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COLLEGE OFT 

ADMISSIONS BULLETIN 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



The College 1 

The Campus 4 

Board of Directors 5 

Administration and Staff 6 

Faculty 7 

School of Music 10 

Curriculum 12 

Degree Programs 12 

Music Education 12 

Jazz/Commercial Music Studies 13 

Opera Emphasis 14 

Admissions 15 

Application Procedure 15 

Auditions 16 

Audition Dates 16 

Audition Repertoire 17 

School of Dance 20 

Curriculum 21 

Degree Programs 22 

Dance Education 22 

Admissions 23 

Application Procedure 23 

Auditions 23 

Audition Dates 24 

Facilities 25 

School of Theatre 28 

Curriculum 29 

Degree Programs 30 



Admissions 30 

Application Procedure 30 

Auditions 30 

Audition Dates 31 

Graduate Studies 32 

Graduate Program in Music 33 

Graduate Program in Opera 34 

Application Procedure 35 

General Information 38 

Student Life 39 

Student Housing 39 

Summer Session 39 

ACT 101 39 

Pre-College Training 39 

Early Admissions Program 40 

Part-Time Students 40 

Transfer Students 40 

Foreign Students 40 

Financial Aid 41 

Scholarships 42 

Tuition and Fees 43 

Faculty Biographies 45 

Calendar 59 

PCPA Student Body 61 

Map 62 

Tips to the Applicant 63 

Application for Admission 64 




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COLLEGE OF THE 
PEI^FOF^MEHG AI(TS 



AN INVITATION TO ATTEND 



The Philadelphia College of the Performing 
Arts is dedicated to excellence in the training of 
professional musicians, dancers, actors, music 
educators, and dance educators. The PCPA 
curriculum combines the performance emphasis of 
a traditional conservatory approach, stressing 
individualized training, practice, and discipline, with 
a liberal arts education. 

Founded in 1870 as the Philadelphia Musical 
Academy, the Philadelphia College of the Perform- 
ing Arts has long been regarded as one of 
America's foremost contributors of outstanding 
musicians. Many of the College's early graduates 
and faculty became members and founders of the 
Philadelphia Orchestra when it was formed in 1900. 
The Philadelphia Orchestra continues to play a 
significant role in the life of PCPA with many of its 
members currently serving on the College faculty. 
Located in Philadelphia's historic Shubert Building, 
PCPA is adjacent to the Academy of Music, home 
of the world-famous orchestra. 

In 1976, still offering only a music program, the 



College officially changed its name to the Philadel- 
phia College of the Performing Arts. This signified 
a new direction for the school, and in essence 
announced the College's intention to expand its 
curriculum to include all three of the performing 
arts — Music, Dance, and Theatre. 

In 1977, the College incorporated the School 
of Dance into its curriculum; the School of Theatre 
opened in 1983, thus adding new dimensions to the 
College's program. The high standards of training 
and professionalism established by the School of 
Music are an integral part of the dance and acting 
programs. 

The Philadelphia College of the Performing 
Arts, long regarded as a leader and pioneer, is 
Pennsylvania's first and only independent college 
dedicated exclusively to the performing arts. One 
of the first of its kind in the United States, the 
College is recognized as a school which is serving 
present and future needs. Its philosophy is founded 
on the principle that performing artists, whatever 
their discipline, have a common bond, and that 



they must reach out to each other for inspiration 
and growth. Many of the College's students follow 
interdisciplinary careers requiring familiarity with all 
the performing arts. 

The College is proud of its distinguished 
faculty, most of whom are widely-recognized per- 
forming artists. Because of this faculty, along with 
the College's philosophy that superior individual- 
ized instruction is of the utmost importance, PCPA 
has established a reputation for excellence in pro- 
fessional training. This reputation is strengthened 
by the impressive and ever-growing list of PCPA 
alumni which includes pianists Andre Watts, 
Eugene List and the late William Kapell, composer 
Vincent Persichetti, soprano Florence Quivar, 
dancers Judith Jamison and Rodney Griffith, and 
jazz artist Stanley Clarke. 

The Philadelphia College of the Performing 
Arts, a fully-accredited independent institution, is a 
member of a unique consortium. The College 
shares membership with the Juilliard School, San 
Francisco Conservatory, New England Conserva- 



tory, Cleveland Institute of Music, Mannes School, 
Manhattan School of Music, and Peabody 
C6nservatory. 

The Philadelphia College of the Performing 
Arts offers the student the unique opportunity to 
learn and grow creatively as an individual and as a 
performing artist. The coeducational student body 
is composed of students from across the United 
States and many foreign countries. All students 
receive personal attention, professional individual- 
ized training, and are regarded as unique individ- 
uals possessing abilities and talents which must be 
guided, respected, and allowed to grow to full 
potential. Our goal is to assist each student to 
realize the full attainment of his true potential. 

Indeed, the Philadelphia College of the 
Performing Arts is a place where one can study 
with a professional to become a professional, while 
earning a fully-accredited college degree. 

The College looks forward to the future and 
invites young artists to consider becoming a part of 
this exciting experience. 




THE PHILADELPHIA COLLEGE OF THE PERFORMING ARTS 
250 S. Broad St., Philadelphia, PA 19102 • (215) 893-3174 

Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Founded: Philadelphia Musical Academy, 1870 

Chartered by: The Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 1915 

Amalgamated with: The Philadelphia Conservatory of Music, 1962 

The Philadelphia Dance Academy, 1977 
Approved by: Pennsylvania Department of Education 

Accredited by: Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

National Association of Schools of Music 



THE CAMPUS 



The Philadelphia College of the Performing 
Arts is located in Center City Philadelphia, a 
location highly advantageous for the young 
performing artist. Its buildings are in the center of 
an area which serves as the focal point of the city's 
major performing arts activities. Within one block 
of the College, one will find the permanent homes 
of the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Pennsylvania 
Ballet, the Philadelphia Civic Ballet, the Phila- 
delphia College of Art, Philadelphia's High School 
for the Creative and Performing Arts, and Phila- 
delphia International Records. Indeed, concen- 
trated within this small area, one finds more 
professional music, dance, and theatre represented 
than in any other part of the city. 

The home of PCPA is the modern seven-story 
Shubert Building at 250 South Broad Street. Phila- 
delphia's historic Shubert Theatre, owned and 
operated by the College, is housed on the ground 
floor of the building, and is today the major 
performance hall for PCPA students and faculty. 
At the same time, it is the permanent home of the 
Pennsylvania Ballet, and it is frequently a major 
stop for pre-Broadway shows and national touring 
companies. The opera/concert theatre has a 
seating capacity of 1800 persons and is considered 
to be one of Philadelphia's finest. 

On the third floor of the building is the Clara 
and William S. Fishman Memorial Library. 
This library houses more than 14,500 volumes and 
scores and over 10,000 records and tapes. In addi- 
tion, the collection includes the Lattimore- 
Nahumck Library of Dance which is an exten 
sive reference collection related to the art of dance. 
The remainder of the building houses a full comple- 
ment of modern classrooms, chamber music 
studios, student lounges, and administrative offices. 
In addition, there is an electronic music studio, 
class piano laboratory, and audio-visual equipment. 
Practice rooms are carpeted, have full-length 
mirrors, and individual heat controls. Many are 
equipped with grand pianos. Also available is a two- 



manual Challis Harpsichord, an 8-track Moog 
Synthesizer, a complete computer laboratory for 
student use and research, two harps, complete sets 
of percussion instruments, and more than 100 
orchestral instruments which may be used on a loan 
basis for rehearsals and class instruction. 

The Annex Building, located at 313 South 
Broad Street, houses the jazz, and opera programs 
of PCPA. This building has spacious dance studios 
and several smaller practice rooms. Studios are 
equipped with sturdy barres, mirrors, and resilient 
wood floors. Dressing rooms are available with 
individual lockers and showers. Several rooms are 
available as rehearsal space for large ensembles 
and other functions. The building also houses the 
Performing Arts School, PCPA's own private 
school for grades 5-12. 

Theatre 313 is located in the Annex and 
serves students and faculty as a recital hall for 
student and faculty concerts and productions. With 
a seating capacity of approximately 200, this 
theatre provides an intimate setting for small 
productions. 

The School of Dance at 309 South Broad 
Street, is one of the College's two new facilities. 
The building houses three spacious studios with 
high ceilings, barres, mirrors, and resilient floors. 
There are also dressing rooms, showers, office and 
lounge areas. 

The Residence Hall (Furness Hall) is 
located at 15th & Pine Streets, about two blocks 
from the Shubert Building. Students from both 
PCPA and the Philadelphia College of Art reside in 
Furness Hall and another building which is also 
about two blocks from the campus. The residences 
feature two, three and four person apartments with 
separate kitchen and bathroom facilities. All 
campus residences are co-educational. College 
housing is supervised by Resident Advisors and a 
live-in director. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 




Ira Brind, Chairman 



Ira Brind, Chairman 

John W. Merriam, Chm. Exec. Comm. 

Jack F. Adler, Treasurer 

Charles W. Raison, Executive Director 



Jack R. Bershad, Esq. 

C. Graham Berwind, Jr. 

Lennox K. Black 

Joseph Castaldo, President Emeritus 

Herbert Cook 

Vincent C. Desiderio, M.D. 

Richard L. Freundlich 

Russell A. Glicksman 

Mrs. Helen P. Neuman Kaplan 

Phyllis C. Kaufman, Esq. 

Stephen J. Korn, Esq. 

Robert S. Lee, Sr. 

Harold T. MacCracken 

Mrs. Matthew T. Moore 

Mrs. Suzanne Morgan 

Ronald Naples 

Ms. Robyn F. Perlman 

Edwin P. Rome, Esq. 

Michael J. Rotko, Esq. 

Adolph E. Sinkow 

The Hon. Faith Ryan Whittlesey 

Harold L. Yoh, Jr. 



ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 



Charles W. Raison 

Executive Director 

Fredrick Kaufman 

Dean of the College/Director, School of Music 

Edward T. Brake 

Dean of Admissions/Student Services Liaison 

Susan Glazer 

Director, School of Dance 

Walter Dallas 

Acting Director, School of Theatre 

Carlton Jones Lake 

Director, Performing Arts School 

Elaine Evans 

Director, New Studies Center 

Dovie' R. Prather 

Director of Development 

Douglas Fitzgerald 

Director, ACT 101 

Rita DiRenzo 

Registrar 

Arthur M. Hoist 

Director of Financial Aid 

Nadine Senyk 

Director, Student Residence 



Phoebe Law 

Librarian 

William P. Parrish, Jr. 

Admissions Counselor 

Nancy Wright-Hamilton 

Assistant Director of ACT 101/ 
Counselor 

Edna Cohen 

Assistant to the Director, 
School of Dance 

Betty Reiser 

Director, Audience Development 

Barbara J. Silzle 

Administrative Assistant to the Executive 
Director 

Chris Blinebury 

Administrative Assistant to the 
Dean of Admissions 

Marilyn Roberts 

Secretary, Dean of the College 

Joseph Castaldo 

President Emeritus 

Maria Ezerman Drake 

Assistant Dean Emeritus 

Nadia Nahumck 

Dean Emeritus, School of Dance 



FACULTY 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Fredrick Kaufman, Director 
Coordinator, Division of Applied Studies 
WOODWINDS 

*Adelchi Louis Angelucci (Bassoon) 
**Robert Bloom (Oboe) 

Shirley Curtiss (Bassoon) 

Harold Karabell (Clarinet, Saxophone) 

Pat Kendel (Flute) 
*Loren Lind (Flute) 

Lawrence McKenna (Saxophone) 

Guido Mecoli (Clarinet) 
*Ronald Reuben (Clarinet) 

David Schneider (Oboe) 
**John Shamlian (Bassoon) 

Joseph Smith (Saxophone, Clarinet) 

Marshall Taylor (Saxophone) 

Adeline Tomasone (Flute) 

William P. Zaccagni (Saxophone) 

BRASS 

*Tyrone Breuninger (Trombone) 

Joseph DeAngelis (French Horn) 

Richard Genovese (Trombone) 

James Hala (Trumpet) 
*Frank Kaderabek (Trumpet) 

Jay Paul Krush (Tuba) 
*Paul Krzywicki (Tuba) 

Anthony Marchione (Trumpet) 

Michael Natale (Trumpet) 

Calvin Price (Trumpet) 
*Seymour Rosenfeld (Trumpet) 
*Charles G. Vernon (Trombone) 
*David Wetherill (French Horn) 

PERCUSSION 
*Michael Bookspan 

Nicholas D'Amico 

Joe Nero 



KEYBOARD 

George Akerley (Piano) 
Richard Alexander (Organ) 
James Amadie (Piano) 
Jeanne Behrend (Piano) 
Andrea Clearfield (College Accompanist) 
Robert Elmore (Organ) 
Frances Fanelli (Piano) 
Yoheved Kaplinsky (Piano) 
Robin Kissinger (Accompanist) 
Florenza D. Levengood (Piano) 
Ronald Marlowe (Piano) 
Michael Stairs (Organ) 
Susan Starr (Piano) 
Benjamin Whitten (Piano) 
HARP 

*Margarita Csonka Montanaro 
Karin Fuller 

STRINGS 

Robert Cerulli (Double Bass) 

*Frank Costanzo (Violin) 

*Neil Courtney (Double Bass) 

*Joseph dePasquale (Viola) 

*Julia dePasquale (Violin) 

*Robert dePasquale (Violin) 

*William dePasquale (Violin) 
Domenick Fiore (Double Bass) 

*George Harpham (Cello) 

*Gloria Johns (Cello) 

*Joseph Lanza (Violin) 
"Dr. Leonard Mogill (Viola) 
"Deborah Reeder (Cello) 

*Henry G. Scott (Double Bass) 
Carlos Villa (Violin) 
"Mihalay Virizlay (Cello) 

GUITAR 

Robert DiNardo 
Ed Flanagan 
John Leonard 
Patrick Mercuri 
Peter Segal 



VOICE 

Paula Brown 

Marianne Casiello 

Deborah Cook 

Franco Iglesias 

Harold Parker 

Alan Wagner 

Vivian Wagner 

OPERA 

Kay Walker, Coordinator 

Lelia Calder (Vocal Pedagogy) 

Larry Cannon (Make-Up) 

Allison Green-Kelley (Acting) 

Gabriela Roepke (Opera, Theatre History) 

Danielle Smith-Orlando (Coach) 

Leon Unger (Coach) 

THEORY/COMPOSITION 

Dr. Donald Chittum, Coordinator 

Joseph Castaldo 

Annette DiMedio 

Lilburn Dunlap 

Fredrick Kaufman 

Jan Krzywicki 

Yinam Leef 

Andrew Rudin 

Dr. Carl B. Schmidt 

MUSICIANSHIP 

Jan Krzywicki, Coordinator 

Sean Deibler 

Lilburn Dunlap 

Janice Kestler 

Nadine Senyk 

Michael Stairs 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

Dr. Douglas S. Medlin, Coordinator 
Nicholas D'Amico 
Douglas Fitzgerald 
Regina Gordon 
Dr. Carlton J. Lake 
S. Archye Leacock 
Sandra Levinson 
*Joseph Primavera 



JAZZ/COMMERCIAL MUSIC 

Evan Solot, Coordinator 
George Akerley 
James Amadie 
Robert DiNardo 
Frances Fanelli 
Domenick Fiore 
Ed Flanagan 
Richard Genovese 
Gene Leone 
Lawrence McKenna 
Patrick Mercuri 
Michael Natale 
Joe Nero 
David Schneider 
Fred Scott 
Adeline Tomasone 
William P. Zaccagni 

+CONDUCTING 

Sean Deibler 
*Joseph Primavera 

ENSEMBLES 

Fredrick Kaufman, Coordinator 
Symphony Orchestra 
Joseph Primavera, Conductor 
Symphonic Wind Ensemble 

Douglas Fitzgerald 

Chorus 

Sean Deibler, Conductor 

Jazz Ensembles 

Evan Solot, Director 
William P. Zaccagni, Director 

Chamber Ensembles 

Fredrick Kaufman, Coordinator 
Robert Bloom (Mixed Chamber) 
Sean Deibler (Vocal Chamber Ensemble) 
Joseph dePasquale (String Chamber) 
Robert dePasquale (String Chamber) 
William dePasquale (String Chamber) 
Nicholas DAmico (Percussion Ensemble) 
Robert DiNardo (Jazz Guitar Ensemble) 
George Harpham (String Chamber) 



