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\ 



A COLLECTION 



ov 



TREATIES, ENGAGEMENTS, AND SANADS 



BBLATINe TO 



imik AND NEIGHBOURING COUNTRIES. 



OOHPILBS BT 



0. U. AITCHI80N, B.O.S., 

UNDER-SECBBTART TO THB QOVEBNMBNT OP INDU Uf THB 

fORBIGN DEPARTMENT. 



VOL. VII. 



oovTAnmre 



• « v*« 



• ••• - 



THE TREATIES, etc.. RELATING TO THE BOMBAY PRESIDENCY. 






Part II. — Kutoh, Oambat, Surat Agekoy, SLpRkt, Jahjiba, 

SaTABA JaGIRDABS, EoLHAPUB and SoUTHlfiBN ^AHf^irTA 

Country, Sawantwabi, Savanub, ^j^p, jli^d : 

Lapsbd States. •/ :: 



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■^ v' « 






Revised and continued up to the present time '" 

IPs th^ Jlttthmts oi thz Jornjn Jepartmentr . 



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t(.J «!« tj 



CALCUTTA : 

OFHCE OF THE SDPEBINTENDENT OF GOVBBiniBNT PBIMTINQ, INDIA. 

1892. 



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CONTElfTS. 



TREATIES, ENGAGEMENTS, and SANADS eblatino to thb STATES 

WITHIN THB BOMBAY PRESIDENCY. 



PART II. 



I.— KUTCH. 
NARRATIVE 



TUEATIirS, etc. No. 

I.— >Treatjr ooncladed by Jamadar Fateh Muhammad on behalf of the 
Rao of Eutoh for the BnppreBsion of piracy, dated 26th October 

XtS^Jv ••••• •••• XL 

Engagement entered into by Diwan Hansraj Samidas, renouncing 
tS[ claim to interference in the conn tries east of the Galf of 
Kntoh and the Ran, dated 28th October 1809 ... 12 

Translation of a paper from Diwan Hansr^ Samidas for th« 
sovereignty of Mandvi Bandar, dated 12th November 1809 • ib, 

II. — ^Treaty entered into by the Rao of Kntch, engaging to pay an 
indemnity for losses caused by the inroad from Wagar, dated 
14th January 1816 14 

Deed executed by the Bao of Eutch for the cession of the district 
of Anjar to the Honorable Company, dated 16th January 1816 . 16 

Ill.^Supplementarv treaty concluded with the Rao of Eutch on the 
remission oi the annual subsidy paid to the Honorable Company, 
dated 18th June 1816 18 

IV.—Treaty concluded with the Rao of Eutch guaranteeing to His 

Highness tibe integrity of his State, dated 13th October 1819 J9 

v.— Deed executed by the Wagar Chiefs, engaging to preserve the peace 

within their estates, dated 16th April 1819 .... 23 

Deed of Fa'el Zamin passed by Madvi Samla Ajani of Ajapur for 
I the Wagar Chiefs, dated 11th April 1819 . .26 

I Deed of Arr Zamin by the Jareja Chiefs of Eanthakot for the 

; Wagar Chiefs, dated 11th April 1819 ib. 

VI. — Treaty entered into by the Rao of Eutch on the restoration of the 

district of Anjar, dated 2l8t May 1822 23 

Vil.— Treaty concluded with the Rao of Eutch on the remiBsion of 
arrears dne to the British Government for military expenses, 
dated 20th September 1832 17 



U CONTBNTS. 

I —KUTCU-eonid. 

Faoi 
TREATIES, etc No. 

VIII. -- Treaty entered into by the Rao of Kntoh on beinfr iiiTeste<1 with 

tlie management of his State, dated 6th July 1834 ... 29 

IX.-^Proclamation issued by the Rao of Kutch, abolishing the importa- 
tion of slaves into Katch— 1836 31 

X. — Roles exemj)ting from payment of duties vessels driTen by stress of 

weather into ports in Kutch .•..•.$&. 

XL — Agreement entered into by the Chiefs of Junagarb, Nawanagar, 
Bhaunat^ar and Porbanoar, engaging to exempt from pa.vment 
of customa duties Kutch vessels driven by stress of weather into 
their ports— 1873 33 

XXL— Agreement signed by the Council of Administration of Kutch, 
exempting from export duties eoods washed ashore within 
Kutoh territory, being portion oi cargo jettisoned by vessels 
hailing from, or belonging to, ports of Nawanagar, dated 26th 
April 1884 34 

XIII.'— Engagament entered into by the Jareja Chiefs of Eotoh, renounc- 
ing female infanticide, dated 23rd March 1840 • . • ib. 

XIV. — Agreement entered into by the Jareja Chiefs, engaging to suppress 

female inianticide, dated 7th May 1846 .... 36 

XV. — Engagement entered into by the Chief of the Hothi tribe of Jarejas 

for the suppression of female infanticide — 1842 ... 37 

XVI.— Agreement executed by the Rao of Kutch for the constitution of a 

Bhayad court — 1875 • . 38 

XVII.— Prot^laiuation by the Rao of Kutch, warning his subjects generally 

against engaging in the slave-trade, dated 24tb April 1869 42 

XVII I.— Proclamation by the Kao of Kntoh to his subjects r<>8iding at Zan- 
zibar, warning them against engaging in the slave-trade, dated 
16th December 1872 43 

A similar proclamation was issued to the Rao's subjects at Maskat. ib, 

XIX. — Adoption sanad granted to the Rao of Kutch, dated 11th March 

1862 44 

XX.— Salt agreement with the Rao of Kutch, dated 16th January 1885 . ib. 

XXL— Agreement with the Rao of Kutch for the construction of a tele- 
iph Une from the eastern boundary of the State to Mandvi, 
ited 5th November 1890 46 



date 



II.- G A MB AY. 
NARRATIVE .49 

TREATIES, etc. No. 

XXII. — Treaty concluded with the Nawab of CSambay for the transfer of 

the fort of Tali^a to the Nawab, dated 2ard April 1771 . 53 

XXIIL— Agreement entered into by the Nawab of Cambay engHging not to 

molest the Thakor of lihaunagar, dated 22nd October 1771 . 54 

XXIV.— Engagement entered *nto by the Nawab of Cambay for the farm of 
the Peshwa's share of the chauth and the tappa of Nappar to the 
Honorable Company ..•••••• 55 

XXV.— Agreement entered into bv the Nawab of Cambay for the levv 
of transit duties on goods imported and exported by sea through 
the |>ort of Cambay S^T 



• •• 



COKT«NTS. HI 

11.- OAUBAY—tHMid. 

FkQM 
TREATIES, etc. No. 

Memorandum of imtes of trandt duty to be levied on articles to be 
imi>orted from Cunbaj in lien of aea, land onstome, and other 
duties • . . ((9 

Memorandum of arrangemeDts with the Nawab of Cambay re- 
garding oostoms duties to be levied on goods imported into the 
eity of Cambay and on goods the prodube thereof when exported 
by sea 60, 

Statement showing the rate of sea customs duties on goods im- 
ported into, and exported from, the town of Cambay, and anchor- 
age fees to be levieo on vessels arriving at Cambay • • 62 

Statement of the distribution of the hakk allowances from the 
customs and anchorage fees levied at the port of Cambay • 68 

Amended article 11 of the agreement with the Nawab of Cambay 
for the disposal of rahdari collections ib. 

XXVI — Agreement concluded with the Nawab of Cambay in supersession 
of the agreements of 1856 regarding the administration of the 
Customs Department and the levy of rahdari and transit duties 
in the Sute of Cambay, dated 2nd April 1886 . • .64 

XXYII.— Ag^reement executed by the Nawab of Cambay, probibitinflr the 
cultivation of the poppy and the manufacture of opium in his 
State— 1881 68 

XXVIII. — Salt agreement with the Nawab of Cambay, dated 17th March 

lool. .«• .•• •■•• o9 

XXIX.— Adoption sanad granted to the Nawab of Cambay» dated 11th 

March 1862 78 

XXX. — Agreement of the- Nawab of Cambay for the removal of all restric- 
tions on free tiade in his State, dated 26th February 1888 . 74 

XXXl. — Agreement executed by the Nawab of Cambay for the lease of the 
Abkari revenue of his State to the British Government for ten 
years, dated 18th August 1889 76 



III.-SURAT agbucy. 

1. SACHIN. 
NARRATIVB 79 

TREATIES, etc No. 

XXIX.*— Adoptioii sanad granted to the Nawab of Saohin, dated 11th March 

1862 74 

XXIXII.— Agreement eoncloded between tiie Nawab of Sachin and the 
Pcdihwa on the leeigBation oC the Nawab's claims on Janjira 

■ 

Engagement entered into by Sidi Abdnl Eairim Khan agreeing to 
abide" by the abov« agreement' 88 

XXXnL— Agreomeni enttred into by> the Kawid> oit Saohin on tbo assump- 
tion of the nMiaageinent <if his oonntnr by the British Govern- 
meni tiU te liqoidatioo ol his dabta-1829 . . . . ib 



IT 00NT8NT8. 

m.-SUBAT AGENOY— 0011^. 

2. BANSDA. 

Paob 
NARRATIVE 80 

TREATIES, •tc. No. 

XXXIV.-^A^eement enter«d into by the Raja of Bansda for the farm of the 

Goyernmexit chanth zakat, dated 16th March 1868 ... 84 

XXXV.— Agreement executed by the Raja of Bansda for the abolition of 

transit duties in his State, dated 24th April 1873 ... 85 

XXXYI. — Agreement executed hj the Raja of Bansda regarding the Abkari 

administration of his State, dated 2drd September 1886 . . 87 

XXXVII. — Adoption sanad granted to the Raja of Bansda, dated 11th Maroh 

1^32 89 

8. DHARAMPUR. 
NARRATIVE 81 

TREATIES, etc. No. 

XXX VII. — Adoption sanad granted to the Etaja of Dharampur, dated 11th 

Maroh 1862 89 

XXXVI IL — ^Agreement entered into by the Raja of Dharampur for the farm 

of the British ohauth zakat, dated 6th April 1870 . . • ih, 

XXXIX. — Engagement executed hj the Raja of Dharampur regarding the 
extradition and trial of his subjects who have committed offences 
in Portuguese India, dated 27th December 1885 . • • 91 

XL. — Agreement executed by the Raja of Dharampur regarding the 

Abkari administration of his State, dated 5th July 1886 • 93 



IV.-JAUHAB. 
NARRATIVE 95 

TREATIES, etc No. 

XLI. — Memorandum of settlement made for the administration of the 

Jan bar Samasthan, dated 16th December 1822 . • • 98 

XLII. — Adoption sanad granted to the Raja of Jauhar, dated 23rd June 

1890 100 

XLIIL— Agreement entered into by the Raja of Jauhar, farming the Abkari 
revenue of his State to the Bombay Goyemment, dated 28th Jan- 
uaiylSSO ib. 

XLIV. — Agreement executed by the Raja of Jauhar regarding the Talauli- 

Dahanu station road, dated SOth April 1881 . . • .103 

XL v.— Agreement entered into hj the Raia of Jauhar, prohibitiog the 
cultivation of the poppy m, and tne illicit importation of opium 
into, his States dated 9th October 1881 . • . • . ib. 

XLVI.—Enga^ment executed by the Raja of Jauhar regarding the extra- 
dition and trial of his subjecte who have committed offences in 
Portuguese India, dated 4th June 1888 ■. » • • • 104 



C0NTBNT8. Y 

v.— JANJIBA. 
NARRATIVB . • 107 

TREATIES, etc. No. 

XLVIL— Treaty of offensive and defensive alliance concladed with Sidi 

Kasim Yakut Khan of Janjira, dated 6th December 1733 . Ill 

Secret article oonduded with the Sidi of Janjira for the expenses 
of the fleet, dated 7th December 1733 ... .114 

XLVIIL— Agreement mediated between Sidi Yakut Khan and Abdur Rahim 

Khan for the adjustment of their dispute, dated 6th June 1772 • ib. 

XLIX.— Agreement entered into by Balu Mian ceding his claims on 
Janjira to the Peshwa for lands near Sunt, dated 6th June 
1791 .116 

L.-* Agreement entered into by Nawab Ibrahim Khan, accepting the 

conditions of his reinstatement to the Chief ship of Janjira . 118 

U.— Agreement entered into by the Nawab of Janjira regarding the 
administration of the Departments of Customs, Salt, Opium, and 
Abkari in Hab8an-1884 119 

m 

VI.— SATABA JAGIBDAB8. 
NARRATIVE 123 

TREATIES, ete. No. 

LIL— Adoption sanad granted to the Raja of Akalkot and to the Chiefs 

of Aundh, Bhor, Phaltan and Jath, dated 11th March 1862 . 129 

1. AKALKOT 
NARRATIVE 128 

TREATIES, etc. No. 

LIII. — Engagement entered into by the Raja of Akalkot on the restora- 
tion of his jagir, dated 3rd July 1820 129 

Agreement concluded between the Raja of Satara and Fateh Singh 
for the jagir of Akalkot, dated nth July 1820 . . .18$ 

2. BHOR. 
NARRATIVE 124 

TREATIES, etc No. 

LrV.— Agreement entered into by the Pant Sachiv of Bhor on the restor- 

aijon of his jagir, dated 22nd April 1820 • • • . 136 

Agreement concluded between the Riga of Satara and Chimnaji 
l^andit Sachiv on the restoration of the latter's jagir, dated Julj 
1820 .139 

L v.*— Engagement concluded with the Pant Saohiv for an exchange of 

territory, dated 12th April 1830 141 

Statement containing particulars of the territory ezshanged • 144 

Statement of the revenues mutuallj exchanged with the Pant 
Saohiv • . • 146 



Tl C0NTICNT8. 

VI.-8ATARA JAOlRDABB-eomtd. 

2. BEOR^eontd. 

Paoi 
TREATIES, etc. No. 

LVI.— 'Agreement entered into by the Pant Sachiy for tbe adminiBtration 

of his jagiTr dated did February 1889 147 

Lyil.-*-Agreement entered into by the Paat Saohiv of Bhor, prohibiting 
the caltivation of the poppy in, and the illicit importation of 
opium into, his territory, dated let Deoember 1880 . .149 

LVIIL— Agreement executed by the Pant Saohiy of 13hor, transferring the 
administration of the Abkari revenue of his State to the British 
Government, dated 24tb NoTember 1886 . . . .150 

UX.^ Agreement entered into by the Paut Saohiv of Bbor for the 
abolition of all taxes on commodities other than snuff, sulphur, 
and poisonous drags .....••. 163 



3. AUNDH. 
NABRATIYE 126 

TREATIES, etc. No. 

LZ.— Engagement entered into by the Pant Pratinidhi of Aundh 

on the restoration of his jagir, dated 22nd April 1820 . .164 

Agreement concluded between the Baja of Satara and Rajeshri 
Parsuram Pandit on the restoration of the latter's jagir, dat-ed 
July 1820 • 167 

LXI. — Agreement executed by the Pant Pratinidhi of Aundh, dated 3rd 

November 1881 169 



4. JATH. 
NARRATIVE 126 

TREATIES, etc. No. 

LXII.— Agreement entered into by Renuka Bai on the restoration of the 

jagir of Karzgi and Jath,. dated 22nd April 1820 . • . 160 

Agreement concluded between the Riya of Satara and Renuka Bai 
on the restoration of the parganas of Jath and Karzgi^ dated 
July 1820 164 



5. PHALTAN. 
NARRATIVE 127 

TREATIES, etc. No. 

LXIIL— Engagement entered into by Jan Bao on the restoration of the 

jagir of Phalten. daled Sted April 1820 . . . .167 

Agreement eonsladed btetveen the Baja ol Satara and the Nimbal- 
kar on the restoration of the jagir of Phaltan, dated Jaly 1820 • 170 



COVTEMT8. irii 

Tl^SATABA JAGIBDAB8— rone^tf. 

e. THE WAIKAB. 

Paoi 
NARRATIVE 127 

TREATIES, etc No. 

LXlV.-»Sii|rag«meiit entered into by Shaikh Mira Waikar oo the reetor* 

ation of his jagir, dated di^ July 1820 174 

Tad from the Raja of Satara to Shaikli Mira Waikar on the restor- 
ation of Ilia Jagir, dated 8rd July 1620 177 

VII.-^KOLHAFUB Alf D SOUTHBBN MAHBATTA COUIi^TB? AGENCY. 

1. KOLHAPUR. 
NARRATIVE 181 

TREATIES, etc. No. 

XXXVIL^Ad<H>tion aanad granted to the Raja of Kolhapar, dated 11th 

March 1862 ... 89 

LXV.— Treaty of oommerce concluded with the Raja of Kolhapnr, dated 

12th January 1766 . . 194 

LXVL— Agreement entered into by the Raja of Eolhapur fur the payment 
of compensation for loeaes suatained by merchants at Mai wan 
and for the establishment of factories at Malwan and Kolhapor, 
dated 26th November 1792 .196 

LXVIL— -Agreement entered into by the Raja of Kolh^por, ceding the port 
of Mai wan and engaging to renounce piracy, dated ist October 
1812 198 

LXVIII. — Treaty entered into by the Raja of Eolhapur, engaging to reduce 

his army to peace establit^hment* dated 2lth Janunrj 1826 . 201 

LXIX. — Agreement entered into by the Raja of Kolhapur, limiting the 

strength of his army, dated 2drd October 1827 . 203 

LXX. — Treaty with the Raja of Kolhapur for the cession of certain 

dish'icta to the Honorable Company^ dated 15th MhicH 1829 203 

LXX I. — Treaty entered into by the Raja of Kolhapur on the restoration of 

the administration to him, dated 20th uotober 1862 . . 209 

IiXXII.— Agreement entered into by the Raja of Kolhapur, prohibiting the 
cultivation of the poppy and the manufacture of opium in, and 
its import into, his territory, dated 22nd October 1880 . 211 

LXX III. — Agreement for the remoyal of restrictions on Free Trade in the 
State of Kolhapur and certain adjoining States of the Southern 
Mahratta Country, dated Ist November 1886 . .212 

2. SOUTHERN MAHRATTA JAGIRDARS. 
NARRATIVE' • 186 

TREATIES, etc. No. 

LXZIV. — Agreement entered into by the Jagirdar of Sangli, prohibiting the 
cultivation of the poppy in, and the illicit importation of opium 
into, hii territory, dated 1st February 1881 . • • .214 



VUl CONTENTS. 

VII.— KOLHAPUB AND SOUTHERN HAHBATTA OOUNTBY AGENCY 

—-eonid. 

2. SOUTHERN MAHBATTA JAQIRDARS— con^i. Paob 

TREATIES, etc. No. 

Similar affreements exeoated bj the Chiefs of Miraj (Senior and 
Jnnior), Jaxnkhanrli, Karnndwar (Senior and Jnnior), iiamdur^, 
and Mndhol— 1880 215 

LXXY. — Agreement entered into by the Jagirdar of Sangli, for the leaFe of 
the Abkari revenue of his estate to the British Government, 
daled 2nd September 1885 215 

Similar agreements exeoated by the Chiefs of Mndhol, Ramdorg, 
Miraj Junior, Kurundwar Senior, Jamkhandi and Kjirundwar 
Junior— 1886-86 •...•... 218 

LXXYI.— Agreement entered into by the Jagirdar of Sangli for renewing 
the lease of the Abkari revenue of his State to the British Gov 
ernmeut, dated 2od September 1885 ib. 

Similar agreements executed by the Chiefs of Mudhol, Ramdnrg, 
Miraj Junior, Kumodwar Senior and Junior, and Jamkhandi ~ 
1885-1887 221 

LXXVIL— Agreement entered into by the Chief of Miraj, Senior Branch, for 
leasing the Abkari revenue of his State to the British Govern- 
ment, dated 24th March 1892 ib. 

LXXVIII. — Agreement entered into by the Jagirdar of Sangli for the promo- 
tion of Free Trade in his States, dated 19th November 1886 . 224 

Similar agreements executed by the Chiefs of Ming, Senior and 
Junior— 1886 226 

LXXIX.— Agreement entered into by the Jagirdar of Ramdurg for the pro- 
motion of Free Trade in his State, dated 10th November 1886 . ib. 

Similar agreements executed by the Chiefs of Mudhol, Kurundwar 
Senior and Junior, and Jamkhandi— 1887 .... 227 

LXXX. — Afrreement of Pandarpur mediated between the 8. M. Jagirdars 

and the Peshwa, dated July and August 1812 . • • . ib, 

LXXXI. — Memorandum of terms granted to Chintaman Rao Patwardhan 
for the lands held by him from the Peshwa, dated 15th May 
Jol9 •••.«• ..». ^d9 

Articles of stipulation on the transfer of lands to Chintaman Rao, 
dated 12th December 1820 230 

Agreement entered into by Chintaman Rao on the restoration of 
hisjagir .••••..... 231 

Abstract statement of the revenues of the districts finally ceded 
by Chintaman Rao to the British Government . • 233 

LXXXII.— Terms granted to Ganpat Rao Bapu Patwardhan for the lands 
held by him from the Peshwa's Government, dated 17th June 
1819 234 

LXXX I II.— Terms granted to Eeflhav Rao Baba Patwardhan for the lands 

held by him from the Peshwa's Government— 1819 . • 238 

Similar eogaffoments were entered into by Ganpat Rao Miraj kar, 
Gopal Rao Jamkhandikar and Ganpat Rao Shedbalkar— 1819 .240-1 

LXXX I v.— Letter from Trimbak Rao Ganpat of Shedbal agreeing to a cash 

payment in commutation of military service, dated 15th March 
1848 241 

Similar letters from the Chiefs of Jamkhandi, Miraj, Mudhol, and 
Kurundwar 242-5 



0ONTBNT8. IX 

Til.— KOLHAPT7B AND SOITTHEBN HAHBATTA OOUNTBY AGENCY 

% SOUTHERN MAHRATTA JAGIRDABS— cofic^i. 

Paob 
TREATIES, etc. No. 

LXXXY.— Adoption sanad granted to the Chiefs of Sani^li, Miraj, Jam- 
kbandi, and Eornndwar (Senior Branch), dated 11th March 
1862 . .246 

(1). SANGLL 
NARRATIYE 189 

(2). MIRAJ, SENIOR BRANCH. 
NARRATIYE 189 

(3). MIRAJ, JUNIOR BRANCH. 
NARRATIVE 190 

(4). JAMEHANDI. 
KARBATIYE 190 

(5). EURUNDWAR, SENIOR BRANCH. 
NARRATIVE 191 

(6). KURUNDWAR, JUNIOR BRANCH. 
NARRATIVE 191 

(7). RAMDURO. 

NARRATIVE 191 

TREATIES, etc. No. 

LXXXV.— Adoption sanad granted to the Chief of Ramdnrg, dated 11th 

March 1862 . 245 

LXXXVI. — Agreement entered into by the Chief of Ramdnrg on the restor- 
ation of his jagir, dated 9th June 1821 246 

Similar engagement entered into bj the Chief of Nargund • • 247 

(8) MtlDHOL. 
NARRATIYE 193 

TREATIES, etc. No. 

LXXXy.— Adoption sanad granted to the Chief of Mudhol, dated 11th 

March 1862 246 

LXXXYII.— Terms granted to Venkat Rao Raja Ghorpade for the lands held 

by nim from the Peshwa's Government, dated 27th December 
1819 248 



CONTKNTSf. 



VIII.-8AWAWTWABI. 

Paob 
NARRATIVE 251 

TREATIES, etc. No. 

XXXVII. — Adoption sanad granted to tlie Chief of Savrantwari, dated 11th 

March 1862 89 

LXXXVIIL— Treaty of offensive and defensive alliance concladed with Phond 

Sawant against Kanhoji Angria of Kolaba, dated 12th Janaaiy 
1730 ... 256 

LXXXIX.— Treaty entered into by Ehem Sawant on the restoration of the 

fort of Reri, dated 7th April 1765 257 

XC.-~Treaty with Ehem Sawant for the cession of the fort of Vingorla, 

dated 24th October 1766 261 

XCI. — Treaty negotiated with Phond Sawant for the suppression of 

piracy, dated 3rd October 1812 264 

XCII.— Treaty entered into by Ehem Sawant on his submission to the 

Bntish Government, dated 17th February 1819 • . .266 

XCIII. — Treaty entered into by the Regency of Sawantwari on the restor- 
ation of certain districts ceded to the Honourable Company, 
dated 7th February 1820 269 

XCIV. — Engagement mediated between the Sawantwari and Eolhapur 
Darbars for the payment of revenue from the district of Man- 
gaon to the fort of Rangna, dated 16th March 1820 . • 270 

XCV. — Engagement mediated between the Sawantwari and Eolhapur 
&n)aT8 for the payment of revenues from the district of 
Manohar to the fort of Maoohargarb, dated 6th March 1820 . 272 

XCVI. — Engagement mediated between the Sawantwari and Eolhapur 
Darbars for the exchange of certain villages, dated 24th March 
1820 274 

XCVII. — ^Treaty concluded with Ehem Sawant regarding the appointment 
of a Minister to the Sawantwari State, dated 25th December 
1832 . . .275 

XCVIII. — Treaty conoluded with the Chief of Sawantwari for the transfer of 
the right to levy land and sea customs in Sawantwari to the 
British Qovemment, dated 15th September 1838 • . • 276 

XCIX.— Letter from the Chief of Sawantwari entrusting the management 
of his t6rrit.ory to the British Qovemment* £ited 15th Septem- 
ber 1888 278 



IX.-8AVANUB. 
NARRATIVE 279 

TREATIES, eto. No. 

C. — Adoption sanad granled to the Nawab of Savanur, dated 19th 

March 1866 280 



00NTBMT9. xi 

Paob 
NARRATIVE . . . 28r 

TREATIES, etc. No. 

CI.— 'Parwana from the Prince of Sind for the estahlishment of facto- 
ries and trade immunities granted to the English, dated 22nd 
Septemher 1768 294 

Parwana from Ghulam Shah, Prince of Sind, granting certain 
customs privileges to the English, dated 22nd September 1768 . 296 

Letter from Qhnlam Shah, Prince of Sind, to Mr. Robert Sump- 
tion, for the building of a factory at Shah-bandar, dated 11th 
December 1768 297 

Order from Ghulam Shah, Prince of Sind, to his Metah Kustam- 
das, regarding certain privileges granted to Mr. Sumption, dated 
I8th December 1768 . ib, 

Parwana from Ghulam Shah Abbas regarding customs privileges 
* g^nted to the English Company, dated 22nd September 1768 . ib, 

CII.— Parwana granted by Ghulam Shah, Prince of Sind, renewing the 
oustoms privileges granted to the English, dated 22nd April 
1761 298 

Parwana granted by Ghulam Shah, Prince of Sind, exempting 
English vessels from the payment of " Mori " • . • 800 

Parwana from Ghulam Shah, Prince of Sind, granting certain 
privileges to the English Company, dated 22nd April 1761 . ib, 

cm. — Parwana from Mir Fateh Ali Khan granting certain privileges of 

trade to the English Company, dated 18th August 1799 . . 301 

Parwana from Mir Fateh Ali Khan regarding the adjustment and 
settlement of affairs of commerce for the English factory in 
Sind, dated 23rd August 1799 308 

Sanad granted by Prince Fateh Ali Khan to Mr. Crow remitting 
a portion of the duty on English goods, dated 12th April 1800 . 307 

Sanad granted by Prince Fateh Ali Khan to Mr. Crow regarding 
his ingress into and egress from the fort of Karachi with arms, 
dated 14th April 1800 808 

CIV. — Treaty concluded with the Amirs of Sind for the exclusion of the 

French from their dominions, dated 22nd August 1809 • f6. 

CV. — Treaty concluded with the Amirs of Sind for the exclusion of 
European foreigners from their dominions, dated 9th November 
1820 809 

CVI. — Treaty concluded with Mir Rustam Khan, Chief of Ehairpur, for 

the navigation of the Indus, dated 19th June 1832 . . 310 

CVIL — Treaty concluded with the Amirs of Hyderabad for certain privi- 
leges to merchants and traders of Hindustan by the rivers and 
roads in Sind, dated 19th June 1832 311 

Supplementary treaty with the Amirs of Hyderabad for the levy 
of a duty on merchandise, dated 19th June 1832 . 313 

Cyni.^Hommercial treaty concluded with the Ck>vernment of Hvderabad 
in Sind for the levy of a toU on merchant boats on the Indus, 
dated 2nd July 1834 314 

ClX.«»Commercial agreement concluded with the Government of Hyder- 
abad for opening up the trade of the Indus, dated 28th Novem- 
ber 1836 316 

« 



Xll OONTBNTS* 

FkQM 

TBEATJUSS, eto. No. 

ex.— Treaty concluded with the Amirs of Sind for stat oning a British 

Agent at Hyderabad, dated 20th April 1838 . . . .819 

CXI. — Treaty concluded vith Mir Rustam Ali Khan, of Khairpur, 
guaranteeing the independence of his territories, dated 24th 
December 1888 320 

Separate article relating to the occupation of the fortress of 
Bakkar, dated 24th December 1838 822 

Kharita from the Qovernor General to Mir Bustam Ali Khan of ' 
Khairpur, guaranteeing the protection of the British Ooyem- 
ment, dated 10th January 1839 ib. 

Agreement with Mir Mubarak Khan of Ehairpur, regarding the 
independence of his territories, dated 28th December 1838 . 323 

Similar agreements concluded with Mir Muhammad Khan and 
Mir Ali Murad 824 

CXII. — Agreement entered into by Hasal Bin Baoha for the surrender of 

the fort of Karachi, dated 7th February 1839 . . . ib. 

CXIII.— Treaty concluded with the Amirs of Hyderabad defining their 

relations with the British Qovemment, dated 11th March 1839 . 326 

CXIV. — Treaty concluded with Mir Sher Muhammad Khan of Mirpur 
defining his relations with the British Qovemment, dated 18th 
June 1841 828 

CXY.— Treaty concluded with the Amirs of Hyderabad regarding the 

coinage of Hyderabad, dated 4th Noyember 1842 . .331 

Treaty with the Amirs of Khairpur for cession of territory to 
the British Goyernment, dated 4th Noyember 1842 . . • 833 

CXYI.— 'Adoption sanad granted to Mir Ali Muiad Khan of Khairpur, 

dated 19th March 1866 .336 

XI.-LAPSED STATES. 

1. BBOACH. 

NABRATIVB 337 

TBEATIES, etc. No. 

CXYII. — Treaty of peace and friendship oonduded with the Nawab of 

Broach, dated 30th Noyember 1771 860 

Separate article concluded with the Nawab of Broach, guarantee- 
ing the protection of the Honourable Company to the Nawab • 362 

Bond of the Nawab of Broach for the payment of the amount due 
to the Honourable Ck>mpany ib, 

2. MANDVI. 

NARRATIVE • 337 

TREATIES, etc. No. 

CXVIII. — Treaty entered into by the Raja of Mand?i, engaging to defray 
the military expenses of the expedition sent to his aid, dated 
18th January 1810 ••••••«• 358 



• • • 



CONTENTS. XIU 



XI.-IiAP8SD STATSS-mftf. 
2. MANDYI— cofi^. 



Paob 



TREATIES, etc. No. 

OXIX. — Treaty entered into by the Raia of Mandvi, enf!ra|^ng to pay an 
annual tribute to the Honourable Company for ite protection, 
dated nth March 1810 353 

CXX. — Agreement entered into by the Baia of Mandyi, engaging to dis- 
miss his evil advieers, and to make no ohanee in the admini- 
stration of the coonixy without the knowledice and consent of 
the Honourable Company, dated 21st May 1818 . • • 355 

3. 8URAT. 
NARRATIVE 389 

TREATIES^ etc. No. 

CXXI.— Treaty concluded with the Governor of Surat for the establish- 
ment of commercial relations on the western coast of India, 
dated 20th October 1612 856 

CXXII.— Letter from His Majesty King James to Selim Shah, the Great 
Muffhal, intimating the deputation of Sir Thomas Roe, Kt., as 
Ambasndor to his Court — 1614 858 

Letter from the Grand Mughal to His Maiesty King James, 
granting oommerdal privileges to the English merchants im Uie 
Mughal Empire ........ 359 

CXXin.— Farman granted by Shah Aurangzeb to the Honourable East India 
Company for certain commercial privileges, dated 25th June 
1667 ih. 

CKXIY. — Treaty concluded with Masud Khan and Safdar Khan of Surat for 
compensating the English for losses, and permitting them to 
trade according to their farman, dated 17th March 1752 • 361 

Memorandum regarding the ratification of the above treaty • 362 

Bond execated by Sidi Masud Khan for the payment of two lakhs 
of rupees to the English, dated 17th March 1752 . . • f5. 

Bond executed by merchants and subjects for the payment of two 
lakhs of rupees to the English, dated 17th March 1752 . . 363 

CXXY. — Treaty entered into by Faris Khan, ceding to the English the 

government of the castle of Surat, dated 12th March 1758 • ib. 

CXX VI. — Treaty concluded with Mian Achan on his accession to the gov- 
ernment of Surat, dated 4th March 1759 .... 364 

Parwana granted to the English for the tankha and government of ' 
Surat— 1759 ... 366 

Representation made to the Mughal Emperor by Mr. John 
Spencer on behalf of the English East India Company . . t5. 

Parwana under the Wazir's seal granted to Mai-nd-din Khan to 
act as Governor of Surat 367 

Order under the Wazir's seal to Mr. Spencer to assist and advise 
with Mai«ud-din Khan in the government of Surat • . 368 

Order under the Wszir's seal to the subjects and inhalntants to 
acknowledge Mai-ud-din Khan as Governor of Surat . f&> 

Order under the great seal of the Nawab Wazir-ul-Mamalik Nizam- 
ul-Mulk Bahadur to Mr. Spencer regarding the government of 
the castle and command of the fleet at Surat, dated 24th June 
1759 369 



IIV CONTENTS. 

ZI.-LAP8BD STATMB-eoM. 

Paob 
TREATIES, etc. No. 

ParwaDM nnder the email eeal of the Nawah Wazir-nl-llamalik 
Nisam-ul-Molk Bahadur to Mr. J. Spencer . . .369-70 

Farman under the Great Mughal'a seal to the Honourable Company 
for holding the government ol the castle of Burat, dated 4th 
September 1769 • 370 

Order under the Khan Fteian'e seal to the Honourable Company 
for holding the Kind's fleet, dated 26th August 1769 • • 371 

Order under the Wazir'e eeal to Mai-ud-din Khan for the pay- 
ment of the tankha on account of the fleet to the Honourable 
Company, dated 18th September 1769 ib. 

Order under the seal of Nawab Wazir-ul-Mamalik to the Honour- 
able Company accompanying the farman .... 372 

Order nnder the Wazir'e seal to Mr. Richard Eouichier, Grovemor 
of Bombay • ib. 

Similar orders from the Wazir to Mr. Spencer and Mai-ud-din 
Khan, Qovemor of Surat . . . . . . t5, 

CXXVII. — Treaty concluded with Nasir-ud-din Khan for the administration 

and collection of the revenues of Surat, dated 13th May 1800 • 373 

4 CXXVIII. — Letter from the Nawab of Surat accepting an annual provision 

from the Honourable Company, dated 24th March 1818 . . 376 

Letter to the Nawab of Surat regarding the provision assigned to 
the Nawab, dated 20th April 1818 ib. 

4 KOLABA. 
NARRATIVE 346 

TREATIES, etc No. 

CXXIX.— Treaty concluded with Raghuji Angria, recognising his ri>rht8 in 

Kolaba, dated June 1822 376 

Letter from Raghuji Angria, regarding the allowances enjoyed by 
his Diwan, dated 4th April 1818 379 

Memorandum of assignments made by Raghuji Angria to his 
Diwan 380 

Letter from Raghuji Angria of Kolaba, reanesting assurance of 
protection on behalf of his Diwan, dated 4th August 1819 . 382 

Letter to Raghuji Angria of Kolaba, guaranteeing British protec- 
tion to his Diwan, dated 11th April 1819 • . , ib. 

Memorandum of bond fide debts contracted by the Diwan of the 
Kolaba State, dated 2nd August 1821 383 

Memorandum of privileges enjoyed by Parsuram Sridhar of Angria ib. 

Schedule of territory exchanged with the Chief of Kolaba^ dated. 
4th September 1828 384 

6. SATARA. 
NARRATIYE 346 

TREATIES, etc. No. 

CXXX.-^Treaty of oommeroe concluded with the Raja of Satara, dated 

16th April 1767 . . 388 



CONTBNTS. 

XI.-LAP8BD BTAT^B-eoneld. 

6. SATARA— con^c^. 

Paob 
TREATIES, etc. No. 

CXXXI.— Treaty of friendship and alliance concluded with the Raja of 

Satara, dated 2Sth September 1819 391 

Schedule of territory and revenue oeded to the R^ja of Satara . 894 

CXXXII. — Agreement concluded with the Raia of Satara for the cession of 

territory on the Mahableshwar Hills, dated I6th May 1829 . 401 

CXXXIII.— Treaty concluded with Shahnji on his accession to the Riy of 

Satara, dated 4th September 1839 403 

6. THE NIPANIEAR. 
NABRATIVB 349 

TREATIES, eto. No. 

CXXJIY.— Terms (granted to Sidoji Rao Nimbalkar on the restoration of the 

jagir of Nipaoi, dated 14th June 1820 .... 404 

Ihdbx to the Yolumb • • (i) 



TREATIES, ENGAGEMEOTS. AND SANADS 

BBLATIira 

« 

TO THE STATES 

WITHIV THB 

BOMBAY PRESIDENCY. 



CORRIGENDA. 



if 



» 



Faff$ i89.— In line 12, for " Dbund" read " Dhunde." 

Pasfe i^i.— In line 31, for ** Madbo Bao BaUl " read '* Madliav Riio Knllal.* 

^asfe 198,— hi line 20, for " He has been granted " rea^i " He was granted.' 

Poffe 275.— In line 4, for " 16th March 1820 " read •« 6th March 1820." 

Pa^e 285.— In line 9, fbr " Bakkar " read '* Bukkur." 

Fa^e 2PS.-ID line 9, for " 1.29,679 " read •• l,29.6tf7." 

JPaffe 846.— In lines 18 and 19, for *' Balaji Biswanath *' read *' Balaji Viahwanath. ' 



tuoiiM uKiDir, wiiiQ me neip ot tne King ot Anmaaabad, trom whom lie 
received the district of Morvi and the title of Rao, — a title held by the rulers of 
Kntoh ever since^— succeeded not only in recovering his father's possessions^ 
but in expelling Jam Rawal from Kutoh and reducing Dadar to subjection. 
The former fled to Kathiawar, and there founded the State of Nawanagar^ the 
rulers of which are still called Jams. Six generations later Pragmalji, third 
son of Rayadhanji^ after his father's death, murdered his elder brothers and 
himself ascended the gadi of Kutch ; lie however thought it politic to conci* 
Hate his nephew Eayanji by establishing him in the independent principality 
of Morvi, which is still in the possession of his descendants. The Chiefs of 
Nawanagar and Murvi, though united to the Rao of Kutch by the bonds of 

B 



TREATIES, ENGAGEMENTS. AND SANADS 

BBLATIira 

TO THE STATES 

WITHIV THB 

BOMBAY PRESIDENCY. 

PART 11. 



L— ZUTCH AGENCY. 

From, Bombay Government Records, No, XV of new Series^ and reports by the 

Bombay Government. 

1. KUTCH. 

The Jarejas of Kutch are said to be a branch of the Samma tribe, 
and to have emigrated from Sind about the fifteenth century under the 
leadership of Jam Lakha, son of Jara, from whom the tribe derive their name. 
The possessions which the family acquired in Kutch were divided by Lakha's 
three grandsons. About the year 1540, the three branches of the family were 
represented by Jam Dadar, Jam Hamiri and Jam Rawal. Dadar ruled over 
Wagar^ or the eastern district of the province ; and Rawal, after murdering 
his kinsman Hamir, usurped his possessions and united the western districts^ 
or Kutch proper, under his own government. But Khengar, the son of the 
murdered Hamir, with the help of the king of Ahmadabad, from whom he 
received the district of Morvi and the title of Rao, — a title held by the rulers of 
Kutoh ever since,— succeeded not only in recovering his father's possessions, 
but in expelling Jam Rawal from Kutch and reducing Dadar to subjection. 
The former fled to Kathiawar, and there founded the State of Nawanagar, the 
rulers of which are still called Jams. Six generations later Pragmalji, third 
son of Rayadhanji, after his father's death, murdered his elder brothers and 
himself ascended the gadi of Kutch ; he however thought it politic to conci* 
liate his nephew Kayanji by establishing him in the independent principality 
of Morvi, which is still in the possession of his descendants. The Chiefs of 
Nawanagar and Murvi, though united to the Rao of Kutch by the bonds of 

B 



Kutoh A.ganQj—Kitieh. Fart II 



kindred, are unhappily divided from him by many and acrimonious disputes^ 
which after years of discussion still remain unsettled. 

The first Chief of Eutch with whom the British Goverament formed 
treaty relations was Rao Rayadhan^ who commenced to rule in 1778 and died 
in 1813. Between Khengar and Rao Rayadhan there were eleven successions. 
The cruelty and tyranny of Rao Rayadhan, who was insane, alienated the 
Chiefs of the country, and in 1786 they seized his person and placed him 
in confinement. The administration was thereafter conducted by an energetic 
soldier, named Jamadar Fateh Muhammad. He was, however, looked upon 
with jealousy by the Chiefs, many of whom refused him obedience. Thus in 
1 809,^ when the first treaty with Kutch was concluded, Hansraj, a rival of 
Fateh Muhammad, ruled independently in Mandvi in the south-western portion 
of the province, and the other Chiefs, with the exception of some of the Jareja 
Chiefs who took no part in the quarrel, were divided in their allegiance ; some 

* In 1802, when Captain Seton was deputed to Kutch, the Diwan offered to conclude the 
following treaty, but owing: to the distracted state of the country it was deemed inexpedient to 
contract any close alliance with Eutch : — 

Agbebmbki between the Hovoubablb Comfaitt and Maha Rao Ratadhak, Raja of Kutch, 
by Captain Dayid Sbton, for the Uokoubabui Compant, and Uansbaj Sbtb, Diwak, on 
the part of the Raja. 

Abticlb 1. 
There shall be an alliance, offensive and defensive, between the two States. 

Abtiolb 2. 

When the Raja requires thenssistnnce of the Honourable Company's troops against his enemies, 
foreign or domestic, it shall be granted. 

Abticlb 8. 

When the Rajn requires the assistance of the Honourable Company's troops he shall defray 
the expense of them Hgreeable to the estimate. 

Abtiolb 4. 

Whilst the English troops are in the Kaja's country, he shall g^ve them full possession and 
sovereignty of the place where they are encamped. 

Abtiolb 5. 

The Raja's Government shall place no Thanas or Chankis at the place granted to die Honour- 
able Company. 

Abtiolb 6. 

No duties shall be taken on provisions coming to the English camp by land or water. 

Abtiolb 7. 

The Raja or his Diwan shall not interfere in the purchases of provisions for the English 

Camp. 

Abticlb 8. 

The Enf^lish shall not kill the following animals sacred by the BaJH's religion :*the oow, bnll> 
calf, buffalo, parrot, or pigeon. 



Part II Eutoh A^enoy—Kutch, 



acknowledging the supremaoy of Fateh Muhammad^ and others that of Hansraj. 
Inroads made by Fateh Muhammad into Qujarat (Ouzerat) and Kathiawar, and' 
the piracies committed by the people of Kutch, provoked the interference- 
of the British Government. In October 1809, Treaties (No. I) were concluded 
with Fateh Muhammad on behalf of the Rao, and with Hansraj, by which 
they renounced all claim to interfere in the countries to the east of the Gulf of 
Kutch and the Ran, and engaged to suppress piracy and to exclude Europeans 
and Americans from their possessions* Hansraj was also guaranteed in the 
separate possession of Mandvi till such time as the Rao should assume the 
srovernment. 



r» 



ABTIOLB 9. 

That the English shall respect the places of worship in the Raja's country. 

Abticlb 10. 

No European nation shall have permission to have a factory without the consent of the 
Hononrahle Company's government. 

Abtiolb 11. 
The Riya grants to the Hononrahle Company leave to have a factory in Kutch. 

Abticlb 18. 

Mandvi being a sacred place, and those that live in it abstaining from animal food, the 
servants of the factory cannot dwell within the town ; but Compan^s ware-boases and oflBces may 
be there, and the servants live where they may please to build without the wall, and keep 40 
musqneteers for the protection of their godowns. 

Abticlb 13. 

The staples of the Honourable Company imported shall pay a duty of 6 per cent, on the 
amount sales, and their exports the same, agreeably to the following list of articles :— 

Imports. — Broad cloth of every kind, copper, tin, lead, iron, steel 

^jrporif.— Piece-goods, cotton, horses. 

Abticlb 14. 
Sondarji shall be the medium between the two governments and broker to the factory. 

Abticlb 15. 

If the Honourable Company wish to attack the Okha pirates, the Baja will assist and land 
their troops at Kachchi Garb. 

Abticlb 16. 

The troops of the two governments shall take Beyt, Dwarka, and every place in Okha where 
pirates are, and after taking them, the collection of the revenues shall remtiin with Hansraj and 
Snndarji, one-fourth to the Raja, and three-fourths to the Honourable Company. Beyt and 
Dwarka being sacred places shall be garrisoned by the Kutch troops, and the management of the 
government left to Hansraj and Sundarji. The troops of both governments shall be at their 
resp«ctive expense. 

Abtiolb 17. 

If a factory shall be granted the Raja at Bombay, his staples shall also be at half the 
duties paid by oUier merchants, as the Uonuurable Company at Kutch. 



4 Kutoh Agency— Kut eh. Part II 

- — - 

Notwithstanding repeated remonstrances, these engagements were not 
kept ; piracies were not suppressed. Retaliation was more than once threatened* 
and in 1813 a British officer was deputed to insist on immediate compliance 
with the demands of the British Government. During the negotiations Fateh 
Muhammad died on the 5th October 1813. Rao Rajadhan survived him only 
1^ month. On his death the succession was disputed between Man Singh or 
Ebarmal, his illegitimate son, and Ladbubha, the legitimate sou of his brother. 
The former was supported by Husain Mian and Ibrahim Mian, the sons of 
Fateh Muhammad, and with their assistance succeeded in overcoming his cousin 
The rule of this Chief, who was afflicted with the same malady as his father, 
presented a succession of the most atrocious cruelties and aggressions on the 
territories of his neighbours. No restraint was put on the lawless inhabitants 
of Wagar, who made constant inroads into Gujarat and Kathiawar, and after 
repeated remonstrances on the part of the British Government, it became 
necessary to move a force into Kutch. On the 14th January 1816, a Treaty 
(No. II) was concluded, by which the Rao agreed to pay indemnity for the 
losses caused by the iuroads from Wagar, to suppress piracy, to exclude 
Europeans and Americans and Arab mercenaries from Kutch, and to give no 
shelter to outlaws; and the British Government engaged, in consideration 
of the cession of Anjar and other villages, and the payment of two laklis of 
Koris^ annually, to reduce the Rao's subjects to his authority and to reform 
the Wagar district. "Within a month after the conclusion of this treaty, 
the whole of Kutch was reduced to the Rao's authority. As the country had 
been greatly impoverished by twenty years of turmoil and misrule, the British 
Government, by a supplcmenlary Treaty (No. Ill), voluntarily remitted the 
whole of the military expenses the State had incurred, and the annual sum 
which the Rao had engaged to pay. 

Not long after order had thus been restored, the Bao returned to his evil 
courses. He murdered his cousin Ladhubha, deprived many Chiefs of their 
estates, increased his troops, and showed such manifest hostility to the 
British Government, that the provisions of the treaty of 1816 were suspended. 
The interference of the British Government was again earnestly invited 
by the principal Jareja Chiefs. A force was therefore moved against the 
Rao in IS 19; he was deposed, and his son Desal was placed in power, 
under a regency consisting of some of the Jareja Chiefs, aided by the 



* The anionnt in Bterlinfir money, at 60 Koris (silver coin cnrrent in Kutch) to the pound, is 
£h,2l7*lOH»- Somhaji Gatetteer, Vol. r, p. 168. 



Part II Eutoh Agency— Kutch. 



British Resident ; and a new Treaty (No. IV) was signed on the 13th October 
1819. This treaty, besides renewing the provisions of former engage- 
ments^ guaranteed the integrity of Kutch from foreign or domestic enemies ; 
secured the location of a British force in Kutch, to be paid for by that State; 
excluded the civil and criminal jurisdiction of the British Ooverument 
from Kutch; prohibited the Rao from political correspondence with, and 
aggression on, other Suites; provided for the suppression of infanticide; 
and guaranteed the estates of the Bhayad and other Rajput Chiefs on con- 
dition of their engaging to abstain from that crime. In 1828 the 20th Article 
of the treaty, which provided that all supplies for the use of the British 
troops in Kutch should pass through the Rao's teiTitory free of transit duty 
was abrogated in consequence of the abuses to which it gave rise. 

One of the first acts of the regency was to restore certain Wagar Chiefs 
to their estates on their engaging (No. V) to preserve the peace. 

In 1822 the district of Anjar was restored to Kutch by Treaty (No. VI) 
in consideration of an annual payment of Sikka Rupees 88,000. The only 
payment which had hitherto been required from the State of Kutch was a con- 
tribution of two lakhs of Sikka rupees (Company's rupees 1,86,969) towards 
the expense of the British subsidiary force. This, however, was not paid with 
regularity, and a large debt was allowed to accumulate. In 1832, therefore, 
a new Treaty (No. VII) was executed, remitting to Kutch all arrears, and 
limiting the demand to two lakhs of Sikka rupees, to be reduced in proportion 
to reductions made in the subsidiary force, provided that the sum to be paid 
should never be less than Sikka Rupees 88,000. 

In 1838 Rao Desal was allowed to take part in the transaction of 
public business. The progress he made was so great that it was resolved 
to make over to him the entire administration a year sooner than had been 
originally intended. Accordingly, in 1834, the Rao was by Treaty (No. 
VIII) placed in power. He was always conspicuous in his attachment 
to the British Oovernment. In 1836 he abolished (No. IX) the importation 
of slaves into Kutch. In 1840 he exempted from duty vessels forced into 
Mandvi by stress of weather. The rules then framed were superseded by 
other Rules (No. X) in 1851, and in 1873 the States of Junagarh, Bhau* 
nagar, Nawanagar, and Porbnndar agreed (No. XI) to allow to Kutch 
vessels driven into their ports by stress of weather the same exemption from 
customs as is granted to their vessels under these rules by the Rao of Kutch. 
In 1884 (No. XII) an Agreement supplementary to that of 1851 was accepted 



Eutch Agency— JTutcA. Fart II 



bjr the Kaich Darbar, exempting from export duties all goods washed ashore 
within Kateh terrttorj, being portion of cargo jettisoned by vessels hail- 
ing froniy or bebnging to, ports of Nawanagar in Kathiawar. 

Vigorous measures were taken for the suppression of infanticide in 
Kutchj where the crime was very prevalent. Special provision was made for 
its suppression in the treaty of 1819, and in March 1840 the engagement 
was renewed (No. XIII) by the Jareja Chiefs, who promised to render a 
yearly retnm of all the sons and daughters bom to them, and to take other 
measures for the prevention of the crime of infanticide. These engagements 
were renewed in 1846 (No. XIV). An Engagement (No. XV) was also 
made in 1842 with the head of the Hothi tribe, who claim affinity with the 
Jarejas. These measures have been attended with the most satisfactory 
results. In 1 842 the proportion of males to females of the Jareja tribe in 
Kutch was as 8 to 1 : in 1862 it was as 3 to 1, and in 1868 it was as 
1*04 to 1. In 1844 a fund, called the infanticide fund, was instituted. The 
British Government and the Kutch State each contributed Rs. 4,000 a 
year to it. The object of the fund wag to give pecuniary assistance to the 
poor Jarejas in the State, to enable them to defray the cost of marrying their 
daughters. In 1857 the fund had a large invested balance, and the contri- 
butions from Government and Kutch were discontinued. In 1864, and again 
in 1882, the Government of India declined to renew the contribution from 
imperial revenues, holding that the Kutch Darbar was competent on its own 
resources to deal with infanticide. In 1883 it was decided that the fund 
need not be kept up, and that grants might be made in case of necessity from 
its capital. In this way the capital was exhausted by the year 1891, and 
the Rao of Kutch then proposed that the system of grants sh(»uld as a rule 
be abolished, and that assistance should be restricted to cases where it was 
really required by the most indigent Jarejas. This propofal was accepted 
by the Governments of Bombay and India, on the understanding that the 
Darbar would be held strictly responsible to prevent any revival of infanticide 
in Kutch. 

In 1852 the Jareja Bhayad gave a written undertaking to abolish 
the practice of Sati, and proclamations to the same effect were issued by His 
Highness the Rao in that and the two following years. 

The Rao of Kutch has supreme authority within his own estates, but 
only lintited jurisdiction in those of his Chiefs, to whom the collective term 
of Bhayad has generally been applied from the fact of their being descendedj 
with few exceptions, from the same ancestor as himself. The Bhayad pay no 



Part II Eutoh Agenoy—Kutch. 



revenue ; they take cognizance of all minor offences on their own estates, and, 
except in serious cases, such as murder and dacoity, claim immunity from 
interference on the part of the Darbar. In return they are bound to furnish 
troops on any great emergency, and on certain occasions they make custom- 
ary presents to the Bao.* The estates of the Bhayad do not descend accord- 
ing to the law of primogeniture, but a system of subdivision prevails, which 
Jias in many oases become so minute as to render the guarantee holders unfit 
to exercise the jurisdiction contemplated in the settlement of 1819, when 
their numbers were only half what they have now reached. Secured by the 
guarantee io the possession of their estates, the Bhayad resisted all improve- 
ments, refused allegiance to their Chief, and sought a living by plunder and 
oppression. Bao Desal in his turn attempted to assert a more complete 
authority over his Chiefs ; to acquire claims over their lands by purchase and 
mortgage ; to promulgate laws without their consent ; to isRue processes to 
their subjects; and to dispense in a measure with the advice which he was 
bound under the treaty of 1884 to take from the council of the Bhayad. 

These pretensions were discountenanced by the Bombay Government, but 
a proposal to place restrictions on the Rao's issue of processes was not 
accepted by him, as he regarded it as an infringement of his legitimate autho- 
rity. The question therefore remained open. 

Bao Desal died in 1860 and was succeeded by his eldest son Pragmal. 
Soon after his accession to power, Rao Pragmal showed a disposition to increase 
his influence at the expense of the Bhayad by restoring the innovations 
condemned in his father's lifetime; by creating fresh impositions in the 
shape of fines on the Chiefs and theic vassals; and by minute interference in 
civil cases. To remedy this state of things it was proposed to define the 
limits of the Rao's power; to determine who were guarantee holders according 
to the original agreement ; and to re-organise the council of the Bhayad ; 
but the Rao deprecated any curtailment of his powers over the Bhayad and 
claimed sovereign jurisdiction. 

The British Government determined to maintain the Chiefs in the full 
enjoyment of their possessions and rights as they existed at the time of the 
treaty of 1819, and to mediate between the Rao and his Bhayad so as to 
maintain the equilibrium of power as it existed at the time of the treaty. 
On the other hand, it was necessary to encourage and strengthen the Rao 



* In 1877 it wosftcttb'd with tlie iMiiictiou uf Govcrnnieut that thuy should p»y uazoruua on 
tucceuiou to their estates. 



8 Kutoh Agenoy~Jr«/cA. Fart II 

in the full exercise of all his legitimate rights. It was further laid down that 
the British Government was under no obligation to enforce the engagement in 
the treaty of 1834? which provided for the government of the oountiy by the 
Rao under the advice of his ministers and the Bhayad. In regard to the gen- 
eral administration, the Kao was to be left in the exercise of full authority in 
his own lands : as to the estates of the Chiefs, it was proposed that the Rao 
should have a Council whom he would be bound to consult. In case of differ- 
ence the Council, or the Chief whose interests were affected, might appeal to 
the British representative and finally to the Bombay Oovernment. Existing 
holders of jurisdiction were to be classified on a combined consideration of their 
))oesessions and intelligence, a certain amount of civil and criminal jurisdiction 
being assigned to them, and the remainder was reserved to the Hao through the 
Council. A concession was made to the Rao that his minister should represent 
him in the Council. These principles were embodied in a draft agreement, but 
it was not acceptable to the Rao, and certain modifications were introduced in 
1868, as a compromise providing in all reasonable respects for the maintenance 
of the recognised rights of the Rao. The latter, however, strongly objected to the 
terms of this agreement as tending to raise unduly the status of some of the Bha- 
yad, to curtail his own authority, and to introduce innovations opposed to the 
usage of the country. As the British Government was desirous to obtain the 
cordial concurrence of the Chief in any improvements in the administration, 
he was allowed the fullest possible opportunity of urging his objections to any 
proposals which might be supposed to affect his rights in any way, and in 1872 
he found himself in a position to propose an agreement for the constitution of 
the Bhayad Court, which met with the general concurrence of the British 
Government. Further discussion, however, ensued regarding the rules, and 
the settlement and rules were finally sanctioned by the Bombay Oovernment 
in 1874} and 1875« His Highness the Rao died without formally affixing his 
signature to the rules and settlement, but his intention to sign them was 
accepted. A few slight alterations were subsequently made, and the settlement 
and rules as they now stand are appended as No. XVI. The Bhayad were in- 
formed that it had been found necessary to revise the original settlement of 1868^ 
that all guaranteed rights of their body had been sufficiently conserved under the 
new rules, and that Government had every confidence that the Court would be 
worked to their satisfaction. 

In 1871 the Rao of Kutch, at the instance of the Political Agent, declared 
his willingness to adopt measures upon a basis of reciprocity for the surrender 



Part II Kutoh Agenoj—Kuich. 9 



of offenders to and from any neighbouring State having first class jurisdio 
tion ; but no formal engagement was submitted for the sanction of the 
British Government. 

Amongst other foreigners, natives of Kutch have established themselves 
in considerable numbers at Zanzibar, and in 1869 the Rao of Kutch issued 
m Proclamation (No. XVII) to the inhabitants of Kutch, and more particularly 
to those trading with Zanzibar and the Arabian and African coasts, warning 
them against the penalties they would incur by engaging in the slave trade^ 
and informing them that their claims and suits were to be settled by the 
British Government in the same way as if they were subjects of the British 
Government. 

In 1872 the Rao of Kutch issued fresh Proclamations (No. XVIII) 
to his subjects at Zanzibar and Maskat, stating 'his determination to put a 
stop to their participation in the slave trade, and declaring that any of his 
subjects directly engaging or indirectly assisting in the traffic would be 
punishable by the British Government, which he empowered to deal with such 
persons as with its own subjects, and that all property in Kutch belonging to 
persons convicted of the ofienoe would be confiscated. He also deputed his 
minister to co-operate with Sir Bartle Frere, who was then employed as Her 
Majettty's special envoy for the more effectual suppression of the Bast African 
slave trade, to make enquiries into the participation of Kutch subjects in the 
slave trade, and to prosecute those found to have been engaged in it. This 
spontaneous action on the part of the Rao was cordially recognised by the 
British Government. 

In 1873 the Rao abolished transit duties in Wagar, and thus freed 
Kutch from taxation which had been discontinued in his other districts 
since 1856. 

Rao Pragmal, who had received the right of adoption (No. XIX), died 
in January 1876, and was succeeded by his eldest son Khengar, the present 
Chief, who is now (1892) twenty-six years of age. 

The Kutch State has not entered into an agreement regarding opium. 
There is no cultivation or manufacture of opium in Kutch territory. The 
local consumption is supplied only with opium which has paid duty to the 
British Government, a partial drawback being allowed. The State is res- 
ponsible for preventing the import of illicit opium into and the export of all 
opium from its territory. 



10 Kutoh Agenny— JTfffcA. Part II 



In 1885 an Agreement (No. XX) was concluded with the Rao, under 
which His Highness undertook to prevent the exportation from Kutoh of all 
salt manufactured or produced within the province to any part of British 
India or of any Native State^ or of any foreign European settlement in 
India. 

In 1890 an Agreement (No. XXI) was made with the State of Kuteh for 
the construction of a line of telegraph from the eastern frontier of Kutch 
through Bhuj to Mandvi. The line was constructed and is worked by the 
British Telegraph Department. 

The population of Kutch^ according to the census of 1891^ amounts to 
558,415. The estimated area is 6,500 square miles. The gross revenue of 
the Rao^ part of which is annually farmed out, is Rupees 18,04,000 : that of 
the subordinate Chiefs or Bhayad aggregates Rupees 11,80,000. The State 
pays a contribution of Rupees 1,86,949 to the British Government, which 
is liable to be reduced to a minimum of Sikka Rupees 88,000 in the event of 
the reduction of the subsidiary force. 

In 1885 the title of ^'Sawai Bahadur'' was conferred on His Highness 
as an hereditary distinction. He is entitled to a salute of 17 guns. 

The military force of the State consists (1891) of 2 field and 162 other 
^uns, 16 artillerymen, 859 cavalry, and 1^425 irregular infantry, includ- 
ing police. In addition to these troops the Rao's Bhayad could furnish on re- 
quisition a mixed force of about 4,000 men. 



Part II Kutoh Affency--JriffoA~No« I. 11 



No. t. 

1S09. 

Articles of Agkebmsnt between the Hokoura^ble East India 
Company, entered into by Captain Samuel Adam Green- 
wood, under the orders of Lieutenant-Colonel Walker, 
Resident, with the Vizarut Jemadar Futtbh Mahomed 
and his son Notiar Hussain Meeja, on behalf of the 
Maha Bao Shree Roydhunjee, viz. — 

Articls 1. 

As friendship exists between the government of the Honourable Com- 
pany and the government of the Maharaja Anund Rao Ouikwar Sena Khas 
Kheyl on the one part and the government of the Maha Rao Shree Roydbun 
on the other, it is agreed that no troops shall cross to the country to the east 
or opposite side of the Gulf and Runn lying between Kutch and Guzerat^ nor 
shall any claim or interference be therein maintained. 

Article 2. 

The above article is indispensable, but as the Maha Rao Mirza Roydhnn 
possesses old claims on Nowanuggur, it is agreed that these aa well as any 
other demands, either pecuniary or otherwise, which exist, or may arise^ shall 
be settled agreeably to equity and justice, and with due regard to the character 
of Maha Kao Shree, by the decision of three people, one on behalf of the 
Honourable Company, one on behalf of the Maha Rao Shree, and a third on 
behalf of the parties on whom the claims are made. 

Articlr 3. 

The Maha Rao Shree Roydbun engages that piracy shall be eradicated 
throughout the country of Kutch. Should any piracy take place, the pirates 
should be punished and expelled from the country. 

Articlb 4. 

Maha Rao Shree Roydbun engages not to permit any establishment 
whatever to be made in the country by any European 'or American power or 
any of those nations to remain therein. 

To the truth of the above God is witness. 

Dated 16th of Batman 1884 Hepiree, corresponding with the 3rd of 
Athwin Vud Sumvut 1866 and the 26th October 1809 A.D. 

Confirmed by the Governor-General of India on 7th December 1809. 



12 Kutoh Agenoy-iTiftoA— No. I. ^"^ ^^ 



Articles of Engagement entered into by Dewan Hunseaj 
Sambdass of Mandaveb Bunder, with Captain Samuel 
A. Greenwood, on behalf of the Honourablb Company, 
as follows : — 

Article 1. 

As friendsbip exists between the goverDinent of the Honoamble Com« 
pany and the government of the Maharaja Sena Khas Kheyl Shnmsher 
Bahadoor on the one part, and the government of the Maha Bao Shree Uoy- 
dhnn on the other, I do hereby agree that no troops shall cross to the country 
on the opposite side of the Gulf and Kann (lying between Kutch and Ouze- 
rat)^ nor shall any claim or interference be maintained therein ; should any 
claim or dispute arise, the same shall be settled by arbitration, under the 
mediation of the Company. 

* Article 2. 

Hunsraj Sa, Dewan, engages, on behalf of the Maha Rao Roydhun, that 
piracy shall be eradicated throughout the territories subject to Mandavee; 
should any act of piracy occur, the pirates shall be punished and expelled the 
country. 

Article S. 

Hunsraj Sa, Dewan, aleo engages, on behalf of the Maha Rao Roydhun, 
not to permit any Enroi>ean or American power to form an establishment at 
Mandavee and its dependencies^ nor to permit any (of these nations) to 
remain therein. 

Dated 1866 Assoin Vud 5th, corresponding with 28th October A.D. 1809. 

Written by Hunsraj Samedass« What is above written is truth* 



Translation of a Paper to the address of the Honourable 
Company from Dewan Hunsraj Samedass of Mandavee 
Bunder. 

I, Hunsraj Samedass of Mandavee Bunder, the Dewan and servant of 
Maha Kao Mirza Roydhun, wishing to preserve and secure to my sovereign 
and roaster the possession of Mandavee Bunder in peace and tranquility, do 
hereby require the protection of the Honourable Company on the following 
terms and conditions :— 

Artiolb • 

The town and port of Mandavee, its villages and dependencies, to be 
maintained in my possession on behalf of the said Maha Rao Mirza Boydhun, 



Part II Katoh Agenoy— JTufcA— No. I. 18 



to whom^ his heirs and successors^ the said dependencies shall be restored under 
the guarantee of the Company ; whenever he or they shall be restored to the 
exercise of their legal and uncontrolled authority^ and when my sovereign 
shall assume the government of this country, this port of Mandavee and its 
dependencies shall be delivered up to him* 

Aktioli 2. 

In order to give effect to the above Articlci and to ensure its execution, 
an Agent on the part of the Honourable Company^ who shall be attended by 
a guard of 40 men, shall reside at Mandavee, so long as the place may remain 
in my possession, but to be afterwards subject to such arrangement in respect 
to remaining or being dismissed as the sovereign Maha Kao may agree to. 

Artiolb S, 

For the expenses of this eatablishment an annual nuzzerana of Rupees 
18,000 shall be paid to the Honourable Company's Government in four instal- 
ments, viz., commencing from the arrival of the Company's Agent. 

Aeticlb 4. 

In the event of any persons attempting to farain possession of Mandavee 
and its dependencies, the Honourable Company will be pleased to extend their 
aid and protection to the extent of two battalions, with their proportion of 
Artillery, the expenses of which shall be defrayed, at the rate of Rupees 
82,600 per month for each battlion, payable in monthly instalments, dnrin<i^ 
the employment of the troops, and to be returned when I have no further 
occasion for them. 

Abticlb 6. 

It is to be understood that the employment of this force is intended 
solely for the defence of Mandavee and for its preservation under my mauapre- 
ment, and therefore should any person become the enemy of Mandavee, the 
Sircar will arrange with them. 

Abticlb 6. 

My sole object being to secure under the protection of the Honourable 
Company the possessions of my sovereign in peace and tranquility, I engage 
to enter into any terms of accommodation with Futteh Mahomed that may 
appear advisable and conducive to this end, and which may receive the sanc- 
tion of the Honourable Company. 

Signed for Sbth Hunsbaj Samidass 

by Jobb Sa. 

What is above written has my consent when the parties arrive. 
Dated Sumwut 1366, Kariict Soodh ffM, A.B. 1809, November 12fh. 
Confirmed by the Oovernor-Oeneral of India on 6th January 1810. 



14 Katoh Agency— JTv^eA— No. II. Part II 



No. II. 

Abtioles of a Treaty of Alliance between the Honoitbablb 
English East India C!ompany and His Highness Maha- 
RAJ MiRZA Rao BHARKtiLJEE of KuTCH, agreed to by both 

OOYEBNHENTS — 1 816 

Article I. 

A finn and lasting peace and amity shall hereafter exist between the 
contracting governments. 

Article 2. 

The people of the Kutch District of Wagar having commit.fed unpro« 
voked depredations in the mehals of their Highnesses the Peishwa and 
Guikwar in the peni'nsnia of Eatty wur, the Maha Rao engages to reimburse 
the losses sustained by their aggressions, and also to defray the military 
expenses incurred in consequence according to a separate deed by which the 
Maha Bao engages to abide. 

Article 3* 

His Highness the Maha Rao engages to become responsible to the 
Peishwa's, Guik war's, and Honourable Company's governments for any loss 
which their subjects may hereafter sustain by depredations from subjects of 
the Kutch State. 

Article 4. 

The subjects of the Euich State shall on no account cross the Gulf or 
Bunn for hostile purposes, neither shall they cross to act against the subjects 
of the Honourable Company or those of Sreemunt Peishwa or the Guikwars. 
The subjects of the aforesaid three governments shall (in like manner) not 
cross the Gulf or Bunn for hostile purposes against the Kao's subjects. The 
fort of Anjar, etc., having been ceded to the Honourable Company, no olgec- 
tions exist to troops and stores crossing the Gulf or Runn for that place. 

Article 5. 

His Highness the Rao binds himself to suppress in the most effectual 
manner the practice of piracy throughout his dominions and coasts, and 
engages to make good any losses sustained by vessels sailing under the 
pass of the Honourable Company by piracies committed from the ports 
in Kutch. The practice of confiscating property wrecked on the coast shall 
from this date be suppressed, and His Highness engages to cause all property 
thus seo^uestrated to be returned to the legal owner. 



Part II Katoh Agenoj^Kutek^JXo. II. 16 



Articlb 6. 

His Higliness the Rao engages that no foreign^ European, or American 
force of any description, or agent of any of those powers^ shall be permitted 
to pass through or reside in the State of Kutch. 

Article 7. 

The Rao binds himself to prohibit the admission of Arab merceDaries 
into Kutch. Arabs resorting for mercantile purposes shall not be permitted 
to leave any of their followers. They shall return with the merchants. This 
shall be particularly attended to. In consideration^ however, of the situation 
of Luckput on the borders of Sindh, and for the object of keeping the 
district of Wagur in subjection, the Rao shall retain in his service Arab 
Sebundy not exceeding in number four hundred men. 

Article 8. 

The Honourable Company, in consideration of the distracted state of the 
government of Rao Bharmuljee, and its inability to fulfil the above obligations 
without aid, engage to cause such possessions sm have been alienated by the 
treachery of his servants to be restored to His Highnesses authority ; any of 
the servants above alluded to returning to their allegiance through the media- 
tion of the Honourable Company shall have their affairs arranged in a manner 
meeting the wishes of both governments. 

Aeticlb 9. 

The district of Wagur, a dependency of the Kutch State, will require 
to undergo a thorough reform. The prohibition which exists to the Rao enter- 
taining Arab Sebundy beyond a limited number disables him from effecting 
a settlement of that district satisfactorily to the Honourable Company. The 
latter, therefore, agree to aid His Highness with a force to arrange this 
talooka in a manner suitable to the objects of both governments, so that it 
remain obedient to the Rao's authority, who binds himself, as in Article Srd, 
to be responsible for the future acts of the people. 

Article 10. 

As a friendly return for the essential services thus engaged to be per- 
formed. His Highness the Bao agrees to cede to the Honourable Company in 
perpetuity the fort of Anjar, with villages, including Toorea Bunder, and in 
addition engages to pay in perpetuity an annual sum of two lakhs of corries 
(Rao Shai) in cash to the Honourable Company, The particulars of this 
Article are contained in a separate deed. 

Article 11. 

The slaughter of cows and bullocks being directly at variance with the 
religion of the Jharejas and the greater portion of the natives of Kutch, the 



16 Katob Agenoy—Kuteh^lXo. II. Part IX 



Honourable Company engages to abstain from tbe slaughter of those animals 
within the limits of Kuteh^ and from violating the religious prejudices of the 
Rao's subjects. 

Articlb 12. 

His Highness the Rao engages not to allow a Bharwuttea of the Shree- 
munt Peishwa, Ouikwar, or Honourable Company's governments to reside 
within his territory, and (in like manner) the above three governments engage 
not to permit a Bharwuttea of the Rao's country to reside in their mehals. 
In the event, however, of a Bharwuttea residing within a foreign State and 
committing acts of depredation from thence, the power aflTording him ao 
asylum shall be considered responsible. 

Article 13. 

A representative of the Honourable Company's government shall reside 
with the Rao in the capital, in order that all questions which may arise 
between the contracting governments be discussed in a friendly manner, and 
the engagements of both parties be watched over and preserved inviolate. 
This vakeel shall not listen to any complaints either from the Rao's Bhayad 
or his ministers; at the Rao's request, however, the Sircar will afEord him its 
best advice. 

The above thirteen Articles of Treaty shall be adhered to by the Bao, his 
heirs and successors, and the Honourable Company. 

J)ofte at Bhooj on the fourteenth da^ of Januarijf, A.D, IS 16, 

(Sd.) James Macmurdo, 

Eviplojfed on a musion fo Kutch b^ the 
Bombay Ooverument. 

Ratified by the Right Honourable the Governor General of India in 
Council on the 9th March 1816. 



Teanslation of a Deed executed by Maharaj Mirza Rao 
Bhabmttljee of Kutch, in favour of the Honourable 
English East India Oompant. 

Abticle 1. 
My Sircar^ as a friendly gift, has for ever done over to you by deed the 



Part II Katoh Agenoy— -BTirfc*— No. II. IT 



fort of An jar with villages^ including Toorea Bunder, according to the folIow« 
ing list :— 



Anjar Town. 
Meethee Bohar. 
Keedhena. 
Rotnal. 
PoBwallia Khasi. 

Ditto Maethee. 
Sidoogura. 
Nargolpore, sinall* 
Padhanoo. 
Bapoie. 

Borickamegpore. 
Yanamiree. 



Toorea, port jpclosiTO* 

Khasee Bohor. 

Shirai. 

AnteijaL 

Sotapore. 

Sopardha. 

Sogallia. 

Nargalpore, large. 

Kokra. 

Bhamaair. 

Nagal. 

Ifonin. 



Aocording to the above list I 'have given 70a the fort and bander, inclusive 
M villaa:i*8, and earrender to yon all sovereignty, control, and produce in those 
places that m^ Sircar has enjoyed. Any charitable, religious, or other ancient 
gifts of my government shall be investigated by the Honourable Company, 
and on authentic papers being produced the Honourable Company'? govern- 
ment shall continue them. Orassias who have enjoyed grass from ancient 
times in the pergunnah or in Anjar shall not be obstructed by the Honourable 
Company in receiving their produce. Disputes regarding villages, boundariesj 
or disputes of any kind between the subjects of the two governments shall be 
adjusted by two persons on the part of the Sircars, agreeably to justice. One 
Sircar shall not send orders or mohsuls on the subjects of tiie other; subjects 
or inhabitants of the above places coming to me to complain I shall not 
listen to them. 

Article 2. 

In addition to the above deed I have agreed to pay to the Honourable 
Company from my government an annual sum of two lakhs of Rao Shai 
eorries; this cash is to be paid in two kists, as follows : — 

1,00,000 1 lakh corries on Assar Soodh 2nd. 
1,00,000 1 ditto on Pons Soodh 2n4. 

2,00,000 



In this manner I am to pay two lakhs of corries annually f<»r ever, and 
should the corries not be paid on the stipulated dates I am to pay interest at 
the rate of 9 per cent, per annum. 

I have given these two Articles in writing to the Honourable Company's 
Sircar of my own free will ; I and my heirs and successors are to abide by 
them. 

Done Sumwut 1872, Pou$ Fud 2nd, Tue$day, 16th January 1816. 

This deed was ratified by the Right Honourable the|Uoveruor General of 
India ih Council under date the 9th March 1816. 



18 



Eutoh Ajgenoy^Kuich—'No, III. 



Part II 



No. III. 

SuPPLEMBNTAET Tebatt with KUTCH in 1816. 

The Honourable Companj and the Rao^s Sircar concluded a Treaty of 
thirteen Articles on the I4th January I816; supplementary to thesOy however, 
the following two are valid :— 

Article 1. 

The Right Honourable the Oovernor General in Council has ratified the 
thirteen Articles of Treaty concluded on the 14th January 1816 between 
the English Sircar and that of His Highness the Rao; but as His Highnesses 
government is newly established^ and is responsible in the 2nd Article of 
the Treaty for a debt of twenty lakhs of rupees^ which it would find much 
diflScuIty in discharging, the Honourable Company, guided by feelings of 
friendship, relinquishes as a voluntary gift the sum of eight lakhs thirteen 
thousand eight hundred and seventy-aix rupees, being the amount charged to 
its military expenses. 

Aeticlb 2. 

In order still further to aid the Maha Rao's government, and aa a testi- 
mony of the interest which the Honourable Company takes in its welfare, 
the latter does of its own free will relinquish the annual sum of two l&khs of 
corries which the Rao has agreed to pay by the 10th Article of the aforesaid 
Treaty. It is hoped that these disinterested and friendly aids conferred by 
the Honourable Company on His Highness the Bao will induce the latter to 
repose perfect confidence, to act with unanimity and to preserve inviolate the 
stipulations contained in the original Treaty. 

Lone at Bhooj tki$ Tuesday, the eighteenth day of June J. D. 1816, 



(Sd.) 



(Sd.) 

ft 
9> 



Jamss Macmubdo, 
Resident at Bhooj. 

MOIBA. 

N. B. Edmonstons. 
Archibald Sbton. 
G. Dowdbswkll. 





T^atifipd by the Governor General in Council at Fort William thia 
twenty-first of September one thousand eight hundred and sixteen. 

j[Sd.) John Adak, 

Secretary to Oovernmeni. 



Part II Kutcb iLgencj-Kutoh^Vo. IV. , 19 



No. IV. 

Treaty of Alliance between the Honourable East India 
Company and His Highness Maharaja Mirza Rao Shree 
Dessuljee, his heirs and successors, concluded by Captain 
James Macmurdo, on the part of the Honourable Com- 
pany, and by Jharejas Prutherajjbe, Vijerajjee, Mera- 
MUNJEB, Pragjee, Pragjbe Mokajeb, Allyajeb, Nong- 
hunjee, Bhanjee and Jeymuljbk, by virtue of full powers 
from their respective Governments — 1819. 

Whereas a Treaty of alliance^ consietiDg of thirteen Articles, was con- 
t^luded on the 16th Janoary 1816^ with two supplementary Articles, under 
date 18th June 1816^ between the Honourable East India Company and the 
Mabaraj Rao Bharmuljee and his successors. In consequence, however, of 
the hostile conduct of the said Rao towards the Honourable Company, and 
his tyranny and oppression to his Bhayad, it has become necessary for the 
stability of the alliance between the contracting parties to make certain alter- 
ations in the above-mentioned Treaty. 

Article 1. 

It is hereby declared that all Articles of the aforesaid Treaty which are 
not modified or superseded by any of the Articles in the present Treaty shall 
be considered good and valid. 

Aeticlb i. 

Agreeably to the desire of the Jhareja Bhayad the Honourable Company 
agrees in declaring Bharmuljee to have forfeited all claims to the guddee of 
Kutch, and he is accordingly solemnly deposed. The said Bharmuljee shall 
reside in Bhooj as a State prisoner, under a guard of British troops, subject, 
however, to be removed to a place of further security in the event of Lis 
being implicated in any intrigue, the Kutch government agreeing to pay 
annually the sum of 86,000 oorries through the Honourable Company for the 
subsistence of the said Bharmuljee. 

Abticlb 3, 

The infant son of the late Rao Bharmuljee having been uoanimously 
elected by the Jhareja Chiefs to succeed to the vacant throne, he and his 
legitimate offspring are accordingly acknowledged by the Honourable Com- 
pany as the lawful sovereigns of Kutch under the aiame and title of Maha- 
rajah Mirza Rao Dessuljee. 



20 Kutoh Agenoy^fWeA— No. IV. Part XI 



Article 4. 

In eoDsequenoe of the minority of the present Bao Dessnl the Jhaieja 
Bhayadi with the Honoarahle Company's advice^ determine that a regenoy 
shall be formed with fall powers to transact the afEairs of the goyernment. 
The following are chosen as the members : Jhareja Vijerajjee of Somri Boha, 
Jhareja Prntherajjee of Nanorercha, Rajgoor Odhowjee Hirbhoy, Mehta 
Lnckmidas Wullubjee, Khattri Buttonsi Jettani, and the British Resident 
for the time being. These six persons are entrusted with the executive manage- 
ment of the government of Kutch; and in order that they may perform the 
service of the State witii effect the Honourable Company agree to afford the 
regency their guarantee^ until the Rao completes his twentieth year^ when the 
minority ceases. 

Articlb 5. 

The Honourable Company engages to guarantee the power of His High- 
jie^B the Rao Dessul^ his heirs and successors, and the integrity of his domi- 
nion^i from f<ireign or domestic enemies. 

Articlb 6. 

The Honourable Company, at the desire of Bao Shree Dessul and the 
Jhareja Bhayad, for the security of the government of Kutch, agrees to leave 
a British force in its service. Fqr the payment of this force Bao Shree 
Dessnljee and the Jhareja Bhayad agree that funds shall be appropriated * from 
the revenues of Kuteh. The Honourable Company retains to itself the option 
of reducing or entirely withdrawing its troops (and relieving Kutch from the 
expense) whenever, in the opinion of government, the eflSoiency and strength 
of the Bao's authority may admit of its being done with safety. 

Aetiolb 7. 

The money stipulated for in the preceding Article is to be paid io instal- 
ments, each of four months, and it is further engaged that the regency 
appointed in the 4th Article shall enter into a separate responsibility for the 
regular payment of the above kists. 

Article 8. 

The Kutch government engages not to allow any Arabs, Seedees, or 
other foreign mercenaries to remain in its territories, nor generally to entertain 
any soldiers, not natives of Kutch, without the consent of the Houourabla 
Company's government. 

Articlb 9. 

The Kutch government agrees that no foreigh vessels, American, European 
or^ Asiatic, shall be allowed to import ipto the territories of Kutch arms or 
military Btores. The Honourable Company engages to supply the wants of 
the Kutch government in these articles at a fair valuation. 



Flurt II Kutoh Agenoy— JTv^A— No. IV. SI 



Akticlb 10. 

The Honoarable Comfiany engages to exercise no aathority over the 
domestic concerns of the Rao or of those of any of the Jhareja Chieftains 
of the country ; that the Bao, his heirs and successors, shall be absolute 
masters of their territory, and that the civil and criminal jurisdiction of the 
British Government shall not be introduced therein. 

Articlb 11. 

It is clearly understood that the views of the British Oovemment are 
limited to the reform and organization of the military establishment of the 
Kutch government, to the correction of any abuses which may operate 
oppressively on the inhabitants, and to the limitation of the general expenses 
of the State within its resources. 

Akticlb 12. 

The RaOyhis heirs and successors, engage not to enter into negotiations 
with any Chief or State without the sanction of the British Government, but 
their customary amicable correspondence with friends and relations shall 
continue. 

Akticlb IS. 

The Rao, his heirs and successors, engage not to commit aggressions 
on any Chief or State, and if any disputes with such Chief or State accident, 
ally ari»e they are to be submitted for adjustment to tbe arbitration of 
the Honourable Company. 

Abtiolb 14. 

The Rao, his heirs and successors engage to afford what military force 
they may possess to the aid of the Honourable Company's government upon 
its requisition. This Article, however, is not to be understood as imposing 
any duties on the Jhareja fihayad contrary to their established customs. 

Akticlb 15. 

The Kutch ports shall be open to all British vessels, in like manner as 
British ports shall be free to all vessels of Kutch, in order that the most 
friendly mteroourse may be carried on between the governments. 

Akticlb 16. 

The British Government, with the approbation of that of Kutch, engages 
to ^arantee by separate deeds the Jhareja Chiefs of the Bhayad, and generally 
all Rajpoot Chiefs in Kutch and Wagur, in full enjoyment <f their possessions, 
and further to extend the same protection to Mehta Luckmidas Wullubjee^ 
who^ for tbe welfare of the Kutch Durbar, has acted in concert with the. 
Jharejas, and with great zeal and sincerity. 



Futoh Agency— f«<04— No. I^. Part II 



ABTlCliB 17. 

His Highness the Rao, his heirs and successors, at the particular instance 
of tlie Honourable Company, engage to abolish in their own family the 
practice of infanticide ; they also engage to join heartily with the Honourable 
Company in abolishing the custom generally through the Bhayads of Kutch. 

Abticlb 18. 

Previously to the execution of the deed of guarantee in favour of the 
Jhareja Bhayad, according to the tenor of the 16th Article, a written engage- 
ment shall be entered into by them to abstain from the practice of infanticide, 
and specifying that in case any of them do practice it^ the guilty person shall 
submit to a punishment of any kind that may be determined by the Honour- 
able Company's government and the Kutch Durbar. 

Article 19. 

The British Resident or his Assistant shall reside in Bhooj^ and be treated 
with appropriate respect by the Government of Kutch. 

Article 20.* 
« «•# * « « « « 

Article 21. 

Itbeingcontrary to the religious principles of the Jharejas and people of 
Kutch, that cows, bullocks, and peacocks should be killed, the Honourable 
Company agree not to permit these animals to be killed in the territory of 
Kutch or to permit in any way the religion of the natives to be obstructed. 

These twenty- one Articles are binding to the Rao, his heirs and Buoces- 
ors, for ever, and to the Honourable Company. 

Done at Bhooj on the thirteenth day of October A. D. 1819. 

(Sd.) Jaicbs Macmubdo, Captain, 

And Resident in Kuteh, 



fhe Governor 

Qenerttrs 
■maU Seal. 



(Sd.) Hastings. 
J. Stewart. 
J. Adah. 



99 



99 



Ratified by His Excellency the Governor General in Council this fourth 
day of December a. d. 1819. 

(Sd.) C. T. Metcalfe, 

Secretary. 

* This article, which proTided for the trauait throogh the Bao's territory, free of Bahdari 
duties of all eapplies lonAflde for the use of the Honourable Company's troopt, wai abrogated by 
the Local Oovernment in 1828, their action beinir confirmed by the QoTernmcnt of ladia in 1854 
(Letter No. 564 of 10th February 1854, to GoTernment of Bombay). 



Fart JI Kutoh Agenoj'-Kuich^'No V. 28 



No. V. 

Deed passed to Maha Rao Shkeb Dessuljbe by Waghela 
Veesajee, Svtajeeanee, Fremsingjee, Rahjebanee, Me- 
HBBJEE3 Dewajeeaneb, Ramsingjee, Bhojrajseanee, and 
the whole Bhayad of Bela, dated Choitro Vud 6th, Sumwut 
1875, or 15th April A. d. 1819. 

The Durbar, as a panishment for our bad conduct, had deprived us of our 
villages and geeras : at present, however, the Honourable Company's army 
having accomplished a reform in the affairs of the Durbar, the English gov- 
ernment has graciously interfered and restored to us our geeras, etc. We do 
therefore engage that henceforth none of us shall be guilty of improper or 
troublesome conduct, and we engage to abide by the following Articles :— 

Articli 1. 

We engage to countenance or protect in no way any Bharwuttea or cri« 
minal of either of the two Sircars of the Honourable Company and the Rao 
or encourage any person to disturb the peace. 

Articlb 2. 

We shall permit no person who thieves or steals to live in our lands, nor 
shall we listen to any such people. Should any person living in our lands 
commit any act of plunder, and the fact be ascertained to be positive, we en*> 
gage to become responsible individually for the act to both Sircars, aud to 
surrender the criminals to the Durbar* 

Article 3. 

Should travellers be plundered in our lands, or should any property be 
lost, we engage to become responsible, agreeably to the order of the Durbar 
to remove the crime from ourselves by establishing it satisfactorily elsewhere. 

Article 4* 

Should we have any dispute with oar neighbouring Bhomias and Gras* 
sias relative to boundaries, etc., we engage to refer the dispute to the arbitra- 
tion of both Sircars. We engage to have '' Ver " (feuds) with none. 

* 

Articlb 5. 

Should a Grassia or other person attempt to leave our lands with the 
intent of having a feud, or disturbing the peace, we will prevent him ; if he 
goes by force we will instantly inform the Durbar. 



24 Eutoh Agency KuteA-JSfo* V. Part II 



Articlb 6. 

Should Dhara or plunderers attempt to pass through our lands with the 
intention of depredating, we will not permit them to pass. If they proceed 
by force we will give instant information of it to the Sircars. 

Abtiolb 7. 

We will perform the Rao's service with fidelity. We will accompany 
the Durbar troops when they are acting, and act in concert. 

Articlb 8. 

On an alarm of plunderers passing with plunder, we will instantly pro- 
ceed and intercept them. 

Article 9. 

We have given a distinct deed to the Durbar, under the guarantee of the 
Sircar, for the payment for ever of an annual jummabundee. The specific 
jummabundee mentioned in it we shall yearly pay. Should any heavenly or 
earthly misfortune happen, in such year the Durbar is to look to our articles. 

Articlb 10. 

Should we have a necessity for money, and wish to sell our villages we 
engage to acquaint the Sircars beforehand. 

Articlb 11. 

Any old fort or castle on our lands we engage to permit to be destroyed, 
and henceforth to build no new work of the kind. 

In the above manner we engage to behave justly, peaceably, and honestly 
and not to act improperly or infringe on our engagements. 

Signed by Waghela Veesajee and others. 

(Sd.) J. lif ACMX7BD0, 

Retident at Bkooj. 

Memorandum. — The above engagement was at the same time subscribed 
to by following additional Chiefs : — 

Weerbhuder Dewajee Samaljee, etc., of Kuntakot. 

Jhareja Kulliansingjee, of Ausir. 

Jhareja Mimajee, of Wandia. 

Waghela Sadhojee and Vijerajjee, of Soodram. 

Jhareja Rotlajee, etc., of Kammar. 

Jhareja Jewunjee, of Lakria. 

Waghela Poonjajee, etc., of Palauswa. 



Part II Eutoh Agenoy- ITtt^cA— No. V. 26 

Jhareja Narunjee, of Chitrore. 

Jhareja Ajeetsingjee and Jussajee, etc., of Veejpasir. 

Jhareja Partapsiogjee, of Koombbardee. 

Wagbelas Bbarojee, Sadbojee, and Juraljeej of Jattawaro. 

Bana Soojajee, etc., of Geerea. 

Waghela Mousingjee, etc., of Bhimasir* 

Jhareja Haldurjee, of Trummoo. 

Jhareja Ubhesingjee and Bhaeeja, etc., of Roree and Jessura* 

Waghela Meghrajjee, of Hummeerpoor. 

Waghela Jemaljee and Pachan jee, of Kurrianaggur. 

Waghela Anundsingjee and Kfaetajee, of Mowanoo. 

Jhareja Bhimjee and Jugajee, etc., of Ambliaroo. 

Jhareja Nathajee and Mullojee, etc., of Shmnva. 

Jhareja Jogajee and Pragjee Nesajee, of Chiree* 



Fa*el Zahin Debd passed by Mudveb Samla Ajanee, of 
Ajafore, in behalf of the Bela Waghelas, to Maha 
Rao Dessvljee. 

I engage to be Fa'el Zamin for the Wagbelas of Bela ; they have passed 
a deed of Articles to Durbar ; I will caase them to be adhered to. It is on 
my responsibility should they be guilty of breaking the agreement into which 
they have entered; or should they act improperly I individually become 
responsible for the acta in such manner as the Durbar may direct* 

Choitro Fud ht, Sumwut 1876, or the 11th April a.d. 1819. 

(Sd.) MuDVftB Samla Ajanbb. 



Deed of Arr Zamin. 

We, Weerwudur Dewajee Samatjeeanee, Akherajee, and Kanthurjee 
Pattajeeanee, of Kuntakot, are Arr Zamin to the effect of the above deed. We 
are individually responsible for its efficiency, and will cause it to be adhered to. 

Choitro Fud he, Sumwut 1875, or the llth April a. d. 1819. 

The marks x x x of Weerwudur and others. 

(Sd.) J. Macmubdo, 

Heiiffent at Bhooj. 

s 



86 Kutoh Agency— ir«^oA-No. VI. Part II 



No. VI. 

Tbeaty between the Hoi^oueablb English East India Com- 
pany and M AHA RAJ Mikza Bao Shrbe Dessuljee, his 
heirs and successors, concluded by Charles Norris, Esq., 
Resident in Kutch, on the part of the Honourable Com^ 
PANY, and by the Jhaueja Bhayad Vijerajjbe Bragjee, 
of KoTORBB, Mokajeb, Chundajee, Buarrajeb, Allyajee, 
Bhanjbe, Fragjeb, of MuowA, Kayajbb, and JbymuljeBi 
on the part of the Rao, by virtue of full powers from their 
respective Governments — 1822. 

. Abticlb 1. 

The British Government and the Government of Kntch^ thinkings it 
expedient that the town and district of An jar should be transferred to His 
Highness the Rao of Kutch for a pecuniary equivalent^ the lOth Article in 
the Treaty of Sumwut 187*2 (a. d. 1816) is annulled^ and the separate deed 
therein alluded to is declared void. The sum of Ahmedabad Sicca Rupees 
(88y()00) oivhty-eight thousand a year, is agreed to by both governments as 
the amount ^hich is to be paid by the Kutch government to the Honourable 
Company in return for transfer of the town and district above-mentioned to 
His Highness the Rao of Kutch^ including, in the An jar district, the town of 
Lukhapoor, the separate deed of which is declared void. 

Aeticle 2. 

The town and district of Anjar will be delivered over to the Kutch 
Government on 2nd Assar Soodh, Sumwut 1S79 h.b., corresponding with 
20th June a« d. 1822^ and the government of Kutch engages to make good 
the payment of the sum above stipulated every year by two half-yearly pay- 
ments, the first of Rupees (44,000) forty-four thousand on Pons Soodh 2nd, 
and the second, of Rupees (44,000) forty-four thousand on Assar Soodh 2nd. 
No diminution in the amount of compensation above fixed for the town and 
district of Anjar shall ever take place; and the Government of Kutch agrees 
that if it shall not be paid regularly at the periods above specified good and 
satisfactory assignments of land in full soveieignty, either the Anjar talook 
or other districts as may suit the Kutch government, shall be made to the 
British Government for the purpose of realizing the amount which may have 
become due. 

Articla 3. 

Since the establishment of the connexion l.etwten the two governments 
the British Brigade ha8 been cantoned at the foot of the hill fort of Bhojea, 
which lias remained in the hands oi the British. The British Government^ 



Part II Eutoh Agency— ir«^cA—No. VII. 27 



from an auxiely to restore th*' fort to His Highness the Hao, has had the 
f{ round in the neighbourhood of Bhooj examined with the view of removing 
the camp. One spot only has been found suitable for a cantonmeut; it is 
situated to the north of the town and belongs to Hajgoor Brahmins, and the 
government of Kutch being unable to induce the owners voluntarily to sur- 
render this ground, has expres^sc^d a wi^h that the cantonment may remain 
where iti-tat present, and the fort continue in the occupation of the British. 
To this proposal the British (-iovernment agrees, and the Kut(;h government 
engages never to require the Biidf-h (rovernment to give up the fort without 
obtaining by pure ha^^e from the proprietors the ground above-mentioned and 
giving it to the British Government, and indemnifying the British Govern- 
ment for any expense wiiici^ it may have incurred in repairing the fort, which 
expense, however, is not to exceed the sum of Rupees (45,000) forty- five 
thousand. 

Doted lit Jeet Svodhy Sun$wftt 1878, corresponding with 2tH May 
1822 A. D. 

(Sd.) C. NORRIS, 

Hesident. 

Batified by the Governor General in Council at Fort William in Bengal, 
this fifth day of July one thousand eight hundred and twenty -two. 

(Sd.) Hastings. 



9i 

if 



J. Adam. 
John Pkndall. 
W. B BaVley. 



By hU Excellency the Governor General in Council. 

(Sd.) G. SWINTON, 



Secretary, 



No. VII. 

Tkbatt between the Honourable East India Company and 
Shree Mabakaj Mibza Eao Dessuljeb, his heirs and suc- 
cessors, concluded by Lieutenant- Colonel Henry Pottin- 
GBR, Resident in Kutch, on the part of the Honourable 
Company, and Jharejas Chandabhoy of Naugercha, 

DoSAJEE of KOTORKE, PrAGJEE of MOTABA, NaRRONJEE of 

Mhow, Deeda Bhojrajjeb, and the Minister Dewan 
LucKMiDAS Wullubjee, on the part of His Highness the 
Rao— 1832. 

Whereas the Ri^iht Honourable John, Eail if Clare, Governor in Coancil 



28 Eutoh Agency— ITw^eA— No. VII. Part II 



of Bombay, is of opinion that bj the TreatieR now in force a greater snm if 
required from Kufcch than the resources of that principality can afford , as a 
proof of which there are now due to the British Government by the Kutch 
Durbar arrears amounting to 9,75,000 corries, and which the Kutch govern- 
ment is unable not only to liquidate, but even to discharge the annual amount 
stipulated by former Treaties for the pay of the troops and on account of 
An jar. The two g:overnments have therefore ao^reed to modify existing Treaties 
in the manner written iu this engau:ement, which is dated at Bhooj on this 
20th day of September 1832, being the llth day of Bhadurwa Vud, 1889 
Sumwut. 

Aktiole 1. 

The 1st and 2nd Articles of the Treaty of the 21st May 1822 are main, 
tained m force only as described in the succeeding Articles of the present 
Treaty, and the contracting parties do now engage as follows :— - 

Articlb 2. 

The Honourable East India Company's government hereby remits 
(subject to the condition specified in the 4th Article) the equivalent for Anjar, 
viz , 88,000 Ahmedabad Sicca Rupees per annum, Hxed by tlie 1st and 2nd 
Articles of the Treaty oE the 2l6t May 1822, together with nil nr rears now 
due on that as well as on any other account by the Kutch Durbar to the 
British Government, or which shall be found due on the settlement of the 
Accounts for the past year, that is, the Sumwut lK88y which terminated on 
the 1st day of July last. 

Article 3. 

His Highness the Bao Shree Dessuljee, his heirs and successors^ solemnly 
agree that the funds stipulated by the 6th Article of the Treaty of October 
1819 to be appropriated for the pay of the Kutch subsidiary force, but which 
it is herel)y declared are never to exceed the amount of two lakhs of Ahmeda- 
bad Sicca Rupees per annum, shall be hereafter regularly, without fail, and 
under any circumstances whatever, discharged by four (4) quarterly equal 
instalments, viz , on the 15ih days of January, April, July, aud October of 
each year. 

Aeticlb 4. 

The Kutch government further engages that in the event of the British 
troops in that principality being greatly diminished, and the necessary pay- 
ment on account of them being similarly lessened, so as to reduce it below 
the amount of the above remitted Anjar equivalent, that is 88,000 Ahmeda- 
bad Sicca Rupees per annum, or in the event of the entire removal of the 
troops from Kutch, His Highness the Rao, his heirs and successors, shall still 
be responsible, in either case, for making to the British Government an annual 
payment amounting on the whole to not less than the above lecited Anjar 
equivalentj or Ahmedabad Sicca Rupees 88,000. 



Part II Kutoh Agency— iPti/cA— No. VIII. 29 



Articlb 5. 

All exietingr stipnlationB and en$:agemert8 which have been entered into 
by former Treaties between the Honourable East India Company's govern- 
ment and the Government of Kutch, and which shall not have beOQ altered or 
modified by the present Treaty, are to remain in full force. 

(Sd.) Hbney Pottingbr, Lieut-Col., 

Resident in Kutok» 

W. C. Bbntinck. 
E. Babnes. 
C. T. Metcalfe. 
A. Ross. 



9f 
99 



Ratified by the Right Honourable the Governor-General in Counoil at 
Fort William in Bengal, this twenty-third day of April a d. 1833. 

(Sd.) W. H. Macnaohten, 

Secretary to tie Govt. 



No. VIII. 



Trbaty between the Honourable East India Company and the 

GOVEKNMBNT of KUTCH — 1834. 

Whereas by the 4th Article of the Treaty concluded at Bhooj on the 
lS:h day of October 1819 it was stipulated that a regency nhould be formed 
with full powers to transact the affairs of the Kutch government until His 
Highness Mirza Rao Shree Dessuljee should have completed his twentieth 
year, and whereas His Highness will not attain the above described age until 
on or about the Sri day of August 1835, nevertheless the British Govern- 
ment, desirous of affording to His Highness a strong proof of its consider- 
ation and friendship, has consented to a modification of the above stipulation, 
and this Treaty has been this day entered into by Lieutenant-Colonel Henry 
Pottinger, Resident in Kutoh, etc., on behalf of the Honourable East India 
Company, and by the undersigned Jharejas, etc., on behalf of the Rao of 
Kutch, in virtue of full powers entrusted to them by their respective govern- 
ments. 

Abticle 1. 

The period for the minority of His Highness the Ruo censing shall 
be altered from the completion of his twentieth year to Assar Soodh Booj, 
Suiuwut 1891, corresponding with the 8th day of July a. d. 1854, on which 



30 Kutoh Agency— JTk^cA -No. VIII. Part II 



day the f unci ions of the re^fncy shall tenninate and His Highness shall be 
placed in charge of the poverament of his country under the constitutional 
and established advice of his ministers and the members of the Jhareja 
Bhayad. 

Akticlb 2. 

With a viow to the welfare and prosperity of the State of Kutoh, and 
also to relieve His Highness Mirza Rao Shree Dessuljee from all vexation 
and annoyance on the subject, the British Government reserves to itself, 
agreeable to the 2nd Article of the Treaty of October 1819, the entire manas^« 
ment and control, through the Resident in Kutch, of the ex- Rao Bharmnljee, 
and will permit no interference on his part in any act of the Kutoh govern- 
ment. 

Articls 3* 

All existing cn^ragements between the two States, not modified or altered 
by this Treaty, are to be considered in full force and efficacy. 

Done at Bhooj on the 6th daji of July 1834, corresponding with Jeii 
Wuddh 14th, Humwut 1691. 

(8d.) W. C. Bbntinck. 

F. Adam. 

W. M ORISON. 

E. Ibonsiob. 



»» 



» 



CompaTiy's 
Seal. 



1. Jhareja Khangai^jee, of Roha. 

2. „ CHUNDI4RJEB, of NaugeT<»ha. 

3. DosAJBR, of Kotoree. 

4. Pkagjbr, of ^^now. 

5. SoouRAJBF, of Terah. 

6. Sahibjbb, of Vinjnn. 

7. Pragjbe, of Mohtalla. 

8. Jeymuljeb, of Bharra. 

9. Ryahjeb, of Mohtara. 
10. GoorjeEj of Sootree. 

(Sd.) Hbnrt Pottingbr, 

Hesident in Kutch. 

Ratified by the Ri?ht Honourable the Governor General of India in 
Council on the 12th September 18:34. 



Part II Kutoh Agienoy^KutoA^TSfoB. IX and X. 81 



JSO. IX. 

Proclamation issued by the Sao of Kutgh abolishing the Im« 
PORTATION of Slaves into Ktjtch— 1836. 

Be it known to the principiil merchant'^ of Mandvee, and every other 
merchant as well as trader in Kutcb, whether belonging to it or only trading 
thereto, to all navigators of vessels, to the inhabitants of Kntoh generally^ that 
if any slaves^ Negn es or Abyssinians, shall be brought for sale to any seaport 
in Kutch after the middle of July next, the vessel conveying them shall be 
confiscated, and its cargo shall become the property of this Government (Dar- 
bar). No petition for its restoration shall be listened to ; and further, the 
offenders shall be brought to condign punishment^ whether th^^y beLmg to 
Kutch or another country. There will be no departure from this resolution. A 
Tcssel which brin<r8 slaves shall be seized, and summary punishment inflicted 
on those who navigate her 

The British Government have made arrangements to suppress the trade in 
slaves throughout the arljacent countries, and it has instructed the officers 
commanding its ships to seize and retain all vessels bringing slaves. I 
therefore strictly prohibit, after the date bef »re mentioned, any more slaves 
being brou«:ht to this country ; let all my subjects disc )ntinae this custom^ 
and take heed of this Proclamation, and look to their interests and welfare by 
attending to it. 



No. X. 

1851. 

BuLES for the Exemption from Payment of Ddtie» by Vessels 
driven by Stress of Weather into any of the Kutch Ports 
whilst on their voyage between Bombay and Sindh, in Su- 
persession of those established in the year Sumwut 1897, 
Magsur Soodh 8th, 2nd December A.i>. 1840. 

Rule 1. 

Vessels from or belonging to tbe ports of Bombay, or those nnder the 
Gaikwar government, Joonagurh^ Nowanuggur, Bhownuggur, Porebundur, 
Jafferabad, and Mangrol, trading with any ports under tbe Knglish Govern- 
ment, driven by stiess of weather into Mandavee or any other of my ports, 
shall, provided they depart without having landed their cargo, or any portion 
oE it, be exempt from payment of duty on the same, with the exception of a 
charge of five corries, which is to bu levied as a fee on all vessels under the 
foregoing circumstances. 



82 Kutoh Agency— ir«^oA—Iffo. X. Fart II 



Bulb t. 

A vessel driveD into Mandavee, etc., under the dreumstanoes above 
detailed, requiring suoli repairs as will involve the necessity o^' landing her 
cnr^o, a time will be fixed under which the repairs must be cimpleted, and 
the cargfo re-shipped, when no duty will be chnro^ed, provided that during that 
time no attempt be made, eithpr by the tindal, the owners of the boat, or 
their accreditee! agents, to defraud me of custom duties by the surreptitious 
sale of any portion of the cargo. 

Bulb 3. 

A vessel driven into Maodavee, etc., under the foregoing circumstances, 
and being found unseaworthy, her cargo may^ within a specific time, be 
transhipped free of duty charges. 

Bulb 4. 

Should a boat be driven into Mandavee^ etc., at the close of the season, 
and be compelled to lay up for the monsoon, security must, in the first instance, 
be given for the full amount of customs on the whole cargo, when the gooiis 
may l)e landed and warehoused at the expense and risk of the owner or tindal 
of the vessel ; the original invoice of the cargo; nr an authentic copy, shall be 
deposited with the custom authorities; at the opening ot the season the goods 
must be re-shipped on board the vessel which brought them, unless she be 
proved unseawoithy. 

Bulb 5« 

Should it be proved that the tindal or owner of a vessel driven into 
Mandavee, etc., attempt to defraud the custom authorities of duty by the sale 
of any portion of the cargo, or should they, without satisfactory reason, fail 
to sail within the period assigned for the completion of the repairs, duty will 
be chargeable on the full value. of the cargo ; or should less be re-shipped than 
was originally landed, or any portion of the cargo have been opened, and a 
most satisfactory explanation of the cause for so acting not be given, duty 
will be charged on the whole cargo. 

All perishable or damaged articles may be sold, under the sanction of the 
custom-house authorities, on payment of the usual duty. 

BuiJB 6. 

Vessels driven into Mandavee, etc., under the circumstances already set 
forth, and strictly observing the rules now laid down, shall be allowed to 
depart on the payment of five corries (5) only ; but the infringement of any 
one of the rules now established, either by the tindal, the owner of the vessel, 
or any one of her accredited agents, shall involve the penalty of payment of 
duty on the value of the cargo. 



Part II Kutoh Agenoy^Kutch^JXo. XI. 33 



Previoas to punishing the breakers of the law now promulgated tbeir case 
must be reported to me for consideration^ the offenders in the mean time pro- 
viding approved security for their appearance to answer any charge that may 
be preferred against them, in default of which they are to be retained in con- 
finement. 

The above rules are to bd made public, and have effect from the 27th 
October 1851. 

(Sd.) Rilo Dessuljbb. 



No. XI. 

Engagement executed by the Joonagueh Dubbab, dated 

26th May 1873. 

We formerly gave an Agreement to Colonel Loner, Political Agent, on 
the 20th of December 1849, that if any vessel of the British Government or 
of the States of Kattywar were driven into our ports by stress of weather we 
wonld collect no sea customs from it. 

At that time the Maharaja of Kutch hnd not given in an Agreement to 
take no customs from ships from our ports driven by stress of weather into 
the Kutch ports, and therefore we did not make that concession to him. 

But afterwards the Rao Saheb on the 27th of October 1851 gave in 
certain regulations to Government wherein he agreed not to take customs on 
vessels from the Kattywar ports driven into the Kutch ports by stress of 
weather. 

Wherefore we hereby agree that we will in future allow to Kutch vessels 
driven into our ports by stress of weather the same exemption from ^iustoms 
as is granted by His Highness the Rao in the abovenamed regulations. 

(Sd.) Jh4LA Gokuljt, 

For m* Highness the Nawah* 

Similar Agreements executed and signed by 

His Highness the Jam Shri Vibbagi of Mowanugguri dated 28th June 
1878. 

The Joint Administrators of Bhownuggur, dated 13th May 1873. 

Bana Shri Vikmatji of Porebunder, dated 2l8t May 1873. 

Sd. J. B. Peilb, 

Acting Folitical Agent. 

F 



84 Kutoh Agency— X«/cA— Nob. XII and XIII. Part II 

No. XII. 

CUTCH AND NAVANAGAR. 

Export Ddty on Goods washed Ashore. . 

April 26U, 1884. 

The Council of Administration, Cutch, hereby agree that the Cuteh 
State will not in future levy any l!)xport duties on goods which may be 
washed ashore within Cutch territory, being portion of cargo thrown over- 
board from vessels sailing from, or belonging to, ports under the jurisdiction 
of the State of Navanagar in Kathiawar. 

This agreement is supplementary to that by His Hi^^hness the R£o of 
Cutoh on 8th October 185 1. ( Fide page SO of Aitchison's Treaties, Vol. IV.) 

(Sd.) A. M. Phillips, Lieutenant-Colonel, 

Acting Political Agent^ Cutck^ and President 

of the Council of Administration. 

(Sd.) Manibhai J., 

Divan of Cutch and Executive Member of the 

Council of Administration, Cutck. 

(Sd.) Jadbja Shbi Vbbismji, 

Jareja Member of tie Council cf Administration ^ Cutch. 

(Sig. illegible). 

Mercantile Membtr of the Council of Administration, Cutck. 

Mandvi Cutch, 26tA April 1884. 



No. XIII. 

BeneW*ed Engagement entered into by the Jhabeja Chiefs of 
KUTCH, under date the 23rd March ISIO^ renouncing Fe- 
MALB Infanticide —1840. 

The writing of Jhareja Rahebjee, Chief of Kotara, is this : — In the year 
of Sumwut 1875 (a. d. 1819) thisre was a Treaty made between the Durbar 
of Kuteh and the English government. In the 17th Article of that Treaty 
it was stipulated that we, the Jharejas^ would no longer destroy onr female 
children; and in Sumwut 1891 (a. d. 18S5) we renewed our engagement to 
the Durbar on this subject. Now the two governments have no confidence 
in the fulfil meut of our engagements ; therefore we have been summoned and 
required to cousider the following arrangement :^- 

Abticlb 1. 

An accurate aoronnt of all the sons and daughters born in the Bhayad 
shall be rendered yearly to the Durbar according to a set form. 



Part II Kutoh Agency— Jr«<cA— No. XIII. 35 



Articlb 2. 

Whenever a newly -born child is destroyed among the Bhayad the Chief 
shall give information to the Durbar, within the space of fifteen days, in 
order that th^ murderer may be visited with punishment by fine or otherwise^ 
If the Chief conceals any instance of the crime, or neglects to take such measures 
as are sure to prevent its concealment from himself, and information of its 
having been committed reaches the Durbar from another quarter, then the 
Chief himself shall submit to be heavily fined. It therefore behoves the Chief 
to take good precautions and whenever it is ascertained that the wife of a 
Jhareja has been pregnant, and the child is stated to have been born prema- 
turely, or to have died naturally, in such case four respectable men shall take 
cognizance of the facts^ and their verdict shall be reported to the Durbar 
within fifteen days. 

Abtiolb 8. 

The Durbar will keep the amount of all fines inflicted under the 2nd 
Article in a separate fund, out of which assistance will be given to any poor 
man who is marrying his daughter, on a representation of the circumstances 
being made by the Chief. 

Article 4. 

One or two mehtas from the Durbar will go round the country and when 
they arrive in any of the villages the Chief will cause accurate lists of all 
the sons and daughters to be made out for the information of the two govern- 
ments. 

To the above four Articles I do hereby agree, in behalf of myself and my 
posterity, to every generation. 

(Sd.) Jhabsja Bahbbjbb, 

Bated Bi6oj\ 23rd. March 1840. Of Kotara. 

A similar engagement was on the same day signed by the undermen- 
tioned Chiefs : — 

Jhareja Chandabhaee, of Naugercha. 
Jhareja Soomrajee, of Terah. 
Jhareja Khangarjee, of Roha. 
Jhareja Soomrajee, of Mohtara^. 
Jhareja Gorjee, of Suturee. 
Jhareja Kulian Sing, of Airysir. 
Jhareja Humeerjee, of Roturee. 
Jhareja Momyajee, of Goojoo. 
Jhareja Humeerjee, of Saudau. 
Jhareja Lukajee, of Assombeea. 
Jhareja Assaryajee, of IMureeya. 
Jhareja Jeehajee, of Kheroee. 
Jhareja Gaeejee, of Furadee. 
Jhareja Nathajee, of fiidra. 



9a Kutch Agency— JTk^cA— No. XIV. Part II 



No. XIV. 

Translation of an Engagement entered into by Jhareja Ebn- 

GABJEB, of BhoaHi On the 7th May 1846. 

Jhflreja Een^rjee, of Soomree Rhoah, writes thus: — Because in 1819 
the British Government made a Treaty with that of His Highness the BaOj 
and in the 17th Article it was agreed that infanticide should not be permittedi 
and to this effect I gave a written agreement ; again in a«d. 1833-34^ on this 
account I gave a written paper to the Durbar ; but the two governments not 
having full faith, again^ in 1839-40, took from me a fiesh writing; and now 
to make enquiries the two Sircars have summoned me to Bhooj, when all the 
above written papers and the written notice sent by Sir J. Malcolm in 18^9-30 
were all read, and regarding the 2nd Article of the Agreement of 1839-40, T 
was questioned, when it appeared that it was not altogether fulfilled ; whereas 
I could not make any excuse, I requested pardon, and petitioned that I would 
take certain measures to see that the following arrangements were duly carried 
out, re^f.:— 

Abticlb 1. 

A skilful midwife, such as shall be approved of by the Durbar writers I 
will always entertain as a servant, and she will every two months travel through 
all the villages belonging to my clan, and come and inform me of the number 
of women in labour and the number of months, that she and I may be able to 
give an account to the Durbar writer when he comes round. 

Aetiole 2. 

Whenever a premature birth shall occur this midwife will inform me of 
it, so that 1 may keep a correct account of it and of those who are in child 
labour. 

Article S. 

Thus^ as is written above in the 1st Article, the account of women in child 
labour being kept, after nine months I will cause inquiry to be made, and take 
great care about it and not neglect it ; if after this any neglect should be 
apparent on my part the two governments may take any measures that will 
satisfy them. 

Articlb 4. 

I will keep a strict register of all male and female births, with such wit- 
nesses and explanations of all deaths caused by disease, etc., as will be satisfac- 
tory to the Durbar Agents.* 

Articlb 5. 

From the form of the births and deaths of children which the Durbar 
sends annually for, the two Sircars observe that more deaths from disease 



Part II Kutoh Agency— JCW^A— Wo. XV. 87 



oocnr amongst the females than the male children, and that sufScient care and 
protection is not afforded to the former, and on this account desire greater 
cautions ; therefore I will take every possible means as above, and by every 
ot&er way endeavour, so that it may be certain the female infants will be 
carefully nourished amongst the brethren of my tribe so that it will be 
apparent to the two governments. 

Abticlb 6. 

Should any of the wives of my brethren go abroad or into any other 
country, or to the homes of their fathers, and there have female infants and 
put them to death, this will not be on my head. I only answer for what may 
take place in my country. 

Thus having in view as written in the above Articles, together, with the 
former engagements, I will be answerable that great care is taken, so that 
should any difference exist, and the arrangement not be suflScient, then the 
two governments are masters, and shall make what arrangements they choose^ 
and such shall be binding on me. 

The above in the name of my forefathers I agree to. 

(Sd.) Jhaebja Kbmgarjbb, 

Of Sooree Rhoah. 
Bated 7th May 1846. 



A similar agreement was entered into separately by the undermentioned 
Jharejas : — 

Jhareja Raibjee, of Kottorah. 
Jhareja Humeerjee, of Sondhow. 
Jhareja Saomrajee, of Teyrah. 
Jhareja Madowjee, of Vunnotee. 
Jhareja Assoreajee, of NuUia. 
Jhareja Gorjee, of Sootree. 
Jhareja Humeerjee, of Kotree. 
Jhareja Soomrajee, of Mothalle. 
Jhareja SahebjeCj of Yinjan. 



No. XV. 



Engagement executed by the Chief of the Hotheb Tribe for 
the Suppression of Female Inpanticide — 1842. 

I, Hothee KoonurjeOj of Burra Bundra^ write that there was a Treaty 
made between the English and Kutch Government in the year Sumwut 1875, 



38 Katoh Agenoj - Kuteh ^JSo. XVI. Part II 



A.D. 1819, ID the 17th Article of which all the Jhareja Bhayad agreed not to 
destroy their female children; in that agreement the whole of the tribes con- 
curred ; therefore the Durbar many times has reiterated it4i orders, bot we 
from our foolishness did not agree to this ; but now Moonshee Gool Mahomed 
came to our village to make the census, and we would not, according to the 
custom of the country, allow him to take it. This was on our part a great 
fault ; therefore the Sircar sent on us ten Mohsul sowars, and we went and 
prayed for pardon of our ofEence from the two Sircars, and agreed, aocording 
to the agreement of all the Jharejas, to keep our children alive according 
to the four paragraphs written underneath :«- 

Article 1. 

An accurate account of all the sons and daughters born in the Bhayad 
shall be rendered yearly to the Durbar, according to a set fornu 

Article 2. 

