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I 



«5 



GENERAL INDEX 



TO THE 



COLLECTION OF 



STATE TRIALS 



COMPILED BY 



T. B. HOWELL, and T. J. HOWELL, Esqrs. 



By DAVID JARDINE, Esq. 

OF THB MIDDLB TXUPI.B, BARRISTBR-AT-IJIW. 

KOBIS IN ARCTO ET INOLORIUS LABOR,— 7aoi7. Annai. Lib. tr. cap. K, 



LONDON: 

LONGMAN, REES, ORME, BROWN & GREEN ; J. M. RICHARDSON ; PARBURY, 
ALLEN & CO. ; BALDWIN & CRADOCK ; £. JEFFERY & SON ; J. HATCHARD 
ft SON ; R. H. EVANS ; J. BOOKER ^ J. BOOTH ; and BUDD & CALKIN. 



1828. 



,„„ iSZ^««'«"- 



^U6 2T 1900 



rr 



T. C. HAwsAikD, Printer, PatBr-noster-row, London. 



APVERTISEMENT. 



•^r**!'*— ••■•w^fiBPfwiw^ 



JLT hQA kmg heek « auAi^el of legset ta ali clasads of ilMukte, and 
pmrti^dai^ly to Metatera o£ Aa ii^* I\ofes8ioii» thai tlKf mass, of; 
yMmhlk iiifenniion oii U^ atld coiistiitttiiMibl subjeets^ conUdned' 
iot tke Stele Triahr »1]k>iiM- imaih lit a gteat otfeasnre ka^iceadible for^ 
want <^f m cbkii^iaant lodte. the 6ea€»al'lnd«x to Haufgntw's Stalia 
Tnab, yftHSuSi W4la* iipHoifipited^^y Iba^ Wii^d Editor of the work^ iis^ 
atnauidiy impeyfidct/ iAi 'ftift of ^t^tfa^i^ ; ttd ef«tt lAtl^ the 
a8di»taBc6 (^ & Table of Parallel Reftfeiiee^ fiimisheti a Tery «i»kwardt 
and insufficient guide to the con<feht6 of the Octavo edition; 
besides which, the matter which is common to both editions forms 
fittle more than half of the contents of HowelFd Collection. By 
the chronological arrangement of Howell's State Trials, a part of 
the inconvenience which applied to the earlier editions is removed ; 
but it is obvious that there are innumerable points and circumstances, 
fidntly remembered, and not associated in the mind with any date or 
time, which it is hopeless to attempt to find amongst three and thirty 
volumes of desultory matter, without the assistance of an Index. 



Under these circumstances, it is hoped that no apology is necessary 
for offering to the Public a Work, upon which much time and labour 
have been employed, and which must be usefiil to some extent, even 
though imperfectly executed. It was originally intended to form a 
Digest, or Abstract, of the State Trials, with Notes and Illustrations 
of a merely professional character, with a view of rendering more 
practically useful the information on legal subjects which the work 
contains ; but the appearance of Mr. Phillipps's excellent Book, upon 
a somewhat similar, though less comprehensive plan, with other 
considerations, induced the Compiler to abandon that intention, and 
to restrict his undertaking to the formation of an Index. It has been 



ADVERTISEMENT. 

considered that the object of an Index, namely, that of furnishing a 
ready means of reference to the contents of the work, would be best 
attained by the simplest method of arrangement, and that any arti« 
ficial analysis would be altogether inapplicable to the State Trials ; 
this Compilation, therefore, merely consists of two Tables, alphabeti- 
cally arranged ; the first being a Table of Names, with a short abstract, 
under each name, of the contents of the work,, so far as they relate 
to the individual to whom the name belongs, and a reference to the 
passages in which he is mentioned: the second being a Table of 
Principal Matters, containing references to the leading subjects, as 
well as the points of ISw, arguments, and' other circumstances, 
incidentally mentioned throughout the whole Collection. The heads 
of reference in both these Tables have been made as numerous and 
partic^^dar as possible, in order to afford a large number of such points 
as tosiy most probably occur to the memory of the Reader, smd by 
v^hich he may be guided directly to the object of his search. A Table 
of Parallel Reference has been added, for, the purpose of rendering 
the Index applicable to Hargrave's State Trials, as well as to the 
Octavo Edition. This Table is the converse of that which is given 
in the twenty-first Volume of the Work; the one containing, a 
reference from the Folio edition to the Octavo, and the other a 
reference from the Octavo to the Folio. 

. It may be necessary to explain to the Reader, that as it frequently 
happens that eminent and remarkable Characters are mentioned . in 
the State Trials, as having been present on particular trials or occa- 
sions, without their having taken any prominent part in the proceed^ 
ings, it has been thought proper to refer to theftn in the Index of 
Names, with their description as Judges, Serjeants, Counsel, &c. and 
the date of the transactions in which their names occur. 



geserax 



GENERAL INDEX 



TO THE 



STATE TRIALS. 



Part I. — Names. 



iM^^MiitfHaM 



AbBOT^ George, Archbishop of Canterbury. 
— *He is appointed one of the Commissioners 
for examining the matters contained in a 
Petition of Divorce, by Frances Howard, 
Countess of Essex, against her husband, 
Robert, Earl of Essex, 11 Jac. 1, 1613, 
2 vol. 785. — His Reasons against the 
Divorce, ibid. 794. — ^Answer of King James 
the First to these Reasons, ibid. 798. — Arch- 
bishop Abbot's Account of the Proceedings 
in this Case, ibid. 805. — Speech intended to 
have been delivered by him in the Court of 
Delegates against the Divorce, ibid. 844. — 
The King's Letter to him respecting his 
Opinion in this Case, ibid. 860. — ^For his 
conduct in this Case he was excluded from 
the Council Table, ibid. 786 (note). — Pro- 
ceedings against him for accidentally kill- 
ing Edward Hawkins, 19 Jac. 1, 1621, 

2 vol. 1160. — The King refers the Case to 
certain Bisbops and Judges fur their opinion, 
ibid, 1161. — ^Their Answer thereto, ibid. 
1162. — The King directs a Commission to 
the Lord Keeper and certain Bishops to grant 
a Dispensation to the Archbishop, ibid. 
1163. — ^Form of the Dispensation, ibid. 
11 81. --Apology for Archbishop Abbot, ibid. 
1165. — Spelman*s Answer to the Apolocy, 
ibid. 1169.— Proceedings against him for 
refusing to license Dr. Sibthorp's Sermon, 

3 Car. 1, 1627, ibid. 1449.--The King's 
Commission for the Sequestration of his 
Ecclesiastical Offices, ibid. 1451. — His Nar- 
rative of these Proceedings against him, 
ibid. 1453.— ffis Account of the first Pro- 
motion of the Duke of Buckingham, ibid. 
1478. — ^His Speech at the Conference be- 
tween the two Houses of Parliament respect- 
ing the Liberty of the Subject, 3 vol. 166. 

ABBOTSBURY Witnesses. See Gibbons, Jokn. 

ABBOTT, Charles, Counsel, 26 vol. 8, 534, 
1218.— 27 vol. 821, 1283. — 28 vol. 356, 
529.-29 vol. 1, 423,«'His Argument in 
VOL. XXXIV, 



support of the Demurrer to the Plea in 
Abatement to the Jurisdiction of the Court 
in Judge Johnson's case, 29 vol. 388. . 

ABBOTT, Sir Charles, Judge of K. B., 32 
vol. 20, 765. — His Charge to the Jury on the 
Trial of John Hatchard, for a Libel, 32 vol. 
713. — His Charge to the Juiy on the Trial of 
Ludlam for High Treason, at Derby, ibid. 
1271. 



", Chief Justice of 
K. B. — His Charge to the Grand Jury 
assembled under the Special Conunission at 
Clerkenwell for the Trial of the several 
persons concerned in the Cato Street Plot, 
33 vol. 683. — His Charge to the Jury on 
the Trial of Thistlewood, ibid. 919.— His 
Address in passing Sentence upon Thistle- 
wood and the other Prisoners convicted of 
High Treason, in being concerned in the 
Cato Street Plot, ibid. 1560. 

ABINGTON, Edward.-^His Trial at West- 
minster, with Charles Tilney, Edward Jones, 
John Travers, John Chamock, Jerome 
Bellamy, and Robert Gage, for High 
Treason, in conspiring to kill Queen Eliza- 
beth, at the instigation of the Papists, 28 £liz« 
1586, 1 vol. 1141.— They all plead Not 
Guilty, ibid. 1143. — ^Abiogton's Trial, ibid, 
ib.— Tilney's Trial, ibid. 1149.— Jones's 
Trial, ibid. 1151.— Travers's Trial, ibid. 
1152.— Chamock's Trial, ibid, ib — Gage's 
Trial, ibid. 1154.— Bellamy's Trial, ibid. ib. 
—Judgment of death is passed upon them, 
ibid. 1156. — They are executed, ibid. ib. 

ABNEY, Sir Thomas, Counsel.— His Speech 
for the Plaintiff on the Trial of an Issue 
upon the Return to a Mandamus to the 
Town and Port of Hastings, 17 vol. 849.— 
His Reply in the same Case, ibid. 906. 

■ I ■ Judge of Ct p., f Geo. 
2, 18 vol. 329. 

B 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



ACTON, Wilham.-^The House of Commons 
order bim to be prosecuted for the Murder 
ot several Prisoners under his custody in 
^e Marshalsea Prisop, 17 vol., SJO.-Hui 
P^i^^ the Surrey Assizes, fop the Murd^er 
ot Ihomas Bliss, 3 Geo. 2, 1729, ibid. 461. 
—Upening Speeches of the Counsel for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 463.-~Evidence for the 
I'rosecution, ibid. 466.— The Prisoner's De- 

•r^®;^'^'"^- 485.— Evidence for him, ibid. 
ib.--Mr. Baron Carter's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 503.~The Jury acquit him, 'Ibid. 510. 
--•liis Trial at the same Assizes for the 
:Murder of John Bromfield, ibid. 511.— 
J^ndence against him, ibid. 513.— Evidence 
Jor him, ibid. 518.~Mr. Baron Carter's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. 522.— The Jury 
acquit him, ibid. 524.— His Trial at the 
same Assizes for the Murder of Robert 
iVcwton, ibid. 525.— Evidence against him, 
jjid. lb.— His Defence, ibid. 533.— Mr. 
Baron Carter's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
540. — The Jury acquit him, ibid. 544.— His 
Trial at the same Assizes for the Murder of 
James Thompson, ibid. 546. — Evidence 
against him, ibid. ib.-^His Defence, ibid. 
554.— Mr. Baron Carter's Charge to the 
Jury, ibid. 558.— The Jury acquit him, ibid. 
562.— Another Bill of Indictment is prefer- 
red against him, but is thrown out by the 
Grand Jury, ibid. 563. 

AD AI{t, James, Serjeant-at-Law,and Recorder 
of London, 21 vol. 687.-24 vol. 238.-25 
vol. 2.— His Speech in Defence of Stone, 
for High Treason, 25 vol. 1320. 

ADAM, William, Counsel, 26 vol. 1218.— 27 
vol. 821.— 30 vol. 450. — His Speech in 
Defence of Crossfield, on his Trial for 
Treason, 26 vol. 91.— His Speech for the 
Prosecution on the Trial of the Bishop of 
Bangor, ibid. 464.— His Speech in Defence 
ofWm. Cobbett, on his Trial for a Libel 
on the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, 29 vol. 
37.— His Speech in Defence of Wm. Cob- 
bett, in an Action by Mr. Plunkett against 
him for a Libel, ibid. 72.— His Speech in 
Defence of Mr. Justice Johnson, on his 
Trial for publishing a Libel on the Lord 

Lieutenant of Ireland, ibid. 468 HisSpeech 

on summing up the Evidence for the De- 
fence, on the Trial of Lord Melville, ibid. 
1313. ' 

ADOLPHUS, John, Counsel.— His Speech in 
Defence of Thistlewood, on his Trial for 
High Treason, in being concerned in the 
Cato Street Plot, 38 vol. 850.— His Speech 
m Defence of Ings, on his Trial for the 
same Treason, ibid. 1079.— His Speech in 
<• Defence of Brunt, on his Trial for the same 
Treason, ibid. 1272.— His Speech in De- 
fence of Davidson and Tidd, on their Trial 
foe the same Treason, ibid. 1441; 

AIKENHEAD, Thomas. — Proceedings in 
8 Will. 3, 1696, 13 vol. 917.-^The -ladiet* 



ment, ibid. ib. — His Petition to the Court of 
Justiciary, containing his retractation, ibid. 
921 (note). — Evidence against him, ibid. 923. 
— He is ^n4 Guilty, and sentenced to be 
l)aiig»d, ibid, 927.— IJis Petition to the 
Privy Council, ibid. ib. — Letter of Mr. 
Locke to Sir Fras. Masham, respecting his 
Case, ibid. 928. — Another Letter respecting 
him, ibid. 929. — His Speech at the place of 
Execution, ibid. 930. — His Letter to his 
frifsfi^n, w7n(teii.on the day of his death, ibid. 
034. — Animadversions upon his doctrines, 
ibid. ib. Arnot's account of his Trial, ibid. 
917 (note). 

AITKEN, James, otherwise John the Painter. 
— His Trial for feloniously setting Fire to a 
Rope House in the Dock Yard at Ports- 
mouth, 17 Geo. 3, 1777, 20 vol. 1317.— The 
Indictment, ibid, ib.— Mr. Serjt. Davy opens 
the Case for the Prosecution, ibid. 1319* — 
Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 1328. — 
The Prisoner's Defence, ibid. 1347. — Mr. 
Baron Hotham's Charge to the Jur^, ibid. 
1348.— The Jury find hira Guilty, ibid. 136S. 
•—Sentence of Death is passed upon htm, 
ibid. 1364.— His Confeswon, ibid. 1865. — 
Account of his Execution, ibid. 1368. 

ALAND, John fortescue. Solicitor Genetal. 
r-His Reply for the Crown on the Trial of 
Francia for High Treason, 15 vqI. 975. 

^, Sir John Fortescue, Baron of the Ex- 
chequer.— His Aigument on delivering his 
Opinion in favour of the King's Prerogative, 
respecting the Education and Marriage of 
the Royal Family, 16 vol. 1216. 

— *^, Judge of K.B. 



16 vol. 114, 



ALLEN, John. See O'Coigly, James. 

ALLEYNE,- — rr,Counsel.^His Argument in 
the case of the Island of Grenada, 20 vol. 268. 

ALLYBONE, Sir Richard, Judge of K. B. 12 
vol. 122.--Hi3 Charge to the Grand Jury of 
the County of Surrey, immediately after the 
Trial of the Seven Bishops, 12 vol. 1§0 
(note).— He was one of the Judges, before 
whom the Seven Bishops were tried, ibid. 
189. — He was said by lord Camden, to have 
been a rigid Papist, 19 vol. 993. 

ALMQN, John.— His Trial, upon an Ex-officio 
Information, for publishing Junius'a Letter 
to the King, 10 Geo. 3, 1770, 20 vojl. 803.^ 
The Information, ibid, ib.— XHe Speech of 

•u?, ^"„T^y„^.^''®'^^ *^' ^'^ Prosecution, 
ibid. 823.— Evidence for the Prosecution 
ibid. 828.— Serjeant Glynn's Speech for the 
Defendant, ibid. 8f31.— Evidence for the 
defendant, ibid. 835.— Lord Mausaeld's 
Charge to the Juyy ibi^. 836.^Tlie jZy 
find him Guilty ibid. 839.-.proceeaings on 
a Motion for a New Trial, upon the grouudl 
Uiat there was no proof of pHblioation by the 
PefendantpersoB^ly, but. only by his ^op- 
mn, itad, ib.^The Qouft h(M Ods \& U 



THE STATE TRIALS* 



sufficient prim& facie Evidence of publication 
by the Defendant, and refuse a New Trial, 
ibid. 842. — Proceedings on his being brought 
up for Judgment, ibid. 843.*— His Sentence, 
ibid. 847.— Other Accounts of the Proceed- 
ings, on the application for a New Trial, 
ibid. 848. 

ALTHAM, John, Baron of the Exchequer, 
6 Jac. 1, 2 vol. 576, 725, 952. 

ANANDALE, William, Marquis of. See 
Baillie, David, 

ANDERSON, Sir Edmund, Chief Justice of 
C. P., 1 vol. 1096, 1128, 1251, 1315, 
1333. — He was ope of the Commissioners 
named by Queen Elizabeth for the Trial of 
Mary, Queen of Scots, 1 vol.1167, — His 
Speech on the Proceedings against William 
Davison, the Queen's Secretary, for a Con- 
tempt in delivering the Warrant for the 
Execution of Mary Queen of Scots, ibid. 
1235. — He was one of the J udges on the Trial 
of Sir Walter Raleigh, 2 vol. 1. 

ANDERSON, Lionel, alias Munson.— His 
Trial with William Russel, alias Napper, 
Charles Parris, alias Parry, Henry Stark ey, 
James Corker, William Marshal and Alex- 
ander Lumsden, for High Treason, under the 
Stat. 27 Eliz. c. 2, for being Seminary Priests 
in England, 31 Car. 2, 1680, 7 vol. 811. — 
Corker and Marshal object, at their Arraign- 
ment, that they have been already tried for 
Treason, but the Court overrule the Objec- 
tion, ibid. 830, 831. — They all plead Not 
Guilty, ibid. 829. — The King's Counsel. open 
their Case against Anderson, ibid. 833 — 
Evidence against him, ibid. 835. — Oates's 
Evidence, ibid. 837. — His Defence, ibid. 
841. — Evidence against Corker, ibid. 846. — 
Evidence against Marshal, ibid. 847. — Evi- 
dence in bis Defence, ibid. 853. — ^Evidence 
against Russel, ibid. 858. — Evidence against 
Parry, ibid. 860. — Evidence for him, ibid. 
863. — Evidence against Starkey, ibid. 867. 
Evidence against Lumsden, ibid. 8^9. — ^He 
is proved to be a Scotchman, and the Court 
direct the Jury to find a Special Verdict as 
to him, ibid. 871. — The Jury return a Special 
Verdict as to Lumsden, and find the others 
Guilty, ibid. ib. — Sentence of Death passed 
upon all, excepting Lumsden, ibid. 882. 

ANDERTON, William.— His Trial at the 
Old Bailey for High Treason, in publishing 
treasonable Libels, 5 Will, and Mary, 1693, 
12 vol. 1245. — ^Account of his Trial, from the 
Sessions Paper, ibid. ib. — ^His Trial, as pub- 
lished by his Friends, ibid. 1250. — The Jury 
Hod him Guilty, ibid. 1259. — He pleads in 
arrest of Judgment, ibid. 1261. — Science 
of Death is passed upon him, ibid. 1262. — 
His conduct at the place of Execution, ibid. 
1264. — Paper given by him to the Sheriffs, 
ibid. 1265. 

ANDREWS, Eusebius.-- Prooeedings against 
bin for iUgh TrtasoD, 9 Car. 2, t^Q, 5 



vol. 1.— He is arrested and examined before 
the Council, ibid. ib. — He is committed to 
the Tower, ibid. 2.— His Narrative of the 
Matters upon which the Charge against him 
was founded, ibid. 3.— He is brought before 
the High Court of Justice, ibid. 13. — His 
Answer to the Charge against him, ibid. ib. 
— His Arguments against the validity of the 
Court, ibid. 19. — ^Judgment of Death is 
passed upon him, ibid. 31. — His Speech, 
and Conauct on the Scaffold, ibid. 37. 

ANGLESEA, Richard, Eari of. See Anneskyy 
James, — Trial of an Action of Ejectment in 
Ireland, between him and James Annesley, 

17 Geo. 2, 1743, 17 vol. 1139.— His Trial 
with Francis Annesley, and John Jans, for 
nn Assault upon James Annesley and others, 

18 Geo. 2, 1744, 18 vol. 197.— The Indict- 
ments, ibid, ib.— The Defendants are tried 
upon four separate Indictments, for four 
Assaults on different Persons, ibid. 198. — 
Speeches of the Counsel for the Prosecution, 
ibid, ib.— -Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 
206.— Speeches of the Counsel for the De- 
fendants, ibid. 256.— The Counsel for the 
Defendants apply to the Court to charge the 
Jury to return their Verdict, as to Francis 
Annesley and Jans, upon one of thr* Indict- 
ments, before the Defence is' opened, in 
order that they may be competent Witnesses 
for Lord Anglesea, ibid. 259. — The Court 
grant the application, ibid. 267. — The Jury 
tind Lord Anglesea guilty on the First In- 
dictment, but acquit the other Defendants, 
ibid. ib. — Evidence for Francis Annesley, 
on the Second Indictment, ibid. ib. — He is 
acquitted of that Indictment, ibid. ib. — He 
gives Evidence for the other Defendaots on 
the same, ibid. 268.-^Lord Anglesea and 
Jans are found guilty upon the Second In- 
dictment, ibid. 274. — Defence on the Third 
Indictment, ibid. ib. — Lord Anglesea and 
Jans found guilty on the Third Indictment, 
ibid. 280. — ^The Court charge the Jury upon 
the Evidence on the Third Indictment, as to 
Francis Annesley, and upon the whole Case 
upon the Fourth Indictment, ibid. 286. — 
The Jury find Francis Annesley guilty upon 
the Third Indictment, and acquit all the 
Defendants upon the Fourth, ibid. 287. — Sen- 
tence is passed upon them, ibid. 289. 

ANGLESEY, Arthur, Earl of.— Proceedings 
against him before the King in Council, 
respecting a Book reflecting upon the Duke 
of Ormond, 34 Car. 2, 1684, 8 vol. 989.— 
The Duke of Ormond's Petition to the King 
against him, ibid, ib.— Order of Council 
thereupon, ibid. 998. — His Speech to the 
King on appearing before the Privy Covincily 
ibid. 999. — His Answer to the Duke's Charge 
against him, ibid. 1000,— The Duke's Par- 
ticulars of Charge against him, ibid. 1008. — 
His Answer thereto, ibid. 1009. — The 
Council resolve that the Book is a Scandalous 
Libel, ibid. 1011.— He is oidered to deliver 
up the Privy Seal, ibid. I014---Letter from , 
B 3 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



Dr. Morley^ Bishop of Winchester, to him, 
ibid. 1015. — Letters between the Earl of 
Anglesey and the Duke of Ormond, on the 
subject of the Book in question, ibid. 992 
(note). 

ANNESLEY, Francis. See Anglesea, Bichard, 
Earl of. 

ANNESLEY, James.— His Trial with Joseph 
Redding at the Old Bailey for the Murder of 
Thomas Egglestone, 15 Geo. 2, 1742, 17 
vol. 1093.— The Indictments, ibid. 1094.— 
The Counsel for the Prosecution open their 
Case, ibid. 1098.— Evidence for the Prosecu- 
tion, ibid. 1099.— Tlieir Defence, ibid. 1112. 
— Evidence for the Prisoners, ibid. 1113. — 
Arguments for the Prisoners, that the Homi- 
cide in this Case, amounted only to Chance- 
medley, ibid. 1126. — Arguments for the Pro- 
secution contra, ibid. 1129. — Reply of the 
Prisoners' Counsel, ibid. 1130.— The Court 
charge the Jury, ibid. 1133. — ^The Jury acquit 
them of Murder, on the ground that the facts 
amounted only to Chance-medley, ibid. 1139. 
— ^Trial of his Title to certain Lands in Ireland, 
in an Action of Ejectment between Campbell 
Craig, his Lessee, and Richard, Earl of Angle- 
sea, in the Court of Exchequer in Ireland, 17 
Geo. 2, 1743, ibid. ib. — The Declaration, ibid. 
1141. — Opening Speeches of the Counsel for 
the Lessor of the Plaintiff, ibid, 1143. — Evi- 
dence for the Lessor of the Plaintiff, ibid. 
1149. — ^The Attorney-General's Speech for 
the Defendant, ibid. 1254. — Evidence for 
the Defendant, ibid. 1262. — Evidence in 
Reply, ibid. 1338.— Speeches of the Defend- 
ant's Counsel, on the close of the Evidence, 
ibid. 1355. — Spe'feches of the Counsel for 
the Lessor of the Plaintiff, ibid. 1383.— The 
Lord Chief Baron's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
1406* — Mr. Baron Mounteney's Address to 
the Jury, ibid. 1425. —Mr. Baron Dawson's 
Address to the Jury, ibid. 1439. — The Jury 
return a Verdict for the Lessor of the Plain- 
tiff, ibid. 1443. — This is said to have been 
the longest Trial ever known, ibid. 1139 
(note), 1406. — Account of Annesley ex- 
tracted from the Gentleman's Magazine, 
ibid. 1443. — ^Trial of Mary Heath, one of 
the principal witnesses for the Defendant 
in the Ejectment, for Perjury, 18 vol. 1. — 
Trial of the Earl of Anglesea and others, for 
an Assault upon him, ibid. 197. 

APPLETREE, Thomas. See Messenger, 
Peier. 

ARCHER, John, Judge of C. P., 18 Car. 2, 
6 vol. 769. 

ARCHER, Thomas.— -His Trial with Alex, 
ander Sheils, and others, at Edinburgh, for 
Treason, in being engaged in Argyle's Rebel- 
lion, 1 Jac. 2, 1685, 11 vol. 889.— The In- 
dictment, ibid. ib. — ^He is found Guilty, and 
sentenced to Death, ibid. 901. — His Dying 
Speech, ibid. 904 (note). — ^^Vodrow's Ao- 
count of hioDj ibid. 90} (Qote)«-«^FouQtaiQ- 



hall's Account of these Proceedings, ibid. 
889 (note). 

ARGYLE, Archibald, Earl of.— His Trial in 
Scotland for Treason, 33 Car. 2,1681, 8 vol. 
843. — He takes the Test required from him, 
as a Privy Councillor, with an Explanation 
of the mode in which he understood it, ibid. 
883.— Letter from the Council to the King, 
informing him of their having committed the 
Earl of Aigyle, ibid. 892.— The King's 
Answer, ibid. 897. — Indictment against 
him, ibid. 898.— Abstract of the Acts of 
Parliament on which the Indictment is 
founded, ibid. 901.— His Speech to theCourt, 
on his Arraignment, ibid. 909. — Charles 
the 2nd's Letter to him, when Lord Lorn, 
ibid. 912.— Debate on the relevancy of 
the Libel, ibid. 918.— The Court find the 
Libel relevant, ibid. 944.— He is found 
Guilty by the Assize, ibid. 946.— Letter from 
the Council to the King, desiring leave to 

Pronounce Sentence upon him, ibid. ib. — 
he Duke of York says, that if the King's 
Answer did not arrive soon, he should take 
upon himself what was to be done, ibid. 858 
(note). — Speech which he intended to have 
made before Sentence was pronounced upon 
him, ibid. 946. — He makes his Escape, ibid. 
980.— The King's Answer to the Letter of 
the Council, ibid. ib. — His Reasons for his 
Escape, ibid. 983. — Accounts of these Pro- 
ceedings, by Burnet and Laing, ibid. 843 
(note). — Fountainhall's Account of the Pnj- 
ceedings against his Advocates, and his 
Remarks on his Conviction, 11 vol. 1063 
(note). — Account of his Invasion of Scotland, 
in concert with the Duke of Monmouth, in 
1685, 10 vol. 1016. — Declarations published 
by him on landing in Scotland, ibid. 103,2. 

ARGYLE, Archibald, Marquis of.—- Proceed- 
ings in Scotland against him for High 
Treason, 12 and 13 Car. 2, 1661, 5 vol. 
1369. — Laing's Account of these Proceed- 
ings, ibid. ib. (note). — Charge exhibited to 
the Parliament of Scotland against him, ibid. 
1369. — His Answer thereto, ibid. 1394. — 
Indictment for Treason exhibited against 
him by the Lord Advocate, ibid. 1405. — His 
Petition to the Parliament of Scotland, 
claiming Precognition of his Case, ibid. 
1419. — His Speech in his own Defence, ibid. 
1422. — His submission, ibid. 1434. — ^His 
Defences to . the Indictment, ibid. 1438.-^ 
Bishop Burnet's Account of these Proceed- 
ings, ibid. 1500. — He is found Guilty, and 
sentenced to be beheaded, ibid. 1504.— 
His Conduct at the place of Execution, ibid. 
1505. — Laing's Character of him, ibid. 
1508 (note).— Lord Clarendon's Character 
of him, ibid. 1509. 

ARLINGTON, Henry Bennett, Earl of. — 
Proceedings in the House of Commons 
against him, 25 Car. 2, 1674, 6 vol. 1053. — 
Articles of Complaint against him, ibid, 

}Q54«-^Ha requests to be heard by th^ 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



House> ibid. i057.— His Speech in the 
House, ibid. ib. — Questions put to him by 
the House, with his Answers, ibid. 1061. — 
The Resolution moved against him is nega- 
tived, ibid. 1062. — Buraet's Account of him, 
ibid. 307 (note). 

ARMSTRONG, Sir Thomas.— Proceedings 
against him in the King's Bench, upon an 
Outlawry for High Treason, 36 Car, 2, 
1684, 10 vol. 105. — He is brought to the 
King's Bench Bar by Habeas Corpus, ibid. 
ib. — ^He claims the benefit of the Stat. 6 
Edward 6, and desires to be tried, ibid. 110. 
— ^The Court decide, that he is not entitled 
to the benefit of that Statute, as he did not 
voluntarily surrender, ibid. 111.— The Court 
refuse to bear Counsel upon the point, ibid. ib. 
— ^The Rule for Execution granted, ibid. 112. 
— ^His Wife applies for a Writ of Error, ibid. 
119. — His Execution, ibid. 115. — His Con- 
versation with Dr. Tennison, at the place of 
£zecution,l 3 vol. 432. — The Paper delivered 
by him to the Sheriff, at the place of Exe- 
cution, ibid. 122. — The Proceedings con- 
demned in Parliament, after the Revolution, 
and 5,000/. is voted to be paid to his Wife 
and Children by his Judges and Prosecutors, 
ibid. 1 16. — Sir John Hawles's Remarks upon 
these Proceedings, ibid. 123. — Mr. Erskine's 
allusion to Jefferies's conduct in this Case, 
in his Defence of Hardy, 24 vol. 944. 

ARNOLD, Edward.— His Trial at the Surrey 
Assizes for maliciously shooting at Lord 
Onslow, 10 Geo. 1, 1724, 16 vol. egS.—The 
Indictment, ibid. ib. — He pleads Not Guilty, 
ibid. 696. — His Counsel apply to the Court 
to permit the Solicitor to assist the Prisoner 
in calling his Witnesses, ibid. 697. — ^The 
Court refuse the Application, ibid. 698. — 
Speeches of the Counsel for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 699. — Evidence for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 702. — ^Witnesses called by the Pri- 
soner, to prove his Insanity, ibid. 717. — 
Reply of the Counsel for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 745. — Evidence in reply, ibid. 751. — 
Mr. Justice Tracy's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
754. — He is found Guilty, and sentenced to 
Death, but is respited at the intercession of 
Lord Onslow, ibid. 766. 

ARUNDEL, Philip Howard, Earl of.— His 
Trial for High Treason, in conspiring with 
Parsons, and other Papists, against Queen 
Elizabeth, 31 Eliz. 1589, 1 vol. 1249.— 
Henry, Earl of Derby, created Lord High 
Steward, ibid. 1259.— He pleads Not Guilty, 
ibid. 1253. — He is found Guilty, and sen- 
tenced to Death, ibid. 1258. — He dies in the 
Tower, ibid. 1259.— Account of his Trial, 
from Kennett's Complete History, ibid. ib. 

ARUNDEL, Richard, Earl of. See Gloucester, 
Thomas^ Duke of. 

ARUNDEL, Thomas Howard, Earl of*— Is 
Lord High Steward, on the Trial of Thomas, 
Eail of Strafford, 3 vol. 1417. 



ARUNDEL, of Wardour, Henry, Lord. See 

Stafford^ William, Viscount. 

ASHBY and WHITE.— Proceedings in Parlia- 
ment, and in tlie Queen's Bench, in this 
Case, 2 and 3 Anne, 1704-1705, 14 vol. 
695.— *-Recordof the Judgmentin the Queen's 
Bench, ibid. 697.— Judgment was given for 
the Defendants, in the Queen's Bench, by 
three Judges, against Holt, C. J., ibid. 779- 
—The Judgment of the Queen's Bench re- 
versed in Error in the House of Lords, ibid, 
ib. — Debates in the House of Commons upon 
the question raised by this case, whether an 

" action lies at Common Law by an Elector, 
whose vote has been refused at an Election 
for Members of Parliament, ibid. 696.— Sir 
Thomas Powis's Argument for the negative, 
ibid. 712.— Sir John Hawles's Argument tor 
theaffirmative, ibid. 724.— Resolutions of the 
House of Commons, asserting an original 
and exclusive right in themselves to deter- 
mine all matters relating to the Election of 
their own Members, ibid. 776.— They resolve 
that Ashby is Guilty of a Breach of Privilege, 
in prosecuting the Action, ibid. 778.— Pro- 
ceedings in the House of Lords on these 
Resolutions of the House of Commons, ibid, 
ib.— Report of the Committee of the Lords, 
appointed to draw up the State of the Case 
upon the Writ of Error, ibid, ib.— Reasons of 
the Lords for reversing the Judgment of the 
Queen's Bench, ibid. 781.— The Defendants' 
Case on the Writ of Error, as drawn up by 
their Counsel, ibid. 779 (note).— Resolutions 
of the House of Lords upon the Proceedings 
in the House of Commons, ibid. 799. — Exe- 
cution is taken out upon the Judgment in 
this case, and other similar Actions are 
brought, ibid. 800.— Proceedings in the 
House of Commons respecting them, ibid, 
ib.— The Plaintiffs in those Actions are voted 
Guilty of a Breach of Privilege and sent to 
Newgate, ibid. 804.— Their Petitions to the 
House of Lords, and Orders of that House 
thereupon, ibid. 811.— Proceedings in the 
Queen's Bench, upon a Habeas Corpus 
brought by the Aylesbury Men, ibid. 849.— 
Arguments of Counsel on that occasion, ibid. 
850.— The Judges of the Queen's Bench desire 
the Assistance of the other Judges, who are 
all of opinion, excepting Holt, C. J., that the 
Prisoners ought to be remanded, ibid, ib.— 
The Counsel, who pleaded in the Queen's 
Bench on the return of the Habeas Corpus, 
ordered by the House of Commons to be taken 
into the custody of the Serjeant at Arms, for 
a Breach of Privilege, ibid. 807.— Writs of 
Habeas Corpus, issued to the Serjeant at 
Arms, requiring him to brihg them before 
the Lord Keeper, ibid. 830.— Resolutions of 
the House thereon, ibid. ib. — Conference be- 
tween the two Houses of Parliament, on occa- 
sion of these Proceedings, ibid. 1813. — Free 
Conference on the same Subject, ibid. 831. — 
Representation and Address of the Lords to 
the Queen,, on occasion of the commitment of 



6 



6£MI;ttAt tNDEX to 



the I^laliittffs in the Actions, ibid. 861.— 
The Queen's Answer, ibid. 8T8.-^The Par- 
liament is prorogued, ibid. 879. — Some 
Arguments used by the House of Lords Xo 
maintain their own Resolutions in tiiis Case, 
ibid. ib. — Reference to Books and Pam- 
phlets in which the Points in this Case are 
discussed, ibid. 695 (note). 

ASHLEY, Sir Francis, Serjeant at Law. — His 
Argument on behalf of the King, and against 
the Arguments of the Commons, at a con- 
ference of the Lords and Commons, respect- 
ing the Liberty of the Subject, 3 vol. 148. — 
He is committed by the House of Lords, fol 
his Speech on that occasion, ibid. 151. 

ASHLEY, James. See Simons, Henry, 

ASHTON, John. See Graham, Sir Richard. 

ASK, Richard. See Constable, Sir Robert. 

ATKINS, Edward, Counse1.--He was of 
counsel for Prynr.e, on the Proceedings in 
the Star-Chamber against him, for writing 
Histrio-mastix, 3 vol. 564. 

, Serjeant at Law, 3 vol. 



763. 

ATKINS, Sir Edward, Judge of C. P. during 
the Protectorate.— Ha was one of the Com- 
missioners for the Trial of the Portuguese 
Ambassador, Don Pantaleon Sa, 6 vol. 
466. 



there should b^ twd Witnesiies to ev^ry 
Overt Act, ibid. 1528. 

ATKYNS, Sir Robert, Judge of C. P. 30 Car. 2 . 

—7 vol. 99, 249, 261, 424, 601, 734, 831, 
12 vol. 656, 833, 1244.— His Argument in 
the Case of Barnardiston against Soames, 6 
vol. 1074.— His Argument for Sir Wm. Wil- 
liams, on an Information in the King's 
Bench against him, for publishing Danger- 
field's Narrative, 13 vol. 1380. 



Knight of the Bath.- 



His Defense of Lord Wm. Russell's Inno- 
cency, 9 vol. 719. — His Discourse concern- 
ing Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction in England, 
occasioned by the Ecclesiastical Commission 
of James 2nd, 11 vol. 1148 (note). — His 
Inquiry into the Dispensing power, ibid. 
1200. 



■ ■ ■ , Baron of the Exchequer, 

12 Car. 2^ 6 vol. 769, 879. — He was one of 
the Judges, to whom the Special Commission 
for the Trial of the Regicides was directed, 
5 vol. 986. 

ATKINS, Samuel.— His Account of his Ex- 
amination before a Committee of Lords, 
appointed to investigate, the Murder of Sir 
Edmondbury Godfrey, 6 vol. 1473. — His 
Trial at the Bar of the King's Bench, for 
being accessary to that Murder, 31 Car. 2, 
1679, 7 vol. 231. — Indictment against him, 
ibid, ib.— He pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 232. 
The Court offer to dischi^rge him on Bail till 
the Sessions, ibid. 233. — The Attorney- 
General's Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. 
237. — Evidence against him, ibid. 238. — 
His Defence, ibid. 245. — Evidence for him, 
ibid* 246.— He is acquitted, ibid. 249. 

ATKINS, William.— His Trial at Stafford 
for High Treason, under Stat. 27 Eliz. c. 2., 
for coming, as a Seminary Priest, into Eng- 
land, and remaining there, 31 Car. 2, 1679, 
7 vol. 725. — He is found Guilty, and sen- 
tenced, ibid. 730. 

ATKYNS, Edward, Baron of the Exchequer, 
32 Car. 2. — His Charge to the Jiiry on the 
Trial of Thomas Thwing, and Mary Pres- 
sicks, for Treason, 7 vol. 1179. — His Speech 
on delivering his Opinion in the House of 
Lords, on the Trial of Lord Stafford, that it 
was unnecessary, in cases of Treason, that 



Chief Baron of the 

Exchequer, 2 Will, and Mary, 12 vol, 656, 
833, 1244. 

ATTERBURY, Francis, Bishop of Rochester. 
— Proceedings in Parliament against him, 
John Plunkett,and George Kelly, alias John- 
son, upon Bills of Pains and Penalties for a 
treasonable Conspiracy to restore the Pre- 
tender, 9 Geo. 1, 1723, 16 vol. 323.— Com- 
mittee of the House of Commons appointed 
to take Examinations of several persons in 
the Tower respecting the Conspiracy, ibid, 
ib. — Report of the Committee, ibid. 325. 
— ^The House resolve to bring in Bills of 
Pains and Penalties against them, ibid. 425. 
— The House of Commons refer the Report 
of the Committee to the House of Lords, 
ibid. 427. — Minutes of the progress of the 
Bills through the House of Commons, ibid« 
428. — Proceedings in the House of Lords, 
ibid. 438. — Report of the Committee of 
Lords, ibid. ib. — Proceedings respecting 
the Bill against Plunkett, ibid. 460.— The 
Bill, of Pains and Penalties against him, 
ibid. 468. — Proceedings respecting the Bill 
against Kelly, ibid. 469.— The Bill of Pains 
and Penalties against him, ibid* 476. — His 
Speech at the Bar of the House of Lords, 
ibid. 477. — Proceedings respecting the Bill 
against Bishop Atterbury, ibid. 490. — Sir 
C. Phipps*s Speech in his Defence, ibid. 
498.— Serjeant Wynne's Speech in his De- 
fence, ibid. 516. — ^The Bishop's Counsel 
produce Evidence against the Bill» ibid. 
570. — Sir C. Phipps recapitulates the Evi- 
dence, ibid. 573. — The Bishop's Speech in 
his own Defence, ibid. 585. — Reply of the 
Counsel for the Bill, ibid. 607.— The Bill is 
passed, ibid. 640. — Bill of Pains and Penal- 
ties against Bishop Atterbury, ibid. 644. — 
The Bishop quits the Kingdom, ibid. 646. — 
Speech of Dr. Willis, Bishop of Salisbury, 
in favour of the Bill against Atterbury, ibid, 
ib. — ^The Duke of Wharton's Speech against 
it, ibid. 664. — Remarkable Anecdote re- 
specting the Duke of Wharton*s Speech on 
this occasion, ibid. 693. 



ftit g^ATE I'kfALS. 



ATTWOdt>, William.— His Exatninatioh of 
the Authorities quoted by Lord Chief Justice 
Herbert^ m the Case of Sir Edward Hales, 
upon the subject of the King's Dispensing 
Pdwer^li yol.|1280. 

AUDLEY, Mervin Lord.— His Trial in the 

House of Lords for Rape and Sodomy, 7 

Car. 1, 1631, 3 voL 401. — Points resolved 

at a coosultatioh of the Judges ptevrous to 

tbe Trial, ibid. 409. — ^Three Indictments 

found against him, one for Rape on his 

Wife, the tWo others for Sodomy with a 

Man, ibid^ 401. — ^The Indictments, ibid. 

406.— He pleads Ifot Guilty, ibid. 408.~ 

The Lord High Steward's Charge to the 

Lords, ibid. ib« — The Attortiey Generars 

Speech, ibid, ib.^— The Evidence against 

lillil, ibid. 41(j.— His Defence, ibid. 415.— 

Is fdtmd Guiity on all tbe Indictments, and 

sentenced t6 be hanged, ibid. 416. — His 

Execution, ibid. 417.'^He denies his guilt 

on the scalTold, ibid. ib. — Confession of his 

Servants at their Execution, ibid. 421. — If 

he iiad Stood Inute upon the Indictment for 

Rape he tvotild have entitled himself to the 

benefit of Clergy as to that offence, 13 vol. 

1032 (note). 

AUDLEY, Sif Thomas, Lord Chancellor.— 
He presides on the Commission for the Trial 
0^ Sir Thomas More> I vol. 387. 

AVONMORE, Lord. See Yelverton, Barry, 
Lord* 

AXTEL, Daniel, 5 vol. 971. See Regicides. 



BABlNGTON, Anthony. — Indicted ^ith 
Ghidiock Titchbume, Thomas Salisbury, 
ftobert Bamewell, John Savage, Henry 
I)own, and John Ballard, for High Treason, 
in conspiring to kill the Queen, at the insti- 
piion of the Papists, 28 Eliz., 1586, 1 vol. 
1127.— They all plead Guilty, ibid. 1135.— 
Babidgton*s Letter to the Queen after his 
condemnation, ibid. 1140.— Their cfuel 
Execution, ibid. 1158. — Mary Queen of 
Scots accused of being privy to Babington's 
Treason, ibid. 1173.— His Letter to Mary 
Queen of Scots, ibid. 1174. 

BACON, Sir Francis, Solicitor General.— His 
Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
Lord Sanquire, for Murder, 3 vol. 750. — 
His Argument in the House of Commons 
in support of the Prerogative of the Crown 
to impose Taxes without the interference of 
Parliament, ibid. 395. — His Argument in 
the Eiebequer Chamber as Counsel for 
Calvin, in the Case of the Postnati, ibid. 



- Attorney General. — His 

Speech in the Star-chamber^ on the Prose- 
cution of Mr. James Whitelocke, for giving 
an opinion as Counsel against the King's 
Prerogative, 2 vol. 706. — His Speech before 
a Select Council, aaainst the Countesii of 
Shrewsbtity, fot tefuslng to answer Questions 



before the Privy Cottncil, ibid. 776.— fiis 
Speech in the Star-chamber against Mr. St. 
John, for publishing a Paper against Be- 
nevolences, ibid. 902. — His Speech for the 
Prosecution on the Trial of the Earl of 
Somerset, for the Murder of Sir Thomas 
Overbury, ibid. 909.-^Speech intended to 
have been made by him on the Trial of the 
Countess of Somerset for the same Murder, 
ibid. 957. — His Speech in the Star-chamber 
on opening the Cfharge against Sir Thomas 
Hollis and others, for traducing public 
Justice, ibid. 1021. — His Speech in the Star- 
chamber in the Case of Duels, ibid. 1034. — 
His Letters to James the First respecting 
Peacham^s Case, ibid. 871. — He is said by 
Home Tooke to have been the first Attorney 
General who was permitted to sit in the 
House of Commons^ 20 vol. 696. 

BACON, Francis, Lord Verulam, Viscount St. 
Albans^ Lord Chaneellor.-^His account of 
the Proceedings against Sir William Stanley, 
1 vol. 280. — His Speech on presenting the 
Petition of Grievances to James 1st, 2 vol. 
531.— Proceedings against bim for Bribery 
and Corruption in the execution of his office 
of Lord Chancellor, 18 and 19 Jac. 1, 1620, 
ibid. 1087* — Report of the Committee of 
tbe House of Commons, ibid. ib. — Second 
Report of the Committee, ibid. 1090. — 
Debate in the House of Commons, ibid. 
1092. — Message from the King to the Com- 
mons, recommending a Commission to ex- 
amine the charge, ibid. 1094. — The charges 
against Lord Ekcon opened at a Conference 
between the Lords and Commons, ibid. 
1097. — Particulars of the Charges against 
him, ibid. llOl. — He sends ft general^ Sub- 
mission to the Lords, ibid. 1102. — To which 
they object, ibid. 1105^ — He sends a par- 
ticular Confession of each of the Charges, 
ibid. ib. — ^Judgment against him, ibid. 1112. 
— His Letter to the King, praying a remis- 
sion of the punishment, ibia. 1113 (note). — 
The King pardons him, ibid. ib. — He dies 
in great poterty, ibid. 1114, 

BACON, Francis^ Judge of K. B.| 20 Car. 2, 

4 vol. 666. 

BAD BY, John, — Proceedings against him for 
Heresy, 10 Hen. 4, 1409, 1 vol. 219* — 
Articles of his Opinions, ibid. 220. — His 
Answers to them, ibid. 223. — On his re- 
fusing to recant he is declared a Heretic, 
and delivered to the Secular Power, ibid. 
225. — He is executed at Smithfield, ibid.ib. 

BAILEY, Dr. Thomas.— Extracts from the 
Life of John Fisher, Bishop of Rochester, 
ascribed to him, 1 vol. 398. — This Life was, 
in fact, written by Dr. Richard Hall| ibid. 
397. 

6AILLI£| David. — ^The Proceedings before 
the Lords of the Council in Scotland against 
bim,. for defamine the Duke of Queensberry 
and the Marquis of AnandalC; 3 Anoe, 



8 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



ir04, 14 vol. 1035.— His first Examination 
before the Council, in which he charges the 
Duke and Marquis with soliciting him to 
depose against the Duke of Hamilton and 
others, ibid. ib. — His second Examination 
before the Council, ibid. 1036.— Written 
Interrogatories delivered to him, with his 
partial answers thereto, ibid. 1037. — Entries 
from the Council Records at Edinburgh 
respecting these Proceedings, ibid. 1040. — 
TheJ-ibel,ibid. 1043.— His Answers thereto, 
ibid. 1047.— Reply of the Queen's Advocate, 
ibid. 1051.— The Lords of the Council find 
the libel Proven, and pass Sentence upon 
him, ibid. 1053.— The Sentence was not 
carried into complete execution, ibid. 1056. 
— ^Further particulars respecting this Case, 
from Lord Fountainhall, and other Works, 
ibid. 1055.— Letters alluded to in the Pro- 
ceedingSy ibid. 1057. 

BAILLIE,Robert,dff Jerviswood.— His Trial 
at Edinburgh for High Treason, 36 Car. 2, 
1684, 10 vol. 647.— The Indictment, ibid, 
ib.— He pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 666.— 
Evidence against him, ibid. 668. — His 
Counsel object to the Evidence of one of 
the Witnesses against him that he is Particeps 
Criminis/ ibid, ib.— The Court overrule the 
Objection, ibid . 671 .—The King's Advocate's 
Address to the Inquest, ibid. 701. — He is 
found Guilty, and executed, ibid. 709.— His 
Dying Speech, ibid. 719.— Wodrow's Ac- 
count of this Case, ibid. 711. — ^Wodrow's 
Account of the Proceedings of the Council 
against him some years before, ibid. 650 
(note). — Burnet's Account of this Case, ibid. 
647 (note). — Entries in Fountainhall's De- 
cisions concerning it, ibid. 655 (note). 

BAILLIE, CapUin Thomas.— His Memorial 
to the Cojsimissioners and Governors of 
Greenwich Hospital, respecting certain 
abuses in the Hospital, 21 vol. 1.— His 
Letter to Lord Sandwich, then First Lord of 
the Admiralty, with his Memorial, ibid. 9. — 
Proceedings in the Court of lying's Bench on 
a Motion for a Criminal Information against 
him, for a Libel contained in the Memorial, 
18 Geo. 3, 1778, ibid. 10.— Mr. Bearcroft's 
Speech on showing cause against the Rule 
for a Criminal Information, ibid. 11. — Mr. 
Peckham's Speech on the same side, ibid. 
23. — Mr. Erskine's Speech on the same 
side, ibid. 31. — Speech of the Solicitor 
General in support of the Motion, ibid. 45. 
—Mr. Newnham's Speech on the same side, 
ibid. 57. — Mr. Macdonald's Speech on the 
same side, ibid. 61. — Lord Mansfield delivers 
the Judgment of the Court, discharging the 
Rule with Costs, ibid. 66.— Captain BailUe's 
Evidence before a Committee of the House 
of Lords, upon an Enquiry into the abuses 
at Greenwich Hospital, ibid. 76, 125, 128, 
190, 216, 229, 234, 247, 251, 379. 

]9A1RD|TK.oin«s. Se« M'Iare% Akxtaukr. 



BALDWIN, Sir John, Chief Justice of C. P., 
26 Hen. 8, 1 vol. 398. r 

BALDWIN, Sir Samuel, King's Serieant.-— 
His Speech for the Prosecution, on the Xrial 
of Ireland and others, for Treason, 7 vol. 
85. 

BALE, Sir John. See Hastings^ Henry. 

BALLARD, John. See Bahhigtoth AfUhany. 

BALMERINO, Arthur, Lord.— His Trial in 
the House of liOrds for High Treason, m 
being concerned in the Rebellion of ir45, 
20 Geo. 2, 1746, 18 voL 441. — See Kilmar- 
nock, WUliamy Earl of, 

BALMERINO, John, Lord.— His Trial in 
Scotland, for a libel, 10 Car. 1, 1634, 3 vol. 
592.— Observations on this Prosecution, 
from Laing's History of Scotland, ibid. ib. 
(note).— The Indictment against him, ibid- 
596.— The libel, ibid. 604.— Objections to 
the relevancy of the Indictment by the 
Defendant'sCoun8el,ibid.610.— AChallenge 

of a juror for partiality admitted, ibid. 690. 
— His Depositions before the Council, ibid. 
694.— He is found Guilty by a plurality of 
voices, and sentenced to death, out is par- 
doned by the King, ibid. 712.— Conduct of 
one of the Jurors, ibid. 594 (note). 

BALMERINOTH, Lord.— His Trial for High 
Treason at St. Andrew's, 7 Jac. 1, 1609, 
2 vol. 721*— Tlie Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 
724. — He receives a pardon, ibid. ib. 

BAMBRIDGE, Thomas, Warden of the 
Fleet,— Report of the Committee of the 
House of Commons, appointed to inquire 
into the state of Gaols, against him, 17 vol. 
297. — Resolutions of the House thereupon, 
ibid. 308. — The House resolve to address 
the King to direct the Attorney General to 
prosecute him, ibid. ib. — His Trial at the 
Old Bailey, for the Murder of Robert Castell, 
ibid. 383. — Evidence against him, ibid. 386. 
— He is acquitted, ibid. 395. — Account of 
the Proceedings in the King's Bench on an 
Appeal brought against him and Richard 
Corbett by Castelrs wife, ibid. ib. — ^Their 
Trial on the Appeal, 4 Geo. 2, 1730, ibid. 
397. — Speeches of the Counsel for the 
Appellant, ibid. ib. — Evidence for the 
Appellant, ibid. 403. — Serjeant Darnell's 
Speech for the Appellees, ibid. 430. — Ser- 
jeant Eyre's Speech for the Appellees, ibid. 
433. — Evidence for the Appellees, ibid. 
435. — Reply of the Appellant's Counsel, 
ibid. 450.— CShief Justice Raymond's Charge 
to the Jury, ibid. 452. — They are acquitted, 
ibid. 462. — Proceedings in the King's Bench 
on an application by him to be admitted to 
Bail upon a charge of Felony, ibid. 563. — At 
the Old Bailey Sessions the Recorder (Sir 
William Tliompson), being a member of the 
House of Commons, by ^rhom the Prosecu- 
tion was ordered, refuses to try him, 
ijbid, 565^— The Tri«A postponctd till th« 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



9 



next Sessions, \vhen it is again pat off, 
and the Prisoner is bailed, ibid. 571. — ^At 
the following Sessions the Trial is still 
further postponed, at the instance of the 
King*s Counsel, and his bail are continued, 
ibid. ib.—His Trial for Felony at the Old 
Bailey Sessions, 3 Geo. 2, 1729, ibid. 581. 
—Opening Speeches of the Counsel for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 583. — Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 589. — The Prisoner de- 
cUdcs making any Defence, ibid. 611. — 
Chief Justice Eyre's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 612, — ^Tlie Jury acquit hiro, ibid. 617. 
—Proceedings of a Committee of the House 
of Commons respecting a Charge made 
against Chief Justice Eyre, of having visited 
and supplied him with Money while in 
gaol, ibid. 619. See Huggim, John, 

BANBURY, Charles, Lord. See Knowks, 
Charles, 

BANCROFT, Richard, Archbishop of Canter- 
bury. — ^Articles of Complaint exhibited by 
him, in the name of the Clergy, against the 
Judges, 3 Jac. 1, 1605, 2 vol. 131. 

BANGOR, John Warren, Bishop of.— -His 
Trial at Shrewsbury, with Hugh Owen, John 
Roberts, John Williams, and Thomas Jones, 
for a Riot and Assault, 36 Geo. 3, 1790, 
26 vol. 463. — ^Abstract of the Indictment, 
ibid. ib. — Mr. Adam's Speech for the Prose- 
cution, ibid. 464.— Evidence for the Prose- 
cution, ibid. 479. — Mr. Erskine's Speech 
for the Defendants, ibid. 506. —Mr. Justice 
Heath's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 523.— The 
Jury acquit all the Defendants, ibid. 528. 

BANKES, Sir John, Attorney General.— His 
Argument for the King in the Case of Ship 
Money, 3 vol. 1014.— His Speech on the 
Trial of Thomas Harrison, for insulting Mr. 
Justice Hutton on the Bench, ibid. 1374. 

BANNANTYNE, John. See Green, Thomas, 

BARBOT, John.— His Trial in the Island of 
St. Christopher for the Murder of Matthew 
Mills, esq., by killing him in a Duel, 26 
Geo. 3, 1753, 18 vol. 1229.— The Indict- 
ment, ibid. ib. — He pleads Not Guilty, ,ibid. 
1231. — Speech of the Solicitor General for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 1235. — Evidence for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 1248. — ^The Prisoner's 
Defence, ibid. 1281* — Evidence for him, 
ibid. 1284. — ^The Prisoner's Summing-up of 
his Evidence, ibid. 1290. — Reply of the 
Solicitor General, ibid. 1296. — Charge of 

. the Court to the Jury, ibid. 1304.— -The 
Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 1317. — Sentence 
of Death is passed upon him, ibid. ib. — His 
Address to the Court after his Sentence, 
ibid. 1318.— He is executed, ibid. 1321. — 

, Account of him, ibid. ib. 

BARGENY, John, Lord. — Proceedings agaius 1 
him in Scotland for Treason, 32 Car. 2, 
1680, 11 vol. 65.— The Indictment, ibid, 
ib.— Th« Privy Council order him to be set 



at liberty on his giving surety for bis Appear- 
ance, ibid. 74. 

BARKER, Humphrey. See Sacheverell, Win, 

BARKSTEAD, Colonel John, 5 vol. 971. 
See Regicides, 

BARNARD, William.— His Trial at the Old 
Bailey for sending a threatening Letter, in 
a fictitious name, to Charles, Dcdce of Marl- 
borough, 31 Geo. 2, 1758, 19 vol. 815.— 
The Indictment, ibid. ib. — ^Serjeant Davy's 

. Speech for the Prosecution, ibid, ib.— Evi- 
dence of the Duke for the Prosecution, ibid. 
824. — Other Evidence for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 830.— Evidence for the Defence, ibid. 
833.— Serjeant Davy's Reply, ibidi 841.— 
The Jury acquit the Prisoner, ibid. 846. 

BARNARDISTON, Sir Samuel.— Proceedings 
in an Action by him against Sir William 
Soame, Sheriff of Suffolk, for a double Re- 
turn to a Writ for the Election of a Member 
of Parliament, 26 Car. 2, 1674, 6 vol. 1063. 
—The Record, ibid, ib— A Writ of Error 
is brought in the Exchequer Chamber, and 
the Judgment in the Court of King's Bench 
is reversed, ibid. 1070. — Reasons of Ellis 
and Atkins, Justices, for their opinion that 
the Judgment should be affirmed, ibid. ib. — 
Chief Justice North's Argument that tlie 
Judgment should be reversed, ibid. 1092. 
— He brings a Writ of Error in the House 
of Lords, ibid. 1117.— Roger North's His- 
tory of the motives for this Writ of Error, 
14 vol. 719 (note).— The Reversal is a^rmed 
in the House of Lords, ibid. 1119. — ^The 
Counsel who argued this Case for the De- 
fendant in the Court of King's Bench were 
afterwards made Judges, and decided the 
Case in the Exchequer Chamber, 14 vol. 
745.— His Trial for a scandalous and se- 
ditious Libel, 36 Car. 2, 1684, 9 vol. 1333. — 
The Indictment, ibid. 1336 (note).— Evi- 
dence against him, ibid. 1341. — The Chief 
Justice's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 1351. — 
The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 1358.-*Pro 
ceedings on a Motion in arrest of Judgment, 
ibid. 1357^ — Mr. Williams*s Speech in sup- 
port of the Motion, ibid. 1358. — ^The Mo- 
tion is refused, ibid. 1367. — He is sentenced 
to pay a fine of 10,000/., ibid. 1369.— Mr. 
Emlyn's Remark upon the extravagance of 
this sentence, 1 vol. xxxvi. 

BARNES, Henry. See Green, Thomas, 

BARNEWELL, Robert. See Babington, 
Anthony,. 

BAROVERSE, Sir James. See BwUigh, Sir 
Simon, 

BARRINGTON, The Hon. Daines, Justice of 
the Great Session of the County of Denbigh, 
21 vol. 847.<— His Remark upon Lord Coke*s 
Parliamentary Conduct,- 3 vol. 81 (note). — 
His Observations upon the Punishment of 
the Pillory, 7 vol. 1209 (noteX 

BARTQN> £U«ahetb> the Holy Maid of KenU 



Xo 



OEi^AiiAL li^bSx t6 



—4 ¥bl. 881 (flotfe), 1^83. See Fkfier, John, 
Bithop of Bochester, 

BASrWtCK, Dr. Johhi— Proceedings in the 
Star Chaitiber against him for several Libels^ 
13 Car. 1, 1637, 3 vol.711. Sbq PtytinCy 
WUUam, 

BATEMAN^ Charles.—His Trial at the Old 
Bailejr for High Treason, t Jac. 1, 1685, 
11 tol. 467.— He pleads Not Ouil^, ibid. 
469<— ^The Indictment, ibid* ib. — He is 
found Guilty and executed, ibid. 474. — Sir 
John Hawles's Remarks upon his Trial, 
ibid^ 473. 

fiAt£$, Johii.— The Great Case of Imposi- 
tions, on ah Information in the Exchequer 
against him, 4 Jac. 1, 1606, ^ vol. 3f I. 

fiAtHtJftST, Charles.— Proceedings in the 
Hoiise of Lords, and in the tlouse of Com- 
mons on his Case, respecting the Right of 
Judicature iii the latter, ^ Anne, 11^04| 14 
vol. 889. 

BATHURST, Henry, King's Counsel*— His 
Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
Mary Blandy, for the Murder df her father, 
18 ToL 1180«-^Hi8 Reply in the same Case, 
ibid. 11684 

fiATHtJRST, Henry, Earl, Lord Chancellor. 
— He is appointed Lord High Steward on 
the Trial of the Duchess of Kingston for 
Bigamy, 20 voL 358. 

BATTRAGH, Williata. See Chadwick, Thos. 

Baxter, Richard.— HIs Trial at Guildhall 
for a seditious Libel, 1 Jac. 2, 1685, 11 vol. 
493.r-Tlie Information, ibid.ib. — Jefferies's 
abusive treatment of his Counsel, ibid. 498. 
— Account of this Trial, from Fox''s History, 
ibid. 497 (note). — He is found Guilty, ibid. 
502.-^The Court fine him 500/. and order 
him to find security for seven years, ibid. ib. 

bayard. Colonel Nicholas*— -His Trial in 
ihe Province of New York for High Treason, 
14 Wm. 3, 1702, 14 vol. 471.— His Com- 
mitment by the Lieutenant Governor and 
the Council, ibid. 473. — Special Com- 
mission, to try him tod John Hutchins, ibid. 
476«-^C6nduCt df the Court respeotmg the 
Grand Jury, ibid. 477. — ^The Prisoners' 
Counsel move to quash the Indictment, 
eight of the nineteen Grand Jurors having 
been against finding the Bill, ibid. 478. — 
The Motion is refused, ibid. 486. — The In- 
dictment, ibid. 482. — He pleads Not Guilty, 
ibid. 483. — Evidence against him, ibid« 
487**— Mr. Nicholas Defence of him, ibid. 
495. — Mr. Emot's Speech for him, ibid. 498. 
—The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 505.— His 
Counsel move in arrest of Judgment, ibid. 
606. — ^Tbe Court [overrule the Objections, 
ibid. 508, 515. — Sentence of Death is passed 
upon him, ibid. 516. — His Attainder was 
afterwards reversed, ibid. ib. 

BAYKBSi Jobnj Serjeatit-6t-Lftw*--His l^peeeh 



in Defence of Williflm Hales, oii his ¥tial 
for Forgery, 17 vol. 190. — His Speech for 
the Crown, in the Case of theQdo Warraiito 
to try the rights of the Election of Freetaen 
for the Port of Ne^ Romney, ibid. 825. 

BAYNTON, Sarah. See Swendsen, Huagen,-^ 
Her Trial, with John Hartwell and John 
Spurr, at the Queen's Befnch, for forcibly 
carrying away Pleasant Rawlins, and pro- 
curing her to be married to Haagen Swetid- 
sen, 1 Anne, 1702, 14 vol. 597.— They plead 
Not Guilty, ibid, ib.— The Counsel for the 
Proseeution opefi the Case, ibid, ibj — -Evi- 
dence against the Prisoners, ibid. 599. — 
Their Defence^ ibid. 610. — Evidetiee ia 
reply, ibid. 636.— Chief Justice Holt's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. ib.-i-Tl}e Jury find 
Mrs* Baynton Guilty, but acquit HariweU 
and Spurr, ihid. 630v — Judgment of the 
Court upon Mrs. Baynton, ibid. 634. — tJpon 
her statifig herself to be with child, a Jtify 
of Matrons is impimelled, wlto return that 
she is quick with child, ibid^ ib.-^Shd is 
reprieved, ibid. ib< 

BEARCROFT, Edward^ Counsel, 21 Tdl. 
498, 22 vol. 183, 380, 791, 986, 24 vol. 338. 
His Speech in the Court of King's Bench on 
Shewing Cause against a Rule for a Criminal 
Information against Captain Baillie, 21 toI. 
11. — He is examined in the House of Lords 
respecting a negotiation between Captain 
Baillie and Lord Sandwich, for a compro- 
mise, ibid. 408.— His Speech for the Prose- 
cution on the Trial of the Dean of St. 
Asaph, ibid. 885. — His Speech in Defence 
of Bembridge, 22 vol. 49. — His Argument 
in support of a Motion for a new Trial' in 
Bembridge's Case, ibid. 77. 

BEASLEY, Richard. See Mmenger, Fetet, 

BEAUCHAMP, John. See Burleigh, Sir 
Simon. 

BEAUFORT, Henry, Bishop of Winchester 

Proceedings against him for Treason, 4 Hen. 
6, 1426, 1 vol. 267. — Articles of accusation 
preferred against him in Parliament by 
Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, with his 
Answers tnereto, ibid. 270. — He is acquitted, 
ibid. ib. 

BECKETT, Thomas.— Impleaded by John 
Marshall, in the Archbishop^s Court, 9 Hen. 
2, 1163, 1 vol. l.-^Mannall removes the 
suit into the King's Court, and procures the 
King's Writ, requiring Beckett to answer 
there, ibid, ib.— Beckett sends an excuse, 
ibid. 2. — Accused of Treason in the Council, 
for not obeying the Kinsc's Writ, and con- 
demned, ibid. 3. — His Disputes with the 
King and Bishops thereupon, ibid. 5. — 
Another s^ccount of his Trial, by Quad- 
rilogus, ibid. 8.— He claims exemption 
from secular authority, and appeals to the 
Pope, ibid. 12. 

BEDFORD, George Netille, Duke of.---His 



THE STAfE TftlALS. 



Degradation fr6m th6 t'eerage in the iteign 
of Edward the 4th, ^i vol. 169. 

BEDFORD, Earl of;-— Proceeding^ in the Star 
Chamber, oh an Information against him, 
the Earl of Clare, the Earl of Somerset, Sir 
Robert Cotton, John Selden, Olirer St. 
John, and others, for publishing a scandalous 
and seditious Writing, 6 Car. 1, 1630, 3 vol. 
387. — Opinion as to the cause of this Pro- 
secution, ibid. ib. (note). — ^The Writing, ibid. 
389. — ^The Proceedings put an end to by 
the King, ibid. 397.--The Earl of Bedford's 
Answer to the Information, ibid. 398. 

BEDLE, Edward. See Mestenger, Peter, 

BEDLOW, William. — His Examinations, 
taken before a Committee of I/ords, appoint- 
ed to inquire into the Murder of Sir Ed- 
mondbury Godfrey, 6 vol. 1486. — His Ex- 
amination concerning the Popish Plot, taken 
at Bristol by Chief Justice North shortly before 
his death, ibid. 1493. — His Evidence on the 
Trial of Green and others, for the Murder 
of Sir Edmondbury Godfrey, 7 vol. 1 79. — His 
Evidence on the Trial of Samuel Atkins for 
being accessary to the Murder, ibid. 242. — 
His Evidence on the Trial of Whitebread 
and others for Treason, in being concerned 
in the Popish Plot, ibid, 344,—His Evidence 
on 'the Trial of Richard Langhorne, ibid. 
436. — His Evidence on the Trial of Sir 
George Wakeman, ibid. 631. 

BEGG, John.— His Trial at Dublin for High 
Treason in being concerned in the Irish 
Itisurrection, under a Special Commission of 
Oyer and Terminer, 43 Geo. 3, 1803, 28 vol. 
849. — The Indictment, ibid, ib.— Evidence 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 853. — Mr. Mac- 
Nally's Speech in his Defence, ibid. 860. — 
Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 864. — Mr. 
BalFs Speech on summing up the Evidence 
for the Prisoner, ibid. 868. — Reply of the 
Solicitor General, ibid. 877-— The Jury find 
him Guilty, ibid. 886. 

BELKNAP, Sir Robert, Chief Justice of C. P. 
— He is arrested for Treason, with Sir Roger 
Fulthorp, Sir John Carey, Sir John Holt, 
Sir William Burleigh, and John Locton, the 
King's Serjeant, while sitting in their places 
as Justices, 11 Ric. 2, 1388, 1 vol. 100.— 
They are charged with giving false answers 
to certain questions proposed to them by 
Richard II. respecting the validity of the 
Commission issued to Gloucester's Faction 
by Act of the Parliament, ibid. 106. — Belk- 
nap refuses to answer the Questions pro- 
posed to him until obliged, by the Duke of 
Ireland and the Earl of Suffolk to do so, 
ibidil06 (note). — His Exclamation on setting 
his Seal to the Answers, ibid. ib. — ^They are 
impeached by the Commons for signing the 
Answers, ibid. 119. — ^They plead that Ihey 
did so by constraint, ibid. ib. — ^Judgment 
is given against them to be drawn and 
banged^ ibid. 120. — At the intercession of 



11 



certain Lords their lives are spared, and 
they are banished for life to Ireland, ibkl. 
ib.^ — ^Lord Chancellor Ellesmere, in his argu- 
ment in the Case of the tostnati, says, that 
Belknap was banished in coflsequenee of 
the power of his enemies, and not the 
greatness of his offence, 2 vol. 677. — Re- 
marks upon ^this Case by Mr. St. John, in 
his Speech in the House of Lords against 
the Judges, for their conduct in the Case of 
Ship Moneyi ibid< 1276.— See TresiU^n, 
Robert. 

BELLAMY, Jerome. See Abmgton^ EduxiH* 

BELLASIS, John. See Stt^ord, William, 
Viscount, 

BELWOOD, Roger, Counsel, f toL 492, 
833, 887, 1166. 

BEMBRIDGE, Charles.— Proceedings on an 
Information filed against him by the Attorney 
General for a Misdemeanour, in fraudulently 
concealing Items in the Accountu <»f the 
Paymaster Getieral, 83 fc 24 G^o. 8, 1763, 
22 vol. 1. — Extracts from the Minutes of 
the Board of Treasury, telating to th^se 
Proceedings, ibid, ib* — Opitiion Of the 
Attorney and Solicitor General, advising the 
Prosecution of Bembridge, ibid. 14.-^The 
Information, ibid. 15. — Speech of the Solici- 
tor General for the Prosecution, ibid. 29. — 
Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 33.— 
Mr. Bearcroft's Speech for the Defendant, 
ibid. 49.— Evidence for the Defendant, ibid. 
61.— Reply of the Solicitor General, ibid. 
67. — Lord Mansfield's Charge to the Jury, ' 

ibid. 74 The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 

77. — Proceedings on a Motion for a New 
Trial, and in Arrest of Judgment, ibid.ib. — 
Mr. Bearcroft*9 Argument on that occasion, 
ihidi ib.-^Mr. Scott's Argument on the 
same side, ibid. 90. — Mr. Erskine*s Argu- 
ment on the same side, ibid. 98. — Mr. 
Adam's Argument on the same side, ibid. 
112. — Argument of the Attorney General 
against the Motion for a New Trial, ibid. 
117. —Sir Thomas Davenport's Argument 
on the same side, ibid. 126. — Mr. Cowper's 
Argument on the same side^ ibid. 188* — Mr. 
Bearcroft's Reply, ibid. 138.— The Court 
refuse the Motion for a new Trial, and the 
Motion in Arrest of Judgment, ibid. 150. — 
Judgment of the Court upon him, ibid. 157. 

BENBOW, John. See Derln/, Jamds SfarUeyy 
Earl of. 

BENNETT, Henry. See Arlington^ Earl of. 

BENNETT, Sir John.— Proceedings in Par- 
liament against him for Bribery and Cor- 
ruption, 19 Jac. 1, 1621, 2 vol. 1145. — 
Charges against hitn, ibid. 1146. 

BENNETT) Ralph. See Saeheverellf WilHm. 

BENYON, George. — Proceedings in Parlia- 
ment against him for promoting a Petition 
from the City of London against the Ordi« 



12. 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



nance for the Militia, 18 Car. 1, 1642, 4 vol. 
141. — Articles of Impeachment against 
him, ibid. ib. — His Answer thereto, ibid. 
149. — Sentence against him, ibid. 151. 

fi£R£SFORD,Simonde,Kuight.— TheHouse 
of Lords pass Judgment of death upon him, 
at the suggestion of the King, for assisting 
Roger Mortimer, £arl of March, in his 
Treasons, 3 Edward 3, 1330, 1 vol. 54.— 
Record of the Judgment in this Case, 12 
vol. 1228. — ^Remarks upon this Case, 8 vol. 
236 (note). 

BERKELE, Thomas de. — Proceedings against 
him for the Murder of Edward 2nd, 1 vol. 
55.— Pleads Not Guilty, and puts himself 
on the Country, ibid. 56. — Acquitted by 
the Jury, ibid, ib.— His Case cited by Lord 
Hale as the only instance he ever knew of 
a Peer being tried by a Jury of the Country, 
12 vol. 1219 (note). 

BERKLEY, Robert, King's Seijeant.~His 

■ Argument in the King's Bench, on the 

l^turn of a Habeas Corpus sued out by 

AVilliam Stroud and others, in favour of tlie 

Validity of a commitment by certain Lords 

ofthe Privy Council, 3 vol. 244. 

BERKLEY, Sir Robert, Judge of K. B.— 
3 vol. 844. — His Argument in the Exchequer 
Chamber, in favour of Ship Money, 3 vol. 
1087. — Articles of Impeachment against 
him for his Judgment on that occasion, ibid. 
1283. 

BERNARDI, John, Major. — Proceedings 
against him and several other persons for 
being concerned in the Assassination Plot, 
8 Will. 3, 1696, 13 vol. 759.— His Life and 

' Adventures previous .to these Proceedings, 

. ibid . ib.— Particulars of his first acq^iaintance 
with Rookwood, ibid. 765.— A Reward is 
offered for |his apprehension, ibid. 766. — 
They are committed to Newgate, ibid. 767.— 
They apPty ^^^ their discharge, at a Session of 
Gaol Delivery, ibid. 768.— Several Acts of 
Parliament are passed to authorize their im- 
prisonment, ibid. 769, and (note). — Bernardi 
petitions Queen Anne for his liberty, without 

. success, ibid. 770.' — In the beginning of the 
Reign of George tlie 1st he and the others 
are brought into the Court of King's Bench 
by Habeas Corpus, and remanded, ibid. 
771. — Another Act of Parlianf\^nt is passed 
to continue tlieir Imprisonment during the 
King's pleasure, ibid. 772. — On the demise 
of George the 1st they are again brought 
into the Court of King's Bench by Habeas 
Corpus and remanded, ibid. 773. — ^Another 
Act of Parliament passed to continue their 
Imprisonment, ibid. 774. — ^They petition 
George the 2nd, ibid, ifc.— Bernardi s Peti- 
tions, ibid. 776.— His Wife's Petition, ibid. 
779. — He marries, and has 10 children 
during his confinement, ibid. 785. — He dies 
in Neweate at the age of 82, having been 

> eonfined about 40 years ibid. 788. 



BERRY, Henry.— See Greetiy Eohert. 

BERRY, John.— See Macdamd, Stephen. 

BERRY, Walter. — See Cdlender^ Jama 
Thompson. 

BERTIE, Vere, Baron of the Exchequer, 31 
Car. 2, 7 vol. 261. 

BERWICK, John.— His Trial for High Trea- 
son, in being concerned in the Rebellion of 
1745, 20 Geo. 2, 1746, 18 vol. 367.— He is 
found Guilty, ibid. 369.— -And executed, 
ibid. 370. 

BEST, William Draper, Serjeant at Law, 30 
vol., 966. — His Speech in tlie Court of Ad- 
miralty, in Defence of William Macfarlane, 
on his Trial for feloniously casting away the 
Brig Adventure, 28 vol. 286. — ^His Speech 
in Defence of Colonel Despard, on his Trial 
for High Treason, ibid. 434.— He is one of 
the Managers for the Commons on the Trial 
of the Impeachment of Lord Melville, 29 
vol. 606. — His Speech for the Prosecution, 
on the Trial of John Hatchard, for a Libel, 
32 vol. 685. 

BETHEL, Slingsby. See Pilkington, Thomas. — 
His Trial for an Assault on Robert Mason, and 

. for slanderous words, 33 Car. 2, 1681, 8 vol. 
747. — ^The Indictment,ibid. 748. — Evidence 
against him, ibid..749. — His Defence, ibid. 
762.— He is found Guilty, ibid. 758. — 
Judgment is arrested on the Count for 
.Slander, and he is fined five Marks for the 
Assault, ibid.ib. — Dryden's Character of him, 
ibid. 747 (note). 

BINNS, John. See (XCoigly, James.— His 
Trial at Warwick, for uttering seditious 
words, 37 Geo. 3, 1797, 26 vol. 595.— The 
Indictment, ibid, ib.— Mr. Perceval's Speech 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 598. — Evidence for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 602. — Mr. Romilly's 
Speech for the Defendant, ibid. 609. — Evi- 
dence for the Defendant, ibid. 622. — Mr. 
Perceval's Reply, ibid. 643. — Mr. Justice 
Ashhurst's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 649. — 
The Jufjr acquit him, ibid. 652. 

BIRD, James. — His Trial in Ireland, with 
Roger Hamill, Casiroir Delahoyde, Patrick 
Kenny, Bartholomew Walsh, Matthew Read, 
and Patrick Tieman, for conspiring to raise 
an Insurrection, 34 Geo. 3, 1794, 25 vol.749. 
— ^The Indictment, ibid. ib. — Evidence for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 751. — Mr. Curran's 
Speech in Defence of Bird, Hamill, and 
Delahoyde, ibid. 769. — Evidence for the 
Defence, ibid. 755. — Mr. Justice Downes 
charges^ the Jury, ibid. 781.— The Jury ac- 
quit all the Prisoners, ibid. 784. 

BLACK, David. — Proceedings against him 
and James Paterson, in Scotland, for Sedi- 
tion, and administering unlawful Oaths, 38 
Geo. 3, 1798, 26 vol. 1179.— The Indict- 
ment, ibid. ib. — Black's Declaration, ibid. 
1184.-*Paterson's Declaration, ibid. 1186. 
— Black is outlawed for not appearing,, ibid » 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



13 



1187. — Paterson is found Guilty, and sen- 
tenced to Transportation for five years^ ibid. 
1190. 

BLACKHEAD. See Spratt^ Dr. Thomas, 
Bi^ufp of Rochester. 

KLACKBURNE, Robert. See Bemardi, John, 

BLACKMORE, Sir Richard.-— Observations 
on his Style, 12 vol. 1299 (note). Extract 
from his History of the Assassination Plot, 
ibid. 1299. 

BLACKMORE, Robert. See Leach, Ihyden. 

BLACKSTONE, Sir William, Judge of C. P. 
^His Judgment, in the Court of Common 
Pleas, in the case of Brass Crosby, esq.. 
Lord Mayor of London, upon a commitment 
by the House of Commons, 8 vol. 36. — Lord 
£ilenborough*s Depreciation, and Lord Ers- 
kine's Vindication, of the Authority of his 
Commentaries, 20 vol. 798. 

BLACKWOOD, Robert. See Lowrky William, 

BLAGUE, William.— His Trial at the Old 
• Bailey, for High Treason, in being concerned 
in the Rye-House Plot, 35 Car. 2, 1683, 9 
vol. 653.--The Indictment, ibid. 637.— He 
is arraigned, with John Rouse, and pleads 
Not Guilty, ibid. 638.— Evidence against 
him, ibid. 654. — Jury acquit him, ibid. 666. 

BLAIR, Sir Adam. — ^Proceedings in Parlia- 
ment, against him and others, on an Im- 
peachment of High Treason, for dispersing 
a treasonable and seditious Paper, being a 
Declaration of James the 2nd, 1 and 2 Wil- 
liam and Mary, 1689—1690, 12 vol. 1207. 
—The Declaration is read, ibid. 1209. — 
Articles of Impeachment against them, ibid. 
1213. — ^The Articles are carried up to the 
House of Lords, ibid. 1217. — ^The Lords 
resolve to proceed with tlie Impeachment, 
ibid. 1230. — Answers to the Articles of Im- 
peachment, ibid. 1231. —They are held to 
bail by tiie House of Lords, ibid. 1234. 

BLAIR, Alexander. — Proceedings on an Assize 
of Error, against him and other Jurors, for a 
false Verdict, in acquitting a person indicted 
for Treason, 33 Car. 2, 1681, 11 vol. 75. — 
The Indictment, ibid, ib.— Objections to the 
Proceeding by the Advocates for the Pa- 
nels, ibid. 84.— Evidence against them, ibid. 
92. — ^Verdict of the Assize, ibid. 95. — Judg- 
ment against them, ibid. 99. — Fountain- 
hall's Account of this Proceeding, ibid. 100. 

BLAKE, John. — He is Impeached, with 
Thomas U8ke> of High Treason, for drawing 
up the Questions to which Belknap and the 
other Justices made answer, 11 Ric. 2, 1388, 
1 vol. 120.— They plead that they were of 
Counsel for the King, and what they did was 
by his command, ibid. 121.— They are found 
Guilty, and executed, ibid. ib. 

BLANDY, Mary.— Her Trial at Oxford for 
the Murder of her Father, 25 Geo. 2,;i752, 

18 Tol 1U7* Th« ^^dictmeat, ibid, ib*- 



She pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 11 19.-^Speeches 
of the Counsel for the Prosecution, ibid. 
1120. — Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 
1135. — ^The Prisoner's Defence, ibid. 1163. 
— Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 1164. — 
Mr. Baron Legge's Charge to the Jury, ibid, 
1 1 70.— The Jury find her Guilty, ibid. 1 187. 
^-Sentence of death is passed upon her, ibid. 
1188. — Account of her Conduct after Sen.* 
tence was passed, ibid. 1189. — ^Her Execu- 
tion, ibid. 1191. — Her Declaration at the 
place of Execution, ibid. 1193. 

BLENCOWE, Sir John, Judge of C. P. 4 Geo. 
1. — His Opinion in favour of the King's 
Prerogative, respecting the Marriage and 
Education of the Royal Family, 15 vol. 
1220. 

BLUNT, Sir Christopher.—His Trial, with Sir 
Charles Davis, Sir John Davis, Sir Gilly 
Merrick, and Henry Cuffe, for High Treason, 
43 Eliz. 1600, 1 vol. 1410.— The Indictment, 
ibid. 1416. — They inquire whether they may 
plead Not Guilty to a part, and confess tl^ 
residue, and are answered by the Court in 
the negative, ibid. 1410, 1417. — They plead 
Not Guilty, ibid, ib. — ^They are found Guilty, 
ibid. 1412, 1446. — ^Their Speeches before 
Judgment, ibid. 1447. — Chief Justice Pop- 
ham's Address, on pronouncing Sentence 
upon them, ibid. 1450. Sir C. Blunt and 
Sir C. Davis are beheaded, but the rest are 
executed at Tyburn, ibid. 1412. — ^Their 
Speeches at the place of Execution, ibid. ib. 

BOIG, James. See CargUl, Donald, 

BOLEYN, Anne, Queen of Henry the Eighth. 
— Her Trial, with her brother. Lord Roch- 
ford, for Treason, 28 Henry 8, 1536, 1 vol. 
409. — Observations on the different accounts 
of these Trials, ibid, ib.— Account of the 
Queen's Trial and Execution, from the Har- 
Ician Manuscripts, ibid. ib. — Causes of the 
King's dissatisfaction with her, ibid. 411. — 
Her conduct upon her Arrest, ibid, 413.-— 
Archbishop Cranmer's Letter to the King 
on her behalf, ibid. 415.— She is arraigned 
with the Lord Rochford, before their Peers, 
ibid. 417.— They are both found Guilty, and 
condemned to Death, ibid. 418. — Dispute 
respecting the Queen's Sentence, ibid, ib.— • 
Her Speech after her Condemnation, ibid. 
424. — ^Alleged Pre-contract between her 
and the Earl of Northumberland, ibid, ib.— 
The Earl of Northumberland denies such 
Pre-contract on his oath, ibid. 419, 426, 
434. — ^The Marriage between the King and 
Anne Boleyn declared null and void, ibid. 
419. — The Queen's last Letter to the King, 
ibid. 426. — Her Execution, ibid. 421. — 
Various Opinions respecting her, ibid, ib.— 
She was friendly to the Reformation, ibid. 
428. 

BOUNGBROKE, Henry, Lord Viscount.— 
Proceedings in Parliament, on an Impeach- 
ment and Act of Attainder against him, 1 and 
2 Geo, 1, 1715, 15 Yol, 993,— Artides of Im^' 



1 

I 

I 



14 



QENEJtAl4 INDEX TO 



peachqaentf ibi4- 094.*-Act of Attainder | 
passed, ibid. 1002. — He obtains a Pardon 
m>m Georg[e the First, ibid. 1003. — An Act 
of Parliament is passed^ enabling him to 
hold Lands, ibid. 1004, 

BOLRQN, Ilobert»-^Aecountof the Pamphlet 
published by him in 1680, by order of the 
Hqnse of Commons, entitled ** The Papist's 
Bloody Oath of Secrecy, and Litany of In- 
tercession for England ;" 7 vqI. 969 (note). 
His Evidence against Sir Thomas Gascoigne, 
on his Trial for High Treason, ibid. 970. — 
His Evidence on the Trial of Thomas Tbwing, 
and Mary Pfessicks, for High Treason, ibid. 
1164. 

BOLTON, John, See Crook, John, 

BOLTON, Sir Richard .—Lord Chancellor of 
Ireland, 16 Car. 1. See Jtatdiff^ Sir Oeorge* 

BOND, OUver.-r-His Trial at Dublin, under a 
Special Commission of Oyer and Terminer, 
for High Treason, in being concerned in 
the Irish Rebellion, 38 Geo. 3, 1798, 27 
vol. 523. — ^The Indictment, ibid. 527. — 
His Counsel move to postpone his Trial, 
on the ground that Statements tending 
to prejudice the Jury had appeared in the 
Newspapers, and that ' a material Witness 
vras absent, ibid. 531.^ — ^The Court refuse the 
Motion, ibid. 534.-^The Attorney GeneraKs 
Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. 536. — Evi- 
dence for the Prosecution, ibid. 542. Mr. 
Curraa's Speech in bis Defence, ibid. 574. — 
Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 579. — Evi- 
dence in Reply, for the Prosecution, ibid. 
586. — Mr. Ponsonby's Speech, on summing 
up the Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 588. 
— Mr. Saurin's Reply for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 594. — Mr. Justice Chamberlain's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. 602.— The Jury 
find him Ouilty, ibid. 611,— Sentence is 
passed upon him. — ibid, ib« — He receives 
a conditional Pardon, ibid. 613.— Proceed- 
ings against him in 1793 by the Irish House 
of Xordsji for a Breach of Privilege, ibid, 523 
(note), 

BONIFACE, Archbishop of Canterbury.— 
Articuii Cleri, or Articles of Grievances, 
exhibited by him, on behalf of the Clergy of 
England, in the reign of Henry the ard, 2 
voLiai, 

BONNER, Edmund, Bishop of London.— Pro- 
ceedings against him for opposing the Re- 
formation, 1 and 3 Edw. 6, 1547—1550, 
1 vol. 631. -^Commissioners appointed by 
the King, to swear him to his Renunciation 
of the Pope, and his Obedience to the King, 
ibid. ib.-*The Commissioners deliver certain 
InjunctioBS and Homilies to him, which he 
receives with a Protestation that he will ob. 
MTVfl them, if they are not contrary to the law 
of the Church, ibid. ib. — He renounces this 
PffHeatation, ibid. 633.*-His Letter to the 
Bishop of Westminster, with the Order of the 
CorumII for the abolitiou of Candles, and 
^)m» SftBtth CtnoiMiteiy ibid» 635.*«p-His 



Letter to the same, with the Order f»r the 
abolition of Images, ibid. 637, I^etter from 
the King andCounciltohim, commanding the 
abolition of Masses at St. Paul's, ibid. 643. 
— His Letter to the Dean and Chapter of St. 
Paul's therewith, ibid. -ib. — Letter from the 
King and Council to him, charging him t9 
be more diligent in the use of the Common- 
Prayer Book within his Diocese, ibid. 647. — 
His Letter to the Deanand Chapter of St.Paul's 
thereupon, ibid. 648.— He is commanded 
to preach at Paul's Cross on a particular 
Sunday, and the heads of his Sermon are 
prescribed to him, ibid. 649. — He disregards 
this Injunction, and preaches in favour of 
Popery, ibid. 653. — Bill of Complaint against 
him, presented to the King by Hooper and 
Latimer, ibid. ib. — Commission to Cranmer, 
and others to examine him, ibid. 655.— His 
behaviour before the Commissioners, ibid. 
656.— Proceedings against him under the 
Commission, ibid. 658. — Sentence of Depri- 
vation passed upon him, ibid. 708.— He is 
committed to Prison, ibid. 710. — He appeals 
to the King, ibid. 712. — Restored to his 
Dignities by Queen Mary, ibid. 713. — His 
Conduct after his Restoration, ibid. ib. — His 
unfeeling behaviour to Cranmer, ibid. 804, 
809. 

BONNJiT, Major Slede.^His Trial, with 
several others, at theCourtof Vice-Admiralty, 
at Charlestown, in South Carolina, for Piracy, 
5 Geo. 1, 1718, 15 vol. 1231.— The Judge's 
Charge to the Grand Jury, ibid. 1232.— The 
Indictnient, ibid. 1241. — Bonnet escapes 
from Prison, and the others are tried with- 
out him, ibid. 1243. — ^Tlie Counsel for the 
Prosecution open the Case, ibid. 1242. — 
Evidence against them, ibid. 1249. — They 
are found Guilty, ibid. 1256% — ^Trials of 
other Prisoners belonging to the same Ship, 
ibid. ib. — Sentence of death is passed upon 
them,ibid. 1285. — Bonnet's Trial, ibid.1291. 
Evidence against him, ibid. ib. — He is found 
Guilty, ibid. 1297. — Sentence of death is 
passed upon him, ibid. 1298.— He is exe- 
cuted, ibid. 1302, 

BOOTLE, Thomas, Counsel, 15 vol 1331.-- 
His Speech in Defence of Richard Francklin, 
his Trial for publishing a seditious Libel^ 
17 vol. 654. 

BOOTH, Benjamin. See Walker, Thomas. 

BOROSKI, George. See Coningmorkf Charles 
John, Count, 

BOSGRAVE, James. See Camphn^ tldmmd. 

BOTHWELL, James, Eari,— His Trial for the 
Murder of Lord Darnley, 9 Eliz. 1567, 1 
vol. 901. — Commission from Mary, Queen 
of Scots, to try him, ibid. 903.— Summons 
indorsed thereon, ibid. 904. — Indictment 
against him, ibid. 905. — The Constable of 
Scotland claims cognisance of the Cause^ 
ibid. ib. — ^Letter of Lord Lennox to Mary, 
urging h«r mot to postpone the Trial; ibid. 



TP5 PTATE T^IM**. 



14 



907.-r-4nQtHer ItCHer from J^ord I^npoz to 
iki QMesQ} (Qh^rging Bothw^ll and oth^rs 
with the Murder, ibid. 908.— Tbc Jyry 
acquit him, ibid. 909.—- Bothwell offers to 
prpve his innoGeiuie by single Combat, ibid. 
910» — TheCliaUenge accepted, butBpthwell 
makes no reply, ibid. 911. — liis Flight, Im- 
pfisomaent, and Death, ibid, ib.—- Further 
Account of the Tfial, with Observations upon 
it and Bothwell, from Laing's History of 
Scotlaad, ibid. ib. 

BOUCHER, James.— Procei?dipg8 m the 
House of Coqninpps and in ^p Hou§e of 
liords relating to him, 9 APQe, 1704, 14 
ToL 937. His Trial at thQ Queen's Bench 
!Rar, for High Treason, ibifl, 983.— The jn- 
dictraents, ibid* ib.— 984, ^ni 983 (notie). 
lie pleads Guilty, ib^d, 985.T-TSentence of 
deatn is passed uppn him, ibid. 96Q. — He is 
r^priey^i ibid- 988, 

BOWLAND, William. See Cavmagh, Michael 

BOACTONwr-rMr.Selden say9, that the author- 
ity of BractOQ is of slight or no moment for 
direction in judgment of the law at the 
present day, 3 vol. 277. — Bracton and Fleta 
aiv» laid by Lord Holt, to be only ornaments 
of the law, and not authorities, 14 vol. 33. — 
Their authority asserted by some of the 
Judges in their Arguments respecting the 
King's Prerogative, in the Marriage and Edu- 
cation of tlie royal ftimily, 15 vol. 1206, 1 215. 

BBADBURN, Richard.— He pleads Guilty to 
an Indictment for High Treason, in being 
concerned ii) ^he Cato Street Plot, 1 Geo. 4, 
1820, 33 vol. 1544. — He receives a Pardon, 
on condition of being transported for life, 
ibid. 1566. 

BRADDON, Lawrence.— His Trial with Hugh 
Speke, for conspiring tq suborn Evidence, 
apd spreading false Reports, that the Earl of 
Essex was murdered by his Keepers, 36 
Car. 2, 1684, 9 vol. 1127. — ^The Information, 
ibid. ib. and 1129 (note). — The King's 
Counsel open the Case, ibid. 1130. — Evi- 
dence for the Prosecution, ibid. 1132. — The 
Defence, ibid. 1165. — Evidence for the De- 
fence, ibid. 1167. — Jefferies's intemperate 
behaviour towards their Counsel, ibid. 1177. 
— Evidence in reply for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 1198.— The Chief Justice's Charge to 
the Jury, ibid. 1205, — ^The Jury find Braddon 
Guilty generally, and Speke Guilty of all but 
the Subornation, ibid. 1218. — ^Their Counsel 
o^r to move in arrest of Judgment, but the 
Court refuse to hear them, ibid. ib. — ^Their 
Sentence, ibid. 1224. — Braddon's Vindica- 
tion of the Earl of Essex from Burnet's 
Charge of Self-Murder, ibid, 1229. 

BRAD6HAW, Dearing. See Walters, Ro^ 
land. 

BflADSHAW, Jame8.--His Trial for High 
Tl^MW^ in l^iQg ^ftftpeiBed in thf Rebel- 
lion of 1745, 20 Geo. 2, 1746, 18 voU 4X5. 



— l^vidlSB^e ^%^inBt him, i))id.'Htt7»^His 
Defence, ibid. 418^— He is found Quilty, 
ibid. 421.— Account of hi|P, ibid* ib. — H§ is 
executed;, ibid. 426. 

BRADSjHAW, John, Serjeant at Law.— Is 
assigned Counsel for John Lilburne, op his 
application to the House of Lords against 
the sentence of the Star-Chamber, 3 vol. 
1347.^Is chosen President of the High 
Coqrt q( Justice, for the Trial of Chadei tht 
First, 4 vol. 1056. — His Speech on pasting 
Sentence of Death upon CHarles the Fir^tty 
ibid. 1008. — Js chosen President of the High 
. Court pf Justice, for the Trial of James, Duke 
of Hamilton, ibid. 1156.— His De^th, and 
Whitelocke*s Account of him, ibid. 1)28 
(note). — ^He refuses to tsJce out a qew Copi- 
mission for his Office of Chief Justice of 
Chester upqn Cromwell's Usurpation, 5 vol. 
365 (note). — Lord Clarendon's Account of 
him, ibid. 1344.— Milton's Character of him, 
ibid. 1345. — He is attainted by Act of Par- 
liament, after his death, and his body dldn- 
terred and {langed, ibid. 1335. 

BRAMBRE, Nieholai. See IVenlian, Itobert. 
Appealed of High Treason, for forcibly re- 
sisting the Commissioners appoint^ by 
Parliament to order Public Amiirs, 11 Ric. 
2, 1388, 1 vol. 99. — He gives security to 
answer the Appeal, ibid* ib. — He 19 cc^l)e4 
upon to answer to the Appeal, t)ut desires 
time and Counsel, ibid. 114.— tWhigh (tre 
refused, ibid. ib. — He offefn tq pvpve j)is In- 
nocence by single Combat, ibid. ib. — ^The 
Parliament decide that Battle does not lie in 
an Appeal of Treason, ibid. 115. — He is 
drt^wn and hanged, ibid. 118. 

BRAMHALL, Dr. John, Bishop of Derry. 

See BatcUff, Sir George. 

BRAMSTONE, John, Serjeant at Law.--His 
Argument in the Court of King's Bench 
for Sir John Heveningham, on the return of 
a Habeas Corpus, sued out by hi?D, 
Sir Thomas Darnell, Sir John Corbet, Sir 
Walter Earl, and Sir Edmund {tampdeo» in 
order to determine the validity of their oom- 
mitment, by the special command of Uie 
King, 3 vol. 6. 

BRAMSTONE, Sir John, Lord Chief Justice 
of K. B , 3 vol. 716, 787, 813.— He was one 
of the Judges who signed the Opinion in 
favour of the Legality of Ship Money, 3 vol. 
844. His Arguments in the Exchequer- 
Chamber in favour of Ship«Mpney, ibid. 
1243. 

BRANDON, Gerard, Lord. See Gerwri of 
Brandon^ Lord, 

BRANDRETH, Jaremiah, alias John Coke, 
alias the Nottingham Captain. — His Trial 
for High Treason, in being ooneeraed in the 
Luddite Insurrection, under a Special Con- 
nissioD, at Derby, *7 Gee. 8. 18ir, 9% vol. 



16 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



' toroey-Generars Spaech for the Prosecution, 
ibid . 779. — Evidence for theCrown, ibid, 795. 
— Mr. Cross's Speech for the Prisoner, ibid. 
863. — Mr. Denman's Speech, on summing 
up the Evidence for the Prisoner, • ibid. 884. 
-*Iteplv of the Solicitor-General, ibid. 908. 
— Chief Baron Richards's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 926. — ^The Jury find the Prisoner Guilty, 
ibid. 956.-— He is executed, ibid. 1394. 

BRERETON, William. See ^brm, Henry; 
Boleyuy Anne, 

BREWSTER, Thouias.— His Trial with Simon 
Dover, and Nathan Brooks, for a Misdemea- 
nour, in publishing a Book called " Speeches 
and Prayers of some of the late King's 
Judges," and other seditious works, 15 Car. 
2, 1663, 6 voL 513. — Indictments against 
them, ibid. 517.— They all plead Not Guilty, 
ibid.ib. — Evidence sigatnst Brewster, ibid. 
541. — His Defence, ibid. 545. — Chief Jus- 
tice Hyde's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 547. 
He is tried upon a seoond indictment, ibid. 
549.— Evidence against Dover, ibid. 554. — 
His Defence, ibid. 558. — Chief Justice 
Hyde's Charge to the Jury, ibid. ib. — 
Evidence against Brooks, ibid. 559. — His 
Defence, ibid. 562. — ^They are all found 
Guilty, ibid. 563. — Sentence against them, 
ibid. 564. 

BRIDGMAN, Sir Orlando, Chief Baron of 
the Exchequer. — He was one of the Judges 
who met to consult upon the necessary 
Proceedings for the Trial of the Regicides, 
5 vol. 971. — His Charge to the Grand Jury 
assembled under the Special Commission, 
for the Trial of the Regicides, ibid. 988. — 
His Charges to the Jury on the several Trials 
of the Regicides, ibid. 1033, 1047, 1057, 
1069, 1073, 1115, 1174, 1184, 1193, 1206. 
— His Address to several of the convicted 
Regicides, on passing Judgment upon them, 
ibid. 1224. 

-, Chief Justice of 



C. P. 6 vol. 568, 769, 899. 

BRIELLAT, Thomas.— His Trial at the 
Clerkenwell Sessions for Seditious words, 
34 Geo.* 3, 1793, 22 vol. 909.— Abstract of 
the Indictment, ibid. ib. — Mr. Silvester's 
Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. 91 3. — Evi- 
dence for the Prosecution, ibid. 917. — Mr. 
Felix Vaughan's Speech for the Defendant, 
ibid. 929. — Evidence for the Defendant, ibid. 
942.— Mr. Silvester's Reply, ibid. 946.— He 
is found Guilty, ibid. 954.— The Sentence of 
the Court, ibid. ib. 

BRISTOL, George, Earl of. See Digby, 
George, XorJ.— Proceedings in the House of 
Conunons, respecting a Message alleged to 
have been conveyed by him from Sir Richard 
Temple to Charles the Second, 1 5 Car. 2, 1 663, 
6 vol. 283. — His Speech in his justification in 
the House of Commons, ibid. 285. — ^Resolu- 
tions of the House on that occasion, ibid. 
292t H9 charges liord Clarendon with Hi([h 



Treason, ibid. 3044— Lord Clarendon's Re* 
marks on his Character, 4 vol. 133 (note), 6 
vol. 304 (note). 

BRISTOL, John, Earl of. See Buckingham, 
George^ Dvke o/l— -Proceedings in Parliament 
against him for High Crimes and Misde-t 
meanours, 2 Car. 1, 1626, 2 vol. 1267. — ^His 
Correspondence with Lord Conway, ibid. 
1274.— Petitions the House of Lords, to 
mediate with the King to summon him to 
ParUament, ibid. 1276.— The King'i Letter 
to him thereupon, ibid. 1277. — He is supi- 
moned to Parliament, but receives a Com*- 
mand from the King not to attend, ibid. ib. 
— ^He petitions the House of Lords there« 
upon, ibidi ib.— The King desires the House 
of Lords to proceed against him, ibid. 1280. 
— ^Articles of Impeachment against him. ibid, 
1281.— His Defence, ibid. 1294.— He is 
allowed Counsel to plead for him, though 
the King remonstrates against it, ibid; 1298 
— 99, 1379. — His Answer to the charges 
against him, ibid. 1386.— The Parliament is 
abruptly dissolved, ibid. 1446. 

BRISTOW. See Campion, Edmund. 

BRITTON, Richard. See Denew, Nathaniel. 

BROADFOOT, Alexander.— His Trial at 
Bristol before Mr. Serjeant Foster, Recorder, 
for Murder, in killing one of a Press-gang, 
18 vol. 1323. — ^The Recorder directs the 
Jury to convict him of Manslaughter only, 
the Press-gang having exceeded their author- 
ity, ibid. 1324. — ^The Recorder's Argument, 
on giving his opinion, in this case, on the 
legality of Impressing Mariners, ibid. 1 326. 
See Pressing Seamen, 

BRODERICK, John, Counsel.— His Speech 
for the Prosecution, on the Trial of Richard 
Hathaway, for a Misdemeanour, in fraudu- 
lently pretending to be bewitched, 14 vol. 
643. — His Argument for the Defendant, in 
arrest of Judgment, in Tutchin's Case, ibid. 
1151. 

BRODWAY, Giles. See Fitzpatrick, Lau^ 
rence, 

BROMLEY, Sir Edward, Baron of the Ex- 
chequer, 4 Car. 1, 3 vol. 359. 

BROMLEY, Sir Thomas. — Chief Justice 
of K. B. — He presides at the Trial of Sir 
Nicholas Throckmorton, 1 Mary, 1 vol. 869, 

', Lord Chancellor, 27 



Eliz. 1 vol. 1114, 1166. 

BROMMICH, Andrew.— His Trial at Stafford 
for High Treason, under the Stat. 27 Eliz. c. 
2, for coming as a Seminary Priest into 
England, and remaining there, 31 Car. 2, 
1679, 7 vol. 715. — ^Indictment against him, 
to which he pleads Not Guilty, ioid. 721.-^ 
Evidence against him, ibid. 722.— He is 
found Guilty, -and sentenced to death, ibid, 
726 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



17 



BROOKE, George. See Markham, Sir Griffin. 

BROOKESBY, Bartholomew. See Markkam, 
Sir Gr^fiann 

BROOKES, Nathan. See Brewster^ Thomus. 

BROUGHAM, Henry, Counsel.— His Speech 
in Defence of the Editors of the Examiner, 
for a Libel, 31 vol. 380. — His Speech in 
Defence of Drakard, the Editor of the Stam- 
ford T^ews, for the publication of the same 
Libei, ibid. 509. 

BROWNE, Gunter. See Thanet^ Sackville, 
Earl of. 

BROWNE, Samuel, Counsel. — He sums up 
the Charge against Archbishop Laud, on his 
Impeachment in the House of Lords, 4 vol. 
576. — He replies to the Archbishop's 
Answer, ibid. 596. 

• — '• ' ^-^, Jiidge of a P'. 18 Car. 2, 

6 voU 769. 

BRUCKUE, John* See Green, Thomas. 

BRUNT, John Thomas.~His Trial at the Old 
.Bailey under a Special Commission, for 
High Treason, in being concerned in the 
Cato-Street Conspiracy, 1 Geo. 4, 1820, 33 
▼ol. 1177.— The Indictment, ibid. 697.— 
Speech of the Attorney General for the Pro- 
secution, ibid. 1181. — Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 1195. — Mr. Curwood*s 
Speech for the Prisoner, ibid. 1256. — Mr. 
Adolphus's Speech for the Prisoner, ibid. 
1272. — Reply of the Solicitor-General, ibid. 
1293. — Chief Baron Richards's Charge to 
the Jury, ibid. 1305. — ^The Jury find him 
Guilty, ibid. 1335. — His Speech on being 
called upon for Judgment, ibid. 1554. — ^He 
is executed, ibid. 1566. 

BUCCLEUGH, James, Duke of. SeeJion- 
mouthy James, Duke of, 

BUCKINGHAM, Edward Stafford, Duke of, 
Hereditary High Constable of England. — 
His Trial for High Treason, 13 Hen. 8, 1522, 
1 vol. 287. — Reference to Historians, who 
give an Account of this Trial, ibid. ib. — Sum- 
mary of the Charges against him, ibid. 289, 
293. — He is tried by his Peers before the Duke 
of Norfolk, Lord High Steward, ibid. 2^1, 
296. — He is found Guilty, and sentenced to 
Death, ibid. 291, 296. — ^He is beheaded, ibid. 
291, 297.— His Degradation from the Order 
of the Garter, ibid. 297.— By his Attainder 
the Office of High Constable reverted to the 

. Crown, and has ever since remained dormant, 
ibid. 298. 

BUCKINGHAM, George Villiers, Duke of. 
See Bristol, Earl of. — Omway, Lord. — 
Proceedings in Parliament against him for 
High Crimes and Misdemeanours, 2 Car. 1, 
1626, 2 vol. 1267.— Sir Robert Cotton's 
Speech in the House of Commons against 
him, ibid. ib. — ^The public feeling much 
excited against him, ibid. 1272. — Lord 
Bristol petitions the House of Lords to be 
VOL, XXXIV. 



heard in accusation of him, ibid. 1277. — 
The Commons resolve to proceedtagainsthim, 
ibid. 1280. — ^The House of Lords resolve to 
hear Lord BristoFs Charge against him, ibid. 
. 1281. — Articles of Impeachment preferred 
by Lord Bristol against him, ibid. 1287. — 
The King desires the House of Lords not 
to imprison him, ibid. 1293. — Ahicles of 
Impeachment against him by the Commons, 
ibid. 1307. — Speeches of the Managers of 
the House of Commons, enforcing the 
Articles of Impeachment, ibid. 1321. — ^Two 
of the Managers of the House of Commons 
committed to the Tower by the King, ibid. 
1371. — ^The King's Speech in his favour, 
ibid. 1372. — His Answer to the Articles of 
Impeachment, ibid. 1422. — ^The Parliament 
is abruptly dissolved, ibid. 1446. — Further 
proceedings against him in a subsequent 
Parliament, ibid. 1447, — HowelPs Letter of 
Advice to him, ibid. 1448.< — Archbishop 
Abbot's Account of his first Promotion, ibid. 
1478. 

BUCKINGHAM, George Villiers, Duke ^f. 
— Proceedings in the House of Commons 
against him, 25 Car. 2, 1674, 6 vol. 1033. — 
He desires to be heard by the House, ibid. 
1038. — His Speech to the House of Com- 
mons, ibid. 1039. — -Debate thereon, ibid. 
1040. — Questions put by the House to him, 
with his Answers, ibid. 1048. — Debate 
on his Answers, ibid. 1050. — ^The House 
resolve to address the King to remove him 
from his Employments and from his Coun- 
cils for ever, ibid. 1054. — Burnet's Account 
of him, ibid. 1033 (note). — Dryden and 
Pope*s Account of him, ibid. 1034 (note). 

BULLER, Francis, Counsel, 20 vol. 660, 
1240,1319. — His Argument for the Plain- 
tiff in Error, in the Case of Fabrigas v. 
Mostyn, 20 vol. 194. — His Reply in the 
same Case, ibid. 220. 

, Judge of K. B. 21 vol. 
687. — ^His Charge to the Jury on the Trial 
of Delamotte for High Treason, 21 vol. 808 . 

BULLER, Sir Francis, Bart. Judge of C. P.— 
He was one of the Judges who sat, under the 
Special Commission, on the Trial of Hardy 
and others, for High Treason, in 1794, 24 voL 
221, 238. — His Charge to the Grand Jury, 
. assembled under the Special Commission at 
Maidstone, for the Trial of O'Coigly and 
others for High Treason, 26 vol. 1192, — His 
Charge to the Jury in that Case, 27 vol. 125. 
— His [Address to O'Coigly on passing 
Sentence of Death upon him; ibid. 139. 

BULMBR, Sir John. See Constable^ Sir 
Robert. 

BURDETT, Sir Francis, Bart.— Reports of a 
Committee of the House of Commons, ap- 
pointed to investigate the legality of Pro- 
ceedings against him, for denying the power 
of that House to commit the people of Eng* 
land, 8 vol. 14. 

c 



19 



GENERAL INPEX TO 



BUEGH, Hubert de. Earl of Kent.— Artiqles 
of Accusationagainstbim by Henry the Third, 
with his Answers thereto, 1 vol. 1 3.— Matthew 
Paris says, that he satisfactorily proved his 
innocence ; but, to appease the Kin^^ he 
was adjudged to surrender to the King four 
of his Castles, ibid. 22. 

BURKE, £dmund.*"His Opinions on the 
question of Reform in Parliament, as quoted 
by Mr. Erskine, in his Speech for Hardy. — 
24 vol. 918.— His Chai*acter of Charles the 
Second, 8 vol. 970. 

BURLEIGH, Sir William. See Belknap, Sir 
Mobert. 

BURLEIGH, Sir Simon. See Tresilian, Sir 
JRoberL^Ue is impeached by the Commons, 
with John de Beauchamp^ James Baroverse, 
and John Salisbury, of Treason, 11 Ric. 2, 
1388, 1 vol. 121.— They are condemned and 
executed, ibid. 122, 123.— The Duke of 
Gloucester and others impeached for their 
conduct in the Prosecution of Sir Simon 
Burleigh, ibid. t28. 

BURN, James. See Greeny Thomas, 

BURNET, Dr. Gilbert, Bishop of Salisbury.— 
Proceedings against him in Scotland for 
High Treason, 3 Jac. 2, 1687, 11 vol. 1103. 
^-^Criminal Letters against him, ibid. ib. — 
His Answer thereto, ibid. 1114. — His Second 
Citation, ibid. 1118. — Fountainhall and 
Wodroiv*8 Notices of these Proceedings, ibid. 
1103 (note). — His Account of various Trials 
and Attainders in the Reign of Henry the 
Eighth, for OflTences relating principally to 
Religion, 1 vol. 469.-*-His Account of the 
Duke of Lauderdale*s Character, 6 vol. 1025 
(note).— His Narrative of the Circumstances 
attending the Disappearance and Death of Sir 
EdmondburyGodfrey,6 vol. 1410. —His Cha- 
racter of Titus Gates, ibid. 1407. — His Ac- 
count of the Proceedings against Lord Cla- 
rendon, ibid. 317. — Of the Fire of London, 
ibid. 807.— Of the Transaction out of which 
the Impeachment of Sir William Penn arose, 
ibid. 869 (note).— Of the Popish Plot, ibid. 
1405.— Of the Rye-House Plot, 9 vol. 491. 
•^Of the Trial and Execution of Lord 
William Russell, ibid. 505, 511.— His Evi- 
dence on behalf of Lord Russel, ibid. 622. 
—His Account of Algernon Sidney's Trial, 
ibid. 514. — Of the death of the Earl of Essex, 
ibid. 504. — Braddon's Charge of Misrepre- 
sentation against his Account of the Deatb of 
theEarl pf Essex, ibid. 1 229.— Of Chief Justice 
Jefferies, and of his Excesses on the Wes- 
tern Circuit after Monmouth's Rebellion, 
ibid. 936 (note), 10 vol. 555 (note). — His 
Evidence on Hampden's Trial, 9 vol. 1091 . — 
His Remarks on Dr. Oliver PlunkettU Case, 
8 vol. 447 (note).— His Account of the Pro« 
ceedings against the Earl of Argyle, in Scot- 
land, ibid. 843 (note).— Of the Proceedings 
against Hackston and Cargill, 10 vol. 850 
(note).— Of the Trials of Charnock, King, and 
Keyes, 1% vol, 1377 (note).-p.Hi« Account of 



the Causes which led to Harley's Reiinsm^ae 
from Administration in the Reign of Queen 
Anne, 14 vol. 1371 (noie).— His Character of 
Lord Holt, 1 5 vol . 1 4 (note).— His Account of 
the Proceedings against Dr. Sacheverell, ibid. 
7 (note).— His Reasons for voting in the 
House of Lords in favour of the 3ill ef 
Attainder against Sir John Fenwick, 1 3 vol. 
751. 

BURNETT, Mr., Advocate^His Speech for 
the Prosecution on tlie Trial of Fyshe Palnjer, 
for Sedition, 23 vol. 331. 

BURTON, Henry. See Prynne, William^ 

BURY, John.— Account of his Case, beinfr ^ 
question respecting the validity of a second 
Marriage, under which there was Issue^ 
the first Marriage having been dissolved »4>n 
account of Impotence, 2 vol. 849, 850 (note). 
— ^The second Marriage was adjudged void^ 
ibid. 850. 

BURY, Sir Thomas, Baron of the DcohecjuwPy 
9 Ann. 15 vol. 547. 

^ Lord Chief Baron of the 



Exchequer. — He delivers his Opinion in 
favour of the Prerogative of the Crown, 
respecting the Education and Marriage of ^e 
Royal Family, 15 vol. 122l» 

BUSBY, George.— His Trial at Derby for 
High Treason, under the Stat. 27 Eliz. c. 2, 
for remaining within the Realm, being a 
Romish Priest, 32 Car, 2, 1681, 8 vol. 525. 
— ^The Indictment, ibid. 626.—He pleads 
Not Guilty, ibid. 527.— Evidence against 
him, ibid. 529. — He contends that he is an 
Alien, but is referred to the Stat. 29 Car. 
2, c. 6. for the Naturalization of the Children 
of British Subjects^ born out of the Realm, 
during the Commonwealth, ibid, 534.«--Hie 
Defence, ibid. 544.^ Baron Street's Charge 
to the Jury, ibid. 547.-^ He is found Guilty^ 
but is reprieved, ibid. 550. 

BUSHELL, Edward.— He is fined 40 Marks, 
as one of the Jury who find the Verdict 
against the direction of the Court in the 
Case of Penn and Mead, and ordered to be 
imprisoned until the Fine is paid, 6 vol. 967. 
—Chief Justice Vaughan's Report of the 
Proceedings upon a Habeas Corpus sued 
out of the Court of Common Pleas by him 
and other Juroni, 22 Car. 2, 1670, ibid. 909. 
— ^The Court discharge them, ibid. 1020;— 
Mr. Ersktne's Observations on diis Case, in 
his Speeeh lor the Dean of St. Asaph, 21 vol. 
925. 

BU8HNELL, Walter.«-Pioceedings of the 
Commissioners, appointed bv Cromwell for 
ejecting scandalous and insufficient Ministers, 
against him, 8 Car. 1, 1656, 5 vol. 633.— 
Articles against him, ibid. 636* — His Ansijrer 
thereto, ibid. 640. 

SUTLER, Cbi^i, OmaA^ma Em&ida* 
tivA b^fgvQ « CiHBniited of ibe H^uie of 



THE STATE TRIALS, 



19 



Lordly appoioted to inquire into the Chsir^es 
made by Captain Baillie pf Misniana|(en)ent 
in the Affairs of Greenwich Hospital, 21 
vol. 340. 

BUTLER, alias Strickland, Mary.— Her Trial 
at the Old Bailey for Forgery, 11 William 
3, 1699, 13 vol. 1249.— The Indictment, 
ibid, ib.— She pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 1260. 
—Serjeant Wright opens the Case for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 1251, — Evidence against 
her, ibid. 1^53. — Evidence in her Defence 
as to her Character, ibid. 1269.-^ Lord 
Holt charges the Jury, Ibid. 1261. — She is 
found Guilty, and sentenced to pay a Fine 
of 500/.. ibid. 1262. 

BUTTLER, Edward, See Newbolt, Willutm. 

BYRNE, James.— His Trial at Dublin under 
a Special Commission of Oyer and Terminer, 
for High Treason in being concerned in the 
Irish Insurrection^ 43 Geo. 3, 1803, 28 to). 
805. — The Indictment, ibid. ib. — Evidence 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 810.^ — Mr. Hac- 
Nally*s Speech in his Defence, ibid. 815. 
— Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 822. — 
Mr. Bairs Speech on summing-up the 
Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 831. — 
Reply of the Solicitor General, ibid. 838. — 
The Jury find him Guiliy^ ibid. 849.— He is 
executed, ibid. 850. 

BYRNE, William.—His Trial by a Court 
Martial in Ireland, for Rebellion and Murder, 
39 Geo. 3, 27 vol. 1077. — Evidence against 
him, ibid. 1078. — Evidence for him, ibid. 
1101. — His Speecli in his Defence, ibid. 
1109. — The Courl convict him of Rebellion, 
but acquit him of Murder, ibid. 1123. — He 
is sentenced to Death, ibid. 1124, 

BYRNE, William Michael.—His Trial at 
Dublin for High Treason, in being con* 
cerned in the Irish Rebellion, 38 Geo. 3, 
I 1798, (27 vol. 455. — ^The Indictment, ibid. 
jb.—Tbe Attorney GeneraPs Speech for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 460.— Evidence for the 
Prosecution> ibid. 462. — Mr. Curran's Speech 
iu Defence of the Prisoner, ibid. 491. — Evi- 
dence for the Defence, ibid. 496.«^Mr. 
Bashe's Speech on summing-up the Evidence 
for the Prisoners, ibid. 504. — ^The Reply, 
ibid. ^06* — The Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
508.— The Jury ^nd him Guilty, ibid. 521. 
— Sentence is passed upon him, and he is 
executed, ibid. 522. 

BYRON, Wiilianh I/ord— Ills trial before 
the House of JUords, for the Murder of 
William Chaworth, esq. 5 Geo. 3^ 1T65, 
19 vol. 1177. — Commission creating the 
Earl of Northin^ton Lord High Steward, 
ibid. 1178. — Certiorari and Return thereto, 
containing the IndictmenL ibid. 1179. — The 
Lord High Steward's Address to him, on 
being brought to the Bar, ibid. 1182. — He 
pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 1183.— The Attor- 
ney Ganeral's Speecb for the Prosecution, 
ibid. ib.-^Evidi^c^ for the prpsecutioj?, ibid. 
%^9>9jrrffSi% SoUsitgr Qeparal s^^gm Ǥ the 



Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 1224. 
— Lord Pyron's Defence, ibid. 1227. — ^f he 
Lords acquit him of Murder, but find bim 
Guilty of Manslagghter, ibid. 1233.— He 
claims the benefit of the Statute, and is dis- 
charged, ibid. 1235. 

CALDERON, Luisa. See Pidon, Sir T/m. 

CALLENDER, Jamea Thompton.— Proceed* 
ings in the High Court of Justiciary, 
against him, Walter Berry, and James 
Robertson, for publishing a seditious Pam« 
phlet, 33 Geo. 3, 1793, 23 vol. 79.--The 
Indictment, ibid. 81.~-Callender is out- 
lawed for not appearing to answer, ibid. 83. 
— Second Indictment against Berry and 
Robertson, ibid. 84- — Interlocutor of Rele- 
vancy, ibid, 88. — ^The Jury find that Robert- 
son printed and published, and that Berry 
published only, the Pamphlet libelled, ibid. 
00. — Argument of the |Hiners Counsel that 
the Verdict amounts to an Acquittal, ibid. 
91. — Argument of the King's Advocate ou 
the other side, ibid. 95. — Reply of the 
Panel's Counsel, ibid. 103. — Judgment of 
the Court that the Verdict amounts to a 
Conviction, ibid. 113.*~Sentence of the 
Court upon them, ibid. 114. 

CALTHORPE, Charles, Counsel.— His Argu- 
ment in the Court of King's Bench for Sir 
John Corbet, on the Return of a Habeas 
Corpus sued out by him, Sir Thomas Dar- 
nell, Sir John Heveningham, Sir Walter 
Earl, and Sir Edmund Hampden, in order 
to try the legality of their Commitment by 
the Lords of the Council for refusing to 
lend upon the Commission of Loans, 3 Car* 
1, 1627, 3 vol. 19. — His Argument for Mr. 
Valentine, in the Court of King's Bench, in 
support of his Plea to the Jurisdiction of 
the Court to try an Information against him 
for seditious Speeches and Conduct in the 
House of Commons, 5 Car. 1, 1629, ibid. 
299. 

CALVERT, Doctor.— His Argument in the 
House of Lords for the Duchess -of King- 
ston, that the Sentence of the Ecclesiastical 
Court, annulling her first Marriage, is a 
conclusive Answer to the Cbai*ge of Bigamy 
against her, 16 Geo. 3, 1776, SO vol. 417, 
530. 

CALVIN, Robert. SsB PottmU. 

CAMBRIDGE^ Eari of. See Hamilton, JomeSi 
Duke of. 

CAMDEN, Charies, Lord, Chief Jn3tice of 
C. P» See PraU, CharlcM, 

CAMERON, Afigus.— Proceedings against 
him and James Menzies, in Scotland, for 
Sedition, Mobbing, and Rioting, 38 Geo. 3, 
1798, 2.6 vol. tl65.-*-The Indictment, ibid. 
Jb.-^CaBieron absconds, and the Lord Advo- 
cate vitfadrawa the Prosecution a^inst 
Meosief, ibid. 1173.-<-Tfaeir Declarations, 
JWd. U74^ 
C2 



20 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



CAMERON, Archibald, Dr — Proceedings 
against him in the Court of King's Bench, on 
his being brought up for Judgment ou an 
Attainder for High Treason, in being con- 
cerned in the Rebellion of 1745, 26 Geo. 
3, 1753, 19 vol. 733.— Account of hiro, 
ibid. ib. — ^Judgment given against him by 
the Chief Justice, ibid. 736. — His Execution, 
ibid. 738. — Papers delivered by him to his 

. Wife immediately before his Execution, ibid . 
739. — ^His Letter to his Son, written while 
under Sentence of Death, ibid. 743. — Ac- 

' count of his Behaviour previous to his Exe- 
cution, ibid. 744. — IVIr, Justice Foster's 
Account of his Case, ibid. 735. 

CAMERON, Richard, Founder of the Sect 
of Cameronians in Scotland. — Account of 
bis Life and Death, 10 vol. 865 (note). 

CAMPBELL V.HALL. See Grenada, Islandof. 

' CAMPBELL, Alexander Hume, Counsel.— 
His Argument for the Orown of the Special 
Verdict in Macdaniel's Case, 19 vol. 779. 

CAMPBELL, Colin, of Allangreig Proceed- 
ings against him in Scotland for High 
Treason, in being concerned in Argyle's 
Rebellion, 1 Jac. 2, 1686, 13 vol. 800. — 
Evidence against him, ibid. 801. — He is 
found Guilty, ibid. 802.— The Sentence of 
the Court upon him, ibid. 806. — Extracts 
from Fountainhall and Wodrow respecting 
these Proceedings, ibid. 787 (note). 

CAMPBiXL, Duncan, the Younger, of Allan- 
greig.---Proceedings against him in Scotland 
for High Treason, in being concerned in 
Areyle's Rebellion, 1 Jac. 2, 1686, 13 vol. 
"jntence of the Court upon him, ibid. 
806. — E5?Nracts from Fountainhall and 
Wodrow respecting these Proceedings, ibid. 
787 (note). 

CAMPBELL, Sir Duncan. — Proceedings 
against him, and other Heritors of the Shire 
of Argyle in Scotland, for High Treason, in 
being concerned in Argyle's Rebellion, 1 
Jac. 2, 1686, 13 vol. 787.— The Evidence, 
ibid. 795.— They are found Guilty and 
sentenced to Death, ibid. 799,— Extracts 
from Fountainhall and Wodrow respecting 
this Case, ibid. 787 (note).. 

CAMPBELL, Sir Hugh.-^Proceedi.ngs against 
him in Scotland for Treason, 36 Car. 2, 
1684, 10 vol. 919.— The Indictment, ibid. 
924.— His Speech after the Indictment is 
read, ibid. 931.— Debate on the Relevancy 
of the Indictment, ibid. 932.— The Court 
find the Indictment relevant, ibid. 961.— His 
Counsel object to some of the Witnesses, 
that they had previously revealed their testi- 
mony to the King's Advocates, and had 
admitted themselves to . be Accomplices 
, ibid. 962. — ^The Court overrule the Objeo- 
tion, ibid. 967.— ITie witnesses prove no 
Treason against him, and he is acquitted, 

ibid, M9,-^WQdrow'8 Accpwt Qf tb« Ev^^ 




deuce of the Witnesses, and of the conduct 
of the Court towards them, ibid, ib.r— Pro- 
ceedings against him in the Parliament of 
Scotland, ibid. 972. — Fountainhairs Account 
of this Case, ibid. 977. 

CAMPION, Edmund.— His Trial with Ralph 
Sherwin, James Bosgrave, Thomas Cottam, 
Robert Johnson Bristow, Luke Kirbie, 
and Henry Orton, for High Treason, in con- 
spiring to kill the Queen, and introduce 
Popery, 24 Eliz, 1581, 1 vol. 1049. — ^They 
plead Not Guilty, ibid. 1050. — Campion 
objects to being tried at the same time vfhh 
the others, ibid. ib. — His Address to the 
Jury, ibid. 1070.— They are all found Guilty, 
and Sentence is passed upon them, ibid. 
1071. — Account of Campion, ibid. 1072 
(note). — Their Examinations previous to 
their Trial, ibid. 1078. 

CAMPMAN, George. See Hendley, WVHam. 

CANNING, Elizabeth.— Her Evidence on the 
Trial of Mary Squires and Susannah Wells, 
for stealing from her person a Pair of Stays, 
19 vol. 262.— Her Trial for Perjury in her 
Evidence on that Trial, 27 Geo. 2, 1754, 
ibid. 283.— The Indictment, ibid. 285.— 
Mr. Davy's Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. 
298.— Mr. Willes's Speech for the Prose- ' 
cution, ibid. 311.— Evidence for the Prose- 
cution, ibid, 323.— Mr. Morton's Speech 
for the Defendant, ibid. 431.— Mr. Nares's 
Speech for the Defendant, ibid, 451. — Evi- 
dence for the Defence, ibid. 467.— Mr. 
Davy's Reply, ibid. 596— The Recorder's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. 633.— The Jury 
return their Verdict, « Guilty of Perjury, but 
not wilful and corrupt," but on the Recorder's 
objecting to this Verdict, they find her Guilty 
generally, ibid. 669.— Some of the Jurymen 
make Affidavits that they consented to the 
Verdict by mistake, ibid. ib. 675. — Her 
Counsel move for a New Trial, which is 
refused by (he Court, ibid. 672.-^ueries 
proposed to Mr. Emlyn respecting this Case, 
with his Answers thereto, ibid. 670 (note). 
— ^The Recorder's Speech on passing Sen- 
tence of Transportation for Seven years upon 
her, ibid. 673. — She is transported pursuant 
to the Sentence, ibid. 680.— She is said to 
have died at Connecticut, in America* in 
1773, ibid. 1418. 

CAPEL, Arthur, Lord.— -Proceedings in Par- 
liament against him and Eight other Lords, 
for absenting themselves from the House of 
Lords, -contrary to an Order of the House, 
18 Car. 1, 1642, 4 vol, 1 76.— Sentence 
agamst them, ibid. 184.— He is taken at 
the Surrender of Colchester to Fairfax, ibid. 
1207.— Proceedings in the High Court of 
Justice against him, Lord Goring and Sir 
John Owen, for High Treason, in being 
taken in arms against the Parliament. 
1 Car. 2, 1649, ibid. 1195.— He escapes 
from the Tower, ibid. 1208, 1245.— He is dis- 

covered at Lambetb by ^ Watermati, Ibid, 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



21 



1209, 1246. — He pleads that Quarter was 
given him upon the Surrender of Colchester, 
ibid.1210.—- Sentence is pronounced against 
him, ibid. 1216.-^His Execution, ibid. 1230. 
—Bishop Morley's Account of the manner 
of his Death, ibid. 1236. —Crom well's 
Opinion of Lord Capet, ibid. 1246. — Lord 
Clarendon's Character of him, ibid. 1249. 

CAREW, John, 5 vol. 1004, 1048, 1237. See 
R^icitkt, 

CAREW, Sir Nicholas. — Attainted and exe- 
cuted for Treason, 30 Hen. 8, 1 vol. 481. 

CAREY, Sir John, Baron of the Exchequer, 
11 Ric. 2. — See Belknap, Sir Robert 

CARGILL, Donald.— His Trial with Walter 
Smith, James Boig, William Thompson, and 
William Coothill, at Edinburgh, for Treason, 
in taking Arms for the Covei^ant, 33 Car. 2, 
1681, 10 vol. 849.'^His Examination before 
the Council, ibid. 859 (note). — ^The Indict- 
ment, ibid. 850. — Evidence against them, 
ibid. 883. — ^They are found Guilty, ibid. 
890.— Their Sentence, ibid. 891.— Cargill's 
Behaviour at the place of Execution, and 
Dying Speech, ibid. ib« — Smith's Execution 
and Dying Speech, ibid. 895. — Boig*s 
Letter to his Brother after his Condemnation, 
ibid. 900. — Thompson's Dying Speech, ibid. 
902.— Coothiirs Dying Speech, ibid. 905. — 
Cargill's Excommunication of the King and 
other enemies of the Covenant, ibid. 872 
(note).— Wodrow's Account of this Case, 
ibid. 851 (note). 

CARLETON, Lord, Chief Justice of C. P. in 
Ireland. — His Charge to the Jury on the 
Trial of Henry and John Sheares for Trea- 
son, 27 vol. 385. 

CARNEGIE, James, of Finhaven.— His Trial 
at Edinburgh for the Murder of Charles, 
Earl of Strathmore, 2 Geo. 2, 1728, 17 vol. 
73.— The Indictment, ibid. ib. — Information 
for the Pursuers, ibid. 75. — Information for 
the Panel, ibid. 92.— The Court find the 
Libel reletunt to infer the pains of Law, ibid. 
134. — Evidence against him, ibid. 135. — 
The Assize find him Not Guilty, ibid. 150. 

CARNWARTH, Robert, Earl of. See JDer- 
wntwater, James, Earl of, 

CARR, Frances* See Somerset^ Frances, 
Omiess of, 

CARR, Henry.— His Trial for a Seditious 
Libel, 32 Car. 2, 1680, 7 vol. 1111.— The In- 
fonnation, ibid, ib.— He pleads Not Guilty, 
ibid. lli4.—:SerjeantJefFeries opens the Case 
against him, ibid. ib. — Evidence against him, 
ibid.1115, — Sir Francis Winnington's Speech 
in his Defence, ibid. 1 1 22.— Evidence for{him, 
ibid, ib.— The Recorder's Reply, ibid. 1124. 
^The Chief Justice's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 1125.— The Jary find him Guilty, ibid. 
1130. 

CARR, Robert. ^iSmers^.Babtfi^Earlof. 



CARRINGTGN, Nathan, 19 vol. 1029. See 
Semtre of Fapers, 

CARTE, Thomas:— Mr. Hargrave's Opinion 
of his History of England, 2 vol. 380. 

CARTER, Sir Lawrence, Baron of the Ex- 
chequer, 2 Geo. 2, 17 vol. 161, 309. 

CARTER, William. See Jackson, WUliam. 

CARTWRIGHT, John, Major.— His Evidence 
on Home Tooke's Trial for High Treason, 
25 vol. 325. 

CARTY, Patrick.— His Trial in Ireland for 
conspiring to murder the Earl of Carhamp- 
ton, 38 Geo. 3, 1797, 26 vol. 877.— The 
Indictment, ibid. 839. — Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 878.— Evidence for the 
Prisoner, ibid. 895. — ^The Jury find him 
Guilty, ibid. 900.— He receives Sentence of 
Death, and is executed, ibid. ib. 

CASSELLS, Robert. See Bemardi, John. 

CASTLE, John. — His Evidence on his Exami- 
nation in chief by Mr. Gumey, on Watson's 
Trial for High Treason, in 1817, 32 vol. 
214. — His Cross-examination by Mr. 
Wetherell, ibid. 284. 

CASTLEHAVEN, Mervin, Eari of. See 
Audley^ Mervin, Lord. 

CASTLEMAINE, Roger Palmer, Earl of.— 
His Trial at the bar of the Court of King's 
Bench for High Treason, 32 Car. 2, 1680, 
7 vol. 1067. — Indictment against him, ibid, 
ib.— The King's Counsel open the Case 
against him, ibid. 1069. —Gates's Evidence 
against him, ibid. 1070. — His Cross-exaoxi- 
nation of Gates, ibid. 1074. — He objects to 
the Evidence of Dangerfield, that he had 
been convicted of Felony, ibid. 1082, — ^After 
much discussion, and a message to require 
the Opinion of the Judges of the Court of 
Common Pleas, Dangerfield is sworn, ibid. 
1090. — Lord Castlemaine's Defence, ibid. 
1094. — He offers Evidence against Gates 
and Dangerfield, ibid, ib.— The Attorney 
Generars Reply, ibid. 1107.— The Chief 

- Justice charges the Jury, ibid. 1108.— He is 
acquitted, ibid. 1112. — He is examined as 
a Witness on Gates's Trial for Perjury, 10 
vol. 1175. — Proceedings in the House of 
Commons against him for High Treason, in 
going as an Ambassador to Rome, 1 Will, 
and Mary, 1689, 12 vol. 597. — His Speech 
in tlie House of Commons in his Defence, 
ibid. 601. — He is conimitted to the Tower 
by a Warrant of the House, ibid. 613. — He 
is afterwards bailed in the Court of King's 
Bench, ibid. 614. — Wei wood's Account of 
his Embassy to Rome, ibid. 597 (note). — 
Account of two Conversations between him 
and Dr. Thomas Smith, ibid. 602 (note). 

CATHARINE op ARRAGGN. See Henry 

tht Sth.' — Proceedings relating to the Disso.< 

lotion of the Marriage between her and 

■ Henry the Eighth^ 1 v<oU299.— She refuses 



lid 



GiMiAL fl^DEX TO 



' toenterupon aReligiott8life,ibid. 309.— Her 
Behayiour at the Trial of her Marriage, ibid. 

' 319.— She solicits the assistance of the 
Emperor, and appeals to the Pope, ibid. 
336-7. — The King's Behaviour towards her, 
ibid. 351.-^He sends to urge her to submit 
to the determination of four Temporal and 
four Spiritual Lords, which she refuses^ ibid. 

^ ib. — Sentence of Divorce pronounced against 
her, ibid. 358.-— Her Marriage with the King 

■ is declared void by Act of Parliament, ibid. 
364. — Her Answers to the Messengers sent 

- by the King to complain of her claiming the 
Title of Queen, ibid. 365-6.— Her Death) and 
Letter to the King, ibid. 368. 

CATLIN, Sir Robert, Chief Justice of K. B. 
14Elii.l vol. 957, 1043. 

CAVE, Ambrose* See Waiters, BdwIotuL 

CAVENAGH, Maurice. — His Trial with 
Edmund Poor and William Bowland, for 
stealing Cows in Ireland, 1 WilL and Mary, 
1689, 1^ vol. 629.— Evidence against them, 
ibid. ib. — Poor and Bowland are found 
Guilty, but CaVenagh is acquitted, ibid. 
630. — Sentence of Death is passed upon 
Bowland and Poor, ibid. 632. 

OELLIER, Elizabeth.— Her Trial for High 
Treason, in being concerned in the Meal- 
Tub Plot, 32 Car. 2, 1680, 7 vol. 1043.— 
The Indittment, ibid. ib. — Evidence against 
her, ibid. 1044. — She objects to the Evidence 
of Dangerfleld, that he bad been convicted 
of Felony, and other offences, ibid. 1049.— 
His Evidence is set aside, ibid. 1052.— The 
Jury acquit her, ibid. 1054.— Roger North's 
Account of her, and of this Trial, ibid. 1064. 
—Her Trial at the Old Bailey, in the same 
year, for publishing a Scandalous and Sedi- 
tious Libel, ibid. 1183.— The Indictment 
ibid. ib/^The same in Latin, ibid. 1213. 
• -^-Evidence against her, ibid. 1189.— Baron 
Weston'* Charge to the Jury, ibid. 1203. 
— Thtf July find her Guilty, ibid. 1208. 
-^Her Sentence, ibid* ib. 

CHADWICK, Thomas.— His Trial with Wil- 
ham Battragh, for High Treason, in being 
concerned in the Rebellion of 1745, 20 Geo. 
2, .1746, 18 vol. 359.— Evidence ag.ainst 

,fhem, ibid, ib.— The Jury find them Guilty, 
ibid. 364.— Chadwick is executed, ibid. ib. 

.r-Battragh is reprieved, ibid. 366. 

CflAMBERS, James. See Bernardi, John. 

CHAMBERS, Richard.— Proceedings against 

him in the Star-Chamber for Seditious 

Speeches before the Privy Coundl, 5 Car. l, 

•1629, 3 vol. 373.— He is fined 2,000/; and or- 

?dered tosabraithimself,ibid.375.— He refuses 

to sign the Submission, ibid, ib.— His Fine is 

. estr^ted into the Exchequeri ibid, 376.— 

.His Plea in the Exchequer, that the Fine was 

.imposed by the King and his Council, and 

.not by^hii Peers, according to Law, ibid. 

377.— The Attorney General moves the 



Court that the Plea may not be filed, 
ibid. 379. — He sues out a Habeas Corpus, 
but is remanded, ibid. 380. — He after- 
wards petitions the Long Pariiament for 
redress, ibid, ib.— He dies in poverty, ibid. 
383. 

CHARLES THE FIRST, King of England.— 
His Conduct in the Case of Lord Strafford, 

3 vol. I512.-He impeaches Lord fcim- 
bolton, and Five Members of the House of 
Commons, 4 vol. 83,— He orders the Im- 
peached Members to be delivered up to 
him, ibid. 86. — He goes himself to the House 
to demand them, ibid. 87.— His Speech to 
the House on that Occasion, ibid. 90. — His 
Trial for High Treason, before the High 
Court of Justice, 24 Car. l, 1649, 4 vol. 
989.— Sommaiy of the Debates in Parlia- 
ment which led to this Trial, ibid, ib.— Lord 
Clarendon's Account of the Debates in 
Pariiament, ibid. 991.-^Act of Pariiatoent 
creating the High Court of Justice i&t the 
Trial of the King, ibid . 1 045.— Arrangements 
for the conduct of the Trial, ibid. 1058.— 
Singular Conduct of Lady Fairfax at the 
commencement of the Trial, ibid. 1005, 
1067 (note). — The Trial commences, and 
the King is brought to the Bar, ibid, 993, 
1069.— Mr. Cook, Solicitor for the Common- 
wealth, opens the Charge against him, ibid. 
995, 1070.— The Charge, ibid. 1070.— -The 
King refuses to answer till he is satisfied of 
the Authority of the Court, ibid. 995, 1073, 
1074. — His Reasons against the Authority 
of the Court, ibid. 1085.— Codt moves for 
Judgment against the King upon his per- 
sisting in his refusal to answer, ibid. 1094. 
—Evidence produced against him, ibid. 
1101. — The King desires to be heard in his 
Defence before the Lords and Commons, 
ibid. 1006.— This is refused by the Court, 
ibid. 1007, 1126.— The Covrt resolve on 
a Sentence of Condemnation, and that it 
shall extend to Death, ibid. Ill 3.— The Lord 
President's Speech in passing ilie Sentence 
upon him, ibid. 1008.— The Sentence, ibid. 
1118.— Brutal Conduct of the Soldiers on 
his passing from the Court, ibid. 1128.— His 
Interview with his Children immediately 
before his Execution, ibid. 1130 {note)^-^ 
The Waixant for his Execution, ibid. 1133. 
—His Cbnduct when going to the Sfcaffold, 
ibid. 1132.~His Speech on the Scaffold, 
ibid. 1137.— His Execution^ ibid; 1141.— 
William Walker said to hate been thfe Exe- 
cutioner/ 5 tol. 1155 (note),— His Character, 

4 rol. 1144.— Mr. Fox's Remarks upon the 
Justice and Policy of. the Execution of 
Cbaries the First, ibid. 1145.— Anecdote re- 
specting a Letter from Charies to hit Queen 
intercepted by Cromwell and Ireton, ibid! 
1 152»— Singular Account of his Burial^ 5 vol* 

. 1339.— Remarks on the Eikon Baailike, ibid' 
1154. /^ 

CHi^ES tiE SECOND, King of Enilana. 
— Hjs unprincipled Conduct respecting Ee- 



titE STATE Trials. 



^ 



ligioB ddriDg the whole of his ReigD, 6 vol. 
30d (note.) — Oppressive character of the 
last Foor years of bis Reign, 8 vol. 242. — 
His unfeeling Speech on the remission of 
part of the Sentence against Lord William 
Rassel, 9 vol. 684 ^note). — Doubts respect- 
ing the authority on which this Anecdote 
rests, ibid. 685 (note). — Differing Opiniofas 
of t)r. Johnson and Mi*. JBurke on his Cha- 
racter, ibid. 910 (note). — Mr. Burke's Cha- 
iteief <yf him, ibid. 970. 

CfiARLTON, Sir Job, Judge of C. P. ^5 
Car. 2. — He was one of the Judges before 
whom William, Lord Kussel was tried, 9 
vol. 592. 

CHAKN£LL, Nathaniel. Se€ AicheverelL 
fniliam. 

CHARNOGR, John. See Abington, JEdward. 

CHA.RNOCK, ftobdrt and Anne; See Grey 
de Werk, Ford, Urd. 