Jay Krush (Brass Ensemble) 

Jan Krzywicki (Renaissance Ensemble and 

New Music Ensemble) 
John Leonard (Classical Guitar) 
Joseph Primavera (Mixed Chamber) 
Michael Stairs (Piano Accompanying) 
David Wetherill (Brass) 

SECTIONALS 

DePasquale String Quartet (Strings) 
Joseph Primavera (Brass, Woodwinds and 
Percussion) 

SCHOOL OF DANCE 

Susan B. Glazer, Director 
BALLET 

Susan Gottlieb 

Andrew Pap 

Barbara Sandonato 

Carol Luppescu Sklaroff 

Alexei Yudenich 

JAZZ/THEATRE DANCE 

Peter Bertini 

Gary Flannery 

Nancey Berman Kantra 

Donald Lunsford 

Jose Meier 

MODERN DANCE 

Jeffrey Duncan 

Manfred Fischbeck 

JoAnn Fregalette-Jansen 

Susan Glazer 

Diane Grumet 

Naomi Mindlin 

Faye Snow 

Pat Thomas 

Joanne Tulli 



TAP DANCE 

Lavaughn Robinson 
Karen Vorkapich 

DANCE STUDIES 

Peter Bertini (Dance Notation) 

Barbara Bourbon (Anatomy, Kinesiology) 

Annette DiMedio (Functional Music/Intro to 

Music) 
Manfred Fischbeck (Eurythmics) 
Allison Green-Kelley (Acting) 
Linda Haviland (Dance History) 
Gloria Lihotz (Voice) 
Dr. Carol Oatis (Anatomy, Kinesiology) 
Gabriela Roepke (Dance in Literature) 
Pearl Schaeffer (Dance Pedagogy) 
John Tacconelli (Mime) 
Joanne Tulli (Effort, Shape) 

SCHOOL OF THEATRE 

Charles Conwell (Fencing) 

Walter Dallas (Acting Director) 

Manfred Fischbeck (Movement) 

Gary Flannery (Musical Theatre) 

Allison Green-Kelley (Speech, Acting Studio) 

Nancey Kantra (Movement) 

Paul Kelley (Make-Up) 

Gabriela Roepke (Intro to Theatre) 

John Tacconelli (Mime) 

Paul Wagar (Speech) 

HUMANITIES 

Dr. John F. DeWitt, Coordinator 

Janice Bryson 

Kent Christensen 

Clint Gould 

Phoebe Law 

Dr. Camille Paglia 

Dianne Perkins 

Gabriela Roepke 



*Member, The Philadelphia Orchestra 
**Former Member. The Philadelphia Orchestr, 
***Member, Baltimore Symphony 

♦ Graduate Composition Students Only 



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The School of Music of the Philadelphia 
College of the Performing Arts is concerned with 
the preparation and training of young artists for 
careers as professional musicians and music 
educators. Moreover, PCPA is dedicated to the 
total education of its students. The College's goal is 
to produce individuals who possess the means to 
function as musicians and as productive citizens. 

The traditional conservatory approach, that 
which stresses the importance of individualized 
training, is a strong influence in the curriculum of 
the School of Music. The College also places great 
emphasis on performance. 

All music majors at PCPA receive intensive 
training in theory and musicianship as well as back- 
ground in the humanities. The PCPA theory 
program utilizes a unique approach to theoretical 
studies, ensuring each student a solid foundation in 
basic skills, analysis, literature and music history. 
Musicianship (ear-training) studies foster an aural 
awareness of pitch and rhythmic materials. Funda- 
mentals of music theory are correlated with aural 
materials so that both intellectual and aural skills 
develop simultaneously and reinforce each other. 

The importance of individualized training is 
reinforced by the College's on-going Master Class 
Series. Recent artists who have conducted Master 
Classes include pianists Andre Watts, Claude 
Frank, Philippe Entremont, and composers George 
Crumb and Robert Suderberg. 

From time to time, guest conductors rehearse 
the PCPA orchestra. Maestros Riccardo Muti, Ra- 
phael Fruhbeck de Burgos, Stanislaw Skrowaczew- 
ski, and Klaus Tennestedt have been recent guests. 

Coupled with the importance of individualized 
instruction, the College is strongly performance- 
oriented. Performance and involvement in perform- 



ing groups is an important part of the curriculum of 
the School of Music. The College makes available a 
variety of ensembles and performance opportun- 
ities. They include: 

Symphony Orchestra 

PCPA Chorus 

Symphonic Wind Ensemble 

Jazz Ensemble I 

Jazz Ensemble II 

Guitar Ensemble 

Piano Accompanying 

String Chamber Ensembles 

Mixed Chamber Ensembles 

Percussion Ensemble 

New Music Group 

Opera Productions 

Studio Concerts 

Student Composition Concerts 

The Troubadour Program 

Occasionally, students have the privilege of 
participating in very special performances. For 
example, the PCPA Chorus performs periodically 
with the Philadelphia Orchestra. The Troubadour 
Program affords students the opportunity to repre- 
sent the College and to perform throughout the 
Philadelphia area. Each spring, the College 
sponsors a celebration of the performing arts in its 
"IN CONCERT" performance series. This culmina- 
tion of each year's performance efforts is a series 
of concerts, recitals and special programs stressing 
all aspects of music and dance. 

Since 1870, the School of Music has been pre- 
paring and training young artists for professional 
careers as musicians and music educators. PCPA's 
comprehensive music training program is geared to 
assist in the fullest development of each student's 
potential. 



11 



CURRICULUM 

The PCPA curriculum stresses individualized 
training with a performance emphasis and includes 
required courses in the Humanities. Each semester, 
students in the BM and the BM/BME programs 
take one Humanities course, with the remainder 
being in music. The Humanities courses, whenever 
possible, are taught with regard to how they relate 
to the performing arts. The College curriculum 
does not include any courses in mathematics or 
science. Students in the Certificate in Performance 
program do not have a Humanities requirement. 

Major Fields of Study — Undergraduate 



Bassoon 


Piano 


Cello 


Percussion 


Clarinet 


Saxophone 


Classical Guitar 


Theory 


Composition 


Trombone 


Double Bass 


Trumpet 


Flute 


Tuba 


French Horn 


Viola 


Harp 


Violin 


Oboe 


Voice 


Organ 


Voice/Opera Emphasis 




DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 
Bachelor of Music 

The four-year Bachelor of Music program is 
designed for those students who wish to prepare 
for professional careers in performance, composi- 
tion, or who desire a thorough background in 
anticipation of graduate study, studio teaching, or 
further work in specialized fields. 

Double Degree: Bachelor of Music/ 
Bachelor of Music Education 

The five-year Double Degree Program prepares 
students for careers in school music teaching. The 
College takes the position that teachers of music 
must be of the same general level of musical 
accomplishment as students graduating with a BM 
degree. Students are granted two degrees: 
the Bachelor of Music degree in either perform- 
ance or composition and the Bachelor of Music 
Education degree. One-third of the College's music 
majors are enrolled in this double degree program. 

In addition to the requirements for the 
Bachelor of Music degree, double degree 
candidates complete courses in instrumental and 
vocal methods, functional piano, psychology, social 
foundations of education, conducting, lab teaching, 
professional methods, and student teaching. 
Methods classes begin in the sophomore year, 
following the traditional freshman year of core 
requirements. 

The degree program in Music Education is 
fully approved by the Pennsylvania Department of 
Education, and persons receiving certification in 
Pennsylvania can, because of reciprocal arrange- 
ments, easily obtain certification in other states. 
Further, courses taken during the additional two 
semesters required for the double degree at PCPA 
are fully applicable to permanent teacher certifica- 
tion in Pennsylvania without the need for additional 



12 



post-baccalaureate instruction. In this sense, PCPA 
offers a most effective program for those who 
recognize the desirability of teaching and the 
attractiveness of an applied career. 

For its Music Education majors, the College 
offers excellent physical facilities, up-to-date 
curriculum laboratory, closely-supervised lab school 
and student-teaching experiences, a curriculum 
emphasizing practical as well as theoretical 
approaches to the basics of accepted educational 
techniques, a faculty widely-experienced in public 
school and private teaching, and a policy of close 
individual career and college counseling. 

Certificate in Performance 

The Certificate in Performance program is a 
two-year program designed for the student who 
wishes to concentrate exclusively on musical 
studies without requirements in the Humanities. 

Jazz Commercial Music Studies 

This four year program resulting in the 
Bachelor of Music Degree is intended to provide a 
direct and pragmatic educational approach for 
those students who wish to pursue careers as 
performers, arrangers, and composers in the jazz 
and commercial music areas. The program carries 
a total graduation requirement of 128 credits as 
well as a Senior Recital of which half must be 
traditional repertoire. 

The curriculum includes courses in jazz piano, 
jazz improvisation, jazz theory and ear training, 
jazz arranging and film scoring, history of jazz, 
business of music, jazz lab, and recording, using 
the 48-track facilities of Sigma Sound Studios, as 
well as a firm foundation in classical studies. 



Students receive performance opportunities 
through the College's award-winning performing 
jazz ensembles, including three big bands and 
numerous small ensembles. 

Jazz scholarship auditions are scheduled for 
April 1, 1985. Jazz auditions after that date are 
considered non-scholarship and may be scheduled 
according to the audition calendar on page 16. 




Opera Emphasis 

The Opera emphasis program exposes the 
undergraduate student to the rigors and literature 
of the operatic world before they continue with 
advanced work in this field. Voice majors may elect 
this program during the final two-years of a four- 
'year degree program at the College. Courses 
include acting, staging, acting Improvisation, opera 
literature and special musical coachings with the 
opera department faculty. 





14 



ADMISSIONS 

Admission to the College's degree and 
certificate programs is determined by a competitive 
entrance audition and a review of the applicant's 
secondary school record and SAT or ACT scores. 
The admissions program seeks to determine the 
applicant's technical and intuitive grasp of his major 
performance medium and of music fundamentals as 
a whole, his ability to function in a college environ- 
ment, and his overall commitment to music as a 
career and as an art. 
Secondary School Requirements 

Applicants must complete requirements for the 
high school diploma, GED, or the foreign equival- 
ent prior to actual enrollment in the College, with 
the exception of those accepted under the Early 
Admissions Program. Proof of completion of the 
secondary school requirements must be submitted 
to the Office of Admissions before enrollment. 
Application Procedure 

All applicants must submit: 

1. A completed Application for Admission and 
a check or money order to cover the non- 
refundable $30 application fee. 

2. Official transcripts from all secondary 
schools or colleges attended. 

3. SAT or ACT test results. (Requests for 
waiver will be given consideration.) 

4. A brief biographical narrative of 
your musical experience and 
activities. 

In special cases, the SAT or ACT require- 
ment may be waived by the Dean of Admissions. 
The college has no minimum cutoff score for SAT 
or ACT. 

A tear-out Application for Admission is in the 
back of this Bulletin. 



Submission of letters of recommendation is 
desirable but not mandatory unless specifically 
requested. 

When feasible, personal interviews are 
encouraged. This provides the opportunity for the 
applicant and College staff members to become 
personally acquainted and to discuss the 
curriculum and facilities. However, because of 
distance and other factors, the interview is only 
recommended. It is not mandatory. 

Because College enrollment quotas may be 
filled early, applications should be filed as soon as 
possible, in order to avoid the possibility of being 
placed on a waiting list. 

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15 



UNDERGRADUATE MUSIC AUDITIONS 

Music Scholarship Auditions 

All audition dates on or before April 3rd are considered scholarship auditions. Those auditioning after that 
date may be considered for awards depending on the availability of funds. 
Regional Auditions 

Regional Auditions will be conducted in the following cities in Spring 1985. 



Chicago 
Cincinnati 
Dallas 
Houston 
Los Angeles 



New York City 
Pittsburgh 
San Francisco 
St. Louis 
Washington, D.C. 



The College reserves the right to limit the number of auditions in any city because of scheduling problems, or a lack 
of a sufficient number of applicants. 



Philadelphia Undergraduate Music Audition Dates 

Listed below are the Philadelphia Undergraduate Audition Dates for admission to the 1985-86 and 1986-87 
Academic Years. The applicant should indicate the desired audition date in the appropriate space on the 
Application for Admission. Graduate audition dates are listed on page 35. 

1985-86 ACADEMIC YEAR 



(Piano, Percussion *February 6, 1985 
(Strings, Guitar, Harp, Composition, Theory) 

♦February 20, 1985 
(Voice, Opera, Organ) *March 6, 1985 
(Brass, Woodwinds) *March 27, 1985 



(Jazz Auditions) *April 1, 1985 
(All Majors) *April 3, 1985 

(All Majors) April 17, 1985 
(All Majors) May 1, 1985 
(All Majors) May 22, 1985 



November 6, 1985 
December 4, 1985 
'February 5, 1986 
'February 19, 1986 



1986-87 ACADEMIC YEAR 

*March 5, 1986 April 23, 1986 

*March 19, 1986 May 7, 1986 

*March 31, 1986 May 28, 1986 
*April 2, 1986 



♦SCHOLARSHIP AUDITIONS 



16 



AUDITION REPERTOIRE 

The repertoire listed below is recommended 
for the audition, although equivalent literature may 
be substituted where necessary. Performance of 
segments from any or all of the selections may be 
requested. The candidate may also be asked to 
sight-read, if time permits. An accompanist will be 
provided, although applicants may bring their own 
if desired. If there are any questions or you desire 
more specific information, please contact the 
Admissions Office. 

Bassoon — Major and minor scales; one study 
from Wiessenborn Studies (1-50), Op. 8; one move- 
ment of the Mozart Concerto; and the first or third 
movement of a Vivaldi Bassoon Concerto. 
Cello — Major and minor scales and arpeggios; a 
Popper etude; any movement from the first three 
Bach Suites; any sonata comparable to Sam- 
martini's Sonata in G Major; any standard concerto. 

Clarinet — Major and minor scales; first and 
second movements from of the following 
concertos: Weber, First or Second Concerto; 
Mozart, Concerto in A Major, Op. 107, K. 622; 
Weber Concertino, Op. 26; any advanced study 
from H. Klose, Cavellini, or C. Rose. 
Composition — Applicants will submit a portfolio 
of original scores and will be interviewed by 
members of the composition faculty. 
Double Bass — Major and minor scales; Simandl 
Exercises, Book No. 1, pp. 74-75, 104-105; solo 
selected by the candidate. 

Flute — Major and minor scales; J. S. Bach, slow 
movement from one of the Six Sonatas, and a 
piece demonstrating technical proficiency. 



French Horn — Major and minor scales; 
Kopprasch, Vol. 1, No. 15; composition compar- 
able to Mozart Third Horn Concerto. 

Classical Guitar — Diatonic major and minor 
scales (Segovia Fingering); one of the following 
studies of Sor (Segovia Edition): Studies No. 1, 6, 
9, 10 or Carcassi Op 60, Studies No. 20 and 23, or 
any of the Villa Lobos Etudes; Pieces representing 
the 16th and 17th Centuries and the 20th Century. 

Jazz Guitar — Diatonic major and minor scales, 
arpeggios, and chord inversions. A jazz solo 
selected by the applicant. 

Harp — Demonstrate general musicianship and 
ability to sight reading; two etudes or sonatinas 
comparable to Bochsa or Nademan; a solo selected 
by the candidate. 

Oboe — Major and minor scales; a movement from 
any concerto or sonata for the oboe. 

Organ — J. S. Bach Major Prelude and Fugue,' 
Toccata and Fugue, or Fantasy and Fugue; Bach 
Trio Sonata movement; a movement from a 
French organ symphony or suite. On piano: any 
Bach Prelude and Fugue from the Well-Tempered 
Clavier; Chopin Prelude. 

Piano — Major and minor scales and arpeggios; a 
work of J. S. Bach (three-part inventions, Preludes 
and Fugues, W. T. C); any sonata by Haydn 
(except C major, H XVI:35), Mozart (except C 
Major, K. 545) or Beethoven (except Op. 49); a 
composition from the Romantic period (Chopin, 
Schumann, etc.); an Impressionist or 
Contemporary composition chosen by the 



17 



candidate (preferably a work by an American 
composer other than the Gershwin Preludes) to be 
performed from memory. 

