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Full text of "Account of the great conflagration in Portland"

ACCOUNT 






Ml llll 



Great Conflagration . 

IN 

PORTLAND, 

• >'*{ ■ 
By JOHN NEAL; •' 

o 

NEW BUSINESS GUIDE, 

• GIVING 

►•* 

•I 

Removals, Changes in Business, &c. . 



( 



\ | '" PORT LA ND': 

\ | roMl'IUCir A\l> PUBLISHED Bt STARBIRD & TWMOHELL, . , ^ % 

L$66... * 



u 



MONITOR PRINT., in MIDDLE ST. - . * J 



PENSIONS, BOUNTIES 



P 



J v i >u jcjl IW kJi', IM -fcl Y x 



Z. K. HARMON, 

ESTABLISHED I3ST 1850. 



BOUNTY MONEY 



Soldiers-who enlisted for three years and hare received flnlj $100 l*. S. Bounty, cad 
now obtain $100 more. Those who enlisted for two years, and have received only $100, 
can < >l»r:i in $50 niore : also the same sums t<> those who enlisted for the above terms, and 
were discharged by reason o$ -wounds received while in h'n< j of duty. Those who were 
kill< (1 or died in service, or have died since leaving the service of wounds or disease, con- 
tracted while in servi -e, Hie same bounties can be obtained for their willows, children or 
parents in the order named. 

WIDOWS' PENSIONS. 

Widows now receiving $8 per month, can obtain s.' additional per month for each 
ehilil nuiler sixteen \ ears of age. I n all eases where a deceased soldier or sailor has left 
two or more children, whose mother has died or married again, said increase of $2 ]>er 
month can be obtained for said children. 

SOLDIERS' AND SAILORS' PENSIONS. 

All Soldiers and Sailors who are totally and permanently disabled, so as to be unable to 
perform any manual labor, can obtain a* pension of $30 per month. And all such who 
have lost a hand or a foot, or who are totally and permanently disabled in either, can ob- 
tain a pension of $15 per month. 

All advice free. Fees from ^.">, to $10, according to the trouble and expense in prosecut- 
ing the claim, and no charge unless successful. Applications should be made in person or 
by letter to the undersigned, at 

No. 12 PvlAKKET SQUARE, 

Opposite the Old Citj Hall. 
About Jan. 1st 186", my Office will be at the old stand in .lose Block, No. 88 Exchange 

Street. 

Z. K. HARMON, 

Portland. Sept. 18W1. 



SIXTEEN YEARS "AMONG THE PENSION PAPERS." 

Mr. II. has been in constant practice a- Claim Agent in thi> pity for over sixteen years. 

and we believe is tin I\ person in this county who make- ii his exclusive business. He 

was for twelve years of the we'll Unou n lirm of Bradford & Harmon, ami until latelj of 
the firm of Harmon & Sawyer. We venture to say that Wr. II. has made and filed more 
claims and larger ones, than any other Agent in this State, and what is still better, he 
always deals fairly and honorably with his clients, paying over p'romptly the full amounts 
due them. We ran confidently recommend him to all having claims against the Govern- 
ment, as a suitable person to prosecute their claims. Portland Press. 



j.. jh. fc> A U Jx-ttiX . 



4> v 





Having had large experience in Building, 

Of which he can refer to Prominent Buildings in various parts of the city, 

oeifibifls his sepi^ices, 

In the line of Masonry to the public generally. He is prepared to do all kinds of 
At the shortest notice, and in the most thorough and workmanlike manner, such as 

SETTING STEAM BOILERS, 

Of the various descriptions in use. 

COOKING RANGES, 

FURNACES, GRATES, 

CHIMNEY PIECES, &c 



Also, Plastering, Whitening, Whitewashing & Stucco Work, 



/ lie has had thorough experience in 



setting Gas Retorts, and offers his services at 



I moderate rates, to other communities who have introduced, j>r are about introducing Gas, 
j and would refer such to his work at the Portland' Gas ( 'ompany's Works. 

; Orders Hit at No.r, Tote Street, or addressed to Post Office Box 1760, will receive 

i » 

J prompt attention. 



*«- 



BLANK BOOKS 



torn 



OIF -A-LIL, KIMDS 



■0 



1S4 Fore Street, 



Make the Best Blank Books 



IN THE CITY. 

While they prefer that Books of their manufacture should speak for themselves, or 
that those who use them should proclaim their excellencies, they desire to call the atten- 
tion of Merchants, Bankers, and all who wish to select from a LARGE STOCK of 
Custom Made Blank Books, or who wish their Books made to order, that thev keep the 
LARGEST stock of BLANK 15< )( >KS and Blank Book Papers on hand in the State. 

They have the largest and best arranged BINDERY in the State— they emplov none but 
the most experienced workmen— they warrant every Book made by them, and " 

Sell First-Class Books at Reasonable Prices ! 




SHOULD B U Y T H E T R 



BLANK BOOKS 



v ij o m 



OYES 



184 Fore Street, until Dec. 1st, 1866. 



ACCOUNT 



*' OF THE 



Great Conflagration 



IN 



PORTLAND, 



JULY Wi & 5lh, /866, 



By JOffiST NEAL; 



AND A 



NEW BUSINESS GUIDE : 



GIVING 



Bemovals, Changes in Business, &c. 



PORTLAND : 

COMPILED AND PUBLISHED BY STARBIM> & TWITCHELL. .* 

1866. ' * I 

SIOJUTOR PRIST., 171 MIDDLE ST. * 






Atwell & Co., 

ADVERTISING AGENTS, 

174 Middle Street. 

Order Slate at Merchants' 1 Exchange. 



B. Thurston & Co., 

STEAM BOOK AND JOB PRINTERS 

Jose's New Building, 175 Commercial Street. 



- 



Davis Brothers, 
BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS AND BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURERS, 

Best Blank Boolcs in the Country. 



N 



THE GREAT FIRE. 



PORTLAND AS IT WAS— IS-AND WILL BE. 



About five o'clock, on the afternoon of our great National Sab- 
bath, while our streets were crowded with strangers from all parts 
of the country, and what seemed to be the larger part of our whole 
population was about, enjoying the delicious weather and waiting 
for the fire works — the balloon-bubble having burst, like a forerun- 
ner of the great catastrophe at hand — the tinkle of a distant 
fire-bell was heard, and soon after, the rattling of engines on their 
way toward Commercial Street. 

No alarm was felt ; we had been so greatty favored, that we had 
grown boastful and presumptuous. Our largest fires had always 
been so well managed, our fire companies were so zealous and 
faithful, and our losses for a long time had been so trifling, that 
although insurance rates were unreasonably low, in comparision 
with rates elsewhere, very few of our people had more than a 
third or half insurance, while others b}' hundreds, had no insurance 
at all, and some few of our large property holders had been long 
in the habit of insuring themselves, or of insuring in home offices 
with small capital, upon the ground that all such business had 
better be kept at home — forgetting that, if the principle were sound, 
next-door neighbors might as well insure each other, and the 
system of mutual endorsement be applied, in the shape of mutual 
guaranties against fire. 

For the first half hour, indeed, so little concern was felt, that 
very few among the thirty odd thousand inhabitants of our pros- 
perous and beautiful city — one of the most beautiful and prosper- 
ous on the face of the earth — took the trouble of ascertaining for 
themselves what the danger was, or which way the wind blew. All 
sorts of stories were abroad. The fire was located in half a dozen 
places, and more than once the cry of " All out !" was heard, and 
the alarm bells were stopped for a season, only to be set a-going 
again, with more vehemence than ever, after a short interval, just 
as it had been about two weeks before, when the five story brick 



mill of Mr. Walter Corey, the great furniture manufacturer, Avas 
partly destroyed, and the whole neighborhood of Exchange Street, 
now laid in ashes, was threatened with just what has now happen- 
ed. 

After awhile, however, a gentleman riding through State Street, 
where the people were congregated by parishes, stopped long 
enough to say, that while over on Cape Elizabeth, he had seen 
enough to satisfy him, that the fire which had originated in a boat 
builder's shop on Commercial Street, near the foot of High Street, 
would certainly take the great Sugar House establishment of 
Brown & Sons, that he had lost no time in communicating with 
one of the parties, and that the buildings were already on fire, in 

several places. 

But, inasmuch, as they had been constructed with great care, by 

a man of remarkable sagacity, prudence and foresight, and were 
well nigh, if not altogether fire-proof, and though covering a vast 
area, were completely walled in from the whole neighborhood, it 
was taken for granted that just there, if nowhere else, the fire 
would be stopped, or go out of itself ; so that for a long while, 
there was nothing of consternation or hurry to be seen, and very 
little anxiety or alarm felt, beyond the immediate neighborhood. 

But by and by the wind sprang up ; a great roaring was heard afar 
off, and coming nearer and nearer — the door-steps and house-tops 
began to be crowded with breathless listners — all conversation was 
carried on in a low voice, and consisted of little more than brief 
hurried questions and answers ; the heavens gathered blackness, 
and a hurricane of fire swept over the city, carrying cinders and 
blazing fragments of wood far into the country, and actually firing 
houses on North Street, more than a mile away, and soon after, in 
Falmouth, five miles distant. 

By this time people began to think of Him, who "maketh his 
ministers a flame of fire." Hands and hearts were lifted in suppli- 
cation — the wings of the destroying Angel seemed overshadowing 
the city — God's judgments were abroad, and voices, almost un- 
earthly in their earnestness, were heard coming up out of the dark- 
ness below. 

Then came the crash of walls — the screams of women and 
children, fleeing for their lives, or huddling together at the corners, 
among their broken furniture and household goods — the blast of 
trumpets — the blowing up of buildings — heavy explosions— the fall 
of spires and chinches, and huge warehouses, like the tumbling 
battlements of a beleaguered city, carried by storm. 



5 

On swept the whirlwind of fire, spreading out like a fan as it 
went, directly through the wealthiest and busiest part of our city ; 
and with such inconceivable swiftness, that people knew not 
whither to fly for safety, and household furniture and costly mer- 
chandise had to be moved again and again, only to be burued up at 
last ; and fire-proof warehouses, with iron shutters and slated 
roofs, crumbled and fell in heaps before the terrific heat. Masses 
of iron melted — even a mortar used for a sign to an apothecary's 
shop, on being struck by the firey blast, fell upon the pavement, 
like melted lead. Kegs of nails were fused into solid masses, and 
glass and crockery into jewels, that seem to be greatly prized by 
the curious, as relics. 

Most of the streets hereinafter enumerated were all on fire at 
once ; and though the fire companies belonging to the city, as well 
as others from Bath, Lewiston, Saco, Biddeford, Augusta, Gardi- 
ner and Boston, labored on, hour after hour, without quailing or 
flinching, in the midst of danger as great as that of the battle-field 
— with falling chimuies and tumbling walls, and showers of bro- 
ken slate, and clouds of smoke, and blazing cinders all about 
them, and a suffocating, scorching atmosphere that few could breathe 
in safety, they only succeeded in staying the conflagration along 
the outskirts ; leaving the main current to exhaust itself, at 
a distance of more than a mile from the place where it origi- 
nated — sweeping away most of our public buildings, no less 
than eight churches, all our banks and insurance offices, and law 
offices — all our printing establishments, all our dry goods and shoe 
dealers and jewelers, and business blocks, both wholesale and re- 
tail, along the streets mentioned ; eight hotels, three large school- 
houses, and over one hundred — more than half — of all our manufac- 
turing establishments — and stopping only in one direction for lack 
of material ; in another at a sand bank, and in another at the old 
grave-yard, where lies accumulated the dust of a larger population 
by far, than our city now numbers among the living ; and where an 
eye witness asserts that he saw a great multitude rushing hither and 
thither, like so many distracted creatures, in the midst of rolling 
clouds and flashing fires, as if the sheeted sleepers had been scared 
to life. 

No experience we have had was fitted to prepare us for the terri- 
ble catastrophe. Our fire department was admirable, and supposed 
to be efficient — with two or three exceptions perhaps — for every pos- 
sible contingency, and the behavior of our fire companies, worthy of 



the highest praise from first to last ; marry of them leaving all they 
had on earth to be destroyed, or pillaged, while they occupied the 
fore front of the battle ground — acquitting themselves like men, 
together with the brave, generous fellows from out of town. But 
from the first, or within two hours, at furthest, it was seen that 
steamers and fire companies, however efficient, on all ordinary oc- 
casions, were entirely powerless, within the immediate range of the 
Destroyer. Water was of no use : it was instantly converted into 
flame, flashing up like gunpowder, when it struck the glowing mass, 
and so fierce and terrible was the onset, that many barely escaped 
with their lives, while yet the danger was believed to be far oft". 
One brave woman told me, that after spending whole hours in get- 
ting ready to move, when it should become necessaiy, while her 
husband with one or two friends were carrying up water and pour- 
ing it on the roof, she w r as suddenly called upon to flee for her life, 
while yet the roaring seemed afar off. She had just time to escape 
with her two children, followed by her sister leading one little 
child and carrying a dead baby on her arm, when the air was al- 
ready so hot, it scorched her throat, and she had to clap her hand- 
kerchief to her mouth, and run for her life, leaving house and furni- 
ture, and clothing ; all she had been getting together with such 
provident care, to be consumed, almost instantaneously. Within 
three minutes — or at the most, five — after the surge struck the Sec- 
ond Parish Church — Dr. Paj'son's — on Middle Street, their house on 
India Street, was in a blaZe. We have all heard of prairie fires, out- 
stripping horses, at full speed, and of fires in our own woods, from 
which the swiftest runners found it hard to escape, but nothing of 
like this in a city. 

No human being would believe that such swift destruction could 
happen by the fires of earth. All that we knew In' personal ex- 
perience or otherwise — all they had ever heard of the great fires* that 
have laid cities in ashes, had failed to prepare the most timid and 
cautious for what followed. Two or three incidents will show the 
astonishing unexpectedness and suddenness of the attack, and the 
completeness of the destruction, where it was least feared. I 
myself, had ah office on Exchange Street, far out of the range of 
the fire. It was protected on both sides by brick w r alls, without a 
single opening, and on one side by a vacant store lot. In the rear 
was a new brick building, only two stories high, and all the back 
windows were fortified with iron shutters. Three times I passed that 
way, in the course of an hour or two, without an idea of being 



obliged to move my library and office furniture, and only at last 
consented to open my safe, and take awajr a small hand-basket of 
papers, owing to the urgent pursuasion of my family — for I knew 
of no safe place, even if I could have obtained a dray or a carriage at 
any price. Within the next hour, that building, together with the 
whole of a large block of stores and offices, running the whole 
length of Exchange Street to Middle Street, was a pile of ruins, 
and all the iron shutters they had put their trust in were shriveled 
like parchment, and fluttering, like old clothes, on the cross wires. 

At one time, while the large wholesale dry goods dealers, com- 
mission houses, and others, were hurrying off their merchandise in 
drays and carts and boxes, though the fire was not within a quarter of 
a mile of them, it changed its direction, and began to threaten a block 
of our handsomest warehouses on Middle street, four and five stories 
high, with iron shutters in the rear. Of the hundreds that stood 
watching its progress, in breathless anxiet}', not one perhaps be- 
lieved it possible that it should overleap that high barrier, and even 
the occupant of one, Mr. Bjtou Greenough, began to believe the 
worst was over, so far as he was concerned ; but on came the fiery 
whirlwind ; all the streets, lanes and alleys roaring like so manj r 
furnace flues, and within five minutes from the time the blast struck 
that iron-clad lofty building, which seemed to have been provi- 
dentially left in its way, the flames were surging through all the 
windows, and reaching the Evans' block, another new, handsome 
and lofty pile, on the opposite side of Middle Street, through which 
it passed in a few minutes, without stopping, till it struck Mussey's 
Row, and uniting with currents of flame, driven by a strong wind 
through Plumb, Union, and Cross Streets, burst upon the Barbour 
block, the Fox block, the Post office and Custom House, and all the 
intermediate stores, till it reached Congress street, and broke over 
the new City Building, utterly destroying the whole, with the ex- 
ception of the Custom House and Post Office, which, though built of 
granite and iron, and supposed tfc be perfectly fire-proof, will have 
to be taken down and wholly rebuilt. 

At the great fire of New York in 1835 — happening in midwinter, 
it did not seem so strange that granite should crumble and smoul- 
der, though I have known masses a foot square, heated to a red heat 
and plunged into the sea^ at a temperature many degrees below 
zero, without crumbling, or undergoing disintegration beyond the 
edges. Yet here, the whole broad side of that magnificent build- 
ing, the Custom House, built of Qtiincy granite, or sienite, more 



8 

properly, flaked off, so as to resemble lime stone, and the corni- 
ces and heavy projections, were tumbling, to the earth in fragments, 
large enough to be very dangerous. Yet this was not in winter — 
but in the month of July, in midsummer ; and it was not owing to the 
sudden application of water when heated, for no water came 
near it, where the heavy walls and projections suffered most. And 
so it was everywhere — all the stone work — the granite, the gneiss, 
the Albert stone, the slate, the sienite — all fared alike, all were 
transformed into shapeless, incandescent boulders and broken frag- 
ments, as if they had been assailed by the frost of ages, and by the 
storms that wear mountains away, and overthrow piles, that were 
intended to outlast the pyramids. 

After raging for fifteen hours, in the direction it took from the 
first, diagonally, across the most crowded, and the busiest portion 
of our city, and along the outskirts, where it was occasionally check- 
ed, and turned into new channels, the conflagration stopped. The 
wind had providentially shifted, and there was nothing more to 
feed it, in the course it now took, till it reached a sand cliff, thirty 
feet high, which proved an effectual barrier, in that direction. 

But in these few hours, it had destroyed fifteen hundred buildings, 
laid in ashes 58 streets and courts, eight miles of thoroughfare closely 
built, thrown ten thousand of the inhabitants, houseless and home- 
less, upon the charity of others, and consumed upon a moderate 
calculation, it was believed, at least ten millions of property. Mr. 
Willis, our indefatigable annalist, in his exceedingly careful ac- 
count of the fire, published by the Transcript, estimates the area 
burnt over at two hundred acres — being about three quarters of a 
mile in length by one third of a mile in average width. But ac- 
cording to the representations of Messrs. P. Barnes, Jacob McLel- 
lan, our late Mayor, and Samuel E. Spring, a committee chosen for 
the purpose of preparing an appeal to the public, the area burnt over 
was three hundred and twenty, acres. By another computa- 
tion, with a map of the city before me, it would appear to be less 
than half the last mentioned amount — or only about one hunched 
and thirty acres ; but enough, with all this large abatement, to ren- 
der it one of the largest fires, of which w r e have any reliable accounts 
in the history of civilization. 

The great fire of London, which broke out on the 2d of Septem- 
ber, 1G6G, when the city contained less than 800,000 inhabitants, 
consumed eighty nine churches, 23,200 dwelling houses, 87 Parish 
churches, 6 chapels, the great cathedral of St. Paul, and four him- 



9 

dred streets, ravaging an area of 43G acres from the Tower to the 
Temple Church, and destroying property worth fifty millions of dol- 
lars at the time, or at least one hundred millions now, with no 
insurance; and yet, within less than five years, "the city was 
almost entirely rebuilt, " say historians, " in a style of far greater 
regularity, security, commodiousness and salubrity. " 

And so with Moscow in 1812. The fire raged for three days, 
7932 houses were burned to ashes, and palaces and churches, and 
warehouses full of the richest merchandize, without number. The 
loss to the government and city was then estimated at 321 millions 
of roubles, or something over four hundred millions of dollars ; and 
yet, within nine years " it had risen from its ruins in greater beauty 
than before the conflagration. " 

By the great fire of New York, in December, 1835, 648 build- 
ings were destroyed, with twenty millions of property; yet, within 
two years, hardly a vestige of the burnt district remained ; and 
after the fire of July 12, 1845, whereby seven millions of property 
were lost, between Broadway and Broad Street, the whole region 
was rebuilt in so short a time, that strangers could not believe there 
had ever been a great fire in that neighborhood. 