CHARNOCK, Robert.--His Trial with Ed- 
wai'd Ring and Thomas Keyes at the Old 
Bailey for High Treason, in being con- 
cerned in the Assassination Plot, 8 Will. 3, 

^ 1696, 12 vol. 1377:— The Indictment, ibid. 
1379, 1386. — Charriock rfequires a copy of 
the Indictment and Counsel, which are re- 
fused, ibid. 1381.— Th6y plead Not Guilty, 
ibid. 1386; — Speeches of the King's Counsel 
ibMhe I^rosecutidn, ibid. i391. — Evidence 
for tbe Prosecution, ibid. 1 397. — Chamock*s 
Defence, ibid. lii^Sf.—King's Defence, ibid. 
1440.— Reyes's Defence, ibid. 1442.— Reply 
of the Solicitor Oeneral, ibid. 1443.— Lord 
Hdlt's Charge te the Jury, ibid; 1447.— 
They are found Guilty, ibid. 1455. — Judg- 
ment agaiiist thfem, ibid. 1461.— their Ene- 
cutioii, ibid. ib.-i-Papei-s delivered by them 
id thfe SherifF, ibid. 1462.— Burnet's Account 

. of these Trials^ ibid. 1377 (note). 

CHAWORTH, William; Bee B^m, William, 
Xorir, 19 vdl. 1177. 

CH£ETUAM> James. See Walker, Thomas. 

GllESHtRE, Johta, Serjednt-at-Ldw, 15 vol. 
1883, 16 Vol. 8, Ittol. 311. 

CHfetWYND, William.— His Trial at the 

. Old Bailey for the Murder of Mr. Thomas 
Ricketts, by stabbing him with a knife at 
School^ 17 Geo. 2, 1748, 18 vol* 289.— Evi- 
dence for. the Prosecution, ibid. 291.— The 
Counsel for the Prisoner contend that the 
facts proved do not amount to Murder, ibid. 
802. — Reply ai the Counsel for the Prose- 
eption, ibid» 309. — The Jury find a Special 

. Verdict at the suggestion of the Court, ibid. 
815.— Case laid before Sir John Strange by 
the friends of Mr. Ricketts, respecting the 
bringing an Appeal if the Prisoner procured 
a Pardon, . with his Opinion thereon, ibid. 
317* — Chetwynd*8 Petition for a Pardon, 
ibid. 820.— Report tff the Attorney and 

- SoUcit|»r General upon the Petiticxi, ibid. 
322««-The Pardon is granted, and be is 



discharged upon pleading it, ibid. 326.--^l1ic 
Court of King's Bench refuse to call upon 
him for Bail for his appearance in an Appeal, 
or for Good Behaviour, ibid. ib. 

CHICHESTER, Thomas, Bishop of.— He is 
impeached by the Commons -for urging the 
Judges to give false Answers to the Questions 
proposed to them by Richard the Second 
respecting the legality of the Commission 
to Gloucester's Faction, 11 Ric. 2, 1388, 1 
vol. 121. — He is found Guilty by the Lords, 
ibid. ib. — He is sentenced to Death, but on 
accbiint of his Dignity is only banishedj ibid. 
12d. 

CLARE, Eari of. See Bedford, Earl of. 

CLARE, Walter.— His Trial under a Special 
Coindiissioii of Oyer and Teiminer at 
Dublin for High Treason in being concerned 
in tbe Irish Insurrection, 48 Geo. 3, 1803, 
28 VOL 887.— The Indictment, ibid.ib.— 
thrideiice for the Prosecution, ibid. 891. -~ 
Mr. Mac-Nally's Speech fdr the Prisoner, 
ibid. 901. — Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 
908. — Mr. Mac-Nally*s Speech on sutnming- 
np the Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 914. 
— Reply of the Solicitor General, ibid. 918. 
—The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 926.— He 
is sentenced, but respited, ibid. ib. 

CLARENCE, George, Duke of. Brother to 
Edward the Fourth. — His Attainder for High 
Treason, 18 Edw. 4, 1478, 1 vol. 275.— He is 
said to have been stifled in a Butt of Malmsey, 
ibid. ib. — He is accused by this Attainder 
of falsely laying Bastardy to Edward 4th, 
which was afterwards maintained by Richard, 
Duke of Gloucester, to the disherison of the 
King's sons, ibid. 276. 

CLARENDON, Edward Hyde, Earl of. Lord 
Chancellor. See Hyde, Edward. — Proceed- 
ings in Parliament against him for High 
Treason and other High Crimes and Misde- 
meanours, 15 Car. 2, 1663, 6 vol. 294. — 
Lord Bristol exhibits Articles against him 
in the House of Lords, ibid. 304.^— Tbe 
Judges deliver their Opinion that the Charges 
in the Articles do not amount to Treason, 
and that, by the Law of England, a Charge 
of High Treason cannot be originally exm 
hibited In the House of Lords by one Peer 
agaitist another, ibid. 312. — ^The Judges 
give their Reasons for their Opinion, ibid. 
813. — Resolutions of the Lords upon the 
Charge, ibid. 817. — Proceedings against 
him upon an Impeachment of High Treason 
and other Misdemeanours, 19 Car. 2, 1667, 
ibid. ib. — Debate in the House of Commons 
respecting his Impeachment, ibid. 323.— The 
Comnons appoint a Committee to arrange 
the Accusation into heads, and report to 
the iioufte, ibid. 330; — The Committee 
^deliver Articles of Accusation against him 
to the House, ibid, ib.-— Debates thereon, 
ibid. 334.— The Commons resolve to carir 
up a Charge against him to the House of 



1 



24 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



Lords, ibid. 350.— Mr. Seymour carries up 
the Charge to the Lords« ibid. ib. — Mr. 
Seymour's Speech on delivering the Charge, 
ibid. ib. 393. — The Articles exhibited against 
him, ibid. 395. — The Lords refuse to commit 
him on account of the generality of the 
Charge, ibid. 351. — Debates of the Com- 
mons thereupon, ibid. ib. — The Commons 
desire a Conference with the Lords, and 
Reasons are delivered for the generality of 
the Charge, ibid. 356.— The Lords still 
refuse to commit him until some special 
Treason is assigned, ibid. 358. — Tlte Com- 
mons desire a Free Conference on the 
Matter, in which the'Lords concur, ibid. ib. 
— Report of the Conference, ibid. 363.— 
The Lords still refuse to commit him, ibid. 
367.^Debates in the House of Commons 
thereon, ibid, ib.— rLord Clarendon with- 
draws beyond seas, ibid. 374.— His Petition 
and Address to the House of Lords, ibid. 
375. — Debates in the Commons upon this 
Pietition, ibid. 380. — Tlie Lords pass a Bill 
of Banishment against him, ibid. 385. — De- 
bates in the Commons upon the Bill, ibid, 
ib. — The Bill passes the Commons, ibid, 
3dO. — ^The bill for banishing him, ibid. 391. 
Protests against the Bill in the House of 
Lords, ibid. 392. — His own Remarks on 
these Proceedings, ibid, 393 (note). — His 
Answers to the Charges seriatim, ibid. 397. 
— Burnet's Account of these Proceedings 
against Lord Clarendon, ibid. 317. — Anec- 
dote related by Burnet of his averseness 
to Corruption, ibid. 331 (note). — He is 
appointed Lord High Steward on the Trial 
of Lord Mori ey for Murder, 18 Car. 2, 1666, 
ibid. 772. — His Character of Archbishop 
Laud, 4 vol. 603 (note). — His Character of 
Mr. Hampden, 3 vol. 825 (note). — His Ac- 
count of the effect of the Proceedings of 
Charles the First against the Five Members, 
4 vol. 83 (note). — His Account of the De- 
bates which led to the Trial of the King, 
ibid. 991 (note). — His Account of the 
Trials of the Duke of Hamilton, Lord Capel, 
and others, before the High Court of Justice, 
ibid. 1241. — His Character of Lord Capel, 
ibid. 1248.— His Account of the effect of 
the Judgment in favour of Ship-Money, 3 
vol. 1254 (note). 

CLARK, Robert, Baron of the Exchequer, 32 
Eliz. 1 vol. 1277. — He was one of the .Tudges 
who attended in the House of Lords on the 
Trial of the Earls of Essex and Southamp- 
ton, 43 Eiiz. 1600, 1 vol. 1334.— His Argu- 
ment in the Great Case of Impositions, in 
favour of the King's Prerogative of imposing 
Taxes by the mere Act of the Crown, 4 
Jac. 1, 1606, 2 vol. 382. 

CLARK, William. See Markfaniy Sir Griffin. 

CLARKE, William. See Gibbons, John. 

CLEMENT, Gregory, 5 vol. 1004, 1283. See 
Regicides. 

CLEMENT, William In nel. — Proceedings 



against him for a Contempt in publishing 
the Trials of Thistlewood and others, con- 
trary to an Order of the Court, 1 Geo. 4, 
1820, 33 vol. 1335.— The Court impose a 
Fine of 500/. upon him, ibid. 1565. 

CLENCHE, Dr. Andrew. See Harrismt 
Hejin/, Cole, John. — ^Trial of Henry Harrison 
for his Murder, 4 Will, and Mary, 1692, 
12 vol. 833.— Trial of John Cole for assist- 
ing in the same Murder, ibid. 875. 

CLERK, John, Advocate. — His Speech in de- 
fence of Alexander Maclaren, on his Trial 
in the High Court of Justiciary for Sedition, 
33 vol. 73. 

CLIFFORD, Henryy Counsel.— His Argu- 
ment for Benjamin Flower in the Court of 
King's Bench on the Return of a Habeas 
Corpus upon his Commitment by the House 
of Lords, 39 Geo. 3, 1799, 27 vol. 1025.— 
His Vindication of the Character of his 
Ancestor, Sir Thomaji Clififord, one of t|ie 
Cabal Ministers, from an Aspersion of Lord 
Kenyon's, ibid. 1065. — His Speedi in De- 
fence of the Editors of the Independent Whig 
for a Libel on Lord EUenborough, ibid. 1247. 

CLIFFORD, Sir Thomas. He was one of the 
Cabal Ministry, 27 vol. 1065. — ^Vindication 
of his Character from an Aspersion of Lord 
Kenyon's, ibid. ib. 

CLONMELL, Eari of. Chief Justice of K. B. 
in Ireland. — His Charge to the Jury on the 
Trial of William Jackson for Treason, 25 
vol. 870.— His Charge to the Jury on the 
Trial of Thomas Kennedy for High Treason^ 
in being concerned in the Rebellion of the 
Defenders, 26 vol. 383. — His Charge on the 
Trial of Patrick Hart, for the same Treason, 
ibid. 409. — His Address to the Grand Juries 
assembled under the Special Commission for 
the Trial of the Defenders in 1796, ibid. 425. 

CLOPTON, Sir Walter, Chief Justice of K. B. 
21 Ric..2,l vol.129. 

CLOTWORTHY,SirJohn. See HoUis, DenzU. 

COBBETT, William.— His Trial at West- 
minster on an ex-officio Information for 
Libels upon Lord Hardwicke, Lord Lieute- 
nant, and other high Officers of Ireland, 44 
Geo. 3, 1804, 29 vol. 1.— Counsel for the 
Prosecution and for the Defendant, ibid. ib. 
— ^The Information, ibid. 2. — Speech of the 
Attorney General for the Prosecution, ibid. 
21.— Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 36. 
Mr. Adam's Speech in his Defence, ibid. 37. 
—Lord Ellenborough's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid . 49.— The Jury find the Defendant Guilty, 
ibid. 54. — Trial of an Action brought against 
him by Mr. Plunkelt, when Solicitor Gene- 
ral for Ireland, for a Libel, 44 Geo. 3, 1804, 
ibid. 53. — The Declaration, ibid.ib. — Coun- 
sel for the Plaintiff and for the Defendant, 
ibid, ib.— Mr. Erskine's Speech for the Pro- 
secution, ibid. 61. — Evidence for the Prose- 
cution, ibid. 69.— Mr. Adam's Speech for 
the Defendant, ibid. 72. — Lord Ellen- 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



25 



borougb's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 78.^ — 
The Jury return a Verdict for the Plairitiff 
with 500/. Damages, ibid. 80. 

COBBY, John. See Jackson, William. - 

COBHAM, Sir John. See Gloucester^ Thomas, 
Dukev/. . - 

COBHAM, Lord.— 'His Trial and Examina- 
tion for Heresy before the Archbishop of 
Canterbury, 1 Hen. 5. 1413, 1 vol.226. — 
Application is made to the King for his Con- 
currence before Proceedings are taken 
against him, ibid. 227. — The King ad- 
monishes him, and then gives Authority to 
the Archbishop to proceed, ibid. ib.-^He 
is cited, and excommunicated for Contumacy 
in not appearing, ihid. 225.— His Confession 
of Faith, ibid. 229. — His Answers to the 
Archbishop respecting Transubstantiation, 
ibid. 233. — Respecting the Authority of 
Holy Church, ibid. 239. — Respecting Con- 
fession, ibid. 243. — Respecting Pilgrimage 
and the Worship of Images, ibid. 244. — 
His Condemnation, ibid. 245.— The Bishops 
counterfeit an Abjuration in his name, ibid. 
249. — He escapes from the Tower, ibid. 
253.—- He is hanged and burned, ibid. 254. 
— His Speech at his Execution, ibid. 256. — 
Record of the Proceedings against him, ibid, 
ib. — ^The forged Record of his Indictment 
and Outlawry for High Treason, ibid. 265. 
— Disputes between Protestant and Popish 
Writers about his Character, ibid. 256. 

COCHRANE, Sir John, of Ochiltree. See 
Loudoun, James, Earl of, 

COCKELL, William, Serjeant.at.Law.--His 
Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
Joseph Hanson for a Misdemeanour in 
encouraging the Weavers of Manchester in 
a Conspiracy to raise the price of Wages, 
31 vol.11. 

CODLING, William.— His Trial with John 
Reid, William Macfarlane, and George 
Easterby, in the Admiralty Court, for felon- 
iously destroying the Brig Adventure on 
the High Seas in order to defraiid the Under- 
writers, 43 Geo. 3, 1802, 28 vol. 1T7. — Sir 
William Scott's Charge to the Grand Jury, 
ibid. 178. — ^Abstract of the Indictment, ibid. 
180. — Counsel for the Prosecution and for 
the Prisoners, ibid. 185. — Mr. Garrow's 
Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. ib. — Evi- 
dence for the Prosecution, ibid. 208. — De- 
fences of the Prisoners, ibid. 268. — Mr. 
Erskine's Argument for Easterby, that there 
was not Evidence, as against him, of any 
Offence within tlie Jurisdiction of the Court, 
ibid. 274. — Evidence for the Prisoners, ibid. 
301. — Lord Ellenborough's Charge to the 
Jury, ibid. 309.— The Jury find Codling, Mac- 
farlane, and Easterby Guilty, and acquitReid, 
ibid. 344. — Sir William Scott passes Sentence 
of Death upon Codling, ibia. ib. — Codling 
is executed, ibid. 345.-:- Easterby and Mao- 
fairlane are pardoned, ibid. ib. 



COKE, Arundel. See Woodbume, Edward, 

COKE, Sir Edward, Attorney General, 2 vol/ 
94. — He states the Charge against the Earls 
of Essex and Southampton, 1 vol. 1337.:— 
His Speech for tlie Prosecution on the Trial of 
Sir Cnristopher Blunt and others, ibid. 1420. 
— He conducts the Prosecution of Sir Walter 
Raleigh, 2 vol. 5. — His violent Behaviour on 
that occasion, ibid. 7, 9, 16, 20, 26. — His 
Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial of the 
Conspirators in the Powder Plot, ibid. 166. 

--— — — — Chief Justice of C. P. 6 Jac. 
1,^2 vol. 568, 770. 

— '• Chief Justice of K.~ B. 

2 vol. 1043. — He is one of the Commis- 
sioners for the Trial of the Murderers of Sir 
Thomas Overbury, 13 Jac. 1, 2 vol. 91 1, 952. 



His Speech in the Star- 

Chamber on the Proceedings against Mr. 
Wraynham for slandering Ix>rd Chancellor 
Beacon, 16 Jac. t, 1618, 2 vol. 1072.— His 
Speech in the House of. Commons against 
. Loans, 3 Car, 1, 1627, 3 vol. 63. His Ob- 
servations on the Judgment of the Court of 
King's Bench in Sir Thomas Darneirs Case, 
ibid. 68, 77. — He opens the Charge on he- 
half of the Commons on the Impeachment 
of Lord Treasurer Middlesex, 22 Jac. .1, 
1624, 2 vol. 1190. — His Argument at the 
Conference between the two Houses of Par- 
liament on the Liberty.of the Subject^ 3 vol. 
126i — He proposes . the Petition of Rights 
in the House of Commons, ibid. 188. — Mr. 
Hargrave's Developement of the Princjples 
upon which he supposes Sir Edward Cfoke 
to have proposed the Petition of Rights, 2 vol. 
374. — Mr. Barrington's Observations upon 
his Parliamentary conduct, 3 vol. 81 (note). 

COKE, John. See Brandreth, JeremioJi, 

COLE, John. See Harrison, Hcwy.— His 
.Trial at the Old Bailey for the Murder of 
Dr. Clenche, 4 Will, and Mary, i692, 12 
vol. 875. — ^The Jury acquit him, ibid. 884. 

COLEMAN, Edward.— His Trial at the Bar 
of the Court of King's Bench for High 
Treason in being concerned in the Popish 
Plot, 30 Car. 2, 1678, 7 vol. 1.— Indictment 
against him, ibid. 3,'--Speeches of the King's 
Counsel for the - Prosecution, ibid. .6. — '< 
Oates*s Evidence against him, ibid. .15^^ 

. Other Evidence against him, ibid. 30. — IjU,- 
Defence, ibid. 59. — Reply of the Soli'^irt -,^i 
General, ibid. 61.— Chief Justice F^iLt,««; 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. ^^—'Ihf^^^?^^^ 
him Guilty ibid 70.-Senten^^J^^^^^^^^ 
him, ibid. 72.— He is execut "»f' '" l" ;L" 
His conduct at the place.n^f if ,^^, ^^^'^'^ 
573.~Burnet:sAccour-**^*' ^ ^^^- ^^^- 
— BuBneVs Account. See Bertiardi, John* 

COLEPEPER,Wrhomas, Lord, Lo^d Rfeeper. 

COLLEDGE, Lord HigH Steward^ on th^ Trial 

for High Ti^^udjiey^ 3 vol. 404*— His Address 

Conspirac3*wlvfe Judges, id the Slar-Chamblf, 

I to the Circuits, directing them to 



^6 



GENERAL IStDEX TO 



8 vol. 549. — His Petitions to the King pre- 
• Viotii to the Trial, ibid, ib.— The iBdict- 
th^nty ibid. 5Ci7, — He desires some Papers, 
^hich had been takeh from him, to be re- 
stored before he pleads, which is denied by 
the Conn, ibid. 570.— He pleads Not Guilty, 
Ibid. 582. — his Solicitors are called upon to 
tji^itet for a Contempt in giving him the 
Papers, ibid. 584. — The Codrt refuse to re- 
tarn bim his Papers, but allow him to make 
tise of Some bf them for his Defence in the 
hftfkli of a third p^Hotiy ibidi 587.— The 
King's Counsel open the Charge, ibid* 588. 
•— Evidence against him, ibid. 591. — At the 
close ot the Case for the Crown he objects 
that there is no Evidence of a treasonable 
Conspiracy, but the Court overrule his Ob- 
jection, ibid. 619.— 'His Defence, ibid. 622. 
'^Etiledee ht bim, ibid. 626.--Oate8's £vi^ 
B^nee fbt him, ibid. 646.^— He sums tip the 
Btideiice fbr hh D«fenc6« Ibid. 675. — 
Eepljr of the King'ftZCodn^eli ibid. 694.— 
Chief Juitiee North's Charge to the Jury, 
ibidk ri(>>-The Jury find him Guilty^ ibid. 
714; — Setftence of death psissed upon him, 
. ibidi ibi— His Speech at the plac6 of £xe- 
dition, ibid. 717.— Sir John Hawles's Re- 
marks upon this Trial, ibid. 723.— AecOunts 
of this Trial by Burnet and other Historians, 
ibidi 549 (note). — Sir John Hawles says, 
thiit ** perhaps CoUedge made the best'De- 
fence ever made bv a Defendant upon a 
dUpttal Indictm^nt/^ 11 vol. 466^ 

COtiLIER, Jereiny. See Cook, Sluidrach. — 
tie was the Author of the Historical Dic- 
tionary and other learned works^ 13 vol. 411 
. (note). 

COLLIEKi Joseph. See Waiket, Thmaa. 

COLXiINSi Darby. See Oolding^ John. 

GDlIilNS, John. See Pole, Sir Geoffrey. 

COLLI^S, John. See 0W», John, 

COMPTON, Dr. Henry, Bishop of Oxford. 
See Seven Bishops. — Granger*s Account of 
him, ia vol. 188. 

GOMPTON, Dr. John, Bishop of London.— 
Proceedings against him by the Commis- 
sioners fdr Ecclesiastical Affairs for not sus- 
pending Dr. Sharp, Rector of St. Giles's, 2 
Jac. 3, 1686, 11 vol. 1123.— the King's 

9f «tter to him requiring him to suspend Dr. 

Th<4*':n, ibid. 1155. — His Answer, ibid. ib. — 

sla^tieaVoceedings against him by the Eccle- 
• tence of SC'Om mission ers, ibid. 1157. — Sen- 

^164. — Buril^~)ension passed against him, ibid. 

itigs^ ibid, i lilt's Acdduttt of these Proeeed- 

COjTYte, John,'^^^.®'^ . 
732, i4l2. ^eant-at-Law, 15 vol. 

CdkYKS, Sir. John, Baroriv 

3 Geo. 2, If vol. 570, ^'he Exchequer, 



CONJNGSBY, thomfts, Lord^-r ^ 

i» Parliament against him and \:^'?<^!«^**1SS ^^^^ , ^ , xx. . , l 

^ \ Sir Charles \ COOK, John, Counsel.— Hia Arffmuept in \\i9 



Porter, on animpe&ehment of High Treason, 
5 William and Mary, 1693, 12 vol. 1279,— 
Articles of Impeachment, ibid. ib. — The 
Lords resolve not to ptoeeed With the Itn* 
peachmant, ibid. 1284. 

CONINGSMARK, Charles John, Ccttttot.— 
His Trial with George Borosky, Christopher 
Vratz, and John Stem, for the Marder of 
Mr. Thynn, 34 Car. 2, 1682, 9 vol. 1. — Being 
Foreigners, an Interpreter is sworn to explain 
the Charge to them, ibid. 2« — ^The Indict- 
ment, ibid. 8. — ^They plead NotGy^ilty, and 
claim a Jury de medietate lingue, ibid. 8. — 
Sir Francis Withens's Speech for the Pro- 
secution, ibid. 15. — Evidence against them, 
ibid. 19. — Chief Justice Pemberton calls 
upon the Count for his Defence, and ex- 
plains to him the points of the Evidence for 
the. Prosecution which he has to answer, 
ibid. 59. — ^I'he Count addresses the Jory in 
French and Dutch, ibid. 62, dd.^The King's 
Counsel reply, ibid. 68. — Tl>e Chief Justice 
charges the Jury, ibid. 77. — The Jury acquit 
the Couiit, but find the others Guilty, ibid. 
80.— The Recorder passes Sentence of 
Death upon them, ibid. 81. — Their Execu- 
tion, ibid. 84. — Burnet's Account of their 
Conduct in prison, after their Condemnation, 
and at the place of Execution, ibid. 83* — 
Dr. Horneck's Account of their Conduct, 
ibid. 94. — Sir John Hawles's Remarks on 
this Trial, ibid. 125. — Reresby's Account of 
this Transaction, ibid. 1 (note), 

CONSTABLE, John. See Kfr%, Cotonet 
Richard, 

CONSTABLE, Sir Robert.— He is indicted 
for Treason, in being concerned in the Lin- 
colnshire Rebellion, with Sir John Bulmer 
and his Lady, Sir Francis Pigot, Sir Stephen 
Hamilton, Sir Thomas Piercy, Aske, and 
several others, in the reign of Henry the 
Eighth, 1 vol. 478.— They are foond Gtiihjr,' 
and executed, ibid. ib. — Lady Bulniet is 
burned in Sinithfldd, ibid. ib. 

CONWAY, lord. See Buckingham, GeorgCy 
Du/ceo/*.*<- Proceedings against him in Par- 
liament for High Crimes and Misdemea'* 
nours, 2 Car. 1, 1626, 2 vol. 1267.— His 
Correspondence with Lord Bristol, ibid. 
1274. — The House of Lords resolve to hear 
Lord Bristol's Charge against him, ibid. 
1281.— -Lord Bristors Articles of impeach- 
ment against him, ibid. 1290. — His Answer 
thereto, ibid. 1441.— rThe Parliament is 
abruptly dissolved, ibid. 1446. 

CONY, Mt— Ludlow's Account of his Case, 
5 vol. 935.— He refuses to pajr Taxes to 
Cromwell, and on the amodnt being taken 
violently from him, sues the Collector, ibid. 
936. — Cromivrell sends the Counsel who 
pleaded for him to the Toi/^er, ibid. ib.-^He 
compromises the Action, ibid. 937.— Lord 
Clarendon's Accoimt of thiij Cas6, ibid. ib. 



THE STAtE TRIALS. 



a 



House of liOrds in Support of Lilburae*s 
Claim for Reparation for the Sentence pass- 
ed upon him in the Star-Chamberi 13 Car. 
1,1637, 3 vol. 1352. 

-, Solicitor General to th6 Common- 



wealth. — Speech intended to have been 
f|>oken by him on the Trial of Charles the 
Ifirsty 4 vol. 1018. See Uegicidet, 

COOK, Peter.— ftis Trial at the Old Bailey for 
High Tt-eason in being toncenied in the 
Assassination Plot, 8 Will. 3,' 1696, 13 vol. 
311.— The Indictment, ibid. 345.--'riie At- 
torney General opens the Csise against him, 
ibid. 849. — Evidence agaitist him, ibid. 351. 
— Serjeant Darnairs Defence of him, ibid. 
356. — Evidence for him, ibid. 359.— Sit B, 
ShoWfet sumil up tb0 £videnc6 for the De- 
ftnce, ibid. 876.— The Solicitor General rte- 
plies^ ibid. 382.«-^Chief Justice Treby charges 
the Juiy, ibid. 386.--The Jury find him 
G«ilty, ibid. 894.--*-Sentence of death passed 
upon him, ibid. 395. — Pie is iifterwardi par- 
dotted) upon condition of his transporting 
. himself for Life, ibid» 397. — Extract of his 
Confessions and Examinations, ffom Dal- 
rymple's Memoirs, ibid. 898. 

COOK, Shadrach.— Proceedings against him, 
Jeremy Collier, and William Snatt, three 
Non-juring Clergymen, for publicly absolv- 
ing Sir William Parkyns, and Sir John 
Fnend, 8 Will. 3, 1696, 13 vol. 40^.— Bur- 
net's Account of this matter, ibid. ib. — Cook 
. and Snatt are committed to Newgate, and 
Collier absconds, ibid. 408. — Collier's De- 
fence of his conduct, ibid. ib. — A Declara- 
tion ol* the Archbishops and Bishops, on the 
subject, ibid. 41 1 . — Collier's further Defence 
of his Conduct, in consequence of the De- 
claration, ibid. 413. — Proceedings against 
Cook and Snatt in the King's Bench, ibid. 
420. — ^A Special Verdict was found, ibid. 
421. — Argument of the Special Verdict for 
the Defendants, ibid. 42t. 

C0OPER,-9ir Anthony Ashley. See Shaftes- 
biiryf Jjithorti/, Earl of. — He Sat as one of 
the Judges on the Trial of the Regicides, 
5Toi. 986. 

COOPER, Charles. See ThUtkwood, Arthur, 
*^He pleads Guilty to an Indictment for 
High Treason, in being concerned in the 
Cato-Street Conspiracy, 1 G^o. 4, 1820^ 33 
vol. 1544.'— He receives a Pardon, on con« 
dition. of being transported for life, ibid. 
1566. 

ettOTHlLL, William. See CargUl, Donald. 

COPLEY, Anthony. See Markham, Sir 
Griffin. 

COPLEY, John Singleton. — Serjeant at Law, 
. 82 vol. 765. — His Speech, on Summing up 
t the Evidence for the Defence, on Watson's 

Trial for HighT^^s^OB, 57 Geo. 3, 1817, 

32 vol. 499. 



COPLEY, Sir John Singleton, Solicitor-Gene- 
ral> 33 vol. 7ll« — His Reply for the Crown, 
on Thistlewood's Trial for Hig^h Treason, 1 
Geo. 4, 1820, 33 vol, 894ft^tiis Speeeh on 
opening the Case for the Prosecution^ on the 
Trial of Ings upon the same Indictment, 
ibid. 959.^ — His Reply for the Prosecution, 
on the Trial of Brunt on the same Indict- 
ment, ibid. 1293. 

CORBET, Miles, 5 vol. 1301. See Rt^ddei. 

CORBETT, Sir ifohn. See BarmU^ Sir 
Thorhas. 

CORBETT, Richard. See Bofnbridge, Thomat. 

CORKER, James,. See Anderson^ Lmet, 
Wakemafif Sir George^ 

CORNISH, Henry. I^e Femkjfi J^* ^^ 
kington, ThotnoM. 

CORNWALLIS, Charles, Lord.-llis trial in 
the Court of the Lord High Steward, for the 
Murder of Robert Clerk, 30 Car. 2. 1678,7 
vol. 143.— -He pleads Not tiuilty, ibid. 148, 
— ^The Attorney General's Speech for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 149. — He is acquitted, 
ibid. 157. — Sir Thomas Jones's Report of 
his Case, ibid. 143 (note). 

COSINj John, 1:)r.— Proceedings in PaHia^ 
ment against him, for introducing Popish 
Ceremonies, 16 Car. 1, 164a, 4 vOl. 22.*- 
Articles of Impeachment agaitlst him, ibid. 
23. — He vindicates himself by fais Answer, 
and the Lords dischafge hitn, upon hii giving 
Bail for his Appearance, ibid. 28.— AccoUUt 
of him, ibid. lb. (note). 

COTTAM^ Thomas. See Conxion, Edmund, 

COtTINGTON, Francis, Lord, Chahfcelloi' of 
the Exchequer.-^HiS Speech in the StAr- 
Chamber, on delivering his Opinion in favour 
of a severe Sentence on Henry Sherfield. for 
breaking a painted Wit^doW in a Church at 
Salisburv, 3 vol. 539 •— His Speech in the 
same Court, on delivering his Opitiidn 
respecting the pr6per Sentence to be passed 
on Prynhe, for publishing Histtio-mdiStiX| 
ibid. 574. 

COTTON, Edward. See Mateng^t Peter. 

COTTON, Sit Robert, See Bedford, Earl oj. 
— Proceedings in the Star-Chamber against 
him and others, for publishing a scanaalous 
and 'seditious Writing, 6 Car.l, 1631, 3 vol. 
387. — His Speech in the House of Commons 
against the Duke of Buckinghatn, ibid. 1^67. 
—His Account of Proceedings, in different 
Countries and kt different times, agaitist 
Ambassadors for Crimes, 5 vol. 495. 

COUNTER, James. See Bernardi^ J^n. 

COVENTRY, Thomas, Lord^ Loi:d Keeper, 
' — He was Lord Higl^ Steward, on the! Trial 
of Lord Audley^ 3 vol. 404.— Hi^ Addrtts 
to the Twelve Judges^ id Ui« Star«Chitmblry 
previous to the Circuits, directing them to 



as 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



explain in their Charges at the several 
Assizes, the nature and design of levying 
Ship-Money, 1635, ibid. 825.--His Address 
on a similar Occasion in the following year, 
ibid. 839. — He delivers his Opinion in the 
Star-Chamber in favour of a mild Sentence 
upon Henry Sherfield, for breaking a painted 
window in a Church at Salisbury, ibid. 559. 

COVENTRY, Thomas, Lord. See Norths 
ampton, Spencer ^ Earl of. — Proceedings 
against him and Eight other Peers, for ab- 
senting themselves from the House of Lords, 
contrary to an Order of the House, 1642, 4 
vol. 176. . . 

COWPER, Spencer, Counsel.— His Trial with 
Ellis Stephens, William Rogers, and John 
Marson, at Hertford Assizes, for the Murder 
of Sarah Stout, 11 Will. 3, 1699, 13 vol. 1105. 
— The Indictment, ibid. ib. — They plead Not 
Guilty, ibid. 1107.— Opening Speech of the 
Counsel for the Prosecution, ibid. 1109. — 
Evidence against them,ibid.l 1 1 2. — Evidence 
that Cowper was last in Company with the 
Deceased, ibid. ib. — Evidence of the finding 
of the Body, ibid. 1116 et seq.^ — Evidence 
of the Physicians who examined the Body, 
ibid. 1123, 1126, 1128, 1129, 1130.— Evi- 
dence of Physicians respecting the Floating 
of Dead Bodies, ibid. 1131 et seq. 1158, 
1160, 1162. — Evidence of Sailors on the same 
subject, ibid. 1134. — Evidence against Ste- 
phens, Rogers, and Marson, ibid. 1137.— 
Mr. Cowper's Defence, ibid. 1143.— Evi- 
dence for the Defence, ibid. 1151. — Evi- 
dence of the finding of the Body,* ibid. ib. — 
Evidence of Dr. Sloane, as to the immediate 
cause of Death from drowning, ibid. 1155. 
—Evidence of other medical Men , ibid .1157. 
Evidence to Mr. Cowper's Character, ibid. 
1179. — Marson's Defence, ibid. 1180. — 
Evidence for him, ibid. 1182. — Mr. Baron 
Hatseirs Charge to the Jury, ibid. 1187. — 
The Jury acquit them, ibid. 1190. — Papers 
written soon after the Trial relating to this 
Case, ibid. ib. — ^An Appeal is afterwards 
prosecuted against them, but the Writ not 
being returned within the lime of Limitation, 
it could not be proceeded with, ibid. 1192. 

COWPER, William, Counsel.— He is of 
Counsel for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
Charnock and others for High Treason, 8 
Will. 3, 1696, 12 vol. 1446.— He is also of 
Counsel for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
Lord Mohun for the Murder of Richard 
Coote, 13 vol. 1035. — His Speech in Reply 
for the Prosecution, on the Trial of Sir Wm. 
Parky ns for High Treason in being con- 
cerned in the Assassination Plot, ibid. 123. 
—His Speech in the House of Commons, in 
the Diebate upon the Case of Ashby and 
White, 14 vol. 755. 

COWPER, William, Lord, Lord Chancellor. 
— He preside^in the House of Lords, on the 
Trial of Dr. Sacheverell, 1710,15 vol. 36.— 
He is appointed Lord High ^Steward, upon 



the Trial of Lord Derwentwater and others 
for' High Treason, 171 6, ibid. 777. — Also on 
the Trial of Lord Wintoun, ibid. 816 — 
Also on the Trial of Robert, Earl of Oxford, 
ibid. 1050. 

CRANBURNE, Charles.— His Trial at West- 
minster for High Treason in being con- 
cerned in the Assassination Plot^ 8 Will.' 3, 
1696, 13 vol. 221. — ^The Indictment, ibid. 
139.— He pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 142. — 
The Attorney- General opens the Case 
against him, ibid. 241. — Evidence against 
him, ibid. 243. — Lord Holt's charge to the 
Jury, ibid. 263. — The Jury find him Guilty, 
ibid. 266. — Lord Holt's Address on passing 
Sentence upon him, ibid. 307. — His Execu- 
tion, ibid. 310. 

CRANMER, Thomas, Archbishop of Canter- 
bury. — His Letter to Henry the Eighth in be- 
half of A nne Boley n, 1 vol. 41 5. — His Letter in 
behalf of Cromwell, ibid. 435.— rFroceedings 
against him for Treason and Heresy, 2 Mary, 
3 Philip and Mary, 1554, 1556, ibid. 767.— 
He hesitates to sign the Will of Edward the 
Sixth, excluding Mary from the Succession, 
ibid. 769. — He is sent to the Tower, and afterr 
wards removed to Oxford, ibid. 771. — He is 
cited before Brooks, Bishop of Gloucester, 
and other Commissioners appointed by the 
Pope, ibid.772. — His Conduct, on appearing 
before them, ibid. 773. — Brooks's Oration 
to him, ibid. ib» — Cranmer's Answer there- 
to, ibid. 798. — Dr. Martin's Oration, ibid. 
779.— Cranmer's Confession of Faith, ibid. 
781. — Dr. Story's Oration, ibid. 784.-— Con- 
versation between him and Dr. Martin con- 
cerning the obligation of Oaths taken against 
the Pope's Jurisdiction, ibid. 786.— Inter- 
rogatories proposed to him, with his Answers 
thereto, ibid. 790. — Brooks's Oration at the 
close of the Examination, ibid. 792. — ^Cran- 
mer's answer to the objection concerning 
his Marriage, and the Bondage of his Chil- 
dren, ibid. 801. — ^The Commissioners cite 
him to appear at Rome within 80 days, ibid. 
802. — His Letter to the Queen, after this 
Citation, ibid. 823. — A new Commission 
from the Pope, executed by Thurlby, Bishop 
of Ely, and Bonner, Bishop of London, ibid. 
837. — They proceed to degrade him, ibid. 
804. — Bonner's brutal Conduct to him, ibid, 
ib. — He appeals to the next General Council, 
ibid. ib. — His Instructions for drawing the 
Form of his Appeal, ibid. 833.— The Bishop 
of Ely refuses to admit the Appeal, ibid. 809 
— He is imprisoned for three years, ibid. 810. 
— Means taken to induce him to recant, ibid, 
ib. — He subscribes a Recantation, ibid. 812. 
Dr. Cole appointed to preach a funeral 
Sermon forhiro,ibid, 8 13.--Cranmer brought 
into the Church to hear the Sermon, ibid. 
815. — His Grief and Bepentance during the 
Sermon, 817, 857. — Being called upon to 
repeat his Recantation, he renounces it, 
ibid. 818. — ^He is taken from the Church to 
the Stake, and burned, ibid. 821 .-^His mag- 



The state trials. 



29 



naoimous Conduct at the Stake, ibid. 860.-— 
Dr. Taylor's Letter to him, ibid. 836. — Mr. 
Whiston's Inquiry into the Evidence of his 
Aecantation, ibid. 844. — Mr. Strype's Ac- 
count of his Death, ibid. 855. 

CRANSTOUN, Geoiye, Advocate.— His Ar- 
gument in the High Court of Justiciary, 
against the Relevancy of the Indictment 
against Wm. Edgar for administering un- 
lawful Oaths, 57 Geo. 3, 1817, 33 vol. 150. 
— His Argument against the Relevancy of 
the Indictment on the Trial of M'Kinley for 
a similar Offence, ibid. 282. 

CRAWFOORD, Alexander. See Oraham, 
John, 

CRAWFOORD, John. See Geddes, James. 

CRAWLEY, Sir Francis, Judge of C. P.— He 
is one of the Judges who sign the Opinion 
in favour of Ship-Money, 3 vol. 844. — His 
Argument in the Exchequer Chamber, on 
giving his Judgment in favour of Ship- 
Money, ibid. 1078. 

CREIGHTON, Robert. See Stmquhar, Lord. 

CREW, Sir Randolf, Lord Chief Justice of 
K. B. 1624. — He is removed from the Bench 
for discouraging Loan-Money, 3 vol. 1 (note). 
— Mr. HoUis's Panegyric upon him in the 
House of Lords, ibid. 1296. 

CREW, Sir Thomas, King's Serjeant, 7 Car. 1, 
3 vol. 408. 

CRISPE and DALMAHOY.— Their Case re- 
ported from the Loi'ds* Journals, 6 vol. 
1144. 

CROFTS, Sir George. See Foh, Sir Geqffr^. 

CROKE, Sir George, Justice of K. B. 2 vol. 
952, 911, 3 vol. 295.— Justice of C. P. 3 
vol. 359, 844,— Sir John Finch admits that" 
Croke signed the Opinion in favour of 
Sbip-Money, merely for conformity to the 
Judgment of the Majority of the Judges, 

- 4 vol, 6. — His Argument for Mr. Hamp- 
den, in the Case of Ship-Money 3 vol. 
1127. — Anecdote related by Whitelocke, 
respecting his delivering his Opinion against 
the King in the Case of Ship-Money, 6 vol. 
906 (note). 

.CROKE, Sir. John, King^s Serjeant, 4 Jac 1. 

* — ^His Speech on opening the Case for the 
Crown, on. the Trial of Garnet for being 

• concerned in the Gunpowder Plot, .2 vol. 
i ,21.7. 

CROMERTIE, George, Earl of. See XiT- 
mamocky WiVkany Earl of 

CROMWELL, Thomas, Earl of Essex.— Pro- 
ceedings against him for Treason, Heresy, 
and other Offences, 33 Hen. 8, 1541. 1 vol. 
433. — ^He is attainted in Parliament, ibid. 
434. — Cranmer writes to the King on hi9 
1:>ehalf, ibid. 435.— His Speech ana Prayer, 

ou tbQ Scaffold, ibid, 437^«*^me account of 



his Life, ibid. 438.-rHe was said to be the 
First man who promoted Attainders, 13 vol. 
726. 

CROMWELL, Oliver (Protector).— Trial of 
Miles Sindercoroc, for conspiring to kill him, 
8 Car. 2, 1657, 5 vol. 841. — Remarks on the 
Administration of Justice during his Protec- 
torate, ibid. 935. — His Speech on taking 
away the Great Seal from the Commissioners 
Whitelocke and Widdrington, ibid. 939. — 
Instances of his illegally committing per- 
sons to Prison, ibid. 940.— His Merit, in pro- 
viding for the due Administration of Justice 
during the Protectorate, ibid. 944. — Singular 
Account of his Burial, ibid. 1339. 

CRONE, Matthew. — Proceedings against him 
for High Treason. 2 Will, and Mary, 1690, 
12 vol. 1237.— The Jury find him Guilty, 
after being enclosed a whole night, ibid. 
1239.— His Exception in arrest of Judgment, 
ibid. 1240, 1243.— Sentence of Death is 
passed upon him, ibid. 1244. — He appears 
to have been afterwards pardoned, ibid. 
1243. 

CROOK, John.— His Trial with Isaac Grey, 
and John Bolton, for refusing to take the 
Oath of Allegiance, 14 Car. 2, 1662, 6 vol. 
201. — Crook is brought to the Bar at the 
Old Bailey, and required by the Court to take 
the Oath, ibid. 205. — tie refuses to answer 
this Requisition, ibid. 206. — Indictment 
against them, ibid. 212 (note). — Crook hesi- 
tates to plead, ibid. 213. — He pleads Not 
Guilty, ibid. 220.— Grey is required to take 
the Oath, ibid. ib. — He desires time to con- 
sider, ibid. 221. — Grey and Bolton plead 
Not Guilty, ibid. 222. — They are found 
Guilty, and Sentence of Prsmunire is passed 
upon them, ibid. 226. 

CROSBY.— His Trial in the Court of King's 
Bench for High Treason, 7 Will. 3, 1695, 
12 vol. 1291. — Lord Rajrmond's Rq)ort of 
his Case, ibid. ib. — Report of his Case, 
from Owen Wynne's MSS. ibid, ib.-— The 
Jury acquit him, ibid. 1298, 

CROSBY, Brass, Esq. Lord Mayor of London. 
— His Case upon a Commitment by the 
House of Commons for a Breach of Privi- 
lege, 11 Geo. 3, 1771, 19 vol. 1137.— He 
moves the Court of Common Pleas for a 
Writ of Habeas Corpus, ibid. ib. — Serjeant 
Glynne's Argument for his Discharge, ibid. 
1138.— Serjeant Jephson's Argument on the 
same side, ibid. I143.-T-Judgment of the 
Court that he be remanded, ibid. 1146. . 

CROSS, John, Counsel. — ^His Speech for 
Jeremiah Brandreth, on his Trial for: High 
Treason in being concerned in the Luddite 
Insurrection, 32 vol. 863. — His. Speech in 
Defence of William Turner, on his Trial for 
the same Treason, ibid. 1046.-«-His Speech 
in Defence of Isaac Ludlam, fQf the same 
Treason, ibid. 1217, 



00 



GENERAL INI>EX TO 



CEOSSFIELD, Robert Thomas.— HU Trial 
at tbe Old Bailov for High Treason, 36 Geo. 
3, 1796, 26 vol. 1.— The Indictment, ibid. 
2. — Counsel for the Prosecution and for the 
Prisot}«r;ibid. 7, 8.«-Speech of tbe Attorney 
General for the Prosecution, ibid. 11. — Evi- 
dence for the Prosecution, ibid. 25. — Mr. 
Adam's Speech for the Defence, ibid; 91. — 
Bvidence for tbe Defence, ibid. 126.-~Mr. 
Gnmey's Bpeech on summing up the Evi- 
dence for the Defence, ibid. 146. — ^Tbe At- 
torney Generars Reply, ibid. 168. — Chief 
Justice £yre*s Charge to the Jury, ibid. 190. 
—•The Jury acquit him, ibid. 233. 

CUFFE, Henry. See Blunt, Sir Chmt<^her. 

CULLEN, Robert, Advocate.— His Speech in 
Defence of David Downie, on his Trial fo^ 
High Treason in the Court of Justiciary, 

34 vol. 121. 

CULLENDER, Rosc^Her Trial with Amy 
Duny, at Bury St. Edmond's, for Witch- 
craft, before Lord Hale, 17 Car* 2, 1665, 
6 vol. 687. — Efidence against them, ibid, 
ib. — Lord Hale*s Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
700.— The Jury find them Guilty, ibid. 701. 
They are executed, ibid. 703. 

CURLL, Edmund .—His Case in the Court of 
King's Bench, on a motion in arrest of Judg- 
ment on a Conviction for publishing an ob- 
scene Libel, 1 Geo. 2, 1727, 17 vol. 153. — 
Argument of his Counsel in arrest of Judg- 
ment, ibid. ib. — Argument of the Attorney- 
General in answer, ibid. 154, — ^The Court 
give Judgment against him, ibid. 160. 

CURRAN, John Philpott, 26 vol. 841.— His 
Speech in Defence of Hamilton Rowan, 22 
vol. 1066. — His Speech in Defence of Bird, 

35 vol. 769.-— His Speech in Defence of 
James Weldon, 26 vol. 264 — His Speech in 
Defence of Peter Finerty, ibid. 964.— His 
Speech in Defence of Finney, ibid. 1099. — 
His Speech, on summing up the Evidence for 
the Prisoners, in the Case of Henry and John 

. Sheares,37 vol.364.— PeculiarCircumstances 
Attending the delivery of this Speech, ibid. 363 
(note). — His Speech in Defence of M'Cann, 
ibid. 491. — His Speech in Defence of Oliver 
Bond, ibid. 574. — His Speech for James 
Napper Tandy, ibid. 1205.-- His Speech for 
the Piaintiif in the Case of Hevcy against 
Sirr, 28 vol. 2. — His Speech in Defence of 
Kirwan,ibid.786. — His Speech in Defence of 
Felix Rourke,ibid. 945. — His Speech in De- 
fence of Killen and M'Cann, ibid. 1006. 
-^His Argument for Mr. Justice Johnson's 
Discharge upon a Habeas Corpus in the 
Court cJ King's Bench in Ireland, 29 vol. 
134.— His Argument, upon a similar Habeas 
Corpus in th^ Court of Exchequer in Ireland, 
ibid* 336. 

CURTIS, Jane.— Her Trial for a Libel on 
liord Chief Justice Scroggs, 33 Car. 3, 1680, 
7 vol. 059»«<*IShe confesses the Indictment, 
ibid, ib* 



CURTIS, Richard.— His Case, on a Trial for 
Murder, in the year 1756, reported by J4r. 
Justice Foster, 15 vol. 742 (note), 

CURWOOD, John, Counsel.— His Speech in 
Defence of Thistlewood, for High Treason, 
in being concerned in the Cato-Street Con? 
spiracy, 33 vol. 830,— His Speeches in De- 
fence of other Prisoners, tried upon the same 
Indictment, ibid. 1055, 1356, 1410. 

CUTHELL, John.— His Trial for publishing 
a Seditious Libel, 39 Geo. 3, 1799, 27 vol. 
641. —The Indictment, ibid, ib.— The At- 
torney GeneraVs Speech for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 654.— Mr. Enskine's Speech for the 
Defendant, ibid. 655. — Lord Kenyon's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. 673.— The Jury 
find him Guilty, ibid. 676.— His Affidavit in 
mitigation of Punishment, ibid. 677. — He ie 
sentenced to pay a fine of 30 Marks, and 
discharged, ibid. 680. 

DACRES, William, Lord.— His Trial by his 
Peers for High Treason, 27 Hen. 8. 1535, I 
vqI. 407. — Reason for inserting his Trial io 
the Collection, ibid, ib.— He is acquitted by 
the Lords, ibid. 408.— Expressions of popu- 
lar^atisfaction at his Acquittal, ibid. ib. 

DALGLEISH, George. See Damlej/, Henry, 
Lord, — His Deposition, respecting the 
Murder of Lord Darnley, 1 vol. 919. — His 
Trial in Scotland, with several others, for 
being concerned in the Murder, 9 Elis. 1567', 
ibid. 926. — He is convicted, and sentenced 
to Death, ibid. 927.— His Confession, ibid. 
928. 

DALLAS, Robert, Counsel, 22 vol. 331, 30 
vol. 1.— His Speech for. the Prisoners, on 
the Trial of O'Coigly and others for High 
Treason, 37 vol. 53. — His Speech in Defence 
of John and Michael Hedges, on their Trial 
for a Fraud on Government, committed in 
the Woolwich Dock Yard, 28 vol. 1386. — 
His Speech in Defence of Governor PLcton, 
on his Trial for a Misdemeanour in order- 
ing the Torture to be applied to Luisa Cal* 
deron, at Trinidad, 3© vol. 467.— His Argu- 
ment in Support of a Eule for a new Trial 
in that Case, ibid. 756.— Hb Speech^ for 
Governor Picton on the Second Trial, ibid. 
818. — His Speech in Defence of Alexander 
Davison, for a Fraud upon Government m 
the purchase of Military Stores, 31 vol. 136. 
— His Speech in mitigation of Punishment 
in the same Case, ibid. 336. — His Speech in 
Defence of Valentine Jones, for Frauds in 
the Administration pf his OiSce as Commif- 
sary General of the Forces in the West Indict, 
ibid, 293.— His Speech for Mr. Jones, in 
mitigation of Punishment, 33 ToU 1575t 

DALLAS, Sir Robert, Judge of C. P. 33 Tol. 
765. His Charge to the Jury, on the Trial 
of William Turner for High Treason in 
being concerned in the Luddite I^stirrectSon, 
ibid, noi. 



tHE STATi TRIALS. 



OAIXA3, Sir Uo\>eti, Chief JusUce of C. P. 
33 vol. 711.— His Charge to the Jury on the 
Trial of IngSy for High Treason, in being 
eoBcerned in theCato-Street Plot, ibid. 1 1 85. 

DALMAHOY. 8^ C^. 

DALRYMPLE, Sir James, of Stair. See 
Monmouth, Jamet, Duke of. 

DALRYMPLE, Sir John. — Founlainhairs 
Account of a curioos litigation between him 
and Grahame of Claverhouse (afterwards 
Viscount Dundee), H vol* 945. 

DAMMAREE^ Daniel.— His Trial for High 
Treason in levyinc^ war against the Queen, 
under pretence of pulling down Meeting- 
HoQses, 9 Anne, 1710, 15 vol. 521.— The 
Indictment, ibid. 524.*-He pleads Not 
Guilty, ibid. 584.— The Queen's Counsel 
open the Case for the Prosecution, ibid. 549. 
— rEvidence against him, ibid. 552. — Mr. 
Whittaker and Serjeant Darnell's Defence 
of him, ibid. 562,'-«Evidence for the Defence, 
ibid, 566.— Mr. Whittal^er sums up the 
£videDce for the Defence, ibid. 584.-— Chief 
Justice Parker's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
596.— The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 611. 
— Sentence of Death is passed upon him, 
ibid. 612. — He is pardoned, ibid. 614. — Mr. 
Xuders'i Observations upon the Law of 
Treason in the Article of Levying war, as laid 
down in this Case, ibid. 523 (note). 

DAMPIEJEt, Henry, Counsel, 22 vol. 823, 25 
-vol. 5. 

DANBY, Thomas, Earl of. See (hbome, 
Sir TibiTuu.-r^Proceedings in Parliament 
against him, on an Impeachment of High 
Treason and other high Crimes and Mis- | 
demeanours, 30 Car. 2, 1 Jac. 2, 1678- 
t686, 11 vol. 599.— Sir John Reresby's Ac- 
count of the circumstances which led to 
these Proceedings, ibid. 601 (note).-— Sir 
William Temple's Account of his Fall, ibid. 
01Q (note). — Notice of these Proceedings in 
Algernon Sidney's Letters, ibid. 611 (uote). 
— ^Roger North's Account of them, ibid. 614 
(note).-— Articles of Impeachment against 
bioi, ibid. 621. — His Speech in the House of 
Lords, upon the Articles being read, ibid. 
627. — Debate in the House of Lords, respect- 
ing his Commitment, ibid. 631.-— Defence of 
I^ord Danby, in a Letter to a Metpber of the 
House of Commons, ibid. 634. — Answer to 
the Defence, ibid. 654. — ^The EarFs Ueply 
to this Answer, ibid. 677.T-Sir Robert 
Howard's AccouiH of the Revenue, as left 
by the Earl, ibid. 693.-- The Earl's Answer 
t9 Sir Rob«rt Howard, ibid, 709.«- Debates 
in th^ House of Commons respectins the 
{mpeachment, ibid, f 24.-*The King informs 
ParUainent, that he bad granted him a Pardon, 
ihid* 735,<— Debates in the House of Com- 
mons thereon, ibid, ib.-* Th# l^Vn Plea to 
th^ Aniolef of Impeachment, ibid. 764. — 
Copy of tbt mng'^ Pai^on, ibid, 766^De- 
Mil k thfl SouM gf CflWttoai cm the 



$i 



validity of the Pardon, ibid. 773.— Tbf 
Commons resolve that no Counsel shall be 
allowed to plead in support of the Pardon, 
ibid. 807. — ^The King prorogues the Parlia- 
ment, ibid. 830. — Proceedings in the King's 
Bench, upon the Earl of Danby's AppUcatioa 
to be admitted to Bail, ibid. 881.— ^e 
Coutt bail him, ibid. 871. — He was all«r^ 
wards successively created by King William, 
Marquis of Carmarthen and Duke of Leeds, 
13 vol. 1263 (note). — As Marquis of Car- 
marthen, he was President of the Council, 
and Lord High Steward on the first TiM of 
Charles Lord Mohun for Mnrderi 12 vol. 
953. — Proceedings in Parliament against 
him, when Duke of Leeds, for High Crii|aes 
and Misdemeanours, 7 Will. 3, 169M701, 
13 vol. 1263. — The Commons resolve to im- 
peach him, ibid. 1265. — ^Tbe Duke's Speech 
in the House of Lords, ibid, ib.— >tiis Speech 
in the House of Commons, ibid. 1266.— 
Articles of Impeachment against him, ibid. 
1269. — His Answer thereto, ibid. 1270. — 
The Commons are unable to proceed with 
the Impeachment, on account of the Absence 
of a material Witness, ibid. 1271* — No iur- 
ther Proceedings being taken by the Com* 
mons, the House of Lords dismiss the 
Impeachment, ibid. 1274. 

DANGERFIELD, Thomas.— His Evidence 
on the Trial of Knox and Lane, for a Con- 
spiracy to scandalize Oates and Bedlow, T 
vol. 790. — His Evidence on the Trial of 
Lord Castlemaine for Treason, in being 
concerned in the Meal-Tub Plot, ibid. 1090. 
— He is rejected as a Witness on the Trial of 
Elizabeth Cellicr, ibid. 1052.— Short Ac- 
count of his Trial, for a Libel upon James 
the Second, when Duke of York, 1 1 vol. 503 
(note). — ^Trial of Robert Frances for the 
Murder of Dangerfield, ibid. 503. 

DANIEL, William, Judge of C. P. 6 Jac. 1, 
2 vol. 576. 

DARBEY, Leonard. See Morrii, Jo^t. 

DARCY, Lord. — He is tried by his Peers, con- 
victed, and executed, for joining the Rebel* 
lion in the North, in the Reign of Henry the 
Eighth, 1 vol. 478. 

DARNELL, Jolm, Counsel. — He is assigned 
as Counsel for the Earl of Castlemaine, on his 
Trial for High Treason, in being concerned 
in the Meal-Tub Plot, 32 Car. 2, 1680, f 
vol. 1084. — His Defence of John Giles, for 
attempting to Murder, Mr. Arnold, ibidw 
1144. 

' '— *• Stijeanlt %t lAWr«<-<'Hii is 

assigned Counsel for Peter Cook, on his 
Trial for High Treason, 8 Will. 3, 1696^ i^ 
vol. 313. 



■'■', Klng*8 Serjeant, 13 vol. 
1063, 14 vol. 534, 561, 1100.— He is of 
Counsel for the Prosecution, on the Trial of 
Denew and othars lor a Conspiracy and 
Aiauilt^ 8 ^e, 1704^ 14 ?qI* 909» 



9^ 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



DARNELL, John, Counsel. — He defends 
Dammaree and others on their several Trials 
for High Treason 9 Ann, 1710, 15 vol. 587, 
627, 665. 

-, Serjeant at Law, 15 vol. 



1412, 16 vol. 750, 17 vol. 804.— His Argu- 
ment for the Crown of the Special Verdict 
in Major Oneby's Case, for Murder, 17 vol. 
38. — He defends Hales on his Trial for 
Forgery, i Ceo. 2, 1728, ibid. 198.— He de- 
fends Bambridge and Corbett on their Trial 
on an Appeal of Murder, ibid. 430. 

[CORNELL, Sir Thomas. — ^Proceedings on the 
Habeas Corpus brought by him, Sir John 
Corbett, Sir Walter Earl, Sir John Heven- 
ingham, and Sir Edmund Hampden, at the 
King's Bench, Westminster, 3 Car. 1, 1627, 
3 vol. 1 ^-;-He is imprisoned with many others, 
for refusing to lend on the Commission of 
Loans, ibid. 2. — ^The Return to the Habeas 
Corpus, ibid. 3. — Serjeant Bramston's Ar- 
-gument for Sir J. Heveniugham, ibid. 6. — Mr. 
Noye's Argument for Sir Walter Earl, ibid. 
11.^— Mr. Selden's Argument for Sir E. 
Hampden^ ibid. 16.— Mr. Calthorpe's Argu- 
ment for Sir John Corbet, ibid. 19. — ^The 

' Attorney General's Answer, ibid. 32. — ^The 
Resolution of the Court, that they should be 
remanded, delivered by the Chief Justice, ibid . 

. 51 . — They remain in Custody three Months, 

' and are then released by the King's Order, 
and are elected in the next Parliament, ibid. 
59. — Sir Edward Coke's Observations on 
the Judgment in this Case, ibid. 68, 77. — 

' Debates in Parliament on the Principle of 
the Judgment in this Case, ibid. 59. — Con- 
ference between the two Houses of Parlia- 
ment on this Question, ibid. 83. — Mr. Lit- 
tleton's Argument at the Confei'ence against 
the Judgment, ibid. 85. — Mr. Selden's Ar- 
gument, ibid. 94.-^Sir Edward Coke's Ar- 
gument, ibid. 126. — ^The Attorney General's 
Reply, ibid. 133. — ^The House of Lords call 
upon the Judges to answer for their Judg- 
ment in this Case, ibid. 160. — Answers of 
the Judges, in which they disclaim having 
given any Judgment on the Principle sup- 
posed to be implied in this Case, ibid. 161. 

•DARNLEY, Henry, Lord. See Botkwetl^ James 
Earl of, — Depositions of William Powrie, 
George Dalgleish, John Hay, and John 
Hepburn, respecting his Murder, 1 vol. 915. 
— ^Their Trial and Sentence for the same, 
ibid. 926. — Deposition of Nicholas Hubert, 
alias Paris, respecting the Murder, ibid. 931 . 
—Confession of the Laird of Ormistoun, 
respecting the same, ibid. 944. 

DAUNCEY, Philip, Counsel.— His Speech 
in Defence of Colonel Draper, for a libel 

J arising out of Governor Picton's Prosecution, 
30 vol. 1005. 

DAVENPORT, Humphrey, King's Seijeant. 
— His Argument in the Court of King's 
^encb| ia fctYOttr of the legality of the Com- 



mitment of Mr. Stroud and cHhers, by the 
King, 3 vol. 250. 

DAVENPORT, Sir Humphrey, Chief Baron 
of the Exchequer. — He joins in the Answer 
given by the Judges to Charles the First 
in favour of the legalityjof Ship-Money, 3 
vol. 844. — His Argument in the Excliequer 
Chamber against Ship-Money, ibid. 1202. 

DAVENPORT, Thomas, Counsel.— He is of 
Counsel for Mr. Wilkes, on his Application 
to the Court of King's Bench to be admitted 
to Bail, 19 vol. 1080. 

Sir Thomas, King's Counsel. 

He is one of the Counsel for the Prosecution, 
on the Trial of Bembridge for Misconduct 
as a Clerk in the Pay-Office, 22 vol. 33.— 
His Argument in the Court of King's Bench 
against the Motion for a new Trial in that 
Case, ibid. 126. — Curious Anecdote respect- 
ing him, 28 vol.819. 

DAVENTRY, Heneage Finch, Baron of. Lord 
Chancellor. — ^He is appointed Lord High 
Steward on the Trial of Lord Stafford, 7 vol. 
1291, 1295.— His Address to Lord Stafford, 
on passing Sentence on that occasion, ibid. 
1555. See Finch, Heneage, 

DAVERS, Sir Charles. See Blunt, Sir Chris- 
topher. 

DAVIDSON, William. — His Trial with 
Richard Tidd, at the Old Bailey, for High 
Treason in beiug concerned in the Cato- 
Street Conspiracy, 1 Geo, 4, 1820, 33. vol. 
1337.— The Indictment, ibid. 607.— Mr. 
Gurney's Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. 
1341. — Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 
1351.— Mr. Curwood's Speech for the Pri- 
soners, ibid. 1419. — Evidence for the Pri- 
soners, ibid. 1434.— Mr. Adolphus's Speech 
for the Prisoners, ibid. 1441. — Davidson's 
Speech for himself, ibid. 1458. — Tidd's 
Defence of himself, ibid. 1464. — Reply of 
the Attorney General, ibid. 1466.— Mr. 
Baron Garrow's Charge to tlie Jury, ibid. 
1481. — The Jury find both the Prisoners 
Guilty, ibid. 1542. — Davidson's Speech, on 
being called upon for Judgment, ibid. 1548. 
— ^They are both executed, ibid. 1566. 

DAVIS, Sir John. See Bhmt, Sir Christopher. 

DAVIS, Sir John, King's Serjeant, 2 vol. 952. 
— His Argument for the Crown, in the 
Great Case of Impositions, in favour of the 
King's unlimited Prerogative ' of imposing 
Taxes and Duties, 2 vol. 399. 

DAVISON, Alexander.— His Trial at West- 
minster, for defrauding Government in the 
purchase of Military Stores, by means of false 
Vouchers, 49 Geo. 3, 1808-1809, 31 vol. 99. 
— Abstract of the Information, ibid, ib.— 
Speech of the Attorney General for the Pro- 
secution, ibid. 103^ — Evidence for the" Pro- 
secution, ibid. 116. — Mr. Dallas's Speech 

for the DefendsAt, ibid. 136«^£vid9nQe for 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



33 



the Defendant, ibid. 163.— Reply of the At- 
torney General, ibid. 194. -Lord Ellen- 
borough's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 205. — 
The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 219.~Pro- 
ceedings on his being brought up for Judg- 
ment, ibid. ib. — Mr. Dallas's Speech in 
mitigation of Punishment,ibid. 226. — Speech 
of the Attorney General in aggravation, ibid. 
237. — Sentence of the Court, ibid. 247. 

DAVISON, William.— He is appointed a 
Commissioner for the Trial and Examination 
of Mary, Queen of Scots, 28 Eliz. 1586, 1 
▼ol. 1167. — Proceedings against him in the 
Slar-Chamber for Misprision and Contempt, 
in delivering Queen Elizabeth's Warrant for 
the Execution of Mary, Queen of Scots, 
without her privity, ibid. 1229.— He is sen- 
tenced to pay 10,P00 Marks, and be impri- 
soned during the Queen's pleasure, ibid. 
1234.— Another Account of the Proceedings, 
ibid. 1241. — His own Account of his Con- 
duct, ibid. 1239 (note). 

DAVY, William, Serjeant at Law, 19 vol. 280, 
705, 815, 20 vol. 1240, 1285, 1319.— His 
Argument for the Prisoners, in the Case of 
Macdaniel and others, 19 vol. 790.— His Ar- 
gument against the Discharge of Somraersett, 
the Negro, 20 vol. 76.— His Speech for the 
Defendant, in the Case of Fabrigas v. 

' Mostyn, ibid. 99. 

DAWSON, James.— Account of his Trial and 
Execution, for High Treascn, in being con- 
cerned in the Rebellion of 1745, 18 vol. 374 
(note).— Pathetic. Occurrence at his Execu- 

. tion, ibid. 375. 

DAWSON, Joseph.— His Trial with Edward 
Forseith, William May, William Bishop, 
James Lewis, and John Sparkes, in the Ad- 

• miralty Court, for Felony and Piracy, 8 
Will. 3, 1696, 13 vol. 451.— Dawson pleads 
Guilty to the Indictment, ibid. 452.— The 
rest are acquitted, contrary to the Opinion of 
the Court,ibid.453.— They are committed 
upon other Charges, ibid. ib. — Sir Charles 
Hedges's Charge to the Grand Jury, upon 
another Indictment being preferred, ibid. 
454._The Second Indictment, ibid. 458.— 
Dawson confesses it, the others plead Not 
Guilty, ibid. 459.— Evidence for the Crown, 
ibid.461.— Their Defence, ibid. 472.— Reply 

. of the Solicitor^Gcneral, ibid. . 477.— Lord 
Holt's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 478. 
— The Jury find them Guilty, ibid. 481.— 
They are afterwards tried and convicted on 
two other Indictments, ibid. 482.— They are 
sentenced to be hanged, and are executed, 
ibid. 484. 

DEACON, Thomas Theodorus.— His Trial for 
High Treason, in being concerned in the 
Rebellion of 1745, 20 Geo. 2, 1746, 18 vol. 
365.— He is found Guilty, 366— And exe- 
cuted, ibid. 368. — His Speech at the place 
of ;&[ecutioDy ibid. 390. 

DEAGLB, John. See JPUkingtm, Thomas, 
VOL. XXXIV, 



DE BRUCE, William.— His Sentence for in- 
sulting one of the Judges while sming on 
the Bench, 34 Ed w. 1, 3 vol. 1376. 

DEE, Mr., Counsel. — He is assigned of 
Counsel for Dr. Sacheverell, 15 vol. 36. 

DE GREY, William, Solicitor General.— His 
Argument for the Plaintiffs in Error, in the 
Case of Leach against Money and others, 
19 vol. 1012.— His Reply in the same Case, 
ibid. ib. — His Speech in the House of Lords, 
on the Trial of Lord Byron, for the Murder 
of Mr. Chaworth, ibid. 1224. 

■ Attorney General, 19 

vol. 1079. 

■ Sir William, Chief Justice of 

. C. P. 20 vol. 1285.— He delivers the Judg- 
ment of the Court in the Case of Brass 
Crosby, 19 vol. 1146.— Also on a Motion for 
a new Trial, in the Case of Fabrigas v. 
Mostyn, 20 vol.175. 

DE HARTLEY, Constantine. See Golding, 
John, 

DELAHOY, Casimir. See Bird, Jama, 

DELAMERE, Henry, Lord .—His Trial in the 
Court of the Lord High Steward, for High 
Treason, 1 Jac. 2, 1686, 11 vol. 509. Ac- 
count of him, ibid. (note). — Sir John 
Reresby's Account of this Trial, ibid. 513 
(qote). — ^The Indictment, ibid. 516. — He 
pleads that he ought to be tried by the Peers 
in Parliament, and not in the Court of the 
Lord High Steward, ibid. 519.— The Plea is 
overruled, ibid. 526. — He pleads Not Guilty, 
ibid, ib.— The Lord High Steward's Charge 
to the Peers, ibid. ib. — ^The King's Counsel 
open the Case against him, ibid. 328. — Evi- 
dence against him, ibid. 531 .—The Lord High 
.Steward, after consulting the Judges, refuses 
to adjourn the Court tilltheTrial is.tinished, 
ibid. 562.— His Defence, ibid. 564. — Evi- 
dence in Support of his Defence, ibid. 566. 
—Reply of ihe King's Counsel, ibid. 586. — 
The Lord High Steward's Charge to the Peers, 
ibid. 592. — He is acquitted, ibid. 593. • 

DE LA MOTTE, Francis Henry.— His Trial 
for High Treason, in giving Information to 
France, 21 Geo. 3, 1781, 21 vol. 687.— The 
Indictment, ibid. ib. — ^Counsel for the Crown 
and for the Prisoner, ibid. 708. — The Attorney 
Generars Speech for the Prosecution, ibid, ib. 
—Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 718.—' 
Mr. Peckham*s Speech for the Prisoner, ibid. 
767.— Evidence for the Defence, ibid. 790. 
— Speech of the Solicitor General in Reply, 
ibid. 794. — Mr. Justice Buller's Charge to 
the Jury, ibid. 808, — The Jury find him 
' Guilty, ibid. 814. — Mr. Justice Buller passes 
Sentence upon him, ibid. ib. 

DE LA POLE, Michael. See Suffolk, Earl of. 

DE LA POLE, William. See Suffolk, Duke of. 

DENEW, Nathaniel.— His Trial with John 
Merriam and Richard Britton, at the Queen's 
Bench Bar, for a Conspiracy to assault 
William Colepeper, Esq. 2 Anne, 1704, H 





9i 



OE^iFjiM, fNDE3j; TO 



vp), 805. — The Indictment, ibid. 896. — Sev- 
j^ant Parnell opens the Case for t^e P^se- 
cution, ibid. 903. — Mr. Colepeper's Evi- 
dence against them, ibid. 905. — Other Evi- 
dence against them, ibid. 916. — Speech of 
the Counsel for the Defendants, ibid. 925. 
-!— Evidence for the Defence, ibid. 929.-^ 
Merriam is acquitted generally; Brittoin is 
acquitted of the Conspiracy and Assault, 
but found Guilty pf the rest of the Indict- 
ment; Denew is acquitted of the Con- 
spiracy, but is found Guilty of the rest of 
the Indictment, ibid. 936>-^DeQew is fined 
200 Marks, a^d Qrittaa 100/. ibid. 938. 

DENHAM, Sir John, Baron of the Exchequer, 
4 Car. 1, 3 vol. 359, 401, 844.— He delivers 
bis Opinion in the Exchequer Chamber 
against Ship Money, 3 vol. 1201. 

pENHOLME, William. — Proceedings in 
Scotland against him and others for being 
concerned in Argyle's Rebellion, 1 Jac. 2, 
1685, 11vol. 987. 

DENISON, Sir Thomas, Judge pf K. R. 20 
Geo. 2, 18 vol. 329. 

PENMAN, Thomas, Counsel.— His Speech on 
summing up the Evidence in Defence of 
Brandreth,on hisTrial for High Treason, 32 
vol. 884. — His Speech in Defence of Turner, 
on his Trial for High Treason, ibid. 1059. — 
His Speech in Pefence of Isaac Ludlam for 
the same Treason, ibid. 1226. 

BENTON, Alexander, Counsel*— rHis Argu- 
ment foi' the Discharge of several persons 
brought into the Court of King's Bench by 
Habeas Corpus, having been committed by 
the House of Commons for commencing 
Actions in contravention of the Decision of 
that House, in the Case of Ashby against 
White, 14 vol. 852.—The House of Com- 
mons resolve that by pleading in that Case, 
he is guilty of a Breach of Privilege, ibid. 
809. — The House order him to be taJcen into 
the Custody of the Serjeant at Arms, ibid.ib. 
—A Writ of Habeas Corpus, returnable be- 
fore tVe Lord Keeper, is served on the Serjeant 
at Arms, ibid. 817. 

DERBY.— Report of his Case on a Habeas 
Ojorpus, upon a Commitment by the Secretary 
of ^te, in the Reign of Queen Anne, 19 
vol. 1014 (note). 

BERBY, Henry, Earl of.— He is created Lord 
High Stevirard on the Trial of Philip Howard, 
Earl of Arundel, for High Treason, 31 EHz. 
1589,1 vpl. 1259. "^ 

DERBY, James Stanley, £arl of.— Proceed- 
ings against him, Sir timothy Fethcirston- 
haugh, and Captain John Benbow, before a 
Court-Martial, for High Treason, 3 Car. 2, 
1651, 5 vol. 293. — Ix)rd Clarendon's Ac- 
count of the Earl of Dlerby, ibid, ib, (note). 
— ^They are found Guilty, and Sentence of 
Dlealjh is passed upon them, ibid. 296. — The 
jfearl of Derby*s Speech and Conduct upon 
the Scjaffol^s ^^^^* ^^* ^9^i dlS.-r-l^is 



Funeral Sermon by Dr. Qre^i^i ibid. 3D|« — 
His liCtter to Iretbn, in Ansvrer to his. p^m- 
moi)s of the Isle of Ma^n, ibi4. 32Q, — xiis * 
Declaration respecting his determination to 
hold the Isle of Man for the King, ibi4- ib. \ 
'- — Sentence asiaipst Sir T. !^etherstonhaugh 
and Captain Benbow, ibid,^ll.— £xf^ut?on 
of Sir T. Fetherstonhanghy ibid. ib. 

DERING, Sir Edward .-^Proceedings ag«iDst 
him on an Impeachment, by the Houf^ of 
ComVnons, for High Crimeii and Misdem^a- 
nonm, ip contriving apd presenting the I^ent- 
ish Petition, 18 Car. 1, 1642, 4 vol. 151.— , 
tie escapes from the Custody of the Ser- 
jeant at Arms, ibid. 153.r— ^rtic)es of im- 
peachment against him, ibid. 154. 

DERWENTWATER, James, Earl oi— Pro- 
ceedings ia Parliament against him, with 
William Lord Widdrington, William' Earl of 
Nithisdale, Robert Earl of Carnwath, 
WilHara Viscount Kenmure, and William 
Lord Nairn, upon an Impeachment for High 
Treason, 2 Geo. 1, 1716, 15 yol. 761.— Mr, 
Lecbmere's Speech in the Hous.e of Condons 
on the Motion for their Impeacbipejity ij^id. 
ib. — Articles of Jmpeachment carried up to 
the House of Lords, ibid. 770. — Thp Articles 
of Impeachment, ibid. 779.-— Lor4 Derwept- 
vt^ater's Answer, plea4iQg.puilty to the Ar- 
ticles, ibid. 784. — Lord Widdringtoin's 
Answer, also pleading Guilty, ibid. 786.— 
Lord Nithisdale's Answer, also pleading 
Guilty, 788. — The others plead Guilty, ibid. 
790. — ^Tbe Lord High Steward passee Sen- 
tence upon them, ibid. 796.— The Loids 
Widdrington, Camwath, and Nairn, are re- 
prieved and afterwards pardloped, ibid. 8,0^* 
-rThe others are ordered for Execution, ibid, 
ib. — Lord Nithisdale escapes, ibid. ib.-rLord 
Derwentwater's Speech from th,e Sca^old, 
ibid. ib.~t/>rd Kenmure*s Letter toa Noble- 
man the day before his Execution, ibid. Q^S. 
—His pxecutiojQ, ibid. 806. 

DESPARD, Edward Marcus.^His Trial at 
Newington for High Treason, under a Special 
Commission of Oyer and Terminer, 43 
Geo. 3, 1803, 28 vol. 345.— Lord Ellenbo- 
rough's Charge to the Grand Jury, ibid. 347. 
— The Indictment, ibid. 359.— *The Attorney 
General's Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. 
363. — Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 
886.— Mr. Serjeant Best's Speech in his De- 
fence, ibid. 434. — Evidence for the Prisoner, 
ibid. 460. — Mr. Gumey's Spefcb on sum- 
ming up the Evidence for the Prisoner^ ibid. 
462. — Reply of the Solicitor General, ibid. 
469.— Lord Ellenborough's Charge to tiie 
Jury, ibid. 485. — ^The Jury find Um Guilty, 
but recommend bim tp Mercy, ibid. 5^4.--* 
iLord Elienborough passes Sentence of Death 
upon him and several others, tried ijinder the 
same Commission, ibid. 525.^ — He is exe- 
cutcijiy ibid. 52^. 

DESPENSER, Hugh, and Ht^ Le, Fater 
and S9^,--J«denlj^Bg.Qf Copfe^er^ ijf t(^ 






TH? STATU TRIALS. 



3& 



%l9 !^4 B^i»n5 ^fpim them. 13 Edw, 2, 
1^0^ 1 vol. 23.— Article^ of Qiarge against 
Hi^f ibid. 24. — Av^ard qf 3api«h!Tient and 
Blsh^nsoi) 9gai|isi therp, ibid. 27. — Act of 
Qrace for all Felonies and IVansgressions 
comipitted Ibiy \he Earls a^d Batons in the 
Pco9ecatiQp of t{ieni^ il^id. 28, — Award of 
B^ui^hq^ept against tdeBespenser^ repealed, 
upon their Petitiops, ihid. SQ. — iiord paeon's 
Remarks upon the Charge against them, 2 
v«l. 599. — Despenser, the Father, is taken l>y 
Queen Isabel, and banged, 1 vol. 36. — De- 
fpensep, thq Son, taken, ibid. ib.-^Sii Wm. 
Tmssel'^ Address to hina in passing Sen- 
tence, ibid. ib. — He is a\so banged, ibid. 38. 
— Proceedings in Parliament in the Reign 
of Edward the Third, and Richard theSeeond, 
respecting the Exile and Disherison of the 
Despensers, ibid. ib. 

pWBREVX, Jqj>i[^.— pisTrial befrre a Court 
IKartlai ip f relan^y for Rebellion, 40 Qeo. 3, 
1799-1800, 27 vol, 1137 —Evidence against 
hr^ib;id- ib. — llvidepceforthe Pefence,ibid. 
1 1 55. — The Prisoner's Speech on his Defence, 
ibid. 1179.— He i§ sentenced to Transporta- 
tion for J.ife, ibid, ^190. 

DEVONSHIRE, Wtlliam, Earl oi-mProeeed- 
ittga against him in the Kin§% Benek for 
assanlting Cofonel Culpepper in thd King's 
Palace^ 3 Jac. 2, 1697, 11 vol. 1353.-r^The 
InformatioI^ ibid. ib. (B9te).— He pleads his 
Pnvilege in abatement, ibid. 1 3^4. -r-. His Plea, 
ibid. 1355 (note).— The Court avermle his 
Plea, and b« confesses the Information, ibid. 
1 3 j^T.— Sentence of the Court, ibid. ib.-r— J^ir- 
guments against the Legality oi these Pvocaed- 
ings, it»d. ib>— Proceedings in the Hause of 
Lords In bis Case, aftettheRtTolution, ibid. 
1367. 

PJQBY, Sir Everard.-.-Pe i^ arraigned at West- 
mister for fiigh Treasop^ io being concern- 
ed in the Powder Plot, 3 J[ac. 1, 1606, 2 vol. 
187. — He confesses, the Indictment, ibid. ib. 
— Judgment passed upon him, ibid. 194. — 
His Execution, ibid. 215. 

DI6BY, George, Lord. See Bti^ol, GtorgCy 
Marl of, — Proceedings again&t him for High 
Ti^asoo, 17 Car. 1, 1642, 4 voL 133.— Ar- 
ticles of Impeachment against bim,ibid. 138. 
— Lord Clarendon's Character of him, ibid. 
1^ (note). — Further Accovnt of hjun, ibid. 
139 (note> 

DINGLEY, Thomas. See Fvrtescuey Sir 

DISNEY, William.— His Ttial-, under a Spe- 
cial Commission at Southwack, for High 
Treason, in publkhing a traitorous Deafera^ 
tion at the time of the Duke of Moomouth's 
Rebellion, 1 Jac. 2, 1685;, 11 xo\. 465.— He 
is conTicted and executed, ibid. 46^. — 
Account of his Behaviour at the place of 
Execution, ibid. 467. 

PODP, Saq^D^l, Counsel. —His Speech in De- 
fence of Dr. Sachevet^.to,th(?3^^WJ^ Article 



of Impeachment^ If vol, 292. — His Speech 
upon the Third Article, ibid. 818.-^His 
Speech upon the Fourth Article, ibid. S44. 

t)ODDERIDGE, Siv John, Judge of K. B. 
3 vqI. 359.— He i^ one of the Commissioners 
for the Trial of the Murderers of Sir Thomas 
Overbury, 14 Jac. 1^ 1616, ^ vol. 952.— |Ie 
is one of the Judges to v^hom \\^e Case of 
Archbishop Abbot, for accidentally killing 
lord Zoucn*s Keepf r, was referred By Janaes 
the First, ibid. 11 61 .'-His Ansvrer in ^e 
Hous^ of X^rd^^ when questioned fbr his 
Judgment in the Court of King's Bench, in 
the Case of Sir Thomas DarneU, 3 vol. 103. 

DODDJNGTON, Mr.-rHis Speech on opep^ 
ing the Evidence on one of the Article^ of 
Impeachment against Lord Chancellor Mac« 
clesfield, 16 vol. 822. 

DOLBEN, Sir WilUam, King% Seijeaat, and 
Recorder of London. — He opens the Indict* 
ment on the Trial of the E^trl of Pembrokf 
in the House of Lords, for Miirder, 6 vol. 
1321. — He is called as a Witness on one of 
theTria^ls ojf Gates fox P^juryy 10 v«i, 1172. 

DOLBEN, Sir WilKam, Judge of K. B. 1^ voL 

172, 233, 261, 706, 830, 869, 964, HS^T, 8 
vo^. 250„ 457, 502, 9 vol. 127, 11 vol. OTl. 
— His Charge to the Jury on the Trial of 
Thomas Thwin^ and Mary Pressicksy for 
Tres^spn, J voK 1177.— Bunwt says, that he 
was dismissed from his Office in coiKsequence 
of his not being clearly for the Crown in the 
Ca^e of the Qiio Warranto against the City 
of t^on^on, 8 vol. 1 039 (note). 

DONNELLY, Thomas.— Hi» Trial vrhh Nicho- 
ias Farrell, Laurence Begley, and Michael 
Kelly, at Dublin, tnder a Special Commission 
% High Treason in If^eing con^eriped in ^l^e 
Iri^h Insiij^iseotions 43 Geo* 3^1803, 2^ voh 
1069.— Th^ Jndicl^ften^ ibid- ib.— Evidence 
against them, ibid. 1075L.-T-ldr. Mac NaUy's 
Speech in thieic De$ence> i>idi- 1085. — Evi-^ 
deoee los the Prisonei;s, ibid. 1Q91. — The 
iufy, t^d them Guilty, ibid. 10197. — l^bey are 
executed^ ibid.. 1Q9S. 

DQRAN, Jxjseph.— His Tr^l at Dublin, undet 
a Special Commission of Oyer and Terminer^ 
for High Treason, in being copcerned in. the 
Irish Insurrection, 43 Geo. 3, 1803, 26. vol. 
1041.— The Indictment, ibid. 1042,— Evi- 
d^i^ce for the Prosecution, ibid. 1045.— Mr. 
Mac Nally's Speech for the Prisoner, ibid. 
1053.-T-Evidence for the Pci^pjti/^i^ ibijDl. 
1055. — He is acquitted^ ibidc 1970. 

DQRMER, Robert, Counsel, 7 vol. 96f.— 
He states the Case for the Prosecution, on 
the trial of Eli2aJ)eth Cellier, for a Lib^l, 7 
vol. 1188. 

DORSET, Edvcf^d, Earl of.— His Speech in 

the Sltar-Chamber, Qn delivering his gpinion 

respecting (he Sentence upon Prynne,. for 

publishing Hi3trio^mastiX| 3 vol* ^$2.— -Bis 

P2' 



J 



36 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



Panegyric upon Henrietta Maria, Queen of 
Cbaries the Firsts ibid. 584. 

DOUGLAS, Niel.— His Trial in the High 
Court of Justiciary in Scotland, for Sedition, 
57 Geo. 3, 1817, 33 vol. 633.— The Indict- 
ment, ibid. ib. — Interlocutor of Relevancy, 
ibid. 637. — Evidence for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 638. — Evidence for the Panel, ibid. 
661. — ^The Solicitor General declines press- 
ing for a Conviction, but urges the Jury to 
find a Verdict of Not Proven, ibid. 673. — 
Mr. Jeffrey contends for a Verdict of Not 
Guilty, ibid. 677. — The Jury unanimously 
find him Not Guilty, ibid. 681. 

DOVER, Henry, Eari of. See Northampton, 
Spencer, Earl of, 

DOVER, Simon. See Brewster, Edward. 

DOWNES, John, 5 vol. 1005, 1210. See 
Regicides, 

DOWNES, William, Chief Justice of K. B. in 
Ireland. — His Argument on delivering his 
Judgment in the Case of Judge Johnson, 29 
vol. 202. — ^His Charge to the Grand Jury 
assembled under a Special Commission in 
the County of Sligo in Ireland, for the Trial 
of the Threshers, 30 vol. 1. — ^His Argument 
on delivering the Judgment of the Court 
against the Plea in Abatement, in the Case 
of Dr. Sheridan, 31 vol.611. — His Charge 
to the Jury on the Trial of Dr. Sheridan, for 
a Misdemeanour, under the Irish Conven- 
tion Act, in attending the Election of a 
Member in an Assembly of Roman Catho- 
lics, ibid. 745. — His Charge on the Trial of 
Thomas Kirwan,for a similar Misdemeanour, 

. ibid. 909.— His Charge to the Jury on the 
Trial of Hugh Fitzpatrick, for a Libel upon 
the Duke of Richmond, ibid. 1229. 

DOWNIE, David.— His Trial at Edinburgh, 
for High Treason, under a Special Commis- 
sion of Oyer and Terminer, 34 Geo. 3, 1794, 
24 vol. 1 . — Counsel for the Crown and for the 
Prisoner, ibid. ib. — ^Abstract of the Indict- 
ment, ibid. 3. — Speech of the Lord Advocate 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 6. — Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 19. — Mr. CuUen's Speech 
in his Defence, ibid. 121. — Mr. Anstruther's 
Reply for the Prosecution, ibid. 167. — ^The 
Court sum up the Evidence, ibid. 186. — ^The 
Jury find him Guilty, but recommend him to 
Mercy, ibid. 192. — ^The Lord Presidentpasses 
Sentence upon him and Robert Watt, ibid. 
197.— He is afterwards pardoned, ibid. 200. 

DRAKARD, John.— His Trial upon an Ex- 
officio Information at Lincoln, for a Seditious 
Libel, published in the Stamford News, 51 
Geo. 3, 1811, 31 vol. 495.— The Indict- 
ment, ibid, 536.— Mr. Clarke's Speech for 
the Prosecution, ibid. ib. — Mr. Brougham's 
Speech for the Defendant, ibid. 509. — Mr. 
Cflarke's Reply, ibid. 529.— Mr. Baron 
Wood's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 533.— The 
Jury find the Defendant Guilty, ibid. 536. 

DRAKB| Williamt^ProceediDgs on an Im-' 



peachment against him for pubKshing a 
seditious Pamphlet, 12 Car. 2, 1660, 5 vol. 
1363. — He is called before the House of 
Commons, and confesses that he was the 
Author, ibid. 1364. — ^The Impeachoienty 
ibid. 1366.— The Lords order him to be 
apprehended and prosecuted by the Attorney 
General, but no further Proceedings sdem 
to have been taken against him, ibid. 1368. 

DRAPER, Edward Alured.— Proceedings 
against him upon an Information in the 
Court of King s Bench, for publishing cer- 
tain Libels upon the Right Honourable John 
Sullivan, arising out of the Proceedings 
against Governor Piclon, 46-48 Geo. 3, 
1806-1807, 30 vol.959. — Mr.Garrow moves 
for a Criminal Information against him, ibid. 
ib. — A Rule to show. Cause is granted, ibid. 
966.— Serjeant Best shows Cause, ibid, ib* 
^-The Rule for a Criminal InfoAnation is 
made absolute, ibid. 977. — ^The Information, 
ibid . 980. — Trial of the Information, ibid. 990. 
— Counsel for the Prosecution and for the 
Defendant, ibid. ib. — Speech of Sir V.Gibbs, 
• Attorney General, for the Prosecution, ibid. ib. 
—Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 996. — 
Mr. Dauncey's Speech for the Defence, ibid. 
1005.— Evidence for the Defendant, ibid. 
1017. — Reply of the Attorney General, ibid. 
1022. — Lord Ellenborough's Charge to the 
Jury, ibidi 1024.— The Jury find the De- 
fendant Guilty, ibid. 1029. — ^An Application 
for a New Trial is made, and refused by the 
Court, ibid. ib. — ^Affidavits on behalf of the 
Defendant on the Motion for Judgment, 
ibid. 1031. — Affidavits for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 1096. — Mr. Daunce/s Speech in 
Mitigation of Punishment, ibid. 1040. — ^The 
Attorney General's Speecli in Aggravation, 
ibid. 1045. — Mr. Garrow's Speech on the 
same side, ibid. 1053.— Judgment of the 
Court, ibid. 1060. — Proceedings against him 
in the Court of King's Bench for a Libel on 
William Fullarton, Esq. deceased, ibid. 1063. 
— The Indictment, ibid. 1347. — He suffers 
Judgment by default, ibid. 1063. — Affidavits 
for the Prosecution on his being brought up 
for Judgment, ibid. 1365.'-Affidavitsfor the 
Defendant, ibid. 1063. — ^Additional Affida- 
vits for the Prosecution, ibid. 1089. — Mr. 
Garrow's Speech in Aggravation of Punish^ 
ment, ibid. 1118. — Mr. Nolan's Speech on 
the same side, ibid. — 1122.— The Court dis- 
charge the Defendant upon his own Recog- 
nizance to appear and receive Judgment 
when called upon, ibid. 1128. 

DREWRIE, Robert.— His Trial at the Old 
Bailey for High Treason upon the Statute 
of Elizabeth, for returning into England as 
a Popish Priest, 5 Jac. 1, 1607, 2 vol. 358. 
— He pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 360.— The 
Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 362.— He offers 
to take the Oath of Allegiance, ibid. 365.— 
But afterwards refuses it, ibid. 367. — ^Judg- 
ment passed against him, ibidt 369. — His 
Execution, ibid, 370. 



T HE STATE TRIALS. 



07 



DRU^TMOND, H. Home, AdTocate.— His 
Speech ia Reply to the Objections to the 
Aelevancy of the lodictmeDt on the Trial 
of William £dgar, for Administering unlaw* 
ful Oaths, 33 vol. 169.— His Speech in 
Reply to similar Objections in the Case of 
M«Kinley, ibid. 329, 

DUCK, Arthur. See Rea, Lord. 

DUDLEY, Sir Andrew. See Gates, Sir John. 

DUDLEY, Edmund. See Empson, Sir Thos, 

DUFFIN, Patrick William.— His Trial with 
Thomas Lloyd, for a Conspiracy to escape 
from theFleet^ and a Seditious Libel, 33 
Geo. 3, 1792, 22 vol. 317. — Evidence for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 320. — Mr. Lloyd's 
Defence. of himself, ibid. 326. — ^They are 
both found Guilty, ibid. 356.-^Lloyd stands 
in the Pillory, ibid. 357. 

DUNCAN, Alison.— His Trial at Edinburgh 
with Neil Reidpath and Robert Mitchell for 
Mobbing and Rioting in resistance of the 
Militia Act, 37 Geo. 3, 1797, 26 vol. 827.— 
The Indictment, ibid. ib. — ^The Jury find 
them Not Guilty, and they are discharged, 
ibid. 840. 

DUNCOMBE, Charles.— His Trial at the Bar 
of the Court of King's Bench for a Fraud in 
the execution of his office as Cashier oi the 
Excise, 11 Will. 3, 1699, 13 vol. 1061.— The 
Attorney General opens the Case for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 1063. — Evidence against 
him, ibid. ib. — Speeches of his Counsel in his 
Defence, ibid. 1076. — Evidence for him, 
ibid. 1087. — He is acquitted, ibid. 1106. 

BUND AS, James.— Proceedings against him 
in the Court of Justiciary in Scotland for 
Leasing-making and Sedition in receiving a 
Medal, with a head of the Pretender and a 
Seditious Inscription, into the Collection of 
the Faculty of Advocates in Edinburgh, 10 
Anne, 1712, 15 vol. 715.— The Libels 
against him, ibid. 716. — Debate upon their 
Relevancy, ibid. 725. — The Court find the 
Libels relevant, ibid. 727. — ^The Diet is 
afterwards deserted, ibid. ib. 

DUNDAS, Robert, Lord Advocate, 35 Geo. 
3.— His Speech for the Prosecution on the 
Trial of William Skirving for Sedition, 23 
vol. 536. — His Speech for the Prosecution 
on the Trial of Maurice Margaret for Sedi- 
tion, ibid. 679. — His Speech for the Prose- 
cution on the Trial of Sir Archibald Gordon 
Kinloch for the Murder of his Brother, 25 
vol. 968. — His Speech for the Prosecution 
on the Trial of George Mealmaker for Ad- 
ministering unlawful Oaths, 26 vol. 1158. — 
He was afterwards Lord Chief Baron of the 
Eicbequer in Scotland, 25 vol. 968 (note). 

DUNDEE, John Grahame, of Claverhouse, 
Viscount.'"— Proceedings in the Parliament 
of Scotland against him and others for High 
Treason, 2 Will, and Mary, 1690, 13 vol. 
817.— Rtcairn's Epitaph upon him^ ibid. 



ib. (note). — Correspondence between him 
and Lord Strathuaver, ibid. 818 (note).— 
Fountaiuhall's Account of a curious Litiga« 
tion between him and Sir John Dalrymple, 
11 vol. 945. 

DUNN, James. — His Trial in Ireland for 
conspiring to murder the Earl of Carhamp^ 
ton, 37 Geo. 3, 1797, 26 vol. 839.— The 
Indictment, ibid, ib.— Speech of the Attorney 
General for the Prosecution, ibid. 842. — 
Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 846. — 
Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 866. — Mr. 
Justice Boyd's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 871. 
—The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 878.— He 
receives sentence of Death, and is executed, 
ibid. 900. 

DUNNING, John, Counsel, 20 vol. 1285, Jil vol. 
708 .-^His Argument in ^le Duchess of King- 
ston's Case, that a Sentence of the Ecclesias- 
tical Court, annulling her first Marriage, is 
not a conclusive answer to the Charge of* 
Bigamy, 20 vol. 481.— -He is one of the 
Counsel for the Prosecution in the Case of 
Lord George Gordon, 21 vol. 498. — His 
Speech for the Madras Council, ibid. 1139. 
— His Argument, in the Case of Leach and 
Money, against the power of the Secretary 
of State to commit for Libel, 19 vol. 1020. 

DUNY, Amy. See Cullender, jRose. 

DYER, Sir James, Chief Justice of C, P, 14 
Eliz. 1 vol. 957. 

EADON, John. See Luddites. 

EARBERRY, . —Report of his Case on 

a Prosecution for a seditious Libel, 1732, 
20 vol. 853. 

EARL, Sir Walter. See Darnell, Sir Thomas. 

EARLES, John. See Messenger, Peter. 

EASTERBY, George. See Codling, William. 

EATON, Daniel Isaac— His Trial at the Old 
Bailey for publishing the Second Part of 
Paine's Rights of Man, 33 Geo. 3, 1793, 
22 vol. 753. — The Indictment, ibid. ib. — 
Counsel for the Prosecution and for the De- 
fendant, ibid. 756. — Mr. Garrow's Speech for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 757.— Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 766. — Mr. Felix Vaughan's 
Speech for the Defendant, ibid. 767.— The 
Recorder's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 778.— 
The Jury find him Guilty of publishing, but 
not with a criminal intention, ibid. 780. — 
After some discussion, this Verdict is record- 
ed, ibid. 781. — ^The Defendant's Remarks on 
this Case, ibid. 782.— His Trial in the Court 
of King's Bench on an Ex-officio Information 
for publishing Paine's " Letter to the Ad- 
dressers on the late Proclamation," ibid. 785. 
—The Information, ibid. ib. — Counsel for the 
Prosecution and for the Defendant, ibid 791. 
— Speech of the Attorney General for the Pro- 
secution, ibid. ib. — Evidence for the Prosecu- 
tion, ibid. 797.— Mr. Felix Vaughan's Speech 
{qx the Defendant, ibid. 800.— Reply of ih« 



dl» 



GtNlSRAL INbEX t6 



Attorney General, ibid. 813. — ^The Jury find 
ft Verdict of Guilty of publishing, ibid. 82S.— 
The Attorney General mores, in the ensuing 
Term, to have the Verdict entered accordiiu? 
to its legal import, ibid. ib. — A Rule to shew 
cause is granted, but no furthet Proceedings 
are taken in this or the preceding Case, ibid, 
ib.— His trial at theOld Bailey for publishing 
ft seditious Libel, 34 Geo. ^, 1794, iZ vol. 
1013.— The Indictment, ibid. 1014.— Coun- 
sel for the Prosecution and for the Defendant, 
ibid. ib.--Mr. Fielding's Speech for the Pro- 
secution, ibid. lOlt. — Evidence for the Pro- 
secution, ibid. 1030.— Mr. Gumey's Speech 
in his Defeticc, ibid. 1031.— Summing-up of 
the Recorder, ibid. 1047.— The July acquit 
him« ibid. 1054.— Hi* Trial in the Court of 
Kinff's Inchon ftn&K-ofiScio Information for 
publiriiiog ft blasphemous libel, 52 Geo 3, 
1812) 31 y<4. 927*— Speech of the Attorney 
Geoeral for the Prosecution, ibid. 928. — 
Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 934. — 
Baton's Defence of himself, ibid. 938.— The 
Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 950.— Mr. Prince 
Smith's Address to the Court in Mitigation 
of Punishment, on his being brought up for 
Judgment, ibid. 953.— The Court sentence 
him to 18 Months Imprisonment, and to 
stand in the Pillory, ibid. 958. 

EDGAR, William. — Proceedings against him 
in the Coutt of Justiciary in Edinburgh for 
Administering unlawful Oatlis, 57 Geo. 3. 
1817, 33 vol. 145.— *The Indictment, ibid, 
ib. — Mr. Crftnstouto'i Argument ibr the 
Panel against the Relevancy of the Indict- 
ment, ibid. 150. — Mr. Drummond's Argu- 
ment for the Prosecution, ibid. 169.-^Argu- 
ment of the Solicitor General on the same 
side, ibid. 175. — Mr. Clerk*s Argument in 
Reply for the Panel, ibid. 187.— The Court 
direct Informations upon the Relevancy of 
tfie Indictment, ibid. 202. — Second Indfict- 
tneUt ig^nst him, ibid* ib.-*-Mr. CraUstoun's 
Argument, that it is not competent for the 
Court to proceed on a second Indictment 
for the same offence, until the first is desert- 
ed, ibid. 207.— ^Mr. Drummond's Argument 
in support of the Proceeding, ibid. 214. — 
Mr. Clerk's Reply, ibid. 217.— A majority 
of the Court repel the Objection, but agree 
to give forther time to the Panel, ibid. 222. 
—Mr. Drommond's Argument against Mr. 
Cranstoun*s Objection, that it is not compe- 
tent to serve a Second Indictment, during 
the pendency of the First, ibid. 244.^Mr. 
Clerk's Argument in Reply, ibid. 255.— The 
Court decide against the Objection, ibid. 274. 

3£DMONSTON, Patrick. See StiHmg, James. 

EDWARD THE SECOND, King of England. 
— Proceedings relating to his Deposition, 
20 Edw. 2, 1327, 1 vol.47.— He is prevailed 
itpon to resign the Crown to his Son, ibid. 49. 
—He is murdered at Berkeley Castle, ibid. 50. 

EDWA&D t«E SIXTH, King of EngUird.-- 
His WiH, 1 ▼<^. 754.--»Rapin's AeceuM of 



the Circumstances under which it was made, 
ibid. 761. 
EDWARDS, Susannah. See tb^d, Temm 

EG AN, James. See Macdmkli Stephen* 

EGERTON, Thomas, Solicitor General, 24 
Eliz. 1 vol. 1051, 1281, l3224^His Speech 
for the Crown upon the Inquisition held 
upon the Death of Henry Piercy, Earl of 
Northumberland, 1 vol. 1120* 

' — n . - .i, ■ ^ Attorney General^ 1 iroL 



1327. 



-, Lord Keeper. See 



EUetmere^ Tiftoimu, Lord. — ^His Deolaration 
respecting the tumult at the house of the 
Earl of Essex, on his being sent to faidi by 
Queen EUEabeth, 1 vol. 1840. 

ELDER, John.— Proceedings against him and 
William Stewart at Edinburgh for Sedition^ 
33 Geo. 3, 1793, 23 vol. 25.--the tndict- 
ment, ibid. ib. — Steivart is outlawed for 
not appearing, ibid. 32. — No forther Pro- 
ceedings appear to have been taken against 
Elder, ibid. 34. 

ELLENBOROUGH, Edward, Loid, Chief 
Justice of K. B. See Law^ Edwurd* — 20 voL 
546, 30 vol. 538, 863, 1024.->His Charge 
to the Jury on the Trial of Codling and 
others, in the Court of Admiralty, for casting 
away a Ship with intent to defraud the 
Under-writers, 28 voh 309.— His Charg« to 
the Grand Jury, assembled under a Special 
Commission for the Trial of Colonel Despard 
for High Treason, ibid. 347. — His Charge 
to the Jury on that Trial, ibid. 485. — His 
Address to Colonel Despard on parsing 
Sentence upon him, ibid. 525.'-His Charge 
to the Jury on the Trial of Pc?ltier for a Libel 
on Buonaparte, when First Consul of the 
French Republic, ibid. 616. — His Charge to 
the Jury on the Trial of Michael and John 
Hedges for a Conspiracy to defraud ^he 
Government by false Vouchers for Work 
done in Woolwich Dock -yard, ibid. 1408. — 
His Charge to the Jury on the Trial of an 
Action brought by Mr. Plunkett, when 
Solicitor Genera] in Ireland, against William 
Cobbett, for a Libel, 29 vol. 78.-^llis Charge 
to the Jury on the Trial of Mr. Justice 
Johnson for a Libel, ibid. 498. — His Charge 
to the Jury on the Trial of Alexander Davi- 
6on» for defrauding Government by means 
of false Vouchers, 31 vol. 205.— His Charge 
to the Jury on the Trial of Valentine Jones, 
for Frauds on the Government, committed 
by him, while Commissary General of the 
Forces in the West Indies, ibid. 321. — His 
. Charge to the Jury on the Trial of Lambert 
and Perry for a Libel on George the Tliird 
in the Morning Chronicle, ibid. 363. — His 
Charge to the Jury on the Trial of John and 
Leigh Hunt for a Libel in the Examiner, 
ibid. 408. — His Charge to the Jury on the 
Trial of Daniel Isaac Eaton, for publishing 
a blflsplieifrogs libel, il»id . H9.-^His Charge 



THE STATE TRtALS. 



3d 



lo (te Jntf om tfa6 Tfial of James Watson 
ftir High Tteasotj, ibid; 578. 

ELLtS, Richard, it toI. 821. See New 

£LL£SM£R£, Thomas, Lord^ Lord ChaD- 
ceUor. See EgerUmy Thomas, — His Argu- 
ment In the £xcheqaer Chamber in the 
Case of Ae Postnati, 2 voK 659. — He is 
sp'fiointed Lord High Steward fbr the Trials 
of the Barl aiid CdunteSs of Sbrewsbuty 
for Ae Murder of Sir Thomas OTerbury, 
ibid. 952, ^68. 

ELUdrrt, Bdniund, ISl vol. 645. See Gra^ 
Aon, SB' JRkhard, 

BLLIOTTj Sir John. — Proceedings against 
him, Deiizil HoIHsv and Benjamin Valentine, 
apon an Inferraation agaibst them for sedi- 
tious Sp^ecbe^ in Parliament, 5 Car. 1, 
1629, 8 Tbh 29d.— The Information^ ibid. 
320.— Their several Pleas, ibid. 324.— The 
Attorney Gene|'al*s Demurrer to the Pleas, 
ibid. 3^7.-^Jddgment of Respondeat Ouster, 
ibid; 328.-^udginent against them for hot 
pleading in chief, ibid. 829.— Writ of Error 
brought by Holiisj ibid. 331.— Judgment 
teversed in the House of Lords, ibid. 333. 
— Arguments of their Counsel upon their 
Pl^aS to the Jurisdiction, ibid. 295.— The 
Attohiey General's Reply, ibid. 304.— The 
Judgment of the Court for the Crown, ibid. 
306:— Resolutions of the House of Com- 
tQo'n8in164i respecting these Proceedings, 
ibid; 310. — The Commons resolve that the 
Jodgnient in this Case was illegal and a 
breach (^f their privileges, ibid: 319. 

ELLIS, Sir William, Judge of a P. 26 Car. 
2. — ^His Argument in the Exchequer Cham- 
ber for affirming the Judgment of the Court 
of Ring's Bench in the Case of Barnardiston 
sgaindt Sodmes^ 6 vol. 1070. 

ELWES, Sir iervis.— His trial as actessary 
before the fact to the Murder of Sir Thomas 
Overbury, 13 Jac. 1, 1615, 2 vol. 935.— He 
is fouiid Guilty, and executed^ ibid; 942. 

BMttJf, Soilomi Counsel.— His Preface to 
the Second Edition of the State Trials, 1 vol. 
nii.^^His Opinion upon the Queries sub- 
mitted to him respecting the Case of Eliza- 
beth Canning, 19 vol. 670 (note). 

EMMET, Robert. -His 'Trial at Dublin for 
High Treason, under a Special Commission 
of Oyer and Terminer, 43 Geo. 3, 1803, 28 
▼ol. 1097. — ^The Indictment, ibid. 1098. — 
Speech of the Attorney General for the Pro- 
secution, ibid. 1111. — Evidence for the Pro- 
secution^ ibid. 1130. — The Prisoner directs 
bis Coun^ei to make no Speech to the Jury, 
and to call no Witnesses, ibid. 1157. — Mr. 
Plunkett's Reply, ibid. 1158.— Lord Nor- 
btity's Charge tb the Jury^ ibid* 1168.-^The 
Jury find hitn Guilty^ ibid. 1171— His Ad- 
^fHs on being called on for Judgment, ibid. 
ib.--He is executed, ibid. 1178. — Extract 



« 

respecting him from ''The Life of Mr. 
Curran by his Son,'' ibid. 1097 (note). 

iMPSON, Sir Thomas. — Mr. Hargtave's 
Notice of a common Errot amongst Histo- 
rians respecting the Attainder of Einpson 
and Diudley, 1 vol. 283.— Petitions againfj*t 
hinoi and Dudley presented to Henry the 
Eighth upon his Accession, ibid 285. — ^They 
are called before the Council, ibid. ib. — Einp- 
son's Speech to the Council, ibid, ib.-^ Ac- 
count of the Charge against them, ibid^ 286. 
—They are both committed to. the To Wet, 
ibid. ib.^-Account df Empsoti's Origin, ibifl. 
ib.— They are both indicted for Constrttctlve 
Treason, found Guilty, and attainted, ibid. 
287.— They ar6 afterwards beheaded, % 
virtue (jff a Special Writ from the King, ibid. 
588.— Dudley's Attaihder afterwards re- 
versed in Parliament, ibid. ib. 

ENTICK, John^ 19 vol. 1029^ See Seigute bf 
Papers: 

ESTlfcK and CARRINGTON, i9 vol. 10219. 
See Seizure of Papers. 

ERSKINE, The Honourable Thomas, Colinsel. 
— His Speech on shewing cause against a 
Rule for a Criminal Information against 
Captain . Thomas Baillie, for publishing 
Libels on the Directors of Greenwich Hos- 
pital, 21 voL 31 J — His Speech in Defence 

• of Lord George Gordon, for High Treason, 
in being concerned in the No-Popery Riots 
in 1780, ibid. 587. — His Speech on shewing 
cause against the Motion for putting off the 
Trial of Dr. Shipley, Dean of St. Asaph, 
ibid. 859. — His Speech in Defence of the 
Dean of St. Asaph, on his Trial for publish- 
ing Sir William Jones's Dialogue on Grovem- 
ment, ibid. 898.— His Speech in the Court 
of King's Bench on moving fbf a New Trial 
in that Case, ibid. 956. — His Speech in sup- 
port of the Rule for a new Trial, ibid. 971. 
— His Speech in the Court of King's Bench 
for the Council of Madras^ in Mitigation of 
Punishment, ibid. 1259. — His Argument ;n 
support of a Motion for a new Trial in the 
Case of Bembridge, convicted of misconduct 
as a Clerk in the Pay Office, 22 vol. 98 — 
His Speech in Defence of John Stockdale, 
for a Libel on the House of Commons, ibid. 
252. — ^Remarks of the Edinburgh Review 
upon this Speech, ibid. ib. (note). — His 
Speech in Defence of Thomas Paine, on his 
Prosecution for publishing the Second Part 
of the " Rights of Man," ibid. 410.— His 
Speech in Defence of John Frost for Sedi- 
tious W^ords, ibid. 488. — His Speech in De- 
fence of Perry, Lambert, and Gray, for pub- 
lishing in the Morning Chronicle an Address 
of the Derby Society for Historical Informa- 
tion, ibid. 995. — ^His Speech for the De-« 
fbndants on the Trial of Thomas Walker and 
others, for a treasonable Conspiracy, 23 vol. 
1103.— His Speech in Defence of Thomas 
Hardy, for High Treason, 24 vol. 877. — 
His Speech in Defence of Home Tooke, for 



40 



General index to 



High Treason, 25 vol. 257. — His Speech on 
summing up the Evidence for the Defence 
on Stone's Tri^l for High Treason, ibid. 
1370. — His Speech in Defence of the Bishop 
of Bangor, for a Riot and Assault, 26 vol. 
506. — His Speech for the Prosecution on 
the Trial of Williams for Blasphemy, ibid. 
,660. — His Reply in the same Case, ibid. 
696.— His Letter to the Editor of the State 
Trials, explaining his motives for returning 
bis Retainer for the Prosecution, in VVilliams*s 
Case, ibid. 714 (note). — His Evidence on 
the Trial of O'Coigly and others for High 
Treason, 27 vol. 38. — His Speech in Defence 
of Lord Thanet, for a Riot and Rescue, ibid. 
868. — His Letter to a Gentleman of the Bar 
in Ireland, on the power of .Courts of Justice 
to commit for Contempts, ibid. 1019. — His 
Speech for John Vint and others, for pub- 
lishing a Libel on the Emperor of Russia 
in the Courier, ibid. 630. — His Speech in 
Defence of Cuthell, for publishing a Sedi- 
tious Pamphlet, written by Gilbert Wake- 
field, ibid 655. —His Argument for one of 
the Prisoners in Codling's Case, for destroy- 
ing a Vessel at sea, with intent to defraud 
the Underwriters, 28 vol. 274. — His Speech 
for the Prosecution on the Trial of Michael 
and John Hedges, for Frauds in Woolwich 
Dock-yard, ibid. 1326. — He was one of the 
Counsel for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
William Cobbett, for a Libel on the Lord 
Lieutenant of Ireland, 29 vol.1. — His Speech 
for the Plaintiff in the Case of Plunkett 
against Cobbett, for a Libel, ibid. 61.— -His 
Speech for the Plaintiff in the Case of Troy 
V, Symonds, for a Libel in the Anti-Jacobin 
Review, ibid. 505. 

Thomas, Lord, Lord Chancellor. 



— He presides in the House of Lords on the 
Trial of Lord Melville, 29 vol. 607. 



Thomas, Lord, 30 vol. 1344. 



ESSEX, Arthur, Earl of. — Burnet's Account 
of his implication in the Rye-House Plot, 
9 vol. 491. — His Account of his Death, and 
of the Suspicions entertained respecting it, 
ibid. 504, 513.— Coroner's Inquest held upon 
his Body, ibid. 1132. — Trial of Braddon and 
Spake, on a Charge of suborning Evidence, 
to prove that he was murdered by his 
Keepers, ibid. 1127. — Braddon's Arguments 
and Statements in Vindication of him from 
Burnet's Charge of Self-murder, ibid. 1229. 
— Opinions of several Histcrians respecting 
his Death, ibid. ib. (note).— Committee of 
Lords appointed after the Revolution to 
inquire into the circumstances of his Death, 
ibid. 1260. — Substance of the Depositions 
before the Committee, ibid. 1262. 

ESSEX, Frances Howard, Countess of. — Pro- 
ceedings- between her and Robert, Earl of 
Essex, her Husband, in a Cause of Divorce, 
11 Jac. 1, 1613, 2 vol. 785.— -Weldon's Ac- 
count of this Prpceeding, ibid. ib. ^note).— 



Lady Essex's Libel, ibid, ib.— The Earl's 
Answer thereto, ibid. 787. — Depositions in 
the Cause, ibid. 788. — Archbishop Abbot's 
Reasons against the Divorce, ibid. 794. — 
The King's Answer thereto, ibid. 798. — A 
Jury of Matrons impaneled to examine the 
Countess, ibid. 802. — Entry thereof, Ibid, . 
ib. — Sentence of Dissolution pronounced, 
ibid. 804.— The Countess marries the £arl 
of Somerset, ibid. ib. — Memorial of this 
Case by Archbishop Abbot, ibid. 805.-r- 
Speech intended to have been spoken thy 
Archbishop Abbot in this Case, ibid. 844.— 
The King's Letter to the Archbishop re- 
specting the Decision in thisCase, ibid. 860. 
— Her Trial by her Peers for the Murder of 
Sir Thomas Overbury, 14 Jac. 1, 1616, ibid. 
951.— She pleads Guilty, ibid. 954.— She is 
condemned to be hanged, ibid. 957.-^ 
Speech intended to have been spoken by 
Sir Francis Bacon, had . she pleaded Not 
Guilty, ibid. ib. — She is pardoned, ibid. 
1005. 

ESSEX, Robert, Earl of.— Trial of him, and 
Henry, Earl of Southampton, in the House 
of Lords, at Westminster, for High Treason, 
43 Eliz. 1600, 1 vol. 1333.— They plead 
Not Guilty, ibid. 1336.— The Eari of Essex 
inquires if he might challenge any of his 
Peers, and is answered in the negative, ibid. 
1335.— Sir Edward Coke (Attorney General) 
states the Charge, ibid. 1237.— They are 
both found Guilty, ibid. 1356. — Judgment 
of Death against them, ibid. 1357. — The 
Earl of Essex is ordered for Execution, but 
the Earl of Southampton is reprieved, ibid. 
1358. — Account of the Execution of the 
Earl of Essex, ibid. 1359. — Expressions 
said to have been used by Sir Walter 
Raleigh respecting him before his Execu- 
tion, 2 vol. 44. 

ESSEX, Robert, Eari of, 2 vol. 785. See 
Essex, Frances Howard, Countess of. 

EVIOT, Peter. See Gowrie, Earl of. 

EXETER, Marquis of.— He is tried with Lord 
Montacute, by his Peers, for Treason in 
uttering Seditious words, 30 Hen. 8, 1538, 
1 vol. 479. — ^They are found Guilty, and 
Judgment is passed upon them, ibid. ib. 

EXMEW, William. See Middlemore, Hrnn^ 

phry. 

* 

EYRE, Sir Giles, Judge of K. B. 4 Will, and 
Mary, 12 vol. 1244. — He is summoned with 
Lord Holt to the House of Lords^ to answer 
fcjr the Judgment of the Court of King's 
Bench in Caseof ChariesKnowles, claiming 
to be Lord Banbury. 12 vol. 1179 (note). — 
His Speech in the House of Lords on that 
Occasion, ibid. 1180 (note). 

EYRE, Giles, Seijeant-at-Law, 4 Geo. 2, 18 
vol. 387. — His Speech for Bambridge and 
Cqrbett, on an Appeal of Murder, 17 vol, 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



41 



433^ — His Argument of the Special Verdict 
in Major Oneb/s Case, for Murder, ibid. 39. 

EYRE, James^ Recorder of London, 1 9 vol .1154. 

Sir James, Chief Justice of C. P. — 

His Charge to the Grand Jury at the Old 
Bailey, assembled under a Special Commis^ 
sion for the Trial of Treasons in 1794, 24 
Tol. 200. — Strictures upon this Charge, 
ibid. 210 (note). — His Chargd to the Jury 
on the Trial of Thomas Hardy for High 
Treason, ibid. 1293. — His Charge to the 
Juiy on the Trial of Home Tooke, 25 vol. 
555.--His Charge to the Jury on the Trial 
of Crossfield for High Treason, 26 vol. 190. 

£YR£, Robert, Solicitor General, 9 Anne, 
15 vol. 655. — His Speech in Reply for the 
House of Commons, on the Impeachment 
of Dr. Sacheverel, 15 vol. 396. 

Sir Robert, Chief Justice of C. P. — 

Proceedings of a Committee of the House of 
Commons upon a Charge against him of 
having visited Thomas Bambridge, and sup- 
plied him with Money, while in Prison by 
virtue of a Commitment by the House, 17 
vol. 619. — His Charge to the Jury on the 
Trial of Bambridge for Felony, ibid. 612. 

EYRE, Sir Samuel, Judge of K. B. 7 Will. 3, 
12 vol. 1291.-13 vol 139, 451. 



FABRIGAS, Anthony. — Proceedings in an 
Action of Trespass for false Imprisonment and 
Banishment, brought by him against Lieute- 
nant-General Mostyn, Governor of Minorca, 
14 Geo. 3, 1773-74, 20 vol. 81.— Counsel for 
the Plaintiff and for the Defendant, ibid . ib. — 
Statement of the Pleadings in the Writ of 
Error afterwards brought, ibid. 184. — Ser- 
jeant Glynn's Speech for the Plaintiff, ibid. 
85.— Evidence for the Plaintiff, ibid. 92 — 
Serjeant Davy's Speech for the Defendant, 
ibid. 99. — Evidence for the Defendant, ibid. 
118. — Serjeant Glynn's Reply, ibid. 146. — 
Mr. Justice Gould's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 161. — ^The Jury return a Verdict for 
the Plaintiff, with 3,000/ Damages, ibid. 
175. — Proceedings on a Motion for a new 
Trial, ibid. ib. — Lord Chief Justice DeGrey 
delivers the Judgment of the Court against 
a new Trial, ibid. ib. — A Writ of Error is 
brought in the Court of King's Bench upon 
a Bill of Exceptions, ibid. 183.— Record of 
the Proceedings in Error, ibid. ib. — The 
Bill of Exceptions, ibid. 189. — Assignment 
of Errors thereon, ibid. 193. — Mr. BuUer's 
Argument for the Plaintiff in Error, ibid. 
194. — Mr. Peckham's Argument for the De- 
fendant in Error, ibid. 207. — Mr BuUer's 
Reply, ibid. 220. — ^The Judgment of the 
Court delivered by Lord Manstield, that the 
Judgment of the Court below be affirmed, 
ibid. 226. 

FAGG, Sir John. — ^Proceedings in Parliament 
on an Appeal in the House of I^ords by Dr. 
Shirley, against biro apd other JNJembers of 



the House of Commons, 27 Car. 2, 1675, 
6 vol. 1121. — ^He is ordered by the House 
of Lords to put in his Answer to a Petition 
preferred against him by Dr. Shirley, ibid, 
lb. — He petitions the House of Commons 
thereupon, ibid. 1122. — Dr. Shirley is sent 
for by the Commons to answer for a Breach 
of Privilege, in prosecuting a Suit by Peti- 
tion of Appeal in the House of Lords 
against a Member of the House of Com- 
mons, ibid. 1128. — The Commons resolve 
that the Appeal is a Breach of their Privi- 
leges, ibid. 1133.— The Commons order 
that Sir John Fagg be sent to the Tower for 
a Breach of Privilege in appearing and 
answering to Dr. Shirley's Appeal, ibid. 
1 147. — Resolutions of the Commons in sup- 
port of Sir John Fagg, ibid. 1166.— The 
Parliament is prorogued, ibid. 1170.— Dr. 
Shirley renews his Appeal the next Session, 
ibid. ib. — ^The Earl of Shaftesbury's Speech 
on the Debate respecting the appointment 
of a day for hearing the Appeal, ioid. 1171. 
—The Lords appoint a day for hearing the 
Appeal, ibid. 1181. — ^The Commons again 
resolve that the Appeal is a Breach of their 
Privileges, ibid. ib. — The Dispute is ended by 
another Prorogation ofParliament, ibid. 11 86. 

FAIRFAX, Lady. — ^Her singular Conduct at 
the commencement of the Trial of Charles 
the First, 4 vol. 1005, 1067 (note). 

PARREL, Richard. See Metsenger^ Peter, 

FARWELL, John. See Thompson, NatfumieL 

FAULCONER, Richard.— His Trial for Per- 
jury, at the Bar of the Upper Bench, 5 Car. 
2, 1653, 5 vol. 323.— Account of the Circum- 
stances which gave occasion to this Trial, 
ibid. ib. — ^The Indictment, ibid. 335. — ^The 
Indictment is found by the Grand Jury, ibid. 
337. — ^The first Indictment is withdrawn, on 
accountof a defect, and a Second is preferred 
and found, ibid. 345.— He pleads Not Guilty, 
ibid. 347. — A Trial at Bar ordered, ibid. ib. 
— Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 348.— 
Evidence of his general bad Character given, 
ibid. 354. — Evidence in his Defence, ibid. 
356.— Reply on behalf of the Prosecution, 
ibid. 361. — He is found Guilty, ibid. 365. 

FAWKES, Guy. See WinUr, Robert. 

FAZAKERLY,Thomas, Counsel.— HisSpeech 
in Defence of Richard Francklin, for a 
Seditious Libel in the Craftsman, 17 vol. 649. 

FIELDING, Robert.- His Trial at the Old 
Bailey for Bigamy, in marrying the Duchess 
ofCleveland, his former Wife beingstill alive, 
5 Anne 1706, 14 vol. 1327.— Tlie Indictment, 
ibid . 1328.— He pleads Not Guilty, ibid. ib. 
— ^The Counsel for the Crown open the Case, 
ibid. 1329. — Evidence against him, ibid. 
1332.— His Defence, ibid. 1351.— Evidence 
in support of his Defence, ibid. 1352. — Reply 
of the Counsel for the Crown, ibid. 1358. — 
Mr. Justice Powel's Charge to the Jury, 



4i 



GfelJfeftAL tNbfeX TO 



ibid. )362.-^'Ilie Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 
1368. — Hie obtains the Queen's Warrant to 
suspend the Execution of his Sentence, ibid, 
ib. — Proceedings , in Doctors' Commons 
against biro, ibid. i36p. — Definitive Sen- 
tence, annulling the Marriage yirith the 
Duchess of Cieveiandi ibid. 1370. 

F£LL, Margaret. See Crook, John, — Proceed- 
ingk dgaibst htir for refUsitig the Oath of 
Obedience, 16 Cflti^. H, 1664, 6 vol. 132^.— 
Sh« neAi^bs to take the Oath tvhfen it is ten- 
dered W hir by a Judge of Assize, ibid. 633. 
^She is ibdibted for her refiiisal, ibid. 636. 
—The Jury find her Giiiily, ibid. 640.— The 
Court pass Judgment of rremunire against 
herj ibid. 641. 

FfetTdN, John.— His Execution for High 
Treason, in 8ettin|; up a traitorous Bull on 
uie GaU of the fiishbp of London, 13 Eliz. 
1570, 1 Tol. 1085. 

PBLTONj Johtti— Proceedings agairiit hini for 
ih^ Miirder of the Duke of Buckingham, 4 
Car. 1, 1628, 3 ¥dl. 369.— He confesses the 
Indictment, and is hangfed, ibid. 87i; — ^The 
Judges refuse to order his hand to be cut off, 
ibid. ib. 

FENNER, Edward, Judge of K. B. 84 Eliz; 
1 Tol. 1815, 133^ 2 rol: 576. 

FENWICfe, Johil. Sfee WhUebread, thomas. 

FENWiCKi Sir Jdhn, Baronet.— Proceedings 
in Parliament agdinst him upon a Bill of 
Attainder for High Treason, 8 Will, 3, 1696, 
13 i6i. 537.— He is brought to ihfe JHLouse of 
Comhions, ibid. 539.— The Housd resolve 
id bribg in a Bill of Attainder against him, 
ibid. 542. ^-^The house resolve, upon Debate, 
that triien brought to the Bar, the Serjeant at 
Aims shall stand by him at the Bar with the 
Mace, ibid. 546. — He is brbught to the Bar, 
ibid. ib.--^The Bill of Attainder is read to 
him, ibid. 547.— Serjeant Gblild and the 
Recorder doen the Evidence agdinst him, 
ibid. 548. — His Counsel object to the pro- 
duction of Evidence against him to prove 
his Guilt generally, ibid. 552. — After Debate, 
the Hctuse resolve th^t he shall be allowed 
fUrthet timfe to yirodUce his Witnesses, and 
that he ilatne them, ibid. 575. — The House 
also resolve that the King*s Counsel may 
j^rbdtib^ Evidence 16 pi-ove his Giiilt getier- 
ally, ibid. 576. — Evidence against him, ibid. 
5^0.-^liis Counsel Object to Evideiice, that 
Lady Fenwick tampered with one of the 
"Witnesses against him, ibid. 581. — I'he 
Hoiise, after Debate, resolve to receive the 
Evidence, ibid. 588. — His Letter to his Wife, 
on being arrested, ibid. 627 (note). — Sir 
Thomas Powis*s Speech in his Defence, ibid. 
631 . — Sir B. Shower's Speech in his Defence, 
ibidi 640.— Reply of Serjeant Gould and the 

' Recoirder, ibid. 646. — Debate in the House 
of Commons oti the Second Iteading of the 
flill Qf Attainder, ibid, 659.— the Bill is 
cotnniitted, ibid. 712.— t)ebate on the Third 



Readibgi ibid, ib.— the Bill is read ^a third 
time in the House of Commons, ibid. 749. 
— Prbclsedingsupbn it in the House dt Lords; 
ibid. 750.— Bishop Biimet's Reasons for 
voting in favour of the Bill> ibid. 751. — ^The 
Bill passes the Hovsfe of Lords by a majority 
of Seve.n, ibid. 755.— ^Prc^testasainstit, ibid. 
756. — Paper delivered hy Sir John Eenivi<^ 
to the Sheriff^ at the place of Execution, ibid. 
757. — ^Watrant for bia Execution^ ibid. 756. 
—He is executed, ibid* 768. 

FEftGtSSdN, ftbbert, Cou6sM. Sefe I%ph^t, 
^kville, Ehtt q/:- fiis trial with Lbtd 
Thanet and others fbr k Riot in the Cdilrt 
of Justice! 27 vol. 821.~t^H^ ;8 fcm^d GtiiltjTi 
ibid. 941 .^Sentence of the Court upon biln, 
ibid. 952. — His. Observations updn his df^n 
Case, and the points of Law ariaing upon the 
Information, ibid. 958. — His Evidence on 
the Ttial ot Hardy for High treasoti, H vol. 
Ib97. 

FERNLEY, John.— His Trial with ^iTilliam 
Ring, Elizabeth Gaunt^ ahd Henry Cornish, 
at the Old Baily, for High Trfeasdn, in har« 

^ bouring Traitors after Monihouth's Rebel- 
lion, 1 Jac. 2, 1685^ 11 Vol; 381.— The 
several Indictments, ibid. 383. — Tliey . all 

glead Not Guilty, ibid. 384, 410.— Trial of 
Ling, ibid. 390.— Trial of Fernley, ibid. 398. 
—Ring and Fernley are both found Guilty, 
ibid. 410.— Triai of Elizabeth Gaunt, ibid. 
413.— She is foimd Guilty, ibid. 441.— trial 
of Cornish, ibid. 421.— He is found Guilty, 
ibid. 448. — Sentence passed upon theln, 
ibid. ib. — Fernley arid Ring arfe reprieved, 
ibid. 450.-^ornish*s Execution, ibid. 451. 
—Elizabeth Gaunt's Execution, ibid. 452.— 
BUrnet's Account of her Trial, ibid. 300 
(note). — Act of P^irliaraent after the Revo- 
lution^ reversing the Attainder of Cornish, 
ibid. 454.— Sir John Hatvles*s Remarks upon 
Corni:Jh's Trial, ibid. 455. 

FERON, Robert. See Ball, a Secular Prksl. 

FERRERS, Lawrence, Earl.- His Trial be- 
fore the House of Lords, for the Mutder of 
John Johnson, 33 Geb. 2^ 1760, 19 vol. 8&5. 
— Commission to Lord Henley to b^ Lord 
High Steward, ibid. 887. — Certiorari to re- 
move the Indictment, with thetleturn to the 
same, ibid. 888. -The Indicttiient, ibid. fl91 . 
— The Lord High Steward's Addresii to the 
Prisoner, Ibid. 892, — He pleads Not Guilty, 
ibid. 893.— The Attorney General opens the 
■Case for the Prosecution, ibid. 895. — Evi 
ddnce ibr (he Pi*0sebuti6n, ibid. 902. — His 
Defence, ibid. 922.- -Evidence for the De- 
fence, ibid. 923. — He desires that a Written 
Defence may be read, ibid. 944. — Reply of 
Mr. Yorke, the Solicitor feeneril, for the 
Prosecution, ibid. ^45. — ^i'he Lords uudni- 
mously find him Guilty, ibid. 956.-^Spfeech 
of the Lord High Steward, on prtmottneing 
Judgment of Death upon him» ibid* 058.— 
Mr. Justice Foster's Report of .IHe Reasons 
of the Answers given by the Judges to the 



*rHfe StAtE TfetALS. 



I» 



Questions proposed to them, respecting this 
Trial, ibid. 960. — Account of the Execution 
of Lord Ferrers, ibid. 973. — ^Lord Emkine's 
Remarks upon the Case of Lord Ferrers, in 
his Defence of Hadiield, 37 yoI. 1324. 

FETHEBSTONHAUGH, Sir Timothy. See 
Derhyy Jrnnts Donley ^ Eari cf^ 

FIELD, Theophilus, Dr. Bishop of LlandafF. 
•^Proceedings in Parliament against him, 
for Bribery and Corruption, 18 and 19 Jac. 
1, 162Q, 2 vol. 1088. — Particulars of the 
Charges against him, ibid. 1116. — ^The Con- 
sideration of the Charge is referred to Arch- 
bishop Abbot, ibid. 1118. — Characteristic 
Letter from the Bishop to the Duke of Buck- 
ingham, ibid. 11 19.-*- After these Proceed- 
ings, he was successively Bishop of St. 
David's and Hereford, ibid. 1089 (note). 

FIEKNES, Nathanael, Colonel.— His Trial by 
a Countil of Wat, for Cowardice, in surrent 
d^rin^ the Cit/ and Castle of Bristol, 19 
Car. 1, 1643, 4 vt>l. 185.— He is accused by 
Mr. Prynn and Mr. Walker, ibid, ib.— Mr. 
Prynn contends that the Trial should be 
open, ibid. 186.— The Court determine the 
contrary, ibid, 190.— Articles of Impeach- 
ment against hitn, ibid. ib.-^His Answer 
thereto, ibid. 194. — The Prosecutors proceed 
to prove the Articles, ibid. 205.-^His De- 
fence, with Mr. Prynn's Replies to the 
several points thereof, ibid. 225. — ^The 
Council find him Ouilty, and sentence him 
to death, ibid. 297.-* ue appeals to Parlia- 
ment, and is afterwards pardoned, ibid. 298. 
—Precedents of Prosecutions for Cowardice, 
referred to by Mr. Prynn, ibid. ib. 

-^NCH, Sir Heneage, Solicitor General, 12 
Car. 2, 6 vol. 971, 6 vol. 229. — His Speech 
for the Prosecution, on the Trial of Colonel 
Harrison, the Regicide, 5 vol. 1011. --His 
Speech in the House of Commons, in the 
Debate upon the Proceedings against Lord 
Clarendon, 6 vol. 328. — His Speech in the 
House of Lords, on Summing up the Evi- 
dence against Lord Morley, on his Trial for 
Murder, ibid. 778. — His Argument for the 
Crown, in the Great Case of Monopolies, 
10 vol. 405. 

-, Lord, afterwards Baron 



Daventry and Earl of Nottingham. — He 
presides in the House of Lords as Lord High 
Steward, on the Trial of the Earl of Pem- 
broke, for Murder. 6 vol. 1317. — Also on 
the Trial of Lord Cornwallis, for Murder, 7 
vol. 143. 

-, Lord, Baron of Da- 



ventry, Lord Chancellor. — He presides as 
Lord High Steward on the Trial of Lord 
Stafford, 7 vol. 1295. 

FINCH, Sir Heneage, Solicitor General, 34 
Car. 2, 9 vol. 690, 10 vol. 567, 1092*— His 
Argument for the Crown in the Case of the 
Quo Warranto against the City of Londoui 



8 vol. 1087i — His Speech on sumtaing up 
the Evidence for the Prosecution, oh the 
Trial of Lord William Russel, 9 vol. 625.— 
His Speech on summing up the Evidence 
for the Prosecution on the Trial olf Algernon 
Sidney, ibid. 880. — His Speech in Reply 
for the Prosecution on the Tri&l of Lord 
Delamere. for High Treason, 11 vol. 586,— 
His Speecn in Reply for the Prosecution on 
the First Trial of Gates, for Perjury, io vol. 
Ii99. — His iSpeech in Reply^ on Oates*s 
Second Trial, ibid. 1291. 

FINCH, Sir John, Speaker of the HoUte of 
Commons. — He is held forcibly in the Chair, 
While the Hou^^ t>f Cothnion^ pass c6Hain 
Resolutions, 3 vol. ^^^^--^^His Speech tO the 
Kitog, on delivering the Answer of the Com- 
mons to several Messages. coiiVeyed to them 
during tlie Debates bn the LibeHy of tlie 
Subject, ibid. 165. 



' ' . ' ■ ■ - - ^ • » Chief Justice «f G* P; 3 
vol. 717, 810.— His Speeeh in the Star- 
Chamber, on delivering his Gpiniod respect- 
ing the Punishment to be infiieted on Dr. 
Williams, Bishop of Lincoln, for speaking 
scandalous Words of the Governments ibid. 
785. — He was one of the Judges who sigiied 
the Opinion in favour of Ship-Money)- ibid. 
844. — His Argument in the Exchequer 
Chamber, in favour of Ship-Money^ ibid. 
1216. See Finchf John, Lord. 

-^ John, Lord, Baron Fprdwich, Lord 



Keeper.— Proceedings in Parliament acainst 
him for High Treason^ 16 Car. 1^ 1640, 
4 vol. L — He petitions to be admitted to 
speak for himself in the House of Com- 
mons, which is granted, ibid.ib.^His Speech 
on that Occasion^ ibid. ib. — His Explanation 
of his conduct in refusing to put a question, 
when Speaker of the House of Commons, 
ibid. 3* — His Account of the means by which 
the Opinion of the Judges was obtained, in 
the Case of Ship-Money, ibid. 4. —He says 
that Croke and Hutton signed that Opinion 
only for Conformity, ibid. 6.— His Account 
of his Argument in the Case of Ship-Money, 
ibid. ib. — He is voted a Traitor by th(2 Com- 
mons, and they resolve to impeach him of 
High Treason, ibid. 9. — He escapes into 
Holland, ibid. 10. — His Letter to the Lord 
Chamberlain from thence, ibid. ib. — ^Articles 
of Impeachment againt him, ibid. 11. — They 
are presented to the Lords, ibid. 15. — The 
Lords require him to appear and answer, 
but he does not surrender, ibid. 18. — At the 
Restoration, he was one of the Commis- 
sioners for the Trial of the Regicides, 5 vol. 
986 (note). 

FINERTY, Pelef.— His Trial in Ireland, for 
publishing a Seditious Libel. 38 Geo. 3, 1797^ 
26 vol. 901 .— NarraiiVe of thd circumstanced 
which gave rise to this Trial, ibid. ib. — The 
Indictment, ibid. 92d.-^Speeich of the At^ 
torney General for the Prosecution, ibid. 
927.-— EviddDce for the Prdsdcution, ibid. 



44 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



935.— Mr. Fletcher's Speech for the Defend- 
ant, ibid. 951. — Evidence for the Defendant, 
ibid. 961. — Mr. Curran's Speech, on Sum- 
ming up the Evidence for the Defendant, 
ibid. 964. — Mr. Prime Serjeant's Reply, 
ibid. 992. — Mr, Justice Downes's Charge to 
the Jury, ibid. 1003. — The Jury find him 
Guilty, ibid. 1008. — His Address to the 
Court on being brought up for Judgment, 
ibid. 1009. — Mr. Justice Downes passes the 
Sentence of the Court upon him, ibid. 1011. 
—Account of the Proceedings against Wm. 
Orr, out of which this Prosecution arose, 
ibid. 906. 

FINNEY, Patrick.— His Trial in Ireland, for 
High Treason, 38 Geo. 3, 1798, 26 vol. 1019. 
— The Indictment, ibid. ib. — Mr. Curran 
moves on his behalf to postpone the Trial^ 
ibid. 1030. — The Court refuse the motion, 
ibid. 1037. — Speech of the Attorney General 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 1045. — Evidence 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 1053. — Mr. Mac 
Nally's Speech for the Prisoner, ibid: 1078. 
' — Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 1091. — 
Mr. Curran's Speech on summing up the 
Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 1099. — 
Reply of the Solicitor General, ibid. 1113. — 
Mr. Justice Chamberlain's Charge to the 
Jury,ibid. 1122. — Mr. Baron Smith's Charge, 
ibid. 1128. — ^The Jury acquit the Prisoner, 
ibid. 1132. 

FISHER, John, Bishop of Rochester. — His 
' Trial for High Treason, in denying the King's 
Supremacy, 26 Hen. 8> 1535, 1 vol. 395. — 
Account of his previous Prosecutions, one of 
which was for Misprision of Treason, in con- 
cealing the predictions of Elizabeth Barton, 
the Holy Maid of Kent, against the King, 
ibid. ib. — Character of the Report of this 
Trial, ibid. 397. — ^Names of his Judges, ibid, 
ib. — ^Tlie Indictment read, ibid. 399. — Pleads 
Not Guilty, ibid. ib. — Mr. Rich's Evidence, 
and the Bishop's Answer to it, ibid. ib. — He 
states that his Opinion against the King's 
Supremacy was given in the way of counsel 
upon the King's demanding it, ibid. 400. 
—The Jury find him Guilty, and the 
Court pass Judgment of Death against 
him, ibid. 402. — Anecdote respecting his 
cheerfulness after his Trial, ibid. 403. — His 
Conversation with the Lieutenant of the 
Tower, when informed that the Order for his 
Execution was arrived, ibid. 404. — His 
anxiety respecting his dress on the day of 
Execution, ibid. 405. — His conduct at his 
Execution, ibid. 474.— Anecdote related of 
Henry the Eighth, when told of the Pope's 
intention to send the Bishop a Cardinal's 
hat, ibid. 408. — Burnet's Account of his 
Trial, Execution, and Character, ibid. 473. 

FITZALAN, Thomas, Archbishop of Canter- 
bury — His Impeachment by the Commons, 
for High Treason, in advising and procuring 
the Commission to the Duke of Gloucester's 
Fwtiop, 21 Rio. 2a 1397, t vol. 1^3,— He is 



banished, and his Temporalities forfeited to 
the King, ibid. 124. 

FITZGERALD, Thomas Judkin.— Proceed- 
ings on the Trial of an Action in Ireland, 
brought ag^nst him by Mr. Wright, for 
Assault and Battery, 39 Geo. 3, 1799> 27 
vol. 759. — Evidence for the Plaintiff, ibid, 
ib. — The Defence, ibid. 763. — Evidence 
for the Defence, ibid. 764. — ^The Jury find a 
Verdict for the Plaintiff, with £500 Damages^ 
ibid. 766.— Proceedings in the Irish House 
of Commons on his Petition for Indemnity, 
ibid. 766. 

FITZHARRIS, Edward. — Proceedings in 
Parliament against him, upon an Impeach- 
ment for High Treason, in being concerned 
in the Popish Plot, 33 Car. 2, 1681, 8 vol. 
223. — His Examination, ibid. ib.r— The Com- 
mons resolve to impeach him, ibid. 227.— 
The Lords refuse to proceed upon the Im- 
peachment, ibid. 23 1.<— Pretext for their 
refusal supplied by Lord Nottingham, ibid« 
23 (note). — Debate in the House of Com- 
mons thereupon, ibid. 232. — ^Their Resolu- 
tions upon the subject, ibid. 236. — The Par- 
liament is dissolved before any further 
Proceedings can be taken, ibid. 242. — Pro- 
ceedings against him in the King's Bench, 
on an Indictment for High Treason, in the 
same year, ibid. 243. — ^The Grand Jury 
require the Opinion of the Court, whether 
they can lawfully find a Bill against biro, 
pending his Impeachment in Parliament, 
ibid. 247. — ^The Court inform them that they 
are not to take notice of the Impeachment, 
ibid. 249. — He pleads the pendency of the 
Impeachment in Abatement, ibid. 251. — 
Counsel are assigned him, ibid. 252. — ^The 
Attorney General demurs to the Plea, ibid. 
272. — ^Arguments for the Demurrer, ibid. 
281. — ^Arguments of the Prisoner's Counsel 
in support of the Plea, ibid. 282. — Reply of 
the King's Counsel, ibid. 311.— The Court, 
without giving their Reasons, give Judgment 
against the Plea, Dolben Justice dubitante, 
ibid. 326. — He pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 327. 
—His Trial upon the Plea of Not Guilty, at 
the Bar of the Court of King's Bench, ibid. 
330. — The Court refuse to examine him, 
respecting the Murder of Sir E. Godfrey, 
ibid. 331. — Substance of the Indictment, 
ibid. 336. — The King's Counsel open the 
Case against him, ibid. 339. — Evidence 
against him, ibid. 342. — Evidence for him, 
ibid. 363. — His Defence, ibid. 377.— Reply 
of the King's Counsel, ibid. 379. — Chief 
Justice Pemberton's Charge to the Juiy, 
ibid. 385.— The Jury find him Guilty, 
ibid. 391. — Judgment of Treason passed 
upon him, ibid. 392. — Writs of Execution 
against him, ibid. 393. — ^His Execution, ibid. 
394. — His Declaration while under Sentence 
of Death, ibid. 396. — A Narrative of bis 
Conversation in the Tower with Dr. Haw- 
kiD8| ibid. 399,— Strict! *«» upon this Nar« 



TH£ STATE TRIALS. 