Saxophone — Major and minor scales and 
arpeggios; one study from Labanchi Concert 
Etudes, Book 1; a solo selected by the candidate. 

Theory — Applicants will be interviewed by 
members of the theory faculty and are encouraged 
to bring any supporting materials such as original 
analytic essays. 

Trombone — Major and minor scales; Kopprasch, 
Book I; Rochut, Melodious Etudes; and a solo 
selected by the candidate. 

Trumpet — Major and minor scales; any one of 
the Arban Characteristic Studies; a solo selected 
by the candidate. 

Tuba — Major and minor scales; Cimera, Tuba 
Studies, exercises 7 through 11; Wagner, Overture 
to "Die Meistersinger" and a solo to be selected by 
the candidate. 

Percussion — Snare Drum: Loud roll, soft roll; 
prepared solo and sight-reading. Mallets: Marimba, 
Xylophone or Vibraphone prepared solo; major 
and minor scales and arpeggios. Timpani: tuning of 
timpani at several intervals; prepared solo or etude. 

Viola — Major and minor scales and arpeggios; one 
of the Kreutzer Etudes or Mazas Special and 
Brilliant Etudes; one of the following: Handel, 
Concerto in B Minor; Telemann, G Major; or 
Stamitz, A Major; or Hoffmeister Concerto. 



Violin — Major and minor scales (preferably in 
three octaves); selection from the Kreutzer Etudes; 
a sonata by Handel or Mozart, or a concerto by 
Mozart or Haydn. 

Voice — Three classical songs; one early Italian 
song, and two in English. 



A NOTE ABOUT THE JAZZ/ 
COMMERCIAL MUSIC AUDITION 

The Jazz/Commercial Music Audition requires 
the applicant to demonstrate proficiency in both 
the classics and in jazz/commercial music. 

The Jazz/Commercial Music Audition is in two 
parts: 

1. Perform the regular entrance audition de- 
scribed (by instrument) on pages 17 and/or 18. 

2. After performing the above audition appli- 
cants are required to demonstrate proficiency 
in the jazz/commercial area of music. This 
part of the audition includes: A jazz solo or 
improvisation on a 12-bar blues progression. 
Demonstration of improvisation ability is 
recommended, but not mandatory. 

There is only one exception to the information 
listed above. Those applicants applying as a "Jazz 
Guitar Major" are not required to follow the above 
procedure. Instead, Jazz Guitars majors are to 
follow only the audition instruction listed for Jazz 
Guitar on page 17. 



18 



PLACEMENT TESTING PROGRAM 

Following admission to the college, a series of 
placement tests is administered. These tests are 
given to allow a realistic assessment of the 
applicant's strengths and weaknesses and are not 
factors affecting admission to the college. 

The following tests are part of the Placement 
Testing Program: 

1. The Ear Training Placement Exam 
deals with the ability to match pitches, 
identify intervals and triads, and to sight- 
sing melodies and tap rhythms. 

2. The Theory Placement Exam 
reviews the applicant's conversance with 
major and minor (natural, harmonic, 
melodic) scales, intervals, chords, and basic 
music terminology. 

3. The Basic Piano Placement Exam 
(for non-keyboard majors only) reviews the 
applicant's ability (if any) to play the piano. 

Placement Exam results are used as a general 
index of musical accomplishment, and as a specific 
mechanism for class assignments. The tests allow 
us to place students in class sections with students 
of similar ability. 





The DePasquale String Quartet, in residence, faculty (Robert 
dePasquale, William dePasquale, George Harpham, and Joseph 
dePasquale) 



19 



Maestro Riccardo Muti, Music Director and Conductor of the 
Philadelphia Orchestra, conducts the PCPA Orchestra during 
rehearsal. 




feu 

Pianist Susan Starr, faculty, coaches student 



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20 



21 



The School of Dance of the Philadelphia 
College of the Performing Arts is dedicated to the 
training of young artists for careers as professional 
dancers, dance educators and choreographers. The 
School is founded on the belief that today's profes- 
sional dancers must have extensive knowledge and 
experience in their chosen field as well as skills in 
related disciplines. With this in mind, the College 
offers a broad-based curriculum which prepares 
students to enter the professional world of dance 
with confidence. 

Daily technique classes in ballet, modern 
dance, and jazz dance are basic to all courses of 
study. Additional course offerings include tap, 
improvisation, repertory, and partnering, as well as 
electives such as Spanish dance, character, and 
mime. In courses such as dance history and score 
reconstruction, students gain a historical 
perspective of different dance traditions. Music, 
voice, and drama classes provide dancers with the 
necessary links to the allied performing arts. 
Practical experience in aspects of production is an 
essential part of the program. Various courses in 
the humanities and social science are offered, with 
special emphasis given to their relation to the arts. 

Performance is an essential and enjoyable part 
of the curriculum and serves to integrate class- 
room work with stage experience. Students are 
encouraged to organize their own studio work- 
shops and concerts in addition to participating in 
the regularly-scheduled performances. Each spring, 
the year-long efforts culminate in a celebration of 
the arts — the "IN CONCERT" performance series. 
Students perform a wide range of classical and 
modern repertory in addition to original works 
choreographed for them by the faculty. The 
College also has its own modern dance/jazz 
company, CONSORT, which performs throughout 
the year. Auditions for the Company are held each 



September. All dance students are eligible to audition. 

Other performance opportunities include the 
Troubadour Program, a community outreach 
program, which enables students to perform in 
schools and institutions throughout the Delaware 
Valley. The School's affiliation with cultural 
institutions throughout the city provides students 
with the opportunity to participate in professional 
productions. 

Performance opportunities involve students in all 
facets of production, including lighting, costuming, 
make-up, and set design. Through this process, 
students gain an understanding of dance as a 
performing art. 

The large faculty of professional artists brings 
with it a wide range of experience and tradition. 
Small classes and individualized instruction provide 
a creative and exciting atmosphere where students 
are challenged and guided. 

Former students have achieved success in 
many different companies throughout the world. 
They have been performers with such renowned 
companies as Alvin Ailey, Bejart, Joffrey, Jose 
Limon, and Pearl Lang, and teachers in such 
institutions as the North Carolina School of the 
Arts. For these students, the high level of technical 
and artistic training acquired in the PCPA School 
of Dance contributed to their subsequent success. 

CURRICULUM 

The demands of today's professional dance 
world require that dancers be familiar with more 
than one style of dance. For this reason, the College 
has created a core program including all basic dance 
styles for all students. 

The intensive training in dance is comple- 
mented by performance opportunities and required 
elective courses in the humanities. 



Core Curriculum 

Freshman Year 
Ballet 

Modern Dance 
Jazz and Tap 
Eurythmics/ 

Improvisation 
Dance Elective* 
Introduction to Music 
Piano 

Humanities Courses 
Ensemble/Dance Lab 



Sophomore Year 
Ballet 

Modern Dance 
Jazz and Tap 
Anatomy/ 

Kinesiology 
Dance Elective* 
Notation 
Dance History 
Composition for Dancers 
Humanities Courses 
Ensemble/Dance Lab 



*Dance electives: Spanish, Ethnic, Mime, 
Character Dance, Dance in Literature, Yoga, Voice 



In the third and fourth years of study, students 
major in Ballet, Modern Dance, or Jazz Dance 
while maintaining a nominal amount of study in the 
related styles. 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) 

The BFA degree program is designed for those 
students who desire to prepare for a professional 
performing career in dance. The program is 
normally completed in four years of full-time study 
and carries a total graduation requirement of 130- 
133 credits, depending on the major field of study. 
24 of these credits are in liberal arts courses and 
13 are in music courses. Graduation requirements 
for all dance majors include the successful 
completion of performance requirement. 



Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance Education 
(BFA in Dance Ed.) 

The BFA in Dance Education degree program 
is a five-year program specifically designed for 
those students whose primary intention is to enter 
the dance profession as a teacher of dance. The 
College takes the position that teachers of dance 
must be of the same high level of accomplishment 
as students graduating from the four-year BFA 
program. For this reason, the course of study for 
the first four years is the same as that followed by 
non-education majors. The fifth year of study offers 
students the opportunity to obtain practical and 
theoretical training in teaching methods and styles 
while strengthening their foundation in dance 
techniques. 

Although there is currently no Pennsylvania 
certification for dance teachers, this program of 
study does include a semester of supervised 
student teaching in schools and/or private studios 
located in the Philadelphia area. The total require- 
ment for graduation from this program is 165-168 
credits. 

Fifth Year Curriculum (Dance Education) 
Semester IX Semester X 



Ballet 

Jazz Dance 
Modern Dance 
Dance Education 

Seminar 
Methods of Teaching 

Dance in Secondary 

Schools 
Social/Folk/Square 

Dance 
Society & Education 



Ballet 

Jazz Dance 
Modern Dance 
Dance Education 

Seminar 
Student Teaching 



22 



Certificate in Dance 

The two-year Certificate program is designed 
specifically for those students who wish to concen- 
trate on dance studies without a liberal arts 
requirement. This program gives students concen- 
trated study in the broad spectrum of dance styles 
and develops students' familiarity, proficiency, and 
performing ability in these areas. Graduation 
requirements include the successful completion of 
the performance requirement as well as the 
prescribed course of study. 

ADMISSIONS 

Admission to the College's degree and certifi- 
cate programs is determined by a review of the 
applicant's secondary school record, SAT or ACT 
scores, and audition results. The admissions 
program seeks to determine the applicant's tech- 
nical and artistic grasp of his or her major perform- 
ance medium and of dance fundamentals as a 
whole. It also evaluates the applicant's ability to 
function in a college environment and overall 
commitment to dance as a career and as an art. 

In special cases the SAT or ACT requirement 
may be waived by the Director of Admissions. No 
specific SAT or ACT cut-off is employed by the College. 

Applicants must complete requirements for the 
high school diploma, GED, or the foreign 
equivalent prior to actual enrollment in the College, 
with the exception of those accepted under the 
Early Admissions Program. Official transcripts of 
secondary school credits earned must be submitted 
to the Admissions Office before enrollment. 
Application Procedures 
All applicants must submit: 

1. A completed Application for Admission and 
a check or money order to cover the non- 
refundable $30 application fee. 

2. Official transcripts from all secondary 
r,o schools or colleges attended. 

3. SAT or ACT scores. (Requests for waiver 



will be given consideration.) 
4. A one-page resume of previous dance train- 
ing including the names of teachers, studios, 
length of study, and performance experience. 
This should be attached to the application, 
and a photo is helpful but not required. 

DANCE AUDITIONS 

The dance audition is of major importance in 
the admissions process. Selection is based upon 
the applicant's current level of technical proficiency 
and potential for professional development. The 
audition consists of one-half hour class each in Ballet, 
Modern Dance, and Jazz Dance. Applicants must 
also perform a dance composition limited to two 
minutes which may be the applicant's own choreog- 
raphy. Musical accompaniment must be provided on 
a cassette tape or record. 
VIDEO-TAPED AUDITIONS 

If distance makes a personal audition 
impossible, two letters of recommendation from 
dance teachers with whom the applicant has 
studied and a video tape of performance will be 
acceptable. We request that video tapes submitted 
be either in Beta-I Format or VHS Format. 
All video-taped dance auditions must show: 

1. Ballet and either modern or jazz. 

2. Warm-up including both floor work and 
barre. Barre to be taped sideways and 
frontwards and should include: plies-demi 
and grand, tendues, degages (battement 
jetes), ronds-de-jambes, grands battements, 
developpes (extensions) — en croix. 

3. Center work should include small and large 
jumps, pirouettes, adagio and a modern or 
jazz combination. 

4. Locomotor in jazz or modern dance — a 
combination of at least 8 measures which 
includes leaps and turns. 

5. A short work of your own, not longer than 
two minutes. 



DANCE AUDITIONS 

Dance Scholarship Auditions 

All auditions on or before April 3rd are considered scholarship auditions. Those auditioning after that date 
may be considered for awards depending on the availability of funds. 



Regional Auditions 

Regional auditions will be conducted in the following cities in Spring 1985. 



Chicago 
Cincinnati 
Dallas 
Houston 
Los Angeles 



New York City 
Pittsburgh 
San Francisco 
St. Louis 
Washington, D.C. 



The College reserves the right to limit the number of auditions in any city because of scheduling problems, 
or a lack of a sufficient number of applicants. 



Philadelphia Audition Dates 

Listed below are the Philadelphia Audition Dates for admission to the 1985-86 and 1986-87 Academic Years. 
The applicant should indicate the desired audition date in the appropriate space on the Application for Admission. 

1985-86 ACADEMIC YEAR 



*February 6, 1985 
*February 20, 1985 
*March 6, 1985 
*March 27, 1985 



"April 3, 1985 

April 17, 1985 
May 1, 1985 
May 22, 1985 



November 6, 1985 

December 4, 1985 

*February 5, 1986 



1986-87 ACADEMIC YEAR 

*February 19, 1986 
*March 5, 1986 
*March 19, 1986 



*April 2, 1986 

April 23, 1986 
May 7, 1986 
May 28, 1986 



*SCHOLARSHIP AUDITIONS 



24 






Barbara Sandonato, faculty 



Facilities 

The School of Dance is housed at 309 South 
Broad Street and in the Annex Building at 313 S. 
Broad. These buildings house six spacious studios 
equipped with barres, mirrors and resilient floors. 
Dance administrative offices, dressing rooms, 
lockers, showers, and lounges are also located in 
these buildings. 

In addition to the main PCPA Library, 
students have available to them one of the largest 
and most diversified collections devoted to dance 
in the United States. Books, films, records, and 
journals are available to students for research 
studies and coursework. 



25 



CAMPUS VISITS 

Applicants are encouraged to visit the College. 
An appointment is required in advance for a 
student to attend a day of dance classes or to meet 
with dance or admissions personnel. Visits are an 
excellent opportunity for the applicant to 
experience our program and to meet college 
officials, but is not part of the audition procedure. 





Dancer Rudolf Nureyev receives an honorary doctorate degree 
from PCPA in Spring of 1980. 




Barbara Sandonato and Alexei Yudenich. faculty 



26 






27 



Manfred Fischbeck. faculty 




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Actor training at PCPA is designed to provide 
practical education in the craft of acting, reinforced 
by courses in literature and the arts, to create an 
intelligent actor. Our purpose is to educate for the 
profession of acting. 

By involving the student in a professional 
training atmosphere, PCPA faculty encourage the 
acting student's emotional, physical and intellectual 
capacities and focus them on the process of acting. 

The curriculum is designed to develop the 
actor's basic tools: the voice, the body and the 
mind. Each course addresses a specific need in the 
development of an actor and stresses the actor's 
ability to find artistic individuality, relaxation and 
concentration in performance and to make 
intelligent decisions in the growth of a character. 

Performance before an audience is not 
required until each of the actor's tasks is under- 
stood and fulfilled. 




Curriculum 

Freshman Year 

Acting Studio 

Speech for the Actor 

Intro, to Theatre 

Movement 

Mime 

English Composition 

Musical Theatre 

Sophomore Year 
Acting Studio 
Speech for the Actor 
Make-up/Costume 
Movement 
Arts in History I 
Musical Theatre 

Junior Year 
Acting Studio 
Speech for the Actor 
Movement 

Personality & Creativity 
Rehearsal & 
Performance 

Senior Year 
Acting Studio 
Rehearsal & 

Performance 
Musical Theatre 



Acting Studio 

Speech for the Actor 

Intro, to Theatre 

Movement 

Fencing 

Dramatic Literature 

Musical Theatre 



Acting Studio 
Speech for the Actor 
Make-up/Costume 
Movement 
Arts in History II 
Musical Theatre 



Acting Studio 
Speech for the Actor 
Movement 

Science and the Arts 
Rehearsal & 
Performance 



Acting Studio 
Rehearsal & 

Peformance 
Musical Theatre 



29 



The late composer Richard Rodgers and actress Liu Ullmann 
congratulate each other upon receiving honorary doctorates from 
PCPA. 



DEGREE PROGRAM 

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) 

The BFA degree program is designed for those 
students who desire to prepare for a professional 
acting career. The program is normally completed 
in four years of full-time study and carries a total 
graduation requirement of 123-126 credits, of which 
24 are in the liberal arts. Graduation requirements 
include successful completion of performance 
requirements. 

