine play delightfully through the sylvan scene, and 
give force and bnlliancy to the general effect. 

A^fl. 6tn. by 5 ft. 6tii.— P. 

This picture was purchased by a dealer, from an ancient family at 
Antwerp, in 1825, for about 25,000/« , 1000/., and sold to His 
Highness the Prince of Orange. Now in his Palace at Brussels. 

The original Sketch for die preceding picture, about the same 
size, is in the Dresden Gallery. — See p. 82. 



932. The Adoration of the Shepherds. In this composition, 
which consists of five figures, the infant Saviour, wrapped in 
swaddling clothes, is lying on some straw, in a crib, and the 
Virgin kneels on the shaft of a column to uncover the babe to 
the view of a shepherdess, who is bending over him, while a 
shepherd is on his knees, worshiping the infant ; thdr offer- 
ing, a lamb, lies bound in front. 

Engraved by Panneels. 

This is probably taken from a small picture, formerly in the 
church of St. John, at Malines. 



988. The Adoration of the Shepherds. The infant Saviour, 
from whom a bright radiance emanates and illumines the sur- 
rounding figures, b placed in the centre ; the Virgin is seated 
in front, at the head of the babe ; and a shepherd is bending on 
his knees before him. A composition of mx figures. 

Engraved by Basan. 



278 RUBEKS. 

934. The Nativity. The infant Saviour lies aaleep on some 
straw in a crib placed in the centre, and the Vir^ and 
St Joseph are on each side of it ; the former, with her hands 
crossed on her bosom, is bending in adoration, and the latter 
expresses, by the movement of his hand, his devout affection ; 
three angels, bearing a scroll, hover above. 

Engraved by Bokwert and DauUe. 

This subject is also engraved by Laurie ; and again, for a book- 
print, anonymous ; Vanden Enden ex. 



935. The Adoration of the Kings. In the dispoadon of the 
groups in this picture the Virgin is seated dose to part of a 
building, at the side, with the naked infant in her lap, before 
whom one of the magi is bowing, on his knees, and offering a 
cup full of money ; two others are standing on the farther side 
of him ; one of them has a chalice, the other carries a casket ; a 
company of four angels hover above. 

Engraved by G. Frizza. 

There is also a book-print of this subject, engraved anonymous ; 
Vanden Enden ex. 



936. The Annunciation. The Virgin is bending on her knees 
before a little table on the left, with a book in her hand; she 
appears to have been arrested in her devotions by the sudden 
appearance of a celestial messenger, who stands behind her with 
a palm-branch in his hand ; the Holy Spirit, in the similitude 
of a dove, is descending in a stream of light, and two angels 
are showering down flowers from their liands. 

Engraved by F. de Steen. 

The same subject, engraved ; Vanden Enden ex. — a book-print. 



987. David, with the Elders of Israel offering Sacrifice on the 
removal of the Ark from the house of Obed-edom. The cere- 
mony is re|Mresented in a temple (a liberty whidi the artist has 
taken), in the right of which, and on an elevation of some steps, 
is placed a richly-ornamented brazen altar, with the victim, a 



RUBENS; 279 

sheep, lying on it, and on the farther ade stands the high 
priest, in his sao^otal robes, invoking the acceptance of the 
offering ; two Tenerable men are approaching the altar, one of 
them, wearing a linen ephod over a yellow robe, carries a lamb 
under his arm ; they are attended by three young Levites, two 
of whom have wax lights in their hands, and the third is holding 
a vessel to receive the blood of the victim ; close to the front 
are two children with a pair of doves ; in the opposite ride are 
other worshippers bringing their ^ts to the altar, and beyond 
them are four priests bearing the ark on their shoulders, accom- 
panied by the shouting hosts of Israel. 

2 A 3 J in. by ft ft. 10 in.— P. Worth 500 gs. 

Now in the collection of Earl Spencer, at Althorp. 

This and similar sketches are the best proofs of the artist's 
genius, and of all his works these are the most esteemed by con- 
noisseurs. It was evidendy done for a design to be worked in 
tapestry, as it is terminated at the sides by pillars supporting a cor- 
nice, to which four angels are attaching the border of the tapestry, 
a similar way to the Loeches pictures in the Grosvenor Gallery. 



988. The Virgin, with the infant Saviour in her arms. The 

composition represents the Virgin, seated, and dressed in a scarlet 

robe, with a gray mantle and some white linen covering her 

knees, on which the infant is reclining, naked, and extending its 

arms to embrace its parent, who is looking down with maternal 

affection on the babe ; her left hand is placed under his right 

foot, and her right hand sustains his back ; St. Joseph, in a blue 

dress, is at the side, looking over the Virgin^s shoulder at the 

infant 

Sft. Sin. by 2ft. 8m.— C. 

Now in the collection of Earl Spencer, at Althorp. 



989. The Judgment of Solomon. The king, seated on his 
throne, with a sceptre in his right hand and his left extended, 
appears to be watching the issue of his trying sentence ; the 
executioner stands on the left, holding the hving infant by the 
heel, and raising the sword to perform the king^s command ; 



280 RUBENS. 

the real mother is prostrate before the judge; and the pre^ 
tended parent stands at the side of the executioner. A oompo- 
ntion of ten figures. 

Engraved by Bolswert. The same subject, with variations, is 
engraved by C. Visscher; again by Viel; and diere is also an 
indifferent print from a picture of this subject, very erroneously 
ascribed to Rubens, engraved by Car Gregori, Flor. 

A Sketch for the preceding picture was sold in the collection of 

M. Schryvere, Bruge$, 17 6S. . l^tOjlo. 11/. 

12tfi. by 15 in, — P. 



940. The Assumption of the Virgin. A company of ten 
angels and two cherubim attend the ascending Virgin ; one of 
the former, with a palm-branch, is giving flowers to another, 
who receives them with both hands. The apostles and three 
females surround the deserted tomb below ; two of the latter 
are on their knees, with the winding-sheet in their hands. 

This picture is very indifferently engraved by Lommelin* 



941. The Assumption of the Virgin, In this composidon 
the ascending Virgin is borne up on clouds, accompanied by 
five infant angels, who minister under her feet; the twelve 
apostles are on the top of an arch and on the steps descending 
to the tomb, in which are seen the three holy women. 

Etched by Panneels. 

A fine Drawing, the study for t]ie preceding, was sold in the 
collection of M. Mariette, .... 1775. . 40/jr. ILlOs. 



942. The Virgin, bending on one knee and having her hand 
placed on her breast, is interceding with the Saviour, who stands 
before her holding his cross, which an angel also supports ; two 
other angels are above. 

Engraved by Van Panderen. 



94S. Sunt Matthew writing his Gospel under the dictation 
of an angel. The figures are seen to the middle. 
Engraved by C. Watson. 



BUBENS. 281 

944. Bathsheba, while in the Bath ; reodraig a letter frcm a 
messoiger of David. 

Engraved; attributed to Prenner. 



945. Six Females vintbg the Saviour^s Tomb, at the en- 
trance to which stand two angels, one of whom appears to be 
informing them, that ^^ he is not here, but is risen, as he said."" 

Engraved by Vosterman. 



946. The Descent from the Cross. In the composition of 
the group, Joseph of Arimathea is on a ladder, lowering the 
body of the Saviour, by the help of a sheet, into the arms of 
two women, one of whom is on her knees ; St John is also 
assisting on a ladder, in the opponte side. 

Engraved by Waumans. 



947. St Jerome. A venerable old man, naked to the middle, 
seated near some rocks, holding a crudfix and a stone in his 
hands. 

Engraved in mezzotinto by Laurie ; the print indicates this to be 
a questionable picture of the master. 



948. A Magdalen at devotion. The pious female is kneeling 
on a rock, with one hand placed on her breast and the other 
raised up towards Heaven, from whence a bright light descends. 

Engraved^ anonymous. 

949. The Baptism of ConsUntine. The composition, which 
oon»sts of fourteen figures, exhibits the emperor in the centre, 
bending on his knees with his hands crossed on his breast, and 
the priest standing by his nde, pouring water upon his head. 

Engraved by C. Baroni { this is a very indifferent print, and so 
unlike the composition of Rubens, that the Writer feels no hesitation 
in pronouncing it to be erroneously ascribed. — See p, 206, 



950. The Holy Family. The Virgin is seated near a 
bower with the infant Saviour in her lap, whom St John is 



282 BUBENS. 

amuHDg with a bird attached to a string; St Elizabeth is on 
the farther side of the latter, with one hand round his loins ; 
and St. Joseph stands behind, leaning one hand against the 
trunk of a tree, and looking at the playful infiuits. 

Engraved by Bolswert. This print is repeated, in reverse, 
anonymous. 

951. The Holy Family. The Virgin is seated in a chair, 
holding the infant Saviour with one hand round his loins and 
the other under his foot, in an erect position in her lap ; the 
child, with one arm round his mother^s neck and the other 
placed on her bosom, is looking affectionately in her face; 
St. Ann is on the farther side of them, and St Joseph leans 
on the back of the chair, contemplating the infant ; a cradle 
stands by the ade of the Virgin. The figures are entire. 

This beautiful composition is admirably engraved by Bolswert* 
Rubens has repeated the composition of the Virgin and Child in 

the preceding picture, seen to the knees only. 

Engraved by P. Pontius; and again, with the omission of 

St Ann, by Alexander Voet. 



952. The Holy Family. In this compoation the infant 
Saviour is bending on one knee in his mother^s lap, extend- 
ing the other leg on a cradle, and in an animated position 
holds a dove, which the infant St John, with one foot in the 
cradle, is reaching out to take from him ; St Elizabeth is 
behind the Virgin, with one hand on her shoulder, and 
St Joseph by her side, both of whom are looking earnestly at 
the interesting scene. The figures are entire. 

Engraved ; M. Vanden Enden ex. 



953. The Virgin, wearing a celestial crown, and holding a 
globe in her hand, is seated with the infant Saviour in her lap ; 
his kingly power is designated by a sceptre, which he has in 
his hand. The figures are seen in a front view, to the knees. 



EUBENS. £83 

I 
EngraiTed by BoUwert; and alao, veryindiflbreiidy, by Aubert 

and Ganiere ex. 

A similar subject is engraved anonymous. 



964. The Virgin and Child, and St. Joseph. The Virgin is 
seated, holding the infant Saviour round the body with both 
hands, while the babe has turned round, and is affectionately 
embracing his mother ; St Joseph is behind, with his hand on 
his chin. 

Engraved by G. B. Barb^. 



955. The Virgin and Child, with Angels. This composi- 
tion represents the Virgin seated at the foot of a tree at the 
fflde, holding the infant Saviour, who is sitting on her lap, 
with one hand round his waist; an infant and a youthful 
angel stand before him, presenting a basket of fruit, some of 
which the Saviour has taken, and is affectionately offering to his 
mother ;. a third angel is seen climbing a tree. The figures are 
entire. 

Engraved by Alexander Voet, jun. 

The same subject as the preceding, in which St. John is offering 
the Saviour a basket of fruit, is engraved anonymous ; Vanden 
Wyngaerde ex. 

956. The Virgin with the infant Saviour in her arms, who, 
together with St John, is playing with a lamb. 

Engraved (oval) by Vosterman. 



957. The Holy Family. The infant Jesus is caressing his 
mother, and St John, who is presented by St. Joseph, is 
accompanied by a lamb. 

Engraved by Lasne. The same composition, with the introdue- 
tion of St Ann, who is leanii^ on the cradle, is engraved by 
Vosterman ; and repealed, anonymous. 

This picture is in the Marlborough Collection.— /Spe p. 246. 



284 RUBENS. 

A beautifttl Drawing, of a round form, done with a pen in 
bistre, of the preceding picture, engraved by Lasne, was sold in the 
collection of M. Mariette, • . • . 1775. . 1300/r. 52L 



958. The Holy Family. The Virgin, with the infant 
Saviour sitting naked in her lap, and St. John, with a lamb 
in his arms, standing by her ade; beyond the latter is a boy, 
and in the opposite eide St Joseph. 

Engraved (oval) by Witdouc. 



959. The Virgin, seated on a bank, holding forward the 
infant Saviour towards St John, who is held by Elizabeth 
kneeling on the ground, while he amuses the Saviour with a 
bird, which he holds in his hand. 

Engraved, anonymous. The composition and style exhibited in 
the print renders it more than doubtful that the picture is wrongly 
attributed to the master. 



960. The Marriage of St Catherine. The infant Saviour, 
seated on the Virgin^s knees, is putting a ring on the finger of 
St. Catherine, who is on the right of the print 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

961. The same, with St Catherine on the opposite side of 
the Virgin, and differently composed. 



962. The Virgin, holding the infant in an erect pontion in 
her lap ; one of his hands is placed on the back of one of his 
mother^ the other is raised above his head. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

96S. The Virgin, seen in a front view, with a crown on 
her head and a sceptre in her hand, is holding the infant 
Saviour in an erect position in her lap ; one of the child'^s arms 
is round her neck, and his. hand holds the cross of a gbbe. 

Engraved by Bolswert 



RUBENS. 285 

964. The Virgin, seen in a front view with her head 
inclining downwards, is holding the infant Saviour in an erect 
pontion in her lap by the arm ; both the mother and child are 
looking at St. John, who stands by her side with a lamb. 
St Joseph, with his hand to his face, is behind. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

965. The Virgin, seated in a landscape, holding the infant 
Saviour in an erect position, with one hand under his arm and 
the other behind him ; St Joseph is by the side of the Virgin, 
near a tree. FuUJength figures. 

Engraved by Alexander Voet. 



966. The Vir^, seated, holding the infant Saviour erect 
on her knee ; the child is naked, and seen in a front view, 
with one hand between the fingers of his parentis hand, the 
other is on her wrist ; a cushion lies on a table at the side* 

Engraved by Panneels. 



967. The Virgin and Child, with St. John. The Virgin is 
seen in a front view, seated, holding the infant Saviour in her 
lap and looking at St John, who is offering the Saviour a 
basket of fruit 

Engraved by W3rngaerde. 

968. The Virgin, seated, with the infant Saviour lying (naked) 
asleep on her arm ; she appears disposed to place the child in a 
cradle, which stands by her side, and is in the act of removing 
the clothes for that purpose. St Joseph stands behind, leaning 
on the back of the cradle. 

Engraved by R. Morghen, afler a picture then in the collection 
of Lord Clive. If the engraver has faithfully represented the pic- 
ture, there is much more of the character of Van Dyck than that of 
Rubens in the print* 

969. The Virgin, with the infant Saviour standing in her lap. 
lliis picture was sent by the grateful artist as a present to the 



286 EUBENS. 

Baron de Vicq, who was then ambassador from the court of Belgium, 
at Pans, as an acknowledgment for the civility he had received in 
consequence of the Baron's recommendation and introduction of him 
to the Queen Marie de Medicis. 

Sold in a sale at Rotterdam, • • • 1752. • 450 fi>. 40L 

Engraved by Bolswert. 



970. The Virgin suckling the infant Saviour, who is enve- 
loped in swaddling clothes ; St. Ann stands behind, looking at 
the babe. 

Engraved by Paulis. 

971* The Virgin offering the breast to the infant Saviour. 
Engraved by P. Pontius. 

972. The Virgin, watching the infant Saviour sleeping in a 
cradle. 

Etched, anonymous. 

973. The Vingin, seated, wearing a celestial crown, with 
the infimt Saviour in her arms, whom she holds with both hands 
knit together under him, while the duld'^s arm is placed on 
her bosom. 

Engraved (oval) by Witdouc. 

The same composition, with the addition of two angek pre- 
senting the Saviour with a basket of fruit, is engraved by Voet, jun. 



974. The Vii^^n, having on her knees the infimt Saviour, 
whom she is hddbg under one arm. 

Engraved by Lauwers. 

975. The Holy Family. The Virgin is suckling the infant 
Saviour, who is seated (naked) in her lap ; and St. John stands 
by her knees, holding the babels foot with one hand, while the 
other is placed on tlie head of a lamb. St. Elizabeth is behind 
St. John, looking anxiously at the infants, and St. Joseph is in 
the back-ground. 

Engraved by Witdouc. 



EUBBNSt 887 

976. The Holy Family. The Vii^ is seated with the 
infant Jesus sleeping on her breast ; St Elizabeth stands by 
her side, with h^r foot on a stool^ holding. St John on her knee» 
who, with his hands united, is looking affectionately at the 
Saviour ; and St. Joseph is in the opposite side, leaning on a 
pedestal. The figures are entire. 

Engraved by Witdouc. 

977. The Virgin, with the infant Saviour kneelmg in her lap, 
and looking affectionately in his mother^s face ; her arms encom- 
pass the child's body, with the hands united in front. The 
figure is seen to the knees. 

Engraved by Bolswert, and smaller by Suyderhoef ; the latter is 
eopied in reverse, anonymous. A print, of precisely the same com- 
position, with the introduction of St Ann at the side of the Virgin, 
is engraved by N. Ryckman. 



978. The Virgin, seated, holding the infant Saviour, who 
stands with one foot on a table and the other on his mother^s 
lap ; both the mother and child are looking towards a fountain 
in the opposite ade. 

Engraved by Bobwert 

979. The Virgin and Child. The infant is lying on a pillow, 
and the Virgin is bending over him, and pressing milk from her 
breast into his mouth. 

Engraved by Bolswert. The same composition is engraved by 
Pilsens. 



980. The Virgin, holding in her arms the infant Saviour, 
dressed in swaddling clothes. 
Engraved ; supposed by Bolswert. 



981. The Virgin, with the swaddled infant in her arms, 
whom she appears to be about to embrace. 
Engraved ; attributed to Bolswert. 



288 RUBEXS. 

982. The Virgin, with the swaddled infant in her arms, on 
whose under lip his mother is putting her finger ; three angels 
and four cherubim are contemplating the Saviour. 

Attributed to Bolswert. 



983. The Virgin, holding the infieuit Saviour on her knees ; 
her cheek is resting on the child'^s head. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

984. The infant Saviour caresang and embracing his mo- 
ther ; St Joseph is behind, with a pear in his hand. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

985. The Virgin with the infant Saviour in her arms ; a 
part of a cradle is seen at the side. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

986. The infant Jesus sleeping in the arms of the Virgin, 
and holding a pear in his hand. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

987. The Virgin playing with the infant Jesus, who lies re- 
cumbent and appears disposed to hide himself behind a veil ; 
tliree cherubim are present. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

988. The infant Saviour sleeping in the Virgin^s arms, and 
St. John affecdonately holding his hand. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

989. The Vir^n with the infant Saviour in her arms, and 
St John with a cross by his side; the infants are caressing 
each other. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

990. The infant Saviour and St. John, seated on a bank 
caresnng each other ; near them are a cross and a lamh» 

Engraved by Bolswert. 



BUBENS. 289 

991. The. infant Saviour, with his arm round the neck of 
St John ; both of them are caresang a lamb. 
Engraved by Bobwert. 

99S. The Virgin, with the Saviour and St Joseph, at table, 
saying grace over their repast 
Engraved, anonymous. 

993. The infant Saviour, seated on a cushion placed on a 
cloud, holding in one hand a globe and raising the other hand 
as if bestowing a benediction. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

994. Samson taking the Honeycomb from the jaws of a dead 
Lion. 

Engraved by Gralle, for the frontispiece of a book. 



995. A Monk bowing in adoration before a crucifix. 
Engraved by Vanden Bergh. 



996. A Youth, in an ecclesiastical dress, standing in the posi- 
ti(Hi of a person speaking an oration. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

997. St Gregory, habited in a pontifical robe, leaning his 
head on his hand and meditating over a book. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

998. Saint Hiltrudis. A young female, wearing a chaplet of 
flowers round her brows, holding a book in one hand and a 
lamp in the other. • 

Engraved by Galle, 1617. 

The same saint is engraved in an oval, by Thomas Galle. 



999. Esther before Ahasuerus. The king has risen from 
his throne, and is extending his sceptre over the fainting Esther. 

Engraved by Panneels, and also by Collins. The same subject is 
engraved by Wyngaerde. — See pp. 184 and %%5. 

VOL. II. u 



290 BUBKNS. 

1000. The Marriage of the Virgin. The priest, with « ring 
in his hand, stands on the left, attended by an asnstant holding 
a book, and a page kneeling by his side with a torch in his 
hand ; Joseph and Mary stand before him ; the latter is in front, 
with her left hand on that of Joseph ; three females are behind 
them; three angels, shedding flowers upon their heads, are 
flying above. 

Engraved by Bolswert and Lauwers. 



1001. Judith cutting off the Head of Holofemes. An aged 
female, her attendant, stands on the farther side of her, and four 
angels, hovering above, witness the heroic deed. 

Engraved by Galle. 

lOOS. Judith putting the Head of Holofemes into a sack 
held by her attendant. 
Engraved by Voet. 
A picture of this subject is also engraved by Schroider. 



1003. Nicodemus visiting Christ by night 
Engraved by KraflL 

1004. The good Shepherd. 
Engraved by Hendriex. 



1005. The Last Supper. A copy, by Rubens, after the 
celebrated picture by Lionardi da Vinci. 

Engraved by Soutman, and copied by A. Van Rymsdyk. 



1006. Chrisfs Agony in the Garden. An angel stands be- 
fore the Redeemer with a chalice in his hand. 

Engraved by Melar, Coget, Captain Baillie, and anonymous. 



1007. Christ crowned with Thorns. << Then came Jesus 
forth, wearing the crown of thorns and the purple robe, and 
Pilate saith unto them — ^behold the man.^ The Saviour stands 
upon the summit of a flight of steps in the presence of Pilate, 



RUBENS. S91^ 

who has rifleairoiii. his sait; Sve soldiers, one of whom is 
bringing a prisoner bound, are present; four Jews are in 
front, lifting their hands in derision at the suffering Jesus. 
Engraved by Bolswert, Lauwers, and Aubert. 



1008. Samuel offering up Sacrifice after the recovery of the 
Ark finom the Philistines. 
Engraved by Lommelin. 

1009* Samson, while sleeping in the lap of Delilah, is 
being shorn of his hair by a young man, at whose ride stands 
an old woman hol£ng a candle to light him in the operation ; 
an open door in the back of the room shows the armed Phi- 
listines waiting to enter. 

Engraved by Matham. 

1010. The Daughter of Herodias, accompanied by a young 
Female, receiving from the Executioner the Head of St. John 
the Baptist in a charger. The figures are seeB to the knees. 

Admirably engraved, by Bolswert. 

A picture of this subject is in the collection of the Earl of 
Carlisle. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1824. 



1011 . The Daughter of Herodias, with the Head of St John 
the Baptist in a charger, accompanied by an elderly woman 
with a lighted candle in her hand. Two figures, seen to the 
knees. 

Engraved by Paoneels, 1631. 



1012. The miraculous Draught of Fishes. The compori- 
tion oonrists of six figures, two of them are in the nearest boat 
and three in the second ; the sixth man is on the shore stooping 
down, and, together with all his companions, appears actively 
engaged in attempung to land << the multitude of fishes." 
A spirited and energetic sketch. 

Engraved by Soutman. 



1013. A MagdnleD, teariag her* 
yanities of tbe worl4. 

Engraved^ anonjinous. > 



1014. A Magdalen, with her. arms crossed on her bosom 
9nd b^r eyes directed upwards. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

1015. A Magdalen on her knees, in a cavern. 
..Epgrav«dby P.P. 



1010. The Head of a Magdalen, seen nearly in profile. 
Eagraved, anonymous. 

1017. The Head of a Magdalen, seen in a front view. 
Engraved, anonymous. 

1018. A Mi^alen oh her knees before a crucifix. 
Engraved, anonymous. 



■IN- 



.1019^ A Magdalen, recHning her head in meditation before 
a crucifix. 

Engraved, anonymous. 



' lOfiOl A Magdiden, bending over a crucifix, which she is 
hdiifing in b»*4iaiids. 
'^•Bngrated^ anonymous. ' 

lOSl. The Magdalen expiring. Supported by two angels. 
Engraved by Balliu. 

1022. Saint Theresa with a dove^ 
Engraved by Verscbuypen. 



lOeSw A Mjag^alen^, seat^ at tijie foot of a rock, with a ^kull 
underneath her feet. 
Engraved, anonymous. 



^ 



1084 Saint Michael dhiving dbwn the 6reat Dci^ lo 
Perdidon. In the oom|ioa[ii0& nxe four kngds,' (riie 0f mhota 
has pierced the tail of the monster with a spear, whHe loiother 
has seized a demon by &e motith. 

r 

Engraved by Neefis. 

A similar subject, diflferently composed, is engraved by Voster- 

manandRagot — Seep* 61, 

III/ 

1025. Christ on the Cross. . The head of the dying Saviour 
reclines back, and the countenance is dii'ected upurjEirds ; dark 
clouds obscure the sky, and the distance is veiled l>y the 
shadows of twilight 

Engraved by Soutman. 

1026. The same. The Saviour has yielded up the ghoat, 
and his head is sunk upon his breast. The city of Jerusalem 
b viable in the back-groimd. 

Engraved by Bolswert ; also with a light back-ground by £• If ar- 
feldt ; and repeated in small, without the city, by C Galle;* jujqt* 



10S7« The same. Th^<poM]|teni|ioe<>f:theexpirii«g.8a:tfour 
is directed upwards, ai^ iihe artint i^peard to bHiye Sntendad 
to represent the mofaeiU when^^ Jesus was utterijig his laat 
exclamation. A castl^i^ se^ on a biU in the di^Canca 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

1028. The same. Two angels are seen in the cloudy 
driving down Sin and Deatk 
Engraved by P. Pontius ; the same, in reverse, C. Galle ex, . 



1029. Cain slaying his' Biother Abet The corapositioD re- 
presents Abel pro8tnKe^;on the groand, fopd Cain standng 
over him with the weapon ^f death in his hand. 

Engraved by D. de Meyae ^x. . 



■ I* > 



1030. The agomzing Siprr^ws of the Vii:;pn. The Vitgii6 
is on her knees sufiported by two angel^ one of whom is 



294 RUBENS. 

drawing a sword from her breast A oross, a crown of thorns, 
•and a spear, are on the ground in front. 

Engraved by W. P, Leuw. 

A Drawing, in chalks, done by the artist for the ei^;raver to 
work from, is in the collection of Sir Thomas Lawrence, P.R.A. 

llf ta. by 7|tfi» 



lOSl. The Vir^, standing with the infant Saviour in her 
arms, and presenting a scapulary to a Carmelite monk, who is 
receiving it on his knees. 

Engraved by P. de Jode. 

loss. Saint Ignatius Loyola, while asleep, tormented by 
demons. 

Engraved by Audran, from a drawing by Rubens, formerly in 
the collection of M. Mariette^ 



loss. PhUemon and Baucis entertaining Jupiter and 
Mercury. 
Engraved by Meyssens. 

1034. Venus suckling the Loves. The goddess is repre- 
sented bending down with one knee on the ground, and 
pressng the lips of one of the infant Loves to her breast, 
which the other two are also endeavouring to obtain. A 
landscape forms the back-ground. 

Engraved by Sunigue and C. Galle. M. Watelet has also etched 
the same, from a drawing by Rubens, done with the pen and 
chalk; then in the collection of M. Mariette; sold, 1775, for 
170/#., 7/. 

The following ^ghteen Saints are 4ni^le figures, . charac- 
terized by their appropriate emblems i^^ 
10S5. Sl Anthony. 104a St Hubert 

1086. St Anthony, of Padua. 1041. St Ignatius de Loyola. 
10S7. St Bernard. 104S. St John the Baptist 

1038. St Francis. 1043. St John the Evange- 

10S9. St. Frauds de Paula. list, with a chalice. 



KUBENS. 295 

1044. St Joseph. 1047. St Paul. 

1045. St Joseph, and the infant 1048. St. Agnes. 

Jesus holding a branch 1049* St Agatha, 
of lilies. 1050. St ApoUonia. 

1046. St Joseph, having in 1051. St Theresa. 

his anns the Saviour, 1052. St. Ursula. 
who is crowning a saint 
The whole of the preceding are engraved ; Vanden Enden ex. 



1053. St. Catherine leaning on a broken wheel, and holding 
a sword in her hand. A half-length figure. 
Engraved by B. B<^wert and Panned. 



1054. St. Catherine leaning on a sword, and treading under 
foot a portion of a wheel ; an angel is placing a crown on her 
head. 

En^aved by Galle. 

A similar composition, entitled ** The Coronation of St. Cathe- 
rine," is engraved by P. de Jode, and copied anonymous. The 
same is engraved by L. Zucchi. 



1055. St Catherine. 

Engraved by Vostennani on an outline by Rubens, done from 
the antique. 

1056. St Catherine treading on a broken wheel, holding 
in one hand a sword and in the other a palm-branch. A 
study for a ceiling. 

Etched by Rubens. 

1057. An Allegorical Composition, representing the Virgin 
standing apon three globes, placed on the back of St Frauds, 
who is bending on his knees with the weight The Virgin 
appears to be addressing a company of monks, at the head 
of whom is Philip IV. ; beyond these is seen a car in the 
clouds, drawn by eagles and guided by an angel, having 
three kings in it; in the opposite side is a similar car, drawn 



296 RUBENS. 

by lions, coDtaining four females, emblems of the cardinal 
virtues; in the ctame side, and in front, are several monks; 
driving the devil headlong into the jaws of a dragon. A 
finished study, done en grisaille. 

I ft. 10 in. by 2 ft. 7 m.— P. 

Engraved by P. Pootius, and etched by Spruyt. 

Now in the collection of M. Van Sasseghem, at Ghent. 



1058. Faith, Hope, and Charity, represented by three females. 
The first is contemplating a cross, which she holds up in her 
hand ; the second has an anchor ; and the last is accompanied 
by two infants, one of whom stands on her hand, embracing 
her as its protector. 

Engraved in a circular form by J. B. MicheU, from a picture at 
that time in the collection of Sir Edward Swinburne, Bart. 



1059* St Francis de Paula mounting in the air, in the 
presence of a multitude of persons, who are assembled to 
witness his ascent ; among them appear to be many that are 
diseased and possessed of devils. 

Engraved by Lommeb'n. 



1060. The Exaltation of the Virgin. The First and Second 
Persons of the Trinity are represented placing a chaplet on the 
head of the Virgin, who is seated on clouds, with an inverted 
crescent under her feet ; a company of five angels, two cherubs, 
and the Holy Spirit, in the form of a dove, are hovering 
above. 

Engraved, anonymous ; Vanden Enden ex. 



1061. Purgatory. In this imagined place of torment num- 
bers of wretched b^gs are represented writhing in the fiery 
element ; an angel is compassionately raising one of them by 
the hand ; another angel and four cherubim are above ; and the 
name of. Jesus, briUiantly irradiated, appears in the centre. 

This is finely engraved ; GaUe ex. 



BUBENS. 297 

This subject is repeated by two other engravers, anonymous. 
The composition of the picture is taken from one of St. Theresa 
interceding for Souls, with additions and alterations. 



1062. War of the Flesh and the Spirit. Represented by a 
winged figure of a man suspended in the air, to whom a cord 
is attached, which is pulled in opposite directions by an angel 
and devils. 

Engraved by P. Pontius. 

106S. St. Dorothy, with a palm-branch in one hand and 
some roses in the other. 
Engraved by C. Galle. 
The same saint is engraved, anonymous. 



1064. St Jerome expounding the Scriptures to three Car- 
dinals, who are seated near him ; three angels hover above, 
bearing symbols of the church. 

Engraved by Galle. 

1065. Saints Ambrose, Gregory, Jerome, and Augustin, 
habited in pontifical robes, looking over a book. 

Engraved by Van Dalen. 



1066. Two Cardinals investing a third Prelate with the 
mitre ; a compoation of eight principal figures. Id the back- 
ground are the Virgin and the twelve apostles, standing upon 
an elevation, and the Holy Spirit, in the form of a dove, 
hovering over thdr heads. 