4iS 



ntive, ibid. 411. — Remarks upon bis Trial 
by Sir John HaWles, ibid. 425. 

FITZHERBERT, Sir Antbony, Justice of 
C. P. 26 Hen. 8, 1 vol. 398. 

FITZ-JAMES, Sir John, Chief Justice of 
R. B. 26 Hen. 8, 1 vol. 387. — He was one 
of the Judges who presided at the Trial of 
John Fisher, Bishop of Rochester, for High 
Treason, in denying the King's Supremacy, 
1 vol. 398. 

FUZPATRICK, Hugh.— His Trial at the Bar 
of the Court of King's Bench in Ireland, 
upon an Ex-officio information for a Libel 
upon the Duke of Richmond, Lord Lieuten- 
ant, 53 Geo. 3, 1813, 31 vol. 1169.— The In- 
formation, ibid. ib. — Speech of the Attorney 
Genera] for the Prosecution, ibid. 1173.— 
Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 1185. — 
Mr. Burrows's Speech for the Defendant, ibid. 
1188. — Evidence for the Defendant, ibid. 
1205. — Reply of the Solicitor General, ibid. 
121 1 . — Chief Justice Downes's Charge to the 
Jury, ibid. 1229.— The Jury find the De- 
fendant Guilty, ibid. 1234. — Proceedings on 
an Application to the Court to set aside the 
Verdict, ibid. ib. — The Motion is refused, 
ibid. ib. — On a Notice of an intended Appli- 
cation to arrest the Judgment, the Defend- 
ant is admitted to Bail, ibid. 1241; 

FTTZPATRICK, Laurence. See Audley, 
Mervin, Lord. — ^Trials of him, and Giles 
Brodway, at the Bar of the King's Bench, 
for Rape and Sodomy, 7 Car. 1, 1631> 3 vol. 
419.— They are both found Guilty, ibid. 420. 
—Letter from the Judges to the Lord Keeper, 
respecting their Execution, ibid. ib. — ^They 
confess their Guilt at the place of Execution, 
ibid. 421. 

FLEETWOOD, George, 5 vol. 1005. See 
Regicides. 

FLEMING, Sir ThoAas, Chief Baron of the 
Exchequer, 3 Jac. 1, 2 vol. 159.— His Argu- 
ment in the Great Case of Impositions, 2 
vol. 387. 

, Chief Justice of 
K. B. 10 Jac. 1, 2 vol. 770. 

FLETA. See Bracton. 

FLETCHER, Andrew, of Saltoun. See Mm- 
mouthy James, Duke o/i— Mr» Laing's Account 
of him, 11 vol. 1049 (note). 

FLETCHER, George.— His Trial for High 
Treason, in being concerned in the Rebel- 
lion of 1745, 20 Geo. 2, 1746, 18 vol. 353. 
—Evidence against him, ibid. ib. — His De- 
fence, ibid. 357.— The Jury find him Guilty, 
ibid. 358. — He is executed, ibid. ib. 

FLOWER, Benjamin. — Proceedings on his 
Commitment by the House of Lords, for a 
Breach of Privilege, in publishing a libel 
on the Bishop of Llandaif, 39 Geo. 3, 1799, 
27 vol. 985.— Preface to this Case, ibid. ib. 
— Order of the House of Lords for bringing 
him to the Bar, ibid« 1001 .—His Speech io 



the House of Lords, on being brought to the 
Bar, ibid. 1004. — Debate in the House, 
upon the Punishment to be inflicted upon 
him, ibid 1012. — He is committed to New- 
gate for Six Months, and until he pays a Fine 
of £100, ibid. 1016.— Mr. Clifibrd moves 
the Court of King^s Bench on his behalf, for 
a Habeas Corpus, ibid. 1021. — ^The Court 
grant the Writ, ibid. 1023.— Mr. Clifford's 
Argument in the Court of King's Bench, for 
his discharge upon the Return to the Habeas 
Corpus, ibid. 1025. — ^The Court refuse to 
discharge him, ibid. 1062. — Mr. Clifford's 
Postcript to this Case, ibid. 1065. — ^The 
Bishop of Llandaff's Notice of the Proceed- 
ings azainst Flower, in the Anecdotes of his 
Life, ibid. 1005 (note). 

FLOYDE, Edward.— Proceedings in Parlia- 
ment against him, for scandalizing the 
Princess Palatine and her Husband, 19 Jac. 
1, 1621, 2 vol. 1153. — Sentence of the House 
of Commons against him, ibid. ib. — Discus- 
sions between the Lords and Commons 
respecting a power of Judicature in the 
latter, ibid. 1155. — Proceediugs against him 
in the House of Lords, ibid. 11 57.— The At- 
torney GeneraVs Charge, ibid, ib.— Floyde's 
Answer, ibid. 1158. — He is found Guilty, 
and sentenced by the Lords, ibid. 1159. — 
Extracts from the Oxford Debate^, and the 
Parliamentary Journals, respecting these 
Proceedings, 8 vol. 92. 

FOGG, Christopher. See Kirkby, Colonel 
Richard, 

FORD, John, Counsel.— His Speech for the 
Defendant, on the Trial of John Owen, for a 
Libel, 18 vol. 1223. — His Argument for Lord 
Lovat, on his Trial for High Treason, in 
Support of an Objection to the Admissibility 
of the Evidence of Murray of Broughton 
against him, ibid. 614. 

FORD, William. See Messenger, Peter. 

FORDWICH, Lord, ^ee Finch, John, Lord. 

FORREST, an Observant Friar.— He was 
hanged and burned, in the Reign of Henry 
the Eighth, for denying the King's Supremacy, 
and holding heretical Opinions, 1 vol. 478. 

FORRESTER, Alexander, Counsel. — His 
Argument for Lord Lovat, in Support of an 
Objection to the Admissibility of the Evi- 
dence of Murrny of Broughton against 
him, 18 vol. 611. 

FORSEITH, Edward. See Dawson, Joseph. 

FORTESCUE, Sir Adrian.— He was attainted 
and executed, "With Thomas Dingley and 
Robert Granceter, in the Reign'of Henry the 
Eighth, for denying the King's Supremacy, 
1 vol. 482. 

FORTESCUE, Sir John. See Aland, Sir John 
Fortescue, 

FORTESCUE, Sir John. See Goodwin, Sir 
Francis. 

FORTESCUE. Sir John, Chief Justice, of 
England aua tord ChaQcellor,^ChiefJu9« 



40 



©FNiBAt INDEX f6 



iiQfi Fi|K*i in W» Aigumwt ia feTonr of 

Stip-MonQy., d^njea tliat Forte^due wa» ever 
Lonl Cbsncellor, 3 vol. 122^. 

FOSTER. James.— His Account of the beha- 
viour or Lord Kilmarnock from the time of 
his Trial until his Ei^eciition, 18 vol. 503. 

yOSTEB. Midi^el, Co!jQ^^l,r^A<jcoum of a 
Tract upqp the Ecclesiastical L^w of J^ng- 
Is^lt^y ifritten by hin^ before h^ beoafse a 
Judg^y ^ vol. 157 (note). 



-——, Serjeant at taw, and Re- 
corder gf Bristol. — His Argument in favour 
of the legality of Pre^ssing Seamen, contained 
m his Charg? to the Jury on the Trial of 
Alexander Broadfobt^ for Murder, 18 vol. 
1326.— His Charge to the Jury on the Trial 
of Captain Goodere and Matthew Mahony, 
for theMurderof his Brother, Sir John Dinely 
Goodere, 17 vol. 1067.— His Charge to the 
Jury on the Trial of Charles White for the 
same Murder, ibid. 1089. — ^His Address to 
Qoodere, Mahony, and White, on passing 
Sentence of Death upon them, ibid. 1091. 

-, Sir Michael, Judge of K. B. 20 Geo. 



2.— His Arguipent on delivering his Judg- 
mei^tin the Case of the Kinlochs, respecting 
^he power of the Coi^rt to discharge a Jury 
in capital Cases, 18 vol. 40Tr-^His Charge 
to the Grand Jury, assembled under a Spepial 
Commission at Chichester, for the Trial of 
certain Smugglers for the Murder of Wm. 
Chater ftnd Daniel Gaily, ibid. 1069. — His 
Charge to the Jury on that Trial, ibid. 1106. 
— His, Report of Francis Tqwnley's Case, 
ibid* 329.T-His Heport of Deacon-s Case, 
ibid. 3^6. — His Report of John Berwick's 
Cf»s^, ibid* 369. — His Report of Alexander 
Mac prowther's Case, ibid, 392.— -His 
Report of the C^e of the Kinlochs, ibid. 
896.— His Report QfSir John Wedderburn's 
Ca^e, ibi4. 42T. — His. Report of Charies 
Ratcfiffe's Case, ibid. 429.— ^is Report of 
-^neas Macdonald's Case, ibid. 857. — His 
Aocount of the steps taken preparatory to 
the Trials of the Rebels in 1745, 18 vol. 829. 
—His Report of Dr. Cameron's Case, 19, vol. 
735. — Hip Report of the Judgment of the 
Court in Iftacdaniers Case, ibid. 801. 

FOSTER, Sir Robert, Chief Justice of K. B. 
13 Gar. 2, 6 vol. 74, 205.— He persuades 
Charles the Second to sign the Warrant for 
the Execution of Sir Henry Vane, notwith- 
af%Q4ii^ the Petitions of both Houses of 
parliament on hia behalf, 6 ypl. 188. 

FOUNTAINHALL, Lord.— His Notice of the 
Case of William Iiowrie, of Blackwood, 9 
vol. 1021. — Extracts from his " Decisions '' 
respecting the Case of Robert Baillie, of 
Jemswoqd, 10 vol, 05^ (note).— His Notice 
of Spreuirs Case for Treason, ibid. 727 
(note) — Extracts from liis '^ Decisions ^' 
respecting the Proceedings against Sir Hugh 
Campbell of Cesnock, for Treason, ibi^. 977. 
i^Kxtracis res|)ectin^ the C^se of the Earl 



qf iQudoMfP, forTi^^sop, ibii, J»4lc— |Iis 
Account of th^ proqe^ings against th? Fife- 
shire Heritors for absentine ihemselvQ^ frooi 
the King's Host, 11 vol. 40. — ^His Nari^tive 
of the Case of Charles, Earl of Lauderdale, 
and others, foi officii Malversatioivs re^pepl- 
ing the Mint of Scotland, ibid. 157.— rflis 
Account of the Proceedings in an A^zq of 
^rr<>r ^gainst Alexander Blair an4 oljier 
Jurprs for returning a false Verdict, ibid. 
100. — His Account of the Pypo^edings 
against the Lanarkshire Men for peing CQ%- 
cerned in the Rebellion at Bothwell Bridge, 
ibid. 245 (note). — His Account of the t*ro- 
ceedings against Arcl^er and others for 
Treason, ibid. 889 (note). — His ApcouBt of 
a curious Litigation between Sir John Dai- 
ry i^ple and Grahame of Claverhouse, it>id. 
946.— -His Notice of the Trial of David 
Mowbray for a Tumult in Burgh, ibid. 1003 
(note).— -His Account of the Proceedings in 
Scotland against persons who co-operated 
with the Duke ot Monmouth's Rebellion, 
ibid. 1023 (note). — ^His Account of the pro- 
ceedings against Dr. Gilbert Burnet, ibid. 
1 103 (note). — His Account of the Case of 
John Love and others for Rebellion and 
Treason, 12 vol. 568. — His Remarjts on the 
Ca&e of John Renwick, ibid. 585. — His 
Notice of the Case of the Campbells of Allan- 
greig, 13 vol. 787 (note^.— His Particulars 
tespecting th^ Qkse. of Pa^id RsMllie f^^r 
defaming, the DvJce of Queen^ib^ri^y vskd the 
Marquist of Anpandale, 14 vol^ 1055, 

FQWKE, J[oseph and Fraocis. See Jjfif^o* 
comar, 

FOWLIS, Sir I>avid.~-PraceediBg^ in^ the 
Star-Chambex against him, Su Thotiey^ l^y- 
ton, and Henry Fowlis, fer oppos.tn^ the 
King's Service, and traducing l^is Oikef s> of 
State, 9 Car. 1, 1633, 3 vol. 585— This 
Prosecution was promoted by Lord Went- 
worth, afterwards Lord Strafford, ibid. ib. — 
Information against them, ibid. ib. — ^Their 
Answer^ ibid. 590. — Sentence against Sir 
David and Henry Fowlis, ibid. 59 1. — 
Sic Thomas Layton is dismissed, ibid. 592. 
— Sir D. Fowlis and Sir Thoijiias Layton, 
were afterwards material \Yitnesses against 
Lord Strafford on his Trial, ibid. 1422. 

FOWLIS, Henry, ^ee Fowlis^ Sir David. 

FOX, Charles James. — His Evidence, on the 
Trial of Home Tooke for High Treasp.n, 25 
yol. 370. — His Remarks on the Popish Plot, 
extracted from his Historical Work, 6 vol. 
1403. — His Remarks upon the Executibo of 
Charles the First, 4 vol. 1145. — Hia Remarks 
on the mode of estimating the degree of 
Credit due ta the Peclarations of XXying 
Men, 11 vol. 885. 

yO.X, George. See Crook, John, — Proceed- 
ipgs against him for refusing the. Oath of 
Obedience, 16 Car. 2, 1,664^ 6 vol. 629.— 
He refusegi th^ Os^th, ibid. 634. -^Judgment 



agaii^ hini is uri)^^ on fudefj^ct in ^he 
)^ic|mep|9 ibid. 644.-^Tl^e Oath is tender- 
ed to bifn ^ain, i^pd op his rQ^usal to t^ke 
it, I, n^w Ti^^i^tO^^Q^ ^ PF^ferred against 
t^ff^^ ibid. 64IL 

FOX, Somerset. Seo Oerftord, ^/afta. 

FEAVp£;S, BQ^rt.-rrHis Trial m |he Old 
Q^ilej for th^ Murder of Thpma9 Danger- 
fift)4, 1 JaQ. J}, 1685, U Tpl. 503,— He is 
found pujUy, ^l(i(l< 505.— If i^ Spee<}h at the 
)))aQe of Exeicijtiqni il^id- 507. 

FRAl^CIA, Francis.-^fiis Trial at the Old 
BailejF for High Treason in conapiring to 
levy war against the King in favour of the 
Prgtefider, 3 Geo. 1, 1717, 15 yol. ^97.— 
The Indictment, ibid. 90^.— Opening 
Speeches of the Counsel for the Prosecution, 
imd. 803.-?-£Tidence ior the Prosecution, 
ibid. &13.-7T-Mr. Horace Walpole's Bvidence, 
ibid. 915.'TrrHi^ Itefenc^, ibid» Q60.-^£vi- 
depce in support of the Defence, ibid* 961. — 
Bcp^y of Uiie Cxuinsel for the Prosecution, 

. ibid. 975.-«r-The Chief Baron Buiy charges 
the Jury» ibid. 985.^— The Jury acquit him, 
ibid.ddC 

FRANCIS, Ph»ip.r-His Evidence on Hardy's 
Trial for High Treason,' 24 vol. 1104. 

FRANCRLIN, Richard.— His Trial at West- 
minster for rublishing a $editipus Libel in 
Ihe praftsptt^n, 5 Qeo. 3^ 1731, 17 vol. 625. 
rr-Oj^euing Speeches of the Counsel for the 
Prosecution, ibid, ib, — !Evidpnc,e for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 636. — Mr. Fazakerly's 
Speech in his Defence, ibid. 649.'^Mr. 
sootle's Speech on the same side, ibid. 654. 
— Evidence for the Defence, ibid. 660. — 
The Attorney General's Reply, ibid. 664.^- 
Chief Justice Raymond's Charge to the 
Jery, ibid. 671. — ^Tbe Jury find him Guilty, 
ibid. 676. — He is sentenced to pay a Fine 
of 100/. and find Security for seven years, 
^d. ib. — Proceedings on a Motion to set 
aside the Verdict, 22 vol. 972 (note). 

FRANKLIN, Jaro.es,— -His Trial, as an Acces- 
sary before the Fact, to the Murder of Sir 
Thomas Overbury, 13 Jac. 1, 161 5, 2 vol.947. 
— He is fouiid Giiiity, and executed, il?i4. 948. 

Fa^SER, Charles, Lord.^Amot's Abridg- 
ment of his Trial in Scotland for High 
Treason, in proclaiming the Pretender as 
Ijivful King; 1693^ 15 vol. 727. 

FRASpR, Thomas.*^Proceedings in Scotland 
against him. Captain Simon Fraser, after- 
f a(4s the cejlebrated Simon, Lord Lovat^ 
and others for Treason and other Criwes, 
10 Will. 3, If 9fe, 14 vol. 349.--Criminal 
Letters .^inist thepo,^ Jbid. ib. — Witnesses 
against them, ibid. 3^4.— The Asfize find 
them Guilty, ibid. 372. — Sentence of Death 
f r^Doniced, ibid. 373.-r^Amot says, that this 
IS the only instance of a Trial before the 
CQyi^jt of Justiciary in the absence of the 
ity accused since the Revolutiori; ibid. 

>i|ii Remaps u^on this Trial^ ibi(J. ^b. 



FMSER^WiUiaii^. ^^^^^ybtff'tm^Ale^0l(l4er. 
FREEMAN, Richard. See BUkmgiim, Z!|fw. 






FREIJfP, Sir John. See Porlcyns, Sir WiRfgrn. 
Cook, iSMrac&.-^His Trial at the Old 
Bailey for High Treason in corispiring to pro- 
cure and assist in an Invasion from France, 
8 Will. 3, 1696, 13 vol. 1.— The Indictment, 
ibid. 3.^He pleads Not Guilty, ibid. &-^ 
The Attorney General's Opening ^peech 
fqr fhe Pro^ecutipn, ibjd. 12.-^Evide]^ce 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 18.; — He objects 
xq the Evidence of Papists agaipsit l^m, 
bi^t the Objection is overruled, ibid. 32, 
43. — Evidence for him, ibid. ^2.— fhe 
Solicitor (GeneraVs RepljS i^jd. 48l— :Lprd 
Holt's Charge \o the -Jury, ibid. 55, — 
He i^ found' Guilty, ibid. 63.— And sen- 
tenced to Death, il)id, 64.— Paper deliveired 
by hin^ to the Sheriff at his Execution; ibid. 
136. — An Account of what passed at his 
Execution, ibid. 406. 

FREND, William.— Proceedings ip tbf Uni- 
versity of Car^bridge, ^d iii th^ Coi|rt of 
King's Bench respecting him, for publish- 
ing a Scandalous Pamphlet^, 33 and 34 O.eo. 
3, 1793-1794, ?2 vol. 523.— He is cited to 
appear in the Vice- Cl^ancellor*s Court, ibid. 
526. — Proceedings in ttle Vice-Chancellor's 
Court, ibid. 527.— Articles of Accusation, 
ibid. 530. — Evidence called hy the Pro- 
moter, ibid. 535.— The Promoter sums up 
the Eifidenc^, ib^<l, ^p4,'-r■^r. Ffepd^ 
Speech in his Defence, ibid. 571.— Tlie 
Promoter's Reply, ibid. 621. -^The Court 
find him Guilty, aai recjuire him to retract, 
ibid. 625. — He refuses to sign a Recanta- 
tion, ibid. 630,— -The Vice-Chancellor's 
Spei^ch on delivering the Sentence of the 
Court, ibid. 631. — Sentence of Banishment 
passed upon him, ibid. 640. — Mr. Frend 
appeals to ihe Court of Delegate^, ibid. 641. 
— Proceedings in the Court of Delegates, 
ibid. 642. — Mr. Frend states his Causes of 
Appeal, ibid. 65T.— The Court of Delegates 
confirm the Proceedings in the Vice-Chan- 
cellor's Court, ibid. 670. — Proceedings in 
the Court of King's Bench, upon an appli- 
cation by Mr. Frend for a Mandamus, ibid. 
677.— The Court of King's Bench refuse a 
Mandamus, ibid. 690. — Mr. Frend's Ac 
count of the Grounds on which his Applica- 
tion to the Court of King's Bench was 
founded, ibid. 701. — ^Proceedings of Jesus 
College, Cambridge, against him, ibid. 733. 
— ^The Master and Fellows resolve to re- 
move him from the College, ibid. 737.-r-ile 
appeals to the Visitor, ibid. 738.^— Answer 
of the Master and Fellows to ^e Appeal, 
ibid. 740.— Mr, Frend's Reply thereto, ibid, 
746.— The Visitor dismisses (he Appeal, 
ibid. 751. — Mr. Frend applies to the Court 
of King's Bench for a Mandamus to the 
Visitor, ibid. 752.— The Application is re- 
fused, ibid. 753. 

FJRXyH, jQlmt— PxQQeedinfs pn a Ch^e of 



46 



GENEkAL Index to 



High Treason against htm for throwing a 
Stone at the King, 30 Geo. 3, 1790, 22 vol. 
307. — Counsel for the Prosecution and for 
the Prisoner, ibid. 309. — A Jury is sworn to 
try whether he is sane, ibid. 311. — Evidence 
of his Insanity, ibid. 312.— The Jury find 
him Insane^ ibid. 318. 

FROISSART.-His Narrative of Tresilian's 
Apprehension, 1 vol. 116 (note). 

FROST, John.— His Trial in the Court of 
King's Bench for Seditious Words, 33 Geo. 
3, 1793, 22 vol. 471.— The Indictment, ibid, 
ib.— Speech of the Attorney General for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 474. — Evidence for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 482.— Mr. Erskine's 
Speech in his Defence, ibid. 488. — ^The At- 
torney General's Reply, ibid. 509. —Lord 
Kenyon*s Charge to the Jury, ibid. 514. — 
The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 519.— Judg- 
ment of the Court upon him, ibid. ib. 

DULLER, WiUiam.— His Trial at the Guild- 
hall of London, for publishing a Scandalous 
L.ibel, 1 Anne, 1702, 14 vol.517.— Proceed- 
ings in Parliament which gave occasion to 
this Trial, ibid. ib. — The Indictment, ibid. 
526 (note). — Evidence against him, ibid. 
533. — He is found Guilty, ibid. 536. 

FULTHORPE, Sir Roger, Judge of C. P. 
See Belkrtap, Sir Robert, 

GAGE, Robert. See Ahington, Edward. 

GARDINER, Stephen, Bishop of Winchester. 
— Proceedings against him for opposing the 
Reformation, 5 Edw. 6, 1551, 1 vol. 551. 
— Charges against him, ibid. ib. — He is 
sent to the Fleet, ibid. 554.— His Letter 
respecting the destruction of Images at 
Portsmouth, ibid. ib. — His Abuse of the 
Lollards, ibid. 555.— ^His Defence of the 
Worship of Images, ibid. ib. — His Corres- 
pondence with the Lord Protector respect- 
ing the Suppression of the Reformation, ibid. 
557. — He defends the observance of Lent, 
ibid. 567. — ^He contends for the King's dis- 
pensing Power, ibid. 583. — Articles pro- 
posed to him, with his Answers thereto, 
ibid. 602. — ^Letter from the King and Coun- 
cil, commanding him to subscribe certain 
Articles, acknowledging the King's Supre- 
macy, ibid. 621. — He subscribes to these 
Articles, ibid. 623. — Other Articles, con- 
taining a general Submission to the King, 
proposed to him, ibid. 624. — He refuses to 
sign the Submission absolutely, and the 
other Articles whilst in prison, ibid. 626. — 
His Benefices are sequestered, ibid. 627. — 
He is called before the Archbishop of 
Canterbury and other Commissioners, and 
certain other Articles are proposed to him, 
ibid. 628. — The Commissioners remove 
him from his Bishoprick by a definitive 
sentence, ibid« ib. — ^He protests against the 
Sentence, ibid. 629. — On the Accession of 
Mary he is made Lord Chancellor, and re- 



stored to his Bishoprick, ibid. 632. — ^He 
was a man of Learning, ibid. ib. — His con- 
versation with Sir James Hales, on his ap- 
pearance in Westminster Hall to take the 
Oath as Judge of C. P. on the Accessidn of 
Queen Mary, ibid. 714. 

GARDINER, Sir Thomas, Recorder of Lon« 
don. — He was one of Lord Strafford's 
Counsel, 3 vol. 1472.— He was also assigned 
of Counsel for Sir Edward Herbert, on his 
Impeachment for High Crimes and Misde- 
meanours, 4 vol. 127. — Articles of Impeach* 
roent against him, 18 Car. 1, 1642, ibid. 
167. 

GARLAND, Augustine, 5 voL 1005, 1215. 
^See Regicides, 

GARNET, Henry.— His Trial at Westminster 
for High Treason in being concerned in the 
Gunpowder Plot, 4 Jac. 1, 1606, 2 vol. 217. 
— Sir Edward Coke opens the Charge against 
him, ibid. 219. — Gramet's Defence, ibid. 
233. — He says that he knew of the Plot 
only from Auricular Confession, ibid. 241. — 
The Attorney General replies, ibid. 245. — 
The Earl of Nortliampton's Address to 
Garnet, ibid. 247, 259. — Garnet excuses 
himself that his only Knowledge of the Plot 
was derived from Sacramental Confession, 
which he was bound not to disclose, ibid. 
255.— The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 259. 
— Judgment against him, ibid. 355. — His 
Execution, ibid. ib. 

GARROW, William, Counsel, 22 vol. 309, 
756, 24 vol. 238, 25 vol. 1155, 26 vol. 
8, 1218, 27 vol. 821, 28 vol. 356, 529, 
29 vol. 1, 423, 30 vol. 990, 31 vol. 83, 
121. — His Speech for the Prosecution on 
the Trial of Codling and others, for destroy- 
ing the Brig Adventure, 28 vol. 185. — His 
Speech for the Defendant in the Case of 
Troy V, Symonds, for a Libel in the Anti- 
jacobin Review, 29 vol. 519. — His Speech 
for the Prosecution on the Trial of Governor 
Picton for a Misdemeanour in inflicting the 
Torture upon Luisa Calderon, in the Island 
of Trinidad, ibid. 451. — His Speech for the 
Prosecution on the second Trial of Governor 
Picton, ibid. 805. — His Speech in Reply in 
the same Case, ibid. 849. 

, Sir William, Attorney General.— 

His Speech for the Defendant on Hatchard's 
Trial for a Libel, published in a Report of 
the African Institution, 32 vol. 698. 

' , Baron of the Exche- 

quer. — Ilis Charge to the Jury on the Trial 
of Davidson and Tidd for High Treason, in 
being concerned in the Cato-street Con* 
spiracy, 33 vol. 1481. 

GASCGIGNE, Sir Bernard. See Lmu, iSr 
Charles, 

GASCGIGNE, Sir Thomas.— His Trial at the 
Bar of the Court of King's Bench for High 
Treason, in being concerned in the Popikh 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



49 



Plot, 32 Car. 2, 1680, 7 vol. 959.— The 
Indictment, ibid. 960.^— He pleads Not 
dniltjr, ibid. 963.-^The King's Counsel open 
the Case, ibid. 967. — Bolron's Evidence 
against him, ibid. 970. — Further Evidence 
against him, ibid. 999. — Evidence for him, 
ibid. 1011. — The King's Counsel reply, ibid. 
1032. — Mr. Justice Jones's Charge to the 
Jury, ibid. 1036. — ^The Jury acquit him, ibid. 
1044. — Account of Bolron, and of the cir- 
cumstances which led to his accusation of 
Sir T. Gascoigne, ibid. 974 (note). 

GATES, Sir John. — He is condemned and 
executed, vnth Sir Andrew Dudley, Sir 
Henry Gates, and Sir Thomas Palmer, for 
High Treason in maintaining the title of 
Lady Jane Grey to the Crown, 2 Mary, 1554, 
1 vol. 767. 

GAUNT, Elizabeth. See Fendey, John. 

GAVESTON, Piers.— Proceedings in Parlia- 
ment against him in the reigns of Edward 
the First and Edward the Second, 1 vol. 21. — 
Ordinance of Banishment against him, ibid. 
22. — He is put to death by the Earl of 
Warwick, ibid. 24. 

GAWDY, Francis, Queen's Serjeant, 28 Eliz. 
1 vol. 1173, 1233. 

, Judge of K. B. 1 Jac. 1, 
— He was one of the Judges on the Trial of 
Sir Walter Raleigh at Winchester, 2 vol. 1. 

GAWDY, Sir Thomas, Judge of K. B. 28 
Eliz. 1 vol. 1251, 1315, 1334.— He was one 
of the Commissioners appointed to try 
Mary, Queen of Scots, 1 vol. 1167. 

GAYRE, Sir John, Lord Mayor of London. — 
Proceedings against him and other Members 
of the Corporation of London, for encourag- 
ing tumults against the House of Commons, 
23 Car. 1, 1647, 4 vol. 959. — An Account 
of the Events which immediately preceded 
these Proceedings, ibid. ib. — Articles of 
Impeachment delivered against them, ibid. 
980. — ^Tbe Proceedings against them are 
discontinued, ibid. ^3. 

GEDDES, James.— His Trial with John 
Crawfoord at Edinburgh, for drinking the 
health of the Pretender, and cursing the 
King, 1 Geo. 1, 1715, 17 vol. 799. 

GERARD of Brandon, J^rd. -— Narcissus 
Luttrell's Account of his Trial for High 
Treason in being concerned in the Rye-House 
Plot, 1685, 10 vol. 1414. — Remarks upon this 
Trial in Mr. Attwood's Review of Chief 
Justice Herbert's Account of the Authorities 
in law upon which the Judgment of the 
Court in Sir Edward Hales's Case was 
founded, 11 vol. 1305. — He was afterwards 
Earl of Macclesfield, and is supposed 
to have been the Husband of the celebrated 
Countess of Macclesfield, the Mother of 

. Savage, the Poet, ibid. ib. 

GERPLARO, John.— His Trial before the 
High Court of Justice, vrith Peter Vowell 
VOIi,XXXXV, 



and Somerset Fox, for High Treason in 
conspiring to murder the Protector, -^6 Car. 
2, 1654, 5 vol. 517. — Fox pleads Guilty, 
ibid. 522. — Gerhard and Vowell plead Not 
Guilty, ibid. ib. — The Attorney-General 
opens the Charge against them, ibid. ib. — 
Evidence against them, -ibid* 524. — ^They 
are found Guilty, apd sentenced to be 
hanged, ibid. 531. — Fox is reprieved, ibid, 
ib.— Execution of Gerhard, ibid, ib— ^ 
Vowell's Speech on the Scaffold, ibid^ 5)37. 

GERRALD, Joseph.— His Trial at Edinburgh 
for Sedition in being a Member of an un- 
lawful Assembly, 34 Geo. ^, 1794, 23 vol. 803. 
— He applies to the Court to assign him 
Counsel, which is done, ibid, ib, — He objects 
to the Lord Justice Clerk sitting on the Bench 
during his Trial, on the ground of certain Ex- 
pressions charged to have been used by him, 
ibid. 808. — ^The Court overrule the Objec- 
tion, ibid. 809.— The Indictment, ibid. 814. 
— Mr. GilUes's Argument against its Rele- 
vancy, ibid. 827.— Mr. Montgomery's Argu- 
ment in support of its Relevancy, ibid. 853. 
— Argument of the Solicitor General on the 
same side, ibid. 865. — Mr. Laing's Argu- 
ment in Reply, ibid. 869. — The Court de- 
cide that the Indictment is relevant, ibid. 
889. — Gerrald objects to one of the Jury 
that he had said, ** he would condemn any 
Member of the British Convention," ibid. 
899. — The Objection is overruled, ibid. ib. 
— He objects to another Juror that, he is 
Tailor to the King, ibid. 902.— The Objec* 
tion is overruled, ibid. 903. — Evidence for 
the Crown, ibid.ib. — Speech of the Solicitor 
General for the Prosecution, ibid. 933. — Mr. 
Gerrald's Speech in his Defence, ibid. 947. 
— The Court sum up the Evidence, ibid. 
997.— The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 1002. 
— Mr. Gillies objects to the Verdict, ibid. 
1003. — ^The Court overrule the Objection, 
ibid. 1005. — He is sentenced to Transporta* 
tion for Fourteen years, ibid. 1007. — He dies 
soon after his arrival in New Holland, ibid. 
14J2. 

GIBBON, John. See New Romney. 

GIBBONS, John.— His Trial before the High 
Court of Justice, foe High Treason in plot- 
ting against the Commonwealth in corres- 
dondence with Charles the Second, 3 Car. 2, 
1651, 5 vol. 267. — He petitions for Counsel, 
but is refiised, ibid. 269. — He pleads Not 
Guilty, ibid. ib. — Substance of the Charge 
against him, ibid. ib. — ^The Evidence against 
him, ibid. 270. — His Defence, ibid. 274. — 
Sentence of Death passed upon him, ibid. 
285.— ^His Execution, ibid. ib. 

GIBBONS,*John.— His Trial with William 
Clarke and Thoriias Greville, for Perjury in 
their Evidence on the Trial of Mary Squires 
and Susannah Wells, 26 Geo. 2, 1753, 19 
vol. 275. — The Indictment against Gibbons, 
ibid. 277. — ^They are acquitted ftfr want of 
ProsecutioDjibid, 280, SeeCanrnVigi^taa^Aj 
£ 



50 



GENERAL INDEX t6 



OIBBSy NathlmioL See I^nge, Thomt, 

OIBBS^ Vicatt) Counsel^ STtoL 831.>— 96 vol. 
185.-^His Defence of Winterbotham for 
preaching a Seditious Sermon. 22 vol. 638. 
•^His Speech in Defence of Hardy, $4 vol. 
111d.^Hi« Speech in Defence of Home 
Tooke, 25 vol. 449. 

Sit Vicaiy, Solicitor General, 29 vol. 



423. 



- Attomev General^ 31 vol. 



81, 103, ft54, 369.— His Speech for the Pro- 

aecntioii on the Trial of Colonel Draper for 

a Libel, 30 vol. 990.-->His Speech for the 

Prosecution on the Trial of the Editors of 

' the Independent Whig for a Libel contained 

in Certain Strictares upon a Trial in the 

Adttiralty Court, ibid. 1156.^HiB Speech 

£oi the Prosecution on the Trial of the same 

persons for a Libel on Lord EUenboroogh, 

ibid. 1224. 

GIFFORD, Sir Robert, Solicitor General— 
' His Spejch in Reply on Watson*8 Trial for 
High Treason, 32 voK 536.— His Speech in 
Reply on the Trial of Brandreth for High 
Treason, ibid. 908. — His Speech for the 
Prosecution in Tumer^s Case for High 
Treason, ibid. 964. — His Reply in Ludlam*s 
Case, ibid. 1253.— His Speech for the Pro- 
secution in Weightman's Case, ibid. 1308. 

iiiii nm i M 1 1 1 ■ ■! ■ -■ Attorney General. — 



■MaBMi 



His Speech for the Proaecution on the Trial 
of liiistlewood for Treason in being con- 
certied in the Cato-Street Plot» 33 toU 716. 
--•Hia Reply for the Prosecution, on the 
Trial of Ings for the same Treason, ibid. 
im..^His Speech for the Prosecution, on 
Brunt's Trial for the same Treason, ibid. 
1181/M.His Reply for the Prosecution, on 
the Trial of Davidson and Tidd for the same 
Treason, ibid. 1466. 

GILBERT, Jeffery, Chief Baron of the 
Exchequer in Ireland. — Proceedings of the 
Irish House of Lords against him, John 
Pocklington, Esq., and Sir John St. Leger, 
Rniffht, Barons of the Exchequer in Ireland, 
for disobedience to an Order of the House, 
5 Geo. 1, 1719, 15 vol. 130 1. —Petition of 
the Sheriff of Kildare to the House of Lords, 
ibid, ib.— Report of a Committee of the 
Lords thereon, ibid. 1304. — Resolutions of 
the House upon the Report, ibid. 1314. 

GILCHRIST^ James.— He pleads Guilty to 
an Indictment for High Treason in being 
coQMraed In the Cato-Street Conspiracy, 
33 vol. 1541»-^He is pardoned on condition 
of being transported for Ufe, ibid. 1566. 

GILES, John.-^His Trial at the Old Bailey 
for assaulting and attempting to nrarder 
John Arnold, esq. 32 Car. 2^ 1680, 7 vol. 
1129.— The Indictment, ibid. 1130.— The 
Counsel for 4he Prosecution open the Case 
against him, ibid. 1131. — ^Mr. Arnold's Evi- 
deneei ibid. 1 1 35. — Further Endenoe against 
iMtti ibid. 1198.-*|iia D^eace^ ibid. 1144. 



>->ȣYidence in support of his Defence^ iMd. 
1145^— Jeffdries, the Recorder, chargea the 
Jury, ibid. 1152.— He is found Guilfcy, ibid. 
1159.— His Sentence^ ibid. ib. 

GILLIES, Adam, Advocate.— His Argument 
against the Relevancy of the Indictment 
against Joseph Gerrald on hi^ Trial for 
Sedition in the High Court of Justiciary, 
23 vol. 827. 

" Lord of Session, 33 vol. 
14. — HisArgumenton delivering his Opinion 
against the Relevancy of the Indictnaent in 
the Case of M*Kinley for Administering 
Unlavrfol Oaths, 33 vol. 502. 

GLANVILLE, John» Serjeant-at-LaW*— His 
Speech at a Conference between the Lords 
and Commons respecting the Liberty of the 
Subject, 3 vol. 200. 

GLANVILLE, Ranulph de, Chief Justice of 
England^ temp. Hen. 2. — His Work said by 
Mr* Selden to be of slight or no authority 
for direction in judgment of the laW| 8 toI. 
277. 

GLEN, George. See Green, Captain Thomas, 

GLENNAN, Andrew.~His Trial in Ireland, 
with several others, for a Conspiracy to kill 
John Hanlon, 36 Geo. 3, 1796, 26 vol. 437. 
—The Indictment, ibid. 438.— Speech of the 
Attorney General for the Prosecutioft, ibid. 
439« -Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 
442.— Mr. M'Nally's Speech for the Defend- 
ants, ibid. 454. — The Jury find them all 
Guilty, eicepting two, ibid. 457. — Lord 
Cloomeirs Address on passing Sentence 
upon those convicted, ibid. ib. 

GLOCESTER, Thomas, Duke of. See 2Ve- 
si/ian, jRo6er^.— *He is impeached^ with 
Richard Earl of Arundel Thomas, Earl of 
Warwick, Thomas Mortimer, and Sir John 
Cobham for High Treason in compelling 
Richard the Second to make the' Commission 
to tlie Council of Thirteen, and for convict- 
ing and executing Sir Simon Burleigh, 21 
Ric. 2, 1397, 1 vol. 125.— The Eari of 
Arundel pleads a special and general Pardon 
from the King but is convicted and sen- 
tenced to Death, ibid. 130.— The Duke of 
Glocester, though dead, convicted, and his 
Castles declared forfeited to the King, ibid, 
ib. — ^His Confession, ibid. 131. — John Hall-^ 
Confession of the manner of his Death, ibid. 
163.-^The Eari of Warwick is convicted, 
and banished for life to the Isle of Mao, 
ibid* 134. — Thomas Mortimer makes his 
escape^ ibid, ib* — Sir John Cofalmm pleads, 
as to the Commission, that all he did in 
relation to it was by the King^s licence, and 
vnth respect to Sir Simon Burkigh, that he 
was told by those then in power, 4at what 
he did was accordhig to the King's wish, 
ibid. 135*— He is convicted, and banished 
to the Isle of Jersey, ibid. 136. 

OIiYNNi J«ilD^ C9asati««>^H4» was ^lie of Ae 






THfi STATE T&IAXS. 



•eat of th« £ari of Stntford, 3 vol, 1421. 

»■ ■■ ■ Recorder of London. See 

HoQiSf t>enzU. — Proceedings against hiro^ 
Denzil HoUis, and several other persons on 
a Ckargo preferred against them by the 

. Army, 23 Car. 1, 1647, 4 vol. 857. 

Seijeant-at-LaW| 5 toI. 518, 



6 fol. 82« 229. 



h*mm 



Chief Justice of tho Upper 



fiends 8 Car. 2, 1657, 5 vol. 841« 

King's Ancient Serjeant. — He 




: 

I onens the Indictment on the Trial of Lord 
F Morley in the House of Lords for Murder, 
18 Car. 2, 1666, 6 vol. 776. 

GLYNN, John, Seneant at Law.-*-Hi8 Speech 
in Defence of John Almon, for publishing 
Jantus'8 Letter to the King, 20 vol. 831."— 
His Speech in Defence of John Miller, for 
re^pristing the same Letter, ibid. 878. — His 
Speech for the Plaintiff in the Case of Fabri- 
gas V. Mostyn, ibid. 85. — His Reply in the 
Mme Cue, ibid. 146 

GODFREY, Sir Edmondbury. See Atkins, 
iSsmue/.— Burnet*s Narrative of the Circuto- 
itances of his Disappearance and Death, 6 
vol. 1410, — Trial of Green and others for 
murdering him, 7 vol. 159. — Evidence re- 
specting uie state of his body when found, 
8 vol. 1378,1 389» 

GOLDING, Johtt««i^Proceeding8 against him 
and others for Piracy, though acting under 
a Commission from James the Second, 12 
voL 1269.-~>Dr. Oldish's Argument that 
they were not Pirates, ibid. ib. — They are 
tried and condemned, ibid. 1275. — ^Their 
Petition to the House of Peers, ibid. ib. 

GOLDWELL, Thomas. See Pole^ Cardinal, 

GOODENOUGH, Richard. See FUkingion, 
Thomai, , 

GOODERE, Captain Samuel.-*-His Trial with 
Matthew Mahony at the Bristol Gaol De- 
tivery, before Mr. Serjeant Foster, Recorder, 
for the Murder of Sir John Dinely Goodere, 
Bart. 14 Geo. 9, 1741, 17 vol. 1003.— The 
lodiotment, ibid. ib. — ^They plead Not Guilty, 
ibid. 1005. — Mr. Vernon's Speech for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 1009. — ^The Witnesses are 
ordered to withdraw, at the suggestion of the 
Prisoner's Counsel, ibid. 1015. — Evidence 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 1016.«-*Mahony's 
Confesnon before the Magistrates, ibid. 
1053. — Evidence for the Prisoner Goodere, 
ibid. 1057. — Reply of the Counsel for the 
l^rosecution, ibid. 1064.— The Recorder's 
Charge to the Junr, ibid. 1067.-^The Jury 
ind them both Guilty, ibid. 1079. — Sentence 
is passed upon them, ibid. 1090« — ^They are 
executed, ibid. 1094. 

GOODMAN, Dr. God^, Biihop of Glo- 



GOODMAN, JoKo, a Seoiinuy Piie9t.<* 
ceediB^i in Parliament rtspectbg the Kii 
Reprieval of him, after he h%d been capitd ^ 
convicted of High Treason, in remaining 
within the realm under the authority of the 
Pope> 1 6 Car. 1 , 1641, 4 vol. 59.— The King's 
Reasons for reprieving him, ibid^ 60.— I^ 
Remonstrance of both Houses of Parliament 
thereupon, ibid, ib.*— The King agrees to 
leave him at their disposal, ibid, 62.—- Good- 
man's Petition to the King to be left to the 
disposal of the Parliament, ibid. 64. 

GOODWIN, Sir Francis,*-The Case betwetn 
him and Sir John Portescue, relative to a 
return of Members to serve in Parliamont 
for the Count]^ of Bucks, 1 James 1, 1604, 
2 vol. 91.-*-Dispute between the Kiuj^ and 
the House of Commons, respecting his Re- 
turn, ibid. 94. — He writes a Letter to the 
Speaker and voluntarily vacates his Seat, 
ibid. 112. 

GORDON, Lord George.— His Trial in the 
Court of King's Bench at Westminster for 
High Treason, in having promoted the No, 
Popery Riots i n 1 780, 21 Geo. 3, 1 781 , 21 vol. 
485.— •The Indictment, ibid. 494. — Counsel 
for the prosecution and for the Prisoner, ibid. 
498. — Speech of the Attorney General for the 

^ Prosecution,ibid.499. — Evidence for the Pro-^ 
secution, ibid. 511. ^-Mr. Kenyon's Speech 
for the Prisoner, ibid. 546. — Evidence for 
the Defence, ibid. 562, — Mr. Erskine's 
Speech on summing up the Evidence for the 
Defonce, ibid. 587.--The Reply of the 
Solicitor General, ibid. 621.— 'Lord Mans- 
field's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 644.-"-The 
Jury find him Not Guilty, ibid. 647.^His 
Trial on an Ex-officio Information, for a 
Libel upon the Judges and the Administia- 
tionofthe Law, 27 Geo. 3, 1787, 22 vol. 
175.— -The Information, ibid. ib.^-'Cottnsel 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 183.—The Attor* 
ney General's Speech for the Prosecution, 
ibid. ib. — Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 
187.— The Libel, ibid. 189.— Lord George 
Gordon's Speech in his Defence, ibid. 196* 
—The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 209.— 
Trial and Conviction of Thos. Wilkins, for 
printing the same Libel, ibid, ib, — Wilkins is 
pardoned, ibid. 231.— Trial of Lord George 
Gordon for a Libel on the Queen of France, 
and the French Ambassador, ibid. 213. — 
The Information, ibid. 214.— Speech of the 
Attorney General for the Prosecution, ibid. 
221. — Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 
226.— He is found Guilty, ibid. 231.7^ 
Judgment of the Court upon bioi^ ibid. ib. 
—His extravagantConduct on being brourii^ 
into Court t9 give security for his good Be-* 
faaviour at the expiration of his imprison- 
ment, ibid. 235.-— Being unable to procure 
Bail for his good Behaviour, he is remanded 
to Prison, and remains there till his death, 
ibid. 236.— Mr. Burke's Notice of him, ibid « 
1253. 

GOBDOH^SuMMtt^WiUJMiy wtA 4Jiz^ 

£ 2 



52 



GENERAL INDlEX TO 



ander. -* Pi^eedings against them and 
others, in Scotland for Treason, 312 Car. 2, 
1680| 11 vol. 45. — ^The Indictment, ibid. ib. 
— Evidence against them, ibid. Gl.— They are 
found Guilty, and Sentence is passed upon 
them, ibid. 64.-nThe Council order Alexander 
Gordon to be put to the Torture, ibid. 51 
(note). 

GORING, Lord. See Holland, Earl of.—Ue 

was created a Peer by Charles the first in 

1628 with the title of Lord Goring, and in 

1644 he was advanced to the Earldom of 

• Norwich, 4 vol. 1 198 (note). 

GOULD, Henry, King's Serjeant.— He con- 
ducts the Evidence for the Crown in the 
' House of Commons, on the Bill of Attainder 
ag^ainst Sir John Fenwick, 13 vol. 546. 

Sir Henry, Judge of the Queen's 



Bench, 2 Ann, 14 vol. 852. 

GOULD, Sir Henry, Judge of C. P. 14 Geo. 3. 
— His- Charge to the Jury in the Case of 
• Fabrigas v. Mostyn, 20 voU.161. 

GOWRIE, John, Earl of. — ^Proceedings in the 
Scottish Parliament respecting him, Alex. 
Kuthven his Brother, Henry Ruthven, Hugh 
Moncrief, and Peter Eviott, for an attempt 
to murder James the First, 42 Eliz. 1600, 1 
vol. 1359. — ^The Ruthvens, Moncrief, and 
Eviott, are summoned, but do not appear, 
ibid. 1361. — Depositions of Witnesses re- 
specting the Transaction, ibid. 1363. — ^The 
Earl of Gowrie and Alexander Ruthven, his 
Brother, declared by the Parliament to have 
been guilty of High Treason, their Estates are 
confiscated, and their Bodies ordered to be 
hanged, drawn, and quartered, ibid. 1381. — 
The othiers adjudged guilty of Treason, and 
their property confiscated, ibid. 1383. — Ac- 
c6unt of the Gowrie Conspiracy, from Lord 
Somers*s Tracts, ibid. ib. 

GRAHAM, John.— His Trial in Scotland 
with Alexander Crawfoord, and Wm. Hogg, 
for drinking the Pretender's health, 1 Geo. 1, 
1715, 17 vol. 1. — The Indictment, ibid. ib. 
—Crawfoord confesses the Indictment, ibid. 
3. — Information for the King'sAdvocate, ibid . 

. 4. — Information for Graham, ibid. 16. — ^Tlae 
Court find the Libel relevant to infer an 
arbitrary punishment, ibid. 26.— The Assize 
find the Libel against Graham and Hogg 

. Not Proven, and against Crawfoord Proven, 
on bis own Confession, ibid. 29. — ^The Court 
fine Crawfoord 50/. ibid. 30. 

GRAHAME, John, of Claverhouse. See 
Dundee, Viscount, 

GRAHME, Sir Richard, Baronet, Viscount 
Preston in Scotland.— His Trial with John 
Ashton and Edmund Elliott, at the Old 
Bailey for High Treason in conspiring to 
overthrowthe Government, 2 Will, and Mary, 
1691, 12 vol. 645.— The Indictment, ibid. 

' 646. — ^Lord Preston, on his Arraignment, 
objects that he is a Peer of England, ibid. 

- ^58.«i-Tb^ Court oyerrule the objectioa on 



' his not being able to produce his Patent; ibid. 
656. — ^The Court deny him a Copy of the 
Indictment, ibid. 658.— He pleads Not 
Guilty, ibid. 665.— Ashton and Elliot, also 
plead Not Guilty, ibid. 666.— Tbey elect to 
be tried severally, ibid. 673. — ^The Solicitor 
General (Somers) opens the Case against 
Lord Preston, ibid. 678. — ^Evidence against 
him, ibid. 685. — His Defence, ibid. 726. 
— Lord Holt's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
730.*— Chief Justice PoUexfen addresses 
the Jury, ibid. 741. — ^The Jury find him 
Guilty, ibid. 745.— Ashton's Trial, ibid. 747. 
— Serjeant Thompson opens the Case, ibid. 
749.— Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 
752.— His Defence, ibid. 788.— He calls 
Evidence to his religious Character, ibid. 
792. — Serjeant Thompson's Reply, ibid. 
800.— Lord Holt's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
803. — Chief Justice Pollexfen's Address 
to the Jury, ibid. 810. — He is found Guilty, 
ibid. 813. — ^Judgment of Treason is passed 
upon them, ibid. 816. — Lord Preston is 
pardoned, but Ashton is executed, ibid. 817. 
— Paper deliver&d by Ashton to the Sheriff 
at the place of Execution, ibid. ib. — ^Pro- 
ceedings in the House of Lords upon Lord 
Preston's Claim of Peerage, ibid. 744 (note). 

GRANCETER, Robert. See Fortetcue, Sir 
Adrian, 

GRANT, John. See Winier, fiobert 

GRAY, James. See Perry, James, 

GREAVES, John. See SachevereU, William* 

GREAVES, William. See SachevereU, William. 

GREEN, Robert. See SachevereU, WiUiam, 

GREEN, Robert.— His Trial with Henry 
Berry, and Lawrence Hill, at the bar of the 
Court of King's Bench, for the Murder of 
Sir Edmondbury Godfrey, 31. Car. 2, 1679, 
7 vol. 159. — Indictment against them, ibid, 
ib.— They plead Not Guilty, ibid. 160.— 
Speeches of the Counsel for the Prosecu- 
tion, ibid. 162. — Evidence against them, 
ibid. 167. — Praunce's Evidence, ibid. 169. — 
Evidence for them, ibid. 195. — ^The Attorney 
General's Reply, ibid. 210. — Chief Justice 
Scroggs's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 213.^ 
The Jury find them Guilty, ibid. 220.— Sen- 
tence of Death passed upon them, ibid.. 222. 
— ^Their conduct at the place of Executioo, 
ibid. 226. — ^They all declare their Innocence, 
ibid. ib. — Account of their behaviour in 
Newgate, ibid. 577.— Praunce is afterwards 
convicted of Perjury in his Evidence in this 
Case, ibid. 228 (note). 

GREEN, Captain Thomas.— His Trial, with 
several of his Crew, at the High Court of 
Admiralty of Scotland, for Piracy and 
Murder, 4 Anne, 1705, 14 vol. 1199.— The 
Indictment, ibid. 1211. — Defences proponed 
by the Panel's Counsel, with the Pursuer's 
Answers thereto, ibid. 1223.-T'Peremptory 
Defences proponed fgjr. the Pan^i ibidt 



THE- STATE TRIALS. 



fi» 



1242.— The Court repel the Defences/ ibid. 
1259. — ^Evidence against the Panels, ibid. 
1 26 1 . — Speech of the Ad vocatefor thePursuer, 
ibid. 1272. — ^Verdict of Assize against the 
Panels, ibid. 1281. — Sentence is passed 
upon them^ ibid. 1283. — Green is executed, 
ibid. 1284. — ^Confessions and Declarations 
made by some of Green's Crew, ibid, ib.-— 
Account of the Objections made by the 
Panels to the Witnesses, ibid. 1291. — 
Paper published after Green*s Execution, 
detailing the Circumstances discovered since 
the Trial, by which the testimony of the 
Witnesses against him was invalidated, ibid. 
1294. — Allusion to this Case by Duncan 
Forbes, Lord Advocate, in a Speech in the 
House of Commons, in 1736, ibid. 1311. — 
Aniot's Account of this Case, and its origin, 
ibid. 1199 (note). 

GREEN, William. See Messenger, Peter. 

GREGG, William, — Proceedings against him^ 
at the Old Bailey for High Treason, in cor- 
responding with France, 6 Anne, 1708, 14 
vol. 1371.— Burnet's Account of these Pro- 
ceedings, and the Circumstances from which 
they arose, ibid. ib. (note). — He pleads 
Guilty, and Sentence of Death is passed 
upon him, ibid. 1375. — ^Proceedings in the 
House of Lords upon his Conviction^ ibid. 
1376. — ^Letter from the Ordinary of New- 
gate respecting his conduct and conversa- 
tions while under sentence of Death, ibid. 
1389. — Paper delivered by him to the 
Sheriffs at the place of Execution, ibid. 1391 . 
—Swift's Notices of Gregg's Case, ibid. 
1394. 

GREGORY, George. See Sacheverell, William. 

GREGORY, William, Baron of the Exchequer, 
32 Car. 2, 7 vol. 1527, 8 vol. 515, 11 vol. 
440. — He is examined as a Witness for the 
Defendant on Oates's Trial for Perjury, 10 
vol. 1170. 

GREVILLE, Thomas. See Gibbons, John. 

GREY, Henry, Duke of Suffolk. See Suffolk, 
Dukeqf, 

GREY, Isaac. See Crook, John. 

GREY, Lady Jane. — ^Proceedings against her 
for High Treason in assuming the Crown, 
1 Mary, 1553, 1 vol, 715. — She is appoint- 
ed ^to succeed Edward the Sixth by his Will, 
and a Deed of Settlement made with the 
consent of the Nobility, ibid. 717. — She is 
proclaimed Queen, ibid. ib. — ^Mary's Letter 
to the Council, asserting her Title, ibid, ib.— 
Their Answer, ibid. 719. — ^The Council for- 
sake Lady Jane Grey and proclaim Mary, 
ibid. 721. — She is imprisoned in the Tower, 
ibid. 722. — Conversation between her and 
Feckenham, ibid. 723. — Her Letter to her 
Fatiier just before her Execution, ibid. 725. 
—Her Letter to her Sister, written at the end 
of a Greek Testament, ibid. 726.— She is 
behead^,^ ibid. 729.— Ker Behaviour upon 



the Scaffold, ibid, 727.— Account of her 
Education, ibid. 730. — ^Anecdote related of 
her, in Somers's Tracts, ibid. 737. — Account 
of her from the Biographia Britannica, ibid. 
731. — ^The Instrument by which she was 
proclaimed Queen, setting forth the .reasons 
for her Claim, ibid. 739. 

GREY, Lord Leonard.— His Trial at West- 
minster for High Treason, 33 Hen. 8, 154t, 
1 vol* 439. —Articles of Accusation against 
him, ibid. 441, 442, 444.r-'Being an Irish. 
Peer, he is tried by a Common Jury, ibid. 
443.— He confesses the Indictment, and is 
beheaded, ibid. 444. 

GREY, of Ruthen, Charies, Lord. . See Norths 
ampton, Spencer, Earl of, 

GREY DE WERK, Ford, Lord. See Pilkmg' 
ton, Thomas. — His Trial with Robert Char« 
nock, Anne Chamock, David Jones, Francis 
Jones, and Rebecca Jones, on an Informa- 
tion by the Attorney Geperal for a Con- 
spiracy to run away with Lady Henrietta 
Berkeley, 34 Car. 2, 1682, 9 vol. 127.— The 
Information, ibid. 129 (note).— The King's 
Counsel open the Charge, ibid. 132.-— Evi- 
dence for the Prosecution, ibid. 135. — Mr* 
Williams's Defence of them, ibid. 159.— 
Lord Grey's Speech for himself, ibid. 164. 
— ^Lady Henrietta Berkeley is permitted to 
give Evidence for the Defendants, ibid. 173* 
— Chief Justice Pemberton's Address to the 
Jury,ibid. 178.— Itis admitted by the King's^ 
Counsel that there is no Evidence against 
Rebecca Jones, ibid. 183.— They are all 
found Guilty except her, but the matt^ is 
compromised, ana no Judgment is entered, 
ibid. 186.— Lord Grey's History of the Rye- 
House Plot, and of Monmouth's Rebellion, 
ibid. 359. — His Letter to James the Second, 
confessing his participation in them, ibid..ib. 
—His Evidence on the Trial of Lord Dela- 
mere, 11 vol. 538.— He gives his Vote in the 
House of Lords for the conviction of Lord 
Stafford, 7 vol. 1552.— Remarks upon his 
Character, 9 vol. 361. 

GRIFFIN, Lord.— Account of his Case on an 
Award of Execution against him after Out- 
lawry for High Treason, 19 vol. 736 (note). 

GRIMSTONE, Sir Harbottle.— His Speech 
against Archbishop Laud in the House of 
Commons, 4 vol. 317.— He was one of the 
Commissioners for the Trial of the Regicides, 
5 vol. 986.— He was Speaker of the House 
of Commons at the time of the Restoration, 
ibid. 959.— His Speech in the House of 
Commons in the Debate on the Earl of 
Danby's pleading a Pardon from the King 
to an Impeachment, 11 vol. 784. 

GRINDALL, Edmund, Archbishop of Canter- 
bury. See &icA«?ere//, Dr.— His Letter to the 
Lords of the Council, decliaingto obey the Cir- 
cular recommending the Suppression of Pro*, 
phesiying, 15 vol. 317,— Remarks on his con- 
duct resjpectin^ hi^ Refusal to suppress ^^<k 



M 



OSKEftAL IKDE!E fO 



|4ifpif»iWA.428^»^iU0D«uito<!Bsduiiwter 

0itOS£; Naftkv SegeaiU at Lav^ 20 vol 1240, 
91vol.md. 

Ml SirT^ash, Jtid|e«fK.B.SOTol. 1169. 

— ^He was one of uie Judgfes on Hardy's 
Xnal for iXigb Treasoo, 24 toL 221 . 

CaiOVE, John. See B^foiuZ, ffiStom. 

OUBN£Y, Joha, Counsd, 22 vol. 757, 791, 
913,^ vol. 185. — Bis Speech in Defence of 
£i^D, for pnblbhioig a seditious libel^ 23 
vol. 1031. — He was «Be of the Assistant 
Counsel for the Prisoner, on Hardy's Trial, 
24 vol. 238. — His Speech on summing up 
the Evidence for the Defence, on the Trial 
«f CroM&eld Sor High Tjneason, 26 vol. 146. 
—His Speech in Ddenoe of Bia&s, on his 
Trial witb Arthw OXiSoiiiior aad others for, 

> BaghTHtaMn, 27 voU 1 < — ^He was of Counsel 
for Governor WslX, on his Tital for Muider, 
tt wsAm Q4s — ^His Speech on summing upthe 
Evidence £or the Defenee of Cokinel jDes- 
paid, 410 his Triai for High Treason, ibid. 
4^2. 

■ ■ ■ King's Counsel. — ^He was 

One of the Counsel for the Prosecution on 
the Trial of the Persons concerned in the 
Cato Street Plot, 33 vol. 711.— His opening 
Speech lor the Prosecution on the Trial of 
Davidson and Tidd for High Treason, in 
being concerned in that Plot, ibid. 1341. 

GURNET, Sir Ricbard,Lopd Mayor ofLondon. 
—Proceedings by the House of Commons 
against him for High Crimes and Misde- 
meanours, 18 Car. 1, 1642, 4 vol. 159. — 
Articles of Impeachment against him, ibid. 
ib. — His Answer thereto, ibid. 163, 164. — 
He is committed to the Tower, ibid. 163 . — He 
refuses to appoint a Deputy Lord Mayor,ibid . 
164. — The Aldermen refuse to elect a Locum 
Tenens,ibid.ib.— Sentence against him,ibid. 
165. — He refuses to deliver the Sword of 
OflBce, but it is taken from him, ibid. 166. — 
Xord Clarendon's Commendation of him, 
ibid, 159 (note).— Lord Clarendon's Remarks 
on these Proceedings, ibid. 161 (note). 

aUENEY, William de.— Judgment is given 
in Parliament against him and William de 
Ocle, for the Murder of Edward the Second, 
1 vol. 56« — Record of the Judgment against 
them, 13 vol. 1229. 

OYBBON, Mr.— His Speech as one of the 
Managers for the Commons, in support 
of some of the Articles of Impeachment 
against Lord Chancellor Macclesfield, 16 
vol. 924. 

HACKER, Francis, 5 toL 1005, 1176, 1286. 
See Bigwidei. 

PACKSTOUN, David.— His Trial at Edin- 

• burgh for Treason and the Murder of Arch- 

Wlhop SJiarp, Z^ Gar. 2^ 1680, 19 yol. 791. 



^-The Indictment^ ibid, ib.— 'Evidence 
against him, ibid. 926.— His Exsmination 
before the Pri^nr Council, ibid. 631 CM|o). 
—He is found Guilty, ibid. $43.<^His Sen- 
tence, ibid, ib.— His Conduct at the place ol 
Execution, ibid. 649. — ^His Account of the 
rencounter at Air^s Moss, and what befel 
him afterwards, ibid. 634 (note). — Burnet's 
Account of his Execution, ibid. 850 (note). 

HADFIELD, James.— His Trial at the Bar oi 
the Court of King's B&Kh for High Treason, 
in shooting at t^ King, 4^ Geo. 8, 1600, 
27 voL 1281.^ — Counsel for the Prosecution 
and for (he Prisoner, ibid, ib.— The Indict- 
nent, ibid. 1283. — ^Tbe Attorney General's 
Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. 126C*- 
Evideace for the Prosecution, ibid. 1293.— 
Mr. Erskine's Speech for the Pmoaer, ibid. 
1307« — Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid* 
1330. — The Attorney General consents to a 
venlict of Acquittal upon the Evidence d 
the Prisoner's Insanity, ibid. 1354. 

HAGGART, Mr. Advocate.— His Argument 
for the Panel in the Debate on the Relevancy, 
on the Trial of Fyshe PaUner for Sedition, 23 
vol. 255. 

HAIGH, James. SeeLuddket. 

HAINES, George. See Green, Captain 
Thomas, 

HAKEWILL, WilUam, Counsel.— His Argu- 
ment in the House of Commons againat the 
Power of the Crown to impose Arbitrary 
Taxes, 2 vol. 407. 

HALE, Matthew, Counsel, 5 vol. 425. — He is 
appointed one of Archbishop Laud's Counsd 
on his Trial, 4 vol. 337. — Heme's Speech on 
behalf of Laud said to have been written by 
Hale, ibid. 577. — He was of Counsel for 
Macguire on his Trial for High Treason, 
ibid. 702. — And for James, Duke of HamiU 
ton, ibid. 1156. — He argues the Exceptions 
to the Charge of High Treason in Love's 
Case, 5 vol. 211. — ^He subscribes the En- 
gagement to the Commonwealth, ibid, ih, 
6 vol. 128 (note). 

————— Judge of C. P. during the 
Commonwealth, 5 vol. 945 (ncte).— He ii 
requii*ed by Cromwell to preside on the Trial 
of Colonel Penruddock. ibid. 767 (note).— 
His Conduct on discovering that Cromwell 
h^d caused a Jury to be packed, in a Cause 
to be tried before him, ibid. 938.-^Bumet's 
Account of the Reasons which induced him 
to accept a Commission from Cromwell, ibid. 
946. 

■ ' ■ Serjeant at Law. — He was 

one of the Commissioners for the Trial of the 
Regicides, 5 vol. 986. —His Motion in the 
House of Commons during the discussions 
respecting the Restoration, for a Committee 
to look into the propositions made to Charles 
the First, at the treaty of Newport, in order 
that from them the Propositions tp b? spn^ to 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



6a 



Cbtries the Second migbt be toned^ ibid. 
909. 



Sir Matthew, Ckief Baron of the £x- 

cbequ^r, 6 yol. 769.— Trial of the Suffolk 
Witches before him> 6 vol. 647.— He avows 
his belief in Witchcraft, ibid. 700. — He 
dissents from the Opinion of the Judges iii 
the Case of Messenger, ibid. 899. — His 
reesons for his Dissent, ibid. 911 (note). - 
His Charge to the Jury on the Trial of Ro- 
bert Hawkins for Larceny, ibid. 948. — Ex- 
tract from an unpublished Tract written by 
him, containing bis Opinion against the right 
of the Crown, by the Law of England, to tax 
the Subject without the consent of Parlia- 
nenty 2 vol. 379. 

HALES, Sir Christopher, Attorney General, 
25 Hen. 8, 1 vol. 389. 

HALES, Sir Edward, BaroneL— Proceedings 
against him for neglecting to take the Oaths 
of Supremacy and AUegianoe, 2 Jac. 2, 1686, 
11 vol. 1165. — Qui tarn Declaration against 
him on the Stat* 25 Car. 2, c. 2. ibid. ib. — 
He pleads a dispensation from the King, ibid. 
1178.--ThePlsuntiff demurs to his Plea, ibid. 
1186. — Argument in support of the De- 
murrer, ibid. 1187. — Arguments for theDe- 
fendant, ibid. 1192. — Burnet's Remarks on 
the Arguments at the Bar in this Case, ibid. 
1199 (note).— Judgment is given for the 
Defendant with the concurrence of all the 
Judges, except Baron Street, ibid. 1197. — 
Burnet's Notice of these Proceedings, ibid. 
1199 (note).— Chief Justice Herbert's Ac- 
count of the Authorities upon which the 
Judgment of the Court in this Case was 
founded, ibid. 1251. — Sir Hobert Atkins's 
Animadversions upon Chief Justice Herbert's 
Account, ibid. 1267.— -Mr. Attwood's Ob- 
servations thereon, ibid. 1280. — Sir Robert 
Atkins's Enquiry into the King'fi Dispensing 
Power, ibid. 1200. — Sir Edward Hales was 
Lieutenant of the Tower at the time of the 
Trial of the Seven Bishops, 12 vol. 192.— 
He is mentioned as a Prisoner in the Tower 
after the Revolution, ibid. 597. 

HALES, Sir James, Judge of C. P. 1 Mary, 
16 vol. 831.*-He refuses to sivn the Order 
for the Succession of Lady Jane Grey, 1 
vol. 717. — Conversation between him and 
Lord Chancellor Gardiner on his appearance 
in Westminster Hall to take his Oath as 
Judge, on the accession of Queen Mary, ibid. 
714.— Proceedings against him for charging 
a Jnry at the Quarter Sessions with Inaict- 
ments upon the Statutes of Henrv the Eighth 
in favour of the Reformation, 1 Mary, 1553, 
ibid. ib. 715. — He is committed to Prison 
and attempts to kill himself, ibid. 714. — 
He recants and afterwards drowns himself, 
ibid. ib. 

HALES, WilUam.— HisTrial at the Old Bailey 
for forging a Promissory Note, 2 iQeo. 2, 

iraa, n rol. t?l,— TM lnd;ctn^nt, J^d. 



16ft.— 'The Conniel for the Proseention open 
their Case, ibid. 164.— Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 171.— The Defence, ibid. 
198«-— Mr. Justice Page's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 203.— He is found Guilty, ibid. 209.^ 
His Trial at the Old Bailey for forgipg 
several other Notes and Indorsements, 3 
Geo. 2, 1729, ibid. ib. — Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 213. — Chief Baron Pen- 
gelly's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 219. — His 
Trial by the same Jurv for obtainin|^ Money 
by false Tokens, ibid. 227. — He is found 
Guilty on both charges, ibid. 228. — His Trial 
with Thomas Kinnersley at the same Old 
Bailey Sessions for forcing a Note of hand, 
ibid. 229.— Evidence for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 232.— Hales's Defence, ibid. 240.^— 
Kinnersley's Defence, ibid. 241. — Evidence 
for Kinnersley, ibid, 244. — Chief Baron 
Pengelly's Charge to the Jury^ ibid. 250* — 
The Jury find them both Gulltyi ibid. 264.<— 
Hales's Trial by the same Jury on another 
Indictment for obtaining Money by false 
Tokens, ibid. 265,— He is found Guilty, ibid. 
268. — His Trial with Thomas Kinnendey at 
the same Sessions, for forging another 
Promissory Note, ibid. 267. — Mr. Justice 
Reynolds's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 280. — 
They are both found Guilty, ibid. 2BT,^— 
Hales's Trial at tlie same Sessions for ano- 
ther Forgery, ibid. ib. — He is found Guilty, 
ibid. 295.— The Counsel for the Prosecution 
press for a corporal Punishment beyond the 
Pillory and Imprisonment, ibid, 295.— Sen- 
tence passed upon both Defendants, ibid. 296. 

HALFORD, Sir Richard, See Sattingi, 
Henry, 

HALIFAX, Charles, Lord. See SmerSf John, 
Lord, 

HALL, a Secular Priest.— He is tried with 
Robert Feron for Treason, in denying the 
King's Supremacy, in the Reign of Henry 
the Eighth, 1 vol. 472.— Hall is hanged, and 
Feron receives a Pardon, ibid. 473. 

HALL, John.— Proceedings against him for 
the Murder of Thomas, Duke of Glocester, 1 
Hen. 4, 1399, 1 vol. 161,— His Confesfsion, 
ibid. 163.— He is condemned and executed, 
ibid. 164. 

HALL Dr. Joseph, Bishop of Norwich. See 
Iwdve Bishopt. 

H ALTON, Lord. Set Maiiland Cfiarkt. 

HALYBURTON, Alexander.— His Trial with 
William Fraser in Scotland, for High Treason, 
in surprising a King's Fortress and holding 
it against the Government, 4 Wm. and Mary, 
1692, 13 vol. 831.— The^ Indictment, ibid. 
ib.^The Evidence againlt them| ibid, 835. 
-^They are found Guilty and sentenced to 
Death, ibid, 841. 

HAMILLy Roger, See Bird, Jama* 
HAJJIJUTON, 4n4revyCott|iHl,--»ii Sf9§9\^ 



56 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



in Defence of Peter Zenp^er on his Trial at 
New York, for a Libel upon the. Government 
there, 17 vol. 696. — The Corporation of New 
York present him with the Freedom of the 
City for his Defence on this occasion, ibid. 
726. 

HAMILTON, James, Duke of, and Earl of 
Cambridge. — His Trial for High Treason 
before the High Court of Justice, 1 Car. 2, 
1649, 4 vol. 1155. — The Charge against him 
is for levying war against the Parliament, 
ibid. ib. — He pleads, 1st, that he acted under 
the Command of the supreme authority in 
Scotland : 2nd, that he was an Alien : 3rd, 
that he had surrendered himself in war 
upon Articles of Capitulation promising 
Quarter,ibid. ib. — Counsel are assigned him, 
ibid. 1156, — Jividence in support of his 
Pleas, ibid. 1157.— His Speech in support of 
his Pleas, ibid. 1161. — Summary of the Ar- 
guments of his Counsel, ibid. 1162. — Argu- 
ments of the Counsel for the Commonwealth, 
ibid. 1165.— Mr. SceeVs Argument against 
the Pleas, ibid. 11 67.— The Court give Judg- 
ment against the Pleas, ibid. 1187. — Sen- 
tence of Death is passed upon him, ibid. 
1188.— His Address to his Friends previously 
to his being taken to the place of Execution, 
ibid. ib. — His Speech on the Scaffold, ibid. 
1191.— His Execution, ibid. 1193. 

HAMILTON, Robert, Advocate.— His Speech 
in Defence of Robert Watt, on his Trial in 
Edinburgh for High Treason, under a Special 
Commission of Oyer and Terminer, 34 Geo. 
3, 1794, 23 vol. 1328.— His Argument on a 
Motion in arrest of Judgment in the same 
Case, 24 vol. 192. 

HAMILTON, Sir Stephen. See Constable, Sir 
Robert. 

HAMMOND, John. See Jackson, William, 

HAMPDEN, Sir Edmund. See Darnell, Sir 
Thomfis, 

HAMPDEN, John. See Kimbolton, Edward, 
XoTf/.—proceedings in the Exchequer in the 
Great Case of Ship-Money, 13 Car.l, 1637, 
3 vol. 825. — Lord Clarendon's Character of 
him, ibid. ib. (note). 

HAMPDEN, John.— His Trial at the Bar of 
the Court of King's Bench for a seditious 
and treasonable conspiracy, 36 Car. 2, 1684, 
9 vol. 1053. — He was Grandson of the cele- 
brated Hampden, ibid. 49 3. »— Burnet's Ac- 
count of him, ibid. ib. — The Indictment, ibid. 
1053, 1056 (note).— He pleads Not Guilty, 
ibid. 1056. — His Counsel challenge a Juror 
because he holds an office under the Crown, 
ibid. 1057. — Chief Justice Jefferies decides 
that this is no ground of Challenge, ibid. 
1059. — ^The King's Counsel open the Case 
against him, ibid. 1061. — ^The Duke ofMon- 
roouth is called as a Witness against him, 
but docs not appear, ibid, '1063. — Lord 
Ho\?w4'% £videaQj&4 ibidv t064*— Qth^r 



Evidence against him, ibid. 1073. — ^Tha 
Record of Sidney's Attainder is offered in 
Evidence, ibid. 1078. — Mr. Williams's 
Speech in his Defence, ibid. ib. — Evidence 
for the Defence, ibid. 1086. — ^Evidence of 
Lord Howard's Declarations respecting the^ 
Conspiracy, ibid. ib. — Evidence of Lord 
Howard's holding irreligious Opinions ten--^ 
dered, and refused by the Court, ibid. 1103. — 
The Chief Justice's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
1104.— The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 1 124. 
— He is sentenced to pay a Fine of 40,000/. 
ibid. 1126.— His Trial at the Old Bailey for 
High Treason, 1 Jac. 2, 1685, 11 vol. 479. \ 
—The Indictment, ibid. 485. — He pleads' 
Guilty, ibid. 482. — Sentence is passed upon ' 
him, but he is afterwards pardoned upon 
making a Submission, ibid. 484. — About ten 
years afterwards he commits Suicide, ibid, 
ib. — His Examination by a Committee of 
the House of Lords appointed in 1689 to 
inquire, who were the Advisers and Prosecu- 
tors of the Murders of Lord William Russel, 
Colonel Sidney, and others, 9 vol. 954. 

HANSON, Joseph. — His Trial at Lancaster 
for a Misdemeanour, in encouraging the 
Weavers of Manchester in a Conspiracy to 
raise their Wages, 49 Geo. 3, 1809, 31 vol. 
1. — Counsel for the Prosecution and for the 
Defendant, ibid. ib. — ^The Indictmentyiibid. 
2. — Mr. Serjeant Cockell's Speech for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 5. — Evidence for the Pro- 
secution, ibid. 11. — Mr. Raine's Speech for 
the Defendant, ibid. 27. — Evidence for the 

. Defendant, ibid. 42. — Mr. Seijt. Cockell's 
Reply, ibid. 68. — Mr. Justice Le Blanc's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. 77. — The Jury find 
him Guilty, ibid. 81. — Proceedings in the 
Court of King's Bench on his being brought 
up for Judgment, ibid. ib. — Sentence of the 
Court, ibid. 97. 

HARCOURT, Sir Simon, Solicitor General, 
1 Ann, 14 vol. 989, 1100. — ^His Speech for 
the Prosecution on the Trial of Plaagen 
Swendsen, for forcibly carrying away Mrs. 
Pleasant Rawlins, 14 vol. 361. — His Speech 
in the House of Commons on the great Case 
of Ashby and White, ibid. 740. 

. — His Speech for 
Dr. Sacheverell on the Trial of his Impeach- 
ment in the House pf Lords, 15 vol. 196. 

HARCOURT,' William. See Whitbread, 
Thomas, 

HARDWICKE, Philip, Lord, Chief Justice of 
K. B. 10 Geo. 2, 17 vol. 845, 

Lord Chancellor. — 



He is appointed Lord High Steward upon 
the Trial of the Earls of Kilniamock and 
Cromertic and Lord Balmerino for High 
Treason, 18 vol. 449. — His Address on pass- 
ing Judgment upon them, ibid. 497. — He is 
appointed Lord High Steward for the Tri^ 
of Lord Lovat, ibid. 541.r-Uia Addre» 
QQ,pasain|; Jad^m^nt upon Uid^ ibi4% Q93^ 



THE STATE TRIALS- 



57 



H ARDY, John.*— His Trial at Edinburgh for 
Treason, in uttering seditious expressions 
against the King and GoTemment, 4 Jac. 2, 
1688, 12 vol. 585.— The Indictment, ibid, 
ib.-— The Court decide that the expressions 
libelled do not infer the Crime of Treason, 
ibid. 596. 

HARDY, Thomas.— His Trial for High Trea- 
son at the Old Bailey, under a Special Com- 
mission of Oyer and Terminer, 35 Geo. 3, 
1794, 24 vol. 199.--List of the Grand Jury, 
ibid. 200. — Chief Justice Eyre's Charge to 
them, ibid, ib.— Strictures on this Charge, 
ibid. 210 (note).--The Grand Jury return a 
trae Bill against him and twelve others, ibid. 
211 .—The Indictment, ibid .224.— List of the 
Counsel employed on both sides, ibid. 238. 
—Hardy's Arraignment, ibid. 240, 1405.— 
Speech of the Attorney General (Sir John 
Scott) for the Prosecution, ibid. 241. — Evi- 
dence for the Prosecution, ibid. 370. — ^Dis- 
cussion of the propriety of separating the 
Jury on a proposal tor an Adjournment, ibid. 
414. — ^The Jury are provided with beds at 
the Old Bailey, and the Court adjourns till 
the next morning, ibid. 418. — ^The second 
night the Jury, with the consent of Counsel 
on both sides, sleep at a Tavern, ibid. 572. 
—Mr. i^kine's Speech for the Prisoner, 
ibid. 877. — Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 
971.— Mr. Gibbs's Speech for the Prisoner 
at the Close of the Evidence for the Defence, 
ibid. 1112.— Reply of the Solicitor General 
(Sir John Mitford), ibid. 1167.— Chief Jus- 
tice Eyre's Summing up to the Jury, ibid. 
1293.— The Jury acquit him, ibid. 1384. 

HARGRAVE, Francis, Counsel.— His Argu- 
ment against the legality of Slavery, in the 
Case of James Sommersett the Negro, 20 
vol. 23. — His Argument for the Defendant 
in the Case of the Island of Grenada, ibid. 
293. — His Preface to the Fourth Edition of 
the State Trials, 1 vol. xlvii.— His Preface 
to the 11th Volume of the Fourth Edition of 
the State Trials, ibid. li. 

HARLEY, Edward. See HoUis, DenzU. 

BARLEY, Robert, Speaker of the House of 
Commons. See Oxford and Mortimer^ Earl of, 
— GreggyWiUiam, — His Speech in the House 
of Commons on opening the Debate on the 
Great Case of Ashby and White, 14 vol. 703. 
—His Speech in the Debate on that Case, 
ibid. 753. — Burnet's Account of his retire- 
ment from the Ministry of Queen Anne, ibid. 
1371 (note). 

HARRINGTON, James.— He is accused of 
being concerned in a Conspiracy against the 
Government with the Fifth Monarchy Men, 
6 vol. 114 (note). — His Examination in the 
Tower by Lord Lauderdale, Sir George 
Carteret and Sir Edward Walker, ibid. 115 
(note). — Anecdote respecting Cromwell's 
Seizure, of hi^ Oceana, as related by Mr. 
Ec^ii^t iJik hk Speech in Dofi^noe qf ?aine^ 



22 vol. 469. — Mr, Erskine*8 Allusion to his 
Pedigree, ibid. 468. 

HARRIS, Benjamin.— His Trial for selling a 
Seditious Libel, 32 Car. 2, 1680, 7 vol. 925. 
—Evidence against him, ibid. 928. — His 
Counsel object that there is no malice proved, 
ibid. ib. — ^The Court decide that this is un- 
necessary, ibid. 930. — Chief Justice Scroggs's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. 929. — The Jury 
return a Verdict of '' Guilty of selling the 
Book," which the Court refuse to receive, 
ibid. 931.— -The Juiy find him Guilty gener- 
ally, ibid, ib.— The Chief Justice rebukes the 
Jury for their hesitation, ibid. ib. — Sentence 
passed upon him, ibid. 932. 

HARRIS, — Doctor of Civil Law.— His Argu- 
ment on the Trial of the Duchess of Kingston 
for Bigamy, that a Sentence of the Ecclesias- 
tical Court, annulling her former Marriage, 
was not a conclusive Answer to the Charge^ 
20 voL 494. 

HARRISON, Henry.— His Trial at the Old 
Bailey for the Murder of Dr. Clenche, - 4 
Will, and Mary, 1692, 12 vol. 833.— The 
Indictment, ibid. ib. — He pleads Not Guilty, 
ibid. 834. — Evidence against him, ibid. 839. 
— His Defence, ibid. 853. — Evidence in his 
Defence, ibid. 854. — Evidence in reply, 
ibid. 860.->Lord Holt's Charge to the 
Jury, ibid. 864.^The Jury find him Guilty, 
ibid. 871. — Sentence of Death is passed 
upon him, ibid. ib. — His Behaviour at the 
place of Execution, ibid. 872. 

HARRISON, John.— He pleads Guilty to an 
Indictment for High Treason, in being con- 
cerned in the Cato Street Conspiracy, 33 
vol. 1544. — ^He is pardoned on condition of 
being transported tor Life, ibid. 1566. 

HARRISON, Thomas, 5 vol. 998, 1008. 1230. 
See Regicides, — Burnet's Account of his 
Character, 5 vol. 1008 (note). 

HARRISON, Thomas, Clerk.— His Trial in 
the King's Bench for insulting Mr. Justice 
Hutton, while sitting on the Bench of the 
Court of Common Pleas, 14 Car. 1, 1638, 3 
vol. 1369.— The Indictment, ibid. ib. 1371 
(note). — His Examination, in which he con- 
fesses and justifies the Offence, ibid. 1373. — 
Speech of the Attorney General for the Prose- 
cution, ibid. 1 374. — The Defendant's Speech 
tor himself, ibid. 1378.— He is found Guilty, 
ibid. 1376, 1380.— His Sentence, ibid. ib. — 
Mr. Justice Hutton afterwards recovers 
10,000/. against him in an Action, ibid. 1376, 
1381. 

HARRISON, William.— Narrative of his sin- 
gular Disappearance, and of the Trial and 
Execution of the Perry s for his supposed 
Murder in the year 1660, 14 vol. 1312. 

HARSNET, Samuel, Bishop of. Norwich.— 
Proceedings in Parliament against him for 
Extortion, and other Misdemeanours,. 22 
Jac. 1, 1624^ a vol. 11^59^.— Report Q? the 



58 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



Oharges against him, ibid, ib.— His Answer 
thereto, ibid. 1255.-^Tbe House of Lords 
refer the matter to the High Commission, 
but nothing more is heard of it, ibid. 1258. 

HART, John Harriott, 30 vol. 1131. See 
WhUcy Henry. 

HART, Patrick.--<His Trial in Ireland for 
High Treason, in acting with a Treasonable 
Association called Defenders, 36 Geo. 3, 
1796, 26 vol. 387.— Speech of the Solicitor 
General for the Prosecution, ibid, ib.— £yi- 
. dence for the Prosecution, ibid. 393. — Mr. 
Lysaght's Speech for the Defence, ibid. 397. 
— Evidence fpr the Defence, ibid. 401. — Mr. 
Mac Nally's Speech on Summing up the 
Evidence for the Defence, ibid. ib. — Lord 
Clonmell's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 409. — 
Mr. Justice Chamberlain's Charge, ibid. 414. 
— The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 419. — 
Lord Clonmell's Address on passing Sen- 
tence upon him and Kennedy, ibid. 420. — 
Hart is executed, ibid. 438. 

HARTLEY, William. %^q Luddites. > 

HARTWELL, John. See Baynton, Sarah. 

HARVEY, Edmund, 5 vol. 1005, 1176. See 
Begicides, 

HARVEY, Sir Francis, Judge of C» P, 4 Car. 
1, 3 vol, 359. 

HASLERIG, Sir Arthur. SeeKimbolt(m,Edumrd, 
Lord, — ^His Speech in the House of Com- 
mons in vindication of himself from the 
Articles of Treason preferred against him by 
Charles the First, 4 vol. 95. 

HASTINGS, Henry.— Articles of Impeach- 
roent exhibited by the Commons against 
him. Sir Richard Halford, Sir John Bale, and 
John Pate, for raising Forces against the 
Parliament, 18 Car. 1, 1642, 4 vol. 171. — 
It does not appear that the Parties impeach- 
ed ever put m an Answer to these Articles, 
or that any further Proceedings were had 
upon them, ibid. 174. 

HASTINGS, Warren, Governor General of 
Bengal. — ^Trialof Maha Rajah Nundocomar, 
and others, for a Conspiracy to charge him 
with Bribery and other Offences, 20 vol. 
1077.— His Evidence on that Trial, ibid. 
1179. — His Evidence on a Trial of the same 

S arsons for a similar Conspiracy against Mr. 
arwell, ibid. 1200.— Trial of John Stock- 
dale for publishing '^ A Review of the prin- 
cipal Charges against him,'' 22 vol. 237. 

HATCHARD, John.— His Trial at West- 
minster for a libel on the Aides-de-Camp 
of the Governor of Antigua, and on the 
Grand Jury of that Island, published in the 
Tenth Report of the Directors of the African 
Institution, 57 Geo. 3, 1817, 32 vol. 673.— 
Counsel for the Prosecution and for the De- 
fcndantjibid. ib.— The Indictment, ibid . 674. 
—Mr. Seijeant Best's Speech for the Prose- 
jmtion, ibW. 965,— Evidence for the Prose- 



cution, ibid.' 691. — ^The Attorney General's 
Speech for the Defendant, ibid. 698. — ^Mr. 
Justice Abbott's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
713.— The Jury find the Defendant Gailty, 
ibid. 718. — Affidavits on behalf of the De- 
fendant on his being brought up for Judg- 
ment, ibid. 719. — Mr. Scarlett's Speech in 
Mitigation of Punishment, ibid. 735. — Mr. 
Serjeant Best's Speech in Aggravation, ibid. 
741-^ttdgment of the Court that the De* 
fendant pay a Fine of 100/. ibid. 752. 

HATHAWAY, Richard.— His Trial at the 
Surrey Assizes for a Cheat, in pretending to 
be bewitched, 1 Anne, 1702, 14 vol. 639. — 
The Information, ibid. ib. 641 (note).— The 
Counsel for the Prosecution open the Case, 
ibid. 642. — Evidence against him, ibid. 648. 
—-Serjeant Jenner's Defence of him, ibid. 
668. — Evidence for the Defence, ibid. 669. 
— ^Lord Holt's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 683. 
— The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 690. — He 
is sentenced to pay a Fine of 100 Marks, to 
stand three times on the Pillory, to be whip- 
ped, and kept to hard labour for half a year, 
ibid. 639 (note).— Record of the Judgment 
against him, ibid, ib.— His Trial at the same 
Assizes with Thomas Wellini^, Elizabeth his 
Wife, and Elizabeth Willoughby, for a Riot 
and Assault, ibid. 689. — ^The Information, 
ibid. ib. (note). — ^They plead Not Guilty, 
ibid. 691. — Evidence against them, ibid. 692. 
— ^They are all found Guilty, ibid. 696.— 
Their Sentence, ibid. 639 (note). 

HATSELL, Sir Henry, Baron of the Exche- 
quer, 11 Will. 3, 13 vol. 943, 1108, 14 vol. 
134. — His Charge to the Jury on the Trial 
of Spencer Cowper, and others^ for the Murder 
of Sarah Stout, 13 vol. 1187. 

HATTON, Sir Christopher, 1 vol. 1095, 1114. 
— He was one of the Commissioners for the 
Trial of Mary, Queen of Scots, 1 vol. 1167. 

HAVERSHAM, John, Lord.— Proceedings 
against him for Words derogatory of the 
House of Commons, spoken at a Conference 
between the Houses of Parliament, 14 vol. 
292. — His Answer to the Charge exhibited 
against bim by the Commons, ibid. 313.— 
The Charge is dismissed by the House of 
Lords for want of Prosecution by the Com- 
mons, ibid. 322. — His Speech on Dr. Sache- 
verell'sTrial, 15 vol. 475. 

HAWKINS, Robert.— His Trial at the Assizes 
at Aylesbury for Larceny, 21 Car. 2, 1669, 
6 vol. 921. — ^The Indictment, ibid. ib. — He 
pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 922. — Evidence for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 924.— His Defence, 
ibid. 937.-— Evidence in support of the De- 
fence, ibid. 943.— Lord Chief Baron Hale's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid, 948. — The Jury 
acquit him, ibid. 952. 

HAWLES, John, Counsel, 12 vol. 1297.— He 
is assigned for Counsel to CoUedge, on his 
Trial for High Treason, 8 vol. 561.— He is 
one pf Lord Mohun's Counsel, on his Trial 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



Ar the Harder of Mr. MountibTd, 12 toI. 
1016. 

-Sir John, Solicitor General, 7 Will. 



69 



3, 12 vol. 1367, 13 vol. 149, 461, 14 vol. 
151, 532. — His Speech on summing up the 
£?id6Dce for the Crown on the Trial of 
Chamock, King, and Keyes for High Trea- 
lOD, 13 tdL 1 443.— -His Speech for the Crown 
on the Trial of Sir WilUam Freind for High 
TreascHi, 13 vol. 46. — His Speech for the 
Crown on the Trial of Sir William Parkyns 
for High Treason, ihid. 119.— His Speech 
in the House of Commons in faTour of the 
Bill of Attainder against Sir John Fenwick, 
ibid. 664. 

His Speech in the House 



of Commons in the Debate on the Great 
Case of Ashby and White, 14 vol. 724.--His 
Speech in support of one of the Articles of 
ImpeadiaieDt against Dr. Sachevereli, 15 
vol. 116.--HiB Remarks upon Fitahkrris's 
Trial, 8 ▼01.425.— On Colledge's Trial, ibid. 
723^—0(1 the Earl of Shaftesbury's Grand 
Jury, ibid. 835.--On Connt Coningsmark's 
Trial, 9 vol. 126.->On Lord Russel's Trial, 
ibid. 794. — On Algernon Sidney's Trial, 
ibid. 999. — On the Award of Execution 
against Sir Thomas Armstrong, 10 vol. 123. 
--On Bateman's Trial, 11 vol. 473.— On 
Coniish's Trial, ibid. 455.--OnMr. Wilmer's 
Writ of De Homine replegiando, and the 
Quo Warranto against tne City of London, 
8 vol. 1347. 

HATES, Joseph.--His Trial at the King's 
Bench for High Treason in corresponding 
with Sir Thomas Armstrong, an outlawed 
Traitor, 36 Car. 2, 1684, 10 vol 307.— The 
lodictroent, ibid. 309 (note). — Evidence 
against him, ibid. 311. — ^He contends that 
the Treason charged is proved to have been 
committed abroad, and therefore that he 
onght to have been indicted under the 
Sutute 35 Hen. 8, c. 2, ibid. 814.--The 
Court refuse to allow him Counsel, and 
overrule the Objection, ibid. 314. — His 
Defence, ibid. 316. — Chief Justice Jefferies's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. 318. — The Jury 
aoquit him, ibid. 320. — Accounts of this 
Case by Burnet and Luttrell, ibid. 307 (note). 

HAY, John. See Damley, Henry, Lord, — ^^His 
Deposition respecting the Murder of Lord 
Damley, Husband to Mary, Queen of Scots, 
1 vol. 921. 

HEARIiE, John. See Henu, John. 

HEATH, Mary.— Her Evidence for the De- 
fendant on the Trial of an Action of Eject- 
ment, at the Bar of the Court of Exchequer 
in Ireland, between James Annesley and 
Richard, Earl of Anglesea, 17 vol. 1289. — 
Her Trial for Perjury in her Evidence on 
that Occasion, 18 vol. 1.— She applies for 
the postponement of her Trial, ibid. ib. — 
The Trial is postponed, ibid. 7.— Proceed- 
ings against a party for forcibly detaining 



one of her Witnesses, ibid. ib.^The Prose- 
cutors apply to postpone the Trial, ibid. 23. 
—This IS refused by the Court, ibid. 38. — 
The Indictment, ibid. 46.-'Speech of the 
Counsel for the Prosecution, ibid. 50. — 
Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 53. — 
Speech of the Counsel for the Defendant, 
ibid. 136. — Evidence for the Defence, ibid. 
139. — Mr. Justice Bletanerhasset's Charge 
to the Jury, ibid. 189. — Chief Justice Mar- 
lay's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 194. — ^The 
Jury find her Not Guilty, ibid. 196. 

HEATH, John, Esq. Judge of C. P., 21 vol. 
687, 815, 22 vol. 309, 23 vol. 1055, 26 vol. 
1198.— -His Charge to the Jury on the Trial 
of the Bishop of Bangor and others for a 
Riot, 26 vol. 523* — His Evidence on the 
Trial of Lord Thanet and others for a Blot, 
27 vol. 847. 

HEATH, Robert, Seijeant.at.Law, 3 yoL 1371. 

Sir Robert, Attorney General, 7 Car. 

1, 3 vol. 405. — His Argument in the Court 
of King's Bench against the Discharge of 
Sir Thomas Darnell and others, committed 
by the Ring for refusing to lend unon Com- 
missions of Loans, 3 vol. 30.— -His Ubjections 
to the Arguments of the House of Commons 
at a Conference with the House of Lords 
upon the Liberty of the Subject, ibid. 133. 
— ^His Argument in the Court of King's 
Bench against the Discharge of William 
Stroud and others, committed by the King 
for their conduct in Parliament, ibid. 280. — 
His Argument in the jsame Court in the 
Case of Sir John Elliott and others, in sup- 
port of the Jurisdiction of the Court to take 
Cognizance of Offences supposed to be 
committed in Parliament, ibid. 304. 



Chief Justice of C. P. 8 

Car. 1 . — His Speech on delivering his Opinion 
in the Star Chamber respecting the Sentence 
to be passed upon Henry Sherfield, for 
breaking a painted Window in a Church at 
Salisbury, 3 vol. 541. 

HEDGES, Michael.--His Trial with John 
Hedges, in the Court of King's Bench, for 
Fraud in their Offices as Cler^ in the Doclc 
Yard at Woolwich, 44 Geo. 3, 1803, 28 voU 
1315. — The Information, ibid. ib. — Mr. 
Erskine's Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. 
1326. — Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid« 
1341. — Mr. Dallas's Speech in their De- 
fence, ibid. 1386. — Evidence for the De- 
fendants, ibid. 1402. — Lord EUenborough'a 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. 1408.--The Jury 
find them Guilty, ibid. 1429.— Proceedings 
on their being brought up for Judgment| 
ibid* ib. — Sentence of the Court, ibid. 1334 

HEDGES, Mr.— His Speech as one of thf 
Managers for the House of Commons on th^ 
Trial of the Impeachment of Lord Chancelloj 
Macclesfield, in support of ^Qme pf th^ 
Articles, 16 vol 929, i 



ee 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



HENDLEY, WiUiam.--His Trial with several 
others for a Conspiracy tp defraud, under 
pretence of collecting Money for Charities, 
4 Geo. 1, 1719, 15 vol. 1407.--The Indict- 
ment, ibid. 1409. — ^The Jury find him Guilty, 
ibid. 1414.— Letter from the Judge, Sir L. 
Fowis, to the Lord Chancellor, on occasion 
of this Trial, ibid. ib. 

HENLEY, Robert, Lord, Keeper of the Great 
Seal, 33 Geo. 2. See Northingtfmy Bobert, 
Earl of. — He is appointed Lord Hi);[h Steward 
on tfie Trial of Lord Ferrers for Murder, 
19 vol. 887, 

HENRIETTA MARIA, Queen to Charies the 
First. — ^The Earl of Dorset's Encomium upon 
her in the Star Chamber, 3 vol. 584. 

HENRY THE FOURTH, King of France.— 
His Speech on behalf of the Jesuits, 7 vol. 
536. 

HENRY THE EIGHTH, King of England. 
— Proceedings relating to the dissolution 
of the Marriage between him and Catha- 
rine of Arragon, 19 Hen. 8, 1528, 1 
vol. 299. — His scruples respecting the 
Marriage, ibid. ib. — He solicits from the 
Pope a Commission to Cardinal Wolsey 
to try the validity of the Mamage, ibid. 
301. — ^The Pope grants a Commission to 
Cardinals Wolsey and Campejus, ibid. 
304. — Campejus attempts to persuade the 
Queen to enter upon a religious life, which 
she refuses to do, ibid. 309.J^The Emperor 
disapproves of the Divorce, ibid. ib. — The 
People being discontented with the proposed 
Divorce, the King dismisses Anne Boleyn 
from. Court, ibid. 314. — He charges Wolsey 
and Campejus to proceed with the Commis- 
sion, ibid. 317. — ^The Commission is opened, 
ibid. ib. — ^The Queen appears to protest 
against the Proceedings, but refuses to ap- 
pear to answer, ibid. 319. — ^The fiull and 
Breve of Pope Julius the Second, authorizing 
the Marriage, ibid. 320, 322. — Objections to 
the Bull and Breve, ibid. 310, 324.— Wit- 
nesses examined, ibid. 325.— Letters from 
Pope Julius the Second to the King, ibid. 
330. — ^The King's Protest against the Mar- 
riage, before its consummation, ibid. 332. — 
The Evidence is closed, and a day appointed 
for concluding the Trial, ibid. 333. — In- 
hibition of further Proceedings by the Pope, 
and his Letter to the King thereupon, ibid. 
337. — ^The Pope offers him a Dispensation 
to have two Wives, ibid. 341. — His Procla- 
mation against procuring Bulls from Rome, 
ibid. 342. — Declaration of the House of 
Lords to the Pope respecting his Marriage, 
ibid. ib. — ^The Pope's Answer thereto, ibid. 
345. — ^The Commons disapprove (he Mar- 
riage, ibid. 351.— The King's Behaviour to 
the Queen, ibid, ib, — ^The Pope's Letter to 
the King, urging him to take his Queen 
again, ibid. 353. — A Motion made in the 
Commons to the same effect, ibid. 355. — 
Vl^on vj^hi^ch the King re^manjs the Speaker, 



ibid, ib.— The King determines to proceed 
with the Divorce without the authority, of 
the Pope, ibid. 357. — Sentence of Divorce, 
ibid. 358. — ^The King proceeded against at 
Rome, ibid. 360. — ^The Pope's Sentence 
against him, ibid. 363. — ^The Marriage witK 
Queen Catharine declared Void by Act of 
Parliament, ibid. 364. — His Conduct when 
informed of the Execution of Sir Thomas 
More, ibid. 396. — ^Anecdote related of him 
when told of the Pope's intention to send 
the Bishop of Rochester a Cardinal's hat, 
ibid. 408.— Remarks on the severities prac- 
tised by him against the Papists, ibid. 469. 
—His Book against Luther written with his 
own pen, ibid. 476. — Proceedings against 
various persons during his reign for denying 
the Supremacy, ibid. 469. — His Will, ibid. 
743. 

HENRY, PRINCE op WALES, Son of James 
the First. — Accounts by several Historians 
of the Suspicions which existed of his having 
been poisoned, 2 vol. 1001 (note).— Report 
of the examination of his Body after his 
Death, ibid. ib. 

HENSEY, Florence.— His Trial for High 
Treason in maintaining a treasonable Cor- 
respondence with the King's Enemies, 32 
Geo. 2, 1758, 19 vol. 1341. — ^His Arraign- 
ment, ibid. ib. — Evidence for the Prosecu- 
tion, ibid. 1356. — The Defence, ibid. 1375. 
— ^The Jury find him Guiltv, ibid. 1345. — 
His Address on being called upon to receive 
Judgment, ibid. ib. — Lord Mansfield passes 
Sentence upon him, ibid. 1348. — A more 
circumstantial Account of his Trial, ibid. ib. 
He was pardoned, ibid. 1382. 

HEPBURN, John. See Darrdeyf Hemy^ Lord. 
— His Deposition respecting the Murder of 
Lord Darnley, Husband of Mary, Queen of 
Scots, 1 vol. 923. 

HERBERT, Edward, Counsel.— He was of 
Counsel for the Prosecution in the Proceed- 
ings in the Star Chamber against Prynne, 
Bastwick, and Burton, for several l2bels^ 
13 Car. 1, 3 vol. 719. 

— — — Sir Edward, Attorney General, 
1 7 Car. 1 . — He delivers Articles of Impeach- 
ment in the House of Lords against Lord 
Kimbolton and the Five Members, 4 vol. 83. 
— He is examined by the Comntons respect- 
ing his share in the Accusation of the Five 
Members, ibid. 102. — Proceedings against 
him on an Impeachment by the Commons, 
for High Crimes and Misdemeanours, in 
advising and delivering the Articles against 
the Five Members, 17 Car. 1, 1642, ibid. 
120. — Articles of Impeachment, ibid, ib.— 
His Answer thereto, ibid. 121. — Letter from 
the King to the Lord Keeper, declaring that 
the Attorney General did not advise or con- 
trive the obnoxious Articles, ibid. 123.—- 
Serjeant Wylde enforces the Impeachment 
for the Commons against him^i ibid. 124»— 
His Coun^^l sqnt to the T!awex for not b^ing 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



61 



prepared to pleady and others assigned him, 
ibid. 127. — ^Their Argament for him, ibid. 
128. — Sentence against him, ibid. 129.— 
Lord Clarendon's Account of this Proceed- 
iDgyibid. 130. 

HERBERT, Sir Edward, Chief Justice of 
K. B., 1 Jac. 2, 11 vol. 1324.— He delivers 
the Opinion of the Judges on the Question 
proposed to them in Lord Delamere's Case, 
whether the Court of the Lord High Steward 
can be adjourned during a Trial, 11 vol. 561. 
— ^He delivers the Opinion of the Court of 
Ring's Bench, in the Case of Sir Edward 
Hales, in favour of the King's Dispensing 
Power, ibid. 1195. — ^His Account of the 
Authorities in law upon which the Judg- 
ment of the Court in Sir Edward Hales's 
Case was founded, ibid. 1251. — Sir Robert 
Atkins's Answer thereto, ibid. 1267. — Mr. 
Attwood's Strictures thereon, ibid. 1280. — 
Burnet's Character of him, ibid. 11 95 (note). 

' Chief Justice of 



. C. P., 4 Jac. 2, 12 vol. 124.— He was son 
of the Sir Edward Herbert who was Attorney 
General in the Reign of Charles the First, 
11 vol. 1314. 

HERNE, John, Counsel.- -His Defence of 
Heniy Sherfield, on an Information in the 
Star Chamber, for breaking a painted Win- 
dow in a Church, 3 vol. 520. — ^His Defence 
of Prynne, on his Trial in the Star Chamber 
for writing "Histrio-mastix,"ibid.573. — He is 
appointed ono of Archbishop Laud's Coun- 
sel, 4 vol. 337. — His Speech in Defence of 
Laud, ibid. 577. — His Interview with Laud 
in the Tower immediately before his Execu- 

• tion, ibid. 586 (note). 

HERTFORD, Edward, Marquis of.— -Account 
. of his Restoration to the Title of Duke of 
Somerset, 1 vol. 526. 

HEVENINGHAM, Sir John. See DameU, 
Sir Thoma$» 

HEVENINGHAM, William, 5 vol. 1000, 
1219, 1229. See Regicides. 

HEVEY, John. — Proceedings in the Court of 
King's Bench in Ireland on the Trial of an 
Action of Assault and False Imprisonment, 
brought by him against Charles Henry Sirr, 
42 Geo. 3, 1802, 28 vol. 1.— Mr. Curran's 
' Speech for the Plaintiff, ibid. 2. — Evidence 
' for the Plaintiff, ibid. 13.— Mr. Fletcher's 
' Speech for the Defendant, ibid. 19. — Evi- 
dence for the Defendant, ibid. 26. — Mr. 
Barrington's Reply, ibid. 34. — Lord Kil- 
warden's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 47. — ^The 
Jhry return a Verdict for the Plaintiff, with 
' 150/. damages, ibid. 50. 

HEWETT, Dr. John.— His Trial before the 
High Court of Justice for Treason in hold- 

. ing traitorous Correspondence with Charles 
the Second, 10 Car. 2, 1658, 5 vol. 883.— . 

• The Charge against him, ibid« 884. — ^He 

- besiUtes to plead, ibid^ 89^«--^Fte^ and 



Demurrer intended to have been tendered to 
the Court, ibid. . 895.— Judgment against 
him, ibid. 928.— His Execution, ibid, 930. 

HEY, James. See Luddites, 
HEY, Job. See LuddUes. 

HEYWOOD, Samuel, Seijeant-at-Law^-^His 
Historical Account of the Judges in the 
Reigns of Charles the Second and James 
the Second, 12 vol. 257 (note). 

HICKFORD, Robert.— His Arraignment for 
High Treason, 14 Eliz. 1571, 1 vol. 1041.— 
He pleads Guilty to the Indictiyent, ibid. 
1044. — Chief Justice Catlin's Address to 
him on passing Judgment, ibid. 1044. 

HILLIARD, John. See Pole, CarcUnaL 

HILL, James. See Aitken, James. 

HILL, John. See Luddites, 

HILL, Laurence. See Green, Bobert, 

HIND, James. See Tonge, Thomas. 

HINDE, James. See AUken, James, 

HOADLEY, Dr. Benjamin, Bishop of Here- 
ford. — His Remarks upon Bishop Atter- 
bury's Defence at the Bar of the House of 
Lords, 16 vol. 664 (note). 

HOBART, Sir Henry, Chief Justice of C. P. 
14 Jac. 1, 2 vol. 952, 1042, 1161.— His 
Speech in thA^tar Chamber, on giving his 
Opinion respecting the sentence on Mr. 
Wraynham, for slandering Lord Chancellor 
Bacon, 2 vol. 1077. 

HOBART, Sir Miles. See Stroud, WUliam. 

HOE, John. See SachevereU, William, 

HOGG, William. See Graham, John. 

H0L60RNE, Robert, Counsel.— His Speech 
for Prynne, on his Trial in the Star Chamber 
for publishing "Histrio-mastix," 3 vol. 572. — 
His Argument for Mr. Hampden in the 
Great Case of Ship Money, ibid. 963. 

HOLLAND, Earl of. — Proceedings in the 
High Court of Justice against him, the Earl 
of Norwich, Lord Capel, and Sir John Owen 
for High Treason in bearing arms against 
the Commonwealth, 1 Car. 2, 1649, 4 vol. 
1195. — Lord Clarendon's Account of Lord 
Holland, ibid. 1196 (note). — ^Lord Capel 
escapes from the Tower, ibid. 1208, 1245. — 
He is discovered at Lambeth by a Water- 
man, ibid. 1209, 1246. — He pleads that 
Quarter was g^veu him when he was taken, 
ibid. li^lO. — Sir John Owen pleads Not 
Guilty, ibid. ib. — Lord Holland pleads that 
Quarter was given him when he was taken, 
ibid. 1215. — Sentence of Death pronounced 
against all of them, ibid. 1216. — ^The Earl 

. of Norwich is reprieved, ibid « 121 7. — Exe- 
cution of Lord Holland, ibid. 1218.-r-Exe^ 
cution of Lord Capel, ibid. 1230. — Bishop 
Morley's Account of the manner of Lor4 



ds 



GENSRAL INDEX TO 



Captrt deatfay iM. 1386.*-€roinweirs 
Omnion of Lord Cftpel^ ibid. 134a.-^Lord 
Clarendon's Charaeter of him^ ibid* 1249. 

HOLLIS, DeDziU See Elliott, Sir John. 
EimboiUon, Edwardf Lorii.— Proceedinffs in the 
Coart of King's Bench against hiniy Sir John 
Elliott^ and Benjamin Valentine, for sedi- 
tious Speeches in the House of Commons, 
and for forcibly detaining the Speaker in 
the Chair after a Motion for an Adjourn- 
ment, 5 Car. 1, 1629, 3 vol. 293.— He is 
one of the Five Members accused of Treason 
in the House of Commons hy Charles the 
First, A^\. 83. — His Speech on deliveriug 
the Articles of Impeacnment against the 
Nine Lotds for departing from Parliament 
without leave, ibid. 178. — He Aocuses Arch- 
bishop Laud of Treason, by order of the 
Commons, ibid. 318. — Proceedings against 
him and Mr. Wbitelocke, for a Breach of 
Trust reposed in them by the Parliament, 
in an Embassy to the Ring, 21 Car. 1, 1645, 
ibid. 754.*— Particulars of the Charge against 
them, ibid. 755.— Mr. Whitelocke's Defence, 
ibid. 757. — ^The Charge is referred by the 
House of Commons to a Committee, ibid. 
759.-*They are examined separately by the 
House, ibid. 764. — The House acquit them, 
ibid. 766. — Proceedings against him, Sir 
Philip Stapleton, Sir William Lewis, Sir 
John Clotworthy, Sir William Waller, Sir 
John Maynard, Major-general Edward Mas- 
sey, John Glynn, Recorder of London, 
Walter Long, Edward Harley, and Anthony 
Nicholl (the Eleven Members), on a Charge 
preferred against them by the Army, 23 Car. 
1, 1647, ibidi 857. — Lord Clarendon's Ac- 
count of the Oricin of these Proceedings, 
ibid. ib. (note). — ^The Charge against them, 
ibid. 867. — ^Their Answer thereto, ibid. 882. 
— Votes of the House of Commons respect- 
ing them, ibid. 913. — These Votes are re- 
scinded, ibid. 920. — Articles of Impeach- 
ment against Sir John Maynard carried up 
in the House of Lords, ibid. 914. — He re- 
fuses to kneel at the Bar, upon which he is 
fined, ibid. 918.:— The Eleven Members 
petition for leave to withdraw beyond Sea, 
which is granted them, ibid. 910.-— Hollis 
sits as Judge on the Trial of the Regicides, 
5 vol. 986 (note). — His Address to Harrison, 
the Regicide, on his Trial, ibid. 1028. 

HOLLIS, Sir John.—Ptoceedings in the Star- 
Chamber against him, Sir John Wentworth, 
and Mr. Lumsden for traducing the Admi- 
nistration of Justice, 13 Jac. 1, 1615, 2 vol. 
1021.— Their Sentences, ibid. 1034. 

MOLLIS^ Thomas Brand.— His Trial with 
General Smith, upon Informations filed by 
the Attorney General by the Order of the 
House of Commons, for Bribery at the 
Hindon Election, 16 Geo. 3, 177^, 20 vol. 
1225. — Resolutions of the House of Com- 
mons, ibid. ib. — ^The Information against 
Ganml toidi, ibid« i88n<-CouQ»el for 



the Prosecution and for the Defendant, il 
1240<— Evidence for the Prosecution against 
him, ibid, ib.— The Jury find him Guilty, 
ibid. 1266.— Trial of Mr. HoUis, ibid. 1269. 
— Counsel for the Prosecution and for the 
Defendant, ibid, ib.— Evidence aaainst him, 
ibid, ib.— He is found Guiltv, ibid. l281. — 
They are brought up for Judgment, ibid. ib. 
—Their Sentence, ibid. 1283, 

HOLLOWAY, .—His Case upon an 

Indictment for Murder, and a Special Verdict 
found, 18 vol« 302 (note). 

HOLLOWAY, James. — Proceedings against 
him in the Court of King's Bench on an 
Outlawry for High Treason, 36 Car. 2, 1684, 
10 vol. 1. — He is brought to the Bar by 
Habeas Corpus, ibid. 2.— A Rule for Bxe- 
cution granted, ibid. 5. — He petitions Ihe 
Ring for Mercy, ibid. 6.— His Execution, 
ibid. 7. — ^The Paper delivered by him to the 
Sheriffs at the place of execution, ibid. 14.— 
His Confession, or Narrative, delivered by^ 
him to Mr. Secretary Jenkins, ibid. 18. — 
Bumet*s Account of him, ibid. 1 (note)* 

HOLLOWAY, Richard, Serjeant-at-Law.— 
He is one of the Counsel for the Prosecution 
on the Trial of CoUedge, 8 vol. 591. 



' ' Sir Richard, Judge of K. B. 85 

Car.2, 9 vol. 867, 10 vol. 45, 151, 1101 His 

Argument on delivering bis Opinion ifo the 
Great Case of Monopolies, 10 vol. 516.< — 
After the Revolution he is ordered to iq>pear 
in the House of Commons to Answer for iin« 
posing an exorbitant Fine in the Case of 
the Earl of Devonshire, 11 vol. 1368.— He 
was one of the Judges of the King's Bench 
at the Trial of the Seven Bishops, 12 vol. 
189. — Account of his Appointment and Re« 
moval, extracted from Mr. Serjeant Hey- 
wood's Historical Account of the Judges 
under the House of Stuart, ibid. 263 (note). 

HOLT, Daniel. — Proceedings against him for 
publishing two Seditious Libels, 33 & 34 
Geo. 3, 1793, 22 vol. 1189.— The Informa- 
tion in one of the Cases, ibid. 1 199. — ^He is 
found Guilty upon both Prosecutions, ibid. 
1191, 1203.— Proceedings in the Court of 
King's Bench upon an Application for a 
New Trial, ibid. 1203, 1206 (note).— Mr. 
Erskiue*s Argument in support of the Motion, 
ibid. 1209. — The Court refuse the Applica- 
tion, ibid. 1233.— Judgment of the Court 
upon him, ibid. 1235. 

HOLT, Sir John, Judge of C.P. 11 Rtc. 2* 
See BeOcnap^ Sir Robert. 

HOLT, John, Counsel, 7 vol. 931, 959, 1131, 
8 vol. 749, 9 vol. 128, 241, 324, 10 vol. 40. 
— His Defence of John Lane, upon an In« 
dictment for a Conspiracy to scandalize the 
Witnesses for the Popish Plot, 7 vol. 808, fcc. 
—He is appointed Counsel for several of the 
Five Popish Lords, ibid. 1248, 1260.— His 
ArguntDt in support of i^id Willian Avs^ 



TttE STATE TRIALi 



6i 



8eU'« Challenge of a Juror for not having a 
forty-shillingFreeboldi 9 vol, 58f. — His Ar- 
gument for the East India Company in the 
Great Case of Monopolies, 10 vol. 371. — His 
Argument for the Defendant in the Case of 
the £arl of Macclesfield against Starkey, 
ibid. 1851. 

■ ■ Sir John, King's Serjeant, 12 vol. 125. 

Chief Justice of K. B. 12 vol. 

946, 13 vol. 478, 1103, 1261, 14 vol. 533, 
990. — His Charge to the Jury on the Trial 
of Sir Richard Grahme rotherwise called 
Lord Preston), and others for High Treason, 
12 vol. 730. — ^His Charge on the Trial of 
Harriaoti, for the Murder of Dr. Clenche, 
ibid. 864» — ^His Charge on the Trial of 
Chartiock, King, and Keyes, for High Trea- 
son, ibid« f447.—He is examined by a Com- 
mittee of the House of Lords respecting his 
Judgment in the Court of King's Bench, in 
the Case of Charles Knowles, claiming to 
be Earl of Banbury, ibid. 1179 (note).— He 
is heard in the House of Lords when the 
Committee deliver their Report, ibid. 1182 
(note).-~-His Charge to the Jury on the Trial 
ef Sir John Friend, 13 vol. 55. — His Charge 
on the Trial of Sir William Parkyns, ibid. 
126. — His Charge on the Trial of Ambrose 
Rookwood, ibid. 213.— His Charge on the 
Trial of Charles Cranburne, ibid. 263. — His 
Ch'^rge on the Trial of Robert Lowick, ibid. 
303. — His Address to Alexander Knightley, 
on passing SentCiCe of Death upon him, 
ibid. 403. — His Charge to the Jury on the 
Trial of Haagen Swendsen for forcibly 
abducing Mrs. Pleasant Rawlins, 14 vol. 
392. — His Charge to the Jury on Tutchin's 
Trial for a Libel on the Government, ibid. 
1125. — His Argument in the Exchequer 
Chamber in the Banker's Case, ibid, 29. — 
He dissents from the opinion of the other 
Judges of the Court of King's Bench in the 
Great Case of Ashby and White, ibid. 779. 
—He died during the Trial of Dr. Sacheve- 
rell, and was succeeded by Serjeant Parker, 
15 vol. 14 (note). — Burnet's Character of 
him, ibid. ib. 

HONE, William.— His Trial for High Treason 
in being concerned in the Rye-House Plot, 
35 Car. 2, 1683, 9 vol. 571.— The Indict- 
ment, ibid. ib. — He pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 
572. — Evidence against him, ibid. 574. — 
He is found Guilty, ibid. 578. — His Sentence, 
ibid. 668.— His Execution, ibid. ib. 

HOOPER, John, Bishop of Worcester and 
Gloucester. — ^Bill of Complaint against Bon- 
ner, Bishop of London, presented to Edward 
the Sixth by him and Latimer, 1 vol. 653* 

HORNBY, Joseph. See Banker's Case. 

HOPE, Charles, Advocate.— His Speech in 
defence of Sir Archibald Gordon Kinloch, 
01^ bis Trial in Scotland for the Murder of 
bit Biodier^ %6 ?ol« n^i-^^<i wai after- 



wards Lord President of the Court of Se8« 
sion, ibid. ib. 

HORNE, John. See Tookcy John Uwne. 

HORSPALL, William.— Trial of Mellon and 
others for his Murder, 31 vol. 997. See 
Luddites. 

HOTHAM, Sir Beauiqont, Baron of the Ex- 
chequer, 30 Geo. 3, 22 vol. 30^.— -His Charge 
to the Jury on the Trial of James Aitken, 
otherwise called John the Painter, for setting 
Fire to a Rope*House in the Portsmouth 
Dock -Yard, 20 vol. 1348. — He was one of 
the Judges who presided at Hardy's Trial 
for High Treason, 24 vol. 221. 

HOUGHTON, John.— Proceedings against 
him, Augustin Webster, Robert Laurence, 
and Richard Reynolds, for denying the 
Ring's Supremacy, 27 Hen. 8, 1535, 1 vol. 
472. — ^They are condemned and executed, 
ibid. ib. 

HOUGHTON, Robert, Judge of R. B. 14 Jac. 
1, 8 vol. 952. 

HOWARD, Catharine, Queen Consort of 
Henry the Eighth. — Proceedings against her 
for Incontinency, 33 Hen. 8, 1542, 1 vol. 
445. — Particulars of her Misconduct, ibid . 
ib. — Bill of Attainder brought in against 
her, ibid. 449. — She confesses her Guilt, and 
is beheaded, ibid. 451-2. 

HOWARD of Charlton, Charles, Lord. See 
Northampton^ Spencer Earl qf» 

HOWARD, Lady Fra nces « See Essex, Frances 

Howard, Countess of, 

HOWARD of Escrick, William, Lord.—His 
Evidence on the Trial of Edward Pittharris, 
8 vol. 370. — His Information to the King 
respecting the Rye-House Plot, 9 vol. 430. 
— Burnet s Account of his Apprehension 
and Confession, ibid. 593. — His Evidence 
on the Trial of Lord William Russel, ibid. 
602. — His Evidence on the Trial of Algernon 
Sidney, ibid. 849. — His Evidence on the 
Trial of John Hampden, ibid. 1065. — His 
Evidence on the Trial of Lord Delamere, 
11 vol. 531. — He gives his Vote in the 
House of Lords for the Conviction of Lord 
Stafford, 7 vol. 1552. — Evidence respecting 
him given by Burnett and others on the 
Trial of Hampden, 9 vol. 1086. — Evidence 
tendered on that Trial of his holding irre- 
ligious Opinions, ibid. 1103. 

HOWLEY Henry.— His Trial, under a Spe- 
cial Commission, at Dublin for High Tlrea* 
son in being concerned in the Irish Insur- 
rection, 43 Geo. 3,1803,28 vol. 1183.— The 
Indictment, ibid. ib. — Evidence for the 'Pro- 
secution, ibid. 1191.— The Jury find him 
Guilty, ibid. 1213.— He is executed, ibid. 
1214. 

HUBERT, Nicholas (otherwise called Paris)* 
Se« Donc/ey^ Bmy, lMrd.^liis PepoMtion 



64 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



respecting the Murder of Henry, Lord 
Damley, Husband of Mary, Queen of Scots^ 
1 vol. 931. 

HUDSON, William, Counsel.— He opens the 
Information in the Star Chamber against 
Prynhe, for writing " Histrio-mastix," 3 vol. 
562. — ^The House of Commons resolve that 
he is guilty of a Breach of Privilege in sub- 
scribing the Information in th^ Star Cham- 
. ber against Sir John Elliott and others, for 
matters done by them in Parliament, ibid. 
311. — ^Lord Mansfield's Notice of his Treatise 
on the Star Chamber, 19 vol. 1002. 

HUDSON, William.— His Trial at the Old 
Bailey for Seditious Words, 34 Geo. 3, 
1793, 22 vol. 1019. — Circumstances from 
which this Prosecution arose, ibid. ib. — 
Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 1021. — 

. The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 1032.— His 

. Sentence, ibid. ib. 

HUGGINS, John. See Bambridge, Ih)mas.^ 
Report of the Committee of the House of 
Commons appointed in 1729 to enquire into 
the state of Gaols in this Kingdom, 17 vol. 
297. — Resolutions of the House thereupon, 
ibid. 308. — ^The House resolve to address 
the King to direct the Attorney General to 
prosecute Huggins for Misconduct in his 
Office of Warden of the Fleet, ibid, ib.— His 
Trial at the Old Bailey for the Murder of 
Edward Arne by his ill-treatment of him, 
when a Prisoner in the Fleet, 3 Geo. 2, 
1729, ibid. 309. — He pleads Not Guilty, 
ibid. 310. — Speeches of the Counsel for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 311. — Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 314. — His Defence, ibid. 
330. — Mr. Justice Page*s Charge to the 
Jury, ibid. 354. — ^Tbe Jury find a Special 
Verdict, ibid. 368. — Judgment of the Court 
of King's Bench that the facts found by the 
Special Verdict amount to an Acquittal of 
Murder, ibid. 370. 

HUME, David. — Mr. Hargrave's Opinion of 
his History of England, 2 vol. 380. — Mr. 
Laing's Exposure of his wilful Mis-statement 
of facts respecting Charles the First's hearing 
the preparations for his Scafibld on the night 
before his Execution, 4 vol. 1136 (note). — 
Mr. Fox's Opinion of him as an Historian, 
ibid. ib. 

HUNGERFORD, John, Counsel, 16 vol. 18, 
698. — His Defence of trancia for High 
Treason in corresponding with the French 
Government, for the purpose of bringing in 
the Pretender, 15 vol. 965. — His Speech 
in Defence of Christopher Layer, on his 

. Trial for High Treason in levying war for 
the purpose of bringing in the Pretender, 
1 6 vol. 233.— His Defence of John Matthews, 
on his Trial for High Treason in printing a 

. Pamphlet asserting the Pretender's title, 
15 vol. 1359. 

HUNGERFORD, Lord.—He is attainted and 
exccut94 for hf^rbouhng a Traitor^ and en- 



couraging the use of Magic against the . 
King, and also for Sodomy, 32 Hen. 8, 1540, 1 
1 vol. 485. 

HUNT, John.— His Trial with Leigh Hunt, 
at Westminster, for a Seditious Libel in the 
Examiner, 51 Geo. 3, 1811, 31 vol. 367. — 
The Attorney General's Speech for the Pro- 
secution, ibid. 369. — Evidence for the Pro-' 
secution, ibid. 375. — Mr. Brougham's Sjlieech 
for the Defendants, ibid. 380. — Reply of 
the Attorney General, ibid. 401. — Lord 
Ellenborough's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
408. — The Jury acquit the Defendants, ibid. 
414. 

HURLY, Patrick.- His Trial at the King's 
Bench Bar in Ireland upon two Indict- 
ments, one for Perjury, and the other for 
Conspiracy to cheat the County of Clare, 
13 Will. 3, 1701, 14 vol. 377.— He is charged 
with both Indictments at once, ibid. ib. — 
The Case for the Prosecution opened, ibid. 
378. — Evidence against him, ibid. 379.— 
Justice Coolers Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
435. — He is found Guilty on both Indict- 
ments, ibid. 445.— For the Peijury the 
Court sentence him to pay a Fine of 100/. 
ibid. 446. 

HUSSEY, Sir William, Chief Justice of K. B. 
1 Hen. 7. — He petitions the King not to 
require the extra-judicial Opinions of the 
Judges respecting Humphrey Stafford, as they 
expected the Case to come judicially before 
them in Court, 2 vol. 880. 

HUTCHINS, John. See Bayard, Colonel 
Nicholas, 

HUTCHINSON, Charles. See SadievereU, 
William. 

HUTTON, Sir Richard, Judge of C. P. 4 Car. 
1, 3 vol. 359. — His Argument for Mr. 
Hampden, in the Case of Ship-Money, ibid. 
1191. — He says, that his private Opinion 
was always against the legality of Ship- 
Money, and that he signed the Opinion of 
the Judges in favour of it only for con- 
formity, ibid. 1198. — Sir John Finch con- 
firms this Statement, 4 vol. 6. — Proceedings 
against Thomas Harrison, for insulting him 
on the Bench, 3 vol. 1369. 

HYDE, Edward. See Clarendon, Edward, 
Earl o/".— -His Speech to the House of Lords 
against the Juages, for their Conduct in 
the Case of Ship-money, 3 vol. 1282. — He 
assists in conducting the Impeachment of 
Lord Keeper Finch, 4 vol. 15. 

HYDE, Sir Nicholas, Chief Justice of K. B. 
4 Car. 1, 3 vol. 359, 374, 401, 419.— He 
succeeded Sir Randolf Crewe in the office 
of Chief Justice, 3 vol. 1 (note). — His Answer 
in the House of Lords, o(ft being questioned 
respecting his Judgment in the Court of 
King^s Bench, on the Return of the Habeas 
Corpus brought by Sir Thorns^ Darnell mi 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



«ff 



others, imprisoned for refusing to subscribe 
to the Commission of Loans, ibid. 163. 

HYDE, Sir Robert, Chief Justice of K. B. 15 
Car. 2, 6 vol. 515, — His Charge to the Jury 
on the Trial of ^fewster and others for pub* 
lishing the Speeches and Prayers of the 
Regicides, ibid. 547. — His cruel and illegal 
treatment of Benjamin Keach, on his Trial 
for a Libel, ibid. 702, 708. — He was the 
Judge who tried and passed Sentence upon 
the Perrys, for the supposed Murder of 
Mr. Harrison, 14 vof. 1319. 

IMPEY, Sir Elijah, Chief Justice of the Su- 
preme Court of Judicature in Bengal. — His 
Charge to the Jury on the Trial of Nundo- 
comar for Forgery,* 20 vol. 1063. — His Ar- 
gument in the Supreme Court of Judicature 
in Bengal, on refusing a Motion to quash an 
Indictment for Conspiracy against a Native 
Prince, on the ground of his being an Am- 
bassador, ibid. 1119. See Nundocomar. 

IN6S, James.— His Trial at the Old Bailey 
for High Treason, in being concerned in the 
Cato-Street Conspiracy, 1 Geo. 4, 1820, 33 
vol. 957.— The Indictment, ibid. 697. — 
Speech of the Solicitor General for the Pro- 
secution, ibid. 959. — Evidence for the Pro- 
secution, ibid. 972. — ^Mr. Curwood's Speech 
for the Prisoner, ibid. 1055. — Evidence for 
the Prisoner, ibid. 1074. — ^Mr. Adolphus's 
Speech on summing up the Evidence for 
the Prisoner, ibid. 1079.— The Prisoner's 
Defence of himself, ibid. 1108.— The At- 
torney General's Reply, ibid. 1111. — Chief 
Justice Dallas's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
1135.— The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 1176. 
—His Speech on being called upon for 
Judgment, ibid. 1451. — He is executed, 
ibid. 1566. 

IRELAND, WUliam.— His Trial with Thomas 
Pickering and John Grove for High Treason 
in being concerned in the Popish Plot, 30 
Car. 2, 1678, 7 vol. 79.— They are put on 
their Trial vrith Whitebread and Fen wick, 
and plead Not Guilty, ibid. 80. — Speeches 
of the King's Counsel, ibid. 84.-^Oates's 
Evidence against them, ibid. 91. — Other 
Evidence against them, ibid. 106. — The 
Court discharge the Jury of Whitebread and 
Fenwick, there being only one Witness 
against them, and proceed against the others, 
ibid. 120. — Evidence in their Defence, ibid. 
122. — Chief Justice Scroggs's Charge to 
the Jury, ibid. 130. — ^lliey are found Guilty, 
ibid. 136.— -Sentence is passed upon them, 
ibid. 138. — Execution of Ireland and Grove, 
ibid. 142, 574. — ^Pickering is respited, but 
is afterwards executed, ibid. 144. — Burnet's 
Account of this Trial, 6 vol. 1420. 

IVY, Lady Theodosia.— Trial of an Action of 
Ejectment brought against her for the re- 
covery of an Estate at Shadwell, 36 Car. 2, 
1684, 10 vol. 555. — Evidence for the Lessor 
of the Plaintiff, ibid. 556r-Speeche8 of the 
VOL. XXXIV, 



Defendant's Counsel, ibid. 561.*— Evidence 
for the Defendant, ibid. 566 .^-Evidence in 
Reply, ibid. 608. — Discovery of a Forgery of 
some of the Defendant's documentary Evi- 
dence, ibid. 616. — Chief Justice Jemries's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. 631.— fThe Jury 
find a Verdict for the Plaintiff, ibid. 645. — 
i^e is afterwards prosecuted for forging some 
of the Deeds produced by her on this Trial, 
ibid. ib. — ^The Information against her, ibid, 
ib. — Chief Justice Jefferies's Remarks upon 
this Case on Gates's Trial for Perjury, ibid. 
' 1145. 

JACKSON, Samuel. See talker, Thomat, 

JACKSON, William.— His Trial with William 
Carter, Benjamin Tapner, Jo^n Cobby, John 
Hammond, Richard Mills, senior, ^and 
Richard Mills, juMor, for the Murder of 
William Gaily and Daniel Chater, under a 
Special Commission, at Chichester, 22 Geo. 
2, 1749, 18 vol. 1069. — Mr. Justice Foster's 
Charge to the Grand Jury, ibid. ib. — ^The 
Indictment for the Murder of Chater, ibid. 
1073.— The Indictment for the Murder of 
Gaily, ibid. .1075. — Opening Speeches of 
the Counsel for the Prosecution on the first 
Indictment, ibid. 1078. — Evidence fbr the 
Prosecution thereon, ibid. 1090. — Defences 
of the Prisoners, ibid. 1105. — ^Mr. Justice 
Foster's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 1106. — 
The Jury find them Guilty of the Murder of 
Chater, ibid. 1107. — ^Trial of Jackson and 
Carter, on the Second Indictment, for the 
Murder of Gaily, ibid. ib. — They are found 
Guilty, ibid. 1111. — Sentence of Death is 
passed upon them, ibid. ib. — ^Their conduct 
previous to their Execution, ibid. 1113. 

JACKSON, William, Rev.— His Trial in Ire- 
land for High Treason, in corresponding 
with France, and attempting to promote an 
Insurrection in Ireland, 34 & 35 Geo. 3, 
1794, 1795, 25 vol. 783.— The Indictment, 
ibid. 785. — Counsel for the Prosecution and 
for the Prisoner, ibid. 803.— The Attorney 
GeneraFs Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. 
805. — Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 
815. — Mr. Curran's Speech in his Defence, 
ibid. 849. — Mr. Ponsonby*s Speech on the 
same side, ibid. 859. — Mr. Prime Serieant's 
Reply, ibid. 863. — Lord Clonmeirs Charge 
to the Jury, ibid. 870. — The Jury find him 
Guilty, ibid. 882. — Objections made in 
arrest of Judgment, ibid. 883. — ^The Prisoner 
dies in Court before Judgment is passed 
upon him, ibid. 889. — Coroner's Inquisition 
held upon his. body, ibid. 890. 

JAMES, John.^His Trial at the Bar of the 
Court of King's Bench for High Treason, in 
being concerned in the Insurrection under 
the Fifth Monarchy Men, 13 Car. 2, 1661, 
6 vol. 67.— Account of his Apprehension, 
ibid, ib.— His Arraignment, ibid. 74.— Sub- 
stance of the Indictment, ibid. ib. — He 
pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 75. — ^ijeant 



m 



GE)}£&AL tNDEt tO 



nlyttg and Sk Utolhy ^haet open \he 
ClMtf^ ugaiiMt bMl, iM. TV.-^Evidehce 
«M«M him) ibid. 77.-^HIb Speech in his 
»e!hwee, $%ld. 80.— ^eply of tlie King's 
CiMtise), ihfd. 9ft.*--The iurj fiad hita 
O^iny, ibM. 84.— His Wife'i Ap>plttoftlioti to 
the Kifi^ OB his Mvalf, ibid. 85.— JtHlg- 
ftelil ftgaifiA htiki> ibid. 88.— His Behatiour 
<a«l4iKf his Ittprise ft tt c nt, ibM. 8d.-^liis 
OdBdmrt tte Ihe ScftMd, ibid. 98. 

JAMES THs FIRST> Ki^ of EngkwL Aee 
Goime, t/oAn, £ar/ of*.— Proceedings ift the 
Scotch Parliament against persons supposed 
to be concenied in the Gowrie Conspiracy, 1 
Tdi. 1359.»— Hfe Anstrer to the Atgnftients of 
AitihbiiAfoii Abbot against the Divorce of the 
fiarland Owntess of fissez> 8 vol. Y08»^^IIis 
Sietter to A.rchbishop Abbot reftpecdog ibe 
INiirtra^ iMd. 060. — Paper, iia his liaiid- 
wfMmgf diaciissHig wfaeoier the Faieto in 
FeNttham's Case advounted to Treason, ibid. 
€Tf« — HisSpeecb ie the House of JUMds ap- 
Utoving of tile Proceediiifpi against SirOiles 
Mbmfyenon, ibid. 1126;-->>Wits0aNi Account 
<)€ thedttonmstttncesiof ^l>eath, Nvith BlaHtop 
&eMKtt's Note theteon, ibid. 1320 (note). 

4AM£S TBE SECOND, Kiiigx)f EngloAd.— 
His iBstracttons to the Judges^ previously 
. to tfieir going on their Circnits^ lo support 
the Dedaivttioa for Liberty of Conscieace, 
ta vol* 160 (nete>.-^Baf net's Acooant t)f 
jhis inhuman Coudoet, ia personally aittend- 
ing, vrhen Dutoe of York, the application of 
the toitttre in Scotland, 6 vol. 1222 (uot^). 

JANS, >obti. See Afiglesea, JUdiard, Sari^. 

JAY and TOPtiAM.^'-^Voceddings ki Pailia- 
nent respecting that Case, 1 Will, and Maiy, 
1689, 12 vol. 821. 

Jlr¥KftflfiS, i5irC5eoTge, ^Recorder of London, 
7 vol. 8, ICr, 312, 60^, '769, 842, ^08, 959, 
l056, 1061, lice.— His Address to Richard 
Langbom, on passing Sentence of Death 
Upon him, on his Conviction for High Trea- 
son, tn being concerned in the Popish JPIot, 
7 Vd. 487. — His Speech for the Prosecution 
bn tbe Trial of Francis Smith, for publishing 
libellous 'Observations upon the condnct of 
some of the Trials relating to the Popish 
Plot, ibid. 933.— His Violent Condudt to the 
Grand jury for not finding a IPrue Bill 
against Smith, ibid. 042. — ^His Speech for 
the Prosecution on the Trial of Henry Carr, 
for publishing a similar Libel, ibid. 1114. — 
Particulars r^ated by Roger North respect- 
ing his resignation of th6 ReCordership, 8 
toi» 217 (note). 

King^s Serjeant, 8 



I ■ ll I H> *l 



«*.— 



rihMi 



v6l. 458, 363 (note), 9 vol. 128, 237, 301, 
!524, 573, 640, 653. — His Argument for the 
Cfown against the Plea to the Jurisdiction 
in Pitzharris^s Case, 8 vol. 322. — He was 
one df the Counsel for the Prosecution on 
tr^ thai or LoM V^ilK«& ftnsj^^l, 9 teA. 383. 



Kittg^aSeijeaiil>alid 
Justice of Chester, 35 Car. 2, 10 voL 1^34. 

Chief Justicfe of 

K. B. 35 Car. 2, 10 vol. 3, 31^, 358, 555.— 

Burnett Notices o|' hiifl, and bis Account 

of his Excesses on the Special Commisston 

in the West of England, siter Monmouth's 

Rebellion, 9 vol. 936 (note), 10 vol. 555 

(note).-^His Charge to the Jury on the trial 

of Algewion Sidney, ibid. 888. — His Chaige 

to the Jury on the Trial of John Hampden, 

ibid. 1104. — His intemperate Conduct to 

Counsel on the Trial of Braddon and Spefce, 

ibid. 1177.--Hi8 Charge to the Jui^ in that 

Case^ ibid. 1203^-His Charge on the Trial 

of Sir Samuel Barnardiston for Libel, ibid. 

135L— His Abuse of Sidney and Russel in 

that Charge. ilMd. 1353.— His Charge on 

the Trial of William Sacheverell and olhe^, 

for a Riot at Nottingham, 10 vol. 92. — ^His 

conduct on the Motion for Execution against 

Sir Thomas Armstrong, Ibid. 109. — Mr. 

Erskine^s Allnsion to his Coadwet in tiitt 

Case^ in his Defence of Hardy, 24 vcA, 944. 

^-Hte Chai«e to the Jury on the THnl^f Ae 

Actiou^fS(^«d«lnaMagnatniii> by&ellnke 

of Yoik«gainstOates,10vd.l 40;-*4ikChaige 

t>n the Trial of RosewoU, ibid. e37«»His Ar- 

goflsent OB giving Judgment for the EastMia 

Company in the Great Case tof Mondpolss, 

ibid. 619.— His Charge iko the Jniy on the 

Triai of an Acition of Ejoctment against die 

Lady rvy, ibid. 69l>^HiB Conduct to 0mm- 

tel on that Trial, ibid. 626.-->-H«b Chaige on 

Oates's first trial ibr Perjury, iiMd. 1210^ 

His Charge on Oates's teoond IHal ler Per- 

JUiy, ibid. 1298. 

' * George, Lord, Baron of Wem, 

Chief Justice of K. B.— His indecent Con- 
duct towards a Witness for the JProsecutioo, 
on the Trial of Lady Alice Lisle, 11 vol. 
338, 346.— His Charge to die Jury in that 
Case, iWd. 362.— His Abuse of Counsel on 
the Trial of Richard Baxter, ibid. 498.— 
His Cruelties in the West of England, after 
Monmouth^ Rebellion, ibid. 802 (note). 

Lord Chancellor, 1 



lAtM^B. 



wtamtiJkm 



Jac, 2, 11 vol. 1157> 1324.— He is appointed 
Lord High Steward on the Trial of l^rd 
DMamere, ibid. 512.— Mr, Fox's Aecoant 
of him, 10 vol. 555 (note)*- Foslter says, 
that tie wa9> perhaps, the vvorst Judge that 
ever disgraccNl Westminster-Hafi, 11 vol. 
371 (note).-^eijeant Ditvy says, that, irith 
all his faalts, he was always esteeiued a 
great Law3rer, Id vol. 611.— Remafrk npon 
his Titles> 11 voU 381 (note). 

JEFFERYS, Elizabeth. See .Skwi, io^ 

JEFFREY, Frnneis, Advocate^ 33 vol. 633.-- 
His Speech in Defence of Thomas Baiv^, 
on bis Triai in Scodand, for Seditioi> ^^ 
vol. 88i 



TH& STATE TEIAL& 



JEKYXXi Sir J<»8epb> Kiog'i Serjeant, 15 vol. 
904^-^Hi8 Speech ia the House of Com- 
mons in the Debate on the great Case of 
Ashby and White, 14 vol. 476.— His Speech 
on I>r. Saohevereirs Trial in Support of the 
Principles <rfthe Revolution, 15 vol. 95.— 
His Speech in support of the Impeachment 
of the Earl of Wintoun, ibid, 830»— He is 
sppcMoled one of the Managers for the 
Hotite of Comtnons on the Impeachment of 
the Bart of Oxford, ibid. 1164. 

JENKES, Franch.— Proceedings against him 
for a Speech made by him at Guildhall, 28 
Car. 2. 1676, 6 vol. 1189.— The Speech, 
ilTid. ib'.— He is arrested and eJcaniined by 
the Privy Council, ibid. 1192.— He is Com- 
mitted to the Gatehouse, Ibid. 1194.— He 
makes several ineffeetual applications to be 
admitted to Bail, ibid. 1196.— He is after- 
wards Bailed, ibid. 1308.— Probability that 
this Case contributed to the passing of the 
ifttlwiAa Corpus Aet, ibid, ib* (note). 

JfiNKIS, John. See Pilkington, nomas. 