ADMISSIONS 

Admission to the College's acting program is 
determined by a review of the applicant's secon- 
dary school record, SAT or ACT scores, and 
audition results. The admissions program seeks to 
determine the applicant's grasp of the fundamen- 
tals of acting and technical and artistic potential. It 
also evaluates the applicant's ability to function in a 
college environment and overall commitment to 
acting as a career and as an art. 

In special cases the SAT and ACT require- 
ment may be waived by the Dean of Admissions. 
No specific SAT or ACT cut-off is employed by 
the College. 

Applicants must complete requirements for the 
high school diploma, GED, or the foreign equivalent 
prior to actual enrollment in the College, with the 
exception of those accepted under the Early 
Admissions Program. Official transcripts of secon- 
dary school credits earned must be submitted to 
the Admissions Office. 



Application Procedures 

All applicants must submit: 

1. A completed Application for Admission with 
$30 Application Fee. 

2. Copies of all transcripts from colleges and/ or 
high schools. 

3. SAT or ACT scores. (Requests for waiver 
will be given consideration.) 

4. A one-page resume of previous theatre 
training including the names of teachers, 
studios, length of study and performance 
experience. 

5. A letter of recommendation concerning 
dramatic ability. This letter can be written 
by a high school or college acting coach or 
by a theatre director or producer with 
whom the applicant has worked. 

THEATRE AUDITIONS 

Each applicant must perform two scenes from 
memory. These scenes are to be selected from 
published plays, one from comedy and one from 
drama. Each scene is not to exceed three minutes 
in performance time. After the scenes 
performance, the applicant will participate in an 
interview which will be considered a part of the 
audition process. Auditions will be held at PCPA, 
or when appropriate, in the cities listed under 
Regional Auditions on page 31. 



THEATRE AUDITIONS 

Theatre Scholarship Auditions 

All auditions on or before April 3rd are considered scholarship auditions. Those auditioning after that date 
may be considered for awards depending on the availability of funds. 

Regional Auditions 

Regional auditions will be conducted in the following cities in Spring 1985. 



Chicago 
Cincinnati 
Dallas 
Houston 
Los Angeles 



New York City 
Pittsburgh 
San Francisco 
St. Louis 
Washington, D.C. 



The College reserves the right to limit the number of auditions in any city because of scheduling problems, 
or a lack of a sufficient number of applicants. 

Philadelphia Theatre Audition Dates 

Listed below are the Philadelphia Audition Dates for admission to the 1985-86 and 1986-87 Academic 
Years. The applicant should indicate the desired audition date in the appropriate space on the Application for 
Admission. 

1985-86 ACADEMIC YEAR 

♦February 6, 1985 *April 3, 1985 

♦February 20, 1985 April 17, 1985 

*March 6, 1985 May 1, 1985 

*March 27, 1985 May 22, 1985 

1986'87 ACADEMIC YEAR 

November 6, 1985 *February 19, 1986 *April 2, 1986 

December 4, 1985 *March 5, 1986 April 23, 1986 

♦February 5, 1986 *March 19, 1986 May 7, 1986 



May 28, 1986 



31 



♦SCHOLARSHIP AUDITIONS 



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The Graduate Program in Music is an 
intensive two-year course of study leading to the 
Master of Music degree. It is intended for the 
unusually gifted music student who has 
demonstrated excellence on the undergraduate 
level and who can benefit from advanced study in 
music and the humanities. PCPA affords the 
opportunity to study with an outstanding faculty 
including many members of the Philadelphia 
Orchestra, artists of national and international 
acclaim and recognized teachers in music and the 
humanities. A full range of performance 
opportunities is incorporated into each program. 
Degree programs offered include: Composition, 
Performance, and Opera Singing. 

The Master of Music in Composition 
Degree program is based on four broad 
objectives: 

1. To broaden the student's compositional 
skills with reference to compositions written 
for voice, acoustical instruments, and the 
electronic idiom. 

2. To acquaint the student with basic skills of 
research and to assist him in furthering his 
knowledge of music theory and music 
history/literature through the application of 
these basic research skills. 

3. To develop the student's ability to conduct, 
coach, and to prepare a composition for 
performance. 

4. To develop effective skills in writing and 
critical inquiry such that the student's 
perspective of music is broadened through 
studies in the humanities. 



The Master of Music in Performance 

Degree program is based on three broad 
objectives: 

1. To advance the student's performing skill in 
the major area. 

2. To acquaint the student with basic skills of 
research and to assist him in furthering his 
knowledge of music theory and music 
history/literature through the application of 
these basic research skills. 

3. To develop effective skills in writing and 
critical inquiry such that the student's 
perspective of music is broadened through 
studies in the humanities. 




33 



The Master of Music in Opera Singing 
Degree program is based on the following two 
broad objectives: 

1. To train singers in a professionally oriented 
program to be more complete performers 
in the areas of singing, acting, and movement. 
It is intended to enable them to reach a 
high level of theatrical and musical com- 
munication. 

2. To acquaint students with operatic 
literature and to afford them the 
opportunity to participate in productions. 

Specific requirements for graduation are 
determined by the graduate faculty of each major 
discipline. Current requirements are available from 
the Coordinator of Graduate Studies. 

Admissions Criteria 

The following criteria are important factors 
which are considered when reviewing the 
applicant's qualifications for admission to a 
graduate program: 

1. Level of performance or compositional 
ability. 

2. Breadth of general musical knowledge, 
measured in four areas: theory, musician- 
ship, music history, and music literature. 

3. Facility in written and oral organization and 
expression of ideas. 

4. Personal commitment to a career goal. 

5. Keyboard proficiency at a basic level. 

6. Academic record as viewed through 
transcript(s). 




World famous tenor Placido Domingo receives PCPA honorary 
doctorate, Spring 1982. 



34 



Application Procedure 

1. Complete and submit the Graduate 
Application for Admission, available from the 
Office of Admissions, along with the $30. 
application fee. 
~2. Submit a list of all repertoire studied and 
performed or compositions completed. 
Performers will also list the repertoire to be 
performed at the audition and composers 
will indicate which compositions will be 
submitted in a portfolio. 

3. Official transcripts from all post-secondary 
schools attended must be sent directly to 
the Office of Admissions. 

4. Three letters of recommendation from 
current or past teachers, school officials, or 
prominent musicians must be submitted on 
the appropriate forms. 

5. An essay (1000 word minimum) explaining 
how study at PCPA will help the applicant 
achieve his or her career goals must be 
submitted with the application. 

6. Foreign students must take the TOEFL 
examination (Test of English as a Foreign 
Language). 

Following the completion of the application 
procedure outlined above, the applicant will be 
auditioned by the Graduate Committee and 
appropriate members of the applied faculty. 
Applicants will have a fifteen-minute interview with 
members of the Graduate Policy Committee. The 
Committee will then review all of the application 
materials and a decision will be made. 



Audition Repertoire 

Graduate auditions are one half hour in length 
and should be performed from memory. Instru- 
mentalists may choose their own repertoire which 
must reflect different style periods and include at 
least one Twentieth Century Work. Vocalists, 
including opera applicants, should prepare 
selections in English, German, French, and Italian. 
Composers should come prepared to discuss their 
compositions, compositional style, previous train- 
ing and compositional goals. All instrumentalists 
and vocalists will be expected to sightread a piece 
selected by the Graduate Committee. A competent 
accompanist will be available at each audition. 

Taped auditions will be accepted only at the 
discretion of the Graduate Policy Committee and 
by prior arrangement. Any acceptance by tape will 
be tentative pending a live audition upon arrival at 
the College. 

Graduate Audition Dates 

Please indicate on your application the date on 
which you prefer to audition: 

February 27, 1985 
March 13, 1985 
March 27, 1985 

April 24, 1985 

Scholarship dates are indicated in black bold 
print. However, applicants applying after those 
dates may be considered for scholarship if funds 
are still available. 



35 



Recent Opera Department productions include: (clockwise) 
Monteverdi's Orfeo, Massenet's Manon, Puccini's Gianni 
Schicchi, and Poulenc's Dialogues of the Carmelites. 






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PHILADELPHIA 
COLLEGE OF THE 
PERFORMING ARTS 

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Student Life 

The focal point of most student life at PCPA is 
involvement in the various ensembles and 
productions. In addition, students maintain the 
Student Government Association, electing student 
officers annually. An active student chapter of 
Music Educators National Conference is an integral 
part of student life for many at PCPA, while 
additional student organizations are available. 

The Center City location offers a variety of 
restaurants, movies, professional touring company 
productions, all types of shopping, museums, 
libraries, historical areas of interest, and other 
forms of entertainment. All of these are within 
walking distance of the College. 

Student Housing 

The RESIDENCE HALL (Furness Hall) is 
located about two blocks from the main campus. 
Rooms are available for two, three and/or four 
persons. Each room is equipped with a small 
kitchen, therefore no food service is available. 

All freshmen are expected to reside in the 
dormitory, however those requesting space after 
June 1st cannot be assured of a room, since a 
limited number are available. 

The Summer Session 

The College offers a three-week and a six- 
week Summer Session. Students may register for 
the courses on a regular credit basis. A list of 
course offerings may be obtained from the 
Registrar after May 1st. 

ACT 101 

Made possible through a grant from the 



Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Office of Equal 
Opportunity, ACT 101 is geared to assisting 
educationally and economically disadvantaged 
students to the completion of the certificate or 
bachelor's degree. 

The Program provides for specialized tutoring 
and counseling in select courses in music, dance, 
and the humanities. In addition, if enrollment merits 
it, a six-week pre-college summer preparatory 
session is offered. All services offered by ACT 101 
are free of charge, and every effort is made to 
distribute available financial aid in such a way as to 
arrange adequate aid packages to all ACT 101 
students. Those who qualify for participation in the 
program must be residents of the Commonwealth 
of Pennsylvania and must demonstrate economic 
and educational need within the regulations 
specified in the program guidelines. Interested 
persons are encouraged to contact the ACT 101 
Coordinator. 

Pre-College Training 

The College has found that the applicants who 
are best prepared for its programs of study are 
those who have had a minimum of two to five 
years of serious study prior to matriculation. 

PCPA offers pre-college level training in music 
and dance to persons of all ages on a non-credit 
basis in the Music Conservatory and Dance 
Extension Divisions of the school. Instruction is 
available on all instruments, voice, theory, 
composition, ballet, modern dance, and jazz dance. 

PCPA applicants are not required to study in 
one of the School's pre-college divisions, however 
many have found it to be an excellent preparation 



for the college bound student. Additional informa- 
tion is available from the Conservatory Division, or 
the Dance Office. 

Early Admissions Program 

The Early Admissions Program is available to 
those who have completed the sophomore year of 
high school with at least a B average. This special 
program allows the student of exceptional talent 
and ability to complete high school and begin 
college simultaneously. Those accepted into the 
program are not eligible for college graduation until 
which time all high school graduation requirements 
have been completed and a diploma awarded. 

This program is available ONLY to those who 
have exceptional talent, ability, and potential in an 
area of performance as well as high academic 
achievement and the full cooperation and approval 
of the College, the applicant's high school and 
parents. 

Those interested should arrange for a personal 
interview with the Dean of Admissions. 

Part-Time Students 

Part-time study is available to degree and non- 
degree students each semester. Interested persons 
should contact the Dean of Admissions for 
information regarding registration procedures and 
instructions. 

Transfer Students 

Students wishing to transfer to PCPA from 
another college should follow the same application 
procedures as outlined on pages 15-16 for music 



majors, pages 23-24 for dance majors and pages 30- 
31 for theatre majors. 

Any credits earned at another institution other 
than in the applicant's major area will be evaluated 
and validated by the PCPA Applied Music, 
Theoretical Studies, General Studies/Humanities, 
Music Education and/or Dance Division before 
they will be accepted for credit toward a PCPA 
degree. Advanced standing in the major area is 
determined as a result of the audition. The 
applicant may be asked to take tests which will aid 
in the evaluation of skill and knowledge. In no case 
will credit earned with a grade below "C" be 
accepted. Transfer students may receive no more 
than four semesters advanced standing in the 
major area. 

Foreign Students 

Foreign students who wish to enter PCPA 
must comply with all provisions of the Immigration 
Act and will be admitted only on a full-time basis. 
Immigration information is available from U.S. 
Embassy offices in foreign countries. 

Foreign students are required to take the TEST 
OF ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE 
(TOEFL) or provide proof of English proficiency. 
The College requires a TOEFL score of 450 or 
higher. TOEFL information is available from the 
Educational Testing Service, Box 899, Princeton, 
New Jersey, 08541, USA. 

The 1-20 Form, issued by the College for 
immigration purposes, will not be forwarded until 
the applicant has been fully admitted, provided an 
acceptable TOEFL score or the equivalent, and 
submitted the required advance tuition deposit. 



40 



FINANCIAL AID 

PCPA offers financial aid to qualified students 
to help defray educational expenses. Some of the 
awards may be offered singly or in various 
"package" combinations. Last year, over 85% of 
the PCPA Student Body received aid through 
PCPA institutional grants and employment, state 
and federal need-based programs (grants, loans, 
employment), private grants and scholarships, or a 
combination of all types of aid. 

The standard FEDERALLY-SPONSORED 

PROGRAMS at PCPA are: 

*Basic Educational Opportunity Grant 
(BEOG/PELL Grants) 

*Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant 
(SEOG) 
*College Work-Study Program (CWSP) 
*National Direct Student Loan (NDSL) 
*Federally-Insured Loans 
The following STATE PROGRAMS are 
available at PCPA: 

*PHEAA (Pennsylvania residents only) 
*Guaranteed Student Loan (GSL) 
The following INSTITUTIONAL PROGRAMS 
are available at PCPA: 

Tuition Remission Grants (TRG) 
*Private scholarships and awards 
To be considered for any or all of the above types of 
student aid, applicants must submit: 

1. The Financial Aid Form (FAF) published 
by the College Scholarship Service. FAF'sare 
available at any secondary guidance office 
or by writing to the PCPA Financial Aid 
office. 



2. The PCPA Financial Aid Application to the 
Director of Financial Aid. 

3. The appropriate federal or state applications 
for individual programs. 

NOTE: Those who wish to be considered for 
a Tuition Remission Grant and/or 
private scholarships and awards must 
apply for admission and complete the 
required audition prior to April 3. 

ALL QUESTIONS OR PROBLEMS 
PERTAINING TO FINANCIAL AID OR 
APPLICATION PROCESSES SHOULD BE 
ADDRESSED TO THE DIRECTOR OF 
FINANCIAL AID. 




Maestro Stanislaw Skrowaczewski conducts the PCPA 
Orchestra during a rehearsal session 



41 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

The following scholarships are incorporated into PCPA's Tuition 
Remission Grant program. Applicants will be considered for these and 
other scholarship awards when applying for a Tuition Remission Grant. 



The Lisa Caserta Memorial Scholar- 
ship — awarded annually to a piano major. 

The D. Hendrick Ezerman Piano 
Scholarship — awarded annually to an 
accomplished musician majoring in piano studies. 

The Edwin B. Garrigues Scholarship — 

awarded annually to an outstanding undergraduate 
music student. 

The John T. Mathis II Saxophone 
Scholarship — awarded annually to a saxophone 
student whose performance orientation is in 
modern music. 



The PCPA Alumni Scholarships — 

awarded annually to outstanding students in music, 
dance and theatre. 



The Clement C. Petrillo Piano 
Scholarship — awarded annually to a deserving 
piano major. 

The Presser Scholarship — awarded 
annually to a qualified music student at conclusion 
of the junior year. 

The Elizabeth Ann Pulaski Memorial 
Scholarship — awarded annually to a major in 
jazz dance studies. 



The Edmund J. Parks Memorial 
Scholarship — awarded annually to a foreign 
student of string instruments. 



The Elizabeth M. Strine Piano 
Scholarship — awarded annually to a qualified 
piano student at the graduate level. 



