(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Advanced arithmetic"

o^ 

T 



^ 



LIBRARY 






UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA. 

Received A^i^<^ cJL^i 88 F^ 

A i cessions No . ^^ ^ ^f/ Shelf No. 









<■■? 


OS* 








1 
















1 _ _ — — _ — -- 

1 









Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2008 with funding from 

IVIicrosoft Corporation 



http://www.archive.org/details/advancedarithmetOOcalirich 



CALIFORNIA STATE SERIES OF SCHOOL TEXT-BOOKS. 



ADVANCED 



AEITHMETIC 




COMPILED UXDER THE DIRECTIOX 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



sacramento, california. 
Printed at the State Printing Office. 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1887, hy the 

STATE OF CALIFORNIA, 

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 



PREFACE. 



The State Board of Education expect to make no revolution in 
teaching the old subject of Arithmetic, by the issuance of a new 
book. They feel, however, that arithmetics have been too much 
given to talking and not enough to doing — that a student seldom 
or never masters the thought in a long and minute explanation. 
He cannot understand it before working the examples, and does 
not need it afterward. Hence, the explanations in the present 
volume have been made brief, and may be enlarged by the teacher 
as the occasion demands. 

Let no one despise the book on account of its small size, but work 
a class carefully through it, making it familiar by frequent reviews, 
and observe the effect. We respectfully invite the candid criticism 
of those who have done this, that the defects of the present volume 
may be remedied in the near future. 



COKTEE'TS. 



PAGK. 

Notation and Numeration 5 

Addition 14 

Subtraction 21 

Multiplication 34 

Division 43 

Factors 63 

Fractions 72 

Short Methods 115 

Bills 119 

Weights and Measures 122,. 

General Analysis 172 

Proportion 176 

Partnership 178 

Percentage 181 

Profit and Loss 185 

Commission 189 

Insurance 194 

Taxes 198 

Stocks 201 

Interest 204 

Partial Payments 214 

Compound Interest 216 

Discount 219 

Accounts 221 

Exchange 228 

Average of Payments 233 

Average 235 

Powers and Roots 237 

Mensuration 246 

Miscellaneous Problems 257 

Abbreviations 262 

Signs ' 263 

Glossary 264 

Answers 271 

Index 287 




cjlLiforwia. series. 
ADVANCED 

ARITHMETIC. 



NOTATION AND NUMERATION. 

A single, whole thing is called a unit; as, o?ie, one apple, 
one pencil. 

Several things taken together as a whole may be a unit; 
as, one dozen pencils, one pile of hooJcs, one class of hoys. 

A number consists of one or more units; as, one, one cent, 
seven, seven hooks, ten pens. 

Writing numbers is called NoTATiOiN. 

The notation in common use is the decimal notation, 
which employs ten different characters, or figures, to form 
all numbers. 

All numbers are properly followed by a point (.). called 
the decimal point ; as in the table below. In writing num- 
bers in a series or in a sentence, the decimal point is omitted 
to avoid confusion with the period. 

The following table gives the ten characters of the deci- 
mal notation in the upper horizontal row and their names 
beneath. Then follow their combinations, forming num- 
bers of two figures. Put this diagram on the slate and fill 
out completely, writing (1) the figure (2) the combination 
(3) the name. 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



Figure 

Name 



Figure 

Combination 

Name 



Figure 
Combination 

Name 



Figure 

Combination 

Name 



Figure 

Combination 

Name 



Figure 

Combination 

Name 



Figure 
Combination 

Name 



Figure 

Combination 

Name 

Figure 

Combination 

Name 

Figure 

Combination 

Name 




Zero 


1. 

One 


2. 

Two 


3. 
Three 


10. 
Iten 
Ten 


11. 

f 1 ten \ 

1 1 unit i 

Eleven 


12. 

f 1 ten \ 

\ 2 units j 

Twelve 


13. 
( 1 ten ) 
t 3 units 1 
Thirteen 


20. 

2 tens 
Twenty 


21. 

j 2 tens ) 

\ 1 unit j 

Twenty-one 


22. 

( 2 tens ) 

\ 2 units 1 

Twenty-two 




30. 
3 tens 
Thirty 








40. 
4 tens 
Forty 








60. 
5 tens 
Fifty 








60. 

6 tens 
Sixty 








70. 

7 tens 
Sevent}" 








80. 
8 tens 
Eighty 








90. 
9 tens 
Ninety 









Observe 



r Units form the first figure at the left of tlie decimal 
In column i, the absence of units is marled by 0, 

any decimal place is always marked by 0. 
Hoiv many units make 1 tenf 



ARITHMETIC. 



4. 

Four 



5. 
Five 



14. 15. 

(1 ten M f 1 ten 

'( 4 units ) t 5 units 
Fourteen Fifteen 



6. 

Six 



Seven 



16. 

f Iten ) 

\ G units I 

Sixteen 



17. 
I 1 ten I 
[ 7 units j 
Seventeen 



Eight 



18. 
f 1 ten ) 
( 8 units ) 
Eighteen 



9. 
Nine 



19. 

1 ten 

9 units 

Nineteen 



f 1 ten ) 

\ 9 units j 



point; tens, the second. 

called nought, zero, or cipher. The absence of number in 



94. 


18. 


82. 


72. 


27. 


97. 


13. 


55. 


47. 


29. 


14. 


79. 


85. 


32. 


28. 


44. 


66. 


38. 


51. 


74. 


70. 



90. 


95. 


98. 


49. 


59. 


36. 


37. 


46. 


41. 


20. 


67. 


75. 


88. 


92. 


58. 


50. 


12. 


39. 


19. 


21. 


96. 



8 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

EXERCISE 1. 

Draw a diagram like the preceding and write the names 
of the following numbers and the combinations which 
make them: 

40. 

77. 

30. 

62. 

71. 

54. 

87. 

EXERCISE 2. 

Write the following combinations in figures and their 
names in words: 

1. 2 tens 4 units, 3 tens 1 unit, 6 tens, 5 tens 3 units. 

2. 8 tens 4 units, 4 tens 2 units, 8 tens, 3 tens 5 units, 6 
tens 8 units, 5 tens 6 units, 6 tens o units. 

3. 8 tens 6 units, 5 tens 7 units, 7 tens, 4 tens 5 units, 1 
ten 6 units, 7 tens 3 units, 6 tens 1 unit. 

4. 1 ten 7 units, 9 tens, 6 tens 9 units, 4 tens, 1 ten 8 
units, 7 tens 8 units, 8 tens 1 unit. 

5. 3 tens, 2 tens 6 units, 4 tens 8 units, 9 tens 9 units, 6 
tens 4 units, 2 tens 5 units, 5 tens 8 units. 

6. 4 tens 3 units, 9 tens 1 unit, 8 tens 9 units, 6 tens 5 
units, 2 tens 3 units, 3 tens 4 units, 5 tens 2 units. 

7. 4 tens 1 unit, 7 tens 5 units, 1 ten 7 units, 9 tens 6 
units, 3 tens 3 units, 5 tens 8 units, 1 ten 5 units. 

The third figure at the left of the decimal point is called 
hundreds; thus, 236 is 2 hundreds 3 tens 6 units, or tico 
hundred thirty-six. 

* How many tens make 1 hundred ? 

These three places of figures — units, tens, and hundreds — 
form the first group of numbers, called units. 



ARITHMETIC. 9 

The fourth, fifth, and sixth places at tlie left of tlie deci- 
mal point form the second group, called thousands ; units, 
tens, and hundreds of thousands, respectively. 

The seventh, eighth, and ninth places at the left of the 
decimal point, form the third group, called millions ; units, 
tens, and hundreds of millions, respectively. 

The following table shows the scheme for reading num- 
bers, or Numeration. In reading, begin at the left, read 
each group, and add the group name; thus, one hundred 
twenty-four sextillion, seven hundred thirty quintillion, etc., 
omitting the name of the unit group: 



TABLE. 



m C p. m 

d O .2 • 'TJ 

.2 -3 ^ ?2 «^ a ^ 

^ '-^ r^ O O .2 ^ 

■■^ ^ ^ 'r^ -^ 'B ^ 

<^ Ej Bj T^ •:::) d r^ 

02 CT" CT" -t5 ^ Pi qS 

o o o o o o o 



0QO0CQCOCOC/2CCOQ 

Ti "73 T? 'T3 "T^ "T^ "^ "73 

'T^ xn Ti en 'Xi cotU zn Ti oq'tJ w Ti cc"^ 02 

124,730,218,6 9 3,013.978.210,453. 

Note. — The omission of ''and" between hundreds and tens is 
the better usage, although many writers and speakers still use it. 

Suggestion. — Require oral exercise by the class upon the preced- 
ing table until it is familiar to all. 

EXERCISE 3. 
Read, or write on slates or blackboard, in words: 

1. 208. 4. 727. 7. 7051. 10. 3108. 

2. 523. 5. 4009. 8. 555. 11. 4018. 

3. 1001. 6. 300. 9. 476. 12. 23760. 



10 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

13. 1414. 22. 1211. 31. 525. 40. 5729. 



14. 


2007. 


23. 


41407. 


32. 


800. 


41. 


100010. 


15. 


105. 


24. 


270. 


33. 


805. 


42. 


74179. 


16. 


8248. 


25. 


643077. 


34. 


3104. 


43. 


85128. 


17. 


5678. 


26. 


21190. 


35. 


7228. 


44. 


7300. 


18. 


179. 


27. 


758. 


36. 


720. 


45. 


211. 


19. 


24198. 


28. 


7112. 


37. 


5000. 


46. 


2419, 


20. 


179226. 


29. 


987. 


38. 


2726. 


47. 


43200, 


21. 


473. 


30. 


3721. 


39. 


54100. 


48. 


7290. 



EXERCISE 4. 
Write the following in figures, to be read in the class: 

1. Five hundred seventy-two, one thousand seventeen, 
five thousand ninety, four hundred sixty-four, twenty-four 
thousand eight, three hundred forty-six, nine thousand 
ninety-nine. 

How many groups are employed in writing the first number? 
How many in writing the second? The third? What places are 
vacant in each group? They should be occupied by zero. 

2. Eleven thousand seven hundred eighty-five, seventeen 
thousand twenty-nine, eight hundred eight, three thousand 
fifteen, eighteen thousand thirty, twenty-five thousand four 
hundred, seven hundred six. 

3. Forty thousand nine hundred three, sixty-one thou- 
sand three hundred thirty-three, one hundred four thousand 
twenty, seven thousand forty-six, eight hundred eighty- 
eight thousand eight, nine hundred sixty-nine, two thou- 
sand four hundred thirteen. 

4. Fourteen thousand seven hundred forty-five, two 
hundred fifty-one thousand one hundred sixteen, thirty- 
four thousand one hundred eleven, five thousand sixty-six, 
thirty-one thousand nine hundred fifty-two, eighty-two 
thousand three hundred twelve. 

5. Nineteen thousand five hundred, seven thousand four 
hundred twenty-three, six hundred nine, six hundred nine 



ARITHMETIC. 11 

thousand, six thousand nine, fifty-nine thousand five, five 
thousand nine hundred five. 

6. Three thousand thirteen, three hundred thirteen, 
three hundred thousand thirteen, thirty thousand thirteen, 
eight hundred eighty-one, eight thousand eighty-one, eighty 
thousand eighty-one. 

EXERCISE 5. 

Write, on your slates, through the group of milhons, a 
table like that on page 9, and place under it in vertical col- 
umn 20 numbers of your own selection, containing from 
3 to 9 places each, for reading and dictation in the class. 

EXERCISE 6. 
Read the numbers under Exercises 22 and 24. 

EXERCISE 7. 
Write the following in figures: 

1. 5 thousand 2 hundred 10, 24 thousand 6 hundred 3, 
11 thousand 29, 7 hundred 63, 16 thousand 8 hundred, 4 
hundred 44. 

2. 123 thousand 123, 14 hundred 14, 73 thousand 5 
hundred 8, 17 hundred, 141 thousand, 3 million 3 thousand 
3 hundred 3. 

3. 7 thousand 7, 7 hundred 7, 7 million 7 thousand 7, 
7 million 7, 13 hundred 30, 13 thousand 30. 

4. 115 thousand 7 hundred 74, 10 hundred 10, 10 thou- 
sand 10, 1 thousand 10, 5 hundred 91, 8 thousand 4 hun- 
dred 20. 

5. 404 thousand 44, 23 thousand 213, 180 thousand 180, 
47 thousand 474, 3 thousand 206, eighty-one. 

6. 826 thousand 013, 15 thousand 411, 111 thousand 
111, 400 thousand 400, 328 thousand 910, 50 thousand 50. 

7. 501 thousand 107, 55 thousand 76, 28 thousand 1. 

8. 101 thousand 10, 101 million 1 thousand 6. 

9. 110 thousand 11, 20 million 11 thousand 11. 



12 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



EXERCISE 8. 

Dictation exercise by the class, each giving his own num- 
bers without reference to book, slate, or paper. Repeat this 
exercise until the class dictate and write rapidly. 

EXERCISE 9. 

Place the following in tabular form, as in Exercise 5, for 
reading in the class: 

. 224368192, 1724261, 2004101, 7264180, 2010194, 3762108, 
23101, 47266, 4004, 20801, 76001, 2108, 17007, 100100. 

Another notation, called the Roman notation, is some- 
times used for writing dates, headings of chapters, and the 
like; but it is too cumbrous for ordinary computations. 
The Roman notation eniploys seven capital letters, with 
their combinations, to represent numbers, viz.: 

I V X L C D M 

One, five, ten, fifty, one hundred, five hundred, one thousand. 
1 5 10 50 100 500 1000 

The following table shows the method of combining: 



I . 


one. 


VII . 


. seven. 


LX . . . sixty. 


II . 


two. 


VIII . 


eight. 


XC . . ninety. 


Ill . 


. three. 


IX . 


. nine. 


XL . . . forty. 


IV . 


. four. 


X . 


. ten. 


L . . . fifty. 


V . 


five. 


XI . 


eleven. 


C . one hundred. 


VI . 


. . six. 


XX . 


twenty. 


D . five hundred. 




M one 


thousand. 


M one n 


lillion. 



Observe ^ 



' Repeating a letter repeats its value. 

If a letter of smaller value precedes one of larger, 
the difference of their values is indicated; if the 
reverse, the sum. 

A dash ( — ) above a letter indicates so many thou- 
sand; thus, L = fifty thousand. 



ARITHMETIC. 



13 



EXERCISE 10. 
Write in Roman notation: 

8, 14, 27, 144, 1875, 599, 1620, 35, 178, 83, 124000, 753, 
16, 222, 1888, 7, 12, 79. 

EXERCISE 11. 

Read the following numbers: 

XIX, XXIX, XXXVI, CCCI, ex, DCLII^ CDXIV, 
MDLXXXIV, MDCCCLXXXVI, CXLVII, MC, XCIX, 
CCCXXV, LXXII, DIV, MCCXVIII, CXI, DCCXLVII, 
MDCCLXXXIX, MCDXCII, CL, CCXV. 

EXERCISE 12. 
Prepare 3 columns on your slate as follows: 

First column, 10 numbers written in words; 

Second column, the same numbers in decimal notation; 

Third column, the same in Roman notation. 

Model : 



No. 


"Words. 


Decimal Xotatitin. 


Eoman Notation. 


1. 

2. 

3. 
4. 
5. 
G. 

7. 

8. 

9. 

10. 


Twenty-five. 


25. 


XXY. 























































14 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



ADDITION. 

If you have 8 apples and a schoolmate gives you 5 more, 
how many will you have ? 

The process of putting together two or more numbers of 
the same kind into one is called. Addition. 

The result obtained is called the sum or amount. 

The sign (-|-), called plus or and, is used to indicate ad- 
dition. Thus, 

8-\-5=^lo is read 8 plus 5 equals 13^ or 8 and 5 are 13. 

Suggestion. — With beginners ''and" is preferable to plus. 

EXERCISE 13. (Oral.) 

To THE Teacher. — Give pupils pebbles, beans, peas; or, better, 
pasteboard cut into strips }q in. wide and 3 in. long, to find out the 
results by going through with the combinations. Drill on the fol- 
lowing until the pupil recognizes at sight the sum of each pair : 

123132214353526428 



2 


1 


1 


3 


2 


3 


2 


4 


1 


3 


2 


6 


5 


5 


3 


2 


6 


3 


6 


5 


7 


8 


6 


9 


4 


5 


3 


1 


7 


9 


8 


5 


2 


6 


6 


4 


5 


9 


6 


8 


4 


3 




4 


5 


6 


2 


9 


7 


3 


9 


8 


6 


9 



24772736529813 
84974542176597 

EXERCISE 14. (Written.) 
Write each of the pairs and their sum, in Exercise 13, 
horizontally, using the signs ( + ) and (=); thus, 1-^2=3. 
Bring to the class to read. 

EXERCISE 15. (Oral.) 
Add these columns, taking the figures in pairs, and call- 



ARITHMETIC, I •" J5 

ing only the sums of the pairs ; thus, in the first; -?<?, 15) abo 
add across the page from left to right as indicated by the 
sign(+) : 

1+3+4+3+8+7+8+7+5-1-8=:? 
4+2+3+9+4+6+5+8+5+1=? 
.7+5+7+4+3+9+8+5+6+4=? 
3+6+9+6+1+5+9+4+3+9=? 

7+9+7+8+2+2+9+6+2+2=? 
1+1+7+8+8+9+9+9+1+6=? 
9+6+3+5+4+2+2+3+8+4=? 

3+6+8+7+4+7+5+3+6+7=? 

EXERCISE 16. (Oral.) 

Extend Exercise 15 by beginning with the second figure 
on the left in each horizontal row and adding through the 
row. Then begin with the third, and so on. 

EXERCISE 17. (Written.) 
Copy the following, fill out as indicated, and write results: 

1. 2. 3. 5. 8. 

2+5= 3+7= 7+8= 3+9= 9+9= 

12+5= 13+7= 17+8= 13+9= 19+9= 

22+5= 23+7= 27+8= and so on. and so on. 

32+5= 33+7= 37+8= 6. 9. 

42+5= 43+7= and so on. 6+6= 7+7= 

52+5= 53+7= 4. 16+6= 17+7= 

62+5= 63+7= 7+6= and soon, and soon. 

72+5= 73+7= 17+6= 7. 10. 

82+5= 83+7= 27+6= 4+7= 1+9= 

92+5= 93+7=: and so on. and so on. and so on. 

EXERCISE 18. (Oral.) 

1. Begin with and add by 2's to 50; thus, 0, ^, 4, 6, 
etc. Do the same, beginning with 1, to 51; thus^ I, o, Oj etc. 



16 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

2. Add by 3's from to 51; from 50 to 98; from 2 to 
50; from 51 to 99. 

3. Add by 4's from to 52; from 51 to 99; from 2 to 
50; from 52 to 96. 

4. Add by 5's from to 100; from 1 to 101; from 2 to 
102; from 3 to 103; from 4 to 104. 

EXERCISE 19. (Written.) 
Write as in Exercise 17: 

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 

4+9= 3+8= 9+7= 8+8= 8+5= 

14+9= 13+8= 19+7= 18+8= 18+5= 

24+9= 23+8= 29+7= 28+8= 28+5= 

and so on. and so on. and so on. and so on. and so on. 

6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 

5_|-8= 9+2= 2+9= 6+5= 5+6= 

15+8= 19+2= 12+9= 16+5= 15+6= 

25+8= 29+2= 22+9= 26+5= 25+6= 

and so on. and so on. and so on. and so on. and so on. 

Suggestion. — Let the teacher give further oral work of the same 
kind. 

EXERCISE 20. (Oral.) 

1. Add by 6's from to 60; from 52 to 100; from 1 to 
61; from 43 to 103; from 5 to 65. 

2. Add by 7's from to 70; from 3 to 73; from 32 to 
102; from 16 to 86; from 31 to 101. 

3. Add by 8's from to 80; from 21 to 101; from 5 to 
85; from 17 to 97; from 6 to 86; from 43 to 123. 

4. Add by 9's from to 90; from 2 to 101; from 5 to 
104; from 13 to 103; from 8 to 98; from 7 to 106. 

EXERCISE 21. (Oral.) 
(1) Begin with the bottom of each colmnn and add up- 
ward in pairs (2) begin with the top and add downward 
in pairs (3) add across from left to right: 



ARITHMETIC. 17 

7_|_5_|-3_^6+7+2+9+3+8H-4=? 
2+2+3+8+4+9+2+9+1+6=? 
9+9+9+1+6+2+9+6+2+2==? 
2+9+6+2+2+4+3+9+3+6=? 
4_^3_|_9_j_3-|_6+5+6+4+9+6=? 
5+6+4+9+6+8+5+1+1+1=? 
8+5+1+1+1+7+5+8+7+9=? 

5+3+9+3+6+8+7+4+7+5=? 
8+6+4+9+6+3+5+4+2+2=? 
7+5+1+1+1+7+8+8+9+9=? 
3+5+8+7+9+7+8+2+2+9=? 
7+6+9+6+1+5+9+5+3+6=? 
4+5+7+4+3+9+8+8+7+5=? 
1+2+3+9+4+6+7+1+4+2=? 
4+3+4+3+8+7+8+1+1+3=? 

1+4+7+3+3+2+5+6+5+5=? 
3+2+5+6+4+3+7+9+8+1=? 
4+3+7+9+3+9+4+6+7+1=? 
3+9+4+6+8+4+3+1+9+1=? 
8+4+3+1+7+6+9+5+7+7=? 
7_|_6+9+5+8+7+8+9+8+8=? 
8+7+8+9+1+1+8+5+2+8=? 
1+1+8+5+7+8+5+4+2+9=? 
7+8+5+ 4+5+5+6+3+9+9=? 

This exercise may be extended by beginning at any 
intermediate point and adding onward. 

To write and add numbers of two or more figures. 

Suggestion. — Before allowing the pupils to study this or any ^um- 
lur explanation , the teacher should take the work orally with them 
and let them make as many of the suggestions as they can. 

Find the sum of 327, 48, and 452. 
2— A 



FULL WORK 


327 


48 


452 


17 


110 


700 



18 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

Explanation. — We cannot add 7 pencils and 6 pens, 
because they are unlike. Likewise, we cannot add 
tens to units. Therefore, write units under units, tens 
under tens, etc. The sum of the units is 17; of the 
tens, 11; of the hundreds, 7. Adding these results 
gives 827. 

Why is 5;ero (0) placed after 11? 
Why are two zeros (00) placed after 7? 

827 

But 17 units are 1 ten 7 units. As the 1 ten belongs 

CONTRACTED, in the tens' column, we may write only the 7 units, 

3 2-7 as in the contracted operation, and add the 1 ten to the 

43 tens' column; thus, 1, 6, 10, 12. Again, 12 tens are 1 

^ r 9 hundred, 2 tens. As before, write, in the result, only 

the 2 tens and add the 1 hundred to the column of 

8 2 7 hundreds. 

Test^ or prove, the correctness of the ivork hy adding down- 
ward. 

EXERCISE 22. (Written.) 

Write in columns properly, add, and test the work: 

1. 424, 236, 38, 120. 11. 1234, 4321, 1324, 4231. 

2. 34, 108, 246, 5. 12. 3579, 9753, 3795, 9573. 

3. 402, 1728, 526, 100. 13. 908, 7098, 9708, 987. 

4. 3756, 11, 153, 4005. 14. 7890, 798, 8790, 809. 

5. 271, 109, 9019, 49. 15. 4796, 7694, 976, 479. 

6. 7310, 101, 476, 1203, 45. 16. 3251, 1523, 5237, 8. 

7. 423, 13, 9, 237, 2314, 103. 17. 487, 9217, 1499, 7. 

8. 19, 500, 275, 2406, 2728, 2010. 18. 534, 434, 898, 10. 

9. 9019, 428, 1300, 23, 99, 3003. 19. 921, 651, 1397, 14. 
10. 1314, 810, 278, 4130, 44, 176. 20. 1455, 1085, 95, 117. 

EXERCISE 23. 

Add the columns of figures in Exercise 1, and test. Add 
the same across the page. 

Write each example of Exercise 2 in column, add, and 
test. 



ARITHMETIC. 19 

EXERCISE 24. 

Add and prove, in columns and in rows: 

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 

15. 4298+1029+ 428+7296+ 49=? 

16. 376+ 76+5001+ 98+1311=? 

17. 107+ 237+ 19+ 402+ 205=? 

18. 25+4196+1279+ 13+ 15=? 

19. 3178+ 703+ 499+ 720+3146=? 

6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 

20. 9+ 207+ 575+3209+1712=? 

21. 79+3426+ 82+ 729+5726=? 

22. 4327+ 127+ 426+ 48+ 209=? 

23. 214+5728+1350+7216+8702=? 

24. 903+4019+ 407+ 590+ 435=? 

11. 12. 13. 14. 

25. 375409+ 72496+ 718409+ 419009=? 

26. 23216+570203+ 20171+ 21060=? 

27. 25100+ 30206+ 376219+ 1199=? 

28. 5196+175410+4211010+ 519257=? 

29. 576206+ 76228 + 5176159+4219219=? 

30. 61070+481112+ 172105+ 728400=? 

EXERCISE 25. 
Add the columns of figures in Exercise 3, and test. Add 
the same across the page. AVrite each example, Exercises 
4 and 7, in columns, add, and test. 

EXERCISE 26. 
Write 10 examples of your own, of 10 numbers each, 
perform, and prove, and bring into the class to dictate to 
the others for board-work. 

EXERCISE 27. 
Dictate numbers of your own, without reference to book, 



20 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

slate, or paper, for the other members of the class to per- 
form. Repeat the exercise until each dictates rapidly. 

Accomitants and business men, by constant practice, add 
two or even three columns at once with great rapidity. 

To add two columns, it is customary to add the tens first 
and then the units in each successive number. 



24 
57 



Thus, 3 tens 4 units + 4 tens ( = 7 tens) 6 units = 8 tens 
units, +5 tens ( = 13 tens) 7 units = 13 tens 7 units, +2 tens 
4 6 ( = 15 tens) 4 units = 1G tens 1 unit. In reading omit parts 
3 4 in parenthesis and the words, tens and units; thus, 5, 4; 
8, 0; 13, 7; 16, 1. 



161 



24 88 

17 40 

50 26 

75 23 

29 81 

31 44 



(Written or Oral.) 
Copy and fill out, or read, as in the first example: 
30^20=50=5 tens. 



19 


5721 


3333 


12 


4804 


3214 


4141 


6789 


1818 


2AU 


7117 


7642 


7236 


2104 


4261 


4004 


5016 


1781 



40+30= 


70+50= 


100+20= 


120+60= 


40+20= 


90+40= 


100+30= 


140+70= 


70+20= 


80+20= 


110+40= 


130+80= 


80+10= 


50+40= 


110+70= 


110+60= 


50+30= 


30+20= 


130+40= 


150+90= 


60+40= 


60+30= 


150+70= 


100+40= 


90+70= 


80+40= 


110+50= 


140+50= 


70+40= 


40+10= 


120+70= 


160+80= 


80+50= 


90+60= 


100+50= 


170+90= 


30+10= 


60+20= 


140+60= 


150+80= 



Observe I ^^^^^9 -^^'^ '^ ^^'^ (/wes lO^s, as adding units to 
{ units gives units. 



ARITHMETIC. 



21 



SUBTRACTION. 



Copy the following on your slates, and put in place of 
each blank the number that you must add to the one above 
the line to make the One below: 



2 pencils 
pencils 



4 pens 
pens 



5 apples 
apples 



9 books 
books 



marbles 
marbles 



3 pms 
pins 



9 apples 



17 l)Ook^ 



10 marbles 



9 pins 



7 pencils 11 pens 

Copy the following, also. Place below each line the num- 
ber that will be left, if you take away the lower from the 
upper number: 

11 pens 



7 pencils 
5 pencils 



/ pens 



9 apples 
4 apples 



17 books 
8 books 



16 marbles 
8 marbles 



9 pins 
6 pins 



pencils 



pens 



apples 



books 



marbles 



pms 



Compare these two exercises. What did you do in the 
first ? In the second ? Since 5 put with 2 makes 7, 5 taken 
from 7 will leave 2. 

The process of taking one number from another of the 
same kind is called Subtraction. 

The number from which Ave take is called the minuend. 

The number taken away is called the subtrahend. 

The number left is called the difference or remainder. 

Pick out each in the second iiart you copied above. 

The sign ( — ), called minus or less, is used to indicate sub- 
traction ; thus, 

7 — 5-—2 is read 7 minus 5 equals S, or 7 less 5 are 2. 

Suggestion. — With beginners, leas, is to be preferred to minus. 
EXERCISE 28. (Written.) 

Place in each blank the number that must be added to 
the number above the line to make the one below: 



22 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

47215 675848627 

12 16171311181413171518141219 
591 273 10 6 13 9258 

181316^15 1715121718151211 
3 13 5 12 14 5 3 9 6 7 10 4 12 

1816nr71816i41113181914T6 

EXERCISE 29. (Oral.) 

Perform Exercise 18 backward. That is, in (1) begin 
with 50 and take away 2 each time; thus, 50, 48 ^ 4^, etc. 
Then begin with 51; 51^ ^9, ^7, etc. 

Then in (2) begin with 51 and subtract by 3's; and so on. 

Repeat until all subtract readily. 

EXERCISE 30. (Written.) 

Copy the following, fill out as indicated, and write the 
remainders: 





1. 




2. 




3. 




4. 


5 


. 


i — 


-5= 


10- 


-7= 


15- 


-8= 


13- 


-6--= 


12- 


-9= 


17- 


-5= 


20- 


-7= 


25- 


-8= 


23- 


-6= 


22- 


-9= 


27- 


-5= 


30- 


-7= 


35- 


-8= 


33- 


-6-= 


32- 


-9= 


37- 


-5= 


40- 


— / = 


45- 


-8= 


43- 


-6= 


42- 


-9= 


and 


soon 


and 


so on 


and 


so on 


and 


. so on 


and so on 


to 9 


7—5. 


to 100-7. 


to 9 


5—8. 


toS 


>3— 6. 


to 92 


1—9. 


e 


>. 


7. 




B. 




9. 


10. 


12- 


-6= 


11- 


— / = 


18- 


-9= 


14- 


r^ 


10- 


-9= 


22- 


-6= 


21- 


— / = 


28- 


-9= 


24- 


— / : 


20- 


-9== 


32- 


-6= 


31- 


_'7 


38- 


-9= 


34- 


-7= 


30- 


-9^ 


42- 


-6= 


41- 


_'7 . 


48- 


-9= 


44- 


-7= 


40- 


-9= 


and 


soon. 


and 


so on. 


and 


so on. 


and 


so on. 


and so on. 



Compare this work with that of Exercise 17, 



ARITHMETIC. 23 

EXERCISE 31. (Oral.) 

Subtract the lower number from the upper: 

20 32 31 25 21 23 33 22 16 43 
9535 11 89893 



39 


18 


26 


59 


47 


64 


71 


74 


41 


55 


4 


1 





8 


7 • 


5 


6 


7 


5 


6 


72 


85 


91 


67 


54 


35 


46 


69 


56 


44 


8 


5 


10 


8 




8 


5 




o 

O 


8 


77 


86 


98 


83 


90 


49 


57 


43 


38 


25 


9 


4 




3 


1 


8 


J 


9 


9 


9 


40 


52 


71 


50 


41 


53 


61 


84 


91 


50 


2 


3 


5 


5 


2 


4 




5 


3 


4 


70 


23 


87 


85 


91 


41 


53 


28 


93 


96 


6 


4 


5 


I 


8 


6 


4 


^ 
i 


5 


9 



EXERCISE 32. CWritten.) 
Fill out as directed in Exercise 30: 



1. 


2. 


3. 


4. 


5. 


13-4= 


11—3= 


11—9= 


16—9= 


16-8= 


23-4= 


21—3= 


21—9= 


26-9= 


26-8= 


and so on 


and so on 


ana so on 


and so on 


and so on 


to 93—4. 


to 91—3. 


to 91—9. 


to 96—9. 


to 96—8. 


6. 


7. 


8. 


9. 


10. 


13-8= 


14—8= 


10—6= 


11—6= 


17-8= 


23—8= 


24—8= 


20-6= 


21—6= 


27—8= 


and so on 


and so on 


and so on 


and so on 


and so on 


to 93—8. 


to 94—8. 


to 90 6. 


to 91—6. 


to 97—8, 




EXERCISE 33. (0 


RAL.) 





Perform the work of Exercise 20 backwards, as you 
were directed in Exercise 29. 



24 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

EXERCISE 34. (Written or Oral.) 
Copy and fill out, or read, as in the first example: 
30—30=10--=! ten. 



40—30=. 


70—50= 


100—20= 


120—60: 


40—20= 


90—40= 


100 30= 


140—70: 


70 20= 


80—20= 


110—40= 


130—80: 


80—10= 


50 40= 


■ 110—70= 


110—60: 


50—30= 


30—20= 


130 40= 


150—90: 


60—40= 


60—30= 


150 70= 


100—40 


90 70= 


80—40= 


110—50= 


140-50: 


70—40= 


40 10= 


120—70= 


160—80 


80—50= 


90—60= 


100—50= 


170—90: 


30—10= 


60—50= 


140—60= 


150—80: 



^, ( Suhtractmq 10 s from 10 s leaves 10 s, as subtract- 

Observe < , . '^ ^ ^ . -, . 

( mg units jrom units leaves units. 

EXERCISE 35. (Oral.) 

1. 15—7+4—10+9+6—10+1—4+9+3+10—5=? 

2. 5+9—1+7—3—5—2+11+4—9+3—10+1=? 

3. 1+9—10+5+3—7+10—11+3—2+8+9—8=? 

4. 43— 5+2— 10— 9+4— 10+3— 7+3— 9+5— 10=? 

5. 17+5—11—1+8—16+4—6+11+9—3—2+5=? 

6. 44+6—10+1—9+8—10+3—8+2—9+2—11=? 

7. 90—20+ 5—10— 5+1—10+ 2—9+3—8—9—10=? 

8. 1+17+2—9—10+7+8—11+5—10+0+1+4=? 

9. 3+9—11+10+4—3+7+1—7+2—8+2+1=? 
10. 2+6—7+10+4+3—9—1+3+2—6—7=? 

To subtract numbers of two or more figures. 

Take 416 from 829. 



OPERATION 

829 



Explanation. — Write the subtrahend under the 
minuend, units under units, etc., as in Addition, 
4 1 G and for the same reason. (What reason?) Begin 

^\'^ with units. 



ARITHMETIC. 25 

EXERCISE 36. (Written.) 

1. 178—134= 6. 447—336= 11. 4391—1290= 

2. 495_274= 7. 678—567= 12. 7448—5346= 

3. 982—471= 8. 595—494= 13. 8254—3223= 

4. 778—545= 9. 309—207= 14. 9725—2501= 

5. 904—503= 10. 828—721= 15. 3486—1376= 

Take 479 from 627. 
FULL OPERATION. EXPLANATION. — "\Ye Can not take 9 

500+14 0+ 1 7=6 2 7 units from 7 units. Take away 1 ten 
400+ 70+ 9^479 from the 2 tens of the minuend and 

put it with the 7 units, making 17 

100+ 40+ 8=148 units. 9 units from 17 units leave 8 
units, which we write below in the units column. We can not 
take 7 tens from 1 ten (left in the minuend); hence take 1 hundred 
from the 6 hundred in the minuend and put it with the 1 ten, mak- 
ing 11 tens. 7 tens from 11 tens leave 4 tens. 4 hundreds from 5 
hundreds leave 1 hundred. 

Test by adding the remainder and subtrahend; the result 
should be the minuend. 

EXERCISE 37. (Written.) 
Write properly, find the differences, and prove : 

1. 738 and 542. 4. 500 and 430. 7. 1247 and 8146. 

2. 239 and 410. 5. 378 and 909. 8. 598 and 399. 

3. 5786 and 4310. 6. 246 and 725. 9. 979 and 451. 

Sometimes, when our minuend figure is too small, it hap- 
pens that the next minuend figure is 0, or nothing to take 
from. In such a case go to the first minuend figure, not 0, 
to the left, and reduce down. Thus, 

Subtract 2378 from 5005. 

_„^„ .-„T^xT Explanation. — AVe can not take 8 from 5, and the 

4 9 9 15 next two minuend figures are O's. We, therefore, take 

500 5 1 thousand from the 5 thousands, leaving 4 thousands, 

o o -- o as shown by the small figure above. 1 thousand is 

10 hundreds. Again, take 1 hundred from the 10 hun- 

2 6 2 7 dreds, leaving 9 hundreds, as shown above. 1 hun- 



26 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

dred is 10 tens. Take 1 ten from 10 tens, leaving 9 tens. 1 ten 5 
units are 15 units. Now subtract tlie subtraliend figures from the 
small figures above the minuend. 

EXERCISE 38. (Oral and Written.) 

Take the lower from the upper numbers; also subtract 
as indicated by the sign ( — ) ; prove your work. 

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 

13. 800—143=? 15. 1467—300=? 17. 671—420=? 

14. 75— 29=? 16. 229— 85=? 18. 176-- 89=? 

7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 

19. 1100—240=? 21. 1728—1128=? 23. 990—871=? 

20. 73— 19=? 22. 411— 301=? 24. 747— 75=? 



EXERCISE 39. (Written.) 

Write and find the difference between the first two num- 
bers of each example in Exercise 22 ; prove your w^ork. 
Thus 

^'236 ' 34 

Do the same with the last two numbers of each example. 

EXERCISE 40. (Oral or Written.) 

Find the difference between each number, except the last, 
and the next one below it in examples 1 to 14, Exercise 24. 
Finish with the numbers of Example 1, then take those of 
Example 2, and so on. Number your examples as you 
write them. 

EXERCISE 41. 

Find the difference between each number, of the first 
two, and the second number below it in examples 1 to 14, 
Exercise 24; between the first number and the third num- 
ber below it. Work in the same order as in Exercise 40. 

EXERCISE 42. 

Find the difiference between the first number of Example 



ARITHMETIC. 27 

1, Exercise 22, and the first number of each of tlie other 
examples. Tlius, 

1. 4^4—34; 2. 424—402; 3. 3756—424; and so on. 

Difference between the second number of Example 1 and 
the first number of each of the other examples ; the third 
number of Example 1 and the first number of each of the 
other examples ; the fourth number of Example 1 and the 
first number of each of the other examples. 

EXERCISE 43. 

Find the difference between each number, except the last, 
and the next number to the right in examples 15 to 30, 
Exercise 24. Finish with each line before proceeding to 
the next. 

EXERCISE 44. 

Difference between each number, of the first two, and 
the second number to the right in examples 15 to 30, Exer- 
cise 24 ; between the first number and the third number to 
the right. Work in the same order as in Exercise 43. 

EXERCISE 45. 

Write, perform, and prove 20 examples of your own in 
Subtraction. Bring to the class to dictate to the others. 

EXERCISE 46. 

Dictate, without writing them and without help, numbers 
of your own, to the others of your class. 



28 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



PRACTICAL WORK IN ADDITION AND SUBTRACTION. 

All examples in Addition and Subtraction may be re- 
duced to one of the following general forms : 

General ( A.— Find the sum of 327, 48, and 452. 
Forms. \ B.— Find the difference between 479 and 627. 

Illustration 1. — A man has 256 trees in one orchard and 
375 in another ; how many has he in both? 

We are to put together, or add, the trees in both orchards ; 
hence, the general form for the example is: 

A. Find the sum of 256 and 375. 

Illustration 2. — A man having 324 oranges sold 108 of 
them ; how many had he left? 

We are to take away the number of oranges sold from the 
whole number he had ; hence, the general form for this ex- 
ample is: 

B. Find the difference between 324 and 108. 

EXERCISE 47. 
Think of each example carefully, find out what is asked, 
and then write the general form for each of the first 20 ex- 
amples below: 

1. A man had a ranch of 4750 acres, from which he sold 
1287 acres ; how many acres had he left? 

2. A man sets oat an orchard of 156 pear trees, 273 apri- 
cot trees, 195 peach trees, 390 apple trees, and 312 almond 
trees ; how many trees were in the orchard ? 

3. A boy saves $83 the first year after leaving school, and 
$147 the second; how much does he save in both? 

4. Two men walk a three days' race. One travels 263 
miles; the other, 197. How many more miles does one 
walk than the other? 

5. There are 31 days in January, 28 in February, 31 in 



ARITHMETIC. 29 

March, 30 in April, 31 in May, 30 in June, 31 in July, 31 in 
August, 30 in September, 31 in October, 30 in November, 
and 31 in December. How many days are there in the 
whole year? 

6. I paid $2500 for a house, $350 for a horse and buggy, 
$65 for a cow, $119 for furniture, and $47 for groceries; 
what did I pay for all? 

7. The number of people in Sacramento in 1870 was 
16283; in 1880, 21420. How many more people were in 
Sacramento in 1880 than in 1870? 

8. Gen. Grant was born in 1822 and died in 1885; how 
old was he when he died ? 

9. The Mississippi River is 2816 miles long; the Missouri, 
3047. Which is the longer and how much? 

10. In 1882, Alameda County cast 4617 votes for George 
Stoneman for governor; Los Angeles, 3943; Sacramento, 
3248; San Francisco, 24257; Santa Clara, 3308. How many 
votes did these 5 counties cast for Mr. Stoneman? 

11. How many more votes were cast by San Francisco 
County than by the other 4 counties put together? 

12. A man having $2375 in the bank drew out $187 at 
one time and $298 at another; what did he draw out in all, 
and what was still remaining in the bank? 

13. In 1880 there were 16120 Indians and 75025 Chinese 
in California; there were how" many of both, and how many 
more of one than of the other? 

14. In a certain orchard containing 425 trees, 187 are 
orange trees, 153 are lemon trees, and the rest are nut trees; 
how many nut trees are in the orchard? 

15. Bought a horse for $185 and sold it for $212; how 
much did I gain? 

16. George Washington was born in 1732 and died 
in 1799. Abraham Lincoln was born in 1809 and died 
in 1865. Which lived the longer, and how many years 
longer? 



30 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

17. A farmer raises 1276 centals of wheat; his neighbor 
on the right raises 125 centals more than he; his left-hand 
neighbor raises 375 centals more than both the others. 
Find the number of centals raised by each, and by all 
together. 

18. Daniel Webster died in 1852 at the age of 70; in 
what year was he born? 

19. A stock-raiser has 1483 sheep in one corral, 578 in a 
second, 230 in a third, and 1020 in a fourth ; how many 
sheep has he ? 

20. Sold a carriage for $145, which was $65 less than it 
cost me; what did it cost me? 

21. California became a State in 1850 ; how many years 
has it been a State ? 

22. From the sum of 309 and 576 subtract their differ- 
ence. 

23. A speculator bought a lot of cattle for $2375, paid 
$450 to get them to market, and sold them for $3100; how 
much did he gain? 

24. The distance by rail from San Francisco to Ogden is 
602 miles ; from Ogden to Oinaha, 1312; from Omaha to 
Chicago, 490 ; from Chicago to New York, 963. Find the 
distance by rail from San Francisco to Chicago ; from San 
Francisco to New York. 

25. Which is the longer distance by rail, from San Fran- 
cisco to Omaha, or from Omaha to New York, and how 
much longer? 

26. How many years is it since Columbus discovered 
America ? 

27. The votes cast in California at the presidential elec- 
tion of 1884 were as follows : For Cleveland, 89225 ; for 
Blaine, 102406 ; for St. John, 2960 ; for Butler, 2010 ; scat- 
tering, 356. What was the total vote of California? 

28. Blaine received how many more votes than Cleve- 
land? 



ARITHMETIC. 81 

^9. Blaine received how many more than all the rest put 
together? 

30. I bought a carpet for $17, a chamber suit for $26, a 
spring mattress for $8, a lounge for $18, an extension table 
for $11, and a parlor stove for $7; gave in payment $100. 
What change should I receive? 

31. The smaller of two numbers is 173, and their differ- 
ence is 49; what is the larger? 

32. The sum of two numbers is 1208, and the larger is 
749; what is the smaller? 

33. The larger of two numbers is 970, and their differ- 
ence is 127; what is the smaller? 

34. A man bought 4 house lots for $4000. He paid $800 
for the first, $125 more for the second than for the first, and 
$250 more for the third than for the second; what did he 
pay for the fourth ? 

35. A boy said if he had 23 more marbles he Avould have 
100. How many had he ? 

36. What number taken from 1728 leaves 209? 

37. Should a man die to-day at the age of 69, in what 
year was he born? 

38. If you live till the year 1922, how old will you be? 

39. Three men go into business together. The first puts 
in $2500; the second, $1550; the third, $1325. They gain 
$725 during the year. How much money have they in all 
at the close of the year? 

40. A certain school has 7 grades. In the first are 57 
pupils; in the second,. 73; in the third, 61; in the fourth, 
93; in the fifth, 84; in the sixth, 101; in the seventh, 112. 
How many pupils are in the school ? 

41. If 273 pupils in the above school are boys, how many 
are girls? 

42. Benj. Franklin was born in 1706 and lived 84 years; 
in what year did he die ? 

43. The population of the United States in 1870 was 



32 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

38567617; in 1880, 50267519. How much had it gained in 
10 years ? 

44. There were 6608 miles of railroad built in 1883 in 
the United States, and 11591 miles in 1882. How many 
miles were built in both years? How many more in 1882 
than in 1883? 

45. How many days from Jan. 1 to July 1? 

46. Two boys have each 145 cents; one gives the other 
25 cents. How many cents has each now, and how many 
more has one than the other? 

47. A man has $2783 on hand and owes $1296 ; how 
much is he really worth ? 

48. A man receives $125 a month for 3 months ; he spends 
during that time $171. How much does he save? 

49. A man lays up $370 a year for 4 years ; how much 
has he at the end of the time ? 

50. A merchant bought 3 lots of wheat containing 1250, 
498, and 726 centals respectively. He sold 550 centals at 
one time and 1500 at another ; how many centals remained ? 

51. The city of Rome was founded 753 years before 
Christ (B. C). How old is it? 

52. The date given for the creation is 4004 B. C. The 
Flood occurred 1652 years later. In what year was the 
Flood? 

53. Mt. Everest is 29062 feet high ; Mt. Whitney, 14900. 
What is the difference in their heights ? 

54. A lady went on a journey, traveling 175 miles by 
steamer, 213 by rail, and 94 by stage. What was the 
length of the journey? 

55. A man gained $45 by selling a horse for $190. What 
did the horse cost him ? 

56. How much will a man have left from $1000, if he 
spends $125 at one time, $256 at another, and $114 at 
another? 

57. A man sells 130 sheep for $325, 115 sheep for $345, 



ARITHMETIC. 33 

and 58 sheep for $203. How many sheep did he sell, and 
what did he get for all ? 

58. A sells a house to B for $2375; B sells it to C at a 
gain of $250; C sells it to D at a loss of $175. What does 
D pay for the house? 

59. A man dying leaves $3400 to his wife, $1700 to each 
of his two sons, and $1500 apiece to his three daughters. 
How much money does he leave? 

60. During the year ending July 1, 1885, 2114 arrests 
were made in Oakland, of which all hut 906 were caused 
by drunkenness. Find the number thus caused. 

61. How many days from August 1 to the end of the 
year? 

62. How many years was it from the birth of Moses 1571 
B. C. to the founding of Rome? 

63. A man exchanged a lot of wheat and $725 for cattle 
valued at $2700. What was the value of the wheat ? 

64. How many more days are there from June 1 to Octo- 
ber 1 than from Jan. 1 to May 1? 

65. The first Spanish mission founded in California was 
at San Diego in 1769. 79 years later, gold was discovered 
in the State. In what year was gold discovered? 

66. Mt. Everest is 29062 feet above the sea level; the 
Dead Sea is 1317 feet below the sea level. How many feet 
does Mt. Everest rise above the Dead Sea ? 

67. A boy has 175 cents but gives away 30 to a boy who 
had none. After the gift, how many more has the first boy 
than the second? 

68. A fruit grower has 4 rows of trees in a certain orchard, 
containing 32 trees each. 72 are orange trees and the 
remainder are lemon; how many lemon trees are there ? 

EXERCISE 48. 

Make up 10 examples of your own like the preceding, 

work out, and bring into the class for dictation to the others. 
3— A 



34 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



MULTIPLICATION. 

I bought 2 apples for which I paid 2 cents each ; what 
did I pay for both apples? 

How do you find it? 

At 2 cents each, what must I pay for 3 apples? For 4? 
For 5? ForG? For 7? For 8? 

Compare your work with the first direction in Example 
1, Exercise 18. In this work you are adding by what num- 
ber? How many times do you take 2 to get the price of 2 
apples? To get the price of 3? Of 4? Of 6? Of 7? 

To find how much any number of apples, oranges, pen- 
cils, etc., costs at 2c. each, we add by 2's as many times as 
there are apples, oranges, pencils, etc. 

At 3 cents each what will 2 pencils cost? 3 pencils? 4? 
5? 6? 7? 8? 9? 

Compare with the first direction in Example 2, Exercise 
18. You are now adding by what number? How many 
times, for 2 pencils? For 3?5?7?9? 

Instead of adding from up, every time, when we wish 
to perform examples like the preceding, it is better to com- 
mit to memory these results for all numbers up to 10. 

The process of taking any number of times a given 
number is called Multiplication. 

The number to be taken a number of times is called the 
multiplicand. 

The number showing how many times the multiplicand 
is to be taken is called the multiplier. 

The result of multiplying is called the product. 

Picl: out each in the above illustrations. 

The sign ( X ), called times, is used to indicate multiplica- 
tion. Thus, 

3X3=9 is read 3 times 3 are 9, or 3 3^s are nine. 



ARITHMETIC. 35 

The multiplicand and multiplier are sometimes called 
factors of the product. Thus, in the phrase, 
3 ^'s are 6, 3 and 2 are factors of 6. 

In general, any whole numbers, which, multiplied to- 
gether, will produce a given number, are called factors of 
that number. 

EXERCISE 49. (Oral and Written.) 

Add by 2's from to 20, write out the work in column as 
indicated below, and commit to memory, reading as 
directed above. Thus, 1X2= 2 

3X2= 6 

JtX2= 8 

5X2=10 

and so on 

to 10X2. 

Do the same with 3's from to 30; 4's from to 40; 5's 
from to 50; 6's from to 60; 7's from to 70; 8's from 
to 80; 9'sfrom Oto90. 

EXERCISE 50. (Oral and Written.) 

After the thorough memorizing of the tables, give them 
backward, writing them backward, also. 





EXERCISE 51. 


(Oral.) 




3X2= 


4X3= 


5X6= 


4X9= 


2X9= 


2X3= 


3X4= 


6X5= 


9X4= 


3X6= 


4X2= 


5X3= 


8X5= 


7X7= 


7X9= 


2X4= 


3X5= 


5X8= 


8X7= 


9X7= 


7X2= 


3X7= 


4X7= 


7X8= 


8X9= 


2X7= 


7X3= 


7X4= 


8X8= 


9X8= 


9X2= 


9X3= 


6X7= 


6X6= 


9X9= 


2X9= 


3X9= 


7X6= 


4X4= 


5X9= 


6X2= 


10X3= 


8X6= 


2X8= 


9X5= 


2X6= 


3X10= 


6X8= 


8X2= 


5X5= 



36 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

EXERCISE 52. (Written.) 

Write all the factors of the following numbers, and bring 
in to the class for reading. Thus, 

SI has 3 and 7 for its factors; hence, 7y^3=^21. 

21, 42, 32, 36, 16, 45, 27, 80, 48, 18, 15, 10, 56, 30, 9, 40, 
25, 64, 14, 28, 56, 20, 60, 63, 81, 70, 24, 72, 90, 8, 12, 54, 11, 
17, 23, 29. 

EXERCISE 53. (Oral.) 

Use 2 as a multiplier with each of the following numbers; 
then use 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 in turn: 

7385296410 

A number applied to a particular object or thing is called 
a concrete number; as, 7 bools, 3 yards, 71 days. 

A number used Avith no reference to any object or thing 
is called an abstract number; as, 7, 3, 71. 

EXERCISE 54. (Written.) 

Write, in one column, the concrete numbers, and, in 
another, the. abstract numbers in the following : 

51, 29 inches, 7 pencils, 147, 512, 14 cows, 28 horses, 28, 
158, 12 months, 10 cents, 12 knives, 159, 6 dozen pens, 
1200, 496. 

AVrite 10 abstract and 10 concrete numbers of your own. 

When both factors are abstract, either may be the midfi- 
plicand. 

When one factor is concrete, it is the multiplicand, and the 
product is like it. 

Thus, 

M-r. M-d. P-t. 

7X3 units=^21 units; 7X3 tens^Sl tens; 7Xp=i21. 

At 5 cents apiece what will 7 pencils cost? 

Model for Analysis. — If 1 pencil costs 5 cents, 7 pencils will 
cost 7x5 cents, or* 35 cents. 



ARITHMETIC. 37 

Pick out (1) the multiplicand (2) the multiplier (3) an 
abstract number (4) a concrete number. What is the 
product like in name? 

EXERCISE 55. (Written.) 

- Write the analysis of the following like the preceding 
model: 

1. At 10 cents a dozen what will 9 dozen oranges cost? 

2. If a watch ticks 3 times in 1 second, how many times 
will it tick in 6 seconds ? 

3. If 1 yard contains 3 feet, how many feet do 8 yards 
contain ? 

4. If 1 ton of coal costs $8 what will 7 tons cost? 

5. What will 3 pairs of shoes cost at $2 a pair? 

6. If a man can walk 4 miles an hour, how far can he 
walk in 9 hours? 

7. What cost 7 cords of wood at %1 a cord? 

8. How many trees are there in an orchard containing 9 
rows of 8 trees each ? 

9. There are 7 days in 1 week; how many days are in 
^ weeks? 

10. 8 boys have 6 marbles each; how many have all? 

Repeat the analysis orally in the class. 

EXERCISE 56. (Oral Analysis.) 

1. Find the cost of a dozen pencils at 3 cents each. 

2. There are 4 quarts in a gallon. How many quarts are 
there in 7 gallons? In 4 gallons? In 9 gallons? In 5 
gallons ? 

3. At 9 cents a yard what must be paid for 4 yards of 
calico? For 7 yards? For 2 yards? For 8 yards? 

4. If a man works 8 hours a day, how many hours does 
he work in 5 days? In 6 days? In 8 days? In 3 days? 

5. I pay $5 a week for board. What do I pay for board 
for 2 weeks? For 4 weeks? For 6 weeks? For 7 weeks? 



38 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

6. There are 10 tens in 1 hundred. There are how many 
tens m 5 hundreds? In 7 hundreds? In 9 hundreds? 

7. A horse travels 6 hours at the rate of 7 miles an 
hour. How far does he travel? 

8. What cost 7 2-cent postage stamps ? 5? 8? 4? 

9. If 6 men can dig a ditch in 6 days, how long will it 
take 1 man? 

10. At 7 cents a yard what will 10 yards of ribbon come 
to? 8 yards? 3 yards? 2 yards? 6 yards? 

As the multiplicand may be concrete, representing hours, 
cents, etc., any example in multiplication may be made a 
practical example like the above. Hence, instead of 

6X3=18, 
write 

At 3 cents each what ivill 6 apples cost? 

