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Full text of "An account of the physicians and dentists of Groton, Mass"

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AN ACCOUNT 



OF THE 



PHYSICIANS AND DENTISTS 



OF 



GROTON, MASSACHUSETTS: 



INCLUDING THOSE WHO, BORN THERE, HAVE PRACTISED 
THEIR PROFESSION ELSEWHERE. 



Wiit]) an ^ppentiix. 



By SAMUEL A. GREEN, M.D. 



AN ACCOUNT 



PHYSICIANS AND DENTISTS 



GROTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



INCLUDING THOSE WHO, BORN THERE, HAVE PRACTISED 
THEIR PROFESSION ELSEWHERE. 



SMt'tlj an appcntJi'i. 



By SAMUEL A^^GREEN, M.D. 



GROTON 

1890. 




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John Wilson and Son, Cambridge. 



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OK 

DR. JOSHUA GREEN, 

DURING HALF A CKNTURY A CITIZICN OF GROTON, 
THIS ACCOUNT IS INSCRIBED 

BY HIS SON. 



TJiis Acco?cnt of tJic Physicians and Dentists was 
prepared originally for the GroTON HISTORICAL 
Series, and the various references in the pages are to 
that Series. For the use of friends one hundred copies 
are nozv struck off in this form. 



THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 



During the early days of New England there was no dis- 
tinct class of men following the profession of medicine, but 
the practice was taken up in connection with some other 
calling. In every community either the minister or the 
schoolmaster or some skilled nurse was expected to act 
in cases of need, and for the most part such persons per- 
formed the duties now undertaken by the faculty ; and at 
that period obstetrical practice was taken by women. In the 
early part of 1672 the Reverend Samuel Willard wrote a long 
account of a case of witchcraft which befell Elizabeth Knapp, 
of Groton, and he relates how the " Physitian " came to see 
her on November 5, 1671, when he gave his judgment on the 
case, or, in other words, made the diagnosis. It would be an 
interesting fact to know who was the doctor then practising 
in the neighborhood, but this is now beyond the reach of 
historical inquiry. 

The earliest physician in Groton, mentioned by name, of 
whom I have found any trace, is Dr. Henry Blasdell. On 
May 28, 1725, he petitioned the General Court that an allow- 
ance be made him for his professional services and for medi- 
cines furnished during the campaign of the previous autumn, 
while he was Surgeon to the Western Forces. The amount 
of his bill was £,26 \^., and the General Court allowed him 
^17 95-. Dr. Blasdell had been impressed into the public 
service by Colonel Edmund Gofife ; and other particulars are 
given in "Groton during the Indian Wars" (pages 130, 131). 



2 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

Dr. Ezekiel Chase, of Groton, was married at Newbury, 
on May 20, 1729, to Priscilla Merrill, of that town. See the 
first volume of this Historical Series (No. XIII. page 51). 
She was the daughter of Nathan and Hannah (Kent) Merrill, 
and born at Newbury, on October 16, 1703. 

Dr. Benjamin Morse was the son of Dr. Benjamin and 
Abigail (Dudley) Morse, and born at Sutton, on March 20, 
1740. He was married on November 27, 1760, to Mary, 
daughter of Isaac and Sarah Barnard, who was born at 
Sutton, on September 13, 1741 ; and they had a family of six 
children born in that town. Dr. Morse came to Groton 
probably during the Revolutionary period, and was a repre- 
sentative of the town to the General Court during the session 
of 1784 and in several succeeding years ; and he was also 
a delegate to the Convention for adopting the Constitution 
of the United States in the year 1788, where he opposed the 
adoption. He lived in the south part of the town, now near 
the village of Ayer ; and the site of his house is laid down 
on Mr. Butler's Map of Groton, which was published in 1832. 
He died on May 31, 1833, aged 93 years; and his widow, on 
December 16, 1835, aged 94 years. 

Dr. Ephraim Ware, a physician of Groton, was married at 
Cambridge, on October 13, 1785, to Mrs. Abigail Gamage. 
See the first volume of this Historical Series (No. XIII. page 
45). Dr. Ware was a native of Needham, and born on Janu- 
ary 14, 1725. His first wife was Martha, daughter of Josiah 
and Elizabeth Parker, of Groton, where they were married on 
July 26, 1764. She was born on January 7, 1737, and died 
at Groton, on April 4, 1776. After their marriage they went 
to Dedham to live, as the records of that town say : " The 
Selectmen on the 2'' Day of Aug' 1765. gave Orders to Is- 
rael Everett, Constable, to warn Ephraim Ware, Martha Ware 
[and three others] to depart this Town in 14 Days, or give 
Security to indemnify the Town." Such orders were in 
accordance with an old practice, then common throughout 
the Province, which aimed to prevent the permanent settle- 



THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 3 

ment of families in towns where they might become a public 
burden. Their two eldest children, both boys, were born at 
Dedham ; and three other children — a daughter Sarah, and 
two sons who both died in infancy — were born at Groton. 
Sarah, born on September i8, 1769, married Richard Sawtell, 
of Groton, on March 10, 1796, and died on March 23, 185 i, 
having been the mother of nine children. 

Dr. Ephraim Woolson was practising medicine at Groton 
in the year 1766. He was a son of Isaac and Sibyl Woolson, 
and born at Weston, on April 11, 1740. He graduated at 
Harvard College in the Class of 1760, and was married on 
July 29, 1765, to Mary Richardson. Dr. Woolson appears 
to have been living at Weston just before his residence at 
Groton, and in the year 1767 he bought land at Princeton, 
where six of his children were born. He was a Justice of 
the Peace, and is said to have died in the year 1802. 

Dr. Jonathan Gove was a son of John and Tabitha (Liv- 
ermore) Gove, and born in that part of Weston which is now 
Lincoln, on August 22, 1746. He graduated at Harvard Col- 
lege in the Class of 1768, and studied medicine under the 
instruction of Dr. Oliver Prescott, of Groton. About the 
year 1770 he was married to Mary, daughter of Nathan and 
Mary (Patterson) Hubbard of this town ; and here John and 
Lucinda, their two eldest children, were born and baptized. 
This son graduated at Dartmouth College in the Class of 
1793, studied law, and died at Chillicothe, Ohio, in the year 
1802. From Groton Dr. Gove went to New Boston, New 
Hampshire, where three more children were born. His wife 
was born at Groton, on January 9, 1748, and died at New 
Boston. He was married, secondly, on January 6, 1791, to 
Polly Dow, who became the mother of three children. In 
the year 1794 Dr. Gove removed to Goffstown, New Hamp- 
shire, where he died on March 24, 181 8. 

Dr. Samuel Farnswortii and Betsey Fitch, both of Groton, 
were married by the Reverend Mr. Chaplin, on November 25, 
1788. Dr. Farnsworth was the youngest child of Isaac and 



4 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

Anna (Green) Farnsworth, and born on September 29, 1767. 
He subsequently went to Bridgton, Maine, where he had a 
successful career as a physician. His wife was a daughter 
of Captain Zechariah and Lydia (Tuck) Fitch. They had 
a family of eight children, of whom two sons, Samuel and 
Benjamin Franklin, were graduates of Dartmouth College in 
the Class of 181 3. Their eldest child, Betsey, was born at 
Groton on July 2, 1789, and the next one, Samuel, at Bridg- 
ton on October 9, 1791 ; and the removal from this town 
took place in the year 1790. Dr. Farnsworth died at Bridg- 
ton, on November 4, 181 7. His eldest son, Samuel, followed 
in his footsteps, and studied medicine. He succeeded the 
father in the practice of his profession at Bridgton, where he 
died on April 13, 1842 ; and the other son, Benjamin Frank- 
lin, became a minister, and subsequently was connected with 
institutions of learning in Kentucky and Tennessee. He 
died on April 13, 1842. 

These several physicians practised their profession in the 
neighborhood of Groton, though they had never taken medi- 
cal degrees. Before the present century this was the rule 
throughout the country ; and the instances were very rare, 
where practitioners could rightfully append M. D. to their 
names. As a class they were men of shrewd sense and 
acute observers, and their practice was attended with marked 
success. Perhaps they made a better use of their opportuni- 
ties than we make to-day with our richly endowed medical 
schools and numerous hospitals. 

During the last century Dr. Oliver Prescott was an 
eminent physician of Groton, and took high professional rank 
throughout the Province. He was the youngest of three dis- 
tinguished brothers, of whom the eldest was Judge James Pres- 
cott, of Groton, who filled many important positions in civil as 
well as in military life; and the second was Colonel William 
Prescott, of Pcpperell, who commanded the American Forces 
at the Battle of Bunker Hill. Both Dr. Prescott and his son 
Dr. Oliver Prescott, Jr., occupy such exceptional places in the 



THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 5 

profession of this neighborhood, that I reprint in full, from 
Dr. James Thacher's " American Medical Biography " (Bos- 
ton, 1828), the memoirs of these two physicians, as given 
in the first volume of that v^rork (pages 428-436). 

PRESCOTT, Hon. OLIVER, M.D., M.M.S.S. and A.A.S., 
was born at Groton, Massachusetts, April 27th, 1731. He was of 
the fourth generation from John Prescott, Esq. wlio came from 
England about the year 1640. His father, the late Hon. Benjamin 
Prescott, of the same Groton, was a distinguished statesman and a 
leading member of the General Court for many years; and was 
once chosen Agent for the Province in England ; but having never 
had the smallpox, and there being much danger apprehended from 
it at that time, he declined the appointment. He died the 3d 
of August, 1738, in the 43d year of his age. The subject of this 
article was then a little more than seven years old. His mother 
was Abigail, daughter of the Hon. Thomas Oliver, of Cambridge, 
one of his majesty's council, and a near relation of the first pro- 
vincial governor of that name. 

Dr. Prescott was educated at Harvard College, in Cambridge, 
and received his first degree in 1750. He was distinguished at 
college for his literary attainments and correct deportment. Soon 
after his graduation he commenced the study of physic under the 
tuition of Dr. Roby ^ of Sudbury, who had been educated in 
Europe, was a disciple of the celebrated Boerhaave, and an emi- 
nent physician. After having completed his preparatory studies 
in medicine, he settled in Groton, his native town, and supported 
for many years a very extensive practice. As the number of physi- 
cians who were regularly or suitably educated, was at that day 
small, and those were settled far apart, the limits of his practice 
were extended to a great distance on every side ; so that no person 
in this country, probably, underwent more laborious and continued 
exercise in the profession than Dr. Prescott, to the time when his 
services were pressed into civil and political employment. 

Dr. Prescott was enabled to employ a greater portion of time in 
the extensive circuit of his professional duty, by having acquired 

1 [Dr. Ebenezer Robie was a distinguished physician of the last century. He 
was a graduate of Harvard College in the Class of 1719, and died at Sudbury, 
on September 4, 1772. See " The Massachusetts Gazette : and the Boston Weekly 
News-Letter," September 17, for a long notice of him.] 



6 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

in early life, what to many persons may appear scarcely credible, 
a practice of readily sleeping on horseback, when deprived of his 
necessary rest in bed. On a horse of easy carriage, to which he 
had been accustomed, and found trustworthy ; and when returning 
homeward, where no danger was to be apprehended lest the steed 
should take a wrong direction, he would, when drowsiness came 
upon him, brace himself in the stirrup, rest a hand on the pommel 
of the saddle, and resign himself without fear, for miles together, 
to quiet repose. This was more particularly the case when on a 
favorite horse, of easy amble, which he owned for nearly twenty 
years, and which he usually selected for those excursions which 
must necessarily extend into late hours of the night. The writer 
of this sketch has frequently travelled with him, and witnessed his 
sleeping in the manner before described, his horse continuing the 
whole time at the usual travelling pace. The animal, accustomed 
to his master's manner of sitting, would seem to be conscious of 
being left to his own guidance, and therefore to step with more 
caution. 

After Dr. Prescott was called into public life, until a short 
time previous to his death, every moment which could be spared 
from public affairs, was devoted to the duties of his profession. It 
was well and truly observed in a discourse delivered on the Sabbath 
succeeding his interment by an eminent divine who had known him 
intimately for many years, that "his distinguished professional ac- 
quirements, his prompt and unremitted attention to his patients, 
his peculiarly tender and pleasant manner of treating them in their 
distress, his moderate charges and forbearance towards the poor, 
and the general success which attended his practice, operated to 
render him for nearly half a century one of the most popular, while 
he was, unquestionably, one of the most eminent and useful physi- 
cians in the commonwealth." His high standing in the profession 
gave him a place in the Massachusetts Medical Society at the time 
of its incorporation in 1781. He was also an honorary member of 
several medical societies out of the commonwealth.-' He was like- 
wise President of the Middlesex Medical Society during the whole 
period of its existence ; and many years before his death the hon- 
orary degree of Doctor of Medicine was conferred on him by 
Harvard University. 

- [He was chosen an honorary member of the New Hampshire Medical 
Society in the year 1794.] 



THE rilVSICIANS OF GROTON. 7 

Dr. Prescott took an early and decided part in the American 
revolution, by entering warmly into those measures which were con- 
sidered necessary to vindicate our national rights, and by assisting 
cheerfully and largely in their defence. He exerted his influence 
in moulding the government into its present shape, and remained 
to the close of his life its invariable defender. He was very influ- 
ential in suppressing the dangerous insurrection of 1786. 

He received from government many appointments and commis- 
sions. In the militia he was commissioned under the king a major, 
then lieutenant colonel, and colonel, and in 1775, or beginning of 
r776, he was elected and commissioned by the Supreme Executive 
Council of the Massachusetts Bay, brigadier general of the militia 
for the county of Middlesex. To this office appertained at that 
time the direction and superintendence of the numerous guards 
which were raised and stationed at the bridges of rivers and vari- 
ous other places, to prevent the tories and enemies of the revolu- 
tion from all intercourse with the British troojDS, who were then 
confined to the capital and its vicinity, or any improper correspond- 
ence with each other ; as well as to answer the repeated calls for 
drafts on the militia. These duties, his command including the 
whole county, joined to his care in aiding to organize the town 
committees of correspondence in that part of the country in which 
he lived, made his office and station not only very responsible, but 
very laborious. 

In 1776 he was chosen a member of the Board of War. In 
1777, " during the five years interregnum," when there was neither 
governor nor lieutenant governor, he was elected a member of the 
Supreme Executive Council of the state, and served in that ca- 
pacity three years : in the fourth year he was unanimously re- 
elected to the same office, but declined serving. 

In 1778 he was appointed the third Major General of the militia 
throughout the commonwealth. 

la 1779, o" the death of the celebrated John Winthrop, LL.D. 
F.R.S., he was appointed his successor in the office of Judge of 
Probate of Wills, &c. for the County of Middlesex. This office 
he retained until his death, giving universal satisfaction by his re- 
markable urbanity, as well as by his able and correct manner of 
discharging the duties of that important station. In this depart- 
ment he always appeared desirous of despatching the business 
before him, and of preventing, as far as was consistent with cor- 
rect procedure, an accumulation of costs. His manners were pe- 



8 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

culiarly adapted to soothing the feelings of that large class, who, 
in a state of bereavement and affliction, were called to do business 
in his court. 

In 1 781 he was appointed the second Major General of the 
militia ; but he considered there was not, at that time, that urgent 
call upon his patriotism, which in the earlier state of the war had 
induced him to accept a military command, and he soon tendered 
his resignation. 

In the month of February of this year, 1781, Dr. Prescott re- 
ceived from government a commission to " cause to be apprehended 
and committed to gaol, any person, whom you shall deem the safety 
of the Commonwealth requires to be restrained of his personal 
liberty, or whose enlargement within the Commonwealth is danger- 
ous thereto." The delegation of such authority and power shows 
that government held him in high estimation for true patriotism 
and sound discretion. He was in early life appointed a Justice 
of the Peace and of the quorum for his county, and was for many 
years a justice throughout the commonwealth ; and he received 
several commissions to negociate business of importance for the 
state. 

Dr. Prescott was incorporated a Fellow of the American Academy 
of Arts and Sciences in 1780. He regarded schools and the edu- 
cation of the rising generation as highly interesting and important 
to the community. Incorporated as one of the Trustees of Groton 
Academy, and first president thereof, he was its patron and bene- 
factor, employing his extensive influence to promote its reputation 
and usefulness. He was employed in all important town business ; 
served as town clerk for thirteen years in succession, and was one 
of the selectmen for more than thirty years. 

Dr. Prescott married in 1756 Lydia, daughter of the late David 
Baldwin, Esq. of Sudbury, by whom he had ten children ; only 
four of whom, two sons and two daughters, survived him. He was 
a firm believer in the christian religion, and, together with* his 
consort, on entering the connubial state, made a public profession, 
continuing to the end of his life a conspicuous, influential and 
useful member of the church in Groton, contributing much to its 
peace, regularity and reputation. 

Dr. Prescott was in stature full six feet, and rather corpulent. 
The versatility of his powers was remarkable. To the transaction 
of all matters of difficulty and moment, he showed himself at once 
competent. Hence the wonderful diversity of his attainments, and 



THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 9 

the surprising rapidity with which he rendered himself master of 
whatever came before him. He possessed and ever practised a 
peculiar suavity and politeness of manner, a pleasant facetiousness 
of address, joined to that firm, gentlemanly deportment, which was 
well calculated to command both esteem and respect. His col- 
loquial talents, ready wit, and fondness for anecdote, joined to a 
great fund of information and learning, made him a pleasing com- 
panion, notwithstanding his hearing was imperfect for many of tlie 
last years of his life. He died at Groton of a pectoral dropsy, 
November 17th, 1804, aged 73 years and about 7 months. 

It is not known that he wrote any thing for the public, in the 
department of his profession. Indeed, his employments were too 
numerous, and his time was too much engrossed by public con- 
cerns and professional duties, to afford leisure for composing a 
book or treatise on medicine. 

Dr. Prescott had but two brothers, viz. the late Hon. James 
Prescott, who died February 15 th, 1800, aged about 79 years, and 
who was for many years a Senator, Counsellor, High Sheriff, and 
at the time of his death Chief Justice of the Court of Common 
Pleas for the County of Middlesex ; and the late Col. William 
Prescott, who so greatly distinguished himself in tlie battle of 
Bunker's Hill and elsewhere, and who died October 13th, 1795, 
aged 70 years. He had also four sisters, one of whom only lived 
to be married, viz. Elizabeth, wife of the late Hon. Abijah Wil- 
lard of Lancaster, who was, at the commencement of the revolu- 
tion, one of his majesty's Mandamus Counsellors for the Province. 

This article contains but little more than a chronological sketch 
very hastily prepared. So various were the employments and the 
ofBces, which had been held by the accomplished physician and 
eminent man, who is the subject of it ; and so numerous were the 
incidents of his eventful life, that much more time would have been 
necessary to have filled up the sketch properly, than the write)- 
could command ; and therefore it is presented in this imperfect 
state. — O. Prescott, M.D. 

PRESCOIT, OLIVER, M.D., M.M.S.S. was born in Groton, 
Massachusetts, April 4th, A. D. 1762. He was placed at Dummer 
School in Newbury, Byfield Parish, and was there prepared for 
admission to Harvard College, by the celebrated Samuel Moody. 
This was at that time the only free school in New-England, if not 
in North America. He was matriculated at Harvard University 



lO THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

in 1779, ^"^ ^^^^ graduated in course, in 1783. Very soon, if not 
immediately afterwards, he began the study of physic with his 
father, the subject of the preceding article, and finished his pro- 
fessional education under the celebrated Dr. James Lloyd of Bos- 
ton. He passed the Board of Censors of the Massachusetts Medi- 
cal Society, as licentiate, in June, 1786. 

In noticing the professional progress of Dr. Prescott it is indis 
pensable that some reference should be made to the times and 
circumstances of his early life, which continued to exert a very 
marked influence on the best period of his succeeding history. It 
will be seen by dates that he was but a youth in the earlier periods 
of the revolution ; but he was old enough to understand some of 
its distinguishing features, the moral and intellectual power it was 
exerting, and especiall}' would he after no long time learn that 
whatever the individual might be in profession or talent, he would 
not fulfil his whole duty by a private occupation. The medical 
profession had given a noble illustration of this in the instances 
of its ablest men, who had left its duties for those of the field, or 
made the field the scene of their professional labors. Educated 
men of all the professions continued for many years after the close 
of the war to take a part in municipal or state affairs, which is 
quite unknown to those of the present day ; and he who was faith- 
ful in these relations, was not thought neglectful of his peculiar 
labors, however far his new duties might take him from the place 
of his more appropriate ones. These remarks are neither offered 
as an explanation, nor as an apology for the course pursued by Dr. 
Prescott in his early career. They are made, because they present 
a view, an imperfect one it is acknowledged, of a very peculiar 
and interesting time of our histor}-, and serve to show how deep 
was the whole influence of the age upon the well educated and 
able men of that period. In one year after his admission to the 
profession. Dr. Prescott became himself an instance of what has 
now been briefly adverted to. 

In January, 1787, a regiment was detached from the third divi- 
sion of the militia of the commonwealth, under the command of 
Col. Henry Woods, and together with other regiments from the 
several counties, was placed under the command of Gen. Lincoln. 
Dr. Prescott was commissioned as surgeon to these forces, and 
with his commission he received a blank warrant and a request 
that he would insert the name of such person as he might wish 
to select for his mate. The purpose for collecting these troops 



THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. I I 

was the suppression of Shays's rebellion, and although this was 
accomplished in a few weeks, the army was obliged to traverse the 
western counties during the inclement season of that severe win- 
ter. Dr. Prescott afterwards was made surgeon of the sixth regi- 
ment of the third division of the militia, and retained his office 
till he resigned in 1800. 

The municipal and state offices filled by Dr. Prescott, show the 
public estimation in which he was iield, and the willingness with 
which he met the professional sacrifices required by the perform- 
ance of his public duties. In 1789 he was commissioned as a 
Justice of the Peace for the county of Middlesex, and was contin- 
ued in it by septennial appointments without application and with- 
out interruption during his residence in that county. He was 
repeatedly chosen member of the General Court of the state as 
a representative from Groton, and declined repeated solicitations 
to serve in the senate for the county of Middlesex. In his own 
town Dr. Prescott sustained for many years the useful offices of 
clerk to the corporation, chairman of the board of selectmen, and 
of overseers of the poor, &c. &c. In this variety of municipal func- 
tions which he faithfully discharged, there is discovered the deep 
interest which he took in the prosperity of his native town, for they 
were alike uncongenial with his taste and his profession. Dr. Pres- 
cott is remembered for the zeal with which he labored to procure for 
his town and county, the benefits of a more liberal instruction than 
that to which they had been accustomed. He was one of the ori- 
ginal founders of the Academy of Groton, and was a trustee, and 
the treasurer of that institution. When he removed to Newbury- 
port, he resigned these trusts, and was soon after elected a Trustee 
of Dummer's Academy. He devoted a portion of his leisure to 
agriculture, and was rewarded for his zeal in this pursuit by the 
consideration in which he was held by the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural Society, of which he was a member, and by the Western 
Society of Middlesex Husbandmen, of which he was President. 