42 



TUITION 

Undergraduate 
Full-Time 
Full-Time 



1984-85 TUITION AND FEES 



Schools of Dance and Theatre Per Semester 
School of Music Per Semester 



Part-Time Rates 

Individual Major Instruction 

Class Instruction 
Graduate 

Full-Time School of Music 

Part-Time Rates 

Individual Major Instruction 

Class Instruction 
Music, Opera 



Per Hour 

Per Credit Hour 

Per Semester 

Per Hour 

Per Credit Hour 



$3045.00 
$3045.00-$3355.00* 



$260.00 
$3255.00-$3525.00 



$350.00 



43 



COLLEGE HOUSING (Room Only), 1984-85 

Double-room occupancy Per Semester $1000.00 

FEES AND CHARGES, 1984-85 

Application Fee $ 30 

Registration Fee (Per Semester, Part-Time Only) $ 25 

Tuition Deposit (Not refundable after July 1) $ 100 

Health Fee $ 15 

Examination for Advanced Standing $ 50 

Late Registration Fee $ 50 

Late Tuition Payment Fee $ 50 

Special or Make-Up Examination $ 25 

Returned Checks $ 5 

Graduation Fee $ 60 

Transcripts (each) $ 2 

Instrumental Rental Fee (Per Semester) $ 25 

For Double Degree Students Only) 

Instrument Deposit (Per Semester) $ 50 

(For Double Degree Students Only) 

Ensemble Library Deposit (Per Semester) $ 10 

Course Overload Fee — Undergraduate (Per Credit Hour) $ 250 

Course Overload Fee — Graduate (Per Credit Hour) $ ** 

*A variable rate, dependent upon Individual Major Instruction. 
**A variable rate, dependent upon specific Graduate Program. 



TUITION DEPOSIT 

A tuition deposit is required of all new 
students when accepted and is credited to the first 
semester's tuition. It is not refundable after July 1 
for students entering in the Fall Semester or 
December 1 for students entering in the Spring 
Semester. 

A tuition deposit is also required of all return- 
ing students in November for the spring semester 
and prior to registration in April for the fall 
semester. The deposit is credited to the following 
semester's tuition and is not refundable after July 
1 for those registering for the Fall Semester and 
December 1 for those registering for the Spring 
Semester. 

PAYMENT OF FEES 

Tuition and fees are payable on or before 
August 1 for the Fall semester and on or before 
December 1 for the Spring semester. Credit will be 
allowed for amounts paid at registration. 

Students who are delinquent in payment of 
financial obligations will not be permitted to attend 
classes or register for the following semester and 
will be subject to appropriate late payment and late 
registration fees. No transcript, grade report, 
degree or certificate will be issued to a student 
until all tuition, fees, fines, emergency loans and 
any other assessed charges are paid in full. 

COLLEGE REFUND POLICY 

The College must engage its faculty and make 
other financial commitments in advance of each 
term in accordance with the number of students 
who have expressed their intent to enroll. When 



students withdraw from the College, vacancies are 
created which cannot be filled and the College's 
financial commitment must still be honored. 

The refund policy at PCPA applies only to a 
complete withdrawal from all courses for which 
either a full-time or part-time student is registered. 
Any partial withdrawal (i.e. from individual courses) 
will not result in a partial refund of tuition. A 
change in tuition assessment status from full-time 
to part-time will not be permitted on or after the 
first day of classes. 

Any student who withdraws from the College 
before the first day of classes will receive a 100% 
refund of tuition paid (excluding fees and charges). 

For those who withdraw on the first day of 
classes or anytime thereafter, an administrative 
committee may review refund requests. When 
approved, the refund schedule allows for up to 80% 
refund during the first week of classes; 60% during 
the second week; 40% during the third week; 20% 
during the fourth week; and no refund after the 
fourth week of classes. 

In computing refunds, the date of withdrawal is 
the date on which the Registrar receives written 
notice from the student, his parents, or his 
guardian. If notice is received after withdrawal, 
refunds cannot be made retroactive to date leaving. 

No refunds will be made to students dismissed 
at any time for unsatisfactory academic standing or 
infraction of regulations. 

Refunds for students receiving financial 
assistance from scholarships, grants, or loans will 
be returned first to the grantors in accordance with 
their requirements, and the difference, if any, will 
be refunded to the student. 



POLICY STATEMENT — The Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts adheres to a non-discriminatory policy with regard to race, color, sex, national 
ethnic origin, and religious affiliation with regard to the review, consideration, and final disposition of applications for admission to the College. It adheres to 
a full non-discriminatory policy in the administration of its educational programs and policies, financial aid, and all other college-administered programs and 
activities. The College reserves the right to change the regulations, tuition, fees, faculty, and other information contained in this publication at any time 
without prior notice. However, in the event that any such changes become necessary, attempts will be made to publicize them adequately. 



44 



FACULTY BIOGRAPHIES 



RICHARD ALEXANDER (Organ)-BM, Curtis Institute of 
Music; MM, Yale University; Research Fellow, Institute of 
Sacred Music of the Yale University School of Divinity; organist 
and choirmaster of St. Paul's Church, Chestnut Hill. 

JAMES V. AMADIE (Modern Harmony and Jazz 
Theory)— BME, Philadelphia Musical Academy (Philadelphia 
College of the Performing Arts); former jazz pianist with the 
Woody Herman Orchestra; performed at New York's 
Copacabana; accompanist for Mel Torme, Bobby Rydelland Al 
Martino; performed with the Philadelphia Orchestra Brass 
Ensemble; composed for Woody Herman, Oscar Peterson and 
Charlie Byrd; conducted score for National Football League 
films. 

ADELCHI LOUIS ANGELUCCI (BassoonJ-Graduate, 
Curtis Institute of Music; member of the Philadelphia Orchestra 
since 1950. Student of Walter Guetter, Bassoonist; former 
member of the Pennsylvania Symphony and principal 
bassoonist with the National Symphony Orchestra; former 
member of ballet and opera orchestras of Philadelphia. 

JEANNE BEHREND (Rano)-Graduate, Curtis Institute of 
Music ; studied piano with Josef Hofmann and composition with 
Rosario Scalero; received the Distinguished Daughter of 
Pennsylvania award in 1978. 

NANCEY BERMAN KANTRA (Modem Jazz Dance)- 
BA, University of Colorado; MFA, Philadelphia College of 
Performing Arts; has been principal dancer with The 
Philadelphia Dance Company since 1978; has taught 
extensively throughout the Tri-State area. 

PETER BERTINI (Jazz Dance) -Graduate, SUNY at 
Brockport and Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts; 
additional study at the Clark Center for the Performing Arts and 
Jo Jo's Dance Factory; performed with The Great Chazy 
Dance Company and the Schuylkill Valley Regional Dance 
Theatre. 



ROBERT BLOOM (OboeJ— Graduate, Curtis Institute of 
Music; student of Marcel Tabuteau; former member of the 
Rochester Orchestra; former solo oboist with the NBC 
Symphony Orchestra under the direction of ArturoToscanini; 
toured with the Bach Aria Group and served as solo oboist; 
Professor Emeritus at Yale University; former faculty member 
at the Juilliard School of Music; former students include solo 
oboists in the Chicago, Los Angeles, Pittsburgh, Toronto, San 
Francisco, Rochester Philharmonic, Vancouver, St. Paul, 
Orlando, Tampa, and New Haven Symphony Orchestras. 

MICHAEL BOOKSPAN (Percussion)-BS, Juilliard 
School of Music; studied with Morris Goldberg, Saul Goodman, 
and Fred Albright; Principal Percussionist and Associate 
Tympanist with the Philadelphia Orchestra; and former 
xylophone soloist with the US Air Force Band; former member 
of the Little Orchestra Society of New York, the New York City 
Ballet Orchestra, and the Goldman Band; current faculty 
member of the Curtis Institute of Music. Recipient of C. 
Hartman Kuhn Award of the Philadelphia Orchestra. 

BARBARA M. BOURBON (Anatomy Kinesiology)— BS, 
Physical Therapy, Boston University, PhD, Anatomy, Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania; partner, Philadelphia Institute for Physical 
Therapy; Assistant Professor, Graduate program of Physical 
Therapy, Beaver College, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy 
and Science, Temple University; Semester guest lecturer at 
Hahnemann and Jefferson Universities. 

EDWARD T. BRAKE (Dean of Admissions, Student 
Services Liaison)— BS, Artist's Diploma in Voice, Southwest 
Missouri State University; MS, Southern Illinois University; 
Dean of Students and Instructor in Psychology, Bethany 
College, Lndsborg, Kansas (1966-70); Director of Financial Aid, 
Trenton State College, Trenton, New Jersey (1970-76); served 
on Special Presidential Advisory Committee on Financial Aid, 



45 



Washington, D.C. (1972-73); studied and performed with 
Marjorie Lawrence; studied with Robert Ruetz; appeared in 
musicals as actor/singer in Equity productions. Starlight 
Theatre, Kansas City (1964-70); has performed with Duke 
Ellington (on tour), and with Shirley Jones, Donald O'Connor, 
Pernell Roberts, Giorgio Tozzi, Molly Picon, John Davidson, 
Sandy Duncan, Ginger Rogers; currently Vice President, Board 
of Directors of Philadelphia Boys Choir; adjudicator for 
numerous talent and scholarship competitions; Outstanding 
Educator in America (1971); listed in Who's Who in the East 
(1973-83); Outstanding Young Man of the Year Award (U.S. 
Jaycees, 1977). 

PAULA BROWN (Voice,)— Graduate, Curtis Institute of 
Music; studied with Raquel Adonaylo; appeared as soloist with 
the Philadelphia Singers, the Pennsylvania Pro Musica and the 
University of Pennsylvania Collegium Musicum; also has 
appeared with the Pennsylvania Opera Theatre as Paquette in 
Bernstein's Candide; has performed recitals throughout the 
United States. 

JANICE BRYSON (German)— BM, Philadelphia College of 
the Performing Arts; MM, Temple University; PhD candidate, 
Bryn Mawr College; member of the Philadelphia Singers. 

LELIA CALDER (Vocal Pedagogy/Engfe/i Diction)— BA, 
Harvard University; MM, Temple University; private voice 
instructor at Swarthmore College; teacher of class and private 
voice, lecturer on vocal literature. Temple University; formerly 
a soloist with Singing City and Philamel; member of the 
Philadelphia Singers. 

LARRY CANNON (Make-Up)— Designer and make-up for 
numerous opera companies throughout the U.S., Canada, and 
South America, including the San Francisco Opera and the 
New York City Opera; currently, the Master of Wigs and Make- 
up, Opera Company of Philadelphia. 



MARIANNE CASIELLO fVoiceJ-Graduate. Curtis 
Institute of Music; professional engagements include operatic 
roles such as Mimi, Violetta, Micaela, Nedda and Marguerite 
(Faust); faculty member of Curtis Institute of Music and Settle 
ment Music School. 

JOSEPH CASTALDO (President Emeritus Composition) 
BM, MM, Philadelphia Conservatory of Music (Philadelphia 
College of the Performing Arts); student at St. Cecilia Academy 
in Rome and the Manhattan School of Music; student of Vittorio 
Giannini and Vincent Persichetri; numerous compositions 
performed throughout the world; served as a founder and Presi- 
dent of the Philadelphia Composers Forum. President of the 
Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts, 1966-1983. 

ROBERT L. CERULLI (Double Bass)— Graduate, Curtis 
Institute of Music; BM, Philadelphia Musical Academy (Phila- 
delphia College of the Performing Arts); MA, Trenton State 
College; student of Roger M. Scott; former member of the 
Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra; current member of the 
Trenton Symphony, the Delaware Symphony, New Jersey 
State Opera Orchestra; served as Master Bass teacher for the 
19th International String Conference. 

DONALD CHITTUM (Coordinator, Theory, Composition 
Division)— BM, MM, DM, Philadelphia Conservatory of Music 
(Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts); studied with 
Vincent Persichetti and Boris Koutzen; former president of the 
Pennsylvania Music Teachers Association and the Pennsyl- 
vania Council on Music and Education; former chairman of the 
Pennsylvania Fine Arts Project; current chairman of the Music 
Teachers National Association; recently named Teacher of the 
Year by the Pennsylvania Music Teachers Association; chair- 
man of the Music Department of the Pennsylvania Governor's 
School for the Arts. 



46 



KENT CHRISTENSEN (Humanities)-BA, Columbia 
Univeristy; MA, University of Connecticut. 

ANDREA CLEARFIELD (College Accompanist)— BA, 

Muhlenberg College; MM, Philadelphia College of the 
Performing Arts; student of Margaret Garwood and Susan 
Starr; accompanist and coach at the Aspen Music School; 
participant in the New College Chamber Music Festival; 
accompanist and teacher in Philadelphia area. 

CHARLES CONWELL (Stage Fencing)— BS, Norths 
western University; MFA, Brandeis University; is a certified- 
recommended actor-combatant of the American Society of 
Fight Directors; taught stage combat at Temple University; has 
directed various stage fights in As You Like It, Hartford State 
Company; Off-Broadway production of The Flight of the Earls; 
People's Light and Theatre Company productions of Hamlet, 
Macbeth and Treasure Island; has taught stage combat at the 
Shaw Festival in Ontario while assisting artistic director, 
Chnstopher Newton. 

DEBORAH COOK (Opera)— Studied with Irene Williams; 
sang leading roles at Royal Opera House Covent Garden, 
Deutsche Oper Berlin, Hamburg State Opera, Bayerische 
Staatsoper, Frankfurt Oper, Stuttgart Oper, Victorian 
(Australian) Opera; Recordings with Pierre Boulez, Georg Solti, 
title role of Dinorah; currently sings with Los Angeles 
Symphony, New Philharmonia, London Sinfonietta, Orchestre 
de Paris and records regularly with Radio Orchestra Leipzig, 
Brussels Radio Orchestra, Radio Stuttgart; commutes to 
Europe regularly for opera/concert/oratorios. 
FRANK COSTANZO (Violin)— BM, University of Pennsyl- 
vania; member of the Philadelphia Orchestra since 1941; former 
member of the American String Orchestra; received the 
Hartman Kuhn Award of the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1959. 

NEIL COURTNEY (Double Bass)- BM and Performer's 
Certificate, Eastman School of Music; studied with Oscar 
Zimmerman and Roger M. Scott; member of the Philadelphia 
Orchestra since 1962; former member of the US Marine Band 



and the Rochester Philharmonic under Eric Leinsdorf; former 
Principal Bassist with the National Symphony Orchestra. 

SHIRLEY CURT1SS (Bassoon)— BM, BMEd, Murray State 
University; MM, University of Miami; former student of Sol 
Schoenbach; students and ensembles include numerous 
winners of Youth Concerts of the Philadelphia Orchestra, New 
York Philharmonic and other orchestras in the Delaware 
Valley; former students also hold positions in major symphony 
orchestras and universities in the United States and abroad. 

WALTER DALLAS (Acting Director, School of Theatre)— 
BA, Morehouse College; MFA, Yale Drama School; additional 
studies at Harvard University, University of Ghana, and Paul 
Sills (improvisation); has taught and/or directed workshops at 
Yale University, Antioch College. University of California, 
Berkeley, and University of Ghana; has guest directed at several 
off -off, off-Broadway and regional theatres, including Atlanta's 
Alliance theatre, Baltimore's Center Stage (where he was a 
National Endowment for the Arts Director Fellow), San 
Francisco's Montgomery Playhouse and New York's Negro 
Ensemble Company; founder of Atlanta's Proposition Theatre, 
Proposition Drama School and Yale's Black Ensemble 
Company; recipient of many awards, including Best Director 
and Creative Genius Awards from Atlanta Critics, two Bronze 
Jubilee Awards for Theatre Excellence and a California Emmy 
nomination; among his original plays which have been 
produced, Willie Lobo Manchild is regularly aired in California 
and New York. 

NICHOLAS D'AMICO, JR. (Percussion)— Graduate, 
Curtis Institute of Music; free-lance percussionist throughout 
the East including engagements with the Pennsylvania Ballet 
Company Orchestra. 

JOSEPH DeANGELIS (French Horn)- BM, Juilliard 
School of Music; student of James Chambers; former member 
of the New Orleans Philharmonic; current Principal Horn with 
the Philadelphia Opera Orchestra and the Pennsylvania Ballet 
Company Orchestra; has played extra horn with the New York 
Philharmonic for the past 20 years. 



47 



SEAN DEIBLER (Musicianship /Choral Conductor)— BS, 
Susquehanna University — Clarinet and Voice; Graduate 
Diploma, KODALY Musical Training Institute; Graduate 
Certificate; Franz Liszt Academy in Budapest — Conducting, 
Chamber Music and Solfeggio; founder and director of The 
Music Group of Philadelphia; director of the Choral Arts 
Society of Philadelphia. 