EXERCISE 57. 

Form 10 examples of your own, like the above, from the 
following, and analyze: 

1.9X2=? 3.5X9=? 5.7X7=? 7. 8x5=? 9.3x8=? 
2.6X7=? 4.9X3=? 6.4x4=? 8.10x7=? 10.8x7=? 

Dictate similar examples in the class, on the spur of the 
moment. 

To multiply a number, of several figures, by units. 

Multiply 423 by 2. 

OPERATION. 

4 z o. Explanation. — "Write the numbers as in Addition. 

2. Write the several products in their proper column. 

EXERCISE 58. 

1. 724X2= 4. 123X3= 7. 821x3= 

2. 522X3= 5. 443X2= 8. 610x4= 

3. 321X4= 6. 711X5= 9. 7122x4= 



ARITHMETIC. 



39 



10. 4201X4= 12. 9011X5-= 

11. 2304X2= 13. 7022X4= 

Multiply 538 by 7. 

FULL OPERATION. 

500+ 30+ 8= 538 

7 7 



14. 3322X3= 

15. 4232X3= 



Explanation. — 7x8 are 56, or 5 
tens 6 units. Write 6 in units' place 
and add the 5 tens to the tens' pro- 
duct. 7x3 tens are 21 tens, +5 tens 
are 26 tens, or 2 hundreds 6 tens. 



3500+210+56=3766 
Write 6 tens in tens' column and add the 2 hundreds to the hun- 
dreds' product. 7x5 hundreds are 35 hundreds, + 2 hundreds are 
37 hundreds; which write in hundreds' column. 

EXERCISE 59. (Written.) 

Give oral explanation in the class: 



1. 5X 25= 

2. 7X 230= 

3. 9X 436= 

4. 4X3198= 

5. 2X4722= 

6. 3X3428= 

7. 4X 409= 

8. 7X4600= 

9. 6X 36= 

10. 5X1008= 

11. 4X 571= 

12. 3X 298= 

13. 9X1019= 



14. 6X 236= 

15. 5X 756= 

16. 8X4008= 

17. 2X 765= 

18. 7X 477= 

19. 8X. 888= 

20. 9X1112= 

21. 6X 746= 

22. 5X4591= 

23. 3X1233= 

24. 7X8769= 

25. 9X9761= 



27. 2X 989= 

28. 4X7017= 

29. 5X5136= 

30. 3X4203= 

31. 6X 547= 

32. 8X7209= 

33. 9X8080= 

34. 7X6700= 

35. 5X2350= 

36. 3X3031= 

37. 4X1105= 

38. 2X7566= 

39. 6X9999= 



26. 4X5005= 
EXERCISE 60. 'Oral and Written.) 
]Multiply the upper by the lower number in each exam- 
ple of Exercise 31. 

EXERCISE 61. (Oral AND Written.) 
Multiply each multiplicand in examples 1 to 20, Exercise 

59, by every number in turn from 2 to 9, except the one 

already given in the example. 

The same may be done with the other examples of the 

same exercise. 



40 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

To multiply by any number of lO's, lOO's, lOOO's, etc. 

Write in figures and read by common names the follow- 
ing: 

7 10's= 155 lOO's (hundreds) = 

15 10's== 176 lOO's " = 

25 10's=^ 3141 lOO's " = 

230 10's= 7 lOOO's (thousands) =^ 

175 10's= 12 lOOO's 

3126 10's= 36 lOOO's 

6 lOO's (hundreds)^ 172 lOOO's 

17 lOO's " = 230 lOOO's 

20 lOO's " = 1756 lOOO's 

But 7 lO's or 7X10, is the same as 10 7's or 10x7; 15 
lO's, the same as 10x15; 175 lO's, the same as 10X175; 6 
100's=:100x6; 3141 100's=100x3141; 12 1000's=1000X 
12; 172 1000's=1000Xl72; and so on. 

Hence, to multiply a number by 10, what will you do? 
By 100? By 1000? By 10000? By 100000? 

7X2 tens=:? 7x2 hundreds^? 7x2 thousands^? 

7X2 lO's is the same as 2 10'sX7, or 20x7. 

7X2 lOO's is 200X7. 

27X200=200X27. 

77X2000=2000X77. 

Hence, to multiply by 2 lO's, 3 lO's, 4 lO's, etc., what can 
you do? By 2 lOO's, 3 lOO's, 4 lOO's, etc.? By 2 lOOO's, 
3 lOOO's, 4 lOOO's, etc.? 

EXERCISE 62. (Written.) 

Perform the multiplications indicated below. Also, mul- 
tiply by two other numbers of lO's, lOO's, lOOO's, besides 
tliose given. The multiplication by numbers with O's is 
usually written as below. 

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 

43 225 75 239 3141 729 
30 70 400 GOO 500 3000 



AlilTIlMJLTliJ. 

7. 8. 9. 


10. 11. 


4280 2146 404 


75 675 


50 7000 900 


10000 800 


To multiply by numbers of two or 


more figures. 


Multiply 5847 by 3075. 




FULL WORK. 


CONTRACTED. 


5847 


5847 


3075 


3075 


29235-= 5X5847 


29235 


409290== 70x5847 


40929 



17541000=3000X5847 17541 



17979525-r3075x5847 17979525 

Since O's count nothing in adding, it shortens the work to omit 
writing them, as in the contracted operation. 

Test by using the multiplicand foi^ the midtiplier ; that is, 
multiply 3075 by 5847. 

EXERCISE 63. 

Multiply each multiplicand, of examples 31 to 39, inclu- 
sive, Exercise 59, by each multiplicand of examples 1 to 
10, inclusive, and prove. 

The same may be done with examples 11 to 30 pf the 

same exercise. 

EXERCISE 64. 

Write, perform, and prove 10 similar examples of 3^our 
own, and bring into the class for dictation. 

EXERCISE 65. (Written.) 
See " Model for Analysis," p. 36, and analyze the follow- 
ing: 

1. Bought 25 cows at $37 a head; what was paid for all? 

2. There are 24 hours in one day; how many hours are 
in 32 days? 

3. A lady paid $16 a month for board for 11 months; 
what was her board bill ? 



42 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

4. There are 5280 feet in a mile; how many feet are there 
in 18 miles? 

5. At an average rate of 23 miles an horn*, how far will a 
railroad train go in a day? 

6. A man sets out 93 acres of fruit trees, setting 104 trees 
to the acre; find the number of trees in his orchard. 

7. What will be the cost of building 35 miles of railroad 
at an average expense of $33275 a mile ? 

8. Find the cost of a ranch of 960 acres at $75 an acre. 

9. How many pounds of tea are in 346 chests, each chest 
containing 65 pounds ? 

10. A clerk's salary is $75 a month; what does he re- 
ceive in a year? 

11. At $23 each, what does a furniture dealer receive for 
24 lounges ? 

12. A grocer's sales average $19 a day for the month of 
March; leaving out 5 days for Sundays, what were his 
receipts during the month? 

13. Each workman in an iron foundry is paid $525 a 
year; what do 12 men receive at that rate? 



ARITHMETIC. 4 



o 



DIVISION. 

Copy the following exercise on your slates, and in place 
of each hlank put how many times the number above the 
line must be taken to make the one below: 

786389 10 3 75 



35 72 42 18 48 54 60 27 63 45 

Copy the following, and place below the line the number 
of times the number on the left of the curve is contained in 
the number on the right: 
5)40 7 )56 9 )81 8)32 5 )50 4 )20 10)30 6 )54 5 )27 8)59 

How do the last two differ from the others? Find the 
largest number below 27 that is an exact number of times 
5. Find the remainder after taking away 5 5's from 27. 
Do the same with the 8's in 59 and find what remains. 

The process of finding how many times one number con- 
tains another, is called Division. 

The containing number is called the dividend. 

The number contained is called the divisor. 

The number of times the di\ddend contains the divisor 
is called the quotient. 

The part of the dividend left over, when the divisor is not 
contained an exact number of times, is called the remain- 
der. It is always like the dividend. 

Pich out each in the ahore exercise. 

The sign (-^) is used to indicate division. Thus, 

35-^7=5, 
Is read, 

S5 divided hy 7 is 5. ' 

It may also be written -^ = 5. 



44 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

What precedes the sign (-^.) in the first expression? 
Where is the same found in the second ? What follows the 
sign (-^) and stands below the line? 

EXERCISE 66. (Written.) 

Write, in vertical column, the numbers from 2 to 20, by 
2's. Write the sign (-^) after each, and, using 2 as a divi- 
sor of each, find the quotient. After writing, practice upon 
the exercise. Thus, 

First Form, j ^"^^""^ 

( 4-^2=2, and so on. 

The same by o's from 3 to 30 with 3 as a divisor, express- 
ing the division in the second form. Thus, 

( ^=1 -^=3 

Second Form. ■] I ^ , ? , , 

If =2 V = 4; and soon. 

The same by 4's from 4 to 40, with divisor 4, using the 
sign —; 

By 5's from 5 to 50, using divisor 5 and the line; 
By 6's from 6 to 60, using divisor 6 and the line; 
By 7's from 7 to 70, using divisor 7 and sign (-^); 
By 8's from 8 to 80, using divisor 8 and sign ( --) ; 
By 9's from 9 to 90, using divisor 9 and line. 
Bring into the class to read. 

To divide a number is to separate it into equal parts. 

Thus, when we divide an apple into 2 equal parts, each 
part is one-half; when into 3 equal parts, each part is one- 
third; when into 4 equal parts, each part is one-fourth; and 
so on. 

So when we divide a number b}^ 2, or into 2 equal parts, 
we get one-half the number; into 3 equal parts, one-third 
the number; into 4 equal parts, one-fourth the number. 
Thus, dividing 12 by 2 is taking one-half of it; or, 
12-^2=one-half of 12=6, 12---4=:one-fourth of 12=3, 
12--3=one-third of 12=4, 12--6=one-sixth of 12=2, 
and so on. 



ARITHMETL 



C 



4 



Ai' 



What is each part when we divide a number into 5 equal 
parts? Into 6? 7? 8? 9? 10? 11? 12? 15? 17? 19? 
25? 3G? 50? 100? 136? 175? 

Read the following exercise thus, One-fifth of 80 is 6, etc.: 
5)30 4)28 7)35 6^ 9)_54 3)21 2)U 8)J72 10)90 
EXERCISE 67. (Oral.) 

Use the numbers in the left hand column for divisors and 
the other numbers in the same row for dividends. 

Name quotients and remainders. Read, 

3 in 15. 5 ; 3 in 29 ^ 9 and 2 over ; and so on. 

Also read, 

■^ (one-third) of 15 is 5 ; i of 29 is 9 and 2 over, or P| (two- 
thirds); -f (one-seventh) of 44 ^^ 6 and 2 over, or 6^ (two- 
sevenths). 



. 1 


3 


15 


29 


31 


23 


18 


9 





24 


17 


27 


14 


"1 


7 


U 


37 


28 


19 


7 


14 


24 


32 


46 


56 


38 


43 


9 


22 


35 


41 


80 


72 


56 


19 


7 


26 


81 


93 


45 1 

1 


6 


36 


43 


14 


8 


49 


53 


62 


25 


33 


18 


42 


51 


8 


21 


17 


16 


80 


QQ 


44 


55 





38 


14 


35 


76 


5 


35 


43 


52 


24 


37 


15 


8 


28 


49 


36 


21 


18 , 


4 
8 
2 


15 


22 


28 


35 


18 


7 


11 


24 


31 


17 


10 





48 


79 


46 


64 


15 


23 


59 


75 


41 


12 


9 


28 


5 


2 


11 


13 


19 


7 


8 


12 


10 


3 


6 


17 


7 
9 


42 


21 


9 


17 


33 


55 


66 


35 


03 


71 


13 


11 


85 


44 


27 


10 


36 


51 


75 


25 


13 


63 


97 


17 


10 


23 


30 


17 


46 


10 


87 


54 


95 


70 


36 





14 


6 


48 


27 


10 


19 


30 


66 


54 


47 


13 


24 


11 


59 


7 


40 


02 


22 


72 


45 


67 


27 


15 


54 


59 


73 


18 


8 


22 


43 


16 


25 


71 


85 


53 


29 


78 


19 


49 


87 



46 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

EXERCISE 68. (Written Analysis.) 
If 7 pencils cost 35 cents, what costs 1 pencil? 

Model. — If 7 pencils cost 35 cents, 1 pencil costs } of 35 cents, or 
5 cents. 

f In this form of analysis the dividend and quotient 
J a7^e concrete numbers of the same kind. 
I The divisor is abstract and corresponds to the mul- 
I tiplier. 

Write analyses of the following : 

1. If 9 dozen oranges cost 90 cents, what will 1 dozen 
cost? 

2. If a watch ticks 18 times in 6 seconds, how many 
times does it tick in 1 second ? 

3. How many feet in 1 yard, if 8 yards are 24 feet? 

4. What is the price per ton, when 7 tons of coal cost $56? 

5. If three pairs of shoes sell for $6, what do they bring 
a pair? 

6. How far does a man walk in 1 hour, if he goes 36 
miles in 9 hours? 

7. Paid $49 for 7 cords of wood; how much was the wood 
a cord ? 

8. 9 rows of trees in an orchard contain 72 trees; how 
many trees in a row? 

9. If there .are 63 days in 9 weeks, how many days in a 
week? 

10. I divided 48 marbles equally among 8 boys; how 
many did they receive apiece? 

Compare the above work with that of Exercises 69 and 55. 

EXERCISE 69. (Written Analysis.) 

At 5 cents apiece, how many pencils can I get for 35 
cents ? 

Model. — If 1 pencil costs 5 cents, I can get as many pencils for 
35 cents as 5 cents is contained times in 35 cents, or 7. 



ARITHMETIC. 47 

[ In this form of analysis the dividend and divisor 
are concrete numbers of the same hind. 



Observe , ^, . . , , , 

The quotient is an abstract number and corre- 
sponds to the nudtiplier in Midtiplication. 

Write analyses of the following : 

1. How many dozen oranges at 10 cents a dozen can be 
bought for 90 cents ? 

2. How many nickel watches at $3 each can you buy for 
$18? 

3. There are 3 feet in a yard; how many yards in 24 feet? 

4. At $8 a ton, how many tons of coal can be bought for 

$56? 

5. At $2 a pair, how many pairs of shoes can be bought 

for $6? 

6. At the rate of 4 miles an hour, how long will it take a 
man to ^valk^G miles? 

7. How many cords of wood at $7 a cord can you buy for 
$49? 

8. An orchard of 72 trees has 8 trees in a row; how 
many rows are there ? 

9. In 63 days how many weeks ? 

10. I divided 48 marbles among some boys, giving 6 
marbles to each boy; how many boys were there? 

Compare work with that of Exercise 55. 

EXERCISE 70. (Oral Analysis.) 

1. At 3 cents each, hoAv many pencils can vou buy for 36 
cents ? For 24 cents ? For 18 cents ? For 30 cents ? 

2. There are 4 quarts in 1 gallon; how many gallons will 
28 quarts make ? 16 quarts? 32 quarts? 24 quarts? 

3. At 9 cents a 3^ard, how many yards of calico can be 
bought for 36 cents ? For 63 cents ? For 18 cents ? For 
72 cents? 

4. If a man works 8 hours a day, how many days' work 
will 40 hours make? 48 hours? 64 hours? 24 hours? 



48 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

5. I pay $5 a week for board; how many weeks' board 
can I get for $10? For $20? For $30? For $35? 

6. There are 10 tens in 1 hundred; how many hundreds 
will 50 tens make ? 70 tens ? 90 tens ? 

7. A horse travels 7 miles an hour; in how many hours 
will he travel 42 miles ? 63 miles ? 

8. How many 2-cent postage stamps can you get for 14 
cents? 10 cents? 16 cents? Scents? 

9. If 1 man can dig a certain ditch in 36 days, how 
many men will it take to do it in 4 days? In 9 days? In 
6 days? In 12 days? 

10. At 7 cents a yard, how many yards of ribbon can be 
bought for 70 cents? For 21 cents? For 56 cents? For 
14 cents? For 42 cents? 

As the divisor and dividend may represent cents, dollars, 
hours, etc., any example in Division may become a practi- 
cal example. Thus, instead of 

18—3=6, 
Write, 

At 3 cents each, hotv many apples can he bought for 18 cents? 

EXERCISE 71. (Written.) 

Form, from the following, 8 examples like the above, 
and analyze: 

1. 18--2=? 3. 45-^5=.? 5. 49-f-7=? 7. 40-=-8=:? 

2. 42--6=? 4. 27--9=? 6. 16--4=? 8. 70--10=? 

Give additional examples in the class. 

EXERCISE 72. (Oral Analysis.) 

(-36 1 
1. If 9 pencils cost -j on f cents, what does 1 pencil cost? 

181 J 
Note. — Use each of the numbers in the braces for one example. 



ARITHMETIC. 



49 



2. If 28 quarts make 7 gallons, how many quarts are in 
1 gallon? 

■ ' 44 ' 

3. If 4 yards of calico cost ^ 4c |^ cents, what costs 1 yard ? 

I AQ I 

4. If { r'p r" hours make 8 days' work, how many hours' 

(34 J work to a day? 

f 101 

8 ' 

5. If I pay $ •{ w r) r" for 2 weeks' board, what is the rate 



per week ? 



12 

I14j 



6. If there are 50 tens in 5 hundred, how many tens in 



1 hundred? 



7. If a horse travels < 
rate per hour? 



00 
42 



54 y miles in 6 hours, what is his 
48 
.60J 



8. I bought 7 postage stamps for 14 cents; what did each 
stamp cost? 

9. 1 man can dig a ditch in 36 days; how long will it 
take 6 men? 4 men? Omen? omen? 12 men? 2 men? 
18 men? 36 men? 

r 801 

10. If 10 yards of calico cost ^ 90 [> cents, what is the 
price of 1 yard? UOoJ 

f 351 
14 1 

11. If 7 pen holders cast ^ 49 )> cents, what does 1 pen 



holder cost? 



63 
[56 



12. If 9 Plymouth Rock chickens cost $27, what is the 
price of 1 ? 

EXERCISE 73. (Written.) 

From the examples given in Exercise 70, form 8 exam- 
ples of your own, similar to those in Exercise 72. 
4— A 



50 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



SHOET DIVISION. 

To divide numbers, of several figures each, by units. 

Divide 8484 by 4. 



OPERATION. 

4 )8484 
2121 



Direction. — Write the divisor at the left of the div- 
idend for convenience and begin with the left figures 
of the dividend. Write the quotients in their respect- 
ive columns. 



This method of dividing has been named Short Division. 



1. 3699^3= 

2. 3699--9= 

3. 8484--2= 

4. 728--8= 

Divide 43457 by 7. 

FULL OPERATION. 

7)43457 



EXERCISE 74. 

5. 455--5-= 

6. 217--7= 

7. 1282--2= 

8. 1596--3= 



9. 2505- 

10. 7007- 

11. 1402- 

12. 903- 



42000- 

1400- 

57- 



4345' 



-7= 
-7= 
-7= 



6000 
200 

8 1 over 



6208 1 over 



Explanation. — j of 43 thousand 
is 6 thousand, and 1 thousand 
over. But 1 thousand is 10 hun- 
dred, which, with the 4 hundred 
in the dividend, make 14 hun- 
dred. } of 14 hundred is 2 hun- 
dred. Y of 57 is 8, and 1 over. The 



ciphers counting nothing in adding, they are omitted in the work, 
as in the contracted operation. In explaining the work, read thus : 
7 in 43, 6, and 1 over; 7 in 14, ^; 7 in 5, 0, and 5 over; 7 in 57, 8, 
and 1 over, or f. 

Test hy multiplying divisor and quotient, and adding the 
remainder. The residt should he the dividend. 

EXERCISE 75. (Written.) 

Give oral explanation in the class, reading as in the ex- 
planation above, and prove the work. 

1. 59^2= 4. 88-f-7= 7. 84--4=r 10. 67--3= 

2. 78--3= 5. 99--6= 8. 93-t-5= 11. 796--9= 

3. 97^5= 6. 51--3=: 9. 79-r-2= 12. 576--8= 



ARITHMETIC. 51 

13. 479--6==r 22. 8000--9^ 31. 436208-f-3=' 

14. 510-:-5= 23. 8796-f-4= 32. 58436-f-9-= 

15. 708--7= 24. 1001--9= 33. 90000--8= 

16. 429--2= 25. 4296--3= 34. 723506-f-5= 

17. 233-f-4= 26. 6511-^-8= 35. 117452--6= 

18. 420--7= 27. 2458-^2= 36. 89001-^9= 

19. 129---2= 28. 9400-^8.= 37. 76400-^3= 

20. 5309^7= 29. 8057-f-7== 38. 14700-^2= 

21. 7002--5= 30. 23809-^7= 39. 518206h-9= 

EXERCISE 76. (Written.) 

Divide each of the dividends in examples 31 to 39, Exer- 
cise 75, by each number from 2 to 9, inclusive, except the 
one used as divisor in the example. Finish with the divi- 
dend of Example 31 by all the divisors, before going to 32. 

This exercise may be extended to as many of examples 
1 to 30 as the teacher mav desire. 

EXERCISE 77. (Oral Review.) 

1. 7+3,--5,X4,— 1,X4,— 3,--5,+7,-^4,x9,+3,--3=? 

2. 15-^3,— l,X4,--8,+7,-^3,X4,--2,--2,x5,— l,--7=? 

3. 9x4,--6,-l,x8,-f2,--7,X4,--8,-f7,X6,-4,-f-8=? 

4. 17+4,-3 -2,X7,-3,--4,+4,-^3,x9,-f6,+3,--5,-9, 
+0=? 

5. 48--8, X 9,— 4,-10,-3, X 7,+ 1,-5,-3, X 5,-7,+ 1, X 
4, + l=? 

6. 9x9,-l,-8,-3,x9,+l,-8,-2,x9,+6,-10,-5,X7, 

-2,+5=? 

7. 3+6,X8— 2,-7,+3,— 5,X10,+10,-10-3,X5,— 2,- 
4,+6,— 10=? 

8. 41 + 7,-6,X2,-l,-3,X4,-2,-2,+l,+4,x3,+5,-7, 
— 5=? 

9. 7xO,+9,x5,-3-G— 4,X8,— 18,X2,— 12,+3,X9,+ 
9,X6=? 

10. 11— 10,+17,— 9,+14— 8,+19,— 3,+20,— 3,+40,— 7, 
+ 15,-2-? 



52 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

To divide by any number of lO's, lOO's, lOOO's, etc. 

How many lO's in 85, and what remainder? In 97? In 
117? In 376? In 475? 

If now you move the decimal point from the right of the 
nmiiber one place toward the left, you have, at the left of 
the point, the quotient arising from dividing by 10, and at 
the right of the point, the remainder. Thus, 

8.5, 9.7, 37.6, 
Should be read, 

8 and 5 over ; and so on. 

How many lOO's in 395, and what over? In 510? In 
708? In 1576? In 9301 ? 

How many places to the left shall we move the decimal 
point to show a division by 100? By 1000? By 10000? 

To divide by 20, since 20 is 2 lO's, we divide first by 10 
by moving the point one place to the left, and then this 
result by 2. Thus, 

395—20=39.5—2=19 15 over. 

So with 30, 40, 50, and on to 90. 

To divide by 200, since 200 is 2 lOO's, divide first by 100 
by moving the point two places to the left, and this result 
by 2. Thus, 

3784-^200=37.8^-^2=18 184 over, 

EXERCISE 78. (Written.) 

Divide each dividend in examples 21 to 25, inclusive. 
Exercise 75, by 20; by 30; by 40; and so on to 90. 

Divide each dividend in examples 26 to 30, inclusive, 
Exercise 75, by 200; 300; and so on to 900. 

Divide each dividend in examples 31 to 35, inclusive, 
Exercise 75, by 2000; 3000; and so on to 9000. 

EXERCISE 79. 

Construct 10 examples of your own like the examples of 

Exercise 77, and bring into the class for dictation. 



ARITHMETIC. 53 

LOI^G DIVISION. 

To divide by numbers of two or more figures. 

All operations in division are performed like Short Divis- 
ion; but, in divisions by one figure, we easily recognize the 
quotients and remainders. With large numbers, however, 
the operations must be written, as we cannot tell at sight, 
but must find by trial, the quotients and remainders. This 
process has received the name of Long Division. 

Divide 1459774 by 239. 

OPERATION. EXPL-^ATION.-For COHVeil- 

239)1459774(6107 Quo. ien^e write the quotient to the 

14 34 right of the dividend, as we need 

^ y the space below. We find by trial 

- ^ „ multiplication that we can take 6 

Z^ 239's, or 1434, out of 1459 with 25 

187 remainder. Write down the next 

000 di\adend figure, 7. There is 1 239 

-J o rr A in 257 with a remainder 18; 239's 

in 187 with a remainder 187; 7 

239's, or 1673, in 1874, with a re- 



1^73 
201 Eem. mainder 201. 



The following hints will be found useful : 

1. To find quotient figures, use the first figure of the divi- 
sor and the first one or two figures of the dividend. Thus, 
in the above example, 

2 in U; 2 in 2; 2 in 1; 2 in 18. 

2. One or two dividend figures can be used only in case 
as many more are left in the dividend as are left in the 
divisor. Thus, in dividend 187, 18 cannot be used, as it 
leaves one figure only in the dividend, while there are two 
others in the divisor. In such a case, the figure in the quo- 
tient is 0. 

3. If the second or third divisor figure is large, take one 



54 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

or two less than the number of times the first divisor figure 
is contained in the first dividend figure. Thus, 

2 in IJi, 7 ; but 7 239^s are 1673, which is too large. 

4. Remember : There must always be a quotient figure 
for every figure brought down from the dividend. 

EXERCISE 80. (Written.) 

Divide each dividend in examples 26 to 35, Exercise 75, 
by each dividend in examples 1 to 10. Prove. Finish 
with the dividend of example 26 by all the divisors before 
going to example 27. 

Divide each dividend in examples 36 to 39, Exercise 75, 
by each dividend in examples 11 to 20. 

Divide each dividend in examples 32, 35, 36, and 39, by 
each dividend in examples 26 to 30. 

EXERCISE 81. (Analysis.) 
Analyze as in Exercise 69 : 

1. How many cows at $37 a head can be bought for $925? 

2. How many days are there in 744 hours? 

3. I have $176; how many months' board will it pay at 
$16 a month? 

4. At the rate of 23 miles an hour, how many hours will 
it take a railroad train to go 552 miles ? 

5. How many acres will 9672 fruit trees require, allowing 
104 trees to the acre ? 

6. At $33275 a mile, how many miles of railroad can be 
built for $1164625? 

7. Find the number of acres, at $75, that can be bought 
for $72000. 

8. How many chests will 22490 pounds of tea fill, allow- 
ing 65 pounds to a chest? 

9. A clerk received $900 salary, at $75 a month; how 
many months did he work? 

10. Find how many .ponies worth $55 each are in a band 
sold for $605. 



ARITHMETIC. 55 

GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF DIVISION. 

f Divideud 4 8 Quotient 
y Divisor 4 

Multiply the dividend of A by 2, and divide that product 
by the divisor 4. How does this quotient compare with the 
quotient of A ? How many times greater? 

Multiply dividend A by 3, and divide the result by divi- 
sor A. Compare your quotient with quotient A. Try 4 for 
a multiplier in the same way. Try 5. 

Fill out the blanks properly in the following : 
Multiplying the dividend by any number the quo- 
tient by number. 

Divide dividend A by 2, and divide the result by divisor 
A. How does your quotient compare with the quotient A ? 
Try 3 for a divisor and describe the result. Try 4. 

Fill out : 

Dividing the dividend by any number the quotient 

by number. 

Multiply divisor A by 2, and divide dividend A by the 
product. Compare with quotient A and describe the result. 
Try 3 and 4. 

Fill out : 

^Multiplying the divisor by any number '• the quotient 

by number. 

Divide divisor A by 2, and divide dividend A by the re- 
sult. Compare with quotient A and describe. Try 4. 

Fill out : 

Dividing the divisor by any number the quotient by 

number. 

Multiply both dividend A and divisor A by 2, and divide 
the results. Multiply both by 3; by 4; by 5. Divide both 
by 2 and divide the results; by 4. 



56 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

Fill out: 

Multiplying or dividing both dividend and divisor by the 
same number the quotient. 

PRINCIPLES. 

From these illustrations we see that — 

(1) Multiplying the dividend or dividing the divisor hy 
any number, midtiplies the quotient hy the same number. 

(2) Dividing the dividend or midtiplying the divisor by 
any number, divides the quotient by the same number. 

(3) Midtiplying or dividing both dividend and divisor by 
the same number does not change the quotient. 

With the following, write on your slate, operations similar 
to those performed on A : 

1. 60=6 3. 1^=8 5. ^i'«=10 
10 18 10 

2. |2=6 4. 96=4 6. ? = 10 
12 24 9 



PRACTICAL WORK IN MULTIPLICATION AND DIVISION. 

Examples in Multiplication and Division may be reduced 
to one of the following general forms : 

C— What are 12 times 198? 
D. — How many times is 12 contained in 144? or, 
What is yV of 144 ? 



General 

Forms. 



EXERCISE 82. 

Determine what is to be found in the following examples, 
and write the first 20 in general form before performing. 
Then analyze. 

1. A merchant sold 50 pieces of cloth, each containing 
45 yards; how many yards did he sell? 



ARITHMETIC. 57 

2. Sold hay to the amount of $1728 at $8 a ton; how 
many tons did I sell? 

3. What will 190 acres of land cost at $112 an acre? 

4. A mile is 320 rods; how many rods are 15 miles? 

5. Bought 11 chests of tea at $31 a chest; what did the 
tea cost me ? 

6. At $14 a ton, how many tons of coal can be bought for 
$1500? 

7. Bought 15 bales of hay, averaging 235 pounds to the 
bale; how many pounds were there? 

8. How many bales of hay will 19600 pounds make, 
allowing 240 pounds to a bale ? 

9. A field of 600 acres produced 8700 bags of wheat; how 
many bags to the acre was that ? 

10. Sent to San Francisco 5 boxes of eggs, each contain- 
ing 360 eggs; how many eggs did I send? 

11. How many days are in 9785 hours? 

12. How many hours are in 365 days? 

13. Sold 850 head of cattle at $28 a head; how much 
money did I receive? 

14. How many calves at $14 can I purchase for $1974? 

15. I Avalked 3 days, 8 hours per day, and found I had 
gone 72 miles; what was my average rate per hour? ^ 

16. A man saves $175 a year for 11 years; how nuich 
does he save in the time ? 

17. In one year in the United States 132890 tons of lead 
were produced, worth $95 a ton; find the whole value. 

18. 137 mills in California in 1882 produced 1246453 
sacks of flour; what was the average per mill? 

19. The State raised 3672 centals of buckwheat from 297 
acres; find the average per acre. 

20. At 25 cents a day what will a man's cigars cost him 
in 1 year? 

21. Paid $512 for 64 tons of hay; what will 25 tons cost 
at the same rate ? 



58 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

22. If a family spend 15 cents a day for beer, how much 
is spent in 4 weeks? How many loaves of bread at 10 
cents each would the money buy ? 

23. Bought 15 cows at $25 a head, 11 horses at $95, and 
50 sheep at $3 ; what did the whole cost me ? 

24. Bought 15 acres of land of one man for $1575, and 
25 acres of another for $2750; which cost me the more per 
acre, and how much? 

25. I have $2000. I buy a lot of land for $295; build 
a house on it for $1275, a shed for $96, and set out trees 
which cost me $12; buy a horse for $115, and 5 tons of hay 
at $12 a ton. With the remainder of my money I buy 3 
acres of pasturage; what do I pay per acre? 

26. Exchanged 8 rolls of butter for 2 pounds of tea at 
65 cents, 1 pound of coffee at 35 cents, 10 pounds of sugar 
at 8 cents, 25 pounds of flour at 3 cents, and 2 pounds of 
honey at 20 cents; what did I receive a roll for my butter? 

27. Bought 15 sacks of potatoes for 1275 cents, and sold 
them for 10 cents a sack more than I paid for them; what 
did I get for them, and how much more than I paid ? 

28. Bought 95 centals of wheat at $1 a cental; if I give 5 
20-dollar pieces in payment, what change do I receive? 

29. What must I pay for 10 pounds of oatmeal at 5 cents, 
4 rolls of butter at 75 cents, and 2 dozen eggs at 25 cents ? 

30. After taking 37 oranges from a box, there were 13 
more than twice as many left in the box; how many oranges 
were in the box before any were taken out? 

31. At $21 a barrel how many barrels of sugar can be 
bought for $3675? 

32. Suppose each barrel in the 31st example contained 
265 pounds; what was the total weight? 

33. A ship sails 4032 miles in 14 days; how many miles 
a day does she sail? How many miles an hour? 

34. Sold 35 bales of cloth, each bale containing 41 yards; 
how many yards did I sell ? 



ARITHMETIC. 59 

35. A cattle dealer bought 175 head of cattle at $24 a 
head, paying $3500 cash down; how much remained to be 
paid? 

36. $3 a day amounts to how much in 4 weeks? 

37. Subtract 3 thousand 8 hundred 79 from 4 thousand, 
multiply the remainder by 1 hundred 21, add 17 hundred 
81 to the product, and divide the sum by 23; what is the 
quotient ? 

38. Two men start from the same place and travel in the 
same direction, one at the rate of 23 miles a day, the other, 
28 miles; how far apart are they at the end of 13 days? 
Draw a diagram on j^our slate to show this. 

39. Two men start from places 600 miles apart and walk 
towards each other; one travels 20 miles a day, the other 29 
miles; how far apart are they at the end of 11 days? Draw 
diagram. 

40. The first census of the United States was taken in 
1790; since then a census has been taken every 10 years; 
how many had been taken, up to 1887? 

41. The first president of the United States was inau- 
gurated in 1789; since then a president has been inaugu- 
rated every 4 years; how many inaugurations had there 
been, up to 1887? 

42. In California, in the year ending June 30, 1880, 5 
factories produced $159175 worth of silk goods ; what was 
the average per factory? 

43. If a man spends 20 cents a day for whisky, and 25 
cents for cigars, what will he spend in 4 years? At 50 
cents a day, how many days' board would the money fur- 
nish to a disabled soldier ? 

44. How many bales of cotton in 259186 pounds, allow- 
ing 312 pounds to a bale? 

45. Which goes farther, a railroad train in 6 days at the 
rate of 22 miles an hour, or a steamship in 7 days at the 
rate of 16 miles an hour? How much? 



60 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

46. Find the cost of 137 cords of wood at $13 a cord. 

47. I have two fields of 160 acres each. From one I cut 
2 tons of hay to the acre and sell it for $11 a ton; from the 
other I get 16 centals of wheat to the acre and sell it at 
$1 a cental; tind what I received for both, and how much 
more for one than for the other. 

48. I feed my cow 32 pounds of hay a day; how long will 
8 bales, of 240 pounds each, last? 

49. How many sacks of flour will 2750 j^ounds make, at 
50 pounds to a sack ? 

50. Bought 10 horses at $125 each and paid for them in 
wood at $10 a cord; how many cords did it take? 

51. A fruit-grower sets out 11984 trees on 107 acres of 
land; how many trees to the acre ? 

52. If 12 men can dig a ditch in 12 days, how long will 
it take 1 man? 

53. How many boxes of oranges at $1 a box can I buy 
for $375? 

54. At an average of 750 oranges to a tree, how many 
oranges are in an orchard of 84 trees? How many dozen? 

55. What are they worth at 12 cents a dozen? 

56. If 12 men can build a house in 16 days, how long 
will it take 6 men ? 

57. Bought 150 barrels of flour for $750; sold 125 barrels 
at $6 a barrel, and the remainder at $4; how much did I 
gain ? 

58. How many 65-dollar gold watches can you buy for 
$1000, and how many 5-dollar gold rings for the remainder? 

59. A man receives $120 a month; his expenses are $60 
a month ; how long will it take him to pay for a house that 
cost $1920? 

60. A man's salary is $1500 a year; he pays $22 a month 
for board, and $42 a month for additional expenses; what 
will he save in 4 years ? 

61. A man bought a horse for $175; he kept him 24 



ARITHMETIC. 61 

weeks at an expense of -^2 a week and then sold him for 
$225; what did he gain? 

62. If a man deposits $15 in the bank every month from 
the time he is 21 years old until he is 70, how much will he 
then have deposited ? 

63. The President of the United States receives $50000 a 
year; what does he get a month? In 1 term of office? 

64. I pay $1974 for 141 head of calves; how much do I 
pay per head ? 

65. A man bought 150 calves at $14 a head and sold 
them so as to gain $450; what did he get a head? 

66. What is the average value of 5 horses, worth respect- 
ively $85, $95, $105, $115, and $120? 

67. A man receives a salary of $1750; his expenses are 
$3 a day; how much does he save in a year? 

68. If 23 acres of land cost $1955, what will 33 acres cost 
at the same rate ? 

69. Bought a certain number of watches for $432; sold 
them for $20 apiece, gaining $2 on the cost; how many 
watches were there? 

70. A farmer had 784 sheep; he sold 200 at one time and 
375 at another; what are the remainder worth at $2 a head? 

71. I have 3 fields containing 320 acres in all and worth 
$30000; the first contains 160 acres worth $125 an acre, the 
second 80 acres worth $75 an acre; what is the value per 
acre of the third ? 

72. Bought 31 hogs at $3 each, and gave in payment 
eight 10-dollar bills and three 5-dollar gold pieces; what 
change should I receive? 

73. A liquor dealer bought 15 casks of brandy, each con- 
taining 38 gallons, at $4 a gallon; find the cost. 

74. Find the average value of 4 lots of land worth re- 
spectively $195, $210, $255, and $300. 

75. In 1 gallon there are 231 cubic inches; how many 
cubic inches in 63 gallons? 



62 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

76. A miller has 11 tons of flour valued at $45 per ton; 
he adds to it 4 tons at the same value, and then sells 8 tons; 
what is the whole value of the part left ? 

77. I paid $2160 for 16 horses; 4 of them being stolen, 
for what must I sell the rest apiece that nothing may be 
lost? 

78. If 35 yards of cloth cost $105, what cost 25 yards ? 

79. A merchant sold two pieces of cloth for $296; one 
piece contained 32 yards, the other, 42 yards; what aver- 
age price per yard did he receive ? 

80. James has 94 marbles, which are 2 less than 4 times 
as many as John has; how many has John? 

81. Mary washes dishes for her mother 15 minutes every 
morning; if she receives 10 cents for an hour's work, how 
much money will she earn in 4 weeks? 

82. John wished to know his father's and mother's ages; 
his father told him the product of their ages was 1755, and 
his mother's age was 39; how old was his father? 

83. How many pounds of cheese at 15 cents a pound are 
worth 135 gallons of milk at 25 cents a gallon? 

84. A certain school has 4 rooms, with an average of 65 
scholars to a room; if 105 scholars are boys, how many 
girls are in the school ? 

85. A field has two of its sides 105 rods each, and the 
other two 108 rods each; how long is the fence surrounding 
the field? Draw a diagram of the field. 

86. A tower is 148 feet high; hoAV many steps, each 6 
inches high, will it take to reach the top? 

87. A certain quantity of barley lasts 11 horses 15 days; 
how long would it last 5 horses ? 

88. Bought 9 horses for $1530, and sold them for $1665; 
how much did I gain on each horse ? 

Make up 10 examples of your own like the above, work, 
and bring to the class for dictation. 



ARITHMETIC. 6 



Q 



FACTORS. 

What are Factors? (See p. 35.) 

Review Exercise 52. What is peculiar in the last 4 num- 
bers of that exercise ? 

An integral exact divisor of a number is a factor of it. 
A number that contains factors is a composite number. 
A number that contains no factors is a prime number. 
Factors which are themselves prime numbers are prime 
factors. 

Pick out illustrations of each in Exercise 52. 

To find the prime factors of a number. 

Find the prime factors of 60. 

OPERATION. 

Explanation. — Divide the given number by its small- 
est prime factor; the quotient by its smallest prime 
factor; and so on until the quotient is prime. The 
quotient and tlie several divisors are the prime factors, 
o 

Test by talcing the product of the prime factors, which 
should be the number itself. 

When the same number occurs in another several times 
as a factor, the number of times it occurs is shown by a 
small figure placed to the right and above it, and called 
the power. Thus, 2, as a factor, occurs twice in 60. Write 
it — 2'-] read it — 2 second power. 

The following hints will be found useful in factoring. 

A number is divisible: 

By 2 or 5, if its units figure is divisible by 2 or 5, respect- 
ively; 

By 3, if the sum of its figures is divisible by 3. 

All higher prime factors than these are usually found by 
trial division. Try the prime numbers as divisors in their 



2 


60 


2 


30 


o 
o 


15 



64 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



order upward, commencing with 2, until you reach one 
whose quotient is no larger than itself. If none of these 
are contained, the number to be factored is prime. 

Composite numbers need not be used as divisors, since 
every composite number is made up of some smaller prime 
numbers than itself, which prime numbers you have al- 
ready tried; and no number contains a composite number 
as a factor, unless it contains all the prime factors of that 
composite number. Thus, a number divisible by 6 is also 
divisible by 2 and 3, the factors of 6. 

EXERCISE 83. 

Make a list of prime numbers to 100, as follows: 

1. Write all the numbers in order, from 2 to 100; 

2. Since every second number after 2 is divisible by 2, 
cross it out; 

3. Cross out every third number after 3, because divisi- 
ble by 3; 

4. Every fifth number after 5, because divisible by 5: 

5. Lastly, every seventh number after 7, because divisi- 
ble by 7. 

Those not crossed are the prime numbers sought. 



EXERCISE 84. (Oral.) 



Determine by inspection which of the following numbers 
are divisible by 2, 3, or 5: 



1. 
2. 

3. 

4. 



f 1351 
1 270 I 
\ 207 ^ 
I 1017 



7021 
4706 [j 
f 3003 ( " 
\ 11011 



5 f ^25 
^' \ 4350 ^ 

^' \ 203 J 

« f 597 ( ^ 
^' \ 237 j 



9. 
10. 

11. 
12. 



9751 
555 
510 
714 



>e 



3781 
1818 
, 1011 , 
I 1101 J 



kf 



13. 
14. 



17. 279, 496. 



15. 
16. 
18. 213, 284. 



(246] 
1438 I 
f720f^ 
J256j 

9811 

846 ^^ 
329 J 



ARITHMETIC. 65 

EXERCISE 85. (Written.) 

Find the prime factors of all the numbers of Exercise 86; 
same in Exercise 84. 



GEEATEST COMMON FACTOE. 

Pick out a factor that is found in all the numbers in each 
of the following sets: 

1. 16 and 20. 3. 12 and 16. 5. 6, 12, and 24. 

2. 25 and 20. 4. 4, 8, and 12. 6. 9, 12, and 18. 

Pick out the largest factor found in all the numbers of 
each of the preceding sets. 

A factor contained in each of several numbers is called 
a common factor of those numbers. 

The greatest factor common to several numbers is called 
their greatest common factor (g. c. f.). 

Name each in the above sets. 

Numbers that have no common factors are prime to each 
other. 

To find the g. c. f. of several numbers. 

What is the greatest factor common to 30, 45, and 75? 

OPERATION. Explanation. — Separate the simplest 

30=2 X 3X 5 number into its prime factors. Of these, 

45 reject such as are not contained in all 

75 3x5=15=g. C. f. the other numbers. The product of the 

remaining factors is the g. c. f. Or, 
3 ) 30 — 4 5 — 7 5 Divide by as many common prime factors as 
5 VTo 15 25^ ^^^^ ^® found; their product is the g. c. f. 

2 3 5 

3X5=15 g. c. f. 
5— A 



66 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

EXERCISE 86. (WRITTEN.) 

Find the g. c. f. of: 

1. 24, 36, 42. 13. 105, 140, 175. 25. 55, 110. 

2. 33, 44, 77, 187. 14. 99, 180, 252. 26. 81, 120, 141. 

3. 120, 144, 216. 15. 132, 154, 165. 27. 78, 169, 130. 

4. 135, 180, 90. 16. 60, 80, 100, 120. 28. 150, 210, 330. 

5. 108, 45, 81. 17. 864, 420, 600. 29. 99, 132. 

6. 85, 95. 18. 75, 105, 120. 30. 120, 165. 

7. 72, 168. 19. 108, 252. 31. 120, 252. 

8. 119, 132. 20. 39, 52, 65. 32. 85, 102. 

9. 24, 33, 120. 21. 84, 132. 33. 42, 77,91. 

10. 36, 44, 144. 22. 168, 539. 34. 34, 44; 

11. 105, 120, 135. 23. 112, 147, 168. 35. 28, 98. 

12. 144, 180. 24. 287, 369. 36. 110, 210. 

EXERCISE 87. (Oral.) 
Name the g. c. f. at sight: 



1. 


4, 6, 8. 


11. 


15, 21. 


21. 


56, 77. 


2. 


9, 12, 15. 


12. 


21, 28. 


22. 


27, 45. 


3. 


10, 15, 20. 


13. 


16, 20. 


23. 


35, 45, 48. 


4. 


4, 8, 12. 


14. 


40, 45. 


24. 


32, 40, 56. 


5. 


7, 14, 21. 


15. 


36, 45. 


25. 


72, 32. 


6. 


9, 18, 27. 


16. 


36, 54. 


26. 


18, 32, 40. 


7. 


10, 20, 30. 


17. 


16, 32. 


27. 


25, 50. 


8. 


16, 24, 32. 


18. 


63, 81. 


28. 


30, 60. 


9. 


3, 4, 5. 


19. 


56, 64. 


29. 


12, 32, 44. 


10. 


18, 30, 36. 


20. 

EXERCISE 


33, 44. 

88. (Written.) 


30. 


24, 27, 33. 



Find the g. c. f. of the sets of numbers included under 
the same figure, Exercise 84. 

Also of each set of numbers included under the same 
letter, Exercise 84. 

Sometimes the prime factors are not easily recognized, 
nor found except by long trial. In such case the work may 



ARITHMETIC. 67 

be shortened by dividing the larger number by the smaller, 
and factoring the remainder; ascertaining whether any of 
its factors are common to the smaller nmnber. 

Thus; 

Find the g. c. f. of 629 and 731. 



OPERATION. Explanation. — Multiplication is the suc- 

62 9)731(1 cessive additions of the same number a 

(^29 certain number of times. If two numbers 

"T-T-r 9wO\/-i7 have a common factor, each may be ob- 

tallied by successive additions of that fac- 

1 7 )629 tor. Here 629 is obtained by adding 37 

37 17's. Any number above 629 containing 

the factor 17 is obtained by adding a sufii- 

. • . 1 /= g. c. f. ^.^^^^ number of 17's to 629. But the sum 

37X1 7^^6 2 9 of the 17's added to 629 to produce 731 is 

ay'-\ 7__ 102 ^^® same as the difference between 629 and 



43X17=731 
factor of their difference. 



731. That is, 
A common factor of two numbers is also a 



EXERCISE 89. (Written.) 

Find by the previous method the g. c. f. of:" 

1. 168, 539. 3. 287, 369. 5. 371, 636. 

2. 147, 168. 4. 78,169. 6. 279,^961. 

Also, sets 2, 4, 6, 11, 15, and 16, Exercise 84. 



MULTIPLES. 



Name 2 numbers that have both 4 and 3 as factors; 7 
and 2; 9, 6, and 3; 8, 4, and 6; 5 and 10. 

Name the smallest number in each case that contains 
the given factors above. 

A number which contains another as a factor is called a 
multiple of that factor. 



68 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

A number which contains several others as factors is a 
common multiple of those factors; if the smallest number, 
the least common multiple (1. c. m.). 

Name an example of each in the above sets. 

To find the 1. c. m. of several numbers. 



20 
15 



Find the 1. c. m. of 9, 12, 15, and 20. 

OPERATION. 



2 


9 12 15 


-20 


2 


9— 6—15- 


-10 


3 


9— 3—15- 


- 5 


5 


3 5 


5 



Explanation. — Multiply the largest num- 

I 20x3x3=180 ^®^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^ prime factors found in the 
"^ I other numbers, but not contained in this. 

12J 

Divide by any prime factor common to 
two or more, and the quotients in the same 
way until prime to each other. The prod- 
uct of the divisors and final quotients is 
the 1. c. m. 
3 

EXERCISE 90. (Written.) 
Find the 1. c. m. of: 

1. 30, 45, 90. 14. 12, 16, 20, 24. 27. 18, 27, 36. 

2. 24, 36, 42. 15. 28, 42, 35. 28. 26, 39, 65. 

3. 4, 8, 10, 5. 16. 50, 75, 125. 29. 33, 44, 55. 

4. 5, 12, 15, 30. 17. 9, 10, 12. 30. 84, 96. 

5. 7, 12, 18, 24. 18. 24, 30, 36, 40. 31. 12, 13. 

6. 75, 100. 19. 108, 132, 144. 32. 13, 16. 

7. 20, 30, 40. 20. 7, 11, 14, 21. 33. 23, 25, 30. 

8. 33, 44, 21. 21. 72, 84, 132. 34. 9, 11. 

9. 105, 120. 22. 75, 105, 120. 35. 24, 26. 

10. 18, 27, 12. 23. 30, 42, 126. 36. 24, 25. 

11. 14, 21, 15. 24. 120, 140, 210. 37. 64, 84. 

12. 3, 4, 5, 6, 10. 25. 15, 21, 35. 38. 34, 36. 

13. 12, 18, 24, 36, 72. 26. 38, 57, 95. 39. 17, 18, 30. 

EXERCISE 91. (Oral.) 
Name at sight the 1. c. m. of: 
1. 2, 3, 4, 6. 2. 2, 11. 3. 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16. 



ARITHMETIC. 69 

4. 6, 9, 18. 13. 6, 8, 12, 24. 22. 5, 10, 25, 50. 

5. 4, 5, 10. 14. 5, 6, 10, 15. 23. 2, 3, 4, 6, 9, 12, 18. 

6. 3, 5. 15. 5, 7. 24. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10, 12, 15. 

7. 5, 8, 10. 16. 4, 9, 6. 25. 2, 3, 6, 7, 14. 

8. 7, 9. 17. 5, 10, 20. 26. 3, 5, 9, 15. 

9. 6, 8, 9, 12. 18. 4, 5, 6. 27. 2, 3, 6, 9, 18. 

10. 5, 10, 15. 19. 5, 10, 12. 28. 3, 6, 9, 12, 36. 

11. 3, 5, 15. 20. 5, 11. 29. 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, 12. 

12. 4, 8, 16. 21. 3, 7. 30. 3, 7, 9. 

When, in finding the 1. c. m. of two numbers, the numbers 
are not easily factored, it is well to find the g. c. f. by the 
division method , divide one of the numbers by it, and mul- 
tiply the quotient by the other. Thus, 

Find the 1. c. m. of 119 and 187. 

OPERATION. 

119)187(1 
119 
68=2X2X17 

17)119(7 7X187=1309 1. cm. 

EXERCISE 92. (Written.) 
Find, by the preceding method, the 1. c. m. of: 

1. 105, 189. 3. 78, 169. 5. 168, 539. 7. 147, 168. 

2. 91, 169. 4. 119, 132. 6. 287, 369. 8. 279, 124. 

Also, examples 11 to 20, Exercise 87, and numbers 
marked 2, 4, 6, 7, 11, 15, and 16, Exercise 84. 

EXERCISE 93. 

AVrite and perform 10 examples of your own in g. c. f. 
and 10 in 1. c. m., and bring to the class for dictation. 



70 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



PRACTICAL WORK IN FACTORING. 



f E. — Find the largest factor common (g. c. f.) to 
General ! 48 and 60. 

Forms. | F. — Find the smallest number that will contain 

1^ (1. c. m. of) 12 and 16. 



EXERCISE 94. 

Write out the following examples in proper general form 
before performing : 

1. I have two rooms respectively 15 and 18 feet wide; 
what is the widest carpeting that will exactly fit the rooms? 

2. A man wishes to fence a field having three sides re- 
spectively 120, 128, and 144 feet long; what is the length of 
the longest rail he can use, and not cut the rails? 

3. Three men can walk 3, 4, and 5 miles an hour respect- 
ively; what is the length of the shortest journey they can 
walk, and each walk an exact number of hours? 

4. A man has two lots of land 360 and 480 feet wide 
respectively, which he wishes to divide into. house-lots of 
equal widths; what is the greatest width of house-lot he 
can make, and how many will there be? 

5. Two boys travel around a race-track 80 rods in circum- 
ference, starting together, one making the circuit in 15 min- 
utes, the other in 20; in what time will they be together 
again at the point of starting? How many rods will each 
have traveled? 

6. What is the smallest tank that can be filled by using 
a 4-quart, 6-quart, 8-quart, or 10-quart measure? 

7. A man sends to market 525 pounds of barley and 945 
pounds of wheat in the largest sized bags he can use and 
have each contain the same number of pounds: how many 
pounds were there to a bag ? What was each kind of grain 
worth at $2 a bag? 



AFdTHMETIC. 71 

8. I wish. to spend the smallest like sum for pencils at 
5, 6, 7, 8, and 10 cents each; find it. 

9. A man spends equal sums in buying 2-cent, 3-cent, 
5-cent, and 10-cent postage stamps, using the smallest sum 
possible; what did all the stamps come to? 

10. Place 112 oranges and 140 lemons in piles, without 
mixing, so that each pile shall have the same number, and 
that the largest possible. 

11. Draw from a basket of nuts 3 lots of equal numbers, 
the smallest possible, so as to arrange the 3 lots in piles of 
7, 9, and 12 nuts, respectively. 

12. A boy has the same number of marbles in each of 4 
boxes; the first he arranges in piles of 3 each, the second in 
piles of 4 each, the third in piles of 5 each, and the fourth 
in piles of 6 each; on calculation he found he had the few- 
est marbles to a box that could be so arranged; how many 
marbles had he? 

13. A dressmaker "wishes to buy a piece of silk which she 
can cut into patterns of either 8, 10, or 12 yards; how large 
must the piece be? 

14. Find the smallest number that can be divided by 12, 
14, or 16, and leave 4 remainder. 

15. Find the largest number that is contained in 47 and 
77, with a remainder of 2. 

16. What are the least equal sums a man can spend in 
buying sheep at $3, calves at $12, cow^s at $30, and horses 
at $75 ? How much for all ? 

17. A teacher distributes 56 cards to one class, 63 to 
another, and 77 to a third, giving the same number to each 
pupil; how many pupils, and how many cards to each? 

18. Find the least number of cards that can be equally 
distributed among 7, 11, 14, or 22 girls. 

19. A kind lady has 18 pears and 33 apples which she 
wishes to give to some poor children in equal numbers; how 
many can she give to each, and to how many can she give? 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



FRACTIONS. 