Engraved by Soutman. 

1067. St. Theresa with a blazing heart in her hand, and an 
angel presenting her with a cup. 

Engraved by Galle. 

1068. Salvator Mundi. The infant Saviour is seated. in his 



298 RUBENS. 

mother^s lap, holding a globe in his hand ; the Virgin has a 
crown on her head and a sceptre in her hand. 
Engraved by C. Galle. 

1069* The Twelve Apostles, distinguished by their several 
emblems. 

Engraved in single figures, by C. Galle. 



1070. Salvator Mundi, holding a cross ; and 
The Twelve Apostles, represented by the various emblems 
which usually distinguish them. Half-length figures. 
Engraved by Ryckman. 
These are also engraved in separate pieces, by Bokwert. 



1071. Ecce Homo. A head. 
Engraved by Dannoot 



107S. St. Francis. Represented in a front view, kneeling 
on the ground, with his hands extended, receiving in the palms 
the stigmates. 

Etched ; attributed to Rubens. 



1078. Ecce Homo. The Saviour is represented naked to 
the waist, with his hands bound behind him, and a crown of 
thorns on his head ; on his left stands a Jew, pointing at him 
with his finger in derision ; and in the opposite ade is a soldier, 
lifting a robe to cover him. The figures are seen to the middle. 

Engraved by Galleus and Lauwers. 



.« 



1074. St Augustin, habited in pontifical robes, with a crosier 
in his hand, standing on the sea shore, and looking with fixed 
attention at an infant, who b seated on the sands with a shell 
in its hand. 

Engraved by Neefs and Alexander Voet. 



107& The Death of St. Anthony. A composition of seven 



AUBENS. 299 

fgures, two of them are kneeliDg at the foot of the dying 
monk'^8 couch. 

Engrayed by P. Clouet. 



lOTSi Bathdieba seated by the ade of a fountain, attended 
by a young female, engaged in wipng her feet, and an old 
woman, who is holding her robes* 

Engraved by Thomassin. 

This subject occurs in Rubens's Catalogue, pp» SI and 171. 



1077. Lot and his Daughters. Lot is represented sitting 
on the farther dde of one of his daughters, with his arm round 
her neck, and an empty cup in his hand ; his second daughter 
stands at a little distance from them, squeezing out the juice of 
grapes into a cup. 

Engraved by CoehBans. 



1078. The same Subject In this composition Lot is seen 
in a front view, atting between his two daughters, on one of 
whom he has both hands ; she is holding a cup, which her 
sister is filling with wine. 

Engraved by Swanenbuig. 



1079. The same Subject Lot is here represented in a 
profile view, sitting with a cushion at his back, and his daughter 
cs on his farther side, asasting him to hold a cup, which his 
second daughter is filling with wine. 

Engraved by W. P. Leuw. — ScefK 247. 

The latter picture is in the Marlborough Collection. 



1080. Danae recaving the Grolden Shower. 
Engraved by Krafil, on an outline of Rubens, after Titian. 



1081. Venus with Cupid deeinng on her bosom. 
Engraved by KraA, on an outline of Rubens, after Georgione. 



300 RUBENS. 

108S. The Judgment of Midas. A compositkm of four 
figures. 

Engraved by Pilsens. 

1083. Jupiter seated on a cloud, with Juno by his side; 
she is leaning on his shoulder. This is probably a study for a 
group in one of the Luxembourg pictures. 

Engraved by Panneels. 



1084i. Diomedes and Ulysses approaching the temple of 
Minerva, hand in hand, to carry off the Palladium. 
Engraved by Vosterman, jun. 



1085. A Satyr, with his brows bound with vine^branches, 
carrying a quantity of fruit before him, and accompanied by 
a female playing on the castanets ; a Faun has a cup in one 
hand and with (he other is squeezing out the juice of grapes 
over the head of the satyr. The figures are seen to the knees. 

Engraved by Carol Faucij, from a picture then in the possession 
of Thomas Lewis, Esq., 1763. 



1086. A drunken Silenus, supported by a Satyr and a 
Faun ; the former is behind him and the latter by his side. 
Engraved (on wood) by Jegher and by Bolswert 



1087. Hercules exterminating the Demons of Envy and 
Discord. 

Engraved by Jegher, on an oatline drawn by Rubens. 



1088. Satyrs and other Figures in a Cave, in which a great 
quantity of gold and ulver vessels, conasting of dishes, vases, 
cups, and flagons, of great variety and richness, is displayed ; 
in the right and front is a satyr reclining asleep, with his arm 
over the neck of a panther, and a great abundance of grapes 
lying at his side ; beyond him is a bacchante drinking out of a 



RUBENS: SOI 

cup into which a female is squeezing the juice of grapes ; in 
the back-ground are a couple courting. 
Engraved by Wyngaerde. 



1089- A Satyr seated on a bank squeezing out the juice of 
grapes into a vase ; a tiger lies asleep in front, while another is 
springing up a tree after the fruit 

Engraved by Vosterman. 

1090. Bacchus, with his brows bound with vine-branches, 
supported behind by a Satyr, and on his right by a Faun, who. 
is pulling him along ; near the latter is a tiger, and at a little 
distance off are two bacchantes, each bearing a thyrsus. 

2ljtn. by 28jm.— P. 

Engraved by Suyderhoef. 

A picture of this composition was sold at Mr. Christie's, 1829. 



1091. A similar compoation to the preceding, omitting the 
tiger and nymphs. 

Engraved by Bolswert, from a drawing by Rubens. 



1092. Diana and her Nymj^s, accompanied by dogs, in 
pursuit of a stag and a fawn. 
Engraved by Goupy. 

109S. A Huntsman, armed with a spear and assisted by dogs, 
attacking a wild boar and her young ones. 

Attributed to Rubens, and engraved by Le Grand, in the Le 
Bran Gallery. 

1094. The Nuptials of Thetis and Peleus on Mount Pelion. 
The couple are represented at table in company with the gods 
and goddesses ; among whom is seen Jupiter givmg the apple 
of discord to Mercury. 

Engraved by Wyngaerde. 



1095. Minerva protecting a naked Female and her Children 



S02 BUBENS. 

(one of which is at' the breast), from tbe itpine of War. A 
compontion of twelve figures. 

Engraved by Henriques, from a picture then in the collection of 
M. Langlier. 

A Study for the preceding ii in the LouVre. 

1096. The Queen of Sheba before Solomon. A composition 
of ten figures. 

Etched by Spruyt, firom a sketch by Rubens. — See pp. 16 and 184. 

1097. Neptune and Amphitrite. The ddty, with a trident 
in his hand, is seated, with Amphitrite standing by his sde 
taking pearls from a shell, which is held by a triton, while a 
cupid is adorning her wrists with pearls. Several animals, 
emblematical of the power and sovereignty of the d^ty, are in 
the compoffltion. 

Engraved by Schmuzer, after a picture in the collection of the 
Count Schonbum, at Vienna. 
A Duplicate of the preceding is in the collection of Lord Lyttehon. 

1098. A Boy eadng Raisins. 
Engraved by Spibbury. 



1099. A young Bacchus. The face, whidi is seen in a 

front view, presents a merry countenance ; a branch of vine is 

bound round the brows, and the fur of an animal covers the 

shoulders. 

I ft. 8 tit. by I ft. 6tn.— P. (about.) 

Engraved by C. Watson. 

This beautiful little production is now in the collection of the 

Marquis of Bute. 

1100. Apollo pursuing Daphne. The nymph, with extended 
arms, endeavouring in vain to escape from her pursumg lover, 
is being metamorphosed into a laurel tree. A sketch. 

Engraved by Panaeeb. 

1101. Boreas bearing off Orithya in his arms. 
Engraved by Spruyt, from a sketch. 



EUBENS. SOS 

1102. Mnetis seeking his Father Anchises in the infernal 
regions. 
Engraved by Vostennan. 

1108. An Allegoiy, allusive to the Peace and Prosperity of 
a State. The composition conmsts of fifteen figures, in the 
centre of which is a female representing commerce, seated with 
a caduoeus in her hand; she is supported by two other females, 
bearing the symbols of Justice and Strei^th, while Victory 
hovers over her head with a wreath in her hand. 

Engraved by Eynhouedts. 

1104. Time, with a rod in hb hand, chastising Idleness and 
applauding Industry. The former is represented by a miserable 
man lying on the ground, with, a female in black weeping over 
him ; and the latter, by a man with a spade in his hand, while 
on the farther side of him is Fame proclaiming his merits. 

Engraved by Couchet 

1106. The Grand Sultan on horseback, accompanied by 
several officers^ also mounted, and a number of persons on foot. 

Engraved by Soutman. 

A Drawing of the preceding in chalks, and finished in bistre, is in 
the British Museum. 



1106. A naked Female grinding colours; evidently incul- 
cating that Art should represent Nature simply, free from all 
meretriciousnesB. 

Engraved by Galle. 

1107. Cupid and Psyche. The nymph is represented naked, 
with a lamp in her hand, looking with fatal curiority at her 
lover, who lies asleep on a couch. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

1108. The Augustan Gem. This precious antique eameo 
represents the Apotheosis of Augustus, who is received «aaong 
the gods. Tiberius, his successor, surrounded by nobles. 



304 EUBENS. 

docupies the centre of the composition, and the conquered 
nations, personified by several figures lying prostrate at tlmr 
feet, form its base ; the whole conasts of twenty-five figures* 

12 in. by lOtn. (ttated to he,) 

Engraved after the drawing, by R. N. 

This valuable production of antiquity was, at the time Rubens 
drew it (in 1625), in the holy chapel at Paris. 



1109. Two Busts of Warriors. One of them is seen in a 
profile view, with bushy hair, and clad in armour. 

Engraved by Gillis. 

1110. Mars and Venus. The warrior is bending on one 
knee at the side of the goddess, who is seated on the right, 
taking his sword from his side ; three cupids are engaged re- 
moving his armour, and a fourth is mounted on his horse. 

Engraved very wretchedly, anonymous ; A. V. Hoom ex. 



1111. Mutius Scasvola before King Porsenna, holding his 
hand in the fire of an altar, for having failed in his attempt 
to slay the king. A composition of seven figures. 

Engraved by Schmuzer, from a picture then in the collection of 
Prince Kaunitz. 



Ills. An Allegorical Subject, 'composed of five females; 
the middle one is seated, and holds a wreath ; a second is on 
her knees, leaning on an elbow-chair, with a chaplet in her 
hand; a third is trimming a burning lamp; a fourth has a 
book, and the remaining one appears to be meditating; two 
angels, one of whom is sounding a trumpet, are above. 

Etched anonymous, but ascribed to Rubens. 



1113. An Allegorical Subject, representing Abundance, 
imposed of three angels bearing a cornucopia. 
Engraved, anonymous. 
The same subjiect, difierently composed, is engraved, anonymous. 



RUBENS. S05 



1114. Famine, an Allegory. 

Engraved in a spirited manner, anonymous. 



1115. A triumphal Arch, decorated with the Arms of Spain. 
Towards the right is Prince Ferdinand in cardinaTs robes, 
to whom a bishop is presenting a paper, and another priest 
appears to be addressing him ; he is conducted by Minerva, 
and followed by females representing Justice, Peace, and 
Plenty ; a fourth female, personifying the Seventeen Provinces, 
lies prostrate at his feet 

Engraved by Bolswert. 



1116. A Gipsy telling the fortune of a Lady, whose pocket 
a young urchin is at the same time picking. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

1117. Neptune and Minerva disputing which of them shall 
name the city of Athens. Various decorations, allusive to 
Pope Urban VIII., surround the centre subject. A design 
for the title-page of a book. 

Engraved by P. Pontius. 

1118. St John baptizing our Saviour in the river Jordan. 
A compoddon of two figures only. 

Engraved by Panneek and Lomroelin. 

Krafil has engraved this subject from a picture similarly composed 
to the above ; in this the bole of a tree is in the centre of the picture, 
and in the preceding there are three trees dose to the side. 



1119- Juno transferring the Eyes of Argus to the Tail of 
the Peacock. The goddess, dothed in a crimson vest, has 
descended from her golden car accompamed by Venus, who 
stands on her right with the head of Argus on her knee, from 
whose forehead she is removing the eyes, and placing them in the 
hands of Juno, who is at the same time transferring them to the 
tail of her fiivburite bird, two of which are near her receiving the 
splendid addition to their plumage, and three playful cupids 

VOL. n. X 



S06 AUBENS. 

are assistiiig in the metamorphoas ; tlie body of Argus lies 
extended in the left and front of the pcture. Th^ latter figure 
is painted with studious care, and a profound knowledge of art 

9 ft. by 12/^.— C. 

This capital picture was purdiased firom the Duraszo Pahiee at 
Ganoa, and imported by Mr. Buchanan. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in IS^S, and then in the 
of T. Gent, Esq. 

Now in the gallery of Mr. Yates, for sale. 



1190. Soldiers carousing in front of a Country Inn. The 
compoffltion is formed of thirteen figures of both sexes, and 
exhibits a scene of mirthful revelry and bacchanalian excess.-— 
See p. 75. 

Etched by F. Vanden Wyngaerde. 

Purchased from the Colonna Palace, by Mr. Ervine, for Mr. 
Gordon. 



1121. The Entombment. 

Purchased by Mr. Ervine from the Colonna Palace. 

This picture is described by Mr. Buchanan as a small but very 
beautiful example of the master, and was sold by him to Thomas 
Duncombe, Esq., for 400 gi. 

1122. Mars and Venus. The interior of a large subter- 
raneous building, in the fore-part of which are the god and 
goddess ; the former, clad in armour, stands with his arm round 
her waist, while she is extending her arms to i*emove his helmet ; 
several cupids are also asasting to disarm the warrior ; armour 
and military weapons are distributed about the place. 

Engraved by J. T. Avril, 1778, entided Mart au ReUmr de ia 
Guerre, 

Nothing but the circumstance that the name of Rubens is attached 
to the print, has induced the Writer to notice so wretched a com- 
position. 

112S. Aebc^ seated naked on some drapoy, hoUisg a cup 
to an eagle, the symbol 'of Jupiter. 
Engraved (oval) by Panneeb* 



RUBENS. 807 

1124. Venus nttbg naked on some drapery, viewing her. 
self in a glass held by Cupid, while an elderly female is 
occu[ned dressing her hair; a quiver and arrows lie on the 
ground in front 

Engraved by Panneels, 16.11. 



1125. Portrait of the Archduke Albert The face is seen in 
a three-quarter view ; a full white ruff adorns the neck, and the 
dress conasts of a black figured silk, relieved with small gold 
buttons and a chain, to which is suspended the Order of the 
Golden Fleece ; the right hand rests upon a covered table, on 
which is his hat, and the left b close to the hilt of his sword. 
This picture was painted about the year 1610. 

9 ft. 10 in. by Sft. 1 m.— C. 

Exhibited in the Bridsh Gallery in 1822. 

How in die collection of Earl Spencer* 



11S6. Portrait of ISaa Midinand, Infant and Cardinal of 
Spain, and Gk>vemor.Greneral of the Lov Countries. The face, 
which exhibits that of a man about eight-and-twenty, is seen in 
nearly a front view ; he is habited in his cardinal robes, con- 
asting of a scarlet cap, and a cape and gown of the same 
colour ; the left hand holds a book, and the right hangs n^li- 
gendy at his ade. This excellent portrait was painted in Spain, 
about the year 1628. 

syi. 6 m. by %ft. 9 tn.—C. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1822. 

Now in the collection of Earl Spencer. 



1127* Portrait of Sir TheodoreTurquet Mayeme, a Physidan. 
Formerly in the Arundel Collection, and now at Cleveland House. 



11S8. Thomas Howard, Earl of Arundel and Surrey, when 
about fifty years of age. Seen in a three-quarter view, with a 
florid complexion, black bushy hair, beard, and mustacheos; he 
is clad in brilliant armour, girt with a blue sash ; the right hand» 



308 RUBENS. 

wearing a gauntlet, holds a staff, and his helmet is placed on a 

table behind him. This is a work of the highest excellence of 

the master. 

^fi. 2 in. by Zfi. 4 1».— C. (about.) 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1818. 

Now in the collection of the Earl of Warwick. 

An excellent portrait of the preceding Earl, head size, is in the 
collection of the Duke of Argyll, and a whole-length portrait of 
the same nobleman is said to be at the Grove. 



1129. Portrait of Titian^s Mistress. A copy, by Rubens, 
after Titian. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1828 ; then in the possession of 
W. Cartwright, Esq. 

1130. Thomas Howard, Earl of Arundel. His expressive 
countenance is seen in a bare threei^uarter view ; the hair, both 
of the head and beard, is dark and bushy ; he is dressed in a 
mantle doubled with fur, and wears a plain pendant collar ; a 
medal, attached to a ribbon, is suspended in front. 

Engraved, in an embellished oval, by Houbraken. 
Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1824. 
Now in the collection of the Earl of Carlisle. 



1131. A Daughter of the Artist, when about seven years 

old, with fur complexion and light bur, the head inclining on 

one side; she is dressed in a black alk frock with slashed 

sleeves, relieved with white linen, and a muslin kerchief and 

apron ; her right arm leans against a tree, and the left hangs 

down at her side. A slight and freely-punted picture. 

ft ft. 4 in. by ly^. 9 in.—C. 

Formerly in the collection of Mr. Richardson, the painter, and 
author of an excellent work on art, and subsequently sold to Greneral 
Skipton and Captain W. Hamilton. 

Now in the collection of Earl Spencer. 



1132. A Girl and two Boys. The former has a bushy head 
of hair, and is seen in a front view, carrying a basket of cherries; 



BUBENS. S09 

the boys, who are dressed in imitation of soldiers, are amusing 
themselves with guns on their shoulders. 

Engraved by Exshaw, from a picture then in the collection of 
P. Eyver, at Amsterdam. 

A picture corresponding with die above description is in the col- 
lection of the Marquis of Bi;te. 



1138. Portrait of Pope Urban VIII.; done for a frontisr 
piece to the Pope^s poetical works. 
Engravedy anonymous. 

1134. Portrait of Isabella d^Este, a Countess of Mantua. 
Painted by Rubens, after a picture by Titian, and attributed in the 

engraving to Vosterman. 

1135. Portrait of a Warrior clad in armour, and wearing a 
mande over his shoulders. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

1136. Portrait of Ferdinand, Governor of Belgium, dad in 

armour and mounted on a spirited charger, with the figure of 

Fame flying behind him, and placing a wreath of laurels on his 

head. The battle of NortHngen is represented in the distance. 
Engraved by Vander Does. 

1137. Portrait of the same Prince, also on horseback, with an 
eagle towering over his head, and in the distance is seen a Fury 
hurling down destruction on the rebel army. 

Engraved by P. Pontius. 

1138. An equestrian Portrait of the preceding Archduke. 
In the collection of His Majesty. 



1139- Another. Representing the prince mounted on a 
prandng bay charger, with a female grasping a thunderbolt, 
accompanied by an eagle (the emblem of Power). The Prince 
wears a large hat, and is clad in armour, holding a baton in his 
right hand. A skirmish of cavalry is seen in the distance. 

4y^. by sy^.Ojm.— P. 

Formerly in the collection of the Marquis of Bristol. — See p. 7^. 



810 RUBENS. 

1140. A full-length Portrait of the same. Represented dad 
in armour, grasping a baton in his right hand, and having the 
left on the hilt of his sword. 

Engraved by Jegher. 

1141. A three-quarter Portrait of the same ; wearing a large 
hat decked with feathers, a broad plain collar with lace edgings, 
and a baton in the right hand. 

Engraved by Neefs. 

The same, without the hands, is engraved by Silvestre. 

The popularity of the Archduke Ferdinand, after the victory of 
Nortlingen, and his consequent triumphal entry into Antwerp, doubt- 
less occasioned a considerable demand for his portrait, many of 
which were executed by scholars, and finished by Rubens. 



1142. Portnut of Cosmo de Medicis. Represented ia a pro- 
file view. (Oval.) 

Engraved by Vosterman. 

1148. A Portrait of Lorenzo de Medicis. 
Engraved, in an oval form, by Vosterman. 



1144. Portrait of Pope Leo X. 
Engraved, in an oval form, by Vosterman. 



1145. Portnut of the Cardinal Bellarmin. Represented sittbg 
at a table in his study. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

1146. Portrait of a Man with short hair and a beard. 
Engraved, in an oval form, anonymous. 



1147. Portrait of a Gentleman, done en grisaille. 
Engaved by Jegher, on an outline by Rubens. 



1148. Portrait of the Marquis of Castel Rodrigo. 
Engraved by P. Pontius, and copied in reverse by A. Does. 
P. Pontius has also engraved a second print of the same person. 



BUBENS. 311 

1140* Portrait of a Lady, the mother of tlie preceding person. 
Engraved, in an embelliahed oval, by P* Pontiua. 



1150. Portrait of John Van Havre, represented in a three- 
quarter view, with a square-shaped beard, and full ruff round 
the neck ; a close black cap covers the head. 

Engraved, in an embellished oval, by C. Galle. 



1151. Portrait of the Count Olivares, Duke of St Lucar, in 
an oval composed of palms, and decorated with two angels 
seated at the sides of the pedestal, and various other symbolical 
ornaments; among these, and at the top, is a star encircled by 
a snake. 

28 in. by 22 tn. (about.) 

Engraved by P. Pontins, and in smaU by Galle, jnn. 

The picture from which these prints were engraved is now in the 
collection of the Doke of HamOton. It is beautifully painted en 
grisaille f and evidently done for the purpose of engraving. 



115S. Portrait of a Doctor of Lou vain. The face is presented 
in nearly a front view, with a short thick beard, and the hiur 
of the head turned back, a plain white collar surrounds the neck, 
and a black mantle covers the shoulders. 

Engraved by Coefanans. 

1158. Portrait of Leonard Lessius, a celebrated Jesuit, author 
of a book entitled De JustMiB Jure* 
Engraved by C. Galle. 

1154. Portrait of Edward Lupus, a distinguished musician 
of the church at Lisbon. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

1155. Portraits of F. Marcellinus de Barca and Heliodorus 
de Barca, two Monks. 

Engraved in oval forms, on the same plate, anonymous. 



312 RUBENS. 

1156. Portrait of Mutius Attendulus, called Sfortia, pre- 
sented in a profile view, with a cap on his head. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

1157. Bust Portrait of an English Minister. 
Etched in an oval fonn by Rubens. 



1158. Portrait of Emanuel Sueiro, a Knight of the Military 
Order of Jesus, represented in a front view, with a broad full 
ruff round his neck, and the body clad in armour ; the right 
hand is placed on a book, and the left on the hilt of his sword. 

Engraved by P. de Jode, 1624. 



1159. Portrait of the Emperor Charles V., dad in a suit of 
rich armour, grasping a sword in his right hand and having 
the left placed on his hip. 

Engraved, after a copy by Rubens from Titian, by Vosterman. 



1160. Portrait of Van Dyck, dressed in a Dutch habiL 
This picture is inserted No. 116, p. 11, of the Catalogue of 
James XL's Collection, and attributed to Rubens. 



1161. Portrait of Charles of Austria, son of Philip III. 
Represented in a profile view, clad in armour. 

Engraved, in an oval form, by P. de Jode. 

The same is engraved in a circular form, for the frontispiece of a 
book of medals printed at Antwerp. 



1162. Ferdinand II. 

Engraved in an oval, surrounded with emblematical figures, by 
Parerga. 

The same is also engraved for a work on medals, anonymous. 



1168. Portrait of Charles de Longueval. 
Engraved in an oval form, and embellished the same as the 
preceding, by Vosterman. 



EUBENS. 313 

1164 Portrait of a Cardinal. Represented sitting in his 
study, with one hand placed on his breast and the other holding 
a rosary ; his attention is fixed on a looking-glass, held by a 
monk, in which is reflected the stigmates of St Frands. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

1165. Portrait of the Baron de Vicq, Ambassador from the 
Court of Bel^um to France. 

1166. Portrait of the Lady of the preceding personage. 
These pictures were afterwards in the collection of M. Vanden 

Brande, 177e.—See Life of the ArtisU 

1167. Two Portraits, a Lady and a Gentleman. 

19 m. by 14 m.— P. 
Sold in the collection of the Prince of Orange Nassau, 1757. 

AmsU . ft05Jh. 18/. 

1168. An equestrian Portrait of the Due dlAibe. The 
face is presented in a front view, a morion helmet covers the 
head, and the body is clad in armour ; the right hand poises a 
baton on the saddle, and the figure is gracefully seated on a 
prancing bay charger; the lines of a fortification and the sea 
are seen in the distance. A finished study for a large picture. ^ 

4ft. % in. by 9ft. 4 m.— C. 
Now in the collection of the Earl of Radnor. 



1169. A whole-length Portrait of a Son of the Artist, when 

about eight or nine years of age. The face is shown in nearly 

a front view, with long flowing hair ; the dress consists of a 

gray doublet and hose, slashed sleeves, worked in gold and 

relieved with white linen; a scarlet cloak hangs behind, and 

ribbons of the same colour adorn the knee-bands; the left 

hand hangs negligentiy by his side, and the right holds his hat, 

which is decked with a plume of feathers. A masterly-finished 

sketch. 

9ft. 1 m. by ^ft. 2j m.— P. 

Schiavonetti has engraved a print, after a drawing of the 

preceding youth. 

Now in the collection of the. Earl of Radnor. 



814 BUBENS. 

1170. Portraits of a Lady and Four Children (said to be 
those of the Duke of Buckingham'^B mistress and her three 
children, the fourth child being a son of the painter). The 
lady, dressed in a tawny yellow embroidered skirt, with white 
body, sleeves, and kerchief, and a cap, is seated with an infant, 
whose head is seen in a fore-shortened view towards the spec- 
tator, lying in her lap; the youngest girl, wearing a dark 
dress with slashed sleeves and white pin-a-fore, stands in front, 
leaning her right arm on her mother'^s knees ; the second fpA 
stands dose to the latter, in front of her parent ; and the fourth 
child, a youth of about fourteen years of age, is on the farther 
side of the latter g^l, reaching out his hand to put aade a 
curtain ; a parrot is perched on the back of the lady^s chair. 

5 ft. 6 in. by 5 ft. 9 in. 

Engraved by W. Walker.— iS'ee Van Dyck't Works. 

Purchased at the Earl of Radnor's sale by Mr. Scawen, in whose 
sale it was again disposed of, and bought by S. Gideon, Esq., for 
500/. On both occasions it was attributed to Van Dyck; it 
certainly partakes of the style of both masters, and is probably 
their united work. The portraits represent the wife and three of 
the children of Sir B. Gerbier, and is a repetition of the principal 
group in a family-picture of that gentleman. 

In the collection of His Majesty. 



1171. Portrait of a Lady, in the character of Cleopatra, 
with a serpent attached to her bosom, and holdmg a cup in 
her hand. 

Engraved by Neefs. 

1172. Maximilian, Archduke of Austria. His oval coun- 
tenance denotes him to be about fifty-five years of age, with 
long mustacheos and short beard; he is dressed in a black 
figured vest, a ruff, and a furred mantle, with the impression 
of a large cross on the shoulder, and a cross suspended to a 
chain roimd his neck. 

Engraved by Vosterman, and in an oval reversed by Meysaens ; 
again, in an embellished oval, by Suyderhoef. 



RUBENS. 315 

ins. Portrait of Ferdinand, Count Paktine of the Rhine 
and Duke of Bavaria. 

Engraved^ in an embelliahed oval ; de Jode, ex. 



1174. Portrait of Gilbert de la Marche, Bishop and Prince 
of Liege ; with a bald head, and habited in a richly-wrought 
cope. 

Engraved by Van Schuppen. 



1175. Philip III. of Spain. 

Engraved, in an oval, embeUiahed with the arms of Spain and 
other devices, by Meyssens. 

1176. Portndt of the Archduke Albert, Governor of 
Belgium. Seen in a front view, with a full ruff round his neck 
and habited in a richly-worked dress; his right hand is on the 
hilt of his sword. 

Engraved by MuUer. 

1177. Portrait of the Archduchess Isabella, seated in an 
arm-chair, with a fiin in her hand ; her dress is of the most 
splendid description. Painted in 1615. 

Engraved by Muller. 

1178. The same Lady. 

Engraved in an oval form, embellished with the figures of two 
infimts and various ornaments, by Lauwers. 



1179. The same Lady. 

Engraved in an oval on a pedestal, and surrounded with the signs 
of the Zodiac, by Galle. 

1180. The same Lady, in the dress of an Abbess, embellished 
with ornaments ; and two angels at top holding a chaplet over 
her head. 

Engraved by P. Pontius. 

1181. The same Lady, without the hands. 
Engraved, anaoymous. 



316 BUBENS. 

118S. The same Lady, dressed in Uack, leaning on a vase, 
with a parrot perched on a shrub near her. 
Engraved in mezzotinto, by Miller. 



1183. Portraits of the Archduke Albert and the Arch- 
duchess Isabella. 

Engraved in an oval border, embellished with palm and laurels, 
done after a drawing for a medal. 



1184. Portrait of the Archduke Albert Represented in a 
profile view, with a hat in his right hand and the left on the 
hilt of his sword ; he is habited in a black dress relieved with 
gold buttons, and a broad ruff round his neck. The figure 
appears to be standing at a balustrade, on which are written the 
name and title of the person. 

Collection of Thomas Emmerson, Esq., 1829, (not sold) 92 gt. 



1185. Companion. Portrait of the Archduchess Isabella. 
The face is seen in a front view, with the head inclining a little 
on one side. The dress is composed of a broad full white rufi^ 
round the neck, a beautiful figured black silk robe with six 
rows of large pearls, a splendid cross, and the Order of the 
Virgin suspended in front; a rich tiara of pearls and other 
jewels adorns the head. The right hand holds a fan, and the 
left is placed on a balustrade, on which are written the name 
and title of the person. 

4ft. 2 in. by Sft. 6 in C. 

Engraved, in one of the triwnphal arches, by Van Thulden. 

These portraits are above the size of nature, and are painted in a 
broad, free, and masterly manner, and were evidendy done on some 
public occasion ; they are said to have formerly adorned the Town- 
House at Brussels. 

Collection of Thomas Emmerson, Esq., 1829, (bought in) 78 ^f. 



1186. Portrait of EUzabeth Brant. Her fair countenance is 
seen in a three-quarter view; she has large dark eyes and 
auburn hair ; the dress is composed of dark gray alk, with a 



BUBENS. SI 7 

collar of the same standing up behind the head, and relieved 
by a white lace frill ; the bodice is decorated with gold braiding, 
buttons, and a triple row of chain of an antique form set with 
jewels, part of which is held by the right hand ; a gold chain 
also adorns the neck. A highly-finished and beautifully- 
coloured production. 

^Jt. \\ in, by 1^1. 6 J in.— P; 

This picture was formerly in the possession of M . Van Havren; 
at Antwerp, in whose collection it formed a suite with the Chapeau 
de PailUf and a Portrait of Helena Forman (see p, 160^, and of 
whom it was purchased by Mr. Buchanan, for the sum of SOOOyir., 
about 320/. 

Now in the collection of T. B. H. Owen, Esq., in which it is 
styled the portrait of Helena Forman. 



1187. Portrdt of, Helena Forman, in the character of a 
Shepherdess, wearing a straw hat decked with a bunch of 
com, and a flower placed negligently on the head ; the bosom 
is exposed, and the right hand holds a bouquet and sustains a 
crook across the shoulder. 

Engraved by Pether, in 1769. The same engraver produced 
two other prints, of smaller dimensions, and in reverse. Done after 
a picture at that time in the possession of B. Bates, Esq., of 
Aylesbury. 

1188. Portrait of the same Lady. This differs only from 
the preceding in the head being covered with a kind of turban, 
decked with com and wild flowers ; the fingers of the left hand 
are placed on the naked bosom, and a crook reclines across the 
right shoulder. 