JOSEPH de PASQUALE (Wo/a)— Graduate, Curtis Insti- 
tute of Music; studied with Louis Bailly, Max Aronoff and 
William Primrose; Principal Violist with the Philadelphia 
Orchestra since 1964; former Principal Violist of the Boston 
Symphony; former member of the US Marine Band; violist with 
the DePasquale String Quartet; current faculty member of the 
Curtis Institute of Music. 

JULIA de PASQUALE (Violin)— Graduate, Curtis Institute 
of Music; student of Veda Reynolds; member of the Philadelphia 
Orchestra since 1964; former member of the Toronto 
Symphony Orchestra; participant in the Marlboro Music 
Festival under the direction of Rudolf Serkin. 

ROBERT de PASQUALE (Violin)— Graduate, New School 
of Music; student of Jascha Brodsky; member of the Philadel- 
phia Orchestra since 1964; former member of the New York 
Philharmonic and the US Navy Band; currently a violinist with 
the DePasquale String Quartet. 

WILLIAM de PASQUALE (Violin)— Studied with Veda 
Reynolds at the Curtis Institute of Music; Associate Concert- 
master of the Philadelphia Orchestra since 1964; received a 
Fulbright Scholarship to study in Salzburg, Austria, former 
Concertmaster of the New Orleans Philharmonic; former 
Concertmaster and violin soloist with the St. Louis Sinfonietta; 
violinist with the DePasquale String Quartet. 

JOHN F. DEVVITT (Coordinator, Humanities Division)— 
BA, Northeastern University; MA, PhD, University of Con- 
necticut; has published three collections of poems: Designs 
For On Ahti, Animals and Finger Food; poems have also 
appeared in a number of magazines; winner of Wallace Stevens 



Poetry Prize; invited to two NEH Summer Seminars; served as a 
consultant to Pennsylvania Department of Higher Education. 

ANNETTE DIMEDIO (Piano)-BA, Swarthmore College. 
MM, Temple University; Ph.D, Bryn Mawr College; student of 
Dr. Clement C. Petrillo; first student to win all three Philadelphia 
Orchestra Student Division Competitions, performing with the 
orchestra on each occasion; performed with the Columbia 
Symphony Orchestra; recent winner of the Ima Hogg National 
Competition resulting in a solo performance with the Houston 
Symphony Orchestra. 

ROBERT DiNARDO (Guitar)— Has been an active, work- 
ing musician since the late 1950s; has performed with the Phila- 
delphia Chamber Orchestra, under the direction of Ansil 
Bruslaw; inaugurated the classical guitar department at the 
Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts (P.M. A.) in 1969; 
was staff guitarist with the Mike Douglas Show and has per- 
formed with such artists as Tony Bennett, Ella Fitzgerald, Vic 
Damone, Joel Grey and Shirley MacLaine. 

JEFFREY DUNCAN (Modern Dance)- Has been Dance 
Artist in Residence at the University of Maryland, Baltimore 
County Campus for the last seven years teaching creative 
courses and producing and directing the resident company at 
the university; was active in the New York dance scene; has 
worked on Broadway, television and opera; founder of New 
York's Dance Theater Workshop (DTW) in 1965, and directed 
it until 1975; current faculty member at Temple University; 
Dance Consultant for Theatre Project and two dance groups in 
Baltimore; tours in his Solo Dance Concert; choreographs for 
various groups across the country; serves as vice-president of 
the American College Dance Festival Association (ACDFA). 

LILBURN DUNLAP (Theory Composition)-BM, MM, 
Philadelphia Conservatory of Music (Philadelphia College of the 
Performing Arts); student of Alison Drake and Vincent 
Persichetti; former president of the Pennsylvania Music 
Teachers Association. 



ROBERT ELMORE (Organ)— BM, University of Pennsyl- 
vania; 3 Licentiates of the Royal Academy of Music, London; 
Associate Degree, Royal Academy of Music, London; LHD, 
Moravian College; LLD, Alderson-Broaddus College; former 
organist/choir director of the Central Moravian Church, 
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and the Holy Trinity Church, Phila- 
delphia; current organist at the Tenth Presbyterian Church in 
Philadelphia. 

FRANCES FANELLI (Piano) -BM, Philadelphia Musical 
Academy (Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts); studied 
with Mme. Genia Robinor and Leon Fleisher; made her New 
York debut at Town Hall in 1966 as winner of the Leschetizky 
Association International Competition; named an Outstanding 
Young Woman in America and is listed in the International 
Who's Who of Musicians. 

MANFRED FISCHBECK (Modern Dance)— BA, Freie 
University of Berlin; former member of Gruppe Motion Berlin, 
the chamber dance ensemble which evolved from the Mary 
Wigman School; since 1968, served as co-director of the Group 
Motion Dance Theatre Company and School in Philadelphia. 

DOUGLAS H. FITZGERALD (Music Education Coordi- 
nator ACT 101 Conductor Symphonic Wind Ensemble)— 
BME, MME, East Carolina University; Supervisor Certification, 
Penn State University, Temple University; studied saxophone 
with James Houlik and Sigurd Rascher; soloist, Utica Sym- 
phony; director of Jazz Ensemble, Hamilton College; Guest 
Conductor of Wind Ensembles/Jazz Ensembles, University of 
Exeter, England, Montreux, Switzerland, New York, Pennsyl- 
vania and North Carolina; music supervisor of Music Education 
for Pennsylvania public schools; past presidents of: Region IV 
PMEA— State Executive Board— MENC; Cavalcade of Bands 
Association; PCPA Faculty Senate; was director of PCPA 
Conservatory Division and director of community theaters; 
currently Executive Director, Community Arts Alliance; 
member Phi Beta Mu; Guest Conductor, clinician and judge for 
music festivals in Pennsylvania, New York, North Carolina, 
Virginia and Canada. 



GARY FLANNERY (Jazz/Music Theatre Dancer-Studied 
at Juilliard School of Music as a full scholarship student; studied 
at the School of American Ballet in New York City; was a trainee 
with the Harkness Ballet; worked with the Canadian Ballet; has 
toured with various Canadian musicals, dance companies, has 
leading roles in Broadway and National Touring companies of 
Pippin and Dancin; lead dancer/assistant choreographer for 
Shirley MacLaine's television specials and four year world tour; 
principal dancer in film All That Jazz; lead dancer in many 
television specials including Mary Tyler Moore, Lena Home and 
Ann Margaret; owns and operates "New Dance Studio" in 
Langhorne; teaches in various professional and community 
centers; studied with Antony Tudor, Jose Limon, Alexandria 
Danilova, Bertrum Ross, Fred Benjamin, Lynn Simonson, 
Stanley Williams and Percival Borde. 

JOANN FREGALLETTE-JANSEN (Modern Dance 
Technique)— BS, Ohio University; MS, Smith College; has 
performed in New York with Gus Solomons, Jr. and Mel Wong; 
since 1976 has been the leading dancer with Dan Wagonner; has 
taught and choreographed in colleges around the country. 

KARIN FULLER (Harp)-BM, Philadelphia Musical 
Academy (Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts); studied 
with Edna Phillips, Alice Chalifoux at the Salzedo School in 
Maine and at the Berkshire Music Center; member of the 
Orchestra Society of Philadelphia and the Pottstown Symphony 
Orchestra; performed with the Philadelphia New Music Group. 
RICHARD GENOVESE (Trombone)— Graduate, Curtis 
Institute of Music; studied with Glenn Dodson, Charles 
Gusikoff and Gordon Pulis; substitute trombonist with the 
Philadelphia Orchestra; current faculty member at Immaculata 
College and Bucks County Community College; performed 
with the Philadelphia Opera Company, Marlboro Festival 
Orchestra and the Stuttgart Ballet Orchestra. 

SUSAN B. GLAZER (Director, School of Dance)— BA, 
American University; MA, Temple University; additional 
studies at La Sorbonne; former member of faculty, Drexel 
University and Harcum Junior College; past president, Phila 



49 



delphia Dance Alliance, member Pennsylvania Council on the 
Arts Advisory Panel; Chairman, Dance Committee, Philadel- 
phia Art Alliance; dance studies with Virginia Freeman, Paul 
Sanasardo, Pearl Lang, and Dan Wagonner; has performed in 
and choreographed for companies in Philadelphia, Washington 
DC, Germany, France, and Los Angeles. 

REGINA GORDON (Music Education)— BME, Applied 
Voice, Temple University; MM, Choral Conducting, West- 
minster Choir College; Supervisor of Fine Arts, Lower More- 
land School District; Director of Choral Activities, Lower 
Moreland High School; vocal student of Florence Berggren; 
conducting student of Robert Page, Dennis Shrock and Joseph 
Flummerfelt; former affiliate faculty University of Mary-land, 
Baltimore County; choirs have performed in Europe and at 
various PMEA and ACDA divisional conferences; present 
PMEA Public Relations Chair; former president PMEA District 
11. 

SUSAN D. GOTTLIEB (Ballet)— BS. Wharton School of 
the University of Pennsylvania; studied at Harkness House for 
Ballet Arts and with the Stuttgart Ballet; performed with the 
Ballet Company of the Philadelphia Opera Company and the 
Downtown Ballet Company in NYC. Taught at University City 
Arts League. 

CLINTON A. GOULD (Humanities)— BA, University of 
North Alabama; MEd, Communications, MS, Arts & Science 
Policy and Planning, University of Pennsylvania; Research 
Fellow, PhD (1985). University of Pennsylvania— Interdiscipli- 
nary Science and Humanities; science writer for NASA and 
Smithsonian Institute, 1971-73; coordinator of NEH and NSF 
grants to develop connections between science and the human- 
ities; currently Assistant Professor of English at Community 
College of Philadelphia. 

ALISON GREEN-KELLEY (Acting)-BFA. MA, New 
York University; studied with Stella Adler, The National 
Theatre, The Central School of Speech and Drama and London 
University; has appeared off-off Broadway, off-Broadway and in 
regional theatre; has taught at New York University, the South 
Bronx Community Action Theatre and at Rutgers University. 



DIANE GRUMET (Modem Dance)— BFA, College Con- 
servatory of Music, University of Cincinnati; former soloist with 
the Joyce Trisler Danscompany; performed with The Bat-Dor 
Dance Company of Israel, Contemporary Dance Theatre, New 
York City Opera Ballet, Cincinnati Ballet and Opera 
Companies; guest artist with the Alvin Ailey and Jose Limon 
Dance Companies; has taught extensively throughout the 
United States; currently presenting Time Pieces, solo concert of 
modern dance, past and present. 

JAMES W. HALA (Trumpet)— BME, Temple University; 
studied trumpet with Seymour Rosenfeld, Gerard Schwarz and 
Frank Kaderabek; studied conducting with Gerard Schwarz; 
studied jazz improvisation with Larry McKenna; former 
member of U.S. Army Band, Concerto Soloists, Pennsylvania 
Pro Musica, Pottstown Symphony; member of Delaware and 
Reading Symphonies; former faculty member at Temple 
University and Germantown Academy. 

GEORGE HARPHAM (Ce//oJ— Graduate. Curtis Institute 
of Music; Assistant Principal Cellist with the Philadelphia 
Orchestra since 1977; member of the DePasquale String 
Quartet and the Philadelphia Chamber Ensemble. 

LINDA HAVILAND (Dance History)— BA, Adelphi 
University; MEd, Temple University; doctoral candidate in 
Aesthetics, Temple University; performs with the Zero Moving 
Company; on faculty at Bryn Mawr College. 

FRANCO IGLESIAS (Voice)— Studied at La Scala of Milan, 
Italy. Past Winner of vocal competition at La Scala. While at La 
Scala he sang with such great artists as Callas, Tebaldi, 
DeStefano, and Del Monoco. Former Artistic Director of El 
Palacio de Bellas Artes, Mexico City, and Israeli National Opera 
Company, Tel Aviv. Former Music Director of Teatro 
Municipal of Caracas and the National Opera of Venezuela. 
Recipient of Rockefeller Award. Currently Director of West- 
chester (NY) Festival and studio coach/teacher in New York 
City. Many former students, including Placido Domingo. 

GLORIA JOHNS (Cello)— BM, MM, New England Con- 
servatory; studied with Stephen Geber, Ron Leonard, and Lynn 
Harrell; member of the Philadelphia Orchestra and former 
Associate Principal Cellist with the Buffalo Philharmonic. 



50 



FRANK J. KADERABEK (Trumpet)- Attended the 
Chicago Musical Academy; studied with Edward Masacek, 
Adolf Herseth, Harry Glantz and Nathan Prager; currently 
Principal trumpet of the Philadelphia Orchestra; former 
member of West Point Band and Dallas Symphony. Member of 
faculty of Curtis Institute of Music and Temple University. 

HAROLD KARABELL (Clarinet/Saxophone)— BA, Glass- 
boro State College; studied with Stanley Marshall and Ralph 
McLane; current faculty member at Temple University and 
Bucks County Community College; performed with the Opera 
Company of Philadelphia and with Bobby Sherwood and Artie 
Shaw; currently the contractor for the Shubert Theatre. 

YOHEVED KAPLINSKY (Piano)-BS, MS. DMA, The 
Juilliard School; studied with Irwin Freundlich and Dorothy 
Taubman; prize winner, J. S. Bach International Competition in 
Washington, DC; former faculty member Glassboro State 
College; performances with orchestras and solo recitals in the 
United States and Israel; radio broadcasts in New York and 
Chicago. 

FREDRICK KAUFMAN (Dean of the College/ Composi- 
tion) — BM, MM, Manhattan School of Music; Resident 
Composer, University of Wisconsin; faculty member, Rubin 
Academy of Music in Israel; Resident Composer and Depart- 
ment Chairman, Eastern Montana College; awards from the 
National Endowment for the Arts, University of London, 
National Association of Jazz Educators, California Fine Arts 
Council, Norwegian Government and Wisconsin Composers 
League; recipient of Fulbnght Fellowship and the Darius 
Milhaud Award in Composition from Aspen Music Festival; 
compositions performed by Israel Philharmonic, Zubin Mehta 
conducting; Pittsburgh Symphony, William Steinberg, 
conductor; and Jersualem Symphony and St. Paul Chamber 
Orchestra; ballets performed by Royal Swedish Ballet, Royal 
Winnipeg Ballet and the Batsheva Dance Company; author of 
the books The African Roots of Jazz and Diatonic Harmony. 

PATRICIA KENDEL (Flute)— Graduate of Curtis Institute 
of Music under William Kincaid; has been faculty member of 
University of Delaware, West Chester State, Swarthmore 



College; currently teaches and conducts flute ensemble at 
Temple University; has been principal flutist with Philadelphia 
Opera Company, Concerto Soloists, Pennsylvania Ballet, and 
Delaware and Reading Symphonies. 

JANICE KESTLER (Musicianship)— BME, MM, Temple 
University; post-graduate study, Westminster Choir College; 
national executive for the Association of Professional Vocal 
Ensembles; performs regularly with the Philadelphia Singers; 
recently recorded Lukas Foss's Time Cycle with the composer 
conducting. 

JAY PAUL KRUSH (Tuba)— BM in Composition; Eastman 
School of Music; MM, Northwestern University; studied with 
Arnold Jacobs; played with the Ars Nova Brass Quintet; 
Principal Tuba of the Eastman Wind Ensemble and the 
Yale/ Norfolk Brass Quintet; winner of composition awards 
from the National Society of Arts and Letters, the National 
Association of College Wind and Percussion Instructors and the 
Bicentennial Anthem Prize; member of the Chestnut Brass 
Company 

JAN KRZYWICKI (Coordinator, Musicianship Division)— 
BM, University of Kansas, MM, Philadelphia Musical Academy 
(Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts); studied at the 
Juilliard School of Music with Vincent Persichetti, Elliot Carter 
and Jane Carlson. Further study with Joseph Castaldo, 
Theodore Antoniou, Nadia Boulanger and Darius Milhaud; 
works have been performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra, the 
Pennsylvania Ballet and the Portland Symphony Orchestra. 
PAUL KRZYWICKI (Tuba)-BM, MM, Indiana University; 
graduate assistant to William Bell; studied with Joseph 
Novotny, Lloyd Geisler, Abe Torchinsky, and Leo Romano; 
member of the Philadelphia Orchestra since 1971; member of 
the Philadelphia Brass Soloists; former member of the U.S. 
Military Academy Band; current faculty member at the Curtis 
Institute of Music; performed with the Portland Symphony, the 
Buffalo Philharmonic, the Youngstown Symphony, the Boston 
Ballet and Opera Companies, and the Aspen Festival 
( >i i hi-stra 



51 



CARLTON JONES LAKE (Music Educat,on)-BM, MM, 
Temple University; DM, Philadelphia Conservatory of Music 
(Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts); former 
supervisor of vocal music for the School District of Philadelphia; 
former coordinator and evaluator for the Juilliard Repertory 
Project; founder and director of the Academy Boys Choir; 
Director of the PCPA Performing Arts School. 