How would, you divide 5 apples equally among 2 boys ? 
If you divide 7 apples among 2 boys, how many would 
each receive ? Among 3 boys ? 8 apples among 3 boys ? 
5~2=? 5--3=? 7—2=? 7--3=? 8--3=? 
What does the form of expression ^, |, f , indicate? 

A Fraction is an indicated division. Thus, the indicated 
division of the remainder in Division is a fraction. 

If you divide 1 apple equally among 3 boys, what part 
does each receive ? If you divide 2 apples equally among 
3 boys, what part of each apple does 1 boy receive ? From 
both apples how many pieces does he receive ? 

Which would he prefer, one piece from each of the apples 
or two pieces from one apple? 

Then -g of 2 apples is the same as f of 1 apple. 

A fraction, therefore, may be regarded as an equal part or 
as equal parts of a unit or one. When so regarded: 

(1) The denominator (namer) names the parts and shows 
their size; 

(2) The numerator (numherer) shows the number of parts. 

^, 3 three (number). 
Thus, -= . ,^, ' , 

8 eighths (name J. 

In the written expression is the denominator above or 
below the line ? The numerator ? To what term in division 
does each correspond? (See pages 43 and 44.) 

The numerator and denominator are the terms of the 
fraction. 

The value of a fraction is the quotient obtained by per- 
forming the indicated division. 

A whole number, also called an integer, may be expressed 
in fractional form by using 1 for a denominator. Thus, 
For ■}, ^, read 7 fs, 27 fs. 



ARITHMETIC. 73 

A combination of a whole number and a fraction forms a 
mixed number ; as 5|, 117^. 

A quotient in division, with the remainder at the right 
over the divisor, is a mixed number. 

When the dividend is equal to, or larger than, the divisor, 
the indicated division is an improper fraction; for the di- 
vision may be performed and the result expressed as a 
whole or a mixed number. 

J-ims, 2 7 3'' 4 5 13- 

What is the quotient in each of these improper fractions? 
How do you prove the division? (See test, p. 50.) 

EXERCISE 95. (Written.) 

In the following examples write on your slate, in separate 
columns, tho fractions (proper), the improper fractions, and 
the mixed numbers; change the improper fractions to 
mixed or whole numbers, and prove. 

1 1 A2l IJi. ft A4. 95J_ iJ_3 IK 9Q1 4JL 2J^ 

■•■• 8i ^55 4 • °* 335 ^'-TT? 3 • ■'■*'• ^'^85 ^14' 42' 

9 119. 7 .'^U. Q 41 117 /jQ 3 IR 11 17 29 

^' 7 1 119) '^17- ^* 1G45 10 5 ^^25- •*•"• 14? 517 oS' 

Q 79J 185. 1_7. TH 1Q11 U. 48. 17 2 GO 50 1 7 . 

o. <_4, -LOy, g . J.U. -1^^505 775 75- •*• ' • ii •, 29 7 ll' 

4. 274 5 .a 11 2 5-|ri3-195 1ft 11^28 917 

fi 4 2_7_ 127 19 9Q 5 187 209 1Q 13.0. 5_S 7_1_ 

*'• 83 8 J 5 • ■'■'^* '^'-'12? 7 7 11- ^^' 7 7 1G7 '56- 

fi 12.A 1 ^13. 180 1 q 4 0.1 375 209 On 13_3. 18. 1 Q 9 

u. J207 ^"157 225- ^^' 1307 3907 220* ■^"' 19 5 3 2 7 ^ -•■ "^T2" * 

7 1442 1 2 5 il_2. 14 907. lii 175 91 411 473 171 

'• -"^^^37 .6 7 144- •'•*• -^97 3 T ^ ^ S- ^^' ^-^27 ^'47 T^"0^- 

Select the first 10 proper fractions to analyze orally in the 
class. Thus, 

I is a fraction because ; 8 is the clenominator 

because ; 7 is the numerator because . 

EXERCISE 96. (Oral.) 

Form improper fractions on your slate by placing the 
dividends in the first 3 columns of dividends, Exercise GT, 
as numerators, and their corresponding divisors in the divi- 
sor column as denominators, and bring into the class for 
oral work in changing to mixed numbers. 



74 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

EXERCISE 97. (Oral.) 
Change to improper fractions: 

1. 4i, 7i 5. 3|, If. 9. 8|, 7^V 13. 9,^, 8|. 

2. 3f , 5t. 6. 5t, llf. 10. 12f , 7t. 14. 7i^, 7f . 

3. 9i 9i 7. 9f , 7|. . 11. 4i 5f . 15. 12f , lO^o- 

4. 7|, 8f 8. 5^, 9^^. 12. 6f , 7i 16. 15|, 5|. 

EXERCISE 98. (Written.) 
Change to improper fractions: 

1. 4511 72^0- 5. 13A, 17|. 9.1^h\, l^A- 

2. 109i, 25j\. 6. 85y«5, 63^0- 10. 1041, i06f. 

3. 58^2^, 193V 7. 49A, 20i|. 11. 781, 49^. 

4. 1401, 14^V 8. 240i, 10.^- 12. lO^o, 19/o. 

Also all mixed numbers in Exercise 95, and prove. 

EXERCISE 99. 

JVrite ten mixed numbers of your own and reduce them 
to improper fractions. Also ten improper fractions and 
reduce them to mixed numbers. 

To reduce to lower or higher terms. 

If you cut each half of an apple into two equal parts, 
what kind of pieces do you get ? How many 4ths in each 
half? Cut each fourth into 2 equal parts, and you get what 
kind of pieces? How many in each fourth? How many 
in f ? Cut each half into 3 equal pieces, and you get how 
many pieces in all ? Name of each piece ? How many in i ? 
Cut each third into 2 equal parts, and you get how many 
pieces in all? How many in each third? How many in 
I? Write these results in a row on your slates; thus, 
1 2 4 1 3. 1 ,2 2 4 

"2 4 8? 2 65 3 65 3 6- 

Also, in a second row under these, write each expression 
backward; thus, 

4 2 1 3 1 2 1 1 — 2 

■g 4 ^5 6 ^5 6 35 6 3* 



ARITHMETIC. 75 

In the upper row, what do you do, in each case, with the 
numerators and denominators of tlie fractions on the left of 
the sign (=) to get those on the right? What in the lower 
row ? Which is the larger, \ or f ? \ or | ? I or | ? | or | ? 

Multiplying hoth numerator and denominator of a frac- 
tion hy the same number is reducing the fraction to higher 
terms, as in the upper row abov^e. 

Dividing both numerator and denominator of a fraction 
by the same number, is reducing the fraction to lower 
terms. 

If both numerator and denominator are divided by all 
their common factors, or their g. c. f., the fraction is re- 
duced to its lowest terms. 

If there i? no common factor, the fraction is already in 
its lowest terms. 

Either of the above processes does or does not change the 
value of the fraction, and- why? (See Prin. 3, p. 56.) 

EXERCISE 100. (Oral.) 
Reduce to lowest terms: 

1_§__7__6_ '^6._i_l_2 Ql21fi28 iq3rt36 33 

^' 12314J10- ^' 9548548- ^' 36J323 ST* ^'^' ¥2"? To' To' 

9_9_lJLi8. fii8.i5.2_0 10 161618 1J.33 8 6o 

^- 15' 21? 24- "• 30' 30' 30- ^^' 24'TO'TO- ■••*• 4T' oT' To"- 

3i8.2_0.i8. 7S_02j42_4 11_8__20._5_ IK 16304.') 

^' 27' 325 36- '• 3G' 305 36" ■'••'■• 185 60' 6 0' ■'•''• 48' GO' 54" 

4.-5__8__6_ Qio.42.2.i 19 1_0 7 14 1C 15 1210 

^' 15? 485 48- °* 35' 49' 28" ^^' 35' 355 35' ■■■"• To' 6""0' TO* 

EXERCISE 101. (Written.) 

Form examples by writing the smaller number in each 
numbered couplet of Exercise 84 for a numerator, and the 
larger for a denominator, and reduce to lowest terms. 

In Exercise 86, select the smallest and largest numbers 
of each example for numerator and denominator, respect- 
ively, and reduce to lowest terms. 

Also, reduce to lowest terms the proper fractions in Ex- 
ercise 95. 



76 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

EXERCISE 102. 

Write and perform 1 examples of your own like those of 
the preceding exercise, and bring to the class for dictation. 

To reduce to a common denominator. 

By what number must you multiply both numerator and 
denominator of ^ to change it to 6ths ? To 8ths ? To lOths? 
Tol2ths? 

f to change it to 6ths? To 9ths? To 12ths? To I5ths? 

I to change it to 8ths? Tol2ths? TolGths? To20ths? 

ftochangeittolOths? To 15ths? To20ths? 

Give results in each case. 

Of the above fractions, ^, |, I, |, which have you changed 
to 6ths? Write on your slate thus: 

I I Of the denominators 2 and 3, what is 6? 

3 6" 

Which have you changed to 8ths ? To lOths ? To 1 2ths ? 
Of the denominators 2, 3, and 4, what is 12? 

Changing fractions of different denominators to equiva- 
lent fractions having the same denominator is reducing to 
a common denominator. 

When the new denominator is the smallest number (1. c. 
m.) that can be used, it is the least common denominator. 

EXERCISE 103. 

Write the fractions of each example. Exercise 100, in 
lowest terms, numbering the examples as in the exercise. 

Do the same with the fractional parts of the examples in 
Exercises 97 and 98. Bring into the class for oral work in 
reducing to least common denominator. 

Name, at sight, several common denominators for each 
example, and decide which is the least common denomi- 
nator. 



ETTI^} 



ARITHMET]^.^ 77 

EXERCISE 104. (Written.) 

Change the fractions of each example, Exercise 95, to 
equivalent fractions having their least common denomi- 
nator. 

EXERCISE 105. 

Write 10 examples of your own, each containing 3 frac- 
tions in their lowest terms. Bring to the class for dictation. 



ADDITION AXD SUBTRACTION. 

What kinds of objects can be put together, or added? 
What subtracted? 

Fractions of the same name (denominator) may be added 
and subtracted. Thus, 

5 apples and 3 apples are hoiv many apples? 

5 sevenths and. 3 sevenths are how many sevenths f 

Express the latter in the written form ; tlius, |-f |-=^:rr:li. 

EXERCISE 106. (ORAL.) 

The fractions in the answers must be proper, and im low- 
est terms : 

1 5_1.J ^ 2. ? Q 3 17 9140 ? 

■••• 8^8 8 8 • O* 4T^4T 4Ti^4T • 

9 _6 L HI 8 I 1_ 9 Q 2 1^_i0 5 3 9 

^' 1 sn^ 1 sn^isn^is — • ^' 23 23 23 23 — • 

Q _7 ]L4_IJL 7_ 9 in 7 1 7 4 1 10 

'^' 30 30^^30 30 • ••■"• 



160 I 160 16 on 16 

4. 19 1 6 24 1 4 9 11 4 3 4 0._1 5 13 9 

*• 125^^125 125^^125 • "'■■'•• 88 88 I 88 I 88 ' 

5 2_1._I 1_9_L3JL 2_ 9^ lO 14 1 5 I 7 I f) 9 

fi A_l_5. 4 3. 9 1Q 8 I H. 3__L10 9 

"• 9 19 9 9 • ■'•'-*• 19'ri9 19 I 19 • 

7 1_6 5__l 4 §_— 9 14. 2.0. I 20 2 2 .9 

'•17 17ri7 17 • •'■^•21I21 21 21 • 

1R JL7_|_i7._4_J_i 6_ 9 

^'^' isn i8n^i8 18 — • 

We have seen that fractions to be added or subtracted 
must have the same name, or denominator. What did you 



/. 



78 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

find could be done to fractions of different names on page 
76? -Then to add or subtract such fractions what must 
first be done ? 

EXERCISE 107. 

In Exercise 100, write the fractions of each example in 
lowest terms and add. Perform mentally as far as possible, 
combining first those most easily reduced. Thus, in 

Example 1. |+i=i-=li. li+f=l|f- 

Also find the difference between the third fraction and 
the sum of the first and second in each example. 

If any or all of the numbers are mixed numbers, add or 
subtract the fractional parts first. In adding, reduce sums, 
if improper fractions, to whole or mixed numbers and add 
the whole part to the sum of the whole numbers. 

In subtraction, if the fraction in the subtrahend is larger 
than the fraction in the minuend, take one from the whole 
number of the minuend and add it to the fraction of the 
minuend, making an improper fraction; then subtract. 

EXERCISE 108. ^Oral.) 

Give the sum and the difference of the mixed numbers in 
each example of Exercises 97 and 98. 

EXERCISE 109. (Written.) 
Add the expressions in each example, Exercise 95. 

EXERCISE 110. (Oral.) 

Subtract -f^ from each of the following; also 3f : 

10 23 41 36 84 93 102 170 

Subtract 4f from each of the following; also 10|: 

20^ 32^ 44| 55^ 61^ 78^ 93| 

EXERCISE 111. (Written.) 
Subtract \^ from each mixed number of Exercise 98. 



ARITHMETIC. 79 

PRACTICAL WORK IN ADDITION AND SUBTRACTION. 

EXERCISE 112. (Oral.) 

1. Lucy gives away \ of her apples to Sarah and \ to 
Jane; what part has she left? 

2. I cut 3 pieces of cloth from 3 yards; the first contained 
I of a yard, the second ^, and the third |; what part of the 
3 yards was still left? 

3. John gave away i and \ of his marbles, respectively, 
to two playmates; what did he give to both? 

4. From | of a yard of ribbon I cut f\ of a yard; what 
length of piece remained ? 

5. Mr. A. buys 2f^j acres of land, and fences \\ acres; 
what remains unfenced? 

6. Frank received on Christmas $24 from his father, $1| 
from his mother, and $^ from his sister; what did he re- 
ceive in all? 

7. How much more from his father than from his mother? 

8. Than from his sister? 

9. Than from both mother and sister? 

10. He spent %^ for marbles and '^^ for a top; what 
had he left? 

11. George lives 2| miles from the school-house; how 
many miles does he have to go a day, going and coming 
once ? 

12. William jumped 8f feet, and John 7| feet; how much 
farther did William jump than John? 

13. Charles earns $1^ Monday, '^1-^ Tuesday, $lf 
Wednesday, $1^3^ Thursday, U\ Friday, and $1| Saturday; 
he spends $3| during the week: how much does he save? 

14. I have 3 pieces of carpeting containing 9f , 7:j, and 8|- 
yards, respectively; what is the length of the three pieces 
sewed together, allowing \ yard for laps ? 

15. I have a journey of 13^^ miles to go; after walking 
3| miles, how much farther have I to go? 



80 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

16. A farmer has 4^ acres in orange trees and 2% acres 
in lemon trees; how much has he in both? 

17. How much more in one than in the other? 

18. I read 3^^ hours on Monday, 2^^ hours on Tuesday, 
and 3|- hours on Wednesday; how many hours did I read 
in three days? 

19. How much longer on Monda}^ than on Tuesday or 
Wednesday ? 

EXERCISE 113. 

Form 5 examples, like the preceding, in addition, and 5 
in subtraction, using the mixed numbers in the first 10 
examples, Exercise 97, and bring to the class for dictation. 

EXERCISE 114. (Written.) 

Rewrite the first 10 examples in general form (A or B, 
page 28), before performing. 

1. I paid $41^ for a watch, $3J for a chain, and $| for a 
ring; what was my bill? 

2. I raised on my land last year 155| centals of wheat, 
76| centals of oats, and 111|- centals of barley; how many 
centals of grain did I raise ? 

3. From a piece of land containing 723|-J acres, I sold 
149-J-l acres; what had I left? 

4. Sold a horse for $125, which was $13| more than he 
cost me ; what did he cost me ? 

5. I start on a journey, going -f^ of the distance the first 
day, and f the second day; what part of the journey have 
I yet to travel ? 

6. In a certain school -^f^ of the pupils are boys; what 
part are girls? 

7. A three-sided field has its sides 31y\, 46|, and 59||- 
rods long, respectively; how far is it around the field ? Draw 
a diagram to illustrate. 

8. A merchant buys a barrel of sugar containing 237^ 
pounds; he sells 17-| pounds at one time, 23| at another, 



ARITiniETIC. 81 

and 41| at a third; how many pounds of sugar are still in 
the barrel? 

9. A man traveled 8yV hours on Monday, 9^ J- on Tuesday, 
llf^ on Wednesday, 8^ on Thursday, 13yV on Friday, and 
lof on Saturday; how many hours did he travel in all? 

10. He traveled 27| miles on Monday, 34f^ on Tuesday, 
Slg^V ^iles on Wednesday, and 1791 miles in all; how far 
did he travel the last three days? 

11. From a piece of cloth containing 108^ yards, 3 pieces 
of 17f, 18^, and 14| yards, respectively, were cut; what 
remained ? 

12. A church steeple reaches lOlyV ^et from the ground; 
the roof of the church is 53^ feet high; how high does the 
steeple rise above the roof? 

13. Two men travel around a pond; the first goes \ of 
the distance, and the second -f^ of the distance, in one hour; 
how much of the distance has one gained upon the other? 

14. 4 piles of wood contain 37y^6-, 41|, 2^^, and 54^4 
cords, respectively; how many cords are in the 4 piles? 

15. One of two stations is 171^^ miles east of a certain 
point, and the other is 235^^^ miles west of the same point; 
how far apart are they? 

16. How far apart if both stations are east of the point? 

17. I bought of one man 1194 acres of land, of another 
91^V acres, and of a third 75f|- acres; what amount did I 
buy in all ? 

18. A man had ^ of his sheep in one pasture, \ in another, 
and ^ in a third, and the remainder in a fourth; what part 
are in a fourth? 

19. A room is 17yV feet long, and 14|^ feet wide; how far 
is it round the room? Draw diagram. 

20. Sold a horse for $11 73^5- at a loss of .$7^; what did I 
pay for him? 

21. A ship was 53|- hours in sailing to a certain port, 

and 41f in returning; how long was she gone? 
6— A 



82 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

To multiply a fraction by a whole number, or the reverse. 

How many apples are 5x2 apples? 2 apples multiplied 
by 5? What are 5X2 thirds? 2 thirds times 5? Write 
this latter operation in proper form. Does it make a dif- 
ference in the product in multiplication as to which term 
stands first? 

EXERCISE 115. (Oral.) 

Leave no improper fractions for answers. 

1. 9Xf 9. liXll. 17. -1X21. 25. 31Xf. 

2. 7X|. 10. i|Xl2. 18. ^X25. 26. 25XA- 

3. 1X5. 11. 9XtV 19- fX29. 27. |X8. 

4. IOXt^. 12. 7xlf. 20. fXlS. 28. t'oX21. 

5. 13X|. 13. y2-xl8. 21. fX20. 29. fX40. 

6. 15Xtt- 14. 13Xi 22. 19XtV 30. SOXtt- 

7. fVXlOO. 15. 17X|. 23. ITXfV 31. 50xf 

8. yVX9. 16. llXf. 24. IXll. 32. 1X91. 

EXERCISE 116. (Written.) 

Multiply each mixed number, of examples 1 to 4, Exer- 
cise 98, by 11. Multiply the fractional part first, and add 
the product to the product of the whole part. 

Multiply examples 5 to 8, by 13; 9 to 12, by 17. 

Mixed numbers may be changed to improper fractions 
before multiplying, when preferable. 

EXERCISE 117. (Oral.) 

Multiply the mixed numbers of examples 1 to 6, Exer- 
cise 97, by 3; 7 to 12, by 5; 13 to 16, by 7. 

Multiplying the numerator by a whole number multiplies 
the fraction by that number. Why? (See Prin. 1, p. 56, 
Division.) What other operation does that Prin. say will 
multiply the fraction ? 

Which term of the fraction is the divisor ? 



ARITHMETIC. 83 

In what two ways, then, can yon mnltiply a fraction by a 
whole nnmber? 

EXERCISE 118. (Oral.) 

In the following, divide the denominator by the whole 
nnmber: 

1. 9X^. 6. 9X|f 11- IIX7. 

2. 7XH- 7. yVX5. 12. 20xif. 

3. 15Xt|. 8. i|X8. 13. |iX6. 

4. 3^0X25. 9. llXfi 14. if^Xll. 

5. 7Xff- 10- 5Xt|- 15. |fX25. 

EXERCISE 119. (Written Analysis.) 

See analysis, page 36, Mnltiplication. 

1. At -t?! a cord what will 25 cords of wood cost? 

2. Sold 19 yards of cloth at $2f a yard; find the whole 
selling price. 

3. What cost 160 acres of land at $65^? 

4. A barrel contains 3H gallons; how many gallons in 12 
barrels ? 

5. What will 175 centals of wheat cost at ^Ijo- a cental? 

6. How far can I walk in 11 honrs, at the rate of 3-y- 
miles an honr? 

7. If a certain number of shoes can be sewed in ISy^- 
hours on 12 machines, how long will it take, using 1 ma- 
chine ? 

8. If I can copy 12^ pages in one day, how many pages 
can I copy in 6 days? 

9. 12 men buy a mill together, each paying $728|-: what 
is the cost of the mill? 

10. One rod contains 5^ yards; how many yards are in 
80 rods? 

EXERCISE 120. 

Write 10 examples of your own, like the preceding exer- 
cise, using 5 examples each from Exercises 115 and 118. 



84 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

EXERCISE 121. (Oral Analysis.) 

1. At $|- a roll what will 10 rolls of butter cost? 

2. What cost 9 yards of cloth at .$f per yard? 

3. What cost 5 rings at $2^ apiece? 

4. How many centals of grain will 12 bags hold, they 
averaging 1^ centals to a bag? 

5. What does a man earn in a week, at $1| a day? 

6. If 1^ pounds of butter pay for a yard of cloth, how 
many pounds of butter will it take to pay for 16 yards of 
cloth? 

7. What cost a dozen oranges at 2^ cents each? 

8. I gave 7 boys $f each ; how much to all ? 

9. A wheel turns 2|- times in going a rod; how many 
times Avill it turn in going 18 rods? 

10. Find the price of 13 sacks of wheat at $lf each. 

Perform the work of the 3 upper rows in Exercise 67, 
reading ■§ of 15, -J of 29, etc. 

I of 29=? 9f are how many thirds? i of 29=\K 

i of 44=: ? 6|- are how many sevenths ? -f of 44=4^. 

f are how many times -g? If -g of 15 is 5, f of 15 is 
what ? If i of 29 is -2/, f of 29=what ? f of 44= ? 

Write these on your slate, in a row; thus, 

I of 15=10, |of29=^S |.of44=if^. 

Below these write in a row, with results: 

1X15= , 1X29= , fX44= . 

Compare answers. "Of," between fractions, is therefore 
equivalent to what sign? 

EXERCISE 122. (Written.) 
Write and find f of each dividend in the upper row. Exer- 
cise 67. In cases similar to the first, write thus, 

5 

;|of;p=io. 

f of numbers in the second row; f in the third; f in the 
fourth. 



ARITHMETIC. 85 

EXERCISE 123. 'Oral Analysis.) 

If 1 dozen eggs cost 30 cents, what will -| of a dozen cost? 

Model. — }4 dozen will cost I3 of 30 cents = 10 cents. % dozen 
will cost 2x10 = 20 cents. 

1. What cost f yard of cloth at 20 cents a yard ? 

2. Bought I of a cord of wood at -$8 a cord; what was 
my bill ? 

3. Sold y^g- of an acre of land at $48 an acre; what did it 
cost? 

4. Sold y^Q- of a ton of hay at $8 a ton : what did I receive ? 

5. From a piece of cloth containing 55 yards, -fi of it was 
cut; how many yards were cut? 

6. Of 63 children in a certain district, -| attend school; 
how many attend? 

7. Bought f of a yard of ribbon at 20 cents a yard; what 
did the ribbon cost me? 

8. A row of trees contains 28 trees; how many trees are 
in \ the row? 

9. In a certain school containing 56 scholars, | are in the 
first grade and | in the second ; how many in each ? 

10. Received $2 for a day's work of 10 hours; what did 
I receive per hour? 

11. If f of 10 questions are missed, how many are missed ? 

To multiply a fraction by a fraction. 

The upper lines divide the 
whole line into how many ItV 
parts? The lower lines? Into how many parts do the 
lower lines divide each fifth? Then -g of \=^Yo'^ or (of=X) 
J- X J- 1- 

,rof|=? fofi==? |of|=? iof4=.? |of4=? 

Use the sign ( X ) , wTiting both ways. How can you ob- 
tain your new numerator in each case from those of the 
multiplicand and multiplier? The new denominator? 



1 


1 




3. 


4 


5 


1 


5 


f 




-?• 


t; 


1 1 


1 


1 1 1 


1 1 1 


1 1 


1 1 


1T5 


1 


1 i i 


1 1 1 


1 1 


1 1 



86 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

EXERCISE 124. (OralJ 



1. 


3 v2 


9. 


3 nf -^ 
20 Ol 10- 


17. 


3v 3 


25. 


2. of -2 
9 '-'1 5- 


2. 


5 V 5 


10. 


7 nf 4 
3 01 5- 


18. 


2. of 2. 
5 ^^ 9- 


26. 


2. of 2. 


3. 


^oftV 


11. 


^ nf 6 

4 01 y. 


19. 


5v 5 
¥/\12- 


27. 


2 0/^5- 


4. 


i\ of I 


12. 


10 of 1 

11 ^1 11- 


20. 


4\/ 5 
7 /\14- 


28. 


■3-V '"^ 


5. 


i X T 6"- 


13. 


7 Ag- 


21. 


9/\3- 


29. 


5 nf '"^ 
T 01 T4 


6. 


J?_ of « 

11 ^^ 7- 


14. 


8 V 8 
11/^11- 


22. 


8 of 8 

9 Ol n- 


30. 


A of J 


7. 


5 nf 1 
T3 01 TT- 


15. 


15V/1 
1 6 /\ 2 • 


23. 


4 V-^ 
13/\3- 


31. 


lx|. 


8. 


2 of 8 

3 01 11- 


16. 


loff 


24. 


_8_ of A 
11 ^1 9- 


32. 


Axi 



What is ^ of 9 apples ? | of 9 apples ? 
What is ^ of 9 tenths? f of 9 tenths? Write the last 
two expressions in full. 

3 

^ of /o=tV (See Exercise 122.) 
I of y% are ^Xt^-^I- (^ee Exercise 115.) 
5 3 

Hence, in writing the work, shorten; thus, ^ of ;^=^f . 

5 
This method of work is called cancellation. 

A common factor of any numerator and denominator, in 
multiplying, may be canceled by Prin. 3, p. 56. Thus, 

J '^ jo_ dividing 4 and 14 by 2, and 9 and 15 by 3, 



^/\i.* 2 1 J 

3 7 



before multiplying. 



What is Prin. 3, referred to? 



■■■• 5 6 Ayr- 

-^^ 2"5/\"39"- 

q 14 of 25 

'^' 1 5 Ol 2T- 

4 11 V.7 

K 5 7 V 1 2 

'^^ 108/^19- 

"• 105/^120- 



EXERCISE 125. (Written.) 






7 8 5 p,f 8 1 
' • TO 8 01 -9 5"- 


13. 


3 2 \/ 2 5 
75/^48- 


O 8 4 of 1 7 
O- 119 01 2 4- 


14. 


3 2 5 \/ 1 
7 /\25 


Q 5 5 v 1 4 1 
^' 81/^143- 


15. 


3 \/32 
160 /\ 9 


10 •'? 9 of 4 <^ 
±U. 6 ^1 6 5- 


16. 


7 V 24 


11 2 1 V 1 S 


17. 


1 5 V 3 
151 /\5. 


1 9 1 9 nf 1 '"^ 
1^. 2 ^1 2 0- 


18. 


1 9 V 7 



ARITHMETIC. 87 

EXERCISE 126. (Written.) 

Multiply together the mixed numbers of each example 
in Exercises 97 and 98. 

EXERCISE 127. (Oral.) 

Write on your slates, in their lowest terms, with "of" or 
sign (X) between, the fractions of each example in Exer- 
cise 100. Bring to the class to multiply. 

EXERCISE 128. (Written Analysis.) 

1. What cost 18| yards of carpet at $22^ a yard? 

2. How far will a railroad train go in 2 If hours at the 
rate of 19f miles an hour? 

3. What is the value of a pile of wood containing 45yV 
cords, at $13f a cord? 

4. At %l a pound what wall 9f pounds of coffee cost? 

5. Find the price of 21^ yards of ribbon at 12^ cents. 

6. What is the weight of llf barrels of flour averaging 
197| pounds each? 

7. At $4^ a barrel what will 84 barrels of flour cost? 

8. What is the cost of building a fence 29| rods long at 
$2^ a rod ? 

9. A certain river flows 7yV niiles an hour; how far^ will 
a boat float on it in 20| hours ? 

10. A wind blowing 27|- miles an hour blows how far in 

9^ hours? 

EXERCISE 129. 

^^"rite 10 examples similar to the preceding, using the last 
10 examples of Exercise 97. 

To divide a fraction or a mixed number by a whole number. 

A\^rite the following with answers on your slate: 
9 apples-^3= 18 dollars-^6= 

9 tenths--3=: 18 twenty-fifths --6= 

12 thirteenths--3= (2^) 30*^ elevenths ^6^ 



88 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

25 cents -i-5= 

(3^) 25 eighths— 5-3 

(2f ) 20 sevenths— 5= 

Dividing anything by 2 is taking what part of it? By 4? 
By 7? Taking ^ of anything is the same as multiplying by 
what? Then dividing by 2 is the same as multiplying by 
what? By 4? 

Write on your slate the following: 



3 


5 


fi 


8 


1 1 


14 


16 


9 


T 


9 


1 3 


1 'J 


5 


15 


17 


2 



Divide each by 2 by taking -| of it; by 4 by taking ^ of 
it; by 7 by taking ^ of it. 

EXERCISE 130. (Oral.) 

Divide the following by each number in turn from 2 to 9, 
choosing the better of the two methods above: 

7 __9_ 91. A 1 4 _§_ Kl_ 

11 10 ^7 7 2 9 11 "^7 

When the dividend is a mixed number whose whole num- 
ber is larger than the divisor, divide as in whole numbers, 
reduce the remainder to an improper fraction and divide it. 
Thus, 4 '^'^ ^-T='^i ^"'^^ -^T5 ^^' fj ove7\ 4 ^'^ f=T- ^'i^s. 4t' 

EXERCISE 131. (Written.) 

Select 10 expressions, either improper fractions, proper 
fractions, or mixed numbers, reducing mixed numbers to 
improper fractions, and divide by numbers that are factors 
of the numerators; also 10 others, with divisors that are not 
factors of the numerators. 

EXERCISE 132. (Oral Analysis.) 
Models on p. 46, Division. 

1. If 7 dozen eggs cost ^If, what are eggs a dozen? 

2. If 5 pounds of butter pay for 11^ yards of cloth, how 
many yards does 1 pound pay for ? 



ARITHMETIC. 89 

3. When I pay $42 1 for 5 cords of wood, what is the price 
per cord ? 

4. At $5 a yard how many yards of silk can I get for $18| ? 

5. Allowing 9 hours a day, how many days' work will 47^ 
hours make? 

6. If 1 man can do a piece of work in 9-^ days, in what 
time can 7 men do it ? 9 men ? 

7. When 5 gold rings cost $11^, what are they apiece? 

8. At $9 a cord how many cords of wood can he bought 
for $20i? 

9. At $2 a day how long will it take a man to earn '$12|? 

10. For %22\ I bought cloth at %o a yard; how many 
yards did I buy? 

To divide a whole number or a fraction by a fraction. 

How man}" times are 3 dollars contained in 15 dollars? 
In 17 dollars? In 2 dollars? 

How many times are 3 fifths contained in 15 fifths? In 
17 fifths? In 2 fifths? 

But ^=3 and ^-=^. Hence 3, or -U,--|=5 ; 3|, or -U, 

• 3 JJ7 P;2. 2 . 3 2 

• 5— 3 ^3- 5'- 5 3- 

f are how many 15ths? f are how many 15ths? . Then 

2.. 3 \Q__. 9_ 10 r»r 1 1 

3 • 5 15 • 15 ~9~; ^^ ^'^• 

EXERCISE 133. (Written.) 
Divide each of the following by |. f , and f in turn : 

11 91 11 11 2. 5 1 7^ 

^ 8 ^4 T2' -"-g" 3 TT "6 ' "^ 



INVERTING THE DIVISOR. 

By Prin. 1 and 2, p. 56, Division, and their explanations, 
we find that the smaller tliB divisor the larger the quotient. 
Di^'iding by f , then, will give a quotient 5 times larger than 



90 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

dividing by 3, because f is 5 times smaller than (or ^ of ) 3. 
But dividing any immber by 3 is taking ^ of it; therefore 
dividing by f is 5)<-i, or -f of it; or multiplying by f (f in- 
verted). Thus, i^-:-f==itXf. With fractions of different 
denominators this is the shorter process, except in cases 
where the numerator and denominator of the dividend are 
respectively divisible by the numerator and denominator of 

the divisor; as 6 

JtJgr . ^ 6 1 1 

5 

EXERCISE 134. 

Repeat Exercise 133 orally by this method. 
Also divide the first mixed number by the second in each 
example, Exercise 97. 

EXERCISE 135. (Written Analysis.) 

1. At $2f each how many chairs will $28y% buy? 

2. At $3^ a day how many days must a man work to 
earn$245f? 

3. How long will it take a tree to grow 30 feet high at an 
average of 3y\- feet a year? 

4. Allowing 9| yards to a dress, how many dresses will 
126f yards of cloth make? 

5. 2SJ- dozen buttons will be sufficient for how many 
dresses, allowing 2i dozen to a dress? 

6. A man divided 458^ A. of land among his sons, giving 
each IHyV A.; how many sons had he? 

7. I divide a pole 3 yards long into divisions -I- of a yard 
long; how many divisions? 

8. If you take If feet to a step, how many steps will you 
take in going 16| feet? 

9. A man digging a ditch 38| feet long, digs 7^ feet a 
day; how many days will it take him? 

10. A cubic foot of air weighs 1| ounces; how many cubic 
feet of air will weigh 16 ounces ? 




ARITHMETIC. 91 

EXERCISE 136. 

In the following complex fractions, perform indicated 
operations: 

9" 3 '-'^ 4 ^4 Ag- 

in the following, multiply each expression of the complex 
fraction by the 1. c. m. of the denominators of all the frac- 
tions above and below the main line, combining as you go. 
Thus, in 5, 6 is the 1. c. m. of 2, 8, and 6. 6xi==3, 6Xi= 
2, 2+3=5; 6xi=l; f=5. Work mentally. 

71 213 Ql 1-1-2 3. 

Q * '3 10 S 1^4 11 "JS 19 2~r3 4 

16 6 4 ^4 12 



191 ^71 ^^1 r^9i 

^'^' loo ^*- loo ^^' loo ^^' 100 

66| 16f 87i 83^ 

100 100 100 100 

To find what part, or fraction, one number is of another. 

What is i of 7? -fofV? f of 7? yV of 15? t\ of 15? 
A of 15? 

1 is what part of 7? 2 what part of 7? What part of 7 
is 3? 

1 is what part of 15? What part of 15 is 4? 8 what part 
of 15? 

The numbers 7 and 15, of which you are finding parts, 
are found where in the resulting fractions? 

AVhere are the numbers which are parts of 7 and 15 found 
in the results? 

Hence we see that, to find Avhat part or fraction one num- 
ber is of another, we form a fraction by placing the number 
that is a part as the numerator and the number of which 
it is a part as the denominator. The fraction thus formed 
should be reduced to lowest terms, when not so. 



92 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



EXERCISE 137. (Oral.) 





AVhat fraction — 










1. 


of 20 is 8? 


9. 


of 24 is 21? 


17. 


is 8 of 20? 


2. 


of 21 is 9? 


10. 


of 27 is 20? 


18. 


of 27 is 20? 


3. 


is 18 of 32? 


11. 


of 20 is 19? 


19. 


is 8 of 32? 


4. 


of 45 is 15? 


12. 


is 20 of 32? 


20. 


is 12 of 16? 


5. 


is 12 of 18? 


13. 


of 21 is 14? 


21. 


of 29 is 27? 


6. 


of 25 is 20? 


14. 


is 15 of 25? 


22. 


is 33 of 44? 


7. 


is 18 of 24? 


15. 


is 24 of 25? 


23. 


of 30 is 25? 


8. 


is 13 of 20? 


16. 


of 30 is 25? 


24. 


of 24 is 18? 



To find the whole when a part is given. 

How does \ of an apple compare in size with f ? 

1 with I? i with I?' iwithf? 

What is i of 9 ? | of 9 ? ^ of 9, or 3, is what part of | of 
9, or 6? 

If 6 is f of some number, i of that number is what part 
of 6? If i is 3, fare what? 

EXERCISE 138. (Written.) 
18 is f of what number? 
Model.— If 18 is §, i is J of 18, or 9; § are 3x9, or 27. 



1. 125 is # of what number? 



6. 642 is I^J of what? 



2. 


144 is A '' 


u 


a 


? 


7. 


840 is iV 


u 


u 


? 


3. 


321 is f " 


a 


u 


? 


8. 


59 is i/ 


(; 


u 


? 


4. 


45is-i- " 


a 


u 


? 


9. 


189 is y% 


a 


u 


? 


5. 


540 is ^2 " 


u 


L(. 


? 


10. 


910 is ;; 


u 


ii. 


? 



EXERCISE 139. (Oral.) 



1. 16 is ^ of what? 



2. 


49 is ,\ " 


ii 


? 


3. 


32is| " 


ii 


? 


4. 


44isTVo" 


ii 


? 


5. 


28 is i " 


ii 


? 


6. 


/ ^ IS J y Q 


ii 


? 



7. 20isi of what? 

8. 19is-3-Vo" " ? 

9. 64 is I " 

10. 50 is i " 

11 12 is 3 t< 

11. ±^ l^ 1 oO 

12. 25 is f " 





ARITHMETIC. 


93 


13. 


3G is f of what? 


17. 


33 is \l of what? 


14. 


14isTVo" " ? 


18. 


144 is -V^ " " ? 


15. 


25 is i " " ? 


19. 


108isx% " " .? 


16. 


28isf " " ? 


20. 


/ is loO 



PRACTICAL WORK IN FRACTIONAL ANALYSIS. 



General 
Forms. 



G.— What is 1 of 16 ? 
H. — 12 is ^ of what number ? 
I. — 12 is what part (fraction) of 16 ? 



EXERCISE 140. (Written.) 
Write the following 20 examples in proper general form 
before performing, and analyze: 

1. A man sold a watch for $36, which was f of what it 
cost him; what did it cost? 

2. A broker having $875 lost $175 in speculating; what 
part of his money did he lose ? 

3. A stock-raiser sold 250 sheep, which were | of all he 
had; how many had he? 

4. I bought a horse for $1575 and sold it for f of the cost; 
what did I get for it ? 

5. I of a ranch is worth $12300; what is the whole worth ? 

6. What is -^ of the above ranch worth? 

7. What part of it is worth $10250? 

8. At $7^ a ton what is f of a ton of hay worth ? 

9. What is | of an acre of land worth if | of it is worth 
$75? 

10. A man owning f of a mill sells f of his part for $5760; 
what is the value of the mill at that rate? 

11. What is the value of the part he has left? 

12. Bought a watch for $65 and sold it at a gain of $5; 
what fraction of the cost did I gain ? 

13. A man having a journey of 248 miles to perform goes 



94 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

31 miles the first day; wliat part of tlie journey is that? 
What part has he left to walk ? 

14. A farmer sold 108 acres of land, which was ^q of his 
whole ranch; how large was his ranch? 

15. After selling -f of my sheep I have 1200 left; how 
many had I at first? 

16. At $5| a yard what will f of a yard of cloth cost? 

17. I buy a place for $2325 and pay $1800 down; what 
part of the money do I still owe ? 

18. A man earns $1575 a year and spends f of it; what 
does he save? 

19. A ship having 320 tons of coal on board sprung a 
leak, and 128 tons were thrown overboard; what part of the 
coal was lost? 

20. -^ of an army was lost in battle and 8800 men were 
left; how many men were in the army? 



ORAL REVIEW IN FRACTIONS. 

EXERCISE 141. 

1. A man gave ^ of a dollar to John, twice as much to 
Eddie, and half as much to Elmer as to the other two; 
what did he give to all? 

2. If he gave the remainder of the dollar to Peter, what 
did Peter get? 

3. Daniel's kite string is 31^ feet long, and he ties a piece 
^ as long to it; how long is it now? 

4. Joseph's kite-string is f as long as Daniel's was at first; 
find the length of Joseph's kite-string. 

5. Elmer can walk 2-| miles an hour, and Charlie 3^ 
miles; how far can both walk in 5 hours? 

6. Katie and Nellie have 10 examples to work; it takes 
them 8f minutes each to perform an example; how long 
will it take both to perform the 10 examples? 



ARITHMETIC. 95 

7. Mamie, by devoting | of an hour to each lesson, studied 
2| hours; how many lessons had she to get? 

8. Agnes devotes 2^ hours a day to study, 1^ hours to 
music, and 1 hour to sewing; what does she spend on all in 
5 days? 

9. Four girls, Bell, Mell, Nellie, and Susie, agree to lay 
b}^ To of ^ dollar each week for the Sunday school ; what 
do they all lay by in 20 weeks? 

10. Angle finds that, by working l-f hours on her dress 
each day, she can make it in 5 days; how many hours does 
it take? 

11. Edith and Hazel have each $1^; they agree to buy 
in equal shares a book costing %1\ as a Christmas present 
for their mother; what has each left? 

12. Florence and Leona together lack i of a dollar to 
buy a picture worth $1^; if each has the same sum, what 
has each? 

13. Hattie and Mary give ■§ of an apple to each of two 
playmates and divide the rest equally between themselves; 
what part has each? 

14. Susie receives jq- of a dollar a day from her mother 
for work; she Welshes to buy a dress worth .^6^ and a hat 
worth $3^ at the close of the school term; can she do it, 
counting the time 20 weeks of 5 days each? 

15. Antone drives the cows to pasture in the morning and 
John gets them at night; if the distance from their house to 
the pasture is | of a mile, how far do both travel in 1 week? 

16. Marvin lives 2| miles from the school -house; if it 
takes him 5^ minutes to go ^ of a mile how long is he in 
going to school ? 

17. It takes Willie 1^ minutes to distribute the copy- 
books to 40 pupils; suppose each scholar were allowed to 
get his own copy-book, taking \ minute, how much time 
would be lost? 

18. Joseph finds he has 20 pages of his grammar to learn 



96 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

to meet the requirements of his class; if he learns 1^ pages 
a day, how long will it take him ? 

19. Alfred and Charles together have 60 cents; Charles 
has -J as much as Alfred ; what has each ? 

20. h of A's money is -g of B's, and together they have 
$75; what has each? 

21. At $4- a yard how many yards of cloth can I get for 
$12? 

22. How many sacks of potatoes at $1^ a sack will pay 
for a barrel of sugar at $18|? 

23. At I of a dollar a pound, how many pounds of coffee 
are worth $15|? 

24. A can do a piece of work in 3 days and B the same 
in 6 days; what part can each do in 1 day? How long will 
it take both together to do the work ? 

25. I deposited $32y^Q- in the bank, which was -^ of what 
I had there already; how much had I there? 

26. 1 man builds a barn in 8|- days; how long will- it 
take 4 men? 

27. John can do a piece of work in 8 days, and Bertie in 
12 days; how long will it take both to do it? 

28. A pole is i in the mud, | in the water, and 10 feet 
above the water; how long is it? 

29. A boy has 52 eggs in his basket; what are they worth 
at 21 cents a dozen? 

30. A can dig a ditch in 6 days, B in 8 days, and C in 12 
days; in what time can all do it? 

31. At 1^ cents apiece, how many oranges will pay for 11 
yards of print at 9 cents a yard ? 

32. Bought 90 centals of wheat at ^Ijo" ^ cental; if I 
give 5 20-dollar pieces in payment, what change do I re- 
ceive? 

33. At $1|- a day, what does a man earn in 5 weeks? 

34. How many oranges can I buy for 105 cents at 1| 
cents apiece? 



ARITHMETIC. 97 

35. John had 17 marbles, which were 5 less than W of 
James's; how many had James? 

36. A can do a piece of work in 10 days, C in 12 days, 
and B in 15 days; in what time can all do it? 

37. In what time can A and B do it? A and C? B 
and C? 



WRITTEN REVIEW IN FRACTIONS. 

EXERCISE 142. 

1. At $lf a yard, how many yards of cloth can I get for 
$9|? 

2. Bought of one man 11^ acres of land at -1^37^, and of 
another 17f acres at $42; how many acres had I and how 
much did I pay for the whole ? 

3. If 43^ yards of silk cost $108|, what must I pay for 
12| yards at the same price? 

4. Multiply x% of 9| by 4 of 2i 

5. A man having 175^ acres of land sold -§ of it at one 
time, and \ at another; what is the remainder worth at $45 
an acre? 

6. Sold 20 dozen eggs at %\ a dozen, and received in pay- 
ment butter at %\ a pound; how many pounds did I receive? 

7. Sold my farm for $2250, which was f of its value; 
what was its value ? 

8. How many coats can be made from 175| yards of 
cloth, allowing 2| yards to a coat? 

9. The length of a room is 17f feet, and the width is 12| 
feet; what will be the cost of a moulding around it at 3^ 
cents a foot? 

10. How many pounds of butter at 22^ cents a pound 
will pay for 18| pounds of sugar at 12 cents a pound? 

11. A sold f of his farm of 475 acres to B, and B f of his 

part to C; how many acres did B sell? 
7— A 



98 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

12. A man contracts to do a job in 60 days; how much 
of the work should be done in 22^ days ? 

13. A lady has $63| in her purse; she spends $17-| for 
a shawl, $3|- for cloth, $7^ for a bonnet, and $5^ for lace; 
how much has she left? 

14. There are 5^ yards in a rod; how many rods are in 
104f yards? 

15. How many yards in 820 rods? 

16. Sold wheat for $517y^o-, gaining $27f on the cost; 
what did I pay for it ? 

17. A man owning 7^ acres of land, divided it into house 
lots containing ^V acres each: how many lots did he make? 

18. If $f buys a yard of cloth, how many yards will $7^ 
buy? 

19. If 3| pounds of coffee costs 99 cents, what will | of a 
pound cost? 

20. How many tons of hay are in 19 loads, each contain- 
ing yf of a ton? 

21. What is the price per yard, when 7-| yards of cloth 
cost $14? 

22. A man owning | of a mill sold fV of his share to one 
man and y\ to another; what had he left? 

23. A has 324 head of cattle, and y^g of his herd is -^ of 
B's; how many has B? 

24. A lot of goods was sold for $4774, of which A owns 
tVj ^ A? ^^^^ C ^^6 remainder; find the money each should 
receive. 

25. A tailor wishes to put 2^ yards of cloth into a coat, 
2-^ into a pair of pants, and | into a vest; how many suits 
can be made from a piece of cloth containing 60^ yards, 
and how many vests from the remainder? 

26. A can do a piece of work in J 3 days, and B in 14 
days; in what time can both do it? 

27. When 5^ centals of wheat cost $6^, how many cen- 
tals can be bought for $12 J^-? 



ARITHMETIC. 99 

28. A man having sold f of his hogs, and lost i by dis- 
ease, had 150 left; how many had he at first? 

29. Find the whole value of 127-i centals of wheat at $11- 
a cental, 18 centals of oats at $1^ a cental, and 75 centals 
of barley at %^^ a cental. 

30. If 4 acres of land cost $321, what are 11^^ acres 
worth ? 



31. Divide 1 by 47^ 



3- 



32. Bought 35 yards of carpeting at $1y^-o a yard, 3 cur- 
tains at $|- each, 5 chairs at $| each; what was my bill? 

33. A can w^alk a mile in I of an hour, and B in ^ of 
an hour; in a race of 22 miles, which will win, and by how 
much ? 

34. A and B can do a piece of work in 10 days, A and 
C in 12 days, and B and C in 15 days; in w'hat time can 
the three working together do it ? In w^hat time can each 
do it working alone? 

35. A man has 49| acres of land; he sold all but 9| acres 
of land for $3190; how much did he get an acre? 

36. When 33^ yards of cloth cost $20, what is the price 
per yard ? 

37. At $2i a yard, how much cloth will $^ buy? 

38. How many sheep must I sell at $3^ to get $169? 

39. A lady divided $3-| among some poor children, giving 
them $y^Q- each; what number of children were there? 

40. If YQ of an acre of land is Avorth $23|, what is 1 acre 
worth ? 

41. Bought 50 sacks of potatoes for $62|; what will 12 
sacks cost at the same rate ? 

42. Paid \ of my money for a lounge, and y^ of it for a 
stove, when I had $106 left; what had I at first? 

43. A's money is I of B's, and together they have $1728; 
what has each ? 

44. What do I receive by selling 17-| bales of cotton, each 
containing b\ hundred weight, at $18| per hundred weight? 



100 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

45. How many dipperfuls, each | of a quart, will empty 
a tub containing 81^ quarts? 

46. A stockman buys a certain number of cattle at $24-| 
each for $588, and sells them at $27|; what does he gain 
on each and on the whole? 



47. Divide the sum of 3^ and b-^-^ by 



4 
37' 



48. A has \ as much money as B, and f as much as C; 
the three have $2835; what has each? 

49. From a chest of tea containing 63| pounds, If was 
sold for $34; Avhat price per pound was obtained? 

50. B's money is If times A's, and C's is If times B's; 
all together have $15300; what has each? 

51. If I of a cord of wood costs $5^, what will \1\ cords 
cost ? 

52. I buy 35f*6- acres of land at one time, 47f acres at 
another, and 17f acres at a third; I sell it all at an average 
rate of $40 an acre; what do I receive for the whole? 

53. At $1^ a cental, how many centals of wheat can be 
bought for $1000? 

54. Find the sum, difference, and product of |-| and |-|. 

55. I exchanged 5^ rolls of butter, worth 40 cents a roll, 
and 10^ dozen eggs, worth 18 cents a dozen, for sugar worth 
?! cents a pound ; how many pounds of sugar did I receive ? 

56. Gained $3|- by selling 12^ yards of cloth for $41fV; 
what was the cost per yard ? 

57. 8^ tons of Wellington coal at $15 per ton, and 9f 
cords of wood at $7-i a cord, amount to what? 

58. Bought 40 acres of land at $63 an acre. Sold -5^ at 
$72 an acre, -f^ at $59^ an acre, and the remainder for $2^^ 
more per acre than I paid for it; what did I gain on the 
whole ? 

59. f of 189 is what fraction of 567? 

60. I lend A a certain sum and B twice as much. -A 
pays me back \ of his and B ^ of his, making $150 received 
from both; what did I lend each? 



ARITHMETIC. 101 

61. A merchant sold 35^ pieces of cloth, each piece con- 
taining 47f yards; how many yards did he sell? 

62. Bought 40 bales of hay, averaging 2^-^ hundred 
weight a bale; how many hundred weight were there? 

63. How many tons in the preceding example, at 20 hun- 
dred weight to a ton ? 

64. There is an average of 365:j days in a year; how 
many hours? 

65. Bought 14 cows at $23-| a head, 11 horses at $85 f a 
head, and 50 sheep at $2f a head; what had I left from 
$1500? 

66. Bought 15 sacks of potatoes for $12|, and sold them 
for -^ dollar a sack more than I paid; what did I receive 
for them, and how much more than I paid? 

67. The distance by rail from San Francisco to Los 
Angeles is Off times the distance from San Francisco to 
San Jose. The sum of the distances is 533 miles; what is 
each distance? 

68. I pay 3 men $12.30 for doing a piece of work. The 
second works 3 times as long as the first, and the third \ 
as long as the first and second together; if they are paid 
the same rate per day what should each receive? 

69. Two men starting at the same point travel in opposite 
directions for 13| hours. One travels 3^ miles and the 
other 3| miles per hour: how far apart are they at the end 
of the time ? Draw a diagram to show it. 

70. Suppose the men in the preceding example traveled 
in the same direction, how far apart would they be ? Draw 
diagram. 

71. Allowing 225| pounds to a barrel, how many barrels 
of sugar will 2483^ pounds make ? 

72. How many collars at $| each can I get for $2^? 

73. What is the average value of 4 horses worth $81^, 
$984, $1051, and $112|, respectively? 

74. A man bought 35 watches for $15^ apiece and sold 



102 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

them so as to gain $17^ on the whole; what did he get 
apiece for them ? 

75. A boy has 375 oranges. He sells y\ of them at one 
time and y\ at another; what are the remainder worth at 
If cents each? 

76. A merchant sold two pieces of cloth for $241^. One 
piece contained 30^ yards, the other 42^ yards; what aver- 
age price per yard did he get? 

77. Richard -^can walk ^ as fast as Walter. In a certain 
time both together walked 5|- miles; what part of the dis- 
tance did each walk? 

78. At $1 a day what will a man earn in 1 year, leaving 
out 60 days for Sm:»days and holidays? 

79. If 11^ boxes of oranges cost $28|, how many boxes 
can I get for $22^? 

80. Fred worked 2| times as long as Frank at | as much 
per day. They received $24^; what part should each have ? 



DECIMAL FEAOTIONS. 

If you divide a unit, or 1, into 10 equal parts, what is 
each part called? How many tenths make a unit? If 
you divide each of the lOths into 10 equal parts, how many 
pieces will there be and what is each called? How many 
hundredths in 1 tenth? If you divide each hundredth 
into 10 equal parts, how many pieces will there be and what 
is each called ? How many thousandths in 1 hundredth ? 

Review Obs. on p. 6. 

What is the first figure on the left of the decimal point 
called? The second? The third? The fourth? How 
many units make 1 ten? How many tens make 1 hun- 
dred? What part of 100 is 10? Of 10 is 1 ? 

Since numbers decrease by 10 fold from left to right we 
may go on in our decimal notation beyond the decimal 



ARITHMETIC. 103 

point on the right, and make the name of each succeeding 
place Y^o" t^^ vakie of the preceding. -Thus, starting with 
units, the first figure on the right of the point will be y\j- of 
units or lOths. 5.7 is 5 and ^^j-. What will the second 
figure on the right of the point be called ? The third ? The 
fourth? How do we mark the absence of number in any- 
decimal place? (See Obs., p. 6.) 

Fractions, then, whose denominators are 10, 100, 1000, 
etc., may be written decimally ; the denominator being indi- 
cated by the number of places on the right of the decimal 
point, and not expressed, as in the common form. 

Put a diagram similar to the following on your slate, 
extending it further if necessary; under it place the mixed 
numbers and fractions of Exercise 143 in their proper 
places, and practice reading. In reading, use " and " at the 
decimal point only. 

Read the fractional part as a whole number first, and add 
the decimal name of the last figure; thus, 

32575 and 4763 hundred-thousandths. 





















QQ 




















r^ 




















■+3 




















^ 


















. 


a 


, 


















c3 
















w. 


n5 


o 


§ 


OQ 


. 








