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Full text of "Addresses, membership roll; semi-annual meeting .."

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ADDRESSES 


MEMBERSHIP ROLL 



SEMI-ANNUAL MEETING 

OCTOBER TWENTY-FIFTH 

1919 



BERGEN COUNTY 
HISTORICAL SOCIETY 






Gift 



The Bergen County Historical Society 

SEMl-AXXrAL MEETING 

Assonhhi noon>. John^o), I'lihllr Lihnirn liiilldlniJ 

II(i(:k( iisdcl-, N<ir Jo'SfiJ 

SATlTxDAY EVENING. 0(-r01>>ER 2r,. 191!) 

at 8 o'clock 

rh'OflRAM 

, , , f u' /,.,,,,,, Lewis Marsona U\\\vv 

Tirporl of Mrndxrship CnnmUlce. . . A:.ornv\uxs \. H. Bogert 



Cliiiiiinan 



, .,7, 'i\-rn<in-<r Tlu'odore Roinaiiu' 

,, . ... The Glee ClvJ) 

Mnyw 

4./r//rx,s--L.r./ llislnn, in Ihf Making". . .Mr. Reid Howell 

"' B.-rpen County Board of Frecholdors 

,, . The Glee Club 

Miisic 

,[,j^j,.,ss—^'So,n( Achifvnnfnts of Camp Mfrrili" 

Major F. G. Landon 

Morale Officer, Cam]) Merritt 

.UUInss-"Tln Camp M<rriii Memorial". .Mr.W. II. Roberts 

' Berjren County Board of Freeholders 

l,/,//.,,s'— "77/r Aim>^ of Our Association" 

Dr. Herman II. Home 

Professor of the History of Edueation, 
Ni'W York University 

Final ynmlxr—TlK Social Half Hour 

All IMemhers and Guests 



THE PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 

On Saturday evening, April 26th, 1919, the Seventeenth 
Annual Meeting of the liergen County Historical Society was 
held in this room. 

This evening, six months later, occurs our first Semi- 
Annual Meeting, and I want to tell you of the pleasure it 
gives me to greet so many of my fellow members and the 
assurance it gives of increasing' interest in the work and in 
the purpose for which this Society is organized. 

At a recent meeting of the Executive Committee it was 
resolved that in addition to our regular annual meeting in 
April, as re(|uired by our constitution, at which we hear 
reports of standing committees and elect otficers for the 
ensuing year, a "get together" meeting shall be held here 
in October of each year. 

Also, one each month November to March inclusive at 
such places in the county where suitable arrangements can 
be made by the local Vice-President and sufficient interest 
manifested by the resident members. 

In this mauner it is hoped that the purposes of the 
Society will become more widely known, its membership roll 
broadened, and correspondingly its ability to carry forward 
the purposes for which the Society is organized. Its pro- 
moters had lofty ideals, and not all have yet been realized. I 
wonder how many members know that the Bergen County 
Historical Society stands for: 

The intellectual cultivation and development of its mem- 
bers. 

To make researches into historical facts, and collect data 

relating thereto. 

To suitably mark bv monu)nent or tablet historic sites, 
to preserve them from oblivion. 

To collect and preserve genealogical records and family 

traditions. 

To foster National. State, Local and Family i)ride. 

To cultivate throughout the county a spirit of Patriotism, 
which is love of country, respect for its laws and aid to up- 
liold tlieni. 

AVe have various standing committees whose duty it is to 
aid specifically in fulfilling the duties itnposed by this declara- 
tion of in-ineiplcs. 

In March, 1902. seventeen gentlemen met in the Johnson 
Public Library Building and on the 26th of that month the 
Px'rgen County Historical Society was organized and a con- 
stitution adopted. 



f) Ti< r<i< n CoiDiti/ 1/ isliiricdl Sociili/ 

111 February, 1907, the Society was incorporated under 
an act of the New Jersey Legislature entitled "An Act to 
Incorporate Associations not for pecuniary profit." 

ill clii-oiioioij'ical order the Executives of the Society have 

l)eell : 

lion. William M. Johnson, Ilaekeiisack, l!»02-0;5. 

.Mr. Cornelius Christie, Leonia, 190:5-04. 

Ml'. T. X. (dover, Rutherford, 1904-0;'). 

Hon. Cornelius Doreiiius, Ridgewood, 190")-0l). 

Mv. Burton IL Allbee, Paterson, 1906-07. 

\)r. l')yron G. \'an Ilorne, Englewood, 1907-08. 

<■()]. W. I). Snow, Ilackensack. 1908-09. 

lion. David 1). Zabriskie. Ridgewood, 1909-10. 

Mr. Everett L. Zabriskie, Ridgewood, 1910-11. 

Mr. Howard 11 Goetschius, Little Ferry, 1 ill 1-12. 

Mr. :\ratt J. Bogert, Demarest, 1912-13. 

Mr. Piohert T. Wilson, Saddle River. 1913-14. 

Mis. Frances A. Westervelt, Hackensack, 1914-16 

Mr. Cornelius V. R. Bogert, Boaota, 1916-18. 

.Mr. Artliur Van liuskirk. Ilackensack, 1918-19. 

Mr. Lewis Marsena Miller, Leonia, 1919-20. 

'Pile steady though not rapid growth of the Society and 
the many objects of historic Intercast now in our museum 
1es1if\- to the ability and conservatism with which the atfairs 
of the Society have lieeii conducted. 

At the (late of our las! annual meeting. April 26th, our 
iiieiid)erslii|) roll numbered one hundred and forty-five, it 
now iiumbeis three hundred and seventy-eight. It is gratify- 
ing to have this evid(Mice of awakened public interest in the 
p'ans and purposes of the Society. 

I'o thes(> iu>w members, all and singly, I extend on be- 
half of the Society a cordial welcome and an e(|ually cordial 
iii\ilatioii to take an active part in its work. 1 ask that each 
will look o\'er the list of standing committees and let me 
Iniow ill wliieli line of work you can feel the liveliest interest. 
I will SIT that opportunity soon knocks at your door. 

I want to call attention to one of the principal objects of 
the Society which should receive more attention than has been 
possible with the limited imnins available. 1 refer to the 
many [xiinls of historic interest which have not been marked 
by commemorative monuments or tablets. The records of 
the Society are not complete in this particular and 1 wish 
i'vriy member of the Society would liecoiiK^ a committee of 
lie to si'ck out such places, verify their claims and then re- 
port tliesr to me for action by the "Historic Sites and 
Invents" " committee. 



Tin I'lu si<l( itTs A(l<lr(S>i 7 

TluM'e arc few, if any counties in the I'liitcd States so 
rich in scenes and events connected with the early history of 
our country. I>eriien County has been making history and 
contributino- to the wonderful develoi)uient of tlu^ Nation all 
along through the years that have passed since the first 
settlers came. But during the past two yeai's there has been 
a great work carried on here, undoubtedly the most im])Oi'- 
laiil ill the history of the county, important not only 1o ns 
but to the whole Nation. 

From Camp Merritt, here in Bersen County, nearly one- 
Ihird of all the men sent overseas received their final training 
and e(|uipment and embarked, mostly from Alpine, to go 
"over there" and helj) "make the world a decent place to 
live in." And how nobly they did it! Not all who went 
have come back, some will never come, but more than five 
hundred thousand returned soldiers, covered with glory, 
have been received and cared for at (^imp Merritt until ready 
1o go to the demobilization camp nearest their home towns. 

11 is the duty of Bergen County to see to it that the site 
of Camp ^lerritt is marked by anoble and imi)ressive Mt^mo- 
rial which shall commemorate the wondei'ful work carried for- 
ward and accomplislied in so short a time. 

This is an ambitious enteri)rise for the liergen ( 'ounty 
Historical Society, 1)ut in line with its duty and we were 
not afraid to undertake it. And what is more important, with 
the earnest co-operation of the l')Oard of Chosen Freeholders 
;ind of the Camp authorities the l)uilding of this Memorial, 
costing one liundred thousand dollars, and ])ossil)ly more, will 
be accomi)lished. 

IMajor Sullivan, the Executive Officei" of (*amp ]\[erritt, 
who is taking Major Landon's place in this program, will 
tell you of the wonderful woi'k that has been cari-ied on here 
in Bergen County and of which we necessarily could know so 
little until the ban on publicity Avas recently removed. 

Mr. Roberts, the Director of the Board of Chosen F'ree- 
hohU'rs, will tell you of the woi'k of the Camp ^Nferi-itt 'Mvm- 
oi-ial Association since its organization. 

The ('amp JMeri'itt IMemorial will not only mark the 
site and commemorate the achievements of that camp, but it 
will stand as testimony to the activity of the Bergen Comity 
Historical Society in fultilling its obligations to l>ei'gen 
Count V. 



8 Pk rr/rn Co}iniii Ifisfon'cal Snclrft/ 

I have referred to the ambition and the duty 
of this Society in connection with the Camp Merritt Me- 
morial. T regret that this movement did not originate here, 
but Major P^rancis G. Landon, llie i\Iorale Otficer of Camp 
Merritt, is the father of th(^ i(h'a and an efficient co-woi-k<'r 
in its accomplishment. It is proper that the records of this 
Society sliould tell its liistory fi'om the bejiinning, and the 
l)pgiiniiiig is shown in the following coi'i'espondence : 



HEADQUARTERS 
CAMP MERRITT, NEW JERSEY. 

Morale Office 
June 17, ID 10 

Mv. Thcodoi'c Romaine, Secretary 
Tlu' IJt'rgcn County Historical Society 
158 Main Street 
Ilackensack, N. J. 
1 ),..,)• Sir:— 

Thr Camp Merritt newspaper. The Merritt Dispatch, in its 
M(Miioi-ial Day number, suggested the idea of erecting a Monu- 
ment to indicate for all tinu^ the place where Camp Merritt 
stood. 

We ai'e looking into the matter as regards the title of a bit 
of land for such purpose, its cost, etc. The question arises 
to whom could we turn over its care and upkeep, and the 
Ihoughl was that the Bergen County Historical Society might 
be willing and interested enough in the idea to help solve this 
])i'()I)l(Mn. 

Will you l)c kind enough to let me know the view of your 
Society as to llu^ suggestion. 