JENKINS, David, a Welsh Judge.— Proceed- 
inp in Parliament against him fof passing 
Sentence of Death against persons convicted 
of Treason^ in refusing to assist the King, 
and for talung up arms himself against the 
Parliament, 23 Car. 1> 1647, 4 vol. 922.— 
He refuses to kneel or plead at the Bar of 
the House of Commons, ibid. 924. — He 
oheerves the same Conduct in the House of 
Lords, ibid. 925.— *His Vindication of him- 
sdfy ibid. 926.— His Reply to an anonymous 
Answer to his Vindication, ibid. 930.— Plea 
delivered by him to the Parliamentary Com- 
missioners for keeping the Great Seal, when 
sued in Chancery befbre them, ibid. 941. — 
His Defence of this Plea, ibid. 943.— His 
Remonstrance to the Loids and Commons, 
ibid. 946. — His Conduct when applied^ in 
Prison to acknowledge the power of the rar- 
liament, ibid. 950.— Catalogue of his Works, 
ibid. 921 (hote). 

JENKINS^ Sir Leoline, Secretary of State.— 
Burnet's Account of him» 8 vol. 228 (note). 

JENKINS, William. See^idrf, Ce§><m«M&im. 

ISNKER, Sir Thomas, Recorder ef Londoni 
^ Car. «,9 vol. 1838j 10 vol* 162, 469, 484. 
«^HIs Speech for the Prosecution on the 
MalOfWm. Sdcheverell and others, for a 
Riot at Nottingham, 10 vol. 36.— His Speech 
for the Prosecution on the Trial of Henry 
Lord Delamere for Treason, 11 vol. 528. 

mrr I wn ritr — k Baroii of the Exchequer, 4 
Jat. S^ 1ft vol« d7, ISO. 

jTudge of C. P. 4 Jac. 2> 



1ft vol. 124.— He was expressly excepted out 
of the Act of Indemnity which passed in 
16d0, \^ vol. 1^41. 



lyui 



ntri in>iiiifi •■■ Sefjeaot at La;#, 1 ABii6.— 
Bte Uff^Mlk iHk P^tM el Ri^ard Hetha^ 



way OB his Trial for a Cheat, in pretendiDg 
to be bewitched, 14 vol. 668. 

JERMYN, Philip, Judge Of tk« Upper fiinch 
during the Cooimonwe^thi 4 tol. 12l$9« 

JOHNSON JPrancis.— His Trial dt Worcester 
for High Treason, under the Stat, tf Bliz. 
c. 2, for coming M a Popish PH^st ihto 
England, and remaining there. 31 C&r. 2, 
1679, 7 vol. rid.- H6 reftised the Oaths of 
Allegiance and Supremacy before a Justice 
of Peace at the Sessions, ibid. r30.-»-Evidetce 
against him on his Trial, ibid. t34.— He is 
found Guilty, ibid. 744.— Sentence of Death 
is passed upon him, ibid. 745.— BiS Dying 
Speech, ibid. ^47, 7A0. 

JOHNSON, George. See AHerbufiff J^tou^i 
Bishop, 

JOHNSON, Robert^ Judge of C« P. in IllAtnd. 
•^Proceedings against him ifi the QeilfU of 
King's Bench and Bsdhequer ill Ireland, &nd 
in the Court of King^sJBench ia Stigbmd^ 
for Libels upon the Lord Lieutemltit and 
other high Officers in Xf6lttttd> 46 iM 46 
Geo. 3, 1805, 29 voU dl.<^Upott HMftiftt ar- 
rested in Ireland, hd iUes out ft Hftheas 
Corpus returnable beford the Chief Justice 
of the King's Bench theriS, ibid. 8f .— 
The Return to the Habeas Corpus, ibid. ib. 
>— His Account of the circumstances whiah 
preceded his Arrest, ibid. 90.-— The Argu- 
ment upon the Return is adjourned into the 
Court of King^s Bench, ibid. 102.— Counsel 
for the Prosecution and for the Defendant, 



Argument 

Discharge, ibid. 124. — Mr. Johnson^s Argu^ 
ment on Uie same side, ibid. 140.-^Argu- 
inent of the Attorney General in Replr, imd. 
167 Judgment of the Court tlial the De- 
fendant is not entitled to be dischaif ed^ i/Lu 
Justice Day dissenting, ibid. 180. — ^rroceed-- 
ings in the Court of Exchequer in Ireltod, 
upon a Habeas Corpus sued out of that 
Court by the Defendant, Ibid. . 215.— Mr. 
Burrowes's Argument for the D«fetidliht*8 
Distiharge,ibid . ib^-^Mr. Ciimy/s A»ttffi«&t 
on the same side, ibid. 226. — Mr. Jdomlon's 
Argument on the same side, ibid. ff58.»-^Mr« 
Prime Seijeant's Argument against the De- 
fendant's Discharge, ibid* 288*— Jtfdgltteilt 
of the Court of Exchequer Against the 
Defendant's Discharge, Mr< Baron Smith 
dissentincN ibid. 293.— Proceedings in the 
Court of King^s Bench in England, upon the 
Defendant's Plea to the Jurisdictioh of the 
Court, ibid. 359.— the Indictment* ibid* ib* 
«— His Plea to the Jurisdiction, ibid. 385. — 
General Demurrer thereto, ibid» 386«— ^r. 
Abbott's Argument in support of the De* 
murrer, ibid. 388.-:Mr. Richardijon's Argu* 
ment in support of the Ple% ibid. 394.— 
Judgment of the Court against the Plea, 
ibid. 4lO.-^His trial, at the Bar of th# Court 
F 2 



u 



GJENERAL INDEX TO 



of King's Bench at Westminster, ibid. 413. 
—Introductory Note to the Trial, containing 
the Proceedings in Parliament subsequently 
to the Decision of the Irish Courts, ibid. ib. 
— CSounsel for the Prosecution and for the 
Defendant, ibid. 423. — Speech of the Attor- 

. ney General for the Prosecution, ibid. ib. — 
Bridence for the Prosecution, ibid. 436. — 
Mr. Adam's Speech for the Defendant, ibid. 

. ■ 458. — Evidence for the Defendant, ibid. 479. 

. —Reply of the Attorney General, ibid. 492. 
«-Lord Ellenborough's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 498.— The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 
502. — ^A Nolle Prosequiis afterwards entered 
on the Record, ibid. ib. 

JOHNSON, Samuel.— His Trial at the Bar of 
thetlburt of King's Bench for publishing 
two seditious Libels, 2 Jac. 2, 1686, 11 vol. 
Id39.-^ubstance of the Information, ibid. 
1340.^— Evidence against him, ibid. 1346. — 

■ The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 1350.— The 
Sentence, ibid. ib. — ^The Judgment reversed 
in Parliament after the Revolution, ibid. 
1351. — His '^Reasons for the Establishment 
of a Standing Army, and for dissolving tlie 
Militia," ibid. 1341 (note).— Another Work 

. of his, extracted from the Second Volume of 
State Tracts, and published in 1692, ibid. 
1342 (note). 

JOHNSTON, William.— Proceedings against 
him at Edinburgh for Contempt of Court, in 
publishing a scandalous Account of the Trial 
of Anderson and others before the Court of 
Justiciary, 33 Geo. 3, 1793, 23 vol.43.--The 
Court order him to appear and answer for 
his conduct, ibid. 45. — He is sentenced to 
three Months Imprisonment, and to find 
Sureties for three years, ibid. 59. — Proceed- 
ings against him in 1794, upon the forfeiture 
of his Sureties for good Behaviour, by a 
seditious Correspondence with Wm. Skirving, 
ibid. 60.— Petitions against him, ibid. ib. — 
The Correspondence with Skirving, ibid. 65 
(note). — ^Answers of himself and his Sureties 
to the Petition, ibid. 69. — ^No further Pro- 
cedure took place, ibid. 80. 

JOHNy the Painter. See AUken, James, 

JONES, David. See Grey de Werk^ Ford, 
Lord. 

JONES, Edward. See Abington, Edward. 

JONES, John, 5 vol. 1004, 1077, 1247. See 
Begiades. 

JONES, Sir Thomas, Judge of K. B. 29 Car. 2, 
7 vol. 59, 174, 261, 706, 780, 838, 935, 1047, 
1073, 1527, 8 vol. 243, 465, 564, 9 vol. 127, 
329. — His Judgment in the Court of King's 
Bench against the Discharge of the Earl of 
Shaftsbury, upon a Return to a Habeas 
Corpus brought by him upon his Commit- 
ment by the House of Lords, 6 vol. 1296. — 
His Charge to the Jury on the Trial of Tas- 
boTough and Price, for Subornation of Per- 
jury, 7 vol. 922. — ^He delivers the Judgment 
gf the Court in the Case of the Quo War- 



ranto against the Corporation of London, < 
vol. 1265, 1267 (note).— He delivers hii 
Opinion on the Trial of Lord'WilliamRassel 
that want of Freehold is no Cause of Chal 
lenge to a juror, 9 vol. 592. — His Charge u 
the Jury on the Trial of SirThos.Gascoigne 
for High Treason, in being concerned in th< 
Popish Plot, 7 vol. 1036. — His Defence ii 
the House of Commons of the Judgment o: 
the Court of King's Bench in the C&se o 
Jay and Topham, 12 vol. 823.— The Housji 
declare him to be guilty of a Breach of Pri 
vilege, by concurring in that Judgment, ibid 
834, — ^The House of Commons resolve U 
impeach him for Misconduct as a Judge, ii 
imposing exorbitant Fines and refusing 
Bail, 8 vol. 195. 

. Chief Justice of C. P 

10 vol. 1082, 1239. — He presided at th« 
Trials of Fernley, Ring, Gaunt, and Cornish 
for High Treason, 11 vol. 389. — Hogei 
North's Character of him, 8 vol. 163 (note). 
— Koger Coke's Account of. his . removai 
from Office, ibid. 195 (note). 

JONES, Valentine.— His Trial at Westminster, 
for Frauds practised by him in his Office oi 
Commissary General to the Forces in the 
West Indies, 49 Geo. 3, 1809, 31 vol. 251* 
— ^Abstract of the Indictment, ibid, ib^ — The 
Attorney General's Speech for the Prosecu- 
tion, ibid. 254? — Eviaence for the Prosecu- 
tion, ibid. 268. — ^Mr. Dallas's Speech in his 
Defence, ibid. 293. — Evidence for the De- 
fendant, ibid. 308. — Reply of the Attorney 
General, ibid. 311.— Lord EUenborough's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. 321. — ^The Jury 
find him Guilty, ibid. 336.— Proceedings in 
the Court of Kind's Bench on his being 
brought up for Judgment, 33 vol. 1567. — 
Mr. Dallas's Speech in mitigation of Punish- 
ment, ibid. 1575. — ^The ['Attorney General's 
Speech in Aggravation, ibid. 1578. — The 
Judgment of the Court, ibid. 1583. 

JONES, Sir William, Judge of K. B. 3 Car. 1, 
3 vol. 359. — His Answer in the House of 
Lords, for his Judgment as one of the Court 
of King's Bench on the Habeas Corpus 
brought by Sir Thomas Darnell and others, 
imprisoned for refusing to subscribe to the 
Loan, 3 vol. 162. — He signs the Opinion in 
favour of Ship-Money v?ith the other Judges, 
ibid. 844. — His qualified Opinion in favour 
of Ship-Money in the Case of Hampden, 
with his Argument in Support thereof^ ibidl 
1181. 

JONES, Sir William, Attorney General, 3d 
Car. 2, 7 vol. 234, 261, 312.— His Speech 
on opening the Case against Philip, Earl of 
Pembroke, on his Triid in the House of 
Lords for the Murder of Mr. Cony, 6 voL 
1321. — His Speech for the Prosecution ob 
the Trial of Stayley for Treason, ibid. 1503- 
— Being called by Writ as Assistant to the 
House, he sat within the Bar on that occa- 
sioui ibid. ib.^-His Speech for the Pro^ectN 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



OB 



tioo, on the Trial of Edward Coleman for 
Treason, in being concerned in the Popish 
Plot, 7 fol. 9. — His Speech for the Prosecu- 
lioo on the Trial of Lord Comwallis for 
Murder, ibid. 149. — His Speech for the Pro- 
KCQtion, on the Trial of the supposed Mur- 
derers of Sir Edmondbury Godfrey, ibid. 
163.— Characters of him by Burnet, Roger 
North, and Sir William Temple, 8 irol. 174 
(note). 

JONES, Sir William.— His Dialogue between 
I Gentleman and a Farmer, on the Principles 
ofGoremment, 21 vol. 894. 

JUNIUS.— Trial of John Almon for publishing 
Jnnins's Letter to the King, 20 vol. 803. — 
The Letter aa set out in the Indictment, ibid. 

805. 

liACH, Benjamin. — ^His Trial at the Assizes 
for the County of Bucks, for a Libel, 17 Car. 
2, 1665, 6 vol. 701.— Chief Justice Hyde's 
nfeeling Conduct towards him, ibid. 702, 
f08.— Tlielndictmentj ibid. 703. — Hepleads 
Not Guilty, ibid. 705. — Evidence against 
lum, ibid. ib. — He is found Guilty, ibid. 708. 
Sentence passed uponhim^ ibid. 710. 

JIEARNEY, Edward.— His Trial under a 
! Special Commission of Oyer and Terminer 
I at Dublin, for High Treason in being conn 
I eemed in the Irish Insurrection, 43 Geo. 3, 
I 1803, 28 vol. 683.— Mr. Justice Downes's 
i Charge to the Grand Jury, ibid. 684.— The 
I lodicunent, ibid. 692.— Speech of the At- 
torney General for the Prosecution, Ibid. 
695.— Eridence for the Prosecution, ibid. 
r07.— Mr. Ball's Speech for the Prisoner, 
ibid, 735. — Evidence for the prisoner, ibid. 
742.— Lord Norbury's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 746.-The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 
751.— He is executed^ ibid. 752. 

KEATING, John, Chief JusUce of C. P. in 
Ireland, 1 Will, and Mary .—His Charge to 
the Grand Jury previously to the Trial of 
KTeral Protestants found in arms in Ireland, 
12tol. 616.— Lord Clarendon's Account of 
K ibid. ib. (note). 

XEBLE, Richard. — ^He is one of the Commis- 
Moncrs for the Trial of John Lilburne for 
High Treason, l Car. 2, 1649, 4 vol. 1269. 
-His Charge to the Jury on the Trial, ibid. 
1401.— He is President of the High Court 
01 Justice, on the Trials of Christopher Love 
vA John Gibbons, 5 vol. 49, 268. 

^^^^G, Josiali. — His Examinations re- 
jecting the Rye-House Plot, 9 vol. 365.— 
«« Eridence against Thomas Walcot, ibid. 
^3.— His Evidence against William Hone, 
*id. 574.— His Evidence against Algernon 
Sidney, ibid. 848. 

^AN, Thomas.— His Trial at DubUn 
ywer a Special Commission of Oyer and 
Aenniner, for Higb Trea.Hon, in being con- 
doned in the Irish Insurrection, 43 Geo. 3, 



1803, 28 vol. 1239.— The Indictmeiity ibid, 
ib. — Speech of the Attorney General for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 1243.— 'Evidence for the 
Prosecution,ibid. 1246.— Mr.Busbe'sSoeech 
for the Prisoner, ibid. 1254. — ^LordNornury's 
Charge to the Jur^, ibid. 12Q5.— The Jur/ 
find him Guilty, ibid. 1268. — ^Lord Norbury's 
Address on passing Sentence upon himy 
ibid. 1269. — He is exeouted, ibid. 1272. 

KEIGLE, Henry. See Green, Captain Thonm, 

KEITH, Alexander.— His Trial at Edinburgh 
ibr Sedition, Mutiny, and Tumult in Burgh. 
2 Jac.2, 1686, 11 vol. 1017.— He is found 
Guilty, and sentenced to Death, ibid. 1024. 

KELLY, George. See AUerbury, Frmea, 
Bishop, 

KELYNG, John, King's Seijeant, 5 vol. 1177» 
6 vol. 76, 229. — He was ordered to attend 
as Counsel for the King at the Consultation 
of the Judges previously to the Trial of the 
Regicides, 5 vol. 971. — His insulting Con« 
duct to Sir Henry Vane on his Trial, 6 vol. 
171. 

Sir John, Judge of K. D. 15 Car. 2, 



6 vol. 532. 



, Chief Justice of K. B. 18 
Car. 2, 6 vol. 769, 879. — Mr. Luders says 
that he had the character of being a violent 
Cavalier, 6 vol. 910 (note).— He was accused ^ 
by the House of Commons of illegally fining 
Juries, ibid, ib.— Account of the I^roceed- 
jngs against him in the House of Commons^ 
ibid. 992* — His Report of the Opinion of 
the Judges in Messenger's Case, ibid. 892. 
— His Report of the Resolutions of the 
Judges in Ix)rd Morley's Case, ibid. 769. 

KENDALL, Thomas.— Proceedings in the 
King's Bench respecting him and Riefaard 
Roe, on a Habeas Corpus upon a Commit* 
ment for High Treason, by the Secretary of 
State, 7 Wm. 3, 1695, 12 vol. 1359.— The 
Return to the Habeas Corpus, ibid.. ib. — Sir 
Bartholomew Shower's Argument against the 
legality of the Commitment, ibid, ib.— 
Answer of the Attorney and Solicitor Ge* 
neral, ibid.l 366. — Sir Bartholomew Shower's 
further Argument against the Commitment, 
ibid. 1368.— The Court bail the Prisoners, 
ibid. 1376. 

KENMURE, William, Viscount, 15 vol. 761. 
See Denventwater, JameSf EarV o/*.— Letter 
written by him on the day before his Exe-i 
cution, ibid. 803.— His Execution, ibid. 806. 

KENN, Dr. Thos. Bishop of Bath and Wells. 
See Seven Bit^.— Granger's Account of 
him, 12 vol. 186. 

KENNEDY, Thos.— His Trial in Ireland, for 
High Treason, in being concerned in the 
Rebellion of the Defenders, 36 Geo. 3, 1796, 
26 vol. 353.— The Indictment, ibid. 355. — 
The Attorney General's Sneech for the Pro-^ 
secutioD, ibid. 362.— Evioence for the Pio- 



1/0 



GENEttAL INDEX TO 



SMUtloDy lUd. d65v^Mr. McNally's Spetch 
for the Deftnet, ibid. 370.-^Mr. J^ysaght's 
Sbeech on lommiDg up the Evidence for the 
Befonee^ ibid. 3r8.^Mr. Prime Serjeant's 
Reply, ibid. 381.— Xord ClonmelVs Charge 
to the Jary^ ibid. 383.-*^The Jury find him 
Guilty bnt recommeDd him to mercy» on 
aeconnt of his youth^ ibid. 388. — Lord Clon- 
mell'a Address on passing Sentence upon 
him itQd Hart, ibid. 420. — ^Lord Clonmeil's 
Address to the Grand Jury on the close of 
this and the other Trials of the Defenders^ 
ibid. 4t5, 

EBIinrON, Uoyd, Counsel.^-His Speech in 
Defence of Lord George Gordon on his Trial 
ibr High Treason, in having promoted the 
No Popery Riots in 1780, 21 vol. 546. 

■■ . ■ '■ Chief Justice of the Court 

of Great Session for the County of Denbigh. 
He delivers the Judgment of the Court in 
favour of the postponement of the Trial of 
the Dean of SW Asaph for a seditious Libel, 
21 vol. 868. 

^m Chief Justice of K. B. 



>f»a 




22 vol. 309, 358. — ^His Charge to the Jury 
on the Trial of John Stockdale for a Libel 
on the House of Commons, 29 vol. 291. — 
His Charge on the Trial of John Frost for 
Seditious Words, ibid. &16.w.His Charge on 
the Trial of Lambert and Perry for publish- 
ing a Seditious Libel in the Morning Chro- 
nlele, ibid. 10ia.<--His Charge on the Trial 
of Stone for High Treason, 25 vol.1493. — 
His Charge on the Trial of John Reeves for 
ft Libel on the English Constitution, 26 vol. 
590.>-*His Charge on the Trial of Thomas 
Williams for publishing a blasphemous Libel, 
ibid. 703. 

KBRNE. Chartes.-^His Trial at Hereford for 
High Treason under the Stat. 27 £lia. o. 2. 
for eoming as a Seminary Priest into £ng- 
land, and remaining there, 31 Car. 2, 1679, 
7 vol.- 707.r-^The Indictment, ibid, ib, — 
lEvidenee against him, ibid. ib^Evidence 
in his Defence, ibid. 712.-^Chief Justice 
Scroggs's Charge to the Jury, ibid.714.-«The 
Jury acquit him, ibid. 716. 

KETELBEY, Abel, Counsel, 16 vol. 114, 17 
vol. 435. — His Speech in Defence of John 
Matthews on his Trial for High Treason, in 
publishing a Pamphlet asserting the Pre- 
tender's Title, 15 vol. 1364.«-*His Speech in 
Defence of Christopher Layer on his Trial 
T High Treason, in levying war to bring in 
Pretender, 16 voU 237, 

KEY, Roberta cSee IFilkwgttm, Tkonm. 

KEYES, Robert. See Winter, Robert. 

KilYESj TliomajJ, See CAamocft; Bo^r*, 

KTOD, CaptaiA WilliauJ. His Trial in the 
Adoiiralty Court for Murder upon the High 
Sea^, 13 Win, 3, 1701. 14 vol. 123.-~He 
hesitates to plead, ibid. 127.~He pleads 



Not Guilty, ibid. 131.— The Indiotnent, 
ibid. 130. — Evidence against him, ilMd. 134. 
—His Defence, ibid. 188. — Evidence foi 
him, ibid. ib. — Chief Baron Ward charges 
the Jury, ibid. 143.— The Jury find him 
Guilty, ibid. 146.— His Trial with Nicholas 
Churchill, James Howe, Robert Lamley, 
William Jenkins, Gabriel Loffe, Hugh Par- 
rott, Richard Barlicorn, Abel Owens, and 
Darby Mullins, for Robbery and Piracy on 
a Ship called the Quedagh Merchant, at thi 
same Admiralty Sessions, ibid. 147. — The 
Indictment, ibid. ib.-<-Several of tbePrisoners 
state that they surrendered upon the King*s 
Proclamation, and are therefore entitled to i 
Pardon, ibid. 148. — ^The Proclamation, ibid. 
149. — ^The Court decide that th^ are not 
within the words of the Proclamation, ibid. 
151. — Opening of the Case for the Prosecu- 
tion, ibid. ib. — Evidenee for the Prosecution] 
ibid. 155.*-'Kidd's Defence, ibid. ie9.-*H6 
gives in evidence Commissions of Reprisals 
and for cruising against the French, and as« 
serts that the Quedagh Merchant had a 
French Pass on board, ibid. ib.-^DefeBces 
of the other Prisoners, ibid. 173.«-^Chief 
Baron Ward's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 180. 
-^The Jury find them all Guilty excepting 
Lamley, Jenkins, and Barlicorn, ibid. 186. 
—Four other Indictments for Piracy against 
them, ibid. 187. — ^ITieir Trials on two of the 
other Indictments, ibid, ib, — 'They are found 
Guilty, with the exception of Lamley, Jenk- 
ins, and Barlicorn, on both Indictments, ibid. 
%X7* — ^Their Trial on the two remaining In- 
dictments, ibid, ib, — ^Three of them, wlio 
came in on the Proclamation, ples^d Guilty, 
ibid. 218.— The others, excepting Lamley, 
Jenkins, and Bariicom, are found Guilty, 
ibid. 231, — Sentence of Death Is passed 
upon all who were convicted, ibid. 233«— 
Kidd is executed, ibid. 234.— Proceed- 
ings in the House of Commons f^om which 
these Trials arose, ibid. 123 (note)t 

SILLEN, John.— His Trial with John Mac 
Cann, otherwise called John Mac Kenna, 
under a Special Commission at Dublin, for 
High Treason in being concerned in tha 
Irish Insurrection, 43 Geo. 3, 1803, 28 vol, 
995.'^Mr. Prime Serjeant's Speech for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 996.— Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid, 998.— vMr, Curran's 
Speech in their Defence, ibid. lQ06.-^Eri- 
dfince for the Prisoners, ibid, tP13,— Mr. 
Baron Daly's Charge to the Jpry, ibid* 10?8. 
—The Jury find them Guilty, ibid, 1040.- 
They are executed, ibid, 1042. 

lilLMABNQCK, William, i;arlof.-Procfl€d- 
ingf iu the House of Peers on Indictroents 
against him, George Eari of Cromertif, and 
Arthur Lord Balmerino, for IIighTrea»eB,in 
being concerned in the Rebellion of 1745, 20 
Geo. 2, 1 746, 1 6 vol. 441 .—Resolutions of the 
House respecting the method of their Trial, 
ibid. 442.— Commission to Lord Chancellor 
Hardwieke, as Lord High Stewafd, ibli 



THE STATE T«IAta, 



449^-i^flM ladietnemts, ibid. 454.— The 
Lord Hiffh Steward's Address to (he Pri- 
sooen wnea brought to the Bar> ibid. 459. 
v^liBFd Kikmavnock and Lord Cromertie 
plead 'Ottilly, ibid. 460, 461.^Lord Bal- 
merino pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 462. — 
Speeches of the Kiog's Counsel on opemng 
th&r Case ^aiost Lcud Balmecino, ibid. 463. 
— Evidence for the Prosecution, ibi^. 470. — 
Uia Defenoe, ibid. 48X* — lie is unanin^ovisly 
found Guilty, ibid. 487. — Lord Kilmarnock^ 
Address q^ being eallfd upon for Ji^4giQeBtf 
ibid, 489. — ^Lord Croptertie's Speech on the 
same Occasion, ihid> 49^. — Loj^ Bal^nerino 
in^kes an Objection in arrest of Judgment, 
ibid. 494i^^He withdraws his Objection,. 
ibid. 497* — ^Sipeech of the lord High Stew- 
ard WH pmi^g Judgmtii^t, ibid, ib.— AccQunt 
of the conduct of Lord Kilmarnock after his 
Sentence, {^nd ^t his Execution, by James 
Foster, ibid. 503.— His interview with Lord 
Balmerino on his way to the place of Execu- 
^op, ibid, §11. — His Peliuon to t/ie Kipg, 
ibid. 5Xi% — His I-etter to his Son, ibid. 516. 
— Paper delivered by him to ]VIr. Foster at 
the place of Execution, ibid. 517. — Account 
qf his aud Lord Balmerino's Conduct by apo- 
ther hand, ibid. 5l8.-^Case of Lord Cro- 
mertie, sis priQted and said to be presented 
to ^he KiQg, ibid. 525. — He is pardoned, 
ibid, 5^8. — ^The Paper delivered by Lord 
Balmerino to the Sheriffs at the pl^^ce of 
Execution, ibid. 523, 856. 

KILWARDEN, Arthur, Viscount, Chief Jus- 
tice of K. B. in Ireland, 27 vol. 1343.-^His 
Charge to the Jury in the Case of Hevey 
ag^ipst Sirr, 28 vol. 47. — Accourit of his 
Assassination in the Streets of Dublin, ibjd. 
734, 700 (npte). See Wolfp, Arthur. 

KIMBOLTON, Edward, Lord. See Mm- 
ekeMter^ Edward, Earl of. — Proceedings in 
Parliament upon a Charge of High Treason, 
made by Charles the First against him, 
Denzil Hollia, Sir Arthur Haslerig, John 
Pym, John Hampden, and William Strode, 
If.Car. 1, 1641, 4 vol. 88.— The Attorney 
General, by the King's Command, exhibits 
Articles of High Treason against them in the 
House of Lord^, ibid. ib. — ^The King sends a 
Message to the House of Commons, requir- 
ing the Fiye Members to be given up to him, 
ibid. 36. — ^The Answer of the Cooimous, 
ibid* 37.-^The King goes to the House of 
Commons apd demands the Five Members, 
ibid. 87,— The Speaker's Answer to jhe King, 
ibid, 90. — Lord Clarendon's Remarks on the 
inmrudence of this measurci ibid. 87 (note). 
— ^Tha Cop^mons declare the King's coming 
to theiir |Iouse to be a breach of their Pnvi- 
|e|;es, ibid. 02,— Speeches of IVfr- Pytn> Sir 
A. ll^Jerigf ^nd Mr. Strode, in vindication 
of Ihienos^lves frgm the ^^rticli^s of Treason, 
ibid. 93. — ^The King abandons thjB Proceed- 
ings against them, ibid. 101. — Tlie Attorney 
G^eral disclaims all knowledge of the truth 
of the Artifites charged against them, ibid. 



II 



10$.-The PeclmtiQl M ^ n9m of 
Cos^moBS respecting tl^e brfadt^ of their 
Privileges by these Prooe^iiu^ ibid. )Q4. 
^The Cownons pe^itio^ w King to 
proceed agaiqst the Lgjrd Kimbplton and. ^he 
Five Men^beriTs, ibid. 107.— Tl^ King a^biiin- 
dons their farther Pros^ution, ifa^d. 108*. — 
An Act of Parliament is passed to yinc^ps^te 
them, ibid. 109.— Lior4 CWeudon's Aoooqnt 
of theiv triumphal Return frpos London to 
Westminster, ibid, ib.— rHis ^ip^ks on^he 
efieots of these Proceedings, ibid. 83 (np^). 
— After he beifiame Earl of M^^chester, l^ 
Kin\bolton s^t ^ J^dge vpoi^ the Trial oflne 
9egioi«fes» ^ vol. 9^ (note). 

KINCH, Tbomas. See SMekhy WiUiani, 

KllNG, peten Counsel. — {lis Speech in |he 
Ifouse of Commons in \he Debate oi| |he 

Greiit Cas^ of Ashby and Whitej 14 vol. 
7?9. 

KING, Sir Peter.-r}lis Speech iv^ Suppprt of 
the Second Article of Impeachment agaifist 
Dr. Sacheverell, 1$ vo}. 134.— |lis Speech 
in Reply, to 3s(chevereU's Defence ta^^at 
A^de, ibid. 419. 



• Chief Jiistice of C. P. 5 

Geo. 1. — Hi^ Charge to the Jury on |he 
Trial of John Matthews for High Treason^in 
printing a Pamphlet asserting ^he Pretepder's 
title, 15 vol. 1386. — His Speech on deliver- 
ing his Opinion in favour of the King's Pre- 
rogative concerning the Marriage and pd|i-. 
cation of the Royal Family, ibid. t222.— His 
Charge to the Jury on the Trial of Wood- 
burae and Coke on $^ Prosepution under the 
Coventry Act, for slitting the nose of Mr. 
Crispe, 16 vol. 74. — He was Speaker pf the 
House of Lords on the Trial of th^ I|n« 
peacbment of Loid Ch^noellor Mai^elesfield, 
ibid. 768. 

KINGSTON, Elizabeth, Duphess of.— Her 
Trial in the House of fiprds for Bigan^y, 16 
Geo. 3, 1776, 20 v<>l« 855.— The Court of 
King's Bench, on her being brought up by 
Habeas Corpus, admit her to Bailwit}! the 
consent of the Prosecutor, ibid. ib. (no^e). 
Commission to Lord Chancellor Bathurst to 
be Lord High Steward|ibid. 358* — Certiorari 
and Return thereto containing the Indict* 
ment, ibid. 368.— The Lord High Steward's 
Address to her on her being brought to the 
Bar, ibid. 370.— She pleads If pt Guilty, ibjd. 
372.---She offers to produce a Sentence of 
Jactitation in the Ecclesiastical Court agaipsi 
her first Marriage, ibid. ib.-r-The Attorney 
General objects to the admissibility of it in 
Evidence, ibid. ib*-rrHer Coifnse) ^re he^rd 
in support of the production of the Spnt#qee, 
ibid. 8T4.-r-.The Attorney G9neral i^onsents 
that the Proceedings in the Eeclesiastipal 
Court should be read, ibid. 375. — TN Pro- 
ceedings are read, ibid. 377.— Mr.. Wallace's 
Argument for the Duchess that the Sep|#»€e 



7i 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



of the EcclesiasticftlGonrt, aDculling the first 
Marriage, is a conclusive Answer to the 
charge of Bigamy, ibid. 391.— Mr. Mans- 
field's Argument on the same side, ibid. 403. 
—Dr. Calvert's Argument on the same 
side, ibid. 417. — ^Dr. Wynne's Argument on 
the same side, ibid. 429.--Tbe Argument of 
the Attorney General for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 446. — Argument of the Solicitor 
General on the same side, ibid. 464.— Mr. 
Bunning's Argument on the same side, ibid. 
481.— Dr. Harris's Argument on the same 
side, ibid. 494 —Mr. Wallace's Reply, ibid. 
508. — Dr; Calvert is heard in reply, ibid. 
530. — ^'I'he House direct the Attorney General 
to proceed with his Charge, ibid. 539. — 
His Speech on opening the Case, ibid. ib. — 
Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 559. — 
The Duchess's Defence, ibid. 602.— Evi- 
dence for the Defence, ibid. 613.— The 
Solicitor General declines to reply, ibid. 
622.— The Lords find her Guilty^ ibid. 623 
-—She prays the benefit of Peerage according 
to the Statutes, ibid. 625.--The Attorney 
General's Argument against her claim to the 
benefit of Peerage, ibid ib. — Mr. Wallace's 
Argument in Support of it, ibid. 633. — Mr. 
Mansfield's Argument on the same side, 
ibid; 634.-^The Attorney General's Reply, 
ibid. 637.— The Question is referred t5 the 
Judges, who give their Opinion that a 
Peeress is entitled to the benefit of the 
Statures, ibid. 642 (note). — She is discharged, 
ibid. 644.. 

KINLOCH, Charles and Alexander.— Foster's 
Report of the Proceedings relative to their 
Plea to an Indictment for High Treason, in 
being concerned in the Rebellion of 1745, 
that tbey were born and apprehended in 
Scotland and ought to be tried there, 20 Geo. 

• 2, 1746, 18 vol. a95.— They plead Not 
Guilty in the first instance, ibid. 396. — Af- 
terwards the Jury are discharged by consent, 
and the Prisoners are permitted to withdraw 
their Plea of Not Guilty, and to plead spe- 
cially to the Jurisdiction of the Court, ibid. 
397. — ^Their Plea to the Jurisdiction, ibid. 
398. — ^The Attorney General demurs to it, 
ibid. 400. — The Court give Judgmentagainst 
the Plea, ibid. 401. — On pleading a second 
time Not Guilty, they are tried and convicted, 
ibid. ib. — They move by their Counsel in 
arrest of Judgment, on the ground that the 
Discharge of the first Jury was illegal,, ibid. 
402. — ^The Court give Judgment against the 
Prisoners, ibid. 405 —Mr. Justice Foster's 
l^easons for concurring in the Judgment of 
the Court, ibid. ib. — The Prisoners were not 
executed, ibid. 401. 

KINLOCH, Sir Archibald Gordon, Bart.-^ 
His Trial at Edinburgh for the Murder of 
Sir Franeiff Kinlochy his^ Brother German, 
a5 Geo. 3, 1795, 25 vol. 891.— The IndicU 
ment, ibid. ib.— Mr. Hume opens the Nature 
Of the Defence, ibid. 894.— Evidence for 
Ifee JProsecution^ ibid. 900.-->Evidenc^ for 






the Defence, ibid. 944. — Evidence of Miss 
Rinloch, Sister of the Panel, .ibid. ^52. — 
Speech of the Lord Advocate for the Pro* 
secution, ibid. 968. — Mr. Hope's Speech for 
the Panel, ibid. 978. — ^The Court sum up 
the Evidence, ibid. 997. — ^The Jury find that 
the Act was committed under the influence 
of insanity^ ibid. 998. — Judgment of the 
Court, ibid. 999. 

KINNERSLEY, Thomas. See Hales, William. 

KINNYNMOUNT, Patrick.— His Trial in 
Scotland for Blasphemy and Adultery, 9 
Will. 3, 1697, 13 vol. 1^73.— The Indict- 
ment, ibid. 1274.— His Defence, ibid. 1278. 
— ^The Court having deserted the Dyet as to 
the principal part of the Charge, the Lord 
Advocate abandons the ProcQedings^ ibid. 
1282. 

KIRBIE, Luke. See Campion, Edmuttd, 

KIRKBY, Colonel Richard.— His Trial with 
Captain John Constable, Captain Cooper 
* Wade, Captain Samuel Vincent, and Captain 
Christopher Fogg, at a Court Martial in 
Jamaica,for Cowardice aud Neglect of Duty, 
1 Anne, 1702, 14 vol. ^37.— Vincent and 
Fogg appear as Witnesses for the Crown, 
ibid. 538. — Evidence against Kirkby, ibid. 
537. — He is sentenced to be shot, ibid. 542. 
— Evidence against Constable, ibid. ib. — He 
is cashiered, ibid. 543. — Evidence against 
Wade, ibid. ib. — He is sentenced to be 
shot, ibid. 544. — Evidence against Fogg and 
Vincent, ibid, ib.— They are sentenced to be 
suspended, ibid. ib. 

KIRWAN, O^en.— His Trial under a Special 
Commission at Dublin for High Treason 
in being concerned in the Irish Insurrection, 
43 Geo. 3, 1803, 28 vol. 776.— The Indict- 
ment, ibid. ib. — The Attorney General's 
Speech for the , Prosecution,* ibid. 778* — 
Evidence for the Prosecution, ibidJ 780. — 
Mr. Currants Speech for the Prisoner, ibid. 
786.— Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 798. 
—Mr. Baron George's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 801.— The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 
804. — He is executed, ibid. 806. 

KIRWAN, Thomas. See Sheridan, Dr, Edward. 

KITCHEN,George. SeeGreen,CaptainThomas, 

KNEVET, Sir Ed mond.— Account^ from 
Stowe's Annals, of his Trial for striking 
within the King's Palace at Westminster, 
33 Hen. 8, 1541, 1 vol. 443.— He is found 
Guilty, and has Judgment to lose his right 
hand,ibid. 444. — ^List of persons called upon 
taexecute the Judgment, ibid. ib. — ^The King 
grants him a free pardon, ibid. 446.— Har- 
grave's Introductory Note to this Trial, ibid. 
443. — His Examination before the Council 
respecting the Charges against the Earl of 
Surrey, ibid. 454. 

KNIGHTLEY, Alexander.— His Trial at the 
Bar of the Court of King's Bemch for High 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



7« 



Treason, in being concerned in the Assas- 
sination Plot, 8 Will. 3, 1696, 13 vol. 397.— 
The Indictment, ibid. ib. — He pleads Not 
Guilty, bat afterwards withdraws his Plea 
and confesses the Indictment, ibid. 400.— 
Sentence is passed upon him, ibid. 403. — He 
is afterwards pardoned, ibid. 406. 

KNIGHTLEY, Sir Richard.— Proceedings in 
the Star-Chamber againsthim, Mr. Halles,and 
Sir — Wickstone and his Wife, for maintain- 
ing and enconraging seditious and sectarian 
Books, 31 £liz.l688, 1 vol. 1263. — Informa- 
tion of the Attorney General, ibid. ib. — 
Knightley^s Answer thereto, ibid. 1266.*- 
Hales's Answer, ibid. 1267. — Wickstone's 
Answer, ibid. 1268.^— Their several Punish- 
ments, ibid. 1270. — Account of Knightley, 
ibid. 1271 (note). — Camden's Notice of these 
Proceedings, ibid. 1S72 (note). 

OOWLES, Charles (commonly called Earl of 
Banbury). — Proceedings against him in the 
Sing's bench for the Murder of Philip Law- 
son, 4 and 5 Will, and Mary, 1692-1693, 
12 vol. 1167. — The Indictment, ibid. ib. — 
He pleads his Peerage in Abatement, ibid. 
1168 — The Attorney replies that the House 
of Lords had dismissed his Petition to be 
tried by his Peers, ibid. 1170. — -He demurs 
to the Replication, ibid. ib. — Judgment of 
the Court in favour of the Plea, ibid. 1191. 
— Account of these Proceedings delivered 
to the House of Lords by the. Attorney 
General pursuant to their Order, ibid. 1171. 
— ^His Petition to the Ring upon the Pro- 
ceedings in the King's Bench, ibid. 1175. — 
The King refers his Petition to the House 
of Lords, ibid. 1177. — Examination of Lord 
Holt and Mr. Justice Eyres by a Committee 
of Lords oj the subject of their Judgment in 
ttis Case, ibid, 1179 (note). — ^The criminal 
Proceedings against him discontinued, ibid. 
1205. — Account of the Proceedings in the 
House of Lords in 1661, respecting the Title 
of the Earl of Banbury, ibid. 1183. — Mr. 
Hargrave's Notice of this CasCj^ ibid. 1203. 
•^Mr. Hargrave's Observations on his Claim 
to the title of Earl of Banbury, ibid. 1205. 

KNOX, Thomas. — ^His Trial with John Lane 
at the Bar of the Court of King's Bench, for 
a Conspiracy to destroy the credibility of the 
Witnesses for the Crown in the Trials 
respecting the Popish Plot, 31 Car. 2, 1679, 
7 vol. 763. — Indictment against them, ibid, 
ib.— They plead Not Guilty, ibid. 766.— The 
King's Counsel open the Charge against 
them, ibid. 767. — Evidence against them, 
ibid. 771. — Speech of Mr. Withins, Knox's 
Counsel, ibid. 801. — Evidence for him, ibid. 
804. — Mr. Holt's Speech for Lane, ibid. 
808.— They are found Guilty, ibid. 812.— 
Their Sentence, ibid. ib. 

KYD, Stewart, Counsel.— His Speech in De- 
fence of Thos. Williams on his Trial for a 
blasphemous libel, 26 vol. 671. — He was 
indicted jointly with Hardy and others for 
High Treason in 1794, 24 vol. 2^2.— After 



the Acquittal of Hardy and Home Tooke, 
the Attorney General declines offering any 
Evidence against him, and he b dischanred. 
25 vol. 745. ' 

LAING, Malcolm. — ^Account of the Trial of 
the Earl of Bothwell for ibe Murder of 
Henry, Lord Darnley, extracted from his 
History of Scotland, 1 vol. 911.— His Re- 
marks upon Charies the First's insincerity of 
Character, 4 vol. 1151. —His Account of the 
Transactions connected with the Trial of 
Archibald, Marquis of Argyle, 5 vol.1369 
(note).— His Character of him, ibid. 1508 
(note).— His Account of the Trial of Archi- 
bald, Earl of Argyle, 8 vol. 851 (note).— His 
Observations on Lord Balroerino's Trial in 
Scotland for a Libel, 3 vol. 591 (note).— His 
Account of Fletcher of Saltoun, 11 vol. 
1049 (note).— His Account of the Duke of 
Lauderdale, 6 vol. 1033. 

LAKE, Dr. John, Bishop of Chichester. See 
Seven JBisAcpj.— Granger's Account of him, 
12 vol. 187. 

LALOR, Robert. — His Trial in Ireland vpon 
an Indictment en Stat. 16 Rich. 2, c. 5, for 
procuring Bulls from Rome, 2 vol. 533. — 

. The Indictment, ibid. 535. — He pleads Not 
Guilty, ibid, 536.— Tlie Attorney General 
produces the Charge againsthim, ibid. ib. — 
Evidence against him, ibid. 554. — He is 
found Guilty, ibid. 558. — Judgment passed 
upon him according to the Statute, ibid. ib. 

LAMBERT, John. See Peny, James. 

LAMLEY, Robert. See Kidd, Captain Thomas. 

LANCASTER, Thomas, Earl of.— Proceed- 
ings against him for High Treason, in taking 
Arms against the King, 15 Edw. 2, 1322, 1 
vol. 39. — Record of his Conviction, ibid. 41. 
— ^Assignment of Errors thereon, ibid. 45. — 
The Judgment is reversed in the first Par- 
liament of Edward the Third, ibid. 40. 

LANE, John. See Knox^ Thomas. 

LANGHORN, Richard.— His Trial at the Old 
Bailey for High Treason, in being concerned 
in the Popish Plot, 81 Car. 2, 1679, 7 vol. 
417. — Tfie Indictment, ibid, ib.— He pleads 
Not Guilty, ibid. 421. — Evidence against 
him, ibid. 424. — Oates's Evidence, ibid. 
526. — Evidence for him, ibid. 448. — Evi- 
dence in Reply, ibid. 470. — ^Chief Justice 
Scroggs'sCharge to the Jury, ibid. 479. — The 
Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 486. — Sentence 
of Death passed upon him, ibid. 487.-^His 
conduct in Newgate, under Sentence, ibid. 
586. — His Execution, ibid. 501. — His Dying 
Speech, ibid. ib. — His Memoirs, published 
soon after his Execution, ibid. 506. — His 
Petition to the King, ibid. 529. 

LATIMER, Hugh.— Passages from his Ser- 
mons respecting the Execution of Lord 
Seymour of Sudley, 1 vol. 505. — Bill of 
Complaint presented to Edward the Sixth by 



74 



6ENEBAL INDEX TO 



hhn and Hooper against Bonner, %bop of 
I/>ncloD, ibid. 653. 

LATIMERy Richard. See Messenger , Peter, 

LAUD, William, Bishop of Bath and Wells. 
-«-His Letter to Lord Scudamore containing 
his Opinion respecting Tithes and the nature 
and origin of the title to them, 4 vol. 436 
(note). 

Bishop of London. — His 



•«..«»*«.• 



Speech on delivering his Opinion in the 
Star-Chamber respecting the Punishment to 
be inflicted on Henry Sherfield, for breaking 
a Window in a Church at Salisbury, 3 vol. 
M8«-— He is said to have promoted the Pro- 
secution of Prynne for puolishing ^' Histrio- 
mastiXf* ibid, 561 (note). — He was accused 
of aggravating to Charles the First, the Of- 
fence of Richard Chambers in uttering 
seditious words before the Pri^ Council, 
ibid. 373 (note). — He threatens Felton with 
the Rack, if he does not confess who con- 
trived the Murder of the Duke of Bucking- 
ham, ibid. 371. 

Archbishop of Canterbury. 



— His Speech in the Star-Chamber on pass- 
ing Sentence against Prynn, Bastwick, and 
Burton, for publishing several Libels, 3 vol. 
725. — His Speech in the Star-Chamber on 
passing Sentence against Williams, Bishop 
of Lincoln, ibid. 792.— Kennett*s Anecdote 
of his Conduct on seeing Lord Strafford 
going to Execution, ibid. 1521 (note). — His 
Trial for High Treason on an Impeachment 
by the Commons, 16-20 Car. 1, 1640, 1644. 
4 vol. 315.'— Mr. Grimstone's Speech against 
him in the House of Commons upon the 
Motion for his Impeachment, ibid. 317. — 
Mr. HoUis, by command of the Commons, 
accuses him in the House ofLords of Treason, 
ibid. 318. — He is committed to the custody 
of the Gentleman Usher, ibid. 319. — Mr. 
Pym and others present Articles of Impeach- 
ment against hira, ibid. 320. — ^The Arch- 
bishop's Speech on the Articles being pre- 
sented, ibid. 32^.-<-The Articles, ibid. 326. 
—He is sent to the Tower, ibid. 330. — 
Ordinances of the Parliament prohibiting 
him from disposing of Preferments, and 
sequestering his Dignities, ibid. ib. — Further 
Articles of Itnpeachroent presented;^ ibid. 
332. — He petitions for time to answer, and 
for Counsel, ibid. 336.^ — Which are granted 
to him, ibid, 337. — He petitions that the 
Charges of Misdemeanour may be distin- 
guished from those of Treason in the Arti- 
cles, ibid. 336. — Upon which the Lords 
refuse to give any Opinion, ibid. 339.-— He 
answers. Not Guilty to the Articles, ibid. 
340.— The Commons complain that there 
is no Answer to the original Articles, ibid. 
344. — His Answer to all the Articles, ibid, 
345.— The Trial commenced, ibid. 349. — 
He requires that the Commons may finish 
the whole of their Evidence before he begins 
his Defence, ibid. 550. — ^This is refused, and 



he is ordered to defend himself npoa the 
charges seriatim, ibid. ib.—Sei}eant Wilde's 
Spe^ against him, ibid. 35d.«^The Arch- 
bishop's Speech before the I^vidence is open- 
ed, ibid. 357. — The Articles urged against 
him, with his Replies, ibid. 364.-<'<vAfter the 
Articles are gone through he reeapitulates 
the points of his Defence, ibid. 566. — ^Mi?. 
BrowB sums up the Charges for the Qom- 
moos, ibid. 576.*^The Archbishop's Counsel 
are heard, ibid. 577.-^Mr. Heme's SpeeNch 
for him, said to haye been written by Hi^e, 
afterwards Lord Hale, ibid. 577 and (note). 
— Serjeant Wilde admits that no one act of 
the Archbishop's amounted to TTeaaon, but 
that all his Misdemeanours taken together 
did, ibid. 586 (note). — Mr.Herne's hmooopous 
Remark on this doctrine, ibid. ib.-^Hi8 Pe- 
fence in the House of CoQiiQons, ibid. -^SS. 
— ^The Commons pass an Ordinance deelariBp 
him guilty of Treason, ibid. 596.-^TheIiQjrds 
vote him guilty of endeavouring to subvert 
the Laws, to overthrow the Protestant Reli- 
gion, and that he was an enemy to Parlia- 
ments, ibid. 598. — The Judges unanimously 
declare that neither nor all of these Charges . 
amounted to Treason, ibid. ib. — The lK>rds 
pass an Ordinance of Attainder against him, 
ibid. 599. — His Speech on the Scaffold, ibid. 
600. — His Prayer, ibid. '622.^He is prevail- 
ed upon by his Counsel, Mr. Heme, not to 
term the Parliament Traitors in his Speech 
on the Scaffold, ibid. 586 (note), — Ho is 
beheaded, ibid. 603.^Judge Whitelocke's 
Opinion of him, ibid. ib. — Lord Clarendon's 
Character of him, ibid. ib. — A Brief Relation 
of his Sufiferings and Death, taken from 
Lord Somers's Tracts, ibid. 607. 

LAUDER, Sir John. See Fountmnhall, Lard. 

LAUDERDALE, Charles, Earl o*f.— Proceed- 
ings at Edinburgh against him, Richard, 
Lord Maitland his Son, and others, for offi- 
cial Malversations respecting the Royal Mint 
of Scotland, 34 and 35 Car. 2, 1682-3, 11 
vol, 157.— Record of the Proceedings, ibid. 
183. 

LAUDERDALE, Richard, Earl of, 13 vol. 
1442. See Melfort, John, Earl of, 

LAUDERDALE, John, Duke of.— Proceed- 
ings in the House of Commons against 
him, 25 Car. 2, 1674, 6 vol. 1025.— The 
House resolve upon an Address to the Kipg 
to remove him from his Employments and 
from his councils for ever, ibid. 1032. — 
Burnet's Account of him, ibid. 1025 (note). 
— Laing's Account of him, ibid. 1033, — 
Statement of facts relative to his Administra- 
tion in Scotland, 11 vol. 157 (note). — Roger 
North praises his Government in Scotland, 
ibid. 171 (note). 

LAURENCE, Robert. See Boughton, Jokn. 

LAW, Edward, Counsel, 22 vol. 231, 309.— 
See Mknboroughy Edwgrdf Lord. 

" Attorney General for Lan- 

caster, 25 vol. 1155, 26 vol. 554, 27 vol. 621. 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



U 



^^is fijMtoh on the Pfoteeutioii of Thomas 
Walker and ethers for a treasonable Con- 
spiraeyy 98 vol. 1081.— He was of Counsel 
for the Prosecution in the Cases of Hardy 
and Uorne Tooke, 24 toI. 238, 35 toI. 2. 
— His Speech for the Prosecution on the 
Trial of iR^edbead Yorke for a treasonable 
Consp.iracY^ 25 vol, 1012. — His Reply in 
the 9aQ)e Case^ ibid. 1137, 

Sir Edward, Attorney €reneral.-**His 



Speeeh for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
Oovemor Wall for Murder, 28 vol. 51. 

LAYER, Christopher.— His Trial at the King's 
Bench bar for High Treason, in conspiring 
to overturn the Govercmept and bring in 
the Pretender, 9 Geo. 1, 1722, 16 vol. 93.— 
The Indictment, ibid. 94. — On being brought 
to the Bar to plead, b^ applies to have his Irons 
taken off, ibid. 96. — ^The Court refuse to order 
them to be taken off, ibid. 1 00. — His Counsel 
move to quash the Indictment, ibid. 101. — 
Arguments of the Counsel for the Prosecu- 
tion against the Motion, ibid. 105. — ^The 
Court refuse the Motion, ibid. 112.— He 
pleads a Misnomer in abatement, and pleads 
over Not Guilty to the Treason, ibid. 114. — 
The Attorney General demurs to the Plea in 
Abatement, ibid. 115. — The Prisoner's 
Counsel ^P9^y ^^ time to join in Demurrer, 
ibid. ib. — This is refused by the Court, ibid. 
122.— He withdraws his Plea in Abatement, 
ibid. 124.— The Trial, ibid. 129,— Speeches 
of the Counsel for the Prosecution, ibid. 1 89. 
— ^The Prisoner objects to a Witness for the 
Crown, that he had been promised a Pardon 
on condition of his giving Evidence against 
him, ibid. 158. — ^The Objection argued, ibid, 
ib. — ^The Court decide that it is no Objection 
to the competency of the Witness, ibid. 161. 
— Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 163. — 
A Paper containing the Scheme of an Insur- 
rection found in his custody, read in Evi- 
dence against him, ibid. 208. — Mr. Hunger- 
ford's Speech in his Defence, ibid. 233. — 
Mr. Ketelbey's Speech in his Defence, ibid. 
237. — Evidence for the Defence, ibid. 244. 
— ^The Prisoner's Address to the Jury, ibid. 
261. — Reply of the Solicitor General, ibid. 
263, — Evidence in Reply for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 287.— Chief Justice Pratt's Charge to 
the Jury, ibid. 290. — ^The Jury find him 
Guilty, ibid 299. — Sentence is passed upon 
him, ibid. 319. — His Execution, ibid. 321. 
— Paper delivered by him to the Sheriff at 
the place of Execution, ibid. 322. 

lAYTON, Sir Thomas. See FowUsy Sir Daoid, 

LEACH, Pryden. — Proceedings in the Court 
of King's Bench in Error in an Action for 
False Imprisonment brought by him against 
John Money, James Watson, and Robert 
Blackmore, three of the Ring's Messengers, 
5 and 6 Geo. 3,1765, 19 vol.1001.— Plead- 
ings in the Court below, ibid. 1003. — The 
Cause is tried and the Jury find for thie 
Plaintiff, with 400^. Damages, ibid. 1006.-* 



Bill of ExoeptioDS tendeied by the Defbad- 
ants and receiv<ed, ibid. ib.*«-ABsignHieBt of 
Errors upon the Bill of Exceptions, ibid. 
1007.»*-ArgumeDt of Mr. De Gre^, Solioitor 
General, for the Plaintiffs in Error, ibid,. 101 2. 
--^Mr. Dupning's Argument for the Defend* 
an(s in Error, ibid. 1020.— Reply of the 
Solicitor General, ibid. 1024.-*-Tbe Court 
affirm the Judgment of the Court below, upon 
a collateral point, without giving any Decision 
upon the principal pointi raised by the 
Argument, ibid. 1028. 

LEARY, Jeremiah. See O^Coigfy, Jamei. 

LEARY, John.-Hls Trial in Ireland for High 
Treason, in being concemed with a treason* 
able Association called Defenders^ 36 Geo. 
3, 1795, 26 vol. 295.-- The Indictment, ibid, 
ib. — Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 302. 
— Mr. Mac Nally's Defence, ibid. 321, — 
Evidence for the Defence, .ibid. 331 .-— Evi- 
dence in Reply for the Prgi^cution, ibid. 837. 
<i*-Reply of the Solicitor General, ibid. 842. 
"^Mr. Baron George's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 347. — ^The Jury acquit him, ibid. 351. 

LE BLANC, Sir Simon, Judge of K. B. 30 
vol. 547, 066, 31 vol. 234. See WUte, Henry. 
— His Charge to the Jury on the Trial of 
Georee Mellor and others for the Murder of 
Mr. Horsfall, 31 vol. 1008. — His Charges to 
the Jury on the Trials of several of the Lud- 
dites, under the Special Commission ^ 
York in 1813, ibid. 1068, 1102, 1139. '' 

LECHMERE, Nicholas, Counsel.— He is 
ordered by the House of Commons to be 
taken into. Custody for pleading in tjhe Court 
of King's Bench for the Discharge of the 
Aylesbury Men, 14 vol. 809. — ^His Speeeh 
in the House of Lords stating the grounds of 
the Charge made by the Commons against 
Dr. Sacheverell, 15 vol. 59. — His Speech in/ 
Support of the fourth Article of Impeach- 
ment against him, ibid. 191.— His Speech 
in Reply to the Defence made by Dr. 
Sacheverell to the First Article, ibid, 406. — 
His Speech in the House of Commons upon 
a Motion for. the Impeachment of Lord 

' Derwentwater and others for High Treason, 
in being concerned in the Rebellion of 1715, 

•ibid. 761, 



■ ■ Attorney General, 

5 Geo. 1. — His Speech for the Prosecution 
on the Trial of John Matthews for Treason, 
in printing a Libel asserting the Pretender's 
titles 15 vol. 1833.^-~His Reply in the same 
Case, ibid. 1378. 

LE DESPENSER, Hugh. S«e Despenser, 
Hugh, 

LEE, Captain Thomas.—His Trial for High 
Treason in conspiring forcibly to compel 
the Queen to liberate the Earis of Essex and 
Southampton, 43 Eliz. 1600, 1 vol. 1403.— 
The Indictment, ibid, ib.— Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 1404. — He is found 
Guilty, ibid. 1409.— Judgment is passed 
upon him, and he is executed, ibid. 1410. 



76 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



LEEy Wiltiai&i CounseL-^His Speech for the 
Appellant on the Trial of the Appeal against 
Bambridge and Corbett for the Murder of a 
Prisoner in the Fleet by ill-treatment, 17 
vol. 401. 

LEE, Sir William, Chief Justice of K.B. 17 
Geo. 2» 18 Tol. 289, 329, 353, 391, 395, 
425, 1203. 

LEECH, Benjamin. — Proceedings against 
hira at the Old Bailey for slandering the 
Election of North and Rich as Sheriffs of 
London, 34 Car. 2, 1682, 9 vol. 351.— The 
Indictment, ibid. 353. — He pleads in Abate- 
ment that the Grand Jury who found the 
Bill against him, were returned by North and 
Rich, and that tiieir Election as Sheriffs was 
void, ibid. 355. — ^The Court reject his Plea, 
• and, on his refusing to plead otherwise, fine 
him 20 Marks, ibid. 358. 

LEEDS, Thomas, Duke of. See Banby^ 
Thomas, Earl of, 

LEGAT, Bartholomew. — Proceedings against 
him for Heresy, 10 Jac. 1, 1612, 2 vol. 727. 
— Account of his Opinions, ibid. 728. — ^He 
is declared a Heretic by the Consistory of 
St. Paul's, and delivered over to the secular 
power, ibid. 729. — He is burned to death in 
Smithfield, ibid. 730.— The King's Warrant 
to the Lord Chancellor to issue the Writ De 
Hteretico comburendo, ibid. 731.— The Writ, 
ibid. 732. 

LEGGE, Heneage, Counsel, 18 vol. 289. 

' ■ ■ Baron of the Exchequer, 
25 Geo. 2, 19 vol. 283.— His Charge to the 
Jury on the Trial of Mary Blandy for Murder,. 
18 vol. 1170. 

LEIGHTON, Alexander. — ^Proceedings in the 
Star-Chamber against him for publishing ''An 
Appeal to the Parliament, or a Plea against 
Prelacy," 6 Car. 1, 1630, 3 vol.383. — Severe 
Sentence against him, ibid. 385. — He escapes 

*■ from Prison, but is retaken upon a Hue and 
Cry, ibid. ib. — ^The House of Commons in 
1641, resolve that his Punishment was illegal, 
and that he ought to have Satisfaction for 
what he had suffered, ibid. 387 (note). 

LEVINZ, Sir Creswell, King's Counsel, 30 
Car. 2, 7 vol. 84.— His Speech for the Pro- 
secution on the Trial of Nathaniel Reading 
for disparaging and attempting to suppress 
the Evidence of the PopishFlot, 7 vol. 268.— 
His Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial 
of Whitebread and others for High Treason, 
in being concerned in the Popish Plot, ibid. 
321. — ^His Speech against Richard Lang- 
borne for a similar offence, ibid. 423. 

--—-—— Attorney General, 31 

Car. 2, 7 vol.824, 968, 1049, 1069, 1555.— 
His Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
Knox and Lane for disparaging the Evidence 
of the Popish Plot, 7 vol. 769.— His Speech 
for the Prosecution on the Trial of Tasborough 
and Price for a similar Offence, ibid. 888.*— 
Sir John Hawlea*s Notice of him in his 
Remarks on f itzharris's Trial, 8 vol. 429. 



■■ -Judge of C.P. 33 Car. 

2, 8 vol. 564, 11 vol. 400. — He delivers his 
Opinion on tiie Trial of Lord William Rus- 
sell that want of Freehold is no ground of 
Challenge to a Juror, 9 vol. 593. 

Seneant at Law. — He 



was removed from the Bench in 1685 by 
James the Second, aud returned •to prac- 
tice at the Bar, 12 vol. 260 (note).-^His 
Speech for the Defendants on the Trial of 
the Seven Bishops, ibid. 296. — He was of 
Counsel for Beiiiardi and others accused of 
participating in the Assassination Plot, 13 
vol. 764. — He argues in the Case of Kendal 
and Roe, against the legality of a Commit- 
ment for High Treason by a Secretary of 
State, 12 vol. 1375. 

LEWIS, David.-.His Trial for High Treason 
on the Stat. 27 Eliz. for returning as a Popish 
Priest into England and continuing there 
upwards of 4© days, 31 Car. 2, 1679, 7 vol. 
249. — He pleads Not Guilty, ibid. ib. — Evi- 
dence against him, ibid. 251.— Evidence for 
him, ibid. 254. — He is found Guilty, and 
Sentence of Death is passed upon him, ibid. 
256.— His Speech at the place of Execution, 
ibid. ib. 

LEWIS, James. See Dawson, JotefA, 

LEWIS, Sir William. See EoUit, DenzU. 

LILBURN, John,— Proceedings in the Star- 
Chamber against him and John Wharton for 
publishing Seditious Books, 13 Car. 1, 1637, 
3 vol. 1315.— Lilbum's Examination at the 
Attorney General's Chambers, ibid. 1318.— > 
He refuses to take the Star-Chamber Oath, 
ibid. 1320.— Their Sentence, ibid. 1327.— 
Lilbum's Speech to the people from the 
Pillory, ibid. 1329.— His Petition to the 
Houseof Commons,ibid. 1 345. — Resolutions 
of the House of Commons in 1640 against 
this Sentence, ibid. 1342. — Resolutions of 
the Commons transmitted to the Lords, ibid. 
1346. — The Lords take off his Fine, and ap- 
point his Cause to be heani de novo at their 
Bar, ibid. ib. — Bradshaw and Cooke assign- 
ed, him for Counsel, ibid. 1347. — The Lords 
reverse the Sentence of the Star-Chamber, 
ibid. 1358. — ^And pass an Ordinance giving 
him reparation out of the Estates of the late 
Lord Keeper, ibid. 1359, 1364.— This Ordin- 
ance thrown out at its second Reading by 
the Commons, ibid. 1360, 1366. — Repara- 
tion ordered him out of certain sequestered 
Estates, ibid. 1367. — His Trial by a Special 
Commission of Oyer and Terminer at the 
Guildhall of London for High Treason, 
1 Car. 2, 1649, 4 vol. 1269.— His Speech at 
his Arraignment, ibid. 1270. — He .argues 
against the legality of a Special Commission 
of Oyer and Terminer, ibid. 1275. — ^He hesi- 
tates to plead, ibid. 1293.— He pleads Not 
Guilty, ibid. 1294. — ^He objects to the At- 
torney General's whispering to the Court, 
ibid. 1324, 1301. — Indictment against hinii 
ibid. 1320.— The Attorney General's Speech, 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



77 



ibid. 133t<"-EFidence against him, ibid. 
1333. — ^His Observations to the Jary upon 
the Evidence against him, ibid. 1882. — The 
Attorney General's Reply, ibid. 1395. — ^The 
Court charge the Jury, ibid. 1401.— The 
Jury acquit him, ibid. 1405. —Extracts from 
Walker^s History of Independency, relat- 
ing to this Case, ibid. 1406. — Lord Cla- 
rendon's Account of Lilbum, and the cir- 
cumstances attending this Prosecution, 
ibid. 1416.— Lilburn's Account of some 
circumstances which preceded his Trial, 
ibid. 1421. — ^A Letter of Censure to him in 
answer to his Account of his Trial, ibid. 1434. 
— His Trial at the Old Bailey for returning 
from Banishment, 6 Car. 2, 1653, 5 vol. 407. 
— His Account of the circumstances which 
led to his Banishment, ibid. ib.—He refuses 
to kneel at the Bar of the House of Com- 
monSf ibid. 409. — ^Act of Parliament for his 
Banishment, ibid . 41 4. — His Commitment to 
Newgate upon his return, ibid. 415. — He 
applies to the Court for a Copy of the In- 
. dictment before he pleads, ibid. 416.— 
Which is granted, ibid. 419. — ^The Indict- 
menty ibid. ib. — ^The Court refuse his Ex- 
ceptions to the Indictment and his demand 
of Oyer of the Act of Parliament, unless they 
are signed by Counsel, ibid. 425, 434. — His 
Exceptions to the Indictment, ibid. 437.— 
The Jury acquit him, ibid. 443. — Examina- 
tion of the Jury before the Council of State 
respecting the grounds of their Verdict, ibid. 
445. — Examinations of the Witnesses against 
Lilbum, ibid. 449. — Passages from Thurloe, 
Oldmixon, and Whitelocke, respecting this 
Trial, ibid. 407 (note). 445 (note). — Crom- 
well's oppressive Conduct towards him, ibid. 
940. 

LILBURNE, Robert, 5 vol. 1003, 1205. See 
Regicides,* 

UMERICK, Thomas. See Messenger^ Peter. 

LINDSAY, David.— His Trial at the Old 
Bailey for High Treason, in being as a 
British Subject in France, and returning into 
England vdthout licence, 3 Anne, 1704,15 
vol. 987 — ^The Indictment, ibid. 988.— He 
pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 990. — The Queen's 
Counsel open the Case, ibid. 991. — He 
admits the facts of the Case for the Prosecu- 
tion, but claims the benefit of a General 
Pardon under a royal Proclamation, ibid. 
992.^*— Mr. Williams's Argument for him to 
shew that he is entiUed to the benefit of the 
Pardon, ibid. 999. — Mr. Raymond's Argu- 
ment to the same effect, ibid. 1007. — ^Argu- 
ments of Sir Thos. Powis and the Attorney 
and Solicitor General to the contrary, ibid. 
1015. — Lord Holt's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
1027.— The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 1029. 
—His Counsel move in arrest of Judgment, 
ibid. ib. — Sentence of Death is passed upon 
him, ibid. 1033. — He is reprieved at the 
place of Execution, ibid. 1035. — He remains 
a Prisoner in Newgate some vears, is banish- 
^^ and im v^ {XpUandi ibid* 1036, 



UNGARD,^^;ComiiiOttS6rieatttofLondon.— 
His Speech in Defence of Lord Cliancellor 
Macclesfield upon several of the- Articles of 
Impeachment against him, 16 vol. 1118, 
1228. — His Speech on summing up the 
Evidence for the Defence, ibid. 1247. 

LINSTEED, Thomas. See Green, Captain 
Thomas. 

LISLE, Lady Alice. See Lisle, John. — ^Her 
Trial at Winchester for High Treason, in 
harbouring a Traitor after the Duke of Mon- 
mouth's Rebellion, 1 Jac. 2, 1685, 11 vol. 
297. — ^The Indictment, ibid. ib. — She pleads 
Not Guilty, ibid. 308. — ^The Court allow her 
to have an indifferent person to assist her on 
her Trial on account of her age ^jjj^ infirmi- 
ties, ibid. 310. — Mr. PoUexfen's Speech for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 316.— Chief JusticeJef- 
feries's Address to the Prisoner, ibid. 322. 
— Evidence for the Prosecution, ibici, 323. 
—The Chief Justice's Examination of an 
unwilling Witness for the Prosecution, ibid. 
325. — ^Hisf violent Conduct towards the Wit- 
ness, ibid. 338, 346. — Lady lisle's Defence, 
ibid. 359.— ^efieries's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 362 .-^Hesitation of the Jury, ibid. 370. 
— It is said that the Jury at first acquit 
her, but that at last, upon Jefieries's 
threats, they bring her in Guilty, ibid. 372 
(note).— The Verdict, ibid. 373.— The Chief 
Justice passes Sentence upon her, ibid. ib. 
— Application is made to the King in her 
behsdf, 'who refuses to interfere, ibid. 376. 
—She petitions the King to alter her Sen* 

• tence to beheading, ibid. ib. — ^The King's 
Warrant for the alteration of the mode of 
Execution, ibid. 379. — She is executed, ibid, 
ib. — ^Paper delivered by her to the Sheriff at 
the place of Execution, ibid. 380. — ^At the ' 
Revolution her Attainder is reversed by Act 
of Parliament, ibid. 381. — Ludlow's Account 
of her Husband's Assassination, ibid. 297 
(note). — Burnet's Account of these Proceed- 
ings, ibid. 300 (note). — ^Foster's Notice of 
this Trial, ibid. 371 (note). 

LISLE, »Sir George* See Lucas, Sir Charles. 

LISLE, John. — He was Lord President of the 
High Court of Justice on the Trials of Sir 
Henry Slingsby, Dr. Hewett, and Mr. Mor- 
dant, ibr High Treason, in bearing arms 
against Cromwell and the Commonwealth, 
5 vol. 875, 886. 908. — Ludlow's Account of 
his Assassination in Switzerland, 11 vol. 
297 (note), 

LISTER, Sir Richard. See lA^ster, Sir 
JRichard, 

LITTLE rON, Edward, Counsel.— His Argu- 
ment, made by Command of the House of 
Commons, at a Conference vrith the Lords in 
favour of the Liberty of the Subject, 3 vol. 
85. — His Argument for Mr. Selden on the 
Return of a Habeas Corpus upon his Com- 
mitment by the Privy Council, ibid. 252.— 
He vras afterwards Chief Justice of the 
Common Fleas and Lord Keeperi ibid« ib, 



td 



OlSNERAL INDEX TO 



MAM* 



•^^ Sir Eclwafd) Solicitor General, 



13 Car. l.-*He was of Counsel for the Pro- 
secntidn ill the Proceedings in the Star 
Chamber against Prynne^ Bastwick^ and 
Burton for Several Libels, 3 vol. 718. — His 
Argument (or the Crown in the Great Case 
of Ship-Money, ibid. 923. 

LLOYD, Humphrey.— Account of his Trial, 
Convietion, and Execution for the Murder 
of a Yeomatt of the King's Guard, 5 Jac. -1, 
1607, 3 tol. 362. 

LLOYD, Sir Richard, Counsel.— His Speech 
on Opening the Indictment against Lord 
Balmerino, 18 vol. 463. 

LLOYD, Temperance. — Proceedings against 
her, Mary Trembles, and Susannah Edwards 
for Witchcraft, 34 Car. 2, 1682, 8 vol. 1017. 
«— Their Examinations and Confesuons be- 
fore Magistrates, ibid. ib.-^Their Confes- 
sions at Uie place of execution, ibid. 1036. 

iiOYD, Thomas. See Dtffi^n, PtOrkk WilUam. 

LLOYD^ Dr. William, Bishop of St. Asaph. 
See Seven Bifhope, — Burnet's Account of his 
ConUuet respecting Turberville, one of the 
Witoesses for the Popish Plot, 7 vol. 1351 
(note)i — Granger*s Account of him, 12 vol. 
185<— His Letter to Fell, Bishop of Oxford, 
et^Btaining an Account of the Execution of 
thb Duke of Monmouthv 11 vol. 1073. 

■ Bishop of Worcester. 

— Proceedings at the Bar of the House of 
Commons against him and his sou on the 
Compliaint Of Sir John Packington, for at- 
tempting to hinder his Election as a Meml)er 
for the Couiity of Worcester, 1 Anne, 1702, 
14 vol. 545. — Articles of Complaint against 
ihem, ibid. ib. — Witnesses examined in sup- 
port of the Articles, ibid. 546. — Tlie House 
resolve that the Bishop's conduct was a 
Breach of Privilege, and that an Address be 
presented to the Queen, praying her to re- 
move him. from his office of Lord Almoner, 
ibid. 557. — Proceedings in the House of 
Lords Upon this Resolution of the Commons, 
ibid. ib. (note).— The Queen's Answer to 
the Address, promising to remove him, ibid. 
558. 

LOFFE, Gabriel. See Kidd, Captmii J^illim. 

LOGAN, Rev. Mr.— He was the author of 
the " Review of the Charges against Warren 
Hastings,'' for the publication of which, 
Stockdale was prosecuted by order of the 
House of Commons, 22 vol. 2^7. — Curious 
Anecdote respecting the effect produced upon 
him hy hearing Sheridan's celebrated Speech 
against Warren Hastings, in the House of 
Commons, ibidi 262 (D0te)i 

LOGAN, Robert.— Proceeding^ in the Parlia* 
mient of Scotland against him, after his 
death, for Itigh Treason in being concerned 
in ^ihe Gowrie Conspiracy, 7 Jac. 1, 1809, 
2 vol. 707.— the Depositions of the Wit- 
nesses, tt)ld. tl4.*-His Namt and Arm de« 



' dared to be aboUshtd, -And his property Ibr- 
ftited to the King, ibid. 722 .--Mr. Laing 
says, in his History of Scotland, that in 
order io satisfy the maxim that no man is to 
be condemned in his absence^ his Bones 
were dug up and arraigned at th« Bar on 
these Proceedings, 11 vol. 47 (tiote). 

LONG, Walter. See Stroud, William. BoUis, 
DenzU, — Proceedings in the Star Chamber 
against him for absenting himself from his 
Bailiwick, when Sheriff of Wilts, to attend 
bis duty in Parliament, 4 Car. 1, 1629, 3 
vol. 233. — Abstract of the Information ex- 
hibited against him, ibid. ib. — He is com- 
mitted to the Tower during the King's 
pleasure, and sentenced to pay a Fine of 
2,000 Marks, and make submission, ibid. 236 . 

LORN, Lord. See ArgpU, ArMdid, EaH of. 

LOUDOUN, James, Earl of.^^Proce^ings in 
Scotland against bin, George Lord Melville, 
Sir John Cochrane of Ochiltree, and John 
Cochrane of Watersyde, his son, for IVeaaon 
in being concerned in Argyie's Rebellion, 
^6 Car. 2, 1684, 10 vol. OBO.-^Lettera of 
Treason exhibited against them by the Ad- 
vocate General, ibid. 991. -^The Cochranes 
are outlawed for non-appearaHoe, ibid. 1001. 
— Evidence against John Cochrane of Water- 
syde, ibid. 1003. — He is found Guiltjr, and 
sentenced, ibid. 1005. — The Earl of L<Hidoun 
and Lord Melville are outlawed for non- 
appearance, ibid. ib. — ^Proceedings against 
them in the Scotch Parliament, ibid* 1006. 
^^FOuntainhall^s Account of these Proceed- 
ings, ibid. 1041 » 

LOUGHBOROUGH, Alexander, Lord, Chief 
Justice of C. P. See Wedderbum, Alexander, 
— His Charge to the Grand Jury on opening 
the Special Commission for the Trial of 
persons concerned id the No^Popery Riots 
in 1780, 21 vol. 485. 

LOVAT, Simon Fraser, Lord. See Ftuser, 
ThomoB, — ^Proceedings in the House of Lords 
on his Trial upon an Impeachment for High 
Treason in bemg concerned in the Rebellion 
6f I745j 20 Geo. 2, 1746-7, 18 vol. 589. — 
Extracts fh)m the Journals of the House of 
Lords relating to the Proceedings ptepftra^ 
tory to his Trial, ibid. ib.'^Lord Chaticellor 
Hardwicke is appointed Lord High Steward, 
ibid. 541.— The Lord High Steward's Ad- 
dress to the Prisoner on his being brought 
to the Bar, ibid. 543 .-^Articles of Impeach- 
ment, ibid. 544.— His Answer therelO) ibid. 
548.— Replication of the CotatnonaL ibid. 
550.-^peeches of the Managers for the 
Commons, ibid^ ib.*^Speech of the Attorney- 
General in support of the Articles, ibid. 559. 
— ^The Prisoner objects to the cofnpetency 
of the Wittiess first called by the Managers, 
ibid. 575.-^The Objection, notbei&g ground- 
ed onfact, is disallowed, ibid. 565.-*-^EWd6nce 
in support of the Articles, ibid. 566.— Lord 
Lovat t)bject9 to the Etidenee of Munrtor of 



\ 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



T© 



Brov^toi^ tiM» Secretary to the jdwaf; Pre^ 
tettder, tliAt he vras attainted by Act of 
Pttrliamefity ibid. 609.-^The Managers for 
the Commons offer to produce the Record 
^f Munray^s Plea in tiie Court of Ring^s 
Bench, iii bar of fixectttion, that he surren- 
dered himself^ according to the Act of Par- 
liament, and was therefore excepted from 
the Attainder, the matter of wliich Plea was 
confessed by the Attorney General, ibid. ib. 
— Objectit>n to the admissibility of this 
EecOrd in EtHence, ibid. 610. — Arguments 
of t!re Prisoner's Counsel in support of the 
Objection, it)id. 611.-— Arguments of the 
Managers in support of its adinissibility, 
ibid. 6 19.^— Arguments of the Prisoner's 
Connsel in Reply, ibid, 633.— The Lords 
decide that the Kecord is admissible, ibid. 
^37. — ^e Recoid of the Proceedings in the 
King^ B^fiCh respectiag Murray, ibid, ib.— 
Hie Prisoner proposes to prove, by Parol 
Evidence, that Murray did not surrender as 
stated in the Record, ibid. 647.— The Lords 
resolve not to permit his Counsel to argue 
the admissibility of such Evidence, ibid. 650t 
— ^Murray's Evidence, ibid. ib,---Sir John 
Straage's Speech on summing up the Evi- 
dence in sup^ort^ the Articles of Impeach- 
menty ibid. 774.— Lord Loval's Defence, 
ibid. 796. — Reply of the Solicitor General, 
Mr. Murray (afterwards Lord Mansfield), 
for the Commons, ibid. 602k-^peeches of 
the Attorney General and other Managers 
in Reply 9 ibid. 814. — He is unanimously 
found Ouilty, ibid. 825. — His Speech on 
being called upon for Judgment, ibid. 827. 
—-The Lord High Steward's Address to him 
on passing Sentence, ibid. 833. — Account 
5xf kis Conduct immediately previous to his 
Execution, ibid. 842. — Paper delivered by 
liim to the Sheriffs at the place of Execution, 
ibid. 854. — ^The Lord President Forbes's 
Letter to him, dissuading him from joining 
ia the RebeUioD, ibid. 709 (note). — Lord 
Lovat's Letter to Murray of Broughton, ibid. 
748. — His Letter to the young Pretender, 
ibid. 751. — His Letter to the Laird of 
Locheil^ ibid. 754. — His Correspondence 
with his Son, the Master of Lovat, ibid. 759. 
— rLetters g( the young Pretender and 
Cosaeron of Lochiel to him^ ibid. 770.; 

IX)VE, Christopher.- His Trial in the High 
Court of Justice for High Treason against 
the Commonwealth in holding Correspond- 
ence with the Ring, 3 Car. 2, 1651, 5 vol. 
43. — The Charge exhibited by the Attorney 
General against him^ ib. 45. — He prays that 
Counsel may t>e assigned him before he 
^eads, ibid. 54. — He pleads Not Guilty, 
raid. 66. — ^The Solicitor Getaeral opens the 
Charge against him, ibid. ib. — ^The Attorney 
GenerarsSpe€ch,ibid.73. — Evidence against 
him, ibid. 76. — He objects to the compe« 
tency of the first Witness, on the ground of 
his having confessed himself guilty of Trea- 
^ ibid. ib.-^-'The Objecttcm is oTerruled, 



ibid, ib.^— Sotee of the Witness^ agiiiiiist 
him refuse to swear, ibid. 113, 132. — His 
Defence, ibid. 136. — ^The Attorney General's 
Reply, ibid. 166.— The Counsel for the 
Commonwealth reply upon the Evidence, 
ibid. 173. — He presents Exceptions in law 
to the Charge, and the Couft assign him 
Counsel to argue them, ibid. 206. — Mr* 
Hale argues the Exceptions, ibid. 214. — 
Sentence of Death against him. ibid. 251. — 
His Speech and Conduct on the Scaffold, ibid, 
ib.— LordClarendon*sNoticeofhim,ibia.267. 

LOVE, John*-^His Trial with others at Edin^. 
burgh for Rebellion, Treason, and Lese 
Majestic^ 3 Jac. 2, 1687, 12 voU 523.«^The 
Indictment, ibid. 524. — Ailments on the 
Relevancy of the Indictmeti't, ibid^ 527.-*>The 
Court decide that it is relevant, ibid. 54d«— 
The Counsel for the Panels object that one 
of the Witnesses is insane and infamous, 
ibid. 550.— The Court, after hearing Evi- 
dence as to the Objections, admit the Wit- 
ness, ibid. 559. — Evidence against them, 
ibid. 561. — ^They are acquitted, ibid. 567. — 
Fountainhairs Account of this Case, ibid. 568. 

LOVELL, Salathiel, Counsel, 10 vol. 61. 

-**M Sir Salathiel, Seijeant-at*Law, and 



rn-rnm^** 



Recorder of London> 14 vol. 1274-^He 
passes Sentence on Peter Cook, convicted of 
High Treason in being concerned in the 
Assassination Plot, 13 vol. 395. — ^He Was 
of Counsel for the Crown in conducting the 
Evidence on the Bill of Attainder against 
Sir John Fenwick, ibid. 546. 

Baton Of the Bsefavquer^ 



Q Ann, 15 vol, 466» 

LOWICK, Robert.-His Trial fot High Trea- 
son in being concerned in the Assassination 
Plot, 8 Will. 3, 1696, 13 vol. 267.— The 
Indictment, ibid. 139.— He pleads Not 
Guilty, ibid* 142.— -His Counsel object to 
the Indictment that the words " then and 
there*' are omitted to a. material Allegation, 
ibid. 267.— The Objection is overruled, ibid. 
277. — Evidence against him, ibid. 285.--Sir 
Bartholomew Shower's Speech in his De- 
fence, ibid. 296. — Lord Holt's Charge to the 
Jury, ibid. 303.-— The Jury find him Guilty, 
ibid. 307. — His Sentence, ibid. 308. — Paper 
delivered by him to the Sheriff at the place 
of Execution, ibid. 310. 

LOWRIE, William, of Blackwood.— Difliculty 
arising from the different names by which 
he is called by Historians, 9 vol. 1025 (note). 
— His Trial at Edinburgh for Treason in 
harbouring Rebels, after the Battle of Both- 
well Bridge, 35 CAr. 2, 1683, ibid. 1021.— 
The Indictment^ ibid, ib.— The additional 
Indictment, ibid. 1030«— ^Debate on the 
Relevancy of the Indictments, ibid. 1031.— 
The Court hold the Indictments relevant, 
ibid. 1039.--Further Debate on the Rele* 
vancy, ibid. 1042.— The Court hold the 
Indictments relevant in some parts, smd re- 
ject them as to others^ ibid. 1049*«-*Bfide&ce 



80 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



for the Prosecution, ihid. ib. — ^He is. foiiiid 
Guilty^ and sentenced to be beheaded, ibid. 
1054. — Fountainhall's Notices of this Case, 
. ilnd. 1021 (note), — ^Burnet's Account of it, 
ibid. 1025 (note). 

LOWTHER,^Sir Gerald. See Ratdiff; Sir 
George, 

LUCAS, Sir Charles.— He is taken with Sir 
George Lisle and Sir Bernard Gascoigne at 
the Surrender of Colchester to Fairfax, and 
condemned by a Council of War to be shot, 

4 vol. 1201. — Sir Charles Lucas and Sir 
George Lisle are shot. Sir Bernard Gascoigne 

' is reprieved, ibid. 1202. — Lord Clarendon's 
Account of this Transaction, ibid . 1 201 (note). 
— ^His Character of Lucas and Lisle, ibid. 
1202 (note). — Mr. Hume's Account of their 
Execution, ibid. 1203 (note). 

LUDERS, Alexander. — Extracts from his 
*' Considerations on the Law of High Trea- 
son in the Article of Levying War," 5 vol. 
972 (note), 6 vol. 899 (note), 902 (note). — 
His Translation of the Statute of Treasons, 

5 vol. 975 Tnote). — ^His Remarks upon the 
principle of qonstructive Levying War, as 
laid down in the Cases of Messenger and 
of Dammaree and Purchase, 6 vol. 902 (note), 
1 5 vol. 522 (note).— His Illustrations of the 
probable meaning of the terms " compassing 
and imagining," in the Statute of Treasons, 
7 vol. 961 (note). 

LUDLAM, Isaac: See Brandrethy Jeremiah. 
Luddites* — His Trial, under a Special Com- 
mission at Derby, for High Treason in being 
concerned in the Luddite Insurrection, 57 
Geo. 3, 1817, 32 vol. 1135.— The Indict- 
ment, ibid. 755.— The Attorney General's 
Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. 1137.— 
Evidence for the Crown, ibid. 1149. — Mr. 
Cross's Speech for the Prisoner, ibid. 1217. 
—Mr. Denman's Speech on summing up 
tlie Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 1226. — 
Reply of the Solicitor General, ibid. 1253. — 
Mr. Justice Abbott's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 1271. — The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 
1306. — He is executed, ibid. 1394. 

LUKE, Sir Walter, Judge of K. B. 26 Hen. 8, 

I vol. 398. 

LUMSDEN, Alexander. See Anderson^ Lionel 

LUMSDEN,Mr. Sae HoUit^ Sir John. 

LUTTRELLi Edward, 16 vol. 1. See Beatofi, 
Hugh. 

LUTTRELL, Narcissus. — Extracts from his 

. *' Brief Historical Relation" respecting the 

Proceedings gainst persons accused of being 

implicated in the Rye-House Plot, 9 vol. 1005. 

LUTWYCHE, Sir Edward, Seijeant-at-Law, 
and Chief Justice of Chester, 10 vol. 559, 

II vol. 511. 

a Judge of C. P. 



4 Jac. 2, 12 vol. 124. — ^He was excepted out 
of the Act of Indemnity which passed iu 
1690| ibid. 1241. 



LUTWYCHE, Edward, Counsel, 15 ▼ol. 134d. 
— His Speech in Reply for the Commons on 
the Impeachment ot Lord Chancellor Mac- 
clesfield, 16 vol. 1361. 

LYSTER, Sir Richard, Chief Baroa of the 
f^chequer, 26 Hen. 8, 1 vol. 398. 

■ Chief Justice of K. B. 

38 Hen. 8, 1 vol. 458. 

MAC CANN, John.— His Trial at Dublin for 
being concerned in the Irish Rebellion, 38 
Geo. 3, 1798, 27 vol. 399.— The Indictment, 
ibid. ib. — Speech of the Solicitor General 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 405 (note). — Evi- 
dence for the Prosecution, ibid. 406.— Evi- 
dence for the Prisoner, ibid. 437. — Evidence 
in Reply, ibid. 448. — Mr. Baron Smith's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. 449.— The Jury 
find him Guilty, ibid. 454.— Sentence of 
Death is passed upon him, ibid, ib.— He is 
executed, ibid. 456. 

MAC CANN, John, alias Mac Kenna. See 
Killen, John* 

MACCLESFIELD, Charles, Earl of. See 
Gerard of Brandon^ Lord. — Proceedings in 
an Action of Scandalum Magnaturo, brought 
by him against John Starkey, one of the 
Grand Jury of the County of Chester, for 
presenting him as a disaffected person, 36 
& 37 Car. 2, 1684-1685, 10 vol. 1329.— 
Abstract of the Declaration, ibid. ib. & 1338. 
—The Defendant pleads, that he returned 
the matter charged as libellous, in the dis- 
charge of his duty as a Grand Juror, ibid. 
1333.— The Plaintiff demurs specially to the 
Plea, ibid. 1335. — Report of the Arguments 
of Counsel in this Case, from Sir William 
Williams's MSS. ibid. 1337. -Mr. .Ward's 
Argument for the Plaintiff, ibid. 1338.—Mr* 
Holt's Argument for the Defendant, ibid. 
1351. — Observations upon some parts of 
Mr. Holt's Argument, from 6ir William 
Williams's MSS. ibid. 1382.— Mr. Wil- 
liams's Argument in Reply for the Plaintiff, 
ibid. 1387. — Judgment is given for the De- 
fendant, ibid. 1414. — ^Mr. Justice Street's 
Note of the Pleadings, Argument, and Au- 
thorities in this Case, communicated by Mr. 
Hargrave, ibid. 1413.— He was afterwards 
outlawed for High Treason, ibid. 1414.— 
The Indictment for High Treason, from 
Tremaine's Entries, ibid. 1416. 

MACCLESFIELD, Thomas, Earl of. Lord 
Chancellor. See Parkery Sir Thomas. — His 
Trial upon an Impeachment by the House 
of Commons for High Crimes and Misde- 
meanours in the execution of his Office of 
Lord Chancellor, 10 Geo. 1, 1725, 16 vol. 
767. — ^The Articles of Impeachment, ibid. 
768.— His Answer thereto, ibid. 784l — Re* 

, plication of the Commons, ibid. 800. — Sir 
G. Oxenden's Speech on opening the general 
Charge for the Commons, ibid. 801 .—Speech 
of Sir Clement Wearg (Solicitor General) on 
the general Charge, ibid. 813,— Sir Willian 



THE STATE TRIAtS. 



81 



Sttickland's Speech on opening the 5th, .6th, 
7th, and 8th Articles, respecting the Sale of 
Masterships in Chancery, ibid. 817. — Mr. 
Doddiogton's Speech on opening the 9th 
Article, respecting the Sale of the Office of 
Cleikof the Custodies, ibid. 822.— Evidence 
respecting the Oath of Office taken by the 
Lord Chancellor, ibid. 827. — Evidence re- 
specting the Oath of a Master in Chancery, 
and the nature of his Office, ibid. 830;— 
Evidence respecting the profits of the Office 
of Lord Chancellor, ibid. 840. — Evidence 
on the 9th Article, respecting the Sale of the 
Office of Clerk of the Custodies, ibid. 843. 
—Evidence on the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th 
Articles, respecting the Sale of Masterships 
in Chancery, ibid. 858. — Mr. Onslow's Speech 
on opening the 11th Article, respecting the 
admission of persons of small property 
into the Office of Masters in Chancery, ibid. 
895.— -Mr. Palmer's Speech on opening the 
12th Article^ respecting the connivance at 
improper practices in the Offices of the 
Masters with respect to the Money of the 
Suitors, ibid. 900. — Evidence in support of 
the nth and 12th Articles, ibid. 901.— Mr. 
Gyhbon's Speech on opening the 13th and 
14th Articles, respecting a corrupt Order for 
an Arrangement in the Case of Fleetwood 
Dormer, one of the Masters, who had em- 
hezzled the Money of Suitors, ibid. 924. — 
Mr. Hedges's Speech on opening the same 
Articles, ibid. 929. — Evidence in support of 
the 13th and 14th Articles, ibid. 934.— Sir 
John Rushout's Speech on opening the 15th, 
16th, and 17th Articles, respecting the use of 
improper means to conceal the deficiency 
in Dormer's OflSce, ibid. 955. — Mr. Thomp- 
son's Speech on opening the same Articles, 
ibid. 966. — Evidence in support of the 15th, 
16th, and 17th Articles, ibid. 970.— Mr. 
Plammer opens the 18th Article, respecting 
the permission of the Masters in Chancery 
to traffic with the Money of Suitors, ibid. 
1002. — ^Mr. Cary's Speech on opening the 
same Article, ibid. 1005. — Evidence in sup- 
port of the 18th Article, ibid. 1007.— Lord 
Morpeth's Speech on opening the 19th 
Article, respecting the suggesting to the 
Masters in Chancery to make a false state- 
ment of their property, in order to prevent 
a Parliamentary Inquiry, ibid, 1025. — Mr. 
SnelVs Speech on opening the same Article, 
ibid. 1032. — Evidence in support of tlie 
19th Article, ibid. 1036.— Mr. West's Speech 
on snfhming up the Evidence in support of 
the Articles, ibid. 1057.— Serjeant Probyn*s 
Speech on opening the general Defence of 
the Earl, ibid. 1080.— Dr. Sayer's Speech 
on the general Defence, ibid. 1105.— Mr. 
Iingard*s. Speech dn opening the Defence 
to the Articles charging the Sale of Master- 
%8 in Chaocery, and the Office of Clerk 
oHhe Custodies, ibid. 1118.— Evidence in 
ropport of the Defence to the 9th Article, 
tcspecting the Sale of the Office of Clerk of 
the Custodies,* ibid, U29.— The Managers 
yOL, XXXIV. 



for the Commons ol»ect to Evidence of the 
practice of former Chancellors, ibid. ib. — 
The Lords admit the Evidence, ibid. 1136. 
—The Managers object to Evidence of the 
Sale of the Office of Cursitor by former 
Chancellors, ibid. 1142. — ^The. Lords resolve 
not to admit the Evidence, ibid. 1144. — 
Evidence in support of the Defeiice to the 
Articles respecting the Sale of Masterships 
in Chancery, ibid. 1146. — Mr. Robins's 
Speech on opening the Defence to the 11th 
and 12th Articles, respecting the admission 
of persons of small property into the Office 
of Masters, and the connivance at improper 
practices by them with the Money of Suitors, 
ibid. 1166. — Evidence in support of the 
Defence to these Articles, ibid. 1180.-^Mr. 
Strangers Speech on opening the Defence to 
the 13th and 14th Articles, respecting the 
Order for an Arrangement on occasion of 
the deficiency in Dormer's Office, ibid. 
1191. — Evidence in support of the Defence 
to these Articles, ibid. 1195. — Mr. Strange's 
Speech on opening the Defence to the 15th, 
16th, and 17th Articles, respecting the use 
of improper means to conceal the deficiency 
in Dormer's Office, ibid. 1211.— Evidence 
in support of the Defence to these Articles, 
ibid. 1216. — ^Mr. Lingard's Speech in the 
Earl's Defence as to the 18th Article, re- 
specting the permission of the Masters to 
traffic with the Suitors' Money, ibid. 1228. 
— Mr. Robins's Speech on opening the 
Defence to the 19th Article, respecting the 
suggesting to the Masters to make a false 
statement of their property in order to 
prevent an inquiry, ibid. 1232. — Evidence 
in support of the pefence to this Article, 
ibid. 1236. — Evidence of the general Cha- 
racter and Conduct of the Earl in his Office, 
in answer to the Charge of corrupt intention, 
ibid. 1241. — Mr. Lingard's Speech on sum- 
ming up the Evidence for the Defence, ibid. 
1247.— Mr. Robins's Speech in support of 
the Defence, ibid. 1254. — Mr. Strange's 
Speech, ibid. 1255.— The Earl's Speech at 
the close of his Defence, ibid. 1265. — Mr. 
Serjeant Pengelly's Speech in Reply to the 
Earl's Defence to the 5th, 6lh, 7th, 8th, 9th, 
11th, and 12th Articles, ibid. 1330.— Mr. 
Lutwyche's Speech in Reply to the Defence 
to the other Articles, ibid. 1361.— Evidence 
in Reply, ibid. 1375. — He is unanimously 
found Guilty, ibid. 1391. — He is sentenced 
to pay a Fine of 30,000/. ibid. 1395.— The 
House of Commons resolve that the Thanks 
of the House be given to the Managers, ibid. 
1393. — Extracts from the Journals of the 
House of Lords respecting the Debates upon 
the Sentence to be passed upon the Earl of 
Macclesfield, ibid. 1397. 

i 

MACDANIEL, Stephen.— His Trial, with 
John Berry, James Egan, and James Salmon, 
at the Old Bailey, for being accessary to a 

' Highway Robbery, 27 Geo. 2, 1755, 19 vol. 
745.— The Indictment, ibid. 746.— Evidence 
G 



99 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



for the Proseeutiony ibid. 747. — ^Their De^ 
fences, ibid. 774. — ^The Jury find a Special 
Verdict, ibid, 777. — Argument of the Special 
Verdict before the Twelve Judges, ibid. 778. 
-—Mr. Hume CampbeU's Argument for the 
Crown, ibid. 779.— *Mr. Madan's Argument 
on the same side, ibid. 786. — Serjeant Davy*s 
Argument for the Prisoners, ibid. 790. — Mr. 
Aston^s Argument on the same side, ibid. 
797. — Mr, Hume Campbell's Reply, ibid. 
800.<— Mr. Justice Foster delivers the opinion 
of the Judges, that the Offence was not a 
Felony under the Statutes, ibid. 801. — They 
are again indicted for a Conspiracy, ibid. 
808.— The Indictment, ibid, ib.— They are 
found Guilty, and sentenced to seven years 
Imprisonment, to stand twice in th^ Pillory, 
to find Sureties for three years, and to pay a 
Fine of one Mark each, ibid. 809. — >£gan is 
killed in the Pillory, ibid. ib. — Macdaniel 
and Berry are tried for Murder, in causing 
Joshua Kidden to be convicted and executed 
for Robbery, knowing him to be innocent, 
ibid. 810.— They are found Guilty, but 
the Court respite the Judgment, in order 
that it may be argued whether the Offence 
amounts to Murder, ibid. 811.— The At- 
torney General declines to argue the point, 
and they are discharged, ibid. 813. 

MACDONALD, Archibald. Counsel.— His 
Argument for the Plaintiff in the Case of the 
Island of Grenada, 20 vol. 287. — His Argu- 
ment in support of the Rule for a Criminal 
Information against Captain Baillie, for a 
Libel upon the Governors of Greenwich 
Hospital, 21 vol. 61. 



■^■i* 



97 Geo. 3, 22 vol. 183. 



■ Solicitor General, 

• 

Attorney General. 

— His Speech for the Prosecution on the 
Trial of John Stockdale, for a Libel on the 
House of Commons, 22 vol. 247. — His Reply 
in the same Case, ibid. 285.— His Speech 
for the Prosecution on the Trial of Thomas 
Paine, for publishing the Second Part of the 
" Rights of Man," ibid. 380. 

' Chief Baron of 



the Exchequer. — He was one of the Judges 
who presided at Hardy*s Trial for High 
Treason, 24 vol. 221. — His Charge to the 
Jury on the Trial of Governor Wall for 
Murder, 3d vol. 143. 

MACIK)NALD, /Eneas, alias Angus.— Fos- 
ter's Report of the Proceedings against htm 
for High Treason in being concerned in the 
Rebellion of 1745, 21 Geo. 2, 1747, 18 vol. 
857. — His Defence is, that he was born in 
the Dominions of the King of France, ibid. 
858. — The Jury find him Guilty, but recom- 
mend him to Mercy, and he is afterwards 
pardoned, ibid. 860. — Whilst un.der Sentence 
: of Death, he is charged with Process in a 
Civil Suit, which the Court refuse to set 
aside; ibid. ib« 



MACDONALD of Glenco, 13 vol. 879. See 
GlencOf Mastacre of, 

MACEWEN, James.— Proceedings against 
him and others, at Glasgow, for administer- 
ing unlawful Oaths, 57 Geo. 3, 1817, 33 vol. 
629. — They are outlawed for not appearing, 
ibid. 632. 

MACFARLANE, William. See Codiing, 
William. 

MACGROWTHEa, Alexander— His Trial 
for High Treason in being concerned in the 
Rebellion of 1745, 20 Geo. 2, 1746, 18 vol. 
391. —His Defence, ibid. 392. — ^He is con- 
victed, but is afterwards reprieved, ibid. 394. 
—Foster's Report of his Case, ibid. 392. 

MACGUIRE, Connor, Lord.-His Trial at 
the Bar of the Court of King's Bench for 
High Treason in being concerned in the Irish 
Massacre, 20 Car. 1, 1645, 4 vol. 653.— 
May's Account ,of the Massacre, ibid. 654 
(note). — The Indictment, ibid. 653.— 'He 
pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 662. — He also 
pleads his Peerage in Abatement, and that 
ne ought to be tried by his Peers in Ireland, 
ibid. 663. — Mr. Prynn*s Argument for the 
Prosecution against this Plea, ibid. 690.— The 
Court decide that an Irish Baron may he 
tried by a Jury in England, ibid. 665. — The 
Parliament approve of the Judgment of the 
Court, ibid, ib,— He asks for time to bring 
Witnesses from Ireland, which is refused, 
ibid. 666. — He challenges all the Jury who 
appear, ibid. 667. — Whereupon a Distringas 
i> issued, returnable the next day, ibid, 669. 
— Having gone through all his Challenges, 
he requires that each Juryman, as he appears, 
may be asked on Oath, whether he has any 
share in the forfeited Rebels' lands in Ire- 
land, ibid. 670. — ^This is done, ibid. 671.— 
The Jury are sworn, and the Evidence pro- 
duced against him, ibid. ib. — His own Ex- 
amination given in Evidence, ibid. 674.— 
His Defence, ibid. 682. — He is found Guilty, 
ibid. 684. — -Sentence of Death passed upoD 
him, ibid. 685. — He petitions Parliament to 
remit a part of his Sentence, ibid. 687.— 
This is refused, ibid. ib. — His Conduct at 
the place of Execution, ibid. ib. 

MACGUIRE, Michael.— Proceedings on his 
Trial in Ireland for High Treason, in en- 
couraging one of the King's Soldiers to he- 
come a Defender, 36 Geo. 3, 1795, 26 vol. 
293.— The principal Witness for the Prose- 
cution being unable to identify his person, 
he is acquitted, ibid. 294. 

MACINTOSH, James, Counsel.— He was 
one of the Counsel §or the Earl of Thanet, 
on his Trial at Maidstone for a Riot, in 
attempting to rescue Arthur O'Connor, 2T 
vol. 821. —His Speech for the Defendant on 
the Trial of Peltierfor a Libel on Buonaparte, 
when First Consul of the French ReinibliC) 
28 vol. 563* 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



MACINTOSH, Joha.—Hw Trial for High 
Treason at Dublin, under a Special Com- 
inission of Oyer and Terminer, for being 
concerned in the Irish Insurrection, 43 Oeo. 
3, 1803, 28 vol. I215.--The Indictment, 
ibid. ib. — Speech of the Attorney General 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 1218. — Bvidence 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 1220. — ^Mr. Mac 
Nally*s Speech in his Defence, ibid. 1233. — 
The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 1239. — ^He 
is executed, ibid. 1240. 

MACKAY, George, 21 vol. 1045. See Sirattan, 
George, 

MACKINLEY, A ndrew. — Proceedings against 
him in the High Court of Justiciary in Edin- 
burgh for administering unlawful Oaths, 57 
Geo. 3, 1817, 33 vol. 275.— The Indictment, 
ibid. 276. — Mr. Cranstoun's Argument 
against the Relevancy of the Indictment, ibid. 
282.^-Mr. Grant's Argument on the same 
side, ibid. 309. — Mr. Drummond's Argu- 
ment in support of the Relevancy of the 
Indictment, ibid. 329. — Mr. Clerk's Reply, 
ibid. 343. — ^The Court order Informations 
to be delivered, ibid. 360. — ^The Lord Ad- 
vocate serves another Indictment, ibid. 363. 
—Information for the Crown, ibid. 372.— 
Information for the Prisoner, ibid. 396. — 
Supplementary Information for the Prisoner, 
ibid. 453. — Lord Hermand's Argument on 
delivering his Opinion in favour of the Rele- 
vancy of the Indictment, ibid. 493. — Lord 
Gillies's Argument on delivering his Opinion 
against the Relevancy, ibid. 502. — ^Lord Pit- 
milly's Argument in favour of the Relevancy, 
ibid. 517. — Lord Reston's Argument on the 
same side, ibid. 526.-^The Lord Justice 
Clerk's Argument on the same side, ibid. 
535.— Interlocutor of Relevancy, ibid. 553. — 
Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 560.^- 
The Lord Advocate having finished the Evi- 
dence for the Prosecution, declines proceed- 
ing further with the Trial, ibid. 620.— The 
Jury, under the direction of the Court, find 
the Libel Not Proven, ibid. 627. — Address 
of the Lord Justice Clerk to the Prisoner 
upon his Discharge, ibid. ib. 

MACK WORTH, Sir Humphrey.— His Speech 
in the House of Commons in the Debate on 
the Great Case of Ashby and White, 14 vol. 
761. — He publishes a Pamphlet upon the 
subject under discussion in that Case, ibid. 
695 (note). 

MACLANE, David— His Trial for High 
Treason at Quebec in Lower Canada, for 
heing concerned in a design to overthrow 
the Government there, 37 Geo. 3, 1797, 26 
▼ol. 7el. — Charge of Mr. Osgoode, Chief 
Justice of the Province, to the Grand Jury 
assembled under a Special Commission for 
his Trial, ibid. 722.-~The Grand Jury find 
a true Bill against him, ibid. 731.— The 
Indictment, ibid. 733. — ^The Attorney Gene- 
ral's Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. 749. 
—Evidence for the Prosecution/ ibid. 763. 



8a 



•—The Prisoners SpM6h in U$ Deteoe, 
ibid. 780. — Speeches of hif Coumel, ibid; 
783. — Reply of the Attorney General, ibid* 
789.— The Chief Justice's Charge to the 
Jury, ibid, 793.— The Jury find bim Guilty, 
ibid. 811. — His Counsel move in Arrest of 
Judgment, ibid. 812. — ^The Attomejr General 
shows cause against the Motion, ibid. 814. 
— ^The Court overrule the Objection, ibid. 
822.-^The Chief Justice passes Sentence of 
Death upon himi ibid. 824,«*He is executed^ 
ibid. 826. 

MACLAREN, Alexander.-^Pfoeeedings in 
the High Court of Justiciary in Scotland on 
his Trial, with Thomas Baird, for Sedition^ 
57 Geo. 3, 1817, 83 vol. l.--.>The Indict- 
ment, ibid. ib. — ^Defences for the Panek^ 
ibid. 6.— Explanation of the Defences by 
the Counsel for the Panels, ibid. 8. — Inter- 
locutor of Relevancy, ibid. 18.^^£vidence 
for the Prosecution, ibid. ib^-«£vidence in 
Exculpation, ibid. 40.<~The Lord Advocate's 
Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. 49.'— Mr. 
Clerk's Speech in Defence of Madareo, ibid* 
73. — Mr. Jeffrey's Speech in Defence of 
Baird, ibid. 88.— The Lord Justice Clerk's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. 121. — ^The Jury 
find them Guilty, but recommend them io 
the clemency of the Court, ibid. 135.— *They 
are sentenced to Six Months imprisonment, 
and to find Security for three Years, ibid. 137. 

MACLAUCHLAN, William. See Porteout, 
Captain John. — His Trial at Edinburgh foe 
Mobbing, Murder, and other Crimes, 10 
Geo. 2, 1737, 17 vol. 993.— The Indictment, 
ibid. ib. — Defences for the Panel, with the 
Answers thereto, ibid. 997.— Interlocutor of 
relevancy, ibid. 1002. — ^The Jury acquit hinif 
ibid. 1003. 

MACPHERSON, James.^ExtrtoU from his 
Life of King James the Second, respeeting 
the Proceedings against Lord Clarendon, 6 
vol. 291.— Doubts of the Authenticity of 
the Life of James the Second, as published 
by him, ibid. 297.— Lord Holland's Detection 
of the Imposture in bis Address prefixed to 
Mr. Fox's Historical Work, ibid. 299. 

MADDER, John. See Green, C^em Thomas. 

MAHONY, Matthew* See Goo4cre, Gg^m 

Samuel, 

MAITLAND, Charles, Lord Haltoa.-<~Ppo« 

ceedings against him in Scotiand for Per- 
jury in his Evidence on the Trial of James 
Mitchel, for attempting to murder Archbishop 
Sharp, 33 Car. 2, 1681, 6 vol. 1261.— Pe- 
tition of Mitchel to the Lords of the Articles^ 
ibid. 1263.— The Letters of Lord Halton to 
Lord Kincardin, upon which the Charge 
against Mitchel rested, ibid. ib. — Lord 
Halton's Answer to the Petition, itnd. 1265^ 
—His £videnceonMitchellBTrial,ibid. 1256. 
— Mitchel's Second Petition, with the Answer 
thereto,ibid.l267.—TheLopdBof the Articles 
declare their <^ini0At»f Lord HaHoa's Inoo^ 
Q 2 



84 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



, cence, t ibid. - 1268.— Lord Fountainhall's 
. Account oflhese Proceedings,, ibid. 1270. 

MALLET, Sir Thomas, Judge of K. B. 18 
Car.l , 6 vol. 74. — His Answer, when required 
to publish from the Bench certain Resolu- 
tions of the Parliament in behalf of the 
Ordinance of the Militia, and against the 
' Commission of Array, 4 vol. 153 (note).— 
He is sent to the Tower on his refusing so 
to do, ibid. ib.—He had been before im- 
prisoned for not giving Notice to the Par- 
liament of the contents of the Kentish 
Petition immediately upon his seeing it, 
ibid. ib.—He was a Judge of K. B. after 
the Restoration, 5 vol. 971.— He was one of 
the Commissioners for the Trial of the Regi- 
cides, ibid. 980. ^ 

MANCHESTER, Henry, Earl of, Lord Privy 

• Seal. — His Speech on delivering his Opinion 

- in the Star Chamber in favour of a mild 

Sentence upon Henry Sherfield for breaking 

a Painted Window in a Church at Salisbury, 

3 vol. 556. 

MANCHESTER, Edward, Earl of, Lord 

Chamberlain. See Kimbolton, Edward^ Ixn-d, 

— He was Speaker of the House of Lords, 

pro tempore, during the Commonwealth, 4 

' vol. 1203.— He sat as a Judge on the Trial 

of the Regicides, 5 vol. 986.— Ludlow's Re- 

markupon his conductin this respect, ibid. ib. 

(note). — He sat as one of the Lords Triers on 

theTrial of Lord Morley for Murder, 6 vol. 775. 

M ANSEL, Sir Robert. See Whitebcke, James, 

MANSFIELD, James, Counsel, 19 vol. 1080, 
20 vol. 1.240, 1319,21 vol. 1061.— His Argu- 
ment iq the Case of the Duchess of Kings- 
ton, that a Sentence of the Ecclesiastical 
Court, annulling the first Marriage, is a con- 
clusive Answer to the Charge of Bigamy, 
20 vol. 403. — His Argument in support of 
the Duchess's claim of Privilege of Peerage 
upon her Conviction, ibid. 634. 

— — ^— Sir James, SoliciPor General. 
— His Speech in Reply for the Prosecution, 
on the Trial of Lord George Gordon for 
High Treason, 21 vol. 621. — His Speech in 
Reply for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
De la Motte for High Treason, ibid. 794. 

MANSFIELD, . Richard. See Sacheverell, 

William, 

MANSFIELD, William, Earl of. Chief Justice 

. of K. B. See Murray^ The Hon. William, 

. — His celebrated Speech on delivering the 

Judgment of the Court for the Reversal 

. of the Outlawry in the Case of John 

Wilkes, 19 vol. 1098.— Another Report 

of a part of that Speech, ibid. 1401. — 

Contemporary Remarks upon it, ibid. 1404 

(note), ibid. 1113 (note).— He delivers the 

Judgment.of the Court in the Case of Fabrigas 

. y. Mostyn, 20 vol. 226. — His Judgment in 

the Case of the Island of Grenada, ibid. 320. 

—His Charge to the Jury on the Trial of 

Johtt Home for ^ ^b^li ibid, 759«— His 



Charge to the Jury on the Trial of John 
Almon for publishing Junius's Letter to 
the King, ibid. 836.— His Charge to the 
Jury on the Trial of John Miller for re- 
printing Junius's Letter to the King, ibid. 
892. — He'delivers the Judgment of the Court 
of King's Bench in the Case of the King v. 
Woodfall, respecting the limit of the powers 
of Juries in Cases of Libel, ibid. 917.— 
This Judgment is afterwards read by him in 
the House of Lords, ibid. 921.— Questions 
proposed to him by Lord Camden respecting 
the Doctrine contained in this Judgment, 
ibid. ib.—He delivers the Judgment of the 
Court of King's Bench on discharging the 
Rule for a Criminal Information against 
Captain Baillie, 21 vol. 66.— His Charge 
to the Jury on the Trial of Lord George 
Gordon for Treason, ibid. 644.— His Charge 
to the Jury in the Case of the Madras 
Council, ibid. 1219.— His Charge to the 
Jury on the Trial of Charles Bembridge for 
Frauds committed by him as an Accountant 
in the Office of the Pay-Master General, 22 
vol. 74. — He delivers the Judgment of the 
. Court on discharging a Motion to arrest the 
Judgment, or to grant a new Trial in that 
Case, ibid. 150. 

M ANWARING, Roger.— Proceedings against 
him for preaching Sermons in favour of 
Loans, and the power of the King to enforce 
them without the authority of Parliament, 
4 Car. 1, 1628, 3 vol. 335.— The Declara- 
tion of the House of Commons against him, 
ibid. 338. — Mr. Pym'a Speech at a Con- 
ference with the House of Lords on deliver- 
ing the Charge against him, ibid. 340.— He 
is brought to the Bar of the House of Lords 
to answer to the Charge, ibid. 352. — His 
Defence, ibid. 353.— The Judgment against 
him, ibid. 356. — ^His Submission and Re- 
cantation, ibid. 357. 

MANWOOD, Sir Roger, Chief Baron of the 
, Exchequer, 26 Eliz. 1 vol. 1096, 1229, 1251. 
— His Speech in the Star Chamber on de- 
claring the manner of the Death of the Earl 
of Northumberland, ibid. 1122. — He was 
one of the Commissioners appointed for the 
Trial of Mary, Queen of Scots, ibid. 1167. 

MARCH, Earl of. See Mortimer, Roger, 

MARGAROT, Maurice.— His Trial at Edin- 
burgh for Sedition, in becoming a Member 
of an illegal Assembly called the General 
Convention, 34 Geo. 3, 1794, 23 vol. 603. 
— ^At the commencement of the Trial, he 
objects to the absence of the Lord Justice 
General, ibid. ib. — ^The Objection is orcr- 
ruled, ibid. 608.— The Indictment, ibid. ib. 
— His Objections to the relevancy of the 
Indictment, ibid. 616. — Answer of the So- 
licitor General thereto, ibid. 617.— Tbe 
Court decide that the Indictment is relevant, 
ibid. 622.— Evidence for the prosecution* 
ibid. 632.— Evidence for the Panel, ibid. 

en,-— Tph.^ Lprd Advoca^e'a Speech foif tw 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



BS 



Piosecution, ibid. 679. — ^Margaret's Speech 
in his Defence, ibid. 710. — ^The Court sum 
up the Evidence, ibid. 763. — ^The Jury find 
him Guilty, ibid. 768. — The Court sentence 
himtoTransportation for Fourteen Years, ibid. 
771. — ^His subsequent Conduct,' ibid. 1412. 
— He dies soon after his return to England 
in 1815, ibid. 1413. 

MARKHAM, Sir Griffin.— He is tried with 
Sir Edward Parham, George Brooke, Bar- 
tliolomew Brookesby, Anthony Copley, Wil- 
liam Watson, and William Clarke, for High 
Treason, in being concerned in Sir Walter 
Raleigh's Plot, 1 James 1, 1603, 2 vol. 61. 
—Indictment against them, ibid, ib.— They 
are all found Guilty, except Sir Edward 
Parham, ibid. 65. — Letter containing an Ac- 
count of the Proceedings respecting them 
after their Trial, ibid. ib. — Watson, Clarke, 
and Brooke are executed, ibid. 66. — Mark- 
ham is pardoned at the place of Execution, 
ibid. ib. — ^The King's Warrant for suspend- 
ing the Execution of Markham, ibid. 69. 

MARLBOROUGH, Charles, Duke of. See 
Barnard, WUUam. 

MARLBOROUGH, John Churchill, Duke of. 
— ^Anecdote respecting his conduct on being 
applied to for his attendance to give Evidence 
at the Trial of the Earl of Oxford (Harley), 
15 vol. 1179. 

MARSHALL, William. See Wakeman, Sir 
George, Anderson, Lionel. 

M ARSON, John. See Cowper, Spencer, 

MARTEN, Henry, 5 vol. 1000, 1199. See 
Regicides, 

MARY, Sister to Edward the Sixth, afterwards 
Queen of England. — Proceedings on the 
part of the Lord Protector and Council re- 
specting her Non-conformity, 4 and 5 Edw. 
6, 1550-1551, 1 vol. 527.— Her Letter to the 
Lord Protector and the Council concerning 
their interference with her Religion, ibid. ib. 
— Instructions for Dr. Hoptou to answer 
her Letter, ibid. 529. — Her Second Letter 
to the Protector and the Council, remonstrat- 
iug against their summoning some of her 
household, ibid. 532. — ^The King's Letter to 
her, ibid. 533.^— Her Reply thereto, ibid. 
535. — Correspondence between her and the 
Council, respecting the Prosecution of her 
Chaplains for saying Mass at her House, 
ibid. 536. — Her Letter to the King, entreat- 
ing him not to interfere with her using Mass, 
ibid. 548. — ^The King's Answer thereto, ibid. 
549. — ^The King's Instructions td the Mes- 
sengers sent by him to her, ibid. ib. 

MARY, Queen of Scots. See Bdbington, 
Anthony, Damley, "Henry, Lord, — Evidence 
of Nicholas Hubert, alias Paris, respecting 
her Adultery with Both well, 1 vol. 942. — 
Indecent Ballads and Letters found in her 
possession, ibid. 991. — Proceedings against 
her for being concerned in Babington's Plot 
against the Qaeen, 28 Eliz. 1586> ibid. 1161. 



— Commission for her Examination .an^ 
Trial, ibid. 1166. — ^The Commissioners meet 
at Fotheringay, ibid. 1168. — She is prevailed 
upon to submit to her Trial, ibid. 1172. — 
Correspondence between her and Babington, 
ibid. 1174. — ^The Commissioners adjourn to 
the Star Chamber, ibid. 1188.— They find 
her Guilty, ibid. 1189.— The Parliament 
petition Queen Elizabeth for Execution upon 
the Sentence, ibid. 1190. — The Queen's 
Answer thereto, ibid. 1192. — The Lord 
Chancellor and the Speaker of the House of 
Commons urge reasons for the Execution 
of Mary, ibid. 1195. — Queen Elizabeth con- 
sents, ibid. 1198. — Commission for her 
Execution, ibid. 1201.— Offensive Letter of 
Mary to the Queen, ibid. 1202 (note). — Her 
Execution, ibid. 1207. — Account of the Evi- 
dence against her, from the Hardwicke State 
Papers, ibid. 1211 — Letter from Archibald 
Douglas to her, confirming the Confession 
of James, Earl ofMortoun, respecting the 
Murder of Lord Damley, ibid. 953. 

MASKALL, Henry John. — His Trial for 
assisting in the destruction of Lord* Mans- 
field's House during the Riots in 17*80, 21 
Geo. 3, 1780, 21 vol. 653. — Evidence for 
the Prosecution, ibid, ib.—- His Defence, 
ibid. 670. — Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 
673.— He is acquitted, ibid. 688. 

MASSEY, Major General Edward. See HolUs, 
DenziL 

MATTHEWS, John.— His Trial for High 
Treason in printing a Libel asserting the 
Title of the Pretender to the Crown, 5 Geo. 
1, 1719, 15 vol. 1323.— The Indictment, 
ibid. 1324. — He pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 
1331. — ^The Attorney GeneraFs Speech for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 1333. — Evidence 
against him, ibid. 1340. — Mr. Hungerford's 
Speech in his Defence, ibid. 1359.— Mr. 
Ketelby's Speech for him, ibid. 1364. — Evi- 
dence for the Prisoner, ibid. 1369. — Evi- 
dence in reply, ibid. 1377. — Reply of the 
Attorney General, ibid. 1378. — Chief Justice 
King's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 1386.— The 
Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 1394. — His 
Counsel make several Objections in Arrest 
of Judgment, which are overruled by the 
Court, ibid. ib. — Sentence is passed upon 
him, and he is executed, ibid. 1403. 

MAWGRIDGE, John.— His Case upon a 
Special Verdict found upon an Indictment 
for the Murder of William Cope, 17 vol. 57. 
— Lord Holt delivers the Opinion of the 
Judges, that the facts found by the Special 
Verdict amount to Murder, ibid. 59. — 
Particulars of the Case, ibid. 71. — ^Before 
the Argument of the Special Verdict, he 
escapes, but is afterwards retaken and exe- 
cuted, ibid', ib. — His Conduct immediately 
before his Execution, ibid. 72. 

MAY, William. See Dawson, Joseph. 
MAY, Thomas*— His Account of the Masaiacrc 



OBNERAL INDEX TO 



of th« PvotMttnti in Inland in the time of 
Charke the Fitit, 4 roh 654 (note). 

MAYNARD, John, Counsel, 6 rol. 348.— He 
iigns the Exceptions to the Indictment on 
the Trial of Lilburne, for returning firom 
Banishmenti ibid. 431. 

--———— Seijeant-at-Law, 6 vol. 
76f dl3, 1045. — ^Hift unworthy Conduct on 
being imprisoned by Cromwell, with Ser- 
jeant Twisden and Mr. Wadham Windham, 
for pleading in the Case of Mr. Cony, 5 vol. 
d36<— -His Speech in the House of Commons 
upon the Deoate upon the Charges against 
liord Clarendon, 6 vol. 326. — He is appoint- 
ed a Manager for the House of Commons 
on the Trial of Lord Mordant, ibid. 796. — 
He is one of the Counsel for the Crown on 
the Trial of Tonge and others for High 
Treason, ibid. 232. — He is of Counsel for 
the Prosecution on the Trial of Lord Morley 
for Murder, ibid. 776. — His Argument in 
the Case of the Earl of Shailesbury, in favour 
of the legality of a Commitment by the 
House of Lords for a Contempt, ibid. 1290. 
•*^His Speech for the Prosecution on Cole- 
man's Trial for High Treason, 7 vol. 6.— His 
Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
Lord Comwallis in the House of Lords for 
Murder^ ibid. 154. 



■■ Sir John, King's Ancient Serjeant, 

8 vol. 267, 453, 1366, 10 vol. 561.— His 
Speech for the Crown on the Trial of Knox 
and Lane, for disparaging the Evidence of the 
Popish Plot, 7 vol. 767.— His Speech for the 
Crown on the Trial of Tasborough and Price 
for attempting to discourage Dugdale, one 
of the Witnesses for the Popish Plot, from 
ffivinff Evidence, ibid. 887.—His Speech 
for the Prosecution on the Trial of Sir 
Thomas Gascoigne for High Treason, in 
being concerned in the Popish Plot, ibid. 
067.— His Speech in the House of Lords as 
one of the Managers for the House of Com- 
mons, in support of the Impeachment of 
Lord Stafford, ibid. 1298. — His Speech in 
the House of Commons on the Motion for 
the Impeachment of Chief Justice Scroggs, 
8 vol. 208.— His Speech for the Defendant 
in the Case of Pritchard against Papillon, 
for a False Arrest, 10 vol. 330.— He is called 
as a Witness on Oates's Trial for Perjury, 
ibid. 1162.— His Speech in the Debate in 
the House of Commons on the Earl of 
Danby's pleading a Pardon from the King 
to an Impeachment by the Commons, ibid. 
785. — He was a King's Serjeant in 1688, 
under James the Second, 12 vol. 125.— He 
takes a part in the Debate on the Mdtion 
for impeaching Sir Adam Blair and others, 
for dispersing a treasonable Declaration of 
James the Second, in 1689| ibid. 1212. 

MAYNAHD, Sir John. See Mdlis, VenzlL 
UAYNABD, WiUiam, Lord. See Suffolk, 



MEAD, WiUiam. See Penn^ WUUtm. 

MEALMAKER, George.— His Trial in Scot- 
land for Sedition and administering unlawful 
Oaths, 38 Geo. 3, 1798, 26 vol. 1135.— The 
Indictment, ibid. ib. — Debate on the Rele- 
vancy of the Indictment, ibid. 1140. — ^The 
Court hold the Indictment relevant, ibid. 
1144. — Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 
1145.<-~The Lord Advocate's Speech to the 
Jury, ibid. 1158. — The Jury find him Guilty, 
ibid. I163.--He is sentenced to Transporta- 
tion for 14 years, ibid. ib. 

MEGGOTT, Sir George-— His Case in Par- 
liament on a complaint of Breach of Privi- 
lege, for having prosecuted at law several 
persons for their Evidence before a Com- 
mittee of the House of Commons, 14 vol. 
749 (note). 

MELANCTHON.— His Opinion respecting 
Impotence and Divorce, as produced by Arch- 
bishop Abbot, in confirmation of his Reasons 
against the Divorce of the Earl and Coun- 
tess of Essex, 2 vol. 796. 

MELDRUM, Robert. See Bemardi, John, 

MELFQRT, John, EaH of.— Proceedings in 
Scotland against him, John, Earl of Middle- 
toun, Richard, Earl of Lauderdale^ and 
others, for Treason under the Scotch Statute, 
1 Will. & Mary, c. 8, for joining in arms 
with the French King, and remaining in 
France after the 1st of June, 1693, 6 Will. 
and Mary, 1694, 13 vol. 1442. — ^They are 
outlawed for not appearing, ibid. 1443.— 
Upon the Petition of the King's Advocate, 
they are afterwards admitted to make their 
Defences, ibid! ib. f^ 

MELLOR, George.~His Trial with WiMMJ 
Thorpe and Thomas Smith for the MutWr 
of William Horsfall, under the Special Com- 
mission at York, for the Trial of peruons 
concerned in the Luddite Insurrection, 53 
Geo. 3, 1813, 31 vol. 997.— Mr. Park's 
Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. 998.— Mr. 
Justice Le Blanc's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
1008.— The Jury find them Guilty, ibid. 
1033. — Mr. Justice Le Blanc's Address on 
passing Sentence of Death upon them, ibid, 
lb.— They are executed, ibid. 1063. See 
Ludditei, 

MELVILLE, George, Lord. See Loudom, 
JameSf Earl of, 

MELVILLE, Henry, Viscount.— His Trial in 
the House of Lords on an Impeachment of 
High Crimes and Misdemeanours by the 
Commons, 46 Geo. 3, 1806, 29 vol. 549.-- 
Introductory Note, ibid. ib. — Resolutions 
of the House of Commons against him, ibid. 
551.— The Resolutions are presented to the 
King, ibid. 655. — Lord Melville requests to 
be heard in his own Defence in the House 
of Commons, ibid, 560. — His Speech, ibid. 
ib.-*-The House resolve to impeaeh biro, 
ibid. 694.-- Proceedings in both Houses of 
Farliametit respecting the Impeacbment, 



THE STATE TRIALS* 



87 



prelimitiaty to the Trial, ibid. tb.^Proceed- 
ings on the Trial, ibid. 605.— Names of the 
Managers for the Commons, ibid. ib. — 
Names of Lord Melville^s Cfomisel, ibid. 
606 .---Articles of Impeachment, ibid. 608. 
Answer of Lord Melville, ibid. 622.-— 
Further Article of Impeachment, ibid. 623. 
— Answer thereto^ ibid. 624. — Replication 
of the Commons, ibid. ib.«— Mr. Whitbread's 
Speech on opening the Articles, ibid. 625. 
-^Evidence in support of the Preamble to 
the Articles, ibid. 671.— The Third lleport 
of the Commissioners of Accounts in 1781, 
ibid. 673. — The Appendix thereto, ibid. 
686.-^£vidence of the Resolutiokis of the 
House of Commons upon the Reports of 
the Commissioners, ibid. 688. — Evidence 
of the Kitig's Wartant for the Augmentation 
of the Salary of Mr. Barr^» then Treasurer 
of the Navy, in cobseqtience of One of the 
above Resolutions of the Comnlonsi ibid. 
689.*-^£Tideilce of the Gratit of ati additional 
Salary to Lotd MeWille, ibid. 706.'^Extract 
from the Eighth Report of the Commissioners 
of Poblie Accounts, ibid. 711. — Evidence 
on the First and Tenth Articles respecting 
the appropriation of certain sums of the 
pubtio money by Lord Melville to his own 
use, before the passing of the Act of Par- 
liament for better regulating the Office of 
Treasurer of the Navy, ibid. 713. — Evidence 
of the Appointment of Mr. Douglas as Lord 
Melville's Paymaster, and of his acting as 
such under a Power of Attorney from Lord 
Melville, ibid. ib. — Evidence respecting the 
Duties and Nature of the Office of Paymaster 
to the Treasurer of the Navy, ibid. 748. — 
The Managers for the Commons propose to 
prove Mr. Douglas's acknowledgment of the 
receipt of a sum of money from the Ex- 
chequer, in order to affect Lord Melville 
criminally with such receipt, ibid. 746. — 
Discussion respecting the admissibility of 
this Evidence, ibid. 747. — ^The Lords decide 
that the Evidence is admissible, ibid. 763.— 
Evidenee of the Examination of Lord Mel- 
ville before the Commissioners of Naval 
Inquiry in 1804, ibid. 797.— His Corres- 
pondence with tlie Commissioners relative 
to that Examination, ibid. 808. — Evidetl^e 
in support of the Fifth Article, respecting 
the appropriation of certain other sums of 
public money by Lord Melville to his own 
use, before the passing of the Act of Par- 
liament, ibid. 892.-— Evidence on the Second 
Article, charging Lord Melville with con- 
niving at the employment of several sums 
of public money by Mr. Trotter, his Pay- 
master^ to his own private use, ibid. 898«— 
Mr. Trotter's Evidence in Chief, ibid. 902. 
—His Cross-Examination, ibid. 929. — His 
Re-Examination, ibid.946. — Evidence of Mr. 
Tierney, ibid. 1111.— Sir Samuel Romilly's 
Speech on summing up the Evidence in 
support of the Articles, ibid. 1150.-«Mr. 
Plbttier*s Speech on openitig the Defefice, 

iWd* n W.— EWdeticfi for the Defence, Ibid. 



130B»<— Mr. Adam's Speceh on summing tip 
the Evidence for the Defence, ibid. iai3.< — 
Sir Arthur Piggott*s Reply upon the poiats 
of law urged for the Defence, ibid. 1371.' — 
Mrt WhitbreadVgeneral Reply for the Com- 
mons, ibid. 1392.^^Questions proposed to 
the Judges by the House of Lords upon 
some of the principal parts of the Charge, 
with their Answers thereto^ ibid. 1468.^ — 
Analysis of the Votes of the Lords upon the 
several Articles, ibid. 1477. — He is acquitted 
by a majority of the Lords upon all the 
Articles, ibid. l481« 

MENZIES^ James. See Cameron, Angus, 
MENNONS, John, See SmUh^ Jameu. 

MEREIAM, Johti. Bee Denew, JStUkankL 

MERRICK^ Sir Gilly. See Blunt, Sir ChrU* 
tephett 

M:fiSSENOER, Peter.— His Trial with several 
Others for High Treason in tutnultuoUsly 
assembling together under the pretence of 
pulling down Bawdy Houses, 20 Caf. 2, 
1668, 6 vol. 879.— Evidence against them, 
ibid. 880.— The Jury, by direction of the 
Judge (Chief Justice Kelyng), find a Special 
Verdict as to some of the Prisoners, and 
acquit the others, ibid. 891.— The Special 
Verdict, ibid* ib. 897.— Kelyng*S Report of 
the Opinions of the Judges upon this Case, 
ibid. 892. — ^All the Judges, excepting Lord 
Hale (then Chief Baron), are of opinion, 
that the Facts found by the Special Verdict 
constitute High Treason, ibid. 899. — 
Resolutions of the Judges as to the Judg- 
ment to be given in each of the several 
Cases, ibid. 911. — Mr. Luders's Remarks 
upon this Case, and the doctrine of Con- 
structive Levying of War, contained in the 
Resolutions of the Judges, ibid. 908 (note). 
— Lord Hale's Account of the grounds of his 
dissent from the Opinion of the Judges, ibid. 
910 (note). 

MICHELL, Sir Francis. See Mompestm, Sir 
'Giles. — Proceedings in Parliament against 
him for Monopoly and abuse of Patents, 19 
Jac> 1, 1631, 2 vol. 1132.— Offences charged 
against him in the House of Lords, ibid, ib, 
— His Defence, ibid. 1133. — He is found 
Guilty by the Lords unanimously, ibid. 1185. 
— His Sentence, ibid. ib. 

MIDDLEMORE, Humphrey.— His Trial With 
William Exroew, and Sebastian Nudigate^ 
for denying tlie King*s Supremacy, 27 Hen. 
8, 1535, 1 vol. 473.— They are found Guilty, 
and Judgment of Death is passed upon them, 
ibid. ib. — They are refused the Sacrament 
before their Execution, ibid. ib. 

MIDDLESEX, James, £ari of. See Suffolk, 
James^ Earl of. 

MIDDLESEX, Lionel, Eari of,LordTreasurer. 
—Proceedings on his Impeachment for High 
Crimes and Mi8demeanours,22Jac. 1,1624, 
2 voj. t J 3^.— Report of ft PowroUtie of \hp 



88 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



House of Lords appointed to examine the 
Stores and Ammunition of War, ibid. 1186. 
— Sir Edward Coke, on the part of the Com- 
mons, opens, the Charges against him, ibid. 
1190. — Sir Edwin Sandys supports the 
Charges for the Commons, ibid. 1194. — The 
Lords appoint a Committee to examine the 
Charges, ibid. 1197. — The Committee report 
thereon, and deliver a part of the Articles of 
Impeachment to the House, ibid. ib. — He 
petitions for Warrants for the attendance of 
Witnesses,and for Counsel, ibid. 1199. — The 
House grant him Warrants for his Witnesses, 
but refuse Counsel, ibid. 1200. — He applies 
for Copies of the Depositions taken against 
him, which are refused, ibid. 1201. — Addi- 
tional Articles exhibited against him, ibid. 
1202. — His Answer to the First Part of the 
Articles, ibid. 1203. — His Answer to the Ad- 
ditional Articles, ibid. 1214.— Petition of 
several Merchants against him respecting an 
Imposition on Hops, ibid. 121 6. — ^The King's 
Speech to the Lords respecting the Proceed- 
ings against the Lord Treasurer, ibid. 1218. 
— ^The Attorney General opens the Charge 
respecting the Wardrobe, ibid. 1221. —rHis 
Answer thereto, ibid. 1223. — The Attorney 
General opens the Charge of Bribery and 
Corruption, ibid. 1225.— His Answer there- 
to, ibid. 1228. — ^The Attorney General opeds 
the Charge respecting the Lease of Sugars, 
ibid. 1230.— His Defence thereto, ibid. 1231. 
— ^The Attorney General opens the Charge 
respecting Groceries, ibid, ib.— His Defence 
thereto, ibid. 1232. — The Attorney General 
opens the Charge as to his unlawful bargain- 
ing for Sir Roger Dallison's Lands, ibid. ib. 
— His Defence thereto, ibid. 1236. — He 
petitions for further time on account of his 
Sickness, ibid. 1237. — ^Tlie Lords send a 
Committee with a Physician to his House, to 
order him to attend on the same Afternoon 
if he were not too ill, ibid.ib. — The Attorney 
General opens the Cliarge respecting Muni- 
tions, ibid. 1238.— His Answer thereto, ibid. 
1240.-— The Attorney General opens the 
Charge respecting the Court of Wards, ibid. 
1241. — His Answer thereto, ibid. 1242. — 
His General Defence to all the Charges, 
ibid. 1244. — ^The Lords acquit him of some 
of the Charges, and find him Guilty upon 
others, ibid. 1245. — Sentence of the Lords 
upon him, ibid. 1250.— Wilson's Account 
of him in his Life of James the First, ibid. ib. 

MIDDLETOUN, Captain James.— Proceed- 
ings in Scotland against him and others for 
High Treason, in holding the Fortress of 
the Bass against the King, 5 Will, and 
Mary, 1694, 13 vol. 643.— The Indictment, 
ibid, ib.— Debate on the Relevancy, ibid. 
851.— Interlocutor of Relevancy, ibid. 865. 
—Evidence against them, ibid. 866.— The 
Jury find two of the Panels Guilty, and they 
are sentenced to Death, ibid. 872. — The 
others are also found Guilty and sentenced, 
ibid, 877. i > 



MIDDLETOUN, John, Earl of. See Mdfort, 
John, Earl of, 

MILLER, John. — His Trial in London upon 
an Ex'Officio Information for re-printing 
Junius's Letter to the King, 10 Geo. 3, 1770, 
20 vol. 869. — ^The Solicitor General's Speech 
for the Prosecution, ibid. ib. — Evidence for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 876. — Serjeant Glynn's 
Speech for the Defendant, ibid. 878. — Mr. 
Davenport's Speech on the same side, ibid. 
885. — Reply of the Solicitor General, ibid. 
888. — Lord Mansfield's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 892. — The Jury acquit him, ibid. 895. 

MILLINGTON, Gilbert, 5 vol. 1002, 1203. 
See Regicides^ 

MILLS, Richard. See Jackson^ WUlidm. 

MITCHEL, James. See MaUland, Charles. 
— His Trial in Scotland for shooting at 
Archbishop Sharp, 29 Car. 2, 1677, 6 vol. 
1207. — Burnet's Account of the Attempt upon 
Archbishop Sharp, ibid. ib. (note). — ^Laing's 
Account,ibid.l215(note). — Mitchel acknow- 
ledges the fact under a promise of mercy, 
before a Committee appointed to examine 
him, ibid. 1216.— After two years imprison- 
ment, he is again brought before the Com- 
mittee and examined, ibid. 1217. — He re- 
fuses to acknowledge his former Confession, 
ibid, 1227. — He is threatened with the Tor- 
ture, ibid. 1228. — ^The Torture is applied 
to him, but he still refuses to acknowledge 
his Confession, ibid. 1232. — His Trial, ibid, 
ib. — Indictment against him, ibid, ib.— He 
denies the Charge, ibid. 1236. — His Counsel, 
in the Debate on the Relevancy of the In- 
dictment, urge that the Offence charged can- 
not amount to Murder, and that the former 
Confession, if made, cannot be available 
against his Life, being made upon a promise 
of Pardon, ibid. ib. — Interlocutor of Re- 
levancy, ibid. 1 253. — ^The Court hold, that if 
it be proved that the Confession was obtain- 
ed on a promise of security for life and 
limb, it is a sufficient defence to ensure the 
Panel his Life, ibid. 1254.— Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. ib. — ^The Assize find the 
Indictment Proven, and that the Confession 
*was not made under a promise of safety, 
ibid. 1260. — Sentence is passed upon him, 
ibid. ib. — His Speech at the place of Execu- 
tion, ibid. 1261. — Mr. Laing s Remark upon 
this Trial, ibid. ib. (note). 

MITCHELL, Robert. See Duncan, Alison. 

MITFORD, Sir John, Solicitor General, 22 
vol. 791, 26 vol. 7, 554, 1218.— His Reply 
for the Prosecution on the Trial of Hardy 
for High Treason, 24 vol. 1 1 67. — His Speech 
for the Prosecution on the Trial of Home 
Tooke for High Treason, 25 vol. 27.— His 
Reply on the Trial of Stone for High Treason, 
ibid. 1396. 

MODERS, Mary, alias Stedman, alias the 
German Princess,— Her Tr^al (or Bigaipy* 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



89; 



15 Car. H, 1663, 6 vol. 273.— The Indict- 
ment, ibid. ib. — She pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 
274. — Evidence against her, ibid. 275. — 
Her Defence, ibid. 278. — She is acquitted, 
ibid. 283. - 

MOHUN, Charles, Lord.— His Trial before the 
House of Lords for the Murder of William 
Mountford, 4 Will, and Mary, 1694, 12 vol. 
• 949. — ^The Indictment, ibid. 956. — ^Address 
of the Lord High Steward to him on his being 
brought to the Bar, ibid. 957.— He pleads 
Not Guilty, ibid. 960.— The Attorney General 
opens the Case for the Prosecution, Ibid. 961. 
— Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 966. — 
Evidence in his Defence, ibid. 988. — Reply 
of the Solicitor General, ibid. 1009. — Reso- 
lutions of the Judges, and Arguments of 
Counsel upon several Questions of law 
arising out of the facts in Evidence, ibid. 
1015. — He is acquitted by a Majority 
of the Lords, ibid. 1048.— His Trial before 
the House of Lords for the Murder of 
Richard Coote, 11 Will. 3, 1699, 13 vol. 
1033.--The Indictment, ibid. 1034.— He 
pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 1035.— The Speech 
of the Attorney General for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 1036. — Evidence for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 1037.— His Defence, 1053.— Reply of 
the Solicitor General, ibid. 1055. — He is 
unanimously acquitted, ibid. 1059. — He was 
afterwards killed in a Duel by the Duke of 
Hamilton, who was also killed, 12 vol. 949 
(note). — ^Passages from Swift's Journal to 
dtelia relating to this Catastrophe, ibid. ib. 

MOMPESSON, Sir Giles. See MicheU, Sir 
Francis, — Proceedings in Parliament against 
him for Monopoly and Abuse of Patents, 18 
Jac. 1, 1620, 2 vol. 1119.— Od being sum- 
moned to appear before the House of Com- 
mons he makes his -Escape beyond Sea. ibid, 
ib. — Measures taken for his Apprehension, 
ibid. 1121. — Reports of the several Com- 
mittees appointed by the House of Lords to 
inquire into the Grievances occasioned by 
his Abuse of several Patents, ibid. 1122. — ^The 
King's Speech in the House of Lords, com- 
mending the Proceedings against him, ibid, 
1126. — Resolutions of the House of Lords 
against him, ibid. 1130. — The Sentence 
p^gssed upon him, ibid. 1131. 

MONCRIEF, Hugh. See Gowrie, John, 
Earl of. 

MONCRIEFF, James, Advocate.— Informa- 
tion for Andrew Mac Kin ley upon the Re- 
levancy of the Indictment against him for 
administering unlawful Oaths, written by 
him, 33 vol. 396. 

MONEY, James. See Leach^ Dryden, 

MONK, General George.— Letter of Charles 
the Second to him from Breda, immediately 
before the Restoration, 5 vol. 947. — His 
Answer to Hale's proposal in Parliament 
respecting the imposition of Conditions upon 
Charles the Second at the Restoration,^ ibid. 