Whenever a newly-born child is destroyed among the Bhayad the Chief 
shall give information to the Durbar within the space of fifteen days, in or der 
that the murderer may be visited with punisbment by fine or otherwise. If 
the Chief conceals any instance of the crime, or neglects to take such mea- 
sures as are calculated to prevent its concealment from himself, and inform- 
ation of its having been committed reaches the Durbar from another quarter, 
then the Chief himself shall submit to be heavily fined. It therefore behoves 
the Chief to take good precautions ; and whenever it is ascertained that the 
wife of a Jhareja has been pregnant, and the child is stated to have been born 
prematurely, or to have died naturally, in such case four respectable men shall 
take cognizance of the facts, and their verdict shall be reported to the Durbar 
within fifteen days. 

Article 3. 

The Durbar will keep the amount of all fines inflicted under the 2nd 
Article in a separate fund, out of which assistance will be given to any poor 
man who is marrying his daughter, on a representation of the circumstances 
being made by the Chief. 

Article 4. 

One or two Mehtas from the Durbar will go round the country ; and 
when they arrive in any of the villages the Chief will cause accurate lists of 
all the sons and daughters to be made out for the information of the two 
governments. 



No. XVI. 
The Cutch Bhayad Settlement of 1876. 

1. His Highness the Rao shall keep a list of the persons entitled to the 
guarantee. The list will be subject to the approval of Government^ and may 



Part II Kutoh Agenoj^Kutck^TXo. XVI. 89 



from time to time be amended by the Rao with the sanction of Government. 
The gaarantee-holders will be divided into five classes. 

2. The members of the Jareja Courti who shall be four in number^ will 
be appointed by the Rao ; they will be selected from among the members of 
the Shayad. His Highness' Divan or Deputy Divan will also be appointed 
member, and will be ex-officio President of the Court. Three, including the 
President^ shall form a quorum. 

8. Cases of every kind, in which a guarantee-holder is concerned^ or to 
which a khalsa subject is a party against a resident on a guarantee-holder's 
estate, or which arise between residents on different estates, shall be decided'by 
the Court. The Court shall also have jurisdiction in other cases arising on 
the estates of guarantee-holders, subject to the following limitations :•— 

(1) In criminal matters the original jurisdiction of the Court, in 

eases arising in 1st class estates, shall be limited to such as 
involve a sentence of more than veven years' imprisonment, ov 
Koris 6,000* fine. 

In cases arising in 2nd, Srd and 45th class estates, to such as involve a 
sentence of more than two years or Koris 2,000 fine, three months or Koris 
800 fine, and fifteen days' imprisonment or Koris 50 fine, respectively. The 
Court shall have jurisdiction in all cases arising in 5th class estates. 

(2) In civil matters the Court shall have no original jurisdiction in 

1st class estates, and in cases arising in 2nd, 8rd and 4th class 
estates its original jurisdiction is limited to eases where the 
value of the disputed property exceeds Koris 10,000, Koris 
2,000 and Koris 200 respectively. 

(8) The penal and civil laws for the guidance of the Court and of the 
four dasses in the exercise of the above powers shall be the 
same as those for the time being in force for the khalsa portion 
of the Rao's territory. 

(4) Sentences of death, transportation for life and fourteen years' 
imprisonment to be confirmed by His Highness the Rao. 

4. The proceedings of the Court shall be conducted in accordance with 
the rules to be framed by His Highness the Rao, subject to the approval of 
(Government ; these rules shall also contain provisions for the right of the Rao 
and for the power of the Court to impose mohasals and also for fees. 

5. An appeal, subject to the exception hereinafter mentioned, from all 
decisions of guaranteed Zamindars shall lie to the Court, and from all deci- 
sions of the Court to His Highness the Rao, with a further appeal to Govern* 
ment, when the party dissatisfied is a guarantee-holder, with respect to cases 
involving the possession of land and his old right of dues. No appeal, how- 
ever, shall lie from the decisions of holders of 1st class estates in cases involv* 
ing a maximum sentence of three months' imprisonment or Koris 200 fine, or 
of 2nd class estates when the maximum sentence shall be one month's impri- 
sonment or Koris 100 fine. In civil cases no appeal shall lie from decisions 

• Q. B. No 2488, dated Srd May 1886. 



40 Kutch Agency— JCWfcA— No. XVI. Part II 



oE zamindars of Ist class estates^ when the value of the property in dispute 
does not exceed Koris 5,000 or Koris 2^000^ in cases arising in estates of the 
second class, provided that class-holders shall have no final unappaalable powers 
in reofard to Mulgirassias residing on their estates, and provided that it shall 
be within the discretion of His Highness the Rao, with the concurrence of the 
Political Agent, to call for and, if necessary, quash the proceedings in any 
case in which it may be shown that injustice has been committed. 

6. Boundary disputes wherein a guarantee-holder is a party shall be 
decided by the Court, with appeal to the Darbar, and a farther appeal to Gov« 
ernment, if the party dissatisfied is a guarantee-holder ; but boundary cases 
in which the Darbar is a party shall be decided by the Courts with an appeal 
to Government. 



Rules por Procedure. 

*Ihe following Rules for the conduct of business in the Jareja Court of 
Kutch have been framed by His Hi^^hness the Rao and approved by Govern- 
ment, in accordance with Article 4 of the new settlement— 

1. Due notice shall always be given to the members of the Court of the 
cases to be brought before it, and the President, before deciding any case, shall 
ask the opinion of each of the members present, and shall record the same in 
the proceedings, the decision resting solely with the President. The opinion 
of all the members of the Court will, in appeal, be duly considered by the 

* Qovernment Resolution No. 5113, Appellate authority, provided that any case 
dated 11 th November 1878. may be decided, by the President without 

consulting the other members of the Court if, after due notice, they absent 
themselves from the sittings of the Court.* 

2. Should the near relation or private servant of any Jareja member be 
concerned in any case, or should the member himself or his rayat be parties to 
any suit or case before the Court, such member is precluded from sitting in 
judgment in any such case. The decision of the President on auy such case to 
DC final. 

8. The following matters of business may be disposed of by the President 
solely :— 

Signature of any writ, order, summons or other judicial process issued, or 
made in the exercise of the Court's original jurisdiction. 

Admission and rejection of plaints. 

Applications for extension of time generally. 

Applications for arrest and attachment before judgment. 

Orders concerning production and admission of documents. 

Attachment of property. 

Applications for Commission to examine witnesses. 



Part II Kutoh Agenoy— Jr«^A-No. XVI. 41 



AppKcatioDS for, or connecfced with execution of decrees^ sales ia execu* 
tion^ etc. 

Applications for leave to sue in /ormd pauperis. 

Applications for orders of reference or arbitration. 

Applications regarding t))e conduct of suits. 

Applications for management of property. 

Inquiries as to the fitness of persons to act as trustees^ receivers^ etc. 

Inqoiries as to sufficiency of bail. 

Preliminary investigation and committal of persons for offences com- 
mitted. 

Applications for registration of appeals. 

Applications for refund of money paid into Court. 

Applications for review of jndgment. 

Power to transfer any case. (Rule 4s.) 

The President may, however, refer any of the above matters to the Court. 

4. It shall be competent for the Jareja Courts in any case within its 
original jurisdiction arising in a Srd, 4th or 5th class estate, to depute to 
any Nyayadish appointed or to be appointed by the Darbar, power to try the 
same. No sentence shall be imposed by any such Nyayadish exceeding 12 
months' rigorous imprisonment or fine of Koris 800. The decision of such 
Nyayadish shall be forthwith reported to the Court, which shall pass such 
order thereon as it shall think fit. 

5. An institution fee, at the rates mentioned in the schedule hereto 
annexed, shall be levied on all suits tried before the Court, save in the matter 
of Political cases, which latter shall comprise boundary cases, <^ Hookoomut '^ 
cases and '^ Yenchun '' cases. 

6. The Court shall have power to impose mohasals on any person in the 
matter of disobedience of its orders. Mohasali orders shall be in accordance 
with custom, and no mohasal shall exceed Koris 5 or Re. 1-5-1 per diem, to be 
computed from the day of issue to the date of return. The following distance 
per diem to be allowed for mohasals :— * 

Foot — 8 kos. 

Hor;?e — li kos. 

7. In the event of the non-payment of any mohasal imposed the Court 
shall recover the mohasal in the same manner as in the execution of a decree. 
The right to pardon mohasals His Highness the Rao reserves to himself. 

8. For sufficient reason more than one mohasal may be imposed on any 
person by the Court. 

9. The rights of His Highness the Rao to mohasal shall be restricted to 
Hii Highnesses right as '' Suzerain/' and shall be, in the case of any guarantee- 
holder^ solely in execution of any legitimate order of His Highness as such. 

o 



42 Kutch Ageny-Kuirh—'No. XVII. Part II 



10. The execution of the Courts' processes, decrees, onlers, etc., shall be 
nrrang^ed tiirough the medium of the Court's own officials in Darbari and 
Bliayadi territory. His Highness the Rao, as well as class-holders, shall co- 
operate in aiding the Court's officials in this matter^ and no obstruction shall 
be raised in any case in which the Court has legitimate jurisdiction. 

11. The Court ^hall furnish such returns as may he called for bj His 
Highness the Rao, and it is incumbent on the Courts in guaranteed estates^ 
likewise, to furnish such returns as may be demanded of them by the Jareja 
Court, for submission to higher authority. 

12. All persons who shall apply may be admitted to practise as Vakils 
of the Court^ provided that they obtain and hold a " Sanad '' from the Court 
to practise as such. The issue of '' Sanads ^* shall be subject to rules that may, 
from time to time, be framed by the Court for the examination and regiatn- 
tion of \'akils. 

IS. Any person authorized and wishing to appeal to the Court must file 
the petition of appeal within 60 days from the date of the decision appealed 
against^ a true copy of which must accompany the petition. 

14. The expenses for witnesses shall be regulated by the rules in the 
Kutch Code. 



No. XVII. 



rilOCLAMATlON bv II IS UIGHNE8S tbc RaO of EUTCH tO lllS 

Subjects — 1869. 



Seal. 



Mahakaja Dhikaj MiKZA Maua Rao Shree Puagmuljee 
Bahaduok, to the population of Kutch generally. 

To wit — That for the security of those among you who, for the purposes 
of trade, etc., permanently reside in, or come and go to and from, the country 
of Zanzibar, I have, at the suggestion of Government, given notice in a yad 
under date the Kartuk Sood ht, Sumvut 1922, through tlie l*olitical Agent^ to 
the exalted Government^ that the claims and disputes with any other persons 
of those of you who permanently reside in, or frequent for the purposes of 
trade, the ports of Muscat and other places in Africa and Arabia and the 
Persian Gulf, and in other countries where my subjects may reside, should h& 
settled by the British Government in the same way as if you were its own 
subjects^ consequent on tlie Treaties concluded with Government. 



Part II Kutch Agency- Kuich No. XVIII. 43 



You formerly carried on trade in slaves. But this traffic having been 
forbidden by the will of Government a Proclamation to the effect that if 
any slaves, Negroes or Abyssinians shall be brought (to Kutch) by any one 
for sale, the vessel conveying them with its cargo will be confiscated, was 
issued by my late father, under date the Maha^ vide 5th Sumvut 1892. 
Notwithstanding this I am now informed through Major Shortt, the 
Political Agent at this place, by the Political Agent at Zanzibar, at the direc- 
tion of Government, that the subjects of Kutch residing at Zanzibar are now 
engaged in the slave trade. From this it appears that you have not yet 
abandoned this trade. It is therefore hereby ordered that if you persist in 
the traffic in slaves the Oovemment will, by virtue of my aforesaid permission 
treating you (who reside at Zanzibar) as its own subjects, liberate all slaves 
from your possession, and will not, however large the number of slaves so 
libeiated, award any compensation whatever, nor entertain any claim in 
regard thereto ; and besides, the perpetrators will be punished there according 
to the law there prevailing, and you will also be considered as criminals, liable 
to punishment here (in my domain). Note this well, and take warning. 

Oiven in Eis Big Anest's presence tits 13 1 A day of the 1st Vaisak Soadj 
Sumvut 1925 of the Vikram era^ corresponding with 24th April 1869. 



No. XVIII. 



Translation of a Proclamation, dated 16tli December 1872, 
issued by His Highness the Rao of Kutch to his subjecls 
in Zanzibar. 

Maharajah Dhiraj Mirza Maharao Shree Pragmuljee Bahadoor, to all 
the Kutch subjects residing at Zanzibar. To wit, that it has come to our 
knowledge that you carry on at Zanzibar the trade of buying and selling in 
slaves. Tbis is a most horrible thing, and by the desire of the Honourablo 
Government to put a stop to this practice, we as well as our revered father 
have before this time issued Proclamations. Notwithstanding these you havo 
not abandoned this horrible tradcj which is very bad on your part. You are, 
therefore, hereby commanded not to persist in this trade at all events, and if 
you are practising it to abandon it at onqe on receipt of this command. He 
who in spite of this shall follow this trade, or in any way abet or assist in the 
same, shall be punished severely by the Honorable British Government, con« 
sidering him to be their own subject, by virtue of the power given them for 
the purpose, and this Durbar will confiscate all his property fituated in Kutch. 
Therefore takestrict warning. Given in His Highne«s's presence this Monday, 
the 1st Magsur Vud, Sumbut 1929 of the Yikram era, corresponding with 16tl\ 
December 1872. 

A similar Proclamation was issued to his subjects at Muscat. 



44 Kutch Agenoy— iTtr^cA— No8. XIX and XX Fart II 



No. XIX. 

Adoption Sunntjd granted to the Rao of Kutch. 

Her Majesty being desirous that the Governments of the several Princes 
and Chiefs of India who now govern their own territories should be perpe- 
tuated, and that the representation and dignity of their houses shouUl be con- 
tinued^ I hereby, in fulfilment of this desire, convey to you the assurance that 
on failure of natural heirs the adoption by yourself and future rulers of 
your State of a successor according to Hindoo law and to the customs of your 
race will be recognized and confirmed. 

Be assured that nothing shall disturb the engagement thus made to you 
so long as your house is loyal to the Crown and faithful to the conditions of 
the Treaties, grants, or engagements^ which record its obligation to the British 
Government. 



Fort William ; 
The nth March 1862, J (Sd.) Canning. 



} 



No. XX. 



Salt Agreement with the Rao of Kutch. 

January 16ih^ 1885. 

Agbeement between Lieutenant-Colonel George Risto Good- 
FELLOW, Political Agent, Cutch, acting under the author- 
ity of the Governor in Council of Bombay, and His 
Highness Maharaja Dhiraj Mirza Maha Rao Shri 
Xhengarji Bahadur, Rao of Cutch, for the regulation 
of the manufacture of, and trade in, salt in the Outoh 
State. 

His Highness the Rao agrees on behalf of himself, his heirs and sncoes- 
sors as follows : — 

1. That the Darbar of Cntoh shall adopt effectual means to prevent the 
exportation from Cutoh, either by sea or by land, of salt manufactured or 
spontaneously produced in the State to any part of British India or of any 
foreign European Settlement in India. 

2. That the Darbar of Cutch shall exercise an efficient control over the 
manufacture of salt and the collection of natural salt within Cutch territory. 

3. That the Darbar of Cutch shall make careful arrangements to watoh 



Part II Kutch Agency— Jr«fcA— No. XX. 46 



the land and sea frontiers of Cntoh with a view to prevent exportation of salt 
from any part of Cutch to any part of British India, or of any Indian Native 
State^ or of any foreign European Settlement in India. 

4. That the Darbar of Catch shall^ by public notification, prohibiti under 
pain of severe penalty, the exportation of salt from Cutch either by sea or by 
land to any part of British India, orof a Native Indian State, or of any foreign 
European Settlement in India. 

6. That the Darbar of Cutch shall so regulate the export of salt from 
Cutch to foreign ports outside of India, and shall place such export under such 
safeguards and checks as to prevent any salt so exported from finding its way 
into any part of British India, or of any Native Indian State, or of any foreign 
European Settlement in India. 

6. That the Darbar of Cutch shall not permit any salt to be exported 
from Cutch to any foreign port outside of India unless the vessel contaioing 
it is bound direct for that poit. 

7. That no vessel bound from Cutch to any port situated in British India, 
or a Native Indian State, or any foreign Euroi>ean Settlement in India, shall 
be permitted to carry salt as its sole cargo or as part of its cargo. 

8. That the Darbar of Cutch shall bind the owner or Captain of any 
vessel carrying salt for exportation from Cutch to any foreign port outside of 
India not to touch on the voyage at any port in British India, or in a Native 
Indian State, or in a foreign European Settlement in India, unless driven 
thereto by stress of weather, and in case he is so driven to any such port to 
give the earliest intimation of arrival to any British or Native Ofhcer residing 
at the port, and not to land any part of the salt contained in the vessel at such 
port. 

The Governor in Council of Bombay agrees that so long as the Darbar of 
Cutch fulfils the conditions aforesaid, the system and rules established in 
Cutch in one thousand eight hundred and eighty and now in force with 
regard to salt shall be and remain in abeyance. 

And His Highhess the Rao agrees on behalf of himself, his heirs and 
successors, that if at any time the Darbar of Cutch fails to fulfil the said con- 
ditions the British Government shall be at liberty to reintroduce the said 
system and rules of one thousand eight hundred and eighty. 

(Sd.) O. K, GooDPBLLOw, Colonel^ 

Political Agent ^ Cutch. 

(Sd.) Bag KHSNOABn. 

/HisN (^^'^ DOPPBEIN, 

(Excellency*! j Viceroy and Oovernor General of India. 

J)ated at Bku;, the I6tk January 1885. 



45 Kutch Agency— -Kir/cA— Wo, XXI. Pa^t II 



This agreement was ratified by His Excellency the Viceroy and Gor- 
ernor General of India at Fort William on the thirteenth day of February 
A.D. one thousand eight hundred and eighty-five. 

(Sd.) H. M. DURAKD, 

Officiating Secretary to the Government of India, 

Foreign Department. 
Certified that the al>ove is a true copy of the original agreement. 

(Sd,) W. Lbb- Warner, 
Offg. Under-Secretary to the Oovernment o/^ India, 

Foreign Department. 
Fort William, the 13th February 1885. 



No. XXI. 



Agrbem£NT with His Highness the Rao of Kutch for the con- 
struction of a Telegraph line from the Eastern bound* 
ART of the State to Mandvi — 1890. 

Whereas the State of Kutch is desirous of having a line of telegraph 
constructed from the Eastern frontier of the territory of His Highness the 
Kao of Kutch to Mandvi, a town on the Gulf of Kutch to be worked in 
connection with the British lines of telegraph, the following terms are agreed 
upon by the Political Agent, Kutch, on the part of the British Government 
duly empowered by the Viceroy and Governor-General of India in Council, 
on that behalf, and by His Highness Maharaja Dhiraj Mirza Maharao Sir 
Shri Khengarji, Sawai Bahadur, g.c.i.b., Bao of Kutch, on behalf of himself 
and his successors :— 

1. 

The British Government agrees to construct for the Kutch State a line 
of telegraph consisting oE one wire to be carried on suitable supports to be 
erected between the Eastern frontier of Kutch and Mandvi, through Bhuj, 
at a cost oi one lakh and eleven thousand rupees (Rs. 1,11,000) more or less, 
and the State agrees to pay to the British Government the cost of the line 
as the money may be required. 

2. 

The line so constructed shall be called the Kutch Branch Telegraph line. 



Part II Kutch Agency— JTk^cA— No. XXI. 47 



3. 

With the oousent of the Governor-General in Council extra wires may 
at any time be ndded by the Teltjraph Department for the Kutch State on 
terms and conditions to be agreed upon at the time between the Kutch State 
and the Government of India. 

4. 

The Kutch Branch Teleg^raph extension shall be kept in efficient repair, 
managed and worked entirely by the officers of the Telegraph or Postal De- 
partments of the Government of India. It shall not be dismantled without 
the consent of the Government of British India. But should it at any time 
be given up the value of the materials of which it is composed shall be 
refunded to the Kutch State, less the cost of dismantling apd returning them 
into store. 

5. 

The State of Kutch shall pay annually to the British Government to 
cover the cost of repairs and maintenance a sum calculated at tbe rate of 2^ 
per cent, per annum on the capital expenditure, and also Rupees 5 per mile 
of line to cover cost of line establishment and minor charges of the telegraph 
between the Eastern frontier of Kutch and Mandvi. These rates may be 
changed at any time hereafter, after one year's notice has been given to the 
State of Kutch. 

6. 

The entire receipts at the Telegraph Offices at Ardesar, Aujar, Bhnj and 
Mandvi. and at any other office within the territory of His Highness the Rao 
of Kutch on the Kutch Branch Telegraph extension, shall be credited annually 
to the Kutch State, and the actual cost incurred in keeping open and working 
the said offices shall be debited annually to the Kutch State. If the receipts 
exceed the cost of the offices, together with the charges under Article 5, the 
surplus shall be paid by the British Government to the Kutch State ; if the 
cost exceeds the receipts the difference shall be paid by the Kutch State to 
the British Government. By " receipts'' is to be understood the value of the 
fees levied at the offices aforesaid, on Inland messages and the Indian share 
of Foreign messages despatched from the offices aforesaid. 

7. 

The accounts of the Kutch Branch Telegraph line and of the offices 
maintained on it shall be rendered yearly to the State of Kutch, and the 
charges and balance shall be adjusted without delay. 

8. 
The Kutch State shall provide free of rent such accommodation for the 



48 Kutoh Agency— JTn/cA— No. XXI. Part II 



offices that may be opened on the Eutch Branch Telegraph line as the Director 
(ieneral of Telegraphs shall consider necessary^ and shall keep the same 
in good repair. 

9. 

The State of Kntch agrees to apply to the Kutch Branch Telegraph line 
the provisions of the British Telegraph Act, XIII of 1 885, and each other 
Acts or legal provisions as have been or may hereafter be passed by the 
British Government with reference to Tel^raphs. 

10. 

The State of Eutch agrees to apply to the Kntch Branch Telegraph 
line any rales or regulations that are now or may hereafter be made applicable 
to lines of telegraph in British India. The British Oovemment will under- 
take to fxirnish the Kutch State with accurate translations of such Acts, Bnles 
and Regulations. 

11. 

The State of Kutch agrees that the Kutch Branch Telegraph line shall 
be open to the inspection and supervision of the Director- Qeueral of Telegraphs 
and of any officer deputed by him for that purpose. 

Dated at Bhuj this fifth day of November one thousand eight hundred 
and ninety. 

(Sd.) Rao Khenoabh, 

Sao of Kutch. 

Wiinesa. 
(Sd.) MOTILAL Lalbhai. 

(Sd.) W. A. Salmon, 

Political Agent ^ Kutch. 

Witness. 
(Sd.) M. V. Dbsa, 

Head Accountant, Kutch Agency. 



Approved and confirmed by His Excellency the Viceroy and Governor- 
General of India. 

FOEEIGN DbPARTMENT, "^ (Sd.) W. J, CUNINGHAM, 

FoBT "William j V Officiating Secretarf to the 

Th$ 18th December 1890^ ) Oovemment of Indian 



Part II Cambay. 49 



IL— CAM BAY. 

Bombay Government Recorde No. XXVI of new Series, and original papers in 

the Foreign Department, 

The founder of the ruling family in Cambay was Mirza Jafar Nizam-1- 
Saniy better known as Momin Khan> the last but one of the Muhammadan 
Governors of Gujarat. While he held the office of governor his son-in-law 
Nizam Khan had charge of Cambay. Momin Khan died iq 1742. His son 
Muftakhar Khan or Nur-ud-din, who had made an unsuccessful effort to 
succeed his father in the government of Gujarat^ went to Cambay to collect 
forces to assert his cause, and there basely compassed the death of Nizam 
Khan and assumed the government of Cambay^ which he held till his death 
on the 22nd January 1784. His rule was marked both by the blackest crimes 
and cruelties and by his brave resistance and diplomatic evasion of the en- 
croachments of the Mahrattas. In the partition of Gujarat between the 
Peshwa and the Gaekwar in 1752 Cambay fell to the Feshwa's share, but the 
dues which he claimed from it were never regularly paid^ and Nur-ud-din 
even levied exactions from the Peshwa^s districts of Gogha, Dhandhuka and 
Kathiawar, captured Ahmadabad, and for some time held it against the 
Mahratta forces. When the British Government had, in 1771, reduced the 
piratical Kolis of Talaja the fort of Tulaja was made over (No. XXII) to the 
Nawab of Cambay in consideration of a payment of Rupees 76,000. Two 
years afterwards, however, the fort was, at the Nawab^s own request, trans- 
ferred to the Chief of Bbaunagar,^ by whom the sum of Rupees 75,000 
was paid, and whom the Nawab had bound himself (No. XXIII) not to 
molest. Nur-ud-din was succeeded by his son-in-law Muhammad Kuli. His 
claim was disputed by Mirza Jani, the illegitimate son of Nur-ud«din, but 
after a severe struggle he succeeded in expelling his opponent and establish- 
ing his own power. He ruled for six years, and was succeeded, on the 7th 
February 1790, by his son Patch Ali. 

With the exception of the adjustment of some disputes with the Gaek- 
war the British Government has interfered but little in the affairs of Cambay. 
Under the Treaty of Bassein the chauth, or fourth share of the revenue of 
Cambay and all the Peshwa's rights in Cambay were ceded by him to the 
British Government. The chauth had been originally granted to the Gaekwar 
in 1736, in consideration of assistance he rendered to the Nawab in cipturing 



• See Kathiawar Agencj, Vol. VI- 



60 Camba.v. Pert TI 

Ahmadahad^ and had fallen to the Peshwa's share in the partition of Gujarat. 
After the cession of the chauth to the British Government it was^ at the 
Nawab'fl request, farmed to him (No. XXIV). The ag^reemetit was not re- 
newed on the expiration of the farm in 1807. The chauth, however, con- 
stitutes the tribute which the Nawab now pays to the British Ooveitiaietit, 

tJnder the treaty of Bassein the British Government succeeded to the 
chauth or tribute payable by the Nawab of Cambay to the Peshwa^s Govern- 
ment. The prin*cipal item of this tribute consisted of a nominal half share 
in the sea and land customs, deducting the expenses of collection. In Feb- 
ruary 1858 the British Government relinquished its share of the land customs 
in consideration of the introduction of the excise duty on salt into Cambay 
territory, but the Nawab retained his share in the land customs^ although he 
was admitted to a half share in the new excise duty. He was however asked 
to revise the highly complicated and onerous tariff of sea customs then in force 
at Cambay, by which every article of trade was subjected to pay duty under 
many distinct heads, the duty varying on several articles, and being differ- 
ent according to the port to or from which the vessel was bound, or according 
to the caste of the trader interested. Although this tariff was highly injuri- 
ous to trade some time elapsed before the Nawab of Cambay consented to in- 
troduce reforms. Eventually, a Committee composed of two high Native 
officials of the British Government and some officers on the part of the 
Nawab was appointed to settle the matter. The principle on which the 
Committee proceeded was to substitute a fixed percentage duty for the multi- 
farious exactions of the Nawab in the shape of sea and land customs. The 
nature of the arrangements finally made will be gathered from the Agree- 
ment '(No. XXV) concluded with the Nawab. Revised* arrangements 
were subsequently sanctioned for carrying out the distinction made as 
regards the treatment in British Indian ports of goods arriving from or 
destined for Cambay being the manufacture or produce of that city or 
intended for its consumption, and goods which might only pass the town of 
Cambay in transit.f The British Government consented to forego the annual 
payment of Rupees 748-5-2 made by the Nawab on account of the Golana 

• See page SO. 

t The result of these Birangcments is that goods, the produce or manufacture of the town of 
Cambf»y, when exported bv sea, are Subject to a duty of five (a) per cent., and on import at any 
lii itish ports to the import duties leviable on foreign goods under Bombay Act I of 1852. 



(•) See pages 60-6?. 



Part II Cambay. ^^ 

and Galiana Nakaa, as by tiiese arrangements i^ll trade pasaing thrpugh the^ 
beeame free. 

By a further Agreement (No. XXVI), which came into effect from the let 
April 1884^ the arrangements made in 1866 were cancelled and the Nawab 
adopted the British customs tariff and system^ the Imperial Oovernmf>nt aban- 
doning all claims for chauth and all interference with the collections : liberty 
was, however, reserved to resume direct control if the Nawab's management 
proved unsatisfactory. 

In 1881 the Nawab executed an Engagement (No. XXVll), by which he 
undertook to prohibit the cultivation of the poppy and the manufacture of 
opium in his State. 

Ixi the same year was also concluded an Agreement (No. XXVIII), which 
provided that in consideration of an annual payment of Rupees 40,000 the 
salt-works in Cambay should be permanently closed, and measures should be 
taken to prevent the manufacture, collection, importation or exportation of 
illicit salt. 

The Nawab Fateh AH died on the 28th October 1823, and was succeeded 
by his brother Bande Ali Khan. He died in 1841, and was succeeded by bis 
nephew Husain Yawar Khan, in whose favour the brother of Fateh Ali resigned 
his claims. He received a Sanad (No. XXIX) guaranteeing any succession 
to his State that might be legitimate according to Muhammadan law. On 
his death, in April 1880, he was succeeded by hia eldest son, Jafar Ali Khan, 
the present Nawab, who is now 43 years of age. 

In a letter (No. XXX) addressed to the PoUtical Agent, dated the 
25th February 1888, His Highness the Nawab undertook to remove all 
restrictions on free trade in his State. 

By an Agreement (No. XXXI), dated the 18th August 1889, signed by 
His Highness the Nawab, and approved and confirmed by His Excellency the 
Viceroy and Governor General, the Abkari revenue of Cambay was leased 
to the British Government for a period of ten years from the 1st January 1888 ; 
and the lease is renewable at the option of the latter, on payment to the 
Nawab of a compensation of Rupees 35,000 annually in monthly instalments. 

In September 1890 His Highness the Nawab was obliged to leave his 
capital in consequence of the occupation of Camb^^y by a riotous mob; and he 
appealed to the British Government for aid to restore order. The Political 
Agent, with a company of sepoys, proceeded to Cambay, and, as the rioters 



52 Cambay. Part II 

refused to disperse^ and even routed the Cambay police who were sent against 
them^ it was necessary to employ the troops. Several lives were lost, and 
after order was restored a minute inquiry was instituted, which disclosed a 
state of bankruptcy and general mis-government. A special officer was sent 
to advise the Nawab, and the administration was put under his control 
with the consent of His Highness. The late Diwan, Shamrao N. Laud^ 
was declared ineligible for service in Cambay, and the whole administration 
was reformed. 

The area of Cambay is about 850 square miles, and the population (1891)^ 
89,72*3. The revenues are about Rupees 6,04,504. The military force 
of the State consists (1891) of 12 field guns, of which 9 are serviceable^ 42 
cavalry, and 407 infantry and police. The Nawab has first class jurisdiction, 
having power to try for capital offences any persons except British subjects. 
He is entitled to a salute of eleven guns. Cambay is under the political super-^ 
vision of the Collector of Kaira. 



Part II Cambay-No. XXII. 58 



No. XXI I. 

Taakslation of the Treaty entered into with Nawab Momun 
Khan, Governor of Oambay, for the Sale of the Fort of 
Tarrajah, with its Ammunition and Dependencies, 1771. 

Articlb 1. 

That in oonsideration of the Honourable Company selling and making 
over to him and his heirs the fort of Tarrajah^ its dependencies and ammuni- 
tion, the same as when taken from the Koolies, he^ the Nawab, agrees to pay 
them (the Honourable Company) the sum of Rupees seventy-five thousand 
(75,000) in the term of five years, at five yearly equal payments of Rupees 
fifteen thousand (15,000) each; the first payment of Rupees fifteen thousand 
(15,000) to be made twenty days after the NawaVs forces have got possession 
of Tarrajah fort, and the remainder to be paid punctually by the Nawab on 
the very same day of every year after as the first payment was made, until 
the whole sum of Rupees seventy-five thousand (75,000) is received. 

Aeticlb 2. 

As the Honourable Company have been pleased to show their great 
regard and favour to him (the Nawab) in giving him the fort of Tarrajah, 
he most solemnly declares he will on no account enter into any terms or 
friendship with the Koolies, or assist them by either sea or land, -or sufier their 
boats to enter any territories belonging to him, or he himself fit or equip any 
piratical boats, and look upon any enemies of the Honourable Company as his 
enemy also, but will distress such as much as possible; neither will he, on any 
account whatsoever, deliver the fort of Tarrajah, or any part of the country, 
to either the Koolies or any other country power whatsoever, without the 
consent of the Honourable Company first had and obtained. 

Aeticle 8. 

That shouH the Honourable Company at any time hereafter have occasion 
to act against the Koolies of the other districts, the Nawab very willingly 
agrees to let the Honourable Company have the use of the fort of Tarrajah 
and its dependencies for the use of their troops whilst they may be there, 
and order his people to assist them with whatever they may want, provided 
they do no damage to the fort or its pergunnah, which in such case is to be 
made good by the Honourable Company. * 

Abticle 4. 

Should any power whatsoever attack or disturb him (the Nawab) in his 
fort of Tftrrajah and its dependencies, he requests the assistance of the 
Honourable Company to keep him in possession, as he must now look upon 



54 Cambny-No. XXIII. Psi-t II 



himself as one of their servaDts ; aud any chari^res sustaiued by the Honour- 
able Company by such their assistance^ he, the Nawab^ most readily agrees to 
defray as soon as he conveniently can ; and should the Honourable Company 
have occasion for his troops, he, the Nawab, is very ready to follow their 
orders with such a number of forces as they may require ; and the Honourable 
Company is to pay such expense as may be inourred on that aocouQt a« soon 
as may be convenient to them. 

Abticlb 5. 

He requests the Honourable Company will send him a proper convoy for 
conyeying his troops to the Kooly coasts and that a sufficient force may meet 
them on the shore to escort them to and deliver them the fort of Tarrajah ; 
and he requests the Honourable Company will supply him with thirty (SO) 
barrels of gunpowder, and fifty (50) maunds of lead^ for the use of Tarrajah 
fort^ which he^ the Nawab, agrees to pay for. 

Abticlb 6, 

He promises and agrees to make the first payment by the time above 
mentioned unto Mr. John Torlesse by transfer upon the shroffs^ and for the 
remainder four payments he makes over the revenue of the Mocawt and 
Cosbaw ; and should it please God to distress the said revenue by want of 
rain, enemies^ or the like, he (the Nawab) then agrees and promises to make 
the same good himself. 

Approved by the Government of Bombay on 28rd April 1771. 



No. XXIII. 



Tbanslation of a Writing from the Nawab of Cambay, 1771. 



L. s. 



Ag££EM£NT between the Honoueablb English Ea^t India 
CSoMPANY and Momun Ehan, Nawab of Cambay. 

Agreeable to what I have been requested by Mr. John Torlesse^ Resident 
at Cambay, I now do promise that should Gogo at atiy time again fall into 
my hands, and the Honourable English Company be desirous of having a 
factory there, I will grant it to them, and on no account whatsoever suffer 
any other European nation to settle there ; also from the long friendship 
subsisting between the Honourable English Company and me, I have hear- 
kened to the recommendation they have been pleased to give to Eckarajee 
and Gopaljee Servia. I will on no pretence whatever meddle with or trouble 



Part II Cambay— No. XXIV. 65 



the ancient possessions of Eckarajee, the son of the late Bowgung, ror tlie 
town or fort of Bhownaffur, and take no more than what has always been 
usual for the possessor of the Bunder of Gogo to take, and what I took when 
I was in possession thereof, and no more will I demand. And with respect 
to Gopaijee Servia, I will give neither molestation ; but I do request th it 
after this agreement, the Honourable Company will not recommend any more 
persons of that conntry to me. And by the help of God, I and my heirs will 
stand to all agreements hitherto entered into between us. 

Written with my own hand this 12th day of the moon Bifjjub, year 1185, 
or 22nd October 1771. 



No. XXIV. 



Translation of an Engagement executed to the Honourable 
Company by Jwallanath Saheb Roy in behalf of his 
master Nizamood Dowla, Mamtazoolmoolk Momin 
Khan Bahadoor Dilawar Jung, of Cambay, for the farm 
of Cambay of Ohouth and Nappaar, for the year 1860, or 
1803-04, which has been ceded by the Feishwa to the 
Honourable Company. 

Articlb I. 

I a^ee to pay off muckta or stipulated revenue for 
Company and the Tuppa of Nappaar^ on the follow- 
ing conditions ... ... ... Rs. 90,001 

Article 2. 

Deduct expense— 

Nappaar, viz. — /?*. 

20 Cavalry for 1 2 months, at Rupees 20 each 

per month ... ... ... i^'SOO 

10 Peons for recovering revenue at Rupees 3 

per month ... ... ... 360 

Oentiogent chanrges called sadeed ... SOCT 

1 CaroooQ ... ... ... 200 

5,860 



56 Cambay— No. XXIV. Part II 



Cambay — 

8 Mehatauns writers upon the Melial 
8 Peons ditto 



••• 



400 






288 


tf88 






• •• 


6,548 


e, Rs. 


83,453 



Articlb 8. 

Payment of the above sum to be made by the following instal- 
ments^ vig» — 

Kartick Sood 12th, or *7th November 1803 ... 18,000 

Pous Sood 12th, or January 1804 ... ... 20,000 

Chitre Sood 12th, or April 1804 ... ... 22,000 

Jeit Sood or end of the year iu the month of June ... 23,453 

83,453 

Article 4. 

I will pay the amount of three instalments fully, but for the last there 
may probably remain a balance in the cultivators^ hands, which shall not, 
however, exceed Rupees 2,000, for the advantage of the pergunnah the 
following year. 

Article 5. 

Should asmany or sultany happen (calamities from the elements or war), 
the loss sustained thereby to be duly considered by the Company agreeable 
to custom. 

Article 6. 

Whatever custom has obtained from time immemorial of receiving from 
the ryots little offerings (such as vegetable, etc.), it shall not be prevented, 
provided they are free and voluntary gifts. 

Article 7. 
Some garrison sepoys to be allowed for the fort of Nappaar. 

Article 8. 

If any repairs should be required for the fort of Nappaar, it shall be 
made by the Comavishdar with the sanction of the Resident, and in that case 
the charge must be credited by the Company. 



Part II Cambay— No. XXV. 67 



Article 9. 

Wunihasun^ or usual allowances to the Brahmins, dawasthans^ khyrat, 
dhurmadao, or charity^ etc., should these be ordered to be continued^ it shall 
be credited by the Company. 

Article 10. 

Should any enemies or other disturbance of the peace appear, the com* 
manding^ officer in the fort of Nappaar will proceed against them on being 
informed of the circumstance by the Comavishdar, or, in his absence, by the 
Garcoon. 

Article 11. 

I will collect from the mehal, over and above the amount of Rupees 
90,001 of rent, on account of our toolebe, etc., a sum not exceeding 
Rupees 1,000. 

Article 12. 
AgreeaUe to the foregoing promises I will act. 



No. XXV. 

Agreement coDcluded between His ExcSllenct the Nawab of 
Cambay and the Bbitisu Goyebnment, regarding the levy 
of Transit Duties on Goods IiIfobted and Expobted by 
Sea through the Fort of Cambay. 

From the manifest of imported goods, those intended for transmission to 
other places shall be entered in a separate memorandum, which shall be signed 
by the customs officers of both Governments and sent to the transit officer. 

2« Goods intended for transmission to other places shall be deposited 
either in the Outside Custom House, or on an open place in front of it. 

5. These goods shall be examined and compared with the memorandum 
mentioned in the 1st paragraph, and weighed or measured as the case may be, 
after which the goods shall be entered in the books of both Governmeuts, 
and the amount of duty to be levied determined. 

4. Then the amount of duty in Cambay, old currency^ due to both 
Governments, shall be levied from the merchant^ and a receipt granted with 
the signatures of both officers, showing the amount levied by each. 

6. After which each package of merchandize shall be stamped, and 

permission to remove the goods granted, whether for transmission by sea or 

land. 

I 



68 Cambay— Na XXV. Part II 



6« No Rahadaree goods shall be allowed to enter the city, but shall be 
taken direct. 

7. All export and import goods intended for transmission to other places, 
fvhich shall not be taken away and dnty paid within one month, shall be 
liable to the higher rates of duty fixed for goods imported into, and exported 
from, the town of Cambay. 

8. Duty shall be levied without delay on all transit goods at the Out- 
side Custom House ; and if they are not taken away within one month, the 
higher rate of duty shall also be levied. 

9. Transit goods, which shall be taken by any road into the city, or 
which, having been stored near the city, sliall afterwards be brought into it, 
shall be treated as smuggled, and dealt with accordingly. 

10. With the exception of holidays and Sundays, the officers of customs 
of both Governments shall be present at their duties every day from 10 a.k. 
till 6 P.M. 

11. Out of every rupee levied on transit goods, the Nawab shall take 
eight annas under the name of " expenses/' four annas shall be taken by the 
Biitish Government, and the remaining four by the Nawab. The details of 
the eight annas taken by the Nawab as '^ expeuses '' are as follows :-^ 

Isl. — From this the Nawab is to build a custom house on the bunder for 
the purposes of au office and for the depositing of transit goods. This office 
is to be for the use of both Governments and as a ware-house for goods. 

2nd. — The Nawab to make arrangements for the protection of all transit 
goods as far as his own frontiers, and keep the roads in his own territory in 
repairs. 

dri;?.— After these objects have been effected, should there be any balance 
left^ the Nawab is to be at liberty to expend the same in repairing the walla 
of the city, or in any way he pleases. 

12. If ever any change should be deemed advisable in the above arrange- 
ments, none shall be made without the consent of both Governments. 

13. Transit goods have been classed, and are to pay duty according to 
different rates, yet there are many descriptions of goods not classed ; with 
regard to these, as many as possible shall be classified, and this shall be done 
by the customs officers of both Oovemments, and witJi the sanction of both 
Governments. 



Part II 



Oambay— Na XXV. 



59 



Memorandum of rates of transit duty agreed on between the British Govern^ 
ment and the Nawab of Cambay to be levied under the name of '' Khurajai 
or expense on the under^mentioned articles imported at Cjmbay for transit 
and brought to Cambag by land for export by sea in lieu of present sea, 
land customs, and other levies to which such goods are now subject. 



At 1| anmui per 
Btand, or Ut. 
8 p«r oart-load. 



6ftff)roii 
Coebineal 
Yermlllioii 
Elephant t«eth. 
Vantlocbon 
Roscapnor 
QaicktllTtf 
Copper . • 
Tin . 

8AiiJe«n . 
Camphor 
Qainoe sMd 
Bine vitriol 
Verdigris 
Brass 
Inikgo • 
Cho<xiee MsUa 
Tobsooo . 



DSBOBIFTZOV Of ▲BTIOX.TB TO ST VAXSD. 



At 1 sons per msund. or 
Bf. S per cart- 
load. 



At \ anna per mannd. 
or Be. 1 per cart- 
load. 



Silk . 

Eorope piece-goods 

Cardamoms 

Cloves 

Nutmegs 

Mace . 

Cinnamon . 

Akiilknra . 

Hing . 

Tea . 

Khiiimiss . 

Bfftelnat (Sewnrdhon) 

Capoor Catchrree 

Tnmaalpateee 

t<ead, red , 

Soap . 

Glass-ware . 

Almonds 

Obee . 

Coooanat-oil 

Honey . 

Cutlery 

Sagar . 

Sagarcandy 



Cotton yam 

Jagree 

Coriander . 

Cummin seed 

Turmeric . 

Alum • • 

Almonds (false) 

Black raisin and red 

Betelnnt (Mangiole) 

Dates, wet . 

l>ates, diy • 

Copra . • 

Bellama 

Senna leaves 

Nesotnr • 

Rose iowerSi^ dry 

Brimstons • 

Goolall 

Dammer . 

Oum . • 

Soomngee • 

Snnchora • 

Oautb • 

Fennel seed 

AJmood 

Sowah • 

Dry ginger . 

Iron tars . 

Cotton 

Spirits or liquor, Europe 

Castor oil • 

GInJelly seed 

liinjelly oil 

Castor seed . 

Bursa seed 

Chunam 

Iron and sted 

Ironware • 

Spelter 



At 8 pies per 
maund, or 8 an- 
nas iMr cart- 
load. 



Chonan stones 
Grain. 
Oil-cake or pe- 

nock. 
Cotton seed 
Vegetables and 

fruits. 



} 



Description of goods to be 
taxed on their nombers 
without refereuos to 
weight. 



Bs.a.p. 
Cocoannt, per 1.000 .10 

Bamboos, per 1,000 .10 



Rafters, per 100 .080 
Teak and black tlm- 8 
bers, per cart. 



Large timbers, per 8 
cart. 



Hambloes, per 4,000 10 



Brooms, per 1,0^ .010 



VatSt date, per corge 8; 



The rates of dnty, as shown in colnmns from 1 t) 5, shall be levied under the name of *' Khnrqjat " on alt 
goods imported into Cannbay for traoHit, and on roods brought to Cambiy for export by sea, in lieu nf sea and land 
customs and all other levies to which such goods are now subiect. and oat of every rupee so levied on such voods 
the Nawab shall lake eiirht annas on account of expenwe for protecting trnde within his territories, and four annas 
shall be taken by the British Oovernmont, and tiie remaining four annas by the Nawab. 

Ail articles not entered in the above Schednle are to bo classified and entered in it by the Cnstom House 
OfBeers of both Oovemments, and Mubmitted for approval, and the value of each article as entered in the Borobuy 
tariff is the value on which the classlfloaUon is to be based, and any article? which may be omitted are to ba 
considered as in the 8rd Class. 



\ 



•O Cambay-No. XXV. Part xi 



Memokandum of Arkangembnts made by His Excellency the 
Nawab of Cambay and the British Gotebnment regarding 
Customs Duties to be levied on goods Imported into the 
City of Cambay and on goods the produce thereof when 
Exported by Sea. 

The manifest of all goods imported by sea^ the vessels reg^'ster^ and any 
papers received at the port of departure, shall, on the vessel's arrival, be pre- 
sented by the tindal to the customs officers of both Oovemments, and they 
shall make entry accordingly in their books, and give orders for the landing 
of the cargo. 

2. I'he merchant shall write on the said manifest a memorandum to the 
effect that such and such goods (if any) are for transit, and the Custom 
House officers of both (joveiimients thaXl then send to the officer at the 
Outside Custom House a Memorandum of such goods duly signed and nam* 
bered, a corresponding number being written on the manifest. 

8. For all goods to be imported into, or exported from, tiie city, tkf 
merchant shall present a ''bumttm'^ (a written application) duly signed, and 
the goods mentioned therein shall be duly examined, weighed, etc., in the 
presence of the officers of both Sircar's and tne value be determined according 
to the Bombay tariff, and duly levied for both Governments together in old 
Cambay currency, according to the schedule hereunto annexed, after which 
each Government's share shall be separated and credited by the officers ol 
both Governments, and a receipt for the total signed by both offieers given to 
the merchant. If the description of goods be not found in the Bombay tariff, 
then they shall be valued at the bazar price. 

4. For all goods exported from Cambay, the tindal shall prepare a general 
manifest in duplicate, and for any goods therein, which are transit g^ods, a 
memorandum to that effect, and showing that duty has been paid thereon, 
shall be written on the general manifests by the officers of the Outside 
Custom House, which documents shall then be presented at the Inside Custom 
House, where they will be compared with the books there, when the manifests 
shall be signed by both officers, and one given to the tindal and one kept in 
the Honourable Company's Offioe, a copy being taken by theNawab's officer; 
the port clearance shall also be signed by both officers* 

* 5. The officers of both Governments shall also levy anchorage fees from 
the owners or tindals of vessels according to the rates prescril>ed in the 
linnexed schedule in one sum and in Cambay old currency, and divide their 
shares after giving to the payer a receipt signed by both. 

6. Goods shall pay duty according to the tables hereunto annexed, but 
there are some articles, such as srrain, firewood, timber, etc., which cannot at 
onoe be brought to the Inside Custom House ; these shall, therefore, be taken 
to the old Meerbeer Chowkee, where they shall be examined and duty levied 
according to the tables and a receipt from both Sircars granted, the shares 
being divided after; but although duties of customs on certain goods are to 
be levied near the Meerbeer Chowkee, yet it is clearly understood that all old 
Meerbeer letiAs are abolished i 



ritaM 



Part II Cambay- No. XXV. ei 



t. All goods to the value of Rupees 80, or petty customs, wJ^ther at 
the Inside Custom House or at Meerbeer Chowkee, shall pay duty according 
to the rates in the schedules, and shall be examined in the presence of the 
oflScers of both Oovernments, and one receipt fot the total sum levied granted 
as above : the shares to be divided afterwards. Of these petty customs, one« 
fourth under the name of *' khoirat ^' (charit}) to be deducted every day, 
and the balance to be credited under the head of '' Petty Customs/' 
The '' khoirat '* of both Oovernments shall be kept in one account book, and 
according to present custom, out of this sum, charity is to be dispensed to 
the lame, fuqueers, blind, etc., by procuring for them gi*ain, drinking water, 
etc., and the expenses entered in the book by the officers of both Governmeuts. 

8. All goods, whether import or export, are to be stamped after the 
duty is levied. 

9. The method of conducting the Kavec Ferry is not to be altered, but 
kept as it is by both Oovernments. 

10. Except the demands authorised by this arrangement entered into 
by both Oovernments, no other levy of any kind, nor under any name> 
is to be made by the customs officers of either Oovernment. 

1 U A true copy of each general manifest shall remain with the Nawab's 
officer, while the original and any papers from port of departure shall remain 
with the Honourable Company's officer. The '^ buruttia '' or written appli- 
cation, after having been examined and signed by both officers, shall be given 
to the Nawab's officer for his records, but shall be shown to any other officer 
at any time they may be required. The dufters of both Governments shall 
be kept so as to correspond. 

12. With respect to smuggled goods seized, they shall be brought into 
the Custom House, and the officers of both Governments shall, as usual, make 
due enquiry into the matter, and the Nawab's officer shall take copies of all 
the papers relating to the enquiry, while the original papers shall be sent to 
the Office of the Deputy or Assistant Commissioner, and whatever orders 
shall be received with respect to each case shall be acted on in the same way 
as at present; but if the decision of the European officer shall seem to 
the Nav^b to require being modified, the Nawab shall write his opinion 
on the subject, when it will be taken into consideration. 

18. Whenever the Nawab's Darogah shall send a note with his signa- 
ture, that such and such provisions are for the use of the Durbar or the 
establishment of the Nawab, they shall be passed free and entered in the 
books as free, and whatever provisions in transit for Europeans, as are at 
present passed free, so they shall be continued to be passed without any hind- 
rance. Provisions of the value of Kupees L5 belonging to travellers, and of 
the value of Rupees 5 belonging to inhabitants of the city, shall be allowed 
•to pass free either way. 

14. The Inner Custom House, now in a dilapidated condition, shall be 
repaired at the expense of the Mawab, and both Oovernments shall have 
therein an Office, a Treasury, and a record room; and for the Company's 



Cunbay— ITo. ZXV. 



officers exclusively another catcheny for all purpoeei aball afterwuda be built 
hy the Nairab. 

15, With the exception of holidays and Siindaya, the eerrants of both 
Govemmenta shall att«nd in the Custotn Hoasa from 10 A..if, to b p.h., and 
shall not make any delay iu the transaction of buEineas. 

16, Piece good^ mannfactured in Carabay are not in tbe tariff, and 
cornelions are put down in the tariff at a Tery low price ; therefore every three 
years a Comiiittee consisting of merchants and the officers of both Oovern- 
meuta shall enquire into the prices of these tliiaga in the bazar, and fix the 
price thereon for the levy of duty under the sanction of both Oovemmenta. 

17, In the annexed schedule are laid down the rates of the Beveial 
huks ; accordiog to that the sums are to be deducted at the time of dividing 
tbe shares of both Go vera men ta, and credited in a separate account book 
kept for that purpose, the entries being signed by the officers of both Oov- 
ernments — tbe money to be kept in the Nawab's tnasnry iu the Custom 
House ; and at the end of eveir month these officers shall give to the hiikdars 
what is due to them, and take their receipts for the same, and whatever 
bnkdare are doing duty, both Uovernmente shall see that they do tbeii dnty 
properly, 

18, No change to be made in the above arrangements without tii« con- 
sent and sanction of both Oovemmeuts. Aecordiug to tliese present arrange- 
ments, the custom dnties thall be carried on; tbe old system with regard to 
neighing, rates, etc., to be abandoned. 



Statement tkowittg the rate of Sea Cvttomt duiiet o» goodi imported into and 
exported from the town of Cambay, and ef anchorage feet to be levied on 
veiteli arriving at Cambay, at agreed upon by tie Britiek Government 
and Bit Sxcellencf the Nawab in He year 1856- 





1! 

§3 


N.w 




1 
J 


II 
51 

Hi 




.\". 




DtBCaiPTIDN 

on lioOUd. 


1 
1 




,1 

1 


...„...„.. 




BegKtrj Collllata. 








E....P, 


lta...p 


B^t-p. 


R...... 


„..,l...... 




B....I> 


m 


Kr..pir 


1 7 


1 7 


.10 


1 . C 


.10 


... 


Fr<mliolOCuiai« 

„ 31 M M 


1 00 


l«t| 


On ktl K«dl n- 
potld 10 wh»t. 


,.. . 


I IS 


1 10 


lit 


... 


... 


„ 41 to K> ., 

„ «1 ta M ., 

„ ai lo 100 .. 


::: 


lit! 



Part II 



Cambay— No. XXV. 



63 



Statement of tie diitribntion of the Euk allotaanees from the Customs and 
Anchorage fees levied at the Port of Camhdy^ as agreed upon by the 
British Government and the Nawah of Camhay conjointly. 







OV iKTOBTa. 


Ov ExroBTe. 


•ssa 

£9JS3 




is 


Hnkdara on the 
dnties former- 
ly taken at the 
Meerbeer. 


tag 

1 


Hnkdara on. the 
dntiea former- 
ly Uk en at the 
Ueerbeer. 


Mooarnff ••••••• 

Canoofo of the Cnetom Hoane and 
CanooRO with Paahan of Meerbeer . 
Thakor^e* Notwerla^ee of Ahmedabad— eli^ 

aeeoant of the Ca<ion; Houee leviea. 
ThakoreJee Navlndhplajee of Cambaj— claln 

aecount of the letiea at Meerbeer. 
Dharmada ••...•. 

Seekmar 

KhaanoTish of Britinh novemment . 

Ditto of Nawab Saheb 
IiotmeenaTiah *•..., 
Yarairee ...... 

Mahdrojee .••••., 

Bwameeaaiyen • . . . . 

Jeaee .••••• 


• 

} 

Im on 

a on 


Ba. a. p. 

8 

6 

'6"'o 6 

6 
10 

■•■••• 
9 


Be. a. p. 

8 
10 

1 6 

6 

6* 7 
18 


Ba. a. 

1 



6***6 


1 

•• ••• 


p. 

6 

6 

8 

8 

4 


Ba. a. p. 

8 
1 8 

1 7 

6 

0***6 6 
1 

• • ••• 

6 


Ba. a. p. 

7 
10 

8| 

0**6* 8 

i* 

n 6 

1 
2 



TOTAI 


[. 


6 


6 


6 





6 4 



Rf. 



Amended 11th Abticlb of the Agbeement with the Nawab of 
Cambay in year 1866| regarding Bahadabeb Collections. 

Amended Abticlb 11. 

Eight annas in each Rupee of the Bahadaree^ or transit collections^ shall 
be shared equally between the British Oovernment and the Nawab. 

The remaining eight annas shall be disposed of as follows :— 

1st. — A fixed establishment, as per margin, 

under the supervision and orders of the 

Nawab, shall be maintained for the protection 

of goods in transit within the Cambay ter« 

^_^ ritories. The strength and pay of this 

Bopoeo . 4,9S0 establishment not to be changed without the 

consent of Gbvernment 

Snd.'^Ol the balance, one-third shall be devoted to educational purposes, 
and shall be expended under the direction of the Political A^ent of Kaira 
on account of the expenditure being annually forwarded to His Excellency 
the Nawab. 

dr^.— The remaining balance to be spent by His Excellency the Nawab 
in such a way as to promote the health and convenience of his subjects. 
Detailed accounts of expenditure to be kept, which the Political Agent of 
Kaim shall be entitled to inspect when desirous of so doing. 



24 Peono 
8 Soimro 

Contiiigeneioo 
1 Karkoon . 
UnkdMif, etc 



» 



»i 



1,920 

2,400 

180 

150 

800 

4,9S0 



64 Oambay -No. XXVI. Part II 



No. XXVI. 

Ageebment between His Highness Japfeb Ali Ehak, Nawab 
of Cahbay, and the Beitish Government, in supersession 
of the agreements entered into by the Nawab of Oahbat in 
one thousand eight hundred and fifty-six, regarding the ad- 
ministration of the Customs Department and the levy of 
Sahdari and Transit duties in the State of Cambay, — 1885« 

1. The treaties of one thousand eight hundred and fifty-six are hereby 
cancelled and in lieu4hereof it is mutually agreed as follows. 

2. His Highness the Nawab of Cambay has, from the first day of April 
one thousand eight hundred and eighty-four^ introduced the British customs 
tariff at his sea-ports, and whenever from time to time the British Govern- 
ment may make alterations or modifications in such tariff^ His Hio^hness the 
Nawab shall make similar modifications in the tariff at his ports. His High** 
ness the Nawab shall further follow the system, use the forms and observe the 
rules in force in British custom-houses^ and shall in all respects assimilate, so 
far as it may be possible, the procedure in his custom-houses therewith. His 
Highness shall not allow the importation by sea into the State of Cambay of 
any fermented or spirituous liquor or the importation or exportation by land 
or sea of any opium except opium duly covered by a British pass. 

3. The British share or chouth on sea customs, anchorage fees and mis- 
cellaneous customs fees is hereby commuted in perpetuity (as the ckouik on 
land revenue has already been) for an annual payment by His Highness the 
Nawab to the British Government of two hundred British Indian rupees. 
The said payment shall be made by His Highness the Nawab to the British 
Treasury at Barsad on the first of April in each year. 

4. While reserving to themselves all rights of control and management 
in the Department of Customs in the Cambay State, which they hold by right 
of conquest from the Peshwa, the British Grovemment will, from the date of 
this agreement taking effect, hand over to His Highness the Nawab the con- 
trol and management of the custom-house at Cambay, and will withdraw from 
Cambay territory their Sarkarkun of Customs and the Mahalkari of Cambay, 
together with the establishments subordinate to these officers, respectively, 
and will abstain from exercising their rights of control and management in 
the Department of Customs in the State of Cambay for so long as the arrange- 
ment in that behalf made by His Highness the Nawab prove satisfactory and 
subject to the following conditions, namely :— 

(a) The British Grovemment shall maintain a special officer, who 
shall be allowed a seat in the Cambay Custom-house and shall be author- 
ized to inspect and scratinize and copy all customs documents and boobs 
and all custooui business transaoted there and in all other places in 



Part II Cambay— No. XXVI. 65 



Carabay territory, as well as to examine all i^oods landed or shipped or 
water-borne to be landed on or from Cambay territory. 

(6) The British Government shnll maintain such establishments as 
they may deem necessary for the prevpntion of salt-smug'gh'ns; and clan- 
destine practices relating to salt in Cambay territory; but the mainte- 
nance of snch establishments by the British Government shall not affect 
the ob1i|^»tions undertaken by His Highness the Nawab himself to pre- 
vent salt-smngcfling' of all kinds, as well as the consumption withio 
the limits of His Highness's State of any salt on which the British ex- 
cise has not been paid. 

(e) The British Government will resume direct control and ma- 
nagement of the Department of Customs in Cambay if the arrangements 
made by His Highness the Kawab do not prove satisfactory. 

5. The British Government and His Highness the Nawab of Cambay 
respectively, agree to discontinue for ever the joint and separate levy of 
Kahdari and Transit duties of all kinds and of all the petty cesses mentioned in 
the schedule hereto attached^ as well as of all similar cesses except such as are 
strictly of a municipal character and fall on the consumption or inhabitants of 
the town of Cambay exclusively ; provided that His Highness the Nawab may 
continue to levy as heretofore on bis own account a royalty on mintage, di- 
vorce and marriage registration-fees, and fees for stamping weights and 
measures. 

6. The British ehouth on the land revenue having been commuted for 
ever, the British Government will not share in any possible increase of land 
revenue following a revision of assessment. 

7. His Highness the Nawab shall pay the Hakdars the same proportion 
of the total customs receipts under the British tariff as was allowed to them 
in the agreement of one thousand eight hundred and fifty -six (page 309, 
Vol. IV, Aitchison's Treaties). 

8. This agreement has taken effect from the first day of April one 
thousand eight hundred and eighty-four, and is binding also on the heirs and 
successors *ot His Hicrhness the Nawab. 

Dated this second day of April one thousand eight hundred and eighty^ 
five. 

Witness. 

(Sd.) Shamrao N. LiiUD, (Sd.) (In Vernacular), 

Diwan of Cambay Slate. Nawab of Camhay 

(Sd.) Jhaunbhai Natbubhai, (Sd.) Arthur Hume Sprt, 

Head Clerk, Kaira Collector's Office. Political Agtni^ Kaira. 



Supplementary Declaration. 
The British Government, in view of the completion of these arrangemttnts 

K 



66 Cambay— Ho. XXVI. Part II 

with the Nawab of Cambay, hereby forages the payment oE the earn of rnpees 
two hundred stipulated as conamutEktioQ in Article 8 of the Agreement dated 
the second day of April one thousand eight hundred and qighty-five. 

Witness. 
(Sd.) SHAtfBAO N. Laud. (Sd.) Abthub Huhx Spbt, 

(Sd.) Jhaukbhai Nathubhai. Political Agent, Kaira. 



Sciedule of Tastes, Fees and Cesses Jointly and separately levied bf the British 

and Cambay Oovemments and now to be abolisAed. 

L Moteshi — 

1. Fees levied for stamping weights and measureey per shop. 

2. Fees for erecting or repairing buildings on— 

(a) Public thoroughfares— 
(1) Carpenters. 
{%) Bricklayers. 
(8) Tile-turners. 

(4) For each door or window fronting main road^ 

(5) For each new verandah do. 

(J) On minor streets— 

(1) On every verandah. 

(2) On every door. 
(8) On every window* 

8. Fees levied at the Divali— 

(1) From each confectioner. 

(2) From each potter. 

(8) From each seller of fireworks. 

4. Fees levied at the Holi — 

(1) From each parched gram maker. 

(2) From each confectioner. 

6. Fees levied during the monsoon— 

(1) From milk sellers for selling boiled milk at every Agiaras. 

(2) From each toy seller at Shrawan fairs. 

(8) At Droathul feast from every Khoja (sweet-meat seller). 

6. Fees levied from each betel-leaf seller, per year. 

7. Fees levied from each iron shopkeeper, per year. 

8. Fees levied from each parched gram seller, per month. 

9. Fees levied from vegetable sellers, per shop per diem. 
10. Fees levied from— 

(1) Fruit and spices sellers, per shop per month. 

(2) Those who sit in the public roads to sell vegetables per 



Part II Cambay— No. XXVL 67 



11. Fees levied on caste feasts of Panjigars (Warp-pasters)^ per feast. 

1 2. Fees levied on mango warehouses, per warehouse. 

IS. Pees on every cart laden with plantains that enters the city. 

II. Nazrana^ 

1. From the panch of cotton-seed sellers, per year. 

2. Do. of firewood sellers do. 

5. Do. of Dasi Bania or cloth sellersi per year. 
4. From the Kanooga of salt do. 

6. Do. Panch of rice-beaters do. 

6. Do. Kanooga of Ghu Kanta do. 

7. Do. Panch of Sootaria do. 

8. Do. Panch of Judia (weavers) do. 

9. Do. Kanooga of Noherji do. 

10. Do. Kanooea of cotton*seed sellers do. 

11. Do. Nakardass of Noherji do. 

12. From the potter, per wheel. 

13. Do, Panch of smoking pipe-makers. 

14. Do. do. of Sathuria. 

15. Do. do. of cocoanut sellers. 

16. Do. do, of pulse sellers. 

17. Do. do. of Pinjara. 

18. Do. do. of oil sellers. 

19. Do. do. of coppersmiths. 

20. Do. do. of vegetable sellers. 

21. Do. do. of flour sellers. 

22. Do. do. of tobacco sellers. 

23. Do. do. of perfume sellers. 

24. Do. do. of weighers. 

25. Do. do, of butchers, 

26. Do do. of grain dealers. 

27. Do. do, of ganja sellers. 

28. Do. do. ofWadiFalia, 

29. Fees from the abkari contractor. 

III. Kotwali Chabutrc 



1. Fees levied on every cart laden with plantains. 

2. Do. on every shop of vegetable sellers. 

3. Fees on re-marriages in the town and suburbs^ other than Machipura— - 

(1) By widows. 

(2) By divorced women. 

lY. Machipura Chabutro*- 

1. Fees on every deed transferring the right to landj for building sites in 

Machipura, and to salt-pans. 

2. Fees levied from tobacco sellers, per shop per annum. 
3 Pees on retail oil sellers, per shop per annum. 

4. Fees on re-marriages in the Maohipura suburb^^ 

(1) By widows. 

(2) By divorced women. 



68 Cambay-No. XXVII. Fart II 



V. Mint— 

J. Fees of one ingot weight of copper coins levied at every time that 
oop)>er ingots are weighed. 

2. Fees of five annas on every crucible used in silver-melting. 

3. Rb. 8-1-8 00 every 1,000 rupees coined. 

4. Basal Duragi Be. 1 on every 1,400 rupees weight of '* moos/' per 

moos. 

5. Rasal Khasumesi uf 5 annas on do. do. 

6. Fees of 2 annas 5 pies on one maund of copper coined. 

7. Baspl Durazi fee of 1 unna on do. 

8. Basal Khasumesi fee of half anna on do. 

Witness. (Sd.) (In Vernacular), 
(Sd.) SflAMB^o N. Laud. Nawab of Camha^m 

( ,, ) Jhaunbhai Nathubhai, ( fy ) Abthub Hums Sfbt, 
Head Clerk, Kaira Collecfor's Office. Political Agent ^ Kaira. 

I \ (Sd.) Duffebin, 

( Seal. \ 






Viceroy and Governor Qeneral of India^ 



'Ihis agreement was ratified by His Excellency the Viceroy and Grovernor 
General of India at Simla on the eighteenth day of June A.D. one thousand 
ei^ht hundred and eighty-five. 

(Sd.) H. M. DUBAND, 

Secretary to the Government of India, 

Jforeign Department, 

Certified that the above is a true copy of the original agreempnt. 

(Sd.) W. J. CuNINQHAMy 

Simla, Officiating Under Secretary to the Government of India, 

The 2i)th June 1885. toreign Department. 



No. XXVII. 



'Pranslated Substance of copy of an Agreement passed by 
His Excellency the Nawab of Cambay in respect to the 
manufacture and sale of Opium in that State, without 
date, and received and ordered to be translated on the 8rd 
November 1881 : — 

1. The cultivation of the poppy and the manufacture of opium to be 
put a stop to. 



Part It Cambay— No. XXVIII. 60 

2. The Nawab should seiid for from the British Government's dep6t at 
Ahmedabad, or some other place, all the opium required for consumption. 
No other person except the Nawab's Surkar (officials ?) shall sell it from the 
Ist October next. 

3 Sections of the Indian Opium Act bearing on the subject, and the 
rules framed under that Act from time to time, will be enforced in the 
Cambay State in accordance with the usage of theNawab's Court. 

4. The stock of opium or its juice which cultivators or merchants may 
possess should be sold before the Ist October. The Nawab will purchase 
the stock of opium which may remain after that date, and resell it to licensed 
parties at the cost price, and on the payment of the full duty. 

5. After the 1st October the price of opium sold in retail in Cambay 
should not be less than that prevailing^ in Kaira. 

6. A half-yearly account showing the quantity of opium imported into 
Cambay and sold, the proceeds of the sale, and the quantity of opium 
remaining, should be sent to the Political Agent. 

7. The Nawab will conduct himself in accordance with the preceding 
six paragraphs. The opium on which the duty has not been paid will not be 
allowed to be imported into Cambay. Opium will not be sold in ntail in Cam- 
bay at a price less than that prevailing in Kaira. In lieu of this the British 
Government agrees to pay to the Nawab the whole of the duty, viz., Rupees (650) 
six hundred and fifty per chest on the opium which^as stated above, may be 
imported for consumption in Cambay. 

(Sd.) S. P. PONDIT, 

Oriental Iraitslator to OovernmevL 



No. XXVIIT. 



Agreement between the British Government and Nawab 

Jaffer Ali Khan of Cambay — 1881, 

Whereas the British Government and Nawab Jaffer AH Khan of 
Cambay are equally animated by the desire to draw closer the ancient ties 
of friendship which unite the two Governments^ and wliereas it has been found 
expedient to close the salt works in the territory of Cambay, in the profits 
of which the two Governments have hitherto shared, the contracting parties, 
viz,y the two Governments aforesaid, hereby agree together in the manner 
following :— 

AllTIOLB 1. 

The Nawab having, since the 19th day of March 1878, closed the 
Cambay salt works and discontinued the manufacture of salt, undertakes 
henceforward to keep the said salt works closed and to suppress the manufao* 
lure of salt in his territory. 



70 Cambay— No. XXVIIL Part H 



Aktiolb 2. 

All works in Cambay territory shall be kept flooded, and otherwiee 
effectnally rendered incapable of yielding or producing salt. 

Artiolb 8. 

The Nawab also undertakes to prohibit and prevent the clandestine 
manufacture of salt and collection of natural salt on the banks of the Mybe 
river or elsewhere, throughout his territory, and also to prohibit and prevent 
the importation into, and exportation from, his territory of any salt other 
than British duty-paid salt. 

Abticls 4. 

The Nawab furthermore undertakes to continue the payments to Hak- 
dars and charitable institutions at the rates and in the manner provided in the 
schedule annexed to his agreement, specifying the names of the recipients 
and the amounts payable to each, subject to the usages and customs to be 
observed by, or on the part of, the sidd Hakdars ana charitable institutionSj 
respectively, in that behalf, 

Aeticlb 5. 

In consideration of the faithful and efEective discharge of the foregoing 
obligations and undertakings, the British Government agrees to pay to the 
Nawab's Government the yearly sum of Rupees 40^000 (forty thousand) in 
two equal instalments, the first of such instalments of Rupees 20,000 (twenty 
thousand) shall be payable on the 10th day of January, and the second in- 
stalment of like sum of Rupees 20,000 (twenty thousand) on the first day of 
July of each and every year. 

Article 6. 

The British Government further agrees to deliver 500 (five hundred) 
Indian maunds of salt annually free of all charge at the Annand Station for 
the consumption and use of the Durbar, 

Artiolb 7. 

In the event of the re«opening by the British Government of the salt 
works closed since March 19th, 1B78, referred to in Article 1, the yearly payment 
to be made to the Nawab's Government under Articles 5 and 6 shall be dis- 
continued from the date of such re-opening, and all the rights and privileges 
connected with the manufacture of, and the levy of duty on, salt enjoyed by 
the Nawab prior to the closing of the salt works shall be restored to him. 

In witness whereof the Nawab hath hereunto set his hand and seal this 
] 7th day of March one thousand eight hundred and eighty-one. 

Signed, sealed, and delivered by the 
within-named Nawab Jaffer Ali ^ (Sd.) Jaffbr Ali Khan. 
Khan in the presence of 

(Sd.) Shamrao N. Lukd, 

Dewan of Catnbay. 



Part IX Cambay-No. ZXVIII. 71 



Seiedule re/ erred to in Article 4 of the Agreement beftoeen tie British Oovern* 
ment and Hie Excellenc]/ Jfafer Aii Khan, Nawab qf Cambay, 

Amount of Hat. Hamee qf Hakdare. 

Re. a, p. 

1,516 11 Hig Excellency the Nawab. 

Re. a. p. 

1,281 12 10 Por*'Balai." 

94 12 For "^ Vaka^tnamBi.'' 
189 8 1 Watching charges. 

Kanugae, 

4iO 15 9 To Damodar and Itohashankar aliae Amtha and 

Nana Magan, heirs of Isliner Aditram, in equal shares. 

440 15 10 Bechae Mansnk Jetha and Bai Ghanga, widow of 
Ganpatranii heirs of Mugat Asharanij in equal shares. 

Musarfi. 

189 8 1 Nnrdi Mahomed Khan|heir of Begum Jan^ daugh- 
ter of Nnrza Bajibeg. 

Nakedar. 

Bowji Modji. 

OalaJbhai Dalabhai. 

Bapu Sojan Sing. 

Malliar Sing Baji. 

Joita Tejsang. 

Bhowsing Ujam Sing alias Ghela Wajesang. 

Rama Jibawa. 

Chotalal Cbamanlal and Lain Bhowsing, in eqnal 
shares. 

Joita Bapnji. 

Lain Joitaram. 

Joita Wakhatsang. 

Chotalal Jofthibhai. 

Shewaklal Portab 9in?. 

Hakimboo, widow of Oafar Basul. 

Oalbhai Thakorji 

Bai Ulaty widow of Narsing Nanabhai. 

Shewaklal Ujamsang. 

Kalia Kesrisang. 

Magan Joitaram. 

Cho?aI ChanuuDu 

Bai Aambai. mother of Kali Kakabhai. 

Kalia Dayabhai. 

Bai Adity widow of Daya Govindram and Bai 
Mankoorer^ mother of Oirjashanker Ghelaj in eqnal 
shares. 



6 


4 


3 


5 


4 


S 


5 


4 


8 


6 


4 


8 


5 


4 


3 


5 


4 


8 


6 


4 


8 


5 


4 


8 


5 


4 


8 


6 


4 


8 


5 


4 


8 


5 


4 


8 


5 


4 


S 


6 


4 


8 


6 


4 


8 


6 


4 


8 


5 


4 


8 


6 


4 


8 


6 


4 


3 


& 


4 


8 


5 


4 


8 


5 


4 


8 


5 


4 


8 



72 Cambay— No. XXVIII. Fart II 



Names of Hakdars. 

Rawji Jitaram. 
Abdul Karim Walde Chand. 
Rasul Latif. 
Jetha Rodhwaram. 

Lalu Bhowsang and Chotalal Chamanlal, in eqnal 
shares. 

Bai Waju, widow of Bapu Bhagwan. 

Bohim Rosal. 

Bai Biban, wife of Sayed Mahomed Abasi. 

Lalu Avagi. 

Bhowsang Ujam^ang and Bhuria Kesarising. 

Madhowrow Bapuji. 

Natho Lalu. 

Jilia, daughter of Gonaii Sing Ujam Sing. 

For feeding birds. 

Rotan Chand Gulab Chand. 

Dharmada [Charitable). 

m 

Krishnaram Ji wan ram. 

Lakhmishankar Rup^hankar. 

Bai Maha L'jxmi, heir of Dipram Motiram. 

Bai Kasi, widow of Dulawrara Krinhnaram 

Magan Karanashankar^ worshipper of Shidhaf 
Mata. 
18 Mnhalakomi and Shiogonga, daughters of Kuberam 

Nandram. 
18 Bai Umia, sister of Balwidd's wife'^ on accoui>t of 
latter's son. 

Pranshankar Pitambee Vyas. 

Bai'MuIkuner^ widow of Mugatram Natharam. 

Bechar Nand Kesar Shukal. 

Chand Pira, Muzawar of Phool Pir. 

Laxmishankar Rupshankar, worshipper of Cha- 
munda Mata. 

Bai Jamna, widow of Motiram Yeniram. 

Amirsha Amanatsha, Murzawar of Memda Pir. 

Bai Vizli, widow of Laxmiram Natharam. 

Bhat Rajaram Sobharam. 

Bai Rukhmani, widow o£ Waid Parbhashankar 
Oanpatram. 

Waijnath Wajiram Vyas. 

Bai Dewali, daughter of Bechar Wajeram. 

Bai Rukhmani, heir of Rajaram Shankarbhat. 

Bai Suraj, widow of Vyaa Harinath Bhaiji. 



Amount < 


of Bak. 


St. 


a, p. 


5 


4 3 


5 


4 3 


5 


4 5 


6 


4 3 


5 


4 3 


6 


4 3 


6 


4 3 


5 


4 3 


5 


4 3 


5 


4 3 


5 


4 3 


5 


4 3 


5 


4 3 


47 


6 


I 


8 


8 





1 


4 


1 


8 


4 






3 








1 


8 





3 








1 


8 





4 








1 


8 








8 





1 


8 





1 


8 





4 








1 


8 





3 








4 








1 


8 






Part II Cambay— No. XXIX. 78 



St. a. 


P- 


8 





1 8 





1 8 





1 8 





5 





10 12 


9 


S 





8 15 


2 


3 16 


2 


8 15 


2 


8 15 


2 


8 16 


2 


8 16 


2 


8 15 


2 


8 15 


2 


8 16 


2 


8 16 


2 


8 15 


2 


3 15 


2 



Damodar, Itcliashankar, Amtha and Magan^ eons 
of Eanusra Ishver Aditram. 

Bai Jadow, daughter of Krishnaram Pipla, 

Premdas Bhagwandas, witrshipper of Thakor Man- 
dir at Menpnr. 

Bai Daya, daughter of Hariram Parbhuram. 

Tulnidas Haridas Bawa of the Machipura Madhi. 

Manu Dayal, who pours milk ia the sea every 
month. 

BAanffiesm 

For bread to dogs^ to Ratanchand Oulabchand. 

Jamna Dewa. 

Nagar Shankar. 

Machha Samji, 

Natha Haria. 

Mitha Wasta. 

Joita Lala. 

Rancher Joita. 

Lala Jetha. 

Jaga Rhima. 

Lala Mongal. 

Berkhi and Adit, daughters of Jiva Beehar. 

Amtha and Jamna, sons of Dewa Dayal. 



Total ... 2,94^ 6 4 



Witness to the signature Persian signature of HisT Excel- 

of His Excellency the Nawab lency. 

Jaffer Ali Khan. 

(Sd.) Sjiaueao N., 

Dewan, 



No. XXIX. 
Adoption Sunntjd granted to the Nawab of Oambay, 1862. 

Her Majesty being desirous that the Ooyernments of the several 
Princes and Chiefs of India who now govern their own territories should be 
perpetuated, and that the representation and dignity of their houses should 
be continued, I hereby, in fulfilment of this desire^ convey to you the assur- 
ance that, on failure of natural heirs, any succession to the government 
of your State which may be legitimate according to Mahomedan law will be 
upheld. 



74 Cambay— No. XXX. Part II 



Be assured that notliiu^ shall disturb the engagement thus made to you 
60 longf as your hou^^e is loyal to the Crown and faithful to the conditions 
of the Treaties, grants, or engagements which record its obligations to the 
British Goveiumeut. 

Dated lUh TdarcJt 1868. (Sd.) Canniko. 

The same to the Chief of Sucheen. 



No. XXX. 

Agrefment of the Nawab of Cambay for the removal of all 
RESTRICTIONS on FREE TRADE in his State, 1888. 

No. 179, dated Camp, 25th Febraary 1888. 

From — His Highness Jappeb Ali Khan, Nawab of Cambay, 

To — W. PoRTEOUs, Esq., C.S., Collector and Political Agent, Kaira. 

With reference to the <5orrespondence ending with your No. 504 of 1 888, 
dated the 29th January 1^88, in regard to the removal of restrictions on 
free trade in my State, I have the honour to inform you that on behalf of 
myself and my successors I enga<^e myself to abolish within my State from 
henceforth all tolls and imposts on the import and export of any commodity 
whatever; Provided that this engagement shall not be deemed to affect or 
prevent the levy by this State of — 

(1) tolls on bridges, roa^ls, ferries, canals or causeways, for the 
purpose of covering the cost of repairing and maintaining 
such bridges, roads, ferries, canals, causeways ; 

{%) duties of Octroi for municipal (including police and education- 
al, purposes upon articles consumed within the limits of a 
Alunicipality ; and 

(3) tolls constituting abkari revenue. 

2. I further on behalf of myself and my successors engage myself 
to abolish, from some date within two years from the date of this agreement 
to be hereafter fixed by me at my convenience, the impost on the weighmeut 
of commodities sold in my State which is known by the name of '^ Aiopara." 

8. With a view to the encouragement of the local industries, I fnrther 
on behalf of myself and my successors engage myself to abolish from hence- 
forth all special tolls on trade and industries, and on the sale of commodities 
manufactured within the Cambay State under whatever designations such 
tolls may hitherto have been levied. 

Hoping that you are in health and prosperity. 



Part II • Cambay— No. XXXI. 76 



No. XXXI. 

Articles of Agreement for leasing the Abkari Revenue of 
the Cambay State to the Briiish Government for a term 
of 10 years from the 1st January 1S88 to the 31st Decem- 
ber 1897. 

Preamble. — Wheivas it is considered desirable to place the administration 
of Abkari revenne of the Cambay State on the same footing as the adminis- 
tration of Abkari revenue of tiie British CoUectorates adjoining the Cambay 
State, which has recently been improved in accordance with the provisions 
of the Bombay Abkari Act, 1878, and especially with a view to prevent 
injnry to the Abkari revenue of either the CoUectorates or the Cambay 
State by illicit manufacture of liquor or by the smuggling of liquor from 
one territory into the other, the following. articles have been agreed on 
between Henry Reade Cooke, Esquire, Political Agent, Cambay, for the time 
being on behalf of the British Ciovernment on the one hand and His High- 
ness Nawab JafFer Ali Khan Saheb Bahadoor, the Nawab of Cambay, on 
behalf of himself, his heirs and successors, on the other. 

Article 1. 

The Nawab of Cambay engages that the law of the Cambay State as 
r^ards Abkari shall be the Bombay Abkari Act of 1878 or any law which 
nay hereafter be substituted for that Act in the Bombay Presidency. 

Abticlb 2. 

In order that the new system of Abkari administration in the Cambay 
State may be efEeotually organized on the principles of the Bombay Abkari 
Act, the Nawab of Cambay engages hereby to farm his entire Abkari revenue 
to the Bombay Government for a term of 10 years from the first January 
one thousand eight hundred and eighty-eight to the thirty-first December 
one thousand eight hundred and ninety-seven, in consideration of an annual 
payment of Hupees (35,000) thirty-five thoueand (being the average of the 
total Abkari revenue of the Cambay State for the years 1885, 1886, and 1887» 
plus about 25 per cent, in consideration of any possible increaf^e of revenue 
during the term of the lease). This sum to oe paid in monthly instalments 
of Rupees 2,916*10-8 each on the of each month. (Note. — The lease 

includes the right of taxing country spirits and toddy and of controlling 
and licensing the manufacture and sale thereof and the sale of foreign 
imported liquors in the Cambay State ) 

Abticlb 3. 

During the term of the farm the administration of the Abkari revenue 
of the Cambay State will be conducted by the Political Agent, Kaira, on the 
following principles :— • 

(a) The rates of taxation of liquor in the Cambay State and in the 
CoUectorates to be equivalent. 



76 Cambay— No. XXXI. Fart 11 



{b) Sach reasonable facilities for obtaining a sapply of liquor for 
consumption are to be afforded to tbe people of tbe Cambay 
State as are afforded to the people of the adjoining Colleo- 
torates. 

(c) The retail sellinsr price of liquor to be the same in this Cambay 
State and in the Collectorates, so as to remote any inducement 
to the people of one territory to consume liquor sold in the 
other territory on account of its being cheaper. 

Abtiolb 4. 

But during the term of the farm the Political Agent will consuU. the 
Nawab of Cambay regarding the details of Abkari administration such as the 
number and position of liqnor shops, the persons to receive retail licenses and 
the like^ and will consider the wishes of the Nawab on such points, 

Aetiolb 6. 

It is understood that the farm conveys to the Government of Bombay 
no right of ownership in palm and other toddy-producing trees or in the 
land on which they stand. Rut the Bombay Government mar levy a tax 
on such of those trees as may be licensed to be tapped for the extraction 
of toddy. 

Aeticus 6. 

On his part the Nawab of Cambay engages cordially to co-operate in 
carrying out the provisions of the Abkari law and rules and to do his best 
by himself, his heirs and successors and by his subordinate oflScers to prevent 
all illicit possession, manufacture, sale and transport of liquor or of tbe 
materials or implements used for its manufacture in accordance with the 
provisions of the Act and of any rules which may be made under it. 

Articlb 6 a. 

The Nawab of Cambay further engages to abstain during the term of the 
farm from levying any tolls, octroi or any duty or impost whatever on liquor 
manufactured in or imported into or exported from the Cambay State under 
permit or transported under permit from one place to another place within 
the Cambay State, or on any materials brought into the State for the 
manufacture of liquor. 

Article 7. 

It is understood that all offences against the Abkari law will be cogniz- 
able under section 51 of the Abkiri Act by the Cambay State Criminal 
Courts in the same manner as other offences are coirnizable. 

Aetiolb 8. 

Duiing the term of the farm the Abkari accounts of the Cambay State 
will be kept separately from those of the adjoining Collectorates, and an 
annual account given to the Nawab of Cambay for his information. 



Part II Cambay— No. XXXI. 77 



Aktiole 9, 

At the conclusion of the ten years' rarm, it shall be renewable at the option 
of the British Government for a further period of five years upon the same 
conditions as herein stipulated. On the expiry of the renewed term of the 
tATin, or in the event of the British Govern ment declining to exercise the 
option of renewal, then on the expiry of the original term of ten years, the 
management of the Abkari revenue will revert to the Nawab of Cambay. 

AhTICLB 10. 

The Nawab of Cambay engages on behalf of himself, his heirs and 
successors to conduct the Alkari administration of his State from and after 
the date of the termination of the farm under Article 9 in accordance with 
the principles laid down in the preamble of tbis agreement, namely : — 

To maintain the same Abkari law and rules as may be in force in 
the neighbouring Collectorates. 

To impose rates of taxation on liquor equivalent to those in force in 
the Collectorates. 

So to manage his revenue that injury shall not be caused by it to 
the Abkari revenue of the Collectorates and to make his 
arrangements in consultation when necessary with the Political 
Agent, Cambay, for the time being, with this view. 

Provided always that this article does not bind the Nawab of Cambay to 
any arrangements injurious to the legitimate interests of the State or revenue, 
and that it is understood that the Abkari revenue of the Collectorates will in 
like manner be so managed as not to cause injury to the legitimate Abkari 
revenue of the State. 

This agreement agreed to at Cambay the eighteenth day of August 
one thousand eight hundred and eighty-nine. 

Witnesses to the signature of His (Signed in Vernacular)^ 

Highness Jafar Ali EJian, Nawab • i.e., Jafar Ali Khan, 

• 

of Cambay. Nawab of Cambay. 

(Signed) Shambao N. Laud, 

Diioan, Cambay Slate, 
(Signed) H. B. Cookb, 

Political Affent, C^tmbay. 

Approved and confirmed by His Excellency the Viceroy and Governor 
General of India. 

(Signed) H. M. Dukand, 

Secretary to the Oovernment of India y 

Foreign Department. 
Foreign Department, Simla, 6th November 1889. 



part II Surat Agency— 5ocAi». 79 



in-StJRAT AGENCY. 

1. SACHIN. 

When in 1791 Balu Mian, Sidi of Janjira, resigned to the Feshwa hitf 
claims to Jarijira,* he received (No. XXXII) lands near Surat yielding Rupees 
75,000, and bound himself to keep faithfully the agreement f then made 
with the Peshwa, and not to disturb the districts of the British Govern- 
ment. The State of Sachin consists of the districts then made over to him. 
On application to the Emperor of Delhi and the payment of a large nazar he 
received the title of Nawab. In 1816 an agreement was made by the Agent 
at Surat with the Nawab to allow British courts to take cognizance of 
crimes committed within his State. But as the concessions made were not 
deemed sufficient the engagement was not ratified. 

Bala Mian died in 180i^, and was succeeded by his sou Ibrahim Muham« 
mad Yakut Khan ; who died in 1853, and was succeeded by his eldest son 
Abdul Karim Khan. Ibrahim Muhammad's extravagance involved the State 
deeply in debt, and in 1829 he made over (No. XXXIIl) his country to the 
management of the British Government till his debts should be liquidated, 
receiving for his support a sum of Rupees 22^000 a year. The State was 
restored to Sidi Abdul Karim Khan in 1864. 

Abdul Karim Khan, who received a Sanad (No. XXIX) guaranteeing 
the succession of his State according to Muhammadan law, died in December 
1868, when the succession of his eldest son Ibrahim Muhammad Yakut Khan 
was recognised by the British Government. This Chief died in 1878 and 
was succeeded by his son Abdul Kadar Khan, who is now 26 years of age. 
Daring his minority the State was under the management of the Agent to 
the Governor. In July 1886, when Abdul Kadar Khan attained his majority 
he and a Native gentleman of position were associated in the administration. 
Doring the next six months Abdul Kadar proved himself totally unfit for his 
position^ and in January 1887 he abdicated in favour of his infant son 
Najaf Ali Khan, now about 3^ years old. The State is at present admin- 
istered by the let Ajssistant Collector of Surat, under the orders of the 
Agent to the Governor. 



* See Janjira, page 107. 
See page 116. 



80 Sorat AgenGj^Bantda, Part n 

The area of Sachin is 42 square miles ; the revenue amounts to Rupees 
2,02,988-8.9, and the population (1891) to 21,289. The Nawab, who is 
entitled to a salute of 9 guns, has second class jurisdiction, that is has power 
to try for capital offences his own subjects only. The State pays no tribute. 
It maintains (1891) a force of 4 g^ns, 5 horse and 65 infantry. 

2. BANSDA. 

The Raja of Bansdn, the early history of which State is unknown, is a 
Solanki Rajput. The Mahrattas exacted from Bansda a ohauth of Rupees 
7,000, which was transferred to the British Government under the treaty of 
Bassein. A tribute of Rupees 7,351-8 is now taken. The late Chief, Hamir 
Singh, succeeded by adoption in 1829 on payment of a relief of Rupees 80,000. 
In consequence of irregularities committed during his minority the State was 
taken under British management, but it was restored in April 1852. 

In 1856 an arrangement was entered into with the Raja of Bansda whereby 
he agreed (No. XXXIV) to pay annually a sum of Rupees 1,500 as ohauth in 
consideration of the British Government foregoing its share in transit duties. 
He also bound himself to limit his demands on account of customs and transit 
duties to certain rates sanctioned by the British Government, making his 
own arrnngements for their collection. 

In 1873 the Rnja executed an Agreement (No. XXXV) to abolish transit 
duties in his State in consideration of receiving from the British Government 
Rupees 8,698 per annum, being the average income for the two precedin^^ years. 
This sum is deducte<l from the Rupees 1,500 chauth and Rupees 7,351-8-0 
tribute due from the Rsija, leaving a balance payable by him of Rupees 158-8-0. 

In 18S6 the Raja executed an Agreement (No. XXXyi)j renewable by 
mutual consent after ten years, by which he undertook to assimilate the 
system of abkari administration in his State to that followed in British terri- 
tory. 

Raja Hamir Singh received a Sanad (No. XXXVII) guaranteeing to him 
the right of adoption. He died on the 16th June 1861, and was succeeded 
by a near collateral relative, Gulab Singh. He died in 1876, and left one son, 
Pratap Singh, the prf sent Chief, now 27 years of age. The Chief receives 
a salute of 9 guns and exercises second class jurisdiction, having power to try 
for capital offences his own subjects only. 

The area of Bansda is 215 square miles. The revenue amounts to Rupees 
2,45,926. The population (1891) is 41,373. 



Part II Surat Agency— Dharampur. 8l 



The armed force of the State consists (1891) of 1 cannon, 21 mounted 
police, and 84 infantry. 

3. DHARAMPUR. 

He ruling Chief of Dharampur is a Sisodiya Rajput. It is not known 
how long his family has been established in the country, and the State has 
generally attracted little attention from other powers. The Mahrattas, how- 
ever, exacted from it a cbauth of Rupees 9,000 a year, which was ceded to 
the British Government under the treaty of Bassein. 

The British share of transit duties levied at Dharampur was formerly 
farmed out annually to the highest bidder, and the realisations varied con- 
siderably. This arrangement was distasteful to the Raja, and in 1869 he 
expressed a wish to take the farm permanently into his own hands. At the 
same time he offered to remit his dues on the whole of the through traflSc with 
Khandesh, provided the British Oovernment did the same, and to make his 
own arrangement^ for the collection of only an import and export duty, allow- 
ance being made in fixing his annual payment for the reduction in his revenue 
caused by these reforms. These terms were considered reasonable, and the 
farm was given to the Raja on his signing an Agreement (No. XXXVIII) to 
make a fixed annual payment of Rupees 9,000, not to increase the taxes in 
force, and not to levy new ones. 

In 1885 the Raja entered into an Engagement (No. XXXIX) regarding 
the extradition and trial of any of his subjects who might be arrested in British 
India after having committed an offence in Portuguese India. In the following 
year he executed an Agreement (No. XL) differing but slightly from that 
accepted by the Raja of Bansda in regard to the abkari administration of his 
State. 

The Raja has received a Sanad (No. XXXVII) guaranteeing to him the 
privilege of adoption. He is entitled to a salute of 9 guns and exercises second 
class jurisdiction, having power to try for capital offences his own subjects 
only. Raja Narayandev, who had enjoyed the personal distinction of being 
addressed by the title of Highness, died on the 7th September 1891, and was 
sacceeded by bis eldest son MohandeVi the present Chief, now 29 years of age. 

The area of Dharampur is 794^ square miles, the revenue Rupees 2,68,081 
and the population (1891) 120,498. 

The armed force of this State consists (1891) of 4 cannon, 40 cavalry, and 

166 infantry. 

u 



62 Surat Agency -fi^<ieAffi— No. XXX1I« Fart It 



No. XXXII. 

Translation of an Agreement entered into by Mabho Rao 
Narraybn Pundit Furdhan and Sbedee Abdool Kurbem 
Khan, alias Baloo Meah, in Suramut Ahdio Tismaiet 
o Alf, A.D. 1790-91. 

Whereas you were declared as heir to Jinjeera^ Kansa, and the Matgbnr 
Talooka^ in the Conean^ and jon have volaDtarily resigned to government 
(Peishwa) year claims over these territories through the medium of the 
British Commissioner, Mr. C. Malet, it has been agreed, vi»>:^ 

Article 1. 

That in consideration of your claims now resigned to government on ibi 
aforesaid forts, with everything contained therein whatsoever, enam territory 
in Giizerat, situated on the seashore, is proposed to be given you, yielding a 
revenue equal to that of the territories dependent on Jinjeera, &c. The value 
of the territory to foe' ascertained by the average rate of collections for the last 
ten years. Of this at present territory to the value of Rupees seventy-five 
thousand has been given you, the remainder will be given on the aforesaid 
Talookas being delivered over to government. 

Article 2. 

You are to repair and reside in the territory now allotted to you as enam 
with all your family. You are not to build any large fortress either in the 
territory now given you, or that may be hereafter given, but only such suffi- 
ciently strong to prevent the Grassias from any attacks. You are to conduct 
yourself properly and peaceably, and raise no disturbances, &c. You are not 
to unite yourself to those who are hostile either to government or to the 
English, or to enter into or to make any hostilities. 

Article 3. 

Should any land be granted in enam or reward to any hubsee for public 
service, the amount of its revenue shall not be deducted from that of your 
enam. 

In all these three Articles have been settled, which shall be always 
regarded by both parties. 

Dated Snd Ramzan. 



Part II 



Surat Agenoy Sackin—'So. XXXIII. 



88 



Translation of an Engagement entered into by Seedbb 
Abdool Ktjreem RHAN5 usually called Baloo Mbah, with 
the Honourable Company's Resident at Poona. 




I, Seedee Abdool Kureem Khan, do hereby engage that I will faithfully 
abide by the agreement into which I have entered with Rao Pundit Purdhau 
through the mediation of Mr. Charles Warre Malet, the Honourable Com- 

rny's Resident at Poona, vested with full powers for that purpose, and that 
will 'in no shape whatever estrange myself from^ or act inimically to, the 
Honourable Company. In testimony of which I have executed this instru- 
ment as a permanent proof thereof. 

D^aed ]biA SAabun 1205 He^ira. 



No. XXXIII. 

Translation of Agreement entered into by Ibrahim Maho« 
MED Yakoot Ehan, for the payment of his debts — 1829. 



8eal of Seedee 

Ibrahim Mahoinod 

YHkoQt Khan. 



I, Seedee Ibrahim Mahomed Yakoot Khan, Moobarnz-oo-Dowlah Nusrut 
Jang Bahadoor^ give this writing to the government of the Honourable Eng- 
lish Company Bahadoor^ that I have given power to the said government to 
settle and pat an end to all the debts due to the Sahooears which lie on me. 
And that after settlement of all claims of the Sahooears, they may make 
everything clear and fair^ and for this purpose may take and retain possession 
of all my villages^ appropriating three-fourths of the revenue in any mode 
which may be most advantageous until the liquidation of the aforesaid debt 



86 Surat Agenoy-^Bantda^'No. XXXV. Fart It 

to accept in lien thereof as compensation from the British Government a sum 
calculated on the average income for the last ten years, but in consequence of 
your not again visitiog Bansda, the amount to be paid has not been deter- 
mined. 

You have now come to Bansda and on examining all accounts you as 
well as I consider Queen's Rupees 8^698 equitable as an average amount. 
We have therefore decided that the British Oovernment should pay me the 
above sum from their Treasury and I should accept it. Deducting the above 
from the Chouth and Tribute which I have to pay every year, there is a balance 
of Rupees 153-8, one hundred and fifty-three and annas eight, which shall be 
sent every year by me to the British Treasury. 

In consideration of the payment to me by the British Oovernment of 
the above sum I will abolish the levy of my portion of the above duty ; that 
is to say, with the exception of the Hoondas on villages, and the proceeds of 
Hulwadas and the pilgrimage of Oonai^ as also the value (or price) of the Timber 
cut in my own jungles, 1 will not levy Khoonti, Chethi or duty of any de« 
scription whatever now leviable or permitted by my Umul Dustoor, and will 
not stop or offer obstacles to any carts in transit. But there is nothing in 
this agreement to prevent my levying under the name of Khootdan any price 
for the Timber from my villages which I think proper in lieu of the Khoot- 
dan and transit duty combined, which is now levied under the Umul Dustoor 
on Timber from my villages. As stated above this Agreement does not 
include the Hoondas on villages and the proceeds of Hutwadas and the 
Oonai pil<^rimaofe, and I shall continue to levy them in accordance with the 
Umul Dustoor formerly received from Government. 

If any complaint is made regarding anything having been done in con- 
travention of this Agreement, you (the Agent) may take cognizance of the 
complaint. We will render the requisite explanation and produce our 
accounts if necessary. 

If we become aware of any smuggled opium, salt or other dutiable article 
passing through our territory, we will detain such article and report the 
matter to the British Government and make over the thing so detained. 

This agreement shall take effect from the 1st of Kartak Yud Sumwat 1930 
(22nd October 1873 A. D), and shall be acted on from year to year. The 
British Government are, however, hereby empowered to cancel this agreement 
at any time without assigning any reason for it, and in the event of such cancel- 
lation the mutual rights and custom between the two Governments are to be 
considered as again in force just as they are at present* 

(Sd.) Mahabaool Shrbe GoOLABSINGJ8B, 

True translation. 

(Sd.) T. C. HoPB, 

ColUetor and Jfent. 



Rart II Sorat Agency— ^Mila—Ko. XZXVI. 87 



No. XXXVI. 

OBEEMBNT between the Agent to His Ezgbllbnoy the Go- 
YEBNOB of Bombay acting under the authority of His Ex- 
cellency the ViCEBOY and Govebnob Gknebal of India in 
Council, on behalf of the Bbitish Govebnmbnt and Ma- 

HABAT7L ShBI PbATAPSANGJI GULABSANG JI, Ra JA of BaNSDA, 

on behalf of himself, his heirs and successors, regarding the 
Abkabi administration of the Ba^sda State — 1886. 

1. 

The Abkari system of the State will be assimilated to that prevailing in 
^he adjacent British territory as regards rates of taxation levied, system of 
^management followed, prices and strengths of liquor placed on sale, and 
flstandard of measures used. 

2. 

The provisions of the British Abkari law, rules, and regulations will be 
Copied in the State. 

3. 

Distilleries will be established in snch places only as may be determined 
Tipon by the Baja and the Agent, and no change in the location o^ distilleries 
will be allowed without the consent of the Agent. 

4. 

The forms of lease and license granted to the Abkari farmers will be 
subject to the approval of the Agent. 

5. 

The Raja will furnish promptly to the Agent all information and 
accounts relating to the manufacture and sale of liquor and the system of 
management followed that may from time to time be called for by the Agent, 
and will give facilities for the inspection of his distilleries and shops and 
arrangements by an officer not below the rank of Mamlatdar who may be 
especially deputed for the purpose by the Agent and who shall report thereupon 
to the Agent. 



As a general principle no shops for the sale of liquor will be allowed at 

{laces within three miles' distance from the frontier either in British or the 
lansda territory. In special cases exceptions to this rule may be made under 
■mtnal consent of the Agent and the Raja. 



t\ 



88 Surat Agenoy->ila«jdfa— No. XXZVI. Part II 



7. 

Information respectino^ arrests made and cases tried by oflScials of the 
State for ofEeiices committed by subjects of the British (•ovemment against 
the Abkari law F-ill be promptly communicated to the Agent, and in like 
manner information of arrests made and cases tned by British officials for 
offences committed by subjects of the State against the British Abkari law 
will be promptly communicated to the Baja. 

8. 

Nothing in this agreement shall affect the tapping of toddy trees or the 
taxation or sale of toddy either in the fermented or unfermented state. The 
distillation of spirit from toddy will not be permitted. 

9. 

This agreement will remain in Iforce for ten years from the date thereof 
and shall then be renewable with the mutual consent of both parties. 

10. 

The State will carry out all the stipulations of this agreement through- 
out its territories, in alienated as well as in Khalsa villages, 

' Executed at Bansda, this twenty-third day of September one thousand 
eight hundred and eighty-six. 

(Sd.) Maharaul Shbi Fabtapsanoji Q., 

Baja of Bansda, 



Executed before me. 



(Sd.) (In Vernacular.) 

„ W. B. MOLOCK, 



Jgent to nis Excellency the Governor. 
Wifnesses. 
Edalii Btbaiishaw. 
Mankkji Kavasji. 

Approved and conBrmed by His Excellency the Viceroy and Governor 
Oeneral of India. 

(Sd.) W. J. CUKINGHAK, 

Offg, Secretary to the Government of India ^ 

Foreign Department. 

Calcutta, 84th December 1886. 



Part II Surat A genoy — Bansda, Dharampur— No. XXXVI I & XXXVI 1 1. 89 



No. XXXVII. 
Adoption Sunnud granted to the Baja of Bansda — 1862. 

Her Majesty bein«; desirous that the Ooveraments of the several Princes 
and Chiefs of India who now govern their oirn territories should be perpetu- 
ated, and that the representation and diornity of their houses should be conti- 
nned, I hereby, in fulfilment of this desire, convey to you the assurance that, 
on failure of natural heirs, the adoption by yourself and future rulers of your 
State of 11 successor, according to Hindu law and to the customs of your race, 
will be recognized and confirmed. 

Be assured that nothing shall disturb the engfagement thus made to you 
no long an your house is loyal to the Crown and faithful to the conditions of 
the treaties, grants, or engagements which record its obligHtions to the 
Brititih Government. 

-Poet William; "^ 
n^ lltk March 1862) (Sd.) Canning. 

A similar Sunnud was grunted to Dhurmpore, Kolhapore, and Sawunt* 
varee. 



No. XXXVlil. 

Translation of tho Agrkembnt pxeouted by the Raja of 
DHri«MP0RK on Cliaitur Sood 5tli Sumvut 1926 (Wednes- 
day, tith April 1870) regarding? tlie British Cuouth levied 
in his Territobiils. 

With regard to the duties levied in our State by the Customs Depart- 
ment oF the British Government under the name of Chouth and annually 
farmed by public auction, we some time a^o pointed out certain inconveniences 
and expressed a desire that the amount of the Chouth migrht be fixed. 
£nqairies ensued resulting in Government Resohition No. 1199, dated 20th 
\)arch 1869^ in consequence of which it has been determined that the transit 
duties of both the Oovernment« should be remitted and in lieu of the British 
Government's share in the rest of the customs "nd dues, we asrree to make 
to the British Government an annual payment of Rupees 9,000 in British 
currency, which amount we will pay annually through you, the Agent to His 
Excellency the Governor at Surat, into the Treasury of the British Govern- 
ment, in installments as written below-* 

Bs. 

Between the Ist and 8th Jan nary • . • • • 2,000 

n 99 .» ff »• April ...... .ijOiJO 

M „ 15th „ 23r«I flu 110 . . . 3,5(0 

H 



90 Surat Agency- Vharam pur —No. XXXVIII. 1 art II 



We will suffer no default to be made in the annual payment of Rupees 9,000 
as above. Should any default be made the British Government is at liberty 
to charge interest or to resume the levies or to otherwise collect the amount. 

2. Inasmuch as in consideration of the loss occasioned by the total 
remission of the transit duties on the part of both Grovernments, tlie above- 
mentioned sum hns been Hxed at an amount less than the average of (the laat) 
ten years, we will levy no transmit, duty (tbat is, duty on goods passing from 
the Khandeish and NasBick Zillahs and other places to the Surat Zillah and 
other places and vice vend) either on behalf of the British Government or 
on our own behalf, on any goods, grain, animals, &x;., from any person what- 
ever, nor will we take any due of any kind, nor take anything else instead 
thereof, nor introduce any new practice. 

3. We will levy customs and imposts excepting the transit duties in 
accordance with the Omul Dustoor of the British Government, which they 
(the British Government) will provide us with, and in accordance with our 
present practice. We will levy neither more nor less. If on occasion it 
become necessary to do so, we will represent the mutter to the British Gk>vern- 
ment, and if they accord their sanction we will act accordingly. But if by 
preserving and conserving any of the forests in our villages afc^r the manner 
of the Forest Department of the British Government, we allow the wood 
to become valuable, there is nothing in this parac^raph to prevent us from 
co'lccting its price when cut in addition to the duty leviable on it under oar 
U mul Dustoor. 

4. No customs or other imposts of any kind are now collected or paid 
on goods, &c., imported from our territories into those of the Portuguese 
Government and vice versd. This practice is confirmed. In the same manner 
the ancient practice by which goods^ &c., imported into our territories from 
those of the Baroda State and vice versd are sulgect to customs duties levied 
bv both the Governments, is confirmed till some other arrangement be made. 
But we will not levy the share which the British Government have in these 
levies. 

5 If we levy any custom or duty in excess of the Umul Dustoor, you, 
the Agent, may take cognizance of complaints on the ^nbjeet. We will rea- 
der the requisite explanation and produce our accounts, if necessary. 

6. If any smugf^led opium or other artic'le is found passiitg through oar 
territories, we will keep such opium or other article in deposit and report the 
matter immediately to the British Government. 

7. If anything is done in contravention of this agreement it (the agree- 
ment) shall be null and void, and the rii>^hts and practice of the British 
Government which existed prior to it shall be considered to be in force. 

8. This agreement shall be considered to have been finally executed 
when it is sanctioned by the Government of Bombay. 



Part II 



Sarat Ae;enoy— />^tf'am/>«r— No. XXXIX. 



91 



No. XXXIX. 

Agbeebient between the Agent to His Excellency the 
Governor of Bombay at Stjrat acting under the authority 
of His Excellency the Viceroy and Governor-General 
of India in CouNcrL, on behalf of the British Govern- 
MENT, and Naran Dbvji Ram Devji, Raja of Dharampur, 
on behalf of himself, his heirs and successors, regarding the 
extradition and punishment of subjects of the Raja who 
have committed oflfences in Portuguese India — 1886. 

Articlb 1. 

The British Government engages to surrender to the Raja of Dharampur 
any of his subjects who may be charged with having committed in Portu- 
guese India any of the offences specified in the Schedule hereto annexed and 
who may be found in British India. 

Artigls 2. 

The surrender above-mentioned will bo made in accordance with suoh 
procedure as the Governor General of India in Council may from time to 
time prescribe. 

Abtiolb 3. 

The Raja of Dharampur engages to cause the person so surrendered to be 
tried according to the laws of the Dharampur State for the offence which he 
may be charged with having committed in Portuguese India, and on convic- 
tion will cause him to be suitably punished. 



Schedule referred to abore in Article 1. 



Description of Offence. 

Iffnrder, oulpable homicide not amounting to murder and causing death 
by rash or negligent act ....•• • 

Attempt to commit murder or culpable homicide • • • • 

Yoluntarilj causing hurt • • . . . • • 

Or grievous hurt • • 

Bape 

Kidnapping, abduction, concealinsr kidnapped person, slave-dealing, or 
selling minors for immoral purposes •••••. 

Immodest assault on a woman • • • • • ' • 

Causing miscarriage and abortion .•••... 

Exposure or abandonment of a child 

"RiefU 



Section* of the Indiaa 
Penal Code which 
apphr to such 
offeneea. 



299 to 304i 
307, 308, 611 
319 to 333 
335 and 338 
375 and 376 

860 to 373 

354 

312 to 316 

317 

378 to 382 



92 



Sural SLgcnOJ—Dkarampur-^JHo. XXXIX. 



Fart II 



Sections referred to nbove in Article 1. 



Description of Offences-^icontd.) 

EztortioDR, robberieff, daooities, attempts to ooiniuit robbery, and beloni; 
ing to a gang of thieves . . . . • 

Criminal misappropriations and eriininal breaches of trast 

Receiving stolen property • .... 

Cheating .••••••. 

Lurking honse-trespass, hoatte-breaking • 

Fraudulent bankruptcy and fraudulent disposition of property 



Dishonest opening of closed receptacle oonUining property 

Being a thug ....«• 

Belonging to a band of dacoits or robbers 

Aggravated cases of wrongful conBnemfciit 

Mischief by fire or explosive substance • 

Mischief to a vessel, or after preparation to cause death, hurt or wrong 
ful restraint ...... 



Sectioni of the lodfan 
Penal Code wli:eh 

apply *^ ^^^^ 
ofeneea. 



Counterfeiting or altering money or uttering oounterfeit or altered 
money, making or possesMing instruments for abovA purposes 

Counterfeiting or fraudulently using of Government stamps issued for 
purposes of revenue ••••.••.. 

Forgery and using of forged documents and making of seal;* for fraudu- 
lent purposes ••..•.•••. 

Use of false trade mark or property mark, and frauds connected with 
such marks ••••• •••«. 

Giving or fabricating false evidence to cause a person to be convicted of 
an ofiEence, and subornation of the same ..... 

Illegal gratifioation taken by a public seiTant or to influence a public 
servant «,.••...... 

Causing the evidence of the commission of any offence to disappear 

False certificate or declaration made by public servant or used by any 
person as evidence .....••.. 

Escape from lawful custody or accusation or conviction of any crime 
specified in this Convention 

Crimei against other Laws. 

Piracy by law of nations. 

Assaults on board a ship on the high seas with intent to destroy life or to 
do grievous bodily harm. 

Sinking or destroying a vessel at sea or attempting or conspiring to do 
so. 

Bevolt or conspiracy to revolt by two or more persons on board a ship on 
the high seas against the authority of the Master. 

Abetment of or attempt to commit any of the foregoing off^ences. 



383 to 402 

408 and 4^9 

410 to 414 

416 to 420 

443 to 446 

206, 208, 421 to 
424 

461 and 462 

810 and 811 

400 and 401 

844 to 348 

435, 436, and 438 

437, 439, and 440 

230 to 254 

255 to 263 

463 to 468» 470 
to 477 

478 to 489 

194 and 195 

161 to 165 
201 

197 to 200 

224 



Part II Sarat Agency— Dharampur^'No. XL. 93 

Dliarampur^ twenty -seventh day of December one tlioiisand eight hun- 
dred and eighty-five. 

Wilnejfses. (Signed in Vernacular). 

(Sig. Illegible.) i. e, Naran Dbvji Ram Devji. i Seal. ) 

Witnesses. (Sd.) W, B. MULOCK, 

(Sd.) EoAUi Byramshaw. Agent to H. E. the Governor^ 

„ Nanabhai MoTiSABRAM. Surat. 

Approved and confirmed by His Excellency the Viceroy and Govemor- 
Oeaeral in Council. 

Fort Williiim, (Sd ) H. M. Duhand, 

The 31st March J8S6. Secretary to the Government of India, 

Foreign Depart meni. 



No. XL. 



Agbbement between the Agent to His Excellency the Ooteb- 
NOR of Bombay acting under the authority of His Excel- 
lency the Viceroy and Governor General of India in 
Council on behalf of the British Govi£Rnment and Nara- 
YAN Devji Ram Devji, Raja of Dharampur, on behalf of 
himself , his heirs and successors, regarding the Abkari 
Administration of the Dharampur State — 1886. 

1. The Abkari system of the State ^ill be assimilHted to that prevailing 
in the adjacent British territory as regards ratps of taxation levied, system of 
manageoiieDt followed, prices and strengths of liquor placed on sale, and stand- 
ard of measures used. 

2. The provisions of the British Abkaii law, rules and regulations will 
be adopted in the State. 

8. Distilleries will be established in such places only as may be deter- 
mined apon by the Raja and the Agent, and no change in the location of 
distilleries will be allowed without the consent of the Agent. 

4. The forms of lease and license granted to the Abkari farmers will be 
subject to the approval of the Agent. 

5. The Raja will furnish promptly to the Agent all information and 
accounts relating to the manufacture and sale of liquor and the system of 
management followed that may from time to time be called for by the Agent^ 



94 Surat Ageiioy— DAarawpitr— No. XL. Part It 



and to give facilities for the inspection of his distilleries and shops and 
arranofements by any officer not below the rank of Mamlatdar who nnay be 
specially deputed for the purpose by the Agent and i\ho shall report tnere- 
upon to the Agent. 

6. As a general principle no 6ho)>s for the sale of liquor will be allowed 
at places within three miles distance from the frontier either in British or 
the Dharampnr territory. In special cases exceptions to this rule may be 
made under mutual consent of the Agent and the Rnja. 

7. Information respecting aiTests made and cases tried by officials of 
the State for offences committed by subjects of the British Government 
asrainst the Ahkari law will be promptly communicated to the Agent, and in 
like manner information of arrests made and cases tried by British officials for 
offences committed by subjects of the State against the British Abkari law 
will be promptly communicated to the Rajn. 

8. Nothing in this agreement shall affect the tapping of toddy trees or 
the taxation or sale of toddy either in the fermented or unfermented state. 
The distillation of spirits from toddy will not be permitted. 

9. This agreement will remain in force for ten years from the date there* 
of and shall then be renewable with the mutual consent of both parties. 

10. The State will carry out all the stipulations of this agreement 
throughout its territories in alienated as well as in Rhalsa villages. 

11. In all Dharampur villages that march with the Portuguese Settle- 
ment of Daman tree tax will be levied on all toddy trees tapped for the ex- 
traction of toddy at the i-ates imposed for the time being on similar trees tap* 
ped for the extraction of toddy in the Pardi Taluka of the Surat District. 

Executed at Dharampur, this (5th) fifth day of July one thousand 
eight hundred and eighty-six. 

Witnesses. (Signed in Vernacular). 

(Signed in Vernacular.) ue. Narayan Devji Rah Dbvh. 

(Signed in Vernacular). 

Witnesses. 
(Sd.) Edalji Bybamshaw. (Sd.) W, B. Mulock, 

(Sd.) Manekji Kavasji. Ageni. 

Approved and confirmed by His Excellency the Viceroy and Governor 
General in Council. 

(Sd.) H. M.DURAND, 

Secretary/ to the Qovernment of India, 

Foreign Department. 
Simla, the 21st August 1886. 



Part II Jauhar. 96 



IV.^JAUHAR. 

There is no accurate account to be obtained of tbe rise of the Jauhar 
family; but it is believed that up to the time of the Muhammadan invasion 
of the Deccan, and a h'ttle later^ the greater part of the northern Konkan 
was held by Koli Chiefs. Jayaba Mukna was one of the roost prominent 
of these, sSid had Jauhar for his head-quarters. His son Nim Shah was 
recognised as Raja of Jauhar by tlie Emperor of Delhi in or about 1343, 
and the present Chief is believed to be directly descended from him, and to be 
almost the last^ if not the last, of the Chiefs of the Koli caste. Nim Shah's 
country is said to have contained 22 forts and yielded 9 lakhs of revenue. From 
the time of Nim Shah very little w:is heard of tiie Jauhar State for three 
or four hundred years. The Mughals never appear to bave attempted to 
exercise any authority over it, and the Portuguese, who held the coast 
of the northern Konkan during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, 
never interfered more in the affairs of the inland districts than was neces- 
sary to prevenc aggression on their own. Shivaji nnd his descendants, in 
like manner, left this wild country to take care of itself, and it was not 
until the power of the Peshwas was well established that they interfered. 
After thev had taken the coast of the northern Konkan from the Pt»rtu« 
guese in 1739-40, they began to annex such of the inland districts as seemed 
of any value, and in this way they gradually took a good part of the posses- 
sions of the Baja of Jauhar. The revenue of the State before this is said 
to have been about 3^ lakhs. But after coDstant aggression on the part 
of the Mahrattas the then Raja, Patang Shah II, in 1782 was glad to enter 
into an arrangement with the Peshwa, by which, in return for an annua) 
tribute of Rupees 1,000, and a nazarana on the investiture of every new Rnja, 
he and his family were confirmed in the small remainder of their possessions, 
yielding then a revenue of about Rupees 20,000. 