JOSEPH LANZA (Violin)— Graduate, Juilliard School of 
Music; student of Joseph Fuchs, Hans Letz, and Frank 
Costanzo; member of the Philadelphia Orchestra since 1958; 
former member of the Juilliard Symphony Orchestra and the 
U.S. Navy Orchestra. 

PHOEBE LAW (Librarian)— BA, (music), Taylor University; 
MA (musicology), University of California, Los Angeles; MALS 
(library science). Rosary College Graduate School of Library 
and Information Science; teaching assistant, Oregon State 
University School of Music; music cataloger, Northwestern 
University School of Music Library; catalog librarian, Mont- 
gomery County Library (Texas); public services librarian, 
Houston Public Library; medical librarian, Elkart General 
Hospital, (Indiana). 

S. ARCHYE LEACOCK (Music Education)- BM, Temple 
University; MA, Indiana University; director of Special Program 
for the Handicapped at Settlement Music School; former music 
teacher in Trinidad, West Indies; director/coach of the National 
Folk Choir of the Best Village Council in Trinidad; coordinator 
of the Office for the Disabled at Temple University; teacher of 
flute and piano at West Oak Lane School of Music. 

JOHN LEONARD (Classical Cwtar)-BM, MM, Philadel- 
phia Musical Academy (Philadelphia College of the Performing 
Arts); student of Robert DiNardo; student of plectrum guitar 
with Joseph Sgro and Dennis Sandole. 

FLORENZA D. LEVENGOOD (Piano)— Early studies 
with her father, Antonio Decimo, clarinetist; studied piano with 
Leo Ornstein at the Philadelphia Musical Academy (Philadel- 
phia College of the Performing Arts); studied chamber music 
and interpretation with Carlo Peroni of St. Cecilia Academy in 
Rome. 



GLORIA V. LIHOTZ (Voice)-BM, MM, Philadelphia 
Musical Academy (Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts); 
studied with Carolyn Dengler and Licia Albanese; studied 
dramatics with Tito Capobianco and Rhoda Levine; current 
faculty member of the Merchantville Conservatory of Music; 
performed with the Philadelphia Opera Company, the Regal 
Opera Company and the Philadelphia Musical Theatre. 

LOREN LIND (Flute)— BM, Temple University; graduate 
studies at the University of Hawaii; student of Murray Panitz; 
member of the Philadelphia Orchestra since 1974; studied with 
the principal flutists of the Honolulu Symphony, Seattle 
Symphony, and the NHK Symphony of Tokyo; former member 
of the Lyric Opera Orchestra and the Honolulu Symphony. 

ANTHONY MARCHIONE (Trumpefj-Graduate, Curtis 
Institute of Music; has performed as Principal Trumpet with the 
CBS Symphony Orchestra, Philadelphia Lyric and Grand 
Opera, and Philadelphia Little Symphony; performed with the 
Metropolitan Opera and the Stuttgart Chamber Symphony; 
current Principal Trumpet with the Valley Forge Music Theatre; 
teacher and conductor with the Philadelphia Archdiocesan 
school system. 

RONALD MARLOWE (Piano,)— Member of twin duo- 
pianist team; the duo has performed with the Philadelphia 
Orchestra, New York Philharmonic, Pittsburgh Symphony and 
the Dallas Symphony Orchestra; as children the duo pianists 
appeared on the Milton Berle. Gary Moore and Steve Allen 
television shows; in addition, they have appeared on the Mike 
Douglas Show, Johnny Carson's "Tonight Show" and NBC's 
distinguished "Recital Hall" series. 

W. ALVIN McDUFFY (Jazz Dance Technique )-B A, Uni- 
versity of Michigan; studied with Alvin Ailey, Martha Graham, 
Nat Home; danced with the Alvin Alley American Dance 
Theater, George Faison Universal Dance Experience; per- 
formed in the national touring companies of The Wiz, Your 
Arms Too Short to Box with Cod. Purlie, Raisin and others; has 
taught and choreographed at the Flex Point Ballet Center in 
Holland, Joseph Russillo Ballet Studio, Paris, Brussels, 
Germany, Martinique and Michigan. 



52 



LARRY MCKENNA (Saxophone) — Studied saxophone 
with Tony Benedetta and arranging with Frank Hunter and 
Dennis Sandole; performed with Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, 
Michel LeGrand, and Sarah Vaughan. 

GUIDO MECOLI (Clarinet)- Graduate, Curtis Institute of 
Music; studied with Ralph MacLean, Jules Serpentine, Ignatius 
Gennusa, and Anthony Gigliotti; former Principal Clarinetist 
with the Philadelphia Lyric and Grand Opera Companies; 
former member of the Reading Symphony and Trenton 
Symphony Orchestra; guest soloist with the Curtis String 
Quartet; member of the Pennsylvania Ballet Orchestra. 

DOUGLAS S. MEDLIN (Coordinator, Music Education)— 

BM, University of Georgia; MM, East Carolina University; EdD, 
University of Illinois; former Director of Music Education at 
West Virginia Wesleyan College, music instructor at Macon 
Junior College, and public school teaching in Connecticut and 
Virginia. 

PATRICK MERCURI (Guitar)— BM, BME, Philadelphia 
Musical Academy (Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts); 
student of Robert DiNardo on classical guitar; performer of 
fretted instrument parts for the Philadelphia Orchestra, the 
Opera Company of Philadelphia, the Pennsylvania Opera 
Theatre and the Forrest Theatre; current faculty member at 
Cabnni College and Eastern College. 

NAOMI MINDLIN (Modern Dance Technique)— BS, 

Brandeis University; has performed with the Boston Ballet 
Company, New England Dance Theatre, the Bridgport Ballet 
and the Jose Limon Dance Company; currently teaches in New 
York. 

LEONARD MOGILL (Viola)-BM, Philadelphia Musical 
Academy; Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music, Honorary 
Doctorate, Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts; student 
of Louis Bailly; member of the Philadelphia Orchestra since 
1935, retired; former member of the Musical Fund Society 
Quartet; current faculty member at Temple University and the 
New School of Music. 



MARGARITA CSONKA MONTANARO (Harp) — 
Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music; graduate studies at Vienna 
Music Conservatory; member of the Philadelphia Orchestra 
since 1963; studied with Carlos Salzedo and Marilyn Costello; 
participant in the Marlboro Festival. 

MICHAEL NATALE (Trumpet)-BME, Philadelphia 
Musical Academy (Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts); 
studied with Gilbert Johnson; staff trumpeter, Mike Douglas 
Show; substitute trumpet for the Tonight Show Band; has 
worked extensively with Peter Matz, Nick Perito and Bob 
Florence; composed original music for NFL films, 1976. 

JOE NERO (Percussion)— Graduate, Curtis Institute of 
Music; toured nationally with Burt Bacharach, Anthony Newley 
and Bette Midler; toured internationally with Bobby Rydell; 
played New York theatre, jazz and night clubs and was house 
drummer at the Waldorf Astoria; has performed with the Penn- 
sylvania Ballet, Grand Opera Company and on the Mike 
Douglas Show; drummer, percussionist at the Forrest Theatre; 
free-lances in commercial and jazz music; on faculty at music 
and high schools in the Philadelphia area; teaches privately. 

CAROL A. OATIS (Anatomy Kinesiology) -BS, Physical 
Therapy, Marquette University; PhD, University of Pennsyl- 
vania, Anatomy; partner, Philadelphia Institute for Physical 
Therapy; faculty member, Graduate program of Physical 
Therapy, Beaver College and Temple University. 

CAMILLE A. PAGUA (Humanmes)-BA, Harpur College 
(State University of New York at Binghamton); M. Phil.. PhD, 
Yale University; Woodrow Wilson Fellowship Designate; Yale 
University Graduate Fellowship; doctoral dissertation directed 
by Harold Bloom; taught at Bennington College, Wesleyan Uni 
versify and Yale University; has lectured and published articles 
and book reviews in scholarly journals, encyclopedias, and 
newspapers. 

ANDREW PAP (Ballet)— Studied at Licoul Pedagogic Uni- 
versitar and Scoala de Coreografie in Romania; current faculty 
member of the Pennsylvania Ballet School; former member of 
the Romanian State Opera and Ballet; taught at Scoala de 



53 



Coreografie, the Italian Dancers Union, the Saratoga Ballet 
Center, and the International Dance Center in Rome. 

DIANNE PERKINS (Humanities)— MA, PhD. Temple Uni- 
versity; lecturer in English, Philadelphia College of Art since 
1979. 

JOSEPH PRIMAVERA (Conductor, Symphony Orchestra/ 
Music Education) — Graduate, Combs College of Music; 
conductor of the Delaware Valley Philharmonic Orchestra and 
the Youth Orchestra of Greater Philadelphia; former member 
of the Philadelphia Orchestra; former conductor of the Old 
York Road Symphony; appeared as Guest Conductor with the 
London Philharmonic; performed as Music Director and 
Conductor of the feature film CYC AD and seven CBS specials; 
recipient of the C. Hartman Kuhn Award from the Philadelphia 
Orchestra. 

CHARLES W. RAISON (Executive Director)-BA, Michi- 
gan State University; MFA, Tulane University; Associate 
Professor and Chairman of the Theatre Department, Lycoming 
College, Williamsport, PA (1961-69); Executive Director, 
American Academy of Dramatic Arts, NYC (1969-1976); 
Director of Planning and Development, Studio Arena Theatre. 
Buffalo, NY (1976-79); Executive Director, Playhouse Square 
Foundation, Cleveland, OH (1979-1982); consultant for 
National Endowment for the Arts and various theatre projects 
nationwide. 

DEBORAH REEDER (Cello)- BM, MM. Philadelphia 
Musical Academy (Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts); 
studied with Lome Munroe and Luigi Silva; former member of 
the Philadelphia Orchestra; current Principal Cellist with the 
Opera Company of Philadelphia and the Mozart Society of 
Philadelphia; former Principal Cellist of the Philly Pops; 
performed with the Cheltenham Trio, Viola de Gambist with the 
American Society of Ancient Instruments and with the Pince- 
ton Chamber Orchestra, the Pennsylvania Ballet Company 
Orchestra, Penn Contemporary Players, the Philadelphia 
Composers' Forum and the Concerto Soloists. 



RONALD REUBEN (C/armeO-Graduate. Temple Uni- 
versity and Curtis Institute of Music; studied with Joseph 
Gigliotti and Anthony Gigliotti; former member of the Stan 
Kenton Band and Chicago Little Symphony; former member of 
Chamber Symphony of Philadelphia; member of faculty at 
Temple University and the New School of Music; Bass Clarinet 
with Philadelphia Orchestra since 1967. 

LAVAUGHN ROBINSON (Tap Dance)- Performed at the 
Apollo Theatre in NYC and Frank Palumbo's clubs in Philadel- 
phia; performed with the Dancing Jets and the South Sydney 
League in Australia; performed with the Wayne Newton show 
for several years. 

GABRIELA ROEPKE (Opera Theatre HistoryJ-Studied 
in Santiago. Paris and the University of North Carolina; 
recipient of two Fulbnght Scholarships and the Roland Holt 
Playwright Award and a Guggenheim Fellowship; author and 
producer of over 15 original plays in Latin America, the United 
States and Spain; former visiting lecturer at the New School for 
Social Research and at the Society for Ethical Culture in New 
York City; lectures for New York City Opera Guild; has had 
numerous articles published in the San Diego Opera Magazine, 
the New York City Opera Spotlight and Opera News. 

SEYMOUR ROSENFELD (Trumpet)-Graduate. Curtis 
Institute of Music; studied with Saul Caston; member of the 
Philadelphia Orchestra since 1946; member of the Philadelphia 
Brass Ensemble; current faculty member at Temple University; 
former member of the Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo and the 
St. Louis Symphony. 

ANDREW RUDIN (Theory Composition)-BM. University 
of Texas; MA, University of Pennsylvania; studied composition 
with Kent Kennan, Paul Pisk, George Rochberg and Karlheinz 
Stockhausen; electronic music compositions heard in Fellini 
film Satyricon; composed for the Pennsylvania Ballet, Murray 
Louis and the Alwin Nikolais Dance Theatre; musical 
contributions to Tennessee Williams' play Outcry. 



54 



BARBARA SANDONATO (Ballet)- Former principal 
dancer and associate founder of Pennsylvania Ballet Company; 
former principal dancer with the National Ballet of Canada; 
taught at the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre and the Pennsylvania 
Governor's School for the Arts; featured guest artist with the 
Boston Ballet Company, the Wisconsin Ballet with Rudolf 
Nureyev, and with the New York City Opera Company. 

PEARL B. SCHAEFFER (Dance Pedagogy) -BS, Drexel 
University; MFA, Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts; 
choreographs for the Academy Boys Choir and Performing 
Arts School; member of the Group Motion Dance Company; 
performed with the Philadelphia Opera Company and the 
Duncan Centennary Ensemble. 

CARL B. SCHMIDT (Coordinator, Graduate Division/ 
Theory and Composition)— BA, Stanford University; MA, 
PhD, Harvard University; scholar on seventeenth century 
Italian and French opera; recipient of research awards from the 
American Philosophical Society and the American Council of 
Learned Societies to underwnte studies on Lully. 

DAVID SCHNEIDER (Oboe)-BM, Philadelphia Musical 
Academy (Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts); student 
of Alfred Genovese; Principal Oboe with the Philly Pops 
Orchestra, Trenton Symphony and the Lancaster Symphony 
Orhcestra; First Oboist with the Philadelphia Opera Orchestra, 
the Concerto Soloists and the Mozart Society; member of the 
Fairmount Woodwind Quintet. 

HENRY G. SCOTT (Double BassJ-Graduate, University 
of Rochester, Eastman School of Music; student of Ferdinand 
Maresh, Oscar G. Zimmerman, and Roger M.Scott; member of 
the Philadelphia Orchestra since 1974; former member of the 
Rochester Philharmonic, the Chamber Symphony of Philadel- 
phia, the Baltimore Symphony, and the New York Phil- 
harmonic. 

PETER SEGAL (Classical Guitar) Studied with Jose 
Tomas, Antonio Vivaldi, Alirio Diaz, and Oscar Ghiglia; 
appeared with Janet Ketchum as flute/guitar duo; second prize 
winner on the International Competition for Guitarists in 
Alessandria, Italy in 1971. 



NADINE SENYK (Musicianship)— BM, Philadelphia College 
of the Performing Arts; MM, New England Conservatory of 
Music; Principal studies with Clement C. Petnllo, Gabriel 
Chodos; Master Classes include Gaby Casadeseus, Re Koster, 
Victor Rosenbaum, Narcis Bonet (Conservatoire Americaine, 
Fontainebleau, France); Special Assistant to the Director of 
Music of the Pennsylvania Governor's School for the Arts. 

JOHN SHAMLIAN (Bassoon )— Graduate, Curtis Institute 
of Music; Graduate, Royal College of Music, London; member 
of the Philadelphia Orchestra since 1951; former member of the 
Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, the London Symphony 
Orchestra, and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, and the 
London Wind Trio; performed at the Prades Festival, France, 
with the BBC Symphony, the BBC Chamber Players, Sinfonia 
of London Film Music, Covent Garden Opera, Sadlers Wells 
Ballet, and the Philharmonic Orchestra of London. 

CAROL LUPPESCU SKLAROFF (Ballet)— Studied with 
Margaret Craske and Anthony Tudor at the Metropolitan 
Opera Ballet School; former member of the Metropolitan Opera 
Ballet touring group and the Ballet Rambert where she danced 
roles in Coppelia and Giselle; principal dancer with the Pennsyl 
vania Ballet Company where she danced leading roles in Lilac 
Garden, Sleeping Beauty, Mignon Pas de Deux, Le Corsair Pas 
de Deux, Donnezetti Vanations and Concerto Barocco; has 
taught ballet classes at the Pennsylvania Ballet School and the 
Ballet Studio. 