969.-~Bumet and Laing's Account of his 
base Conduct in transmitting confidential 
Letters of the Marquis of Argyle to the 
Scotch Parliament^ in order to ensure his 
Conviction, ibid. 1371 (note), 1504 (note). 
— Mr. Rose's Reasonings and Evidences 
respecting the truth of this Charge, 10 vol. 
758 (note). — Sir George Mackenzie seems 
to have established the truth of the Charge, 
ibid. 764 (note). — He sits upon the Trial of 
the Regicides as Duke of Albemarle, .5 
vol. 986. — Mr. Fox's Remarks upon his 
Character, ibid. 987 (note).. 

MONMOUTH, Henry, Earl of. See North, 
ampton, Spencer, Earl of, 

MONMOUTH and BUCCLEUGH, James, 
Duke of. — Algernon Sidney's Account of his 
Procedure against the Scotch Insurgents, 11 
vol. 259 (note).— -Proceedings against him, 
Sir James Dalrymple of gtair, and Andrew 
Fletcher of Saltoun, in the Court of Justiciary, 
for High Treason and Rebellion, 1 and 2 Jac. 2, 
1685-6, ibid. 1023.— The Libel against him, 
ibid. 1057. — Fountainhall's Account of tidese 
Proceedings, ibid. ib. (note). — Monmouth's 
Declaration on his landing at Lyme, ibid. 
1032 (note).— The Act of Attainder against 
him, ibid. 1048 (note). — Account ofhis Exe- 
cution, ibid. 1068. — His Letter to the King, 
ibid. 1072.— Letter of Dr. Lloyd, Bishop of 
St. Asaph, containing an account of his 
Death, ibid. 1073. — Account of his Actions 
and Behaviour from the time of his Apprehen- 
sion till his Death, ibid, 1076. — Observations 
and References on the question, whether 
Charles the Second was married to his Mother, 
il?id.l097.-— Documentsfrom the State-Paper 
Office, relating to the intercourse between 
Charles the Second and him upon the subject 
of the Plots of 1683, ibid. 1097.— Account of 
his Capture after the battle of Sedgmoor, pub- 
lished by command of the King, ibid. 1101. 
— Dryden's Account of his Progress in quest 
of popularity, 10 vol. 1336 (note). 

MONSON, Sir Thomas.- His Arraignment for 
the Murder of Sir Thomas Overbury, 13 Jac. 
1, 1615, 2 vol. 949.— Chief Justice Coke's 
Speech, ibid. ib. — He pleads Not Guilty, 
ibid. ib. — His Trial is abandoned and he is 
se*t at liberty, ibid. 952. 

MONTACUTE, Lord. See Exeter, Marquis of. 

MONTAGUE, Sir Edward, Chief Justice of 
C. P. 38 Hen. 8, 1 vol. 458. 

MONTAGUE, Sir Edward, Chief Justice of 
K. B. 16 Jac. 1. — His Speech on delivering 
his Opinion in the Star Chamber respecting 
the Sentence to be passed upon Mr. Wrayn- 
ham for slandeTing Lord Chancellor Bacon, 
2 vol. 1078. 

MONTAGUE, William, Chief Baron of the 
Exchequer, 32 Car. 2, 7 vol. 1527, 11 vol. 
404. — He is one of the Judges who presided 
at the Trial of Lord William Russel^ 9 vol. 
592. — He is examined as a Witness for the 
Defendant on the Trial of Oatss for Perju/yj^ 



90 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



10 Tol. 1168.^He presides with Jefferies at 
the Trial of Lady Alice Lisle at Winchester, 
llVol.944.^Heis8aidto have been removed 
from the Bench in 1G66» in consequence of 
his refusal to support the Dispensing Power, 
12 vol. 261 (note). 

MONTiiAGLE, Lord.— Narrative of the de- 
livery of a Letter to him, discovering the 
Gunpowder Pioty 2 voL 195. 

MOORE, Henry, It vol. 645. See Hastings, 
Town and Port of, 

MORDANT, John.— His Trial before the 
High Court of Justice for High Treason, in 
conspiring to levy War against the Common- 
wealth, and corresponding with Charles the 
Second, 10 Car. 2, 1658, 5 vol. 907 —The 
Charge against him, ibid. 911.— He disputes 
the Jurisdiction of the Court, ibid. 914.— He 
pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 917.— The Evidence 
against him, ibid. 918.^— His Defence, ibid. 
&2S. — He is acquitted by the President's 
casting Vole, ibid. 923, 912 (note).— Lord 
Clarendon's Account of this Trial, and the 
circumstances attending it, ibid. 907 (note). 

MORDANT, John, Viscount. — Proceedings 
on his Impeachment for High Crimes and 
Misdemeanours, 18 Car. 2, 1666, ibid. 785. 
—Articles of Impeachment against him de- 
livered to the Lords, ibid. 789. — His Answer 
thereto, ibid. 792. — Names of the Managers 
for the Commons^ ibid. 796. — The Commons 
object to his sitting within the Bar on the 
Tnal of the Impeachment, ibid. 799. — Dis- 
pute between the two Houses on this 
Matter, ibid. 801. — The Proceedings are 
ended by the prorogation of the Parliament, 
ibid. 806. — He is again impeached in a 
subsequent Session, and the Charge referred 
to a Committee, ibid. ib. — Lord Clarendon's 
Account of his activity in bringing about 
the Restoration, 5 vol. 912 (note), 6 vol. 
785 (note). — For his Services in this respect 
he was created Viscount Avalon and Baron 
Motdant, by Charles the Second, 6 vol. 787 
(note). — Jealousy of the Royal party towards 
him after the Restoration, ibid. 785 (note). 
— He was Father to the celebrated Charles, 
Earl of Peterborough, ibid. 787 (note). 

MORDANT, Lady Mary. See Norfolk, 
Henri/ Howard, Duke of, 

MORE, Sir Thomas, Lord Chancellor.— His 
Trial for High Treason in denying the King's 
Supremacy, 26 Hen. 8, 1535, 1 vol. 385. — 
His Conversation with Rich, the Solicitor 
General, previous to the Trial, ibid. ib. — 
The, Indictment is read, ibid. 387. — His 
Answers to the Charges contained therein, 
ibid. 388. — Rich gives Evidence of Sir 
Thomas More's Conversation with him, ibid. 
390. — His solemn denial of the truth of 
Riches Statement, ibid. ib. — He contends, 
that to substantiate the Charge against him, 
express Malice must be proved, ibid. 391. — 

' The Jury fiod him Guilty, ibid, 392.— He 



contends that the act of Supremacy is con- 
trary to the Law of God, and that the Indict- 
ment founded upon it is invalid^ ibid, ib.- — 
The Court overrule the Objection to the 
Indictment, ibid. 393. — ^Judgment of Death 
is passed upon him, ibid. ib. — His Conduct 
before and at the time of his Execution, 
ibid. 395. — Burnet's Account of his Trial, 
Execution, and Character, ibid. 475. 

MORETON, John, Serjeant-at-Law. — His 
Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
Twyn and others for High Treason, 6 vol, 
520. 

"^ Judge of K. B. 18 Car. 2, 



6 vol. 769. 

MORETON, Thomas, Bishop of Durham. See 

Twdve Bishops. 

MORETON, William, Recorder of London, 
18 vol. 289, 19 voU 283. — His Charge to the 
Jury on the Trial of Elisabeth Canning for 
Perjury, 19 vol. 633. — His Address to her 
on passing Sentence of Transportation for 
Life upon her, ibid 673. 

MORGAN, David. — His Trial for High 
Treason in being concerned in the Rebellion 
6f 1745, 20 Geo. 2, 1746, 18 vol. 371.— 
Evidence against him, ibid. ib. — His De- 
fence, ibid. 383. — Evidence for him, ibid. 
384. — The Prisoner's Speech on summing 
up the Evidence for his Defence, ibid. 385. 
— Reply of the Solicitor General, ibid. 386. 
—The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 387.— 
He is executed, ibid. 389.— His Speech at 
the place of Execution, ibid. 390. — Account 
of him, ibid. 389. 

MORLEY, Thomas, Lord.— His Trial by his 
Peers in the Court of the Lord High Steward 
for'the Murder of Mr. Hastings, 18 Car. 2, 
1666, 6 vol. 769.— Kelyng's Report of the 
Resolutions of the Judges on such points of 
Law as were likely to arise on the Trial, 
ibid, ib.— Commission to Lord Clarendon to 
be Lord High Steward, ibid. 772. — Evidence 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 776. — Speech of 
the Solicitor General (Finch) on summing 
up the Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 
778. — He is found Guilty of Manslaughter 
by a Majority of the Peers, ibid. 785.— He 
prays the Benefit of the Statute and is dis* 
charged, ibid. 786. 

MORPETH, Lord.— His Speech as one of the 
Managers for the House of Commons on the 
Trial of the Impeachment of Lord Chan- 
cellor Macclesfield, 16 vol. 1025. 

MORRIS, Harvey. See Tandy, James Napper, 

MORRIS, John, alias Poyntz. — Proceedings 
against him, with Mary his Wife, Isabel 
Smith, Leonard Darby, and John Harris, for 
forging and producing in Evidence a Copy 
of a pretended Act of Parliament for enforc- 
ing the eonveyance of certain Ldnds, 23 
Car. 1, 1647, 4 ''ol. 951.— Charge ejdiibitei 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



01 



agftinst tiiem itt iht Hou^fi of Lords by the 
detk of the Parliatnent[»^ ibid. ib. — Sentence 
of the Lords against them, ibid. 953.--^ur- 
ther Proceedings in the House against 
Isabel Smith for the Forgery of another 
Copy of the Act of Pariiamenty and of the 
records of Fines of the Lands mentioned 
therein, ibid. 954.*^The Lords declare the 
Act of Parliament and the Fines to be void, 
ibid. 954.*«~Petition in their favour to Sir 
Thomas Fairfax, ibid. 957^ 

MORRIS, Colonel John, Governor of Ponte- 
fract Castle. — His Trial at York for High 
Treason in levying War against the late King 
and the Parliament. 1 Car. 2, 1649, 4 vol. 
1249.— He pleads Not Guilty, ibid. ;|253.— 
He demanas Counsel and a Copy of the 
Indictment, which are denied him, ibid. 
1260.— His Defence, ibid. 1262.— He re- 
monstrates asainst being ironed, ibid. 1266. 
— ^The Jury find him Guilty, ibid, ib.— His 
Conduct at the place of Execution, ibid. 
1267. — Clement Walker's Account of these 
Proceedings, ibid- 1251 (note). — Lord 
Clarendon s Account of the Transactions at 
Ponte fract Castle which preceded this Trial, 
ibid. 1254 (note).— Whitelocke*s Account of 
the Trial, ibid. 1266 (note). 

MORTIMER, Sir John.— Proceedings upon 
an £x post facto Act of Parliament against 
him for making his Escape from Prison and 
asserting the title of the Earl of March to the 
Crown, 3 Hen. 6,1424, 1 vol. 267.--He is 
sentenced to be hanged, drawn, and quar- 
tered, and is executed accordingly, ibid. 
268. 

MORTIMER, Roger, Earl of March.— Arti- 
cles of Impeachment for High Treason ex- 
hibited in Parliament against him, 3 Edward 
3, 1330, 1 vol.51.— Judgment thereon that he 
should be drawn and hanged, ibid. 53. — He 
is executed accordingly, ibid. 54. — ^The Judg- 
ment against him was afterwards reversed 
by Act of Parliament and his Grandson was 
restored to his Title and Estate, ibid, ib.— 
Account of his immediate Descendants, 
ibid. ib. See Beresford^ Simon de (note). 

MORTIMER, Thomas. See Gbcester, Thomas, 
Duke of, 

MORTON, John. — Proceedings on his Trial 
with James Anderson and Malcolm Craig 
at Edinburgh for Sedition, 33 Geo. 3, 1793, 
23 vol. 7. — The Indictment, ibid. ib. — De- 
bate on the Relevancy of the Indictment, 
abid. d.— The Court find it relevant, ibid, 16. 
—Evidence against the Panels, ibid. ib. — 
Evidence in exculpation, ibid. 18.— The Jury 
iind them Guilty, ibid. 20.— Their Letter to 
the Lord Justice Clerk, ibid. ib. — Sentence 
of the Court, ibid. 26. 

MORTON, John, Counsel, 19 vol. 709.— His 
Speech in Defence of Elizabeth Canning on 
her Trial for Peijury, 19 vol. 431.— He was 
aftfrwfUf^s Chief Jui^tice of Chester, ibid. ib. 



-^He is of Counsel for Dr. H^isey on his 
Trial for High TreasoD| ibid. 1343.--His 
Speech for the Prisoner on that Trial| ibid. 
1875. 

MORTOUN, James, Earl of.--His Trial for 
the Murder of Henry, Lord Darnley, 23 
Eliz. 1581, 1 vol. 947.— Record of the In- 
dictment and Proceedings against him, ibid, 
ib. — His Confession, ibid. 949.— 'His Exe- 
cution, ibid. 953.— Letter from Archibald 
Douglas to Mary Queen of Soots in oonfirmft* 
tion of his Confessioni ibid, ib* 

MOUNTAGUE, Sir Henry, Chief Justice of 
K. B. 15 Jac. 1. — His Speech on granting 
Execution upon Sir Walter Raleigh, 2 vol. 
34. 

MOUNTAGUE, James, Counsel.— His Avpi- 
ment in the Court of King's Bench against 
the validity of the Commitment^of the Ayles- 
bury Men by the House of Commons, 14 
vol. 850.-^His Speech in Defence of John 
Tutohin on his Trial for a Libel, ibid. 1119. 
— His Argument on showing Cause against a 
Rule for amending the Entry of the Jury 
Process in that Case, ibid. 1 161. 

Sir James, Attorney General, 

5 Ann. — His Speech for the Prosecution cm 
the Trial of Robert Peilding for Bigamv, 14 
vol. 1329. — His Speech as one of the 
Managers for the House of Commons on the 
Trial of the Impeachment of Dr. Sacheverel, 
15 vol. 53. — His Speech for the Prosecution 
on the Trial of Dammaree for High Treason, 
ibid. 549. — His Speech in Reply in the same 
Case^ibid. 589. — His Speech for the Prose- 
cution on the Trial ofWillis for High Treason, 
ibid. 616. — His Speech in Rejuy in that 
Case, ibid. 641. — His Speech for the Prose- 
cution on the Trial of Purchase for High 
Treason, ibid. 654.— His Speech in Reply 
in the same Case, ibid. 680. 

" Baron of the Ex- 
chequer 4 Geo. l.^His Argument on de^ 
livering his Opinion on the Case referred to 
the Judges by George the Eirst respecting 
the King's Prerogative in the Education and 
Marriage of the Royal Family, 15 vol. 1215. 

MOUNTAGUE, Richard.— Proceedings in 
Parliament against him for publishing a fttc- 
tious and seditious Book, 1 Car. 1, 1625, 2 
vol. 1258.— The Commons appoint a Com- 
mittee to inquire into the errors of his Book, 
and take Sureties for his appearance to 
answer, ibid, 1259.— The King signifies to 
the Commons his disapprobation of their 
Proceedings, ibid. ib. — The Bishops of 
Rochester, Oxford, and St. David's, write to 
the Duke of Buckingham on his behalf, ibid. 
1260. — Articles drawn up by the Commons 
against him, ibid. 1263.— -It does not appear 
that any thing was done upon these Articles, 
ibid. 1366. 

MOWBRAY, Dav)d.--Hi8 Triftl for » TumiiU 



9d 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



and Riot at Edinburgh against the saying of 
Mass and other Popish Worship, 2 Jac. 2, 
1666, 11 vol. 1003.— The Indictment, ibid, 
ib. — He confesses the Charge, ibid. 1015. 
—He is found Guilty and sentenced to be 
hanged, ibid. 101 7.— He was afterwards re- 
prieved for a short time^^^but whether he was 
ultimately executed, is not known, ibid. 
1018. — Fountainhairs Account of this Case, 
ibid. 1003 (note). 

MUIR, Thomas.«-His Trial in the High Court 
of Justiciary at Edinburgh for Sedition, 33 
Geo. 3, 1793, 23 vol. 117.— The Indictment, 
ibid. ib. — His Defences, ibid. 129. — ^Inter- 
locutor of Relevancy, ibid. 132. — He objects 
to several of the persons who appear on the 
Jury, that they were Members of a political 
Association called the Friends of the Con- 
stitution, ibid. 134. — ^The Court repel the 
Objection, ibid, 136. — Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. ib. — He objects to a Wit- 
ness that he was an Agent for the Crown in 
procuring Evidence against him, ibid. 141. 
—.The Lord Advocate withdraws the Witness 
on this fact being proved, ibid. 142. — Evi- 
dence of the Papers found in his possession, 
ibid. 164. — Evidence in exculpation, ibid. 
168.— Evidence of William Skirving, ibid. 
ib. — The Lord Advocate's Speech for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 179.— Mr. Muir's Speech 
in his own Defence, ibid. 186. — ^The Lord 
Justice Clerk sums up the Evidence, ibid. 
229.— The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 231. 
— Opinions of the different Members of the 
Court respecting the Sentence, ibid. 232. — 
He is sentenced to be transported for 14 
years, ibid. 236.— Address of the Society for 
Constitutional Information to him after his 
Conviction, 24 vol. 566. — His Letter to that 
Society in acknowledgment of the same, ibid. 
570. — His subsequent History, 23 vol. 
1412. 

MULLINS, Darby. See Kidd, WUUam. 

MUNSON, Lionel. See Anderson, IMmel 

MURPHY, Timothy.— His Trial at the Old 
Bailey for forging a Will, 26 Geo. 2, 1753, 
19 vol. 693.— The Indictment, ibid. 694.— 
Speeches of the Counsel for the Prosecution, 

, ibid. 695. — Evidence for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 701. —His Counsel object to the Testi- 
mony of a Person who stood indicted for 
the same transaction, ibid. 702. — Argument 
of the question, whether an Accomplice who 
has been indicted is a good Witness, ibid, 
ib. — The Court decide that his Evidence is 
admissible, ibid. 709. — He is found Guilty, 
ibid. 726.— His Confession, ibid, ib.— He is 
executed, ibid. 734. 

MURRAY, John, of Broughton, Secretary to 
the Young Pretender. — Discussion respect- 
ing the admissibility of his Evidence on 
the Trial of Lord Lovat, 18 vol. 607.— His 
Evidence against Lord Lovat, ibid. 651. 

B«URRAY, The Hon. William.— Solicitor 



General. See Mansfield, WUliamf Lard, 1 8 
vol. 325, 337.— His Reply for the. Prose- 
cution on the Trial of Francis Townley for 
High Treason, 18 vol. 346. — His Reply a3 
one of the Managers for the Commons on 
the Trial of the Impeachment of Lord Lovat, 
ibid. 802. — His Speech on summing up the. 
Evidence for the Prosecution on Sie Trial 
of William Owen for publishing a libel, ibid. 
1222.— He was afterwards Chief Justice of 
K. B.ibid. 337. 

NAIRN, Katherine,— Her Trial in the Court of 
Justiciary, with PatrickOgilvie for Incest and 
Murder, 5 Geo. 3, 1765, 19 vol. 1235.— The 
Indictment, ibid. 1236. — Debate on the Rele- 
vancy of the libel and the Defences of the 
Panels, ibid. 1244.— The Court find the Libel 
relevant, ibid. 1258. — The Prisoners petition 
the Court to have one of the Witnesses for 
the Prosecution kept apart from the rest, ibid. 
1259. — ^Tlie Petition is granted, ibid. 1261. 
— Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 1262. 
— Evidence for the Panels, ibid. 1310. — 
They are found Guilty by a ereat plurality of 
voices, ibid. 1315. — ^Tbe Counsel for the 
Panels move in Arrest of Judgment, ibid. 
1318. — The Court refuse to arrest the Judg- 
ment, ibid. 1326. — ^Katherine Nairn petitions 
for a suspension of her Sentence on account 

. of pregnancy, ibid . 1 327.— Sentence of Death 
is passed upon Patrick Ogilvie, ibid. 1328. — 
A Jury of Midwives is sworn to try the 
pregnancy of Katharine Nairn, who return 
that they are uncertain whether she is preg- 
nant or not, ibid. 1330. — The Court direct 
them to report their Opinion at a future day, 
ibid. ib. — Proceedings in this Trial trans- 
mitted to the Privy Council, ibid. 1332. — 
Opinion of an English Barrister thereon, 
ibid. ib. — Ogilvie is respited for some time 
and he is then executed, ibid. 1335. — Paper 
signed by him before his Execution declaring 
his innocence, ibid. 1337. — The Jury of 
Midwives return that Katherine Nairn is 
pregnant, ibid, 1338. — She afterwards 
escapes, ibid. ib. 

NAIRN, William, Lord. See Derwentwater, 
James, Earl of, 15 vol. 761. 

NARES, George, Counsel. — His Speech in 
Defence of Elizabeth Canning on her Trial 
for Peijury, 19 vol. 451.— He argues in 
Support of an Objection to the Evidence of 
a witness on the Trial of Timothy Murphy 
for Forgery, ibid. 702. 

- Serjeant at Law, 19 vol. 

1153. 

Judge of C. P. 11 Geo. 3, 

19 vol. 1152, .20 vol. 183, 1316. 

NAYLER, James. — Proceedings in the House 
of Commons against him for Blasphemy and 
other .Misdemeanours, 8 Car. 2, 1656, 5 vol. 
801.— Report of the Committee of the House 
of Commons on his Case, ibid, ib, — First 
Article against him that, he assumed the 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



03 



Character of Christ, ibid. 805. — Evidence in 
support thereof, ibid. ib. — ^The Committee 
resolye that the first Article is proved, ibid. 
806. — Second Article that he assumed the 
Titles of Christ, ibid. 808.— Evidence of his 
Assumption of various Titles of Christ with 
the Resolutions of the Committee thereon, 
ibid. ib. — He is brought to the Bar of the 
House and examined, ibid. 81 5. — The House 
resolve that he is guilty of Blasphemy, ibid. 
816. — Debates in the House whether he 
should be put to Death, ibid. 817. — His 
Sentence as finally resolved on by the House, 
ibid. ib. — Neale's Account of the Proceed- 
ings against him, ibid. 801 (note). — Account 
of his Extravagances, ibid. 819 (note). — 
Whitelocke's Argument that he ought not to 
be put to death, ibid. 821. — Account of bis 
life. Trial, and Examination, from the 
Harleian Miscellany, ibid. 827.*'Hume's 
Notice of him, ibid. 803 (note). 

NEILE, Dr. Richard, Bishop of Lincoln. — 
Proceedings in Parliament against him for 
Words spoken by him in dissuading the 
Lords from a Conference with the Commons 
on the subject of Impositions, 12 Jac. 1, 
1614, 2 vol. 865.-*He makes a Submission 
in the House of Lords, ibid. 868. 

NEVIL, Alexander, Archbishop of York. See 
TresUiofi, Sir Robert, 

KEVIL, Sir Edward. See Pole, Sir Geoffrey. 

NEVILL, Sir Edward, Judge of C. P. 4 Will, 
and Mary, 12 vol. 833, 1039, 1379, 13 vol. 
1, 139. — He was made a Baron of the Ex- 
chequer in 1 685, and was removed from the 
Bench in 1 686 (2 Jac. 2), for refusing to 
support the Dispensing Power, 12 vol. 261 
(note). — At the Revolution he was restored 
to the Bench, ibid. ib. 

NEWBOLT, William.— Account of the Pro- 
ceedings on his Trial with Edward Buttler 
for High Treason, in publishing a Declara- 
tion of James the Second, extracted from the 
Harleian MSS. 15 vol. 1404.— They are both 
found Guilty, ibid. 1406. 

NICHOLL, Anthony. See HoUis, Denzii. 

NICHOLLS, Sir Austin, Judge of C. P. 14 
Jac. 1, 2 vol. 952. 

NITHISDALE, William, Earl of. See Der- 
toentwater, James, Earl of^lS vol. 761. 

NIVEN, John.— His Trial in Scotland for using 
slanderous expressions respecting the Duke 
of York (afterwards James the Second), 32 
Car. 2, 1680, 8 vol. 125. — He is found 
Guilty, and sentenced to be hanged, but it 
does not appear that the Sentence was exe- 
cuted, ibid. 128. — ^Fountainhall*s Account of 
this Case, ibid. 125 (note). 

NOBLE, Richard.—His Trial with Mary Sayer, 
and Mary Salisbury, for the Murder of John 

Sayer, 12 Anne, 1713, 15 vol. 731. —Evi- 
dence giv^ of attempts m^d^ by th^ Prisoners 



to tamper with the Witnesses and Jury, ibid. 
732. — ^Upon this Evidence the Jury are set 
aside and another Jury called, ibid. 735. — 
Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. ib. — 
Their Defence, ibid. 739. — Noble is found 
Guilty, and Mary Sayer and Mary Salisbury 
are acquitted, ibid. 745. — Noble moves in 
arrest of Judgment, but his Objections are 
overruled, ibid. 746.— His Address to the 
Court before Judgment, ibid. ib. — He is 
executed, ibid. 750. — His Dying Speech, 
and an Account of his Conduct after his Con- 
demnation, ibid. ib. — Observations by a 
Student of the Inner Temple upon the point 
of Law on which his Motion in Arrest of 
Judgment was founded, ibid. 753. 

NOEL, William, Counsel. — His Speech in 
Defence of Richard Francklin on his Trial 
for a Libel in the Craftsman, 17 vol. 662. — 
His Speech as one of the Managers for the 
House of Commons on the Trial of the Im« 
peachment of Lord Lovat, 18 vol. 817. 

Sir William, Judge of C. P. and Chief 

Justice of Chester, 32 Geo. 2. — He delivers 
the Judgment of the Court in the Case of 
Stevenson, that the facts proved by the Spe- 
cial Verdict amounted to Manslaughter only, 
19 vol. 878. 

NOLAN, Michael,Counsel.— His Argument on 
shewing Cause against the Rule for a New 
Trial in the Case of Governor Picton, 30 vol. 
733. — His Argument of the Special Verdict 
found at the Second Trial of that Case, ibid. 
884. 

NORBURY, John, Lord, Chief Justice of C. P. 
in Ireland. See Toler, John, — His Charges 
to the Juries on the Trials of several per- 
sons for High Treason, in being concerned 
in the Irish Insurrection, 28 vol. 746, 882, 
1265.— His Charge to the Jury on the Trial 
of Robert Emmett for being concerned in 
the same Insurrection, ibid. 1168. — His 
Charge to the Grand Jury of the County of 
Tipperary assembled for the Trial of the 
Caravats and Shanavests in 1811, 31 vol. * 
414. 

NORFOLK, Henry Howard, Duke of.— Pro- 
ceedings in the House of Lords upon his 
application for a Bill of Divorce, 3 Will, and 
Mary, 12 vol. 883.— The Duchess petitions 
to be heard before the Bill is received, 
ibid. 885. — The House order that both par- 
ties be heard by their Counsel at the Bar 
as to the reception of the Bill, ibid. ib. — The 
House resolve to receive it, ibid. 886. — ^The 
Bill, ibid.ib. — Reasons on behalf of the Duke 
for receiving the Bill, ibid. 888. — On the 
reception of the Bill by the Lords, the 
Duchess petitions for Particulars of the 
Charge against her, ibid. 889.— The Duke's 
Charge against the Duchess, ibid. ib. — Her 
Answer, complaining that the Charge is 
general and indefinite, ibid. 890. — ^The 
Dnke deliy^rs a more particular Charge, 



d4 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



ibid. 891.— Answer of the Duchess thereto, 
ibid. 892. — Evidence is produced and 
Counsel heard in support and in denial of 
the Charge} ibid. 894. — Depositions of the 
Witnesses in support of the Charge, vfiih 
the Evidence or Witnesses on the part of 
the Duchess to invalidate their Testimony, 
ibid. 897. — Observations upon the Evidence 
in support of the Charge published by the 
Friends of the Duchess, ibid, 898 (note). — 
The Bill is negatived on the second read- 
ing, ibid. 928. — Burnet*s Account of these 
Proceedings, ibid. 883 (note). — ^Proceedings 
in an Action for Criminal Conversation with 
the Duchess, brought by the Duke against 
John Germaine, 4 Will, and Mary, 1692, 
ibid. 927. — Speech of the Attorney General 
for the Plaintiff, ibid. 928. — Evidence for the 
Plaintiff, ibid. 929.— Evidence for the De- 
fendant, ibid. 939. — ^Lord Holt's Charge to 
the Jury, ibid. 945. — ^The Jury return a Ver- 
dict for the Plaintiff with 1 00 Marks Damages, 
ibid. 948. — Proceedings in Parliament on 
the Duke's second Application for a Divorce, 
12 Will. 3, 1700, 13 vol. 1283.— The Bill, 
ibid. ib. — ^The House of Lords resolve to 
receive only Evidence of facts occurring 
since the rejection of the former Bill, ibid. 
1286. — Evidence in support of the Bill, ibid. 
1287. — Evidence against the Bill, ibid. 1305. 
— Evidence in Reply, ibid. 1322. — ^The 
House commit the Bill, ibid. 1327. — The 
Duchess's Petition to the Commons on the 
Bill being sent down to them, ibid. ib. — 
Reasons for passing the Bill published by 
the Duke, ibid. 1328. — Reasons of the 
Duchess against the passing of the Bill, ibid. 
1338. -^Proceedings in the House of Com- 
mons, ibid. 1344. — ^The Duchess's Counsel 
are heard, ibid. 1345. — Sir Thomas Powis's 
Speech against the Bill, ibid, ib — Mr.Dodd's 
Speech on the same side, ibid. 1352.^ Dr. 
Pinfold's Speech on the same side,ibid. 1 353. 
—-Mr. Serjeant Wright's Speech in its Sup- 
port, ibid. 1355. ^Speeches of Mr. Nortbey 
and Dr. Oldish on the same side, ibid. 1359. 
—Sir Thomas Powis's Reply, ibid. 1361.— 
The House go into a Committee on the 
Bill, ibid. 1364, — ^The Duke's Counsel open 
the Evidence for the Bill, ibid. ib. — The 
Counsel against the Bill require further time 
to make their Defence, which is refused, 
ibid. 1366. — ^They offer to produce the De- 
positions of the Witnesses for the Bill in the 
House of Lords to shew a variance between 
them and /their Evidence to the Committee, 
ibid. 1367 — On this being refused the 
Duchess's Counsel decline proceeding fur- 
ther with their Case, ibid. 1368.— The Bill 
is passed, ibid. 1370. — The Duchess after* 
wards marries Sir John Germaine^ ibid. 
1370 (note). 

NORFOLK, Thomas Howard, Duke of (The 
Father). — Proceedings against him for High 
Treason, 38 Hen. 8, 1546, 1 vol. 451.— On 
certain Charges being made against his Son, 



Henry, Earl of Surrey, he is sent to the 
Tower, ibid. 453. — His Letters to the King 
and to the Lords, ibid. 456. — His Confession 
and Submission, ibid. 457.— Burnet's Ac- 
count of the Proceedings against him, ibid. 
458. — A Bill of Attainder is passed against 
him, ibid. 461.— A Warrant to behead him. 
the next morning was sent to the Tower, 
but the King dying in the night, it was not 
executed, ibid, ib.-:— Bishop Thirleby's 
Letter respecting him, ibid. 465. — ^The 
Duke's Letter to the Lords of the Council 
after his Examination in the Tower, ibid. 
466. — He was Lord High Steward on the 
Trial of Edward, Duke of Buckingham, ibid. 
296. — He was one of the Commissioners for 
the Trial of Sir Thomas More, ibid. 387. — 
He was also Lord High Steward on the 
Trials of Lord Dacres and Queen Anne 
Boleyn, ibid. 408, 409. 

NORFOLK, Thomas Howard, Duke of (The 
Son).-- His Trial before the Lords at West- 
minster for High Treason in assisting the 
claim of Mary Queen of Scots to the Crown 
of England, 14 Eliz. 1571, 1 vol. 957. — 
Arrangements in Westminster Hall for the 
Trial, ibid. ib. —The Indictment in English, 
ibid. 959. — The same in Latin, ibid. 1035. 
— He applies to the Court to allow him 
Counsel, which is refused, ibid. 965.— He 
pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 967. — His Address 
to the Lords previous to the Case being 
opened against him, ibid, ib.—- The Queen's 
Counsel open the Charges against him, ibid. 
968. — Examination of the Bishop of Ross 
read, ibid. 975. — ^Letter of the Earl of Mur- 
ray read, ibid. 979.— ^Letter from the Bishop 
of Ross to the Queen's Mother (Anne 
Boleyn), ibid. 983.— The Duke's Letter to 
the Earl of Murray, ibid. 986 .^The Bishop 
of Ross's Confession read, ibid. 992. — 
Cavendish's Evidence, ibid. 997. — ^TheDuke 
is found Gnilty, ibid. 1031. — Judgment is 
passed upon him, ibid. ib. — His Address to 
the Lords after Judgment is pronounced, 
ibid. 1032, — His Execution, ibid. ib. 

NORKOT, Jane.— Curious Narrative of the 
Circumstances attending the discovery of her 
supposed Murderer, found among the Papers 
of Serjeant Maynard, 14 ?ol. 1324. 

NORRIS, Henry.— His Trial with Mark 
Smeton, William Brereton, and Sir Francis 
Weston, for High Treason, in having Criminal 
Conversation with Queen Anne Boleyn, 28 
Henry 8, 1536, 1 vol. 417. — Smeton con- 
fesses, and the others are found Guilty by the 
Jury, and Sentence of Death is passed upon ^ 
them, ibid. ib. — They are executed, ibid.421. 

NORTH, Sir Dudley. See London, City qf. 
Prifchard, Sir William, — His Examination 
before a Committee of Lords appointed 
after the Revolution to inquire into the 
Prosecutions of Lord William Russel, 
Colonel Sidney, and otherS| 9 vol. 969. — 
Roger North's Accovnt of the Disturb^ 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



06 



anc^s respecting his Election to the 0£5ce of 
Sheriff for the City of London^ ibid. 187. 

NORTH, Francis, Counsel, 6 vol. 520, 540, 
880. 

NORTH, Sir Francis, Chief Justice of C. P. 
31 Car. 2, 6 vol. 1396, 7 vol. 312, 424, 609, 
1527, 8 vol. 775, 9 vol. 7. — His Argument 
on delivering his Opinion in the Exchequer 
Chamber in the Case of Bafnardiston v. 
Soames, against the Judgment of the Court 
of King's Bench, 6 vol. 1092. — His 
Narrative at the Council Board of his Exa- 
mination of Bedlow at Bristol concerning 
the Popish Plot, ibid. 1494.— -His Charge to 
the Jury on the Trial of Nathaniel Reading 
for attempting to suppress Evidence of the 
Popish Plot, 7 vol. 307. — His Address to 
Reading on passing Sentence upon him, 
ibid. 309. — Resolution of the House of Com- 
mons to impeach him, 8 vol. 211. — ^His 
Charge to the Jury on the Trial of Colledge 
for Treason, ibid. 710. — Burnet's Remark on 
his Conduct on Colledge's Trial, ibid. 551 
(note). — Sir John Havfles's Remark upon 
him, 9 vol. 801. 

————— Lord Keeper. — 'His 
Speech to the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and 
Citizens of London, on the presentation of 
their Petition respecting the Quo Warranto 
against them, 8 vol. 1274. — Extracts from 
his MSS. respecting the Popish Plot, pub- 
lished by Sir John Dalrymple, 6 vol. 1497. 
— Roger North's Defence of his refusal to 
grant a fiat for a Writ of Error to reverse 
Sir Thomas Armstrong's Outlawry, 10 vol. 
121. — Doubts respecting the truth of Roger 
North's Statement, that he interfered with 
James the Second to put a stop to JefiPe- 
ries's Severities in the West of England after 
Monmouth's Rebellion, 1 1 vol. 306 (note). 

NORTH, Roger, Counsel. See North, Francis, 
9 vol. 522, 641, 653, 10 vol. 38, 559, 11 vol. 
390. — He is one of the Counsel for the Pro- 
secution on the Trial of Lord William 
Russel, 9 vol. 594.— He is also of Counsel 
for the Prosecution on the Trial of Algernon 
Sidney, ibid. 840. — His Account of this Trial 
in the " Examen," ibid. ib. (note). — His 
History of the Motives for the Writ of Error 
in the Case of Bamardiston against Soames, 
14 vol. 719 (note). — His Account of the 
Proceedings on the Impeachment of the Earl 
of Danby, 11 vol. 614 (note). 



Attorney General to the 

Queen, 4 Jac. 2, 12 vol. 125. — His Examina- 
tion by a Committee of the House of Lords 
appointed in 1689 to inquire who were the 
Advisers and Prosecutors of the Murders of 
Lord William Russel, Colonel Sidney, and 
others, 9 vol. 995. 

NORTHAMPTON, Earl of.-His Speech on 
the Trial of Henry Garnet for being concern- 
ed in the Powder Plot, 2 vol. 247.— His 
Case on an Information in the Star Chamber 



for slanderous Words spoken of liim, ex* 
tracted from Coke's Reports, 10 Jac. 1,1613. 
ibid. 861. — Resolutions of the Judges in this 
Case, ibid. 863. 

NORTHAMPTON, Spencer, Earl of.— Pro- 
ceedings against him, William Earl of De- 
vonshire, Henry Earl of Dover, Henry Earl 
of Monmouth, Charles Lord Howard of 
Charlton, Robert Lord Rich, Charles Lord 
Grey of Ruthven, Thomas Lord Coventry, 
and Arthur Lord Capel, for absenting them- 
selves from the House of Lords contrary to 
an Order of the House, 18 Car. 1, 1642, 
4 vol. 176.— The House of Lords send for 
them, ibid, ib.— Their Answer, ibid. 177.^- 
The Commons impeach them, ibid. 178. — 
Mr. Hollis's Speech on delivering the Arti- 
cles of Impeachment, ibid. ib. — Sentence 
against them, ibid. 184. 

NORTHAMPTON, William Parr, Marquis 
of. See Norlfwmberland, John Dudley, 
Duke of. 

NORTHEY, Edward, Counsel, 13 vol. 1253- 
— His Argument for the Plaintiff against 
the King's Dispensing Power in the Action 
against Sir Edward Hales for neglecting to 
take the Oaths of Supremacy and Allegiance, 
11 vol. 1187.— His Speech in the House of 
Commons for the Duke of Norfolk, on the 
Second Reading of his Divorce Bill, 13 vol. 
1359. 

NORTHEY, Sir Edward, Attorney General, 
1 Ann, 14 vol. 531. — His Speech in Reply 
for the Prosecution on the Trial of David 
Lindsay for High Treason, ibid. 1018.— His 
Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
John Tutchin for a Libel, ibid. 1105. — His 
Argument in support of a Motion to amend 
the Jury Process in that Case, ibid. 1140. — 
His Speech as one of the Managers for the 
Commons on the Trial of the Impeachment 
of the Earl of Wintoun for High Treason, 
15 vol. 833. — His Speech for the Prosecu- 
tion on the Trial of Francis Francia for 
High Treason, ibid. 906. 

NORTHINGTON, Robert, Earl of. Lord 
Chancellor, 5 Geo. 3. See Henley, Robert, 
Lord. — He is appointed Lord High Steward 
on the Trial of Lord Byron for the Murder 
of Mr. Chaworth, 19 vol. 1178. 

NORTHUMBERLAND, Henry Piercy, Earl 
of. — Report of the Public Declaration of his 
Treasons in the Star Chamber after his 
Death; together with the Examinations of 
several Persons respecting his Suicide, 27 
Eliz. 1585, 1 vol. 1111.— Speech of the- 
Attorney General (Popham) in the Star 
Chamber, detailing the Earl's Treasons, ibid. 
1115. — Speecli of the Solicitor General 
(Egerton) on the same Subject, ibid. 1120. 
— Speech of Sir Roger Manwood, Chief 
Baron of the Exchequer, describing the 
Manner of his Death and the Examinations 
taken on a Coroner's Inquisition, ibid. 1122* 



96 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



NORTHUMBERLAND, John Dudley, Duke 
of. — ^His Trial in the House of Loi^s, with 
William Parr, Marquis of Northampton, 
and John Dudley, Earl of ^Warwick, for High 
Treason, in asserting the title of Lady Jane 
Grey to the Crown, 1 Mary, 1553, 1 vol. 
765. — ^The Duke proposes two Questions of 
Law to the Court, ibid. ib. — They all con- 
fess the Indictment, ibid. 766. — They are 
executed, ibid. 768. — ^The Duke disavows 
his Religion on the Scaffold in hopes of a 
Pardon, ib. ibid, and (note). 

NORTON, Christopher.— Account of his Exe- 
cution with John Norton for High Treason, 
in being concerned in the Northern Re- 
bellion, 13 Eliz. 1570, 1 vol. 1083. 

NORTON, Sir Fletcher, Attorney General, 4 
Geo. 3.— He exhibits an Information against 
John Wilkes for a Seditious Libel in the 
" North Briton," 19 vol. 1075, 1382.— His 
Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
Lord Byron for the Murder of Mr. Cha- 
worth, ibid. 1183. 

Speaker of the House 



of Commons, 19 vol. 1138. 

NORWICH, Earl of. See Holland, Earl of . 

NOTTINGHAM, Earl of. See Finch, Heneage. 

NOY, William, Counsel. — His Argument in 
the Court of King's Bench for Sir Walter 
Earl, on the Return to a Habeas Corpus 
sued out by him and others, in order to try 
the legality of their Imprisonment for re- 
fusing to lend on the Commission of Loans, 
3 vol. 11. 



' Attorney General, 8 Car. 1. — 

His Speech in the Star Chamber on the 
Prosecution of Henry Sherfield for breaking 
a Window in a Church, 3 vol. 536. — His 
Speech in the Star Chamber on the Prose- 
cution of Prynn for writing ''Histrio- 
mastix,'' ibid. 566. — Notices of him by 
Howell, Kennett, and other Writers, ibid. 
828 (note). — Lord Clarendon's Character- of 
him, ibid. 834 (note). 

NUDIGATE, Sebastian. See Middlemore, 
Humphrey, 

NUNDOCOMAR, Maha Rajah.— His Trial 
at Calcutta for forging a Persian Bond, 15 
Geo. 3, 1775, 20 vol. 923.— The Indictment, 
ibid. 925. — Translation of the Bond charged 
to be forged, ibid. 933. — Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 934. — The Defence, ibid. 
968. — Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 969. 
— Chief Justice Irapey's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 1063.— The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 
1 078. — His Trial with Joseph Fowke, Francis 
Fowke, and Roy Rada Churn, at Calcutta, 
for a Conspiracy against Warren Hastings, 
Esq. Governor General of Bengal, and 
others,' ibid. 1077". — Proceedings previous 
to the Trial, ibid. ib. — Motion on behalf of 
tie Goveroor General and Council to quash 



the Prosecution as against Roy Rada Chum, 
on the ground of his being a Sovereign 
Prince and an Ambassador, ibid. 1107.— 
Arguments of the Counsel for the Prosecu- 
tion on opposing the Motion, ibid. 1112.— 
Arguments of the Court' on refusing the 
Motion, ibid. 1119. — ^The Indictment, ibid. 
1143. — Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 
1147. — ^They are acquitted^ ibid. 1186.— 
His Trial Ivith Joseph Fowke and Roy lUda 
Chum for a Conspiracy against Richard 
Barwell, Esq. one of the Members of the 
Supreme Council of Bengal, ibid. 1185.— 
The Indictment, ibid. ib. — Evidence for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 1187. — Fowke and 
Nundocomar are found Guilty, RoylUda 
Churn is acquitted, ibid. 1226. 

GATES, Dr. Titus. See Fopish FbtJ-Bx% 
NaiTative of the Popish Plot, 6 vol. 1429.— 
His Evidence against Coleman, 7 vol. 15.— 
Against Ireland and others, upon which he 
was afterwards convicted of Perjury, ibid. 
91. — ^Against Whitbread and othiers, ibid. 
322.— Against Richard Langhom, ibid. 426. 
— Against Wakeman and others, ibid. 619. 
— Against Anderson and others, ibid. 837. 
— Against Lord Castlemaine, ibid. 1070. 
—Against Lord Stafford, ibid. 1320, 1347. 
—He and Bed low exhibit Articles of Accu- 
sation before the Privy Council against 
Chief Justice Scroggs, 8 vol. 163.— His 
Evidence against Fitzharris, ibid, 362.— 
His Evidence on behalf of Colledge, ibid. 
646. — Proceedings on a Writ of Inquiry in 
an Action of Scandalum Magnatum, brought 
by James, Duke of York (afterwards James 
the Second), against him, 36 Car. 2, 1684, 
10 vol. 125.— The Judgment in this Action 
was reversed at the Revolution, ibid. 1327. 
—The Writ of Inquiry, ibid. 129.— Evi- 
dence of the Words spoken by him, ibid. 
134.— Chief Justice Jeffei:ies*s Charge to 
the Jury, ibid. 140. — The Jury assess the 
Damages at 10,000/., ibid. 148.— His Trial 
at the King's Bench for Perjury in his Evi- 
dence on the Trial of Whitebread and 
others, 1 Jac. 2, 1685, ibid. 1079.— He 
challenges a Juror peremptorily, but his 
Challenge is not allowed, ibid. 1080.— The 
Indictment, ibid. 1082. — Speeches of the 
King's Counsel on opening the Case against 
him, ibid. 1089. — Evidence against him, 
ibid. 1092.— His Defence, ibid. 1135.— He 
urges that the Record of the Conviction and 
Attainder of Whitebread and others is con- 
clusive Evidence of the Facts therein stated, 
and that those Facts cannot be averred to 
be false against it, ibid. 1136.— The Court 
hold otherwise, ibid. 1137.— Evidence for 
the Defence, ibid. 1140.— Repl/ of the 
King's Counsel, ibid. 1 172.— Evidence in 
reply, ibid. 1175. — Oates sums up his En- 
dence, ibid. 1191.— He objects to the Evi- 
dence of Papists against him, ibid. 1192.— 
The Court decide that a Papist is a coffl- 
petent Witness, ibid, 1193,— The Solicitor 



THE STATE TtllALS. 



97 



General sums up the Evidence in reply for 
the Grown, ibid. 119^9. — Chief. Justice 
Jefferies's Charge to the Jury, ibid, 1210. — 
The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 1227.— 
His Trial on the Second Indictment for 
Perjury, 1 Jac. 2, 1685, ibid., ib. — ^The 
Indictment, ibid. ib. — ^The Speeches of the 
Counsel for the Prosecution, ibid.' 1239. — 
Evidence against him, ibid. 1240. — His De- 
fence, ibid. 1281 . — Evidence for the Defence, 
ibid. 1285.—- He sums up his Evidence, ibid. 
1288. — ^The Solicitor General replies, ibid. 
1291. — Chief Justice Jefferies's Charge to 
the Jury, ibid. 1298. — The Jury find him 
Guilty, ibid. 1309. — He makes Objections 
- to both Indictments in aiTest of Judgment, 
• ibid. 1311. — The Court overrule the Objec- 
tions, ibid. 1312. — Judgment against him 
on both Indictments, ibid. 1315. — Particu- 
lars of his Application to the House . of 
Lords, after the Revolution, for a Reversal 
of these Judgments, ibid. 1317. — The Judg- 
ments are affirmed, ibid. 1326.— Burnet's 
Character of him, 6 vol. 1407. 

O'BRIEN, Dennis, See Thanet, SackvUle, 
Earl of , 

OCLE, Thomas de. ^ee Gttmej/y William de, 

O'COIGLY, James.~His Trial with Arthur 
O'Connor, John Binns, John Allen, and 
Jeremiah Leary for High Treason, be- 
fore a Special Commission of Oyer and 
Terminer, held at Maidstone, 38 Geo. 3, 
1798, 26 vol. 1101.— Mr. Justice Buller's 
Charge to the Grand Jury, ibid. 1192. — 
The Grand Jury return true Bills against 
them, ibid. 1197. — Caption and Indictment, 
ibid. 1202. — Counsel for the Crown and for 
the Prisoners, ibid. 1218. — Application on 
the part of the Prisoners to the Court, com- 
plaining of an attempt made to excite a 
Prejudice against them in the minds of the 
Jury, ibid. 1219. — Affidavit in support of 
the Application, ibid. 1223. — Objections to 
Jurors tried by Triers, ibid. 1227-1230. — 
The Counsel for the Prisoners object to the 
Crown's right to challenge without cause, 
ibid. 1231. — Mr. Scott's Argument in sup- 
port of the Objection, ibid. ib. — ^The Court 
d^ide in favour of the Right of the Crown, 
ibid. 1240. — ^The Attorney General's Speech 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 1245. — Evidence 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 1266. — Mr. 
Pluroer^s Speech in Defence of O'Coigly 
and O'Connor, ibid. 1375. — Mr. Gurney's 
Speech in Defence of Birnis, 27 vol. 1 . — 
Mr. Fergusson's Speech in Defence of Allen, 
ibid. 16. — Mr. Scott's Speech in Defence of 
Leary, ibid. 26. — Evidence for the Prisoners, 
ibidi. 27-— Mr. Erskine's Evidence as to the 
Chai^aater of O'Connor, ibid. 38. — Mr. Fox's 
Evidence to the same effect, ibid. 41. — Mr. 
Sheridan's Evidence, ibid. 45. — Mr. Dallas's 
Speech on summing up the Evidence for 
the Prisoners, ibid. 53. — ^The Attorney- 

. Gene^l's R^ply, . ibid, 95^,— Mr, Justice 
VOL, XXXIV, 



Buller's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 125. — 
The Jury find O'Coigly Guilty, and acquit 
the other Prisoners, ibid. 138. — Mr. Justice 
Buller's Address on passing Sentence upon 
O'Coigly, ibid. 139.— Life of O'Coigly, with 
Observations on his Trial, ibid. 141. — His 
Conduct previous to and at his Execution, 

ibid. 247 ^Trial of the Earl of Thanet and 

others for a riotous attempt to rescue Arthur 
O'Connor at the close of his Trial, ibid. B21. 

O'CONNOR, Artlmr. See OCoigly, Jmrm, 

OGILVIE, James, Lord. See Spotiswood, Sir 
Robert. 

OGILVIE, John (a Jesuit). — Proceedings 
against him for High Treason . at Glasgow, 
13 Jac. 1, 1615, 2 vol. 883.— His Exami- 
nation at Glasgow, ibid. ib. — Commission 
issued to try him, ibid. 885. — His Answers 
to the Questions proposed to him respecting 
the temporal and spiritual power of the 
Pope, ibid. 886. — Indictment against him, 
ibid. 887. — His Defence, ibid. 891.— He is 
found Guilty and sentenced to be hanged, 
ibid, 897. — Account of his Execution, ibid. 
898. 

OGILVIE, Patrick. See Nairn, Catharine. 

OKEY, Colonel John, 5 vol. 1301. See 
Regicides, 

OLDCASTLE, Sir John. See Cobham, Lord. 

OLIPHANT, John.— His Trial with others, 
at Edinburgh, for drinking the health of the 
Pretender and cursing the King) 1 Geo. 1> 
1715, 17 vol. 763.— The Indictment, ibid. 
764. — Information for the King's Advocate, 
ibid. 766. — Information for the Panels, ibid. 
770. — ^The Court find the Libels relevant, 
ibid. 777. — Evidence for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 778. — Verdict of the Assize, ibid. 779. 
— Sentence of the Court, ibid. 780. 

ONEBY, Major John.— His Trial at the Old 
Bailey for the Murder of William Gower, 
12 Geo. 1, 1726, 17 vol. 29.— The Indict- 
ment, ibid. ib. — Evidence against him^ ibid. 
31. — Evidence for him, ibid. 34. — The Jury 
find a Special Verdict, ibid. 36. — Serjeant 
Darnell's Argument of the Special Verdict 
in the Court of King's Bench for the Prose- 
cution, ibid. 38. — Serjeant Eyre's Argument 
for the Prisoner, ibid. 39. — ^Judgment of the 
Court on the Special Verdict, that the facts 
found constitute Murder, ibid. 41. — Chief 
Justice Raymond's Argument on delivering 
the Judgment of the Court on the Verdict, 
ibid, ib.— Sentence of Death is passed upon 
him, but he commits Suicide in Newgate, 
ibid. 55. — Narrative of his Life, ibid. 56. 

ONSLOW, Arthur. — His Case upon an Appeal 
in the House of Lords, brought against him 
by Sir Nicholas Stoughton, 6 vol.1134. 

ONSLOW, Mr.— His Speech in the House of 
Lords as one of th^ Managers for the Housq 
H 



»8 



GENERAL INDEI TO 



of Commons on th« Trial of the Impeoch- 
ment of Lord Chancellor Macclesfield, 16 
vol. 895. 

ONSLOW, Deozil.-^His Case on an Action 
brought by him against the Sheriff of Surrey 
for a False Return of Members to serve in 
Parliament for that County, 14 toI. 707 
(note). 

ONSLOW, Lord, f^ee Arnold, Edward. 

ORFORD, £dward, Bail of. See Somerh 
John, Lard, 

ORLETON, Adam de, Bishop of Hereibrd.-— 
He is accused of Treason in taking Arms 
against the King, 16 £dw. 2, 1323, 1 toI. 
39. — He pleads his Privilege as a Minister 
of Holy Church, and that he ought not to 
answer tvithout leave from the Archbishop 
of Canterbury, ibid, ib.— The Archbishop 
and his Suffragans intercede for him, ibid, 
ib. — He is again summoned to answer, 
"When the Archbishops and other Churchmen 
take him forcibly from the Bar, ibid, ib.— 
The King prefers a Bill of Indictment 
against him to tlie Grand Jury of Hereford- 
shire, and, on its being found, seizes on his 
Temporalities, ibid. ib.->^His Temporalities 
are restored to him by Edward the Third, 
ibid. 40. — He moves in Parliament that 
King Edward the Second should be deposed, 
ibid. 47.*^He is one of the Deputation from 
the Parliament to resign their Homage and 
Fealty to Edward the Second, ibid. 49. 

ORMISTOUN, the Laird of. See Darrdey, 
Bentjy Lord, 

ORMOND, James, Duke of.— Articles of 
Impeachment against him for High Treason 
in adhering to the Pretender, and holding 
Correspondence Vith the French Govern- 
ment, 1 & 2 Geo. 1, 1715, 15 vol. 1007.-— 
On his not appearing to Answer, a Bill of 
Attainder is passed against him, ibid. 1012. 
—He passes the rest of his life abroad, in 
adherence to the Pretender, ibid. 1014. 

ORR, William. See Pmcrfjr, Peter. — Account 
of the Proceedings in Ireland against him, 
under the Irish Insurrection Act, for ad- 
ministering unlawful Oaths, 37 Geo. 3, 1797, 
26 vol. 901.— Arguments of his Counsel in 
arrest of Judgment, upon a Verdict of Gnilty 
being returned, ibid. 909.-~The Objections in 
arrest of Judgment are overruled, and Sen- 
tence of Death is passed upon him, ibid. 
914.— Trial of Peter Finerty for a Libel, in 
certain Remarks upon this Trial, and the 
Execution of the Sentence against Orr, ibid. 
923. 

ORRERY, Earl of.— Proceedings against him 
on an Impeachment by the Commons for 
High Crimes and Misdemeanours, 21 Car. 
2, 1669s 6 vol. 913.— Debate in the House 
of Commons upon the Charges, ibid. ib. — 
He is ordered into the custody of the Ser- 
}eant-at-Arms; ibid. 915.— His Defence in 



tht House of Commons, ibid. ib. — ^The 
House resolve that the Aiccusation against 
bim be left to be prosecuted at law, ibid. 
92a'^No further Proceedings appesr to 
have been bad, ibid. ib. (note). 

ORTON, Henry. See Conxion, Edmund. 

OSBALDESTON, Lambert See WUUama, 
John, Buhop qf Lincoln. 

OSBORNE, Sir Thomas. See Dattby, Thomas, 
Earl of. — His Speech in the House of Com- 
mons in the Debate upon the Impeachment 
of Lord Clarendon, 6 vol. 837.:-^Bumet's 
Notice of him, ibid. ib. (note). 

OVERBURY, Sir Thomas.— Trial of his Mur- 
derers, 2 vol. 91 1 . — ^Trial of Richard Weston, 
ibid, ib.— Trial of Anne Turner, ibid. 930. 
—Trial of Sir Jervis Elwes, ibid. 935. — 
Trial of James Franklin, ibid. 947.— Trial 
. of Sir Thomas Monson, ibid. 949.— Trial of 
the Countess of Somerset, ibid. 951.*— Trial 
of the Earl of Somerset, ibid. 965. 

OWEN, John, otherwise Collins. Proceed- 
ings against him for Treason in declaring 
the Pope's Supremacy, and maintaining 
that it would be lawful to kill the King/ 
if excommunicated by the Pope, 13 Jac. 1, 
1615, 2 vol. 879.— He is found Guilty by 
the Jury, ibid. 882. — ^The Court unani- 
mously hold that the Offence amounts to 
Treason, ibid, ib; — Judgment is given 
against him, ibid. 884. 

OWEN, Dr. John, Bishop of St. Asiapk See 
Twdoe Bi$hofA. 

OWEN, Sir John. See Holland, Earl of. 

OWEN, Dr. Morgnn, Bishop of Llandaff. See 
Twfhe Bitbops. 

OWEN, William.— His Trial for publishing a 
seditious Libel, upon a Prosecution by the 
Attorney General, at the suggestion of the 
House of Commons, 26 Geo. 2, 1752, 18 
vol. 120a,— The Information, ibid. 1204. — 
Speech of the Attorney General for the Pro- 
secution, ibid. 1220. — Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 1 222. — Mr. Ford's Speech 
in his Defence, ibid. 1223. — Evidence to 
the Character of the Defendant, ibid. 1227. 
—Mr. Pratt sums up the Evidence for the 
Defendant, ibid. ib. — The Jury acquit bim, 
ibid. 1228. — Lord Mansfield^ in delivering 
the Judgment of the Court against the 
Motion for a new Trial in the Case of the 
Dean of St. Asaph, says that the Report of 
this Trial in the State Trials is incorrect, 21 
vol. 1038. 

OWENS, Abel. See Kidd, dptmn WiUiam. 

OXFORD AND MORTIMER, Robert, Earl 
of. See EM^, JMer^.— Proceedings in 
Parliament against bim upon an Impeach* 
ment for Higli Treason and other High 
Crimes and MtsdemeammTS, 8 Geo. 1 , 1 717, 
1 5 vol. 1045. — Connntssion to Lord Ghta- 
^eilor Cowper to be Lord High Ste<mffd, 



THE STATS TRIAIS. 



Oft 



ibid. 1050.^-The Articles of Impeachment, 
ibid. 1052. — His Speech m the House of 
Lords on the Motion for his CommitmeDt, 
ibid. 1084.<— Further Articles of Impeach- 
meot, ibid. 1085. — His Answer, ibid. 1103. 
—Replication of the House of Commons, 
ibid. 1158.— Mr. Hampden's Speech for the 
Commons, ibid. 1160. — ^The Lords resolve 
that the Commons be not admitted to pro- 
ceed upon the Articles for Crimes and Mis- 
demeanours till Judgment is given upon the 
Articles for High Treason, ibid." 11 65. — 
Paper delivered by the Commons at a Con- 
ference between the two Houses, containing 
their Reasons against this Resolution, ibid. 
I166.*-The Lords resolve to adhere to their 
Resolution, ibid. 1168^ — ^Reasons of the 
Lords for the maintenance of their Resolu- 
tion, ibid. 1169.^ — After disputes upon this 
subject, the Lords resolve to proceed pre- 
sently with the Trial, ibid. 1174. — ^Form of 
Proclamation adopted by the Lords on the 
aoDp^ppearance of the Commons to make 
good their Impeachment, ibid. ib. — ^He is 
unanimously acquitted, ibid. 1176.-— Swift's 
Character of him, ibid. 1045 (note).^ — ^Lord 
. Bolingbroke^s Opinion of him, ibid. 1047 
(note). — Bnmet's Account of his Advance- 
ment* to the Peerage, ibid. 1048 (note)« — 
Preamble to his Patent, composed by Svrift, 
ibid. 1049 (note). 

PAGE, Francis, Counsel. — His Argument in 
the Court of Queen's Bench for the Discharge 
of the Aylesbury Men, on their Commitment 
by tlie House of Commons for a Breach of 
Privilege, 15 vol. 850. — ^The House order 
him into the Custody of the Serjeant-at- 
Arms for arguing that Case, ibid. 808. 

■■ Sir Francis, Judge of K. B. 5 Geo. 1, 
15 vol. 1324, 17 vol. 160.— His Charge to 
the Jury on the Trial of William Hales for 
Forgery, 17 vol. 203. — His Charge to the 
Jury on the Trial of John Huggins for 
Murder, ibid. 354. — His Charge to the Jury 
on the Trial of Thomas Bambridge for 
Murder, ibid. 394. 

PAIN, William. See Ttwmj^Wj Natkamel. 

PAINEy Thomas. — His Trial on an ex»officio 
Information, in the Court of King's Bench, 
for a Libel, contained in the Second Part of 
the Rights of Man, 33 Geo. 3, 1792^ 23 vol. 
357.— 'The Information, ibid. ib. — Counsel 
for the Crown and for the Defendant, ibid. 
380. — Speech of the Attorney General for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 400.-rPaine's Letter 
to the Attorney General, from Paris, on the 
subject of this Prosecution, ibid. 397, 404.— 
Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 400. — 
Mr. Erdtine's Speech for the Defendant, 
ibid. 410.— The Jury stop the Attorney 
General's Reply, and return a Verdict of 
Guilty, ibid. 472.^His Letter to the People 
ol France, 24 vol. 495. 

PALMER, Sir Geoflfrey, Attorney General, 
12 Car. 2, 6 vol. 971; 983, 6 vd. 733, T76. 



—He was named in the GommiKuoh for the 
Trial of the Regicides, 5 vol. 985. — ^His 
Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
John James, one of the' Fifth Monarchy 
Men, for Hish Treason, 6 vol. 77.-<-Hif 
Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
Sir Henxy Vane, ibid. 148. 

PALMER, Roger. See Caitlmame, liogtr, 
Barlof. 

PALMER, Sir Thomas. See Qotei, /Sir JeAit. 

PALMER, Thomas Fyshe.— His Trial before 
the Circuit Court of Justiciary at Perth for 
Sedition, 33 Geo. 3, 1793, 23 vol. 237.--The 
Indictment, ibid. ib. — His Counsel object 
to the Indictment on the ground of a Mis- 
nomer, ibid. 244. — ^The Court overrule the 
Objection, ibid. 252. — Mr. H^gart's Ar|:u- 
ment against the Relevancy of the Indict- 
ment, ibid. 255. — Mr. Maconochie's Argu- 
ment on the other side, ibid. 282. — ^Xne 
Court decide that the Indictment is relevant, 
ibid. 290^-^Evidence for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 299. — Evidence for the Defence, ibid. 
329. — Mr. Burnett's Speech for the Prose* 
cution, ibid. 331. — ^Mr. Clarke's Speech for 
the Defence, ibid. 339. — ^The Court sum up 
Um Evidence, ibid. 388. — ^Tbe Jury find bim 
Guilty, ibid. 371 < — He is sentenced to 
Transportation for seven yean, ibid. 372<-^ 
Proceedings in the House of Commons on 
the presentment of a Petition from him, ibid. 
360 (note). — Accounts of him in various 
contemporary Publications, ibid. 248 (note), 
ibid. 378. — ^Address by the Society for Con- 
stitutional Information to him after his Sen- 
tence, 24 vol. 586. — His Letter to the Chair- 
man of the Society in answer thereto, ibid. 
56*7. 

PALMER, Mr.— His Speech a^ one of the 
Managers for the Commons, in the House 
of Lords, on opening some of the Articles 
of Impeachment against Lord Chancellor 
Maoclesfield, 16 vol* 900. 

PANTALEON SA, Don, Brother of the Por- 
tuguese Ambassador.— Proceedings against 
him for Murder, 6 Car.. 2, 1654, 5 voL 481. 
—Account of the Riot and Tumult, occa- 
sioned by him and his followers, at the New 
Exchange, ibid. ib. — ^Wbitelocke's Narrative 
of the Transaction, ibid. 464. — He is tried 
with two of his Fdlowers hj a Special Com- 
mission of Oyer and Terminer, ibid. 466.—- 
He pleads ihaX he was one of the Suite of 
the Portuguese Ambassador, and that, in 
his absence, he had a Commission to be 
Ambassador himself, ibid, ib^— The Court 
reject his Plea of Privilege, ibid. ib. — He 
pleads Not Guilty, ibid. ib. — The Jury find 
them Guiltjr, and they are sentenced to be 
hanged, ibid. 467.— His Petition to Crom« 
well, ibid. 493. — ^He is beheaded, ibid. 479. 
— Dr. Zouch's Account of these Proceed'i 
ings, ibid. 482. — Another Account, ibid. 
483.— Extracts from Thurloe's State Pape^ 
relating to the IVansaction, ibid, 488. 
R 2 



100 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



PAPILLON, Thomas; See Pritchard^ Sir 

WiUiam, . 
PARHAM, Sir Edward. See Markham, Sir 

Gr^iu 

PARK, James Allan, Counsel, 29 vol. 423, 
503, 31 vol. 1, 271.— His Speech for the 
Prosecution on the Trial of Swallow and 

« others for Burglary, under the Special Com- 
mission at York in 1813 for the Trial of the 

. Luddites, 31 vol. 972. — ^His Speech for the 
Prosecution on the Trial of Mellor and 
others, under the same Commission, for the 
Murder of Mr. Ilorsfall, ibid. 998.--His 
Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
John Schofield, under the same Commis- 
sion, for maliciously shooting at John 
Hinchliffe, ibid. 1035.— His Speech for the 

' Prosecution on the Trial of John Eadon, 
under the same Commission, for administier- 

' ing unlawful Oaths," ibid. 1 064.— His Speech 
for the Prosecution on the Trial of James 

' Haigh and others, under the same Codq- 

■ mission, for riotously destroying a Mill, 
ibid. 1093. — His Speech for the Prosecution 
on the Trial of Job Hey, under the same 
Commission, for a Burglary, ibid. 1137. 

PARKER, John, Baron of the Exchequer 
during the Protectorate, 5 vol. 946. 

PARKER, Thomas, Counsel. See Mocc/es- 
Jield, Thomas, Earl of. — His Argument for 

• the Defendant in the Court of King's Bench, 

' on shewing cause against the amendment of 

• the Jury Process, in the Case of Tutchin, 14 
vol.1173. 

Sir Thomas, Queen's * Serjeant.— 



His Speech as one of the Managers for the 
House of Commons, in support of the Fourth 
Article of Impeachment on the Trial of Dr. 
Sacheverel, 15 vol. 169. — His Speech in 
Reply to the Defence on the Fourth Article, 
ibid r 447. — Burnet says, that he distinguish- 
ed himself above all on that Occasion, ibid. 
11 (note). — ^He was appointed Chief Justice 
of K*. B. on the death of Lord Holt, ibid. 
14 (note). 

Thomas, Lord, Chief Justice of the 



Queen's Bench, 9 Ann, 15 vol. 731. — His 
Charge to the Jury on the Trial of Dam- 
maree for High . Treason, ibid. 596. — His 
Charge to the Jury on the Trial of Francis 
- Willis for High Treason, ibid. 646.— His 
Charge to the Jury on the Trial of Purchase 
for High Treason, ibid. 684. — His Speech 
on delivering his Opinion in favour of the 
King's Prerogative respecting the Marriage 
and Education of the Royal Family, ibid. 
1222. 

PARKYNS, Sir William.— His Trial for High 

Treason in being concerned in the Assassi- 

' nation Plot, 8 Will. 3, 1696, 13 vol. 63.— 

• The Indictment, ibid. 66. — He pleads Not 

Guilty, ibid. 70.— He applies to the Court 

' to postpone the Trial, on the ground that 

he has not had time to collect his Witnesses^ 



ibid, ib.— The Court refuse the Application, 
ibid. 72.— He applies for Counsel, suggest- 
ing the late Act of Parliament (7 Will, and 
Mary, c. 3), ibid, ib.— The Court refuse the 
Application, on the ground that the Act of 
Parliament had not come into operation, 
ibid, ib.— Speech of the Attorney General 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 77. — Evidence for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 85.— Lord Holt sug- 
gests to him the material points of the 
Evidence for the Prosecution, and he 
answers them seriatim, ibid. 108. — ^He ob- 
jects that there is but one Witness to prove 
his design to assassinate the King, ibid. 
112. — The Court hold that, as the design to 
assassinate the King v?as merely an Overt 
Act of compassing the King's Death, and as 
there were Witnesses to other Overt Acts of 
the same species of Treason, . the Evidence 
was sufficient, ibid. ib. — Reply of the 
Solicitor General, ibid. 119.— Lord Holt's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. 126. — ^The Jury 
find him Guilty, ibid. 133. — Judgment is 
passed upon him and Sir John Freind, ibid. 
136. — Paper delivered by him to the Sheriffs 
at the place of Execution, ibid. 138. — An 
Account of what passed at his Execution, 
ibid. 406. — Proceedings against Mr. Collier 
and two other Non-juring Clergymea for 
absolving him and Sir John Freind at the 
place of Execution, ibid. 405. — Mr. Collier^s 
Defence of his Conduct in giving him Abso- 
lution, ibid. 408. — Declaration by the Arch- 
bishops, and certain Bishops, censuring the 
Conduct of the Clergymen at his Execution, 
ibid. 411.— Mr. Collier's Reply to the 
Declaration, ibid. 413. 

PARR, Catharine, Queen Dowager of Henry 
the Eighth.— She marries Lord Seymour of 
Sudley, 1 vol. 484. 

PARR, William, Marquis of Northampton. 
See Northumberland^ John Dudley, Duke of. 

PARRIS, alias PARRY, Charles. See ^w- 
derson, Lionel. 

PARROT, Hugh. See Kidd, Captain WUium. 

PARRY, John. See Vinty John. 

PARRY, William>-His Trial for High Trea- 
son in attempting to kill the Queen, at the 
instigation of the Papists, 26 Eliz. 1584; 1 
vol. 1095. — He is arraigned, and pleads 
Guilty, ibid. 1097-1098.— The Evidence is 
produced against him notwithstanding his 
Confession, ibid. 1098. — His Confession 

Previous to his Trial, ibid. 1099. — His 
•etter to the Queen, ibid. 1104. — Letter to 
him from the Cardinal di Como, ibid. 1105. 
— His Letter to the Earl of Leicester and 
the Lord Treasurer, prajring ^ for Pardon, 
ibid. 1106. — He offers to withdraw his Con- 
fession, and says that it was extorted from 
him, ibid. 1107. — Chief Justice Wray passes 
Sentence of Death upon him, ibid. 1110.-^ 
He is executed in Palace Yard, Westminsteri 
ibid, 1112, 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



101 



PATE, John. See Hastingt, Henry, 

PATERSON, James. See Black, Bavid. 

PAUL, William. See Walker, Thomas. 

PAULETT, Lord William.— His Speech in 
support of the Second Article of Impeach- 
ment against Dr. Sacheyerell, 15 vol. 151. 

PEACHAM, Edmund.— He is indicted for 
Treason for treasonable Doctrines contained 
in a Sermon not preached, but ivritten by 
him, and found in his Study, 12 Jac. 1, 
1615, 2 vol. 869. — He is tried and found 
Guilty, but not executed, ibid. ib. — Inter- 
rogatories exhibited to him, ibid. ib. — He is 
examined upon the Interrogatories with the 
Torture, ibid. 871. — Sir Francis Bacon's 
Letters to the King respecting this Case, 
ibid. ib. — Peacham's second Examination 
in the Tower, ibid. 877. — Paper in the 
hand-writing of James the First, discussing 
whether the Facts in Peacham's Case 
amounted to Treason, ibid. ib. 

PEACHELL, Dr. John, Vice-Chancellor of 
the University of Cambridge. See Cam- 
bridge University, — Proceedings against him 
and the University of Cambridge before the 
Ecclesiastical Commissioners appointed by 
James the Second, for refusing to admit a 
fienedictine Monk to the degree of Master 
of Arts, 3 Jac. 2, 1687, 11 vol. 1315.— 
Summons from the Commissioners, ibid. 
1324. — His Examination, ibid. 1325. — ^The 
Answer of the Univeraity, containing their 
Reasons for their Conduct, ibid. 1326. — 
His second Examination, ibid. 1329. — Sen- 
tence of Deprivation is passed upon Dr. 
Peachell, ibid. 1335.— The Sentence, ibid. 
1339. — Burnet's Account of these Proceed- 
ings, ibid. 1315 (note). 

PEARSALL, Oliver. See Wdker, Thomas. 

PECK, Edward, Serjeant-at-Law. — He is 
ordered into the custody of the Serjeant-at- 
Arms by the House of Commons for plead- 
ing on an Appeal in the House of Lords 
against a Member of. the House of Commons, 
6 vol. 1146. 

PECKHAM, Mr. Counsel.— His Argument 
for the Defendant in Error in the Case of 
Fabrigas v. Mostyn, 20 vol. 207.— His 
Speech in Defence of De la Motte on his 
Trial for High Treason, 21 vol. 778. 

PELTIER, Jean.— His Trial upon an ex- 
ofiBcio Information for a Libel on Napoleon 
Buonapar^, when First Consul of the French 
Republic, 43 Geo. 3, 1803, 28 vol. 529.— 
Counsel for the Prosecution and for the 
Defendant, ibid. ib. — The Information, ibid. 
530. — Speech of the Attorney General for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 547.— -Evidence for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 558.— Mr. Mac- 
intosh's Speech for the Defendant, ibid. 
563. — Reply of the Attorney General, ibid. 
608.— Lord Ellenborough's Charge to the 
Jury, ibid. 616.— The Jury find him Guilty, 
hwt in consequence of the renewal of the 



War between France and Great Britain, he 
is not brought up for Judgment, ibid. 619. 

PEMBERTON, Francis, Counsel, 20 Car. 2, 
1668. — He is of Counsel for the Prosecution 
on the Trial of Messenger and others for 
Treason, 6 vol. 880. 

Serjeant-at-Law, 27 



Car. 2. — He is ordered into the custody of 
the Seijeant-at-Arms by the House of Com- 
mons for a Breach of Privilege in pleading, 
by Order of the House of Lords, on an 
Appeal brought in that House against a 
Member of the House of Commons, 6 vol. 
1146. 

Sir Francis, Judge of K. B. 



31 Car. 2. — He presides at several of the 
Trials for the Popish Plot, 7 vol. 330, 428, 
610, 771, 831, 889, 965.— Burnet says, that 
he lost his Seat in the Court of King's Bench 
by means of Chief Justice Scroggs, 8 vol. 
245 (note). — On being displaced from his 
Seat on the Bench, he returns to his 
Practice at the Bar, 9 vol. 580 (note). 

'• Chief Justice of 



K. B. 33 Car. 2.— On Sir William Scroggs's 
removal, he is made Chief Justice, 8 vol. 
245 (note). — His Charge to the Jury on the 
Trial of Fitzharris, ibid. 385. — Sir John 
Hawles says, that the Evidence was unfairly 
summed up by him on that Trial, ibid. 438. 
— His Charge to the Jury on the Trial of 
Dr. Oliver Plunket, ibid. 488. — His Address 
on passing Judgment upon Plunket, ibid. 
492. — IJis Charge to the Grand Jury pre- 
vious to preferring the Indictment against 
the Earl of Shaftesbury, ibid. 760.— His 
Charge to the Jury on the Trial of Nathaniel 
Thompson and others for slandering the 
Evidence of the Popish Plot, ibid. 1366.— 
His Charge to the Jury on the Trial of 
Count Coningsmark and others for Murder, 
9 vol. 77. — His Charge to the Jury on the 
Trial of Lord Grey of Werk and others for 
conspiring to debauch Lady Henrietta 
Berkeley, ibid. 178. — Burnet says, that not 
being satisfied to give his Judgment for the 
Crown in the Case of the Quo Warranto 
against the City of London, he was removed 
to the Common Pleas, upon North's Ad- 
vancement, before the final Judgment of the 
Court in that Case was delivered, 8 vol, 
1039 (note). 

Chief Justice of 



C. P. 35 Car. 2.— His Charge to the Jury 
on the Trial of Thomas Walcot for High 
Treason in being concerned in the Rye- 
House Plot, 9 vol. 558. — His Charge to the 
Jury on the Trial of Lord William Russel, 
ibid. 635. — His Charge to, the Jury on the 
Trial of John Rouse, ibid. 653.— He is 
taken from the Bench shortly after the Trial 
of Lord William Russel, ibid. 580 (note). 

Serjeant-at-Law, 



36 Car. 2.~He is one of the Counsel in the 
Lady Ivy's Case,. 10 voL 567.— He is onft 



1<» 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



of ibe Coonsel for the Seven Bisbops, 12 
▼ol. 202. — He 18 ordered to attend in the 
House of Commons to answer lor his con- 
cnmog in the Judgment of the Court of 
King's Bench in the Case of Jay and Top- 
ham, ibid. 822. — His Beasons for his Judg- 
ment in that Case, ibid. 825, 827.— ^The 
House of Commons resolve that he was 
Guilty of a Breach of Privilege by concur- 
ring in that Judgment, ibid. 834. — He 
appears to have been assigned as Counsel 
to Sir John Fenwick in 1696, 13 vol. 543. 
—Burnet's Notice of his Character, 8 vol. 
245 (note). — He filled three judicial Offices, 
was removed from each, returned twice to 
practice at the Bar, and died at last a Puisne 
Serjeant, 12 vol. 260 (note). 

I>BMBROKE, Philip, Earl of.— His Trial at 
Westminster, in the Court of the Lord High 
Steward, ibr the Murder of Nathaniel Cony, 
30 Car. 2, 1678, 6 vol. 1309.— His Petition 
to the House of Lords for a Trial, ibid. ib. 
— His Petition is refened to a Committee 
of Privileges, ibid. 1312. — Report of the 
Committee upon the method of bringing 
him to Trial, ibid. 1313. — A Special Com- 
mission of Oyer and Terminer is issued, 
under which an Indictment is preferred and 
found against him, ibid. 1315.— The Indict- 
ment is removed into the House of Lords 
by CertioTari, ibid. ib. — ^His Trial, ibid. 
1316.— Lord Nottingham, then Lord Finch, 
is appointed Lord High Steward, ibid. 1317. 
— ^The Lord High Steward's Address to the 
Prisoner on his being brought to the Bar, 
ibid. ib. — ^The Indictment, ibid. 1320. — 
Speech of Sir William Jones, Attorney 
General, for the Prosecution, ibid. 1321.^- 
Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 1323. — 
Evidence for the Defence, ibid. 1338. — 
Reply of the Solicitor General, Sir Francis 
Winnington, ibid. 1343.— The Lords acquit 
him of Murder, but find him Guilty of Man- 
slaughter, ibid. 1349.— He prays the Privi- 
lege of the Statute, and is aischarged, ibid. 
1350. — Extracts from the Journals of the 
House of Lords respecting him, ibid. 1309 
(note).— He is committed to the Tower by 
the King for Blasphemy, ibid. ib. — Upon 
committing a violent Assault upon Philip 
Ricaut, he is compelled to give Security in 
the House of Lords for keeping the peace, 
ibid. 1311 (note). — Proceedings in the 
House of Lords on his Quarrel with the 
Earl of Dorset, ibid. 1312 (note). 

PENGELLY, Thomas, Seijeant-at-Law.— He 
is said to have been a natural Son of Richard 
Cromwell, 6 vol. 140 (note).— His Speech 
for the Prosecutioh on the Trial of Chris- 
topher Layer for High Treason, ibid. ib. 



■ ; Sir Thomas, King's Serjeant. — 

His Speech in Reply for the Commons on 
the Trial of the Impeachment of Lord 
Chancellor Macclesfiela, 16 vol. 1330. 

■ Chief Baron of the 



Exchequer, 3 Geo. 2»— His Charge t6 the 
Jury on the Trial of William Hales for 
Forgery, 17 vol. 219.— His Charge to tho 
Jury on the Trial of Hales and Kinnersley 
for Forgery, ibid. 250. 

PENN, William.— Account of his Trial with 
William Mead for being present at a 
tumultuous Assembly in Gracechurch Street, 
written by themselves, 22 Car. 2, 1670, 6 
vol. 951. — ^The Indictment, ibid. 954. — 
They plead Not Guilty, ibid. 955.— The 
Court fines them for not taking off their 
Hats on coming into Courl, ibid. 956. — 
Evidence against them, ibid. 957. — They 
are remeved from the Bar, and the Jnry are 
charged in their absence, against which Fenn 
remonstrates, ibid. 961. — ^Die Jury return a 
Verdict of " Guilty of Preaching in Grace- 
church Street," ibid. 962. — The Jury are 
commanded to re-consider their Verdict, 
but return into Court with the same Verdict 
as to Penn, and Not Guilty as to Mead, 
ibid. ib. — The Court threaten the Jury, 
ibid. 963.— The Jury are enclosed all night, 
and the next morning deliver the same 
Verdict, ibid. 964. — They are enclosed a 
second night, and then return a Verdict of 
Not Guilty as to both Defendants, ibid. 
966. — ^The Court fine the Jury for their 
Verdict, ibid. 967. — Penn and Mead are 
sent to Newgate for non-payment of their 
Fines, ibid. 969. — Defence which they in- 
tended to have made, ibid. 970. — ^The Jury 
are sent to Newgate for non-payment of 
their Fines, ibid. 969. — Proceedings in the 
Court of King's Bench upon a Habeas 
Corpus sued out by Bushell, the Foreman 
of the Jury, ibid. 999. 

PENN, Sir William. — Proceedings against him 
on an Impeachment for several High Crimes 
and Misdemeanours, 20 Car. 2, 1668, 6 vol. 
869. — Burnet's Account of the Transaction 
from which these Proceedings arose, ibid, 
ib. — Articles of Impeachment against him, 
ibid. 873. — His Answer thereto, ibid. 876. 
— ^The House of Commons refer the consider- 
ation of the Answer to a Committee, ibid. 
878. — ^The Proceedings appear to have been 
discontinued here, ibid. ib. — Lord Claren- 
don's Account of him, ibid. 869 (note). — 
He was Vice*- Admiral of England, and 
Father of the Founder of Pennsylvania, ibid, 
ib. 

PENNINGTON, Isaac, 5 vol. 1000, 1198. 
See Regicides, 

PENRUDDOCK, Colonel John.— His Trial 
with several others, at Exeter, for High 
Treason in levying War against the Lord 
Protector and the Government, 7 Car. 2, 
1655, 5 vol. 767. — He demands Counsel, 
but is refused, ibid. 771. — He pleads Not 
Guilty, ibid. 773.~He contends that there 
can be no such Oifence as Treason against 
the Protector, ibid. ib. — His Address to the 
Jury, ibid. 776.— The Jury find him Guilty, 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



lOB 



ibid. TTf.— His Address tb the Court on 
being cat!etl upon fbt Judgment, ibid. lb. — 
He is sentenced to Deatb, ibid. Jb.— His 
Address to tbe People from the Scaffold, 
ibid. 77B.— Letter frofn his Wife, ^H^ith his 
Answer 'thereto, written the night befbre 
his Execution, ibid. 783.-^Curious Notes 
for the assistance of Colonel Penruddock 
and the other Prisoners on their Trial, ex- 
tracted from Thurloe's State Papers, ibid. 
784. — list of the several persons indicted, 
with the Verdicts in their respective Cases, 
ibid. 78d.— Lord Clarendon's Account of 
the Transactions which led to the Trial of 
Penruddock, ibid. 76T(note).^Lord Hale 
refbses to assist as Judge at the Tri&l, ibid, 
ib. 

PERCEVALi The Hon. Spencer, Counsel.-- 
His Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial 
of John Binns, at Warwick, for Seditious 
Words, 20 vol. AQSt-'^is Speech in Reply 
in the samf Case, ibid. 643* 



— Solicitor Ge- 



neral, 28 vol. 64. 

■■ »> > >■ ■ ■ ■■■■■ n iiw ! ■■ ■ I AttomeyGe- 

neral. — ^His Speech for the Prosecution on 
tbe Trial of Colonel Despard for High 
Treason, 28 vol. SOd.-^His Speech for the 
Prosecution on the Trial Of Peltier for a 
libel on Buonaparte, when Firdt Consul of 
the French Republic, ibid.54T. — Hie Speech 
for the Prosecution on the Trial of William 
Cobbett for a Libel on the Lord Deutenant 
and other Officers of State in Ireland, 29 
vol. 21.^»-His Speech for the Prosecution 
on the Trial of Mr» Justice Johnson for a 
Libel, ibid* 423. — His Speech in Reply in 
the same Case, ibid. 492. 

PERIAM, William, Judge of C. P. 28 Eliz. 
1 vol. 1251, 1315.— He was one of the 
Commissioners for the Trial of Mary, Queen 
of Scou, 1 vol. 1167. 

Sir William, Chief Baron of the 



Exchequer, 43 Eliz. 1 vol. 1334. 

PERROTT, Sir John, Lord Deputy of Ire- 
land. — ^liis Trial at the Bar of the Court of 
King's Bench for High Treason, 84 Eliz. 
1592, 1 vol. 1315.— Abstract of the Indict- 
meots, ibid. 1816-17.->-He pleads Not Guilty 
to both Indictments, ibid. ib« — Contemptu- 
ous Words, used by him respecting the 
Queen, given in Evidence to show a treason- 
able intention, ibid. 1318. — ^The Jury find him 
Guilty, but Judgment is respited, ibid. 1326. 
-^Betng called on for Judgment, he ofiers to 
make an Exception to the Indictment, but 
is not permitted, ibid. 1828.«>-His Speech, 
ibid. ib. — ^Chief Justice Anderson passes 
sentence of Death upon him, ibid. 133 1.<— 
He dies in the Tower, ibid. 1334. 

PERRY, James.— His Trial with John Lam- 
bert and James Gray, on an ex-officio In- 
formation, for a Seditious Libel, 34 Geo. 3, 



1798, 22 Vol. 963.«*-Mr. Fetty^ Advertise- 
ment to the original Report of the Trial, ibid, 
ib. — The Information, ibid. 958. — On the 
Cause being called on, only seven Special 
Jurors appeared, and, the Attorney General 
not praying a Tales, the Trial goes off, ibid. 
965.— A Rule for a new Special Jury being 
taken out, Mr. Erskine moves the Court On 
behalf of the Defendants to discharge it, 
ibid. ^5.— Mr. Erskine's Argument in sup- 
port of the Motion, ibid. ib. — ^The Court 
grant the Motion, ibid. 983.— Counsel for 
the Prosecution and for the Defendant, ibid. 
986.'^The Attorney Generars Speech t&t 
the Prosecution, ibid» ib.*— Mr. Erskine^s 
Speech for the Defendants, ibid. 995.— The 
Attorney Generars Reply) ibid. 1011.— 
I^rd Kenyon's Charge to tbe Jury, ibid. 
lOlO.i^The Jury aequit them^ ibid. 1020.— 
Mr. Peng's Trial with James Lambert, on 
an eXM)fficio Information, for a Libel on 
the King, 50 Geo. 3, 1810, 31 vol. 335.—- 
Counsel for the Prosecution and for the 
Defendants, ibid^ ib.' — ^The Information, 
ibid. 336.— speech of the Attorney General 
for the Prosecution, ibid* 337. — Mi;. Perry's 
Speech in his Defence, ibid» 340.^Reply 
of the Attorney General, ibid. 358.— Lord 
Ellenborough's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
363.-^The Jury acquit the Defendants, ibid. 
368. 

PERRY, Joan.— Remarkable Account of lier 
Trial, Condemnation, and Execution^ with 
her two Sons, John and Richard Perry, for 
the supposed Murder of Mr. Harrison, 14 
voL 1312i — On Mr. Harrison's sudden dis- 
appearance^ John Perry states before a 
Magistrate that he and his Brother had 
jrobbed and murdered him, and that their 
Mother was accessary thereto, ibid. 1315. — 
Joan and Richard Perry declare their inno- 
cence, ibid. 1317.-— An Indictment is found 
against them at the Assizes, but the Judge 
(Sir Christoplier Turner) refuses to try them, 
because the body had not been found, ibid. 
1318. — At the next Assizes they are tried, 
condemned, and executed, Joan and 
Richard Perry at the place of Execution 
strongly asserting their innocence, ibid. 
1319* — Mr. Harrison afterwards returns 
home, ibid. ib. — His Letter, accounting for 
his sudden disappearance, ibid. ib. 

PETERBOROUGH, Henry, Earl of. See 
Sdisbuty, James, Earl of. 

PETERS, Hugh, 5 vol. 1007, 1016, 1279. 
See Regicides, 

PETRE, William, Lord. See Stafiord, WO- 
Ham, Viscount. 

PETT, Peter.— Proceedings against him on 
an Impeachment for several High Crimes 
and Misdemeanours, 20 Car. 2, 1668, 6 vol. 
865.— Articles of Impeachment, ibid. 866. 
— No further Proceedings are had against 
him, ibid. 868. 



le* GENERAfL INDEX TO 

PEYTO, WiUiam. See Tde, Cardinal. 

PHILIPS, Sir Ambrose, Serjeant-at-Law. — 
His Examination before a Committee of the 
House of Lords, appointed in 1689, to 
inquire into the Murders of Lord Russel, 
Colonel Sidney, and others, 9 vol. 989. 

PHILIPS, George. See Tonge, Thomas, 



PHILLIPS, Sir Edward, King's Serjeant.— 
He opens the Indictment on the Trial of 
the Conspirators in the Powder Plot, 2 toI. 
164. 

PHFLLIPSONE, Christopher.—His Trial in 
the Court of Justiciaiy in Scotland - for 
drinking the health of James the Second, 
and wounding Ensign Loudoun, 9 Will. 3, 
1697, 14 vol. 113.— Debate on the Rele- 
vancy of the Indictment, ibid. 115. — In- 
formation and Defences for the Panel, ibid. 
116. — Interlocutor of Relevancy, ibid. 118. 
• — Evidence against him, ibid. 119.«^He is 
acquitted, ibid. 121. — Hi^Wife complains 
by Petition to the Lords of Justiciary against 
him for ill-treatment, ibid. ib. — The Ix)rds 
order him to find Security for keeping the 
Peace towards her, ibid. 123. 

PHIPPS, Constantine, Counsel, 14 vol. 781 
(note). — He was of Counsel for Ambrose 
liookwood and Charles Cranburne on their 
Trials for High Treason, in being concerned 
in the Assassination Plot, 13 vol. 146, 254. 
— He defends Captain Thomas Vaughan on 
his Trial in the Court of Admiralty for 
Treason on the High Seas, ibid. 486. — His 
Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
Richard Hathaway for a Cheat, in pretend- 
ing to be bewitched, 14 vol. 646. — His 
Speech in Defence of Dr. SachevercU upon 
the First Article of the Impeachment against 
him, 15 vol. 222. — His Speech in Defence 
of Dr. Sacheverell upon the Second Article, 
ibid. 295.— His Speech on the Third Article, 
ibid. 320.— His Speech on the Fourth Ar- 
ticle, ibid. 347. 

Sir Constantine, Lord Chancellor of 



Ireland. — He was appointed Lord Chan- 
cellor of Ireland by Queen Anne's Tory 
Ministry in 1711, 15 vol. 222 (note).— Mr. 
Currau*s Representation of the Proceedings 
against him in the Irish House of Commons, 
ibid. ib. — References to these Proceedings 
in th£ Journals of the Irish House of Com- 
n^ons, ibid. ib. 

In the Reign of 



George the First he returned to his Practice 
at the English Bar, 15 vol. 222 (note). — His 
Argument for the Earl of Wintoun in arrest 
of Judgment, on his Trial for High Treason 
in the House of Lords, ibid. 876. — He is 
reprimanded by the House for addressing 
the Lords before the point of law is stated, 
and leave given him by the House to argue 
it, ibid. 875. — His Argument in Reply on 
\he 9ame occasion, ibid. ^^Q. — He is of 



Counsel for WiUiam Hendley, ibid. 1412. — 
His Speech in the House of Lords against 
the passing of the Bill of Pains and Penalties 
against Bishop Atterbury, 16 vol. 498. — His 
Recapitulation of the Evidence against the 
Bill, ibid. 573. 

PICKERING, Thomas. See Ireland, William. 



PICTON, Thomas, Governor and Commander 
in Chief in Trinidad. — Proceedings against 
him for a Misdemeanour in inflicting the 
Torture upon Luisa Calderon, in the Island 
of Trinidad, 44-52 Geo. 3, 1804-1812, 30 
vol. 225. — Writs of Mandamus from the 
Court of King's Bench to the Governor of 
the Island for the Examination of Witnesses 
on the subject of the Prosecution, ibid. ib. 
— Return thereto, ibid. ^31. — Examinations 
and Proofe annexed to the Returns, ibid. 
233. — Abstract of the Indictment, ibid. 
227. — His Trial in the Court of King's 
Bench at Westminster, ibid. 449. — Counsel 
for the Prosecution and for the Defendant, 
ibid. ib. 450-451 .-:-Evidence for the Prose- 
cution, ibid. 456. — Mr. Dallas's Speech for 
the Defendant, ibid. 467.— Lord Ellen- 
borough suggests the propriety of a Special 
Verdict, which is agreed to, ibid. 491. — 
Evidence for the Defendant, ibid. 492. — 
Evidence to shew that the Spanish Law in 
the Island of Trinidad authorized Torture, 
ibid. 506. — Evidence to shew the contrary, 
ibid. 516. — Mr. Dallas's Speech to the Jury 
upon this Question in the Case, ibid. 521. — 
Mr. Garrow's Reply, ibid. 525. — Lord 
Ellenborough's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
536. — ^The Jury find that there was no Law 
authorizing the infliction of the Torture in 
the Island, and, under the direction of Lord 
Ellenborough, return a. general Verdict of 
Guilty, ibid. 540. — Proceedings in the 
Court of King*s Bench on a Motion for a 
New Trial, ibid. ib. — Affidavits for the 
Defendant, ibid.'ib. — A Rule to shew cause 
is granted, ibid. 555.--*Motion for leave to 
file a supplemental Affidavit for the De- 
fendant, ibid. 559. — Leave is given to file 
the Affidavit, ibid. 568.— The Rule for a 
New Trial is enlarged till the Return of a 
Mandamus to be issued to the Governor of 
Trinidad, to examine Witnesses and receive 
Proofs respecting the allowance of Torture 
by the Law then established in the Island, 
ibid. 592. — Return to the Mandamus, ibid, 
ib. — -Mr. Garrow's Argument on shewing 
cause against the Rule for a New Trial, 
ibid. 728. — Mr. Nolan's Argument on the 
same side, ibid. 733. — Mr. Harrison's Ar- 
gument on the same side, ibid. 754. — Mr. 
Dallas's Argument in support of the'Rule, 
ibid. 756. — The Court suggests the propriety 
of a New Trial for the purpose of raising 
the Questions in the Case upon a Special 
Verdict, ibid. 803.— The Rule for a New 
Trial is made . absolute, ibid. 806. — Pro- 
ceedings on the Second Trial, ibid. 805.— 
Mr: Oarrow's Speech for the ProscQutiqn^ 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



im 



ibid. ib. — Evidence for the Prosecution, 
ibid, 809.— Mr. Dallas's Speech for the 
Defendant, ibid. 818.— Evidence for the 
Defendant, ibid. 840.— Mr. Garrow's Reply, 
ibid. 8.49.— Lord EUenborough's Charge to 
the Jury, ibid. 863.— The Jury find that, 
by the law of Spain, Torture was allowed 
in the Island of Trinidad at the time of its 
cession to Great Britain, and they negative 
Malice on the part of the Defendant, ibid. 
870, — ^The Special Verdict, as recorded, 
ibid. ib. — Argument on the Special Verdict, 
ibid. 883. — Mr. Nolan's Argument of the 
Special Verdict for the Crown, ibid. 884. — 
Abstract of Mr. Stephen's Argument on the 
other side, ibid. 931.— Mr. Nolan's Reply, 
ibid. ib. — No Judgment was ever pro- 
nounced by the Court upon the Special 
Verdict, ibid. 955 (note).— Account of 
General Picton's military distinction after 
the period of this Trial, ibid. 956.— He 
twice receives the Thanks of the House of 
Commons for his services, ibid. 957. — He 
was killed at the Battle of Waterloo, ibid. ib. 

PIERCY, Sir Robert. See Constable, Sir 
Robert. 

PIERS, Dr. William, Bishop of Bath and 
Wells. See Twelve BUJiops. 

PIGGOTT, Sir Arthur, Attorney General,— 
His Speech in Reply for the Commons on 
the Impeachment of Lord Melville, 29 vol. 
1371. 

PIGOTT, Sir Francis. See Constable, Sir 
Robert, 

PIGOTT, George, Lord. See Stratton, George, 

PILKINGTON, Thomas. See Ward, Sir 
Patience.— -His Trial with Samuel Shute, 
Henry Cornish, Ford Lord Grey of Werk, 
Sir Thomas Player, Slingsby Bethel, Francis 
Jenks, John Deagle, Richard Freeman, 
Richard Goodenough, Robert Key, John 
Wickham, Samuel Swinock, and John 
Jekyll for a Riot and Assault at the Election 
of Sheriffs for the City of London, 35 Car. 
2, 1683, 9 vol. 187.— Roger North's Ac- 
count of the Contests for the Election of 
Sheriffs in London from which this Case 
arose, ibid, ib.— Account of the same Oc- 
currences from Narcissus Luttrell's MS., 
ibid, 211.— The Information, ibid. 219.— 
Tlie Defendants' Counsel Challenge the 
Array, ibid. 226.— The Court overrule the 
Challenge, and a Bill of Exceptions is 
tendered, which the Chief Justice (Sir 
Edmund Saunders) refuses to sign, ibid. 
234.— The King's Counsel open the Case, 
ibid. 235. — Evidence for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 240. — Evidence respecting the manner 
of electing Sheriffs in London, ibid. 242. — 
Mr. Williams's Speech in their Defence, 
ibid. 264. — Evidence for them, ibid. 269. — 
The Attorney General's Reply, ibid. 286.— 
The Chief Justice charged the Jury, ibid. 
?88.— Tb^ Jury iind them Guilty, ibid, m* 



— Their several Sentences, ibid. 293.— -The 
Judgment is reversed in Parliament at the 
Ilevolutiou, ibid. ib. — ^They petition the 
King that their Prosecutors and Judges 
may be excepted from the Act of Grace, 
ibid. 294. — Debate in the House of Com* 
mons upon their Petition for Indemnity 
from the Estates of their Prosecutors and 
Judges, ibid. 295. — ^The Question for bring- 
ing in a Bill for such Indemnity is nega- 
tived, ibid. 298. — Account of the Action for 
Scandalum Magnatum brought by the Duke 
of York against Pilkington, ibid. 299 (note). 

PINE, Hugh. — His Case upon a Charge of 
Treason, for speaking contemptuous Words 
of the King, 4 Car. 1, 1628, 3 vol. 359.— 
Precedents of Prosecutions for Slander of 
the King, ibid. 360. — ^The Judges declare 
his Offence not to be Treason, ibid. 368. 

PINFOLD, Sir Thomas. See GokUng, John. 

PITCAIRN, Alexander. — Proceedings in 
Scotland against him for High Treason in 
impugning the Title of King William to the 
Throne by scandalous 'Expressions used in 
a Sermon, 9 Will. 3, 1697, 13 vol. 1449. 

PITT, The Hon. William.— His early Opinions 
respecting a Reform in Parliament, 22 vol. 
492 (note), ibid. 494 (note). — His Evidence 
on the Trial of Home Tooke, 25 vol. 381. 

PIUS THE FIFTH.— His Bull excommuni- 
cating Queen Elizabeth, and absolving her- 
Subjects from their Allegiance to her, 1 vol. 
1076. 

PLAYER, Sir Thomas. See Pilkington, 
Thomas, 

PLESSINGTON, William.— He was a Semi- 
nary Priest, executed at Chester at the time 
of the Popish Plot, 7 vol. 702.— His Dying 
Speech, ibid. ib. 

PLUMER, Thomas, Counsel, 28 vol. 81, 
356. — His Speech in Defence of John 
Reeves on his Trial for a Libel on the 
English Constitution, 26 vol. 555. — His 
Speech in Defence of 0*Coigly on his Trial 
for High Treason, ibid. 1375.— He is lead- 
ing Counsel for Lord Melville on the Trial 
of his Impeachment in the House of Lords, 
29 vol. 606. — His Speech in Defence of 
Lord Melville, ibid. 1196. 

Sir Thomas, Solicitor General.— 

His Argument for the Crown in the House 
of Lords on the Writ of Error in the Case 
of Hart and White, for a Libel in the Inde- 
pendent Whig, 30 vol. 1337. 

PLUMMER, Mr.— His Speech as one of the 
Managers for the Commons on the Trial of 
the Impeachment of Lord Chancellor Mac- 
cles^ld, 16 vol. 1002. 

PLUMTRE, Henry. See SacheoereU, William, 

PLUNKETT John. See Atterhwry, Francis,, 
BiSihop, 



106 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



PLUNKET, Dr. Oliver, Titular Primate of 
Ireland.— His Trial at the Bar of the Court 
of King's Bench for High Treason, 33 Car. 
2, 1681, 8 vol. 447. — He applies for time 
to bring his Witnesses from Ireland, which 
is denied him, ibid. 448. — Substance of the 
Indictment, ibid. 451.— The King's Counsel 
open the Case, ibid. 452. — Evidence against 
him, ibid. 454.-- The Solicitor General and 
Serjeant Jefieries sum up the Evidence for 
the Crown, ibid. 484. — ^A Witness examined 
for him, ibid. 488.— Chief Justice Pember- 
ton's Charge to the Jury, ibid. ib. — ^The 
Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 489.— His Speech 
on being brought up for Judgment, ibid. ib. 
— ^The Chief Justice passes Sentence of 
Death upon him, ibid. 493. — His Speech 
at the place of Execution, ibid. 495.— Bur- 
net's Accdunt of this Trial, ibid. 447 (note). 
— Mr. Fox's Remark upon this Case, ibid. 
500 (note). 

PLUNKETT, William Conyngham, Counsel, 

28 vol, 1. — ^His Speech in Defence of Henry 
Sheares. on his Trial for Treason, 27 vol. 
340. — His Reply for the Prosecution on the 
Trial of Robert Emmett, 28 vol. 1158.— 
His exercise of the right to reply in that 
Case occasioned Animadversions, ibid. ib. 
(note).-«Proceedings in an Action brought 
by him against Cobbett for a Libel, 29 
vol. 1. 

Attorney 

General for Ireland. — His Speech for the 
Prosecution on the Trial of Mac Donough 
and Kearney, being the first Case under the 
Special Commission for the Trial of the 
llireshers, 30 vol. 5. 

POCKLINGTON, Dr. John.— Proceedings 
against him for Innovations upon the Church 
of England, 17 Car. 1, 1641, 5 vol. 747.— 
Petition of one of his Parishioners to the 
House of Lords against him, ibid. ib. — 
Articles of Charge against him, ibid. 749, — 
Sentence of the House of Lords upon him, 
ibid. 765. — Articles against him found 
amongst the Records of the University of 
Cambridge, ibid. 766. 

POLE, Cardinal. — He is attainted in absence 
with Michael Tbrogmorton, John Hilliard, 
Thomas Gold well, and William Peyto, for 
subjecting themselves to the Pope, 29 Hen. 
8, 1538, 1 vol. 481. 

POLE, Sir Geoffrey. — He is indicted with 
Sir Edward Ne?ill, George Crofts, and John 
Collins, for denying the King's Supremacy, 

29 Hen. 8, 1538, 1 vol. 480.— They all plead 
Guilty, excepting Sir Edward Ne^fill, ibid. 
481. — Sir Geoffrey Pole is the only one hot 
executed, his life being spared on account 
of his having discovered the Matter, ibid. ib. 

POLE, Michael De la. See Sufolk, Earl of. 

POLE, William De la. See Suffolk, Duke of 

POLLEXFEN, Henry, Counsel, 7 vol. 1242, 



8 vol. 561. 10 vol. Iir6.*-His Speedi in 
Defence or Tasborough on his Trial for 
Subornation of Peijury, T vol. 889. — His 
Argument in support of the Plea in Abate- 
ment in Fittharris's Case, 8 vol. 307. — I£is 
Argument for the Corporation in the Case of 
the Quo Warranto against the City of London, 
ibid. I213.--His Speech in Defence of Sir 
Patience Ward, on his Trial for Perjury, 9 
vol. 337. — His Argument in support of 
Lord RusseVs Challenge of a Juror for not 
having a forty-shilling Freehold, ibid. 586. 
— His Defence of William Sacheverell and 
otliers for a Riot at Nottingham, 10 vol. 65. 
— His Argument in support of Rosev^ell's 
Motion in Arrest of Judgment, ibid. 277. — 
His Argument for Mr. SSmdys in the Great 
Case of Monopolies, ibid. 414.-- HisSpeech 
for the Prosecution on the Trial of Lady 
Alice Lisle, 11 vol. 316.— His Speech for 
the Defendants on the Trial of the Seven 
Bishops, 12 vol. 370.— Anecdote from the 
Diary of Henry, Lord Clarendon, respecting 
his language ontheLandingof King William, 
and the Flight of James the Second, 13 vol. 
204 (note). — His Speech for the Defendants 
in the Case of the Seven Bishops, ibid. 370. 
— Burnet says, that he was an honest and 
learned, but a perplexed Lawyer, ll vol. 
776 (note). 

Sir Henry, Chief Justice of 



C. P. 2 Will, and Mary.— His Charge to 
the Jury on the Trial of Lord Preston, 12 
vol. 810. 

POOR, Edmund. See Cavenagh, Michad. 

POPE, Alexander.— He is examined as a 
Witness for Bishop Atterbury on the Pro- 
ceedings against him in the House of L<ords, 
16 vol. 572 (note). 

POPHAM, John, Attorney General, 24 Eliz. 
1581, 1 vol. 1051, 1131, 1320.— His Speech 
in the Star Chamber declaring the Earl of 
Northumberiand's Treasons, 1 vol. 1115.— 
His Speech in the Star Chamber on the 
Prosecution of William Davison for de- 
livering the Warrant for the Execution of 
Mary, Queen of Scots, ibid. 1229. 



Sir John, Chief Justice of K. B., 

34 Eliz. 1 vol. 1333, 1409, 2 vol. 159.— He 
was made Chief Justice on the 28th of May, 
1 592, 1 vol. 1 327.— His Evidence on the Trial 
of Sir Christopher Blunt and others for High 
Treason, containing an Account of his Mis- 
sion to the Earl of Essex by the command of 
Queen Elizabeth, ibid. 1426.— His Address 
to Sir Walter Raleigh on passing Sentence 
of Death upon him, 2 vol. 30.— He is one 
of the Commissioners for the Trial of Garnet 
for High Treason in being concerned in the 
Powder Plot, ibid. 217.— His Opinion in 
the Case of the Postnati, ibid. 568. 

PORDAGE, Dr. John.— Proceedings of the 
Commissioners appointed by Cromveell for 
ejecting scandalous and insufficient Ministers 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



107 



against him, 6 Car. 2, 1654, 5 toI. 539. — 
The first Articles of Charge against him for 
maintaining certain heterodox Opinions in 
Religion, ibid. 542. — His Answer to them, 
ibid. 545. — ^The second Articles for speak- 
ing against Matrimony, and dealing with 
Conjurers, ibid. 549. — His Answer thereto, 
ibid. 551. — ^The third Articles for holding 
unsound Doctrines in Religion, for Incon- 
tinence, and conversing with Spirits, ibid. 
555. — His Answer thereto, ibid. 562. — 
Depositions of the Witnesses against him, 
ibid. 579. — He is ejected from his Church, 
ibid. 629. — He is restored to his Living 
at the Restoration, ibid. 632. 

PORT, Sir John, Judge of K. B. 26 Hen. 8, 1 
vol. 398. 

PORTEMAN, Sir William, Judge of K. B. 1 
Mary, 1 vol. 869. 

PORTEOUS, Captain John. See Madauchlan, 
William, — Proceedings on his Trial at Edin- 
burgh for Murder, 10 Geo. 2, 1736, 17 vol. 
923.— The Indictment, ibid. ib. — Advocates 
for the Crown and for the Panel, ibid. 928. — 
Information for the King's Advocate, ibid, 
ib. — Information for the Panel, ibid. 939. 
— ^The Court find the Indictment relevant, 
ibid. 963. — Evidence for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 965. — Evidence for the Panel, ibid. 
978.— The Assize find him Guilty, and 
Sentence of Death is passed upon him, 
ibid. 985. — His Petition to Queen Caroline, 
ibid. 986.— He is reprieved, ibid. 989. — ^The 
Mob break open the Prison and hang him, 
ibid. 991. — Extracts from the Gentleman's 
Magazine relating to this Transaction, ibid. 
992. 

PORTER, Sir Charles. See Caningibtf^ Tliomat^ 
Lord, 

PORTER, Captain George.— His Evidence 
against Chamock, King, and Keyes, 12 vol. 
1396.— His Evidence againstSirJohnFreind, 
13 vol. 16. — Against Sir William Parkyns, 
ibid. 85. — Against Ambrose Rookwood, 
ibid. 182. — Against Charles Cranburne,ibid. 
243. — ^Against Peter Cook, ibid. 351. — 
Against Sir John Fenwick, ibid. 580. — He 
has a Pension granted to him in conse- 
quence of his Discoveries relating to the 
Assassination Plot, ibid. 784 (note). — Ac- 
count of his Trial for the Murder of Sir 
James Hacket, ibid. 782 (note). 

PORTERFIELD, John,of DuchalL— HisTrial 
at Edinburgh for Treason in harbouring 
Triutors, and concealing a proposal made to 
him to advance Money to the Earl of 
Argyle, a declared Traitor, 36 Car. 2, 1684, 
10 vol. 1045. — He is found Guilty upon his 
own Confession, ibid. 1062. — Sentence 
against him, ibid. ib. — The time and place of 
his Execution left to the King^ ibia. ib.— « 
Fountainhairs Report of this Case, ibid, 1064. 
— The Scotch Parliament ratify the Sentence 
of the Court of Justiciary, ibid. 1066. 



PORTLAND, William, Bad of. See Somen, 
John, Lord, 

POTTER, Vincent, 5 vol. 1005, 1214. See 
Regiddei, 

POWELL, Sir John, Judge of K. B. 3 Jac. 2. 
—He is brought to the Bar of the House of 
Lords, to answer for his Judgment in the 
Earl of Devonshire's Case, 11 vol. 1368. — 
He was one of the Judges of the Court of 
King's Bench at the Trial of the Seven 
Bishops, 12 vol. I89.r.-He gives hisX)pinioa 
in that Case, against the lUng's Dispensing 
Power, ibid. 426. — He is said by Lord 
Camden, to have been the only honest man 
of the four Judges of the Court at that 
time, 1 9 vol. 990.-^Dean Swift's Notice of him 
in his << Journal to Stella,'^ 15 vol. 707 (note). 

Judge of C. P. 8 Will. 3, 



18 voLl39, 451. 



■ Judge of K. B. 1 Ann. 

14 vol. 1189. — ^His Address on passing Sen- 
tence of Death upon Haagen Swendsen, 
and Sarah Baynton, for forcibly taking away 
Pleasant Rawlins, an Heiress, 14 vol. 631.— 
He delivers his Opinion against the Discharge 
of the Aylesbury Men, ibid. 854.^ — ^His 
Charge to the Jury on the Trial of Robert 
Feilding for Bigamy, ibid. 1362. 

POWIS, Sir Littleton, Baron of the Exche- 
quer, 8 Will. 3. 13 vol. 451, 14 vol. 559.— 
His Letter to Lord Chancellor Macclesfield, 
containing an Account of the Trial of Wm; 
Hendley for unlawfully collecting Money for 
Charities, 15 vol. 1414. 

JudgeofK. B. 4Geo.l, 



15 vol. 162, 16 vol. 34. — His Opinion in 
favour of the King's Prerogative respecting 
the Education and Marriage of the Royal 
Family, 15 vol. 1220. 

POWIS, Sir Thomas, Solicitor General, 2 
Jac. 2. — ^His Argument for Sir Edward 
Hales in favour of the King's Dispensing 
Power, 11 vol.1192. 

■ ' ■ Attorney General, 4 

Jac. 2. 12 vol. 125. — His Speech for the 
Prosecution on the Trial of the Seven Bishops, 
12 vol. 280.— His Reply in the same Case, 
ibid. 397. 

- Counsel, — He is of 



Counsel for the Defendant on the Trial of an 
Action brought by the Duke of Norfolk 
against John Germaine, for Criminal Cou"* 
versation with the Duchess, 12 vol. 930. 
— His SpeechJn the House of Commons 
on behalt of Sir John Fenwick, against the 
Bill of Attainder in his Case, 13 vol. 631. 
— His Argument on the Trial of the Earl 
of Warvnck for Murder, in favour of the 
Competency of a Witness convicted of a 
clergyable Felony, who has received his 
Clergy, but has not been burned in the Hand, 
or pardoned, ibid. 1007,— His Speech in 
Defence of Charles Duocombe on nis Trial 



109 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



for fraudulently indorsing Exchequer Bills, 
ibid. 1076. -His Speech for the Duchess 
of Norfolk in the House of Lords, against 
the passing of the J)uke's Divorce Bill, ibid. 
1345. — His Argument in the House of Lords 
in the .Case of Dr. Thomas Watson, Bishop 
of St. Darid^s, against the power of an 
Archbishop to deprive a Bishop, 14 vol. 455. 
-—His Speech in the House of Commons in 
the Debate on the Great Case of Ashby 
and White, ibid. 712. 

Queen's Serjeant, 3 



Ann. — His Argument for the Crown on the 
Trial of David Lindsay for Treason, 14 vol. 
1015. — He is of counsel for the Crown on 
the Trial of Tutchin for a Libel, ibid. 1104. 
— His Argument in favour of the amend- 
ment of the Jury Process in Tutchin*8 Case, 
ibid. 1135. 

POWIS, William, Earl of. See Stafford, Wil- 
liam. Viscount. 

POWLE, Henry. — His Speech in the House 
of Commons on a Motion for the Im- 
peachment of the Earl of Danby, 11 vol. 
724. — His Speech, as one of the Managers 
for the Commons, on summing up the Evi- 
dence against Lord Stafford, 7 vol. 1516. 

POWRIE, William. See Damh/, Henry, 
Lord, — His Depositions respecting the 
Murder of Lord Darnley, 1 vol. 915. 

POYNTZ, John. See Motris, John. 

PRAED, William Mackworth, Serjeant at Law. 
— His Evidence in the House of Lords on 
the Trial of the Impeachment of Lord Mel- 
ville, 29 vol. 797. 

PRAT, Waller. See Hendley, WUliam. 

PRATT, Charles, Counsel. — His Speech on 
summing up the Evidence for the Defence 
on the Trial of William Owen for a Libel, 
18 vol. 1227.— He is one of the Counsel for 
the Prosecution on the Trial of Timothy 
Murphy for Forgery, 19 vol. 707. 



■ Attorney General, 33 Geo. 

2. — His Speech for the Prosecution on the 
Trial of Earl Ferrers for Murder, 19 vol. 895. 
— His Speech for the Prosecution on the 
Trial of Dr. Hensey for High Treason, ibid. 
1350. — He is said to have instituted but one 
Prosecution for Libel while he was Attorney 
General, and to have stated to the Jury on 
that occasion, that he did not wish for a Con- 
viction,if any man whatsoever doubted of the 
Guilt of the Defendant, 20 vol. 709. 

Sir Charles, Chief Justice of C. P. 



3 Geo. 3. — He delivers the Judgment of the 
Court of Common Pleas on discharging Mr. 
Wilkes, 19 vol. 987, 990.— His Charge to the 
Jury in the Case of Wilkes v. Wood, ibid. 
1166. 

Charles, Lord Camden, Chief Jus- 



tice of C. P, — His Argumetit on deliverijog 



the Judgment of the Court of Common 
Pleas for the Defendant, - in the Case of 
Entick V. Carrington, 19 vol. 1044. — His 
Questions to Lord Mansfield respecting the 
Doctrine laid down by him, on the extent 
of the power of a Jury on Trials for Libel^ 
20 vol. 921. 

PRATT, Sir John, Judge of K. B. 3 Geo. 1, 
15 vol. 923. — ^His Argument on delivering 
his Opinion in favour of the King's Prero- 
gative respecting the Education and Marriage 
of the Royal Family, 15 vol. 1216. 

Chief Justice of K. B. 8 



Geo. 1 . — His Charge to the Jury on the Trial 
of Reason and Tranter for Murder, 16 vol. 
45.— His Charge to the Jury on the Trial 
of Christopher Layer for High Treason, ibid. 
290. 

PRAUNCE, Miles.— His Evidence on the 
Trial of Green and others for the Murder of 
Sir Edmondbury Godfrey, 7 vol. 169. — 
Account of the Proceedings against him 
for Perjury in his Evidence on that occasion, 
ibid. 228 (note). — ^His Examinations before 
the Privy Council respecting the Popish Plot, 
7 vol. 1225, 1231. See Thompson, Nathaniel. 

PRESSICKS, Mary. See Thwing, Tlumas. 

PRESTON, Lord. See Grahme, ^ Richard, 

PRICE, Anne. See Tasborough, John. 

PRICE, John. — Proceedings against him and 
several other Protestants in Ireland, for High 
Treason, 1 Will, and Mary, 1689, 12 vol. 
613.-— Chief Justice Heating's Charge to the 
Grand Jury, ibid. 616.— The Indictment, 
ibid. 621. — ^The Trial is postponed for want 
of qualified Jurors, ibid. 627. 

PRICE, Robert, Counsel.— His Letter to the 
Duke of Beaufort, containing an Account 
of the Trial of the Seven Bishops, 12 vol. 
200 (note). — His Argument for the Prisoner 
on several points of Law, on the Trial of 
Loi*d Molmn, in the House of Lords for 
Murder, ibid. 1020, 1025, 1028, 1033, 
1037. 

■ Baron of the Exchequer, 4 

Geo. 1. — His Opinion against tlie King's 
Prerogative respecting the Education and 
Marriage of the Royal Family, 15 vol. 
1224. 

PRIDEAUX, Edmund, Attorney General for 
the Commonwealth, 5 vol. 521, 773. — His 
Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
Chriatopher Love for Treason, 5 vol. 73. — 
His Reply to Love's Defence, ibid. '^66, 
181. — His Argument against the Discharge 
of Captain Streater, upon a Commitment by 
Order of the Parliament, ibid. 391 . — He is 
charged by John Lilburne with being an 
impeached Traitor, ibid. 430. 

PRIEST, William.— Proceedings in the Star 
Chamber against him and Richard Wright 
for sending and carrying a ChaUenge,| la 



THE STATE TRIALS; 



109 



Jtc. 1, 1615, 2 vol. 1033. — ^Decr^e of the 
Court against them, ibid. 1042. * 

PBITCHARD, Sir William. —Trial of an 
Action on the Case for a malicious Arrest 
brought by him against Thomas Papillon, 
Esq. at uuildhall in London, 36 Car. 2, 
1684, 10 vol. 319.— The Declaration, ibid. 
322 (note). — Speech of the Attorney General 
for the Plaintiff, ibid. 323. — Evidence for 
the Plaintiff, ibid. 324. — Serjeant Maynard*s 
Speech for the Defendant, ibid. 330.— 
Speeches of Mr. Williams and Mr. Ward 
for the Defendant, ibid. 332, 334. — Evi- 
dence for the Defence, ibid. 338. — Reply 
of the Plaintiff's Counsel, ibid. 350. — Evi- 
dence in reply, ibid. 353. — Chief Justice 
Jefferies's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 358. — 
The Jury find for the Plaintiff, with Damages 
10,000/. ibid. 372.— Account of this Trial 
from Narcissus Luttrell's MSS. ibid. 319 
(note). 

PROBYN, Edmund, Serjeant at Law.— His 
Speech in the House of Lords on opening 
the General Defence of Lord Chancellor 
Macclesfield, 16 vol. 1080. 

Judge of K. B. 3 Geo. 2, 



17 vol. 568. 

PRYNN, William.— Proceedings in the Court 
of Star Chamber against him for publishing 
a Book entitled " Histrio-mastix,'* and against 
Michael Sparkes for printing, and William 

. Buckner for licensing the same, 9 Car. 1, 
1632, 3 vol. 562. — ^The Information, ibid. ib. 
— ^His Answer thereto, opened by Mr. Atkins, 
ibid. 564. — S|teech of the Attorney General 
(Noy) for the Prosecution, ibid. 566. — Mr. 
Atkins's Speech in Defence of Prynn, ibid. 
570. — Mr. Holborne^s Speech in his Defence, 
ibid. 572. — Mr. Heme's Speech in his De- 
fence, ibid. 573. — Speeches of the Members 
of the Court, on delivering their Opinions 
respecting the Sentence to be pronounced 
upon him, ibid. 574.— ^Proceedings in the 
Star Chamber against him, Dr. John Bast- 
wick, and Mr. Henry Burton, for several 
Libels, 13 Car. 1, 1637, ibid. 712.— They 
prepare their Answers to the Information, 
but their Counsel refuse to sign them, ibid. ib. 
— ^They petition to be allowed to' sign them 
themselves, but are refused by the Court, ibid . 
713. — Prynn's Reasons for being allowed to 
sign his Answer, ibid. ib. — ^They put in a 
Cross Bill against the Bishops, which the 
Lord Keeper refuses to admit, ibid. 714. — 
Mr. Holt, Prynn's Counsel, draws his Answer 
but refuses to sign it, ibid. 716. — Mr. Tom- 
linshisSecondCounsel signs it, but the Officer 
of the Court refuses to take it, ibid. 717.— 
The Information is taken by the Court pro 
confesso, and they are brought up to receive 
their Sentences, ibid, 716, 717. — Prynn's 
Speech, ibid. 719. — Bastwick's Speech, ibid. 
721. — Burton's Speech, 724. — ^Archbishop 
Laud's Speech on delivering his Opinion as 

; iQ am S«nteQ9e| ibi4i T%5,-r'The Seuteoce, 



ibid. 766.— Bastwick's Letter to Archbishop 
Laud, praying for Mone^ to assist him in 
preparing his Defence, ibid.' 725 (note).— « 
Their Conduct at the Pillory, ibid. 745. — 
They are imprisoned until the year 1641, 
ibid. 755. — ^Their Petitions to the Long 
Parliament, ibid. ib. — Resolutions of the 
House of Commons, condemning the Pro- 
ceedings against them, ibid. 764.— rExtracts 
from Clarendon and Kennet respecting them, 
ibid. 766. — Clarendon's Account of their 
triumphant Entry into London after their 
liberation, ibid. 769. — Prynn conducts the 
Prosecution of Colonel Fiennes, 4 vol. 185. 
■ — He is employed by the Commons, with 
otliers, to manage the Evjdence against Arch' 
bishop Laud, ibid. 348. — ^His Argument in 
Macguire's Case, to prove that a Baron of 
Ireland may be tried by a Jury in England 
for Treasons committed in Ireland, ibid. 689. 
— He is ordered by the House of Commons 
to assist in preparing the Charge against 
Judge Jenkins, ibid. 923. 

PUCKERING, Sir John, Queen's Serjeant, 1 
vol. 1233.— He opens the Charge against 
Abington and others on their Trial for High 
Treason, 1 vol. 1143. — Reasons urged to 
Queen Elizabeth by him, as Speaker of the 
Lower House of Parliament, for- the expe- 
diency of executing Mary Queen of Scots, 
ibid. 1195. 

PULESTONE, John, Judge of C. P. during 
the Commonwealth, 4 vol. 1249, 1269. 

PURCHASE, George.— His Trial at the Old 
Bailey for High Treason its. levying War 
against the Queen, under pretence of pulling 
down Meeting-houses, 9. Anne, 1710, 15 
vol. 651.— The. Indictment, ibid. 545. — He 
pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 546.— Speech of the 
Attorney General (Sir James Montagu),* for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 654. — Evidence against 
him, ibid.- 655. — Mr. Darnell's Defence of 
him, ibid. 664. — Evidence in support of the 
Defence, ibid. 668. — ^Mr. Darnell sums up 
the Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 678. — 
Reply of the Counsel for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 680. — Chief Justice Parker charges 
the Jury, ibid. 684. — ^The Jury find a Special 
Verdict, ibid. 690. — ^The Special Verdict, 
ibid.691.— Chief Justice Parker delivers the 
Opinion of the Judges, that the facts found 
by the Special Verdict amount to Treason, 
ibid. 699. — He is afterwards pardoned, 
ibid. 702. 

PYM, John. See EmhdUany EAoard, Lord. — 
. His Speech at a Conference between the 
Lords andCommons, on delivering the Charge 
of the Commons against Dr. Manwaring, for 
preaching Sermons containing Doctrines 
subversive of public Liberty, 3 vol. 340.— 
He conducts the Charge for the Commons 
on the Trial of the Earl of Strafford, ibid« 
I417.--His Speech in the House of Lords on 
delivering the Articles of Impeachment 
against Sir George B^tcUff| 4 toK 49,-^His 



110 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



Sp«teh in tha House of hords on delirering 
tb« Aiticloi of Impeajchment aeaiast Arch- 
bifhop Laud, ibid, a20,-^Hi8 body, which 
was buried in Westminster Abbey in 1643, 
was removed at the Restoration, 5 vol. 1337 
(QDte)« 

QU£ENSB£RRY,Jamc8,Dukeof.See£aa/ie, 



QUELCH, Captain John.— His Trial with 
several others at the Court of Admiralty in 
New England for Piracy, Robbery, and 
Murder, 3 Anne, 1704, 14 vol. 1067.— Arti- 
cles against them, ibid. 1068.~Several of 
the prisoners plead Guilty, and are received 
as Witnesses for the Queen, ibid. 1071. — 
Quelch pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 1072. — 
Speeches of the Counsel for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 1073. — Evidence against Quelch, ibid. 
1076.-*^His Counsel make several legal Ob- 
jections to the Case for the Prosecution, 
which are overruled, ibid. 1084. — ^The Court 
adjudge him Guilty, and pass Sentence upon 
him, ibid. 1088.^Ue is executed, ibid. 1095. 
•-^Trials of the others, ibid. lOSB.-^Accoant 
of. their Execution, ibid. 1095. 

RABY, John, Counsel,— »His Speech on sum- 
ming up the Evidence for the Prosecution 
on tiie Trial of Woodbume and Coke for 
disfiguring Edward Crispe, 16 vol. 66. 



m,, I ■ . ■ , Serjeant at Law.— His Charge to 
the Jury on the Trial of William Hales for 
Forgery, 17 vol. 393. 

RADLEY, Richard. — Proceedings against him 
for speaking Scandalous Words of Chief 
Justice Scroggs, 8 vol. 701.— He is con- 
victed and fined 200/. ibid. 706. 

RAINE, Jonathan, Counsel.— His Speech in 
Defence of Joseph Hanson, on his Trial for a 
Misdemeanour in encouraging the Weavers 
of Manchester in a Conspiracy to raise their 
Wages, ai voL 27. 

RALEIGH, Sir Walter.—He interests himself 

on behalf of Udall, a Puritan Minister, tried 

and convicted of Felony, in writing a Libel 

upon Queen Elizabeth, 1 vol. 1308.— He 

attends in the House of Lords as Captain of 

the Guard on the Trial of the Earls of Essex 

and Southampton, ibid. 1335.— He attends 

voluntarily at the Execution of the Eaii of 

Essex, ibid. 1360. — His own Account of his 

disposition towards the Earl of Essex, 2 vol. 

44.— His Trial for High Treason, 1 James 1, 

3 vol. l.-^ub&taDce of the Indictment, ibid. 

ib.-^e pleads Not GuUly, ibid. 4.--'Sir 

Edward Coke (Attorney General) opens the 

Case against him, ibid. 5.-^Scurnk)us Laii- 

gotge used by Coke towards him, ibid. 7,9,10, 

^ d6.-^Coke is rebuked by the Court for 

hia impatience, ibid. 26.— Cobham's Exaini- 

nations read against him, ibid, to, 12. — 

RtWigb prodoees a Letter from Cobharo k- 

voki&ghiftAciusAtioBy iMd» S&^-^He i» foiwd 



Ooil^, ibid. 29.— Cikief Justioe Popinla's 
Address to him on passing Juagncnt 
against him, ibid. 30. — ^After 14 yeai^ Im« 
prisonment, he is allowed to command an 
expedition to Guiana, ibid. 31. — On return- 
ing unsuccessful. Proceedings are taken 
in the Court of King's Bench for Execution 
on the Judgment against him, ibid. 33.— 
He contends that the King's Commission 
to command the Guiana Expedition was 
an implied Pardon, ibid. 34.— JExecution is 
awarded, ibid. 35.— Warrant for his Exe- 
cution, ibid. ib. — His Letter to the King 
in defence of his conduct in Guiana, ibid. 
37. — ^His Letter to the King written the 
night before his Execution, ibid. 38.— His 
Letter to his Wife written at the same time, 
ibid. 39.— His Execution, ibid. 40.— Bishop 
Kennett's Remarks on Sir Walter Raleigh's 
Conspiracy, ibid. 45. — Two Letters of Sir 
Dudley Carleton respecting the same, ibid. 
ib. — ^Account of the Guiana Expedition, with 
a character of Sir Walter Raleigh, from 
Howeirs Familiar Letters, ibid. 55.-^ir 
John Hawles expresses an Opinicm, that if 
Sir Walter Raleigh was guiltv of the Matter 
laid to his Charge, it was High Treason, ibid. 
63 (note). 

RAMSEY, David. See Rea, JJmtld, Lord. 
Uchiltrie, James, Lord, 

RATCLIFF, Sir George.— Proceedings in the 
House of Lords in Ireland against him, Sir 
Richard Bolton, Lord Chancellor of Jreland, 
Dr. John Bramhall, Bishop of Deriy, and 
Sir Gerard Lowther, Chief Justice of the 
Common Pleas, for High Treason, 16 Car. 1, 
1641,4 vol. 51.-<Oa]>taii^ Mervin*8 Speech 
to the Lords on bringing up the Impeach- 
ment against them, ibid. ib. — ^Articles of 
Impeachment against them, ibid. 57.— The 
Parliament afterwards order Reparation to 
several persons out of Ratcliff's EsUte, ibid. 
68. — ^Proceedings in Parliament against him 
for being concerned in the Treasons of the 
Earl of Strafford, 16 Car. 1, 1640, ibid. 47. 
^^Articles of Impeachment against him, ibid. 
48.— Mr. Pym's Speech in the House of 
Lords <m delivering the Articles against him, 
ibid. 49.- -He is committed by the House of 
Lords to the Gate-House, ibid. 50. 

RATCLIFFE, Charles,— Foster's Report of 
the Proceedings in the Court of King's 
Bench, respecting the Award of Execution 
against him upon an Attainder for High 
Treason, in being concerned in the Rebellion 
of 1715, 20 Geo. 2, 1746, 18 vol. 429.-On 
being brought into Court by Habeas Corpus, 
he pleads that he is not the person namea in 
the Record of Attainder, upon which Issue 
is joined, ibid. 430.— Account of the Evi- 
dence against him upon this Issue, ibid. 433 
(note).— The Jury find that be is the same 
person, ibid. 434.— He is executed, ibid. 
437. 

SAVAILLAC^AcGoaiiC ef thf bwtodas 



THE STATE TEIALa 



111 



circiunstaiices of his Torture and BxecutioD, 
6 ?ol. 1223 (note). 

> RAWLINS, Pleasant, 14 vol. 597. See&^ 
(OR, Sarub. Swendserif Haagen, 

RAYMOND, R6bert, Counsel, 14 vol. 642> 
1329. — He is assigned of Counsel for David 
Lindsay on his Trial for High Treason, 14 
▼ol. 989.— -His Argument for the Prisoner 
CD that Trial, ibid. 1007. 

I Sir Robert, Attorney General, 
9Geo. 1. — His Speech for the Prosecution 
on ihe Trial of Christopher Layer for High 
Treason, 16 vol. 151. 

■ ■ Chief Justice of 

K. B. 12 Geo. 1, 17 vol. 159.-'He delivers 
the Judgnoent of the Court upon the Special 
Verdict in Msyor Qneby's Case, 17 voU 41. 
— Hi« Qiarge to the Jury on the Trial of an 
Appeal of Murder, brought by Mary Castell 
against. Thomas Bambridge and Richard 
CorbeU, ibid 452.*- His Charge to the Jury 
on the Trial of Richard FrancKlin for a Libel 
published in The Crafuman, ibid. 671. 

RAYMOND, Thomas, Serjeant at Law, 7 vol. 
1242. 

Sir Thomas, Judge of K. B. 34 

Car. 2, 7 vol. 1048, 1082, 8 vol. 564, 1273 
(note), 9 vol. 127, 11 vol. 858. 

RAYNESFORD, Sir Richard, Baron of the 
Exchequer, 18 Car. 2, 6 vol. 769, 879. 

I I > i ■ Chief Justice 

of K.B.29 Car. 2. — ^He delivers his Opinion 
against the Discharge of the Earl of Shaftes- 
bury, 6 vol. 1296. 

REAy Donald, Lord . See UehUirie, Jcma^ Lord. 
—Proceedings in the Court of Chivalry on 
an Appeal of High Treason by him against 
David Ramsey, 7 Car. 1, 1631, 3 vol. 483. 
— Mr. Hargrave's Introductory Note, ibid. 
ib.<— Sanderson^s Account, ibid. 485. — Oc- 
casion of thfe Quarrel, ibid. ib. — Form of 
die Proceeding, ibid. ib. — Precedents of 
Trial by Battle on an Appeal of Treason, 
referred to by Dr. Duck, the King's Advo- 
cate, ibid. 487. — ^The Appellant delivers in 
his Charge in Writing, ibid, ib.-- -Ramsey's 
Answer thereto, ibid. 489. — Rushworth's 
Account, ibid. 494. — ^Letters Patent creating 
L<»d Lindsey Constable of England, ibid. 
496« — ^Lord Rea's Petition to the King, ibid. 
497, — ^Hts Appeal, ibid. 498.'-Ram8ey's 
Defence, ibid. 502«-*-Form of the Adjudica- 
tion of Battle, ibid. 507. — Dimensions of the 
Weapoiis to be used, ibid. 51 1. — ^Tlie King 
revolves tiie Letters Patent to the Lord 
Constable, and ends the Proceeding, ibid. 
5«.— The King's Letter to the Marquis of 
Hamilton respecting this Proceeding, ibid. ib. 

READ, --^. — Account of bis Case before Lord 
Holt fiir publisfaiag an obseene Libel; 17 vol. 
167 (note). 



READING, Nathaniel.— His Trial for a Mis- 
demeanour in bribing a Witness to give 
false Evidence against Persons accused of 

^ being concerned in the Popish Plot, 31 Car. 
2, 1679, 7 vol. 259.— The Indictment, ibid. 
262.— He pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 264.— 
Speeches of the King's Counsel for the Pro- 
secution, ibid. 267.— Evidence for the Pro- 
secution, ibid. 270. — His Speech in his 
Defence, ibid. 286.— Evidence in 8)tpport of 
the Defence, ibid.289.— Chief Justice North's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. SO/.-^He is found 
Guilty, ibid. 309.— His Sentence, ibid, 310. 
—-His Evidence in the House of Lords 
respecting a Breach of Privilege by |he 
Arrest of Counsel in the Court of Chancery 
by the Serjeant-at-Arms of the House of 
Commons, 6 vol. 1155. 

REASON, Hugh.--.His Trial vi^ith Robert 
Tranter at the Bar of the Court of King's 
Bench for the Murder of Edward Lutterell, 
Esq. 8 Geo. t, 1722,16 vol, I, -.The Indict- 
ment, ibid, ib,— They plead Not Guilty, 
ibid. 5.— Speech of Mr. Serjeant Cheshire 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 7.«— Evidence for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 18, — Evidence of the 
Dying Declarations of Mr. Lntterell, ibid. 
24.— Defenoeof the Prisoners, ibid. 38.-*^Evi- 
dence for the Prisoners, ibid. 39.— Reply of 
the Counsel for the Prosecution, ibid. 42* — 
Chief Justice Prati's Charge to the Juiy, ibid. 
45. — Underthe direction of the Chief Justice, 
the Jury find them guilty of Manslaughter, ' 
ibid. 54. — ^The Sentence of Burning in the 
Hand is executed upon them behind the Bar 
of the Court, ibid, ib.— Sir John Strange's 
Report of this Case, ibid. 1 (note).-*Foster's 
Remarks upon Strange's Report, ibid. 9 
(note). 

REDDING, Joseph. See AngKik^f, Jame^ 

REDHEAD, Henry, otherwise called Henry 
Yorke. — His Trial at York for a Seditious, 
Conspiracy, 35 Geo. 3, 1795, 25 vol. 1003^ 
—He objects to the Crown's Right of chal* 
lenging without Cause, ibid« ib.^ -Counsel 
for the Prosecution and for the Defendant, 
ibid. 1004.— The Indictment, ibid. ib. — Mr. 
Law's Speech for the Prosecution, ibid, 1012. 
—Mr, Justice Rooke informs the Defendant 
that he must elect whether he or his Counsel 
will address the Jury, ibid. 1021.— He is not 
permitted by the Court to examine the same 
Witnesses which his Counsel has examined 
ou his behalf, ibid. ib. — Evidence fpr the 
Prosecution, ibid, ib.— The Defendant's 
Speech to the Jury in his Defence, ibid, 
1065. — Evidence for the Defendant, ibid. 
1113.— Mr. Law's Reply, ibid. 1137.— Mr. 
Justice Rooke's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
I149.--The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 1154. 
—He is sentenced to pay a Fine of 200/. to 
be imprisoned for two years in Dorchester 
Gaol, and to find Sureties, ibid, ib. — He is 
afterwards called to the Bar, ibid. ib. 

REDMOND, OeM Lfuubert^; 



112 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



' Dublin under a Special Commission of Oyer 
and Terminer for High Treason, in being 
concerned in the Irish Insurrection, 43 Geo. 
3, 1803, 28 vol. 1271.— The Indictment', 
ibid. ib. — Speech of the Attorney General 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 1276. — Evidence 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 1284. — Mr. Mac 
Nally's Speech in his Defence, ibid. 1299. 
— ^Mr. Baron George's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 1307.— The Jury find hiro Guilty, ibid. 
1310. — Mr. Baron George's Address to him 
on passing Sentence of Death, ibid. 1311. — 
He is executed, ibid. 1315. — Previously to 
his Trial, he attempts to commit Suicide, 
ibid. 1316. 

REEVES, John. — His Trial on an ex officio 
Information filed by the Attorney General 
at the suggestion of the House of Commons, 
for a Libel upon the English Constitution, 
36 Geo. 3, 1796, 26 vol. 529.— The Informa- 
tion, ibid. ib. — Speech of the Attorney Ge- 
neral (Sir John Scott) for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 534.— Evidence for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 554. — Mr. Plumer's Speech for the 
Defendant, ibid. 555. — The Attorney Gene- 
ral's Reply, ibid. 581. — Lord Kenyon's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. 590. — ^The Jury, in 
giving their Verdict of Not Guilty, express 
an opinion that the Publication was improper, 
ibid. 594. — ^Note upon the Conduct of the 
Jury in this respect, and the cause of it, 

' ibid. ib. 

REEVES, Thomas, Counsel.— His Speech in 
. Reply for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
Reason and Tranter for Murder, 16 vol. 42. 
— His Speech in Reply in the House of 
Lords, in support of the Bill of Pains and 
Penalties against Bishop Atterbury, ibid. 
607. — His Speech for the Appellant on the 
Appeal of Murder against lliomas Bam- 
bridge and Richard Corbett, 17 vol. 398. 

REID, John. See Codling, William. 

RENWICK, James.— His Trial at Ediriburgh 
for High Treason for preaching in the fields 
against the Government, 4 Jac. 2, 1688, 12 
vol. 569. — The Indictment, ibid. ib. — ^He is 
found Guilty and sentenced ^o be hanged, 
ibid, 572. — Wodrow's Account of him and 
of these Proceedings, ibid. 573. — Account 
of his Execution, ibid. 583. — Fountainhairs 
Notice of this Case, ibid. 585. 

RERESBY, Sir John.— His Account of the . 
Trial of Lord Stafford, 7 vol. 1293 (note). 

REYNOLDS, James, Seijeant-at-Law.— His 
Argument on behalf of the Prince of Wales 
against the Prerogative of the Crown re- 
specting the Education and Marriage of the 
Royal Family, 15 vol. 1203. 



■ Judge of K. B. 3 Geo. 2. 

— His Charge to the Jury on the Trial of 
Hales and Kinnersley for Forgery, 17 vol. 
280. 

REYNOLDS, John. ^^^Grem^CaptamThmas, 



REYNOLDS, Richard. See Roughtotif Jokn. 

RICCARDS, Arthur. See Sacheverell, William. 

RICH, Richard, Solicitor General, 26 Hen. 8. 
— His Conference with Sir Thomas More in 
the Tow^r, 1 vol. 388. — ^He gives Evidence 
of what passed at this Conference on Sir 
Thomas More 's Trial, ibid. 390. — Sir Thomas 
More charges him with Perjury, ibid. ib. — 
He gives Evidence on the Trial of . Fisher, 
Bishop of Rochester, ibid. 399. 

RICH, Robert, Lord. See Northampton, 
Spencer, Earl of, 

RICHARD THE SECOND, King of England. 
— Proceedings respectinghis Depositionfrom 
the Throne, 1 Hen. 4, 1399, 1 vol. 135. — He 
renounces the Crow;n by Deed, ibid. 138. — 
Articles of Accusation exhibited against him 
in Parliament, ibid. 140. — Sentence of Depo- 
sition against him, ibid .151 . — His Conversa-* 
tion with theCommissioners who conveyed the 
Sentence of Deposition to him in the Tower, 
ibid. 155.-^Debate in Parliament respecting 
the mode of disposing of him, ibid. 1 58. — 
The Bishop of Carlisle's Argument against 
the lawfulness of deposing him, ibid, ib.— - 
His Imprisonment and Death, ibid. 160. — 
Different Accounts of the manner of his 
Death, ibid. 160 (note) e. 

RICHARDS, Sir Richard, Chief Baron of the 
Exchequer.: — His Charge to the Jury on the 
Trial of John Thomas Brunt for Hfgh 
Treason, in being concerned in the Cato- 
Street Plot, 33 vol. 1305. 

RICHARDS, Samuel. See Sacheverell, WiUiam. 