QQ 




c5 


-1-3 


OQ 


c3 


OQ 








-1-3 


r^-' 


m 




:^ 


-C5 








^ 


c3 


»— ' 


^ 


o 


(V 






CO 




O 


g 


^3 


^ 


. 


m 


X 


'T^ 


w. 


-^ 


'^ 






cc 


~t-^ 


-(-3 


C 
^ 


"P 


1 


/-( 




O 


a; 


.1— 1 


C 

o 


O 


r2 


3 


-♦-i 


^ 


l-M 


4-3 


P 


-*-^ 


r-—t 


-*^ 


•h^ 


r^ 



\ 



3257 5. 4763 

' The number of figures on the right of the point 
Observe, i corresponds to the number of O^s in the denom- 
y inator of the fraction. 

EXERCISE 143. 

1. 75.14 3. 131.131 5. 7.007 7. 1389.9 

2. .125 4. .0785 6. .13147 8. .0091 



104 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



9. 


857.14 


15. 


2.0404 


21. 


480.7 


27. 


3150.071 


10. 


85.0714 


16. 


7814.002 


22. 


526.114 


28. 


4090.07 


11. 


.07408 


17. 


7.0707 


23. 


.070107 


29. 


293.0293 


12. 


.00291 


18. 


20.0003 


24. 


.1410 


30. 


47.141 



13. 405.01 19. 171.4112 25. 82.1073 31. 29.641 

14. 78.78 20. 27141.75 26. 1.01010 32. 10.1 

EXERCISE 144. 

Write each example of Exercise 143 with denominators, 
thus, 7r 1 4 

Write each in words, also; thus, 

Seventy-five and Jourteen hundredths. 

EXERCISE 145. 

AVrite the following in decimal and in common forms, 
and reduce the fractional parts in the common form to 
lowest terms: 

1. Twenty-five and twenty-five hundredths, 9 and 114 
thousandths, 7 and 5 tenths, 11 and 8 thousandths. 

2. 74 and 99 ten thousandths, 11 and 45 hundred thou- 
sandths, 4 thousandths, 4 hundredths. 

3. 75 hundredths, 75 ten thousandths, 40 and 40 hun- 
dredths, 4 thousand and 4 thousandths. 

4. 91 hundredths, 91 tenths, 400 thousandths, 121 hun- 
dredths. 

5. 90 tenths, 57 thousandths, 5 and 11 thousandths, 72 
and 6 tenths. 

6. 87 and 54 hundredths, 90 and 8 tenths, 117 and 41 
thousandths, 25 and 9 thousandths. 

7. 238 and 12 thousandths, 171 and 125 thousandths, 
328 and 10 thousandths, 190 and 8 thousandths. 

8. 2 tenths, 24 tenths, 120 tenths, 175 tenths. 

9. 830 hundredths, 375 hundredths, 57 hundredths, 9 
hundredths. 

10. 2496 thousandths, 7125 thousandths, 125 ten thou- 
sandths, 25 thousandths. 



ARITHMETIC. 105 

EXERCISE 146. 

(1) Write 10 mixed numbers or fractions of your own in 
the common form, using 10, 100, 1000, etc., for denomina- 
tors; (2) the same in decimal form; (3) the same in words; 
(4) write the first examples with the fractions in their low- 
est terms. Bring to the class for dictation. 

EXERCISE 147. 

Write the following in common form and reduce to low- 
est terms: 

1. .25, .75, .125. 6. .144, .0256, .075. 

2. .375, .088, .048. 7. .84, .164, .175. 

3. .0175, .35, .015. 8. .8, .50, .0625. 

4. .16, .016, 1.75. 9. .1875, .625, .18. 

5. .33^, .661, .78. 10. .95, .3125, .105. 



DOLLARS AND CENTS WRITTEN DECIMALLY. 

The decimal notation is employed in writing dollars and 
cents in United States money. There are 100 cents in 1 
dollar. Hence any number of cents are so many, hun- 
dredths of a dollar; thus, 

5 cents are yfo-, or .05 of a dollar; 20 cents -f^Q, or .20. 

12 dollars 6 cents is written $12.06; 17 dollars 37 cents, 
$17.37; 18 dollars 12^ cents, $18.12^ All rules for opera- 
tions in decimals are equally true of United States money. 

Observe. — The decimal point is 'placed at the right of dollars. 

EXERCISE 148. 
Read the following as dollars and cents: 

1. $7.02 5. $175.75 9. $708.09 13. $927.06 

2. $25.50 6. $38.25 10. $150.12^ 14. $41 .62^ 

3. $137.37-1 7. $450.80 11. $45.33^ 15. $108.03 

4. $98.01 8. $92.90 12. $128.07 16. $29.66f 



106 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

EXERCISE 149. 

Write 20 numbers of your own, representing dollars and 
cents decimally, and bring to the class for reading and dic- 
tation. 

To change any fraction from the common to the decimal 
form. 

How is a fraction reduced to higher terms? (See pp. 75 
and 76.) How do you change ^ to a fraction having a de- 
nominator 10? \ is how many lOths? f are how many 
lOths? f? f? i is how many lOOths? |? i is how 
manylOOOths? f? |? |? 

Write each result in decimal form. 

We see from this, that, to change any fraction from the 
common to the decimal form, we reduce it to a fraction 
having 10, 100, 1000, etc., for a denominator, and write 
decimally. 

EXERCISE 150. (Oral.) 

Change to decimal denominator and express decimally: 



13 4 7 
■■■• 1 0? 5? 2 0- 








4. 


2 13 19 
5' 2 05 2 5- 


7. 


2 19 24 
45 505 25- 


9 4 1111 
^' 2" 5"7 5"0"? "2¥- 








5. 


17 3 18 
"2 0"? 4 5 2 5' 


8. 


4 5 1 1 
505 205 5- 


q 11 9 27 
^' 2 55 5 0? -2 5- 








6. 


49 21 17 
505 2 55 5 0* 


9. 


7 14 37 
255 205 50 


Again: 5^|-= 


= 


5 0- 
1 0^ 


— 500 
~1 00 


zr^: 


fU^=5.000 






1^^ of 5, or 


1 

8 


of 


5 
1000 




t¥^V=8) 5.000 







.625 
Therefore |=.625. 

Hence, to change common to decimal fractions, annex 
ciphers to the numerator and divide by the denominator. 

If the denominator contains no other prime factors than 
2 or 5, the division will be exact; and the number of places 
will be equal to the largest number of times 2 or 5 is con- 
tained as a factor. 

Thus, in yf-, the division is exact, because 5 is the only 
prime factor in 125, and there will be 3 places, because 125 



ARITHMETIC. 107 

contains 5^; in -^^ the division is not exact, because 375 
has the factor 3. When the division is not exact, carry it 
to 3 or 4 places and express the remainder in the form of a 
common fraction. 

EXERCISE 151. (Oral.) 

Tell by inspection whether the following are exact deci- 
mals; and, if exact, how many places in the decimal: 



2.S 
40 


1 9 

2 


4 
125 


1 .3 
5 


1 9 
75 


40 
60 


17 
150 


13 
105 


1 8 1 
125 


.3 6 
17 5 


1 9 

2 00 


4 3 

10 


78 
2 7 5 


_3JL 
300 


17 
250 


1 1 
¥T5" 



In performing work where denominators are as small as 
in the preceding exercise, it is better to Avork mentally, 
reducing as voii go; thus, 

^=.5^.57\=.575 ; ^=.0-.S=.00^S=.002i. 

Work the preceding exercise in this way. 

EXERCISE 152. 

Change the fractions in Exercise 150 to decimals by this 
method. 

Also the fractional part in Exercises 97 and 98, and re- 
write the mixed numbers in decimal form. 

EXERCISE 153. , . 

Write 10 common fractions of your own, and -change to 
decimals. Bring to the class for dictation. 



CIRCULATING DECIMALS. 

In cases where the division in the preceding work is not 
exact, the figures of the quotient will begin to repeat at 
some point of the division, producing what is called a circu- 
lating decimal. The circulate, or repeating part, is marked 
by a dot over the first and last of the repeating figures. 

The number of places before the circulate begins will 
equal the greatest number of 2's or 5's in the denominator. 



108 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

When special accuracy is required, however, it is better 
to divide until the 2's and 5's are all canceled, and express 
the remainder as a common fraction. Thus, ■2V-o=.4409, 
expressed as a circulate; or .44jiy, expressed fractionally. 



ADDITION AND SUBTRACTION OF DECIMALS. 

Decimals containing fractions are written and worked, 
for adding and subtracting, like whole numbers. How 
must they be written, and why? (See explanations, pp. 18 
and 24, Addition and Subtraction.) 

EXERCISE 154. 

AVrite properly and add the numbers in examples 1 to 8, 
Exercise 143; same with 9 to 16, 17 to 24, 25 to 32. Also 
find the sum of the numbers in each row. Add the num- 
bers in each example of Exercise 145. 

EXERCISE 155. 

Find the difference between Example 1, Exercise 143, 
and each remaining example in the same column; Exam- 
ple 9 and each remaining example in the same column; 
Example 17 and each remaining example in the same col- 
umn; Example 25 and each remaining example in the same 
column. 

EXERCISE 156. 

Add the numbers in each example. Exercise 97, as they 
are; change to decimals and add; compare results. 
Subtract in the same way. 

EXERCISE 157. 

Change the common fractions to decimals, and perform 
examples 1, 2, 3, 8, 10, 17, and 20, Exercise 114. 



ARITHMETIC. 109 

MULTIPLICATION OF DECIMALS. 

Multiply 3.728 by .18. 

OPERATION. Explanation. — Any number of units times a certain 

3 . / 2 8 denomination gives tliat denomination as a product. 

.18 Hence, 18X3.728=67.104; but the multiplier is ^'h or 

9 <m 9 /t ^''^ ^^ ^^' Tlierefore the product will be too of 67.104 

or .67104. Whence the law for multiplying decimals : 

O y r) Q i- « o 

Point off from the right as many places in the product 



.6 7104 as there are in both 'multiplicand and multiplier. 

EXERCISE 158. 

Use numbers in examples 1 to 8, Exercise 143, as multi- 
plicands, and 75.14 for a multiplier of each: also, .125 as a 
multiplier; 9 to 16 as multiplicands, and examples 3 and 
4 as multipliers; 17 to 24 as multiplicands, and 5 and 6 as 
multipliers; 25 to 32 as multiplicands, and 7 and 8 as mul- 
tipliers. 

Finish with one multiplier before using another. 

EXERCISE 159. 
Multiply the numbers in each example, Exercise 97, as 
they are; change to decimals and multiply. Compjjre re- 
sults. Perform the work of Exercise 119, changing com- 
mon fractions to decimals. 





EXERCISE 
Find: 


160 


. (Analysis, General Fori 


n G, p. 


93.) 


1. 


.06 of 725. 


8. 


.33^ of 515.1. 


15. 


.8 of 3.55. 


2. 


.8 of 42.5. 


9. 


.05 of 480. 


16. 


.025 of 96. 


3. 


.125 of 7.84. 


10. 


.175 of .764. 


17. 


.28 of 250. 


4. 


.03 of 17.28. 


11. 


.04 of 57.75. 


18. 


1.05 of 1400 


5. 


.12^ of 4.096. 


12. 


.9 of 1.044. 


19. 


1.2 of 380. 


6. 


.161 of 256. 


13. 


.06:1 of 72400. 


20. 


.45 of 920. 


7. 


.25 of 2.444. 


14. 


.15 of 245.4. 







Also perform the above by changing the multiplier in 
each example to a common fraction. Compare work. 



110 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

EXERCISE 161. 

Perform Exercises 123 and 128, changing the fractions 
to decimal form. 



DIVISION OF DECIMALS. 

Di^dde .67104 by 3.728. 

OPERATION. Explanation. — Any denomination di- 

3.728).67104(.18 vided by tlie same denomination gives miits 

3 7 '2 8 ^^^ '^ quotient; .671-^3.728 gives miits 

9 Q k 9 1 ^^^ '^ quotient ; the remaining places in the 

9 Q K 9 4 dividend will be the number of places to 

point off in the quotient giving .18. 

Whence the law for division of decimals : 

Point ojf as many places from the right in the quotient as those in 
the dividend exceed those in the divisor. 

When the division is not exact, carry the answer to 3 or 4 places 
beyond the point; in money operations, to 2 places, adding 1 to the 
second figure if the third figure should be 5 or more. 

Where special accuracy is required, express the remainder as a 
common fraction. 

In actual practice it is a shorter and surer way to draw a vertical 
line in the dividend after the figure whose denomination is that of 
the divisor, first annexing ciphers to the dividend if necessary: 
when the division has reached this line put a point in the quotient. 

Divide 44.232 by .12. 

OPERATION. 

"19W4 9319 Draw a vertical line after hundredths, that 
— — ^ ^ Q ^ being the denomination of the divisor. The part 
o b 8 . b ^j ^YiQ dividend on the left of the hne contains 
the divisor 368 times. Then comes the point. 

EXERCISE 162. 

Divide examples 1 to 8, Exercise 143, by .02 (short 
division) ; examples 9 to 16 by .095; 17 to 24 by 327; 25 to 
32 by 1.01. 



:frc. 



ARITHMETIC. Ill 

EXERCISE 163. ^^ 

Divide each number in this row by 25: 
1. 3. 4. 7. 8. 1.1 7.8 .001 

Divisor .1 for this row: 
10. .001 75. 7.5 .75 .1 100. 

Divisor 150 for this row: 
45. .0450 .75 7.5 3. 10. 15. 

EXERCISE 164. 

Divide, in Exercise 97, the greater number by the less, 
using the numbers as they are; change to decimals and 
divide. Compare results. 

EXERCISE 165. 
Perform the work of Exercises 132 and 135 by decimals. 

EXERCISE 1 66. (Analysis, Geueral Form H, p. 93.) 

9. 120 is .15 of what? 



1. 


75 is 


.03 of 


what? 


2. 


125 is 


.05 " 


a 9 


3. 


128 is 


.2 " 


u 9 


4. 


296 is 


.04 '^ 


u 9 


5. 


144 is 


.12 " 


a 9 


6. 


50 is 


.025 " 


u 9 


7. 


150 is 


.1 " 


a 9 


8. 


99 is 


.011 " 


u 9 



10. 


240 is 


1.20 '' 


u 


? 


11. 


196 is 


1.4 '' 


u 


9 


12. 


28 is 


.07 " 


a 


? 


13. 


13 is 


.08 " 


a 


? 


14. 


14 is 


.09 '' 


sU 


? 


15. 


15 is 


.10 " 


a 


? 


16. 


16 is 


.11 " 


u 


9 



CONTRACTED MULTIPLICATION OF DECIMALS. 

In multiplying decimals having several places on the 
right of the point, where the product is desired only to 2 or 
3 places, the work may be greatly shortened by multiply- 
ing only those denominations that produce the required 
places. Thus, 

Multiply 428.9543 by 17.454: 2 decimal places required. 



112 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

OPERATION. Explanation. — Place denominations of the same 

4 2 8.9 543 name under each other. For convenience, use the 

1 7.454 ^^^^ figure of the multipher first, if there is a unit 

q r\ Q 9 no figure, since units times any denomination gives 

Q Q qV ^ tl^^^t denomination. Begin with hundredths in the 

multipUcand, the required denomination in the 

l/l.Oo answer. 7X5 hundredths^35 hundredths+3 hun- 

21.45 dredths (7X4 thousandths=28 thousandtlis, w^hich 

1.7 2 being 2H oi" more we call 3)==38 hundredths; and 

748 6~97 ^^ ^^^* ^^^ multiplying by 1 ten we go one place 

farther to the right in the multiplicand; by 4 tenths, 

one place farther to the left; and so on. 

This operation saves so much labor that it should be used, when 
available, throughout the work. 

EXERCISE 167. (Written.) 

Perform by contracted multiplication; the first 5, to 2 
places, the remainder, to 3 places. 

1. H17.87X.0783. 6. 85.0714x131.131. 

2. 191.45X.173. 7. 7814. 002X. 0785. 

3. .956X1.413. 8. 20.0003x7.007. 

4. .7854X3.1416. 9. .13147x480.7. 

5. 91.4726X7.141. 10. 171.4112X293.0293. 



CONTRACTED DIVISION OF DECIMALS. 
Divide 4129.7854 by 47.62143; 2 decimal places required. 

OPERATION. 

47021143) 41 2^9.71854(86.72 Explanation.- The con- 
^•^007 traction consists in omitting 

a figure from the right of the 
divisor, instead of bringing 
down one at the right of the 
dividend, in each successive 
division . The last divisor is 
the left-hand figure of the 
divisor. Now take the divi- 
dend to include the same 
denomination as the highest 



3201 

2857 


344 
333 


11 
10 



PROOF. 










47.62143X867 


2 


reserving 


1 dec 


Pl 


47.62143 










86.72 










285.7 










38097 










333 










10 











ARITHMETIC. 113 



place in the divisor, and the 
quotient will he units (see 
p. 110); therefore go to the 
right of this denomination as 
many places as you wish to 
reserve decimal places in the 
quotient. 

Cut down the divisor from 
the right until it is contained 
in this dividend. 



4129.7 

1. 3.4268731 --.284638413, reserving 2 decimal places 

2. .04278593— .02872539, reserving 3 decimal places. 



PRACTICAL AVORK IN DECIMALS. 

EXERCISE 168. (Written.) 

1. In 1880 California raised 240.25 acres of cotton, aver- 
aging .63 of a bale to the acre; how many bales were pro- 
duced ? 

2. If there are 475 pounds of cotton in a bale, what num- 
ber of pounds to the acre was produced ? 

3. At $40 an acre, what are 3 fields worth, containing, 
respectively, 17.6 acres, 23.25 acres, and 42.625 acres? 

4. A man owning .3125 of a ship, sold .2 of his share; 
what part had he left? 

5. What are 36 dozen eggs worth at $.12^ per dozen? 

6. A man divided his ranch of 648.96 acres into 8 equal 
fields; how many acres did each field contain? 

7. At $2.25 each, how many books can you buy for $27? 

8. How far will a horse travel in 11 hours at the rate of 
6.75 miles an hour? 

9. A bushel contains 2150.42 cu. in.; 5.16f bushels con- 
tain how many cu. in.? 

10. A man earns $1.37| a day; if he works 296 days dur- 
ing the year, what will he earn? 

8— A 



114 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

11. There are 16.5 feet in 1 rod; how many rods are in 
272.25 feet? 

12. A man walks 32.75 miles on Monday, 29.8 on Tues- 
day, 27.41 on Wednesday, 40.5 on Thursday, ol.G6| on Fri- 
day, and 25.33:^ on Saturday; how far did he walk during 
the week? 

13. What was his average distance per day? 

14. A real estate agent having 3218 acres of land to sell, 
sold, on different occasions, 278.15 acres, 392.14 acres, 171.9 
acres, 429.51 acres, and 530.875 acres; what liad he left? 

15. Allowing 2.625 yards to a pair, how many pairs of 
pants can be made from a piece of cloth containing 42 
yards ? 

16. There are 231 cubic inches in a gallon, and 31.5 gal- 
lons in a barrel; how many cubic inches are in a barrel? 

17. How many rods of fence will surround a field 32.0625 
rods long and 28.4375 rods wide? 

l&j- How many turns will the driving-wheel of a locomo- 
tive make in going 1 mile, the wheel being 21.96 feet in 
circumference? 

19.. I bought 12 horses at $81,875 apiece, and gave a 
1000-dollar note in pajniient; what change did I receive? 

20. At $7.75 per cord, how many cords of wood can be 
bought for $162.75? 

21. I have 4 fields; the first contains 7.231 acres, the sec- 
ond 9.124 acres, the third 6.715 acres, and the fourth i as 
much as the other 3 together; what do they all contain? 

22. What are all worth at $50 an acre? 

23. I spend .08 of my money one day, .16 a second day, 
i of it a third; if I have $26 left, how much had I at first? 

24. A man on a journey goes ^ of it on Monday, and .450 
on Tuesday; how much has he left to perform? 

25. I have 15J cords of wood in one pile, 17.66| in a sec- 
ond, 14^ in a third, and 15.125 in a fourth; how many 
cords in all? 



ARITHMETIC. 115 

26. How much is it worth at $7f a cord? 

27. The distance around a pond is .59375 of a mile; how 
many times around it can I travel in 8 hours, traveling 4f 
miles per hour? 

28. How many fence rails l.b feet long will go 3 times 
around a field ISyV rods long and 10.1875 rods wide ? Draw 
diagram. 

29. The rainfall at Sacramento for the year ending with 
August, 1880, was 26.744 in.; 1881, 26.134 in.; 1882, 
16.283 in.; 1883, 18.3 in.; 1884, 24.78 in. What was the 
average yearly rainfall for that time? 

30. We inhale about 2.125 gallons of air every minute; 
how much do we inhale in an hour? 

V 31. Sold 17.125 tons of hay at $9f per ton; what was 
received for the hay? 

32. Two men start from the same place at the same time 
and travel in opposite directions; one goes 4.64 miles an 
hour, the other 5.16; how far apart are they in 13 hours? 

33. When they are 107.8 miles apart, how many l^ours 
have they traveled? 

34. The distance around a circle is 3.1416 times the dis- 
tance across it. If I can walk across a circular field in 48 
seconds, how long will it take me to walk around it? 

35. If the distance through the earth is 8000 miles what 
is the distance around it? 

Perform decimally examples 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, 14, 17, 21, 
25, 27, 30, 35, 37, 38, 39, 40, 52, 53, 57, 65, 71, 73, 76, 
Exercise 142. 



SHOUT METHODS IN MULTIPLICATION. 

An aliquot part of a number is such a number, whole or 
fractional, as is contained in it an exact number of times. 
Thus, 20, 25, and 33^ are aliquot parts of 100, being con- 
tained respectively 5, 4, and 3 times in 100. 



116 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

1. To multiply by an aliquot part of 100, 1000, etc. 

Multiply 447 by 33^ 
OPERATION. Explanation. — Multiplying by 100 gives a product 
3)44700 3 times too large, since 100=3X33i; dividing by 3 
1 4900 gi'^^s ^^6 ^^'^^ product. 



2. To multiply by 9, 99, 999, 9999, etc. 

Multiply 5728 by 99. Multiply 387 by 999. 

OPERATION, OPERATION. 

572800.=100X5728 , 387000. 

5728.=^ 1X5728 387^ 

5(37072.^ 99X5728 386613. 

3. To multiply when a part of the multiplier is a multi- 
ple of another part. 

Multiply 3216 by 357. 

OPERATION. 

3216 

OCT 

"^"^ ' Explanation. — Multiply by 7 for the first 

22512 product; then this product by 5, since 5X7 

1 12 5 60 times a number is 35 times that number. 



1148112 



4. To multiply numbers whose tens are alike and the 
sum of whose units is 10. 

43X47=(50X40) + {3X7)=2021. 
43 

■47 

^ 7v^ Explanation. — The product of 

the tens by 1 more than itself gives 

"^ " ^^^^ / X 4 U \ hundreds ; and the product of the 

120- 3X40 - =50X40. units, units. 
1600 =40X40 ) 
2021 

The preceding method may be applied to mixed num- 



ARITHMETIC. 117 

bers whose integral parts are alike and the sum of whose 
fractional parts is 1. 

5|-X54=(6x5) + aXf)=30i|. 

5. To find the product of two numbers whose mean 
number is easily squared. 

57x63=3600—9=3591. 

Here the mean or middle number is 60, it being 3 
greater than 57, and 3 less than 63. 

The result is 60'^— 3^=3591. 

The same process may be applied to mixed numbers. 
4|x5i=5^-i^=24||. 

6. To multiply a number by itself or square it. 

64^=60^+2x4x60+4^=4096. 
64 
64 



1 6=4" Explanation. — Square the tens ; add the prod- 

2 4Q__4v/gQ net of the tens by twice the units, and the square 
240=4X60 ^f the mats. 

3 600 =60^ 

4096 

The same result may be reached by reversing the process 
in No. 5. 

64^=60 X 68+ 4-=4096. 

EXERCISE 169. (Written.) 

1. 4721X999. 9. 82x78. 17. 41x39. 

2. 117X113. 10. 104X106. 18. lUXl2i 

3. 576x33i 11. 4184X125. 19. 99x4201. 

4. 875X328. 12. 396xl6§. 20. 68x62. 

5. llfXllf. 13. 3248Xl2i 21. 75x2320. 

6. 7^X8|. 14. 81X89. 22. 166fX891. 

7. 2160X99. 15. 1064x25. 23. 8iX8f 

8. 41X41. 16. 94X94. 24. 72xT2. 



118 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

SHORT METHODS IN DIVISION. 

1. To divide by an aliquot part of 100, 1000, etc. 

Divide 4256 by 33f 

OPERATION. Explanation. — 100 is contained 42 

3X42+1=127 Quotient. times with 56 Rem. 33^ (i of 100) 

56-33^=221 Remainder. ^^ contained 3x42+(56^33t) or 127 

times with 22| Rem. 

Divide 4256 by 14f . 

7x42+3=297 Quo. 

56— (3Xl4|-)=13i-Rem. 

2. To divide by a number a little less than 100, 1000, etc. 

Divide 31241 by 99. 

OPERATION. Explanation. — 100 is contained 312 

QQ\o-|2 41 times with a remainder ; 99 is contained 

-| o 312 times with 312 units additional re- 

mainder. Dividing this remainder, 100 is 
contained 3 times with 12 remainder, so 



Qno.=3 15 5 6=Rem. 99 jg contained 3 times with 3 more re- 
mainder. Tlie sum of the quotients is 315, and the sum of the 
remainders, 56. When the sum of the remainders equals or ex- 
ceeds the divisor, it must be again divided in the same way. 

If the divisor be 98 or 97 the additional remainder is the quotient 
times 2 or 3. 



Divide 31241 


by 


998. 








998)31 


241 
6 2 




Quo. --3 1 130 3 






EXERCISE 170. 


5280--16|. 




5. 9825--125. 


28171-f-99. 




6. 7200--lli. 


7428^97. 




7. 41256- 


-997. 



:Eem. 



1. 5280--16|. 5. 9825--125. 9. 21047--98. 

2. 28171-f-99. 6. 7200--lli 10. 7519--166|. 

3. 7428^97. 7. 41256-f-997. 11. 2763--114f 

4. 7800--25. 8. 5386^333^. ]2. 3672-=-212i. 



ARITHMETIC. 



119 



BILLS. 

When one person sells goods to another, or works for 
another, he writes to the buyer or employer an account of 
the things sold or work performed, with dates, prices, and 
amount. Such a writing is called a Bill., 

When the bill is paid, the person receiving the money 
signs his name, with the words, " Received Payment," or, 
" Paid,'" at the end. This is called receipting the bill. 

The abbreviation Dr. for debtor (ower) is sometimes used, 
showing that the person first named in the bill owes the 
money. 



Mk. F. E. Adams, 



Los Angeles, ]\Iar. 26, 1886. 
Bought of Ellis, Wells, & Co. 



1886 




Peb. 


10 


i i 


i i 


a 


15 


Mar. 


1 


i I 


i I 


i( 


10 



10 tt). Gran. Sugar, @ O^i-f 

3 " Cheese, . '' 15^ 

2 bags Flour, . " $1.25 

1 2 tt^. Coffee, . '• 37>^'^ 

2 " Tea, . . " bM 

3 rolls Butter, . " 60^ 



$ 




ct. 

95 
45 


$ 




2 


50 
75 






1 


10 






1 


80 


7 



ct. 



-)0 



Rec'd Payment, 

Ellis, Wells, & Co. 



San Jose, Cal., Mar. 1, 1886. 
Mr. a. S. Ames, 

To J. E. Symoxds, Dr. 

To 5 days' Labor, @ $1.25 $6.25 

Rec'd Payment, 

J. E. SVMONDS. 

EXERCISE 171. 

Copy, on paper or slate, carry out the items, and receipt 
the bills found on page 120. 



120 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



Oakland, June 1, 1886. 



Mr. Geo. H. Jones, 







To Barnes & Cole, Dr 


• 


1886 














May 


30 


To 1 bbl. Gran. Sugar, 245 ft). @ 8^ 
" 1 10-pound sack Oatmeal, . . . 
" 3 ft). Honey, . . . @ 12)^^ 
" 4 sacks Flour, . . . " $1.35 
" 3 ft). Eaisins, ... " 15*/ 
*' 7 doz. Eggs, . . . . " 16<? 
" 10 ft). Crackers, . . " 8)^^ 
" Icaddy Japan Tea, 22 ftj.," G5</' 
" 10- ft), sack Salt, . . " 3K'? 




25 







2. 

Mercantile Library, 



San Francisco, Mar. 1, 1885. 
To James Land, Dr. 



To binding 


27 vol. 


Atlantic Monthly, 


. @ 900 




2 '' 


Pop. Sci. Mo., 


. '' 900 




3 " 


St. Nicholas, . . 


. " 750 




1 " 


Overland Mo., 






3 '' 


Harper's Mo., 


. '' 900 




4 '' 


Century, . . . 


. " 750 



90 



3. 

Mr. H. B. Crockett, 



HoLLiSTER, Cal., Sept. 3, 1884. 
Bought of Smith & Tyler. 



1884 




June 


o 


a 


i i 


July 


5 


(I 


n 


ii 


17 


Aug. 


10 


< ( 


13 


11 


28 



5 Gent's Collars, @ 300 

1 doz. Hdkf., '' 250 

2 pr. Kid Gloves, ^' $1.75 

3 doz. Buttons, " 400 

3 Fine Linen Shirts, . . . . " $2.25 

4 pr. Gent's Hose, " 350 

3 pr. Linen Cuffs, " 400 

1 Derby Hat, 



50 



ARITHMETIC. 121 

EXERCISE 172. 

Make out bills of the following, and receipt them, using 
your own and classmates' names: 

1. 5 yd. Ribbon @ 12^ cents. 11 yd. Black Cashmere @ 
$1.60. 4 doz. Buttons @ 30 cents. 2 yd. Silicia @ 20 cents. 
10 yd. Sheeting @ 18 cents. 1 pr. Gaiters $3.50. 

2. 5 gal. Kerosene Oil @ 25 cents. 3 pr. Blankets @ $6.50. 
25 lb. Brown Sugar @ 7 cents. 3 doz. Eggs @ 20 cents. 1 
Turkey, 12 lb., @ 22 cents. 50 lb. Irish Potatoes @ 1^ cents. 

3. Mar. 3, 1880, 2 lb. Steak @ 12^ cents. Mar. 4, 4^ lb. 
Roast Beef @ 12 cents. March 5, If lb. Sirloin @ 15 cents. 
March 6, 5^ ft. Mutton @ 10 cents. Mar. 8, 1 15-ft. A..& C. 
Ham @ 19 cents. Mar. 10, 3 ft. Veal Roast @ 14 cents. 

4. John Smith performed 12 days' work for M. S. John- 
son at $1.50 per day. 

5. \ doz. Wooden Chairs @ $1. 1 Lounge $12.50. 1 Bed 
Room Set $22.75. 3 Fancy Chairs @ $2.25. 1 Extension 
Table $7.50. 1 Center Table $4. 

6. S. Wilson sold Geo. Sims 10 tons of hay @ $10 a ton. 

7. 8 doz. Oranges @ 15 cents. 10 ft. Nuts @ 10 cents. 
8 Lemons @ 2| cents. 5 ft. Mixed Candies @ 20 cents. 
1 box Apples $1. 7 boxes Strawberries @ 45 cents. ' 

8. 1 doz. Lead Pencils @ 5 cents each. \ ream Note 
Paper 40 cents. 4 Note Books @ 10 cents. 1 Rubber 
Eraser 5 cents. 1 package Envelopes 10 cents. 2 Fifth 
Readers @ 85 cents. 2 School Geographies @ $1.40. 

9. 14 yd. Print @ 12 cents. 3 ft. Butter @ 28 cents. 4 
bars Soap @ 10 cents. 1 pr. Child's Shoes $1.75. 25 ft. 
Flour @ 2\ cents. 1 can Lard 65 cents. 2 ft. Cheese @ 
17 cents. 

EXERCISE 173. 

Ask your parents for 3 bills they may have, and bring to 
the class for dictation. They may caution you not to lose 
them even though paid. Why? 



122 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

A concrete number when written in terms of one denom- 
ination is simple ; thus, 

125 yards ; 15.25 dollars; 3.435 hours are simple numbers. 

But when expressed in two or more different units it is 
said to be compound ; thus, 

2 yards 2 feet 3 inches is a compound number. 

These compound numbers were used before the decimal 
notation was known to English-speaking people. Calcula- 
tions are made much simpler and easier by the use of 
decimals. 

The compound number has properly no unit ; although 
one of any denomination may be taken as the unit. In 
the example given above of 2 yd. 2 ft. 3 in., the unit may 
be 1 yd., 1 ft., or 1 in. 

15.6 pounds: 7 lb. 6 oz.; 16 ounces; 17 gal. 3 qt. 1 pt.; 
13.75 inches; 156 A. 25 rd.; 13 quarts; 7 bu. 3 pk. 7 qt. 1 pt. 

From the above select the simple and the compound 
numbers, and analyze in each case, thus: 

1. is a simple number because it is a tvrit- 

ten in of one . 

2. is a compound number because it is writ- 
ten in or . 



LOI^G OE LINEAK MEASUEE. 

The denominations of length or line measurement are given 
in the following table: 

12 inches (m.) = l foot (ft.). 
3 ft. =1 yard (yd.). 

b}4yd. =lrod(rd.). 

320 rd. :-l mile (mi.). 



ARITHMETIC. 



123 



In the 4-inch scale here given what divisions of 
the inch do you find? 

Draw on paper a hne 2|- in. long. 

Draw a Une that you think is 3| in. long. 

Measure it. 

Draw on the blackboard a line 1 ft. long; 1| ft. 
long; 1 yd. long. . 

Divide, without measuring, the last line into 
parts each 9 in. long. 

Now measure them. 

Divide your yard line into 3 equal parts. How 
long should each part be? Measure. 

Draw the same line vertical or oblique and 
divide it into 6 in. parts. 

Estimate the width and length of your desk; 
measure it. The width and height of the win- 
dow; the door; dimensions of the blackboard; 
dimensions of the teacher's desk; measure each. 

Estimate the length and width of your scbool- 
room, and measure, using the yardstick or tape 
measure.' 

Pace off the length and width of your school 
yard, and then measure with the tape-line. Take 
long steps. Eind from this how long your paces 
are. 



A l^right, intelligent class well fitted in the work thus far, will 
need the pencil or crayon to record results only in most of the fol- 
lowing work. 

EXERCISE 174. 

1. How many in. in 1^ yd.? In 2 yd.? 

2. How many ft. in 7 yd.? In 4 yd.? 

3. How many yd. in 3 rd. ? In 4 rd.? 

4. In 108 in. how many ft.? In 720 in. ? 

5. What part of a mi. are 16 rd.? 160 rd. ? 

6. What part of a ft. are 9 in.? 6 in.? 4 in.? 



124 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

7. What part of a yard are 2 ft. ? 9 in. ? 18 in. ? 

8. In "2 mi. how many rd.? 

9. In -J yd. how many in.? 

10. In -g mi. how many yd. ? 

11. 2 ft. 6 in. are what part of a yd.? 

12. How many rd. in 1 mi.? 1 mi. 25 rd.? 

13. How many yd. in 5 rd.? In 5 rd. 3 yd.? 

14. How many yd. in 1 mi.? How many ft. in 1 mi.? 
How many in.? 

15. In 1 mi. 20 rd. 4 yd. how many yd.? 

16. How many inches in 1 rd. 2 yd. 2 ft. 7 in.? 

17. How many ft. are there in 2 mi. 35 rd. 2 yd. 2 ft.? 

18. How many ft. and in. are there in 40 in.? 

19. How many yd. ft. and in. are there in 79 in.? 

20. How many rd. yd. ft. and in. are there in 607 in.? 

21. How many yd. ft. and in. are there in 874 in.? 

22. How many yd. ft. and in. in 211 in.? In 100 in.? 

23. How many rd. yd. and ft. in 373 ft.? 

24. HoAV many rd. are there in 35 yd.? 

25. How many mi. and rd. are there in 650 rd.? 

26. How many rd. and yd. are there in 98 yd.? 

27. How many rd. yd. and ft. in 1000 ft.? In 179 ft.? 

To reduce to a decimal of any denomination. 

28. Reduce 3 mi. 235 rd. 2 yd. 2 ft. 3 in. to rd. 



12 


3 in. 


3 




3 


2.25 ft. 


adding the 2 ft. 


5^ 


2.7 5 yd. 


adding the 2 yds. 




2 3 5.5 rd. 

960.0 =: 


adding the 235 rds 
mi. 




1 19 5.5rd. 





29. Express 2 ft. 6 in. in inches. Express decimally, 
using the ft. as the unit. 



ARITHMETIC. 125 

30. Express 3 mi. 2 rd. 4 yd. 2 ft. in ft. Express deci- 
mally, using the yd. as the unit. 

31. Express 3 yd. 2 in. as in. Express decimally, with 
the yd. as the unit. 

32. Express 1 mi. 2 rd. 2 ft, in ft. Express decimally, 
with the mi. as the unit. 

33. Express 3 rd. 4 yd. 2 ft. 6 in. in inches. Express 
decimally, using the ft. as the unit. 

34. Express 2 rd. 1 yd. 2 ft. 6 in. as in. Express deci- 
mally, using the ft. as the unit. 

35. Express 1 mi. 2 rd. 1 yd. 1 ft. 6 in. as in. Express 
decimally, using the yd. as the unit. 

36. Express 3 mi. 80 rd. in ft. Express decimally, with 
the mi. as the unit. 

37. Express 2 mi. 2 rd. 3 ft. in ft. Express decimally, 
with the mi. as the unit. 

38. Express 3 rd. 2 yd. 2 ft. 3 in. in in. Express deci- 
mally, with the rd. as the unit. 

39. Express 4 mi. 240 rd. as yd. Express decimally, 
with the mi. as the unit. 

40. Express 3 mi. 8 rd. 3 yd. 2 ft. 3 in. in ft. Express 
decimally, with the yd. as the unit. 

41. Express 7 rd. 2 yd. 2 ft. 3 in. as in. 

To reduce to a fraction of higher denomination. 

42. 3 yd. 2 ft. 6 in. is what fraction of a rd.? 

3 yd. 2 ft. 6 in. 



6 in.=^ ft. 
3" 



2i ft.=:^=f yd. 



^ ycl.=i=ll rd 



43. Change 4|- rd. to a fraction of a mi. 

44. Reduce -f mi. to a decimal of a mi. 



126 CALIFORNIA SERIES. t 

45. Reduce .375 mi. to rd. 

46. 2 ft. 6f in. are what decimal of a rd.? 

47. Change 65 rd. 2 yd. 2 ft. 6 in. to the decimal of a mi. 

48. Express 25 rd. 4^ yd. as a decimal of 35 rd. 3 yd. 
2|ft. 

49. Express 42 rd. 2 yd. 4.3 in. as a decimal of a mi. 

50. Express 6 ft. 8.5 in. as a decimal of a rd. 

51. Express S^ yd. as a fraction of 7 yd. 4 in. 

52. Express 165 rd. 2 yd. 2 ft. 9 in. as a fraction of a mi. 

53. Express 2 yd. 2 ft. 2 in. as a fraction of 3 yd. 

54. Express 98 rd. 7 yd. 2 ft. 4 in. as a fraction of a mi. 

EXERCISE 175. 
Bring in 10 examples of your own like those of the pre- 
ceding exercise, for dictation. 



SUEYEYOE^S LOT^G MEASUEE. 

The land surveyor uses the following table. It has some 
advantages over the table given above, being partly deci- 
mal. 

25 links (l.) = l rd. 

4 rd. —1 chain (ch.). 

80 ch. =1 mile (mi.). 

EXERCISE 176. 

1. How many ch. in 2 mi.? In 3| mi.? 

2. How many links in 4 rd. ? In 5 rd.? 

3. How many rd. in 7 ch. ? In 5A ch.? 

4. How many yd. in 2 ch. ? 

5. How many ch. in | of a mi.? 

6. In 160 ch. how many mi.? In 320 ch.? In 96 ch.? 
In 100 ch.? 

7. What part of a ch. are 75 1. ? 20 1.? 

8. What part of a mi. are 5 rd.? 16 rd.? 



ARITHMETIC. 



\Z 



9. What part of a rd. are 5 1. ? 10 1. ? 
10; Reduce 1 mi. 2 ch. 1 rd. to 1. 

11. Reduce 2 mi. 2 rd. 6 1. to 1. 

12. Reduce 5 mi. 79 ch. 8 rd. to rd. 

13. Change 29763 1. to higher denominations. 

14. Change 8543 1. to higher denominations. 

15. How many mi. ch. rd. and 1. in 79G328 1. ? 

16. How many mi. ch. rd. and 1. in 76543 1.? 

17. Reduce 5 ch. 15 L to rd. 

18. What part of a rd. is 15 1.? 

19. How many rd. in 3^ ch.? How many 1.? 

20. Reducelmi. Ich. Ird. 11. toch. To rd. To mi. Tol. 

21. What is the difference between 15 ch. 44 1. and 
15.44 ch.? • 



LONG MEASUEE-METEIO SYSTEM. 

The French express measures and weights decimally, 
and their methods and measuring units have been adopted 
by most of the nations of Europe. In the United States this 
system has been legalized, and is coming slowly into use. 

The unit of length is one ten-millionth the meridian dis- 
tance from the equator to the pole; is nearly 39.37 inches, 
and is called a meter, whence this system is called the 
metric system. 

The decimal places have received names; thus. 



tz 
















a 




C^ 


iJ, 






^h' 


?-l 


-M 


'r-l 




:v 




%^ 


o 


<v 


o 


(V 


'CD 


-^ 




Qj 


-^^ 


-M 


>H 


-M 




o 




•^ 


<D 


CD 


.r— I 


0) 


O 






•t— 1 


• I— 1 


g 


2 


• 1— 1 






a 






s 



0000 0.0 



Qi (That myria, kilo, hekto, cleka, deci, centi, milli, are 

( prefixes used in weights and measures. 



128 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



EXERCISE 177. 

1. How many centimeters are there in 47.265 
meters? How many decimeters? How many 
dekameters ? 

2. Read 3825.386 meters, by placing in turn 
each of its names in place of meters and with- 
out changing its value. 

3. In the above metric scale what is the dis- 
tance from " c " to " s "? 

4. AVrite the distance from " d " to each of 
the following points: a, n, q, r, h, t. 

5. AVrite the distance from " x " to each 
^ of the following points: v, t, o, 1, h, m, b, 

a, q, g. 

6. Draw on paper a line .187 meters long. 

7. Draw on the blackboard a line 1 meter 
long. 

8. Divide this line into halves; into tenths. 
What are the last divisions called ? 

9. How many feet and inches in 5.24 
meters ? 

10. How many yd. ft. and in. in 35.428 
meters ? 

11. In 5785 meters how many mi. ? 

12. In 7856918 in. how many meters? 







■^^ 




z 






2 


= 


X 




— 


— 


— 


V 

I 
s 
r 

1 
P 



n 
m 




— 


— 


— 


a 


— 


— 


— 


I 


't-i 

o 




— 


— 


h 




— 


— 


— 


h 
9 
f 
e. 




— 


— 


— 


d 
c 
b 
a 











SUEFACE MEASUEE. 

A flat surface of four straight edges and square corners 
is a rectangle. 

A square is a rectangle with equal edges. 

The measuring unit is a square having a linear unit for 
its edge : as 1 square foot, 1 square meter, 1 square inch, 1 
square mile. 



ARITHMETIC. 



129 



TABLE. 

144 square (sq.) in. = l sq. ft. 
9 sq. ft. = 1 sq. yd. 

30)^ sq. yd. =1 sq. rd. 

160 sq. rd. =1 acre. (A.) 

640 A. =1 sq. mi. or section of land. 

The side or edge of the acre is not a unit of lensrth. 



A rectangle 6 units 
long and 1 unit wide 
contains 6 square units; 
3 units wide it contains 
3 times 6 sq. units, or 
18 sq. units; hence, 



2 



To find the area of a rectangle. 

f 1st. — The length and the breadth are factors of 
Observe. \ the area. 

[^ 2d. — The midtiplier is an abstract number. 



EXERCISE 178. 

1. A rectangle 8 in. long and 5 in. wide contains how 
many sq. in. ? 

2. How many sq. ft. in a rectangle 17 ft. long and 13 
ft. wide? 

3. How many sq. yd. in a square whose edge is 36 ft.? 

4. How many sq. in. in 2 sq. ft. ? 

5. In 6 sq. yd. how many sq. ft. ? 

6. In 3 A. how many sq. rd. ? 

7. In 1^ sq. mi. how man}^ sq. rd. ? 

8. In 36 sq. ft. how many sq. yd. ? 

9. How many sq. ft. in 288 sq. in. ? 

10. In 2^ acres how many sq. rd.? 

11. How many sq. ft. in a table 5^ ft. long and 3 ft. wide? 

9— A 



130 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

12. If your reader is 7^ in. long and 5 in. wide, how many 
sq. in. in the surface of its sides ? 

13. How many sq. in. in | of a sq. ft.? 

14. How many sq. ft. in f of a sq. yd.? 

15. What cost a quarter section of land at $1.25 an acre? 

16. How many sq. yd. in 2 sq. rd.? 

17. In a piece of land 9 ft. wide and 12 ft. long, how 
many sq. yd.? 

18. Reduce 1 sq. rd. to sq. in. One A. to sq. ft. 

19. Change 2 A. 40 sq. rd. 17 sq. ft. to sq. ft. 

20. How many sq. ft. in 3 A.? 

21. Find the number of sq. yd. in 3 sq. mi., 17 sq. rd., and 
4 sq. yd. 

22. Find the number of sq. ft. in 3476 sq. in. 

23. How many sq. ft. and in. in 98756 sq. in.? 

24. Change 7856 sq. ft. to higher denominations. 

25. Reduce 48413 sq. yd. to higher denominations. 

26. At $75| an A., what is the value of a farm 189.5 rd. 
long and 150 rd. wide? 

27. If 37 A. 128 sq. rd. are uncultivated in a farm of 170 
A. 16 sq. rd., what part of the farm is cultivated? 



SURVEYOR'S SURFACE MEASURE. 

625 sq. 1. = 1 sq. rd. 

16 '' rd. = l " ch. 

10 " ch. = l A. 
640 A. =1 sq. mi. or section. 

EXERCISE 179. 

1. How many sq. rd. in 3 sq. ch.? In 2\ sq. ch. how 
many sq. rd.? 

2. How many sq. ch. in 5 A. ? In 6^ A.? 

3. In 1 sq. mi. how many sq. ch. ? 

4. How many sq. ch. in \ of an A. ? 



ARITHMETIC. 131 

5. Twenty-five sq. 1. are what part of a sq. rd.? 

6. Eight sq. rd. are what part of a sq. ch.? 

7. What part of an A. are 5 sq. ch. ? 2 sq. ch.? 

8. 80 A. are what part of a sq. mi. ? 

9. In a quarter section land, how many A.? 

10. In a section of land, how many sq. 1.? 

11. Reduce 160 A. to sq. 1. 

12. How many sq. ch. in 2 sq. mi. 6 A. 9 sq. ch.? 

13. Reduce an A. to sq. 1. 

14. In 1 sq. mi. 1 A. 1 sq. ch. 1 sq. rd., how many sq. 1.? 

15. Change 842590 sq. 1. to higher denominations. 

16. Reduce 25373896 sq. 1. to higher denominations. 

17. In 98754 sq. rd., how many A., sq. ch., and rd. ? 

18. In 9857 sq. ch., how many sq. mi.. A., and ch.? 

19. Reduce 75328 sq. rd. to higher denominations. 

20. A man owned a piece of land 46 ch. long by 37 ch. 
wide; he sold a piece containing 42 A. 5^ sq. ch.; what 
part of the whole was left ? 

21. A man owns a piece of land containing 12 A.; has 
an irrigating ditch cut through one part of it, 25 1. wide and 
5 ch. long; what part of an A. does he lose by the ditch, 
and what part of the whole can he cultivate? 

22. A surveyor, starting at a certain point, laid his chain 
10.6 times to the east, then south 5 times, then west 5.3 
times, then south 3 times, then west 5.3 times, then meas- 
ured north to the place of beginning; how long was his last 
line, and how many acres in- the field? 



SURFACE MEASURE— METRIC SYSTEM. 

The unit of land measure is a square whose edge is 10 
meters; hence the unit contains 100 square meters. The 
name, are, meaning area, has been given to it. 

All perfect squares, in the decimal system, end in the 



132 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



alternate places commencing with units; hence only those 
places have received names. 



Small areas are given 
in square meters or centi- 
ares, while large ones are 
usually given in hektares. 

The hektare:=2.47 acres, 
nearly. 











^ 


















o 


















-h-l 


















OJ 


















d 


















H 


















1—1 




. 




J-^ 










a' 


















02 




-M 




O) 


<v 








II 








a 
•I— 1 


f-l 








^ 




'o 




f2 


a 








03 




<Xi 




<D 


-^J 








'-fS 




'^ 




U 


rt4 




OJ 




s 










<D 




;h 




CD 




cj' 




& 


r^ 




03 




O 




CO 




OQ 



0.0 



/ 



EXERCISE 180. 

1. 236.47925 ares: read this number as hektares; ascen- 
tiares; as square meters; as square decimeters; as square 
centimeters. 

2. In 34652 sq. centimeters, are how many ares? 

3. How much land in a field 234.56 meters long and 
184.25 meters wide ? 

4. What is the difference between 6 square meters and 
6 meters square ? 

5. How many ares in 1 quarter section of land? 



CARPETING. 



The lighter carpets, as ingrains, are 1 yard wide; the 
heavier, as Brussels, etc., are | yd. wide. Carpets waste in 
matching, according to the pattern, the breadths requiring 
to be cut longer than tlie room. 

EXERCISE 181. (Written.) 

1. How many yd. of carpeting | yd. wide will it take for 
a room 17 ft. long, 15 ft. 9 in. wide, if the breadths run 
lengthwise? 

2. How nuich yard-wide carpeting will be required for a 
room 17 ft. 6 in. wide, 23 ft. 4 in. long, if the breadths run 
crosswise ? If they run lengthwise ? 



ARITHMETIC. 183 

^^^^ 

3. How many yd- of carpeting | yd. wide will it take for 
a room 11 ft. wide, 15 ft. long, if the breadths run across 
the room? If they run lengthwise? 

^^C^ What will it cost to carpet a room 19 ft. wide and 24 
it. long, with carpet a yd. wide costing $1.25 per yd., the 
breadths to run crosswise and ^ of a yd. on each breadth 
allowed for matching? 

5. Find the smallest cost at which a room can be car- 
peted, which is 13 ft. G in. wide, 18 ft. long, the carpet | yd. 
wide at $2.75 per yd., \ yd. in each breadth allowed for 
waste in matching. 

PLASTERING. 

Usually estimated by the square yard. Multiply the 
distance around the room by the height from floor to ceil- 
ing ; deduct \ the surface of the openings and add the area 
of the ceiling. 

6. At $.27 per sq. yd. what will it cost to plaster a room 
18 ft. wide, 20 ft. long, 10 ft. high, having 3 windows, each 

2 ft^ wide, 6 ft. high, and 1 door 3 ft. wide, 7 ft. high? 
^jfC^How many sq. yd. of plastering in 17 rooms of a hotel, 

each 11 ft. wide, 12 ft. long, 12 ft. high, there being T win- 
dow 2\ ft. wide and 6 ft. high, and 1 door 2f ft. wide and 
7 ft. high in each room ? 

8. How many sq. yd. of plastering in a hall 90 ft. long, 
65 ft. wide, and 24 ft. high, there being 13 windows, each 

3 ft. wide and 10 ft. high, and 4 doors, each 4 ft. wide and 
9 ft. high? 

9. How many yd. of plastering in a room 16 ft. wide, 24 
ft. long, and 9 ft. high, allowing 12 sq. yd. for doors and 
windows ? 

10. What will it cost to plaster a room 24 ft. 6 in. long, 
15 ft. 3 in. wide, and 10 ft. high, at $.30 per sq. yd., allow- 
ing 14 sq. yd. for doors and windows? 

11. Find the cost of papering a room 15 ft. wide, 18 ft. 



134 CALIFORNIA SEHIES. 



long, and 10 ft. high, with paper 24 in. wide at $.95 a roll, 
8 yd. in a roll, 20 sq. yd. allowed for doors and windows. 
.1^^. Find the cost of plastering a room 17 ft. 6 in. wide, 
24 ft. 8 in. long, 10 ft. high, at $.33 per sq. yd., allowing 50 
sq. yd. for doors and windows. 

*j4s^^hat will be the cost of the paper for the same room, 
18 in. wide, 8 yd. in a roll, at $.75 a roll? 

14. How many thousand shingles will it take to cover a 
roof whose rafters are 25 ft. long, and ridge pole 30 ft. long, 
if 4 in. in width and 5 in. in length of each shingle is 
exposed to the weather? 

15. How many bricks 8 in. long, 4 in. wide, will be 
required for a sidewalk 100 ft. 4 in. long and 4 ft. wide? 

**¥&. If it takes 840 sheets of tin 16 in. wide and 24 in. 
long, to roof a house, what is the area covered? 

17. AVhat will it cost to plaster a room 18 ft. long, 16 ft. 
wide, and 12 ft. high, at $.37^ per sq. yd., allowing for 3 
windows 2| by 8 ft. and 2 doors 3 by 8 ft. 

18. In a border of tiling around my fireplace, 8 in. w'ide, 
3 ft. 8 in. high, and 4 ft. across the top, how many tiles 4 
in. sq.? Draw diagram before working. 

EXERCISE 182. 

Measure the length, breadth, and height of all the rooms 
in your school building; also take the dimensions of the 
windows, doors, and baseboards. Estimate the cost of 
carpeting and plastering each room. 

Make the same measurements of three rooms at your 
homes and bring to the class for similar work. 



SOLID OE CUBIC MEASUEE. 

A solid, all whose faces are rectangles or squares, is a 

rectangular solid ; the cube has equal square faces. I 

The unit of solid or cubic measure is a cube having a 



ARITHMETIC. 



135 




linear unit for its edge; as 1 cubic inch, 1 cubic yard, 1 

cubic meter. 

Work. — This rectangular solid is 
4 units long, 3 units wide, and 3 units 
high. How many cubic units does 
it contain? 

4 longXS wide gives 12 sq. units in 
base ; for 1 unit high there are 12 cubic 
units, and for 3 units high 3X12 cubic 
units=36 cubic units. 

1. — The length, width, o»r/ height are factors of 
Observe. "! the cubic contents. 

2. — The multipliers are abstract numbers. 

Do the same w^ork with the foot as the unit; with the 
yard; with the meter; with the inch. 

TABLE. 

1728 cu. in.=l cu. ft. 
27 cu. ft. =1 cu. yd. 
128 cu. ft. =1 cd. 