It is, however, in his attainments, in his reputation, and in his 
usefulness as a physician, that Dr. Prescott's best claims are laid 
for a memory among his living brethren, and for this record among 
the dead. In 1800 he was elected a member of the Massachusetts 
Medical Society. He was afterwards chosen a counsellor of the 
society for the district in which he lived. He pronounced the an- 
nual discourse in 18 13 ; in 1814 he received the honorary degree 
of Doctor in Medicine from Harvard University ; in 1825 he was 



12 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

unanimously elected a member of the Corporation of the Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital ; and was elected Vice President of the 
Medical Society in 1827. This is the public testimony which has 
been offered by his professional brethren to his talents, to his zeal, 
and to his success. Dr. Prescott had a very extensive practice in 
his native town, and in the towns in its vicinity ; but, thinking that 
an asthmatic habit and a commencing dropsy of the chest might be 
diminished or removed by living near the sea, and by the greater 
regularity of life in a large town than could be adopted or pursued 
in a country practice, he removed with his family from Groton to 
Newburyport in February, 181 1. In the latter place his practice 
soon became extensive, and continued so until the time of his 
death. During his extensive professional and other engagements, 
Dr. Prescott still found time to study and inform himself of the va- 
rious discoveries and improvements daily making in medical sci- 
ence both at home and abroad. He had early been remarkable for 
his quick apprehension and retentive memory. At college he was 
distinguished among his class for his acquaintance with the classics 
and with natural history. Through life he maintained a fondness for 
these studies, and amidst the engrossing duties of his profession he 
secured to himself leisure for the cultivation of general and more 
elegant literature. Habits of mind were thus produced and pre- 
served, highly favorable for the best uses of medical study. He 
not only studied, but labored to add to the stock of useful knowl- 
edge in medicine by publishing the results of his own observations. 
Some valuable articles were contributed by him to the New-England 
Journal of Medicine and Surgery; but his most important publica- 
tion was the discourse before mentioned, which he delivered before 
the Medical Society [on June 2, 1813]. This discourse is entitled, 
" Dissertation on the Natural History and Medicinal Effects of the 
Secale Cornutum or Ergot." ^ Dr. Prescott was led to the use of 
this article, and to the study of its eft'ects, by a letter addressed to 
Dr. Akerly by Dr. J. Stearns of Albany, and published in the sec- 
ond volume of the New-York Medical Kcpository. Many of the 
statements of Dr. S. are confirmed by Dr. Prescott, and any differ- 
ence of opinion between them, or diversity of result, very candidly 
stated, 'i'his dissertation was very favorably received by the pro- 
fession. It was reprinted in Philadelphia and London, and was 

^ [This address was printed among the annual dissertations of the Medical 
Society, and also as a separate pamphlet (Svo, pages 16) with an engraved plate 
at the end, showing figures of spurred rye.] 



THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 1 3 

translated into the French and German languages, and was pub- 
lished in full, so far as relates to the medicinal properties of Ergot, 
in the article Ergot, in the 13th volume of the French " Dictioii- 
naire des Sciences Medicales." The interest Dr. P. took in the 
investigation of the properties of this substance, arose, very prob- 
ably, from his zeal in the study and practice of midwifery, in which 
department of the art he was very successful. The attention of 
physicians has been strongly directed to the use of Ergot since the 
publication of this discourse ; and to this day scarcely a number 
of a medical journal arrives from abroad, which does not contain 
some notice of the extended employment of this active medicine. 

Dr. Prescott was highly respected and beloved by his patients. 
He had, perhaps, the most extensive practice of any physician in 
the county in which he lived. He acquired this confidence, the 
most valuable possession which a physician can acquire, by ardent 
zeal in the cause of the sick, diligent study, and acute observation. 
His manners were frank, manly and engaging, and though long 
afiflicted with deafness, he had none of the irritability so common 
to that infirmity. His manners indeed were founded on a natural 
benevolence of heart, which led him to connect his own happiness 
with the welfare of those who were about him. In his domestic 
relations he was distinguished by equanimity of temper, kindness 
of manners and great warmth of affection. He sought in the 
bosom of his family the sources of his own happiness, which he 
was ever ready to sacrifice to the permanent advancement of 
theirs. In his political sentiments he was undisguised and con- 
sistent through life. The zeal with which he co-operated in the 
suppression of Shays's rebellion, showed his early attachment to 
good order and constitutional principles, and these he never 
thought proper to desert when desertion of them became fashion- 
able. He was a firm believer in Christianity, and at an early age 
made a public profession of his faith. 

Dr. P. was twice married, first to Ann Whiting, daughter of 
Leonard Whiting, Esq. of Hollis, by whom he had nine children, 
six of whom survived him ; and afterwards to Elizabeth, widow of 
Thomas Oliver, Esq. who is still living. 

He died in Newburyport, September 26th, 1827, after a short 
illness, of typhus fever, in the 66th year of his age. 

The following advertisement in the " Columbian Centinel," 
September 22, 18 10, refers to the estate which had previously 



14 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

belonged to Dr. Oliver Prescott, the father, but which at that 
time was offered for sale by Dr. Oliver Prescott, the son. 
It is situated at the lower end of the village street, near the 
fork of the roads. The dwelling was afterward burned on 
the night of February i, 1815 ; and the house built on the 
site is now kept as a tavern. 

Valuable Real Estate in Groton. 

O^HE Subscriber offers for sale, his DWELLING-HOUSE, Out- 
Houses, and Farm, situated in the town of Groton, about one 
fourth of a mile from the Meeting-House and Academy, and on the 
post road from Boston to Keene, N. H. and Windsor, Vt. The 
House is large and commodious, the Farm contains about one 
hundred acres of Land, equal in goodness, perhaps, to any in the 
Commonwealth. The situation of the Buildings and quality of 
the Land are too well known to require a particular description. 
A liberal credit will be given for a great proportion of the purchase 
money. 

OLIVER PRESCOTT. 
Groton, Sept. 22, 1810. 

N. B. Any quantity of the Land, even to one acre, will be sold 
with the buildings, if most agreeable to the purchaser. 

Dr. Joseph Mansfield was a son of Richard and Eliza- 
beth (Whittemore) Mansfield, and born in Lynn on Decem- 
ber 17, 1770. His father was born in the same town on June 
17, 1744, and his mother was born — in Salem, probably — 
on February 22, 1748; she was a daughter of P^dmund and 
Keziah (Burrage) Whittemore. 

Dr. Mansfield graduated at Harvard College in the Class 
of 1 801 ; and among his classmates were Tyler Bigelow, 
Thomas Bond, James Abbot Cummings, Timothy Fuller, 
Luther Lawrence, Stephen Minot, and William Bant Sulli- 
van, who were either natives or at some time residents of 
Groton. Both while an undergraduate and while studying his 
profession, he kept the district school on Farmers' Row, and 
even after he had acquired his profession, he taught the same 
school with the understanding that his hours of instruction 
should conform somewhat to the needs of his practice. He 



THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 1 5 

studied medicine with Dr. Oliver Prescott, Jr., at that time one 
of the most eminent physicians in the Commonwealth. While 
in college, he took high rank as a scholar, and at an exhibition 
near the end of his Junior year he delivered a poem which 
attracted some attention in literary circles. It was printed 
under the following title: "Hope, a poem, delivered in the 
chapel of Harvard University, at a public exhibition, July 8th, 
1800. By Joseph Mansfield, a Junior Sophister." Cambridge. 
Printed by William Hilliard. 1800 (4to. pages 15). A 
second edition of the poem appeared at Fitchburg in the 
year 1871 (i6mo. pages 10). 

Dr. Mansfield was married on June 11, 1805, to Abi, 
daughter of Benjamin and Meriel (Nichols) Hartwell, who 
was born at Shirley on October 9, 1785, and died at Groton 
on February 8, 1871. After his marriage he lived for a while 
on Farmers' Row, in the house occupied by J. K. Bennett, — 
when Mr. Butler's Map of Groton was made in the year 
1832, — but now moved away. About 1810 he built the 
large dwelling with brick ends, near the Baptist Meeting- 
house, where he resided until his death, which took place 
on April 23, 1830. 

His son, George Mansfield, born at Groton on October 8, 
1807, also studied medicine, under the tuition of Dr. Nehe- 
miah Cutter, of Pepperell, and graduated at the Harvard 
Medical School in the Class of 1832. He was married on 
November 15, 1832, to Hannah Maria Curtis, of Boston. At 
that time Dr. Mansfield was a resident of Waltham, but later 
he lived for many years in Lowell, where he practised dentis- 
try ; and he died at Janesville, Wisconsin, on July 25, 1869. 

The following account of Dr. Joseph Mansfield is given 
in James Robinson Newhall's History of Lynn, published in 
the year 1883 : — 

This individual, for many years a reputable practising physician 
in Groton, Mass., was born on the 17th of December, 1770, in the 
old Mansfield house, known also as the Moulton house, on the 
north side of Boston street, opposite the foot of Marion, and was 
a lineal descendant of Andrew Mansfield, the first Town Clerk. 
He graduated at Harvard college in 1801, and soon applied iiim- 



l6 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

self to the study of medicine, the practice of which he pursued as 
tl e business of his life, which terminated on the 23d of April, 1830- 
Mr. Mansfield early exhibited poetic talents which bid fair to 
place his name among the foremost of American bards. But he 
seems not to have been ambitious of any such distinction and 
hence did not cultivate his rare gift. On the 8th of January [July], 
1800, he delivered a poem in the chapel of Harvard college, for 
which he took the prize of eighty dollars, offered by the faculty for 
the best metrical production. The poem is entitled Hope, and is 
two hundred and twenty-four lines in length. In reading it one is 
reminded of Pope's philosophical style ; though there are passages 
in a sentimental vein, and some in a playful. And as it was written 
at a period of intense political agitation, there are highly patriotic 
strains. The first and last stanzas, with a single intervening one 
will be here introduced. 

I am not blest, but may hereafter be : 
Who knows what fortune has in store for me ? 
This is the language common to mankind, 
Nor is to age, or rank, or sex, confined. 
Hope points to each some not far distant day, 
When every blessing will his wish obey ; 
When to possess, he only need require ; 
Fruition's self will supersede desire. 

See doting parents sedulously trace 
The opening beauties of their infant's face ; 
Commencing physiognomists, they find 
A world of wonders in its features joined ; 
The mother reads, and comments as she reads; 
My child was born for more than mortal deeds ; 
Then Hope steps up and whispers by her side, • 
You cradle in your arms creation's pride. 



We liope, long as the central orb attracts, 
Long as the force of gravitation acts, 
Long as the East is opposite the West, 
Long as the name of Washington is blest. 
Long as the atheist hopes to sleep in dust, 
Long as the sons of anarchy are curst, 
Long as the future differs from the past, — 
So long, Columbia, will thy Freedom last. 
But should the monster Faction break his chains, 
And fiery demagogues usurp the reins — 
We hope that future Washingtons may rise, 
Or rather make a visit from tiie skies. 



THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 1 7 

An accident which happened to I\Ir. Mansfield, as narrated by 
Mr. John T. Moulton, was so singular as to merit notice here. 
"While bathing near Chase's mill he w^as seized with the cramp in 
his limbs and so disabled that he could not reach the shore, and 
when found by his companions, who were at work, haying, on the 
marsh near by, was supposed to be drowned ; but by the applica- 
tion of the proper means he was resuscitated and taken home, but 
did not regain his consciousness for some days. Then, awaking 
from sleep, he suddenly exclaimed, ' Mother, where have I been ? ' 
He seemed to have lost what knowledge he had acquired and his 
mind was like that of a child, so that it was necessary for him to 
begin and learn again his letters as he had done when a boy." 

It may not be inappropriate, in closing this notice, to remark that 
a poetic vein seems to have run in this family connection. Mr. 
John T. Moulton, who delivered the much-applauded poem at the 
reunion of the High School graduates. May 19, 1865, is one of the 
line ; and Solomon Moulton, of whom a biographical notice with 
specimens of his writing may be found in the 1865 edition of our 
History, and of whose poetic talents Mr. Lewis frequently spoke in 
high terms, was an uncle of John T. And this latter gentleman 
has, among his valuable collection, a number of poems, in manu- 
script, of Mr. Mansfield, the subject of this notice, which it is hoped 
may at some future time appear in print. (Pages 170-172.) 

Dr. Jeremy Stimson was the eldest child of George and 
Abigail Stimson, and born at Hopkinton, on October 13, 
1 75 1. He was married, first, to Nancy Jones (published at 
Hopkinton, on August 20, 1779, where he is recorded as of 
Marlborough) ; and, secondly, on December 19, 1807, at Groton, 
to Mrs. Abi (Nichols) Richardson, widow of Jcphthah Rich- 
ardson, and daughter of Israel Nichols, of Leominster. Dur- 
ing many years her first husband kept a tavern, on the site 
of the Baptist Meeting-house, where he died on October 9, 
1806, at the age of 49 years. At the time of the second 
marriage Mrs. Richardson was living on the place now occu- 
pied by Mrs. Mary Tileston (Humphrey) Shumway ; and here 
Dr. Stimson resided for a short period, though he did not 
practise his profession at the time. The marriage did not 
prove to be a happy one ; and soon afterward there was a 
mutual separation, when Dr. Stimson returned to Hopkinton, 



1 8 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

where he died on January 24, 1821. See " Groton Epitaphs," 
page 162. The following entry is found in the Groton 
records : — 

Abi Stimson, formerly wife of Jephthah Richardson, deceased, 
and afterwards the wife of Jeremy Stimson, also deceased, died at 
Groton, May 17, 1825. 

Dr. Amos Bancroft was a son of Edmund and Rachel 
(Howard | Barron) Bancroft, of Pepperell, where he was 
born on May 23, 1767. He graduated at Harvard College 
in the Class of 1791, and studied medicine with Dr. Isaac 
Hurd, of Concord, and Dr. Oliver Prescott, Jr., of Groton. 
He began the practice of his profession at Westford, but soon 
afterward went to Weston, where he remained until the year 
1811, when he removed to Groton. He was married, first, on 
August 29, 1796, to Abigail, daughter of Captain Leonard and 
Ann (Hall) Whiting, of Hollis, New Hampshire, who was born 
on March 25, 1772, and died at Weston, on December 4, 1799; 
secondly, on October 7, 1800, to Sarah, daughter of Henry and 
Faith (Savage) Bass, of Boston, who was born on April 21, 
1768, and died on April 30, 1837; thirdly, on October 17, 
1839, to Eliza Doane, of Boston, who died on November 11, 
1840; and fourthly, on October 31, 184:, to Mary, daughter 
of Richard and Martha (Hall) Kneeland, who was born on 
February 25, 1789, and died at Westford on April 22, 1862. 
The first wife and the last were cousins. 

Dr. Bancroft had a large practice, and at various times 
a considerable number of medical students under his charge, 
including among them the brothers James Freeman Dana 
and Samuel Luther Dana, who were grandsons of the Rev- 
erend Samuel Dana, a former minister of the town, and 
graduates of Harvard College in the Class of 1813 ; Jonathan 
Newell, of Stow, and Stillman Spaulding, of Lexington. He 
was frequently called in consultation by other physicians, and 
often at a long distance from home. In those days there 
were no railroads, and travelling was attended with many 
difficulties. During the winter, when the roads were blocked 
up with snow, he was obliged sometimes to travel on snow- 



THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. I9 

shoes ; and, as his patients lived many miles apart, he was 
often absent from home for several successive days. To add 
to his discomfort on such occasions, it was difficult to obtain 
proper food, though there were at that period but few dwell- 
ings where he could not procure some New England rum or 
other spirit to help restore exhausted nature. 

His intimacy with some of the physicians of Boston and 
its neighborhood, and his punctual attendance at the meetings 
of the Massachusetts Medical Society, of which association 
he was a Councillor, obliged him to make frequent journeys to 
that city, which were always taken with his own horse and 
chaise or sulky. 

A story is told of him that he stopped late one evening at 
the Ridge Hill tavern, in order to see a patient. Passing 
through the bar-room he noticed two evil-looking men, who 
eyed him suspiciously ; and when going out, after his visit was 
made, he looked for them, but they were gone. The road 
leading from the tavern was lonely, and the village three 
miles away. As he had considerable money about him, he 
felt some misgivings, which proved to be well grounded, for 
he had no sooner reached a particularly secluded spot than 
these very men stepped out of the undergrowth by the road- 
side and tried to stop his horse. One of them snatched at 
the bridle, but missed it, as the horse threw up his head at 
the time ; and Dr. Bancroft, whipping the animal, left the 
men far behind, but not before a bullet had pierced the back 
of the sulky, and whizzed close by his ear. 

Dr. Bancroft rarely left home for pleasure ; but in the year 
1829 his health demanded a change, and in company with 
a brother he went West in order to visit a half-sister, Mrs. 
Mary (Bancroft) Dana, then living at Marietta, Ohio. It was 
a long and tedious journey, but the trip benefited him. 

Dr. Bancroft was a member of the First Parish Church 
(Unitarian) in Groton, and one of the eight mentioned in Mr. 
Butler's History (page 197), who received from the seccders 
a note of pretended excommunication. He was a constant 
attendant on the Sunday exercises until his hearing became 
much impaired. His health was never strong ; but the severe 



20 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

attacks of illness to which he was subject decreased in fre- 
quency as his years advanced. On July 12, 1848, while 
walking down State Street in Boston, he stepped from the 
sidewalk in order to cross the way, when a wagon coming 
along rapidly knocked him down, and injured him so severely 
that he died a few hours later. The following account of the 
fatal mishap appears in the " Daily Evening Transcript " of 
that day : — 

Serious AccroENT. As the venerable Dr. Amos Bancroft, of 
Groton, was crossing State street this morning at 11 o'clock, he 
was struck in the head by the shaft of a wagon driven through the 
street by D. Lawrence, Dover, N. H., knocked down, and rendered 
senseless by the shock. He was taken up and carried to the 
apothecary shop of Dr. Brown by police officer Whiting, and Dr. 
Shattuck and other physicians who happened to be near were 
promptly on hand to render aid and assistance. He was taken to 
No. I Crescent Place, where every aid possible for his relief will 
be administered. He bled profusely from the ear, and it is feared 
he is fatally injured. Dr. Bancroft is 77 [81J years of age, and par- 
tially deaf, and of defective eyesight. The last information we had, 
Dr. B. had partially recovered his senses, but was very weak from 
the great loss of blood. 

Dr. Mansfield and Dr. Bancroft were the last physicians 
in town who used to ride on horseback, with saddle-bags, 
while visiting patients, although they also drove in sulkies. 
In very early days, owing to bad roads, physicians on their 
professional rounds were in the habit of riding ; and it was 
near the beginning of the present century, in this neighbor- 
hood, that the sulky, or covered gig, came into fashion. At 
the present time the four-wheeled buggy exclusively is used 
by the doctors. 

Dr. Joshua Green was a son of Joshua and Mary (Mosley) 
Green, and born at Wendell, on October 8, 1797. He at- 
tended school at the academies in New Salem, Westfield, and 
Milton, and graduated at Harvard College in the Class of 
18 1 8. He studied medicine with Dr. John Collins Warren, 
of Boston, and took the degree of M.D. at the Harvard Medi- 



^Sl^.-i-^, 



THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 21 

cal School in the year 1821. Soon after taking this degree, 
he was appointed apothecary at the Massachusetts General 
Hospital, then just opened for the reception of patients, where 
he remained for one year. At that time the apothecary, in 
addition to his own duties, performed those of the house- 
physician and house-surgeon. 

Dr. Green began to practise his profession at Sunderland, 
in March, 1823. He was married on January 5, 1824, to 
Eliza, daughter of Major Samuel and Susanna (Parker) Law- 
rence, of Groton. His wife was born on March 13, 1796, and 
died on August 20, 1874. During a winter of his college 
course he taught a district school at Groton, now known as 
the Moors School, and boarded in the family of Major Law- 
rence, who lived on Farmers' Row. This fact is supposed to 
have some connection with his marriage, as well as with the 
life and lot of the writer of these lines. In the spring of 1825 
Dr. Green removed to Groton, where he continued the prac- 
tice of medicine; but after about ten years, owing to ill health, 
he gradually gave up his profession. In the year 1832 an 
attack of bleeding from the lungs compelled him to pass a 
winter in the island of Cuba, where to a fair degree he re- 
gained his health. He joined the Massachusetts Medical 
Society in 1826, and for many years was one of its Coun- 
cillors. He represented the town in the Legislature during 
the years 1836 and 1837; ^"^ was one of the Trustees of 
Lawrence Academy at Groton from 1831 to 1867, and for 
most of this time was either the Secretary or the President 
of the Board. He had a fondness for antiquarian and gene- 
alogical matters, and was chosen, on August 18, 1849, 2. 
Corresponding Member of the New England Historic, Gene- 
alogical Society. On the seventy-first anniversary of his 
birthday (October 8, 1868), he had a paralytic stroke, from 
the effects of which he never fully recovered. After the 
death of his wife he went to live with an only daughter, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Lawrence (Green | Kendall) Swan, at Morris- 
town, New Jersey, where he died on June 5, 1875, from a 
general feeble condition of the body. She was the wife of 
Dr. Charles Young Swan, who took his medical degree at 



22 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

the New York College of Physicians and Surgeons in the 
year 1856. Her first husband was John, son of the Honor- 
able Amos and Jane (Kyle) Kendall, and a graduate of Dart- 
mouth College in the Class of 1853. Mrs. Swan died at 
Morristown, on March 29, 1882. 

For a notice of Dr. Green, see " The New-England His- 
torical and Genealogical Register" (XXX. 126) for January, 
1876 ; and also pages 98 and 140 of Volume H. of this His- 
torical Series. 

Dr. Coale. In Elizur Wright's " Reminiscences of Groton 
during the Years 1826 and 1827 " (page 9), which comprises 
the second number of Volume I. of this Historical Series, 
there is an allusion to Dr. Coale, though I can find out noth- 
ing about him. I once asked Mr. Wright if he was sure as to 
the Doctor's name, when he told me that he had a good recol- 
lection both of the man and of the name, and that for a while 
they boarded together in the three-story house at the south 
corner of Main Street and Broad Meadow Road ; but beyond 
this he could give no information. Probably Dr. Coale did 
not remain long at Groton, as he seems now to be forgotten 
by the townsfolk. 

Dr. Micah Eldredge was a son of Hezekiah and Abigail 
(Whiton) Eldredge, and born at Ashford, Connecticut, on 
May 24, 1776. His parents were married on January 16, 
1766; and his mother was a sister of Dr. Israel Whiton, of 
Winchendon. He studied medicine with an elder brother, 
Dr. Hezekiah Eldredge, of Princeton, and in 1798 began the 
practice of his profession at Dunstable, where he resided for 
many years, living first on one side of the State line and then 
on the other. 

It may be noted that the running of the Provincial boun- 
dary between Massachusetts and New Hampshire in the year 
1 741 nearly bisected the old township of Dunstable, and 
created two towns of the same name, adjoining each other, one 
in each Province. This condition of affairs continued until 
January i, 1837, when the New Hampshire town, by legis- 



THE PHVSICIAXS OF GROTON. 23 

lative enactment on December 8, 1836, dropped its old name 
and took that of Nashua. 

During the years 1809 and 181 1 Dr. Eldredgc was a repre- 
sentative from Dunstable to the Massachusetts Legislature. In 
1826 he removed to Groton, where he remained for two years, 
living on what is now Hollis Street, in the house occupied by 
the Reverend John Todd, when Mr. Butler's Map of the town 
was published in 1832. He left Groton early in 1828, and 
went to Dunstable, now Nashua. The honorary degree of 
M.D. was conferred upon him by Dartmouth College in 1841. 
Wherever he lived, he always identified himself with the Con- 
gregational church, and both at Dunstable and Nashua he was 
chosen a Deacon. He died at Milford, New Hampshire, on 
July 2, 1849, and was buried in the Hollis Street Cemetery, 
at Nashua. 