By that of Hamburg, in May, 1842, a great commercial city of 
one hundred and sixty thousand inhabitants, renowned for their 
free spirit, commercial enterprise, and great wealth, 1747 buildings, 
and 61 streets and 120 passages and courts were destroyed, and 
about 20,000 of the people left houseless. And yet, within 
the next following twelve years, a large portion of the city was 
rebuilt, with vast improvements, upon a regular plan, which has 
been followed ever siiice. Instead of the narrow, crooked, dirty 
and dark streets, crammed with wretched brick buildings of the 
ancient type, the streets are now broad, pleasant and airy, and the 
buildings handsome, spacious and convenient. 

Six times, within seven years, the city of San Francisco has been 
wasted by fire, and nearly destroyed, losing, in May, 1851, 2,500 
buildings, and seventeen millions of property, and at other fires, 
immediately following, enough to make her losses amount, alto- 
gether, to thirty millions — equal to four millions a year — and yet 
she has grown wealthier and stronger, and ( more populous, and 
more attractive, with every visitation. 

And just now — August 20th — we hear of a disastrous fire in 
Jersey City, where the loss amounts to nearly two millions, and 
of another in Norway, whereby, as late as the 16th o£ July, 1,500 
houses were burned, and 10,000 of the inhabitants left homeless; 
which seems to be like those periodical conflagrations of Jeddo 



10 

and Constantinople, where the houses are not to be numbered, but 
flash up and disappear, street after street, like their own fire-works, 
which have desolated so large a portion of other countries, and 
laid so many of our towns and cities under contribution, or in 
ashes, anJ brought upon us, beyond all question, the loss of 
millions upon millions. 

The very fire, which we are now giving an account of, originated 
with a fire-cracker, thrown by a heedless boy, upon a pile of scat- 
tered shavings outside of a boat-builder's shop. Other accounts 
have been given, to be sure, and Ex-Mayor McLellan believed, 
when I saw him last, that the first building was fired by sparks 
from a passing locomotive. But the question is now settled. 
There are witnesses to the fact that the fire was caused by a 
cracker; and Ave have the declaration of an engineer of the fire 
department that two other fires happened on the same day, froni 
the same cause, both of which were extinguished, without raising 
an alarm; and from another credible witness, that, to his certain 
knowledge, fires had happened on the two previous fourths of July 
from fire-crackers, in the same neighborhood, without spreading. 

And now let us ask with all seriousness, — are we to have cities 
ravaged, and. thousands of families impoverished, and millions 
upon millions wasted hereafter, that our children may be amused, 
year after year, with squibs and crackers, on our great national 
sabbath? or shall Ave prohibit, at once and forever, the importation, 
the manufacture, and the sale of such destructive playthings ? 

But for the hurry and bustle attendant upon a closing session, 
Ave happen to knoAV that Senator Fessenden would have introduced 
such a bill as Ave now want, and must have at the next session. 

And now, what are we to do? What are our prospects? "What, 
are our hopes? What grounds have Ave for consolation and 
encouragement ? 

Let us remember first how much Ave haA-e to be thankful for, 
and hoAV much more destructive the visitation must have been, had 
it happened in mid-winter, or at dead of night, or if both of these 
conditions had concurred. Owing* to the timely notice we had, 
to the favorable season, and the pleasant weather, only tAvo lives 
were lost, and they might have been lost by a common fire in the 
hoiise the parties occupied, for both Avere helpless from intoxica- 
tion. Had they cried for help, or had their condition been sus- 
pected, both might have been rescued, without difficulty or danger. 

Next, , what abundant reason for thankfulness have Ave, in 
the dry, pleasant weather, so long continued, as to be without 
example in our history. Had the rains Ave so much needed for 



11 

weeks before the fire, the rains that were prayed for so earnestly, 
and that we had a right to expect, because heavy rains, according 
to the evidence furnished by Prof. Espy himself, almost always 
follow large fires — had such rains fallen, before the people were 
provided with shelter, or even after they were encamped, we might 
have had an epidemic in our midst, if not a wasting pestilence. 
But instead of this, we have had the most favorable weather for all 
kinds of labor, for rebuilding to -advantage and for living in tents ; 
and though it has been warmer than was ever known here for so long 
a time, and the heat of the ruins, and the dust — without smoke — 
have been ahnost insupportable, with the thermometer up to ninety- 
six, ninety-eight, and one hundred and three, the labor of clearing 
up, and preparing for speedy renovation, has never been sus- 
pended for a single hour, even where the very pavements were 
calcined, the street railways warped into all sorts of contortions, 
and deep cellars were glowing like so many furnaces, with hard 
and soft coal, and with the few half smothered fragments of timber 
that were not charred through and through, or reduced to ashes; and 
the plentiful rains we have since had — after the poor outcasts were 
sheltered, having mostly fallen at night. 

Yet more — it has made us acquainted with ourselves, and 
with one another; it has brought forth our noblest characteris- 
tics — our courage, our cheerfulness, and our trust in God ; it has 
touched the hearts and awakened the sympathy, and secured the 
help of thousands and tens of thousands, throughout our whole 
country, and over the sea ; the contributions, in cash, having already 
amounted to over $500,000, and in clothing, food, building material 
and labor, to at least $100,000 more, as may be seen by table No. 1. 

Let me ask again— what are we to do ? Are we to feel discour- 
aged, or doubt the wisdom, or the goodness, of our Heavenly Father ? 
With the examples of Moscow, London, New York, Hamburg, 
and other large cities that have been wasted by fire — and which 
have so profited by the visitation, that, after a few years, it has 
proved to be, if not a blessing in disguise, at least a prodigiously 
over-estimated calamity, and well fitted, while trying our faith, to 
strengthen our trust in the Lord — what have we to fear ? 

At first, we are always led to exaggerate our losses ; but after 
the panic and terror, the. confused shouting, and the hurry and 
uproar have passed away, and we have begun to look about us, 
and figure up for ourselves, we are quite sure to find that we have 
greatly over-estimated our losses. The first impressions of a 
beleaguered city are always taken advantage of by the foe. The 
first approach of pestilence always leads to frightful exaggeration, 



12 

and oftentimes to groundless alarm. Before the fire was well over 
it was understood that all the insurance offices must fail, and that 
our losses would not amount to less than fifteen or twenty millions 
of dollars. But within a few days, it Avas demonstrated, by actual 
payments, that all hut two of our insurance offices were perfectly 
safe, and would meet every loss without quibble or delay, and that 
of these two, both home offices, and utterly wrecked, one would 
pay about 50 per cent., after being in business only a year or two, 
and sinking the whole capital, which had been subscribed by some 
of our leading merchants and property holders, and the other a 
smaller per centage, by instalments, beginning with 10 per cent., 
after having operated with great prudence ami astonishing success for 
thirty-seven years, until their live policies amounted to $1,150,000, 
of the whole number in force at the time of the lire ; and the aggre- 
gate loss began to be estimated lower and lower, until it sank to ten 
millions. But even that calculation appears too high, — perhaps 
much too high. For example : The total amount actually paid 
by the insurance offices up to the 14th of August, according to 
an official report in the Advertise?' of that day, was $3,159,450. 
See Table No. II. Add to this amount what may now be expected 
from the Dirigo and Portland Mutual, above mentioned, and we 
shall have $3,600,000 toward indemnification. Very little remains 
to be paid, all the above being anticipations, and little or nothing 
seems to be in dispute. Supposing the average of insurance to be 
two-thirds of the value destroyed, which cannot be far from the 
truth — for nobody is ever fully insured, except by accident, and 
most people are satisfied with insuring a half, or at most, two- 
thirds of what they have at risk, always hoping, if the worse comes 
to be the worst, in which hope they are justified by all past expe- 
rience, that they can save a large part of the rest, if not the whole — 
we then have the following results for our encouragement, after 
allowing an average insurance of two-thirds on the whole, in 
addition to the salvage, which was often considerable : 

Whole amount of insurance acknowledged, as per tabic. . . .$3,859,450 
Add one-third part uninsured by the sufferers, including 
salvage, and we shall have 1,284,483 

(Total amount lost by the assured $5,145,933 

i E we add to this, for the losses of those who had no insur- 
ance, either in the Dirigo or Portland Mutual, or elsewhere 
liable to question, about one-sixth, which would be a large 
estimate, perhaps, we have a further loss of 854,067 

And the sum total of. $6,000,000 

Being six millions, instead of ten millions, for the aggregate of 
our losses. 



13 

But from these six millions we are to deduct all the insur- 
ance money already received by the sufferers, being $3,459,450 

Also, the amount which maybe expected from the Dirigo 
and Portland Mutual, say 100,000 

All the cash contributions, as per table, up to August 25th. . 500,000 

All the contributions in clothing, food, materials for build- 
ing, &c, and all the private contributions, which, together, 
cannot be less than 100,000 

We have then $4,159,450 

"Which, being deducted from the aggregate loss of six mil- 
millions, leaves for the diminution of our capital, only $1,840,550 

So tlrat, although the loss of capital to our country may be 
six millions, the loss of Portland will be less than two 
millions. 

And even from this sum, there should be deducted the enhanced 
value of our building lots for stores and houses in the very heart of 
our city, owing to improvements in actual progress, — so large 
in the aggregate as to well nigh justify the declaration of one of 
our clearest headed and most enterp rising men, and the largest 
sufferer, by far, that the real estate of Portland was worth more 
the day after, than it was the day before the fire. Already, store 
lots on Exchange Street have been leased for more than was paid 
for the stores before the fire, and house lots on the new square can- 
not be had for less than two dollars a foot — more than double the 
average price they would have, commanded on the third of July 
last, and oftentimes with the buildings included. 

If these calculations are well founded — if they are not a delu- 
sion — if they are justified by the facts within our reach, what have 
we to fear? Nothing whatever, absolutely nothing, unless we 
should grow presumptuous and careless, and forget God, or provoke 
Him to repeat His admonitions. 

Already, as may be seen by Table No. Ill, we have underway, 
and nearly completed for occupation, about 300 houses and stores, 
and everywhere, within the business parts of the town, and along the 
outskirts, the cellars are emptied of the bricks and rubbish, the 
streets cleared, the walls run up, and whole blocks of stores on 
their way, to be larger and handsomer than ever, though not always 
as high, by one story, as they were before. 

And now let us see what may be reasonably expected hereafter. 
That great improvements will be made is clear. New streets are 
to be opened, others are to be widened and straightened, and we 
are to have what we have always much wanted, a public square in 
the very heart of the city, which, of course, will add greatly to 
the value of property in the neighborhood, and to the comfort and 
health of our people. 



14 

Our great commercial thoroughfare is untouched. Our whole- 
sale grocers, flour dealers, and commission merchants have escaped 
altogether, and even our wholesale dry goods' dealers, shoe and 
leather dealers, jobbers, and manufacturers, and machinists have 
had but a slight scorching. Our retailers are all at work, once 
more. Our banks are all re-established. All our insurance offices, 
and printing offices, and newspaper establishments, are in full 
blast — and all our doctors and 1 awyers. What, then, have we to fear ? 
I ask a^ain. What is there of discouragement or hindrance in our 
way, which may not be speedily overcome? We were astonish- 
ingly prosperous. We hail grown up to be not only one of the 
most beautiful, but one of the busiest cities on the face of the 
earth, and were enlarging our borders, lengthening our cords, and 
strengthening our stakes, in every direction, and our people had 
come to be known everywhere, as among the most active, enter- 
prising, and prosperous in our country. Our valuation had increased 
within a few years from ten to thirty millions, which, by the way, 
was far below the actual worth of our property, after deducting 
our mortgages ; and within fifteen years, no less than fifteen mil- 
lions, — being over a million a year, which must continue, of course, 
in a compound ratio: Our valuation being, for 1847, about 
110,000,000, for 1850, 813,364,000, for 1851, $15,000,000, for 1860, 
822,072,500, for 1864, 826,954,000, for 1865— not made up, but 
believed to be full 830,000,000 ; and our population had increased 
from 15,218 in 1840, to 26,342 in 1860, and could not have been less 
than 30,000 or 31,000 on the day of the fire. We had, and, still have, 
one of the best harbors in the world, with facilities for shipping 
and manufacturing almost unequalled. Our city, occupying two 
elevations, with the long ridge between, with salt water in front 
and reai-, and capable of drainage from every point, all open to the 
sea, and always swept by the wholesome land or sea breeze, and 
abounding in magnificent scenery, with the White Mountains for 
a barrier, our streets large ami wide, and crowded with handsome 
buildings, and over-hanging elms, and other beautiful forest trees, 
had become a proverb in all parts of the earth. 

And what is it now? Changed in nothing but in the loss of 
buildings, soon to be replaced, more beautiful and more convenient 
than ever; in the loss of trees, where most of them were no longer 
wanted, and in the temporary suspension of business, at a season 
of the year when our people spend most of their time in getting 
ready for the fall trade. That thousands of the poor have been 
living in tents, upon public charity for awhile, though the number 
of rations has been reduced from 7,200 to about 500 per day, and all 



15 

who are willing to work, even at very high price?, may have constant 
employment, and our worst neighborhoods have been purged by fire ; 
that many of our worthiest fellow citizens, our mechanics and 
laborers, our milliners and dress-makers, and our work-women of 
all kinds, have been impoverished, ^'ust when most of them bad 
begun to feel comfortable and secure, must be acknowledged. But 
what then ? They will not be allowed to suffer, and for the next 
two or three years we shall be among the busiest, and if Ave are 
wise, among the happiest, and most thankful communities to be 
found. A single twelvemonth, or two, at the most, will restore the 
capital we have lost, supposing what Ave have left to yield 
only six per cent, of surplus accumulation a year. Six per cent, 
upon twenty-eight millions, — the balance left in our hands after 
deducting our aggregate losses, which amount, as Ave have seen, to 
not more than tAVO millions, — being no less than $1,680,000 a year; 
and our a Average increase of capital having been, for the last fifteen 
years, a million a year. 

This being so, I ask again, what have AA r e to fear, if we are faith- 
ful to ourselves and to our convictions of duty, " not slothful in 
business, and fervent in prayer ? " The God of our fathers Avill not 
forsake us, if we do not forsake Him. And long before some 
of the oldest among us shall have passed away, Ave shall have 
a handsomer, a richer, a safer, and a much more beautiful city, for 
our habitation, and all that we have been called upon to suffer Avill 
be forgotten, or be remembered only as a subject for thanksgiving 
and congratulation. 

ENUMERATION OF STREETS BURNED. 

Some idea may be obtained, as to the character of the buildings 
destroyed, from the fact that the gas company have lost eight 
thousand dollars worth of meti-es, — being about one-third of all that 
were in use, — in addition to the waste of gas, through broken pipes 
and other sources ; and the following list of streets, partly taken 
from the Boston Journal of July 7th, will be a further help : 

On Commercial Street, where the haaAuest houses are estab- 
lished, with a feAV exceptions, every building on the north side is 
gone, from the coal office of W. H. Evans to Cotton Street. 

On York Street — Every building on the south side to Danforth 
Street; on the north, three buildings next aboA'C Maple Street, and 
all beloAV Maple and Danforth. 

On Maple Street — All the buildings betAveen York and Dan- 
forth, except one upon the corner of Maple and Danforth. 



16 

Danforih Strut — All the buildings on the south side, from 
Maple to Fore Streets, and all on the north side from the Gore 
house. 

On Centre Street — Brick building on the western corner, and 
all the buildings on the easteiy side, nearly up to Spring Street. 

On Cotton Street — Three buildings on the west side, near Free 
Street, and six or eight on the other Bide. 

On Plum Street — Every building on both sides, and among 
them the house of Dr. Carruthers, and the Portland Athenaeum. 

On Myrtle Street — From Congress to Cumberland, nothing on 
the westerly side is gone but the City Hall; on the east, all 
destroyed, except one dwelling house on the corner of Cumberland. 
On Exchange Street — A mass of ruins on both sides. Corey's 
large furniture establishment, all the book stores, jewelers' shops, 
insurance offices, banks, and everything, save the Custom House, 
from Fore Street to Congress Street. 

On Lime and Milk Streets — Everything swept away, with Milk 
Street and Warren Market, through to Congress Street. 

On Temple Street — Everything in ashes from Middle to Con- 
gress Sti-eet, on east side, and to Federal on the west. 

On Free and Middle Streets — Free Street Block, all gone, 
except Mr. Tolford's large store ; and every building on Middle 
Street from Free Street to India, except the store of D. F. Emery 
& Sons. Here were the principal dry goods establishments. 

On Federal Street — Shop of Marr Brothers, and Dr. Mason's 
apothecary shop were saved ; on the south side, every building from 
Chase & Co.'s hardware store, inclusive, to India Street gone, and 
on the north, every building from the Elm House to India Street. 

On Congress Street — From Temple to India on the north side, 
up to, and including the Catholic School, above Washington Street, 
and on the south side, everything. 

On Cumberland Street — On the south side, all the buildings 
from Myrtle to Washington Street, and thence up Munjoy, are 
gone ; and on the north side, all the buildings from the Radford 
frame house, corner of Pearl. 

On Oxford Street — Upper part all gone on both sides. • 
On Washington Street — Large number of houses destroyed — 
number cannot be correctly ascertained. 

On Fore Street — With the exception of three stores belonging 
to the estate of John Fox, every building on the north side from 
Centre Street is destroyed ; on the south side, from Cross to India, 
not a building: suffered. 



17 

On Cross Street — Both sides, from Fore to Middle Street, 
completely destroyed. 

Union Street — All gone; all the shoe and leather stores, Wins- 
low's machine shop, Grant's coffee and spice factory, and every 
building on both sides. 

Other Streets. — On Silver, Willow, Vine, Deer, Chatham, Frank- 
lin and Hampshire Streets, every building was destroyed, — and 
with them, Sebastopol, the Gomorrah of Portland. 

In addition to those before mentioned are the following streets 
and courts, either wholly or partially destroyed: 

Bradley's Lane — Wholly. 

Stephenson'' s Court — Wholly. 

Hank Street — Wholly. 

- Maple Street — Partially. 

Fox Court— Wholly. 

Ashland Avenue — Wholly. 

Garden Street — Wholly. 

Church Street — Wholly. 

Harrison Place — Wholly. 

Fremont Place — Wholly. 

Sumner Street — Everything to India, and greater part of the 
biiildings beyond. 

Chapel Street— Wholly. 

Quiticy Street — Wholly. 

Wilmot Street — From Congress to Cumberland, wholly; several 
buildings below Cumberland. 

Locust Street — Wholly. 

Mayo Street — Partially. 

Smith Street — Wnolly, from Congress to Oxford. 

Boyd Street — Partially. 

Poplar Street — Partially. 

Larch Street — Wholly. 

Anderson Street — Partially. 

York Place— Wholly. 

IngrahanrHs Court — Wholly. 

Dyer Street — Partially. 

North Street — Five buildings. 

India Court — Wholly. 

Hancock Court — Wholly. 

Montgomery Street — Wholly. 

Abysinnian Court — Wholly. 



18 

PUBLIC r.ULMXGS AND LARGE BLOCKS DESTROYED. 

Hall of Portland Society of Natwal History, Congress St., with 
all the furniture and collections, for the second time. This noble 
institution, founded and supported by private subscriptions, had 
just begun to carry out another of its great purposes, by a course 
of free lectures. It organized in 1835 — was transferred to the Cus- 
tom House building, where it lost everything by the fire of 1854. 
Again it was built up, and had gathered to itself, through the 
liberality of the State, in granting a half township, and by the 
help of individual contributions, property worth at least $25,000 
or $30,000. It has now lost everything but a few books, and a por- 
trait of Humboldt, from Mr. H. W. Longfellow, and must begin 
anew for the third time, undismayed and hopeful. 

Portland Athenaeum — Founded in 1820; opened Jan. 1,1827; 
established on the remains of the old Library Association, which 
was destroyed with the town in 1775 — revived in 1784, and con- 
tinued to this time with encouraging success ; its new and very hand- 
some building, on Plum St., erected in 1861, at a cost of $20,000, 
utterly destroyed, together with library of eleven thousand volumes. 
Library insured for $4,000 ; building, in Portland Mutual, for 
$2,000. 