EXERCISE 183. 

1. How many cu. ft. in a room 17^ ft. long, 14 ft. wide, 
and 12 ft. high? How many cu. yd.? 

2. How many cd. of wood are in a pile 18 ft. long, 12 
ft. wide, and 9^ ft. high? 

3. How many cu. ft. in ^ cu. yd.? 

4. How many cu. in. in a brick a ft. long, 5 in. wide, 
and 1^ in. thick? 

5. How many cu. ft. in 2 cu. yd.? 

6. How many cu. ft. in 1^ cd. of wood? 

7. How many cu. ft. in 3 cu. yd.? 

8. How many cu. yd. in 108 cu. ft.? 

9. What part of a cu. yd. are 9 cu. ft. ? 

10. What part of a cd. are 64 cu. ft.? 

11. Four cu. ft. are what part of a cd. ? 



136 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

12. How many cu. ft. in a stick of timber 9 in. wide, 4 
in. thick, and 24 ft. long? 

13. A trench for a water main is 3 ft. deep, 2 ft. wide, 
and 21 ft. long; how many cu. ft. have been excavated to 
form it? 

14. How many cd. in a pile of wood 4 ft. wide, 4 ft. high, 
and 8 ft. long? 

15. How many cu. ft. in a tank 8 ft. long, 6 ft. wide, and 
3 ft. deep? 

16. Change 13 cu. yd. 11 cu. ft. to cu. in. 

17. In 9 cu. yd. 4 cu. ft. 13 cu. in. how many cu. in.? 

18. Change 159728 cu. in. to higher denominations. 

19. If there are 9 cu. ft. 828 cu. in. in one block of stone, 
and 7 cu. ft. 932 cu. in. in another, how many in both? 

20. How many cu. yd. in a room 12 ft. long, 11 ft. wide, 
and 9 ft. high? 

21. A parcel of wrapping paper is 30 in. long, 24 in. wide, 
and 2 in. thick; how many cu. in. does it contain? 

22. If a cu. ft. of stone weighs 175 ft)., what will be the 
weight of a cu. yd.? 

23. A water tank is 7 ft. deep, 9 ft. long, and 7 ft. wide. 
Find its contents in cu. in. 

24. If a load of wood is 3| ft. wide and 5 ft. high, how 
long must it be to contain 1-J cd.? 

25. A block of stone is 7 ft. in each dimension; how 
many cu. yd. does it contain? 

26. How many cd. of wood in a pile 56 ft. long, 4^ ft. 
high, and 6 ft. wide? 

27. A dealer gets $6.50 a cd. for a pile of wood 16 ft. 
long, 4^ ft. wide, and 7 ft. 6 in. high; how much does he 
receive ? 

28. In 247 cu. ft. how many cu. yd.? 

29. The excavation for a block of stores was 63 ft. wide, 
157 ft. long, and 8 ft. deep; how many cu. yd. of earth 
were excavated? 



ARITHMETIC. 



ISI 



30. Find the value of the wood piled on one half of a 
vacant lot 60 ft. by 150 ft., the wood being piled 9 ft. high, 
and Avorth $9.50 per cord. 

31. Reduce 20 cu. ft. 432 cu. in. to the decimal of a cu. yd. 

32. 216 cu. in. are what decimal of a cu. ft.? 

33. 648 cu. in. are what fraction of a cu. yd.? 

34. Reduce .75 of a cu. yd. to cu. in. 

35. What is .975 of a cu. yd. expressed in lower denomi- 
nations? 

36. Express .375 of a cd. in cu. ft. 

37. How many cu. ft. of air does your school room contain? 



SOLID MEASUEE-METEIC SYSTEM. 

In the decimal notation of solid measure the stere, or 
cubic meter, is the unit. 



.-^ 


0) 


o 


f-t 


I ; 


CD 


Ij 


H-J 


o; 


m 


tn 


o 


J-^ 


CJ 


02 


'TS 



EXERCISE 184. 

The 



stere=1.308 cubic 
yards, or .276 cords. 

1. Read 34.6 steres as 
decisteres; as dekasteres. 

2. Read 225.463829731 
cubic meters as cubic 
decimeters; as dekasteres; 
as cubic millimeters; as 
cubic centimeters. 

3. In 28.5 steres of wood are how many cd. ? 

4. How much wood in a pile 7.2 meters long, 1.7 meters 
wide, and 2 meters high ? 



0. 00000000 



STONE AND BRICK WORK. 

A wall is measured on the outside, no allowance being 
made for corners. All measurements are made in feet. 



138 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

Multiply the length thus obtained by the height, deduct 
the surface of the openings, and multiply by the thickness; 
divide by 16^ for perches, or multiply by 21 for the number 
of bricks. 

EXERCISE 185. 

1. At $5.25 a perch what will it cost to build a wall 
around a piece of land 22 ft. by 45 ft., the wall 1^ ft. thick 
and 8 ft. high? 

2. How many bricks would it take to build the walls of 
a house 30 ft. wide, 45 ft. long, and 20 ft. high, the wall to 
be 1 ft. thick? There are 10 windows, each 2^ ft. wide and 
7 ft. high, and 4 doors, each 3 ft. wide and 8 ft. high. 

3. At $4 per thousand for bricks, what will it cost for the 
wall of a building 58 ft. long, 25 ft. wide, 44 ft. high, the 
wall to be U ft. thick; there being 20 windows, each 3 ft. 
wide, 8 ft. high, and 9 doors, each 3 ft. wide and 8 ft. high? 

4. How many perches of masonry in a wall 5 ft. high, 1^ 
ft. thick, inclosing a garden 9 rd. long, 7 rd. wide? 

5. How many perches of stone in a wall 2 ft. thick and 
4 ft. high, inclosing a piece of land 40 rd. sq. ? 

6. How many bricks will it take to build a house 46 ft. 
long, 34 ft. wide, 20 ft. high, the wall 18 in. thick; allowing 
for 12 windows, each 8 ft. high and 3 ft. wide, and 6 doors, 
each 7 ft. 8 in. high and 3 ft. 3 in. wide? 

LUMBER MEASURE. 

Lumber is commonly estimated by board measure; 1 foot 
being 1 square foot of surface and 1 inch in thickness. 

Less than 1 inch in thickness counts the same as 1 inch. 
Above 1 inch the thickness is counted by fourths; as, li, 
1^, If, etc. One cubic foot counts as 12 ft. of lumber. 

The width of a tapering board is half the sum of the end 
widths. 

7. Find contents and cost of a board 14 ft. long, 1 ft. 4 in. 
wide, at 1^ cents a ft. 



ARITHMETIC. 139 

8. Find the contents of a tapering board 15 ft. long, 16 
in. wide at one end and 11 in. wide at the other. 

9. How many ft. in a stick of timber 30 ft. 6 in. long 
and 8 in. square? 

10. Find the cost of 40 boards 14 ft. long, 11 in. wdde, at 
$32.50 per thousand. 

11. Find cost of 9 planks 12 ft. long, 14 in. wide, and 3 
in. thick, at $40 per thousand. 

12. How many ft. in 45 2-by-4 scantlings 18 ft. long? 

13. What will 328 inch boards, 12 ft. long, 8 in. wide, 
cost at $24 per thousand? 

14. How many ft. in a board 12 ft. long, 8 in. wide, | in. 
thick? 

15. In a stick of lO-by-12 in. timber 24 ft. long, how 
many ft.? 

16. Find the number of ft. in 8 3-in. planks 14 ft. long 
and 10 in. wide. 

17. In a stick of timber 50 ft. long 12 in. square, how 
many ft. ? " 

18. In 10 4-by-6 in. joists 18 ft. long, how many ft.? 

19. In 8 2-in. planks 16 in. wide 18 ft. long, how many ft. ? 

20. In a tapering board 11 ft. long 18 in. wide at one end, 
11 in. wide at the other, and I in. thick, how many ft.? 

21. In 2 sticks of timber each 15 in. square and 19 ft. 
long, how many ft. ? 



LIQUID MEASUEE. 

TABLE. 

2 pints (pt.) = l quart (qt.). 
4 qt. =1 gallon (gal.). 

3Hgal. =1 barrel (bbl.). 

The gallon ^=231 cubic inches. The barrel is a measure 
in estimating the capacity of tanks and cisterns. Casks of 



140 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

all sizes are used for wine, beer, oil, etc., the number of gal- 
lons in each being marked on the outside. 

EXERCISE 186. 

1. How many pt. in 3 qt. ? In 3 qt. 1 pt. ? 

2. How many qt. in 5 gal.? How many pt. in 2^ gal.? 

3. How many gal. in 48 qt? In 96 qt.? 

4. What part of a gallon is 1 pt.? 

5. What part of 3 qt. are 3 pt.? 

6. If milk is worth 8 cents a qt., what will 5 gal. cost? 

7. How many pt. of lemonade can be made from the 
water in a 6-gal. olla which lacks 3 qt. of being full ? 

8. How many pt. bottles can a druggist fill from 7 gal. of 
alcohol ? 

9. How much linseed oil can you buy for $5, at 12| ct. 
per qt. ? 

10. If a gallon of molasses cost $.60, what will 3 pt. cost? 

11. What will 4 gal. of milk cost at 2 ct. per -i pt. ? 

12. A physician uses 1 pt. of distilled water in 1 day; 
how long will 2^ gal. last him? 

13. How many pt. in 1 bbl. 2 qt. 1 pt.? 

14. How many qt. in 5 bbl. 6 qt.? 

15. How many pt. in a bbl.? 

16. Reduce 5 bbl. 2 qt. 1 pt. to pt. 

17. Reduce 2 gal. 1 qt. 1 pt. to pt. 

18. Change ^ bbl. 3 qt. to qt. 

19. Change 1 bbl. i gal. 1 pt. to pt. 

20. How many bbl. in 7856 qt. ? 

21. Change 9563 pt. to higher denominations. 

22. Change 9543 qt. to higher denominations. 

23. Change 86543 pt. to higher denominations. 

24. Reduce 6754 gal. to higher denominations. 

25. A maker of patent medicine has 16 gal. prepared; 
how many pt. bottles does he need? 

26. Find the cost of 2 bbl. 4 gal. 2 qt. 1 pt. of vinegar at 
5 ct. a pt. 



ARITHMETIC. 



141 



27. What will be the cost of the following lots of molas- 
ses at $.75 per gal.: 41 gal. 3 qt. 1^ pi, 25 gal. 7 qt. 1 pt., 
and 9 gal. 3 qt. 1^ pt.? 

28. A man sells in one week 73 gal. 3 qt. of oil, in an- 
other 60 gal. 2 qt., in another 40 gal. 1 qt., and in a fourth 
65 gal. 2 qt.; what is it worth at $.17 a gal.? 

29. A Ventura oil well yields 150000 gal. of refined oil; 
how many 5-gal. cans will it fill, and what is the value at 
$1.75 a can? 

30. 4 gal. 1 pt. is what fraction of a bbl. ? 

31. What is the value of .75 bbl.? 

32. 13 gal. 1 pt. is what fraction of | of a bbl.? 

33. Reduce ^ of 16 gal. 2 qt. to the fraction of 1-| bbl. 

34. Reduce | gal. to the decimal of a bbl. 

35. How many quarts in .375 of a bbl.? 



DRY AND LKiUlD MEASURE— METRIC SYSTEM. 

The unit, or liter, is the cubic decimeter=1.057 quarts. 









Ph 






%^ 


, • 


■4-S 


t-' 


CD 




r-{ 


CD 


s 


* '— 1 


O 


.1—1 


-M 




Qi 


-f^ 


■+^ 












-(-^ 




• 1— 1 


c3 


• ^H 


o 

rl4 


1 1 




• r— ( 


1 1 


1—1 




2 






.1—1 


• 1— 1 


.1— ( 

. I—H 


ri 


• 1— 1 


O 


o 


-t-i 


a 


o 






^ >> 


-^ 


"^ 


-r=i 


^ 


O 


r^ 



EXERCISE 187. 

1. In a cubic meter of water 
are how many liters? 

2. Read 9852.436 liters with 
any one of the names in the 

000 0.000 table as the unit. 

3. How many liters are there in a cubic dekameter of 
water? 

4. A rectangular cistern is 2.75 meters long. 1.82 meters 
wide, and 1.12 meters high, inside measurement. How 
many liters of water will it hold? How many kilograms? 

5. Find the answer to the last example in gallons, and 
in pounds avoirdupois. 



142 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



WEIGHT. 

This is the measure of the force that draws all bodies 
downward. 

The table in common use is that of 

AVOIRDUPOIS WEIGHT. 

16 ounces (oz.) = l pound (ft.)- 
100 1b. =1 cental. 

20 centals =lton(T.). 

The cental is also called the quintal and hundredweight. 
100 lb. of grain or flour is called a cental ; 100 ft), dried fish, 
a quintal ; 100 lb. of other coarse substances, a hundred- 
weight (cwt.). 

EXERCISE 188. 

1. How many oz. in 3 lb.? In 4 lb. ? 

2. In 5 cwt. 25 lb. how many lb. ? 

3. How many lb. in 4^ centals? 

4. What is a quintal of fish worth at 6 ct. per lb.? 

5. How many lb. in 2 T. ? In 3^ T.? 

6. What part of a ton are 400 ft).? 500 ft).? 

7. What part of a lb. are 4 oz.? 12 oz.? 

8. Wliat part of a cwt. are 75 ft).? 66| lb.? 

9. 20 lb. are what part of a cental ? 

10. 60 lb. are what part of a cental? 

11. At 5 ct. per lb. what are 7 cwt. of beef worth? 

12. At $.12^ per lb. what are 12 lb. of cheese worth? 

13. How much are 2^ centals of wheat worth at $.94? 

14. A druggist buys powdered bloodroot at $1.00 per ft). 
and sells it for 12-| ct. per oz.; what does he gain? 

15. A man buys 240 lb. of sugar at the rate of 12 lb. for 
a dollar, and pays for it in peaches at 2 ct. a lb.; how 
many lb. of peaches will it take? 

16. A woman takes 300 lb. of honey from her hives each 
month. What is it worth for one year at $5.00 per cwt. ? 



ARITHMETIC. 143 

TROY WEIGHT. 

The following table is used for weighing gold, silver, and 
precious stones : 

24 grains (gr.)=l pennyweight (pwt.). 
20 pwt. =1 ounce (oz.). 

12 oz. =1 pound (ft).). 

The Avoirdupois pound=7000 Troy grains. 

The purity of gold and silver was formerly expressed in 
24ths, or carats; thus if yf of a piece of metal was gold, it 
was 18 carats fine. 

This reckoning of fineness of silver and gold by 24ths, or 
carats, is now used only for jewelry. In buying and sell- 
ing, as well as in coining, fineness is now reckoned in thou- 
sandths; thus, 

925 fine means that -fw^ of the entire weight is pure metal. 

EXERCISE 189. (Written.) 

1. How many gr. heavier is the Avoirdupois lb. than the 
Troy ft).? 

2. Which is the heavier and by how many gr., the 
Avoirdupois oz. or the Troy oz.? 

3. In 1^ pwt. how many gr. ? In 3 pwt.? 

4. How many gr. and pwt. in 80 gr. ? 

5. What part of a pwt. are 12 gr.? 3 gr.? 8 gr.? 

6. How many pwt. in 3 oz.? In 5 oz.? In 7^ oz.? 

7. In 70 pwt. how many oz.? In 90 pwt.? 

8. In 72 oz. how many lb. ? In 84 oz. ? 

9. How many oz. in 9 lb. ? In 6 lb.? In 7^ lb.? 

10. What part of a lb. are 4 oz. ? 6 oz.? 

11. What part of a ft), are 40 pwt.? 60 pwt.? 

12. If a pwt. of gold is worth $.95, what are 12 pwt. 
worth? What are 12 gr. worth? 

13. If a salt spoon weighs 5 pwt., how many spoons can 
be made from 2 ft), of silver? 

14. Reduce 35624 avoirdupois oz. to cwt. 



144 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

15. Change 16256 avoirdupois oz. to higher denomina- 
tions. 

16. How many cwt. in 40607 avoirdupois oz. ? 

17. In 267235 ib. how many T.? 

18. Change 8420724 avoirdupois oz. to T. 

19. Reduce 24 ft). 9 oz. 6 gr. Troy, to gr. 

20. Change 855 gr. to higher denominations. 

21. Change 25 ft). 7 oz. 18 pwt. 9 gr. to gr. 

22. Reduce 6 ft). 8 oz. 6 pwt. to gr. 

23. Reduce 3756 ib. to gr. 

24. Reduce 217 T. 35 ft), to ft). 

25. Change 7 T. 9 cwt. 18 ft), to ft). 

26. If a man has 987567 ft), of wheat how many centals 
has he? 

27. How many quintals of fish in 9875 ft). ? 

28. What are 78569 ft), of wheat worth at $.95 a cental? 

29. Find the value of 8564 oz. of tea at $1.25 per ft). 

30. Change 97546 gr. Troy to higher denominations. 

31. How many Troy ft)., oz., and gr. in 85643 gr.? 

32. What are 755 centals of barley worth at $.84^ a 
cental ? 

33. Find the cost of 896 lb. of dried apricots at $25 per 
cwt. 

34. What are 745 ft), of dried ginseng worth at $.12^ per 
oz.? 

35. A lady buys table silver weighing 2 lb. 3 oz. 10 pwt. 
at the rate of $1.60 per oz. Find the cost. 

36. The Monitor Co. ships by the Wells-Fargo Express 
Co. 9 bars of silver bullion, each bar weighing 1000 oz., the 
whole valued at $9612; what is the value of an oz.? 

37. A car-load of ore taken to Denver yields 800 oz. of 
silver to the ton; if there are 10 tons in the car, what is it 
worth according to the vahiation in the preceding example ? 

38. A gold mine was sold for $200000; if the ore yields 
$248 a load, how many loads will it take to pay for it, and 



ARITHMETIC. 



145 



how many bricks will it make of 500 oz. each, if an oz. of 
gold is worth $20? 

39. Reduce 5 oz. 5 pwt. to the fraction of a ib. 

40. Express as a decimal -^-^ of y^o" ^• 

41. Express .08 ib. as units of lower denominations. 

42. What decimal of a lb. is .24 oz.? 

43. What decimal of a lb. is 4 oz. 10 pwt.? 

44. Change 2 centals 15 oz. to the fraction of a T. 

45. Change 3 centals 8 oz. to the decimal of a T. 

46. Express in lower denominations yj of a T. 

47. Express in lower denominations .075 of a T. 
4S. 



1 T 

•2 ^ • 



j\ of a T. is what fraction of | of 2 

49. What fraction of 3 T. is .065 of a T.? 

50. Reduce 17 centals 50 ib. to the decimal of a T. 



WEIGHT— METRIC SYSTEM. 

The gram, or unit, is the weight of a cubic centimeter of 
pure water. 

The gram=15.4 grains 

Troy weight. It is the unit 

.rp, for very small weights. 

For common purposes the 



c3 



tJO 



c5 



0000000.000 kilogram is the unit 

The kilogram=2.2 pounds avoirdupois. 
The ton =2204.6 " '' 



EXERCISE 190. 

1. 2784.683 grams: read this value as kilograms; as hek- 
tograms; as decigrams. 

2. What is the weight of a liter of water? 

3. 434.28 grams: give this value in Troy wt.; in Avoir- 
dupois wt. 

10— A 



146 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



4. A cistern holds 74625837 grams of water, how many 
liters of water does it contain ? 

5. How many liters in a barrel of water? 

6. A garden is 115 meters long, 87.5 meters wide; when 
rain falls on it to the depth of 1^ centimeters, how many 
liters of water has it received ? 



CIEGULAB MEASURE. 




A circle is a flat surface whose edge is a uniformly curved 
line. 

The edge, or circumference^ is divided into 360 equal parts 

called degrees. Learn the names connected with the circle 

from the figure. 

TABLE. 

60 seconds (") = 1 minute (')• 
60' = 1 degree (°). 

90° = 1 quadrant. 

4 quadrants = 1 circumference. 



ARITHMETIC. 147 

EXERCISE 191. (Written.) 

1. What part of a circumference is 90°? What part is 
180"? 

2. How many seconds in 2° 1' 5"? 

3. How many degrees in a quadrant? 

4. How many degrees in \ a circumference? 

5. How many degrees in 3600"? 

6. In 2^ minutes, how many seconds? 

7. How many degrees in -^ of a quadrant? In 3- of a 
quadrant? In | of a quadrant? 

8. 2\ quadrants are what part of a circumference ? 

9. How many seconds in 29° 35' 26"? 

10. Change 943765" to higher denominations. 

11. What is I of 45°? 

12. What part of a quadrant is 25"? 

13. Reduce .05 of a circumference to the fraction of 3 cir- 
cumferences. 

14. Change .32 of a quadrant to the decimal of a circum- 
ference. 

15. What part of 5° 2' 3" is 1° 40' 41"? 

16. Reduce 9° 25' 48" to the decimal of 25° 3' 28". 

17. What fraction of 9° 8' is \ of 22° 50'? 

18. Change .125 of a degree to minutes and sec. 



TIME. 



The earth is a huge pendulum marking time by its 
motion; turning once around on its axis marks one day. 

TABLE. 

60 seconds (sec.) = 1 minute (min.). 
60 min. =1 hour (hr.). 

24 hr. =1 day (da.). 

7 da. =1 week (wk.). 

365 da. = 1 common year. 

366 da. = 1 leap year. 



148 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

All years divisible by 4 are leap years. 

Exception: those divisible by 100 and not by 400 are 
common years. 

The year has 12 months of 28, 29, 30, or 31 days. The 
following rhymes serve to keep the lengths of the months 
in the memory: 

Thirty days hath September, 
April, June, and November, 
February twenty-eight, 
Thirty-one the others rate. 

The extra day for leap year is added to February, mak- 
ing 29. 

For school purposes and in working examples, 4 weeks 
are counted as 1 month. 

In reckoning interest 30 days are counted as 1 month. 

EXERCISE 192. (Written.) 

1. How many min. in | of an hour? In ^ of an hour? 
In I of an hour? 

2. Howmany sec.inf of amin.? f of a min.? f of a min.? 

3. How many min. in 5 hr.? How many hr. in 25 da.? 

4. Change 3 min. 25 sec. to sec. Change 2 wk. 5 da. to 
da.; 4 da. to hr.; 7 wk. 3 da. to da. 

5. How many wk. in 497 da.? In 427 da.? 

6. How many da. in 72 hr. ? In 96 hr. ? 

7. How long is it from 25 min. past 5 a. m. to noon? 

8. How many days from Mar. 16 to June 11 of the 
same year? 

9. How many mo. from July 4 to Dec. 4 of the same 
year ? 

10. Wliat is ^ of 1 da. 2 hr. 40 min. 20 sec? 

11. If a horse trots 1 mi. in 2 min. 35 sec, how long will 
it take him to go 3 mi. at the same rate? 

12. If a man earns $3 per day and pays $5 a week for 
board and other expenses, what can he save in 6 months ? 



ARITHMETIC. ' 149 

13. Reduce 5 hr. 15 min. 25 sec. to sec. 

14. Reduce 2 yr. 11 da. 12 min. to min. 

15. Reduce 3 yr. 37 da. 16 hr. 24 min. 13 sec. to sec. 

16. Reduce 58967379 sec. to higher denominations. 

17. Change 47675 min. to higher denominations. 

18. Change 427329 sec. to higher denominations. 

19. Change 157540 min. to higher denominations. 

20. Reduce to higher denominations 8567983 sec. 

21. How many min. are there from 25 min. past 9 p. m. 
to 15 min. past 6 the next morning? 

22. How much time is there from 9 min. 25 sec. past 3 
p. M. to 8 min. 16 sec. of 5 a. m. of the next day? 

23. A young lady reads German 25 minutes each day for 
6 years; hov/ much time does she spend? 

24. If it takes you 25 min. 15 sec. to walk to school, how 
much time will you spend in 6 mo. if you make two trips 
a day? 

25. Reduce f of a common yr. to da. 

26. What part of a day are 2 hr. 30 min. 45 sec. ? 

27. What part of 6 da. 15 hr. 40 min. 36 sec. are 3 da. 7 
hr. 50 min. 18 sec? 

28. Reduce .075 of a da.; .625 of a wk.; .378 of a com- 
mon yr. to lower denominations. 

29. What fraction of a wk. is 2 da. 18 hr.? 

30. Reduce .58 of a common yr. to lower denominations. 

31. Express 4 da. 7 hr. 45 min. 48 sec. as a decimal of 
34 da. 14 hr. 6 min. 24 sec. 

32. Find the value of .975 of a yr. 

33. Express .125 of a yr. in lower denominations. 

34. 22 da. 12 hr. is what part of a mo.? 

35. 2 hr. 40 min. 36 sec. is ^vhat fraction of a mo.? 

36. Express 11 hr. 33 min. as a fraction of a wk. 

37. Reduce 31 min. 30 sec. to the fraction of a da. 

38. Express in integers 4.655 yr. 

39. Express in decimals of a week, 3 da. 3 hr. 



150 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

40. 2 mo. 3 da. 4 hr. 28 min. 28 sec. is what decimal of 
6 mo. 1 wk. 2 da. 13 hr. 25 min. ? 

41. 3 hr. 37 min. 1 sec. is what decimal of 12 da. 1 hr. ? 



LONGITUDE AND TIME. 

The earth turns on its axis 360°, or once around, in 24 
hours; therefore in one hour it turns -2V of 360°= 15°. 

If then we divide the degrees of longitude between two 
places by 15, the quotient is the difference of time in hours. 
Or if we multiply the difference of time, in hours, by 15, 
the product is the difference in degrees of longitude. Now 
the hour and degree have the same division into minutes 
and seconds; hence, 

Hoursxl5 = degrees of longitude. 

Minutes of timexl5 = minutes of longitude. 

Seconds of timexl5 = seconds of longitude. 

And difference of longitude divided by 15 gives corre- 
sponding divisions of difference of time. 

EXERCISE 193. (Written.) 

1. What is the difference of longitude of two places whose 
difference of time is 3 hr. 25 min. 30 sec? 

2. Two towns have a difference of longitude of 17° 48' 
36"; what is the difference of time? 

In changing difference of time to difference of longitude, 
we multiply by 15 and divide the products of the minutes 
and seconds by 60 to reduce. Multiplying by 15 and divid- 
ing by 60 is equivalent to dividing by 4, hence we may 
shorten the work in this Avay: 

1. 3'^'"- 2 5'"^'^- 30^*^"- 

15 



4 5° 15' 3 0" 

25h-4=_6^ 3 0~4:= 7 

51° 2 2' ^ws. 51° 22' 30". 



ARITHMETIC. 151 

2. By the opposite process longitude is changed to time. 

15)17° 48' ar 

-| hr. Omin. O 2.sec. 

2X4=_8 3X4::^^! 2 

-^ -j^min. 14-2- *cc. 



Ans. r-^- 11"^^"- 14-1 



sec. 



The student, with a Httle practice in this method, will 
work any example without using his pencil except to write 
the answer. 

3. Two hours difference in time corresponds to how many 
degrees difference in longitude? 

4. What difference in longitude corresponds to \ hr. dif- 
ference in time? 

5. If the difference in time between two places is 2 hr. 
15 min., what is the difference in longitude? 

6. When it is noon at Sacramento, what time is it 15° 
east of that place? 

7. A meteor is observed by two persons whose difference 
in longitude is 8° 30'; what will be the difference in time 
recorded ? 

8. The difference in time between two places is 2 hr. 25 
min. 6 sec; what is their difference in longitude? 

9. What is the difference in longitude between two places 
whose difference in time is 1 hr. 24 min. 16 sec? 

10. When the difference in time between two places is 
3 hr. 14 min. 28 sec, what is their difference in longitude? 

11. Find the difference in longitude when the difference 
in time is 5 hr. 13 min. 12 sec. 

12. What is the difference in longitude when the differ- 
ence in time is 4 hr. 8 min. 12 sec? 

13. When the difference in time is 17 hr. 9 min. 14 sec, 
what is the difference in longitude? 

14. What is the difference in longitude of two places 
whose difference in time is 15 hr. 14 min. 13 sec? 



152 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

Counting from the meridian that passes through the 
observatory of Greenwich, near London, the longitude of 

New York is 74° 3" W. Paris, 2° 20' 22" E. 

New Orleans, 90° 5' W. Boston, 71° 3' 30" W. 

Berlin, 13° 23' 53" E. Pekin, 116° 28' 54" E. 

Chicago, 87° 37' 30" W. Montreal, 73° 34' W. ^ 

Cincinnati, 84° 26' W. St. Petersburg, 30° 18' E. | 

St. Louis, 90° 15' 16" W. St. Paul, 93° 5' W. 

Bombay, 72° 53' E. San Francisco, 122° 24' 15" W. 

Mexico, 99° 5' AV. Omaha, 95° 56' AV. 

Washington, 77° 2' 48" W. Los Angeles, 118° 18' W. 

Albany, 73° 32' W. 

15. What is the difference in time between San Francisco 
and St. Paul? 

16. Find the difference in time between New York and 
New Orleans. 

17. What is the difference in time between Berlin and 
Bombay ? 

18. Find the difference in time between San Francisco 
and New York. 

19. What is the difference in time between Chicago and 
St. Petersburg? 

20. Find the difference in time between the City of Mex- 
ico and St. Louis. 

21. What is the difference in time between Cincinnati 
and Washington, D. C? 

22. What is the difference in time between Pekin and 
Montreal ? 

23. When it is noon at San Francisco, what time is it at 
Paris? I 

24. When it is six o'clock p. m. in Boston, what time is 
it at Pekin? 

25. When it is midnight in Paris, what time is it in St. 
Petersburg ? 

i 

As the earth turns eastward in its daily motion, the sun ' 



ARITHMETIC. 153 

appears to move westward 15° per hour. When it is noon 
at any point, it will be past noon at all places east of that 
meridian, and before noon at all places west; therefore we 
reckon to the west for earlier time, and to the east for later. 

26. When it is 10^ o'clock a. m. at Sacramento, longitude 
121° 26' W., what is the longitude of the places having the 
following times: 7 hr. 20 min. a. m.: 2 lir. 25 niin. p. m.; 1. 
lir. 10 min. p. M. ; 5 hr. 15 min. a. m.? 

27. What is the longitude of a place where it is 3 hr. 30 
min. p. M. when it is 7 hr. 30 min. A. m. in Albany? 

28. At Paris it is 4 p. ]\r., and at the same time it is 2 a. m. 
of the next day in another place; give the longitude of the 
last place. 

29. In Boston it is 1:25 p. m. when it is 1.25 a. m. of the 
next day at another place; what is the longitude of that 
place? 

30. What is the longitude of the place where it is 9 hr. 
25 min. a. m. when it is 6 hr. 30 min. p. m. of the same day 
at Paris? 

31. What is the longitude of a place where it is 15 min. 
past 8 o'clock a. m., when it is 7 hr. 30 min. a. m. in Omaha? 

32. When it is 45 min. past 11 p. m. in Montreal, it Js 15 
min. past 2 o'clock a. m. next day at another place: what 
is the longitude of the second place? 

33. What place in the above list has 5 hr. 5 min. 21| sec. 
earlier time than Paris? 

34. A gentleman travels from Boston to Springfield where 
he finds that, by his watch, the sun rises 6 min. 6^ sec. 
later than in Boston; what is the longitude of Springfield? 

35. At how late an hour may news be telegraphed from 
New York and reach San Francisco at 3 a. m. ? 

36. The absolute difference in time between the Bermu- 
das (which are east of New York) and New York is 37 
min.: find the longitude of the Bermudas. 

37. Find the longitude of the place where it is 20 min. 



154 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

past 5 p. M. when it is 25 min. past 11 p. m. in St. Peters- 
burg. 

The change of time from place to place is very incon- 
venient for travelers and railways. To do away with this 
the United States has been divided into four districts by 
lines running nearly north and south. The eastern district 
takes the time of the 75th degree of longitude west from 
Greenwich; the next district takes the 90th degree; the 
next the 105th, and the western, which includes all the 
Pacific states and territories, takes the 120th degree. 

In traveling across the continent the minute hand of an 
accurate watch keeps always right; the hour hand alone 
needs changing. 

In changing from local time to the time now kept, what 
change was made by San Francisco, Ion. 122° 26' 4" W.? 
What by Los Angeles, 118° 18'? By Sacramento, 121° 26'? 
By San Diego, 117° 10' 40"? 

Note. — The examples in this book are wrought for true time and 
not for the standard time given above. 



EEFEREI^CE TABLES. 

LENGTH. 

7.92 in. =11. 

6 ft. =1 fathom. 

120 fathoms =1 cable-length. 

1 nautical mile =1.153 common mile. 

1 deg. at equator =60 nautical miles = 69.16 common miles. 

40 rd. = 1 furlong. 

4 in. =1 hand. 

9 in. =1 span. 

18 in. =1 cubit. 

12 lines =1 in. 

33.39 in. = 1 vara. 



ARITHMETIC. 155 

The table of cloth measure seems to be entirely obsolete. 

SQUARE OR SURFACE MEASURE. 

40 sq. rd. = 1 rood. 
100 sq. ft. =1 square. 

CUBIC OR SOLID MEASURE. 

16 cu. ft. =1 cord foot (cd. ft.). 

8 cd. ft. =lcord(cd.). 

16K cu, ft. of masonry = 1 perch. 
50 cubic feet of hewn timber, or round timber enough to make 
40 ft. of hewn timber =1 ton. 

- Masonry is usually estimated by the cubic foot; but the 
perch is not unfrequently used, and may be that given 
above, or the old measure of 24| cubic feet. 

Custom in California has reduced the cord of wood to an 
uncertain quantity, usually called 96 cubic feet or 3 tiers 
of 12-inch stove wood, 8 ft. long and 4 ft. high. 

LIQUID MEASURE. 

4 gills (gi.) = l pt. 
42 gal. =1 tierce. 

2 bbl. =1 hogshead (hhd.). 

2 hhd. = 1 pipe or butt. 

2 pipes =1 tun. 

BEER MEASURE. 

2 pt. =lqt. 
4 qt. =1 gal. 
36 gal. = 1 bbl. 
l>^bbL = lhhd. 

The beer gallon^282 cubic inches. 

DRY MEASURE. 

2 pt. =1 qt. 

8 qt, =1 peck (pk.). 

4 pk. = 1 bushel (bu.) 

The bushel=21 50.42 cubic inches. 



156 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



The table of dry measure is seldom or never used in Cal- 
ifornia, grain and vegetables being bought and sold by 
weight. It is still in common use in the eastern states and 
the Mississippi valley, but the bushel differs somewhat in 
the different states. 

The English standard bushel=:2218.19 cu. in. 

APOTHECARIES' WEIGHT. 

20 gr. =1 scruple (scr.) 

3 scr. =1 dram. 

8 drams = 1 oz. 
12 oz. =1 Itx 

Used in mixing medicines but not in buying and selling. 
The pound, ounce, and grain are the same as in Troy 
weight. 

DIAMOND WEIGHT. 

16 parts = 1 carat gr. 
4 carat gr. = 1 carat. 
1 carat =3.17 gr. Troy. 

Circular measure has been expressed decimally by divid- 
ing the quadrant into 100 equal parts called grades, the 
tenths being called minutes, and the hundredths, seconds. 
Thus, 45° 30' 15" would be 50.56 grades, but the French 
people, who invented this, have not generally adopted it. 



PAPER AND BOOKS. 





24 sheets = 1 quire 


(qr.). 




20 qr 




= 1 ream 


(rm.). 




2 rm 


I. 


= 1 bundle (bun.). 




5 bun. 


= 1 bale. 




A sheet fol 


ded into 


2 


leaves forms a folio. 


A " 


i (I 


4 


li a 


a quarto or 4to. 


A '' 


C C i 


8 


(C il 


an octavo or 8vo. 


A '' 


I a 


12 


(( n 


a duodecimo or 12mo 


A " 


t a 


18 


li (I 


an 18mo. 


A " 


: cc 


36 


11 t( 


a 36mo, 



ARITHMETIC. 157 

ENGLISH AtONEY. 

4 farthings (far.) = i>?^nny (d.)- 

12 d. =1 .slimiu^Js^)._ 

20 s. =1 pound (£)." 

The pound=$4.86. 

FRENCH MONEY. 

The franc is the unit, tenths being called decimes, and 
hundredths, centimes. 1 franc;=$.186. 

CALIFORNIA MEASURES. 

The following approximate measures may be found of 
practical value: 

A cord of stovewood is a pile 8 ft. long, 4 ft. high, and 
three tiers wide. 

Hay is not dried grasses, as in most of the states, but oats, 
barley, or wheat cut before the grain is fully formed; a ton 
of hay in the stack, well settled, is a cube each of whose 
edges is 8 ft., or 8X8X8=512 cu. ft. If loose on the wagon 
it is 10X10X10=1000 cu. ft. 

4 cu. ft. of unshelled corn^^l cental of shelled corn. If 
loosely thrown in and not settled, 4-| cu. ft.=l cental. 

A square whose edge is 70 paces^l acre. 

Flowing water is measured by the inch in California. 
The inch, however, is not, at present (1887), a fixed unit, 
but varies by custom of the different companies supplying 
water for irrigation or domestic purposes. By statute, the 
inch is the water flowing through a square inch of vertical 
surface, the center of the opening being A\ inches below 
the surface of the reservoir from which the water is flowing. 
The amount is given as 1.394 cubic feet per minute. 

COUNTING TABLE. LONG TON TABLE. 

12 units make 1 dozen (doz.). 28 ft. make 1 quarter. 

12doz. '' 1 gross (gro.). 112" " 1 cwt. 

12 gro. " 1 great gro. 20 cwt. *' IT. 
20 units *' 1 score (sc). 



158 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



ADDITION. 

EXERCISE 194. (Written.) 

1. Add 69 rd. 2^ yd., 1 mi. 14 rd. 2 yd. 2 ft. 3 in., 16 rd. 
9 in., and 25 rd. 11 ft. 

2. Add 7 yd. 2 ft., 5 yd. 1^ ft., 2 ft. 9^ in., 3 yd. 1 ft. 6^ 
in., 2| ft., and 4^ yd. 

3. Add 25 yd. 1 ft. 9 in., 32 yd. 1 ft. 8 in., 35 yd. 6 ft. 4 
in., 7 yd. 2 ft. 11 in., and 9 ft. 

4. Add 23 mi. 118 rd. 14 ft., 19 mi. 137 rd. 11 ft., 8 mi. 
62 ft. 8 in., 23 mi. 147 rd. 6 in., and 9 rd. 7 in. 

5. Add 22 rd. 2 yd. 2 ft., 18 rd. 4 yd. 2 ft., 22 rd. 6 yd. 
1 ft., and 16 rd. 4 ft. 3 in. 

6. Add 7 mi. 59 rd. 6 ft. 7 in., 8 mi. 96 rd. 7 ft. 8 in., 5 
mi. 9 rd. 8 in., 26 mi. 87 rd. 8 ft. 3 in. 

7. Add 71 mi. 23 rd. 4^ yd., 9 mi. 17 rd. 2 yd. 2^ ft., 23 
mi. 3 yd. 9 in. 

8. Add 1^ yd. 3 in., 2 ft. 4 in., and 3^ ft. 

9. Add i yd., ^ ft, and i rd. 

10. Add I mi., ^ rd., ^ yd., and | ft. 

11. Add 79 ch. 3 rd. 16 1., 65 ch. 2 rd. 11 1., 33 ch. 2 rd. 
6 l.,46ch. 1 rd. 13 1., 75 ch 2 1. 

12. Add 75 A. 4 sq. rd. 9 sq. yd. 72 sq. in., 27 A. 48 sq. 
rd. 18 sq. yd. 92 sq. in., 7 A. 100 sq. rd. 29 sq. yd. 8 sq. ft. 
139 sq. in., and 7 sq. yd. 129 sq. in. 

13. Add -| A. and f sq. yd. 

14. Add f A., "I sq. rd., and f of a sq. yd. 

15. Add 5 cd. 7 cd. ft., 2 cd. 2 cd. ft. 12 cu. ft., 6 cd. ft. 
15 cu. ft., 7| cd., 3 cd. 2 cu. ft. 

16. How many cu. yd. and ft. in three bins, the first con- 
taining 95 cu. yd. 26 cu. ft. 985 cu. in., the second, 87 cu. 
yd. 19 cu. ft. 876 cu. in., the third, 98 cu. yd. 3 cu. ft. 875 
cu. in.? 

17. A man buys 3 lots of vinegar; the first is 29 gal. 2 



ARITHMETIC. 159 

qt. 1 pt., the second, 16 gal. 3 qt., the third 11 qt. 1 pt.; 
how much did he huy, and what will it sell for at 10 cents 
a qt. ? 

18. A man sold three lots of beans; the first, 5825 pt., 
the second, 4285 pt., the third, 3426 pt. ; how many bushels 
did he sell, and what did they amount to if retailed at 12^ 
ct. a qt.? 

19. A woman picked in one day 1 bu. 4 qt. 1 pt. of straw- 
berries, the next day, \ bu. 3 qt. 1 pt., the third day, 27 qt. 

1 pt. ; how many qt. boxes can she fill, and what will she 
receive at 12^ ct. a box? 

20. A carpenter worked for $.35 an hour; on Monday he 
worked 9 hr. 15 min., Tuesday 8 hr. 20 min., Wednesday 
11 hr., Thursday 10 hr. 35 min., Friday 9 hr. 45 min., and 
Saturday 6 hr. 50 min.; what did he receive for his week's 
work? 

21. Add 1 doz. 3, 2 gro., 3 doz., 1 sc, 3 gro. 5 doz. 4. 

22. How many sheets in 2 bun. 1 rm. 3 qr., 3 bun., 17 
sheets, 1 bun. 1 qr. ? 

23. A traveler in England spends £6 17s. 5d. in one week, 
the next, £7 lis. 4d., the third, £9 7s. 3d.; how much did 
he spend? 

24. A school girl paid \ dollar for paper, 10 cents for 
pencils, $1,374 for a reader, $.95 for an arithmetic, and $.25 
for a slate; what was the entire cost? 

25. A man sold 4 lots of baled hay; the first weighed 14 
T. 13 cwt. 75 ft)., the second, 25 T. 12 cwt. 26 ft)., the third, 

2 T. 5 cwt. 14 ft)., and the fourth, 17 T. 16 cwt. 29 ft).; how 
much did it all weigh? 

26. Add 84 T. 12 cwt. 74 ft). 6 oz., 23 T. 12 cwt. 26 
ft). 8 oz., 51 T. 16 cwt. 45 ft). 15 oz., 81 T. 5 cwt. 4 ft). 
7 oz. 

27. Three miners have the following amounts of gold 
dust : the first, 5 ft). 9 oz. 14 pwt., the second, 3 ft). 7 oz. 13 
pwt., the third, 2 ft). 4 oz. 11 pwt.; how much have all? 



160 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

SUBTEACTIO]^. 

EXERCISE 195. (Written.) 

1. A man owning a farm of 160 A. sold at one time 25 
A. 74 sq. rd., at another 74| A., and at another \ as much 
as at the first sale; how much had he left? 

2. Take 3 mi. 110 rd. 4 yd. 2 ft. from 7 mi. 25 rd. 3 yd. 4 ft. 

3. Find the difference between two fields: one is 14 ch. 
43 1. by 17 ch. 25 1.; the other, 8 ch. 11 1. by 15 ch. 

4. From 48 cu. yd. 12 cu. ft. 1236 cu. in. take 28 cu. yd. 
24 cu. ft. 1500 cu. in. 

5. From 4 gal. 2 qt. of syrup 1 gal. 3 qt. 1 pt. was drawn; 
what amount was left? 

6. A merchant has two barrels of kerosene, one holding 
Sl-J gal., the other 30 gal. 1 qt. He sold at diff'erent times 
6 gal. 2 qt, 5 gal. 3 qt., 5-J gal., 7f gal., and 28 gal.; what 
did his sales amount to at 27 cents per gallon and what 
amount has he left? 

7. A grocer buys at one time 7 cwt. 11 oz. of tea, at 
another 6 cwt. 38 lb. 7 oz. He sells 11 cwt. 79 lb. 8 oz.; 
what has he left? 

8. From .625 Troy ft. take 4.25 Troy oz. 

9. From 1 cwt. take ^ of ^ of 72 ft. 12 oz. 

10. A silver butter dish weighs 1 ft. 2 oz. 5 pwt., and 1 
doz. teaspoons weigh 11 oz. 17 pwt. 18 gr.; find the differ- 
ence in weight. 

11. From 2 ft. Apothecaries' weight take 9 oz. 1 dr. 2 
scr. 7 gr. 

12. Take 3 yr. 4 da. 3 hr. from 5 yr. 2 mo. 2 wk. 1 da. 7 hr. 

13. From 3 mo. take 2 wk. 4 da. 8 hr. 19 min. 29 sec. 

14. Find the difference in days between the first half of 
the year 1885 and the time from Christmas to the fourth 
of July, 1884-5. 

Note. — Count the day to which, and omit the one from which 
you reckon. 



ARITHMETIC. 161 

15. Find the difference between .659 wk. and 2 wk. 3-J da. 

16. A lady has $729 for house furnishing. She buys 23 
yd. of carpeting at $1.75 per yd., 19 yd. at $1.12| per yd., 
47 yd. at $1.50 per yd., 12 yd. at $.97; 6 chairs at $1.25 
each, 3 at $2.75 each, one for $16, and two for $19 each. 
She spends \ of the remainder for hnen and silver, \ of 
what still remains for kitchen articles; Avhat has she left? 

17. From the sum of -f- of 3^ mi. and 17| rd. take 120^ rd. 

18. How many more seconds from New Years Day to tlie 
Fourth of July, 1885, than in the remainder of the year? 

19. Find the difference between 3 yr. 17 da. 9 hr. 12 min. 
7 sec. multiplied by 4, and 96 yr. 11 mo. 1 wk. 2 da. 4 hr. 
12 min. 16 sec. divided by 3. 

20. From | of 8 T. 16 cwt. 24| ib. take .25 of a T. 

21. From -fj of a sq. rd. take | of a sq. yd. 

22. From £48 17s. 6d. 2 far. take £39 14s. 9d. 3 far. 

23. The latitude of the Cape of Good Hope is 34° 22' and 
that of Cape Horn 55° 58' 40" S.; find their difference. 

24. What is the difference between f^ of a lb. and 5 lb. 
4 oz. 8 pwt.? 

25. Find the difference between £-| and | of |s. 

26. Find the difference in the area of two roofs: one is 
46 ft. square, the other contains 46 sq. ft. 



MULTIPLICATIOIsr. 

EXERCISE 196. (Written.) 

1. Multiply 5 mi. 28 rd. 3 yd. 2 ft. 11 in. by 9. 

2. Multiply 79 ch. 3 rd. 23 1. by 7. 

3. Multiply 158 sq. rd. 27 sq. yd. 7 sq. ft. 138 sq. in. by 11, 

4. MuUiply 98 cd. 13 cu. ft. 758 cu. in. by 13. 

5. Multiply 5T3bl. 29 gal. 3 qt. by 23. 

6. Multiply 7 oz. 17 pwt. 23 gr. by 96. 

7. Multiply 75 centals 15 oz. by 274. 

11— A 



162 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

8. Multiply 9 yr. 7 mo. 3 wk. 5 da. 19 hr. 35 niin. 28 sec. 
by 63. 

9. What is the length of a fence inclosing a square field 
one side of which is 17 rd. 3 yd. 2^ ft. long? 

10. If a hogshead of sugar weighs 7 cwt. 29 ib. 4 oz., 
what will 9 hhd. be worth at 9^ ct. per pound? 

11. A letter carrier travels 5 mi. 19 rd. 4 yd. each trip; 
how far does he go in the month of January, mail being 
delivered twice each day, four Sundays excepted ? 

12. A Avorkman drinks a pint l)ottle of wine each day in 
the year, which costs him 25 cents per bottle; how much 
has he drunk in 13 years, three of them being leap years, 
and what has it cost him? 

13. His wife buys a pint of milk per day at $1.25 per 
month for the same time; which costs the most and how 
much ? 

14. $125 buys 5 A. 24 rd. 19 sq. yd. 7 sq. ft. of land; what 
will $1375 buy? 

15. A lady has 17 silver spoons, each one weighs 5 pwt. 
6 gr.; how much do they all Aveigh? 



DITISIOK. 

EXERCISE 197. (Written.) 

1. Divide 9 mi. 78 rd. 4 yd. 2 ft. 8 in. by 9. 

2. Divide 68 ch. 2 rd. 24 1. by 6. 

3. Divide 296 sq. rd. 29 sq. yd. 8 sq. ft. 98 sq. in. by 16. 

4. Divide 97 cd. 11 cu. ft. 979 cu. in. by 28. 

5. Divide 23 bbl. 28 gal. 3 qi by 19. 

6. Divide 56 lb. 11 oz. 19 pwt. 21 gr. by 15. 

7. Divide 87 cwt. 13 oz. by 95. 

8. Divide 24 yr. 11 mo. 2 wk. 3 da. 11 hr. 47 min. by 17. 

9. If 294 sacks of walnuts weigh 20600 lb. what is the 
average weight? 



ARITHMETIC. 163 

10. If two coops of fowls Aveigh 340 ft). 11 oz. and there 
are 27 fowls in a coop, what is the average weight? 

11. If a township 6 mi. sq. he divided into 62 equal 
farms, how much land does each contain? 

12. The area of a piece of land is 39 sq. rd. 2 sq. yd. 6 
sq. ft. 128 sq. in. Its length is 11 rd. 2 ft. 8 in.; what is its 
width? 

13. If 4 men work 5 days to remove 120 cu. yd. 5 cu. ft. 
of earth, how much does one man remove in a day? 

14. How many cups holding one half pt. each can a restau- 
rant keeper fill from a coffee urn holding 2 gal. 3 qt. 1 pt.? 

15. How many steel rails 30 ft. long are needed to build 
one mile of railroad ? 



REVIEW. 



EXERCISE 198. (Written.) 

1. A car wheel is 4 ft. 5 in. in circumference and revolves 
59 times a minute; how far does it go in 2 hr. 55 min. ? 

2. How many cu. yd. of earth have been removed to 
make an irrigating ditch 1 mi. 8 rd. long, 3 ft. wide, and 
2 ft. deep. 

2 Metric. How many cu. yd. of earth have been removed 
to make an irrigating ditch 1649.58 meters long, .914 meters 
wide, and .609 meters deep? 

3. A man sells wheat at .$1.50 per cental and receives 
$855.95; how much wheat has he sold? 

4. If a horse averages a mile in 11 min. 45 sec. how far 
does he go in a day of 11 hr. ? 

4 Metric. If a horse averages 1609.34 meters in 11 min. 
45 sec, how far does he go in 11 hr. ? 

5. How many cu. ft. in the drawers of a school desk, one 
of them 3 ft. 2 in. long, 2 ft. 10 in. wide, and 5 in. deep, the 
other 1 ft. 4 in. wide, 3 ft. long, 5 in. deep? 



164 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

5 Metric. Find the cubic contents of the drawers of a 
school desk: one is .965 meters long, .863 meters wide, and 
.127 meters deep, the other .91 meters long, .406 meters 
wide, and .127 meters deep. 

6. How many square feet in the surface of two blocks of 
stone, one 4 ft. in each dimension and the other 3 ft. long, 
2 ft. 4 in. wide, and 1 ft. thick? 

7. In a section of land how many sq. in.? 

7 Metric. In a section of land how many hektares? 

8. In a pile of wood 16 ft. long, 3-i ft. wide, and 5 ft. high, 
how many cd.? 

8 Metric. In a pile of wood 4.87 meters long, 1.06 meters 
wide, and 1.52 meters high, how many steres? 

9. If a field 260 rd. long contains 9| A. what is its 
width? 

10. How many spoons weighing 16 pwt. 11 gr. can be 
made from 5 ft). 1 pwt. 11 gr. of silver? 

10 Metric. How many spoons weighing 25.649 grams 
can be made from 1872.4 grams of silver? 

11. From 7 yr. take 1 mo. 2 wk. 3 da. 11 hr. 35 min. 42 sec. 

12. At 12| cents apiece what cost posts to fence a ranch 
480 rd. long and 330 rd. wide, posts set 24| ft. apart? 

13. What will it cost to put three wires around the same 
ranch, if the wire is worth 5^ cents per ft), and weighs 1| 
ft), to the rod ? 

14. A bbl. of kerosene holding 32 gal. loses Mi by 
evaporation. One half of the remainder is sold at $.29 
per gal., ^ of that remainder at $.27 per gal., and 8 gal. 3 
qt. at $.26 a gal., and the balance at $.28 per gal. It cost 
$.17 per gal. Find the gain. 

15. Reduce 660 ft. to the decimal of a mile. 

16. A ranchman buys 4 sets of harness at $31.75 apiece, 
a wagon for $175, a bbl. of sugar for $17.50, and grain sacks 
to the amount of $18.42; how much wheat at $1.50 per 
cental will it take to pay the bill ? 



ARITHMETIC. 165 

17. From a pile of wood containing 8964 cu. ft., 9^ cd. 
were sold at one time and 7^ at another; find the worth of 
the remainder at $7.25 i)er cd. 

17 Metric. A pile of wood contained 253.736413 steres; 
33.514492 steres were sold at one time and 27.173913 at 
another; what is the remainder worth at $2,001 per stere? 

18. If a herder averages 7 mi. 148 rd. travel in a day, 
how much does he travel in a year? 

18 Metric. If a herder averages 1609.372 meters a day, 
how far does he go in a year? 

19. From f ft).+4f oz.+31^ pwt, take (f oz.— | pwt.). 

20. How many dollars of 25.8 gr. can be made from 2 
ft). 6 oz. 17 pwt. 12 gr. of gold? 

20 Metric. How many dollars of 1.6753 grams can be 
made from 961.5584 grams of gold? 

21. If 6 cu. yd. 2| cu. ft. of earth are used in grading 
one rod of street, how much will be used in grading 16| 
blocks, allowing 12 blocks to a mile? 

22. A milkman starts out with 9 six-gallon cans of milk. 
He delivers a pt. each to 35 customers, 1 qt. each to 48, 2 
qt. each to 69. He sells \ of what is left, lacking one pt., 
to a boarding-house keeper; how much remains unsold? 

23. How many cu. ft. in a wall one rod long, 5^ ft. high, 
and 1 ft. thick? 

24. How many lots 45 by 150 feet can be made from 10 
A., allowing one fourth for streets? 

25. At $1.60 an ounce what is the value of 2 doz. spoons, 
each weighing 11 pwt. 23 gr. ? 

25 Metric. At $.50 for 31.168 grams what is the value of 
2 doz. spoons, each spoon weighing 18.636 grams? 

26. A cistern holds 98 bbl. If 4 gal. run in by one pipe 
in a minute, and 6 gal. run out in the same time by another, 
how long will it be in emptying ? 