I am very truly yours, 

(Signed) F. d. LANDON, 

Major A. G. 
]\forale Officer. 



Tin J'f( si(J< III 's A(]<Jr(ys 



June 20, l!)ll). 
Majoi' F. G. Ijaiidoii. 
]\roralo Office!-, 
("am]) ]\I('n'it1, 
New Jersey. 
Dear Sir:— 

1 am ill reeei])t of your favor of llie ITtli iiist., wliicli T 
am referring to our Pr(\sident, Mr. Lewis M. ^filler, 112 Oak- 
1 ree Place. Leonia, New Jersey. You will doubtless hear 
from liim eillier liy letter or in person. 

Tliaiikiiii;' you foi' referring this matter to our Society, 
I am, 

Yours very truly, 
(Signed) THEODORE KOMAIXE, 

Secretary. 

Leonia, 22nd June, 1!)1!). 
I\rajor F. 0. Landon, 
:\rora]e Officer, 

("am}) ]Merritt, X. J. 
Dear Sir: 

T am today in receipt of your letter of the 17th iust. 
addressed to Mr. Romaine, the Secretary of this Society, and 
assure you that personally T am in sympathy with the idea 
of erecting a monument not only to indicate the site of Camp 
jNTerritt, but to commemorate the important work begun, ac- 
complished and finished there. 

It will be my pleasure to bring this matter before the 
Exeeulive Tommittee of this Society at Iheir first meeting. 
Very truly yours, 
(Signed) LEAVIS M. MILLER, 

President. 

At the meeting of the Executive Committee called to 
consider this matter a Special Committee Avas appointed to 
carry forward the movement, viz: 

Cornelius V. R. Bogert, Chairman. 
Dr. Byron G. Van Home, of Englewood. 
IVIr. M. J. Bogert. of Demarest. 
This Committee, with the President, appeared before 



10 Purfii }i Coiinli/ Jlisloricul S(ici(hj 

the l^oai'il of Chosen Freehoklers soliciting the co-operation 
of tlie I>oar(l and apjiointment of a committee of three to act 
will) us. wliicli iT(|uest was pi-oiii|)1 ly coiiipli(^(l with l)y the 
;!ppoiii1 meiil of 

Mr. lu'id Howell, of Rut hei-foi'd. ( 'liainiiaii. 
Mr. William II. Roberts, of Closlei-. 
Ml'. ('Iiarles I\. Allen, of Ridj^iTwood. 

This action was rej)oi'ted 1o Majoi' Laudon a1 ('amp 
Merrill, whereupon (icnei'a! Dunean, ('ommandani of th' 
( "amp. appointed 

Ma.jor Francis (i. Landon, Morale ()fticei' 
Majoi- Max W. Sullivan, K.xecntive Officer 
Major Jessie I. Sloat, Chief Medical Office)' 

a committee to )•( ])!'esent the ('amp and co-opei'ate with the 
Historical Society and the IJoard of ( 'hosen Freeholders. 

These llii-(e connnittees met at tlie Officers" Chd) and 
or.uaidzed ihc Camp ^lerritt JMenmrial Association hy electing 

Cornelius \'. R. !)0o'ert. President 
William H. Roberts, ^"ice-Pl■esident 
Major Francis G. Landon, Secrtdary 

and conslituling these three officers as the Executive Com- 
mittee. 

Major-Cenei'al (jieorge 1). Duncan, Counnandant of the Post, 
.Mr. doseph Kinzle>', Jr.. Director of the Poard of Freeholders. 
Mr. Lewis M. ililler, Pi'esident of the P)ergen County His- 
torical Society, 
wen elc(de(l members of the Association. 

Subse(pien1ly the counnittce of the Histoi'ical Socie1\' 
was eidai'ged liv the appointment of ^Ir. Abram DeRonde, 
Mr. Fdmund W. Wakelee, ^Ir. Daniel E. Pomeroy, xMr. 
Dwight \V. .Morrow, Mr. J. W. P.inder. Hon. WiHiaMi :\I. 
Johnson, Mi'. William Conklin and Mi', (reorge Van I>nskirk. 
These gentlement were immediately elected to membei'ship 
of the Camp Meri'itt ^lemorial Association, which has nnder- 
takeii with the co-oi)eration of all the members of the Bergen 
Count.\ Historical Society, the constniction of a Memorial 
which shiill be noble in proportion, dignified, artistic and 
inspiriuL;. 




THE PARAMl'S (HrRCII. J3UILT ITT 



Th( Aims of Our Association 1:1 



THE AIMS OF OUR ASSOOFATION 

1?V PKOFESSOR II. II. IIORNE. NEW YORK TNIVERSITV. 

Rcsl(l< III of Lionld. 

Cai'lyle says a nation Avithout a history is a nation 
without heroes. We want to make history, and know his- 
tory that we may have heroes. American history ami Aim ri- 
can ti'aditions help make the American spirit, which in- 
spired the final effort in winning the (Jreat War. America 
sent ci'usading heroes to Europe. 

The function of an hisforial association is to he society's 
memory. Its motto might well be: "Lest We Forget!" 

At this point let me read into the record on.^ good jKira- 
iiraph, — provided nie hy our active and in-ogressive presi- 
dent, on our aims, as follows: 

The Bergen (*ounty Historical Society was organized in 
1902 and incorporated in 1907 for the intellectual cultiva- 
tion and development of its members. 

To protect and ])reserve genealogical recori's niid family 
traditions. 

To make researches into historical facts and to collect 
data relating thereto. 

To seek and suitably mark to preserve from oblivion 
historic sites and events. 

To cultivate and broaden a si)irit of Patriotism thi'ough- 
out the County. 

To foster and extend National, State, Local and Family 
l)i"ide. 

How are we to solve our ])i-oblem and be Society's 
memory for IJergen County? There are a numbei- of things 
we might well undertake, both as a society and as individual 
members. Among these T venture to note the following: 

1. Pi'esei've all war nuitei'ials. all souvenirs of the war, 
in whatsoevei" tangible foi'm. One iiuMuber of our Society, 
Mr. R. n. Greene, of Leonia, has already collected several 
hundred posters. A century from now such nuiterial will 
|)robably be rare and very valuable. 

'2. Dig. The sites of the Revolutiomiry battle i:ronnds, 
as described in Nelson's Histol•^■ of l>ergen County, might 
wtll be dug over foi' rt'lics. Other counties have been re- 
warded for such etfort. 

;». Study the publications of other historical socirtie-<!. 

for information and suggestive ideas. Exchange periodicals. 

4. Concentrate on one point for a season, like Dress, 

Diiiik. or Deportment. Urge every member to be ready to 



14 J>( >■(/' n CiiKiiti/ nisloricdl Sociffji 

contribute souicthing to the iiUM'tiiifi'. Have a talk-fent at 
th(^ meetings devoted to these points. Other topics will l)e 
mentioned later. 

."). Interview the oldest residents of each commnnily, 
and niak(^ notes on their i-ecoUect ions of men and thinus and 
folk-ways. 

(i. Keep some leadiu"' Ilistoiieal ^lagazines on fih' in \\i>' 
lihi-ai-y and let the public school teachers of the county know 
at)0u1 the society, its work, and its uniseum, and reference 
library. 

7. Pi'izes on assiuricd to|)ics for comi)Ositions by school 
childi-en should be otfered. A g'ood beginning- has ali'eady 
been nuide in the Allison prizes. 

S. Stud\- Court House records for interesting histori- 
cal matei'ial, sure to be found, concerinng laws. dee«is. wills, 
boundaries and the like. 

I). Ivuiinmige in gari'ets. An old hair trunk may re- 
veal ])recious documents and souvenirs, and the hun: iisilf 
will ])rove engaging. 

10. Write out your own reminiscences, and, if you 
have never dniu' so, begin now and keep a diai-y for one 
year at least. Report any and cverythinu coming under 
your daily observation. It will be valuable for posterity, 
and may win you a place in a footnote of the future history 
of Iiergen County. 

11. I'reserve old newspapers, old albums, and old 
photos, '.villi the luimes and dates |)Iainly iiuii'ked on each 

picture. 

V2. Keep the r( cords of the meetings of the ]>oi'ough 
Councils carefully. Some of tlie i-ecords of the early town 
nuM:'tings of this couidy are \\ilh(;ut d(ud)t well \voi-th editing 
and publishing. 

l:!. The files of the leading County papers should be 
carefully kei)t. The new building of the Society should 
have a tii'e-pi'oof va\dt foi- its most valuable ])Ossessions. 

14. Study folk-loi-e and old forms of speech. The -ler- 
sey Dutch dialect and pronunciations are uni(pn' and inter- 
esting. Old superstitions reveal the folk-soul. 

1."). Put interesting historical notes in the papei's, and 
sign Nduself a mend)er of this Society. 

IG. (iive what you can si)ai'e from your own collec- 
tion of anliijues to the museum ol' Ihe Association. Do it 
by gift now, not in your will, and gel the liviirj s;it isfact ion 
(d" kiuiwing it is done. 

17. The Association slmuld make itself well known in the 
County by its a^^gressive support of the l)ig movemenis of the 



Tlic Aims of Our Associalion 15 

day ; for example the Roosevelt ]\leinorial and the Camp 
Merritt Memorial. 

18. Investigate such topics as these in the past histoiy 
'^f the county : 

Churches Boundaries Lighting 

Home-Life Indians Heating 

Agriculture First Letters Styles 

Government Cemeteries Manners 

Newspapers and Names Transportation 

Cooking Schools Taverns 

( 'ostumes Industries Negroes 

Intoxicants Money ]\Iills 

Roads Railroads War Sites 

What suggestiveness in such place names as Fort Lee, 
Closter, Ilackensack, Saddle River, and English Neighborhood 
(old name of Leonia) ! 

And what interesting ancestral history there must be 
behind such personal names as Ackerson, Blauvelt, Brinker- 
hoff, Cosse, DeBaun, DeRonde. Doremus, Goetschius, Jelfers, 
Kelder, Linkroum, Mabon, Marinus, Parigot, Staib, Stunnn, 
Terhune, Van Buskirk, Yoorhis, Zabriskie, and all the 
"Vans/' and many others. 