Young Men's Christian Associatioti — Instituted 1843, lost 
everything; 1,000 volumes in library. 

Mercantile Library Association — Established in 1851. Lost 
everything, with a library containing over 3,000 volumes. They 
have, just received a donation of 500 volumes from the New York 
Mercantile Library Association ; and 200 volumes from the Boston 
Mercantile Library Association. 

Swedenborgian Church, Congress Street — Built in 1847. 

Third Parish Church, Congress Street — Built in 1809. Occu- 
pied by two societies before the present. 

Bethel, or Seamen's Church, Fore Street — First organized 1827. 
Church built in 1847. 

First Baptist Church, Federal Street — Built in 1803 ; rebuilt 
and enlarged in 1811. 

Church of the Immacidate Conception, Cumberland Street — 
Built in 1846. Cost, about $26,000. Value of all the buildings 
connected with it, over $140,000. To be rebuilt and ready for 
occupation in November next. 

St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, Pearl Street — First built in 
1802 ; rebuilt and greatly enlarged in 1839. 

Second Parish, Congregational Church, Middle Street — Built 
in 1788, Enlarged for Dr. Payson, about 1826. 



19 

First JJniversalist Church, Pearl Street — Built in 1821. Cost, 
$6,000. 

Casco Bank Building, Middle Street — Erected in 1850. Cost, 
$14,000. 

Cumberland Bank — Incorporated in 1812 as the Maine 
Bank, and so continued for ten years. All our Banks suffered 
severely in the great commercial convulsion and paralysis of 1837 
and 1838: in Portland they lost half their capital. 

Ocean Insurance Company's Blocks of three stores, Exchange 
and Milk Streets— Built in 1860. 

City Hall, Congress Street — A magnificent pile, with front of 
Albert stone, and wings and rear of brick and Albert stone. Here 
were all the town offices, county offices, court-rooms and record 
offices, corporation rooms, and one of the largest and handsomest 
public halls in the country. Built in 1862-3. Cost, $264,000. 
James H. Rand, architect. 

Custom House and Post Office — Begun for Exchange and stores, 
in 1839. Cost $100,000. Bought by the General Government for 
Custom House, Post Office, and U. S. Courts and offices in 1849, 
for $149,000. Destroyed by fire in 1854. Rebuilt, with large 
improvements, and made fire-proof, in 1855. An appropriation of 
$100,000 has just been made by Congress for repairing, but it will 
have to be taken down and wholly rebuilt. 

Sugar House — Portland Sugar Company — Building begun 
in 184f>. 

Estimated value of sugar-house building, before fire $118,410.00 
Estimated salvage, ..... 11,500.00 

Amount of loss, .... $106,910.00 

Value of machinery destroyed, . . . 161,128.70 

Stock in sugar-house destroyed, . . . 254,492.75 

Total loss, $522,532.00 

Total amount of insurance, . . . 275,000.00 



Actual net loss of the company, . . $247,432.45 

The fire is still burning here, (Aug. 22,) and in cellars elsewhere, 
and masses of timber still burning, though charred to a coal, are 
carted away. 

Wood's Marble Hotel, Middle Street— Built in 1854-5. Unfin- 
ished — upper stories lathed and plastered. Cost, $140,000. 

Large Block, built by Mr. J. M. Wood, corner of Middle and 
Silver Streets. Owned by J. E. Donnell. Occupied for diy goods, 
and wholesale shoe and leather business. Masonic Hall in upper 



20 

story, handsomely finished and furnished,— nothing saved but 
Lodge jewels, records and charters. 

Block on opposite corner, built in 1850, by J. C. Proctor. Cost 
of both blocks, 860,000. 

Granite Block, on Middle Street— Built in 1830, by Martin 
Gore, William Swan and others. Withstood both of the great 
Temple Street fires. 

Large Block, on Middle Street, opposite Post Oflice, known as 
the Advertiser Building. Built in 1856, by John M. Wood, at a 
cost of $14,000. 

Free Street Block— Built in 1853-4, by F. O. Libby and oth- 
ers. Cost, $60,000. 

Mussey's Block, Middle Street— Erected in 1856. Cost about 
$80,000. Wholly burned down three times, and partially once. 
On the same spot where Mr. Mussey lived when a boy; being 
rebuilt each time. The first bricks on Middle Street, after the fire, 
were laid here August 1. 

Hanson's Block, Middle Street— Built in 1857. Cost, $15,000. 

Barbour Block, Middle Street— Built by H. K Jose, in 1850. 
Cost, $20,000. 

Fox Block, on Exchange Street. — Built in 1853-4. Cost, 
$75,000. 

Jose Block, on Exchange Street — Built in 1856. Cost, 
$22,000. The Odd Fellows' Hall was in this building. Three 
Lodges and two Encampments held their meetings there. Nothing 
saved but charters and records. Loss, $3,500 ; insured for $1,500. 

Thomas Block, Exchange Street— Built in 1855. Cost $25,000. 

Jones's Mow, Exchange Street — Built in 1800; rebuilt and 
greatly enlarged in 1838 and 1844. 

The following is the list of losses paid by the Insurance Com- 
panies — furnished by Messrs. Foye, Coffin & Swan : 

JOHN E. DOW AND SON. 

Metropolitan, of New York $210,000 

Phoenix, of New York 85,000 

Niagara, of New York 76,000 

Manhattan, of New York 70,000 

Yonkers, of New York 30,000 

Hanover, of New York 35,000 

North American, of New York 68,000 

Baltic, of New York 13,000 

Columhia, of New York 25,000 

Springfield Fire and Marine 110,000 

Charter Oak, of Hartford 90,000 

Hampden, of Springfield 80,000 

Union, of Bangor, Maine 10,000 

Liverpool and London 6,000 

$908,000 



21 

J. B. CARROLL. 

Lamar, of New York ^.tH°J? 

Howard, of New York 38,000 

Go ,1)00 

FOYE, COFFIN AND SWAN. 

^Etna, of Hartford ^MS 

People's, of Worcester, Mass 52.000 

Norwich, of Norwich ix.t'.ou 

Fulton, of New York lit.ooo 

Arctic, of New York 21,000 

Insurance of North America, Philadelphia 30,000 

Royal, of Liverpool and London 23,000 

Lorillard, of New York 125,000 

Continental, of New York • 41 > 000 Q00 

J. W. MUNGER AND SON. 

Home Insurance, of New Haven ® 10 >i'2nn 

Howard, of Boston • At,!^ 

International oo ™ 

American, of Providence, R. I o ™ 

Elliot, of Boston „°>000 

Croton, of New York *>>000 

Merchant's, of Providence, R. 1 15,000 

30 (,000 

W. D. LITTLE. 

Phcenix, of Hartford • 40,000 

City Insurance Company, of Hartford Vnll 

North American Insurance Company, of Hartford 2J,Oo 

Merchants', of Hartford 22,500 

Harmony Fire and Marine, of New York IwJi 

Atlantic Fire and Marine, of Providence, R. I • • „™nn 

Western Massachusetts Insurance Co., of Pittsfield, Mass 32,000 

Atlantic Mutual, of Exeter, N. H • • 1.750 

New England Fire Insurance Company, of Hartford 8,350 

LORING, STACKPOLE AND CO. 

Security, of New York $ 3 7,000 

Atlantic, of New York 5,300 

Providence Washington, of Providence, R. I o ™n 

Astor, of New York 3,700 

Lafayette, of New York • J , wu mQ 

DOW AND LIBBY. 

Home, of New York & 1 } 3,000 

Market, of New York Jfi""" 

Adriatic, of New York 15,000 

Naragansett, of Providence, R. I n- » n 

National, of Boston *«**' 

Putnam, of Hartford »»000 

Germania, of New York • ih wu 

JEREMIAH DOW. 

Hartford, of Hartford ^i 5 .'^ 

Connecticut, of Hartford 17,000 

Albany City, of Albany, New York • 35,000 

JAMES D. SEAVEY. 

Farmers' and Mechanics' of Lowell $ 1* ,000 

Prescott, of Boston • 3,000 

L. S. TWOMBLEY. 

Relief, of New York $ 64.000 

Excelsior, of New York 11.000 

Standard, of New York • 15,000 ' 



22 

X. F. DEEDING. 

Manufacturers' Insurance Company, of Boston $228,000 

228,000 

E. WEBSTER AND SON. 

* Massasoit, of Springfield $ 70.000 

Holyokc of Salem 130,000 

Maine Mutual, of Gorham, Maine 5,000 

205,000 

*The Massasoit will close up, and not issue any more policies. 

H. R. STICKNEY. 

Park Company, of New York $05,000 

05,000 

WARREN SPARROW. 

Republic, of New York $27,000 

27,000 

A. K. SHURTLEFF. 

Dirigo, of Portland $400,000 

400,000 

EDWARD SHAW. 

Portland Mutual, of Portland $300,000 

300,000 

Total $3,859,450 

To show something of our first impressions, we give the follow- 
ing, from the Advertiser, which appeared with the foregoing list 
of losses from the insurance agents : 

" By the above it will be seen that after taking out the losses of the 
Portland Mutual and the Dirigo, which have not yet decided what 
share of their losses they can pay, the total amount paid by the 
several companies will not exceed $3,159,450, while the lowest 
estimated loss given by any party amounted to $10,000,000, which, 
after deducting the $3,159,450 paid, leaves a loss to the city's 
wealth, of $6,840,550. But the real loss sustained must exceed 
this amount. These losses will, in many cases, ruin the companies, 
as in the case of those in our city. The Massasoit, of Springfield, 
Mass., whose capital was previously impaired, will be obliged to 
close up its affairs. The Hampden, which was also in a precarious 
condition before the fire, will have its capital swept away, but 
nearly all of the New York, Boston, and Hartford companies will 
probably be able to survive the blow." 

It is now thought that some eight or ten companies will be 
obliged to close up their business, in consequence of the losses 
incurred. 



OUR FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

This is not what it should be. It must be enlarged and reformed. 
Our average yearly loss by fire, from 1843 to 1849, both inclusive, 
was $103,795 ; from 1854 to 1859, $46,867.89 ; from 1860 to 1865, 
$42,305.00. Yet we have only four steamers, with fifteen men 
each, one hook and ladder company, of twenty men, and five 



23 

men constituting the board of engineers — in all but eighty-live 
men. 

Our total yearly expenses, for the fire department, for a long 
while, has averaged only $11,000 a year, while those of Roxbury, 
Mass., a town of about 30,000 inhabitants, were no less than 
$27,5:2:2.14, last year, and the average yearly losses for the last 
fourteen years are about $18,900. And yet Roxbury is near to 
Boston, Charlestown, Chelsea, and Cambridge, while Portland is 
fourteen miles away from the nearest help. 

We had one steam fire engine from Saco, one from Augusta, and 
one from Lewiston, the next day, all of which were in the thickest 
of the light, and maintained their position to the last ; with one hand 
engine from Bath, one from Gardiner, one from Biddeford, one 
from Libby's Corner — not included in the Portland fire depart- 
ment—and a company from Boston, without their engine, all ren- 
dering valuable services where they were most needed, and 
often where the danger was greatest ; and by outflanking the fire 
and heading it oif, the upper part of the city was saved from total 
destruction. 

Some idea of the steadfastness and perseverance of our fire 
department as a body, may be had, from the fact that our steamers 
made from eight to ten different settings each. 

Some of the engines were in great danger, the fire spread so 
fast, that two or three had a very narrow escape. It was reported, 
and believed, for a time, that several were out of the city, attend- 
ing celebrations elsewhere, but the story had no foundation. 

The Casco, one of our steam fire engines, was laid up for repairs, 
and lost in the fire. Much of our hose-pipe was too farj gone for 
service, upon such a trying occasion, so that our firemen were 
greatly embarrassed and delayed, and continued working to great 
disadvantage up to the last. All the hand engines were on the 
harbor side of the city — the steamers on the west side, throughout 
the struggle. 

Of the sixty-two fresh water reservoirs, thirty were completely 
drained — or more than one-half of the whole supply within our 
city limits, over and above what was taken from cisterns, and wells, 
and from the harbor. 

Our people were out by thousands, to see the balloon ascension, 
the circus, and the trotting park; and among them were about the 
whole of our police force. Hence the unaccountable delay in 
giving the alarm, which allowed the fire to get such headway, by 
the time the engines arrived, that the most determined and heroic 
efforts seemed to be utterly thrown away, and the water itself, 



24 

though emptied upon the fire by tons and tons, of no use whatever, 
but to exasperate the flames. At the beginning, the shop where 
the fire originated might have been carried oft' bodily, or levelled 
with the earth, in ten minutes, by a dozen men. 

The whole fire department of the city were at work, almost 
incessantly, from Wednesday night until the Sunday night fol- 
lowing. Meanwhile, we were supposed to be thronged with 
incendiaries and ruffians from New York. All strangers were 
narrowly watched and followed, and one fellow was caught in the 
act of setting fire to a house on Munjoy, after a second or third 
attempt. An alarm followed on Sunday, while our churches were 
crowded — but they were soon emptied — which almost frightened 
our people out of their senses, the fire being reported at Lancaster 
Hall, a large building in the heart of the city, surrounded by moun- 
tains of combustible material, and crowded with furniture and 
merchandise, and then, toward night, a thunder storm followed, and 
the tall spire of State Street Church was struck by the lightning, 
and before a proper length of hose could be brought to bear, the 
flames were bursting through the side, two-thirds of the way up, 
and the nearest neighbors were getting ready to abandon their 
houses. But after a half hour's delay, caused by the want of suffi- 
cient hose, the fire was soon extinguished, and we began to breathe 
freely once more. 

Three engines, and one hook and ladder company, were all 
ready at Boston, waiting for the telegraph ;• and at the Amoskeag 
Works, Manchester, they had two fine steamers, all completed, 
with thousands of feet of the best of hose. Mr. Straw, the Superin- 
tendent of those works, informed the Committee of our Fire Depart- 
ment, when they visited the works, shortly after the fire, that if 
he could only have known of the fire, he would have had them 
both here in two hours from the time he received the information? 
and no one can estimate the benefit they might have done us. He 
had been telegraphed to, but the office was closed, and he received 
the despatch the next morning, while at breakfast — it was the first 
news he had of the fire. With all the feeling of a generous man, 
he lamented the loss of an opportunity to do our citizens 
a favor, which they never Avould have forgotten, and it is but fair 
to his workmen to say, that they shared in his chagrin. 

INCIDENTS, &c. 

There were many strange and solemn, and not a few laughable 
incidents to be remembered. Our friend, Mr. Charles P. Illsley, 



25 

gives the following account of what he saw at the upper burial 

ground : 

" About three o'clock, on the morning of the 5th of July, wc 
made our way to Commercial Street, passing through Fore Street, 
which, from Center nearly to India Street, on its upper side, was 
one unbroken mass of flame, looking, with its sinuosities, like a 
monstrous, writhing, fiery serpent. From Commercial Street we 
proceeded to Mountfort Street, until we reached the eastern boun- 
dary of the burial ground. At this period we had the whole fearful 
spectacle before us. The wind was blowing a perfect gale, whirl- 
ing clouds of dust into the air. 

We stood at the entrance of the grave-yard. Houseless men, 
women, and children, were seated in scattered groups about the 
place, looking as if the tenents of the tombs and graves had come 
forth to witness the appalling scene. Overhead, lurid clouds of 
smoke rolled wildly away toward the north, whence descended 
an incessent shower of fiery rain. The flames had not reached 
India, and the lower part of Congress Streets, but for a mile or 
more before, and on each side of us, was one vast, raging sea of 
fire, where billows of flame were tossed tumultuously to and fro, 
surging and roaring, as we have seen and heard the Atlantic, from 
the Cape, during a fierce tempest. Occasionally, a gigantic billow 
would dash against some tall building, causing the flaming surf, 
and the sparkling spray, to leap high into the heavens. On and 
on swept the fire-demon, lapping up, in an instant, as it were, and 
destroying the homes of men. 

Amid the crackling of burning timber, the roaring of the fiery 
billows, and the rush of the gale, came the crash of falling build- 
ings, the muffled explosion of houses and stores razed to the 
ground, the shriek of the steam fire engines, and the cries of the 
excited multitude. Verily, as I gazed bewildered on the terrible 
scene before me — on the graves, and the awe-stricken people, 
crouching among them, upon whom the heavens seemed to be 
pouring their vials of fiery wrath — verily, it seemed as if the night 
of Judgment was at hand, and I could not help repeating the lines 
of Sir Walter Scott : 

' That day of wrath ! — that dreadful day, 
When heaven and earth shall pass away!" 

******* 

When, shriveling like a parched scroll 
The flaming heavens together roll; 
And louder yet — and yet more dread — 
Swells the loud trump that wakes the dead ! ' 

It was a scene that will never pass from memory." 
When the flames swept over the buildings on the south side of 
Exchange Street, and struck the opposite side of the street, they 
recoiled with such tremendous power, as to force their way entirely 
through all the windows from front to rear, the iron shutters shriv- 
elling and bursting out before the surging blast. As the fire swept 
through Middle Street, and the flames from Union Street, and 
Cross and Plum Streets, flowed into the maiu current, like so 



26 

many feeders or tributaries to a mighty river, bursting its bounda- 
ries, it seemed like an ocean of fire lashed by a tempest. Id fifteen 
minutes after it struck Walter Corey's immense establishment, on 
Exchange Street, and Fox's Court, the whole pile of buildings had 
disappeared, with the five story brick mill, just rebuilding from 
the fire of a preceding month, together with the store-house 
adjoining, lined with brick and covered with slate. 

Wood's magnificent hotel, unfinished, and with little or nothing 
in it of combustible nature, was reduced to ashes in twenty-eight 
minutes. 

The fire was only sixteen or eighteen hours in oversweeping the 
whole area burned. Estimating the number of buildings at 1,600, 
it would give only forty seconds to each. If these buildings were 
set in a continued line, they would reach from Portland to 
Standish, a distance of fifteen miles. . 

At the Chestnut Street Methodist Church it Avas announced, on 
Sunday, that the dwelling houses of one hundred of the members, 
and the business establishments of forty, had been destroyed. It 
was even worse with the Swedenborgian Church and congregation. 

Among other articles destroyed at the Merchants' Exchange, 
was the original order of secession, of South Carolina. 

Charles Holden, Esq., lost a clock which had been in the family 
one hundred and fifty years. 

The large granite pillar which had lain for several years in front 
of the open space adjoining the enclosure of the Wood Mansion, 
was broken into fragments by the intense heat. It was the only 
one saved uninjured from the old Exchange. 

The following, concerning the narrow escape of our well known 
Bounty and Pension Agent, Z. K. Harmon, Esq., as related in the 
Ddily Advertiser, will be read with interest: 

"One of the most terrible experiences of that night of confla- 
gration and woe in this city, the night of the 4th, was that endured 
by Z. K. Harmon, Esq., the gentlemanly Claim Agent. Shut up 
in the massive U. S. Post Office and Custom House building, there 
was no w r ay of escape. During the long night he was obliged to 
remain. Egress on Exchange Street was impossible. The flames 
were leaping out from the high Fox Block, and the heat cleaving 
off large rocks from the massive walls of the building. The side- 
walks and the street were literally red with heat — a perfect sea 
of flame rolled up from the lower part of Exchange Street on the 
front, while on Lime Street the intense heat from the Sturdivant 
House, and the new Printing House of the Advertiser, just finish- 
ing, both wooden buildings, perfectly enveloping the U. S. building 
in sheets of flame. 

The only hope was in the endurance of the building, it being 
fire-proof, and yet the Avood work in the upper portion of it was 



27 

in flames, and stifling smoke filled every room, even to the cellar. 
It does not appear that Mr. Harmon was discouraged; on the 
other hand, he manfully lent all his energies in efforts to subdue 
the flames in the upper story, and coolly meditated, as a last resort, 
to endeavor to run the gauntlet of fire, encased in mail bags. 
This is the courage and coolness of which heroes are made, and 
which have turned the tide of battle on many a bloody field. He 
attributes his salvation to a kind Providence. It was really little 
less than a miracle, as any one may see by glancing at the disfigured 
massive walls of the U. S. building, which must have undergone 
little less than a red-hot heat." 