27. A man owning a quarter section of land, gave a piece 
17 rd. square as a church site; how much has he left? 



166 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

28. What must be paid for a pile of wood 15 ft. long, 4 
ft. high, 4 ft. wide, at $9.75 per cd. ? 

29. The small wheel of a bicycle is 3 ft. in circumfer- 
ence, and the large wheel 8 ft. and 3 in.; how many more 
times does the small wheel turn than the large one in going 
a mile? 

30. From -| A. take 79 sq. rd. 7 sq. yd. 6 sq. ft. 98 sq. in. 

31. How much carpeting | of a yd. wide will it take to 
carpet a room 14 ft. by 27 ft., the breadths to run crosswise? 

32. At $.32 a square yard, what will it cost to plaster a 
room 11 ft. 3 in. by 15 ft., and 9 ft. high, deducting one half 
the surface of two doors each 3 ft. wide and 6 ft. 8 in. high, 
and 3 windows each 2|- ft. wide and 6 ft. high ? 

33. How many cu. ft. in a tank 9 ft. 3 in. long, 6 ft. 4 in. 
wide, 4 ft. 9 in. deep, inside measurement? 

34. From ^ of 2 A. 159 sq. rd. 13 sq. yd. 4 sq. ft. 138 sq. 
in. take 100 sq. rd. 24 sq. yd. 7 sq. ft. 96 sq. in. 

35. If a celebration on the Fourth of July begins at 10 
o'clock A. M. in Chicago, at what hour must it begin at Los 
Angeles to be at the same time ? 

36. Buenos Ayres is longitude 58° 22' W., and the Cape 
of Good Hope 18° 28' E. ; when it is 6 hr. 30 min. a. m. in 
Buenos Ayres, what is the time at the Cape of Good Hope? 

37. If you sleep 9 hr. each night, what decimal part of 
your time are you asleep? 

38. Add I mi., i rd., f ft. 

38 Metric. Add 1005.84 meters, 1.67 meters and .25 
meters. 

39. If a tank, containing 105 cu. ft., is 7 ft. long and 4 
ft. deep, what is its width? 

40. At 6 cents a square foot, what will it cost for the 
wainscoting of a room 16 ft. wide and 22 ft. long, if ih'e 
wainscot is 2 ft. 10 in. high, deducting for 3 doors, which, 
with their casings, are each 4 ft. 11 in. wide? 

41. How much will it take to carpet a room 18 ft. wide 



ARITHMETIC. 167 

■ 22 ft. long, if the carpeting is | yd. wide, and the breadths 
run across the room? 

41 Metric. How much wdll it take to carpet a room 5.48 
meters wide, 6.70 meters long, with carpet .68 meters wide? 

42. How much carpet a yard wide will carpet a room 11 
ft. 11 in. wide, and 17 ft. 10 in. long, if the breadths run 
lengthwise ? 

43. How much will it cost to carpet a church with yard 
wide carpeting at $1.50 per yd., the auditorium being 60 ft. 
wide and 80 ft. long, breadths running lengthwise, and 10 
yd. extra allowed for the pulpit platform; one parlor being 
20 ft. wide and 24 ft. long, the other 20 ft. wide and 36 ft. 
long, breadths running crosswise in both parlors? 

44. A stage is robbed of two bars of bullion Aveighing 170 
lb. each, worth $3700.00; how much is it worth an ounce? 

45. What wdll it cost to carpet a room 17 ft. wide and 26 
ft. long, with carpet | yd. wide, at $2.75 per yd., allowing 
yV of a yd. for matching, if the breadths run across the 
room, and a border of 1 ft. wide is used, costing $1.95 per 
yard? How much border will it take? 

46. What part of a yard is yttt of a mile? 

47. Reduce to lower denominations |- of .225 of a mile. 

48. Reduce yf of a cd. ft. to the fraction of a cd. 

49. What will it cost to paper a room 16 ft. wide, 22 ft. 
long, 9 ft. high, with paper at $.87-| per roll, 8 yd. in a roll 
and H ft. wide, allowing 20 sq. yd. for doors, windows, and 
baseboards ? 

50. A man having 2 T. 7 cwt. 28 lb. of hay, sold 5 cvd. 
91 ib.; what fraction of the whole did he sell? 

51. A man has a piece of land 360 ft. long containing 
396 sq. rd. 21 sq. yd.; he is offered $605 an acre; but he 
runs a 10-foot alley lengthwise through the piece and di- 
vides it into 16 equal lots, which he sells at $175 each; 
what is the size of his lots, and what does he gain? 





f^ 








q3 


a. 
I— 1 
1 — 1 


oi 






bb 


s 


r-H 


S 


C5 


o 


• 1— 1 


s 


r^ 


CD 


^ 


^ 


o 


fl 



168 CALIFORNIA SERIES, 



UNITED STATES MONEY. 

United States money is written decimally, the dollar be- 
ing the unit. Five decimal places have been named. 

The mill is not represented by any 
coin. Results should be carried to hun- 
dredths only. 

Gouverneur Morris first recommended 
making our money in decimal divisions; afterward Jeffer- 
son and Hamilton improved upon his plan. 

The Spanish silver dollar was chosen as the unit, and 
coinage commenced in 1792. 

Gold and silver are soft, hence the coins are now alloyed 
with y^Q- of some other metal to harden them. In gold 
coins the alloy is a mixture of silver and copper; the dollar 
weighs 25.8 grains, and all other coins are multiples of this 
weight. They are 2-|-, 3-, 5-, 10-, and 20-dollar pieces. 

Silver coins are alloyed with copper. The dollar weighs 
412^ grains; the smaller coins are lighter; thus, 2 half dol- 
lars, 4 quarters, 10 dimes, or 20 half dimes weigh but 385.8 
grains. The half dime is now made of nickel and copper, 
and the 2- and 1-cent pieces of copper. 

i=.m i=.20 i=.SSi |=.87i j\=Mi 

i=Mi i=AO i=.14f tV=-08^ TV-=-06i 

|=.66f |=.60 i=.12i fV=-41| A-.18I 

3 T^i 1 1fi2 5 a<r>l IX 012 _7_. 

4 -'-^ 6" -L"3 8 ^-2 T2 '^^S IG 



EXERCISE 199. 

1. At $.16f per pound, what will 96 ib. of coffee cost? 

$.16i=$i. 96X'1^i-='n6. 

2. How many doz. eggs at $.12-^ per doz. can be bought 

for $2.75? 

$.12^=$i n.75~H=22 doz. 



ARITILVETIC. 169 

3. What will 128 centals of wheat cost at $1.25 per 
cental? 

$.25=i iXl28=32. 128+32=$160. 

4. Find the cost of 8576 bricks at $9 per thousand. 

8576--1000=8.576 
8.576X9=$77.184 

5. What will 7864 ft. of hay cost at $12.00 per T.? 

7894--1000=7.894 
7.894--2=3.947 T. 
3.947 X12=$46.364. 

6. AVhat part of 100 is 33^? What part is 8|? 37^? 

7. What part of 100 is 87^? 6f? 16;i? 

8. What is i of 100? I of 100? | of 100? 

9. What is I of 100? yV of 100? j\ of 100? 

10. What part of 100 is 411? 

11. What will 10 yd. of cotton cloth cost at 12^ cents 
per yd.? 

12. Find the cost of 6 centals of w^heat at $1.16f per 
cental. 

13. A lady paid $12.00 for cloth at $.16f per yard; how 
many yards did she buy? 

14. Find the cost of 720 ft. of soap at $.08^. 

15. How many yards of cloth at $1.33^ per yard can be 
bought for $128.00? 

16. What will 248 dozen eggs cost at $.374 per dozen? 

17. At $1.62| apiece how many histories can be bought 
for $2613.00? 

18. What will 7 cords of wood cost at $9.75 per cord ? 

19. At $11 per cwt. how much sugar can be bought for 
$44? 

20. What will 500 bricks cost at $8 per thousand ? 

21. What will 5500 ft. of boards cost at $22 per thousand ? 

22. At $.06| per pound how much honey can be bought 
for $16? 

23. How many books at $1.25 apiece will $48.75 buy? 



170 CALIFORNIA SEEIES. 

24. What will 874 grain sacks cost at 6:j cents apiece? 

25. When beeswax is $.25 per ib. how many pounds will 
$16 buy? 

26. What cost 84 lb. of veal at 12-J cents per pound? 

27. At $.12:| per yd. what will 648 yd. of gingham cost? 

28. How much alfalfa seed at $.12^ per pound can be 
bought for $19? 

29. What will 976 boxes of limes cost at $.75 per box? 

30. What Avill be the cost of 879 centals of wheat at 
$1.40 per cental? 

31. At $.87-2 pel* yard how much flannel can be bought 
for $40? 

32. A hotel keeper spends $9.33^ for spring chickens at 
$.66f apiece; how many does he buy? 

33. What will 376 dozen eggs cost at $.37-J per dozen? 

34. At 6| cents apiece how many paper bags can a con- 
fectioner buy for $32? 

35. When hay is $12.75 per ton how many tons will $357 
buy? 

36. Find the cost of 7212 lb. of evaporated apples at 8^ 
cents per ib. 

37. At $1.25 per yard what will 18 yd. of silk cost? 

38. What will 189 lb. of coffee cost at $.33^ per pound? 

39. How many pounds of tea at $.62^ per lb. can a grocer 
buy for $26.87^? 

40. How many sheep at $4.75 apiece can be bought for $95? 

41. At $1.87^ per sack what will 408 sacks of flour cost? 

42. At $1,625 per yd. what will 248 yd. of silk cost? 

43. A dealer buys butter for $.87^ a roll to the amount 
of $100; how many rolls does he buy? 

44. What will 249 yd. of velvet cost at $2.66S per yard ? 

45. At $.83^ per yard what will 726 yards of cashmere 
cost? 

46. What will 97856 feet of boards cost at $19.00 per 
thousand ? 



ARITHMETIC. 171 

47. Find the cost of 785409 bricks at $8.00 per thousand? 

48. At $6.00 per cwt. what will 9856 ib. of beef cost? 

49. What will 764398 lb. of flour cost at $2.40 per cwt.? 

50. Find the cost of 43986 lb. of coal at $.70 per cwt. 

51. A man paid $95.00 for freight on wool at $1.25 per 
cwt.; how much wool had he? 

52. What is the freight on 7543 lb. of merchandise at 
$2.50 per cwt. ? 

53. What will 98756 lb. of hay cost at $12.00 per ton? 

54. How many pounds in a load of coal which costs $8.00, 
when coal is $12.00 per T.? 

55. What is the value of 3 loads of hay weighing respect- 
ively 1975, 1125, and 1240 pounds, at $12.75 per T.? 

56. How many dollars can be made from one lb. of pure 
gold ? 

57. How many dollars can be made from one ib. of pure 
silver? 

58. How many dollars can be made from 7 lb. 11 oz. 18 
pwt. 3 gr. of pure silver? 

59. How many dollars can be made from 1 lb. 1 pwt. 21 
gr. of pure gold? 

60. How many eagles can be made from 2 lb. 3 pwt. 18 
gr. of pure gold? 

61. How many half dollars can be made from 6 lb. 6 
pwt. 18 gr. of pure silver? 

62. How many quarters can be made from 1 lb. 6 oz. 1 
pwt. 164 gr. of pure silver? 

63. How many dimes can be made from 3 lb. 3 pwt. 9 
gr. of pure silver? 

64. A bar of silver bullion is .975 pure; how many half 
dollars can be made from it? Weight 9 lb. 2 oz. 8 pwt. 

65. How many $2^ pieces can be made from 3 lb. 8 oz. 
11 pwt. of gold bullion? 



172 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



GENERAL ANALYSIS. 

When several successive operations in multiplication and 
division are to be performed in the same example, each 
operation may be determined by ordinary analysis and 
indicated by placing the number concerned above or below 
the division line. Thus, , 

If 15 acres of land cost $620, what are 12 acres worth at 
the same rate? 

OPERATION. Analysis, — If 15 acres cost $620, 1 acre costs 

-'- ^ "^ '^ ^ of $620, or ^^. 12 acres cost 12 times 1 

$020x;2 ...r ^^ ^^ 

-.rv-^=-^49 6 i|;620 ,^ $620X12 ^. . . 

ip acre, or -^r— xl2 = -^ — r^ — . The work is 

^ lo lo 

shortened by cancellation. 

If 18 tons of coal cost $189, how many tons can be bought 
for $105? 

OPERATION. . T^ 1 J n i, 1 

Analysis. — For 1 dollar you can buy -^t^ 
2 5 -^ ' 189 

18 
18X10^^ ^ of 18 tons, or — — tons ; and for 105 dollars 

/V^ ' =^l tons. ^<^J 

189 T^- ,. 18, 18x105. 

'^ ^ ' lOo times 7—-, tons, or — tt^— tons. 

If 200 bushels of oats will last 30 horses 50 days, how 

long will 150 bushels last 45 horses? 

operation. Analysis. — 200 bushels last 50 

2 5 JL^ days; 1 bushel will last ^ of 50 

^0X;f50X'S0 ^^ , 50 

200X45 ~ days, days, or ^-^^ days, and 150 bushels, 

o Q ,_^ ,. , 50x150 

f p loO tunes as many days, or — ^^^ — 

days ; this is the number of days for 30 horses, for 1 horse 30 times 

, 50x150x30 , A t Ar X. 1 

as many davs, or .^rr; days, and for 45 horses -r= as many 

J . 200 ' 45 "^ 

, , 50x150x30 , 

days as one horse, or — -^-^r^ — r^r— davs. 
•^ 200 x4o 



ARITHMETIC. 173 

Observe that in these examples, one number is of the 
same kind as the answer sought, and the others are in 
hke pairs. In the last example, 50 is like the answer, days. 
Then there are two numbers of bushels, and two of horses. 
The first two examples have one pair each, beside the num- 
ber tliat is like the answer. 

The following is a short statement of the method: Begin 
with the number like the answer; then in each pair reason 
from the given number of the pair to 1, and from 1 to the 
number required. 

The results all the way through are like the required 
answer. 

EXERCISE 200. (Written.) 

1. If 18 sheep are worth $45, what are 30 sheep worth at 
the same rate ? 

2. If 7 men dig a ditch in 15 days, how long will it take 
15 men? 

3. If 48 rods of fence cost $108, what wall 84 rods cost? 

4. If a locomotive goes 564 miles in 24 hours, how far 
will it go in 22 hours? 

5. If 160 A. of land produce 96 tons of wheat, how many 
tons will 175 A. produce? 

6.* If 75 A. of land produce 50 tons of wheat, how many 
A. will produce 18 tons? .^ 

7. If 50 chairs cost $112.50, how many chairs can be 
bought for $90? 

8. If 8f yd. of cloth cost $17.50, what will 12^ yd. cost? 

9. If 12 men earn $78 in 4 days, how many men will earn 
$58-| in the same time? 

10. If 18 men can do a piece of work in 32 days, how 
many men will do it in 24 days? 

11. If the freight for transporting 18 cwt. of household 
goods from San Jose to Los Angeles is $61.20, what will it 
cost to transport 42 cwt. ? 

12. If 30 gal. of oil cost $3.75, what cost 100 gal.? 



174 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

13. If a man can perform a journey in 14 days of 10 
hours each, how many days of 12 hours each will he need 
to do the same? 

14. If 12 cows can be bought for $486, for how much can 
22 cows be bought? 

15. When 12 cows cost $486, how many cows can be 
bought for $891? 

16. If 9^ yd. of broadcloth cost $44^, how many yd. will 
cost $33i ? 

17. If it costs $720 to transport 12 tons of freight 480 
miles, what will it cost to transport 15 tons 300 miles? 

18. If 16 men earn $640 in 4 wk., Avhat will 18 men earn 
in 2 wk.? 

19. If 130 ft), of tea cost $117, what will 80 ft), cost? 

20. If a pasture will feed 120 horses 81 da., how many 
horses will it feed 108 da.? 

21. If 12 men in 12 da. of 9 hr. each can perform a cer- 
tain piece of work, how many days of 8 hr. each will it take 
9 men? 

22. How many lb. of sugar can you buy for $380 if 20 
ft), cost $1.90? 

23. If it takes 27 yd. of carpeting f of a yd. wide to car- 
pet a certain room, how many yards of 1 yd. wide carpeting 
will it take ? » 

24. If 9i\ yd. of cloth -| of a yd. wide cost $11.40, what 
will 10 yd. 1^ yd. wide cost? 

25. If 6 bbl. of flour last 80 men 12 da., how long will 9 
bbl. last 60 men? 

26. If a doz. brooms cost $4.50, how many brooms can 
you get for $3.37^? 

27. IIow many men will build 35 rd. of wall in the same 
time that 6 men build 42 rd.? 

28. If 7 men dig a ditch 28 feet long in 2 da. of 8 hr. 
each, how many da. of 10 hr. each will it take 10 men to 
dig a ditch 25 ft. long? 



ARITHMETIC. 175 

29. If it cost $42 to plaster the ceiling of a room 14 ft. 
long and 12 ft. wide, what will it cost for a room 16 ft. long 
and 14 ft. wide? 

30. If 11^ lb. of coffee cost $3.45, what will 10^ lb. cost? 

31. When the shadow of a post 10 ft. 6 in. high is 12 ft. 3 
in. long, what is the length of shadow of a post 8 ft. 9 in. 
high ? 

32. The shadow of a post 16 ft. 3 in. high is 5 ft. 5 in. 
long; what height of post will give a shadow 3 ft. 4 in. 
long? 

33. If 4 men huild 12^ rd. of fence in 3^ da., how long 
will it take 18 men to build 237i% rd.? 

34. If a tank 36 in. long, 22 in. wide, and 7 in. deep 
holds 24 gal., how much will a tank 3 ft. 8 in. long, 1 ft. 2 
in. wide, and 1 ft. deep hold ? 

35. If H of an acre of land is worth $198, what are -J of 
an acre worth? 

36. At the rate of 14 lb. for $1, what will 8 bbl. of sugar 
averaging 259 lb. to a barrel cost? 

37. How many oranges at 15 cents a dozen will pay for 
7 5-gallon cans of kerosene at $f a gallon ? 

38. I buy a certain quantity of rice at $4.50 per lOO lb. 
and pay for it with 717 ft. of pine lumber at $15 per M; 
what weight of rice did I buy? 

39. A farmer bought grain bags worth 7-i cents each for 
150 sacks of oats averaging 125 lb. each at $1.20 a cental; 
how many grain bags did he receive ? 

40. Sold a newspaper proprietor 3 bun. of paper, 60 lb. 
each, at 7 cents per pound, for which he agreed to furnish 
me his daily paper delivered at 15 cents per week; how 
long did I receive his paper ? 

41. Bought 12 doz. glass jars at $1.75 and paid for them 
in potatoes at 1^ cents a lb. ; how many 80-pound sacks did 
I give ? 



176 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



PROPORTION. 

Examples in General Analysis will be seen to contain one 
number of the same kind as the thing required in the 
answer, while the other numbers are arranged in pairs. 

A formula or statement called a Proportion is sometimes 
used in such examples, to precede the performing of the 
work and take the place of the logical and proper analysis 
of the example. 

3 days is what fraction of 12 days? $4 is what fraction 
of $24 ? 9 horses of 16 horses ? 

A ratio is a fraction whose terms are of the same kind. 
Thus, J 2" o^' 4 expresses the ratio of 3 to 12, or of 3 days to 
12 days. 

Review Exercise 137, examples 1 to 16, reading, " What 
is the ratio of 8 to 20?" Substitute concrete terms; thus, 
8 men to 20 men. 

A ratio is often written by using two dots between the 
terms. Thus, the ratio of 8 to 20 is written 8 : 20. 

What is the ratio of 6 to 9 in its lowest terms? Of 12 to 
18? What can you say of these two ratios? We will write 
them equal. f-:||, or (6 : 9) = (12 : 18). 

Two equal ratios form a proportion. 

In the written expression four dots ( : : ) are often used for 
the sign =. 

The first and last terms of a proportion are the extremes ; 
the second and third, the means. 

In any proportion the product of the means equals the 
product of the extremes; thus, 9X1^=6X18. Hence, the 
product of the means divided by one extreme will give the 
other extreme; or, the product of the extremes divided by 
one mean will give the other mean. Thus, 



ARITHMETIC. Ill 

9X12_ 9X12 ^ 6X18__ ^ 6X18 _ 

' 6 ~ ' 18 ~'' 9 ~^^- 12 



To determine and write a proportion. 

If 15 A. of land are worth $620, what are 12 A. worth? 

OPERATION. Explanation. — $620 is like the required 

15:12::620:? answer. 15 and 12 are A. The ratio of 15 A. 
12x620 to 12 A. must be the same as the cost of 15 A., 

=4 J 6. ^(320, to the cost of 12 A.; or, as written above. 
Soh^e as in Anah^sis. 



15 



To arrange the terms, 

1. Place the number which is hke the required answer 
for the third term; 

2. If, in the nature of the problem, the answer ought to 
be larger than the third term, arrange the pair so that the 
second term shall be larger than the first,- but if the answer 
should be smaller than the third term, let the smaller of 
the two numbers be the second term. Then divide the 
product of the means by the given extreme. 

Sometimes the result depends upon the relations of sev- 
eral pairs, producing a compound proportion. In such case 
consider the result with reference to each pair separately, 
as in simple proportion. 

Thus, in the third analysis. General Analysis, consider 
first the horses alone; then the bushels alone. 

45: 30 1 _-^ . 
200: 150 \ — ^^- • 

30X150X5 0_^K 
45X200 • ' 

For work, perform the examples in General Analysis. 
12— A 



178 CALIFORNtA SERIES. 



PARTNERSHIP. 

Two men paid $6 for a pasture 1 month. If each puts in 
2 coAVS what should each pay? If one puts in 2 cows and 
the other 1 cow what should each pay? If the first had 
his 2 cows in pasture 4 weeks and the second his 1 cow 
only 2 weeks how much should each pay? 

Thus, we see that each man's share of the expense de- 
pends upon the product of the number of cows pastured 
and the time, if the times are different. 

An association of two or more persons together in busi- 
ness is called Partnership. 

The persons associated are called partners. 

The money subscribed is called the capital or stock. 

Each partner receives the same part or fraction of the 
losses or gains that his capital is of the whole capital in- 
vested, if all invest for the same time; if for different times, 
each partner's capital must be nuiltiplied by the time it is 
in use and the product taken as his share of the capital; 
the sum of these products being taken as the entire capital, 
provided no special division has been agreed upon. 

Property of all kinds owned by a firm are its assets. 

Its debts are liabilities. 

EXERCISE 201. (Written.) 

Find out, if you can, how to prove these examples and 
prove each. 

1. Two men enter into partnership in the grocery busi- 
ness. A furnishes $2500 capital; B, $1500. Their gain 
the first year was $1840. Find the share of each. 

2. A and B trade together. A furnishes -^ of the capi- 
tal; B, the remainder. Divide their loss of $637 fairly. 

3. Two men hire a pasture for $96. One pastures 40 



ARITHMETIC. 179 

sheep for 11 weeks; the other, Qi) sheep 8 weeks. What 
should each pay? 

4. Two men engaged in the clothing business with a joint 
capital of '$6000. The first year's gain was $2892, of which 
one received $964. AVhat amount of capital did each furnish? 

5. Three men engage in business. A puts in $2000 the 
first of January; B $3000 the first of March; and C $4000 
the first of April. The profits at the close of the year of 
$6045 will be shared how ? 

6. Divide $195 among 3 boys, giving them 3, 4, and 6 
parts respectively. 

7. A bankrupt owes A $1000, B $1500, C $1800, D $2000, 
and E $2700. His assets are $6000. What sum can he 
pay each? 

8. A man has $5175 and owes $6210; what can he pay 
on every $1 he owes? What will a man to whom he owes 
$1320 receive? 

9. A, B, and C sent a ship loaded with Wellington coal 
to San Francisco. A put on board 180 tons, B 250 tons, 
and C 400 tons. On account of storm 249 tons Avere thrown 
overboard; find the loss of each. 

10. In a certain firm B has 3 times as much capital as 
A, and C has ^ as much as the other two. What is each 
one's share in a loss of $786? 

11. In a gain of $600 A received -i, B |-, and C the re- 
mainder. If the whole capital was 12 times A's gain what 
was the capital of each? 

12. Two men receive $1000 for grading. One furnishes 
3 teams 20 days and the other 5 teams 30 days. If the 
first receives $100 for overseeing the work what does each 
receive ? 

13. Two men contract to move 5316 cu. yds. of gravel at 
25 cents a cu. yd., and agree to share the profits in the pro- 
portion of 2 to 3. They employ 5 teams 45 days at $4 each 
per day. What did each make ? 



180 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

14. Divide 1728 in the proportion of 3, 4, and 5. 

15. Three men have wheat of different grades in a ware- 
house. A has 1200 centals worth $1.10; B has 800 centals 
worth $1.25; C has 1600 centals worth $1.12^ The wheat 
being damaged, the whole was sold for $3090. Find each 
one's share. 

EXERCISE 202. (Oral.) 

1. Divide 75 cents among 3 boys, giving to the first 3 
cents as often as to the second 5 cents and the third 7 cents. 

2. Albert and James buy a book together costing $1.50, 
of which Albert paid 50 cents and James the rest. They 
afterwards sell it for 75 cents. What should each receive? 

3. A lady gave $2 to her children aged 8 and 12 in pro- 
portion to their ages. What did each receive? 

4. Three girls bought $l's worth of oranges; the first 
receiving ^, the second ^, and the third the rest. How 
much money did each contribute? 

5. I hire a pasture, in company with a friend, for $65. 
I pasture 8 cows 4 months; my friend, 11 cows 3 months. 
What is his share of the expense? 

6. Divide 50 cents in the proportion of \ and -|. 

7. I owe $2000 and have $1500. How much can I pay 
for every dollar owed ? 

8. What will a man whom I owe $100 receive? 

9. A man leaves $5000 to his two sons in the inverse 
ratio of their ages, 15 and 10. Find what each had. 

10. Two men in partnership lose $800, of which the first 
bears $500. Their capital was $2400; what capital did 
each furnish? 

11. Divide 45 marbles with two companions so that one 
shall receive 2 to your 1, and the other 3 to your 2. 

EXERCISE 203. (Written.) 

Form 10 Partnership examples of your own, perform, 
and bring to the class for dictation. 



ARITHMETIC. 181 



PERCENTAGE. 

Review Exercises 139, 137, 123, and examples 13 to 20, 
Exercise 136. 

W nat is y o^-Q 01 Duu .'^ ttju- tfo- too- loo- loo- 
lo is y-Q^ or wiiai : yoo- lOO- loo- loo- loo- 

Per cent means hundredths {irom.'per centum, by the 
hundred). Thus, yf o, or .03, is 3 per cent. y^o> oi' -O'^^ is 
5 per cent. 

The word rate is sometimes used for per cent. 

That number of which anothei* is a fraction or per cent 
is called the base. 

Name the base in the above illustrations. 

Rewrite the above illustrations, using the term per cent 
instead of the denominator 100, with the answers following. 

Thus,What is 1 per cent of 600 f Ans. 6. 

The sign % means per cent. 

EXERCISE 204. (Written.) 
Rewrite the following in decimal and common forms, 
and reduce the common form to lowest terms. 
Thus, Q%=.OQ=jU--^i\. 



6 per 


cent. 


14f% 


5|% 


Qi% 


i% 


9 " 




4S% 


1\% 


^i% 


i% 


12 " 




114% 


^% 


m% 


2\% 


15 '' 




n% 


^% 


16|% 


%% 


18 '' 




i% 


5|% 


30% 


\% 


22 '' 




\\% 


22h% 


SSi% 


^% 


27 " 




12% 


17i% 


37^% 


Si% 


32 " 




85% 


13^% 


m% 


i% 


36 " 




84% 


23i% 


66f% 


87i% 


Q 1 " 
^TT 




96% 


21i% 


83i% 


i% 



Practice on the last two columns until familiar. 



182 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

EXERCISE 205. (Oral.) 
Name the corresponding fractions in lowest terms. 



b% 25% 


45% 




65% 




85% 


4% 


7% 30% 


50% 




70% 




90% 


100% 


10% 35% 


55% 




75% 




95% 


i% 


20% 40% 


60% 




80% 




2% 


t\% 




EXERCISE 


206. 


(Written.) 






How many lOOths, or %, 


are 










i i 


5 3 

6 800 




2 

7 


7 
1 1 


1 

16 


3 
41 


2 _1_ 

3 1 2 


1 3 

16 400 




5 

T9- 


4 
9 


1 3 

2 00 


7 
45 


"1 ^io" 


5 7 
8 400 




4 

T3" 


5 
16 


1 1 

900 


12 
61 


"e 8 300 150 




3 

22 


1 1 
12 


4 
21 


9 
¥0- 



Drill on the first four columns until familiar. 

EXERCISE 207. (Oral.) 
How many lOOths, or %, are: 



i 


1 
25" 


1 

80 


7 
50 


4 
5 


3 
40 


f 


7 
"21T 


i 


1 
30 


3 
4 


3 
5 


9 
TO" 


4J 


5 


24 
"25" 


1 

5" 


1 
4-0" 


2 
"5 


tV 


7 
25 


4 

25 


6 
25 


1 1 
50 


1 
TO" 


^V 


A 


1 1 

2 


13 
20 


21 
50 


li 


^ 


A 


tV 


3 

2 


8 

"25" 


9 
5 


19 
2 


li 


4 



EXERCISE 208. (Written.) 

Change the fractions in Exercise 123 to lOOths, and re- 
write the examples, using ''per cent" instead of " lOOths." 
Thus, in Example 1, |=tW- hence, rewrite thus, 

What cost 75 per cent of a yard of cloth at 20 cents a yard? 

Same with Exercise 160, orally. 

EXERCISE 209. (Written.) 

Rewrite in fractional form, and analyze, using the deci- 
mal and common forms: 

1. $75 is 3 per cent of what sum? 

2. What is 25% of $1728? 

3. $750 is 20% of what? 

4. $640 is what per cent of $3200? 



ARITHMETIC. 183 

5. What is t% of $9900? 

6. $75 is 1^% of what sum? 

7. $25.92 is U% of what sum? 

8. $102.50 is what % of $20500? 

9. What is 62^ per cent of $7288? 

10. What is 16f%of $36? 

11. $490 is what % of $5000? 

12. $6.50 is 12^% of what sum? 

13. What is 40 per cent of $1683.25? 

14. $150 is 33^% of what? 

15. $729.80 is 66| per cent of how much? 

16. $2.50 is what per cent of $20? 

17. What is 2^X of $400? 

18. What is 14% of $1500? 

19. $13.50 is what per cent of $81? 

20. $37.50 is 6% of what amount? 

EXERCISE 210. (Oral.) 
Perform Exercise 137, changing each answer to lOOths, 

or %. 

EXERCISE 21 1. (Written.) 

Change the fractions in Exercise 138 to lOOths, and re- 
write the examples, using per cent instead of lOOths. ^ 



PRACTICAL WORK IN PERCENTAGE. 

^ . , c J.— What is I (.75) of 16 ? 

General forms \ , 

r r) i -^ K. — 12 is 4 (.75) of what number? 

lor rercentage: ; 

I L.— 12 is what fraction (%) of 16 ? 

(Compare with *' General Forms," p. 93.) 
EXERCISE 212. (Written.) 

Change the per cents to fractions in their loAvest terms, 
rewrite in general form , and analyze: 

1. A man having $3300 lost 3 per cent of it; how much 
did he lose? 



184 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

2. A man had an annual income of $2500. He spent 10 
% of it for board; 5% for clothing, and 18% for inciden- 
tals; how much did he spend for each? 

3. A man lost $120, which was 40% of all he had; how 
much had he? 

4. A man having $5800 worth of hay lost $870 worth by 
fire; what fraction and what per cent of the whole was the 
part lost? 

5. If you buy eggs at 20 cents a dozen and sell them at 
a gain of 2| cents a dozen, what fraction and what per cent, 
of the cost do you gain ? 

6. A merchant sells a barrel of flour for $6.25, which was 
125% of what it cost him; what did it cost him? 

7. A jeweler sold a watch for $36, which was 90 per cent 
of its cost; find the cost. 

8. A ship carrying 8750 tons of coal sprung a leak, on 
account of which it was found necessary to throw over- 
board 1250 tons; what per cent of the coal was thus lost? 

9. A man spent in one year $2150, which was 5f% of 
what he had; how much had he? 

^10. My salary is $2400; if I spend S7i% of it, how 
much money do I spend? 

EXERCISE 213. (Oral Analysis.) 

1. A man having 800 boxes of oranges lost S% by decay; 
how many boxes did he lose ? 

2. $25 is 25% of what sum? 

3. In a school of 150 pupils 3 were absent; what per cent 
was absent? 

4. A man having spent 33^% of his money has $600 
left; what had he at first? 

5. A boy increasing his money by 25% of itself has $1; 
what had he at first? 

6. A man owning 75% of a ship sold 33^% of his share 
for $6000; find the value of the ship. 

7. 20 is 40% of what number? 



ARITHMETIC. 185 

8. Sold a horse for •I'lOO at 20% above cost; find the cost. 

9. $18 is what per cent of $72? 

10. ^Bought a cow for $35 and sold her for 20% above 
cost; what did 1 receive for her? 



PEOFIT AND LOSS. 

Gains^ losses, and selling-price, are always a per cent or 
fraction of the cost. , 

The cost, then, in Profit and Loss, is always the base. 

EXERCISE 214. (Written.) 

Label everything given in the first 10 examples, with the 
word gain, loss, selling-price, or cost, rewrite in general form, 
and then perform. 

1. A man sold a harness for $35, gaining 4Q% on the 
cost; find the cost. 

Model: $35 = S. P. 100% = Cost. 40% = Gain. 
$33 is 140% of wliaf niirtiber? 

2. I wish to make Zl\?4 on a ton of hay which cost me 
$7.20; for what must I sell it? 

3. By selling a house for $3500 I lose $500 on the cost; 
what fraction, and per cent, of the cost did I lose? 

4. A merchant sells cloth for $3.75, losing 16|/^; what 
was the cost? 

5. A broker bought cotton to the amount of $3840. The 
price falhng, he was obliged to sell at 2h% loss; find his 
loss and selling price. 

6. A man bought 144 pounds of sugar at the rate of 12 
pounds for a dollar and sold it at 10 cents a pound. What 
per cent did he gain ? 

7. Bought tea at 37^ cents and sold it at 50 cents. What 
was gained per cent? 

8. Sold wheat at $1.05, losing \2\%; what did it cost? 



186 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

9. A merchant marked cloth at 25% advance on the 
cost. The goods being damaged, he was obHged to take 
off 20% of the marked price, selhng it at $1.50 per yard; 
what was the cost? 

10. I sold I of an acre of land for what the whole acre 
cost me ; what was my gain % ? 

rl. What per cent is gained in buying goods by long 
ton weight and selling them at the same price per ton by 
short ton weight ? 

: "ii^. If 20% is lost by selling wheat at $1, for what must 
it be sold to gain 10.% ? 

13. By selling a cow for $7 less than she cost I lose 
I4y% ; what was her cost and selling price ? 

14. How shall a merchant mark cloth that cost 16| 
cents per yard so as to gain 20% ? 

15. I buy a box of oranges containing 300 oranges for $1.50; 
for how much must I sell them per dozen to gain 41|%'? 

16. Sold goods for $3.50 less than cost and lost 14%; 
what should I have gained per cent by selling for $2.75 
above cost? 

17. A man sold a sack of potatoes at a loss of 12^%, 
thereby losing 10 cents; find the cost. 

18. A man sold a buggy for ll-|-% above cost, and with 
the money bought another which he sold for $160, losing 
1H%. Did he gain or lose on the whole and how much 
per cent? 

19. Bought 12 acres of land for $840. Sold i of it at 
$85 per acre, i of it at $75 per acre, and the remainder at a 
loss of 14f % on an acre; what per cent was gained or lost 
on the whole? 

20. Two sets of furniture were sold at $35 each. On one 
there was a gain of 16|%; on the other a loss of 16|%; 
was there a gain or loss on both, and how much %? 

"S^^ A merchant bought carpetings at 75 cents, 95 cents, 
and $1.10; for what must he sell each to make 20%? 



ARITHMETIC. 187 

^^. A furniture dealer sold 10 dozen chairs for $96; if he 
paid 55 cents apiece for them, and 5 cents each for trans- 
portation, what % was his profit? 

^^An oil company paid 8 cents a gallon for a cask of 
crude oil containing 31-| gallons; if 11^% of it leaked out, 
at what price must it be sold per gallon to gain 11^% on 
the cost? 

24. A grocer sells -f of a barrel of sugar for $7.82, losing 

8% ; for how much must he sell the remainder to gain 8% 

on the whole ? 

Y^ xlk. By selling a suit of clothes for b% less than cost, a 

^ I tailor gets $5.55 l?ss than if he had sold them for 10% 

\ above cost; find the cost. 
*j 2^. The labor in making a machine will cost $37.50, and 
*^jthe whole cost is $65; the laborers strike and get an ad- 
vance of 105'o on their wages; for what must the machine 
be sold to gain 20% ? 

2i. A merchant bought wheat at 96 cents a cental, and 

marked it for sale at $1.12^. He afterwards marked up 

^the price 6|%, and sold 240 centals. The buyer failed, 

lowever, and settled by paying 75 cents for every dollar he 

owed. Did the merchant gain or lose, how much, and how 

much per cent? 

^. A hardware merchant bought three dozen agate ba- 
sins at the rate of 3 for $5, and sold them at a gain of $10 
on the whole; what was the average selling price of each, 
and what was the gain per cent? 

^9. A merchant sold 25 yards of cloth for $31.25, at a 
loss of 161%"; find the cost per yard. 

' 30. A boy bought oranges at 40 cents a hundred, lost b% 
by decay, and sold them at the rate of 3 for 2 cents; what 
was his gain % ? 

EXERCISE 215. (Oral.) 

1. A man bought a horse for $75 and sold him at a gain 
of 20%; find the selling price. 



188 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

2. Find the gain per cent on sugar bought at 8 cents and 
sold at 9 cents. 

3. Sold calico at 16 cents, gaining 4 cents; what was the 
gain %? 

4. I wish to make ol\% on a suit of clothes that cost 
$16; for what must I sell them? 

5. A grocer sold tea for 30 cents a pound; if he lost 16f X, 
what did the tea cost? 

6. Sold a carriage for $40 less than cost, losing 40% ; find 
the cost. 

7. If a dozen lemons are bought for 25 cents and sold for 
35 cents, what is the per cent of gain? 

8. Gained 10 cents by selling a penknife at 25% profit; 
what did it cost? 

9. Sold goods for \ more than I paid for them; what was 
the gain % ? 

10. A grocer makes 10% by selling coffee at 2| cents 
above cost; what is the cost and the selling price? 

11. A boy sells newspapers at 5 cents, which is 66|% 
above cost; find the cost. 

12. A boy buys pencils for 25 cents a dozen, and sells 
them for 5 cents apiece; what is his gain % ? 

13. Bought oranges for 1 cent apiece, an-d sold them at 
the rate of 2 for 3 cents; what was the rate of gain? 

14. Bought 4 books for $2.40, lost one, and sold the re- 
mainder at $1 each; find my gain %. 

15. A man bought a hat for $4, and traded it for $3 and 
a box of 6 collars, worth 25 cents each; wdiat was his rate 
of gain ? 

16. A furniture dealer bought a second-hand set of chairs 
at 32 cents each, spent 8 cents each in repairs, and then 
sold them at a gain of 25%; what did he receive for them? 

17. Bought a suit for $25, which was 16|% less tlian the 
asking price, and the asking price was 50% above the cost; 
find the cost. 



ARITHMETIC. 189 

18. 20% of my sales is profit; what is my gain %? 

19. Sold 4- of my stock for what the whole cost; what did 

I gain per cent? 

EXERCISE 216. 

Find everything not given; gain or loss, rate of gain or 
loss, cost, and selling price. 

Cost $1500; loss 1\%. 13. Loss $125; S. P. 83^%. 

Gain $500 at 2h^%. 14. S. P. $480 or 73^%. 

S. P. $1320; loss \%. 15. Cost $920; loss $15%. 

Loss $75; cost $2000. 16. Loss 13^%=$840. 

5. Gain 7f%; cost $1085. 17. Gain $5.50; S. P. $95.50. 

6. Cost $2375; S. P. $3050. 18. Cost $175; S. P. $200. 

7. Gain 1% or $147. 19. Gain 14%; cost $7000. 

8. Loss 16|%; S. P. $2085. 20. Profit 50%; gain $25.50. 

9. Cost $12.50; S. P. $10. 21. S. P. $175; cost $150. 

10. S. P. $18.50; loss 6^%. 22. Cost $15; loss 20%. 

11. Profit $45 or 3^%. 23. S. P. $15; loss 16f %. 

12. Cost $1300; S. P. 130%. 24. Gain 3%; S. P. $1030. 

EXERCISE 217. 

Select 10 examples from Exercise 209 and form practical 
examples in P. and L. Perform and bring to the class for 
dictation. 

Model : Example 1. I gained $75 by selling goods at 3% profit ; 
what did thev cost? 



COMMISSlOjSr. 

Some men are employed in transacting business for oth- 
ers, such as buying and selling goods or lands, renting 
houses, collecting money. 

These men are found in our business centers under 
various names, including commission merchants, brokers, 
auctioneers, real estate agents, collectors, and the like. 



190 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

The money received for their services is called Commis- 
sion. 

It is usually a percentage (1) on the money paid for prop- 
erty bought, (2) received for property sold, (3) on the 
amount of money collected. 

The sum left after taking out the commission is called 
the proceeds. 

A broker's commission is called brokerage. 

r Cost. 

Base= -l Selling price. 

[ Money collected. 

EXERCISE 218. (Written.) 

Label numbers given in the first 10 examples with the 
words cost, S. P., money collected, proceeds, commission, or 
rate of commission ; rewrite in general form, said perform. 

1. I send 50 tons of baled hay to a commission merchant 
in San Francisco, who sells it for me at $14 a ton and 
charges S% commission; what is the amount of his com- 
mission, and what do I receive? 

Model: 50x$14 = $700 S. P. 3% = Rate of commission. 
What is 3% of $700? 
What is 97% of $700? 

2. If I pay $10.50 per ton for the hay and $1.14 per ton 
for freight, what % do I make on the whole cost? 

3. A merchant buys 100 barrels of flour for me, paying 
$5.50 per barrel. If he charges o% commission what sum 
of money must I send him to pay for the flour and his ser- 
vices? 

4. I send $3120 to a commission merchant to buy flour 
at 4% commission; for what does the $3120 pay? What 
is the cost of the flour? Commission? 

5. For what must I sell the above flour per barrel to gain 
205^ on the whole cost, supposing I received 750 barrels? 

6. A farmer sends 72 dozen eggs to an agent who sells 



ARITHMETIC. 191 

them @ 32 cents at a commission of ^\%] what does the 
farmer receive for his eggs per dozen ? 

7. An auctioneer sells at auction a farm, buildings, stock, 
and tools. He receives $14000 for the farm and buildings, 
$2700 for the stock, and $1300 for the tools; what is his 
commission at \\% ? 

8. A man sends $31500 to a broker to buy cotton at 5X 
commission; how many bales at $100 each does he buy? 

9. A grocer sends $2490 to a commission merchant to 
buy sugar at 3f % commission. If he pays 8 cents a pound 
for the sugar, for what must the grocer sell the whole to 
gain 16f % on the whole cost, and at how much per pound? 

10. An agent sells Blaine's "Twenty Years in Congress," 
at $5 a volume, receiving 35% commission; how many vol- 
umes must he sell to make $1400? 

11. A collector collected rents at 3% commission and 
received $87.60 for his services; what sum of money did 
he collect? 

12. A farmer sends 3000 centals of wheat to a commis- 
sion merchant in San Francisco, who sells it at $1.16f per 
cental at a commission of 21%; what is his commission 
and what does the farmer receive for his wheat? 

13. My commission for selling flour for $5150 is $128.75; 
what X? 

14. T sent $5115 to an agent who buys goods for a com- 
mission of $165; what %1 

15. My agent received $123 for collecting rents at 2>%] 
how much money did he collect? 

16. I pay $275 for a house lot and build on it a house 
costing $1720, which my agent rents for $25 a month, 
charging b% commission; what per cent do I make a year 
on the money laid out? 

17. A lawyer collects lh% of a bill of $5600 and charges 
6|% for collecting; what is his commission and what does 
the creditor receive? 



192 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



18. A town owes a debt of $1890 which is to be collected 
from the people of the town. If the collector charges 10% 
for collecting, what sum must be collected to pay the debt? 

19. I wish to gain 2h% on cloth for which I paid $1.20 
per yard, b% commission to my agent, and 1\ cents per 
yard for freight; what must be the selling price? 

20. I send $2689.75 to my agent to buy pork at 1\% 
commission; how many pounds can he buy at 3 J cents a 
pound ? 

21. How many pounds of sugar at 8^ cents does an agent 
purchase for me, if his commission at ol% amounts to 
$25? What does the sugar cost me per pound? 

22. How many barrels of flour at $5 can a commission 
merchant purchase with $5150 on a commission of 3%? 

23. Find the commission on the sale of 100 bales of cot- 
ton, averaging 480 lb. to a bale, at $18 per cwi, the com- 
mission being h%. 

24. An agent sells 450 tons of hay at $13 a ton, commis- 
sion 5X, and with the proceeds bought wool at 22^ cents 
per pound, commission 4%; what was his whole commis- 
sion and how many pounds of wool did he buy? 

25. Bought 500 boxes of oranges at $2.50 a box, and paid 
$12 freight. My whole bill was $1287; what % commission 
did I pay for buying ? 



EXERCISE 219. (Oral.) 

1. My agent sells $250 worth of goods for me at AX com- 
mission; what do I receive? 

2. I send an agent sufficient money to buy $75 worth of 
shoes at A%\ what do I send him? 

3. A commission merchant sold a bill of goods at 3% 
commission, receiving $30 for his services; what was the 
value of the goods sold? 

4. A commission merchant sells goods for me for $200, 
receiving $4 commission; what %? 



ARITHMETIC. 193 

v" ) * 

5. An agent receives $2 for buying eggs on a commission 
of 2% ; what does he pay for the eggs ? 

6. An auctioneer sells a sewing machine for $20, receiv- 
ing 5/0 for his services; what is the sum received by the 
owner ? 

7. If a commission merchant sells flour for $5 a barrel 
on a commission of 5%, how many barrels must he sell to 
realize $100? 

8. $10 commission; 10^ rate; find the cost. 

9. Bought a lot of clocks through an agent, pajdng $50 
for the clocks and $2 commission; what was the rate of 
commission ? 

10. For how much a yard must cloth be sold to gain 
33^%, if the cloth was bought @ 20 cents on a commission 
of 0% ? 

11. Sent $30 to an agent to buy lead pencils at 50^ 
commission; how many at 2 cents apiece can he get? 

12. Sales $2000; commission $10; find the rate. 

13. What amount of money must I send my agent that 
he may buy 100 pr. of shoes at $1 and pay himself a com- 
mission of 3% ? 

14. Remittance $2020; commission IX; find cost. ^ 

15. Cost $300; remittance $309; find commission %. 

EXERCISE 220. 

Find everything not given of the following; rate of com- 
mission, commission, cost, S. P., proceeds. 

1. Com. $165; (S. P.) $6600. 

2. Com. for buying $140 at H%. 

3. Remittance to agent $5600; com. 2\%. 

4. Com. for selHng at \l% is $13.50. 

5. Auction sale $8732; com. 2%. 

6. Com. $14.21; cost $568.38. 

7. Sum collected $14000; com. $420. 

8. Com. $141; proceeds $2209. 

13— A 



194 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



9. Remittance to agent $4000; com. $250. 

10. Remittance to agent $2182.80; com. 1%. 

11. Cost $4800; remittance $4872. 

12. Com. for selling $48.29 at 2|%. 

13. Remittance to agent $1500; com. $41.12. 

14. Proceeds $4975; com. $25. 

15. Com. for buying $74.25 at H%. 

16. Rate of com. l%] S. P. $2000. 

EXERCISE 221. 

Select 10 examples from Exercise 209 and construct 
practical examples in commission. Perform and bring to 
the class for dictation. 



l^SUEAlsrOE. 

I build a house for $3000. A company gives me a writ- 
ten promise to pay me $2000 if the house burns, and charges 
me ^% per year of the promised sum for the promise. What 
do I pay for the promise? What does the company lose if 
the house burns within a year ? 

A company is made up of two or more persons joining 
for the transaction of business. 

Insurance is a guaranty of a sum of money to be paid 
in case of loss of property or life. 

The company making the written contract to pay losses 
is an Insurance Company. 

The written contract is called the policy. 

The sum paid by the owners of property for insurance is 
called the premium. 

The 'premium is a certain fraction, or per cent, of the sum 
insured, and is paid in advance. 

Fire Insurance Companies rarely insure property for more 
than f of its value, and in no case pay for more than the 



ARITHMETIC. 195 

value of the property destroyed, whatever may be the face 
of the poHcy. 

In Life Insurance the premium is a sum of money vary- 
ing with the amount of insurance and the age of the 
individual. 

A fee of $1 or more is sometimes charged for making out 
the policy. 

Do insurance companies lose money by 'paying these losses? 
Whyf 

EXERCISE 222. 

1. A merchant has his store and contents insured for 
$5500 at i% premium; what is the cost to him? If the 
store and contents are destroyed, what sum does the insur- 
ance company lose? 

2. A trader paid $110 premium to have a shipment of 
horses insured at 2|% of their value; what was their value? 

3. A sea captain insures his vessel for $48000, paying 
$360; what is the rate of insurance? 

4. A farmer has his standing grain, worth $4000, insured 
for ^ its value at ^% per month. At the end of a month 
and a half the grain burns; what does the insurance com- 
pany lose? 

5. I pay $62.50 to insure my house f(ti' f its value for 3 
years at 2^%. What is the value of my house? 

6. An insurance company loses $3528 by the wreck of a 
carload of flour which it had insured for $3600. What was 
the rate of insurance ? 

7. A man has a policy of $7600 placed on his house, 
which sum includes the insurance value and the premium 
at li%; what is the premium, and the value of the house? 

8. I have a house worth $6000, a barn worth $1800, and 
personal property worth $1200; on all which I am insured 
for f value, paying $106 including $1 fee for the policy. 
What is my rate of insurance? 

9. I buy a house for $6500, expend $500 in repairs, and 



196 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

insure it at ^% on f of the whole cost including repairs. I 
then sell it at a loss of 4% on my whole expense. What 
is my selling price ? 

10. Sent $2846.25 to my agent, who buys flour at $5-1 a 
barrel, charging S^% commission. I insure it at !{% on 
the cost; for how much must I sell it per barrel to gain 
10^ on the whole cost? 

11. A house, insured for $2400, at 1%, burns. The owner 
buys another with the insurance money and gets it insured 
for $30; find the rate on the latter house. 

12. Which is cheaper, to get my building insured in two 
different companies for $1500 each, at f%, or in one com- 
pany for $3200 at i%? 

13. Paid S% every 3 years to get an insurance of $2400 
on my house. If it burns at the end of 8 years, what is 
the loss of the insurance company ? 

14. A merchant imports a cargo from Liverpool, En- 
gland, worth £1500 and insures it at ^%; find the premium 
in $'s. 

15. Paid $42 to get an insurance of $2562 on my stock, 
the insurance covering the premium; what was the rate? 

16. I insure my life for $8000, paying $19.80 per $1000 
per year; what do I pay the company if I live 20 years 
after insurance ? 

17. Paid li% to get my library insured; premium 6|X; 
what was the value of the library? 

18. A grocer insures 200 barrels of flour for 66f % of 
their cost at 1^%, paying a premium of $10.50; what price 
per barrel must the flour bring to gain 16|% on the cost 
exclusive of insurance? 

19. For what sum must a policy be made out to cover 
the insurance on a property of $2100, at ^% ? 

20. I buy a house for $6000 and pay li% to get it insured. 
I also pay $900 for repairs. I then sell it at a gain of oS^% 
on all it has cost me. The money thus received I send to 



ARITHMETIC. 197 

a commission merchant, who buys flour for me at o^% com- 
mission, paying $4.50 per barrel. He finally sells the flour 
for $4 a barrel at 3^% commission and sends the balance 
to me. What % have I gained on all I paid out for the 
house? 

EXERCISE 223. (Oral.) 

1. Paid $7 on an insurance of $1400; find the rate. 

2. Paid $20 to get stock insured for |%; find the value 
insured. 

3. If I pay H% a year to get my house insured for $1500, 
how many years will it take to pay its value in premiums? 

4. Paid $3 on an insurance of $400; find the rate. 

5. Paid $12 to insure merchandise at li/1): find its value. 

6. Insared \ share in a ship worth $100000 for \ value 
at \%\ find the premium. 

7. Gained 25^ by selling flour for $505, the cost includ- 
ing an insurance of 1% ; find the first cost. 

8. I insure my house for f of its value of $3000, and my 
stock for f of its value of $600, for ^% premium; find the 
premium. 

9. Paid $2.50 on an insurance of $500; find the rate. 

10. Paid 1% on an insurance of $900; find the premium. 

11. Paid $5 to get an insurance at 2\%] find the insur- 
ance. 

12. Insured standing grain worth $2000 for \ its value at 
\% a month; what do I pay for 2 months' insurance? 

13. Paid ^% a year for 5 years on property insured for 
$5000; if it burns then, what is the company's loss? 

14. Paid $13, including $1 for policy, on an insurance of 
$1200; what w^^s the rate? 

15. $1010 policy including 1% premium; find the value. 

EXERCISE 224. (Written.) 

Construct 10 examples of 3"our own from Exercise 209, 
perform, and bring to the class for dictation. 



198 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



TAXES. 

Towns, counties, and states are at expense to maintain 
schools, courts, roads, public buildings, officers, and the 
like. To meet these expenses the people are required to 
pay a per cent of the value of their property. 

The money paid by an individual for public expense is 
called a Tax. 

Taxable property is of two kinds: (1) Personal, or mov- 
able property; as, money, tools, carriages, stock; (2) Real 
estate, or immovable property; as lands, buildings. 

In California, men between the ages of 21 and 60 are 
also taxed so much a head without regard to property. 
This is called poll tax. The amount raised by poll tax 
makes the property tax so much less. 

EXERCISE 225. (Written.) 

1. Suppose the property of this county to be valued at 
$4000000, and its expenses for this year to be $21800. If 
1200 men pay a $1.50 poll tax, what will be the fraction, 
and %, of tax on the property? 

2. If your parents own real estate valued at $4000 and 
personal property valued at $1800, and pay 1 poll tax, what 
is their whole tax? 

3. If your next door neighbor pays a tax of $16, includ- 
ing 1 poll, what is his property valued at? 

4. Suppose Mr. B pays 3 polls and has real estate valued 
at $5500 and personal property valued at $1700; what is 
his tax? 

5. A county builds a bridge for $4500. The property is 
valued at $1000000: what is the tax per $100? 

6. A tax of $8500 was raised on a town at $16 on a $1000 
worth of property. If there were 500 polls at $1 each, what 
was the value of the town property? 