If we should undertake even a portion of such a program 
as this in carrying out our aim to be Bergen County's mem- 
ory for it, how local pride would be stimulated, how the his- 
tni'ic feeling would be cultivated, how the past would live, 
how we should antagonize violent overthrow of existing insti- 
tutions, how elders and youngsters Avould be brought together 
by common interests, how county esprit de corps would be 
developed and would take possession of our many newcomers, 
how patriotism would be cultivated, and how present prob- 
lems would be understood and appreciated in the light of the 
past evolution of society ! 

There is only one question for the Association and for its 
individual members: Will AA^e Do It? 




Tiii; .\.\L)i;h I'Kisu.x iiousi:. bkkokk i;i:>tui;.\tiu-\ 




■J'llK AXDIM': I'IMSOX IlOl-.-l';, AS I'l' NOW APl'lvMi.S 



Address hji Major Max W . SaJliran 17 

ADDRESS BY MAJOR MAX W. SULLIVAN 

Executive Officer of Camp Mrrrifi 
Mr. Prrsidfuf. Ladies and Gentleme)! : 

I hope T can do justice to ^Major Laiidon, whose time I 
Mill to fill because of his illness. 

If yon will pai'don me, I wonhl mention that T arrived 
at Camp Mei-ritt abont 6:00 A.M. September 17. 1917, with 
tlie 49th Infantry from Syracuse, New York. As Adjutant 
of the Guard Regiment, later Camp Adjutant, and as Execu- 
tive Officer of the Camp for the past year, which var'ious 
capacities M'ill give you my connection with the Cam]-». 

Camp Merritt occupies an area of seven hundred seventy 
(770) acres; five hundred eighty (580) acres of that is actu- 
ally occupied in barrack buildings. Thei'e are one hundred 
ninety (190) acres left, which is occupied by warehouses, rail- 
road ai'eas and a small athletic field, setting aside for izarden 
l)ro(Uice about eighty (80) acres, which the permanent per- 
sonnel put to very good use in raising cjuantities of garden 
ti-uck for their various messes. The buildings occupied by 
troops passing overseas was eleven hundred seventy-one 
(1171 ), buildings for hospital ninety-three (93), and for wel- 
fare organization twenty-eight (28). making a total number 
of buildings twelve hundred ninety-two (1292). 

As to the capacity, which is somewhat over forty-two 
lliousand (42.000), is worthy of mention. I had occasion to 
go to Camp Dix recently, to go over their organization, and 
ill doiiiu so they told me. with a great deal of pride, that Hiey 
liad a capacity of thirty-five thousand (35,000) which was hy 
I'nr the largest camp in the country according to their own 
statements. l)eing their guest T said nothing, but for >our 
information, Camj) ]\Ierritt has barrack accommodations for 
forty thousand four hundred thirty-eight (40,438) enlisted 
men and (|uarters for two thousand twelve (2,012) officers. 

With regard to the personnel necessary to operate the 
Camp — we found it necessary as the work grew to increase 
our commissioned and enlisted strength so that at the time 
of the signing of the armistice our personnel consisted of 
appi'oximately five hundred (500) officers and seven thous- 
and (7,000) enlisted men. At present our total strenglh. 
commissioned and enlisted, is about thirty-five hundred 
(3,500). 

What we tried to do in getting the men overseas was to 
get them there as (juickly as possible with little inconvenience 
and publicity, and I believe Ave succeeded. In total, w^e sent 
ovei'seas nearlv seven hundred thousand (700,000) men. The 



is Til r(/( II Cnutilji llisloruiil Socirli/ 

izrc^atest imiiihci' s(Mit in any one iiiontli ^vas in September, 
1918, which a])i)roxiniately readied eighty-five thousand 
(85,000). On Iroops rcturninu- we have had come back to 
(bite nearly seven hundred thousand (700,000). The greatest 
nund)er in bi-iuiiing them back from overseas in oiu' month 
\vas not (|uite seventy thousand (70,000). 

It is uninteresting to go into (h'tail too much, and I do 
not want to l)m'den you with a series of figures oi- statistics. 
We li'icd various schemes in luindling the Iroops so as to 
han(]lc Ihcm as fast as jiossibh', so by process of cxpci'inicnt 
we found tlie best method was to divide tlu' camp into seven 
sections oi' districts as they were finally called. We had 
seven small camps, in other words, within the larger cam]). 
As ti-oops came in to go overseas they would be assigned a 
certain disti'ici and they left from that district for overseas, 
'{'be transient p('i'sonn(d ntn-ei' found it necessary to come 
1o cam]) h('ad(|uar1('i's as the disti-icl head(|uarters could meet 
all their wants and we were not ainioycd ])y endless or un- 
necessai-y (juestions. in receiving li'oops from overseas 1lie 
same system, in i-everse order, worked vei-y well. We had a 
i-eceiving disti-ict Avhere all troops from overseas were billeted, 
and after uoing thru 1lie Sanitary Process Plant (the de- 
lousei') they were split u)) into detachments corresponding 
1o their home cam|)s and distributed in the othei' districts 
for preparation to i»e sent home. TIk' 7th District was used 
fo)- colored troops. Tlu'y wei-e handled entirely in this dis- 
trict and kept more or less sepai'ate as nuich as possible j'l-om 
the I'est of the camp. 

[u the matte!' of sending tl'oops ovel-Seas. we wei'e fl'e- 
(piently called ii])(ni, from 31ay nj) to the signing of the 
ai-mistice, to e(|uip five thousancl (o.OOO) men in twoity-l'onr 
(24) houi-s. This meant the ivplacing of all woi'u ai'ticles of 
uniform, eiiuipment, clipping of the hair, and most tedious of 
all details was the stam])ing of identification tags, in dupli- 
cate. At times we had as iiuiny as forty men doing tins work. 
The greatest number we I'eceivd at one time to (Mpiip was 
fifteen tlHuisand (15,000). Thvy an-ived in a series of four- 
leeii ti-ains at that particular time. Especially when there 
was lai'ge convoys going out we wei-e called upon fi'e(|uenily 
lo e(|uip tivi' hundred (500) to tw^) thousand (2.000) men at 
short notice, usually fi'om eight to fifteen hours. We foinid 
it n(cessar.\- at times, oi- sevei'al times in fact, to empl.\- the 
barracks on (uie side of camp, get the troops on the road and 
start them for the raili'oad station oi" Alpine binding while 
the buildings would be refilled, as fast as em|»tied. by inccm- 
inu' t!'oops, not allowing the fires even to go out. 



A(](Jr(ss hi) Major Mux M\ Xiillivitn ID 

The (|nestion soon arose as to how we shoiihl keep track 
of these men. The scheme finally established was on indiv- 
idual 3x5 inch cards and as the status of each individual 
changed during his stay in Camp a corresponding entry had 
to be made on his i:)articular card, making changes that often 
reached ten thousand (10,000) entries per day. Every time 
a man's status changed, we M'ould change the record on his 
cai'd. To accomplish all this it was found necessaiy to an- 
swer correspondence during the day which up until very 
recently amounted to two thousand (2,000) letters a day. 
We would use the clerical forces during the day to get the 
data from these cards of men who had gone through and 
tluMi use a night force to bring the card record up to date 
as to what happened during the preceding twenty-four hours. 
Tn(|uiries from anxious mothers were answered during the 
day from data obtained from the above mentioned cards. 

For the trooi)S coming in from overseas we used the same 
process, except that the work of getting the troops segre- 
gated according to their home camps on their return was 
nnicli more in detail than getting them over. Troops for over- 
seas was only a matter of inspection and equipment, while we 
fo\iiid in hringinii them back from overseas, the men were apt 
to find fault and criticise, and we tried to satisfy everybody. 
Tn so doing, we had to go through the records of every man 
to see exactly where he should be sent and we tried to send 
them as near as possible to the camp nearest their home. He 
wouhl never be over three hundred and fifty (350) miles 
fi'otii his home upon arrival at a demobilization camp. In 
order to accomplish that, we had three shifts of eight (8) 
hours each of the permanent personnel who continued to 
work on these records during tlie stav of the individual. The 
stay of a transient Avas occupied as follows: During the first 
twenty-four (24) hours the permanent personnel inspected 
file records of the men to find out the nearest home camp, 
for example, Camp Dix for this State, or to whatever camp 
they should be assigned. Then they were moved from the 
receiving district, segregated into detachments for the camp 
nearest their respective homes. The next day was used in 
making up train rosters and the tliird day in making up the 
ti'ain and getting them oi;t. 

!^o you s»M' a man's stay at camp was seldom over sev- 
en1y-1wo (72) hours after coming back from overseas. There 
were a number of complaints about details, but upon inves- 
tigation it was found that it was not caused by a fault of 
ours. I)u1 the men themselves would often leave Camp and 
not return on time, and when an individual wouhl relui'n 



20 lit rf/t )i ('oiiiih/ Ilisloricdl Sncitfi/ 

at tt'ii-lhirly (10::)0) to makt' a Icn (lOi o'clock train lie 
would iitccssarily be held until the next train for that })ar- 
tieiilar camp was made up. soiiiel iiiies causino- the individual 
a two or three day delay. 

The matter of feetling' — at fiivst the cooks l)t4ong'in<>' to 
organizations were i'e(|uired to pi'epare the meals for their own 
organizations and we furnished them the rations and neces- 
sary kitchen ('(piipment, hut it was found tluM'c was an end- 
less waste. They would leave the kitchens hurridly some- 
times, then food was allowed to spoil. 

The School for Hakers and Cooks was established and 
the messing arrangements of the entire Camp was run under 
the supervision of one head. We had one hundi'ed and sixty- 
four (1()4) kitchens in the Camp at one time in operation 
undei- the School for Bakers and Cooks. The tires were kcj^t 
'-:oing so that men shifted fi'om one part of the Cami) to an- 
othei-, their meals wei'c never delayed. In connection with 
the School we established a course of instruction covering a 
pei'iod of two (2) months which pei-mitted us to S(Mid over- 
seas several gi'aduate cooks and bak'ei's in addition to hand- 
ling the vai'ious kitchens in cani|). For a pei'iod of six ( (i ) 
months just past thei'e was a net saving to the (lovernment 
of a little ovei- two hundi'ed thousand (200,000) dollars over 
what it would have been if oi'ganizations fed themselves. 

i^'rom the medical point of view, we found it necessary 
when troops were brought in fr(un overseas that they be put 
through a sanitar\- plant. All wornout and shrunken clothing 
was re|)Iaced with new. Prior to leasing cam}) for the camj) 
nearest their respective homes, th;' men were examined oiu' 
(1) luuir before entraining and if not round in good j)l'iy- 
sical conditi(Ui were taken out and li-ld for 111 ■ next movement. 