This is the second time in his life that Mr. Harmon has miracu- 
lously escaped death by fire. The first time, at the fire in Glou- 
cester, in 1864, when he occupied a room in the Custom House 
building. From some cause, during the confusion, he was locked 
in, and deprived the means of escape, but through almost super- 
human efforts, he not only saved his own life, but the building, from . 
destruction. 

The largest losers are J. B. Brown & Sons, C. Staples & Son, 

E. E. Upham, Ocean Insurance Co., Tukey, Chase & Co., C. J. 
Walker & Co., C. H. Breed & Co., Tyler, Lamb & Co., W. W. 
Thomas, Elias Thomas, Shurtleff & Co., Stevens, Haskell & Chase, 
Hayes & Douglas, K Ellsworth & Son, Deering, Milliken & Co., 
Woodman, True & Co., H. J. Libby & Co., Lane & Little, Thrasher 
& Co., J. R. Corey & Co., N. I. Mitchell, E. A. Marrett & Co., J. E. 
Donnell, Nathan Cummings, A. & S. Shurtleff, James Rackliff, W. 

F. Phillips & Co., St. John Smith, Winslow & Co., (machine 
works,) Harris & Waterhouse, Byron Greenough & Co., N. P. 
Richardson & Co., Haines, Smith & Cook, while many of our 
small traders and mechanics were made nearly destitute. 

It is understood that Mr. H. C. Barnes telegraphed on his own 
responsibility, at the outbreak of the fire, to Saco, Biddeford, Lew- 
iston, and Boston. Had there been any delay, it would have been 
too late, as the telegraph office had to take up another position. 

There were numerous cases of extortion; but to offset them 
were many noble, daring, and generous acts. For example — many 
labored long and persistently for the good of all, unmindful of the 
destruction of their own property, while the blowing up of build- 
ings required true nerve and courage to accomplish. 

A portion of Wilmot Street, above Oxford Street, was saved 
through the exertions of Capt. William Willard, of the steam tug 
Uncle Sam, who brought his force-pump from the tug into use. 

A dollar greenback, and a tax receipt, partially burned, were 
picked up in the town of Brunswick, thirty miles away, on the 
morning; of the 5th. 



28 

Mrs. Day, now in her 99th year, well remembers the burning of 
Portland, by Mowatt, in 1775 — tbe bombardment, and tlie destruc- 
tion of her father's bouse. And there are others yet living, who 
have now repeated their terrible experience. Mrs. Hannah Thurlo 
Avas only a few weeks old when her father's house was burned by 
Mowatt, on Fore Street, below India. From a house erected on 
the same spot, this aged woman, now in her ninety-second year, 
was again removed to another place of safety at this fire. 

On Thursday morning, an Irish boy was seen about the "Dump," 
with something he supposed to be lead. The nugget was exam- 
ined, and proved to be silver. It could not have weighed less 
than three pounds. The boy said he found it in the cellar of St. 
Stephen's Church, where, by the way, Mrs. John M. Wood had 
lodged her best furniture, plate, and jewels, for safety, in the hurry 
and confusion of breaking up, which were destroyed, together with 
the church itself, in the course of two or three hours, at furthest. 

Flocks of doves, as they were driven from the church towers, 
and other places, would fly oft* beyond the fire, into the darkness, 
and then return toward the light, and flying high above the hurri- 
cane of fire cinders, would drop into the abyss below. 

An Irish woman was seen carrying off a large pig, from the 
the midst of the flames, leaving her baby to take care of itself, till 
her " darlint " was safe. Another was seen chasing a pig at full 
speed, with her clothes flying looses and hair streaming " like a 
meteor," down Centre Street. The pig made a dash at a heap of 
furniture, followed by the woman, with loud outcries. A few 
moments later, while she was poking around after him, he re-ap- 
peared, with a wash-stand upon his back, through the legs of which 
he had thrust himself, and not being able to get rid of it, he was 
now seen hurrying away, like a miniature elephant, with a tower 
on his back, at full speed, followed by his poor mistress, in a trans- 
port of terror. 

An Irishman was hard at work, on Center Street, unmindful of 
a great blaze coming tOAvard him, like a tornado. A friend calls, 
"Look out for the fire, Pat ! " " Faith, and be jabers, its all fire," 
says Pat, and went on with his Avork. 

At daybreak, on the morning of the 5th — Avhat a scene! — 
The passage-ways, back yards, and door-steps, the Avharves 
and allies, outside the burnt district, and the further outskirts 
of the city, Avere heaped with household goods and furniture, 
while here and there might be seen groups of pale, frightened 
faces, and whole families exhausted and asleep, some on piles of 
lumber, and some on heaps of furniture, and many on the side- 



29 

walks, and along the highways. The folloAving, one of a hundred 
similar scenes, occurred near the "Dump," a large, empty space on 
the cove : A little family were gathered together, near a spot, 
where, only a few hours before, stood their happy home ; the father, 
seated on a little heap of household stuff, which he had saved from 
the flames ; and as he sat there, with eyes fixed upon the ground, 
and twisting a fragment of stick between his fingers, his two half 
naked children at his knees, and wife standing before him, with 
large, silent tears rolling down her cheeks, trying to comfort him, 
it was really too piteous for description, and the spectator turned 
away speechless, and left them to look for consolation elsewhere. 

The old Maine Bank vault, used by Lowell & Senter, for the 
last nineteen years, is the same that was robbed by Mauley, in 
August, 1818. They found their watches all going, and the tem- 
perature faithfully recorded, by a self-registering thermometer, 
several days after the fire. 

No less than thirteen dwelling houses, which had escaped the 
fire of 1775, and outlasted all the changes since, were swept away 
by this. The loss of our people then was estimated at £54,600, 
lawful money, equal to half a million now, and the buildings 
destroyed amounted to more than three-quarters, when we had a 
population of only 1,500, without insurance — a heavier calamity, 
by far, than that we are now suffering from. To Mr. Willis, we 
are indebted for a circumstantial account of all these houses, and 
of many others, built by our first settlers, in the Portland Tran- 
script, of August 11th, under the title of "A Walk among the 

Ruins." 

One of our traders on India Street, near foot of Middle Street, 
finding he had no time to lose, began to remove the mer- 
chandise from his shop, by lugging off a large box of tobacco, 
which he left, as he believed, in a place of safety. On returning 
to the shop, he found it on fire, with little chance of saving any- 
thing more. Seizing a quantity of provisions, he started for the 
wharf, where his family had betaken themselves for safety, and met 
a stranger carrying off the very box of tobacco he had so carefully 
saved. The thief was hailed ; he made no answer, but quickened 
his pace, and the trader, dropping his provisions, gave chase. On 
overtaking the fellow, he gave him two or three blows, and tumbled 
him into the gutter. Then, after having secured his tobacco a 
second time, and again depositing it in a safe place, he went back 
for the provisions he had dropped on the way. Having made sure 
of all he could find, he hurried back to the spot where he had left 
the tobacco — it was no longer there — it had wholly disappeared — 



30 

not a trace could be found. But there was one comfort; the original 
thief had not secured it, for on the way back with the provisions, 
the sufferer found him lying where he had left him, in the gutter. 

There were terrible cases of intoxication also. The owners of 
prohibited liquors Avere enforcing the Maine law in every direction, 
by rolling their barrels and kegs into the street, only to be carried 
off by strangers, or destroyed by the encroaching flames. One 
aged citizen was seen steaming up through Exchange Street, with 
a two gallon tin measure in his hand, hotly pursued by the flames. 
On reaching the grocery, corner of Exchange and Federal Streets, 
he tumbled into a large box. Very soon, however, an unmanagea- 
ble horse, being led on the sidewalk, contrived to kick the box over, 
and tumble the old gentleman out ujdou the pavement. He was 
then helped off by a fireman, just when he was in danger of being 
roasted alive, for the flames were now roaring around that very 
corner. He was next found lying under the suction hose of one 
of the engines, near the curb-stone by the City Building. Being 
helped out of this difficulty, he disappeared for a time ; but it 
having suddenly occurred to policeman Dolley, that there were ten 
kegs of powder in the police office, and fearing the terrible conse- 
cpiences of an explosion, he hurried off to the building, which was 
then all on fire. As he entered the passage-way, on Myrtle 
Street — it was very dark — he stumbled over something, which, 
upon being dragged to the light, proved to be the same old fellow. 
He was then taken below Cumberland Street, and left there, while 
the policeman, and others, removed the powder. 

It seems, too, that another poor fellow, half seas over — and 
perhaps, more, for the worst of liquor was plentiful as water, and 
might be had anywhere in certain neighborhoods, for the asking — 
was lodged in one of the cells, and left there, for safe keeping, and 
then wholly forgotten. But the next morning he was thought of; 
and though the whole City Building had been burned to ashes 
over his head, he was found in a refreshing sleep, wholly uncon- 
scious of the danger he had run of being roasted alive — or baked 
to a crisp — and utterly heedless of the tumult and uproar still 
raging about him. 

Two or three days after the fire, while our city was thronged 
with strangers, come to see what there was left of us, to hunt for 
mementos, or keep-sakes, among the masses of molten jewelry in 
our cellars, tw T o persons — a man and wife, probably — who had 
taken lodgings at the Preble House, and had just come out to see 
the ruins, were found near the top of High Street, having turned 
the Avrong way, as they came out of the hotel. As they were look- 



31 

Lng about, in all directions, the woman was heard to say, "Well, if 
this is not the greatest humbug I ever heard of! nearly half the 
city laid in ashes, according to the newspapers, and not a burned 
house to be seen, nor a tree scorched ! " A passing stranger 
stopped, on hearing this, and advised them to go down Free Street 
a few rods, toward the burnt district, assuring them that they 
would probably find it no humbug — if they Avent far enough. 

Our trees ! — our beautiful trees ! — the boast of our city and the 
admiration of strangers, are not wholly destroyed, even in the 
burned district. Thousands do "still live," and the charred trunks 
are sprouting afresh, with living emerald, and the branches are 
feathering out, like plants in a tropical region, after the terrible 
forcing they have had to undergo, "all greenly fresh and wildly 
free." Nevertheless, we have lost where they were most crowded, 
and where a large portion of them could be well spared, no less 
than 6-25. 

Much labor and expense, and the patient waiting of three-score 
years, will be required to reproduce them in all their glorious 
exuberance of foliage, and ponderous weight of limb, overarching 
some of our widest thoroughfares. Not a few of them are historical, 
and well deserve to be remembered. For example, the two fine 
elms in front of Mr. Oliver Gerrish's house, on Locust Street, 
patriarchs in their way, and in magnitude aboriginal, if not ante, 
deluvian, were transplanted from Saccarappa, fifty-two years ago, 
by Mr. George B. Starbird, then apprentice to Mr. Seth Clark, a 
merchant tailor on Exchange Street, where Short & Loring's book- 
store was before the fire. Mr. Clark owned and occupied the 
house at the time. Mr. Starbird is still a resident of Portland. 

Ten or twelve of the largest elms at or near the corner of Wil- 
mot and Cumberland Streets, were brought into the city fifty-one 
years ago, and set out by Mr. Simeon Rice, yet living with us. 

Many of the older houses burned were built and owned by our 
ship masters, sea-faring in the early history of Portland, being a 
favorite business with our people. 

Among those most familiar to our older citizens, may be men- 
tioned those of Capt, Tucker, Capt. Phineas Drinkwater, Capt. 
Philip Greeley, Capt. Harwood, Capt. Hood, Capt. Mountfort — a 
revolutionary relic — on Congress Street ; Capt. David Drinkwater, 
Capt. Mcintosh, Capt. Hallet, Capt. Clark, Capt. Hamilton, on 
Cumberland Street, the last named owned by the Catholic 
Society at the time of the fire; Capt. Moody, Capt. William 
Woodbury, on Franklin Street ; Capt. | Hubbs, corner Federal 
and Franklin Streets; Capt. John Williams, on Federal Street, 



32 

nearly destroyed by fire in September last; Capt. Choate, 
corner of India and Federal Street; Capt. Samuel Blanchard, on 
India Street; Capt. Vining, corner of Oxford and Franklin— who 
mailed from Portland in the Brig Talmadge, and was never again 
heard of; Capt. Kelleran, corner of Wilmot and Cumberland, 
owned and occupied, at the time of the fire, by Chas. Holden, Esq. 

We intended to give a list of new buildings, and tables of con- 
tributions, but the changes are so rapid — and many but tempo- 
rary — and the contributions coming by instalments, we find it 
impossible. References are made in the foregoing pages to such 
tables, with a belief that they might be obtained. The cash con- 
tributions are now over 8000,000, which have come to us from all 
directions— New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago, Cleveland, 
St. Louis, Springfield, Worcester, New Bedford, Salem, Lowell, 
Lawrence, Lynn, Newburyport, Roxbury, Portsmouth, Newark, N. 
J., Albany, N. Y., Lewiston, Saco, Biddeford, Bath, Bangor, Au- 
gusta, Concord, Dover, N. H., Hartford, Ct., St. John, N. B., and 
Montreal, giving liberally, all of which, together with the smaller 
gifts, are duly and gratefully acknowledged. 

We have only to add, that the weather continues favorable, and 
that the work of reconstruction is still going on through all our 
streets and avenues, with ever increasing comprehensiveness, 
energy and foresight. Within two years it will be completed, 
with large improvements, beyond all question — God helping us. 
Already, more than three hundred buildings are in advanced pro- 
gress, and not a few occupied by carpenters, painters, furniture 
dealers, grocers, and small traders, while hundreds more give 
promise of speedy occupation by our largest wholesale dealers. 

Mr. J. B. Brown has leased the lot, for fifty years, where stood 
the two stores of Eben Steele, on Middle Street, and will erect 
the finest block in the city, extending from Union Street to the 
First National Bank property, corner of Plum Street. The bank 
building is to be rebuilt, with a beautiful brown stone front. 

One hundred and twenty families have been lodged in barracks, 
and eighty more will get in during the week. There are forty- 
four tenements on the Hill, forty-eight on the "Dump," thirty-one 
near the Glass Works, and fifty-four near the Workhouse, almost 
done. All these accommodations are in addition to the great 
number which the Committee have aided individuals to put up. 

And if further evidence of the spirit and energy of our business 
people be needed, we refer the reader to the array of advertise- 
ments in this very publication — the result only of a few days can- 
vassing. What, Ave ask, may not be expected of such a people ? 



33 



MOIsTITOK/ 



174 MIDDLE STREET, 174 







In returning our sincere thanks to our friends for the liberal patronage bestowed upon 
the "Monitor," both before and since the terrible conflagration, we respectfully announce 
that to enable us to promptly meet their wants we have added largely to our material and 
are now prepared with 

FIVE PRESSES, NEW TYPE, 

AND A CORPS OF SKILFUL WORKMEN; to accommodate our patrons with every 

description of 

. - L - 

J^T SHOE/T NOTICE, 
And shall spare no effort to please our customers in style, quality and price of work. 

WE ARE READY TO FILL ORDERS FOR 

Posters, Programmes of all sizes, Shop Bills, 
Hand Bills, Auction Bills, &c, &c. Circulars, 
Billheads, Monthly Statements, Letter and Note 
Headings, Envelopes, Labels, Bank, Railroad and 
Steamboat Receipts, Checks, Notes, Wedding and 
Address Cards, Business Cards, 
Plain and Fancy Show Cards, &c, &c, &c. 



BLA3STKS, 

We l?eep constantly on hand a complete assortment of approved Blanks of every descrip- 
tion, pertaining to 

TENSION AND S077JVTT CZAIMS 

Under the late Acts of Congress. Also, 

Blank Deeds, Mortgages, Leases, Eailroad and other Eeceipts, 

JVOTJES, SILLS OF LA&IJVG, d-c, <£c. 



PRICES 



ttzntiifoirim: 




SEND m YOUR 



OR IDE PIS. 



34 

DOW & LIBBY. 

FIRE AND MARINE. 

o 

Home, of New York. 
National, of Boston. 
Narragansett, of Providence. 
Putnam, of Hartford. 
Adriatic, of New York. 
Market, of New York. 
Standard, of New York. 

AND OTHER RELIABLE OFFICES. 
No* //7 Com?nercial, corner of Uxc?ia?ige Street. 

John Dow. Frank TV. Libby. 



BOOK, CARD AND JOB 

Head Widgery's Wharf., 

Over Rufus Stanley's. 



35 



J. E. FERNALD & SON, 

MBBOHANT T&ILOB1 



9 



AND DEALERS IN 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS 



UNION H.LLZ, 85 FREE STREET. 

J. E. FERNALD. A. S. FERNALD. 




Wholesale and 



Retail Dealers La 



NEW AND SECOND-HAND 



fill 



i 



0-Xj.a.ss w^irie, 

Crockery, Cutlery, Wooden Ware, &c. 

GENERAL ASSORTMENT OF HOUSE-FURNISHING GOODS. 

No. 11 Preole St., opposite Preble House. 



Martin, Pennell & Co., 



tin 



ftfll 






MANUFACTURERS, 
No. 21 PREBLE STREET. 



Carriages and Sleighs in every variety of style and finish on hand, and made to order, at 
short notice and warranted. 



E. MARTIN, 



T. PENNELL, 



J. P. WATERIIOUSE. 



36 



X*. NEWCOMB 



JkfftMt©©! 



5) 



OFFICE. 



INTO- 30 FREE STREET. 

REFERENCE: 



Hon. J. Gregory Smith, President Vermont Central and Canada Railroads. 

John D. JUDSON, President Judson'a Bank, Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Hon. Wh. A. Wheeler, Ex-Member of Congress, Malone, N.T. 

R. B. Chapman, Esq., Rye, N. Y. 

L. Willis, No. 5 State Street, Boston, Mass. 



A. N. NOYES & SON, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

STOT15, 

Ranges and Furnaces, 

Can be found in their 

New Building on Lime Street, 

(OPPOSITE THE MARKET,) 

Where they will be pleased to see all their 
former customers, and receive orders as us- 
ual. 



SHEPHERD & Co., 
Commission Merchants 



) 



Wholesale Dealers in 

sitnerican Manufacture* ', and Eng- 
lish, French and German 



2 GALT BLOCK, COMMERCIAL ST. 



JKS^House, 53 North Street. 



jjattersox .c- ciiAiuioi i;yj:, 

J^ War (.'hum and Real Estate Agents, 
1G8 1 ,' Middle Street. 

OAMTJJEJL ROLFE, Druggist and 

& Apothecary, dealer in Drugs, Medi- 
cines and Paints, Chestnut Street. 



o. 

ket. 



B. HOWARD, Dealer in Boots 
and Shoes, opposite Milk Street Mar- 



FOSIAH Z. BOSTON, Groceries, 
*-* Provisions and Country Produce, Lime 
Street, opposite end Milk Street Market. 

J\ li. MICKJEM & CO., 186 Fore 
-LP* Street, Wholesale Produce and Pro- 
visions. 



THOMAS F. FZAJfNERY, Marble 
and Brown Stone Worker, No. 43 
Preble Street. 

J-)YFIt & PIERCE, Groceries and 
JS ship Stores, Lime, near corner Lime 
and Fore Streets. 

J~ TCKSRVRY & CO., Dealers in 
*/ • Boots, Shoes and Rubbers, cor. Fore 
and Lime Streets. 

TROW «l- ./OH.V.SO.Y, at Miss L. M. 
Cartland's, 347 Congress Street, Fancy 
Goods and Millinery. 

X|7" H". CLIFFORD, Attorney and 
»' • Counsellor at Law and Solicitor of 
Patents, at present 8 Clapp's Block. 