Engraved by Elliot, from a picture at that time in the pos- 
session of Mr. Bradford. A portrait of this Lady is also engraved 
by Dickenson. 

1189. A full-length Portrait of a Lady in an erect position, 
wearing a large ruff round her neck. 

Engraved, anonymous. 



S18 BUBEKS. 

1190. The Head of an old Man. 
Engraved from a drawing, anonymous. 



1 191- The Head of an Infant^ with a cap on, decked with 
plumes of feathers. 

Engraved by Bloteling. The same head, seen in a profile vi^vr,. 
is engraved by the same artist. 



119S. The Head of a Man. Apparently a study for the 
paralytic, in the subject of ** Christ healing the SicL^ 
Engraved by Bloteling. 

119S. Portnuts of four of Rubens's Children. The compo- 
sition represents the eldest boy handing along his eldest sister, 
followed by a ^li, who is holding the hand of her Ettfe 
brother while riding a hobby-horse. The children are attended 
by two maid-servants, one of whom carries a basket of fruit 
under her arm. 

Engraved by Tassaert, after a miniature picture, then in the 
collection of His Majesty, done by Fruytiers, from a capital picture 
said to be by Rubens. 

1194b Portnuts of three of Rubens^s Children. One of 
them, a boy, is riding a large dog, which his sister holds by 
the collar ; the young^t child is playing in a go-cart. 

Engraved, in mezzotinto, by Mac Ardell. 



1195. A View of the Escurial and surrounding Country. 
This solemn and majestic edifice occupies the projecting 
acclivity of a mountain on the left; it is sheltered in the rear 
by the lofty crags which overtop the building, and, by com- 
parison, render this immense pile a diminutive object From 
this point the view stretches itself far away in long perspective 
over a wide and spacious valley, bounded at the sides by lofty 
mountains, over whose summits roll volumes of douds, which 
dther float along their broken and arid sides or are driven by 



BUBEN8. 319 

currents of wind acrosB the vallej, where, mixing with nsang 
vapours, they obscure the view of still more distant objects. 

Sft. 4 in. by eft. 5 m.— C. 

Cumberland, in his Anecdotes of Spanish Painters, describes 
with admirable force and clearness this extraordinary building and its 
adjacent landscape ; he observes, " that Philip having made a vow, 
upon the victory of St. Quintin, to dedicate a church and monastery 
to San Lorenzo, he began, in the midst of a solitary and frightful 
desert, to displace the rocks, and compel them to take the shape of 
an edifice." — *' As a monastery it is vast and awful, fitly calcu- 
lated to entomb the living and the dead ; as a palace, it is justly 
emblematic of its founder, who, on the summit of the superincum* 
bent mountain, was accustomed to sit and survey his rising fabric 
in silent contemplation and delight." He adds, '* the furious 
gusts of wind that occasionally sweep fix>m the impending mountains 
surpass description : the Escurial is placed in the eddy of these 
furious gusts ; neither man, nor beast, nor carriages, can stand 
before them ; and to escape its effects, a subterraneous passage is 
cut through the rock under the area of the court, for a commmii* 
cation with the town." The long residence of the artist at the 
court of Madrid must have afibrded him frequent opportunities of 
viewing this magnificent scene under the varied influence of raging 
storms and tranquil sunshine ; and the excellent picture above 
described exhibits it imder its most solemn and gloomy aspect. 

Now in the collection of the Earl of Egremont. 

A picture, representing a similar view to the above, was sold 
in the coQestion of Richard Cosway, Esq., R. A., by Mr. Stanley, in 
1821, and bought by Messrs. Woodbum, for 44 gs. 

Stfi. 1 m. by Zfi. 1 m.— P. 

A third, belonging to the Rev. Edward Balme, was exhibited 
in the British Gallery in 1819. 

A fourth, attributed to Rubens (but in reality is a capital picture 
by Mompers), is in the collection of the Earl of Radnor. 

Ift. by 10y>. (cbouX.) 

A fifUi occurs in the Dresden Gallery. — Seef. 82* 

This reduplication of the subject may be accounted for from 
Mompera (an excellent landscape paintar) having taken copies of 



380 RUBENS. 

the original (varying them in* size and effect) under the eye of 
Rubens, who afterwards retouched them, and thereby rendered 
them worthy of his name. 

1196. A Landscape, intersected by a stream flowing towards 
the front, the banks of which are overgrown with bulrushes and 
other water-plants. A cottage upon the summit of a hill, with 
a cluster of trees before it, is seen in the middle distance on 
the right; and a second house, partly concealed by trees, 
appears in the middle, but more remote from the spectator. In 
the fore-ground are two women and two men ; one of the former 
is milking a cow, while the other is busy with the cans; the 
men appear to be engaged in conversation with them. 

Engraved by L. Van Uden. 

1197. A Landscape, of an oval form, with a dngle figure of 
a female seated in the middle, upon some drapery spread upon 
the grass, leaning her head pen^vely on her hands ; two sheep, 
grazing on the bank of a river, are at a little distance from her. 

Engraved by Coelmans. 

1198. A woody Landscape, with a large company of men 
and women, several of whom are dancing to the music of a 
bagpipe. 

Engraved by Charpentier. 

1199* A hilly Landscape, with a high road on the right, at 
the side of which are three peasants, one of whom is seated near 
a post 

Engraved, anonymous. 

Although this print ascribes the picture to the pencil of Rubens, 
it has much more the character of being by Teniers the elder ; 
the two preceding are also doubtful productions of the master. 



ISOO. A Landscape, intersected by a stream flowing by the 
side of a high bank, upon the summit of which are four lofty 
trees, these stand in the centre of the view ; a second dustier of 
trees is at the side, and upon a bank in front are three cows', 



BUBENS. 321 

one of them lying down. The rays of the sun, darting from 
behind a cloud, illumine the distant hills. 
Engraved by Dankaerts. 

1901. A hilly Landscape, with a large umbrageous tree 
standing in the middle, by the side of which are passing a shep- 
herd and a flock of sheep, preceded by two men on horseback 
and another on foot; on the other side of the tree a bubbling 
cascade flows toward the front-ground, beyond which are seen 
richly wooded uplands; while in the oppoate side the view 
opens over a fine fertile country. 

I ft. 5\%n. by 2 ft. \\'m P. 

Engraved by Major. 

120S. A View, looking over meadow grounds, divided by a 
deep ravine, through which flows a stream round a bank, form- 
ing the fore-ground ; a single tree placed across the brook serves 
for a bridge, beyond which a man pn horseback is descending 
a bank to water his steed. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

1S03. A View, extendmg over an open flat country, diversi- 
fied with clusters of trees and a winding stream flowing to the 
front ground, in which a man is watering two horses ; beyond 
him is a woman pouring milk fro^i a can into a pail, and close 
to her are two cows and a calf. In the opposite side is a woman 
carrying a can on her head and a basket in her hand, descend- 
ing a hill, at the nde of which sits a peasant playmg on a pipe. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

1904. A Landscape, with a large hill on the left, various 
architectural ruins at its side, and excavations under it. A 
shallow stream flows over the front-ground, through which are 
passing two women carrying baskets of fruit, followed by a man 
driving three cows before him. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

VOL. II. Y 



822 BUBENS. 

1905. A Landscape, exhibitiog a wild iequestered scenes 
composed of a bold broken hill, occupying a large pcnrtion of 
the view ; its sides and summit are covered with bushes and 
Icity trees, and its base encompassed by a stream overrun with 
bulrushes and other aquatic plants. On a bank, in the left and 
front of the picture, are two women, one of whom has a can on 
her head and a basket under her arm ; the other, wearing a 
scarlet skirt, is getting up water in a pail ; behind them are 
three cows, one of which is rubbing its head against a tree; the 
view aa this side is bounded by a thick grove of trees. 

2ft. 6 in. by Sft. 6 m.— P. Worth 700 gs* 

Engraved by Bolswert 

This very admirable production is of the highest quality and ex- 
cellence, grand and powerful in its effect, and beautiful in the ter- 
mination of its detail. 

Imported from Holland by Mr. Emmerson, in 1818, and now in 
the collection of Jeremiah Harman, Esq. 



1206. A richly-wooded Landscape, traversed by a winding 

stream, which flows along the front, and is crossed on the left 

by a rustic bridge ; near which stands a herdsman leaning on a 

sUck, tending a flock of nineteen sheep that are browsing on 

a sloping bank skirted by a thick wood of young trees ; passing 

among which, in the distance, are seen a huntsman and dogs ; 

in the right ride, and dose to the front, is a cluster of trees 

growing on a bank. 

ft ft. t in. by 3 ft. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

Collection of the Due d'Orl^ans, Paru, 1749. 

Exhibited in the British Gallery in 1819. 

This beautiful landscape is now in the collection of the Earl of 

Carlisle. 



1807. A Landscape, with an andent chfiteau on a hill in the 
left, and an old bridge and a well; on the same side, but 
nearer the front, is a man watering two horses near the 



BUBENS. 38$ 

bridge ; in the opponte ade lie some trunks of trees, beyond 
which is seen a cottage sarrounded by clustering groves; a 
brilliant sunset lights up the marshy valley in the centre. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

There is a copy of this print, in reverse, by Van Tienen ex. 



1208. A Landscape, with the ruins of a castle or convent 
upon a rugged hill in the right, and a rapid stream flows 
obliquely to the fore-ground in the oppomte side, through 
which three females, preceded by a fourth carrying a basket of 
fruit on her head, are preparing to pass ; a man, leaning on a 
stick, tending five goats, is on the farther bank of the water in 
the second distance, beyond whom are three travellers and a 
laden ass. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

1209* A bald mountainous View, with a castle upon the 
summit of a distant hill, surrounded by an irregular wall 
extending down the side of the hill ; the fore-ground exhibits 
bokl rocky masses broken by chasms, among which grow a £sw 
stonted bushes, and near these are two goats browsing upon 
the scanty herbage; at some distance off, on the right, are 
a man on horseback and another on foot, driving a flock of 
sheep; and beyond these are several buildings, and a river 
flowing through a valley. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

IXLO. A View over an open flat country, chiefly composed 
of meadow lands, intersected in parts by dwarf hedges ; the 
fore-ground presents a marshy soil, with a pool of water on the 
right; and another, in the opposite side, with trees growing on 
its banks ; in the centre and front are a man with a basket at 
his back, and a woman with one on her arm and another an her 
head. A farm-house, and the steeple of a church, are seen in 
the distance. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 



SS4 BUBENS. 

There is a copy of this print in reverse, and instead of the two' 
peasants, in the fore-ground, is introduced the Holy Family returning 
from Egypt« 

ISll. A Landscape, exhibiting a omilar view to the pre- 
ceding, but varied with a few scattered trees and bushes, and 
the introduction of a cottage or farm-house in the distance ; a 
narrow stream, flowing between banks, extends along the fore- 
ground ; on the left of which are two women, one of whom 
carries a rake, the other has a basket of fruit on her head, 
these are near three trees growing by the water-dde. In the 
opposite part of the picture are three hay ricks, a team drawn 
by two horses, and a man at work stacking hay. The centre- 
ground is illumined by the light of a brilliant rainbow. 

Engraved by Bolswert* 

This picture was exhibited in the British Gallery in 1815, and was 
then the property of J. Graves, Esq. 



1S12. A Landscape, representing a fertile country of a 
broken and undulated surface, varied by numerous small bushy 
trees, and a narrow stream formed to drain the meadows, and 
obliquely dividing the fore-ground. In the left side, and front, 
is a shepherd, seated on a stone, playing on a pipe ; his dog 
stands by him, and his flock are browsing near ; beyond these 
are two trees and a little bridge, and still farther stands a 
farm-house with a tower, and a church is seen in the distance. 
A glowing sunset disseminates its cheering light and warmth 
throughout the rural scene. 

lyi. 8 in. by 2jt. 9 in.— P. Worth 600 g$. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 

It may be said generally of this master's landscapes, that if they 
do not surprise us into admiration, they never fail to create delight 
when contemplated with patient attention ; this delightful examj^e 
of his pencil fully justifies the observation. 

Now in the collection of the Bight Hon. Lord Famborough. 

A picture, very similar in description to the preceding, is inserted 
in Desanfan's catalogue in 1802, valued at 105 gt.'-^See p* liOO. 



BUBENS. SS5 

1S18. A Landscape) presenting on the right an open meadow, 
in which are twelve cows and four women ; three of the latter 
are milking, and the fourth stands with a pail on her head ; a 
farm-house b seen at the extremity of the field ; this part is 
divided by a stream running obliquely to the left side and front, 
close to which are two sportsmen, one of whom is firing at 
some ducks; on the farther side of the 'water the country 
offers a richly-wooded scene. 

Engraved by Bolswert. 



1214. A View on the Sea Coast, represented under the effect 
of a raging storm, attended by flashes of lightning and heavy 
rain; the right offers an extent of open sea, bounded in the 
middle distance by lofty mountiuns, at whose base appears a 
fortified town, and vessels riding at anchor near it The fore- 
ground and middle distance are composed of a low rocky shore, 
on which grow a few stunted trees, sheltering two buildings 
resembling convents. The left nde and front rise to a rocky 
hill, over which are pasring a man and a woman, bending 
under the violence of the storm. 

Engraved by Bolswert; and also by Le Moitte, when in the 
coQection of the Count de Bruhl. 



1216. A Shipwreck, taken from a description in the third 
book of the ^neid. The view exhibits a lofty rocky mountain 
(the Strophades), on the summit of which stands a blazing 
beacon, and around its base beats the turbulent and boisterous 
ocean, whose violence has dashed a vessel against the rock& 
Only two mariners remain on board of the sinking ship ; a 
third, thrown upon the shore, is seen clinging to a broken tree ; 
while a fourth has climbed up a bank and is assisted by a man 
kneeling at the side of it In the left are five men who appear 
to have escaped from the storm and are engaged in making a 
blazing fire ; beyond these are two others hastening towards 
the coast A rustic bridge in the centre crosses a ravine leading 
to a pass, formed between the rocks, to ascend the mountain ; 



886 BUBEN8; 

on the farther nde of which appear a fortresg and'the masts 
of vessels riding at anchor. The sublime and awful effect 
which pervades the scene is finely relieved by the breakii^ of 
the morning light, contrasting with the dense blade clouds 
which hang over the sea, and the blazing fires, whose lurid 
flame sparkles through the gloom. 

it ft. by Sft. S in. — C. on P. 

Engraved by Bolswert, with addidons and alterations. 

Now in the collection of Thomas Hope, Esq. 



1216. A Landscape, with a Farm-house and a Hermitage. 
The occupants of the latter are introduced in the fore-ground, 
apparently in conversation with two peasants. 

Engraved by Van Uden. 

1S17. A Landscape, with Cattle and Figures. 
Exhibited in the British GaUery in 1815. 
Now in the possession of Lord 6. Cavendish. 



1218. A Landscape, with some rinng ground in the left, 
the aides of which terminate abruptly with broken banks, from 
whence rise, at intervals, several large trees ; three cottages 
are on the summit of the hill, b^ond whidi the view ter- 
minates with woods ; in the oppoate side are four men who 
appear to be busy with a loaded waggon^ the horses of which 
and the driver, who is mounted on one of than, are at a little 
distance off ; a pool of water occupies the centre of the fore- 
ground, and two logs of timber lie on the left. 

Engraved by Van Uden. In some of the prints the picture is 
attributed to Van Uden. 

The following Drawings, with maky others noticed 
IN this Catalogue, wxbb sold in the Collection or 
M. Mabiette^ 1775. 

1219. A Study of bushes and tnmks of trees. 

18 tn. by 24 in. 
Done from nature in colours. IftOfs. 91. 



&UBEN& 827 

1290. Four wmaHl Drawings of subjecta reladng to the life of 
St. Ignatius. 

1S21. A pen Sketch of the Defeat of the Army of Sennacherib 
by the destroying Angel. 19^. 

1222. A View of the Vegetable Market at Antwerp, with 
several women, who are busy with fruit, &c. A lady, followed 
by her maid, is approaching a stalL 

Done with a pen, washed in bistre. 315/«. 12L 10«* 

Collection of Prince deConti, . . 1777. . 280fs. 11^ 



1228. An Altar, near which is a Genius uniting Painting 
with Nature. A tablet, surmounted with the prow of a ship, 
and supported at the sddes by figures personifying Abundance 
and Gkxxl Grovemment 

Done with a pen, washed in bistre. ^^fo* 



1224. Time overooming Death, the Destroyer of all things. 
Done in black chalky washed in India ink, for a tide*page. ISl fs. 



1225. A Compomtioa of fifteen figures, of which the Savbur 
and the Virgin are the prindpal ones. 

Done in bistre, he^htened with white ; for a tide*page. BO ft. 



1226. A Trophy of the arms of vanquished nations. 

Done for a title-page to ahistory of the Caesars. Engraved by Lasne. 



1227. View of a Village in Flanders, in the middle of which 
is a wood hovel. 

A pen drawing, washed with indigo. 1^7 fs. 6L 



1228. View of a Hamlet in Flanders, with a river in the 
fore-ground, in which cavaliers are watering their steeds, and 
cows are drinking. 14i)Ji. 5L 10s. 



328 BUBEN& 

18S9* Pcrtndt of ToUas Strinmer, a German paibter. Two 
terminiy supporting an entablature, deocnrate the mdes. 

Done in bistre, heightened ^ith white. 50 fs* 2/. 



1280. Portrait of Lucas Van Leyden. 

Done in a similar numner to the above. SS/s, 



1231. Portrait of Philip IV., drawn in profile for a medal. 
On the same paper is a penitent holding a crudfix, with the 
head of a man, and a female asleep on her arm. 49^. 



1232. The Saviour in Glory, surrounded by Saints. 
Done at Rome, after a picture by Raffiielle. 



1283. Jacob and Esau. 

A superb drawing by Rafiaelle, finished by Rubens ; pen wash. 

141/*. St. lOt. 

1234. The Rape of the Sabines. After Polidoro, by Rubens. 
Done in a pen wash, heightened with white. 140/r. 5/. lOs. 



1235. The Viaon of Ezekiel, after Raffaelle ; and 
The beautiful figure of Ganymede, after Michael Angelo. 
The former done in red chalk ; and the latter a pen drawing, 
mixed with black chalk. They were retouched byRubens, on a 
design of Julio Clovio. 60/«. 



1236. A whole-length figure of a Pope^ accompanied by two 
saints and an angel ; the latter carries a mitre; the Third Person 
of the Trinity appears above. On the same sheet is a drawing 
of a dying Magdalen, supported by two angels, with a glory 
of angels above ; the latter is by Diepenbeck. A third drawing, 
of a woman with a dog, is on the sheet 7%/^* 



1237. Ten sheets, containing various Studies. 

Done with the pen and black chalk. 131 /#. 



BUBEKS. 829 

1288. The Head of a Female. 

A beantifiil drawing in black chalk. 

Collection of the Duke deTallard, 1756. . 150 ft. 6L 



1289. The Martyrdom of a Saint. 

A pen drawing, tinted. 

Collection of M. Lempereur« • • 1783. • 24fOfs. BLlOs. 



1240. A Landscape. 

Done in India ink wash. 

Same collection^ . • 240/«. 9/. 10«. 



1241. The Head of a Man. 

Done in red chalk. 9| in. by 7| tn. 

Collection of R. de Boiaaet, . • . 1776 65 fs. 



1242. Two Drawings. . The Elevation of the Cross, and 
Melchizedeck giving Bread and Wine to Abraham. 

The former is a tinted drawing, and was the property of Treiste, 
the Bishop of Ghent; the latter came from the Collection of 
M. Jabach. 

Collection of M. Crozat, . . . . 1741. . 256/9. 10/. 



1248. A Lion in repose. 

A drawing in chalks, washed in India ink. 

Now in the British Musemn. 



1244. Portrait of a Siamese Priest He wears a large 
loose robe and a plain high cap, and is represented stancUng 
with his hands in front 



1245. A Siamese Ambassador, in a mmilar dress and 
posidon to the preceding. 

The artist is said to have drawn these portraits when about to 
leave England. 

Engraved by W. BaiUie, when in the collecticm of John 
Barnard, Esq. 



830 BUBENS. 

IS46. Albert Rubens, when a youth about thirteen years 
old; seen in a front view, wearing a cap decked with a 
feather. 

Engraved by Schiavonetti, from a drawing then in the collection 
of R. Cosway, Esq., R.A. 

1247. The Martyrdom of a Saint (probably St Geoi^). 
The martyr b represented on the summit of a hill, bending on 
on one knee, with his hands bound before him ; he is attended 
by a female friend, who is binding up his head with a napkin, 
while the executioner stands on his left with a sword in his 
hand, and three soldiers are on the right awaiting the per- 
formance of the sentence ; near the front are a young woman 
with an infant in her arms, and a young man supporting her ; 
and behind these are an old man and woman, and a young 
female and two children; all these appear to be deeply 
affected by the approaching death of the saint On the 
opposite ude are two soldiers, dad in armour, and a horae« 
Three angels are seen descending, bearing the rewards of 
martyrdom. This is a beautiful drawing in colours, done 
with great freedom and energetic expresaon; evidently the 
first study for an altar-piece. 

28 in. by 20| in. 

Now in the collection of Sir Thomas Lawrence, P.R. A. 



11248. Augustus, Livius, Germamcus, and Tiberius, at- 
tended by soldiers, erecting a trophy. 

A drawing after a cameo in the collection of the Emperor of 
Germany; engraved, anonymous. 



1249. Germanieus and Agrippa, mounted in a car drawn 
by Centaurs. 

Engraved, anonymous, after a drawipg by Rubens, done from a 
cameo. 



1S50. The Triumph of an Emperor, who is mounted in a 



BUB£NS. SSI 



car, the wheels of wUdi are paaaog over the dead bodies of 
his enemies. 

Engraved (ovsl), anonymoasy after a drawing by Rubens done 
from a cameo. 



1251. Three Heads, afiter cameos, xnz, Agrippina, between 
two comueojnas, fnm whidi are issmng the heads of two 
infants^ her children; of die other two heads, one wears a 
hehnet encompassed by a wreath of laurels, the other a diadem. 

The two last are engraved, anonymous, of a round form. 



1252. Six Heads, 'viz. Tiberius, crowned with oak and 
having a shield before his breast, two heads of young Romans, 
Mecsnas, a Female wearing a hehnet shaped like an elephant's 
head, and Pallas. 

Ovals, done after antiques ; engraved, anonymous, on the same 
plate. 

125S. Four Heads (the faces are all represented in profile), 
viz, Germanicus Csesar, C. Cassar Augustus, Solon, and 
Socrates. 

Done after antiques ; engraved, anonymous, on the same plate. 



1254. Four Heads, viz. Plato, Nidas, Pallas, and Alex- 
ander Magnus. 

Done after antiques ; engraved, anonymous, on the same pkte. 



1255. A Plate with twenty-four ovals, oxteen of whidi 
oontiun medals of Julius Cassar. 

Done after antique medals ; engraved, anonymous. 



1256. A Swan seated on her nest, composed of reeds and 
bulrushes^ in a sequestered landscape. A brilliant and 
sketdi, deagned to be engraved (at a book. 



SSa KUBENS. 

IJUTT. A Bust of Plato placed in a niche 

Done from the antique in marble ; engraved by Vosterman. 

1258. A Bust of Seneca. 

Done after the antique in marble ; engraved by Vosterman. 



1SQ9. A Monument erected to commanorate an achieve, 
ment of Balthazar-Charles, son of Philip III. .of Spain, for 
having killed in the chase a bull and a wild boar, in l&tS. It 
is composed of a pedestal containing a long inscription, sur- 
mounted by busts of Minerva, Diana, and Mercury ; on one 
side is the young prince with a gun in his hand, accompanied 
by a huntsman, and on the other is a page holding the skin of 
a lion, on which is emblazoned the arms of Austria. A dead 
bull and a boar lie in front 

Engraved by C. Galle. 

• 

1260. A Nymph reclining in the arms of a Triton upon a 
dolphin, and attended by two cupids. 



1261. The same subject The triton has bis back to the 
spectator. 

1262. A Satyr, seated on a rock, holding a goat attached 
by the neck to a string, with which an infant is playing ; three 
other infants are also in the group. 



136S. A Syren, seated on a sea-horse, holding an infant in 
her arms, and accompanied by three cujnds sporting around 
her. 

The preceding four compositions were apparendy designs for 
borders of salvers to be made in sOver. 

Engraved by Van Kessel ; and anonymous. 



1264. A Series of twelve Busts, drawn by -Rubens after the 
•antique in marble, and engraved aixnit the year 16S8, viz. 
Sophodes, Socrates, Hippocrates, Sdpio, and Nero, engraved 



by P. Pontius ; Democrites, Plato, M. Brutus, and Seneca, by 
L. Vosterman; Demosthenes and Cicero, by Witdouc; and 
Julius Csesar, by Bolswert 



The following ax subjects are engraved anonymous, after 
drawings by Rubens, when at Rome, done to illustrate a work( 
written by Philip Rubens, entitled AniuerpuB ex OffianA Plan^ 
iiniana^ 1608, viz: — 

1265. A Female wearing the Roman toga. 



1266. A Chariot Race in the Circus. 

Drawn from an antique bas-relief, near the gate of Pope Pius. 



1267. Two Figures wearing the Roman tunic. 
Drawn after antique statues in marble. 



1268. The Head of a Priestess, seen in profile, with a cap on. 
At the nde is another cap of a priestess. 



1269. A Frieze, composed of the instruments used in sacri- 
fices and a cap of a priestess. 

1270: A Medal of Faustina; and on the reverse a subject 
alluding to an establishment formed by that princess for the 
education of young females. 



The following were ENGaAVsn, aftbe Designs bt 
Rubens, foe Feontispieces and Vignettes for Books. 

1271. An architectural Elevation, decorated at the sides by^ 
termini of Mercury and Minerva supporting a cornice, and the 
figure of Juno attended by an eagle and peacock. Dated 1618. 



1272. A Tablet containing the title^ above which are Samt 
Augustin with a blazing heart; Samts Innocent, Zozimus, 



884 BUBfiNS. 

Bomfiwe, and Celesdnus, treading under iooi Pelagiusy Cdes- 
tins, and Julien, and their works. 

Engraved by C. Galle. The same plate, with the title altered,, 
was afterwards used to an edition of AugUMtinui Jansemus. 



1S78- An architectural Elevation, decorated on one side by 
a statue of Moses, and on the other by that of a prophet UpoD 
a tablet above are a globe and the emblems of the Trinity, and 
below is a bas-relief representing Christ giving the keys to St. 
Peter. 

Engraved, anonymous. Dated 1620. 

1274. A Pedestal, surmounted by a female personifying 
Flanders. The figures of Mercury and Ceres are at the sides, 
and a representation of the rivers Scheldt and Lys is below. It 
is doubtful whether the design of this was by Rubens. 

Engraved by P. de Jode. 

1S75. An Angel delivering Captives is on one tide of an oval 
tablet, and on the other is an Angel destroying Heretics with a 
thunderbolt ; the upper part is adorned with a portrait of Pope 
PiusV. 

Engraved, anonymous. Dated 1640. 



1276. An architectural Elevation, at the summit of which is 
a female with two flambeaux emblematic of Theology, and on 
each side are ierminiy supporting symbolical emblems of ancient 
and modem laws. 

Engraved by CoUaer t. Dated 1617. 

1277. A Monk of the Order of Benedictines, and the Author 
of the Book. Represented on his knees, ofiering to the Saviour 
and the Virgin his work, which is supported by four females, 
oDoblems of the cardinal virtues; other allegorical figures^ 
allusive to the subject, are introduced. 

Engraved, anonymous. Dated 1632. 

1278. Solomon, habited in ample robes, offering on his knees 
his book of Ecclesiastes (which is supported by two angels) to 



RUBENS. S35 

the IXviiie Wisdom, represented by an irradiated female seated 
on a throne in the clouds. The back-ground exhibits Paradise, 
and there is in front a cavern, the limbo of purgatory. 
Engraved by C. Galle. Dated 1634. 



1S79. A Pedestfld, on each side of which are St Peter and St 
Paul, and on its summit is a female representing the Churchy 
with an open book in one hand and a triple cross in the other ; 
two angels with frankincense are at either side; below the 
pedestal are the arms of Gregory XV. In the second edition 
of the book the arms of Pope Urban VIII. were substituted. 

Engraved by T. Galle. 

The same composition, with the introduction of an oblong tablet 
instead of the arms, for a book. Dated 1621. 



1S80. A Tide, inscribed on the skin of a cow, held up by a 
lion and an eagle. The bead of a cow is placed in the centre; 
above which is seated the author, around whose neck Fame is 
placing a chain of medals ; on his right is an angel widi an open 
book; at the sides, in the lower part, are St Augustin with 
a book, and St. Frauds holding a burning heart The ori^al 
sketch, done on paper, en griaaiUey is in the Writer^s posses- 
sion. Value 20^. 

Engraved, anonymous. Dated 1628. 



1S81. An architectural Elevation, composed of four Corin- 
thian columns, surmounted by Moses with the tables of the law. 
Engraved, anonymous. Dated 1616. 



1S8S. An architectural Elevation, with a pedestal in the 
centre, on the summit of which is seated Moses with the table 
of the laws : to the pillars at the ndes are attached four medal- 
lions containing subjects relating to Jewish history, and in the 
lower part is Moses surrounded by the children of Israel. 



. 1383. A Title-page, surrounded by the Twelve Apostles^ 
each of whom holds a book, and on every respective book is 



336 BUBENS. 

inflcribed a passage from thdr hdy works ; the symbol of tbe 
Trinity is above. 
Engraved by C. Galle. Dated 1625. 



1S84. A subject from the Apocalypse of St. John. The 
Ddty seated, surrounded by the twenty-four Elders^ under 
whom are the four Evangelists. 

Engraved by E. Galle. Dated 1627. 



1285. A Drapery, supported by two Angels. On one ade 
is St. John the Baptist; on the other St. Theresa; and the 
name of God is inscribed above. 

Engraved, anonymous. Dated 1620. 



1286. A Pedestal, surmounted by a figure of the Saviour 
with a cross ; at his feet are two females, personating Faith 
and Religion. 

Engraved by C. Galle. Dated 1617. 



1287. A triumphal Arch, composed of four Corinthian 
columns, and surmounted by a globe, which two figures of 
Victory are crowning with wreaths. 

Engravedi anonymous. Dated 16S1. 



1288. On one ride of this title-page is a figure personaUng 
Time drawing Truth from a well, and on the other. Time 
plunging Envy into one. The pedestal is surmounted by 
Cybele caressing two lions. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

1289. A Drapery, supported by two Angels, at the sides of 
whom are St. Peter and St. Paul ; and in the under part is a 
female, the emblem of the Church, with a blazing torch, from 
which several angels are lighting other torches. 

Engraved by L. Vosterman. Dated 1624. 



RUBENS: 337 

1390. A Title-page, surrounded by a i^umber of Saints of 
both sexes, and surmounted by a figure of the Virgin. In the 
lower part are three infants on a cloud. 

Engravedy anonymous. Dated 1619. 



1S91* A Pedestal, surmounted by an eagle with a thunder- 
bolt in its talons. On each nde are trophies, and in the lower 
part are two griffins supporting arms. 

Engraved by Lasne. Dated 1618. 



1292. A Pedestal, on the summit of which is a female, 
allegorically representing History, seated with a blazing torch 
in her hand, illuminating a globe. At the sides are Mars and 
the Groddess of Peace. Cybele and a river-god are bdow. 

Engraved, anonymous. Dated 1623. 



129S. The Temple of Janus, the door of which is burst 
open by Rage, Discord, and Envy. A drapery is attached to 
the transom of the door, on which is inscribed the tide of the 
book. 

Engraved, anonymous. Dated 1623. 