As to flies and mos(|uitoes, it was antici[)ated there would 
be considerable annoyance from this source, but on the con- 
trary we kept the ground free of them, and with forty thous- 
and (40,000) troops in cam]), ne\'er ha\-e I sei'ii any flies to 
any great extent. Wv have fifty ( .lO ) colored men of th. 
Saiiitar.N Detaehmeiit operating in a radius of three {'.]) 
miles of camp, cleaning out ditches, watei'-hdlcs and other 
like breeding places foi' flies and mos(piitoes. With ;. litth^ 
elTort on the ])art of the Sanitary Depart meiil the gi'oiiiids 
were kept in a clean condition. 

As to our sick rate. Camp Merritt has th" lowest sick 
rate of any eamj) in tlu' eounti-x-. ( 'oii'-idering th" nature of 
the canip, men ])assing through it in eitlcM' direction, the 
record of haviir.: the lowest sick rate in the eountr.x' is some- 
thing to remem!>er. Even during the awful hitlui'uza epi- 



A(l<lr(ss hi/ Mdjiir Mux IV. Siilllrrni 21 

deinic, and having to shift the men, our death rate during that 
time was lower than any other Military Camp in the country, 
considering the size. 

As to care, the Post Exchange is the general store by 
which we tried to meet the needs of the men during their 
stay, and to furnish them with tobacco, &c. From July, 1918, 
until Jiuie 80, 1919, there was a million dollars in sales, the 
nel pi'oflt was not (|uite one hundred thousand (100,000) 
dollars, so that no soldier could consistently complain that he 
was charged outrageously in prices. We found that the 
connnei'cial bakeries would not fix us up a pie that the men 
liked. We undertook to get a pie from the commercial bak- 
eries, but they charged us too much. We established our own 
pie bakery, it cost five thousand (5,000) dollars, and we made 
up our own pie with a thick tilling that cost us seventeen and 
one-half (17^2 ) cents and we sold it to the men for twenty 
(20) cents. 

]\Ien coming back from overseas were anxious to get out 
of their hobnail shoes. We found we could buy shoes in five 
tliousand (5,000) pair lots. We obtained them for five dollars 
and seventy cents ($5.70) and sold them to the soldiers for 
five dollars and eighty cents ($5.80). We tried to help the 
■ten out in every way possible. The same shoe is sold on 
l>ioadway in New York City for twelve dollars ($12.00). 

We also found that we could give better service to the 
men in passing through by establishing a barber shop. We 
constructed a twenty-four chair shop, Avhich was fully appre- 
ciated. We cut the prices to rock bottom. The barber shop 
oidy paid for itself less than two (2) months ago. 

Out of the five per cent, profit we made in the last year, 
one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000), forty thousand 
dollars ($40,000) of that was put into buildings and impi-ove- 
ments, so that there is not much left in actual money. 

As to the Welfare Organizations, iNIajor Landon, as Mor- 
ale Officer, was their official head, handled them very well. 

A camp paper was started there known as the Camp 
^Fci-ritt Dispatch. We tried to develop any current stories 
about camp that wouhl interest the men and tend to create 
a lioiiie feeling amongst them and give them something to 
lldnk about during their off moments. 

The Y. W. C. A. had a welfare house there. They con- 
ducted a dance for the enlisted men every Thursday night. 
The K. of C. likewise had similar arrangements on Tuesday 
night. 

Another place of amusement was the Liberty Theatre, 
wliich also added to the welfare of the men during the eve- 



]>( )■(!( )i ('oioilij Ilislorical Soc'kIij 



iiings. Tlip f-apacity was twcnty-thi'ee hundred (2800) seats. 
There were performances each night, vaudeville changes three 
times weekly, and in that way we w(M'e able to keep the men 
(.'iitertaincd dui'ing the evening. 

A ti'uc soldiers' club located ernti-ally, known as ^leri'itt 
Hall, was another institution that will always be remembered 
by th<' men that ])assed thru Caiiip ]Merritt as it was a place, 
o])en (la\- and iiiglit. whtM'e the men could get something to 
eat in a hurry at very moderate pi'ices. This club was alwayrs 
crowded. It contained a cafeteria, library and some twenty 
pool tables. 

Cam]! ]M('ri'itt was named after one of our most distin- 
guished officei's, Major General Wesley Merritt, who was a 
noted Cavalry leader and Corps Commander during the Civil 
War, before he was twenty-seven years of age. He was Super- 
intendent at the United States ^Military Academy, at West 
Point, from 1882 to 1887. He later commanded our Expe- 
ditionary Forces, which captui-cd ^Fanila from th<' Spanish 
Forces in August, 1898. 



A(J(]r<ss hji ^y. 11. Rohrrls 



ADDRESS U\ W. II. ROliERTS 

of Clostcr 
Dirrclor (if I Ik I'xxiyd of ('h<is( ii Fr(( holders 

Mr. rr(sid<Ht, Ladies and (JiiilUincn: 

I .should go back a little to the beginning — take the letter 
that Mr. Miller received from Major Landon. 

When that letter was received by the Historical Society, 
they found in looking- into the matter, that the pi'oblem was 
a big one. it was a very proper thing to ask the Bergen 
County Historical Society, to do this, but the more they looked 
into it, the bigger it got, so as Mr. Miller tells you, they came 
before the Board of Freeholders, and with the recommenda- 
tion of the Army officers and the wonderful spirit shown by 
the officers at the camp, and the influence of the Bergen 
County Historical Society, the P^reeholders really had no alter- 
native but to say yes. We felt as you do and as the men at 
Camp Merritt feel, that Camp Merritt is one of the greatest 
camps in the Cnited States. J think Major Sullivan is mod- 
est when he said a few things tonight. I would rather have 
him exaggerate, than be too modest. He says Camp Merritt 
is the best camp in the country. I think it is the best 
in the world. The boys that have gone through have told 
me it is like going from the Bowery to Fifth Avenue. They 
were happy; I never saw a boy (and 1 have talked to hun- 
dreds of them) who was dissatisfied. 

The Board of Freeholders were anxious to co-operate 
with the Historical Society and the Army officials, and we 
appointed a committee. We have three committees. These 
committees work together harmoniously. The committees 
have appointed an Executive Committee who will do a great 
deal of the detail work and report. The idea of the Board of 
Freeholders was to perpetuate this memorial and that was tht 
reason why we, representing all of you, should act as the 
custodian of this memorial, because Ave wanted to make it a 
I^ermanent proposition. The Bergen County Historical So- 
ciety is prosperous today, but twenty years from now A\-e do 
not know where it will be, and in the ev(^nt thai it should 
disband there would be no one to take care of th:' memoi'ial, 
;uid for that reason the Board of Freeholders decided to 
accept title to property and to handle funds and to dis- 
l)urse them under ]iroper committees, to see tiiat the money 
was spent propei'ly and as directed. That is as fai' as we 
have gone. 



:24 B( )■(/( It Count !i Historical Soci(tij 

II was iicci'ssary to g^ct sonic |)i-()])ci'l y. The ori^'iiial 
idea was to lake the intersection of .Madison Avenue and 
Kniekei"l)oekei' Road, and })laee llie nieiiioi-ial in the center. 
We had ol her suggestions, l)ut the committee decided we 
\van1ed a sile that wouhl phici^ Ihe monument so tliat you 
wouhl come against it as you came u]) eitliei" road. We have 
agreed that Ihe pi'oper })hice is at the intersection of these 
1 wo s1 1'eels. 

To aid tile Historical Society and committee, the ('ount\' 
Engineei- has done some surveying and the committees have 
unanimously decided to use a circle of 150 feet radius from 
the cenli'e of the road, 100 feet radius from the centre to be 
devoted to memorial and landscape treatment which will be 
necessai'>', and the part from TOO feet to the 150 foot uuirk 
for a di'iveway. Rvei'y vt^iicle. every automobile has to drive 
ai'ound 1he monument. 

When we got as far as Ihal. we fouiul it necessai'y lo 
get a little further advice. Washington, in the meantime. 
Inward about the ]>ergen County Historical Society movemeni 
for a Camp Merritt Memorial. We received a letter from 
the American Federation of Pine Arts, composed of uu^n 
who ai'e of the greatest authority on Art and Sculpture aiid 
ljatidscap(>. Vou have all heai'd of the dollar-a-year men 
who liaN'e gone to Washington to give their services. You 
caiHiot atfoi'd to hire them, and the (Jovei'ument cannot affoi'd 
t(^ pay them. Every man of the Amei'ican Fetleration of 
Fine Arts who has volunteered his services gets nothing for 
it, but he is the greatest authority in the Fniti^l States. He 
gets his transportation, but his time away fi'om his pi-ofes- 
sion, and business, and home, is given gratis. They have 
asked us to meet them in Xew York, with the idea of gt4ting a 
fitting monument, something that would do credit to the 
officers and mem who have jiassed throu'-;h Camp Merritt. 
and to the peo]ile of Px'rgen County. 

This week the Executive Committee, composed of Mr. 
C. V. \l. r>ogert, ^fa.ior Landon and myself, were to nieei 
with Ml'. Mooi-e at the Century Clid). Mr. iJogei't and I 
attended. We all regi-et that Ma.joi- Lamlon was too ill to 
attend. 

This Fine Ai'ts Commission was formed at the i-e(|Uest 
of the Pi-esident of the Fnited Slates, and it has been busily 
engaged since the ai'mistice, because there are so many monu- 
ments being ei'ected that ai'e not right. We have been ad- 
\isi'd to ^^{'\ in touch with organizations that ai'e ])utting u]) 
memorials. We were fortunate in having the co-o))erat ion 
()!' this coiiiiiiittee. We are awaiting ad\ice Froiii them lo 



Addiuss 1,1/ W. II. R<,h'rl> 



tell us how to o'o ahead. They said the avei'age inoiiiiineiit 
is i)iit up undei' such wierd taste the ineniorial is not in 
keepinu witli tlie suri'oundings. He saitl it is difficult because 
\V( have got to treat the subject without the surromidings, 
and they were pleased to find that we have decided on the 
circle of 150 feet radius, it makes the task much easier for 
tliem. It is an architectural i)roposition. They feel that the 
ti'eatmeut around that monument is as essential as the monu- 
iiii'iit itself. We accept and value their advice. 