C. El. THOMPSON^ 

Hosiery, G-loves and TJnderflannels, 

CA8C0, CORNER OF PROSPECT STREET. 



c 



F£ 



FARLEY, 

Dealer in 

Agent for the State for Ritchie's Liquid Compass. 

c4t W. ?1- Tearce's, fSO Fore Street. 



37 



OWEN & BARBER, 



Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



trait, S0ttfecii0mr}) t Soit&ttv* ^S^rs, 

NUTS, FANCY GROCERIES, &c, 

183 FORE ST., (OVER, O. M. RICE'S.) 

jgg- Will remove to the Old Stand, No. 21 Exchange Street, as soon as rebuilt. 



Sole Agents for the 

Eldorado Cook and Par- 
lor Stoves; also Agents 
for the celebrated Ma- 
gee Furnace; 
Dealers in 

SHIP CABOOSE -STOVES, 

(RANGES, 



Fanners' Boilers, Sinks, Oven, Ash and Boiler Months. 

Custom Tin Ware. Tin, Sheet Iron and Zead Work done at 

s/iort notice. 

NO. 174 FORE STREET. 




Y ORIXG- & SOULE. Provision Deal- 
J-J ers, Nos. 10 and 11 Milk Street Market. 



I) 



11. GEO. F. FRE JVC H, House and 

Office, 241 Congress Street. 



/~1 KOROE F. TALBOT, Counsellor 
tf~ and Attorney at Law, 8 Clapp's Block, 
Congress St. 



jyt K. BOOTHBY, Gunsmith, Feder- 
J-J» al St., op. site of Elm House, {up 
stairs.) Ammunition and Sporting Goods 
for sale. 

f* & H. P. INGAZLS, Manufactur- 
JAi» ers Mineral and Soda Water, dealers 
in Ale, Porter and Cider, No. 26 Portland 
Street. 



Eastern Express Company, 

Are now permanently located 



HOTS 



HAVE REMOVED TO 

No. 151 Commercial, near the foot of Union Street, 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

The Trade are particularly invited to call and examine our Stock, or order, as may best 
suit their convenience. 
Special pains will be taken to fill orders, and all goods warranted. 
We have constantly on hand the 

Patent Prepared Paste, 

For Manufacturers, Book-Binders and Printers. Try it and you will never be without. 

ALSO, AGENTS FOR THE FAMOUS 

Will remove to Union, near Middle Street, in November, 1866. 

R. L. Morse. W. W. Lothrop. S. K. Dyer. 



S'HAW has opened his China Tea Store 
under Old City Hall, at Kendall & 
Whitney's. 

&A MITEL WA TERHO V 8 E, at 

A3 present may be found at 162 Fore St., 
residence 24 Gray St. 

TOHN C. VB.OCTOJR, Real Estate 

«/ Broker, Office on Middle Street, oppo- 
site site of Wood's Hotel. 

f1H ARIES JtOZFJE, 65 Middle St., 
\y at J. C. Proctor's Office, opposite 
site of Wood's Hotel. 

A T WOOD'S Oyster and Eating House, 
-^L Center Street, Oysters furnished by 
the gallon. 



TO SI AH HEAII), Dentist, No. 241 



Congress Street. 



T C. BARKER, Trucking and Sprink- 
*-f • ling Streets, 131 Commercial Street. 

T> KENT, Ship Bread Bakery, 107 
-**'• Fore, corner Vine Street. 

T* S. WEBSTER <ۥ CO., No. 9 

JLi/» Clapp's Block, Congress Street. 
Clothing and Furnishing Goods at very low 



prices. 



TkR. C. H. BURR, No. 399 Congress 
JLS Street. 

T\ V. CLARK, Dealer in Ice, Silver 
JLP* Street Ice House and 174 Fore St. 



C. M. & H. T. PLUMMER, 

JVo. 12 UJVIOJV STREET, 

Whxit and Dtarlt £ initlts, 

Iron Bailing, Doors, Window 
Shutters, Grating, &c, 

Furnished at short notice. Also, particular 
attention paid to 

Steam and Gas Fitting. 



J. T. LEWIS & CO. 



Manufacturers & Wholesale Dealers in 

CLOTHING, 

FLANNEL SHIRTS, 

GURNSEY FROCKS, 

AjY2> furnishixg goods, 

No. 1 Gait Block, Commercial St. 



J. T. LEWIS, 



J. P. LEWIS. 



39 




City Baggage Wagon. 

A. J. BEAN, PROPRIETOR. 

Bafff/ctf/e moved to and from Cars, Steamboats 
and from place to place in the City. 

Order Slate at Mansfield's, 174 Middle St. 



BAKERY REBUILT. 



Takes this means to thank his customers 
for their liberal patronage before our great 
calamity. 

Also — to inform them with all his friends 
and the public,that he has rebuilt on the old 
spot, 

NEW PiARL STREiT, 

Where he means to serve them with as 
good 

Bread, Cakes, Wastry , Cracker s, &c., 
as Ever. 



J, AMBROSE MERRILL, 

DEALER IN 

Watches, Jewelry, 

Masonic 32 eg alia, 

AJSTU IHILIT^RY GOODS, 

No. 13 Free Street, 

Same Store with Geyer and Calef. 

Templar Kegalia, Lodge Jewels, Lodge 
Seals, Marks, &c. 



mi Sr 



Iff j| 



CARRIAGE MANUFACTURER. 



Of all kinds done to order. Special attention given to 



Carriage Repairing, Iron fort for Buildings, tc. 

JVo. &5 TftESLE ST., head TOftTZAJYZ) ST. 



NATHAN GOOLD, 



SE 



!N"o. 16 Market Square. 



HOWAKD & CLEAYES, 



JVO. 77 EREE STREET. 

N. Cleaves, Notary Public. 

CHADBOUKN & KENDALL, 

Jolliers of Woolens, Tailors' Trimmings, & Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, 

Ware's Hall, over 103 and 105 Federal Street. 

B. F. CHADBOURN, j. A . KENDALL. 



40 



O.-S. BEALE^ 



?. 



Has resumed business at 

JS7 FORE STREET, (over Wall's Clothing Store.) 



SAMUEL S. RICH & SON, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Nos. 13S &: 140 Exchange St. 

Kobes and Plates furnished. Barstow's Metalic Burial Caskets for sale. 
Residence, 02 Pearl or 28 Myrtle St. Coffins delivered at all hours of the day or night. 



DEALERS IN 



» 



'■OjVM,, 



HAVE BUILT A NEW STORE SINCE THE FIRE, 

Opposite S7 Spring- Street, 

" The Choicest Variety of Meats the Market affords al- 
ways on hand. 

Vegetables of all sorts, fresh and nice, constantly in 
from the Country Gardens. 

No. 27 Spring Street, No. 27. 



"W . s . DYER, 

s^wiag laelia© Agea©?* 

No. 166 Middle Street, (up one Flight Stairs.) 



41 



JOHN E. DOW & S 



AGENTS FOE TIHIE 



Metropolitan, Phoenix, 

Niagara, Manhattan, 

North American, Yonkers, 
Columbia and Baltic 





KjfS *tf><HiY< 



OF 1 NEW YORK, AND 



■ A" 



>ritua Mmjui* jc-xa-lj MM. 



IlIII 



OF SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

ALSO, THE 

LIVERPOOL, LONDON AND GLOBE, AND QUEEN INSURANCE COS. 

CXE 1 GREAT BRITAIN. 
jperpeltial Insurance effected on First Class ^Properly in the 

ENTERPRISE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

OF PHILADELPHIA. 

ALSO, AGENTS POE, THE 

®T©w ¥@gk Mi© I&smsa&e© 

ASSETS, $6,000,000, 

AND 

TRAVELLERS' INS. CO., of Hartford, Conn. 

J6S=-The losses paid by this Agency, by the recent conflagration, were OVER $800,000. 
Fire, Marine, Life, and Accident Insurance, effected to any amount desired. 

Office, f76 Fore, foot of Uxcfiange Street. 

%3~Will remove about Oct. 1st, to 38 Exchange Street. 



42 



C. J. 




At present to be found at House, 244 Cumberland St., 

HEAD OE MECHANIC STREET. 
'All orrtcrs Hi rough the iPosl Office will receive prompt allenlion. 




"WZMI. A.. PBARCE 



<¥! 



cJ5s-?i> 






OK 
MAKER OF 






itt 




ami Watcv (Klosrtis, 



FORE STREET. 



Warm, Cold, ami Shower Baths, Wash Howls, Brass and Silver ^Plated Cocks. 

Every description of Water Fixtures for Dwelling Houses, Hotels, and Public Buildings, 
Ships, etc., arranged and set up in the best manner, and all orders in town or country faith- 
fully executed. «S~A11 orders for Jobbing promptly attended to. Constantly on hand 
Lead Pipes and Sheet Lead, and Beer Pumps of all kinds. 

IKsT" Tin Conductors and Tin Work. 



IMIOSIES PEABSON, 

6 old and f tor §!atcr and Panufactor of j?tor W&m, 

TEMPLE STREET, 1st DOOM FROM CON&MJES8 STREET. 

j(Kg= Spoons, Forks, Steel Knives, &c, &c, Plated in the best manner and warranted. .fflfr 

SMARDO^, SCAMMAjS" & GO'S. 
B J^ X£ E I£ Y , 

AT THE OLD SPOT, 8 & 10 UNION STREET. 



All kinds of Bread, Crackers, &c, usually found in a first-class Bakery. 



43 



LEWIS, ROLLINS & BOND, 

MERCHANT TAILORS 



And Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



Fine Clotliii, Cloths, and Gents' Furnishing Goods, 

JVo. ?8 MA ft AFT SQUAR&. 



T. C. LEWIS, 



X. C. llOLLINS, 



W. M. BOND. 



HAYES & DOUGLASS 

MAY BE FOUND FOR THE PRESENT AT 

No. 218 FORE STREET, (Corner of Union,) 

Where they are ready to show their old friends a good assortment of 

Kerosene Lamps, Lanterns, Plated Spoons, Forks, &c., 

AT WHOLESALE OB RETAIL. 
>Kg=PIease give us a call. 



GEO. E. LUSCOMB, 






Lime Street, opposite Custom House 
and Post Office Building. 

Ships' Cabins Grained, Ornamented and 
Polished. 



H. C. HARRIS, 



OF jLLZ, KINDS. 

Piano-Fortes packed and moved at short 
notice. 

Piano Boxes of all sizes constantly on 
hand, and furnished to order. 

Order Slate at 85 Commercial St. 



" RE-CONSTRUCTED." 

JAMES S- STAPLES, 
BOOK, CARD AND JOB PRINTER, 

Mariner's Church Building, 104 Fore Street, cor. Moul/on Street. 
Having taken great pains in the selection of new presses and material, has facilities for 
the speedy execution of work second to none in the State. Old customers, and the public 
generally, are invited to call and leave their orders. 

DARIUS H. INGRAHAM, " 

e©pisiii©i if saw, 

COH. JSX CHANGE j4JW FE?)EltAL 82HEETS, 

Residence, United States Hotel. 



44 



Having taken the Chambers 

311 Congress Street, 



z$ 



ADJOINING MECHANICS' HALL, 

Are now prepared to offer their friends and the public a large and well assorted stock of 

gmrpctiujgs, |taptr femjings, ffi attain $>oobs, %c. 

Purchasers of the above goods are respectfully invited to examine our stock, which is 



Jas. S. Marrett. 



Fred A. Poor. 



H. M. PAYSON, 



BUOKER. 

STOCKS AND BONDS BOUGHT AND SOLD ON COMMISSION. 

Slay be found for the next sixty days at the Store of F. & C. B. Nash, 174 Fore St., 
after that time at the old place, '.i'Z Exchange Street. 

"W. F. PHILLIPS & CO., 

JVo. j %S FO(RJEJ STft&ET. 

Having removed to above place in consequence of the late fire, we are all ready to fill 
orders promptly. 

CHARLES F. MOULTON, 
BmIm la BMfek IBmi ft BmWtMt 



No 390 CONGRESS STREET. 



X* . 



F 



O S T, 



I 



IaU $r 



MAY BE FOUND AT 

332 1-2 CONGRESS STREET, 

WITH A 

Desirable Assortment of Cloths for the Season, 

"Where he will be happy to meet all his former patrons, and any in want of 

CLOTHING MADE IS THE MOST APPEOVED STYLES. 

Portland, August 18, 1806. 



45 



HENRY P. WOOD 



in£)©Cl 



; £? 



$m 



>■&" 



AND DEALER IN GOVERNMENT SECURITIES, 

No. 192 Fore Street, (Store of Rufus Stanley.) 

4®> Will remove to or near the old stand on or before the Spring of 18G7. 

PEARSON Sc SiMIITH 

Continue to manufacture 

BREAD AT WHOLESALE ONLY, 

M §teaK» Bak©ry 8 AsftCacidi Ave., between: Pearl & Via© Sts. 

Such as Pilot Bread, Ship Bread, Common Crackers, Oyster Crackers &c. 

Shipping Masters and others will do well to call before purchasing elsewhere. Par- 
ticular attention paid to putting up bread for foreign voyages. 

P. & S. will still continue to keep a choice selection of Family Flour, which they will 
deliver in any part of the city free of expense. 

OUR MOTTO— " SMALL PROFITS AXD QUICK RETURXS" 



FOYE, COFFIN & SWAN, 

Underwriters & General Insurance Agents, 

185 FORE STREET, UP STAIRS. 



W. II. FOYE, 



J. H. COFFIN, 



F. K. SWAN, 



C. II. FOYE. 



111111 II41II lilli 

2sT. J". DAYIS, 

Formerly of the Commercial House. 
J . O . LOYEJOY, 



WHOLESALE DEALER IN 



Lime, Cement and Plaster, 

FRANKLIN WHARF; OFFICE 33 COMMERCIAL ST. 



46 



Cape Elizabeth Iron Foundry. 



W. E. STEVENS & CO., 



II 



Building Fronts, Pillars, Columns, Ship Work, "Window Weights, Gudgeons, Machinery, 
Agricultural Tools, Iron Fences, &c, &c. Also, job work, executed with prompt dispatch. 



OEEICE, 131 COMMERCIAL STREET. 



W. E. STEVENS, 



E. B. POOR. 



JAMES B. RACKLYFT, 
Main© Bonnet Bleacksr^^ 

Jlfo. SOS Congress Street, in new Hooins, i/j) one /tight of stairs. 
All kinds of Ladies', Misses' and Gentlemen's Hats Bleached and Pressed in a superior 
manner. All orders promptly attended to. 



IN THE MAST. 



N. I. MITCHELL & CO., 

Dealers in 

Silks, Shawls, Stress Goods, 
^Broadcloths, Cassimeres, and 
a General Assortment of For- 
eign and ^Domestic 2)ty Goods, 

No. 268 Congress Street, 

IN THE MART. 



A, T. HALL, 

"Will be happy to meet his former Custom- 
ers at the 

OLD S TAN D, 

ON 

hvhixjIk: street, 

On and after Nov. 1st, where he will 
offer them a choice selection of 

Groceries & Produce, 

At prices lower than ever. 



JXlH'ItSOX * CO., Hoop Skirts 
-^8- and Corsets, 328 Congress Street. 

J COBB & CO., Worsted Goods, 
-^J-» Lace Goods, Gloves, Hosiery, Fin- 
broideries and Fancy Goods, No. 2, under 
U. S. Hotel, with Mrs. M. J. Nichols. 

4 KEITH, Watchmaker, 13 Free 
« Street. 

T/~ N . HAIEY, Hair Dressing Sa- 
-IX. loon, 95 Federal St. 

Y S. CROCKETT, Commission Mer- 
*' • chant and dealer in Groceries and 
Produce, corner of Lime and Milk Streets, 

XEOX M. BQW&OIN, Laces, Em- 
broideries, Fancy Goods, Gloves and 
Hosiery, 39 Center Street. 



J DVXYOX, Watches, Jewelry, Sil- 
-<-*_• ver-ware and Fancy Goods, under 
Mechanics' Hall, cor. Congress and Casco 
Streets. Watches and Jewelry carefully 
repaired. 

TOHX 11. VIII1AMS, Counsellor 

*/ at Law, Office corner Congress and 
Chestnut Streets, in the Boody House. 

TAXES O'DOXXEII, Attorney and 
tf Counsellor at Law, Commissioner of 
Deeds for the several States. ;;;,;; i. Con- 
gress, between Green and Oak Streets. 

J WIIIIS 1'AIXE, Dry and Fan- 
*£L» cy Goods, Buttons, Kid Gloves, Cor- 
sets, Hosiery, &c, 13 Market Square. 



A. BEXT, Millinery and Fancy 
Goods, 25 Free Street. 



A 



SHEPLEY & STROUT, 

COUNSELLORS AT LAW, 



G. F. SHEPLEY, 



JiTO. 



Office over A. B. Stephenson's, 
12 f COMMEStCI^lZ STREET. 



A. A. STROUT. 



47 



Dealer in all varieties of 



Strain Wrapping Papers ? 

Paper Bags, Sheathing: Paper, &c. Also, Cotton, Jute and Hemp 
Twines, Marline, k, 

No. fS3 EORE STREET. 

TYI^EJEfc, JLtAJMJS &z Co., 

MANUFACTURERS AXD WHOLESALE DEALERS IX 



WMB% §B#1;.I' 






Sole and Upper Leather and Findings, 

29 1-2 COMMERCIAL STREET. 

B3"ManufactorY at Minot, Me., until we resume business at the old stand, Jan. 1, 1807. 

HENKY DUNN & SON, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

HARNESSES, 

TRUNKS, VALISES, 

CARPET BAGS, 

WHIPS, &c. 

No. 172 Middle Street. 



HESKV DUNN, 



e. n. nrxx. 



POSTER & MEANS, 

Garriagt Pafaitm 9 

No. 44 1-2 Preble St., 

Head of ^Portland. 

A.U kinds of Carriage faint- 
ing promptly attended to. 



J. N. PORTER, 



V). M. MEANS. 



BRADBURY & SWEAT, 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law. 

OFFICE, A r o. 219 CONGRESS STREET, 

CHAD WICK MANSION, (nearU. S. Hotel,) 



BION BRADBURY, 



L. D. Jf. SWEAT. 



DAVIS & DRUMMOND, 
NO. 249 CONGRESS STREET, Chadwick House, 

WOODBURY DAVIS, JOSIAII H. DRUMMOND. 



48 



Cr i TflL ■ 3Ea 




Dealer in 



BOOTS, SHOES RUB- 
BERS, &c. 



Boots and Shoes made to order, of 



IH^tlie best stock ; also, repairing- done in 



a neat and substantial manner, at 

NO . 10 INDIA 



STREET. 



O. M. & D. W. NASH, 

Nos. 13 and 15 Moulton Street, head of Long Wharf, 

Would remind their old customers and the public generally, that since the 
great lire they have received an ENTIRE iNEff .STOCK of 

S T O "V IE S - 

Among them are some of the best patterns ever offered in this market. \\ e name the 
eek-brated 1M'. STEWART COOKING STOVE, for wood and coal; GARDNER CHIL- 
SON'S NEW COOKING STOVE, one of the most superior Cook Stoves for coal in this 
market. Also tin CRITERION COOKING STOVE, made by N. P. Richardson & Co.; it 
is an excellent working Stove for burning coal. Also for sale a large stock of Parlor, 
Office, and Ship Stoves, Cooking Ranges, Registers, Ventilators, Pumps, Lead Pipe, Sheet 
Lead, &c, &c, with a large assortment of articles usually kept in a store of this kind. 

Grateful to the public for past favors, we would respectfully solicit a liberal share of your 
patronage, and it will be our object to serve you promptly, faithfully and honestly. 

Portland, Aug., 1S(>(>. O. M. & D. W. NASH. 



J. T. SMALL & CO., 

Dealers in 

Groceries, Flour, Produce and Ship Stores, 



JVO. /2 LIME ST REE T. 
J8Sf Produce sold on commission. Consignments solicited. 



A, 



I), conn. Provision Dealer, Nos. 3 
& i Milk Street Market. 



A 



MOS It l.XSIOJV, Provision and 
Meat Dealer, 7 Milk Street Market. 