1294. A Pedestal, at the top of which is seated the Virgin, 
with the Saviour in her arms. Her attention is directed to the 
Archduke Albert, who is bending on one knee before her ; 
two angels with a crown and manacles are at his side, and 
below him is an angel kneeling, with a globe and fetters in her 
arms. In the opposite side of' the pedestal stands St Francis, 
offering a burning heart to the Saviour. 

Engraved by C. Galle. Dated 1640. 



1295. The In&nta Isabella embradng the Queen her 
Mother. On their right are emblematical figures holding 
crowns; and on the left is an angel pointing to a hand, which 
holds a wreath of laurels. 

Engraved by.C. Galle. Dated 1692. 

VOL. II. z 



988 BUBENS. 

1296. This Title-poge is the same as No. 1292, exoepdng 
that Histoiy, uistead of a torch, holds the anus of Spain, 
which occupy the place of the globe, and below is an escatchcoD, 

Engravedy anonymous* Dated I6ft5» 



1297. An architectural Elevation, at the ades of whidi 
are Abraham and St Francis; above are the Daty, with 
Moses and Aaron on his right, and several monks on his left ; 
in the lower part is a female seated on ruins, all^orically 
representing the Holy Land* 

Engraved, anonymous. Dated 16S9. 



1298. The same as No. 1298, retouched. Dated 1640. 



1299. A Pedestal, surmounted by a statue of Julius Caesar, 
with a ball in one hand and the Grenius of Rome in the other. 
At the sides are Ccmstantine the Great, and Rodolph, Emperor 
of Grermany. 

Engraved by C. GalJe. 

1800. A Female leaning upon an oval tablet, with a cornu- 
copia in her left arm, and holding a pair of scales with her right 
hand ; a grotto forms the back-ground. 

Engraved, anonymous. Dated 1615. 



1801. A rustic Portico, with the termini of Tacitus and 
Seneca at the sides, surmoimted with a medallion, contain* 
ing a portrait of Justus Lipsius, and embellished with various 
allq;orical figures, allusive to Philosophy and Politics. In the 
lower part are four other emblematical figures. 

Engraved by C. Galle. Dated 1637. 



1802. An Oval, at the top of which is a figure of Commerce, 
with a caduceus in her hand, and at her sides the signs of lAhr^ 
and Leo; at the ades of the oval are figures personiiting the 



RUBENSr. SSd 

Earth and Abundance; and in the lower pait are Ignorance 
and Superstition bound in chains. 

Engraved by C. Galle. Dated 1617. In subsequent e^tions 
the head of Justice or Commerce is covered with a veiL 



1803. A Pedestal, at the top of which is a figure represent- 
ing Religion, with a cross in one hand and a mitre in the other; 
at her side are two angels, one of whom has a flambeau, and 
the other the symbol of Eternity ; at the sides of the pedestal 
are females personating the Jewish Ceremonies and the law 
of Truth ; Envy and Superstition lie bound in front 

Engraved by CoUaert. Dated 1622. This plate was subse- 
quently adapted to anodier book. 



1804. A Tablet, surmounted by a bust of a Female wearing 
a castellated crown, with the emblem of Eternity round her 
neck, and having the eye of Providence over her head; two 
angels are at the sides, and on the right and left of the tablet 
are Mercury and Minerva joining hands. A bas-rdief ci 
'wSantM at play decorates the loWer part. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

1805. A Pedestal, surmounted by a figure of History, hold- 
ing a' flambeau in one hand and writing with the other. On 
one side is Mercury attaching a banner to a palm-tree, and in 
the other a female suspending medals to a laurel-tree. The 
rape of Europa is represented at the bottom. 

Engraved by C. Galle, Dated 1640. 



1306. A rustic Arch, at the top of which is Samson finding 
the honeycomb in the jaws of a dead lion. The Portrait of 
Pope Urban VIII., already noticed, belongs to this book. 

Engraved by C. Galle. Dated 1634. 



1S07. The Saviour appearing to Mary Magdalen in the 
Garden. Behind these figures are two pahn-trees, whose 



S40 RUBENS. 

bnmches unite, and aerre for a seat to two infants, who support 
the anns of some lady. 

Engraved, anonymous. Dated 1617. 



1S08. A Pedestal, adorned with two genii ; one of whom is 
playing on a lyre, and the other on a double pipe. 
Engraved by Theodore Galle. Dated 1622. 



1809. A Tablet, at the ndes of which are Victory with a 
palm and a chaplet, and Mars with a sword and spear. The 
arms of the Infant of Spun, with various emblems, adorn the 
upper part 

Engraved by Marinus. Dated 1635. The same plate was 
adapted to a French edition of the same work. 



ISIO. An Elephant carrying a Tower, containing several 
armed soldiers, preceded by a hero in a two-horse car, and 
attended by two soldiers dad in complete armour. 

Engraved by C. Galle. Dated 1636. 



ISll. The same as No. ISTQy with this exception, that the 
arms of the popes are covered with a tablet. 
Engraved by Hangelet. Dated 1621. 



131S. The same as No. 1S18. Adapted to another work. 
Dated 1620. 



1818. A Pedestal, surmounted by a figure personifymg 
Rome crowned by Victory ; in the lower part is a wolf, the em- 
blem of that dty, and captives chuned to trophies. 

Engraved, anonymous. Dated 1617. The same plate was 
adapted to the preceding work in 1620. 



1814. An Oval, surmounted by the arms of Spidn, with 
Hercules and Pallas at its sides ; in the lower part is a female, 
personifying the city of Breda, seated on a heap of arms, and 
a starved female, with looks of despair, clinging round her neck. 

Engraved, anonymous. . Dated 1626. 



RUBE19S. 841 

1815.' A Pedestal, with a figure of Fame seated' on its 
summit, and at its sides are Mars and Minenra; within a 
cavern, in the lower part, are Remus and Romulus in the act 
of being suckled by a wolf; and at the odes are two river 
deities. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

1316. A Bishop holding a tablet, on which is inscribed the 
title of the book. St Peter and St. Paul, with Faith, Hope, 
and Charity, complete the group. The symbol of the Trinity, 
and a glory of cherubim are above. 

Engraved by C. Galle. Dated IGSS. 



' 1817. A Pedestal, surmounted by a figure of the infant 
Saviour holding his cross ; at the sides are two females, one of 
whom holds a burning heart, the other a flambeau. 
Engraved, anonymoos. Dated 1680. 



1818. A Laurel-Tree, to the branches of which are attached 
the armorial bearings of the Chigi family ; at the foot of the 
tree, on one side, is seated Apollo, and on the other Mercury. 

Engraved, anonymous. Dated 1654. 



1819* A Portrait of Philip IV., crowned by two genii ; the 
vanquished dragon lies at his feeL 

Engraved by J. Neefs. Dated 1639. Although the name of 
Quelinus is attached to the print, connoisseurs have thought proper 
to insert it among the works of Rubens, firom a belief that it is 
his composition* 

1820. A Stone, surmounted by the Saviour bearing his 
.cross, and inviting three of his disciples to carry their crosses 
also; in the lower part is a medallion of the sign which ap- 
peared to Constantine. 

Engraved, anonymous. . Dated 1635. 

13S1. A Globe, on which are represented the dties of 
Lopvain and Prague ; Justice, upon a cloudy appears above. 



S4S BUBEKS. 



between the signs of Leo and Libra ; and near these are a 
sword and an open book. 
Engraved by C. Galle. 

1322. A Title-page surrounded with infants, intermixed 
with fruit and various armorial devices. The Nassau anna 
are above. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

1S2S. A Tablet, surmounted by a bust, the head of which 
is covered with drapery and crowned with laurel, and a chain 
of medals is suspended round the neck ; on one side are figures 
of Time and Death, precipitating the heroes of antiquity into 
the cavern of oblivion ; and on the other side are Mercury raising 
up their statues from the cavern, and Hercules giving a bowl 
of money as a reward to Industry. 

Engraved by C. Galle. 

13S4. On one side of this Title-page is Apollo placing his 
lyre on an altar, and in the other is a Muse watching over the 
infant Hesiod, while sleeping in a cradle ; at the same time bees 
are deporting their honey on the child^s lips. 

Engraved, anonymous. Dated 1632. 



13S5. An Escutcheon, supported on one ade by a figure in- 
dicating Policy, and on the other side by Abundance. 
Engraved by C. Galle. Dated 1624. 



18S6. An architectural Portico, of the Doric order, at the 
sides of which are Zeno and Cleantes ; in the lower part are 
three medallions of Seneca and Epictetus ; in the centre Honour 
and Virtue; and above are three other medals, inscribed 
with the names of Pallas, Hercules, and Ulysses. In the first 
edition, published in 1605, the bust of Seneca was seen in 
profile ; and in the second, of 1615, it was altered to a three- 
quarter face. This change is attributed to Rubens, as the 
second edition was revised by his friend, Justus LIpeius ; the 
best of the cpropoation is considered to be by another hand. 



RUBENS. S48 



1827. Upon the summit of a Pedestal, on which is h 
the title, is seated Phifip IV., receiying the homage and 
of La Franche Compt^ represented by a female on her knees, 
at whose nde is a £gare of Plenty. 

Engraved by C. Galle. Dated 1638. 



1S28. The same as No. 1824, adapted to another book. 



1829. A Pedestal, at the ades of which are St. Peter and 
St Paul, and on its summit is a figure denoting the Church, 
surrounded by cardinals and bishops; and at its base are 
figures representing Heresy and Discord bound in chains. 

Engrayed, anonymous. Dated 1623. 



1880. An antique Altar, on the fiEurther side of which is a 
Grenius, with one hand placed upon a figure of Nature^ while 
with the other he is recdving some of the implements of paint« 
ing from Mercury. 

Engraved by C. Galle. Dated 1634. 



1881. A Pedestal, surmounted by a triform bust of Minerva 
and Mercury. Upon a scroll on the left is seated a figure of 
Minerva ; and on the other side a female, representing History, 
writing a book. 

Engraved by Galle. Dated 1636. 



1882. A Drapery held by two Angels, who are sounding 
trumpets, at each side of which respectively stand St. Peter 
and St. Paul ; in the centre, above, are the lamb and the 
book with seven seals ; a female, representing the Church, is 
seated below, with a book in one hand and a torch in the 
other ; around her are four angels with flambeaux, and before 
her are bending the four quarters of the globe, personified by 
that number of figures. 

Engraved by Vostennan. Dated 16iS3. 



iposed 



344 RUB£N8« 

holding a 'sceptre, seated on an elevation^ surrounded by ax 
other females, each of whom have mathematical instruments ia 
their hands; in front is seated a geniua with a sextant and 
compasses in his hands ; two other infants with similar instru* 
ments are on each ude of a tablet below. 



1SS4. A rustic Portico, to which is attached the skin of aa 
ox with the head in the centre, surmounted by an owl ; in a 
niche below stands a sack, from the mouth of Which money is 
falling out; the utensils for painting are hung against the 
wall. On the skin b inscribed, Petrus Pauha Rubens 
deUneavit. P, Pontius sctdp. 



1SS6. An Oval, at the ndes of which are St. Peter and 
St Paul; in the upper part are the Trinity and a large 
company of saints and angels; and at the base of the oval are 
seen Moses and Aaron. 

Engraved by C. Galle. Dated 1632. 



1SS6. A Drapery, attached to a rustic niche, at the sides of 
which are St Paul, the hermit, and St Anthony ; and below 
these are St. Paula and St Eugenia, on their knees, before a 
death^s head ; Elijah and St. John are above. 

Engraved by J. Collaert. Dated 1617. 



1SS7. An InscripUon only. 



1SS8. An architectural Elevation, composed of pilasters of 
the Corinthian order, and decorated with statues of St Paul 
and St Anthony ; at the four angles are escutcheons, on which 
are represented the prophet Elias, St John the Baptist, 
St Eugenia, and St Euphrosyne. 

Engraved by C. Galle. Dated 1628. 



1SS9. A Drapery attached to a rock, within a cavern of 
which are seated St Paul, the hermit, and Stv' Francis; and 



BUBBNS. 345 

'at the sides are three females and an angel; Elijah and 
St John the Baptist are on the top ; and' in the lower part are 
the Magdalen and Mary of Egypt. 
Engraved by C. Galle. 



1S40. An Escutcheon, surrounded by a chain; to which is 
suspended a cross ; upon the top of the escutcheon is placed a 
crown, and at its rides are Mercury and a figure personifying 
Government, which support a pediment. In the lower part 
are several escutcheons with devices on them. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

1841. A Portico with spiral columns, in the centre of which 
is a pedestal, decorated with a bas-relief bearing the Austrian 
arms and surmounted by a pyramid,' to which are attached 
armorial devices. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

' 1842. A Female, seated on a pedestal, looking sorrowfully 
at a tablet supported by several angels; other angels are above, 
bearing a level and a balance. 



134S. An Elevation, of rustic architecture, before which is 
held a drapery, by the Archduke Albert and the Archduchess 
Isabella ; and upon the summit of the' elevation is a warrior on 
horseback, accompiEmied by two angels. 

Engraved, anonymous. 

1844. A Pedestal, on which is inscribed. Deb Pads, V.C.L.^ 
Joan Gevartkts^JurigconwUus^ S^c. ; and on the top of it is an 
architectural niche, within which is placed a bust of the author, 
Grevartius. On one side of the pedestal stands a figure of 
Justice with the balance, and on the other side Prudence, or 
Wisdom. 
' Engraved by Lommelin ; and Rubens deL 



1845. An architectural Elevation, with a tablet in the centre. 



S46 aUBENS. 

«apported at the sides bj an elderly female, with the tables of 
the law and a rod in her hands, and a young female wearing a 
crown, and holding a chalice and a book ; these personify the 
Old and New Law. At the top is seated the Deity, with a 
sword, whom two angels are worshijmig ; and at the base are 
three ovals, with scriptural subjects^ 
EngTETed, anonymous. 

Besides the preceding title-pages (several of which are doubtful 
as to their being the designs of Rubens) there are also eleven others, 
which some connoisseurs attribute, but with very little reason, to 
his pencil. 

Vignettes. 

1346. The mx following subjects were done to embellish a 
Book on Optics : — 

1. A Figure representing Philosophy, seated, and apparently 
conversing with three little genii ; a globe, a sphere, and some 
books are by its side. 

2. Several Genii, occupied in dissecdng an eye, which they 
have taken from the head of a Cyclops ; a Philosopher, seated, 
with a pen in his hand, is observing the operation with great 
attention. 

S. The same Philosopher, looking through a magnifying glass 
at two little balls, which two genii are showing him. 

4. The same Philosopher calculating, with a theodolite, the 
height of the Colossus at Rhodes, while a genius who is behind 
him is making the same observation. 

5. The same Philosopher, leaning on a table, observing the 
effect of the intersection of rays of light, which are made to pass 
through holes in a board ; the rays are produced by two lamps, 
held by a genius. 

6. The same Philosopher, bearing on his shoulders a celestial 
sphere, while a genius, flying over with a flambeau, produces a 
shadow on the ground which two genii are examining. 

The whole of them are engraved by J. B. Barbe. 



BXTBENS. 547 

1M7. The Arms of th^ Duke of Bavsija ; the escutcheon 
is supported by ea eagle and a peacock, grasping flambeaux in 
talons, and surmounted by a star. 



1348. An oval Tablet, supported by St Peter and St. Paul. 
A mitre and cross keys adorn the upper part 



1849. The same as the preceding. 
Engraved by Jegher. 

1350. A Hen ntting on her Nest ; above is a burning lamp ; 
at the two sides are a cock and an owl, and the heads of 
Mercury and Minerva. 

Engraved by C. Galle. 

1361. The same as the preceding, of a smaller size. 
Engraved by A. Voet 

135S. A Tablet, decorated with cornucopias and garlands. 
A Globe, crowned with a wreath of laurels, and surmounted by 
the face of the sun. 

Engraved by CoUaert 

1358. The same. 

Engraved in reverse, anonymous. 



1364. A Tablet, in the centre of wUch is a pelican, and in 
the back-ground is St Frauds receiving the stigmates. 

1355. A Tablet, decorated with a wreath of laurels, and a 
hand holcUng a compass entwined with a label, on which is 
written, Lahore et Consiantid; the tablet is supported by 
figures of Hercules and Constancy. 

Engraved by C. Galle. 

1856. The same. 

Engraved on wood, by E. Jegher. 



848 BUBENS. 

1857. A Book, ooiitainiiig twenty pages of progresnve studies 
of the human figure, and of cows and horses ; Dganira and 
the centaur Nessua, and Love subduiDg a centaur. On the 
title-page, which represents the skin of an ox, is inscribed P. P. 
Rubens ddineavU. A. Voet, P. ParUiuSf scuip. 



1S58. A Set of Studies of lions, in four sheets. 
Engraved by Bloteling. 

1859. A Study of lions. 



1S60. Two Tigers eating Raisins. 

This and the preceding are engraved by Hollar. 



1S61. A combat of Dragons, Serpents, and other monsters. 
Engraved, anonymoiu ; N. Visscher ex. This etching has been 
attributed to Rubens. 



1S62. Count Caylus has etched a number of studies of de- 
tached portions of pictures by Rubens. 

1368. A Set of thirty-one Heads, studies of different chaiac- 
ters, to which is affixed a Utle-page, inscribed ReceuU de Tiies 
d^Anioine Van Dyke, iirSes du Cabinet deM.de Crozai, ei 
gravies par M. C. de C. (Camte de Caylus), 1785. 

Basan observes, " that these are improperly attributed to Van Dyck, 
with the exception of two, which he has introduced in his picture of 
St. Augustin ; die whole of die others are indubitably by Rubens, 
who has employed most of them in many of his pictures." The 
Writer of this Work thinks it very probable diat Van Dyck copied 
these heads from pictures by Rubens, at the time he was under that 
master. Twenty-seven of these heads, on four sheets of paper, were 
sold in the distinguished collection of M. Mariette, 

1775. . 541/*. 221 

1364. An antique Bit for a Horse, around which are several 
angels in attitudes of devotion. 



BUBENS. 849 

This Print was done for a book entitled Le Voyage du Prince 
Ferdinand, Infant d^Espagne. Although the name of Rubens is 
attached to the print, it is doubtful whether he made the drawing. 
The Bit here represented, which was formerly in a collection at 
Milan, is said to have been made by order of Constantine, from one 
of the nails from the cross of the Saviour. 



IS65. A Collecdon of architectural Designs of Palaces and 
Public Buildings, chiefly taken from edifices at Grenoa, was 
published in two parts, at Antwerp, in 162S, under the direc- 
tion of the artist himself. The book contains one hundred and 
thirty-nine prints, and is entitled Palazzi di GeniMj da Pietro 
Paulo Rubens. 

The three following Portraits were inserted in a Catalogue of 
the Pictures at Easton Neston, the seat of the Earl of Pomfret; 
published in 1758 :— 

1366. Lewis (or Lodowick Stuart), Duke of Richmond. 



1S67. Frances, Duchess of Richmond. 



1868. James, Duke of Richmond. 

TTteJbUawinff thirteen Pictures were in the splendid coUec^ 
tion of the Duke of Buckingham^ andjbrmed part of the 
extensive purchase he made of Rubens^ amounting to the 
sum of 10,0002. A large portion of this valuable collection 
was sent to Antwerp^ in 1647, Jor sale; several of them 
were bought by the King of Bohemia Jot his Gallery at 
Prague J and are now at Vienna ; others were selected by the 
Elector of Bavaria, and are now at Munich. 

A large Piece, being a Landscape, full of figures, horses, 

and carts. 

5Jl. by 7 ft. 7 in. 

This is probably the one now in His Majesty's Collection. — See 

p. 2$S. 



850 BUBENflk 

A Picture of tbe Queen Regent of Fnmee, mtting under a 

canopy. 

\ft. 9m.hj2ft.—F. 

Thii was probably a portrait of Marie de Medicii seated on a 

thronei receiving the homage of France. — Seep. 125, No* 418* 

A Piece representing Winter, wherdn there are nine figures. 

4A by 7 ft. 
Now in His Majesty's Collection. — See p. ft$7. 

Another large Piece, wherein are several gods and goddesses 
of the woods, and little Bacchuses. 

5 ft. 4 in. by 7ft. 6 in. 

This is probably the picture now in the Munich GaU^iy. — See 
p. 63 1 No. 179. 

Another ditto of Cymon and Iphigenia. There being in 
this picture three naked women and a man in a landscape. 

7ft. 6 in. hy\0 ft. 9 in. 
Now in the Belvidere Palace, at Vienna. — Seep. 98, No. 3Zl. 

A Fish Market, wherdn our Saviour and several other large 
figures are painted. 

9 ft. Sin. by IS ft. 9 in. — C. 
The Writer has no knowledge of this picture. 

A wild Boar Hunt, wherdn several huntsmen on foot and 
on horseback are represented. 

5 ft. 6 in. by eft.—C. 

A Landscape, with the e£Fect of Evening. 

2ft. by tft. 

The Head of an Old Woman. 

I ft. 8tn. by I ft. 4tn. 

Medusae's Head. 

2 ft. 6 1«. by 4ft. 

This is probably die picture now at Christ Church, Oxford. 



BUBEK8. 35 X 

A naked Wonum with a Hemut. 

\ft. by tft. 6 in. 
Now in the Vienna GaUery. — See No* 315, j>. 97. 

The DuchesB of Brabant with her Lover. 

5 A hy «y». 6 ia.— P. 
Now in the Vienna Gallery. — See No* 289| p. 90. 

The Three Graces with Fruit 

S/f. by 2 ft. 6 in. 
N.B. — Sir James Thomhill bought this picture at Paris, which 
was sold after his death. — Seepp, 31, 157, and 150. 



The JbOowing Subjects are inserted in ^ Caialogue of 
Hecquety and, Jbr that reason only, are they noticed by 
Basan^ to whose tcork the Writer is greatly indebted Jbr 
much information^ and as Basan has thought proper ^ Jbr the 
gratification qf the curious^ to recapitulate them^ ihe same 
motive has induced the Writer tojbllow his example^ and 
the Connoisseur may then Judge Jbr himself. 

Six emblematical subjects, vix :— • 

1. Two Infants, one of whom has its arm round the other'^s 
neck ; one of them has Ep^ctacles on, and a pair of spectacles 
in his hand, and is looking at a fly. 

S. Two Infants, one of them has a flambeau and the othec 
a pair of bellows, and is before a chimney, where stands a cup 
oontuning burning hearts. 

8. Two Infants, driving a yoke of oxen in a plough ; in the 
distance are four figures and three houses, on one of the latter 
are pigeons. 

4. Two Infants, seated on a quiver ; one of them holds a 
parasol, and the other has a fan in his hand ; a cloud obscures 
the sun. 

5. Mmerva, armed ndth a spear and a shield, accompaniedby 



852 BUBENS. 

two children, one of whom holds a toy, ,the other a bow ; an 
owl flies above. 

6. Two children, each of whom holds a pot by the handle, 
into which one of them is pouring water ; a bow and quiver 
lie in front. These m emblems are exceedingly rare. 

The preceding six suljects are engraved, anonymous. 



The following twenty-one Allegorical Subjects are without 
ather the name of the painter or the engraver, and are also 
exceedingly rare : — 

1. A Female, representing Policy, holding another female at 
her feet, by the hair of her head ; Time, who is in the back- 
ground, appears to be quitting them. 

3. Policy detaining Mars, who appears disposed to destroy a 
city, personified by a female seated on a heap of arms, crowned 
by Victory. 

3. A Female, accompanied by dogs, in pursuit of Love, whom 
she has caught in a net ; another woman follows her, blowing 
a horn ; in the front are a dog with a quiver in his mouth ; a 
boW is on the ground. 

4. A Emg on his throne, reclining in the arms of Pleasure, 
while Fame is sleeping, and angry Wisdom appears disposed to 
abandon him. 

5. A King seated on his throne between Peace and War, 
which are distinguished by their respective attributes. 

6. A Sing, driven from his throne, beholding the burning of 
aeity. 

7. Two Heroes playing at some game ; a landscape forms 
the back-ground, in which is seen Fame conducting Love. 

8. Two Warriors at table under a Tent ; a page is pouring 
out liquor for them, and the youngest is fastened by a chun to 
a female representing Wisdom. 

9. A Female seated on an elevation, with a table near her, on 
which is a quantity of books and a sphere ; she is giving a 
melon to a young man. 

10. Japus and Policy. In the back-ground is a cavern 



AUBENS. 853 

enclosing Time, and all the evils which accompany him ; a 
•serpent, emblematic of Eternity, seals the door. 

11. Policy with Fortune fastened to her wheel. An archi- 
tectural back-ground. 

12. Indiscretion, in the character of Pantaloon, dancing on a 
cord, between Hope and Fear ; these two passions are repre- 
sented by a hare and an anchor. 

IS. A Theatre, in which Heavenly and Earthly Love play 
alternately their parts. The former is showing a death'^s head 
to the spectators ; the latter, attended by Folly, appears to be 
praising the virtues of some nostrums which he holds, and which 
a young person from the crowd seems desirous to taste. 
' 14. Love delivered from captivity by two Females, repre- 
senting Giuety and Sentiment 

15. Love escaping from Labour and the controul of Duty 
4nd Subordinatoon. The latter is represented by a female 
seated with a bridle in her hands and a ferula at her feet. 

16. Love, blind-folded, turning his back on Virtue, and 
running to the brink of a precipice. 

17. Love in the arms of Death. At a little distance, to the 
right, are four skeletons drawing Love in a car ; and on the 
opposite side are four others cutting Love to pieces. 

18. A Female and a young Man embracing before a looking- 
glass. 

. 19. A Female in bed receiving an Infant who is quitting an 
egg-sheU ; by her side are Venus and Love ; in the back-ground 
ia Love elevated upon an altar, and several people adoring him. 

M. A Man, enticed by Love and Folly, is detained by an 
Infant, which a woman holds in her arms. 

21. A Shepherdess seated at the foot of a tree, weeping over 
a head which she holds on her knees ; the body lies near her ; 
Time and two other figures appear to be consoling her. 



. The following have still less claim than the preceding to be 
•fittributed to Rubens, bdng also without either the names of 
painter or engraver : — 

VOL. II. A A 



S54 l^UB£N& 

1. An Eagle, covering a young one with her wings. 

S. An Eagle, whose wings are covered with escutcheons bear- 
ing the arms of Austria and Spain. Four young eagles are 
looking steadfastly at the sun, in the centre of which isa chaho& 

3. An Eagle, holding in its beak the arms of the Cardinal 
Infimt of Spain, in one of its talons a chalice, and in the other a 
blazing sword. 

4b An Eagle, armed with a thunderbolt, combating a 



Allegorical subjects relating to the Eucharist:— 

1 . An Altar, on which is placed a chalice, at the ride of whidi 
are two figures, emblems of the bread and wine, which seem to 
be vanishing. 

S. An Angel, whose head is reflected in a broken mirror. 

3. An Angel, with a flambeau, at which three other Angek 
are lighting torches. 

4. Three little Angels, one of whom is depicting the arch of 
Union, a second the emblem of Invitation or Proposal, and the 
third the Paschal Lamb. The elements of the sacrament are 
seen above, surrounded with a glory. 



A set of four emblems without signatures : — 

1. Fortune presenting, in emblems, several Cities to an Infant, 
who is armed with a cuirass. 

S. Amphion raising the walls of Thebes by the muric of his 
Lyre. 

S. A Trophy of Arms, erected in the centre of a number of 
warriors. 

4. A Rainbow. 



1. An Escutcheon, containing a table on which two hands 
appear from under a doud, and are marking geometrical lines, 

S. A Coffer on a table, which a hand, appearing fincun under 
a cloud, is opening. 



RUBENS. 855 

8. A Tid)lety in the centre of wbich is an open book with the 
words In ScriipiurA Veritas appearing on its pages. 

4. A Vme surrounded with armorial Bearings; to its 
branches are attached mitres, crowns, and instruments relating 
to the church ; at the sides are two angels pressing the juice of 
grapes into a chalice. 



ADDENDA. 

1369. Portrait of a (rentleman (probably of a G^oese 
ambassador to the court of Spain) when about sixty years of 
age, of a thin countenance, represented in a three^uarter 
view, with scanty beard, mustacheos, and gray hair. He has 
on a marone-colour ulk bonnet with full lappets at the ades, 
edged with gpld lace, and rich oik robe of the same colour; a 
full ruff adorns the neck, and the Order of the Grolden Fleece, 
appended to a gold chain set with jewels, is suspended in front; 
the left hand rests on the top of a cane, and the right is con- 
cealed under the dress. The back-ground is composed of 
curtains; the upper one, being of a tawny yellow, crosses the 
jHCture, and is attached to a pillar at the side. This excellent 
portnut was painted by the artist in Spain. 

4fi. d| in. by 4fi. 1 in.— C. 

Now in the collection of Sir Henry Bunbiiryf Bart. 



1370. Portrait of a Monk, styled the Confessor of Rubens 
He is habited in the dress of the Order of St Francis. 

Sfi. 6 in. by 2/t. 6 in. (about.) 
Now in the Doria Palace, Rome. 



1371. Portraits of a Lady and Gentleman. The former is 
distinguished for its brilliancy of colour and admirable finishing. 

4f/t. by 3ft. 4 in.—C. (about.) 
Now in the Doria Palace. 



SCHOLARS AND IMITATORS 



OF 



RUBENS. 



In recording the Dames of those able scholars and coadjutors 
whose talents and exertions have so much contributed to the 
fame of Rubens, it seems but just that the lustre which adorns 
his name should shed some of its glories on those who have had' 
so large a share in the furtherance of his great works, and 
whose skill in the executive part of the art approached so near 
to his as to be often mistaken for his actual performance. 
Among these the following are the most eminent 

Anthony Van Dyck, whose pre-eminent talents, when in 
the school of Rubens, not only placed him at the head of his 
fellow students, but also acquired for him the honourable title 
of the prince of his scholars ; his accomplished skill in the 
system of his instructor, accompanied by his own natural- 
genius, enabled him to imitate to such perf^tion the style and 
manner of his master, that in one instance he is said to have 
deceived even his penetration ; it may, therefore, readily be 
conceived that, with such an assistant, little more than the 
conception or sketch of the master was necessary to the pro- 
duction of a work worthy of the name of the principal. 

. Justus Van Egmont. He was also a scholar of Rubens, 
and is recorded to have been one of his most active pupils, in 
forwarding many of the large altar-pieces produced at that 
period, and also the splendid series of pictures illustrative of 
the life of Marie de Medicis. Very little is known of this 
painter after he quitted his master; some biographers stating 



^HOLARS AND IMITATORS. 357 

tliat he died y<mng (and in this opinion the Writer is disposed to 
eoindde); others state that he went to Paris, and became 
an asfflstant to Simon Vouet. A few portraits only are all that 
the Writer has seen of this painter*s authenticated works, and 
these were very inferior to those of bis master^s productions of 
a amilar class. 

Theodobe Van Trulden. Few of Rubens^s scholars 
deserve more honourable mention than this pfunter, whose 
dedded predilection for the art procured him, at an early 
age, admittance into this eminent school, in which he soon 
distinguished himself by the facility of his handling and a 
remarkable aptitude in imitating his instructor; his talents 
were, therefore, in constant exercise, either in copying or 
forwarding large works; his ready hand could adapt itself, 
with equal success, dther to large or small jnctures. He 
possessed a more universal genius than most of his com 
temporaries, and painted history, battle-pieces, conversations, 
merry-makings, and landscapes ; he also introduced figures into 
the jHctures of other artists, such as the interior views of 
churchea by Neefs, the landscapes by Wildens and Mompers, 
and the game-pieces by Snyders. He appears to have retuned 
the friendship and occasional employment of Rubens, and was 
one of the principal artists engaged by him in executing his 
splendid deigns for the triumphal arches erected in honour of 
Ferdinand, in 1635. These are freely etched by his hand, in 
a set of thirty-one plates ; he also etched about ninety plates^ 
after pictures and designs of his own. His original works^ 
however, bear no comparison to the excellence of his master^s^ 
whose defects he always exaggerated, his forms bdng heavy 
and his drawing incorrect ; nor is his colouring less defective, 
from the frequent predominance of pinky tones, and the violent 
reflexes of colours. He was bom at Bois-le-Duc, in 1607, and 
died in 1676, aged axty-nine. 