RICHARDSON, John, Counsel, 29 vol. 1, 
503. — His Argument in support of the Plea 
in Abatement to the Jurisdictiod of the Court 
in Judge Johnson's Case, 29 vol. 394. 

' Sir John, Judge of 

C. P. — He is one of the Judges named 
in the Special Commission for the Trial of 
the Conspirators in the Cato- Street Plot, 33 
vol.711. 

RICHARDSON, Sir Thomas, Chief Justice of 
C. P. 4 Car. 1, 1 vol. 359, 371, 374, 401. 

■ Chief Justice of 



K. B. 8 Car. 1. — His Speech on delivering 
his Opinion in the Star Chamber, respecting 
the Sentence of the Court on Henry Sher- 
field for breaking a Window in a Church, 3 
vol. 543. — His Speech on delivering his 
Opinion in the Star Chamber respecting the 
Sentence of the Court upon rrynne for 
writing "Histrio-mastix," ibid. 577. 

RICHMOND, James, Duke of.—Proceedings 
against him in Parliament as a Malignant 
and an evil Counsellor to the King, 17 Car. 1, 
1641-2, 4 vol. 111. — ^The Commons propose 
to the Lords to join them in a Petition to the 
King to remove him from his Offices, ibid. 
114.— His Defence, ibid. 115.— Upon hear- 
ing the Evidence, Uie Lords resolve not tQ 
join in the Petition^ ibid. 120, 



tH[E STAT 

lUCHMOND^ Duke of.— -His Evidence on 
Hardy's Trial, 24 vol. 1047.— His celebrated 
Letter to Colonel Sharman on Parliamentary 
Reform, ibid. 1048. 

BICKHILL, Sir William, Judge of C. P. 21 
Ric 3. — He is commissioned by Richard the 
Second to take the Confession of Thomas 
Dake of Glocester, 1 vol. 131. 

RIGBY, Mr.— His Speech in the House of 
Commons in Answer to Lord Keeper Finch's 
Defence of himself, 4 vol. 8. 

RING, William. See Fendey^ John, 

ROBERTSON, Andrew. See Green, Captain 
Thomas. / 

ROBERTSON, George.— His Trial in the 
Court of Justiciary for neglecting to pray 
for tlie King, when performing Public Wor- 
ship at a Meeting-House, 1 Geo. 1, 1715, 17 
voL 781. — The Indictment, ibid. ib. — In- 

. formation fortheKing's Advocate, ibid. 782. 
— Information for the Panel, ibid. 785. — ^The 
Court decide that the Libel is relevant, ibid. 
787w— Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 
788. — ^Verdict of the Assise, ibid. 790.— The 
Court sentence him to desist from preaching 
for three years under a Penalty of 500 Marks 
for each contravention, ibid. ib. 

ROBERTSON, James. See CidUnder, James 
TAompion. 

ROBINS, Mr.— His Speech in Defence of 
Lord Chancellor Macclesfield upon several 
of the Articles of Impeachment against him, 
16 voL 1160, 1232. 

ROCHE, Thomas Maxwell.— His Trial at 
Dublin under a Special Commission of Oyer 
and Terminer for High Treason, in being 
concerned in the Irish Insurrection, 43 Geo. 
3, 1803, ^8 vol. 753— -The Indictment, ibid. 
ib. — Speech of the Attorney General for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 756. — Evidence against 
him, ibid. 758. — Mr. Mac Nally's Speech in 
his Defence, ibid. 765. — Evidence for the 
Defence, ibid. 771.— Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 772.— The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 
774. — He is executed, ibid. 776. 

ROCHESTER, Bishop of. -See Atterbwy, 
Dr. Francis. Fisher, Dr. John. Spratt, iSr. 
Thomas. 

ROCHFORD, Lord. See Bolet^, Anne. 

ROE, Owen, 5 vol. 1003, 1204. See Regicides. 

ROE, Richard. See KendaU, Thomas. 

ROGERS, WilUam. See Cowper, Spencer. 

ROKEBY, Sir Thomas, Judge of K^B. 8 Will. 
3, la Tol. 1, 64, 451. 

ROLLE, Henry, Chief Justice of the Upper 
Bench during the Commonwealth, 5 vol. 344, 
466. — ^Ludlow's Accountofthecircumstances 

' which induced him to resign his Seat on the 
Bench, 5 vol. 936.— Whitlocke calls him 

VOL. XXXIV. 



E TRIALS* 113 

'^a wise and learned Man,'^ ibid. 466 
(note). 

ROMILLY, Samuel, Counsel. — His Speech in 
Defence of John Binns on his Trial at War. 
wick for uttering Seditious Words, 26 vol. 
614. 

Sir Samuel, Solicitor General.— 



His Speech on summing up the Evidence 
for the Commons on the Impeachment of 
Lord Melville, 29 vol. 1150.^ — His Vindica« 
tion of the Maidm that it is better that ten 
guilty Persons should escape than that one 
innocent Man should suffer, 7 vol. 1529 
(note). 

ROMSEY. SeeRumsey. 

ROOKE, Giles, Serjeant at Law. — His Speech 
for the Prosecution on the Trial of William 
Winterbotham for preaching a seditious 
Sermon, 22 vol. 826. — His Speech in Reply 
in the same Case, ibid. 869. 

I Sir Giles, Judge of C. P. 35 Geo. 3, 

— His Charge to the Jury on the Trisd of 
Henry Redhead, otherwise Henry Yorke, 
for being concerned in a treasonable Con- 
spiracy, 25 vol. 1149. — He is one of tlie 
Judges who sit under tlie Special Commis* 
sion for the Trial of Governor Wall for 
Murder, 28 vol. 51 . 

ROOKWOOD, Ambrose. See Winter, Robert. 
— He was one of the Conspirators in the 
Powder Plot, 2 vol. 159. 

ROOKWOOD, Ambrose.— His Trial for High 
Treason in being concerned in the Assassina- 
tion Plot, 8 Will. 3, 1696, 13 vol. 139.— The 
Indictment, ibid. ib. — He pleads Not Guilty, 
ibid. 142. — His Counsel ol^ect to proceeding 
with the Trial, that the Copy of the Jury 
Panel was not delivered two full days before 
the Trial, and after the Return of the Venire, 
ibid. 145. — ^The Court decide that it is un» 
necessary that the Copy of the Jury Panel 
should be delivered aner the Return of the 
Venire, ibid. 152. — ^His Counsel object that 
the Copy of the Indictment delivered ac- 
cording to the Act of Parliament does not 
contain the Caption, ibid. 114. — ^The Court 
decide that the Objection is made too late 
after Plea, ibid. 156. — His Counsel offer to 
move to quash the Indictment after the Jury 
are sworn and before Evidence is given, 
ibid. 161.— The Court refuse to entertain the 
Motion on the ground of its Irregularity in 
point of time, ibid. 168.— Speech of the 
Attorney General for the Prosecution, ibid. 
178. — Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 
182. — Sir Bartholomew Shower's Defence of 
him, ibid. 201.— The Prisoner's Counsel 
offer Evidence of the general bad Character 
of one of the Witnesses for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 209. — ^The Court allow them to shew 
his general Character, but not to prove him 
Guilty of particular Crimes, ibid. 211.— 
Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 212.<^Lord 
I 



114 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



Holt's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 213.— The 
Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 222. — ^Lord Holt's 
Address on passing Sentence upon him and 
the other persons convicted of the same 
Treason, ibid. 308. — His Execution, ibid. 
310. — Paper delivered by him to the Sheriff 
at the place of Execution, ibid. 311. 

ROSE, Sir John William, Recorder of London. 
— ^His Address to Governor Wall on passing^ 
Sentence of Death upon him, 28 vol. 1349. 

ROSEW£LL» Thomas.— His Trial at the Bar 
of the Court of King's Bench for High 
Treason in preaching a Seditious Sermon at 
a Presbytenan Conventicle, 36 Car. 2, 1684, 
10 vol. 147.— The Indictment, ibid. 149.— 
He pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 152. — ^Evidence 
against him, ibid. I59w — He takes sevend 
Objections to the form of the Indictment, 
which are overruled, ibid. 180. — ^His Speech 
2D his Defence, ibid. 183. — Evidence for 
him, ibid. 190^ — He sums up the Evidence 
for his Defence, ibid. 233. — Chief Justice 
Jefferies charges the Jury, ibid. 237. — The 
Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 259. — He objects 
in arrest of Judgment, that the treasonable 
words laid in the Indictment are not alleged 
to have been spoken of and concerning the 
King, ibid. 260.— The Court assign him 
Counsel to argue the Objecti6n, ibid. 264. — 
Arguments of Counsel for and against the 
Objection, ibid. 269.— The Court defer their 
Judgment till the next Term, when he pleads 
a Pardon, ibid. 302. — The Pardon, ibid. 
303. — Burnet's Account of these Proceed- 
ings, ibid. 147 (note). 

ROSS, George. See Vint, John. 

ROTHERAM, John, Counsel.— He draws the 
Plea offered to the Court by Colonel Sidney, 
9 vol. 822. — Jefferies's Conduct towards him, 
when pleading for Richard Baxter, 11 vol. 

499. 

Serjeant at Law. — ^His 

£3caminatioa before the Committee of Lords 
appointed in 1689, to examine into the 
Murders of Colonel Sidney, Lord Russel, and 
others, 9 toI. 988. 

ROURKE, Felix.— His Trial at Dublin under 
a special Commission of Oyer and Terminer 
for High Treason in being concerned in the 
Irish Insurrection, 43 Geo. 3, 1803, 28 vol. 
925. — ^The Indictment, ibid. ib. — Speech of 
the Attorney General for the Prosecution, 
ibid .928. — Evidence for the Prosecution,ibid. 
930. — Mr. Curran's Speech for the Prisoner, 
ibid. 945. — Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 
950. — Mr. Ponsonby's Speech on summing 
up the Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 969. 
— Reply of the Solicitor General, ibid. 980. 
— ^The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 992. — 
Mr. Baron George's Address on passing 
Sentence of Death upon him, ibid. 992.- He 
is executed, ibid. 996. 

ROUSE, John.— His Information respecting 
the Rye-House Plot, 9 vol, 490.— His Trial 



at the Old Bailey for High Treasan in faeiqgi 
concerned in the Rye-House Plot, 35 Car. 
2, 1683, ibid. 637.— The Indictment, ibid. 
ib. — He is arraigned with William Blagne, 
and pleads ^ot Guilty, ibid. 638.— He is 
tried alone at his own desire, ibid. 639.— 
Evidence against him, ibid. 641. — Hts De- 
fence, ibid. 647.— He is found Guilty, ibid. 
654. — His Sentence and Execution, ibid. 
668. 

ROWAN, Archibald Hamilton.— Proceedhigs 
on the Trial of an Ex-ofiicio Information 
filed against him in the Court of King's 
Bench in Ireland for a Seditious libel, 33 
and 34 Geo. 3, 1793-4, 22 toI. 1033.— The 
luformation, ibid. ib. — ^The Attorney Gene- 
ral's Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. 1040. 
—Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 1054^ 
—-Evidence for the I>eflendant,ibid. 1064.— 
Mr. Currants Speech for the Defendant,ibid. 
1066. — Mr. Prime Serjeant's Reply, ibid. 
1097. — Lord Clondleirs Charge to the Jnty, 
ibid. 1107.— The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 
1119. — ^Affidavits in support of a motion for 
a New Trial, ibid. 1 120. — Arguments on the 
motion for a New Trial, ibid. 1128.— Judg- 
ment of the Court affirming the Verdict, 
ibid. 1163.— Mr. Hamilton Rowan's Speech 
on being called upon for Judgment, ibid. 
1180.— Account of his Escape from Prisdn, 
ibid. 1186. — He receives a Pardon, ibid. 
1189.— Proceedings in Scotland against him, 
23 vol. 750 (note). 

ROY Rada Chum. See Nundoeomar. 

RUDYARD, Sir Benjamin.— His Speech in 
the House of Commons in the Debate on the 
Liberty of the Subject, occasioned by the 
Imprisonment of Sir 'Iliomas Darnell and 
others for refusing to lend upon the Com- 
mission of Loans, 3 vol. 62. — His Speech in 
the House of Commons in the Debate on tiie 
same subject, previously to drawing up the 
Petition of Riglit, ibid. 173. 

RUMBOLD, Colonel Richard,— Proceedings 
in the Court of Justiciary against him for 
High Treason, in being concerned in the 
Rye-House Plot and Argyle's Rebellion, 1 
Jac. 2, 1685, 11 vol.873.— The Indictment, 
ibid. 875.— He is found Guilty, ibid. 678^ 
Account of his Execution, ibid, ib.— Wod- 
row's Account of the mode of his App|«- 
hension^ ibid. 873 (note).— Lord Fottntaitt- 
hall's Account of these Proceedings, ibw. 
881.— Mr. ?ox's Account of Rumbolffs 
Case, ibid. 882. 

RUMLEY, William. See Wukeim,SitOmp' 

RUMSEY, Colonel John.— His E»min»tios 
and Informations respecting the Bye-HonjJ 
Plot, 9 vol. 374, 437.— His Evidence on tW 
Trial of Walcot, ibid. 52&— His £vid»oe 
on the Trial of Lord Russel, ibid. ^Sfi-Tff 
Evidence on the Trial of ColonelSidneyy^l^^ 
847. 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



iU 



mUSHOUT, Sir Jbh]i.-^His Speeeh in the^ 
House of Lords as one of the Managers for 
the CommoQSi in sapport of several of the 
Articles of Impeachment against Lord 
Chancellor Macclesfield^ 16 ¥01.955. 

RUSSEL, WilHam. See Anderson, JUonel 

RUSSEL, WilUam, Lord.— His Examination 
in the Tower respecting the Rye^Honse 
Plot, 9 Tol. 488. — Burnet's Account of his 
Apprehension, ibid. 500. — ^His Trial at the 
Old Bailey for High Treason, in being con- 
cerned in the Rye-House Plot, 35 Car. 2, 
1683, ibid. 577. — The Indictment, ibid., 578. 
— He pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 581. — Lady 
Russel assists him by taking Notes, ibid. 584. 
—He objects to Jurors not having a free- 
hold of 40s. per annum, and Counsel are 
assigned him to argue the Objection, ibid. 
585.— Argument of his Counsel, ibid. 586. 
'-Argument of the King's Counsel against 
the Objection, ibid. 589. — ^The Court 
decide against the Objection, ibid. 591.*— 
The King's Counsel open the Case, ibid. 
594. — Speech of the Attorney General (Sir 
Robert Sawyer), for the I^rosecution, ibid. 
595.—- Colonel Rumsey's Evidence against 
liim, ibid. 596. — Lord Howard's Evidence, 
ibid. 602. — Evidence for Lord Russel, ibid. 
619.— Eiddence of Lord Howard's repeated 
Declarations that he knew nothing about 
the Plot, ibid/ 620.— Dr. Burnet's £vi- 
dence, ibid. 6!el. — Lord Russel's Address 
to the Jury, ibid. 625. — ^The Counsel for 
die Pfoseeation reply, ibid. ib. — Chief 
Justice Pemberton's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 635. — ^The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 
636. — Summary Account of this Trial from 
Narcissus Luttrell's MSS. ibid. 1009.— He 
is brought up for Judgment, ibid. 666. — 
Judgment against him, ibid. 667. — ^The King 
remits the whole of the Sentence except be- 
heading, ibid. 684 (note). — ^The King's un- 
feeling Speech on remitting part of his Sen- 
tence, ibid. ib. (note).*-^Petitions of the Earl 
of Bedford and Loitl Russel for Lord Ros- 
sePs life, ibid. 686 (note).— Lord Russel's 
Letter to the Duchess of York, ibid. 687 
^ote). — His Letter to the King, delivered 
after his Death, ibid. 688 ^note). — ^Lady 
Russel's Letter to the King, ibid. ib. — His 
Execotien, ibid. 683. — Paper delivered by 
htm to the Sheriff at the place of Execution, 
ibid. 685. — Luttrell's Account of bis Exeeu- 
tiouy ibid. 1010. — Mr. Fox's Remark upon 
the Story of the last days of his Life, ibid. 688 
(note).<^-Act of Parliament for rerersing his 
Attainder, ibid. 695.— Burnet's Account of 
his Trial and Execution, ibid« 505.^— The 
''Case of WiUiam Lord RusseV ibid. 695. 
•—Sir Bartholomew Shower's '^Antidote 
against Poison," being Remarks upon the 
Paper delivered by Lord Russel to the 
Sheriff ibid. ro9.-^rRobert Atkins's ** De- 
fence of Lord Russel's Innoceney/^ ibid. 719. 
-*-Sir B. Shower's ^ Magistracy and Grovem* 
amt U England vindicated^" ibid. 741.^ 



-~" Further Defence of Lord Rossiers Infto- 
cency," ibid. 783.— Sir John Hawles's Re- 
marks upon Lord Russel's Trial, ibid. 7^3. 
' —The Depositions of seyeral persons con^ 
nected with this Trial, and those of Algernon 
Sidney, Sir Thomas Armstrong, and Mr. 
Cornish, before a Committee of the House 
of Lords after the Revolution, ibid. 951. 

RUtHVEN, Alexander and Henry. See 
Gowrie, John, Earl of, 

RYAN, John. See Goldmg, Jokn. 

RYDER, Sir Dudley, Attorney General, 20 
Geo. 2. — His Speech for the Prosecution on 
the Trial of Francis Townley for High Trea- 
son, in being concerned in the Rebellion of 
1745, 18 vol. 335. — His Speech in the House 
of Lords as one of the Managers for the 
Commons, on the Trial of the Impeachment 
of Lord Lovat, ibid. 559.— His Argument 
in favour of the admissibility of the Evi^ 
dence of Murray of Broughton on that Trial, 
ibid. 619. — His Speech for the Prosecution 
on the Trial of William Owen for a Libel, 
ibid. 1220. 



SACHEVERELL, Dr. Hcnry^— A Summary 
Account of the Proceedings in Parliament 
rdiating to his Case, 15 vol. 1. — Burnet's 
Account of his Character and of the Pro-i 
ceedings against him, ibid. 7 (note). — His 
Trial in Westminster Hall upon an Impeach ' 
ment by the Commons for High Crimes and 
Misdemeanours, in preaching seditious Do^ 
trines in two Sermons delivered at Derby 
and at St. Paul's, 9 Anne, 1710, ibid. 86.— 
Articles against him, ibid. 37.*— His Answer 
thereto, ibid. 40. — Replication of the Com« 
mons, ibid. 52. — Speech of Sir James 
Mountague (Attorney General), for the 
Coiiimons on opening the Articles of Im- 
peachment generally, ibid. 53. — Mr. Lech- 
mere's Speech on the same side, ibid. 59.—* 
Dr.Sacheverell's Counsel admit the* public 
cation of the Sermons, ibid. 68.— The Dedi- 
cation of the D^rby Sermon, ibid. ib. — ^The 
Dedication of the Sermon preached at St. 
Paiil's, ibid; 69. — The Sermon preached at 
St. Paul's, ibid. 71.— Sir Joseph Jekyll's 
Speech in support of the First Article of Im- 
peachment, charging him with traducing the 
Principles of the Revolution, and denying 
the lawfulness of Resistance, ibid. 95. ---Sir 
John Holland's Speech in support of the 
First Article, ibid. 110.— Mr. Walpole's 
Speech, ibid. 112. — Sir John Hawles's 
Speech, ibid. 116. — General Stanhope's 
Speech, ibid. 126.— Sir Peter King's Speech 
in support of Uie Second Article of Impeach- 
ment, clmrging him^with preaching against 
Toleration and Liberty of Conscience, ibid. 
134.— Lord William Paulett's Speech, ibid. 
151.— Mr. Cooper's Speech, ibid. 152. — Mr. 
Thompson^ Speech in support of the Third 
Article, charging him with arraigning the 
Resolution of Parliament in 1705, asserting 
the Security of the Church of England^ ibid, 
X % 



JIW 



GENERAL IINDEX TO 



157.-^Mr.'Cdnp%6n'8 Spieechy ibid. 194. — 
Mr. Dolben's Speech, ibid* 167. — Serjeant 
Parker's Speech in support of the Fourth Ar« 
ticle, charging seditious Suggestions against 
the Government, ibid. 169. — ^Mr. Secretary 
Boyle's Speech, ibid. 186.— -The Chancellor 
of the Exchequer's Speech, ibid. 188. — Mr. 
Lechmere's Speech, ibid. 191. — ^The Mana- 
gers for Uie House of Commons close their 
Case, ibid. 195. — Sir S. Harcourt's Speech 
in his Defence to the First Article, ibid. 196. 
— Mr. Dodd's Speech, ibid. 213. — Mr. 
Phipps's Speech, ibid. 222.— Mr. Dee's 
Speech, ibid. 237. — Dr. Henchman's Speech, 
ibid. 240. — Extracts from Sermons and 
Homilies asserting Non-resistance to be a 
Doctrine of the Church of England, read in 
his Defence to the First Article, ibid. 244. 
— Mr. Dodd's Speech in his Defence to the 
Second Article, ibid. 292. — Mr. Phipps's 
Speech, ibid. 295. — Mr. Dee's Speech, ibid. 
302. — Dr. Henchman's Speech, ibid. 304« — 
Evidence in support of the Defence to the 
Second Article, ibid. 309. — ^Mr. Dodd's 
Speech in his Defence to the Third Article, 
ibid. 318. — Mr. Phipps's Speech, ibid. 320. 
— Mr. Dee*8 Speech, ibid. 327.^— Dr. Hench- 
. man's Speech, ibid. 329. — Evidence of 
. blasphemous and heretical Publications in 
. support of the Defence to the Third Article, 
ibid. 331. — ^Mr. Dodd's Speech in his De- 
fence to the Fourth Article, ibid. 344. — Mr. 
. Phipps's Speech, ibid. 34T. — Mr. Dee's 
. Speech, ibid. 354.—- Dr. Henchman'j Speech, 
ibid. 357. — ^Proclamations against Profane- 
ness and Immorality read in Evidence in 
support of the Defence to the Fourth Article, 
ibid. 359. — ^Dr. Sacheverell's Speech, ibid. 
364.— Sir Joseph Jekyll's Speech in Reply 
for the Commons to the Defence to the 
First Article, ibid. 380.— The Solicitor 
. Generars Speech, ibid. 396.-«Mr. Lech- 
. mere's Speech, ibid. 406.— Sir Peter King's 
Speech in Reply to Uie Defence to the 
Second Article, ibid. 418. — Mr. Cooper's 
Speech, ibid. 431. — Mr. Thompson's Speech 
in Reply to the Defence to the Third Article, 
ibid. 438.— Serjeant Parker's Speech in 
Reply to the Defence to the Fourth Article, 
. ibia. 447. — Question proposed to the Judges 
at the suggestion of the Earl of Nottingham, 
ibid. 466.— The Lords resolve that the Com- 
mons have made good their Articles of Im- 
peachment, ibid. 468.— They find Dr. Sache- 
verell Guilty by a majority of Seventeen, 
ibid. 470. — He pleads in arrest of Judg- 
ment, ibid. 471.— Mr. Hatsell's Account of 
the Dispute between the Blade Rod and the 
Speaker, oji the Speaker's going up with the 
Commons to the House of Lords to demand 
.Judgment, ibid. 472 (note).— The Lords 
overrule the ppints taken in arrest of Judg- 
ment, and pass Sentence, ibid. 473.-^He is 
sentenced not to preach for Three years, and 
his Sermon* are ordered to be , burned by 
the common Hangman, ibid. 474.— L<«pd 
Haversham's Speech in the House of Loids 



on tbe First Article of Impeachment, tbiS* 
475.— The Bishop of Salisbury (Buniet's> 
Speech, ibid. 480.— The Bishop of Oxford's 
Speech, ibid. 494.— The Bishop of Dncoln's 
Speech on the Second Article, ibid. 503. — 
Tne Bishop of Norwich's Speech, ibid« 516« 
—^Protests i^inst the Resolutions of the 
Lords in this Case, ibid. 32. — After the ex- 
piration of the term of Silence imposed upon 
him by the Sentence, he is presented to the 
Rectory of St. Andrew's Holbom, by Qaeen 
Anne, ibid. 474. 

SACHEVERELL, William. ~Hb Trial with 
several others for a Riot and Consph^cy at 
the Election of Mayor for the Town of 
Nottingham, 36 Car. 2, 1684, 10 vol. 29. — 
The Information, ibid. 31. — ^The King's 
Counsel open the Case, ibid. 36. — Mr. 
PoUexfen, for the Defendants, objects to the 
Evidence of Members of the new Corpora- 
tion, as the merits of the Case turned upon 
the validity of the Charter of that Corpora* 
tion, ibid. 39.. — The Objection is overruled 
by &e Court, ibid. 40. — Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 41.— *Mr. Pollexfen's 
Speech for the Defendants, ibid. 65. — Evi- 
dence for the Defendants, ibid. 71. — Chief 
Justice Jefferies's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
92. — ^The Jury find them all Guilty excepting 
one, ibid. 96. — Their several Sentences, ibid» 
ib. — Mr. Sacheverell's Statement of the 
Case of the Corporation of Nottingham, ibid. 
95. 

SAINT ALBANS, Viscount. See Bacon, Sir 
Francit. 

SAINT ASAPH, Dean of, 21 vol. 847. See 
Shipley, William Davies, 

SAINT JOHN, Oliver, Counsel. See Bedford, 
Earl of, — His Case on an Information in 
the Star-Chamber for publishing a Paper 
against a Benevolence collected under 
letters of the Privy Council, 13 Jac. 1, 1615, 
2 vol. 899. — Mr. Hiu^ve's Introduetocy 
Note to this Case, ibid. ib. — ^Mr. Saint 
John's Letter to the Mayor of Marlborough, 
which formed the subject of this Prosecution, 
ibid. 900. — Sir Francis Bacon's Speech for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 902.— His Argument 
for Mr. Hampden in the Great Case of Ship- 
Money, 3 vol. 856. — ^His Speech on deliver- 
ing the Resolutions of the House of Com« 
mons against Ship-Money, at a Conference 
of both Houses of Parliament, ibid. 1262.*- 
His Argument for the Bill of Attainder 
against Lord Strafford, ibid. 1477.— Lord 
Clarendon's Account of him, ibid. 856_(note). 
— He was Chief Justice of the Common 
Pleas during the Protectorate, 5 vol. 946. 

SAINT LkOER, Sir John. See Gilbert, 
Jeffery, 

SALISBURY, James, Earl of.— Proeeedings 
in Ptoliament against him and Henry» Eirl ' 
of Peterborough, on an Impeachment (^High 
Treason^ for departlDg from their AUegiaace 



THE STATE TRIAlS. 



117 



«nd being reconciled to the Church of Rome, 
1 and 2 Will, and Mary, 1689-1690, 12 vol. 
t9^3.-^Tbey are brought severally to the 
Bar of the House of Lords, ibid. 1234, 1235. 
. — They are committed to the Tower, ibid. 
1235. — They remain in the Tower for nearly 
two years, daring which time a Dissolution 
and several Prorogations of Parliament take 
place, and then are discharged, ibid. 1238* 

SALISBURY, John. See Burleigh, ^ Simon. 

^SALISBURY, Mary. See Noble, Richard. 

SALISBURY, Thomas. See Babington, Atir 

SALMON, Francis. See SachevereU, William. 

SALMON, James. See Macdahiel, Stephen. 

SANCHAR, Lord. See Spnquire, Lord. 

SANCROFT, Dr. William, Archbishop of 
Canterbury. See Seven Bt<A(^.'— Granger's 
Account qI him, 12 vol. 183. 

SANDYS, Sir Thomas. See Monopolies, Ca$e 
of. 

SANQUIRE, Lord.— Proceedings on his Ar- 
raignment at the Bar of the Court of King's 

- Bench for being accessary to the Murder of 
John Turner, 10 Jac. 1, 1612, 2 vol. 743. — 

. £ennet*8 Account of the Circumstances which 
led to the Murder, ibid. ib. (note).— The 
Indictment, ibid. 744.^ His Address to the 
Court, confessing his Guilt, ibid. 746.— 
Sir Francis Bacon's Speech, ibid. 750.— Mr. 
Justice Yelverton's Address on passing Sen- 

. tence of Death upon him, ibid. 753. — His 
Execution, ibid. 754.>-Lord Coke's Report 
of Lord Sanquire^s Case, ibid. 755. — His 
Account of the Facts, and of the difficulties 
of this Proceeding, ibid. 761. — ^LordSanquire 

y demands his Trial in the House of Lords, 
but is denied, not being a Peer of Parlia- 
ment, ibid. 755. 

8ARUM, Countess of. — She is beheaded for 
denying the King's Supremacy, and holding 
correspondence with the Pope, 31 Hen. 8, 
1539, 1 vol. 482. 

SAUNDERS, Edmund, Counsel, 8 vol. 779, 
1378. — His Speech in Defence of Anne 
Price, on her Trial with John Tasborough for 
endeavouring to suppress the Evidence of 
the Popish Plot, 7 vol. 906. — He is assigned 
as Counsel to Lord Stafford and the other 

. Popish Lords, ibid. 1242. — His Argument 
for the Crown against the Plea in Abate- 
ment in Fitzharris's Case, 8 vol. 270. — He 
moves the Court of King's Bench to dis- 
charge the Earl of Danby on Bail, 11 vol. 
831. 

— — — Sir Edmund, Chief Justice of 
K. B. 35 Car. 2. — Memorandum of his pro- 
' motion to the Bench, from Sir Thomas Ray- 
' motid's Reports, 31 vol. 607.— His Charge 
' to the Jury on the Trial of Pilkington and 
•' others for a Riot in ^th^ Common Hall on 



occasion of llhe Election of Sheriffs for 
London, 9 vol. 288. — His Charge to the 
Jury^on the Trial of Sir Patience Ward for 
Forgery, ibid. 346.— Burhetsavs that ** he was 
a learnt, but a very immoral Man,'' B vol. 
1039 (note). — Roger North's curious Account 
of his Or^n and Character, 9 Toi. 22<6 
(note). 

SAUNDERS, Sir Edward, Judge of C. P. t 
Mary, 1 vol. 869. 

' Chief Baron of the 



Exchequer, 14 Eliz. 1 vol. 957. 

SAUTRE, William.— Proceedings against hiik 
for Heresy before a Convocation of Bishops, 
2 Hen. 4, 1400, 1 vol. IdS.'^Arttcles against 
him, ibid. 165. — His Answers thereto, ibid. 
165. — Sentence against him,'ibid. 168.— His 
Recantation, ibid. 169. — Sentence of De- 
gradation pronounced against him, ibid. 171. 
— His formal Degradation from the Priest- 
hood, ibid. ib. — The writ De Httrelico Com- 
biirendo is issued against him, ibid. 173.— 
The Writ De Hseretico Comburendo was in 
this Case a Special Act of Parliament, ibid« 
174. 

SAVAGE, John. See BabuigUm, Anthin^. 

SAWYER, Sir Robert, Counsel.— His Speech 
for the Prosecution on the Trialof Sir George 
Wakeman for High Treason, in being con- 
cerned in the Popish Plot, 7 vol. 599. 






—*-——— Attorney General, 33 
Car. 2, 8 vol. 453, 775, 9 vol. 236, 300, 10 
vol. 3, 133, 162, 311, 323, 557, 11 vol. 391. 
—His Argument, against the. Plea in Abate- 
ment in Fitzharris's Case, 8 vol. 243.---His 
Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
Fitzharris, ibid. 340.--His Speech for the 
Prosecution on the Trial of Colledge, ibid. 
589.— His Argument for the Crown in the 
Case of the Quo Warranto against the City 
of London, ibid. 1147.— His Speech for the 
Prosecution on the Trialof Ford Lord Grey, 
and oUiers, for carrying away Lady Henrietta 
Berkeley, 9 vol. 132.— His Speech for the 
Prosecution on the Trialof Walcot for High 
Treason in being concerned in the Rye* 
House Plot, ibid. 522.— His Speech for the 
Prosecution on the Trial of lord Williato 
Russel, ibid. 595.— His Speech for the Pro- 
secution on the Trial of Algernon Sidney, 
ibid. 838.— His Speech for the Prosecution 
on the Trial of John Hampden for a Misde- 
meanour, ibid. 1062.— His, Speech for the 
Prosecution on the Trial of Braddon and 
Speke, ibid. 1130.— He moves the Court of 
King's Bench for Execution agaius^ Sir 
Thomas Armstrong on the Record of his 
Outlawry for High Treason, 10 vol. 109. — 
His Argument for the East India Company 
in the Great Case of Monopolies, ibid. 457. 
—His Speech for the Prosecution on Gates's 
First Trial for Perjury, ibid. 109a— His 
Speech on Gates's Second Trial, ibid. 1240. 
—His Speech for the Prosecution o» the 



119 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



Trial of Lord Delamere, 11 toI. 598 <— His 
proper Conduct, on being required by James 

. the Second to draw up a Warrant to invest 
a Popish Priest with a Benefice, ibid« 1192 
(note). — ^His Speech for the Defendants on 
the Trial of the Seven Bishops, 12 vol. 358. 
— Burnet's Character of h^n, 8 vol. 1039 
(note]).— He was expelled the House of 
Commons after the Revolution, for being 
concerned in the Proceedings upon Sir 
Thomas Armstrong's Outlawry, 9 vol. 935 

. (note), 10 vol. 119.— Mr. Hargrave's fie. 
marks upon him, 10 vol. 117 (note). 

KAYER, Dr.— His Speech in Defence of Lord 
Chancellor Macclesfield on the Trial of his 
Impeachment, 16 vol. 1105. 

SAYER, Mary. See Nohlcy Bkhard. 

j^AYRE, Stephen. — ^Trialofan Action brought 
by him against the Earl of Rochford, one of 

. His Majesty's Secretaries of State, for false 
Imprisonment, 17 Geo. 3, 1777, 20 vol. 
1285.— Counsel for the Plaintiff and for the 
Defendant, ibid. ib. — Abstract of Mr. Ser- 
jeant Glynn's Speech for the Plaintiff, ibid. 
1287 (note).— Evidence for the Plaintiff, 
ibid. 1287. — Abstract of the Speech of the 
Attorney General (Thurlow) for the Defend- 
ant, ibid. 1300 (note). — Evidence for the 
Defendant, ibid. 1301.— Abstract of Mr. 

. Serjeant Glynn's Speech in R^plv,ibid. 1311 
(note). — Chief Justice De Grey's Charge to 
the Jury, ibid. 1312 (note).— The Jury 
return a Verdict for the Plaintiff with l,000r. 
Damages, subject to the Opinion of the 

• Court upon two Questions, ibid. 1811. — ^The 

' Court give Judgment for the Defendant, 
ibid. 1316. 

SCARLETT, James, Counsel.— His Speedy in 
the Court of King's Bench in mitigation of 
Punishment in the Case of John Hatchard, 
32 vol. 735. 

SCHOFIELD, John. See LaddUa. 

SCOT, Thomas, 5 vol. 1004, 1058, 1272. See 
Tiegicideh. 

SCOTT, Alexander. See JUinrgoro^, Misurice. 
Gerraldy Joseph, Skirvingf William, — Pro- 
ceedings against him in tne High Court of 
Justiciary for Sedition, in belonging to an 
unlawful Society, 34 Geo. 3, 1794, 23 vol. 
383. — The Indict nent, ibid. ib. — He is out- 
lawed for non-af earance, ibid. 391. 

SCOTT, John, Counsel.— He was of Counsel 
for Mr. Bembridge on his Trial for Miscon- 
duct as a Clerk in the Navy Pay Office, 
22 vol. 61.— His Argument for a New Trial 
in that Case, ibid. 90. 

•— r — Sir John, Solicitor General, 22 vol* 
309, 380. 



Trial of Eaton for publishing Paine's ^Letter 
to the Addressers on the Late ProclamatioD/' 
ibid. 791. — HisSpeech in Reply in thetame 
case, ibid. 813. — ^His Speech for the Prose- 
cution on Hardy's Trial for High Treasoo, 
24 vol. 241. — His Reply for the Prosecution 
on the Trial of Horne Tooke for High 
Treason, 25 vol. 497. — His Speech for the 
Prosecution on Stow's Trial for HighTreason^ 
ibid. 1170. — His Speech for the Prosecutioii 
on Crossfield's Tnal for High Treason, 26 
vol. 11 . — His Reply in the sa,me Case, ihid. 
168. — His Speech for the Prosecution on the 
Trial of O^Coigly and others for High 
Treason, ibid. 1245.^ — His Speech for the 
Prosecution on the Trial of Cutbell for a 
Libel, 27 vol. 654. — His Speech for the 
Prosecution on the Trial Of LordThanet and 
others for a Riot, ibid. 829. 

SCOTT, Sir William, Judge of theAdmiradty 
Court. — His Charge to the Grand Jury at 
the Admiralty Sessions, previously to the 
Trial of Codling and others for feloniously 
casting away a Ship at Sea, 28 vol. 178. 

SCROGGS, Sir WilUam, Counsel, ^ y^U 
876. 

. ' ' Chief Justice of 



• — . ■ Attorney General. — His 

Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
John Binns for Seditious Words, 22 vol. 474. 
•—His Speech in Reply in that Case, ibid. 
609.— :His Speech for the Pwjiecutiou on the 



K. B. 30 Car. 2, 7 vol. 714,767.— His Charge 
to the Jury on the Trial of William Stayley for 
being concerned inthe Popish Plot,6 vol.1 508. 
— His Charge to the Jury on the Trial of Cole- 
man, 7 vol, 66. — ^His Charge to the Jury on 
tbeTrial of Ireland and otiiers, ibid.l 30. — His 
Charge to the Jury on the Trial of Green and 
others for the Murder of Sir Edmondbury 
Godfrey, ibid. 213.— His Charge to the Jury 
on the Trial of Whitebread and others for 
being concerned in the Popish Plot, ibid. 
411. — ^His Charge to the Jury on the Trial 
of Richard Langhorn, for being concerned 
in the Same Plot, ibid. 479. — His Charge to 
the Jury on tlie Trial of Sir George Wake- 
man and others for b^ng concerned ia the 
same Plot, ibid. 681. — His S^peech in the- 
Court of King's Bench on holding several 
' persons to Bail for a Libel upon himself, il)id. 
701.— His intemperate Conduct on the Trial 
of Andrew Brommich, a Romish Priest, 
ibid. 725. — His Charge to the Jury on the 
Trial of Harris for publishing a seditious 
Libel, ibid. 929. — His illegal Conduct on 
Francis SmitVs Application to be admitted 
to Bail on a Charge of Libel, ibid. 955.—* 
His Chaige to the Jury on the Trial of ihe 
Earl of Castleraaine for being concerned in 
the Popish Plot, ibid. 1107. — He was at first 
a zealot in the Prosecution of persons accused 
of being concerned in the Popish Plot, but 
when he found the King and Court averse to 
these Prosecutions, he altered his conduety 
ibid. 1054 (note). — ^Proceedings against him 
before the Privy Council, 31 Car. 2, 1679, 
8 vol. 163. — Articles exhibited against him 
by Gates and Bedlow, ibid. ib. — His Answer 
thereto,ibid. 172.^Prooeedings against him 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



110 



♦ ' • • • 

in Paiiiftment for dischar^ng a Middlesex ^ 
Grand Jury , in order to prevent their present- 
ing tbe Duke of York as a Papist, 32 Car. 
2y 1680, ibid. 174. — The House of Commons 
resolve to impeach him, ibid. 195.-^Articles 
of Impeachment against him, ibid. 197.— 
Debate in the House of Commons upon these 
Articles, ibid. 201 . — He is ordered tp find 
Bail for his appearance in tlie House of 
Lords to answer the Impeachment, ibid. 
212. — ^His Answer to the Articles of Im- 
peachment, ibid. 215. — He is removed from 
his Office, and receives a Pension for life, 
ibid. 216. — Roger North's Account of him, 
ibid. 168 (note). — Burnet's Character of him, 
6 vol. 1425. 

SCROOP, Adrian, 5 vol. 1004, 1034, 1298. 
See Regicides. 

SEAFORTH, Kenneth, Earl of.— Proceedings 
against him in the Court of Justiciary for 
Treason, 9 Will. 3, 1697, 13 vol. 1445.— He 

' is discharged upon giving Security for his 
good behaviour, ibid. 1449« 

SEATON, Archibald. See Stirling, James. 

SEDLEY^ Sir Charles, Bart.— Summary Ac- 
count of the Proceedings in the Court of 
King's Bench against him for Obscenity, 15 
Car. 2, 1663, 17 vol. 155 (note). — He con- 
fesses the Indictment, ibid. ib. — He is fined 
2,000 Marks, and imprisoned for a Week, 
ibid. ib. 

SELDEN, John, Counsel. See Bedford, Earl 
rf. — His Argument for Sir Edmund Hamp- 
den in the Court of King's Bench, on the 
Habeas Corpus brought by him and others 
to try the vaJidity of their Commitment for 
refusing to lend upon the Commission of 
Loans, 3 vol. 16. — His Speech in the House 
of Commons in the Debate on the Liberty 
of the Subject previously to the Petition of 
Rights, ibid. 78.— His Argument at the 
Conference between the two Houses of Par- 
liament respecting the Liberty of the Sub- 
ject, ibid. 94. — Proceedings in the House of 
Commons against the Earl of Suffolk for 
charging him with razing a Record, ibid. 156. 
^-His Argument at a Committee of Lawyers 
appointed to draw up th^etition of Rights, 
ibid. 175. — Proceedings in the Court of 
King's Bench, upon a Habeas Corpus sued 
out by him to try the validity of his 'Com- 
mitment by the Lords of the (^Council for 
resisting the King's Command for an Ad- 
journment of the House of Commons, ibid. 
236. — Mr. Littleton's Argument for his 
Discbarge, ibid. 252.^- His own Argument, 
ibid. 264.— Proceedings against him in the 
Star-Chamber for publishing a scandalous 
and seditious Writing, 6 Car. 1, 1630, ibid. 
887« — He was one of the Managers for the 
Commons on Lord Strafford's Trial, ibid* 
1421* — Selden, Holbome, and Bridgman, 
strongly oppose the Bill of Attainder against 
Lord Strafford, ibid. 1469. 

SELLERS^ John. See Tonge, Thmas 



SEMPLE, John. — Proceedings against him, 
John Watt, and Gabriel lliompson, in the 
Court of Justiciary at Edinburgh for pub- 
lishing a treasonable Declaration, 36 Car. 2, 
1684, 11 vol. 949.— The Indictment, ibid, 
ib. — ^The Declaration, ibid. ib. (note). — Ibey 
are found Guilty, ibid. 974. — They are sen- 
tenced to Death, ibid. 976. — Semple's Letter 
to his Mother and Sister, ibid. 983. — Wod- 
row's History of the Circumstances connected 
with these Proceedings, ibid. 949 (note). — 
Fountainhairs Account of these Proceed- 
ings, 10 vol. 846 (note). 

SEXBY, Colonel Edward.— His Confession of 
his having instigated Miles Sindercome to 
attempt to murder the Protector, 5 vol. 
845 (note). — He dies in the Tower in 1658, 
ibid. 846 (note). — Account of the Evidence 
respecting his being the Author of the 
Book called " Killing no Murder," ibid. 852 
(note). 

SEYMOUR, Edward.— He was active in the 
Prosecution of Lord Clarendon, 6 vol. 323, 
ibid. ib. (note).— Proceedings in Parliament 
against him on an Impeachment for Mis- 
conduct in his Office of Treasurer of the 
Navy, 32 Car. 2, 1680, 8 vol. 127.— Arti- 
cles of Accusation against him, ibid. 128. 
— His Answer to them in the House of 
Commons, ibid. 138.— The House resolve 
to impeach him upon these Articles, ibid. 
154. — Articles of Impeachment against him 
read in the House of Lords, ibid. 160.— »His 
Answer thereto, ibid. ib. — He petitions for 
Counsel, who are assigned to him, ibid. 161 . 
— ^The Dissolution of the Parliament puts an 
end to the Proceedings, ibid. 162. — ^Bur- 
net's Account of him, ibid. 180 (note).— 
Dryden's Character of him under the name 
of ** Amiel," in Absalom and Achitophel, 
ibid. 136 (note). 

Sir Edward. — His Speech in the 

House of Commons in the Debate on the 
Great Case of Ashby and White, 14 vol. 
730. 

SEYMOUR, Sir Francis.— His Speech in the 
Debate in the House of Commons on the 
Imprisonment of Sir Thomas Darnell and 
others for refusing to lend upon the Com- 
mission of Loans, 3 vol. 60. 

SEYMOUR, Sir Thomas, Lord Seymour of Sud- 
ley. — Proceedings in Parliament against him 
for High Treason and other Misdemeanours, 
2 and 3 Edw. 6,1 549,1 vol.483. — He marries 
Catherine Parir, the Queen Dowager, and 
obtains an influence over the mind of the 
King, ibid. 484^— He is prosecuted by his 
Brother, the Protector, ibid. 486. — ^Articles 
against him, ibid. 487.— *0n the Articles 
being]delivered to him, he demands an open 
Trial,' ibid. 492. — ^His Answer to some of 
the Articles, ibid. 493. — A Bill of Attainder 
against him is passed in the House of 
Lords, ibid. 494.— Some Opposition is made 



130 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



to it io the Hcmse of Commons, ibid. ib. 
(note). — ^The Bill passes the Commons^ ibid. 
495 (note).— The Bill, ibid, 496.— The 
Warrant for his Execution, ibid. 504. — 
Passages from Latimer's Sermons respecting 
his Executioni ibid. 505. 

SHAFTESBURY, Anthony, Earl of.— His 
Speech in the Honse of Lords in the De- 
bate on Dr. Shirley's Case, 6 vol. IITI. — 
Proceedings in the Cburt of King's Bench 
on a Habeas Corpus sued out by hi&a on his 
Commitment to the Tower by the House of 
Lords, 29 Car. 2, 1677, ibid. 1269.— Ac- 
counts of these Proceedings and the Circum- 
stances from which they arose, by Burnet, 
Kennett, and North, ibid. ib. (note).— The 
Eeturn to the Habeas Corpus, setting out 
an Order of the House of Lords for his 
Commitment iot Contempts generally, ibid. 
1270. — Mr. Williams's Argument against 
the Return, ibid. 1276.— Mr. Smith's Argu- 
ment on the same side, ibid. 1285. — Argu- 
ments of Serjeant Maynard and the Attor- 
ney and Solicitor General in support of the 
Commitment, ibid. 1290. — Tlie Earl's Speech 
in Reply, ibid. 1294. — Judgment of the 
Court that they have no Jurisdiction to 

. inquire into the validity of the Coromit- 
ment, ibid. 1296. — ^The Earl makes a Sub- 
mission to the House, ibid. 1297. — ^Extracts 
fpom the Journals. of the House of Lords 
respecting this Transaction, ibid. ib. — Reso- 
lution of the House of Lords in 1680. con- 

. demning these Proceedings, ibid. 1310. — 
Proceedings at the Old Bailey on present- 

. ing to the Grand Jury a Bill of Indictment 
against him for High Treason, 33 Car. 2, 
1681, 8 vol. 759.— Chief Justice Pem- 
berton's Charge to the Grand Jury, ibid. 
760. — ^The King's Counsel require that the 
Evidence to the Grand Jury may be given 
in open Court, to which the Court consents, 
notwithstanding an. Objection by the Grand 
Jury, ibid. 771. — ^The Indictment, ibid. 
775. — Evidence against him, ibid. 780. — 
The Jnry return the Bill Ignoramus, ibid. 
821. — Accounts of this Proceeding by 
Burnet and other Historians, ibid. 759 
(note), B25, 827. — Sir John Hawles's Re- 
marks on this Proceeding, ibid. 835. — 
Dry den's Character of Lord Shaftesbury, ibid . 

766 (note). — Mr. Fox's Notice of him, ibid. 

767 (note). 

SHARP, Dr. James, Archbishop of St. 
Andrew's. — ^His treacherous Conduct in the 
Case of Mitchell, 6 vol. 1207 (note).— Ac- 

• counts of his Death by Burnet and Laing, 
ibid. 1212 (note). — Wodrow's Particular 
Account of his Assassination, 10 vol. 812 

' (note). — ^Narrative of his Muider published 
by Authority, ibid. 821 (note).— Trial of 
David Hackstoun for being concerned in 
his Mui*der, tbid. 791. 

iSH ARPE, Dr. John. See Compton, Dr. Heitry, 

SHARPLESS, John. See Mmenger, Peter. 



SHEARES, Henry and John.— Their Itial at 
Dublin, under a Special Commissioa of 
Oyer and Terminer, for High Treasoo ia 
being concerned in the Irish Rebellion, 38 
Geo. 3, 1798, 27 vol. 255. — Counsel for 
the Prosecution and for the Prisoners, ibid. 
256.— The Indictment, ibid. 257.-- The 
Counsel for the Prisoners move to quash 
the Indictment, on the ground that one of 
<he Grand Jury was an Alien, ibid. 265. — 
The Court refuse the Application, ibid. 266. 
— ^They plead in Abatement that one of the 
Grand Jury is an Alien, ibid. 207. — Repli- 
cation of the Crown, that the Grand Juror 
objected to had taken the Oaths of Allegiance 
and Supremacy, ibid. 268. — The Prisoners 
demur to the Replication, ibid. 271. — Mr. 
Currants Argument in support of the De- 
murrer, ibid. ib. — Mr. Prime Serjeant's 
Argument for the Replication, ibid. 281 .—- 
Mr. Plunkett*s Argument for the Demurrer, 
ibid. 282. — ^The Court give Judgment 'of 
Respondeat Ouster upon the Demurrer, ibid. 
285. — The Attorney General's Speech to 
the Jury for the Prosecution, ibid. 292.-— 
Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 306. — 
Mr. Ponsonby's Speech in Defence of John 
Sheares, ibid. 329. — Mr. Plunkett's Speech 
in Defence of Henry Sheares, ibid. 340.-- 
Evidence for the Prisoners, ibid. 347.^ — Mr. 
Curran's Speech on summing up the Evi- 
dence for the Prisoners, ibid. 364. — Peculiar 
circumstances attending the delivery of this 
Speech, ibid. 363 (note). — ^Mr. Prime Ser- 
jeant's Reply, ibid. 379< — Lord Carleton's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. 385. — ^The Juiv 
find them Guilty, ibid. 392. — LordCarieton^ 
Address on passing Sentence upon them, 
ibid. 395.-^Iney are executed, ibid. 397. 

SHEILS, Alexander. See Archer, Thonuu. 

SHEPHERD, Sir Samuel, Attorney General. 
His Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial 
of James Watson for High Treason, 32 vol. 
26. — His Speech for the Prosecution on the 
Trial of Jeremiah Brand reth, for High Treason 
in being concerned in the Luddite Insurrec- 
tion, ibid. 779. — His Speech in Reply on 
the Trial of William Turner for the same 
Treason, ibid. 1084. — ^His Speech for the 
Prosecution on the Trial of Isaac Ludlam 
for the same Treason, ibid. 1137. 

SHERFIELD, Henry. — Proceedings against 
him in the Star-Cbamber, for breaking a 
painted Window in a Church at Salisbury, 
8 Car. 1, 1632, 3 vol. 519w--Sir Robert 
Heath (Attorney General) opens the In- 
formation against him, ibid, ib.— Mr. Hemes' 
Speech in his Defence, ibid. 520. — His 
Ajnswer to the Information, ibid. 522. — 
Depositions of the Witnesses for the Prose* 
cution, ibid. 525.^--Mr. Herbert's Speeph 
for the Defendant, ibid; 528. — Evidence for 
the Defendant, ibid. 530. — ^The Attorney 
General's Reply, ibid. 536. — Speeches of 
the different Members of the Court on 
delivering their Opinions respecting the 



THE STATE TRIALS- 



121 



, Sentence, ibtd;539<. — Bishop Laud's Speech, 
^d. 548. — Sentence of the Court upon him, 
ibid^ 562. 

SHERIDAN, Dr. Edward .-^-Proceedings in 
the Court of King's Bench in Ireland against 
him and Thomas Kirwan for Offences 
against the Stat. 33 Geo. 3, c. 29, called 
the Irish Convention Act, 52 Geo. 3, 1811, 
1812, 31 vol. 543.— Counsel for the Prose- 
cntioD and for the Defendant, ihid. ib. — 
The Defendant Kirwan challenges one of 
the Grand Jurors, ibid. 548. — Right of a 
Defendant to chsdlenge a Grand Juror 
argned, ibid. 549. — ^The majority of the 
Court decide that no Challenge lies to a 
Grand Juror, ibid. 566. — Kirwan pleads in 
Abatement that several of the Grand Jury 
held Offices under the Crown, and thai others 
of them were not Freeholders, ibid. 576.^ — 
The Attorney General demurs to the Pleas 
in Abatement, ibid. 578. — Argument of the 
Attorney General in support of the De- 
murrer, ibid, ib.— Mr. North's Argument for 
the Plea^, ibid. 587.— Mr. Goold's Argu- 
ment for the Pleas, ibid. 593. — ^Mr. Towns- 
end's Reply for the Crown in support of 
the Demurrer, ibid. 600. — Judgment of the 
Court against the Pleas in Abatement, ibid» 
611.— Trial of Dr. Sheridan, ibid. 634.— 
The Indictment, ibid. 638. — Speech of the 
Attorney General for the Prosecution, ibid. 
641. — ^Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 
656. — Mr. Burrowes's Speech in Defence of 
Dr. Sheridan, ibid. 684.— Mr. Goold's 
Speech on summing up the Evidence for 
the Defence, ibid. 712. — Reply of the Solici- 
tor General, ibid. 729. — Chief Justice 
Downes's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 745. — 
The Jury acquit Dr. Sheridan, ibid. 753. — 
Trial of Mr. Kirwan, ibid, ib.— He challenges 
the Array of the Jury, on the ground of. its 
being made at the nomination of the Solici- 
tor for the Prosecution, ibid. 754. — ^Trial of 
the Challenge, ibid. 755.— The Triers find 
against the Challenge, ibid. 799.-— The Jury 
are sworn, ibid. 807. — Speech of the Attor- 
ney General for the Prosecution, ibid. 809. 
— ^Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 817. 
— ^Mr. Burrowes makes an Objection to the 
Case for the Crown on the ground of a 
Variance, ibid. 854. — The Court reserve the 
point, ibid. 867.^— Mr. Burrowes's Speech 
for (he Defendant, Mr. Kirwan, ibid. ib. — 
Reply of the Solicitor General, ibid. 887. — 
Chief Justice Downes's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 909.-^The Jury find Mr. Kirwan 
Guilty, ibid. 922.— The Court inflict a 
nominal Punishment upon him, ibid. 928. 

SHERIDAN, Richard Brinsley.— His Eri- 
dence on the Trial of Home Tooke for 
High Treason, 25 toI. 386.— His Evidence 
on the Trial of William Stone, ibid. 1248. 
— His Evidence on the Trial of the Earl of 
Thanet and others, 27 vol. 923. 

SHERWIN, John. See SachevereU, WilUam. 

^HERWIN, Ralph. See Can^'m, Msiund. 



SHIELDS, William.— His Trial in Ireland 
with Thomas Watson and Thomas Kinch 
for the Murder of Thomas Ryan, 43 Geo. 
3, 1802, 28 vol. 619.— The Indictment, 
ibid. ib. — Counsel for the Prosecution and 
for the Prisoners, ibid. ib. — Mr. Mac Natt/s 
Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. 621.— 
Eridence for the Prosecution, ibid. 624.'^— 
Evidence for the Prisoners, iWd. 640. — The 
Jury acquit Kinch and Watson, but^ not 
agreeing in their Verdict as to Shields, they 
are discharged, ibid.— The Trial of WiU 
liam Shields, by another Jury, ibid. 647^-«' 

' Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 650.*^^ 
Evidence for the Prisloner, ibid. 670.F-^Mr. 
Justice Day's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 679* 
-^The Jury acquit him, ibid. 682. 

SHIPLEY, William Davies, Dean of St. 
Asaph. — Proceedings on an Indictment 
against him for publishing Sir William 
Jones's Dialogue on the Prmciples of Go- 
vernment, 23-24-25 Geo. 3, 1783-1784, 21 
vol. 847.— Introductory Note to this Case, 
ibid. ib. — ^Motion on the part of. the Prose- 
cution to put ofi* the Trial at Wrexham, on 
the ground of Pamphlets having been cir- 
culated tending to prejudice the Juiy, ibid. 
848. — Mr. Erskine shews cause against the 
Motion, ibid. 859.— The Court grant tke 
Motion, ibid. 868.— The Trial comes on 
before Mr. Justice Buller, at Shrewsbwy, 
ibid. 876.— The Indictment, ibid. ib. — 
Counsel for the Prosecution and for the 
Defendant, ibid; 885. — Mr. Bearcroft^s 
Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. ib.-^Evi- 
dencefor the Prosecution, ibid. 891. -r-Mr. 
Erskine's Speech for the Defendant, ibid. 
898. — Evidence for the Defendant, ibid. 
930.— Mr. Bearcroft's Reply, ibid; 933.— 
Mr. Justice BuUer's Charge to the Juiy, 
ibid. 943.— The Jury return a Verdict of 
« Guilty of publishing only," ibid. 950.— Con- 
versation between the Judge, Mr. Erskine, 
and the Juiy before the Verdict is recorded, 
ibid. ib. and ibid. ib. (note).— A Verdict of 
« Guilty of publishing, but whether a libel 
or not the Jury do not find," is recorded, 
ibid. 955.— Proceedings in the Court of 
King's Bench on a Motion for a New Trial, 
ibid, ib.— >Mr. Erskine^s Speech on that 
Occasion, ibid. 957.— The Court grant a 
Rule to shew causci ibid. 970. — Mr. 
Erskine's Arguments for the Rights of 
Juries, in his Speech in support of the Rule, 
ibid, ib.— Mr. Welch's Speech on the same 
side, ibid. 1023.— Lord Mansfield's Judg- 
ment on discharging the Rule, ibid. 1033. 
—Mr. Erskine moves in Arrest of Judg- 
ment, ibid. 1041.— The Judgment is arrdsted 
for want of proper Averments in the In- 
dictment, to point the application of the 
libellous matter charged to the King and 
Government, ibid. 1044. 

SHIRLEY, Dr. Thomas, 6 vol. 1121. See 
Faggf Sir John. 

SHIV£RS^ Richard. See Golding, JQhtjk, 



133 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



SHOWERy 9ir BaHhokmiew, Recorder of 
I/mdon. — ^He was one of the Counsel for 
the Prosecution on the Trial of the Seven 
l^hops, 12 vol. 333. 

■ ' ' ' ' ■ Counsel. — His 



T 



Argument in the Court of King's Bench in 
the C^se of Kendall and Roe, against the 
. Yitlidity of a Commitment by the Secretary 
. of State for High Treason, 12 vol. 1359. — 
. His Argument of several points of law for 
. Ambrose Rookwood, on his Trial for High 
Treason, 13yol. 145, 154, 201. — His Speech 
oa summing up the Evidence for the Prisoner 
. ^Q the Trial of Peter Qook, ibid. 376.— His 
. Speedi in the House of Commons in De- 
fence of .Sir John Fenwick, ibid* 640.—- His 
Speech in Defence of Charles Duocombe, 
' on his Trial for a Fraud upon Government, 
ibid. J080. — ^His "Antidote against Poison," 
being Remarks by him upon the Paper 
delivered by Lord William Russel to the 
Sheriffs at the place of Execution, 9 vol. 
710.-i-His *' Magistracy and Government of 
England vindicated" respecting the Proceed- 
ings in the Case of Lord William Russel, 
ibid.r41. 

SHREWSBURY, Gilbert, Eari of.— Lord 
Cdce's Report of the Case respecting his 
claim to the Earldom of Waterford and 
Barony of Dungarvan in Ireland, 2 vol. 741. 

SHREWSBURY, Mary, Countess of.— Pro- 
ceeding3 against her before a Select Council 
for a (Jbntempt, in refusing to answer fully 
before the Privy Council respecting the 
Escape and Marriage of Lady Arabella 
.Stuart, or to subscribe her Examination, 10 
Jac. 1, 1612, 2 vol. 769.—- The Charge against 
ber, ibid. 770. — ^The Council determine that, 
if s^e should be proceeded against judicially 
in the Star Chamber, she should be fined 
"^OfiOOl. and be imprisoned during pleasure, 
•ibid. 776.— -Sir Francis Bacon's Speech 
against her, ibid. ib. 

SfilUTE, Samuel. See PUkmgton, Thomat. 

SIDNEY, Colonel Algernon.— His Trial at 
the Bar of the Court of King's Bench for 
High T/eason in being concerned in the 
Rye^Housa Plat, 35 Can 2, 1663, 9 vol. 817. 
—The Indictment, ibid, ib.— He hesitates 
to pl^d, ibid^ 8!^0,— He offers a Special 

. Plea* which he afterwards withdraws, and 
Ijieads Not Guilty, ibid. 822.-*The Special 
Plea, ibid. ib. (note). — ^He demands a Copy 
of the Indictment, and Cpunsel, which are 
xelused by the Court, ibid. 833. — Speech of 
the Attorney General (Sir Robert Sawyer) 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 838.--^Evidence 
against him, ibid. 840.— Lord Howard's 
Evidence, ibid, 849. — Evidence of his hand- 
writing to certain Papers, ibid. 854.— Chief 
Justice Jefieries's unworthy Attempt to pro- 
cure his acknowledgment that he was the 
Author of certain Papers produced against 
him, ibid. 858 and (note). — ^His Defence, 
ibid. 860,»-<-£videiiee in contradiction of 



Lord Howard's Testimony, ibid. 969. — ^U^ 
Address to the Jury, ibid. 876. — Reply of 
the Solicitor General (Finch), ibid. 860. — 
Chief Justice Jefferies's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 888.— The Jury find him Guilty, ibtd. 
895. — Being called on for Judgraeoty he 
makes several Objections, which are over- 
mled, ibid. 897.— Sentence of Death is pass- 
ed upon him, ibid. 901. — His Petition to the 
King, ibid. 904w — ^His Execution, ibid. 906. 
—The King remits all the circumstances of 
his Sentence, except beheading, ibid, tb.-— 
Paper delivesed by him to the Sheriff at the 
place of Execution,ibid.907. — ^His "Apology 
lor himself in the Day of his Death,'' ibid. 
916.*'The Examination of several Peraons 
after the Revolution connected with this 
Trial and the Cases of Lord Russel, Sir 
Thomas Armstrong, and Mr. Cornish, ibid. 
951.— Act of Parliament reversing Sidney's 
Attainder, ibid. 991.r~Sir John Hawles's 
Remarks upon this Trial, ibid. 999.— Roger 
North^s Account of it in the ^^Exanaen,'' 
- ibid. 840 (note). — Burnet's Account of 
Sidney, ibid. 492. — ^His Account of his Trial 
and Execution, ibid. 514.— Remarks upon 
the existence of a Concert between Sidney 
and the Court of France, ibid. 906 (note). — 
Accountof his Trial and Execution, extracted 
from Narcissus Luttrelfs ^ Brief Historical 
Relation," ibid. 1014, 1016. 

SIMONS, Henry, the Jew. — ^His Case upon 
his Trial for maliciously and fiilsely putting 
Money into the Pocket of James Ashley, 
with intent to charge him with robbing him 
of the same, 25 Geo. 2, 1752, 19 vol. 680. 
— Narrative of the Circumstances which 
gave occasion to this Trial, ibid. ib. — The 
Indictment, ibid. 682. — He is found Guilty, 
ibid. 684. — He moves for a New Trial, ibid, 
ib. — Affidavits of the Jury in support of the 
Motion for a New Trial, statingj^that they 
merely meant to find the fact that Simons 
put the Money into Ashley's Pocket, as 
charged by the Indictment, but not the 
criminal Intention with which he was charged 
to have done it, ibid. ib. — ^The Court grant 
a New Trial, ibid. 692. — Simons recovers 
Damages in Actions for false Imprisonment 
against Ashley and the Constables who 
apprehended him, ibid. ib. (note). 

SINCLAIR, Charles. See Skning, WUlmm. 
GerrMy Jowpk. Margarotf iictmoe.— -Pro- 
ceedings against him in the High Court 
of Justiciary for Sedition, in being a 
Member of an unlawful Assembly^ c&dled 
the General Convention, 34 Geo. 3, 1794, 
23 vol. 777.— The Indictment, iUd. tU 
— "Advocates for the Prosecution and for 
the Panel| ibid. 784. — ^Argument of Mr. 
Fletcher against the Rc^vancy of the Indict« 
ment, ibid. ib. — Argument of the Counsel 
for the Prosecution in support of it, ibid. 
786.— The Court decide that the Indictment 
is relevant, ibid. 795. — ^The Prosecution ii 
abandoned; ibid* 802. 



T|IJE STATE TRIALS. 



1S3 



ailD£aCO|i£, Miles, otlMniMe oalled Fiih. 
— His Trial for High Treason in oonfpifing 
the Death of the Lord Protector, and the 
subversion of the Government, 8 Car. 2, 
1657, 5 vol. 841.— The Indictment, ibid. 
844.— He pleads Not Guilty, ibid. ib.>-The 
Evidence against him, ibid. ib. — He is 
foond Goiitjri and sentenced to Death, ibid. 
648. — He tid&es PoiseQ in the Tow«r, ibid. 
851«~-*Proceedings on the Coroner's Inquest 
held on his body, ibid. 853. — Certificates of 
the Physicians and Surgeons respectipg the 
appearance of his body after death, ibid. 
857. — ^Verdict of the Coronet's Inquest, ibid. 
8S8. — ^Evidence produced on the Coroner's 
Inquest, ibid. 860.— -Examinations taken 
before the Council, ibid. 866. — ^Lord Claren- 
don's Notice of his Case, ibid. 851 (note)« 

SIRR, Charles Henry. See Hevey, John, 

SKENE, Jame8.-^His Trial at Edinburgh for 
being accessary to the Rebellion of the 
Covenanters at Air's Moss and Bothwell 
Bridge, and for treasonable Declarations, 
32 Car. 2, 1680, 8 vol. 123.— He is found 
Guilty upon his own Confession, and bang- 
ed, ibid. 124. — Lord Fountainhairs Notice 
of this Case, ibid. 123 (npte). 

SKINNER, Matthew, Ser|eant4it*Law.~His 
Speech for the Defendants on the Trial of 
the Qno Warranto against the Town and 
Port of Hastings, 17 vol. 893. 



■^ King's Serjeant. <>- His 

Speech for the Prosecution in Uie House of 
liords, on the Trial of Lofd Kilmam e ck ^ 18^ 
vol. 463. 

SKINNER, Dr. Robert, Bishop of Oxford. 
See ISodve Bithops. 

SKINNER, Thomas.^ProceedingB , on a Pe- 
tition by him to the House of Lords against 
the East India Company, 18 Car. 2, 1666, 
6 vol.. 709. — ^Hia Petition to the King in 
Council, ibid. 711.T*-<It is referred to certain 
Inords,. ibid. ib.rrrHis Case before the Lords 
Referees, ibid. 712.— Answer of the East 
Jndift Company, ibid. 713.*r-His Reply, 
ibid. 714. — ^The Leeds Referees report to 
the JLipg and Council in favour of his claim, 
ibid. 715. — ^The King, by a Message, re- 
commends it to the House of Lords to do 
justice to him, ibid. 716.-T*The Company's 
Answer to his Petition in the House of 
I^ds, denying the Jurisdiction of the Lofds 
to determine the matters of the Petition, 
ibid. ib. — The House of Lords appoint a 
day to hear the Case, but Parliament is 
proiogQed before any Decision is formed 
upon it, ibid. 717.-^His Petition to the 
House of Lords on the next meeting of Par- 
liament, ibid. ib.T-^The Company's Answer 
thereto, objecting as before to the Jurisdic- 
tion of the House of Lords, ibid. 718.^The 
Jadgfes give their Opinion tQ the House, 
that, part of the matters of the Petitions 
mi^ht.^ determined in the ordinaiy Courts 



of Lnr, and pari not, sUd. TlOd^llie 
Howe refer it to a Committee to state vHiat 
Recompence he ought to receive, ibid. 721. 
— ^Tbe Company's Petition to the House of 
Commons, ibid. ib. — Resolutions of the 
Commons against the Proceedings of the 
Lords, ibid. 726. — ^The House of Lords 
resolve that the Petition of the Company to 
the House of Commons b a scandaloudt 
libel^ and that the Company should pay to 
Skinner 5,000/., ibid. 724.--C!onferences 
between the two Houses of Parliament ]re- 
specting the Jurisdiction of the House of 
I^rds to take cognizance of this Case, ibid. 
729. — The King proposes to both Houses to 
erase from their respective Journals aU 
Entries relating to this Ca^e, and to end 
their differences, which is done, ibid. 767.— 
Narrative of the Occurrences subsequent to 
the Conferences, from Mr. Hargrave's Abridg- 
ment of this Case, ibid. 7^8. 

SKIRVING, William. See Oerrald, Joupk. 
Muur^ Thomoi, Margmrot^ JMonrtoi—- His 
Evidence on the Trial of Thomas Muir, 
23 vol. 168.— His Trial at Edinburgh for 
SeditioUf in being a Member of an ui|* 
lawful Society, 34 Geo. 3, 1794^ ibid. 
391, 472.— The Indictment, ibid. 472.— 
The Solicitor General's ArgumeUt in sup« 
pcNrt of ^ Relevancy of the Jadictmeiit, 
ibid. 484.H-Mr. Skirving's Argument against 
it, ibid. 491. -^The Court decide that the 
Indictment is relevant^ ibid* dOd.-^Evidesce 
for the Prosecution, ibid. dH'-VJTie Panel 
produces no Evident, ibid. 53^.wrbe Lord 
Advocate's Speech for the Prosecution,, ibid. 
536. — Skirving's Speech in his Defenooi 
ibid. 562.-^The Court sum up the Case, 
ibid. 588.«*The Jury find him GuiUy» ilnd. 
593.— The Court determine to .sentence him 
toTransportationfor Four teen years,ibid-594. 
— ^Address of the Society for Constitutional 
Information to him after his Conviction, 24 
▼ol. 566.t— His Letter to -the President of 

the Society in acknowledgment tharepf„ ibid* 
568. — ^He dies soon after his arrival in New 
Holland, 23 vol. 1412. 

SLAUGHTER, Johui See Gfo^iiM^, Jo4«. 

SLAUGHTERFORD» Christopher.^Aeeouit 
of his Trial ^d Condi^qination .upon aa 
Appeal of Murder aft^r i^n Acquittal upon 
an Indictment, 18 vol. 326 (note) — Paper 
delivered by him to the Sheriff at the place 
of ExecutioQ, ibid* ib. 

SIINGSBY, Sir Henry.—His Trial befom the 
High Court of Justice for, High.Treasoi)i in 
conspiring to deliver up the GsirrisoQof^ll* 
to Charles the Second, 10 Car. 2, 1658, 5 
vol. 871.<-*The Charge against him, ibid* 
874.— *He pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 876. — 
Evidence against him, ibid. 877. — ^Ilie At- 
torney General (Prideaux) sums up the Evi- 
dence, ibid. 882.— Judgment of the Court 
upon him, ibid. 925.-T-His Execution, ibidi 
929.^Loid Claraodon's Aeoeunt of htm. 



134 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



' ibid. 871 (note).— LadlowV Account of the 
TransactioQ from nvhicli this Proceeding 
. aroie, ibid. 882. 

SIJOANE, Dr. (afterwards Sir Hans Sloane). 
— ^His Evidence respecting the Appearances 
of the Bodies of persons who have died by 
Drownings 13 vol. 1 156. 

SMETON, Marie. See Norrit, Henry. 

SMITH, Francis.— His Trial for publishing 
libellous Remarks upon the Trial of Wake- 
man and others, 32 Car. 2, 1680, 7 vol. 931. 
—Speech of Jefferies, the Recorder, for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 933. — His Counsel admit 
the Indictment, ibid. 936. — ^A small Fine is 
imposed upon him, ibid. 937. — A Narrative 
of nis Sufi&rings in consequence of this and 
other Proceedings against him, written by 
himself, ibid. ib. — A Bill preferred against 
liim for another Libel is ignored by the 
Grand Jury, ibid. 942. — ^Jefferies's Conduct 
to die Grand Jury on that occasion, ibid. ib. 
•^-Jefferies endeavours to induce him to 

. confess the Bill which the Grand Jury had 
ignored, ibid. 943. 

SMITH, Henry, 5 vol. 1005, 1205. See 
* 'RegjiddeM, 

SMITH, Isabel. See Morrti, John. 

SMITH, James. — ^Proceedings against him and 
^John Mennons, in the High Court of 
Justiciary, for Sedition, in belonging to an 
unlawful Society, 33 Geo. 3, 1793, 23 vol. 
33.— The Indictment, ibid, ib.— Smith is 
outlawed for not appearing to answer, ibid. 
42. 

SMITH, Mary.— Account of her Case for 
Witchcraft, 13 Jac. 1, 1616, 2 vol. 1049.— 
Her Interviews with the Devil, ibid. 1051. — 
Her supposed' Practices against several 
persons, ibid. 1053. — Her Conduct at her 
£zecution, ibid. 1050. 

SMITH, Samud. See SachevereO, William. 
SMTTH, Walter. See CargiU, Donald. 

SMYTH, Sydney Stafford, Counsel, 17 vol. 
801. — ^His Speech for the Prosecution on 
the Trial of the Smugglers at Chichester for 
Murder, 18 vol. 1086. 

■ III Sir Sydney Stafford, Baron of the 

Exchequer, 25 Geo. 2, 18 vol. 1117. 

SNATI, William. See Cook, Skadrach. 

SNIGG, George, Baron of the Exchequer, 6 
Jac. 1, 2 vol. 576. 

80AME, Sir William, 6 vol. 1063. See Bar- 
fuardition, Sir Samud, 

SOMERS, John, Counsel— He is of Counsel 
. for the Defendants on the Trial of Pilkington 
and others, for a Biot at the Election of 
Sheriffs for the City of London, 6 vol. 226. 
— He is retained as one of the Counsel for 
the Seven Bishops, at the suggestion of 
^ FpUexfeo, who rcSfttsed to aocept a Retainer 



unless he was joined with him, 12 toI. 31 fi 
(note). , - ( 

Sir John, Solicitor General, 3 Will. 



and Mary. — His Speech for the Prosecution 
on the Trial of Lord Preston for High 
Treason, 12 vol. 678. 

Attorney General, 4 Will. 



and Mar^, 12 vol. 928. — His Speech for the 
Prosecution on tlie Trial of Ix>rd Mohun 
in the House of Lords for Murder, 12 vol. 
961. 

— - John, Lord, Lord Chancellor, 11 
Will. 3. — He is appointed Lord High 
Steward on the Trials of the Earl of Waiwick 
and Lord Mohun for Murder, 13 vol. 940. 
— ^His Address to the Earl of Warwick, on 
his being brought to the Bar, ibid* 952. — 
— His Address to Lord Mohun on his being 
brought to the Bar, ibid. 1033. . . 

Lopd Keeper, 12 WilL 

3. — His celebrated Argument on giving his 
Judgment in the Exchequer Chamber in the 
Bankers' Case, 14 vol. 39, — Mr. Hargrave 
characterizes this as one of the most elaborate 
Arguments ever delivered in Westminster 
HaSu, ibid. 3. — ^He is said to have expended 
several hundred Pounds in collecting Books 
and Pamphlets for this Argument, ibid. 39 
(note).— Part of his Argument in this Case 
alluded to in the Articles of Impeachment 
subsequently preferred against him, ibid. 
262. 



'■ ' Proceedings in Par- 

liament against him, William Ead of Port- 
land, Edward Earl of Orford, and Chaiies 
Lord Halifax, upon an Impeachment for 
High Crimes and Misdemeanours, 1 3 Will. 
3, 1701, 14 vol. 233.— 'Articles of Impeacln 
ment against Lord Orford, ibid. 241.— His 
Answer thereto, ibid. 245.— Articles of 
Impeachment against Lord Somers, ibid. 
250.— His Answer thereto, ibid. 363.— A 
day is appointed for the Trial of Lord 
Somers, ibid. 285. — ^Articles of Impeach- 
ment against Charles Lord Halifax, ibid. 
293.— His Answer thereto, ibid. 299. — Pro- 
ceedings on the Trial of Lord Somers, ibid. 
308.— The Commons not appearing to pro- 
secute the Impeachment, the Lords resolve 
to acquit him, ibid. 310.-^A day is ap- 
pointed for the Trial of Lord Orford^ ibid. 
311. — ^The Lords resolve to acquit him, on 
the Commons not appearing to prosecute 
the Impeachment, ibid. 321. — ^No Articles 
being exhibited against Lord Portland, the 
Lords dismiss his Impeachment, ibid. 322. 
— ^The Impeachment of Lord Halifax also 
dismissed for the same reason, ibid, ib.-^ 
Proceedings in the House of Commons re- 
specting mese Impeachments, ibid. 323.-' 
Dean Swift's Account of these Proceedings, 
ibid. 234 (note).— Swift's various Opinions 
of Lord Somers at different periods, ibid, 
ib* ibid. 236 (note), ibid. 237 (note). 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



125 



SOMERSET, Edwardy Duke of, Lord Pro* 
tectbr. — Proceedings against him in Par- 
EameAt for Treason and Misdemeanours, 
3 £dw. 6y 1550, 1 vol. 509.—Proclamation 
against lum by the Council, ibid. ib. — He 
is committed to the Tower, ibid. 510. — 
Articles of Accusation delivered to him in 
the Tower, ibid. ib. — ^His first Submission 
and Confession^ ibid. 512. — ^An Act of Par- 
liament passed, imposing a Fine upon him, 
founded upon his Confession, ibia. 514. — 
His second Submission, ibid. ib. — He \s 
pardoned, and almost the whole of his 
Estate is restored to him, ibid. 516^ — ^Pro- 
. eeedings against him for Treason and Felony, 
5 Edw. 6, 1551, ibid. 516.— He is sent to 
the Tower, ibid. ib. — Examinations of seve- 
ral Witnesses against him, ibid. 516. — Com- 
mission granted to the Lord Treasurer, 
appointing him Lord High Steward to try 
him, ibid. 51 7.— Several Indictments against 
him, ibid. 518, — ^Record of the Proceedings 
on one of the Indictments, ibid. ib. — He is 
. acquitted of Treason, but is found Guilty of 
' Felony, ibid. 521. — He petitions for his Life, 
bat is beheaded, ibid. 522. — Account of 
bis Execution, ibid. ib. — ^His Speech on the 
Scaffold, ibid. 523. — Singular Occurrence 
at his Execution, ibid. 524.— It was generally 
believed that the Conspiracy on which he 
. was condemned, was a Forgery, ibid. 523 
(note).— Case presented by his 6reat Grand- 
son, the Marquis of Hertford, to the House 
of Lords, in support of his Petition to be 
restored to the Title, ibid. 526. — His Cor- 
respondence with Gardiner, Bishop of Win- 
. Chester, respecting the Reformation, ibid. 
55r. 

SOMERSET, Countess of. See Et$ex, Frmeet 
Eoward, Ccunteuqf. 

SOMERSET, Robert Carr, Earl of.— His 

Trial in the House of Lords for being 

accessary before the &ct to the Murder of 

. Sir Thomas Overbury, 14 Jac. 1, 1616, 2 

. vol.965. — ^He pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 968. 

— The Lord High Steward's Address to him 

' on his being brought to the Bar, ibid. ib. — 

■ Speech of the Attorney General (Sir Francis 

Bacon) for the Prosecution, ibid. 969. — 

Evidence agatnstbim, ibid. 978. — His Speech 

• in his Defence, ibid. 992.— The Lords find 
« him Guilty, ibid. 997. — Sentence of Death 

• is passed upon him, ibid. ib.-*-King James's 
Anxiety during the Trial, ibid. 998 (note). — 
His Letter to the King si^er his Condemna- 
tion, ibid. 999. — ^His Pardon, ibid. 1010. — 
His Petition to Charles the First for the 
recovery of his Estate, ibid. 1018. 

SOMERSET, Earl of. See Bedford, Earl of . 

SOMERSETT, James, the Negro.— His Case 
on a Habeas Corpus in the Court of King's 

. Bench, to {ry the legality of his detention as 
a Slave, 12 Geo. 3, 1771-72^.20 vol. 1.— 
Statement of the Facts of the Case, ibid, 
ib.— R^om to the Habeas Corpus, ibid. 7. 



— ^Mr. Hargrave's Argument for his Dis- 
charge, ibid. 23.-— Mr. Alleyne^s Aigument 
on the same side, ibid. 67. — Mr. V^IIace's 
Argument on the same side, ibid. 69. — Mr. 
Dunning's Argument for his Detainer, ibid. 
71. — Serjeant Davy's Argument on the same 
side, ibid. 76.— Lord Mansfield delivers the 
Judgment of the Court in fiivour of his 
Discharge, ibid. 80* 

SOUTHAMPTON, Henry, Earl of, 1 vob 
1333. See Emxj Robert, Earl of. 

SPARKES, John. See Dainon, Josqfh. 

SPARKES, Michael. See Ptym, WiUiam.-^ 
Proceedings in the Star Chamber against 
him for printing '< Histrio-mastix," 9 Car. 1,. 
1632, 3 vol. 561. 

SPEKE, Hugh, 9 vol. 1127. See BradAm, 
Lawrence* 

SPELMAN, Sir Heniy.— His Answer to ih% 
Apology for Archbishop Abbot, 2 vol. 1169. 

SPILMAN, Sir John, Judge of K. B. 26 Hen. 
8, 1 vol. 898. 

SPOTISWOOD, Sir Robert.— -Proceeding* 
V against him for High Treason, at a Parlia- 
ment holden at St. Andrew's, in Scotland, 21 
Car. 1, 1645, 4 vol. 767.— The Indictment, 
ibid. 768.— His Answer thereto, ibid. 771. 
—Replies to his Answer, ibid. 774. — ^His 
Duplies to the Replies, ibid, 778.— He 
pleads, that when he was taken Prisoner of 
War, Quarter was granted him, and there- 
fore that as these Proceedings cannot touch 
his Life, they ought to be stayed, ibid. 781. 
-—Reply to this Plea, ibid. 784.— Duplies 
to the Reply, ibid. 786.— Lord Ogilvie*8 
Defence, as referred to by him, and incor- 
porated with his own, ibid. 794. — ^Auswers 
to Lord Ogilvie's Defence, ibid. 799. — 
Reasons why he should not be called upon 
for his other Defences till the question of 
Quarter is decided, ibid. 800. — ^Answers 
thereto, ibid. ib. — ^Duplies to these Answers, 
ibid.. 802. — ^Report of the Commissioners 
appointed to conduct the Process against 
him, ibid. 803. — ^The Parliament declare 
him Guilty of Treason, and pass Sentence of 
Death upon him, ibid. 806. — His Eiacution, 
ibid. 815. — Mr. Laing's Observations upon 
this Prosecution, ibid. 767 (note). 

SPRATT, Dr. Thomas, Bishop of Rochester. 
See Seven Bi$hopt, — His Letter to the Eccle- 
siastical Commissioners, declining, to act 
any longer under the Commission, 12 vol. 
492 (note).— He was one of the Commis- 
sioners appointed to exercise ecclesiastical 
Jurisdiction in the Diocese of London during 
the Suspension of Bishop Compton, 11 vol« 
1166. — ^He was one of the Bishops appointed 
to degrade Johnson, ibid. 1350. — Proceed- 
ings against' him before the Privy Council 
concerning a Plot to restore King James 
the Second, 4 Will, and Mary, 1692, 12 vol. 
I051.«-His Fint Examination befMe aCom- 
miltee of the Council, ibid. 1055|-*Hia 



186 



Second ExaminaUoDy ilnd. 1059.— Black- 
head's Evidence against him, ibid. 1 060. — 
His Account of the Witnesses who supported 
the Charge against him, ibid. 1079. — One 
of them, under Sentence of Death for Coin- 
ing, confesses the falsehood of the Charge, 
ibid. 1165^— Some Particulars respecting 
bim, 9 vol. 362^ and (note), 12 toI. 1051 
(note). 

SPREULL, John.— His Trial with Robert 
Ferguson at Edinburgh, for Treason in 
being concerned in the Rebellion- in Scot- 
land previously to the Battle of Bothwell 
Bri^, 33 Car. 2, 1681, 10 vol. 725.— The 
Indictment, ibid. 728.— SpreuU's Exami- 
nation before the Council, ibid. 729 (note). 
— ^The Torture is applied to him, ibid. 730 
(not<i}. — ^His Counsel object that he cannot 
by Law be indicted for Offences denied by 
bim under Torture, ibid. 757.— Answer <» 
the King's Advocate to the Objection, ibid. 
756.— Sir George Lockhart's Reply for the 
Panel, ibid. 766.— The Court overrule the 
Objection, ibid. 772.— Ferguson confesses 
the Indictment, ibid. 774. — Evidence against 
SpreuU, ibid. 775. — ^His Counsel object to 
the evidence of a Witness against him, that 
be had beea previously examined on oath 
vespecting the contents of the- Indictment, 
ibid. 778. — ^The Objection is overruled, ibid. 
781.— His Counsel object to Evidence of 
his Confession before the Privy Council, 
because it was not signed by himy ibid. 785. 
—The Court refuse to admit the Confession, 
ibid. 790.— The Court, at the suggestion of 
the King's Advocate, interrogate him whether 
he thought being at Bothwell Bridge was a 
Rebellion, ibid^ ib< — He refused to answer, 
ibid, ib.— The Assize find Ferguson Guilty 
upon hn own Confession, and acquit Sprenll, 
ibid. 791.~«Extracts from Lord Fountain- 
hall's Decisions respectio|^ SpreuU, ibid. 
725 (note). — ^Wodrow's Account of the Pro- 
ceedings against him, ibid. 727 (note). 

SPROT, George.— His trial at Edinburgh for 
being concerned in the Gowrie Conspiracy, 
6* Jac. 1, 1608, 2 vol. 697. — His Confession 
respecting the Conspiracy, ibid, ib.— The 
Indictment, ibid. 701.— He confesses the 
Indictment, ibid. 704. — The Assize find him 
Guilty, ibid. 705.— Sentence of Death is 
passed upon him, ibidn ib. — His*£Secutien> 
ibid* 706. 

SPUR, John. See BaynUm^ Sarah, 

SQUIRES, Mary. See Cammg, Mitabeth. 
Gibbons, John, — Her Trial with Susannah 
Wells, at th& Old Bailey, for feloniously 
stealing a Pair of Stays firom the person of 
Elizabeth Canning, 25 Geo. 2, 1753, 19 vol. 
261 — Evidence of Elizabeth Canning, ibid. 
• 262.— Evideuoe in support of an Alibi for 
Squires, ibid«. 272. — ^The}r are both found 
Guilty, and Squires is sentenced to Death, 
ibid. 274**-*Peti4ion of the Lord Mayor to 
the Kiog on their behalf, ibid, ib.— They 



GENERAL INDEX TO 

recdve a Pardon, ibid. 275.— Trial of ihA 
Witnesses for the Prisoners for Peijury id 
their Evidence on this Trial, ibid. ib. — ^Triaj 
of Elizabeth Oanniog for Perjury in he< 
Evidence on this Trial, ibid. 283. 



STAFFORD, William, Viscount.— Proceed 
ings in Parliament against hitn, the Earl ot 
Powis, Lord Petre, Lord Arundel of Wardour, 
and Lord Bellasis (commonly called the Five 
Popish Lords), for High Treason, in being 
concerned in the Popish Plot, 30 Car. 2, 
1670, 1 Jac. 2i 1685, 7 vol. W17. — Pro- 
ceedings respecting their Arrest, ibid, ib.— 
The Commons resolve to impeach them, 
ibid. 1123, 1124. — Articles of Impeachment 
against ihem delivered to the Lords by the 
Commons, ibid. 1235. — ^The House of LoTd» 
Older that Counsel be permitted to assist 
them in matters of Law, ibid. 1240. — Names 
of the Counsel respectively assigned to 
them, ibid. 1 242. — ^Answer of Lord Bellasis 
to the Articles of Impeachment, ibid. 1244. 
— Lord Powis's Answer thereto, ibid. 1248. 
— Lord Stafford's Answer, ibid. 1251. — 
Lord Petrels Answer, ibid* 1254. — ^Lord 
Arunders Answer, ibid. 1255.— -The Com- 
mons object that the Answer of Lbrd 
Bellasis must be put in in person, and that 
the Answers of the other impeached Lords 
are evasive and argumentative, ibid. 1259. 
^-All of them, except Lord Petre, withdraw 
their former Answers, and answer genendly 
Not Guilty, ibid. 1260. — ^Debates asd Reso- 
lutions in the House of Lords ptetiminary 
to die Trial of the Impeachment, ibid. 
1266. — Commission to Heneage,Lord Finch, 
(afterwards Earl of Nottingham) to be 
Lord High Steward for their Trials, ibid. 
1^1.— Trial of Lord Stafltord, 32 Car. 2, 
1680, ibid. 1293.-~Order of the Prt>ceeding8 
for the Trial, ibid, ib.— The Lord High 
Steward's Address to him on his beings 
brought to the Bar, ibid. 1297. — Speech of 
Serjeant Mmiard for the Commons, ibid. 
1298.— Sir Francis Winnington's Speech, 
ibid. i302.-^Mr.Treby's Speech^ ibid. 1308. 
— General Evidence of the existence of the 
Plot, ibid. 1310, — Dugdale's Evidence^ ibid. 
1314. -Gates's Evidence, ibid. 1320.-— The 
Records of the Convictions of Coleman and 
others given in Evidence, ibid. 1833.-*^Par« 
ticular Evidence of Lord Stafford's ocmnexion 
with the P1g4, ibid. 1340.--Di^gdale^8 £vi« 
dence on this part of the Case, ibid. ib. — 
Oates's Evidence, ibid. 1347. — Turbenrille's 
Evidenee,ibid«1351 .—Lord StaffordlB Speech 
in his Defence, ibid. 1356.— Dugdaie is 
examined again, ibid. 1377.— Evidence to 
contradict Dugdale, ibid. 1382.— Witnesses, 
called to prove, that Dugdale had endeavour* 
ed to persuade them to swear falsely against- 
Lord Stafibrd, ibid. 1400.— Gates is ex- 
amined' again, ibid. 1407:— Evidence in 
Reply, ibid. 1449. — At the dose of the 
Evidence in Reply^ Lord Stafibrd is permit- 
ted to add to his Evsdencei ibid. 1482^— 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



137 



Speech on sumioiDg up. the Evidence 
for the Defence, ibid. 1486. — His Remarks 
upon OateSy ibid. 1488. — Several Points of 
law suggested by Lord Stafford, ibid. 1491. 
—Sir William Jones's Speech in Reply for 
the Coinmons, ibid. 1493*— Mr. Powle's 
Speech, ibid. 1516.-— Answers of the Mana- 
gers to the Points of law suggested by Lord 
StaiTord, ibid. 1519.— The Lords resolve to 
liear Lord Stafford's Counsel upon the Point 
of law, whetherin caiies of Treason, there must 
be two Witnesses to each Overt act, ibid. 
1525.— His Counsel decline to argue it, un- 
less time is given them for ])reparation, ibid. 
ib. — ^The Judges deliver their Opinions in the 
negative upon the Point of law, and that it 
is not disputable, ibid. 1528. — ^Lord Stafford's 
Remark upon the Reason given by Baron 
Atkyiis for his Opinion, ibid. 1529. — He is 
permitted by the JLords to address them again 
m his Defence, ibid. 1538. — ^His Speech, 
ibid. ib. — General Reply of the Managers 
for the Commons, ibid. 1549. — He is found 
Guilty by a Majority of Twenty*Four Peers, 
ibid. 1553.— He moves in arrest of Judg- 
ment upon a defect in his Arraignment, 
ibid* 1554.— The Objection is overruled, 
ibid. ib. — The Commons demand Judgment 
against him, ibid. ib.<— >The Lord High 
Steward passes Judgment upon him, ibid. 
1555. — Burnet says, that Lora Nottingham's 
Speech on passing Judgment upon Lord 
Stafford, was one of the best he ever made, 
ibid. 1556 (note).— The Writs for his Exe- 
cation, ibid. 1561. — ObjeetiOns made by 
the Sheriffs to the form of the Writs, ibid. 
1562.— ^Burnet's Account of his Conduct 
afteir his Condemnation, ibid. 1559 (note). 
— Burnet's Character of him, ibid. 1993 
(note). — His Speech from the Scaffold, ibid. 
1564. — Sir John Reresby's Account of Lord 

Sufford's Trial, ibid. 1293 (note) Mrs. 

Macaulay's Account of it, ibid. 1583 (note). 
— A Bill was brought into Parliament in 
1665 for reversing his Attainder, but did not 
pass the Commons, ibid. 1571. — The other 
Lords are discharged in 1685, ibid. 1572. — 
Account of Mr. Hargrave's Argument re- 
specting the validity of Lord Stafibid's 
Attainder, ibid. 1573 (note). 

STAIR, Earl of. See Glenco, Matsacre of.--' 
Apolo^ for his Conduct respecting the 
Massacre of Glenco, 13 vol. 883 (note). — 
Letters written by him to Lord Breadalbane 
pieviously to the Massacre, ibid. 888 (note). 

STANDSFIELD, Philip.— His Trial at Edin- 
burgh for High Treason and Parricide, 
4 Jac. 2, 1688, 11 vol. 1371.— The In- 
dictment, ibid. ib. — ^Debate on the Rele« 
vancy of the Indictment, ibid. 1377.— The 
Court decide that the Indictment is relevant, 
ibid. 1393. — Evidence against him, ibid. 
1394. — Evidence that, on his touching his 
Father's dead Body, the Blood flowed from 
it, ibid. 1403, |409.—*Sir George Mackenzie's 
Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. 1413, — 



He is found Guilty, and Sentence of Death 
is passed upon him, ibid. 1419. 

STANFORD, WiHiami Queeo^s Serjeant, l 
Mary, 1 vol. 869. 

STANLEY, Sir William. — Proceedings against 
him for Treason, 10 Hen. 7, 1494-5, 1 vol. 
277. — Mr. Hargrave's Introductory Note to 
this Case, ibid. ib. — ^His Offence consisted 
in saying, " that if he knew eertCHnly that 
Perkyn Warbeck was the Son of Edward 
the Fourtli, he would not bear arms 
against him/' ibid. 278, 282.*~Beasons 
of the Judges for holding these words to. 
be Treason, ibid. 282.— Some Writers say, 
that he had promised Warbeck Assfetaalsey 
and sent him Money, ibid. ib. — He con* 
fesses the Words, ibid. 278, 281 .—He is 
arraigned, condemned, and beheaded, ibidJ 
279, 281. — He is said to have been llie 
richest man in England, ibid. 281.— His 
Case is cited for the Crown on the Trial of 
Sir Nicholas Throckmorton, ibid. 893. — 
Lord Bacon's Account of the Proceedings 
against him, ibid. 280. — ^The Record of las 
Case, 3 vol. 366. 

STAPLETON, Sir Miles, But.— His Trial at 
York for High Treason, in being coneemed 
in the Popish Plot, 33 Car. 2, 1(S81, 8 vol. 
5dl. — The Indictment, ibid, ib.-— He pleods 
Not Guilty, ibid. 502.— His Trial deferped 
till the next Assizes for deiault of Jurors^ 
l!he King's Counsel refusing to pray a Tales, 
ibid. 503. — His Trial at the next Assizes, 
ibid. ib. — Serjeant Stringer's Speech for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 504.*-£vidence ibr the 
Prosecution, ibid. 505. — Bolron's Evidence 
against him, ibid. 507.— Evidence for &e 
Prisoner to contradict Bolion^ ibid. 511.-— 
Evidence in Reply, ibid. 521. — Mr. Justice 
Dolben^s Charge to the Jury, ibid. 523.—^ 
Mr. Baron Gregory's Charge, ibid. 524. — 
the Jury acquit him, ibid. 526. 

STAPLETON, Sir Phflip, Bart.--See EoUii^ 
DengiL 

STARKEY, Henry. Se^ Anderson, Lionel* 

."^TARKEY, John. See Maccksfieldp Charles, 
Earl of, 

STAUGHTON, Sir Nicholas. See StoughUm, 
Sir Nicholas. 

STAYLEY, WHliam.-.His Trial for High 
Treason, in being concerned in the Popish 
Plot, 30 Car. 2, 1678, 6 vol. 1501.— He 

J leads Not Guilty, ibid, ib.— Sir William 
ones's Speech for the Prosecu^bn, ibid. 
1502. — Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid, 
ib. — His Defence, ibid. 1505. — Chief Jus- 
tice Scroggs examines the Prisoner,, ibid. ib. 
—Evidence for the Defence^ ibid. 1508^-^ 
The Chief Justice's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid, ib.— Sentence of Death is passed upon 
him, ibid. 1510.-^He is executed, ibid. 
1511.— His Conduct at the place of Execu* 



128 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



tion, 7 Tol. 569.— Burnet's Account of this 
Trial, 6 ToL 1415. 

STEDMAN, Mary. See Moders, Mary. 

STEEL, William^ Counsel.— He is one of the 
Counsel appointed by the Commonwealth 
to prepare and prosecute the Charge against 
Charles the First, 4 vol. 1056. 

. • Attorney General for the 

Commonwealth, 4 vol. 1209.^His Argu- 

- ment for l^e Prosecution on the Trial of 
James, Dukft of Hamilton, ibid. 1167. 

STEPHENS^ Ellis. See Ccwper^ Spencer. 

STERN, John. See Cofdngmark^ Charles John, 
CounL 

STEVENSON, John.--His Trial at the Chester 
Assizes for the Murder of Mr. Francis 
Elcock, 32 Geo. 2, 1759, 19 vol. 845.— 
' Counsel for the Crown and for the Prisoner, 
ibid, ib.— Abstract of the Indictment, ibid, 
ib. — The Attorney General for Cheshire 
opens the Case for the Prosecution, ibid. 
847. — Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 
850.—The Prisoner makes no Defence, ibid. 
864.<— His Counsel argue against the validity 
of the Warrant, under which Mr. Elcock 
was .acting when the. Prisoner shot him, 
ibid. 864.^-Argument of the Counsel for 
the Prosecution in answer to the Objection, 
. ibid. 870.'— Reply of the Counsel for the 
. Prisoner, ibid. 873.-— The Jury, under the 
. direction of the Court, find a Special Ver- 
dict, ibid. 876.— Tlie Special Verdict, ibid. 
ib.--*The Court decide, that the facts stated 
on the Special Verdict, amount only to Man- 
slaughter, ibid. 878.— The Prisoner is burnt 
in the hand, and discharged, ibid. ib. 

STEWART, Alexander.— His Trial at Edin- 
burgh for maintaining the title of the Pre- 
tender, 1 Geo. 1, 1715, 17 vol. 791.— Tnfor- 
mation for the Ring^s Advocate, ibid. 792. 
— ^Infohnation for the Panel, ibid. 794. — 
The Court find the Indictment relevant, 
ibid. 796. — Evidence for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 797.— Verdict of the Assize, ibid. 798. 
—He is discharged by the Court upon the 

' Verdict, ibid. ib. 

STEWART, Arabella. See Stuart, Arabella. 

STEWART, Archibald.— His Trial at Edin- 
burgh for neglect of Duty in his Office of 
Lord Provost of Edinburgh, before and at 
the time of the Rebels taking possession of 
the City in 1745, 20 and 21 Geo. 2, 1747, 
18 vol. 863. — ^The Indictment, ibid. 867. — 
' Counsel for the Crown and for the Panel, 
ibid. 874. — The Court order Informations, 
ibid. ib. — ^Information for the King's Advo- 
' cate, ibid. 875. — Information for the De- 
fendant, ibid. 911. — Interlocutor of Rele- 
' vancy, ibid, 952. — Upon a technical Objec- 
' tion by the Counsel for the Panel, the Lord 
' Advocate abandons the first Prosecution, 
ibid. 954.— -Proceedings on the Second Trial, 



ibid. 955.— 'Evidence in support of the 
Indictment, ibid. 962. — Evidence for the 
Panel, ibid. 1042. — ^The Assize unanimously 
find him Not Guilty, ibid. 1067. 

STEWART, James.— His Trial before the 
Circuit Court of Justiciary at Inverary for 
the Murder of Colin Campbell of Glenare, 
25 Geo. 2, 1752, 19 vol. 1.— The Indict- 
ment, ibid. ib. — ^Advocates for the Crown 
and for the Panel, ibid. 14. — He j^eads Not 
Guil^, ibid, ib.— Debate on the Relevancy, 
ibid, ib.— Argument of Mr. Walter Stewart 
for the Panel, ibid. ib. — ^Argument of Mr. 
Mackintosh for him, ibid, 25. — Mr. Fraser's 
Argument for the Prosecution, ibid. 41.— 
Mr. Erskine's Argument for the Prosecn- 
tion, ibid. 50. — ^Argument of the Lord 
Advocate, ibid. 60. — Mr. Millar's Reply for 
the Panel, ibid. 81. — Interlocutor of Rele- 
vancy, ibid. 89.— Evidence for the Prosecu- 
tion, ibid.-91. — Evidence for the Panel, ibid. 
150.— The Lord Advocate's Address to the 
Jury on the close of the Evidence, ibid. 171. 
— Mr. Brown's Speech for the Panel, ibid. 
213.— The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 243. 
•—Sentence of Death pronounced upon him, 
ibid. 248.— Address of the Lord Justice 
General to the Panel after the Sentence, 
ibid, ib.— His Dying Speech, ibid. 254.— 
Amot's Observations upon this Trials ibid. 
249. 

STEWART, William. See JEider, John. 

STIRLING, Archibald. See Stirling, James. 

STIRLING, Charles. See Stirling, James. 

STIRLING, James.— His Trial in the High 
Court ef Justiciary, vri& Archibald Seaton, 
Archibald Stirling, Charles Stirling, and 
Patrick Edmonston for High Treason, in 
taking Arms in support of the Pretender, 
7 Anne, 1708, 14 vol. 1395.— The Indict- 
ment, ibid. ib. — Warrant from the Queen 
requiring the Lord Advocate to proceed 
against them, ibid. 1398. — ^Information for 
the Panels, ibid. 1399. — Information for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 1405. — ^Interiocutor of 
Relevancy, ibid. 1414. — Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 1415. — The Assize find 
the Libel Not Proven, ibid. 1418. 

STOCEDALE, John.— His Trial on an ex- 
officio Information for a libel on the House 
of Commons, 30 Geo. 3, 1789, 22 vol. 237. 
— Introductory Remark on this Case, ibid, 
ib. ibid. 247 (note). — The Information, ibid. 
239. — ^The Attorney General's Speech for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 247^ — ^Mr. Erskine's 

. Speech for the Defendant, ibid. 250.—' 
Reply of the Attorney General, ibid. 285.-* 
Lord Kenyon's Charge to the Jury, ibid» 
291. — The Jury acquit the Defendant^ ibid. 
293. 

STODDART, Thomas. See Archer, Thomas. 
—His Trial in the Court of Justiciary for 
Treason, in being concerned in Argyle*s 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



129 



BebellioDy 1 Jac. 2, 1685, 11 vol. 889. — 
His Dying Speech, ibid. 892 (note). 

STONE, William: See Jackson, WilHam,— 
His Trial for High Treason at the Bar of 
the Court of King's Bench, 36 Geo. 3, 1796, 
25 vol. 1 155. — Counsel for the Prosecution 
and for the Prisoner, ibid. ib. — The Indict- 
ment, ibid. 1158. — Speech of the Attorney 
General (Sir John Scott) for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 1170. — Evidence for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 1207. — Speech of Serjeant Adair for 
the Prisoner, ibid. 1320'. — Evidence for the 
Defence, ibid. 1365. — Mr. Erskine*s Speech 
onsummingup the Evidence for the Prisoner, 
ibid. 1370. — Reply of the Solicitor General 
(Sir John Mitford), ibid. 1396. — Lord Ken- 
yon's Charge to the Juiy, ibid. 1423. — The 
Jury acquit the Prisoner, ibid. 1438. 

STORY, Dr. John. — He is one of the Com- 
missioners appointed to try Cranmer, Latimer, 
and Ridley, 1 vol. 772. — His Oration on 
the Trial of Cranmer, ibid. 784.— His Trial 
for High Treason, in conspiring to kill the 
Qoeen, and procure an Invasion of the 
Realm, 14 Eliz. 1571, ibid. 1087.— He is 
arrested, and sent to the Queen*s Bench 
Prison, ibid. 1089. — He escapes from thence 
into Flanders, and obtains a Commission 
from the Duke of Alba to seize the Goods 
and Merchandize of British Subjects brought 
into that Country, ibid. ib. — He is inveigkd 
on board an English Ship, and carried to 
England, ibid. ib. — He is confined in the 
Lollards* Tower, ibid.ib. — His Trial, ibid. 
1090. — He pleads that he is not a Subject 
of England, ibid.ib. — The Plea is overruled, 
and Sentence of Death is passed upon him, 
ibid. 1091. — The People revile him on the 
way to the Tower, ibid. ib. — ^His Speech at 
the place of Execution, ibid. 1092. 

STOUGHTON, Sir Nicholas.— He is ordered 
by the House of Commons into the Custody 
of the Serjeant-at-Arms, for prosecuting an 
Appeal in the House of Lords against 
Arthur Onslow, Esq. a Member of the 
House of Commons, 6 vol. 1134. 

STOUT, Sarah. See Coioper, Spencer, 

STOWE, John.— Account of the Trial of 
Edwanl, Duke of Buckingham, extracted 
from his Chronicle, 1 vol. 292. — Account of 
the Trial of Sir Edmond Knevet, extracted 
from his Annals, ibid. 443. 

STRAFFORD, Thomas Wentworth, Earl of. 
See WefUtoorthy Sir Thomas. Wentworth^ 
Thomas Lord, — He apparently promoted 
the Prosecution of Sir David Fowlis and 
others in the Star Chamber, 3 vol. 585. — 
Proceedings on his Trial in the House of 
Lords, upon an Impeachment of HigK 
Treason by the Commons, 16 Car. 1, 1640, 
3 vol. 1381. — Message from the Commons 
to the Lords, accusing him of High Treason, 
delivered by Mr, Pym, ibid. ib. — ^The Lords 
commit him to the Custody Qf the Gentle- 
VOL, XXXIV, 



' man Usher, ibid. 1385. — Seven Articles of 
Impeachment are delivered, ibid. ib. — 
Twenty-eight further Articles are delivered, 
ibid. 1387. — His Answers thereto, ibid. 
1401. — Lord Clarendon's Account of the 
Preparations for the Trial, ibid. 1413 (note). 
—The Trial, ibid. 1413.— The Eari of 
Arundel is appointed Lord High Steward, 
ibid. 1417. — The King and Queen, with 
the Prince of Wales, attend privately in the 
House of Lords during the Trial, ibid. 1414. 
— Three additional Article* are tendered 
against him by the Commons, ibid. 1418. — 
His Answers thereto, ibid. 1419. — Names 
of the Managers for the Commons, ibid. 
1421. — The Managers enforce the Charge 
contained in the Five first Articles against 
him, and he replies to them, ibid. ib. — The 
Sixth Article, charging him with illegally 
dispossessing Lord Mount norris of certain 
Lands in Ireland, ibid. 1426. — His Defence 
thereto, ibid. ib. — The Seventh, and part of 
the Eighth Articles are passed over, ibid. 
1427. — Part of the Eighth Article, charging 
him with corrupt Conduct in the matter of 
a Petition to the Council in Ireland, ibid, 
ib. — His Defence thereto, ibid. 1428 — 
Ninth Article, charging him with unjustly 
arresting persons who refused to appear to 
Ecclesiastical Citations, ibid. ib. — His De- 
fence thereto, ibid. ib. — Five next Articles, 
charging him with Offences relating to 
the Revenue, ibid. ib. — Fifteenth Article, 
charging him with arbitrarily enforcing his 
Orders against individuals by military force, 
ibid. 1433. — ^Lord Strafford objects to the 
admissibility of a Copy of his Warrant to 
the Soldiers, ibid. 1434.-— The Lords allow 
the Objection, ibid. ib. — Other Evidence 
in support of the Charge, ibid. ib. — ^The 
Earl's Defence thereto, ibid. 1435. — Six- 
teenth Article, charging him with forbidding 
Irish Subjects to Appeal to the King, and 
with issuing arbitrary Proclamations, ibid. 
1436. — His Defence thereto, ibid. 1437. — 
Nineteenth Article opened by Whitelocke, 
charging him with enforcing the administra- 
tion of a new and illegal Oath to the Scotch 
in Ireland, ibid. 1438. — His Defence thereto, 
ibid. 1439. — ^I'he Five next Articles, charg- 
ing various Acts and Declarations, showing 
a design to reduce the Kingdoms of England 
and Scotland to an arbitrary. Government, 
ibid. 1440.— His Defence thereto, ibid. 
1444. — ^Iwenty-fifth Article, charging him 
with advising the rigorous levying of Ship- 
Money, ibid. 1448. — His Defence thereto, 
ibid. 1449. — ^Twenty'Sixth Article, charging 
him with advising the King to imbase the 
Coin of the Realm, and to seize the Bullion 
in the Mint, ibid. 14.51. — His Answer 
thereto, ibid. ib. — Twenty-seventh Article, 
charging him with making unlawful Impo ' 
sitions upon the King's Subjects, ibid. 1452. 
— His Defence thereto, ibid. 1453. — The 
Managers for the Commons waive the 
Twenty-eighth Articlei and conclude their 



ISO 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



Case, ibid. 1454.— Notes of a ConTersation 
at a Meeting of the Privy Council, in which 
he took a part, commanicated to the House 
of Commons by Sir Henry Vane, ibid. 
1457 (note). — ^The Managers for the Com- 
mons propose to prove these Notes by way 
of Snpplement to tlie Twenty-second Article, 
ibid. 1458. — ^Debates upon this proposal, 
ibid. 1160.— The Managers abandon the 
proof of Sir Henry Vane's Notes, ibid. 1461. 
—The £arrs Speech in his Defence to the 
Matters of Fact, ibid. 1462. — Mr. Erskine's 
allusion to this Speech in his Defence of 
Home Tooke, 25 vol. 312. — Whitelocke's 
Remarks upon the Earl's Defence, 3 vol. 
1467 (note). — Mr. Glynn and Mr. Pym 
reply for the House of Commons, ibid. 1468. 
—The Commons propose a Bill of Attainder 
against him, ibid. 1469. — ^This is opposed 
by Selden, Holbome, and Bridgman, ibid, 
ib. — Opinions of different parties respecting 
the Bill of Attainder, ibid. 1470.— The 
Lords object to the Bill of Attainder, ibid. ib. 
— ^The EarVs Counsel argue the Matters of 
Law arising upon the Articles in his behalf, 
ibid. 1472.— Mr. St. John's Argument in 
favour of the Bill of Attainder, ibid. 1477. 
— ^The King's Speech to the Commons 
respecting this Prosecution, ibid. 1512. — 
Lord Strafford's Letter to the King, ibid. 
1516. — Doubts respecting the genuineness 
of this Letter, ibid. 1517 (note).— -The Bill 
of Attainder passes the Lords, ibid. 1514. 
— ^The King signs it, and a Commission is 
drawn up for the Earl's Execution, ibid. 
1518. — His Petition to the Lords on behalf 
of his Children, ibid, ib.— The Bill of At- 
tainder, ibid. ib. — The King's Letter to the 
Lords on his behalf, ibid. 1520. — His Exe- 
•ution, ibid. 1521. — His Address to the 
People from the Scaffold, ibid. 1522. — 
Character of him by Mrs. Hutchinson, ibid. 
1525 (note). — Mr. Fox's Observations on his 
prosecution, ibid. ib. — Mr. Laing's Remarks 
upon it, ibid. 1416 (note). — Act of Parlia- 
ment reversing his Attainder, ibid. 1525. — 
Names of the Strafford ians posted in Palace 
Yardj ibid. 1527. — His Speech to the Lords 
in the Tower before he went to Execution, 
ibid. 1528. — The Speech intended to have 
been spoken by him on the Scaffold, ibid. 
1532. — Burnet's Observations on his Case, 
13 vol. 752. 

?TRAFFORD, Thomas, Earl of.— Proceed- 
ings in Parliament on his Impeachment for 
Misconduct as British Plenipotentiary at 
the Treaty of Utrecht, 1- and 2 Geo. 1, 1715, 
15 vol. 1013. — Articles of Impeachment, 
ibid. ib. — His Answer thereto, ibid. 1025. 

STRANGE, James, Lord. — His Impeachment 
for High Treason in raising Forces, and 
endeavouring to put the Commission of 
Array in execution against the Parliament, 
18 Car. 1, 1642, 4 vol. 173.— Articles of 
Impeachment, ibid, ib.— Order of Parlia- 
ment for his AppreheDiHon, ibid. 176. — No 



further Proceedings appear to have been 
taken, ibid. ib. 

STRANGE, John Shaw.— He pleads Guilty 
to an Indictment for High Treason, in being 
concerned in the Cato Street Consptracy, 
33 vol. 1544. — He is pardoned on condition 
of being transported for life, ibid. 1566. 

STRANGE, John, Counsel, 16 vol. 7, IT vol. 
164, 637. — ^His Speeches in the House of 
Lords on opening the Defence to several of 
the Articles of Impeachment against Lord 
Chancellor Macclesfield, 16 vol. 1191,1211. 
— His Speech at the Conclusion of the De- 
fence, ibid. 1255. — His Opening Speech for 
the Plaintiff on the Trial of the Quo War- 
ranto against the Corporation of the Town 
and Port of Hastings, 17 vol. 851. 

Sir John^ Recorder of London, 17 



vol. 1093. 



• 



' — 18 vol. 469. — His Opinion 

respecting bringing an Appeal of Murder in 
the Case of William Chetwynd, 18 vol. 317. 
— His Speech for the Prosecution on the 
Trial of Francis Townley, ibid. SSd.—His 
Argument for the Crown on the Trial of 
Lord Balmerino, against an Objection made 
by the Prisoner to the sufficiency of the 
Evidence against him, ibid. 483. — His Speech 
as one of the Managers for the Commons, on 
summing up the Evidence for the Prosecu- 
tion on the Trial of the Impeachment of Lord 
Lovat, ibid. 774. 

STRANGFORD, Philip, Viscount.— Proceed- 
ings against him in the Irish House of Lords 
for acting corruptly as a Lord of Parliament, 
by offering to sell his Vote in a question of 
Appeal, 24 Geo. 3, 1784, 22 vol. 161.— He 
is ordered into the custody of the Gentleman 
Usher of the Black Rod for not obeyiog an 
Order of the House requiring him to attend 
in his place, ibid. 165.— His Letter to one 
of the parties interested in the Appeal, re- 
questing an advance of Money, ibid. Ifi^-T" 
Resolutions of the House thereon, ibid. ib. 
— A Bill is passed disablingliim from sitting 
in Parliament, ibid. 167. 

STRATFORD, John, Archbishop of Canter- 
bury. — Proceedings against him for High 
Treason, 14 Ed w. 3, 1341, 1 vol. 57.-H»s 
Letter of Advice to the King, ibid.ib.— fne 
King sends Letters of Accusation agamst 
him to the Bishop of London and the Chapter 
of Canterbury, ibid. 59.— The Archbishops 
Answer to the King's Letters, ibid. 62.-0n 
his coming to a Parliament, a Committee ot 
Twelve Peers is appointed to consider the 
Charges made by the King against him, ibid- 
65.— The Archbishop submits himself and 
receives the King's Pardon, ibid. 66. 

STRATTON, George.— Proceedings againsj 
him, Henry Brooks, Charles Floyer, ana 
George Mackay, Members of the Coancil ai 
Madras, on an Information by the Atto^ey 
General ioi a MifldCToeanour, in arrestwg 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



131 



and deposing Lord Pigot, Governor of 
Madras, 19 and 20 Oeo, 3, 1779-1780, 21 
▼ol. 1045. — Resolutions of a Committee of 
the House of Commons respecting their 
Conduct, ibid, ib.— The Commons address 
the King, praying him to direct a Prosecu- 
tioDy ibid. ib. — ^The Attorney General files 
an Information against them, ibid. 1047.-- 
The Solicitor General applies to quash the 
first Information, for the purpose of filing a 
more complete one, ibid. ib. — The Court 
suggest the entering a Noli prosequi upon 
the first Information, which is done accord- 
ingly, ibid. 1048. — ^The second Information, 
ibid. 1049.— Counsel for the Prosecution and 
for the Defendant, ibid. 1061. — Speech of 
the Attorney Genen^l (Wedderburne) for the 
Prosecution, ibid. ib. — Evidence for the Pro- 
secution^ ibid. 1094. — Mr. Dunning's Speech 
for the Defendants, ibid. 1139. — He pro- 
poses to give Evidence of the Opinion of the 
Governor and Council of Bengal respecting 
the transaction, ibid. 1188. — ^The Attorney 
General objects to the Evidence, ibid. 1189. 
— The Court overrules the Objection, ibid. 
1190. — ^Speech of the Attorney General in 
Reply, ibid. 1195. — Lord Mansfield's Charge 
to the Jury, ibid. 1219. — ^The Jury find them 
Guilty, ibid. 1226. — Account of the Pro- 
ceedings in the Court of King*s Bench on 
their being brought up for Judgment, ibid, 
ib. — Lord Mansfield's Report of the Evi- 
dence, ibid. ib. — Affidavits in mitigation of 
Punishment, ibid. 1231. — Speeches of the 
Counsel for the Prosecution in aggravation 
of Punishment, ibid. 1255.— Speeches of the 
Defendants* Counsel in mitigation, ibid. 
1257. — Mr. Erskine's celebrated Speech on 
this Occasion, ibid. 1259. — Mr. Justice Ash- 
hurst's Address on passing the Judgment of 
the Court upon the Defendants, ibid. 1282. 
—They are each fined 1,000/., ibid. 1292. 

STREATER, Captain John.— His Case on a 
Habeas Corpus sued by him out of the 
Court of the Upper Bench, 5 Car. 2, 1653, 
5 vol. 365. — The Habeas Corpus, ibid. ib. 
—The Return sets out two Cfommitments, 
one by the Council of State, and the other 
by the Speaker of the House of Commons, 
ibid. 371. — His Argument against the 
vaiiditx of the Commitment by the Council 
ofState^ ibid. 373.^ His Argument against the 
validity of the Commitment by the Speaker, 
ibid. 380.— The Court remand him, ibid. 
98$.r— He sues out an Alias Habeas Corpus, 
ibid* 388. — ^The Return thereto, containing 
the two former Commitments and the Rule 
of Court by whieh he was remanded on the 
former occasion, ibid. 389. — Discussion in 
the Court of the Upper Bench upon the Re- 
tnra, ibid. 391. — His Argument against the 
Return, ibid. 394.-- The Court discharge 
ioiD, ibid. 402.— Rule of Court for fais Dis- 
charge, ibid, ib— Styles's Report of this 
Case, ibid. 405. 

STREET; JSir Thomas, Baron of the Exche- 



quer, 33 Car. 2, 9 vol. 536.*-His Charge to 
the Jury on the Trial of George Busby for 
High Treason under the Statute of Eliza- 
beth, for remaining within the Realm as 
a Popish Priest, 8 vol. 547. — ^He gives his 
Opinion against the validity of Lord Russel's 
Challenge of a Juror for not having a 405. 
freehold within the City of London, 9 vol. 
593. 

Judge of C. P. 2 Jac. 



2, 1 2 vol. 124. — He gives his Opinion against 
the King's Dispensing Pov/er in the Case of 
Sir Edward Hales, 11 vol. 1198.— His Note 
of the Pleadings, Judgment, and Authori- 
ties, in the Case of the Earl of Macclesfield, 
V. Starkey, 10 vol. 1413. 

STRICKLAND, Mary, 13 vol. 1249. See 
Butkr, Mary, 

STRINGER, Sir Thomas, Serjeant-at-Law, 7 
vol. 261. — He opens the Indictment on the 
Trial of Green and others for the Murder of 
Sir Edmond bury Godfrey, 7 vol. 162. — ^Also 
on the Trial of Samuel Atkins for the same 
Murder, ibid. 236. 

— 33 Car. 2, 10 vol. 555. 

—He moves the Court of King's Bench for 
a Habeas Corpus to bring up Edward Fitz- 
harris to be arraigned upon an Indictment 
for the Murder of Sir Edmondbury Godfrey, 
8 vol. 249. — His Speech for the Prosecution 
on the Trial of Sir Miles Stapleton for High 
Treason in being concerned in the Popish 
Plot, ibid. 504. 

STRINGMAN, Daniel. See Oreeny Captain 
Thomas, 

STRODE, Thomas, Serjeant-at-Law.— He is 
of Counsel for the Crown on the Trial of 
Anderson and others for High Treason, in 
being concerned in the Popish Plot, 7 vol. 
834.— He defends Benjamin Harris on his 
Trial for a Libel, ibid. 928. 

STRODE, William. See Stroudy WUUam. 

STROUD, William. See Kimboltm, Edward 
I^frd, — Proceedings against him, Walter 
Long, John Selden, and others, on a Habeas 
Corpus in the Court of King's Bench, 5 Car. 
1, 1629, 3 vol. 236. — Questions proposed to 
the Judges in this Case, with their Answers, 
ibid. 237.— The Return to the Habeas 
Corpus, setting out one Warrant from the 
Lords of the Council and another from the 
King, ibid. 240. — Argiu^ients of Counsel 
against the sufficiency of the Return, ibid. 
241.— Reply of the King's Counsel, ibid. 
244. — Mr. Littleton's Argument £^ainst the 
Return, ibid. 252.-— Mr. Selden's Argument, 
ibid. 264.— The Attorney General's Reply, 
ibid. 284.— On the day appointed for the 
Judgment of the Court, they are removed 
to the Tower, ibid. 286.— The King's Letter 
to the Judges explaining the reasons of their 
Removal, ibid. ib. — ^The Court offer to bail 
them on their giving Sureties for their good 
Behaviour, ibid. 289*- -They refuse to give 
Sureties for their good Behaviour and are re« 



132 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



mandedy ibid. ib. — Stroud and Sir Miles 
Hobart are indicted for an Escape from 
Prison, but are acquitted, ibid. 291. — Reso- 
lutions of the House of Commons in 1641, 
respecting these Proceedings, ibid. 312, — 
Stroud's Body was removed from Henry the 
Seventh's Chapel at the Restoration, 5 vol. 
1338 (note). 

STRYPE, Mr.—His Account of the Death of 
Archbishop Cranmer, 1 vol. 855. 

STUART, Arabella. See Raleigh, Sir Walter. 
— Account of her Relationship to James the 
First, 2 vol. 1 (note), ibid. 769.— Wilson's 
Account of her unsuccessful Escape from 
Confinement, ibid. ib. — Proceedings against 
the Countess of Shrewsbury for refusing to 
answer Questions put to her by the Privy 
Council, respecting her Marriage and Escape, 
ibid. 769. 

STUART, Mary. See Mary, Queen of 
Scots, 

STUBBS, Francis. See Tonge, Thomas. 

SUDLEY, Lord. See Seymour, Sir Thomas. 

SUFFOLK, Henry Grey, Duke of.— His Ar- 
raignment for High Treason in being con- 
cerned in Wyatt's Rebellion, 1 Mary, 1553, 
1 vol. 761. — Account of his Execution, ibid. 
763. 

SUFFOLK, James, Earl of.— Proceedings 
against him, Francis Lord Willoughby of 
Parham, John Lord Hunsden, William Lord 
Maynard, Theobald Earl of Lincoln, George 
Lord Berkley, and James Earl of Middle- 
sex, for High Treason, in levying War 
against the King, Parliament, and Kingdom, 
23 Car. 1, 1647, 4 vol. 984.— They are taken 
into the Custody of the Gentleman Usher, 
ibid. 985. — ^The Commons impeach them, 
ibid. ib. — ^Further Articles delivered against 
them, ibid. 986.— They plead Not Guilty 
thereto, ibid. 988. — The Commons abandon 
the Impeachment, ibid. ib. 

SUFFOLK, Michael De La Pole, Earl of. 
Lord Chancellor, 10 Ric. 2. — He is im- 

Esached in Parliament by the Commons of 
igh Crimes and Misdemeanours, 11 Ric. 
2, 1388, 1 vol. 91. — Articles of Impeach- 
ment against him, with his Answers thereto, 
ibid. ib. — He is condemned and imprisoned 
in Windsor Castle, ibid. 94. — Walsingham 
says that he had nothing to say in his De- 
fence to these Articles, ibid. ib. (note). — He 
is released by the King from his imprison- 
ment, ibid. 95. — He afterwards conspires 
with Tresilian, Brambre, the Archbishop 
of York, and the Duke of Ireland, to 
urge the King to the destruction of the 
Duke of Glocester's Faction, ibid. ib. — 
They are appealed of High Treason in Par- 
liament by the Duke of Glocester's Faction, 
ibid. 97. — Articles of High Treason exhibited 
against them, ibid. Itfl.— The Eari of Suf- 
f^k escapes to Calais, ibid. ^d.-^The Lords 



upon the non-appearance of the Appellees, 
adjudge them Guilty of High Treason and 
sentence them to be drawn and hanged, 
ibid. 114. 

SUFFOLK, William De La Pole, Duke of.— 
Proceedings against him for High Treason, 
28 Hen. 6, 1451, 1 vol. 271.— Articles of 
Accusation against him, ibid. 273.- He re- 
fuses to put himself upon his Trial by bis 
Peers, but refers himself to the King's 
Award respecting him, ibid. 274. — He is 
sentenced to Banishment for Five years, not 
by the Judgment of Parliament, but by 
Order of the King, ibid. ib. — He is taken 
and killed at sea, ibid. 276. 

SURREY, Henry Howard, Earl of. See Nor- 
folk, Thomas, Iktke of — Proceedings against 
him for High Treason, 38 Hen. 6, 1546, 1 
vol. 451. — Examination of several persons 
before the Council respecting the Charges 
against him, ibid. 453. — His Arraignment 
and Trial, ibid. 455. — He is tried by a Jury, 
not being a Lord of Parliament, ibid, ib.— 
The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. ib. — Judg- 
ment is passed upon him and he is executed, 
ibid. ib. 

SWALLOW, John. See Luddites. 

SWAN, John.—His Trial with Elizabeth Jef- 
ferys at the Chelmsford Assizes for the 
Murder of Joseph JefTerys, 25 Geo, 2, 1752, 
18 vol.1193. — At the Summer Assizes in 
1751, they are both indicted for Murder, 
Swan for giving the mortal wound, and 
Elizabeth JefTerys for aiding and assisting 
therein, ibid. ib. — At the ensuing Assizes, 
an Indictment is found against them upon 
the same circumstances, charging one with 
Petit Treason, and the other with Murder, 
ibid. ib. — ^The Second Indictment, ibid. ib. 
— On being arraigned upon that Indictment, 
they plead in Abatement the pendency of 
the former Indictment, ibid. 1197.— The 
Counsel for the Prosecution demur to the 
Plea, ibid. ib. — The Court give Judgment 
against the Plea, ibid. 1198. — Mr. Justice 
Foster's Argument on that occasion, ibid. ib. 
— Confessions of the Prisoners, ibid. 1196.— 
They are both found Guilty, ibid. 1195.— 
Their Execution, ibid. 1201. 

SWENDSEN, Haagen. See Baynton, Sarah. 
—His Trialatthe Bar of the Court of Queen's 
Bench for forcibly taking away and marry- 
ing Pleasant Rawlins, an Heiress under the 
age of Eighteen years, 1 Anne, 1702, 14 vol. 
559. — On his Arraignment he states himself 
to be a Foreigner, and claims a Jury de me- 
dietate linguae, ibid. ib. — ^The Indictment, 
ibid. 560.— Speech of the SoUcitor General 
(Sir Simon K&ircourt) for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 562. — Evidence for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 564.— Evidence of Pleasant Rawlins, 
ibid. 575.-T-The Prisoner's Defence, ibid. 
577. — ^Evidence for him, ibid. 579.r— BepljT 
of the Solicitor General, ibid. 590.— Evi- 
deng^ in Reply,, ibi^, 591,-rl<ord Holrt 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



163 



Chais^e to the July, ibid. 592.--The Jury 
find him Guilty, ibid. 596. — Hesitation of 
one of the Jury to concur in the Verdict on 
account of the absence of Evidence of actual 
force, ibid. 616. — The Court argue the 
Qaestion with the Juror, ibid. ib. — He agrees 
with the rest of the Jury, ibid. 619. — Mr. 
Justice Poweirs Address to him and Sarah 
Baynton on passing Sentence of Death upon 
them, ibid. 631. — He is executed, ibid. 634. 
— Paper delivered by him at the Place of 
Execution, declaring his innocence, ibid. ib. 

SWINOCK, Samuel. See Pilkkgtony Thomas. 

SYMONDS, Henry Delahay. See Troy, 
Thomas, 

SYMPSON, James. See Green, Captain Thomas, 



TALBOT, The Honourable Charles, Solicitor 
General, 2 Geo. 2, 17 vol. 171, 314. 

TALBOT, William. — Sir Francis Bacon's 
Speech against him on an Information ore 
tenus in the Star-Chamber for maintaining 
the doctrine, that Kings excommunicated by 
the Pope might be lawfully deposed and 
killed by their Subjects, 11 Jac. 1, 1613, 2 
vol. 778. — ^The Declaration upon which the 
Charge was founded, ibid. 782. — It does not 
appear what Judgment was given by the 
Court, ibid. 778. 

TANDY, James Napper* — Proceedings against 
him and Harvey Morris in the Court of 
King's Bench in Ireland, upon their At- 
tainder for High Treason by Act of Parlia- 
ment, 40 Geo. 3, 1800, 27 vol. 1191.— The 
Attorney General prays Execution against 
them upon the Attainder, ibid. 1194. — The 
Counsel for the Prisoners request further 
time to plead, which is objected to by the 
Attorney General, and refused by the Court, 
ibid. ib. — ^The Prisoners plead in barof Exe- 
cution, that they were arrested abroad by the 
King's Command, and were thereby pre- 
vented from surrendering before the day 
limited for their Surrender by the Act of 
Attainder, ibid. 1198. — Counsel for the Pro- 
secution and for the Prisoners, ibid. 1204. 
— Mr. Curran's Speech In support of the 
Plea, ibid. 1205. — Evidence in support of 
the Plea in the Case of Tandy, ibid. 1212. — 
The Attorney Generars Speech against the 
Plea, ibid. 1219.— Mr. Ponsonby's Reply for 
the Prisoner, ibid. 1232. — Mr. Mac Nally's 
Speech on the same side, ibid. 1237.— 'Lord 
Kilwarden sums up the Evidence to the 
Jury, ibid. 1243.— The Jury find a Verdict 
for the Prisoner, ibid. 1246. — ^I'he Attorney 
General confesses the Plea in the Case of 
Morris, ibid. 1246. — Proceedings in Actions 
by Mr. Tandy in 1792, against the Lord 
Lieutenant and other Members of the Coun- 
cil, for issuing a Proclamation for his Appre- 
hension, ibid. 1246.^<-On a Suit being corn- 
menoed by him in the Court of Exchequer 
Bgainit the Lord Lieutenant, the Attorney 



General mores to quash the Writ, ibid. 1 247. 
— Mr. Butler's Argument against the Motion, 
ibid.ib. — Mr.Emmet'sArgumentonthesame 
side, ibid. 1257. — The Court grant the Mo- 
tion of the Attorney General, ibid. 1264. — 
Proceedings in other Actions commenced by 
him against Members of the Council, ibid. 
1267. 

TANFIELD, Sir Laurence, Judge of K. B. 
6 Jac.l, 2 vol.576. 

■ i Chief Baron of 

the Exchequer, lO Jac. 1, 2 vol. 770, 952. — 
His Speech on giving his Opinion in the 
Star-Chamber respecting the Punishment to 
be inflicted on Mr. Wraynham for slander- 
ing Lord Chancellor Bacon, 2 vol. 1070. 

TANKRED, Mr.— He is ordered by the House 
of Commons to pay Costs to a person 
against whom he had made a frivolous Com- 
plaint of Breach of Privilege, 14 vol. 749 
(note). 

TAPNER, Benjamin. See Jackson, William. 

TARRAS, Walter, Earl of. — Proceedings 
against him at Edinburgh for Treason in re- 
ceiving Traitors, and being concerned in 
Argyle's Rebellion, 36 Car. 2, 1685, 10 vol. 
1065.— The Indictment, ibid, ib.— His Peti- 
tion to the King for Mercy, confessing his 
Guilt, ibid. 1070. — He confesses the Indict- 
ment, ibid. 1072. — He is found Guilty, ibid, 
1 074. — His Sentence, ibid. 1075. — ^The King 
orders him to be set at liberty, upon his 
giving Security to appear when called upon, 
ibid. ib. — Act of Parliament reversing the 
Sentence of Forfeiture against him, ibid. 
l076. — Fountainhall's Notices of this Case, 
ibid. 1079. 

TASBOROUGH, John. -His Trial with Anne 
Price at the Bar of the Court of King's 
Bench, for tampering with one of the Wit- 
nesses for the Popish Plot, and for Subor- 
nation of Perjury, 32 Car. 2, 1680, 7 vol. 
881. — Indictment against them in English, 
ibid. ib. — The, same in Latin, ibid. 884 
(note).— The King's Counsel open the Case 
against them, ibid. 887. — Evidence against 
thera, ibid. 889. — Dugdale's Evidence, ibid. 
890. — Mr. Saunders's Defence of Anne 
Price, ibid. 906. — Evidence for her, ibid. 
908. — Mr. Pollexfen's Efefence of Tasbo- 
rough, ibid. 911. — Evidence for him, ibid. 
917.— The King's Counsel reply, ibid. 920. 
— Mr. Justice Jones's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 922. — ^The Jury find them Guilty, ibid. 
926. — ^Tasborough is sentenced to pay a fine 
of lOOZ., and Price of 200/. ibid. ib. 

TAYLOR, Alexander. See Green, Captain 
Thomas, 

TAYLOR, Daniel.--His Trial with several 
other Persons at Edinburgh for not praying 
for the King, 2 Geo. 1, 1716, 18 vol. 1363. 
— ^The Indictment, ibid. 1364.— Information 
for the King's AdroQatei ibid, 1368.— In* 



134 



OEIJERAL IKDEX TO 



fonnation for the Panels, ibid. 1373.— The 
Court find the Indictment relevant, ibid. 
1380.— Evidence against them, ibid. ib. — 
Verdict of the Assize, ibid. 1384.— Sentence 
is passed upon them, ibid. ib. 

TEMPLE, James, 5 vol. 1006, 1217. See 
Regicides, 

TEMPLE, Peter, 5 vol. 1217. See Regi- 
cides. 
THANET, Sackville, Earl of.— Proceedings 
upon the Trial of an Ex-officio Information 
at the Bar of the Court of King's Bench 
against him, Robert Fergusson, Gunter 
Browne, Dennis O'Brien, and Thomas 
Thompson, for a Riot in a Court of Justice, 
and an attempt to rescue Arthur O'Connor 
from the Custody of the Sheriff, 39 Geo. 
3, 1799, 27 vol. 821. — Counsel for the 
Prosecution and for the Defendants, ibid, 
ib.— The Information, ibid. 822.— Speech 
of the Attorney General (Sir John Scott) 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 829.--Evidence 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 835.--Mr. Ser- 
jeant Shepherd's Evidence, ibid. 836. — 
Mr. Justice Heath's Evidence, ibid. 847. — 
Mr. Erskine's Speech for the Defendants, 
ibid. 868.— The Attorney General consents ' 
to the acquittal of Mr. Browne and Mr. 
Thompson, ibid. 909. — Evidence for the 
Defendants, ibid, ib.— Mr. Warren's Evi- 
dence, ibid. 915.— Mr. Whitbread's Evi- 
dence, ibid. 922.— Mr. Sheridan's Evidence, 
ibid. 923.— The Attorney General's Reply, 
ibid. 928.— Lord Kenyon's Charge to the 
Jury, ibid. 938.— The Jury find Lord Thanet 
and Mr. Fergusson Guilty, and acquit Mr. 
O'Brien, ibid. 941 .—Lord Thanet's Declara- 
tion on being brought up for Judgment, 
ibid, ib.— His Aflidavit of the Uuth of the 
facts contained in his Declaration, ibid. 943. 
— Mr. Fergusson's Declaration and Afiidavit 
on the same occasion, ibid. 944. — The Court 
express adoubt whether, upon several Counts 
in the Information, they have power to award 
any Punishment but the specific Sentence of 
Cutting off the hand, ibid. 949.— Upon this 
suggestion, the Attorney General enters a 
Noli prosequi upon those Counts of the 
Information as to which the doubt arose, 
ibid. 951. — Mr. Justice Grose's Address on 
delivering the Sentence of the Court, ibid. 
952. — Mr. Fergusson's Observations on his 
own Case, and the points of law aiising 
upon the Information, ibid. 958. 

THELWALL, John.— He is indicted jointly 
with Home Tooke, Hardy, and others, for 
High Treason, 24 vol. 232.— He pleads Not 
Guilty, ibid. 1406.— After a Trial which 
lasts four days, he is acquitted, 25 vol. 748 
(note). 

THIRN YNGE, Sir William, Chief Justice of 
C. P. 1 Hen. 4. — He is appointed by the 
Parliament one of the Commissioners to 
pronounce Sentence of Deposition on 
Richardthe Second, 1 vol. 151.— His Ac- 



count of the Conversation between iUohttd 
and the CommissioneFs in the Tower, ibid. 
155. 

THISTLEWOOD, Arthur. See Waison, James. 
—His Trial at the Old Bailey under a 
Special Commission, for High Treason in 
being concerned in the Cato Street Con- 
spiracy, 1 Geo. 4, 1820, 33 vol.681. — Chief 
Justice Abbott's Charge to the Grand Jury 
assembled under the Special Comnaission, 
ibid. 683.— The Grand Jury return true Bills 
against him for High Treason, Murder, and 
maliciously shooting at one of the Bow- 
Street Officers who endeavoured to appre- 
hend him, ibid. 695.— The Indictment for 
High Treason, ibid. 697.— Speech of the 
Attorney General (Sir Robert Gifford)^ for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 716.— Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 736.— Robert Adams's 
Evidence, ibid, ib.— Lord Harrowby's Evi- 
dence, ibid. 788.— Mr. Curwood's Speech 
in Defence of the Prisoner, ibid. 830. — ^Evi- 
dence for the Prisoner, ibid. 840.— Mr. 
Adolphus's Speech on summing up the 
Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 850.— Reply 
of the Solicitor General (Sir J. S. Copley), 
ibid. 894.— Chief Justice Abbott's Charge to 
the Jury, ibid. 919.— The Jury find him 
Guilty, ibid. 956.— His Speech on being 
called upon for Judgment, ibid. 1544.— The 
Chief Justice*s Address to him and the other 
convicted Prisoners, on passing Sentence 
upon them, ibid. 1560.— He is executed, 
ibid. 1566. 



THOMPSON, Sir Alexander, Baron of the 
Exchequer.— His Address to the Grand 
Jury assembled under the Special Commis- 
sion at York for the Trial of the Luddites in 
1813, 31 vol. 966.— His Charge to the Jury 
on the Trial of John Schofield under that 
Commission, for maliciously shooting at John 
Hinchliffe, ibid. 1047. 

THOMPSON, Gabriel. See Semple, John, 

THOMPSON, Nathaniel.—His Trial with 
William Pain, and John Farwell for publish- 
ing Letters, importing that Sir Edmondbury 
Godfrey had killed himself, 34 Car. 2. 1682, 
8 vol. 1359.— The Information, ibid, ib-— 
The King's Counsel open the Charge agamst 
him, ibid. 1365.— The Letter on which the 
Prosecution was founded, ibid. 1368.— 
Evidence for there, ibid. 1378.— The Jury 
find them Guilty, ibid. 1386.— Tlieir Sen- 
tence, ibid. 1388. 

THOMPSON, Richard.— Proceedings against 
him for a Breach of Privilege of Parliament, 
in preaching a Scandalous Sermon, 32 Car. 
2, 1680, 8 vol. 1. —Evidence against him 
before a Committee of the House of Com- 
mons, ibid. 3.— The House resolve to im- 
peach him, ibid. 7.--Oldmixon's Accou"t 
of him, ibid. 1 (note).— Report of the 
Debate in the House of Commons in ">' 
Case, from Grey*s Debates, ibid. 180. 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



136 



THOMPSON, Th^Hiiai. BMThmiet,Sackvilk, 
Earlqf. 

THOMPSON, WilUam. See Cargitt, Donald, 

THOMPSON, WmianijCounsel.— His Speech 
in Defence of Tasborough for tamperiuj^ with 
Dugdale,one of the Witnesses for the Popish 
Hot, Tvol. 916. — His Speech for the Prose- 
cation on the Trial of John Giles for at- 
tempting to Murder Mr. Arnold, ibid. 1132. 
— His Speech in Defence of Bethel for an 
Assault, 8 vol. 752. 

THOMPSON, William, King's Serjeant, 2 
WilUand Mary, 12 vol. 929. — His Speech 
for the Prosecution on the Trial of John 
AshtOD for High Treason, 12 vol. 749. — He 
opens the Indictment on the Trial of Lord 
Mohun for the Murder of Mr. Mountford, 
ibid. 960. 

THOMSON, William,Counsel.—nisArgument 
of the question of Law for the Prosecution in 
Daramaree's Case, 15 vol. 595. — His Argu- 
ment for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
Willis, ibid. 645. — His Argument for the 
Prosecution in the Case of Purchase, ibid. 
683. — His Speech in the House of Lords, as 
one of the Managers for the Commons in 
support of the Third Article of Impeach- 
ment against Dr. Sacheverell, ibid. 157. — 
His Speech in Reply to Dr. Sachevereirs 
Defence to tliat Article, ibid. 438. 



■ Sir William. — ^His Speech in Reply 

as one of the Managers for the Commons on 
the Trial of the Earl of Wintoun for High 
Treason, 15 vol. 869. 

■■ Recorder of London, 

17 vol. 295. — He refuses to try Thomas 
Bunbridge on a Prosecution ordered by 
the House of Commons, on the ground of his 
having concurred in the Order as a Member 
6f Uie House, 17 vol. 566. 