IL 



]'. JDEANE, Counsellor and Attor- 
- ney, 8 Clapp's Block, Congress St. 
Particular attention given to writing Wills, 
Contracts, Deeds, and all legal instruments. 
Also, making collections and examining 
titles of Real Estate. 

J71KED F. BALE, Photographic 
J- Stock, Picture and Mirror Frames, 01 
Commercial Street. 



8 r j: E I E 



Manufacturing 



T H - 

"• Jeweler and Repairer, 233% Congress 
Street, (up stairs.) 



CfHAW'S Hat, Cap and Fur Store, cor. 
& of Congress and Center Streets, oppo- 
site Preble House. Sept. 1, 1866. 

TTAMES I). EESSEXI)EX, Counsel- 
ed lor at Law and Solicitor of Patents, 
Deering Hall, opposite Preble House. 

lt/f A. ]iT{l T XS, Cabinet Maker and 
J-TJ-* Upholsterer. All kinds of Furniture 
repaired to order, 23 Preble St. 

U T K 1' H E A* G A I E , Druggist and 
^5 Apothecary, at the old spot, corner of 
Middle and Lime Streets. 

TXT E . TODD, Watches, Clocks, 
rr • Jewelry, Spectacles, Eye Glasses, 

&c, 25 Free Street. Repairing done and 

warranted. 



1IOLDEX & PEABODY, 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law, 

No. 229 1-2 CONGRESS STREET. 



49 



R. T. 




I 




ALSO, MANUFACTUBEB OF 






IJtfc 









JOB S3IITIIING, 




Done to order, in the neatest manner. 



>&d ©f Wmi@® W&asf. 



50 




THOMAS WmSIaOW, 

s ik X IF 




STEA3IBOAT BLACKSMITH, 

Head of St. John Smith's Wharf, Commercial St. 

■ All kinds of Jobbing done to order. Residence Montreal Street, corner of Merrill 



Street. 



LEATHE & GORE, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Steam Refined Soaps, 

FOR EXPORTATION 

And. Domestic Consumption, 

J%o. 397 COMMERCIAL STU&UT, 

OPPOSITE P. & K. DEPOT. 



DANIEL CLAKKE & CO., 

Dealers in 

BOOTS _A.:L>T:D SHOES, 

JVo. 29 MARKET SQUARE, under Lancaster Mall, 

To be found at old stand, 119 Middle Street, after Jan. 1st, 1867. 

DANIEL CLARKE, CYRUS LOWELL. 

J. GRANT, 



Cor. Commercial and Union Streets, 

At True & Frothingbam's. 

O. ZHI. BL.A.IKIIE], 

No. 10 CROSS STREET, 

MANUFACTURER OF 



BOOK-CASES AND COFFINS, 
Furniture and Mattresses, 

REPAIRING, VARNISHING, GLAZING, &C. 

All business promptly attended to. 



51 



J. R. COREY & Co., 



Wholesale and Eetail Dealers in 



1? ID 



*:xyo 



^ tfi? m 



"/ 



CHIE.A.iE 3 FOB CASH, 



NEW STORE, 



No. 39 Free Street. 

HOOPER & EATON, 



Wholesale and 




Eetail Dealers in 



NEW AND SECOND-HAND 

FURNITURE, ft 

G-LASS "W-A-ZR/IE, 
Crockery, Cutlery, Wooden Ware, &c. 

GENEEAL ASSOETMENT OE HOUSE-EUENISHING GOODS. 
130 Exoliang-e Street. 



J 



52 



ESTABLISHED IN 1839. BEINSTATED AUG., 18GG. 




i % 



B. THURSTON & CO., 

No. 175 COMMERCIAL STREET, 

Have procured an entirely 

NEW PRINTING OFFICE, 

And are prepared to execute, in the best manner, all kinds of 

Commercial, 

ffiailroad, 

Steamboat, 

23ook, Card, 

Newspaper, and 

JOB PH1NT1M, 

With promptness. We have "the most 

In the country and the neatest and most elegant styles of Type, anywhere to be found. 
Remember the number, 175 Commercial Street. 



Vickery & Hawley, 



Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



Woolens, Gloves, Hosiery, 

AND SMALL WARES, 
No. 31 FBEE STBEET, 

C. A. VICKERY, TIIAD. B. HAWLEY. 



G.A.SUSSKRAUT, 



wwm 



a?:.. 



L7 P 

m n 



Importer and Manufacturer 



FUR GOODS 



No. 40 CENTER STREET, 
fst door from Congress. 



MERRILL BROTHERS & GUSHING 

IMPORTERS AND WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 






GLOYES, HOSIERY, COKSETS, YARKS, 
SMALL WARES, TRIMMINGS, &c. 

No. 5 Summer St., Boston. 18 FEEE ST., POKTLAND, 



H. MERRILL, 



I. M. MERRILL, 



A. R. CUSIIING. 



53 



*M©Sf4!19 a w °v 



J N©4M©Rt)H °1 Q l 



'$xrm mm snsss. 




xi saaTvaa 



& NoiHBnoH y Noswig 

JAMES FREEMAN, 

WHOLESALE 



mm 



NO. 2 UNION WHARF, 

TWO DOORS FROM COMMERCIAL ST. 



f~1 W. IiTTCY, Confectioner. Special 
v/i attention given to the manufacture 
of Wedding Cake ; 364 Congress St. 

~M/TRS. <T. & A. HAM, Ladies' Hair 
JjJL Work in all its branches, 13 Market 
Square, 1st door to the right. 

JTTiX JOT & McCAEEAR, Boots, 
JCJ Shoes and Rubbers, 11 Market Square. 
Repairing d<?ne at short notice. 



H. 



M. EREWER, Belt Manufacturer, 
No. 311 Congress Street. 



fOHK CRONAN, Groceries, Provis- 
«/ ions and Country Produce, New Store, 
No. 59 Fore St. 



XB. & W. A. GRAHAM. Iron 
• Pounders and Manufacturers of Ma- 
chinery and Ornamental Castings, Door 
Rollers, Saw Clamps, Brackets, &c, 100 
Green Street. 



H 



UGH HOEAK, New and Second- 
Hand Clothing, 244 Fore St. 



E. 



E. TEN MO RE, Dealer in Choice 
Groceries, 66 Fore St. 



J^HWARH SMAEE, Booksellers' and 

-*-' Publishers' Bookbinder, 64 Exchange 
Street. 



JD 



R. A. J. LOCKE, Dentist, 38 
Brown Street. 



54 



&' 



A 



@w- 



Jobbers of 



% 



3 



RUBBERS AND MOCCASINS, 

.VO. 33 COMMEX CIAL STREET. 

Will remove to Union Street, near Middle, in Nov., 1860. 

J. C. STEVENS, M. E. HASKELL, A. E. CHASE. 



Q. W. Rich & Co., 

( Successors to A. M. Smith, ) 
Manufacturers and Dealers in 

GOODS, 

Jfo. 3 CEJYTXAZ WMAXF. 

Particular attention given to Custom Work. 

Back in old stand, 173 Fore Street, Nov. 
1st, 1866. 

G. W. Rich, R. Lewis, B. Lewis. 



PABROTT & LARRABEE, 

Can be found at their New Shop, 

Head of St. John Smith's 
Wharf, rear of Commercial SI . 

HOUSE JOBBING, 

Of all kinds, done to order. 



"W. ID. LITTXjIE, 

JVo. 79 COMMERCIAL ST., {2nd Story,) 

OVER STORE OF JOHN DENNIS & CO. 



JMTM. C. BECKETT, Merchant 
*' Tailor, at Store of Pray & Smith, 

Morton Block, ready to attend to his friends 

and the public. 

~\TE WIIA Z I, GIJB S O A T & CO., 

-*-V Pine and Spruce Lumber, Clapboards, 
Shingles, Laths, &c, head of Smith's Wharf, 
Commercial Street. 



J~AM E 8 E URBI S H, Professor of 
t/ Languages and Mathematics, 36 Oak 
Street,where he will fit boys for College, and 
give instructions in Modern Languages. 

CtTAJTWOOE <& DODGE, Commis- 

^3 sion Merciiants, Dealers in Groceries, 
Flour, Produce and Ship Stores, 3 Chase's 
Block, head Long Wharf. 



MERCHAN 



: T 



Ju ucJu JL J^-J K-S JL hi 



No. 346 Congress Street, near Oak Street. 
VIOTriALIIV& CELLAR, 

HEAD OF LONG W H A It F . 
J8®= Meals and lunches at all hours. Board by the day or week, on reasonable terms. 



55 



PORTLAND ACADEMY, 

Union Hall, Free Street. 

Masters and Misses, of all ages and attainments, received at any time in the term. 
Superior advantages offered to young men preparing themselves for College. 
Private Classes of young Ladies and Gentlemen in the Languages, Mathematics, Book- 
Keeping, &c, attended to at any hour of the day or evening, by the Principal. 

Instruction furnished in 'Pencil and Crayoft Drawing, and 
in Oil Painting. 

No. 28 HANOVER STREET. 



P. O. Box 103. 



LOWELL & SENTER, 



No. 161 COMMERCIAL STREET, 

(Over M'Gilvery, Kyan & Davis,) 

Chronometers, Charts, Compasses, Spy 
Glasses, Masthead Glasses, Almanacs, Par- 
allel Rules, Scales, Dividers, Clocks, Barom- 
eters, Thermometers, Coast Pilots, Naviga- 
tors, Ship Masters' Assistant, &c. &c. 

Mating and Repairing as usual. 

Will re-occupy their old stand on Ex- 
change Street, as soon as completed. 



O.J. WALKER & CO., 

Manufacturers and Wholesale 
Dealers in 

BOOTS, SHOES, 

Rilers, Leather & Filings, 

750 Commercial Street, 



Chas. J. Walker, 
Calvin S. True, 



Llewellyn R. Smith, 
Benj. P. Whitney. 



mm 



PVSnVQV, 




DEALERS IN 



New and Second-Hand Furniture, 



AS WELL, AS 



Carpeting, Crockery, and Glass, 2in and Wooden 
Ware, Sedding of all kinds, Chamber and Parlor 
Sets, &c, &c, at prices as low as can be bought in 
this, or any other market. 

Exchange Street, cor. Federal Street. 
ANDERSON, BONISTELL & CO., 

Architects, Civil Engineers and Surveyors, 

NO. 306 CONGRESS STREET. 

J. F. ANDERSON, M. STEAD, W. F. BONNELL. 



CHARLES H. MARK, 
Druggist and Apothecary^ 

First class Drugs and Medicines constantly on hand. 
NO. 34 ST. LAWRENCE STREET. 



5G 

N. M. PERKINS & CO., 

DEALERS IN 

Glass, &®. 



AGENTS FOR THE FLORENCE LEAD COMPANY'S 

WHITE LEAD A^D ZI]^C PAIJSTTS, 

AND BOSTON ROOFING COMPANY'S 

ROOFING 3^1 _A.TIE RIAL, 
No. 204 FORE STREET. 

W. P. FILES & CO., 



&§©m^ a 



niidl© 



Having been before the Portland Public for more than THIRTY YEARS, as a 

Build' er r 

The senior member of this firm feels assured that he can give in the future, as he has given 
in the past, perfect satisfaction. 

We are now prepared to contract with parties wishing to build, and to do in a thorough 
and workmanlike manner, 

JOBBING O F AZZ JZriWBS. 

References .—All the business men in the city. Orders left at 28 Hanover Street, or ad- 
dressed to P. O. Box 103. 



"VV. P. FILES, 



J. L. T. FILES. 



~fii FAIRFIELD, Stencil Cutting. 
J2j • Agent for Stencil Alphabets and 
Figures, Steel Stamps, &c. No. 130 Ex- 
change Street. 

JJ~ENEY IiAIIEY «€• CO., Commis- 
Jj. gion Merchants and Auctioneers, 170 
Fore Street. 



fl 11. HUE 1>D & CO., Ladies', Miss- 
^- / » es' and Children's Boots and Shoes, 
Shoe Stock and Findings, 107 & 109 Com- 
mercial Street. 

Of II. HE AG DO N, Carpenter and 
>-?• Builder. All kinds of Job Work at- 
tended to. Cotton Street. 



W. H. WOOD & SON, 

Stock, Exchange and Specie Brokers, 

And dealers in 5-20 & 7-30 Government Bonds, 



NO 



19 8 FORE STREET. 



STK0UT & GAGE, 



NO. 113 FEDERAL STREET. 

SEWAU C. STROUT, HANXO W. GAGE. 

Will remove to corner of Exchange and Federal Streets, when rebuilt. 

C. MUEPHY & CO., 

NO. 164 CONGRESS STREET, NEAR INDIA STREET, 

Carpentering and Glazing, 

And all kinds of Shop Work done neatly, and to order. 



57 



J. H. TEMPLE, 



DEALER I2ST 




see&esa 



e, 



&e©* 



m* 



No. 220 CONGRESS, CORNER PEARL STREET. 

SAMUEL STROUS, 

Dealer in 



AND GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. 

NEW CLOTHING— THE LATEST AND BEST STYLES. 

Constantly on hand a large assortment of GENTS' and LADIES' SHC0ND-H4ND 

CIO THING— Overcoats, Slants, presses, Silks, Sedcihiff of all kinds, 

CHIZ&ZtHN'S CZO THING, &c. 

SELLS LOW FOR CASH. 

jg^Call aiid examine before purchasing elsewhere. 

New Store, Middle, corner Hampshire Street. 

WANTED— $10,000 worth of 2ND-HAND CLOTHING; Highest Prices Paid. 

X. D. IMIIEIR/IE^IIjIL, Sc CO., 

PLUMBERS, 

No. 27 "UNION STREET. 

Water Closets, Force and Suction Urinals, Pumps, Bath 

Boilers, Wash Bowls, Silver-plated and Brass 

Cocks, of all kinds, 

COITSTAISTTLY OIT HAND. 

All kinds of Fixtures for hot and cold water set up in the best manner. 
All orders, in city or country, personally attended to. 

I. D. MERRILL, JOHN BOND, S. D. MERRILL. 



58 



PERKINS, JACKSON & CO., 



Wholesale and Retail 




THE CELEBKATED JACKSON'S McNEAL COAL 



Always on hand, for retail. 



High St. Wh'f, (formerly Sawyer's) 302 Commercial, foot High St. 



<U C. RVNDIETT, Inventors' Ex- 
&• change. Clothes Wringers and Dry- 
ers constantly on hand ; also, Wringers and 
Lamps repaired. 209 Congress St. 

T" M. TOM) has fitted up nice Rooms 
** * in New Eating House, Sawyer's Build- 
ing, Lime Street, few doors above Post 
Offi ce. 

_E O. M. HARDIN G, Architect, 
Plans, Specifications, &c, for every 
description of Building. Office, 2l}£ Free 
Street, 

OFFICES of J. B. Brown & Sons, and 
Portland Sugar Company, are for the 
present at 27> 2 Danforth Street. 

C1HURCHIIE, BJtOWNS £ 
MANSON, Commission Merchants, 
No. 270 Commercial Street, head of Smith's 
Wharf. 



G 



QfAMtrjEZ OSJiORN, Groceries, Pro* 
*3 visions, Fruit, &c, No. 2 North Street) 
nearly opposite the Observatory. 

JT/- T. K1JLBORN & CO., Carpet- 
" * • ings and Upholstery Goods, Whole- 
sale and Ketail, 33 Free Street. 

TfDWARI) F. HAINES, Watch- 
-*-' maker, 39 Center Street. All work 
will receive his personal attention. 

THE ODOR JOHNSON, Figure and 
Ornamental Carver, 85 Federal Street. 

&TEFHE\ BERRT, Book, Job and 
*3 Card Printer, 172 l 2 Fore, foot of Ex- 
change Streets All kinds of Fine and Or- 
namental Printing, in Black or Colors. 

Tp M E It S O N it- BURR, Clothing, 
J-J Hats, Caps and Furnishing Goods, 
(Mechanics' Building,) 317 Congress Street. 



JOHN B. HUDSON, JR. 




PAIITTER, 

No. 27 MARKET SQUARE. 

Signs, Banners, Transparencies, Curtains, Ornamental Cards, Glass Signs 
of Fancy Painting, executed in an artistic manner. 
Scene fainting of all descriptions. 
Special attention given to Masonic Banner and Transparency Painting. 

HALLS DECORATED AT SHORT NOTICE. 

R. B. HEIRY & CO., 



, and all kinds 



PACKERS OF 



rorftfliml Ummsmm fJirtn si Hams. 

Also, Manufacturers of 

2?ologna and "Pork Sausages, Wholesale ^Dealers in Sausage 
Casings, ffioutid Hogs, iPork, Z,ard, Sams, d-c. 

Ho. SO POEfLAID STREET. 



R. B. HENRY, 



II. H. NEVENS. 



59 




HI JOHN KINSMAN, 

GAS FITTER, 

And Dealer in 

Gas Pipes and Fixtures; also, 

Galvanized Iros Water Fipes s 
No. 25 Union Street. 



Win. Kenney & Son, 

Dealers in all kinds of 

Meats, Poultry, 

VEGETABLES, 

Country Produce, k, 

Nos. 5 & 6 Milk Street Market. 



WM. KENNEY, 



W. H. KENNEY. 



Wholesale Dealers in 
FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC 

DB Y G O OB S 

AND WOOLENS, 

Mechanics' 1 Hall, Corner of Congress 
and Casco Streets. 



P. LANE, 



A. LITTLE. 



AMERICAN HOUSE, cor. Middle 
-£*- & India Sts. Wm. M. Lewis, Prop'r. 



R. D O D GE , at No. 15 Myrtle 
Street. 



D 



CflLAS S. DREW, Foreign and 
& American Dry Goods, cor. Congress and 
Preble Streets. 



E. 



T. MERRILL & CO., Boots and 
Shoes, 327 Congress Street. 



JTTM. ALLEN, Jr., Fruit, Confec- 
* * tionery, Tobacco, Cigars, &c, No. 5 
Moulton,foot Exchange Street. 

jp D W A RD HARLOW, Dealer in 
J-J Hardware and Groceries, new build- 
ing, 222 Fore Street. 



f~1ERRISH & PEARSON, Watches, 
^*" Jewelry and Silver- ware, 15 Free St. 
Oliver Gerrish, Natii'l Pearson. 

OCEAN INSURANCE CO., No. 1% 
Fore Street. 
Wm. W. Woodbury, President. 

Geo. A. Wright, Secretary. 

fllTY LIQUOR AGENCY, No. 188 

*s Fore Street, entrance in the rear from 
Central Wharf. 

fOHN EENNO, Dealer in Groceries, 
ft* Country Produce, &c, new building, 
220 Fore Street. 

TpDWARI) P. SHERWOOD. Coun- 
-*-' sellor and Attorney at Law and Nota- 
ry Public. Office, Deering Block. 



STAE/BIRD'S 
Establishment for Cleansing, Repairing &. Pressing 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS " 

IS now located at 

No. 376 CONGRESS STREET, 

(OVER THE MESSRS. DEERING'S STORE, OPPOSITE THE CITY HOTEL, 

head of Green Street,) 
Where he will be happy to see his old customers and the hundreds of new ones which 
have been added since the Fire, whose orders will be executed in his usual neat and 
superior style. 

N. B. Garments cut and made to order, 

Portland, Sept. 10, 1866. 



60 



EASTERN ARGUS. 



ESTABLISHED IN 1803 



PUBLISHED BY 

JOHN 31. ADA3IS 



& CO. 



Office, No. 1 Printers' Exchange, 175 Commercial Street. 

The terms of the Daily Argus are $J .00 per annum in advance,— otherwise $7 .50. 
The Tki- WEEKLY Argus, $£.,00 per annum, strictly in advance. The WEEKLY Argus, 
$2 .50 per annum, invariably in advance. 

ADVERTISEMENTS TAKEN ON LIBERAL TEEMS. 



OAXADIAX EXPRESS CO. Office, 
104 Fore Street, James K. Prindle, 

Agent. 