On the death of Patang Shah II in 1798 the Peshwa allowed his eldest 
son, Vikram Shah III, to succeed, but made him agree to manage his affairs in 
submission to the Peshwa's Government, to pay a succession fee of Rupees 3,000, 
and to be subject to the supervision of the mamlatdar of Trimbak. Vikram 
Shah III died without heirs in 1821, but shortly after his death a son named 
Patr.ng Shah was born. The succession was disputed by the widows of two 
brothers of the late Chief, To prevent disorder the Collector ot* the northern 
Konkan was directed to proceed to Jauh.-ir ai:d tu make such arrangements as 



•mi^ 



98 Jauhar. Part IZ 

might seem necessary respecting the succession and the adniiuistratiou o£ ihe 
State. Patang Shah III was recognised (No. XLI) as Raja^ and his motJier 
was charged with the administration till he should be personally qualified to 
undertake it. The nazarana due to the British Qovernmeot was remitted as 
an act of grace^ without affecting the right of Ooverument to claim it on 
any future occasion. 

Before his death in June 1865 Patang Shah III had adopted Narajan Rao,. 
crrandson of Madhav Rao, Patang Shah's uncle. This Narayan Rao, called 
Vikram Shah IV, died in July 1865. Narayan Rao's young widow. Rani 
Tjakshmibai, at the advice of Gopikabai, Narayan Rao's mother and guardian, 
adopted as her son Malhar Rao, also called Patang Shah IV, the present Raja, 
who was then about ten years of age. The adoption of Patang Shah wassane- 
tioned, and a nazarana of Rupees 2i^000 was paid to the British Government. 
During the minority of Patang Shah, Rani Gopikabai was appointed Regent, 
and the administration of the State was carried on by a Karbhari, under the 
supervision of the Collector and Political Agent of Thana. The Regent, Rani 
Gopikabai, died in 1875, and then the direct management of the State was 
assumed by the Political Agent. Kaja Patang Shah was educated in the 
Poona High School, and, after he reached his majority in 1877, was entrusted 
with full administrative powers. 

The Raja has second class juris»liction, which gives him power to try- 
capital offences in the case of his own subjects only, without the express 
permission of the Political Agent. He has otherwise full jurisdiction over 
Native and British subjects committing crimes in his territory, subject 
always to the control of the Political Aj^ent, should there be ground for inter- 
vention on his part. Except the succession fee the Raja pays no tribute 
to the British Government. 

The Raja has received aSanad (No. XLII) guaranteeing the privilege of 
adoption on failure of natural heirs ; and in the matter of succession the family 
follows the rule of primogeniture. 

In 1880 the Raja entered into an Agreement (No. XLIII) for a term of five 
years, by which, amonc: other conditions, he undertook that the law of his ter- 
ritory as regards abkari should be the Bombay Abkari Act of 1878 or any 
law which might be substituted for that Act in the Bombay Presidency, and 
that his entire abkari revenue should be farmed to the Bombay Government 
for a term of five years, from the 1st April 1880, in consideration of an annual 



Part II Jauhar. 87 

payment of Rupees 82,000 for all abkari rights in the Jauhar State. The 
agreement has been renewed for a term of 9^ years from April 1885. 

In 1881 an Agreement (No. XLIY) was entered into between the Jauhar 
State and the British Governmenti by which the Raja consented to abolish all 
transit duties and tolls upon British commodities passing along the Talauli 
Dahann Station Road, provided Government constructed it and kept it in 
good repair. 

In the same year (1881) the Raja entered into an Agreement (No. XLY) 
by which he undertook to prohibit the cultivation of the poppy and the illicit 
importation of opium into his State. 

In 1888 an Agreement (No. XLVI) was entered into between the Jauhar 
State and the British Oovernment regarding the extradition and punishment 
of subjects of the Jauhar State, who may be charged with having committed 
certain offences in Portuguese India. 

The State of Jauhar covers an area of 684 square miles, and yields a 
revenue of about Rupees 1,60,000. The population, according to the census 
of 1891^ is estimated at 62,796, composed chiefly of Warlis, Kathkarisj and 
other low-caste tribes. The State has no military force. 



Jauhar— No- XLI. Fait IS 



No. XLI. 

Translation of a Memorandum of a Settlement wade for the 
SuwASTHAN JowAR by Savillb Marriott, Esq., Collector 
and Magistrate of the Northern Ooncan, attended by 
some OfiBcers and a detachment of troops, on behalf of the 
Honourable the Governor in Council of Bombat at 
MouzA EooRUN, in the Jotitar Terr^tprt, on thjB 16th 
December 1823. 

Article 1. 

Being in camp at Mouza Kooran on the 18th of the present mopt^ a. 
proclamation waa issued to the inhahitants, stating that the Honoarable 
Company have confirmed Pattung Shah, Rajah of Jowar^ on the throne of 
his ancestors, and that Vuttimg Shah Rajah^s mother, Sogoona Bai, Baned, 
is charged with the dae administration of the Suwasthan until the said 
Puttung Shah shall be personally qualified to undertake it, and that all the 
inhabitants are enjoined to obey the orders of Sugoona Bai Ranee. This 
proclamation being publicly notified at the Durbar Cutcberry at my head- 
quarters, the investiture was duly conferred. 

Article 2. 

Sagoona Bai Ranee will conduct the affairs of the Jowar government in 
behalf of the Rajah, but should any violent proceedings be resorted to by 
any person in the Suwasthan Jowar, including the per^nnnah Ounjad^ aspisi- 
ance will, if necessaryi be rendered by the British Government to quell such 

acts, 

Articlb S. 

The claims of the different branches of the Jowar family and their con- 
nezions with that State having had mature consideration, as well as the 
revenues derivable from the Suwasthan Jowar, including Gunjad, it has been 
determined to allot specific payments from the joint revenue of these districts 
to the members of that family in the order and proportion as follows :— 

To Luximee Bai and her Bon Pratap Rao, jointly per annnm • • • 1,600 

Saveetree Bai alias Ramma Bai, and her son Tookaiam, jointly per annum • 600 

Dhondee per annnm • . • 200 

Dbewba Rao Mooknay Rajkooynr per annum •••••• 200 

Rupees . 2,400 

making together rupees two thousand four hundred, and Sugoona Bai should 
personally satisfy herself that the full amount, as specified above^ is made to 
each person respectively. 



Part II Jauhar— Ko. XLI. '89 



Aeticlb 4. 

The revennes of tne Snwasthan Jowar being smalli and the dissensionB in 
the family haviD^ caused the full expenditure of it in maintaining troops^ &€., 
having had its full weight of consideration , it will be recommended to the 
Honourable the Governor in Council of Bombay in this instance to waive the 
British Ooveinment's right of demanding and receiving a nuzzur in the 
present investiture of Puttnng Shah Rajah to the guddee of his ancestors^ but 
the power of remitting it rests with that authority. 

Article 6. 

Independent of the differences that existed in regard to the Pergunnah 
Gunjad, there are some petty quarrels in the family of the Suwasthan^ to 
which Sugoona Bai Ranee should give due attention, and settle them amicably 
between the several parties. If this is not efiet'ted mutually the character 
of the Snwasthan will be lowered and my intentions go unfulfilled. The 
different members should always be friendly together that no disturbance may 
exist. 

Articlb 6. 

t)hewba Rao Mooknay Rajkoovur should avoid for the future his seditions 
and other illegal acts of conduct. To effect this object Sugoona Bai Ranee 
should keep a watchful eye over his acts, and if he resorts to illegal measures 
in the Suwasthan Jowar, he is to be immediately imi'risoned there, or receive 
such other punishment as the laws of the country direct, or should he come 
within my jurisdiction the Comavishdar of the district in which he may be 
to be writ to, who will give every assistance to secure him : to this end 
separate orders will be addressed to Comavishdars of Soubahs in my jurisdic- 
tion. Mo^eover^ the said Dhewba Rao having been^ under date the 14th 
of the present month^ allowed an annual sum of rupees two hundred, payable 
by the Suwasthan^ which is considered sufficient for his subsistence, he was 
verbally directed to discharge the armed men he raised, with the exception of 
two, which he was allowed to retain, within five days from the above date. 
Whether or not this order is conformed to by the Mooknay, Sugoona Bai 
Banee is to make herself personally satisfied with. 

Article 7. 

Sugoona Bai Ranee will personally exert herself to the maintenance of 
the peace and welfare of the territory under the Suwasthan ; will look to the 
bringing of land into cultivation, as its appearance seems to indicate great 
fertility. 

Articlb 8. 

For the present a Soubabdar and a party of sepoys are sent to Jowar 
with the view to preserve the Rajah and the Suwasthan; this party will 
remain at that station two or three months^ or until I am satisfied that 
Sugoona Bai Ranee can by her own authoiity and means fully execute the 
c&arge which has devolved upon her in behalf of her son Puttuug Shah 



100 Jauhar— Hob. XLII ft XLIII. Part II 



Bajah. The abore Soabahdar Laxmon Manay and his party have been in- 
structed by Captain Wood as to the manner of their conduct ; a copy of thege 
instractions I send yon separately. By this yon will be satisfied of the desire 
which the British Government feels for the prosperity of yonrself and Snwae* 
than. 

(True translation.) 

(Sd ) 8. MAEftlOTT, 

Collector. 
Approved by the Bombay Government on 22nd February 182S, 



No. XLII. 



Adoption Sanad granted to Patanosha Vikeamsha Mukhik, 

Baja of Jawhab — 1890. 

Her Majesty beings desirous that the Oovernments of the several Princes 
and Chiefs of India who now govern their own territories should be perpe- 
tuated^ and that the representation and dignity of their houses should be 
continued, I hereby, in fulfilment of this desire, convey to you the assurance 
that, on failure of natural heirs, the adoption by yourself and future rulers of 
your State of a successor according to Hindu law and to the customs o£ yoor 
race will be recognised and confirmed. 

Be assured that nothing shall disturb the engagement thus made to yoa 
so long as your house is loyal to the Crown and faithful to the conditions of 
the treaties, grants or engagements which record its obligations to the British 
Government, 

Simla, (Sd.) Lansdownb, 

The S3rd June 1890. Viceroy and Qovr. Genl. of India. 



No. XLIII. 



AoBBEMBNT between the Political Agent of Thana, acting under 
the authority of His Excbllenot the Viceroy and Goybb- 
NOR General in Council, on behalf of the British Govern- 
ment on the one hand, and Patangsha YikramskAi Raja 
of Jawhar, on behalf of himself, bis heirs and successors 
on the other hand, regarding the Abkari administration of 
the Jawhar State— 1880. 

Whereas the agreement between the above-mentioned parties, under date 
January 28th, 1880, recited in full below, on the subject of the Abkari ad« 



Part II Jauhar— No. XLIII. 101 



ministration of the Ja\?har StatOi ceased and determined on March Slat, 1885^ 
it is hereby provided, and the respective parties agree, that it be continued in 
all particulars as before for a further period of 9^ years or from April Ist^ 
1885, to July Slst, 1894. 

Agreement dated 88tli January 1880. 

The object of this ag^reement is the improvement of the administration of 
the Abkari reTcnue of the Jawhar State on the same principles on which the 
administration of the Abkari revenue of the Thana Collectorate adjoining the 
Jawhar State lias recently been improved in accordance with the provisions of 
the Bombay Abkari Act of 1878, and especially with a view to prevent injury 
to the Abkari revenue of either the Collectorate or the Jawhar State by illicit, 
manufacture of liquor or by the smuggling of liquor from one territory into 
the other. With this object it is agreed as follows : 

1. The Raja of Jawhar engages that the law of his territory as regards 
Abkari shall be Bombay Abkari Act of 1878, or any law which may hereafter 
be substituted for that Act in the Bombay Presidency, 

2. In order that the new system of Abkari administration in Jawhar may 
be effectually organized on the principles of the Bombay Abkari Act, the 
Baja engages hereby to farm his entire Abkari revenue to the Bombay Gov- 
ernment for a term of 5 years, from let April 18H0 to Slst March 1885, in 
consideration of an annual payment of Bs. 32,000 for all Abkari rights in the 
Jawhar State. This sum to be paid in equal moieties half-yearly from the 
Thana Treasury on 10th September and 10th March of each year. 

8. During the term of the farm the administration of the Abkari revenue 
of Jawhar will be conducted by the Political Agent on the following priu-* 
ciples : 

(a) The rates of taxation of liquor in the Jawhar State and in the 
Collectorate to be equivalent. 

{b) Reasonable facilities for obtaining a supply of liquor for consump- 
tion to be afforded to the people of the Jawhar State as to the 
people of the Collectorate. 

(e) The retail selling price of liquor to be the same in the Jawhar 
State ana in the Collectorate so as to remove any inducement 
to the people of one territory to consume liquor sold in the 
other territory on account of its being cheaper. 

JVa^.—'Under the last stipulation it will not be necessary to forbid sale 
of liquor in Jawhar shops to British rayats or vice vend. 

4. But during the term of the farm the Political Agent will consult the 
Baja re^rding details of Abkari administration, such as the number and posi-* 
tion of Tiauor shops, the persons to receive retail licenses and the like, and will 
condder tne wishes of the Baja on such points. 

5. It is understood that the farm conveys to the Government of Bombay 
no right of ownership in palm and other toddy-producing trees, or in the land 
on which they stand. 



\ 



102 Jauhar— No. XLIII. Part n 

6. On his part the Raja engages cordially to c^-operate in carryitig out 
the provisions of thd Abkari law add rules, and to do his best bj himself and 
his officers to prevent all illicit posseseioo, manufacture, sale, transport} frc.^ 
of liquor or of the materials or implements used for its manufacture in accord- 
ance with the provisions of the Act and of any rules which may be made 
under it. 

7. It is understood that all offences against the Abkari law will be 
cognizable under section 51 of the Abkari Act by the Jawhar Criminal Courts 
in the same manner as other offences are cognizable. 

8. During the term of the farm the Abkari accounts of the Jawhar 
State will be kept separately from those of the Thana CollectoratOj and an 
annual account given to the Raja for his information. 

9. At the conclusion of the five years' farm the management of the 
Abkari revenue of the State will revert to the Raja. 

10. He engages thereafter to conduct his administration of it in accord* 
ance with the principles laid down in the preamble of this agreement, namely,— 

To maintain the same Abkari law and rules as may be in force in the 
Tbana Collectorate : 

To impose rates of taxation on liquor equivalent to those in force in the 
Collectorate : 

So to manage his revenue as that injury shall not be caused by it to 
the Abkari revenue of the Collectorate and to make his arrange- 
ments in consultation, when necessary, with the Political Agent 
with this view or to again sell the farm of the State Abkari to 
the British Government for whatever may, at the expiration of 
five years, appear a fair' and reasonable price to both Governments. 

Provided always that this article does not bind the Raja to any arrange- 
ments injurious to the legitimate interests of his State or revenue, and that it 
is understood that the Abkari revenue of the Collectorate will in like manner 
be so managed as not to cause injury to the legitimate Abkari revenue of the 
Raj'i. 

11. This agreement, if approved by the Government of Bombay, to come 
into force from 1st April 1880. 

Witnesses, 

(Sd.) (In Vernacular.) (Sd.) G. Vidal, (Sd.) Patangshai 

(Sd.) R. M. Jog, Collector 8f Political Baja of Jawhar. 

Secretary. Ageni^ Tkana. 84'5'18S8. 

Witness, 

(Sd.) Wasudbo Mahadbo, 
Head Clerk to the Collector of Thana. 



Fart II Jauhar— No8. XLLIV & XLV. 1041 



Approved and confirmed by His E^^cellpncy. tbo Viqeiioy and, Goxernor 
General in CoancU. 

Simla, ^ (Signed) H. M. Dubano, 

> Secretary to tie Oovernment of India^ 

The 27th July 1888. J Foreign. Pepar^etU. 



No. XLIV. 

AoBEBMENT regarding thQ Jawhab and Dahanu Station. Road 

1881. 

1. The road from Jawhar to the boundary of tbe State between Talowli 
and Saweh villages to be constructed and repaired by the Jawhar State. 

2. Westward of the bcundary between Talowli and Saweh the road up to 
the Dahanu Railwav station to be constructed by the British Government and 
to be repaired by it^ the State providing the land for that portion of the 
road passing through it. 

8. The road to be constructed by the British Government, to be either a 
elearedi moorumed or metalled joad^ a^ the Executive Engineer, Thana, may 
suggest. 

4« The British Government guarantee not to levy tolls, duty, or fee 
whatever on any of the carts, animals, goods or traffic on that portion of the 
road constructed and repaired by it, i.e., between Talowli and Dahanu station. 

6. The Jawhar State on the other hand guarantees that it will levy no 
toll, duty, or fee whatever on any of the carts, animals, goods or traffic on 
the roads westward of, its Talowli boundary, and up to Dahanu station. 

Jawhar, \ (Sd.) P. V. 

The 30th April 1881. j Raja. 

(Sd.) W. B. M. 

Political Agent. 



No. XLV. 



Agbbbment by the Jawhaq, Dabbab to accompany letter No. 
36 of 9th October 18S0 to the Collectob and Political 
Agent, Thana, 

1. Hereafter we will not (mltivate ,poppy^ ^or a}low it to be cultivated 
(by others). 



104 Jaahar-No. XL VI. Part II 



2. We will purchase the opium required by ourselves for our owd oon- 
sumptioD and for the people of our villages at Thanai or any other jdaoe 
appointed by Government for the supply of opium. 

3. We will have the opinm sold at the rates fixed from time to time for 
British districts^ and will not allow it to be sold at cheaper rates. 

4. We will not allow illicit importation of opium, that is to say, allow no 
opium to enter our territory that has not paid the British pass-fee. In return 
for this Government have been pleased to agree to grant us a remission to the 
extent of 20 per cent, of the pass-fee on opium, and, on hearing of this, we 
have bound ourselves to abide by the terms above said. Should we &il in 
this we will not|gefc the said remission of 20 per cent, of the pass-fee. 

6. We will furnish every half-year a statement showing in detail the 
quantity of opium purchased, the quantity sold, and the balance in stock, 
&C. This statement will be furnished free of errors and in the form fixed by 
Government, and we will keep accounts of the same in the manner required. 

Jawhab, ") (Sd.) Fatangsha, 

TAe 9th October 1881. J Baja of Jawiar. 

(True copy.) 

(Sd.) Lallubhai O., 

Personal Aaiitani to He Commr. of 
Cuetomt, Opium, and AbkarL 



No. XLVI. 

Agreement between the Collector and Political Aobiit» 
Thana, acting under the authority of His Excellenot thb 

YlCEBOT AKD GOVERNOR GENERAL of InDIA IN CoTJNCIL, On 

behalf of the British Government on the one handy and 

Fatanqsha Yiejblamsha Mukhim, Baja of Jawhar, on be* 

half of himselfi his heirs and successors, on the other hand, 

regarding the extradition and punishment of subjects of the 

Raja who have committed ofEences in Fortuguesb India, 

1888. 

Abticlb 1. 

The British OoverDment engages to surrender to the Raja of Jawhar any 
of his subjects who may be charged with having conimitted in Portaguese 
India any offences specified in the schedule hereto annexed^ and who may be 
found in British India. 



Part II 



Jauhar— No. XLVI. 



105 



Aeticle £. 

The surrender above-mentioned will be made in accordance with such 
procedure as the Governor-General of India in Council may from time to 
time prescribe. 

Aeticle 8. 

The Raja of Jawhar engages to cause the person sq surrendered to be 
tried^ according to the laws of the Jawhar State, for the offence which he may 
be charged with having committed in Portuguese India^ and on conviction 
will cause him to be suitably punished. 

Schedule referred to above in Article L 



Deicription of Offence. 



Mnrder, culpable homicide not amounting to murder, and causing death hy 
rash or negligent act ....•..• • 

Attempt to commit murder or culpable homicide 

Voluntarily causing hurt ••••.•..• 

Or grievous hurt 

EaM . . . . . 

Kicmapping, abduction, concealing kidnapped person, ulave-dealing or selling 
minors for immoral purposes ••..... 

Immodest assault on a woman ...••... 

Causing miscarriaee and abortion .•••... 

Bxpoeure or libanaooment of a child ..••••. 

Thefts . . . . . . . . . . . . 

Extortions, robberies, dacoities, attempts to commit robbery and belonging 
to a gang of thieves ....••••. 

Criminal misappropriations and criminal breaches of trust • . • 

Receiving stolen property ••..•••.. 

Cheating •... 

Lurking-house trespass, house-breaking . .^ 

PrMdment bankruptcy and fraudulent disposition of property . 

Dishonest opening of dosed receptacle containing property 

Being a thug •••••••••.. 

Belonging to a band of dacoits or robbers ...... 

A^EgraVated cases of wrongful confinement . • . • •• 

Mischief by fire or explosive substance .••••.. 

Mischief to a vessel or after preparation to cause death, hurt or wrongful 
restraint . . • • • • 

Counterfeiting or altering money or uttering counterfeit or altered money, 
making or possesoing instrument for above purposes 

Counterfeiting or fraudulently using Government stamps issued for pur- 
poses of revenue ... ...... 

Forgery and using of forged documents and making of seals for fraudulent 
purposes ........... 

Use of false trade mark or property mark, and frauds connected with such 
marks •••..•••.,. 



Seotiont of the 

Indian Penal Code 

which apply to 

such offences. 






299to804A. 

307, 308, 511. 

319 to 833. 

836 and 338. 

376 and 376. 

860 to 378. 

354. 
312 to 316. 

317. 
378 to 382. 

883 to 402. 

403 to 409. 

410 to 414 

415 to 420. 

443 to 446. 

206, 208, 421 

to 424. 

461 and 462. 

810, 311. 

400 and 401. 

344 to 848. 

435, 436 & 438. 

487, 439, 440. 

230 to 254. 

255 to 268. 
463 to 468, 
470 to 477. 

478 to 489. 



106 



Jauhar— No. XLVI. 



Fart II 



Description of Offence. 



Givine or fabricating false evidence to cause a person to be conyicted of an 
offence and subornation of the same ...... 

Illegal gratidcatiou taken by a public servant or to influence a publto servant 

Causing the evidence of the commission of any offence to disappear • • 

False certificate or declaration made by public servant, or used by any 

person as evidence .......... 

Escape from lawful custody on accusation or conviction of any crime speci- 
fied in this Schedule .....•• . , 

Crimes against other Laws. 

Piracy by law of nations. 

Ausaults on board a ship on the high seas with intent to destroy life or to 

do grievous bodily harm. 
Sinking or destroying a veRsel at sea or attempting or conspiring to do so. 
l^ovolt or conspiracy to revcilt by two or more persons on board a ship on 

the high seas against the authority of the Master. 
Abetment of or attempt to commit any of the foregoing offences. 



Secttont of the 
Indian Pnial Gods 
whieb w|»lj to 
inch oflroiM 



194 and 195. 
161 to 165. 

aoi. 

197 to 200. 



224. 



Dated at Jawhar this the fourth day of June one thousand eight hundred 
and eighty-eight. 

"Witness. (Sd.) Patangsha, 

(Sd.) Shiveam Nilkant, Baja ofJawiar. 

Karbhari. (Sd.) G. Vidal, 

"Witness, Collector and Political Agent, 

(Sd.) Wasudev Mahadev, Tiana. 

Head Clerk to the Collector and 

Political Agents Tiana. 

Approved and confirmed by His Elxcellency the Viceroy and Qoveruor- 
Oeneral in Council. 



Simla, *1 

The 20th August 1888. J 



(Sd.) H. M. DURAND, 

Secretary to the Oovernment of India, 

Foreign Department. 



IPart II Janjira. 107 



V.-JANJIRA. ' 

It is not known at what time the Abyssinians established themselves on 
'the western coast of ludiai but at a very early date the Sidis were Admirals 
of the Muhamroadan fleetj and held jagirs from the kings of Bijapur^ which 
were attached to the office to meet the expense of the marine. The grea^ 
maritime dep6t was Danda Rajpuri^ in tbe middle of which stands the islan^ 
of Janjira. At the time of Shivaji^s rise tbe principal Abyssinian was Wazir 
Fateh Khan^ one of Shivaji's most formidable enemies, against whose fort of 
Janjira the Mahrattas erected batteries for many successive years. Seduced 
by the promises and threats of Shivaji^ Fateh Khan was on the point of 
joining the Mahratta cause when he was seized and put in confinement by 
three of bis subordinate officersj one of whom, Sidi Sambal, assumed the 
command and put the'Bijapur fleet and the jagir under the authority of the 
Emperor of Delhi in consideration of assistance given by the Mughal govern- 
ment of Surat. 

In 1678 Sidi Sarobal. who had received the title of Yakut Khan from 
Aurangzeb, was superseded in the command by Sidi Kasim Yakut Khan, who 
held the fort against all the efforts of the Mahrattas^ and made frequent 
inroads into their districts, from which he levied contributions. Sidi Kasim 
died in 1707| and was succeeded by Sirul Khan. With this Chief the Britis^^ 
Oovernment entered into an offensive and defensive alliance (No, XLVII) 
in 1783^ the main object of which was to put a stop to the piracies committed 
by the Chiefs of Kolaba and to procure the restoration of territories taken 
from the Sidis by the Mahrattas. From this time the Sidis were firm allies 
of the British Oovernment, whose ships were spared in the general piracies 
which they conxmitted. Sidi Sirul died about 1734| leaving several sons, the 
eldest of whom, Sidi AbduUa, was murdered by his brothers, who usurped 
the government. Sidi Rahman, one of the brothers, who was absent from 
Janjira, and was not concerned in the conspiracy, threw himself on the 
support of tbe Peshwa Baji Rao. The Peshwa besieged Janjira, and, although 
unable to take the place, compelled the usurpers to enter into a treaty 
giving up seven districts to Sidi Rahman and ceding five of their forts 
to the Mahrattas. Sidi Rahman was removed from power in 1889, and 
his brother Sidi Hasan was appointed in his place. On the latter's 
death in 1745, the Chiefship of Janjira was for a time usurped by one 
Saiyid Allana, but was recovered in the following year by the rightful heir. 



108 Jaigira. Part I| 

Sidi Ibrahim Khan. In 1762 Sidi Ibrahim was murdered by his slave Yakut, 
who usurped the Chiefship, to the prejudice of the late Chiefs brother-in-law^ 
Sidi Abdur Rahim, who was generally considered the nearest heir. Ineffec- 
tual endeavours were made by the British Government to oompromia^ 
the disputei but Abdur Rahim would yield nothing of his claim* A military 
force was sent by the British Government to compel him to submit, 
whereupon he fled to Poooa. Another unsuccessful attempt was made in 1768 
to effect a compromise^ but four years afterwards^ as it was feared ibajt the 
Peshwa might support Abdur Rnhim, an aocommodation (No. XLVIII) was 
effected^ by which Abdur Bahim was put in possession of Danda Bajpuri in 
subordination to Sidi Yakuts who also promised him the succession to Janjira. 
Abdur Bahim accordingly succeeded Sidi Yakuts and on his death in 1784 
bequeathed the principality to his eldest son Abdul Earim Khan called Bala 
Mian. But Sidi Yakut's will had bequeathed the State to Abdur Bahim'a 
second eon, who, during his minorityi was to be under the guardianship of 
Sidi Jauhar, a personal friend of Sidi Yakut, and governor of the fort of 
Janjira. Sidi Jauhar, with the view of securing his own regency^ asserted the 
pretensions of the youth, but Balu Mian fled to Poena, taking his younge^ 
brother with him. It had always been the ambition of the Peshwa to obtain 
possession of Janjira, and he was now preparing to reduce it, when the British 
Government, after the conclusion of the alliance with the Peshwa against 
Tipu, being anxious to dissolve the offensive and defensive aUianoe with 
Janjira, which circumstances rendered it impracticable any longer to preaerve 
with consistency, negotiate and ratified an Engagement (No. XLIX) 
between Balu Mian and the Peshwa, by which the former ceded to the Peshwa 
Janjira and his other possessions, receiving near Surat lands yielding Rupees 
75,000 a year, to be afterwards increased to the value of the revenues of 
Janjira and its dependencies as collected in the most productive of the ten 
preceding years. 

The Peshwa, however, does not appear ever to have been able to establish 
his influence in Janjira, and the State remained virtually independent, at least 
in its internal administration. Ibrahim Khan, to whom in all probability the 
government was resigned by Sidi Jauhar, was succeeded in 1826, after a rule 
of about 24 years, by his eldest son, Sidi Muhammad Khan. 

In 1834 the British Government declared Janjira to be subject to the 
British power, and, in virtue of the British supremacy, abolished the native 
mint, from which debased coinage had been issued. 



Part II Janjira. ^ XOO 

In 1848 Sidi Muhammad abdicated in faypur of bis son 8idi Ibrahim 
Khan« In 1867 a warning was conveyed to the Chief of Janjira^ im consequence 
of his oppressive treatment of one of his subjeots^ that the British Government 
would hold him responsible for any abuse of power which might be brought 
home to him^ and he was urged to provide an independent tribunal for the trial 
of serious offences. Two years later another instance occurred of the cruelty 
of the Chief, which resulted in the death of two men. He was therefore de- 
prived of all criminal jurisdiction^ and a British officer with limited judicial 
powers was appointed to the political charge of the State. The civil and 
revenue jurisdiction was left in the hands of the Chief. 

In 1870, during the absence of the Chief at Bombay, the administration 
of civil justice fell into disorder, and the irregularity in the collection of revenue 
gave rise to numerous disputes. The Sidi Sardars, indignant at the Nawab's 
prolonged residence in Bombay, at his extravagance, and at his employment 
of Hindus instead of Muhammadans, formally deposed the Nawab, and elected 
his son as Chief in his stead, pleading in justification of their proceedings that 
by ancient usage they had a right to interfere in the government of the 
State. A British officer was deputed to Janjira to enquire into the relations 
between the Nawab and his Sardars, the alleged dissatisfaction of the people 
with the NawaVs rule, and the conditions under which his authority might be 
re-established. The result of this enquiry was to establish the fact that, alchough 
the Sardars had from time to time exercised an irregular power of interference 
in the government, no claim to exercise this power had been preferred since the 
establishment of the paramount authority of the British Qovernment, by which 
the Nawab has always been treated as the sole responsible ruler. Although 
a certain amount of discontent was found to exist at Janjira, the general dis- 
affection did not appear to be such as should preclude the return of the Chief 
under proper security for the better management of the State. Accordingly 
it was decided to restore the Nawab on certain conditions. These were em« 
bodied in a formal Agreement (No. L) and accepted by the Nawabj 
who was formally reinstated in December 1870. 

On the death of Sidi Ibrahim Khan in 1879 the succession was contested 
by his eldest illegitimate son, Sidi Muhammad Khan Bakhshi. Government^ 
however, recognised the claim of the younger and only legitimate son, Sidi 
Ahmad Khan, who accordingly succeeded to the Chiefship. He is now SO 
years of age. 



110 Janjira. Fart II 

In 1884 the Nawab entered into an Agreement (No. LI) by which 
he undertook [to assimilate his customs system to that in force in British 
India, to prohibit the manufacture of illicit salt and its importation into his 
dominions, to prevent the cultivation of the poppy in bis State and the im« 
portation of illicit opium, and to make over to the British Oovernment| on 
certain conditions, the management of the abkari revenue of his country. In 
consideration of these concessions he receives Rupees 13^000 per annum from 
the British Government and is supplied with salt and opium on favourable 
terms. 

The area of Janjira is 824 square miles; the supposed gross revenue 
amounts to Bs. 4,70,507, and is principally derived from land. The popula- 
tion (1891) is 81,582. The Sidi pays no tribute. The Nawab also owns the 
dependency of Jafarabad in Kathiawar, which yields a revenue of about Rupees 
60,000. The total strength of the military force is (1891) 168 guns classed 
as serviceable, 14 artillerymen, and 289 irregular infantry. 



Part H Janjira— Wo. XLVII. HI 



No. XLVII. 

Articles by which the English Nation and the Sbbdbes of 
JiNJEEBA of Bajahpore have adjusted an Alliance, 
Defensive and Offensive, on the Coast of India — 1733. 

For to establish upon a firm and lasting foundation a perpetual alliance 
and sincere friendship betwixt the governments of Jinjeera and Bombay, 
Seedee Saut, Seedee Ombar Affaja^ Seedee Mossoot, and the other principal 
Seedees residing in the said Jinjeera^ have agreed and settled with the 
Honourable Robert Cowan^ Esq., President and Governor for the Honourable 
English Company, etc., in Council. 

Article 1. 

That they shall make a league against all the enemies of both govern- 
ments in India (Europeans, subjects of the kings of Hindostan^ Persia, 
Arabia, and China excepted), and particularly against Angria, both govern- 
ments making a vigorous war by sea and land, not regarding any offers of 
peace from that enemy, and neither of the two allies shall hear alone nor 
particularly anything relating to peace, unless both are present at the same 
time anything is proposed, and are to resolve on nothing without the consent 
of both governments. 

Article 2. 

That in case one oE the two governments may have an enemy that is in 
amity with the other, in such case the league is only to be defensive, and 
must not fail on any pretence to assist them that are invaded; and in case of 
any invasion, the government that is in amity with the aggressor shall 
interpose their good offices as mediators to accommodate the differences that 
have happened. 

Article 3, 

As to the union of the forces of Bombay and Jinjeera in their actions 
against Angria, as well by sea as by land^ nil the marine forces of fiombay 
are to be in conjunction with those of Jinjeera, who are to be commanded by 
their own proper officer, yet he is to act as subordinate to the chief commander 
of the English forces, as being more experienced in sea-fighting, and the fleet 
of Bombay of greater force ; and as in Bombay there is no more infantry 
than is sufficient for their garrisons, the necessary land forces are to be 
provided by the Seedees of Jinjeera. 

Article 4. 

And likewise, in case the territories of the Seedee should be invaded by 
any power that is an enemy to both governments, they are to be assisted with 
all the marine force of Bombay ; and in case that the Government of Bombay 
should be invaded by any power that is an enemy to both governments, they 
shall be assisted from Jinjeera witli thirty fighting gallivats and two thousand 
sepoys. 



H2 Jalijira— Ho. XLVII. Part n 



AfiTtCLB 5. 

That all thnt is taken in this war by sea by the anited forces of both 
governments shall be given to the English^ and what shall be taken by .land 
shall be given to the Seedees, according as is expressed in the 6Ui and 7th 
Articles. 

Abticls 6. 

And if God shall be pleased to give this alliance the desired succesnj and 
that Angria shall be expelled the fort of Cundary by the united forces of both 
goyemmentSy that place shall be given to the English with all the ammu- 
nition and artillety that shall be found therein, and all tiie other forts that 
shall be taken from the said enemy shall be given to the Seedee with all the 
ammunition and artillery found in tliem, except Colaba, which shall be entirely 
demolished with all its bulwarks and batteries^ so as one stone shall not be 
left above another, and shall never be rebuilt without the consent and pleasure 
of both governments ; and the revenues and produce of the lands annexed to 
that fort, and whatever tribute belongs to it (except royal grants and posses- 
sions in the hands of the ancient proprietors), shall be annually and equally 
divided, half to the English and the other half to the Seedees of Jinjeera^ 
and the care and security of these lands is to be provided for by both. 

Abtiolb 7. 

In the place called Mopaut, betwixt the rivers of Nagotan and Penn 
in the district of Colaba, the English may build, if they think proper, a 
warehouse and small fort with artillery sufficient for the better security of 
those lands and their roads, and the conveniency of merchants tra^ng, 
putting a garrison therein, and the customs and other rents that shall be 
recovered shall be annually and equally divided, half to the English and half 
to the Seedees of Jinjeera, and likewise they shall equally pay the chaises, of 
building the fort and its garrison, and both governments shall take care to 
encourage trade and preserve the subjects. 

Abticlb 8. 

That all the ammunition that shall be expended in the war, as Well by 
sea as by land, by either of the governments, shall be on their respective 
accounts, and in case one should be necessitated to take of the other, if they 
can spare it, they are to give it for its just price. 

Article 9. 

If any robberies are committed on either side, restitution is immediately 
to be made to the persons wronged. 

Article 10. 

That deserters who put themselves under the protection of either govern- 
ment shall not be delivered up if they have committed a crime worthy of 
death. 



Part II 



Janjira-No. XLVII. 



113 



Abticlb 11. 

That the Seedees of Jinjeera shall upon no pretence hereafter issue out 
their passes to the shipping and people of Angria. 

Artici^ 12. 

That after Colaba is taken with its dependencies^ if it should l)e attacked 
by the enemy^ the charg^es of the forces that shall be left for its defence shall 
lie equally defrayed by both governments. 

Abticlb 13. 

That after the ratification of these Articles^ by which the league is ad- 
justed, we are immediately to put them in execution. 

Tiis lOtk dajf of tke month Mu^jub, and the 16th year of Ilis Majesty^s 
reign and 1146 of the Law, or the 6th of December 1733. 




Seedee 

AbdoU 

Rehman't 

Seal. 




Seedoo 
Takoot 
Kban's 

Seal. 


• 






• 
• 


Seedee 

Saat't 

Seal. 








Seedee 

Mosoot's 

Seal. 








Seedee 
Sombbole's 
Seal. 








Seedee 

Oinbar't 

Seal. 



Confitmed by the Honourable the President in Council of Bombay on 
the 11 th December 1733. 



114 



Janjira-Np. XLVIII. 



Fftrtll 



Secret Article adjusted betwixt the Govebkhents of BoMBAr 
and Jin JEEBA of Rajahpore, signed and published the same 

■ _ 

time as was the Oenebal Tbeaty of Alliance. 

In equipping a fleet to chastise and destroy the enemy Angria^ the 
Government of Bombay have expended Rupees two lakhs ; that the same be 
efFectually represented to oourt^ and the King's order obtained upon the 
Governor of Surat for the payment of Rupees three lakhs on account of the 
tunkha of the fleet and forts^ which order we oblige ourFelves to deliver to 
the Government of Bombay, in wliich order it shall be expressed that the 
said n\oney shall be paid out of the treasury of Surat to the Goveromf nt of 
Bombay^ and after the said Rupees three lakhs are leoeived from the Surat 
government, they shall take to themselves Rupees two lakhs, and one shall 
be given to the Seedees of Jinjeera. 

Tkis Utk of the montk BaJJub, in tie 16th year of Hie iliyest/e reign, 
or the 7th of December 1733. 



Khayrit 

Kban't 

Seal. 




Seedee 

Abdall 

B^'biuao's 

Seal. 




Seedee 
Takoot 
Khau'a 
Seal. . 



No. XLVIII. 

Whebeas a difference has subsisted between Seedee Yakoot 
Khan and Seedee Abdool Raheem Khan, who have left 
their dispute to the decision of the Governor of fioMBAY 
of their own free will, he has settled the following Articles 
to be entered into between them ; if they act contrary there- 
to, they will fall under the displeasure of the Honourablb 
Company— 1772. 

Article 1. 

That Seedee Abdool Raheem Khan shall live at Ra jepore as Soubadar 
with seven hundred men under his command, whose pay he shall pay out of 
the rent of 2i tuppas agi*eeable to the Sircar's rule, which tappas f-hall be' let 
out to him at farm, excepting five villages belonging to Seedee Yakoot, and 
he shall pay the balance, if any due after paying for the above seven hundred 
men, into the Sircar annually^ tendering the account thereof to Seedee Yakoot 
Khan. 



Part II Jax^ira— No. XLVIII. 116 



Artiolb 2. 

That Seedee Yakoot Khan will 'allow Seedee Abdool Raheem Khan 
certain viih^eB and oarts for his house expense, 

Aktiole 3. 

That Seedee Abdool Raheem Khan shall take such care of the Conkery 
and its town walls as he may think proper^ with orders from Jinjeera, and 
will not admit any man belonging to the foreign durbar to come in without 
orders from Jin jeera^ and will^not let any man pass or repass by Moorad gate 
withoat orders from Jinjeera as usual. 

Aeticlb 4. 

That Seedee Abdool Raheem Khan shall write no letter to the foreign 
durbars without orders from Jinjeera, neither shall he keep any man who 
might go to him from Jinjeera upon disgudt. 

Articlb 5. 

That Seedee Abdool Raheem Khan shall make no command in the coun- 
try, nor has he anything to do with the fleet ; only the Sircar has power over 
the country and fleet, 

^ Aeticlis 6. 

That Seedee Abdool Raheem Khan has no manner of business with the 
town and government ; the Sircar^s officers will remain there and carry on 
the business as usual. 

Article 7. 

That the seal of Yakoot Khan [shall be made use of by Yakoot Khan 
only. 

Article 8. 

That Seedee Abdool Raheem Khan shall supply the fort of Jinjeera with 
cajans, ko,, necessaries, as usual, for which he shall have customary abatement 
in the amount of the farm of the prementioned 8i tuppas. 

Article 9. 

That Seedee Abdool Raheem Khan shall not interfere in any examina- 
tion of criminal causes for justice, but send the parties guilty thereof to 
Jinjeera to be examined. 

The above nine Articles both contracting parties shall strictly observe, 
and Seedee Abdool Raheem Kban will obey Seedee Yakoot Khan's orders 
and perform his duty agreeably to the above agreements. 

Bombay Caslle, 6th June 1172. 



116 Janjira— No. XLIX. l?mrt IZ 



No. XLIX— 1791. 

Ageeembnt between the Honourable Unitbd English East 
India Company and the Feishwa Madho Eao Naeaik 
Pundit Purdhaun Bahadur, settled by Mr. Gharlbs 
Warren Malbt, Resident of the said Honourable 
United East India Company at the Court of Poona, by 
virtue of the full powers delegated to him by the Eight 
Honourable Charles Earl Cornwallis, K.Q., Ooybr- 
hOR General in Council, appointed by the Honourable 
the Court of Directors of the said United Company to 
direct and control all their affairs in the East Indies 
relative to the Forts of Jinjebra, Dhunda, Bajkporr, 
Cons AW, and Medgur, with their dependencies in the 
country of Cokun, now in the possession of the Abyssi- 
NiANS, and of which Seedee Abdool Kubeem Khan, 
commonly styled Balloo Meeh, was heir, but wjio has by 
his own free will and consent resigned, by a written instru- 
ment, all claim thereto agreeably to the following 
Articles : — 

Abticlr 1. 

I, Seedee Abdool Knreem Khan^ have by a written instrument resigned 
to the Sircar of Rao Pundit Purdhaun Bahadoor all claim to my hereditary 
territory, with its forts, and all effects, great and small, contained therein, 
the said Rao Pundit Purdhaun Bahadoor having on his part agreed to grsjit 
me and my heirs for ever, free from all claim or incumbrance, and without 
reserve, a territory under the denomination of altumgah, in the province of 
Guzerat, on the sea coast in one quarter, and as far as possible contiguous in 
its parts, yielding a revenue (to be computed from the best collection of the 
collections of ten preceding years under the Peishwa^s government) equal to 
the revenue of Jinjeera and its dependencies aforesaid, as collected in the most 
productive year of ten years preceding the present. A portion of the said 
territory, producing the yearly revenue of Rupees seventy-five thousand, is to 
be granted me in altumgah ; at present the remainder to be put in my pos- 
session in the same year that the aforesaid forts and districts may fall into 
the possession of the Sircar of the said Pundit PurShaun, in which the condi- 
tion of contiguity to the former grant is to be observed with all possible 
punctuality. 



r 



Part II Janjira— No. XLJX. 117 



Abticls 2. 

I agree to proceed with my brother, relations^ and dependants to reside 
^n the territory previously granted to me, on which, and on that hereafter 
to be granted, 1 agree not to constmct any fort or place of greater strength 
than may be necessary for my protection against Grassias and freebooters. 
I engage to conduct myself peaceably and justly, to create no feuds or dis- 
turbanoeSf to join no enemy of the Honourable English East India Company 
or o£ Rao Pundit Purdbaun Bahadoor, nor to act hostilely towards them. 

Abticlb 3. 

If Rao Pundit Pnrdhaun Bahadoor should permit any part of my above- 
mentioned hereditary territory to remain in the possession of any Abyssinian 
or other person for the promotion of his own objects, or should he, after 
getting possession of the said territory, dispose of any part thereof by gift or 
otherwise, no deduction is to be made on that account from my altumgab, of 
which I am to be put in full possession on the cessation of hostilities between 
the Peishwa and the suid districts of Jinjeera, according to this agreement, on 
a calculate of the full produce of the revenue of the dependencies of Jinjeera 
as above mentioned. The said Seedee Abdool Kureem Khan having, by the 
foregoing three Articles, relinquished all his hereditary titles and possessions 
to Rao Pundit Purdhaun, and an engagement being thereby entered into 
between the parties, neither is to deviate therefrom. And Rao Pundit Pur- 
dhaun is at liberty to pursue such modes and at such times as he may think 
proper to get possession of the aforesaid forts and dependencies that are at 
present in the hands of other Abyssinians, to whom no assistance will be 
given by the Honourable Company. This being agreed to by the Sircars 
of the Honourable Company and Rao Pundit Purdhaun Bahadoor, written 
instruments executed by Rao Pundit Purdhaun on one part, and Mr. Malet 
on the other, specifying the same, have been exchanged ; the said Mr. Malet 
having engaged to procure and deliver to Rao Pundit Purdhaun Bahadoor 
a copy, ratified by the Right Honourable the Governor General in Council, 
on the delivery of which the Treaty executed by Mr. Malet shall be returned. 

Signed and sealed in Poona, tie 6th June 179L 



The Honour- 
able Com- 
pany's Seal. 



(Sd.) C. W. Malbt, 

Resident. 



Exchanged 12th June 1791. 

(Sd.) C. W. Malet, 



118 Jaxu'ira— Ho. In Part II 



No. L. 

Abticles of Ag&eement with His Exoellency Sbedbe 
Ibrahim Ehan, Nawab of Jinjebba. 

Whereas His Excellency Nawab Seedee Ibrahim Khan has applied to ihe 
British Oovernment to reinstate him in the administration of the State of 
Jinjeera, and whereas (Joverument are willing to reinstate him subject to 
such conditions as will secure the welUbeing of the people and a better 
administration of the affairs of the State, His Excellency Nawab Ibrahim 
Khan hereby agrees to observe the following Articles of Agreement : — 

. Article 1. 

In all matters of importance the Nawab of Jinjeera agrees to follow 
the advice of the British Government as conveyed by the Political Officer 
representing that Government at Jinjeera. 

Abticlb i. 

The Nawab will defray all expenses connected with the Agency, the 
amount of such expenses being fixed by Government from time to time 
according to what may appear to them necessary for the due exercise of the 
control now vested in them. 

Abticlb 3. 

The Nawab will give all proper assistance to the Political Agent and his 
Assistant in the exercise of the criminal jurisdiction now vested in them, and 
for this purpose will appoint a competent Magisterial Officer, to be approved 
by Government, to exercise powers similar to those of a subordinate Magis- 
trate of the first class, and to commit cases for trial by the Political Agent 
and his Assistant. 

Article 4. 

The Nawab will maintain an efficient Executive Police force df a 
strength approved by Government. The officer in charge of such force will 
be under the control of the Nawab^s magisterial officer, and will be his 
Assistant for Police purposes. 

Article 5. 

The Nawab agrees to draw up a code of Rules for the guidance of hia 
revenue officers, prescribing the mode of assessing and realizing the revenue 
and of dealing with defaulters. Such rules when approved by Government 
to be recognized as the only legal procedure. 

Article 6. 

The Nawab agrees to entertain a competent tutor, to be approved by 
Government, for the education of his son, Seedee Ahmed Khan, and wiU 
retain his services so long as Government consider it advisable. 



Part H Janjira— No. LI. 119 



Articlb 7. 

All complaints and claims brought by the Nawab against Seedee Hossein 
Jaburtee and others in connection with the recent, usurpation, and all com- 
plaints and claims which may up to the date of the present Agreement have 
been brought by Seedee Hossein Jaburtee and others jigainst the Nawab^ 
shall, if not already settled by the orders of. Government, be submitted to 
the arbitration of the Political Agent, subject to the confirmation of Govern- 
ment. 

Articlb 8. 

The Nawab agrees to dismiss Hajee Mahomed Thangay from his service, 
and engages not to re-employ him either in a public or private capacity. 



No. U. 

Ageeement between Sidi Ahmed Ehan Nawab of Janjira and 
His Excellency the Govbenoe of Bombay in CouNCiii 
regarding administration of the Departments of Customs, 
Salt, Opium and Abkaei in Habsan — 1884. 

All conventions^ agreements or arrangements of whatever kind relating to 
Costoms^ Salt, 0()ium and Abkari existing prior to this agreement are hereby 
cancelled and in lieu thereof it is mutually agreed as follows :— 

Articlb 1.— ^< to Customs. 

(a) The Nawab of Habsan shall, from the date of the execution of this 
agreement, adopt the British Customs Tariff at all ports in Habsan, and 
whenever from time to time the British Government may make alterations or 
modifications in such Tariff, the Nawab shall make similar modifications in the 
tariff at Habsan ports. The Nawab shall further follow the system, use the 
forms and observe the rules in force in British Custom-houses, and shall in 
all respects assimilate therewith, so far as it may be possible to do so, the 
procedure in the Habsan Custom-houses. 

(6) The cordons of Preventive and Customs stations heretofore maintained 
by the British Government and the Nawab on the land frontier shall be re- 
moved from the date of this agreement coming intoforce^ and all land customs 
and transit duties on traffic passing from the dominations of the one Govern- 
ment to that of the other sball be abolished from the same date; except with 
the consent of both Governments such land customs and transit duties shall 
not be revived. 



120 Janjira— No. LI. Part IX 



(c) The Nawab shall levy port-due? at all Habsan ports on the scale 
for the time being in force at the southern group of ports in the * Bombay 
Presidency entered in Part IV of .the first schedule of the Indian Ports Aot 

of 1875. 

(d) All articles imported into Habsan ports bond fide for the use of the 
Nawab and his family shall be free of duty. 

le) The Nawab shall manage Habsan Custom-houses : Provided that the 
Political Agent or any officer authorized by him for that purpose shall have 
authority, from time to time, to inspect the books kept at the Habsan 
Custom-houses with a view to satisfy himself that the British Tariff and 
the British Customs system and mode of transacting businesa are being 
enforced. 

Aeticle 2. — Ji io Salt. 

Id) The Nawab shall suppress all salt-works in Habsan and shall prohibit 
the manufacture of salt and collection of salt-earth in Habsan territory* 
The Nawab shall also take measures to prevent the spontaneous generatioD 
of salt in Habsan and to destroy such salt as soon as it may appear. 

Ih) The Nawab shall prohibit the import into all Habsan ports of any 
but British excise salt covered by British permits. 

(e) The Agents of the Nawab may annually select and purchase at the 
British excise salt-works at Uran salt to the amount of ten thousand six 
hundred and fourteen maunds for the domestic consumption of the inhabitants 
of Habsan and the British Government will levy no duty on the salt thus 
annually purchased by the Nawab's agents for such purpose. 

11) The Nawab shall retail the salt thus supplied for the domestic con- 
sumption of the inhabitants of Habsan through licensed vendors at sadi price 
as he may think fit. 

ie) The Nawab shall establish fish-cnring yards wherein salt will be 
supplied by the British Government to fishermen only for fish-curing at ten 
and two-third annas per maund. These yards shall be under the control 
of British Salt officers, 

Abticle 8. — Annual Payment, 

In consideration of the stipulations contained in the above two articles and 
conditional on the effectual prevention by the Nawab's Government of 
all contraband trade or practices or smuggling of salt, opium and liquor, the 
British Government shall pay annually to the Nawab of Habsan the sum of 
Rupees thirteen thousand. The said payment shall be made on the first May 
of each year. 

Article ^.-^As to Opium. 

(a) The Nawab shall continue to prohibit the import of opium into 
Habsan, whether by land or by sea, and shall also prohibit all poppy culti- 
vation in Habsan territory. 



nrt II Jai^ira -No. LI. 12 1 



(J) The Nawab shall obtain tlie opium necessary for the consumption of 
the inhabitants of Habsan only from the Commissioner of Customs, Salt, 
Opium and Abkari> at Bombay^ or in such other manner as Government may 
from time to time direct. 

(c) The Commissioner shall allow a drawback on alls'jch opium at a rate 
equal to one-fifth of the duty actually levied by the British Government on all 
epium supplied to or obtained by the Navvab. 

Articlb b.'^As to Mkari, 

(a) The-Nawab shall continue to prohibit the import into any portion of 
his territory of all liquor front Portuguese territory. He shall also absolutely 
prohibit the export of all spirit from Habsan to any other place. 

(b) The British Government undertakes the management of the Abkari 
revenue of Habsan on the British system for a term of (10) ten years from the 
first August one thousand ei^^ht hundred and eighty-four^ and the Nawab 
undertakes to afford all facilities to the officers appointed by the British 
Government in that behalf. 

{e) After deducting the actual cost of management from tlie gross sum 
annualljr realized, the British Government undertakes to pay the balance into 
the Nawab's treasury. Such payment to be made in the month of August 
of each year. 

(d) Sxcept in the higher grades, the officers employed by the Briti<^h 
Goveinment in the management of the Abkari revenue of Habsan shall, as far 
as may be practicable, be selected from the servants of the Habsan State. 

This agreement shall take effect from the first August one thousand eight 
hundred and eighty-four. 

(Sd.) Alfbed Keyskr, (Sd.) Sidi Ahmed Khan, 

Political Agent. Nawab of Janjira^ 



(Sd.) DUPFERIN, 

Viceroy and Oovernor^Oeneral of India. 



This Agreement was ratifiefl by His Excellency the Viceroy and Gov- 
omor-Geueral of India, at Fort William, on the twenty-third day of Februarjr 
A.D. one thousand eight hundred and eighty-five. 

(Sd.) H. M. DUEAND, 

Officiating Secretary to Ike Government of India^ 

Foreign Department' 




122 Ja^jira— No. LI. Part IX 



Certified that the above i» a true copy of the orig^inal agreement. 

(Sd.) W. Lbb-Wabnbb, 
Officiating Under-Seeretary to the Government of India, 

Foreign Deparimeui, 
Fort William, ') 
The26tl February 1S85.) 



fart II Satara Jt^girdAVB—Akalkot, 12d 



V1.-THE SATARA JAGIBDABS. 

from Bombay Government Records, No. XLI of New Series, and Reports by the 

Bombay Government, 

By the 7th article of the Satara treaty of 1819* the possessions of the 
Jagirdars within the territory of the Raja of Satara were guaranteed by the 
British Government, who engaged to secure that the Jagirdars should per- 
form the service they owed to the Raja, according to established custom. The 
Jagirdars thus guaranteed were the Raja of Akalkot, the Pant Sachiv, the Pant 
Pratinidhi, the Daphle, the Nimbalkar, and Shaikh Mira Waikar. The tenures 
of these Chiefs are held to date from the period when their agreemeuts were made 
with the British Government, and not from the date of the grants made by the 
Rajas of Satara. In 1839, on the accession of Shahaji, the Jagirdars were placed 
ander the direct management and control of the British Government, their 
contingents and pecuniary payments being reserved to the Raja on the scale 
&zed in 1819. They have not the power of life and death. All serious crimi- 
nal cases, involving the punishment of death, or transportation for life, or 
offences punishable with seven years' imprisonment in certain cases, are tried 
in a court presided over by a British officer, in'association with the Jagirdar or 
the minister of the Jagirdar within whose territory the offence was committed, 
and the confirmation of the British Government is required before the sentence 
can be carried into effect. The Jagirdars maintain a few sowars and sepoys for 
police and revenue duties, but have no regular troops. The political control 
over these jagirs vests partly in the Political Agent and Collector of Satara^ 
and in the case of Akalkot with the same official at Sholapur, in the case of 
Bhor with the Collector and Agent at Poena, and in the case of the Daphle 
(Jath) with the Political Agent and Collector of Bijapur. 

In \^Q% the Jagirdars, with exception of the Waikar, were granted Sanads 
(No. LII) conferring on them the right of adoption. 

In 1880 the manufacture of earth-salt was prohibited throughout the 
jagirs, and compensation has been granted to the Jagirdars on this account. 

1. AKALKOT. 

In 1707, when Shahuji, grandson of Shivaji of Satara, was engaged in 
battle with Tara Bai for the recovery of his rights, a woman, whose husband 



♦ See Lupscd Stjitos, page 337. 



i24 Satara Jagirdars— ^Aor. Part II 



had been slaia in action, threw her child before the Raja^ calling out that she 
devoted him to the Raja's sernce. Shahuji took charge of the child^ and 
named him Fateh Sing^h Bhonsla^ in commemoration of his victory. In 1710 
this lad received the ja^jir of Akalkot and the title of Raja — a title which 
has been recognised by the British Government^ but without the pre6x of 
Highness. 

Fateh Singh was succeeded in 1760 by his adopted son Shahuji^ and be 
in turn by a second Fateh Singh who was the Jagirdar with whom the Britiah 
Government formed Engagements in 1820 (No. LIII). He was succeeded 
by his sou Maloji Rao, and the latter in 18*38 by his son Shahuji^ who died ia 
1857. The misrule and incapacity of his successor^ Maloji^ necessitated the inter- 
vention of the British Government^ and on the 19th February 1866 the Raja 
was set aside and the State was placed under Government management. Maloji 
died in 1870^ leaving an infant son^ Shahuji, who has not yet been invested 
with power. In 1868 the contingent of 100 horsemen, which the Chief was 
bound to maintain under the treaty of 1820, was disbanded, and a money- 
payment of Rupees 14,592 per annum, being two-thirds of the actual cost 
of the contingent, was substituted. The Chief receives from Government 
Rupees 9,606-4-0 and Rupees 5^536-4-0 per annum, on account of Pune Panch- 
mabal Jakat and Mokasbab respectively ; the latter amount is, however, a 
fluctuating one. 

The revenue survey and settlement was introduced in 1871, and the State 
is still administered under British supervision. In 1886 transit duties were 
abolished. Civil and criminal jurisdiction over the lands of the Akalkot 
State within the limits of the Great Indian Peninsula Railway was ceded to 
the British Government in 1865, and within the limits of the Southern 
Mahratta Railway in 1887. 

The estimated gross revenue of Akalkot is Rupees 2,75,001, which includes 
a sum of Rupees 2,470-6-0 on account of compensation for abkari and Rupees 
142-0-10 on account of salt paid by the British Government. The population 
(1891) is 75,774 and the area 498 square miles. 

2. BHOR, 

The Pant Sachiv of Bhor is one of the eight hereditary ministers of 
the old Mahratta empire. Chimnaji Sachiv, with whom the first Engagement 
(No. LIV) was made by the British Government^ was one of the earliest 
to abandon the cause of Bajt Rao after the Proclamation of the 11th February 



f 



Part II Satara Jagirdars— ^«fM/A. 125 



1818. He died io 1887 and was succeeded by his adopted son Raghunath 
Rao Chimnaji, with whom an Engagement (No. LV) for the exchange of 
-territory was concluded in 1830. 

Chimnaji Raghunath was adopted by his uncle Raghunath Rao on the 
latter's death-bed in 1837. A new Engagement (No. L VI) was concluded with 
'Chimnaji in 1839, by which he undertook among other things to abolish all 
transit duties in his territory. On his adoption he was required to pay a 
nazarana of Rupees 53,021 to the Raja of Satara, and Rupees 27,703 to the 
British Government. He died in 1871 and was succeeded by his son Shankar 
Rac, the present Chief, now 38 years of age. On the understanding that he 
was not at liberty, without the consent of Government, to impose any new 
taxation, he was in 1874 entrusted with the management of his estate. The 
family enjoys an assignment of six per cent, on the revenues of certain 
districts in the Deccan and Ehandesh^ and a considerable jagir to the south- 
west of Poona. 

In 1880 the Pant Sachiv entered into an Agreement (No. LVII) by 
which he undertook to prohibit the cultivation of the poppy in Bhor and the 
ilhcit inuwrtation of opium into his territory. This agreement was renewed 
with certain alterations in 1887. 

With a view to assimilating the abkari administration in Bhor to the 
system in force in the adjoining British districts, the Pant Sachiv entered 
into an Agreement in 1885 (No. LVlll) by which the management of the 
abkari revenue of the State was transferred to the British Government up to 
the 3ist July 1894^ in consideration of an annual payment of Rupees 
1M48-13-8. 

In 1890 (No. LTX) the Pant Sachiv entered into an Agreement with 
the British Government to abolish all taxes or imposts on the import, export 
and measurement of commodities other than snuff, sulphur and poisonous 
drugs. 

The Pant Sachiv pays a tribute of Rupees 4,646-2-0 to the British Gov- 
ernment. His revenues amount to Rupees 4,22,436 ; the area of his jagir is 
1,491 square miles, and the population (1891) is 155,488, 

3. AUNDH. 

The Jagirdar of Aundh has the title of Pant Pratinidhi. The Chief with 
whom the British Government formed its first Engagement (No. LX) was 



126 Satar* Jagirdars— t/o^A. Pi^ XI 



Parasram Pandit. The title of Pratinidhi, which means '* the likeness and 
representation of the Raja/' was conferred by Bajaranij when, during the 
misfortunes which followed the death of Shivaji^ he established a court at 
Gingi on the plan of the court of his father. The title is higher than that of 
Peshwa. Parasram Paudit had held the jagir for about forty years before 
he overthrow of the Peshwa Baji Rao. In 1846 he adopted a son^Sriniyas 
Parasram, now 59 years of age, on which occasion he was required to pay a 
nazarana of Rupees 25,000 to the Raja of Satara. Srinivas Parasram succeeded 
his father on the 11th June 18lf8. 

In 1880 the Chief of Aundh executed an opium Agreement (No. LXI) 
similar to that which, as mentioned above, was accepted in the same year by 
the Chief of Bhor. In 1887 he abolished the imposts called sthalmod and 
sthalbharit in his territory. 

The Pant pays no tribute to the British Government, but there is an 
assignment of six per cent., or Rupees 1,918, on the revenues of some of his 
villages. The total revenues of the jagir amount to about Rupees 8,06,225, 
and the population (1891) is 65,146. The area of the jagir, which is com- 
posed of various isolated estates, is 447 square miles. 

4. JATH. 

The family of the Daphles of Jath derive their name from the village 
of Daphlapur in the Jath Pargana. 

The Engagement (No. LXI I) of the British Government in 1820 was 
made with* Renuka Bai, first widow of Khanaji Daphle, late Chief of 
the Jath State. The estate passed from her to the second widow, Salu 
Bai on whose death in 1823 Ramrao Daphle, the head of a younger 
branch of the family, succeeded. In 1827 the jagir was attached by the 
Raja of Satara to pay oflE the Chief's debts. After their liquidation the 
estate was restored in Ib^l to Baghirathi Bai, widow of Ramrao. The British 
Government has more than once interfered to adjust the pecuniary affairs of 
the jagir. 

Iq 1872, in consequence of numerous complaints of oppression on the 
part of the Jagirdar, Amrit Rao Daphle, he was deprived of all civil and 
criminal jurisdiction, and a karbhari was appointed with certain limited 
powers for a time ; but the subsequent contumacy of the Jagirdar rendered it 
necessary to assume the whole management of the jagir. This arrangement 



curt II Batara Jagirdars— PAa/ton— r4« Waihar. 127 



Imsted till 1883, when the Chief was made Joint Administrator, and was allowed 
tx> assist in the management of the State. The whole administration was 
made over to him in 1885 on certain specified conditions, which were laid down 
in gpreater detail in 1887. These conditions he made no attempt whatever 
to fulfil, and in 1891 it was found necessary in the interests of the State to 
depriYO him of all authority, an annual allowance of Rupees 20,000 being 
granted to him. Amrit Bao Daphle died on the 12th January 1892, and the 
succession of Bowaji, a minor, aged 6 years, has been recently sanctioned by 
t»be Government of India. 

The Jagirdar pays to the British Government Rupees 6,400 per annum in 
lieu of a service of 50 horsemen, a tribute of Rupees 4,847 on account of 
€^ertain rights inherited from the Rajas of Satara, and some other small sums 
on account of rights in other districts. He also pays Rupees 958-1-4 to 
^he Pant Pratinidhi from the revenues of certain villages. The population 
of the jagir of the Daphle, including Daphlapur, is (1891) 79,797, being 
71,451 in Jath and 8,346 in Daphlapur. The revenue in 1889-90 was 
^Bupees 1,81,671 for Jath, and Rupees 15,748 for Daphlapur; and the area 
^A both together is about 979 square miles. 

5. PHALTAN. 
The Chief of Phaltan, styled Nimbalkar, belongs to an ancient family, 
TTbey long held the district of Phaltan under the Muhammadan rulers 
^ Bijapur. Jan Rao, with whom the British Government formed an 
Engagement (No. LXIII) in 1820, died at a very advanced age in 1825. He 
^was succeeded by Banaji Naik, who paid a nazarana of Rupees 80,000 to 
the Raja of Satara. Banaji Naik died in 1841, when his widow was per- 
mitted to adopt the present Chief, Mudhoji Naik, now 53 years of age, 
a nazarana of Rupees 30,000 being paid to the Raja of Satara. He succeed. 
ed to the gadi on the 26th March 1860. The State became embarrassed 
through the mismanagement of the Chief ; and in December 1882 the gov- 
ernment was entrusted to two joint administrators. In July 1885, order having 
been to some extent restored, the Jagirdar was reinstated. In 1887 he finally 
abolished both sthalmod and sthalbharit. He pays Rupees 9,600 per annum 
in lieu of a service of 75 horse. His revenues amount to Rupees 2,35,921 ; the 
jagir contains an area of 397 square miles, and a population (1891) of 66,383. 

6. THE WAIKAR. 
Shaikh Mira of Wai was an .infantry oflScer in the service of the 
Baja of Satara. On the return of Shahuji from imprisonment Shaikh 



128 Satara Jagirdars— T!l« Waikar. Fart ir 

Mira espoused his eause and was rewarded with the rent-free grant of the 
village of Pasarni^ a pension of Rupees 1^800 a month, and promotion to the 
command of 60 horsemen^ for the maintenance of whom be held assig^nmenta 
to the amount of Kupees 40^000. The pension ceased on the death of 
the first Shaikh Mira, and the revenue assignments have since fallen off to 
Rtipees 18^000, which, with Pasarni, are still held by the family. Hie- 
Engagement (No. LXIV), concluded in 1820, was modified by the amendment 
of the schedule of 1826 attached to the Satara treaty of the 25th September 
1819. 

The last representative of the family. Shaikh Azim-ud-din, died on ibe 
18th September 1891, and the afEairs of the Saranpm are at present the sub^ 
jeot of litigation. 



Tart 11 Satara Jagirdars— GendraZ, Akalkot-^TSf os. LII As LIII. 129 

Na LII. 
Adoption Sunnud granted to the Rajah of Akulkotb — 1862. 

Her Majesty being desiroas that the Oovernments of the several Prin* 
ces and Chiefs of India who now govern their own territories should be perpe- 
tuated, and that the representation and' dignity of their Houses should be 
continued; in fnlfilment of this desire this Sunnud is given to you to convey to 
yon the assurance that, on failure of natural heirs, the British Government 
will permit and confirm any adoption of a successor made by yourself or by 
any fnrture Chief of your State that may be in aocordance with Hindoo law 
and the customs of your race. 

Be assured that nothing shall disturb the engagement thus made to you 
80 long as your House is loyal to the Crown and faithful to the conditions of 
the Treaties, grants, or engagements, which record its obligations to the 
British Government. 

(Sd.) Canninq. 

Dated 11th March 1862. 



Similar Sunnuds were granted to the Punt Prithee Nidhee> Punt Suoheoi 
the Nimbalkur, and the Dufiay. 



No. LIII. 

AouEEMBMT between the Honoubable East India Company 
and the Bajah of Akulkote, dated the 3rd July 1820. 



Senl of 
Oaptain J. 
Grant, 



Teems fixed by Captain James Grant, on the part of the 

HONOUBABLE COMPANY, for RaO SaHIB MeHEBBAN EUTTEH 

SiNO Bajah Bhonslay Akulkotkub. 

The jaghires, etc., held by you have come into the possession of the 
British Government along with the rest of the country. In consideration^ 
however, of the antiquity and respectability of your family, whatever was 
held by you up to the war is, with the exception of the Mogulaee Umuls, not 
appertaining to the villages at present held by yoU| graciously restored to yoa 

8 



ISO Satara jAgird^TB—Akalkot'^TSfo. LIII. Part IX 



by Government. As your ja^hires, etc.^ come within the limits of the terri* 
tory of His Highness the Raj^h Chutruputee of Satara^ aocording to the 
Treaty, you are to be considered a jnghiredar of His Highnesses govemment. 
The followins: articles are therefore agreed upon between you and the Briti^ 
Government :— 

Article I. 

Pergunnah Akulkote and other districts and umuls held by you up to thft 
war, with the exception of the Mogulaee Umuls, not appertaining to the 
villages at present held by you, are now restored to you and confirmed. 
Daring the government of the Peishwa you had to furnish a body of horse, 
but as you have been deprived of the Mogulaee Umuls, and as the jaghire 
territory is in a bad state, and as you should have enough for your own 
maintenance, and for the expense of the contingent of horse to be kept in a 
complete state of equipment and in readiness to serve at all times of the year^ 
government have dispensed with the former number and fixed the contingent 
at 100 horse, which must be constantly in the service of His Highness'a 
government. 

Article 2. 

The horses and men forming the contingent are to be good. The horses, 
of the value of from Rupees 800 to 400, to be always present in the service 
of His Highness, and to proceed without delay or remonstrance wherever 
their services may be required. They are to be mustered whenever so ordered, 
and should there be any deficiency in the number, such deficiency must be 
made good at the annual rate of Rupees 300 each horse, to be calculated 
from the period of the former muster ; but previous to enforcing the demand, 
a representation of the circumstances will be made by His Highnesses govern- 
ment to the Agent of the British GU>vemment, and his concurrence obtained. 

Article 3. 

In the event of the contingent being employed in war under a requisition 
from the British Government, and should any men or horses in consequence 
be killed or wounded| it is to be clearly understood that nothing in the way 
of equivalent shall be paid by the government of His Highness ; risks and 
casualties of all kinds^ as well as the furnishing of ammunition, are included 
in the allowance. 

Article 4. 

The whole expense of managing the jaghire is to be defrayed without 
reference to what is incurred by keeping up the horse. As the territories 
of the British Government and of His Highness adjoin the jaghire, it is 
therefore determined that, in the event of «any disturbance taking place in 
them, on the requisition of the mamledars of either Government, aid shall be 
furnished by a ready co-operation with all the disposable police of the jaghire. 

Article 5. 

■Whatever villageB, wuttuns, etc., were held by you up to the war within 
the territories of the British Government or of His Highness^ shall, with the 



Atrt II Satara jBgirdais—Jkalkoi—No, LIII. lax 



exception of the Mogulaee Umuls not appertaining to the villages now held 
by yoa, be continued^ and whatever items of revenue belonging to His High- 
. ness's government may be within the jaghire^ shall be continued to be paid. 
All doomala villages and lands^ wurshasun, dhurmadao^, dewasthans^ rozindors, 
khyrat^ nemnooks^ etc.^ and jaghire and knrkoonee held by durukdars^ within 
your mehals, must be continued on the same tenure as hitherto. Grants under 
government title deeds are to be continued ; notwithstanding the temporary 
interruption in regard to them, care must be taken that no cause of complaint 
may be bronght forward in such points. In case any of the persons holding 
the* abovementioned rights shall behave improperly, or die without heirs^ it 
will be necessary to acquaint the Agent of the British Government^ who will 
intimate to His Highnesses government what course is to be pursued either 
in respect to the punishment or resumption, when His Highnesses govern- 
ment will adopt necessary measures. Should zemindars raise any disturbance 
ag^nst youy or commit any offence against the public peace^ or should any 
one die without heirs, you will resume the wuttun as may seem expedient, 
mnd report the same to government, when His Highnesses government, with 
t;be advice of the Agent of the British Government, will send orders^ which 
most be oooformed to. 

Article 6. 

The inhabitants of the jaghire territory must be protected, justice pro- 
perly dispensed, and a good police upheld to detect thefts, murder, or disturb- 
ance, and suppress gang robberies. If this is not attended to, and the 
^conntry be without justice, so that people are obliged to complain, the 
government of His Highness, with the advice of the Agent of the British 
Government, having investigated the matter, will decide on such subjects, 
«nd their decisions must be attended to ; and further, ehould such decisions 
not be attended to, so that the country fall into a state of misgovernment, 
'mnd robberies and other crimes become of very frequent occurrence, in such 
an events whatever may appear to be the most proper measures, shall be sug- 
j^ted by the Agent of the British Government, and corresponding arrange- 
mentB will be made by His Highnesses government. 

Article 7. 

Family dispute about your respective shares of property, which arose 

letween you and Tooljajee Rajah Bhonslay, was settled in the time of Bajee 

Bso, and deeds of division were given by each of you. Agreeably to the 

«ame deeds, arrangements are made by the British Government f both of you 

houldj therefore, abide by them. 

Akticlb 8. 

Without orders from Government no extra troops are to be levied, and 
fione assembled for the purpose of making war on any one. In matters of 
family disputes concerning relationship and such like, no appeal to arms 
can be permitted, but the case is to be represented to the Agent of the 
British Government, who will communicate with the government of His 
Eigbneet, and whatever decision is given must be reckoned binding. 



132 Satara Jagirdars—^AratAro^— No. LIII. Part II 



Aeticlb 9. 

Witb the exception of persons under the government of His Highnefls, 
no intercourse or communication by letter is to be entered into with sooh 
parties as Bajee Rao Sahib^ or other Princes, Chieftains^ CommanderSf and 
others^ nor is any aid or assistance by joining the troops of any one to be 
given. This Article forms the basis of the present agreement, and, should 
what is written above be departed from, the jaghire will not be continaed* 

Abticlb 10. 

All persons having committed crimes within the jaghire country, who 
may take shelter in the territories of the British Government or His High- 
ness^ shall be delivered over to you, after information has been given to the 
Agent of the British Government, and by him communicated to the British 
Government or to the government of His Highness, as the case may be; 
and, in like manner, all criminals from the territories of the British Govern- 
ment or of His Highness shall be apprehended and delivered up by you to 
their respective governments^ and assistance must be rendered to people of 
either government who may be sent for the apprehension of such offenders. 

Article 11. 

Whilst you shall continue to fulfil the terms of your service in good 
faith, integrity, and fidelity, your jaghire shall be continued without any 
interruption from His Highnesses government : on this point the BritLsli 
Government is your guarantee. 

Articlb 12. 

All titles and forms of respect hitherto enjoyed by yon shall be conti- 
nued by the Agent of the British Government and His Highnesses govern- 
ment. All requests on the part of the jaghiredar, which may be reasonable 
and proper, shall be granted, but such as are otherwise shall not be acceded 
to. 

Article 13. 

As the jaghire districts adjoin the territory of His Highness, and it may 
be necessary to effect exchanges of items of revenue or land, for the purpose 
either of defining the boundary or for police arrangements, therefore, on a 
representation from the government of His Highness, the Agent of the 
British Government will arrange such exchanges as may be necessary, pro* 
vided they are not injurious to the interests of the jaghiredar, and such 

ezchauges must be made accordingly. 

The above IS Ajrticles must be observed* 

Bated 3rd July J. D. 1820, corre^potitthg with Shf Ramzdn Ahdee^wu* 
Usireen'tou'Myatein'Wu- Vlf. 

(Sd.) Jamks Grant, 




134 Satara Jagirdars— ^Ara/I'o^— No. LIII. Fart II 



Article 8. 

In the event of your contingent beings employed in war by His HighneM, 
with the concurrence of the British Resident, no remuneration on account 
of tbe wounded and slain will be granted ; but all such risks and casualties^ 
as well as tbe supply of ammunition, are included in the grant. 

Article 4. 

You are to defray tbe expense of your village establishments, as well 
as of tbe contingent. Should any commotion or disturbance occur in the 
districts, either of His Highness the Rajah, or of the British Government, 
you are, on the requisition of the mamlutdars of either government, to aid 
and co-operate with them with the Police in your mehals. 

Article 6. 

Tlie villages, inams, wuttuns, etc., in His Highness the Rajah's country 
held by you up to the war, together with the umuls and villages in the 
Nizam's country now in your possession, will be continued to you, this gov- 
ernment also retaining its umuls in your territory. All doomaia villages, 
lands, wursbasuns, dhurmadaos, dewastbans, rozindars, kbyrats, nemnooks, 
as also the jaghires of danikdars and kaikoonee, etc., are to be continued to 
tbe several parties as heretofore, without objection, together with the lands 
held by virtue of Sunnuds, although they may have been on certain grounds 
placed under attachment. Should any of the parties enumerated above act 
improppily, or die intestate, you are to report the same to this government, 
when His Highness, with the concurrence of the British Resident, will 
award such punishment to the offender, or direct the resumption of the 
land, as may appear expedient. If any landholder creates a riot, or raises a 
rebellion in your country, or refuses to acknowledge your supremacy, or 
if a wuttundar dies intestate, you should attach his wuttun and report the 
matter to government, when His Highness, with the concurrence of the 
British Hesident, will issue such orders as may appear expedient, and to which 
you are to conform accordingly. 



Article 6. 




Pi^ IX Satara Jagirdartt~^Ara/4ro<~I9o. LIII. 136 



Aeticlb 7. 

During the administratioii of l^ajee Rao Rughoonath a dispute having 
arisen between you aud Tooljajee Bhonslay for division of property, the 
same was decided, aud deeds of acquitlauce passed by you both, which are 
approved of and confirmed by this goverumeut, and you both are to abide by 
the same accordingly. 

Article 8. 

You should not, without the knowledge of this government, muster a 
force and engage in hostilities with any person. If any dispute arises among 
you respecting Bhaoopoona rights, etc., you should quietly refer the matter to 
this goyerument, when His Highness, with the concurrence of the British 
Besident, will issue the necessary orders in the case, and to which you are to 
conform. 

Article 9. 

With the exception of the subjects of this government, you are to hold 
DO intercourse nor to carry on correspondence with Bajee Rao Rughoonath, or 
any other Prince or Chieftain. If you do, your country will be resumed. 

Article 10. 

Should an offender from your country take shelter within the territories 
of His Highness, you are to repoi't the same to this government, when 
measures will be taken to apprehend the offender and make him over to you. 
In like manner offenders from the territories of His Highness or of the British 
Government, taking shelter within your mehals, should be immediately appre- 
hended and delivered up by you to whichever government they may belong. 
Further, you are to aid and assist the officers of either government who may 
enter your jurisdiction in pursuit of offender?. 

Article 11. 

So long as you continue in good faith and render faithful service, your 
mehals, etc., will be continued to you uninterruptedly by this government, for 
which yon have the guarantee of the British Government, and which is agreed 
to by His Highness. 

Article 12. 

All titles and customary forms of respect hitherto enjoyed by you shall 
he continued. You are to represent all your affairs to this government; such 
jreqoasts as are reasonable will be granted, and such as are not will be refused*. 

Article 18. 

As the country of His Highness adjoins your territory, it might be 
necessary at a future period to effect certain territorial exchanges, with the 
advice of the British Kesident, for the good of the country, and for the pur* 



136 



Batara 



-^ilor— No. LIV. 



Fart II 



pose of defining distinctly the boundaries of the two governmentsi oare being 
taken to secure you from loss. You are required to agree to this arrange 
ment. 

Abticlb 14. 

You are to attend on His Highness annually, at the celebration of the 
Dussera festival^ as also at other times when your presence may be required. 
You are also to accompany His Highness whenever he may proceed on a lonig 
journey. 

The circumstances contained in the foregoing 14 paragraphs are oon* 
firmed. 



Small Seal 

c hBajah 
of Satank 



Dated the 29th Bamzan 8oor Sun Jhdee^wU'VthreeH'WU^Myateiti'Wu-Ul/s 
eorreiponding wifh the lUh July A,I). 1820, 



No. LIV. 
Ageebment with the Punt Sucheo^ dated 22nd April 1820. 




Terms fixed by Captain James Grant Sahib Bahadoob on the 
part of the Honourable Company Bahadoor with Bao Sahib 
MoosHPUCK Meherban Chimnajee Fttndit Sttcheo. 

The possessions of the Punt Sncheo came under the British GovemmeDt 
along with the rest of the country, but the antiquity and respectability of the 
family having been duly considered, the British Government have freely 
bestowed and made over to him the whole of his possessions as formerly held 
up to the war, with the exception of his possessions within the territory of the 
Nizam« The districts of the Punt being within the limits of the territory 
made over by Treaty to His Highness the Rajah of Satara, the Punt^ there- 



Part II Satara JagirdarF—^Aor— Wo. LIV. 187 



fore, is placed under the government of His Highness. The British Govern- 
ment is the guarantee^ and the terois are fixed as follows :— 

It^— That the inhabitants of the country under the Punt Sucheo may 
be protected, justice must be properly administered, and a proper police 
established for the prevention and detection of thieves and robbers; but if 
this IB not attended to and people are obli<red to bring forward complaints in 
conseqnenoe of the want of police and justice, in that case, whatever orders 
may be given on the subject by His Highnesses government, with the advice 
of the Agent of the British Government, must be carried into effect. 

8nd. — An effective police must be established in the country of the 
Punt Sucheo sufficient to prevent any inhabitants of his districts from 
committing robberies within the territories of the British Government or of 
His Highness, and whenever stolen property may be pointed out within 
the country of the Punt, or thieves traced into it, both the property and the 
thief must be delivered over to whichever of the governments may demand 
them, and assistance must be afforded to officers of either government who 
may be sent for the apprehension of criminals and offenders. In the event 
of a failure in these respects tabing place, all arrangements made by the 

S)vernment of His Highness, at the recommendation of the Agent of the 
ritish Government, must be carried into effect. 

dr</.-^Excepting those under the Government of His Highness, no 
intercourse or communication by letter can be allowed with any Chiefs, such 
as Bajee Rao Sahib or other Princes, Chieftains, Commanders, and others, 
nor is it permitted to send aid to any one whatever. This Article forms the 
basis of the agreement ; and if it is departed from, all advantages appertain- 
ing to the Punt by virtue of the present agreement shall be forfeited. 

4/^.— Without the knowledge and permission of government no extra 
troops are to be levied, or war entered upon with any one. In all domestic dis- 
putes about relationship, and such like, no appeal to arms will be permitted, but 
ioformation is to be sent to the Agent of the British Government, who will 
communicate with the government of His Highness, and the decisions given 
in consequence must be attended to. 

6^i.— In the event of disputes occurring relative to items of revenue 
whidi belong to the Punt Sucheo in the countries of the Putwurdhuns and 
others, intelligence must be given to the Agent of the British Government, 
after which proper arrangements will be made, but no separate communicatiou 
by letter is ever to be made. 

0M.-— As the country of the Pnnt Sucheo is surrounded by the territories 
of the British Government and of His Highness, it may be necessary to make 
exchanges on account of police arrangements, or for the defining of boundaries ; 
therefore such exchanges shall take place provided they are not injurious to 
the Pant. ' 

7/i.— A yearly payment of ten thousand rupees was made by the 
Ftant Sucheo to the government of the Peishwa as an allowance for elephants^ 



188 Satara Jagirdars-J^i^— No. LIV. Ihatt II 



but t^e village of Sonapore having been tafc^n by the Peishwa'a government, 
and whioli at present is in the po88e08ion of the Bt-itish Government, therefore 
a deduction of Rupees 1,000 is allowed, and the annual payment fixed at 
Buf ees 9,000 to the government of His Highness as follows :— 

Ba. 

A payment of Rupees 8,010 annually made by the Pant Prithee Nidhee 

to the Punt Saclieo is now transferred to His Highness . • • 2,000 

Amount enam payments from the honxoor mamla of Karar, formerly 
paid to the Punt and now transferred to His Highness . • • IfOOO 

A cash pnyment to be made yearly by the Punt to His Highnoss' {rov* 
emment ; items of revenue or villages to be made over to the gov- 
ernment of His Uighuess as may be arranged by the Agent of the 
British Qovemuient to the amount of 6»000* 

Total • 9.000 

8M.— All doomalla^ dhurmadao^ enams, wurshasun, dewasthan, rorindur, 
nemnook, daruk^ and such like allowaDces which at present exist within the 
territory of the Punt, must be continued to their holders; there must be no 
occasion for complaints on these points, 

9^^.— As the country of the Punt is surrounded by the territ »rie3 of the 
British Government and of His Highness, it is therefore required tha% in 
the event of disturbances taking place, every assistance be given ou the 
requisition of the mamlutdars of either of the governments. 

lot A. ^^ At the annual festival of the Dusserah^ the Punt SucSieo must 
always appear in person under the government of His Highness. All titles 
and honors hitherto enjoyed by the Punt Sucheo shall be continued. In all 
ten Articles, which must not be departed from. 

Dated 22nd April 1820 , cor responding with tie 8ih Rujjub Suunut Asireen^ 
wu-Myalein-wu^Ulf, or Arabic year 1220, at Satara. 

(Sd.) Jambs Grant. 



The following dedaotioni have since been made on accoant of the Satara Amal receired 
by Chief of Bhor from the villages of Akld. Bhalvani, and Brahmapnri in the Rhaw- 
d norpar taluka now compriaed in the Sholapar Colleoiorate (in nauye cnnency) , GOO 

Difference in value between British and Native currency SM 

On account of compensation for loss sastained by the Chief of Bhor in connection with 
the Nin Canal proyect 599 

Leaving a balance to be paid by the Chief annually of . . . • . . . . 4,087 

fl^OOO 



Part II SaUra Jagirdars— JSAor— No. LIV. 1S9 



Ag&bbmkkt entered into in July 1820 by His Highness the 
Rajah of Satara with the Punt Sucheo. 



I anre Senl 

of UU High' 

ncAB •tlie 

lUjah of 

Satara. 



Agrbbuent on the part of Uis Highness the Bajah of Satara 
respecting Raj&shree ChImnajee Pundit Sugueo, to 
whom these commands are issued. 

The ooontry formerly possessed by you hns been freely restored and 
bestowed throagli the liberality of the British Governmeut^ and an agree- 
ment consisting of ten Articles, has been made out and delivered to jou by 
Oaptain James Grant Bahadoor, on the part of the British Government. 
Yoor aoantry has come within the limits of the territory made over to His 
Highiiets by the Treaty with the British Government, and the terms fixed 
by the British Government bavin«^ been approved of, the Hoozoor, for the 
porpoae of confirming you in possession, has determined as follows :«- 

Article 1. 

Should any disturbances take place in the territories of His Highness or 
of the British Government whi<h adjoin yonr country, aid must be afforded, 
by sending all the disposable police in your district, on the requisition of the 
namkitdarB of either government. 

Abticlb 2. 

All Wnttnn and other allowances hitherto possessed by you within the 
territory of His Highness shall be continued ; and in like manner^ all items 
of revenue belonging to His Highnesses government within your country 
shall oontinae to be paid ; all doomala villages and lands^ wurshasuns, 
dhnrmadaos, dewasthans, rozindars, khyrats, nemnooks, daruks, and all other 
allowances hitherto enjoyed within your country, must be continued without 
iotermption ; and should at present any investigation be carried on respecting 
the rights or possessions of tnose holding them on government deeds, decisions 
most be given upon the fixed principles of justice, so that no complaints may 
be made. Should persons holding inheritances of the abovementioned descrip- 
tion raise or excite disturbances, or commit offences against the public peace, 
or should persons possessed of such inheritances die without heirs, you will 
fully investigate the matter and state what may appear really just, when 
His Highnese's government, with the advice of the Agent of the British 
Qoveitement, will send such orders as may appeajr fit, which must be con* 
formed to. 



136 



Batarft Jagirdara^^ilor-No. LIV. 



Put XI 



pose of defining distinctly the boundaries of the two governments, care being 
taken to secure you from loss. You are required to agree to ihia arrange* 
ment. 

Articlb 14. 

You are to attend on His Highness annually, at the celebration of the 
Dussera festival^ as also at other times when your presence may be required* 
You are also to accompany His Highness whenever he may proceed on a ]otig 
journey. 

The circumstances contained in the foregoing 14 paragraphs are oon* 
firmed. 



Small Seal 

o hBajah 
of Satank 



Sated the 29tk Ramzan 8oor Sun Jhdee^wU'VtAreen^tou^Myaleiti^wU'O'l/i 
eorreiponding wifh the lUh July A.B. 1820. 



No. LIV. 
Agbebment with the Punt Sucheo, dated 22nd April 1820. 




Tekhs fixed by Oaptaik James Gbant Sahib Bahadoob on the 
part of the Honourable Compaky Bahadoob. with Bao Sahib 
MoosHPUCK Meherban Chimnajee Ftjndit Sttcheo. 

The possessions of the Punt Sacbeo came under the British GoverameDl 
along with the rest of the country, but the antiquity and respectability of the 
family having been duly considered, the British Oovernment have freely 
bestowed and made over to him the whole of his possessions as formerly held 
up to the war, with the exception of his possessions within the territory of the 
Nizam« The districts of the Punt being within the limits of the territory 
made over by Treaty to His Highness the Rajah of Satara^ the Pant| there* 



fttft II Satora JagirdarF—^Aor— Wo. LIV. 187 






tore, is placed under the government of His Highness. The British Govern- 
ment is the guarantee^ and the terois are fixed as follows :— 

l«^-^That the inhabitants of the country undf^r the Punt Sucheo may 

be protected, justice must be properly administered, and a proper police 

established for the prevention and detection of thieves and robbers ; but if 

^bis is not attended to and people are obliired to bring forward complaints in 

equcDOe of the want of police and justice, in that case, whatever orders 

be g^ven on the subject by His Highness's government, with the advice 

of the Agent of the British Government, must be carried into efEect. 

2nd. — An effective police must be established in the country of the 
f unt Sucheo sufficient to prevent any inhabitants of his districts from 
csommitting robberies within the territories of the British Government or of 
His Highness, and whenever stolen property may be pointed out within 
"fclie country of the Punt, or thieves traced into it, both the property and the 
"C^hief must be delivered over to whichever of the governments may demand 
^hem, and assistance must be afforded to officers of either government who 
lay be sent for the appreheuFion of criminals and offenders. In the event 
f a failure in these respects tabing place, all arrangements made by the 
[>vernment of His Highness, at the recommendation of the Agent of the 
ritish Government, must be carried into effect. 

3rd, — Excepting those und<r the Government of His Highness, no 
utercourse or communication by letter can be allowed with any Chiefs, such 
18 Bajee Rao Sahib or other Princes, Chieftains, Commanders, and others, 
^sior is it permitted to send aid to any one whatever. This Article forms the 
lasis of the agreement ; and if it is departed from, all advantages appertain- 
ing to the Punt by virtue of the present agreement shall be forfeited. 

4/^.^Without the knowledge and permission of government no extra 
'iiroops are to be levied, or war entered upon with any one. In all domestic dis- 
3)uteis about relationship, and such like, no appeal to arms will be permitted, but 
"inf'ormation is to be sent to the Agent of the British Government, who will 
^sommnnicale with the government of His Highness, and the decisions given 
'jn consequence must be attended to. 

S^A.— In the event of disputes occurring relative to items of revenue 
^rbich belong to the Punt Sucheo in tlie countries of the Putwurdhuns and 
others, intelligence must be given to the Agent of the British Government, 
after which proper arrangements will be made, but no separate communication 
bj letter is ever to be made. 

6M.— -As the country of the Punt Sucheo is surrounded by the territories 
of the British Government and of His Highness, it may be necessary to make 
exchanges on account of police arrangements, or for the defining of boundaries ; 
therefore such exchanged shall take place provided they are not injurious to 
the Pant. ' 

7^i,..A yearly payment of ten thousand rupees was made by the 
Ftant Sucheo to the government of the Peishwa as an allowance for elephants^ 



140 Satara Jagirdara— BAor— No. LIV. Part XX 



Articlb 3. 

That the inhabitants of your country may be protected, justioe mast be 
honestly admiuistered, and a proper police must be established for the preven- 
tion and detection of thieves and robl>er8 ; but if this is not attended to, and 
unjust decisions given, or thefts and robberies become of so frequent occnr- 
rence, so that people may be obliged to bring forward complaints, in that caae, 
whatever orders may, in consequence^ be issued by His Highnesses govern- 
ment, with the advice of the Agent of the British Government, these mnst be 
carried into effect. 

Article 4. 

Without the knowledge and orders of government no extra troops are to 
be levied or war entered upon with any one. In all cases of domestic disputes 
about relationship and such like, no appeal to arms will be permitted, bat 
information is to be sent to government, when surth orders as may be sent on 
the subject, with the advice of the Agent of the British Government^ must 
be considered binding. 

Article 5. 

Excepting those under the government of His Highness, no intercourse 
or communication by letter can be allowe<l with any Chiefs, such as Bajee 
Rao Sahib, or other Princes^ Chieftains, Commanders, and others, nor is it 
permitted to send aid to any one, or to become concerned in any assemblage of 
troops whatever. Thin Article forms the basis of the present agreement, and 
if it is departed from, with the advice of the British Gh>veroment, yonr 
possession shall not be continued. 

Article 6. 

All offenders and criminals from your eountryi who may take shelter in 
the territory of His Highness, shall be delivered over to you ; and in like 
manner all offenders and criminals from the territories of His Highness, or of 
the British Government, who may enter your territory, shall be given up and 
delivered over to whichever government they belong ; and assistanoe must be 
rendered to all officers or people of both governments who may go into your 
district in pursuit of such offenders. 

Article 7, 

Whilst you remain and perform the conditions of your seyice in good 
faith, integrity, and fidelity, your possessions shall be continued without inter- 
ruption on the part of His Highnesses government, and on this point the 
British Government is your guarantee, which His Highnesses government 
approves of and agrees to. 

Article 8. 

All titles and honors formerly enjoyed by you shall be continued, and all 
requests forwarded by you shall be attended to, and if reasonable and proper^ 
they will be granted, but if otherwise, rejected. 



Part II 



Satara Jagirdars- BAor~No. LV. 



141 



Article 9. 

As yonr country adjoins the territory of His Highness, and it may be 
necessary in consequence to effect exchanges, either for the purpose of defining 
boandaries for police arrangements, or for settling revenue matters, therefore 
such exchanges shall be made with the advice of the Agent of the British 
Government^ provided th^ are not injurious to your interests. 

Article 10. 

Ton must appear in personal attendance yearly at the festival of the 
Dussera> and also be present on all occasions of ceremony or congratulation, 
when your attendance may be required by His Highness ; you must also 
attend in person whenover the establishment of His Highness may move to 
any great distance. 

Article 11. 

A yearly payment of ten thousand rupees was made by you to govern- 
ment on account of elephant establishment, but the villnge of Sonapore 
having come into the possession of Government, a deduction of one thousand 
rupees is allowed in consequence, and the payment of the balance is to be 
made as follows : — 

A payment icade annuallj to you by Purnshram Pandit Rupees. 
Prith« e Nidhee, which is now transferred to His High- 
ness' goYemment ..••... 2,000 

Payment formerly made to you from the hoozoor mamla 
of Frant Kurar, now transferred to His Highness' 
goYemment ...•••• 1,000 

A eash payment to be made yearly by yon to His High- 
ness' government or items of revenae, land, or vil- 
iHges as may be arian^i^ed by the Agent of the British 
Government, to the amount of • • . • 



Total 



6,000 
9.000 



Dated- 



•July 1820. 



No. LV. 



Small Seal of 

His Highness 

the Rajah of 

Satara. 



Agrebmbkt for an interchange of territory between the Honotjr- 
ABLB the East India Company and the Punt Stjchbo of 
8ATARA9 dated the 12th April 1880, with Schedule annexed. 

Articlb 1. 

Whereas a mntnal interchange of territory between the British Oovern- 
ment and the Punt Sueheo has been agreed upon, according to the jumma- 



142 Batara Jagirdars*-Bior— Na IiV* Bart II 



bundee of the year Soorsun Saman-wa Usiireen Mjatein*wa-Ulf (A. D. 
)827<'28) after the dedaetiona of parbhara aiiditlak (alieuationB, penaioiia^ &c., 
kc.,) and tota khurch (the amoant which eaoiiot be realized), to have efEeet 
from the Istof May 1829; and on the 13th of November 1829 a memorandam 
was prepared of the country to be transferred, in which certain items remaioed 
for adjustment : tiie following settlement has therefore been determined on :•— 

Amoant of revenue of the country transferred by the rritish 
Government to the Pant Sucheo, as by the memorandum 
of the 13th November 1829 Ba. 82,556 2 83 

Dednct^ 

The produce of the jungle toddy trees (raeemar) of the 
following villages which have been retained by the 
Honourable Company :~ 

No. of Baeei. 



ouz 


a Wangnee • 


i • • 


1 


»» 


Sookolee • < 


» • • 


1 


f> 


Bahgaon • 


• • • 


2 


>» 


Wasgaon • 


• • 


3 


f> 


Pigonde 


• • 


1 



8 Rs. 4^ 2 

' The tax from persons fishing in the Tam Doho» 
situated within the boundaries of roouza Tarn- 
solee, of the Nagotna turrnf, which is retained 
by tiie Honourable Company, aud was erro- 
neouhly included in the Mohturfa of Mamie 
Palee Rs. 35 

The proportion of the value of the honey pro- 
duced on the Raees mentioned above . • . >, 3 

The transit duties, and those on ealt, at the Naka 
of Ooiiiurkhind, which las been retained by 
the Honourable Company, aud was erroneously 
included in the former memorandum • • . », 132 3 74 



216 1 74 



Total transferred by the Honourable Company to the Punt Sucheo • Rs. 32,840 1 09 

Transferred in lieu of revenue belonging 
to the Pant's jaghire ... Rs. 29,317 3 05 

Ditto ditto belonging 

to the Punt on account of Sahotra 
and Mokasa : — 

Mouza Jhamp Rs. 1,119 1 22 

,. Waololee . , • • .„ 736 3 26 

9, Targaon „ 124 2 44 

„ Rasul , 1,041 3 12 

— — 3,022 2 04 

82,340 1 09 



Fftrt II Satara Jagirdars— £Aor— No. IiV. 148 



Amoimt of revenue transferred by the Pant Sucbeo to the Honourable 
Company as by the memorandum of the Idth November 1820 • Be. 32,522 42 

Amount to be added to the Punt's revenue of the twelve villages of 
the Shee Mehal retained hV the Honourable Company in conse- 
quenoe of a mistake in the Koolkumees' aooounts . • m „ 280 1 34 

Amount to be added in consequence of the alienations from the Punt's 
revenue in the Nagotna turruf having been erroneously twice deduct- 
ed " . . .„ 187 1 11 

Amount awarded to the Punt Sucbeo in lieu of all claims in conse- 
qoenoe of certain items which have been disallowed • • • „ 51 98 

Turruf NttgotnOm 

Deduct— 

Amount overcharged in the Punt's 
accounts on the price of batty straw . • • Rs. 

Ditto ditto in the tax on milch cattle • • • 

Ditto ditto in the quartemal receipts 
from the zemindars of turruf Nagotna 



n 



19 



Overcharge in the receipts from the 
zemindars of turruf Ashtumee $ 



131 8 94 


37 2 06 


118 1 96 


287 8 96 


12 2 80 



300 2 76 



Total transferred by the Punt Sucbeo to the Honourable Company Rs. 32,740 1 09 
Bevenue belonging to the Punt's jaghire • • Bs. 29,723 3 40 

Bevenne derived from the Sahotra and Mokasa r^* 

Sahotra Bs. 1,329 01 

Mokasa •••••„ 1,687 1 68 

3,016 1 69 

32,740 1 09 



Abstract 

Transferred by the Honourable Company to the Punt Sucbeo . • Bs. 32,340 1 09 
Ditto by the Punt Sucbeo to the Honourable Company • . ^ 32.740 1 09 



Balance in favour of t^e Punt Sucbeo to be paid annually in cash . Bs. 400 



Article 2. 

The country prodacing revenue to the above amonnt of Bs. 82^840-1-09 
has thus been transferred, in full sovereignty^ by the Honourable Company 
to the Pant Sucbeo, in lieu of revenue belonging to that Chieftain, amounting, 
as above, to Rs. 8ft,740-l<49, and the balance Bs. 400 is to be paid annually 
in cash to the Punt. 



144 



Satara Jagirdara— JBior— No. LV. 



Part II 



Settled on the part of the Honourable Company by L. B. Reid^ Esq., 
Principal Collector and Magistrate of the Konkan, and on that of the Pant 
by his Vakeels, Ragho Appajee Mokuddum and Pandoorang Oungadhor 
Gnnpoole^ and signed this 18th of Shawul, the 5th of Chintm Vudj Shake 
1752 (the 12th of April A. D. 1830). 

(Sd ) L. B. Bbid, Principal Collector. 
Ragho Appajbb Mokuddum. 
, Pandoobuno Qungaduub Ounpoolb. 



Paper contaiDiDg the Particulars of the Transfer of Tkrri* 
TORY alluded to in Article 1 of the Agreement* 

Schedule of villages of Turrufe Palee and Skee Mehal, in which the Honour^ 
able Company* g rights have been made over to the Punt Sueheo in entire 

sovereignty, 

Mamle Palbb, 
1. The Kusba or town of Palee. 



2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



MoQza Oodhur. 
Targaon. 
Pursure. 
Khandpolee. 
Bhjmo. 



»* 



f» 



Turruf Huwelee, 

S. 

9. 
10. 
11. 



Moaza Wawe. 
,9 RasuL 
„ Ambnole. 
„ Dapore. 
9, Waghosee. 



12. Moaza Ghotnore. 



13. 
14. 
15. 



If 
If 



Wawe. 
Wasonde. 
Moogaon Boozoorg. 



Turruf Asre Adharne. 

16. Moaza Mongaon Khoord* 



17. 
18. 
19. 






Muzre Sawe. 

Bheleew. 

Phulian. 



20. Moaza Jhamp. 



Turruf Antone. 

<v I 21. 

22. Mouza Boorinbalee. 



Moaza Wawlolee. 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 

7. 

8. 



Moaza Rondgaon. 
Ambegaon. 
Wanrosee. 
Mazree Nuogur. 
Moaza Kanhiwlee. 
Tiwree. 
Pernlee. 
Kan sal. 
9. Kasba Asree. 
10. Moaza Moolshee. 
11 • n Kulamb. 

12. ,, Hurneree. 

13. ,, Eifltwur. 



» 






TuRBDP Sheb Mehal. 

Turruf Asree Adharne. 

14. Muzree Hednolee. 

15. Moaza Warar. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
39. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 

27. Muzree Dondiwlee. 



»i 


Kurcbonde. 


fa 


panose. 


»% 


Pargholee. 


» 


Amnoree. 


fi 


Dubigaon. 


>» 


Goudao. 


it 


Chindargaon. 


t» 


Hatond. 


U 


Mahagaon. 


»t 


Purlee (inam)* 


n 


Dhokshet. 



ff 



Part II 


Satara Jagirdara— SAor- 


-No. LV. 146 






Tntfuf Antone, 




88. 


Moaza Kureamle. 




40. 


Mooza Nandgaon. 


89. 


„ Nennalee. 




41. 


n Gomasee. 


80. 


M Pimplolee. 




42 


„ Potlu^ Kboord. 


81. 


99 Nagoye. 




43. 


H Potluj Boozoorg. 


82. 


vf Nagabet. 




44 


99 Adoolsee. 


88. 


Kuaba Antone. 




45. 


M Bbarje (inam). 


84. 


Mooza EQlenboaae. 




46. 


„ Ambnolee. 


86. 


„ Bnlke. 




47. 


„ Amtnon^ 


8e. 


„ . Cbinchaolee. 




4'^. 


,1 Sideahwor Khoord. 


87. 


M Kaodule. 




49. 


„ Sieshwor fioozoorg. 


88. 


9, Gondale 




60. 


M Pooee. 


89. 


m Googoolwara. 




51. 


f, EbendaoM. 






62. Mouza Narsoor. 








Turruf Huwelee. 




68. 


Mooza Ooaalo. 




59. 


Mooza EoTelee* 


64 


„ Cbi^e. 




60. 


„ Wafegor. 


66. 


Mazree Jnmpoobara. 




61. 


,» Yiranee. 


66. 


99 Bbilpara. 
Mooza Aondbe. 




62. 


„ Eomnjgor. 


67. 




63. 


9, Kboolee (inam). 


68. 


M Koombhargur. 


64. 
Abstract. 


M Morbalee. 


Mamie Palee 


... ..• 


... Villages 22 


Torrof Sbee Mehal ... 


••• ••• 


... ••• 99 04 

86 


SoUTHIBir KOKKIK ; ^ 




COIUCTOB 


'8 OrnoB, > 




(Sd). L. R. Rbid, 


12ih Noffember 18^. ) 




Collector. 



Sekedule of villages of Afamle Palee and Turruf Skee Mehal retained by the 

Honourable Company. 



Mamlb Palbb. 
Turruf Huwelee. 



1. Mooza Shiloaee. 

8. f9 Bab^ftoD. 

3. 99 Bolbap. 

4. .. Ghikolfi 



•f 



Ghikolgaon, 



6. Mouza Oonere Boozoorg. 



6. 
7. 
8. 



ff 



Gornere Kboord. 
Piloaree. 
Khoombarabet (inam). 



Turruf Asre Adharne. 



9. Mooza Gomre. 
10. M Ghawonee. 



11. Mooza Tookanee. 



12. 



13. Mooza Nere. 



>» 



Doorabet. 



1. Mooza Wozrolat. 



TuBBUP Sheb Mehal. 
Turrvf Huwelee, 

i 2. Mooza Pimplolee. 



146 



Satara Jagirdan— Mor— Ho. LV. 



fart II 



3. MoQza Shene. 

4. ,9 • Virane. 

6. »9 Nanegaon. 



10. Moaza Ernl. 



Mamie Palee • 
Turrof Bhee Melud 



Southern Eonkak; 
Collbctor's Oppicb 
18tA November 1889 




Turrqf Jiree Adkdrne. 



6. MoazA Adharne. 

7. ,, Hetuone. 

8. ^ Tilhere. 
9. Moaza Wumone. 



Turruf Antone. 

I 11. Muzree Kamthek 

12. Jf uzree Dhngarwaree. 



Abstract. 



(Sd.) 



Villagea 13 
« 13 

25 



L. B. Rkid;, 

Collector. 



Statement of the amount of revenue mutually transferred between ike Briiisi 
Government and tie Punt SucAeo, framed according to tke aecounU of ike 
If ear A,D. 1827-28, Soorsun Suman''WU'U9Areen'VU'Mjatein'fou<'Ulf» 

Made over by the Honourable Company to the Punt Sucheo in full 

sOTereignty, 22 villages of Mamie Palee . . . • . Rs. 11,653 1 65 

The Company's share of 64 Yillages of turruf Shee Mehal • • • „ 15,854 3 89 

Land customs, including titinsit duties on salt witbio the above tract • „ 5,148 1 29 



Made over by .the Punt Sucheo to the Honourable Company 
The Punt's share of the revenue in turruf Nagotna 
The same in turruf Ashtumee • • • • • 
The same in 12 villages in turruf Shee Mehal • 



Bs. 32,556 2 83 

Rs. 18,375 2 52 

„ 13,122 3 22 

„ 1,023 2 68 



Rs. 82,522 42 



Balance in favour of the British Qovemment 



ff 



34 2 41 



Southern Konkan; 
Collkctor's Office 
LitU November 1829 




(Sd.) 



L. R. Beid, 

ColUctor, 



Part II Batara Jagirdars— JB^or— No. laVI. 147 



No. LVI. 

Ag&eement between the Honoueablb East India Company 
and the Punt Sucheo, dated the 3rd February 1889. 

The late Punt Sncheo Rii^lioonath Rao haying on his death-bed adopted 
the son of his half-brother, Ramjee Appa, as his heir^ which adoption, after 
a foil consideration of the case, the Right Honourable the Governor General 
of India has been pleased to recognize, and orders having been received to 
this effect from the Honourable the Governor in Council of Bombay, as well 
as that the present heir, Chimnajee Ku^hoonath, being of tender years, a 
Karbaree should be appointed to manao^e the affairs of the jaghire, a commu- 
nication was transmitted to Shore on this subject, and in accordance with this 
csommnnication, Damodur Moreshwar, Yenkajee Rungnath, and Sudasheo 
JELhondi ,Rao, hMvin^ waited on the Resident with full powers to make the 
arraogaments pointed out by Government, the following Articles are hereby 
agreed to by the undersigned on the part of Chimnajee Rughoonatli Punt 
Sucheo :— 

Articlb 1. 

By the lat and £nd articles of the Treaty between the British Govern- 
vnent and the Punt Sucheo, under date the S2nd April 1820, the Punt is 
Ijound to provide for the establishment, in his jaghire, of a good police j as 
a^lso that whenever stolen property may be pointed out within the country of 
tlihe Pant, or thieves traced into it, both the property and the thief must be 
dlelivered over to whicliever of the governments may demnnd them, and 
assistance most be afforded to the officers of either gpovernment who may be 
aent f<M* the apprehension of criminals and offenders. In elucidation of this 
Article, it is now also agreed that the Punt fully recognizes the right of the 
officers of the British Government to enter his territory in pursuit of offen- 
ders and stolen property ; tliat he will aid these officer? to the utmost of his 
ability in the performance of this duty ; and that all such offenders and stolen 
property will be given up without demur to the British Government. All 
«uch evidence, etc., also as may be required for the trial of British subjects 
Xefore British Courts, for crimes committed in the Punt^s country, are imme- 
diately to be forwarded, as pointed out by the British authorities. 

Article 2. 

It is also hereby understood and agreed to by the Punt that the entire 
jnrisdiction, civil and criminal, of the villnge of Payet, of the Poona zillah, 
and of the kasha of Neeghoz, of the Ahmednug«rur zillah, shall be ceded 
to the British Government. These two villages being surrounded by the 
Company's territory, and quite detached from that of the Punt Sucheo, 
justice will henceforward be administered according to the rules and regula- 
tiona in force in the British territory. 



148 Satara Jagirdars-iffAor— No. LVXf Part II 



Abticlv 8. 

Whereas for the promotion of trade and commerce^ the British Gk)yem- 
ment has aholished all transit duties, the Funt Sueheo, with the same object, 
consents to abolish those levies within his territories* The Pant also hereby 
agrees to adopt the same system as may be adopted by the British Govern- 
ment with respect to the compensation to be granted to all parties posBessing 
hulks on the duties to be abolished by this Article. 

Abticli 4. 

It is also understood and agreed to that the settlement made by the 
late Rughooiiath Rao Punt Sucheo with the baukers, for the payment of the 
debts of the estate, is to be strictly adhered to, and that no further debt ia 
to be contracted on any account whatever without the sanction of the British 
Government. 

Article 5. 

It is also understood and agreed to that the annual allowances of Radha 
Pai and Bhuwanee fiai, the grandmother and mother of the late Punt Sacheo, 
are to be duly paid in the same manner as during the lifetime of Bughoonath 
Rao. 

Abticlb 6. 

It is also hereby declared and agreed to by the Punt Sncheo that the 
Company's Rupee shall be the current coin within the Punt's territory in the 
same manner as in the Company's country. 

Abticlb 7. 

The undersigned having been named by Gnngabai Sucheo as Karbareea 
for the management of the estate, they hereby agree that they will faithfully 
and honestly discharge their duty so as to give satisfaction to the British 
Government, to the Punt, and inhabitants at large ; yearly accounts of the 
receipts and disbursements of the jaghire are also to be rendered. And it is 
clearly understood that these Karbarees may be removed or changed as Gov- 
ernment may deem expedient. 

Articlb 8. 

Finally, it is understood that the above agreement refers to the territory 
of the Punt Sucheo within British jurisdiction. 

In all, the eight Articles, as set forth, are agreed to. 

Sunnut Tissa-tau-Sullaseen'fou'JUyaiein'WU'Ulf, the 17ik of Ziliadf He 
3rd of February 1839. 

(Sd.) Damodur Morbshwub Gandbkub, in his own handwriting, 

„ Ybnkajkb Rungnath, in his own own handwriting. 

„ SuDASUBO Ehukdb Rao, in his own handwriting. 



Approved and confirmed by the Bombay Government on the 16th Fe- 
bruary 1889, and by the Right Honourable the Governor General of India 
on the 8th April following. 



»art II Batara Jagirdars— BAor— No. LVTI. 149 



No. LVII. 

SuBSTAKCB of copy of an Agreement passed by Shankabrao 
Pandit Sachiv, dated the Ist Decembbb 1880, and received 
and ordered to be translated on the 8rd Novembeb 1881. 

A written communication has been received from the Political Agent, 
Satara, to the effect that if I pass an agreement as stated below, the British 
Government will agree to supply at a reasonable price the opium required for 
sale in the Sansthan, and to pay me money at the rate of 1 annas per cent. 
of the duty on the opium that may be imported into the Sansthan from the 
British depdt. Therefore the undermentioned agreement is entered into, to 
make arrangements about opium in my Sansthan. 

5. I shall introduce into the Sansthan the Opium Act, No. I of 1878, 
which is in force in the British territory, and the Acts that may be passed 
about opium from time to time, and I shall also introduce, as far as practicable, 
the roles that may be framed under those Acts. 

8. The cultivation of the poppy has been discontinued in the Sansthan 
from former times. 1 shall take steps to have its cultivation entirely stopped. 
I shall also take proper steps to prevent the preparation of opium. If any 
one illegally import smuggled opium into the Sansthan, I shall criminally 
prosecute him according to law. 

4. I shall purchase from the depdt of the British Oovemment, on the 
payment of price, the opium required in the Sansthan. I shall not purchase it 
from another place. I shall not allow opium for which there is no pass (from 
the British Government given after the payment of the fee) to be imported 
into the Sansthan. If any one import it, I shall not allow it to be sold in 
the Sansthan, but shall criminally prosecute him according to law. 

6. Permission to sell opium will be given only to licensed persons. I 
shall take steps to make them keep accounts of the receipts and sale of opium, 
and prevent them from selling it in retail at a rate lower than that at which 
it 18 sold iu the neighbouring British territory. 

6. I shall send to the Political Agent, Satara, a half-yearly statement 
showing the quantity of opium imported from the British depdt, the quantity 
sold, the proceeds of the sale, and the quantity of opium remaining (unsold). 

7. I beg that I may be allowed the liberty to make with the licensed 
retail sellers of opium such additional agreements as may appear proper, and 
as may be in accordance with the aforesaid Acts and rules and this agreement. 

8. Should Government confirm this agreement, it will be enforced from 
the 1st January 1881. 



150 Batara Jagirdars^Bior— No. LVIII. San II 



No. LVIII. 

AoEEEHKNT regarding the Abkari Administration of the Bhor 
State between Joshua King, Esquire, Political Agent 
of Satara, acting under the authority of His Excellency 
the Governor of Bohbay in Council on behalf of the 
British Government of the one part and Mbhbrban 
Shankar Rao Pandit Pant Sachiv, Chief of Bhob, on 
behalf of himself, his heirs and successors of the other 

part— 1885. 

Abticlb 1. 

With u view to asBimilatiDg the system of Abkari administration ia the 
Bhor State to the system in foi-oe in the adjoining British distriets of Poona, 
Satara and Kolaba and thereby preventing^ loss to the revenue from Abkari 
a» well in the said State as in the said British districts, the Pant Sachiv 
agrees that the law from time to time in force in the said British districts re- 
garding Abkari shall also have foroe so far as may be in the Bhor State. 

Abticlb 2. 

In furtherance of the same object the Pant Sachiv agrees to continne the 
farm of the Abkari revenue of the Bhor State to the British Oovernment 
until the thirty-first day of July one thousand eight hundred and ninety •four 
on the conditions : — 

(a) That the annual sum of rupees twelve thousand four hundred 
and forty-eiglit annas thirteen and pies eight comprising the following 
items shall be paid to him by the British Government in equal half-yearly 
iustahneiits on the tenth January and tenth July (namely) :— 

Ss» dm jp» 

AmoDDt paid annually to the Pant Saobiv as per bis agreement of 
twentieth April one thousand eight handred and seventj-uine 11,902 5 6 

Now added ^^ i 

Amount of compensation to be piud annually by the Pant Saobiv 
to Inamdars and Hakdars in the Sudhagad Mahal for the re- 
linquishment of their Abkari rights ..... 170 4 2 

Ms* a, p* 
Value of liquor customarily supplied by contract- 
ors to the State ..... 
Add twenty-five per cent, on do. 



Value of liquor customarily supplied by contract- 
ors on account of the Bhorai deity 
Add twenty-five per cent on do. 

On account of the loss of import duty on Mowra 

flowers .»••.• 

Add twenty-five per cent, on do. 



15 
3 


10 
14 



6 


4 
1 


8 




6 
11 


\ 281 
70 


2 

4 


6 

7 



19 8 6 



5 4 6 



351 7 1 



Total . 12,448 13 8 



XI Safara Jagirdars— Bilor— Bfa LVIII. 



(6) That the above sum of rupees twelve thousand four hundi 
and forty-eight annas thirteen and pies eight includes compensation 
ftccount of toddy in the Sudhagad taluka only^ and therefore whate> 
sums are realized by the British Qovernment on account of trees tapp 
in the other talukas shall be paid to the Pant Sachiv from time to tii 
in addition to the annual payment named in clause (a) of this article. 

{e) That the British Oovernmetit will be prepared to consic 
claims for compensation on account of any item of Abkari revenue whi 
may hereafter be found to have been overlooked at the time of the ei 
oution of this agreement. 

Article 3. 

The British Government aprrees that during the term of the said fa 
^he Abkari administration of the Bhor State shall be conducted under 1 
^>rder8 of the Oovernor in Council of Bombay in accordance with the Ii 
^aforeaaid and subject to the following conditions^ namely :— 

(a) That the rates of the taxation of liquor in the Bhor State sh 
be the same as in the aforesaid British districts. 

{b) That the same reasonable facilities shall be afforded to the 
babitants of the said State to obtain liquor for their consumption as 
the inhabitants of the said British districts. 