Abraham Vak Diefenbeck. The genius of this artisi 



858 SCHOLABS AND IMITATORfl» 

was first devekq)ed by his skill in pmnting oa glasK, but h^ 
«oon discovered diat this pursuit was both limited and un- 
certain in its results; he therefore quitted it to enter the sdiool 
of Rubens, where his genius receiTed a suitable direction^ and 
his zealous study and application were attended with corre- 
spending success. Like the rest of his feIlow*studentSy his 
pendl was soon made available by the intelligent lessons of his 
instructor, and the examples of those around him. The su* 
perior education he had previously recaved, and a journey 
made to Italy, gave him advantages of which he early exhilnted 
proofs, by a ready invention, which, added to a perfect know«. 
ledge of drawing and great dexterity in handling, enabled him 
to surpass most of those in the same school with himself. His 
historical productions, both in large and small, are very w^ 
merous, as are also his designs for frontispieces of books and 
vignettes; these latter are painted in a free sketchy mann^, 
approaching the style of his master, with this difference^ how* 
ever, that his forms are more meagre, his oompodticHi less 
united^ and his expression veiy inferior. Upon the whole, his 
general style and colouring approach nearer to Van Dydk'*s 
than to those of Rubens. He was bom at Bois-le-Duc, in 1607, 
and died in 1675, aged sixty-^ght. 

Jacques Jobdabns. This excellent painter was bom at 
Antwerp, in 1594, and became a scholar of Adam Van Ooidt, 
whose vidous conduct and bmtal manners disgusted Rubens, 
and corrapted Jordaens. Upon quitting this master he cntoed 
the studio of Rubens, under whom he acquired a style of 
painting and colouring which approaches very near to those 
of his master, and ultimately proved, by numerous original 
productions, that he inherited a genius of no common miler* 
There can be little doubt that, had he received 4* suit^ 
able educatbn, and been properly initiated into the sdenoe 
of the art by his first instructor, he would have become an 
artist of great eminence. This opinion is supported by many 
excellent historical pictures, oompoaed in a style fittle iitferior 



SCHOLAKS ANB IMITATORS. 859 

to that of Rubens, and painted with a power of handling and 
brilliancy of colour second to no one ; neither of these qualities, 
however admirable in themselves, can compensate for the 
ignoble expressions and vulgarity of forms which appear in most 
of his works. One of his grandest productions is in the House 
in the Wood, at the Hague; it represents a triumphal entry 
of Frederick William Prince of Orange. Another cajntal 
work by his hand is in the chapel at Blenheim— a Descent 
from the Cross. He died in 1678, aged eighty-four. 

P£TBB Van Mol. That the works of this painter are so 
UtUe known must be attributed, in a great measure, to their 
being frequently ascribed to Rubens, of whom it is said he 
learned the art of painting, and was, for many years, employed 
by him in forwarding his works. The original pictures 
of Van Mol are coarse imitations of hb master's, possessing 
aU his defects but none of his beauties. He was bom at 
Antwerp, in 1580, and died at Paris, in 1650. 

CoBKBLius ScHUT. This artist was bom at Antwerp, in 
1000, and became a disciple of Rubens, and ultimately one of 
his most eminent scholars ; possesring a poetical genius and a 
ready invention, he was enabled to imitate the historical and 
allq^rical compositions of his master. He painted many large 
pictures for churches and public buildings; among these may 
be enumerated the cupola of Notre Dame, at Antwerp, ** the 
Martyrdom of St George,^ now in the Academy of the same 
city, and an Assumption, formeriy in the church of the Jesuits 
at Ghent His latter pictures have a greater resemblance to 
the style and colouring of Van Dyck than to that of his 
master. He died in 1660, aged rixty, 

JoHK Van Hoeck. He was one of the many puinls and 
active assistants of Rubens, and is mentioned as being an artist 
of conriderable alnlities. On quitting his master, he travelled 
to Italy for improvement; and on his return, was invitted by 



360 SCHOLARS AND IMITATOBS.* 

the Emperor Ferdinand II. to Vienna, where 'he received 
constant employment fin: his pencil, and painted many altar- 
pieces for churches in that city and at Prague, and also 
nuinerous portraits; but although the school from whence be 
imbibed his knowledge of painting may be traced through his 
works, they are too far removed from the style of his master to 
be mistaken for them. 

Simon be Vos. This excellent disciple of Rubens was 
bom at Antwerp, in 1603 ; he commenced his studies at an 
early age, and from the period of his enteriiig the school was 
influenced by a laudable ambition to imitate his master^s works, 
in which he ultimately became an accomplished adept He 
painted both history and portraiture with eonnderable success, 
particularly the latter, in which he was greatly admired ^for the 
clearness and brilliancy of his colouring, and the extraordinary 
neatness of the finishing; and it may justly be said of him,, 
that not any one of the school possessed greater capability of 
imitating deceptively the easel pictures of his master. In the 
Academy at Antwerp is an excellent pcture by his hand, 
representing the Adoration of the Magi. There is also an 
ex-voto, possessing great merit Sir Joshua Reynolds, in bis 
Tour through Flanders, very highly commends his portraits. 
He died in 166S, aged fifty-nine. 

Peter Soutman. A name rendered more familiar to the 
amateur by the production of many excellent engravings after 
Rubens than by pictures in his style ; he, however, learnt the 
art of painting in this school, and practised it occasionally 
during his life. His works consist chiefly of portraiture, many 
of which are in Germany and Italy ; these partake of a style 
and colouring between Rubens and Van Dyck. He was bom 
about the year 1590, and died m 1653, aged sixty-three. 

Deopato Delmont. He was bom in 1581 '; his family, 
being persons of opulence, gave him a liberal education, and^ in 



SCHOLARS AND IMITATORS. S6l 

^accordance with the Inas of his inclination, placed him under 
the care of Rubens, with whom he travelled to Italy, where he 
distinguished himself by his talents in architecture and punt- 
ing; he was subsequently employed many years by the Duke 
of Nieubourg, who conferred on him the honour of knighthood. 
He died in 1634, aged fifty-three. 

Samuel Hoffman. This painter was bom at Zurich, in 
il589; after studying the art for some time in his owil 
country he travelled to Flanders, and found means sufficient 
to enable him to enter the school of Rubens; he appears^ 
however, to have possessed but very moderate abiUties, and 
rose to no distinction by his subsequent works, which consist of 
history, portraiture, and objects of still life. He died in 1648, 
aged fifty-nine. 

Erasmus Qukllinus. The pursuit of painting was an 
ulterior choice with this artist, who, to a certain age, hail 
followed the study of natural philosophy, in which science he 
rose to the honour of a professorship in the coll^ of his native 
<nty. An insurmountable propensity for drawing induced him 
to vacate the distinguished situation which he had previously 
acquired, and to place himself under the tuition of Rubens ; 
"with such an instructor, seconded by his own zealous applica- 
tion, he attained considerable eminence among his contempora- 
ries ; and being gifted with a quickness of invention and great 
facility in execution, he was enabled to produce a vast number 
of pictures, both of a lai^ and a cabinet size. The greater part 
of his works, both in the drawing and colouring, approximate 
nearer to Van Dyck^s than to those of Rubens. Many of this 
master^s pictures are totally destroyed, in consequence of their 
having been painted on the brown Italian ground so much 
in vogue at that period. He was bom in 1607, and died in 
1678, aged seventy-one. 

Francis Woutebs. He was a disciple of Rubens, in 
whose school he distinguished himself for his taste in landscape 



862 SCHOLAUS AND IMITATORS; 

painting, and he was odnaequently more engaged in thai 
deportment than in any other ; he did not, however, neglect 
the study of the figure, of which he attained a suffidnit know* 
ledge to paint historical subjects of a small size: but his chief 
delight was in representing forests and sylvan scenes, whidi be 
painted with a broad free pencil and a fresh verdant tone of 
colour, and usually introduced in them subjects taken £tom 
Heathen Mythology, such as Diana and her nymphs. Pan 
and Syrinx, Venus and Adonis, && : these are painted in a 
style and colour exactly like his master^ to whom they are 
occasionally attributed^ Tins artist visited England in 16S7, 
where he was appointed chief painter to the Prince of Wales, 
afterwards Charles II., and subsequently became Director of the 
Academy at Antwerp ; his death was prematurely caused by the 
accidental discharge of a gun, in 1659, when he was forty-fiva 

JoHK Thomas. This painter was also numbered among 
the scholars of Rubens; possesmng considerable abilities, 
he distinguished himself by the production of many dever his*- 
torical works, all of which mark distinctly the school from 
whence he acquired his knowledge. A deare for improvement 
induced him to accompany his friend and fellow-student, 
Diepoibeck, to Italy ; and he ultimately settled in Germany, 
where he had the honour of bdng appointed principal painter 
to the Emperor Leopold, with a ccm&idarable pension. He 
executed a few etchings in a free and spirited manner; thej 
show to advanti^ his style and manner of composing. He 
was bom at Ypres, in 1610, and died in 167S. 

Nicholas Vamdeb Hobst. He was IxMrn at Antwerp^ in 
159S ; having workied a few years in the school of Rubens, 
and made a journey to Italy, he found himself sufBdendy 
qualified to ex^cise hb profession. He settled at Brussels, and 
painted history and portraiture ; but none of his works ris^ 
above mediocrity. He died in 1646, aged forty-eight. 

WiLLEAM Pahveels. Whatever may have been the talents 



SCHOLABS AKD IMITATORS. 863 

^ of this punter, whose name is registered among the pujnls of 

iE this transcendent school, he is only known to the connoisseur 

9- by nmnerouS' spirited etchings, done from pictures (chiefly 

\£ sketches) by Rubens. He was a native of Antwerp, and bom 

k about the year 1600. 

i 

a Matthts (or Matbius) Vanben Berg. He was a disciple 

i of Rubens, but did not arrive at any distinction as an original 

painteiv having chiefly occupied himself in copying or imitating 



11 



e his master^s works. He was bom in 1615, and died in 1687. 



s 



David Tskibbs, called the Elder. Were it not that writers 
^ have uniformly classed this artist among the scholars of Rubens, 

^ the litde similarity existing between their works would never 

have occasioned such an opinion. He was bom at Antwerp, 

in 1582, and died in 1640. 



I 



t 

» 
I 
I 

i 



Theodqrs Bostebmams. He was instructed in the art of 
painting by Rubens, under whom he obtained some reputation 
lor his skill in drawing, and subsequently produced several 
historical compoations, which were greatly admired; he pos- 
sessed oonaderable dexterity in handling, and could with &cility 
adapt his pendl to painting figures, ather of a laige or small 
size, by which means he became frequently useful in embellishing 
the {nctures of other artists with figures, particularly the land- 
scapes by. Grenoels; architectural views, by Van Dalen; and 
huntii^-pieoes by Fyt and P. de Yos. He does not appear 
to haive implicitly followed the manner of his tutor, his style 
and colouring being much more like Van Dyck^s. 



IMITATORS AND ANALOGOUS PAINTERS. 

Fbahcis Sntdees, whose eminent talents as an animal 
painter render him worthy to be enrolled as one of the most 
valuable coadjiutors of Rubens, was bom at Antwerp, in 1575, 



8641 SCHOLARS AND IMITATORS. 

and instructed in the art by Henry Van Baelen, witb whom he 
appears to have learnt little more than the first prindpleel 
of paidUng. On quitting this master he followed the bent 
of his own genius, commencing witb fruit and other objects of 
still life, to which he subsequently added the study of wild 
animals. In this latter pursuit he was doubtless much 
assisted and encouraged by Rubens, who highly appreciated 
his talents, and employed him extensively for many years. To 
the advantage of working conjointly with such a master, may 
be attributed the excellence to which he ultimately attained in 
his peculiar department of the art. Of the variety of subjects 
treated by his pencil, his genius is most conspicuous in hunts of 
the bear and wild boar ; in these he displayed a correct know- 
ledge of the diversity of action and strong excitement exhiUted 
ifi such pursuits. The natural propensities of the dogs in the 
attack, and the sturdy and sanguinary re^stance of their oppo- 
nents, are depicted with spirit, energy, and truth. His produc- 
tions of this kind are exceedingly admired ; but in a representa- 
tion of the nobler animals he was evidently less successful : his 
lions, however accurately delineated, frequently required the 
hand of Rubens to ^ve them the fire and ferodty of expression 
characteristic of that quadruped ; and it does not appear that 
he ever attempted to portray the horse. The most estimable 
works of this artist are those in which are incorporated the 
figures of Rubens, and those which were painted during that 
artist's life. In the absence of that great painter, he had 
recourse to the assistance of Van Thulden, Wouters, Boeyer- 
mans, and other artists of the school. It is but just to observe, 
that the reputation of Snyders is sometimes injured by the 
imposition of pictures by his pupils, Jurian Jaoobz and Peter 
Boel ; but those of a third scholar, Paul de Vos, are occa^ 
tonally worthy the name of Snyders, He died in 1657> 
aged seventy-eight 

John Wildeks. A name so frequently associated with that' 
qf Rubens> that nothing more need be said to prove that be. 



SCHOLAES AND IMITATORS. 865 

was an excellent artist. No mendon is made by whom he was 
taught the art of painting, but his works show that nature was 
the source from whence he acquired his best information. His 
landscapes (to which he exclusively confined himself) exhibit 
every variety that nature offers in mountain and vale, wood 
and water, composed in a grand style, and admirably adapted 
to the diversity of subject witli which they are usually adorned 
by the pencil of Rubens and Snyders. If subjects of the 
chase are represented, the scene shows a wild and sterile 
country, finely relieved by a bright sky and an agreeable 
dispersion of sunshine and shade; but if intended for the 
residence of Pan and other fabled beings of the poets, then 
appears the thick Arcadian groves, and the rich luxuriant 
vine. To an invention ever ready and appropriate, he added 
the most masterly freedom of handling and rapidity of execu- 
tion. Hb colouring is rich and transparent, and at all times 
skilfully harmonized with those of his coadjutors. His talents 
must have been in almost constant requisition by Rubens 
and Snyders, although he occasionally assisted Diepenbeck, 
Lang Jan, and other painters of the school. He was bom at 
Antwerp, in 1584, and died in 1644. 

Lucas Van Ussn. He had the advantage of bang the 
son of a painter, and was consequently instructed at an early 
age in the several rudiments of the art ; having properly acquired 
these, he then made nature his constant study, and by that 
means attained a degree of excellence which places him among 
the best landscape painters of that period. With Rubens, 
every man of genius was admired and respected, and he seems 
to have taken a peculiar pleasure in promoting an union of hia 
own with their works, which he effected so skilfully that those 
pictures appear to be the production of one and the same 
band. The landscapes of Van Ud«i usually represent hillyi 
soenery finely diversified with wood and water, enlivened by 
the setting sun, or the partial gleams of that luminary. His 
pencilling, particularly in the foliage of his trees, is tender and 
delicate; his colouring exceedingly transparent, and well 



866 SCHOLARS AND IMITATOB& 

adapted for the back-grounds of Rubens^ eaael pictures; and^ 
when so employed, he imitated the broad free toudi of that 
master with admirable success. This practice, united te Us 
own suitable style, gave him the means and facility of oc^ying 
and imitating the landscapes by Rubens more dec e ptively than 
any other ardst of that schooL Van Uden was bom at 
Antwerp in 1595, and died in 1660. 

JossB (or JoDOCOs) MoMFSEs. That an artist poa ocao ing 
the superior talents of Mompers should have escaped the 
notice of the early biographers, can only be explained by sup 
poang that, like many writers of this class, they more fie> 
quently borrowed from others than quoted from their own 
knowledge of the subject. He u sujqposed to have been ban 
about 1589 ; and as his style and manner of painting resembles 
those of Loub Vadder, it is very probable that be was first 
instructed in the art by that master. His pctures generally 
represent bold mountainous views, intersected by ravines or 
deep valleys; these are painted with a firm free hand, but leas 
transparent in colour than is usual to artists in this school, and 
his works require to be viewed at a certain distance in order 
to appreciate thdr excellence; but, when so viewed, they 
present to the eye of the connoisseur a satisfieictory proof 
that he was an artist of real genius. Rubens saw and 
admired his talents, and assodated the productions of his 
pencil with his own. It is the Writer^s o^uniou that this artist 
accompanied Rubens to Spain, where be asasted him in sudi 
pictures as required a landscape back-ground. He also copied 
with admirable success the landscapes of Rubens, and could 
skilfully introduce such alterations as to give them the ap- 
pearance of original compomtions. One of this painter's moat 
capital productions, representing a view of the Escurial and 
surrounding mountains, is in the collection of the Earl of Radnor ; 
such is its excellence that it has constantiy been attributed to 
the hand of Rubens, and it is no injury to the reputation of 
that artist to think it so. 



SCHOLARS AND IMITATORS. 867 

. Mabtik Pxpik. Of this contempcHvoy of Rubens y&j 
little authentic information is given by biographers ; neither the 
master by whom he was instructed, the place of his reffldence, 
nor the time of his decease,, are correctly known. Hu style 
of painting would induce an opinion that he was instructed by 
Otho Voenius ; be this as it may, it is said that he went while 
young to Italy, where he acquired, by bis talents, an excellent 
reputation ; in further confirmation of tins it is added, that when 
a rumour was spread at Antwerp of his intended return, even 
Rubens felt some upeasiness, and was heard to state, that be 
(Pepin) was the only artist capable of competing with him for 
the pahn of superiority. All this is probably mere fiction: 
if this painter had spent the greater part of his life in Italy, as 
is stated, his works would unquestionably be known in that 
country, and appear in the public galleries ; this, however, is 
not the fact, and as there are a number of his pictures in the 
Low Countries, it is much more likely that he spent a large 
portion of his time there : this probability is further corrobo- 
rated by the time when his portrait was painted in Flanders, 
by Van Dyck, namely, about the year 1628. The few pictures 
by his hand, which have come under the Writers view, bear 
considerable resemblance to the manner of Rubens ; one of these, 
representing St. Norbert, is in the church of Notre Dame, at 
Antwerp, and there are three others in the Academy of that 
city. He was bom at Antwerp, in 1578, and died about 1685. 

Gebabd Seghers. The similarity of this distinguished 
painters works to those of Rubens consosts more in the form 
and similitude of the figures than in the brilliancy of the colour* 
ing, but even in this particular many of his latter works are by 
no means defident; th^ diflerence condsting chiefly in the 
shadows having a tendency to brown, and a slight degree of 
hardness in the outlines and in the marking of the features, 
with a palpable defidency in that animated expression whidi 
is ever the distinguishing characteristic of Rubens. Van Baelen 
and Jansens were his first instructors in painting; to improve 



368 SCHOLARS AND IMITARORS^ 

his taste he went to Italy, where he first attempted an imitation 
of the style of Caravaggio, whose broad shadows and powerful 
effects were then greatly admired, and subsequently placed him- 
self under the tuition of Manfredi. On his return to his native 
city he exhibited his works in the newly-^acquired style, which 
he found so little admired by his countrymen that he abandoned 
it, and adopted the luminous colouring of the Flemish school, 
which he ever after retained. Many of this master'*s best works 
have been engraved by Vosterman and Bolswert. He was bom 
in 15899 and died in 1651, aged sixty-two. 

Gaspar de Cbayer. Of the many excellent Flemish artists 
of the sixteenth century, none stand higher in succession to 
Bubens, as an historical painter, or more worthy of commenda- 
tion, than de Grayer. He was bom at Antwerp in 1583. His 
knowledge of the rudiments of the art was derived from Michael 
Coxcie, the rest he achieved by his own superior genius. En- 
dowed with a fertile invention, a sound judgment, and correct 
taste, he composed and executed a vast number of capital pic- 
tures for churches and other public buildings ; these occupied 
so large a portion of his time that easel pictures and portraits by 
his hand are exceedingly rare. One of his grandest works, 
representing the Exaltation of the Virgin and Infant Saviour, is 
in the Public Grallery at Augsburg, and there are several fine 
pictures by his hand in the Musee at Brussels. His colouring 
b much less transparent than that of Rubens ; his handling re- 
markably clean and sharp ; and his effects broad and luminous. 
His figures, although admirably drawn, have too much the ap- 
pearance of having been painted after living models to be properly 
historical. Rubens was fully sensible of the merit of this artistes 
productions, and paid due homage to his talebts by an exclama^ 
tion (made on viewing one of his pictures), *^ Grayer, nobody 
will surpass you."^ He died in 1669} aged eighty-seven. 



SCHOLARS AND IMITATOES. 369 

- Having enumerated the principal scholars and imitators of 
Rnbens, and pven a brief description of the pecuUarities 
which characterise their several performances, a few general 
observations are necessary. 

Firsibff That these pupils, while in the painting academy 
of Rubens, under his guidance and correction^ copied hi^ 
works with almost deceptive success, often varying from the 
originals so as to produce the appearance of new composi- 
tions. These pictures, whether retouched by his hand or not, 
will conunue to pass, as they hitherto have done, under hb 
name. 

Secondly^ It is evident that several of his scholars conti- 
nued, after quitting him, to copy and imitate his pictures ; 
sometimes of a smaller size than the ori^nals, and occasionally 
with variations and omissions : but these, although possessing 
ihe colour, have neither the expresaon, force, nor freedom in 
execution, of their prototypes ; they are nevertheless attributed 
to his pendl, and it is frequently a painful task to con- 
noisseurs to express a doubt as to their originality. 

Thirdly^ That, with the exception of a few of the early 
pictures by Van Dyck, the works of nearly the whole of these 
scholars are remarkable for the meagre drawing of their 
figures, instead of the bold roundness of form and sweeping 
outline inseparable from the genuine works of Rubens. Their 
colouring also is frequently feeble, or tending to brown or 
pinky gray, instead of the vigorous freshness and purity of the 
master. The few that retained the nearest resemblance to his 
forms and colour too frequently exaggerated his defects; such 
instances are exemplified in the pictures by Van Thulden, 
VanMol, and Jordaens. 

LasOy^ That with the exception of Van Dyck, Diepenbeck, 
Jordaens, and Schut, the original pictures of the rest of the 
scholars are defective in comporition and keeping, which shows 
that however skilful they were in the executive part, the master- 
mind of Rubens was the creator, director, and guide, in all 
those great compontions that bear his name. That they could 

VOL. II. B B 



370 SCBOLABS AND IMITATOBS. 

seize and embody the ooDcepdon of tbdr master (and that fire- 
quently from dight intimatknis) b proof that, though vastly 
inferior to him, they had some pordon of his genius ; and their 
occasional deviations from and alterations of his compoatians, 
that they would have been more distinguished as original 
painters, if by force of habit they had not become his imitators. 



CLASSIFICATION OF SUBJECTS 



AS ARRANOBD IN THE FOLLOWING 



INDEX. 



OLD TESTAMENT. 

NEW TESTAMENT. 

HOLY FAMILIES. 

SACRED SUBJECTS, BLENDED WITH SAINTS AND RELI- 
GIOUS LEGENDS. 

RELATING TO THE VIRGIN. 

SAINTS, APOSTLES, MONKS, PRIESTS, ftc— SINGLE FIGURES 
AND HEADS. 

HISTORICAL. 

MYTHOLOGICAL. 

ALLEGORICAL, AND HISTORICAL BLENDED WITH ALLE- 
GORY. 

FANCY AND FAMILIAR SUBJECTS. 

PORTRAITS. 

HUNTS OF WILD ANIMALS, && 

DEAD GAME AND LARDERS. 

LANDSCAPES. 

FRONTISPIECES, VIGNETTES, AND MEDALS. 



INDEX. 



OLD TESTAMENT. 

Na Page 

SS. ABIMELECH giving the Sacred Bread to David . . 16 

42. Abraham about to sacrifice Isaac 17 

346. Same subject Potsdam. 105 

379. Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden . • Hague, 113 

459. Same subject EscuriaL 15S 

592. Abigail meeting David with Presents. P.Methuen^Esq. . 170 

659. Abimelech with Abraham and Sarah 187 

779. Abraham sending away Hagar and IshmaeL 

. . Earl GfOKOMT. 217 
912. Abel lying dead on the fore-ground of a Landscape. 

Duke of Bedford. . 270 

Bathsheba at the Fountain. Rubens's Catalogue^ Lot 87. 31 

595. Same subject ...... . . • . ... . • . 171 

944. Bathsheba receiving a Letter from David . • • • . 28.1 

1 076. Bathsheba seated near a fountain, attended by her women 299 

1029. Cain skying his brother Abel 295 

36. David cutting off the Head of Goliah : 16 

562. Daniel in the Den of Lions • • Duke of HanuUon. 162 

580. David slaying a Lion 168 

900. David strangling a Bear 266 

937. David, with the. Elders of Israel, removing the Ark* 

' Earl Spencer. 278 

46. Ehjah translated 17 

48. Esther beforie Ahasuerus t6. 

999. Same subject 289 

643. Same subject ••.••... Mr^ Norton. . 184 

802. Same subject . • ^ . • ^ 2^5 

386. Ehjah fed by an Angel in the Desert . . . Louvre. .114' 

505. Same subject. A sketch 142 



374 OLD TESTAMENT. 

Na Page 

1235. Ezekiel'8 Vision. A drmwing after Raffaelle . • . dS8 

604. Hagar and Ishmael in the Desert 17d 

44. Joseph promoted by Pharaoh 17 

132. Jonas cast into the Sea Maiines, 46 

151. Job in the extremity of his suffering, seated on a dung- 

heap • . . • . 54 

244. Same subject. A sketch Munich, 79 

201. Jacob and Esau meeting Munich, 68 

639. Same subject. A study .183 

1233. Jacob and Esau. A drawing by Raffiielle, retouched 

by Rubens 328 

500. Israelites gathering Manna in the Wilderness. 

Earl Groivenor, 140 

607. Joshua overcoming the Amalekites 173 

1001. Judith cutting off the Head of Holofernes .... 290 

1002. Judith putting the Head of Holofernes into a Sack . t6. 
403. Lot and his Family fleeing from Sodom . • Louvre. 120 

826. Same subject Marlborough. 241 

839. Lot in the Cave with his Daughters . Marlborough. 247 

1077, 1078, & 1079. Same subject. Three descriptions . . 299 

40. Moses with Aaron and Urr 16 

S76. Melchizedeck supplying Abraham with Bread and 

Wine HeueCassel 110 

504. Same suhject Earl Gronenor. 141 

641. Same subject. A finished study. Dowtiger Lady Stuart. 184 
1242. Same subject. A drawing 329 

1 12. Maccabees, Martyrdom of the ^ 

34. Sheba (Queen) before Solomon 16 

642. Same subject A sketch .... Mr. Nortmt. 184 
1096. Same subject. Composed of ten figures 302 

Susanna and the Elders. Rubenis Cat.99.lSl ^ 162. 81 &33 

598. Same subject. A study 172 

220. Same subject Munich. 73 

344. Same subject Potsdam. 105 

186. Samson and Delilah Mtmich. 65 

1009. Same subject « i , 291 

193. Sennacherib and his Host destroyed . « • Munich. 66 



NEW TESTAMENT. 37^ 

No. i^gv 

12S1. Same robject. A pen drawing St7 

194. Same tubject. A study 67 

S5S. Sequent (Elevation of) in the Wilderness . PoUdam. 107 

461. Same subject EscunaL 133 

769. Same subject T. B. H. Omen^ Esq. %\S 

579. Samson slaying a Lion 168 

939. Solomon, the Judgment of. Ten figures 279 

1008. Samuel offering Sacrifice on the Recovery of the Ark . 291 

130. Tobit and the Angel Maimes. 46 



NEW TESTAMENT. 

14. Angelsy two. These were cut out to the form of the figure 8 

17. Adoration of the Magi, composed of twelve figures 

Antwerp. 9 

Same subject . • . Rt^fem^i CakUoguef Lot 105, 34 

35. Same subject 16 

113. Same subject, composed of twenty-four figures • • 39 

119. Same subject, composed of seventeen figures • • • 41 

126. Same subject. Composed of twenty figures MaUnet^ 43 

Same subject. A study for ditto Marquis of Bute. 45 
140 & 388. Same subject, ten figures . • • Louvre. 49 & 115 

840. Same subject. A duplicate of ditto . Marlborough. 247 

154. Same subject, composed of twenty figures Brussels, 54 
156 & 776. Same subject, eleven figures Earl Grosvenor 55 & 218 

157. Same subject. A study .... Van Sasseghem, 55 

347. Same subject Potsdam. 106 

694. Same subject. A study ^ . • • • 195 

472. Same subject, in which is the Portrait of Rubens. Escurigd. 135 

781. Adorationof the Shepherds 220 

629. Same subject 180 

714. Same subject. A study. Sale of Sir Joshua Reynolds. 198 

935. Same subject The Virgin is seated near an old building 278 

45. Ascension of our Lord Jesuits^ churchy destroyed. 17 

Annunciation. — See subjects rekUing to the Virgin. 

796. Adultery, the Woman taken in . J. P, Miles, Eeq. 223 



376 NEW TESTAMENT. 

No. P^e 

S4. Adoration of the Shepherds. A basket of eggs and 

.two fowls \ft 

672. Same subject. A study for ditto 190 

117. Same subject, composed of eleven figures .... 40 

127. Same subject 45 

162. Same subject. One of the females holds an egg . . 58 
170. Same subject. One of the shepherds carries a bagpipe 

Mwuck* 60 

236. Same subject A study Mwuch. 77 

9SZ, Same subjecL The Virgin kneels on a broken column 277 

93S. Same subject. The Virgin sits at the head of the In&nt t6. 