T\ M. C. I) VXX, Wholesale Millinery. 
JS» Good assortment constantly on hand, 
at 29 Free Street. 



w. 



H. H. HATCH, Watchmaker 
• and Jeweler, 27 Free Street. 



nHIXEHAS liARXES, Counsellor 
-*■ at Law, 19 Free Street. 

f DOW'S Boarding House, 20 Free 
«/ • Street. 



JTAIXES, SMITH & COOK. Hard- 

-*-*• ware and Cutlery, 3 Gait Block, Com- 
mercial Street. 



JJTIXSLOWS MACHINE 
* ' W O R K S , at W r inslow, Doten & 
Co's. Planing Mill. 

jyAIXE'S MUSIC STORE, Corner 
-L of Congress and Center Streets, oppo- 
site Preble House. 

fyHARLE S M VI I IX, Groceries, 
v^ Provisions and Country Produce, new 
store. No. 61 Fore Street. 

T\TM. H. FESSEXDEX, Counsel- 
'* lor at Law, Deering Block, and War 
Claim Agency, at No. :f4 Brown Street. 

~M~ W, HAXSOX, Iron Founder and 
*/ • Plow Maker ; also, Ship, Stove, Piow 
and Machine Castings, Job Work done to 
order. Head of Smith's Wharf. 



F. A. LEA VITT, 

S4I1 14111, 

Also, Maker of 

Italian Awnings, Tents, Cov- 
- ers, Sackings, &c. 

Wi dgery's W?i a rf. 

All orders promptly executed. 



W. P, Freeman & Co., 

UPHOLSTERERS, 

And Manufacturers of 

Furniture, Louies, Bei-Steads, 

Spring-Serfs, .Traitresses, 3F*en> 
Cushions, t&c, 

Clapp's Block, foot Chestnut Street. 

W. P. Freeman, D. W. Deane, 

C. L. Quimby. 



R. R. ROBINSON, 

IP IL. TJ im: street, 

BETWEEN FOBE AND MIDDLE STREETS. 

"edw 7 ! iE~I biro o ik: s , 



125 FEDERAL STREET, formerly 17 Exchange. 

■ Pastry, Fruit, Confectionery, Ale and Cigars. 



Gl 



PORTLAND ADVERTISER, 



ESTABLISHED A. D. 1785. 



T. W. IIWIA1, E&it®a? and Publisher. 

T E IR JML S: 

DAIZ Y—$6. 00 per annum. 

TftI- )( 'EJ5KL Y— Published every Monday, Wednesday and Friday Mornings, 
at $4 • OO per annum. 

It'/. ' Kh'L Y— Published every Thursday Morning, at $2.00 per annum. Itisabeauti- 
ful sheet, and has sufficient capacity for contents to make it emphatically a paper for the 
family. In its columns will be found interesting Stories, Poetry, the News, Messages, 
Public Speeches of interest, with the Editorial and Political matter of the Daily and Tri- 
Weekly issues. 

The price is $2.00 per annum in advance. To Clubs of ten subscribers, we wili send 
the Weekly Advertiser one year for ft/ . 75 each, in advance. The Commercial and 
Financial News and the Markets of the Weekly will alone be worth the price of subscrip- 
tion. 

States of Advertising \ — Our rates of advertising are as follows : 

Fifteen Lines solid Nonpareil (or 1' 4 ' inches) comprise a square. 

Special Notices $1.50 per square for first week: $1.00 per week after. 

Transient Advertisements $1.25 per square for first week, every day; C2 1 , cents 
per week after. One square, every other day, two weeks, $1.25; 50 cents per week after. 

COUNTING ROOM ON CROSS STREET, 

No. 1 New Advertiser Building. 



1 Coe&McCallar 



removed to 
No. II MARKET SQUARE, 

And are ready to furnish all of the desira- 
ble styles of 

Hmiit> flags, &®« 

We are manufacturing some 

RICH FURS, 

Which will be ready for the Fall trade, and 
shall offer them low for cash. 

COE & McCALLAR, 

11 Market Square. 



STATE STREET 

Bowling Saloon 

NEAR WESTERN DEPOT. 

The subscriber having refitted the above 
Saloon, and furnished 

NEW BALLS AND PINS, 

It is now open to the public from 8 A. M. 
to 10 P. M. 

A. II. RAYMOND, Proprietor. 



EDWARD M. PATTEN & CO., 

Commission Merchants and Auctioneers, 

WESTERLY SIDE OF PLUM, NEAR FORE ST. 

EDWARD St. PATTEN, STEPHEN W. PATTEN. 

SMALL & KNIGHT, 

( Successors to J. D. Cheney, ) 

Organ and Melodeon Manufacturers, 

AT STEVENS' PLAINS, 
On line of Westbrook Horse Cars. Post Office address, Portland, Me. 



62 




BUENHAM & MERRILL, 



MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IN 



Imtmti 



A FULL SUPPLY CONSTANTLY ON HAND, AND SOLD AT 

PRICES AS LOW AS ELSEWHERE IN THE CITY. 

mm®@>ww « wmmb Bmmmwmmm 

SOUGHT, SOZ& AND EXCHANGED. 

No. 368 CONGRESS STREET. 



A M. McKENNEY, Frame Manu- 
-^-i-» factory and New Photograph Gallery, 
284 Congress, cor. Center Street, (opposite 
Preble House.) Photographs, Ambrotypes, 
H allotypes. 

fl F. THRASHER, Dealers in Dry 
*~s • Goods, No. 9 Park Place. 

TTOHN E. 1>A I, ME It, Wholesale 
** Straw Goods and Millinery, 31 Free 
Street, (up stairs.) 

"tt/TM. J". HASTINGS, Manufacturer 

' ' of Cabinet Organs and Melodeons, 
15 Chestnut Street. 

J~ E. EAND, (late 54 Union Street,) 
*J • Crockery and Glass Ware, 105 Federal 
Street. 



f\H- S. C. EERNALD, Surgeon 
-*-* Dentist, No. 17 Free Street. 

JTONES & BR.O UN, Country Produce, 
*J Meats and Fruits, 1 & 2 Milk Street 
Market. 

ZIIiliY & EIliRACK, Machinists, 
No. 100 Green Street, Manufacture 
and Repair all kinds of Machinery. 

TTTARREN SE ARROW, Insurance 
** Agency, 80 Commercial St., Thomas 
Block. 

~f & E. M. RANT), Counsellor at 
v • Law, 16 Free Street. 



ZRA RERRY, Jr, 
17 F 



Free Street. 



Watchmaker, No. 



LOWELL & SENTER, 

39 PEARL STREET, 
Dealers in 

WATC HE S, 

Jewelry, Silver anfl Plated Ware 

AND PINE PANCY GOODS. 



Will occupy Store 301 Congress Street, 
soon as completed, for this branch of their 
business. 



Chas. Morse, M. D., 



Bronchitis, Asthma, Con- 
sumption, and all affec- 
tions of the Throat 
and Z/ungs, by 

COLD MEDICATED INHALATION 

And other remedies, 
No. 5 DEERING STREET, 
Second house from New High St. 



Hack and Boarding Stable. 

JVo . 6 G'RBBJV S T^RBB T. 

4®» Hacks furnished for Funerals, Weddings, Parties, Railroads and Steamboats, at 

short notice. 

H. E. UNDERWOOD & CO., 

Straw, Lace, Leghorn Bonnets & Gentlemen's Hats 

BLEACHED AND PRESSED AT THE SHORTEST NOTICE. 
NO. 3/0 f-2 CONGRESS STREET. 



G3 



Mansfield, Eedlon & Co,, 

Manufacturers of 
MANSFIELD'S 

Vegetable Mitigator, 

Extracts, Oils, drc, and 

^Dealers in all 

Medicines, 

No. 27 GREEN STREET. 

All orders promptly filled. 

Dr. Wm. P. Mansfield, B. M. Redlon, 
T. H. Mansfield. 



HENRY QUINCY, 

Dealer in. 

SPECTACLES 

OF ALL KINDS, 

Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, Cut- 
lery, Stationery, and other 
useful articles, 

No. 20S< FORE STREET. 

Cash paid for old Gold, Silver, Tortoise 
Shell and Watches. 




T"WO EDITIONS ID J± I Xj "Y 
jIT ?2 M. A.JVD 5 T. M. 



AND A 

SPLENDID ADVERTISING MEDIUM. 

EiP Advertisers have the Benefit of both Editions. =^1 



W 1 EE.*r 

THE BEST NEWSPAPER FOR THE PRICE 

EVEK PKINTED IN MAINE. 
OFFICE, 176 MIDDLE STREET. 



0. M. & E. P. BK00&S, 

Dealers in 
FOREIGN AND AMERICAN 

Manufacturers of and Dealers in 
Gents' Clothing and Fur- 
nishing Goods, 
JVo. 333 CONGRESS STREET, 
Would say that we are prepared to sell all 
goods in our line at the lowest cash prices. 
Grateful for past favors— would solicit a 
share of your patronage. 



J. S. RICKER & CO., 

Tanners & Curriers, 

Have constantly for sale of their own 
manufacture, 

Self, Sole, Card and Strap 
I, eat her ; also, Wax, Stiff, 
Split leather and Calf Steins. 

Highest cash price paid for Hides 
and Calf Skins. 

No. 98 GREEN STREET. 



64 

ATWELL Sc CO, 3 

Advertising Agents, 

174 MIDDLE STREET. 

ORDER BOX AT THE MCHAmnCMBB, HO. 2 LONG WHARF. 

Advertisements received for all papers in Maine and throughout the Country. 

Patrons of this Agency sire assured of having their work well and promptly done. 

Tiik particular inducement we offek is, that we will do your advertising for 
you at least as cheap as you can get it done, and save you the trouble of personal negotia- 
tion with the different publishers. If out of town advertising, you will save the trouble of 
writing letters, the expense and risk of remitting money and the payment of postage. 

Our files of papers, part of which may be seen at the Merchants' Exchange, are al- 
ways open to the inspection of advertisers, that they may see that their advertisements are 
correctly and properly inserted. 

We shall always be happy to wait upon parties at their places of business and give any 
information we possess as to papers, circulation and rates of advertising, and then to take 
your orders ; provided, you think it for your interest to give them to us. 

Orders may be left at our office, deposited in our order box at the Merchants' Exchange, 
or sent through the Post Office, and will receive prompt and faithful attention. 

PANNELS IN THE HORSE CARS, 

ci S AD YEP TIS IJYG MEDIUMS. 

The great advantages of this method of advertising, must be apparent on consideration 
of the immense number of passengers passing daily in the cars— being over 100,000 per 
month, or about 4,000 per day. 

Apply to M. G. Palmer, at "the Horse Railroad Depot, or to Atwell & Co., Advertising 
Agents. 

SHORT & LOSING, 

Booksellers and Stationers, 

WHOLESALE AND EETAIL, 

NO. 31 FREE, CORNER CENTER STREETS, 

Have on hand a full supply of 

©Mais ©©©kg?, 

Stationery of all kinds, Cash, Post Office and Envelope Cases, 
letter 'Presses, Pen Packs, <&c. 

We have just received from New York a full supply of 

PAPER HANGINGS., 

New Patterns and Choice Styles. 
Of all kinds. GITJS US A CALL. 

S K O IB, T Sc LOSING, 

31 FREE, COBNEB OF CENTEB STBEET. 



Business Guide and Advertising Index. 

ABBOTT A., boot manufacturer, 229-i congress. [merit p 55. 

Adams & Purinton, furniture, cor federal and exchange; see advertise- 

Advertiser Office, cross ; adv p 61. 

Allen William, Jr., fruit dealer, 5moulton; adv p 59. 

American Telegraph Co., horse r r depot, and commercial, foot of moulton. 

Anderson, Bonnell & Co., architects, 30G congress, adv p 55. 

Anderson & Co., hoop skirts, 328 congress; adv p 46. 

Anderson John, boots and shoes, 47 st lawrence. 

Argus Office, printers' exchange, 175 commercial ; adv p 60. 

Atvvell C. W., advertising agent, 174 middle, adv p 64. 

Atwood K. D., oyster saloon, 41 center, adv p 38. 

BAILEY & NOYES, books and stationery, 184 fore, adv 1st fly leaf. 

Bailey G. L., sporting goods, 9 free. 

Bailey Henry & Co.. auctioneers, 176 fore, adv p 56. 

Bank Portland Savings, 13 free. 

Bank Five Cent Savings, 19 free. 

Bank First National, 23 free. 

Bank Casco National, 190 fore. 

Bank Merchants National, 172 fore. 

Bank Canal National, 188 fore. 

Bank Cumberland National, 109 commercial. 

Bank National Traders, 21 £ free. 

Bank Second National, 188 fore, up stairs. 

Barbour J. & C. J., shoe dealers, 180 fore. 

Barbour & Hasty, carpenters, rear 86 federal. 

Barker J. C, trucking, 131 commercial ; adv p 38. 

Barnes P., counsellor. 19 free; adv p 60. 

Bean A. J., city baggage wagon, 174 middle ; adv p 39. 

Beale Oliver S., sign painter, over 187 fore; adv p 40. 

Beal & Strout, tailors, 93 federal. 

Beckett William C, tailor, morton block, congress; adv p 54. 

Bennett Francis, grocer, 355 congress. 

Bedlovv Miss M. E., fancy goods. 430 congress. 

Belknap C. W., 8 milk street market. 

Beale C. L., house painter, cor congress and franklin. 

Benson & Houghton, lumber dealers, berlin mills wharf; adv p 53. 

Bell B. & Co., painters, rear 86 federal. 

Bent A. A., millinery, 25 free; adv p 46. 

Berry Ira Jr., watch maker, 17 tree; adv p 62. 

Berry Stephen, printer, 172£ fore; adv p 58. 

Blake C. H., cabinet maker, 10 cross ; adv p 50. 

Bowen & Merrill, tancy goods, 33 free. 

Boothby E. K., gunsmith, federal, op site elm house; adv p 37. 

Boston J. L., grocer, lime, op market; adv p 36. 

Boyd William, counsellor, 72 danforth. 

Boyd Mrs E., millinery, corner free and center. 

Bowdoin L. M., fancy goods, 39 center; adv p 46. 

Bourne Major, slater, temple, between middle and federal. 

Breed C. H. & Co., shoe manufacturers, 109 commercial; adv p 56. 

British Consulate, room 3 g t depot. 

Browning Robert, boarding, 110 fore. 

Bragdon 8. H., carpenter, cotton; adv p 56. 

Brann & Merrill, carpenters, cross, rear advertiser office. 

Brewer H. M., belting, 311 congress; adv p 53. 

Brooks Edward K., restaurant, 1?5 federal ; adv p 60. 

Brown J. B. & Son, 27 h danforth ; adv p 58. 

Brings Mrs. M. A., dress maker and fancy goods, 1 chestnut. 

Brackett Edward, eating house, 90 federal. 

Brown L. S., gas fixtures, 96 federal. 

Brooks O. M. & E. P., dry goods, 333 congress ; adv p 63. 

Brims M. N., cabinet work, 23 preble ; adv p 48. 

Bradbury & Swett, counsellors, chad wick mansion, 249 congress ; adv p 47 

Brackett & Naylor, house painters, rear of 220 congress. 

Burke H., dye'house agency, 324 congress. 



Burnham & Merrill, furniture, 368 congress; advp G2. 
Burr C. II., physician, 399 congress; adv p 38. 

CANADIAN EXPRESS CO., 194 fore; adv p GO. 

Causer William, saloon, 10 pleasant. 

Carr W. W., fruit, 170 fore. 

Cary B., boarding, 225 Cumberland. 

Chadbourn & Kendall, jobbers of woolens, 103 federal; adv p 39. 

Christian Minor, printers' exchange, 175 commercial. 

Churchill. Browns & Manson, com merchants, 240 commercial; adv p 58. 

Cheney J. D., melodeons, 233£ congress. 

City Marshal's Office, chestnut st school house. 

City Clerk's Office, mechanics' hall building. 

City Treasurer's Office, mechanics' hall building. 

City Engineer's Office, mechanics' hall building. 

City Auditor's Office, mechanics' hall building. 

Clerk Relief Committee, mechanics' ball building. 

Clark D. & Co., boots and shoes, 29 market square; adv p 50. 

Clark D. W., ice office, 174 fore; adv p 38. 

Cleavy John, shoe maker, cor york and bank. 

Clifford W. II., counsellor, 8 clapp's block ; adv p 36. 

Cobb A. D., grocer, 3 and 4 milk st market; adv p 48. 

Cobb W. C, baker, old stand, new pearl st; adv p 39. 

Cobb A. & Co., worsted goods, under u s hotel ; adv p 46. 

Colesworthy S. H., bookseller, 45 oxford. 

Colby Mrs. A., bonnet rooms, 4 cotton. 

Conlon Dennis, grocer, 139 fore. 

Coolidge J. II., jeweler, 208 fore. 

Cook & Avers, tailors, 103 federal. 

Coe & McCallar, hats and caps, 11 market square; adv p 61. 

Cole S., carpenter, Cumberland, near Washington. 

Corey Walter & Co.. furniture, kennebec, near p and r depot. 

Corey J. R. & Co.. dry goods. 29 free ; adv p 51. 

Crockett John & Co., furniture, 11 preble; adv p 35. 

Crockett J. S., grocer, cor milk and lime; adv p 46. 

Cronan John, grocer, 59 fore; adv p 53. 

Cummings T. & J. B., builders, cotton. 

Cummings Mrs. B , groceries, 13 india. 

Cummings <fc lloyt, carpenters, rear 220 congress. 

Cushman Rufus, grocer. 6 moulton. 

Cushman Ara, boots, 27 commercial. 

Cutter E. P., saw filer, 27 union. 

DAVIS BRO'S, books and stationery, 200 fore; adv 2d fly. leaf. 

Davis, Baxter & Co., fancy goods, 1 gait block commercial. 

Davis N J., u s hotel ; adv p 45. • [p 47. 

Davis & Drummond, counsellors, chadwick mansion, 249 congress ; adv 

Dam, nirs. J. & A., hair work, 13 market square ; adv p 53. 

Davee George W., boot maker, cor india and middle. 

Deehan Patrick, cooper, 181 commercial. 

Deering Nathaniel, insurance, 19 free. 

Dean 11. P., counsellor, 8 clapp's block; adv p 48. 

Deblois & Webb, counsellors, boody mansion, cor congress and chestnut. 

Deering. Milliken & Co., dry goods, 31 commercial. 

Dow & Libby, insurance, 117 commercial ; adv p 34. 

Dow John E. & Son, insurance, over 176 fore; adv p 41. 

Dow Jonathan, boarding house, 26 free; adv p 60. 

Downes C. G., tailor, 233£ congress. 

Dolan Hugh, clothing, 244 fore ; adv p 53. 

Dodge Moses, physician, 15 myrtle ; adv p 59. 

Donovan John, shoe maker, at C P Kimball's, preble. 

Drew S. S., dry goods, under preble house; adv p 59. 

Drinkwater David, house painter, lime op post office. 

Duran C. F., apothecary, 37 middle. 

Duran & Brackett, trunks, sidewalk rear old city hall. 

Duran J., grocer, Cumberland, under casco st church. 

Dunn D. M. C, millinery, 29 free; adv p 60. 

Dunn Henry & Son, harnesses, 172 middle; adv p 47. 

Dunyon A., watches and jewelry, congress, cor casco ; adv p 46. 



Ill 



Dunphy James, grocer, 10 danforth. 
Dyer W. S., sewing machines, 166 middle; adv p 40. 
Dyer & Pierce, grocers, lime op market; adv p 36. 
Dyer C, clothing, 27 market square. 

EASTERN EXPRESS CO., 21 free; adv p 37. 

Eastman Bro's, dry goods, 332 congress. 

Edwards Calvin & Co.. piano fortes, 352 congress. 

Elder G. M , boots and shoes, 10 India; adv p 48. 

Elliott & Manning, insurance, 179 middle. 

Elliott & McCallar, boots and shoes, 11 market square ; adv p 53. 