To start tliis proposition, Major Landon did not say 
anything about that, but these Army people from Camp Mer- 
I'itt did not come to us with suggestions without giving us 
something. They are starting the movement themselves with 
i^iTjSOO, through the generous influence of General Duncan 
and other officers. If the Camp Merritt men, who are giving 
their lives and every minute of their time outside of their 
business can do this much, the people of Bergen ('ounty 
should do their share. We expect this memorial will cost 
^100,000. If the men of Camp Merritt can give us $7,500 
it ouiiht to be easy for the people of Bergen County to give 
us the difference. We expect to get some State aid. We con- 
template starting a drive. We are rather tired of drives, 
but the people want to conti'ibute. We will have to let you 
know how and when we are going to do it. We have a man 
in mind as chairman. The organization can be perfected '"n 
a few weeks. We want every member of this Society to talk 
about it and advertise it. The Board of Freeholders are 
doing this because the people want us to do it. We will h \ 
you know from time to time through your officers how we 
are doing it. Get all your friends actively interested, and 
help the publicity committee of this Society to awaken public 
interest throughout the countv. 



Local Ulslorij III The Maling 21 



LOCAL HISTORY IN THE MAKING 

BY REID HOWELL 

Mr. rrcsidcnf, end Ladies axd Chnilcmcn: 

It is my purpose to attempt to bring to your notice a 
few of the facts and events in liergen County that might be 
considered as having something to do with "history in the 
making. 

History is a narration of past events: it is a systematic 
account of' facts and events atfecting nations and states— 
that is the dictionary definition of history. It is not all a 
story of Kings and Queens. 

We rarely find ourselves conscious of the fact that we are 
observing history in the making. In our work-a-day world 
we seldom think of minor happenings as having their place 
in the making of history. Our angle of vision ordinarily 
does not register events we witness as a part of history. The 
macadam road we see being supplanted by asphalt, and this 
in turn by concrete, is seldom thought of as a fact or event 
in the history of road building. 

However, during the great war there was forced uimn 
our consciousness, and in many emphatic ways, the startling 
fact that we were witnessing history being nuide. 

The facts and events in Bergen County that reveal^ his- 
tory in the making have a past in one of two things — either 
in the outcome of public sentiment ; or in the outcome of 
legislative enactment, or are a consecjuence of both. 

The history around which tonight my thought is turning 
begins with a citizens' movement to establish a small Board 
of^Freeholders, or with the public at large in Bergen County 
setting up a new mode of administrative procedure. 

On the first of April in 1912 there was enacted by the 
Legislature an Act to reorganize the Boards of Chosen Free- 
holders, making it possible for counties having the larger 
boards of freeholders — in this County a board with thirty-two 
members — to change their system of administration and place 
it in the hands of seven men. T need not attempt to go into 
details about what immediately followed the passage of this 
Act. But in 1914 a very strong citizens' organization, under 
the leadership of Joseph" A. Brohel, was formed in this County 
for the purpose of having a small Board of Freeholders, and 
through tlie influence of this organization was brought about 



28 f'x )■(/( )) ('i)iflili) [[ ishificdl Sdciilij 

tile adopt ioii of this act in this ("omity, in tlie fall of 1914, 
and the idection of a small Board of seven men in 1915.* 

Oil Jannary 3. 1916, these seven men met in the Conrt 
Honse and organized. William P. Eager, of Tenafly, was 
made Director. He was then presented by his friends from 
Tenafly with a gavel, and in accepting the gift said, among 
otlici- things: "Hereafter in this County the public dollar 
shall be llie c(|uivalent of the dollar in the private pocket." 
James M. Harkness was made Clei-k, and William A. Linn 
was made (Collector and Clarence IVIabie was made Counst-l. 
On that date there was planted in this County a new mile 
])()st. There was Ix'gun at tliat time a new chapter in local 
liistoi'y. 

Iiiiiiiediately following the fall of the new gavel Free- 
bolder lu'id Howell offered the following resolution: 

"Resolved, that the liy-Laws, Rules and Regu- 
lations of the Board of Chosen Freeholders of the 
County of Bergen, New Jersey, now existing be aiul 
the same are hereby abolished and abrogated." 

Thns bringing to an end and abolishing for all time the old 
large Hoard of P'l'eeholdei's. Fpon the adoption of the reso- 
lution j\Ir. Howell inti-oduced another i-esolution presenting 
th(^ By-Laws, Rules and Re'^ulations iindei' which tlie i)resent 
Board is now operative. 

It is imi)Ossible at this time to narrate in detail the work 
that the Board of Freeholders has since accomplished, nor is 
it possible to review with much detail many of the events that 
have since ha])pened, but T do want to cite a few of the facts 
and events in the life of tlie new Boai'd that present them- 
selves as "history in the making."" 

That Ad of 1912 under whieh the Small Board was 
ci'eated pi'ovided, anmng other things, that "wlu'nevei' the 
pt'Ople of a county should adojit the act as its charter, thei'e 
should he a complete change in the pei'sonnel of tlie connty 
government, and that, upon the oi'ganization of the new board 
every officer who had been appointed by the preceding board 
should cease to hold his office without regard to its charactei- 
or the length of its term, so that the new Board of Freeholdei-s 
might have, in every branch of the county government, men 
of its own si'lection, and thns be imhamiiered by any condi- 
tions for the existence of which it was not i-esponsible." 



■ Willijur. Reswick, of Garfield: Louis S. foe, of Englewood : W. P. K;m:ir, 
of T.-naflv: .1. Rhuivplt Hopper, of Ridsi-wood : Reid HowiOl. of Rntlicrford ; 
.loscpli Kin/liM-. ,Ir., of llnr-kcnsnek; K. R. WcliUoii, of Ridiicfidd I'aiK. 



Local Ilishn'ij III The Makiiit/ 



Thus it came al)out that ainoig other officers removed at that 
time was Mr. J. Ernest Thier, the Supervisor of Roads. 

By a provision, however, in the Act of 1912, an exception 
was made of soldiers and sailors of the United States from 
being removed from office, and it transpired that Mr. Thier, 
without the knowledge of the new l)oard, was a veteran of 
the Spanish-American War, and on March 7, 1917, Mr. Thier 
was reinstated. 

r cannot express to you the pleasure I have in recalling 
to you this fact. Some of you pi'obably are aware of it. In 
Mr. Thier the county has a capable executive, and the splen- 
did hiiihways in the connty, which we enjoy today, are due to 
his care in their npkeejx 

Another featnre of legislation wliich has to do with liis- 
tory in the making, is the Pierson Act. I am not going to 
undertake to tell you in minute particulars how the Pierson 
Act aft'ects our finances, but it does reciuire of the Board of 
Freeholders that at the first of each year, or beginning now, 
October, November, December, that they engage in making 
up a budget for the next year. During the next three months 
the Board will have next year's i)rogram in the making. Ev- 
ery account during the next year will be influenced by the 
acts of the Board during the next few months. The heads 
of the different departments, the County Collector, the Coun- 
ty Enaineer, the Supervisor of Roads, the various Committees, 
the Surrogate, the County Clerk, the Prosecutor and the 
Shi'i-itf will all lay before the Board an estimate of the amount 
of funds that they deem will be re(|uired to run their re- 
spective departments. For the next few months the Board 
will consider these estimated amoinits and if possible to do 
so will reduce them, and tlien will proceed on next year's 
business with the amount of money fixed upon by the budget. 
Tliis method of financing the year's work in advance has a 
great deal to do with many features of your County govern- 
nunt that does not appear on the surface. Some men are 
oidy too willing at times to accuse a public body such as 
iiu' l>oard of Chosen Freeholders of extravagance. As I see 
it, with the budget system and its method of adoption, and I 
tliiidv you grasp the situation, the possibility of extravagance 
is almost eliminated. As a matter of fact, the I>oard is in 
"liard sledding" right now because of the manner in which 
it trimmed its budget to the bone last year. 

The Civil Service law which recently was adopted in this 
County has brought about a new condition, in that it secures 
*o a great many of the County employees a life tenure in 
office. A mendier of th.^ Stat(» Civil Service Commission onlv 



'.]{) fit !■(/( II ('(iiiiilii II islofiidi Sociilji 



last WtMliK'sday visited tlic IJoai'd to lay Ix'forc it a iniiiiiiiTnn 
and iiiaxiiiiiim wag'c scale, ])rovidiiio' foi- the salaries to be 
paid to all County employees affected by the Civil Service 
rules. This State Civil Service Comuiission is operating in 
this way in all the Counties of the State, and it has brought 
to Bergen ('ounty a scale of wages, and recommends its adop- 
tion. This the Board of Fi-eeholdei's will very likely do. 
Such a schedule furnishes a very carefidlN' jirepared guide 
for the Uoard to follow in future in (ixing the salaries of its 
employees. 

It is interesting to note in this connection that the B)Oar(l 
of Fi'e(4iolders without such assistance from the State Com- 
mission have been a])Ie to conduct the affairs of the County 
on a wage scale to employees, exclusive of the unclassified 
list and Ihe heads of departments, which at pi-esent totals 
;|^214,!I7() a year. Many of the employees have been in the 
sei'vice of llie Comity for four years, and naturally Iheir 
salaries already have been increased fi-om time to tinu\ but 
the Board at no time has been extravagant about it. In some 
instancis it would be (|uestionable if it had been just. The 
minimum rales under the new scale furinshed by the State 
Civil Sei-vice Couunission would fix the County pay roll, 
exclusive of the unclassified list and th(> heads of departments, 
at .t"J06,000. If the maximum figui'es wei'e being \mu\ the 
])ay roll would be .$278,000. At the jiresent time the pay i-oll 
fur the same grouji of employees is only ifi214,000. 

or recent dale the State Highway Commission was 
changed and the responsibility shifted from a single com- 
mi-siniiei- to a commission of eiiiht. Also, the Edg-e Road iJill 
became a law, imi)Osing a direct tax of $15,000,000 on the 
people of the State for a State liighway system. 