On October i, 1797, Dr. Eldredge was married to Sally, 
daughter of Tilly and Abigail (Hale) Buttrick, of Princeton ; 
and they had twelve children, among whom were Hezekiah 
(M.D., Brown, 1825) and Frederick Augustus (Dartmouth, 
1832). 

For references to the Eldredge family, see pages 98-101, 
and 241, 242 of Volume H. of this Historical Series. 

Dr. Jacob Williams was a son of Jacob and Hannah 
(Sheple) Williams, and born at Groton, on July 16, 1789. 
His father, a son of Jason, was born on August 28, 1755, and 
died on May 2, 1829 ; and his mother was born on August 
26, 1761, and died on November 25, 1826. The following 
notice of Dr. Williams is found in Daniel Lancaster's History 
of Gilmanton, New Hampshire (1845) : — 

Dr. Jacob IVillicwis^ a native of Groton, Ms., came to Gilmanton 
Iron Works about the year 1816, and was married in June, 1822, to 
Irene Locke of Epsom. In 1828, he returned to his native town, 
where he was in practice for a time, but is now established in 
Kensington, N. H. (Page 231.) 

His wife, Mrs. Irene (Locke) Williams, died at Groton, on 
March 11, 1831 ; and he was married during the next year, 



24 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

secondly, to Betsey Wakefield, of Kennebunk, Maine. Dr. 
Williams became a member of the Massachusetts Medical 
Society in the year 183 1. While practising in Groton he 
lived on what is now known as Hollis Street, and the site of 
his house is given on Mr. Butler's Map. He remained here 
until the year 1835, when he removed to Kensington, New 
Hampshire, where he died on July 7, 1857. His remains 
were brought to Groton, and placed in the family tomb on 
the northerly side of the old Burying Ground. 

Dr. James Wilson was a son of the Honorable Abiel and 
Abigail (Putnam) Wilson, and born at Wilton, New Hamp- 
shire, December 4, 1796, on the farm where his maternal 
great-grandfather, Jacob Putnam, began a settlement in the 
year 1739. His early education was received at the common 
schools, with some help from the Reverend Thomas Beede, 
the minister of the town. He studied medicine under the 
tuition of Dr. John Wallace, of Milford, New Hampshire, and 
graduated at the Dartmouth Medical School in the Class of 
1 82 1. He was practising his profession at Boston in the 
early part of 1825, as his name appears in the Directory of 
that year, and he removed to Groton near the beginning of 
1828. He was married in February of that year to Elizabeth 
P. Wilson, of Boston, whose father was the City-Crier, and 
by her he had a son and a daughter. The publishment of 
their intended marriage was on P"ebruary 11, 1828. Dr. Wil- 
son came to this town under the patronage of Dr. Amos Ban- 
croft, who desired some respite from a large practice, and 
acted as his sponsor in the community. He lived in the 
house between the Academy building and the First Parish 
Meeting-house, where he remained for more than two years. 
After leaving Groton he returned to Boston and passed a 
brief period, and then resided in New York for a short time. 
Soon afterward he went to Cuba, where he spent the re- 
mainder of his days, and died in Matanzas, on November 
23, 1868. 

Dr. Wilson was twice married, his second wife being a 
Spanish lady. After taking up his residence in Cuba, he 



THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 25 

returned to New England two or more times, on short visits ; 
and the tradition is that on these occasions he was both frail 
and feeble. 

Dr. Gp:orge Stearns was the youngest child of Ephraim 
and Molly (Oilman) Stearns, and born at Walpole, New Hamp- 
shire, on May 10, 1802. He studied medicine, — according 
to the Annual Catalogue of Harvard College, October, 1825, 
first, with Dr. Moses Hale, — and, secondly, with Dr. Amos 
Twichell, of Keene ; and he graduated at the Harvard Medical 
School in the Class of 1827. He began to practise medicine 
in Boston, where he remained about three years, and then he 
established himself in Groton. Here he met with consider- 
able success, having a wide practice in the neighborhood, and 
became somewhat noted as a surgeon. For many years he 
was a member of the Massachusetts Medical Society, and 
always took a deep interest in professional matters. He was 
married late in life, on July 2, 1868, to Mrs. Ann (Moulton) 
Gilson, widow of Joshua Gilson, of Groton. She was a native 
of Framingham, and died on April 11, 1874, aged 72 years 
and 8 months. 

Dr. Stearns was the last survivor of thirteen children, and 
died on March 7, 1882, at which time he was the oldest 
physician in Groton. 

See Dr. Henry Bond's " Genealogies of the Families and 
Descendants of the Early Settlers of Watertown, Massachu- 
setts " (page 506), and George Aldrich's " Walpole as it was 
and as it is " (pages 362-364), for other facts concerning the 
Stearns family. 

Dr. Amos Farnsworth was a son of Major Amos and 
Elizabeth (Rockwood) Farnsworth, and born at Groton on 
August 30, 1788. His father was an officer of distinction 
during the Revolutionary War. In his boyhood the son 
attended school at Groton Academy, when that institution 
was under the preceptorship of William Merchant Richardson. 
On June i, 1809, he began the study of medicine under the 
tuition of Dr. Calvin Thomas, of Tyngsborough, though he 
subsequently left this instructor, and on July 10, 181 1, resumed 



26 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

his Studies with Dr. John Collins Warren, of Boston. On 
April 14, 1 81 2, just before war was declared by the United 
States with Great Britain, he was commissioned as Surgeon's 
Mate in the Fourth Massachusetts Infantry Regiment ; and 
two months later, on June 15, his regiment left South Boston 
for Burlington, Vermont, for service on the frontier. He 
remained with the Fourth Infantry during thirteen months, 
when he resigned his commission on May 14, 18 13. He 
graduated at the Harvard Medical School in the Class of 
1813 ; and at the time of his medical examination he pre- 
sented a thesis on pneumonia, which was written, by the light 
of pine-knots, while in camp on the northern borders. On 
May I, 1 8 14, he began the practice of medicine in Boston, 
and in the autumn of 1816 was chosen a Fellow of the Massa- 
chusetts Medical Society. He continued in the active practice 
of his profession during sixteen or eighteen years, and lived 
in Hanover Street. In 1832 he removed to Groton, residing 
at the southerly end of the village street, on the place 
formerly owned by Dr. Oliver Prescott, and retired from 
the profession. 

Dr. Farnsworth was married, on March 21, 1823, to Mrs. 
Mary (Bourne) Webber, widow of Captain Seth Webber, of 
Boston. He died in Roxbury on July 31, 1861, and his wife 
in Boston on October 27, 1828, aged 37 years. They had 
three children, namely : two .sons, Amos Henry Farnsworth 
(born on August 8, 1825), of Troy, New York, a graduate of 
Harvard College in the Class of 1844, and George Bourne 
Farnsworth (born on February 29, 1828), a graduate in the 
Class of 1847, who died in Roxbury, on April 11, 1887 ; and 
a daughter, Mary Elizabeth Farnsworth (born on December 
28, 1823), who was married, first, on December 9, 185 1, to 
Josiah Burrage Kilbourne, and, secondly, on May 21, 1861, to 
Samuel Hall, of Brookline. 

See " Medical Communications of the Massachusetts Med- 
ical Society" (X. 159), published at Boston in 1866, for a 
brief notice of Dr. Farnsworth, signed " M. E. H.," the 
initials of his daughter; and also the first volume of this 
Historical Series (No. XI. page 20) for another notice. 



THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 27 

Dr. Amos Bigelow Bancroft was a son of Dr. Amos and 
Sarah (Bass) Bancroft, and born at Groton, on April 3, 1811. 
He attended school at Groton Academy, and graduated at 
Harvard College in the Class of 183 i. He studied medicine 
with Dr. George Cheyne Shattuck, Senior, of Boston, and 
graduated at the Harvard Medical School in the year 1834, 
when he began the practice of his profession at Groton in 
connection with his father. Dr. Amos Bancroft. On June 11, 
1840, he was married to Marietta, daughter of Nathan and 
India (Emerson) Shepley, of Pepperell. He joined the Massa- 
chusetts Medical Society in 1837, ^"^1 for some years was one 
of its Councillors. Dr. Bancroft remained here until the 
spring of 1853, when he removed to Charlestown, and became 
associated with Dr. Jonathan Wheeler Bemis. While living 
in Charlestown he was physician to the State Prison during 
more than ten years. Under the administration of General 
Grant he was appointed Superintendent and Surgeon in 
charge of the Marine Hospital at Chelsea, which position he 
held from August i, 1869, to June 30, 1877, when he took 
up his residence in Boston. While travelling abroad with 
his family, he died in Florence, Italy, on November 8, 1879, 
much lamented by a wide circle of friends and patients at 
home, — leaving a widow and two daughters to mourn his 
loss. 

Dr. Abel Hervey Wilder was a native of Winchendon, 
where he was born on June 16, 1801. He was a son of Levi 
and Grace (Wilder) DivoU ; but by an Act of the Legislature 
on February 7, 1824, his name was changed from Hervey 
Divoll to Abel Hervey Wilder, keeping the surname of his 
mother's family. He graduated at the Dartmouth Medical 
School in the Class of 1828, and began to practise his pro- 
fession at Temple, New Hampshire. On February 29, 1828, 
he was married at New Ipswich to Mary, daughter of Ephraim 
and Elizabeth (Bent) Brown, who was born at Lincoln, Massa- 
chusetts, on November 16, 1803. Dr. Wilder next removed to 
Pepperell, where he was associated for a while with Dr. Nehe- 
miah Cutter in the management of an institution for the 



28 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

treatment of nervous diseases. In the year 1836 he came 
to Groton and bought the house on Main Street, next to 
Dr. Green's place, where he organized a similar institution 
for the care of nervous patients. In this specialty he met 
with considerable success, and at the same time maintained 
a good standing in general practice. He became a member 
of the Massachusetts Medical Society in the year 1837, and 
continued to live at Groton until the death of his wife, which 
took place on February 12, 1843 ; and from this town he 
removed to Pittsfield. While living in Richmond, Virginia, 
he was married to a second wife, who had been a school- 
teacher. 

The following sketch of Dr. Wilder is found among the 
obituary notices in the Appendix to the Report of the Stand- 
ing Committee, printed in the Transactions of the Medical 
Society of New Jersey, at their Ninety-eighth Annual Meeting 
in 1864, — which gives his subsequent career after leaving 
this town, though in some particulars it is not strictly 
accurate : — 

Dr. Abel Hervay Wilder was born in Winchendon, Mass., June 
sixteenth, 1801 ; he died at Bloomfield, N. J., January second, 
1864. 

He was educated at Dartmouth College, and studied medicine 
with Dr. Mazzy [Mussey], of vegetarian celebrity, who lived at 
Hanover. He attended lectures in Boston, and began practice 
at Pepperal, N. H. [Pepperell, Mass.], among the granite hills. 
The severities of the climate brought on the asthma, which never 
ceased to give him more or less inconvenience to the close of his 
life. He next removed to Groton, Mass., where he remained till 
the death of his wife. Relinquishing practice for a while, he 
resided at Pittsfield, Mass., where his only child — a daughter 
[Mary Elizabeth], now the wife of Henry J. Mills, Esq. — was 
pursuing her education. Dr. Wilder, seeking a warmer climate 
than that of Massachusetts, next removed to Richmond, Va., where 
he practiced medicine for several years. He returned North and be- 
came associated in the proprietorship of a lunatic asylum at North- 
ampton, Mass. This proved a commercial failure, and with broken 
fortune he crossed "the plains" to California in 1848, where he 
remained several years with considerable pecuniary advantage, and 



THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 29 

finally settled in a pretty cottage on the wooded summit of the hill 
that skirts the village of Bloomfield, N. J., on the west, where he 
spent the remainder of his life. His funeral was numerously at- 
tended, and many who sincerely mourned his loss followed his 
remains to his family vault in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, near Newark. 
Rev. Dr. Newlan, his pastor, bore abundant evidence of his entire 
preparedness for death. He paid a feeling tribute to the deceased 
as a beloved physician to whom he owed his life. He was from his 
youth an invalid on account of his asthmatic difficulties, but he 
died at length in consequence of an attack of congestion of the 
brain. Although he did not intend to seek practice in Bloomfield,* 
he was serving many families with great acceptance. He was a 
well-educated man, had a patient, investigating mind, with consid- 
erable physical courage, and had seen in the course of his life 
considerable practice. His professional engagements had increased 
to the full extent of his ability to meet them. He visited his 
patients till within a few days of his death. 

Dr. Wilder was the soul of honor. On this subject he was in- 
tensely sensitive, and some events of his life, if related, would 
show how far his nice sense of honor exceeded the ordinary com- 
mercial honor of the present day. Although he felt that his fail- 
ure to meet his engagements at Northampton was owing to no fault 
of his, still after his successes in California, he arranged that his 
creditors at Northampton should be invited to a dinner, and under 
each plate he caused to be placed a check for the full amount with 
the interest due the person to whom that particular place was as- 
signed. A silver pitcher now adorns his parlor, which affords the 
evidence of the appreciation of those so unexpectedly repaid. Dr. 
Wilder was a stout, well-built man. His erect carriage and courtly 
manners gave him a military air. The effect was hightened by 
the single-breasted coat and ruffled shirt, which he invariably wore. 
Though not readily accessible to all, none knew him well but loved 
him, or employed him professionally without readily giving him 
their entire confidence. In politics he was wholly and entirely 
loyal. His allegiance was not doubtful or divided. (Pages 77, 78.) 

Dr. James Merrill- Cummings was a son of Jacob Abbot 
and Elizabeth (Merrill) Cummings, and born in Boston on 
July 27, 1810. His father was a native of Hollis, New 
Hampshire, where he was born on November 2, 1772; he 



30 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

pursued his preparatory studies at Groton Academy, and 
graduated at Harvard College in the Class of 1801. After 
leaving Cambridge the father became a teacher for several 
years, and later a bookseller and publisher, and a member of 
the well-known house of Cummings and Hilliard in Boston. 
The son was educated at Phillips Academy, Andover, and at 
Bowdoin College, where he graduated in the Class of 1830. 
He studied his profession with Dr. John Barrett, of Portland, 
Maine, and in the year 1834 took the degree of M.D. at the 
Bowdoin Medical School. On November 4, 1835, ^^ ^^^ 
married to Sarah Thurston Phillips, daughter of Joel and 
Sarah Phillips (Thurston) Hall, of Portland, who was born on 
September 10, 1804, and died on January 29, 1890. 

Immediately after graduation from the Medical School, Dr. 
Cummings took up his residence at Calais, Maine, for a year 
or thereabouts, and then went to Nashua, New Hampshire, 
where he remained for about two years. In 1839 he removed 
to Cairo, Illinois, and lived there for the next two or three 
years. In the spring of 1842 he came to Groton and bought 
out the establishment of Dr. Wilder, which he conducted for 
four years. He became widely known in this town and neigh- 
borhood as a physician of the homoeopathic school, and there 
are still many persons among his former patients who remem- 
ber him with much pleasure. In the spring of 1846 he went 
to Salem, where he remained during four years, and then 
removed to Portland, which became his final abiding place. 
Here he died after a week's illness, on July 20, 1883, leav- 
ing a widow, and a son, James Abbot Cummings, and a 
daughter, Elizabeth Wainwright Cummings, to mourn his 
loss. A man of most agreeable manners, he left behind him 
a large circle of friends. 

Dr. Rufus Shackford is a son of Captain Samuel and 
Hannah (Currier) Shackford, and was born at Chester, New 
Hampshire, on December 17, 1816. - He went to school at 
Groton Academy, in the year 1840, and afterward studied 
medicine in the office of Dr. James M. Cummings, of Groton. 
He attended a course of lectures at the Dartmouth Medical 



THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTOX. 3 1 

School in 1842, and two courses at the Harvard Medical 
School in 1844 and 1845, graduating at the latter institution 
in the Class of 1845. His practice at Groton was of short 
duration, after which he lived at Lowell for a brief period, 
when he removed to Portland, Maine, where he is still in 
practice. Dr. Shackford has been married twice, but has no 
children. 

Dr. Norman Smith was a son of Jesse and Nabby (Kit- 
tredge) Smith, and born at Mount Vernon, New Hampshire, 
on October 13, 1811. He was married, first, on May 3, 1838, 
to Harriet, daughter of John and Lydia Sleeper, of Frances- 
town, New Hampshire, who was born on September 7, 18 16, 
and died at Groton, on September 2, 1839 J secondly, on 
November 6, 1843, to Mariett Sleeper, a sister of his first 
wife, who was born on October 9, 1826, and died at Groton, 
on July 6, 1846; thirdly, on September 22, 1847, at Lowell, 
to Abigail Maria, daughter of Ephraim and Sarah (King) 
Brown, of Wilton, New Hampshire, who was born on August 
26, 1828, and died at Groton, on July 17, 1852 ; fourthly, on 
September 12, 1853, to Sarah Young, daughter of Solomon 
and Dorcas (Hopkins) Frost, of Groton, who was born on 
July 13, 1832, and died at Fitchburg, on December 4, 1856; 
and, fifthly and lastly, on September 11, 1866, at Barre, to 
Mrs. Mary Jane (King) Lee, daughter of Daniel and Rebecca 
(Parmenter) King, of Rutland, Massachusetts, and widow of 
George Huntington Lee, who was born on November 5, 1828. 

Dr. Smith came to Groton about the year 1837, when he 
was associated for a time with his cousin P^ranklin Otis Kit- 
tredge, in the business of making fancy boxes. P>om an early 
age he had a decided taste for medicine and surgery, and he 
found it impossible to repress the natural tendency of his de- 
sires. In the year 1843 he graduated at the Vermont Medical 
College, Woodstock, and soon became widely known as a sur- 
geon in this neighborhood. He had a large practice, extend- 
ing over the northern part of Middlesex County, and over the 
southern part of Hillsborough County, New Hampshire. In 
April, 1 861, at the beginning of the War of the Rebellion, he 



32 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

went out as Surgeon of the Sixth Massachusetts MiHtia Regi- 
ment, and was with that famous organization on its march 
through Baltimore, and during its first campaign of three 
months. On June 9, 1875, Dr. Smith sailed for Europe, 
where he passed several months in visiting hospitals and 
other medical institutions, and after his return he settled in 
Nashua, New Hampshire. Here he remained until the year 
1879, when he came back to Groton and resumed practice, 
but owing to the condition of his health, which had been 
broken down by exposure in the army, it was not now exten- 
sive. During the last few years of his life he received a pen- 
sion from the Government for his disabilities. He was a 
member of the Congregational Union Church, and prominent 
in all matters connected with the welfare of the town. He 
died on May 24, 1888, at his farm on Common Street ; and 
the funeral, on May 28, was conducted under Masonic rites. 

For an account of Dr. Smith's services in the army, see 
pages 358-360 of Volume H. of this Historical Series. 

Dr. Batchelder, a Botanic physician, came to Groton in 
the summer of 1843 to practise the healing art, as expounded 
by his school of medicine. He lived in the Chaplin house, on 
School Street, then owned by James Needham, but now by 
Charles Woolley, and situated just north of the Burying 
Ground. I well remember the sign placed along the ridge- 
pole of the building, which read '-' Dr. Batchelder's Thomso- 
nian Establishment." Dr. Batchelder did not remain in the 
town more than six months, as the house took fire on the 
evening of January 4, 1844, when the roof and the upper story 
were burned off; and the establishment was then given up. 
I know nothing in regard either to his antecedent or his 
subsequent career. 

Dr. Lemuel Fuller was a son of Dr. Lemuel and Mary 
(Shepherd) Fuller, and born at Marlborough, on April 2, 
1 8 II. Soon after his birth the family removed to Attlebor- 
ough, where the father practised medicine for many years. 
The son obtained his degree of M.D., on June 9, 1841, from 



THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 33 

the Vermont Medical College at Woodstock. He was mar- 
ried, on June 6, 1844, to Catharine Palliseur, daughter of 
Francis and Maria Foster (Palliseur) Barrett, of Concord. 
Dr. Fuller practised his profession at Groton during three 
years, coming here from Harvard in 1847. Subsequently he 
lived at Milton, and also for ten years at North Weymouth, 
where, on January 9, 1853, he received a " call" to settle from 
a committee of the citizens of that village. He died at Har- 
vard, during a temporary absence from home, on February 1 1, 
1864, leaving a widow, but no children. 

Dr. Miles Spaulding is a son of Captain Isaac and Lucy 
(Emery) Spaulding, and was born at Townsend, on April 4, 
1 8 19. He attended school at the Ashby and the Pepperell 
Academies, and also at the school in Plymouth, New Hamp- 
shire, then known as the Teachers' Seminary. He began the 
study of medicine under the instruction of Dr. Ebenezer 
Parsons Hills (M.D., Bowdoin, 1825) and Dr. John Bertram 
(M.D., Dartmouth, 1825), both of Townsend, and with Dr. 
Alfred Hitchcock (M.D., Dartmouth, 1837), of Ashby, but 
later of Fitchburg. He attended lectures at the Berkshire 
Medical Institution, Pittsfield, where he graduated in the 
Class of 1842. After graduation he was for a time in the 
office of Dr. Oilman Kimball (M.D., Dartmouth, 1827), of 
Lowell, and later he continued his studies also at the Tre- 
mont Street Medical School in Boston. Dr. Spaulding 
began to practise his profession in the year 1843 at Dun- 
stable, where he remained until 185 1, when he removed to 
Groton. In 1844 he became a member of the Massachu- 
setts Medical Society, and in i860 and again in 1872 he 
was chosen a Councillor ; he is also a member of the Ameri- 
can Medical Association. He has been twice married, 
first, on January 12, 1848, to Sophia Louisa, daughter of 
Aaron and Lucinda (Munson) Miller, of New Haven, Con- 
necticut, who died at Groton, on September 4, 1852, aged 
25 years; and, secondly, on August 27, 1863, to Mary Me- 
hetable, only child of Stephen and Mary (Kilburn | French) 
Stickney. By the first marriage a son was born, who died in 



34 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

infancy. Dr. Spaulding lives in the first house, south of the 
Academy grounds, on Main Street. 

Dr. Peter Pineo is a son of Peter and Sarah (Steadman) 
Pineo, and was born at CornwalHs, Nova Scotia, on March 6, 
1825. He graduated at the Bowdoin Medical School in the 
Class of 1847 ; and was married in Boston, on May 8, 1850, to 
Elizabeth, daughter of Kendall and Betsey (Hill) Crosby. In 
the spring of 1853 he came to Groton, and took the house and 
practice of Dr. Amos B. Bancroft, who had then just removed 
to Charlestown. Dr. Pineo remained here two years, and in 
the spring of 1855 went to Quechee, a village in the town of 
Hartford, Vermont. On June 11, 1 861, he was commissioned 
Surgeon of the Ninth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, 
and soon afterward was promoted to a Brigade Surgeoncy, 
which office was the next year abolished by an Act of Con- 
gress, on July 2, 1862, when officers of that rank became 
Surgeons of United States Volunteers. On February 9, 1863, 
he was made Medical Inspector, United States Army, with 
the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel, and he served with distinction 
until the end of the war. Since that period he has been a 
resident either of Boston or Hyannis, a village in Barnstable, 
though of late he has been somewhat of an invalid. He be- 
came a member of the Massachusetts Medical Society in the 
year 1850, and as their Anniversary Chairman, on June 12, 
1878, he presided with acceptance at the annual dinner. 