Elden & Whitman , dry goods, under casco st church. 

Elsworth N. & Son, crockery, 26 market square. 

Emery & Drummond, counsellors, 8 clapp's block. 

Emerson & Burr, clothing, 317 congress; adv p 58. 

Evans & Putnam, counsellors, 113 federal. 

FAIRFIELD E., stencil cutter, 130 exchange; adv p 56. 

Farley C. H., nautical instruments, 180 fore; adv p 36. 

Farmer James L., com merchant, room 5 g t depot. 

Fassett F. H., architect, new city hall building. 

Fenley W. A., stable, 6 £reen; adv p 62. 

Fenno John, grocer, 220 fore ; adv p 59. 

Fessenden J. D., counsellor, deering hall ; adv p 48. [adv p 60. 

Fessenden William II., counsellor, deering hall; claim agency 34 brown; 

Fernald James E. & Son, tailors, 85 free ; adv p 35. 

Fernald S. C, dentist, 17 free; adv p 62. 

Felt Jesse S., jeweler, 8 laurel. 

Felt A. E., jeweler, 8 laurel. 

Fenderson & Sabine, fruit, 122 commercial. 

Files W. P. & Co., masons and builders, 28 hanover; adv p 56. 

Files Charles O., portland academy, 85 free; adv p 55. 

Flannery Thomas F., marble worker, 43 preble; adv p 36. 

Fogg Benjamin, boots and shoes, 4 moulton. 

Foye, Coffin & Swan, insurance, 185 fore; adv p 45. 

Foster A., dye house, 315 congress. 

Fobes Charles, paints, 3 custom house wharf. 

Frost P. B., tailor, 332J congress ; adv p 44. 

Frost C. R. & L. E., carpenters, 246 fore. 

Freeman W. P. & Co., furniture, kennebec, near p and r depot; adv p 60. 

Freeman James, oyster dealer, 2 union wharf; adv p 53. 

French George F., physician, 241 congress ; adv p 37. 

Furbush H. H., agent portland sugar house, 238 commercial. 

Furbish James, prof of languages, 34 oak ; adv p 54. 

GALE STEPHEN", apothecary, cor middle and lime; adv p 48. 

Gammon E., dining saloon, 13 lime; adv 2d fly leaf. 

Gammon & Thomas, painters, cor Federal and Temple. 

Gerrish & Pearson, watch makers, 15 free ; adv p 59. 

Gill Daniel & Son, victualling cellar, head long wharf; adv p 54. 

Gilman X. J., jeweler, 6 free. 

Goold N., tailor, 16 market square; adv p 39. 

Gould Edward, grocer, 129 fore. 

Gould James, coroner, chestnut st school house. 

Goodwin E., box manufacturer, 216 fore. 

Goddard & Haskell, counsellors, 19 free. 

Go well A., boots and shoes, 1 chestnut. 

Gowell S. B., broom manufacturer, 24 preble. 

Grant J., coffee and spices, 157 commercial ; adv p 50. 

Graham L. B. & W. A., iron founders, 100 green; adv p 53. 

Gray George, grocer, 7 sumner. 

Greenough Byron & Co., hatters, 164 middle. 

Grohsarth Charles, watch maker, 6 free. 

Grueby & Thorndike, sash and blinds, plum. 

HARRIS & WATERHOUSE, hatters, 71 commercial; adv 4th p cover. 
Harris F. R., hats and caps, 22 market square. 
Harris H. C, trucking, 85 commercial; adv p 43. 
Hall A. T., grocer, 1 milk; adv p 46. 
Hall G. W., grocer, cor lime and milk. 



IV 

Hall Joseph B., monitor printing rooms, 174 middle; adv p 33. 

Hall C. H. & Co., fancy goods, S3 free. 

Hale F. F., photographic goods, 61 commercial ; adv p 48. 

Haley H. N.. barber, 95 federal ; adv p 46. 

Haines. Smith & Cook, hardware, 3 gait block, commercial; adv p 60. 

Hatch H. H., grocer, 10 lime. 

Harper & Smith, last manufacturers, 150 commercial. 

Hardy Freeman, eating saloon, op milk st market. 

Halehan Timothy, grocer, 232 fore. 

Haves & Douglass, crockery, 218 fore ; adv p 43. 

Hanson V. C. & Co., boots and shoes, 345£ congress. 

Hanson & Dow, real estate agents, 345^ congress. 

Hatch W. IT. II., jeweler, 27 free; adv p 60. 

Harding G. M., architect, 21i free; adv p 58. 

Harlow Edward, hardware, 222 fore; aclv p 59. 

Hamlin Lorenzo, liquor agency, rear 1S8 fore; adv pT59. 

Hastings W. P., melodoons, 15 chestnut; adv p 62. 

Haines E. P., watch maker. 39 center; adv p 58. 

Hanson J. W., plow manufacturer, 26 york; adv p 60. 

Hankerson J. & Co., agency, 166 middle. 

Harmon Z. K., claim agent, 12 market square; adv 2d p cover. 

Heald J., dentist, 241 congress; adv p 38. 

Herriman James, grocer, 15 fore. 

Benrv R. B., pork packer, 80 portland; adv p 58. 

Hilton W. W.. jeweler, 202 Fore. 

Hill L. J., coifee and spices, 100 green. 

Hillman & Mellen, millinery, deering hall, congress. 

Hill F. F., jewelry, 11 free. 

Howard & Cleaves, counsellors, 17 free ; adv p 39. 

Howard O. B., boots and shoes, lime, op market; adv p 36. 

Howard John L. & Co, stove dealers, 132 exchange. 

Hooper & Eaton, furniture, 130 .exchange; adv p'5»l. 

Holden & Peabody, counsellors, 229 congress; adv p 48. 

Hodsdon William S., periodical store, 37 center. 

Hoyt E., furniture, 325 congress. 

Hudson J. B., sign and banner painter, 27 market square; adv p 58. 

Hughes J. B., physician, 4 preble. 

Huntress Bros, house painters, cor fore and union; adv 2d fly leaf. 

Huntington James, gun manufactory, plumb. 

INGRAHAM D. H., counsellor, cor exchange and federal; adv p 43. 

Ingalls R. and H. P., mineral and soda water, 26 portland; adv p 37. 

JEWETT & COOK, eating-house, 310 congress. 

Jerries W. H., real estate broker, horse r r depot. 

Johnson T., carver, 85 federal, op site elm house; adv p 58. 

Jones B. W., confectionery, 155 commercial. 

Jones B. H., boots and shoes, 111 federal ; adv 2d flyleaf. 

Jones J. W. canned fruits, 155 commercial. 

Jones & Brown, grocers, 1 and 2 milk st market; adv p 62. 

Jordan James, livery stable, 86 federal. 

KALER F. W., millinery. 315 congress. 

Kaler H. S. & Co., millinery, 8 brown. 

Kenney William & Son, grocers, 5 and 6 milk st market; adv p 59. 

Keith A., watch maker, 13 free; adv p 46. 

Kent Reuben, baker, 107 fore ; adv p 38. 

Kilborn W. T. & Co., carpetings, 33 free ; adv p 58. 

Kinsman J., gas fixtures, 25 union ; adv p 59. 

Kidder L., counsellor, 93 commercial. 

King & Dexter, hardware, 28 preble. 

Knight & Googins, tin and sheet iron workers, temple; adv 2d fly leaf. 

Knight Isaac, grocer, cor india and middle. 

Knight M. J., grocer, 20 oxford. [fly leaf. 

LAUGHLTN THOMAS & SOX, ship smiths, 185 commercial; adv 3d 

Land J. F.. crockery, 105 federal; adv p 62. 

Lane & Little, dry goods, congress, cor casco ; adv p 59. 

Larrabee R. J. D., picture frames, 8 central wharf. 



Leighton Robert Jr., provisions and wood, 28 middle; adv 3d fly leaf. 
Leathe & Gore, refined soaps, 397 commercial; adv p 50. 
LeightOg Charles II., grocer. 28 middle. 
Leavitt F. A., sail maker, widgery's wharf; adv p 60. 
Levy it Mathias, clothing, 229 congress. 

Lewis J. T. & Co., clothing, 1 gait block, commercial; adv p 38. 
Lewis Wm. M., american house, cor middle and india; adv p 59. 
Lewis, Rollins & Bond, clothing, 18 market square; adv p 43. 
Libby & Lidback. machinists. 100 green; adv p 62. 
Libby J. P., paper box manufactory, 3454 congress. 
Libby II. J. & Co., commission merchants, 214 free. 
Libby & Bolton, edge tool makers, 234 fore. 
Litchfield Mrs. F. A., dress maker, 3224 congress. 
Little W. D., insurance, 79 commercial ; adv p 54. 
Locke A. J., dentist, 38 brown ; adv p 53. 

Lowell & Senter, nautical instruments, jewelry and silver ware, 161 com- 
mercial and 301 congress ; now at 39 pearl ; adv p p 55 and 62. 
Loring & Soule, grocers, 10 and 11 milk st market; adv p 37. 
Loring Francis, boots and shoes, 320 congress. 
Loring Thomas G., druggist, cor exchange and federal. 
Loring George & Co., slaters, cor federal and temple. 
Low John W., clothing, cor middle and Chatham. 
Lovejoy J. G., lime and cement, 33 commercial; adv p 45. 
Lucas Thomas, dry goods, 270 congress. 
Lucy C. W., confectionery, 364 congress; adv p 53. 
Lunt J. R., apothecary, 14 market square. 
Luscomb George E., grainer, lime op post office ; adv p 43. 
MARRETT, POOR & CO.. carpetings, 311 congress; adv p 44. 
Mayor's Office, mechanics' hall building. 
Mann Joseph, carriage smith, 45 preble ; adv p 39. 
Mark G. & G., lock smiths, pearl near cor federal. 
Martin, Pennell & Co., carriage manufactory, 21 preble; adv p 35. 
Marston Mrs. William, dry and fancy goods, 28 sumner. 
Mark C. H., apothecary, 34 stlawrence; adv p 55. 
Marrett E. A., dry goods, 345 congress. 
Mansfield J. W., harnesses, 174 middle; adv 2d fly leaf. 
Mansfield, Redlon & Co., patent medicines, 27 green; adv p 63. 
McAlpine S. M., insurance, 19 free. 
McCobb & Kingsbury, counsellors, 156 middle. 
McGowan Dennis, 2d hand clothing, cotton. 
McCarthy Charles, grocer, 4 danforth. 
McMenamin John, grocer, Cumberland, near Washington. 
McGowan Terance, books and clothing, 139 congress. 
McCarthy M., boots and shoes, 3 elm under u s hotel. 
McKenney A. M., photographer, cor center and congress; adv p 62. 
Merrill Bro's & Gushing, fancy goods, 18 free ; adv p 52. 
Merrill I. D. & Co., plumbers, 27 union; adv p 57. 
Merrill E. T., boots and shoes, 327 congress; adv p 59. 
Merrill A. H., boots and shoes, 342 congress. 
Merrill J. A., watches and jewelry, 13 free; adv p 39. 
Merrill D. S., water, order slate 118 fore. 
Merchants' Exchange, 2 long wharf. 
Mercantile Library Association, sawyer's building, lime. 
Merry George A., barber, cor fore and india. 
Mitchell N. I., dry goods, 268 congress ; adv p 46. 
Mitchell George H., livery stable, 24 preble. 
Miller & Dennett, counsellors, 93 commercial. 
Miller X. J., collector internal revenue, 904 commercial. 
Morgan, Dyer & Co., wholesale grocers, 143 commercial. 
Moses H. W., provisions, 248 congress. 
Moxcey J. C, barber, 123 commercial. 

Morse, Lothrop & Dyer, shoe dealers, 151 commercial ; adv p 38. 
Morse Charles, physician, 5 deering; adv p 62. 
Moulton C. F., boots and shoes, 390 congress; adv p 44. 
Municipal Court Room, chestnut st school house. 
Murphy C. & Co., carpenters, 164 congress; adv p 56. 



Murphy John IT., clothing. 5 commercial. 

Mullin Charles, grocer, 59 fore ; adv p 60. 

Murch Josiah, shoe maker, 211 congress. 

NASH F. & C. B., stove dealers, 174 fore; adv p 37. 

Nash O. M. & D. W., stove dealers, 13 and 15 moulton; adv p 48. 

Nason E. P., grocer. 12 Washington. 

Newcomb L., architect, 30 free ; adv p 30. 

Newhall Watson, agent oriental powder co, 93 commercial. 

Newhall, Gibson &Co., lumber, head smith's wharf; adv p 54. 

Noyes A. N. & Son, stove dealers, lime op market; adv p 36. 

Nowell Henry, grocer, 8 milk st market. 

NuttCr E., boors and shoes, 36 center. 

OCEAN INSURANCE CO., 196 fore; adv p 59. 

O'Donnell J., counsellor, chadwick mansion, 249 congress; adv p 46. 

Osborn Samuel, grocer, 2 north ; adv p 58. 

Otis Isaac, grocer, cor wilmot and oxford. 

Owen & Barbour, fruits and confectionery, 183 fore ; adv p 37. 

PATTERSON & CHADBOURNE, real estate and claim agents, 1684 

middle ; adv p 36. 
Palmer John E., straw goods, 31 free; adv p 62. 
Payson H. M., stock broker, 174 fore; adv p 44. 
Paine H. L., coal and wood, 267 commercial. 
Paine's Music Store, 284 congress; adv p 60. 
Patten E. M. & Co., auctioneers, plumb near fore; adv p 61. 
Paine A. Willis, fancy goods, 13 market square; adv p 46. 
Palmer R. L., painter, 97 federal. 
Parker I. W., counsellor, 11 clapp's block. 
Packard H., books, 337 congress. 

Parrott & Larrabee, carpenters, head smith's wharf; adv p 54. 
Pearson & Smith, bakers, old stand, new pearl st; adv p 45. 
Pearce W. A., plumber, 180 fore; adv p 42. 
Perkins, Jackson & Co., lumber, head high st wharf; adv p 58. 
Perkins N. M. & Co., hardware, 204 fore; adv p 56. 
Perry E. N., hats, 294 congress. 
Perry Charles, clothing, 294 congress. 
Phillips W. F. & Co., druggists, 148 fore; adv p 44. 
Phinney & Jackson, commission merchants, 240 commercial. 
Pearson Moses, silver plater, temple ; adv p 42. 
Pierce Lewis, counsellor, 8 clapp's block. 
Pingree L. F.. patterns and models, 26 preble. 

Plummer C. M. & H. T., white and blacksmiths, 12 union; adv p 38. 
Portland Gas Co., boody mansion, congress. 
Portland Kindling Wood Co., 322 commercial. 
Porter & Means, carriage painters, 244 preble; adv p 47. 
Powers Samuel, shoe maker, cor adams and mountfort. 
Probate Office, chesnut st school house. 
Prince's Express, 174 middle. 
Press Office, printer's exchange, 179 commercial. 
Proctor J. O, real estate broker, middle near lime; adv p 38. 
QUINCY HENRY, jeweler, 208 fore ; adv p 63. 
Quincy H. G., toys and fancy goods, north corner old city hall. 
RACKLYFT JAMES B., bonnet bleachery, 308 congress; adv p 46. 
Rand J. & E. M., counsellors, 16 free; adv p 62. 
Rand Rufus, sale and livery stable. 43 center. 
Raymond A. H., bowling saloon, state; adv p 61. 
Reeves A. D., tailor, 36 free. 
Reeves George, jeweler, 16 market square. 
Rice C. M., paper dealer, 183 fore; adv p 47. 
Rice George M., barber, 366 congress. 
Rich G. W., clothing, 3 central wharf; adv p 54. 
Rich S. S. & Son, coffins, 138 exchange; adv p 40. 
Richardson J. F., engraver, at Berry's, foot of exchange. 
Richardson & Allen, horse shoeing, rear 86 federal. 
Ricker D. B. & Co., grocers, 185 fore; adv p 36. 
Packer J. S. & Co., tanners, 98 green ; adv p 63. 



Vll 

Richardson N. P. & Co., iron founders, 290 commercial. 

Robinson A., book seller, 223 congress. 

Robinson R. R., plumb; adv p 60. 

Roberts S & Son, grocer, 24 st lawrence. 

Rolfe Sam'l, druggist, chestnut; adv p 36. 

Rolfe Charles, with J C Proctor, 65 middle; adv p 38. 

Rollins & Gilkcy, apothecaries, cor congress and preble; adv 2d fly leaf. 

Russell Moses, carpenter, pearl, near federal. 

Rundlett S. C, inventors' exchange, 209 congress; adv p 58. 

Ryan Martin, grocer, 89 green. 

SAWYER S. M., carpenter, cotton. 

Sawyer S. H. & Co., clothing, 266 congress, 

Sawyer G., confectionery, 370 congress. 

Sawyer J. H., restaurant, sawyer's building, lime. 

Scamman J. D., painter, 134 fore. 

Schumacher C. J., banner painter, 244 Cumberland; adv p 42. 

Schwartz John, file cutter, lime op post office. 

Seabury C, auctioneer, 109 federal. 

Seavey M., homoepathic medicines, 27 free. 

Shaw Edward, insurance, 150 middle. 

Shaw G. C, china tea store, under old city hall ; adv p 38. 

Shaw Bros, hats and caps, 284 congress ; adv p 48. [p 3 6. 

Shepherd & Co., wholesale fancy goods, 2 gait block, commercial; adv 

Shepley & Strout, counsellors, 121 commercial; adv p 46. 

Short & Loring, book sellers, cor free and center ; adv p 64. 

Sheriffs Office, chestnut st school house. 

Sherwood E. P., counsellor, deering hall block; adv p 59. 

Sinnott Thomas, grocer, 185 fore. 

Smardon, Scamman & Co., bakers, 8 and 10 lime ; adv p 42. 

Smith, Clark & Co., grocer3, 90£ commercial. 

Smith B. P. & Son, photographers, 16 market square. 

Smith & Read, counsellors, morton block. 

Small J. T., grocer, 12 lime; adv p 48. 

Small Edward, book binder, 64 exchange; adv p 53. 

Small H. N., physician, 258 congress. [adv p 61. 

Small & Knight, inelodeon manufacturers, Stevens' plains, westbrook ; 

Sprague Joseph B., barber, 113 federal. 

Sparrow Warren, insurance, 80 commercial; adv p 62. 

Sparrow T. J., architect, 13 union. 

Star Office, 176 middle ; adv p 63. 

Strous Samuel, clothing, 29 middle ; adv p 57. [adv p 54. 

Stevens, Haskell & Chase, boot and shoe manufacturers, 33 commercial; 

Stevens Isaac S., confectionery, 35 middle. 

Stevens Bro's, grocers, wilmot, below Cumberland. 

Stevens M. L., insurance, 14 boyd. 

Stevens William E. & Co., iron founders, 131 commercial; adv p 46. 

Stanwood & Dodge, provisions, long wharf; adv p 54. 

Stanwood E. L., apothecary, cor fore and hidia; adv 2d fly leaf. 

Staples Charles & Son, iron founders, 215 commercial. 

Staples James S., job printer, 164 fore; adv p 43. 

Starr George H., commission merchant, room 3 g t depot. 

Stead M., architect, 306 congress. 

Steadfast Thomas, barber, lime, op market. 

Stewart T. E., mason and builder, 6 tare; adv 1st fly leaf. 

Steele J. H., jeweler, 233h congress ; adv p 48. 

Starbird George B., tailor, 376 congress; adv p 59. 

Strout & Gage, counsellors, 113 federal ; adv p 56. 

Stoneham & Bailey, window shades, 168£ middle; adv 3d fly leaf. 

Stinchcomb J., iron founder, 11 union. • 

Susskraut G. A., hats and caps, 40 center; adv p 52. 

Sullivan Timothy, horse shoeing, 70 federal. 

Supreme Court Room, chestnut st school house. 

Sweetser J., grocer, 36 Washington. 

Symonds J. W., counsellor, boody mansion, congress. 

Sylvester George S., carpenter, op 26 spring. 









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