When the Edge Road l>ill was presented to the Legisla- 
tui'e there was no ]irovision in it for a State highway in l>er- 
gi'ii County. Asseml)lyman Walter (i. Winne discovered the 
onnssion and at the very last moment he had Route 10 ])ul 
iu the bill, descrilung a route from Patei>()n ])y way of Dun- 
dee Lake to Ilackensack an.d Foi't Bee. Cpon the adoi>tion 
of the bill the immediate conclusion was that the road in 
Bergen ('ounty to be taken over as a State highway was 
Bss( X Sti-eet, and Court Street noi-th of the Court TTonse, 
and the l-'oi't Lee Tui-n])ike to tlu^ Fort Tjim^ Ferry, a route 
with which you are all familiar. This Fort Lee Turnpike 
is a ro;id of many sleep gi'ades. It was a vei'y costly high- 
way to i)\iil(l. Probably the amount of money that went into 
its const i-nct ion was .^oOO.OOO. The taking over of this iugh- 
way as part of Koute 10 would iinolvc the teai'ing uj) of 



Local JIlsl (>)■!/ In Tlir Malting \\\ 

much of it in order to reduce the grades. The State High- 
way Commission do not put money into roads having grades 
of more than 5 or 6 per cent. These hills on the Fort Lee 
Turnpike have a grade of 10 to 14 per cent. In addition to 
these grades, consideration also would have to be given to 
the enormous expense that already has been put into the 
permanent improvement of that highway. 

Now, let me here remind you of an event in history 
that took place under the old Board of Freeholders. During 
the very last days of the old Board they took over fi-om the 
Public Service Corpoi-ation the highway on the southerly 
side of the Court House, known as Hudson Street, and the 
l)ergen Pike — something like five miles of road that had been 
in possession of the Public Service people for many years. 
A highway from which they yet were collecting tolls. With 
the assistance of the old Board of Freeholders the Public 
Service put this highway over on the people of the County 
in an unimproved and worn out condition and with its bridges 
very much depreciated in value. The present Board of Free- 
holders faced a great problem there. They could hardly tell 
how they were to finance it. 

When this new proposition from the State came along, 
M'ith its plan for Route 10 as a State highway in the County, 
the Board immediately considered the advisability of divert- 
ing the route from Court Street and the Fort Lee Turnpike 
to Hudson Street and the Bergen Turnpike and so put upon 
the State forever the burden of rebuilding and the upkeej) 
of the Bergen Turnpike. The Board had its Engineering De- 
partment, under County Engineer Roscoe Parke McClave, 
prepare maps with detailed drawings of the new route, also 
including a new route over the cliff at Edgewater and down 
to Fort Lee, Avith the result that when the program was laid 
before the State Highway Commission with General Goethals 
])resent it was accepted, thus relieving the people of the 
County of the burden of the upkeep of Bergen Tui'upike and 
the rebuilding of the bridges over the Hackensack and the 
Overpeck Creek. 

That is really county history in tlie making. A splendid 
P'^rformance of the Board of Freeholders. It is one of the 
most notable things they have as yet accomplished. And this 
one accomplishment always will be regarded as an achieve- 
nu^nt. 

The State Board of Health under date of August 3, 
1!)17, granted permission to the Freeholders to erect a tuber- 
culosis hospital on the County farm at Oradell. Already 
Iho'e liad been inuch agitation over a tuberculosis hospital 



fit !'(/( ii Coinilji II islorlcdl S(ici(h/ 



bein^ l)lacc(l in lliis Couiily. Tlic State IJoard some time 
Ix^fore had passed upon a site on Chestnut Ridge as accept- 
ahh' to them, })ut because of ol)jections that were made by 
projieily ownei's in the vicinity the l>oard of FreehobU'i's 
abandoned it and selected the site on tlie County farm. 

J>efoi'e llie ei'ection of a 1 ubei'culosis liospital is com- 
|)h'ted, and the whole progi'am of County institutioiuil de- 
velopiiieiil is concluded, a gi'eat many things will happen 
which will be liistorA' in the making. And in this coniu'ction 
it is my l)elief that the nuMubers of the Board of Freeholders 
will appreciate very highly the heli)fulness they may bave 
from you of the Historical Society as the jM^ople of the County 
in ))ringing to them such moi'al sui)])ort as will enable them to 
see it as a ])ai'1 of tlieii" duty to go on with that develoiniient 
and their construction jirogi'am. 




k 



^.lA^ 






t^ -^'^ 




*f ^i iH^;. 




-e 



THE OLD STONK CHURCH, SADDLE RIVER, BUILT 1780 



.')4 Ii< /■(/( II f'liinih/ Jlisliiricdl Suciifji 

OFFICEKS OF THE SOCIETY 
1919-^1920 

ri< si(h )ii 

Ijcwis Marsrii;! ^lillci- Lo;mi!;i 

S< (■)■( hiri) and T i'( (tsiin r 

Tlicodon' Koituiiiic ir)8 Main Street, Ilaekeiisa'-k 

Ciivaloy 

^frs. F. A. Weslei'velt Ilackeiisa.-k 

Former Preside nis 

Hon. William ^F. Jolinson Ilaekens^ck 

Cornelius ('hfistie Leoiiii 

T. X. (ilovei- Rutherford 

llou. Coi'nelius Doreiiius RidgeAVOod 

r>urtoii If. Alll)ee Patersou 

Dr. l)yron (t. Van Ilorne Englewood 

William D. Snow TTackensar-k 

Hon. I). I). Zabi'iskie Ividgcwood 

Kverett ]j. Zabriskie "Ridgtnvood 

IFoAvard 15. < Joetscliius Hackmsaek 

^Falt. J. Hoocrt Demarcst 

Kol).M-1 T. Wilson Saddle River 

I\ri-s. V. A. W('st("rvclt Ilaekensack 

('ornclius \". R. IJogci't Bogota 

Ai'tliuf \'an lluskirk Haekcnsack 

Vice-Pre.ndcnf.-i 

William (). Allison Englewood 

I ). D. Aekei-man Closler 

1 )ain('l (i. Bogert Englewood 

I). I. I)emar(>st Oradell 

E. K. Bird ITackensaek 

P. ( '. 'Pci'liune Ilaekensack 

M. R. Jacohus Riduefield 

(ieoi-ge Ar. Eekcrt Saddle Rivci- 

R'icliai'd T. Wilson Ridgewood 

A. AV. \'an Wiidde Rntlierfoi-d 

.\. Z. l'>ogei-1 River Edge 

J. (i. Demaivsl Oradell 



Officd's of lh< Socitfi/ 35 

STANDING COMMITTEES 



Arc]iiv(s and Proix rlfi 
Mrs. F. A. West(M-velt Haekensaek 

Ancirni Vcm( trries 
Man. J. Dogori Deinarest 

Cliiircli Hish))'!/ 
Everett L. Zabriskie RidgeAvood 

Ciirr( )it Histori/ 
Theodore Romaiiie Haekensaek 

E.rfciifive 
The Officers, Former Presidents and T'oinmitee Chairmen 

G( nralogicdl (nid Biographical 
Mrs. John Christie Ware SacUlle River 

Tlistoric Sites and Events 

Arthur Van lUiskirk Haekensaek 

Memljersliip 
C. Y. R. P>ogert Bogota 

PuhJiealion 
Dr. liyron G. Van Home Englewood 

PtihJieifg 
J. W. r,in(h'r Haekensaek 

TopograpJiical and Historical Geographi/ 
Robert J. G. Wood Leonia 

Wars and Bevolntionarg tio]di(rs' Graves 
Riehard T. Wilson Ridgewood 

^yolnl n '.s AK.riliarg 
.Mrs. A. Z. liouei-t River Edge 




IIOMK OF .1(.)HN R. ACIIEXBACK. ( Foniicrly Ackennnn ) , 

WASHIXOTOX'S HKAIXH'ARTKKS, 

SAUDLK KIV1-:K. 



}l( mix rsjiip IJsl 



37 



MEMBERSHIP LIST 

OF 

The Bergen County Historical Society 



ALLENDALE 
WILLIAM H. ACKERMAN 
WILLIAM DEWSNAP 
MRS. WM. DEWSNAr 
MRS. HAROLD MILLER 
GEORGE PARIGOT 

GEORGE M. POTTER 

ARTHTR TOMALTN 

A. L. ZABRISKTE 

BOGOTA 

CORNELIUS V. R. BOGERT 

\V. P. CANE 

GEORGE C. FELTER. -IR. 