THORPE, Williatn,— His Account of his Ex- 
amination on a Charge of Heresy before the 
Archbishop of Canterbury, 8 Hen. 4, 1407, 
1 vol. 176. — His Confession of Faith, ibid. ib. 
• — His Scruples at taking an Oath, ibid. 179. 
• — He refuses to publish the names of the 
Lollards, ibid. 1 80. — His conduct when re- 
qvired to recant, and threatened by the 
Archbishop, ibid. 181. — ^He confesses that he 
is a disciple of Wicliffe, ibid. 184. — He is 
charged with preaching Heresy at Shrews- 
bury, ibid. 186. — His Answers to the Arch- 
bishop respecting the lawfulness of preaching 
^ without the authority of a Bishop, ibid. 187. 
— Respecting the Sacrament, ibid. 193. — 
Respecting the Worship of Images, ibid. 
105. — Respecting the lawfulness of Pil- 
grimage, ibid. 199.^ — Respecting tlie use of 
Music in Churches, ibid. 201. —Respecting 
the lawfulness of Tythes, ibid. 202. — Re- 
specting the lawfulness of Oaths, ibid. 207. 
<^U« refuses to submit, and is taken to 



Prison, ibid. 220. — ^It is not known what 
ailerwards became of him, ibid. ib. 

THORPE, Sir William, Chief Justice of K. B. 
22 £dw. 3. — ^He is adjudged to be hanged 
for Bribery, 24 Edw. 3, 1361, 3 vol. 1273. 
—-Mr. St. John's Remarks upon this Judg- 
ment, ibid. ib. 

THORPE, William. See Mellor, George. 

THROCKMORTON, Sir Nicholas.— His Trial 
for High Treason in being concerned in Sir 
Thomas Wyatt's Rebellion, 1 Mary, 1554, \ 
vol. 869. — Names of his Judges, ibid. ib.-^Hi3 
Arraignment, ibid. ib. — He offers to address 
the Court before Plea, but is told that he must 
first plead to the Indictment, ibid, ib.— He 
pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 870. — ^The Attorney 
General shews the Jury Panel to one of the 
J udges, who notes which Jurors are to be chal- 
lenged for the Crown, ibid. 871.— Throck- 
morton remonstrates with him, ibid. ib. — ^Two 
Jurymen challenged for the Crown without 
cause shewn, ibid. ib. — He- urges the King's 
Counsel to conduct the case fairly, ibid. 872. 
— He is allowed to answer each matter of 
Accusation as it is urged against him, ibid. 
873. — ^The Confessions of various persons 
given in Evidence against him, ibid, ib.—- He 
objects to the Evidence of a convicted Traitor, 
that he is not a lawful Witness within the 
meaning of the Statute of Edw. 6, c. 12, 
§. 22, ibid. 880. — He is not suffered to pro- 
duce a Witness to disprove a part of the 
Charge, ibid. 884. — He admits that it had 
been the Custom not to allow Witnesses 
against the Crown, ibid. 887. — The Court 
refuse him Books to shew the Jury the Law, 
ibid, ibi — His Remonstrance thereupon, ibid, 
ib. — He contends that by the Stat. 1 Mary, c. 
1, all Treasons are limited to tiiose ex- 
pressed by tlie Stat. 25 Edw. 3, ibid. 888. — 
He reminds some of the Judges that they 
had spoken strongly in Parliament upon the 
danger of leaving the construction of penal 
Statutes to a Judge, ibid. 890.. — He con- 
tends that the Statute of Edward the Sixth 
had established a distinction between Words 
and Acts in Treason, ibid. 895. — He argues, 
that if the Statute of Edward the Third were 
not to be construed strictly, it were better 
that the severe Laws of Henry the Eighth 
against constructive Treasons had not been 
repealed, ibid. 896.— He is permitted to ad- 
dress the Jury after they have been charged 
by the Court, ibid. 897.— He is acquitted by 
the Jury, ibid. 899.— He is remanded into 
Custody though acquitted, ibid. 900.— The 
Jury are imprisoned and fined for their 
Verdict, ibid. 901. 

THROGMORTON, Michael. See Fole, Car- 
dined, 

THURLAND, Sir Edward, Baron of the Ex- 
chequer, 32 Car. 2, 7 vol. 1243. 

THURLOW, Edward, Solicitor General, to 
Geo. 3,-— His Speedi for the Prosecution on 



136 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



the Trial of John Miller for a Libel in pub- 
lishing Junius's Letter to the King, 20 vol. 
869. — His Speech in Reply in the same 
Cdse, ibid. 888. — His Argument for the 
Crown on the effect of the Verdict in Wood- 
falPs Case, ibid. 906. 

Attorney General, 15 



Geo. 3. — His Argument in the Case of the 
Island of Grenada, in favour of the Right of 
the Crown to impose Taxes upon a conquer- 
ed Country, 20 vol. 312. — His Argument for 
the Crown m the Trial of the Duchess of 
Kingston, that the Sentence of Jactitation 
pronounced by the Ecclesiastical Court upon 
her first Marriage, is not a conclusive Answer 
to the Charge of Bigamy against her, ibid. 
446. —His Speech on opening the Case for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 539. — His Speech for 
the Prosecution on the Trial of John Home 
(afterwards Home Tooke) for a Libel, ibid. 
667.— His Speech in Reply in the same 
Case, ibid. 745. — His Speech in Aggravation 
of Punishment in the same Case, ibid. 775. 

THWING, Thomas. See Gascoigne, Sir 
Thomas, — His Trial with Mary Pressicks at 
York for High Treason, in being concerned 
in the Popish Plot, 32 Car. 2, 1680, 7 vol. 
11^1. — The Indictment, ibid. ib. — They 
plead Not Guilty, ibid. 1163.--Bolron*s 
Evidence against them, ibid. 1164. — Fur- 
ther Evidence against them, ibid. 1166. — 
Evidence in their Defence, ibid. 1169. — Mr. 
Justice Dolben's ("harge to the Jury, ibid. 
1177.— The Jury find Thwing Guilty, and 
acquit Pressicks, ibid. 1180. — Sentence of 
Death is passed upon Thwing, ibid. 11 81. — 
He«is reprieved, but afterwards executed, 
ibid. ib. — His Speech at the place of Execu- 
tion, ibid. 1182. 

THYNN, Thomas. -Trial of Count Conings- 
mark and others for his Murder, 9 vol. 1. 

TICHBOURN, Robert, 5 vol. 1002! See 
Regicides, 

TICKLEFOOT, Tom. -Observations upon 
the Trials of Sir George Wakeman and 
others for being concerned in the Popish 
Plot, published shortly after the Trials under 
that Signature, 7 vol. 687. 

TIDD, Richard, 33 vol. 1337. See Davidson. 
William. 

TIERNEY, George.— His Evidence on the 
Trial of the Impeachment of Lord Melville, 
29 vol. 1111. 

TILLOTSON, Dr. John.— His Evidence in 
behalf of Lord William Russell, 9 vol. 
622. 

TILNEY, Charies. See Abington, Edward. 

TITCHBURNE, Chidiock. See Babington, 
Anthony, 

TOLERi John, Solioitor General for IpeUnd, 
99 vol. t040t See Norbttr^f John Lord* 



Attorney General for Ireland.-^* 

His Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial, 
of Henry and John Sheares for HighTreasoa. 
in being concerned in the Irish Rebellion,' 
27 vol. 292. — His Speech for the Prosecu-; 
tion on the Trial of Oliver Bond for being 
concerned in the same Rebellion, ibid. 536. 
— His Speech for the Crown 00 the Issue 
joined on the Plea in Abatement in the Case 
of James Napper Tandy, ibid. 1219. 

TOMKINS, Mr. See WaUer, Edmund. 

TONE, Theobald Wolfe.— His Trial at Dublin 1 
by a Court Martial for High Treason, in 
entering into the military Service of the Ring 1 
of France, 39 Geo. 3, 1798, 27 vol. 613.- | 
He Confesses the Charge, ibid. 617.— His | 
Address to the Court, ibid. 618. — He is cod- i 
demned to Death, but commits Suicide, ibid. 
623. —After the Sentence of the Court Mar- 
tial, Mr. Curran moves the Court of Kiog's 
Bench for a Habeas Corpus, on the ground 
that the Court Martial had no Jurisdiction, 
ibid. 624. — Account of Tone from the 
" Memoirs of Mr. Curran by his Son," ibid. 
613, 626 (note). 

TONGE, Thomas.— His Trial with George 
Phillips, Francis Stubbs, James Hind, John 
Sellers, and Nathaniel Gibbs for High 
Treason in being concerned in a Conspiracy 
to kill the King, 14 Car. 2, 1662, 6 vol. 225. 
—Their Arraignment, ibid. 229.— They all 
plead Not Guilty, except Hind, who con- 
fesses, ibid. ib. — Speeches of the Counsel 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 281. — Evidence 
against them, ibid. 233. — Their Defence, 
ibid. 256.— Reply of the Solicitor General 
(Sir Heneage Finch), ibid. 260.— Chief Jus- 
tice Forster*8 Charge to the Jury, ibid, 262. 
—The Jury find them Guilty, ibid.^263.— 
Sentence of Death is passed upon them, 
ibid. 264.--Their Conduct at the place of 
Execution, ibid. 265. — Remarks of Ludlow 
upon this Transaction, ibid. 271.- Proba- 
bility that the Transactions out of which 
these Proceedings arose were much exag- 
gerated by the Court, ibid. 272. 

TOOKE, John Home.— Proceedings against 
him in the Court of King's Bench on the 
Trial of an Information by the Attorney 
General against him for a Libel, 17 Geo. 3, 
1777,20 voL651.— The luformation, ibid, 
ib.— He objects to the right of the Attorney 
General to a Reply in the Case of an In- 
formation, where the Defendant calls no 
Witnesses, ibid. 661.— His Argument in 
support of the Oljjection, ibid, ib.— I^rd 
Mansfield rules that the Attorney General is 
entitled to a Reply,ibid. 664.— The Attorney 
General (Thurlow) opens the Case, ibid. 
667. — Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 
671.— Mr. Home Tooke's Speech in his 
Defence, ibid. 675.— Evidence for him, ibid. 
742.--The Attorney General's Reply, i^^* 
745.~^Lord Mansfield's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 769— The JU7 find him GuiUyi wd. 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



137 



764.— Proceedings in the Court of King's 
Bench on his being brought up for Judg- 
menty ibid. ib. — He moves in arrest of Judg- 
menty on an Objection to the Indictment, 
ibid. ib. — ^The Attorney General's Answer 
to the Objection, ibid. 766.— Mr. Tooke's 
Keply, ibid. 767. — The Court overrule the 
Objection, ibid. 772. — The Attorney Gene- 
ral s Speech in aggravation of Punishment, 
ibid. 775.— Mr. Tooke's Speech, ibid. 783. — 
Sentence of the Court, ibid. 787. — He brings 
a Writ of Error in Parliament, ibid. 789. — 
The Judgment of the Court of King's Bench 
is affirmed, ibid. 797. — His Trial for High 
Treason by a Special Commission of Oyer 
and Terminer at the Old Bailey, 35 Geo. 3, 
1795, 25 vol. 1.— The Indictment, 24 vol. 
224. — ^His Arraignment, ibid. 1404. — Nar- 
rative of the Proceedings against him pre- 
viously to his Trial, from Stephens*s Memoirs 
of him> 25 vol. 1 (note). — Counsel for the 
Prosecution and for the Prisoner, ibid. 2, &c. 
— ^Address intended to have been delivered 
by him upon his Arraignment, ibid. 7 (note). 
— ^The Court in consideration of bis ill state 
of health, permit him to sit near his Counsel, 
ibid. 12. — Speech of the Solicitor General 
(Sir John Mitford) for the Prosecution, ibid. 
27. — Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 71. 
— Mr. Erskine's Speech in his Defence, ibid. 
257. — Evidence for the Defence, ibid. 325. 
— ^Mr. Gibbs sums up the Evidence for the 
Defence, ibid. 449. — Reply of the Attorney 
General (Sir John Scott) ibid. 497. — Chief 
Justice Eyre's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 555. 
—The Jury acquit him, ibid, 743. — His Ad- , 
dress to the Court and Jury after his Acquit- 
tal, ibid, ib.— -The Attorney General declines 
offering Evidence against several other per- 
sons charged in the same Indictment, and 
they are discharged, ibid. 745. 

TOPHAM. See Jay and Tophmn, 

TOWNLEY, Francis.— His Trial for High 
Treason in being concerned in the Rebellion 
of 1745, 18 vol. 329. — ^The Indictment, ibid. 
332. — Speeches of the Attorney General (Sir 
Dudley Ryder), and Sir John Strange, for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 335. — Evidence for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 337. — The Defence, 
ibid; 344.— Reply of the Solicitor General 
(Mr. Murray), ibid. 346. — ^The Jury find him 
Guilty, ibid. 347. — Mr. Justice Foster's 
Report of this Case, ibid. ib. — Warrant for 
his Execution, ibid. 349. — His Execution, 
ibid. 351. 

TOWNSEND, Mr.— Recorder of Chester.— 
His Argument for the Prisoner on the Trial 
of John Stevenson for Murder, 19 vol. 864. 

TRACY, Robert, Judge of C. P. 9 Ann, 15 
vol. 547, 939. — His Argument in favour of 
the King's Prerogative respecting the Edu- 
cation and Marriage of the Royal Family, 15 
vol. 1219.-*- His Charge to the Jury on the 
Trial of Edward Arnold for ihooting at 
Lord ODfloWi 16 vol. 745. 



TRANTER, Robert. See Beaton, Hugh. 

TRAVERS, John. See Abington, Edward. 

T^REBY, George, Counsel. — ^His Speech as 
one of the Managers for the House of Com- 
mons on the Trial of the Impeachment of 
Lord Stafford, 7 vol. 1308. 



■ Sir George, Recorder of London, 34 

Car. 2. — His Argument for the Corporation 
in the. Case of the Quo Warranto against the 
City of London, 8 vol. 1099. — His Speech 
in Defence of Sir Patience Ward on his 
Trial for Perjury, 9 vol. 312. — His Ailment 
for the Defendant in the Great Case of 
Monopolies, 10 vol. 383. — His Evidence on 
the Trial of Gates for Perjury, ibid. 1171 . — 
He was one of the Counsel for the Seven 
Bishops, 12 vol. 376. 

Attorney General, 1 



Will, and Mary, 12 vol, 597. 



■ Chief Justice of C. P. 4 

Will, and Mary, 12 vol. 1248, 1379, 13 vol. 
1, 64, 139, 451. — He delivers his Opinion 
with the other Judges on several Questions 
of Law proposed to them by the House of 
Lords on the Trial of Lord Mohun for 
Murder, 12 vol. 1034, 1038, 1043, 1047.-— 
His Charge to the Jury on the Trial of Peter 
Cook for High Treason, 13 vol. 386. — His 
Argument in the Banker's Case, 14 vol. 
23. 

TRELAWNY, Sir Jonathan, Bishop of Bristol. 
See Seven Bishops, — Granger's Account of 
him, 12 vol. 187. 

TREMAIN, John, Serjeant-at-Law, 12 vol.685, 
929. 

TREMBLES, Mary. See Uoyd, Temperance, 

TRESILLVN, Sir Robert, Chief Justice of 
K. B. 11 Ric. 2. See Brambre, Nicholas, — 
Proceedings in Parliament against him, 
Alexander Nevil, Archbishop of York, Robert 
Vere, Duke of Ireland, Michael De la Pole, 
Earl of Suffolk, and Nicholas Brambre, for 
High Treason, 11 Ric. 2, 1388, 1 vol. 89.— 
He is appealed in Parliament with them of 
High Treason, ibid. 96. — Articles of Appeal 
against them, ibid. 101. — ^Tresilian, the 
Archbishop, the Duke of Ireland, and the 
Earl of Suffolk, do not appear, and*are found 
Guilty, and sentenced to be drawn and 
hanged, ibid. 114.-^Tresilian is discovered 
concealed under a Table, ibid. 115.— Frois- 
sart's Account of his" discovery, ibid. 116 
(note). — He is drawn and hanged, ibid. 117. 
— Magical Signs said to be found upon his 
person, ibid. ib. — Remarks upon Tresilian's 
Offence, by Mr. St. John in his Speech to 
the House of Lords against the Judges for 
their conduct in the Case of Ship-Money, 
3 vol. 1276. 

TREVORi Sir Thomas, Baron of the Eiche- 
qu«ri 4 Car, « 1, d fol. a59.«-NQt«i of bit 



GBNSBAI. IHPEX TO 



TEEVOR, Sir Thomas, SoUdtot General, 4 
Will, and Mar;.— His Speech for the Pro- 
Hcntion on the Trial of Lord Mohun Id the 
HouM of Lords for the Murder of Mr. 
Monntford, 13 vol. 1009. 

..-.,..- Aliorney General, 7 

Will. 3.— Hifi Argument in the Court of 
King'sBencb against the Diichargeof Kendal 
and Roe, upou a Habeas Corpus sued out 
by them, npon their CommitmeDt for High 
Treason by the Secretary of State, 13 vol. 
1366. — His Speech fbr Ihe Prosecutioo on 
the Trial of Chamock, King, and Keyes for 
High Treason, in being coocerned ia Ihe 
Auaswnation Hot, ibid. 1391. — His Speech 
on the Trial of Sir John Freind, 13 vol. IS. 
—His Speech on the Trial of Sir William 
Parkjns, ibid. TT.— His Speech on the Trial 
of Ambrose Rookwood, ibid. I4T. — His 
Speech on the Trial of Peter Cook, ibid. 
349. — His Speech in the House of Commons 
in the Debate respecting the mode of pro- 
ceeding against Sir John Fen wick, ibid. 55B, 
— His Speech for the Prosecution on the 
Trial of Ihe Earl of Warwick for the Murder 
of Mr. Coote, ibid, 965.— His Speech for 
the Prosecution on the Trial of Lord Mohun 
for the same Murder, ibid. 103G. 

-Chief Justice of C. P. 



3 Ann, 14 vol. 989. 

TRIGGE, Thomaa. See Sachevirtll, WiUkm. 

TRINDER, Henry, Seijeanl-al-Law.— He was 
one of the Counsel for the Prosecution on 
Ihe Trial of the Seven Bishops, 12 rol. 333. 

TROY, John Thomas.— Proceedings in the 
Court of King's Bench upon the Trial of an 
Action brought by him against Henry Dela' 
hay Symonda, for aLibel in the Ami-Jacobin 
Review, 45 Geo. 3, 1805, 29 »ol. 503.~ 
Chunsel for the Plaintiff and for the De- 
fendant, ibid. ib. — Mr. Ersktne's Speech for 
the Plaintiff, ibid. 505.— Evidence for the 
Plaintiff, ibid. 513. — Mr. Garrow's Speech 
for the Defendant, ibid. 519.— Lord Elli 
borough's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 546. 
The Jury find a Verdict for the Plaintiff, 
with 50f. Damages, ibid. 5S0. 

TRUSSEL, Sir William, a Justiciary, 15 Edw, 
a, laaa.^llis Address to ihe younger De- 
spenser on passing Sentence upon him, 1 
vol. 36.^ — He is appointed one of the Depu- 
tation from the Parliament to resijiin their 



39 Geo. 3, 1799, S7 toL 1137.— Evidcnoe 
foi the FiosecuLoD, ibid. ib. — Evidence in 
bis Defence, ibid. 1133.— The Jury find him. 
Guilty, ibid. 1135.— Sentenoe of Dealli is 
paned upon him, ibid. 1130.— He ia exe- 
Guled, ibid. 1138. 

TURNER, Anne.— Her Trial, as an Accessary 
before the fad, to the Murder of Sir Thomas 
Overhury, 13 Jac. 1, 1615, 3 vol. 930. — She 
pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 931. — Letter from 
Ftances, Countess of Essex, to her, ibid. ib. 
—The Jury find her Guilty, and she is e»e- 
cuted, ibid. 935. 

TURNER, Anthony. See Wlutel»tad,Tkomat. 

TURNER, Sir Christopher, Baron of the Ex- 
chequer, 12 Car. 2, 6 vol. 769, 879.— He 
tvas one of the Commissioners for the Trial 
of the Regicides, 5 vol. 986. — He refuses 
to try the Indictment against Joan Perry 
and her two Sons, for the supposed Murder 
of Mr. Harrison, because the Body had not 
been found, 14 vol. 1318. 

TURNER, Sir Edward, Counsel —His Speech 
for the Prosecution on the Trial of Harrison, 
the Regicide, 5 vol. 1015.— His Speech iu 
Reply on tlie Trial of Jdin Cook, (he 
Regicide, ibid. 1103. 

TURNER, Dt. Francis, Bishop of Ely, 
Granger's Account of him, 12 vol.165. See 
Seven BUhcps. 

TURNER, Colonel James.— His Trial with 
John Turner, William Turner, Mary Turner, 
and Ely Turner, at the Old Bailey, for 
Felony and Burglary, 15 Car. 2, 1664, 6 vol. 
566.— James, John, and William Turner 
are indicted fbr Bur|riary, and Mary and 
Ely Turner for being Accessaries after the 
fact, ibid, ib.— They all plead Not Guilty, 
ibid. 567. — Evidence against them, ibid. 
573.— Their Defence, ibid. 594. — Chief 
Justice Hyde's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
613. — Chief Justice Bridgman's Charge, 
ibid. 613.— The Jury find James Turner 
Guilty, and acquit the others, ibid. 615. — 
His Confession, ibid. 617. — Sentence of 
Death passed upon him, ibid. 619. — His 
Conduct at the place of Execution, ibid. ib. 
— Siderfin'a Report of this Case, ibid. 615 
(note).- Kelyog's Report, ibid. 616 (note). 

TURNER, Wimam.— His Trial under a Spe- 
cial Commission at Derby for High Treason 
in being concerned in the Luddite Insur- 
rection, 57 Geo. 3, 1817, 32 vol. 957.— The 
Indictment, ibid. 755. — Speech of the So- 
licitor General (Sir Robert Gifford) for Ihe 
Prosecution, ibid. 964. — Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 975. — Mr- Serjeant Cross's 
Speech for the Prisoner, ibid. 1046.— Evi- 
dence for the Prisoner, ibid. 1068. — Mr. 
Deuman's Speech on summing up the Evi- 
dence for the Prisoner, ibid. 1059. — Keply 
of the Attorney General (Sir S. Shepherd^ 
ibid. loe4.~Mr. Justice Dallai'i Chkrg* to 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



ia» 



the Jury, ibid, 1101.— The Jury find him 
GailtXfibid.l 1 34.-— He is executed, ibid.l 394. 

TURPIN, Joseph. See SaehevereU, WiUum. 

TUBTON, Sir John, Judge of K. B. 8 Will. 
3, 13 vol. 451, 485, 14 vol. 134.— His 
Charge to the Jury on the Trial of Kidd and 
others for Piracy and Robbery, 14 vol. 211. 
— His Charge on the Trial of the same per- 
son on another Indictment, ibid. 228. 

TUTCHIN, John.— His Trial at the Guildhall 
of London, on an £x-ofHcio Information, for 
a Libel entitled " The Observator," 3 Ann, 
1704, 14 vol. 1095.— The Information, ibid, 
ib. — ^The libellous Papers, as set out in the 
Information, ibid. 109T. — Opening Speeches 
of Sir Thomas Powis and the Attorney 
General, for the Prosecution, ibid. 1102. — 
ETidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 1105. — 
At the close of the Case ibr the Prosecu- 
tion, Mr. Mountague objects for the De- 
fendant, that there is no proof of a publica- 
tion within the City of London, ibid. 1117. 
— ^The Objection is overruled, ibid. 1118. — 
Mr. Mountague's Speech in his Defence, 
ibid. 1119. — Reply of the Attorney General, 
ibid. 1124.— Lord Holt's Charge to the 
Jury, ibid. 1125. — ^Lord Holt leaves the 
question of the character of the Publications 
to the Jury, ibid. 1128. — ^The Jury find the 
Defendant Guilty of composing and pub- 
lishing the Libel, but not of writing it, ibid. 
1129. — His Counsel move in arrest of Judg- 
ment for an irregularity in the Jury-Pro- 
cess, ibid. ib. — Arguments of Sir Thomas 
Powis, the Attorney General, and Serjeant 
Darnell on moving for a Rule to amend the 
irregularity, ibid. 1135. — ^The Defendant's 
Counsel shew cause against the Rule, ibid. 
1151. — ^fteply of the Attorney General, ibid. 
1179. — The Court are equally divided in 
their Opinions upon the point, ibid. 1187. — 
The Court quash the Trial, ibid. 1194.-- He 
was never tried again on this Charge, ibid. 
1195. — His Trial at Dorchester, before Chief 
Justice Jefferies for being concerned in the 
Duke of Monmouth's Rebellion, ibid. ib. — 
Account of his Interview with Jefferies in 
the Tower, ibid. 1199. 

TWYN, John. See Brewster, 2%iwnai.— His 
Trial for High Treason, in printing a Book 
containing treasonable Doctrines, 15 Car. 
2, 1663, 6 vol. 513. — Substance of the In- 
dictment, ibid. 514. — He pleads Not Guilty, 
ibid. 515. — Serjeant Morton opens the Case 
a^inst him, ibid. 520. — Evidence against 
bim, ibid. 522.— His Defence, ibid. 531. — 
Chief Justice Hyde's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 533. — ^The Jury find him Guilty, and 
Sentence of Death is passed upon him, ibid. 
535. — His Conduct at the place of Execu- 
tion, ibid. 536. — Kelyng's Report of the 
Resolution of the Court in this Case, that 
the Offence charged amounted to High 
Treason in the article of Compassing the 
King's Deatbi ibid, 513 (note), 



TWYSDEN, Thomas, 8e^eiiBt«at-Law.---His 

unworthy Conduct when sent to the Tower 
by Cromwell for pleading in Mr. Cony's 
Case^ 5 vol. 936. 

Sir Thomas, Judge of K. B. 13 



Car. 2, 6 vol. 74, 206, 634, 769, 1297. 

TYRRELL, Sir Tliomas, Judge of C. P. 18 
Car. 2, 6 vol. 769. 

TYRIE, David.— His Trial at Winchester for 
High Treason, in holding a traitorous Cor- 
respondence with the French Government, 
22 Geo. 3, 1782, 21 vol. 815.— The Indict- 
ment, ibid. ib. — Counsel for the Prosecution 
and for the Prisoner, ibid. 818. — Evidence 
ibr the Prosecution, ibid. 819. — Mr. Wat- 
son's Speech in his Defence, ibid. S36. — 
Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 843. — He 
is found Guilty, and Sentence of Death is 
passed upon him, ibid. 844. — Letter in his 
hand-writing, containing treasonable matter, 
discovered after his Trial, ibid. ib. 

TYTLER, James. — ^Proceedings in the Court 
of Justiciary against him for publishing a 
Seditious Libel, 33 Geo. 3, 1798, 23 vol. 1. 
— ^The Indictment, ibid, ib.— He is out- 
lawed for not appearing to answer, ibid. 6. 

UCHILTRIE, James, Lord. See Rea, Donald, 
Lord, — -His Trial at Edinburgh for slandering 
the Marquis of Hamilton and other Noble- 
men, 7 Car. 1, 1631, 3 vol. 425.— Act of 
Council, commanding the Lord Advocate to 
proceed against him, ibid. ib. — Depositions 
of him and Lord Rea before the Privy 
Council, ibid.427. — Indictment against him, 
ibid. 436. — Objections by his Counsel to the 
Indictment, ibid. 441. — Lord Rea*s Rela- 
tion, ibid. 446. — He is sentenced to per- 
petual Imprisonment, ibid. 482.— Burnet's 
Observations respecting him, ibid. ib. (note). 

UDALL, John, a Puritan Minister. — Proceed- 
ings on his Trial for Felony, on the Stat. 23 
Eliz. cap. 2, for publishing a seditious Book, 
32 Eliz. 1596, 1 vol. 1271.— Upon his 
Arraignment, he applies for Counsel, which 
is denied him, ibid. 1277. — He pleads Not 
Guilty, ibid. ib. — He offers Witnesses in his 
Defence, but the Court refuse to hear Evi- 
dence against the Crown, ibid. 1281. — He 
objects to Evidence of the Testimony given 
on a former occasion by an absent person, 
ibid. 1282. — The Court decide that the 
Testimony of an absent person is sufficient, 
if proved to be his by the Oaths of others, 
ibid. ib. — He argues diat his Offence is not 
within the Statute, ibid. 1283.— The Juiy 
find him Guilty, ibid. 1290* — Judgment is 
respited upon his submission, ibid* 1295. — 
He is called upon at a subsequent Assizes, 
and pressed to make a full Submission, ibid. 
1297. — He delivers a Paper to the Judges, 
containing his Reasons why Judgment should 
be arrestedp ibid. 1298.-^Being called on 
for Judgment, he prays to be heard in arrest 



140 



GENTEEAL INDEX TO 



of Judgment, ibid. 1 300.— Sentence is passed 
upon him, but he is reprieved, ibid. 1306. 
—His points of belief, ibid. 1309.— The 
King otScotland writes^to the Queen in his 
behalf, ibid. 1314. — He offers to go as a 
Missionary to Guinea, ibid. 1316.— The 
Queen refuses to sign his Pardon, and he 
dies in Prison, ibid. ib. 

URLINESS,. Samuel. See Green, Obtain 
Thomas. 

USHER, James, Archbishop of Armagh.— His 
Scheme for the Reformation of the Church, 
6 vol. 3 (note). 

USKE, Thomas. See Blake, John, 

VALENTINE, Benjamin, See EUioU, Sir 
John. 

VANE, Sir Henry, the Elder.— Hi^ Evidence 
against Lord Strafford, 3 vol. 1442.— Lord 
Clarendon's Account of his Enmity to Lord 
Strafford, ibid. 1443 (note). 

VANE, Sir Henry, the Younger. — Proceed- 
ings of Cromwell and his Council against 
him for the publication of a Seditious 
Book, 8 Car. 2, 1656, 5 vol. 791.— He is 
ordered to find Security to do nothing to 
the prejudice of the Government, ibid. 793. 
—His Letter to the Clerk of the Council 
refusing to give such Security, ibid. 793. — 
Warrants of the Council for his Apprehen- 
sion, ibid. 795. — ^His Remonstrance with 
Cromwell, ibid. 796.-— He is imprisoned in 
the Isle of Wight, but is afterwards set at 
liberty, ibid. 799. — Ludlow's Account of 
this Transaction, ibid, ib.— His Trial for 
High Treason at the Bar of the Court of 
King's Bench, 14 Car. 3, 1662, 6 vol. 
119. — Reports of the points of Law deter- 
mined in this Case, ibid. ib. — Argument 
prepared by him for his Defence before 
the Indictment was found, ibid. 136. — 
The Indictment, ibid. 142. — He pleads 
Not Guilty, ibid. 143.— Memoranda intend- 
ed to have been used by him for an Argu- 
ment to the Court before his Plea, ibid. 
144. — ^The Attorney General opens the Case, 
ibid. 148. — Evidence against him, ibid. 149. 
-—His Defence, ibid. 152.— He suggests Ob- 
jections in law and requires Counsel to 
argue them, ibid. 153.— The Jury find him 
Guilty, ibid. 156.— His own Account of the 
substance of his Defence, ibid. ib. — On being 
called upon for Judgment, he tenders a Bill 
of Exceptions, which is refused, ibid. 169. — 
The Bill of Exceptions tendered by him, 
ibid. 171.— His Reasons for arresting the 
Judgment, ibid. 176.— Sentence of Death is 
passed upon him, ibid. 188.— His Behaviour 
at his Execution, ibid, ib.— Ludlow's Ac- 
countof him and of this Trial, ibid. ib. (note). 
—Letter of King Charles the Second to the 
Lord Chancellor respecting him, ibid. 187 
(note) — Extracts from Burnet, Clarendon, 
and other Historians, respecting him, ibid. 
198.— Mr. Fox's Remark* upon hig Case. * 
ibid. 201. 



VAUGHAN, Felix, Counsel, 22 vol. 38a— His 
Speech in Defence of Daniel Isaiac Eatoo, on 
his Trial for publishing the Second Part of 
Paine's Rights of Man, 22 vol. 767.— His 
Speech in Eaton's Defence, on his Trial for 
publishing Paine's *' Letter to the Addressers 
on the late Proclamation," ibid. 800.— His 
Speech in Defence of Briellat on his Trial 
for speaking seditious Words, ibid. 929. 

VAUGHAN, Sir John, Chief Justice of K. B. 
22 Car. 2.— His Report of Bushell's Case, 
6 vol. 999. 

VAUGHAN, Captain Thomas.— His Trial in 
the Admiralty Court for High Treason in 
taking the Command of French Ships of 
War on the High Seas, 8 Will. 3, 1696, 13 
vol. 485.— -The Indictment, ibid. 488, 489 
(note). — He pleads Not Guilty, ibid. 489. 
— Speech of Sir John Hawles (Solicitor 
General) for the Prosecution, ibid. 493.— 
Evidence against him, ibid. 494.^— Evidence 
for the Defence, ibid. 518. — Lord Holt's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. 525. — ^TheJury 
find him Guilty, ibid. 529. — His Counsel 
take several Objections in Arrest of Judg- 
ment, ibid. 530. — He is sentenced to Death 
and executed, ibid. 536. — His Commission 
from the French King, ibid. ib. — Chief Jus- 
tice Eyre's allusion to this Trial in the Case 
of Sparenburgh v. Bannatyne, ibid. 485 
(note). 

VENNER, Thomas.— Archdeacon Echard's 
Account of the Insurrection of the Fifth 
Monarchy Men under him, 6 vol. 67 (note). 
— ^Trial of him and several other Persons 
concerned in the same Insurrection, ibid. 
105. — Burnet's Account of the Insurrection, 
ibid. 113. See James, John. 

VERE, Robert, Duke of Ireland. See 
Tresilian, Robert. Brambre, Nicholas, 

VERNON, Sir George, Baron of tlie Exche- 
quer, 4 Car. 1, 3 vol. 359. 

:^ Judge of C. P. 13 Car. 

1 . — His Opinion for the Crown in the Great 
Case of Ship-Money, 3 vol. 1125. 

VERULAM, Francis, Viscount. See Bacon, 
Sir Francis. 

VINCENT, Samuel. See Kirkb^, Richard. 

VINT, John.— His Trial with George Ross, and 
John Parry, for a Libel upon Paul the First, 
Emperor of Russia, published in the Courier 
Newspaper, 39 Geo. 3, 1799, 27 vol. 627.— 
The Information, ibid, ib.— Mr. Erskine's 
Speech in their Defence, ibid. 639.— Lord 
Kenyon's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 639.— The 
Jury find them Guilty, ibid. 642.— Sentence 
of the Court, ibid. ib. 



VOWELL, Peter. See Gerhard, John, ' 

VRATZ, Christopher, See Qmingsmarhi 
Charles, Count, . 

WADEi Cooper. See £ir%, JRuto^« 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



141 



WAITE, Thomas, 5 vol. 1006, 1217. See 
Regicides, 

WAKEFIELD, Gilbert. See Cuthell, John.— 
His Trial on an Ex-officio Information for 
the publication of a Seditious Libel, 39 Geo. 
3, 1799, 27 vol. 679.— The Information, 
ibid. ib. — Speech of the Attorney General 
(Sir John Scott) for the Prosecution, ibid. 
702. — Mr. Wakefield's Speech in his De- 
fence, ibid. 704. — Reply of the Attorney 
General, ibid. 734. — ^Lord Kenyon's Charge 
to the Jury, ibid. 735. — ^The Jury find him 
Guilty, ibid. 737, — His Speech on being 
brought up for Judgment, ibid. ib. — Mr. 
Justice Grose's Address on passing the Sen- 
tence of the Court upon him, ibid. 754. — He 
is sentenced to two years Imprisonment in 
Dorchester Gaol, ibid. 756. — He dies soon 
after the expiration of his Imprisonment, 
ibid. 760. 

WAKEMAN, Sir George.— His Trial with 
William Marshall, William Rumley, and 
James Corker, at the Old Bailey for High 
Treason, in being concerned in the Popish 
Plot, 31 Car. 2, 1679, 7 vol. 591.— Corker 
is arraigned with Whitebread and others, but 
petitions for time, ibid. 311. — ^The Indict- 
ment against him, ibid. 595. — The others 
plead Not Guilty, ibid. ib. — The Indictment 
against Sir George Wakeman, Rumley, and 
Marshal, ibid. 592. — Sir Robert Sawyer's 
Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. 597. — 
Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 601. — 
Gates's Evidence, ibid. 619. — ^Their Defence, 
ibid. 638. — Evidence for the Defence, ibid. 
644. — Rumley is not called upon for his 
Defence, there being no sufficient Evidence 
against him, ibid. 655. — Chief Justice 
Scroggs's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 681. — 
They are acquitted, ibid. 688.---Observations 
on this Trial under the fictitious signature of 
Ticklefoot, ibid. 687. — ^Answer to these Ob- 
servations, ibid. 695. — Speech of Chief Jus- 
tice Scroggs in the Court of King's Bench 
on occasion of some libels on himself, pub- 
lished in consequence of this Trial, ibid. 701 . 
— Burnet's Account of this Trial, ibid. 591 
(note). — Sir George Wakeman is examined 
as a Witness on Oates's Trial for Perjury, 
10 vol. 1175. 

WALCOT, Thomas.— His Trial at the Old 
Bailey for High Treason, in being concerned 
in the Rye-House Plot, 35 Car. 2, 1683, 9 
vol. 519. — ^The Indictment, ibid. ib. — The 
Attorney General (Sir Robert Sawyer) opens 
the Case for the Prosecution, ibid. 522. — 
Evidence against him, ibid.*526. — Rumsey's 
Evidence, ibid. ib. — His Defence, ibid. 
552.— Reply of the Solicitor General (Finch), 
ibid. 555. — Chief Justice Pemberton's Charge 
to the Jury, ibid. 558. — ^The Jury find him 
Guilty, ibid. 560.— His Sentence, ibid. 668. 
^-His Execution and Dying Speech, ibid, 
ib. — Burnet's Account of his Trial and Exe- 

. «utiQD| JiUdi (flO^'-^Tlie Juclgmeot against 



him reversed in Error in the Court of King's 
Bench after the Revolution, ibid. 560. — 
Record of the Proceedings in Error, ibid.ib. 
— Sir Bartholomew Shower's Report of the 
Proceedings in the House of Lords on the 
affirmance of the Judgment of the Court of 
King's Bench reversing his Attainder, 
ibid. ib. 

WALCOT, Sir Thomas, Judge of K. B. 36 
Car. 2, 10 vol. 151, 1197. 

WALKER, Clement.— He and Prynn exhibit 
Articles of Accusation for the Commonwealth 
against Colonel Fiennes for Cowardice in 
surrendering the City and Castle of Bristol, 
4 vol. 190. 

WALKER, Thomas.— His Trial at Lancaster 
with several other persons for a Conspiracy 
to overthrow the Government, 34 Geo. 3, 
1794, 23 vol. 1055.— The Indictment, ibid, 
ib. — Indictment against Mr. Walker for 
seditious Words, ibid. 1078.— His Corres- 
pondence with the Secretary of State pre- 
viously to his Commitment, ibid. 1055 (note) 
— Account of the Proceedings against the 
other Defendants previously to the Trial, 
ibid. 1064 (note). — Indictment against 
Cheetham, one of the Defendants, for se- 
ditious Words, ibid. 1079. — Counsel for the 
Prosecution and for the Defendants, ibid. 
1081. — ^Mr. Law's Speech for the Prosecu- 
tion, ibid.ib. — Evidence for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 1088. — Dunn's Evidence, ibid. ib. — 
Mr. Erskine's Speech for the Defendants, 
ibid. 1102.— Evidence for the Defendants, 
ibid. 1120 — On Dunn's Evidence being 
directly contradicted, Mr. Law abandons the 
Prosecution, ibid. 1164. — ^The Defendants 
are acquitted, ibid. ib. — Dunn is tried and 
convicted of Perjury in his Evidence on this 
Trial, ibid. 1165. 

WALL, Joseph, Governor of the Island of 
Goree.— His Trial at the Old Bailey for the 
Murder of Benjamin Armstrong by flogging 
him for being concerned in a pretended 
Mutiny, 42 Geo. 3, 1802, 28 vol. 51.— The 
Indictment, ibid. 1438. — Speech of the At- 
torney General for the Prosecution, ibid. ib. 
— Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 64.— 
The . Prisoner's Defence, ibid. 101. — Evi- 
dence for the Prisoner, ibid. 105. — Evidence 
for the Prosecution in Reply, ibid. 138. — 
Chief Baron Macdonald's Charge to the 
Jury, ibid. 143. — ^The Jury find him Guilty, 
ibid. 178. — ^The Recorder passes Sentence 
of Death upon him, ibid. 1439. — He is exe-> 
cuted, ibid. 178. 

WALLACE, James, Counsel. — ^His Argument 
for the Duchess of Kingston on her Trial for 
Bigamy, that a Sentence of the Ecclesias* 
tical Court is a conclusive answer to a 
criminal charge founded upon the facts 
which formed the subject matter of that 
Sentence, 20 vol. 374. — His Argument in 

Reply ia t^Q same Casej ibidi 508<«-<'Hiii 



142 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



Argument for the Defendant in the Case of 
the Island of Grenada, 20 Tol. 277. 

Solicitor General, 19 Geo. 



/ 3, 21 vol. 1061. 



■ Attorney General, 21 Geo. 

3, 22 vol. 15. — His Speech for the Prosecu- 
tion in the Case of Lord George Gordon for 
High Treason, 21 vol. 499. — His Speech for 
the Prosecution in the case of Francis De 
La Motte for High Treason, ibid. 708. 

WALLER. Edmund.'— Proceedings against 
him, Mr. Tomkins, Mr. Challoper, and 
others, before a Council of War, for a Plot 
against the Parliament, 19 Car. ], 1643, 4 
vol. 626. — The House of Commons commu- 
nicate the Particulars of the Plot to the 
Lords, ibid. ib. — Upon discovery of the 
Plot, the i Parliament order an Oath or 
Covenant to be taken by Members of Par- 
liament and the Army, ibid. 631. — ^Tomkins, 
Challoner, and others, are tried by a Council 
of War and sentenced to Death, ibid. 632. 
— Mr. Tomkins's Speech immediately before 
his Execution, ibid. ib. — Mr. Challoner's 
Speech, ibid. 633. — Mr. Waller's Speech in 
the House of Commons, ibid. 635. — ^He is 
expelled the House and condemned to die 
by a Council of War, but is reprieved by 
General Essex, ibid. 638. — He is imprisoned 
a year, pays a Fine of 10,000/. ana is dis- 
charged, ibid. ib. — Lord Clarendon's Ac- 
count of this Transaction, ibid. ib. — White- 
locke's Account of it, ibid. 650.— Letter 
from Mr. Waller to Colonel Godwin upon 
his Accusation, ibid. 652. 

WALLER, Sir Hardress, 5 vol. 995, 1220. See 
Regicides. 

WALLER, Sir William. See HoUis, DenxU. 

WALLIS, Dr. John.— Letter written by him 
on the Art of Deciphering, 16 vol. 540 
(note). 

WALLOP, Richard, Counsel, 8 vol. 561.— 
His Argument in support of the Plea in 
Abatement in Fitzharris's Case, 8 vol. 303. 
— His Speech for the Defendants on the 
Trial of Braddon arid Speke, 9 vol. 1165. — 
His Argument in Arrest of Judgment in 
Rosewell's Case, 10 vol. 269.— Chief Justice 
Jefferies's Abusive treatment of him on the 
Trial of Richard Baxter, 11 vol. 498.— He is 
assigned as Counsel to Lord Stafford to argue 
the points of law in his Case, 7 vol. 1525. 

WALMESLEY, Sir Thomas, Judge of C. P. 
43 Eliz. 1 vol. 1334.— He dissents from the 
Opinion of the Judges in the Case of the 
Postnati, 2 vol. 576. 

WALPOLE, Horatio.— His Evidence on the 
Trial of Francis Francia for High Treason, 
15 vol. 915. 

WALPOLE, Robert.— His Speech in the 
House of Commons in t!ie Great Case of 
Ashby and White, 14 vol. 774.— His Speech 
as one of the Managers for the Commons on 
the Trial of Dr, Sacheverell, 16 vol. 112. 



WALSINGHAM, Sir Francis.— He was one 
of the Commissioners appointed by Queeu. 
Elizabeth for the Trial of Mary, Queen of 
Scots, 1 vol. 1167. 

WALTER, Sir John, Chief Baron of the 
Exchequer, 6 Car. 1, 3 vol. 359. — White- 
locke's Account of the Causes of his removal 
from the Bench by Charles the First, 3 vol. 
292 (note). — Being discharged flrom ' his 
Office by a Message from the King, he re« 
fused to quit his place as Chief Baron, unless 
compelled by legal Proceedings, ibid. ib. 

WALTERS, Rowland.— His Trial with Bear- 
ing, Bradshaw, and Ambrose Cave, for the 
Murder of Sir Charles Pymm, 4 Jao. 2, 1688. 
12 vol. 113.— The Indictment, ibid. ib. — 
Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 115. — 
Mr. Baron Jenner's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
120.— The Jury find Walters guilty of Man- 
slaughter, and acquit the others, ibid. 122. 

WARBURTON, Sir Peter, Judge of C. P. 43 
Eliz. 1 70I. 1334, 2 vol. 1, 576.— He was 
one of the Commissioners for the Trial of 
the Conspirators in the Powder Plot, 2 vol. 
159. 

WARBURTON, Peter, Judge of the Upper 
Bench during the Commonwealth, 4 vol. 
1269, 5 vol. 841. 

WARD, Edward, Counsel.— His Argument 
in support of Lord Russel's Challenge of a 
Juror tor not having a Freehold in London, 
9 vol. 589.— His Speech for the Defendant 
in the Case of Pritchard, v. Papillon, 10 vol. 
334.— His Argument for the Plaintiff in 
support of the Demurrer to the Plea in the 
Case of the Earl of Macclesfield v. Starkey, 
ibid. 1342. 



^ Attorney General, T Will. 

3. — His Speech for the Prosecution on the 
Trial of Crosby for High Treason, 12 vol. 
1293. 



• Sir Edward, Chief Baron of the Ex- 
chequer, 8 Will. 3, 12 vol. 1379, 13 vol. 144, 
451, 15 vol. 547.— His Charges to the Jury 
on the several Trials of Kidd and others for 
Piracy and Murder, 14 vol. 143, 180. 

WARD, Sir Patience.— His Trial at the Bar of 
the Court of King's Bench, for Perjury in his 
Evidence on the Trial of an Action of Scan- 
dalum Magnatum between the Duke of York 
and Thomas Pilkington, 35 Car. 2, 1683, 9 
vol. 299. — Speeches of the Attorney General 
and Serjeant Jefferies for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 300. — Evidence for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 303.— His Defence, ibid. 312.— Evi- 
dence for him, ibid. 317.— Speech of Sir 
George Treby in his Defence, ibid. 332.— 
Mr. Williams's Speech on the same side, 
ibid. 333.— Sir Francis Winningtoe's Speech, 
ibid. 336. — Speech of the Attorney General 
in Reply, ibid. 338.— Speech of Sir George 
Jefferies,ibid. 343.— Chief JusticeSaunders's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. U6,^Jhe Jvtrj 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



148 



find him Guilty, ibid« 350.— Account of this 
Trialy from Narcissus LuttrelFs MSS., ibid, 
ib. — ^After the RcFolution, Sir Patience Ward 
was returned as one of the Members of Par- 
hament for the City of London, ibid. ib. 

WARNER, Dr. John, Bishop of Peterborough. 
See Twelve Bishops. 

WARREN, Dr. John. See Bangor, Bishop of. 

WARWICK AND HOLLAND, Edward, Earl 
of. See Mohuny Charles Lord. — His Trial 
before the House of Lords for the Mulder 
of Richard Coote, 11 Will. 3, 1699, 13 vol. 
939. — Commission to Lord Chancellor 
Somers to be Lord High Steward, ibid. 940. 
— ^The Indictment, ibid. 945. — ^The Coroner's 
Inquisition, ibid. 946. — ^The Lord High 
Steward's Address to him on his being 
brought to the Bar, ibid. 952. — ^He pleads 
Not Guilty, ibid. 954.— Speech of the At- 
torney General (Sir Thomas Trevor), for the 
ProsecutioD, ibid. 955. — Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 957. — His Defence, ibid. 
996. — Evidence in support of the Defence, 
ibid. 998.— He proposes to call Mr. French, 
who had been previously convicted of 
Manslaughter for being concerned in the 
same Transaction, and had been allowed his 
Clergy, but was not burned in the hand, 
ibid. io02.— The Attorney General objects 
to the competency of the Witness, ibid. 
1095. — His Argument in support of the 
Objection, ibid. ib. — Sir Thomas Powis's 
Argument for the Earl in favour of the com- 
petency of the Witness, ibid. 1007. — Argu- 
ment of Serjeant Wright in reply, ibid. 1011 . 
— ^The Judges deliver their Opinion against 
the competency of the Witness, ibid. 1014. 
— ^Speech of the Solicitor General (Sir J. 
Hawles), in Reply upon the Evidence, ibid. 
1026.*-*He is unanimously acquitted of 
Murder, but found Guilty of Manslaughter, 
ibid. 1031. — ^He claims the Privilege of 
Peerage and is discharged, ibid. 1032. 

WARWICK, John Dudley, Earl of. See 
Northumberland^ John Dudley, Duke of.^^ 
H Trial in the Court of the Lord High 
Steward for asserting the Title of Lady Jane 
Grey to the Crown, 1 Mary, 1553, 1 vol. 
765. — He is executed, ibid. 767. 

WARWICK, Thomas, Earl of. See Glocester, 
TJtomas, Duke of. 

WATSON, James. See Leach, Dn/den, 

WATSON, James (the Elder).— His Trial at 
the Bar of the Court of King's Bench for 
High Treason, 57 Geo. 3, 1817, 32 vol. 1.— 
Mr. Justice Bayley's Charge to the Middle- 
sex Grand Jury, ibid. ib. — ^The Grand Jury 
return a true Bill for Treason against Arthur 
Tbistlewood, James Watson, the Elder, 
James Watson, the Younger, Thomas Pres- 
ton, and John Hooper, ibid. 8. — The In- 
dictment, ibid. 10. — Counsel for the Prose- 
cvtieu and for the Prisoner; ibid. 20,-^The 



Attorney General (Sir Samuel Shepherd)' 
elects to try James Watson, the Elder, firsb 
ibid, 21. — Speech of the Attorney General 
for the Prosecution, ibidf. 26. — Evidence for 
the Crown, ibid. 56. — Examination in chief 
of John Castle, the Accomplice, by Mr. 
Gurney, ibid. 214. — His Cross-Examination 
by Mr. Wetherell, ibid. 284.— Mr. Wetherell's 
Speech for the Prisoner, ibid. 420.^-His 
Remarks upon tlie Witness, Castle, ibid. 
354, 358. — Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 
474. — Mr. Serjeant Copley's Speech on 
summing up the Evidence for the Prisoner, 
ibid. 499. — Reply of the Solicitor General 
(Sir Robert Gifford), ibid. 538.— Lord 
EUenborough's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
578. — ^Tlie Jury acquit the Prisoner, ibid. 
673. — The Attorney General offers no Evi- 
dence against the other Prisoners, and they 
are discharged, ibid. 674. 

WATSON, Dr. Thomas, Bishop of St. David's. 
—Proceedings against him for Simony and 
other offences, 7 Will. 3, 1695, 14 voL 447. 
— Summary of the Irregularities alleged 
against him, ibid. ib. — Petition of several 
Gentlemen to the House of Lords against 
him, praying for leave to prosecute him, 
ibid. 452. — His Answer thereto, ibid. ib. — 
Proceedings in the House of Lords upon his 
resumption of his Privilege, after bis oepriva- 
tion by the Archbishop of Canterbury, ibid. 
454. — Arguments of his Counsel that the 
Archbishop had no power to deprive him, 
ibid. 455. — Arguments of Counsel on the 
other side, ibid. 459. — Record of the Pro- 
ceedings before the Ecclesiastical Judges, 
ibid. 463. — Burnet's Remarks upon these 
Proceedings, ibid. 467. — Accounts given 
of the Bishop by different Writers, ibid. 
470. — Burnet says that " he was one of the 
worst men he ever knew in Holy Orders," 
ibid. 468. 

WATSON, William. See Markham, Sir 
Griffin, 

WATT, John. See Semple, John. 

WATT, Robert.— His Trial at Edinburgh for 
High Treason, under a Special Commission 
of Oyer and Terminer, 34 Geo. 3, 1794, 23 
vol. 1167. — The Commission, ibid. ib. — 
Precept for the Grand Jury, ibid. 1169. — 
The Lord President's Address to the Grand 
Jury, ibid. 1171. — Precept for the Petit 
Jury, ibid. 1183. — Counsel for the Prose- 
cution and for the Prisoner, ibid. 1184.— 
Mr. Anstruther's Speech for the Prosecu- 
tion, ibid. 1189. — Evidence for the Prosecu- 
tion, ibid. 1220.— Evidence for the Prisoner, 
ibid. 1321. — Mr. Hamilton's Speech for the 
Prisoner, ibid. 1328. — ^The Lord Advocate's 
Reply, ibid. 1360. — The Court sum up the 
Evidence, ibid. 1386. — ^The Jury find him 
Guilty, ibid. 1394.— His Declaration and 
Confession, ibid. ib. — Mr. Hamilton's Ar- 
gument in arrest of Judgment, 24 vol. 192. 
—The Court overrule the Objection* in 



144 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



arrest of Judgment, ibid. 197.— Sentence 

is passed upon him, ibid. ib. — Account of 

his Execution, ibid. 198. 

• 

WEARG, Clement, Counsel. — He opens the 

Indictment on the Trial of Christopher 

Layer for High Treason, 16 vol. 138.— His 

Speech in Reply in the House of Lords in 

favour of the Bill of Pains and Penalties 

against Bishop Atterbury, ibid. 629. 

Sir Clement, Solicitor General, 10 



Geo. 1. — His Speech in support of the 
general Charge on the Trial of the Impeach- 
ment of Lord Chancellor Macclesfield, 16 
vol. 813. 

WEBB, Philip Carteret. —Note of the Pro- 
ceedings against him for Peijury in his Evi- 
dence on the Trial of the Action, brought by 
Mr. Wilkes to try the validity of General 
Warrants, 19 vol. 1172. 

WEBSTER, Augustin. See Houghton, John. 

WEDDERBURNE, Alexander, Solicitor Ge- 
neral. See Loughborough, Alexander, Lord, 
— His Argument in the Duchess of King- 
ston's Case against the conclusiveness of a 
Sentence of the Ecclesiastical Court as an 
Answer to a criminal Charge founded on 
Facts, virhich formed the subject-matter of 
that Sentence, 20 vol. 464. 

■ ■ Attorney Ge- 

neral, 19 Geo. 3. — His opening Speech for 
the Prosecution in the Case of the Madras 
Council, 21 vol. 1061.— His Reply in the 
same Case, ibid. 1195. — In 1780, he was 
Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, in 1793 
Lord Chancellor, and in 1801 was created 
Earl of Rosslyn, ibid. 1061 (note). 

WEDDERBURNE, Sir John.— His Trial for 
High Treason, in being concerned in the 
Rebellion of 1745, 20 Geo. 2, 1746, 18 vol. 
425. — Evidence against him, ibid. ib. — His 
Defence, ibid. 426. — He is convicted, ibid. 
427. — Mr. Justice Foster's Report of this 
Case, ibid, ib.— Account of his previous 
History, ibid. ib. — He is executed, ibid. 428. 

WEIGHTMAN, George.— Hi^ Trial at Derby 
for High Treason, under a Special Com- 
mission for the Trial of persons concerned 
in the Luddite Insurrection, 57 Geo. 3, 
1817, 32 vol. 1307.— The Indictment, ibid. 
755.— Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 
1316.-~His Counsel decline entering into 
any Defence, the Facts proved being the 
same upon which Verdicts of Guilty had 
been returned against three other persons 
successively by other Juries, ibid. 1380. — 
Mr. Justice Holroyd's Charge to the Jury, 
ibid. 1384.— The Jury find him Guilty, but 
recommend him to Mercy, ibid. 1386. — He 
is afterwards pardoned, upon condition of 
being transported for Life, ibid. 1394. 

WEIR, WilUam. See Lowrie, WiUiam, 

WEW>ON James.— His Trial in Ireland for 



High Treason^ in being concerned in the 
Insurrection of the Defenders, 36 Geo. 3, 
1795, 26 vol. 225.— The Indictment, ibid; 
228. — His Counsel make Objections to the 
Caption of the Indictment, which are over« 
ruled by the Court, ibid. 236. — ^The Prisoner 
pleads in Abatement a wrong Addition to his 
name in the Indictment, ibid. 237.— A 
Panel is returned instanter to try the issue 
upon the Plea in Abatement, ibid. ib. — ^The 
Jury return a Verdict for the Crown upon 
that Issue, ibid. 242. — Tlie Prisoner pleads i 
Not Guilty, ibid. ib. — ^The Attorney Gene- 
ral's Speech for the Prosecution, ibid. 243. ' 
— Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 251. I 
— Mr. Curran's Speech for the Prisoner, 
ibid. 264. — Mr. Justice Finucane's Charge 
to the Jury, ibid. 278. — Mr. Justice Cham- 
berlain's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 284.— 
Mr. Baroii George's Charge, ibid. 286.— 
The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 289.— His 
Counsel move in arrest of Judgment upon 
a technical Objection to the Indictment, 
ibid. ib. — ^The Court overrule the Objection, 
ibid. 292. — Sentence is passed upon him, 
and he is executed, ibid. ib. 

WELLING, Thomas and Elizabeth, See 
Hathaway, Richard, 

WELLS, Susannah. See Squires, Mary, 

WENTWORTH, Sir John. See HoUis, Sir 
Jcjm, 

WENTWORTH, Sir Thomas. See Sirt^ord. 
Thomas, Earl of. --His Speech in the Debate 
upon the Liberty of the Subject, on occasion 
of the Imprisonment of several Gentlemen 
for refusing to lend upon the Commission 
of Loans, 3 vol. 61. 

WENTWORTH, Thomas, Lord. See Straf- 
ford, Thomas, Earl of. — ^He apparently pro- 
moted the Prosecution of Sir David Fowlis 
and others, on a Charge of opposing the 
King's Service, and traducing his Oflicers of 
State, 3 vol. 585.--His Judgment in the 
Star Chamber respecting the Sentence to be 
passed upon Henry Sherfield for breaking 
a Window ill a Church, ibid. 553. 

WEST, Mr.— His Speech in the House of 
Lords on summing up the Evidence on 
behalf of the Commons, on the Trial of the 
Impeachment of Lord Chancellor Maccles- 
field, 16 vol. 1057. 

WESTON, Francis. See Norris, Henry, 

WESTON, Sir Francis, Baron of the Exche- 
quer, 13 Car. 1.— -His Argument on deliver- 
ing his Judgment for the Crown in the Case 
of Ship-Money, 3 vol. 1065. 

WESTON, Richard.— His Trial for the Murder 
of Sir Thomas Overbury, 13 Jac. 1, l^lo, 
2 vol. 911.— Lord Coke's Charge lo tue 
Grand Jury, ibid, ib.— The Indictment, 
ibid. 912.— He pleads Not Guilty, Dw 
refuses to put buuself upon the CQ^mfi 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



though threatened with the Peine forte et 
dure, ibid. 913. — Lord Coke explains to 
him the Punishment of the Peine forte et 
dure, ibid. ib. — Evidence against him, ibid. 
919. — He at length puts himself upon the 
Coantiy, ibid. 923. — Further Evidence 
against him, ibid. 925.— He is found Guilty, 
condemned^ and executed, ibid. 928. 

WESTON, Sir Richard, Baron of the Ex- 
chequer, 32 Car. 2, 7 vol. 1528. — His Charge 
to the Jury on the Trial of Elizabeth Cellier 
for a Libel, ibid. 1183.— Roger North's 
Character of him, 8 vol. 166 (note). 

WETHERELL, Charles, Counsel.— His Ar- 
gument for George Easlerby, on liis Trial 
•with William Codling and others for 
feloniously destroying a Ship at Sea, in order 
to defraud the Underwriters, 28 vol. 291 .— 
His Speech in defence of James Watson, 
on his Trial for High Treason, 32 vol. 420. 

WHARTON, Thomas, Lord. See Batftunt, 
Charles, 

WHARTON, John. See Lilbum, John. 

WHISTON, William.—His Inquiry into the 
Evidence of Archbishop Cranmer's Recan- 
tation, 1 vol. 844.— Proceedings against him 
for publishing Doctrines contrary to the 
Established Religion, 10 Anne 171 1» 15 
vol. 703. — ^Address of the Archbishop and 
Bishops of the Province of Canterbury to 
the Queen, praying her to require the 
Opinion of the Judges, 'whether they have 
the power of proceeding against him in 
Convocation, ibid. ib. — ^The Queen refers 
the matter to the Judges and the Attorney 
and Solicitor General, ibid. 704.— Opinions 
of the Judges and of the Attorney and 
Solicitor General thereon, ibid. ib. — Pro- 
ceedings of the University of Cambridge 
against him, ibid. 707. — Doctrines dissemi- 
nated by him in the University, ibid. 708. 
— ^He is banished from the University, ibid. 
710. — Burnet's Account of Whiston's Case, 
ibid. 711. 

WHITAKER, Edward, Counsel.— His Argu- 
ment against the Amendment of the Record 
of the Jury Process in Tutchin's Case, 14 
vol. 1176. — His Speech in Defence of 
Dammaree, on his Trial for High Treason, 
15 vol. 562. 

■ Seijeant-at-Law, 17 

vol. 213. — His Speech in Reply for the Pro- 
secution on the Trial of Hales and Kin- 
nersley, for forging an Indorsement upon a 
Promissory Note, 17 vol. 247. 

WHITBREAD, Samuel.— His Speech as one 
of the Managers for the House of Com- 
mons on the Trial of the Impeachment of 
Lord Melville, 29 vol. 625. — His General 
Reply for the Commons in the same Case, 
ibid. 1392. 

^THITE, Charles, See Goodcre. Capium 
VOL, XXXIV, 



145 



j^omtfe/.- His Trial at the Bristol Gaol 
Delivery for the Murder of Sir John Dinely 
Goodere, 14 Geo. 2, 1741, 17 vol. 1079. — 
The Indictment, ibid. ib. — Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 1082. — His Examination 
and Confession before the Magistrates, ibid. 
1085.— His Defence, ibid. 1087.— The Re- 
corder's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 1089. 

The Jury find him Guilty, ibid. 1090.— 
Sentence of Death is passed upon him, ibid. 
1091.— He is executed, ibid. 1094. 

WHITE, Henry.— His Trial Tvith John Har- 
riott Hart for Libels upon Sir Simon Le 
Blanc and the Administration of Justice, 
contained in certain Remarks upon a Trial 
in the Admiralty Court, published in the 
Independent Whig, 48 Geo. 3, 1808, 30 
vol. 1131. — ^The Information, ibid. ib. — 
Speech of the Attorney General (Sir Vicary 
Gibbs) for the Prosecution, ibid. 1156. — 
Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 1167. — 
Mr. Adolphus's Speech for the Defendants, 
ibid. 1169.— Reply of the Attorney Gene- 
ral, ibid. 1180. — Mr. Justice Grose's Charge 
to the Jury, ibid. 1189.— The Jury find 
them Guilty, ibid. 1194.— Their Trial for 
Libels upon Lord Ellenborough and the 
Administration of Justice, contained in 
Remarks on a Trial of an Action of Assault 
in the Court of King's Bench, published in 
the Independent Whig, ibid. 1193. — The 
Information, ibid. 1194.— Speech of the 
Attorney General for the Prosecution, ibid. 
1226.— Mr. Clifford's Sjpeech for the De- 
fendants, ibid. 1247. — Tne Attorney Gene- 
ral's Reply, ibid. 1301. — ^Proceedings on a 
Motion for a new Trial, on the ground of 
the Evidence of Publication in London being 
insufficient, ibid. 1316. — The Motion is 
refused, ibid. 1319. — ^Judgment of the Court 
upon the Defendants upon both Informa- 
tions, ibid. 1321. — ^They are sentenced to 
be imprisoned respectively at Dorchester 
and Glocester Gaols for 18 Months on each 
Conviction, and to give Security, ibid, ib.— 
The Defendants bring a Writ of Error in 
the House of Lords to reverse the Judgment ^ 
of the Court of King's Bench, ibid. 1322. — ' 
Mr. Clifford's Argument for the Plaintiffs 
in Error, that the Court of King's Bench has 
no power to award imprisonment out of the 
County in "which the Offence was coinmit- 
ted, or in which the Court was sitting at the 
time of passing the Sentence, excepting in 
the immediate Prisons of the Court, and 
also that the Security required is illegal and 
excessive, ibid. 1325. — ^Argument of the 
Attorney General in support of the Judg- 
ment, ibid. 1335. — ^Argument of the Solicitor 
General (Sir Thomas Plumer) on the same 
side, ibid. 1337.— Mr. Clifford's Reply, ibid. 
1340. — The Judges deliver their Opinion 
that the Court of King's Bench has the 
power of imprisoning in any Gaol in the 
Kingdom^ and of requiring Sureties for 

good BehayiQur for a reasonable timei ibidi 



146 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



1344.^The Jadgment is unatiimously af- 
flrmedyibid. 1346. 

WHITIi, Dr.Thomas, Bishop of Peterborough. 
See Seven Bishops, 

WHITEBREAD, Thomas.— His Trial with 
William Harcourt, John Fen wick, John 
Gavan, and Anthony Turner, for High 
Treason, in being concerned in the Popish 
Plot, 31 Car. 2, 1679, 7 vol. 311.— White- 
bread and Fenwick are arraigned and put 
on their Trial with Ireland and others, but 
the Jury are discharged as to them, for want 
of Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 120. 
— Remarks on the illegality of this Proceed- 
ing, ibid. 497 (note). — ^These two object 
that they ought not by law to be placed a 
second time in jeopardy, ibid. 315.— The 
Court overrule the Objection, ibid. 316. — 
Indictment against them, ibid. 313. — ^They 
plead Not Guilty, ibid. 317. — Speech of 
Sir Creswell Levinz for the Prosecution, 
ibid. 320. — Oates's Evidence against them, 
ibid. 322. — Further Evidence against them, 
ibid. 334. — Their Defence, ibid. 357. — 
They require that their Witnesses may be 
sworn, which is refused by the Court, ibid. 
359. — Evidence for them, ibid. ib. — ^The 
King's Counsel reply, ibid. 393. — Evidence 
in Reply for the Crown, ibid. 395. — ^They 
are further heard in their Defence, ibid. 403. 
— Chief Justice Scroggs*s Charge to the 
Jury, ibid. 411. — They are found Guilty, 
ibid, 418. — The Recorder (Jefferies) passes 
Sentence of Death upon them, ibid. 487. — 
Their Conduct at the place of Execution, 
and their Dying Speeches, ibid. 491, 585. — 
Animadversions on the Speeches delivered 
by them at the place of Execution, ibid. 
543. ^ 

WHITELOCKE, Bulstrode. See Ho^ts, 
Denzil, — ^He conducts the Charge for the 
Commons on the seven last Articles of 
impeachment against Lord Strafford, 3 vol. 
1438. — Lord Strafford's favourable Opinion 
of his mode of conducting the Charge 
against him, ibid. 1456 (note). — His Ac- 
count of Lord Strafford's Defence of him- 
self, ibid. 1467 (note).-^He carefully ab- 
stains from all share in the Trial of the 
King, 4 vol. 990 (note). 

' ■■ Sir Bulstrode, Lord Com- 

missioner of the Great Seal of the Common- 
wealth. — His Argument on delivering his 
Opinion in the negative on the Question 
whether James Nayler should be put to 
Death for Blasphemy, 5 vol. 821. 

WHITELOCKE, James, Counsel.— Proceed- 
ings in the Star Chamber for a Contempt 
ia giving a professional Opinion on a 
Question of Prerogative, 2 vol. 765. — Mr. 
Margrave's Introductory Note to this Case, 
ibid. ib. — Sir Francis Bacon's Speech for 
the Pr9se€tttie»; ibid. 76^ 



Sir James, Judge of K. B. 

3 Car. 1, 3 vol. 369, 421.— His Answer in 
the House of Lords to the Charge of the 
House of Commons against him for concur- 
ring in the Judgment of the Court of King's 
Bench on the Habeas Corpus brought by 
Sir Thomas Darnell and others, imprisoned 
for refusing to lend upon the Commission 
of Loans, ibid. 161.— His Report of the 
Case referred to him and the other Judges 
by Charles the First, respecting the proposed 
Trial by Battle of an Appeal of Treason, 
brought by David Ramsay against Donald, 
Lord Rea, ibid. 495. 

WHYTE,Alexandcr.— His Trial at the Quarter 
Sessions at Newcastle-upon-Tyne for pub- 
lishing a Seditious Libel, 33 Geo. 3, 1793, 
22 vol. 1238.— Evidence for the Prosecu- 
tion, ibid. ib. — The Defendant's Address to 
the Jury, ibid, 1241.— The Jury at first 
return a Verdict of Not Guilty of Publishing, 
and afterwards a General Verdict of Not 
Guilty, ibid. 1248. 

WICKHAM, John. See PWdngton, Thomas. 

WICKLIFFE, John.— Proceedings against 
him for Heresy, 51 Edw. 3, 1377, 1 vol. 67. 
— -Articles of his heretical Doctrines, ibid. 
ib. — Bull of Pope Gregory the Eleventh to 
the University of Oxford respecting him, 
ibid. 68. — The Pope's Letter to Richard 
the Second respecting him, ibid. 70. — His 
Conclusions exhibited to the Convocation 
of Bishops at Lambeth, ibid. 71. — His 
Exposition and Defence of his Conclusioas, 
ibid. 73. — He is charged not to preach his 
heretical Doctrines again, and dismissed, 
ibid. 78. — In 1382 he is again summoned 
before a Convocation, ibid. 79. — Further 
Articles of heretical Doctrines exhibited 
against him, ibid. 80. — ^Letter of the Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury to the Bishop of 
London, enjoining .him to suppress the 
Doctrines of Wickliffe and his adherents, 
ibid. 82. — Letter from the Archbishop to 
the Chancellor of the University of Oxford, 
commanding him to forbid Wickliflfe and 
his followers from preaching their Doctrines 
in the University, ibid. 84. — Statute for 
restraining the diffusion of his Doctrines, 
ibid. 86. — ^Tbe Statute is repealed, ibid. 88. 
— ^Wickliffe's Letter to Pope . Urban the 
Sixth, with a Confession of his Faith, ibid, 
ib, — He dies at Lutterworth, ibid. 90, 225. 



WICKSTONE, Sir 
Richard, 



See Knigktlm/^ Sir 



WIDDRINGTON, WilKam, Lord. SeeDcr- 

wentwater, James, Earl of, 

WIGHTMAN, Edward. See Legatt, Bar- 
Mo/oTWcw. — Proceedings against him for 
Heresy, 10 Jac. 1, 1612, 2 vol. 727.--He is 
convicted before the Bishop of litdifield 
and Coventry, ibid. 730. — His Doctrines, 
ibid, 735. — Precept to the Lord Chancellor 
.to i9juie the Wnt. De h^eretiwo cottbwei^o, 



THE ST^ATE TRIALS. 



147 



iWd. r«4.— Writ to the Sheriff, ibid. 737.— 
He is burned at Litchfield, ibid. 730. 

WIIX30CKS, Samuel. See Green^ Captain 
Thomas. 

WILDE, George, Serjeant-at-Law. — Ilis 
Speech for the Commons in support of the 
Charge against Sir Edward Herbert, the 
King's Attorney General, 4 vol. 124. — He 
is appointed by the Commons with others, 
to manage tlie Impeachment of Archbishop 
Laud, ibid. 347. — His Speech on opening 
the Impeachment of Laud in the House of 
Lords, ibid. 353. 



■'■ Chief Baron of the Ex- 
chequer during the Commonwealth, 5 vol. 
416. 

WILDE, Sir William, Knight and Baronet, 
Recorder of London. — He was named as 
one of the Judges in the Special Commis- 
sion for the Trial of the Regicides, 5 vol. 
986. 



«————— King's Serjeant. — He 
wa8 one of the Counsel for the Prosecution 
on the Trial of Messenger and others, 6 vol. 
888. 

Judge of C. P. 20 



Car. 2, 6 vol. 899. 



Judge of K. B. 29 

Car. 2, 7 vol. 59, 261. — His Opinion in the 
Case of the Earl of Shaftesbury, 6 vol. 1296. 
— His Address on passing Sentence upon 
Green and others, for the Murder of Sir 
Edmondbury Godfrey, 7 vol. 222. 

WILKES, John. — His Case upon a Habeas 
Corpus, returnable in the Court of Common 
Pleas, sued out by him to try the legality 
of his Commitment by the Secretary of 
State for writing a seditious Libel, 3 Geo. 
3, 1763, 19 vol. 981.— The Warrant of the 
Secretary of State for his iVpprehension, 
ibid. ib. — ^He is arrested thereon, ibid. ib. 
—Serjeant Glynn moves the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas for a Habeas Corpus to the Mes- 
sengers of the Secretary of State, which is 
granted, ibid. 982. — He is committed to the 
Tower before the Writ of Habeas Corpus is 
delivered to the Messengers, ibid, ib.— 
Copy of the Warrant of Commitment to 
the Tower, ibid. ib. — ^The Messengers re- 
turn to the Habeas Corpus directed to them, 
that he was not in their Custody, ibid. 983. 
— Doubts respecting the sufficiency of this 
Return, ibid. 984. — A Habeas Corpus is 
granted' by the Court, directed to the Con- 
stable of the Tower, ibid. ib. — Mr. Wilkes 
is brought to the Bar, ibid. ib. — His Counsel 
move for his Discharge upon several Objec- 
tions to the Warrant of Commitment, ibid* 
985. — ^His Speech to the Court, ibid. 986. 
— Cbi^ Justice Pratt delivers the Judg- 
ment of the Court that he be discharged, 
npoa the gio«od that; as a Member of Par- 



liament, he is privileged from Arrest, except 
for Treason, Felonyi or actual Breach of 
the Peace, ibid. 987.-^Another Account of 
the Argument of the Chief Justice on giving 
Judgment, ibid. 990. — Resolution of both 
Houses of Parliament against the- Doctrine 
established by this Judgment, ibid. 993. — 
Protest in the House of Lords against this 
Resolution, ibid. 994. — Proceedings in the 
Court of King's Bench and in the House of 
Lords on two Informations against him for 
Libels, 4 Geo. 3, 1763, 10 Geo. 3, 1770, 
ibid. 1075. — Verdicts are found against him 
on both Informations, and on his not ap- 
pearing to receive Judgment, he is out- 
lawed, ibid. 1077.— -Before any Process is 
issued on the Outlawry, he appears in Court, 
ibid. ib. — His Speech to the Court on that 
occasion, ibid. ib. (note).— The Attorney 
General moves to commit him, and his 
Counsel move to admit him to Bail at the 
same time, ibid. 1079. — The Court refuse 
both Motions, ibid. 1081.— Mr. Wilkes 
sues out Writs of Error upon the Out- 
lawries, ibid. 1085.— He moves the Court 
to be admitted to Bail, which is refused, 
ibid. 1087. — ^Argument of the Errors assign- 
ed upon the Outlawries, ibid. 1093. — Lord 
Mansfield delivers the Judgment of the 
Court that the Outlawries must be reversed, 
ibid. 1098. — Copy of the Record of the 
Proceedings in the Court of King's Bench, 
ibid. 1382. — Upon the reversal of the Out- 
lawry, Mr. Wilkes moves in arrest of Judg<« 
ment, on the ground that the Informations 
were filed by the Solicitor General, and 
applies for a New Trial, on the ground that 
an Amendment of the Informations was 
made by a single Judge out of Court, ibid; 
1117. — ^The Court refuse both applications, 
ibid. ib. — Sentence of the Court upon him, 
ibid. 1124. — He brings Writs of Error, re- 
' tuniable in Parliament, ibid. 1126. — Reasons 
stated by his Counsel in support of the 
Errors assigned, 20 vol. 799. — Questions 
proposed by the House of Lords to the 
Judges, with their Answers thereto, 19 vol. 
1127. — ^The House of Lords affirm the 
Judgment of the Court of King's Bench 
in both Cases, ibid. 1136. — Proceedings 
in the Court of Common Pleas in an 
Action of Trespass, brought by him against 
Robert Wood, in order to try the Question 
of the validity of General Warrants, 3 
Geo. 3, 1763, ibid. 1153.— Counsel for 
the Plaintiff and for the Defendant, ibid, 
ib. — Speech of the Counsel for the Plain- 
tiff, ibid, ib.— Evidence for the Plaintiff, 
ibid. 1155. — Speech of Sir Fletcher Norton 
(Solicitor General) for the Defendant, 
ibid. 1158. — Evidence for the Defend- 
ant, ibid. 1160. — Serjeant Glynn's Reply, 
ibid. 1164. — Chief Justice Pratt's Charge 
to the Jury, ibid. 1166. — The Jury return a 
general Verdict for the Plaintiff, with 1,000/, 
damages, ibid. 1168. — ^The Solicitor General 
tenders a Bill of Exceptions; ivbzcb the 
h 2 



148 

Chief Justice refuies to accept, ibid.ib.— 

One of Ibe Witnesses for the Defeadant h 
ttfterwarda tried for Perju^ in his Eridence 
on (hia Trial, and acquitted, ibid. 1172. 

WILKINS, Thomas. See Gordon, Lord 

WILKS, William. See Maieuger, Peter. 

WILLES, Edward, Counsel.— Hia Speech 
for the Prosecution on the Trial of Eliia- 
beth Canning for Perjury, 19 vol. 311. 

Sir Edward, Judge of K. B. 8 Geo. 

3. — lie delivers his Opinion a^nst ad' 
tnitliog John Wilkes to bail on his Appear^ 
ance to reverse an Oullavtiy upon a crimi- 
nal Information, 19 vol. 1091- — He declares 
his Opinion in Wilkes's Case in favour of 
the right of the Soliciloc General (o lile 
a Criminal Information in llie absence of 
the Attorney General, and also in favour 
of the Competency of a single Judge at 
Chambers to order a formal Amendment 
in a Criminal loformation, ibid. 1133. 

WILLES, Sir John, Attorney General, 10 
Geo. 2. — His Speech for ttie Defendants 
in the Case of Ihe Quo Warranto against 
the Town and Port of Hastings, 17 vol. 



- Chief Justice of C. P. 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



20 Geo. 2, IB vol. 329, 19 vol. 673.— He 
delivers Ihe Opinion of the Judges against 
the granting a New Trial in the Case of 
Elizabeth Canning, 19 vol. 672. 



WILLIAMS, Dr. John, Bishop of tm 
Proceedings in the Star-Chamber 
him for tampering wiih the Wilnea 
(he Prosecution on an Information 
Um for publishing false News 
scandal of Government, and for re 
Secrels of State, 13 and 14 Car. 1. 
3 vol. 769.— He is defended by Gs 
Recorder of London, ibid. 771.— 
of the Attorney General (Sir John 1 
ibid. 772.-Speeches of (he Meml 
the Court on giving their Opinic 
spccting his Sentence, ibid. 783.- 
hishop Laud's Speech in givii 
Opinion, ibid. 792. — The Prow 
against him anB Lambert Osbaldal 
conspiring to spread false and scai 
Reports on political subjects, 1638-! 
804.— Letters of Dsbaldslon to 1 
which the' Charge is founded, ibid 
Speeches of the Members of the 
on giving their Opinion respecting tne 
Sentence, ibid. BIO.— The Sentence of the 
Court, ibid. aie.-Clarendon's Account of 
him, ibid. 819, — Notices of him by other 
Historians, ibid. 824.— He was afterwwls 
leatoted to bis Dignities, ibid. 8Q4 (nole). 



■ — Archbi^op of York. 

See Twelve Biihopi. 

WILLIAMS, , of Esse*.— His Case 

upon an Indictment for High Treason in 
writing seditious Books, 17 Jac. 1, 1619, 
2 vol. 1085.— Sir William Williams's allu- 
sion to this Case on the Trial of the Sevea 
Bishops, 12 vol. 328, ibid. ib. (note). 

WILLIAMS, Thomas.— His Trial in the 
Court of King's Bench for publishing a 
blasphemous Libel (Paine's Age of Reason), 
on an Indictment preferred by the Society 
for the Suppression of Vice, 37 Geo. 3, 
1797, 26 vol. 653.— Introduction to this 
Case, containing Mr. Bayley's Opipion 
that Blasphemy is an indictable OSence, 
ibid. 654.— Counsel for the Prosecution 
and for the Defendant, ibid. 656. — The 
Indictment, ibid. ib. — Mr. Erskioe's Speech 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 660.— Evidence 
for Ihe Prosecution, ibid. 669, — Mr. Stewart 
Kyd'a Speech for the Defendant, ibid. 671. 
. — Lord Kenyon's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
703.— The Jury find the Defendant Guilty, 
ibid. 705.— His Affidavit in mitigation of 
Punishment on being brought up for Judg- 
ment, ibid. 709. — Mr. Justice Ashhurst'a 
Address on passing the Sentence of the 
Court upon him, ibid. 714. — Mr. Erskine's 
Letter to the Editor of the State Trials, 
explaining his motives for returning the 
Prosecutor's Retainer in this Case, ibid. 
714 (note). 

WILLIAMS, William, Counsel, 10 vol. 568. 
— His Defence of Ford, Lord Grey of Werk, 
and others, for a Conspiracy to debauch 
Lady Henrietta Berkeley, 9 vol. 1 59- — His 
Speech in Defence of Filkington and others, 
on their Trial for a Riot at the Election of 
Sheriffs for the City of London, ibid. 264. 
^Ilis Speech in Defence of Sir Patience 
Ward, on his Trial for Perjury, ibid. 333. — 
His Instructions to Algernon Sidney for his 
conduct on his Trial, 9 vol. 825 (uote). — 
His Speech in Defence of Mr. Hampden, 
ibid. 1078.— His Speech in Defence of 
Braddon and Speke, ibid. 1166.— His De- 
fence of Sir Samuel Bamardiston, ibid. 
1347.— His Speech for Sir S. Bamardiston, 
in arrest of Judgment, ibid. 135B. — His 
Speech for the Defendant in the Action of 
Pritchard v. Papillon for a false Arrest, 10 
vol. 332. — His Argument for Mr. Sandys 
in the Great Case of Monopolies, ibid. 495. 
—He is examined as a Witness on Oa(es'» 
Trial for Perjury, ibid. 1166. — His Argu- 
ment for the Earl of Macclesfield in the 
Action of Scandalum Magnatum brought 
by him against John Slarkey, ibid. 1387. 

Sir William, Baronet, Solicitor 

General, 4 Jac, 2, 12 vol, 125. — His Ail- 
ment in the Case of the Seven Bishops, that 
Sureties of the Pence may be required for 
the publicaUon of a. Seditious Libel, ibid. 
325'— His Speech in leply for t|)« FnNefiii 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



149 



tion on the Trial of the Seven Bishops, ibid. 
401. — Burnet says that he took very indecent 
liberties in conducting the Prosecution in 
that Case^ ibid. 201 (note). 

12 vol. 

752, 929, 1211, 1367, 13 vol. 422, 615.— 
Proceedings against him for the publication 
of Dangerfield's Narrative, reflecting upon 
the Duke of York (afterwards James the 
Second), 36 Car. 2, and 7 Will. 3, 1684-1695, 
13 vol.1369. — The Information in the King's 
Bench, ibid, ib. — He pleads that he caused 
the Paper to be printed as Speaker of the 
House of Commons, and by the command of 
the House, ibid. 1377. — Sir Robert Atkyns's 
Argument for him, ibid. 1380.— His Plea is 
overruled, and he is fined 10,000/. ibid. 1436. 
— ^The Judgment is afterwards reversed in 
Parliament^ ibid. 1441. 

WILLIAMS, WiUiam Peere, Counsel.— He is 
of Counsel for the Earl of Wintoun on his 
Trial for High Treason, 15 vol. 811. 

WILLIS, Francis. See Dammaree, Daniel; 
Purchase, George, — His Trial for High 
Treason in levying War against the Queen 
under pretence of pulling down Meeting- 
Houses, 9 Anne, 1710, 15 vol. 613. — ^The 
Indictment, ibid. 536. — He pleads Not 
Guilty, ibid. 545. — Evidence against him, 
ibid. 617. — Mr. Darnell's Speech in his 
Defence, ibid. 627. — Evidence for the De- 
fence, ibid. 630. — Reply of the Counsel for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 640. — Chief Justice 
Parker's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 646. — 
The Jury acquit him, ibid. 652. 

WILLOUGHBY, Elizabeth. See Hathaway, 
Richard, * 

WILLOUGHBY fof Parham, Francis, Lord. 
See Suffolk, James, Earl of, 

WILMER, John. — He was Foreman of the 
Grand Jury who threw out the Bill of In- 
dictment against Stephen Colledge, 9 vol. 
552 (note). — Kennet says that he was ex- 
amined before the Privy Council, and after- 

' wards obliged to fly beyond seas for his 
Conduct on that occasion, ibid. ib. — Roger 
North denies that he was obliged to fly on 
that account, but says, that he was compelled' 
to leave the country on account of his having 
kidnapped two youths, and sent them to the 
Plantations as Slaves, ibid. 557 (note). — 
Account of his Conviction for this Offence, 
extracted from Narcissus Luttrell's MSS., 
ibid. 1347 (note). — Sir John Hawles's Re- 
marks upon the Proceedings upon a Writ 
De Homine Replegiando issued against him, 
ibid. 1347. 

WILMOT, Sir John Eardley, Chief Justice o^ 
C. P. 9 Geo. 3. — Account of his Charge to 
the Jury on the Trial of an Action of Tres- 
pass and False Imprisonment brought by 
John Wilkes against Lord Halifax, His 
Majesty's Secretary of State, 19 vol. 1408. 



WILSON, James William.-2-He pleads Guilty 
to an Indictment for High Treason in being 
concerned in the Cato Street Plot, 33 vol. 
1542. — He is pardoned on condition of 
being transported for life, ibid. 1566. 

WILSON, William. See Sacheverell, WUliam. 

WINCHESTER, William, Marquis of, Lord 
Treasurer, 5 Edw. 6. — He was appointed 
Lord High Steward for the Trial of Edward 
Duke of Somerset for High Treason and 
Felony, 1 vol. 517. 

WINDHAM, Sir Hugh, Judge of C. P. 31 
Car. 2, 7 vol. 261, 609. — He delivers his 
Opinion with the other Judges against Lord 
Russets Challenge of a Juror for not having 
a Freehold within the City of London, 9 vol, 
592. 

WINDHAM, Wadham, Counsel.— His Con- 
duct on being imprisoned by Cromwell, with 
Serjeant Maynard and Serjeant Twisden 
for pleading in the Case of Mr. Cony, 5 vol. 
936. — He is ordered to attend the Consul- 
tation of the Judges previous to the Trial of 
the Regicides, as Counsel for the King, ibid. 
971. — His Speech for the Prosecution on the 
Trial of Colonel Harrison, ibid. 1023. 

Judge of K. B. 13 

Car. 2, 6 vol. 74, 769. — He is said by Sir 
John Hawles to have been the second best 
Judge in Westminster Hall since the Re*^ 
storation, 9 vol. 1003. 

WINDEBANK, Sir • Francis, Secretary of 
State. — Proceedings in Parliament against 
him for favouring Popish Recusants, 16 
Car. 1, 1640, 4 vol. 41. — ^Articles of Im- 
peachment against him, ibid. 44. — He 
escapes to France, ibid. 43. — His Letter 
from thence to the Lord Chamberlain, ibid. 
45. — He obtained his Office by the influence 
of Archbishop Laud, ibid. 41 (note). — Lord 
Clarendon's Account of the Proceedings 
against him, ibid. ib. 

WINNINGTON, Sir Francis, Solicitor Gene- 
ral, 30 Car. 2, 7 vol. 167,770.— His Speech 
in the House of Lords on summing up the 
Evidence for the Prosecution on the Trial 
of Philip, Earl of Pembroke, for Murder, 6 
vol. 1343. — His Speech on summing up the 
Evidence for the Prosecution on the Trial 
of Edward Coleman for being concerned in 
the Popish Plot, 7 vol. 61.— His Speech on 
summing up the Evidence on the Trial of 
Lord Cornwallis for Murder, ibid. 152. — 
His Speech on summing up the Evidence on 
the Trial of Sir Thomas Gascoigne for being 
concerned in the Popish Plot, ibid. 1033. 

9 vol.241, 12 



vol. 1295, 13 vol. 422.^-His Speech in De- 
fence of Henry Carr, on his Trial for publish- 
ing a Libel upon the Government and the 
Administration of Justice, 7 vol. 1121. — His 
Speech as one of the Managers for the Com- 
mons on the Trial of the Impeachment of 



150 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



Lord Stafford, ibid. 1302. — Hb Argument 
in Support of the Plea in Abatement in Fitz- 
faarris's Case, 8 vol. 296. — His Speech in 
Reply for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
Count Coningsmark and others for Murder, 
9 vol. 68. — His Speech iii Defence of ^ir 
Patience Ward on his Trial for Perjury, 
ibid. 336. — ^His Speech in the House of 
Commons in the Debate on the Earl of 
Danby's Impeachment, 11 vol. 729. 

WINTER, Robert.— His Trial at Westminster 
with Thomas Winter, Guy Fawkes, John 
Grant. Ambrose Rookwood, Robert Keyes, 
and Thomas Bates, for High Treason in being 
concerned in the Powder Plot, 3 Jac.l, 1606, 
2 vol. 159.— The Indictment, ibid, ib.— They 

, plead Not Guilty, ibid. 164. — Speech of Sir 
Edward Coke (Attorney General), for the 
Crown, ibid. 166. — ^The Jury find them 
Guilty, ibid. 185. — Judgment passed upon 
them and Sir Everard Digby, ibid. 194. — 
Account of their Execution, from the Har- 
leian Miscellany, ibid. 21 5« 

WINTER, Thomas. See Winter, Robert 

WINTERBOTHAM, William.— His Trial at 
the Assises at Exeter for preaching a sedi- 
tious Sermon, 33 Geo. 3, 1793, 22 vol. 823. 
— ^Abstract of the Indictment, ibid. ib. — 
Counsel for the Prosecution and for the De- 
fendant,ibid.ib.— Mr.SerjeantRooke'sSpeech 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 826. — Evidence for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 827. — Mr. Gibbs's 
Speech for the Defendant, ibid. 838. — Evi- 
dence for the Defence, ibid. 848. — Serjeant 
Rooke'sReply,ibid.869.— Mr.BaronPerryn's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. 875. — The Jury find 
him Guilty, ibid. 876. — His Trial at the same 
Assizes for preaching another seditious 
Sermon, ibid. 875. — Evidence for the Pro- 
secution, ibid. 878. — Mr. Gibbs's Speech in 
his Defence, ibid. 884.— Evidence for the 
Defendant, ibid. 893.— Mr, Baron Perryn's 
Charge to the Jury, ibid. 905.— The Jury 
find him Guilty against the Opinion of the 
Judge, ibid, 906.— Proceedings in the Court 
of King's Bench on his being brought up for 
Judgment, ibid, ib.— The Sentence, ibid. 
907. 

WINTOUN, George, Earl of.— His Trial be- 
fore the House of Lords upon an Impeach- 
ment of High Treason in being concerned in 
the Rebellion of 1715, 2 Geo. i, 1716, 15 
vol. 805. — Proceedings in Parliament pre- 
vious to his Trial, ibid, ib.— Proceedings on 
his Trial in Westminster Hall, ibid. 815.— 
Lord Chancellor Cowper appointed Lord 
High Steward, ibid. 816.— The Lord High 
Steward's Address to him on his being 
brought to the Bar, ibid. 817.— The Articles 
of Impeachnfent, ibid. 818.— His Answer 
thereto, ibid. 823.— Reply of the House of 
Commons, ibid. 825.— Mr. Hampden's 
Speech for the Commons in Support of the 
Impeachment, ibid. 826. — Sir Joseph 
Jekyll's Speech on the same side, ibid. 830. 
*-Tho Attorney General, Sir Edward 



Northey's Speech on the same side, ibid, 
833. — Evidence in Support of the Impeach- 
ment, ibid. 837. — ^The Earl applies for lar-< 
ther time to bring his Witnesses, ibid. 859. 
— This is refused by theHouse^ ibid. 861.— < 
The Prisoner not entering into any Defence, 
the Managers for the House of Commons 
reply, ibid. 867. — ^Mr. Cowper's Speech in 
Reply, ibid, ib.— Sir William Tnomson's 
Speech, ibid. 869. — ^The Lords unanimously 
find him Guilty, ibid. 874. — ^He objects in 
arrest of Judgment, that the time is not laid 
with sufficient certainty in the Impeachment, 
ibid. 875. — Arguments of his Counsel in 
Support of the Objection, ibid. 876. — ^An« 
swer to the Objection by the Managers for 
Commons, ibid. 883. — Reply of Lord Win- 
toun's Counsel in Support of the Objection, 
ib^d. 888. — The Objection is overruled y ibid. 
893. — ^The Lord High Steward's Address on 
passing sentence of Death upon him, ibid. 
893. — He afterwards makes his Escape from 
the Tower, ibid. 896. 

WITHERINGTON, Sir Thomas, 5 vol. 239. 
— His Speech on presenting the Articles of 
Impeachment against Dr. Wren, Bishop of 
Ely, to the Lords, 4 vol. 38. — He abstains 
from all share in the Proceedings respecting 
the Trial of Charles the First, 4 ^ol. 990 
(note). — He refuses the oflBce of Commis- 
sioner of the Great Seal of the Common- 
wealth, not being satisfied of the authority of 
the House of Commons, ibid. 991 (note). 

WITHINS, Francis, Counsel.— His Speech in 
Defence of Thomas Knox on his Trial for 
conspiring with John Lane to suppress the 
Evidence of tho^Popish Plot, 7 vol, 801. 



— — — Sir Francis, 7 vol, 1125, 8 vol. 
778. — Resolutions of the House of Commons 
against him for presenting a Petition ex- 
pressing an Abhorrence of petitioning the 
King for the calling and sitting of Parlia- 
ments, 8 vol. 216.— He is expelled the 
House, ibid. ib. — Burnet says that "the 
merit of this raised him soon to be a Judge, 
for indeed he had no other merit,'' ibid. 217 
(note). — His Argument for the Crown on 
Fitzharris's Plea in Abatement, ibid. 269.— 
His Speech for the Prosecution on the Trial 
of Count Coningsmark and others for Murder, 
9 vol. 15. — He is raised to the Bench on the 
removal of Sir William Dolben, who was not 
satisfied to act for the Crown in the Case of 
the Quo Warranto against the City of 
London, 8 vol. 1039 (note). 



— - Judge of K. B. 35 

Car. 2, 9 vol. 310, 593, 820, 1059, 1146, 10 
vol.5, 40, 1092, 11 vol. 390, 1356.— His 
Address to Mr. Hampden on passing the 
Sentence of the Court of King's Bench upon ', 
him, 9 vol. 1125. — He is expressly excepted 
in the Act of Indemnity which passed at the I 
Revolution, 12 vol. 1241. — After the Revo- | 
lution |ie is examined by the House of Com- 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



151 



nons respecting^ the Proceedings against Sir 
Tlionias Armstrong, 10 vol. 119. 

WOLSEY, Thomas, Cardinal and Archbishop 
of York. — ^He is said not to have promoted 
the Divorce of Henry the Eighth from 
Catharine of Arragon, 1 vol. 299. — He and 
Cardinal Campejus are appointed by the 
Pope to try the validity of the King's Mar- 
riage, ibid. 304. — Their Commission from 
the Pope, ibid. 317. — ^His intrigues to secure 
the Papacy, ibid. 316. — ^The Great Seal is 
taken from him, ibid. 369.— Proceedings 
against him on the Stat, of Provisors for 
procuring Bulls from the Pope, 16 Rich. 2, 
20 Hen. 8, 1529, ibid. 370. — ^Abstract of the 
Indictment against him, ibid. 371. — He 
confesses the charge, but protests that he did 
not know that he acted against the Law, ibid, 
ib.— Sentence of Praemunire is passed upon 
him, ibid, ib, — Articles preferred against 
him in Parliament, ibid. 372. — Thomas 
Cromwell defends him in the House of 
Commons, ibid. 381. — The King pardons 
him, and restores him to his Archbishop- 
rick of York, ibid. ib. — His Revenues taken 
from him, and he is sent to his Bishoprick at 
York, ibid. ib. — He beseeches the King to 
spare theUniversity of Oxford, ibid. 382. — He 
is arrested at York by the Esu-1 of Northum- 
berland for High Treason, ibid. ib. — His 
remarkable Speech to Sir William Kingston 
just before his death, ibid. 384. — His Death, 
and Observations on his Character, ibid. ib. 

WOOD, George, Counsel, 22 vol. 380, 474, 
791, &86, 23 vol. 1081, 24 vol. 238, 25 vol. 
2, 1004, 1155, 26 vol. 8, 27 vol. 821, 29 vol. 
423. 

Sir George, Baron of the Exchequer, 



51 Geo. 3. — His Charge to the Jury on the 
TViil of John Drakard for publishing a 
seditious libel, 31 vol. 533. 

WOODBURNE, Edward.— His Trial with 
Arundel Coke at the Suffolk Assizes on an 
Indictment on the Coventry Act, for mali- 
ciously maiming and wounding Edward 
Crispe, 8 Geo. 1, 1722, 16 vol. 53.— The 
Indictment, ibid. 55. — ^They plead Not 
Guilty, ibid. 56. — Opening Speeches of the 
Counsel f>rthe Prosecution, ibid. 57. — Evi- 
dencefortheProsecution,ibid. 59. — Speeches 
of the Counsel for the Prosecution on sum- 
ming up the Evidence at the close of their 
Case, ibid. 66. — Woodburne's Defence, ibid. 
68. — Coke's Defence, ibid. 72. — Chief Jus- 
tice King's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 74.^ 
The Jury find both Guilty, ibid. 81.— On 
being called upon for Judgment, Coke urges 
that as the Evidence proved an intention 
to kill and not to maim and disfigure, the 
Offence is not within the Statute, ibid. 83. — 
Arguments of the Counsel for the Prosecu- 
tion against the Objection, ibid. 85. — Chief 
Justice King overrules the Objection, ibid. 
92.— Sentence, of Death is passed upon 
them, ibid. 93."They are executed, ibid. 



WOODFALL, Henry Sampson.— His Trial in 
London on an Ex-offioio Information for 
publishing Junius's Letter to the King, 10 
Geo. 3, 1770, 20 vol. 895.— Evidence for the 
Prosecution, ibid. 898. — Mr. Seijeant 
Glynn's Speech for the Defendant, ibid. 899. 
— Lord Mansfield's Charge to the Jury, ibid. 
900.— The Jury return a Verdict of " Guilty 
of printing and publishing only," ibid. 903. 
-"Argument of two Motions upon this Ver- 
dict ; First, Why it should not be entered up 
according to the legal import of the words ; 
Secondly, Why the Defendant should not be 
discharged from any Judgment upon it, ibid. 
903. — Serjeant Glynn's Argument for the 
Defendant, ibid. 903. — ^Arguments of the 
Solicitor General (Thurlow), Mr. Wallace, 
Mr. Dunning, and Mr. Walker, for the Pro- 
secution, ibid. 906. — Reply of Serjeant 
Glynn, ibid. 909. — Sir James Burrow's Re- 
port of the Proceedings upon these Motions,, 
ibid. 914. — Lord Mansfield delivers the 
Judgment of the Court, awarding a Venire 
de Novo, ibid. 917."*— Lord Mansfield after- 
wards reads his Judgment in this Case in the 
House of Lords, ibid. 921.— Questions pr(>« 
posed to Lord Mansfield by Iiord Camden 
respecting the Doctrine contained in the 
Judgment, ibid. ib. 

WOODWARD, Richard. See Messenger, 
Peter. 

WORCESTER, Dr. William Lloyd, Bishop 
of. See Lloyd, Dr, William, 

WRAY, Sir Christopher, Chief Justice of 
K. B. 24 Eliz. 1 vol. 1049, 1095,1128, 1251. 
—He is one of the Commissioners appointed 
by Queen Elizabeth for the Trial of Mary, 
Queen of Scots, 1 vol, 1167. — His Speech 
on delivering his Opinion in the Star- 
Chamber in the Case of William Davison,- 
ibid. 1238. 

WRAYNHAM, Mr. — Proceedings againsthim 
in the Star-Chamber for accusing Lord 
Chancellor Bacon of Injustice and Corrup- 
tion, 16 Jac. 1, 1618, 2 vol. 1059.— The 
Attorney 'General's Charge against him, ibid, 
ib. — Mr. Wraynham's Defence, ibid, 1066. 
—Serjeant Crew's Reply, ibid. 1071. — Chief 
Justice Coke's Speech on delivering his 
Opinion respecting the Sentence, ibid. 1072. 
—Speech of Chief Baron Tanfield, ibid. 1076. 
— Speech of Chief Justice Montague, ibid. 
1078. 

WREN, Dr. Matthew, Bishop of Ely. See 
Tujelve BtMopi.— Proceedings against him in 
Parliament for favouring Popish Ceremonies 
in the Church, 16 Car. 1, 1640, 4 vol. 27.— 
Articles of Impeachment against him, ibid. 
29. — ^The Commons resolve that he is un« 
worthy to hold any spiritual Office in the 
Commonwealth, and that the Lords be re- 
quested to join them in an Address to the 
King to remove him from his Service, ibid. 
36.— Sir Tliomas Witherington's Speech on 

delivering the Articles of Impeachment 



153 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



against him, ibid. 38. — ^No further Proceed- 
ings upon this Impeachment appear to have 
taken place, ibid. 42.—- Summary Account of 
Wren, ibid. ib. (note). — Lord Clarendon's 
Account of him, ibid. 27 (note). 

WRIGHT, Nathan, King's Serjeant, 13 vol. 
954, 1098. — His Argument in reply on the 
Trial of the Earl of Warwick for Murder, in 
support of an Objection to the competency 
of a Witness, who had been convicted of 
Manslaughter, and allowed his Clergy, but 
was not burned in the hand or pardoned, 

13 vol. 1011. — His Speech in reply for the 
Prosecution on the Trial of Charles Dun- 
combe, for fraudulently paying Exchequer 
Bills with false Indorsements into the 
Treasury, ibid. 1098.— His Speech for the 
Prosecution on the Trial of Mary Butler 
for forging a Bond, ibid. 1251. — His Speech 
in the House of Commons in favour of 
the Duke of Norfolk's Divorce Bill, ibid. 
1355. 

" Sir Nalhao, Lord Keeper, 2 Ann. 

14 vol. 861 (note). 

WRIGHT, Richard. See Prieit, WiUiam. 

WRIGHT, Dr. Robert, Bishop of Litchfield 
and Coventry. See Twelve Bishops, 

WRIGHT, Sir Robert, Judge of K. B. 2 Jac. 2, 
11 vol. 1352. 



' Chief Justice of K. B. 

3 Jac. 2, 11 vol. 1354, 12 vol. 124.— 
—He is one of the Sub-Commissionei?, ap- 
pointed by James the Second's Ecclesias- 
tical Commission, to examine the Vice 
President and Fellows of Magdalen Col- 
lege Oxford, respecting their refusal to elect 
Dr. Farmer President of the College, 12 
vol. 26. — He presided on the Trial of the 
Seven Bishops, ibid. 189. 

— — — — ^— His Answer in the 



House of Lords after the Revolution, for his 
concurrence in the Judgment of the Court 
of King's Bench overruling a Plea of Pri- 
vilege, in the Case of the Earl of Devon- 
shire, and imposing an exorbitant Fine upon 
him, 11 vol. 1369. 

WYATT, Sir Thomas. See Throckmorton, 
Sir Nicholas.-^lLh Trial for High Treason, 
1 Mary, 1554, 1 vol. 861. — He confesses the 
Indictment, ibid. ib. — He is executed, ibid. 
870.— Account of his Rebellion, extracted 
from Rapin*s History, ibid. 864. 

WYLDE, George, Serjeant-at-Law. See Wilde, 
George, 

WYLDE, Sir William. See WUde, Sir 
fFilliam. 

W YNDHAM, Sir Hugh, Judge of C. P. See 
Windham, Sir Hugh. 

WYNNE, William, Serjeant-at-Law.- His 
Speech in the House of Lords against the 
passing of tho Bill of PaiQS and Peqalties 



against Bishop Atterbury, 16 vol. 516.— 
His. Vindication from a reflection made by 
Lord Oxford on his Conduct on this Occa- 
sion, ibid. ib. (note). — His Defence of 
Francis Townley for High Treason, in being 
concerned in the Rebellion of 17459 18 vol. 
344. 



YATES, Sir Joseph, Judge of K. B. 8 Geo. 3. 
— His Argument on giving his Judgment in 
the Case of John Wilkes, on his appearance 
in the Court of King's Bench to reverse the 
Outlawry against him, 19 vol. 1083, 1090, 
1095. 

YELVERTON, Barry, Lord, Chief Baron of 
the Exchequer in Ireland, 37 Geo. 3, 26 vol. 
914, 27 vol. 759. — His Argument on deliver- 
ing his Judgment in the Court of Exchequer 
in Ireland against the discharge of Mr. Jus- 
tice Johnson, 29 vol. 357. 

YELVERTON, Sir Christopher, Queen's Ser- 
jeant.— His Speech for the Prosecution on 
the Trial of the Earls of Essex and South* 
ampton, 1 vol. 1336. — He opens the Indicts 
ment on the Trial of Sir Christopher Blunt, 
ibid. 1419. 



■ Judge of 

K. B. 4 Jac. 1, 2 vol. 217. — ^His Address 
to Lord Sanquhar on passing sentence of 
Death upon him on his Conviction as an 
Accessary to a Murder, 2 vol. 752. 

YELVERTON, Sir Henry.— His Argument in 
the Great Case of Impositions, against the 
power of the Crown to impose Taxes arbi- 
trarily upon the People of England, 2 vol. 
477. 



■ . Attorney General, 

16 Jac. 1. — ^His Speech on opening the In- 
formation in the Star-Chamber against Mr. 
Wraynham for slandering Lord Chancellor 
Bacon, 2. vol. 1059. — Proceedings in Par- 
liament against him for improper Conduct 
in his Office, respecting persons concerned 
in Monopolies and abuses of Patents, 19 
Jac. 1, 1621, 2 vol. 1136. — Charges against 
him with his Answers thereto, ibid. ib. — He 
is proceeded against in the Star-Chamber for 
a breach of Duty, ibid. 1141. — His Speech 
at the Bar of the House of Lords, ibid. 1142. 
—Sentence of the Lords against him for his 
Speech in Parliament reflecting upon the 
King, ibid. 1144. — Sentence against him for 
his Scandal respecting the Marquis of Buck- 
ingham, ibid. ib. — The King and the Mar- 
quis of Buckingham afterwards remit bis 
Fines, and he is set at liberty, ibid. 1146.— 
He is made a Judge of the Common Pleas 
in the Reign of Charles the First, ibid. ib. 



. Judge of C, P. 4 

Car. 1, 3 vol. 359. 

YONGE^i Sir William,-.Hi8 Speech as one of 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



153 



the Managers for the Commons on the Trial 
of the Impeachment of Lord Lovat, 18 vol. 
550. 

YORKE, The Hon. Charles, Solicitor General, 
33 Geo. 2.1— His Speech in the House of 
Lords on summing up the Evidence for the 
Prosecntion on the Trial of Earl Ferrers, 19 
vol. 945. — His Speech in Reply for the 
Prosecution on the Trial of Dr. Hensey for 
Treason, ibid. 1343. 

YORKE, Henry. See Redhead, Hemy. 

YORKE, Sir Philip, Solicitor General, 9 Geo. 
1. See Hardwicke, Philip, Earl o/*.— His 
Speech in Reply for the Prosecution on the 
Trirlof Christopher Layer for High Treason, 
16 voL 263. 



. Attorney General, 2 

Geo. 2. — His Speech for the Prosecution on 
the Trial of William Hales for forging a 
Promissory Note, 16 vol. 165.— His Speech 
for the Prosecution on the Trial of John 
Huggins for Murder, ibid. 312.r— His Speech 
for the Prosecution on the Trial of Richard 
Francklin for publishing a Seditious Libel, 



ibid. 630.— His Speech in Reply in the same 
Case, ibid. 664. 

ZiENGER, John Peter.— His Trial at New 
York for publishing a Libel against the 
Government, 9 Geo. 2, 1735, 17 vol. 675. — 
Proceedings of the Council previous to his 
Trial, ibid. 677. — ^He is arrested upon a 
"Warrant from the Council, ibid. 681. — ^He 
sues out a Habeas Corpus, and is admitted 
to bail, ibid. 682.— The Attorney General of 
the Province files an Information against 
him, ibid. 683. — His Exceptions to the Com- 
mission of the Judges, ioid. ib. — ^The At- 
torney General opens the Information against 
him, ibid. 690. — The Information, ibid. ib. 
— Mr. Hamilton's Speech for the Defendant, 
ibid. 696. — ^The Jury acquit the Defendant, 
ibid. 723. — The Corporation of New York 
present Mr. Hamilton with the Freedom of 
the City for his Defence on this occasion, 
ibid. ib. — Remarks on this Trial, ibid. 726. 

ZINZENDORF, Count. See Moravians.-— His 
extravagant Impression at a Conference upon 
some of the religious Doctrines of the 

' Moravians, 5 vol. 542 (note). 



END OF PART I.— NAMES. 



GENERAL INDEX. 



Part II.— Miscellaneous Contents. 



ABATEMENT. 

I» a Plea in Abatement, certainty to a cer- 
tain intent in general is required, 12 vol. 1194. 
—If the Prosecutor demur to a Plea in Abate- 
ment to an Indictment, the Defendant must 
join in Demurrer immediately, Layer's Case, 16 
Yol. 122.— Courts will not allow an opportunity 
ex gratii to a Plea in Abatement, ibid. 123. — 
The Statute of Anne, requiring an Affidavit of 
the truth of the matters contained in a Plea in 
Abatement, held by Lord Mansfield to apply to 
Criminal Cases, excepting Trials at Bar, 18 vol. 
399 (note).— On the Trial of John and Henry 
Sheares for Treason in Ireland in 1798, the 
Court held that the Statute applied only to 
Civil Cases, 27 vol, 267. See also Kirwan's 
Case, 3l vol. 577 (note).— Plea in Abatement 
by a person indicted for High Treason in Eng- 
land, that he is a Peer of Ireland, and ought to 
be tried by his Peers in the Irish Parliament, 
Macguire's Case, 4 vol. 663.— Plea in Abate- 
ment to an Indictment for Treason, that an 
Impeachment in Parliament for the same 
Treason is pending, Fitzharris's Case, 8 vol. 
251.— Plea in Abatement by a Peer of Par- 
liamfint indicted as a Commoner, Earl of 
Banbnrjis Case, 12 vol. 1168.— Plea in Abate- 
ment of a misnomer of the Christian Name of 
the Defendant, 16 voL 114.— Plea in Abate- 
ment to an Indictment for High Treason in 
England, that the Offence was committed in 
Scotland, and that the Prisoner resided there 
at the time of its commission, Kinloch*s Case, 
18 vol. 399.— Plea in Abatement to an In- 
dictment for a libel in England, that the 
Defendant resided in Ireland, and that the 
supposed libel was published while he was 
resident there, Justice Johnson's Case, 29 vol. 
385.— Mr. Abbott's Argument in the Court of 
King's Bench against this Plea, ibid. 388.— 
Mr. Richardson's Argument in Support of it, 
ibid. 394.— Lord Ellenborough delivers the 
Judgment of the.Court against the Plea, ibid. 
410. — Plea in Abatement to an Indictment for 
High Treason, that one of the Grand Jury by 
whom it was found is an Alien, Sheares's 
Case in Ireland, 27 vol. 267.— Sir John 
Hawles assigns as a Reason for the Abate- 
ment of a civil Action by the death of the 
Defendant, that there may be matters of 
Defence in his personal knowledge which are 
unknown to his Representatives, 1 1 vol. 476. 
—Plea in Abatement to an Indictment, that 
several of the Grand Jury by whom the Bill 
was found, held offices under the Crown, from 
which they were removable at pleasure, 



Kirwan's Case, 31 vol. 576.— Arguments in 
support of this Plea, ibid. 590, 597.— Argu- 
ments against it, ibid. 608, — The Court of 
King's Bench in Ireland give Judgment against 
the Flea, ibid. 611.— Plea in Abatement to an 
Indictment, that several of the Grand Jurors by 
whom the Bill was found have no Freehold 
within the City of Dublin, Kirwan's Case, ibid. 
577,— Arguments against the Plea, ibid. 579, 
600. — Arguments in support of it, ibid. 587. 
— Judgment of the Court against it, ibid. 
611.— The Amendment of a Plea in Abate- 
ment to an Indictment for Murder allowed by 
the Court,, before it was entered on Record, 
against the Opinion of Lord Holt, Earl of 
Banbury's Case, 12 vol. 1190. 
ABDICATION. 
Walsingham's Account of the Abdication of 
Edward the Second, 1 vol. 49.— Deed of Ab- 
dication signed by Richard the Second, ibid. 
1 38. — ^Reason assigned at a Conference between 
the two Houses of Parliament, previously to the 
passing of the Bill of Rights at the Revolu- 
tion, for declaring the Conduct of James the 
Second to be an Abdication, 15 vol. 101. 

ABDUCTION. 
In a Prosecution for Felony on Stat. 3 Hen.T, 
c. 2, for the forcible Abduction and Marriage of 
an Heiress, the offence is complete, though, 
after the forcible taking, the woman consented 
to the Marriage, Swendsen's Case, 14 vol. 595. 
^The same point was decided by Mr. Justice 
Lavn-ence, in a Case on the Oxford Circuit in 
1804, ibid. 596 (note). 

ABJURATION. 
Account of the ancient common-law practice 
of Sanctuary and Abjuration of. the Realm, 15 
vol. 145.— The Penalty of Abjuration, applied 
to Protestant Dissenters by the Stat. 35 E\h, 
was derived from this practice, ibid.'146— It 
was again abolished by the Toleration Act, 
ibid. ib. and 310. 

ABSOLUTION. 
Discussion respecting the Doctrine of Abso- 
lution at the Hampton Court Conference, 2 
vol. 72.— Account of the nature of Absolution 
as a Rite of the Church of England, and the 
power and practice of Divines respecting it, 
13 vol. 424. —Argument to show that the Ab- 
solution of a condemned Traitor at the place 
of Execution, by a Clergyman, without a 
confession of the Treason for which he was 
about to suffer, is not an Offence by the law of 
Engls^dy ibid. 42^. 



156 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



[MiSCBlX* 



ACCESSARIES. 



An Accessary cannot be convicted before the 
Principal is attainted, Sanquhar's Case, 2 vol. 
756.— By Stat. 2 Edw. 6, c. 24, if a man be 
accessary in one County to a Murder or Felony 
committed in another, he may be indicted and 
tried in the former County, ibid, ib.-— In the 
Indictment of an Accessary in Middlesex to a 
Murder committed in London, it must be stated 
directly tliat the Principal committed the 
Murder in London, and not merely that he was 
indicted for it there, ibid. 757. — If a person be 
indicted as an Accessary to two, and is found 
by Verdict to be Accessary to one only, the 
Verdict is good, ibid. 759. — ^Though the Prin- 
cipal be errpneously attainted, the Accessary 
may be convicted, unless the Attainder of the 
Principal is actually reversed, ibid. 760. — A 
Wife cannot be convicted as an Accessary to a 
Felony committed by her Husband, or by her- 
self under his direction, Turner's Case, 6 vol. 
612. — It is not necessary that an Accessary, 
though charged in the same Indictment with 
the Principal, should be tried at the same time, 
9 vol. 125. — ^When in practice the Accessary 
and Principal are tried together, the Verdict 
always is, and ought to be, returned against 
the Principal first, ibid. ib. 19 vol. 87. — ^An 
Accessary to several Principals jointlv is ac- 
cessary to each of them severally, 9 vol.126. — 
Discussion of the Question whether by the Law 
of Scotland, an Accessary can be tried before 
the conviction of the Principal, in the Debate 
on the Relevancy in Stewart's Case for Murder, 
19 vol. 24, 30, 58. — Authorities in support of 
the negative of this Question, ibid. 86. — In- 
quiry into the nature of Accessaries before the 
»ct, and the History of the Law of England 
respecting tliem, in Mr. Hume Campbell's 
Argument for the Crown in Macdaniel's Case, 
ibid.783. — It was held by all the Judges, in Mac- 
daniel's Case, that one who procures a Felony 
to be done, though by the intervention of a 
third person, is an Accessary before the fact, 
and within the meaning of the Statutes depriv- 
ing such Accessaries of their Clergy ibid. 804. 
—If it appears in Evidence on the Trial of an 
Accessary before the fact to a Felony, that the 
Crime of the Principal was not Felony, or not 
that species of Felony with which he was 
charged, the Accessary may avail himself of 
this, and ought to be acquitted, Macdaniel's 
Case, ibid. 808 (note). 

ACCOMPLICE. 

Sir Thomas Witheriagton's Argument, in 
Love's Case, in favour of the competency of 
Accomplices to give Evidence against persons 
tried for the Offence in which they are impli- 
cated, 5 vol.176. — Mr. Hale argues for the 
Prisoner in the same Case, that an Accomplice 
is not a "lawful and suflScient" Witness 
in Cases of High Treason within the mean- 
ing of the Statutes of Edw. 6, ibid. 240.— 
It was held by all the Judges in Tonge's 
Case, that an Accomplice is a good Wit- 



ness within the meaning of those Statutes, 
6 vol. 227 (note), 228 (note). — If a Pardon is 
promised to a person upon condition that he 
discovers a Plot generally, this does not destroy 
his competency as a Witness on the Trial of 
persons concerned in that Plot, Tonge's Case, 
ibid. 228 (note).— But Lord Hale thought that 
it would be otherwise, if he had been promised 
a Pardon upon condition of his giving Evidence 
against any particular person connected with 
the Plot, ibid. ib. — Discussion of Lord Hale's 
Opinion upon this point, in Layer's Case, 16 
vol. 158. — Chief Justice North says, in Lang- 
horn's Case, that it is no Objection to the evi- 
dence of an Accomplice that he receives bis 
maintenance from the Crown, 7 vol. 446. — Sir 
Robert Atkins's Remarks upon the credibility 
of an Accomplice, 9 vol. 721. — Discussion 
whether an Accomplice, already indicted for 
the same. Offence which he is called to prove 
against another person, is a good Witness for 
the Crown against that person. Murphy's 
Case, 19 vol. 702. — ^The Court in that Case 
decided in favour of his Competency, ibid. 709. 
— An Accomplice is not to be credited by a 
Jury, unless his Testimony be confirmed in 
some material points, but it is not necessary 
that he should be confirmed in every particular, 
31 vol. 980, 1123.— Mr. Serjeant Copley 's Re- 
marks upon his doctrine in his Defence of 
Watson, 32 vol. 513.— Lord Holt's Remarks 
upon the credibility of Accomplices in 
his Charge to the Jury on the Trial of Char- 
nock and others, 12 vol. 1454. — Lord Ellen- 
borough's Directions to the Jury in Despard's 
Case, respecting the mode of estimating the 
degree of credit due to the Testimony of an 
Accomplice, 28 vol. 487.— His Observations on 
the same subject, in his Charge to the Jury in 
Watson's Case, 32 rol. 583. — Chief Justice 
Abbott's Remarks on the Testimony of Accom- 
plices in his Charge to the Grand Jury, pre- 
viously to the Trials of the persons engaged in 
the Cato Street Conspiracy, 33 vol. 689. — Mr. 
Hume's Observations on the Law of Scotland 
respecting the admissibility of the Evidence of 
Accomplices, 11 vol. 1052 (note). — Mr. 
Burnett's Remark upon the same Subject, 18 
vol. 855. — It was expressly held in Downic's 
Case, that Accomplices were competent Wit- 
nesses by the Law of Scotland, 24 vol. 32. — 
Difference in the practice of English and 
Scotch Courts of Justice respecting the Exa- 
mination of Witnesses who are socii criminis, 
ibid. 30. — It is said in Quelch's Case, that by 
the Civil Law an Accomplice could not be a 
Witness, 14 vol. 1086. 

ACCROACHMENT OF ROYAL POWER. 

Mr. Luders's Account of the application of 
this phrase in ancient times, 11 vol. 623 (note). 

ACCUMULATIVE TREASON. 

Mr. Heme's humorous Remark on the doc- 
trine of Accumulative Treason, in Archbishop 
Laud's Case; 4 vol. 586 (note). 



CONMNTS.] 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



157 



ACQUITTAL. 

Acquittal in a penal Statute means an Ac- 
quittal by due course of law, and not a Pardon, 
Chetwynd*s Case, 18 vol. 327. 

ACTION. 

Definition and nature of an Action at Law, 
6 vol. 1078. — Argument of Sir Robert Atkins 
in the Case of Bamardiston v, Soames, in favour 
of the proposition, that where a wrong is done, 
and a particular Damage sustained thereby, 
the Law gives the party injured a Remedy by 
Action, ibid. 1077. — Chief Justice North's 
Reasons against the universality of this propo- 
sition, ibid. 1107. — No Action will lie against 
a Judge for any thing done by him judicially, 
ibid. 1096. — Actions in new cases are always 
received with caution by the Courts, ibid. 1108. 
— Sir John Hawles assigns as a reason for the 
Abatement of a Civil Action by the death of 
the Defendant, that there may be matters of 
Defence in his personal knowledge, which are 
unknown to his Representatives, 11 vol. 476. 

ACT OF PARLIAMENT. See Statutes. 

ADDITION. 

An erroneous Addition to the name of the 
Defendant in an Indictment cannot be taken 
advantage of in Arrest of Judgment, but must 
be pleaded in Abatement, Axtell the Regicide's 
Case, 5 vol. 1223. — The Stat. 27 Eliz. c. 7, re- 
quiring an Addition to be given to the name of 
every Juror returned, does not apply to Juries 
from the City of London, Matthews's Case, 15 
vol. 1323. — No Addition is required to the 
name of the person on whom an Offence is 
charged to have been committed, Goodere's 
Case, 1 7 vol. 1 025. — ^A general Title of Courtesy 
is a sufficient Addition in an Indictment ^ and 
therefore where a Prisoner, indicted in Ireland 
as a Yeoman, pleaded in Abatement that he 
was not a Yeoman but a Soldier, the Judges, 
upon Argument, held the Addition sufficient, 
Weldon's Case, 26 vol. 237. 

ADHERING TO THE KING'S ENEMIES. 

See Treason, 

If the rebel Subjects of a foreign Prince, who 
is at amity v^th Great Britain, invade England 
without a Commission from their Sovereign, 
they are the Enemies of the King of England, 
and English Subjects adhering to them, are 
guilty of High Treason, Duke of Norfolk's 
Case, 1 vol. 1 030. — Assisting a Government 
hostile to England in making war against an 
Ally of England, is Adhering to the King's 
Enemies within the Statute of Treasons, 
Vaughan's Case, 13 vol. 530. — Sending Sup- 
plies or Intelligence, or rendering any assist- 
ance to a Hostile Force designing an Invasion 
of England, is High Treason in the Article of 
Adhering to the King's Enemies, ibid. 531. — 
In an Indictment for this species of Treason, 
it is sufficient to allege in the words of the 
Statute that the party *' adhered to the King's 

]BQ«imeV^ wiUiQut saying << Against th^Kio^/' 



ibid. ib. — Mr. Justice Foster says, that in 
Gregg's Case the Judges were of opinion, that 
the sending Intelligence to Enemies, though it 
be intercepted before it reaches them, is an 
Overt Act of Adhering, and that this Opinion 
was adopted by the Court in Hensey's Case, 

14 vol. 1376 (note), 19 vol. 1344.— See also 
the Case of Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk, 
1 vol. 957. — Mr. Justice BuUer, in his Charge 
to the Grand Jury previous to the Trial of 
De La Motte, adopts this Opinion, 21 vol.808. 

ADJOURNMENT. 

Chief Justice Saunders says in Pilkington's 
Case, that a person who has authority to call 
and dissolve a Meeting, has also power to ad' 
joum it, 9 vol. 289. — A Criminal Court has 
the power of adjourning, in Capital Trials, 
after the Jury are charged and before verdict, 
where such Adjournment is necessary for the 
ends of Justice, 25 vol. 1295 (note). — Entry of 
such an Adjournment on the Record in Stone's 
Trial for High Treason, ibid. 1 296 (note).— Mr. 
Hume says, that an Adjournment of the Diet 
after the Assize is sworn, is strictly forbidden 
by the Scotch Law, 18 vol. 1068. 

ADMIRALTY. 

Observations upon the extent of the Jurisdic« 
tion of the Court of Admiralty, 13 vol. 454. — 
Antiquity and Jurisdiction of the Court of Ad- 
miral ty,and of IheOfficeoftheLordHighAdmiral, 

15 vol. 1232. — Mr.Erskine's Argument in Cod- 
ling's Case, that the Jurisdiction of the Admiral- 
ty Courtis strictly local, 28 vol. 274. — Caption 
of the Admiralty Sessions, 30 vol. 1132, 

ADULTERY. 

Mr. Emlyn's Objections to the Law of Eng- 
land for not expressly making Adultery punish- 
able as a crime, Em. Pref. 1 vol. xxxiti. — He 
states his Opinion, that in principle it is an 
indictable offence, ibid, xxxiii (note A).— 
Bishop Cozens's Argument that after a Divorce 
on the ground of Adultery, the Husband may 
lawfully marry again, 13 vol. 1332. — If a 
Husband find a Man in the act of Adultery 
with his Wife and kill him, it is Manslaughter 
only, Mawgridge's Case, 17 vol. 70. 

AFFIDAVIT. 

Instance of a New Trial being granted in a 
Criminal Case, by the Court of King's Bench 
upon Affidavits of the Jury, stating that they 
did not mean by their Verdict to find the 
criminal intent stated in the Indictment, 
Simons's Case, 19 vol. 680. 

AGENT. 

In all Cases of General Conspiracy, where 
many Agents are employed, the Acts of those 
Agents may be given in Evidence on the Trial 
of a person for being a party to that Conspiracy, 
in order to show its general nature and Objects, 
Home Tooke's Case, 25 vol. 127. — Discussion 
respecting the extent to which the Acts and 
DeclarationsofanAgentmayaffecthisPrincipal 

crimiasmyi LQr4 MelyiUe's Case, 29 vol* 747f ; 



158 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



[MlfiOBliZr. 



AIDING AND ABETTING. 

, To all Cases of burning or pulling down 
Buildings, the being present, Aiding and Abet- 
tirijg, though no Act be done by the party, is 
a capital Felony, Lord George Gordon's Case, 
21 vol. 493. 

AIR-GUN. 

Evidence respecting the construction and 
properties of the Air-Gun, 26 vol. 85. 

ALEHOUSES. 

Lord Keeper Coventry's Directions to the 
Judges, in the Reign of Charles the First, for 
their conduct on their several Circuits, re- 
specting the Regulation of Alehouses, 3 vol. 835. 

ALIEN. See Allegiance — Post'fuUi. 

An Alien may be a Witness, Duke of 
Norfolk's Case, 1 vol. 1026, 4 vol. 1177.— 
Definitioa and Description of an Alien by the 
Law of England in Lord Coke's Report of 
Calvin's Case, 2 vol. 636. — ^Incidents of 
Aliens, ibid. 639. — Reasons why an Alien 
born is not capable of inheriting Lands in Eng^ 
land, ibid. 640. — Precedents of Scotchmen, 
before the Union, being tried and executed in 
England for Treason committed in England, 
cit^ by Mr. Steele, Attorney General for the 
Commonwealth, in the Duke of Hamilton's 
Case, 4 vol. 1176. — If Alien Enemies join 
with English Rebels and are taken, the Aliens 
are to be tried by Martial law or ransomed ; 
but if Alien Friends so join, it is Treason in 
all, ibid. 1182. — An Alien Enemy coming 
into the Kingdom with a safe-conduct from 
the Kiug, has all the rights and privileges of 
an Alien Friend, Sir Robert Sawyer's Argu- 
ment in the Great Case of Monopolies, 10 
vol. 469.— -Such an Alien may maintain a per- 
sonal Action, ibid. ib. — An Alien cannot be 
naturalized by the King without the authority 
of Parliament, Mr. Williams's Argument in 
the same Case, ibid. 499.— Instances in which 
the Kings of England formerly exercised the 
power of expelling Aliens from the Realm, 
15 vol. 528 (note). — Where a party defends 
himself from a criminal Charge on the ground 
of his being an Alien, the presumption is 
against him, and he is held to strict proof of 
his birth out of the King's dominions, Lindsay's 
Case, 14 vol. 994, aud ^ueas Macdonald's 
Case, 18 vol. 860. 

ALLEGIANCE. See AUen^Fost-nati. 

Definition and Etymology of Allegiance, 
2 vol. 613, ibid. 679.-- Four different kinds of 
Allegiance by the Law of England, ibid. 615, 
4 vol. 1171.— Mr. Locke's Remarks on the 
constitutional meaning of Allegiance, 22 vol. 
1184 (note). — Allegiance and Laws are not 
co-extensive, 2 voL 569, ibid, 596.— Discussion 
of the Question whether Allegiance is due to a 
King de jure and not de facio, 6 vol. 121 
(note> — Sir Henry Vane's Argument, that 
AUegiaace is dtt« nQt to Uie natural body 



of the King, but to the King in conjunction 
with the Parliament, the Law, and the King- 
dom, ibid. 158.— Mr. Williams's Argument in 
Lindsay's Case against the universsd applica- 
tion of the Resolution in Calvin's Case, that 
Allegiance is a quality of the mind, and en- 
tirely personal and transitory, 14 vol. 1009. — 
The Allegiance due from a natural-bom Sub- 
ject to the King of England is perpetual and 
unalienable, and cannot be dissolved by his 
beine employed by a foreign Prince, iEneas 
Macdonald's Case, 18 vol. 859.— Reference to 
authorities establishing the inalienability of 
Allegiance, 5 vol. 504 (note). — Some foreign 
Jurists maintain a different Doctrine, ibid. ib. 
— Statutes at present in force respecting the 
Oaths of Allegiance and Supremacy, 6 vol. 201 
(note). — Scotch Acts of Parliament relating to 
the Oath of Allegiance at the Revolution jn 
1688, 13 vol. 1450 (note). 

AMBASSADOR. 

By the Law of Nations, if an Ambassador 
compass the Death of ^ the King in whose 
country he is, it is Treason in him ; but if he 
commit any other kind of Treason, he is to be 
sent to his own Country, 2 vol. 881 and (note). 
— Argument to prove that an Ambassador to 
this Country has no privilege to exempt him 
from Trial for a Crime committed in England 
against English Laws, 5 vol. 491. — Sir Robert 
Cotton*s Relation of Proceedings against Am- 
bassadors for Misconduct, ibid. 495. — An 
Ambassador procuring a Rebellion against the 
Sovereign of that Country to which he is sent, 
has no privilege to exempt him from punish- 
ment, ibid. 499. — Opinions of eminent Civilians 
on the civil and criminal liabilities of Ambas- 
sadors, ibid. 503.— Lord Coke defines an Am- 
bassador to be a person sent from one Sove- 
reign to another, with authority, by Letters of 
Credence, to treat upon affairs of State, 20 
vol. 1115. — One who has not sovereign au- 
thority cannot send an Ambassador to another, 
ibid. ib. and 5 vol. 499. — Discussion whether 
the East India Company is entitled to send 
and receive Ambassadors, 20 vol. 1119. — 
Reason of the Privileges of Ambassadors, ibid. 
1130, 1134, 

AMENDMENT. 

A criminal Information may be amended at 
any time before Trial, but not an Indictment, 
9 vol. 1366 (note). — ^AfPlea in Abatement to 
an Indictment for Murder amended by the 
Court before it was entered on Record, against 
the opinion of Lord Holt, Earl of Banbury's 
Case, 12 vol. 1190.' — Arguments on the ques- 
tion, whether a clerical Error in the Teste of a 
Distringas Corpora Juratorum may be amend- 
ed by the Court after Verdict, Tutchin's Case, 
14 vol. 1135.— The Court of King's Bench 
are equally divided in opinion upon the ques- 
tion, ibid. 1187. — Lord Mansfield's Argument 
in giving Judgment in Wilkes's Case, that a 
Criminal Information may ba ameadad, 19 



C(annN«.]| 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



159 



vol. 1118. — The Amendment of an Infonnation 
for Misdemeanour by inserting the word 
"tcnour" instead of "purport," ordered by Lord 
Mansfield at Chambers, upon hearing the 
parties, but without the Defendant's consent, 
held good, Wilkes's Case, ibid; 1077, 1117.— 
Great clamour raised at the time against the 
conduct of Lord Mansfield in allowing this 
Amendment, ibid. 1082 (note). 

AMICUS CUBiaE. 

Mr. Justice Foster expresses an opinion, 
that if, after a Verdict of Guilty in a Case of 
Treason, any person, as Amicus Curiae, suggests 
to the Coiirt, that the Prisoner is entitled to 
the benefit of a Parliamentary Pardon, he 
ought to be heard, though the Pardon is not 
specially pleaded, Ratclifie's Case, 18 yoI. 435. 

ANARCHY. 

Tyranny said by Lord Camden to be better 
than Anarchy, 19 vol. 1074. 

ANNUAL PARLIAMENTS. 

Joseph Gerrald's Arguments in favour of 
Annual Parliaments on his Trial for Sedition 
in Scotland, 23 voL 961. 

APPEAL. 

Origin and History of Appeals, 6 vol. 314. 
■^Proceedings in an Appeal of High Treason 
in Parliament against Tresilian and others, in 
the Reign of Ridiard the Second, 1 vol. 971. 
—Opinion of the Judges and Serjeants that 
this Appeal was improperly brought, ibid. 113. 
—Wager of Battle does not lie in an Appeal 
of Treason in Parliament, ibid. 115, 6 vol. 
315. — ^Appeals of Treason in Parliament taken 
away by the Stat. 1 Hen. 4, c. 14, 6 vol. 314, 
ibid. 313 (note).— Proceedings on an Appeal 
of High .Treason in the Court of Chivalry, 
and an Award of a Trial by Duel thereon in 
the Case of Donald, Lord Rea, 3 vol. 463. — 
The King cannot pardon in an Appeal of 
Murder, because it is the suit of the party, 6 
voL 287. — Lord Holt approved of Appeals of 
Murder, 13 vol. 1199 (note).— Proceedings on 
an Appeal for Murder, Bambrtdge and Cor- 
bett's Case, 17 vol. 395-7.— The Stat. 3 Hen. 
7, c. 1, requiring the Court before whom a 
party is acquitted of Murder to remit bim to 
prison, of to take Bail for his appearance to 
an Appeal, does not apply to the case of a 
Pazdoi^, Cbetwynd's Case, 18 vol. 326. 



APPEARANCE. 

Courts of Law are not bound to take notice | 
of the voluntary Appearance of a Defendant 
upon an Outlawry, Wilkes's Case, 19 vol. 1081. 

APPROVER. See Accomplice. 

All Approver had formerly a P^iny a^ay 
for Maintenance daring bis service, 7 vol. 440. 

-"•^MdM'ji PtfiBktioii -of m i^ppr9¥er, 9 



vol. 127. — In early times, a party who had 
pleaded to Issue in a capital Case could not 
afterwards be admitted as an Approver, Kin-' 
loch^s Case, 18 vol. 410. — Reason of this 
Rule, ibid. ib. — The admission of Approvers 
was always a matter of discretion in the Court, 
ibid. ib. 

ARCHBISHOP. 

Arguments in the House of Lords in the 
Case of Dr. Watson, Bishf p of St. David's, on 
the power of an Archbishop to deprive a 
Bishop, 14 vol. 455. 

ARRAIGNMENT. 

Want of Arraignment assigned for Error in 
the Record and Proceedings against Thomas, 
Earl of Lancaster, 1 vol. 45 ; see also 5 vol. 
27. — Holding, up the hand upon Arraignment 
is merely a ceremony to show that the Prisoner 
at the Bar is the person called upon, 4 vol. 1 289. 
— ^tt seems doubtful whether a Peer should be 
required to hold up his hand on his Arraign- 
ment, 6 vol. 1319 (note).— Reference to various 
Trials of Peers as to the practice in this re- 
spect, ibid. ib. — Holding up the hand de- 
clared by all the Judges in Lord Stafford's 
Case to be merely a ceremony to show the 
Court who the Prisoner is, and the omission 
of it to be no legal exception, 7 voL.1555.— 
Blackstone's Account of the meaning and 
object of calling upon a Prisoner to hold up 
his hand at his Arraignment, 6 vol. 1319 (note). 
— It is no Plea to an Indictment, that the 
Prisoner has been previously arraigned in 
another Court upon an Indictment for the 
same Offence, unless further proceedings have 
been taken upon the former Indictment, Dr. 
Plunket's Case, 8 vol. 448. 

ARRAY. See Challenge, 

ARREST. 

Mr. Justice Foster's Observations upon the 
Law respecting Homicide upon Arrests or 
attempts to arrest, 19 vol. 873. — Discussion 
of the Question whether an Arrest under a 
Warrant, in which the Officer's Name is in- 
serted after the Warrant is sealed, is legal, 
ibid. 864.— The question decided in the af- 
firmative in Stevenson's Case, ibid, 878. — 
Remarks of Mr. Hume and Mr. Burnett upon 
the Law of Scotland respecting Homicide in 
resisting Arrests, ibid. 879. 

ARREST OF JUDGMENT. 

An erroneous Addition to the Defendant's 
name in an indictment cannot be taken ad- 
vantage of in Arrest of Judgment, but must 
be pleaded in Abatement, Axtell the Regicide's 
Case, 5 vol. 1223. — Upon a Conviction on a 
Trial at Bar in the Court of King's Bench, 
whether by Confession or Verdict, the Prisoner 
has four full days to move in Arrest of Jttdg** 
ment, Knightley's Case, 13 vqI, 403, 



160 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



DiiBrntsL. 



ARSENIC. 



Dr. Black's Account of the usual symptoms 
in Cases of Death from Arsenic, in his Evi- 
dence on the Trial of Mary Blandy for the 
Murder of her Father, 18 vol. 1140 (note). 

ART AND PART. 

Mr. Hume's explanation of the meaning of 
this phrase by the Law of Scotland, with 
Remarks upon its Origin and History, 10 vol. 
807 (note). 

ARTICULI CLERL 

Lord Coke's Observations upon the Articuli 
Cleri exhibited by Boniface, Archbishop of 
Canterbury, 51 Hen. 3, 1258, 2 vol. 131.— 
Articuli Cleri exhibited by Archbishop Ban- 
croft in the Reign of James the First, ibid. 
134. 

ASSASSINATION PLOT. 

Informations and Depositions respecting 
the Assassination Plot, 12 vol. 130;1. — ^Asso- 
ciations entered into by the Houses of Parlia- 
ment and other public bodies on tlie discovery 
of the Assassination Plot, ibid. 1462 (note). 
See Chamockj Bohert — Freindy Sir John — Par- 
hfttt, Sir WdUam-^Batikwood, Ambrose — Cran^ 
himef Oktrles — Lowick, Robert — Cook, Peter 
— Fenwick, Sir John, 

ASSAULT. 

On the/ Trial of an Indictment for a com- 
mon Assault upon a woman, Evidence of an 
Assault with intent to ravish is inadmissible, 
per Lord Mansfield in the Case of the Madras 
Council, 21 vol. 1227. 

ASSIZE. 

Manner of forming the Assize in Criminal 
Cases by the Law of Scotland, 19 vol. Ill 
(note). — Of the form in which the Assize 
deliver their Verdict by the Law of Scotland, 
11 vol. 92 ^note), 96 (note). — Mr. Hume says, 
that an Adjournment of the Diet after the 
Assize is sworn, is strictly forbidden, 18 vol. 
1068.— Instance of such an Adjournment with 
the consent of all parties, ibid. 1011. 

ASSIZE OF ERROR. 

Account of an Assize of Error against the 
Jury for finding a false Verdict by the Law of 
Scotland, 11 vol. 75 (note). — Instance of a 
Protest by the Lord Advocate, before the Jury 
were inclosed, for an Assize of Error against 
them in case they assoilzied, 10 vol. 790. — 
Instances of Proceedings on Assizes of Error, 
11 vol. 75, 101. 

ATHANASIAN CREED. 

Tillotson's Opinion of the Athanasian Creed, 
15 vol. 703 (note).— Dean Swift's Account of 
}t| ibid, ib( 



ATTACHMENT. 



Mr. Erskine's Reasons for bis Opinion re* 
specting the power of Courts of Justice to 
proceed by Attachment for Contempts, con- 
tained in a Letter to a Gentleman of the Bar 
in Ireland, 27 vol. 1019. 

ATTAINDER. 

Observations of Bishop Burnet and Lord 
Coke on the Attainders in the time of Henry 
the Eighth against persons not brought to 
Trial, 1 vol. 481. — Many of the Commons 
argued against Attainders in absence, in the 
Case of Lord Seymour of Sudley, ibid. 494 
(note). — Opinions of several eminent Writers 
respecting Bills of Attainder, 16 vol. 651 
(note).— :Lord Cromwell, in the time of Henry 
the Eighth, is said to be the first man who 
promoted Bills of Attainder, 13 vol. 726. — 
Arguments of Counsel in Sir John Fenwick's 
Case against Bills of Attainder, ibid. 631.— It 
was resolved by the House of Commons in 
that Case, that a Prisoner brought to the Bar 
to hear a Bill of Attainder read against him, 
must stand with the Mace at the Bar, ibid. 
546. — Act of Attainder against several per- 
sons concerned in the Rebellion of 1745, 18 
vol. 640. — The person of a Man under an 
Attainder by a conviction for High Treason is 
not absolutely at the disposal of the Crown, 
and until Execution is done, his Creditors have 
an interest in his person for securing their 
Debts, Mnesa Macdonald's Case, ibid. 862. — 
Mr. Cruise's Summary of the effects of At« 
tainders upon Peerages, 19 vol. 979. — ^By Stat. 
7 Ann, 0.-21, it is provided, that no Attainder 
for Treason shall work a Disherison of the 
Heir, or affect any other right than that of the 
Offender during his life, Emlyn's Pref. 1 vol. 
xxviii. 

ATTAINT. 