{e) That the retail selling prices of liquor shall be the same in 1 
Bhor State as in the said British districts^ and there shall be no prohi 
lion of the sale of liquor in shops in the said State to British subjects 
friee vertd, 

{i) That the Pant Sachiv shall be consulted from time to time 
to the number and position of the liquor shops to be licensed in the Sts 
the fitness of the person to whom it is proposed to give retail licenses s 
sueh like details of the Abkari administration, 

(e) That if the farm of the Abkari revenue shall be sublet tc 
third person, the Pant Sachiv shall be furnished with a copy of such si 
farmers agreement with the British Government. 

Article 4. 

The farm of the Abkari revenue to the British Government for the per 

foresaid shall not be deemed to confer upon the said Government any p 

ietary right to the palm and other toddy-producing trees or to the land 

"^vhich such trees are growings but the juice produced from all such tr 

hall be subject to the farm as an item of Abkari revenue. 

Abtiole 5. 

9 

The Pant Sachiv en^rages cordially to co-operate with the officers of 
Sombay Government in giving effect to the provisions of the Abkari law f 
Yoles from time to time in force and will nee every endeavour himself i 
through the subordinate officers of the Slate to prevent the illicit manufactc 
vale, tzaneport or possession of liquor or the unlawful possession or use of i 



162 Satara JaRirdars— £ik>r— No. LVIII. Fart II 



material or implement for manufacturing liquor or any breach of any of the 
provisions of the said law or rules. 

Abtiolb 6. 

All ofEences against the said Abkari law and rules committed in the Bhor 
State shall be cognizable by the ordinary Criminal Courts of the State. 

Aktiolb 7. 

The British Oovernment agrees that during the term of the said farm a 
separate account shall bekept of the Abkari revenue of the Bhor State and that 
a copy of the account shall be given, if required, annually to the Pant Sachiv 
for his information. 

Abticlb 8. 

On the expiry of the term of the said farm on the 1st August one thoo- 
sand eight hundred and nioety-four the administration of the Abkari revenue 
of the Bhor State shall revert to the Pant Sachiv, but the Pant Saohiv agrees 
that on and after the said date : 

(a) The same Abkari law and rules which are in force in the adjoining 
Briti^ districts of Poona, Satara and Kolaba shall be maintained in the 
State. 

{b) The rates of the taxation of liquor in the State shall be the same 
as in the aforesaid British districts. 

(c) The Abkari administration of the State shall be in every way so 
conducted as not to cause injury to the Abkari revenue of the adjoining 
British districts, and the Political Accent shall be consulted, when necessary^ 
with a view to preventing any such result. But nothing in this article 
shall be deemed to require the Pant Sachiv to make any arrangement 
injurious to the legitimate interests of the Bhor State, and the British Oovern- 
ment undertakes that the Abkari administration of the adjoining British 
districts shall be so conducted as not to cause injury to the legitimate inter- 
ests of the said State. _ 

Executed at Bhor this twenty-fourth day of November one thousand 
eight hundred and eighty-iive. 

(Sd.) J. King, (Sd.) Shankab Rao, 

Political Agent, Satara. Chief of Bkor. 




Approved and confirmed by Bis Excellency the Viceroy and Governor 
General of India. 

(Sd.) H. M. DUBAND, 

Secretarf to tie Govt, of India, Foreign Dept* 
Fort U'illiam, the 29th January 1886. 



art II Satars Jsgirdars— PAor— No. LIX. 154 



No. LIX. 
Bhor Agreement — 1890. 

No. 1040. 

Political DBPAmniBNT. 

Bombay Castle, 13th February 1890. 

Memorandam from the Commissioner, C. D., No. Pol.^-ftO, dated the 
15th Janaary 1890-*SabmittiDg, as required by paragraph 14 of Go?emment 
Beeolution No. 2808 of the 26th April last, a letter No. PoL— 10, dated the 
9th January 1890, from the Political Agent, Poona, who forwards the follow- 
ing agreement with the Pant of Bhor':*« 

'' JriieU of Agreement for the removal of resirieiions oMfree trade in tie Bk^ 

State under the Poona Political Agene^m 

** Pbeaubls. 

'' Whereas the Chief of Bhor declared oa the Ist August 1887 his inten- 
tion to abolish the duties on export and import known as Sthalmod and 
Stalbharit, and whereas it is considered by the Governor of Bombay in Council 
desirable to obtain an engagement from the Chief of Bhor that he wiQ 
continue this policy iu regard to free trade, the foliowincf article in this view 
it agreed upon between Meherban Shankarrao Pandit, Pant Sachiv, Chief of 
Bhor, on behalf of himself and his heirs and successors on the one part, and 
W. A. East, Esquire, Political Agent of Poona, for the time being, on behalf 
of the British Government on the other. 

Abticlb 1. 

*' The Pant Sachiv engages to abolish within his territory from henceforth 
all taxes or imposts on the import, export or measurement of commodities other 
than annff, sulphur and poisonous drugs : Provided that nothing contained in 
this artiole shall be construed to prevent the levy of any tolls on bridges, roads, 
ferries, canals or causeways for the repair or maintenance of the sauje, or of any 
Octroi levied upon articles consumed within Municipal limits or of any taxes 
eonstitnting the Abkari revenue. 

'^ Bxeonted at Bhor this 22nd day of Oetober.'' 

States that the Chief was also desirous of adding the words '' and Forest" 
between " Abkari" and *' revenue" in the last line of the document, and that 
it appears the Chief is in the habit of levying dues on forest i>roduce from 
private lands exported from the State which the Chief thought might be taken 
as precluded if not specially excepted from the agreement ; observes that he 
thoQght it better to inform Government separately of the Pant's wishes than 
to insert in the agreement words which might be quoted hereafter as implying 



Xb^ Satars Jagirdars— ^wiuiA— No. LX. Part II 

the tacit approval of Government to a form of revenue of the legitimate nature 
of which he is not persuaded ; and mentions in this connection that the Pant's 
claims to a share in forest prodace on private lands have been for some little 
time a bone of contention between him and his rayats and are in some in* 
stances of doubtful validity. The Commissioner considers that the Political 
Acfent acted judiciously in declining to allow the proposed addition to the 
agreement. 

Resolution. — The action of the Political Agent in advising the Chief not 
to insert the words *' and forest'' in the agreement is approved. A fuller 
report should be submitted regarding the Chiefs claim to dues on the foreet 
produce of private land. 

8, 1 he agreement should be kept on the records of Qovemment. 



7o 



J. MoMTSATHy 

JeUnp Seereiaty to Gavemnuni. 



The Commissioner^ C. D. 

The Collector and Political Agent, Poena. 



No. LX. 

Agreement between the Honourable East India Compant and 
the Punt Prithee Nidhee, of Satara, dated the 22nd 
April 1820. 



Seal 

of 

Captain 

J. Qraut. 



Terms fixed by Captain James Grant Sahib Bahadoor, on the 
part of the Honourable Company, for Rao Sahib Mubh- 
PUK Mbherban Fur ash ram Pundit Prithee Nidhee. 

The possessions of the Punt Prithee Nidhee came into the possession 
of the British Oovernment along: with the rest of the country ; hut in con- 
sideration of the antiquity and respectability of the family^ they have been 
freely restored in the same manner as they were held up to the period of the 
war. But as the greater part of the country of the Prithee Nidhee is within 
the limits of the territory made over by Treaty to his Highness the Rajah 
of Satara, the Prithee Nidhee therefore is placed under the government of 
His Highness, 




Satsra Jagirdara^^KtM^A— No. LX. 165 



The British Government is the gaarantee, and the terms fixed are aa 

Article 1. 

That the inhabitants of the coantry under the Prithee Nidhee may be 

3t>teetedy justice must be properly administered, and a police established 

^r the prevention and detection of thieves and robbers. Should justice 

ot be honestly dispensed, and thefts and robberies, from the inefficiency of 

Tie police, become so frequent that people may be obliged to complain ; in the 

▼ent of such being the case, the (lovernment of His Highness will, with 

advice and assistance of the Agent of the British Oovemment, issue 

ions on the subject which must be attended to. 

Articlb 2. 

An efficient police must be established, so that no inhabitants of the 

untry under the Funt Prithee Nidhee may commit thefts or robberies 

^^vithin the territories of the British Government or of His Highness. 

Should at any time stolen property be found, or thefts traced by Magistiate 

*^thin the country of the Punt Prithee Nidhee, the thief and stolen pro})erty 

^must be madd over to whichever government may demand them. People 

of either government, who may enter the country of the Prithee Nidhee 

jor the purpose of apprehending criminals and other offenders, must have 

every assistance given to them. If this is not attended to, then whatever 

appears to be the proper measures shall be suggested by the Agent of the 

British Government, and corresponding arrangements will be made by His 

Highnees's government. 

Aeticlb S, 

Exoepting those under the government of His Hig^hness, no intercourse 
or communication by letter can be allowed with any Chiefs, such as Bajee 
Rao Sahib, or other Princes, Chieftains, Commanders, and others, nor is it 
permitted to give aid or assistance to any one. This article is the basia 
of the present agreement, and a departure from it will occasion the forfeiture 
of all advantages possessed by virtue of this agreement. 

Article 4. 

^Without the knowledge and orders of government no extra troops are to 
be entertained or war entered upon with any one. In all cases of domestic 
disputes about relationship and such like, no appeal to arms can be permitted, 
but information must be sent to the Agent of the British Government, who 
will represent the affair to the government of His Highness, and such decision 
as, with his advice, shall be given, must be reckoned binding. 

Abticlb 6, 

In the event of disputes taking place regarding items of revenue 
possessed by the Prithee Nidhee within the districts of the Putwurdhun or 



156 Satan Jagirdan— it«iMfi— No. LX. 'P^^ II 



othen, iDformation of the particulars must be sent to the Agent of tlie 
British Government, when a settlement will take place in conseqaen^.; bvk 
no separate commanication is to be made. 

Abticle 6. 

As the country of tbe Prithee Nidhee adjdos the territories of the 
British Qovemment and of His Highness, it may be necessary to make 
exchanges for the purpose of correctly defining the boondary, or on aocoant 
of police arrangements, but such exchanges shall be made in a manner not 
hijurions to the interests of the Punt. 

Artiolb 7. 

The sum of rupees two thousand (2,000) formerly paid yearly by the 
Prithee Nidhee to the Punt Suciieo has been made over by him to the 
government of His Highness, to whom it must, accordingly, be paid 
annually. 

Articlb 8. 

All allowances in the country of the Prithee Nidhee, such as doomala, 
dhurmadao, inams, wurshasuns, dewasthan, rozindar, nemnook, dumk, and 
others of the like kind, must be continued as they at present exist : there 
ought to be no complaints on this head* 

Abtiolb 9. 

As the British territories and those of His Highness adjoin the oonntry 
ef the Prithee Nidhee, it is necessary that in all cases of disturbance oceur^ 
ring in them, assistance shall be rendered on the requisition of the mamla^ 
dars of either government. 

Article 10. 

The Punt Prithee Nidhee must appear in personal attendance on Hie 
Highness yearly at the festival of the Dusserah. AU titles and customary 
forms of respect hitherto enjoyed shall be continued to the Punt. 

In all 10 Articles, as above, which must be observed. 

Dated at Satara, the 22nd April 1820 ^ corresponding will 8ih 
Bunnui Uskreen-wu-lfyaiein'WU'Ul/j or Arabic year 1280. 

(Sd.) Jamrs Grant. 



P«rt ZI Satara Jagirdan— ^viMfA— No. LX. 157 



AoRSSMBNT between the Rajah of Sataba and the P^nt 

F&iTHBE NiDHEB — July 1820. 



Sen] of 

Hit Higrhnfflt 

the Bajsh 

of Sfitani. 



^GBBEMENT on the part of His Highness the Rajah of Satara 
respeeticg Rajesreb Furushram Pundit Prithee NidhbEi 
to whom these commands are issued. 

The ooantry formerlj possessed by joq has been freely restored and 
l)e8towed throagh the liberality of the British Ooyemment, and an agpree* 
inenty consisting of 1 Articles, has been made ont and delivered to you by 
Captain James Qrant Sahib Bahadoor on the part of the British Oovemment. 
The greater part of your country has come within the limits of the territory 
made over to His Hi^liness by the Treaty with the British Oovernment, and 
the terms fixed by the British Government having been approved of, the 
Hoozoor^ for the purpose of confirming you in possession* has determined as 
follows :— 

Abticle 1. 

Should any disturbances take place in the territories of His Highness 
or of the British Government which adjoin your country, aid must be 
afforded by sending all the disposable police in your districts on requisition 
from the mamlutdars of either government* 

Artiols t. 

AH wuttun and other allowances hitherto possessed by you within the 
territory of His Highness shall be continued, and in like roauner all items of 
revenue belonging to His Highnesses government within your country must 
be continued to be paid. AH doomalla villages and land, wurshasuns, 
dhurmadao, dewasthan, rozindar, khyrat, nemnook, duruk, and all other 
allowances hitherto enjoyed within your country must be continued without 
interruption, and should at present any investigation be carrying on respect- 
ing the rights or possessions of those holding them on government deeds, 
decisions must be given upon the fairest principles of justice^ so that no 
complaints may be made. Should persons holding inheritances of the above* 
mentioned descriptions raise or excite disturbances, or commit offences against 
the public peace, or should persons possessed of such inheritances die without 
heirs, you will fully investigate the matter and state what may appear really 
juet, when His Highnesses government, with the advice of the Agent of the 
British Gt)vernment, will send such orders as may be fit and proper, which 
must be conformed to. 



158 Satara Jagirdara— iltuKii— Vo. LX. Part IX 



Abticlb 3. 

That the inliabitaDts of jour country maj be protected, justice most bo 
honestly administered, and a proper police established for the prevention and 
detection of thieves and robbers ; out if unjast decisions are £^iven, and no 
£^ood police kept op, so that thefts and robberies become of frequent oocnrrenoe, 
and people in consequence may be obliged to bring forward complaints ; in 
the event of such being the case, whatever orders may in consequenoe be 
issued by His Highnesses government, with the advice of the Agent of the 
British Government, these must be carried into effect. 

Abticlb 4. 

Without the knowledge and orders of government no extra troopa are 
to be levied or war entered upon with any one. In all cases of domestic 
disputes about relationship and such like, no appeal to arms will be permitted, 
but information is to be sent to government, when such orders as may be 
sent on the subject, with the advice of the Agent of the British Government, 
must be considered binding. 

Abticlb 6. 

Excepting those under the government of His Highness, no interoonrse 
or communication by letter can be allowed with any Chief, such as Bajee 
Bao Sahib or other Princes, Cliieftains, Commanders, and others, nor is it 
permitted to send aid to any one, or to become concerned in the assemblage 
of any troops whatever. This article forms the basis of the present SLgree- 
ment, and if it is departed from, with the advice of the British Government 
your possessions shall not be continued. 

Abtiolb 6. 

All offenders and criminals from your country who may take shelter 
in the territory of His Highness shall be deliver^ over to you, and in like 
manner all offenders and criminals from within the territories of His High- 
ness, or of the British Government, who may enter your country, shall be 
given up and delivered to whichever government they belong. Assistance 
must be rendered to people of both governments who may enter into your 
country in pursuit of such offenders* 

Abticlb 7. 

Whilst you remain and perform the conditions of your service in good 
faith, integrity, and fidelity, your possessions shall be continued without inter« 
ruption on the part of His Higlmess's government, and on this point the 
British Government is your guarantee, which His Highnesses government 
approves of and agrees to. 

Abticlb 8« 

AH titles and forms of respect hitherto enjoyed by you shall be continued, 
and all requests forwarded by you shall be attended to, and, if reasonable and 
proper, they will be granted, but if otherwise, rejected. 



Sari II Satara Jagirdars— ^^fM^A— Ko. LXI. 169 



Article 9. 

Ab jonr coantry adjoins the territory of His Highness, and it may be 
necessary in oonseqaence to effect exchanges either for the parpose of defining 
boundaries for police arrangements, or for settling revenae matters, therefore 
such exchanges shall be made with the advice of the Agent of the British 
GoYernment, provided they are not injurions to your interests. 

Article 10. 

You must appear in personal attendance yearly at the festival of the 
Bosserab^ as well as on all occasions of ceremony and congratulation wlien 
His Highness may require you to be present in person. Whenever the estab« 
lishment of His Highness may move to any great distancCi you must on such 
occasions be present and accompany His Highness. 

Article 11. 

The Punt Suoheo receives from you a yearly payment of Rupees two 
thousand (2,000), which is now agreed to be transferred to His Highness on 
aooonnt of the elephant establish men t, and you must accordingly pay thii 
•um annually to His Highness's government. 



No. LXI. 

Sthmtakob of copy of an Agreement passed by SHRiNiwAfi 
Fakdit, Fbatinidhi, dated the 11th September 1880, and 
received and ordered to be translated on the 3rd Noyembei 
1881. 

A written communication has been received from the Political Agentj 
Satarai to the effect that if I pass an agreement as stated below, the British 
Oovemment will agree to supply at a reasonable price the opium required 
tor sale in the Sansthan and to pay me money at the rate of Rupees (10) ten 
r oent. of the duty on the opium that may be imported into the Sansthan 
Wl the British depOt. Therefore the undermentioned agreement is entered 
intOj to make arrangements about opium in my Sansthan. 

2. I shall introduce into the Sansthan the Opium Act No. I of 1878 
which is in force in the British territory, and the Acts that may be passed 
about opium from time to time, and I shall also introduce, as far as practicable, 
the roles that may be framed under those Acts. 

8* The cultivation of the poppy has been discontinued in the Sansthan 
{r^m former times. I shall take steps to have its cultivation entirely stopped. 



noi 



■•»■ 



160 Satara Jagirdsrs— J«^*-Ko. LZIZ. Part %l 



I shall also take proper steps to preTent the preparation of opium. If any 
one illeg^ally import smug^gled opiam into the Sansthan, I shall criminallj 
prosecuto him according to law. 

4. I shall purchase from the depdt of the British Goveniment» on tha 
payment of price, the opium required in the Sansthan. I shall not purchase it 
from another place. I shall not allow opium for which there is no pass ffrom 
the British Gh)vernment given after the payment of the fee) to be importea into 
the Sansthan. If any one import it, 1 shall not allow it to be sold in the 
Sansthan, but shall criminally prosecute him according to law. 

5. Permission to sell opium will be given only to licensed persona. I 
shall take steps to make them keep accounts of the receipts and sale of optnm, 
and prevent them from selling it in retail at a rate lower than that at which 
it is sold in the neighbouring British territory. 

6. I shall send to the Political Agent, Satara, a half-yearly statement 
showing the quantity of opium imported from the British depdt, the quantity 
sold, the proceeds of the sale, and the quantity of opium remaining (unsold), 

7. I beg that I may be allowed the liberty to make with the licensed re- 
tail sellers of opium such additional agreements as may appear proper and as 
may be in accordance with the aforesaid Acts and rules and this agreement. 

8. Should Government confirm this agreement, it will be enforced from 
the 1st October 1880. 



No. LXII. 



Agbebmbkt between the British Govbenhbkt and the Dui*- 

LAYKUB, dated 22nd April 1820. 



Seal 

of Captain 

J. Grant 



Tbrms fixed by Captain James Grant Sahib Bahadoor on the 
part of the Honourablb Company Bahadooe for UsMin? 
Puna Benooka Bai Duflay Dbshmook of Jttt and 
KuRZGBE, by which the Jut and Exjrzgeb Fergunnahs are 
made oyer to her. 

^ These districts were formerly held as a personal and military jaghire^ and 
having come into the possession of the British Government along with the 
rest of the country^ they are now freely restored in consideration of the anti- 
quity and resptotability of the- family, . to be held as formerly in penoaal 



Part II Satara Jagirdara-Jb/A— No. LXII. 161 



and military jaghire. But as these districts came within the limits of the 
territory of His Highness the Rajah of Satara, according to the Treaty with 
the British GovemoQeDt, therefore Henooka Bai Duflay is to be considered a 
jaghiredar of His Highnesses government, but under the guarantee of the 
British Government. 

The following articles are agreed to on the part of the British Govern- 
ment and Benooka Bai Duflay :— 

Articlb 1. 

The districts of Jut and Kurzgee having been possessed as a jaghire up 
to the period of register, they are now freely restored and confirmed. 
During the government of the Peishwa these districts were held as an allow- 
ance for four hundred and fifty (450) horse under Rasteea, but afterwards the 
number was fixed at three hundred (300), and because the country was not 
in a flourishing state, full service to that amount was not demanded, and the 
number finally fixed at two hundred. That Renooka Bai Duflay may live in 
affluence and comfort, and also be enabled to keep up the contingent in the 
most complete state of equipment, Government have remitted three-fourths 
of that number, and fixed the present contingent at fifty (50) horse, which 
must be kept up constantly in the service of His Higlmess the Rajah of 
Satara. 

Abticle 2. 

The horses and men forming the contingent are to be good. The horses 
of the value of from Rupees SOO to 400 to be always present in the service 
of His Highness, and to proceed without delay or remonstrance wherever their 
services may be required. They are to be mustered whenever so ordered, and 
should there be any deficiency in the number, such deficiency must be made 
good at the annual rate of Rupees 300 per each borse, to be calculated from 
the period of the former muster, but previous to enforcing the demand, a 
representation of the circumstances will be made by His Highnesses govern- 
ment to the Agent of- the British Government, and his concurrence obtained. 

Abticlb 3. 

In the event of the contingent being employed in war under a requi* 
sition from the British Government, and should any men or horses in 
consequence be killed or wounded, it is to be clearly imderstood that nothing 
in the way of an equivalent shall be paid by the government of His Highness. 
Risks and casualties of all kinds, as well as the furnishing of ammunition, 
tte included in the allowance. 

Articlb 4. 

The whole expense of managing the jaghire is to be defrayed without 
reference to what is incurred by keeping up the horse. As the territories 
of the British Government and of His Highness adjoin the jaghire, it is 
therefore determined that in the event of any disturbance taking place in 
ibem, on the requisition of the mamlutdar of either government, aid shall 
he furnished by a ready co-operation with all the disposable police of the 
jighire. 



1 



162 Sstara Jagirdars— JaM-Ko. I<XII. Part II 



Abtiolb 5. 

Whatever inam villages, wuttans^ and other allowances have hitherto 
belonged to Benooka Bui Uuflay within the territories of the British Govern- 
xnent or of His Highness shall be continuedi and whatever items of levenae 
belonging to His Highnesses government may be within the jaghire district 
shall continue to be paid ; all doomalla villages and land, wurshasan, dhurmadao, 
dewasthani rozindar, kbyrat^ nemuook, durruk, and such like allowances within 
the jagbircmust be continued as they are at present. All persons having pos- 
sessions on government deeds are not to be interfered with : such interruptions 
as might exist from temporary causes at the time charge was received from 
the British Government are to be examined and the claims justly settled. 

Care must be taken that no just cause of complaint may be bioiiglit 
forward on such points. In cases where any of the above-mentioned posses- 
sors of inheritance or allowance Bhall behave improperly, it will be necessary 
to acquaint the Agent of the Britisii Government with the particulars, who, 
in conjunction with His Highnesses government, will intimate what coarse 
is to be pursued either in respect to punishment or resumption. Should 
persons holding such inheritances or allowances raise or excite any disturb- 
ances, or commit any offences against the peace of the public, or should 
persons possessed of such rights die without heirs, you will folly investigate 
the matter and state what appears really jnst, when His Highnesses govern- 
ment, with the advice of the Agent of the British Government, will send 
such orders as may seem fit, and which must be conformed to. 

Abtiolb 6. 

That the inhabitants of the jaTrhire territory may be protected, justice 
must be properly dispensed, and a good police upheld to detect theft and to 
suppress gang robberies. If this is not attended to, and the country be 
without justice, so that people are obliged to complain, the government of 
His Highness, with the advice and assistance of the Agent of the British 
Government, having understood the matter, will decide on such subjects 
and their decisions must be altended to. And further, in regard to such 
decisions not being attended to, so that the country may fall into a state of 
misgovernment, aud robberies and other crimes become of very frequent 
occurrence, in such an event, whatever may appear to be the most proper 
measures shall be suggested by the Agent of the British Government, and 
corresponding arrangements will be made by His Highnesses government. 

Artiolb 7. 

Without orders from government no extra troops are to be levied, and 
none assembled for the purpose of making war on any one. In matters of 
family disputes concerning relationship and such like, no appeal to arms «ui 
be permitted, but the case is to be represented to the Agent of the British 
Government, who will communicate with the government of His HighnesiK, 
and whatever decision is given must be reckoned binding. 



Part II Satara Jagirdars— J^a/A-No. LXII. 168 



Articlb 8* 

With the e^iception of those under the governmeDt of His Highness^ 
no intercourse or eommanication by letter is to be entered into with such as 
Bajee Kao Sahib^ or other Princes, Chieftains, Commanders, and others, nor 
is any aid or assistance, by joining the troops of any one, to be given. This 
article forms the basis of the present agreement, and should what is above 
written be departed from, the jaghire will not be continued. 

Aeticls 9. 

All persons having committed crimes within the jaghire country, who 
may take shelter in the territories of the British Government or of His 
Highness, shall be delivered over to Benooka Bai Duflay after information 
has been given to the Agent of the British Government, and by him com- 
mnnicated to the British Government or to the government of His Highness, 
as the case may be ; and in like manner all criminals from the territories of 
the British Government or of His Highness shall be delivered up by Benooka 
Bai Duflay to their respective governments, and assistance must be rendered 
to people of either government who may be sent for the apprehension of such 
offenders. 

Articlb 10. 

Whilst you, Benooka Bai Duflay, shall continue to fulfil the terms of your 
aervice in good faith, integrity, and fidelity, your jaghire shall be held without 
any interruption from His Highnesses Government; on this point the British 
is your guarantee. 

Articlb 11. 

All titles and forms of respect hitherto enjoyed by Benooka Bai Duflay 
shall be continued. All requests on the part of the jaghiredar, which may be 
reasonable and proper, shall be granted, but such as are otherwise shall not 
be agreed to. 

Articlb 12. 

As the jaghire district adjoins the territory of His Highness, and it may 
be necessary to efiPect exchanges of items of revenue or land for the purpose 
either of defining the boundary or for police arrangements, therefore, on a 
representation from the government of His Highness, the Agent of the 
British Government will arrange such exchanges as may be necessary, provided 
they are not injurious to the interests of the jaghiredar, and such exchanges 
most be made accordingly. 

In all twelve Articles, as above, which must be observed. 

Dated 88nd April A.D. 1880, corre»pon4ing with 8th Unjjub Snnnut Ushreen^ 

wU'Myatein'WU* Ulf or Arabic year 1820, at Satara, 



Sipnatnre of 

Captain 

J. Qrant. 



164 Batara Jagirdars— JaM-No. LXII. Fart II 

Agreement between the Rajah of Sataba and the Duplaykub, 

July 1820, 



Seal of 

His Highness 

the Bajah 

of Satsra. 



Ageeement on the part of His Highness the Rajah of Sataka 
respecting Renooka Bai Duplay, Dkshmook of the Per- 
gunnahs of Jut and Kurzgke, to whom these commands 
are issued. 

The pergannahs of Jut and Eurzgee having^ been for a loDg time past 
possessed by you in jagbire^ therefore the British Government have in their 
liberality freely restored and bestowed the same on yoa according to terms fixed 
by Captain James Grant Bahadoor on their part coQsisting of 12 Articles. 

The country of the jaghire having come within the limits of the territory 
of His Highness by the Treaty with the British Government} an agreement 
in consequence has been made out and delivered to you on the part of the 
British Government^ which has been approved of by the Hoozoori and for the 
purpose of confirming you in the above-mentioned jaghire the Circar has de- 
termined as follows : — 

Artiols 1. 

The pergunnahs of Jnt and Kurzgee are to be held as a personal and 
military jaghire on condition of fumiBbing fifty (50) horse, completely equip- 
ped, to be kept constantly present in the service of His Highness the Kiajah 
of Satara. 

Aeticle 2. 

The horses and men forming the contingent are to be good ; the horsea 
ot the value of from Rupees 8 to 400 to be kept constantly ready in the 
service of His Highness, to be mustered whenever so ordered, and to proceed 
wherever their services may be required without delay or remonstrance. 
Should any deficiency in the number appear at muster, such deficiency mast 
be made good at the annual rate of Rui)ees 30U for each horse, to be calcalated 
from the period at which the former muster took place ; but previous to en- 
forcing this demand His Highuess's government will make a representation of 
the circumstances and obtain the concurrence of the Agent of the British 
Government. 

Article S, 

In the event of your contingent being employed in war on requisition 
by the Agent of the British Government, and should any men or horses in 
consequence be either killed or wounded, it is to be clearly understood that 
nothing in the way of compensation shall be paid by the government of His 



Part II Batara Jagirdars— JaM— No. LXII. 195 



Highness. Risks and casualties of all kinds^ as well as the furnishing of 
ammunition, are included in the allowance. 

* 

Article 4. 

The whole expense of managing the jaghire is to be defrayed without any 
reference to what is incurred by keeping up the horse. The territories of the 
British Government and of His Highness being situated close to the jaghire 
country, in the event of any disturbance taking place, on the requisition 
of the mamlutdars of either government, aid must be furnished by a ready 
co-operation with all the disposable police of the jaghire. 

Articlb 5. 

Whatever wuttun or other allowances have hitherto been enjoyed by yon 
within the territory of His Highness shall be continued, and all items of 
revenue belonging to His Highness within your districts shall continue to be 
paid. Within the jaghire country all doomalla villages and land, wurshasun, 
dhurmadao, dewasthan, rozindar, khyrat, nemnook, daruk, and such like allow- 
anoes must be continued as they at present stand. All persons having posses- 
sions on government grants are not to be interfered with; such interruptions 
as might exist from temporary causes at the time you received charge (from 
the British Government) are to be examined, and the claims justly settled. 
Yon will be careful that no just cause of complaint is brought forward against 
you on such points. 

In cases where any of the above-mentioned possessors of inheritance or 
allowance shall behave improperly, it will be necessary to acquaint the Agent 
of the British Government with the particulars, who, in conjunction with 
His Highnesses government, will intimate what course is to be pursued either 
in respect to punishment or resumption. Should persons holding such inherit- 
ances or allowances raise or excite any disturbance, or commit any offences 
against the peace of the public, or should such persons die without heirs, you 
will fully investigate the matter, and state what may appear really jnst, when 
His Highnesses government,' with the advice of the Agent of the British 
Government, will send such orders as may seem fit, and which must be con- 
formed to. 

Aeticlb 6. 

That the inhabitants of the jaghire country may be protected, justice 
must be properly administered, and a good police upheld to detect theft 
and to suppress gang robberies. If this is not attended to, and unjust deci- 
sions given, so that people are obliged to complain, the Government of His 
Highness, with the advice and assistance of the Agent of the British Govern- 
ment, having understood the matter, will decide on such subjects, and their 
decisions must be attended to. And further in regard to such decisions not 
being attended to, so that the country may become in a state of misgovern* 
ment, and robberies and other crimes of very frequent occurrencCi then what- 
ever appears to be the proper measures shall be suggested by the Agent of 
the British Government, and corresponding arrangements will be made by 
His Highnesses government. 



166 Satara Jagirdars— Jo^il^No. LXIL Vart II 



Abtiolb 7. 

Without orders from goverDinent no extra troops are to be leTiedj and 
none assembled for the purpose of making war on any one* In matters of 
family disputes concerning relationship and such like, no appeal to arms 
can be permitted: but the matter is to be represented to govern mont, when 
such orders as may be given , with the advice of the Agent of the British 
Oovemment, must be reckoned binding. 

Articlb 8. 

With the exception of those under the government of His Highness, no 
intercoui-se or communication by letter is to be entered into with any Chiefsy 
such as Bajee Rao Sahib, or other Princes, Chieftains, Commanders, and 
others, nor is any aid or assistance by joininu^ the troops of any one to be 
given. This Article forms the basis of the present agreement, and should 
what is above written be departed from, with the advice of the Agent of the 
British Government, the jaghire will not be continued. 

Article 9. 

All persons having committed crimes within the jaghire conntry, and 
who may take shelter in the territory of His Highness, shall be delivered over 
to jou; all criminals from within the territories of His Highness or of the 
British Government shall be delivered up to their respective governments, and 
every assistance must be rendered to people of either government who may 
enter your country in pursuit of such offenders. 

Article 10. 

Whilst you continue to perform the terms of your service in good faith, 
integrity, and fidelity, your jaghire shall be held without any interruption on 
the part of the Circar ; on this point the British Government is yonr guaran- 
tee, which His Highnesses government agrees to. 

Aeticlv 11. 

m 

All titles and all cnstomary forms of reepect hitherto enjoyed by yon 
shall be oontinued. All requests on your part which may be reasonable and 
proper shall be granted, but such as are otherwise shall not be agreed to. 

Artiolb 12. 

As your jaghire adjoins the territory of His Highness, and consequently 
it may be necessary to effect exchanges of land or items of revenue, either for 
the purpose of distinctly defining the boundary, or for police arrangements, 
therefore such exchanges shall take place with the advice and assistance of 
the Agent of the Britiui Government, provided they are not injurious to 
your interests. 



Fart II Sstara Jagirdars— PAa/^<r»— No. LXIII. 167 



Aetiolb 18, 

YoQ. muBt appear in personal attendance jearly at the festival of the 
DoBserab, and also attend on all occasions of ceremony or congratulation 
when your attendance may be required by His Highness. You must also be 
in personal attendance whenever the establishment of His Highness may 
move to any great distance. 



No. LXIII. 

Agreement between the Honourable East India Company and 
the Desumook of Phxjltun, commonly called the Nimbaii- 
KUR, dated tiie 22Dd April 1820. 



Seal of 

Captain 

J. urant. 



Terms fixed by Captain James Grant Sahib Bahadoor on the 
part of the Honourable Company for Rao Sahib Meher- 
BAN Jan Rao Naik Nimbalkur, Deshmook of Phultun, 
by which the Pergunnah of Phultun is made over to him, 
as he enjoyed the same formerly io personal and military 
jaghire. 

This district, alonj? with the rest of the country, having come into the 
possession of the British Government, it is now freely bestowed as a military 
ja^^bire in consideration of the antiquity and respectability of the family ; 
but as, according to the terms of the Treaty concluded with His Highness 
the Rajah of Satara, this jaghire is within the limits of his territory, therefore 
Jan Bao Naik Nimbalkur is to be considered a jaghiredar of His Highnesses 
govern men t, but under the guarantee of thd British Government. 

The following Articles are agreed to on the part of the British Govern- 
ment and Jan Rao Naik :— 

Article 1. 

The Phultun pergunnah having been possessed up to the war as a 
personal and military allowance, in like manner it is now restored and con* 
firmed. Daring the government of the Peishwa^ the contingent was fixed at 
three hundred and fifty (350) horse, but in consequence of the country not 
being in a flourishing state, service to the full amount of this number was not 
insisted upon. 



168 Satara Jagirdars—P^/'aii-No. X<XIII. Fart II 



That Jan Rao Naik may live in affluence and comforti and also be 
enabled to keep up his contingent in the most complete state of equipment 
and readiness for the service^ Oovemment have fixed the amount of it at 
nitiety (90) horse, of which number seventy-five (75) must always remain 
in the service of His Highness the Rajah of Satara> and the remaining fifteen 
(15) with the Naik. 

Article 2. 

The horses and men forming the contingent are to be good, the horses of 
t)ie value of from Rupees SOO to 400, and to be always kept ready in the 
service of His Highnesses government. Wherever their services may be 
required, they are to proceed without any delay or remonstrance. They are to 
be mustered whenever so ordered, and should there be any of the number 
deficient, such deficiency must be made good at the annual rate of Rupees 
8€0 for each horse, calculated from the period at which the former master 
took place ; but previous to enforcing the demand. His Highnesses govern- 
ment will make a representation of the circumstances and obtain the concur- 
rence of the British Government. 

Abtiolb 3, 

In the event of the contingent being employed in war, under a requisi- 
tion from the British Government, should any horses or men in consequence 
be killed or wounded, it is to h& clearly understood that nothing in the way 
of an equivalent shall be paid by His Highnesses government. Risks and 
casualties of all kinds, including the furnishing of ammunition, are included 
in the allowance. 

Articlb 4. 

The whole expense of managing the jaghire is to be defrayed without 
any reference to what is incurred by keeping up the horse. The territories 
of the British Government and of His Highness being situated close to the 
jaghire, in the event of any disturbance taking place^ on the requisition of 
the mamlutdars of either of the Governments, aid must be furnished by a 
ready co-operation with all the disposable police of the jaghire. 

Articlb 5. 

Whatever inam villages, wuttuns, etc., have hitherto belonged to the 
Naik shall be continued to him in the territory of His Highness, and all items 
of revenue of His Highness, which lie within the district of the Naik, shall 
be paid to His Highnesses government. Within the jaghire territory all 
doomalla vilages, wurshasun, dhurmadao, dewasthan^ rozindar, khyrat, nem- 
nook, daruk, and such like payments, must be continued as they are at this 
time. All persons having possessions on government grants are not to be 
interfered with ; such interruptions as might exist from temporary causes 
at the time you received charge (from the British Government) are to be 
examined, and the claims justly- settled. You will be careful that no just 
cause of complaint is brought forward against you on such points. 



Part II Satara Jagirdars— PAa/ian - No. LXIII. 169 



In cases where any of the abovemeutioDed possessors of inheritance or 
allowances shall behave improperly, it will be necessary to acquaint the 
Agent of the British Oovernment with the particulars, who, in eonjuuction 
with His Highnesses government, will intimate what course is to be pursued, 
either in respect to punishment} or resumption. Should persons holdni^ such 
inheritance or allowance raise or excite any disturbance, or commit any offences 
against the peace of the public, or should persons possessed of such rights 
die without heirs, you will fully investigate the matter, and state what may 
appear really jnst, when His Highnesses government, with the advice of the 
Agent of the British Government, will send such orders as may seem fit, and 
which must be conformed to. 

Article 6. 

That the subjects of the jaghire territory may have protection, justice 
moat be properly administered, and a good police upheld to detect thefts and 
to suppress gang robberies. If tins is not attended to, and the country he 
without justice, so that people are obliged to complain, the government} of His 
Highness, with the advice and assistance of the Agent of the British Oovern- 
ment, having understood the matter, will decide on such sui)jects, and their de« 
oisions must be attended to ; and further, in regard to such decisions not being 
attended to. So that the countiy may become in a state of misgovern men t, and 
robberies and other crimes of very f requi)nt occurrence, then whatever appears 
to be proper measures shall be suggested by the Agent of the British Gov- 
ernment, and corresponding arrangements will be made by His Highnesses 
government. 

Article 7. 

Without orders from government no extra troops are to be levied, and 
none assembled for the purpose of making wnr on any one. In matters of 
family disputes concerning relationship and such like, no appeal to arms can 
be permitted, but the case is to be represented to the Agent of the British 
Government, who will communicate with the government of His Highness^ 
and whatever decision is given must be reckoned binding. 

Article 8. 

With the exception of those under the government of His Highness, no 
intercourse or correspondence by letter is to be entered into with such as Bajee 
Bao Sahib, or other Princes, Chieftains, Commanders, and others, nor is any 
aid or assistance by joining the troops of any one to be given. This Article 
forms the basis of the present agreement, and should what is above written 
be departed from, the jaghire will not be continued. 

Article 9. 

All persons having committed crimes within the jaghire territory, and 
who may take shelter in the dominions of the British Government or of His 
Highness, shall be delivered over to Jan Bao Naik Nimbalkur, after informa- 
tion has been given to the Agent of the British Government, and by him 
communicated to the British Government, or to the government of His High- 

z 



170 Satara Jagirdars— Pftdt/a*— No. LXIII. Part IX 



Dess, as the case may be; and in like manner^ all criminals from the territories 
of the British Governmeut or of His Highness shall be delivered np by Jaa 
Bao Naikto their respective governments, and assistance must also be rendered 
to any public servants who may be sent for the appreheusion of such persoDS. 

Articlb 10. 

Whilst Jan Bao Naik shall continue to fulfil the terms of Ms serrioe in 
good faith, integrity^ and fidelity, the jaghire shall be held without any inter- 
ruption from His Highnesses government ; on this point the British Govern- 
ment is the guarantee. 

Articlb 11. 

All titles and customary forms of respect hitherto enjoyed by Jan Baa 

Naik shall be continued. All requests on the part of the jaghiredar, which 

may be reasonable and proper, shall be granted, bat such as are otherwise 

shall not be agreed to. 

Article 12. 

As the jaghire district adjoins the territory of His Highness, and con- 
sequently it maji be necessary to effect exchanges of items of revenue or land* 
either for the purpose of distinctly defining the boundary, or on account of 
arrangements in the police, therefore, on a representation from the govern- 
ment of His Highness, the Agent of the British Government will arrange 
such exchanges as may be necessary, having previously ascertained that they 
will not be injurious to the interests of Jan Bao Naik, and such exohaDgos 
must be made accordingly. 

In all, 12 Articles, as above, which must be observed. 

Dated at Satara, ike 82nd April 1620 {or 8ik Rnjjub Sunnut Uiireem- 
Myalein-wu- Vlf, or Arabic year 1220). 

(Sd.) JAMxa Grant. 



Agreement entered into in July 1820 by His Highness the 

Bajah of Sataba with the Nimbalkuk. 



LHrgc Seal of 

His Highness 

the Rajah of 

Satiira. 

Agreement on the part of His Highness the Bajah of Satara 
respecting Bajeshkee Jan Bag Naik Nimbaleur, Desh* 
MOOK of the PnuLTUN Pergunnah, to whom these com- 
mnnds are issued. 

The pergunnah of Fhultun having been for a long time past poiisessed 
by you as a personal and military jaghire^ the British Qoverument| tberefol^^ 



Part II Satsra Jagirdara— PAo/toii— No. LXIII. 171 



liave in their liberality freely bestowed and restored the same to you according 
to terms fixed by Captain James Grant Bahadoor on their part. The coun* 
try of the jaghire having come within the limits of the territory of the 
Hoozoor, by the Treaty with the British Government^ it has accordiDgly 
been placed under it^ and an agreement on the part of the British Govern- 
ment has been made and delivered to you^ which has been approved of by 
the Circar; and, for the purpose of confirming you in the abovementioned 
jaghircj the Hoosoor has determined as follows :— 

Article 1. 

The petgunnah of Phultun is to be held as a personal and military 
jaghire, on condition of furnishing ninety (90) horse, seventy-five (75) of 
which, completely equipped, and the horses good, are always to be kept in 
the service of tlie Uoozoor, and the remaining fifteen (15) to remaiu with 
you. 

Aeticle 2. 

The hortes and men fonmng the contingent are to be good, the horses 
M tke value of from Rupees SOO to 400, and to be always kept ready in the 
service of His Highnesses government. Wherever tiieir services may be 
lequired, they are to proceed without any delay or remonstrance. They are 
to be mustered whenever so ordered^ and should there be any of the 
number deficient, such deficiency must be made good at the annual rate of 
Rupees SOO for each horse, calculated from the period at which the former 
muster took pkce; but previous to enforcing the demand, His Highness's 
government will make a representation of tlie circumstances and obtain 
tiie concurrence of the Agent of the British Government. 

Article 3. 

Tn the event of the contingent being employed in war, under a requisi- 
tion from the British Government, should any horses or men in consequence 
be killed or wounded, it is to be clearly understood that nothing in the way 
of an equivalent shall be paid by His Highness's government. Risks and 
casualties of all kinds^ including the furnishing of ammunition, are included 
in the allowance. 

Article 4. 

The whole expense of managing the jaghire is to be defrayed without 
any reference to what is incurred by keeping up the horse. The territories 
of the British Government and of His Highness being situated close to the 
jaghire, in the event of any disturbance taking place, on the requisition of 
the maralutdars of either of the governments, aid must be furnished by a 
ready co-operation with all the disposable police of the jaghire. 

Article 5. 

"Whatever inam villages, wuttuns, etc., have hitherto "belonged to the Naik 
ahall be oontiniied to him in the territory of His Highness ; and all items of 



172 Batara JaKirdarg-PAa/teii—No. LXIII. Pan H 



revenue of His Higbness which lie within thedistriet of the Naik, shall be paid 
to His Highnesses goverQment. Within the jaghire territory all doomalla 
villages, warphasun, dharmadao, dewasthan, rozindar^ khyrati nemnook^ darak, 
and such Kke paymects^ mast be contiimed as they are at this time. All persons 
having possessions on govemm-fnt g^nts are not to be interfered wiih; Bach 
interraptions as might exist from temporary causes at the time you reoeived 
charge (from the British Qovemment) are to be examined, and the claims 
justly settled. You will be careful that no just cause of complaint is faroogkt 
forward against you on such points. 

In cases where any of the abovementioned possessors of inberitanoe or 
allowance shall behave improperly, it will be necessary to acquaint the Agent 
of the British Government with the particulars, who, in conjunction with 
His Highnesses government^ will intimate what course is to be pursued, either 
in respect to punishment or resumption. Should persons holding such inherit* 
ances or allowances raise or excite any disturbance, or commit any oflFenoes 
against the peace of the public, or should persons possessed of such rights die 
witliout heirs, you will fully investigate the matter and state what may appear 
really just, when His Highnesses government, with the advice of the Agent of 
the British Government, will send such orders as may seem fit, and which 
must be conformed to. 

Article 6. 

That the subjects of the jaghire territory may have protection, jostiee 
must be properly administered, and a good police upheld to detect thefl and 
to suppress gang robberies. If this is not attended to^ and the country he 
without justice, so that people are obliged to complain, the government of His 
Highness, with the advice and assistance of the Agent of the British Oovern- 
menty having understood the matt^^r, will decide on such subjects, and their 
decisions must be attended to. And further, in regard to such decisions not 
being attended to, so that the country may become in a state of misgovem- 
ment^ and robberies and other crimes of very frequent occurrence, then what- 
ever appears to be the proper measures shall be suggested by the Agent of the 
British Government^ and corresponding ari-angements will be made by His 
Highness's government. 

Articls 7. 

Without orders from government no extra troops are to be levied, and 
none assemble for the purpose of making war on any one. In matters 
of family disputes concerning relationship and such like, no appeal to arms 
ran be permitted, but the case is to be represented to the Agent of the 
British Government, who will communicate with the government of His 
Highness, and whatever decision is given must be reckoned binding. 

Article 8. 

"With the exception of those under the government of His Highness, no 
intercourse or correspondence by letter is to be entered into with such as Bajee 
Kuo Sahib, or other Princes, Chieftains, Commanders, and othersi nor is aaj 



Pftrt II Batara Jagirdars— PAat^aw— No. LXIII. 178 



aid or assistance by joining the troops of any one to be given. This Article 
forms the basis of the present a^^reeraent, and if what is above written be 
departed from, by the advice of the British Government^ the jaghire will not 
be continued. 

Abttolb 9. 

All persons having committed crimes within the ja^^hire territory, and 
who m^y take shelter in the country of the Hoozoor, shall be delivered over 
to you, after information has been given to the Agent of the British Govern- 
ment, and by him communicated to the British Government, or to the govern- 
ment of His Highness, as the case may be; and in like manner all criminals 
from the territories of the British Government, or of His Highness, shall be 
delivered np by Jan Rao Naik to their respective governments, and assistance 
must also be rendered to any public servants who may be sent for the 
apprehension of sneh persons. 

Abtiolb 10. 

Whilst yon shall continae to fulfil the terms of your service in good 
fiuth, integrity, and fidelity, the jaghire shall be held without any inter- 
ruption on the part of the Ci rear; on this point the British Government is 
yoor guarantee, which is agreed to by the Circar. 

Abtiolb 11. 

All titles and all customary forms of respect hitherto enjoyed by you 
shall be continued. All requests on your part which may be reasonable and 
proper shall be granted, but such as are otherwise shall not be agreed to. 

Abticlb 12. 

As the jaghire district adjoins the territory of Bis Highness, and conse« 
qnently it may be necessary to effect exchanges of it«ms of revenue or landj 
either for the purpose of distinctly defining the boundary, or on account of 
arrangements in the police, therefore, on a representation from the govern- 
ment of His Highness, the Agent of the British Government will arrange 
sudi exchanges as may be necessary, having previously ascertained that they 
will not be injurious to your interests, and such exchanges must be made 
accordingly. 

Abtiolb 13. 

Ton must appear in person evpry year at the festival of the Dussernh' 
and also attend, wnenever requested so to do, on all great occasions of cere* 
mony and congratulation ; and when His Highness with his establishment 
may proceed to any great distance, you must also be in personal attendance^ 



DaUd Julf 1880. 



Small Seal 

of His High- 

neM the £k* 

jah of Satara. 



174 Satara Jagirdara— 2%« WaHar—llto. UilV. Part II 



No. LXIV. 

Agreement concluded with Sheikh Miba Wab&ub, dated the 

3rd July 1820. 



Seal of Cap- 
tain J. Qraut. 



Teems fixed by Captain James Gbakt, on the pftrt of the Boif- 
OUBABLE Company, for Sheikh Miba Wabkub, by which 
the jaghires, etc. (with the exception of Febgunnah Dubya- 
pobx, Pbant Wubad, Mouza Bholbe, Febgunnah Shib« 
ALLEEi MouzA FuLSEE, Fbant Waee) are made over to him. 

These jaghires, etc., were formerly held by you as a personal and military 
jaghire; but having come into the possession of the British Government 
along witli the rest of the conntryi they are now restored^ in consideration of 
the antiquity and respectability of the family, to be beldi as formerly, in 
personal and military jaghires. But as these jaghires, etc., came within the 
limits of the territory of His Highness the j^jah of Satara, according to 
the Treaty with the British Government, therefore Sheikh Mira Waeknr is to 
be considered a jaghiredar of His Highnesses government, bnt under the 
guarantee of the British Government. The following Articles are agreed to 
on the part of the British Government and Slieikh Mira Waekur : — 

Artiolb 1. 

The pergunnah of Yerodole, Prant Khandesh, and the pergunnaha in 
*' Swudesh'' (Feishwa's territory), were granted after fixing the '^khundnee'^ 
(tribute). Formerly you had to furinsh 63 horse to the Peishwa's govern- 
ment ; but as pergunnah Duryapore, etc., were attached, and as the country 
wns not in a flourisluno: state, full service to that amount was not demanded. 
That Sheikh Mira Waekur may live in comfort and affluence, and also be 
enabled to keep up the contingent in the most complete state of equipment, 
government have fixed the present contingent at ten (10) horse, which must 
be kept up constantly in the service of His Highness the Bajah of Satara. 

Article 2. 

The horses and men forming the contingent are to be good, the horses of 
the value of from Rupees 300 to 400, to be always present in the service of 
His Highness, and to proceed, without delay or remonstrance, wherever their 
services may be required* They are to be mustered whenever so ordered^ and 




n Batara Jagirdars^I^ Watkar—JXo. LXIV. 175 



ould there be any deficiency in the number, such deficiency must be made 

ood at the annual rate of Rupees 800 ench horse, to be calculated from the 

riod of the former muster; but previons to enforcing the demand, a repre- 

ntaiion of the circumstances will be made by His Highnesses government 

o the Agent of the British Governmeut^ and his concurrence obtained. 

Article 3. 

In the event of the contingent being employed in wnr under a reqtii« 
sition from the British Government^ and should any men or horses in 
consequence be killed or wounded, it is to be clearly unaerstood that notliing 
in the way of equivalent shall be paid by the government of His Highness. 
Bisks and casualties of all kinds, as well as the furnishing of ammunition, 
are indnded in the allowauce. 

Abticlb 4. 

The "whole expense of managing the jaghire is to be defrayed without 
lefereace to what is incurred by keeping up the horse. As the territories 
of the British Government and of His Hi^^hness adjoin the jaghire, it is there* 
fore determined that in the event of any disturbance taking place in them, 
on the requisition of the mamlutdars of either government, aid shall be fur- 
nished by a ready co-operation with all the disposable police of the jaghire. 

Abticlb 6. 

Whatever inam villages, wuttuns, nnd other allowances have hitherto 
belonged to Sheikh Mira Waekur within the territories of the British Grov- 
emment or of His Highness shall be continued; and whatever items, of 
revenue belonging to His Highnesses government may be witbin the jaghire 
shall be continued to be paid. All doomalla villages and land, wurshasun, 
dhnrmadao, dewasthan, rozindar, khyrat, neronook, daruk, etc., within the 
jaghire must be continued as they are at present. All persons having posses- 
sions on government deeds are not to be interfered with; such interruptions 
18 might exist from temporary causes at the time charge was received (from 
the British Government) are to be examined, and the claims justly settled : 
care most be taken that no just cause of complaint may be brought forward 
on such points. In cases when any of the abovementioned possessors of 
inheritance or allowance shall behave improperly, it will be necessary to 
acquaint the Agent of the British Government with the particulars, who, in 
coDJunction with His Highnesses government, will intimate what course is to 
be pnrsued either in respect to punishment or resumption. Should persons 
holding such inheritances or allowances raise or excite' any disturbances, or 
commit any offences against the peace of the public, or should persons pos- 
sessed of snch rights die without heirs, you will fully investigate the matter 
and state what appears really just, when His Highnesses government, with 
the advice of the Agent of the British Government^ will send such orders aa 
say seem fit, and which must be conformed to* 



176 Satara Jagirdanh-n« WtUk&r^JXo. JJLIV. Part II 



Aetiolb 6. 

That the inhabitants of the jaghire territory may be protected^ jnatiea 
must be properly disfiensed, and a good police upheld to detect theft and 
suppress gang robberies. If this is not attended to, and the country be with« 
out justice^ so that people are obliged to complain^ the government of Hia 
Highness, with the advice and assistance of the Agent of the British Oovem- 
menty having understood the matter, will decide on such subjects, and their 
decisions must be attended to ; and further, in regard to such decisions not 
being attended to, so that the country may fall into a state of misgovemment, 
and robberies and other crimes become of very frequent occurrence, in sneh 
an event, whatever may appear to be the most proper measures shall be sng^ 
gested by the Agent of the British Oovemroent, and corresponding arrange- 
ments will be made by His Highnesses government. 

Article 7. 

Without orders from government no extra troops are to be levied, and 
none assembled for the purpose of making war on any one. In matters of 
family disputes concerning relationship and such like, no appeal to arms ean 
be permitted, but the case is to be represented to the Agent of the British 
Government, who will communicate with the government of His HighnesSj 
and whatever decision is given must be reckoned binding. 

Articlb 8. 

With the exception of those under the government of His Highness, no 
intercourse or communication by letter is to be entered into with such as 
Bajee Rao Sahib, or other Princes, Chieftains, Commanders, and others, nor 
is any aid or assistance by joining the troops of any one to be given. This 
Article forms the basis of the present agreement, and should what is written 
above be departed from, the jaghire will not be continoed, 

Articlb 9. 

All persons having committed crimes within the jaghire conntrjj wbo 
may take shelter in the territories of the British Government or of His 
Highness, shall be delivered over to Sheikh Mira Waekur, after information 
has been given to the Agent of the British Government, and by him com« 
municated to the British Government, or to the government of His High- 
ness, as the case may be ; and in like manner all criminals from the territories 
of the British Government or of His Highness shall be delivered up by 
Sheikh Mira Wavkur to their respective governments, and assistance must be 
rendered to people of either government who may be sent for the apprehen- 
sion of such offenders. 

Articlb 10. 

Whilst yon, Sheikh Mira Waekur, shall continue to fulfil the terms of 
your service in good faith, integrity, and fidelity, your jaghire shall be held 
without any interruption from His Highnesses government; 6n this point 
the British Oovemment is your guarantee. 



Part II Satara Jagirdars— 2%e Waikar-^ JXo, LXIV. ^77 



ASTICLE 11. 

All titles and forms of respect hitherto enjoyed by you shall be eon- 
tinaed. All requests on the part of the jaghiredar which may be reasonable 
and proper shall be granted, but such as are otherwise shall not be agreed to. 

Abticlb 12. 

As the jaghire districts adjoin the territory of His Highness, and it may 
t)e necessary to effect exchanges of items of revenue or land for the purpose 
either of defining the boundary or for police arrangements, therefore, on a 
representation from the government of His Highness, the Agent of the 
British Oovemraent will arrange such exchanges as may be necessary, pro. 
Tided they are not injurious to the interests of the jaghiredars, and such 
exchanges must be made accordingly* 

The above 12 Articles must be observed* 

Dated lie 3rd July 1820, corresponding with the 2Ut Ramgan, Ahdee* 
p>%^ Vthreen^wu-^Myattin^wu" Vlf. 

(Sd.) James Grant. 




Translation of a Tab executed by His Highness the Rajah 
of Sataba respecting Soojayut Shaab Sheikh Miba 
Waekur, to whom these orders are issued. 

The whole of the jaghire, etc., enjoyed by you have, with the rest of the 
country, reverted to the British Government ; but as that government has 
been pleased, in consideration of the antiquity of your family, to guarantee 
to you the villages held up to the war, excepting pergunnah Duryapore, Prant 
Wurad, mouza Bholee, pergunnah Shiralee, and mouza Pulsee, Prant Waee^ 
by a Yad of 12 paragraphs executed to you by Captain James Orant, the 
British Hesident, whereof having been constituted a jaghiredar of this State 
daring the pleasure of the British Government, you are to conduct yourself 
towards it like the other jaghiredars mentioned in the Treaty, and as a Yad 
has been executed to you by the British Government, His Highness approves 
of the same, and for the continuation of the villages to you determines as 
follows, viz. 2— 

Abticlb 1. 

The pergunnah of Yerndole, Prant Khandesh, and other possessions in 
the Deccan are hereby continued and confirmed to you. Formerly you had 
to maintain a contingent of 63 hoi*8e for the service of the Peishwa's govem- 
jifient j but as pergunnah Duryapore, etc., has now been resumed, and as you 
nave sustained loss in the remaining umuls. His Highness, to enable you to 



■■^^^r 



178 Satara J8giirdar8-rA« Wmikmr^tfo. laXtV. Ihurt IX 



support yourself and to keep the hone and men of jonr contiiigeDt in good 
order for service throaghout the year, reduces the contiBgeot to 10 horae^ 
which you are always to maintain for the service of the Satara State. 

Ariiclb 2. 

The contingent is to be efficient, the horses to be of the value from Rnpeea 
300 to 400, and the men in a complete state of equipment ; the contingeot 
to be always kept present for the service of His Highness; the^ sboald 
attend muster when ordered, and proceed to whatever place directed without 
delay or remonstrance. Should it appear, however, on muster that any num- 
ber of the contingent is deficient, His Highness will, with the concurrenoe of 
the British Government, oblige you to refund in the proportion of Bupeea 
SOO per annum a horse for the whole period of such deficiency^ aecording to 
the terms of the agreement entered into with you. 

Abticlb 8. 

In the event of your contingent being employed in war by His Highness 
with the concurrence of the British Resident, no remnneration on account of 
the wounded and slain will be granted ; but all such risks and casualties, as 
well as the supply of ammunition, are included in the grant. 

Article 4. 

You are to defray the expense of your civil establishment as well as of 
the contingent. Should any commotion or disturbance occnr in the districts 
either of His Highness the Rajah or of the British Government, you are, 
on the requisition of the mamlutdars of either government, to aid and co- 
operate with them with the police in your districts. 

Abticlb 5. 

The villages, umuls, and wuttnns, etc., in His Highness the Rajah's 
country held up to the war will be continued to you ; the government also 
retaining its umuls in your lands. All doomalla villages, doomalla inam 
lands, wurshasuns, dhnrmadaos, dewasthans, rozindars, khyrats, and nem- 
nuoks, etc., as well as the rights of darukdars, are to be continued to the 
several parties as heretofore without objection, together with the lands held 
by virtue of Sunnuds, although they may have been on certain grounds 
placed under attachment. Should any of the parties enumerated above act 
improperly, or die intestate, you are to report the same to this government, 
when His Highness, with the concurrence of the British Government, will 
award punishment to the offender, or direct the resumption of the land, as 
may appear expedient. If any jemadar creates a riot, or raises rebellion in 
your country, or refuses to acknowledge your supremacy, or if a wuttmidar 
dies intestate, you should attach the wuttun and report the matter to govern- 
ment, when His Highness, with the concurrence of the British Resident^ 
will issue such orders as may appear expedient, and to which you are to eon* 
form accordingly. 



I^art IX Satapa Jagirdturs— r^ Waikar^iSo. LXIV. X7Q 



Article 6. 

Yea should endeavour to make your subjects happy^ distribute justice 
impartially^ and adopt measiires {or the preveution of theft, murder, aud 
other crimes; if these are not done, and if justice is not administered pro- 
perly, and coipplaints are made to this government^ His Highness, in con* 
junction with the British BesideDt, will enquire into the complaints, and 
issue such orders as may appear necessary, to which you are to conform ; but 
if you do not do so, and the country continue in a state of misgovernment, 
and crimed are of frequent occurrence^ His Highness will^ with the concur* 
rence of the British Besident, adopt such preventive measures as may appear 
expedient to him. 

Article 7. 

You should not, without the knowledge of this government^ muster a force 
fmd engage in hostilities with any person : if any dispute arises among you 
respecting *^ bhow pnna '* rights, etc., you should quietly refer the matter 
to this government, when His Highness, with the concurrence of the British 
Besidenti will issue the necessary orders in the case^ and to which you are to 
conform. 

Artiolb 8. 

With the exeeption of the subjects of this government, you are to hold no 
intercourse nor to carry on correspondence with Bajee Rao Bus^hoonauth, or 
any other Prince or ChieftaiUj etc. ; if you do, your country will be resumed. 

Article 9* 

Should an offender from your country take shelter within the territories 
of His Highness you are to report the same to this government, when mea- 
sures will be taken to apprehend the offender and make him over to you. In 
like manner, offenders from the territories of His Highness or of the British 
Government taking shelter within your jaghire should be immediately appre- 
hended and delivered up by you to whichever government they may belong. 
Further^ you are to aid and assist the oflScers of either government who may 
enter your jurisdiction in pursuit of offenders. 

Article 10. 

So long as you continue in good faith and render faithful service, your 
jaghire villages, etc., will be continued to you uninterruptedly by this govern- 
ment, for which yon have the guarantee of the British Government^ and 
which is agreed to by His Highness. 

Article 11. 

All titles and customary forms of respect hitherto enjoyed by you shall 
be continued. You are to represent all your affairs to this government; such 
requests as are reasonable will be grantedj and such as are not will be refused. 



180 Satara Jagirdara— rA^ Waikar^lfo. LXIV. Part II 



Article 12. 

As the territory of His Highness and of the British Oovemment adjoins 
your jaghire, it might be necessary at a future period to effect certain terri- 
torial exchanges^ with the advice of the British Besident^ for the good of the 
country and for the purpose of defining distinctly the boundaries of the two 
governments ; care being taken to secure you 6oin loss ; you are required to 
agree to this arrangement, 

Abticlb 13. 

You are to attend on His Highness annually at the celebration of thb 
Dusserah festival^ as also at other times when your presence may be required. 
You are also to accompany His Highness whenever he may proceed on a long 
journey. 

The circumstances contained in the foregoing IS paragraphs are oonfirmed. 

Dated Saiara, 2Ut Ramzan Sunnui Adkee^wu^Uthreen'WU'^M^ateit^wu^D^^ 
corresffoding with the 3rd July A^D. 1820. 



(Sd.) 




3trt n Kolhapur Agenoy^Kolkapfir. 18i 



VIL— KOLHAPUE AND SOUTHERN MAHEATTA COUNTET 

AGENGT. 

1. KOLHAPUR. 

From tie Records of the Bombay Oovernment, No. Fill of new Meriet, ^e. 

Koliapur.'^The Rajas of Kolhapur are the representatives of the yoanger 
branch of the family of Shivaji^ as the Rajas of Satara were of the elder. 
After the death of Rajaram^ Shivaji's younger son, who was the head of the 
Mahratta power during the captivity of his nephew Shahuji, his widow^ Tara 
Bai, placed her son Skivaji in power. He died in 1712, and was succeeded bv 
Sambhaji, son of Rajaram's younger widow. The Kolhapur family, supported 
by Ham Chandar Pant Amatya, Sarjerao Ohatge of Kagal, and other powerful 
Chiefis^ long struggled to retain the supremacy among the Mahtattas, but 
irere compelled to yield precedence to Shahuji, who by treaty''^ in 1731 
recognised Kolhapur as a distinct and independent principality. 



* Partition Treaty of Satara, dated 26th April 173U 

Abtiolb 1. 

The following Treaty, dmwn np between Hie Majesty Aba Sahib (Shaba Baja) and Sambbaji 
ja, has been agreed to on the part of the latter, as hereafter specified. 

Abticli 2. 

I agree to receive, as my share of the dominion, that part of the conntry lying to the sontb* 
and eastward of the Krishna river below its junction with the Wama, inclading all the forts 
posts within the said boundary, and all claims whatsoever. 

Abticls 8. 

The whole of the country lying south of the junction of the two rivers aforesaid as far as the 

;9 nnetion of the Tungabhadra and Krishna, including all the forts and posts within the said 

^juuudary. 

Abtiolb 4. 

The whole of the tract lying south of the fort of Viziadrug. 

Abtiolb 6. 

I agree to cede the fort of Ratnagiri, and to receive the fort of Kopal in lien thereof, and I 
'Win destroy the post at Wargam accordinij^ to sgreement. 

Abtiolb 6. 
I agree to relinquish the posts in the districts of Miroh and Bijspur, now in my'possession. 

Abticlb 7. 
I agree to rcoeive the half of any conquests to be made between the river Tungabhadra and 
Bameahwar. 



182 Kolhapur Aeenoy—Kolhapur, Ptrt II 



On the death of Sambhaji in 1760, the direct descendants of Shiva ji be- 
came extinct. A member of the Bhonsla family was adopted as bis succes- 
sor under the name of Shivaji, and the widow of Sambhaji conducted the 
administration during^ the minority. Under her administration the greatest 
irregularities prevailed both by sea and land. 

The prevalence of piracy compelled the British Government to send an 
expedition against Kolhapur in 1765, wiiich resulted in the eonclosion of a 
commercial Treaty (No. LXV). The conditions of this treatyi however, 
were never observed. The payments which Kolhapur had agreed to for 
the expenses of the expedition were not made, piracy was not suppressed, and 
in 1792 another expedition was prepared. The Baja thereupon signed another 
Treaty (No. LXVI), engaging to give compensation for the losses which 
the merchants had sustained from the year 1785^ and to permit the establish- 
ment of f^tories at Malwan and Kolhapur. 

The Rani died in 1772. After her deaths the young Raja was long en- 
gaged in war with other Mahratta powers^ more particularly the Patwar- 
dhan family, the Sawant of Wari, and the Nipanikar, and his government 
was weakened by internal factions. On several occasions, during these 
struggles, the British Qovernment declined to interfere between the parties. 
But in 1811, during a war between the Nipanikar and Kolhapur, when the 
British Resident at Poena was engaged in the settlement of the Southern Mah- 
ratta country, a peace was negotiated between the contending parlies, and the 
Raja of Kolhapur concluded a Treaty (No. LXVII) with the British Oovem- 
mentj by which| in return for the cessiou of certain forts, he was guaranteed 
against the aggression of all foreign powers. He also engaged to abstain from 
hostilities with other States, and to refer all his disputes with other States to 
the arbitration of the British Government. 

Shivaji died in 181ii, having ruled fifty- three years. He left twe eons^ 
Shambhu or Aba Sahib and Shahaji or Bawa Sahib, and was succeeded by the 



Article 8. 
I agree to att»ck any Sitate which shall engage in war against Satara, and, in like mapner, 
the Big a of Satara agrees to make war with any State attacking this house. 

Abticlb 9. 

I agree to entertain no person discarded from the service of the Raja of Satara, nor la he to 
entertain any person discarded by me. 

The above nine Articles, being stipulated and mutually agreed on between both pjEurties, sbaU 
in no wise be departed from in the least on my part. 



II Eolhapur Agency— fb^^jMrr. 18S 



ormer. In the war with the Peshwa in ]817 Aba Sahib cordially sided with 

^he British Government^ and in reward for his services the districts of Chikori 

Mni Manoli, which in former years had been wrested from Kolhapnr by the 

TlipaDikar, were restored. In 1821 Aba Sahib was murdered. His infant son 

'^ied the following year, and the succession devolved on Bawa Sahibj who 

proved an oppressive and profligate ruler. Three times between 1822 and 

1829 the British Government was obliged to move a force against him in con* 

sequence of his aggressions on other Chiefs, in which he did not respect even 

British territory, and of the spoliation of his jagirdars which drove them to 

rebellion. 

In 1826 he signed a Treaty (No. LXVIII),by which he agreed to reduce 
his army to its peace establishment, and to attend to the advice of the British 
Government in all matters affecting the public peace ; to respect the rights of 
certain jagirdars, and never to grant an asylum to rebels. On the last occa* 
sion on vehich a force was moved against him, in 1827, in consequence of his 
infraction of the 2nd article of the treaty of 1826, he signed a preliminary 
Treaty (No. LXIX), which was subsequently modified (No. LXX). By this 
his army was limited to 400 horse and 800 infantry ; he was stripped of the 
districts of Cliikori and Manoli and of Akiwat ; he was compelled to admit 
British troops into his forts, to pay Rupees 1,47,94!8 compensation to certain 
jagirdars, to cede lands as security for the payment, and to accept a minister 
appointed by the British Government. 

Bawa Sahib died on the 29th November 1838, and was succeeded by his 
son Shivaji, then a minor. A Council of Regency was formed, consisting of 
Shivaji's mother, his aunt and four officials. Soon after the members of the 
Regency quarrelled, and the young Chief's aunt, Diwan Sahiba, assumed the 
entire control of the State. The misrule was so great that the British Gov- 
ernment, under the provisions of the treaty, interfered and appointed a mi* 
nister of its own, Daji Krishna Pandit. The efforts he made to reform 
the administration resulted in a general rebellion, which extended to the 
neighbouring State of Sawantwari. After the suppression of the rebellion 
the direct administration of the State was assumed by the British Govern- 
ment during the minority of the Raja, and nntil he should be fit to be entrust- 
ed with powers of government, and the country could be given over to him in 
a settled and improved condition. The forts of every description were dis- 
mantled, and the system of hereditary garrisons was abolished, llie military 
force of the State was disbanded and a local corps entertained in its stead, and 



184 Kolhapur ABonoj—Kolka/mr, Part XI 



the Kolhapur State was required to pay the expense of suppressing the iebel« 
lion. In 1862 the management was restored to the Baja> with whom a new 
Treaty (No. LXXI) was concluded. By this treaty the Raja is bound, in all 
matters of importance^ to be guided by the advice of the British Oovernment, 

During the mutinies of 1857 the Raja remained faithful in his allegi- 
nnce to the British Goyernment^ but his younger brother^ Chima Sahib, joined 
the rebels. He was subsequently imprisoned^ and died in confinement. 

Raja Shivajij who had received the right of adoption (No. XXXVII), died 
in 1866^ when the succession of his nephew and adopted son Rajaram, then 
sixteen years of age, was recognised by the British Government. Daring the 
minority of the young Chief the administration of the State again devolved 
upon the British Government, and a British officer was appointed to superin* 
tend his education until he should attain the age of nineteen. 

In 1870 Raja Rajaram proceeded on a tour through Europe, but died at 
Florence in November of that year without leaving any issue. There was no 
near blood relation of the late Chief eligible for adoption, bnt Government 
declared its willingness to recognise as his successor any person who might be 
selected as most fitting and acceptable to the family and the principal persona 
of the State, even though he might not fulfil all the conditions required by 
Hindu law and the custom of the Kolhapur family. Their unanimous choice 
fell upon Narayan Rao Bhonsle, son of Dinkar Rao, the head of the Khanvat 
Bhonsles and next of kiu to the Kolhapur family, and it was confirmed by 
the British Government. He was accordingly installed as Raja of Eolha« 
pur in October 1871, and took the name of Shivaji. 

The education of Raja Shivaji was at first superintended by a British 
officer, and he was afterwards sent to the Bajkumar College in Eathiawar. 
In 1879 the Raja showed signs of insanity, which unfortunately developed ; 
and in 1882 a committee of medical officers pronounced him incurable. A 
Council consisting of the Chief of Kagal as Regent and three members 
was thereupon appointed to conduct the administration. Raja Shivaji 
died in December 1883, and was succeeded by Yeshwantrao Baba Sahib 
Gbatge, the eldest son of the Regent, whose adoption by Anandibai Sahiba 
Rani, Shivaji's widow, was sanctioned by Government. The young Raja, who 
is nearly eighteen years of age, assumed the title of Shahu II (Shahaji) Chha- 
trapati, and the administration continued to be conducted by the Regency 
Council. On the death of the Kagal Chief, which took place in Afarch 1886^ 



Part II Eolliapur Agenoy—Koikapur, 186 



the Political Agent^ under the orders of Government^ took his place as Presi- 
dent of the Council for a few months, till in November of that year Govern- 
ment appointed the Diwan to be President. The Diwan still continues to hold 
that o£Bce with the two other members of council »s his colleagues. 

In October 1880 the Kolhapur State entered into an Agreement 
(No* LXXII) prohibiting the cultivation of the poppj and the manufacture of 
opium in Kolhapur territory and the import of opium into the State. 

The oppressive export and import duties known as sthalbbarit and stbal- 
mod were abolished in 1886; and in 1887 the State agreed (No. LXXIII) to 
a larger measure of free trade. By this agreement the whole of the Southern 
Mahratta Country jagirs^ as well as the State of Kolhapur, were ultimately 
placed on the same footing as British districts, and a large accession of traflSc 
to the Southern Mahratta Country Railway and its feeders was secured. 

The area of Kolhapur is 2,855 square miles, and the population (accord- 
ing to the census of 1891) 913,131. The gross revenue of Kolhapur and 
its dependencies is Rupees 83,06,090, of which about 8 lakhs belong to the 
dependent jagirdars. 

The Raja of Kolhapur receives a salute of nineteen guns. 

The military force of the State, including its feudatories, consists (1891) 
of 67 guns, 51 artillerymen, 255 cavalry, 530 infantry, and 1,372 police. 

In early times the internal government of the State was modelled on 
that of Shivaji ; and most of the larger jagirs in Kolhapur are still held by 
the successors of the old ministers of the State, to whom they were originally 
granted. These jagirdars pay nazarana to the parent State on the occasion 
of a succession and a fixed money contribution in lieu of service. The follow- 
ing list shows the eleven principal feudatories of the Baja of Kolhapur. 



2b 



Solhapar Agenoy— Anrfttm JIaAnttts Ja^itdttr*. 











*r«i. 


srt 


OK* 




KUDMOIPUIM. 




U*. 


Cute. 


Sr 


be C*D(U 


Tribal*. 


Vi.h.lgrf . . . 


Abflinw Kriihd.. P.ol 


H 


Dcibiith. Bnh. 






Hi. 


Sm. 










in 


KM 


IMM 


«,W» 


Bird! 


Uulh.Tm UnrHbou 


















3» 


DllW , . 


l«T 


wn 


KM 


MM 


Kijni . . . 


Plnjlrw Bopn S.hil) 
















ah.tEe. Rirjcno V.i*- 


18 


ll.hl.ttB 


iia-7 


ea.m 


ifil.au 


I/X» 


Iqh.lK.BnJi . . 


"vr~'"'-'r-: 


11 


K.>nk>i><th. Bnh 


















M7S 


a«.Mt 


tfl».IM 


lAW 


X.ihU . 


Jn.ulnghru Gborpida, 


Ifl 


UibntU . 




1S,S»9 


4l.V}« 


1,«0 


Tofg.1 . . . 


















Kbu Khel . . . 




Iilllo . . 




IM« 


u.eM 


WM 


DXwmd . . . 


N.r«jiiirM GnDrp.d», 




















Ditto . . 




»fiao 


isjsao 






Ud^ruCh."™ Hl'mm.i 


















17 


Ditic . . 


W 


!•,*» 


7i.»a 


4,aw 


Ka((.l, Junior Br.och 


Dimiiru OhilgcSujal 




















DIIW . . 




H^a 


s*.ns 






















a.[ Luhku 


M 




» 


«.w» 


6&oia 








Gl 


DIU. . . 


* 


»,»M 


18.IM« 


»» 



2. SOUTHEEN MAHBATTA JAGIRDARS. 

Under the Kolbapar and Soathem Mahntte Coontiy Agency are the 
Soathern Mahratta Jagirdars, irho aonsist of three large families— the Patwai^ 
dhan, the Bhawa, and the Ghorpade. All theee Chiefs enjoy second class 
jariadiction, having power to try for capital offenoes their own aobjeots only. 

Tbey have all entered into an Agreement (No, LXXIV] by which they 
are bound to prohibit the cultivation of the poppy in their States and to pre- 
vent the illicit importation of oi>iom into their territories. 

With the exception of the Chiefs of Jamkhandi and Ming (Senior), they 
all, in consideration of annual cash payments, leased (No.LXXV) their abkari 
revenue to the British Government for a term of five years from 1881 to 
1886. A three years' lease, also terminating in 1888, on similar terms, was 
taken from Jamkhandi. In 1886 all these Engagements were renewed (No. 
LXXVI) for a further t«rm of eight years, and a similar Engagement (No. 
LXXVII) has been entered into with Miroj (Senior). 

In 1887 the (ihiefs of Mudhol, Mirsj (Senior and Junior), Sangli, Ram- 
durg, Jamkhandi, and Kuruodwar (Senior and Junior) agreed (Nob. LXXVIll 
and LXXIX) by abolishing sundry taxes to promote tbe growth of free 
iiade. 




Part II Kolhapar AgenOJ—Soulhem Mahralta Jagirdars. 187 



The founder of the Patwnrdhan family was Hari Bhat^ a Konkani Brah- 
maii^ who became the family priest of the Ghorpades of Ichal KaraDJi^ and 
whose three sons^ Ooviiid Hari> Kamchandar Hari^ and Trimbak Hari^ rose to 
military command under the first Peshwa and received grants of land on condi. 
tton of military service. The first grant of land^ which was of the value of 
Rupees 25,20,668^ was in the name of Oovind Hari^ but the Peshwa subse- 
quently divided it in unequal portions between Oovind Hari and his two 
nephews, Parashram Bhao^ the most celebrated of all the Mahratta generals 
son of Ramchandar Hari> and Nilkanth Rao^ son of Trimbak Hari. To 
Oovind Hari was assigned Miraj, to Parashram Bhao Tasgaon, and to Nil- 
kanth Bao Kurundwar. 

In 1782 Miraj descended to Chintaman Rao, grandson of Oovind Hari 
a child six years of age; during his minority the estate was managed by 
hia uncle Oangadhar Rao. When Chintaman Rao came of age he quarrelled 
with his uncle, who attempted to keep him out of his rights. Eventually the 
estate was divided between them, the uncle retaining Miraj, and Chintaman 
Sao taking Sangli. The revenues of SangU were Rupees 6,35,178, and of 
Miraj Rupees 4,79,798, and these estates were respectively liable to find for 
service 1,920 and 1,219 horse. 

On the death of Parashram Bhao of Tasgaon the estate descended to his 
son Bamohandar; but in the year 1811 a share was g^ven by the Peshwa to 
Oanpat Rao, a younger son. Two estates were thus formed, Jamkhandi, held 
by Ramchandar, yielding a revenue of Rupees 4,54,160 and subject to a 
service of 1,278 horse; and Tasgaon, with a revenue of Rupees 2,08,776, held 
by Oanpat Rao, subject to a service of 640 horse. 

In 1812 the estate of Kurundwar was also divided, a half share, called 
Shedbal, being given by the Peshwa to Oanpat Rao, the nephew of Nilkanth 
Rao. The Kurundwar share yielded a revenue of Rupees 1,27,989, and was 
subject to a service of 280 horse. The revenues of Shedbal were Rupees 
1,00,691, and the contingent due was 280 horse. 

The power of the Patwardhans had for some time excited the jealousy 
of the Peshwa, who attempted to strip them of their rights. Rebellion was 
several times threatened, and at last in 1812 the Patwardhans asked for the 
interference of the British Oovernment. Through the mediation of Mr. 
Blphinstone an Engagement (No. LXXX) was drawn up, by which the 
^1 together with the other jagirdars of the Southern Mahratta Country 



188 Kolhapur Agency— 5oirf*«r» Mahraiia Ja^Mhrt. Part H 



were secured in their possefleions on condition of rendering stipulated senrioe^ 
and the Peshwa engaged to abstain from interference with their administra- 
tion. 

At the time of the Peshwa's overthrow, therefore, there were six separate 
estates held by members of the Patwardhan family. With the Chiefs of 
^hese estates three Engagements (Nos. LXXXI^ LXXXII, and LXXXIEL) 
were concluded in 1819, by whicb the number of horsemen they were required 
to furnish was reduced to one-fourth, and in lieu of the others cash was to be 
paid at the rate of Rupees 800 for each horse, or land was to be assigned. 
The engagements also bound them to dependence on the British Government, 
to whom all quarrels were to be referred. With the exception of the Chief 
of Sangli, who gave up lands yielding Rupees 1,35,000, all the others elected 
to furnish the contingents required. 

In 1820 the estate of Miraj was, with the sanction of the British Gh>T* 
^rnment, divided into four shares, and the service of horse was proportionately 
assigned. Two of these shares lapsed in 1842 and 1845 from failure of male 
issue, and two now remain-*one held by Oangadhar Rao of Miny, and the 
other by Lakshman Rao Anna Sahib. 

The Jamkhandi estate also was divided in 1821 by the formation of the 
Separate estate of Chinchui, which was assigned to Oovind Rao Nana Sahibj 
nephew of Ramchandar Rao. Chinchni lapsed in 1886. Tasgaon also lapsed 
in 1848. 

In the remaining estates the maintenance of a contingent force was 
commuted (No. LXXXIV) in 1849 to a money payment. 

The estate of Shedbal, after having once been continued by adoption in 
1820, lapsed in 1857. 

In 1854 a division of the Kurundwar State between Baghunath Rao 
and his nephew Oanpat Rao, and two younger brothers, Vinayak Rao and 
Trimbak Rao, was sanctioned. Trimbak Rao having died in 1869 without 
male issue, his share of the saranjam was bestowed on the two younger 
Chiefs, and his portion of inam holdings reverted to the elder Chief. The 
arrangement seems to have originally contemplated the continuance of the 
saranjam, with independent jurisdiction, to the senior Chief alone^ and 
the vesting in him of sole management of the inams. The younger Chiefs 
were to be treated as holding ordinary landed estates; and until the 
estates of the junior Chiefs were brought under the Regulations one of 



Part II Kolhapur Agency— -S. 3f. JagirdarM—Sangli, Miraj Senior. 189 



them was to be invested with the powers contemplated by Ueg^ulation XIII 
of 1880 and Regulation XIII of 1842. It was decided, however, that the 
younger Chiefs should not be brought under the Regulations, and that one of 
them should exercise jurisdiction for the rest. 

The Jagirdars of the Patwardhan family, with the exception of the Chief 
of Jamkhandi, whose conduct was suspicious, behaved well in the mutinies 
of 1857; and all of them except the Chief of Kurundwar (Junior) have 
received Sanads (LXXXV) authorising them to adopt a successor in default 
of natural heirs. 

The following estates are now held by the Patwardhan family :— - 



(1) SANGLI. 

Chintaman Rao (see p. 187) died in 1851, and was succeeded by Dhund 
Rao Chintaman, the present Chief, who is 52 years old. He is a first-class 
Sardar under the British Government. The affairs of the State were jointly 
administered by the Chief and a British officer appointed by Government, in 
consequence of the Chief^s mismanagement, from 1873 to 1887. In 1888 the 
Chief was restored to full powers on condition (1) that he agreed to follow in 
all important matters the advice of the Political Agent for the Southern 
Mahratta Country, (2) that he maintained the efficiency of the administration 
at its present high standard to the satisfaction of the Governor in Council, (3) 
that he exercised his power of appointing or dismissing the State Karbhari 
only with the sanction of Government, and (4) that he gave a written agree- 
ment to the Political Agent to abide by these conditions. 

The area of Sangli is 1,083 square miles, with a population (1891) of 
288,945 souls, and its revenue amounts to Rupees 10,52,099. The military 
force consists (1891) of 2 field and 2 other guns, 64 mounted and 489 foot 
police. 

(2) MIRAJ, SsKioR Branch. 

Narayan Rao, son of Gangadhar Rao, was the founder of this branch of 
the family. His son Oanpat Rao was the first Chief who became a feudatory 
of the British Government after the downfall of the Peshwa. Ganpat Rao 
died in 1833 and was succeeded by his son Gangadhar Rao. The present 
Chief, Gangadhar Rao, alian Bala Sahib, who is 25 years of age, succeeded his 



100 Kolhapiir Agenoy—iSf. Jr. Jasttrdara—Miraf JwUor^ J mmAk t md i. Part II 

father Oanpat Rao Tatia Sahib in 1874. The Chief is a firBt^lass Sardar 
under the British GoYernment. 

The Chief pays an annaal contribution of Rupees 12^557 to the British 
Government on account of service. 

In 1888 land belonging to this State was taken up for irrigation works. 
Rupees 1,194 are paid annually to the Chief on this account. 

The area of the possessions of this branch of the family is 389 square 
miles, with a population (1891) of 88,343; the revenue amounts to Rupees 
3,11,919. The military force consists (1891) of 1 serviceable and 6 unser- 
viceable guns, 46 mounted and 494 foot police. 



(3) MI RAJ, Junior Branch. 

Madhav Rao, a younger son of Gangadhar RaO| was the founder of this 
branch of the family. He died in 1845 and was succeeded by his son Laksh- 
man Bao, who died in 1876, in his sixty-eighth year, and was succeeded by his 
only son Harihar Rao. He died in the following year, and was succeeded by 
the present Chief, Lakehman Rao Anna Sahib, who is now IS years old. He is 
a first-class Sardar under the Kritish Government, and pays an annual oootribu- 
tion to the British Government of Rupees 6,412.8 on account of service. The 
State is managed by Joint Karbharis, one appointed by Government and the 
other by the young Chief's mother. 

The area of the possessions of this Chief is 225 square miles, with a 
population (1891) of 35,487 : the revenue amounts to Rupees 2,12,131. The 
military force consists (1891) of 2 field and 3 other guns, 25 horsemen and 
207 infantry. 

(4) JAMKHANDI. 

Gopal Rao Ramchandar, the head of the Jamkhandi family, died in 1840, 
and was succeeded by the present Chief, Ramchandar Rao Gopal, who is 57 
years of age. He is a first-class Sardar under the British Government. The 
possessions of this family contain an area of 555 square miles, with a population 
(1891) of 102,162. The revenue amounts to Rupees 4,62,142. The Chief 
pays an annual contribution of Rupees 20,840-10 to the British Government 



Fart XI Eolhapor Agency— A M. Jagirdart^Kwrandwar^ Eamdurg. lOl 



OD account of service. The military force consists (1891) of 1 gun, 54 horse- 
men and 943 infantry. 

(6) KURUNDWAR (KURUNDVAD), Senior Branch. 

Krishna Rao Baba Sahib^ the head of his family, died in 1827, and wa3 
Buceeeded by Raghunath Rao Keshav, who died in 1876 in his sixty-fifth 
year, and was succeeded by his son Chintaman Rao, the present Chief, now 
40 years of age. He is a first-class Sardar under the British Government. 

The possessions of this Chief contain an area of 174 square miles, with 
a population (1891) of 43,809. The revenue amounts to Rupees 1,3],450. 
The Chief pays an annual contributioa of Rupees 9,618-1:2, which includes the 
amounts payable by the Junior Chief to the British Government on account 
of service. The military force consists (1891) of % guns^ 10 horsemen, and 
164 infantry. 

(6) KURUNDWAR (KURUNDVAD), Junior Branch. 

There are two Chiefs of this Branch, Ganpat Rao Harihar, who is 52 years 
of age, and Harihar Rao Vinayak, who is 89 years of age. They are first- 
class Sardars of the British Government. The arrangements made with 
them after the partition of the jagir have been described above. There are 
n6 separate engagements with these Chiefs except the opium and abkari 
agreements, but all those entered into by the senior branch are considered 
binding upon them. 

Tlieir estate contains an area of 134 square miles, with a population (1891) 
of 32^528. The revenue amounts to Rupees 1,30,821. The military force 
consists (1891) of 1 gun, 12 cavalry, and 306 infantry. 

(7) RAMDURG. 

The Bhawa family now hold the Chiefship of Ramdurg. Nargund and 
Ramdurg were two of the strongest forts in the Southern Mahratta Country. 
Appaji Sum was governor of both forts, and procured the appointment of his 
friend Ram Rao Daji to Nargund. There after some changes of fortune and 
the kpee of about 20 years, Ram Rao^s son Jogi Rao and his grandnephew 
Bhaskar Rao were confirmed by the Feshwa Madho Rao Balal in 1753. 
The estates at that time were managed by Bhaskar Rao, who supported Jogi 
Bao. They yielded a revenue of Rupees 2,47,251| and were subject to a 



192 KoVbApxa Agenoy-'Soniksrn Makraita Jagirdarg'-JUniidmty. Part II 



service of 350 horsemen. Bhaskar Rao was succeeded by his son Venkat Rao, 
who continued to manage the estate, supporting Jogi Rao, and afterwards 
his grandson Ram Rao. These arrangements continued till 17.78, when the 
country was brought under subjection by Haidar Ali, but in 1784 Tipa 
Sultan made further demands. These were resisted, in consequence of which 
the fort was blockaded. After a seige of seven months Venkat Bao aor. 
rendered, and, in violation of the terms of capitulation, was carried off a 
prisoner with his whole family by Tipu. On the fall of Seringapatam in 1702 
Venkat Rao was released, and the Peshwa restored to him Nargund and lands 
yielding Rupees 1,27,1 H, and granted to Ram Bao the fort of Ramdarg, 
with lands worth Rupees 26,000 a year. 

The two branches of the family continued to enjoy their respective shares 
till 1810, when the Peshwa made a new division of the lands in equal shares 
to Venkat Rao and Narayan Rao, the sons of Ram Bao. On the fall of the 
Peshwa* the estates were continued to these two Chiefs by an Engagement 
(No. LXXXVI) dated 9th June 1821. 

Venkat Kao was succeeded in Nargund by his son Dadaji Bao, and he by 
his son Bhaskar Bao, elder brother of the Chief of Ramdurg. In 1867 
Bhaskai* Rao murdered Mr. Manson, the Political Agent ; for this he waa 
hanged^ and his estate was confiscated. 

Narayan Rao died in 1827 without male issue and without having ob- 
tained permission to adopt a son. The estate was, therefore, placed under 
attachment. But his widow was afterwards allowed to adopt Harihar Bao, 
the younger son of the Chief of Nargund, who took the name of Ram Rao ; 
retaining the management of the estate for her life. Ram Rao continued faith* 
ful during the mutinies, and received a Sanad (No. LXXXV) guaranteeing 
to him the privilege of adoption. He died in 1873 and was succeeded by his 
son Yogi Rao. He died in 1878 and was succeeded by the present Chiefj 
Venkat Rao, who is now IS years of age, and a first-class Sardar under the 
British Government. The management of the State is conducted by Joint 
Karbharisy one appointed by Government and the other by the adoptive 
grandmother and guardian of the young Raja. 

The area of the State is 169 square miles, with a population (1891) of 
86,181. The revenue amounts to Rupees 1,51,813. The Chief's estate is 
considered a personal holding, and is exempted from rendering service to the 
British Government. The military force consists (1891) of 1 gun, IS cavalry^ 
and 455 infantry. 



Part II Eolhapar A genoy— Southern Mdhratta Jagirdara^ HudhoL 10 3 



(8) MUDHOL. 

The Chief of Mudhol belongs to the Bhonsla Ghorpade family. The ori- 
ginal name was Bhonsla^ and the Mudholkar is said to be descended from a 
common ancestor with Shivaji. There are two branches of the Ghorpade 
family^ the ^'Sathkas'' and the '^Naukas/^ to the former of which the 
Mudhol Chief belongs, while the other division is represented by the Senapati 
of Kapshi in the Kolhapar State. 

The Ghorpade family rose to eminence under the Muhammadan rulers of 
Bijapur, from whom they received their estates. They were the most deter- 
mined opponents of Shivaji during his early conquests, but on the overthrow 
of the Muhammadan power they joined the Mahrattas and accepted military 
command from the Peshwa. 

In 1815 the thenfChief of Mudhol, Narayan Rao, died, and was succeed- 
ed by his son Yenkat Uao, who was selected by the Peshwa in preference to 
Qovind Bao, the elder son, by a junior wife. On the fall of the Peshwa the 
estate was continued to Venkat Rao under an Engagement (No. LXXXVII) 
similar to that made with the Patwardhans, and in 1850 a money payment of 
Rupees 2,671-11 a year was substituted (No. LXXXIV) for the service with 
horsemen. Venkat Rao died in 1853, and was succeeded by his son fialwant 
Bao. He has been granted (No. LXXXV) the privilege of adoption. 

Balwant Rao died in 1862, and was succeeded by the present Chief,. 
Yenkat Rao Raje, who is 30 years of age. The Chief is a first-class Sardar 
under the British Government. 

The area of Mudhol is 361 square miles,' with a population (1891) of 
61,815. Its revenue aniounts to Rupees 2,63,009. The military force cousibbs 
(lb91) of 1 gun, »0 cavalry, and 378 infantry. 



2c 



184 Kolhapur Agency— A^M<i/w«— No. IXV. Fsrt II 



No. LXV. 



Articles of Agbebhent made with the Maharajah Jbbjabot 

at Fort Augustus, the 12th January 1766. 

Articlb 1. 

There shall be a perpetual peaoe and firm friendship re-establiBhed between 
the Houourabls Company and Maharajah Jeejaboy, the Ranee, their soocesson 
and heirs ; and for the stricter observance of the following Treaty of peace, 
Maharajah Jeejaboy, the Kanee, agrees to send one hostage of note^ with his 
family, to reside at Bombay, and to be maintained at her charge. 

Abticlb 2. 

Maharajah Jeefaboy, the Ranee, ap^rees to pa}^ the Honourable Company 
Rupees seven lakhs fifty thousand (7,50,000) as restitution for the expenses 
they have been at during the troubles subsisting between the respective 
parties^ and maintaining the different garrisons at Fort Augustus and its 
dependencies ; three lakhs sixty thousand to be paid within two months from 
the 12th of January 1766, the remaining three lakhs ninety thousand 
(5,90,000) to be paid within four years from the date hereof ; that is, one 
lakh (1,00,000) for the three first years and ninety thousand (90,000) the last 
year : for the performance of which Maharajah Jeejaboy, the Ranee, agrees 
to give two substantial securities, such as may be approved of by the. Honour- 
able the Pi esident and Council of Bombay; and she also agrees to allow 
six (6) per cent, exchange on the three lakhs sixty thousand (8,60,000) that 
is to be paid beft>re the delivery of the Fort, which is to be in the following 
sort of Rupees : Hookary, Peerchaney, Arootey, Hazancy, and Ourang Shah ; 
and the remainder to be made good equal to Bombay Rupees. 

Articlb S. 

The Honourable Company, in consideration of Maharajah Jeejaboy, the 
Ranee, fulfilling the foregoing Article, do agree, on the payment of the first 
sum, that is. Rupees three lakhs sixty thousand (3,60,000), to deliver up to 
her, Maharajah Jeejaboy, the Ranee, the Fort of Augustus, formerly called 
Sundudroog, with the Forts of Rajhcote, Serjacote, and Pudrumdroog, and 
do further renounce all claim or pretension to the lands and tenements belong- 
ing thereto. 

Articlb 4. 

The Honourable Company will carry away all guns, carriages, mortars, 
shot, shells, powder, stores, etc., of what kind soever that they may have 
brought here ; and they do give up to Maharajah Jeejaboy, the Ranee, such 
guns and carriages as are here that were belonging to Fort Augustus; also 
those at Rajhcote, Serjacote, and Pudrumdroog. 



Part II Kolbapur Agenc j—Kolhapur -No. LXV. 106 



Article 5. 

Maharajah Jeejaboy, the Banee^ will permit the Honourable Company 
to baild a factory witli warehouse at Rajhcote, or at such place as may be 
most convenient for them (at which place they will hoist their flag), or any 
part of her territories adjacent to tlie sea shore, for vending their commodities, 
and to keep there such servants and people, as also vessels or boats, as they 
shall think necessary for conducting the pame ; and should any of the mer- 
chants, or others^ her subjects, become debtors to the English, they shall have 
free liberty to imprison their persons, and seize their effects and vend them 
till satisfaction is made and obtained. 

Abticlb 6. 

The English subjects, and the subjects of the Ranee, shall have free 
liberty to trade and commerce with each other, without any hindrance or 
molestation whatever. 

Abticlb 7. 

Maharajah Jeejaboy, the Ranee, will not, directly or indirectly, give any 
hindrance or molestation to any vessels or boats with English colours and 
passes, or any vessels and boats going under English colours; in like manner, 
the English will not molest any vessels or boats belonging to Maharajah 
Jeejaboy, the Ranee^ or her subjects. 

Abticlb 8. 

Maharajah Jeejaboy, the Ranee, grants to the Honourable English 
Company an exclusive right of importing and vending all Europe cloths, 
lead, iron, steel, copper, and Europe commodities^ and to pass the same 
through her country. 

Abticlb 9. 

Maharajah Jeejaboy, the Ranee, will allow all merchants or vanjarrahs 
free liberty to pass and re-pass her territories, to and from the English factory 
at Malwan, near Rajhcote, or any place where they build one, with their 
effects, merchandize^ packages, carriagep, and beasts of burden, they paying 
the duties agreeable to the custom practised at Ohereah, Rajahpore, and no 
more, on any pretence whatever ,* and whatever goods are landed at the 
English factories no customs whatever are to be levied. When they are 
carried out by the merchants they are to pay the duties agreeable to the 
custom before mentioned. 

Articlb 10. 

Maharajah Jeejaboy, the Ranee, will not entertain in her service any 
people belonging to the English, whether Europeans or other, but, on the 
contrary, give striot orders to her oflScers to seize such as may be seen in her 
dominions ; nor suffer any European deserters to pass through her country, 



196 Kolhapur AgBnoy-- Eolhapur^TSfo. LXVI. Part II 



bat return them to the Resident of the English factory, on promise of 
pardon, whether they are applied for or not. The English will observe the 
same in respect to the subjects of the Banee;and slaves to be zetnmed 
on both sides. 

Article 11. 

If any vessels or boats belonging to the Englishi their subjects or allies 
at any time be drove n^^hore, or wrecked, in any part of the Banee's domi- 
nions, she agrees to afford all suitable assistance for the preservation of such 
vessels and their cargoes ; and whatever part thereof may be saved^ to be 
delivered to the lawful owners, without any salvage whatever^ except the 
labourers' hire. The English, on their parts, to observe the same in respect 
to the subject of the Ranee, their vessels or boats. 

Artiolb lit. 

Maharajah Jeejaboy, the Ranee, will not, by menaces or otherwise, 
directly or indirectly, plunder, or in any shape molest the inhabitants, or 
others, that may have served or lived under the protection of the English 
during the time they had possession of Fort Augustus and dependencies, but 
permit them to enjoy peaceably their houses, lands, and tenements in the 
same free and ample manner as when the Malwan government subsisted 
before the English took this place. 

Articlb is. 

The Honourable Company will, at the same time that Fort Augustas is 
delivered up to Maharajah Jeejaboy, the Ranee, deliver to her the prisoners 
taken in Sundadroog Fort when they conquered it^ and are now at Bombay. 

Artiglr 14. 

Maharajah Jeejaboy, the Hanee, agrees, should the Honourable Company 
be attacked, and they should require her assistance^ to provide them with 
what troops they may want, they supplying them with provisions only. 
The Honourable Company, in like manner, agrees to assist the Ranee shookl 
it be convenient for them. 



No. LXVI. 



Agreement with the Rajah of Kolhapoee for the payment of 
Compensation and the establishment of Eaotoribs at 
Malwan and Kolhapobb. 

Lieutenant William Thomas Sandiford, Persian Interpreter to the 
Honourable Major General Robert Abercromby, President and Governor of 



Part II Eolhapur Agenoy— fb^^pur— Ko. LXVI. 107 



Bombay, and Balajee Bam, Commandant of Cavalry to Sevajee, Bajah of 
Kolhapore, being invested with full powers to form a Convention for the 
purposes of settling the debt dae by the said Bajah to the Honourable 
Company, and likewise for satisfying the merchants under the protection of 
the Presidency of Bombay for the losses they have sustained by the Mai wan 
fleet since the year 17H6, have agreed to the following Articles : — 

Article 1. 

The friendship that formerly subsisted between the Honourable Com- 
pany and the Bajah of Kolhapore is hereby renewed and con6rmed, and the 
disputes that have lately subsisted between the two governments will be 
finally settled when the following Articles are executed and fulfilled. 

Aeticlb 2. 

The Bajah of Kolhapore hereby agrees to discharge the balance due by 
him to the Honourable Company, agreeably to his engagement with Mr. 
Brome, in three separate payments, the first payment to be made on the first 
day of January i79S, and the others on tbe first day of every succeeding 
January^ until ike whole is discharged, which shall be done on the 1st of 
January 1795. 

Abticlb 8. 

The above due by the Kolhapore Bajah to the Honourable Company 
having for many years borne an interest, which, from the distresses of the 
Kolhapore government for a length of time past, the Bajah has become 
totally unable to pay, he therefore throws himself on the mercy of the 
Honourable Company in hopes of their relinquishing a demand he is with- 
out resources to discliarge. It is therefore agreed that if the other parts 
of the convention are faithfully and fully complied with on the part of the 
Bajah no demand shall be made for the said interest. 

Article 4. 

The Bajah of Kolhapore, in order to satisfy the merchants for the losses 
they have sustained by his fleet since the year 17H5, the account of which^ 
caloulated with interest to the 81st of July 1792, has b^n transmitted to 
him by the Honourable Major General Bobert Abercromby, President and 
Governor of Bombay, agrees to pay immediately (and he has sent for that 
purpose by Balajee Bam) Rupees twenty thousand, and vrill agree to pay a 
further sum of Rupees thirty-five thousand, to be made good in four different 
payments, the first to be paid on the first of the next March, and the others 
on the first of every succeeding March, until the whole is discharged, which 
shall be considered as a full compensation for the losses they have sustained. 

Article 6. 

Ail a security for the payments before mentioned, and at the same time 
to convince the Honourable Company that no interruption shall be given in 
future by hii^ fleet to any vessels sailing with English passes, the Bajah of 



186 Kolhapur Agency— Kolkapmr'^Ko. LjlVII. Part II 

Kolhapore hereby a^^irees to a factory being established on the Island of 
Malwan^ where the English flas: shall ba hoisted until the several claims are 
dipohnrgt9d, or to be permanent at the option of the Honourable Company. 
The Rajah will likewise grant the English a faotory, if required^ at Kolha- 
pore, where he resides himself, and the provisions wanted for as many sepoys 
as the the Company shall keep at both of these faotories shall be supplied at 
the Rajah's own expense^ until these Articles are fully executed. 

Abticlb 6. 

Bflla jee Ram being invested with full powers from his master^ the Kolha* 
pore Rajah, to conclude this Agreement, and to sign the same and aflSx the 
public seal given to him by the Rajah for that purpose, it becomes binding 
on the said Rajah when signed and sealed by the said Bulajee Ram. On the 
part of the Honourable Company this Convention becomes binding if 
approved of by the Ri<j:fat Honourable Charles Earl Cornwalli^i k.o.^ Governor- 
General of India, and full powers are delegated by him for the same^ to be 
signed and sealed on behalf of the said Honourable Company. 

Agreed on at Bombay by Lieutenant William Thomas Sandiford, 
Persian Interpreter to the Honourable Major General Robert Abercromby, 
President and Governor of Bombay, on the one part ; and Balajee Rami^ 
Commander of Cavalry to the Rajah of Kolhapore, on the other, this twenty- 
fifth day of November, in the year of Our Lord one thousand seven hundred 
and ninety-two. 

The original of the above agreement, written in the Mahratta languagOj 
is signed. 

Balajbb Rah, Sir Lascar, ' 

By order from his master the Bajah of Kolhapore. 




Ratified by the Governor-General in Council on 2'lth December 1792« 



No. LXVII. 



Articles of Agreement oonoluded between the Rajah of KohvUL^ 

FORE and the Honoubablb Mountstuart Elfhinstohb^ 

Resident at Poona, on the part of the British Govern* 

hent, and accepted by the Rajah of Kolhapore on the Ist 

of October 1812. 

Article 1. 

There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between the allied g^Tem« 
ments of the Honourable Company and His Highness the Petshwa on the 
one part, and His Highness the Rajah of Kolhapore on the other^ 



Part II Kolhapur Agency— Jro/Aap«r' No. LX VII. 199 



Abtiolb 2. 

The Bajali of Kolhapore, on his own part and on that of his heirs and 
successors, heieby renounces all right and claim of whatever description on 
the districts cf Chikoree and Manowlee, and all dependencies which have 
hitherto been comprehended in those districts. The districts aforesaid are 
henceforward to belong in absolute sovereignty to Kao Pundit Purdhaun 
Feishwa fiahadoor^ his heirs and successors. 

Article 3. 

All the forts and country taken in consequence of the wars occafiioned 
bj the disputed claims to Chikoree and Manowlee from the Rajah of Kolha- 
pore, within the last four years, t. e., since the month of Septemb«^r 18<)8 
and now occupied by the troops of Rao Pundit Purdhaun Peishwa Bahadoor 
shall be imm^iately restored to the Kajah of Kolbapore. 

Abtiolb 4. 

The Rajah of Kolhapore hereby renounces all otb r claims of whatever 
description on Rao Pundit Purdhaun Peishwa Bahadoor, and on all and 
every part of his dominions, with the except Lm of the new conquests men- 
tioned in the third Article; His Highness the Maharajah likewise renounces 
all claim upon Nepaunee: His Highness the Rajah of Kolhapore hereby 
further renounces aJl claims of whatever description on all the Peishwa's 
subjects of whatever rank and denomination. 

Abticlb 5. 

For the security of the British trade against a renewal of the piratical 
depredations formerly practised by the Rajah of Kolhupore's subjects, the 
Rajah of Kolhapore hereby agrees, on his own part and on the part of his 
heirs and successors, to cede to the Honourable Company in perpetual sove- 
reignty the liarbour of Malwan, tliat is to pay, the fort and island of Sundu- 
droog or Malvvan, and the forts of Puddumghur, Hajhcote, and Surjacote, 
with the lands dependent on the said forts, and the British tioops shall imme* 
diately be put in possession of the said forts and their dependencies. 

Articlb 6. 

His Highness the Rajah of Kolhapore engages, on his own part and on 
that of his heirs and successors, never to employ any armed vessels, or to 
permit any armed vessels to be fitted out at or to enter any of the seaports 
which may remain in His Hi^huess^s possession, after the cession of the 
places bt^fore mentioned, or which he may hereafter acquire ; and the Rajah 
agrees that the Honourable Company's vessels shall have the right to search 
all vessels that may be in the said ports, or that may have sailed from them ; 
and that if any aims are found in vessels so searched, the said vessels shall 
be lawful prize to the Honourable Company. The Rajah further engages to 
permit agents en the part of the Honourable Company to reside in all porti 



200 Eolhapur Agency— Kolhafur-JS[o. LXVII. Fart II 



in his dominions, or which may hereafter fall into his hands, for the purpose 
of ascertaining the state of all vess^els lying in such ports, and to permit the 
said agents to search the said vessels. 

Article 7. 

If any ship bearing the British flag, or furnished with a British pass, or 
belonging to the allies of the British Government, sliould hereafter be put into 
the Bajah cf Kolbapore's ports, or be driven by stress of weather, or any 
other cause, upon his shores, His Highness the Rajah of Kolhapore engages 
on his own part and on that of his heirs and sucoessorR, that all practicable 
assistance shall be rendered to such vessels. And tlie Rajah further agrees 
that no claim shall be advanced by himself or any of liis subjects on any 
vessel belonging to whatever nation that may be shipwrecked or driven by 
stress of weather upon his shores. 

Artiolb 8. 

In consideration of the cession of the harbour of Mai wan, and on condi- 
tion of the effectual suppression of piracy, the Honourable Company engages 
to sfuarantee such territories as shall remain in the Rajah of Kolhapore^s poa* 
session against the aggression of all foreign Powers and States, 

Article 9. 

With a view to the full execution of the agreement contained in the 
foregoing Article, His Highness the Rajah of Kolliapore, on his own part 
and on that of his heirs and successors, engages not to pursue any measures 
of hostility against foreign States without the previous consent of the 
Honourable Company ; and if any differences shall in future arise between 
His Highness, his heirs and successors, and any foreign power or State, the 
Honourable Company siiall apply themselves to the adjustment of such 
differences conformably to justice and propriety; and His Highness the Rajah 
of Kolhapore agrees that whatever adjustment of such differences the Hononr* 
able Company shall determine, His Highness shall acquiesce in and abide by. 
His Highness the Rajah of Kolhapore, on his part and on that of his heirs 
and successors, engages not to urge any claims on foreign States which may 
have originated previously to the date of this agreement. Should the condi* 
tions contained in this Article not be fulfilled by the Rajah the eighth Article 
is to be considered null and void. 

Artiolb 10. 

And whereas various demands subsist on the part of the Honourable 
Company against His Highness the Bajah of Kolhapore in consequence of 
depredations formerly committed on the trade of the Honourable Company 
and its subjects; the Honourable Company being convinced of the Rajah's 
inability to satisfy those demands, and of his sincere desire to prevent a repe- 
tition of the injuries formerly complained of, consents to relinquish all pecu- 
niary claims and demands whatsoever against the Rajah of Kolhapore. 



Part II 



Xolhapur Agenoj-Kolhapur^JSlo. LXVIII. 



aoi 



What is written in the above ten Articles is hereby agreed to. 
Done at Curveer on ike 24th of Ramxan. 



The 

Company't 

Seal. 



The Governor 

Generare 

SniHll Seiil. 



No. LXVIII. 

Abticles of Agrbement concluded between Shajee Cheitek- 
BUTTY Mahabaj Cubyeer, the Rajah of Kolhapobe, and 
the Bbitish Goyebnment — 1826. 

Preaiaiitf. —Whereas a Treaty of peace and friendship was concluded 
between the British Government and the Rajah of Kolhapore on the Jstof 
October 1812, and whereas certain misunderstandings have since arisen ; with 
a view to the removal of those misunderstandings, and to the confirmation 
of the alliance, the following Articles have been agreed on between the two 
governments :— 

Aeticls 1. 

Such parts of the former Treaty concluded on the 1st of October 1812 
as are not affected by the provisions of the present engagement shall remain 
in full force, and are mutually binding on the con txactiug parties. 

Article 2. 

The Bajah of Kolhapore engages to reduce his army to the peace estab- 
lishment, and never to raise or assemble such a force as shall be likely to 
endanger the public tranquillity within or without his territories, unless with 
the previous consent of the British Government. The Rajah further engages 
to attend to the advice of the British Government on all measures calculated 
to affect the public tranquillity. But this Article is nowise to diminish the 
independence of (he said Rajah as a sovereign prince. 

Articlb 3. 

The Rajah of Kolhapore engages never to molest Hindoo Rao Ghatkey 
Kaeulcar or Narain Rao Ghorepurey Echnlcurenjeeour in the enjoyment of 
their respective lands and rights according to ancient custom. 

2d 



202 Kolhapur ▲genoy— £bMai>air— No. LXVIII. Part II 



Abticlb 4. 

The districts of Chikoree and Manowlee were transferred to the Rajah 
of Kolhapore by a Sunnud under the signature of Major-General Sir Thomas 
MunrOy Bart., k.c.b., but have not yet been mentioned in any Treaty or 
Agreement. The Honourable East India Company now acknowledges them 
to be ceded to the Rajah of Kolhapore io full sovereignty! the Rajah engaging 
on his part to respect the rights and privileges of the zemindars^ enamdars^ 
and wuttundars of the said districts. 

A&TICLB 6. 

His Highness the Rajah of Kolhapore hereby recognizes the award of 
the British Government made in 1822 relative to the half umuls in the Sawant 
Warree territory, and engages to respect the rights of the Warree State con- 
ferred by that award. He also consents to the territorial arrangement of 
assigning to him an equivalent in land in such part of the Carnatic CoUeo* 
torate as may be allotted to him by the British local authorities. 

A&TICLB 6. 

The Rajah of Kolhapore engages never to grant an asylum to the 
enemies of the British Government, nor to rebels. The Rajah also promises 
that if any robbers or other offenders issuing from his territories shall commit 
robberies or other offences in those of the British Government or of other 
States, His Highness will apprehend them and deliver them up ; and His 
Highness further consents that in case he shall not fully restrain such offend* 
ers, the British Oovernment shall give due notice to the Rajah, and shall^ 
after such notice, be competent at all times to send its troops and police into 
His Highnesses territories for the apprehension of the said offenders, and His 
Highness shall afford any necessary assistance to the troops or police to enable 
them to discover and apprehend the objects of their pursuit. If any persons 
who have committed offences in the Rajah's territory shall take refuge in that 
of the Company, the British Government will, after due investigation, adopt 
such measures in regard to the said offenders as equity and justice may appear 
to require, adopting, at the same time, every means to prevent their commit- 
ting any acts injunous to the territories of the Rajah. 

Abticlb 7. 

The Rajah of Kolhapore promises to continue to Bhow Maharaj and 
Baba Mabaraj their .respecUva lands and rights agreeably* to the Schedule 
•iineied. 

The guarantee of the British Government to the enjoyment of the above 
lands and rights shall only continue during*the lifetime of the abovemen- 
lionad perseosi but the rights of their descendants, as founded on Sunnud or 
eustom» diaU not be pi^udioed by the cessation of the said guarantee. 



Part 1 1 Eolhapur Ageuoj—Kolhapur^'No. LXIX. 203 



Articlb 8. 

The Rajah having: given his anqaalified assent to the demand upon him 
for the injaries occasioned to the several individuals whose possessions and 
rights he had invaded^ according to the Schedule annexed, hereby agrees to 
pay such sums as may be adjusted after a full investigation into the extent of 
the losses actually incurred ; and in failure thereof^ within sixty days after 
such final adjustment, to transfer to the British Government such portions of 
the pergunnah of Chikoree and Manowlee as were formerly ceded to the Kol« 
hapore Bajah, for such term of years as may be necessary to collect a sum 
equal to the amount due; the Principal Collector and Political Agent engag- 
ing on his part to render a faithful account of the sums collected, and expenses 
of managementi during the occupation of those pergunnahs. 

This agreement, agreed to at Kolhapore on the SOth of December 1825^ 
between T. H. Baber, Esquire, Political Agent, on the one part, and by 
Kristna Rao Oirdey and Jowa Rao Jadava, Havildar, on the other, is con- 
firmed, with certain modifications, by the Qovernor in Council of Bombay on 
the 24th of January 1826, and will be binding on both parties, unless dis* 
approved by the Governor General iu CounciL 

(Sd.) M. Elphinstonb. 



•I 



J. Warden. 
R. F. GoDWiif. 
J. J. Sparrow. 



Ritified by the Right Honourable the Governor General in Council at 
Fort William in Bengal, this tenth day of March one thousand eight hundred 
and twenty-six. 

(Sd.) Amherst. 



Seiil of the 
Governor 
Qeneral. 



>9 



9f 



J. H. Haringtok. 
W. B. Batlbt. 



By command of the Right Honourable the Governor General in Council* 

(Sd.) Geo. Swintom, 
Secretary to the Government. 



No. LXIX. 
Abticlss of AoBEBMBNT concluded between Baje Shah Oh£T- 

TBRBUTTY CUBVBEB EUB, RAJAH of EOLHAPOBB, and 

the Bbitish Govbenmbnt— 1827. 

Preamble. — Whereas a Treaty of peace and friendship was concluded 
between the British Government and His Highness the Uajah of Kolhapore 



204 Eolhapur Agency— iro/Aa/7«r— No. IiXIX. Part II 



on the 24th of January 1826 ; and whereas His Highness has latelj com« 
mitted several acts in direct violation of the said Treaty and in hostile opposi* 
lion to the British Government; the following Articles for repealing, altering 
and confirming respectively the conditions of the said Treaty , and providing 
for others of a new nature, have been agreed on between the two govern- 
ments :— 

Article 1. 

In the 2nd Article of the aforesaid Treaty, His Highness Chetterbuttj 
Sahib engaged *' to reduce his army to the peace establishment, and never to 
raise or assemble such a force as should be likely to endanger the public tran* 
quillit.y^ within or without his dominions, unless with the previous consent of 
the British Government;'^ notwithstanding which His Highness latelj 
collected a large army, and, in spite of all advice from the British Govern- 
ment, proceeded to commit a variety t)f excesses : it has therefore become 
requisite to limit the number of His Higrhness's troops, and Hie Highness 
hereby engages not to keep more than 400 horse (including khas pagah 
surinjamee, shetsundee, etc.), and 800 of infantry, exclusive of moderate 
garrisons for his forts, as per annexed list* His Highness further engages 
never to be accompanied by guns without the sanction of the British Govern* 
ment. 

Abticlb 2. 

In the 4th Article of the above Treaty, the British Government "ceded 
the districts of Cliikoree and Manowlee in full sovereignty to His Highness^ 
he engaging on his part to respect the rights and privileges of the zemindars^ 
enarodars and wuttundars of the said districts/' When this grant was made 
by the British Government, it was hoped that peace and good-will would have 
subsisted for many generations between the two governments ; but instead of 
this, His Highness has uniformly evinced a total disregard of the friendship 
of the British Government^ and, in violation of the above conditions, bus 
repeatedly infringed the rights of the enamdars and wuttundars of these 
talooks. It therefore becomes necessary that His Highness should give back 
to the British Government the said talooks in the same state in which he 
received them, and His Highness hereby agrees to do so. 

Article 8. 