WILLIAM S. HOPPER 

W:^l. ST. .lOHN TOZER 

REV. .1. C. VOORHIS 

p. 15, WESLEY 

BEBGENFIELDS 

WALTER CHRISTIE 
.lOllN W. RADFORD 

CLOSTER 

D.WID D. ACKERMAN 
HERBERT BOGERT 
RICHARD W. COSTNER 

\BRAM DEMAREST 
.lOHN -T. DEMAREST 

I Z DEMAREST 

MRS. .1. Z. DEMAREST 

K W. LOZIER 

FRANCIS E. MEYER 

DR CHARLES A. RICHARDSON 

WILLIAM H. ROBERTS 

ALBERT T. SXEDEN 

DEMAREST 

FRANK ACHILLES 
M \TT .1. BOGERT 
CLARENCE A. BOGERT 

VTRITL BOGERT 

KI)\V.\RD MALCOM DEAN 

DR. .\. L. WARD 

EDMCNM) \V. W.XKEEEE 



ENGLEWOOD 

WILLI.\M O. ALLISON 

JOHN B. ALLISON 

\\ILLIAM BECK 

MISS JESSIE BENSON 

HENRY W. BLAKE 

DANIEL G. BOGERT 

CHARLES \. BOGERT 

JOHN V. BOGERT 

STEPHEN H. BOGERT 

PERCY W. CHRISTIE 

WM. MARVIN COE 

WILLI.VM CONKLIN 

JACOB R. DEMAREST 

ABRAM DE RONDE 

PHILIP DE RONDE 

PETER S. DURYEE 

J. H. EMANUEL, JR; 

ADOLPH L. ENGELKE 

HON. E. HOWARD POSTER 

MRS. EMM.\ GEROW 

HON. W. IRVING GLOA^ER 

EDSON B. GORHA]\[ 

REV. EDWARD KELDER 

THOMAS W. LAMONT 

JOHN B. LEWIS 

HENRY MANN 

MRS. HENRY MANN 

D. J. McKENNA 

J. R. MELCHER 

D WIGHT W. MORROW 

D.\N FELLOWS PLATT 

L. .1. PLUME 

I).\NIEL E. POMEROY 

SEWARD PROSSER 

FR.\NK C. PUTNEY 

A.RTHI'R B. REEVES 

WM. E. H. SCHNEIDER 

OLIVER DRAKE SMITH 

CYRUS D. STAGG 

WTLLI.\M TALLMAN 

J. H. TILLOTSON 

DR. S. S. TREADWELL 

DR. BYRON G. VAN HORNE 

MRS. B. G. A^\N HORNE 

C.\PT. EDG.VR A'.\N NAME 



;!s 



Ji( )■(/( )i CoiDiIji Uixlorital Snrlrh/ 



(). ('. WKATHKR14Y 
SIMOX [.. WESTKRVKLT 
WTNTOX .1. WHITE 

EAST ORANGE 
^V. K. I'.RITTOX 

EAST NORTHVALE 
MRS. (■ \T11ER1XK CORY 

FAIRVIEW 
MRS. MARY .1. EXOEE 
Wll.l-IAM E. VATL 
MRS. WNE E. V.\1E 

FORT LEE 

.101 IX C. .\151i()TT 

v;i)\VAi;i) .E K-\rEER 

GARFIELD 

\VIEEE\M WllEI-EllE.M) 

HACKENSACK 

DR. C. F. ADAMS 

GARRETT G. ACKERSON 

GEORGE (E ACKERMAN 

REX 15. ALTSCHULER 

MISS CORNELIA H. ANDERSON 

HENRY .V. BERRY 

.1. \V. I'.EXDER 

E. K. 151RD 

MESS EEEIE ]5E.\i;VEET 

T H EO I )t)R E BOETTGER 

MRS. .lOHN \V. BOGERT 

HENRY MYERS BOGERT 

MRS. HENRY MYERS BOGERT 

GEORGE K. BR.VDPIEED 

CORNELIUS V. BRINCKERHOFF 

Di;. ^E R. BRINKM.\N 

.losEl'H .\. F.ROHEE 

CH.VRLES W. BRO\VER 

T. IIOW.VRD 13RUSH 

W. 1-. lU'RDETT 

IE I'.. C.\NXOX 

.\li;s. H. H. CANNON 

CIL\RLES S. CONKEIN" 

.MRS. ( HAREES S. CONKEIN 

I'AIE 11. CROMEEIN 

RE\-. .1. .E crXNEEEY 

( H.VE'EES ( I'RTIS 

C. .M. I).\ERYMPEE 

.\. CI': iE\rx 

MRS. .\. 1)E BAUN 

( 'L.\ YTON i ) EM .\ R EST 

MRS. CL.\YT()N DEMAREST 

MISS. ELENORE E. DEM.VKEST 

MISS S.VK.MI E. DE.MAKEST 

HON. MIETOX DE.MAK'EST 



.lOSE M. DIAZ 

^VILLIAM S. DOREMUS 

S. LESLIE DOREMUS 

\VILLIAM P. EAGER 

T. HENRY" ECKERSON 

MRS. T. HENRY ECKERSON 

FRED V. FERBER 

FREDERICK T. FISHER 

MISS MAGDALENE E. FISHER 

W. EDWARD FOSTER 

MRS. M. REBECCA C. FOSTER 

CHARLES S. FOUNTAIN 

DR. A. FR.\NCK 

DR. FR.VNK FREEE.VXD 

WIEEI.VM C- GRECJG 

.1. S. GRUNOW 

.\. C. H.\RT 

\'1CT0R H.\RT 

M. L. HAGGERTY 

(iEORGE HARING 

TUNIS A. HARINCJ 

R. .\. HEWITT 

.1. W. HOLBERTON 

GEORGE E. HOLLANDER 

MRS. HENRIETTA D. HOWEEL 

.\EFRED T. HOLLEY 

LEWIS W. HYDE 

HON. \VJL M. .lOHNSON 

D- <;. .lEFEERS 

.lOSEPH KINZLEY, .IR. 

MISS .JENNIE H. L.\l!.\(;ii 

• lOSEl'H G. LID]>LE 

COURTL.VNDT LINKROl'M 

MRS. COURTL.VNDT LINKROI^.M 

CH.VRLES H. EOZIER 

:\IRS. C. H. LOZIER 

( E.VRENCE MABIE 

MESS ELIZABETH M.VBOX 

CLIXTOX IE M.VCARTllY 

miss .lexnie s. m.\c.\rtiiy 
dr. h.vrry g :\l\c don. \ 1,1) 
tyn.\n s. m.\rsh.\ll 
hon. wfeli.vm b. afackvy, jr. 
(;eorge c. mercer 
.i.vmes w. mercer 
avileiam w. m0nt.\eyo. .ir. 
wieliam morse 
willi. \m l. p.vueison 
ch.\rles h. plenty 

FRANK B. PEYMPT(tX 
EDWIX W. PRESTOX 
CH. \R1,ES C. R.\MEY 
HON .1. R. R\MSEY 
THEODORE ROM.MNl': 

MPS. •rHi':i»i>opi': k-o.m.\ixe 

E. H. S.\GE 

MISS GRACE SLINGERLAND 



M ( mix rship Li si 



:V.) 



p. C. STAIB 

MRS. P. C. STAIB 

ANDREW STERTZER 

DR. H. S. STEWART 

DR. .\. A. SWAYZE 

FREDERICK K. STILLWELL 

HON. F. M. TAYLOR 

C. W. TERHUNE 

HOW.VRD 1). TERHUNE 

1". CHRISTIE TERHUNE 

MRS. P. C. TERHUNE 

.lOHN. W. THOMSON 

.\RTHUR VAN BUSKIRK 

GEORGE V.\N BUSKIRK 

HERMAN V.\NDERW-\RT 

J. R. V.\N DYCK 

H. H. V.\N SAUN 

R.VLPH N. VOORHIS 

MR.S. RALPH N. VOORHIS 

FR.VNK H. VREEL.\ND 

H. B. WELLS 

MRS. FRANCES \. WESTERVELT 

WEND.\LL -I. WRKJHT 

FRANK YOUNG 

HON. .rOHN B. ZABRLSKHO 

J'RED C. Z.\BRLSK1E 

.lESSE F. Z.VBRISKIE 

NORTH HACKENSACK 
EMILE ST.\XGE 

HASBEOUCK HEIGHTS 

MRS. L. P. BERNSTEIN 
FRANK S. FLAGG 
EDMUND E. FIELD, .IR. 
E. L. D. HESTER 

HOHOKUS 

HUGO F. KRISS 
.\UGUST M. FAY 
VERYL PRESTON 

HOBOKEN 

MISS DORA SMITH 

JERSEY CITY 
.JOHN W. li.VNT.V 
•JERSEY CITY FREE LIBR.\RY 

LEONIA 
GUY .1. AGR.VTI 
PAUL BALZE 
.\NDREW A. CHRISTIE 
CH.\S. SYDNEY CLARK 
MRS. FLORENCE M. DUVAL 
.lOHN ETTL 

ROBERT HILL GREENE 
ROSCOE GUERNSEY 
C.\PT. .TAMES M. HACKETT, M.D. 



COL. E. W. HALFORD 

DR. HERMAN H. HORNE 

MISS M.VUD KIDDER 

■f. G. C. MANTLE 

LEWIS MARSENA MILLER 

MRS. LEWIS M. MILLER 

E. D. PAULIN 

H. G. R.\MPSPER(iER 

R. A. SIGSBEE 

W. M. SPEAR 

EDW.VRD ST.VGG 

THEODORE Wlr>Ll(;H 

R. .1. (i. WOOD 

LITTLE FERRY 

D. M. GOETSCHIUS 

LODI 

\\illl\m w. .\mmerm.\n 

lyndhurst 

peter .\. kthx 
ref:ve.s d. b.vttex 

MAHWAH 

]>.\VII) IIOIM'ER 

MIDLAND PARK 
HEXRY WOSTIiROCK 

NYACK, N. Y. 

.1. EI.MKK CHRlS'l'lE 

NEW MILFORD 

MISSS C.VTH.\RINE V.\N BUSKIRK 
NEW BRIDGE 

.'.XDREW U. COLLIXS 

NEW YORK CITY 
GEORGK H. BUDKE 
GROVE D, CURTIS 
ALLISTER GREEN 
MA.IOR FR.VNCIS G. L.\NDOX 
CH.\RLES C. VOORHIS 

NEWARK 

MRS. IS.\]5ELLE S. KRESS 

ORADELL 

ELMER BLAl'VELT 
MRS. ELMER BL.\UVELT 
MRS ELIZ.V A. BL.VUVELT 
MRS. M.VRIA A. BELLIS 
MISS ANNA BELLIS 
MISS LIDA S. BELLIS 
JOHN W. BELLIS 
MRS. .1. W. BELLIS 
AlJ'.Eirr D. lilXiEKT 



r>( nji II Coiiiilij llishiriiiil Sttcii/i/ 



MRS. J. I). CHRISTIE 
.lOHX G. DEMAREST 
DANIEL T. DEMAREST 
DAMKL E. DEMAREST 
ISAAC D. DEMAREST 
MRS. ISAAC D. DEMAREST 
■ lows .1. VAX WAGONER 