In Cases where an Attaint lies, the Jury 
cannot be fined by the Judge for giving their 
Verdict against Evidence, or the directions of 
the Court in matters of Law, Bushell's Case, 
6 vol. 1009. — ^Accounts by Mr. Barrington and 
other Writers of the reason why an Attaint 
did not lie against the Jury for a false Verdict 
in criminal Cases, 11 vol. 77 (note), 78 (note). 

ATTORNEY. 

Discussion respecting the origin and extent 
of the Rule, that Attornies shall not be called 
upon to divulge in Evidence facts affecting 
their Clients, which came to their knowledge 
as Attornies, 17 vol. 1224. — ^The Rule does 
not apply where the facts do not come to the 
knowledge of the Attorney in his professional 
capacity, ibid. 1239. 

ATTORNEY GENERAL. 

Remarks on the Origin and History of the 
OflSce of Attorney General, in the Judgment 
of the Court of Common Pleas in Wilkes's 
Case, 19 vel. 1128. — Home Tooke's Reraaiks 
on 4ie 0£|9e| 20 ?q1. 694.-"-Sir Fnoicis BaoQQ 






is said to hare been the first Attorney General 
"who was permitted to sit in the House of Com- 
moos, ibid. 696. — ^The Attorney-General had 
formerly no Pre-audience for any Motions but 
sach as he made for the King^ 2 vol. 881 (note). 

AUGMENTATIONS, COURT OF. 

Lord Keeper Somers's Argument in the 
Bankers' Case,that,the Court of Augmentations 
at its dissolution by Queen Mary, was united 
to the Court of Exchequer, 14 vol. 89. — Lord 
Holt denies, in his Argument in the same Case, 
that it was ever legally united to the Court of 
Exchequer, ibid. 36. 

AY3LESBURY MEN, CASE OF.—See Ashhy 

and White, 

BAIL. 

Distinction between Bailable and Replevia- 
ble, 3 vol. 91 . — In a Charge of Rape or Sodomy, 
the Prisoner cannot demand to be bailed de 
jure, but he may be bailed ex gratili. Lord 
Castlehaven's Case, ibid. 403. — A Peer com- 
mitted by the House of Lords cannot be ad- 
mitted to bail by the Court of King's Bench, 
Earl of Shaftsbury's Case, 6 vol. 1296. — 
Arguments' in the Earl of Danb/s Case, on 
the question whether a Person imprisoned by 
the House of Lords upon an Impeachment 
by the Commons, can be bailed by the Court 
of King's Bench upon a Dissolution of the 
Parliament, 11 vol. 831. — Bail cannot be 
taken in a Homine Replegiando till the party 
eloigned be produced, I^rd Grey de Werk's 
Case, 9 toI. 185. — ^An Acquittal of an Indict- 
ment for Murder is a sufficient foundation for 
admitting the Party to Bail upon an Appeal 
for the same Murder, Bambridge*s Case, 17 
vol. 396.— The Statute 5 and 6 Will, and Mary, 
authorizing a Court before which a Pardon for 
Felony is pleaded, to require Bail for good 
behaviour, 18 vol. 327. — The Court will not 
require a Party, who has been pardoned after 
a Special Verdict found upon an Indictment 
for Murder, to give Bail for his Appearance to 
answer to an Appeal ; the word '' Acquittal " 
in the Statute 3 Hen. 7, c. 1, being to be Con- 
strued strictly, Chetwynd's Case, ibid. ib. — ^A 
person in Custody on a Capias utlagatum after 
conviction of a Misdemeanour is in Execution, 
and cannot therefore be admitted to Bail with- 
out the consent of the Prosecutor, Wilkes's 
Case, 19 vol. 1089, 1094. — Recognizance of 
Bail in the King's Bench to appear and answer 
to an . Indictment for Felony in Parliament, 
20 vol. 356 (note). — A Tender of Bail on a 
charge before a Magistrate must not be con- 
ditional, but must be absolute like a Tender of 
Money, ibid. 1315. 

BAILIFFS. 

. Distinction between Bailiffs of Hundreds 
and Special Bailiffs, 16 vol. 50 (note).— Of the 
extent of protection which the Law gives to 
Bailiffs executing legal Process, ibid. 50, 
VOL, XXXIV, 



THE STATE TRIALS. 

BANISHMENT. 



161 



Distinction between Banishment and Trani- 
portation, 23 vol. 794.— Of the lejral and ety- 
mological meaning of the word Bar-ishment, 
ibid. 849.-— Argument that Transportation and 
Banishment are not distinct species of Punish- 
ment by the Law of Scotland, ibid. 861, 866. 

BANKERS' CASE. 

The Case of the Bankers in the Court of 
Exchequer, and afterwards in the Exchequer 
Chamber and Parliament, 2 Will, and Mary, 
—12 Will. 3, 1690-1696-1700, 14 vol 1.— 
Mr. Hargrave's Introductory Note to the Case, 
ibid, ib, — Account of the Case from Freeman's 
Reports, ibid. 6.— From the Fifth Volume of 
Modern Reports, ibid. S.—The Record of the 
Petition to the Court of Exchequer, ibid. ib. 
— Letters Patent from Charles the Second to 
Joseph Hornby, the Petitioner, ibid. 9.--The 
Attorney General demurs to the Petition, ibid. 
19. — The Court of Exchequer give Judgment 
for the Petitioner, upon which the Attorney 
General brings a Writ of Error, ibid. ib. — 
Record of the Writ of Error, ibid. ib. — 
Argument of Chief Justice Treby in the Ex- 
chequer Chamber against the Judgment of 
the Court of Exchequer, ibid» 23. — Chief 
Justice Holt's Argument for the Judgment, 
ibid. 29. — Lord Keeper Somers's celebrated 
Argument against the Judgment, ibid. 39. — 
Mr. Hargrave calls this Argument of Lord 
Somers's one of the most elaborate ever deliver- 
ed in Westminster Hall, ibid. 3. — The Court 
of Exchequer Chamber reverse the Judgment 
though the majority of the Judges thought it 
should be affirmed, ibid. 105. — Proceedings in 
Error in Parliament, ibid. 106. — Case of the 
Plaintiff in Error in Parliament, ibid. ib. — 
Resolution of the House of Lords that the 
Judgment of Reversal be reversed, ibid. 110. — 
Record of the Judgment of the House of 
Lords, ibid* 111. 

BAPTISM. 

Discussion at the Hampton Court Confer^ 
ence, respecting the Rite of Baptism according 
to the Liturgy of the Church of England, 2 voL 
72. 

BAR. 

The Inns of Court have merely an authority 
delegated to them by the Judges to call to 
the Bar, 20 vol. 688 (note). — It was held by 
several Inns of Court, on consultation, to be 
improper to admit to the Bar a person who 
had taken Orders, ibid. 587 (note). — Lord 
Mansfield says, in the Case of Hart, that a 
Mandamus will not lie to compel the Benchers 
of an Inn of Court to admit a Candidate to 
the Bar, ibid. 689 (note). — If a Person is ag- 
grieved by the refusal of the Benchers of an ' 
Inn of Court to call him to the Bar, the proper 
Remedy is a Petition of Appeal to the Twelvi 
Judges, ibid, ib, 



i§i 



GEi^riftAt tiiiitx f d 



(Ui^^htj. 



BAtlttSETAGE. 



Origin of the title ofBafon^t, if vol. 1023. 
—In an Itidictment fot the Murder of k 
Baronet^ it was held iinhecessary lo describe 
hira as stich^ Captain Ooodere*s Case, ibid. 
1025. 

BATTLE. 

In Appeals bf Treason in Parliament, Wager 
of Battle does not lie^ 1 vol. 115 and ibid. ib. 
(note).— Instance Of the Av^ard of a Trial by 

Eattle in the Court of Chivalry^ 3 vol. 483.— 
lackstone's Account, of the mo^e Of waging 
Battle npon Appeals, ibid. .484 (note); — 
Description and I)imensiOns of the Weapons 
used in a Trial by Battle in the Court of 
Chivalry, ibid. 511. — Particular Acfcount of 
the Trial by Battle, from Minshew's Dictionary^ 
ibid. 514. — Resolution of the Judges upon an 
Exception taken to a Trial by Battle in a 
Writ of Right, that the Chdnlpions ^ere liired 
for Money, ibid. 518. 

BENEFIT OF CLERGY.-See Cfergy. 

BENEVOLENCES. 

Mr. Hargrave's Accoudt of Benevolences, and 
the present state of the Iftw respecting thehi, 
2 vol. 899. — Mr. Yclverton'is Reniai-ks on B^he- 
voliences ih his Argument ih the Great Cas6 of 
Impositions, ibid. 485. — Mr. St. Johh'^ Argu- 
ment against a Benevolence collected tindei: 
Letters of the Privy Council, ibid. 900.— Bene- 
volences were declared to be contrary to 
Law by the Petition of Rights, i tol; 221. 

BIGAMY. 

Trial of Maty Moders for Bigainy iii the 
Reign of Charles the Second, 6 "vol. S73;— The 
Trial of the Duchess of kingstoii for Bigataiy; 
20 vol. 369.— -The history arid preseht State of 
the law respecting thfe Criihe of Bigamy, ibid. 
358 (note).— The Statute of Bigamy, 4 Ed#; 1 j 
c. 5, ibid. 361 (note).— Sir Samuel Romilly*s 
Remarks upon the Crihie of Bigamy, ibid. 362 
(note). — Discussion in the Duchess of King- 
ston's Case, whether a sentence of Jactitation, 
pronouucea by the Ecclesiastical Court upon a 
first Marriage, is not a conclusive answer to a 
Charge of Bigamy upon the party's contracting 
a second Marriage, ibid. 391. 

BILLS OF ATTAINDER.— See AttttMer. 

BILL OF EXCEJPtrONiS. 

The Stat, oir Westminster, 2 c. 31, which 
gives the Bill of Exceptions, does not ixterid 
to criminal Cases, Sir Hehry Vane's (Case, 6 
vol. 130.and (note).--Writto.the Lord Chief 
justice Pratt to confess hiis Seal to a Bill of 
Exceptions, 19 vol. 1001.— Form and ceremony 
of a Judge'^s appearance in Court to confess His 
Seal, ibid. 1003.— Lord Camden, when Chief 
Justice of the Court of Common Pleas,, refused 
to accept a Bill of fexceplions tendered to hiUk 
lifter the Verdict was recorded^ ibid. Ilig8« 



BISHOPS.— See Bimi BMt)pi. 

, biseussion of the Qaestion whether it ts 
lawful for a Bishop to hunt, 2 vol. 1167, 1174* 
— Lprd Clarendon's Notit^e of the Discusdieii 
in the House of Commons previously to the 
Trial of Lord Strafford, respecting th^ attend- 
ance of the Bishops in the House of Lords on 
the Trial. 3 tol. l3ld tnote>.— The Bishops 
voluntarily withdraw frbm th^ House on tnfe 
Triall, ibid. 1315 rtiDte).~Re&olved by thfe 
Hddse of Lords ifa tlie debates previotis to tfafe 
Trial of Lord Sttaffordj that the BiMhotis bk^b 
a right to remain iti the Hoiisfe ddririg a capital 
Trial till Judgment of De«lth is passed, f irol. 
1269. — The Bishqps witl)drew from the House 
dhrihg the Trial of Lord dtafford-, ibi^: 1^96;-^ 
So also in the Case of Siflidn Fraser, Lord Lovat, 
before Judgment was pronounced, delivering 
a Protestation, 18 vol. 824 (note). — Bishops 
could not, before the Stat. 7 and 8 Will. 8). be 
summoned to the Court of the JLord High 
Steward, ibid. 444 (note). — A Bishop pleading 
his Privilege must state it) his Plea generally, 
that " he is one of the Feeb of the ttealm,*' 
having no Letters JPatent to set out, !^rl of 
Banbury's Case, 12 vol. 1194— Qishops are 
hot to be tried by their Peei*s for Treason or 
Felony, but by a Jury, 4 vol. 744. — ^The Bisjiops 
are not named it^ the enacting part of Bills ot 
Attainder, l3 vol. 7i2. 

BLACK ACT. -^eeAmoldf kdujordi ^rmtrdf 

Wiiliam, 

In ^ Phlsebtltloh m thk Black Aet ibt 
hialicibusly shooting, it i§ hbt necessary td 
jirov^ that the Prisoner had his JPace blacked, 
or w^s otherwise disguised, Arnold'^ Casie^ l6 
vol. 744-5 and (liote).— Not is It tiecessdN- in 
sdch a Prosecution W ph)ffe exjitess ^iiuce> 
Schofldd*^ Casej 31 tol. l044, l047. 

BLANK WAttRAl*TS. 

Argumefats of Counsel in Stevenson's Case 
on the legality of an Artest iipon a Blank 
Warrant, 19 Vol. 864. 

BLASPHEMY.— See Aikenkeadi Thommt 

fetyttibtogV arid origittdl sighii5c4tioh of the 
Wbtd blasphetny, 5 Vbl. 822.— Whitelocke'i 
Argument ih Jame^l^ayleir^s Cas^, that Blas- 
phemy ought not to be capitdlly nuhished;ibid. 
82l.--Accoutit of the Offence of filasphetiiy, 
and its Ptihishmeht by the Mosaic tAw, ibitt. 
823. —Distinction between H'eresV dnd &is- 
phemy, ibid. 826.— Scotch Act of Parliament, 
ihaking Biasjihemy a bapital offence. Id vol. 
12^4 (bote).— Mr. ftayiey's Opinion itt WiU 
liams's Case, that Blasphehiy h ah ihdictabfe 
offence at Common Law, 56 vol. 654. — Re- 
ference to several Cases deciding that Blas- 
phemy is ajt Offence at Common Law, in the 
Speech of sir Vlcary Gibbs foi- the Prosectitibft 

Oh the Trial of Daniel Isaa^^ Eaton. 31 nxlL 
931. 



uMfMflMj 



3PH6 STATE TRIALS. 



lea 



BOROUGHS. 



or th§ <>Hf«l ^nd hatttfie df the Hght of 
BitfbttgH^ le %i^t iri§bif^s6ilttttiV«8 in Parlid^ 
m^ii 14 f^l. lr83.:^THidr« tir« tw« sbrtS bf 
Bdi^^ in £A^lft»d^ ibid. ib.-^In artci^nt 
Bottfteglili Vhercf iaticls are b^ld ih BUr^ag^^ th« 
BH^si^^ buf fe a feal righi ann^i^ tc^ ih^t 
iAki^ Id li^rid MdttabSH Vb ParUattietit, and 
ih tti9§6 Bbii9i3|b^ ktld Citie§ Which hate a 
right li$ «iect represetitaliVe»by tpreseriptidb di- 
dtaHef) il is ik ^^rianal right anniexed td the 
bbdy p6litie d)* edrj^fatidtt) ibid, ib^ 

fiOtJMANt 

AccouDt by Sir Walter §cott and other 
WiiteH^ of the fipecies of AgricultHrsll Tetiant 
80 called in Scotland, 19 vol. 118 (note). 

BOX-MONfeY. 

. it is a Sum of IVfohey annually distributed 
by the Leni Ghanceltor in private Charities, 16 
▼ol. 1259. 

BRIBERY.— See Hollis, Thomas Brand. 

The same ineB|>acities ensue Upon a Convic* 
tioh far Bribery at Common Law^ aa when the 
Preceedinli is by Aetibn upott the Statute, 20 

BRISTOL. 

Evidence l^sjpeetihg thd extent of the 
Boundaries of y>e Gity of Bristol, 17 vol. 
1056. 

BftittSH CONVENTION. 

Miniltes of t pdtitical Association so called^ 
feriiieQ iii Bdinburgh in 1793, 23 vol. 391.-^ 
See Skkmng^ Willwms Marglsrolf MauHces 



BULLSi 

fittti of I^6p6 Jhtihs m S^tbhd adthdritifag Ihtg 
Maifla^e df Catharine bf Arraeon to Henry 
tbfe toghth, 1 vol. 320.— Bull of Pope I'ias the 
Fifth, eitdommutiicating and det^riving Qneen 
tllikdtl«ih and abSblVing hel' Stibjects frdm their 
Allegiante, ibid. 10^6. 

BtJROLARY. 

If terend persens come to rob a House) 
ud soraci break in and ihe rest stand wateh, it 
is Bargli^ in all^ Colonel Turner's Cas^ 6 
veil 613, 4l5;-»If ft door is opened by a Piek« 
Mt^ it is as much a Burglary as if it were 
tiol4)Uy brokeii^ ibid. 614. — ^It was formeiiy 
lield that a parsen acc^itted of Burglary iii the 
House of Ai ahd stealing A^i gdods, could not 
be again indicted foe the same Burglary in the 
iMse of Ai and stealiiig B^s goods, though he 
AafiA be indicted for the Larceny of B's goods^ 
but it seefiaii now to be otherwise considered, 
>^. 616 (Bote)t*s^f Ik Footmaii open the Door 
^ hii Uia^f^ H«u^ froiLwithia in the atght, 



and admit persons for the purpose of robbing 
the House, il is JBurglary in the Fpotraan, 
Com well's Case, 1 vol . 785 (note).— If Thieves 
influence a Constable to break the Door of a 
House, and they then enter and rob, it is Bur- 
glary, ibid. 782. 

BURNING. 

In all Cases of burning Houses, the being 
present aiding, abetting, and encouraging, the 
actual Offenders, though no Act is done by the 
party, is a cat)ital Felony, 81 vol. 4981 

BUftNti^G n^ THE HAND, 

In Lord Ca^tlemaide^sCase it was determin- 
ed by the CdUtt of;Kidg's Bench, after a com* 
mUhicalidn tfrith the Justices of C* P. that a 
persoti conf itted of Felony ind burbt in the 
hadd, liiay be a Witness; otherwise, if he be 
convicted of Felony and pardoned, but not 
burht in the hand, 7 Vol. 1096.— Opinion of 
the Judges in the Earl df Warwitk^s Case, that 
i Commoner convicted df Felony, and allowed 
his clergy^ but not pardoned or burhed in the 
hElnd, is net a good Witness, 13 vol. 1014.— 
Pfeers are ekcu^ed frdin burning hi the hand by 
Stat. 1 Edw. 6, ibid, ib.— Opinion of the 
Judges in the Duchess of Kingston's Case^that 
d Peeress convicted of a clergyable Felony is 
entitled to the benefit of the Statutes id the 
same ihatiner as a Peer, without being burnt 
id the hand, 20 voL 642 (note). 

CABAt. 

Origin of the term, 6 vol. 1344 (note)."^ 
Attack upon the Ministers so called^ in the 
House of Commons, ibid« 1044. 

CAMiERONIANS.— See Covenanters ; CargiUf 
lionabii Haekstounf Davids Semple, John, 

Mr. Laing's Account of the religious Sect 
so ealled in the time of Charles the Second, 10 
vol. 868 (note).— The Apologetical Declaration 
and Admonitory Vindication, published by 
them in 1684, 11 vol. 949 (note).— The King^a 
Proclamation against it, ibid. 953 (note). — 
Wod row's Account of the Origin of this Pro^ 
clamation, ibid. 957. — Instance of a Cameronian 
in 1793 being committed by the Court of 
Justiciary for refusing to be sworn as a witness 
dn the ground of religious scruples, 23 vol; 145. 

CAMBRIDGE, UNIVERSITY OF. 

, Proceedings against Dr. John Peachell, 
Vice-Chancellor, and the University of Cam- 
bridge, for not admitting Alban Francis, a 
Benedictine Monk, to the degree of Master of 
Arts, 3 Jac. 2, 1687, 11 voL 1315.— Burnet's 
Aecount of these Proceedings, ibid. ib. (note). 
-^The Vice-Chancellor and a Deputatipn from 
the Senate are summoned to appear before the 
Ecclesiastical Commissioners, ibid. 1324. — 
Their Answer to the question proposed to 
theio, ibid. 1826.— Sentence of Deprivation 
passed en tiie Vke^^ChaoceUor. ibidi 1335«--k 



164 



GENEEAL INDEX TO 



PkflSClBZiX'^ 



Copy of the Sentence, ibid. 1339. — Proceed- 
ings of the University of Cambridge in 1793, 
against William Frend forpublishing a libellous 
Pamphlet, 22 vol. 523. 

CAPTION. 

The Caption said to be merely the style of 
the Court, and no part of the Indictment^ 23 
vol. 237. 

CARAVATS AND SHANAVESTS. 

Meaning of the Term, 31 vol. 440.— Trials 
of the Caravats and Shanavests under a Special 
Commission for the Counties of Waterford, 
Tipperary, and Kilkenny, in Ireland, 51 Geo. 
3, 1811, ibid. 413. — ^Lord Norbury's Address 
to the Grand Jury of the County of Tipperary, 
ibid. 414.— Trial of Andrew Kenvirick and 
Laurence Dwyer for robbing the Guard of 
the Cork Mail of his Arms, ibid. 418. — 
Speech of the Solicitor General (Mr. Bushe) 
for the Prosecution, ibid. ib. — Evidence for 
the Prosecution, ibid. 426. — Evidence for the 
Prisoners, ibid. 428. — The Jury acquit them, 
ibid. 430. — Trial of James Kitchen, under 
Lord EUenborough^s Act, for firing a Gun vfrith 
intent to murder, ibid. ib. — He is acquitted, 
ibid. 432. — Trial of David Lamy for a similar 
Offence, ibid. ib. — The Jury find him Guilty, 
ibid. 434. — Sentence is passed upon him, ibid. 
435. — Maurice Murphy is tried and convicted 
of Highway Robbery, ibid. ib. — Henry Hogan 
is tried for firing a Gun, and acquitted, ibid. 
436. — He is tried and convicted of receiving a 
Blunderbuss, knowing it to have been stolen, 
ibid. 381. — Patrick Dwyer and several others 
are tried and convicted for assuming the name 
of Caravats, and sounding a Horn, with intent 
to excite a Riot, ibid. 437. — ^Trial of John Cor- 
coran and others, for firing a Gun with intent 
to murder, and also for assuming the name of 
Caravats, and appearing in arms by night, il^d. 
439. — ^They are found Guilty of a Misdemea- 
nour, an error being discovered in the capital 
part of the Indictment, ibid. 443. — Thomas 
Power is tried, convicted, and sentenced to 
Death, for Murder, ibid. ib. — Michael Foley is 
tried and convicted for robbing a Soldier of his 
firelock, ibid. 446. — John Lonergan is tried, 
convicted, and sentenced to Death, for an at- 
tempt to rob a person of a Gun, ibid. ib. — 
Timothy Dwyer is tried, convicted, and sen- 
tenced to Death, for attacking a House in the 
night-time, ibid. 449. — James Lang is tried, 
convicted, and sentenced to Death, for Murder, 
ibid. 450. — Proceedings under the Commission 
for the County of Waterford, ibid. 451. — Trial 
of Thomas Blake and several others for Menaces 
and Threats, and firing a Gun with intent to 
murder, ibid.ib. — Mr. Serjeant Moore's Speech 
for the Prosecution, ibid. 452. — They are found 
guilty, and receive sentence of Death, ibid. 463. 
— ^Thomas Dwyer pleads guilty to an Indict- 
ment for stealing arms, and Sentence of Death 
is passed upon him, ibid. ib. — ^John Brown and 
jMaurice Quan sire tried for Burglary and found 



Guilty, ibid. 465. — ^The Jury recommend Brown 
to mercy ; Quan receives Sentence of Death, 
ibid. 466. — ^Thomas Welan and John Welan 
plead Guilty to an Indictment for Burglary, 
ibid. ib. — Address of the Solicitor General to the 
Court, on the close of the Trials for the County 
of Waterford, ibid. ib. — ^Lord Norbury's Ad- 
dress to the Grand Jury of the County of Kil- 
kenny, ibid. 468. — ^John Quinlan is tried for 
Robbery and Burglary, ibid. 472.— Speech of 
the Solicitor General for the Prosecution, ibid, 
ib. — Evidence for the Prosecution, ibid. 488. 
— Evidence for the Prisoner, ibid. 493. — ^The 
Jury find him Guilty, and Sentence of Death 
is passed upon him, ibid. 496. 

CATO STREET PLOT.— See Thutlewood, 

Arthur, 

CERTAINTY. 

Chief Justice De Grey's Explanation of the 
different degrees of Certainty required in dif- 
ferent kinds of Pleadings, 20 vol. 792. 

CERTIORARI. 

Certiorari to remove an Indictment found 
in an inferior Court to the Court of the Lord 
High Steward, 6 vol. 773. See also Balmeriao, 
Arthur y Lord; Byron, William, Lord; Ferrars, 
Laurence, Earl ; Kilmarnock, WilUam, Earl of; 
Mohun, Charles, Lord; Warwick, Edw(«rd, 
Earl of. 

CHAINS.— See Irons. 

CHALLENGE. 

There can be no Challenge of a Peer of the 
Realm in a Trial before thel^rd High Steward, 
Duke of Somerset's Case, 1 vol. 521 .—So held 
by all the Judges in Lord Castlehaven's Case, 
3 vol. 402. — ^The Challenge of a Peer disallowed 
on the Trial of the Earls of Essex and South- 
ampton, 1 vol. 1335. — In a Trial for Treason 
before the Lord High Steward, the Prisoner 
cannot challenge any of his Peers for being 
implicated in the same Treason with himself^ 
unless they are attainted, Duke of Norfolk's 
Case, ibid. 765. — ^A Challenge of a Juror 
after the Oath was administered, but before 
the Juror had kissed the Book, was held to be 
too late, Colonel Morris's Case, 4 vol. 1255. — 
It was resolved by all the Judges in the Case of 
the Regicides, that if several persons, jointly 
indicted for the same Ofience, are severally 
tried, and if, after the conviction of some, any 
of the same Jurors are called to try the others^ 
they cannot be challenged on this Account, 5 
vol. 978. — Lord Holt seems to have held the same 
doctrine in Cranburne's Case, 13 vol. 235.— 
The Objection was made on the Trial of Peter 
Cook, but was overruled by the Court, ibid. 
313. — It was held by all the Judges, in the 
Case of the Regicides, that if one Jury be 
charged with several Prisoners, and they chal- 
lenge peremptorily, and sever in their Chal- 
lenges, a Juror, who is challenged by one, is 
drawn for all, 5 vol, 979. — Peremptory Chal- 
lenges are only allowed in capitcd Casesi 



CoMTKMTaj 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



165 



&eadiDg*9 Case, 7 vol. 265 .—The same point 
-was ruled by Chief Justice Jefieries on dates's 
Trial for Perjury, 10 vol. 1080. See also 
Blackstone's Opinion, ibid» i\\, (note).—- The 
Crown may challenge peremptorily till the 
Panel is gone through, because the Law will 
have those for Jurors who are minus suspecti, 
8 vol. 334. — Chief Justice Pemberton, on the 
Trial of Lord Grey of Werk, states the rule to 
be, that the King cannot challenge without 
cause, but that he is not bound to show his 
Cause till the Panel is gone through, 9 vol. 128. 
•—In Count Coningsmark'sCase, Chief Justice 
Pemberton seems to have expressed a different 
Opinion, ibid. 12.-^ If there be a Default of 
Jarors when the King challenges, he must show 
Cause for each Challenge, Peter Cook's Case, 
13 vol. 313. — ^This Rule was objected to by the 
Counsel for the Prisoner in Layer's Case, but 
Lord Holt and the rest of the Court overruled 
the Objection, 16 vol. 134. — ^The same Rule is 
stated by the Court on Home Tooke's Trial for 
High Treason, 25 vol. 25. See also Spencer 
Cowper's Case, 13 vol. 1108. — Discussion of 
the principle and validity of the Rule, that the 
King is not to show his Cause of Challenge till 
the Panel is gone through, in the Case of 
O'Coigly and others, 26 vol. 1231. — Judgment 
of the Court in that Case, confirming the Rule, 
ibid. 1240. — ^Allowance of the Challenge of a 
Juror by the Crown, on the Trial of Sir Miles 
Stapleton for being concerned in the Popish 
Plot, because he had disparaged the Witnesses 
for the Plot by calling his Dogs after them, 8 
vol 503. — ^Arguments on the validity of a 
Challenge to a Juror on aTrial for High Treason 
in London, for not having a freehold of 405. per 
annum within the City, Lord RusselFs Case, 9 
vol. 586. — ^Judgment of the Court against the 
Challenge, ibid. 591.— Sir John Hawles's 
Remarks upon this Judgment, ibid. 795. — 
Discussion whether it is a good cause of 
Challenge to a Juror, by the Defendant, on a 
Trial for a Misdemeanour, that he holds an 
office of profit under the Crown, ibid. 1057. — 
Lord Holt holds, on the Trial of Sir William 
Parkyns, that it is no Cause of Challenge by 
the Prisoner to a Juror that he is a Servant of 
the King, 13 vol. 75. — See Mr. Hargrave's 
Note upon this Subject, 22 vol. 1038 (note). — 
It is a good cause of Challenge to a Juror that 
he has expressed an Opinion of the Prisoner's 
Guilt; but the fact must not be proved by the 
Examination of the Juror, but must be proved 
aliunde, Peter Cook's Case, 13 vol. 334. — If the 
cause of Challenge touch the honesty of the Juror, 
he is not to be examined on it, 15 vol. 898 (note). 
—Lord Holt says in Tutchin's Case, that there 
canbenoChallengeforfavouragainsttheCrown, 
14?ol. 1101. — Discussion of this Doctrine in 
the Case of Sheridan and Kirwan, in Ireland, 
3 vol. 554. — It is a good cause of Challenge to 
a Juror in a criminal Case, that he is one of 
the Grand Jury who found the Bill, Dr. Oates's 
Case, 10 vol. 1081. — It is no cause of Chal- 
lenge by the Prisoner, that a Law-suit was, 
some time previously, depending between him 



and the Juror, Francia's Case, 15 vol. 897. 
—The Prisoner cannot challenge peremp- 
torily on the Trial of collateral Issues, Rat- 
cliflfe's Case, 18 voL 432.--Upon this point a 
different Opinion appears to have prevailed 
formerly, ibid. ib. (note). — Lord Coke says 
that when the King is a party, a person shall 
not challenge the Array for favour in the. 
Sheriff, because, in respect of his Allegiance, 
he ought to favour the Crown more, 22 vol. 
1038 (note). — Mr. Hargrave's Remarks upon 
the reason given by Lord Coke for this Posi- 
tion, ibid. ib. — Lord Coke says, that if the 
Sheriff be a Vadelect, or menial servant of the 
Crown, the Array may be challenged, ibid. ib. 
— Mr. Hargrave's Note on this point, ibid. ib. 
— Discussion whether there can be a Challenge 
to a Grand Juror, in Sheridan and Kirwan 's 
Case in Ireland, 31 vol. 548. — Decided in the 
negative by a Majority of the Court of King's 
Bench, ibid. 566. — Form of the Challenge in 
that Case, ibid. 545. — Trial of a Challenge of 
the Array, ibid. 755. — Trial of a Challenge of 
a Juror, 26 vol. 1230. — ^The Rule respecting 
the time of making a Challenge in Criminal 
Cases is, that the Prisoner should declare 
whether he challenges, before the Counsel for 
the Crown are called upon, Brandreth's Case, 
32 vol. 774. — The same Rule is insisted upon 
by the Attorney General in Layer's Case, 16 
vol. 135. 

CHAMBERS, 

The Benchers of the several Inns of Court 
have the sole Privilege of making Rules 
respecting the letting of Chambers, subject to 
an Appeal to the Lord Chancellor and the 
Twelve Judges, 20 vol. 689 (note), 

CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEQUER. 

The Chancellor of the Exchequer said to be 
a Judicial Officer, 15 vol. 1320. 

CHANCE-MEDLEY. 

If one, shooting at Wild Fowl, happen to 
kill a Man, this is Chance-medley, 16 vol. 80. 
— If a Parent or Master, being provoked by 
some miscarriage of a Child or Servant, cor- 
rects him with a moderate weapon, and 
happens to kill him, it is Chance-medleys but 
if he uses an improper instrument for the 
purpose, it is Murder, Mawgridge's Case, 17 
vol. 67. 

CILARACTER. 

On a criminal Charge Evidence of the good 
Character of the person accused, has no weight 
ao^ainst Evidence of the fact, 6 vol. 613.— 
Observations of Lord Holt respecting the value 
of Evidence of Character, 14 vol. 596. — Chief 
Justice Parker's Remarks on Evidence to 
Character, 15 vol. 604.— .Mr. Erskine's Ob- 
servations on the proper object and e0ect of 
Evidence to Character, 24 vol, 1073, 1076, 
1079. — On a criminal Trial, Evidence of 
Character; where the facts are not disputed; U 



166 



OBNERAL IKDEX TO 



irrelevaDt as to the Verdict, but it is ^^missible 
in mitigation of Punishment, Draper's Case^ 
30 vol. 1018, 1019.— Evidence of Character 
must be general, and particular facts establishing 
it are not admissible, Davison's Case, 31 vol. 
18f. — Lord Ellen borough says in that Case, 
that " the correct mode of examining a Witness 
to Character is to ask him, whether, from his, 
knowledge of the Defendant's general Charac-^ 
ter, he thinks him capable of comraittipg the 
Offence charged against him/' ibid. ib. and 189. 
-—On the Trial of Lord Stafford, Evidence of par- 
ticular acts of misconduct committed by the Pri. 
soner's Witnesses was admitted, for the purpose 
t)f discrediting them, 7 vol, 1459, 1478.— Lord 
Holt lays down the Rule in Rookwood's Case, 
that Evidence may be given of the general bad 
Character of a Witness, but that Evidence of 
particular Crimes is inadmissible, 13 vol. 211. 
—Chief Justice Pratt asserts the same Rule in 
Layer's Case, 16 vol. 246.— Rule of the Civil 
Law respecting the limits of the examination 
into the Character of Witnesses, 7 vol. 1484, 
—By the law of Scotland, infamy of Chs^racter 
disqualifies a Witness, but he must be shown 
to be infamous by a legal conviction of some 
crime inferring infamy, 12 vol, 551 (note).— 
Instance of the allowance of Evidence in 
support of the Character of a Witness after his 
credibility had been impeached by Evidepcc 
on the other side, Murphy's Case, 19 vol. 724. 
—Mr. Justice BuUer says iu De La Motte's 
Case, that the proper question to be put to a 
Witness, who is called to impeach the veracity 
of another Witness on the ground of bad 
Character, is, whether from his knowledge of 
bis general Character, he considers him as 
deserving belief upon his Oath, 81 vol. 811.— 
See the form of the question in Watson's Case. 
32 vol. 495. > 

CHARITIES.— See flcwd/ey, WUliam, 
Indictment against a Clergyman for collect- 
ing Money for Charities without being 
authorized hy Letters Patent or Briefs, 15 vol. 
1409.— Sir Littleton Powis's Account of thp 
Trial of this Indictment, ibid. 1414.— His Ac- 
count of the Arguments of Counsel, and his 
own Opinions on the Offence, as expressed by 
him in his Charge to the Jury, ibid. 1415. 

CHARTERS.^8ee Corpwatum$ London, 

tity of, 

Roger North's Account and Vindication of 
the Proceedings respecting the Surrender and 
Seizure of Charters in the Heign of Charles the 
Second, 8 vol. 1041 (note). 

CHEAT.^See Hathaway, Riehard. 

Lord Holt'5 Definition of a Cheat, 14 vol. 

^*4- — Porra of a Criminal Information against ' 

a Man for a Cheat in pretendipg to be bewitched, 

ibid. 641 (note). ^> 

CHIEF JUSTICES. 
It was resolved by all the Judges in J^rd 
mortey'i Case, that the Chief Justices were to 



wei^r t^eiF Colkir« of $^, i^ the C^uft of ti|9 
I^ord High Sltf>^ar4 pn the Trial ^ % fe^^ 9 

CmVAtRY,CQUIlT OF.--See fl^a, Aw^ 

Blackstone's Aeeount of the Qouft of Cbi^ 
valry, 3 vol. 483 (note). 

CHRONICLES. 

Lord Coke sa^s that Chrppicle I^w is not to 
be regarded, 3 vol. 953. 

CHURCH.r>See Sheffield^ Henry. 

Acta and Canons respectiqg th^ repiiiriBg 
and internal arrangement of Churches, ^ y^\, 
53d.-^ContrQversy between the Bishopa 91^4 
the Presbyterian! at ^he ReatQrativkntTespe^t^pi; 
th§ Keforots^tioQ of the ChnrfiJ^, ^ vpl, t. 

CINQUE PORTS.^^e |r«irti^i; ^i^ 

Account of an aqcient GostQiQiury q( the 
Cinque Ports^ IT vol. 849. 

CLARENDON. 

Articles of the Copstitutiops of Cl^re^^oPy 
Z vol. 546, 

Ignorance of |he Clergy in gucient tjnaf^j |2 
vol, 632 (note).-^]VIr. Barrington dou^t^ wh%. 
the? the Parochial Clergy could read m th^ 
Reign pf Edward the First, ibidt §§^ (ePts)? 

CLERGY, BENEFIT OF. 

It was resolved by all the Judges \n Lord 
Castlehaven's Case, that if a Prisoner stood 
mute on his Trial for Rape or Sodomy, he w^s 
entitled to his Clergy, 3 vol. 402,-^The Reasop 
of this RjBSolution, jbid. ib. (note).— The Law 
in this respect was altered by the Statute 3 
and 4 Wil). and Mary, c. 9^ ibfd. 4Q3 (note).— 
It was also resolved in Lord Casdehaveq's 
Case, that if a Prisoner, instead of pleading, 
prayed the Benefit of Clergy, this amounted to 
a Confession, ibid, 4Q3,^r-Women were nev^r 
entitled to Benefit of Clergy, 6 vol. 281,2Qvoj. 
6?6. — ^Statutes extending a similar Privilege to 
Benefit of Clergy to Woinen, vol. 281 (note), 
20 ?ol. 631. — It appears that anciently Nuns 
profipssed were admitted to the Benefit of j 
Clergy, 6 vpl. 282 (note).— Reference to varioi|s ' 
Cases and authorities respecting Benefit of 
Clergy, 12 vol. 631 (note).--Mr. Barrington's 
Observations thereon, ibid. ib. — Phief Justice 
Kelyng fiues a Clergyman for ni.a)f:ing ^a un- 
true Report respecting the reading of a con- 
victed Felop praying bis Clergy, Ibid. 683.— 
By Stat. 5 Ann. c, 6. the Benefit of Clergy 
shall be allowed to all who .^re entitled to ^k 
it, without requiring them tp read, ibid. 634 
(note).— Discussions ^n the effect of4lhf «Hov- 
auce of Clergy to a peruon coovicted of Frfoey ■ 



CgM!Wȴ.!i 



?IfE STATP TRJAXa 



167 



i«j. lQD^..T-vl^ief.Jja|tice Treby's Obsery^tipns 
pB tb» Prigin and bistpry of the Bepefit of 
Ckrgy, ii» delivfifipg tb^ opinion of t^e Judges 
in ti»Q fCp« pf Lord Warwick, ibig. lOloT— 
Vr. Q^rriDgtop says tbat the Du^e of Somerset's 
Ca$9 i|s the only jin^taoce he found of ^ 
CrijviinM's not praying' tbfs Benefit of Clergy, 
ibid. 1032 (note). — Voltaire's Remarks upon 
tbe B«i)$fit of JD)ergy, 20 vol. 650 (npte).— R^- 
iDaH^ OP the ^t^t|aes giving tfie Privilege of 
Ciergy to Peers, in the Argument of the At- 
torney G^f^^ral (Thuriow) ii^ th^ pughess of 
Eiqgslo^'s Case, ibid. 637.— Biscnssipn of t^e 
Question ^hethj^ a Repress i^ within those 
S^tltt^9> ibid, ib.— Qpin^pn of th^ Judges that 
I BeeT»99 W entitled tP the i\i\l b^p/jfit of tho§e 

CLERGYMEN. 

Jirgmf^isn% th^i it i^ p^mfi^l for Pl^rj^ymen tp 
bi^t, ^ yoi. ll^.T-^elm^'s Ar^umeDt ^n 
fvppori of a cpntr4|ry Poctrine in his Answer 
tp the Apology for A^chbishqp Abbot, ibid. 
1171. — Clergymj^p p^ay be pmpelled by the 
King tp ^Ve arms^ if \t l^e nepessary for the 
Defence pf tlie Realm, 3 vo|. 939' — Proceed- 
ings of the Commissioneri; appoipted by Oliver 
CfOfpwell for ejecting scandalous and in^u$- 
gien^ Clergymen, 5 vol. 539,633. — Account of 
the Prpceedings pn the Degradation of a Cler- 
gyinan in the Rieign of James the Second, 11 
Vo|. ^^5!^. — for other Ii^stances of the Pegr^da- 
tion pf Cl^rgyix^eny see l vol. iJU ^bid. 0O4> 
HU 

CLERK OF THE CUSTODIES. 

letters Patent making ^ gppointm^pt to 
this Office, 16 vol. «44. 

C?OIN.— See Mo^* 

COLONY. 

Di^linptiop between ^ Colony and a pop- 
qfiere4 Country as to th^ right pf the I^ing to 
ipalp new f^lfs for, or impose Taxes upop the 
Inhabitants; 2p vol. 326.-r-Mr. Nolan*^ Ar^u- 
mept ip Goyprno): Pipton's Ca^e^ that the Kipg 
paniu^^ IpajcQ or continue Laws ip a Cplpny or 
QQA^pefed Cpuptryi^hiph are inconsistent with 
the ^indapi^ntal laws of Great Britain. 30 vqI. 
^^d.-'-ColoniaTOovernments are iostifpted by 
Ch^ter Of by Con^ni^sion, ibid. 937. 

COMBAT.— See Battle. 

OOMMISSIOM OF LOANS. 

I^ropeedings ip the Court of Kipg's Benphon 
a Habeas Corpus broug[ht by oir Thomas 
jbam^ll and others for refusing to lepd upon 
jlhe Commission of Loans, ^ yo). 1. 

COMMISSIONS. 

CoipmissipD of Aichard the Secopd to the 
Cl^unqi pf Thirteen, 1 yql. ;i5.— Cpmpiission 
from Pope Glpm^Pl the Pev^plh t9 Cardinals 

WoiMjr »94 C9mpiiiH9 Ui Uy tbe jrjijdii/ of 



the IVf^rrfage of JJenry the pighti and Qneen 
Catherine Howard, ibid. 317^ — Commission ap- 
pointed hy Edward the Sixth tq receive Bishop 
Banner's renunciation of Popery, ibid. 631. — 
Commission issued by Queen Elizabeth for the 
Ex^imination and Trial of Mary Queen of 
Scots, ibid. 1166. — Commission for the Execu- 
tion of Mary Queen of Scots, ibid. 1202. — Lil- 
burn's Argument agi^iinst extraordinary Com- 
missions of Oyer and Terminer, 4 vol.' 1275. — 
Alteration of the st^le of Con^missions during 
the Commonwealth on the assjimption of the 
Pr9tectorate by Cromwell, 5 vol. 480 (note). — 
Coniroissipns are determined by the death of 
the ting who grapts them. 6yol. 12t. — Eccle- 
siastical Commissiop in me Reign of James 
the Second, 11 vql. ^143.— Sir Robert Atkyns's 
Argument against it, ibid. 1148 (note). — Roger 
Cokeys Remark on the incopsistency of the 
form of this Commission, 12 vol. 26 (note).— 
The Ecclesiastical Coipmission e:|ercised a 
Jurisdiction in ca^ises matrimonial, 11 vol. 
(144 (note). — Fo^ms of Commissions to Masi 
ter^ in Chancery in the Reigns of Edward the 
Sixth and George the First, 16 vol. 831, 633, 
835.rr-Comraission fropi Queen Elizabeth to 
Lord Burleigh for the manumission of certain 
Villeins, 20 vol. 1371. — Special Commission of 
Oyer and Terminer under the Stat. 7 Ann. c. 
21, to try High Treason committed in Scot- 
land, 23 vol. 1167. — It was resolved in San- 
quhar's Case, that Commissioners of Oyer and 
Terminer and Goal Delivery could pot, by the 
poinmon Law, sit during Terni in the same 
County with the iCourt of King's Bench, 2 vol. 
759. — A Tales cannot be i^ranted under a Com- 
iplssion of Gaol Delivery, 13 vol. 322, 326^ 18 
yplt 863.— Difference in the Practice respect- 
ing the 'Jury Process, under Compoissions of 
Gaol Delivery, and of Oyer and Terminer, 13 
vol. 326.--rBy the worps of their Commie- 
sion, Justices pf Oyer and Terminer may 
inquire by other ways and means than by In- 
di9tment, |0 vol. 1357. — Qn Special Commis- 
sions of Oyer and Terminer it is not the prac- 
tice to return the Depositions taken before the 
oon^mitting Magistrates, 26 voU 1192. 

COMMISSIONS OF HIGH STEWARDS, 

Commission to Edward, Earl of Clarendon, 
to bf High Steward on the Trial pf Lord 
Morley for Murder, 6 vol. 772. — Commission 
to Heneage, Lord Finch, for the Trial of the 
Earl of Stafford and the other Popish Lords, 7 
vol. 1291.— To Thomas, Marquis of Carmar- 
then, for the Trial of Charles, Lord Mohun, for 
Murder, 12 vol. 953.— To Lord Chancellor 
Somers for ^he Trial of the Earl qf Warwick 
and Lord Mohun fpr Murder, 13 yol. 940.— To 
Lord Chancellor Cowper for tbe Trial of the 
Earl of Dervyentwater, and the other Lords 
concerned in the Rebellion of 1715, 15 vol. 
777. — To Lord Chancellor Cowper for the 
Trial of Robert, Earl of Oxford, on his Im- 
peachment for IJigh Treason, 15 vol. 1050.— 
To Philip, Lord Hardwiicke, for the Trial pf the 
Eftr) pf KilwiU^i^Qci ^n4 tb$ Q^W l^ordf 900* 



168 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



[M18CBU14 



remed in the Rebellion of 1745, 18 vol. 449.— 
To Lord Hardwicke for the Trial of Simon 
Fraser, Lord Lovat, ibid. 541. — To Lord 
Keeper Henley for the Trial of Earl Ferrers for 
Murder, 19 vol. 887.— To Lord Chancellor 
Northington for the Trial of Lord Byron for 
Murder, ibid. 1178.— To Lord Chancellor 
Bathurst for the Trial of the Duchess of King- 
ston for Bigamy, 20 vol. 358. 

COMMITMENT. 

Argument of Serjeant Bramston for Sir 
John Heyeningham against the validity of a 
Commitment under the hands of two L^rds of 
the Council, by the Special Command of the 
King, without stating a Cause of Imprison- 
ment, 3' vol. 6w — Mr. Noye's Argument against 
a similar Commitment in the Case of Sir Walter 
Ea'-l, ibid. 11. — Mr.Selden's Argument against 
a similar Commitment in the Case of Sir 
lidmund Hampden, ibid. 16.— Mr.Calthrop's 
Argument against a similar Commitment in the 
Case of Sir John Corbet, ibid. 19. — Argument 
of the Attorney General (Heath) in Support of 
the Commitments, ibid. 30. — ^Judgment of the 
Court of King's Bench in favour of the Com- 
mitments, ibid. 51. — Mr.Selden's Argument 
in the House of Commons in the Debate pre- 
vious to the Petition of Rights against the 
legality of Commitments without a specified 
Cause, ibid. 78.— Mr. Littleton's Argument 
against such Commitments at a Conference 
between the two Houses of Parliament, ibid. 
85.- Mr. Selden's Argument on the same 
occasion, ibid. 94. — Sir Edward Coke's Argu- 
ment on the same occasion, ibid. 126. — Objec- 
tions to these Arguments made by the Attorney 
General (Heath) before a Committer of both 
Houses of Parliament, ibid. 133. — Serjeant 
Ashley's Argument in support of the Commit- 
ments, ibid. 148. — Mr. Littleton's Argument in 
the Case of William Strbud against Commit- 
ments by the Privy Council and the King for 
Contempts and Sedition generally, ibid. 252. — 
Mr. Selaen's Argument in his own Case against 
similar Commitments, ibid. 264. —Argument of 
the Attorney General (Heath) in favour of the 
Commitments, ibid 280. — ^Arguments in the 
Earl of Shaftsbury's Case against a Commitment 
by the House of Lords for Contempts generally, 
6 vol. 1276. — Arguments in favour of the Com- 
mitment, ibid. 1290.— The Court of King's 
Bench give Judgment in favour of the Com- 
mitment, ibid. 1296. — General Reference to 
Pamphlets and Treatises on the subject of the 
power of the House of Commons to commit 
for Breach of Privilege, 8 vol. 13.— Reports of 
a Select Co<nmitiee of the House of Commons 
appointed to consider of the Proceedings re- 
specting the Commitment of Sir Francis Bur- 
dett for publishing a Libel upon the House, 
ibid. 14, 21.— Instances of the Claim and Re- 
cot^nition of the power of the House of Com- 
mons to commit for Breach of Privilege, ibid. 
27.— Judgment of the Court of Common Pleas 
in Crosby's Case affirming this power, 19 vol. 
1146.— Precedents of Commitments by the 



House of Commons for Publications and 
Speeches reflecting on the Proceedings of the 
House, 8 vol. 23. — Argument of Mr. CliflTord 
in the Court of King's Bench in Flower's Case 
against the power of the House of Lords to 
commit any person not an QjSBcer of the House 
for a Contempt committed out of the House,' 
ibid. 1027. — Judgment of the Court affinning 
this power in the House, ibid, 1062.— Refer- 
ence to Cases on the Question whether the 
legality of a Commitment by either House of 
Parliament can be questioned in a Court of 
Law, 13 vof. 1371 (note). — A Commitment by 
a House of Parliament said to be a Commit- 
ment in Execution, 27 vol. 1065. — In the Case 
of Captain Streater, the Court of King's Bench 
held that they had no power to discharge a 
Prisoner committed by an Order of Parlianient, 
5 vol. 365.— Argument of Sir Bartholomew 
Shower in the Case of Kendall and Roe against 
the power of a Secretary of State to commit for 
Treason or Felony, 12 vol. 1359. — Lord Holt 
seems to have been of opinion that a Secretary 
of State had such a power, ibid. 1367, 1376. 
— Lord Camden's Observations on Lord Holt's 
Opinion upon this Subject, 19 vol. 1058.— 
Report of the Case of the Queen against 
Derby, in which the Court of King's Bench 
expressly decided that a Secretary of State 
has power to commit for a seditious Libel, 
ibid. 1014. — It has been doubted whether the 
Lord Chancellor or Lord Keeper has a power 
of Commitment except in a Court of Equity, 
12 vol. 1361. — Lord Coke says that a lawful 
Commitment must either be when the Offence 
appears upon Record, as a Capias upon an 
Indictment, or when it appears on Oath that 
the Offence has been committed, ibid. 1364.— 
Lord Camden says, in his Judgment in-Wilkes's 
Case, that a Magistrate ought not tocommitupon 
his own knowledge that an Offence has been 
committed, without an Information upon Oath, 
19 vol. 988. — It is unnecessary to set forth 
in a Warrant of Commitment the Information 
or Evidence on which it was granted, but the 
species of the Offence charged must appear 
upon it, Wilkes's Case, ibid. ib. — See also ibid. 
1016 (note). — In a warrant of Commitment for 
writing a seditious Libel, the libel itself need 
not be set out, Wilkes's Case, ibid. 988.— Of 
the power of Courts of Justice to commit for 
Contempts, 8 vol. 34. — Cases of Commiiments 
for Contempts in Courts of Justice, ibid. 49. 
— Mr. Erskine's Opinion on Commitments by 
Courts of Justice for Contempts contained in a 
Letter to a Gentleman of the Bar in Ireland, 8 
vol. 83, 27 vol. 1019.— Mr. Fox's Answer to 
certain Queries proposed to him by Mr. Perry, 
\ the Editor of the Morning Chronicle, upon this 
I subject, 8 vol. 89. — Mr. Eralyn's Remarks 
[ upon Commitments and upon the Remedies 
; provided by the Law ot England for illegal 
j Imprisonment, Em. Pref. 1 vol. xxvi. — LHsciis- 
sion in the Case of the Seven Bishops, respect* 
I ing the validity of a Commitment made by the 
; Lords of the Privy Council, but not stated in 
I the Warrant to be made in CouncO, 12 vol. 20€. 



C0NTBKT8.3 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



I6d 



COMMON LAW. 

The Judges have no power or authority to 
alter the Common Law, 6 vol. 1095, 1116. 
— A general immemorial usage, not incon- 
sistent with any Statute, is part of the Common 
Law, 18 vol. 1331. 

COMMON-PRAYER BOOK. 

Account of the Composition of the Common- 
Prayer Book, 1 vol. 640.— Act of Parliament 
establishing the same, ibid. ib. — Discussions 
respecting it at the Hampton Court Confer- 
ence, 2 vol. 72. — Discussions respecting it 
between the Church of England and Presby- 
terian Commissioners at the Conference in the 
Savoy at the Restoration, 6 vol. 28. 

COMMONS.— See Hotae of Comnum. 

COMPARISON OF HANDS. 

Evidence of hand-writing by a Comparison 
of writings is not admissible, 9 vol. 864 (note). 
—The Evidence of hand-writing in Sidney's 
Case was not entirely by Comparison of Writ- 
ings, ibid. ib. — Discussion of Evidence of this 
kind in the Case of the Seven Bishops, 12 vol. 
296. — In that Case the Court were divided in 
their opinions respecting the admissibility of 
such Evidence, ibid. 305. — Lord Eldon's Re- 
marks on this subject, in his Judgment in the 
Case of Eagleton v. Kingston, ibid. 305 (note). 

COMPASSING THE KING'S DEATH. 

See Treason, 

Mr. Luders's Illustration of the probable 
meaning of the words Compaissing and Imagin- 
ing in the Statute of Treasons, 7 vol. 961 
(note). — On th^ Trial of Thomas Howard, 
Duke of Norfolk, the Attorney General con- 
tends, that an attempt to marry a Person 
claiming a present title to the Crown, ad- 
Tersely to the reigning Sovereign, is an overt 
act of compassing the Death of that Sovereign, 
1 vol. 1003. — Opinion of the two Chief Jus- 
tices and the Chief Baron, on the Trial of the 
Earls of Essex and Southampton in the House 
of Lords, that when a Subject attempts to put 
himself into such force that the King may not 
be able to resist him, and thus to compel the 
King to govern otherwise than he wishes, it is 
a compassing the Death of the King, ibid. 
1355. They also gave it as their Opinion, 
that the law intends the compassing the Death- 1 
and Deprivation of the King as a necessary | 
consequence of a Rebellion against his au- 
thority, as foreseeing that a Rebel will not 
suffer him to live who might punish his Trea- 
son, ibid. ib« — On the Arraignment of Sir 
Christopher Blunt and others, Chief Justice 
Popham declared, that if a Subject attempts 
forcibly- to overrule the Royal will, the law 
intends his compassing the Death of the 
King, judging not of the fact by the intent, 
but of the intent by the fact, ibid. 1410, and 
ibid. 1417 (note).-^By the Law of Nations, if 



an Ambassador compass the Death of the 
King in whose Country he is, it is Treason, 
2 vol. 881. — An attempt to imprison the King^ 
though his Death be not intended, is High 
Treason in the Article of compassing his 
Death, Williams's Case, ibid. 1087.— On the 
Trial of Sindercome for Treason against the 
Protector, the Court held, that compassing 
the Death of the Chief Magistrate, by what* 
soever name he is called, is High Treason, 5 
vol. 848. — It was resolved at a Meeting of the 
Judges in 1663, that a Conspiracy to levy 
War, though no War be actually levied, is an 
overt act of compassing the King's Death 
within the Statute of Treasons, ibid. 984.— 
In Layer's Case this was said to have been 
decided a hundred times, 16 vol. 312. — In Sir 
Henry Vane's Case the Court held that the 
consultation and advising together of the 
means of destroying the King and Govern- 
ment, is an overt act of compassing the 
King's Death, 6 vol. 122.— The same point 
was resolved at a Meeting of the Judges in 
Tonge's Case, ibid. 225 (note). — 'The Court 
hold in Sir WUiiam Parkyns's Case, that a 
Conspiracy to invade the Realm, or to depose 
the King, are overt acts of High Treason in 
the Article of compassing the King's Death, 
13 vol. 110, 113. — See also the language of 
Lord Holt in Freind's Case, ibid. 61; and 
of Chief Justice Eyre in Home Tooke's Case, 
25 vol. 725.— Lord Ellenborough adopts this 
Doctrine as undoubted law in Watson^ Case, 
32 vol. 579. — Lord Mansfield says, in Dr. 
Hensey's Case, that levying War is an overt 
act of compassing the Death of the King, 19 
vol. 1344. — Mr. Justice Foster says, that every 
Conspiracy to levy War for the purpose of 
dethroning or imprisoning the King, or to 
oblige him to alter his measures of Govern- 
ment, or to remove evil CouncillorS| is an 
overt act of compassing the King's Death, 
21 vol. 490. — Mr. Justice Buller says in De 
la Motte's Case, that the sending intelligence, 
or collecting intelligence for the purpose of 
sending it to an Enemy, for the purpose of 
enabling them to annoy us, or defend them- 
selves, is an overt act of compassing the 
King's Death, ibid. 808.— Mr. Erskine's Argu- 
ment, in his Defence of Hardy, on the nature 
of the Offence of compassing the King's 
Death, 24 vol. 894. 

CONFERENCE. 

Proceedings in a Conference of Divines at 
Hampton Court, in 1604, summoned by James 
the First to discuss certain Reformations of the 
Church, 2 vol. 69. — Proceedings at a Con- 
ference in the Savoy, at the Restoration, be- 
tween the Clergy of the Church of England 
and the Presbyterians, respecting a Review of 
the Liturgy, 6 vol. 1. 

CONFESSION. 

On the Trial of Babington and others for 
High Treason in 1586; the Case for the Pfose- 



ivd 



GBFE&AL 



eutioii vai provtd ia detail, though tht 
Pmoners comeysed the*lDdictiQent by p)ead- 
ilig Guilty, 1 vol. 1187.—- The ConfessioQ of a 
CQuicied Tnutor, implicating another penoo 
in biff Guilt, read in Byidence against the 
latter on his Trial for the same Treason, ibid. 
1146.— In Sir Cbi'istopher Blont's Case, the 
pourt frould not permit the Prisoners to con- 
fess a part of the Indictment and plead Wot 
G^iltyto the residue, ibid. 1^10, 1417.— It 
ivas resolved by all the Judges In Tonge's 
Case, that if a person before a Privy Counsel- 
lor or |i Justice of the Peace confesses Trea- 
son, and afterwards at his Trial denies it, it 
will be suiScient at his Trial to prove his Con- 
fession by two Witnesses, without any proof 
of the actual Comi^aission of the Treasons 
charged, the Confession being within the exr 
ception in th^ Statute of Bdward the Siith, 
requiring two Witnesses to Pfove the actual 
Treason, 6 vol. 227 (note).rr-The Judges ^Iso 
held, that a Confession before a Priyy Counr 
sellor. though he l)e not a Justice of the Peace, 
b within the meaning of that Statute, ibi4* 
828 (note).^But the Court, jn Willis's Case, 
doubted whether ^videoce of a Confession 
would supply the want of two Witnesses re- 
quired by the Stat. 7 Will. 3, to every oyert 
act of Treason, though they tbopght that such 
Evidence is admissible in coofirniation of 
them, 15 vol. 623. See Mr. Justice Foster's 
doubt upon this point in Berwipl^'s Case^ 
18 vol. 369. — Chief Justice Eyre says in 
Crossfield^ Case, that there U no rule of 
Law making it imperative on the Prose- 
cutor to prove an overt act by two Witnesses 
before Evidence of a Confession c^n be ad- 
mitted. 26 vol. 4»7. — A Confession by a Pri- 
soner pefbre the Privy Council re(ince4 into 
writing, but not read over to him, nor signed 
by him, cannot be given in Evidence against 
him as a Writing, Layer's Case, 16 vpl. 214--;:t^ 
But a person who took Minutes of the Exan^i- 
naliop before the Council, may prove the Coq- 
fession by Parql, and refresh his memory by 
the MiniUes, ibid, ib.— It seems not to be 
necessary that tl^e Corpus Delicti should be 
proved befojre Evidence of a Confession is 
• admitted, 26 vol. 57.-T-Eeasons for receiving 
Evidence of (Confessions in arimina) mattpfs 
with Caution, ibid. 108.— Opinions of Blac^- 
stooe and Foster respecting Confessipps as 
proving^ Crimes, ibid. 111. — Argument that 
by the Law of Sicotland a Confessioo elicited 
by a promjse of Pardoq is only a conditional 
aiid qualified Confession, and cannot be used 
against the Prisoner unless the Condition i^ 
performed, 6 vol. 1250. — It seems, that by thq 
Scotch Law, ^ Confession of Guilt cannot b^ 
given in Evidence against a Prisoner, unless i^ 
has been subscribed by him, and m^de b^for^ 
a competent Tribunal, 10 vol. 785. 

CONFIRMATION. 
Discussion respecting Confirmation as ^ 
Cereift9Py pf the Church pf ^ngian^ at th^ 



Lprd Coke say^, ^l>at it ^ly^ renqtffi^ J?y all 
the Judges in Calvin's Ca^e pat |f ^ m^^ 
come to a ^ngdom by Conquest, be n)iy alter 
the I^vj of that kingdom, s^ that }^ti%jit\i 
makes the alteration the ancient Lawe of the 
Kingdom remain; but if he come to the 
Kingdom by descent; k^ canno^ ^er the 
laws without the consent of Parliament, 20 
vol. 336. — Lord if ansfi^eld adopts ibis Reso- 
lution as law in giving the Judgment of the 
Court in the Case of the Island of Grenada, 
ibid. 320. — Difference between a cpoquered 
Country and a Colony, with respect tq the 
power of the King to make new Laws or im- 
pose Taxes upon the inhabitants^ ibid. 326.«-* 
Discussion respecting the power of the |Ung 
to impose Taxes on a conanered Country, ibid. 
239d — Mr. Baron Maseres^ Doubts reapefiting 
the Doctrine laid down by Lord Mansfield in 
the Case of the Island of Grenada, ibid. 333. 
— A]^ument that ^ f^^T of a iCojiptiy c^iigi^r- 
ed by Great Britain, Tyhicji {s i^l4.if» »^ le^ 
instantly ceases ppon the Conquest, 30 voL 
741. — Mr. Nolan's Argunient l|i Goyernof 
t^icton's Case ag^in^t the pQwer of the ^ing 
9f Great Britain to Rake o^ cpiitinpje I^ws ia 
^, conquered Conntry ^hic)} are incppsistjei^^ 
i^it}^ the fundan^eot^ L^w^ of England, ibid. 
^99. ■ ' T 

CONSERVATORS QF THP PSAP)?, 

The power of Consei'vators of the Peace at 
Common Law was very short of the authority 
of Justices of the Peace at present^ 12 vol. 
1376 (no^e). — Discus3ion whether a Secre- 
tary of State is a Copserv^tof qf t|)e Peece |t 
Comnjon Law, 19' vp}. iQlgTip??.— Ii?d 
Cap^den del)y e|r^ the Judgment of' the Coi^rt 
of pommon Pleas in theC^se of £ntick^a4 
Carrington in the negatiye^ ibi4. 1P48. 

PPWSPIR4.CY. 

If several persons conspire \f> cpmigil a 
crime in one manner, and ^oi|ie qjf tliein, in 
fact, execute it in another, yet tli^ act of the 
latter, though differei)^ in manper, is t|ie 9ft 
of all who conspire, by reasop of the general 
malice of the inteni, per Pppltam d, J. ii^ Sir 
Phristopher JQlunt^s Case. 1 vql. 1412.— :A 
Cpnspiracy may be thp subject of an Indict- 
ment Of Action, (jio^gh i( does not take effect, 
10 vpl. 1344* — ^4p ^ct 4one by que pf s^ver^l 
parties to ^ Cqnspiracy p)^y be given in Eyi- 
depce for the Prosecution on th^ fmi of 
another pfirty to the Conspiracy, for the jp9r- 
pose qf proving a qrcumstanpo in the Coo- 
spiracy, bqt not tp affect the person on his 
Tris^l criminally lyith tj^t Act, i}ar4y> C^s^y 
24 vol. 438.>-In 9\\ c^es pf general tpn* 
spiracy, ^here many Agents are epaployed, 
the acts of those Agents m^f be givei^ ;f^ ffVi- 
dence on the Tri^l of ^ person for heiqg & 
party tq the Conspiracy, in qrder (p snow its 
gdperai nature fin4 Objects, Qprne jmff^ 
Paw, ?« fPlt W*-A C9^mt^][ fo. tW 



THE S<PATE TRIALS. 



in 



War is oot Treason in Iteelf, but a Conspiracy 
|p dfi{iQSf or kill th& Ki^g^ Of to |n)prison or 
^\ aqj^'r^trfiint uppi^ ^|m l^y levying War i^ 
^ overt ac( or comp^i^iDg t]^e King's Deat^, 
£r *Jol)fi i'rm^'s Case, 13 vo). 61, 11Q> i^' 
^Se^ ^so Chief Justice Eyre's Charge to* the 
pf^D4 •^H^y Fevipws IP tfee Tf rials of flar4y 
and Hori^e Took% ^%\ yql. ^03.rrA^<p6?^( 
Ugaimii this ^ctriuei 9 vol. 698. 

CONSTABLE.— See Arrest, Warrant, 

Constables having a legal Warrant to arrest 
for a t)irf»aph of the Pe^ce, inay break open 
Doors after l^a^ng demanded admission and 
given i^otice of their Warrant, 15 vol. 744 
(no^e). — ^And if they are afterwards resisted 
imd ]ulled| it is Mufderi ibid. ib. 

CONSTIXUTIPfJAJi SOCIETY. 

Sir John Scott's Account of the Origin and 
Proceedings of the Qpi^stitptional Society in 
his Speech for the Frosecution on the Trial of 
Home TodsB, 25 vol. 3?,r-Evidenee on that 
Tfialf iffispectiBg the nature and objects of the 
Soeieiy, ibid. 82^. 

CONSTITUTION OP ENGLAND. 

Remarks upon the limits within which the 
pow«r of the tDrown was confined during the 
early part of the History of England, 22 vol. 
448(note). 

CQNSTaUCTlVE TREASON. 

Lord Strafibrd's Observations in his Defence 
i^ainst Constructive Treason, 3 vol. 1466. — 
Mr. Luders's Strictures upon the Doctrine of 
Constructive Levying Wa^, as laid down in 
the Cases of Messenger, and of Dammaree 
and Purchase, 6 vol.902 (note), 15 vol. 522 
(noteV — Mr. Erikine*s Argument against Con- 
struetive ^reason in his Defence of Hardy, 24 
vol. 87f. — Mr. Wetherell's allusion to the 
Cases establishing the Doctrine of Construc- 
tive licvying War. in his Defence of Watson, 
82 vol. 431.— See also the Arguments of Mr. 
Cross an J Mr. Denman, in Defence of Brand- 
reth on his rfrial for High Treason, ibid. 865, 
889. 

CONTEMPT.-^ee CommUment. 

Of the power of Courts of Justice to com- 
nuit for Contempts, 8 vol. 34 (note).— Prece-. 
4ents of sucti Commitments, ibid. 49.— Mr. 
£rs]cine's Opinion on Commitments by Courts 
of Justice for Contempts, 'in a Letter to a 
Gentleman of the Bar in Ireland, 27 vol. 
1019. — Argument of Mr. Cliflford, in Flower'i^ 
* Case, against the power of the House of Lord^ 
to commit a person, not ati Officer of the 
House^ for a Contempt committed out of the 
Hopsf, ibid. 1027.— Proceedings in the Star 
Chamber against Mr. Whitelocke for a Con- 
^pipt in giving a professional Opinion against 
t^e King's Prerogative, 2 vol. 765. — ^Proceedr 
IBM against th^ Countess of Shrewsbury for 
ft uoiiiWpt HI r^fosing to answer iMlf b^for^ 



the Privy Council, ev to subscribe her Exami- 
nation, ibid. 769.— The Court fine the Editor 
of the Observer Newspaper 5662. for a Con- 
tempt in publishing the Proceedin|s on the 
Trial of Thistlewood and others 'for kigh 
Treason, in contravention of an Order of the 
Court, 33 vol. 1564. ' 

CQNTft4 PAQPf. 

l^egal sigmfication qf the words Contca 
Pacem, 19 vol. 1107. * 

CONVOCATION.' 

Opinions of the Judges, and the Attorney 
and Solicitor General in the ^eign of ^ueen 
Anne respecting the power of Courts of Con- 
vocation, without a licence from the Crown, 
to cite persons before them ibr Heresy, 15 vol. 

COPY OF INOJCTMENTj 

Chief Justice JefTeries says, in Rosewell's 
Cas^, that t|ie Court fiave U|f po^^r, |t pom- 
mon Law^ of granting a uopy of an Indict- 
ment to a Prisoner in capital Cases, upon 
reasonable cause being shown, IQ vol. 866. — 
A Copy of the Indictment was cefoaed oy tM 
Court in Fitzharris'sCase, 8 vol 262..— rQpinion 
of Lord Chipf Justice North, Barop Thurland, 
and Levinz, Attorney General, in the House of 
Lords, in the Case of the Five Popish Lords, 
that no Prisoner indicted for a capital Ofence 
can have a Copy of the Indictment except 
by leave of the Court, 7 vol. 1 243.-r-The Stat. 7 
Anne, c. 21, sec. 11, allowing a Copy of the 
Indictment to persons a^ciised of Treason, or 
Misprision of Treason, 10 vol. 268 (note).-^It 
was said by Lord Holt to bp a settled point at 
Common Law that no Prisoner for Treason 
or Felony could have a Copy of the Indict- 
ment, or Counsel to assist him in his Defence, 
12 vol. 660, 1382.-:-By the Stat. T Will. 3, 
c. 3, a party indicted for High Treason is 
entitled to a Copy of the Indictment ten days 
before his Arraignment, 21 vol. 648.<rTln the 
Case of Charnock, King, and Keyes, whose 
Trial for Hig|i Treason took place aliter tbe 
passing of the Statute of William the Third, 
and before the day on which it was to eon^e 
into operation, a Copy of the Indiotm^t was 
deniea by the Court, 12 vol. 1381. 

COPY QF JURY PANEL, AND WST OF 

^ ' ' WIT NESSE3. 

Stat. 7 Anne, c. 21. sec. 11, aM(hori?(ipg tl^e 
delivery of a Copy ot the Ji^ry P^R^l, ap4 a 
List of the Witnesses fpr the Prosecution, to 
persQi)s accused of jr^^^on or Misprj^ipn pf 
Treasoi?, 10 vol, J263 (note).-«-Th^ Copy of 
the Jury Panel requife4.l5y ^^^ ^\^^* 9^ Will. 
3 to be delivered to persons accused of High 
Treason, m^y be 4elivered before the return of 
the Venire facias, Rookwood^s Case, 1 3 vol. 152. 

CO&QIIATION. 
Edward the Third acted as King ^fore hii 






172 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



[Hl80ELli« 



Coronation^ 1 vol. 49.— Lord Coke, in Calvin's 
Case, says, that Coronation is merely a solem- 
nization of the descent of the Crown, and 
conveys no power to the King which he had 
not before^ 2 vol. 626. ' 

CORONER. 

It was formerly a part of the Coroner's duty 
to summon a Jury where a person had been 
desperately wounded, 16 vol. 27 (note). — Mr. 
Barrington's Observations upon the object of 
imposing this duty on the Coroner, ibid. ib. — 
As to the admissibility in Evidence of Exami- 
nations taken before a Coroner, see the Reso- 
lutions of the Judges in Lord Morley's Case, 
6 vol. 770. 

CORONOCH. 

Account of the two kinds of Coronoch in 
the Highlands of Scotland, 14 vol. 367. — Mr. 
Scott's Account of the Coronoch, 18 vol. 714. 

CORPORATION.— See Hastings^New 

Romney, 

Arguments of Counsel in the Case of the 
Quo Warranto against the City of London on 
the Question whether a Corporation can be 
forfeited by Misuser, 8 vol. 1087, 1101, 1155, 
1240. — Argument that a Corporation cannot 
commit a capital Crime, or any Crime against 
the Peace, ibid. 1137. — Remarks on the ques- 
tion whether a Corporation can be surrendered, 
ibid. 1283. — Mr. Kyd's Account of the legal 
meaning and nature of a Corporation, ibid. 
1102 (note). — His Account of the sense in 
which a Corporation is said to be immortal, 
ibid. 1104 (note). — Account of the various 
Proceedings against Corporations at the end 
of the Reign of Charles the Second, 10 vol. 
29 (note). — It was said in the Great Case of 
Ashby and White to be usual and proper that 
Corporations should have interests granted to 
them which enure to the advantage of the 
Members in their private capacities, 14 vol. 
783. — It was decided in Milward v. Thatcher, 
that where a person, being in possession of a 
corporate OfiSce, accepts another Office incom- 
patible with it, the former Office becomes 
vacant, 17 vol. 845 (note). 

CORPUS DELICTI. 

It seems not to be necessary by the law of 
England that the Corpus delicti should^ in 
criminal Cases, be fully proved before Evidence 
of a Confession is admitted, 26 vol. 57. — By 
the civil law, the Corpus delicti must be proved 
by positive Testimony before presumptive Evi- 
dence can be admitted to ascertain the Offender, 
14 vol. 1229, ibid. 1246. 

CORRUPTION OF BLOOD. 

Mr. Cruise's Summary of the effects of the 
Corruption of Blood on the descent of Dig- 
nities, 19 vol. 98Q. , 



COSTS 



The disproportion of the Costs recovered in 
Civil Suits by the Law of England to those 
actually incurred complained of by Mr. £mlyn, 
Em. Pref. 1 vol. xxi v.— Instance of the House 
of Commons ordering one of their Members, 
who had made a groundless Charge of a Breach 
of Privilege, to pay the accused person the 
Costs of his attendance upon the House, 14 
vol. 749 (note). 

COVENANTERS. 

Wod row's Account of the Prosecutions of 
them during the latter part of the Reign of 
Charles the Second, 10 vol. 851 (note). — Lord 
Fountainbairs Account of the Prosecution of 
several of them, ibid. 877 (note). See CargiU, 
Donald — Hackstoun, David-^Semple, Johnn-^ 
Skene, James^Lanerkshire Men, 

COUNSEL. 

Collections of State Trials said to be useful 
in doing justice to the memory of eminent 
Counsel, Em. Pref. 1 vol. xxiii,— Thomas 
Howard, Duke of Norfolk, was refused the 
assistance of Counsel on his Trial for High 
Treason, ibid. 966. — In the Case of Chamoclj, 
King, and Keyes, Lord Holt says, that it was 
the invariable practice at Common Law to 
refuse Counsel to Prisoners in Cases of Trea- 
son, 12 vol. 1382.— By the Stat, 7 Will. 3, c. 
3, a person accused of High Treason is en- 
titled to a full Defence by Counsel, Em. Pref. 
1 vol. xxviii, and 5 vol. 467 (note). — ^By the 
Stat. 20 Geo. 2, c. 30, the provisions of the 
Statute of William the Third, respecting the 
allowance of Counsel in Cases of Treason aie 
extended to Parliamentary Impeachments, 5 
vol. 467 (note), 15 vol. 814 (note), ibid. 818, 
862, 18 vol. 535 (note).~Summary of Cases 
in which Counsel have been allowed or refused 
before and since the Statute of William the 
Third, to Prisoners on their Trials for Treason 
or Felony, 5 vol. 471 (note).-^ln Trials for 
Felony. Prisoners are not entitled to a full 
Defence by Counsel, ibid. 468 (note). — Mr. 
Emlyn's Remarks upon this Rule, Em. Pref. 
1 vol. xxxi. — Mr. Justice Foster approves of 
the Rule, 5 vol. 468 (note).— Whitelocke ex- 
presses an Opinion that the Law ought to be 
reformed in this respect, ibid. 469 (note). — Mr. 
Justice Blackstone and Professor Christianas 
Animadversions on the Rule, ibid. ib. — Sir 
Robert Atkins says, that he always considered 
this Rule as a severity in our Law, 9 vol. 
724. — Chief Justice Jefferies, in Rosewell's 
Case, admits the hardship of it, 10 vol. 
267.— Sir John Hawles's Remarks upon the 
insufficiency of the Reasons usually assigned 
for refusing Counsel to Prisoners in capital 
cases, and upon the injustice of the Rule, 8 
vol. 726. — He states it as his Opinion, that 
it probably arose from the poverty of Pri* 
soners, and consequent non-usage, ibid. ib. 
•—Lord Nottingham, in Lord CornwalUs's 



€aNTBMl<8.J 



THE STATE TRIAL«. 



m 



Case, 8^8, that the only good reason alleged 
for the Rule is, that the proof of the facts 
establishing the Prisoner's guilt should be so 
dear, that no possible doubt can be suggested, 
7 vol. 149. — On collateral issues. Prisoners on 
their Trial for Treason or Felony were allowed 
the full assistance of Counsel, Ratcliffe's Case, 
5to1. 467 (note), 18 vol. 434. — In Cases of 
Felony, Counsel may be assigned to Prisoners 
on incidental Motions, Bambridge's Case, 17 
vol. 574. — On Captain Goodere's Trial at 
Bristol for Murder, before Mr. Serjeant Foster, 
the Prisoner's Counsel were not permitted to 
put Questions for the Prisoner to the Wit- 
nesses, . ibid. 1022. — On the -Trial of Lord 
Lovat on an Impeachment for High Treason, 
his Counsel were not permitted to examine or 
cross-examine the Witnesses as to matters of 
Fact, 18 vol. 544, 578.— Soon after Lord 
Lovat's Trial the Statute 20 Geo. 2, c. 30 was 
introduced into the House of Commons by 
Sir William Yonge, the leading Manager of 
his Impeachment, 5 vol. 468 (note). — If a 
Prisoner in a capital Case desire the assistance 
of Counsel in matters of law, the points which 
he suggests must appear to the Court to be 
doubtful, 7 vol. 1523, 8 vol. 570, 11 vol. 525. 
— The Prisoner must plead to the Indictment 
before the Court will assign him Counsel to 
argue matters of Law, 5 vol. 63. — In the Case 
of David Lindsay, the Court assigned the 
Prisoner Counsel before he pleaded, 14 vol. 
989. — On the Trial of Lord Treasurer Middle- 
sex, upon his Impeachment by the Commons 
for Misdemeanours, the House refused to 
allow him Counsel to plead for him at the 
Bar, 2 vol. 1200.— Counsel were allowed to 
the Earl of Bristol on the Trial of his Impeach- 
ment for Misdemeanours, ibid. 1380. — It was 
resolved upon debate in the House of Lords, 
in the Case of Sir Edward Herbert, that he 
should be allowed his full Defence by Counsel 
on a Charge of Breach of Privilege, 4 vol. 
126.— rPrecedents respecting the allowance of 
Counsel in the House of Lords to persons 
impeached of Misdemeanours, 6 vol. 797. — 
Counsel are allowed to make a full Defence 
in an Appeal of Murder, Bambridge and 
Corbett's Case, 17 vol, 430. See also 8 vol. 
726.— Explanation of the meaning of the 
maxim, mat in capital Cases the Judge is of 
Counsel for the Prisoner, 5 vol, 466 (note), 
6 vol. 516, and ibid. ib. (note). — A Judge is 
to be of Counsel for a Prisoner, who cannot 
by law have Counsel, to prevent him from 
losing any advantage by his ignorance of the 
Law, of which he might otherwise legally avail 
himself, ibid.ib. and 4 vol, 1274. — But in 
jCranborne's Case Lord Holt says, that where 
^e Law allows Counsel, the Judges are to be 
indi£ferent between the Crown and the Pri- 
soner, and his Counsel are to take care that 
he loses no legal advantage, 13 vol. 237. — The 
tei»e in which Judges are Counsel for Prisoners 
by the Scotch Law, 23 vol. 805.— On the Trial 
ei Braddon and Speke .for a Misdemeanpur, 

Vlu«f /uitige Jeffenes admonished oqq of the ^ 



Defendants, who asked permission to make 
his own Defence, that if he did so, his Counsel 
would be discharged from making any Defence 
for him, 9 vol. 1171.— On the Trial of Redhead 
Yorke for a Misdemeanour in 1795, . Mr. Jus- 
tice Kooke called upon the Defendant to make 
his election whether he or his Counsel would 
address the Jury, and refused to permit him 
and his Counsel to examine the same Wit- 
nesses, 25 vol. 1021. — Instance in 1681 of 
Counsel for a Defendant on his Trial for Mis- 
demeanour being permitted to address the 
Jury on opening and on closing his Evidence, 
8 vol. 752. — See also the Trial of the Seven 
Bishops, 12 vol. 392. — Lord Holt seems to 
have allowed this practice on the Trial of 
Denew and odiers for an Assault and Con- 
spiracy, 14 vol. 929. — ^The same practice was 
allowed by Chief Justice Lee on the Trial of 
Owen for a Libel in 1753, 18 vol. 1227.-^In« 
stances in the time of Lord Mansfield of Coun«> 
sel for Defendants in Cases of Libel address- 
ing the Jury on summing up as well as opening 
their Evidence, 20 vol. 835, 885, 899.— Pro- 
fessor Christian's Remarks on the Conduct 
proper to be observed by Counsel in conduct- 
ing criminal Prosecutions, and in Cases in 
which their own Opinions are against the merits 
of the Cause in which they are engaged, 6 vol. 
134 (note). — Mr. Emlyn's Remarks upon the 
same subject, Em. Pref. 1 vol, xxix. — Mr. 
Erskine's Reasons for his Opinion, that Coun« 
sel ought not to refuse to defend a Prisoner 
because they are satisfied of his Guilt, 22 vol. 
412. — See the Opinion of Mr. Henry Erskine, 
Dean of the Faculty of Advocates, on this 
subject, 23 vol. 806 (note). — Lord Chancellor 
Nottingham says, that " Counsel should speak, 
not as abetting the Guilt of their Clients, but 
as advocating their Innocence," 8 vol. 1131.— 
After the Court have delivered their Opinion, 
it is irregular for Counsel to argqe against it, 
10 vol. 1186. — Counsel cannot be heard by 
the Judges in Cases where their extra-judicial 
Opinions are required by the King, without 
the King's Consent, 15 vol. 1201 . — ^It is lawful 
for Counsel to give a professional Opinion 
upon any Question of Prerogative, which a 
Subject may contest with the Crown in a Court 
of Justice, but they must not, under colour of 
an Opinion, utter private or public Scandal, 
2 vol. 766. — So also Counsel may plead their 
Client's Cause against the King, but if, under 
colour of that, they utter Sedition, they are 
punishable for it, 6 vol. 540 (note), ibid, 548. 
— Counsel are protected from an Action of 
Slander for saying anything in Court which 
is pertinent to their Case, and within the 
range of their Instructions, 13 vol. 1386. — 
Reasons why Counsel should not be compelled 
to give Evidence of facts which come to their 
knowledge in their profe9sional character^ 
even with the express consent of their Clients, 
21 vol. 358.r— In the Case of the Regicides, 
the Counsel for the Crown were permitted tp 
manage the Evidence before the Grand Jury^ 

5 yol< 972,-^11 Jobii llawles's AQi^^^^i^ioxi^ 



iU 



GKNfiEAL IMDEX TO 



on the t>nMitle« of tdtnitttiig Coanwl befert 
tbe OfaAd Jury, ibid* ib. (note).-^The Inns of 
Cottft baf « m%t%\f an autbority delegated to 
tbtm from the Jndgea to call persons to tbe 
Bari 3d vol. 688 (DOte).-'The seteral Inns of 
Conn determined in tbe Case of Home Tooke, 
tbat it would be improper to admit a person 
in Holy Orders to the Bar, ibid. 68f (note). 

COUNTS. 

Doubts respectihg th6 universality of the 
llule in eivU Actioos, where there is a Verdict 
tipon several Counts and one is defective, that 
the Judgment must be arrested upon the whole 
Declaration^ 22 vol. 124. 

COtJNTt.-See Veiure. 

Mr. Justice Foster says that thie most proper 
£videnee to prove fit particular plaee to be 
Within the bounds of a County is the constant 
eftefeise of Jurisdiction, and the execution of 
legal process in the place in question, by the 
municipal Officers of thd County, IT vol. 1064^ 

lor*. • 

COURTS. 

Account of the Court of Chivalry, 3 vol. 
483 (note). — Colonel Lilbume's Argument 
against Extraordinary CoUrts of Oyer and 
Terminer ferebted for special purposes, 4 vol. 
1275._Act of Parliament for erecting a High 
Court of JusticU for the Trial of Charles the 
Firsti ibidi 1045.— Arguments agkinst the 
legality of the Hi^h Court of Justicis established 
in 1680, 6 VOL 13.--tleason given by Sir John 
Hawles why all the Proceedings in Courts of 
Justice should be public, 11 vol. 46d.— Mr. 
Barrington remarks that in ancient times the 
Courts wero not open in the sense in which 
they are now understood to be so^ 23 vol. 681 
(bote).-— Mr. Emlyn mentions the publicity of 
our Courts Of Justice as one of the excellent 
eies of oUIr Law^ Em. Pref. 1 Vol. xxv.— Mr. 
Justice F<;»ster*s Account of the Court of thd 
King in Parliament^ and its distinction from 
the Cdurt of the Lotd High Steward, 19 vol. 
961.— Mr. £mlyn*s Objections to the Eccle- 
siastical Courts in England^ Em. Pref. 1 vol. 
XXIV* 

COWARDICE.— See Tieiines, C0IOMBI 
KatkanaeL 

t'receclents of Prosecutions for Cowardice 
and Neglect of Duty in Governors of towns and 
Castles^ 4 vol. 298. 

CtlEDiBlLlTV.-See Witnem. 

CHIMES. 

Argument of Mh Steele, in the Cas6 of the 
Duk^ of Hamiltob, respecting the extent to 
which a person actitag under the authority of> 
ikhd in obedience to the commands of Another, 
will be excused fW)m responsibility for the 
Cl<mittiiisitm of CHiiket, 4 voi. lloe.^Ali 



Crimes are, by the law of England^ eevcrri | 
and if in att Indictment^ a Crimfe is charged M 
be committed by several^ it Will be snppetted 
by proving that onO committed it^ per Lorti 
Holt, in I^wick's Case^ 18 vol* S78.— By lfa9 
Law of England a Crime of an inferior degree 
is merged in a superior dne^ but this doetrinCs 
does not exist in the Law of Scetlandj 33 toL 
593i--Mr. Ftolyn*s Remarks on the PBniab^ 
ment of Crimes by th% Law of £ng1and| £bba 
Pref. 1 vol. xxxii. 

CRIMINAL CONVERSATIONt*^ee 

If the form bf At^tion for Criminal Convei^st- 
tion be Trespass, the tim^ of limitation by tBd 
Statute of Janaes ii four years, if Cilse, ^it 
years, 13 vol. 929 (note).— t^rbceediUgs in aii 
Action for Crim. Con. brought by HCttfy, 
Duke Of Norfolk, against John Germaine^lt>id« 
927. 

CIltMlNAL LAW. 

The ISuperiority of the Law of England eon^ 
sists principally in the excellence of the Cri- 
minal part of it, Jtm. Pref. vol. 1, p. xxv. — 
Comparison of the Criminal Law of Itngtand 
with that of other Countries, ibid. ib. 

CROSS EXAMINATION. 

Bdmett'ft Remarks upon the practice bf 
Counsel in English Courts of Justice with 
respect to the CrosSAExaminatien of Witnesses^ 
34 vol. 648 (note).— In Criminal Trials in Bcot- 
land| leading questions are not allowed bn 
Cross-Examinatton, ibid. 659 (note). — JjxtA 
Chief Justice Evre says, in Hardy^s Case^ thit 
it Was contrary io his practice, and his opinion, 
to put the Words into a Witness's [Moiitfa, 
even on Cross-Examination, ibid. Odd, 7BB, 

CUSTOMAL. 

Account of an Ancient Customal bf Uie 
Cinque Ports, 17 Vol. 849.— ArgumOnts against 
the Admissibility of this Costomal in Evidence 
on the Trial of a Mandamus to the Corporation 
of Hastings, ibid. 833, 887.— Lord HardVricke 
admits it in Evidence, ibid. 854, 916. 

CtJSTOMS. 

At the Common Law there were no (justotns 
due to the King except of wool, wdelfell^ and 
leather, 10 vol. 378. 

CtJlTtNCJ OTp tHE hAND.-See 

Striking in Courts, 

Mh Hdi-grave says that this is a t^fH Fnnish^ 
iUent by the JBnglish LaW^ 1 Vol. 44g.-'-a)etail 
of the Preparations for the EiEecutloU of thi 
Sentence in Sir EdUiond Khetet's bailey ibid. 
444.— The only Offenceis to which this Ptitti^ 
ment is affixed, are drawing a Weilpon on oat 
of tbe Rin2*s Judges, or striking in thO Kibg'b 
Court dr Palace, ibid. 443.'^tnstatae6 t«lat4d '• 
ill Btow's Annab of ^ iiafiiethHI H iht JhttyiU 






mUft 6TATB TRIALR 



lU 



flitlfli of CaiHiif i^ff tltd tlltha fot stnkiftg ti 
p^lstiti befi^tig dne 6f the Riiig's Judged at 
WfeBtminsteh ll YOl. 1356 (hbtfe).^Mr. Fet- 
gittioii^s Cotiectidii Of setetdl Cases in Vfhich 
oistussibhs krose r^specti^g this Sentetice^ l^ith 
his Cdnittiehts tipbii theid, 27 vol. 96d.— The 
Judges i^fd^^d to order f elton's hand to be 
. feat off, #beii he w%ib conticted of the Mtirdisr 
of the Duke of Buckinghatn, ttiotigh at th^ 
eipress suggestion of the King^ 3 vol. 372^ 

DAMAGES. 

Chief Justice Jefieries's Directions to a Jury 
teji|)ectiii&f th6 ihOd^ of asb6rtai»ing theDdtil&ges 
ifi ab Abtibti of false ItnpHsonttieiit^ 10 vol. 
iira.^ti) all Cdsel ^hete the lAit dOe§ hot 
ftlfhbh d paftvinjiit^d ^iih dh AbtiOh to f^cdrbt 
tin specific thing lost hf ihH wi-On^fhl act of 
ifibth^t', he itlay r^^over I)attlagei$ iii lieu 
thfetfeof, case of Ashby and White, 14 Vol. 794. 
s-SitJohtiHa^iessays, thsit the giving ^«^t- 
ngeohS 13aiiiages in Cased arisihg out Of 
boiitichl Disptit^^, was boe Of the dailies of th^ 
disaffbction of the Nation to th^ Stliart Govern- 
tiieiit, 8 Vol. 426.~Lotd Caitideii, itt his Charge 
tb the JUiry iti the Case of Wilkes t). Wood, says 
that DaiAiages '^ere designed not only as a 
Satisfaction to the party injured, but as a 
Punishment to thb Gtiitty, atid that, therefore, 
the Jury have the power of giving Damages 
beyonii the amount of the injury actually sus* 
tained. 19 vol. 11^7. — See also 10 vol. 370. — 
Chief J ustice t)e Grey's Account of the I^rac- 
tice of Courts in granting or refusing New 
Trials on the ground of excessive t)amages, 20 
vol. 175. — ^In the Case ofPersonal Wrongs the 
Jurv are' the Judges of the amount of Damages, 
iBifl. l8ii 

DANEOELT* 

Mr. St. John's RbMftirks tlpoil the tiature attd 
origin of the Imposition called Danegelt in his 
Argdllii^ht itk the 6t^at Case of Ship-Money, 
3 vol. 906.— He <ibtit«tids that Danegelt was 
imposed in Parliament^ ibid. 907*. 

t)AV. — See truUcinmitf thne. 

It l«raS hdd bv thfe Court in Sir Henrj^ 
Vi,n^*i Case, ihat the day laid iil tia Indictmetii 
is imtuatekial, and that the Jury might ebhvict 
upon it, dbough tlie Dfifence Were proved to 
hafe b^h cominittied on ati learlleror lAt^erday 
thdSi Ukttt kid in the Indiictment, 6 vol. 131 .-- 
LM Holt ^aysj Oh the Trial of Chiaraock, 
lUhg^ aUti Keyes, that for the sake of foriA 
there Ss a partitiuiar day laid in the Indictttient, 
bm \ht OToof is ttot to be tied up to that d^y ; 
if the Qtence be ptoVed at any time b^pfore or 
afteV, pn>vid«rd it be before the Ibdittmetitpre- 
ht^, it is well fenoughj 12 vol. 1396;— Dis- 
atssion wke^er iii ati I&pi^chment for IVfeaion 
it is necessary to charge the Oflfence to have 
btoin tmhmitt^ oh a patticulat day, 15 vol. 
i^6.-^tn Indictments for capital ofifences it is 
t^et^saty to state a particular day to whith 

tte faamtt lim v^f m, ^,^Ko in- 



dictm^nt ekn bO gOOd Hlpithoiit pttdsdy show- 
ifig a certain day and year of the facts alleged 
in it, 13 vol. 275 (tiote).—t)pililOft of all the 
Judges in 'Lord Balmerifio'i Cafte that it i^ 
unnecessary to prbve an overt Act of T reastiO 
to hate been comniitted ofa the particular day 
laid in the tndictirtent, 1^ vol. 485. 

DfiATH-BEO bECtA&AtlONS. 
See Dj^ing DeclarcUioni, 

DECLARATIGN.-^See Pkm ttnd JPkading, 

DBCLAIlATIONS. 

Deelarhtioti bf Chafles thb Seeotid to the 
People of England soon after th^ SneOUtiOft Of 
his Father, 5 vol. 959. — His Declaration on 
the same occasion to th^ l^eople of Scotland, 
ibid. 962k— The Duke of Monmouth's De- 
claration on his landing ai Lyme iii Dorsetshire, 
11 vol. 1032 (note). — James the Second's 
Declaration for Liberty of Conscience, 12 vol. 
231. — Declaration of the I'rince of Orange on 
his appearing in arras in England| 15 voh 

28(:). 

fiEGYPhERlNO* 

Letter of the celebrated t)r, Wallis on the 
Science of Decyphering, 16 vol. 540 (note). 

D£f AMATlON^See Slanekr, 

Narcissus Luttrell's Account of this freqUehcy 
Of PrOsecutibbs for Defamation during the 
latter part of the Itbign of Charies the SebOnd> 
10 vol. 125 (note). 

DEFENCE.— Sfee C&iMkei-^ttidL 

DEFENDERS. 

Proceedings on the l^riais of the defenders 
in Ireland, 36 Geo. 3, ,1795, 26 vol. 225.— Se« 
Olehnan^ Andrew — ffetr/,' Patnck—KeHnetfy^ 
Thomas-^ Leary^ Jbhn — Weldon, Jame$. 

DEGRADATION OF CLERGYMEN^ 

I^roceecling:s On th6 Degradation of William 
Satitre for lleresy, 2 hen. 4, 1400, 1 vol. 171. 
— t>egradation of Cratthler, Archbishop of 
Canterbiiiry, ibid. 804. — Form of degrading an 
Archbishop, ibid. 841.— tbrm of the Degrada- 
tion of a Ciergyihan in the Reign of Jaines thii 
Second, 11 vol. 1352. 

DEGRADATION OF A KNIGHT OF THE 

GARTER. 

iPfbceedirtgsoh the Degradation of EdwatJ, 
Duke of Buckingham, from the Order of thb 
■Garter, 13 Hen. 8, 1522 1 vol. 297. . 

DEGRADATION OF A PEEIt. 

History of the Degradation of George NeviHej 
Duke of Bedford, by Act of Parlianient, in thd 
Wign t>f fid%^ tfe^ fV>totb> « voli U9^ 



176 GENERAL INDEX TO 

DE HOMINE REPLEGIANDO. 



pfi8esz«Zf< 



In a Writ De Homine Replegiando there is 
an exception of a Commitment by the Special 
command of the King, 3 vol.43. — ^Two Records 
of Proceedings on Writs de. Homine Replegi- 
ando, 8 vol. 1350 (note). — Sir John Hawles's 
Remarks upon the Writ De Homine Replegi- 
ando in the Case of Wilmer, ibid. 1347. — A 
Commitment upon this Writ is merely until 
the Body is produced, 9 vol. 185. — ^The person 
eloigned is' properly the Plainti£f in a De Ho- 
mine Replegiando^ ibid. ib. 

DELINQUENT AND MALIGNANT. 

: Oldmixon's Explanation of the meaning of 
these Terms, 4 vol. 857 (note). 

DEMURRER. 

In Cases of Misdemeanour thelre is a four- 
day Rule to join in Demurrer, but in Capital 
Csiises, the Party must join in Demurrer imme- 
diately, Layer's Case, 16 vol. 116, 122. 

DEPOSITIONS.— See Examinatiom, Evidence, 

Informatiom, 

Instances in former times of Depositions of 
Witnesses -v^o might have given their Testi- 
mony viv& voce, being admitted in Evidence 
for the Crown on Criminal Trials, 1 vol. 985, 2 
vol. 10. — Resolved by all the Judges in Lord 
Morley's Case, that Depositions taken before a 
Coroner upon proof of the death of the Wit- 
nesses, or their inability to travel, and Oath 
made by the Coroner that the Depositions are 
unaltered, or upon proof that the Witnesses 
have been withdrawn by the Prisoner, may be 
admitted in Evidence for the Crown on a Trial 
for Murder, 6 vol. 770, 776.— Such a Deposi- 
tion admitted in Evidence by Lord Holt on 
Harrison's Trial for Murder, where there was 
reasonable ground for suspicion that the Wit- 
ness had been kept out of the way by the pro- 
curement of the Prisoner, 12 vol. 852, and 
(note). — Discussion in the House of Commons 
in Sir John Fenwick's Case, respecting the ad- 
missibility in Evidence against a person under 
a Criminal Charge of a Deposition taken before 
a Magistrate in the absence of the accused 
person, 13 vol. 591, et seq. — A Prisoner upon 
his Trial is not entitled as of right to see the 
Depositions taken before the committing Ma- 
gistrates, Dr. Sheridan's Case, 31 vol. 835. 

DIGNITIES. 

The Case of Dignities from Coke's Reports, 
2 vol. 741.— Mr. Cruise's Summary of the 
effects of Attainder upon Dignities, 19 vol. 
979. 

DILATORY PLEA.— See Ahatemeni. 

Where a Dilatory Plea is pleaded by the Pri- 
soner in a Capital Case, and demurred to, the 
Court will not indulge the Prisoner with time to 
join ift Pemurrer, Layer's Case, 16 vol 122,— i 



TheCourt willTgrant no opportuaity ex gratiA 
to a Dilatory Plea, ibid. 123.— An AfiSdavit ol 
the truth of the matters contained in a Dilatory 
Plea said not to be necessary in Criminal Cases, 
Sheares's Case, 27 vol. 267. — See also Kirwaii*a 
Case, 31 vol. 577 (note). — ^The Statute requir- 
ing such an Affidavit, held by Lord MansfieI4> 
to apply to Criminal Cases, excepting Trials 
at Bar, 18 vol. 399 (note), 

DISABILITY.— See Witnesi. 



DISCONTINUANCE. 

Arguments in Tatchin*s Case, whether a 
Discontinuance occasioned by a clerical error 
in the teste of a Distringas*Corpora Juratonim 
may be cured by the amendment of the Teste 
by the Roll, 14 vol. 1120.— The Court of Riqg's 
Bench are equally divided in Opinipn upon the 
Question, ibid. 1187. — In case of a CrimiDal 
Trial at Bar, where a Venire is returnable on th^ 
first general Return of the Term, the appearance 
day for the Jury, is the Quarto die post, but the 
Court may adjourn the Jury to any day before 
the next Return without any entry on Record 
of such Adjournment, and it will not be a Dis- 
continuance, Layer's Case, 16 vol. 307. 

DISCRETION. 

Lord Coke's Definition of legal Discretioo, 
23 vol. 990. — Meaning of judicial Discretion 
explained by Lord Mansfield, 19 vol. 1089.— 
Danger of intrusting Judges with discretionary 
power, 8 vol. 56 (note). 

DISGUISE. 

On a Trial for an Ofience under the Black 
Act, it is not necessary to show that the Of* 
fender was disguised at the time of its Com- 
mission, 16 vol. 745 (note). 

DISPENSING POWER.-^ee Eak$^ 
Sir Edward. 

Lord Coke's Opinion in Calvin's jCase in 
favour of the Dispensing Power, 2 vol. 632. — 
If a Statute directs a Penalty incurred by the 
Coijdmission of an Offence to be divided be* 
tween the King and the Poor of the Parish, the 
King can only dispense with his own part of 
the Penalty, 3 vol. 1179. — Mr. Hargrave's 
Note on the Question of the King's Dispensing 
Power, 11 vol. 1187 (note).— His Reference to 
Treatises and Cases illustrating the Controversy 
on this Subject, ibid. 1190 (note). — Sir Robert . 
Atkyns's Inquiry into the King's Power of J 
dispensing with penal Statutes, ibid. 1200. — ] 
Mr. Northey's Argument in the Case of Sir 
Edward Hales against the Dispensing Power, 
ibid. 1187. — ^^Sir Thomas Powis's Argument in 
the same Case in support of it, ibid. 1192. — 
Chief Justice Herbert delivers the Judgment of 
the Court of King^s Bench in favour of it, ibid. 
1195. — His Account of the Authorities on 
which this Judgment was founded, ibid., 1251. 
—Sir Egbert Atkyns's Aiumadrersio&s thi^repOi 



ibid. 1267. — ^Mr. Attwood's Remarks upon 
Chief Justice Herbert's Defence of the Ji^g- 
ment, ibid. 1280.— Arguments of Sir Robert 
Sawyer^ Mr. Finch, Mr. Pollexfen, and Serjeant 
Pemberton, against the Dispensing Power, in 
6eir Defence of the Seven Bishops, 12 vol. 
362, 367, 370, 371 .—Sir Robert Sawyer declares 
his Opinion in favour of the Dispensing Power 
in his Argument in the Great Case of Mono- 
polies^ 10 vol. 473. — ^Mr. Justice Powell's 
Dedauation against the dispensing Power in 
the Case of the Seven Bishops, ibid. 427. — ^The 
Exercise of the Dispensing Power respecting 
tiie Test and P6i^ai Laws, said by Sir John 
Hawles to be one of the chief causes of the dis- 
affection of the nation to the House of Stuart, 
8 vol. 427. 

DISSECTION. 

.IMssection in Cases of Murder forms part of 
the Sentence, 18 vol. 1201, 19 vol. 959. — 
Statute directing the delivery of the bodies of 
persons executed in London and Middlesex for 
Murder to the . Company of Surgeons to be 
dissected and anatomized, 19 vol. 979 (note). 

DISSENTERS. 

Proceedings respecting Presbyterian Dis- 
senters at the Restoration, 6 voL 1.— -Proceed- 
ings respecting Dissenters after the Revolution, 
ihtd. 47. — Persecution of Protestant Dissenters 
during the Reign of Charles the Second, ibid. 
996. — ^The Penalty of Abjuration of the Realm 
derived from the ancient Common Law prac- 
tice of Sanctuary and Abjuration applied to 
Dissenters by 35 Eliz. and afterwards abolished 
by the TolerationAct, 15 vol. 146, andibid.310. 

DISTRINGAS. 

Arguments in Tutchin's Case, whether an 
Error in the date of the teste of a Distringas 
Corpora Juratorum be amendable by the Roll 
80 as. to avoid a Discontinuance, 14 vol. 1135. 
^— The Court of King's Bench are equally di- 
vided in Opinion on the question, ibid. 1187. 

DIVORCE. 

Proceedings relating to the Divorce of 
Catharine of Arragon from Henry the Eighth, 
1 voL 299. — Opinions of Melancthon and other 
Divines concerning Impotence as a cause of 
Divorce, 2 vol. 796. — Account of Bury's Case, 
containing a Decision against the validity of a 
second Marriage, under which there was Issue, 
the first Marriage having been dissolved on the 
ground of impotence, ibid. 849, 850 (note).—' 
The Duke of Norfolk's Divorce Bill, 13 vol. 
1283. — Bishop Cozens*s Argument in Lord 
Bms's Case, that a Man divorced from his 
Wife may lavefully marry again, ibid. 1332. — 
Sir Thomas Fowis's Argument in the Duke of 
Norfolk's Case, against Bills of Divorce, ibid. 
1345.-*Piscussion in the Dt^chessof Kingston's 
Case^ whether a Sentence of Divorce in the 
Bcdesiastioal Court upon a first Marriage is a 
coQclusive Bnswer to a Chai^^ ^ Bigamy, 20 
Tol. 391. 

yoL, XXXIV, 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



177 



DROWNING. See QfU^, Spencer. 

Evidence respecting 'the inference to be 
drawn from the sinking or floating of a dead 
body, as to whether the death was occasioned 
by drowning, or whether death had taken place 
before the body came into the water, 13 vol. 
1131, 1158, 1160, 1162.— Opinions of Dr. 
Sloane and others upon the immediate cause 
of death from drowning, ibid. 1155. — Opinions 
of medical men that it is not necessary that the 
body should have much water in it where dieath 
has been caused by drowning, ibid. 1158, 1159. 
— Further Observations on the immediate 
causes of death from drowning, ibid. 1202. 

DRUNKENNESS. 

Drunkenness cannot be pleaded in extenua- 
tion of Crimes^ Dammaree's Case, 15 vol. 603, 
690, 17, vol. 1092. — Fielding's Opinion respect^ 
ing the effect of Drunkenness on the Character, 
15 vol. 604 (note).— -Discussion respecting the 
effect of Drunkenness in extenuation of Crimes 
by the Law of Scotland, 17 vol. 1001.— Mr. 
Locke's Opinion of the reasonableness of not 
admitting Drunkenness as an excuse for crimes, 
22 vol. 520 (note).— 'Although Drunkenness 
does not excuse from criminal responsibility, 
no inference of crime can arise from the con- 
duct of a man when in a state of intoxication. 
26 vol. 122. 

DUELS. SeeBaHle. 

The Case of Duels in the Cou;rt of Star^ 
Chamber, 13 Jac. 1, 1615, 2 vol. 1033.— Sir 
Francis Bacon's Argument against them in that 
Case, ibid. ib^-^Decree of the Star-Chamber 
against them, ibid. 1042. — ^Lord Holt says, in 
delivering the Judgment of the Court in Maw-< 
gridge's Case, that if two persons appoint a 
time to fight, and meet and fight accordingly, 
and one of them is killed, it is Murder in the 
other, 17 vol. 66. — He also says, in the same 
Case, that if two persons are fighting a Duel 
upon malice prepense, and a third person ac- 
cidentally comes up, and ignorant of the malice, 
takes part with the one who he thinks has the 
disadvantage, or who is his Friend, and one is 
killed, it is Manslaughter, ibid. 69.— See 
J^ron, WUliamf Lord; Mohun, Charles, Lord; 
Warwick and Bollandy Edward, Earl of, 

DURESS. 

If a Prisoner dies in consequence of Duress 
of Imprisonment, it will be Murder in the 
Gaoler, 17 vol. 453 (note). — ^The only Duress 
which will avoid responsibility for Criminal 
Acts, is a force upon the person inducing a pre- 
sent fear of Death, Mac Growther's Case, 18 
vol. 394, 

DYING DECLARATION. 

Instance of a Dying DeclaratTon being re« 
ceived in Evidence wiSiout previously shewing 
that the party examined was in expectation of 
Death, 6 vol. 1325.— Mn Fox's Remarks upon 
the mode of estitaating the degree of creditaue 



.■k 



IVd 



GENERAL IKDEX TO 



£lkC2fl6VIitf 



to Dying Dficl^tkmi, 11 vol. 885.*--The prin* 
ciple upon which Djring Peclarations are ad« 
inissihle in Evidence in Cases of Murder, 16 
vol. 24 (note). — ^tt is a question for the Court 
and not for the Jury, whether the party whose 
Dying Declaration is offered in Evidence, was 
conscious of the immediate approach of Death 
at the time he made it, ibid. 25 fnote). — Re-> 
marks on the Admissibility of Evidence of 
Dying Declarations, by the Law of Scotland, 
ibid. 2T (note). 

DYING SPEECHES 

Of John Eisher, Bishop of Bochester, ex- 
ecuted for Treason, A. D. 1535, 1 vol. 406. — 
Of Queen Anne Boloyn, ezeouted A. D. 1536, 
ibid. 410.— Of Thomas Cromwell, Earl of 
Esset, executed A. D. 1541, ibid. 48r.— Of 
Edward, Duke of Somerset, executed A.D. 
1552, ibid. 523.— Of Lady Jane Grey, ex- 
ecuted A. D. 1553, ibid, T28.*-Of lliomas 
Howard, Duke of Norfolk, executed A.D. 
1572, ibid. 1032.— Of Sit Christopher Blunt, 
Sir Gilly Merrick, and Henry Cuile, executed 
A.D. 1600, ibid. 1412.— Of Sir Walter 
Baleieh, executed A.D. 1618, 2 toI. 41. — 
Of Henry Garnet, executed A.D. 1606, for 
being concerned in the Gunpowder Plot, ibid. 
856. — Of Sir Jervis Elwes, executed A.D. 
1615, fbt the Murder of Sir Thomas Orerbury, 
ibid. 942. — Of Mervin, Lord Audley, executed 
A.D. 1631 for Rape and Sodomy, 3 vol. 
417. — Of Fittpatrick and Brodway, executed 
A. D. 1631, for Sodomy, ibid. 421, 423.— Of 
Lord Strafiord, executed A. D. 1641, for Trea- 
son^ ibid. 1^21. — Of Archbishop Laud, ex- 
ecuted A. D. 1644, for Treason, 4 rol. 618.-^ 
Of Charles the Firet, King of England, ex- 
ecuted A.D. 1649, ibid. 1137.— Of James, 
Duke of Hamilton, executed A. D. 1649, ibid. 
1 186.^-Of the Earl of Holland, executed A. D. 
1649, ibid. 1220.— Of Arthur, Lord Capel, 
«Xecuted A.D. 1649, ibid. 1282«-^Of Chris- 
topher Love, executed A. D. 1651, 5 rol. 252. 
— Of John Gerhard, executed A.D. 1654, 
ibid. 586.-«Of Peter Vowell, executed A.D. 
1654, ibid. 53r.--Of Colonel Penruddock, 
executed A.D* 1655, ibid. 778.— Of Dr. 
Hewet, executed A.D. 1658, ibid. 93a— 
Dying Speeches of the Regicides, executed 
A. D. 1660.— Of General Harrison, ibid« 1235. 
—Of John Carew, ibid. 1241.— Of John Cook, 
ibid. 1252.— Of Thomas Scot, ibid. 1275— Of 
Colonel John Jones, ibid. 1285v-^0f Colonel 
Daniel Axtcll, ibid. 1291;-^-Of Colonel Francis 
Hacker, ibid. 1294.*^ Of Colonel Adrian 
Scroop, iW. 1300.-HOf Colond John Okey, 
executed A. D. 1662y ibid. 1319^^^^! Miles 
Corbet, ^id. 1822.— Of Colonel John Bark- 
stead, ibid. 1325.— Of Archibald, Man|Uttof 
Argyle, executed A. D. 1661, ibid. 1505.— Of 
John James, exeeuted A. D. 1661, 6 vol. 98. 
-— Of Sir Htnry Vane, exeiiuiled A. D. 1662, 
ibid« 193.^*-*<af Thomas Tonge, Geoige I%H. 
lips, Francis Stubbs, and I^thaaiel Gibbs, 
executed A.D. 1662* ibid. t6& .^fJQi John. 
Tlryji^ tMfM^ iWD^ 1668^ ibid, m^^fl 



Colonel James Turner, executed A. D, 1664* 
ibid. 620.— Of James MitohtU, executed »l 
Edinburgh, A.D. 1681, ibid. 1261.— Of Wil* 
liam Ireland and John Groves, executed A. D« 

1678, 7 rol. 142.*^Of Lawrence Hill, execatot 
A. D. 1679 for the Murder of Sir Edraondboij: 
Godfrey, ibid. 226.^0f David Lewis, 9!^ 
eouted A.D. 1679, ibid. 256.*<^Of ThomW 
Whitebtead and four others, commonly oalled 
the Five Jesuits, executed A. D.'1679 fojp being 
concerned in the Popish Plot, ibid. 481.— *Of 
Richard Langhom, executed A. D. 1679, ibid. 
502. — Of Francis Johnson, exeoutod A.D* 

1679, ibid. 750.— Of William Ples»ngto% 
executed A.D. 1679, ibid. 762.-<*Of Thonuw 
Tfawing, executed A.D. 1680, ibid. 1182.>»*^ 
Of Lord Stafford, executed A. D. 1680, ibid« 
1564. — Of Edward Fitzharris, executed A.D* 
1681, 8 vol. 395.— Of Dr. Oliver Flunkey 
executed A» D. 1681, ibid. 495.<***Of Stephen 
CoUedge, executed A.D. 1681, ibid. 71 7v**- 
Of William, Lord Russell, executed A.O. 
1683, 9 rol. 512, 683.— Of Captain Wah»t, 
executed A. D. 1688, ibid. 668.^0f Williatt 
Hone, executed A. D. 1683, ibid. 674.— Of 
John Rouse, executed A.D. 1683, ibid. 675. 
— Of Cplonel Algernon Sidney, executed A. D. 
1683, ibid. 907.— Of Sir Hiomaa Amstrong, 
executed A. D. 1684, 10 vol. 115.— Of Donald 
Cargill, executed A.D. 1681, ibid. 891.— Of 
Walter Smith, executed A.D. 1681, ibid. 
895.— Of James Boig, executed A. D. 1681, 
ibid. 900. — Of William Thomson, executed 
A.D. 1681, ibid. 902— Of William Cuthil, 
executed A.D. 1681, ibid. 905. — Of Lady 
Alice Lisle, executed A.D. 1685, 11 yoI. 380. 
—Of Henry Cornish, executed A.D. 1685, 
ibid. 451.— Of Elizabeth Gaunt, executed 
A.D. 1685, ibid. 452.— Of Robert Frances, 
executed for the Murder of Thokas Danger- 
field, A.D. 1685, ibid. 507.— Of Ei^ard 
Rumbold, executed A. D. 1685, ibid^ 879.-^ 
Thomas Archer, executed A.D. 1689, ibid. 
906. — Of James Reaw\ck, executed A.D. 
1689, 12 vol. 583. — Of John Ashton, aecuted 
A.D. 1691, ibid. 817.— Of Captain Henry 
Harrison, executed A. D. 1692 for the Murder 
of Dr. Clenche, ibid. 874.— Of Robert Young, 
executed A.D. 1700 for Coining, i^td. 116^* 
— Of William Anderton, executed A.D. 1693, 
ibid. 1265. — ^Of Robert Charnoek, Edward 
King, and Thoi&as Keyes, executed A.D. 
1696, ibid. 1462.— Of Sir John Frie&d and Sir 
William Parkyns, execttted A. Di 1696, for 
being concerned in the Assass! nation Plot, 
1 3V0I. 1 36.<— Of Robert Lowick and Ambrose 
Rookwpod, executed A. Dv 1696, ibid. 310.^ 
Of Sir John Fenwiok, executed A. D« 1697, 
ibid. 757^^--Of Thosms Aikeuhead, executed 
in Scotland 'for l^aspiiemy, A. D. 1697, ibid. 
930.— Of Haagen Swendsen, executed A.D. 
1702 for feloniously abdueiug an Heiress 
14 nA. 634.-<-Of John Quelch, John Lambert, 
Christopher Scudamore, J(^n Miller, Erasmas 
Peterson, executed A. P. 1704 for Piracy and 
Murder^ ibid. 109l»«— Of WiUiaiB Gtmi «•- 
ecuted A, D, 1708, ibid, J39J,'*-Of RvM 




THE STATE TRIALS. 



I7d 



exficnted A.B, t713, 15 vok. 7S0.--Of 
iUtfmr, Loffi Baimerino, executed A. D. 1746, 
§m bemg coBeeraed ia ihe Rebetlioa of 1746, 
im rol. 523.-^f SimoB Fraser, Lord Lovat, 
MDKBtod A.D. 1747, ibid. a54.--Of William, 
Atfl of Kilmariioek, executed A.D. 1747, 
Mi. 517.*rOf Mary Blaady, executed A. D. 
ir53» for die Murderof her Fati^, ibid. 1102. 
«t-ef Johi» Baibot, exeooted A. D. 1763, in 
Ae Island of {ftcChiislopher, for MuTder, ibid. 
1321 .--^f Jaines Stewart, executed in Scot- 
fand for Murder, A. D. 1762, 19 vol. 254.— 
Of J}t, Archibald Cameron, executed A D. 
%fS9f 3Md» 744. — Of Xames Aitken, executed 
JUI>- 1777 for setting Fire to the Fortsmoi^ 
Hock Yard, 20 vol. 1368.~^f David Mac- 
hine, executed A. D. 1797, 26 vol. 827.— Of* 
lames O'Coiglyy executed A.D. 1798, 27 vol. 
2M 

EAST-INDJA COMPANY. 

The Great Case of Monopolies between the 
laat India Company and Thomas Sandys, 
vespecting the validity of the Company's 
Charter ror the exclusive Privilege of trading 
to India, 10 vol. 371. — Mr. Holt*s Argument 
for the Company, ibid. lb.«!— Sir Geoi-ge Treby's 
Atjpxment for Mr. Sandys, ibid. 383* — Argu- 
jaent of Solicitor General r inch for tlie Com- 
pany^ ibid. 405. — Mr. PoUexfen's Argument 
iot Mr. Sandys, ibid. 414.— Sir Eobert Saw- 

Sr's Argument for the Company, ibid. 457. — 
r. Wniiam^'s Argument for Mr. Sandys, 
ibid. 495. — ^Tbe Court give Judgment for the 
Company, ibid. 516. — Qiief Justice Jefferies's 
Argument on giving his Judgment, ibid. 519. 
f— Roger Nortlrs Notice of this Case, ibid. ib. 
(note). — Remarks upon it from Anderson's 
''History of Commerce," ibid. 374 (note). — 
Discussion whether the East India Company 
ire entitled to send and receive Ambassadors, 
20 vol. 1119. 

ECCLESIASTICAL COMMISSIONS. 

Act of Parliament in the Reign of Queen 
Elizabeth, empowering the Crown to issue 
Ecclesiastical Como^issions, 11 vol. 1123. — 
Form of such a Commission issued by Queen 
Elizabeth, ibid. 1139.— Stat. 16 Car. 1, c. 11, 
removing from the Crown the power of issuing 
tuch Commissions, ibid. 1141.— Ecclesiasticsd 
Commissions are one of the subjects com- 
plained of in the Petition of Grievances, pre- 
sented to James the First in 1610, 2 vol. 522. 
—The Ecclesiastical Commission issued by 
James the Second, 11 vol. 1143.— Sir Robert 
Adnms'ji Argument against it, ibid. 1 1 48 (note). 
•— litis Commission exercised a Jurisdiction 
la Causes Matrimonial, ibid. 1144 (note). — 
Jtoger Coke's Remark on the inconsisteticy of 
1B^ form of this Commissions 12 vol. 26 (note). 

ECCI-ESIASTICAL COURTS. 

. Mr. Emlyn S9grs, ihctt the sttperiority of the 
BiflMh l^ doe$ not QOMist in the exeeUence 



xxiv.— Mr. Jufttice Potter's R^nMoia lOn the 
respective Authoiity of the Eeclesiastkad and 
Temporad Courts, 2 vol. 157 <note).-~^Sir 
Robert Atkyns's Discourse concening Ecde- 
siastical Jiuriadictio& in Eogkad, 11 toI. 1148 
(note).— Discussion whether a eentenceol Jac« 
titation in the Ecclesiastical Court is a con- 
clusive Aoftwer to a (Hsniaal Charge founded 
upon the validi^ of the Marriage svhich is 
the subject of such Sentence, and whether the 
e^Qt of such Sentence may not be avoided 
by proving it to have been procured by fraud, 
20 vol. 391. — Opinion of ^ Judges in the 
negative upon the first Question, am in the 
affirmative upon the Second, ibid. 537 (note). 
— Opinions of the Judges in 1637^ thuX Pcoceas 
may issue from the Ecclesiastical Courts in the 
name^ of the Bishops, and that a Patent under 
the Gr/&at Seal ia not veeessary for holding such 
Courts, 3 vol, 714, 

ElKON BASILIKE* 
Remarks upon it, 4 vol. 1154. 

ELECTIONS. 

The merits of Election9 are determinable in 
Parliament^ though the Writs of Election are, 
by Stat. 7 Hen. 4, returnable in Chanceiy, 2 
vol, 1 04 .-— Argument of Chief Justjkie North 
that the Sheriff presides as Judge as to declar- 
inj; the majority at an Election for Members 
of Parliament, 6 vol. 1096. — The Speaker's 
Account of the different Statutes relating to 
the Return of Members at Elections, in the 
Debate in the House of Commons on the Case 
of Ashley and White, 14 vol. 703. — ^Instances 
of summary Proceedings adopted by the House 
of Commons against persons misconducting 
themselves at Elections, ibid. 711 (note), — 
Debates in the House of Commons in the Case 
of Ashby and White, upon the Question 
whether an Action at Law lies by an Elector 
whose Vote has been refused at an Election, 
ibid. 696. — Sir Thomas Powis's Argument for 
the negative, ibid. 712.— Statement of the 
Reasons upon which ^e House of Lprds 
decided in the Affirmative, ibid. 781. —Argu- 
ment that the House of Commons has an 
original and exclusive right to determine all 
matters relating to the Election of their own 
members, ibid. 733.-*Strong Argument against 
this Doctrine, arising from the different nature 
of the Rights of the Electors and Elected, 
ibid. 792. — Resolutions of the House of Com- 
mons, on occasion of the Case of Ashby and 
White, asserting this right, ibid. 776.— By 
Stat. 7 and 8 WiU. 3, c. 7, if any person shall 
return a Member to serve in Parliament eon-« 
trary to the last determination of the House 
of Commons of the Right of Election in the 
place for which the . Return is made, it is a 
ialse Return, ibid. 781 (note).— The respectire 
rights of Election in Counties and Boroughs 
exphiined,. ibid. 782.— Every Freeholder has 
an original and fundamental right, which is 

Sart of his Freehold^ to vote at Elections for 
Lmghta of die Skm, ibidt ib»— Of the OnfiHk 



im 



GENERAL INDEX TO 



[IfisoBuL 



and Nature of the right of Boroughs to elect 
Members to senre in Fariiament, ibid, ib^ — Ii^ 
ancient Boroughs whose Lands are held in 
Burgage, the Burgesses have a real right an* 
sexed to their estates to send Members to Far- 
liamenty and in those Cities and Boroughs 
that have a right to elect Representatives by 
prescription, or Charter, it is a. personal right 
annexed to the body politic, or Corporation, 
ibid. ib. 
ELEVEN MEMBERS.— See HoUU, Jkrml 

^iiBARGOES. 
Mr. Hargraye's Reasons why the King's 
Prerogative of laying Embargoes should not 
be restricted to time of War, Harg. Pref. 1 vol. 
lii. — Sir John Davis's Remarks on the Pre- 
rogative of layitig Embargoes, in his Argu- 
ment in the Great Case of Impositions, 2 vol. 402. 

ENGLISHlttE. 

Meaning and Origin of the Law so called, 
explained by Lord Holt on delivering the 
Judgment of the Court in Mawgridge's Case, 
17 vol. 60, 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE. 

Specimen of the elegance of the English 
Laneuage in the Reign of Richard the Second, 
1 vol. 131.— When Criminal Proceedings were 
in Latio, the Indictment was read to the 
Prisoner in Eoglish before he pleaded, 6 vol. 
132 and (note). 

ENTRIES. 

Entnr of Venire and Postea on the Record 
of the Proceedings on the TVial of Thomas de 
Berkele for the Murder of Edward the Second, 
1 yol. 56. — Entry of the impannelling a Jury 
of Matrons to inspect a Woman in a Case of 
Divorce, 2 vol. 802. 

EQUIVOCATION. 

Remarks on the Popish Doctrine of the 
lawfulness of Equivocation, 7 vol. 545. — 
Opinions of several eminent Catholic Divines 
on the subject, ibid. 557. 

ERASTLA.NS. 

Account of the Founder of the Sect so call- 
ed, and of his Opinions, 10 vol. 871 (note). 

ERROR. 
The Errors assigned in Parliament in the Re- 
cord of the Proceedings against Thomas, Earl 
of Lancaster for High Treason, in the reign 
of Edward the Second, were that he was not 
arraigned, and that he was not tried by his 
Peers, 1 vol. 45.— If there be Error in Proceed- 
ings on the Trial of a Peer in Parliament 
for Treason, the Judgment may be reversed 
by a Writ of Error in the Court of King's 
Bench, per Whitlocke, J. in Sir John Elliott's 
Case, 3 vol. 308.— It was said by Lord Chief 
Justice North that the principal use of Writs of 
Error was to preyent any change of the Law, 
6 yol. 1094. — ^A Writ of &ror does not lie upon 
the refusal of a Habeas Corpus, 14 vol. 848.— 
BeioWed by Tea Judgei out of Twelve, that a 



Writ of Error, returnable in Parliame&t, oogU 
to be granted by the Crown of right and not ol 
fayour, ibid. 861 (note).— Since that Resoluticm 
it ought not to be denied in any Case undei 
Treason and Felony, where there is probable 
Error, of which Uie Attorney General is to jadge 
before he grants his Fiat, 19 vol. 1099. — Mr. 
Hargrave's Statement of the result of the 
authorities on the subject of Writs of Error in 
criminal Cases, ibid. 1136 (note). 

ESCAPE. 

Distinction between an Escape and Breach 
of Prison, 3 vol. 293. — ^It is an Offence by Law 
for . a person to depart from Prison with the 
^Gaoler's Licence, ibid. ib. — ^It is an Escape to 
bring a Prisoner in Execution out of the Kolea 
of a Prison, though it be done by an Order of 
the Court in order that he may give his Bti* 
dence, 7 yol. 1201, 10 yol. 1081. 

EVIDENCE. See WUnm. 

In the Case of Sir Nicholas Throckmorton, 
the Evidence of a person convicted of Treason 
was admitted for the Prosecution, though ob- 
jected to by the Prisoner, 1 yol. 880. — A per- 
son confessing Treason, but not attainted, held 
to be a sufficient Witness to prove Treason 
against others, Duke of Norfolk's Case, ibid. 
1023.— Evidence on oath of the Testimony of 
an absent person on a former occasion allowed 
against a Prisoner on his Trial for Felony, 
Udairs Case, ibid. 1283. — ^An Examination 
not signed by the party examined, but attested 
by others, allowed to be Evidence against a 
Prisoner on his Trial for Treason, Sir Walter 
Raleigh's Case, 2 vol. 15. — It was resolved by 
all the Judges in Lord Castlehaven's Case,' 
that a Wife may be a Witness against hec 
Husband to prove his aiding and abetting the 
commission of a Rape upon herself, 3 toL 
402. — In a Prosecution on the Statute ol 
Henry the Seventh, for forcibW marrying 
Wpman of Substance, the Wife may gii 
evidence of the facts against her Husban< 
even though she afterwards acquiesced in tl 
Marriage, Swendsen's Case, 14 yoL 575.- 
Opinion of the Court of Exchequer in Ireli 
in the Case of Annesley v. Lord AngU 
that a Wife may give evidence as to her Hi 
band's credibility upon his Oath, but not 
points affecting his property, 17 yol. 1376. 
By the Law of Scotland, a Wife cannot in 
Case be a Witness for or against her Husband 
18 vol. 580 (note).— It was resolved by all 
Judges in Lord Morley's Case, that De^ 
sitions taken upon a Coroner's Inquisitioi 
upon proof of the death of the Witnt 
and oath made by the Coroner that the De] 
sitions are unaltered, or upon proof that 
Witnesses are withdrawn by the procuremel 
of the Prisoner, are admissible in Evidence ~ 
the Prosecution on a Trial for Murden 6 1. 
776.— On the Trial of Harrison for nfurdf 
before Lord Holt, the Deposition of a Whm 
before the Coroner was admitted' in £yid< 

for the Crowsi on reasonable proof being i 



Commm.] 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



181 



dial the Witness badbMQ k«pt out of the way 
.^the Prisoner, 12 vol. 851. See also ibid. 
jS52 (note), and some discussion on this sub- 
ject in Sir John Fenwick's Casey 13 vol. 591. 
— In a criminal Case, where a Paper is proved 
to come from the Custody of the Prisoner, it 
my be read in Evidence against him without 
proof of his hand-writing. Layer's Case, 16 
f ol. 206. — Remarks upon the degree of caution 
with which Evidence of Hand-writing should 
he received by Juries in criminal Cases, 21 
▼ol. 779.— Evidence to belief is sufficient to 
prove Hand-writing, Layer's Case, 16 vol< 205. 
—Evidence of hand-writing by a comparison 
of hands is inadmissible, 9 vol. 864 (note). — 
Discussion on this subject i|i the Case of the 
Seven Bishops, 12 vol. 296. — Summary of the 
Cases and the Law upon this Subject by Mr. 
Wynne, in his Speech m Defence of Bishop At- 
teriiury, 16 vol. 546.-- >Lord Chancellor Eldon's 
Remarks on the mode of proving hand-writing 
in the Case of Eagleton v. lUngston, ibid. 
3(M» (note)^ — ^Mr. Serjeant Peake's suggestion 
as to the reason of the Rule respecting the 
proof of hand-writing, ibid. 306 (note). — 
Lord Chief Justice North says in CoUedge's 
Case, that the^ effect of the evidence in a 
criminal Trial is matter of Law for the Court, 
and that the truth of the evidence is matter 
of Fact for the Jury, 8 vol. 710.— Judge 
Jenkins says, that examinations in Court, not 
upon' Oath, are merely communications, and 
not Evidence, 4 vol. 932. — Evidence of the 
general bad Character of the Defendant ad- 
mitted for the Prosecution on the Trial of 
Major Faulconer for Perjury during the Com^- 
monwealthy 5 vol. 354. — Mr. Justice Foster's 
Bemarks on the reasonableness of the Rule, 
that in criminal Trials no evidence should be 
allowed which is foreign to the point in Issue, 
ibid. 978 (note).— On the Trial of Count 
Coningsmark and others for Murder, Chief 
Justice Pemberton would not admit in evi- 
dence the Examination of one of the Prisoners 
before a Magistrate, because it implicated the 
others, 9 vol. 23.-«On the Trial of Lord Grey 
de Werk and others for a Conspiracy to de- 
bauch Lady Henrietta Berkeley, the Lady was 
admitted as a good Witness for the Defend- 
ants, ibid. 173. — Before evidence of any thing 
done on a Trial can be admitted, the Record 
of the Trial must be produced, 10 vol. 1163. 
—Chief Justice Jefferies held, on the Trial of 
Gates for Perjury, that the Journals of the 
House of Commons were not Evidence, be- 
cause that House cannot administer an Oath,, 
and the Journals are not a Record, ibid, ib.-r- 
But ip Lord George Gordon's Trial for Trea^ 
ion before Lord Mansfield, sworn copies of 
the Journals of the House of Commons were 
admitted in evidence, 21 vol. 650, — The 
printed Journals of the Houses of Parliament 
are not Evidence, and only examined copies 
are admissible, 29 vol. 685. — Instances in 
which the Journals of Parliament have been 

!iTen in evidence, 7 vol. 1408, 12 vol. 376.— 
t is PQt • general Rule that copies of no 



Documents but Records are admissible in 
Evidence, if the Originals exist, 21. vol. 650 
(note). — ^The correct principle appears to be, 
that wherever an Original is of a public nature, 
and would be evidence if produced, an inmie« 
diate sworn Copy thereof will be Evidence, 
ibid. 651 (note). — See Lord Erskine's Opinion 
on this subject, on Lord Melville's Trial, 29 
vol. 695. — Chief Justice Jefferies refused to 
hear a Witness who was called to prove that 
he had perjured himself on a former occasion, 
10 vol. 1185w— On the Trial of Elizabeth Can- 
ning for Perjury, Mr. Baton Legge refused to 
admit such Evidence, 19 vol. 632. — In former 
times. Evidence of particular acts of miscon* 
duct by Witnesses was admitted for the pur- 
pose of discrediting them, 7 vol. 1459, 1478, 
1485.— The maxim of the Civil Law respecting 
this practice, ibid. 1484. — ^Instance in modem 
times of Evidence in support of the Character 
of a Witness being admitted for the purpose 
of establishing his credibili^r» Murphy^s Case, 
19 voU 724. — ^Probable Evidence is sufficient 
to authorize a Grand Jury to find a Bill, 13 
vol. 455. — Original Orders and Rules of Court, 
containing the names of theCounsel who moved 
them, held to be good Evidence to prove that 
that particular Counsel was, at the time they 
were moved, at the place where the Court 
then sat. 18 vol. 177.— ^Doubts resnecting the 
infallibility of circumstantial Evidence, and 
its value in comparison with positive Testi- 
mony, 19 vol. 73 (note).— Selling a libel by 
a servant in a shop is presumptive Evidence 
of a publication by the Master, 20 vol. 838, 
839. — ^It was held by a majority of the Court 
on Hardy's Trial, that a Letter written by a 
party to a Conspiracy, and rdating to it, is 
admissible in evidence to show the nature and 
object of the Conspiracy against a person 
charged with being concerned in it, 24 vo1« 
473i— In all Cases of general Conspiracy, 
where many Agents are employed, the acts of 
the Agents may be given in evidence against 
a party to the Conspiracy, in order to show 
its nature and objects, per Eyre, C. J. in 
Home Tooke's Case, 25 vol. 127. — On a Pro- 
secution for High Treason in sending intelli- 
gence to an Enemy, a Letter sent by one Con« 
spirator in pursuance ol the common design 
is Evidence against all engaged in the same 
Conspiracy, Stone's Case, ibid. 1268,^ ibid. 
1277 (note).— The fact that one of several 
parties to a Conspiracy brings a Paper to a 
Printer to be printed, is Evidence against other 
parties to the same Conspiracy to prove a cir- 
cumstance in the Conspiracy, but not to affect 
the latter criminally with the publication of 
the Paper, Hardy's Case, 24 vol. 438.«-*It was 
doubted by the Court in Watson's Case« 
whether Papers found in the possession of a 
party to a treasonable Conspiracy might not 
be given in Evidence against aperson charged 
with participating in it^ in order to show the 
object of the* Conspiracyi without express Evi- 
dence that the Papers were to be used in 
furthenMAce of the desi^i di vol dGO^-^By 



1st 



^ENEllAX INDEX TO 



fKflMIU» 



Hhe Cvni Law, tlie Cofrpiis ]>elicti mnst be 
proved by positive testimony before Evidence 
can be adfoutted to ascertain the Offender, 14 
▼oL 1229, 1246. — ^Discassion of this subject 
on die Trial of Captain Green and others in 
Scotland for Piracy and Murder, ibid. tK--^ 
Declarations or ConYersations of a Defendaxtt 
npoil a speculative subject, connected with 
criminal acts charged against hhn, are Evidence 
to show thai h» general Opinions upon that 
subject are inconsistent with a criminal inten- 
tion in the particular acts upon which the 
Charge is founded, Hardy's Case, 24 vol. 
1094.— There is no Rule of Law that in Cases 
of Treason the Overt Act tttust be proved by 
two Witnesses before evidence of a uonfession 
Is admissible, Crossfield's Case, 26 vol. 57.--^ 
In an Action for a Libel in a weekly Paper, 
Evidence of the publication of the same Paper 
to* other parties and at other times than those 
Btated in the DecYwration is admissible to show 
that the Ltbel was pubtisbed deliberately and 
in the ordinary course of business, and not 
accidentally, or by mistiifl^e, Plnnkett tr. Cob- 
bett, 29 vol. 69 (note)<-^Probable Evidence of 
the destruction of a written document h suf^ 
ficient to let in secondary Evidence of its cofr- 
tents. Justice Johneon's Case, ibid. 437.— On 
Franeia's Case for Treason^ where one of the 
Overt Acts charged tras the vrriting certain 
Letters, the contents of which were not set 
out in the Indictment, an Objection by the 
Prisoner to the admissibility of the Letters in 
Evidence was overruled, 15 vol. 931 ^-^In 
Watson*s Case, Evklence of seditious Speeches 
by the Prisoner was admitted for the Prosecu- 
tion, though they were not set out in the Ih" 
dictmeitt, 32 vol. 87. — In a Case of Treason, 
where the Prisoner was proved to have taken 
a portion of certain printed Placards from a 
Printer, it was held that all of thefn were 
Duplicate Originals, and therefore, that a Copy 
remaining with the Printer might be read in 
Evidence for the Prosecution, to show the Pri- 
soner's knowledge of their contents, withoat 
a .Ndtice to the Prisoner to produce the por- 
tion taken away by him, Watson's Case, ibid. 
86.— The existence of Peace or War between 
England and a foi^ign Country is matter of 
notoriety, and need not be expressly proved. 
Lord George Gordon's Case, 22 vol. 230.— See 
- also what is said as to this by Lord Ellenboroue fa, 
in Peltier's Case, 29 vol. 616.—- Discussion whe- 
ther the receipt of a Letter in the County of Mid* 
dlesex, in the hand-writing of the Defendant, 
and bearing the Dublin Post-mark, is suffi-i 
cient Evidence to charge the Defendant vnth a 
Publication of the Letter in Middlesex without 
proof of its actual transmission from Dublin, 
Judge Johnson's Case, ibid. 448.— Sir Samuel 
RomiUy's statement of the presumptions which 
the law makes, in civil cases> against a partv 
to a Suit who has destroyed Evidence, ibid'. 
119d.-^LaWs of a ibreigu Countty milst be 
proved by an authenticated Copy of them, 30 
v«l. 49t.-Bookt of History ire, in some 
CAses, ftdmiliible la Etidenoe^ ibid. 4^t)^The 



Rntes of Evideitee aW Ithe stnie in erii^tiid 
and in civil Cases, 25 Vol. 1314, 29 vol. 7d4. 
— Instance of a Declaration of a dying penmt 
being received hi evidence, vrithout previous 
Evicknce that the party examined was ifi im- 
mediate apprehension of death, 6 vol. 1325. — 
The principle upon which the Declarations of 
dying persons are atdmiesibfe va Evidence in 
Cases of Murder, 15 vol. 24 (note). — It is a 
question for the Court, and not for the Jury, 
whether the patty whose dying Declamtion is 
offered in Evidence, was conscious of fans im- 
mediate danger at the time he made it, ibid. 
25 (note). — Remarks on the admissibility of 
Evidence of the Declarations of dying persons 
by the law of Sc(4land, ibid. 27 (note}.-*Tbe 
London Gaxette is evidence of all acts of State, 
and the production of it is sufficient to prove 
an Averment} in na Infornialion, that ceHaia 
Addresses have been presented to the Kingj 
because being received by the King in Im 
puUio capacity, they become Acta of -State, 
Holt's Case, 21 vol- 1218 (note).-— Notice in 
the Gaiette of the ratification of Treaties of 
Peace with a foreign Country, held to be 
evidence of the existence of Peace with that 
Country, Quekh's Case, 14 vq). 1084. 

EXAMINATION OF WETNESSES. ---Set 
Witneiij Crim^Examkiation. 

EXAMINATIONS. See ^vid^noe; 
DqfoiUiont, 

An Examination not signed by the party 
examined, but attested by others, allowed in 
Sir Walter Raleigh's Case to be Evidence 
against a third person, on his Trial for High 
Treason, 2 vol. 15. — Examinations in Law are 
upon Oath, and if made in Court not upon 
Oath, are merely Communications, and not 
Evidence^ 4 vol. 932.^-Hume's Account of the 
Precognitions or Examinations taken previously 
to Trial, by the law of Scotland, 10 vol. 783 
(note)d — Examinations before a Coroner, or 
Magistrate, may be admitted in Evidence 
against a Prisoner if the Witnesses be dead) 
or withdrawn by the procurement of the Pri- 
soner, 6 Vol. 776. See also 12 vol. 852, and 
(note), and 13 vol. 593. — Discussion in Sir 
Johti Fenwick's Case, respecting the admissi<* 
bility in Evidence against a Prisoner, of Ez^ 
aminations taken in his absence before a Ma* 
gistrate,13 vol. 591. — A Prisoner is not entitled 
to demand copies of the Examinations before 
the committing Magistrates, either in Cases of 
Felony or Misdemeanour, 31 vd. 574. 

EXCEPTIONS. See BiU of EtapHm. 

Mr. Emlyn's Reason why Defendants m 
Crimiual Cases ought not to be deprived of 
the opportunity of making even captions Ex- 
ceptions, 1 vol.xxxi. — Exceptions to an Indki- 
ment cannot be taken after the Jury are sworoi 
IS vol. 161. 

EXCHEQUER, C*OURT OF. 
Reference to Treatises at ^e<;ottrt of £r« 



OtmnamJ 



THE STATE TRIALS. 



183 



diequer, 14yol. 37.-**^Loid Chief Justice Treby^s 
Aigiiment in the Backers' Case, respecting Uie 
power of the. Barons of the Court of Exchequer 
.10 dispose of pr to control the Kin^s Revenue, 
•ibid; 23.— Lord Somers's celebrated Argument 
«pon this Subject, in the same Case, ibid. 46. 
—Lord- Jiolt's Argument, in the same Case, 
Hhat the Court of Augmentations was not in- 
'^orporated with the Court of Exchequer, ibid. 
36. — ^Lord Somers's Argument to the Contrary, 
ibid. 8i>.-*Lord Somen maintains that the 
Barons are subordinate Officers of the Court of 
Exchequer, ibid« 64. 

£XCH£QU£IUCHAMB£B, COURT OF. 

Opinion of the Majority- of the Judges in the 
Bankers' Case, that in the Court of Exchequer- 
Chamber, erected by Stat. 31 £dw. 3, c. 12, to 
determiDe Writs of Error from the Common - 
Law side of the Court of Exchequer, the Lord 
Keeper, or Lord Chancellor, may give Judg- 
fiieet according to his own Opinion, though it 
differs Drom that oi the majority of the Judges, 
H Yol. 105. 

EXCOMMUNICATION. 

The practice of the Eoclesiastical Courts in 
pronouncing Sentence of Excommunication 
upon ininute Offences, animadrerted upon by 
Mr. Emlyn, 1 vol. xxt. — Discussion respect- 
ing Excommunication in Ecclesiastical Courts 
at the Hampton Court Conference, 2 vol. 72. — 
Donald Cargili's Excommunicatiolk of Charles 
the Second, and other enemies of th