JOSEPH SMITH (C/anneti-BM, Curtis Institute of Music; 
MM, Temple University and West Chester State College; 
studied with Anthony Gigliotti and Anthony Liberio; member of 
the Pennsylvania Ballet Orchestra, the Philharmonic 
Orchestra, and Young Audiences, Inc. 

DANIELLE SMITH-ORLANDO (Opera Coach)- BM, 
MM, Temple University, Piano Performance; studied at the 
Eastman School of Music; former Musical Director of Opera 
Department at Temple University; active accompanist in Phila- 
delphia area; currently the Assistant Conductor of the Phila 
delphia Opera Company. 



55 



FA YE B. SNOW (Jazz Dance)— BS, West Chester State 
College; MA, George Washington University; studied Horton 
Technique with Marion Cuyjet and Joan Kerr Dancers; also 
studied with James Truitte at Alvin Ailey American Dance 
Center; choreographed for Juba and Joan Kerr Dancers; 
danced with Arthur Hall African American Dance Ensemble 
and the Coppertone Review; worked with Duke Ellington and 
Count Basie. 

EVAN SOLOT (Coordinator, Jazz Studies)— BM, MM, 
Philadelphia Musical Academy (Philadelphia College of the 
Performing Arts); performed with and/ or composed for Burt 
Bacharach, Count Basie, Tony Bennett, The Carpenters, Mike 
Douglas, Sergio Franchi, Lena Home. Woody Herman, Henry 
Mancini, Barry Manilow, Bette Midler, Lou Rawls, Diana Ross, 
John Travolta, and Dionne Warwick; former chairman of the 
National Association of Jazz Educators Composition Contest, 
honored by Down Beat magazine for his efforts in making 
PCPA one of the best jazz education resources in the United 
States; currently a voting member of the National Academy of 
Recording Arts and Sciences. 

MICHAEL STAIRS (Musicianship/Organ)- BM, West- 
minster Choir College; Artist Diploma. Curtis Institute of 
Music; studied organ with Alexander McCurdy; studied piano 
with Mathilde McKinney and Vladimir Sokoloff; studied 
composition with Warren Martin and Matthre Colucci; 
Associate Organist of the John Wanamaker Court Organ; 
Chairman of Musicianship Studies at the New York School of 
Liturgical Music; organist/choirmaster at the Church of St. 
Asaph, Bala Cynwyd. 

SUSAN STARR (Piano)— Graduate, Curtis Institute of 
Music; studied with Eleanor Sokoloff and Rudolf Serkin; 
appeared as soloist with the Philadelphia Orchestra more than 
30 times since her debut with the Orchestra at the age of six; a 
winner of the Second International Tchaikovsky Competition in 
Moscow; appeared in recital at the White House at the request 
of President Carter. 



JOHN TACCONELLI (MimeJ-Has studied at the New 
York Pantomime Theatre with Menni Yakin; additional studies 
with Zwi Kanar. Henry Shreibman and Christopher Duncan; 
has performed in many Philadelphia-area theatrical produc- 
tions, including To Be Young, Gifted and Black and Death of a 
Salesman, and has done work in radio and film. 

MARSHALL TAYLOR (SaxophoneJ-BME, Wheaton 
College; MM, Northwestern University; additional studies at 
Paris Conservatory and the University of Paris under a 
Fulbright Grant; studied with Theodore Varges, Russell H. 
Platz, Fred Hemke, Marcel Mule, and Henry Schumann; former 
member of the U.S. Military Academy Band; current faculty 
member of Temple University. 

PAT THOMAS (Modem Dance Technique)— Trained with 
Martha Graham; taught and performed with Alvin Alley; 
performed with Yuriko Dance Company and the Swedish 
Modern Dance Company; toured the Far East performing and 
teaching in Japan, Hong Kong and Maylasia; taught in Spain and 
in Israel where she performed with the Batsheva Dance 
Company. 

ADELINE TOMASONE (Flute) BM, Curtis Institute of 
Music, under Murray Panitz; Also studied with Kenton F.Terry 
and Julius Baker; Solo appearances with Philadelphia 
Orchestra, Lansdowne Philharmonic, Bricktown Philharmonic 
and PCPA Orchestra; currently solo flutist of Opera Company 
of Philadelphia, Davidsbund Chamber Players, Bach Chamber 
Consort, Mozart Society of Philadelphia, Delaware Valley Phil- 
harmonic; Member of Fairmount Woodwind Quintet with 
Young Audiences, Inc.; Theater and studio work in Philadel 
phia and New York; Former member of Philly Pops, Delaware 
Symphony. 

JOANNE TULLI (Jazz Dance)-BA, SUNY at Brockport; 
MFA, Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts; studied with 
Rhea London and Harold Pierson; performed with the Ballet des 
Jeunes in Philadelphia and the Philadelphia Dance Company. 



56 



LEON LINGER (Voice)— Graduate, Gdansk Conservatory 
of Music; past-president of Jeunesses Musicales de Pologne; 
former music director of Operetta Studio in Gdynia, Poland and 
assistant director of the Opera Theatre of the Warsaw 
Academy of Music; coached in opera theatres of Warsaw, Lodz, 
Gdansk, Gdynia and Szczecin; has performed chamber music 
throughout Poland; currently coaching at the Chamber Opera 
Theatre of New York; coaching vocal students of Mrs. Antonia 
Lavanne at Mannes College and Mrs. Margaret Hoswell van 
Der March in Manhattan. 

CHARLES VERNON (TromboneJ-Graduate, Brevard 
College and Georgia State University; studied with Arnold 
Jacobs and Edward Kleinhammer; former member of the Balti- 
more Symphony and the San Francisco Symphony; current 
member of the Philadelphia Orchestra. 

CARLO VILLA (Violin)— Graduate of Curtis Institute of 
Music; student of Ivan Galamian; has appeared with orchestras 
under the baton of Klemperer, Giulini, Sawallisch, Tennstedt, 
Szell, Boult, Munchinger and others; has appeared with major 
symphony orchestras throughout North and South America 
and Europe. 

MIHALY V1RIZLAY (Cello)— Artist's Diploma, Franz Liszt 
Academy; studied with Zoltan Kodaly; currently, principal 
cellist of the Baltimore Symphony; appeared with the Chicago 
Symphony under Fritz Keiner and with Sergiu Comissiona, 
Brian Pnestman, William Steinberg, Leopold Stokowski, and 
Yehudi Menuhin; taught master classes at the Shawnigan Lake 
School of the Arts performing with John Ogden, Gary Karr, 
Janos Starker, and Ruggiero Ricci. 

KAREN VORKAPICH (Tap Dance)-Studied at Indiana 
University and Thomas Hampton's On Stage Studio; 
performed with the Sue Charles Dancers; member of Vardar, a 
Yugoslavian folk dance ensemble; studied tap with Thomas 
Hampton. Formerly on faculty of Temple University; performs 
with the Mill Creek Cloggers and the Philadelphia Tap Dancers. 



PAUL WAG AR (Speech for Actors)— University of Toronto; 
Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art, London; private 
study with Vivian Matalon; past company member of: The Royal 
Shakespeare Company; The New Shakespeare Company, 
London; The Stratford Festival, Canada; founding member of 
The American Repertory Theatre, London; past Artistic 
Director of Toronto Repertory Theatre; currently Co-Artistic 
Director of The Philadelphia Area Repertory Theatre. 

ALAN WAGNER (Voice)— BM. Northwestern University; 
MFA, Carnegie-Mellon University; studied with Todd Duncan 
and with Richard Torigi and Nicola Moscona at Academy of 
Vocal Arts; winner of regional Metropolitan Opera auditions; 
1971 first prize winner of national Emma Feldman Competition; 
performs leading roles with Philadelphia Opera, Pittsburgh 
Opera, Opera Delaware, Pennsylvania Opera Theatre; soloist 
with Philadelphia Orchestra; current faculty member at West 
Chester University. 

VIVIAN WAGNER (Voice)— BM, Curtis Institute of Music; 
studied with Richard Bonelli and Euphemia Giannini Gregory; 
coached and Leo Resonek and Vladimir Sokoloff; recipient of 
the Whitney Award for Excellence presented by the Boston 
Conservatory of Music; extensive performing experience here 
and abroad; featured soloist with the Concerto Soloists, the 
Philadelphia Singers; currently master teaching operatic 
principals in companies in Germany. 

KAY WALKER (Coordinator, Opera Division)— BM, West- 
minster Choir College; MM, University of Michigan; Artist's 
Diploma, Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts; opera 
director and choreographer for companies in the Princeton and 
Philadelphia areas. 



57 



DAVID WETHER1LL (French HornJ-Graduate, Curtis 
Institute of Music; Associate Principal Horn with the 
Philadelphia Orchestra since 1978; performed as soloist at La 
Scala in Milan and with the Ensemble Inter-Contemporaire of 
Paris. 

BENJAMIN WHITTEN (Piano)- Graduate, Peabody Con- 
servatory of Music; studied with Austin Conradi; Leon Fleisher, 
and Emerson Meyers; appeared with orchestra throughout the 
United States, Canada, Panama, South America, and Europe; 
recipient of the Tiffany Scholarship, the Paul Thomas Award, 
the Mason and Hamlin Award; designated as a Danforth 
Foundation Associate; current faculty member of the Wilming- 
ton Music School and West Chester State College; former 
president of the Pennsylvania Music Teachers Association; 
named PMTA Teacher of the Year in 1970 and 1979. 



ALEXEI YUDENICH (Ba/tetJ-Graduate, Sarajevo Opera 
Ballet School, Yugoslavia; former member of the Sarajevo 
Opera Ballet Company; former principal dancer with the Penn- 
sylvania Ballet Company; taught at the Pennsylvania Ballet 
School and the Princeton Ballet Society; choreographed for 
Misericordia College and the Wilkes-Barre Ballet Theatre; 
performed with the Boston Ballet Company, California Ballet 
Company and Jacksonville Ballet Theatre. Chairman, Dance 
Department of the Pennsylvania Governor's School for the 
Arts. 

WILLIAM P. ZACCAGNI (Saxophone)- Studied at 
Temple University and with Vince Trombetta and Harold 
Karabell; toured with Burt Bacharach and Anthony Newley; 
recorded with the Salsoul Orchestra and MFSB. 



NOTE: Faculty biographies not included in this section were not available at time of printing. 



Edited By: Dovie R. Prather 



58 



CALENDAR 



1985 SPRING SEMESTER 

January 21, 1985-May 10, 1985 



'Subject to change 



59 



1985-86 ACADEMIC YEAR* 

FALL SEMESTER 

September 4, 1985-December 13, 1985 
SPRING SEMESTER 

January 20, 1986-May 9, 1986 



PCPA STUDENT BODY* 



United States: 



Alabama 1 

Alaska 2 

Arizona 1 

California 5 

Colorado 2 

Connecticut 2 

Delaware 5 

Florida 3 

Georgia 3 

Illinois 1 

Iowa 1 

Indiana 1 

Kansas 1 

Kentucky 1 

Louisiana 1 

Massachusetts 4 

Maryland 12 

Michigan 1 

Foreign Countries: 

Canada 5 

Israel 1 

Italy 1 

Japan 1 

Korea 6 

Malawi 1 



Minnesota 2 

Missouri 1 

Montana 2 

New Jersey 89 

New York 22 

Ohio 3 

Oklahoma 1 

Oregon 1 

Pennsylvania 192 

Puerto Rico 3 

Rhode Island 2 

Tennessee 1 

Texas 3 

Vermont 5 

Virginia 3 

Washington 3 

Washington, D.C 8 



Malaysia 1 

Norway 1 

Mexico 2 

Philippines 1 

Spain 1 

Taiwan 2 

Venezuela 3 



* Based on 1984 Fall Semester Enrollment 



61 



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PCPA PCPA 

Dorm. Shubert Building 

15th & Pine 250 S. Broad St. 



PCPA 

Annex Dance Studios 

313 S. Broad St. 309 S. Broad St. 



52 



TIPS TO THE APPLICANT 

1. Submit your Application for Admission as early 
as possible. 

2. Answer each question on the Application; type 
or print clearly. 

3. List the name(s) of your parent(s) or 
guardian(s). This information should also be 
supplied by married applicants; in the event of an 
emergency, the College will need to make these 
contacts. 

4. As soon as you submit your Application, 
request that copies of your high school and/or 
college transcript(s) be sent to the Admissions 
Office. 

5. If you are applying for financial aid, please do 
not hesitate to contact the Director of Financial 
Aid, who can advise you and answer your 
questions on financial aid programs. 

6. To be considered for a talent scholarship grant, 
you must submit your Application and complete 
your audition on or before April 3, 1985. Appli- 
cants who audition after that date will be consid- 
ered for scholarships, if funds are available. 

7. If you wish to participate in a Regional Audition, 
you must first submit the Application for Admis- 
sion. 

8. Remember, if you or your parents have any 
questions, please contact the Admissions Office; it 
exists to make your application and admission 
procedure as simple as possible. A telephone call 
or letter sometimes can alleviate a great deal of 
concern. Call or write: PCPA Admissions Office, 
250 S. Broad St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19102. 
(215)893-3174. 



63 



APPLICATION FOR 
UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION 

PERSONAL DATA (Please Pnn. or Type! 

Name 

Street Address 

City 



COLLEGE OF THE 
PEI^OEgn^G AI^TS 



Xounty._ 



_Social Sec. No 

-Telephone __ 1 

Area Code 

_State 



JZ\p_ 



Citizenship _ 



_Sex. 



_Birth Date_ 



_Marital Status_ 



EDUCATION 

List All High Schools and Colleges Attended 



City 



Dates 



STATUS 

Full-time a 
Part-time o 



DEGREE OR DIPLOMA PROGRAM FOR WHICH YOU ARE APPLYING 

(Complete MUSIC, DANCE or THEATRE Section below) 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC a Bachelor of Music □ Double Degree 

n Two-Year Certificate in Music 

Major Date You Plan to Enter o January n September, 19 

SCHOOL OF DANCE n Bachelor of Fine Arts □ Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance Ed. 

a Two-Year Certificate in Dance 
Major Date You Plan to Enter o January o September, 19 



SCHOOL OF 
THEATRE (ACTING) 

Major 



o Bachelor of Fine Arts 



Date You Plan to Enter n January n September, 19 



AUDITION DATES are listed in the Admissions Bulletin. Please indicate the dates on which you most prefer to audition. 



LENGTH OF STUDY in major area_ 



PIANO PLACEMENT: (Music & Dance majors only) Have you ever studied piano? a yes a no. If yes, how long? 
TAP PLACEMENT: (Dance Majors Only) Have you ever studied tap? a yes a no. If yes, how long? 



TEACHER PREFERENCE (Music Majors Only) Assignment subject to teacher acceptance and schedule vacancy. If you have 
a teacher preference, please indicate 



64 



PARENT(S) OR LEGAL GUARDIAN (S) (Married students should also complete. Information to be used only in 
event of emergency notification.) 

Name Age Occupation 

Address Title 



City. State, Zip Employer _ 

Phone Bus. Phone 



Yes No 
o □ I have requested copies of my high school/college transcripts to be forwarded to the Admissions Office, 
a a I have requested that the results of my SAT's or ACT's be forwarded to the Admissions Office. 
n □ Please forward a Financial Aid Application and information 
n □ I have enclosed my Dance Resume (Dance Majors ONLY) 
n n I have enclosed my Biographical Narrative (Music Majors ONLY) 
□ □ I have enclosed my Biographical Narrative or Resume (Theatre Majors ONLY) 

Which area(s) best indicate the way(s) in which you first learned of and became interested in the Philadelphia College of 
the Performing Arts? Please be specific. 

□ College Night/Career Day □ Private Teacher 

□ Friends. Relatives, etc. □ High School/College Counselor 

□ Classroom Teacher □ Newspapers, Ads, etc. 

□ Other — (Please Indicate) 

I certify that the information on this application and attached documents (if any) is true and correct to the best of my 
knowledge. A student found guilty of NONDISCLOSURE or MISREPRESENTATION in the completion of this application may 
be subject to the appropriate disciplinary action, resulting in possible dismissal from the College. 



Signature Date_ 



Note: Please enclose a check or money order for the $30 Application Fee (non-refundable) made payable to the 
Philadelphia College of the Performing Arts and mail to: Admissions, Philadelphia College of the Performing 
Arts, 250 South Broad Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19102 (215) 893-3174. 



65