In the 7th Article of the said Treaty Hie possessions of Bhow Maharaj 
and Baha Maharaj were guaranteed to them for the terms of their respective 
lives only (provision being made that the rights of their deccendants, as 
fuiinded on Sunnud or custom, should not be prejudiced by the cessation of 
the said guarantee). As, however. His Highness Chetterhutty Sahib has 
never ceased to annoy and distress these persons by seizing their villages and 
other property, it has been deemed necessary to extend the guarantee of the 
British Government to their descendants, and His Highness accordingly 
e.igages never to molest them. 

Articlb 4. 

Mahnraja Chetterhutty Sahib having on the death of Wiswas Rao Ghat- 
ey resumed all but two of the eight and a half villages held by him in the 



Part II Kolbapur Agency -JToMajHtr— No. LXIX. 205 



Ka^^ul talook, now engasfes to restore the whole to the heir of the deceased 
and never again to io'&rfefe with them. 

Abticle 5. 

It having been deemed necessary^ in consequence of the number of rob- 
beries committed on the surinjamadars and other persons under the protec* 
tion of the British Government by the inhabitants of Akewat, and of its 
being a place of general resort of robbers, that it should be given up to the 
British Government, the Maharaja hereby engages to cede the sume, together 
with lands adjoining, to the value of Rupees 10,0U0 per annum. 

Article 6. 

His Highness Chetterbutty Sahib having compelled the British Govern- 
roent, by various acts of aggression, committed in direct breach of the 
above Treaty, to have recourse to arms, it has been deemed necessary, as 
security for his future good conduct, that lie should admit British garrrisons 
into the forts of Kolbapore and Panallaghur, and His Highness hereby accord- 
ingly agrees to do so, and further engages to pay the expense of such 
garrison. 

Article 7. 

His Highness Chetterbutty Sabib having hitherto neglected to afford 
redress to Govind Rao Sahib Putwurdqn, Appajee Rao Seetole, Bhow Maha* 
raj, and Baba Muharaj, for the injuries done to thein in 1826, as agreed 
with the late Political A^zent, Mr. Baber, and having recf-ntly committed 
still more serious aggressions a&^ainst these and other Chiefs under the pro- 
tection of the British Gevernment, His Highness hereby engages to pay, 
as per annexed Schedule,* the sum of Rupees one lakh forty-seven thousand 
nine hundred and forty eight (1,47,948), the same being tiie aggregate 
amount of claims admitted^ after a full investigation, to be due to the injured 
parties ; and His Highness further agrees to transfer to the British Govern- 
ment, for the purpose of liquidating the said debt, territory yielding an annual 
revenue of Rupees 50,000; the Principal Collector and Political Agent engag- 
ing on his part to render a faithful account of the sums collected and expenses 
of management during the occupation of the said territory. 

* The scbednle being bulky and of no pnu^tical use ii not printed. The items in the aggre* 
f»tean — 

Bi. a. p, 

Bnlance of former olaima ... ... ... 2,665 8 

Chinchunkur ... ... ... ... 86,5y8 10 3 

EnchaUcnrronjeekur ... ... ... ... 47,567 7 6 

Bhow Maharaj ... ... ... ... 26,618 8 9 

liiaeelUneoos ... .». ... ... 18.499 2 o 

KagiJk«r ... ... ... ... 16,000 

Total ... 1,47,948 10 6 



toe Eolhapur Agency— fo2;Ui|Hfr— No. LXX. Part I C 



Abticlb 8. 

The British Oovernment deeming it necessary to appoint a chief minister 
for the future management of the Bajah^s government, His Highness Chetter« 
butty Sahib hereby engages to be guided by his a<lvice in all matters relating 
to the administration of his State, the British Oovernment having the sole 
power of appointing or removing the said minister as they may see fit. 

Abticlb 9. 

Such parts of the former Treaty, concluded on the 24th day of Jana* 
ary 1826, as are not affected by the provisions of the present Agreement, 
shall remain in full force, and are mutually binding on the contracting parties. 

This Treaty, agreed to at Kolhapore on the 2Srd day of October 1827^ 
between Josiab Nisbet, Esq., Political Agent, on the one part, and Bajab 
Shah Clietterbutty, Rajah of Kolhapore, on the other, and confirmed by the 
Honourable the Oovernor in Council of Bombay on the fifth day of Novem- 
ber 1827, is here finally ratified. 



No. LXX. 



Articles of Agbebment concluded between Baje Shah Ohet- 

TERBUTTY CURVEEB EUB, BaJAH of KOLHAPOBE, and the 

Bbitish Qovebnment — 1829. 

Preamble, — Whereas a Treaty of peace and friendship was oonclnded 
between the British Oovernment and His Highness the Rajah of Kolhapore 
on the 24th of January 1826; and whereas His Highness having committed 
several acts in direct violation of the said Treaty and in hostile opposition 
to the British Oovernment, a preliminary Treaty for repealing, altering, and 
confirming respectively the conditions of the aforesaid Treaty, and providing 
for others of a new nature, was agreed to at Kolhapore on the 24th of Octo* 
ber A.D. 1827, between Raje Shah Chetterbutty Maharaj, Rajah of Kolha- 
pore, on the one part, and Josiah Nisbet, Esquire, Political Agent, on the 
other ; and whereas it has been deemed advisable to modify certain parts of 
' the said preliminary Treaty, the following Articles are now finally agreed 
on by the two governments :— 

Article I. 

In the 2nd Article of the aforesaid Treaty His Highness Chetterbutty 
Sahib engaged ^' to reduce his army to the peace establishment, and never 
to raise or assemble such a force as should be likely to endanger the public 
tranquillity, within or without his dominions, unle&s with the previous consent 
of the British Government,^^ notwithstanding which His Highness lately 
collected a large army, and in spite of all advice from the British Uoveru« 



Vart II Kolhapur Agenoy~iro/Aap«r— No. LXX. 207 



ment, proceeded to commit a variety of excesses: it has therefore become 
reqamte to limit the number of His Highness's troops, and His Highness 
hereby engnges not to keep more than 400 horse (including *' khas pagah, 
Borinjamee^ shetsundee/' etc.)^ and 800 infantry, exclasive of moderate garri* 
sons for his forts, as per annexed list. His Highness farther engages never 
to be accompanied by guns without the sanction of the British Government. 

Articls 2. 

In the 4th Article of the above Treaty the British Government " ceded 
the districts of Chikoree and Manowlee in full sovereignty to His Highness/^ 
he engaging on his part to respect the rights and privileges of the zemindars, 
'' enamdars/^ and ^* wuttundars ^^ of the said districts. When this grant was 
made by the British Government, it was hoped that peace anil good-will 
would have subsisted for many generations between the two governments ; 
but, instead of this, His Highness has uniformly evinced a total disregard 
of the friendship of the British Government, and in violation of the above 
conditions has repeatedly infringed the rights of the ''enamdars^^ and 
'' wuttundars ^^ of those talooks; it therefore becomes necessary that His 
Highness should give back to the British Government the said talooks in 
the same state in which he received them, and His Highness hereby agrees 
to do so. 

Artioli 3. 

In the 7th Article of the said Treaty the possessions of Bhow Maharaj 
and Baba Maharaj were guaranteed to them for the terms of their respective 
lives only (provision being made that ** the rights of their descendants, as 
founded on Sunnud or custom, should not be prejudiced by the cessation of 
the*said guarantee'^). As, however, His Highness Chetterbutty Sahib has 
never ceased to annoy and distress these persons by seizing their villages 
and other property, it has been deemed necessary to extend the guarantee of 
the British Government to their descendants, and His Highness accordingly 
engages never to molest them. 

Article 4. 

Maharaj Chetterbutty Sahib, having on the death of Wiswas Rao 
Ghat key, resumed all but two of the eight and a half villages held by him 
in the Kagul talook, now engages to restore the whole to the heir of the 
deceased, and never again to interfere with them. 

• 

Articlb 6. 

It having been deemed necessary, in consequence of the number of rob- 
beries committed on ^' surinjameedars '^ and other persons under the protection 
of the British Government by the inhabitants of Akewat, and of its being 
a place of general resort for robbers, that it should be given up to the British 
Government, the Maharaj hereby engages to cede the same, together with 
lands adjoining, to the value of Rupees 10,000 per annum. 



208 Kolhapur Agency -JTo/Aa^Mr— No. LXX Part II 



Article 6. 

His Highness Chetterbntfcy Sabib haying compelled the British Goveni« 
menty by various acts of aggression, committed in direct breach of the above 
Treaty, to have recourse to arms, it has been deemed necessary, as security 
for his future good conduct, that he should admit British garrisons into the 
forts of Kolhapore and Panallaghur, and His Highness hereby accordingly 
agrees to do so, and further engages to pay the expense of such garrisons. 

Articlb 7. 

His Highness Chetterbutty Sahib having hitherto neglected to afford 
redress to Govind Rao Sahib Putwurdun, Appajee Rao Setole, Bhow Maharaj, 
and Baba Maharaj for the injuries done to them in 1826, as agreed with the 
late Political Agent, Mr. Baber, and having recently committed still more 
serious aggressions against these and other Chiefs under the protection of 
the British Government, His Highness hereby engages to pay, as per annexed 
Schedule^, the sum of Rupees one lakh forty-seven thousand nine hundred and 
forty-eight (Rupees 1,47,948), the same being the aggregate amount of 
claims admitted, after a full investigation, to be due to the injured parties ; 
and His Highness furiher agrees to transfer to the British Government, for 
the purpose of liquidating: the said debt, territory yielding an annual revenue 
of Rupees 50,000 ; the Principal Collector and Political Agent engaging on 
his part to render a faithful account of the sums collected, and expenses of 
management, during the occupation of the said territory. 

Abticlb 8. 

The British Government, deeming it necessary to appoint a chief minister 
for the future management of the Rajah's government. His Highnees 
Chetterbutty Sahib hereby engages to be guided by his advice in all matters 
relating to the administration of his State, the British Government having 
the sole power of appointing or removing the said minister as they may see fit. 

Article 9. 

Such parts of the former Treaty, concluded on the S^th day of January 
] 826, as are not affected by the provisions of the present agreement, shall 
remain in full force, and are mutually binding on the contracting parties. 

This definitive Treaty, agreed to at Kolhapore on the 15th of March 
1829, between Raje Shuh Chetterbutty Curveer Kur, Rajah of Kolhapore^ 
on the one part, and Josiah Nisbet, Esq., Political Agent, on the other, is 
now confirmed by the Governor in Council of Bombay on the 15tli of July 
1829, the preliminaiy Treaty of the 24th October 1827, above referred to, 
having been previously confirmed in like manner. 

(Sd.) John Malcolm. 



99 
99 



T. Bradfobd. 
Jab Rombr. 



• See note on page 206* 



Pfert II Kolhapur Agenoy'-Kolhapur^'No, LXXI. 209 



Ratified by the Right Honourable Governor General in Council at Port 
INfilliam in Bengal, this twentj-firat day of August one thousand eight 
hundred and twenty-nine. 



Company't 
SeftU 



(Sd.) W. C. Bbntinck. 

COMBBRMBRE. 
W. B. BAfLBY. 
C. T. MSTCALFB. 



99 



By eommand of the Right Honourable the Governor General in Council. 

(Sd.) Gborgb Swinton, 
Clief Secretary to the Oovernment. 



No. LXXI. 



Articles of Eevised Agreement with His Highness the 
Rajah of Eolhapobe, dated the 20th October 1862. 

Whereas a desire has been expressed by His Highness the Bajah of 
Kolhapore to assume the administration of the affairs of that State, His 
Excellency the Honourable the Governor of Bombay in Council has^ in con- 
sideration of the Rajah having attained full age, and having evinced loyalty 
towards the government of Her Majesty the Queen, more particularly during 
the disturbances of 1857-58, when the Rajah's brother (Chima Sahih) was 
ao aetive conspirator, resolved to transfer to the Rajah the administration of 
Kolhapore, with such reservations as are contained in an agreement to be 
signed by the Rajah. 

In carrying into effect the proposed transfer of administration, the 
Honourable the Governor in Council considers that in the choice of a karbaree 
or minister, while it mijpfht be more agreeable to the Rajah that the minister 
should not be the exclusive choice and the servant of the British Government, 
it is at the same time highly desirable that in the first instance at least the 
chief minister in Kolhapore, self-governed, should be one whose nominutioa 
by the Bajah is fully approved by the British Government* 

In accordance with the spirit of the above observations, the following 
specific conditions of agreement are proposed for the acceptance of the 
Bajah ;— 

Articlb 1. 

That in all matters of importance the Bajah of Kolhapore agrees to- 
follow the advice of the British Government as conveyed by the Political 
Officer representing that government at Kolhapore. 



210 Kolhapur Agenoy^£bMap«r— No. LXZI. Part II 



Abticls 2» 

That under the Rajah's administration there should be a kbasgee kar- 
baree, as at present^ whose accounts should be kept separately, and beaDnaalljr 
included in the State accounts in a single item. 

Article 8. 

That the Rajah's durbar should i^eiid its correspondence witb other oonrta 
through the Political Agent. 

Abticli 4. 

That the revenue administration should be entirely in the hands of the 
Rajah^ he making arrangements for the liquidation of the British debt bj 
instalments of at least one lakh of Company's Rupees per annum. 

Articlb 5. 

That the Rajah should make no new alienations of land without the 
concurrence of government until the firitish debt is liquidated* 

Articlb 6. 

That the Kolhapore infantry should be maintained at its present strength 
and be under.the command^ as at present^ of British oiSScers ; and that the 
Rajah fihould continue to pay Rupees 28,914 per annum, the sum requited 
for the detachment of the Southern Mahratta Horse at Kolhapore, so long 
as it may be deemed desirable to station the detachment within the Kolha- 
pore territory. 

Articlb 7. 

That the present three native courts of civil justice be maintained, with 
an appeal court, to be called the Rajah's court. 

That there should be a combined court of the Rajah and the Britis^h 
Agency for the disposal only of cases against the higher Sirdars. 

The mamlutdars should have authority in minor criminal cases, as at 
present. 

That for more serious criminal cases there should be a Nyayadesh court 
imposing sentences of imprisonment for such period as may be fixed by the 
Rajah ; sentences of longer imprisonment than three years to require the oon« 
firmation of the Rajuh, and sentences of death to be referred to the authority 
ot Government. 

Article 8. 

That certain of the higher jaghiredars, such as the Pratinidhee of Vishal- 
gur, the Punt Amatya of Bowia, the Chiefs of Kagul Inchulkurunjee^ Kapsee, 
Torgul, the Sirluskur, Narayen Rao of Kagul, Ruma^ Bai Walwa, Himmut 

* Since dead. 



Pftrt II Kolhapur Agency— Xo/^pwr—Na LXXII. 811 



Bahadoor^ should be considered as still in some decree under the supervision 
of the Political Agent, who should act, as far as circumstances will permit, in 
co-operation with the Rnjah's' government; and that all criminal cases within 
the jurisdiction of these Sirdars, involving death or imprisonment beyond 
seven years, should be forwarded for trial before the Political Agent, for sub- 
mission to Government. The supervision proposed to be retained over these 
Sirdars, and the guardianship of such of them as may be minors, by the 
British Government acting in concert with the Rajah, are not intended in any 
way to infringe the seignorial rights of the Rajah, but merely to secure good 
government, and to prevent those disputes which in old days were frequently 
the canse of disturbance and bloodshed. 

Articlb 9. 

That the Rajah should defray^ as long as it may be consirlered necessary 
^y government, the expenses of the Agency, including the salaries of the 
Agent, with establishments. That the Rajah should also defray the expense 
of all public buildings which may be deemed by government necessary for the 
troops stationed at Kolhapore. 

(Sd.) Sbvajbb. 



No. LXXII. 



Kolhapur Opium Ageeembnt, 1880. 
Kolhapur and Southern Maratha Country. 

No. 1054, dated Kolhapur, 22nd October 1880. 

From— Mahadxo Vasudby Babyb, State Karbhari, Eolhapar, 

To— CoLONBL W. C. Pabb, Political Agent, Kolhapur and South Maratha Country. 

With reference to GoTernment Resolution No. 2754-89 (Confidential), 
dated 27th May 1880, and your letter No. 8627, dated 20th instant, on the 
subject of cultivation of the poppy and the manufacture and sale of opium, 
I have the honour to report, for the information of Ooveroment, that the 
Kolhapur Darbar consents to abide by the following conditions relating to the 
growth of the poppy, manufacture of opium, etc. :— 

i«^.— That the Kolhapur Darbar has already consented to prohibit the 
cultivation of the poppy and manufacture of opium, and now hereby promises 
and agrees to prohibit the cultivation of the poppy and manufacture of opium 
in the Kolhapur State. 

3nd. — That the Kolhapur Darbar will use every effort to put a stop to the 
illicit importation of opium from the Nizam's dominions and all other opium 
which has not paid the British pass-fee. 



212 Kolhapur Ageno j^Kolhapwr^'No. IiZXIII. Ssrt II 



dr^«— That the Kolhapur Darbar agrees to introduee in the Kolhapur 
State the provisions of the Opium A.ct (No. I of 1878) and the mles framed* 
under it^ as far as possible. 

4th. — The Kolhapur Darbar fnrther promises and agrees that all opinm 
required for consumption within the limits of the Kolhapur Stiite shall W 
obtained from a British opium depdt under such conditions and precautions as. 
Oovemment may deem necessary. 

5/^..i.The Kolhapur Darbar further promises to arrange that only lioenaed. 
Tenders will be allowed to sell opium in retail in. the Kolhapur State at a price, 
not less than that at which it is retailed in the adjacent British districts, such 
vendors being required to keep accounts of all purchases and sales, the Kolha- 
pur Darbar being still at liberty > as heretofore, to make sueh terms as might 
appear to the Darbar most advisable with farmers for the privilege of selling^ 
opium by retail, subject to the above conditions. 

6/A.— The Kolhapur Darbar agrees to submit, for the information of 
Government, through the Political Agent, half-yearly returns showing parti- 
culars of the purchases and sales of opium in the Kolhapur State. 

7M.— In return for the making of this agreement, and as a condition of 
its terms being kept, the British Government agree to remit to the Kolhapur 
Darbar one-fifth of the pass-fef", ruling at the time of purchase, on all opium 
purchased by the Kolhapur Darbar from a Government depdt for sale in the 
Kolhapur State* 

I have the honour to be, kc, 

(Sd.) Mah^dbo Vasudkv Babvb^ 

Siaie £ar6iari, Kolhapur. 



No. LXXIII. 

Abticlbs of Agreement for the removal of restrictions on Frsb 
Tbapb in the State of Kolhafxjb and certain adjoining 
States of the Squthben Mabatha Countey — 1886. 

Pream^Ztf.— Whereas the Regent in Council of Kolhapur declared on the 
fifteenth of January one thousand eight hundred and eighty-six his intention 
to abolish the duties on export and import known as Sthalmod and Stlial* 
bharit, as well as the imposts koown as Oh&t Dasturi other than road tolls 
throughout the Kolhapur territories and the Feudatory States^ and iwhereas it 
is considered bv the Council of Administration desirable to remove farther 
restrictions on tree trade in the said territories and Feudatory States of Kol- 
bapur, and to obtain from the adjoining States of the Simthern Maratha 
Country under the Political Agency of Kolhapur and the Sonthern Maratha 
Country an engagement that they will pursue an identical policy in regard 
to free trade, the following articles in this view are agreed upon between the 



l?art II Kolhapur Agency— £o/^ap«r— No. LXXIII. 213 



ConHcil of Administration of Kolhapur on behalf of His Highness Shahu 
Chatrapati, Raja of Kolhapur, his heirs and successors, on the one part, and 
William Lee-Warner, Esquire, Political A^ent of Kolhapur and the Southern 
Maratha Country for the time being, on behalf of the British GoverDment, on 
the other. 

Articlb 1. 

The Kolhapur State engages to abolish within the territories of His 
Highness the Raja of Kolhapur, and to cause to be abolished in the Feudatory 
States from henceforth, all taxes and imposts on the import, exporter measure* 
ment of commodities other than Fuuff, sulphur and poisonous drugs : provided 
that nothing contained in this article shall be construed to prevent the levy 
of any tolls on bridges, roads, ferries, canals, or causeways for the repair or 
maintenance of the same, or of any octroi levied upon articles eonsi^med 
within municipal limits, or of any taxes constituting the Abkari revenue* 

Articlb 2. 

With a view to encourage local industries, the State of Kolhapur engages 
to abolish all special taxes on trades and industries or on the sale of their manu- 
factured commodities, whether levied under the designation of the Mohtarpha 
taxes or any other name. 

Abticlb 8. 

_ • • 

The British Government engages to obtain from the State of Sangli, the* 
States of Miraj Senior and Miraj Junior, and the State of Ramdurg, an en^ 
gagement similar to that embodied in Articles 1 and .2 of this agreement. 

Article 4. 

llie British Government engages to use its best endeavours to secure the 
adhesion of the States of Mudhol, Kurundvad and Jamkhandi to the engage- 
ment expressed in Articles 1 and 2 aforesaid, and the Kolhapur State on its 
account engages similarly to use its influence with the Feudatory States to 
induce them to abolish the taxes mentioned in Article 2 of this agreement. 

Exeouted at Kolhapur this first day of November one thousand eight 
hundred and eighty-six. 

(Signed) William LbE-WABNBR, 

Political A genl^ Kolhapur. 
(Signed) William Lei-Waensr, President. 



9f 



$f 



93 



M. KUVARJI, 

Divan and Member of Cd»ncii. 

Council of Admini- 
B. N. JosHi, y stration, Kolha- 

Chief Judge and Member of Couueil, pur. 

Krishnaji Ramchandba, 

Cii^ Revenue Officer and Member 

of Council. 



214 Kolhapur Agenoy— ^8. M, Ja^dart^Opium^'No. IiXXIV. Part II 



Approved and confirmed by His Excellency the Vioeroy and Governor 
General in Council. 

(Signed) W. J. Cdninghau, 
O^ff. 8eey. to tie Oovt. of India, Foreign Lepi. 



FoET William, "I 
The 28th Feburary 1887. J 



No. LXXIV. 

Tbanslatiok. 



Aqbeement entered into by the Sangli State with the British 

Government — 1881. 

Whereas the British Government have deemed it desirable to conclnde 
arrangements for the complete prohibition of the cultivation oi the poppy and 
manufacture of opium in my State, I have already given my consent gladly to 
oo-operate cordially and loyally with them in carrying out these arrangements ; 
and I now hereby promise and agree to prohibit the cultivation of the poppy 
and manufacture of opium in my State. 

2. I will use every efEort to put a stop to the illicit importation of opium 
from the Nizam's dominions and all other opium which has not paid the 
British pass -fee. 

3. I also hereby agree to introduce in my State the provisions of the 
Opium Act (No. I of 1878) and the rules framed under it, as far as possible. 

4* I further promise and agree that all opium required for consumption 
within the limits of my State shall be obtained from a British opium depOt 
under such conditions and precautions as Government may deem necessary. 

5. I further promise to arrange that only licensed vendors will be allowed 
to sell opium in retail in my State at a price not less than that at which it ia 
retailed in the adjacent British districts, such vendors being required to keep 
accounts of all purchases and sales. I shall of course l^ at liberty still, as 
heretofore, to make such terms as might appear to me moat advisable with 
farmers for the privilege of selling opium by retail, subject to the above 
conditions. 

6. I agree that I will submit, for the information of Government, 
through the Political Agent, half-yearly returns showing particulars of the 
purchases and sales of opium in my State. 

7. In return for the making of this agreement and as a condition of its 
terms being kept to, the British Government agree to remit to me one-fifth of 
the pass-fee ruling at the time of purchase on all opium purchased by me from 
a Government depdt and sold in my State. 



Tart II Kolhftpur Aganoy^iS. M. Jagirdari-^Ahkari—JSfO. LXXV* 216 



Oiven under my hand and seal this first day of February one thousand 
eight hundred and eighty*one. 

(Signature of Chief) '' Raja '* 

(Sd.) W. P. F. Waller, MafOfy 

Joint AdminiHraior of Sangli. 

True translation. 

(Sd.) W. F. P. Waller, Major, 

Joint Jdministraior of SangU. 



Similar agreements were executed in 1880 by the Chiefs of Miraj (Senior 
and Junior), Jamkhandi, Kurundwar (Senior and Junior), Rumdurg and 
Mudhol. 



No. LXXV. 



Abtigles of Agreement for leasing the Abkari Revenue of 
the Sanglj State to the British Government for a term 
of five years from first August one thousand eight hundred 
and eighty-one to thirty-first July one thousand eight 
hundred and eighty-six — 1885. 

Preamble, — Whereas it is considered desirable to place the administra- 
tion of the Abkari revenue of the Sangli State on the same footing as the 
administration of the Abkari revenue of the British Collectorates adjoining 
the Sangli State, which has recently been improved in accordance with the 
provisions of the Bombay Abkari Act of 1878, and especially with a view to 
prevent injury to the Abkari revenue of either the Collectorates or the Sangli 
State by illicit manufacture of liquor or by the smuggling of liquor from one 
territory into the other, the following articles have been agreed on between 
Dhundirao Chintaman, Chief of Sangli, and Captain William Butler Ferris, 
Acting Joint Administrator of Sangli, on one part, and Lieutenant-Colonel 
Henry Nicholas Reeves, Political Argent, Kolhapur and Southern Maratha 
Country, for the time being on behalf of the British Government, ou the 
other. 

Article 1. 

The Joint Administrators of Sangli engage that the law of the Sangli 
State as regards Abkari shall be the Bombay Abkari Act of 1878 or any law 
which may hereafter be substituted for that Act in the Bombay Presidency. 



S16 . Kolhapnr Agency— 'S. Jr. Jagirdan-^Ahkari^'So. IiZXT. Part n 



Articlb 2. 

In order that the new system of Abkari a'lministra^on ih the Sangli 
State mny be eflSoientlj organised on the principles of the Bombaj Abkari 
Acty the Joint Administrators of Sangh engage hereby to farm the entire 
Abkari revenue of the State to the Bombay Government for a term of five 
years from first August one thousand eight hundred and eighty-one to thirty- 
first July one thousand eight hundred and eighty-six, in consideration of 
an annual payment of Rupees twenty-nine thousand two hundred and eisrhty- 
one annas two and pies eight, being the average of the total net Abkari 
revenue of the State from Fasli 1280 to Fasli \%fi>%, plu$ twenty-five per oent. 
in consideration of any possible increaf^ of revenue during the term of the 
lease,* 

This sum to be paid in equal moieties half-yearly on tenth January and 
tenth July of each year. 

Article S. 

During the term of the farm the administration of the Abkari revenue of 
the Sangli State will be conducted by such oflScers as Ooverument may 
appoint, on the following principles :^^ 

(a) The rates of taxation of liquor in the Sangli State and in the 
Collectorates to be equivalent. 

(h) Reasonable facilities for obtaining a supply of liquor for oon« 
sumption to be afforded to the people of \h^ Sangli State as to 
the people of the Collectorates. 

(c) The retail selling price of liquor to be the same in the Sangli 
State and in the (Jollectorates, so as to remove any inducement 
to the people of one territory to consume liquor sold in the other 
territory on account of its being cheaper. 

Note.— Under the last stipulation it will not be necessary to forbid sale 
of liquor in Sangli shops to British raiyats or vice vend. 

Article 4. 

But during the term of the farm the ofBcertf appointed by Ooverument will 
consult the Joiut Administrators regarding details of Abkari Admiilistration, 
such as the number and po8ition of liquor shops^^the persons to receive retail 
licenses and the like^ and will consider the wishes of the Joint Adminisftantors 
on such points. 

Article 5. 

It is understood that the farm conveys to the Government of Bombay 
no risrht to ownership in palm and other toddy-producing trees or in the land 
in which they stand. 

* NoTB. — In calculating the amount of compensation the average net receipts of t^e SaogU 
Treasury f lom toddy (or the joioe of different kinds of palm trees) are inclcided». a» svoh itm< 
are Abkari reveaue luider the Bombay Abkari Act. 



Fart II Kolhapur Agency— ^9. Jf. Jagirdan^Ahkari—'So. LXXV. 217 



Article 6. 

On their part the Joint Administrators of Sangli engage cordially to 
co-operate in carrying out the provisioas of the Abk<ari law and rales, and to do 
their best by themselves aud their subordinate officers to prevent all illicit 
possession^ manufacture, sale, transport of liquor or of the materials or imple- 
ments used for its manufacture, in accordance with tho provisions of the Aci 
«nd of any rules which may be made nndor it. 

Article 7. 

It is understood that all ofEenccs against the Abkari law will be cog« 
nizable, nnder section 51 of the Abkari Act, by the Sangli Criminal Courts, in 
the same manner as other ofEences are cognizable. 

Article 8. 

During the term of the farm the Abkari accounts of the Sangli State will 
be kept separately from those of the adjoining CoUectorates, aud an annual 
aecouut given to the Sangli State for information. 



Article 9. 

At the conclusion of the five«year &rm the management of the Abkari 
revenue of the Sangli State will revert to thi Joint Administrators of Sangli. 



Article 10. 

They engage thereafter to conduct their administration of it in accordance 
~ with the principles laid down in the preamble of this agreement, namely : 

To maintain the same Abkari law and rules as may be in force in the 
the neighbouring CoUectorates. 

To impose rat*»8 of taxation on liquor equivalent to those in force in 
the CoUectorates. 

So to manaore their revenues that injury shall not be caused by it to 
the Abkari revenues of the CoUectorates, and to make their arrange- 
ments in consultation, when necessary, with the Political Agent, 
Kolhapur and Southern Maratha Conntry, for the time being, with 
this view. 

Provided always that this article does not bind the Joint Administrators 
of Sangli to any arrangements injurious to the legitimate interests of the 
State or revenue, and that it is underst ood that the Abkari revenue of the 
CoUectorates will in like manner be so managed as not to cause injury to the 
legitimate Abkari revenue of the State. 

2f 



218 Kolhapur Agenoy— ^8. M. Jag%rdar9^Ahhari^'So. IsXXVL Part II 

This agreement agreed to at SangU on the 2nd (second) day of September 
one thou&and eight hundred and eighty* five. 

Approved and confirmed by His (Sd.) In VerDacuIar. 

Excellency the Viceroy and Governor ( « ) W, B. Ferris, Captain, 
General in Council. Acting Joint Administratarp 

(Sd.) H. M. DuRAND, Sanglu 

Seeretarf to tie Government of India, ( w ) John W. Watson, 

Foreign Department. Acting Political AgetU, 

Kolhapur and 8. M. Country. 

Fort William, 

The 2Bth January 1886. 



Similar agreements were executed by the Chiefs or Representtttives of the 
Jludhol State on 27th August 1S85, the iiam^tfr^ State on SOth November 

1885, the Miraj Junior State on 29lh March 1886, the Kurundtcar Senior 
State on 5th July 1886 ^ the Jamkhandi State for 5 years on GthAuy^ust 

1886, and the Kuru/idwar Junior State on the— ~ 



No. LXXVI. 



Abticlbs of Agreement for benewing the lease of the Abkabi 
Eeyenue of tiie Sangli State to the British Oovebkkent 
for a TEKM of eight years from first August one thousand 
eight hundred and eighty-six to thirty-first July one thou« 
sand eight hundred and ninety-four — 1885. 

Preamhle.^'YIhereas it is coneidered desirable to place the administration 
of the Abkari revenue of the Sangli State on the same footing as the admini- 
stration of the Abkari revenue of the British Collectorates adjoining the Sangli 
State, which has recently been improved in accordance with the provisions of 
the Bombay Abkari Act, 1878, and especially with a view to prevent injury 
to the Abkari revenue of either the Collectorates or the Sangli Stat« by illicit 
manufacture of liquor or by the smuggling of liquor from one territory into 
the other^ the following articles have been agreed on between Dhundirao 
Cbidtaman, Chief of Sangli^ and Captain William Butler Ferris, Acting Joint 
Administrator of Sangli, on the one part, and Lieutenant-Colonel Henry 
Nicholas Beeves, Political Agent, Kolhapur and Southern Maratha Countrfj 
for the time being, on behalf o£ tho British Government, on the otheti 



«<tai 



jPart II Kolhapur Agenoy—'S'. Jf. JagMara^Ahkari^'So. LXXVI. 219 



Aetiolb 1. 

The Joint Administrators of Sangli engage that the law of the Sangli 
State as regrards Abkari shall be the Bombay Abkari Act of 1878^ or any law 
which may hereafter be substituted for that Act in the Bombay Presidency. 

A&TIGLB 2. 

In iorder that the new system of Abkari administration in the Sangli 
State may be effectually organised on the principles of the Bombay Abkari 
Act, the Joint Administrators of Sangli engage hereby to farm the entire 
Abkari revenue of the State to the Bombay Government for a term of eight 
years from first August one thousand eight nundred and eighty-six to thirty- 
first July one thousand eight hundred and ninety-four, in consideration of an 
annual payment of Rupees twenty- nine thousand two hundred and eighty- 
one^ annas two and pies eighty being the average of the total net Abkari 
tevenue of the State from Fasli 1280 to Fasli 1289, plus twenty-five per cent, 
in consideration of any possible increase of revenue during the term of the 
lease.* 

This sum to be paid in equal moieties half-yearly on tenth January and 
tenth July of each year. 

Article 8. 

During the term of the farm the administration of the Abkari revenue of 
the Sangli State will be conducted by such officers as Government may 
appoint^ on the following principles :— 

{a) The rates of taxation of liquor in the Sangli State and in the Col- 
lectorates to be equivalent. 

{p) Reasonable facilities for obtaining a supply of liquor for consump- 
tion to be afforded to the people of the Sangli State as to the 
people of the Collectorates. 

(c) The retail selling price of liquor to be the same in the Sangli State 
and in the Collectorates, so as to remove any inducement to the 
people of one territory to consume liquor sold in the other terri- 
tory on account of its being cheaper. 

Note. — Under the last stipulation it will not be necessary to forbid sale 
of liquor in Sangli shops to British raiyats or vice versd. 

Article 4. 

But during the term of the farm the officers appointed by Government 

will consult the Joint Administrators regarding details of Abkari administra- 

. tion, such as the number and position of liquor shops^ the persons to receive 

■ — 

^ NoTB. — In calculating the amount of compdnsation the average net receipts of the SangH 
' Treaaory from toddy (or the juice of different kinds of palm treei) are included, as sach items are 
■ Abkari revenue uuder the Bombny Abkari AoU 



S20 Kolhapur Agenoy^^. M. Jag%tdar9-^Ahkari^'So. LlULVI. Part II 



retail liceDses and the like^ and will consider the wiahes of tbe Joint Admini- 
atrators on such points. 

Article 5. 

It is understood that the farm conveys to the GoTemment of Bombay no 
right of ownership in palm and other toddy-prodacing trees or in tbe land in 
which they stand. 

Article 6. 

On their part the Joint Administrators of Snngii engage cordially to eo- 
operate in carrying out the provision? of the Abkari law and rules, and to do 
their best by themselves and their subordinate officers to prevent all illicit 
possession, manufacture, sale, transport of liquor or of the materials or imple- 
ments used for its manufacture, in aocordaLoe with the provisiooa of the Act^ 
and of any rules which may be made under it. 

Article 7. 

It is understood that all ofFences against the Abkari law will be cognis- 
able under section 51 of the Abkari Act l>y the Sangli Criminal Courta^ in the 
same manuer as other offences are cognizable. 

Article 8. 

During the term of the farm the Abkari accounts of the Sangli State 
will be kept separatdy from those of the adjoining Colleotorate^^ and sn 
annual account given to the Sangli St«te for information. 

Article 9. 

At the conclusion of the eight-year farm the management of the Ai«kari 
revenue of the Sangli State will revert to the Joint Administrators of SanglL 

ASTICLE 10. 



ance 



They engage tiiereafter to conduct their administration of it in accord- 
with the principles laid down in the preamble of this agreement, namely : 

To maintain the same Abkari law and rules as may be in foree in the 
neighbouring CoUectorates. 

To impose rates of taxation on liquor equivalent to those in force in the 

CoUectorates. 

So to manage their revenue that injury shall not be eaifsed by it to the 
Abkari revenues of the CoUectorates, and to make their arrange- 
ments in consultation, when necessary, with the Political Agent^ 
Kolhapnr and Southern Maiatha Country, for the time being, 
with this view. 

Provided always that this article does not bind the Joint Administrators 
of Saugli to any arrangements injurious to the legitimate intevesti of the State 



222 Kolhapur Agenoj^S, M, Jagirdar$^Ahkari—TSo, LXXVII. Part IX 



from one territory into the other, the followin^^ articles have been ag^med on 
between Gangadhar Rao Ganesh Patwardhan, Chief of Miraj Senior, on be- 
half of himself, his heirs and successors on the one part, and Colonel Charles 
Wodehouse, C.I.E.i Political Agent, Kolhapur and Southern Marat ha Country, 
•for the time being, on behalf of the British Government, on the other. 

Article 1. 

The Chief of Miraj Senior engages that the law of the Miraj Senior 
State as regards Abknri shall be the Bombay Abkari Act of 1878, or any law 
which may hereafter be substituted for that Act in the Bombay Presidency. 

ARTICLE 2. 

In order that the new system of Abkari administration in the Miraj 
Senior State may be efEectually organized on the principles of the Bombay 
Abkari Act, the Chief of Miraj Senior engages hereby to farm the entire Abkaii 
revenue of the State to the Bombay Government for a term of eight years 
from first August one thoasaud eight hundred and eis^hty-six to tbirty-first 
July one thousand eight hundred and ninety-four, in consideration of an 
annual payment of Rs. (6,122-2-8) six thousand one hundred and twenty-two, 
annas two and pies three (being the average of the total net Abkari revenue 
of the Miraj Senior State from FasH 12 SO to Fasli 1289, plus about 25 
per cent, in consideration of any possible increase of revenue during the term 
of the lease).* This sum to be paid in equal moieties half-yearly on the tenth 
January and tenth July of each year. 

Aeticlb 3. 

During the terra of the farm the administration of the Abkari revenue of 
the Miraj Senior State will he conducted by such oflScers as Q-overnment may 
appoint, on tlie following principles : — 

(a) The rates of taxation of liquor in the Miraj Senior State and in the 
CoUectorates to be equivalent. 

ifl) Such reasonable facilities for obtaining a supply of liquor for con- 
sumption are to be afforded to the people of the Miraj Senior 
Slate as are afforded to the people of the adjoining CoUectorates. 

(c) The retail selling price of liquor to be the same in the Miraj Senior 
State and in the CoUectorates, so as to remove any inducement 
to the people of one territoiy to consume liquor sold in the other 
territory on account of its being cheaper. 

NoTB.— Under the last stipulation it will not be necessary to forbid sale 
of liquor in the Miraj Senior State shops to British raiyats or vice vend. 

* KoTB. — In calcalating the amonnt of compensation the average net Teceipts of the Miraj 
Treasury from toddy (or the juiee of different kinds of palm trees) are inclndedy as sach items 
are Ahkari revenue under the Bomhay Ahkari Act. 



Part II Kolhapur Agency— /9- Jf. Ja^irdars^Ahkari—'No. LXXVII. 228 



Articlb 4. 

But during the tenn of the farm the officers appointed hj Governmeot 
will consnlt the Chief of Miraj Senior regarding details of Abkari administra- 
tion, such as the number and position of liquor shops, the persons to receive 
retail licenses, and the like, and will consider the wishes of the Chief on such 
points. 

Articlb 5. 

It is understood that the farm conveys to the Oovernment of Bombay no 
right in palm and other toddy-produciug trees, or in the land in which they 
stand. 

Abticlb 6. 

On his part the Chief of Miraj engages to co-operate in <»rrying out the 
provisions of the Abkari law and rules, and to do his best by himself, his heirs, 
successors and by his subordinate officers to prevent all illicit possession, 
manufacture, sale, and transport of liquor or of the materials or implements 
used for its manufacture, in accordance with the provisions of the Act and of 
any rules which may be made under it. 

Article 7. 

It is understood that all offences against the Abkari law will be cogniz- 
able under Section 51 of the Abkari Act by the Miraj Senior State Criminal 
Courts in the same manner as other offences are cognizable. 

Articlb 8. 

During the term of the farm the Abkari accounts of the Miraj Senior 
State will be kept separately from those of the adjoining CoIIectorates, and an 
annual account given to the Chief of Miraj Senior for his information. 

Abticlb 9. 

At the conclusion of the eight years^ farm the management of the Abkari 
revenue of the State will revert to the Chief of Miraj Senior. 

Artici^ 10. 

The Chief of Miraj Senior engages, on behalf of himself, his heirs and 
successors thereafter to conduct the administration of it in accordance with the 
principles laid down in the preamble of this agreement, viz, :«— 

To maintain the same Abkari law and rules as may be in force in the 
neighbouring CoIIectorates. 

To impoFo rates of taxation on liquor equivalent to those in force in the 
CoUectofates. 



324 Kolhapur Agenoy— ^. M. Jagirda/r^^Ff IVade^Vo. IiXXVIIL Fftft IZ 



So to manag^e his revenue^ that injury shall not be caused by it to tha 
Abkari revenue of the Collectorates, and to make his arrange- 
ments in consultation, when neoessary, with the Politioal Agent, 
Kolhapur and SoutLem Mahratta Country, for the time being, 
with this view : 

Provided always that this article does not bind the Chief of Miraj Senior 
to any arrangements injurious to the legitimate interests of the State or 
revenue, and that it is understood that the Abkari revenue of the Collectorates 
will, in like manner, be so managed as not to cause injury to the legitimate 
Abkari revenue of the State. 

This agreement agreed to at Miraj the twenty-fonrth day of March one 
thousand eight hundred and ninety-two. 

(Sd.) Charles Wodehousb, (Sd.) O. G. Patwabdhajt, 

Political Agent, Kolhapur and Chief of Miraj Senior. 

8, M. Country. 

Approved and confirmed by His Excellency the Viceroy and Oovemor- 
General of India. 

(Sd.) H. M. DUBAND, 

Simla, ) Seereiary to the Government of India, 

The 28th May 1892. ) Foreign Department. 



No. LXXVIII. 



Articles of Agebbment for the promotion of Free Trade in the 
State of Sangli and certain other States in the Southern 
Maratha Country— 1886. 

Preamble. — ^herens the Joint Administrators of Sangli agreed on the 
eighth of February one thousand eight hundred and eighty-six to abolish the 
duties on import and export, known respectively as Sthalmod and Sthallharit, 
throughout the Sangli State, on condition that the States of Miraj Senior and 
Junior agreed to surrender any claims or shares which they might possess or 
assert in regard to the receipts of the said taxes ; and whereas it is desired to 
give permanency to this engagement^ and at the same time to remove further 
restrictions on Free Trade iu the Sangli State, the following articles in this 
view are agreed upon between the Joint Administrators of Sangli, Meherban 
Dhnndirao Chintaman, Chief c£ Sangli, and Lieutenant-Colonel William 
Arthur Salmon, Joint Administrator of Sangli, on behalf of the Chief of 
Sangli, his heirs and successors on the one part, and William Lee- Warner, 
Esquire, Political Agent oE Kolhapur and Southern Maratha Countryi for the 
time being, on behalf of the British Government, on the other. 



Fart II Kolhapiir Agenoy— iS. M Jagirdan—Free Trade—'No. LXXVIII. 226 



Aaticle 1. 

The Sangli State engagres to abolish from henceforth all taxes or imposts 
on the import, export^ measurement^ or private sale of any commodities other 
than snuffy sulphur aud poisonous drugs : Provided that nothing contained in 
this article shall be construed to prevent the levy of any tolls on bridges, 
roads, ferries, canals, or causeways for the repair or maintenance of the same, 
or of any octroi levied upon articles consumed within municipal limits, or of 
any taxes constituting the Abkari revenue. 

Artiolb 2. 

With a view to encourage local industries, the State of Sangli engages to 
abolish all special taxes on trades or industries levied under the name of 
Mohtarpha or any other designation. 

Aktiole 3. 

The British Government engages to obtain from the States of Miraj 
Senior and Miraj Junior a relinquishment of their claims upon, or shares in, 
any duties or imposts which are abolished in the State of Sangli under the 
operation of Articles 1 and 2 of this agreement. 

Artiole 4. 

The British Government engages to obtain from the States of Miraj 
Senior and Miraj Junior an agreement to abolish within their respective terri- 
tories any duties or taxes therein levied which may correspond to those which 
the State of Sangli has engaged to abolish, and the State of Sangli thereon 
agrees to abandon whatever claims or shares it may now assert or possess in 
the said duties or taxes accordingly abolished in the States of Miraj Senior 
and Miraj Junior. . 

Executed at Sangli this nineteenth day of November one thousand eight 
hundred and eighty-six. 

(Sd.) William Lbb-Warnbh, 

Political Agent, Southern 
Maratka Countryand KolAapur, 



(Sd.) William Arthur SalmoNi 

Lieut.'Colonelf 
JoifU Administrator, Sangli, 




226 Eolhapur Agenoy— ^9. Jf. JagWdart -Free Trade^lXo. T^'XTT^- Part IX 



A pproved and confirmed by His Excellency the Viceroy and Oovernor- 
Generai io Council. 

(Sd.) W. J, CUNINQHAM, 

Officiating Secretary to ike Oovernment of India, 

Foreign Department. 
Fort William; *) 

Tie 28th February 1887. ) 

Similar agreemeDts were exeoated by the Chief of Miraj Senior and th« 
Representatives of Miraj Junior, on the 8th November 1886. 



No. LXXIX. 



Abtioles of Agkeement for the promotion of Free Trade in the 
State of Kamdurg and certain other States in the Southern 
Maratha Country— 1886. 

Preamble. — Whereas the State of Ramdurg agreed on the thirteenth of 
April one thousand eight hundred and eighty-six to abolish the duties on 
import and export known respectively as Sthalmod aud Sthalbharit^ and 
whereas it is desired to give permanency to this engas:ement and to remove 
further restrictions on free trade in the Ramdurg State by the abolition of 
other taxes upon trade and industry, the following articles in this view are 
agreed upon between the Joint Karbharis of the State of Ramdurg on behalf 
of Venkatrao Yogirao^ Chief of Ramdurg, his heirs and successors, on the one 
part, and William Lee- Warner, Esquire, Political Agent of Kolhapur and 
the Southern Maratha Country, for the time being, on behalf of the British 
Government, on the other. 

Article 1.- 

The State of Ramdurg engages to abolish from henceforth all taxes or 
imposts on the import, export, measurement or private sale of any commo« 
dities other than snuff, sulphur and poisonous drugs : Provided that nothing 
contiiined in this article shall be construed to prevent the levy of any tolls 
on bridges, roads, ferries, canals or causeways for the repair or maintenanoe 
of the same, or of any octroi levied upon articles consumed within municipal 
limits, or of any taxes constituting the Abkari revenue. 

Aetiole S. 

With a view to encourage local industries, the State of Ramdurg engages 
to abolish all special taxes on trades or industries levied under the name of 
Mohtarpha or any other designation. 



Part II Kolhapujr Agenoy— ^. M, Jayirdan^The Patwardkans^TXo. IiXXX. 227 



Articlb 8. 

The British Government engages to obtain from the State of Kolhapur 
an agreement to abolish within the territories of His Highness the Raja 
of Kolhapnr any duties or taxes therein levied ^ which may correspond to 
ihoae which the State of Ramdurg has engaged to abolish. 

Executed at Ramdurg this the tenth day of November one thousand 
eight hundred and eighty-six. 

(Signed) William Leb-Warneb, 

Political Agent f Southern Marat Aa Country 

and Kolhapur. 

(Signed) (in Vernacular) 

State Karbhari, 

(Signed) Waman Krishna Date, 

Barbar Karbhari^ 
Joint Administrators y Ramdurg State. 

Approved and confirmed by His Excellency the Viceroy and Governor- 
General in Council. 

Port William ) (^^-J ^- ^' Cuningham, 

-.. ^« . ■« , \r>rm. V Offg, Secfetarv to the Govt, of India. 

The 28th February msr . j "' ^ Foreign Department. 

Similar agreements were executed by the Chief of Mudhol on the 
2nd May 1887, the Chief of Kurundwar Junior on the 10th June 18H7, the 
Chief of Ja^khandi on the 17th June 1887, and the Chief of Kurundwar 
Senior on the dth July 1887. 




No. LXXX. 



Articles of Aobeement* entered into by the Honottkable M. 
Elphikstone, in the name of the Beitish Goyernmei^t, on 
behalf of the Feishwa, with the Jaghiredabs of the South- 
ern Mahbatta Gountby, in July and August 1812, com- 
monly called " The Agbeement of Pundebpobb/* 

Articlb 1. 
The British Gk)vernment engages that no notice shall be taken of past 

* This docameot conreiponds with the Paper of requests presented by the Besident at Foona 
to the Peshwa's Ministers on the 6th of July 1812. See '* The Pesbwa,*' VoU VI. The original 
agreement is supposed to have been bornt with the Poona Besidency in 1817. This copy is taken 
from a draft agreement appended to a letter from Mr. Elphinstone, to Lord Minto, dated 9th July 
1812, and corresponds with a copy in the possession of one of the jaghiredars. It may therefore 
be accepted as genuine. 

NoTB. — The above terms were agreed to by the jaghiredars of the Southern Mahratta country 
in July and August 1812. The Chief of Tasgaon was not included in the agreement. 



228 Kolhapur Agenoy— A M. Jagirdar$^Th$ PiOwardhanM^'No. IiXXX. Part IX 



offences by His Highness the Peishwa, and also that the jaghiredars shall not 
be molested by the revival of old claims of a pecuniary nature or otherwise. 
On the other hand^ the jaghiredars promise never to revive any former claims 
on His Highness the Peishwa. 

Artiolb £. 

The jaghiredars engage to restore promntly all usurped lands without 
exception, and to relinquish all revenues which they enjoy without Sunnuds. 
Their Sunnuds to be examined for this purpose^ and any grounds they may offer 
for mitigation to be hereafter investigated. Under this Article all lands 
whidi are held in kamavis are to be restored to the Peishwa. 

Article S. 

The jaghiredars engage to serve His Highness the Peishwa according 
to the former practice of the Mahratta Empire^ as laid down in the Tynat 
Zabitas. 

Artiolb 4. 

The jaghiredars are to carry on no hostilities whatever, unless authorized 
by His Highness the Peishwa ; and should any occasion arise for priva:te wars 
among themselves, they promise to submit their disputes to the Peishwa^ and 
to abide by His Highnesses decision. 

Artiolb 5. 

The British Government pledges itself that the jaghiredars shall retain 
undisturbed possession of their Sunnudee lands as long as they serve His 
Highness the Peishwa with fidelity, and also promises to use its influence to 
induce His Highness to restore them to favour, and to treat them with due 
consideration, on the same terms. 

Article 6. 

His Highness the Peishwa has entrusted all the negotiations affecting 
the preceding questions to the British Resident, who has been instructed by 
the Bight Honourable the Governor-General to carry them into effect, and to 
see that they are punctually observed. 

(Sd.) M. ELPfllNSfONB, 

Resident at Poona, 



(A true translation.) 



(Sd.) R. Close, 

Jssitiant BesideHi, 



Part II Kcdliapiir Agy.— ^. M. Jaffirdar9^The Taiwardkant^'So. 'LXXSi'L 229 



No. LXXXI. 

Mbmoranbum of Terms granted by the Honourable East 
India Company to Chintamun Rao Appah Putwurdhun 
regarding the lands which he held from the Government 
of His Highness the Peishwa for the Payment of his 
Contingent, of his Personal Allowance, etc., bearing 
date the Arabic year 1219, a.d. 1819. 

Abtiola 1. 

In the Arabic year 1£1S a settlement was conclnded, and a letter and 
memorandam on the part of the British Government were despatched from 
Panderpore. In the Srd Article of that memorandum it is written that you 
are to serve the Peishwa according to the ancient custom of the Mahratta 
Empire^ as it appears in your Tynat Zabita. With reference to that agree- 
ment it has now been settled that you shall serve with (450 horse) one«fourth 
of the contingent of troops, for the maintenance of which you now hold 
lands; or that in lieu of such service you shall pay to the government in ready 
money, at the rate of Rupees 800 a horse, the amount of the allowance of 
that number, or that you shall relinquish an equivalent in land, whereupon 
yon having agreed to give up the amount of the allowances in land, you will 
now make over the said land to the government according to a separate 
Schedule. 

Article 2. 

As long as you remain faithful and true to government, your lands shall 
be continued to you without interruption. This stipulation was contained in 
the 5th Article of the terms of Punderpore and is hereby confirmed. A 
Sunnud to this effect, issued by the Most Noble the Governor-General, will 
be made over to you. 

Abtiole 3. 

You shall on no account entertain troops for the purpose of engaging in 
a contest with any person whatever. In the event of any cause of dispute 
arising, you must not resort yourself to extreme measures, but must refer the 
question to Government for consideration]: it will then be impartially adjusted, 
and you must abide by the decision. This Article corresponds with the '4th 
clause of the terms of Punderpore, which is hereby confirmed. 

Articlb 4. 

You will attend to the prosperity of the ryots of your jaghire, to the 
strict administration of justice, and the effectual suppression of robberies, 
murders, arsons, and other crimes. This Article is an essential condition of 
the present Agreement ; you must therefore indispensably maintain the good 
order of your country. 



230 Kolhapur Agy.—S. IC Jag%rdari'^Th9 Fatwardhat^JSfo. IiXXXI. Fart II 



Artiolb 5. 

You will continue all rights within your jaghire^ whether belongings to the 
State or to individuals^ all doomallee, surinjam, and enam villages and lands, 
all wurshasuns (or annual pensions)^ dhurmadaos (or charitable allowaiioes)^ 
dewasthans (or religious establishments), rozeenah (daily stipends), kbyrats 
(alms to Maliomedans), nemnooks (or assignments on the revenue), etc., and if 
in any particular instance any interruption shall have been offered to a ^raut 
not annulled by government, such grant shall likewise be made good without 
hindrance to the proprietor. No complaints on this head are to be suffered to 
reach the government. 

Articlb 6. 

If any offenders from your jaghire lands shall come into those of the 

Severn ment, you will represent the affair, and they shall, on enquiry, be 
elivered up to you ; and should any offenders against the government, or 
criminals belonging to its territory, seek refuge in your country, they will be 
pursued by the government officers ; and you will afford every assistance in 
delivering up such offenders. 

Articlb 7. 

The British Oovernmirnt will maintain your rank and dignity as it was 
maintained under His Flighness the Peishwa. It will attend to any of your 
representations^ and will decide equitably upon them ; you shall in no respect 
suffer injury, but will of course be supported as far as it is just. 

Articlb 8. 

Any villages, lands, or other possessions belonging to your surinjam or 
enam situated within the lands of government shall be continued without 
obstruction as they have heretofore been continued. 

Tie ahove^writtm eight Articles are agreed to, 16th May 1619, correspond^ 
ing to 19th Bujjub. 



Abtiolbs of Stipulation on the Tbansfbb of Lands to the 
amount of Bupees 1,35,000 in lieu of Contingent of 460 
required by the Tynat Zabita, dated Beejapore, 12th Decem- 
ber 1820. 

The giving up of Shapore^ which was desirable from its proximity to 
the cantonment of Belgaum^ being objected to by Chintamun Kao^ it is 
engaged as follows :— 

Article 1. 
There shall be no spirit^dealing in Shapore. 



Part II Kolhapur Agy»^8. Jr. Jagirdars^The Patwardhans-^J^o, LXZXI. 281 



Abticlb 2. 

There shall be no mint or coinage in Shapore, to prevent objectiont 
xegardiDg the carreDoy. 

Article S, 

No equivalent to be required from the British Government on- acoouut 
«f these two items. 

Abticlb 4. 

The Collector will fix villages in the neighbourhood of Belgaum^ with 
ihe exception of Shapore^ to be given up to the amount of Rupees 10^775-1-68, 
required to complete the sum of Rupees 1^85,000. Villages to be given up 
which contain toddy trees^ in order to prevent future collision, and the nem- 
nook or village payments to be deducted in the estimation of they value. 



Aeticle 5. 

The large petta of Sbapore near the cantonment shall aid in the supply 
of coolies and bullocks that may be required for military purposes. 



Article 6. 

The Collector of Dharwar will deliver over all the lands held under 
attachment, which are to be relinquished on security being furnished for such 
other lands being given (by three instalments of one month each) as shall be 
found requisite to complete the necessary sum (Rupees 1>S5^000), the deduc- 
tions on' account of police and nemnook expenditure being included in the 
calculation. 

Article 7. 

The revenues of the relinquished lands are entered according to the data 
furnished from the Collector's Office at Dharwar; and the Vakeel having 
represented that the revenues may be found to be somewhat greater on 
examination, it is stipulated that should such be the case, there will be a 
proportional deduction made in the lands remaining to be transferred to the 
Company in the Shapore Mehal. 



Agbbembnt made by Chintahtjn Bao Fandoobung, Sunnut 

TJshreen-wu-Myatein-wu-TJlf 1229 Fuslee. 

I was a Sirdar and subject under the Peishwa. The Peishwa's govern- 
ment was set aside, and that of the Company established. My jaghire has 



m 

282 KoUiapar Agy^S. M, Ja^irdan^Tke Paiwardhatu^lSfo. LXXXI* Pari II 



with the other territories come under the British OoverDment. I will serre 
the British Government, as I may he directed^ with fidelity an4 attachment, 
with such lands as may be graciously bestowed on me. I ehsdl not maintaia 
connection with, or dependence on^ the Peishwa. I shall not hereafter make 
any claims according to the former Tynat Zabita. I relinquish the claim I 
made formerly of my relations, the Miritchkur^ Tasgaonkur, Koorundwarkur 
Sirdars, being under my authority. I accept only whatever jaghire the 
British Government may be pleased to grant me, and I beg a memorandam 
for the continuance of it, by which I will permanently abide. This is the 
agreement. 



P«ft n KoUMpnr Atr.—S. X. Jt^rdart—Tk* Tatwardhtmt^NO. ttXXXt. 338 



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284 KolhWOT Agy.— 'S'. Jf. Jagirdarg-^TIU Paiwardhant^JSfo. LXXXH* VBXt II 



No. LXXXII. 

Terms granted by the Honourable East India Compaiit to 
GuNPUT Rao Bappoo Putwurdhdn regarding the lands 
which he held from the Pbishwa*s Government for the 
Payment of his Contingent, of his Personal Allowance, 
etc., and regarding the future arrangement of his jaghire 
and the execution of the Agreement concluded with him 
by Brigadier* General T. Munro. Arabic year 1220 — 
(1819). 

Abticlb 1. 

According to ancient practice, you ouofht to serve with as many horse 
as your lands will maintain at Rupees 800 a horse ; but as that would be 
more than you could accomplish, General Munro made the following declara- 
tion in the 18th Article of his Agreement:— ''The Company does not exact 
service like the constant duty you used to do under the Peishwa ; once in ten 
or fifteen years, when an important affair occurs, it is necessary to come to the 
Company^s assistance ; except in such times you shall not always be summoni- 
ed/' On this you have now requested that the terms of your service may not 
be left indistinct, and have stated your inability to act up to the full extent 
of the terms of your Tynat Zabita : it is therefore a^eed that you shall be 
excused the service of three-fourths of your contingent, and shall serve con- 
stantly with the remaining fourth, 150 horse only. This is hereby confirmed 
by the government. 

Article 2. 

Your troops shall be mustered whenever called on ; the horses and men 
shall be good and effective, and shall serve the whole year. Should the 
number upon muster prove deficient, the amount of such deficiency shall be 
repaid to government at the established rate. If a detachment of 2U or W 
horse is required to be sent from the army on your affairs, you must first 
mention it to the oflBcer in command on the part of the government, and they 
will in that case be included in the muster. When your troops are not 
required, they will be permitted to return to your own station fo^ monsoon 
quarters for four months during the rainy season, but it' they are required, 
they must remain. 

Articlk 3. 

You shall serve in such manner as the government may order; you will 
not in general be required to t^erve bejond the Godavery and Toombudra; 
but if at any time you should be required to do so, you must go without 
objecting. On such occasions you will 1 e furnished with money for the pay- 
ment of your troops according to the estimated expense, which money is to be 
rt'paid to government in your own country. 



Fart II Kolhapur Agy.— 5. Jf. Jagirdarg-^TKe Patwardham --TXo, LXXXII. 235 



Abticle 4. 

in tli« event of either men or horses being killed or wounded in action, 
you will receive ik) compenf^ation from government; all expenses are to be 
provided for out of the war allowance granted. This is to be observed accord- 
ing to former ))ractice ; but if any great man should be wounded or killed in 
uction, a reward will be given to him by the government if wounded^ or a 
pension to his family if he be killed in action. 

Article 5. 

In addition to your contingpnt you will maintuin at your own expense 
9neh establishments for the preservation of order within your limit as may be 
nt-cessary ; and iu the event of disturbances in the districts adjoinin^^ to yours, 
you will' furnish assistance with Ruch troops as may be in your lands. If any 
great disturbance should break out in your lands, you will receive assistance 
on your applying to government. 

Article 6. 

In the loth Articlp of the Ajrteement with General Munro it is written 
that on your submitting to the Britii^h Government, your jaghire shall be 
t^oiitinued to you on the former footing, and in the Hth Article is a nimUar 
engagement for the maintenance of your honour and dignitv : it is therefore 
agreed that as long^as you shall continue to serve the British Government 
with fidf'lity and attachment, your ja<jhire shall remain unquestioned and 
undi:^turbed in your po> session, and a Sunnud shall be procured to the same 
<efE«;ct from His Excellency the Most Noble the Governor-Geiieral hereafter. 
When new Sunnuds are required for your descendants in puccession, it is to 
be represented to government, which will graciously confer a new Sunnud 
without exactinir any nuzzur. A separate Article has been executed on this 
headj which will be conformed to. 

Article 7. 

Any villages, lands, or other possessions belonging to your surinjam enam 
situated within the lands of government shall be continued without cbstruc* 
tiou aa they have heretofore been continued. 

Article 8. 

You will continue all rights witiiin your jaghire, whether belonging to 
the State or individuals, all doomallee, surinjam, and enam villages and lands, 
all wureihasnns (or annual pent-ions), dhurmadaos (or relioious establishments), 
rozeenah (daily stipends), kliyrats (alms to Mahomtdans), nemnooks (or 
assignments on the revenue), etc, in conformity to the list contained in the 
grant of your suiinjam, .and if in any particular instance any interruption 
shall have been offered to a gram not annulled by government, such grant 
shrill likewise be made good without hindrance to the proprietor, i^o com- 
plaints on this head are to be suffered to reach the government. If any 
zemindar should be guilty of rebellion or treason, or bhculd resist your 



236 Kolhapur Agy.— ^. M. Jag%riar»'^Tk§ Fatmardhmt9^Vo. IiZZZII. Fart I. 



anfhoritji you are at liberty to resume his lands ae a punishment on satisfy- 
ing yourself of his gxjolt. If any of the other persons above enumerated 
should be guilty of an ofience^ or it any of them should die without heirs, you 
will announce it to government, which will punish the guilty and '* take posses* 
sion of the vacant lands/' * 

Articlb 9. 

You will attend to the prosperity of the ryots of your jagi ire, to the 
strict administration of justice, and the effectual suppreation of robberies^ 
murders, arsons, and other crimes. The government will not enquire into 
any trifling complaints that may arise in your jaghire. When any complaint 
is made, it will be referred to you, and you are to settle it equitably. If at 
any time your jaghire should fall into great disorder, and robberies should be 
committed without proper investigation and redress on your part, it will be 
necessary that arrangements should be made on the part of the government. 

• 

Articlb 10. 

You shall on no account entertain troops for tbe purpose of engaging in 
a contest with any person whatever. In the event of any cause of dispute 
arising, you must not resort your^^elf to extreme measuref>, but must refer the 
question to government for consideration; it will then be impartially adjusted, 
and you must abide by the decision. * t 

Abticlb 11. 

In the 16th Article of your A^rreement with General Mnnro it is agreed 
that if any persons of your district, or any of your dependants, should be 
guilty of offences, and should fly to the government or to any other person, 
they shall, on representation to government, be delivered up. It is therefore 
now agreed that if any offenders of yours escape to the lands of government, 
or to those of other persons, you are to represent it to government, and on 
enquiry they shall be delivered up ; and should any offenders against the gov- 
ernment, or criminals belonging to its territory, seek refuge in your country, 
they will be pursued by the government officers, and you will afford every 
assistance in delivering up such offenders. 

Articlb lit. 

The British Government will maintain your rank and dignity as it was 
maintained under His Highness the Feishwa iii former times. It will attend 
to any of your representations and will decide equitably upon them ; you shall 
in no respect suffer injury, but will, of course, be supported as far as is just. 
To this effect it wa« promised by General Munro in the 4th Article of hia 
Agreement ; it is therefore inserted here. 

• Mahraila—** mtkt Arrao^cmeutt." 



Part II Kolhapur Agj.^8. Jf. Ja^irdar^—Tke Paiwttrdkamt—Vo. LZZXII. S87 



AirasLi IS. 

It WM agreed by General Monro that you shoald only serve on g^reat 
oocationBj such as oocar once in ten or fifteen years; nevertheless, you have 
atirreed to serve at all times with a fourth of your contingent ; it is therefoxe 
determined to grant yon, under the name of personal allowance (Zabita Tyoat), 
lands yielding an annual revenue of Rupees SO^OOO, to commence from the 
l«t day of the current year. 

Abticlb 14. 

It was agreed by General Munro, in the 16th Article of his agreement, 
that vour disputes with your relations should be equitably adjusted; there is a 
stipulation in the 4th Article for the equitable division of Bhoze and Yek- 
slinmba, and an adjustment on these principles would exclude all consider^ 
ations of delicacy : it is therefore resolved to put an end to the disputes between 
the Sirdars by the following grant to you, to commence from the 1st day of 
the current year, in full satisfaction of all your claims regarding the jagfaire. 
If the village of Bhoze is not obtained for you from Oopal Rao, you will 
receive lands yielding Rupees 6,400 a year, the addition of Rupees 800 to the 
value of the village being as a compensation for your disappointment. In lieu 
of the third share of Annapore^ you will receive Rupees 1,800. 



ARTIOLli 15. 

You applied to General Munro for an enam for the god Gunputtee, at 
Tasgaon ; it is therefore determined to grant, from the first day of this year, 
an eaam of Rupees 2,000 ; Rupees 1,000 for the expenses of the daily sacrifice 
and annual oeremoniesi and Rupees 1^000 for the expense of a band of music. 

Articlb 16. 

If it should appear that you were in the habit of receiving from the 
Peishwa's government exemptions from the payment of duties on flocks of 
sheep, or rice, cloth, and other articles required for your own use, you will on 
enquiry receive similar exemptions, but should these exemptions derange the 
system established for the country, they will not be granted. 

Article 17. 

The lands now granted to you for a personal Tynat, and for the purpose 
of accommodating your disputes with your family, do not involve the service 
of any horse in addition to the stipulated number of 150. 

Tie above seventeen Articles are agreed to this 17th of Juno 1819^ Siahun 
SSrdj 1220 Arabic, in camp at Moockoondee, in tkepergunnak of Jutt. 



238 Kolhapor Agy.— 5. U. Jagirdart—Tkt Fatwardhatu—TSo. LZXZIII. Fart II 



No. LXXXIII. 

Teems granted by the Honourable E^st India Company to Kecu 
sow Rao Baba Futwubdhun regarding the lands which he 
held from the Government of His Highness the Pbishwa 
for the Payment of his Contingent, of his Personal 
Allowance, etc., bearing date the Arabic year 1219, a.d. 
1819. 

Abticlr 1. 

In the Arabic year 121«*5 a peitlement was concluded, and a letter and 
a memorandum on the part of the British (Government were despatched from 
Funderpore. In the three Articles of that memorandum it is written that 
you are to serve the Peishwa according to the custom of the Mahratta Empire, 
as it appears in your Tynat Zabita; but as the Sirdars would not be able to 
perform the serving according to the terms of their Tynat Zabitas, it is now 
Settled, out of consideration for them, that they shall serve with one-fourth of 
the contingent of troops, for the maintenance of which they hold lands, or 
that in lieu of such service they shall pay to government in ready money, at 
the rate of Rupees 300 a horse, the amount of the allowance of that number 
of troops, or that they shall relinquish an equivalent in land. Whereupon 
you having agreed to serve with 70 horse, being a fourth of your contingent, 
that arrangement is hereby confirmed by the government. 

AaTicLE 2. 

Your troops shall be mustered whenever called on ; the horses and men 
shall be good and efTective, and shall serve the whole year. Should the num- 
ber upon muster prove deficient, the amount of such deficiency shall be repaid 
to government at the established rate. If a detachment of from 5 to 7 
horse is required to be sent from the army on your affairs, you must first 
mention it to the officer in command on the part of the government, and they 
will in that case be included in the muster. When your troops are not required, 
they will be permitted to return to your own station for monsoon quarters for 
four months during the rainy season, but if they are required they must re- 
main. 

Article 3. 

You shall serve in such manner as the government may order ; you will. 
not in general be required to serve beyond the Gtxlavery and Tumbudra ; but 
if at any time you should be required to do so, you most go without objecting. 
On such occasion you will be furnished by government with money for the 
payment of ycAir troops at the established rate of pay, which money is to be 
repaid to government in your own country. 



Fart;il Kolhi^lir Agy.— ^|if. Jagirdara -The Paiwardhan9—Vo. LXXXIII. 289 



Article 4. 

In the event of either men or horses bein^ killed or wounded in aotion, 
yoa will receive no compensation from government ; all expenses are to be 
provided for out of the war allowance granted. This is to be observed accord- 
ing to former practice ; but if any great man (should be wounded or killed in 
action, a reward will be given to him by the government if wounded, or a 
pension to his family if he be killed in action. 

Artiolb 5. 

In addition to your contingent you will maintain at your own expense 
such establishments for the preservation of order within your limits as may be 
necessary ; and, in the event of disturbances in your neighbourhood, you will 
furnish assistance with sach troops as may be in your lands. If any great 
disturbance should break out in your lands, you will receive assistance on your 
applying to the government. 

Abticlb 6. 

As long as you continue to serve the British Government with fidelity 
and attachment, your ja^hire shall remain unquestioned and undisturbed in 
your possession and that of tlie Sirdars of your family. This stipulation, ex- 
pressed in the 5th Article of the Terms . of Pundorpore, is hereby con6rmed| 
and a Sunnud shall be procured to the same eSeot from His Excellency the 
Most Noble the Grovemor-General hereafter. When new Sunnuds are required 
for the descendants of each respectively, it is to be represented to the govern- 
ment, which will graciously confer a new Sunnud, and continue the jaghire 
without exacting any uuzzur. 

Article 7. 

Any villages, lands, or other possessions belonning to your surinjam or 
enam, situated with^the lands of government, shall be continued without 
obstruction as they^have heretofore been continued. 

Article 8. 

You will continue all rights within your jaghire, whether belonging to 
the State or individuals ; all doomallee, surinjam, and enam villages and lands, 
all wurshasuns (or annual pensions), dhurmadaos (or charitable allowances), 
dewasthans (or religious establishments), rozenah (daily stipends), khyrata 
(alms to Mahomedans), nemnooks (or assignments on the revenue, etc.), in 
conformity to the list contained in the grant of your surinjam ; and if in any 
particular instance any interruption shall have been offered to a grant not 
annulled by government, such grant shall likewise be made good without 
hindrance to the proprietor. No complaints on this head are to be suffered to 
reach the government. If any zemindar shall be guilty of rebellion or treason, 
or should resist your authority, you are at liberty to resume his lands as a 
punishment on satisfying yourself of his guilt. If any of the other persons 



240 Kolhapur Agy.— A IC JagWdart^ThB Paiwtrdhani^lto. LXXXXII* Pttzi 11 



above enmneratecl slioald be guilty of an offence^ or if any of tbem sbonld die 
without heirs, you will announce it to government^ which ^will punish the 
guilty and make arrangements.* 

AanctB d. 

Ton will attend to the prosperity of the ryots of your jaghire, to the strict 
administration of justice, and the effectual suppression of robberies, murders, 
arsons, and other crimes. The Uovernment will not enquire into every com- 
plaint that may arise in your jaghire. When any complaint is made it will 
be referred to you, and you are to settle it equitably. If at any time your 
jaghire should tall into great disorder, and robberies should be committed^ or 
if any great crime should be committed, without proper investigation and 
redress on your part, it will be necessary that arrangements should be^made 
on the part of the government. 

Articlb 10. 

You shall on no account entertain troops for the purpose of engaging in 
a contest with any person whatever. In the event of any cause of dispute 
arising, you must not resort yourself to extreme measures, but must refer the 
question to government for consideration; it will then be im^iai^ially adjusted 
and you must abide by the decision. This Article corresponds with the fourth 
clause of the Terms of Punderpore which is hereby confirmed. 

• 
Articlb 1L 

If any offenders from your jaghire lands shall come into those of the 
government, you will represent the affair, and they shall on enquiry bo 
delivered up to you ; and should any offender against the government or 
criminal belonging to its territories, seek refuge in your country, they will be 

Sursued by the government officers, and you will afford every astfistaHoe in 
elivering up such offenders. 

Articls 12. 

The British Oovemment will maintain your rank and dignity as it was 
maintained under His Highness the Peishwa in former times. It will attend 
to any of your representations, and will decide equitably upon them. Yon 
shall in no respect suffer injury, but will^ of course, be supported as far as 
is just* 



GuKPUT Bao Tatia Meebujkub and Gopal Bao 

JUMEHTJyDEBEUB. 

The treaty with these Chiefs is the same as that contained in 12 A.v.v.«. 
with the Chief of Eoorundwar, with the addition that both parties shall 

* In tbe English trantUtion transmitted from Poonsb, it is here entered ** shall take 
aion of the vacant lands," 



Port II Kolhapur Agy.— 19. M. JagirdarM^The Paiwardhami^Ko. LXXXIV. 241 



gerve with 800 horse, as noted im 1st Article ; and in the Snd Article that, 
should occasion require it^ tbey may eend bom ^b to 40 horse for their own 
service on receiving the sanction of the officer commanding on the part of 
Government. 

Daie of Treaty, 6th June 1819, Oulgullee on He Kitina. 



OuKPUT Bao Shedbaleub. 

The Treaty with this Chief was made at the same place. It corresponds 
With the Koorundwarkor^s Theaty, excepting in requiring the services of 70 
hoxM in the Ist paragraph and in the Snd Article admitting of 5 or 7 horse- 
men being employed at home. 

Dated 6th Jwne 1819. 



No. LXXXIV. 



Tbakslation of a Letter from Tbimbace Rao Ounput of 
Shedbal, to J. D. Invbrabity, Esq., Acting Political 
Agent, Southebn Maheatta Countby, dated 9th Rubbee- 
ool-Akhir Sunnut Suman-wu-Arbaeen-wu-Myatein-wa-Ulf 
Shokkay 1769, PluTusg Nam Saowutsur, or Wednesday, 
the 11th of Falgoon Shood, the 15th March 1848. 

After compliments. — Further you have addressed to me a letter dated 
4th January lb48, to the efiEect that on a former ocoasion a oommunication 
was sent to me enquiring what objection there existed to make a cash pay- 
ment or cede land to government in lieu cf my sowars serving under govern- 
ment; and that now^ under instructions from government^ this letter is writ- 
ten to me to say that on my adopting measures to make a cash payment for 
my 86 sowars« who at present serve under government, at tiie rate of Rupees 
28r4-8 each a month, that is, Rupees 801-9 per mensem, or 9,618-12 per 
annum, or cede land in lieu of this payment, the remaining 84 sowars whom 
I am liable to furnish in conformity to my engagements will be dispensed 
with ; but that in virtue of the tenure of the surinjam continued to me, I am 
tb attend with my forces, etc., to afford assistance to government when it has 
occasion for the same. With reference to this, I hee to state that on an 
emergency, assistance shall be rendered to government by sending (men, etc.) 
out of my surinjam (or force). I am very glad that you have been kind 
enough to dispense with 84 sowars. I shall continue to toqt to government, 
(Ml aeeount of the salary of the remaining 86 sowars, Aupees 9,618-12 per 
annum, at the rate of Rupees 801-9 per mensem. 

For the rest, etc., etc. 

2 lit 



242 Kolhapur Agy— 5. M, Jagirdart—The Paiwardkoni'-JSfo LXXXIV. Part II 

. ■ ■ ■ ■ . ■■ I . . I . ^M 

Translation of a Letteb from Bamchtjndeb Bao Gopal of 

JUMKHUNDY, to J. D. InVBRAEITY, EsQ., POLITICAL AOENT, 

Southern Mahratta Country, dated 29th Jemmadee-ool* 
Akhir Sunnut TisRa-wu-Arbaeen-wu-Myatein-wu-Ulf, dated 
23rd May 1849. 

Aft^r complimeDts. — Further two memoranda have been received from 
you to the address of my Vnkeel^ stating: that the Bai Saheb had sent a 
letter to the effect that she did not wish to make a cash payment in lieu of the 
sowars fromi^his estate who perform service under government, and that the 
sowars be allowed to serve as before ; that therefore these written communica- 
tions are sent to me with a request that I should at an early date inform you 
in writing which of the above courses I wish to follow. With reference to 
this, I be«r to state that for a long period, and from the time of my ancestors 
Bargeer Silledars, etc., the dependants of my family, rendered services when 
occasion required; that out of these, 78 sowars perform service under govern- 
ment^ and that they are to be provided for. I have addressed a letter, under 
date the 29th May 184S, to the effect that 72 sowars being dispensed with, I 
agree to pay, according to the orders of government, Rupees 20,840-10 on 
account of the annual salary of 78 sowars. 

For the rest, etc., etc. 



Translation of a Letter from Gungadhur Rao Otjnesh of 
Meeruj, to J. D. Inverarity, Esq., Political Agent, 
Southern Mahratta Country, dated 28th Shaban l^ssa- 
wu-Arbaeen 1258 Fuslee, the 30th July 1848. 

After compliments.— Further, your letter No. 5, dated 12th June 1848, 
has been received, stating, with reference to my communication, to the effect 
that the annual salary of my sowars who now serve (under government), cal- 
culating it according to its monthly rate, amounts to Rupees 12,557-18, and 
that this sum should be annually recovered from the amount of duties; that 
the subject of duties is under the consideration of government, and that on a 
decision being passed on it, the sum (due on account of duties) would be paid 
to me, but that the above-mentioned amount (on account of sowars) is required 
to be paid in cash, and requesting me testate my wishes on the point. Ad- 
verting to this (letter), I beg to state that as it is written (above) that the 
amount on account of duties will be paid according to the decision (that may 
be passed), I have no further representation to make about the matter. On a 
former occasion I wrote to you everything, including particulars about sowars. 
It is now stated above that the sum (on their account) should be paid in cadi. 
I shall accordingly continue to pay it in cash. I have no objection to make a 
^sash payment. Let this be known to-you. 

For the rest, etc., etc. 



Part II Kolhspur Agy.— <9. M. JagirdarM-^Tl^ PaitDardhans—lXo. LXXXIV. 243 

Translation of a Letter from Luxoomun Hag Madho of 
Mbbbuj, to J. D. Inyerarity, Esq., Political Agent, 
SoXTTHBRN Mahratta Oountry, dated 17th Rubee-ool- 
Awul SuQQut Arbaeen-wa-Myateia-wu-Ulf, Tuesday, the 
4th of Magh, Wudya Shukkay 1769, Flu7ang Nam Sao- 
wutsur, corresponding with 22nd February 1848. 

After oompliments.— Further, you have addressed to me a letter dated 
4th January 1848, to the effect that on a former occasion a communication 
was sent to me enquiring^ what objection there existed to make a^sash payment 
or oede land to government in lieu of my sowars now performioti;' service under 
government, and that now^ in accordance with instructions from government, 
tills letter is sent to me to pay that on my adopting measures to make a cash 
payment for my 24 sowars now under government, at the ratj of Rupee:3 
22-4-8 each a month, that is. Rupees 534-6 per mensem, or Coiupany's 
Rupees 6,412-H per annum, or cede land in lieu thereof, the remaining 46 
sowars, whom I am liable to furnish for service in conformity to my engage- 
ments, will be dispensed with. I have learned this— you have dispensed with 
46 sowars, and it has been settled that Rupees 6,412-8 on account of the 
salary of 24 sowars per annum should be paid to the Company's government; 

I will continue to pay this sum in cash. 

* 
For the rest, etc., etc. 

Translation of a Letter from Venkut Rao Rajah Ghorbpu- 

RAY of SUMSTHAN MoODHOLB to J. D. InVERARITY, EsQ;, 

Acting Political Aoent, Southern Mahratta Country, 
dated 25th Ramzan 1268 Fuslee, or 26th August 1848. 

After compliments. — Further in a letter received from you, it was stated 
that on my making a cash payment of the salary of my 10 sowars who 
perform service (under government), the remaining 10 sowars would be dis- 
pensed with. I thereupon wrote, under date the 17th January 1848, to say 
that service would be rendered, as from former times it was the intention of 
the members of my family to perform service ; but I learn from my Vakeel's 
writing that all the jaghiredars have now consented to make cash payments 
in lieu of service. It wonld not be proper for me to withold my consent to 
the measure after all have agreed to it. I therefore do not object to make a 
cash payment of Rupees 2,67 1-14, being the amount of the annual salary of 
the 10 sowars, if (the other) 10 sowars are dispensed with. The payment will 
be made at any place you may name. The 10 sowars who now perform 
service are old dependants of my family. If they are employed on behalf of 
government, it wonld not be necessary for me to make provision for their 
support ; if they are not employed on behalf of government, I shall have to 
make provision for them, as they are old dependants of my fumily« It ther»< 
fore rests with yon kindly to employ these sowars. 

For the rest, ete., etc* 



244 Kolhapur A.gy.—S. M, Jagirdan'^The Paiwardhant^ f(o. LZZXI V. Part II 



Teanslation of a lettee from Rughoonath Rao Keshbw of 
KooBooNBwAB to J. D Invbrabity, Esq., Aotino Politi- 
cal Aqekt, SouxaEBN MAHRArrA Country, dated 14th 
Rubee-ool-Akhir Sannut Suman-wu-Arbaeea-wu-Myatein* 
wu-UIf 1257 Fuslee, correRponding with 2l8t March 1848, 
Shukkay 1769, Pluvung Nam Saowutsur the 2nd of Palgoon 
Shoodh. 

After compliments. -—Fartheri I have received your circular letter No. I, 
dated 4tli January 1848^ to the effect that on a former occasion a communiea- 
tion was sent to me^ enquiring what objection there existed to make a eadi 
payment or cede land in lieu of my sowars who render service to government 
and that now, under instructions from government, this (letter) is written 
to me to say that on measures being adopted to make a cash payment for 
my 86 sowars who now perform service under government at the rate of 
Rupees 22-4-8 each a month, that is, Rupees 801-9 a month, or Rupees 9^618- 
12 per annum, or to cede land in lieu of this payment, the remaining ^4t 
sowars, whom I am liable to furnish for service in conformity to my engage- 
ments, will be dispensed with. With reference to this, 1 beg to state that in 
paragraph 1 of the Memorandum about the settlement of my sorinjams, eta, 
given at Poona by the Honourable Elphinstone, with hiti sicrnature and seal 
thereon, in the year 1819, corresponding with sun Ushreen Myatein-wu-Ulf, 
it is stated that considering that Sirdars will not ^be able to get on if they 
were required to perform service with troops, according to the practice prevail- 
ing in tne Sivuraj (or the Peishwa's rule, and the former Tynat Zabita. and 
that therefore a settlement is made out of (regard for) them ; that for the dis- 
tricts continued on account of surinjams sowars equivalent (or whose salaries 
may be equal) to one-fourth the proceeds thereof should be furnished, or in 
lieu thereof the amount equal to their salaries should be paid in cash to gov* 
emment, or territory transferred on their account. That accordingly the above- 
mentioned personage settled that 70 sowars should be furnished tor service on 
account of one-fourth (of the surinjam held), and stated that the settlement 
bad been sanctioned by government. Accordingly it was settled that 70 sowars, 
equivalent to one-fourth of my surinjam, should be furnished to the Company's 
government for service, and my family has since been furnishing sowars for 
service according to the orders received from the Sahib, and it is my intention 
to furnish sowars for service hereafter also. But you now write that on 
meas\ires being adopted to make a cash payment for 86 sowars, who at prt^sent 
perform service under government at the above-mentioned rate, or cede land 
m lieu thereof to government, the remaining 84 sowars, whom I am liable to 
furnish, will be dispensed with. Bearing in mind the fact that the mehals 
and villages of this surinjam are losing concerns (that is, yield less revenue 
than estimated) ; that the revenue is not received in proportion to the extent 
of lands cultivated ; that this estate is encumbered with a heavy expense; and 
that therefore it would be difficult for me to get on if I was made to furnish 



Part II Kolll^ur A gy.^S. Jf. Jagirdar^-^ Th9 Paimardkani^'Ko. LXXXV. 245 



70 sowars for service according^ to the eDgagement entered into, you wrote to 
His Excellency the Governor in Council, obtained orders for dispensing with 
the rennainingr sowars, and addressed a letter to me on the subject. I am very 
glad that government has conferred this favour upon me. Agreeably to the 
opinion expressed by you in writing I am willing to pay from year to year, 
by the end of Mrig Sal, Company's Rupees 9,618-12 in cash into the Com- 
pany's government on account of the salary of 86 sowars. 

You write that in virtue of the tenure of the surinjam continued to me 
I am bound to atteiid with my forces, etc., to afEord assistance to gc»vemment 
whenever it has occasion for the same. With reference to this I beg to state 
that this provision does not appear to exist in the aforesaid Memorandum 
entered into with the Company's government regarding my estate. Govern- 
ment is, however, well aware that I have never failed, on receiving an intima- 
tion, to send in time my troops, etc., to afford assistance to government. 

In this manner the particulars are given in two paragraphs, and yon will 
learn the same. 

For the rest, etc., etc. 



No. LXXXV. 

AdoptioN'Sunnud granted to the Putwuedhuns* — 1862. 

Her Majesty being desirous that the governments of the several Princes 
and Chiefs of India who now govern their own territories should be perpe- 
tuated, and that the representation and dignity of their Houses should be 
continued ; in fulfilment of this dasire this Sunnud is given to you to convey 
to you the assurance that, on failure of natural heirs, the British Government 
will recognize and confirm any adoption of a successor made by yourself or 
by any fnture Chief of your State that may be in accordance with Hindu 
I^w and the customs of your race. 

Be assured that nothing shall disturb the engagement thus made to yon 
so long as your House is loyal to the Crown and faithful to the oonditions of 
the treaties, grants, or engagements which record its obligations to the Bri- 
tish Government. 

(Sd.) Canning. 
Dated llth March 1862. 



The same to the Chiefs of Bumdurg and Mudhol. 



* The Chiefi of Sanglee, Meeruj (Senior and Junior), Jamkhund]» and Kurnudwad (Senior). 



246 Kolhapur Agenoy— <9. M. Jagirdar9^Bamdwrg^'S[0, USJSJCTTi. Part II 



No. LXXXVL 

Tkanslation of an Agbeement entered into by the Honottbablb 
Company with Narain Rao Ram Ramdeoookub — 1821. 

Whereas your ancestors held the snwasthan of Nurgoond for many years 
under the government of the Sreemunt Punt Pradhan, and whereas a partition 
was made between you and the Nurgoondknr, when half the sawasthan, 
comprising the fort and talook of Bamdroog and 17 villages of the talook of 
Nurgoond^ was awarded to yon by the Peishwa's government, and whereas 
the Peishwa's territories have since come into the possession of the Hodoot- 
able Company, that government has been pleased, in consideration of the 
suwasthan being an ancient one, and from personal regard, to continue year 
possessions to you ; the following Treaty is now concluded :— 

Article 1. 

You formerly engaged, for the consideration of your fort and possession 
to serve the Peishwa with 113 horse in lieu of rent ; but as you have repre- 
sented to the government that you have not served the Peishwa for many 
years, the Sircar renounces its claim to the aforesaid quota of horse, and con- 
firms you in your possessions out of favour, and you on your part engage 
to continue in friendship with the British Gk>vei'nment. 

Abticle 2. 

In a former agreement^ it was stipulated that you should pay the gov- 
ernment annually the sum of Rupees 3,468} as your share of the jaghire of 
Konoor; this Article is confirmed, and you hereby engage to continue to pay 
the aforesaid sum yearly into the Company^s treasury. 

Article 3, 

As long as you may continue in friendship with the government^ the 
suwasthan and villages attached will be continued to you without interrup- 
tion, and to your heirs from generation to generation, and a grant to this 
effect, confirmed by the Supreme Government, will be delivered to you, which 
will be renewed at every succession to your estate, and on your preferring an 
application, these Sunnuds will be renewed without the usual demand of 
nuzzur. 

Article 4. 

The government hereby enga^^res to continue to you such possessions 
held by you in enam, &c., at the time of the war, as may be within the limits 
of the Honourable Company's special dominions, while it reserves the right 

• With the Peishwa, dated •• 1219 Fuslee. 



Part II Kolhapar Agenoy— <9. M, Jagirdan^Bamdurg'-'SfO. LXXXVI. 247 



of resaming such within your territory as may hereafter appear to belong to 
the Sircar. On yonr part you engage to continue to the holders of enams^ 
dhurmadao, khyrat, nemnook, &c., within your territory, their several rights 
without interruption. ^ 

Abtiolb 5. 

Tou further engage to protect the ryots of the country forming your 
suwasthan, to make legal aud just enquiries, to protect the inhabitants against 
robbersi murderers, thullygars, &;c., aud to obey such orders a.s the government 
may deem it necessary to issue in the event of complaints being preferred 
against you. In failure thereof, or in the event of your country being, from 
your own neglect or carelessness, infested with robberSj &c., the Sircar will 
tuke measures for its better management. 



Article 6. 

You further engage not to assemble any f^arty, or to attack or fight 
against any person without the orders of the government, and to report to the 
government all disputes that you may be involved in without resorting to 
arms, when a fair enquiry shall be made and orders issued, agreeably to which 
yon engage to conform. 

Abticlb 7. 

Yon further engage never to hold any connexion or correspondence with 
Bajee Rao Sahib or other dowlutdar, or suwasthan, and not to afford assistance 
to any disaffected person* 

Article S. 

You further engage to report to the Sircar all instances in which any of 
your offenders shall take refuge in the Company's territories, when enquiries 
shall be instituted and the offenders transferred to your authority ; also to 
seize and apprehend criminals from the Sircar's country, who may take refuge 
in your territory, and deliver them to the government, or to assist such detach- 
ment as the Sircar may deem it necessary to send in pursuit of them^ and 
deliver up the criminals to the Sircar. 

9th June 1821, Fuslee. 



The Snnnnd of the Nargundkur was similar to this. 



248 Kolhaimr Agenoy^ ^f. jt j0gfirdMr9^MmdM^<ao. LXXXVII. Purt II 



No. LXXXVII. 

Teems granted by the Honoubablb East India Oompakt to 
Vbmkut Rao Rajah Gobbpu&at regarding the lands which 
he held of His Highnbss the Pbishwa for the payment of 
his contingent, which are now comprised within the terri- 
tories of the British Government, and are graciously granted 
to him for furnishing a contingent to government in consi- 
deration of his family being of old standing, bearing date 
Sunnut Ushreen-wu-Myatein-wu-Ulf, corresponding with 
December A.D. 1819. 

Article 1. 

The five mehals of Moodbole, which were contiiiiied until the war for 
personal and oontingent allowance, are now confirmed. It was usual to supply 
150 horse, and those who were paid by the Peishwa's goverament were at the 
rate of Rupees 12 monthly. In lieu of the latter, a deduction of half (70) 
the contingent is made.^ But with a view to support the family, and in cod* 
sideration that the contingent is required throughout the whole year, and the 
horses to be good and effective, the British Oovemment is graciously pleased 
to relinquish three-fourths of the contingenti and to fix the contingent here- 
after to be furnished at 20 horse, 

Articlb 2. 

The horses shall be good, valuing between Rupees 300 and 400, and the 
men efficient. They must serve wherever required. Should their numbers be 
deficient, the amount of such deficiency shdl be repaid to government, at the 
ritte of Rupees SOO for each, from the date of being present at muster. 

Articlb 3. 

In the event of either men or horses being killed or wounded in action, 
you will receive no compensation from government* All expenses are to be 
provided for out of the allowance granted. This is to be observed according 
to former practice ; but if any great man should be wounded or killed in 
action, a reward will be given to him hf the government if wounded, or a 
pension to his family if he be killed in action* 

Articlb 4. 

In addition to your contingent ^ou will maintain at your own expense 
such establishments for the preservation of order within your limits as may 



Part n Kolhapnr Agenoy—'^. Jf. Jaffirdarg^Mudhoh-TS^o. IiXXXVII, 240 

a 

be necessary ; and in the event oi disturbances in your neigbbourhood, yott 
will famish assistance with such troops as may be in your lands. 

Artioi^ 5. 

As long as you continue to serve the British Government with fidelity 
and attachment, your jaghire shall remain undisturbed in your possession and 
that of the Sirdars of your family, and a Sunnud shall be procured to the 
same effect from His Excellency the Most Noble the Governor-General here- 
after ; when new Sunnuds are required for the descendants of each respectively, 
it is to be represented to the government, which will graciously confer a new 
Snnnud and continue the jaghire without exacting any nuzzur. 

Abticlb 6. 

Any villages, lands, or other possessions belonging to your surinjam or 
enam, situated within the lands of government, shall be continued without 
obstruction as they have hercftofore b^n continued. You will continue all 
rights within your jaghire, whether belonging to the State or individuals, all 
doomala, surinjam, and enam villages, and lauds, all wurshasuns or annual 
pensions), dhurmadao (or religious establishments), rozeenah, (daily stipends), 
khyrats (alms to Mahomedans), nemnooks (or assignments on the revenue), etc., 
in conformity to the list contained in the grant of your surinjam ; and if in 
any particular instance any interruption shall have been offered to a grant not 
annulled by government, snch grant shall likewise be made good without 
hindrance to the proprietor. No complaints on this head are to be suffered 
to xeach the government. If any should act improperly, or be without heirs, 
you shall report to the British, which has authority to punish and resume. If 
any zemindar should be guilty of rebellion or treason, or should resist your 
authority, or die without heirs, you are at liberty to resume his lands as a 
punishment, on satisfying yourself of his guilt, at the same time reporting 
the matter to government, and receiving its orders regarding it, which shall 
be executed accordingly. 

Articlb 7. 

Yon win attend to the prosperity of the ryots of your jaghire, to the 
strict administration of justice, and the effectual suppression of robberies^ 
murders, tullee, arsons, and other crimes. Should that not be done, and the 
government gives orders regarding any complaint made in your jagliire, you 
will act accordingly in the settlement of the matter. Any decision of govern- 
ment regarding the administration of justice which may be made on investi- 
gation must be duly executed. If any obstruction should be offered, or should 
the country fall into great disorder, and robberies and other offences begin 
to be committed, the government will make such arrangement for the surin- 
jamee lands as it may deem proper. 

Aeticlb 8. 

You shall on no account entertain troops for the purpose of engaging in 
a oontest with any person whatever. In the event of any cause of dispute 

2k 



260 Kolhapar Agency- <9. M. Jagirdar^—Mudka-^'So. LXZXVII. Fwt IX 

arising, yoa must not resort yourself to extreme measures, but must refer tiif 
question to government for eonsideration ; it will then be impartially adjusted, 
and you must abide by the decision. 

Abtiolb 9. 

You shall hold no connexion or correspondence with Bajee Kao or other 
dowlutdar, or suwasthan, as proclaimed by government, and shall afford aid 
to no disaffected person. This condition is hereby engaged for, and if infringed, 
the jaghire will not be continued. 

Articlb 10. 

If any offenders from your jaghire lands shall come into those of the 
government, you will represent the affair, and they shall on enquiry be 
delivered up to you; and should any offender against the government, or 
criminal belonging to its territories, seek refuge in your country, he shall be 
apprehended and delivered up, and if pursued by the government officers, you 
shall afford every assistance in delivering up such offender. 

Abtiolb 11. 

The British Government will maintain your rank and dignity as it was 
maintained under His Highness the Peishwa in former times. It will attend 
to any of your representations and will decide equitably upon them. Yoa 
shall in no respect suffer injury. 

The above II Articles are agreed to this 27th December, 5th Rnbbee^ool* 
Awul; Poonah. 



-^ 



P^A n SawantwaH. 251 



VIII.-8AWANTWAEI (SAVANTVADI). 

"Prom Simbajf Oovemment Records, No. X of New Series, and Beports hy the 

Bombay Government. 

The Sawants were hereditary deshmukhs of Wari near Ooa. They are 
of the BfaoDsla family ; and are still styled by that name. The family is an 
old one, but the first Chief of note was Khem Sawant, who in 1707 received 
from Shahuji, the successor of Shivaji, a deed confirming him in his possessions 
in fall sovereign ty, and assigning to him, conjointly with the Chief of Eolaba, 
half the revenues of the Salshi Mahal. 

The first Chief with whom the British Government formed relations 
was his nephew Phond Sawant, who succeeded in 1709. The Treaty (No. 
LXXXVIII), which was concluded in 17S0, was offensive and defensive against 
Kanhoji Angria, the piratical Chief of Kolaba. Phond Sawant was succeeded 
in 1738 by his grandson Ramchandra Sawant^ and he in 1755 by his son Khem 
Sawant, who ruled for forty -eight years. The rule of Khem Sawant was one 
long war with various Mahratta Chiefs, particularly the Raja of Kolhapur, and 
with the Portuguese, in the course of which he lost some of his best districts. 
His piracies provoked the British Government, who in 1765 sent an expedition 
against him, and captured the fort of Reri, which they named Fort Augustus, 
The fort, however, was restored on his subscribing a Treaty (No. LXXXIX), 
by which he ceded all the lands between the rivers Karli and Salshi from the 
sea to the foot of the hills, and bound himself to pay a lakh of Rupees for 
the expenses of the expedition, to allow free trade, and to permit the British 
to build a factory in his territories. The treaty was not observed, and the 
following year another (No. XC) was concluded. By this treaty Khem 
Sawant ceded the fort of Vingorla for thirteen years, or for such further time 
as the indemnity should remain unpaid. 

Khem Sawant died in 1803 without male issue, and there ensued a civil 
war regarding the succession. In 1805 the war terminated by the widow of 
' Khem Sawant adopting Ramchandra Sawant, or Bhao Sahib, who was murdered 
in 1807. He was succeeded hy Phond Sawant, who ruled till 1812, under the 
regency of Durga Bai, second widow of Khem Sawant. Shortly before his 
death, in consequence of repeated piracies committed by his subjects, a Treaty 
(No. XCI) was negotiated with him for the suppression of piracy. He was 
required to cede the fort of Vingorla, and to promise to cede the forts of fieri 



252 Sawantwari. Part U 

and Neoti, if piracies were committed in futare. All vessels leaving Neoti 
were subjected to search by the British authorities. To this treaty it was 
proposed to add supplementary articles^ ceding absolutely the forts of Beri 
and Neotii and binding the Raja to abstain from hostilities with other States, 
and to refer all disputes to the arbitration of the British Government, who, 
on their part, were to guarantee the territories then in the Raja's possession 
against the aggression of all foreign powers. But as the terms of these 
articles were believed to interfere with some supposed claims of the Peshwa to 
supremacy over Sawantwari, the negotiations were never prosecated to a 
conclusion. 

On the death of Phond Sawant his son Khem Sawant succeeded, Dnrga 
Bai being again regent. She commenced her rule by forcibly occupying the 
forts of Bharatgarh and Narsingarh, which had been wrested from Sawant- 
wari a few years before by the Raja of Kolhapur, the integrity of whose 
territories the British Ooverument were by a recent treaty bound to defend. 
The Rani rejected all proposals for an amicable adjustment of the dispute, and 
Sawantwari was therefore declared to be in a state of war. The districts 
of Maland and Varad, interlaced with the territory in Malwan, which bad 
been ceded to the British Government by Kolhapur, were seized, and prepa- 
rations were made for the invasion of Sawantwari. Hostilities, however, 
were suspended in consequence of the anarchy which prevailed in Sawant- 
wari, arising out of disputes between Durga Bai, supported by Sambhaji 
Sawant, and another Rani, Dadi Bai, supported by Chandroba. The latter 
wished to place in power a person pretending to be the Bhao Sahib, who, they . 
alleged, had not been murdered in 1807. Durga Bai was reduced to great 
difficulties, and offered to adjust all causes of quarrel if the British Govern- 
ment would support her cause. Interference, however, was declined. In 
the meantime the Chiei's who headed the rival factions seized forts and 
plundered on their own account. Their depredations extended to British 
territory. During the war with the Peshwa also Durga Bai, who had 
again recovered much of her former power, threatened the invasion of British 
territories, and did what she could to support the Peshwa's cause. The* 
depredations committed in British territory did not cease even after the 
overthrow of the Peshwa; and it was found impossible longer to post- 
pone hostilities with Sawantwari. A force was marched into the country, 
and terms were offered after the capture of the forts of Yashwantgarh or Reri 
and Neoti. Meanwhile Durga Bai had died, and the regency had been 



Part II Sawantwari. 253 



assumed by the two Banis^ Savitri Bai and Narmada Bai» the soryiviug widows 
of Kbem Sawant. The terms offered were readily accepted^ and a Treaty 
(No. XCII) was concluded on the 17th February 1819^ by which the 
British Goyemment agreed to protect the State of Sawantwari^ and the 
regency acknowledged the British supremacy^ agreed to abstain from political 
interooiMrse with other States, to deliver up to the British Qovernment perBons 
guilty of offences in British territory, to cede the whole line of sea-coast from 
the Karli river to the boundaries of the Portuguese possessions, and to 
receive British troops into Sawantwari. In consideration of the readiness 
with which these terms were accepted, a portion of the territory which had 
been ceded to the British Government, yielding a net revenue of Rupees 
80,000, was by Treaty (No. XCIII) restored in the following yean 

In 1820 three engagements were mediated between the Eolhapur 
and Sawantwari Darbars. The first (No, XCIV) regelated the amount 
of revenue to be paid to the fort of Bangna from the district of Mangaon ; 
the second (No. XCV) fixed the revenue payable to the fort of Manohar- 
garh from the district of Manohar; and the third (No. XCVI) transferred 
the village of Sivapur from Sawantwari to Kolhapur, in exchange for another 
village. The revenue assignments for the forts were in 1822 commuted to a 
money payment of Pirkbani Rupees 7,834-6-8 to Kolhapur. But in 1826 a 
tract of country yielding the above amount was transferred to Kolhapur by 
the British Government ; and thereafter the money payment was made by 
Sawantwari to the British Government. 

In 1846 the fort of Manohar and the possessions appertaining thereto 
below the Gli&ts were transferred from the Kolhapur State to Sawantwari for 
control and management. In 1863 all pecuniary and territorial claims of 
Kolhapur connected with that fort and certain villages of the fort of Prasidh- 
garh were settled, and in lieu thereof a fixed sum of Rupees 8,898-10-2 is 
annually paid by the Sawantwari State to Kolhapur. 

Khem Sawant was entrusted with the administration of the State in 
1822. His affairs soon got into disorder, and in 1830, and again in 1832, he 
received the assistance of British troops to suppress rebellion. On the latter 
occasion he was required to execute a Treaty (No. XCVII), by which he 
bound himself not to remove his minister without the sanction of the British 
Government ; to adopt such measures of reform as the British Government 
might sanction ; and to pay the cost of any troops required for the settlement 
of his affairs. In 1888 the Chief transferred (No. XCVIII) to the British 



Sawantwari. ]^art ti 



GoverniheDt ibe right to levy land aud sea customs in Sawantwari, the 
British Goverament agreeing to pay him annually a sum equal to the average 
amount realised in the three preceding years. 

The mismanagement of the country under Khem Sawant was in no way 
lessened by the measures adopted under these treaties; and the Sardars 
of the State became almost independent of his authority. In 1888, there* 
fore, the British Government assumed the management of the country with 
the consent of the Chief (No. XCIX). Several times the turbulent 
Sardars rebelled, and attempted to throw off the control of the British 
Government, more particularly in 1839 and 1844; but the outbreaks were 
suppressed, and the country has since remained quiet. In 1867 no attempt 
was made to disturb the peace. Khem Sawant, who had received the right of 
adoption (No. XXXVII) , died in October 1867, and was succeeded by his son 
Phoud Sawant or Anna Sahib. Phond Sawant had joined the rebels in 181^4, 
and after the suppre^^sion of the disturbances found a refuge at Goa. He was 
subsequently allowed to return to Sawantwari, but was declared to have 
forfeited his position as heir to the gadi. In 1861, however, he was pardoned 
and recognised as heir to the Chiefship on the condition that the debt due to 
the British Government on account of the expenses incurred in putting down 
the insurrection in 1844 should be cleared off, and that nazarana of a year's 
revenue should be paid on the succession of Fhoiid Sawant, who should then 
enter into an agreement to protect his subjects and pay for the expense of a 
British Agent and his establishment. The debt, amounting to more than 5^ 
lakhs of Rupees^ was paid off in 1862, and on the accession of Phond Sawant 
in 1867 the prescribed nazarana was levied. The incapacity of the new Chief 
made it necessary to impose more stringent restrictions on his independence of 
action than had been contemplated in 1861 ; he was, therefore, required among 
other stipulations to accept the scheme of administration which had been 
introduced by British authority, to refrain from making any organic changes 
except with the previous approval of Government, and to submit for the 
approval of the British Government the names of any person whom he might 
wish to nominate as minister or secretary. Anna Sahib died in March 1869 
before the conclusion of the formal agreement which it had been proposed to 
take from bim. He left an only son, Kaghunath Sawant, the present Chief, 
who is now 29 years of age. Owing to his misconduct and incapacity he has 
not yet been installed, and the administration of the State continues to be 
carried on under the orders of the British Government. 



Part II Sawsntwfuri. -^ S(Si^ 

The area of Sawantwari is about 026 square miles^ the gross revenue 
Rupees 4,20,000, and the population (1891) 192,948. The Sawantwari local 
oorps, with a strength of 400 non-commissioned officers and men, was rafsed 
in 1839 for military and police purposes. The Political Superintendent is the 
commandant, and he has under him one European officer, who is also ex-offieio 
Assistant to the Political Superintendent. In 1845 the Sawantwari mint 

suppressed, and British coinage was introduced. 

The Chief is entitled to a salute of nine guns. 



} 



266 Sawantwari— No. IJCXXVIII. Fart II 



No. LXXXVIIL 

Abticles of Pbacb and Friendship agreed on and conoluded by 
BoBEET Cowan, Esq., Fbesident and GK)vbbnob of Bom- 
bat, for and in behalf of the Honoubablb English East 
India Company, and Bapajee Naique, Chief Commandbb 
at Sea for Fondesaunt Sabdesay of Ouddall, for and 
in behalf of the said Sabdesay— 1729-30. 

Abtiolb ]. 

That there shall henceforward for ever be a firm peace and friendship 
betwixt the said Honourable Eng^lish East India Company, their senrants and 
subjects, and the said Sardesay, his subjects, and vassals, by land and sea, 
under the following conditions :-• 

Aeticlb 2. 

That in case the fleet of the said Sardesay shall, at any tame, meet at sea 
any ships or vessels under English colours, whether of war or merchandize, 
they shall not molest them, but on discovery that they belong to the English, 
give them all the assistance they can ; and in case of meeting with a single 
vessel, they shall not, after showing her colours, chase her with more than 
one gallivat, to be certainly informed that she is really English; in like 
manner, when the vessels of war of the said Honourable Company shall meet 
at sea the fleet or vessels of the said Sardesay, they shall permit tnem to pass 
unmolested on showing their colours, and sending a gallivat or other small 
embarkation to certify who they are, 

Abtiolb S. 

If at any time, through stress of weather, or any other accident, any 
yessels belonging to the English should be drove ashore and shipwrecked in 
the ports or territories of the said Sardesay, they shall not be forfeited ; on 
the contrary, all aid and assistance shall be given the people belonging to 
them in saving and preserving the said vessels and their cargoes, and free 
liberty granted to transport or dispose of what is so saved, as they shall 
think proper, without paying any salvage, custom, or duty whatever for the 
same ; and the like shall be observed with all vessels belonging to the subjects 
of the said Sardesay that shall meet with the like misfortune in the ports or 
territories of the said Honourable Company. 

Abtiolb 4. 

The ports, places, and settlements of the said Hgnourable Company and 
the said Sardesay shall be free and open to the subjects and servants of both 
to navigate and trade in on paying the respective duties that are usually paid 
at the said ports and places, or that shall be hereafter stipulated and agreed on. 



Part II Sawantwari-No. LXXXIX. 287 



Articlb 5. 

The sons of Canojee Angaria beings professed enemies to the Honourable 
Company and the said Sardesay^ it is agreed that the joint endeavour of both 
shall be exerted to destroy the said enemy, the Honourable Company by their 
vessels of war by sea distressing them as much as possible, and the Sardesay 
both by land and sea as much as in his power ; and wheti a proper oppor- 
tunity offers, the said President and Governor, in behalf of the said Honour- 
able Company, promises to give the said Sardesay what assistance he can to 
destroy the said enemy by imiting one or more of the Honourable Company's 
▼essels of war with the fleet of the Sardesay, the better to obtain the end 
desired ; but in case of such an union oF the marine force of both parties, the 
chief command of the united force shall remain to the English Commander. 

Aeticlb 6. 

That the Honourable Company shall supply the Sardesay with such 
artillery and warlike stores as he may want, and they can eonveniently spare 
at reasonable prices. 

Articlb 7. 

That these Articles agreed on and concluded shall be exchanged and rati- 
fied by the said President and Governor under the seal of the said Honourable 
Company, and by the said Sardesay under his proper seal, in six months from 
the date hereof, or sooner if opportunity offers. 

Done in Bombay Castle, the 12th day of January 1789-30. 
Ratified by the Governor of Bombay on 17th April 17S0. 



No. LXXXIX. 



Abtigles of Agbbement with the Bhonsla, concluded at the 

Fort at Raree^ the 7th April 1765. 

Article 1. 

There shall be perpetual peace and friendship re-established between 
the Honourable Company and Khem Sawnnt, the Bhonsla, their succes- 
sors and heirs ; and for the stricter observance of the following Treaty of 
peace, Khem Sawunt, the Bhonsla, agrees to send two hostages of note, 
with their families, to reside at Bombay, and to be maintained at his 
charge. 

AUTICLE 2. 

The Bhonsla renounces all pretensions which he has heretofore formed, 
or might form, to the lands and tenements situatt^d between the rivers of 

2l 



258 Sawantwari-No. LXXXIX. Fart II 



Karlee and Salsee from the sea-shore up to the foot of the ghauts, which 
he cedes and guarantees to the Honourable Company in full rights and 
will put them in possession of the same, as likewise the sovereignty of 
the said river aud the islands therein; but the Bhonsia requests and 
hopes the Honourable Company will cause the amount of one-third of 
the annual revenues of the said lands and tenements to be paid him, 
either in money or Europe staples^ or in grain. In consideration of his 
agreeing to and fulBUing the 10th Article, the Honourable Company, on 
their part, renounce all pretensions to the lands, rents, revenues, and tributes, 
which now or heretofore did pay obedience, rents, or tributes to the Malwans 
in any part of this country to the south of the river Karlee, and cedes and 
guarantees the same in full right to the Bhonsia. 

Abticlb 3. 

The Bhonsia agrees to pay to the Honourable Company one lakh of 
Rupees as the restitution for the expenses they have been at during the 
trouble subsisting between the contracting parties ; half to be paid in eiglit 
days from the time in which this Treaty is concluded, Rupees 25,000 within 
twelve months of this date, and the remainder Rupees 25,000 within three 
years from the date hereof. 

Abticle 4. 

The Bhonsia will not, by any menaces or otherwise, directly or indirectly 
deter the inhabtants of the different districts or villages ceded to the 
Honourable Company from living in them peaceably ; and furthermore, will 
oblige all the inhabitants, with their families, who belonged to or lived in the 
aforesaid districts, who have quitted them, or may hereafter leave them, to 
return to their habitations. 

Arttolb 5. 

The English subjects and the subjects of the Bhonsia shall have free 
liberty of trade and commerce with each other without any hindrance or 
molestation. 

Article 6. 

The Bhonsia will permit the Honourable Company to build a factory 
or factories on any part of his territories adjacent to the sea-shore for vending 
their commodities, and to keep there such servants and people as they shall 
think necessary for conducting the same ; and should .any of the merchants 
or others, his subjects, become debtors to the English, they shall have liberty 
to imprison their persons, or seize their effects, and vend them till satisfaction 
is obUined. 

Abtiols 7. 

The Bhonsia grants to the Honourable Company an exclusive right 
(except to the Portuguese nation) of importing aud vending all Europe 



Part II Sawantwari— No. LXXXIX. 259 



cloths, lead, iron, steel, copped, and Europe commodities^ in his territories, 
and to pass the same through his country. 

Article 8. 

The Bhonsia will allow all merchants or vanjarrahs free liberty to pass 
and repass his territories to and from Fort Augustus with their effects, 
merchandize, carriages, and beasts of burden, they paying the accustomed 
duties and no more on any pretence whatever. 

Article 9. 

The Bhonsia agrees to deliver up all the effects which have been 
carried away from Fort Sundero in the Malwan gallivats, with guns 
and all kinds of stores belonging to them^ if any such can be proved to be in 
his possession now or at any other time. 

Article 10. 

If Jeejaboy Maharajah, the Ranee, shall offer to invade the territories of 
either of the contracting powers, or that she hinders the merchants or van- 
jarrahs from passing the ghauts, and the Honourable Company should find 
it necessary to attack her, in such case the Bhonsia agrees to assist and aid 
the Honourable Company with his whole force, and furnish a sufficient num- 
ber of draught and pack oxen to carry ammunition, provisions, and stores. 

Article 11. 

The Bhonsia shall not keep any fleet, or have any vessels or gallivats 
equipped for war. 

Article 12. 

If ever the Honourable Company should think proper to demand of the 
Mahrattas the lands in the districts of Salsee, which formerly belonged to 
the Malwans, that in such case they will likewise demand for and on behalf 
of the Bhonsia the lands in the said districts formerly belonging to him : the 
Bhonsia to pay an adequate share of the expenses. that may accrue to the 
Honourable Company in making these demands. 

Article 13. 

The fort of Mussoora, with all the guns, shot, carriages, and stores 
therein, shall be delivered up to the Honourable Company, in its present situa- 
tion, within eight days from this date ; in lieu whereof the Honourable Com- 
pany shall at the same time deliver up to the Bhonsia the fort of Karee, with 
all guns and carriages found on the walls when conquered by the English, 



260 Sawantwari— No. LXZXIX* 



Abticlb 14. * 

The Bhonsla ^ill not eDtertain in bis service any people belonging to tiie 
Englisby wbetber Europeans or others^ nor suffer any European deserters to 
pass tbrougb bis districts^ but^ on tbe coDtrary, give strict orders to all his 
officers to seize sucb as may be seen in his dominions^ and return them to the 
Chief of Fort Augustus on promise of pardon, whether they are applied for 
or not. The English will observe the same in respect to the subjeets of the 
Bhonsia ; and slaves to be returned on both sides. 

Abticlb 15. 

If any vessels or boats belonging to the English, their subjects or depend- 
ants, shall at any time be drove ashore, or wrecked in any part of the Bhon- 
sla's dominions, he agrees to afford all suitable assistance for tbe preservation 
of such vessels and their cargoes, and whatever part thereof may be saved 
to be delivered up to their right owner without any salvage whatever, except 
the labourers' hire; the English on their parts to observe the same in leepect 
to the vessels belonging to the Bbonsla. 

Abticli 16. 

If at any time the Bhonsia should have occasion for powder and ball 
and military stores, the Honourable Company will supply him with what 
they can spare at the usual rates. 

Abticls 17. 

The Honourable Company agree, if convenient to them, to furnish the 
Bhonsia with troops to go against his and their enemies. 

Abticlb 18. 

The Bhonsia agrees to fulfil the first, second, third, and thirteenth Articlaa 
within eight days from the signature of this Treaty ; in default of which, 
he agrees to pay all the charges of maintaining the garrison of the fort of 
Baree till they nre fulfilled, at which time the Honourable Company will deliver 
up the fort of Raree. * 

Abticlb 19. 

In witness of these Articles of agreement between the contracting partiee, 
we the underwritten agents and ministers plenipotentiary have signed with 
our hands, and in their name, and in virtue of our full powers, the present 
definitive Treaty, and have caused the seals of the Honourable Company and 
the Bhonsia to be put thereto. 

Done at tke Fort of Raree, the 7th day of April 1766. 



Part II Sawantwari— No. XO. 261 



No. XC. 

Abticles of Agrbement made and entered into by and between 

the HONOUEABLB UNITED COMPANY of MERCHANTS of 

England trading to the East Indies and Khbm Sawunt, the 
Bhonsla, concluded at the Fort Baree^ the 24th of October 

1766. 

Abticlb 1. 

There shall be perpetual peace aod firm friendship re-established between 
the Honourable Compauy and Khem Sawunt^ the Bhonsla^ their successors 
and heirs ; and for the stricter observance of the following Treaty of peace, 
the BhoDsIa agrees to send (should the Company require it) two hostages of 
note with their families to reside at Bombay^ and to be maintained at his 

charge. 

Abticlb 2. 

The Bhonsla agrees to pay the Honourable Company Rupees 2^00,000 as 
restitution for the expenses they have been at from the time the troubles sub- 
sisted between the respective parties, and maintaining the fort of Raree, 
Rupees 80,000 to be paid in three montha from the 24th October 1706^ that 
is, Kupees 60^000 the first month, and Rupees 30^000 within the three months ; 
the remaining Rupees 1,20,000 to be paid in two years from said 24th 
of October 1766, at equal payments of Rupees 60^000 each year, for tjie 
performance of which the Bhonsla agrees to give Vittojee Commotim of Ooa 
as security, and the amount to be paid in Peerkhaney and Hookarey Rupees, 
and as security to Vittojee, the Bhonsla agrees to lodge in the Honourable 
Company's hands two hostages, by name Dowlut Delvie and Seuzam Bawab^ 
who are to reside at Bombay^ and to be maintained at his expense. 