ISO. Andrew (St.) leaning on his Cross . . • Maiines, 46 

440. Andrew (St.) Martyrdom of Madrid. ISO 

441. Study for ditto Sir Thomas Lawrence. ib. 

1. Cross, the Elevation of the Antwerp. 1 

2. Studies for ditto . . . Jeremiah Harmam^ Esq. 2 
1242. Cross, the Elevation of the. A drawing .... 329 

41. Same subject .- .* • Ceiling ef the Jesmts' church. 16 

5. Cross, the Descent firom the Antwerp. S 

614. Study for ditto 177 

116. Cross, the Descent from the, composed of nine figures 40 

946. Same subject 281 

138. Same subject Liere. 48 

Christ on the Cross Rubens' s Catalogue^ Lot 144. 33 

12. 85, 86, & 87. Same subject 8. 25 & 26 

122 8c 128. Same subject Antwerp. 42 & 45 

133. Same subject Malines. 46 

203. Same subject • . Munich. 69 

596. Same subject . • 171 

611. Same subject 174 

724. Same sulject . Sir S. Clarke. 200 

1025, 1026, 1027, & 1028. Same subject 293 

9. Christ triumphant over Sin and Death . • • . • 8 

515. Same subject Florence. 147 

597. Same subject 171 

757. Christ rising from the Dead. — See also Resurrection. - 211 

Christ discovering himself to his Disciples at Emmaus 38 



NEW TESTAMENT. 377 

No. Page 

246. Christ disoovering himself to his Disciples at Emmaus 

Munich, 79 

443. Same subject • • • Eicurial, 131 

602. Same subject 172 

921. Christ journeying with his Disciples to Emmaus . . 27d 

ISl. Christ walking on the Sea • ... . • . Malines* 46 

145. Christ's Charge to Peter . . . Prince of Orange, 51 

146. Same subject, differently composed Fan Lanckeren, 52 
159, Christ bearing his Cross to Calvary • • BrusseU, 56 
160 & 384. Study for ditto .... Amsterdam, 57 & 114 
320. Christ holding his Cross Vienna, 98 

534. Christ crowned with Thorns • • . . ^ . • • 152 

601. Christ, a dead. A study 172 

797. Christ bearing his Cross. A study 224 

1006. Christ's Agony in the Garden 290 

778. Christ appearing to Mary Magdalen. M. Six, Fan Winter. 219 

845. Christ blessing little Children . • • Marlborough, 249 

1007. Christ crowned with Thorns 290 

27. Crucifixion on Mount Calvary .... Antwerp, 13 

28. Study for ditto • M,Schamps. 14 

28. Drawing of ditto, very fine • . . Sir T, Lawrence, t6. 

79. Crucifixion between the two Thieves (no spectators). . 23 

535. Crucifixion, a composition of several figures. Lost at sea, 153 
393. Same subject, differently composed . . . Louvre, 116 

536. Circumcision in the Temple Genoa. 153 

20. Entombment, a composition of five figures* Antwerp, 10 

139. Same. St. Francis and two angels are present. Brussels, 49 

164. Same. Two persons are carryii^ the body • • • . 58 

293. Same. Virgin is removing a thorn firom his brow, fifiimi. 91 

315. Same. Virgin is closing his eyes .... Fienna, 97 
339. Same. Two persons are bearing the body. A study. 

Lichtenstein, . 104 

494. Same Madrid. 138 

571. Same. The Virgin holds a napkin 165 

1121. Same. A smaU picture . • , • T. Duncombf Esq, 306 

78. Same. The Virgin, with St. John, and Mary Magdalen. . ' 23 



378 NEW TESTAMENT. 

No. fage 

502. Evangelists, the four Earl Granenor. 141 

503. Study for ditto E, Gray, Esq. ib. 

1071. Ecce Homo. A head 29S 

1073. Same subject, composed of several figures • . • . ib. 

23. Flagellation of our Lord ...... Antwerp. 11 

488. Study for ditto EseuriaL 137 

389. Flight into Egypt, by night Lowre. 115 

860. Same subject. A study Sir A. Hvme. 254 

603. Herodias's Daughter showing the Head of St. John to 

Herod, before a company 172 

1010. Herodias's Daughter receiving the Head of St John . ib, 

101 1. Same» with the Head in a charger, attended by a woman ib» 
Holy Gho8t« — See Pentecost. 

30. Incredulity of St. Thomas Animerp. 15 

218. Innocents, Murder of the Munick» 72 

126. John (St.) plunged into boiling oil . . . Malines. 44 

126. John, DecoUationofSt. Ditto. ib. 

126. John (St.) baptising the Saviour in the river Jordan. 

Ditto. 44 

126. John (St.) in the Island of Patmos .... Ditto. 45 

549. Jesus at the house of Simon the Pharisee Russia. 157 

1118. John baptising in Jordan 305 

887. Same subject. Very laiqge . . . • M. Sckamps. 262 
574. Joseph and Mary returning to Jerusalem in search of 

'their Son 166 

39. Last Supper 16 

624. Study for ditto ISO 

125. Last Supper. Represented in a lofty hall .... 43 

922. Last Supper. A sketch 273 

1005. Same subject, after Lionardo da Vinci 290 

357. Lasarus, Christ raising him from the dead. Potsdam. 108 

625. Study for ditto 180 

130. Miraculous Draught of Fishes . . . . . Malines. 45 

1012. Same subject. A study 291 

693. Martha and Mary, Christ with . . . The Writer. 194 

33. Nativity . Ceiling of the Jesmts* church, destroyed. 16 



1 



N£W TESTAMENT. 379 

No. Pag€ 

5S5, Nativity. A composition of eight figures. — See Ado- 

nUion of ike Shepherds 169 

934. Same subject. The Virgin bends over the Infant. Ditto, 278 

1003. Nicodemus visiting Christ by night 290 

5. Presentation in the Temple 4 

Prodigal Son, near a cow-house. . Ruhenis Cat, 169. 54 

804. Same picture W. fVUkins, Esq, 226 

150. Peter finding the Tribute-money in a Fish • Malines, 46 

150. Peter with the Keys in his hand . . • . Malines, ib. 

175, Pentecost. Descent of the Holy Ghost . . Munich. 62 

176. Same subject A drawing • • . Sir T. Lawrence, ih, 

577. Peter, Martyrdom of St. Cologne, 111 

192. Paul, Conversion of St. • .* Munich, 66 

774. Same subject. A grand gallery picture. J, P, Miles, Esq, 217 
650, 651, & 652. Same subject. Sketches 186 

775. Same subject. A finished study • Earl Grosvenor, 218 
7. Resurrection of our Lord. — See also Christ risen, ^c, 7 

45. Same subject • . • . Jesuits' church, destroyed, 17 

71. Return of the Holy Family from Egypt. Mr, Buchanan, 21 

850. Same subject, differently composed . Marlborough, 245 

129. Resurrectionof our Lord. A small picture . ... 45 

5. Salutation. — See subjects relating to the Firgin . • 8 

165. Stephen, Martyrdom of St. Prince ofSaxe Coburg. 59 

566. Saviour and St. John, when infimts, at play. Potsdam, 109 

990. Saviour and St. Jc^n, seated, caressing each other. • 288 

729. Samaritan, the Good * . . . . 201 

798. Salvator Mundi 224 

1004. Shepherd, the Good 290 

57. Temptation of Christ in the Desert. JestUts* church. 16 

147. Thomas, Martyrdom of St 52 

592. Tribute-Money Louvre, 116 

577. Same subject. The original London. 167 

945. Tomb, six women viaitii^ the 281 



380 HjOLY; FAMILY. 

HOLY FAMILY. 
No. P^e 

295. Holy Family reposing. Zacchariah is oflfering the In- 
fant fruit Vienna. 92 

349. Same. The Infant stands on his mother's knees, St. 

John and St Joseph Potsdam, 109 

365. Same. The Infant is bending forward to embrace St. 

John Potsdam. 106 

435. Same. A study in chalks, from RafiaeUe Louvre. 129 
507. Same. The Infant is in a cradle caressing St. John. 

Florence. 143 
543. Same. The Infimt stands on the knees of the Virgin. 

Turin. 156 

546. Same. The infants are'caressing a lamb • . Russia. ib* 

711. Same, with St. Elizabeth . . . ,Sale of Sir J. Reynolds. 198 

718. Same. A sketch .... Sale of Sir J. Reynolds. 199 

756. Same. A composition of four figures. Sir S. Clarke. 210 
761. Same, with St. Joseph and St. John. Sale of J. PurUng. . 212 

763. Same. Infant sleeps in the Virgin's arms .... ib. 

764. Same. The Saviour is caressing St. John . • . • 213 
784. Same. The Infant stands in the lap of the Virgin. 

His Majesty. 221 
812. Same. The Saviour stands, and St. John sits on the 

knee of Elizabeth ....... BoursauU. 231 

837. Same. The Virgin embraces the child, Elizabeth leans 

on a cradle Marlborough. 246 

837. Same. A duplicate of ditto .... . . Chev. Erard. . t6. 

950. Same. St. John is amusing the Saviour with a bird . . 281 

951. Same. The Infant stands in the Virgin's lap, and St. . 

Joseph leans on a chair • 282 

952. Same. The Infant stands with one foot in a cradle, and 

holds a dove tft. 

955. Same. An angel presents the Infant a basket of firuit . 283 

956. Saxne. The Infant and St. John play with a lamb . . ib. 

958. Same. The Infant sits in his mother's lap, and St. John 

has a lamb 284 

959. Same. Virgin holds the Infant to St. John .... ib. 



HOLY FAMILY. 381 

Nc. ' Page 

975. Holy Family reposing. Virgin suckles the Infant, and 

St John stands by her 286 

976. Same. The Infant sleeps in his mother's arms, and St 

John and Elizabeth are by . . 287 

989. Same« St. John stands, on the knees of the Virgin, 

holding a cross • . . . . • ... • • . . 288 
964. . Same. The Infant stands, and, with his parent, is look- 
ing at St. John - . . . • - . . 285 

967. Same. St John is offering the Saviour some fruit . . f6. 
970. Same. The Virgin suckles the Infant, and St. Anne is 

near them . • . . . . ' 286 

531. Virgin and St Anne adoring the Saviour 152 

20. Virgin holding the In&nt erect on a table. Antwerp. 1 1 
83. Virgin with the Infant standing by her side. A parrot. 

. . . Antwerp. 24 

183. Virgin holding the Inj&nt on a table • . . Munich* 64 
886. Same. ! A duplicate ..•••• Marlborough, 245 
205. , Virgin with the Infant in her arms, surrounded by angek. 

Munich. 69 
345. Same, encircled by a multitude of angels. * Potsdam. - 1 05 

391. Same. A duplicate . . . - Louvre.. 116 

390. Same, surrounded by flowers • • • . . Louvre. 115 
445. Same, with the Infimt in her arms . • • EscuriaL- 131 
458.. Same, with angels, in a landscape . . . EscuriaL . 133 
609. • Same, watching over the sleeping Infant . • • . .174 
701. .Same, with the Infant in her arms ...... . . . . 196 

794. , Same. The Infant stands naked in his mother's lap. 

Sir M. Sykes. . 223 
S85. Same. The Infant sits naked on a pillow . ... 245 

957. Same . ... . . . . . . . 283 

r 938. Same. The Infant extends his arms to embrace his 

mother Earl Spencer. 279 

953. Same. The Virgin holds a globe and wears a crown. 282 

1068. Same 297 

' 963. Same. The Infant stands in her lap 284 

954. Same. The Virgin has both her hands round the In- 

fant's body 283 



S8S RELATING TO THE YIRGIK. 

No. Pmge 

962. Virgin. Tbe Infiuit ftands in his mother's lapi with one 

hsnd raised 284 

965. Same* Virgin sealed, in a landscape ; the Infant stands 285 

966. Same. Tbe Infant stands, and has one band between 

his parent's fingers tft. 

968. Same. The Infant sleeps in his mother's lap . • . t6. 

969. Same. Tbe Infant stands in his mother's lap • . * f6. 

971. Same* The Virgin offers the breast to the Infiuit . 286 

972. Same. The Virgin watches over the Infiuit sleeping in 

a cradle J6. 

978. Same. Tbe Virgin wears a celestial crown, and the In- 
fant's arm is on her bosom ift. 

974. Same. The Virgin holds the Infant under one arm t6. 

977. Same. The Infant kneels in his parent's lap» and looks 

in her face 287 

978. Same. Tbe Infant stands with one foot in a cradle . afr. 

979. Same. The Infant lies on a pillow and tbe Virgin bends 

over him « . . . • t6. 

980. Same. Tbe Infant lies swaddled in his mother's lap • ti. 

981. Same. The Virgin is caressing the swaddled Infant • t6. 

982. Virgin with tbe Infant in her arms ; her finger is on 

his lip ftt 

983. Virgin caressing the infant ift. 

984. . Infiuit caresses bis mother ; St. Josq4i holds a pear i6. 

985. Virgin with the Infiuit on her lap ; part of a cradle at 

the side t6. 

986. Infimt sleeps in his parent's arras, and holds a pear . ii. 
. 987. Infant is playing with bis mother t6. 

988. Infant sleeps in bis mother's arms, and St. Joseph holds 

his hands •&• 

992. Virgin with tbe Infimt, and St. Joseph, at table . . • 289 



RELATING TO THE VIRGIN. 

72. Annimciation. Tbe angel bends on one knee. Jlfarttdroif^A. 21 
822. Same subject. Tbe Virgin and angel are seen in a 

profile view . . » . Vmma. 99 



RELATING TO THE VIRGIN. S88 

SB5. Annunciatioii •*•••••• Awuterdaim. 114 

684. Same subject. A sketch . • • • 192 

901. Same subject* A basket and a cat in front 

Thomas Hamlet^ Esq. 266 

936. Same subject. The Vii^pn has a book in her hand 278 

6. Assumption of the Virgin. Very splendid. jitUwerp. 6 

47. Same subject. A ceiling pictare 17 

70. Same subject. Twelve angels are under the Virgin's 

feet Brussels* 20 

762. Study for ditto His Majesty. 212 

141. Assumption. The Saviour is seen above, Au^gslmrg. 60 

172. Same subject Munich. 61 

148 & 324. Same subject. Tbe Virgin kneek on a cloud 

Lichienstein. 53 & 100 

149. Study for ditto P. Ranter ^ Esq. 63 

284. Assumption. A large company of angels • Fietma. 83 

359. Same subject. A sketch Potsdam* 108 

516. Same subject. A drawing Florence. 147 

582 & 586. Same subject. A sketch 168 & 169 

631. Same subject • . . Sale of Pommels at Brussels. 181 

649. Same subject. A sketch 186 

698. Same subject. A fine study. Sale of John Wehh^ Esq. 195 

858. Same subject Earl of Pembroke. 254 

940. Same subject. Ten angels and two cherubs • • • 280 

941. Same subject. Five angels, &c ib. 

31. Coronation of the Virgin by the Holy Trinity, Brussels. 15 

49. Coronation of the Virgin. Ceilingof the Jesuits* church. 17 

446. Conception, the immaculate • . . . . Madrid. 131 

573. Coronationof the Virgin • 165 

352. Exaltation of the Virgin Potsdam. 107 

1060. Same subject — ^in the presence of the Holy Trinity 296 

54. Mary (the Name of ) surrounded by angels .... 17 
81. Virgin, with the In&nt in her arms, appearing to 

St. Francis 24 

Virgm encompassed with Flowers. Rubens's Cai., 249. 34 

608. Virgin's Statue, adorned by infants with festoons of fruit 173 



384 SAINTS, APOSTLES, MONKS, &c. 

•No. Ph^ 
942. Virgin interceding with the Saviour, who stands before 

her 280 

1000. Virgin, the Marriage of the. Several figures and angels 290 

1030. Virgin, pierced with a sword, supported by two angels 293 



SAINTS, APOSTLES, MONKS, PRIESTS, &c. 

50. Athanasius, St. A ceiling picture, destroyed ... 17 

51. Anne (St.) and the Virgin. Ditto tft. 

67. Same subject . • • • Ditto ih, 

61. Augustin, St Ditto ih, 

S05. Same . • Vienna, 95 

64. Ambrose, St. A ceiling picture, destroyed ... 17 

135. Agnes (St.) with a Lamb • • , 48 

285. Andrew (St.) with his Cross Vienna, 88 

265. Apostle. A bust, seen in profile .... Dresden. 84 

530. Apostles, the Twelve. Single figures. Formerly at Rome, 152 

1069. Same, with their various designations 298 

1070. Same, with the Saviour. Half-length figures ... t5. 
' 62m Basil, St.- A ceiling picture, destroyed 17 

351. Barbara (St); a pa]m*branch in her hand and sword at 

her feet . Potsdam. 106 

1. Catherine (St.) with a palm-branch and a sword in her 

hands 2 

57. Catherine, St. A ceiling picture, destroyed ... 17 
1053 to 1056. Same, variously represented 295 

5. Christopher (St.) bearing the In&nt on his shoulders 4 
55. Cecilia, St. A ceiling picture, destroyed 

Rubens* 8 Catalogue^ Lot 93. 17 8r 31 

58. Chrysostom, St. Ditto, Ditto 17 

137. Chura, St 48 

295. Clara & Albert (Sts.), with Albert & Isabella. Vienna. 91 

1063. Dorothy (St.) with a palm branch 297 

1. Eloy, St Whole-length.^Door to No. ] 2 

65. Eugenia, St.^ A ceiling picture, destroyed .... 17 

136. Francis (St.) receiving the Stigmates 48 

875. Same subject Sir A, Creighton. 258 



8AINTS» APOSTLKS, MONKS, &c. 385 

Na Page 

1072. Francis (St.) receiving the Stigmates ...... 298 

528. Francis (St.) kneeling on a Bank . • . • Florence* 152 

878. Friarsy two, reading a book together ••.... 258 

56 & 66. Gregory, St. A ceiling picture, destroyed • . 17 

997. Same, leaning his head on his hand, meditating . . 289 
George (St.) on horseback. Rubens's Catalogue^ Lot 155. 88 

222. George (St.) slaying the Dragon .... Munich, 74 

460. Same EscuruU. 188 

185. George (St) with the' vanquished Dragon under his feet 47 

700. Same 196 

5. Hermit, with a lantern 4 

998. Hiltrudis (St) wearing a chaplet of flowers . . . 289 
7. John (St) the Baptist, standing in an attitude of address 7 

20. John (St.) the Evangelist, seated, looking up at an Eagle 1 1 

59. Jerome, St A ceiling picture, destroyed .... 17 

805. Same Vienna. 95 

442. Same Etcurial. 181 

542. Same, with a Lion 155 

947. Same. He holds a crucifix and a stope 281 

148. Ignatius Loyola (St) standing at the altar • . . . 51 

1082. Same, tormented by Demons ....,•.. 294 

209. Same, a portrait of 70 

60. Lucie, St A ceiling picture, destroyed 17 

7. Martine (St) with a palm-branch in her hand . . 7 

5^. Mary Magdalen. A ceiling picture, destroyed ... 17 

Magd^dep. Si^e of life. Rubens*s Catalogue^ Lot 86. 81 

660. Same 187 

799. Same 225 

948. Same, at her devotions 281 

J1018 to 1028. Same, in various positions 292 

6$, Margaret St A peiling picture, destroyed .... 17 

716. Matthew, St A bust . • Sale of Sir J. Reynolds. 199 

948. Same, writing his Gospel • * 280 

790. Monk, in the dress of a Benedictine, with a skull • . 222 

888. Monk. Father Ruzzola Schamps. 261 

896. Mpnk,habitedinthedres8ofaG>rdelier P.d^Arenberg. 265 

^995. Same, adoring a crucifix . • . • • • • • • • 289 

VOL. II. c c 



886 SACRED SUBJECTS. 

No. Page 

80 & 223. Peter and Paul, Sts. . . . Munich. 23. 83 & 74 

158. Same. Heads 55 

302. Same. A study Vienna. 94 

266. Peter (St) with the keys. A bust , • • Dresden* 84 

754. Same Sale of Mr. Bryan. 210 

755. Paul, St DUto. ib. 

334. Same. A head Lichtenstein, 103 

289.- Pepin and Begue, Sts. • • .' • • • • Fienna. 90 

894. Priest on his knees before a table Earl of EgremonU 264 

895. Same, much older, in a similar position . * . Dtito. 265 

1 022. Theresa (St) with a Dove 292 

1067. Same, with a blazing heart 297 

1035 to 1052. Saints of various denominations 294 

144. Xavier (St) in a white surplice before the altar • . 51 



SACRED SUBJECTS, BLENDED WITH RELIGIOUS LEGENDS. 

77. Anne (St) instructing the Virgin to read • Antwerp. 23 

323. Anne (St), the Virgin, and St Joachim. Lichtentiein. 99 
287. Ambrose (St) refusing Theodosius admittance to the 

Church Vienna. 89 

245. Study for ditto Munich. 79 

1065. Ambrose, Gregory, Jerome, and Augustin, Saints • • 297 

371* Angel^ a choir of Potsdam. 110 

525. Angels bearing a picture of the Virgin and Infant Saviour 151 

690. Angeb bearing the body of a Child 193 

861. Annunciation in the presence of patriarchs, prophets, &c. 

Sir A. Hume. 254 

1074. Augustin contemplating an infant seated on the sands • 298 

1075. Anthony, the Death of St Composed of seven figures 16. 

105. Bavon (St.) distributing Alms Ghent. 36 

106 & 868. Same subject, of a more extended composition. 

Rev. H. Carr. 36 & 256 

161. Benedict (St), the Miracles of. A sketch. M. Sehamps. 57 

5 & 189. Christopher carrying the Saviour. Antwerp. 4 8eB6 

21. Cardinals and Bishops in Council 11 

1066. Cardinals investing a Priest with a Mitre • • . . 297 



SACBED SUBJECTS. 387 

No. P^ 

J164. Cardinal viewing in aglaas the stigmates of St. Francis 313 

11. Catharine borne to the tomb by Angels B 

82. Catharine (St), Marryige of Antwerp. 24 

82. Study for ditto.— /Sae aho No. 646, p. 185. 

Earl of Mulgratte, 24 & 34 

115. Catharine, Martyrdom of St 40 

134. Catharine (St.), Marriage of . . Duke of Rutland. 47 

708. Study foi: ditto . 198 

3$3. Same subject Potsdam. 109 

25. Christ descending in wrath to destroy the world. Lyone. 12 

108. Same subject, difierently composed . . Brussele. 37 

74. Christ lying on the knees of the Father . Antwerp. 22 

75. Christ appearing to St. Theresa . • . Antwerp, ib. 
062 & 663. Studies for ditto . . . M. Fan Sasseghem. 188 
190. Clxrist appearing to the four Penitents. . . Munich. 66 

583. Same subject 169 

960 & 961. Same subject 284 

348. Christ triumphant over Sin, Death, and the QtKwe*-^See 

Resurrection Potsdam. 106 

350. Cecilia (St) attended by Angek . • • « Potsdam. ib. 

627. Same subject, differently composed • 180 

628. Same subject ib. 

648. Same subject 185 

885. Clotilda (St) bestowing alms on a cripple. M.Schamps. 262 

216. Dragon, the Fall of the Great, &c. &c. • . Munich. 71 

658. Doctors pf the Church, the Four 187 

22 1 . Ex Voto. St John introducing the donor to the Saviour. 

Munich. 74 
139. Entombment St Francis and two Angels are present 

Brussels. 49 
867. Eipperor Cities V., Philip IV., Elisabeth de Bourbra, 

&c M. Perignan. 255 

29. Francis d'Assise receiving the Communion. Antwerp. 14 

68. Francis Javier raising the dead Vienna. 18 

282. Sam^ picture 87 

110. Francis (St) receiving the Stigmates • . • Ghent. 38 

136. Sa\ne subject A door 48 



388 SACRED SUBJECTS. 

• No. P^ 
81. Francis (St.) receiving the Infant from the Virgin • • 24 

118. Same subject ............. 41 

186. Same subject 48 

875. Francis (St.) bending in rapture over the infant Saviour 

and St. John Sir A. Creighion* 258 

1057. Francis supporting three globes; many Saints are 

present . • Af. Fan Saaeghem, 295 

1059. Francis de Paula (St.) Ascension of, &c. • • . • . t6. 

501. Fathers of the Church .... Earl Grosvenor. 140 

581. Fall of the rebel Angels 168 

759. Fathers of the Church with St. Jerome, reading • .211 

1058. Faith, Hope, and Charity ; three females 296 

18. God the Father • 8 

18. Gregory (St.) with St. Ckra and others .... 10 

185. George (St.) Martyrdom of 47 

185. George (St.) treading under foot the vanquished Dragon 48 
568. George (St.) with the vanquished Dragon, and many 

other figures . His Majesty. 162 

• 541. Gonzaga, Duke of Mantua, imploring the Trinity . 155 

568. Helena (St.) discovering the true Cross 152 

226. Holy Trinity Munich. 74 

902. Same subject. An Allegory of the Christian Faith. 

Z). Baillie, Esq. 267 

69. Ignatius Loyola (St.) healing the sick, &c. • Fienna. 19 

587. Same subject • • • . . Genoa. 154 

155. I von (St.) giving some papers to a female '• • . . 55 

295. Ildefonso, the Virgin investing with a chasuble. Fienna. 91 

910. • Inspiration ; a female listening to a dove. W. WeUs^ Esq, 269 
998. Infant Saviour, seated on a cloud, with a globe in his hand - 289 

1220. .Ignatius (St.), four drawings relating to the Life of • 827 

16. Justus (St.) martyrdom and miracle of 9 

62. Jesus (the Name of) illumined • • Jesuits* church. 17 

114. .Joseph (St.) presenting the infant Saviour to the Deity 89 

281 & 288. Same picture, and the two studies . Fienna. 87 

167. Judgment, the Day of Munich. 60 

257. Study for ditto Dresden. 88 

569. Judgment, Last .165 



SACRED SUBJECTS. 389 

No. Pagt 

1064. Jerome (St) expounding the Scriptures .... 297 

107. Lieven (St), Martyrdom of Bnusels. 37 

150. Lawrence (St.), Martyrdom of ... • Munich, 5S 
i?42. Legend, a sketch, illustrative of a Romish Legend. Munich, 78 

109. Magdalen supported hy two angels 37 

290. Magdalen renouncing the vanities of the world. Vienna, 90 

32. Michael (St.) driving down the rehel angels ... 16 
173. Michael (St) driving down Lucifer to perdition. Munich, 61 

188. Michael (St) and angels driving rehel angels. Munich, 65 

907. Michael (St.) treading Satan under foot Mr, Wooding, 269 

1024. Michael (St) driving down the great Dragon . • • 293 

822. Martin (St) dividing his cloak . • • His Majesty, 239 

526. Martyrdom of a female Saint ..•••.«• 151 

1239. Martyrdom of a Samt A drawing 329 

1 247. Same subject. A drawing • . Sir T. Lawrence. 330 

Penitents, the four • Rubens' s Catalogue, Lot 160. 33 
'545. Same subject — See also Christ appearing to the 

Pemtents 156 

111. Purgatory; the Virgin interceding with the Trinity . 38 

1061. Purgatory; the name of Jesus brilliantly irradiated • 296 

644. Pope causii^ the holy gate to be opened . ... 185 

1236. Pope, accompanied by two Saints and an Angel 328 

863. Priest, the unbelieving, and another person at the altar 255 

121. Roch (St) interceding with the Saviour . • Alost, 42 

123. Roch (St) healing the diseased ..... Ditto, ib. 

124. .Roch (St) in prison Ditto, ib. 

206. Resurrection of the Just Munich, 69 

269. Saint, the Glorification of a Munich, 85 

788. Sebastian (St), Martyrdom of 222 

1225. Saviour and Virgin, with Saints. A drawing . • . 327 

1232. • Saviour in Glory, surrounded by Saints. A drawing 328 

142. Theresa (St), Christ appearing to ••.••. 50 

387 & 498. Triumph of the Christian Law . Louvre. 114 & 139 

495. Triumph of Charity J, Taylor, Esq. 138 

496. Triumph of the Church ....... Spain. 139 

497. Study for ditto Scotland. ■ ib. 

499. Triumph of the Christian Keligion • . . Spain, . 140 



390 SACRED SUBJECTS. 

Na 

636. Ufsula (St.) and the VirgioB ... Fan SasMeghem. 182 
15. Virgin with the Infant in her anns, surrounded by 

Sainto Antmrp. 8 

Same Rubeni* Catalogue^ Lo^ 84. 90 

862. Virgin, with the Infant in her armsy surrounded by 

SainU PaUdam. 108 

581. Virgin and St. Anne adoring the infant Saviour . . 152 

555. Virgin with a rosary ; caUed Our Lady • • Russia, 159 
647. Virgin with the infiemt Saviour in her arms, and eight 

persons near her 185 

848. Virgin with the Infant seated on a throne, encompassed 

with Saints Marlborwgh, 248 

1081. Virgin presenting a scapulary to a Monk 294 

10. Walburge(St.)in a boat tossed by a tempest. ^.iSc&impf. 8 

599. Same picture 172 

600. Walburge, burial of, by angels ib. 

1062. War between the Flesh and the Spirit .297 



HISTORICAL, 

245. Ambrose refusing Theodosius admittanoe into the 

Church 79 

819. ^neas escaping from Troy Fietma. 98 

1248. Augustus* Livitts, and others, erecting a trophy . • 880 

1251. Agrippina between two cornucopias • 881 

Caesar, Julius, triumphal procession. Rt^ens^s Cat. 815. 55 

808. Same picture iS'. Rogers^ Esq* 225 

658. Cambyses' escample of unjust Judges 1816 

788. Constandne, Marriage of • • • 202 

784. Constandne viewing the apparition of a Cross ... ib. 

785. Constantino committing the sacred banner to his Soldiers, 

— BrooksbasAf Esq, •&• 

786. Constantine giving battle to Mazendus. 

— Brookshank^ Esq. 208 

787. Constantine, Death of Maxendua • S. Rogers^ Esq. H. 

788. Constantine crowned by Victory, -r- Brcoksbank^ Esq, 204 

789. Constantine's Entry into Rome . Hvn. /. G, Vemom, ib. 



HISTORICAL. 391 

No. Pog9 

740. Constantine restoriog liberty to the Romans* 

^091. /• Gm Vernon, 205 

741. Constantine investing Crispus with command ... ib. 

742. Constantine approving the plan of Constantinople • . t6. 

743. Constantine adoring the Cross • — Brookshank^ Etq. 206 

744. Constantine receiving Baptism • . t6. 

949. Same subject, composed of fourteen figures • • • • 281 

816. Ceiling of the chapel of Whitehall 284 

1259. Charles, son of Philip III. ; his Monument .... 832 

Dido, the Death of . Rubens^s Catalogue, Lot 175. 34 

168. Diogenes looking for an honest man • . . Munich* 60 

895. Same subject Louvre. 117 

328. Decius consulting the Priests . • • Lichtenstein. 101 

329. Decius haranguing his Soldiers Ditto, 101 

330. Decius receiving the benediction .... Ditto, t6. 
211. Study for ditto Munich. 70 

331. Decius sending away the Lictors • • Lichtenstein, 102 

332. Decius slain while combating the Enemy • . Ditto, ib, 

333« Decius, the Obsequies of Ditto. tb, 

184. Study lor ditto Munich. 64 

633. Decius, four cartoons relating to the Life of ... 182 

668. Decius. A picture. Ditto 189 

1250. Emperor, the Triumph of an. A drawing .... 330 

1264. Emperors, the Busts of the Roman 332 

92 & 288. Ferdinands, the Meeting of the three. Vienna, 27 & 89 

288. Study for ditto Sir A. Hume. 90 

98. Ferdinand oi Austria and Hungary at the Battle of 

Nortlingen His Majesty. 28 

99. Ferdinand's triumphal Entry into Antwerp • • • . ib. 
1115. Ferdinand with a Bishop and a Priest, &c 305 

521. Grotius, Lipsius, Philip Rubens, and the Artist. Florence. 149 

1249. Germanicus and Agrippina in a Car 330 

518. Henry IV. at the Battle of Ivry • • • Florence. 147 

519. Henry IV., triumphal Procession, &c. • . Florence. 148 

809. Study for ditto Lord Whamcliffe. 228 

879. A sketch for ditto • Earl Daimley. 260 

616. Hippolytus, the Death of . . . ^ Sir 4* Hume. 177 



392 HISTORICAL. 

No. Pagi 

617. Hippolytus, the Death of 178 

1252 to 1255. Heads of Emperors, Philosophers, &c« &c. SSI 

816. James I. Apotheosis and other subjects WhitehalL 284 

Maid of Orleans . . Rubens* s Catalogue^ Lot 159* 38 

94. Maximilian and Maria of Burgundy, Marriage of. M. Noe, 27 

241. Marie deMedicis. Studies for the Life of Munich. 78 

404. Medicis, the Destiny of Marie de .... Louvre. 121 

405. Medicis, the Birth of Marie de • . • • • Ditto. t6. 

406. Medicis, the Education of Marie de • • . Ditto. tft. 

407. Medicis, Henry IV. deliberating the Marriage of Marie 

de Ditto. ib. 

408. Medicis, the Marriage of Marie de, by proxy. Ditto. 122 

409. Medicis, the Debarkation of Marie de . • • Ditto. ib. 

410. Medicis, the Marriage of Marie de, consummated. jDt^. ib. 

41 1 • Medicis. Birth of Louis XIII Ditto. ib. 