Dr. Kendall Davis was a son of Joseph and Hannah 
Davis, and born at New Ipswich, New Hampshire, Decem- 
ber 4, 1802. According to the State Register for the years 
1 847-1 850, he was then living at Groton, where he practised 
for a short time. He was a brother of Deacon Isaiah Cragin's 
wife ; and from this town he went to Athol, and died at Tem- 
pleton, on September 20, 1875. 

Dr. Aaron Andrew was a son of Eleazer and Olive Ayers, 
and a native of Dedham. His surname was changed by an 
Act of the Legislature, on June 18, 1825, to Andrew. His 



THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 35 

first wife was Susan Ikyant, of Uedham ; and by this mar- 
riage there were two children, both now dead. At a later 
period he studied medicine, and came to Groton, where in the 
year 1820 he was married, secondly, to Mary, daughter of 
William and Susanna (Chauncy) Parker, who was one of six- 
teen children. Her father's family lived in the Rocky Hill 
District, at the east part of the town. In 1824 Dr. Andrew 
removed to Boston, and had an office in North Square ; and 
in that neighborhood he practised for more than thirty years. 
About 1857, his health failing, he returned to Groton, where 
he died on December 12, i860, aged 68 years, and was buried 
in the Parker tomb. Dr. Stephen Andrew Wood, of Bedford, 
is a grandson. 

Dr. Richard Upton Piper is a son of Samuel and Mary 
(Folsom) Piper, and was born at Stratham, New Hampshire, on 
April 3, 1 818. He graduated at the Dartmouth Medical Col- 
lege in the Class of 1840, and during the next year began the 
practice of his profession at Portland, Maine, where he was 
married on November 8, 1841, to Elizabeth Francis Folsom, 
a native of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. Subsequently he 
lived at Woburn, Massachusetts, from which place, in the 
year 1864, he came to Groton, and remained five years, 
though without engaging in the active practice of medicine. 
He lived on a farm near the village of West Groton, in a 
house situated opposite to Oliver Page's place, as shown on 
Mr. Butler's Map of Groton. He afterward lived in Chicago, 
Illinois, but is now a resident of Washington, D. C. In the 
year 1843, at which time he was living in Boston, he became 
a member of the Massachusetts Medical Society, and in 185 i 
was one of the Censors ; and later he was a member of the 
Illinois Medical Society. 

Dr. Piper is an author of some note ; and, while living at 
Woburn, he wrote a book entitled " Operative Surgery Illus- 
trated," which was published by Ticknor, Reed and Fields, at 
Boston, in the year 1852. It was a work of considerable 
merit, and contained more than nineteen hundred engrav- 
ings, of which many were from original drawings, made by 



36 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

his own hand. He also wrote "The Trees of America," a 
work profusely illustrated by himself, of which four numbers 
appeared at different times, the first number in the year 
1855. "The North American Review " for July, 1857, says 
of the author, that " he has the eye of an artist, the hand of a 
draughtsman, and the spirit of an enthusiast " (page 179). 

Dr. Joseph Franklin Coolidge was a son of Charles and 
Nancy (Spaulding) Coolidge, and born at Westminster, on 
September 11, 1837. He was educated at Westminster 
Academy, and in the year 1857 went to the State of Illinois. 
He attended the Medical College at St. Louis, Missouri, in 
1858 and 1859; and for two years he practised medicine in 
Calhoun County, Illinois. He graduated at the Harvard 
Medical School in the Class of 1862, and came to Groton 
in 1864, where he practised his profession, living in Jonas 
Eaton's house on Main Street. He died of consumption 
on June i, 1865, and was buried in his native town. His 
father was born at Westminister, on February 4, 1807, and 
died there on May 23, 1866 ; and his mother was born at 
Francestown, New Hampshire, on February 5, 1811, and 
died at Grand Haven, Michigan, on May 20, 1886. Dr. 
Coolidge was one of a family of ten children, and never 
married. 

Dr. William Ambrose Webster was the only son of 
William Gordon and Susan (Ambrose) Webster, and born at 
Rochester, New Hampshire, on June 13, 1830. In the spring 
of 1862 he graduated at the Medical School of the Long 
Island College Hospital in Brooklyn, New York, Soon after 
graduation, on July i, 1862, he was commissioned Surgeon of 
the Ninth Regiment New Hampshire Volunteers, which left 
for the seat of war on August 25, 1862 ; and he continued in 
that capacity until January 5, 1865, when he was honorably 
discharged. He then returned to Manchester, New Hamp- 
shire, and became connected with the United States General 
Hospital, which had been established on the old Fair grounds. 
In September, 1865, at the conclusion of his hospital service, 



THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 37 

he came to Groton, where he resided for three years. While 
here, Dr. Webster lived in the chambers over the Brick Store, 
and by his kind heart and fine presence made many friends. 
In the year 1868 he removed to Westford, where he remained 
ten years, when he went back to Manchester. In that city 
he served several years as a member of the School Board, and 
was connected with a lodge of Free Masons. His death took 
place in Manchester, on February 8, 1887, and resulted from 
the effects of malaria contracted while in the military service, 
and from which he had never been wholly free since his con- 
nection with the army. Dr. Webster was twice married, first, 
in August, 185 1, to Mary Anne Kaime, of Pittsfield, New 
Hampshire; and, secondly, on August 9, 1858, to Marion M. 
Ladd, of Middlesex, Vermont. By the first marriage two 
daughters were born, who both are now living ; and by the 
second marriage one daughter, Susan Marion Webster, was 
born at Groton, on June 25, 1866, but she died before her 
father. 

In " The Groton Landmark," February 19, 1887, is along 
notice of Dr. Webster taken from " The Manchester Union," 
February 8. 

Dr. David Roscoe Steere is a son of Scott and Mary 
(Mathewson) Steere, and was born at Lisbon, Connecticut, on 
April 27, 1847. He was married on June 18, 1873, to Adelia, 
daughter of Jephthah and Betsey (Boynton) Hartwell, of 
Groton, who was born on January 17, 1838. Dr. Steere 
graduated at the Dartmouth Medical School, in the Class of 
1 87 1, and after graduation practised for a few months at 
Savoy, Massachusetts. In July, 1872, he came to Groton, 
where he has since remained ; and in the year 1878 he built 
the house at the corner of Main and Church streets, which 
he now occupies. It is situated on the site of a store that 
was burned on November 17, 1874. (See the first volume 
of this Historical Series, No. VII. page 7, for an account of 
the old building.) Dr. Steere became a member of the 
Massachusetts Medical Society in the year 1881. 



38 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

Dr. Edward Hubbard Winslow was a son of the Rever- 
end Hubbard and Susan Ward (Cutler) Winslow, and born 
in Boston on December 26, 1836. He was married on Sep- 
tember I, 1859, at Montville, Maine, to Helen Ayer. He 
came to Groton in the early spring of 1875, taking the home- 
stead and practice of the late Dr. Smith, who at that time had 
removed to Nashua, New Hampshire. Dr. Winslow remained 
here about two years ; and while a resident of the town a son, 
Reginald Kenelm Winslow, born at Bridgeport, Connecticut, 
on June 23, 1868, died on May 6, 1876. Dr. Winslow's death 
took place in the city of New York, on October 16, 1878. 

Dr. George Washington Stearns is a son of Paul and 
Lucy (Kneeland) Stearns, and was born at Reading, Windsor 
County, Vermont, on December 25, 1814. His mother was 
a sister of Abner Kneeland, the preacher and author. Dr. 
Stearns took his medical degree first in March, 1857, at Penn 
Medical University, Philadelphia, and secondly, in 1858, at 
the Hahnemann Medical College of the same city. He was 
married, first, on May 8, 1838, at South Yarmouth, to Sylvia 
Crowell ; and, secondly, on July 19, 1877, at New Bedford, to 
Julia Amanda, daughter of Cyrus and Eliza Eastman (Cot- 
trell) Ware. In the spring of 1878 he came to Groton from 
Marblehead, and in November, 1882, removed to Holliston, 
where he remained a few years, when he went to Holyoke, of 
which city he is now a resident. Dr. Stearns belonged to the 
homoeopathic school of medicine, and while in Groton lived 
on the Dr. Smith place, which he had bought of Dr. Winslow, 
and which he subsequently sold to Dr. Warren, the present 
occupant. 

Dr. William Barnard Warren is a son of Noailles La- 
fayette and Mary (Barnard) Warren, and was born at Leomin- 
ster, on November 16, 1853. He studied medicine with Dr. 
Benjamin H. Hartwell, of Ayer, and graduated at the Univer- 
sity of the City of New York, in the Class of 1881, having pre- 
viously attended a course of lectures in 1879 at the Dartmouth 
Medical School. In December, 1882, he came to Groton and 



THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 39 

began practice. He was married in this town on October 31, 
1883, to Ardelia Temple, daughter of Thomas Haines and 
Relief (Cummings) Smith, of Boston. In 1885 Dr. Warren 
bought the house then owned by Dr. George VV. Stearns, and 
previously owned in succession by Dr. Winslow and by Dr. 
Smith, which he now occupies. It is situated on Main Street, 
near the old site of Liberty Hall, which was burned on March 
31, 1878. Dr. Warren became a member of the Massachusetts 
Medical Society in the year 1887. 

Dr. Marion Zachariah Putnam is a son of John and 
Sophia (Weaver) Putnam, and was born at Mount Sterling, 
Illinois, on August 14, 1844. In the year 1870 he graduated 
from the Medical Department of the Northwestern University, 
Chicago, and began practice in his native town. On Septem- 
ber 9, 1880, he was married to Harriet Elizabeth, daughter of 
Thomas Spencer and Harriet Heyward (Lawton) Farnsworth, 
of Groton. About the year 1883 he came to this town from 
Lowell, where he had resided for a short period. He now 
lives on Pleasant Street, but has retired from the active 
practice of his profession. 



GROTON JUNCTION. 

The Fitchburg Railroad was first opened to public travel, 
through the southerly part of Groton, on December 30, 
1844; and the Peterborough and Shirley Railroad, under 
the management of the Fitchburg Company, was opened 
during the year 1847. The Worcester and Nashua Railroad 
was operated for regular business, through its entire length, 
on December 18, 1848, though the section from Groton Junc- 
tion to Clinton had been previously opened on July 3, 1848, 
and from Clinton to Worcester on November 22 ; and the 
Stony Brook Railroad began its operations on July i, 1848. 
Soon after these interconnections were made, a village sprang 
up in the neighborhood, which became popularly known as the 
"Junction," though by the Post Office Department at Wash- 
ington officially called South Groton. On March i, 1861, the 



40 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

name of the post-office was changed by the Department from 
South Groton to Groton Junction. This settlement, growing 
in numbers, in due time was set off from the parent town, 
and by an Act of the Legislature on February 14, 1871, in- 
corporated as a distinct township, under the name of Ayer. 
After this date, therefore, the list of physicians, so far as they 
belong to the Junction, and their biographical sketches will 
cease. 

Dr. Ebenezer Willis is a son of John and Nancy (Sprig- 
gens) Willis, and was born at Newmarket, New Hampshire, 
on January 26, 181 5. He was married at Exeter, on July 
23, 1836, to Mary Frances, daughter of Benjamin Patridge 
and Mary Seavey (Neal) Batchelder, who was born on 
March 31, 182 1. Dr. Willis came to Groton Junction in 
March, 1849, and was the pioneer physician of the place. 
He continues to be a resident of Ayer, and for a man of 
more than seventy-five years of age is still hale and hearty. 

Dr. John Quincy Adams McCollester is a son o^ 
Silas and Achsah (Holman) McCollester, and was born at 
Marlborough, New Hampshire, on May 3, 1831. He gradu- 
ated at Norwich University in the Class of 1853, and from 
the same institution received the degree of A. M. in the year 
1856. Immediately after graduation he began the study of 
medicine in his native town, under the tuition of Dr. James 
Batcheller. In the autumn of 1854 he attended a course of 
lectures at the Dartmouth Medical School, and during the 
winter of 185 5-1 856 another course at the Jefferson Medical 
College of Philadelphia, where he took his degree of M. D. in 
March, 1856. On May 6, 1856, he was married to Sarah 
Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph and Anna (Longley) Hazen, 
of Shirley. His wife was born on February 4, 1838, and 
died at Groton, on May 5, 1858, leaving a daughter, Anna, 
who was born on August 28, 1857. On August 9, 1859, 
he was married, secondly, to Georgianna Lydia, daughter of 
Daniel and Lydia (Fisk) Hunt, of Groton, and a native 
of Sterling ; and they have had six children. Dr. Mc- 
Collester was a member of the School Committee of Groton 



THE niYSICIANS OF GROTON. 4 1 

from April, 1858, to April, 1866. During the War of the 
Rebellion, he was the Surgeon of the Fifty-third Regiment 
Massachusetts Militia, having been commissioned on De- 
cember I, 1862 ; and he was mustered out of the service 
on September 2, 1863. In the spring of 1869 he removed 
to the adjoining town of Harvard, though he still kept an 
office at the Junction. 

Dr. Edson Champion Chamberlin came to Groton Junc- 
tion, probably in the summer of 1859. He has an advertise- 
ment in the "Railroad Mercury," September 15, 1859; '^"•^^ 
again in the Mercury, March 8, i860, ofi^ring to sell his 
new house on Forest Street, as he " wishes to go South." 
Soon afterward he left the Junction and went to East 
Boston, where he opened an apothecary shop, and at the 
same time practised his profession, often changing his resi- 
dence as well as his place of business. While a resident 
of East Boston, he was a member of the Mount Tabor Lodge 
of Free and Accepted Masons. 

Dr. Chamberlin was a native of Thetford, Vermont, where 
he was born about the year 1821. He graduated at the 
Worcester Medical Institution, on June 20, 1854, though he 
had previously practised medicine. He was married to Mary 
A. Pierce, of Southbury, Connecticut, where he died on 
January 26, 1877, aged 56 years ; and his widow died at the 
same place, only a few days later, on February 2, 1877, aged 
50 years. 

Dr. Ghjson Smith came to Groton Junction from the 
State of Maine, about the year 1866. He was an " eclectic " 
physician and a spiritualist, and jiractised medicine after the 
manner of his school. He died at Ayer, on September 26, 
1885, aged 70 years, and was buried at Camden, Maine. A 
notice of him appears in "The Groton Landmark," October 3, 
1885. His wife, Harriet Smith, died at Ayer on December 15, 
1883, aged 64 years. She was a daughter of John and Rebecca 
Prince, and a native of Camden. Her father was born in 
Nashua, New Hampshire, and her mother in Boston. 

6 



42 THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

Dr. John Eleazer Parsons is a son of John and Rosa- 
linda Davis (Robbins) Parsons, and was born at Harrison, 
Maine, on November 20, 1835. ^^ graduated at the Har- 
vard Medical School in the Class of 1863, and on March 18 
of the same year was commissioned as Assistant Surgeon of 
the Twenty-eighth Massachusetts Volunteers, but for disability 
was discharged on July 30, 1863. Dr. Parsons next served as 
Acting Assistant Surgeon, and as Acting Passed Assistant 
Surgeon, United States Navy, from October 10, 1863, to De- 
cember 10, 1866, when he resigned. During the last week of 
December, 1866, he came to the village of Groton Junction, 
where he has since remained. He became a member of the 
Massachusetts Medical Society in the year 1865. 

Dr. Benjamin Hall Hartwell is a son of Benjamin 
Franklin and Emma (Whitman) Hartwell, and was born at Ac- 
ton, on February 27, 1845. His mother was a daughter of Dr. 
Charles Whitman, of Stow. He received his early education 
at Lawrence Academy, Groton, of which institution he is 
now one of the Trustees, and graduated at the Jefferson 
Medical College in Philadelphia, on March 7, 1868. He be- 
gan the practice of his profession at Troy, New Hampshire, 
where he remained for one year, and in March, 1869, came 
to Groton Junction. Dr. Hartwell was married on September 
10, 1879, to Helen Emily, daughter of Major Eusebius Silsby 
and Mary Jane (Shattuck) Clark, of Groton. In 1870 he be- 
came a member of the Massachusetts Medical Society, and 
for many years has been one of its Councillors. On June 29, 
1877, he was appointed by the Governor of the Common- 
wealth to be a Medical Examiner, which office he now holds. 
Since the town of Ayer was incorporated, he has filled many 
prominent positions of trust and usefulness, and is now one 
of the most influential citizens of the place. 

Dr. James Moody Moore was a son of Dr. Ebenezer 
Giles and Eliza Sarah (Hidden) Moore, and born at Wells, 
Maine, on June 20, 1832. He graduated at the Dartmouth 
Medical School in the Class of i860, in May of that year, 



THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 43 

and came to Groton Junction, where he remained until April 
19, 1 861. He joined the Massachusetts Medical Society in 
1 86 1. Dr. Moore then removed to Concord, New Hampshire, 
his father's home, where he died, unmarried, on February 3, 
1870. He was a grandson of the Reverend Samuel Hidden, 
the first minister of Tamworth, New Hampshire, and in his 
day a noted Congregational preacher. 



Dr. Samuel Emerson was a son of the Reverend Daniel 
and Hannah (Emerson) Emerson, and born at Hollis, New 
Hampshire, on September 6, 1764. In the year 1779, while 
yet a lad, he enlisted as a fifer in the company comn\anded 
by his brother. Captain Daniel Emerson, during the Revolu- 
tion, and after the war was prepared for college by his father. 
He graduated at Harvard College in the Class of 1785, and 
studied medicine under the tuition of Dr. Oliver Prescott, 
Senior, of Groton. Dr. Emerson passed his professional life 
at Kennebunk, Maine, where he died on August 7, 185 i. He 
was the father of the late George Barrell Emerson, a graduate 
of Harvard College in the Class of 1817, and an eminent 
teacher and author. 

Dr. John Walton was a son of John and Keziah (Viles) 
Walton, and born at Cambridge, on October 29, 1770. He 
graduated at Harvard College in the Class of 1791, and 
studied medicine under the tuition of Dr. Oliver Prescott, 
Junior, of Groton. He passed his professional life at Pep- 
perell, where he died on December 21, 1862. He was a 
classmate of Dr. Amos Bancroft, of Groton, and at the time 
of his death was the second oldest graduate of the college. 



William Dexter Blaxchard was an only son of Dex- 
ter and Charlotte (Capellj Blanchard, and born at Groton, on 
December 6, 1826. He attended school at Groton Academy, 



44 ' THE PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

and graduated at Williams College in the Class of 1847. ^^ 
began the study of medicine under the instruction of Dr. 
Amos B. Bancroft, but did not finish the course. When gold 
was first discovered in California, like many other young men, 
he was taken with a strong desire to seek his fortune on the 
slopes of the Pacific coast; and in the spring of 1849 he left 
home for those distant regions, whence he never returned. 
He went by the Isthmus of Panama, and died, near the cross- 
ing of the Yuba River, on September 4 of that year. For a 
record of his death, see page 123 of the second volume of this 
Historical Series. 

According to "Turner's Public Spirit" (Ayer), June 22, 
1878, there were at that time five physicians in Groton whose 
surnames began with the letter " S," and they were then the 
only physicians in the town. Mentioned in the order of their 
seniority as residents, they were Dr. George Stearns, Dr. Nor- 
man Smith, Dr. Miles Spaulding, Dr. David Roscoe Steere, 
and Dr. George Washington Stearns. The first two in the 
list are now dead, the next two are living at Groton, and Dr. 
George W. Stearns is a resident of Holyoke. There was no 
kinship between the first one in the list and the last, though 
there was a similarity of name. 



A LIST OF PHYSICIANS, 

NATIVES OF GROTON, OR CLOSELY C0NNECTF:D WITH THE TOWN, WHO 
PRACTISED THEIR PROFESSION ELSEWHERE. 

Dr. Ephraim Lawrence was a son of Peleg and Ruth 
Lawrence, and born at Groton, on March 31, 1735. He 
studied medicine and settled in Pepperell, where his father 
was then living. His preceptor was probably Dr. Oliver 
Prescott, of Groton, who at that period instructed many of 
the young physicians in the neighborhood. Dr. Lawrence 
was married, — first, on March 3, 1768, to Anna, daughter of 
Josiah and Sarah Fisk, of Pepperell ; and, secondly, to Ruth 

• . His first wife was born on December 16, 1747, and 

died on June 12, 1774, leaving two children ; and his second 
wife was blessed with six more. He died at Pepperell on 
December 23, 1809. 

Dr. Ebenezer Rockwood was a son of Elisha and Eliza- 
beth (Adams) Rockwood, and born at Groton on August 13, 
1746. He graduated at Harvard College in the Class of 1773, 
and immediately afterward studied medicine, though there 
was then no institution in New England that conferred the 
degree of M. D. in course. Dr. Rockwood served for a time 
in the army during the early part of the Revolution. In a 
list of officers in Colonel Ebenezer P'rancis's Regiment, sta- 
tioned on Dorchester Heights, November 4, 1776, — pub- 
lished in the "Maine Historical and Genealogical Recorder" 
(V. 3) for July, 1888, — he appears as Surgeon's Mate. On 
June 10, 1779, he was married to Mary, daughter of the 
Reverend Daniel and Hannah (Emerson) Emerson, of Hollis, 
New Hampshire ; and they had nine children. In the year 
1779 he received and accepted an invitation, signed by nearly 
all the voters of Wilton, New Hampshire, to settle in that 
town as a physician ; and he probably went there during the 



46 OTHER PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

next spring, as a letter of dismissal was given to him by the 
church in Groton, on March 5, 1780, 

He was given to hospitality, a man of wide influence, having 
the characteristics of the genuine Puritan stock from which he 
sprung. Eminent in his profession, he had an extensive practice, 
and in addition to that was largely engaged in farming. He built 
the house and owned the farm lately occupied* by Isaac K. Davis, 
also lot No. 14, third range, and that part of lot No. 14, second 
range, lying southwest of Rocky River. It was owing more to his 
influence than to that of any other resident of Wilton that the 
Second Cong. Ch. was organized. (History of Wilton, page 490.) 

Dr. Rockwood died at Wilton, on February 10, 1830; and 
his widow, at the same place, on March 9, 1849. Among his 
children was Ebenezer, Jr., who graduated at Harvard College 
in the Class of 1802, a classmate and friend of the late Hon- 
orable Samuel Hoar, whose son, Ebenezer Rockwood Hoar, 
was named for him. Ebenezer, Jr., was born on June 2, 1781, 
and died on May 8, 18 15. 

Dr. Jacob Patch was a son of Jacob and Mary (Hazen) 
Patch, and born at Groton on November 22, 1772. He at- 
tended school at Groton Academy in the year 1794, under 
the preceptorship of Henry Moor, the first principal of 
the institution, and graduated at Dartmouth College in the 
Class of 1799. He studied medicine in his native town un- 
der the instruction of Dr. Oliver Prescott, Senior, and began 
the practice of his profession at Camden, Maine. On No- 
vember 12, 1806, he was married to Rebekah, daughter of 
Caleb and Betty (Cummings) Woods, who was born at Gro- 
ton, on March 29, 1781. The following sketch of Dr. Patch 
is found in John L. Locke's History of Camden (Hallowell, 
1859):- 

Jacob Patch, M.D., was born in Groton, Mass., and graduated 
at Dartmouth college. Came to Camden about the year 1800. 
Nov. 12, 1806, he was married to Miss Rebekah Woods of Dun- 
stable, Mass. The T)octox^s forte was in teaching school, and not 
a few of those of our citizens who have attained eminence in their 



OTHER PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 47 

chosen pursuits, attribute their success, to the early training they 
received under the tuition of Dr. Patch. For a number of years, 
he was one of the superintending town school committee. As a 
medical practitioner, he never stood in the front rank, which he 
might have done, had his practical understanding and skill, corre- 
sponded with his deep reading and extensive theoretical knowledge. 
In case the utility of any of his prescriptions, or modes of treat- 
ment, were called in question, he was ever ready, from his abun- 
dant information, to quote any number of medical authorities in 
support of his procedure. The Doctor's individuality often ex- 
hibited itself through his eccentricities, which were the natural 
outgrowth of his peculiar temperament and disposition. Delight- 
ing in numismatics, he made an extensive collection of rare coins 
of every description, many of which are now in the cabinet of a 
somewhat enthusiastic antiquary. He had 150 gold coins, of as 
many different kinds. 