Abticlb 8, • 

The Honourable Company, in consideration of the Bhcnsla's fulfilling 
the foregoing Articles, do agree on the payment of the first snuii viz., Rupees 
80,000, to deliver him, the said Bhonsla, the fort of Raree, and do further 
renounce all claim or pretensions to the lands and tenements belonging 
thereto. 

Articlb 4. 

The Honourable Company will carry away all guns^ carriages, mortars, 
shotj shells, powder, stores, etc., of what kind soever they may have brought 
here, and they do give up to the Bhonsla such guns and carriages as are here 
that were belonging to fort Raree. 

Abticlb 5. 

Khem Sawunt, the Bhonsla, will permit the Honourable Company to 
build a factory, etc., with warehouses at Raree, at such place as may be most 



262 Sawantwari— No. XO. Fart II 



convenient for tlicm, at which place they will hoist their flag, or on any part 
of his territories adjacent to the sea-shore, for vending their commodities^ and 
to keep there such servants and people, also vessels and boats, as they shall 
think necessary for conducting the same, and should any of the merchants or 
others, his subjects, become debtors to the English, they shall have free liberty 
to imprison their persons, seize their effects, and vend them till satisfaction is 
made and obtained. 

ARTfCLB 6. 

The English subjects and the subjects of the Bhonsia shall have free 
liberty to trade and commerce with each other without any hindrance or 
molestation. 

Articlb 7. 

Khem Sawunt, the Bhonsia, will not directly or indirectly give any 
hindrance or molestation to any vessels or boats with English colours and 
passes, or any vessels or boats going under English convoys ; in like manner 
the English will not molest any boats or vessels belonging to Khem Sawunt, 
the Bhonsia, or his subjects, provided they have passes or certificates with the 
Bhonsia'^ seal affixed. 

Abtiolb 8. 

The Bhonsia grants to the English nation an exclusive right (except the 
Portuguese) of importing and vending all Europe commodities, as lead, iron, 
steel, cloths, copper, etc., in his country, and to pass the same through his 
territoiies. 

Article 9. 

Khem Sawunt^ the Bhonsia, will allow all merchants or vanjarrahs free 
liberty to pass and repass his territories, to and from the English factory, 
with their effects, merchandize, packages, carriages^ and beasts of burden, they 
paying the accustomed duties and no more on any pretence whatever. 

• 

Articlb 10. 

Khem Sawunt, the Bhonsia, will not entertain in his service any people 
belonging to the English, whether Europeans or others, but on the contrary 
give strict orders to his officers to seize such as may be seen in his dominions, 
nor suffer any European deserters to pass through his country but return 
them to the Resident of the English factory^ whether they are applied for or 
not, on promise of pardon ; the English will observe the same in respect to the 
subjects of the Bhonsia, etc., and slaves to be returned on both sides. 

Articlb 11. 

If any vessels or boats belonging to the English, their subjects or allies, 
or those trading under their protection, at any time be drove ashore or wrecked 
in any part of the Bhonsla's dominions, he agrees to afford all suitable assist- 
ance for the preservation of such vessels and their cargoes, and whatever part 



Part II Sawantwari—No. XC 268 

thereof may be saved to be delivered up to Ihe lawful owners without any 
salvage whatever^ except the labourers' hire ; the EniJ^lish on their parts to 
observe the same in respect to auy vessels belonging to Kbem Sawunt^ the 
Bhonsla, 

Article 12. 

Kbem Sawunt, the Bhonsla^ will not^ by menaces or otherwise^ directly 
nor indirectly plunder, or in any shape molest^ the inhabitants or others that 
may have served or lived under the protection of the English during the time 
they were in pos6es8ion of fort Raree^ but permit them to enjoy peaceably their 
houses^ lands, and tenements, in the same free and ample manner as when the 
Bhonsla's government subsisted before the English conquered this place. The 
least infringement of this Article will be highly resented by the Honourable 
Company. 

Abticle 13. 

Kbem Sawunt^ the Bhonsla, agrees, should the Honourable Company be 
attacked, and they should require his assistance, to provide them with what 
troops they may want, they supplying them with provisions only ; the Honour- 
able Company in like manner agree to assist the Bhousla should it be con* 
▼enient for them. 

Abticlb 14. 

Khem Sawunt^ the Bhonsia, in consideration of Vittojee Commotim^s 
standing his security to the Honourable Company for the amount of this 
Treaty, does make over to the Honourable Company in his behalf, and for 
his use^ the village and district of Vingorla, with all its oarts, farms, rents, 
customs, etc., of any kind or sort whatsoever, for the term of 13 years, at 
which place the Honourable Company will hoist their flag and keep there such 
servants and people as they may tliink proper, and should Khem Sawunt, the 
Bhonsia, not have satisfied Vittojee Commotim for the amount of the Treaty 
at the expiration of the term of 13 years, the Honourable Company will con- 
tinue to keep it in their hands until he has received full satisfaction^ at which 
time it will be returned to Khem Sawunt, the Bhonsia, but the Honourable 
Company will still continue their factory if they think proper. 

Abticlb 15. 

In witness of these Articles of agreement between the contracting parties, 
I, the Underwritten Agent, for and in behalf of the Honourable United East 
India Company, and Khem Sawunt, the Bhonsia, for himself, have signed 
with our hands, and in virtue of our full power, the present definitive Treaty, 
and have caused the seals of the respective parties to be affixed thereto. 

Done at Fort Raree this 24th day of October 1766. 

(Sd.) Thomas Mostyn. 



264 Sawantwsri— No. XCI. Part H 



No. XCI. 

Articles of Agebrment concluded between the B^jah Fhond 
Sawunt Buonsla Bahadoob, Saedesay of CooDALL and its 
Dependencies, on the one part, and Cottetland Schutlbe, 
Esq., Captain of His Beitannig Majesty's 84th BiEgimbnt 
of EooT, and Beitish Envoy at Go a, under instruotlona from 
the Right Hon'blb Oilbeet, Loed Minto, Goybekoe* 
Oeneeal of Beitish India, on behalf of the Hon'blb £a8t 
India Company, on the other part — 1812. 

Articlb 1. 

There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between the Honourable 
Company and the Kajah Fhond Sawatit Bhonala aud their Buooessors and 
heirs for ever. 

Articlb 2. 

In order to the effectnal suppression of the piracies which have hitherto 
been practised by the subjects of the Bajah Phond Sawunt Bhonsla^ it is 
hereby agreed upon^ on the part of the Bhousla, that the fort of Yingorla and 
the battery of Ounaramo Tembe, with the port and proper limits thereof, 
shall be ceded in full right and sovereignty to the Honourable Company for 
ever, and tbe British troops shall be put in immediate possession of the same. 

Article S. 

It is further agreed on the part of the Rajah Phond Sawunt Bhonsla that 
he will deliver up to the Honourable Company all gallivates, pattamars, and 
other vessels of every description that may hereafter be found equipped in a 
warlike manner, and that the same shall become lawful prizes to the Honour* 
able Company. 

Article 4. 

It is further agreed upon on the part of the Rajah Phond Sawunt 
Bhonsla that no vessel of auy description whatever belonging to the Sawunt 
Waree State shall be allowed to proceed to or from the port of Newly with- 
out first being examined by a person or persons who will be appoiuted for 
that purpose by the British authority^ and also that a guard of British troops 
shall be stationed at the port of Newty for the same purpose. 

Article 5. 

It is also agreed upon on the part of the Rajah Fhond Sawunt Bhonsla, 
his heirs and successors, that if at any time hereafter any of his subjects 



Part II Sawantwari— No. XCI. 269 



shall be g^uilty of piratioal acts, the forts of Baree and Newty shall be given 
op to the Honourable Company in like manner with Vingorla. 

Article 6. 

It is farther agreed on the part of the Honourable Company that as soon 
as the British troops shall be put in possession of the fort of Vingorla the 
blockading squadron «hall be withdrawn^ and the ports in the Sawunt Waree 
State shall be opened for the free trade of the subjects of the Honourable 
Company and tlie Rajah Fhond Sawunt Bhonsla. 

Abticlb 7. 

British merchants shall be allowed the free liberty of passing and repass* 
ing the territories of the Rajah Phond Sawunt Bhonsla with their efEects, 
merchandizes, carriages^ and beasts of burden upon paying the same land tolls 
as paid by the natural subjects of the Rajah, and no more upon any pretence 
whatever. 

Abtiolb 8. 

The British troops and subjects residing within the territory of the 
Rajah Phond Saivunt Bhoiisla shall not be obliged to pay a greater price for 
tiie produce of his country than the natural subjeots of the Rajah. 

Article 9. 

That British subjects residing within the territories of the Rajah Phond 
Sawunt Bhonsla shall be solely amenabto to the British authority, and any 
ofEences they may commit shall, on a representation from the Rajah to the 
officer commanding, be duly attended to; and the like to be observed on the 
part of the British towards the subjects of the Rajah. 

Article 10. 

All military stores of every denomination, and all supplies of provisions 
and Europe articles imported for the use of the British officers and troops 
residing in the Sawunt Waree State, to be allowed to pass duty free. 

In witness hereof, we the underttigned Rajah Phond Sawunt Bhonsla 
Bahadoor^ Sardesay of Coodall and its dependencies, and Courtland Schuyler, 
Esq., Captain in His Britannic Majesty's 84th Regiment of Foot, and British 
Bnvoy at Goa, have signed the present Agreement, and have caused our 
respective seals to be set thereto. 

Done at the viUage of Mardoor^ in the district of Santaida, Sawunt IFaree 
State, on the 3rd day of October 1812. 

Additional Article. 

It is further agreed upon that private property of every description 
belonging to subjects of the Rajah FUond Sawunt Bhonsla within the limits 

2u 



266 Sawantwari—No. XCII. Part H 



of the fort of Vingorla and battery of Ounnramo Tembe ceded to the British 
shall be respected ; and further^ that the British anthority will not afford its 
protection to any of the subjects of the Bhousla who may be guilty of offences 
against the Sawunt Waree State ; the latter part of this Article to be observed 
by the Rajah Phond Sawunt Bbonsla towards British subjects. 



The Com- 

{taoy's Wafer 

Sonl. 



TheGovr.- - 
Qenl.'s SmaU { 
Seal. 



(Sd.) MiNTO. 

N. B. Edhonstonb. 
A. Sbtgn. 






Ratified by the Right Honourable the Governor^Oeneral in Council, at 
Fort William in Bengal^ this 15th day of January 1818. 

(Sd.) J. MONCKTON, 

Persian Secretary io Government. 



Np. XOII. 

Treaty between the Honourable East India Company and 
the Regency of Sawunt Waree on the part of Bajah 
Khem Sawunt Buonsla, settled by Major-General Sib 
William Grant Keir, k.m.t., on the part of the British 
Government, and by Kajah Khem Sawunt Bhonsla on 
the part of Government of Sawunt Waree, by virtue of 
full powers from the British Government, on the one 
part, and with the concurrence and consent of the Begbncy 
of Sawunt Waree, on the other— 1819. 

Articlb \. 

There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between the British Oov- 
ernment and the State of Waree. 

Article 2. 

The Britibh Government engages to protect the principality and the 
erritory of Sawunt Waree. 



Part II Sawantwari— No. XCII. 267 



Article 3. 

The Regency on* the part of Eajah Khem Sawunt Bhonsla agrees to 
act in subordinate co-operation with the British Oovernment and acknowledge 
its supreinacy, and will not have any connection with other Chiefs and States. 



Articlb 4. 

The Regency on the part of Elajnh Khem Sawunt agrees not to enter 
into negotiations with any Chief or State without the knowledge or consent 
of the British Government. 

Article 5. 

The Regency on the part of Rajah Khem Sawunt Bhonsla agrees not 
to commit aggressions on any one ; if by accident disputes arise with any 
one, they shall be submitted to the arbitration and award of the British 
Government. 

Article 6. 

The Rajah and his heirs and successors shall remain absolute rulers of 
the country^ and the jurisdiction of the British Government shall not be 
introduced into that principality. 

Article 7. 

The Treaty of ten Articles concluded at Mardoor between Captain 
Conrtland Schuyler and Rajah Phond Sawunt Bhonsla on the Srd October 
1812 is hereby confirmed; but Rajah Khem Sawunt Bhonsla, having per- 
fect confidence in the justice of the British Government, agrees that 
if any of his subjects be guilty of crimes within the territories of the 
British Government, they shall be tried and punished by the officers of the 
British Government, 

Article 8. 

Whereas frequent depredations have been committed in the British 
territory by subjects of the State of Sawunt Waree, the Re*rency on the part 
of Rajah Khem Sawunt Bhonsla agrees never to employ in the service of the 
government of Sawunt Warce Surabajee Sawunt or Babna Gopaul, the 

Srincipal instigators of those depredations. The Regency further engages to 
eliver up to the British Government such of the perpetrators of those depre- 
dations as may be in their power to apprehend, and whose names have been 
given in by Major-General Sir William Grant Keir, k.m t. It is further 
stipulated and agreed that all subjects of the State of Sawunt Waree who 
may in future be gnilty of plundering the territories of the British Govern- 
ment, or any of its allies, are to be given up to • the British Government to be 
punished according to the laws of that government; and in the event of the 



268 Sawantwsri— No. XCIIi 



real criminals not being given up, tbe amount of the property plundered is to 
be paid by the government of Sawnnt Waree to the British Government. 



Articlic 9. 

The Regency on the part of Rajah Ehem Sawnnt Bhonsia cedes in per- 
petuity to the British Government the forts of Raree (Eshwnntghnr) and 
Newty, together with the lands round those forts, which have hitherto 
belonged to their jurisdiction, comprehending the districts of Pant and 
Ajgaum, and the whole lines of sea-coast from tbe Earlee River to Vingorla, 
and from Vingorla to the Portnguese territory ; and as Sumbajee Sawunt 
and Babna Gopaul are unable to reimburse the claims of the British Govern- 
ment, out of consideration to the Rajah Ehem Sawunt Bhonsia, those claims 
are eipressly relinquished on the part of tbe British Government. 

Aeticlb 10. 

As a further security against a renewal of the depredations committed 
by the subjects of the Sawunt Waree government, the Regency, on the part 
of R^jah Khem Sawunt Bhonsia, agrees to admit any British detachment 
that may be thought necessary by the British Government into any part of 
the territory of Sawunt Waree, and to afEord it every assistance^ seising plun- 
derers and freebooters. 

Concluded at Majgaum^ 17th February 1819. 

(Sd.) William Grant Eris^ 

iar^OeneraL 



The above Treaty^ consisting of teu Articles^ was agreed to by Rajah 
Ehem Sawunt Bhonsia Bahadoor Sardesay, with the approval of Nerbudda 
Bai and Saveetree Bai. 

Approved by the Governor-General of India in Council on 24th April 
1819. 



Part II Sawantwari— No. ZCIII. 269 



No. XCIII. 

« 

Abticles of Agkeemekt stipulated and agreed upon between 
the HoNouRABLB East India Comfaky and the Ebgekcy of 
Sawunt Waebb on the part of B/AJAH KhemJ Sawtjnt 
Bhonsla Bahadoob, Sabdesay of CooDALL and its Defend* 
encies^ settled by Oaftain Gideon Hutchinson, in charge 
of the PoLiTiOAL Duties, on the part of the British Gov- 
eenment, and by B/Ajah Khem Sawunt Bhonsla Baha- 
BOOB, on the part of the Govebnment of Sawant^Wabee, 
by virtue of full powers from the Beitish Government, on 
the one part, and with the concurrence and consent of the 
Eegenoy of Sawunt Waeee, on the other— 1820. 

Abticlb ]. 

The British Government^ in token of its friendship towards the Sawunt 
Waree State, and to evince that it demanded the cession of the Ajganm and 
Pant districts, ceded by the Treaty concluded on the 17th February 1819, 
for the sole purpose of putting an effectual stop to the depredations commit- 
ted in the Honourable Company's territories by the subjects of the Sawunt 
Waree State, does hereby restore to Bajah Khem Sawunt Bhonsla Bahadoor 
the Ajgaum and Pant districts (with the exception of the forts of Eshwunt- 
ghur (Haree) and Newty, and the villages forming the line of the sea-coast), 
and the undermentioned villages of the Boordavee district, in perpetuity, viz,, 
the inland villages of the Ajgaum district, Ajgaum, Asoolee, Mauoos, Urio- 
undy, Tuhoanny, Terrawanny, Kenslay, and Gooldeway ; the iuland villages 
of the Pant district, Pant, Tayndoolee, Chandwan, and Kurnathee ; and of 
the Boordavee district, the villages Wurroos, Kuswun, Wussurgaum, Hussaul, 
Koonday, Purvay, Kassurru), and Gauree-warreetururdy. 

Article 2. 

It is expressly agreed, and it is stipulated on the part of the Begency, for 
and in behalf of Bajah Khem Sawunt Bhonsla Bahadoor, that no person of, 
or belonging to, the abovenamed places, and others that may be hereafter given 
on any account or cause whatsoever, shall be responsible, or punished for any 
acts committed or done by orders, or sanction, or cognizance of the Honour- 
able Company prior to the dale of their being delivered to the possession of 
the Sawunt Waree State. 



270 



Sawantwari— No. XCIV. 



Fart II 



The above Treaty, consistin? of Two Articles, was agreed to, and con- 
cluded by, Rajah Khem Sawunt Bhonsla Bahadoor, Sardesay of Cooda]l and 
its dependencies, with the approval of Nerbudda Bai and Saveetree Bai, at 
Sawunt Waree, the 7th day of February 1820, corresponding to Thursday^ 
the third of Rubbelaker, in the year Soorsun Ashreen Myatein-wu-Ulf. 

(Sd.) G. Hutchinson, Captain^ 

In Charge, PolUical Dutiei. 

Note. — The above Treaty was confirmed by the Bombay Government on 
the 9th March 1820. 



No. XCIV. 

Agreement made and concluded by Captain Gideon Hutchin- 
son on the part of the Honouea^blb East India Company, 
Rajssoree Kamchundba Pant Malhab nd Buchajee 
Anunt on the part of the Curyeb Durbab and Bajbsobeb 
VisNOo Bhut Maybwankur, Naboram Pantgamkub on 
the part of the Wabee Durbar, establishing the revenue 
payable to the Fort of Fursadhghur or Nangnay from 
the District of Maungaum, south of the Coodal Biyer ; 
Sawunt Wabee, 16th March 1820. 





GRAIN. 


Total. 


Cash. 






Cooin.4. 


Impor. 


TotaL 




Boat Crop. 


Oeemrias 
Crop. 


Malmey 
Khoro6. 


Manugaam • 

Jbarap 

Nanajhe 

Bannnrday • . • 

Salganm 


80 1 
10 
4 10 
2 
6 10 


6 

10 
2 
110 


1 


86 1 
10 

5 2 
2 2 

6 2 


jB#. a. p, 
16 


R: a, p, 
15 


Total fifty chnrrays and two carideys 


60 2 


15 


16 



Part II 



Sawantwari— No. XGIV. 



271 



The payment of the grain and cash to be mad^^ according to ancient 



UBa^. 



(Sd.) G. Hutchinson, Captain^ 

In Charge, Political Duties. 



272 



Sawantwari— No. XGV. 



Part II 



No. 

Agreement made and concluded by Captain Oideon Hutchinson on the part 
and Buchajee Anunt on the part of the Curveer Durbar, and Rajesoree 
Waree Durbar, establishing the revenue payable to the Fort of Muno^ 









GRAIN. 


-■ 


A 


COOMLA. 


Impost. 


n. A « 














Total. 




Sard 

or MuUMOD 

Crop. 


Gatnas Crop. 


Sur Daysh' 
mookbee. 


Dohahya. 


Mai 
Moykbooree. 


1 

1 


Beerseenffiiy . 


13 


10 


8 8i 


1 17 


3 


1ft 8 15^ 


Wurlay . 


• 




31 


3 10 


1 6| 


3 13 


3 3 


87 1 


Kalmeest 


• 




14 





3 16 


1 I 12 . 


2 


18 8 


WowuIIeeya 


• 




6 





1 4 


3 8 


1 3 


6 1 13 


Daywasoo 


• 




6 


3 


1 6 


3 13 


1 3 


8 3 16 


Parpolee 


• 




14 


1 3 


8 3 


1 3 4 


2 


10 8 6 


Kaysarree 


» 




31 


1 2 


1 10 


3 10 


3 2 


38 1 10 


Santolee 


» 




8 





13 


1 4 


3 


4 16 


Buwulat 


• 




6 





10 


3 


110 


7 


Danolee . 


• 




8 





12 


1 4 


3 


4 16 


Ooparwurr 






10 1 


3 10 


1 8i 


1 7 


2 


14 1 0| 


8angaylee 


4 




43 


1 1 


3 17 


4 1 14 


8 


63 8 11 


Kalaylee 


< 




33 


1 2 C 


1 18 


3 1 16 


2 3 


10 2 14 


Ambaygaum . 


1 




11 8 


3 


3 9 


1 18 


18 


15 2 7 


Mahakholee . 


• 




6 3 





1 8 


3 6 


10 


7 2 9 


Kandoolee . 


• 




6 


10 


1 A\ 


3 9 


10 


8 Si 


Moray • 


• 




10 3 


10 


% t\ 


3 6 


ISO 


IS 171 


Sowpore 


• 




7 


1 16 


1 9| 


2 19i 


1 


2 41 


WuHolce 


• 




13 


3 10 


3 4i 


1 1 9 


3 


17 8 ISi 


Wanaee . 


. 




4 8 





18 


1 16 


3 


6 2 14 


Sankarrar 


■ 




4 3 


6 


18i 


1 ]6i 


3 


6 8 191 


Total three haodred 


ai.d twenty-fi/U 


r bhurraye one 


CHDdy and fl%'e 1 


kooroona 


884 1 6 



The caah payments to be in the following mode: > Fire annas in every Sapee in the month of Shrawnn; 
in every Snpoe in the month of Cheitree. The payments in grain in the following mode : — The sard riee in the 
Veshak ; and the Condolee measarement. One quarter of the Coomla grain to be piud at tbe Tillage of Seevapore 
failare of the crop a sarrey by both parties is to be made and division made accordingly to it, and the lespeetive 
and within thirty days after the receipt of the order at the villages tbe above payments are to be made. In 
qaarters per bhurray, and in failure of tbe payments above ten koorooos per bharray to be added to the amount 
mamlutdar and others under the fort of Mnnohur, bearing date in from the month of Asween last to the present 
failure of the crop, is to be of no effect. Tbe grain and caah as above written are year by year to be paid to the 
quantity of grass upon each hurray of the Coomla to be (18S) one hundred and eighty4wo bundles, the oomma- 
in the village Beevapore. In exchange of Beevapore the village of Ambaygaum is given. 

Finalfy rigned and eoneluded tkit 9Atk day qf Marek 1890, 



Part II 



Sawantwari— No. XCV. 



278 



XCV. 

of the Honourable East India Company ^ Bajesoree Ramchundra Punt Mul/iar 
Fuskttoo Bhut Mayrwankur and Naroram Panigamkur on the part of the 
knrgkur from the District of Munohur ; Sawunt Waree, 16th March 1820, 













CASff. 
















iMton, 




























lOXAJbt 


Nokthab 

orflzad 

ram. 


Maahat- 
patiee. 




Dost. 


Troop. 


Kairad- 
baha. 


Khood 
Muaaalla. 


Harildar 
Doasara. 


Carooonee. 






10 S S 


3 




1 





4 


9 


18 


110 


3 


12 





46 


1 S 


16 1 


6 10 










4 8 


16 8 


2 


2 


1 1 


21 





71 





10 S 1 


8 S 










4 


10 S 


1 2 


12 


10 


16 





62 


2 1 


SOS 


ISO 










S 


4 S 


1 


1 


8 


6 





80 


8 2 


SOS 


ISO 










S 


4 S 


10 


10 


3 


7 





21 


3 2 


10 S 1 


8 S 










4 


10 S 


12 


1 2 


10 


14 





60 


2 1 


10 S 1 


6 10 










6 


16 8 


2 


2 


110 


21 





67 


8 1 


SOI 


8 







1 


S 


S 1 


1 


10 


2 


4 





16 


2 2 


4 10 


110 










4 


8 8 


1 2 


12 


8 


6 





26 


• 


SOI 


8 







1 


8 


2 1 


10 


10 


3 


4 





16 


3 2 


8 10 


S S 










8 


7 S 3 


1 2 


2 


3 


10 





38 


2 3 


SS 1 S 


10 8 




• »• 




6 


82 1 


3 


3 


2 


40 





119 


1 8 


19 S 81 


6 8 










6 


17 1 


12 


2 


10 


26 





88 


3| 


6 18 


8 




8 





S 1 


9 


10 


1 2 


2 


12 





38 


8 


SOS 


ISO 







1 


8 


4 1 1 


10 


1 


2 


7 





22 


2 


1 1 


ISO 




s 





12 


4 S 


10 


10 


2 


6 





18 


2 1 


6 11 


s s s 










3 


7 8 8 


10 


10 


2 


12 





36 


1 1 


8 10 


18 










1 S 


6 10 


10 


10 


2 2 


8 





29 


1 


8 


8 10 










8 


8 


1 2 


12 


3 


16 





46 


8 


SOS 


1 S 










8 


3 1 S 


2 


2 


2 


6 





14 


3 2 


1 S 


1 S 










8 


3 1 2 


2 


2 


2 


6 





13 


3 2 










T 


otal eight hondred an 


d forty-nlni 


i Bnpees tv 


ro and a half 


annas 


• 


849 


2i 



four amuM In arery Bapee in the month of Aaaeen j four annaa in every Bnpee in the month of Poos : three annaa 
month of Kartiek ; the Wnrree and Natebnee grain in the month of Poos ; the Oeemwaa rice in the month of 
Id the kothie admeaanrement ; the remainder In the eereral Tillafrei in the Aoonay measure. In the erent of 
riiaraa of the Kolhapore and Waree States. The rerenne orders are to be iaraed on the let of tbe abore months 
ddkolt of the non-iasne of the rerenne ordera the payment to be made in cash at the rate of eight Bnpeea and two 
Dayable. All bonds or other papers on aoconnt of the current or past year's rerenne taken by or being with the 
wU, are hereby null and rom. The Article polntini: out that both Durbars were to make a surrey in ease of a 
fosi of MoDohur i the Tillages, when wholly uncultivated, are to be exempted, and the rerenne remitted. Tha 
tftiloB at* ropeM one ana three quarters per thoufaod. The Waree Durbar to exercise the sovereignty excepUn 

(8d.) G. HuTOHXvsov, Ck^in, 
In ekargt of Fditical IhUiet, 

2n 



274 Sawantwari— No. XCVI. Part II 



No. XCVI. 

AoBEEMENT for the Traksfbr of the village of Seevapobb 

TO the Eolh afore Durbar — 1820. 

The Vakeels of the Kolhapore Durbar . haying proposed that the Waree 
Durbar should relinqnish their right of sovereignty in the Tillage of Seeva- 
pore for the following reasons :— 

IsL — That the village for the last thirty years had been under the com- 
plete authority of the fort of Monohur. 

2nd. — That the lands are cultivated and the village mostly inhabited by 
the garrison of Monohurghur. 

dr^^.— -The extreme probability of immediate and never-ending disputes 
between the soldiers of both States from the irritated feelings entertained by 
each. 

^^^.— That as the government granary is to be situated in that villagei 
it would be highly desirable that the Kolhapore officers should be exempted 
from foreign jurisdiction. 

5M.— That as the village was close under the fort^ the presence of a 
guard from Sawunt Waree would be detrimental to the safety of the fort. 

The Waree Durbar had no objection if the subjoined arrangements were 
acceded to :— 

Article 1, 

That as the sovereignty was to be relinquished in toto, it was delsirable 
the Kolhapore Durbar should also relinquish its rights and claims to a village. 

Artiolb Z. 

That as the village of Seevapore was esteemed of importance to the safety 
of the fort^ they^ in an equal degree, held in similar importance the village of 
Ambaygaum. 

Artiolb S. 

That the ancient village receipts of the revenue from Seevapore to the 
Waree State, and store of Ambaygaum to the Kolhapore State, should be the 
basis of the exchange in adjusting the revenue. 

The difference on examination of the ancient village records is none or 
little. 

The Kolhapore revenue from Ambaygaum being bhurrays 7-l»0, and 
Rupees 13-1-3. 

The Waree revenue from Seevapore being bhurrays 7-0-0, and Rupees 
26-0-Oi. 



Part II Sawantwari— No* XGVII. 276 



The difference by the present agreement is thus : — 

The Waree Durbar relinquishes its revenue from Seevapore. 

Grain bhurrays 4-8-124, Rupees 28-3. 

The Kolhapore Durbar relinquishes its revenue from Ambaygaum. 

Grain bhurrays 15-2-7, Rupees 88-8. 

An excess only of bhurrays 10-2-18 in lieu of the advantages of the sole 
sovereignty and jurisdiction of the Seevapore. 

In avoidance of the future disputes the above arrangements were made 
and Ci>ncluded. 

Sawunt Wareb, ^ (Sd.) G. Hutchinson, Captain^ 

Tie 24a March 1820. J In Charge, Political Duties. 



No. XCVII, 



SuBffTANCs of a Mehobandum of Bajah Ehem Sawunt Bhon- 
SLA Bahadoob, Sabdesay Fbant Coodax and Mehals; 
Soosun Shullasheen Myatein-wu-Ulf — 1832. 

My country has been thrown into disorder and confusion more than once 
throuiifh my own misconduct^ and the Honourable Company now, at my 
request, undertakes to restore my authority. I therefore engage to act up to 
the following conditions, on which alone the assistance of the Honourable 
Company is extended to me :— 

Article 1. 

I will appoint VittuI Rao Mahadeo Suchnees, my karbarree, to manage 
the afFairs of my State, and I will not remove him without the consent of 
the British Government 

Article 2. 

Whatever measures of reform for the reduction of my expenses or those 
of my State, and whatever arrangements for the satisfaction of those whom 
my misgovernment has rendered discontented, the said karbarree may advise^ 
and the British Government may sanction, I will authorize and act up to, 
and enforce, and I will offer no obstructions whatever, and I will engage to 
the utmost of my ability and power always to support the said minister in 
the discharge of the duties entrusted to him. 

Article 8. 

If I fail in either of these conditions I shall have deservedly forfeited 
the friendship and confidence of the British Government, with whom it will 
then remain to make a suitable arrangement for the State, preserving the 
musnud to my son according to the Treaty. 



276 Sawantwari-No. XOVIII. Part II 



Article 4. 

Whatever extra ezpenseB are required on account of troops, or for anj 
other causes relative to the settlement of the principality, I agree to defray. 

The above four Articles I agree to; Chundree 2nd Sbaban Oorf Posh 
Shud Tretiah 8hekkah 1754, Nunduunam Suwuntsurre, 25th December 1832. 
The memorandum executed on the 19th instant did not contain the name of 
the karbarree appointed, in consequence of which this memorandum is drawn 
up and the first destroyed. 




Approved by the Bombay Oovemment on 15th January 1888. 



No. XCVIII. 



Agbeement entered into between ^lexandbbElphinstok, Esq., 
Collector of Zillah Rutnagheeby, and TJjum Hajah 
Khem Sawunt Bhonsla BahadooBi Sabdbsay of Fbant 
Coodall, Sumsthan Soondub Wabk (Sawunt Waree, dated 
25th Jemmadee-ool-Akhir Soorsun Tissa Sullaseen Myatein- 
wu-TJlf (corresponding with the 15tli September A. D. 1838). 

Article 1. 

Ujnm Bajah Bahadoor does hereby renounce all claim to the sea and 
land customs, including the fee for stamping piece goodsi which he has 
hitherto levied within as well as on the borders of the territory of tiie Waree 
Sxunsthan ; hereafter the Bajah Bahadoor has no claim to the abovementioned 
items of customs. 

Article 2. 

Ujum Rajah Bahadoor does hereby make over to the British Oovem- 
ment the right of establishing nakas on the frontier of the Waree TJmul, and 
the territory consisting of Perne and other mehals now held by the Portu- 
guese of Ooa, and of levying customs there^ as also of levying sea customs 
at the port of Banda. The British Government can levy the customs accord- 
ing to its own rules^ and in any manner it pleases, to which levy the Rajah 
Bahadoor is not to raise any objection on any account. 

Article 8. 

With the eTception of the places mentioned in Article 2 of this agree- 
ment, the levy of land customs, including the fee for stamping piece goods 
t all other places in the Waree Sumsthan Umul, is abolished. 



Part II Sawantwari—No. XOVIII. 277 



Article 4. 

The British GoTernment shall annually make a certain payment to the 
Bajah Bahadoor in lieu of the sea and land customs, including the fee for 
stamping piece-goo<ls, which the Waree Sumsthan hitherto levied^ and of the 
hiiks «rhieh the hukdars received direct, after examining the collections for 
the three years, vfz., 1834-36, 1835-36, and 1836-37, and after fixinff the 
average^ or a third of the total thereof, the amount of the average shiul be 
annually paid to the Uajah Bahadoor. 

Abticle 5. 

The Bajah Bahadoor having signified his wish to the British Oovernment 
that articles imported from Ooa, for his own use, and for the use of his 
durrukdars, might be exempted from customs as long as the customs did not 
exceed Rupees five hundred, the British Government complied with the 
request ; and with a view to avoid constant trouble, the British Government 
agrees to pay annually to the Bajah Bahadoor, on account of the remission, 
a sum of Bupees five hundred in cash in addition to the amount of average 
alluded to in Article 4, and therefore the Bajah Bahadoor is not to raise any 
dispute on account of the above exemption. 

Aeticlb 6. 

If the British Government should give orders to re-establish the levy of 
land customs in its own dominions, the Bajah Bahadoor is at liberty to levy 
customs within his territory at all land nakas, with the exception of the 
abovementioned nakas, on the Waree and Goa frontier and seaports, which 
have been made over to the British Government for the purpose of establish- 
ing nakas. If the British Government should not issue orders to levy land 
customs in its own dominions, the Bajah Bahadoor is not at liberty to levy 
them within his own territory. But should a decision (for levying) be passed 
(by the British Government), then the difference between the average of the 
customs of the frontier and seaport nakas, and the average agreed to be paid 
to the Uajah Bahadoor in Article 4, that is, the average of the customs of the 
nakas at which the Bajah Bahadoor may commence levying customs, is not to 
be paid to him by the British Government. 

The above are the six Articles agreed upon. 

Dated 26th Jemmadee-ooLAkhir {15th September A.D. 1838). 



Small Seal 

of the 

Waree State. 



Confirmed by the Bombay Government on the 12th October 1888. 



87S Sawantwari— No. XOIZ. Part II 



No. XCIX. 

Translation of a Lbttbr from the Ohieftain of Sattunt 
Waree, to Richard Spoonbr, Political Superintendent 
of Sawont Warkb, dated 16th September 1838. 

You have come to Waree and represented to me that my coantrj is sorely 
vexed by the depredations of hkwless rebels^ and that tlie finances of the State 
and also other matters are in great disorder ; that therefore^ under instruotions 
from the Bombay Government^ you had come to Waree, and that, until you 
had settled the country and made good arrangements with respect to all 
affairs of the State, you intended to have the entire management of my 
country and issae every order respecting it through the Minister Moro Punt 
Leleh, and you asked me whether I had any objections to the measure. 

In reply 1 beg to observe that great friendship has from olden time exist- 
ed between the Honourable Company's and my government; and in order 
that my State may not sustain any loss, and may eventually be made over 
to me again in the same manner as I have hitherto enjoyed it, your govern- 
ment have sent you here to settle the country, and you have explicitly 
explained to me the measures which they intend to adopt* and that you intend 
to have the entire management of the country until it is settled and brought 
into good order. 

By the adoption of the above measure my State will not sustain any loss, 
therefore I am willing that you and the Minister Moro Crustu Leleh should 
take the entire management of the country, and govern it justly and accord- 
ing to the existing customs and usages of the country. 

Great friendship exists personally between me and yourself, and I have 
every confidence in you. I am therefore desirous that you alone should carry 
the above measures into efiect, and that yon should remain here until the 
country is settled, and having accomplished this, that you should restore the 
country to me, and that you should not leave me until the country is made 
over again to me. If any other gentleman comes here to manage the entire 
affairs of the country, it will be derogatory to my own personal dignity and 
to that of my State. 

Therefore 1 trust you will make arragements that no other gentleman 
may be sent to conduct this business, but that you, having settled the country 
and made every arrangement respecting it, will restore it again to me the 
same as before, and that the Treaty entered between the Honourable Company 
and my government in a. d. 1819 be respected, and that the protection of the 
Honourable Company may be always continued to me and to my State, 



Pftrt U Savanxir. SI79 



IX.-8AVANUE. 

Abdur Rauf Khan^ the founder of the Pathan family of Savanar« obtained 
in 1680 from the Emperor Aurangzeb the grant of the jagir of Bankapur* 
Torgal and Azimnagar, with a command of 7^000 horse. The family, though 
connected by marriage with Tipu Sultan, was entirely stript of its possessions 
by him, and the Nawab sought the protection of the Peshwa, from whom he 
received a pension of Rupees 48,000 per annum. This was subsequently con- 
verted mto a grant of territory, yielding an equal amount of revenue, through 
the intervention of General Wellesley. 

As this petty State was rather a grant in lieu of pension than an inde- 
pendent jagir, the British Government, on its accession to the sovereignty of 
the Southern Mahratta Country, exercised complete jurisdiction over Savanur ; 
but when the grades of privileged classes were formed, the Nawab was placed 
in the first rank, and, in consideration of the former high position and power 
of the family, was declared to be no longer subject to the jurisdiction of the 
Magistrate of the district. 

In 1860 complete civil jurisdiction was conferred, as a special mark of 
Government favour, on the then reigning Nawab, Abdul Dalil Khan; in 
1869, after his death, it was decided that this jurisdiction was personal to him, 
and could not be exercised by succeeding Nawabs without the express sane^ 
tion of Government. 

Abdul Dalil Khan died in 1862 and was succeeded by his eldest sur- 
viving son, Abdul Khair Khan, who received in 1866 an adoption Sanad 
(No. C), and died in May 1868. He was succeeded by his son Abdul 
Dalil Khan, who died in 1884 without male issue, and was succeeded by Abdul 
Tabriz Khan. On this succession a nazarana of Rupees 28,790 was levied. 

The present Chief, now 27 years of age, has been entrusted with the 
administration of his State. 

The area of Savanur is 70 square miles; the population (1891) is 16,976, 
and the revenues amount to Rupees 70,600. The State is neither tributary 
nor bound to maintain any contingent of horse or foot. 



280 Savanur— BTo. 0. Part II 



No. 0. 
Adoption Sunnud granted to the Nawab of Sayanoob — 1866. 

Her Majesty beiog desirous that the governmeDts of the several PriDces 
and Chiefs of India who now govern their own territories should be perpe- 
tuated^ and that the representation and dignity of their Houses should be con- 
tinued^ I herebyi in fulfilment of this desire^ convey to you the assurance 
that^ on failure of natural heirs^ any succession to the government of your 
State which may be legitimate according to Mahomedan law will be upheld. 

Be assured that nothing shall disturb the engagement thus made to you 
so long as your House is loyal to the Crown and faithful to the condtions of 
the treaties^ grants or engagement which record its obligations to the British 
Oovernment. 

(Sd.) J. Lawbibtcb. 
19iA March 1866. 



Part n Bind. 2dr 



r-SIND. 

Tbb Rajput dynasty which ruled in Sind is said to Iiave keen eon^ 
qtiered about a.d. 711 by the Muhammadans from Arabia. About 1025 the- 
country was annexed to the Ghaznivide empire by ATahmud; and after^ 
various changes of rulers it was incorporated into the Delhi empire by Akbar 
in 1591, from which it was again dissevered in 1740 by Nadir Shah, who- 
exacted from it a tribute of above twenty lakhs of rupees. After the assas* 
sination of Nadir Sbah^ Sind became subject to the Durani rulers of 
Kandahar. 

Before the invasion of Nadir Shah, the Ealhoras, a religfous sect, hadf 
risen to pawer in Sind, and the Chief of the tribe, Nur Muhammad, had 
been recognised as Governor of the province. It was during the rule of hia 
brother, Ghulam Shah, that the connection of the British Government witk 
Sind commenced by the establishment of factories at Tatta and Shah-bandar 
in 1758. In that year Ghulam Shah granted an Order (No. CI) for the 
establishment of the factories and for certain immunities to trade. Thi9- 
order was renewed (No» CII) in 1761. During the rule of Sarfaraz Khan,, 
the eldest son of Ghulam Shah, however, the trade was so much interfered 
with that the British Government found it necessary to withdraw theic 
factories in 1775. 

The violence and tyranny of Sarfaraz Khan and his successors, who from 
jealousy put to death three of the Chiefs of the Talpur tribe, led to the over- 
throw of the Kalhora dynasty. The Talpurs are a Baluch tribe, whose Chiefa 
had long held the first place in the service of the rulers of Sind. To avenge 
the death of their Chiefs the Talpurs rose, and, headed by Mir Fateh Alt 
Khan, Talpur, expelled the Kalhora ruler Abdul-Nabi. This revolution took 
place in the year 1786. The measures which Fateh Ali took to establish his 
authority alarmed his relatives Mir Sohrab Khan and Mir Thora Khan. 
They fled, seised on Khairpur and Shah-bandar, and renounced the authority 
of their kinsman. Mir Fateh Ali was never again able to extend his autho- 
rity over the whole province, which remained divided into three separate 
principalities, riV,, Hyderabad or Lower Sind under Fateh Ali, Khairpur 
or Upper Sind under Mir Sohrab, and Mirpur under Mir Thora. I^ 
Hyderabad, Fateh Ali divided his power with his three brothers Ghulam Ali, 
Karam Ali, and Mnrad Ali, and from their real or apparent unanimity 
the brothers received the appellation of the Char Yar, or four friends. 

2o 



282 SincL Part IX 

^^^-^i— ^^— ^i^— ^— — ^— ^^^^-^— "»~^^^^~~^^~^'^— ^ ^-^-^— — ^— — .^M^— ^^— » ~^"^"~ 

In 1799 the commercial intercourse between the British Government and 
Sind was revived^ and Fateh Ali Khan issued an Order (No. CIII), granting 
certain privileges in favour of English trade, fiut the advantages of this 
trade proved to be overrated^ the promises of the Amirs were insincere, the 
representative of the British GovcHiment was mdely compelled to withdraw> 
and the influence of the British Government in Sind was at an end. This 
arrogant and insulting behaviour of the Amirs was attributed to remon* 
strances from Zaman Shah^ and to rumours of the growing power of the British 
Government consequent on the fall of Tipu Sultan. 

Fateh Ali died in 1801, leaving half his territory to his brother Ghulam 
Ali, and the remainder in equal shares to the other two brothers, with corre- 
sponding obligations for paying the expenses of the State and the annual 
^ribute of thirteen lakhs to Kabul. In this arrangement Mir Sobhdar, the 
son of Fateh Ali, received no share of power. Ghulam Ali died in 1811, 
and his son Mir Muhammad was also excluded from power, which was 
divided between the two surviving brothers, Karam Ali and Murad Ali. The 
former died childless in 18£8, leaving Murad Ali sole ruler of Lower Sind. 
fie died in 1835, leaving two sons, Nur Muhammad and Nasir. From this 
time till 1840 the government at Hyderabad was divided among the four sons 
of the Char Yar — Nur Muhammad Khan, the chief Mir, his brother Nasir 
Khan, and their two cousins, Sobhdar Khan, son of Fateh AH, and Mir 
Muhammad Khan, son of Ghulam Ali. In 1840 Nur Muhammad died, 
leaving two sons, Shahdad Khan and Husain Ali Khan, under the guardian- 
ship of their uncle, Nasir Khan. Thus the heads of the Hyderabad family 
at the time of the annexation of Sind in 1843 were — Mir Nasir, Mir 
Sobhdar, Mir Muhammad, Mir Shahdad, and Mir Husain Ali, between whom 
Nur Muhammad bad divided his possessions by will. 

In Upper Sind and Mirpur the government remained undivided in the 
hands of single Chiefs. Mir Sohrab bequeathed his territory to his son 
Mir Rustam, in 1830. Mir Thora had been succeeded in 18t9 in Mirpur 
by his son Sher Muhammad. These two Chiefs remained in power till the 
annexation. 

The conneotion of the British Government was naturally more intimate 
with the Hyderabad family who governed the lower valley of the Indus than 
with the more remote branches of Khairpur and Mirpur. After his accession 
Ghulam Ali deputed an agent to Bombay in 1803, to apologise for the 
expulsion of the British Agency by his late brother. Friendly relations. 



Fart II Bind. 288- 

1 ^ - ' ^ I 

* 

however, were not at once established in conseqaence of the evasion of the 
demand of the British Government for compensation. But in 1808, when the 
British Government were concerting measures against the threatened invasion 
of the French and the Persians by way of Afghanistan, it was deemed 
expedient to waive the demand. Captain Seton was sent as envoy to Sind 
on the part of the Bombay Government. He concluded an offensive and 
defensive Treaty^ of seven Articles with Ghnlam Shah. The Supreme Gov- 
ernment, however, refused to ratify it, as it committed them to too close a 
connection with Sind, and they sent an envoy of their own, Mr. N. H. Smith, 
to make new negotiations. A Treaty of four Articles ( No. CIV ) was con* 
daded on the £2ud August 1809, with the then surviving brothers of the 

* iMAMMLAXtow oi A Dmed of AoBSiicBrr sealed and dellrered hj Mn Gmvlajc Ali, Hakim of Sind, to Catuxm 

Datxo Sbtov at Hyderabad, the 18th Jaly 1806. 

This Agreement has been drawn up in consequence of Captain David Seton, on the part of 
the Hononrable Jonathan Doncan, Kaq., (^overaor of Bombay, having arrived at Hyderabad, and 
having formed a firm alliMnce between the Qovemment of Sind and the Honourable Company and 
Hononrable Oovertwr aforesaid, 

Abtiolb 1. 

That a firm alliance shall exist between tbe two States, and the friends of one the friends of 
the other, and tbe enemies of one the enemies of the other; and this shall remain for ever. 

Abtxcli 8. 

When tbe assistanc* of troops is reqaired by titber of tbt parties, it sball be granted wben 
•sked. 

Abtioui 8. 
That the disaffected of one government shall not be protected by the other. 

Abtiolb 4* 

That when tbe servants of the Sind Government shaU wish to purchase warlike stores in any 
of the ports belonging to the Honourable Company, they shall be permitted to do so, and be 
assisted in their purchases, and on paying their value M allowed to depart. 

Abtiolb 6. 

That an Agent on the part of the Honourable Company, for tbe inctease of friendship and 
good* will, shall reside at the Court of the Mir of Sind. 

Abtiolb 6. 
The clums on account of former loss in the time of Mr. Crow shall be dropped. 

Abticlb 7. 

That a British factory in the town of Tatta only, on the same footing as in the time of the 
Kalboras, shall, after the full satisfaction, perfect confidence, and with the leave of this govern- 
mentt be established. 

And through the blessing of Qod there shall be no deviation from this firm alliance. 

DaUfd Ut Jamadi-us-sani 1223, or 24tk July 1808. 



984 Sitid. Part IZ 

Hyderabad family. This treaty provided for Ae excdasioR of the Frenoh 
from Sindj and the interohanga of agents between the British Govemmeiii 
and Sind. In 1620 another Treaty (No. CV) was concluded with the two* 
surviving brothers^ Karam Ali and Murad A)i^ by which they agreed to 
exclude Europeans and Americans from their territories, and to prevent 
inroads into the British dominions. The subjects of the two governments 
were to be permitted to reside in each other's territosies on condition oi^ 
orderly and peaceable conduct. 

On the 4th April 1832 the first Treaty (No. CVI) was concluded with 
ihe Khairpur family. Its provisions were chiefly <tl a commercial nature, 
Mir Rustam agreeing to throw open the navigation of the IndnSi* on the 
same condition as might be settled with the Hyderabad Amirs. The terras 
with the Hyderabad Amirs (No. CVII) were concluded on the 20th and 
22nd April 1832, and provided for the passage of traders by the rivers and 
roads in Sind, subject to fixed duties, on condition that no armed vessels or 
military stores should be conveyed by these routes, and that English mer* 
chants should not settle in Sind, but should leave the country as soon as their 
business should be transacted. In 1834 this treaty was modified by another 
(No. CVm), which substituted for a duty on goods a toll of Bspees 570 

• 

between the sea and Rupar, of which Rupees 240 were to be paid to the Sind 
Amirs, and the remainder to Bahawalpur and Baujit Singh, and which pro- 

■ 

vided that bulk broken in the voyage should be charged with the local dutiee 
levied by the req>ective governments within whose territories the goods were 
«old. 

The later treaties with the Amirs of Sind were more of a political nature, 
arising out of the ineasures taken by the British Government to re-establish 
Shah Shuja in Kabul, to which it is necessary more particularly to advert. 

In 1836 Ran jit Singh put forward claims to a tribute of twelve lakhs of 
rupees from Sind, and threatened the invasion of Shikarpnr ; but the British 
Government induced him to abstain from hostilities, and offered to the Amira 
oF Sind to mediate a settlement of Ranjit Singh's claims, on condition of 
their granting oertain conoessione in favour of trade on the Indus, receiving a 
British Agent at Hyderabad, and conducting all their relations with Lahore 
through the British Government. A provisional Engagement (No. CIX) 
was concluded with the Hyderabad Amirs for opening the trade on the Indus 

* lUgardtng trade on the lD4tM •«« TreatUt with Ranjit Singh and the Nawabof Bahawalpur, 
T«l. IX, pagei 25 and 193. 



Port II Bind. 280 

and ttAtioning a British Agent at Shikarpur. Great repagDance^ however, 
was shown to the reception of a British Agent at Hyderabad. Nur Muhammad 
Khan asserted that he was too weak to accept such a measaroi which was 
apposed to the feelings of his family and the whole Talpnr tribe« But as 
concession on this point was made the essential preliminary condition of 
British mediation with Ran jit Singh, the Amir at last consented, and a 
Treaty (No. CX) was concluded, on the SOth April 1838, with Nur 
Muhammad. Separate agreements to the same effect were given at the 
request of Nur Muhammad to the other Amirs, Mir Nasir and Mir Sohhdar' 
the object of this being to secure Nur Muhammad in the position of head of 
the Hyderabad family. 

The 4th article of the tripartite treaty* between the British Oovernment, 
Banjit Singh and Shah Shnja, bound Shah Shuja to abide by whatever 
the British Oovernment should settle regarding Shikarpur and the territory 
of Sind on the right bank of the Indus. Article 16 provided that Shah Shuja 
should relinquish all claims to supremacy over Sind and to arrears of tribute 
on the condition of the payment by the Amirs of such a sum as the British 
Oovemment might determine, out of which fifteen lakhs were to be paid to 
Banjit Singh. In consideration of the advantages to be secured to the Amirs 
by the cessation of their dependence on Kabul and of all tributary claims, 
they were to be required to assist in the passage of the British armies to 
Afghanistan, to permit the temporary occupation of Shikarpur and as much 
territory as would form a secure basis for the intended military operations^ 
and to suspend that article of the treaty of 1832 which prohibited the 
transport of military stores by the Indus. The Amirs were at the same 
time told that any engagement on their part with the Shah of Persia would be 
considered as hostile towards the British Government. The Resident in Sind 
was also empowered, in the event of the British policy being opposed by the 
leading Amirs, to place at the head of the administration any member of the 
family whose disposition might be friendly, and who might have sufficient 
influence in the country to recommend him. 

With the exception of Sobhdar Khan, the Amirs of the Hyderabad family 
manifested the strongest disinclination to comply with the demands made on 
them. Less difficulty was found with the Khairpur family. Mubarak Elhan 
indeed, and a small party attached to him, were subservient to the counsels of 
their relatives at Hyderabad. But Mir Rustam Ali Khan, who had long 

• See Vol IX, pege 88. 



286 Bind. Part II 

manifested a desire for a treaty ^ith the British Oovemment, by which he- 
should be recognised as independent of Hyderabad, entered willingly into the 
British policy. A Treaty (No. CXI), similar to that made in the same year 
with the Nawab of Bahawalpur*, was concluded with him on the 24th December* 
1 888, by which bis territory was taken under British protection ; he acknow- 
ledged the British supremacy, engaged to abstain from political intercourse 
with other States, was guaranteed in the independent administration of 
his territory, and engaged to assist in the passage of troops through his terri- 
tory, and to cede temporarily the fortress of Bakkar as a depdt for treasure 
and munitions of war. Subsidiary agreements were at the same time given 
to the other Amirs of the Khairpur family, Mir Mubarak, Mir Muhammad, 
and AH Murad. It was at first intended to exclude Mir Mubarak from these 
arrangements in consequence of his avowed opposition to the British Govern- 
ment, but at the request of Rustam Ali a guarantee was given to Mir 
Mubarak as well as to the other Amirs. 

In the meantime much opposition was experienced by the Resident at 
Hyderabad. The Amirs were very reluctant to admit the pecuniary claims 
of Shah Shuja, and pleaded that the Shah had already granted them re- 
leasesf written on the Koran from all tributary payments. Mir Sobhdar was 

• See Vol. IX, page 193. 

t Shah Shuja ul'Mulk to Murad Ali Khan. 

Ai the tlavee of the presenoe are now aboot to proceed to conqner Kboraaan and Iran, I have 
entered into the foUowing treaty, which I swear by God and the Koran to abide bj. I will not 
remun above fifty days at Shikarpnr, and will encamp on the Baghi Shahi. At the close of the 
above period, the slaves of the presence will move into Kandahar, and I bestow Sind and Shikar* 
par and their dependencies on yon and your bsirs and successors in the same manner that you 
now hold them. They shall be your territories and property. There shall be no oppression of 
the smallest d<'gree, and besides that, the royal favour will be greatly extended towards you, so 
that all the world may know it. This treaty isvoachsaled on the Koran for your perfect satis- 
fiMtion. 

WHtten the 1th of Muharrum, 1209 Hijra. 

(The King's Sign Manual.) 

jr. A— The following remark is written in the handwriting of the King himself i— 

- This Treaty is confirmed by the Koran. The royal slaves have bestowed of their own free 
will and pleasure the country of Siiid and Shikarpur as a jagir on Mir Murad Ali Khan." 

Shah Shuja-ul-Mulk to the Amirt Nur Muhammad Khan and Nanr Muhammad Khan. 

I hereby, in the name of Ood and by the Sacred Koran, make this agreement, by which I 
be»tow on you the country of Sind and Shikarpur, and all their dependencies, as a jagir,^ which 
you are to enjoy and hold generation after generation. The said oountry will remain with you 
for the future, and no sort of oppression, however small, shall be attempted or practised. The 
friends and enemies of the King shall be considered your friends and enemies. Should you re- 

?nire any assistanoe in the way of troops on account of Sind and Shikarpur, it shall be affoi-ded 
rom the royal army agreeably to your wishes. The slaves of the presence have no sort of claim 
or pretensions on Sind or Shikarpur and their dependencies, nor will any be made. The treaty 



Part ^I 8iDd. 887 

— — — ^-^-^^-^^— ^ 

thronghout friendly in bis bearing, bat tbe otber Amirs, more partieularlj 
Mir Nur Mahammad and Mir Nasir, acted witb deep duplicity. While 
professing a strong desire for cordial friendsbipj they were holding secret 
intercourse with Persia. They threatened in a most insolent manner to 
oppose the passage of Shah Shuja, permitted *the Besident to be insulted 
and stoned, gave secret orders that no assistance should be rendered to the 
British force from Bombay, and tampered with the Nawab of Babawalpur to 
seduce him from the alliauce which he had just concluded with the British 
Oovemment. The paramount importance, however, of hastening the com- 
pletion of the measures for the occupation of Afghanistan induced the British 
Government to abate their demand, provided they could secure the passage of 
troops. The Resident therefore offered to the Amirs a treaty which recognised 
the distinct independence of each of them, but provided for a subsidised 
British force being stationed in their country, and for the exemption of Mir 
Sobhdar from all payment on account of the expenses of that force. The 
treaty was rejected by the Amirs, and every appearance of open hostility was 
exhibited. Preparations were made to attack their capital, when the Amirs 
assented to the demands made on them and signed the treaty. But as a 
punishment for their hostility, a new condition was insisted on that the 
Amirs of Hyderabad, with the exception of Mir Sobhdar, should pay seven 
lakhs of rupees each, being twenty-one lakhs in all, to Shah Shuja, as the 
condition of their exemption from further claims. 

While these events were occurring at Hyderabad, the reserve force from 
Bombay was fired on while approaching Karachi, and its landing was opposed. 
Fire was, therefore, opened on the fort ; and its sea-face was levelled with 
the ground. The fort was taken, and the governor was required (No. CXIl) 
to give over the military occupation of it to the British Government. 

The treaty which had been concluded between the Besident and the 
Amirs was not confirmed in its entirety by Government* Several modifica- 
tions were made, and it was reduced from 23 to 14 articles. The revised 
Treaty (No. CXIIl), signed by the Governor-General, was offered separately 
for the acceptance of the four Amirs. After some demur the Amirs signed it 
being chiefly induced to do so by the example of Mir Sobhdar. 



which the fortunate tlares wrote with the royal handwriting on the Sacred Koran, in the name 
of Mnrad All Khan, of bleased memory, is renewed, at well as what it herein stated to yon, and 
not a hair-breadth't difference shall occar in it. The royal favour and approbation shall be' bes- 
towed and showered on you beyond that shown to tbe other weU-wishers of the King. 

(Signed by the King's Sign Miinaal in red ink.) 



888 SincU Part II 

In the meantime Mir Sber Muhammad, of Mirpur, also expressed a wish 
to enter into a treaty with the British Government. His object was to 
obtain the same doncession as had been granted to Mir Sobhdar of Hyderabad^ 
that is to say, exemption from all payments towards the sabsidiary force. 
Oovernmenti however, refused to treat with him on such terms, and required 
a payment of half a lakh a year. To this the Amir assented, and a Treaty 
(No. CXIV) was concluded with him in June 1841. 

Delay and diflSoulty soon began to be felt in realising the tribute from 
the Amirs, and Lord Ellenborongh, deeming the demand of pecuniary tribute 
from Native States to be a constant cause of misunderstanding, resolved to 
commute it, whenever possible, to a cession of land. In pursuance of this 
policy, negotiations were opened with the Amirs for the cession of Shikarpur 
in lieu of the tribute. Mir Nasir of Hyderabad readily offered to cede his 
own share of Shikarpur, and that of his late brother, Mir Nur Muhammad, 
on condition of being allowed to retain the nominal sovereignty. The nego- 
tiations were nearly concluded, when the filst news of the disasters at Kabul 
arrived and caused an entire change of feeling in the Amirs, leading them 
to break off the discussion. Mir Bustam Ali of Khairpur and Mir Nasir 
of Hyderabad also began to intrigue for the expulsion of the British forces 
from Sind. They were therefore distinctly warned that the result of bad faith 
to their engagements would be the loss of their territories. 

In August 1842 Sir Charles Napier was appointed to the military command 
in Sind and Baluchistan, and invested with authority over all civil and political 
officers in those countries. Besides suspicion as to the fidelity of the Amirs^ 
there were other circumstances arising out of a misunderstanding of those 
articles of the treaty relating to trade, which called for a revision of the 
engagements* The most important discussion related to the interpretation of 
the 11th article. The Amirs insisted that the article exempted only foreign 
boats from duty on the Indus, while the British Government maintained that 
all boats, both of Sind and of other States, were entitled to pass duty-free. 
The objects which were to be kept in view in any new engagement with the 
Amirs were the free navigation of the ludus, the cession of territory in 
exchange for tribute, the establishment of a uniform currency in Sind^ and 
the cession of territory to the Nawab of Bahawalpur, who throughout the 
disasters in Afghanistan had remained faithful to his engagements. A draft 
treaty embodying these demands was offered to the Amirs towards the close o{ 
1842j who protested against them. There seemed to be no hope of an amicable 



'ii;Ai 



^art II 



Bind. 



289 



^0ctttleiii6lit| and the British troops Wef e fltiyancing to enforce the demands ; 
X?hen on tb^ 9<3i February 1843 the Amirs intimated their willingness to 
^subscribe the treaty if Rustam Ali Khan, of Ehairpur, were restored to his 
vights of which he had been deprived by his younger brother^ Ali Marad Khan. 

Mir Solirab of KhairpEir had retired from public life in 181 1^ and abdi- 
x«ated in favour of his son, Mir Rustam Ali. But by his will, which he made 
in 1829^ lie divided his territory among his sons in four shares, of which Mir 
ftastam, as the successor to the Turban, held two, and Mubarak Ali and Ali 
Murad were to receive one each. Mir Ali Murad, who was an infant at the 
time of bis father^ death, a&d was committed to the care of Mubarak Ali^ 
^always believed himself to have been defrauded by his guardian. However 
AiB may be, he received* from the British Government in 1838 a separate 
guarantee for the estates he held in Khairpnr. Mubarak Ali died in 1839, 
Wt the dispute was inherited by his son, Mir Nasir, with whom Mir Rustam 
Ali sided. In September 1842 the brothers met in battle. Rustam Ali and 
Mir Nasir were defeated, and signed the Naunahar Treaty ,t by which they 



* See above, page 286. 

TbuMIiAT16v oi the *tmmrtr niMd betwMti Mxa aumjix Khut, Talp«r, »ad Mia Ati Mvbad Kaiv* TalSpfur. ag 
written on the Konn, which was produced by Ali Muxmd to the CommiBslon in 186(W 

In the name of the Moat Mefrciftil and Compassionate God* 

May the Ood of the Univene be praised I 

Mir Sahib Mir Rostam Elian, Talpnr, made peace and bound himself by promise with Mir All 
Mnrad Khan, Tlilptir, to this effect, that as k dispate arose between Mir Ali Morad Khan and Mir 
Nasir Klitn on the subject of the boandary of Snndsrbela in which Mir Nasir Khan was proved to 
have encroached, Mir Ali Morad Khan having expended lakhs of rnpees came to fight with Mir 
Kasir Khan. lu the meantime, in order to put an end to disturbances, and considering the expense 
in cash and jagirs which Mir Ali Murad Khan has incurred on account of his army, 1 give over 
the villnges of Khanwahan, Abayani, Bacba, Dan, Ghorakna, the villages Raina and Pal^a, with 
my free-will, and that of Mir Nasir Khan to Ali Murad Khan, that he may enjoy them from the 
commencement of the season Kharif 1253, and I (Mir Rustam) will depute a vakil to get this 
treaty sancticmed by the British authorities. I Will never cause any molestotion against the said 
▼ilkges } neither my sons nor Mir Nasir Khan, nor his relations, will raise any claims to this coun- 
try. If they attempt to do so they are false; and as regards the villages of Babarloi, Abri and 
Shah Bela, Muhammad Obag and Mafalani, which are the right of Mir All Murad Khan, although 
they were in the possession of Mir Mubarak Khan, Mir All Mnrad Khan has got them back 
through the British Government ( neither Mir Nasir Khan nor his children are to set forth their 
claims to the said villages, or apply to the British Government for them. If they attempt to do so 
they are false, and I, together with my sons^ shall take part with Mir Ali Murad Khan, as he is In 
the right, and the boundary of Sundarbela, as may be settled by the Ambs, I will give into the 
possession of Mir Ali Mnrad Khan. There is no difference In this treaty, nor will any be made. 
God is witness. 



Rustam 

Fakir, 

Talpnr. 



Mir Ali 

Akbar Khan, 

Talpur. 



Mir 

Nasir Khan, 

Talpur. 



Dated 9th Shaham 126S. 



iv 



%90 Bind. Pftri Jl 



affigned Dine villages to Ali Manid^ seven of which belonged to Mir Bmiaa 
Ali^ and two to Mir Nasir. When Sir Charles Napier arrived in Upper Bind Mir 
Ali Marad complaiDed to him that his brother Bnstam was eodeavonring to 
secnre the succession to the Turban to one of his own sons to the prejudice of 
Ali Murad's right. Sir Charles Napier replied that bj treaty the Chieftaincy 
belonged to Mir Rustam Ali for life^ but that at his death it would be tnuiis- 
f erred to Ali Murad. TVith this assurance Ali Mnrad seemed satirfed^ and 
from that day he attached himself firmly to the British interests. When the 
British army was advancing to enforce the demands contained in the draft 
treaty^ Mir Bustam Ali offered to come into Sir Charles Napier's camp and 
put himself under his protection. He was told he should rather seek the protee- 
tion of Ali Murad. He did so^ and shortly afterwards it was reported that 
he had resigned the Turban to his younger brother^ and had written the 
resignation* in the most solemn manner in the Koran. The resignation was 



Corr of the Tsbavt of NaoiulMr wriiteo on the Ifl Mid to Imt* beta ntracUd ttom the Konn. 

Tratu lotion. 

Id the name of the Moet Merciful and Compawionate God. 

If aj the God of the Universe be praised ! 

Mir Suliib Mir Rostam Khan, Talpnr, made peace and boand himself bj promise with Mrr 
Ali Monid Khan, Talpor, to this effect, that as a dispute arose between Mir Ali Mnrad Khan snd 
Mir Nasir Khsn on the »nMect of the boundary of Snodarbela, in which Mir Nasir Kh^n waa 
proved to have encroached, Mir Ali Mnrsd Khan having expended lukhs of rupees came to fi^fht 
with Mir Nssir Klian. In the roesntime. in order to put sn end to distnrbsncea, Ac., considering 
the expense in cash and jagirs which Mir Ali Murad Khan has incurred on account of his armj» 
1 ffive over the villiiges of Kbannahan, Abayani, Bacha, Dari, Gharakna, the villages Baina and 
Paiya, with my free-will, and the village Padlo, and pargana (a) Mathela with my own free* will 
and that of Mir Nasir Khan. 

(b) The word " deh " sppears here to have been altered to " pargana/' and in attempting ta 
make *' be-marsi " into ** Meharki" the papers seem to have been spoiled. 

* Praise be to God and blessings on the Prophet and his family ! 

Mir Rostam Khan, Talpur, has made a compact, and formed a treaty with Mir Ali Morad 
Khan, Talpur, to the following effect :— At this time dnring the supremacy of the powerful and 
exalted English Government, and from the autumn of 1258, I, Mir Rustam Khan, of my own free 
will sod pleasure, aoeording to the rule and custom of the Chiefs of Hyderabad, present to Mir AK 
Morad Khan (who Is worthy of the Chief ship) the Turban of the Chiefship and brotherhood with 
the control of the whole of my oountry, with the (sar shumari) capitation tax, (mir-bahri) river 
dues, and (jaziya) tax on others than Mubammadans, and farms, and tolls, and fisheries, as speci* 
fled below» so that dnring my lifetime, hsving occupied the seat of Chiefship, he may take into his 
entire possession the countries specified below. No one of my sons or n^hews has or shall have 
claim or entry in this same Turban and this same eountry, which I of my free-will and pleasure 
bestow in gift. If any one advanoes a claim, he is a liar. The administration of affairs, the 
control (ft the army, the nefl^otiatious with the English, all now depend on the will of Mir Ali 
Murad Khan. In this compact the oath of the Koran is used; there shall not be the variation of a 
hair's breadth. God is sufficient witness. Written on the 17th Tekiad 1258 A.H. (December 20th 
1842); Ist, Parganas Kholiara Chehur, Allinria, and Kahtera; 2iid, Parganas Naushahra Firoz; 
8rd, ditto Kandbarra, with Cherpur and Lahari ; 4th, Sad Kokan ; 5th, ditto Mirpur, Manhilas^ 
and Kanurki; 6th, sandy territory in Kene and Nam; 7th, forts ShahKarh, Sirdashgarh, and other 
forts ; 8th, Parganas Obara, Khairpur, Harki ; 9th, ditto Imamwa ; 10th, ditto Bahunak and Burah ; 
nth, one-third of Sa^ial and Parganna Muzaka; 12th» Pargana Shikarpur Mor Ali; 18th, ditto 
Rnpa ; 14th, ditto Balbadka ; 15th, ditto Chak Muzargah ; 16th, ditto Kashmnr. 



Fort II Bind. S91 

made after Mir Bustam All had taken from Mir Ali Murad an engagement* 
securing a provision for himself, his sons and his nephews. When Sir Charles 
Napier heard of the resignation, he asked for an interview with Mir Bustam 
Ali. But the Amir did not wait for it. He fled to the desert, and Ali Murad 
was recognised by Sir Charles Napier as Chief of Khairpur. * It was for the res- 
toration of Mir Rustam Ali to the rights of which he had been thus deprived , 
involuntarily as was afterwards proved, that the Amirs stipulated as the condi- 
tion of their signing the proposed treaty. Major Outram, the British Com- 



* I, Mir Ali Murad, Talpar, reqaested Mir Rostain Khan, on acooant of hie old age and 
weakly state, to abdicate the Turban in my favour and give over in writing all the country ; that 
I would be responsible in every way to the British Qovernment. The Mir oonsented to abdicate 
the Turban and to give over in writing the whole country and also the fortress, but he required 
that I would agree to four Articles, after which he would give over to me in writing the whole 
country. These Articles are as follows : — 

Abtiolb 1. 
That the country north of Bori, according to the proclamation, belongs to the British. 

Abtiolb 2. 

The eonntry belonging to the sons of Mir Mubarak Khan. 

Abtiolb 3. 
The oonntry banging to the sons of Mir Rustam Khan. 

Abtiolb 4. 

My (that is, Mir Rustam's) expenses. 

I consented to the above Articles, taking upon myself the whole responsibility. I do now 
declare, giving the same in writing, tlmt if the British Qovernment remonstrate with Mir Rastam 
Khan and demand why he made over the country north of Rori to Mir Ali Murad, I will be 
answerable and satisfy the Snglish Qovemmeut. If they demand the country, I will give it up, 
but I will not allow Mir Rustam Khan to suffer one word of annoyance. « To the sons of Mir 
Bustam Khan, whom I look upon as my own brothers, I will restore their jagirs ; I will in no way 
depart from this. To take one span of their lands is unlawful. I have no claim whatsover to 
their jagirs ; it is their right, and their right they shall receive. The country belonging to the 
sons of Mir Mubarak Khan should I not take, the British Government wilU I will, therefore, now 
approfniate their country, which I will afterwards make over to them. I have no claim whatever 
on their country; one single span of their country in my possession would be unlawful; the country 
is their right, and their right they shall receive. As for Mir Rustam Khan, his family, servants, 
male and female slaves, 1 will provide for all either inland or in money; nothing shall be deficient. 
I will serve him as he wishes. These Articles I have written out in the form of a treaty that 
bereaf&er they may remain as proof, and that no differences may occur, Qod is my witness. 

Dated the 16th Zulkadr 125S, a.d. 19th December 1842, 

Pottseript, — Mir Rustam Khan to retain possession of Khairpur for life. 

Dated ae above* 

Confirmed. 



Mir Ali 
Murad's 

Seal. 



202 Bind. Fart U 



iAi 



missionerj had no power to re-open tliis subject. At last^ on the 14th Febroaiy, 
the Amirs, except Nasir Khan of Khairpor^ signed the Treaty (No. CXYX 
leaving Mir Bustam Ali'is rights to future investigation. Next dajr th^ reed* 
dence of Major Outram was attacked by 8,000 of the trooper of the Amirs. 
After a most gallant defence the escort made their way to the mam army* 
The battles of Miani and Dabo subjected the whole of Sind to the British 
Government, with the exception of the possessions of Ali Murad, who waa 
established as Chief of Khairpur in the territories which belonged to Mir 
Bustam, both by inheritance and in right of the Turban, as weU as in the 
lands of which he himself stood rightfully possessed at the time of the eon* 
quest. 

As all the territory of Sind, with the exception of the portion to be 
continued to Mir Ali Murad, was confiscated by the British Government, it of 
eourse became Mir Ali Murad^s interest to establish his right to as large a 
portion of the lands of Khairpur as possible. To effeet this he attempted to 
alter thdt clause of the treaty of Naunahar, which conferred on him two 
villages belonging to Mir Nasir Khan, in such a manner as to secure for 
himself large districts of the same name instead of insignificant villages. In 
doing so the leaf of the Koran on which the treaty was written became 
spoiled. The leaf was therefore extracted and the treaty was written on a 
fresh leaf in such a way as to suit Mir Ali Murad^s purpose. This fraud was 
clearly established by a Commission, which met in 1850 to investigate the 
matter, and as a punishment for it Ali Murad was degraded from the rank of 
Bais of Khairpur, and deprived of all his territories^ except those which he 
inherited under his father's will. 

Mir Ali Murad Khan is 78 years of age. In 1866 he was assured by 
Sanad (No. CXVI) that any succession to his State, whibh might be in 
conformity with Muhammadan law, would be respected ; and in 1891 he was 
made a Knight Grand Commander of the Order of thl9 Star of India. He 
enjoys first class jurisdiction, having power to try for capital offences any 
persons except British subjects. He receives a personal salute of 19 guns, 
a salute of 15 guns being attached to the State of E^hairpur. His only 
surviving son, Mir Fariz Muhammad, is recognised as heir to the State. 

The area of Khairpur is 6,109 square miles. The revenue is collected 
in kind, the ruling Mir receiving one-third, which is estimated at Bupees 
7j29,000 ; a considerable portion of this amount, however^ is alienated in jagirs 



Part II Bind. 203 

to the members of Ali Mured Khan's family* The population according to 
the census of 1891 is 131,957. 

After the conquest the deposed Amirs were removed from Sind> and 
pensions were granted to them by the British Government. They are now 
all dead; but their descendants continue to receive liberal pensions. All 
members of the Talpur family have been permitted to return to Sind. The 
pensions at present drawn by the different members and their dependants 
amount to Bupees 2,74,627 a year, distributed thus— 

lU. 
The Hyderabad family • • • • 1,29,679 
The Khairpur family • • • • 99,930 
The Mirpur family 45,000 

Total • a,74,627 



294 6ind-No. OI. Part IX 



No. 01. 

PebwannahSi etc., from the Prince of Sindh in 1768. 

No. 1.— Copy (attested by Oodjbe Mahomed Taya) of the Per- 
wannah from Gholam Shah Abassie, dated the 22nd Sep- 
tember 1768. 

Be it known to all commanders, officers, fuqueers, farmers, and inhabit- 
ants of Duratj Laree-bunder, Aurunga-bunder, Garranehere Darajah, Cha* 
vatra Massotie, Nakass, Barbundie, Oalabajar, Agar, Goozer Rajah Ount, 
Johibar, Sarkar Chachagom, Charcarhallow, Nassepore, Holcandjr, Sarkar 
Soviston, Coodabage, Sarkar Nohorey Abey, etc., places belonging to Sircar, 
that Mr. Sumption, gomastab belonging to the Honourable English Company, 
informed me here that on all the goods he purchases and sends for the 
Honourable Company to Bombay he pays no more than one and a half per 
cent, customs on the market price, which I hereby confirm, and order that 
no more than that custom may be received of him as usual, but on all Europe 
goods which shall be sent from Bombay for Coodabage, Laree, Multon, etc., 
half of what customs, etc., charges (such as passports, convoyi lodging, Duan 
Towff, Canah, etc.,) the Multon merchants pay; and should there be such 
goods as the Multuny never carry, and be it possible to know the customs 
and charges on them, they (the English) are to pay half of what any of the 
considerable merchants used to pay on the same ; but nobody is to demand 
any thing more. And the same customs, etc., as are above mentioned they 
are to pay on the hing, indigo, etc., goods which they never bought before ; 
and they are also to pay one and a half per cent, customs on the saltpetre, 
be it bought by themselves or by anybody for them in the Sircar's plaice, or 
anywhere else ; but no officers, farmers, etc., are to demand any thing more 
from them, but let them carry on their trade uumolested. And I further 
order that should their goods not be disposed of and they want to carry them 
back, no customs shall be demanded thereon, nor on any provisions winch Mr. 
Sumption shall send from any place on board their ships for their main- 
tenance. They are also not to demand any thing for their gardens, nor in any 
shape molest their gardeners, boats, vessels, etc., or send them on any Sircar's 
business ; and it is also ordered that their chests of linen may not be opened, 
or the least hindrance shown them in passing and repassing, it being contrary 
to our rules ; and in short, no one shall presume to make any new customs 
to their prejudice, or in any shape put any affront on them or their people. 
They have also free liberty to provide any sort of grain, and sell the same 
and any European goods at any rate they please. The customs on the 
dubbers of ghee, oil, etc., as also on the chests and pots of goods, are to be 
charged conformable to the weight they put on each dubber, chest, or pot, 
without weighing them again; and the customs on the elephants' teeth ate 
to be received on the amount of sale when they are sold. And should Mr. 
Sumption either buy or build a house or warehouse at Aurunga^bunder or 



Part II Sind— No. CI. 286 



at Tattai my said people are to give him all the assistance they can, that it 
may cost him only a reasonable price, and be is to have all the encouragement 
for carrying on his trade, as it will be an advantage to the government; but 
no other Englishman shall have a house or any encourageiment. And as it \b 
very necessary that I should encourage and please the English, I hereby order 
that an entire compliauce may be shown to this without demanding any 
new order every year. 



No. 2.— TBAK8LA.TI0N of Ghot.am Shah, Princb of Sindh's Per- 
vrannah, for the Honourable Company's customs, privileges^ 
etc., at Sindh, dated 22iid September 1758. 

To all Fuqueers (a term for the Scroys, or people of the Prince's caste, 
inhabitants of the upper part of the country), Diredars, Muttaseddees that are 
at present or shall in future come into offices of the customs, whether under 
the sovereign power, or farmed out at the Dirt or (Tatta custom-house), Laree- 
bund^r, Aurnnga-bunder, Garranchere Darajah, Chavatra Massotie, Nakass, 
Baibundie, Galabajar (or grain custom-house), Agur, Guzer Rajah Gunt, 
Johibar, Sarkar Caehlon Charcarhallow (names of countries), Sarkar Nassee- 
pore, Holcandy, Sarkar Sovistan, Coodabage Ruree, and all other places 
within my dominions : Know ye (or ohserve) that the wealthy, true, faithful, 
and friendly Mr. Sumption, English Agent here, has made application or 
requested that the honourable, threat, noble, and highly esteemed English 
Company of India and Bombay may, on whatever trade or merchundize they 
transact goods, import or export, buy or sell, pay only one and a half per cent, 
customs on the valuation of the real price of the place, which I have conde- 
scended to and hereby grant ; furthermore, that the gomastah (or agent) for 
the said Honourable Company of India may have the privilege, on whatever 
goods be imports from abroad, and chooses to export up the countiy to Cooda- 
bad Ruree, Multon, etc., to receive a putta (or permit), and whatever goods he 
may purchase there or above, to pay only the abovementioned customs ; and 
of the Lauvasma (or customary charges) on the putta goods, such as Raw- 
darree, Deradarre, Muuket, Nut , Furhutt, Nungana, Dusturehoy Duana, 
Moota, at Coodabad, Circarwarry, Donnee, and other Nosem, Kalsay Duana 
Peshoharry, Joab Khanna, etc., the half only of what paid by the Company of 
Multon merchants, which is required to be duly observed, and at any place, or 
wherever there be not a settled custom on the Multon merchants, the half 
only of what is paid by others, the greatest or principal merchants, and at 
your peril not to ask, demand, or receive more ; and if the aforesaid Agent 
should purchase, bring down, and export out of the country, from Tatta, hing, 
indigo, or any other goods which he may not formerly have dealt in, or hath 
a settled custom for, to receive ouly the abovementioned customs and rates by 
the Custom-master, Duanna, etc., as aforesaid, and more (on no terms) to ask 
or demand. And furthermore, if the abovesaid gomastah or agent should, 
in any part within the extent of my dominions, of himself extract or purchase 
from others saltpetre, the customs on the true valuation, at the price of the 



W6 Bind— No. OI. Fart It 



idaoe, with all castomary charges included^ I have settled slid aflS^ed thereoii> 
viz,, in whatever place^ within my government or dominions, that he may 
extract or purchase, to receive on it, in that place only, the abovesaid cnstom 
of one and a half per cent.; and that my Muttaseddees, Costom-masters^ 
Diredars, Badawrs, Guzervans do not, on any pretence of customs or custom- 
ary rights, customs on boats, Moreesor or Misseree on ditto boats, Chitts, of 
other usual customs, in no place within ray territories, give any impediment 
to them ; but the abovesaid gomastah may, without trouble aud in a satis- 
Caotory manner, carry on and transact bis business without molestation ; and 
that no other person may be permitted to export the aforesaid commodity, 
and that whatever goods he may import here and not meet a sale for, if he, 
sooner or later, first or last^ export them again, by no means to demand any 
customs, charges, etc., or give any impediment to their exportation. 

And at the time of their ship's arrival at any of my bunders (or ports), 
if they should purchase provisions for the English and lascars of their ships, 
such as bullocks, cows, goats, sheep, or other necessaries, at Tatta, or from 
out of the country, and export in ships, on no terms to ask, demand, receive, 
or give the least trouble concerning customs thereon. Furthermore, for 
customs or other customary dues on the English garden, which they may keep 
for their pleasure, to give no trouble, or make any demands thereon, nor let 
their gardener be subject to be pressed or molested on any occasion, as yott 
are to observe I hereby exempt them therefrom ; and the chests of wearing 
clothes of the English, and other necessaries they may bring or carry with 
them, you are on no terms to give them trouble about opening, or demand the 
sight of, on any pretence whatever. 

And for customs of Moree, Misseree, etc., on their boat they may hire or 
keep to go to and fro in, not to ask or make any demand on ; and on their 
servants, and those under their protection, by no means to receive or give 
them any trouble, on account of head-moQey, or other dues of any kind, 
received from my subjects, or for any other new customs or demands that 
may arise or be collected in my country. 

And for any Nirkana (customs on rice) or leave of carrying to their house 
of grain, sold in Tatta of Nungana, on cotton imported from abroad, to make 
no demand or give any trouble thereon ; and for Nungana on gh^e or oil 
agpreeable to the custom or maund, for a dubber, to make account as usual and 
receive the customary dues ; and whether it is put in small buttaroes or larger 
jocks, or in other vessels (larger or smaller) to make account on the customs 
of maunds, eight maunds per dubber ; and on the Lauvasma, or customs on 
the sale of elephants' teeth, to receive, when sold, the usual custom of nine per 
cent, paid by the buyer and no more. 

And if the aforesaid gomastah (or agent) should, at Tatta or Aurunga- 
bunder, choose to buy or build a house for a factory, do yoa give him all the 
assistance, to the utmost of your power, to assist and forward him therein, 
and at the least expense, that they may settle in my country, in a strong fiecure 
factory, to their satisfaction, so as to trade with spirit and without apprehen- 
sion, to the increase of revenues and advantage of my country; and that no 
other Englishmen be permitted those favours; and that they may at pleasure. 



Part II Bind— No. CI. 297 



and without control, receive the customary dues and privileges of their factories* 
As the bestowing favours and continuing friendship with the English is 
desirable in my presence, therefore insist that due regard (in every respect) be 
paid to the above Sunnud^ and no demand made for new ones. 

Dated ut Ahmedabad^ in Sindh^ ISik Maharim, 1172 of the Hegira, or 
Stpf ember 22nd, 1768. 

No. 3. — LETTER^from Gholam Shah, Pbince of Sindh, to Me. 
KoBBRT SuMPTiOK, dated lltli December 1768. 

I now inform you that I am arrived with all my forces in the fort of 
Bhah'bunder^ and have determined to collect no customs (not even a single 
pice) on the goods that any King's merchants may bring to Shah-bunder, 
but on all exported from hence they are to pay the usual custom'^. You may 
be sure of this my determination^ and import goods from any parts to trade 
here. 

I hope you will soon send your man here to choose a place for building a 
house or factory. 

No. 4.— Orbee from Gholam Shah, Prince of Sindh, to his 
Metah Coostamdas, dated ISth December 1758, and attested 
under the Codjee^s Seal. 

You are hereby ordered not to demand any customs on the goods which 
Mr. Sumption may import, and likewise to let him have any place which he 
may chooi$e for building a factory on. Give him all the assistance in your 
power, and be a frigid to him, that he may think himself at liberty in carry- 
ing on his trade for the good of the port. 



No. 6. — Oopr (attested under Codjee Mahomed Tata's Seal) 
of the Ferwannah from Gholam Shah Abassie, dated 18th 
Maharim, or 22nd Septenaber 1759. 

Be it known to all commanders, officers, farmers, and inhabitants of 
Durat Laree-bunder, Auninga-bunder, Garranchere Daraja, Chavatra Massotie, 
Nakass, Barbundie, Galabajar, tioozer Rajah Gunt, Johibur, Sarkar Chaohlon 
Charcarhailow, Sarkar Nasseporo, Holcandy, Sarkar Soviston, Coolabage, 
Sarkar Lorah, etc., places belonging to Sarkar, that Mr. Sumption, gomastah, 
or agent, did, for and in behalf of the Governor belonging to the English Coiii- 
pany of India and Bombay, inform here that on all the goods he purchisesaird 
sells for the Honourable Company he pays no more th <n one and a half per 
cent, customs on the market priot^, which I hereby confirm, and oider that no 
more than that custom may be received of him as usnal ; but on all Ejarope 

2q 



298 Slnd— No. CII. Fart II 



goods which may be sent from Bombay here and hence to Coodabage, Laree^ Mul- 
ton, etc , or any brought from thence they are to pay on the same half of what 
customs and chari^^es (such as passports, convoy, lodging, duan towff, canah, 
ehoukey, etc.,) the Multon merchants pay ; atid should there be such goods as 
the Multuny never carry, and it be impossible to know the customs and charges 
on them, they (the Knglibh) are to pay half of what any of the considerable 
merchants pay on the same, but nobody is to demand any thing more ; and 
the same customs, etc., as are above mentioned they are to pay on the hiug, 
indi^'O, etc., goods which they never bought before ; and they are also to pay 
one and a half per cent, customs on the saltpetre, be it bought by themselves 
or by anybody for them in Sircar's place or anywhere else ; but no ofRcers, 
fartTiers, etc., ate to demand any thing more from them, but let them carry on 
their trade unmolested ; and the above-mentioned goods nobody else shall have 
liberty to buy. And I further order that should their goods not be disposed 
of, and they want to carry them back, no customs shall be demanded on them, 
nor on any provisions which they may provide at Tatta. etc., places, to send 
on board their ships for their maintenance. They are also not to demand any- 
thing for their gardens, nor in any shape molest their gardeners^ boats, vessels, 
etc., conveyances, or send them on any Sircar^s business ; and it is also ordered 
that their chests of linen may not be opened, or the least hindrance shown 
them in passing and repassing, it being contrary to our rules; and in short, no 
one must presume to make any new customs to their prejudicO| by any former 
rules or rates, or in any shape put any affront on them and iheir people. They 
have also free liberty to provide any sort of grain, and sell the same aod any 
Europe goods at anv rate they please. The customs on the dubbers of ghee, 
oil, etc., as als» on the chests and pots of goods, are to be charged conformable 
to the weight they put on each dubber, chest, or pot, without weighing them 
ag'ain ; the customs on elephants' teeth are to be received on the amount of 
sale, when sold, at the same rate as was usual in the time of the Prince Malio- 
nied Murad ; and should the Governor either buy or build a house for a factory 
at Aurnng^-bunder or at Tatta, my said people are to give him all the assist* 
ance, that it may cost him a reasonable price ; and he is to have all encouiuge- 
ment for carrying on his trade, as it will be an advantage to the Government ; 
but no other nation that wear hats shall have permission for it ; and as it is 
very necessary that I should encourage and please the English, I hereby order 
that an entire compliance may be shown to this without demanding any new 
order every year. 



No. CII. 

Three Perwannalis from the Prince of Sindh, 1761. 

A Pbrwannah granted by Golam Shah, Princb of Sindh, on 

the 22nd April 1761. ' 

Be it known to all Puqueers, Governors, or other officers, who now are or 
hereafter may be in authority in the department of customs or farms at Tatta, 



Part II 6ind-No. CII. 290 



Shah-bnnder, Anrunga-bunder, Carrpnchere or Darajah, tlie customs on cattle, 
6t<3., called NekasSy package, grain, Bizar customs on leather, and the Qott 
Chuabur, the Sircar of Cachlon and Charcarhallow, the Sircar of Nasseepore, 
etc., Holcandy, the Sircar of Sevastan, Coodabad Ruree, and all other places 
witbiu our dominions, that the noble Mr. Kr^kine, an Kn^lishman, and 
Kesident for affairs of the potent, magnificent, and Honourable English Com- 
pany in Sindh, being come to our court for the more firmly establishing the 
factory of his superiors, has requested, and we have, on account of the strict 
friendship subsisting between us and the said Honourable Company, granted, 
and do hereby particularly order that besides the English, no other Europeans 
shall either import or export goods or merchandize, or come and go upon that 
account within the dominions of Sindh, or the Soubah of Tatta and Buchor, 
or any other of the bunders under our authority. 

Whatever goods or merchandize belonging to the said factory or its 
dependants shall be imported at any of the bunders are to be exempted from 
paying any import customs, agreeable to our former grants, and therefore 
none are to be demanded. If they carry goods either from the bnnders to 
Tatta, up-country, on paying the customs they did formerly, certificates must 
be given them, and nothing further is to be demanded^ on any account, that 
they may carry on their trade with ease and satisfaction. Whatever goods they 
may export from any of the bunders they are to pay one and a halK per cei*t. 
agreeably to our former perwannah ; or if goods are purchased by them and 
exported from Tatta, they are to pay such customs as were before usual, and 
nothing further is to be demanded. No other merchant but the aforesaid 
Resident is to purchase for exportation any of the saltpetre that may be pro- 
duced in Scindy, or within our dominions ; or if they purchase and export this 
article, they shall be punished in such a manner as shall deter th<>m for ever 
again interfering in that trade* Whatever saltpetre the aforesaid Company^s 
Resident shall either extract in any part of onr dominions, or purchase of 
other merchants, and refine, the custom farmers, at such places, shall receive 
the customs thereon as formerly, that the said Company^s dependants may 
carry on this trade to their satisfaction. If they dispatch their own dingeys, 
gallivatSy or other vessels to the Bar, after proper precautions^ permissions 
shall be granted, and they meet with no impediment, which is to be strictly 
observed ; or if their said vessels are sent up and down the river on their 
factory business, and passing under Shah Gurh, or by the guard- vessels, etc., 
on permission granted, they are not to be stopped, that they may come and go 
without trouble. Should it happen, which God forbid, that any of their ships, 
gallivats, boats, etc., should run ashore, or be wrecked, either on our bars, coasts, 
or without our rivers, our officers in such places are to assist them ; and whatever 
effects may be saved, belonging to such vessels, whether rii:ging, necessaries 
belonging to the crew, or other goods, are to be delivered, to the smallest item, 
to the Resident aforesaid, he paying reasonably for the labour and pains of 
those who may assist in saving them. Should the aforesaid Resident choose 
to bnild a brick house at Shah-bunder^ or make a garden for his recreation, 
on any spot of ground he may like, he is to receive all the assistance po'^sible 
for doing it quickly ; and whatever former Sunnuds they have received are to 
remain in full force, and not to be olgected to or di^puti.d on any account. It 



800 8ind-No. CII. Pan II 



beings our pleasure to satisfy the said Honourable English Company^ therefore 
the above must be strictly observed, and no new perwannahs demanded. 

Daled the 16th of Ramzan 1174, or 22nd of April 1761. 



Febwannah granted by Gholam Shah, Fbikcb of Sinph, on the 

23rd of Apiil 1761. 

Be it known to tbe officers of the customs, or fanners of the revenues 
appertaining to the zemindaree of Shah-bunder and Cachiawly that at this 
time Mr. Erhkine, Resident for the Honourable English Company in Sindh, has 
requested that all their vessels might be exempted from paying the Moree 
of Rupees 25 on each vessel, formerly paid the Imaum; and we, being willing 
to grant his request, do therefore exempt all their vessels from paying the said 
Moree of Rupees 25 on each vessel, and now order you not to demand the 
same ; but if more than the sum of Rupees 25 was formerly paid for each 
vessel^ the overplus is to be recovered* 

Let this be strictly observed. 

Dated the 17 th of Ramzan 1174, or the 83fd of April A.D. 1761. 



Febwaknah granted by Gholam Shah, Fbince of Sixdh, on the 

22nd of April 1761. 

Be it known to all Fuqueers^ Gk>vernc>rs^ and oihf^r officers who now are, 
or hereafter may be, employed or concerned either in the c<»llecting or farming 
the customs from the sea to Raree^ and all other places within our dominioup, 
that Mr. Krskine, Reeident of the Honourable English Company's factory in 
Sindb, and their other servants and dependants, send boats and camels up and 
down in our dominions, with trade and merchandize : You are, therefnre, on 
seeing this perwunnaii, not to demand the usual charges of Moree, Misri, or 
Goozurbanee or Sooze, and employ them on our business on any pretence 
whatever ; nor is any person belonging to us, on any of the above accounts, to 
impede or otlierwise stop or hinder boats or camels belonging to them, that they 
may carry on their business without difficulty^ -and make the customs in- 
crease. 

Let this be most punctually observed^ and no person ofEer to dispute it. 
Dated the 16th of Rawzan 1174, or the 22nd of April A, D. 1761. 



Psrt II Bind— No. OIII. 


301 




No. cm. 

Order issued by Mir Fatbh Ali Ehak, 1799. 






Signature 
of the pri- 
vate Secre* 
tarj. 








Signature of 
the public 
Secretary. 


• 








Senl of Meer 

Futteh Ali 

Khaa. 










Signatare 

of the 
Moonsbee. 






Signature 

of the 

Accountant. 















The collectors and farmers, at tbis period and hereafter, of the town of 
Karrachee, will understand that at this time N. Crow^ Englishman, vakeel 
of the asylum of valor, wisdom^ and intelligence, the Honourable Jonathan 
Dancan^ Governor of Bombay and Sorat, on the part of the exalted, noble, 
power! al, renowned Knirlish Company Bahadoor, bas arrived at oar presence 
and requested the establit^hment of a commercial factory in the town of Kur- 
rachee, and the adjustment of customs on merchandize, export and import to 
and from foreign ports, and purchases and sales in the teriitories of Sindh, 
and otiier exportations and importations. For the sake, therefore, of the 
friendship of the English Company, one-third in the articles of customs only 
shall be remitted in the collections of duties on the trade of the English fac- 
tory, and all the fees levied as usual with the other merchants. It is com- 
manded that you forego, then, in levying duties on the trade of the English 
factory, one-third in the article of customs only, collecting all the regulated 
fees, as nsual, amongst the merchants, in order that the agents of the English 
may with confidence labour to increase our customs and their own trade. On 
account of weight or measure of their goods, or the inspection of trunks c>f the 
Resident's baggage, no molestation must be offered, but his invoice and word 
be taken. The duties on provisions and articles of consumption of the 
English and the crews of their ships, and the fee of Moree on their shipg, 
vessels, and dingeys, to be regulated by the custom in use amongst other 
merchants. If by accident any ship or dinge y belonging to the English 
coming or going with cargo to or from Sindh should be stranded or sunk on 
the coast of Kurraehee, the best assistance is to be rendered towards recover- 
ingher, and she must without hesitation be delivered up, the English Resi- 
dent discharging the expense of labourers. The dependan ts of the Resident . 
are not to be pressed on Government service, nor compelled to purchase Oov» 
emment property. A spot of ground for a country house to the English 
factory, and four beegahs of ground for a garden, outside of the fort of Kurra- 
ehee, are g^ven to the Resident with exemption from land or fee tax, and it is 
commanded that they be delivered to him wherever he may prefer, there being 
DO inhabitants nor claims of possessions; towards building the house you 



802 Bind— No. OIII. Part 11 



will afford assistance, the Ensrlish Resident P'lying the expenses. Maistre 
Suohanund^ Collector for the time being, will levy oustoms on the merchan- 
dize of the English and the importations of their ships according to the above 
written, the garden excepted^ and all other fees he will remember agreeably ta 
the purport of tbis^ which is peremptory. 

Dated 16th Rnhee-ooUAwul in the year of the Hegira 1314, tie 18th of 
August 1799 of the Christian era. 



It is repeated that the customs and fees are to be le\ied in correspondence 
with the established rates of import underneath detailed. 

Customs and fees on all ezportations and importations by sea :— ^ 

Customs. 

Rupees 3 and i per cent, on the market pri(*e of imports ; Rupees 2 per 
cent, on tbe amount purchase of exports (one*third excused in this article 
of (Customs only). 

Luwazime Outree Rupees 18 on every bale of Tatta piece goods exported* 

Moree upon vessels of all burdens; Rupees )S-3*75 arriving^ Rupees 
2-l*75 departing. 

Khirvvara upon wheat, rice^ jowaree ; Rupees 2-2 the Rhinwar inciported 
or exported; upon barley and paddy Rupee 1-1; the Rhinwar upon white 
grain Rupee 1-8. 

Pees» 

Moajdurea one pice upon every Rupee in the amount of customs. 
Foujdaree Rupee 1 qr. 2 rs. 4 per cent, in the amount purchase. 
Customs and fees on all importations and exportations by land. 
Customs and fees upon all dealings with the Putan merchants. 

Customs. 
Rupees 8-1 per cent, upon sales and purchases (not excused.) 

Fees. 

Booratun Rupee 1 per cent, upon sales and purchases ; Moajdurea 1 pice 
on every Rupee amount customs ; nut 2 pice and \ on every cameUload. 

Customs of Kurrachee upon all dealings of other merchants Rupees 4 
and i per cent, on all; value of imports above Rupees 4, 3 pice on every 
Rupee, value below that sum, Rupees 2 per cent, on the market price of 
exports. 

(These are the rates on all articles, but grain, excused.) 



Part II 



Bind— No. CIII. 



308 



BooratuQ Rupee 1 per cent, on the market price of all imports or exports. 

Nut 1 anna and \ on every camel-load of grain coming or ?oing ; 2 pice 
and \ on every camel-load of other goods coming or goiug; Moajdurea 1 pice 
on every Rupee amoant customs. 

Dhurtoya 1 seer and \ and 2 annas' weio^ht on each Rhinwar of grain if 
brought from the country and immediately laden on boats ; Clioongee 24 seers 
en each Rhinwar^ in the same circumstances. 

Batei on dutjf on diitinct articles. 

Upon every camel-lead of indigo brought from Khorassan to be exported^ 
if large, Rupees 22, if small, Rupees 15. 

Upon assafoetida brought from Khorassan to be exported^ Rupees 14 per 
S maunds. 

Upon all articles besides those brought from up the country and imme- 
diately exported^ Rupees 2 per cent, (not excused). 

Fe99. 

Upon l«ad and iron, if purchased in Kurrachee and sent abroad, a fee to 
the Collector of Rupee 1 on each maund of lead, and on each maund of iron 
HDiias 8. 



Sigrnature 

of the Privatf' 

Secretary. 








Sis'natnre 

of the Public 

Seci'etary. 




Senl of Meer 

Futteh 

AU Khan. 












Signntare 

of the 
Moonshee. 






Signatare 
. of the 
Accountant. 









The Jasriredars, Patels, Magistrates, Collectors, and Farmers^ at this 
period and hereafter^ of the city of Tatta and of Shah-bunder in Sindh and 
in Lar, the dominions of the State, will understand that at this time N. Crow^ 
Kngli^hman, vakeel of the asylum of valor, wisdom, diirnity, and intelligence^ 
the Hononra^tle Jonathan Dnncan, Governor of Bombay and Suiat, cm the 
part of the noble, powerful, exalted, magnificent C«>mpany Bahadoor, the seat 
of splendftr^ strength and excellence, han reached oar presence and requested 
an adjustment and settlement of afF»irs of commerce for the factory of hia 
patrons. Intent^ therefore^ upon maintaining the friendship of the above- 



B04 8ind— No. CIII. Fart Jl 



mentioned illustrious Company^ we have directed an arrangement for the 
collection of customs upon merchandise, esiport and import, to and from 
foreign countries and ports, and sales and purchases in the dependencies of 
fiitidh under our sovereignty. It is commanded that the collection of customs 
npon goods of commerce, export and import, to and from otiier countries and 
ports, and purchases and sales iu the territories of our government, be made 
according to the dutit's subjoined, as in the time of the deceased Prince 
Gholam Shah Kalhora, and no further exaction be exercised, and besides the 
English Resident no other person of the European nations shall be allowed to 
pass, repass, or trade. On the article o^ saltpetre^ liquid and crystallized, 
whenever in the territories of the Sta^e the English may choose to manufac- 
ture it, the customs are to be collected the same as during the reign of Meer 
Gholam Shah Kalhora 5 four beeg^s of garden ground to be exempted from 
land or fee tax. Also the dulol, moody, washerman, miller, carpenter, brick- 
layer, and shrofF, dependent on the factory, are, according to the custom of the 
aforementioned reii^^n, to be considered privileged, anl not t» be pressed on 
government service^ nor compelled to purchase government property, that the 
agents of the English may with confidence and t*'anquillity be industrious in 
the increase c>f their trade and our customs. On account of weight or 
measure of go )d8 and the inspection of trunks and th3 Resident's clothes and 
baggage, no molestation shall be offered, but his invoice and word be accepted ; 
towards the building of any new factory of the English, every assistance 
must be given, and the hire of the lahonrers be paid by the English agent. 
In respect to demands on artides of coU'^umption and apparel of tlie English 
and the crews of their ships, and the fee Moree on ships, boats and ding^eys, 
the rules of Meer Gholam ShaVs reign are to be observed. If by accident 
any ship or boat or dingey, belonging to the English, coming or going with 
goods to or from the factory in Sindh, should either on the sea coast or in the 
river be stranded or sunk, every assistance towards recovering her mufst be 
given that she may be returned, and all expenses of labour must be discharged 
by the Resident of the English. On whatever goods of the English fact^y, 
from their countries, which not finding sale may be returned, the customs are 
to be regulated by the u^age in force in the time of Gholam Shah Kalhora; 
no variation nor condition must be adopted. 

Account of duties on all goods at Tatta, agreeably to the usage in the 
reign of Meer Gholam Shah Kalhora, according to the report of established 
imposts, signed by Sheikh Beg Mahomed and Ensur Doss, former Collectors 
at that place. 

Munzillanes from 500 to 200 maunds^ weight of goods brought from 
Shah-bunder to Tatta Ghaut, Tatta Rupees 106; from 3^0 to 600 maunds, 
Tatta Rupees 81; from lOU to 3n0 maunds, Tatta Rupees 56, under lOQ 
maunds 6 annas per maund if brought by water, and 2 annas per maund if by 
land. Koot, assafcetida, shawls, and northern pieee goods, imported or 
exported, Rupee 1 and i Tatta price on the valuation in Chutney Rupees. 

Woollens brought from Shah-bunder to pay 8 annas per maund. 

On purchase of piece goods in Tatta sent to Shah-bunder or any of the 
flependenci^s of Sindh^ the customs to be according to the usage of Gholatn 



Part II Bind— No. CIII. 806 



Shah Kalhora^ or by the collections of Sheikh Hussein Zaradar^ and fees of 
appraisenaent agreeably to the custom of other merchants. 

Customs of the mint on stamping copper coins^ Rupees 6 Chutney per 
mannd. 

On the valuation of ivory in Chutney BupeeSj 9 Tatta Rupees per cent* 
to be collected from the purchaser. 

Customs upon grain of the first sort, 12 annas per Rhinwar, and Wukia 
Nigarie, 12 annas per 800 Rhinwars ; on the second sort, 6 annas per Rhinwar. 
and Wukia Nigarie 12 annas per 300 Rhinwars; grain purchased in Tatta and 
exported, Tatta Rupees 8 duty upon each Rhinwar, and the fee of bales. 
Rupees 2 and i, and Choongee i'rom each Rhinwar 3 Togas. 

Fees of permission to purchase grain and to export it to Shah-bunder, 
Tatta Rupee 1 and i per Rhinwar on the first sort, and 12 annas per Rhinwar 
on the second sort. 

Cbitty, Seelamuty, and Manzillanee fees of passing and shipping, accord- 
ing to the practice in force among other merchants; small grain exported to 
Shah-bunder to pay Rupees 4 Chutney per cent, valuation. 

Customs upon imported goods to be levied from the English at Rupee 1 
and i Chutney per cent, on the valuation. 

Customs upon saltpetre, liquid and crystallized. Rupee 1 and 4 Tatta per 
cent, valuation. 

Fees on boats laden with goods brought from abroad, at Tatta Rupee 1 
and 38 pice in full. 

Moree upon hired boats to be levied from the owners, according to the 
custom of the country, and Tatta Rupee 1 upon those the property of the 
English. 

Customs upon camels, horses, oxen, and other animals. Rupees 5 annas 
12 per cent, valuation in full of all fees. 

Customs upon burned and lacquered ware, as trays, boxes, etc., Tatta 
Rupee H per cent, valuation. 

Imports upon dried and green fruits, vegetables, pickles, etc., half the 
usual rates paid by the subjects of the country. 

On hay purchased. Rupee 1 Chutney per 16 bundles ; Rupee 1 upon 
eight loads of wood; Rupee 1 soortee upon 6 maunds chunam; and annas 2 
per maund on lime burnt at home. 

Gum produced in the garden to be sold to the Ziccadur on the same 
terms as by the husbandmen. 

Customs upon timber used in building to be half what is established ; 
Chobar and Rumleybuney fees Tatta Rupee 1 upon every boat-load of goods 
coming and going, and Moree upon every hired boat according to custom. 

Dutolles upon jukt goods annas 12 Chutney per cent. 

Roosum C»noongo fees:— Water carriage from 500 to 2,000 maunds, 
Tatta Rupees 4; from 800 to 500 maunds. Rupees 3; from iOO to 300 

2r 



306 Sind— No. CIII. Fart IX 



maunds^ Rupees 2 and ^ ; Thokas, Barbundy, aad Cliob:ir^ accordin<i: to the 
rules ill force during the time of Gholaiu Shah^ upon all amounts under Rupees 
loo, Chutney pice 3 per Kupee, Goczur Swijee. The writer who could have 
^iveu information ou this head is dead. The customs of Meer Gholam Shah 
Kalhora to be levied, besides which, the fee of equipment upon goods that 
formerly the Nukeem} s used to receive as a kind of charity from the Eng^lish 
factory in the time of the CoUectorship of Ciiuudy Kum is now comprised 
in the revenues of Government aud is at its disposal. 

Account of customs at Shah-bunder, in the per^unnab of Rukahi^ accord- 
inuf to the usage in the time of Gholam Shah Kuthora, as by copy of the 
establislied rates signed and sealed by Sheikh Beg Mahomed aud Ensur Doss, 
former Ziccadurs. 

Imports from sea which in the time of Mahomed Murad-ul Khan were 
subjected to customs and excused by Mir Gholam Sliah, are now likewise 
excused. 

Articles of Tatta exported from Shah -bunder to pay Tatta annas 7 and 
i per Cent, on the invoice purchase turned into Chutney Rupees. Grain and 
ghee purchased in the pergunnah of Rakrata and exported to pay Tatia Rupee 
1 and i per cent. 

On articles brought from up the country through Tatta, according to tl^e 
amount settled there, Tatta Rupee 1 per cent, when exported. Luwazimeh 
Pymany 1 Tryah upon each Rhiuwar; ubwant ivory Tatta annas \t upon Ki) 
Rhiuwar ; ubwant Midsulmany Tatta anna 1 each Rhiuwar; Tatta annas 11 
ou every bundle of hides exported. 

Luwazimeh Choongee 1 Nud on every 100 niaunds of Chunnea exported 
annas 12 per ceut. on tlie sale of ivory valued in Tatta Rupees. 



Customs upon goods imported, which may afterwards he sent from the factory 

by land or water to Tatta. 

Tatta Rupees 11 annas 7 on boat-loads above 100 maunds; Tatta annas 
2 per mauud land carriage. Upon grain purchased in Rakrala and sent to 
Tiitta, 20 pice per Rhinvvar of the first sort, and 5 pice on the secoud sort, 
and Pymany 1 Tryah on each Rhinwar. 

Customs of the zemindaree of Shah-bunder, according to the ancient 
rule in the time of Jam Dussir as above mentioned ; Tatta Rupee 1 and i per 
cent, on all exports according to the English invoice, and annas 12 ou im|>orts. 

Luwazimeh Munzillana, e«ch boat Tatta Rupees 2 4», and 1 quarter 1 anna 
per mauud landcarri;«ge; ivory sent up the country to Naseerpore and Hutty 
Kandy, annas 10 per cent. Tat*, a Rupees valuation. The Canoongo customs 
of Rakrala, according to the present usage. 

Luwazimeh ivory, Tatta Rupte I aud \ upon 80 Rhinwars, exported or 
imported, of 8 maunds'' weight, or else Rupees loO per value each Rhinwar. 

Luwazimeh Mulsulmany, J an auua each Rhinwar. 



Part II Bind— No. CIII. 807 



As all tbe established rates of the reiorn of Meer Gholam Shah Kutliora 
ore not to be found, the customs to be collected in all places in Sindh and Lar, 
under the jurisdiction of i\\e State, must be conformable to the copy of a 
perwannah of that time in their (the En^jlish) possession, namely, Tntta 
Kupee 1 and 4 per cent, customs and half the usual fees. Maitre Clmniy 
Pam, Custom-master of Tatta and Shah-bunder, and Tar Umal and Man 
Umal, Collectors of Sindh and Lar, will act conformably to this without 
deviation or contradiction. 

Dated 91st of Rvlha-ooUAwnl in they^ar of the Hegira J214, or tie 23rd 
of Auguit 1799, of the Christian era. 



By imperial command the purport" of this Sunnud is to be observed from 
the date thereof. 



T : 

Seal of the , 

Prince Meer , 

Futteh Ali ' 

K han. I 



SiTinller 

Sefll of the 

Prince. 



The collectors and farmers, at the present time and hereafter, of the town 
of Kurrachee, will understand that Mr. Crow, Englishman, vakeel of the asylum 
of valour, wisdom, and intelligence, the Honourable Jonatlian Duncan, 
Governor of Bombay and Surat, on the part of the exalted, renowned, and 
powerful English East India Company, has had the honour of rendering 
hims«lf at our presence, and having by his fidelity, attention, and attachment 
cemented the union and friendship of the two governments, we have therefore, 
out of our gracious favour and particular regard to the satisfaction and con- 
venience of the illustrious Company above mentioned, repolved to remit one- 
third of the fee of Foujdaree, which is one and a half per cent, on the value 
of all merchandize, and entirely to excuse the fee of moajdurea, and likewise 
the fee of moree on all dingeys and ships, for two importations of the same 
vessel in one year: you are by this writing instructed of our having granted 
these exemptions, and ordered to consider them in effect from the date of this 
Sunnud, and to act conformably. • 

Two- thirds of the fee of the Foujdaree and two- thirds of the Customs 
fikcoording to our former Sunnud, you will not fail to recover and to carry 
to account. 

Dated the 17th Leclct/de 1214 of He ffegira, or 12th of April 1800 of 
the Chrufiatt era. 



808 



Sind-No. OIV. 



Fart II 



Issued from the preseDce. 



Seiil of the 

Prince Meer 

Fotteh AU 

Khan. 



The killedars and officers of the town of Eurrachee will understand that 
Mr, Crow^ Englishman, being ranked by us amongst our sincere and faithful 
adherentsi therefore, out of regard to him and respect to his patrons, we 
hereby direct that if he pass in or out of the gates of the fort with arms, you 
do not on that account oSer him any molestation or hindrance, but in all 
your behaviour observe kindness and cordiality ; you will consider this 
command peremptory. 

Dated tie 19lh of Lechyde, or the 14th of April 1800. 



No. OIV. 
Treaty with the Ameers of Sindh, August 22nd, 1809. 



SenX of His 

Higliness 

Meer (iholain 

Ali. 



Article 1. 

There shall be eternal friendship between the British Government and that 
of Sindh, namely, Meer Gholam Ali, Meer Kurreem Ali, and Meer Murud Ali. 

ARTICLtt 2. 

Enmity shall never appear between the two States. 

Article 3. 

The mutual despatch of the vakeels of both governments, namely the 
British Government and Scindhau Government, shall always continue. 

Article 4. 

The Government of Sindh will not allow the establishment of the tribe of 
the French in Sindh. 

Written on the 10th of the month of Etijeelf-oolAtoorujub, in the fear of 
the Begira 1824, corresponding with the 22nd of Augutt 1809. 

(Sd.) MiNTO. 



Fart II Bind— No. CV 809 

Ratified by the Right Honourable the Oovernor-General at Fort St. 
George, the 16th of November 1809. 

(Sd.) N. B. Edmonstone, 

Secretary. 




No. OV. 

Treaty between the Honourable East India Company on the 
one hand and the Ameers of Sindh on the other, November 
9th, 1820. 

The British Government and the Government of Sindh having in view 
to gnard against the occurrence of frontier disputes, and to strengthen the 
friendship already subsisting between the two ^^tates, Mir Ismnel Shah was 
invested with full power to treat with the Honourable the Governor of fiombajr, 
and the following Articles were agreed on between the two parties :-— 

AkTICLB 1. 

There shall be perpetual • fiiendehip between the British Government on 
the one hand and Meer Kurreem Ali and Meer Murad Ali on the other. 

Article 2. 

Mutual intercourse by means of vakeels shall always continue between 
the two governments. 

Article 3. 

The Ameers of Sindh engage not to permit any European or American to 
settle in their dominions. If uny of the subjects of either of the two States 
should establish their residence in the dominions of the other, and should con- 
duct themselves in an orderly and peaceable manner in the territory to which 
they may emigrate, they will be allowed to remain in that situation; but if 
such fugitives shall be guilty of any disturbance or commotion, it will be 
incumbent on the local authority to take the offenders into custody, and punish 
or compel them to quit the country. 

Article 4. 

The Ameers of Sindh engage to restrain the depredations of the Khoosas, 
and all other tribes and individuals within their limits, and to prevent the 
occurrence of any inroad into the British dominions. 



Seal of the 

Honourable 

East India 

Ck>mpany. 



Bombaf, 9th November 1820. (Sd.) M. Elphinstonb. 



810 Sind-No. CVI. Part II 



In the name of the Merciful God. This is the Treaty which I, Meet 
Ismael Shah, vakeel of Shah Meer Kureem AH Khan liookii-ood-Dowla and 
JVieer Shah Murad Ali Khan Ameer- ood- Do wla, concluded with Mr Klphin- 
stone, Governor of the populous port of Bombay, on Thursday, in the month 
of Suffer 12:6 Hegira. If it pleases God, there will be no difference to a 
hair's breadth. 



Seal of 
Ismatrl Shab. 



iVo/tf.— The foregoinsr Treaty was approved by the Supreme Government 
on the loth February 1821. 



No. CVI. 
Tee AIT with Meer Roosttjm Khan, Chief of Kheirpore. 

A Treaty, consisting of four Articles, having been concluded on the 2nd 
Zeelcad J 247 a.h., corresponding with the 4th April 1832, between the Honour- 
able East India Company and Meer Roostum Khan, Talpore, Bahadoor^ Chief 
of Kheirpore, in Sindh, through the a?ency of Lieutenant-Colonel Henry 
Pitting er, envoy on the part of the British Governm«*nt, acting under the 
auth 'rity vested in him by the Right Honourable Lord William Cavendish 
Bentinck, o.c.B. and o.c.H.y Governor-General of the British possessions in 
India^ this engiigement has been given in writing, at Simla, this day the 19th 
June 18''32, both in English and Persian, in token of the perfect con Brmat ion 
and acknowledgment of the obligations which it contains in the manner follow- 
ing:— 

Akticlr 1. 
There shall be eternal friendship between the two States. 

Article 2. 

The two contracting powers mutually bind themselves from generation to 
generation never to look with the eye of covetousness on the possessions of 
each other. 

Article 3. 

The British Government having requested the use of the river Indus and 
the roads of Sindh for the merchants of Hiudoostan^ etc., the Government of 



Part II Sind-Wo. CVII. ,^ll 



Kheirpore agrees to grant the same within its owq boundaries, oq whatever 
terms may be settled with the Goverument of Hyderabad, namely, Meer 
Murad All Khan, Talpore. 

Aeticlb 4. 

The Government of Kheirpore agrees to furnish a written statement of 
just and reasonable duti«'s to be levied on all goods passing under this Treaty, 
and fuither promises that traders bhall suffer no let or hiudrauc^* iu transacting 
their business. 



Honourtible 

Compniiy's 

beal. 



(Sd.) W. a Bentinck. 



Governor- 

(jcneml's 

Si'iil. 



No. CVII. 



The ATT with the Government of Hyderabad, in Sindh. 

A Treaty, consisting of seven Articles, having been concluded on the 
iSth Zechy 1247 ah., corresponding with 20th April 1832, i)etween the 
Honourable East India Company and His Highness Meer Murad Ah Khan, 
Taljore, Bahadoor, ruler of Hyderabad, iu Sindh, through the agency of 
l.ieuienant-Colonel Henry Pottiiiger, envoy on the part of the British Govern- 
ment, acting under the authority vested in him by the Right Honourable 
Lord William Cavendish Bentinck, G o.B. and O.O.H., Governor-General of the 
Rritihh possessions in India, this engagement has been given in writing, at 
Simla, this d&y the 19th June 1832, both in English abd Persian, in token of 
th^ perfect confirmation and acknowledgment of the obligations which it 
contains, in the manner following:— 

Article 1. 

That the friendship provided for in former Treaties between the British 
Oovernment and that of Sindh remain unimpaired and binding, and that this 
stipulation has leceived additional efficacy through the mediutn of Lieutenant^ 
Colonel Pottinger, envoy, etc., so that the firm connecting and close alliance 
now formed between the said States shall descend to the children and successors 
of the house of the above-named Meer Murad Ali Khan, principal after prin- 
cipal, from generation to generation. 