412. Medicis. Prelude to the Departure of the King. Dtfto, 128 

418. Medicis, the Coronation of Marie de . . . Ditto. ib. 

414. Medicb. The Apotheosis of Henry IV. • Ditto.. 124 

415. Medicis, the Government of Marie de • . Ditto. i6. 

416. Medicis, Journey of Marie de, to the bridge of C6. Ditto. ii. 

417. Medicis. The Exchange of the two Queens . Ditto., 125 

418. Medicis. Happiness and prosperity of the Regency .Z>i/to. ib. 

419. Medicis. Majority of Louis XIII. . « . Ditto. ib. 

420. Medicis, flight of Marie de, to the city of Blois. Ditto. . 126 

421. Medicis deciding in favour of Peace • • . Ditto. ib. 

422. Medicis. Peace concluded Ditto. ib. 

428. Medicis. Peace ratified in Heaven . « • Ditto. ib. 

424. Time disclosing Truth Ditto. 127 

425. Medicis, Marie de, in the character of Bellona. Ditto. , ib. 
1111. Mutius Scsevola before Porsenna • Prince Esttrhazy. 804 

492. Numa Pompilius, with satyrs and fruit. Mr. Buchanan. 187 

750. Philopoemen cutting wood for the Cook . . . . . 209 

Bomulus and Remus . Rubens* s Catalogue^ Lot 189. SS 

582. Same subject . • . Now in the Capitol at Rome. 152 

867. Same subject Potsdam. 109 

Roman Charity . • Rubens* s Catalogue^ Lot 141. ^ 

382. Same subject • . . ^ Hague* . 118 



mythological: 39S 

• No. Page 

656, fioman Charity ^ • . Russia* 159 

^72. Same subject 165 

640. Same subject 183 

S42. Same subject Marlboraugh, 248 

171. Romans and Sabines, Peace between the • • Munich, 61 

259. Seneca, Death of . Munich. 78 

6S5. Seneca (a head) 182 

488. Sabines, the. Rape of the . Madrid. 130 

613. Study for ditto • • . • . Alexander Barings Esq, 175 

439. Sabines, Reconciliation with the Romans • • Madrid, 130 

618. Study for ditto Alexander Baring, Esq, 175 

615. Sabinesy theRapeof the • • • ^ National Gallery, 233 

712. Studies for ditto . . Sale of Sir Joshua Reynolds, 198 

1234. Sabines, the Rape of the. A drawing after Polidoro . 328 

591. Sophonisba 170 

732. Scipio, Continence of Mr, Yates. 201 

864. Seleucus bestowing Stratonice on his Son • * • • 255 
394. Thomyris causing the Head of Cyrus to be plunged in 

blood •«..« Louore. 116 

745. Same subject, differently composed. Earl of Damley. 206 

746. Study for ditto. A fine drawing • Sir T* Lawrence* 207 
689. Ulysses and his friend discovering Achilles • • . • 193 
664. Wise Men of Greece, the Seven ...««•. 18& 



MYTHOLOGICAL 

Andromeda chained to a rock. Rubens*s Cat,, Lot 85. 31 

360. Same, with Perseus .••*.. Lichtenstein, 108 

832. Same subject Marlborough, 244 

Angelica and Erminia • Rubens's Catalogue f Lot 121« Si 

195. Amazons.and Greeks^ A battle on abridge. Munich. 67 

570. Same subject ..••••« 165 

286. Atalanta and Meleager attacking a Boar ^ » Vienna^ 38 

548. Same subject « . . • . Russia, 157 

928. Same subject Lady Stuart. 275 

929. Same subject 276 

341. Apollo, in his car, attended by cupids . laehienstein* 104 

469. Apollo conducting his car . » • • « EscuriaL 135 

TOL. n. D D 



S94 MYTHOLOGICAL* 

No. 

1100* Apollo in pursuit of Daphne SM 

543. Ajax offering violence to Cassandra . Ltehtetuiem. 105 

751. Adonis, the Death of .... Thanuu Hope^ Esq. 209 

766. Antiope and Jupiter MeMdames Kn^, ftlS 

849. Achilles plunged in the river Styx fSO 

850. Achilles receiving instruction from Chiron • • • • 251 

85 1 . Achilles with the daughters of Lyconiodes.^ofu/, C. Fenum. ik, 
S52. Achilles's anger against Agamemnon H, 

853. Achilles, Thetis procuring Arms for 252 

854. Achilles receiving his beautiful Brieseis.tfoii./. G, Veman. ih. 

855. Achilles vanquishing Hector ik* 

856. Achilles, the Death of > ... 253 

1 102. £nea8 seeking his Father in the Infernal Regions • . 3€0 

319. ^neas escaping with his Father, Son» and Wife from 

Troy Vienna. 98 

101. Bellerophon attacking the Chimaera. W. Beckfard^ Egq. 29 

807. Same picture. (Description) 227 

Bacchus with a goUet in his hand. Rnbens*s Cai.f Lot 91. 31 

Bacchus, Venus, and Ceres. Rubens*s Cat., Lot 143. SS 

Bacchus, a drunken. • Rubens*s Catalogue, Lot 147. ib, 

490. Bacchus, the Triumph of EseurioL 137 

512. Bacchus seated on a cask; Nymphs, Satyrs, 8cc.^/oreiiGe. 146 

1090. Bacchus supported by a Satyr and a Faun. Bacchantes. 301 

1091. Bacchus, &c. A similar composition t6« 

1 099. Bacchus, a young ; or a Faun. A bust MarquU of Bute. 302 

449. Bacchanalian Revel EscuriaL 131 

833. Bacchanalian Procession Blenheim, 244 

1101. Boreas bearing off Orithya in his arms . . . • • 302 
180. -Castor and Pollux carrying off the daughters of Leu* 

cippus • • . . Mumek. 63 

673. Cadmus sowing the Dragon's Teeth 190 

920. Calisto, Discovery of EarlofDerh^. 272 

765. Centaurs, the Loves <^ the . . Duke of Hamilton. 213 

' 657. Ceres and a Satyr, with a cornucopia • 187 

753. Ceres and Pomona 210 

Cupids fighting • • . Rubenii Catalogue, Lot SI » SO 

237. Cupid shaping bis bow. Copy, afbr Correggio. AfimicA. 77 



KYTB0L06ICAL. $95 

Na Fage 

479. Cttpidi and Bacchanals Sicuriat, 196 

1107. Cupid and Psyche. The nymph holds a lamp . . . 50S 

590. Cymon and Iphigenia 170 

1080. Danae receiving the golden shower 299 

632. Dejanira, the Rape of 182 

185. Diana and Nymphs reposing after the Chase. Munich, 64 

215. Diana and Nymphs departbg for the Chase* Muniek. 71 

752. Same suhject. Whole-length figures. Sir J. Clarke, 210 

252. Diana, with three Nymphs, and three Satyrs. Dresden. 81 

481. Diana, the Bath oil A copy, afker Titian . EicuriaL 186 

565. Same subject 164 

819. Diana and two Nymphs asleep, and two Satyrs intruding. 

Hi$ Majeity. 218 

1092. Diana and Nymphs, with dogs, in pursuit of a stag . 301 

1084. Diomedes and Ulysses carrymg off the Palladium • . 300 
825. Erichthonius discovered by the daughters of Ceerops. 

Lichtefuiein. 100 

676. Same. The study for ditto 190 

486. Europa, the Rape of Escurial. 137 

1 102. JEneB» seeking his Father in the Infernal Regions . . 303 

301 . Faun, and a Youth with a pipe Vienna, 94 

S55. Flora, Ceres, and Pomona, with a cornucopia. Potsdam, 107 

791. Same, with two cornucopias «... 222 

454. Flora. A head surrounded with flowers . Escurial, 132 

Graces, the Three . . Rubens* s Catalogue^ Lot 92. 31 

485. Same subject Escurial, 187 

522. Same subject (en grisaille) . • . . • Florence, 150 

566. Same subject 164 

467. Ganymede, the Rape of Escurial, 134 

749. Same subject - . • Orleans Gallery, 208 

484. Giants, the Fall of the Escurial, 136 

Hercules .... Rubens*s Catalogue, Lot 157. 33 

276. Hercules supported by a Nymph and a Satyr. Dresden, 86 

361. Hercules strangling the Nemaean Lion Potsdam, 108 

468. Hercules reposing from his Labours • . Escurial, 135 

480. Hercules killing the Hydra Escurial, 186 

. 520, Hercules, the choice of ..... . Florence, 149 



396 KYTHOLOOICAU 

Mo. 

7S0. Hercules and Ompbale. Several fignre«.JIf r.^mmerjim. 199 

1087. Hercules exterminating the Demons o£ Discord * • ^00 

493. Hippodamia, the Rape of Madrid. 158 

567. Hero and Leander ••• 164 

779. Hygeia, the goddess of Health .•••«.•• 219 

1128. Hebe holding a Cup to the symbol of Jupiter • « • 306 

846. Ixion embracing a Cloud, &c. • • Earl Grosvenar* 249 

918. Juno, Minerva, and Venus, descending on a Cloud • • 271 

1119. Juno transferring the Eyes of Argus to the Tail of the 

Peacock ••• 505 

. 887. Jupiter and other Deities, with the Graces. Lichterutein. 104 

1088. Jupiter reclining on the shoulder of Juno • « • « « 500 
198. Latona and the Carian peasants . • • • Munich. 68 

Mercury lulling Argus with the music of his pipe. 

Rubefu's Catalogue^ Lot 118. 52 

270. Same subject Dretderu 85 

876. Same subject, and composition • • • • Hodgshan. 259 

876. Same subject • Mr. Emmerson. ib. 

450. Same subject Escurial. 182 

587. Mercury conveying Psyche to Olympus. 

MarquU of Stafford. 1 69 
264. Meleager presenting a Boar's head to A talanta.Z)rtf«d!m. 84 

841. Same subject * Blenhetm. 247 

548. Meleager and Atabinta pursuing the Boar. — See aUo 

Hunts ••..•...•••. Russia. 157 

475. Midas, the Judgment of Escurial. 155 

1082. Same subject 500 

527. Marine Deities at table, served by Nereides. Rome. 151 

704. Mars and Venus, with Cupid • • . . Duhvich. 196 

1110. Same subject, differently composed 504 

1 122. Mars and Venus in a subterraneous cavern • • • . 506 

1095. Minerva protecting a Mother and her Children . . 501 

Nymphs and Satyrs. Rubens' s Cat.^ Lots 88 & BS. 50 & 51 

Nymphs, three, with a cornucopia. Ditto, Lot 164« 54 

521. Nymphs, three* reposing naked on a bank . Fienna. 98 

448. Nymphs, two ••...«.•«• EscwiaL 151 

. 489. Nymphs and Satyrs . . . « ^ « « EscwiaL .187 



MYTHOLOGICAL. S97 

No. Page 

665. . Nymphs and Satyrs • • 189 

51$. Same subject Florence, 146 

26S* Neptune dispersing the harpies of Storms and Tem- 
pests Dresden, 85 

268. Study for ditto Duke of Grafton, ib, 

462. Neptune in his Car, drawn by sea-horses . Escurial, 135 
1097. Neptune & Amphitrite, Triton & Cupid. Count Schonbum, 302 
1117. Neptune^ Minerva disputing their right to name Athens 805 

478. Narcissus pining over his own Reflection • Escurial, 186 

483, Orpheus redeeming Eurydice ... * Escurial, ib, 

470. Orpheus charming the Brutes ..... Escurial, 135 

375. Orpheus and Eurydice. A sketch . « Potsdam, 110 

463. Olympus, with a Council of the Gods • • Escurial, 133 
Pythagoras (Numa), with Fruit, Rubens' s Cat,^ Lot 168. 34 

258. Paris, the Judgment of Dresden, 83 

444. Same subject Escurial, 131 

748. Same subject T.Penryce^Esq, 208 

482. Paris carrying off Helen Escurial, 136 

338. Phaeton, the Fall of. ^A sketch . • Lichtenstein, 104 

908. Same subject. A study • . « Earl of Mulgrave. 269 

477.. Phaeton and Apollo ...*♦•• Escurial, 136 

358. Psyche. The Apotheosis Potsdam, 108 

434..Pluto passing sentence on Souls. . A. drawing. Louvre, 129 

451. Proserpine, the Rape of .. • .... . Escurial, 132 

666. Same subject.. A sketch 189 

825, Same subject 241 

453. Progne showing .the Head of her Son to the King. 

. . . Escurial, 132 

456. Perseus and Andromeda • • • • . Escurial, ib, 

588.. Same subject . ••• • 169 

584. Pan pursuing Syrinx •»•••••»••• ib, 

782. Same subject * » • His Majesty, 220 

888. Pan and Ceres. The latter is seated in front. M, Francken, 263 

677. Procris, Death of . . * . . ^ 191 

1033.. Philemon and Baucis entertaining Jupiter and Mercury 294 

622. River God reclining on an Urn • ...<.*«. 179 

. Sacrifice. Style of Elsliiemer. Rubens' s Cat:^ Lot 119. 32 



398 MYTHOLOGICAL. 

No. 

Satyr and a Nymph Rubens* 9 Catalogue f Loi 174. S4 

284. Satyr with Grapes, and a Faun drinking • • Mumch. 77 

267. Satyr squeesing the Juice of Grapes into a Cup. Dresden. 84 

447. Satyr. The sise of life EscuriaL 181 

1085. Satyr carrying Fruit 500 

1089. Satyr squeezing Grapes* A tiger near him .... 301 

Satyrs, with a Man and a Woman. Rubens* s Cat,^ Lai 89. 31 

1088. Satyrs and other figures, in a Cave 300 

476. Satom devouring his Offspring . • • Eseurial. 135 

Silenus, with Nymphs, Satyrs, &c. Rubens*s Cat., Loi 1 70. 34 

564. Same picture . . . The Righi Hon. Robert Peel. 163 

1 79. Silenus supported by a Satyr, &c. • • • Munich. 63 

191. Silenus, a Negro, a Satyr, and an old Woman. Munich. 66 

436. Silenus supported by a Satyr and a Faun • Louvre. 129 

550. Silenus & Satyrs. Females suckling their young. /tii#«ta. 158 

680. Silenus. Satyrs are setting him on an Ass .... 191 

709. Silenus and Bacchanalians . Sale of Sir J. Reynolds. 198 

916. Silenus with Nymphs and Satyrs • P. Meihuen, Esq. 272 

1086. Silenus supported by a Satyr and a Faun .... 300 
721. Thetis supplicating Jupiter on behalf of her Son . • 199 

1094. Thetis and Peleus, the Nuptials of 301 

202. Venus and Adonis Munich. §9 

621. Same subject 179 

487. Same subject . • Escurial. 137 

557. Same subject Russia. 159 

378. Venus detaining Adonis from the Chase . • Hague. 112 

506. Same subject Florenoe. 143 

834. Same subject Blenheim. 245 

317. Venus, a F^te in honour of . . • . . Fienna. 97 

SZ6. Venus arranging her Hair • • . • Lichtenstein. 100 
356. Venus, Birth of; attended by Tritons & Nereides. Potsdam. 107 

848. Same subject (^en ^rMat/^J • • Duke of Hamilton. 250 

452. Venus and Cupid. After Titian . • . Escurial. 132 

594. Venus, Adonis, and cupids 171 

683. Venus, wounded by a Thorn, consoled by Cupid • . 182 

710.^ Venus asleep on a bank, and Cupid alarmed by a Satyr 198 

1034. Venus suckling the Loves . • . 294 



ALLEGORICAL AND HISTORICAL. 899 

N9. Page 

1081. Venus, with Cupid sleeping on her Bosom .... 299 

1124. Venus viewing herself in a Glass held hy Cupid . • 307 

455. Vulcan working at his Forge EscuriaL 182 

678. Same subject A study 191 

527. Vertumnus and Pomona in a Garden . . . Rome, 151 

589. Same subject 170 



ALLEGORICAL, AND HISTORICAL BLENDED WITH ALLEGORY. 

97. Apotheosis of the Archduchess Isabella • . • . • 28 

260. Ambition treading under foot the God of Wine. Dresden. 83 

1113. Abundance. Three angels with a cornucopia • . . 304 
96. Austria and Spain, Union of the Houses of M, Noe, 28 

178. Beauty rewarding Valour Munich, 62 

102. C!ar (a magnificent) with figures .... Antwerp, 29 

374. Charity. A female suckling three infants Potsdam, 110 

801. Commerce of Antwerp .... Earl of Mulgrave, 225 

816. Ceiling of the Chapel at Whitehall 234 

911. Earth and Water. A Man and a Woman. E, of Mulgrave, 270 

90. Ferdinand receiving the Homage of Belgium • • • 27 

95. Ferdinand accompanied by Victory, Mercy, and Religion 28 

268. Ferdinand, Neptune favouring the Voyage of. Dresden, 85 

177. Fame crowning a Warrior Munich, 62 

294. Four Quarters of the Gbbe Vienna, 91 

335. Female weeping over the Bodiesof the slain. Liehtenstem, 103 

1112. Females (five), with various emblems 304 

862. France, with the Emblems of Commerce, &c. M, Henry, 255 

1114. Famine. Suitably allegorised • • 305 

670. Government. A female holdmg a prow 189 

1223. Genius uniting Painting with Nature. A drawing . . 327 
.523. Horrors of War. Mars rushing firom the Temple of 

Janus Florence, 150 

524. Same. A study .... Satnuel Rogers, Esq, 151 

626. Henry IV«, allusive to 180 

675. Henry IV. conducting his Queen • General Phipps, 190 

699. Justice, Peace, and Plenty. Three females ... 196 
878. Jupiter committing to Woman the Universe. Ld, Darnley, 259 

1104. Idleness punished and Industry rewarded • . • • 303 



400 ALLEGORICAL AND HISTORICAL. 

No. p^ 

816. James I., relating to . . . Ceiling at WhltehalL 2S^ 
715 & 717. Studies for ditto. Ceiling at Whitehall. 198 & 199 

100. Janusi Temple of .•••••. 29 

^39. Love and Wine. Artist and his Wife, &c. . Genoa, 154 

674. Louis XIII., Mars presenting Arms to. Gen, Phippt. 190 

94. Maximilian, Marriage of « « • , . » M. Noe, 27 
S54, Medicis, allusive to the Government of Marie de Potsdam. 107 

682. Medicis, allusive to the History of Marie de. Sketch 192 

685. Medicis, the Fates weaving the Destiny of Marie de ib. 

819. Minerva repelling the Demons of War . . '. • « 2Si 

91. Neptune favouring the Voyage of Ferdinand. Dresden, 27 

705. Nature unveiled by the Graces 197 

795. Navigation and Commerce • • Earl of Mulgrave, 228 

89. Philip IV. presenting a Baton to Ferdinand • • . • £6 
98. Philip IV. investing Ferdinand with the Commsnd of 

the Army .,...•••.•••• 27 

482. Pallas defending a Female and her Children. Louvre. 129 

^61. Peace and War. Fourteen figures. National Gallery. 161 
914. Peace and War, represented by Trophies. Mar, of Bute, 271 

669. Peace and Plenty. Two females .189 

679. Same subject \ . • 191 

1108. Peace and Prosperity of a State. Fifteen figures • • 808 

108. Portico, with figures. A sketch • . • Antwerp. 29 

104. Same. A sketch Antwerp^ 30 

702. Rome triumphant • • 196 

671. Strength. A female girt with a lion's skin • • . « 189 

529. Tiber. A river god reclining on a vase • • Rome, 152 
^77. Time disclosing the Truth of Christianity. 

Lord Saye and Sele, 259 

1224. Time triumphing over Death. A drawing • 4 • 827 

1226. Trophy of the Arms of vanquished Nations • • • • t&. 

480. Triumphal Arches. Two studies in chalks. Louore. 129 

96. Union of the Houses of Austria and Spain • M. Noi. 28 

Victory crowning a Warrior. Rubens* s Cat.^ Lot 156. S$ 

814. Union & Peace between England 8c Scotland. E. Gray^Esq. 282 

262. Woman and two Boys with a Pot of Embers. Dresden, 88 

814. Warrior seated on the Bodies of slain Enemies. Vienna, 97 

1i$6, Warrior extending his arms to a Female. Lichtenstein^ 108 



portraits; 401 

portraits. 

No. Pagt 

Anmdely Lord . . . Rubens' s Catalogue^ Lot 97. 51 

'210. Arundel, Lord and Lady, with their Son, &c. Munkh. 70 

1128. Arundel, Thomas Howard, Earl of. Earl Warwick. d07 

1180* Same, dressed in a furred mantle. Earl of CarUtle. 308 

Albert and Isabella. Ruhens's Cat.^ Zo/ 151 & 152. 88 

295. Same, with their Patrons. Doors to a picture. Vienna.. 91 
488. Albert on a spirited charger. A drawing Louvre. 129 
821. Same, also on horseback • • • . Hit Majesty. 289 

917. Same Earl of Upper Onory. 272 

1125. Same, with his right hand on a table. Earl Spencer. 807 
1176. Same, habited in a richly^worked dress • . . ..815 

1188. Same, with the Archduchess Isabella 816 

1184. Same, represented in a profile view ih. 

204. Abbess, a Lady . Munich. 69 

687. Same Choueul CoUection. 188 

291. Austria, Archduchess of. A bust .... Fienna. 90 

1156. AttendulusMutius, called Sfortia 812 

1 1 68. . Albe (Ducd*), mounted on a bay charger. Earl of Radnor. 818 

22. JBreughel, John. Done for his tomb ..•••. 11 
Buckingham, Duke of. Rubens'e Catalogue^ Lot 127. 82 

688. Same, dad in brilliant armour 198 

918. Same, on horseback ..... Earl of Jersey. 272 
1 1 70. Buckingham's Mistress and Children. Lord Saye ^ Sele» 814 

196. Brant (Elizabeth), as a shepherdess . • Munich. 6S 

. 880. Same Lady Hague. 118 

. 514. Same Lady, with a book in her hand . • Florence. 146 

881. Same Lady, with her hair in ringlets . M. Schamps. 260 

1 186. Same Lady, holding a gold chain. /• B. H. Owen^ Esq^ 816 

280. Bourbon (Elizabeth de), attired in bbck • Munich. 76 

906. Same Queen. A duplicate .... Mr. Murch. 268 

292. JSame Queen. A bust Fienna. 91 

« 428. Same Queen Louvre. • 128 

289. Brabant (Due de), with his Daughter, St Begue. Vienna. 90 

296. Burgundy, Philip, Duke of Ftenna. 98 

401. JBoonen (Madame), decked with jewels • • Louvre. . 119 

1 145. Bellarmin, CardinaL He is seated in his study • . .810 

VOL. II. B s 



40S PORTRAITS. 

No. Pogt 

1155. Barca, Marcellinus and Heliodorus de Sll 

Chapeau de Paille. Rubem^s Catalogue, Lai lift. S2 

811. Same picture . . • The Right Han. Robert Peek 228 

9$2. Coiutantia, Queen of Poland Munich. 76 

Charles, surnamed the bold. Rubens* s Cat., Lot 107* 31 

465. Charles V. on horseback. A drawing • • Eicurial. 134 

563. Charles L and Queen Henrietta, 8iC. • His Majesty. 162 

867. Charles V., Philip IV., and his Queen M. Perignon. 255 

1159. .Charles V. clad in armour. A copy, from Titian • 312 

1161. Charles V. of Austria, Son of Philip III ib. 

1164. Cardinal, a, seated in his study 313 

1160. Dyck, Anthony Van His Majesty. 312 

Empress Rubens* s Catalogue, Lot 114. 32 

1134. £ste(IsabeUad'), Countess of Mantua 309 

88. Ferdinand, Prince ; he has a hat on, and holds a baton 26 

Same Prince, as a Cardinal. Rubens*s Cat., Lot 113. 32 

207. Same Prince, ditto Munick. 69 

233. Same Prince, mounted on a bay charger • Munich. 76 

308. Same Prince. Full-length Vienna. 95 

309. Ferdinand, King of Hungary, ditto • . • Vienna. ib. 
728. Ferdinand of Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany . . . 200 
789. Ferdinand of Austria, on horseback. A study • • 222 

1126. Ferdinand, Prince, in his Cardinal's dress. Earl Spencer. 307 

1136. Same Prince, mounted on a spirited charger . • • 309 

1137. Same Prince, on horseback t^. 

1138. Same Prince, on horseback .... His Majesty. ib. 

1139. Same Prince, ditto. A study ib. 

1140. Same Prince, with a baton in his hand. Full-length • 310 

1141. Same Prince. Three-quarter size ib. 

1162. JFerdinand II.,, in an embellished oval 312 

1173. Ferdinand, Count Palatine, and Duke of Bavaria . • 315 

197. Forman (Helena), wearing a cap . • • • Mmtieh. 68 

219. Same Lady, elegantly attired and seated Munich. 73 
256. Same Lady, In black, and a scarf over her head. Dresden. 82 

263. Same Lady, with her hair falling in tresses Dresden. 84 

300. Same Lady, prepared to enter the Bath . . Vienna. 94 

381. Same Lady «... Hague. 113 



PORTRAITS. 403 

No. P^e 

399. Forman (Helena), with two of her Children. lAmcre. 118 

517. Same Lady. A study; in chalks . . Florence, 147 

551. Same Lady, with her hair falling in tresses Busm, 158 

559. Same Lady, elegantly attired . . • His Majesty, 160 

619. Same Lady Sir J, Clarke, 178 

771. Same Lady. A sketch 217 

806. Same Lady, in a profile view Edward Gray^ Esq, 227 

829. Same Lady. Whole-length Blenheim. 242 

881. Same Lady, with Rubens and Child . • Blenheim, 248 
869. Same Lady, elegantly attired . . . Lady Stuart, 257 

882. Same Lady, as a shepherdess • , , M, Schamps, 261 

1187. Same Lady, ditto 817 

1188. Same Lady, wearing a turban i6. 

695. Falconer, with a hawk on his hand His Majesty. 1 95 

8. Goubau and his Wife. Done for his tomb .... 7 

Gentleman, in a Turkish dress. Rubens^ s Cat,^ Lot 140. 88 

218. Same, habited in a Spanish costume . • . Munich, 70 

1869. Same, in a red silk dress . . . Sir H, Bunbury, 355 

1871. Same, and a Lady ...«.• Doria Palace, ib, 

tt5. Same. A Youth Munich, 74 

227. Same, with a book in his hand Ditto, 75 

248. Same. A Head Ditto, 78 

272. Same, with bushy beard, wearing Spanish Dress Dresden, S5 

277. Same. He is pulling on his gloves .... Ditto, 86 

279. Same, -with his right hand on a covered table . Ditto, 87 

806. Same, -seen in a profile view, with a bald head Vienna, 95 

807. Same, dressed in a fur mantle and a ruff . • DUto, ib, 
840. Same, holding a bonnet and gloves . . Lichtenstein, 104 
864. Same, with a Lady, and a large dog . • . Potsdam, 109 

869. Same. A Youth, in the Spanish costume . . Ditto, ib» 
866. Same. Quoted by Sir Joshua Reynolds .... 255 

870. Same, in black, and wearing a ruff . Lady Stuart, 257 
889. Same, in black, his right hand on the hip Sasseghem, 263 
891. Same, his right hand placed in front . Chev, Erard, 264 
904. Same, holding a glove in one^hand, and resting the other 

on a chair C, Czemim, 268 

1147. Snmef dome en grisaille 810 



404 POKTRAITS. 

No. P^ge 

1167. Gentleman and a Lady 313 

521. Grotius, Lipsius, Philip Rubens, and the Aitiflt Florence* 149 

783. Grotius, a portly man. A bust 221 

541. Gronzaga, Vincent, Duke of Mantua .••••• 155 

823. Gerbier, Sir B., and Family • . . His Majesty* 240 

1170. Same Lady, and Children • . Lord Say and Sele* 314 

892. Gevartius. He is seated in hb study . Baron Roose. 264 

1150. HaTre (John Van), with a square-shaped beard and 

blackcap , 311 

1 177. Isabella (Archduchess), seated, with a fan in her hand 315 

1 1 78. Same Princess, engraved oval t6. 

1 1 79. Same Lady, surrounded with signs of the zodiac • • ib. 

1180. Same, in the dress of a Lady Abbess ib. 

1181. Same ib, 

1182. Same, with a parrot near her 316 

1185. Same, leaning on a balustrade . . Mr.Emmersom. ib, 

Lipsius, Justus Aniwerp, 26 

Lady, habited in the French taste, Rubens' s Coi. Xotl 1 0. 31 

Same, styled English . . . Ditto, LoU\ftAh\t%. 32 

Same, with a hat on « « • Ditto. • . Lot 130. ii. 