Characteristic of the Doctor, is the following incident : — At one 
time, he was going to Boston in a vessel, but missing of his passage 
by her sailing before the hour, he at once started for his destina- 
tion on foot, and, though a very inert man, arrived there before the 
captain reached the harbor. In like manner he returned. 

He died without issue, June 23, 1846, aged 73 years. His relict 
deceased April 18, 1854, at the age of 73 years. {Pages 217, 218.) 

Dr. Samuel Hemenway was a son of Samuel and Sarah 
(Fitch) Hemenway, and born at Groton, on November 16, 
1777. He attended school at Groton Academy in the year 
1797, and afterward studied medicine under the tuition of 
Dr. Edward Holyoke, of Salem. He began the practice of 
his profession in that town, and was married on November 13, 
1803, to Sally, daughter of Captain Jeduthun and Mary Up- 
ton, of Salem. Dr. Hemenway joined the Massachusetts 
Medical Society in 1808. About the year 181 7 he removed 
to Boston, where he died on January 8, 1823. See "Groton 
Epitaphs" (page 151), for the inscription on his tombstone. 
He was the father of the late Augustus Hemenway, of 
Boston. 

Dr. James Prkscott Chaplin was a son of the Rev- 
erend Daniel and Susanna (Prescott) Chaplin, and born at 



48 OTHER PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

Groton, on March 27, 1782. His mother was a daughter of 
the Honorable James Prescott, and a niece of Colonel Wil- 
liam Prescott, the commander of the American forces at the 
Battle of Bunker Hill. In the year 1794, he attended school 
at Groton Academy, then under the preceptorship of Henry 
Moor, the first principal of the institution. He studied medi- 
cine for two years with Dr. Calvin Thomas, of Tyngsborough, 
and for one year with Dr. John Warren, of Boston, graduating 
at the Harvard Medical School as the sole member of the 
Class of 1805. On December 10, 1807, he was married to 
Hannah, daughter of Richard and Hannah (Goldthwait) 
Gardner, of Cambridge, who died on May 21, 1838. Dr. 
Chaplin became a member of the Massachusetts Medical 
Society in the year 1808, and at the time of his death was one 
of the Councillors. During a long time he was at the head 
of a private establishment for the treatment of nervous dis- 
eases and the insane, — the earliest institution of its kind in 
New England. It was situated on spacious grounds, near 
the corner of Austin and Prospect Streets, Cambridgeport. 
He died on October 12, 1828, leaving four sons and three 
daughters. See Volume II. of this Historical Series (page 
432), for an account of the Reverend Dr. Chaplin's family. 
The following notice is found in the " Lancaster Gazette," 
October 21, 1828 : — 

In Cambridge-port, Dr. James P. Chaplin, aged 46. The pub- 
lick at large, as well as private friends, are summoned to feel a deep 
regret at this dispensation of Providence. Dr. Chaplin was in the 
height of his usefulness — in that mellow, productive season of 
life when virtue throws its deep richness into every act of benevo- 
lence, and religion grows more celestial as the passions and affec- 
tions withdraw from earth to rest on heaven. 

Dr. Rufus Longley was a son of Joshua and Bridget 
(Melvin) Longley, and born at Shirley, on September 2, 1788. 
He was a lineal descendant of William Longley, one of the 
first settlers of Groton, and received his early education at 
Groton Academy. He entered Harvard College in the sum- 
mer of 1804, but his class was the one principally concerned 



OTHER PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 49 

in the college rebellion, which broke out in the spring of 
1807, when many of the members were expelled. Of this 
number were Rufus Longley, of Shirley, and John Sheplcy, 
of Groton, a brother of the late Honorable Ether Shepley, 
of Portland, Maine. After leaving Cambridge, young Long- 
ley began the study of medicine under the instruction of Dr. 
Oliver Prescott, Jr., of Groton, and subsequently took the 
degree of Bachelor of Medicine at the Dartmouth Medical 
School in the Class of i8ii. At that time Dartmouth Col- 
lege did not give the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Soon 
afterward he established himself in practice at Haverhill, 
where he passed the remainder of his life. On November 5, 
18 19, Dr. Longley was married to Margaret, daughter of 
Bailey and Margaret (White) Bartlett, of Haverhill ; and they 
had four children, of whom only one now survives. He be- 
came a member of the Massachusetts Medical Society in the 
year 1824, and received an honorary degree of M. D. from 
Harvard College in 1850. His last professional visit was 
made only a few days before his death, which took place on 
March 12, 1855 ; and by a coincidence his first patient was 
also his last. His widow died at Haverhill on January 6, 
1880, aged 89 years, 4 months, and 8 days. 

Dr. Thomas Champney Gardner was a son of Thomas 
and Abigail (Champney) Gardner, and born at Groton, on May 
10, 1 79 1. He fitted for college at Groton Academy, and 
graduated at Dartmouth College in the Class of 181 1. He 
studied medicine under the direction of Dr. Amos Bancroft, 
of Groton, and on December 10, 18 13, during the war with 
England, was commissioned as Surgeon's Mate in the United 
States Navy. Dr. Gardner was at once assigned to duty on 
board of the sloop-of-war "Ontario," where he remained, 
probably, until the time of his death, which took place in 
the city of New York during the year 18 19. He was never 
married. The Class Report, published in the year 1850, 
says : " He was a person of respectable talents, and naturally 
a pleasant, amiable young man." 



50 OTHER PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

Dr. Ralph Farnsworth, a younger brother of Dr. Amos, 
who is mentioned on page 25, was the son of Major Amos 
and Elizabeth (Rockwood) Farnsworth, and born at Groton, 
on September 20, 1795. He fitted for college at Groton 
Academy, and graduated at Harvard College in the Class of 
1 82 1. Immediately after graduation he went to Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire, where he was engaged for some years in 
teaching school, and probably also in studying his profession. 
He graduated at the Dartmouth Medical School in the Class 
of 1826. After taking his medical degree, he went to Nor- 
wich, Connecticut, where he began the practice of his profes- 
sion. On November 25, 1828, he was married to Eunice 
Williams, daughter of Coddington and Eunice (Williams) 
Billings, of New London. A few years later he went to 
Buffalo, New York, where he was engaged in mercantile 
affairs for a while, but not liking the kind of business, he 
returned to Norwich, and resumed the practice of medicine. 
His death took place in that city on July 16, 1875. 

Dr. Richard Williams was a son of Jacob and Hannah 
(Sheple) Williams, and born at Groton, on January 12, 1803, 
— a younger brother of Dr. Jacob Williams, who is mentioned 
on page 23. He received his early education at Groton 
Academy, and in the autumn of 1825 entered Amherst Col- 
lege, where he remained during the Freshman and Sophomore 
years. Soon afterward he began the study of medicine, and 
graduated at the Dartmouth Medical School in the Class of 
1830. According to the Annual Catalogue of that institution 
for 1829, Dr. Nehemiah Cutter, of Pepperell, was his medical 
preceptor. He began the practice of his profession at Mil- 
ford, New Hampshire; and on April 25, 1832, he was married 
to Susanna, daughter of Noah and Anna (Sheple) Shattuck, 
of Groton, who was born on May 3, 1807. Dr. Williams died 
at Milford, on October 6, 1842 ; and his widow subsequently 
married, on March 21, 1844, Leonard Chase, a trader of Mil- 
ford, who was born at Millbury, Massachusetts, on August 4, 
1 8 10. Both Mr. Chase and his wife are now dead. 

The Honorable Rodney Metcalf Stimson, of Marietta, Ohio, 



OTHER niYSICIANS OF GROTON. 5 I 

a native of Milford, has kindly given me his recollections of 
the man and physician, as follows: — 

Dr. Richard Williams, from Groton, Mass., settled in Milford, 
N. H., about New Year's, 183 1, to practise his profession. He 
"followed the King," as his predecessor was "young Dr. Spalding," 
so called, to distinguish him from his uncle, Dr. Matthias Spalding, 
of Amherst, the latter doubtless, at the time, the most distinguished 
physician and surgeon who had ever lived in Hillsborough County, 
the younger doctor being his apt pupil in an adjoining town, and 
exceedingly popular. 

Dr. Williams, then about twenty-eight years of age, at once 
proved himself to be fully equal to all the duties he had under- 
taken. He had received a good education, was well read in his 
profession, had good practical sense, and a pleasant manner, and 
grew in the estimation of the people, till his death, in October, 
1842. He had served an intelligent community to entire accept- 
ance for almost twelve years, and fell a victim to typhoid fever, at 
the age of thirty-nine. 

In person, Dr. Williams was about five feet ten inches tall, 
weighed about one hundred and sixty-five pounds, was of clear 
complexion, neither very light nor dark, and was altogether a fine 
looking man. He was of decided convictions, expressed firmly 
but always kindly, a consistent member of the Congregational 
church, and well known as an anti-slavery man, when to be so 
was not so popular as it afterward became. A short time after 
going to Milford, he married Miss Susanna Shattuck, of Groton, 
who was a model wife, a nice looking woman, of a disposition 
always apparently unruffled, and under all circumstances a lady. 
Of their two children, one named George grew to manhood, but 
left Milford more than forty years ago. Mrs. Williams, after some 
years of widowhood, married Leonard Chase, a prominent citizen 
of Milford, but has now been dead for many years. 

Dr. George Mansfield was a son of Dr. Joseph and Abi 
(liartwell) Mansfield, and born at Groton, on October 8, 1807. 
He began to attend school at Groton Academy in the year 
181 5, and graduated at the Harvard Medical School in the 
Class of 1832. He joined the Massachusetts Medical Society 
in the year 1832, {See page 15 of this number.) 



52 OTHER PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

Dr. Franklin Dodge was a son of Samuel and Molly 
(Farnsworth) Dodge, and born at Groton, on September 9, 
1809. His parents were married on September 16, 1790; 
his father, a native of Ipswich, died on September 4, 1838, 
and his mother, a native of Groton, on November 30, 1840. 
Dr. Dodge attended school at Groton Academy as early as 
the year 1822, when this institution was under the precep- 
torship of Eber Child. He graduated at Amherst College 
in the Class of 1834, and began the study of his profession 
at the Dartmouth Medical School, where he graduated in 
the Class of 1837. He practised for a short time in Boston, 
and then in 1838 went to Harwich. On December 6, 1839, 
he was married to Susan, daughter of John and Sukey 
(Parker) Fitch, of Groton. Dr. Dodge joined the Massa- 
chusetts Medical Society in 1841, and was one of the Coun- 
cillors. He had a successful practice at Harwich, which 
continued until it was interrupted by the early symptoms 
of consumption. He died on July 8, 1872 ; and in his death 
the poor lost a warm friend and a kind physician. (See 
page 337 of the second volume of this Historical Series.) 

Dr. William Richards Lawrence was the eldest son 
of Amos and Sarah (Richards) Lawrence, and born in Bos- 
ton, on May 3, 1812. After the death of his mother, which 
occurred on January 14, 18 19, he came to Groton and lived 
in his grandfather Lawrence's family on Farmers' Row. He 
attended school at Groton Academy, where he remained for 
two years ; and subsequently he went to. the Latin School in 
Boston for a year, thence to Dummer Academy for three 
years, and to a school in Gardiner, Maine, for another year. 
At the age of sixteen he went abroad, where he continued 
his studies, and returned home in July, 1832. He was mar- 
ried in Boston, on December 6, 1838, to Susan Coombs, 
daughter of the Reverend Samuel and Henrietta (Bridge) 
Dana, of Marblehead. He graduated at the Harvard Medical 
School in the Class of 1845, and became a member of the 
Massachusetts Medical Society in 1846. He was connected 
with a children's hospital, and with several medical institu- 



OTHER PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 53 

tions for some years, when he retired from the profession. 
Dr. Lawrence died at Swampscott, on September 20, 1885. 

Dr. Noah Torrey is a son of Noah and Sarah (l>lan- 
chard) Torrey, and was born at Groton, on December 23, 
1818. His father was born at Abington, on December 19, 
1772 ; and his mother at Weymouth, on June 13, 1781. He 
fitted for college at Groton Academy, and graduated at Dart- 
mouth College in the Class of 1844. He attended lectures at 
the Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, where he took 
the degree of M. D. in March, 1847. Soon after graduation. 
Dr. Torrey began the practice of his profession at Braintree, 
where he has since lived. On November 16, 185 1, he was 
married to Lucinda, daughter of Jonathan and Ruth (Penni- 
man) Thayer, of Braintree ; and they have two sons and a 
daughter. 

Dr. Charles Hartwell Cragin was a son of Deacon 
Isaiah and Hannah (Hildreth) Cragin, and born at Alstead, 
New Hampshire, on September 17, 1817. His father re- 
moved to Groton in the year 1830, and lived in the house at 
the corner of Chicopee Row and Longley Street. The son 
began to attend school at Groton Academy during the same 
year, and graduated at Amherst College in the Class of 1837. 
For some years afterward he was engaged in teaching, and 
at the same time was studying his profession. He received 
the degree of M. D. from the National Medical College, 
Washington, D. C, in the Class of 1844; and after prac- 
tising his profession in Washington for a short period, he 
removed to the adjoining city of Georgetown, where he 
passed his life, with the exception of a year spent in Cali- 
fornia. He was for four years Police Commissioner of the 
District of Columbia, and for three years Postmaster of 
Georgetown; and he died in that city on April i, 1887. 

On October 2, 1845, ^^- Cragin was married, — first, to 
Mary, daughter of Samuel McKenney, of Georgetown, where 
she was born on l-'ebruary 11, 1820, and died on May 21, 
1853 ; and on April 16, 1857, secondly, to her sister, Henrietta 



54 OTHER PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

Foxall McKenny, who was born on November ii, 1825. 
They had six children, of whom three survived the father. 

For another sketch of Dr. Cragin, see Volume II. (pages 
336, 337) of this Historical Series, where his father's given 
name is incorrectly printed as Josiah. That account was 
taken from the " Obituary Record of the Graduates of 
Amherst College." 

Dr. George Brown is a son of Ephraim and Sarah (King) 
Brown, and was born at Wilton, New Hampshire, on October 
II, 1823. He fitted for college at Phillips Academy, An- 
dover, and in September, 1845, entered the University of 
Vermont, Burlington, where he remained during two years. 
He began the study of medicine under the instruction of his 
brother-in-law. Dr. Norman Smith, of Groton, and took his 
degree of M. D. in the Class of 1850, at the Medical Depart- 
ment of the University of the City of New York. On No- 
vember I, 1850, he was married to Catharine, daughter of 
Artemas and Susan (Barber) Wood, of Groton ; and they 
have one son, George Artemas Brown, who is a physician, 
and an assistant to his father. About the time of his mar- 
riage Dr. Brown established himself at Barre, and took 
charge of an institution for feeble-minded youth, which has 
now grown to large proportions. He became a member of 
the Massachusetts Medical Society in 1866, and is now one 
of the Councillors. 

Dr. Isaiah Hall Nutting was a son of Joseph Danforth 
and Lucinda (Keep) Nutting. He graduated at Williams 
College in the Class of 1846, and took his degree of M. D. in 
the year 185 1, at the Berkshire Medical Institution, Pittsfield. 
The " Necrological Annals. 1865-6," of Williams College 
gives the following sketch of Dr. Nutting's life : — 

Isaiah Hall Nutting was born at Groton, Mass., Dec. 14, 1S24, 
and died at Elgin, 111., of Typhoid Fever, Dec. i, 1865, aged forty- 
one years. 

He prepared for College at Lawrence Academy, and entered as 
Sophomore. He was distinguished among his classmates for high 



OTHER rilYSICIANS OF GROTON. 55 

scholarship and general ability. After his graduation he engaged 
in teaching at different places — one year in Michigan, and for a 
time at Bennington and at Brattleboro', Vt. He also pursued the 
study of theology at East Windsor, and was graduated there in 185 1. 
He studied medicine likewise, and received the degree of M. U. 
He practiced sometimes one and sometimes another of his profes- 
sions, but the principal part of his work was done in teaching, 
wherein he was enthusiastic and successful. He was preceptor of 
Mt. Hollis Seminary at Holliston for some years, and left it to take 
a post in Iowa College, when the breaking out of the war suddenly 
left that institution without students. He then removed to Dyers- 
ville, Iowa, where he preached and practiced medicine for a time 
until his removal to Elgin, 111., where he died. 

Dr. Nutting was a man of original powers. One could not be 
long in his company without perceiving that he was in the habit of 
doing his own thinking. He was apt to leave the beaten track of 
thought, and mark out a path for himself. He meditated much 
upon the connection of mind with matter, and made some commu- 
nications on the subject to the Boston Medical Journal. He also 
wished to introduce some reforms in the teaching of English Gram- 
mar, and published the first of a series of text-books in that de- 
partment of study. His mind was active in a great variety of 
directions, seeking to understand and illustrate the wonderful 
works and word of God. He was a warm Christian, and ear- 
nestly engaged in Christian work, ardently desiring to serve the 
Saviour, and to enjoy His presence forever. It is believed that 
more than a hundred souls owe their conversion under God to his 
instrumentality. A short time before his death he wrote to a 
friend : " We are passing on from one plan and field of studies to 
another, and happy he who early takes his place with the throng 
before the Lamb." His dying testimony was : " I cast my anchor 
when I was thirteen years old upon the Rock ; and it has never 
moved." " I have always preached the all-sufficiency of Christ to 
others, and I am not afraid to trust it now." When told that his 
end was near, he said, " I hail it with joy." (I'agc 20.) 

Dr. Isaiah Hutchins is a son of Thomas and Abigail 
(Spaulding) Hutchins, and was born at Westford, on Septem- 
ber 23, 1829. His father lived for many years on the Gov- 
ernor Sullivan place in Groton, situated on the Lowell 



$6 OTHER PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

road, perhaps three-quarters of a mile from the First Parish 
Meeting-house. He attended school at Groton Academy, 
and graduated at the Worcester Medical Institution, on June 
23, 1852. Dr. Hutchins began the practice of his profession 
at West Acton, where he still resides. On November 25, 
1852, he was married to Sarah Augusta, daughter of Alden 
and Sarah (Faulkner) Fuller, of Acton, and they have, by 
adoption, one child, named George Young Hutchins. In the 
year 1864 he became a member of the Massachusetts Medical 
Society, and in 1867 was one of its Councillors. 

During the War of the Rebellion he served iii the Sixth 
Regiment Infantry, Massachusetts Volunteer Militia, in their 
nine months' campaign. He was a Corporal of Company E, 
and mustered in on August 31, 1862 ; and on March 4, 1863, 
was appointed Hospital Steward of the regiment, in which 
capacity he served until the regiment was mustered out, on 
June 3, 1863, after the expiration of their term of service. 
During the next year, when the same regiment went out for 
one hundred days, he was commissioned as Second Lieuten- 
ant, and served in Company E from July 18 to October 
27, 1864. 

Dr. Samuel Abbott Green is a son of Dr. Joshua and 
Eliza (Lawrence) Green, and was born at Groton, on March 
16, 1830. He began to attend school at Groton Academy in 
the year 1838, and graduated at Harvard College in the Class 
of 185 1, taking his degree of M. D. at the Harvard Medical 
School in 1854. During the war of the Rebellion he served 
in the army as Assistant Surgeon of the First Massachusetts 
Volunteers from May 25 to September 2, 1861, when he was 
commissioned as Surgeon of the Twenty-fourth Massachusetts 
Volunteers, in which regiment he remained until November 
3, 1864. He was also Acting Staff Surgeon, on duty in Rich- 
mond, Virginia, after that city surrendered, from April 9 to 
July 9, 1865. See " Harvard University in the War of 1861- 
1865 " (pages 51, 52), for other details of his military service. 
In the year 1866 he was chosen a Trustee of Lawrence Acad- 
emy, which position he still holds, and from 1884 to 1889 was 



OTHER PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 57 

the President of the IJoarcl. He is now a resident of lioston, 
where he has been a member of the School Committee, Super- 
intendent of the Boston Dispensary, City Physician, Mayor, 
etc. For a sketch of his life, see " Appleton's Cyclopaedia of 
American Biography" (II. 746). 

Dr. Joseph Rutter Draper. The sketch of this physi- 
cian, given below, is taken from the " Obituary Record of 
the Alumni of Williams College, 1885-6." Mrs. Draper 
came to Groton to live, about the year 1845, for the purpose 
of educating the son and a daughter (Lydia Rutter Draper, 
now the wife of the Reverend Alfred Sereno Hudson), who 
both attended school at Lawrence Academy. She lived in 
a small house, then recently built, and afterward owned by 
Mr. P'arley, on the south side of Pleasant Street, near the 
westerly end of Elm Street. The son was married on No- 
vember 22, 1855, to Mary Jane, daughter of Calvin and Abi- 
gail (Rutter) Fuller, of Dedham, who was born on September 
2, 1824 ; and at that time he was a resident of Saxonville. 
He graduated at the Berkshire Medical Institution, Pittsfield, 
in the Class of 1863, and joined the Massachusetts Medical 
Society in the year 1865. 

Dr. Draper and I were scholars together, and in the same 
class under the instruction of Mr. Means. We left the school 
at the same time and went to college in the early autumn of 
1847, — he to Williams and I to Harvard, — and we each 
graduated four years later. As I look back on my school 
days, I remember no boy with whom I had any pleasanter 
relations than I had with Joe Draper. 

Joseph Rutter Draper, son of Ira and Eunice (Rutter) 
Draper, was born at Wayland, Mass., June 30, 1830. At the age 
of fourteen, very soon after his father's death, his mother removed 
to Groton to educate her two children in the Lawrence Academy. 
He there prepared for College, and took the full course. 

After graduation he spent several years in teaching at Dedliam, 
P'ramingham, and Milford. While teaching he studied medicine in 
a general way, and then took the reguhir course at the Medical Col- 
lege in Pittsfield and a course of Lectures in Harvard. In the 

8 



58 OTHER PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

fall of 1862 Dr. Draper went to Washington and received the ap- 
pointment of medical Cadet, and was sent to the Armory Square 
Hospital as assistant to Dr. Bliss. His advantages were great, and 
he remained a year during the battles of the Peninsula. He was 
then commissioned Assistant Surgeon, and at the solicitation of 
the Eleventh Rhode Island Heavy Artillery he was appointed 
surgeon of the battalion, which was ordered immediately to Texas. 
After a few months they were sent into Louisiana, where he re- 
mained until the close of the war. In the following November, 
after receiving his discharge papers, he moved to South Boston, 
where he built up a wide and lucrative practice. "On the 25th of 
June he was taken violently ill with acute laryngitis ; after two days 
the inflammation extended to the lungs ; he had double pneu- 
monia, survived the acute stage of the disease, and for a few days 
improved, but soon showed unfavorable symptoms which baffled 
the skill of the physicians, and he died August 5, 1885. At the 
request of the physicians an autopsy was held, and trouble was 
found that dated back to his army life." 

Dr. Draper was a member of the South Boston Medical Club, 
Councillor of the State Medical Society, member of the Grand 
Army Dahlgren Post, of the Congregational Club, and of Park 
Street Church. 