7. A school district is taxed $3000 to build a school 



ARITHMETIC. 199 

house, which sum is a tax of -f^X of the property value; 
what is the property value and what is the tax on a dollar? 

8. The road tax on a road district was 2 mills on a dol- 
lar; what was the rate per cent of tax, and the amount on 
$3500 worth of property ? 

9. A town whose property value is $450000 has an ex- 
pense of $4750. If a collector charges o% for collecting, 
what rate of taxation must be made ? 

10. At the rate of 8 mills on $1, and $2 poll tax, find a 
man's tax on $7500 real estate, $2750 personal property, 
and 2 polls. 

11. A poll tax of $2 for road improvements is assessed 
on a town of 485 polls; 105^ is paid for collecting. What 
sum of money will be left for improving roads ? 

12. I buy a house lot for $400 and build a house on it 
for $2000. I pay an insurance on the house of ^% on ^ its 
value, and a tax on the whole of $14 on $1000, the property 
valuation being | the cost. For how much must I rent the 
house per month to realize 20"^ a year on my money? 

13. A tax of $2850 is to be raised on a town and suffi- 
cient besides to pay for collecting at h%. If the rate is \ 
cent on a dollar, what is the property worth ? 

14. I buy a house for $6500 and spend $500 for repairs. 
I rent it for $77.50 a month, out of which I pay a yearly 
insurance of ^% on f of its whole cost, including repairs, 
and a yearly tax of \% on f of the same. What per cent 
of income a year do I realize on the whole cost? 

EXERCISE 226. (Written.) 

Ask your parents or guardian for their last tax bill. 
Bring to the class for dictation. 

DUTIES. 

The expenses of the U. S. Government are mostly paid 
by taxes on imported goods. 



200 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

Such taxes are called customs or duties. 

Another object of duties is " protection to home industry." 
Find out what you can about " j^rotection." 

Duties are of two kinds: specific and ad valorem. 

A specific duty is a charge on goods by weight, number, 
or measure without regard to value. 

An ad valorem duty is a per cent of the cost of the goods 
at the port from which shipped. Both classes of duties 
are laid upon some goods. 

Gross weight is the weight of goods including the boxes 
or other packing material. 

Net weight is the weight after deducting the weight of 
the packing material. 

Duties are estimated on the net weight, and all custom- 
house weights are long ton weights. 

EXERCISE 227. (Written.) 

State in connection with each example whether the duty 
is specific or ad valorem. 

1. Find the duty on 100 boxes of oranges at 25 ct. per box 
and 60 boxes of lemons at 30 ct. per box. 

2. What is the duty on 100 French watches valued at 
$15 each, duty 25%? 

3. Imported 11 tons of iron T rails, duty y% ct. ^ ib. 
What was the whole duty? 

4. A merchant imported 12 cases woolen shawls, each 
case averaging 255 ib. valued at 80 ct. ^ ib., duty 35 ct. ^ ib. 
and 35% ad valorem. Charges $72.50. Find the whole cost. 

5. A liquor dealer imported 80 doz. quart bottles of 
champagne, duty $7 per doz. bottles; 3 casks of French 
brandy, 30 gal. each, duty $2 per gal.; 3 casks wine, 31^ 
gal. each, duty 50 ct. per gal.; and 50 doz. pint bottles of ale, 
duty 35 ct. per gal. Find the whole duty. 

6. Paid a duty of $2283.60 on an invoice of silks at 60% 
ad valorem. What was the value of the goods? 



ARITHMETIC. 201 

7. Find the duty on 1280 sq. yd. Brussels carpet valued 
at $725, duty 30 ct. per sq. yd. and oO% ad valorem; 1440 
sq. yd. tapestry valued at $G50, duty 20 ct. per sq. yd. and 
30X ad valorem. 

8. Duty on 840 ft. flaxseed at 20 ct. per bu. of 56 ft. 

9. A coal dealer imported from Sydney, Australia, 1000 
tons of coal, paying 75 ct. per ton duty. What was the cost 
of importing? 

10. A ship brought into port 200 tons of rock salt. What 
was the duty at 8 ct. per cwt. ? 

11. Imported 50 boxes tin plate, 108 ft. to the box net, 
on which I paid a duty of 1 ct. per ft. W^hat did the duty 
amount to? 

12. A merchant imported 25 tons of coke invoiced at $94, 
duty 20%. Find the duty. 

13. Find the duty at 20% on an importation of Bath 
brick of 200 boxes valued at 45 ct. per box. 



STOCKS. 

AVhen a number of men wish to form a railroad company, 
insurance company, bank, or the like, they obtain permis- 
sion by law, and subscribe a sum of money for the under- 
taking. 

Companies authorized by law to carry on business are 
called corporations. 

The money invested is called the Stock. 

The stock is divided into equal parts, commonly of $100 
each, called shares. It may be bought and sold in the 
market like other property, its value depending mainly 
upon the prosperity of the company. 

The nominal value of the stock is called the par value. 

The price which the stock brings in the market is called 
the market value. 



202 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

If the market value is above par, the stock is at a pre- 
mium; if below, at a discount. Thus, stock selling for $118 
per share is at 18% premium; for $82, at 18% discount. 

Usually, the broker's commission for buying or selling is 
a per cent of the jxrr value of the stock dealt in; but in 
mining stocks it is reckoned upon the market value of the 
stock bought or sold. 

The earnings of the company, after deducting the ex- 
penses, are divided among the stockholders, and are called 
dividends. 

Dividends, premium, and discount are reckoned on the 
par value. 

The following table is taken from the -stock quotations 
(market value) found in the daily papers, par value $100: 

N. Y. Central R. R., .... if;i02 Western Union Tel., . . . $66| 

Mich. Central R. R. 70 Home Mut. Ins., 145 

Lake Shore R. R 81| Bank California, 169^ 

St. Paul R. R., 87^ First National, 125 

So. Pacific R. R., 109^ Spring Valley Water, . . . 91J 

Geary St. R., 107 Oregon Navigation, .... 99 

Giant Powder, 60 Bodie Mining, 1^ 

\Vells, Fargo Ex., 118 Mono Mining, 2| 

EXERCISE 228. (Written.) 

1. Make separate lists, from the above, of stocks at a pre- 
mium and those at a discount. 

2. What must I pay for 10 shares of N. Y. Central, bro- 
kerage i%? 

3. After buying the above stock, a dividend of 4% was 
declared; what rate per cent of income did I realize on the 
money invested? 

4. A friend received $320 in dividends at the same time; 
how many shares did he own, and what w^ere they worth at 
the market value? 

5. The Giant Powder Co. declares an annual dividend of 
9% ; how many shares at the above quotation must I buy to 
get an annual income of $720, and what will they cost me? 



ARITHMETIC, 203 

6. What per cent on investment is realized by a dividend 
of 1% in the Home Mutual if i% is paid for brokerage? 

7. Which is the better investment: Bank Cal., paying 
12% dividends, or First National, paying 9%? 

8. I bought a certain number of shares of Lake Shore at 
81 1, and sold them at par, brokerage \% on each transac- 
tion, thereby gaining $2860 on the whole; how many shares 
were there, and what did they cost me? 

9. Find my gain % in the preceding example. 

10. Bought a house for $5000, and rented it for a year for 
$275; out of the rent paid taxes at the rate of 1% on f cost. 
At the end of the year T sold the house for \2% advance on 
cost, and invested the sum in Michigan Central, paying 
^\% dividends. Which was the better investment? 

11. I send a broker $1468 to buy Sp. V. W., at 1% com- 
mission; how many shares can he buy me? 

12. What cost 150 shares Mono at \% brokerage? 

13. What dividend would have to be declared to realize 
11-^ >6 on money invested in Oregon Nav. ? 

14. What is the cost of 50 shares of ^lono and 100 shares 
of Bodie, brokerage \% ? 

15. Lost $340 by buying S. P. R. R. at the above quota- 
tion and selling at 101|, brokerage \% each way; how 
many shares? 

16. How many shares of Western Union must I own to 
realize $570 on a 6% dividend, and for what will they sell 
at the above quotation ? 

17. Which is better, St. Paul R. R., paying b%, or Ore- 
gon Nav., paying 6X? 

18. How many shares in Geary St. R. could 3'ou buy for 
the money you receive by selling 24 shares of Electric Light 
at 53^, no brokerage? 

19. How many shares of Wells, Fargo can I buy for 
$1182.50 at 1% commission? 



204 CALIFORNIA SERIFS. 



INTEEEST. 

Suppose a friend of yours wishes to buy a house for $3000. 
Not having that sum in ready money, he borrows $1000 of 
you and agrees to pay you S% of the sum per year so long 
as he keeps it. What does he pay you a year for the use 
of the money? What for 2 yr.? If he keeps it for 1 year, 
what is the whole sum of money he pays you ? If he keeps 
it 2 yr. ? 3 yr. ? 2^ yr. ? 3 yr. 6 mo. ? 2 yr. 3 mo. ? 

Money paid for the use of money is called Interest. 

The sum lent is called the principal. 

The per cent of interest for a given time is called the 
rate. It is understood as being for a year unless otherwise 
specified. 

The principal and interest added make the amount. 

Banks usually loan money by the month; and sometimes 
pay on deposits from 3 to 5% a year. They reckon 12 
months of 30 days each, or 360 days, to a year. 

The United States laws count 365 days to a year, but 
this reckoning is not in common use among business men. 

EXERCISE 229. (Oral.) 

Find the interest and amount of : 

1. $100, at 6%, for 2 yr.; 3 yr.; 3^ yr. 

2. $200, at b%, for 4 yr.: 4 yr. 6 mo. 

3. $300, at 8%, for 6 mo.; 1 mo.; 3 mo. 

4. $250, at 6%, for 2 yr.; 2^ yr.; 2 yr. 4 mo. 

5. $150, at 4%, for 2 mo.; 6 mo. 

6. $1, at Q%, for 1 yr.; 1 yr. 4 mo. 

7. $2, at 5%\ for 3^ yr.; 2^ yj. 

8. $5, at 8%, for 3 mo.; 3 yr. 

9. $10, at 3%, for 5 mo.; 7 mo. 

10. $20, at 6X, for 9 mo.; 8 mo. 

11. $2.40, at 5%, for 2 yr.; 2| yr. 



ARITHMETIC. 205 

12. $7, at 8/0, for G mo.; for 2 3T. 

13. $25, at A%, for 2 yr.; at 8%. 

14. $50, at 5X, for 6 mo.; at Q>%. 

15. $800, at 3%, for 1 mo.; at 6X. 

16. $800, at b%, for 9 mo.; at 10^. 

17. $750, for 2\ yr., at A%- at 8%. 

18. $1000, for 3 mo., at 4X; at 5X; at 6%. 

19. $1000, for 2 yr. 9 mo., at A%- at 6%. 

20. $1500, for 4 yr,, at 5X; at 6%; at 8X. 

21. $2000, for 2yV jr., at b%] at 4%; at 6^. 

22. $2500, for 2 mo., at \% a month. 

23. $450, for 3 mo., at 1% a month. 

24. $40, for 5 mo., at \% a month. 

EXERCISE 230. (Oral.) 
To find the years, months, and days between two dates. 

1. Find the time from January 16th, 1884, to May 27th, 
1886. 

Method : Jan. 16th, 1884, to Jan. 16th, 1886, ... 2 yr. 
Jan. 16th, 1886, to May 16th, 1886, ... 4 mo. 
May 16th, 1886, to May 27th, 1886, . . . 11 da. 
Ans. — 2 yr. 4 mo. 11 da. 

2. Find the time from October 25th, 1885, to May 10th, 
1887. 

Oct. 25th, 1885, to Oct. 25th, 1886, 1 yr. 

Oct. 25th, 1886, to Apr. 25th, 1887, 6 mo. 

In April after 25th, 5 days, and 10 days in May = 15 da. 
Ans. — 1 yr. 6 mo. 15 da. 

3. Find the time from each date except the last to all 
the following dates in this list: 

January 7th, 1880; May 3d, 1881; August 25th, 1882; 

Sept. 4th, 1883; Dec. 1st, 1884; Dec. 27th, 1885. 

Find the time between January 3d, 1885, and each of the 
above dates. Also from August 7th, 1881, to each of the 
above dates. 



206 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

Suggestion. — The teacher will give additional examples as needed 
until the class is quick in the work of finding the time, using tlie 
pencil or crayon to record results only. 



SIX PER CENT METHOD. 
EXERCISE 231. (Written.) 

6 hundredths of the principal per year means half as 
many hundredths as months; therefore add ^ the number 
of months to 6 times the number of years for the hun- 
dredths of the multiplier. An odd month gives ^ hun- 
dredth, or 5 thousandths; and since a month, or 30 days, 
gives 5 thousandths, -J- of 30 days, or 6 days, gives 1 thou- 
sandth. Therefore, 

To form a multiplier. 

Take 6 times the years and | the months as hundredths, 
and ^ the* days as thousandths. 

Example : Find the interest of $275.75 for 2 yr. 5 mo. 
18 da. at Q% yearly. 



WORK. 






2x6+1- 


-.14 


2 / 5.7 5 Principal. 


5+Y = 


=.008 


.148 Multiplier, 




.148 


2758 

1103 

2 20 

$40.81 Interest. 



A little practice will enable the student to form a Q% 
multiplier very quickly. A good arithmetician will find 
the time between two dates and form a Q)% multiplier from 
it in 80 seconds or less. The contraction in multiplication, 
p. 112, should always be used. 

Form 6% multipliers from each of the differences between 
dates found in Example 3, Exercise 230. 



ARITHMETIC. 
Fill out the following table, rate Q%: 



207 



No. 


Date. 


Date. 


Principal. 


Interest. 


Amoxint. 


1 


Aug. 4, 1881. 
March 19, 1879. 
July 8, 1883. 
Jan. 16, 1884. 
Oct. 28, 1885. 
Dec. 1, 1885. 
June 10, 1883. 
April 14, 1887. 


Sept. 12, 1882. 
February 25, 1882. 
Sept. 24, 1886. 
May 8, 1886. 
Jan. 12, 1886. 
March 12, 1887. 
Jan. 4, 1887. 
May 8, 1887. 


$179.50 
325.00 
758.75 

1024.25 

584.50 

725.84 

387.95 

42.20 


9 


9 


9 


9 


9 


3 


9 


9 


4 


9 


9 


5 


9 


9 


6 


9 


9 


7 


9 


? 


8 


9 


9 







EXERCISE 232. (Written.) 
To find the interest at other rates than 6 per cent. 

First find the interest at 6%; for 5%, subtract -J- of this 
interest from itself; for A% subtract -g. 

For 1% add i of the 6% interest to itself; for 8% add I; 
for 9% add -J; for 10% divide by 6, removing the decimal 
point one place to the right. 

If higher rates are needed, form a 12% multiplier with 
the months as hundredths, and I the days as thousandths. 

Find the interest on: 

1. $450, from Mar. 7, 1885, to July 7, 1885, at 4%; 5%; 
6%. 

2. $387, from May 3, 1884, to Aug. 3, 1886, at 5%; 7%; 
8%. 

3. $718.25, from Jan. 1, 1885, to Jan. 1, 1887, at 4%. 

4. $410, for 3 vr. 3 mo. 10 da., at 7%. 

(3 mo. 10 da.=100 da.=^g=tVye'ir.) 

5. $718, from May 11, 1882, to May 31, 1885, at 5%. 

6. $380, from February 10, 1883, to May 5, 1885, at 7%. 

7. $425, for 2 yr. 5 mo. 17 da., at 8%. 

(Divide interest of 1 vr. bv 12 to get int. for 1 mo. 2 yr. 5 mo. 
17 da.=29H nio.)^ 

8. $910.50, from Jan. 1, 1885, to Mar. 15, 1885, at 6%. 

9. $748, from April 3, 1886, to Aug. 24, 1886, at 5%. 



208 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

10. $875, from July 7, 1886, to Jan. 1, 1887, at 4%. 

11. $2512, from May 1, 1884, to May 10, 1885, at 7%. 

12. $3850, from Mar. 9, 1885, to Sept. 9, 1885, at S%. 

EXERCISE 233. (Written.) 
Find the interest on: 

1. $431, for 3 yr. 2 mo. 12 da., at 6X; at 7%. 

2. $1515, for 1 yr. 1 mo. 1 da., at 6%; at 4%. 

3. $495, for 5 mo. 24 da., at 7^%. 

4. $218.50, for 1 yr. 3 mo. 15 da., at 4^%. 

5. $729, for 2 mo. at S%; at S%. ' 

6. $435, for 4 mo., at 7%; at 5%. 

7. $760, for 1 yr. 9 mo. 27 da., at Q%; at S%. 

8. $129.40, for 7 mo. 16 da., at 4%; at 5%. 

9. $240.50, for 19 mo. 18 da., at 7^%. 

10. $528, from Jan. 1, 1884, to May 16, 1886, at 4^%. 

11. $1150, from Mar. 19, 1884, to July 25, 1884, at 7%. 

12. $1425, from May 3, 1885, to Sept. 30, 1886, at Q>%. 

13. $45, from Aug. 7, 1885, to Jan. 13, 1886, at 5%. 

14. $75, from Apr. 28, 1884, to Apr. 10, 1885, at Q%. 

15. $110, from May 23, 1880, to Sept. 13, 1884, at 4%. 

16. $434.20, from Dec. 1, 1881, to Nov. 1, 1884, at 4^%. 

17. $290, for 1 yr. 11 mo., at S^%. 

18. $4050, for 5 mo. 10 da., at 5%. 

19. $1235, from May 19, 1886, to Sept. 1, 1886, at 6%. 

20. $1425, from Jan. 25, 1884, to May 10, 1885, at 5%. 

21. $475, for 8 mo. 8. da., at S%. 

22. $2150, for 21 da., at 6%. 

23. $1240, for 17 da., at 4%. 

24. $1345, from May 1, to May 25, at Q%. 

Work the examples of Exercise 229 by this method. 

EXERCISE 234. (Written.) 
Find the amount of : 

1. $980, for 7 mo. 10 da., at 6%. 

2. $418.25, for 3 mo., at i% per mo. 



ARITHMETIC. 209 

3. $7280, from Mar. 1 to May 13, at 1% per mo. 

4. $1212.50, for 1 yr. 1 mo. 14 da., at ^%. 

5. $976.10, from May 27 to Nov. 19, at b%. 

6. $3200, for 9 mo. 9 da., at ^%. 

7. $225, from June 29 to Dec. 1, at 1\%. 

8. $850, from Feb. 1 to Sept. 1, at li% per mo. 

9. $230, for 1 mo. 10 da., at 10%. 

10. $1925, for 4 mo. 4 da., at b%. 

11. $458, from Jan. 1, 1887, to Mar. 11, 1888, at Q>1%. 

12. $319.50, for 3 mo., at 8%. 

13. $112.75, for 2 yr. 5 mo. 25 da., at 6%. 

14. $550, from Apr. 3 to Nov. 9, at b%. 

15. $336, from Sept. 20, 1885, to Mar. 1, 1886, at 6%. 

16. $210, for 2i yr., at 1\%. 

17. $640, for 9^ mo., at 8%. 

18. $1350, from Mar. 1 to Sept. 1, at 10%. 

19. $2080, for 4 mo., at A\?/o. 

20. $1875.35, from July 7 to Jan. 1, at Q>1%. 

21. $70, for 11 mo., at 6X. 

22. $10.50, from Jan. 1 to July 10, at 10^^. 

23. $49.50, for 1 yr. 7 mo. 28 da., at A%. 

24. $112, for 2 yr. 12 da., at Q>%. 

25. $129.75, for 2 yr. 17 da., at b\%. 

26. $18.50, from Jan. 1, 1808, to Aug. 17, 1887, at Z%. 

EXERCISE 235. (Written.) 

Construct 10 examples of your own, find the amount in 
each, and bring to the class for dictation. 

To compute accurate interest. 

When interest is to be reckoned on a basis of 365 days 
to a year, count the exact number of years and days be- 
tween the dates. Find the interest for years as in the 
ordinary method. For the days take as many 365ths of 1 

year's interest as there are days. Thus, 
14— A 



210 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

Find the exact interest on $240 from March 1, 1885, to 
July 10, 1885, at b%. (131 da.) 

OPERATION. 

12 

EXERCISE 236. (Written.) 
Find the exact interest on: 

1. $219, for 25 da., at 1%. 

2. $480, from May 10, 1884, to July 3, 1886, at Q>%. 

3. $348, for 73 da., at 6^%. 

4. $1000, for 219 da., at A%. 

5. $1220, from March 27 to July 27, at 10%. 

6. $104, from Jan. 9 to Apr. 4, at 12%. 

7. $210, from Apr. 1, 1886, to July 12, 1887, at 1\%. 

8. $442, for 91 da., at b%. 

9. $920, from Aug. 17 to Dec. 1, at 8%. 

10. $460, for 75 da., at 10%. 

11. $235, from May 15, 1884, to July 27, 1886, at A%. 

12. $40, for 40 da., at 12%. 



PROBLEMS IN INTEREST. 
Analyze by model under Exercise 69: 

1. At 7 per cent, $500 gains $35 in 1 year; how many 
years will it take to gain $105? 

2. ki 1% $500 gains $15 in 3 years; at how many per 
cent will it gain $105 in the same time? 

3. At 7 per cent, in 3 years $1 gains 21 cents; how manyi 
dollars will it take to gain $105 at the same rate and time? 

4. At 7 per cent, in 3 years $1 amounts to $1.21; how] 
many dollars will amount to $605 at the same rate andj 
time? 



I 



ARITHMETIC. 211 

In Example 1, by knowing the rate we know the interest 
for 1 yr. In Example 2, we know, without stating, tlie in- 
terest at 1% for 3 yr. In Example 3, we know the interest 
of '$1 for 3 yr. at 1%] and in Example 4, the amount of the 
same. Hence, the examples may be contracted thus: 

1. In what time will $500 gain $105, at 7>o ? 

2. At what rate will $500 gain $105 in 3 yr.? 

3. What sum will gain $105 in 3 yr., at 7%? 

4. What sum will amount to $605 in 3 yr., at 7%? 

Observe / First apply the co7iditions of the examples to a 
\ unit, or 1, of the things asked for in the answer. 

EXERCISE 237. (Oral.) 
Find: 

1. Time in which $100 will gain $15, at Q%. 

2. Sum that will gain $20 in 4 years, at b%. 

3. Rate at which $50 will gain $1.50 in 6 mo. 

4. Sum that will gain $30 in 3 yr., at b%. 

5. Rate at which $200 will gain $25 in 2^ yr. 

6. Time in which $75 will gain $5, at 4%. 

7. Rate at which $60 will gain $7.50 in 2| yr. 

8. Time in wiiich $150 will gain $21, at S%. 

9. Sum that will gain $100 in 10 yr., at 10.9^. 

10. Sum that will amount to $12 in 2 yr., at lOX. 

11. Time in which $1000 will gain $90, at 4^%. 

12. Rate at which $800 will gain $40 in 1 yr. 3 mo. 

13. Sum that will gain $75 in 5 yr., at b%. 

14. Rate at which $300 will gain $28 in 2 yr. 4 mo. 

15. Time it will take $700 to amount to $749, at 7%. 

16. Rate at which $75 gains $4 in 8 mo. 

17. Sum that gains $200 in 2 yr., at b%. 

18. Rate at which $450 gains $72 in 2 yr. 8 mo. 

19. At what rate any sum will double itself in 4 yr.; 8 
yr.; 10 yr. 

20. Timeitwill take money to double itself, at 5%; at 6%. 



212 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

EXERCISE 238. (Written.) 

1. Find the time in which $360 will gain $97.20, at 6%. 

2. In what time will $900 gain $84, at 1%] at 8%? 

3. What sum will gain $62.50 in 2 yr. 6 mo., at 5%? 

4. Find rate at which $145 will gain $5.80 in 6 mo. 

5. Rate at which $240 will gain $56 in 3 yr. 6 mo. 

6. What smn will amount to $296 in 3-| yr., at 7% ? 

7. A merchant buys goods for $700, to be paid in 6 mo.; 
what sum put at interest to-day at 6% will pay the debt? 

The money, which, put at interest at the present time, will 
amount to a given sum in a given time, is sometimes called 
the present worth; and the difference between the present 
worth and amount, the true discount. 

8. How long will it take $720 to gain $16.20 at 1\% a mo. ? 

9. Find present worth of $400 due in 4 mo., at \% a 
month. 

10. Find true discount of $390 in 6 mo., at 6%. 

11. A man was offered a horse for $100 cash, or $104 in 
6 mo. ; if money is worth 8%, which is the better offer? 

12. How long must $450 be kept at interest, at 8,%, to 
gain what $700 gains in 2 yr., at 4j)6 ? 

13. A man owes 3 bills of $250 each, due in 4, 6, and 9 
months respectively; what are the debts worth to-day, at 
1% a month? 

14. Bought a house for $7500, payable in 4 mo., and sold 
it for $7500 cash; if money is worth \% a month, what did 
I gain? 

15. A house that cost $3400 rents for $35 a month, what 
annual rate of interest is received? 

16. Find rate at which $275 will gain $56.10 in 3 yr. 4 
mo. 24 da. 

17. Find principal that will gain $103.95 in 3 yr. 2 mo. 
15 da., at 7^%. 

18. What sum of money invested at 6% will give an 
income of $100 per month? 



ARITHMETIC. 213 

19. Find principal that will amount to $926.06, at 6%, in 
3 yr. 7 mo. 21 da. 

20. Find time in which $720 will amount to $736.20, at 
1-|% a month. 

Note. — Find the interest first. 

21. Find time in which $125, at 4%, will amount to 
$141.50. 

22. Find rate at which $760 will amount to $926.06 in 3 
yr. 7 mo. 21 da. 

23. Paid a debt due Apr. 1, 1886, which amounted to 
$221.27 June 10, at 6%: find the debt. 

24. I loaned my money at S%, payable quarterly, and 
received $125 a quarter. How much did I loan? 

25. What principal amounts to $560.23 in 2 yr. 7 mo. 15 
da., at 6% ? 

26. Borrowed $90, June 1, 1880, at 7%. Paid it when 
it amounted to $100; when did I pay it? 

27. Paid $71.30, at 5%, for the use of $460 how long? 

28. If I owe $200 payable in 2 mo., $300 in 3 mo., and 
$400 in 4 mo., what should I pay to-day to make the debt 
good, money being worth ^% Si month? 

29. A carriage for which I paid $200 cash, I sold for $210 
on 8 mo. credit. Money being worth Q%, what did I gain? 

30. Find rate at which $410 gains $27.06 in 1 yr. 1 mo. 
6 da. 

31. Paid in 4 yr. $210 interest, at 7%. What was the 
principal ? 

32. Find time in which $550 will gain $102, at 6%. 

33. Find difference between the interest and true discount 
of $270 for 9 mo., at S%. 

34. Borrowed a sum of money at 6% and lent it again at 
7^%, by which I gained $35.10 in 3 yr. What was the sum? 

35. Find rate at wdiich $75 will gain $2 in -^ of a year. 

36. Find present vahie of $2000, i due in 2 mo.,' i in 3 
mo., and the remainder in 5 mo., at 6%, 



214 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

EXERCISE 239. (Written.) 

Select 10 examples from Exercise 232, perform, and then 
form different problems in interest from them, and bring 
to the class for dictation. 



PAETIAL PAYMENTS. 

When a person borrows money it is customary to give the 
lender a written promise to pay it back, with other specifi- 
cations, as that of interest, stated. Thus, if I borrow $500 
of James Willson of Sacramento, at 7%, I write: 

$500. Sacramento, Cal., Aug. 8, 1885. 

Six months after date, value received, I promise to pay 

James Willson, or order, Five Hundred -j^o Dollars, with 

interest at seven per cent per annum. 

Samuel Jones. 

A written promise to pay a sum of money is called a 
note. The date at which the money is to be paid is called 
its maturity. 

A note containing the words "or bearer" may be col- 
lected when due by the person having it in possession. 

If James Willson wishes to make the above note payable 
to bearer, he indorses it with his name. If he wishes to 
make it payable to Alfred Smith he indorses it: 

Pay to Alfred Smith, or order. 

James Willson. 

Alfred Smith may transfer it in the same way. 

One who indorses a note becomes responsible for its pay- 
ment. 

The face of a note or other business paper is the sum 
mentioned in it. 

If Samuel Jones wishes to make the above note a demand 



i 



ARITHMETIC. 215 

note he writes the words, "on demand" in place of "six 
months after date." 

It is sometimes convenient to pay a note in parts, or 
installment'. Such payments are called Partial Payments. 
They should be written, with their dates, across the back 
of the note, and are then called indorsements. 

Suppose the above note to have the following indorse- 
ments: 

Nov. 8, 1885, received $250. 

Apr. 14 ^ 1886, received $150. 

Write the note on paper and put on the indorsements. 

What money was due Nov. 8, 1885? 

What was due after the payment of that date? 

What was due on the remainder Apr. 14, 1886? 

What was still due after the payment of that date ? 

All payments must first go towards paying interest due. 
If a payment is not enough to pay the interest, it is counted 
with the next payment, and its date left out. 

Suggestion. — The teacher may ask the trustees to purchase a 
book of note blanks for the practical use of classes. Five of the 
following notes should be written on the printed blanks. 

EXERCISE 240. (Written.) 

Write out the following in proper form on paper, placing 
the indorsements on the back, and perform. Determine 
mentally, by inspection, whether a partial payment is too 
small to be taken out t"^ itself. 

1. Date, Jan. 1^ 188: Place, your own town. Face, 
$1500. Interest, 6%. :..iorsements: Aug. 7, 1885, $500. 
Dec. 7, 1885, $500. What is due Jan. 1, 1886? 

2. Face, $480. Mar. 8, 1884. Interest, 1%. Indorse- 
ments: • Sept. 3, 1884, $196.80. Mar. 3, 1885, $214. Sept. 
3, 1885, paid the amount due. Find it. 

3. Face, $1000. July 20, 1884. Interest at 8/"^. In- 



216 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

dorsements: Mar. 5, 1885, $50. July 5, 1885, $450. What 
was still due? 

4. Face, $1230. Date, Jan. 1, 1886. Interest at b\%. 
Indorsements: Mar. 1, 1886, $98. June 7, 1886, $500. 
Sept. 20, 1886, $290. Dec. 10, 1886, $100. What is due 
Jan. 1,1887? 

5. Face, $800. Date, Mar. 1, 1886. Interest at 10%, 
Indorsements: Aug. 10, 1886, $200. Sept. 1, 1886, $50. 
Jan. 1, 1887, $15. What was due Mar. 1, 1887? 

6. Face, $365. Date, July 10, 1885. Interest at Q>%. 
Indorsements: Sept. 10, 1885, $68.65. Nov. 18, 1885, 
$103.40. What was still due? 

7. Face, $2500. Date, Aug. 5, 1885. Interest at 1%. 
Indorsements: Jan. 1, 1886, $500. March 10, 1886, $750. 
Find the sum due Aug. 5, 1886. 

8. Face, $960. Date, June 25, 1886. Interest at 7^%. 
Indorsements: Sept. 1, 1886, $10. Dec. 1, 1886, $360. 
Jan. 1, 1887, $300. What was still due? 

9. Face, $500. Date, Feb. 1, 1884. Interest at 8%. 
Indorsements: Mar. 1, 1884, $100. Apr. 1, 1884, $100. 
May 1, 1884, $100. What was due June 1, 1884? 

10. Face, $1200. Date, May 15, 1886. Interest, 6%. 
Indorsements: Aug. 10, 1886,^ $500. Nov. 1, 1886, $500. 
What was due Jan. 1, 1887? 

EXERCISE 241. (Written.) 

Write 3 notes of your own, put 2 indorsements on each, 
perform, and bring to the class for dictation. 



COMPOUND INTEREST. 

Sometimes when a note specifies that interest on it is to 
be paid yearly, semi-yearly, quarterly, or the like, a special 
agreement is made that if such interest is not paid when 



ARITHMETIC. 217 

due it shall be added to the principal, and the amount 
becomes a new principal for the next period. 

This method of computing interest is called Compound 
Interest. In many states it is prohibited by law. 

Compound the interest at 8X on $540 for 7 mo. 12 da., 
payable quarterly. 

OPERATION. 

$540 ^Principal. 
1.02 =am't of $1 for i year. 



$550.80=:" "$540 for i year, or Prin. for 2d quarter. 



1.02 = " '•' $1 '' i 



561.82 = " " $550.80 for iyr., or Prin. for 3d quarter. 

1.009 i= " '•' $1 for 1 mo. 12 da. 
56 7.06 = " " $540 for 7 mo. 12 da., int. computed 

quarterly. 

Find the compound interest above. 

EXERCISE 242. (Written.) 
Find the compound interest on: 

1. $1000. for 4 yr., at (S%, payable annually. 

2. $300, for 1 yr. 7 mo., at 8%, payable semi-annually. 

3. $425, for 11 mo., at A%, payable quarterly. 

4. $250, from Jan. 1, 1886, to Feb. 1, 1887, at b%, pay- 
able semi-annually. 

5. $500, from May 1, 1885, to Aug. 1, 1887, at Q>%, pay- 
able annually. 

6. $490, for 8 mo., at 8%, j^ayable quarterly. 

7. $1500, from Aug. 1, 1886, to Apr. 10, 1887, at 7%, 
payable semi-annually. 

8. $275, for 9 mo., payable quarterly, at 65^0. 

9. $800, for 2^ yr., payable yearly, at Q>%. 

10. $1200, for 1 yr. 6 mo. 6 da., at 6>o, payable semi- 
yearly. 



218 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

Discounting commercial paper. 

Sacramento, Cal., Mar. 4, 1885. 
$15003^0-. 

Six months after date, I promise to pay to the order of 
James Kenney, Fifteen Hundred y\% Dollars, value received. 

Allen Paine. 

Suppose James Kenney carries the above note to the 
bank, April 4, to get money on it. The bank will deduct 
from the face a certain per cent, say 1% per month, from 
April 4 to the date of maturity, and pay him the balance. 
Find the balance on this note. 

This is called discounting the note. 



Observe. ^ 



1. The discount is made on the face of non-inter- 

est bearing notes. 

2. Wheyi the note bears interest the discount is 

made on the amount of face and interest at 
maturity. 



In some of the United States three days, called days of 
grace, are allowed for the payment of the note after it is 
actually due, discount being made for the extra time. 
Days of grace are not allowed in California. 

EXERCISE 243. (Written.) 

Write out the following notes on paper and find the sum 
allowed on each at the bank: 

1. Note of $700, Apr. 10, 1885, payable 4 mo. from date. 
Discounted at 8%, June 10, 1885. 

2. Note of $850, July 3, 1885, payable 60 days from date. 
Discounted, Aug. 1, at 1%' a month. 

3. Note of $1400, May 19, 1886, bearing interest at S%, 
payable 6 mo. from date. Discounted, Aug. 19, 1886, 
at 8^. 

4. Note of $900, June 1, 1885, bearing interest at 1% per 



ARITH^IETIC. 219 

month, payable 3 months from ^is^e. Discounted, July 1, 
2ii\% per month. "-— -: -.^:_— --^ 

5. Note of $250, Sept 9, 1881, payable 30 days after date. 
Discounted, Sept. 9, at 1%. 

6. Note of $1850, May 1, 1885, payable 3 mo. from date. 
Discounted, July 8, at 1% a month. 

7. Note of $525, Jan. 5, 1886, bearing interest at \% a 
month, payable 4 mo. from date. Discounted, Feb. 5, at 
1% per month. 

8. Note of $300, Dec. 11, 1886, bearing interest at |% a 
month, payable in 6 mo. Discounted, Mar. 1, 1887, at \\% 
a month. 

9. Note of $1140, Nov. 28, 1885, bearing interest at 8%, 
payable 1 yr. from date. Discounted, Jan. 1, at %%. 

10. Note of $1375, Aug. 5, 1886, payable 3 mo. from 
date. Discounted, Sept. 1, at 10%. 

11. Note, $735, Jan. 13, 1886, interest at 10%, payable 3 
months from date. Discounted, Feb. 25, at 2% per month. 



DISCOUI^T. 

In buying a bill of goods, a discount or discounts are 
often allowed on the list or marked price of the goods, and 
a further discount on the result for cash. Thus, 

Bought a bill of goods amounting to $800 at 20 and 5 off, 
and 5% off' for cash. 

FIRST OPERATION. 

5)$ 800 ==marked price of goods. 
160 =20% discount. 
20)$640 

3 2 =b% discount. 
20)$608 

ZQAO =b% off for cash. 
$577.60 =actual cost of the goods. 



220 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

SECOND OPERATION. 

2 

^00X4x19- ^19 _^ ^^ 
5X^0X20 

/-vi (Each discount is reckoned by itself and on the sinn 

\ remaining after the preceding discount. 

EXERCISE 244. (Written.) 

I. Find the actual cost of a bill of goods marked at $450 
at 40% off, and b% off for cash. 

^^ 2. Sold a bill of merchandise at 2r)% off, and 5% off for 
cash; find the whole discount. 

3. Sold a bill of goods marked at $250 for 30, and 5 off. 
Was the actual selling price more or less than if a discount 
of 35% had been made? 

4. By getting a discount of 10, and 10 off for cash, I pay 
$810 for a bill of goods; what was the list price? 

5. Bought furniture to the amount of $200, on which a 
discount of 5% was made for cash; what was the cost? 

6. For what must I sell goods which were sold me for 
$830, list price, at 30, 10, and 5 off, to gain 20% ? 

7. Paid $76 for a bill of glass after a deduction of 5%; 
what was the invoice price ? 

8. Find the cash value .of a bill of cloth amounting to 
$425.50 at a discount of 10%, and 5% off for cash. 

9. Bought a bill of goods aniounting to $725 on 6 mo. 
credit, on which a discount of 3% was allowed for cash; 
what did I pa}^ for the goods? 

10. The retail price of a certain book is $5.50. If I get 
a discount of 10, and 10 off for cash, what do I pay for the 
book ? 

II. I paid $1.50 for a book after a discount of 25%, and 
16|% off; what was its marked price? 

12. Sold a bill of goods for $700 on G mo. at 15 off, and 
deducted 4% for cash; what did I receive? 



ARITHMETIC. 



221 



ACCOUNTS. 

Every one who receives and spends money should keep 
a record of receipts and expenses, specifying the date and 
nature of each transaction. 

What does the word "cash" mean? Are greenbacks 
cash? Bank checks? Postage stamps? 

The following is a record of a boy's receipts and expenses: 

Jan. 1, 1886, money on hand, $2.65. Jan. 2, paid 5c. for 
marbles and 10c. for lead pencil. Jan. 4, paid 25c. for a 
Speller. Jan. 5, paid 10c. for a bottle of ink. Jan. 6, 
received 25c. for blacking father's shoes one week. Jan. 7, 
paid 10c. for a top and 15c. for marbles. Jan. 9, received 
$1 for driving cow to pasture and 50c. for milking. Jan. 

11, paid 40c. for a Reader and 60c. for an Arithmetic. Jan. 

12, sold top for 5c. Jan. 13, paid 10c. for postage stamps. 
Jan. 14, paid 20c. for candy. Jan. 16, received 10c. for 
doing errands and paid 5c. for marbles. Jan. 19, lost 10c. 
Jan. 20, received 40c. for blacking father's shoes. Jan. 21, 
paid 50c. for a kite. Jan. 25, sold 5 cents' worth of mar- 
bles. Jan. 26, received 25c. for clearing the yard. Jan. 
27, paid 15c. for setting a broken light of glass. Jan. 29, 
found 25c. Jan. 30, paid $1.15 for a Geography. 

Obtain paper, rule as below, copy, and fill out the month's 
items. Find out how much more he received than paid, 
see if it agrees with the balance, then add each column 
and place the result below. 



1886. 



CASH. 



Rec'd. Paid. 



Jan. 


1 


(( 


o 


<( 


4 



On hand, 

Marbles, 5 cents; Lead pencils, Ij cents. 
Speller, 

Carried forward. 



$ 

2 

11 2, 


ct. 
65 

65 


$ 



ct. 



15 



zo 



40 



222 



CALIFOnNIA SERIES. 



Jan, 


5 


a 


6 


a 


7 


i i 


9 


I i 


11 


Jan. 


30 



Brought forward, 
Bottle ink, . 

Blacking father's shoes, 

Top, 10 cents; Marbles, 15 cents, . . 

Driving cow, $1 ; Milking, 50 cents, . . 
Reader, 40 cents; Arithmetic, 60 cents. 



Balance, 



$ 


ct. 


$ 


2 


65 
25 




1 


50 


1 
1 


5 


50 


5 



ct. 
40 
10 

25 

00 



55 

50 



What does the "balance" in the above account show? 
If the amount of money on hand does not agree with bal- 
ance, what does the difference show ? In the account, which 
column is the larger? Could the other column ever be 
larger in a "cash" account? Whyf 

The "balance" should be found twice a month, at least, 
and oftener as the business is larger. Business firms and 
banks balance their " cash " every day. It is well to write 
the balance in red ink. Why? 

Open an account for February wdth the above balance on 
hand, and write items of your own. Take care that at no 
time your " paid " items exceed the " received " items. Bal- 
ance and bring to the class. 

Write out the following "cash" acct. of a teacher, and 
balance every Saturday: 

May 1 (Sat.) 1886, Cash on hand, $78.80. May 3, Bought 
20 cents worth of P. O. stamps. ^lay 4, Paid $5 borrowed 
money. May 5, Bought 11 yards cashmere @ $1.25; pair 
of shoes $4.50; 1 doz. hdkfs. $1.75. May 6, Paid express 
on package of books 25 cents. May 7, Sent by money order 
$2.75 to pay for books, paying 10 cents for the order. May 
8 (Sat.), Paid for postal cards 10 cents; stamped envelopes 
55 cents; note paper 60 cents. 



ARITHMETIC. 223 

May 11, Paid 2 weeks' board, to May 15, @ $4.50. May 
13, Paid spool thread 10 cents; bottle mucilage 25 cents. 
May 15 (Sat.), Carriage hire $2.50; received $9.25 for serv- 
ices on Board of Education. 

May 18, Paid 2 weeks' board to May 29. May 19, Paid 
mo. contribution to church $1.50; gave a poor woman 50 
cents. May 20, Paid for sending telegram 75 cents; crack- 
ers 25 cents. May 22, Paid 2 mo. subscription to " Daily 
Herald" @ 65 cents; received mo. salary $75. 

May 24, Deposited in bank $50. May 26, Paid $1 for 
book, 25 cents for " legal cap," 40 cents for ribbon. May 
27, Paid $1.25 for gloves; exchanged a second-hand Reader 
for a new one worth 60 cents, being allowed 25 cents for the 
old one, and paid the difference. May 28, Lent a friend 
$2. May 29, Paid for pins 10 cents, penknife 50 cents, 
sheet music 30 cents. 

Balance shows my pocket-book 5 cents short, for which I 
can not account. Balance. 

Write out the following account: 

July 1, 1887, received $5. July 4, bought 5 flags at 25c. 
each, 3 bunches of fireworks at 30c. a bunch, 18 yd. bunt- 
ing at 10c. per yd. July 6, earned 20c. selling papers. 
July 7, gave a poor woman 10c. Balance. 

Write out a cash acct. of your own. Begin with $5 on 
hand. Have 6 items received, and 8 paid. Balance. 

What is a debt? A debtor? A credit? A creditor? Why 
is it necessary to keep an account of our debts and credits? 
When is a man your debtor? Your creditor? Is John 
Smith debtor, or creditor, for what we give him ? For what 
he gives us? What, then, does the debtor side of a man's 
account show ? The creditor side ? If the debtor side be 
the larger, what does the balance show? If the creditor 
side be the larger? If both sides are equal? Explain each 
item in the following account, which we will suppose to be 
your account with John Smith: 



224 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



Dr. 



JOHN SMITH. 



Cr. 



188G. 
Jan. 



He owes me . 
2 loads hay . 
Use of wagon 
Cash .... 



$ 


ct. 


188G. 




43 


05 


Jan. 


2 


9 


50 


u 


12 




50 


a 


18 


9 


70 


i( 


27 






t( 


31 




~~ 







Cash 

Work with team 

Calf 

Order on Robert 
Stewart . . . 

Balance .... 



28 



ct. 
GO 
75 
00 

90 



Copy the above account and complete it. Change it so 
as to show John Smith's account with you. Write an im- 
aginary continuation of the account during the month of 
February. Have 5 Dr. items and 5 Cr. items, and have .1^5 
due John Smith Mar. 1. Have no dates on Sunday. 



Observe. 



i 



Any person becomes Dr. for goods or money deliv- 
ered TO him. 
Any person becomes Cr. for goods or money deliv- 
[^ ered by him. 



The following are the transactions of a farmer with a 
merchant, S. C. Griggs & Co. Copy as above, writing the 
account for each party: 

1886. Mar. 1, Sold S. C. Griggs & Co. 7 doz. eggs @ 18 
cents; 11 rolls butter at 40 cents. Received 10 lb. sugar @ 
8 cents; 1 sack salt 25 cents. 3. Delivered them 10 
sacks potatoes @ 85 cents. 4. Bought 20 yd. sheeting @ 
12^ cents; 12 yd. print @ 10 cents. 6. Sold 12 doz. eggs 
@ 16 cents; 9 rolls butter @ 40 cents; 10 sacks potatoes @ 
80 cents. Bought 4 50-ib. sacks flour @ $1.12^; 2 lb. tea 
@ 65 cents; 5 lb. coffee @ 37-| cents. 9. Bought 1 box 
soap $1.15; 2 lb. cheese @ 17^ cents. 12. Sold 10 doz. 
eggs @ 18 cents; 13 rolls butter @ 40 cents; 5 sacks pota- 
toes @ 90 cents. 15. Bought 20 lb. dried apples @ 7 
cents; can lard 65 cents; 2 boxes paper collars @ 15 cents; 
5 cans apricots @ 30 cents. 18. Sold 2 loads wood @ 



ARITHMETIC. 225 

$4.50. 22. Bought 1 lamp $2; 1 pr. boots $5.50; 1 ham 
12 lb. @ 18 cents. 25. Sold 15 doz. eggs @ 20 cents; 8 
rolls butter @ 50 cents. 'Bought suit clothes $8; 8 lb. 
sugar 75 cents; 1 10-gallon can kerosene $1.75; 1 pr. boys' 
shoes $3.50; 1 sack oatmeal 50 cents. Balance. 

Write an imaginary account between the nearest mer- 
chant and yourself. Have 8 purchases and 7 sales. Have 
your prices reasonable and the transactions such as you 
might make. 

Sometimes a person engages in an enterprise, like renting 
or purchasing grain land, on which he wishes to know his 
profit or loss over and above interest on the money invested. 

The following is an account of the expenses and returns 
of a barley field. Use the name " Barley field," debit it 
with all its expenses, including the interest on the value 
of the land @ 6X for a year, and credit it with all its 
returns. 

Balance, and find the per cent of profit on the land value. 

160 acres of land valued at $70 per acre. Plowing, $1.30 
per A.; sowing, 10 cents per A.; seed, $1 per A.; harrow- 
ing, 25 cents per A.; poisoning squirrels, $4.50; heading, 
$1.75 per A.; thrashing, 10 cents per cental, 2700 centals; 
sacks, 8 cents each, averaging 135 lb. to a sack; sack twine, 
$8; hauling grain to warehouse, 5 cents a sack; sold the 
lot at the warehouse at $1.01-| per cental; sold the straw 
and stubble for $95. 

Do the same with the following Dairy account: 

40 cows at $35 per head. 

1886. Jan. 1. Salt, $1. 5. Rennets, $1.30; coloring, 50 

cents. 11. Wood, $5. 12. Cheese bandages, $7.20. 18. 

Sold 1600 ft), cheese @ 9 cents; freight and commission, 

1 cent per ft). 30. Paid 2 men's wages, $50; board, $32; 

pasture for Jan., $1 per head. Feb. 1. Sold 1400 lb. cheese 

@ 9^ cents; freight and com., 1 cent per ft). Balance. 
15— A 



226 



CALIFORNIA SFEIES. 



BALANCE SHEET. 



The following "Balance Sheet" is a statement of Luke 
Smith's debts and credits at the beginning of the year. 
Copy on the board and explain each item: 



1886. 




BALANCE SHEET. 


Debts. 


Credits. 






1 


$ 


ct. 


$ 


ct. 


Jan. 


1 


Farm and improvements, 






758 


75 






Household proj^erty, . . 






176 


50 






Mortgage on farm, .... 


425 


85 










Note payable on demand, . . 


56 


50 










John Mason, .... 






43 


65 






Wm. Jones, 


88 


35 










Chas. Bell's note, . . . 






76 


50 






Cash, 






19 


85 






Bank of California, . . 






78 


95 






Balance, 





















Put into a balance sheet the following statement of Luke 
Smith's debts and credits Feb. 1, 1886: 

Farm, $472. Improvements, $326.75. Household prop- 
erty, $176.50. Mortgage, $395.25. John Mason owes him 
$29.70. He owes Chas. Bell $18.25 and Thomas Olmstead 
$29.85. He has $28 in money and $48.25 in the Bank of 
California. 

Compare this with the preceding month and tell whether 
he has gained or lost. How does he stand with each per- 
son Feb. 1, as compared with his standing Jan. 1? If his 
debts were larger than his credits, how would he settle with 
his creditors? 

Write an account on balance sheet of your own for Luke 
Smith for March. Leave him in debt. 

What is a bank? What use have we for it? How does 
the bank get pay for taking care of our money? 

If you wish to pay a person a debt and have money in 



ARITHMETIC. 



227 



the bank, instead of paying liim in money you can write 
an order on your banker to pay the same. 

Such an order upon a bank is called a check. 

When you deposit money in the bank, the bank gives 
you a written statement to that effect, called a certificate 
of deposit, and you draw the money on presenting this 
certificate. 

Or the bank will give you a bank account book, and you 
may draw checks till the money is all drawn out. 

[Form of check.] 

No. 9. Merced, Cal., May 7, 1886. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

Pay to James Cash or Order, One Hundred Thirteen and-f-^^ 
Dollars. 

$113.50. John Simms. 

Copy the following bank account and explain each item. 
Write out the checks on paper, with yourself as depositor. 
Add 10 items and balance with $75 to your credit in bank. 



1886. 



BANK OF VENTURA. 



Br. 



Cr. 



Jan. 



Gold ^ 

Check I Tlios. Cruson .... 

Check II Wm. Bell & Co. . . . 
Silver 

Check III Bartlett Bros., . . . 

Check IV Self 

Check on Bank Cal,, 

M. Wooley's check on Bank Vent., 



100 



46 



14 

9 



ct. 

00 

50 



ct. 

85 
05 

75 

65 



228 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



EXCHANGE. 

Suppose you owe A. B. Stanton of New York $500. To avoid 
inconvenience and risk of sending the money you may buy 
of your banker, say D. B. Fairbanks, an order on some New 
York banker, say S. A. Spring, to pay A. B. Stanton. 




ARITHMETIC. 220 

You send the order to A. B. Stanton: and he, on receiv- 
ing it, presents it to S. A. Spring. Spring writes acceptance 
across the face as above, if willing to pay it. At maturity, 
30 days from acceptance, Stanton presents the order and 
receives the money. If he wishes the money before ma- 
turity, the banker w^ill discount it for the difference in 
time. 

Such an order is called a draft, or bill of exchange ; and 
this method of making payments. Exchange. 

A draft is always made out in the money of the country 
on which it is drawn. 

Drafts are either " sight" or " time" drafts; that is, pay- 
able on presentation, or at a certain specified time after 
presentation. 

Which is the above draft? 

The maker of a draft is called the drawer; the person 
to whom addressed, the drawee ; and the person to whom 
payable, the payee. 

Name each in the above draft. 

A draft may be transferred, like a note, by indorsement. 

If the merchants of New York owe the merchants of San 
Francisco more than San Francisco merchants owe them, 
bills of exchange on New York will be plentiful in San 
Francisco and can be purchased cheaply, or at a discount ; 
if the balance is due the other way, bills of exchange on 
New York will be scarce in San Francisco, and will, there- 
fore, be dear, or at a 'premium. 

Time drafts are discounted to the buyer for the time 
specified. The time discount is understood to be the rate 
for 1 year, unless otherwise stated. 

All discounts or premiums are reckoned as per cent of 
the face of the draft. The above draft on S. A. Spring has 
a time discount at 7%; if it be purchased at 1% premium 
what is paid for it? At 1% discount? 



230 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

EXERCISE 245. (Written.) 

Write out the following drafts to imaginary payees and 
drawers, with proper acceptance in red ink. Write no accept- 
ance on sight drafts. Why ? 

1. Find the cost in New Orleans of a draft for $5000 on 
New York at 60 days' sight, exchange being 1^% premium, 
interest at S% per annum. 

2. Bought a sight draft on St. Louis, for $580, at ^% dis- 
count; what was the cost? 

3. I paid $2481.25 for a sight draft on Chicago, at i% 
discount; what was the face of the draft? 

4. I wish to buy a 60 days draft on London, for £320, 
exchange at $4.95 per £, interest at 7%; what will it cost? 

5. Paid $1566.15 for a sight draft on Boston, at 1^% dis- 
count; what was the face? 

6. Paid $4500 for a draft on New York at 90 days sight, 
premium 1^%, interest at Q% per yr.; find the face. 

7. Find the cost of a sight draft on Paris for 4000 francs 
at 1% discount. 

8. A sight draft for $800 cost me $794; what was the rate 
of discount? 

9. What is the cost of a 10 days sight draft for $765, at 
^% premium, time discount 8^^-^? 

10. The cost of a 30 days draft for $800, time discount 
including grace 6%, was $799.60; what was the rate of dis- 
count or premium ? 

11. I buy in Sacramento a 45 days draft on Paris for 
1000 francs, interest 1% a month, exchange 1^% premium; 
what do I pay? 

12. I pay $162.75 for a draft on Paris at 45 days after 
date, time discount 1% a month, exchange l-h% premium; 
what is the face of the draft? 

13. I buy in Paris a 60 days draft on T^ondon for £500, 
exchange being at 26 francs per £, time discount 5%, what 
do I pay? Is exchange at a discount or premium? 



ARITHMETIC. 231 

The payment of small sums at a distance is often effected 
by means of postal money orders or by bank checks. 

A money order is, in effect, a sight draft drawn by the 
postmaster of the debtor upon the postmaster of the cred- 
itor; payable to the creditor, or order. 

Name the payer ^ drawer, and payee. 

Money orders are subject to the following charges and 
regulations : 

On orders not exceeding $10 8 cents. 

Over $10 and not exceeding $15 10 " 

" 15 " " " 30 15 " 

30 " " " 40 20 " 

" 40 " " " 50 25 " 

50 " " " 60 30 '' 

" 60 " " " 70 35 " 

70 " " " 80 40 " 

80 " " '' 100 45 '' 

A single order may include any amount, to $100. 