PATERSON 

lU-RToX II. AMJIKI'', 
K. K. COSSE 
'IIIKODORE RIKER 
.MISS .\hICE OLDIS 

PASSAIC 

.1. HOSEV OSKORX 

RAMSEY 

• lollX V. D.VTER 

• loiIX KR.\XK DE BALIN 

RIDGEFIELD 

.\LFHKi) DIEDRICIl 
CI1.\S. K.\(iELH.\RT 
M. R. .IAC015US 
I''I;1;d I'. SM.M.L 

RIDGEFIELD PARK 

W. .1. MORRISOX, .11;. 
.i. K. \\I|,IJ.\MS 

RIDGEWOOD 

CII.VRLES K. ALLEN 

.\I-KRED E. .\SHFIELD 

C. L. ACCUK 

II. II. I'.E.\UVELT 

.\l,rlX .1. C.VMERON 

l.KWIS 1{. COXKLIX 

CII.VS. S. CHAPMAN 

HON. CORNELIUS DOREMUS 

HEXRY \V. HALES 

ELMER .]. HOPPER 

.1. SMYLIE KIXNE 

SIDNEY H. MOORE 

.l.\MES ALVDDEN 

.1. R. .M.\L'J'15IE 

M. T, RICH.\RDSON 

•lUDSON B. S.\LISBUR1" 

BEX.1.\MIN FRANKLIN SLOAT 

M.\RTn.\ WWNDEt.L STILWEL 

]. W. TR.WIOLL 

CARL M. V.\rL 

REV. .lOHX .\. VAN NEST 

DR \V. L. VROOM 

RK\-. WILLI. \M VROO^r 

WWLTER \V. WILSEV 

CIl.VRLES WOODM.VN 

RKni.VRD T. "WILSON 

EVERETT L. Z.VBRISKIE 



RIVER EDGE 

A\'ILLI.\M F. .\[,P,ERS 

MRS. W. F, ALBERS 

A. '/,. BOCiERT 

MRS. .V Z. BOGERT 

INFRS. ciiA['NCEY AV. BROWN 

MRS. F. H. CRUM 

CLYDE 15. I'L.VCE 

MRS. CLYDE B. PLACE 

CH.VRLES B. RICHARDS 

MRS. C. B. RICHARDS 

MRS. HARRY LEAVELLYN 

HEXRY A'OORHIS 

.MRS. HEXRY VOORHIS 

ROSCOE, N. Y. 

]IOW.\RD l;. (ioETSClUUS 

RUTHERFORD 

MRS. .\. E. C.\STER 

COOK COXKLIX(; 

GlY L F.\KE 

J''. ll.WDEN 

.Aii;s. F. ILWDEN 

liKID HdWKLL 

\\'.\LTER .\. KIPP 

MRS. HELEX G. LUCE 

:\1RS. M.VRIE E. LUCE 

AIRS. ELE.VXOR B. Sl'EER 

EMIL STEFEENS 

.^ \V. V.\N WINKLE 

MRS. .\RTnUR \\'. V.\X WINKLE 

CII.VRLES .\. V.\X WIXKLE 

.•-•I'IRLING V.\N WINKLE 

SADDLE RIVER 
R. .\. .\D.\MS 
.1. (i. ESLER 
LOLA W. ESLER 
GEORWE M. ECKERT 
AlISS K.VTHERIXE PELL 
MRS. FR.\XK D. PELL 
WESTOX AV. W.\GER 
MR^. WESTON W. W.VGER 
MRS. .IIWNIT.V L. W.\XI)ELL 
MRS. .lOllN CHRISTIE W.\RE 

TEANECK 

.lOIlX II. IIAYW.VRD 
MRS. n.\RRY BENNETT 
CAI'T. .1. .1. IMIELl'S 
MISS DOROTHY SOIINKER 
MISS \r.\RION SOHNKER 

<;koR(;e e. wells 



M( )nb(rsJn'p IJsl 



41 



TENAFLY 

K. STANLEY CLARKE 
WATSON G. CLARK 
JAMES KIPP 
HENRY M. ROGERS 
H. B. PALMER 
ALEX. B. ROBERTS 
J. SPENCER SMITH 
WALTER STILLMAN 
.lOHN. A. WILSON 

WESTWOOD 

ISAAC D. BOGERT 

JESSE E. BRANNEN 

MRS. THOMAS EDGAR BRICKELL 

JAMES E. DEMAREST 

ISAAC B. HOPPER 

GEORGE H. HOWELL 

KDW.VRD VAN WAGONER 



WOODCLIFF LAKE 

R.VNDOLPH PERKINS 

WYCKOFF 

THOMAS D. RAMB.VUGH 
MRS. THOMAS D. RAMBAUGH 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 

JOHN T. 1K)YD, JR. 

YONKEES, N. Y. 
PETER .\, H. VOORHIS 

U. S. ARMY 

MAJOR GEN. GEORGE B. DUNCAN 
MAJOR MAX W. SULLIVAN 
M.VJOR .JESSE. I. SLOAT 



WOMEN'S AUXILIARY 



OF 



The Bergen County Historical Society 





ALLENDALE 


MISS 


MRS. 


WILLIAM DEWSNAP 


MRS. 


MRS. 


HAROLD MILLER 


MRS. 
MISS 




CLOSTER 


MISS 


ilKS. 


.(. Z. DEM.VREST 


MRS. 
MRS. 




ENGLEWOOD 


MRS. 


MISS 


JESSIE BENSON 


MRS. 


MRS. 


EMMA GEROW 


MRS. 

MISS 



MRS. HENRY MANN 
MRS. B. G. VAN HORNE 

EAST NORTHVALE 
MRS. C.VTHKRIXE CORY 

FAIRVIEW 
MRS. MARY .1. KNGLE 
MRS. WILLIAM L. VAIL 

HACKENSACK 

MISS CORNELIA H. ANDERSON 
MISS EFFIE BLAUVELT 
MRS. .lOHN W. BOGERT 
MRS. HENRY MYERS BOGERT 
MRS. HENRY B. CANNON 
MRS. CHARLES S. CONKLIN 
MRS. A. DE BAUN 
MRS. CLAYTON DEMAREST 
MISS ELENORE E. DEMAREST 
MISS SARAH F. DEMAREST 
MRS. T. HENRY ECKERSON 
MISS MAGDALENE E. FISHER 
MRS. M. REBECCA C. FOSTER 
MRS. HENRIETTA IX HOWELL 



MRS. 



.lENNIK H. L.\BAGH 
COURTLANDT LINKROUM 
CHARLES H. LOZIER 
ELIZABETH MABON 
.JENNIE S. MACARTHY 
THEODORE ROMAINE 
P. C. STAIB 
P. C. TERHUNE 
RALPH N. VOORHIS 
FR.VNCES A. WESTERVELT 

GRACE SLINGERLAND 
HASBROUCK HEIGHTS 

L. P. BERNSTEIN 



HOBOKEN 

MISS DORA SJIITH 

LEONIA 

MRS. FLORENCE M. DUVAL 
MISS MAUD KIDDER 
MRS. LEWIS M. MILLER 

NEW MILFORD 
MISS CATHARINE VAN BUSKIRK 

NEWARK 

MRS. IS.\BELLA S. KRESS 

ORADELL 
MRS. ELMER BLAUVELT 
MRS. ELIZA A. BLAUVELT 
MRS. MARIA A. BELLIS 
MISS ANNA BELLIS 
MISS LIDA S. BELLIS 
MRS. JOHN W. BELLIS 
MRS. J. D. CHRISTIE 
MRS. ISAAC D. DEMAREST 



44 



r>( /■(/( II ('(III III 11 II islfiricdl S<ici(lii 



PATERSON 

\irss ALICK OLDIS 

RIDGEWOOD 
MARTHA \VAXI>K],L STTLVrELL 

RIVER EDGE 
MRS. WII.LIAM V. ALBERS 
MRS. A. Z. ROGERT 
MRS. CIIAUNCEY W. HROWN. .IR. 
MRS. F. H. CRUM 
MRS. CLYDE B. PLACE 
MRS. CHARLES B. RICHARDS 
MRS. H.VRRY LEWELLYN 
MRS. HENRY VOORHIS 
RUTHERFORD 
MRS. HELEN B. CASTER 
MRS. F. HAYDEN 
MRS. HELEN (i. LUCE 
MRS. MARIE E. LUCE 
MRS. ELEANOR B. SPEER 
MRS. .\RT11UR \V. V.\N WINKLE 



SADDLE RIVER 

MRS. L()[,.\ \V. ESLER 
MRS. FR.\NK D. PELL 
MRS. K.VTHERINE PELL 
MRS. WESTON AW WAGER 
MRS. .IU.\NTTA L. WANDELL 
MRS. .lOHN CHRISTIE WARE 

TEANECK 

MRS, H.\RRY BENNETT 
MISS DOROTHY SOHNKER 
MISS M.VRION SOHNKER 



WESTWOOD 
MRS. THO.M.VS EDG.\R BRICK ELL 

WYCKOFF 

MRS. THO^L\S D. R.\MB.\UGH 



CHAIRMAN 
MRS. .\. '/.. P.0(;EKT River Etlno 

SECRETARY 
MRS. H.\RRY LEWEL1,YN River Ediic 

FIELD SECRETARIES 

ENGLEWOOI) MISS JESSIE BENSON 

H.\CKENS.\CK MRS. CL.\YTON DEMAREST 

LEONI.\ . MRS. FLORENCE M. DUVAL 

OR.\DELL MRS. ELMER BLAI'A'ELT 

RUTHERFORD MRS. F. H.VYDEN 

S.\DDLK RIVKR MRS. .U\\NIT.\ L. W.VNDELL 

■|'E.\NECK MRS. H.\KRY BENNETT 




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AX KARLY KKSTDKXT OF BERGEN COUNTY 



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SATrRDAV KVKXIXG. 0("T()P>KR 2."). 1!»1!) 



Page 

Proi^rain of ^Icoting ^ 

Tlie Pi'csidcnl "s Address -^ 

Addiess^Dr. Ilcnnan 11. Home 1'^ 

Address— Majoi- 'Max W. Sullivan l"*" 

Address— Mr. W. H. "Roberts 23 

Address— :\Ir. Reid Howell 27 

Officers of the Society -^"^ 

The Society's Standing ('omniittee •5'^ 

The Meinbei-shi]) List '^'^ 

The Women's Auxiliary 4o 

Hotne of the Society Facing Page 5 

The Fai-ainus Church " " ^0 

The Schraalenburgh Church " " 1-^ 

The Andre Prison House " " 1'^ 

The Green in 1820 " " 27 

The Old Stoiu- Church, Saddle River " " 32 

The Achenback Homestead " " 37 

An Early Denuirest Home " " 43 

Home of Jacobus Demarest " " 44 

An Earlv Resident of Pjergen County " " 47 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



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