He had married Mary Jane Fuller, of Dedham, in [November 22] 
1855. A daughter died in infancy; a son bearing his father's name 
graduated at Williams last year, and is now in the Harvard Medical 
school. [He graduated in the Class of 1888.] 

His classmate, Hon. James White, and others speak in the high- 
est terms of Dr. Draper as a skillful physician and an earnest 
Christian man. " By his integrity of character. Christian deport- 
ment, purity of heart and life, and by his constant thoughtfulness 
for the welfare of others, he won a large place in the esteem of all 
with whom he came in contact." (Pages 26, 27.) 

Dr. Samuel William Fletcher is a son of Samuel and 
Elizabeth (Corey) Fletcher, and was born at Groton, on Sep- 
tember 18, 183 1. When he was eight years old, his father's 
family removed to Hollis, New Hampshire. In the year 
1846 he began to attend school at Lawrence Academy, and 
graduated at the Harvard Medical School in the Class of 
1858. He became a member of the Massachusetts Medical 



OTHER PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 59 

Society in 1861. During the War of the Rebellion he served 
in the Thirty-second Massachusetts Volunteers, being com- 
missioned, — first, on August 15, 1863, as Assistant Surgeon 
of the regiment ; and, secondly, on June i, 1865, as Surgeon. 
He was mustered out of the service on June 29, 1865. Dr. 
Fletcher was married at Pepperell, on December i, 1868, to 
Martha, daughter of John Newton and Sarah (Holden) 
Worcester, of Hollis. For the last thirty years he has been 
a resident of Pepperell, where he is still in practice. 



Dr. Luther Parker Fitch was a son of John, Jr., and 
Lucy Lawrence (Sawtell) P'itch, and born at Groton, on 
March 26, 1836. He attended school at Lawrence Academy, 
and graduated at Beloit College in the Class of i860; and he 
took his medical degree at the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, New York, in the year 1863. He died on Tuesday, 
February 26, 1889 ; and the following notice of him is found 
in "The Iowa Citizen " (Charles City, Iowa), March i, 1889: 

Fitch — At his residence in Charles City, on Thursday [Tuesday] 
afternoon, Feb. 19 [26], 1889, after a brief illness from pneu- 
monia, Dr. L. 1^ Fitch, aged 53 years and i month 1 11 months]. 

Luther P. Fitch was born at Groton, Mass., March 26, 1836. 
When he was about three years of age, his family removed to 
Cherry Valley, 111., and settled on a farm. He received nearly all 
his early education at Lawrence Academy, an institution in his 
native town. Four years he attended Beloit College, from which 
he graduated in i860. He spent a few months in the medical de- 
partment of Michigan University and then entered the college of 
Physicians and Surgeons at New York City, graduating in 1863 
Shordy after leaving school he was appointed Surgeon of the 47th 
Colored Infantry, with whom he remained until the close of the war. 
In 1868 he came to Charles City. We quote from County History : 
" Here he met with deserved success as a practitioner, and is well 
and favorably known throughout the county as a skillful and reli- 
able physician. On Oct. 13, 1869, he married Martha Baker of 
Berlin, Wis. Two children have blessed their union, Charles L. 
and Lucy." Dr. Fitch was a member of the American Medical 



6o OTHER PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

Association and of the Iowa Medical Society. He had been a 
Vice-President of the Iowa Association. For ten years he was 
a member of the Charles City School Board. For many years he 
had been a member of the Congregational church and at the time 
of his death was Clerk of the Society. He was always an enthu- 
siastic and helpful Sunday School worker. For twenty-one years 
he had been a citizen of this town and had won friends in all 
parts of the county. His influence had always been given on the 
side of right and justice, and his reputation has been that of a 
public-spirited citizen and a clean principled man. The funeral 
was held at the house this morning at lo o'clock. 

For a reference to his father's family, see Volume II. (page 
287) of this Historical Series. 

Dr. John Gray Park is a son of John Gray and Mary 
(Thayer) Park, and was born at Groton, on January 3, 1838. 
He attended school at Lawrence Academy, and graduated at 
Harvard College in the Class of 1858. Immediately after- 
ward he began the study of medicine, and in May, 1861, was 
chosen one of the house physicians at the Massachusetts 
General Hospital. On February 19, 1862, he was appointed 
Acting Assistant Surgeon in the Navy, and ordered to the 
" Victoria," on the coast of North Carolina. In the summer 
of 1864 an attack of illness forced him to obtain leave of ab- 
sence, which he spent at his home in Groton. On November 
6, 1865, he received an honorable discharge from the naval 
service. He graduated at the Harvard Medical School in the 
Class of 1866, and began the practice of his profession in 
Worcester. On October 22, 1872, he was married to Eliza- 
beth Bigelow, daughter of the Honorable Asa Farnsworth 
and Sarah Jane (Bancroft) Lawrence, of Groton. Shortly 
before his marriage Dr. Park was appointed Assistant Super- 
intendent of the Lunatic Hospital at Worcester, and on 
March i, 1877, was made Superintendent, when he took 
charge of the new buildings of the institution, then approach- 
ing completion. He joined the Massachusetts Medical Soci- 
ety in the year 1867. 

For a reference to his father's family, see Volume II. (page 
298) of this Historical Series. 



OTHER PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 6l 

Dr. George Francis Siiattuck was a son of Walter and 
Roxana (Fletcher) Shattuck, and born at New Ipswich, New 
Hampshire, on July 28, 1838. He passed his boyhood at 
Groton, and received his early education at Lawrence Acad- 
emy. (See page 306 of Volume H. of this Historical Series 
for a reference to the family.) At the outbreak of the War of 
the Rebellion, he served as Third Lieutenant of Company B, 
Sixth Regiment Massachusetts Militia, from April 22, 1861, to 
May 2, when he was commissioned as First Lieutenant, and 
acted in that capacity until the return of the regiment on 
August 2. He had previously begun the study of medicine, 
under the tuition of Dr. George Stearns, of Groton, and at- 
tended three courses of lectures at the Harvard Medical 
School, where he took the degree of M. D. in the Class of 
1862. Soon after graduation he was commissioned, on Au- 
gust 31, 1862, as Captain of his former company, when the 
same regiment went into the field for nine months' service, 
returning on June 3, 1863 ; and again he was commissioned 
as Captain of the same company, on July 17, 1864, when the 
regiment went into the field for three months, being mustered 
out on October 27. Dr. Shattuck joined the Massachusetts 
Medical Society in the year 1863. fie was married at West- 
brook, Maine, on September 15, 1868, to Cynthia J. Morrill. 
His death took place at Wilcox, Orange County, Florida, on 
November 7, 1884. -, 

Dr. William Henry Harrison Lewis is a son of William 
Crosby and Emeline Augusta (Bellows) Lewis, and was born 
at Groton, on November 30, 1840. He received his early 
education at Lawrence Academy, and graduated at the Belle- 
vue Hospital Medical College, New York, in the Class of 
1864. On December 24, 1861, he was married to Serene, 
daughter of Jonathan and Maria Ann (Churchill) Buffington, 
of Roxbury, who was at the time eighteen years of age. The 
marriage did not prove to be a happy one ; and on September 
10, 1870, Mrs. Lewis obtained a divorce from her husband. 
During: the domestic troubles she had the undivided confi- 
dence and sympathy of all her friends. Dr. Lewis is now 
practising his profession at Bergen Point, New Jersey. 



62 OTHER PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

Dr. Richard Bulkley Potter is a son of Luther Fitch 
and Lydia Prescott (Ames) Potter, and was born at Groton, 
on January 15, 1845. His middle name was inserted by an 
Act of the Legislature, on May 23, 1851. Many years ago his 
family removed from Groton to Cincinnati, where the father 
died on December 2, 1884. The son graduated at the Medical 
College of Ohio, Cincinnati, in the Class of 1866, and is now 
practising his profession at Figulus, Dade County, Florida. 
Dr. Potter has been a member of the Legislature of that 
State. 

For a reference to his father's family, see Volume IL (page 
307) of this Historical Series. 

Dr. William Chauncy Hall Needham was the eldest 
child of Colonel Daniel and Caroline Augusta (Hall) Need- 
ham, and born at Groton, on August 18, 1845. ^^ ^0°^ 
the degree of M. D. at the Berkshire Medical Institution, 
Pittsfield, on October i, 1867, and again at the Jefferson 
Medical College, Philadelphia, on March 7, 1868. Dr. Need- 
ham began the practice of his profession at Gallipolis, Ohio, 
where he was the City Physician during the years 1877 and 
1878. On October 4, 1870, he was married to Florence 
Adele, daughter of Charles and Emilie (Creuzet) Henking. 
He died on January 12, 1882, in Columbus, Ohio, while a 
member of the Senate of that State. 

For a reference to his father's family, see Volume H. (page 
297) of this Historical Series. 

Dr. Edward Addison Wood was a son of the Reverend 
William and Lucy Maria (Lawrence) Wood, and born on 
May 8, 1848, in Bombay, India, where his parents were mis- 
sionaries. After the death of his mother, on August 13, 185 1, 
he was sent with a younger brother to Groton, where he was 
brought up in the family of his grandfather, the late Deacon 
Curtis Lawrence. He began to attend school at Lawrence 
Academy in the year 1858, and graduated at the Harvard 
Medical School in the Class of 1869, when he was of Groton. 
For several years Dr. Wood practised his profession at North 



OTHER PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 63 

Branford, Connecticut, when his health gave out, and he died 
at the Retreat for the Insane, Hartford, on July 18, 1886 ; as 
also his father a few months later, at the same institution, on 
February 22, 1887. 

Dr. Joseph Morrill Putnam is a son of Osgood and 
Rhoda Ann (Hall) Putnam, and was born at Groton, on May 
26, 1848. He was educated at Lawrence Academy, and grad- 
uated at the Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York, 
in the Class of 1870. He began the practice of his profes- 
sion in Chelsea, where, on February 25, 1875, he was married 
to Harriet A,^ daughter of Sabin Holbrook and Arabella E ^ 
(Hunter) Kimball, and a native of Lubec, Maine. Dr. Put- 
nam was the City Physician of Chelsea from the year 1H75 to 
1887, and was Visiting Surgeon at the Soldiers' Home in 
Massachusetts from January i, 1884, to January i, 1887. He 
was first chosen City Physician in P"ebruary, 1875, and for 
five years re-elected annually, when there was a change in the 
method of election; and in 1881 and 1884 he received an 
appointment to the same office, each term being for three 
years. He became a fellow of the Massachusetts Medical 
Society in June, 1877. 

Dr. William Lawrence Sprague was a son of Seth Ed- 
ward and Harriet Bordman (Lawrence) Sprague, and born 
in Boston, on July 21, 1849. He graduated at Harvard Col- 
lege in the Class of 1871 ; and, while pursuing his profes- 
sional studies, lived at Groton during more than a year. He 
took his degree of M. D. at the Harvard Medical School in 
the Class of 1881, and began the practice of his profession 
in Boston. Dr. Sprague was giving every promise of suc- 
cess, when he died, unmarried, on June 22, 1884. He was a 
grandson of William Lawrence, of Boston, and a great-grand- 
son of Major Samuel Lawrence, of Groton. He joined the 
Massachusetts Medical Society in the year 1881. 

Dr. Herbert Franklin Willl\ms is a son of Samuel 
and Clarissa (Hartwell) Williams, and was born at Groton, on 

' These letters do not stand for any name. 



64 OTHER PHYSICIANS OF GROTON. 

April 5, 1850. He received his early education at Lawrence 
Academy, Groton, and graduated at the Medical Department 
of the University of the City of New York in the Class of 
1873. On June 24, 1885, he was married to Julia Whitehead, 
daughter of Dr. John Gordon and Julia Amanda (Whitehead) 
Howard, of Savannah, Georgia ; and they have one daughter, 
Isabel Lathrop Williams, born on October 23, 1886. Dr. 
Williams is a member of the Kings County Medical Society, 
and of the New York Academy of Medicine, and moreover 
is connected with numerous other medical associations and 
institutions. He is now a resident of Brooklyn, New York, 
and lives at No. 450 Classon Avenue in that city. 



CITY PHYSICIANS. 

The following natives of Groton have served as City Phy- 
sicians, in their respective localities, during the years set 
against their names : — 

Samuel Abbott Green, Boston, 1871-1881. 

Joseph Morrill Putnam, Chelsea, 1 875-1 887. 

William Chauncy Hall Needham, Gallipolis, Ohio, 1877-78. 



Note. — Dr. Jeremy Stimson, mentioned on page 17, joined the 
Massachusetts Medical Society in the 3'ear 1810; Dr. Amos Ban- 
croft (page iS) in 1808; Dr. Micah Eldredge (page 22) in 1817; 
Dr. George Stearns (page 25) in 1836 ; Dr. James Merrill Cummings 
(page 29) in 18473 Dr. Rufus Shackford (page 30) in 1847; E)'"- 
Norman Smith (page 31) in 1865 ; Dr. Lemuel Fuller (page 32) in 
1852 ; Dr. Kendall Davis (page 34) in 18343 and Dr. John Quincy 
Adams McCollester (page 40) in 1857. 



THE DENTISTS OF GROTON, 



THE DENTISTS OF GROTON. 

Dentistry, a kindred art to medicine, began to be prac- 
tised in New luigland during the Revolution, though at that 
period with many crudities. With its advanced schools, as a 
twin sister of the medical profession, it now challenges public 
attention and respect. For this reason I purpose to give, in 
connection with the present number of the Historical Series, 
an account of the dentists of Groton, and to include among 
them those natives of the town who have practised elsewhere. 

The earliest dentist established here, of whom 1 can find 
any trace, was Dr. Lewis B. Allen, who was married in 
September, 1840, at Owego, New York, to Emily S. Pinney. 
In the "Groton Literary Journal," May 15, 1843, the only 
number of a paper under that name, edited by the students of 
Groton Academy, is a notice of a Temperance meeting on 
May 4, which mentions Dr. Allen as giving a toast or senti- 
ment on the occasion. According to my recollection of the 
affair, it was a kind of formal opening of the new Temperance 
House, at that time just started by Thomas T. Farnsworth, 
and then considered a great innovation on existing customs. 
In the " Groton Post and Business Adv^ertiser," June, 1843, 
Dr. Allen has an advertisement, which says that he has "spent 
some time with one of the first Dentists in New York," that 
he intends to make Groton "his place of residence," and that 
" he is able to perform the most difficult operations with the 
least possible inconvenience." He left Groton soon after- 
ward, and died a long time ago in Trenton, New Jersey ; and 
his widow, some years later, in Towanda, Pennsylvania. Dr. 
E. Y. White, of Cambridgeport, writes me that he first knew 
Dr. Allen in the year 1844, when he had an office over Arte- 
mas Wood's store, and boarded in Mrs. Child's house ; and 
that Mrs. Allen was a sister of the Reverend Alfred Pinney, 
v/ho came to Groton and was settled over the Baptist Society 

y 



66 THE DENTISTS OF GROTON. 

during the summer of 1843, — largely through the instrumen- 
tality of Dr. Allen, 

Dr. Charles Elliot Thompson was a son of Deacon 
Asa and Betsey (Darrah) Thompson, and born at Chester- 
field, New Hampshire, on October 10, 18 10. He studied 
dentistry with his uncle, Dr, Robert Darrah, of Lowell, and 
in the year 1843 came to Groton, where he opened an office 
in the Brazer dwelling, which was then kept as a boarding- 
house by William Austin Bancroft. It now belongs to the 
Academy, and is occupied by Mrs. Sibley. Subsequently he 
had an office in Jonas Eaton's boarding-house, opposite to 
the Orthodox Meeting-house, later in Dr. Amos B. Bancroft's 
dwelling, and afterward in Mr. Shumway's house. He re- 
mained in Groton until the year 1859, when he went to Bos- 
ton, where he continued to practise his profession until a 
short time before his death, which took place in Worcester, 
on February 3, 1865. 

Dr. Thompson was married at Cambridge, on September 
16, 1864, to Mary Abigail, daughter of Leonard and Sibyl 
Winship (Newell) Whiting, a native of Pepperell. 

Dr. Edward Y. White, who studied dentistry in Dr. Thomp- 
son's office, gives me some of his recollections of the man. 
He says that he was very neat and particular in his personal 
appearance, and remarkably skilful as an operator as well 
as accurate in all mechanical details. One of his rules was 
never to deceive a patient, especially a child, in regard to 
the pain of an operation, although he always made the most 
favorable statement that the truth would allow. In the 
days of Dr. Thompson's pupilage there were no Dental 
Schools or Colleges ; and the study of the profession was 
then always with a private teacher, who was supposed to have 
some dental methods and secrets which were revealed only to 
his own students. Dr. White remembers Dr. Darrah, and 
says that, before coming to Lowell, he had lived in Washing- 
ton, D. C, where he acquired a large and successful practice ; 
and among his patients was President Madison's family. 
During the latter years of his life, owing to ill health, he was 
obliged to give up all active business. 



I 



THE DENTISTS OF GROTON. G'J 

Dr. Edward Young White is a son of Deacon Samuel 
and Susannah (Young) White, and was born at Groton on 
August 4, 1 8 19. He began the study of dentistry with Dr. 
Thompson, of Groton, in 1844, and remained with him for 
several years, during which period he practised his profes- 
sion, more or less, in the towns of Amherst and Milford, New 
Hampshire, and in Littleton. On November 24, 1853, he 
was married to Agnes Thompson, daughter of William and 
Clarissa (Carkin) Chamberlin, of Littleton. In 1853 he 
established himself at Leominster, where he remained for 
twelve years. He next removed to Charlestown, living there 
for one year, and then settled in Cambridgeport, where he 
has been in successful practice during more than twenty 
years. His office is now at No. 603 Main Street, Central 
Square. Dr. White was among the earliest dentists to ap- 
preciate the importance of the anaesthetic properties of ether 
in their operations, and from the time of its discovery to the 
present day, he has been in the habit of using it in his 
practice. 

Dr. David Stockbridge White is a son of Deacon 
Samuel and Susannah (Young) White, and was born at 
Groton, on November 6, 1822. On May 5, 1854, he was 
married to Lucy Anna, daughter of Cyrus and Lucy (South- 
wick) Barker, of Littleton ; and they have two children, 
Edxvin Markland, born in Boston, on February 10, 1855, and 
Fannie Fletcher, born in Charlestown, on May 4, 1858. In 
the year 1861 he began the study of dentistry at Leominster, 
under the instruction of his brother. Dr. E. Y. White. After 
the completion of the course he established himself at Charles- 
town, where he still remains in active practice. 

The homestead where these two brothers were born and 
brought up is situated between Sandy and Spectacle Ponds, 
in the old School District No. 11, and comes now within the 
limits of Ayer. 

Dr. William Henry Harrison Hinds is a son of Abner 
and Betsey (Pierce) Hinds, and was born at Milan, New 



68 THE DENTISTS OF GROTON. 

Hampshire, on January 20, 1821. He studied dentistry, first 
in Fitchburg and afterward in Boston, and began the practice 
of liis profession at Gardner, where he remained for eight 
years. On September 10, 1852, he was married at Chelsea 
to Ellen Elizabeth Mooney, who was born in the parish of 
Garvaghy, County of Down, Ireland, on May i, 1831. In 
the spring of 1859 he came to Groton Junction and opened 
an office, being the first resident dentist in the village, as he 
had previously been at Gardner. After the breaking out of 
the Rebellion, he was commissioned on August i, 1861, as 
Lieutenant in the Sixteenth Massachusetts Volunteers, which 
position he held until November 9, when he resigned. On 
July 31, 1862, he received a commission as Captain in the 
Thirty-third Massachusetts Volunteers and remained in the 
military service until May 7, 1863. Soon afterward he re- 
sumed the practice of his profession at Groton Junction, 
where he continued until the year 1879, when he removed to 
Kennebunkport, Maine, in which place he is now living. 

Dr. James Dennis Brown was a son of James, Jr., and 
Betsey (Carter) Brown, and born at East Princeton, on 
September 17, 1825. In the spring of 1850 he began the 
study of dentistry under the instruction of Dr. Thomas 
Palmer, of Fitchburg, with whom he afterward was asso- 
ciated as a partner. In the year 1859 he came to Groton 
Junction, where he remained until the spring of 1877. Dr. 
Brown was married in Boston, first, on January 22, 1862, to 
Mary Frances, daughter of Anson and Elizabeth A. Peck. 
She was a native of Boston, and died at Groton, on February 
13, 1866, aged 25 years, 6 months, and 28 days. He was mar- 
ried, secondly, to Ella, a sister of the first wife. Dr. Brown 
died in Worcester on September 2, 1878. 

Dr. Eliphalet Ripley Blanchard was a son of Na- 
thaniel and Hannah (Ripley) Blanchard, and born at Wey- 
mouth, in July, 1820. He was the teacher of music in Law- 
rence Academy from the year 1845 to 1847, as ^^^^ ^s for one 
year at a later period ; and also in the State Normal School, 



THE DENTISTS OF GROTON. 69 

Bridge water, from 1855 to i860. He was married in Boston, 
on December 26, 1850, first, to Mrs. Sarah Olive (Hall) King, 
daughter of Joseph Fletcher and Sally (Moors) Hall, of 
Groton. She was born on May 8, 181 1, and died of con- 
sumption on November 7, 1867; her first husband was Daniel 
C. King. Dr. Blanchard studied dentistry with Dr. C. E. 
Thompson, and in i860 began the practice of his profession 
at Groton, where he remained until 1864. He subsequently 
practised in South Weymouth and Boston, and later removed 
to Chelsea, where he was married, on December 25, 1870, 
secondly, to Mary Mehitable, daughter of Zachariah Tarbox 
and Ann Norton (Butler) Milliken, born at Farmington, 
Maine, on July 19, 1832. Dr. Blanchard died of consumption 
at Chelsea, on October 19, 1883, aged 63 years, 3 months, 
and 17 days, leaving a widow and two children, Alice Ripley, 
born on September 2, 1871, and Frederic, on May 8, 1877. 

Dr. Franklin Earland Gilson is a son of John Mc- 
Keen and Fanny (Blood) Gilson, and was born at Groton, 
on September 7, 1852. He studied his profession with the 
Colton Dental Association in Boston, and in the spring of 
1880 began practice at Groton, where he has since remained, 
occupying until recently the chambers of the Brick Store. On 
December 31, 1881, he was married to Mary Almira, daughter 
of John and Mary (Townsend) Blood, of Holbrook. 

Dr. Gilson is a nephew of Mrs. Susanna (Blood) Prescott, 
who was so cruelly murdered in the southeasterly part of 
Groton, on November 11, 1885 (see Volume H. page 163); 
and it is to her that he owes his middle name. She was a 
nurse of some local repute, and many years ago it fell to her 
lot, in that capacity, to take care of a young Norwegian, Pcder 
A, Erlund by name, who was sick. He was then a scholar 
at Lawrence Academy, and an inmate of Mr. Butler's family. 
The patient made such a favorable impression on the nurse, 
that years afterward she insisted that her little nephew should 
take his surname, which is now perpetuated as Earland. 

See the first volume of this Historical Series (No. IX. 
page 26), for reference to the name of Dr. Gilson's father. 



70 THE DENTISTS OF GROTON. 

Dr. John Edwin Graves is a son of John Jackson and 
Lucy (Pollard) Graves, and was born at Groton on July i6, 
1855. He received his early education at Lawrence Acad- 
emy, and subsequently studied dentistry at the Boston Dental 
College, where he graduated in the Class of 1879. Imme- 
diately afterward he began the practice of his profession in 
Boston, which he still continues, having an office in Hollis 
Street. 