Same, with a dog in her arms Ditto, , . Lot 145. 33 

214. Same, dressed in a black robe and white kerchief ilftmicA. 71 

224. Same, elderly, styled the Artist's Mother • • Ditto* 74 

Stb5, Same, holding a mantle and some roses • • Dresden, B2 

261. Same, dressed in black silk and a veil • • • Ditto. 83 

271. Same, wearing a cap and a broad ruff • • « Ditto, 85 

278. Same, elegantly dressed, holding a gold chain Ditto* 87 

280. Same, with a Child on her knee Ditto, ib* 

316. Same, with gloves and a kerchief in her hand Vienna* 97 

318. Same. Titian's Mistress Ditto, 98 

370* Same, a young • • • Potsdam, 109 

554. Same, seated, with a muff in her lap • . Russia. 159 

696. Same, wearing a cap decked with feathers .... 195 

758. Same. The head inclines forward •««.•• 211 

865. Same, wearing a black veil i55 

800. Same, very richly attired . . . Lucien CoUection* 225 

871. Same, very elegantly attired • • . Lady Stuart* 257 



PORTRAITS. 405 

No. Pag€ 

890. Lady, holding a chain, near a table • Van Sa$9eghem. 263 

89d. Same, very richly attired Baron Roase. S64 

924. Same, a young, in a brown frock . Prmce Talleyrand. 27S 

1167. Same, and a Gendeman. Busts SIS 

1171. Same, in the character of Cleopatra, with a serpent • 314 

1189. Same, wearing a ruff. Full-length 817 

1288. Same. A Head 829 

Louis XIII. (Queen Consort of). Rubens* i Cai. Lot 1 20. Sft 

1144. Leo X. (Pope). An oval 810 

1152. Louvain (a Doctor of ), dressed in a black mantle • . 811 

1158. Lessius (Leonard), a Jesuit •.•...••« t6. 

1154. Lupus (Edward), a Musician ib. 

1 168. Lmigueval (Charles de), in an embellished oval • . 812 
1280. Leyden (Lucas Van), a drawing S^S 

7. Moretus (J. fi.), done for his tomb 7 & 26 

Maiema (Doctor) . • Rubenie Catalogue^ Lot 100. 81 

Mirandola Moretus* 26 

Maximilian (Archduke), Rubens' s Catalogue^ Lot 146. SS 

Medici8'(Marie de) • • Rubens* s Catalogue^ Lot 166* 84 

726. Same Queen . Dulwieh. 200 

828. Medicis (Catherine de), in an arm-chair . Blenhemu 242 

212. Monk, with a skull in his hand . • • • Munich. 70 

1870. Monk, styled Rubens's confessor . . Doria Palace. S55 

299. Men, two Portraits of old Fienna. 94 

478. Men, two heads of old Escurial. 185 

Man (an old) • • . . Rubens's CaUJ/ogue^ Lot 128. 82 

804. Man, a yeneraUe, with a gray beard • • . Vienna. 95 

806. Man, represented in a profile view, in black • DiUo. ib. 

1146. Man, with short hair and a beard 810 

1190. Same, a head of an old * 818 

1192. Same. A study for the head of the paralytic • . • %b. 

1241. Same; ahead. A drawing 829 

810. Maximilian L, clad in brilliant armour « • Vienna. 96 

1172. Maximilian, Archduke of Austria, dressed in black . 814 
466. More, Sir Thomas. A copy, after Holbein • EseuriaL 184 
560. Mantua, the Brother of the Duke of • . » . » • 161 

727. Mayne, Sir Theodore 200 



406 PORTKAIT8. 

Na Piigt 
727 & 1127. Mayerne, Sir Theodore Turquet . • . 200 & 307 

1142. Medicii, Cosino de, seen in a profile view • . • • SiO 

1143. Medicis, Lorenso de ib. 

1157. Minister, an English. A bust 312 

1 174. Marche, Gilbert de la, a gentleman with a bald head . 315 
Neubourg, Duke de . Jt^Aens'i Catalogtie, Lot 117. 32 

!S6. Ophoviusy Michael, in the habit of a Carmelite Hague. 13 

383. Same Picture, described .••••.. Ditto. 113 

793. Officer, a Spanish, wearing a laige hat 223 

1151. Olivares, Count, Duke of St. Lttcar 311 

Philip Duke of Burgundy • . Rubens's CiU., Lot 95. 31 

Philip IV. of Spain • . . IMttu's CaL, Lot \M. 32 

824. Same, mounted on a charger • • • Hig Majesty. 240 

229. Same King, richly habited AfwiicA. 75 

905. Same. A duplicate Mr. Mwrch. 268 

464. Same King, mounted on a fine charger 133 

923. Same, represented ina profile view Primce d^Areaberg. 273 

1231. Same. A fine drawing ««•••••••. 328 

538. Philip IIL, habited in black silk. Full-length Genoa. 154 

1175. Same, in an embellished oval 315 

Prince Cardinal . . • Rubens* i Catalogue^ Lot lOl. 31 

786. Plato. A bust portrait 221 

1257. Same. Drawn firom a bust • • 332 

%%7. Paroelsus. A portly man, wearing a fur cap. Blenkem. 242 

19. Rubens, PhUip XO 

805. Same. A bust portrait . . . Baron Mecklenburg. 227 

521. Same, with Grotius, Lipsins, and the Artist Ihrenee. 149 

73. Rubens, P.P. Apen^drawing •....••• 22 

181. Rubens with Us first wife, Elisabeth Brant Mumch. €1 

217, Same, with his Wife and a ChM . . . . Mumeh. 7% 

31 1. Same,.about 60 years of age, with a bat on • Vienna. 91 

510. Same,.about 45 years .of age, widi a hat on FhrencOm 145 

511. Same, aboutilO yean of age; bald head • • Florence. 146 
540. Same, about 50 years of age, with a hat. O.vaL Genoa. 155 
bb%. Same, about 42 years, with a laige hat on. HisMtifesty. 159 
760. Same. Represented at a window • • — Ora^^ Esq. 212 
777. Same, with his first wife . • . • Earl Grosvenor. 219 



PORTRAITS. 407 

No. ¥agt 

831. Rubens, with Helena Fonnan, and a Child. Blenheim, 24S 

844. Same, with a hat on 248 

880. Same, with a large hat on. A front view. M. Schamps, 260 

689. Same, with his wife on his knee .... Genoa. 154 

259. Rubens's two eldest Sons, when youths . Dresden. 83 

327. Same Licktenstein. 100 

780. Rubens's second Son, at the age of 15 months. Francfort. 220 

810. Rubens's son Albert, when a child 228 

1169. Same, when about eight years old . Earl of Radnor. 313 

1246. Same. A drawing 330 

915. Rubens's Son and Nurse, in a Larder. Marquis of Bute. 27 i 

1131. Rubens's Daughter, in a black silk frock. Earl Spencer. 308 

1193. Rubens's four Children, with two Maids 318 

1 194. Rubens's three Children, one of whom rides a large dog ib. 
402. Richardot, the President, and his Son . . Louvre. 120 
883. Ruzzola, a Carmelite monk .... M. Sehampt. 261 

1148. Rodrigo, Marquis de Castel 310 

1149. Rodrigo, Mother of ditto 311 

1366. Richmond, Lodowick Stuart, Duke of. Earlof Pomfret. 349 

1367. Richmond, Duchess of •...«.. Ditto. ib. 

1368. Richmond, James, Duke of Ditto. ib. 

Spinola, Marquis . • Rubens's Catalogue^ Lot 98. 31 

Spain, King and Queen of . Ditto, Lots 115 & 116. 32 

231. Sigismond, King of Poland Munich. 76 

429. Snyders, Francis, and his Wife. Formerly in the Louvre. 128 

1158. Sueiro, Emanuel. A knight, dad in armour . . . 312 

1229. Strmmer, Tobias. A drawing 328 

1244. Siamese Priest, , Ditto 329 

1245. Siamese Ambassador. Ditto ib. 

1258. Seneca. A bust from the antique 332 

Vinci, Lionardo da . . Rubens's CatatoguCf Lot 109. 31 

1165. Vicq (Baron de). Ambassador 313 

1166. Vicq, Wife of the preceding ib. 

1133. Urban, Pope. A frontispiece 309 

Tunis, King. After Ant. Moro. RubeM^s Cat., Lot 14S. 33 

182. Thulden (Doctor Van), with a book 64 

426. Tuscany, Duke of Louvre. 127 



408 FANCY AND FAMILIAR SUBJECTS. 

Na Page 

427. Tuscany, Duchess of Louvre. 128 

1129. Titian's Mistress. A copy, by Rubens. W. Cariwrigkt. SOS 

1135. Warrior, Portnit of a 309 

996. Youth in an ecclesiastical dress • . 289 



FANCY AND FAMILIAR SUBJECTS. 

Banditti pillaging Peasants . Ruberu's Cat.t Lot 90. 31 

898. Bagpiper embracing a Shepherdess 265 

1098. Boy eating Raisins • 302 

Copies, a great number of. Rubens* s Catalogue^ Lot 319. 35 
187. Children (seven) playing with festoons of Fruit. Munich* 65 

703. Same subject. Study for a ceiling 196 

373. Children (two) playii^ with a Lamb . . Potsdam* 1 10 

697. Children, Studies of the busts of two 195 

715.. Children blowing bubbles .... LordDamley. 198 

431. Car, a magificent. A drawing • . • . • Louvre, 129 

. 544. Cavalier endeavouring to embrace a Female . Turin, 156 

Drawings, a great quantity of. Rubens* s Catm^ Lot 318. 35 

Female (youi^), with Flowers . . DittOf Lot 102. 31 

838. Females (three) gathering Fruit • . . Blenheim, 246 

857. Female, seated disconsolately, in a landscape. Dulnnch, t5S 

1106. Female, standing naked, grinding colours . . . • 303 
217. . Gardens, with the Artist, his Wife, and Child. Munich. 72 

1116. Gipsy telling the fortune of a Lady, a young Thief, &c. 305 

1132. Girl, and two Boys with guns on their shoulders . . 308 
312. Infants (four naked) playing with a Lamb . Vienna. 96 

368. Same . Potsdam, 109 

593. Same 171 

366. In&nt8,Saviour & St. John,play ing with a lMEDb.Pot9dam, 109 

990. Same, caressing each other 288 

991. Same subject, differently composed . . . . • . 289 
. 681. Infimt, seated on a pillow .... Steengracht, 191 
1191. Infimt (the head of an), with a cap decked with feathers 318 

274. Love, Garden of • Dresden, 86 

457. Same Escwrial, 132 

.576. Same Madrid. 166 



BUNTS OF WILD ANIMALS, 409 

H«. Page 

S\$» Man (dd) approadung a bed* on whicb lies a sleeping 

. Female • • • • • 97 

'87l$. Man (yOung) and Woman» Bitting tt^tber. PalBdam, 110 

0t92. >fan and .Woinan» with two Children 194 

897. Man stooping to lift up a Vase • Prmee ^Arenberg* St65 

ns. Milkwoman 178 

886. N^o's Head. A smSing countenance M* Schampt, 292 

919. J^egroes' Heads Earl of Derby. %7t 

Peasants dancing . • • B»ben$*t Catalogue^ Lot 108L 81 

Peasanto fighting Ditto, Lot 149L SS 

feasant Deeding his Dog • « « • Ditto, Lot 299. 55 

874. Peasants going to Market • • • A» Baring, E$q. ftSS 

984. Parrot, of the macaw species. A study. M. Schamps. 261 

Shepherds and Shepherdesses. Rubetu's Cat. 82. 94, 80 & 81 

200. I%epherd and Shepherdess courting . • • Mvmch. 68 

Studies. Six pictures. Rubens'i Cat., LoU 816 & 817. S5 

1287. Studies^ on ten sheets of paper* Drawings • • • 828 

199. Soldiers atfarking and pillaging Peasants Mwndu 68 

620. Same . . . ^ 179 

t%^. Soldiers carousing before a country Inn . • Munieh. 75 

1120. Same » • • Mr. Gordon. 806 

899. Soldier (a Roman) dad in arnwor • . E. Gray, Esq* 266 

1105. Sultaa on horseback, accompanied by his Officers • . <808 

.Woman (old) and a Boy . . Rubens's Cat., Lot 125. St 

262. Woman (old) and two Boys,, with apot of embers. Dresden. 88 

487. .Woman bending on one knee • • • • • Lomere, . 129 

770. .Wpman with a lifted candle, and boy. Ld.FetferMkam. 216 

Warrior, in armour. Rabent^s Cat.^ 129. £. Gray, Esq. 52 

|109..Warrion, thebnstsoftwo .....•*.. 804 

996. .Youth, apparently speaking an ontion • • • « . 289 



I • ■ « 



HUNT? OF WI^iD ANIMALS. 

Atalanta and Meleager purtunig the Boar in a Forest 

Rubens's Cat., Lots 181 8; 168. 52 k 84 

<48..Sa|ne Russia. 157 

<78. Svfne^^See.alvf Fabulau^ *.••«•#*. 167 
▼OL. n. r r 



410^ BEAD GAME AND LARDERS, ^c. 

9ftS. Atalanta&Mdeager attacking the Boar . Lady Stuart. 275 
929. Sane,, differently oonip(Med.«^&eFa6if20Vf. « « • 276 
174. Boar Hunt* with 7 men on foot & 2 onhoraehack* Mimick. 61 
235. Same. Five huntsmen and seven dogs « • « • « 77 
254. Same, in a woody landscape. A sketch . Dreideu B2 

606. Same ,175 

719. Same. A sketch . • . Sale of Sir J. Reynolds. 199 
772. -Same, with the Death of Meleager. A sketch • • 217 
927. Same. Ladies and gentleman on horsehack. EarlDamley,275 
9S I . Same. Four on horseback & seven on foot. P. of Orange* 276 
109d. Same. A huntsman on foot attacking a boar • • • • 501 
258. Crocodile and Hippopotamus Hunt • • Jlfumci. 78 
Diana & Nymphs hunting. SeeFabuloui. Rubens't Cat. 269. 64 

552. Elk, the Death of the ..,...« Ruseia. 158 
722 & 726. HunU. A pair of sketches. Sale of Sir S. Clarke. 199 
247. Lion Hunt. Seven huntsmen, four on horsebadu MuniclL 79 

250. Same. Four men on spirited horses • • Dretdtn. 81 

251. Same, a study for the • « • * Bight Hen. R. PeeL ik. 

491. Xion Hunt EecuriaL 137 

645. Same. Three men attacking two lions* Earl ofDamUy. 185 

926. Same. Four men on horseback • • 274 

553. Lions. Three young ones near their den • • Rauia. 159 
903. Jions, a study of two • • • Prince ofSaxe Coburg. 268 

1359. Same subject «••»«• 348 

1243. Lion in repose* A drawing •»••••♦•• 329 

667. Xioness, with three Cubs »..•.»♦•• 189 

808. .Lioness stretching herself on the ground • » • • • 228 

Stag Hunt . » ^ » Rubens^s.CataloguetLotl54. 33 

656. .Stag Hunt. . Four men with dogs attacking a stsg » • 187 

« 706. .Tigers, in a Jandscqpe . « Sale of Sir /. Repnotdi, 197 

1360. Tigers eating raisins •...•.••••• 348 
925. Wolf Hunt. Three on horseback, 5 ontooiLA.Baring^Mq. 273 
925. Same. A repetition • • • . P. Methwen, Eeq. S7^ 



DEAD GAME AND LARDERS, &c 

84. Cook(a)4>ccupiedatadre8serr onwhichis^game • • 25 
}66..Elemcnts» four, pictures entitled the «.»!«. £9 



|>AND8CAPESi 411 

Mo. F9g€ 

79!S. Femak and a Sportsman in a Larder* C. Baker Esq. . 2ft2 

Han and a Wonuun with dead game. Rubem's Cat., 1 53. SS 

275. Man and a Woman^ and variety of game • Dretden, 86 

615. Same • 177 

915« Rubena's Son and Norse in a Larder. Marquis of Bute. 271 

785. Servants presenting a nobleman Fruit 221 

1222. Vq^table Market* with several women. A drawing • 327 
930. Woman^ Fruit, and a Sportsman . Earl of Plymcwthp 276 



LANDSCAPES. 

548. Ataknta and Meleager attacking the Boar • Riusia. 157 

578. Same 167 

397. Bird Catchers, and Men sawing timber. . Louore. 117 
1209. Bald mountainous View* two Goats, Sheep, and figures 323 
1219. Bushes, and Trunks of Trees. A drawing • ... 326 

Ck>ttage, with figures. Rubens's Caialoguet Lot 295. 35 

Coupk courting, in a landscape • DUtOf Lot 297. t5. 

1200. Ck>ws (three), one lying down ; three trees in the centre 320 

Cow-shed, with the Prodigal Sod. RubenisCat., Lot 169. 34 
Deluge of Phrygia, Baucis, and Phikmon 

RMbens's Catalogue, Lot 137. 33 

297. Same. Bauck and Philemon .... Vienna. 93 

687. Same SW T. Baring. 192 

474. Diana in the Chase. Two small landscapes. EscuriaL 135 

Escurial, and surrounding country. Rubens* s Cat., Lot 1 32. 32 

253. Escurial, situated on the side of a mountain. Dresden. 82 

1195. Same ..•••.... Earl of Egrenumt. 318 

Ftock of Sheep, in a landscape. RubeM^s Cat., Lot 112. 32 

240. Forest, illumined by the rays of the Sun • Munich. 78 

398. Festival (Village), numerous figures . • Louore. 118 

605. Figures, nine 173 

610. .Figures, Cows, Sheep, and a Cart laden with Vegetables 1 74 

654. Figures, Horses, Cows, and Ducks 186 

691. Fkt Country, enlivened with sunshine 193 

1 197. Female (a single figure) seated, and two Sheep . . 320 

1216. Farm-house, a Hermitage, and two PeasanU • . . SM 

248. Herd of 1 4 Cows, with two Women and a Man. Munich. 86 



4M LANDSCAPES. 

Ha nge 

249. Herd of nine Cows, two WomeD, a Man, and a Wag- 
goner on die ibre-hone of a team • • » . AftmicA. 80 

1206. Herdsman, with a flock of Sheep ; a Huntsman and 

Dogs at a distance • • • • Earl ef Carlisle. 9tt 

707. Horsegraaingonthehankof arhrer. EarlofMulgrme^ 197 

Huntsmen and Dogs RvbenaU Catalogue^ Lai lOS. 31 

750. Huntsmen and Dogs passmg through a forest • • • Ml 

781« Same suligect, smaller • • • Earl of M^lgraoe. tft. 

634. Hagar and Ishmael 182 

1228. Hamlet in Flanders, with a River, and Cattle watering 827 

818. Interior of a Cow*house, and a Snow Storm. HuMaf€9ty, 287 

Landscapes, Rulfent^t Catalogue^ Lois 188, 184, 188, 

186. 171 & 172 82^84 

Same, large. Rubeti^s Cai.f LaU 150 & 294* 88 81c 88 

688. Same 188 

868. Landscape. Skr P. Lely's Collegium, No. 688, p. 188. 164 

859. Same WilUm. 254f 

J217. Landscape, with Cattle and Figures. Lord G» CavemdUk. S2$ 

1240. Landscape. A drawing ••,*••.•• 829 

296. Ladies and Gentlemen sporting on a lawn Vietma. 92 

Moonlight. Rubens's Catalogue^ Lot 178. 84 

400. Man seated, with a Pipe, and two Couple courting. Lomtre. 119 

767. Man shooting a( Partridges • • . NatipmU Gallery. 214 
820. Man with. V^;etahles, &&«... HU Mt^eety. tSS 

1203. Man watering 2 Horses ; a Woman, 2 Cows, and a Calf 821 

1207, Man watering two Horses near a Bridgei trunka of. 

Tiees, and a Cottage 822 

1210, Man with a Basket at his hack, and a Woman with one 

on her am^ a flat scene , . 823 

1214. Man ai)d a Woman hending under the violence of a Storm 825 

1198. Men qnd Wom^ dancing to th^ m.usip of a Bifnpipe • 820 
1218. Men (four), husy with a loaded Waggon « . • . 826 

1202. Meadow? divided hyaravine; a Man watering his hone 821 
Pe^isapt ^tli Cattle. Rubens'a Catalogue^ Loi 296. . 85 

768. .Peasants returning from harvest^work ; Catde watering, 

and Ducks ..,•••• Earl qf Orjard. 245 

1199. Peasants (three), one is sealed near a post • . « . 820 



LANDSCAPES. 41 S 

No. Page 

817. Prairie de Lacken ; Women, Cows, &c. His Majesty. ftS7 
RuiDBot^Tempke. Xubens^sCat^^Lois 10S,106,&111. dl&S2 

. 4Tl..ReI]gioi]s Procession. EscuriaL 135 

575..Shepberd and Shepherdess • • .^ 166 

725. Shepherd Ikying a Pipe, and a flock of Sheep* Dulwieh, 200 

1201. Shepherd, with a flock of Sheep, and two horsemen .321 

1212. Shepherd playing a Pipe, a flock of Sheep, and a Dog 

Lard Fsamborough. , 324 

655. Satyrs, Nymphs, and Cupids 186 

686. Stormy &ky». with a transient gleam of sunshine « .192 
872. Stone Bridge over a Moat. A sketch . Lady Stnart. . 267 

1213. Spcttsmen (two), near a running brook, firing atdncks SftS 
1215. Shipwreck, on a bold mountainous shore T. Hope, Esq. ib. 

Tournament in a hmdacape. Rubens^s CaL^ Lot 104. 31 
396. .Tournament of Knights near the walls of a city Losnre 117 
273. Tigress suckling three Cuba, and a Lion near. Dresdaa* . 85 
787. Trayeller refreshing his Steed SideofH.DaioteSjEsq. 222 
509. Ulysses thrown on the Phseacian Coast • Fkrence. .144 
661. Villagera merry-making • • Thos. Emmerson^ Esq. ^ 187 

1227. Village in Flanders. , A drawing * 327 

Woman on a hill. Subens's CaUdogme^ Lots 298, 300, 301 35 
508. .Women, with turnips andgrass on their heads Florence, 144 

1196. Women (two), one milking a Cow, and two Men . • » $M 

1204. Women (two), passing a stream, and a Man with Cows 321 

1205. Women (two), one has a can and, a basket, the other is 

dipping up water •••••/. Harmon, Esq. Sift 
1208. Women (four), fording a stream,, beyond which is a 

nan with five Gotta • • • 323 

1211. .Women (two), one carries a rake, the other has a 

. basket of fruit •• •..•• 324 

547. Waggon descending a steep hank, and a man preventing 

its being overturned .. • Bussia. 157 

847. Waggon and harvesting Peo{de * Earl Grosvenor^ 250 

909. Waggon descending a bank . . • , Earl of Mtdgmve. 269 

680. Watering Place • . • . . IhkecfBwcckugl. 181 



414 FRONTISPIECES, VIGNETTES, ftc 



FRONTISPIECES, VIGNETTES^ MEDALS, AND FRIEZES. 

No. P^f| 

S42. Aogustos and Minerya snpportbg a Medallion. 

• • LtekUmtem. 104 

108. .Anguitan Gem, Apotheods of that Emperor . . • 90$ 

275. Angel deliveringCaptive8» and Angel destroying Heredca 554 

272. Augustin (St.) with a biasing heart, and several Popes 555 

283. Apostles (the Twelve), .each with a book • • • . 555 

284. Apocalypse ofSt. John, the Deity snrrounded with Elders 556 
524. .Apollo placing his Lyre on an Altar. A sleeping infimt, frc. 542 

528. JSame subject *•• 545 

526. Architectural Portico, with Zeno and Geantes, and 

Medallions, &c *. • 542 

552. Angels (two), holding a drapery, and sounding trumpeta 545 

285. Angels (two), supporting a drapery 556 

289. Same, with Saints Peter and Paul at the sides ... t&. 

841. Austrian Arms on a Pedestal, with decorations • • •• 545 

545. Archduke Albert and IsabeUa, holding up a drapery • jft. 

547. Arms of the Duke of Bavaria; Eagle and Peacock • 547 

564. Antique Bit for a horse, 5rc &c. ••••••• 545 

565. Architectural Designs for Palaces. A book • • • 549 

Allegorical Subjects, twenty-one 552 

Same, sixteen ••••«•• 554 

516. Bishop holding a Tablet, Peter and Paul, Faith, Hope, 

and Charity • « . . 541 

528. • Bust ; Time and Death easting Heroes into a cavern •• 542 
802. Commerce, with a Caduceusr Earth and Abundance at 

the sides •*•••••••••»•• 555 

852. .Cornucopia and Garlands decorate a Tablet. A Globe 847 

861. Combat of Dragons and other Monsters . , • . . 845 

Catalogue of the Duke of Buckingham's Pictures • • 549 

297. Deity, with Moses and Aaron, Abraham and St. Franda 555 

298. Same hs 1295 • . • ih. 

556. Drapery attached to a rustic niche ; Paul, the Hermit, 

and Anthonys 544 

291. Eaglie, with a thunderbolt in histalons, and trophies • • 557 

510. Elephant carrying a Tower 540 



FRONTISPIECES, VIONETTES, &c. 41^ 

Now Page 

1340. Escatcfaeon Burromided by a chain. Mercury and 

government ••«••••••«« 345 

Emblematical Subjects of doubtful originality • • .351 

1280. Fame putting a chain of Medals round the neck of a Bust 335 

1315. Fame,.8upported by Mars and Minerva • • • • • 341 

1276. Female on a Pedestal, with two torches, &c. * • • 334 
}279. Female personifying the Church. Saints Peter and . 

Paul at the sides ••«•«•••••« 335 

1311. Same, with an alteration in the arms of the Pope • ^ . 340 

1304. Female, with the Emblem of Eternity round her neck 339 

1329. Female persimifying the Church, supported by St. Peter 

. and St. Paul. 343 

1333. Female seated, holding a sceptre, surrounded by six 

females • t5* 

1342. Female seated on a pedestal, looking sorrowftilly at 

a tablet ••-•.••.••...• 345 
1345. Females,' personifying the Old and New Law, holding 

. Ji tablet . t5. 

1308. ,Genii^ two. One plays a lyre, the other a pipe . • • 340 
13iSl. Globe; over which is Justice between the signs of 

Libraomd Leo .... • « . • • 341 

1330. .Genius receiving the Implements of Art from Mercury 343 
J344. .Gevartius. His bust supported by Justice and 

Prudence .* 345 

1JS92.. History, with a torch in her hand. Mars and the 

.Goddess^f Peace are at the sides •••••• 337 

1296. Same, exceptmg that History holds the Arms of Spain 338 

1305. History writing. Mercury and a female at the sides • 339 
1314. Hercules and Pallas supporting the Arms of Spain • 340 
4350. H^nsittingonhernest ; aCock, an Owl, and a burning 

. ,Lianp ..««•••••.*•••• 347 

• 348 

• 837 

• 338 
. 337 
. 338 



1363.. H^ads, thirty-one, attributed to Van Dyck « 
1293* Janus (the Temple of) burst open by the Furies 
1298. 3ame subject ••«•••»••«• 
J 295. Isabella embracing the Queen, her mother • • 
)299. .Julius C«esar, Constantine, and Rodolph, &c» • 
J 300. Justice holding the Balance « • * ^ ♦ t .^ • • <& 



416 FRONTISPIECES, VIGNETTES, && 

No. 

301. Juitoa Ltpaitts, supported by Tadtnt and Seneca • • 938 

317. InfantSaviour, with across supported by two females 341 

318. Laurel Tree, to which are attached armorial brarings ti. 
358, 1359 & 1360. Lions and Tigers. Studies • • . 348 
271. Mercury and Minerva supporting a Cornice • • • 338 
274. Mercury and Ceres, at the sides of a pedestal • • « 334 

277. Monk presenting a Book to the Saviour and Virgin « tfr* 
273. Moses and a Prophet,.at the side of an elevation • • tfr. 

281. Moses, with the tables of the Law on top of a pedestd 335 

282. Moses surrounded by the Children of Israel • • • ib» 

260. Nymph reclining on the arms of a Triton • • • • 33t 

261. Same subject .•.•.•••••. t6* 

319. Philip IV. crowned by two Genii ••••.•• 341 
^27. Philip IV. receiving the homage of La Fsanche Compt£ 343 
325. Policy and Abundance supporting- an escutcheon • « 34i 

338. Paul (St.X and Anthony and other Saints, near a building 344 

339. Paul the Hermit, in a Cavern ; and other Saints aioond it t6* 
346. .Philosophical and Optical Problems demonstrated • • 346 
335. Peter and Paul (Sts.) supporting a Medallion • » • 344 

348. Peter and Paid (Sts.) supporting a Tablet » ... 347 

349. Same . ••«.•• §6. 

357. Progressive Studies of the Human Figure . • • • 341 

265 to 1270. Rubens (Philip), Sublets for a work by . 331 

303. JSdigion, with a Cross, supported by two Angels, &c 339 

312. Rome crowned by Victory. A Wolf and Captivea • 340 

313. jSame as preceding » • • i6. 

262. Sat^ holding a Goat by a string • • 331 

263. .Syren, with an inftnt in her arms, seated on a sea-hoise tft. 

278. .Solomon presenting his Book of Eoelesiastes to INvine 
Wisdom • • • 334 

286. Saviour with a Cross.. Two females at his feet ... 336 

307. .Saviour appearing to Mary Magdalen 339 

320. .Saviour bearing his Cross, ftinviting others todo the same 341 
306. .Samson finding, the Honeycomb ia the Jaws of a Lieo 339 
334. .Skin of an Ox, attached to a rustic Portico . • • • 344 
256. .A Swan seated on her nest •.••...,• 331 

1287. Triumphal Arch, surmounted by a globe and igoies 336 



FEONTISPIECESt VIGNETTES, ftc 417 

N«w Page 

1^83. Time drawing Truth from a Well and pIongiQg Envy in 55& 

1322. Title Page, surrounded by Infanta 342 

1331. Triform Bust of Mercury and Minerva. Two figures 343 

1354. Tablet with a Pelican. In the back*groand is St. Francis 347 

1355. Tablet decorated with^Laurels ; a liand.liolduig a oompais M,. 
1290. Virgm, and fi number of ^aipts below ber • * . * 337 
1294. Virgin and Child, Albert, and Angels with fetteia . . ib. 
1309. Victory and Mars. The arms of Spain 340 



Rubena's Dispute with the Arquebnsiars .4 

His Letters to Geldorp 1637. ^Al\ 

Thirty-six Pictures destroyed by lightning in the Jesuit^^ . ^ 

Church at Antwerp,^ July 18, 1718 .,.«... 16 

Pietures inserted in a Catalogue of Rubens's eflbcts, after . 

his decease • . • • 30 to 35 

Munich Gallery 60 to 80 

Dresden Gallery 81 to 87 

Vienna Gallery ^ 87 to 99 

LichteDstein Collection 99 to 105 

Potsdam Gallery .,.,.... 105 to 110 

Louvre Gallery ,. ... ^. ....... . 114 to 129 

Escurial and Spain 131 to 143 

Florence Gallery 143 to 151 

Ro9ie . . ..... . . .. .. .. ......... . . 151 

Genoa and Turin Collections 155 & 1^6 

Hermitage Gallery, in Russia 156 to 159 

Observations on the Merit of the Chapeau de Paille . . • 229 

His Majesty's Collection • ^ . . . 237 to 241 

Marlborough Collection 241 to 249 

Drawings sold in the Collection of M. Mariette, 1775 • . St^ 

Frontispieces and Vignettes for Books 333 

A List of thirteen Pictures formerly in the CoUection of the 

Duke of Buckingham •' •- # « w 349 

Various Subjects attributed to Rubens ^l the Cataloj^ of 

Hecquet, afterwards noticed by Basan, ahd inserted in » 

this Work for the gratifieatioD of the curious • • • ^ .351 

▼0L« n« GO 



419 HEFEEENCES IN THE LIFE. 



ScHOLAJtft CoAB/VTOEs, and Imitatoes • •' • . ^' • • ' 856^ 



REFERENCES IN THE LIFE. 

Rubens visits Italy for ImproYement • • • • 1600. xvi 

He is sent Envoy to Madrid •••••• 1604. xviii 

He quits Rome for Milan 1607* xzii 

Rubens returns to Antwerp in consequence of the 

death of his mother • • » 1608. xxiii 

He marries Elisabeth Brant 1610. 

He paints the Luxembouig Pictures • • • » 1620. 
His Introduction to the Duke of Buckingham 
He sella his Collection of Works of Art to the 

Duke of Buckingham 1625. 

Death of Elisabeth Brant 1626- 

Rubens goes Envoy to Spain 1627. 

His Visit to the Duke of Braganxa • • • • *• §(• 

His Arrival at the English Court . • • • . 1629. 

He is kn^hted and quits England • • • • • 1630. 

He returns to Brussels and is sent to Spain • • 

He marries Helena Fonnan ••••••• I68I* xhii 

He is sent on a Treaty to Holland • • • • • 16SS. xlir 

Battle of Nordingen 1664. zlv 

Prince Ferdinand's triumphal Entry mto Antwerp 1685. zhi 

Rubens's Death . . • 1640.' 

Obsbrvations on his Works ••••••.• fir 

BHD OF ?ABT THE SECOND. 



ERBATA. 

p. 5, line 29, inttead of " on one of Ae exterior ess—/' res^ m n/ 
uUrkr t/mii$ tf the eooert. 
Na 140, p. 50, for *< ten" read ekoem figurei. 
No. MS, ^ 162, initeadbf « fotmeriy" read aow» 



The Wriier of the CaiaJogue Baisonne^ 
bigs 'rupecffuBjf to offer his assistance prqfissumaify fir the 
Purchase and Sale ofPictures, estitnaHng their value^ ascer- 
tabwig the Masters by whom (hey are painted^ making Cata- 
logues of Collections j and giving an opinion relative to their 
state and preservation, 

TTie practice and experience of nearly twentyfioe yearSj in 
the commerce of Works tf Art, aided by arduous study and 
zealous attachment to the pursuit, are the jual^icaiions which 
the Writer ventures to adduce as some recommendation to the 
cof^dence qf Gentlemen who may have occasion to employ him 
Jbr either qfike above-named objects. 



It mustie obvious^ to Gentiemen, that no species of" property 
isqf a more uncertain value than Pictures, arising Jrom a 
variety qf causes; one qf which is the difficulty which the 
inexperienced eye Jiels* in ascertaining correctly their origi- 
nality and their consequent value ; another, is the accidental 
event qf a paucity qf buyers. These, and other difficulties qf 
the kind, may Jreguently be obviated by consulting a person 
conversant in such matters, by whose advice much valuable 
property may often be preseroedjrom loss, either by premature 
and injudicious sale, or the infurious effects qf time. For a 
copious notice qf these subfects, the Reader is referred to the 
Introductioii qf the First Part tfthis Work. 

No. Id7» Nbw Bohd Stbxst. 



PART THE THIRD, 



COWTAINI1IO 



THE LIFE AND DESCRIPTION 



OP THE 



WORKS OF VAN DYCK, 



WILL um 



PUBLISHED IN MAY. 



ioxdom: 
rmixTJU) BT T. Bmnriix, bupk&t steset, batmaekst. 



PTIOJ 



a 



ifip 



'^ 



x