Article 2. 

That the two contracting powers bind themselves never to look with the 
eye tf covetuusness on the possessions of each other. 



8lSr Bind— No. OVII. p^rfe II 



Akticlb 3. 

That the British GovernmeDt has requested a passage for the merchants 
and traders of Hiudoostan by the river and roads of Sindh, by which they 
may transport their goods and merchandize from one country to another^ and 
the said Government of Hyderabad hereby acquiesces in the same request on 
the three following conditions : — 

hf'. — ^That no person shall bring any description of military stores by 
the above river or roads. 

Snd.'^That no armed vessels or boats shall come by the said river. 

3rd. — That no English merchants shall be allowed to settle in Sindh, but 
shall come as occasion requiresi and having stopped to transact their business^ 
shall return to India. 

Article 4. 

When merchants shall determine on visiting Sindh, they shall obtain a 
passport to do so from the British Government, and due intimation of the 
granting of such passports shall be made to the said Government of Hydera- 
bad by the Resident in Kutch, or other officer of the said British Government. 

Abticlb 5. 

That the Government of Hyderabad having fixed certain proper and 
moderate duties to be levied on merchandize and goods prooeedint; by the 
aforesaid routes, shall adhere to that scale, and not arbitrarily and despotically 
either increase or lessen the same, so that the affairs of merchants and traders 
may be carried on without stop or interruption, and the custom-house officers 
and farmers of revenue of the Sindh government are to be specially directed 
to see that they do not delay the said merchants on pretence of awaiting for 
fresh orders from the government, or in the collection of the duties, and the 
said government is to promulgate a TarifE or Table of Duties leviable on each 
kind of goodsj as the case may be, 

Abticlb 6. 

That whatever portions of former Treaties entered into between the 
two States have not been altered and modified by the present one remain 
firm and unaltered, as well as those stipulations now concluded, and by the 
blessing of God no deviation from them shall ever happen. 

Article 7. 

That the friendly intercourse between the two States shall be kept up by 
the despatch of vakeels whenever the transaction of business, or the increase 
of the relations of friendship, may rcuder it desirable. 



Honourable 

Company*! 

Seal 



(Sd.) W. C. Bbntinck. 



Govemop- 

Qeneral't 

Seal. 



tart It Slnd-No. OVII. 818 

Supplemental to the Tebaty with the Govjbenment of Hyder- 
abad, in SiNDH. 

The following Articles of engagement having been agreed on and settled 
on the 22nd April 1832 between the Honourable East liidia Company and 
His Highness Meer Murad Ali Khan, Talpore, Bahadoor^ raler of Hjdembad^ 
in Sindfa, as supplemental to the Treaty concluded^ on the SOth April 1882, 
through the agency of Lieutenant- Colo&el Henry Fottinger, envoy on the 
part of the said Honourable East India Company, under full power and 
authority vested in him by the Right Honourable Lord William Cavendish 
Bentinck, GvO.b. and g.c.h., Governor-General of the British possessions in 
India, this engagement has been gfiven in' writing, at Simla, this day the 19th 
June 1832, both in English and Persian, in token of the perfect confirmation 
and acknowledgment of the obligations which it contains, in the manner 
following :— 

Article 1. 

it is inserted in the 5th Article of the iPerpetual Treaty that the Gov^ 
ernment of Hyderabad will furnish the British Government with a statement 
of duties, etc., and after that the officers of the British Government who are 
versed in affairs of traffic will examine the said statement. Should the state- 
ment seem to them to be fair and equitable and agreeable to custom, it will 
be brought into operation and will be confirmed ; but should it appear too 
high, His Highness Meer Murad Ali Khan, on hearing from the British 
Government to this effect through Colonel Pottinger, will reduce the said 
duties* 

AaTicbB 2i 

It is as clear as noonday that the punishment and suppression of the 
plunderers of Parkhur, the Thull, etc., is not to be effected by any one govern- 
ment, and as this measure is incumbent on and becoming the States as tending 
to secure the welfare and happiness of their respective subjects and countries^ 
it is hereby stipulated that on the commencement of the ensuing rainy season, 
and of which Meer Murad Ali Khan shall give due notice, the British, Sindh> 
and Jodhpore governments shall direct their joint and simultaneous efforts to 
the above object. 

Abticl^ 3. 

The govei'liments of the Honourable East India Company and of Kheir- 
pore, namely, Meer Boostnm, have provided, in a Treaty concluded between 
the States, that whatever may be settled regarding the opening of the Indus 
at Hyderabad shall be binding on the said contracting powers. It is there- 
fore necessary that copies of the Treaty should be sent by the British and 
Hyderabad governments to Meer Boostam Khan for his satisfaction and 
guidance. 



Honoorable 

Company's 

Seal 



(Sd.) W. C. BbntInck. 



Govtmor- 

Genelrarg 

Seal. 



28 



814 8ind-No. CVIIl. Part IX 



No. OVIII. 

OoMMErflciAL Tkbatt between the Honottbable the Bast India 
Company and the Government of Hyuebabad, in Sindh, 
dated 2nd July 1834. 

Whereas in the 1st Article of the Supplemental Treaty concluded between 
the Honourable East India Company and the government of Hyderabad on 
the 22nd day of April 1832, corresponding with the 20th of Zeekad 1247 
Hegira, it was stipulated that the government of Hyderabad was to furnish 
the British Government with a statement of duties^ etc.^ and " after that the 
officers of the British Government who are versed in affairs of traffic shall 
have examined the same statement, should the statement seem to them to be 
fair and equitable and agreeable to custom, it will be brought into operation 
and will be confirmed ; but should it appear too high, His Highness Meer 
Murad Ati Khan, on hearing from the British Government to this effect, 
through Colonel Pottinger, will reduce the said duties/' Now according to 
the terms of the above stipulation, the contracting States having made due 
inquiry^ hereby enter into the following agreement :— 

Articlb 1. 

In lieu of a duty on goods proceeding up or down the river lndus> in 
virtue of the 5th Article of the perpetual Treaty of Hyderabad, there shall 
be levied on the rivers, between the sea and Boopur, a toll on each boat of 
Tatta Bupees 19 per Tatta khurrar, of which amount Rupees 8 shall be 
receivable by the governments of Hyderabad and Kheirpore^ and Bupees II 
by the other States possessing dominions on the banks of the rivers, namely. 
His Highness Bhawul Khan, Maharaja Runjeet Singh, and the Honourable 
the East India Company. 

Article 2. 

To obviate any cause whatever of trouble or inconvenience to traders and 
merchants during their progress, and also to prevent disputes and doubts and 
consequent altercation and delay, touching the size of boats, the toll is fixed 
on SO Tatta khurrars. Be a boat large or small, she will pay toll according to 
this, and whether she measures 6 khurrars or 100 khurrars^ she will be 
reckoned as one of SO. 

Abtiole S. 

The portion of the toll above described, appertaining to Sindh, and 
amounting to Tatta Rupees 240 on each boat^ shall be levied at the bunder 
or port of the mouth of the river where the cargoes are transferred from the 
river to the sea boats, and vice versd, and divided as the governments of 
Hyderabad and Kheirpore may think best. 



Part II Sind-No. CVIII. 818 



Aeticlb 4. 

For the purpose of assisting in the realization of the toll due to Sindh^ 
also in the speedy and satisfactory adjustment of disputes which may happen 
to occur amongst the merchants^ boatmen^ and others on the questions of 
fairoj ete.j as well as with a view to the preservation and augmentation of the 
amicable relations which happily subsist between the States^ it is settled that 
a British Agent (who shall not be an European gentleman), nnder the author- 
ity of Lieutenant-Colonel Henry Pottinger^ Agent to the Qovernor-General 
of India for tiie affairs of Siudh, shall reside at the bunder or port at the 
mouth of the river where cargoes are transferred from one description of boat 
to another ; and the British Government binds itself that the said Agent shall 
neither engage in trade> nor interfere in any way with the fiscal or any other 
afiairs of the Sindh government. It is further settled that, when occasion 
connected with this Treaty may render it advisablei the Governor-GeneraPs 
Agent for the affairs of Sindh shall have the power of deputing one of his 
Assistants to the above-described bunder or port, to settle any discussions that 
may have arisen ; after doing which he is to return to Bkooj. 

Article 5. 

For the more perfect fulfilment of tiiis Treaty, it is hereby distinctly 
stipulated that should any portion, however small or great, or of whatever 
description, of the merchandize or goods on board any boat passing up or 
down the river, be lauded for sale by a merchant or merchants, such portion 
of merchandize or goods, whatever may be its quantity or quality, shall in- 
stantly become subject to the existing local duties as levied by the respective 
governments within their own territories ; the purpose of the toll agreed to 
by this Treaty being not to supei-sede or set aside the established dues of the 
different States, but to repay the expense to whieh the governments will 
necessarily be subjected in affording the customary protection to the trade 
in transit on the river. It will be perfectly uiiderstood from this 5th Article 
that the governments have no claim to duties on merchandize merely passing 
up or down the river, and that the toll is all that is to be demanded , but 
should any portion, however small or large, of goods be landed and sold, then 
the usual duties will be levied* 

Wfitten ofi the 2nd day of July 1834, corresponding with the 24th of 
Suffer 1250 A. H. 

(Sd.) W. C. Bbntinck. 



*> 
>} 

n 



Fbedbbick Adam. 
w. morison. 
Ed. Ironside. 



Ratified by the Governor-General in Council at Ootacamund on 2nd 
September 1884». 

(Sd.) W. H. Macnaghtkn, 

Secy, to Qovt. of India. 



810 



Bind— No. OIX. 



Fart II 



No. CIX. 

CoMMEECiAL ARTICLES entered into with the Goyernmekt of 
Hydebabajd, in Sindh, by Colonel Henry Pottinger, 
Agent to the Govbrnor-Gbneral for the affairs of Sindh, 
in virtue of authority vested in him by the Right Honour- 
able Lord Aucklanb; g.o.b., Goviirnor-Generaia of India 
in Council — 1836. 



Proposal 1st. 

The coast of Sindh has no hills, and is 
80 low and level that it is very difficult 
and even sometimes impossible to dis- 
cover the proper entrance to the mouths 
of the river. Permission is therefore 
requested to lay down buoys in the 
water, and to erect wooden landmarks 
on the shore at the proper spots, which 
buoys and marks can be changed when 
fklterations t^ke plape in the riv^r.. 

Pboposal 2ia>« 

Cases will sometimes occur, notwith- 
standing these precautions, in which 
from foul winds or storms, vessels in- 
tending to come into the river will not 
be able to do so, and they must in that 
event seek for shelter in any port they 
can reach. The examination of the 
whole of the coasts and harbours of 
Kutch and Sindh from Mandavee to 
Kurrachee has therefore been ordered, 
and His Highness is requested to in<^ 
struct his officers to this effect. Vessels 
of war will not be employed on this 
duty, and when the harbour of Kurrachee 
is to be examined (which it has not been 
since the mission of Mr. Smith in the 
year of the Hegira 1224), the officer 
will make a special application, through 
the Agent, for a perwannah to the 
Nawab of Kurrachee, to furnish a small 
boat, and one or two ^experienced meu 
to assist. 



Answer 1st. 

Agreed.— Beacons may be erected 
on shore, and buoys laid down in the 
water, and changed as may become 
requisite from alterations in the 
river. 



Answer 2ni). 

Agreed.— A bont and men wiU h^ 
furuished when applied for. 



Part II 



eind-No. CIX. 



817 



Pboposal 3rd. 

The anchorage fees (mohoree) on 
boats at Kikkur varies agreeable to 
their size. To prevent disputes and to 
encourage the resort of merchants to 
that and the other bunders at the 
mouths of the river, these fees are 
recommended to be reduced and deGned, 
in order that information thereof may 
be given to the merchants concerned. 

Pboposal 4th. 

Sjud Azimooddeen Hospein, the 
Native Agent appointed by the Gover- 
nor-General to reside at the mouths of 
the river, has arrived with me and is 
now about to proceed to his station. 
It is begged that His Highness will 
give orders to all the authorities to be 
kind and attentive to the Syud, and to 
refer to him in the event of any dis- 
putes about the toll on the sea^ or river 
boats^ or other matters which are to be 
strictly guided by Treaty, and any 
extra duties or demands not authorized 
by it to be positively prohibited, 

Pboposal 6th. 

As the best season for sending goods 
up the river happens to be that at which 
they cannot be imported by sea, it 
becomes requisite to make some arrange- 
ment on this account* It is therefore 
to be arranged that all persons bringing 
goods to carry up the river may land 
them and place them in ^ warehouse or 
stores at Kikkur or Tatta, under the 
seal of the Native Agent before men- 
tioned, until the proper season for their 
despatch up the river arrives. Any 
portion of such goods if sold at any 
time will of course be subject to the 
duties established by Treaty, and after 
they are once stored, no package is to 
be removed or opened without the leave 
of the Native Agent, else the full datiea 
must be paid on snch pitckage. 



Answer Sbd. 

The settlement of this matter is 
left to Colonel Pottinger, and the 
officers of this government (Hydera- 
bad) will be ordered to levy such 
anchorage fee as he may fix. 

jy.^.— Colonel Pottinger decided 
that each boat should pay half a 
Kupee in addition to the toll estab-* 
lished by Treaty. 

Answbk 4th. 

Agreed.— The officers of this gov- 
ernment (Hyderabad) will receive 
particular instructions to the efEeot 
proposed. 



Answer 5th. 

Agreed. — Goods may be either 
warehoused, as proposed, at Kikkur 
or Tatta. 



818 



Sind—No. GIX. 



Part II 



Proposal 6th. 

It 18 the wish of the Governor- 
Greneral to establish fairs, to be held 
annuallyi and to which merchants from 
all nations woald bring their goods 
and sell or exchange them for those of 
others. Tims merchants from Bulkb, 
Bokhara, Toorkistan^ Cabool, etc., 
would bring the production of those 
countries and exchange them for the 
produce of Europe, India, etc., which 
would be brought from India and Sindh 
by their merchants. If the Govern- 
ment of Sindh would give due en- 
couragement, one of these fairs might 
be established in its territories, which 
would be a great source of wealth to 
the people and increase of revenue to 
the State. It is intended to propose to 
Maharajah Runjeet Singh to have one 
of these fairs held at Methunkote, or 
some place in that neighbourhood ; and 
should the Ameers of Sindh approve 
of it, a similar one might be held 
yearly at Tatta. 

PaoPOSAL 7th. 

The Governor-General of India 
directs me to explicitly state that he 
looks to the government of Sindh to 
I^eep the Muzarees in complete check 
and to suggest how this is to be done 
effectually. If my advice is required, I 
will be ready to give it. 



Proposal 8th. 

The Hyderabad government must 
say distinctly whether it is responsible 
for the acts of the Kheirpore and Meer- 
pore Ameers, as connected with the 
river and traffic by it, because if not, it 
will be requisite to enter into separate 
engagement with them, a measure which 
has been hitherto avoided out of respect 
to the paramouncy of Noor Mahomed 
Khan. 



Answer 6th. 

Agreed. — A fair may be estab- 
lished and held either at Tatta or 
Kikkur. 



Answer 7th. 

The restraining and punishing of 
the Muzarees rests with this gov- 
ernment (Hyderabad). When the 
Seikh troops are removed, what 
power have the Muzarees to disturb 
the country or molest boats ? This 
government binds itself to be re- 
sponsible for them. 



Answer 8th. 

This government (Hyderabad) 
responsible as herein described. 



IS 



Part II 



Sind— No. C2L 



319 



PB0P08AL 9th. 

Amongst the minor arrangements 
the Ameer^s sanction is required to 
cutting down the jungle along the 
banks of the riveri where it may be 
found necessary to do so to facilitate 
tracking. 



Answeb 9th. 

Agreed to^ with the exception of 
those parts of the river banks which 
are occupied by the Ameer's hunting 
preserves (shikargahs) , which would 
be injured by cutting down the trees 
and jungle. All trees that may fall 
into the water and impede the pro« 
gross of boats will be removed by 
persons belonging to the Sindh gov- 
ernment^ but not at its expense. 

Answer 10th. 

This proposition is already met by 
the perpetual Treaty. A gentleman 
may come whenever it is expedient 
and stay two or three months. To 
this no objection will be offered. 



Peoposal 1 0th. 

The general superintendence of a 
British officer seems to the Governor- 
General and to Colonel Fottinger to be 
almost indispensable to give effect to 
the views of the British Government, 
to the cordial aid and union of that of 
Sindh, and to the prevention of disputes, 
correspondence, etc. 

Proposal 11th. 

It is to be observed that the govern- 
ments must not be deterred from com- 
mencing on some of these arrangements 
by the apparent difficulty of effecting 
them. Every important matter looks 
difficult at first, but all obstacles give 
way to exertion and encouragement 
in the course of time. 

Bated at Hyderabad on the 18th of Shaban 1252 Eegira, or 28th of 
November 1836. -^ 



Answer 11th. 

No difficulty can possibly exist 
where the friendship is sincere. 



No. ex. 

Treaty between the Honoubable East India Company and 
the Amebbs of Sindh, concluded by Colonel Henby 
PoTTiNGEB, Agent to the Governor- General for Sindh, on the 
one part, and Theib Highnesses Mbeb Noob Mahomed 
Khan and Meer Nussbbb Mahomed Nussbbb Khan, on 
the other, April 20th, 1838. 

Articlb 1. 
In consideration of the long friendship which has subsisted between the 
British Government and the .Ameers of Sindh, the Governor- General in 



820 ;Sind— No. CXI. Part It 



Council engages to use his good offices to adjust the present differences which 
are understood to subsist bertween the Ameers of Sindh and Maharaja Runjeet 
Sing^ so that peace and friendship may be established between the two States. 

Article 2. 

In order to secure and itnprove the reUtions of amity and peace which 
have so long subsisted between the Sindh State and the British Government^ 
it is agreed that an accredited British Minister shall reside at the Court of 
Hyderabad, and that the Ameers of Sindh shall also be at liberty to depute a 
vakeel to reside at the Court of the British Qovernment; and that the British 
minister shall be empowered to change his ordinary place of residence as may 
from time to time seem expedient, and be attended by such an escort as may 
be deemed suitable by his government. 

Ratified by the Bight Honourable the Governor-General at Simla, this 
20th day of April 1838. 

(Sd.) Auckland. 



No. 0X1. 

Treaty between the Honourable East India Company and His 
Highness Meeb Eoostum Khan, of Kheiepoee-^1838. 

Artiolb 1. 

There shall be perpetual friendship, alliance, and unity of interests between 
the Honourable East India Company and Meer Hoostum Kban^ Talpore, and 
his heirs and successors, from generation to generation, and the friends and 
enemies of one party shall be the friends and enemies of both« 

AUTICLX 2. 

The British Government eligages to protect the principality and territory 
of Kheirpore. 

AUTIOLB i. 

Meer Rdostum Khan and his heirs and successors will act in subordinate 
cooperation with the British Government, and acknowledge its supremacy, 
and not have any connexion with any other Chiefs and States. 

Akticle 4r. 

The Ameer, and his heirs and successors^ will not enter into negotiation 
with any Chief or State without the knowledge and sanction of the British 
Government ; but the usual amicable correnpondence with friends and rela* 
tions shall continue* 



Part II Bind— No. CXI. 821 



Artiolb 6. 

The Ameer^ and his heirs and successors^ will not commit aggressions on 
any one. If by accident any dispute arise with any one, the settlement of it 
shall be submitted to the arbitration and award of the British Govern- 
ment. 

Article 6. 

The Ameer will furnish troops according to his means at the requisition 
of the British Government, and render it all and every necessary aid and 
assistance throughout his territory during the continuance of war, and ap- 
prove of all the defensive preparations which it may make while the peace 
and security of the countries on the other side of the Indus may be threat- 
ened. But the British Government will not covet a dam or d^ram of the 
territories enjoyed by His Highness and his heirs, nor the fortresses on this 
bank or that bank of the river Indus. 

Articlk 7. 

The Ameer, and his heirs and succ'ssors^ shall be absolute rulers of their 
country, and the British jurisdiction shall not be introduced into that prin- 
cipality, nor will any of the Baloches servants, dependants, relatives, or 
subjects of the Ameer be listened to should they complain against the said 
Ameer. 

Artiolb 8. 

In order to improve, by every means possible, the growing intercourta 
by the river Indus, Meer Roostum Khan promises all co-operation with the 
other powers in any measures which may be hereafter thought necessary for 
extending and facilitating the commerce and navigation of the Indus. 

Article 9. 

In order to further secure the relations of amity and pence which have so 
long subsisted between the Kheirpore State and the British Govern irent, it 
is agreed that an accredited British minister shall reside at the Court of Kheir- 
pore, and that the Ameer shall also be at liberty to depute an Agent to reside 
at the Court of the British Government, and the British mini&ter shall be 
empowered to change hU ordinary place of residence as may from time to time 
seem expedient, and be attended by such an escort as may be deemed suitable 
by his government. 

Articlb 10. 

This Treaty of nine Articles having been concluded, and signed and 
iBcaled by Lieutenant«Colonel Sir A. Burnes, Knight, envoy on the part of th« 
Right Honourable George Lord Auckland^ g.c.b., Governor- General of India, 
and Meer Roostum Khan, on the part of himself, Chief of Kheirpore, the 

2 t 



122 SiDd-No. CXI. Part II 



ratification by the Right Honoarable the Governor-General shall be exchanged 
vrithin forty-five days from the present date. 

Done at Kheirpore, this 24th day of December 1838, correiponding with 
the 6th day of Shaval A. H. 1854. 

(Sd.) Albx. Busnbs, 

Envoy to Kheirpore. 

Batified by the Right Honourable the Goyernor-Greneral of India in 
Camp Bhagapoorana on the 10th January 18S9. 

(Sd.) H, TORBBNS, 

Offg, Secy, to the Govt, of India, 
foith the OovemoT' General. 



Sbpabatb Abtiolb — 18S8. 

Since the British Government has taken upon itself the responsibility of 
protecting the State of Kheirpore from all enemies^ now and hereafter, and 
neither coveted any portion of its possessions nor fortresses on this side or 
that side of the Indus^ it is hereby agreed upon by Meer Roostum Khau^ his 
heirs and successors, that if the Qovernor-Oenerali in time of war, should 
seek to occupy the fortress of Bukker as a depAt for treasure and munitionsi 
the Ameer shall not object to it. 

This separate Article having been concluded, signed and sealed by 
Lieutenant- Colonel Sir Alexander Burnes^ Knight^ envoy on the part of the 
Right HoDourable George Lord Auckland, o.c.b.j Governor-General of India, 
and Meer Roostum Khan^ on the part of himself, Chief of Kheirpore, the 
ratification by the Right Honourable the Governor-General shall be exchanged 
within forty-five days from the present date. 

Done at Kheirpore, this 24th day of December 1838, corresponding with 
ihe 6th day of Shaval A.H. 1254. 

(Sd.) A. BUBNBS^ 

Envoy to Kheirpore, 



The GovBRNOR-GrENERAL to Meeb Boosttjm Khan, of Eheir* 
PORE, Camp Bhagapoorana, 10th January 1839. 

The judicious mediation of your friend Sir A. Bumes, the highly esteemed 
and able Agent of my government now with you, has by the blessing of God 
brought about the establishing of our mutuiJ good understandiog by Treaty 
on a firm and lasting basis. 



Part II Sind— No. CXI. 823 



The Bopport afforded to you by the guarantee of the British Oovemment 
will, I am well assured, prove a source of future strength, and, if it be Ood'9 
will, of continued prosperity, to your country ; and I am glad to acknowledge 
the advantages which I hope to derive from your alliance and support in the 
warlike operations which I am about to undertake. 

Having entered into a Treaty with Your Highness in all honesty and 
good faith, I should be sorry to find any part of the written agreement 
between us so worded as to leave either your successors or mine under the 
supposition that we concluded our compact in a spirit, on the one side or the 
other, of any thing like jealousy or distrust. 

The mention, however, of a previous written agreement, in every instance, 
as to the temporary character of the occasional occupation of Sindh by the 
English, is calculated to convey this unpleasant idea. 

I have therefore struck it out ; and in place of inserting a sentence which 
casts a doubt on the sincerity of our intentions, I address you this friendly 
letter, as a lasting assurance of the plain meaning and purpose of the words 
of the separate Article, namely, that the British shall avail themselves of the 
fort of Bukker, the citadel of their ally the Meer of Kheirpore, only during 
actual war and periods of preparing for war like the present. 

I trust that this mode of re-assuring Your Highness will have the double 
effect of setting your mind at ease and of putting you in possession of a 
written testimony to my intentions, such as may remain among your records 
in pledge of the sincerity of the British Oovemment. 

I have, etc., 

(Sd.) Auckland. 



Agreement with Mbeb Mobarik Khan, of Eheirpobe — 1838. 

Whereas Treaties of firm friendship and sincere amity have long been 
established between the government of the East India Company and that of 
Kheirpore, in Sindh, at the present time, agreeably to the request and desire 
of His Highness Meer Roostum Khan, Talpore, and for the satisfaction of 
His Highness Meer Mobarik Khan, Talpore, the following additional agree- 
ment has been made through the agency of Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Alexander 
Burnes, Knight, envoy on the part of the Governor-General, in virtue of full 
powers vested in him by the Right Honourable George Lord Auckland, g.o.b., 
Governor-General of India, etc., etc.^ etc. 

The East India Company hereby agrees never to covet one renl of the 
revenue of the share of Sindh in possession of Meer Mobarik Khan, nor to 
interfere in its internal management. 

The said Company further agrees to preserve the same friendly relation, 
towards the said Meer Mobarik Khan and his descendants that it does towards 



824 Bind -No. CXI I. Pan II 



Meer Boostum Khan, in conformity with the terms of the Treaty now made 
with His Highness Meer Roostum Khan. 

Done at KAeirpore, this 28th day of December 1838, corresponding with 
the 11th day of Saval 1264 A.M. 

(Sd.) A. BUBNKS. 

Ratified by the Bight Honourable the Govemor-Oeneralj CampDanowia, 
on the 16th of January 1889. 

(Sd.) H. TORRBNS, 

Offg. Secy, to the Govt, of India, 

with the OovernoT'General. 

The same to Meer Mahomed Khan and Meer Ali Murad Khan. 



No. OXII. 



Agrbembkt for the surrender of Eurrachee» February 7th, 1839. 

Hassel Ben Butcha Khan, Subadar in the employ of the Oovernor of 
the fort and town of Kurrachee, and late Commandant of the fort on the 
point at the entrance of the harbour^ has been this third day of February oue 
thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine sent on board Her Britannic Majesty's 
Ship Wellealey by the said Governor (Khyer Mahomed) with full powers to 
treat with the British authorities for the surrender of the said fort and town 
of Knrraohee, accompanied by Synah Khan, in the service of Meer Noor 
Mahomed, who had been sent for the same purpose by Ali Bakhi to treat on 
the part of the civil government of the town. 

It is, therefore, this day agreed by the paid Hassel Ben Butcha Khan 
and Synah Khan, in the name of the said two O overnors on the one part, 
and His Excellency Rear Admiral Sir Frederick Lewis Maitland, k.c.b., 
Commander-iu-Chief of Her Britannic Majesty's naval forces in the East 
Indies, and Brigadier Thomas Valiant, K.H., Commanding the British reserve 
Military force in Sindh, in the name and on behalf of the Honourable East 
India Company, on the other part. 

Articlb 1. 

That the full possession of the fort and town of Kurrachee shall be this 
day given up by the aforesaid Oovernor to the British forces. 

Articlk 2. 

That the British land forces under the commnnd of the said Brigadier 
Valiant shall this day, or as soon after as the Brigadier may deem it oonveni* 



Part II 8ind-No. CXII. 825 



ent^ be allowed to enoamp near the town^ and that saoh boats shall be supplied 
by the native government as may be required by the British army upon pay- 
ment of the usual boat hire for them, as also sueh camels and other means 6f 
conveyance as may be hereafter nec^essary, upon the like terms ; as well as that 
all kinds of provisions and other supplies shall be furnished for the use of the 
said British forces as they may stand in need of and require^ the same being 
paid for at the usual rates of the couutry. 

In consequence of the fulfilment of these terms^ the British officers before 
mentioned agree, in the name of the Honourable East India Company, that 
the persons and property of all the inhabitants of the fort an<i town of Kurra- 
chee shall be held sacred, and that they shall be at liberty to carry on their 
business as heretofore ; that their trading vessels shall be allowed to enter the 
port^ and trade as usual without the slightest interruption ; and further that 
the civil government of Kurrachee shall be carried on by the authorities of 
the place. 

In witness whereof we have, this third day of February one thousand eight 
hundred and thirty-nine, set our hands hereunto, on board Her Britannic 
Majesty's Ship fFelleslef, off Kurrachee. 

(Sd.) Frbd. Lewis Maitlakd, 
Bear Admiral and Commatider''in'CMef 
of n. B, M. Naval Forces in India. 

(Sd.) T. Valiant, 
Brigadier^ Commanding Beserve 

Force in India, 



The X mark of Hassel Ben Butcha. 

The X mark of Synah Khan. 

We, whose signatures are hereunto attached, ratify the above as the acts 
of our servants, in which we fully concur. 

The X mark of Khyer Mahomed. 

The X mark of AH Rakhi. 

Witness, His ?tk dag of February 1S39. 



(Sd.) J. Qeat, 
Her Majesty's 10th Begiment. 

(Sd.) T. FosTANS, Lieut., 
Interpreter to Beserve Force. 



326 Bind— So. OXIII. Part II 



No. OXIII. 

Treaty between the British Goybbnment and the Ameebs of 
HydbrabaDi viz.^ Merb Noob Mahomed Khan, Mb;£r 
NussBEB Mahomed Khan, Meeb Mbeb Mahomed Khan, 
and Meeb Sobdab Khan, 1839. 

Whereas Treaties of frieodship and amity have from time to time been 
entered into between the British Government and the Ameers of Sindh ; and 
whereas circumstances haye lately occurred which render it necessary to revipo 
those Treaties ; and a separate Treaty has already been conchided between the 
British Government and Meer Roostum Khan of Kheirpore ^ the following^ 
Articles have been agreed upon by the contracting parties :— - 

Akticls 1. 

There shall be lasting friendship^ alliance^ and unity of interest between 
the Honourable East India Company and the Ameers of Hyderabad, Meer 
Noor Mahomed Khan^ Meer Nusseer Mahomed Khan^ Meer Meer Mahomed 
Khan, and Meer Sobdar Khan. 

Abticlb 2. 

A British force shall be maintained in Sindh and stationed at Tatta, or 
such other place westward of the river Indus as the Governor-General of India 
may select. The Governor-Gteneral will decide upon the strength of this force, 
which it is not intended shall exceed 5,0Ci0 fighting men. 

Articlb 3. 

Meer Noor Mahomed Khan, Meer Nusseer Mahomed Khan, and Meer 
Meer Mahomed Khan bind themselves to pay severally the sum of one lakh of 
Rupees, being three lakhs of Rupees altogether of the Company's currency, or 
of that called Bakkroo^ or Timooree, in part payment of the expense of the 
British force every year. Meer Sobdar Khan is exempted from all contribution 
to the expense of this force. 

Articlb 4. 

The British Government takes upon itself the protection of the territories 
now possessed by the Ameers of Hyderabad from all foreign aggression. 

Article 5. 

The four Ameers^ party to this Treaty, shall remain absolute rulers in 
their respective principalities ; and the jurisdiction of the British Government 
shall not be introduced into their territories. The officers of the British 
Government will not listen to or encourage complaints against the Ameers 
from their subjects. 



Part II 8ind-no. OXIII. 927 



Article 6. 

The (our Ameers, being confirmed in their present possessions by the 
preceding Article^ will refer to the Resident in Sindb any complaint of aggres- 
sion which one of them may have to make against another ; and the Resident^ 
with the sanction of the Governor-General^ will endeavour to mediate between 
them and settle their differences. 

Artiolb 7. 

In case of aggressions by the subjects of one Ameer on the territories 
of another, and of the Ameer by whose subjects such aggressions are made 
dtiolaring his inability to prevent them in consequence of the offending parties 
being in rebellion to his authority^ en a representation of the circumstances 
being made to the G«>vernor-General by the Besident, the Governor-General 
will^ if he sees fit, order such assistance to be aff(»rded as may be requisite to 
bring the offenders to punishment. 

Akticlb 8. 

The Ameers of Sindh will not enter into any negotiation with any 
foreign Chief or State without the knowledge and sanction of the British 
Government; their amicable correspondence with friends and relations may 
continue* 

Artiolb 9. 

The Ameers of Sindh will act in subordinate co-operation with the 
British Government for purposes of defence^ and shall furnish for the service 
of the British Government a body of 8,000 troops, horse and foot, whenever 
required ; these troops, when employed with the British forces, will be under 
the orders and control of the commanding officer of the British forces. The 
Sindh contingent troops, if employed under British officers beyond the Sindh 
frontier, will be paid by the British Government. 

Artiolb 10. 

The Bakkroo or Timooree Rupee current in Sindh and the Honourable 
Company's Rupee being of equal value, the currency of the latter coin shall 
be admitted in the Sindh territories. If the officers of the British Govern- 
ment establish a mint within the territories of the Ameers, parties to this 
Treaty, and there coin the Bakkroo or Timooree Rupee, the Ameers shall be 
entitled, after the close of the present military operations in Afghanistan, to 
a seigniorage on the coinage according to the customs of the country. 

Artiolb 11. 

No toll will be levied on tradings boats passing up or down the river 
Indus, from the sea to the northernmost point of that stream within the 
territories of the Ameers of Hyderabad. ' 



128 Bind— No. CXIV. Pwi II 



Abticlb 12. 

Bat any merchandize landed from such boats on their passage np or down 
the river and sold shall be subject to the usual dnties of the country ; provided 
always that goods sold in a British camp or cantonment shall be exempt from 
the payment of duty. 

Abticlb 13. 

Goods of all kinds may be brought by merchants and others to the 
months of? the Indus (Gorabaree) at the proper season, and kept there at the 
pleasure of the owners till the best period of the year for sending them up 
the river ; but should any merchant land and sell any part of his merchandize, 
either at Gorabaree or anywhere else (except at the British cantonment), such 
merchant shall pay the usual duties upon them. 

Abtiole 14. 

The provisions of this Treaty agreed upon by the Governor-General of 
India on the one part, and the Ameers Meer Noor Mahomed Khan, Meer 
Nnsseer Mahomed Khan, Meer Meer Mahomed Khan, and Meer Sobdar 
Khan on the other part, shall be binding for ever on all succeeding govern- 
ments of India;, and on the heirs and succcFSors of the said Ameers in perpe- 
tuity ; all former Treaties between the contracting parties not rescinded by 
the provisions of this engagement remaining in force. 

This Treaty, consisting of fourteen Articles, having been signed in 
quadruplicate by the Right Honourable George Lord Auckland, o.CB., 
Governor-General of India, at Bussee, on the iLth day of March 1839, one 
of these four documents will be separately granted, tbrongli Colonel H. 
Pottinger, Resident, Hyderabad^ the negotiator of the ^ reaties, to each of 
the four Ameers on his delivering a counterpart engagement, under his seal 
and signature, to the British Besideut in 8iudb, Colonel H. Pottinger. 

Dated the Uth Marek 1839. (Sd.) Auckland. 



No. CXIV. 



Tbbatt of fourteen Articles between the British Government 
and the Amber of Meerpore, Meer Sher Mahomed 

Khan— 1841. 

Whereas Treaties of amity and friendship have been concluded between 
the Honourable East India Company and the Ameers of Hyderabad, a separate 
Treaty on the same priuciple is now entered into between that power and His 



Part II Bind— No. CXIV< 329 



Highness Meer Sher Mahomed Khan of Meerpore, and the following Articles 
have been agreed upon by the contracting parties :— 

Artiolb 1. 

That there shall be lasting friendship^ alliance^ and unity of interests 
between the Honourable East India Company and the Ameer of Meerpore^ 
Meer Sher Mahomed Khan. 

Artiolb 2. 

Meer Sher Mahomed Khan binds himself to pay every year the sum of 
half a lakh of Rupees (50,000) of the Company^s currency in part payment 
of the expense of the British force stationed in Sindb, viz., on the 1st of 
February of each year. 

Abticlb S. 

The British Government takes upon itself the protection of the territory 
now possessed by the Ameer of Meerpore from all foreign aggression. 

Article 4« 

Meer Sher Mahomed Khan shall remain sole ruler in his principality, 
and the jurisdiction of the British Government shall not be introduced into 
his territory; the officers of the British Government will not listen to or 
encourage complaints against the Ameer from his subjects. 

Article 5. 

The Ameer being confirmed in his present undisputed possessions by the 
preceding Article, will refer to the British representative in Sindh any com- 
plaint of aggression which he may make against any of the other Ameers ; 
and the Political Agent, with the sanction of the Governor-General, will 
endeavour to mediate between them and settle their differences* 

Article 6. 

The territories at present disputed between Meer Sher Mahomed Khan 
and the Ameers of Hyderabad shall be submitted to the decision of arbitrators 
appointed by both parties and an umpire appointed by the Political Agent. 

• 

Articlb 7. 

In case of aggression by the subjects of one Ameer on the territories of 
another, and of the Ameer by whose subjects such aggressions are made 
declaring his inability to prevent them, in consequence of the offending 
parties being in rebellion to his authority, on a representation of the oircum* 
stances being made to the Governor-General by the Political Agent, the 
Governor-General will, if he sees fit, order such assistance to be afforded as 
may be requisite to bring the offenders to punishment. 

2 u 



MO Bind— Ho. OXIV. Pari IX 



Akticlb 8. 

The Ameer will not enter into siuy negotiation with any foreigpi Chief 
or State withont the knowledge and sanction of the British Government; 
his amicable c<»Te8pondeoce with his friends and relations maj eontiuue. 

ABTICLfe 9. 

The Ameer will act in subordinate co-operation with the British Govern- 
ment for the purposes of defence^ and shall fornish for the service of the 
British Government a proportional qnota of troops to that supplied hf other 
Ameers whenever required. These troops, when employed with British forces^ 
will be under the orders and control of the commanding officer of the British 
forces ; the Ameer's trrops, if employed beyond the Siodh frontier, will be 
paid by the British Government. 

Abticlb 10. 

The Bakkroo or Timooree Rupee current in Sindh and the Honourable 
Company^s Rupee being of equal value, the currency of the latter coin shall 
be admitted into the Ameer's territory. 

Articlb 11. 

No toll will be levied on trading boats passing up or down the River 
Indus from the sea to the northernmost point of that stream within the terri- 
tories of the Ameer. 

Article 12. 

But any merchandize landed from boats on their p^tssage up or dotvn the 
liver and sold shall be subject to the usual duties of the country, provided 
always that goods sold in a British camp or cantonment shall be exempt from 
the payment of duty. 

Article 18. 

Goods of all kinds may be brought by merchants and others to the 
mouths of the Indus (Gorabaree) at the proper season, and kept there at the 
pleasure of the owners till the best season of the year for sending them up 
the river ; but should any merchant land and sell any part of his merchandize 
either at (Jorabaree or anywhere else, except at the British cantonment, such 
merchant shall pay the usual duty. 

AUTICLB*14. 

The provisions of this Treaty agreed upon by the Governor-General 
of India on the one part and Mecr Sber Mahomed Khan on the other part 



Part II Sind-No. GXV. 831 



shall be binding for ever on all succeeding* governments of India^ and on the 
heirs and successors of tlie said Ameer in perpetuity. 

(Sd.) Auckland. 

Dnted the 27th Kubbte-ool-awul 1267 A.H.^ corresponding with 18th 
June 1841 A.D. 

Ratified and signed by the Right Honourable the Governor-General of 
India, at Fort William in I^engal, on the 16th August in the year of our 
Lord one thousand eight hundred and forty-one. 

(Sd.) T. H. Haddock, 
Secretary to the Qovernment o/ India, 



No. CXV. 

Deaft of a Treaty between the Ameebs of Hyderabad and the 

British Government — 1842. 

Abticlk 1. 

The Ameers of Hyderabad are relieved from the payment of all tribute 
to the British Government^ which, under existing engagements, would become 
due after the Ist of January 1843. 

Article 2. 

The only coin legally current in the dominions of the Ameers of Hyder- 
abad after the Ist of January 1845 dhall be the Company's Rupee and the 
Rupee hereinafter mentioned. 

Articli 8. 

The British Government will coin for the Ameers of Hyderabad such 
number of Rupees as they may require from time to time, such Rupees bear- 
ing on one side the ei^Rgy of the Sovereiarn of England with such inscrip- 
tion as the British Government may from time to time adopts and on tbe 
reverse such inscription or device as the Ameers may prefer. 

Article 4* 

Such Rupeep so to be coined for the Ameers shall contain the same 
quantity of silver and of the same fineoess as the Company's Rupees ; and 



382 8ind-No. CXV. Fart II 



for every Rupee so coined the Ameers shall deliver to the officers of th« 
British Government, who may hereafter be from time to time appointed 
to receive the same, a quantity of silver equal to that contained in such 
Bupee, and of equal fineness, or approved bills of equal value; and such Rupees 
80 coined for the Ameers shall be delivered to them within four months after 
the receipt, by the appointed officers, of the silver equivalent thereto, or with- 
in four months after the payment of the approved bills for the amount, with- 
out any charge for the coinage, which charge will be wholly borne by the 
British Govern men t. 

Article 5. 

The Ameers, in consideration of the above engagement, renounce the 
privilege of coining money^ and will not exercise the same, from the date 
of the signature of this Treaty. 

Articlb 6. 

With a view to the necessary provision of wood for the use of steamers 
navigating the Indus and the rivers communicating therewith, the British 
Government shall have the right to fell wood within one hundred yards of 
both banks of the Indus within the territories of the Ameers; but the British 
Government, being unwilling to exercise such right in a manner inconvenient 
or disagreeable to the Ameers, will exercise it only under the direction of British 
officers, and will refrain from all exercise thereof so long as the Ameers shall 
provide, at the places to be named, such a quantity of wood fit for the pur- 
pose of fuel at the price of the 

as the officers of the British Government may from time 
to time require. 

Artiolb 7. 

The tollowmg places and districts are ceded in perpetuity to the British 
Government: Kurrachee and Tatta, with such arrondissement as may be 
deemed necessary by Major-General Sir Charles Napier ; and, moreover, the 
right of free passage over the territories of the Ameers between Kurrachee 
and Tatta along such line, and within eoch limits on either side thereof as 
Major-General Sir Charles Napier may prefer; and within such limits the 
officers of the British Government shall atone have jurisdiction. 



Article 8. 

All the rights and interests of the Ameers^ or of any one of them, in 
Subzulkote, and in all the territory intervening between the present frontier 
of Bhawulpore and the town of Roree, are ceded in perpetuity to His High- 
ness the Nawab of Bhawulpore, the ever faithful ally and friend of the British 
Government. 



Part II Slnd— No. CXV. 888 



Articlb 9. 

To the Meer Sobdar Ehan^ who has constantly evinced fidelity to his 
engagements and attachment to the British Qovernment, is ceded territory 
producing half a lakh of annual revenue, such cession being made in consider- 
ation of the loss he will sustain by the transfer of Eurrachee to the British 
Government^ and as a reward for his good conduct. 



Abticlb 10. 

The Commissioner appointed by Major-General Sir Charles Napier for 
the execution of this Treaty will, ^after hearing the several Ameers, finally 
decide what lands shall be made over to Meer Sobdar Khan, in pursuance of 
the above Article, by the other Ameers. 

Article 11. 

Inasmuch as the territories to be ceded by the several Ameers, under the 
provisions of this Treaty, difl^er in annual value, and the amount of the tribute 
now payable by the several Ameers is not altogether the same^ the Commis- 
sioner appointed by Major-General Sir Charles Napier shall hear the several 
Ameers as to the annual value of the lands so ceded, and shall declare what 
payments of money, or what cessions of land in lieu thereof, shall be made by 
the Ameers, who shall make no cession of lands, or cessions of lands of inferior 
value, to such as shall make such cessions of higher value under this Treaty, 
that so the value of the cessions made by the several Ameers (always excepting 
Meer Sobdar Khan) shall be as nearly commensurate as possible with the 
tribute to the payment of which each was before liable. 

Article 12. 

Tlie remainder of the tribute now payable which shall not be absorbed 
in the making of such compensations, or lands yielding an annual revenue 
of equal amount, shall be at the disposal of the British Governmenti but 
the British Government will retain no portion thereof for itself. 

8imht November 4lh^ 1842. 



Beatt of Tbeatt between the Bbitish Qoyernment and the 

Ahbees of Kheibporb — 1842. 

Article 1. 

The pergunnah of Bfaoong Bhara, and the third part of the district of 
Sabzolkoto; and tho villages of Gotkee, Maladee^ Chaonga, Dadoola, and 



SS4 Bind— Wo. OXV. Part ll 



Uzeezporo, and all the territories of the Ameers of Kheirpore, or any of them 
intervening^ between the present, dominions of His Highness the Nawab of 
Hhawulpore and the town and district of Roree^ are ceded in perpetuity to 
His Highness the Nawab. 

Articlb 2. 

Ihe town of Snkkur, with such arrondissement as shall be deemed 
necessary by Major-Gteneral Sir Charles Napier, and the islands of Bukkar 
and the adjoining islets, and the town of Roree, with snch arrondissement as 
may be deemed necessary by Major-Oeneral Sir Charles Napier, are ceded in 
perpetuity to the British Government. 

Abticlb S, 

The Commissioner appointed by Major-General Sir Charles Napier for 
ihe execution of this Treaty and of the Treaty to be concluded with the 
Ameers of Hyderabad shall appropriate the surplus tribute, from which the 
Ameers of Hyderabad will be relieved by that Treaty (of which an account 
will be rendered to the Ameers of Kheirpore), or lands of equal value in lieu 
thereof, first, to the indemnification of such Ameers of Kheirpore, other than 
Meer Hoostnm Khan and Meer Nufseer Khan, as may make cessions of 
territory under this Treaty, and then, for the benefit of Meer Roostum Khan 
and Meer Nusseer Khan, in proportion to the annual value of the cessions 
made by them respectively under this Treaty. 

Article 4. 

The Ameers of Kheirpore having, by the Treaty concluded on the 24th 
December 1838, agreed, " in order to improve by every means possible the 
growing intercourse by the River Indus, to afford all co-operation with the 
other powers in any measures which may hereafter be thought necessary for 
extending and facilitating the commerce and navigation of the Indus,'' and 
the Ameers of Hyderabad having since, by a Treaty concluded in 1839, 
agreed '^ that no toll shall be levied on trading boats passing up and down the 
river Indus from the sea to the northernmost point of ihat atream within 
their territories, with the proviso that any merchandize landed from such 
boats on their passage up or down the river and sold shall be subject to the 
usual duties of the country, except goods sold in a British camp or canton- 
ment, which goods shall be exempt from the payment of duty,'' the Ameers 
of Kheirpore now agree to abide by and observe the above provision, in the 
same manner and as fully as if the same were inserted in the Treaty concluded 
by them in 1838, 

Aeticlb 5. 

The only coin legally current in the dominions of the Ameers of Kheir- 
pore after the 1st January 18:^5 shall be the Company's Rupee and the Rupee 
hereinafter mentioned. 



Part II Bind— No. CXV. 335 



Articlb 6. 

The British Government will coin for the Ameers of Kheirpore such 
number of Rupees as they may require from time to time, such Rupees bear- 
ing on one side the e^gy of the Sovoreig^n of England, with such inscription 
as the British Government may from time to time adopt, and on the reverse 
such inscription or device as the Ameers may prefer. 

AbticlH 7. 

Such Rupees, so to be coined for the Ameers, shall contain the same 
quantity of silver and of the same fineness as the Company's Rupees; and 
for every Rupee so coined, the Ameers shall deliver to the officers of the 
British Government, who may hereafter be from time to time appointed to 
receive the same, a quantity of silver equal to that contained in such Rupee 
and of equal fineness, or approved bills of equal value ; and such Rupees, so 
coined for the Ameers, shall be delivered over to them within four months 
after the receipt, by the appointed officer, of the silver equivalent thereto, or 
within four months after the payment of the approved bills for the amount 
without any charge for the coinage, which charge will be wholly borne by 
the British Government. 

Abticlb 8. 

The Ameers, in consideration of the above engagement, renounce the 
privilege of coining money, and will not exerci&e the same, from the date of 
the signature of this Treaty. 

Abticlb 9. 

With a view to the necessary provision of wood for the use of steamers 
navigating the Indus and the rivers communicating therewith, the British 
Government shall have the right to fell wood within 100 yards of both banks 
of the Indus within the territories of the Ameers; but the British Govern- 
ment, being unwilling to exercise such right in a manner inconvenient or dis- 
agreeable to the Ameers, will exercise it only under the direction of British 
ofBcers, and will refrain from all exercise thereof so long as the Ameers shall 
provide, at the places to be named, such quantity of wood fit for the purposes 
of fuel at the price of the as the officers of the British 

Government may from time to time require. 

Abticlb 10. 

The British Government renounces every claim heretofore made upon 
the late Meer Mobarik Khan, or upon Meer Nusseer Khan, or the other sons 
of the late Meer Mobarik Khan, on account of nuzzerana, in the name of the 
late Shah Suja, or on account of annual tribute, and the arrears thereof and 
the interest thereon, on its own behalf. 

Simla, November 4th, 1848. 



886 Bind— ITo. OXVI. Part ii 



No. OXVI. 

Adoption Sunntjd granted to Meeb Ali Mttbad Ehak^ of 

Kheibpobe— 1866. 

Her Majesty being desirous that the Governments of the several Princes 
and Chiefs oi India who now govern their own territories should be perp»- 
tuatedy and that the representation and dignity of their Houses should be 
continued^ I hereby^ in fulfilment of this desire^ convey to you the assurance 
that, on failure of natural heirs^ any succession to the Government of your 
State which may be legitimate according to Mahomedan law will be upheld. 

Be assured that nothing shall disturb the engagement thus made to you 
so long as your house is loyal to the Crown and faithful to the conditions of 
the Treaties^ Grants or Engagements which record its obligations to the 
British Government. 

(Sd.) J. Lawbbnoi. 

Tke 19tk March 1866. 



Part II Lapsed QtB.tesSroaeh, Mandvi. 837 



XI.-LAPSED STATES. 

1. BROACH. 

Broach was conquered by the Mahrattas from the Muhammadans ia 
1685, from which time the Nawabs of Broach continued to hold their terri- 
tories as subordinates of the Peshwa. In consequence of certain claims against 
the Nawab of Broach, which were due by right of sovereignty to the Gov- 
ernment of Surat, the Bombay Government ordered and subsequently counter- 
manded an expedition against Broach. But the local authorities at Surat per- 
sisted and sent a force in 1771 to enforce the demand. The expedition failed, 
and preparations were being made to renew it when the Nawab came to 
Bombay, and a Treaty (No. CXVII) was concluded with him on the SOth Nov- 
ember 1771. The terms given to the Nawab were not so liberal as he expected, 
and on his return to Broach he proceeded to treat with great disrespect the 
chief of the factory there, who was in consequence directed to withdraw to 
Surat. In the following year the expedition was carried out, and Broach was 
taken on the 18th November 1772. The right of the British Government to 
Broach was recognised by the treaty of Purandhar^ and subsequently by the 
treaty of Salbai,t but the town and district were ceded j: to Sindhia in 178S, 
in consideration of hier services in negotiating that treaty. 

In the Mahratta war of 1803 Broach was again taken by a British force, 
and it was finally ceded to the British Government by article 8 of the treaty 
of Sarji Anjangaon. The descendants of the last Nawab of Broach enjoy 
hereditary pensions from the British Government. 

2. MANDVI. 

The early history of this State furnishes a remarkable example of the 
manner in which the Mahrattas dealt with questions of succession to depen- 
dent Chiefships. If there is no instance in which the Peshwa withheld his 
sanction from succession by adoption, there is also none in which be permitted 
it without subjecting the State to a heavy Gne, which was also not unfrequently 
exacted in cases of direct succession. 

The State of Mandvi was founded by a Bhil Chieftain whose successors 
gradually acquired suflScient power to raise themselves to the rank of petty 

• See The Peshwa, Vol. VI. 
. t See The Peshwa, Vol. VI. 
t Sec Gwalior, VoL IV. 

2 I 



838 Lapsed States— JfaiKfvt. Part JI 



sovereigns. la 1730 the ruling Chief^ Durjan Singh^ was deprived of his 
possessious by Damaji Rao Gaekwar, bat about twenty yeai*s afterwards he 
was restored by the Peshwa as a return for military services which he rendered 
against the Portuguese at Bassein. Durjan Singh died in 1771 and wae 
succeeded by his cousin, Bhagwan Singh, who wns required to pay a nazarana 
of Rupees 1,00,000 to the Peshwa. His distant relative, Ouman Singh, who 
succeeded to the State in 1776, was subjected to a payment of Rupees 1 ,50,000 ; 
and in 1786, on the death of Ouman Singh without issue, and on the succes- 
sion of Nahar Singh, also called Durjan Singh, a nazarana of Rupees 60,000 
was levied by the Peshwa. 

By the treaty of BHssein the State of Mandvi, erroneously culled Nundary 
came under the British Government and was subjected to a tribute of Rupees 
65,000. For seven years, however, the Raja evaded payment of the tribute, 
and in 1809 the British Government were on the point of reducing their 
demand to Rupees 25,000, when an insurrection broke out in the country. 
This rising was headed by a fanatical Musalman named Abdur Rahman, who 
seized the fort of Mandvi from which the Raja fled, murdered the Raja's 
minister, and committed depredations in the surrounding country, threaten- 
ing to carry fire and sword into the British districts if the English officers did 
not embrace the Muhammadan faith. In his distress the Raja threw himself 
on the protection of the British Government, to whom he engaged (No. 
CXYIII) to pay the expenses of military aid and six annas in every rupee 
of revenue annually. With the aid of a British force the Raja was reinstated, 
after which, in lieu of a share of the revenues, the Raja agreed (No. CXIX) 
to pay an annual tribute of Rupees 60,000. In consideration of the exhausted 
state of the country, the Raja was neither required to pay the cost of the 
expedition, amounting to Rupees 20,000, nor his arrears of tribute, which had 
risen to upwards of Rupees 4,50,000. 

Durjan Singh died without male issne in 1814, and was succeeded by his 
oousin Hamir Singh, from whom the British Government demanded no 
nazarana. This Chief fell into the hands of evil advisers, and they instigated 
him to hostilities with the British Government, the intention being to put 
the country under the Peshwa, with whom the British Government were then 
at war. The overthrow of Baji Rao, however, and the approach of a British 
force to Mandvi with the view of annexing the country, brought the Raja 
to reason, and in [May 1818 he signed an Agreement (No. CXX) to dismiss 
his advisers and to make no change in the administration of his afiairs 
without the knowledge and consent of the British Government. 



Part II Lapsed States— i9«ra<. 339 

On the 13th February 1884 Hamir Singh was succeeded by bis son Waje 
Sin^h, who was killed on tbe 19th October 1838 by an explosion of fire- 
works. His posthumous son, whose succession was recognised^ died on the ISth 
December I839j and the direct line of succession became extinct. The nearest 
claimant was forty-two degrees removed from the common ancestor of the 
family and was moreover imbecile. The State was therefore treated as an 
escheat and annexed to the British dominions. 

8. SURAT. • 

The first establishment of the English at Surat, which was then included 
in the Suba of Ahmadabad^ took place in 1611. A fleet, which was de- 
spatched from England in that year to establish commercial intercourse with 
the western coast of India, was victorions in a series of actions with a power- 
ful Portuguese fleet, which so raised the reputation of the English as to 
accelerate the confirmation of a Treaty (No. CXXI) with the Governor of 
Ahmadabad. This treaty ^was afterwards confirmed by a farman from Delhi 
in 1613, granting permission for the establishment of factories at Surat, Cam- 
bay, Ahmadabad, and Gogha, with certain commercial privileges. This was 
the first settlement effected by the English on the coast of India. Surat was 
made the chief seat of the Company's trade in 1629 and continued to be so 
till 1687, when the position was transferred to Bombay. In 1614 King 
James I of England sent a letter to the Emperor of Delhi by the hand of Sir 
Thomas Roe. The result was a &rman from the Emperor of Delhi granting 
the English complete freedom to trade in his dominions (No. CXXI I), 

No political influence appears to have been acquired at Surat till 1664, 
when the town was first attacked and partially plundered by Shivaji. The 
gallant defence which the English made in their factory procured for them in 
1667 a new Farman (No. CXXIII) from Aurangzeb, reducing the custx>m8 
duties and securing the unmolested transit of their goods. Owing to hosti* 
lities with Aurangzeb, however, the factory at Surat was seized in 1687, 
but it was eventually restored. In 1712, in consequence of the exacttons of 
the governor, the English withdrew from Surat, but in 1716 a new Charter 
was obtainedj mainly through the influence of Mr. Hamiltor^ the Surgeon 
at the Court of Delhi. From that time the English continued to trade 
quietly at Surat for some years. 

In 1746 Teg Bakht Khan, the Governor of Surat, died^ and was succeeded 
by Safdar Khan, who placed his son Wakhar Khan in charge of the castle, which, 
under the Mughals, had always been a separate command from the civil adminis- 



840 



Lapsed State8->i9iira/. 



Part II 



tration of the town. But an adventurer named Mian Achan or Mai-nd-din^ 
who had married the daughter of Teg Bakht Khan, being supported by the 
inhabitants of the town, expelled Wakhar Khan from the fort. By the assistance 
of the English and of Damaji Oaekwar, to whom he gave up one-fourth of the 
revenues of Surat, he also succeeded in expelling Saf dar Khan from the civil 
government of the town, in which he continued to rule till 17 5 1^ when he was 
himself expelled by Safdar Khan and TVakhar Khan. In the prosecution of 
the contest, Wakhar Khan obtained the help of Damaji Oaekwar on the pro- 
mise of half the revenues of Surat, but when his restoration was accomplished, 
objections were raised to so large a payment, and it was finally settled that the 
Oaekwar should receive one- third, which he afterwards shared equally^ with the 
Peshwa. 

* Tbakblation of an Aobkembvt between Kaim-ttd-Daitla, Bahadttb, Nawab of Svbat, ami 

Kabinath Habi, the Pbshwa's Chavka. 



KflBinath Hari's 



Sri Pant Par- 

dhan Chirni Tat- 

par Kasinath 

Hari Narentar. 



Seal. 



Whereas there has lately sabsisted tome disputes in the Bandar of Snrat by reason of Kasi- 
nath Hari, Srimant Peshwa Sahib's kamaviftdar, having made sundry claims on the Sarkar of the 
Nawab Sahib, Kaim«ud>Daala, Bahadur, on aooount of some Articles of the revenues of the afore- 
aaid Bandar, the particulars of which are below inserted, and which, by the advice, assistance, and 
approbation of Andrew Bamsay, Esq., Chief of the English Factory and Gbvernor of the Mughars 
castle and fleet, It has been by both parties muttutUy agreed and settled that in future in the 
undermentioned Articles there shall on no account be any difference or dispute between the above- 
mentioned parties, who bind themselves by their respective faiths to keep this agreement that it 
may always remain in force. 

On indigo. &o^ for one whole year, which is now somewhat increased, the whole revenue is 
Bnpees 7»510, the sixth part of which is Rupees 1,261 and 10| annas. 

Thirteen ArHclee, 

Rupees. 

Indigo 2,700 

Teak-wood • . 1,625 

TJmra and Dumas Fishery 660 

The Chaukis of the Thana Chanrasi 600 

The Farm of the boats 700 

TJmra Pettahs or liquor shops 180 

The Dutch Chanki 48 

TJmra Chanki 24 

Jewel Office, Vera 600 

From the jewel office for custom •••••.. 76 

Phnlsari in Chanrasi 90 

Batti cleaners in the thana of Chanrasi — pay for seven months • . 84 

Kakas or customs on cattle 324 

7,610 



Part II 



Lapsed States^/^irra^. 



341 



During these dissensions the castle fell into the hands of Sidi Masnd of 
Janjira and Rajpur. The English factory was in great danger, and^ through 

TindalB, customs and others which are not ascertained, but whatever is collected in the year— i 

Twelve Articles. 

TMnksal or mint accidental customs, for a thousand l-l. 

Jagri from the parganas not more than formerly to go in the certificates. 

Jagri from the Deccan was neyer included in the certificates, and is not to be. 

Carts of Dangue not more than usual to pass in certificates. The business to go through the 
proper officers. 

At the Cbaukis in the suburbs, the Chautia's writers to attend. 

The customs on surangi (a dje) shall be brought to account as usual. 

The customs on kusumba (a red dye) shall, as usuhI, be brought to account. 

The income from Raniala shall be brought to account. 

The fee on new silk wheels of Rupees 1-8 each shall be brought to account. 

Artificers to be allowed to the Thana, and not to be taken in belt, 12 carpenters, 9 bricklayers, 
7 tailors, and 6 pot^makers. 

From the Sarkar of the Nawab Sahib to be given shawls from the Naibat. 

Fnlanqnin charges from Ehushir. 

Kasinath Hari, kamavisdar for the share of Srimant Peshwa Sahib, agrees that if the before- 
mentioned Mnwab Sahib, according to the before-written agreement, gives the just proportion to 
the Sarkar of the Peshwa, I have not, nor shall have, as is above written, any claims upon the 
Nawab Sahib. In testimony of which two agreements are drawn out ; to one copy the seal and 
writing of the Nawab is affixed, and to the o^er the seal and writing of Kasinath Hari, kamavis- 
dar of the before-mentioned. 

In the Bandar of Surai, theflrel day of the month Shaban, in the year of the B.ijra 1200 
corresponding with the 29th of May 1786 of the Christian era. 

Written in the Mahratta language by Kasinath Hari. 

These twenty-eight Articles are settled between the Nawab Kaim-ud-Daula, Bahadur, and Kasi- 
nath Hari, the Srimant Pardhan's kamavisdar at Surat. There was a dispute respecting the 
Peshwa's share of the revenue, which has been settled by the advice and means of Mr. Ramsay, 
Chief of the English Factory. The particulars of the Articles are written in Persian, according to 
which the Nawab of Sural is to give the share yearly when there will be no dispute from year to 
year. The Ist of Shaban 1200. 



Mur ah 
Shud. 



TsAnrsLATiOK of an Aobbbmbitt between Kaim-vd-Daula, Nawab of Subat, and Kasinath 

Habi, the Pbshwa's Ch^jtka. 



The Nawab's 



Kaim-ud- 
Daula. 



Sea). 



Whereas there has lately subsisted some disputes in the Bandar of Surat by reason of Kssi* 
nath Hari, Srimant Peshwa Sahib's kamavisdar, having made sundry claims on the Sarkar of the 
Nawab Sahib, Kaim-ud-Daula, Bahadur, on account of some Articles of the revenue of the afore- 
said Bandar, the particulars of which are below inserted, and which, by the advice, assistance, and 
approbation of Andrew Ramsay, Esq., Chief of the English factory and Governor of the Mughal's 
castle and fleet, it has been by both parties mutually agreed and settled that in future in the under- 
mentioned Articles there shall on no account be any difference or dispute between the abovemen- 
tioned parties, who bind themselves by their respective faiths to keep this agreement that it may 
always remain in force. 



848 Iiapsed States— i9«ra/. Part II 



the influence of the Dutch, a peace^ was negotiated between the Agent at 
Surat and the Sidi^ by which all English troops were to be withdrawn 

The Nawab Kaim-ad- Daala, B«hadar, agjees that the sixth share of the aDdermentioned 
Articles shall in f utare be given to the Sarkar of Srimant Peshwa Sahib according to what ii right 
and jnst. 

On indigo, &c., for one whole year, which is somewhat now increMed, the whole reTenae is 
Rupees 7»510, the sixth part of which is Rupees 1,851 and lOi annas. 

Thirteen Artielee, Rupees. 

Indigo 2,700 

Teak-wood 1,826 

TJmra and Dumas Fishery 660 

The Chankis of the Thana Chanrasi 600 

The Farm of the boats 900 

Umra Pettahs or Uqnor shops ' . 180 

The Dutch Chanki 48 

TJmra Chanki 24 

Jewel office, Vera 600 

From the jewel office for costom 76 

Phnlsari in the Chaarasi 90 

Batti cleaners in the Thana of Chanrasi— pay for seven months • 84 

Nakas or customs on cattle 824 

Total • 7,610 

Directions have been given to the karbharis (clerks) that they go on agreeable to former 
customs. 

Tindals customs and others which are not ascertained, but whatever is collected in the year-— 

Twehe Ariielee, 

From the tindals of ships. Rupees 10 a year, tanksal or mint accidental customs, for a 
thousand 1-1. 

Jag^ from the parganas not more than formerly to go in the certificates. 

Jagri from the Deccan was never included in the certificates, and is not to be. 

Carts of Dangue not more than usual to pass in certificates. The bnsiness to go through the 
proper officers. 

At the Chankis in the suburbs, his writers are to attend. 

The customs on surangi (a dye) shall be brought to account as usual. 

The customs on Kasumba (a red dye) shall, as usual, be brought t<> account. The income from 
Raniala shall be brought to account. 

The fee on new silk wheels of 1-2 each should be brought to account. 

It was usual to allow one artificer from each trade on his account ; two of each shall be 
allowed, 12 carpenters, 9 bricklayers, 7 tailors, and 6 pot-makers. 

Written by the Nawab. 

By reason of the decrease in the revenue these have been stopt. 

From the Nawab's Sarkar should be given shawls from the Naibat. 

Palanquin charges from the Khuski. 

Dated the Ui of the month Shahan, in the year of the Hijra 1200, eorretponding with the 
29th of May 1786 of the Christian era, 

*[ Declared null and void by the Honourable the President in Council, Bombay, on the 22nd 

November 1751."] 

Tbbaty l^ween Mb. Laxbb and Couvoil and Satdab Khav and Sini Masvd* 

Abtioli 1. 

As soon as the peace is concluded the English are to take all the soldiers from the castle that 
are in their service, as well Europeans as Indians, and send them on board the ships at the Barj at 
the same time all the Batteries belonging to Masud Khan are to be dismantled. 



Fart II Lapsed States— ^«r<i/. 848 

and the establishments reduced to the footing on which they stood in time 
of peace. This treaty was repudiated by the Bombay Oovernment, and in 
the following year, 17^^> » ^^w Treaty (No. CXXIV) was made, under which 
the English were to receive compensation for losses and to trade according to 
their farman. 

Quarrels soon broke out between Safdar Khan and the Sidi, and the 
former opened negotiations with the English in 1757 to put them in posses- 
sion of the fleet on condition of their expelling the Sidi from the fort ; but the 
offer was not accepted. In the meantime Safdar Khan died in 1758, and 
Sidi Ahmad, wlio succeeded bis father Sidi Masud in the government of the 
castle, made himself the enemy of the English by his close alliance with the 
Dutch and the piracies which be committed. He was so detested by the 
people of Surat that they offered to make over to the English the command of 
the fleet and the castle, with funds for their support, if they would expel the 
Sidi. A Treaty (No. CXXV) was accordingly concluded in 1758 with 
Paris Khan, in which it was agreed that he should be put in possession of the 
government of the town, the English taking the government of the castle and 
continuing to enjoy all their commercial privileges. The fear of provoking 
the Mahrattas, who at this time were supposed to have designs on Surat, pre- 
vented this enterprise from bein«; carried out 



Abtiolk 2. 

Tbe 8< Idiers in the factory, of what denomination soever, are to be sent away, reserying only 
the same number as usual in times of tranquillity. 

Abtiolk a 

Tliat all the ships and goods now at Bombay are to haTe leave to go to their respective porta 
of Mecca, Jedda, Bengal, or anywhere else that they may be bound to. 

Abtiolb 4. 
After the peace is concluded, there is to be no more fighting either in the city or at the Bar. 

Abticlb 6. 

The Company are to pay yearly the same sum as is agroeable to their farmans, with the 
charges thereon. 

Abtiolb e. 

The English are not to protect or take into their factory any goods but what belong imme- 
diately to them. 

We, the under-written Chief and Council f^r the Company of Bnc^land at Surat, declare that 
we approve of the Articles of this present Treaty of peace from our full and entire will, and pro- 
roi«e to conform to them and execute them according to their tenor. 

{Signed hy Mr, Lamhe and Council.) 

Witnessed by the Dutch Secretary. 
Sural, 12th November 1751, 



844 Lapsed States—'^ifra/. Fart II 



Sabsequently, at the iuvitation of the people who were tired of bad 
government and afraid of tbe interference of the Mahrattas, aforce from Bom- 
bay, under Captain Maitland, BuccessfuHy bombarded the town and, as the 
result, a Treaty (No. CXXYI) was concluded with Mian Aohan on the 4th 
March 1759, which confirmed that made with Faris Khan in the previous 
year, and appointed Faris Kban to be Deputy at Surat under the government 
of Mian Achan, an office which was abolished in 1777. These engagements 
were in the same year confirmed by the Emperor of Delhi. 

From the time when they obtained possession of the castle of Surat and 
the command of the fleet, the power of the British Government at Surat greatly 
increased. They were, in fact, the rulers of the country, while the Nawab 
became merely a titular Chief with the government of the town. In February 
1763 Nawab Mian Aohan died. There were four competitors for the succes- 
sion : Mir Eutb-ud-din ; his eldest son, Faris Khan ; the Deputy, AH Nawaz 
Khan ; and Nur-ud-din Ali Khan. The British Government declared in favour 
of Kutb-ud-din, who was installed on the 14th April 1763. He died in March 
1790, and it was then proposed to obtain from the Emperor of Delhi, a sanad 
investing the British Government with the sole administration of Surat, so as 
to remove the inconvenience of a double government. But the Governor- 
General in Council thought it inexpedient to do so, because the Nawab's eldest 
son, Nizam-ud-din Khan, had a claim to the office of Nawab by right of in- 
heritancci and the Emperor was then a puppet in the hands of Sindhia. Ap- 
plication was made to the Emperor for a sanad of investiture in favour of 
Nizam-ud-din Khan, who paid a nazar of Rupees 20,000, No sanad, how- 
ever, was furnished, and in December 1792 Nizam-ud*din Khan was installed 
by order of the British Government, and the Nawab afterwards declined to 
receive a sanad from Delhi, and expressed his desire to be dependent solely on 
the British. In 1798 negotiations were commenced for a treaty with the 
Nawab, under which he was to pay a lakh of rupees a year towards the 
expenses of the management of the castle and town of Surat ; but before the 
agreement was brought to a final oonclubion the Nawab died on the 8th 
January 1799. 

The succession of the Nawab's brother Nasir-ud-din was recognised on his 
signing a Treaty (No. CXXVII) vesting the entire administration of the city 
and its revenues iu the hands of the British Government, who were to pay to 
the Nawab Rupees 1,00,000 yearly, and one-fifth of the annual revenues after 
deducting all charges and expenses of collection. In lieu of this variable 



■Ill « — 



Fart II Lftpsed States^ Kolaba. 845 

allowance, the Nawabin 1817 agreed (No. CXXVIII) to accept a fixed pro- 
vision of Rupees 1,50,000. The Nawab died on the 23rd September 1821, 
and was succeeded by his son Mir Afzal-ud-din, on whose death, on the 8th 
August 1842, without male issue, the titular dignity and office became extinct. 
A provision of Rupees 52,800 a year was settled on his son-in-law Jafar Ali 
Khan and two grand-daughters. The pension to the family was raised in 
1857 to Rupees 1,00^000, to be continued till the death of the survivor of 
the three grantees. Jafar Ali Khan died on the 21st August 1863 ; and one 
grand-daughter, the wife of Mir Ghulam Baba Khan, on the 13th July 1886. 

4. KOLABA. 

The first Angria, Kanhoji, was a servant of Shivaji> and gained a con<* 
siderable principality under him and his descendants. This territory was 
divided between his two sons, Sakhoji and Sambhaji, the latter holding 
Savarndurg. The family were notorious pirates, and one of the earliest en* 
gagements^ which the British Government made with the Peshwa had for its 
object the suppression of the outrages which they committed at sea. On the 
ascendancy of the -Peshwa, Tulaji, the son of Sambhaji, was stripped of his 
possessions and died in prison. Sakhoji died in 1733 without male issue, and 
Manaji, the eldest of Kanhoji^s three illegitimate sons, acknowledged the supre« 
macy of the Peshwa, by whom his son Raghuji was invested in the year 1763. 
On Raghuji's death in 1793 internal disturbances broke out, which led the 
Peshwa to occupy the whole territory. But in 1796 the State was restored 
to Raghuji's son Manaji, who, however, was deposed in 1799, by the Peshwa 
Baji Rao, at the instigation of Sindhia, in favour of Babu Rao, Sindhia^s 
near relative. This Chief was succeeded by his nephew Sambhaji. But the 
Peshwa again set aside this line, and restored the old family in the person ot 
Manaji, grandson of the Chief of the same name, who was deposed in 1799* 
Manaji died in 1817, and his son Raghuji had not been invested when the 
hostilities between the British Government and the Peshwa broke out. The 
peculiar connection which had subsisted between the principality of Angria 
and the Peshwa rendered it necessary that a treaty should be concluded with 
Raghuji after the conclusion of the war, recognising the rights which he 
enjoyed, and embracing certain exchanges of territory to secure a well-defined 
boundary. The Treaty (No. CXXIX) was concluded in 1822, It guaranteed 
the territory of Kolaba against external attack ; prohibited the Chief from 

• 8m The Peihwa, Vol. VI. 

tx 



346 Lapsed QtBLteS" Saiara. Part II 



political iDtercourse with other States; bound him to subordination to the 
British power; and defined generally his relations with the British Goyern-* 
xnent. The exchanges provided for in article 3 of the treaty were not effected 
till 1827. 

Raghuji Angria died on the 26th December 1888. On the 28th January 
1839^ however^ a posthumous son was born ; and his succession, under the name 
of Kanhoji Angria^ was recognised. This boy died on the 9th April 1840^ 
and with him the direct and legitimate line of chiimants to the Chieftainship 
became extinct. The widows of Raghuji Angria wished to adopt a son. The 
succession was also claimed by Sambhaji Angria, grandson of Yesaji, the second 
illegitimate son of the first Kanhoji. But after full deliberation both claims 
were rejected, and the territory of Kolaba was annexed to the British domin- 
ions. Life pensions, amounting to Rupees 53,560, were settled on the 
different members of the Angria family. 

5. SATARA. 

After Shahuji, the g^ndson of Shivaji, had been released from capti* 
vity and had recovered his rights^ as head of the Mahratta power, he left 
the control of his affairs entirely in the hands of his Minister Balaji Biswa* 
nath. Previous to his death he adopted Ram Raja, a grandson of his aunt 
Tara Bai of Kolhapur, a younger branch of Shivaji's family, and gave to the 
Peshwa a deed bestowing on him the entire control of the Mahratta oonfede* 
racy^ on condition of his maintaining the dignity of the house of Shivaji in 
the person of Ram Raja and his descendants. From that time the Rajas of 
Satara remained either puppets or firisoners of the Peshwa, until the over- 
throw of the Peshwa's power in 1817. After the conclusion of the treaty of 
1^56 with the Peshwa,* a commercial Treaty (No. CXXX) was concluded 
with Ram Raja. 

At the commencement of the war of 1817 Pratap Singh was Raja of 
Satara. He had succeeded his father, the second Shahuji, the adopted son and 
successor of Ram Raja. Pratap Singh was kept a close prisoner by the Peshwa 
Baji Rao, who had given orders that the Raja and his family should be put 
to death rather than allowed to fall into the hands of the British. In the 
proclamatiM issued by Mr. Elphinstone on the 11th February I818,t the inten- 
tion was declared of placing the Raja of Satara at the head of a separate State 



• S«e The Peshwa, Vol. VI. I f See Hyderabad, VoL VIII. 



Part II Lapsed States— ^'o^ara. 847 



of such extent as might maintain him and his family in comfort and dignity. 
TheKaja was rescued after the battle of Ashtion the 20th February 1819, and 
on the 25th September a Treaty (No. CXXXI) was concluded with him de* 
fining the limits of his State, and the conditions on which he was to hold 
it. Under the 6th article of the treaty, the administration of the State was 
retained by the British Government till 1822, when it was made over to the 
Baja; but he was bound to attend at all times to the advice which the British 
Government might give him for the good of his State and the mainten- 
ance of general tranquillity. 

In 1829 the Raja ceded (No. CXXXII) lauds in the Mahableshwar 
hills for the establishment of a sanitarium, together with an uninterrupted 
line of communication to the British territories, in exchange for the village of 
Khandla, which had been resumed by the British Government from Sindhia, 
and which, being situated within the limits of the Satara State, would have 
formed a portion of the territory made over to the Raja but for its having 
been held by Sindhia at the time when the Satara State was created. 

In 18S9 Pratap Singh was deposed. He had committed many serious 
violations of his treaty engagements, more particularly of the 5th article of 
the treaty of 1819, in having during a series of years held improper com* 
munications with the Goa authorities ; in having held a clandestine intercourse 
with Appa Sahib, the ex-Raja of Nagpur; and in having tampered with 
the Native officers of the 23rd regiment of Bombay Native Infantry. The 
British Government, however, offered to forgive all his past offences on his 
subscribing to certain conditions'^ to be appended to the treaty of 1819. 

* Conditions otvxbed to thb Raja ot Sataba. 

Information having been received by the British Qovemment that Tour Highness, minled by 
evil advisers had, in breach of the Treaty which placed yon on the thrcae, entered into com« 
munications hostile to the British Qovernment. an enqairy into these accosations was considered 
indispensable. This enqairy has satisfied the British Qovemment that Toar Highness has exposed 
yourself to the sacrifice of its alliance and protection. Nevertheless, moved by considerations of 
clemency towards Toar Highness and yoar family, the British Qovemment hat resolfed entirely 
to overlook what has passed on the following conditious, w», — 

First, — That Toar Highness now binds yourself strictly and in good faith to act up literally 
to all the Articles of the Treaty of the 25th September 1819, and especially to the 2ud Article 
of that Treaty, which is as foliows :— 

** The Baja for himself and his heirs and successors engages to hold the territory in subor- 
dinate co-operation with the British Qovenimeut, and to be gaided in all matters by the advice of 
the British Agent at Em Highness's Court." 

Second, — That Tour Highness binds himself to pay your brother Appa Sahib Maharaj what- 
ever allowances he has heretofore received, and to put him in possession of all his private property » 
and should any dispute arise on this subject, the same is to be referred to the Resident for itdjust* 
ment. Appa ^ahib Maharaj is also to be permitted to reside at any place he bimsdf may chooft 
under the protection of the British Qovemment. 



818 Lapsed States— 'So^am. Fart II 



Thifl he refased to do^ and was therefore removed to Benares ; where he was 
allowed a pension of Rupees 10,000 a month. He died at Benares in IWZ, 
leaving no male issae^ but havin^p^ it is said^ adopted his first coasin Bala 
Sahib Senapati a few years before his death. 

On the deposition of Pratap Singh^ his brother Shahaji or Appa Sahib 
was placed in power^ and a new Treaty (No. CXXXIII) was concladed with 
him on the 4th September 1839. Soon after his accession Shahuji prohi- 
bited the practice of sati and abolished all transit duties in his State. He was 
an intelligent and popular ruler. He died on the 5th April 1848. During^ 
his illness he adopted a collateral relative, Yenkaji Raje, .descended from 
Shivaji, the founder of the Mahratta empire. But Government refused to 
recognise the adoption^ and decided that the Satara territory had^ by failure 
of heirs, lapsed to the power that bestowed it. The Ranis remonstrated 
against the resumption of the State, and refused the provision offered 
to them. Eventually, however, they acquiesced in the arrangements made^ 
receiving for themselves and their adopted son their lands and the private 
property left by the Raja, together with a liberal allowance from the Brit« 
ish Government for life. Yenkaji Raje died in 1864j and in the follow 
ing year the eldest and only surviving Rani was granted permission to 
adopt a son, Rajaram, on the understanding that he would only succeed to 
her private property, personal and real. The Rani died in 1874, when half her 
pension, amounting to a sum of Rupees 2,500 per mensem, was continued to 
Bajaram for life, and it was in contemplation to provide him with a suitable 



2*&tr(i.— That Balwant Rao ChitDavis be dismissed from Tour Highnest's Councils and not 
permitted to reside within Toor Highness's territory without the sanction of the British Qovern* 
ment. 

j^furth, — ^The persons whose names are inserted in a separate list having been guarsnteed by 
the British Government in person, property, and allowances of every description as the same 
stood in July 1836. This guarantee is to be binding on Tour Highness and all complaints against 
them are to be referred to the Resident. Should it appear necessary hereafter to the British 
Government to add the names of any other persons to this list, the same guarantee is to be 
extended to them, and it is to be acted upon in good faith by Tour Highness in any manner that 
may be pointed out by the British Government ; all complaints against these persons are also to 
be referred to the British Resident for his adjustment. 

The above are the terms to be agreed to by Tour Highness, and these conditions are to be 
considered as supplemental to the Treaty of the 25th September 1819, and to be signed and sealed 
as such by Tour Highness ; and while it is announced to Tour Highness that there can be no 
modification in these terms as Tour Highness's sincere well-wisher, the British Government, offers 
them in the confidence that Tour Highness's penetration will recognise their moderation, and the 
eipediency of a prompt acquiescence. It is confidently expected also that the clemency of the 
British Government in preserving your State [Raj] will be duly appreciated by Tour Highness, 
as it cannot fail to be by the general voice of this coantry, and induce Tour Highness for the 
future scrupulously to maintain the relations of friendship and mutual confidence by acting up to 
the provisions and principles of the Treaty. 



Fart II Lapsed BtateB^Nipanikar. 849 

residence. He was, however^ so extravagant in his ideas as to the style o£ 
residence appropriate to his dignity that the matter could not be settled. 
He is heavily involved and no practicable scheme has been devised for a settle* 
ment of his debts. He is a first-class Sardar of the British Government* 
Gratoities to the amount of Rupees 3,615 and pensions amounting to 
Rupees 12^822 per annum have been granted to the dependants of the Rani. 

6. THE NIPANIKAR. 

This Chief was one of the Southern Mahratta Jagirdars (see page 186). 
Sidoji Rao^ with whom the British Government made an Engagement (No. 
CXXXIV) similar to that concluded with the other jagirdars^ died without 
heirs, and his estate lapsed to Government. 



860 Lapsed States— ^rotkrA— No. OXVII. Part II 



No. OXVII. 

Akticles for a Treaty of Peace and Firm Friendship between 
the Honourable William Hornby, Esq., President and 
Governor, etc., Council of Bombay, in behalf of the 
Honourable United English East India Company, and 
the Nawab Imtyazood Dowlah Maazud Khan Bahadoor 
Dilerjung, of BAROA.CH, etc. — 1771. 

Articlb 1. 

Peace and fiiendship to subsist unintermpted in future between the 
Hononrable Company and the Nawab of Baroaoh^ his heirs and suceessors. 

Abtiolb 2. 

All British subjects, or persons trading under the protection of the 
Honourable CompaDy's sealed passes and colour?^ shall pay no customs at 
Baroach, eto.^ places in the Nawab's country^ except such as the Honourable 
the President and Council shall impose, which shall be levied by such persons 
as they shall appoint on nccount of the Honourahle Company; and the 
Nawab engages, for himself and successors, that no fees, duties, or exactions 
of any sort shall be levied on the said trade by himself or them on any pre- 
tence whatever. 

Article S. 

The Honourable the President and Council shall have free liberty to 
settle a factory wherever they think proper; and a suitable portion of jground 
for building the said factory on, or a convenient house^ shall be allotted for 
that purpose. 

Article 4. 

The Dutch have already a factory at Baroach ; but in future no other 
European nation shall be permitted to settle a factory at Baroach without the 
consent of the Honourable the President and Council. 

Article 6. 

The Nawab engages never to assist the enemies of the English nation, 
but obliges himself to assist the Honourable Company in the wars they may 
be engaged in with one thousand private sepoys and three hundred cavalry^ 
with their offcers, or such larger number as they may want and he can spare, 
at the following rates, viz.:-^ 

Each horseman ..•••• Rupees 15 per month 
Each sepoj ....... >i 7i „ 

or at such rates as it'shall appear they stand him in. 



Part II Lapsed Statos-^rooeA-No. OXVII. 861 



Articlk 6. 

The NaWab will not engage in any war with any of his neighboors 
without the consent of the President and Council ; but in all wars whioh he 
shall engage in with their consent, or if he shall be suddendly attacked in 
his territories, they shall give him effectual support and assistance, he paying 
the troops on the following terms :— 

To each European . . . . • Rupees 16 per month. 
To each sepoy ...... >» 7^ ,» 

N.B, — The commissioned officers of the Company and the superior officers 
of the Nawab to be paid at the discretion of the party assisted^ but with the 
concurrence and approbation of the party assisting. 

Abticle 7. 

The Nawab agrees to pay unto the Honourable Company, in considera- 
tion and acquittal of all demands to this day, the sum of four lakhs of 
Rupees, which the Honourable the President and Council agree to accept in 
full for their claim on him for the phoorza and exactions of customs, on British 
merchants, on condition he shall inviolably adhere to the terms herein con- 
tained ; and on failure hereof, it is hereby declared that the above sum of four 
lakhs shall be deemed and taken to be for repaying the expense incurred by 
the expedition only; and the Honourable the President and Council in 
such case hereby declare themselves at free liberty to pursue the most effeo- 
tual means for the recovery of any demands which they or their allies have 
or may hereafter have npon him. The said four lakhs of Rupees are to be 
paid within two years and a half from the date hereof, at the following stated 
periods, tTf^.;— 

Two lakhs within six months from the date hereof ; 

One lakh more within twelve months from the first payment ; and the 

One lakh remaining in the following year; for whioh he will enter 
into a bond, binding himself and his heirsj and mortgaging his whole terri- 
toriesr 

Articlb 8. 

In case any expedition shall be hereafter undertaken^ and success attend 
it, the Honourable the President and Council will take care that the Nawab 
of Baroach shall have a recomj^nse adequate to the assistance he may 
afford. 

Articlb 9. 

In consideration of the friendship established between the Honourable 
Company and the Nawab, he shall have firm friendship with all their friends 
and allies, particularly the Nawabs of Surat and Cambay, with* whom he 
shall enter into a Treaty, and shall consider all their enemies as his, and they 
shall consider all his enemies as theirs. For the due performance of this 
Article, we^ on the parts of the Nawabs of Surat and Cambay, become 
security. 

Bombay Castle, 30lh November 1771. 



862 Lapsed States— ^roocA— No. €XVII. Part XI 



Sepabatb Article entered into with the Nawab of Baroach. 

Yon, the Nawab Saheb Imtyazood^ Dowlah Maazud Klian Bahadoor 
DilerjuDg, may live at the port of Baroach. freely believing us your friends 
for ever. We have given up the demands of phoorza^ its produce for forty 
years, overcharge in the customs on goods belonging to the merchants under 
the Honourable Company, and charge of the expedition sent against yoo. 
Our hearts are quite cleared, and we hav6 made a friendship agreeable to 
your wishes. No demands nor answer now remain to make with you. We 
have given you this acquittance, in full for all demands, as above mentioned. 

We shall get paid yours and your subjects' just debts, from any persons 
or place under your government, on being proved. We shall admit no inform- 
ation against you; we look upon Baroach as ours and Bombay as yours. 
This protectiou paper is granted you from the part of the Honourable Com- 
pany, with their word as well as our word and hopour, that we shall not fail 
in our f liendship and assistance of force and ammunition upon oQcasion, for 
which purpose this everlasting protection paper is given you. All the coun- 
sellors are bound that no difference will be either with you or your children, 
and the friendship shall be daily increased more and more. You may, if you 
ohoose, come to Bombay with your family. For your coming and going, as 
well as for the performance of all the conditions herein above mentioned, this 
agreement will serve you as a voucher, which we ngiee to perform with the 
Honourable Company's word and honour. Should any merchants of Baroach, 
or the persons under your protection, choose to trade for Bombay, we agree to 
their doing it freely, and paying the usual customs of this place, without 
hindrance on the part of the Honourable Company. 



Translation of the Nawab's Bond to the Honourable 

Company. 

Know all men that I, Imtyazood Dowlah Maazud Khan Bahadoor 
Dilerjung, Nawab of Haroach, have this day agreed and acknowledged my- 
self indebted unto the Honourable United English East India Company the 
sum of four lakhs of Rupees, current money of Bombay, for the payment 
of which to be well and truly made unto the Honourable William Hornby, 
Esq., President and Governor, etc.. Council of Bombay, at the following stated 
periods, I hereby bind himself, my heirs, and successors, and mortgage my 
whole territories, to be at the disposal of the said Company, in case of 
failure : — 

Two lakhs within six months from the date hereof; 

One ditto more within eighteen months from the date hereof ; 

One ditto more within two years and six months from the date hereof. 

In witness whereof, etc., etc., in presence of my brother, my uncle, nay 
codjee, my moonshee, my vakeel, who have also signed to this bond as wit- 
nesses of its being my act and deed. 



Part II Lapsed States— Jfiiu^W-Nos. OX VI II & CZIX- S63 



No. CXVIII. 

In. the name of God! To Nathan Crow, Esq., Chief of Surat, in behalf of 
the Honourable Company Bahadoor, write Mehta Netiannndjee Sookhanund- 
jee, Yedianundjee Sookhanandjee and Shevanundjee Atmaramjee, in behalf of 
Kajah Doorjunsingjee of Mandavee, and beg leave to represent that a Fakeer 
named XJbdul Baymann, who resides at Bodhan village, has been breeding 
rebellion by exciting the fanaticism of the Mahomedan religion, and assem- 
bling the Massulraans, Bohrahs, etc., of all the surrounding pergunnahs and 
attempting to force the Brahmins to become Mabomedans; he has also erected 
the flag of Islam and taken possession of Mandavee, and burned down our 
houses with those of the ryots, and plundered to the amount of lakhs of 
Rupees from th« treasury of the Raja, and also to the value of lakhs of 
Rupees in money and jewels of the ryots. The Mahomedans have in fact 
usurped our country without justice, and those of their religion who were in 
our army have joined the fanatics, and the Raja is kept under restriction. We 
therefore enter into an agreement of amity with you, and request that you 
will be pleased to send a detachment from the army of the Honourable Com- 
pany to retake Mandavee and again establish our government there, and what- 
ever charges may be incurred by sending th« detachment shall be defrayed bv 
us^ and repaid by us to you on our retaking possession thereof; and if we fail 
to give a satis&etory answer for the abovementioned disbursements, the 
revenue of our territory shall be answerable for the demand. Besides defray- 
ing the aforesaid expenses we assign to you, on account of your trouble in this 
affair, from the produce of the Mandavee pergunnab and those of Pardy, etc., 
viz., 5 villages, Oudeypore, Eolluk, Balda, Pardy, and Sookus, and also of the 
produce of the jaghire villages, and from whatever territorial revenue we may 
possess we make over a share to the Honourable Company of six annas per 
Rupee, the remaining ten annas belonging to the Rajah, and this division to 
remain in force for ever and ever. The Company Bahadoor, we trust, will take 
under their protection our Wuzarut, and maintain the Rajah in his govern- 
ment in future. For the sake of further security, we beg a party, consisting 
of twenty-five sepoys, may be stationed at Mandavee, the expense of which 
shall moreover be defrayed by us. We have delivered to you this writing 
with our signatures affixed thereupon. 

Dated Sumhut 1866, Pous 8ud 13ti, Thursday, corresponding with 18tk 
January 1810. 

(Sd.) Rajah Dcorjun Singh. 



No. OXIX. 

To the Sircar of the Honourable Company Bahadoor, Nathan Crow, 
K?q., Chief of Surat ; "Wuzeer Netiannndjee Sookhanundjee, and Vedia- 

2 R 



954 Lapsed States— JfaiiiW— No. OXIX. Part II 

nnndjee Sookhanundjee, and Mehta ShevanDndjee, Atmaramjee, on the part 
of Rajah Doorjansingjee of Mandavee, beg leave to represent that we have 
entered with you in an agreement of six annas per Rupee payable to you 
from the territorial revenue of Mandavee Fergunna and the fort of Pardy, 
etc., five villages, and which was concluded on the 17th January 1810, corre- 
sponding with Sumbut 1866, Pousood 1 3th. That your share of six annas^ 
including what His Highness the Peishwa had, has been ceded to the Honour- 
able Company in their books ; for these purposes we now fix sixty thousand 
Rupees (60,000), which from the current Murgsal, in the manner in which Your 
Honour will be pleased to settle the payments whereof by kistbundy or instal- 
ments and in conformity thereof} we shall pay that amount annually in the 
Broach or Pergunnah currency ; and this writing is true. 

Dated Sumbut 1866 y Phagnnsood 6iA, Sundaj^, corresponding wit A 11 th 
March 1810. 

Witness. (Sd.) Maha Rana Doorjunsingjee 

(Sd.) Ravul BAVAJfiE. confirmed the above writing. 

KoosuLSiNO. „ Netianundjei Sookhanundjkb 

confirmed ; handwriting of Vedianuud. 

„ Vbdianundjee Sookhanundjeb 

confirmed the above writing. 

„ Shevanukd Atmabam 

confirmed the above writing. 

In the above writing, in which sixty thousand rupees are inserted, the 
kistbundy or instalments whereof we have mentioned below, and agreeably 
to which we shall pay annually into the Sircar of the Honourable Company 
Bahadur at the rate of Rupees 5,000 per month. 

(Sd.) Nbhanund Bht Sookhanukd 
confirmed this writing. 
The handwriting of Netianund 



}) 



a 



Vedianund Sookhanundjbb 
confirmed this writing. 

MuETrA Shbvanund Atmaram 
confirmed this writing. 



Part II Lapsed States -JfaiMlW— No. OXX. 865 



No. OXX. 

In the name op Gunnissa God— 1818. 

Agbsement passed to the Honourable Company Bahadoob by 
Maha Rana Amebbsingjeb, the Rajah of Mandavee, as 
follows : — 

Article 1. 

That several persons composing my coancils and ministers had planned a 
desperate act against the government of the Honourable Company, upon which 
I have dismissed them and sent them all from my confidence and service. 
That I shall on no account keep them in future^ either publicly or privately^ 
into any confidence and management of my affairs. I further engage that I 
shall never retain in my service or give my confidence to any person or persons 
who may be found to be enemies and bad wishers to the Sircar of the Honour- 
able Company Bahadoor. 

Article 2. 

No change in the administration that may be formed for the affairs of 
Mandavee shall be made or effected^ and no minister^ etc., shall be displaced 
or replaced without the consent and approbation of the Honourable Company^s 
Sircar. Provided in all these cases (if there shall be necessity for any change) 
an acquiescence or approbation of the Honourable Company's Sircar shall in 
the first instance be obtained, to carry such measures into immediate execution. 
Provided also that I shall not iu any wise act without the full consent and 
acquiescence of the Honourable Company's Sircar. 

I have passed this engagement at Mandavee and delivered it with my 
seal and signature aflSzed, and I declare it to be agreeable and confirmed 
by me. 

Dated Sumbnt 1874, Fuyiauk pud 1, Thurtday^ *eor responding wiih the 
21st May d.D. 1818. 

(8d.) Maha Rana Humebrsinojbb. 

Witnesses : 
(Sd ) Muuuda Jaisinobava. 

Rawul Koosulsingjeb. 

SOORUTBEA ChUNDBBSINGJKE. 
SOOUUTEEA GOOMAUNSINGJKE. 



9» 



S> 



356 Lapsed States— 5tcrae— No. CXXI. Part II 



No. CXXI. 

The Articles agreed upon and sealed by the Governor of 
Amadanar and the Governor of Surat, and four principal 
Merchants, and to be confirmed by the seal and firm of the 
Grj:at Moghul within forty days after the former sealing, 
or else to be void, for the settling of trade and factories in 
the cities of Subat, Cambay, Amadanar, Goga, or in any 
other part or parts of this country within the Great 
Moghul's dominions. Witnessed under our hands and seals 
the one and twentieth of October 1612. 

Abticlb ]. 

In primis, that 'all which concerneth Sir Henrie Middleton be remitted, 
acquitted, and cleared to us; that they shall never make seizure, stoppage, nor 
stay of our goods, wares, and merchandizes to satisfy for the same. 

Article 2. 

That they shall procure from their King, the Oreat Moghul, at their 
proper cost, his grant and confirmation of all the Articles of Agreement under 
the great seal of his hand, and shall deliver the same nnto us for our security 
and certainty and perpetual amity, commerce, and dealing with them, within 
forty days aiter the sealing hereof. 

Article S. 

That it shall be lawful for the King of England to keep and continne his 
ambassador at the Court of the Great Moghul during the time of the said 
peace and commerce there to compound and end all such great and weighty 
questions as may any way tend to the breach of the said peace. 

Article 4. 

That at all times upon the arrival of our ships in the Rhode of Swally 
there shall be proclamation in the city of Surat three several days together, 
that it shall be free for the country people of all sorts to come down to the 
water side, there to have free trade, dealing, and commerce with us. 

Article 5. 

That all English commodities shall pay custom, according to the value 
or price that it beareth at the time that it is put into the custom house, after 
the rate of three and a half the hundred. 



Part II Lapsed States-^^tira^— No. OXXI. 357 



Article 6. 

That all petty aod pedlerly ware be free of custom^ provided that it exceed 
not in value ten rials of eight. 

Article 7. 

That we shall have ten manu for our manuda carried from the water's 
side to Surat^ and after the same rate back a^ain : and for carts we are to 
repair to the mookudduvn of Swally to send for Surat, and at Surat to repair 
to the broker for carts down again. 

Article 8. 

That if any of our men die in those parts^ that then neitlier the Kin^, 
nor Governor, nor under-oflScer shall make title or challenge to anything that 
to the dead belonged, nor demand fees, nor any kind of taxes, nor customs. 

Article 9. 

That if all our men die here in these parts, between the timrs of the 
coming of our ships, that then, by some officer thereto appointed, just and 
true inventory, notice, and knowledge be tuk^n of all such monies, goods, 
jewels, provisions, apparel, and what else to our nation belongeth, and the 
same shall safely preserve and keep, and deliver to the General, Captain or 
merchants of the first ships that shall after here arrive; and to receive a dis- 
charge from the General, Captain, or merchants, to whom such goods and 
monies shall de delivered. 

Article 10. 

That they secure our men and goods upon the land, redeeming all such, 
both goods and men, as shall happen to be taken upon the land by the Portn- 
gals ; and shall deliver both men and goods again to us free of all charges, or 
the value of our goods and men instantly. 

Article 11. 

That as in all kingdoms there are some rebels and disobedient subjects, 
so in our nation there may be some pirates and sea-robbers, which may happen 
to come into these parts, and here may rob and steal ; if any such shall 
happen, then will not we, by our trade and factory here, be liable or answer- 
able for such goods so taken, but will aid th^m with our best means that are 
so grieved by justice to our king, for redress and restitution unto them. 

Article 12. 

That all such provisions of victuals as shall be spent during the time 
that our ships shall remain here in the Rhode of Surat and Swally, half free 
of custom, provided it do not amount unto above a thousand dollars in money. 



868 Laps3d States- £«ra<-No. CXXII. Part II 



Article 13. 



That in all questions of wrongs and injury that shall be offered unto us 
and to our nations, that we do receive from the judges, and those that be iu 
authority^ present and speedy justice according to the quality of our com- 
plaints and wrongs be done us, and that by delays we be not put off and 
wearied either by time or charges. 



No. CXXII. 



The King's letters sent to Selim Shagh, the Geeat Moghul, in 

the year 1614, hy SiE Thomas Roe. 

James, by the Grace of Almighty God, the Creator of Heaven and Earth, 
King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Christian Faith^ 
etc. 



To the high and mighty Monarch the Great Moghul, King of the Oriental 
Indies, of Chandahar, of Chismer and Corazon, etc., greeting. 

"We, having notice of your great favour toward us and our subjects, by 
your great firman to all your Captains of rivers and officers of your customs, 
for the entertainment of our loving subjects the English nation with all kind 
respect, at what time soever they shall arrive at any of the ports within 
your dominions, and that they may have quiet trade and commerce without 
any kind of hindrance or molestation, etc., as by the Articles concluded by 
Sue Suff, Governor of the Guzerats, in your name, with our loving subject, 
Captain Thomas Best, appeareth, have thought it meet to send unto you our 
ambassador, which may more fully and at large handle and treat of such 
matters as are fit to be considered of, concerning that good and friendly 
correspondence which is so lately begun between us, and which will without 
doubt redound to the honour and utility of both nations. In which consider- 
ation, and for the furthering of such laudable commerce, we have made choice 
of Sir Thomas Hoe, Knight, one of the principal gentlemen of out Court, to 
whom we have given commission, under our great Seal of England, together 
with directions and instructions, further to treat of such matters as may be 
for the continuance and increase of the utility and profit of each other's 
subjects, to whom we pray you to give favour and credit in whatsoever he 
shall move or propound toward the establishing and enlarging of the same. 
And for confirmation of our good inclination, and well wishing toward you, 
we pray you to accept in good part the present which our said ambassador 
will deliver unto you. And so do commit you to the merciful protection of 
Almighty God. 



Part II Lapsed States— /^tira^- No. OXXIII. 869 



A COPY of the Gkand Moghul's letter to the King. 

Unto a King ri«^htly descended from his ancestors, bred in military affairs, 

and clothed with honour and justice. 

A Commander worthy of all command, strong ai\d constant in religion, 
which the great Prophet Christ did teach, King James, whose love hath bred 
such impression in my thoughts as phall never be forgotten, but as the smell 
of amber, or as a garden of fragrant flowers whose beauty and odour is still 
increasing, so, be assured, my love shall grow and increase with yours. 

Your letter which you sent me in the behalf of your merchants I have 
received, whereby I rest satisfied in your tender love towards me and desire 
you not to take it ill for not having writ unto you heretofore; for this my 
present letter I send to renew our loves, and herewith do certify you that I 
have sent forth my firmans through all my countries to this effect, that if any 
Englii^h ships or merchants shall arrive in any of my ports, my people shall 
permit and suffer them to do what ihey will freely in their merchandizing 
causes, aiding and assisting them in all occasions of injuries that shall be 
offered them, and that the least cause of discourtesy be not done unto them ; 
as also that they be as free and freer than my own people. And as now and 
formerly 1 have received from you divers tokens of your love, so I desire your 
mindfulness of me by some novelties from your country as an argument of 
friendship between us, for such is the custom of Princes here. 

As for your merchants, I have given express order through all my country 
to suffer them to sell, buy, transport, and carry away at their pleasure, without 
the let or hindrance of any person whatsoever, all such goods and merchan- 
dize, or other things as they shall desire to buy, and let this my letter as 
fully satisfy you in the desired peace and love as if my own son had been the 
messenger to ratify the same. And if any in my country not fearing God, 
nor obeying their king, or any other void of religion should endeavour, or be 
an instrument to break this league of f riend^^hip, I would send my son Sultan 
Coronne, a soldier approved in the wars, to cut him off, that no obstacle may 
hinder the continuance and increasing of our affct'tions. 



No. CXXIII. 



Firman granted by Shah Aurungzbb to the Honourable East 
India Company, dated the 26th June 1667. 

Be it known to the Governor, Prefects, and Officers of Affairs of the 
Port of Surat, present and to come confiding in our Royal favour, that at 
this present time, joined to bappiuess, certain notice is come to our ears, 
that whereas formerly the rate for customs of goods belonging to the mer- 



860 Lapsed Btatea- Surat^'No. CXXIII. Fart II 



cbants of the Dutcb cation was on every hundred Rupees three and a halE 
Rupees^ and afterwards^ having an eye to the pro6tab]e condition of the said 
people, two Rupees was only ordered; and whereas the merchants of the 
English nation have made their request that the rates for the customs of their 
goods may be confirmed according to the Dutch constitution, and that a 
firman may pass from our Excellent and Noble Court that the goods and 
merchandizes which the said merchants, having bought in Bengal, and in the 
Royal Seat of our Kingdom, Akburabad, and other countries and great cities^ 
do transport by the way of Burhanpoor and Ahmedabad, to sell them ia the 
Bundur of Surat, may not be stopped by any person in their passage on pretence 
of taking Rahad^ries or other duties, or on any prohibition whatsoever; and 
in case any of the goods belonging to the aforesaid persons be robbed in the 
way, that the officers and the guards of the said place do, in the recovery of the 
said goods^ make all diligent search ; and whereas a petition was directed to our 
exalted throne, upon the sight of a letter which Ghyas-ood-deen Khan, Oover« 
nor of Surat, hath written unto the trusty protector of pur riches, the repose and 
glory of our kingdom, the pillar of our councillors, emblems of honour, the 
flower of our Princes, high in dignity, the provident disposer of our kingdoms 
and estates, the open way to riches and plenty worthy of all grace, a reward er 
of all degrees of men^ a lord of pity, the mark of felicity. Chancellor of our 
kingdoms, and sole manager of our affairs, Jafer Khan, to this effect, that 
in ease any favour be shown to the English nation (who are well wishers 
to the riches of our Court, by their services which they have performed to 
our benefit, have so approved themselves formerly and hitherto in an obliging^ 
manner), it will be well deserved by them ; and whereas the instant desire of, 
our mind, known in truth, and the perfection of our heart, established in justice 
is expended on the quiet state and universal benefit of all people : at the agree 
able petition of the merchants of the English nation, having forgiven them one 
Rupee of the sum of three Rupees (the accustomary duties of their goods), I 
have now ordered them to pay but two Rupees ; therefore, from this time for 
ward on every hundred Rupees value of goods belonging to the English nation 
two Rupees must be taken in the aforesaid Bundur, and the GLovernors, Captains 
of Guards, Lieutenants of countries, Guards of Passes and the highways of the 
provinces and great cities aforesaid, shall not give any molestation or opposi- 
tion to the aforesaid merchants on pretence of Rahadaries or other demands 
whatsoever, which are prohibited in our Court and High Palace; and in case 
in any place the least part of their goods or merchandize be stolen, that in the 
recovery of them all strict search and enquiry be made, and the thieves, together 
with the goods stolen, being apprehended, the goods may be delivered to the 
owners and the thieves to punishment. In this affair let them observe all 
extraordinary diligence towards our Court, and be very circumspect and 
cautious to abstain from the breach hereof. 

Written the 11th day of Mohurrum in the tenth year of our high reign^ 
corresponding with the 25th June A» D. 1667, 



•«<^a 



Part II 



Lapsed Btate8«-i9flfra#— No. pXXIV. 



861 



No. CXXIV. 

Treaty between the Honourable East India Company and 
Seedee Masood Khan and Sufdar Ehan of Surat. 

Original Articles of Peace executed by Seedee Masood Ehan 
and Sufdar Ehan, being written with the latter's hand in 
Persian, and sealed with the former's seal, dated the 17th 
March 1752. 



Aeticle 1, 

The peace made by Mr. Lambe and 
Council to be void and of no effect, 
and the papers to be torn, and a new 
receipt given for the customs. 

Article 8. 

Two lakhs of Rupees to be paid the 
Honourable Company for the expenses 
tliey })ave been at^ and what lost in the 
Latty; the whole sum to be paid in 
ready money. 

Article 3. 

For the Company's sake creditable 
posts must be given to Meah Atchuud's 
sous. 

Article 4. 

The Company's garden, cows, coaches, 
or any thing else taken from us to be 
returned. 

Article 5. 

The Company's business to go on 
agreeably to their firman privilegres, and 
ail goods to pass by the Moolah's gate. 

Article 6. 

Mr. Lambe and the rest of the 
Company's people that are in town 
are not to be hindered from coming to 
us. 



Answer. 

Agreed that it be void, and a new 
receipt shall be given as soon as the 
year is expired. 



Answer. 

Whatever the people think proper 
mutit be done to satisfy them. 



Answer. 

Agreed for the Company's sake to 
give them the post of Lord Mayor. 

Answer. 

Agreed that the cowsj coaches, 
horses, etc., be returned, and a re- 
ceipt taken. 

Answer. 

According to custom every thing 
will go on, and nothing unjust will 
be done, and perhaps better than 
before. 

Answer. 

From the government no hind* 
ranee or harm will happen to them. 

3a 



S62 



Lapjsed BtBteBSurai—TSro. CXXIV. 



Part II 



Answer. 

Tlie hatteries sball he taken away 
and nothing remain that may caoae 
any difference between us. 



Abticlb 7. 

The guards that are set about the 
Cou)pany's house to be taken away, 
and after this the like not to happen 
agiduy and all the batteries within and 
without that have been made upon this 
occasion to be taken down, which will 
be for the good of the peeple, and pre- 
vent further disputes. 

Abticlb 8. 

All servants and dependants upon 
the Company that are now in fear are 
not to be molested, and after this, upon 
no account whatever, no harm is to be 
done to them. 

Dated the 17tl March 1752. 

MEMOEANDrM. — Tl^is Treaty was executed on the 17th March 1752, 
having on that date been signed and sealed by Sufdar Khan and Soidy Musood, 
and delivered to the Chief in Council at Surat. The two following writings 
were at the same time passed to the Chief in Council ty Scidy Musood and 
the principal merchants and other inhabitants of Surat. This Treaty was 
ratified by the Government of Bombay. 



Answbk. 

Whatever has been customary we 
may be assured shall be complied 
with. 



Writings alluded to in the foregoing Memorandum, 

Seedee Masoob Khan and Merchants writing for Two Lakhs 
of Rupees to be paid in the space of one year, executed on 
the 17th March 1752. 

Servant of the King, Scidy Mupood Khan, gives this writing for two 
lakhs of Rupees that was agreed upon to be paid the English on making 
peace; the merchants and subjects of Surat have given me one for this sum 
and settled with me. For this reason I, on the part of the people at Surat, 
am bound that in the space of one year I am happy to pay this sum to the 
Company, These few lines are written by way of bond. 

Bated the IBth of Jemmadee-ool- Awul 1165, sealed bp Scidy Mnsood Khan 
and eleven of the principal inhabitfintsi and heads of castes. 



Part II Lapsed States— ^S^a^— No. CXXV. 363 



Merchants* and Subjects' note for Two Lakhs of Rupees to be 
paid the English, as agreed upon, on making peace ; exe- 
cuted on the 17th March 1752. 

Writing sealed hy Moollah Ameen''Ood-de€n and Ibrahim Chellabjf, elc, 
merchanla aud snbjecU, dated 15th of Jemmmiee^ol'Awul 1166, 17th March 
1752. ' 

The meaning of this is, that eve merchants^ etc., of Surat agree to this, 
that because between the Eng^lish and Khan there have been disputes, to put 
an end to whieb^ for the sake of the people, Sufdar Khan and Scidy Musood 
Klian agreed to make peace^ and to pny two lakhs of rupees in lieu of the 
expenses the English have been at : For this reason we, the merchants and 
subjects, willingly and without force .agretd to it, agreeably to the under- 
written list^ and sdEter this sum is paid, this custom is to be taken off and 
cease, not to be a precedent in future. The one per cent, paid upon ready 
money brought into town, which the Khan agreed the merchants should 
not pay, whatever now arises from this must be given to the English. The 
subjects of Surat are to pay one per cent, on all the money that they import 
in Bombay. Whatever arises from the customs on goods coming in or going 
out of Surat are now to pay one per cent, more than before^ and what it may 
amount to is to be given to the English. 

Dated the 17th March 1753. 



No. CXXV. 



CoNTBACTEB and Agreed between the Honoubable Richard 
BouRCHiEB, Esq., in behalf of the Honourable English 
East India Company on one part, and Faris Khan on the 
other, this 12th day of March 1768, viz. : — 

Articlb 1. 

That the Honourable Company^s troops and marine forces shall put Faris 
Khan in possession of the government of the city of Surat by fixing him in 
the Durbar and supporting him in the same. 

Article 2. 

That the Honourable Company shall possess the castle of Surat, with all 
its immunities and emoluments, and the Tauka, etc., whatever the Scidy is 
now possessed of in Surat and its dependencies. 



864 Lapsed States— 5ifra^— No. OXXVI. Fart II 



Articlb S. 

That Faris Khan sliall pay the whole expense of the expedition, for 
which he binds the phurza or custom house for security of payment. 

Aeticlb 4. 

That the sum of Rupees two lakhs (2,00,000) shall be made good and 
paid to the commanders and private people, both military and marine, that 
they may not plunder nor commit any irregularities, which sum is to be made 
good to him by a varan laid upon the city, merchants, shroffs, eta, inhabit- 
ants. 

Article 5. 

That the water gate callel Mulna's Kirkee shall at all times be possessed 
by the English without molestation from the government's officers or sepoys, 
and that the two gates, one of the inward wall and one of the outward wall, 
next to the English garden, shall always be free for the English to come into 
and go out of at all times without any molestation> 

Abticlb 6. 

That the Honourable Company shall enjoy all the privileges of the 
HoghnPs royal fiiman as amply as they ever enjoyed them without any molest- 
ation from any of the government's officers, either to their own trade or any 
under their protection. 

Articlb 7. 

This contract and agreement is not intended in any shape to prejudice 
the immunities nor indulgencies granted by the Moghul to any other Euro- 
peans, nor to prejudice the Mahrattas in whatever contracts or agreements 
are in force between them and the government of Surat, but that Faris Khan 
shall be obliged tg pay them their stipulated one-third of the revenues of 
Surat, as has been done for some years past. Counterpart of this engage* 
ment is signed, sealed, and exchanged the day above mentioned between the 
contracting parties, the Honourable Richard Bourchier, Esq., and Fails Khan. 

Ratified and exchanged on tie 12th March 1758, 



No. CXXVI. 

Teeaty between the Honoubablb East India Company and 
Meah Atohund of SuKAT, dated the 4th March 1759. 



Seal of 

Mcah 

Atchund. 



Part II 



Lapsed States— iSttra^- No. CXXVI. 



365 



Articles of Aoreement made with Meah Atchund at Surat 

under date the 4th March 1759. 

Agreeably to your desire, I sent a person to you, by whom you advised 
me verbally of your demands ; and with sincerity of heart I now write the 
particulars I can agree to, which are ns follow :— 

Wrote by the Nawah over each 
Article. 



Article 1. 

That Faris Khan shall be appointed 
to the office of Naib in its greatest 
extent, as in the time of Sufdar Khan, 
and nobody but himself shall interfere 
in the said post. 



Article 1. 

Ut. Agreeably to this Article, I 
fully consent to Faris Khan^s ap- 
pointment. 



Article 2. 

1 hat whatever ALrtieles Faris Khan 
has given ia writing, or promised to 
the Honourable Company, (the parti- 
culars of which cannot be drawn out 
at present, and must be deferred till 
we can meet), shall be fully complied 
with without the least diminution. 



Article 2. 

2nd. Whatever Faris Khan has 
wrote or promised to do for the 
Honourable Company, I will stand 
to without the least alteration. 



Article S. 

That the Mecha gate shall be opened, 
our troops admitted, and we shall join 
our forces to drive our enemies out of 
the town. 



Article 4. 

The Mecha gate shall be opened, 
your troops admitted, and joined by 
mine to drive out the enemy. 



Article 4. 

The above Articles a person in your 
behalf demanded, all which I agree to 
and will comply with; and the govern- 
ment shall be continued to me in full 
authority ; and to the above I have put 
mv own seal, and M eer Cootb-oo-deen 
will sign and seal the same, after 



Article 4. 

As^reed to, and that we shall act 
jointly in turning our enemies out of 
the town. 



Wrote by Cootb-oo-deen. 



366 Lapsed StektesSurat^No. CXXVI. Fart II 



which you must send a counterpart of Whatever the Honourable Com- 
this writing, with the Honourable pany have demanded I ag^ree to. 
Company's seal affixed. 



Cootb-oo« 
deen'B Seal. 



A counterpart of the above articles was sealed with the Honourable Com* 
pany's seal^ and sent to Atchund^ the 4th of March 1759. 



Febwannahs granted in 1769, relating to the Oastlb andTANKA 

at SURAT. 

Be peace and happiness with the renowned Mr. John Spencer^ Captain 
of the Factory in the city of Surat. By the hands of your vakeel, your 
present and arzee (or request) have been received, and the purport and parti- 
culars thereof are understood, and your arzee (or request) to His Majesty has 
been delivered. The pains you have taken^ and the success you have met with 
in keeping open the door of Mecha, and delivering^ our subjects from oppres- 
sion, we are pleased and satisfied with. As to the firman for the government 
of the castle, and Sunnud for the fleet, which are requested in the name of 
the English Company, I have given your vakeel an answer, who will particu- 
larly advise you thereof. Let the peshcush on this account be quickly 
remitted, that it may be presented to His Majesty^ and your request thereby 
granted. In the meantime it behoves you to carry on affairs with alacrity, 
and be assured that herein nothing on my part shall be wanting to counte- 
nance you. 



A B/BPRESENTATioK made to the Moghul hy Mr. John Spencer, 
in behalf of the Honourable English East India Com- 
pany. 