For an account of his father's family, see Volume II. of this 
Historical Series (pages 289, 290). 



MARRIAGES. J I 



MARRIAGES. 

January 5, 1758. Dr. Stanton Prentice, of Lancaster, to Rebecca 
Stevens, of Groton. 

Dr. Prentice was a son of the Reverend John and Mary 
(Gardner) Prentice, and a native of Lancaster, where he died 
on December i, 1769, aged 58 years. He was married, first, 
on June 26, 1740, to Mercy Jennison, of Watertown, who died 
on October 26, 1756; and by the two wives there were six- 
teen children. The last wife was married, secondly, on Sep- 
tember 6, 1772, to Dr. Israel Atherton, of Lancaster, and died 
a widow on May 15, 1823, aged 86 years. 

April 23, 1760. Dr. Phinehas Phelps, of Lancaster, to Sarah 
Green, of Groton. 

Dr. Phelps was a son of Edward and Mary Phelps, of Lan- 
caster, and born on January 16, 1732-3. He died on August 
12, 1770, aged 37 years. 

February 10, 1768. Dr. Jonas Marshall, of Chelmsford, to Mary 
Parker, of Groton. 

1802. Dr. Samuel Lovejoy, of Townsend, to Betsey Lawrence, 
of Groton. 

She was a daughter of Amos and Betty (Hubbard) Law- 
rence, and born on June 24, 1782. See "The Genealogy 
of the Family of John Lawrence " (Boston, 1869), pages 64, 
114, 115 ; and also Sawtelle's History of Townsend (page 
291), for an account of Dr. Lovejoy. 

April 27, 1826. Dr. Lemuel Maxcy Barker, of Boston, to Sally 
Merchant Richardson, of Groton. 

She was a daughter of the Honorable William Merchant 
and Betsey (Smith) Richardson, and died at Maiden, on 
March i, 1880. See Chace's History of Chester, New Hamp- 
shire (pages 312, 313), and the Dartmouth Necrology for 
1880-81 (page 16), for an account of Dr. Barker. 



72 MARRIAGES. 

If 
April 24, 1828. Dr. Joseph Reynolds, of Concord, New Hamp- 
shire, to Lucy Prescott, of Groton. 

She was a daughter of the Honorable James, Jr., and 
Hannah (Champney) Prescott. See " The Prescott Memorial " 
(page 106), for an account of her family ; and Chace's History 
of Chester, New Hampshire (page 313), for an account of 
Dr. Reynolds. He studied medicine under the instruction of 
Dr. James Prescott Chaplin at Cambridgeport, and graduated 
at the Harvard Medical School in the Class of 1827. 

November 28 (Thanksgiving day), 1850. Dr. Luther Franklin 
Locke, of Nashua, New Hampshire, to Sarah Follansbee Williams, 
of Groton. 

She was a daughter of Josiah Sartell and Lydia (Simonds) 
Williams, and died in Nashua, on May 5, 1861. Dr. Locke 
was born at Langdon, New Hampshire, on November 3, 1820, 
and attended school at Phillips Academy, Andover. He 
graduated at Middlebury College in the Class of 1845, and 
at the Harvard Medical School in 1849. 

Dr. Locke is still a resident of Nashua, where he practises 
dentistry. According to a notice in " The Railroad Mer- 
cury "(Groton Junction), from January 3, 1861, to September 
26, 1 86 1, at that period he used to come to Groton on the 
first Monday of each month, to practise his profession, meet- 
ing his patients at Dr. Spaulding's ofBce ; and to Groton 
Junction, on the second Monday of each month, for the same 
purpose. 

September 7, 1865. Dr. Isaac Newton Kerlin, of Media, Penn- 
sylvania, to Harriet Caroline Dix, of Groton. 

She is a daughter of Benjamin Perkins and Caroline (Ward) 
Dix, born on September 2, 1842, and a great-granddaughter 
of General Artemas Ward, who was married at Groton, on 
July 31, 1750, to Sarah, daughter of the Reverend Caleb and 
Hannah (Walter) Trowbridge. General Ward was a friend 
of Washington, and the first Major-General of the Revolu- 
tionary Army. 

Dr. Kerlin is a son of Joseph and Sarah Ann Kerlin, and a 
native of Burlington, New Jersey. 



APPENDIX. 



MEDICAL STUDENTS. 

The following sketches give the names of all the scholars 
of Lawrence Academy, so far as they could be obtained, who 
have afterward studied medicine. By an Act of the Legisla- 
ture, on February 28, 1846, the name of Groton Academy was 
changed to Lawrence Academy ; and I have designated the 
school by the title which it bore when they were students. 

Dr. John Locke Alexander is a son of Asa and Abigail 
(Alexander) Alexander, and was born at Winchester, New Hamp- 
shire, on December 21, 1806. He began to attend Groton Acad- 
emy in the year 1827, and graduated at Amherst College in the 
Class of 1831. He attended a course of lectures at the Medical 
College of South Carolina, Charleston, and for a year or two prac- 
tised in the State of Florida ; and later attended another course at 
the Berkshire Medical Institution, Pittsfield, where he graduated in 
the Class of 1835. On October 17, 1850, he was married at West 
Cambridge to Mrs. Rebecca (Perry) Whitney, daughter of James 
and Rebecca (Brown) Perry, who died on October 8, 18S2. From 
the year 1855 to 1859 Dr. Alexander was the postmaster of Bel- 
mont, before it was incorporated as a town ; and he is now a resident 
of the place, hale and hearty for one of his years. 

Dr. Charles Amory is a son of Thomas Coffin and Hannah 
Rowe (Linzee) Amory, and was born in Boston, on May 10, 1808. 
He began to attend school at Groton Academy in the year 1820, 
and afterward studied medicine, graduating at the Harvard Medical 
School in the Class of 1832. On October 15, 1832, he was married 
to Martha Babcock, daughter of Gardiner and Elizabeth Clarke 
(Copley) Greene. He never engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession, but for many years was the treasurer of the Manchester 
Print Works, and the president of the Stark Mills, at Manchester, 
New Hampshire ; and he is now a resident of Cambridge. 



74 MEDICAL STUDENTS. 

Dr. George Frederic Barker is a son of George and Lydia 
Pierce (Pollard) Barker, and was born in Charlestown, on July 14, 
1835. He began to attend school at Lawrence Academy in the 
year 1849, when he was of South Berwick, Maine. He graduated 
at the Scientific School of Yale College in the Class of 1858, and 
subsequently took the degree of M. D. from the Albany Medical 
College in 1863. Dr. Barker has never engaged in the active 
practice of medicine, but has devoted his time to scientific studies. 
He has filled professorships at different institutions, and is now the 
Professor of Physics in the University of Pennsylvania, Phila- 
delphia. Plis published writings have been numerous, and they 
consist chiefly of public addresses and papers on scientific subjects. 
In recognition of his attainments he has received from the French 
Government a decoration of the Legion of Honor, with the rank of 
Commander. He is married and has a family. 

Dr. Thomas Crumbie Barker was a son of Deacon David and 
Sally (Crumbie) Barker, and born at Rindge, New Hampshire, in 
the year 1803. He began to attend school at Groton Academy in 
1820, and graduated at the Dartmouth Medical School in the Class 
of 1829. At one time he practised his profession in Yucatan, 
Central America, and later in Bangor, Maine, where he died on 
October 30, 1870. During the War of the Rebellion Dr. Barker 
was commissioned as Surgeon of the Seventh Maine Volunteers, 
on August 21, 1861, and two days later he left with his regiment 
for the South. He resigned the surgeoncy on December 20, 1861, 
and soon afterward accepted a position of Acting Assistant Surgeon 
in a hospital. 

Dr. William Henry Bass was a son of Henry, Jr., and 
Elizabeth (Bullard) Bass, and born in Boston, on August 15, 1801. 
He went to school at Groton Academy in the year 18 14, and gradu- 
ated at Harvard College in the Class of 1819. He began the 
study of medicine, and during the next winter attended a course 
of lectures at the Harvard Medical School, but he does not appear 
to have taken the degree of M. D. He died in Boston, on May 31, 
1826. According to ''The Massachusetts Register " for the year 
1826 (page 226), he was a practising physician in Boston. 

Dr. Thomas Richardson Boutelle was a son of David and 
Dameris (Richardson) Boutelle, and born at Leominster, on June 9, 



MEDICAL STUDENTS. 75 

1795. He attended school at Groton Academy in the year 1814, 
and graduated at the Yale Medical School in the Class of 1S19. 
He began the practice of his profession at New Braintree ; but 
subsequently, in 1824, he removed to his native town, and finally, 
in 1833, to Fitchburg, where he died, on July 13, 1S69. During 
the War of the Rebellion he took an active part in the work of the 
relief committee of that town, and for a while was the chairman. 
He joined the Massachusetts Medical Society in the year 1827. 

Dr. Calvin Carter was a son of Dr. James and Susanna 
(Kendall) Carter, and born at Lancaster, on December 4, 1783. 
He attended school at Groton Academy in 1800, and for many 
years practised his profession in his native town. On June 28, 
1806, he was married, — first, to Sally Perry, of Fitchburg, who died 
on April 30, 1S40 ; and on June 14, 1841, secondly, to Lucinda 
Cook. He became a member of the Massachusetts Medical Soci- 
ety in the year 1833, and died at Lancaster, on March 27, 1859. 
His first wife also had been a scholar at the Academy in 1803. 

Dr. Arthur Harris Cowdrey is a son of Harris and Abigail 
(Davis) Cowdrey, and was born at Acton, on January 17, 1836. 
His father was born at South Reading, on October 6, 1802 ; and 
his mother at Acton, on September 28, 1807. He attended school 
at Lawrence Academy during the years 1852 and 1853, and gradu- 
ated at the Harvard Medical School in the Class of 1857. He 
became a member of the Massachusetts Medical Society in the 
year 1S66. On February 16, 1859, Dr. Cowdrey was married, in 
Boston, to Mary Wolcott, daughter of Francis Welch Roberts and 
Mary Baker (Wolcott) Emery. In the spring of 1858 he began to 
practise his profession at Stow, where he remained until August 14, 
1862, when he was commissioned as Assistant Surgeon of the 
Seventh Massachusetts Volunteers. On October 26, 1863, he was 
promoted to the surgeoncy of the United States Colored Troops, 
which position he held until he was mustered out of the service, 
on June 22, 1865. He was present at the Battle of Gettysburg, 
and other engagements. (See " Harvard University in the War of 
1861-1865," page 248.) After the end of the war Dr. Cowdrey 
established himself at Stoneham, w-here he is now living. 

Dr. Right Cummings was a son of Thaddeus and Catherine 
Cummings, and born at Lunenburg about the year 17S6. He 



^6 MEDICAL STUDENTS. 

attended school at Groton Academy in the year 1811, and at that 
time was of Lunenburg. About 1825 he began to practise medi- 
cine at Lancaster, and afterward for some years was a member of 
the school committee of that town. A correspondent in Lancaster 
writes me that " he was of stalwart frame, fair mental ability, and 
kindly nature, but slow of speech, and not gifted with social 
graces." On May i, 1827, he was married to Mary, daughter of 
Silas and Mary (Warren) Lawrence, of Townsend, who died on 
March i, 1867. Dr. Cummings died at Lancaster, on March 24, 
1 88 1, aged 94 years and 3 months. 

Dr. Jonas Cutter was a son of John and Abigail (Demery) 
Cutter, and born at Jaffrey, New Hampshire, on March 6, 1791. 
He began to attend school at Groton Academy in the year 1808, and 
graduated at Dartmouth College in the Class of 181 1. He studied 
medicine under the tuition of Dr. Amos Twitchell, of Keene, and 
Dr. Nathan Smith, of Hanover, and graduated at the Yale Medical 
School in the Class of 18 14, which was the first one sent forth from 
that institution. Dr. Cutter began to practise his profession at 
Meadville, Pennsylvania, but soon afterward removed to Litchfield, 
Connecticut, and thence to Savannah, Georgia, where he went in 
the year 1815. He died at Savannah, on October 7, 1820, during 
an epidemic of yellow fever. 

Dr. James Freeman Dana was the eldest son of Captain Luther 
and Lucy (Giddings) Dana, and born at Amherst, New Hampshire, 
on March 29, 1788. His father was a native of Groton, and his 
grandfather was the minister of the town. He began to attend 
school at Groton Academy in the year 1803, and graduated at Har- 
vard College in the Class of 1813. He studied his profession under 
the tuition of Dr. Amos Bancroft, of Groton, and took the degree 
of M. D. from the Harvard Medical School in the Class of 1817. 
He also received an honorary degree of M. D., as well as of A. M., 
from Dartmouth College in the year 182 1. His given name was 
originally Jonathan, but by an Act of the Massachusetts Legisla- 
ture, February 21, 1820, it was changed to James. He became a 
member of the Massachusetts Medical Society in the year 182 1. 
Dr. Dana took high rank as an author and a scientific man, and 
was chosen to the Professorship of Chemistry in the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, University of New York. On January 
18, 1818, he was married to Matilda, daughter of Samuel and 



MEDICAL STUDENTS. TJ 

Rebecca (Smith) Webber, of Cambridge. Her father had been 
the President of Harvard College. Dr. Dana died in New York, 
on April 15, 1827, leaving a widow and a posthumous daughter 
(Matilda Freeman), born on September 16, 1827. 

Dr. John Dwight was a son of John and Susanna (Harris | 
Moore) Dwight, and born at Shirley, on December 22, 1773. He 
began to attend school at Groton Academy in the year 1 794, and 
graduated at Harvard College in the Class of 1800. He studied 
medicine with Dr. John Jeffries, of Boston, and established himself 
as a physician in that city. Late in life he removed to West Rox- 
bury, where he passed the remainder of his days. He died on 
August 5, 1852, leaving four children, of whom the eldest is John 
Sullivan Dwight, the noted musical critic and scholar. 

Dr. Nathan Brown Edwards is a son of Peter Corning and 
]\Iartha (Brown) Edwards, and was born at Westford, on January 3, 
1820. He fitted for college at Groton Academy, under the tuition 
of Horace Herrick, and in 1840 entered Dartmouth, where he 
remained only one year, but left in order to study medicine. He 
received his instruction from Doctors Elisha Huntington and John 
Butterfield, of Lowell ; and in surgery and anatomy from Dr. 
Gilman Kimball, of the same city. He graduated at the Berk- 
shire Medical Institution, Pittsfield, in the Class of 1844, and on 
April 22, 1845, began the practice of his profession at North 
Chelmsford. Dr. Edwards joined the ALissachusetts Medical 
Society in the year 1846, and is still living at North Chelmsford. 
On October 28, 1845, "^^ ^^^ married, — first, to Maria Hartwell, 
daughter of Gardner and Frances (Grant) Fletcher, of Chelms- 
ford ; and, secondly, on February 29, 1852, to Sibyl Robbins, 
daughter of Eliakim and Sibyl (Robbins) Hutchins, of Westford. 
His first wife died on May 26, 1S51, by wliom there were three 
children, of whom one is now living; and by the second wife live 
children, of whom two are living. Dr. Edwards's mother attended 
school at Groton Academy in the year 18 13. 

Dr. Hezekiah Eldredge was the eldest child of Dr. Micah and 
Sally (Buttrick) Eldredge, and born at Princeton, on February 6, 
1798. He began to attend school at Groton Academy in the year 
1817, and graduated at the Medical Department of Brown Llniver- 
sity in the Class of 1825, having studied his profession under the 



78 MEDICAL STUDENTS. 

direction of Dr. Nehemiah Cutter, of Pepperell. While attending 
the Academy his father was living at Dunstable, but afterward for 
a while became a resident of Groton. The son began the practice 
of medicine in Dunstable, but subsequently, in the year 1833, re- 
moved to Pembroke, New Hampshire, where he remained until 
1840, when he went to Amesbury, Massachusetts, and thence in 
1848 to Milford, New Hampshire. Here he resided until his death, 
which took place on January 25, 1870. Dr. Eldredge was twice 
married, — first, in 1826, to Sarah, daughter of Jonathan and Marga- 
ret (Shattuck) Bennett, who died on April 6, 1846; and, secondly, 
on November i, 1846, to Louisa Gushing, eldest child of Deacon 
Gyrus and Elizabeth (Gushing) Eastman, of Amherst, New Hamp- 
shire. His widow is still living. 

Dr. Samuel Farnsworth was a son of Dr. Samuel and Betsey 
(Fitch) Farnsworth, and born at Bridgton, Maine, on October 19, 
1 79 1. He began to attend school at Groton Academy in the year 
1805, and graduated at Dartmouth College in the Class of 1813. 
He studied medicine first with his father, and then with Dr. George 
G. Shattuck, of Boston, receiving the honorary degree of A. M. 
from his Alma Mater in 18 16, and the same year the degree of 
M. D. from the Dartmouth Medical School. He joined the Massa- 
chusetts Medical Society in the year 1808. On September 16, 
181 7, he was married to Nancy, daughter of Theodore and Dolly 
(Sanborn) Mussey, of Standish, Maine ; and they had six children. 
Dr. Farnsworth settled in his native town, where he continued to 
practise his profession, with the exception of a few months, until 
the day of his death, which occurred on April 13, 1842. During a 
short period in 1823 or 1824 he lived at Portland. His widow died 
on December 19, 1882, (For a notice of Dr. Farnsworth's father, 
see page 3 of this number.) 

Dr. Abel Fox was a son of Joseph and Mary (Tuttle) Fox, and 
born at Fitchburg, on December 25, 1782. He began to attend 
school at Groton Academy in the year 1794, and graduated at Har- 
vard College in the Class of 1801. He studied medicine.with Dr. 
Amos Bancroft, then of Weston, but afterward of Groton, and 
received the degree of M. B. from his Alma Mater in 1804, and the 
degree of M. D. in 1811, which was the first year that the College 
conferred the Doctorate of Medicine in course. Dr. Fox joined the 
Massachusetts Medical Society in 180S, and practised his profession 



MEDICAL STUDENTS. 79 

in Charlestown, and in Savannah, Georgia. He died at the Insane 
Asylum in Worcester, on July 30, 1849. 

Dr. Henry Gibson was a son of Dr. Stillman and Rebecca 
(Chandler) Gibson, and born at New Ipswich, New Hampshire, on 
June 9, 1819. He began to attend school at Groton Academy in 
the year 1837, and afterward studied medicine, and established 
himself in practice in his native town. On March 10, 1842, he was 
married to Sarah Maria, daughter of Timothy R. and Sarah (White) 
Robinson, of Jaffrey, New Hampshire. He died at New Ipswich, 
on July 25, 1844, aged 25 years. 

Dr. Henry Gray was a son of Dr. Joseph and Lucy (Bancroft) 
Gray, and born at Nottingham West, now Hudson, New Hamp- 
shire, on March 27, 1782. He began to attend school at Groton 
Academy in the year 1803, and afterward studied medicine. On 
November 23, 1808, he was married to Margaret Carpenter ; and 
they had ten children. He practised his profession for a short time 
at Mason, New Hampshire, and then removed to Londonderry, 
Vermont, where he died on August 24, 1863. 

Dr. Henry Ephraim Holland was a son of Ephraim and 
Mary (Mead) Holland, and born in Boston, on July 6, 1823. He 
attended school at Groton Academy in the year 1837, his father's 
family then living at Walpole, New Hampshire, and he graduated 
at the Harvard Medical School in the Class of 1846. He began 
to practise his profession at Northfield, and subsequently, in 1849, 
went to California. When the Rebellion broke out, he entered the 
military service of his country, and enlisted in Captain Charles S. 
Eigenbrodt's company of the California Cavalry Battalion, which 
afterward became a part of the Second Massachusetts Regiment of 
Cavalry. While this regiment was recruiting, loyal citizens on the 
Pacific coast offered to raise a company which was to count on the 
quota of Boston ; and the offer was readily accepted. The com- 
pany was organized at San Francisco, on December 10, 1862, and 
arrived at Camp Meigs, on January 3, 1S63 ; and afterward a 
whole battalion was offered and accepted, which also became a 
part of the Second Massachusetts Cavalry. Dr. Holland was 
a private in Company E of this regiment, but on December 1 2, 
1863, he was a contract surgeon in the army, showing that before 
this date he had received his discharge from the enlisted service. 



8o MEDICAL STUDENTS. 

Surgeon Charles R. Greenleaf, United States Army, writes me from 
the Surgeon-General's office, under date of January 14, 1890: — 

Henry E. Holland entered into contract for service as Acting Assistant 
Surgeon, U. S. Army, December 12, 1863, and was on duty as such with 
Captain Means's Independent Virginia Rangers at Point of Rocks, Mary- 
land, until March 31, 1864, — date of termination of contract. 

Again entered into contract for service as Acting Assistant Surgeon, 
on June 23, 1864. On duty in the tield, near Petersburg, Virginia, with 
the Fifty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, from July to November 28, 

1864, when his contract expired. 

Shortly after this time he returned to his old home at Walpole, 
where he remained for a brief period, when he started for New 
Orleans in order again to enter the medical service of his country, 
for which he had already made arrangements. While in Boston, on 
his way South, he was taken down with pneumonia and carried to 
the Massachusetts General Hospital, where he died, unmarried, on 
March 28, 1865, from disease contracted in the army. By an over- 
sight Dr. Holland's name was omitted from the marble tablets in 
the Memorial Hall at Cambridge, which commemorate the sons of 
Harvard who died in consequence of their patriotic service. 

Dr. David Low Huntington is a son of Lynde Atwater and 
Margaret Adams (Low) Huntington, and was born in Charlestown, 
on April 10, 1834. He began to attend school at Lawrence Acad- 
emy in the year 1849, and graduated at Yale College in the Class 
of 1855. He received the degree of M. D. from the Medical De- 
partment of the University of Pennsylvania in the Class of 1857, 
and the degree of A. M. from Yale in 1858. He began the prac- 
tice of his profession in Philadelphia, where he remained until the 
breaking out of the Rebellion. He was married, — first, on May 9, 
i860, to Anna Martha, daughter of William Henry Allen, President 
of Girard College, who died on November 8, 1861 ; and, secondly, 
in September, 1869, to Gertrude Webb. On July 11, 1862, Dr. 
Huntington was commissioned as Assistant Surgeon in the United 
States Army, and on April 28, 1877, as Surgeon ; and on March 13, 

1865, was brevetted Lieutenant-Colonel " for gallant and meritorious 
service during the war." He is still in the military service of his 
country, and at last accounts was stationed in California. 

Dr. Lewis Johnson was a son of Lewis and Elizabeth (Pollard) 
Johnson, and born in the South Parish of Bolton, now Berlin, on 
March 16, 1783. He began to attend school at Groton Academy 



MEDICAL STUDENTS. 8 I 

in the year 1801, and graduated at the University of Vermont, Bur- 
lington, in the Class of 1807. He studied medicine and practised 
at Westmoreland, New Hampshire, where he died in the year 1817. 

Dr. Willi.am Kilbourne was a son of William and Mary (Mace) 
Kilbourne, and born at Lunenburg, on June 12, 1802. He began 
to attend school at Groton Academy in the year 182 1, and graduated 
at the Medical Department of Middlebury College in the Class of 
1833. Dr. Kilbourne was married, — first, to Hannah Eliza Barrett, 
of Townsend, who died at Groton, on August 16, 1842, aged 39 
years ; and, secondly, to Charlotte Bates. He died at Auburn, 
Maine, on July 8, 1870. 

Dr. Nathaniel Kingsbury was a son of Deacon Benjamin and 
Lucretia (Locke) Kingsbury, and born at Rindge, New Hampshire, 
on June 28, 1798. He went to school at Groton Academy first in 
1817, and the same year entered Harvard College, where he re- 
mained two years. He taught school in various places, and attended 
a course of lectures at the Dartmouth Medical School in 1828, subse- 
quently graduating at the Bowdoin Medical School in the Class of 
1829. He began the practice of his profession at Rindge, and in 
1834 removed to the neighboring town of Temple, where he died 
on March 3, 1870. Dr. Kingsbury was married four times, — first, 
in 1827, to Catherine Sawin, who diefl a few months later, on June 
17, 1827; secondly, on November 29, 1832, to Mrs. Linda (Ray- 
mond) Ward, who died on October 15, 1834 ; thirdly, on November 
3,1835, to Mrs. Lydia (Barnes) Patten, who died on August 10, 
1839; and, lastly, on November 11, 1840, to Ann Hazen. In the 
"Columbian Centinel " (Boston), April 7, 1828, is the announce- 
ment of his marriage to a lady of Ashby, where he was then living ; 
and in the number of the same newspaper, April 14, is a card from 
Dr. Kingsbury, denying the truth of the notice. 

Dr. Benjamin Willis Kinsman was a son of Henry Willis and 
Elizabeth (Willis) Kinsman, and born in Boston, on Januarys, 1833. 
He fitted for college at Groton Academy, and graduated at Brown 
University in the Class of 1852. He studied his profession at the 
Boylston Medical School, Boston, and graduated at the Harvard 
Medical School in the Class of 1855. He died of erysipelas, in 
Paris, France, after a fortnight's illness, on November 26, 1855, 
while pursuing his post-graduate studies, and was buried in the 
cemetery of Mont Parnasse. Dr. Kinsman was a nephew of the 
Reverend Dudley Phelps's first wife. 

11 



82 MEDICAL STUDENTS. 

Dr. Jonas Henry Lane was a son of Jonas and Eunice (Ken- 
dall) Lane, and born at Lancaster, on January 29, 1800. He 
began to attend school at Groton Academy in the year 1814, and 
graduated at Harvard College in the Class of 182 1, taking the 
degree of M. D. four years later at the same institution. On 
February 2, 1800, he was baptized under the name of Henry Lane ; 
but by an Act of the Legislature, passed June 18, 1825, this was 
changed as written above. He became a member of the Massa- 
chusetts Medical Society in the year 1837. On October 6, 1830, 
Dr. Lane was married to Frances Ann Brown ; and he died in Bos- 
ton, on September 5, 1861. 

Dr. Timothy Livingston Lane was a son of Captain John and 
Mary (Livingston) Lane, and born at Braintree, on September i, 
1800. He began to attend school at Groton Academy in the year 
1819; studied medicine under the instruction of Dr. James Batch- 
ellor, of Marlborough, New Hampshire, and graduated at the Dart- 
mouth Medical School in the Class of 1824. On October 25, 1825, 
Dr. Lane was married to Roxana, daughter of Kimber and Polly 
(Hazleton) Harvey, of Marlborough, New Hampshire, where his 
father had removed from Braintree in the year 1802. He first 
settled at Sullivan, New Hampshire, in the year 1825, but removed 
to Lunenburg, Vermont, in ,1832 ; here he remained until 1834, 
when he went to Gilsum, New Hampshire, where he lived until 
1838; thence to Daysville, Illinois, where he remained till 1841, 
and then removed to Fillmore in the same State. He continued in 
the active practice of his profession until his death, which occurred 
at Fillmore, on September i, 1S49, ^he forty-ninth anniversary of 
his birthday. His wife died on January i, 1849, just eight months 
before his own death. 

Dr. Luke Lawrence was a son of Daniel and Polly (Johnson) 
Lawrence, and born at Hollis, New Hampshire, on April 14, 1803. 
He began to attend school at Groton Academy in the year 1820, 
and graduated at the Dartmouth Medical School in the Class of 
1828. He established himself in the practice of his profession at 
Lunenburg, and died at Hollis, on January 19, 1832. 

Dr. Henry Lincoln was a son of William and Tabitha (Ken- 
dall) Lincoln, and born at Leominster, on August 11, 1804. He 
began to attend school at Groton Academy in the year 1824, and 



MEDICAL STUDENTS. 83 

graduated at Harvard College in the Class of 1830. He took his 
medical degree at the University of Pennsylvania in 1834, when the 
subject of his essay was Metastasis. Dr. Lincoln established him- 
self at Lancaster in the year 1836, and on February 14, 1838, was 
married to Martha, daughter of Moses and Lucy (Fisk) Bond, of 
Sterling. He joined the Massachusetts Medical Society in the 
year 1841, and died at Lancaster, on February 29, i860. 

Dr. James Porter Lynde was a son of William Sargeant and 
Christiana (Coniee) Lynde, and born at Gardner, on March 19, 
1828. He began to attend school at Lawrence Academy in the 
year 1848, and graduated at the Harvard Medical School in the 
Class of 1852, having studied under the direction of Dr. H. C. 
Harriman, of Gardner, and Dr. Ira Russell, of Winchendon. Before 
graduation he attended one course of lectures at the Dartmouth 
Medical School ; and after receiving his degree of M. D. he settled 
at Hardwick, where he remained until the year 1856, when he re- 
moved to Athol. Dr. Lynde joined the Massachusetts Medical 
Society in 1855. While living at Hardwick he represented the 
town in the General Court ; and at Athol he was prominent in 
every plan for promoting the welfare of his town, and exerted a 
large influence in the neighborhood. Li many ways he served the 
public, and always to the satisfaction of the community. He was 
a member of the School Board, Superintendent of Public Schools, 
Moderator at town-meetings ; and was one of the original Medical 
Examiners appointed under Chapter 200 of the Acts of 1877. At 
the time of his death, which took place in Athol on January 21, 
1890, he was the senior physician of the town. On December 
16, 1857, he was married to Candace E., daughter of John and 
Rue (Holbrook) Brooks. 

Dr. Joseph West Morse was a son of Joseph and Phebe Dear- 
born (West) Morse, and born on January 18, 1819, at Orange, New 
Hampshire, from which town his family removed to Chester in the 
same State, during the year 1832. He began to attend school at 
Groton Academy in 1840, and afterward studied medicine. He 
established himself in Salem, where he remained until his health 
failed, when he returned to his father's home at Chester. Here he 
practised, as his bodily condition would allow, but was obliged 
finally to seek a warmer climate. In October, 1850, he went to 
Jacksonville, Florida, where he died a month later, on November 14 
of that year. 



84 MEDICAL STUDENTS. 

Dr. Isaac Walter Mulliken was a son of Dr. Isaac and 
Hannah Mulliken, and born at Townsend, on May 15, 1799. 
He began to attend school at Groton Academy in the year 18 15, 
and graduated at the Dartmouth Medical School in the Class of 
182 1. He was married at Hopkinton, to Alicia, daughter of Dr. 
Timothy and Mary (Stow) Shepard, and practised medicine at Stow 
during about ten years, when he gave up his profession and re- 
moved to Lowell, where he had charge of the Lowell Bleachery. 
After a residence of two years he accepted the superintendency of 
the Waltham Manufacturing Company's Bleachery, which he held 
until about the year i860. Retiring then from active business, he 
became the President of the American Watch Company, and died 
at Waltham, on April 3, 1873. Dr. Mulliken joined the Massachu- 
setts Medical Society in the year 1828. 

Dr. Ebenezer Parker was a son of Ebenezer and Sally Parker, 
and born in Boston, on September 6, 1806. He began to attend 
school at Groton Academy in the year 18 16, and afterward, for a 
few months, was a pupil at Phillips Academy, Andover. He 
graduated at Yale College in the Class of 1825, and at the Har- 
vard Medical School in 1829. He became a member of the Massa- 
chusetts Medical Society in 1831, and died of consumption in 
Boston, unmarried, on November 6, 1833. 

Dr. James Otis Parker was a son of James, Jr., and Ruth 
(Harkness) Parker, and born at Shirley, on June 5, 181 1. He 
began to attend school at Groton Academy in the year 1820, and 
graduated at Amherst College in the Class of 1834. He afterward 
attended two courses of lectures at the Harvard Medical School, 
and one course at the Berkshire Medical Institution, where he 
graduated in the Class of 1841 ; and the same year he became a 
member of the Massachusetts Medical Society. He at once estab- 
lished himself in his native town, where he spent the remainder of 
his life in the practice of his profession, and in farming, except a 
period of two years and a half passed in California. Dr. Parker 
was twice married, — first, on May 13, 1845, to Martha Lincoln 
Carter, of Lancaster, who died on April 30, 1847 ; and, secondly, 
on January i, 1863, to Harriet Morgan Gould, of Greenfield, who 
died on September 14, 1876. He was a lineal descendant of Cap- 
tain James Parker, one of the early settlers of Groton ; and he died 
of paralysis at Shirley, on May 2, 1883. 



MEDICAL STUDENTS. 85 

Dr. Augustus Fkkderick Peirce was a son of Augustus 
and Mary Messer (Clark) Peirce, and born at Dunstable, now 
Nashua, New Hampshire, on August 11, 1827. He began to 
attend school at Groton Academy in the year 1838, and graduated 
at the Bowdoin Medical School in the Class of 1849. On October 
30, 1850, Dr. Peirce was married at Tyngsborough, to Mary Pitts, 
daughter of William Stoddard and Mary (Pitts) Bridge. He be- 
came a member of the Massachusetts Medical Society in the year 
1851. He died at Tyngsborough, on October 18, 1855. 

Dr. John Pierce was a son of Jonathan and Sarah (Dodge) 
Pierce, and born at Lunenburg, in the year 1785. He began to 
attend Groton Academy in 1804, and afterward practised medicine 

in his native town. He was married twice, — first, to Drucilla , 

and, secondly, to Nancy Crombie ; and he died at Lunenburg, on 
March 12, 1848. 

Dr. Edward Liston Pillsbury was a son of Dr. Levi and 
Elvira Sarah (Bagley) Pillsbury, and born at Fitchburg, on June 
28, 1844. He began to attend school at lawrence Academy, 
Groton, in the year 1862, and graduated at the Dartmouth Medical 
School in the Class of 1865. He began the practice of his profes- 
sion at Fitchburg, but subsequently removed to Boston ; and he 
died unmarried at New Ipswich, New Hampshire, on May 31, 1880. 
Dr. Pillsbury became a member of the Massachusetts Medical Soci- 
ety in the year 1866. For a notice of Dr. Pillsbury, see Volume II. 
(page 357) of this Historical Series. 

Dr. William Richardson was a son of Joseph Scwall and of 
Margaret Richardson, and born in Boston, on March 13, 1788. 
He fitted for college at Groton Academy, and graduated at Bow- 
doin in the Class of 1809, taking the degree of M. D. at the 
Harvard Medical School in the Class of 18 13. Dr. Richardson 
began the practice of his profession at Slaterville, Rhode Island, 
where he remained until he removed to Portsmouth in that State. 
He continued to live at Portsmouth till the year 1838, when he 
established himself at Johnston, Rhode Island, where he was en- 
gaged in practice until his death, which occurred on Sc]Dtember 30, 
18C4. Dr. Richardson was twice married, — first, on May 4, 1815, 
at Newport, Rhode Island, to Mary, daughter of Job Almy ; and, 
secondly, on September 5, 1827, to Jane, daughter of Isaac and 
Elizabeth (Gould) Lawton. He had seven children by his first 



86 MEDICAL STUDENTS. 

wife, of whom one survived him ; and five by his second wife, of 
whom four survived him. 

Dr. Augustus Robbins was a son of Jacob and Olive (Willard) 
Robbins, and born at Harvard, on October 17, 1805. He began 
to attend school at Groton Academy in the year 1827, and after- 
ward graduated at the Harvard Medical School in the Class of 
1832. He settled at first in his native town, where he remained 
eight or ten years, when he removed to Holden, and stayed per- 
haps the same length of time. About the year 1850 he established 
himself in Brooklyn, New York, and died there on September 13, 
1855. In 1832 Dr. Robbins joined the Massachusetts Medical 
Society, and in 1836 was chosen a Trustee of Groton Academy, 
which position he held until 1852. He was married to Juliana 
Wilder, who died on October 23, 1888. She attended school at 
Groton Academy in the year 18 18. 

Dr. Frederic Augustus Sawyer is a son of Samuel and 
Eunice (Houghton) Sawyer, and was born at Sterling, on April 4, 
1832. He began to attend school at Lawrence Academy in the 
year 1850, and graduated at the Harvard Medical School in the 
Class of 1856, having studied his profession in the Tremont Street 
Medical School. He commenced the practice of medicine in his 
native town, succeeding, in July, 1856, to the business of Dr. 
Thomas Hovey Gage, now of Worcester, and the same year 
joined the Massachusetts Medical Society. In June, 1862, he 
removed to Greenfield, and entered into partnership with his 
brother-in-law, Dr. Adam Calhoun Deane, with whom he remained 
until March, 1867, when he went to Wareham, where he is now 
practising. 

During the War of the Rebellion Dr. Sawyer was commissioned, 
on November 19, 1862, as Surgeon of the Fifty-second Massachu- 
setts Militia Regiment, which left the State on December 2 of that 
year. He was present at several battles in Louisiana, and at one 
time, while in charge of a hospital, was taken prisoner, but res- 
cued soon afterward. He was mustered out of the service on 
August 14, 1863. (See " Harvard University in the War of 186 1- 
1865," page 247.) 

Dr. Sawyer was married at Colrain, on July 29, 1856, to Helen 
Maria, daughter of Dr. Christopher and Sarah (Ross) Dean, of 
Colrain. 



MEDICAL STUDENTS. 87 

Dr. Jeremy Shattuck was a son of Ebenezer Lakin and 
Hannah (Tarbell) Shattuck, and born at Pepperell, on January 2, 
1797. He went to school at Groton Academy in the year 181 7, 
and died, unmarried, at Burlington, Vermont, on November 25, 
1822. 

Dr. Albert Smith was a son of Samuel and Sally (Garfield) 
Smith, and born at Peterborough, New Hampshire, on June 18, 
1801. He began to attend school in 1813 at Groton Academy, 
where he remained for three years ; but owing to the depression of 
business which followed the War of 1812, his father did not then 
send him to college, but put him to work in his cotton-mill. Here 
the son remained during five years, when he entered Dartmouth 
College, and graduated in the Class of 1825. The subject of his 
oration at Commencement was the Navigation of the Connecticut 
River. On February 26, 1828, he was married to Fidelia, daughter 
of John and Chloe (Phinney) Stearns, of Jaffrey, New Hampshire. 
After graduation he was employed in his father's business until the 
year 1829, when he decided to enter the medical profession ; and 
he accordingly attended courses of lectures at the Bowdoin Medi- 
cal School, at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, and at the 
Dartmouth Medical School, taking his degree at the latter institu- 
tion in the Class of 1833. He began to practise at Leominster, 
where he remained for five years, and thence removed to his native 
town, where he died on February 22, 1878, full of honor and full 
of years. 

In the year 1849 ^^- Smith was appointed Professor of Materia 
Medica and Therapeutics at Dartmouth College, where he gave 
annual courses of lectures until his resignation in 1870, when he 
was made professor emeritus. On Commencement of that year the 
degree of LL. D. was conferrred on him by his Alma Mater; and 
in 1875 an honorary M. D. by the Rush Medical College, Chicago. 

Dr. John Starr was a son of Dr. Ebenezer and Hannah 
(Blanchard) Starr, and born at Dunstable, on December 3, 1783. 
He began to attend school at Groton Academy in the year i 795, and 
graduated at Harvard College in the Class of 1S04. He afterward 
studied medicine, under the instruction of Dr. Matthias Spalding, 
of Amherst, New Hampshire, and about the year 1808 began the 
practice of his profession at Peterborough, where he remained 
until 1814, when he removed to Northwood in the same State. 



88 MEDICAL STUDENTS. 

During the War of 1812 he served for a short time as Surgeon of 
the Second Regiment of the New Hampshire Detached Militia. 
Dr. Starr was married to Sally Virgin, of Concord, New Hamp- 
shire ; and he died at Northwood, on September 8, 1851, leaving 
a widow, but no children. 

Dr. William Prescott Townsend was a son of William and 
Martha (Wilder) Townsend, and born at Lancaster, on July 25, 
1818. He began to attend school at Groton Academy in the year 
1838, and graduated at the Harvard Medical School in the Class 
of 1845. He practised his profession for some years at Shawan- 
gunk, a village now included in Walkill, Ulster County, New York, 
and then removed to Goshen in that State, where he lived for 
twenty-five years. Dr. Townsend was twice married, — first, to 
Mary Ann Mapes ; and, secondly, at Goshen, on November 12, 
1857, to Hannah Elizabeth, daughter of Garrett and Abigail 
(Thew) Thew. He died at Goshen, on December 25, 1876. 

Dr. John Flavel Tyler was a son of Edward and Alma 
Ellery (Holden) Tyler, and born at Harvard, on June 30, 18 18. 
He began to attend school at Groton Academy in the year 1837. 
He afterward studied medicine, under the tuition of Dr. Thomas 
Chadbourne, of Concord, New Hampshire, and Dr. Jesse Morrill, 
of Franklin, New Hampshire, but died on February 8, 1844, before 
he had taken his medical degree. 

Dr. John Varnum was a son of John and Eunice (Gilson) 
Varnum, and born at Pepperell, on December 5, 1787. He began 
to attend school at Groton Academy in the year 1804, and after- 
ward studied medicine, in his native town, under the tuition of 
Dr. John Walton. Dr. Varnum was married as early as 1818 to 
Abigail Getchell, daughter of a Captain Getchell, of Marblehead ; 
and they had two sons, of whom one died in infancy. He prac- 
tised his profession at Lyons, New York, where he died, on Octo- 
ber 6, 1822. His surviving son, William, is now living at Saratoga 
Springs. 



NoTK. — In the General Catalogue of Lawrence Academy (Groton, 1S55), 
Joseph Adams and Henry Skinner appear as physicians, but in both instances 
it is a mistake. I have been unable to gather any facts concerning Henry 
Jewett, mentioned in the same catalogue. 



INDEX 



Alexander, John Locke, 73. 
Allen, Lewis B., 65. 
Amory, Charles, 73. 
Andrew, Aaron, 34. 

Bancroft, Amos, 18. 
Bancroft, Amos Bigelow, 27. 
Barker, George Frederic, 74. 
Barker, Thomas Crumbie, 74. 
Bass, William Henry, 74. 

Batchelder, , 32. 

Blanchard, Eliphalet Ripley, 68. 

Blanchard, William Dexter, 43. 

Blasdell, Henry, i. 

Boutelle, Thomas Richardson, 74. 

Brown, George, 54. 

Brown, James Dennis, 68. 

Carter, Calvin, 75. 
Chamberlin, Edson Champion, 41. 
Chaplin, James Prescott, 47. 
Chase, Ezekiel, 2. 

Coale, , 22. 

Coolidge, Joseph Franklin, 36. 
Cowdrey, Arthur Harris, 75. 
Cragin, Charles Hartwell, 53. 
Cummings, James Merrill, 29. 
Cummings, Right, 75. 
Cutter, Jonas, 76. 

Dana, James Freeman, 76. 
Davis, Kendall, 34. 
Dentists, The, of Groton, 65. 
Dodge, Franklin, 52. 
Draper, Joseph Rutter, 57. 
Dvvight, John, 77. 

Edwards, Nathan Brown, 77. 
Eldredge, Hezekiah, 77. 
Eldredge, Micah, 22. 
Emerson, Samuel, 43. 

Farnsworth, Amos, 25. 
Farnsworth, Ralph, 50. 
Farnsworth, Samuel, 3, 78. 
Fitch, Luther Parker, 59. 
Fletcher, Samuel William, 58. 
Fox, Abel, 78. 
Fuller, Lemuel, 32. 



Gardner, Thomas Champney, 49. 

Gibson, Henry, 79. 

Gilson, Franklin Earland, 69. 

Gove, Jonathan, 3. 

Graves, John Edwin, 70. 

Gray, Henry, 79. 

Green, Joshua, 20. 

Green, Samuel Abbott, 56, 64. 

Hartwell, Benjamin Hall, 42. 
Hemenway, Samuel, 47. 
Hinds, William Henry Harrison, 67. 
Holland, Henry Ephraim, 79. 
Huntington, David Low, 80. 
Hutchins, Isaiah, 55. 

Johnson, Lewis, 80. 

Kilbourne, William, 81. 
Kingsljury, Nathaniel, 81. 
Kinsman, Benjamin Willis, 81. 

Lane, Jonas Henry, 82. 

Lane, Timothy Livingston, 82. 

Lawrence, E[)hraim, 45. 

Lawrence, Luke, 82. 

Lawrence, William Richards, 52. 

Lewis, William Henry Harrison, 61. 

Lincohi, Henry, 82. 

Longley, Rufus, 48. 

Lynde, James Porter, 83. 

McCollestcr, John Quincy Adams, 40. 
Mansfield, George, 15, 51. 
Mansfield, Joseph, 14. 
Marriages, List of, 71. 
Moore, James Moody, 42. 
Morse, Benjamin, 2. 
Morse, Joseph West, 83. 
Mullikcn, Isaac Walter, 84. 

Needham, William Chauncy Hall, 62, 64. 
Nutting, Isaiah Hall, 54. 

Park, John Gray, 60. 
Parker, Ebenezer, 84. 
Parker, James Otis, 84. 
Parsons, John Eleazer, 42. 
Patch, Jacob, 46. 



90 



INDEX. 



Peirce, Augustus Frederick, 85. 

Pierce, John, 85. 

Pillsbury, Edward Listen, 85. 

Pineo, Peter, 34. 

Piper, Richard Upton, 35. 

Potter, Richard Bulkley, 62. 

Prescott, Oliver, 5. 

Prescott, Oliver, Jr., 9. 

Putnam, Joseph Morrill, 63, 64. 

Putnam, Marion Zachariah, 39. 

Richardson, William, 85. 
Robbins, Augustus, 86. 
Rockwood, Ebenezer, 45. 

Sawyer, Frederic Augustus, 86. 

Shackford, Rufus, 30. 

Shattuck, George Francis, 61. 

Shattuck, Jeremy, 87. 

Smith, Albert, 87. 

Smith, Gibson, 41. 

Smith, Norman, 31. 

Spaulding, Miles, 33. 

Sprague, William Lawrence, 63. 

Starr, John, 87. 

Stearns, George, 25. 

Stearns, George Washington, 38. 



Steere, David Roscoe, 37. 
Stimson, Jeremy, 17. 
Swan, Charles Young, 21. 

Thompson, Charles Elliot, 66. 
Torrey, Noah, 53. 
Townsend, William Prescott, 88. 
Tyler, John Flavel, 88. 

Varnum, John, 88. 

Walton, John, 43. 
Ware, Ephraim, 2. 
Warren, William Barnard, 38. 
Webster, William Ambrose, 36. 
White, David Stockbridge, 67. 
White, Edward Young, 67. 
Wilder, Abel Hervey, 27. 
Williams, Herbert Franklin, 63. 
Williams, Jacob, 23. 
Williams, Richard, 50. 
Willis, Ebenezer, 40 
Wilson, James, 24. 
Winslow, Edward Hubbard, 38. 
Wood, Edward Addison, 62 
Woolson, Ephraim, 3. 



I 



OCT 2^ 1908 



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