That by virtue of royal firmans of Your Majesty's predecessors, the 
English hitherto enjoyed favour at Surat^ and carried on their business in a 
reputable manner^ till in these days that the Scidy, usurping an undue 
authority in the town, used it to the rum of the city in general, the lives and 
properties of Your Majesty's subjects being made light of by them, and they 
even proceeded so far as to take away the lives of our people, in direct breach 
of Your Majesty's firman ; and, in short, instead of being the protectors of 
the place, became the oppressors of it, to such a degree that the just orders 
of Your Majesty were no ways regarded in this city, by their means ; and 
things were come to this pass^ that though, in consideration of the Tanka^ 



Part II Iiapsed States— iS«ra*— Wo. CXXVI. 867 



the Scidy was to protect the bar, yet, so far was lie from doing that, that for 
many months past a large fleet of Saiierajee Pant's, Ballajee Rao's Naib, 
entirely shut up the bar, as did a large land force by land, to the infinite 
detriment of the place and inhabitants in general, without the Scidy's inter- 
fering therein ; and there was the greatest reason to believe that, unless some 
speedy and vigorous measures had soon been pursued, Your Majesty's famous 
city of Surat, the only port of good MuBsulmen to the tomb of your Prophet, 
would have been brought to shame. In such circumstances, the eyes of the 
whole town were cast on us, as the only persons of force sufficient to save the 
city from the calamities that it then felt, and was still further threatened 
with ; and in consequence of their solicitations to me, though our business 
in those parts of the world is only trade and merchandize, and we are not 
desirous of taking or governing cities or countries, yet as all the inhabitants 
of this place, great and small, were earnestly desirous of it, and I saw it was 
for the good of the place, I wrote to the General of Sombay on the subject, 
in such manner, that at an immense expanse he sent hither, on our king's 
ships, a great force of good and experienced men, with a large quantity of 
artillery, and other warlike stores of all sorts, with which I have had the 
happiness to procure safety to the city and ease to the inhabitants, and have 
procured an entire currency to Your Majesty's orders in the place ; and Your 
Majesty's authority, by all ways in our power, will be reserved in the place 
as it used to be, and you will consider the Ent^lisb as desirous of receiving 
your orders, such being the intention of the Governor of Bombay and myself, 
whose whole power will be used to maintain the castle that we have possessed 
ourselves of for Your Majesty, and to preserve the bar and sea open against 
all opposers on your behalf ; for we shall not apply the Tanka you have grant- 
ed for this purpose to others, as has hitherto oeen the case; and since our 
having done this, the enemies that surrounded the place^ both by sea and 
land, to its great prejudice, have been removed. We are always ready for 
the safety of the castle and the city, with its inhabitants, and therefore hope 
for Your Majesty's favour in behalf of the Honourable English Company, 
for whose good services on this occasion I must refer Your Majesty to the 
representation of the inhabitants of the place. 



N.B, — There accompanied this a letter to the Vizier, mtich to the same 
purpose, requesting his countenance. Letters went also in the name of the 
Governor of Bombay on this occasion, to the king and vizier, referring in 
general to the above; and the whole was attended with a representation of 
the town in general on our behalf, under the seals of the Nawab Naib Codjee, 
the bead Sciads and officers, and the heads of the merchants in general. 



Perwannah under the Vizier's Seal, for Sciad Moynadben 

Khan to act as Governor of Surat. 

By the advices received here from Surat it has been made known to His 
Majesty that you, with the consent and at the desire of the inhabitants, are 



368 Lapsed States— 'SWra^— No. OXXVI, Part II 



arrived there^ and that afterwards the Honourable Mr. Spencer, Captain of 
the Factory at Surat, widi the renowned Faris Khan^ came and turned out 
Scidy Ahmed^ who had possessed himself of His Majesty's castle, and greatly 
oppressed our subjects, and that thereby the city is now at ease, and the 
inhabitants satisfied ; therefore it behoves you to act as may be most ooa- 
ducive to the good of the city and His Majesty's afEairs, that every body naay 
follow their calling without fear, and the city flourish. Let this be implicitly 
obeyed. 

On tie 2nd of Shabun, and Ike sixth year of the reign of His present 
Majesty. 



HooEUM (or order) under the ViziBa*s Seal, to Mr. Spencbr, 
to assist and advise v^th Sciad Moykadeen Khan in the 
Government of Surat. 

Be it known unto the Honourable Mr. Spencer^ Captain of the Factory 
in Surat, that in these days advice has been received, that with the consent 
and at the desire of the inhabitants of the Bunder of Surat^ the renowned 
and brave Sciad Moynadeen Khan Bahadoor came into the place, and that 
afterwards you, with the renowaed Faris Khan came, and turning out Scidy 
Ahmed from the king^s castle, which he had possessed himself of, and given 
much trouble to the subjects by oppression and otherwise, gave ease and 
satisfaction to the inhabitants of the place, with which we are well satisfied ; 
and it now behoves you to advise with and in conjunction with the above 
renowned so to carry on matters as may be most conducive to the good of 
the place and the honour of His Majesty, by assisting one another, j^t this 
be done* 

On the 2nd of SAabun, in the sixth year of the reign of His present 
Majesty, 



HooKUM under the Vizier's Seal, to the Subjects and Inhabit- 
ants of Surat, to acknowledge and assist Sciad Moyna- 
deen Khan as Governor of Surat. 

Be it known unto all the principal Seiads, Shaiks, and otherwise and old 
men of understanding, as also to all the merchants and others, our subjects^ 
inhabitants of Surat, this His Majesty is made acquainted, by advices from 
thence, that by your consent and at your desire the brave and renowned Sciad 
Moynadeen Khan is come there, and after him Mr. Spencer, Captain of the 
Factory at Surat, with the renowned Faris Khan came and turned out Scidy 
Ahmed, who possessed himself of His Majesty's castle, and greatly oppressed 
our subjects^ and that thereby the city is now at ease and the inhabitants 



Part II Iiapeed States— ^ffwraf— No. CXXVI. 360 



satisfied : thererore it beboves you in all respects to assist ami advise the naid 
Moynadeen Khani and with one aoeord to concur in every thing for the good 
of the place, which I would have implicitly obeyed. 

On the 2nd of Shabun, and tie tixtk year of the reign of Hit present 
Majesty. 

Htjsbtjlhookum under the Great Sbal of the Nabob Vizier Ul 

Mamulik Nizam-ul-Mtjlck Bahadoor. 

Be peace unto the high and renowned Mr. John Spencer. The courage 
and conduct you have shown in His Majesty^s service for the good of our 
subjects^ the inhabitants of Smat, are made known to His Majesty^ and their 
letter, expressing their satisfaction therewith, has also been shown, with which 
His Majesty is well satisfied and praises you ; therefore upon this account, he 
has been pleased to order this Husbulhookom to be sent you, that you may 
take care of His Majesty's castle, and take the preservation of the trade of 
these seas particularly upon you, so that the inhabitants of Surat may carry 
on their business and live in ease and quiet, and the ships and vessels going to 
and coming from the most remarkable ports, as well as others, be in no fear 
from rovers and pirates. The firman for the government of the castle and 
perwannah for the fleet being given in charge to the English Company, sliall 
be sent you from Court. 

On the 1st of the month of ZUkad^ and the sistth year of the reign of His 
present Majesty, the 84th of June 1759. 



JV^£.— The Husbulhookum to the Oovemor is in the same words as the 
above^ only that to the epithets ''high and renowned '' are added ** brave and 



courageous.'' 



Ferwakkah under the Coochtjck (or small) Seal of the Nawab 
Vizier Ul Mamuuk Nizam-ul-Mulck Bahadoor, to Mr. 
John Spencer. 

The arzee of the high and renowned^ with the present and letter express- 
ing the merchants' satis&otion, have been reoeiveid by the hands of Hadee 
Khan. The conduct and courage you have shown for the good of the inhabit- 
ants of Surat and His Majesty^s service have been in a particular manner 
made known to him^ with whicn he is well pleased and praises you for. It 
now behoves yon, with a satisfied mind, particularly to look to the peace of 
the inhabitants and the preservation of His Majesty's castle, and to take earn 
that the trade of the seas is kept open and safe ; that the Hadjees, or pilgrims^ 
and merchants^ meet with no trouble and impediment, and that the ships, to 
and from the renowned and other ports^ may be safe from any fear of viola* 

Sb 



870 



Lapsed States^8urat^J![o, OZXVl. 



Part II 



tion from rovers and pirates. The firman for the ^0Yernmen£, and perwannah 
for the fleets, beiug given in charge to the English Company, shall be sent 
you from Court. 



No date* 



Pbkwannah under the Cooohuck (or small) Sbal of the NawaS 
Vizier XJl Mamulik Nizam-ul-Mulok Bahadoob, to Mb. 
John Spencer. 

High and renowned, the tohod, or sums usually remitted from Sorat^ 
are now much wanted at court, and His Majesty is pressing for them. As 
yet what money the renowned Moynadeen Khan may have sent is not received, 
therefore Ferwannahs have been wrote to hasten him in that respect ; but it 
likewise behoves you to press him on this head, and procure the remittance of 
the tohod by bills as soon as possible. Look upon this as absolutely necessary. 



Firman under the Great Moghul's Seal, and under-sealed by 
the Vizier, for the Honourable Company's holding the 
Government of the Castle of Surat. 



Torah, or 
Verse*, from 
the KorRn, 

in Arabic. 



The Greafc 

Seal of the 

Kings' Names 

io Persian. 



Let the renewed among the people, the English Company, hope for His 
Majestjr's favour; and be it known unto them that in these happy and victo- 
rious times His Majesty has been pleased, out of his great grace and favour, 
to grant unto them the Killedaree, or Government of the castle of Surat, on 
its being taken from Mauphez Ahmed Khan : it therefore is requisite that 
they should be very grateful for ths His Majesty^s favour, and look partico* 
larly to the welfare of the castle, keeping proper order and discipline among 
the troops, and having provisions, stores, and ammunition always in readiness, 
as has been usual, which is strictly and especially required of them by Hia 
Majesty. 

Qiven on the 11th day of Maharimy and in tie sixth year of Biz Majetity^t 
reign^ or 4th of September 17B9, 

At the back of the firman is the Grand Vizier's Seal, and all his titles 
wrote at length. 



Part II Lapsed States— fi«ra<— No. CXXVI. 871 



DusTUCK (or order) under the Ehan Sumaun's (or Steward's) 
Seal, for the Honotjbable Company's holding the King's 
Meet 

The dustack, id the name of the Doble and renowned English Company, 
is as follows : — By His Majesty's Husbulhookum, the oflSce of daroga of the 
great fleet belonging to the Bunder of Snrat, vacant by the dismission of 
Scidy Yacood Khan^ is now delivered into yonr charge ; therefore it behoves 
you to execute the said office with great care and circumspection, and carry 
on the business of it justly and with moderation. Look on this as absolutely 
required of you. 

Dated the 2nd day of Uaiarim, in tie sixth yeaf of His Majesty^e reign 
the 26th of August 1759. 

At the back of this is the seal of Zechal Doulat Fidaudin Khan Baha^ 
door, who is Khan Sumaun^ or Steward to His Majesty, whose prerogative it 
is to grant this order. 



An Order, under the Vizier's Seal, to Sciad Moynadeen 
Khan, (Governor of Surat, regarding the payment of the 
Tanka, on account of the Fleet, to the Honourable Oom« 

PANY, &c. 

To the brave^ noble, renowned^ and careful Sciad Moynadeen Khan 
Bahadoor^ on whom is His Majesty's favour : The Vakeel of the English 
Company having represented that as the daroga> or post of the great fleet 
belonging to the Bunder of Snrat, under the Sonbah of Ahmedabad^ on the 
dismission of Scidy Yaoood Khan, KiUedar of Dunde Bajapore^ from the said 
post, had been granted his constituents, he hoped that a perwannah, or order 
for the tanka, on account of the troops of the fleet, as has been usual since the 
time of him who is now in Heaven (meaning Aurun^zeb), among the other 
charges of Surat, exclusive of what is sent to court, might be given him in 
your name. From the archives of the kingdom it appears that this office was 
in the hands of Scidy Yaoood Khan, and that in the twenty-third year of the 
reign of Mahmud Shah he procured an order on Tegbeg Khan, then Governor, 
for the annual payment of two lakhs according to custom, besides what was 
sent to court Now in these days, the office of daroga of this fleet, on the 
dismission of Scidy Tacood Khan, has been granted to the said Company, 
as has been usual under the Dustuck or order of the Khan Sumaun (or 
Steward), and dated the 2nd of Maharim, and sixth year of the present reign; 
therefore I now write you that yon may pay unto them, account charges for the 
forces of the fleet, the usual tanka of two lakhs every year, agreeable to the 
hereafter order, among the other charges, exclusive of what is sent to court ; 
and let the accounts and papers relative thereto be transmitted hither. 



872 Lapsed 8tateB-A«ra/-No. CXXVX Part II 



Dated He 25ih of Haharim, and iixth f/ear of tke reign of Hie preeeni 

Majestjii or 18tk of September 1769, 

On the back of ibis perwannah is the Vizier's seal, and the zimra, or 
certificate, from the several officers and registers at court, setting forth as is 
above related in the perwannah, and that the Vizier had given orders for 
registering the arzees and orders given thereon. 



An Htjbbulhookum, under the Seal of the Nawab Yizier-tjl- 
Mamulik Bahaboob to the English Company, accompany* 
ing the Firman. 

May His Majesty's &voar ever remain upon the hrave and noble English 
Company. It has pleased His Majesty to grant unto you the office of Kille- 
dar (Castle Governor) of the Bunder of Surat, vacant by his dismissitm of 
Mauphez Ahmed Khan, as also the office of daroga of the great fleet of the 
said Bunder, vacant by the dismission of Scidy Yacood Khan ; therefore, 
agreeable to his order, you are now directed to take particular care of the 
proper execution of the above offices, by looking well to the welfare of the 
castle and preservation of the merchants, etc., on the high seas, keeping them 
clear of pirates and rovers who may infest them. This is positively required 
of you. 



HuBBULHOOKUM, Under the Yizieb's Seal, to Ma. Biohard 

BOUSCHIES, GOVEBNOB OF BOMBAY. 

It has pleased His Majesty to grant unto the brave and noble English 
Company the office of killedar of the Bunder of Surat, vacant by the dismis- 
sion of Mauphez Ahmed Khan, as also the office of daroga of the great fleet 
of said Bunder, vacant by the dismission of Scidy Yakood Khan. Therefore, 
agreeable to his order, this is wrote you to direct that, according to the direc- 
tions and advice of the said Company, you take all the care in your power 
for the proper execution of said offices^ by looking well to the welfare of the 
castle and preservation of trade and merohauts on the high seas from pirates 
and other rovers. Of this you are required to be very carefuU 



Haibalbooknmi similar to the above from the Tizfer to the address of Mr« Spencer, the 
Chief at Surat, and to Sciad Moynadeen KhaD, Qo?emor of Sunt, reached that place fFom th« 
Court of the Moghol on the 7th November 1769. 



i^i^m^^p"^^p" 



Fart II Lapsed States— 'Sum^-no. OXXVIL 878 



No. OXXVII. 

Tbeaty with the Nawab of Subat, 1800. 

Abticles of AoBVBMENT between the Honotibablb East India 
Company and their successors and the Nawab Nuseeb-ood- 
dben Khan, etc., etc., and his heirs and successors, for the 
better Administbation of the Oovbbnmbnt of the City of 
Subat and its Dependencies, concluded on the 13th May 
1800, or the 19th of Zilhuj 12U of the Hegira. 

Whereas the Honourable the English East India Company have been 
subjected to a heavy expense for the prptection of the city of Sumt, and 
whereas the existing system of internal government in the said city haa 
been found inadequate to the protection of the persons and property of the 
inhabitants ; and whereas the Right Honourable the Earl of Mornington, 
Governor-General of the British possessions in India, and the Nawab 
Nuseerooddeen, etc., are mutually desirous of providing more effectually for 
the external defence of the city of Surat, ^nd for the security, case, and 
happiness of the inhabitants, the following Articles of Agreement are con- 
cluded on behalf of the Honourable English Company and their successors, 
by the Honourable Jonathan Duncan, Governor of Bombay, vested with 
full powers for that purpose by the said Governor-General on the one part, 
and by the Nawab Nuseerooddeen, and bis heirs and suoceasprs on the other 
part :— 

Aeticlb 1. 

The friendship subsisting between the Honourable English Company and 
the Nawab Nuseerooddeeii Khan, etc., is hereby strengthened and confirmed 
aod the friends and the enemies of one shall be considered to be the friends 
and the enemies of the other. 

ASTIOLB 2. 

The Nawab Nuseerooddeen agrees that the man^gemei^t and oollectjon 
of the revenues of the city of Surat, and of the territories, places, anl other 
dependencies thereof, the administration of civil and eriminal justice, and 
generally the whole civil and military government of the said city and its 
dependencies, shall be vested for ever entiiety i^nd ^xclusive^ in the Henonvi- 
able English Company. 

Artiolb. 8. 

It is agreed that the Nawab shall be treated on all occasions with the 
same respect and distinction as his predecessors. 



874 Lapsed BUktOB^Bmrai^JSo. OXXVII. I^art JX 



Article 4. 



The Eoglish Company SLgree to pay to the Nawab Nuseerooddeen and 
his heirs^ out of the revenaes of Sumt and its dependencies, in four eqaal 
quarterly payments^ one lakh of Rupees annuallyi which shall be oonsidered 
to be the first charge payable from the said revenues. The Company also 
engage to pay to the said Nawab and his heirs, in addition to the above 
mentioned lakh of Rupees, a proportion of one-fifth of the annual revenaes 
now arising, or which may hereafter arise, from the said city and its depen- 
dencies, after deducting the said lakh of Rupees, the sum payable to the 
Mahrattas, and the charges of collection. The residue of the revenaes, after 
the foregoing deductions, shall be at the disposal of the said Company. 

Article 5. 

In order that the Nawab may at all times have full satisfaction in respeot 
to the revenaes of Su rat and its dependencies, he, the said Nawab, shall be 
at liberty to inspect all the accounts thereof from time to time, or to station 
a vakeel, or accountant, at his own expense, in all or in any of the offices of 
collection, for the purpose of taking and transmitting to His Excellency copies 
of all or any of the accounts of the said revenue. 

Article 6. 

Courts shall be established for the due administration of civil and cri- 
minal justice, which courts, agreeably to the stipulations in the 2nd Article, 
shall be under the sole authority of the English East India Company. The 
said courts shall be composed of officers to be appointed by the Governor in 
Council of Bombay for the time being, and shall be conducted according to 
such Ordinances and Regulations (framed with a due regard to the existing 
laws and usages of the country) as shall, from time to time, be published by 
the said Governor in Council. 

Article 7. 

In complaints brought before the courts of justice, in which it shall 
appear, either by the application of the Nawab or the representation of 
the defendant at or before the time of giving in his or her answer, or by 
the petition of the complainant, that both parties are relations or servants of 
the Nawab, it is agreed that such parties shall, in the first instance, be referred 
for justice to the Nawab, or to any person he may appoint to dispense it. 
Any complaint a^rainst the relations or immediate servants of the Nawab by 
persons of a different description shall, in the first instance, be made to the 
chief Civil Servant at Surat, who shall refer it to the Nawab, who hereby 
engages to order an immediate investigation to be made, or, in case the 
parties should desire it, to order the dispute to be referred to a proper arbi- 
tratioUj the Nawab engaging to bring it to a direct issue, and to carry the 
sentence or award, if unfavourable to his relation or servant, into immediate 
execution. 



Fart II Lapsed Btateo— '9«ffai— Na OXXVIII. 876 



No. OXXVIII. 

Teanslation of a Lbttbb from the Nawab of Subat, to the 
Eight Honottbablb Sir Evan Nbpban, Babt., Oovbrnob 
of Bombay, dated the 16th Jemmadee-ool-Awul 1233 of the 
Hegira, or 24th March 1818. 

After eompltmenti. — All praise be to Qoil At the present pleasant 
season I have been made fuUy acquainted, by the verbal communication of 
the CbiePs Agent, with your proposition regarding the fixing of my fifth 
share, and as to the minute details and ramifications of the transaction, and 
your wishes on the subject, with reference to the past, present and future, I 
duly comprehend the whole; and considering, as I do, that Your Excel- 
lency's views are intended for my well being and happiness, and that without 
empty ceremonies this fact has been exemplified by actual occurrences, I have 
in this affair given my assent and ooncurrenoe to the settlement fixed upon by 
Your Excellency ; and I have now the pleasure to intimate that in lieu of the 
said fifth share, the sum of Rupees fifty thousand in money has been defini- 
tively agreed upon to be at all times paid out of the Honourable Company's 
treasury to me, my family and representatives, without any examination on 
account of batta defalcations, or the trouble of examining books, whilst all the 
former engagements between me and the Honourable Company are confirmed 
and ratifi^ on their former footing by this measure. 

I hope Your Excellency will continue at idl times to enliven the banquet 
of amity by communicating to me your commands and Wishes. 



Lbttbb from the Eight Honottbablb SntEvAN Nbpban, Babt., 
GoYBBNOB of Bombay, to His Excbllbncy the Nawab of 
SUBAT, dated the 20th April 1818. 

J/ier compliments .'^l have had the pleasure of receiving Your Excel- 
lency's oblisring letter of the 16th of Jemmadeeool-Awul, communicating to 
me Your Excellency's assent to the proposition recently made to Your Ex- 
cellency by the Chief of Surat on behalf of this Gt)vernment. 

Your Excellency may be assured that in suggesting the arrangement, in 
which Your Excellency has expressed your acquiescence, the government con- 
sulted your interests as well as the interests of the Honourable Company, and 
it is very acceptable to me to find Your Excellency is entirely satisfied with 
that modification of the existing engagements between the Honourable Com- 
pany and Your Excellency ; at the same time I beg Your Excellency will be 
assured that these engagements are not to be considered as otherwise altered 
in any respect, but on the contrary are now confirmed and ratified. 

(Sd.) Evan Nbpban. 



^76 LiipMd States-- Aldfo^Ko. OXXUL Part II 



No. cxxrx. 

Treaty with Baghojeb Angbia, of Colaba, June 1822. 

Whereas/ by the conquest of the territories of Bajee Rao^ the late 
Peishwa, and the complete extinction of his power, the rights possessed by 
his government are now transferred to that or the Honourable East India 
Company ; and whereas it is desirable to fix with precision the f atnre relations 
between the said Company and Raghojee Angriai the following Articlee 
have been agreed upon :— 

ASTICLB 1. 

The friendly relations which have long subsisted between tbe Honourable 
East India Company and the Colaba State are hereby confirmed, and the 
British Oovernment agrees to afford its protection to the Chieftain of Colaba 
against the attacks of any other State. 

Article 2. 

Baghojee Angria, in consideration of soch protection, engages, on bis 
part, not to employ in bis service any foreigner of any description whatever, 
whether European or American, nor to allow such foreigner to reside within 
his dominions without the permission of the British Oovernment; and in the 
event of any suoh person arriving within his dominions, to report the 
appearance of such person to the British Government ; neither will he enter 
into any treaty of alliance or commerce with any of the Native States, bat 
place his sole reliance on the protection and snpport of the British Govern* 
ment in the enjoyment of his rights. And for securing the objects of this 
stipulation, it is fui-tber agreed that no communication or correspondence shall 
be holden by the State of Colaba witb any other Potentate or State without 
the previous knowledge and sanction of the Honourable Companjr's govern- 
ment, but the Colaba State will continue the usual cc^respondenoe with the 
Khan of Juojeera, Sucheo Pnnt, and otber umuldars on the border of the 
Colaba districts, respecting disputes whiob arise in tlie mehals and depend- 
encies. 

Abticlb S. 

The territories of the Colaba State being intermixed witb those of the 
British Government, and it being desirable that the possessions of each should 
be concentrated by exchanges to be made on fair and just principles, it is 
hereby agreed that such exchanges as may be necessary, with a view to the 
attainment of that objeot, sball be adjusted by Commissioners to be nominated 
for the purpose of settling the boundaries of the British Government and 
those of the principality of Colaba. And the British Government, relying 
upon the fidelity of Baghojee Angria, and on the sincerity of his acknowledge 
ment of the supremacy of the Honourable Company, hereby guarantees to 
him, and to his heirs and successors, on the cooditions hereafter specified, the 



Part II Lapsed States— £'o/a5a— No. CXXIX. 377 

integrity of bis dominions, the boundaries of whicb will be defined by Com- 
missioners to be appointed in pursuance of the foregoing provision. 

Articlb 4. 

The British Oovemment relinquishes in favour of Raghojee Angria^ his 
heirs and successors^ nuzzur nuzzurauai as received or claimed by the late. 
Peifihwa and his successors, but reserves to itself entire supremacy over the. 
Colaba State, and the right of conferriog investiture on the Chief of Colaba 
on any vacancy of the musnud. And the said Raghojee Angria hereby 
engages, in behalf of himself, his heirs and successors, to act generally in 
subordinate co-operation to the British Government. 

Akticle 5. 

The British courts of justice, laws and regulations, shall not be introduced 
into the principality of Colaba against the will of Raghojee Angria, his heirs 
and successors ; but the British Government hereby requires and provides, and 
the Chieftain aforesaid in behalf of himself, his heiri^ and successors hereby 
engages, for the continuance in possession of all persons actually holding 
enam and surinjam lands up to the present time, under the Sunnuds of the 
Peishwa or the Rajah of Satara. 

Aetiolb 0. 

And whereas the said Raghojee Angria has solicited (vide A) that the 
Honourable Company would guarantee to Venaik Rao Pursram Dewanjee 
and his associates certain villages and lands, of the value of Rupees 15,001, 
as per annexed list ( vide B ), the whole have been assigned to him as a reward 
for his past services, together with a debt due by the State of Colaba 
to the said Venaik Rao Pursram Dewanjee {tfide C, D, E), not exceeding 
Rupees 2,28,287-3-18}, and that the said Dewanjee shall not unjustly be 
molested by the Colaba State. Whereas the Honourable Company's govern- 
ment have undertaken the aforesaid guarantee to the said Venaik Rao Pursram 
Dewanjee, and to his heirs and succesaora, together with certain other persona 
therein named, Raghojee Angria hereby engages, in behalf of himself, his 
heirs and successors^ to make due provision for the payment of such amount 
as may appear on investigation to be justly due to the said Venaik Rao 
Pursram Dewanjee ; and in failure thereof^ he further agrees that the Com- 
pany shall be at liberty to interfere, when occasion renders it necessary, with 
a view to compel the said Raghojee Angria to place the said debt in a train of 
liquidation, by allotting specifio funds for that purpose; but it is to be under- 
stood that on the discharge of the said debts, any funds which mit^ht be 
allotted to the payment thereof will revert to the said Raghojee Angria, his heirs 
and successors, on their former footing. With respect to the abovementioned 
debt, such amount as may be ascertained to be justly due shall be paid; In case 
of any item in the account being objected to by either of the parties, as to its 
being of a greater or less amount, in the event of their not being able to come to 
an amicable private settlement between themselves,, the Honourable Company's 

8 c 



378 Lapsed States— ITolaia^No. CXXIX. Fart ZI 



gOYemment will, on inveBttgatioiij decide on any such disputed point, and 
order the party whose claim may appear just to rec3ive •credit for snob ascer- 
tained amount. And whereas certain rights, immunities, and indulgences as 
to fields, salt, batty-fields, pal, etc., now held by the Dewanjee and his associates 
as mentioned in* the annexed Memorandum (videF), may be affected by 
fhe exchange of territories, the said Company engages to continue them to 
the said Dewanjee and his associates, to be enjoyed on the aame footing under 
the British Government, as before under that of the Colaba State. 

Articlb 7. 

All balances shall be adjusted within a reasonable time, and engagements 
shall be taken to that effect from all persons in arrear. In default of payment 
the parties shall be given up, 

Abtiolb 8. 

All guns, stores, and other moveable property in the forts lind places to 
be mutually exchanged^ are to be removed by the parties relinquishing the 
same. 

Article 9. 

Kaghojee Angria hereby agrees, on behalf of himself, his heirs and suc- 
cessors, that in no case whatever shall any asylum be afforded within the 
limits of his possessions to any public offenders, or to any persons desirous of 
escaping from the jurisdiction of the Company's court of jnstice, or from the 
authority of the revenue officers, or of any other branch of the authority of the 
Honourable Company ; and he f urtlier agrees to deliver up all such persons 
without delay, on application from such officer or officers as the Governor in 
Council of Bombay shall appoint for the purpose* 

Article 10, 

Raghojee Angria doth liereby engage on his own part, and on the part of 
his heirs and successors, to prohibit the import and export, as well as the 
trausit of opium, within any part of the territories of the Colaba State. 

Article 11. 

And whereas the British Oovemment hath bound itself to protect Ragho- 
jee Angria, his heirs and successors, against the attacks of any other State, and 
to secure to him the quiet possession of the territories dependent upon Colaba ; 
and whereas it is incumbent upon Raghojee Angria and nis successors to make 
permanent provision for the support of Manajee Angria now residing on the 
island of Bombay, on a stipend of Rupees 250 per mensem, allowed to him 
by the State of Colabn, the said Raghojee Angna hereby engages, on behalf 
of himself, his heirs and successors, to continue payment of the said stipend of 
Rupees 250 per month to the British Government, as heretofore, for the pur- 
pose above stated, whilst the said Manajee Angria shall conduct himself in a 
suitable manner towards the government of Colaba, as now established ; if 



Fart II Lapsed Siates—Kolaha^Ko. CXXIX. 879 



any ciroumstaDces shall hereafter give rise to complaints against the said 
Manajee Angria by the Colaba administration for the time being, the British 
Government reserves to itself the exclusive right of deciding upon the conduct 
of the-said Manajee Angria, whilst he continues to reside witliin the British 
dominions, and also as to the propriety^ or otlierwise, of the continuance of his 
said stipend of Bupees 250. 

Articls 12. 

Beyond the boundaries of the Colaba State, as to be fixed by the exchange 
of territory, there are several villages, umuls, lands, wutcuDS, and places 
belonging to it, both above the ghAts and below them, in turrufE Nagota, 
talooka Soodhagur. These, whatever on enquiry they may appear to be, will, 
after due deliberation, be continued as heretofore, a detailed Schedule of them 
being hereafter made out and annexed to this Treaty. 



!d.) 


Hastings. 


ff 


J. Adam, 


jf 


J. Fbkdall. 


9f 


W. B. Batlby. 



Ratified by the Governor-Oeneral in Coanoil^ at Fort William in Bengal, 
this 16th day of August 1822. 

(Sd.) G. SWINTON, 

Secretary, 



A. 

Translation of a letter from Baghojee Anoria of Colaba 
to the Honourable M. Elphinstone^ at Foona, dated the 
27th Jemmadee-ool-Awul| or 4th April 1818. 

After compliments.— Venaick Porsram, the Dewanjee^ having eminently 
served the State of Colaba nnd^r the administration of the late Mauajee 
Angria, and preserved it by maintaining the alliance with the Honourable 
Company when Bajee Rao -subsequently broke with the Honourable Company 
and commenced hostilities, certain allowances and enams were granted to him 
and to those connected with him, as speciBed in a separate Memorandum, and 
which are to be enjoyed by the respective parties and their heirs, without 
objection, even though the said DewaDJee should retire from office. Any 
claims possessed by him against the State are also to be adjusted F>y the 
accounts, and be is to be duly protected by it, whenever occasion may render 
such protection necessary. I request that the Honourable Company's govern- 
ment will satisfy him on this pomt. 



880 



Lapsed States— fo^o&a— No. OXZIX* 



Tartu 



B. 

Memoeakdtjm of Assignments made by the Colaba Statb to 
Yenaick Fubsbam, Dewan, and to his dependants^ Anno 
Snnnut Seman TJshurah-wu-Myatein wu-TJlf, A.D, 1817*18» 

Rm, a. j>. 
10,002 O O 



To Venaiok Pnrsram, for himself 

VillRges granted in the district of 
Manickghur for • • • 



The wboie village of Eoprolee, in the 
district of Asenrwolee, as enam, 
the batty is fixed at the rate of 
Rs. 16, as per Sunnad. • • 

Villages granted as nemnook, as per 
Sunnad, to the amount of • • • 

The village of Col way. 

Ditto Fnrghar. 



. 8,002 



• • ( 



J2#« a. p, 

1,000 
7,002 



Ditto Dapolee. 

Ditto Johnr. 

Ditto Sawlay. 

Ditto Pirkonay. 

Ditto Kopar. 

Ditto A distilleiy in the district of Aoor?ulee. 



8 



The amount of which 

Deduct the amount granted separately, viz, — 
To Pandoorun^ Nursurweed • 200 
To his dependants . • • 340 



jS#* a* p, 
7,542 



640 
7.002 



. Balance • 

Payable from the Treasoiy in eash 
asQemnook . . • • 

To hia dependants, as nemnook, Bopeea 4260-2'25, 9t««— 
To Bapoojee BuUab, Rupees 1,872. 

Villages to the amount of Rupees 1,900, vts^— 
The village of Eadhewlee, in the 
district of Manickghur, as enam, 
as per Sunnud • • • • 772 

The^ village of Nedhowlee, in the 
district of Manickghur, granted 
for defraying the expenses of a 
palanquin . • • . 528 



8,002 
2,000 O 



From the treasury, as nemnook 



•t* 



1,300 
672 













1,872 



Part II 



Lapsed Stateft— iTo/o&i— No. CXXIX. 



881 



tt* 



To Ehandoo Setaram, Rupees 1,368. 

Enam villages in the district of 
Maniokghar, as per Sannud, with 
detailed Memorandum, Rupees • 

The whole village of Pat, in the 
district o! Doorgatan • • 834 1 18f 

Five hee^ahs of land in the village of 
Eamhay, within the division of 



JB#* a. ^. 



360 



Doorgatan, estimated 
From the treasary, as nemnook 

To Pandoornng, Narsing, Rapees 
As enam • • . • 
On account of land 

From the treasury, as nemno6k 



Amount of enam village* to be given 
to hig dependants of the ■■ . 



lepei 
lien f 



bat which are granted in his own 
name . . • • • 

To Baboo Chut, the son of Gunga- 
dhar Chut Yidheeas, from the 
village of Yursnee • • • 

To certain Karkoons and Brahmins, 
who are his dependants, from the 
treasury • • . • . 



25 2 81} 

580 2 25 

200 

80 2 25 



1,008 



1,368 



••• 



••• 



280 2 25 
800 



•«• 



580 2 25 



340 



100 



•■• 



4,260 2 25 



rss 1 7$ 



Seeapifulation, 

The amount of villages and lands 
granted • • • • • 

From the treasury • • • 



■ •I 



••• 



••• 



••• 



15,001 



10,382 2 25 
4,618 1 75 



••■ 



15,001 



Amounting to Rupees fifteen thousand and one, Viz., villages and lands 
to the amount of Rupees ten thousand thiee hundred and eighty-two, two 
quarters, and twenty-five reas have been bestowed on him, together with the 
sum of Rupees four thousand six hundred and eighteen, one quarter, and 
seventy-five reas, to be paid in eash from the treasury as itlaok nemnook. 
In conformity with the above Memorandum, the villages and lands, together 
with the payments to be made in eash, will be continued to be enjoyed by his 
descendants. Agreed to accordingly. 



882 Lapsed States— JTolfo^a— No. CXXIX. Fart Xt 



TbANSLATIOK of a LtCirtEK from EAGHO^rSB AnGBIA^ of OOLABA^ t^ 

the Bight Hokotjrablb the GoyebnoKi dated the 12th' 
Shawul 1234 of the Hegira^ or 4ith August a.d. 1819. 

I beg to state that this govemment having coneluded a settlement of the 
conoems of Yenaiek Pursram Denranjee^ addressed a letter to the Honourable 
Mountstuart Elphinstone at Poonah, bearing date the 27th Jemmadee-ool- 
Awul, for the satisfaction of the said Dewanjee, and a copy of the replj^ dated 
the 14th Jemmadee-ool-Akhir (the 11th of April 1819)^ is transmitted to Your 
Excellency. It is therein suggested that I should not only make known to 
Your Excellency the amount of the debt, but also (my intenction) that the 
Dewanjee should be secured against molestation from the State of Colaba, on 
which Your Excellency would set his mind at rest ; and I have accordiogly to 
request that the Honourable Compauy's government will give him that assur- 
ance, both in regard to the amount of his debt, for which a Memorandum has 
been granted nnder my seal (mortab)i as admitted on adjustment, and that no 
molestation shall be offered to him by the State of Colaba. 



D. 

Tbanslation of a lbttbe from the Honotj&ablb Mountstuabv 
Elphinstonb, to Baghojbb Angkia, dated 11th April 1819, 
corresponding with the 14ith Jemmadee-ool-Akhir. 

I have received your letter, dated the 27th Jemmadee-ool-AwuI (4th April 
1818) noticing that Yenaiek Pursram, the Dewanjee, having, during the adminis- 
tration of the late Manajee Angria, been ettremely useful, and having preserved 
the State of Colaba by maintaining the alliance with the Honourable Company^ 
when Bajee Bao subsequently broke with the Honourable Company and come- 
menced hostilities, certain allowances and enams had been grsmted to him, as well 
as to Bapoojee BuUal and others connected with him, by the govemment of 
Colaba, as detailed in a separate Memorandum, which were to be enjoyed by the 
respective parties and their heirs unmolested, even though the said Dewanjee 
should no longer act in the administration ; that his claims against the State 
shonld be satisfied according to what might appear to be justly due, and that 
he should be protected by it, whenever occasion might render such protection 
necessary; requesting at the same time, that the Honourable Company's 
govemment satisfy him on these points. In consequence of this applicatioa^ 
I have affixed my signature as guarantee to tlie Memorandum of the enanis 
and allowances granted to him and to his dependants^ which was transmitted 



Part II Lapsed States— JToZaia— No. CXXIX. 388 



under your mortab (seal), amounting to fiupees 15^001; but as you hare 
omitted to state the amount of the debt, and confined yourself to a declaration 
that protection would be extended to his concerns^ I am unable, under such 
general expression, to satisfy him on this point. I therefore request that you 
will communicate the amount of your debt to the Bight Honourable Sir Evan 
Kepean^ Bart., who will not only satisfy him in this respect, but also that he 
will not be subjected to any unmerited harsh treatment from the State of 
Colaba. 



E. 

Translation of a Mehobandum of the bond fide debts eon* 
tracted through the medium of Vbnaick Pubsram Dbwan, 
Anno Soor Sun Ashreen Myatein-wu-Ulf, a.d. 1819-20. 

After examination the accounts show balance dne by government, from 
the commencement up to the 1 1th of Shabun, being the termination of the 
year Sita Usur, 12th Jestood 1741 (5th June 1819), to be Poena Chandore 
Rupees 2,28,287-3-18} which sum of Poena Chandore fiupees, as due to the 
abovenamed up to the end of the year Tisa Usur (5th June 1819), it is agreed 
to pay, with such interest as may become due, at the rate of one per cent, per 
month, together with a premium (munotce) of two per cent, per annum, pay- 
4ible at once. 

Dated Colaba, the 10th Shawul, Anno Soor Sunnut Jihreen, in tie month 
of Shravan, 2nd August 162U 



F. 

Memorandum from Puksram Srekdhue at Aptey, year Ehidi 
wu Asbreen-wu-Myatein-wu-Ulf, a.d. 1820-21 

For many yenrs I and my family have enjoyed privileges which were 
granted to us by Angria in the villa<;e8 under Manickghur; when, therefore, 
an exchange of territory shall take place, I trust that on Angria's inserting an 
Article providing for the continuance of my privileges, the Honourable Com- 
))any will be pleased to cherish me and my family agreeably to what will 
remain to be given in exchange. 

1. I enjoy the vet begar (labour) and firfirmas (presents of fowls and 
fruits, etc.) of the village of Johy, turuff Humrapoor, in tUe Knruala district, 
which belong to both States, vtje^.— - 

A. As the government karaj (hay and wood) required for the fort, and 
also the vet (labour), have been g^ven to me, I take foar weeks' labour from 
each man annually. 



884 Lapsed States- Kolaha—JXo. CXXIX. Fart II 



B. It is the custam to receive two fowls every year from eaoh house. 

C. It 18 the custom to receive two pumpkins every year from each house* 

D. It is the custom to receive ten loads of sajhay from each peisoDj in 
order to thatch the house. 

E. For the Junum Ustamee in the month of Shravnn, there may be 
about six or seven pots of buttermilk, and it is the custom to receive half a 
Rupee as the price of each pot. 

2. I enjoy a kowl (lease) and exemption Concerning the nngde kharee 
(salt batty ground, whose rent is paid in money), and nugdi begah oathaalee 
(sweet batty fields, whose rent is paid in money), for their embankment. As 
I laid out expenses in embanking them, an indulgence has been allowed in 
the rent, and an exemption from house and buffalo tax. Vet begar (labour) 
and firBrmas (presents of fowls, fruits, etc.) have been granted to the people 
for keeping in order the salt batty ground and fields and gardens. 

8. We enjoy goora wareys (sheds for cattle) and pasturage lands. 



Schedule of the Exchange of Territory lately concluded 
between the British Government and Raohojbe Akgria, 
Chief of the State of Colaba, under the 3rd Article of 
the Treaty, 16th August 1822. 

In the 3rd Article of the Treaty concluded between the British Govern- 
ment and Raghojee Angria, the Chief of Colaba, as ratified by the Gbvemor- 
Geueral on tlie 16th August 182*2, and by the Chief on the 12th Ramzan Soor 
Sun Isuney Ishreen Myatein wu-Ulf (3rd June 1822), it is stated that the 
territories of the Colaba 8tate being intermixed with those of the British 
Oovernment, and it being desirable that the possessions of each should be 
eoncentratpd by exchanges to be made on fair and just principles, it is hereby 
agreed that such exchanges as may be necessary with a view to the attain- 
ment of that object shall be adjusted by Commissioners to be nominated for 
the purpose of Fettling the boundaries of the British Government and those 
of the principality of Colaba; and the British Government, relying upoti the 
fidelity of Raghojee Angria and on the sincerity of his acknowledgment of the 
supremacy of the Hon' ble Company, hereby guarantees to him, and to his heirs 
and successors, on the condition hereafter specified, the integrity of his domi- 
oions, the boundaries of which will be defined by Commissioners to be 
appointed in pursuance of the foregoing provision ; agreeably to which Com« 
missioners having met, and having settled the following exchanges and adjust- 



Iiapaed Btatea—Kolala—'No. CXZIX. 



ments of the frontier, tho same are now reoognieed and declared binding oq 
both Governments, viz.— 

Hade over If tie Bonourable Company to Angria. 



i i 



BocnnF i> DdbLI; 



EocTHiu Kdr 



th'p 


Is Anrrii't Unnarj for- 


Mod 


> Eoml . . 




" 


im '. '. 




Wure 


t rtHbtnt Eu>w.hir.r. 


Wirm PtkhncN Bolowe 




Ware 
Ml 


iTbDl.beloiielDJitoBimid* 


Wdj 


ejh.,.b..0»,,,.« 


^Ven]. 


Wu« Tbnl Wsnileo . 




Tbe TilliKB ot kfftoai. la 

WUDllKWg UlODk*. 


Ih« Bcv 



Thit <anii md (Ok ciuloma of Bm 



Kuml iDd Husc tJsDdiiiaoT. 






Ceded Id full HTenigntT. 



Lftpwd Statw— foloia— Ho. CXZXX. 



Made 


yver If Angtia't 








""-.-Si-" 






i 










1 


i 








> 


M 


» 






Soon Knui. 








Zt. 


er^ 


S«u. 




Anffrls'i bilt ifaice cs! Ibe khur 








l.MB 






TbUpluwliilliiitad iDth>M». 
















UD tidtol Uw Mcotiw linr. 


















th«,™rh-4rdoltb«ApilB 


















lloa»Bo.D* . . 


















.. Kanp . . 


















„ CbowdolM 


















" B*<>* . . 










l,Uf 








" Kjn 






















































Z B*.molM . : 




































AdhUI itamn of TllUgM of tlu 
Hnmnpw* H*1ul- 
















"^"ta: 


















Tbew tUIuh ind kharn b*- 


BimKbut . 


















!.'rt«rwt.7s?^ 


Dmdu,, : 


















i»bur ;: : 




























































-rEr' 
























3 


13 


.- 


»,1M 





IS 




■ am Kopar 




















- Dtdnt 
Anih<l KhiR 


















01 tbM* tUIwi ud bbtm. 




















. Anuria mnawd ■ bklf (bu* 




















-hSTb- b«D ci.de ont to 




















tbaHoDoanUiCompMij. 


^*B^J|id XoUb '. 




































- B«lT . . . 


















Horn Konua, 
















TilUiH ud khun of AoorwnlDt 
















torof- 
















HnuKopin . . . . 


































: ^Xj,- ; 






















































.7 sCji-EZ- 










































n 




«.«» 




M 








































» Tulb«=d Poerkone 


















„ UoQiu KDjinr . 


































.. KoWwol* 


















„ lUwuK^pu . 


















„ Zimbo EhuT . 


































.. Tiknur Knlm . 
















:. Bo«rM auti. : 


























^^ 





Fart II Lapsed States— folola— Ho. OXZIX. 



ifarfe over ig Jngrit't govtrnment to ike HoTtourable CowpoMj— (concluded). 




c....„„ 


Hltlsd. 






1 


1 


1 












K.. 


gr.. 


i™. 




Ihe narthwuil of Iho Apll KItu— 


1 
1 














Snwul. 

KiiabG .... 
Buw Sondb Hiwols 


>* 


... 




i,m 


' 


.7 




HnoiLunoDii. 
















fiwgu Prut Tnnif ffarnm— 
















MauuTdlnorD .... 
















:: ^N^rSr ; : ■. : 
















Tgml SoDilo— 
















Muuu Deoronnii 
















turut >hi,n- 
















MouzaAmbnne .... 


















i4 






e.3u 


' 


U 




Ho™Ko««. 
















TnnilTnloJi*- 
















MonuSectal 
















.. Khjtna .... 
















Tn™r Bortca- 
















D^nW .... 
















AnKri-.-t nhiTo ot cuWna ol the 








*,3aj 


' 


3 




















VIllMtB In Ibe PergOBMh of 


] 














UoQUSoolliiniKire 

;; ZSXl,- : : : 


1' 






SM 

M.tOO 


> 


70 






888 



Lapsed States- 5a/ara— No. CXXX. Part II 



ABSTRACT. 

Made over hy the Honourable Compantf to Angrijt Rs. Qrg. Bea^. Bs. Qra. Reas. 

South Konkan 44,919 2 86 

North Konkan 1.6*7 1 40 

«— — — 46,467 26 

Made ov er hy Angria to Honourable Company, 

South Konkan 19,628 1 9 

North Konkan 26,387 2 81 

Ahraedonggar 884 3 70 

■ 46,400 3 60 

Leaving a balance io favoor of Angria of • 66 66 

The above exchange and acljastments of territory are accorJingly recogp- 
nised and declared binding. 

Attested at Rotnagheree on the 4th of September a.d, I8i^8| in the year 
Teesa-wa-Ushreen-wu.Myatein-wu-Ulf 23rd of Suffer A.H. 1244, the 11th o£ 
Shravun Vud, Shuke 1750, in the year named Sarwudharee. 

(Sd.) L. R. Reid, 

Collector and in charge of Political Duties 

in tie Southern Konkan 

Mbmorandum. — The above exchanges and adjustments of territory were 
approved and confirmed by Ihe Government of Bombay on the 26th November 
1828. 



No. CXXX. 



Articles of Agreement made between William Andrew 

Price, Esquire, Chief of Port Victoria, on the part of 

the Honourable United English East India Company, 

and ViTTUL Rao, Eswunt Kao, and Bugwunt Rao, 

Casness and Poetness to His Serene Highness the Sou 
Rajah.— 1757. 

Article 1. 

"Whatever merclicnts carry salt to Maar, the Company to collect, on 
account of Bancote customs, exclusive of the Sciddee Cbowkie at Ambat, at 
Rupees 3| for every anua, and on other goods %\ per ceut. 



Part II Iiapsed States -^o^ara— No. CXXX. 389 



Article 2. 

Goods landed between Bancote and Dasgom, and passing through any 
part of Bngwunt Rao's country, to pay the same radarage as goods that go 
from Goregom and Bajahpore. 

Article 3. 

Salt going from Dasgom up-country, Bugwunt Rao to collect at Maar 
1 Rupee and a quarter for ten oxen (every leu oxen of salt the customs of 
only eight to be collected). 

Article 4. 

Salt to be disposed of in the following manner: if any quantity ^of 
salt is laying at Maar, the English are not to dispose of more than that 
quantity until it is sold, but then they have liberty to sell any quantity 
remaining until a fresh parcel is landed at Maar, and then the above method 
to be again observed, and vice vend, in regard to Dasgom. 

Article 5. 

The English to fix the price of salt at Dasgom, and the Maar Govern- 
ment to sell their salt there at an advance on that price at li per candy. 

Article 6. 

All other goods whatever, ezceptinn^ the Honourable Company's^ to pay 
8 annas per ox, with an allowance as usual. 

Article 7. 

Merchants landing goods at Dasgom, and afterwards choosing to carry 
them to Maar, the English to collect Rupees 32 per anna on salt, and 24 per 
cent, on other goods. 

Article 8. 

The customs at the Sciddee Chowkie on goods which may go to Maar 
to be as usual, namely. Rupees 2^ per anna on salt^ and li per cent, on other 
goods. 

Article 9. 

Elephants, horses, camels, and slaves, sold by the English at Dasgom, 
and passing through Bugwunt Rao's country, to pay radarage as usual to 
the Circar. 

Article 10. 

The straw, grain, etc., which may come to Maar from Bugwunt Rao's 
country and what may go from thence to any part of his countiy, the same 
as with Nana's agreement at Poonah with the English, but iu case any 
merchants purchase gcods from any person under the Maar Government, if 
it passes through Dasgom, either by land or water, to pay 2i per cent* 
customs. 



iaSdP 



SOO Lapsed Btatea—Saiara^'No. OXXX. Part It 



Abtiole 11. 

Rafters, timbers, etc., that go out of Bugwunt Rao's country, or come 
into it, to pay 2) per cent, customs on the valuation, ezolusive of Ambat 
Chowkie. 

Abticlb 12. 

The royalty of Maar River to be preserved to the English in the same 
manner as settled with Nana Pundit Pmdan. 

Aeticlb 13. 

Subjects which fly to either government to be treated in the same manner 
as the subjects of the English and those of N ana's government. 

Abticlb 14. 

Whatever slaves or servants may fly to the English to be returned, in 
like manuer the Maar Government to return whatever may fly to them. 

Abticlb 16. 

The chowkie at Durdwah to be removed, and Bugwunt Rao not to place 
any chowkies ou the banks of the river. 

Abticlb 16. 

The passage boat at Dasgom to belong to the English, and Bugwunt 
Rao not to place any passage boat on the river excepting at Maar. 

Abticlb 17. 

The English will take care of the river in the same manner as settled at 
Poonah. 

Abticlb 18. 

The Honourable Company^s goods to the amount of Rupees 1,50,000 are 
to pass according to the agreement made at Poonah upon Bugwunt Rao's 
receiving a Sunnnd or order for it from Poonah. 

These Articles are to be inviolably observed by both parties, and in con- 
firmation thereof to those which will remain with Bugwunt Rao, I have caused 
the Honourable Company's seal to be affixed ab Dasgom this fifteenth day of 
April in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and fity-seven, and 
to the counterpart, which will remain with the Honourable Company, Bugwunt 
Rao has caused his seal to be affixed the day and year above written, or of the 
Oartoo Style the 27th o£ Chutra 1679^ and of the Mahomedan era, the 25tk 
of Rujjub 1170. 

(Sd.) William A. Pbicb. 

Approved by the Honourable the President in Council of Bombay on the 
8rd May 1767. 




Fart II Lapsed States— 5a/ara— No. CXXXI. 801 



No. CXXXI. 

Treaty of Peepbtual Feiendship and Alliance between the 
HoNouEABLE E^ST India COMPANY and His Hiohness 
Mahakajah Peetaub Sheeaw, hiB heirs and successors, 
concluded at Sataea, the 25th September 1819, by Captain 
James Grant, Political Agent, on the part of the 
HoNOTJEABLB East India COMPANY, and Vittul Punt 
EuENAViEES on the part of the Eajah, by virtue of full 
powers from their respective governments. — 1819, 

Whereas the British Govemment having determined, in consideration 
of the antiquity of the house of His Highness the Rajah of Satara^ to invest 
him with a sovereignty sufficient for the maintenance of his family in comfort 
and dignity, the following Articles have been agreed to between the said 
government and His Hi^^hness :— 

Artiolb 1. 

The British Government agrees to cede in perpetual sovereisrnty to the 
Bajah of Satara, his heirs and successors^ the districts specified in the annexed 
Schedule. 

Article 2. 

The Bajah, for himself and for his heirs and successors, engages to hold 
the territory in subordinate co-operation ^ith the British Government, and 
to be guided in all matters by the advice of the British Agent at His High* 
ness' Court. 

Aeticlb S. 

The British Govemment charges itself with the defence of the Rajah's 
territories and engages to protect His Highness fi*om all injury and aggres- 
sion. The Bajah, for himself and for his heirs and successors, engages to 
afford every facility to the purchase of supplies for such troops as may be 
stationed in his country, or may pass through it, and the pasture lands now 
appropriated for the use of the troops are to be permanently given up to 
them. The Bajah likewise, for himself and for his heirs and successors, 
engages to afford all the assistance in his power to the British Government 
in all wars and military operations in which it may be engaged. 

Abtiols 4. 

His Highness, for himself and for his heirs and successors, engages at 
no time to increase or diminish the military force without the previous know- 
ledge and consent of the British Grovernment. 



892 Lapsed States— 'Sahara— No. CXXXI. Fart IX 



Article 5. 

The Bajah^ for himself and for his heirs and successors^ engages to for- 
bear from nil intercourse with foreign powers, and with all sirdars, jaghiredars, 
chief Sy and ministers, and all persons of whatever description, who are not by 
the above Articles rendered subject to His Highness' authority ; with all the 
above persons His Highness, for himself and for his Leirs and successors, 
engages to have no connection or correspondence. Any affairs that may arise 
with them relating to His Highness are to be exclusively conducted by the 
British Government. If (for the purpose of forming matrimonial connexions 
for His Highness' family, or for any similar purpose) His Highness has 
occasion to communicate with persons not rendered subject to his authority 
by this agreement, such communication is to be made entirely through the 
Political Agent. 

This Article is a fundamental condition of the present Agreement^ and 
any departure from it on the Rajah's part shall subjest him to the loss of all 
the advantages he may gain by the said Agreement. 

Article 6. 

The Rajah shall ultimately have the entire management of the country 
now ceded to him ; but as it is necessary, on account of the recent conquest 
of the country, that it .should at first be governed with particular care and 
prudencci the administration will for the present remain in the hands of the 
British Political Agent, 'ihat oflBcer will, however, conduct the government 
in the Rajah's name; and in consultation with His Highness, and in propor- 
tion as His Highness and his officers shall acquire experience and evince their 
ability to govern the country, the British Government will gradually transfer 
the whole administration into their hands. He will, however, at all times 
attend, as above agreed, to the advice which the British Political Agent 
shall offer him for the good of his State, and for the maintenance of general 
tranquillity. 

Article 7. 

The possessions of the jaghiredars within His Highness' territory are 
to be imder the guarantee of the British Government, which, on the other 
hand engages to secure their performing the service which they owe to His 
Highness according to established custom. 

Article 8. 

AH persons guilty of murder, treason, robbery, or other great offences, 
who may fly from the territories of the Company into those of the Rajah, are 
to be given up to the British Government. In like manner all criminals^ 
as above described, who may fly into the territories of the British Government, 
are to be given up to the Rajah. For the better execution of justice and 
prevention of crimes, the Rajah consents that the officers of the British 
Goveinmeot may pursue criminals and apprehend them in his territory. 



Part II Lapsed States— i9a/ara-*No. GXXXI. 393 



A&TICLB 9. 

The gbauts are to be the general boundary of the Bajah's territory 
towards the Conoan. Where no^ specific exception is made^ those mountains 
are to be included within His Highness' territory. 

A survey is to be undertaken as soon as convenient to fis the frontier 
where the mountains run into the plain. ^ The British Government reserves 
to itself the right of retaining sucn portions of the mountains so situated as 
may be necessary to make a dear frontieri or for other purposes. 

The British Government also reserves to itself the right of cutting 
timber on the western sides of the ghauts. The customs in the line of 
ghauts are to be levied by the CSompany, and an equivalent allowed to the 
Bajah. 

Aetiolb 10. 

The Honourable Company and the Bajah agree to enter^ as soon as may 
be convenient, on a commercial Treaty, and in the meantime the Bajah^ for 
himself and for his heirs and successors, engages to adopt the same system 
with regard to customs as tiiat which may be adopted by the British Govern- 
ment in its adjoining territories. 

Abtiolb 11. 

This Treaty, consisting of eleven Articlesi being this day settled and 
concluded at Satara by Captain James Gbrant and Vittul Punt Furnavees, 
Captain Grant has delivered to His Highness Maharajah Pertaub Sheeaw a 
copy of the same in English, Mahratta, and Persian, under the seal and 
signature of the said Captain James Grant, and His Highness Maharajah 
Pertaub Sheeaw has delivered to the said Captain James Grant another copy, 
also in English, Mahratta, and Persian, bearing His Highness' seal and signa- 
ture; and the aforesaid Captain James Grant has engaged to procure and 
deliver to His Highness, without delay, a copy of the same duly ratified by 
His Excellency the Most Noble Francis, Marquis of Hastings, k.g., one of 
His Britannic Majesty's Most Honourable Privy Council, Governor-General 
in Council, appointed by the Honourable Company to direct and control all 
their affairs in the East Indies, Commander-in-Chief of His Majesty's and 
the Honourable Company's forces, etc., on the receipt of which by His said 
Highness, this Treaty shall be deemed complete and binding on the Honour- 
able East India Company and on His Highness Bajah Pertaub Sheeaw, and 
the copy now delivered to His said Highness shall be returned. 



The 

Company'! 

Wafer Seal. 



(Sd.) Hactinos. 
„ Jas. Stxwart. 
„ 3. Adah. 



The 
OoTT. Qenl/i 

Small Seal. 



Batified by the Governor-General in Council this 27th day of November 
1819. 

(Sd.) C. T. Mbtoaltb, 
Secretary to Oopernment. 

3i 



804 Lapsed Btstes^Saiara^'So. OZZXI. Fart IZ 



Schedule of the Tebkitory and Bevekub ceded to His High- 
ness Maharajah Fertaub Shbeaw of Satara, by the Ist 
Article of the Treaty concluded at Satara on the 25th 
September 1810^ and to which this Schbdulb is annexed. 

The frontier extends from the Kistna and Wama on the sonttij to tlM 
Neera and Beema on the north, and from the western ghaats^ or Syadree 
Hills on the west, to the districts of Punderpore and Beejapore on the eiaat, 
ezclusiye of jaghires^ etc« 

I. That portion of Neerthuree, in the Poena Prant^ and that share of 
Seerwnl which lies south of the Neera River. 

« 

II. The whole of the Waee Prant, including, the following turrufs and 
villages : — 



1. Hnwelee. 




5. Satara. 


2. Wagbolee. 




6. M^dh^. 


3. Neemb. 




7. Purlee. 


4. Koregaoin. 




a EoodsL 




9. Wb 


indan. 



IIL Belonging to the tnrruf of Boheerkhoriei Frant Mawul :-— 

L Monza Kanowree. | 2. Umal, in the village of Hatnose. 

IV, The whole of Jaolee Soobah, from the line at which the ghauts join 
the plain in the Concan^ and including the following nine turrufs :-« 



L Baia Moor^. 
8. Soaat Sdaa. 
8. Tamb. 
4 Ategaom. 
6. Kedamb. 



6. Helwak. 

7. Bamnolee. 

8. Kandatkhore. 

9. Jor Ehore with the fort of Pertab- 

ghur. 



But the forts of Wasota, Buhirowgur, and Pruchitgur are to be garri- 
soned and held by the British Oovernment during its pleasure^ but the lands 
immediately attached to them and within the line aforesaid are to beteng to 
the Bajah. 

V. The Prant Eurar, including the following turrufs and villages :— 



1. Tnrruf Hawelee, includiog Barstf. 

2. Oombrnz, 
8. Targaon. 

4. Nanegbol. 

5. Tarul^ 



6. Murlee. 
7* Patan. 

8. Waroon. 

9. KoM. 

10. KuryatOund. 



Part II 



Lapsed States— Affaro^No. GXXXI. 



896 



VI. BelongiDg to the Southern Coooan^ eight villages — 
(1) Turruf Sawurdi— 

5. Mouza Nao. 



1. Mouza Waghree. 

2. „ PatbarpooDJ. 

3. I, Mala. 

4. .. Eolon. 



>f 



6. 


,, Goware. 


7. 


„ Dankne. 


8. 


,. Wulwun. 



(2) One village in tbe turrnf of Chiploon— - 

1. Nnzrtf Ghaut Matha. 

VII. The whole of Khutad Frant^ including the fort of Bkooshungu 
and the following turrufs^ viz.^^ 



1. PerguDnah Ehutao. 

2. Euryat Nimior. 

VIII. The Prant of Mandesh, including the following turrnfs^ m.*- 



3. Euryat Maeenee. 
4. . pt Lulgoon. 



1. Euryat Mulonree. 

2, PerguDDah Sangol^. 



IX. 



7. Euryat Mhaswor. 

8. Of the Euryat of Atparee» four 
villages. 

9. Eurvat Doheegaoa. 

10. Easba Dharrumpooree. 

11. Pergunnah Hazr^. 
12. Pergunnah Ehasgaon. 

• • 

The following villages and Umuls in Phaltnn Pergunnah :t- 



3. 


»» 


Brumhupooree. 


4. 


tf 


Aklooj. 


5. 


$t 


Bhalownee. 


6. 


f» 


y^lapoor. 



1. Mouza Geervee. 

1. Mouza Turduf. 

2. „ DhowM. 

3. „ Oopnlv^. 

7. Boundary land. 



2. Eusba Tatuora, Umul villages 
4. M Waghofthee. 
6. Mouza Danowdee. 
6. M Wekhree. 
called Dag, Musinga. 



X.— The following turrufs and villages in the Prant of Beejapore, r»f ,— 
1.— The following villages and shares in Huwelee Beejapore :— 

Villaget. 



1. Eusba Beejapore, 

2. Mousa Sarwar. 



3. 


»> 


4; 


»» 


5. 


ft 


6. 


» 


7. 


» 


8. 


» 


9. 


u 


10. 


» 


11. 


»f 



Ehuteejapore. 

EuDmoochaal. 

Joomnal. 

fiumbhapore Ungapore. 

Boornapore. 

Eulkunhullee. 

Chundapore. 

Alapore. 

Wangee. 

83. Mouza 



12. 
13. 
14. 
16. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
Mndbbavee. 



Mouza Ueenapore Busoolpore. 
Efaanapore. 
Goondafauree. 
HuBoheenal. 
Barutga. 
Itangeehal. 
Jaleeeree. 
Urkeeree. 
Bfaootnal. 
Sheemal. 
Jugnal. 



n 
n 

9* 

» 
•f 



Half rUlagei. 



1. Mouza' Tnrvee Nowruspore, 

2. .. Heetunbullee. 



8. Mouza Ootnal. 
4. u Fattehpore. 



306 



Lapsed Stale*— ^Mar»— Ho. OXXXI. 



Fart IX 



2.— VilUigeB and shares in the pergannah of Moolwar^ 



1. Kniba Moolwar. 
8. Mouza Mnlgban* 
8. „ Tanihal. 



4. MoQsa Tnl^war. 
6. ,» SuTiinhulles. 
6, M Maaootee. 
7. Mouza Kulgoorkee. 

Half rUlaget. 
1. Mouza Koorgee. 



8.— Six villages in the pergunnah of Kolhardesh— 

1. Euiha Kolhar. 

8. Mouza Huludg^noor. 

8, n HeeregunuDgee, 

4.— Pergunnah Balotee. 



4. Mouza Rooneehal. 

6, n Cheekffunuugee. 



6. 



Mootuldfleni 



ce. 



6.— Six villages in the pergunnah of Seedhnath— 



1. Kusba Seedhnatb. 

2. Mouza Hule Rooleo. 
8. •. Soolkbair. 



t» 



4. Mouza Turulgee, 

5. ^ Telgee. 

6« M Cbeeruldlnee. 



6. — ^Village in the pergannah of Cheemnlg^— 

1, Mouza Eowlga. 



7.— > Villages and shares in the pergannah of Hortee--- 

Viltaget. 



1. 


Kuaba Hortee. 




11. 


Mouza BomunbuUot. 


2. 


Mouza Eooloorgee. 




12. 


n 


BusnaL 


3. 


•• 


Domnal. 




13. 


M 


Sawulsung. 


4. 


ff 


EuDobeenal. 




14. 


M 


Hnlgoonkee. 


b. 


n 


Mukoapoie. 




15. 


M 


Goondwan. 


6. 


9f 


Boblad. 




16. 


t» 


SonkunbuUaeu 


7. 


f» 


HurulsuDff. 
Neembul Boozoorg. 




17. 


09 


Kooigee* 


8. 


w 




18. 


99 


ModnsnaL 


9. 


9f 


Naombul Kboord. 




19. 


9f 


D^eenid. 


10. 


n 


Euoal. 




20. 


9t 


Goonkoo. 






21. 


Mouza AguBuaL 










Ealf Tillage$. 










1; 


Monsa Turgondae. 
Umuh. 






L 


Mouza Kupueeinburgat. 




1 2. 


Mouia KotnaL 



Part II 



Lapied States— iSstofw— Ha OZZXI. 



S9Y 



8.— YillageB and sharefl in the pergimnah of HolsuDgee— 



Villagei. 



1. EoBba HnlsuDgee. 




13. Mouza Munukuliiree. 


2. Mouza TeUree. 


14, „ Maeenbullee. 


3. n TadSwaree. 




15. „ Murgoor. 


4. „ ArjoonaL 




16. n Cboudfaal. 


5. M Bhymngee. 




17. n Hingnee. 


6. „ BoodeehaU 




18. n Bargoondee. 


7. »f Keroor. 




19. M Ueeranng. 


8. M Chuntfgaon. 




20. ,» Mueelar. 


9. M Ajoot§^ee. 




21. M Sbergoor. 


10. „ PatDoor. 


• 


22. n Ancbee. 


11. 9, BeTDOor. 




2a n Nnndral. 


12. M Chorgee. 




24. n Shirnal. 


85. 


Monza Lonee Kboord. 




Half rUlagei. 


1. 


Mouza Dboolkbair. 




Umuh in 


1. Monsa Imcbam. 


8. Moaza Zulkoe» 


2. o Belolee. 


4. M Lonee. 


9»— ^Fifteen villages in the perg^nnah of Mumdapore-* 


1. Ensba Mumdapore. 




8. Mouza Stfgoonsee. 


2. Moaza Belnmbee. 




9. 9, Dewapore. 


8. H Sootgoondee. 




10. M Agooogee. 


4. M D^warg&ioor. 




11. M EaturhaL 


5. ,f Medffoonkee. 

6. M HimooinaL 




12. M Hokoondeei 




13. 99 Hulgunee. 


7. n Korbagoe. 




14. 99 Lingudhullee. 


15. 


Moaza Kombagee* 


10.— Six Tillages in the pergunnah of Ooti— 


1. MoQia Bableahwur. 




4. MouM Du^aL 


2. M Needonee. 




5. 99 Nagurhal. 


8. ^ DaahaL 




6. ,9 Eoomntgea. 



11. ^In the pergunnah of Indee*^ 

1. Umul in the village of Seergoor. 

12«— In the pergunnah of Ooklee— 

1. Mouza Hometgee. 

18.— Ten villages in the pergunnahs of Jut and Kunijgee^- 



Pergwnnak Jui, 



1. Mouzah ChmebaM. 



8. Mouza Pfer. 



2. Mousa NuraL 



iW*W< 



d» 



698 lAIiMd CttatM— '&i#ar«— Ho. CZXXI. Part II 



Pergwumah Kumjgee. 



1 Mouza Ohureodee. 
2. ,» BhoDstf. 
8. „ Ber. 



4. Monza Deeksnl. 
5t „ Hungeerg^. 
6. o Wankee. 



7. Moaza Tedrao. 



14. — In the pergunnah of Mnngulyedh 

1. Mouza EboopsiDg^. 

XI.— The following turrufa and villages in the Prant Meeruj, rf#.*- 



1. Eoryat Bhalownee. 
2« It £6t. 



8. Knryat Khanapore. 
4. Tha village of Benoor in Earjat 
Unjunee. 



5.'^In the Knryat Isapore^ the Umnls in the following villagest viz.* 



1. Mouza XJlte. 

2. u Andhulee. 



5. Moosa Seergaon. 



8. MoQza Nimbluk. 
4. 19 Neemb. 



6.-— In the Kuiyat Beelowree— 

1. Mouza Doodharee. | 2. Duhiaree. 

Umuls in ike following villager :— 



1. Mouza Tooparee. 

2. M Bumbuvd^. 
8. ,1 Ghogaon. 



4. Mouza Doodbo#. 

5. M Takaree. 

6. n Nagral. 



7.—- Knryat Kowtemahankal-— 

1. Mouza Nimnee. 

1. Mouza Eowlapore. 8. Mouza Sheergaon. 

2. „ Mudgooukee. 4« „ Nagaon near Nimnee. 

6. Mouza Eowte. 



8. — Knryat Aahte— 

1. Mouzah Tandoolwaree. 

2. H Koondulwaree. 
8. „ Dhowlee. 

4. » Sftkbral^ 



6. Mouza Eetkurtf. 

6. „ Malowree. 

7. ,9 Umul in the Tillage of Pok« 

humee. 



9.— 'In Knryat Sanglee— 

1. Umul in the Tillage of Bisoor. 



Fart II 



Lapsed States— Air<tfra— No. CXXXI. 



809 



10.— •Hnwellee Meeruj— 



Umuli in thefollotoing villagei'^ 



1. Mooza Bamnee. 

2. „ Neeljee. 

3. „ Tanae. 

4. „ TankTee. 

5. „ Bel war. 

1 1.— Knryat Tasgaon— 

1. MoQza Poondee. 

2. „ duDohnee. 



6. Moaza Ehatao. 

7. „ Saolee. 

8. Mola Koombhos, belonging to Kusba 

Eoombboz. 
9» Moaxa Sawalwaree. 



3. Moaza Par^. 

4. „ MuDgrool. 



12.— In Koryat Sawurd^ — 

1. Kiuba Sawurd^. | 2. Monza Iiode. 

8. Umal in Dorlee. 



13.-*Kuryat Deshing. 



1. Moaza Karolee. 



XIJ. — The following tarrufs and villages in the Prant Funala :— 

1. Earyat Wangee. | 2. Turraf Walv^. 

8. Earyat B^. 

I. Mouza Baonchee. | 2« Easba Penth. 

^ 3. Umol in Eowttf Peeran. 



4.— Of Kuryat Wui^aon — 
1. Moaza Sheegaon. 



I 



2. Moaza Eoregaon. 



5.— Of Kuryat Kodolee— 

1. Moaza Kurunjowdtf. | 2. Aeetowred Ehourd. 

8. Umal in tbe village of Ghikoordtf. 



6.- 



7.— 



Of turrnf Huwelee belonging to Kolbapore— 

Mooza Eoorlap. 



Of Knryat Tulbeer— 

1. Eusba Tolbeer. 

2. Moaza Mazgaon. 

3. „ Earowl^. 

8.— -Knryat Kae^gaon—- 



1. Easba Eas^gaoo. 

2. Mouza Ted^. 

3. „ Tambvtf. 



4. Moaza Moondh^. 

6. „ Oorool. 

6. Umal io Uie village of WolphuU 



Village$. 



4. Mooza Qhenolee. 

5. ,, Betre Humax. 



400 Lapsed BtaXeit^Satara^Vo. OXXZL Put n 



*i-» 



4. Mooza Bendareo. 

5. 99 BftiiApore. 



Umuli. 
1. Mooza Malkhei^ | 8. MoiiM Nanaempora. 

9._0f Kuryat Satr^— 

1. Umnl in the Tillage of Magltf. 

10.— PerguDDah Sheerala. 
II.— Umul in the Kosba of Knl^hon. 
XIIL— The following villages in the Prant Raeebag :— 
1.— Kuryat Naadurf— 

Umuli. 

1. Mooza Eboojegaon. 

2. •, Hatnolee, 
8. ft Morale* 

2.— Umul in the village of Wariy& 
XI v.— The following villages in the Prant Kagul :— 
1.— Of Kuryat Dingruz— 

1. Mooza Dongor Sooee. 

Umuli. 
1. Kosba Dingroz. | 8. Mooza Borgaon. 

2.«-"Umul in the village of Bajapore. 
8. — Kuryat Manjuree — 

1. Urool in the village of Aoklee. 

XV.— The following villages in the pergunnah of Hookeree :-« 
1.— Kuryat Doodgaon— 

1. Eoaba Doodgaon. 

Umuh. 
1. Mooza Borgaon Dooppot. | 2. Mouza Bharkimbe. 

2. — Kusba Saoluz. 

8.— Kuryat Joogool— 

1. Umol in the village of Moogawotee. 

The possessions of the Bajah of Akulkote, the Punt SucheOj the Punt 
Pruthee Nidhee^ the jaghire of the Duflas in the pergunnah of Jut, the 
jaghire of Jan Rao Naik Nimbalkur in the pergunnah of Phultun, and the 
jaghire of Shaikh Mira Waeekur. 

Such villages or umuls as belong to the Putwurdhuns within the bound- 
aries of any of the abovementioned pergunnahs are to be continued to be 
possessed by them, subject to such exchanges as the British Government may 
see fit, and in like manner such villages and umuls as belong to the Rajah, 
which may be situated within the pergunnahs or turruCs belonging to the 



\ 



Part II Lapsed States— iSa/an»— No. OXXXII. 401 



British GovernmeDt or the PutwurdhunSi will be liable to such exchanges as 
the British Government may deem proper for the general convenience of the 
parties concerned. 

The Rajah shall have power to make such exchanges with the Rajah of 
Akulkote, the Punt Sucheo, and the jaghiredars subject to his authority as 
may be desirable to the paities concerned, for the purposes of consolidating 
their respective possessions, provided that such exchanges be undertaken with 
the immediate concurrence of the Agent of the British Government. 



This Schedule was substituted in 1826 for the original Schedule attached 
to the Treaty. 



No. OXXXII. 



Aeticles of Agreement between the Honoubable Company on 

the one part and His Highness the Ka jah of Sataba pn 

the other, regarding a cession, by His Highness, of certain 

lands and the village of Faub, onlhe Mahableshwub Hills 

in the Distbict of Jaolee, in exchange for the village of 

Khxjndala in the Distbict of Waeb, dated the 16th May 

1829. 

Articlb 1. 

The Honourable Company's Government considering it an object of great 
importance to establish a Convalescent Depdt at Malcolm Feth^ situated on 
the hills contiguous to> and south of^ the village of Mahableshwur in the 
District of Jaolee ; and it being necessary that a tract of ground should be 
ceded for that purpose^ both in reference to the expense which must be incuiTed 
by the British Government in forming such an establishmenti as well as 
to induce others to make such outlays on account of buildings as will render 
the advantages arising from the climate generally accessible to all who may 
be desirous of availing themselves thereof ; and also for the more effectual 
control and government of the settlement^ His Highness the Kajah of Satara 
hereby makes over, in full sovereignty and in perpetuity to the Honourable 
Company, the lands adjoining the said Peth or mart called '^Malcolm Peth/' 
which are contained within the red line in the map or plan, and the measure- 
ment and bearings of which are particularized in the Schedule,^ both of 
which documents are annexed to this agreement, and the latter of which is 
denominated a " Statement of measurement of the boundary of the tract 
attached to Malcolm Peth and the Convalescent Station on the M^hablesh- 



^ Thii Schedule being merely a stRtement of the measarement of the boundariee of this 

cessioDi is not incladed in this compilation. 

8p 



402 Lapsed States— iSa^ara— No. GXXXII. Fart II 



war Hills/^ the whole tract comprisiug a space of about 3 square miles^ 10 
square furlongs^ the oircumfereoce thereof being about 15 miles. 

Article 2. 

His Highness further cedes^ for the same purposes^ and in order to pre- 
clude the likelihood of disputes and misunderstandings between His High- 
nesses officers and those of the Honourable Company^ the Peth and lands of 
the village of Paur, with the exception of the Fort of Pertabghur and its 
established lands ; and also such part of the road leading from the boundary 
of the cession specified in the preceding Article to the top of the Paur Ohant, 
as may not be within the limits of the village of Paur^ and a space of two 
hundred yards (English) on each side thereof. 

Article 8. 

For the better defining of the lands^ as well as the line of two hundred 
yards on each side of the road (as specified in the 2nd Article) now ceded by 
His Highness to the Honourable Company^ landmarks will hereafter be put 
up with the mutual consent of the contracting parties. 

Abticlb 4. 

In exchange for the above cessions^ and in consideration of His High- 
nesses finishing the road now making to the Paur Ohaut^ the Honourable 
Company hereby cedes in full sovereignty and in perpetuity to His Highness 
the Rajah of Satara^ the village of Khundla situated at the bottom of the 
Kamatkee Ghaut in the district of Waee> with all the lands^ revenues^ and 
rights of the Honourable Company in the same. 

Article 5. 

The Honourable Company engages to levy no duties on the sale or transit 
of commerce on the line of road or in the tract of the country now ceded^ 
with the exception of the Bazar duties, which now are and have always been 
levied in the Peth or village of Paur, and His Highness agrees to remove 
from the top of the Paur Ohaut his station for collecting duties ; establishing 
the same at such place or places within bis own limits, on the interior of the 
tract now ceded, as may be most convenient. 

(Sd.) John Malcolm. 

TnoiiAS Bbadfobd. 

John Rombe. 

William Nbwnham. 



9} 
if 



Bated Malcolm Peth, 16th May 1829. 



Approved and confirmed by the Bombay Government on the 9th October 
18:^9. 



Part II Lapsed Statei— i^a^ora^No. CXXXIII. 403 



No. CXXXIII. 

Treaty between the Honoueablb East India Company and 
His Highness Shreemun Mahabaj Shahjee Rajey Chut- 
TBBPUTTBE of Sataba, concluded at Sataea, on the 4th Sep- 
tember 1839, by Lieutenant-Colonbl Ovans, Resident 
at Sataba, on the part of the Honoubable East India 
Company, and by Eswunt Rao Tbimbuck, on the part of 
Shahjee Rajey Chuttebputtee, by virtue of full powers 
from their respective Governments. 

Abticle 1. 

AH Articles of the Treaty of Satara, dated the 25th September 1819^ 
which are not abrogated or modified by the present supplemental Treaty^ are 
hereby confirmed. 

Articlb 2. 

It is hereby explicitly declared that the Raja has no present or prospect- 
ive title or claim to any territory situated beyond the boundaries of the Satara 
State, as the same are laid down in the Schedule, dated the 29th of March 
1826, annexed to the aforesaid Treaty as follows :-— 

'^ The frontier extends from the Eistna and Wurna on the south, to the 
Neera and Beema on the north, and from the western ghauts or Syadree Hills 
on the west, to the districts of Punderpore and Beejapore on the east.'' 

Article 3. 

In modification of Article 7 of the aforesaid Treaty, and to obviate future 
disputes, the jaghiredars herein named, viz,-^ 



1. The Raja of Akuloote, 

2. The Pont Suchoo, 

3. The Punt Prithee Nidhee, 



4. The Duflay, 

6. The Nimbulkar^ 

6. Sheik Meera Waeekur, 



are placed under the direct management and control of the British Govern- 
ment, their contingents and pecuniary payments on the scale fixed in the time 
of Captain Grant being reserved to the Raja, 

Articlb 4. 

The Raja binds himself to pay, through the British Government from 
the Satara revenues, such annual allowance as may be considered proper by the 
British Government for the maintenance and support of his brother, Maha- 
rajah Pertaub Sheeaw, the late Rajah and his family. 



404 Lapsed States— I^ ifipatUkar—'No. OXXXIV. Part II 



This supplemental Treaty, consisting of four Articles, being this day, the 
4th of September 1859, settled and concluded at Satara, to be binding and 
permanent, when ratified by the Right Honourable Lord Auckland, Governor- 
General of India. 

(Sd.) C. OvANS, 

Besident at Satara» 

Ratified and confirmed by the Right Honourable the Govemor^General 
of Inia at Simla, this 24th day of October, iu the year of our Lord one 
thousand eight hundred and thirty-nine. 

(Sd.) Auckland. 



No. CXXXIV. 



T£B.MS granted by the Honoxjeablb East India Company to 
SiDOjEE Kao Naik Nimbalkub, regarding the lands which 
he held from the Government of His Highness the 
Peishwa for the Payment op his Contingent, of his 
Personal Allowance, etc., which are now comprised with 
the rest of the country in the Tereitoeies of the British 
Government, and are graciously granted to him^ bearing 
date A.D. 1820. 

« 

Article 1. 

There was formerly a jaghire in your possession for contingent, etc. The 
talooks of Chickodee and Manowlee have been given to others by the British 
Government*; these have been deducted. The grants in the old jaghire, and in 
lieu of the mokassa and other items of revenue in the Nawab's country, with 
the jaghire now fixed to be granted by the British Government altogether 
for personal allowance and establishment, amount to Hupees 50^000; 
Kupees 12,000 is allowed in addition to support the dignity of Sir Lushkur, 
in lieu of what has been discontinued under this head. With the exception 
of this sum of Rupees 62,000, the rest of jaghire is held for the support of a 
contingent of horse. In the Tynat Zabita the contingent required is of the 
three kinds; the maintenance of these would be more than you could perform. 
The service of the British Government is throughout the whole year, without 
excuse. The horses are required to be good and effective. The amount of 
contingent at the rate of Rupees 300 per horse is 1,107 ; three-fourths of these 
were relinquished, and a fourth of the contingent was fixed, amounting to 
277 horse. You have requested to have 27 horse further reduced, and have 
agreed to furnish 250 ; this is accordingly granted as you wish. 



Part II Lapsed States— T^ mpanikar—TSfo. GXXXIV. 406 



Abticlb 2. 

Your troops sball be mustered whenever called od ; tbe borses and men 
shall be good and effective, and sball serve tbe whole year. Should the 
number upon muster prove deficient, tbe amount of such deficiency shall be 
repaid to Government at tbe rate of Rupees 300. If a detachment of from 
15 to 20 horse is required to be sent from the army on your affairs^ you must 
first mention it to the officer in command on the part of the government^ and 
they will io that case be included in the muster. When your troops are not 
required, they will be permitted to return to your own station for monsoon 
quarters for four months during the rainy season^ but if they are required^ 
they must remain. 

Article 3. 

You shall serve in such manner as the government may order ; you will 
not in general be required to serve beyond the Qodavery and the Tumbadra ; 
but if at any time you should be required to do so^ you must go without 
objecting. On such occasions you will be furnished by government with 
money for the payment of your troops at the established rate of pay^ which 
money is to be repaid to government in your country. 



Article 4. 

In the event of either men or horses being killed or wounded in action, 
you will receive no compensation from government. All expenses are to be 
provided for-out of the allowance granted. This is to be observed according 
to former practice ; but if any great man should be wounded or killed in action^ 
a reward will be given to him by the government if wounded^ or a pension to 
his family if he be killed in action. 

Article 5. 

In addition to your contingent you will maintain at your own expense 
such establishments for the preservation of order within your limits as may 
be necessary ; and in tbe event of disturbances in your neighbourhood^ yoa 
will furnish assistance with such troops as may be in your lands. 

Article 6. 

• 

As long as you continue to serve the British Government with fidelity 
and attachment^ your jag hire shall remain undisturbed in your possession and 
that of the Sirdars of your family^ and a Sunnud sball be procured to the same 
effect from His Excellency the Most Noble tbe Governor-General hereafter. 
When new Sunnuds are required for the descendants of each respectively, it is 
to be represented to tbe government, which will graciously confer a new 
Sunnud and continue the jaghire without exacting any nuzzur. 



406 Lapsed SiAteB-The Nipanihar.^'No, GXXXIV. Fart II 



Aetiolb 7. 

Any villages^ lands, or other possessions belonging^ to yonr snrinjam or 
enam, situated within the knds of government, shall be continued without 
obstruction as they have heretofore been continued. You will continue all 
rights within your jaghire, whether belonging to the State or individuals ; all 
doomallee^ surinjam, and enam villages and lands, all wursbasuns (or annual 
pensions), dhurmadaos (or charitable allowances), dewashthans (or religious 
establishments), rozeenah (daily stipend), khyrats. (alms to Mahomedans), 
nemnooks (or assignments on the revenue), etc., in conformity to the list con- 
tained in the grant of jour surinjam ; and if in any particular instance any 
interruption shall have been ofiered to a grant not annulled by government^ 
such grant shall likewise be made good without hindrance to the proprietor. 
No complaints on this head are to be suffered to reach the Government. If 
any should act improperly, or be without heirs, you shall report to the firitish, 
which has authority to punish and resume. If any zemindar should be guilty 
of rebellion or treason, or should resist your authority, or die without heirs, 
you are at liberty to resume his lands as a punishment, on satisfying yourself 
of his guilt, at the same time reporting the matter to government and receiv- 
ing its orders regarding it, which shall be executed accordingly. 

Abticlb 8. 

You will attend to the prosperity of the ryots of your jaghire, to the 
strict administration of justice, and the effectual suppression of robberies, 
murders, tuUee, arsons, and other crimes. Should that not be done, and the 
government gives orders regarding any complaint made in your jaghire, you 
will act accordingly in the settlement of the matter. Any decision of gov- 
emment regarding the administration of justice which may be made on 
investigation must be duly executed. If any obstruction should be offered, 
or should the country fall into great disorder, and robberies and other offences 
begin to be committed, the government will make such arrangements for the 
surinjamee lands as it may deem proper. 

Abticlb 9. 

You shall on no account entertain troops for the purpose of engaging 
in a contest with any person whatever. In the event of any cause of dispute 
c^B^i3& you must not resort yourself to extreme measures, but must refer the 
question to government for consideration; it will then be impartially adjusted, 
and you must abide by the decision. 

Aeticlb 10. 

You shall hold no connexion nor correspondence with Bajee Rao or other 
dowlutdars or suwasthans, as proclaimed by government, and shall afford 
aid to no disaffected person. This condition is hereby engaged for, and if 
infringed^ the jaghire will not be continued. 



Part II Lapsed States— 2^ yipanikar^JSTo. OXXXIV. 407 



Abticle II. 

If any offenders from yonr jaghire lands shall come into those of the 
tiovernment^ you will represent the affair^ and they shall on enquiry be deli- 
vered up to you ; and should any offender against the (governments or criminal 
belonging to its teriitories, seek refuge in your countryi he shall be appre- 
hended and delivered up, and if pursued by the Oovemment officers, you will 
afford every assistance in delivering up such offender. 

Abticle 12. 

The British Government will maintain your rank and dignity as it was 
maintained under His Highness the Peishwa in former times. It will attend 
to any of your representations and will decide equitably upon them. 

The above 1% Articles are agreed to this 14th Jane 1820^ Bamzan 5th^ 
Jestmas« 



INDEX. 



SUBJIOT, 



Pagb 



Abkabx Rbtinub— 

Soaihern Mahratta Jaglrdan. Lease to the British QoTernment of the 

01 vDO "^ ••• ••« ••• ••• ••• 

Aayssikiak Slati Tbadi — 

Hatch Bao's proclamation prohibltixig his sabjects from engagiiig in the 

AiMFTioir— 

granted the priTilege of 
ditto 



of 



Akalkot Baja 
Anndh Chief 
Bansda Chief 
Bhor Jagirdar 
Dharampor Rfipa 
Jamkhandi Chief 
Jath Baja 
Kolhapar Maharaja 
Zorandwar Senior Chief 



ditto 

ditto ditto 

ditto ditto 

ditto ditto 

ditto ditto 

ditto ditto 

ditto ditto 

ditto ditto 



Kutch Rao ditto 

Miraj Senior and Jnnior Chiefs ditto 



Mudhol Chief 


ditto 


Phaltan Jigirdar 


ditto 


Ramdarg Chief 


ditto 


Sangli Chief 


ditto 


Satara Jagirdars 


ditto 


Sawantwari Chief 


ditto 



ditto ... ••• 

ditto ... ... 

ditto 
ditto 

ditto ... ... 

ditto ... ••• 

ditto .. ... 

ditto ... ... 

iS!M«*8aoces8ion." 

AFBIOA — 

Entchis residing in — . Jurisdiction Ofer -* .„ .•• 

AvBiOAV Slate Tbasb — 

Kotch Bao's proclamation prohibiting his subjects from engaging in the — — 

Ahmad ABAD^ 

Agreement relating to trade condnded with — ... ... 

British factory permitted to be established at — — 

Morvi assign^ to Rao of Entch by '— ..r 

Title of ** Bao " bestowed on the Chief of Entch by — ^ 

AHICASNAGAB^ 

Panth Sachiv's cession of jurisdiction in villages in — — - 
AlBIBIB — 

Infanticide to be renounced by the Jareja Chief of — - 

Ajapub — 

Wagher Chiefs' observance of their treaty obligations. Bond executed by 
Thakur of for — 

Akalkot, Satara Jagir — 

Account of the State of — 

Administration of ^— conducted under British supervision 
Adoption sanad conferred on the jagirdar of — — ... .. 

Agreement on the restoration of the jsgir of — to the Chief ... 



*•• 
••• 
... 
... 
.?• 
... 
... 
••• 
... 
... 
... 
.•• 
... 
... 
.*• 
... 
.•• 



{ 



••• 

•t. 
•*. 
•*• 



the 
••• 

... 
••• 
••* 

... 



216 
224, 

42 

129 

ib. 

89 
129 

89 
245 
129 

89 
246 

44 
246 

ib. 
129 
246 

ib. 
128 

89 



48 

856 

339 

1 

ib. 

147 
85 

25 

123 

124 

129 

ib. 



VII 



( ii ) 



Subject. 



Paoi 



AKikLKOT, Satara Jagir— 

Asoistanoe to be rendered by the jagirdar of — in case of diftnrbanoea 
Britiflh control over poeteesioog of the jagirdar of —^ ... 
British fruarantee to the jagirdar of — ... 

Charitable and religione grants to be respected by the jagirdar of — - 
Contingent of hone to be maintained by the jagirdar of — - 
Criminals to be surrendered by the jagirdar of — 
Foreign States. Jagirdar's engagement not to enter into relations with — 
Jakat (Pone Panch-mahal). Amount received by — from Government on 
accoant of — ... ... ..• ... ,,, 

Justice to be administered by the jagirdar of — - 

Maloj i 's maladministration of — 

Military servioe commuted to a pecaniary payment 

Mokasbab. Amount received by from Government on acoonnt of — 

Railway (G. I. P.) lands. Cession by of civil and criminal jurisdietion 

over ^^* ..• ••> ... ... .«« ... 

Bevenoe survey and settlement introduced in ^— 

Satara Raja's agreement with the jagirdar of ... ^ 

Shabuji, the present Chief of — 

Territorial exchanges to be agreed to by the jagirdar of — — * 

Territorial possessione restored to the jagirdar of ... 

Transit duties abolished in — 

Troops not to be entertained by the jagirdar of 

Akiwat— 

Kolhapnr's cession of —- 

Ambliabv in Kutch — 

Arbitration in disputes of the Thakur of —— 

Criminals not to be sheltered by the Thakur of 

Forts belonging to the Thakur of — to be destroyed ... 

Girasia Chiefs' plundering excursions to be provented by the Thakur of — *»— ... 

Jamabandi payments promised to the Bao of Euteh by the Thakur of 

Military service to be rendered to the Rao of Kutch by the Thakur of »— » 

Plunderers to be intercepted by the Thakur of 

Stolen property. Thaknr's responsibility regarding — 

AXBBIOAVB—- 

Hyderabad Amir's engagement not to permit — — to form settlements in their 
vcrri uory ••• ••• ... ... ,,, ,,, 

Kutch Rao's engagement to prohibit the passage through his territory of troops 

belonging to the 

Kutch Rao's engagement not to permit the establishment of in his territory 

Mandvi Diwan's engagement not to permit the to form settlements in his 

territory ... .. ... ,,, .,, ,,, 

Sind Amirs' engagement to the same effect 

See ** Foreigners." 

Anjab— 

Kotch Rao's deed of oeesion of the fort and villages of —— 

Kotch Rao's engagement for the payment of a pecuniary eqni^ent on the 

restoration of — 
Restoration of — to the Rao of Kutch 



Jurisdiction over — • 



Arabia— 

Kntchis residing in — 

Arms— 

Kutch Kao's engagement not to import — ^ 

A880MBIA in Kntch — 

Infanticide to be renounced by the Jareja Chief of 



( 



ISO 
408 
132 
181 
180 
188 
ib. 

124 
131 
124 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 
188 
124 
182 
180 
124 
181 



205 

207 

28 
ib. 
24 
23 
24 
ih. 
ib. 
28 



800 

16 
11 

12 
309 



17 

26 
ib. 

42 

20 

85 



( iii ) 



SUBJIOT. 



Paoi 



AuiTDH, Satara Jagir^^ 

Account of the jflgir of ... ... 

Adoption sanad conferred on tbe Chief — * 

Aggressions not to be committed by — 

Agreement con taininfl: terms granted to ——> ... 

Assistance to be rendered to — -in case of disturbances 

Bhor Cbief^s tribnte to be paid to the Raja of Satsra by the Jacrirdar of — — ... 

British control oyer the possessions of the Jagirdar of -^ ... 

British guarantee to the therms granted by the Satara Riga to — — 

British revenues from certain villages of — 

Charitable and religious grants to be oontinoed by Jagirdar of^— ... 

Criminals to be surrendered by Jagirdar of 

Foreign States. Engagement of the Jagirdar of not to enter into relations 

W^lwU *"^ •«« a«* «•• ••• •■# ••• 

Jagir of restored on certain conditions to the Fant Pratinidhi ... 

Jath Jagirdar's payment to 

Justice to be administered by the Jagirdar of — — 

Nasarana paid on sucoeasion by -^ 

Opium agreement entered into by the Chief of — ... 

Police to be maintained by — « ... 

Pursuit of criminals. Assistance to be rendered by — in the — ... 

Satara Raja's engagement with 

Srinivas Parasram, present Chief of — .•• 
Sthalbharit abolished in — ... ... ... 

Sthalmod abolisbed in .•. 

8tolen property to be restored by — 
Territorial exchanges to be agreed to by — « 
Troops not to be entertained by -«— 

AURAKGZBB, Emperor of Delhi — 

British goods exempted from transit duties by — — - 

Reduction by — « of customs duty to be paid by the British at Surat 

AUBIR in Kutch — 

Arbitration in disputes of the Thakur of 

Criminals not to be harboured by the Thakur of ... 

Forts belonging to the Thakur of to be destroyed ... 

Oirasias' plundering excursions to be prevented by the Thakur of ^— 
Jamabandi payments promised to the Bao of Kutch by the Thakur of — 
Military serrice to be rendered to the Bao of Kutch by tbe Thakur of — ^ 
Plunderers to be intercepted by the Thakur of — > 
Stolen property. — 's responsibility f or -<> ... 



. . . 

... 

• • « 



. • . 



... 
..• 
... 
... 
... 
... 
••• 



125 
129 
156 
154 
156 
ib, 
408 
166 
126 
156 
165 

a. 

154 
127 
155 
126 

ib. 
155 

ib. 
157 
126 

ib. 

ib. 
155 
156 
155 

860 
ib. 

23 
ib. 
24 
28 
24 
ib. 
ib. 
23 



Baba, Mabaraj, of Kolhapur — 

Agreement of Raja of Kolhapur to respect the lands and rights of — — 

British protection guaranteed to — - ... ... ..* 

Babawalpub on the N.*W. Frontier— 

Khairpor territory transferred to the Nawab of — ... 
Nasir Muhammad Khan*s intrigues with the Nawab of — « 
Nur Muhnmroad Khan's intrigues with the Nawab ot — ^ 

Rori transferred to the Nawab of 

Sabzalkot conferred on the Nawab of — — ... 

Balaji Vishwanath— 

Peshwa's sffairs entrusted to — - 

Bansda in Surat Agency— 

Abkari administration of -^ — . Assimilation of the — to the British system 



... 
... 

... 



{ 



202 
204 
204 

833 
287 

ib. 
888 

ib. 

846 
80 



( iv ) 



••• 



••• 



SiTBJBcrr. 



Bassda in Sarat Agency— 

Account of the Chief sliip of —— ... .^ 

Adoption sanad granted to the Raja of — - 

Chanth paid by to the British Government. Amount of the — 

Chanth &kat farmed to the Raja of — . 
Customs duties. Arrangement regarding -^ 
GuUb 8in(rh's succession to the Raj of — - 
Jurisdiction exercised by the Baja of — . 

Mahratta chauth from 

Pratap Singh, present Baja of — - „ 

Transit duties. Arrangements regarding — 

Transit duties. Compensation paid to the Chief of — for the abolttioo of 

Transit duties abolished in the *<— State ... 

Tribute paid by to the British Oovemment. Amount of the — > 

Tribute paid by the Baja of ^— - 

Batda, a feudatory of Eolhapur — 

Account of the petty Chiefship of — 

BSTT in Okhamandal — 

Administrative arrangements relating 
Division of the revenues of -— — 
Garrisoning of . Anangement 

Bbabwatias or Cbimivals — 

Ambliam Thakur's engagement not to 



Paoi 



*•* 
••• 
••• 

••• 



••• 



to 

• • ■ 

regarding — 



••• 



Ansir Thakur's 
Bhimasir Tbakur's 
Chiri Thakur's 
Chitror Thakur's 
Giria Thakur's 
Hamirpur Thakur's 
Jattawaro Thakur's 
Jessura Thakur's 
Eammar Thakur's 
Kanthkot Thakur's 
Earianagar Thakur's 
Eumbhardi Thakur's 
Eatch Bao's 
Lakria Thakur's 
Mowann Thakur's 
Falsswa Thakur's 
Bori Thakur's 
Shranva Thakur's 
Sudram Thakur's 
Trammu Thakur's 
Vijpasir Thakur's 
TV aghela Chiefs' 
Wandia Thakur's 



ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 

ditto 



afford an asylom to 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 



... 
••» 
... 
... 
... 
... 



.•• 
... 
••• 
... 
... 
••• 
••• 
... 
•*• 
*•• 
.•• 
.•• 
••• 



... 
••• 

••• 
... 



• . . 

... 

... 



See •« Criminals.*' 



Bhau Mahabaj of Eolhapur^ 

British protection guaranteed to 

Eolhapur Raja's engagement not to molest — 

Bhaxtkagab in Eathiawar-- 

Cambay Nawab's engagement not to interfere in affairs of 

Bhauvo BiBBA in Sind— 

Bahawalpur Nawab granted the pargana of — — 



••• 



80 

ih. 

ih. 

ib. 

ib. 

80 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

186 

3 

ib. 
ib. 

23 

ib. 

ib. 

ih. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

ib. 

f5w 







ib. 






ib. 






ib. 






ib. 






ib. 






ib. 






ib. 




( 


204 


• • • 


I 


207 


• • • 




204 


• s« 




55; 


• • • 




833 



( V ) 



SUBJBOT. 



Bhimasib in Entoh— 

Arbitration in dispates of the Thaknr of — r- 

Criminals not to be refuted by the Thaknr of — — - 

Forts belonging to the Thaknr of — — to be destroyed ... 

Girasia Chiefs' plundering excursions to be prevented by the Thaknr of — ... 

Jamabandi payments promised to the Bao of Kntch by the Thaknr of — « 

Military service to be rendered to the Rao of Entch by the Thaknr of »-«• 

Plnnderers to be intercepted by the Thaknr of .. 

Stolen property. Thakur's responsibility regarding — ... 

Bhob, Satara Jagir— 

Abkari administration of — assimilated to the British system 

Abkari revenue of . Management of the — transferrod to the British Gov- 

emmenw ... ... *•• ••• ... ... 

Account of the jagir of —— 

Adoption sanad conferred on -— » 

Aggressions not to be committed by — « ... 

Agreement relating to exchanges with — — ... 

Agreement with Chimnaji Baghanath on his succession to the Chiefshlp of — — 

Allowances of the members of the family to be paid by the — ... ... 

Bankers' debts to be paid by —- 

British coins to be current in the jngfir of — 

British control over the possessions of «— — ... 

British guarantee to the terms granted by the Satara Baja to ... 

British subjects' trial for offences in the jagir of . Bvidenee to be pro- 

uQceci lor ^^ ... ,,. ••• ... ... ... 

Charitable and religious grants to be respected bv — -« ... 
Compensation to be granted to parties having a lien on transit duties 
Criminals to be surrendered by — 
Debts not to be contracted by —^ ... ... ... 

Deccan. Bevenues of ^-^ from the — 

Foreign States. 's engagement not to enter into relations with — 

Jagir in Poona of the Chief of «— 

Jagir possessions restored to the Chief of — — - 

Jurisdiction in villages in Poona and Ahmadnagar ceded by •— — > ... 

Justice to be administered in his jagir by the Chief of 

Earbhari to conduct the administration of the jagir of — ^ 
Ehandesh. Revenues of —from — 
Nazarana paid on succession by the Chief of — » 

Opium agreement of the Chief of 

Opium agreement with . Renewal of the — 

Particulars of the exchange of territory with — 
Police to be assisted in the jagir of — ^ 

Pursuit of criminals in the jagir of ... 

Revenues of the territorial exchanges with 

Satara. ——'s payments to the Baja of — ... 

Satara Raja's engagement with 

Shankar Rno's succession as Chief of ... 

Stolen property to be restored by the Chief of — 
Taxation. No new — to be imposed by the Chief of — 

of Government ... ... ... ... 

Taxes or imposts on import, export, and measurement of commodities other than 

snuff, sulphur, and poisonous drugs abolished in •»— 

Territorial exchanges effected with 

Territorial exchanges to be ngreed to by — 

Transit duties abolished in the jagir of —-—... ... ... ... 

Tribute from ■ ... ... ... .•• ,„ 

TVoops not to be entertained by — ... ... ... 

Bhuj— 

British troops to occupy the fort of — 



Pagb 



without the consent 



23 

lb, 
24 
2S 
24 
ib. 
ii. 
23 

125 

ib. 
124 
129 
187 
141 
147 
148 

ib. 

ib, 
403 
137 

147 
188 
148 
187 
148 
125 
137 
124 
138 
147 
187 
148 
125 

ib. 
149 
125 
144 
147 

ib. 
146 
187 
139 
125 
137 

125 

ib. 
141 
187 
148 
125 
137 

27 



{ vi ) 



• •• 



• •• 



SUBJBCT. 



Bhuj— 

Kutch Rao's engipement regardingr the fort of 

Eatch Rao's engagement to indemnif j the British Govenmeiit lor expenses in 
repairing the fort of — - ... .„ 

BiDBA in Kotch — 

Infanticide to be renonnced by the Jareja Chief of — 

Bombay— 

fioglish seat of GoTemment remoyed to — 
Kntch Eao to be permitted to have a factory at — 

Bboaoh— 

Account of the lapsed State of — ... 

Aggpressions not to be committed by the Nawab of — • 
British factory permitted to be established at — 

British factory withdrawn from 

British protection guaranteed to -^— 

Gaptore of — by the British ... 

Dutch factory permitted to remain at *— 

Expeditions sent against '— ... ••• 

Expenses of British troops sent to the assistance of 

Nawab ... ••• •• 

Foreign European factories not to be permitted in — — 

Indemnity to be paid by the Nawab of 

Military service to be rendered by the Nawab of — 
Nawab's bond for payment of indemnity 
Pensions allowed to the descendants of the Nawab oi - 
Privileges of trade gpranted to British subjects in -«- 

Sindhia's cession of to the British Government 

Treaty of peace concluded with the Nawab of — 

BVKEUB FoBT in Sind— 

Khairpur Amir's engagement relating to British oocnptaion of 

BuKKUB Islands— 

Khurpur Mir's cession of the — - 





Paos 


• > • 


27 


Bnses in 




•.. 


a. 


•.. 


86 


• a. 


889 


a.. 


8 



. • • 

... 

• •• 
... 



to be paid by the 



••• 



Cambat in Bombay— 

Abkari revenue of — . Lease of the — to the British Government 
Account of the Chief ship of — — ... ... ... 

Administration of — . Reformation of the — - 
Administration of — placed under the control of a special officer ... 
Agreement for the distribution of the transit collections at — 
Agreement for the establishment of an English factory at Gogha 
Agreement for the levy of customs duty ou goods imported and exported 

iroui ^""""^ ..• .*• ... «.( «.. 

Agreement with the Nawab regarding the administration of the costome 

ment and the lery of rahdari and transit duties in ^— 
Anchorage fees to he paid by vessels in the port, of — — 
Arrangements for the levy of customs duty at ^— 
Bande Ali Khan's succession to the masnad ... ... 

Bankruptcy. State of in a condition of — ... ,„ 

BhannNgar affairs. Nawab's engagement not to interfere in — ... 

British factory to be established at 

British troops to be assisted by the Nawab of — — 
Chautb. Abandonment of British claims for — in -— « 
Classiflcation of goods 

Custom House arrangements at 

Custom House arrangements for export and import of goods at — 



... 



by 

• • • 

depart- 



• • * 

••• 

• a. 
••* 



887 
851 
850 
387 
858 

837 
850 
887 

851 

850 

851 

850 

358 

887 

850 

887 

850 

823 

884 



61 

49 
52 
ib. 
63 
54 

57 

64 
60 
ib. 
51 
52 
55 
889 
54 
51 
68 
60 
68 



( vii ) 



SUBJSOT. 



Paob 



Oambat in Bombay — 

Custom House to be built by tbe Nawab of — ... ..• 

Custom House to be repaired by the Nawab of — 

Customs collections in — — '. Interference in the — .abandoned by the British 

Government ... ... ... ... ... 

Customs collections in — ». Bight of resuming direct control of the — 

reserved by the British Government 
Customs doty to be paid ttt —— 

Customs tariff (British) adopted by the Nawab of — — ... 
Customs tariff to be revised at -—^ 
Description of articles to be taxed at •^— ... 
Distribution of sea customs duties and anchorage fees at — « 
Duties to be paid at the Custom House at — «— 
Duty to be levied on import and export of goods from — 
Expenses of Britiih troops to be defrayed by the Nawab of — 
Free Trade. Nawab's agreement for the renewal of all restrictions on — in his 

o la bv ... ••• *•* ••• *.. .•• 

Husain-Tawar Khan's succession to the masnad of —— 

Jafar Ali Khan, the present Nawab of ... 

Jurisdiction exercised by the Nawab of — — 

Kaveo ferry to be maintained at — 

Misgovemment of the State of "^ 

Nawab's arrangements for the protection of goods in transit in — — 

Nawab's share in transit du^es levied at -— ^ 

Nur-ud-din's usurpation of the maenad of — 

Opium. Nawab's engagement to prohibit the cultivation of the poppy and the 

manufacture of — in his State 

Payment for the farm of the Peshwa's chauth 

Peshwa's chauth farmed to the Nawab of — 
Piracy to be suppressed by the Nawab of — 
Political supervinoo of — — placed under Kaira 
Provisions exempted from duty at — 
Bate of duty to be levied on goods at ^— ... 
Bate of sea customs duty and anchorage fees to be levied at — ~- ... 
Bevenues made over towards payment of the fort of Talaja by the Nawab 
"* ^"^^^ ... ... ... .«• ... ... 

Biot in . Order restored by British troops 

Biot in — — > and flight of Che Nawab 

Salt agreement of the Nawab of — 

Salute allowed to the Nawab of ^— 

Shannrao N. Land, late Diwan of — » declared ineligible for service in the 

Oiinbe ... .•* .•• ... ... ... 

Smuggled goods seised at . Disposal of — 

Succession sanad conferred on the Nawab of — - 

Talaja fort. Bhannagar's engagement with regarding — 

Transit collections in . Agreement relating to the division of — 

Treaty for the.sale of Talaja to the Nawab of ^-«- ... ••• 

Tribute paid by the Nawab of —— 

Cbixobi Paboava— 

Kolhapor's cession of — ^- ... ... ... ... ••• 

CmvcHKi, S. M. Jagir — 

Lapse of the estate of —« ... ... ... ... 

Chibi in Eutch— 

Arbitraiioo in disputes of the Thakur of 

Criminals not to be afforded an asylum by the Thakur of -^— 

Forts belonging to the Bao of — — to be destroyed 

GimsiM Chiefs plundering excursions to be prevented by the Thakur of — ... 

Jamabandi payments promised to the Bao of Kutoh by the Thakur of — 



[ 



68 
61 

51 

tft. 
60 
51 
62 
59 
68 
60 
68 
64 

74 

61^ 

ib. 

62 

61 

62 

58 

ib. 

49 

68 
65 
56 
55 
53 
52 
61 
59 
62 

54 
52 
61 
69 
62 

ib. 
61 
51 
260 
68 
53 
50 

204 

188 

23 
ib, 
24 
23 
24 



( viii ) 



Subject. 



Chibi in Kutch— 

Military service to be rendered to the Rao of Knteh by the Thakur of 
Plunderers to be intercepted by the Thaknr of ^— 
Stolen property. Beeponsibility regarding — 

Chitbob in Kntch — 

Arbitration in disputes of the Thakur of — ^ 
Criminals not to be refuged by the Thaknr of — 

Forts belonging to Thaknr of to be destroyed 

Girasia Chiefs' plundering excursions to be prevented by the Thakur of 
Jamabandi paymeDts promised to the Bao of Eutch by the Thakor of 
Military service to be rendered to the Bao of Kutch by the Thakor of 
Plunderers to be intercepted by the Thakur of — > 
Stolen property. Responsibility regarding — 

Cbimikalb— 

Akalkot Jagirdar's engHgeroent to surrender — — 



Aundh Chiefs ditto 

Bhor Chief's ditto 

Jamkhandi Chiefs ditto 

Jath Jagirdar*s ditto 

Eolaba Chiefs ditto 

Kolhapur Raja's ditto 

Eurundwad Chiefs' ditto 



ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 





Paob 


^"^^ .*• 


24 


• •• 


ib. 


• •• 


23 


••t 


23 


• *• 


ib. 


• •• 


24 


€ — •.• 


23 




24 




ib. 


• » 


ib. 


•M 


28 


»• • 


182 


• •• 


155 



• • • 

• •• 

• •• 



Eutch Rao'k arrangements regarding the surrender of — ^- 

Eutch Wagher Chiefs' engagement not to afford an asylum to 

Miraj Chiefs' engagement to surrender — — 

Mudhol Chiefs ditto ditto 

Nargund Chief's ditto ditto 

Nipani Chiefs ditto ditto 

Bamdorg Chief a ditto ditto 

Sangli Chiefs ditto ditto 

Satara Raja's ditto ditto 

Sawantwari Cluef s ditto ditto 

Shedbal Chief s ditto ditto 

Tasgaon Chiefs ditto ditto 

Wai Shaikh's ditto ditto 

CuvsAGHWABBT in the Deccan^ 

See ** Eanaghwari." 

CirsTOXS DUX8~ 

Eutch rules to exempt distressed vessels from — — 



••• 

•*• 
••• 
. • • 
• •• 



Dabha in Sind— 

Battle of ■ ... ... ... ... 

Datwad in Kolhapur — 

Account of the petty Chiefship of -^— 

Deocan— 

Bhor Chiefs revenues from certain districts in the 

Delhi— 

Farman of the Emperor of -— — fixing the customs dues on English goods at 

Surat at 2 per cent. 
James Ist, King of England, addressed by the Emperor of — ... 

James Ist* King of England. Letter from — to the Emperor of 

Roe's (Sir Thomas) mission to the Emperor of ^— 



• •• 


137 


• • • 


240 


• •• 


168 


■ t • 


878 


• • t 


203 


• •• 


240 


• •• 


8 


• •• 


28 


• •• 


240 


« • • 


2&0 


• ■• • 


247 


• • • 


407 


• • • 


247 


• •• 


280 


• •• 


392 


• • • 


267 


• •• 


240 


• •• 


286 


• •• 


176 


• •• 


81 


• • • 


292 


• •• 


186 


• • • 


126 


3^ds at 




• • • 


359 


• • • 


ib. 


• • • 


858 


• •• 


ib. 



( ix 1 



SUBJBOT. 



Paob 



Dblhi— 

Sidis' oppreaaionB at Sorat represented to tbe Court of — — 

Snrat castle and fleet entmited to the English by the Conrt of — — 

Sorat tribate demanded by the Conrt of ~ 

BSABIX^UB in Snrat Agency— 

Abkari administration of — assimilated to the Brifsh systam 

Aoooont of the State of ... 

Adoption lanad conferred on the Raja of — ^ 

Agreement relating to the ftkvm of 

Chanth formed to the Raja of ■ ■ - ... ... ..« •.. 

Cnstoms doty. Arrangements reirarding the lewj of •— 

Extradition and trial of — snbjects for offences committed in Portnguese 

India. Arrangement regarding ^ ... 
JnriscUction eiercimsd by the Chief of — ... 
Mahratta chanth from — — 

MohandeT, the present Bi^a of 

Opiom. Arrangement resardiog smnggled — passing throngh ~ 
Innsit daties renounced by — — 

DWABXA in Eathiawar— 

Division of the revennes of —* ... ... 

Garrisoning of -«—. Arrangement regarding — 



BVBOFSAir DB8BBTKB8— 

Kolhapar's engagement to surrender — — ... 
Sawantwari Chief's engagement to surrender 



••• 



FiBADl in Euteh — 

Infanticide to be renonnced by the Jar^a Chief of 

FiVB FiTHD in Eathiawar— 

Hothi tribes' establishment of — — 

FoBuev Mbbobvasiis— 

Kntch Bao's engagement not to entertain «— ... 

FoiBiov Sbtilbmekts— 

Kutch Bao's engagement not to permit the establishment of 
Sind Amirs' engagement not to allow — ... 

Founev Statbs— 

Akalkot Jagirdar's 
Anndh Chiefs 
Bhor Chief's 
Hyderabad Mirs* 
Jath Jagirdar's 
Kolaba Chiefs 
Kntch Bao's 
Mirpnr Mirs' 
Mndhol Chiefs 
Nargnnd Chiefs 
Nipani Jagirdar's 
Phaltan Chiefs 
Bamdnrg Chiefs 
Satara Baja's 
Sawantwari Chief's 
Wai Shaikh's 



in his territory 
•»• ••• 



engagement not 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
diVeo 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 



to enter into 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 



relations with 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
ditto 
dittd 
ditto 
ditto 



••• 

• • • 

• • • 

••• 



• • • 
••• 

••• 

• • t 

. ■ ■ 
• « • 



866 
869 
870 

81 
ib. 
ih. 
89 
ib. 
90 

81 
ih. 
ib. 
ib. 
90 
ib. 



ib. 



195 
i 260 
I 262 



85 

88 

20 

11 
809 

182 
165 
187 
827 
163 
876 
20 
830 
250 
247 
406 
169 
247 
892 
267 
176 



VU 



( X } 



Subject. 



FOBXIGNEBB — 

Kolaba Cbiers engagement not to employ 

Kolhspur Raja's ditto ditto 

Katch Bao's engagement to prohibit the panage^ throagh hia territory of troops 
belonging to •" ■ ,., ••• ••• ... ,,, 

Sawantwari Chief B engagement not to employ —>» 

Vbmb Tbadb — 

Eolhapar agreement for removal of restrictions oa — 

Soothem Mahratta Jagirdsrs* agreements of the — 

FSEVOH— 

Hyderabad Mirs' engagement not to permit the formation of settlements in l^nd 
oy uie "^~"" ... ••• ••• .». •.. ... 



Pagk 



876 
195 

16. 
C 260 
{ 262 

212 
C 224 
1 227 



308 



GlSABIAS— 

Waghela Chiefs to prevent plundering excursions of 

GisiA in Kntch — 

Arbitration in disputes of the Thaknr of — — 
Criminals not to be refnged by the Thaknr of — 

Forts belonging to the Tbakur of to be destroyed ••• 

Girasia Chiefs' plundering excursions to be prevented by the Thakar of ... 

Jamabandi payments promised to the Rao of Katch by the Thakar of — — 
AlilitHry service to be rendered to the Bno of Eutoh by the Thakor of ^— 
Plunderers to be intercepted by the Thakar of — ^ •.. ... ^ 

Stolen property. 's responsibility regarding ^ ,^ ,^ 

GOGHA in Kathinwar — 

British factory permitted to be established at — — ... ... 

Cambay Nawab*s engagement regarding the establishment of an English fibotory 

au " ••• .*• ... ... ... ■ ,,, 

GUJABAT in Bombay— 

Wagher inroads into 

GVJTT in Eutch — 

Infanticide to be renounced by the Jareja Chief of — 

Haxi>ab Ali, Nawab — 

Bamdurg conquered by — 

Hakzbfub in Eutch — 

Arbitration in disputes of the Thaknr of — — ..• 

Criminals not to be refuged by the Tbakur of — ^ 

Forts belonging to the Thaknr of to be destroyed ... 

Girasia Chief's plundering excursions to be prevented by the Thaknr of 

JaiiiNbandi payments promised to the Bao of Eutch by the Thakar of • 

Militiiry service to be rendered to the Rao of Eutch by the Thukur of 

Plunderers to be intercepted by the Thaknr of ... 

Stolen property. 's responsibility regarding — .., 

HOTHI Tbibb of Jarejas in EotA— 

Infanticide to be suppressed by the Chief of the ... 

Htsbbabad in Sivd— 

Account of the Amirs of — 

Americans not to be permitted to form settlements in — - 

Amirs to act in subordinate co-operation with the British Government 



»•%. 



••• 



2a 

23 
24 

2a 

24 
%K 
iK 
2& 

33» 
54 

4 

8S 



192 

23 
ih. 

24 
23 
24 
ib. 
ib, 
23 

37 

281 
809 
827 



< « ) 



SUBJBOT. 



Pagb 



Hydbrabad in Sind— 

Anohorftge fee on tbe Indns. Amngement regarding the kry of — 

Arbitration in diiputes of the Amirs of -—« 

Armed vesaeU not to proceed. up the rivers in — * 

British coinHge to be cnrrent in the territory of the Amirs of — - ... 

British jurisdiction not to be extended to the