Not more than 3 orders may be issued in one day, to the 
same applicant, payable at the same office, to the same 
payee. 

A money order is negotiable, but subject to one transfer 
only. 

A check is, in effect, a sight draft on a bank. 

The value of a check as a medium of exchange is, that 
it passes for money, when certified or signed by the cashier 
of the bank on which it is drawn, and properly indorsed. 

Such a check is called a certified check, and is usually 
cashed by any bank at which it is presented, without dis- 
count to one who keeps an account with that bank. To one 
not keeping an account with that bank, it is customary to 
discount it at 20 ct. or 25 ct. per $100, and a like rate is 
charged the buyer of such a check by a bank with which 
he does not keep an account. 



232 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



EXERCISE 246. (Oral.) 

Name the charges on money orders for the following 
sums, and specify if it takes more than one order for the 
amount named : 

$219.00 $.25 $160.00 

175.00 200.00 80.50 

8.50 190.00 40.05 

3.50 60.00 100.10 



$2.50 


$20.00 


25.00 


40.00 


250.00 


125.00 


19.90 


140.00 



EXERCISE 247. 

Write sight drafts for the following sums and compute 
their cost at i% premium: 

$150.00 $375.00 $400.50 $110.00 $230.75 

190.00 75.25 20.00 318.00 500.00 

Write a draft for $325 at 15 days sight, time discount 
12%, exchange i% premium. Compute cost. 

AVrite a draft for $1000, at 10 days sight, exchange i% 
discount, time discount 9%. Compute cost. 

Write a draft for $725, at 75 days sight, time discount 
10%, exchange i% premium. Compute cost. 



J 



ARITHMETIC. 233 



AVERAGE OF PAYMENTS. 

I buy 2 bills of goods Jan. 1 of Mr. A; one of ^800 on 3 
nio., and tbe other of $250 on 4 mo. If I pay them before 
they are due, I lose the use of the money for the remainder 
of the time. If I delay paying them after they are due, 
Mr. A loses the use of the money for the time. Now, I wish 
to pay both debts together, without loss to either party. 

FULL ANALYSIS. 

The use of $300, 3 mo.=use of $1 900 mo. (300 X 3 mo.) 
4 mo.= " " $1 1000 mo. (250 X 4 mo.) 



" " " $550 j ^ ^^^- ^ = The use of $1 1900 mo. = use 
j 4 mo. \ 

of $550 5^^ of 1900 mo. = 3fj- mo. 3yV mo.=: 3 mo. 14 

da., + Jan. 1 = Apr. 15. 

CONTRACTED OPERATION. 

3x300= 900 mo. 
4X250 = 1000 mo. 

550 )1900 mo. 

3^^ mo. ■= 3 mo. 14 da. Average Time. 

Jan. 1+3 mo. 14 da. = Apr. 15, Date of Payment. 

EXERCISE 248. (Written.) 

1. I owe $180 in 5 mo., $250 in 8 mo., and $100 in 9 mo. 
At what date may I pay the whole with no loss ? 

2. A man owes a note of $800 payable in 3 mo., and one 
of $1000 payable in 4 mo. Find the average time of pay- 
ment. 

3. Bought, Apr. 8, of C. W. Spring & Co., the following 
bills of goods: $150 on 3 mo. credit; $175 on 4 mo. credit; 
and $200 on 6 mo. credit. Find the average time and date 
of payment for all. 

4. I owe 2 bills to the same man, one of $390 due in 16 



234 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

days, and one of $475 due in 20 days. In how many days 
may I pay both together? 

5. Find the average date for paying 3 bills due as fol- 
lows: May 31, $100; June 18, $150; July 9, $200. (Com- 
pute each from May 31.) 

6. If I borrow $250 for 8 mo., how long should I lend 
$400 to repay me an equal interest? 

7. If you lend a friend $550 for 6 mo., what sum should 
he lend you for 10 mo., to repay the favor? 

8. A man owes a debt of $1000 on 10 mo., of which he 
pays i in 4 mo. and ^ in 8 mo. When is the remainder 
due? 

9. Carry out the items in the following bill and find 

when it is due: 

San Francisco, Mar. 22, 1886. 
F. E. Adams (Hollister), 

Bought of Ellis, Wells & Co. 

100 yd. broadcloth @ $4 on 2 mo. 

500 '' sheeting @ 16c. " 3 '' 

75 pieces fancy goods @ $3 " 4 " 

10. In bill 3, page 120, assume the purchases to be on 3 
months time, and find the average time for payment. • 



ARITHMETIC. 235 



AVERAGE. 

Suppose I mix together 2 lb. of tea worth 60 cents a ib., 
4 ft), worth 70 cents per ft)., and 4 ft), worth 80 cents per ft). 
What is the w^eight of the mixture? Its value? Its aver- 
age value per ib.? 

EXERCISE 249. 

1. Sold 2 sheep at $2.50 per head, 3 at $3 per head, and 
10 at $3.25 per head. What was the average price per 
head? 

2. Mixed 10 centals of wheat worth 90 cents per cental, 8 
centals worth 95 cents, and 7 centals worth $1. What was 
the value of the mixture per cental? 

3. Mixed 45 ft), of sugar at 8 cents per lb., and 30 ib. at 
10| cents per ib. For what must I sell the mixture per ib. 
to gain 10% ? 

4. A grocer sold 8 rolls of butter which cost him 40 cents 
per roll, and 10 rolls that cost him 50 cents per roll, all at 
50 cents per roll. What was his average gain per roll? 

5. A liquor dealer mixed 50 gal. of liquor worth 35^cents 
per gal., 50 gal. worth 42 cents per gal., 50 gal. worth 40 
cents per gal., and 50 gal. of water. What was the average 
value per gal. of the mixture? 

6. A grocer mixed 12 lb. of sugar worth 6 cents per ib., 9 
ib. worth 8 cents per ib., 15 ib. worth 11 cents per ib., and 17 
lb. worth 13 cents per ib. What w^as the value of the mix- 
ture per ib. ? 

7. A confectioner mixed 5 ib. of candy at 40 cents per ib., 
7 ft), at 25 cents per lb., 10 ib. at 20 cents per ib., and 2 ib. 
at 50 cents per ib., selling the mixture at 30 cents per ib. 
Did he gain or lose, and how much? 

Mix 4 kinds of sugar, worth respectively 7, 8, 12, and 13 
cents, so that the mixture shall be worth 11 cents per ib. 



236 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



WORK. PROOF. 

Lb. Gain or loss. ^^'- 

7..1--.-+4 1® 7= 7 



-4- / Total gain. 

13__3 —6 



1 " 12 -=12 
3^ " 13 = =3 9 

6 ) 6 6 ( 1 1 Ct. Av. price. 



— 7 Total loss. Explanation. — Taking 1 ft), at 7 ct., 
the gain is 4 ct.; and 1 lb. at 8 ct., the gain is 3 ct. Total gain, 7 ct. 
Taking 3 lb. at 13 ct., the loss is 6 ct., and 1 ft. at 12 ct. makes 
the total loss 7 ct. 

The mixer gains on all goods below the average price, 
and loses on all above. Any set of numbers which makes 
his gains and losses equal, is correct. Usually, several cor- 
rect sets of answers may be found. 

Find two more sets of correct answers to the above exam- 
ple. Test each set by the proof given above. 

A little skill will always enable the student to balance 
the gains and losses, using whole numbers. If this be 
found difficult, make the last number of pounds fractional 
and multiply the number of pounds of each kind by the 
denominator of the fraction. 

EXERCISE 250. (Answers Yariable.) 

1. Mix three kinds of tea, worth 55, 60, and 70 cents, to 
make a mixture worth 65 cents. 

2. If 3 ft), of the 55-cent kind is used, how much of each 
of the others must be used ? 

3. How much water must be mixed with a cask of wine 
containing 30 gal. at $1.50, to reduce the price to $1? 

Sometimes one or more of the quantities may be limited. 

4. Claret worth 35 ct., 40 ct., 50 ct., and 56 ct. per gallon, 
is to be mixed with 20 gallons @ 64 ct., and 14 gallons at 
70 ct., to make the mixture worth 52 ct. per gallon. How 
many gallons of each shall be taken? 



ARITHMETIC. 237 



POWERS AND ROOTS. 

What is the area of a square whose side is 8 inches? 

The product of a number by itself is called the square 
of that number. Thus, 6^ is the square of 8. 

The number itself is the square root of the product. 
Thus, 8 is the square root of 64. 

The square is indicated thus: 8^^ 9^ 2S^. 

The square root thus: 1/64, y^81, \/625; or 64'-'^ 81^, 6SS'''\ 

EXERCISE 251. (Oral.) 

Name the results indicated by the signs affixed to the 
following numbers: 



49'^ 


r-' 


10^ 


8100^ 


i^y .3^ 


? 


IH 


20'^ 


70-^ 


iiY' .09^ 


v/25 


1/9 


1/100 


90'^ 


(1)^ • .25^ 


5^ 


42 


30'^ 


1/3600 


i-hY' -36^ 


64^ 


2' 


|/2500 


V400 


iW 1.1^ 


12^ 


1/I6 


1/I6OO 


4900^ 


ay 1.21^ 


9^ 


IV 


50^ 


100^ 


.1- ^1.2^ 


121 


1/8I 


900^ 


60^ 


0.1^ 1.44^ 


Refer to method for squaring numbers of two figures on 


K 117, 


and square 


i the numbers from 14 to 19 inclusive by 


hat method. 









SQUARE BOOT. 

To extract the square root of a number. 

The full explanation of the extraction of roots must be 
left to Algebra. We here give such illustrations as will 
serve to fix the method in the memory and give a practical 
explanation of it. 



238 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

Find the square root of 1024. 

FULL OPERATION. 

Explanation. — 1024 = tens2 + 2 x 
1 2 4. ( 30+2. tens X units + units'^ The largest 
900 tens'-' in 1024 is 900 = 302. The re- 

2X 30 = (30_)1^2T niainder 124 = 2 xtens contracted. 

]^20 (2 X 30 = 60) X units + 10'^ 4 (32 

T units^. Since 124 con- „ ' — ~ 

tains 60 x units, units — ■ 

^~=±_ = 124 --60 = 2 units, §A) ^ ^^ 
with a remainder 4, 12 4 

which is units^. 

The O's may be omitted in the operation, and because 60 
and 2 are each multiplied by 2, both may be multiplied at 
once, as shown in the contracted work. In dividing by 6, 
remember it is 6 tens in 12 tens and not 6 in 124. Omit 
mentally the right hand dividend figure. 

This operation may be extended to any number. 

In squaring a number, as 48.6, 

.6^^= .36 We see that the square of each figure 

8'^ . = 64 . occupies two places. Hence point 

4^ . =16 . off the number, whose square root 

is to be found, into groups of 2 figures each, commencing at 
the decimal point. Make full groups at the right of the 
point by annexing a if necessary. You will notice that in 
finding each figure of the root, you use the group containing 
its square. 

Find the square root of 2361.96. 
operation. 

23'61.'96(48^ 

^6 

88.) 761. 
704. 



I 



96.6) 57.96 
57.96 



ARITHMETIC. 



239 



1. 2401.^ 

2. 1.8225^ 

3. 930.25^ 

4. .1296^ 

5. 1.225^ 

6. 7056/^ 

7. .8201^^ 

8. 384736.^ 

9. 349281.^ 

10. .4096^ 

11. 4.096^ 

12. 11881/^ 

2^, 8^, 12-^ 



EXERCISE 252. (Written.) 

13. 1/17^ 25. 

14. i/1040yV 26. 

15. 1/424.36 27. 

16. 1/1.0675 28. 

17. 1/10575. 29. 

18. |/.00625 30. 

19. ^.0625 31. 

20. 1/46656. 32. 

21. V1232136. 33. 

22. 1/163.84 34. 

23. 1/6.5536 35. 

24. (Mfl)'' 36. 
18^% and 80'^ to 2 decimal places. 



\9801/ 

1866.24^ 

9312.25^ 

315844.^ 

3858.^^ 

226576.^ 

28134.^^ 

.120409^ 

42.025^ 

4.2025^ 

516961.^ 

51696. r^ 



PRACTICAL EXPLANATION OF SQUARE ROOT. 

Find the square root of 2025. 



402 



OPERATION. 

2025| 40 + 5 
1600 



2x40=80 
_5 
85 



425 
425 



Explanation, — Suppose you wish to 
lay a square floor containing 2025 sq. 
ft. You want to know its dimensions. 
Cut a piece of paper 3 inches square. 
As near as we can determine by in- 
spection 1600 (40-) sq. ft. is tlie largest 
floor. Let your paper represent this 

square floor and label as shown in the accompanying figure. There 

are still 425 sq. ft. to be built 

on. By adding strips of the 

same width to either 2 or 4 

sides of a square, we shall 

preserve the square form. It 

is easier to add to 2 sides. The 

strips put on will be of the 

same length as the square 

already made, or 40 ft.; mak- 
ing the 2 strips 80 ft. long. 

Dividing the area 425 sq. ft., 

which is to be put into these 

additions, by their length, 



40 ft. 


5 ft. 


•20U sq. ft. 


25 
.<q. ft. 


1600 sq. ft. 


00 

O 

o 



40 ft. 



5 ft. 



240 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

gives their width 5 ft. Cut two pieces of paper each 4 in. by )4 in- 
and lay by tlie square as shown above, labeUng each properly. 
But a square corner 5 ft. each way must be put on to complete the 
square. How wide must you cut the paper for this square ? The 
whole length of the 3 additions is 85 ft.; width, 5 ft.; area, 425 sq. ft. 

APPLICATION OF SQUARE ROOT. 

EXERCISE 253. 

To illustrate the following examples, draw figures and 
label them. 

1. Find the side of a square field whose area is 1024 sq. 
rd. 

2. An orange orchard, containing 3364 trees, has the 
same number of rows that there are trees in a row. How 
many rows has it? 

3. A farmer's ranch, containing 640 acres, is in square 
form; how many rods around it? 

4. I have a garden 66 ft. X 148^ ft. What is the side of 
a square field equal in area? 

";^ Find the dimensions of a rectangvdar field containing 
3200 sq. rd., and twice as long as broad. 

J&7 What is the side of a square field equal in area to a 
triangular field containing 4096 sq. rd. ? 
^1 (^ Mr. A has a field 12 rods square, and IMr. B a square 
field containing 12 sq. rd. What is the difterence in their 
area? 

^ How many rods of fence will inclose a square field of 
4 acres ? 

8 Metric. Find the length of a fence which will inclose a 
square farm of 23 hektares. 

^^ A has a square field of 10 acres; B a rectangular field 
of 10 acres, 4 times longer than broad. Which field will be 
the cheaper to fence at $2.25 a rod? 

9 Metric. I have a field 387.5 meters long and 174.8 
meters wide. My neighbor has a square field of the same 



ARITHMETIC. 



241 



area. How much more will it cost to inclose my field than 
my neighbor's at 1.25 francs per meter of fence? 
^. If it costs $425 to fence a field 72 rd. X 98 rd., what 
will it cost to fence a square field of the same area? 
*^. What are the dimensions of the largest possible 
square table that can be made from a rectangular board 
128 in. long and 32 in. wide? 



CUBE ROOT. 



What is the contents of a cube whose edge is 4 inches ? 
The product of a number used three times as a factor 
is called the cube of the number. 

The number, or factor, is the cube root of the product. 

Thus, 64 is the cube of 4 ,' 4 is the cube root of 64- 

The cube is indicated thus: 4^, <^^ ^^ 

The cube root, thus: f 64,^^7, f/l£o ; or 64^,27^,125^- 





EXERCISE 254. 






1^ ^27 


m 


10^ 


^ .3^ 


1^ ^64 


{W 


(iV)^ 


A' 


2^ h' 


{iY 


.r 


0.27'^' 


8^ 125^ 


(t¥5)^ 


1000^ 


.008^ 


3^ {^y 


{irY . 


.001« 


.064^ 


4« {lY 


(H)^ 


.2^ 


( 1 "1^ 

\12o/ 


Find the cube of 


25. 







r 2on I 

25^= ) 2X20X5 ,X^ 



J 



r 20^=8000=tens.' 

r20=-| 2 X 20' X 5^4000=2 X tens' Xu. 
' [ 20X5'= 500=t'nsX units.' 

r 20' X 5=2000=t'ns' X units. 
2 X 20 X 5'=1000=2 X tens X u.' 
5^= 125=units.' 



L 5= 



16— A 



15625 



242 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



Hence to cube a number of two figures, add tens^, 3 X 
tens' X units, 3 X tens X nnits^ and units^ 



To extract the cube root of a number. 

Find the cube root of 15625. 



20'= 
3 X 20'= 1200 



FULL OPERATION. 

15625.(20 + 5 
8000 
762l 
6000 



3X20X5' 



1625 
1500 



Explanation. — 15625 = 

tens^ + 3 X tens'-^ X units + 
3 X tens x units^ + units^. 
The largest tens^ in 15625 is 
8000 = 20^ The remainder, 

3 X tens2 ) 




CONTRACTED OPERATION. 

15625.(25 

8 



3X20'=1200 7 625 
3X20X5= 300 ' 



f;2_ 



25 



1525 



7625 



7625 = -( 3 X tens X units > X units. 
( nuits2 ) . 

3 X tens2 (20^) = 1200. This 
being the largest part found 
in 7625, dividing 7625 by 
1200 gives units 5 (more 
nearly 6, but allowance 
inust be made for the other 
parts in 7625) and 1625 
over. 1625 contains 3 x 
tens X units'-^, or 3 x 20 x 5"-^ 
= 1500, and units^, or 5^, = 
125. 



The O's may be omitted, as shown in the contracted 
work; and, instead of multiplying 1200 (3 X tens'), 300 
(3 X tens X units), and 25 (units') by 5 separately, we mul- 
tiply their sum by 5. , 

In cubing a number, as 56.8, 
.8"'= .512 We see that the cube of each figure 

6^ ^= 216. occupies 3 places. Hence point 

5' . =125 . off the number whose cube root 

is to be taken, into groups of 3 figures each, commencing at 
the decimal point. Each group will be used in finding the 
figure whose cu))e is in it. Make full periods at the right 
of the decimal by annexing 1 or 2 O's. 



ARITHMETIC. 



84027.672^=? 



3x40-=4800 

3X40X 3= 360 

3'= 9 



5169 

3X430^=554700 

3X4*30X8= 10320 

8^= 64 



565084 



84^0 2 7/6 72^(43.8 
64 



2002 



15507 



4520672 



4520672 



EXERCISE 255. (Written.) 



Find the cube root of: 



1. 


195112. 


aa. 


46656. 


23. 


.004096 


2. 


262.144 


13. 


7_2iL 
4096 


24. 


13.824 


3. 


.830584 


14. 


343 
5 12 


25. 


970299. 


4. 


512 
7 2 9 


15. 


279726.264 


26. 


3| 


5. 


17576. 


16. 


54872. 


27. 


91 

2 7 


6. 


175.76 


17. 


12.167 


28. 


15| 


7. 


81fV 


18. 


1.2167 


29. 


10 00 
1331 


8. 


166.375 


19. 


91125. 


30. 


39.304 


9. 


74.088 


20. 


1.728 


31. 


1577635. 


10. 


.117649 


21. 


2197. 


32. 


2 to 2 decimal places 


11. 


531442. 


22. 


.005832 


33. 


7 to 2 decimal places 



PRACTICAL EXPLANATION OF CUBE ROOT. 
Find the cube root of 10648. 



OPERATION. 



20^ = 
3x 20"' = 1200 
3X20X2 = 120 

2^= 4^ 

1324 



10.6481 20+2 
8000 



2648 



2648 



244 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



Explanation, — Suppose we have 
to cut a cubical block of stone to 
contain 10648 cu. in. AVe wish its 
dimensions. 

The largest cube that can be deter- 
mined by inspection contains 8000 
cu. in., or 20^ Its edge will be 20 
in. 2648 cu. in. remain to add to 
the block. Draw on the board a 
cube similar to the figure here and 
label it the same. 




8000 cu. in. 




Since a cube has six equal faces, 
we may cover them all with blocks 
of equal width and preserve the 
cubical form ; or better, three adja- 
cent faces. These 3 additions will 
be 20 in. by 20 in. or each have 400 
sq. in. in their face, making 1200 
sq. in. for the surface of the three. 
They can contain 2648 cu. in. 
Therefore, their thickness will be 
2648^1200 = 2 in. with 248 cu. in. 
over. Draw these additions on the 
board and label. 



2400 cu. iu. 



Three oblong pieces 20 in. long, 
2 in. wide, and 2 in. thick, con- 
taining in all 240 cu. in., must be 
added. Draw and label. Lastly, 
a small cube, whose edge is 2 in., 
contents 8 cu. in., must be add- 
ed. Draw and label. The cube 
is now complete. The addi- 
tions contain 2648 cu. in., using 
all the material. 

Draw the completed cube rep- 
resenting the additions as shown 
in the figure on the next page. 




248 cu. ill. 



ARITHMETIC. 



245 




The teacher should illustrate 
each step by the blocks; and 
extend the work to a second set 
of additions, making three fig- 
ures in the root. 



10648 cu. in. 



PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF CUBE ROOT. 

EXERCISE 256. 

1. Find the dimensions of a cubical box which contains 
9261 cu. in. 

2. Find the dimensions of a cubical tank which holds 
1000 gallons. 

'"8. The area of one of the faces of a cubical box is 576 sq. 
in. How much will it, hold ? 

4. How many gallons will a tank hold, of cubical form, 
the area of whose faces is 3750 sq. in.? 

5. What is the surface of a cube containing 2744 cu. in.? 

6. What are the dimensions of a cubical box containing 
I as much as one whose edge is 4 feet ? 

7. A certain cubical tank contains 1728 cu. in. What 
will a tank whose edge is twice this contain? 

8. A cubical cistern holds, when full, 4238 kilograms of 
water. What are its dimensions? 

9. The roof of a certain building is 225 meters by 14.2 
meters, horizontal dimensions: 2.^ centimeters of rain just 
fill a cubical cistern into which the roof drains. Find the 
dimensions of the cistern. 



246 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



MENSURATION. 

LINES, ANGLES, AND SUEFACES. 



'5} To 



a 
< 



f=.2 








•ri 


^;r^ 






O 
S! 


■^i>^ 


ir 




b 


Hl| 


H 






^-^^liii'puv 



^'^ 



o 2 



.:: a P< 




or Width, 



ARITHMETIC. 



24ri 



Regular Polygon. 
r i m e t e 



Circle. 





In right-angled figures the ividth and length are 
Observe. -<! sides of the figure. 

In slanting-line figures the ividth is not a side. 

Draw these figures on your slate until they are familiar. 

Write definitions of each term given above, from the 
appearance of the figure and the directions. Write exam- 
ples of lines, angles, and surfaces similar to the above, that 
you see in the room or remember. Into what kind of fig- 
ures does a diagonal divide a rectangle? How does the 
radius of a circle compare in length with the diameter? 



Draw on your 
slate two lines 
meeting so as to 
make a square 
corner. Have one 
line 4 in. long; 
the other, 3 in. 

Now draw a 
line between their 
free ends and measure it' 

If your drawing has been 
exact the third line will be 
just 5 in. long. Make these 
lines very heavy and build 
squares upon them as shown 
in this figure. Divide each 
line into inch parts by dots, 



Relations of 
the sides of a 
right - angled 
triangle. 



yr Base. ~ 


















i i i 





248 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

make inch squares by cross lines, and count the number 
of inch squares in each hirge square. 

Notice how the number in the hypotenuse square cor- 
responds with that in both the other squares put together. 

The correspondence found here is always true of right- 
angled triangles; namely: 

/ The square of the hypotenuse is the sum of the squares of 
the other sides. 

The difference of the squares of the hypotenuse and either 
side is the square of the other side. 

Find, by these laws, what should be the hypotenuse if 
the base is 8 in. and the perpendicular 6 in. Draw on the 
board and see if it is true. Try the same with 12 and 9 
in.; with 16 and 12 in. 

EXERCISE 257. (Written.) 

To illustrate the following examples, draw figures and 
label them. 

1. Perpendicular, 10 ft. Base, 10 ft. Hypotenuse? 

2. Base, 15 ft. Hypotenuse, 20 ft. Perpendicular? 

3. Perpendicular, 18 ft. Hypotenuse, 25 ft. Base? 

4. Distance diagonally across a floor 30x40 ft.? 

5. Distance diagonally across a blackboard 8X3 ft.? 

6. Length of a ladder to reach the eaves of a building 22 
ft. high, the base of the ladder being placed 6 ft. from the 
building ? 

7. If you draw the preceding ladder out 3 ft. at the bot- 
tom, how high will it reach? 

8. What length of rope will reach from the top of a 24- 
foot pole to the ground on the opposite side of a street 60 
feet wide? 

9. A rope 250 feet long was stretched from one bank of 
a river to the top of a pole 65 feet high on the opposite 
bank; how wide was the river? 



I 



I 



ARITHMETIC. 249 

10. A tree broken off 14 feet above ground rested on the 
ground 14 feet from tlie stump. How tall was the tree? 

11. Find the distance from the upper corner to the oppo- 
site lower corner of a room 40x30x12. 

12. A pole is held vertical by wires, one of w^hich is 82 
feet long, stretched from the top of the pole to the top of a 
stake 10 feet high and 36 feet from the pole. How high is 
the pole? 

13. What is the length of a path diagonally across a 10- 
acre square field ? 

14. Distance from the center of the a])Ove field to the 
center of a side ? 

15. Diagonal of a cube containing 729 cu. in.? 

16. What is the side of a square field whose diagonal is 
15 rods? Its area? 

17. A ladder 28 feet long placed in a street reaches the 
top of a building 18 feet high on one side and one 15 feet 
high on the other. How wide is the street? 

18. Two vessels sail from the same point, one north 58 
miles, and the other west 72 miles. How far apart are 
they? 

19. Find the longest straight stick you can put ii\to a box 
2^ ft. long, 1^ ft. wdde, and 12 in. deep. 

20. What is the length of the rafters of a building hav- 
ing a gable roof, the building being 36 ft. wide, the eaves 
20 ft., and the ridge-pole 30 ft. from the ground? 



SUEFACE AEEAS. 

The parallelogram is the basis for computing areas, its 
area being the length times the width. 

All triangles are \ the size of a paral- XT""^^---.^ 
lelogram of equal length and width. Thus, \ ^'""•"-^^^^ 

Figures of equal or parallel sides having more than 4 



250 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



sides, and irregular figures, are divided into triangles to 
find their areas. As fig. 6, p. 246, and fig. 7, p. 247. 

A circle may be regarded as made 
up of a very great number of equal 
triangles having their vertices at the 
center and their bases forming the cir- 
cumference. The radius of the circle, 
therefore, is the uniform width, and the 
circumference the continuous bases of 
the triangles. 

When the sides of a regular polygon (see p. 247) are very 
great in number (infinite) the perimeter becomes a circum- 
ference and the apothem a radius. 




Area of 



Parallelograms = length x width. 

( base ) 

1 Triangles = )2 length- perim... . - 
V ( circuni. . . ) 

Circumference =3. 1416 (3t) x diameter. 



X width 



. . .width, 
.apothem. 
. . .radius. 



EXERCISE 258. (Written.') 

To illustrate the following examples, draw figures and 
label them. 

1. A triangular field is 20 rods long and 18 rods wide; 
what is its area ? 

2. A field has two parallel sides 25 and o5 rods long, 
respectively, the distance between them being 13 rd. What 
is the area of the field ? 

3. What is the circumference of a circular pond whose 
radius is 11 rods? Its area? 

4. What is the radius of a circle equal in area to a tri- 
angle 1,3X10 ft.? 

5. A horse is tied to a stake by a 40-foot rope. What 
area of ground can lie graze over? 

6. A circular map of the Eastern Hemisphere is to be 3 
feet in diameter. What surface will it cover? 



ARITHMETIC. 251 

7. A regular 6-sided room has its side 6 feet long and 
the distance from the center of the room to a side is 5.196 
feet. How many sq. yd. of carpet will cover it? 

8. The area of a triangular field is 135 sq. rd., and its 
length 18 rd.; find its width. 

9. Find the area of a right-triangle, two of whose sides 
are equal, and the third is 72 feet. 

10. I have 256 sq. ft. of boards. If laid in a floor of tri- 
angular form 12 ft. wide, how long will it be? 

11. What is the area of a board 18 ft. long, whose ends 
are respectively 12 in. and 6 in.? 

12. AVhat is the distance through a tree that girts 12 ft. 
6 in.? 

13. The radius of a circle is 10 feet; find the radius of a 
circle containing 9 times its area; 4 times. 

14. A cow is one day tied to the top of a stake 5 ft. high 
by a rope 20 ft. long; on the next day she is tied to the 
bottom of the same stake by the same rope. Find the dif- 
ference in the areas over wdiich she can graze. 

15. What will it cost at $2 a rod to fence a circular plot 
of land containing 1 acre ? 

16. Find the cost of a triangular field 72X54 rods^at $125 
an acre. 

17. At $85 an acre, and $1.75 a rod for fencing, what are 
my expenses in the purchase and fencing of a field having 
two parallel sides 108 and 144 rods long, respectively, the 
distance between them being 96 rods, and the other two 
sides being 97.67 rods each? 

18. A gravel walk around a rectangular grass plot 12 ft. 
X8 ft. is 2 ft. wide; what is its area? 

19. How many times will a carriage wheel 4 ft. in diam- 
eter turn around in going 1 mile ? 

20. A square field contains 31.5 acres; what is the length 
of its diagonal? What is the circumference of a circular 
field of the same area ? 



252 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



SOLIDS— SURFACES AND CONTENTS. 



Prisms. 



Pyramid. 



Cone. 



/ 


Upper Base. / 




1. 




/l 


ower Base. 


/ 



Cylinder. 




Frustum 

of 
Pyramid. 




i 



\ 



Up. 
Base. 



L. 

Base. 



V 





Sphere. 



Frustum 
of Cone. 




The distance from the top to 

the bottom, measured by a plumb 

line, or actual height (altitude) 

of jigs. 4, 5, 7, a]id 8 is shorter 

^, . tha7i the distance measured 

Observe. < , ,, . , 
down the side. 

The distance down the side 

perpendicularly is called the 

slant height, and is used in 

^finding the areas. 



Draw these figures on your slate until they are familiar. 
Name any surfaces on these that are like the surfaces on 
p. 246. 



ARTTinrETrc. 



253 



Write examples of these solids that you see in the room 
or remember. Turn fig. 7 upside down for examples. 

The surfaces of all the preceding solids are like the plane 
surfaces on p. 246. Thus, 




The side surface of a prism or cylinder is seen to be a 
parallelogram whose length is the distance around, and 
whose width is the height of the prism or cylinder. 

Prove this by cutting a paper rectangle and folding to 



make the above figures. 

c 





The side surface of a regular pyramid or cone is seen to 
be made up of triangles whose length is the distance around 
the base and whose height is the slant height of the pyra- 
mid or cone. d 

D 





254 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

The side surface of any regular frustum is made up of 
trapezoids. 

Upper and lower bases are circles or polygons. 

The surface of a sphere is 4 times that of a circle having 
an equal diameter. 

A rectangular prism (e. g. a room) is the basis for com- 
puting the contents of solids. Its contents is the product 
of three dimensions; length, width, and height; or the area 
of the base (length X width) multiplied by the height. 

This gives the law for prisms and cylinders. 

A pyramid or cone is found to contain -J as much as a 
prism or cylinder of equal base and height; a sphere | as 
much as a cylinder of equal circumference and a height 
equal to the diameter of the sphere. Hence, 

^ - . ^ = Area of base X height. 
Cylmder ,) 

: y^^^^^ . ^ Area of base X i height. 
Contents oii Cone ) 

Sphere = Great circle X | diameter. 

Frustum = (Sum of areas of bases -f- the 

square root of their product) X i height. 

EXERCISE 259. (Written.) 

Draw figures and label them. 

1. Find the contents of a box whose length, width, and 
depth are, respectively, 4 ft., 3 ft., and 2 ft. 

2. Find its surface. 

3. Find the number of square feet necessary to make a 
piece of stovepipe 2-| feet long and 5 in. in diameter. 

4. Find the amount of tin necessary to make a tin-pail 
cylindrical in form, 6 in. in diameter and 8 in. deep, with- 
out a cover. 

5. How many quarts will the pail hold? 

6. Find how much water can be put into a tin-pail, 10 in. 



/^ 



ARITHMETIC. 255 

deep, like a frustum of a cone in form, whose bottom is 8 
in. across, and top 12 in. across. 

7. How many sq. ft. of tin in the pail described in the 
last example, without cover? 

8. A cylindrical bottle, containing 1 quart of ink, is 3 in. 
in diameter; how deep is it? 

9. A draughtsman puts a map of the world on a globe 12 
in. in diameter; what area does it cover? 

10. If your ink well is 1 in. across and 1 in. deep how 
many times can it be filled from a quart bottle ? 

11. A conical wood pile is 6 ft. high and 12 ft. in diam- 
ete^at the base; how many cords? 

12. How many bushels of oats in a conical pile 2 ft. high 
and 12 ft. around it at the base? 

13. Anticipating rain, the above pile is covered with tent- 
cloth ; how many square yards ? 

^Hh Tind the depth of a cylindrical tank that holds 20 
gallons, and is 18 in. in diameter. 

ISy If the above tank has a conical top 4 in. high, how 
many more gallons can be put in ? 

>• 16. The glass tank of a lamp is spherical in shape and 
^n. in diameter on the inside; how much oil will it hold? 

^L If a 5-gallon oil can is 10 in. square on the bottom 
how deep is it? 

18. What is the difference in the number of square feet 
of lumber necessary to make the sides of a room 16 ft. long, 
12 ft. wide, and 10 ft. high, and one of circular floor con- 
taining the same area and of the same height? 

iV Find the number of cu. ft. inclosed by a barn 60 ft. 
long, 40 ft. wide, and 20 ft. high, with a pyramidal roof 8 
ft. high, all inside measurements. 

20. How many cu. ft. of wood are in a log 20 feet long 
and 14 in. in diameter. 

21. The earth's diameter is about 8000 miles; what is 
its area ? Its volume or bulk ? 



256 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

22. At 28 ct. per cu. ft. what is the cost of a stone wall 28 
in. thick at the base and 18 in. at the top, 4 ft. high and 3G 
rd. long ? 

23. The above wall is laid on a foundation of Portland 
cement 4 inches wider than the base of the wall, and 8 in. 
deep. What is the cost of the foundation at 32 ct. a cu. ft. ? 

24. How many cu. ft. in a regular 8-sided post 10 feet 
high, the length of one side being 3 in., and the distance 
through it 7.24 in. ? 

EXERCISE 260. (Oral.) 

1. Area of a triangular field 10 rd. long and 8 rd. wide? 

2. AVidth of a triangular field containing 1 A., length 20 
rd.? 

3. Width of a rectangular field, with dimensions as in 
Example 2? 

4. Number of cu. ft. in a conical pile G ft. high and 7 ft. 
across at the base? 

5. Area of a square field whose diagonal is 20 rd.? 

6. Radius of a circle whose circumference is 6-f- ft.? 

7. Area of a field having two parallel sides 40 and 30 
rd. respectively^ and width 10 rd.? 

8. How many times will a wheel of 3^ ft. radius turn 
around in going 4 rods ? 

9. Length of rafters on a barn whose gable end is 32 ft. 
wide and the roof 12 ft. high? 

10. Number of sq. in. of material to make a 2-ft. length 
of 7 in. stove pipe, allowing 1 in. for lapping? 

11. Cost of fencing the field in Example 3 at $2 a rod? 

12. Height of a pyramid containing 144 cu. in., the area 
of whose base is 36 sq. in.? 

13. Height of a cone of the same measurement as the 
preceding pyramid ? 

14. Number of cu. yd. of gravel necessary to cover a walk 
3 ft. wide, 54 ft. long, and 3 in. deep? 



ARITHMETIC. 257 



MISCELLANEOUS PROBLEMS. 

EXERCISE 261. 

1. Spent \ of my money for a watch, g\ of the remainder 
for a chain, \ of what then remained for a suit of clothes, 
and "3^ of the rest for a pair of shoes, when I had $150 left; 
what had I at first? 

2. Imported 7 casks of brandy, 30 gal. each, duty $2 per 
gal., charges $27; sold the whole for $1714.27^, gaining 
A2\% on the whole cost; what was the cost of the liquor 
per gal. at the foreign port? 

3. A man dying leaves in the savings bank for his 16- 
year old son such a sum of money as shall amount to $5000 
when the son is 21. If the bank adds the interest to the 
principal every half year, how much money must be left in 
the bank? Interest at 6%. 

4. My agent sells for me 800 bbl. flour at $4.75, commis- 
sion If %, and buys sugar at 6^ cents a ife., commission 2%] 
what is the whole commission, and how many lb. of sugar 
do I receive? 

5. A rectangular field of 4^ A., whose breadth is f its 
length, is surrounded by a close board fence 8^ ft. high, 
with 8-foot posts 5 in. square and 8 ft. apart, and two rows 
2-by-4 scantling around the field. If the lumber cost 
$440.44, what was the price per M ? 

6. Find the dimensions of a rectangular field whose 
length is 3 times its width, and whose area is 327.46 ares. 

7. ^;tZlx41A=.? 

8. Find the cost of carpeting a room 17 ft. by 13 ft. 2 in. 
with carpet 1 meter wide, at 85 cents a meter, laid length- 
wise. 

9. Add 5.13875 miles and 25.312 rods, take away 

147.3125 yards, and give the result in feet. 
17— A 



258 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

10. A horse is tethered by a rope 12.4 meters long; what 
area can he feed ? 

11. A land company buys 36 acres of land whose breadth 
is y^Q- its length, and divides it into city lots. 3 streets 80 
feet wide run lengthwise, and 2 streets 60 ft. wide, crosswise. 
The lots are 50 by 118^ ft., and are sold at $220. How 
much is realized by the sale ? 

12. Suppose the company to have paid $500 an acre for 
the above land, and $800 in paving, grading, etc.; what is 
its per cent of profit in the venture ? 

13. I hire money at 7% to purchase one of these lots, and 
after the lapse of 15 mo. I sell for $500; find my profit %. 

14. What is the diameter of a circle whose area is 278.54 
ares? 

15. A grain dealer buys 3000 centals of barley, i of which 
he sells at a gain of S%, i at a gain of 12%, ^ at a gain of 
16%, and the remainder at a gain of 20%. Had he sold 
the whole at a gain of 15%, he would have received $54 
more. Find the cost per cental. 

16. A commission merchant sold cotton cloth on 1|% 
commission, and invested the proceeds in cotton on 2|% 
Com. If his commissions amounted to $241.40, what sum 
was received for the cloth? Sum given for the cotton? 

17. Bought a note for f its face, on which a collector ob- 
tained 25% more than I paid for it and charged me 5% for 
collecting. If I realized $75 by the transaction, what was 
the fa,ce of the note ? 

18. If 4 men working 10 hr. per day do a piece of work 
in 60 days, how many men will it take to do twice the work 
in 40 days, working 8 hr. per day? 

« ?M^The largest circular path that could be made in a cer- 
tain square garden was 5^ rods in diameter; what was the 
area of the garden? 

20. What is the base of a triangle whose area is §^.28 
ares, and whose altitude is 39.4 meters? 



ARITHMETIC. 259 

21. Find the area iu hektares of a piece of ground 1 mile 
square. 

22. A merchant bought goods for '$3600, marked them at 
30% advance, and finally sold them at 10, and 5 off from 
the marked price for cash. Find his selling price. 

23. How large a draft, payable 60 days after sight, can 
be bought for $502.25, exchange being 1% and interest 6% ? 

24. Express as a decimal ) ? i lI\ i / q i' V \ vy - • 

25. A and B together own 540 acres of land and agree to 
share it in the proportion of 7 to 11. AMiat number of 
acres does each receive ? 

26. Find the surface and solidity of a sphere whose diam- 
eter is 3.64 meters. 

27. A mechanic agreed to work 80 days on condition 
that he should receive $1.75 and board for every day he 
worked, and pay 75 cents a day for board when idle. His 
earnings were $80; how many days did he work? 

28. Says A to B, f of my age equals | of yours. The sum 
of their ages was 136; find the age of each. 

29. A cylindrical tank is 3.8 meters high, and diameter 
of base 2.8 meters, both inside measurements. How much 
water will it hold and what is its weight in kilograms? 

30. Divide 448 A. 144 sq. rd. of land among A, B, C, and 
D, so that A shall have I of the whole + 4 A. 126 sq. rd.; 
B 4- of the remainder; C ^ of what then remains; and D 
the rest. 

31. How deep a ditch 3 ft. wide must be dug around a 
field 5 rods square that the earth removed may raise the 
surface of the field 6 in.? 

32. My garden is 43.6 meters long and 27.9 meters wide. 
My rain gauge registered 16 centimeters in the late storm. 
How many kilograms of water fell on my garden? 

SSi, How many hogsheads, of 63 gallons each, will a cyl- 
indrical tank, 10 ft. in diameter and 10 ft. deep, hold ? 



260 CALIFORNIA SERIES. 

34. What is the vahie of $1 in shillings and pence? In 
francs ? 

35. A rectangular tank holds 58248 liters of water: two 
of its inside dimensions are 3.7 meters and 3.42 meters; 
what is the third dimension? 

36. Find the whole cost of 550 yd. Brussels carpeting at 
$1.80 a yard, commission for purchasing being 2^%, draft 
^%^ and $17 freight prepaid. 

37. A certain principal at a certain rate amounts to $750 
in 3 yr., and the interest is i of the princij^al. Find the 
principal and the rate. 

38. How much wood in a pile 32.5 meters long, 3.2 me- 
ters wide, and 1.8 meters high? 

39. Two men dig a ditch for $53; one man worked 3^ 
days and dug 14^ rd. a day; the other worked as many 
days as the first dug rods per day. What did each receive 
if they shared in proportion to the time worked ? 

40. A and B furnish capital to engage in business and C 
does the work for -^ the profit. A contributes $8000 and B 
$10000. They gain $5400. Find the share of each. 

41. If 52 men can dig a trench 355 ft. long, 60 ft. wide, 
and 8 ft. deep, in 15 days, what is the length of a trench 45 
ft. wide and 10 ft. deep, which 45 men can dig in 25 days ? 

42. At what price must cloth that cost $3.50 a yard be 
marked that may fall 20 per cent and still gain 20 per cent 
on the cost? 

43. Bought 8 cd. 6f cd. ft. of wood at $7.20 a cord and 
paid in equal weights of butter and cheese at 20 cents a lb. 
for butter and 12 cents a lb. for cheese. How many lb. of 
each were required? 

44. Find the surface of a cone Avhose altitude is 3.8 me- 
ters and diameter of base 2.28 meters. 

45. Find the prime factors of 729, 336, and 1836. 

46. Paid $2225 for 180 sheep and sold them for $2675; 
what should I gain on 1500 sheep at the same rate? 



ARITHMETIC. 261 

47. Find the g. c. f. of 84, 336, 420, and 504. 

48. Write the 38th example with the same values in our 
measures and work it, giving the result in cords and feet. 

49. What is f of an acre of land worth, if f of an acre is 
worth $60? 

50. A tank will hold 420 gallons and is | full; what part 
full is it if 87-| gallons be added? 

51. Bought 24 T. 4 cwt. 1 qr. 18 ft), of EngUsh iron at 3 
pence per lb., long ton weight, and sold the same at $142 
per short ton. What did I gain? 

52. When rain falls 3 centimeters in depth, how many 
kilograms have fallen on a garden 73.3 meters long by 38.18 
meters wide? 



53. $714.50. Los Angeles, Aug. 28, 1885. 

For value received I promise to pay H. Miner, or order, 
Seven Hundred Fourteen and -j^^ Dollars, on demand, with 
interest at 12% per annum. James Towle. 

Find the amount Mar. 17, 1886. 



54. $534.00. Los Angeles, Jan. 4, 1886. 
Six months after date, I promise to pay B. Caldwell, or 

order. Five Hundred Thirty-four Dollars, with interest at 
^% per annum, value received. W. P. Johnson. 

Discounted at a Los Angeles bank Mar. 17, 1886, at 10%. 
Find the proceeds. 

55. When are the hour and minute hands of a clock to- 
gether next after 12 o'clock? 

56. What is the time between 12 and 1 o'clock when the 
hour and minute hands are equidistant from 12 on oppo- 
site sides? 

57. I buy a farm for $5000, to be paid for in 5 payments; 
interest at 10% payable annually. The payments to be 
0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 years from date of purchase. It is so ar- 
ranged that I pay exactly the same amount of money at each 
payment. What is the equal payment? 



262 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



ABBEETIATIOI^S. 



A. 


Acre, or acres. 


gro. 


Gross. 


Acc't. 

Am't. 

Anal. 

Ans. 

Apr. 

Aug. 

Bal. 

bbl, 

bu. 


Account. 

Amount. 

Analysis. 

Answer. 

April. 

August. 

Balance. 

Barrel, or barrels. 

Bushel, or bushels. 


hdkf. 

bM. 

hr. 

in. 

Jan. 

1. 

lb. 

1. c. m. 


Handkerchief, or hand- 
kerchiefs. 

Hogshead, hogsheads. 

Hour, or hours. 

Inch, or inches. 

January. 

Link, or links. 

Pound, or pounds. 

Least common multi 
pie. 

Meter, meters, one thou 
sand. 


bun. 
C. 


Bundle, or bundles. 
Cost. 


M. 


cd. 


Cord, or cords. 


Mar. 


March. 


cd. ft. 


Cord foot. 


Mdse. 


Merchandise. 


eh. 


Chain, or chains. 


mi. 


Mile, or miles. 


Co. 


Company, 


min. 


Minute, or minutes. 


Com. 


Commission. 


mo. 


Month, or months. 


Cr. 


Credit, or creditor. 


Mo. 


Monthly. 


c, ct. 


Cent, or cents. 


No. 


Number. 


cu. ft. 


Cubic foot, or feet. 


Nov. 


November, 


cu. in. 


Cubic inch, or inches. 


Oct. 


October. 


cu. yd. 


Cubic yard, or yards. 


oz. 


Ounce, or ounces. 


cwt. 


Hundredweight. 


p. 


Page, or pages. 


d. 


Penny, or pence. 


P. and L. 


Profit and loss. 


da. 


Day, or days. 


pk. 


Peck, or pecks. 


Dec. 


December. 


Pop. 


Popular. 


deg. 


Degree, or degrees. 


pr. 


Pair, or pairs. 


do., ditto 


. The same. 


pt. 


Pint, or pints. 


doz. 
Dr. 


Dozen. 
Debtor. 


pwt. 


Pennyweight, or pen 
nyweights. 


far. 
Feb. 
ft. 
G. 


Farthing, or farthings. 

February. 

Foot, or feet. 

Gain. 


qr. 
qt. 
rd. 
Reed. 


Quire, or quires. 
Quart, or quarts. 
Rod, or rods. 
Received. 


gal. 


(Jallon, or gallons. 


rm. 


Ream, or reams. 


g. c. f. 


Cireatest common fac- 
tor. 


Sci. 
s. 


Science, 

Shilling, or shillings. 


gi. 


Gill, or gills. 


scr. 


Scruple, or scruples. 


gr. 


Grain, or grains. 


sec. 


Second, or seconds. 


gran. 


Granulated. 


Sept. 


September, 



ARITHMETIC. 



263 



S. P» Selling price, 

sq. eh. S(juare chain, or chains. 

sq. ft. Stjuare foot, or feet. 

sq.in. Square inch, or inches, 

sq. 1. Square link, or links. 

sq. mi. Square mile, or miles, 

sq. rd. Square rod, or rods. 



sq. yd. 


Square yard, or yards 


T. 


Ton, or tons. 


vol. 


Volume, or volumes. 


wt. 


Weight. 


yd. 


Yard, or yards. 


yr. 


Year, or years. 



SIGISTS. 



+ 


Addition. 




Ratio, or Division. 


— . 


Subtraction. 


_ 


Equals. 


X 


Multiplication. 


% 


Dollars. 


^- 


Division. 


^ 


Cents. 





Parenthesis. 


£ 


Pounds (Eng. money) 


% 


Per cent. 




Equals (used in propor 


. 


Decimal Point. 




tion). 


<"c 


Account. 


@ 


At. 


o 


Degree. 


1 


Square Root. 


1 


Minute (circ. measure). 


u 


The same. 


II 


Second (circ. measure). 




Therefore. 



264 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



GLOSSAEY. 



Some of the terms in the glossary are not employed in the body of the book. Such as 
are so employed are indicated by the figures in parentheses. These figures refer to the 
page on which the subject is fii'st noticed. 



Abstract number, (36), a number 
used by itself without reference 
to any particular thing. 

Acceptance, (229), agreeing to the 
terms of a draft by writing one's 
name across the face. 

Account, (221), a record of debts 
and credits. 

Accurate interest, (209), interest 
for days computed on a basis of 
365 days to a year. 

Addition, (14), the process of put- 
ting two or more numbers to- 
gether into one. 

Ad valorem duty, (200), a tax on 
the value of imported goods. 

Aliquot part, (115), an exact divis- 
or, integral or fractional. 

Alloy, (168), a mixture of two or 
more metals; a baser metal 
which is mixed with a finer, as 
in money. 

Altitude or actual height, (252), 
the shortest distance from the 
top to the base of a triangle, 
pyrandd, cone, or frustum. 

Amount, (14), the sum of two or 
more numbers; (201), in Inter- 
est, the sum of principal and 
interest; also, a sum of money. 

Analysis, (172), a separation into 
parts for the special treatment 
of each. 

Angle, (246), the difference in direc- 
tion of two lines that meet. 

Apothem, (247), the distance from 
the center of a regular polygon 
to the central point of any side. 

Arc, (146), any part of the circum- 
ference of a circle. 

Are, (131), the metric unit of land 
measure. 

Area, (129), the number of square 
units in a surface. 



Arithmetic, the knowledge of 
numbers and how to use them. 

Assets, (178), the actual property 
of a person, or company. 

Average, (235), the mean of two or 
more unequal numbers. 

Avoirdupois, (142), the weight in 
common use. 

Axis of the earth, (147), a straight 
line joining the two poles. 

Balance, (221), equality of weights 
or numbers; the excess of one 
sum of money over another. 

Balance sheet, (226), a tabular 
statement of facts showing the 
condition of a business. 

Bank, (226), an establishment for 
the deposit, exchange, or loan of 
money. 

Bank discount, (218), the interest 
taken by a bank from the face 
or amount of a note, for paying 
it before it is due. 

Bankrupt, one declared by law to 
be unable to pay his debts. 

Base, (246), in geometrical hgures, 
the side or face on wliich they 
stand; (181), in Percentage, that 
number of which another is a 
part or per cent. 

Bill, (119), a formal statement of 
goods sold or services rendered. 

Bill of exchange, (229), a draft. 

Bond, a written contract for the 
payment of a sum of money un- 
der given conditions. 

Broker, (190), one who buys and 

sells for another. 
Brokerage, ( 190), a percentage paid 

to a l)roker for doing business. 

Cancellation, (86), the division of 
dividend and divisor by a com- 
mon factor. 



ARITHMETIC. 



265 



Capital, (178), money or other 
property by means of which 
business is done. 

Carat, (143), a 24th in pure gold of 
the entire weight of a mixture 
of gold and baser metals ; thus, 
18 carats tine means that || of 
the mixture is pure gold. 

Cashier, (228), one who has charge 
of the cash and cash transac- 
tions of a banlc or company. 

Cental, (142), 100 pounds. 

Centi-, ( 127), a prefix in the French 
metric system meaning y^u o^'. 

Certificate of deposit, (227), a writ- 
ten statement by a bank that 
you have deposited money in it. 

Chain, (see table, p. 123). 

Check, (227), an order on a banlv 
for money. 

Chord, (14G), a straight line join- 
ing any two points in the cir- 
cumference of a circle. 

Circle, (seep. 146). 

Circulate, (107), the repeating fig- 
ures in a circulating decimal. 

Circulating decimal, (107), a deci- 
mal fraction in which the same 
figure, or set of figures, is con- 
stantly repeated. 

Circumference, (146), the bound- 
ing line of a circle. 

Column, (6), a vertical line of num- 
bers. 

Commercial discount, (218, 219), a 
deduction on the face of a bill, 
note, or other writing for money. 

Commission, (189), a percentage 
allowed on the value of goods 
bought or sold, money collected, 
etc. 

Common denominator, (76), one 
common to two or more frac- 
tions. 

Common factor, (65), a whole num- 
ber exactly contained in each of 
two or more numbers. 

Common multiple, (68), a number 
which exactly contains two or 
more whole numbers. 

Company, (194), two or more men 
uniting in some business or en- 
terprise. 



Complex fraction, (91), one hav- 
ing a fraction or mixed number 
in either numerator or denomi- 
nator, or both. 

Composite number, (63), one made 
up of factors. 

Compound interest, (217), interest 
on principal and unpaid interest. 

Compound number, (122), a con- 
crete number expressed in two 
or ]nore units. 

Compound proportion, (177), an 
equality between a simple and a 
compound ratio. 

Compound ratio, (177), the indi- 
cated prodtict of two or more 
simple ratios, term by term. 

Concrete number, (36), one applied 
to a particular object. 

Cone, (252), a solid whose base is a 
circle and summit a point. 

Contents, (129, 135), the number 
of units in a surface or solid. 

Corporation, (201), a body of peo- 
ple authorized by law to do busi- 
ness. 

Credit, (223), that which one has 
paid. 

Creditor, (223), one to whom a debt 
is owing. 

Cube, (134), a solid having 6 square 
faces; (241), the product of a 
number used 3 times aS a factor. 

Cube root, (241), one of the 3 equal 
factors of a number. 

Customs, (200), taxes on imports or 
exports. 

Cylinder, (252), a straight solid 
whose bases are equal and par- 
allel circles. 

Days of grace, (218), 3 days that a 
clebt may remain unpaid after 
the time due, allowed by law in 
many states. 

Debt, (223), that which one is ow- 
ing. 

Debtor, (223), one who owes. 
Deci-, (127), a prehx in the French 
metric system meaning ^-^ of. 

Decimal, a number so written 
that each character is tenfold 
greater at each remove from 
right to left. 



266 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



Decimal fraction, (102), that part 

of a number at the right of the 

decimal point. It is always less 

than a unit. 
Decimal notation, (5), the art of 

writing- numbers by the decimal 

scale, or scale of lO's. 
Decimal point, (5), a period (.) at 

the right of units in a decimal. 
Decimal system, the method of 

writing numbers in decimals. 

Degree, (146), l-360th of a circum- 
ference. 

Deka-,(127), a prefix in the French 
metric system meaning 10. 

Denominator, (72), the number be- 
low the line in a fraction; corre- 
sponds to the divisor in division. 

Diagonal, (216), a line joining any 
two corners of a polygon not 
lying next to each other. 

Diameter of a circle or sphere, 
(U()), a straight line drawn 
through the center and termi- 
nating in the circumference. 

Difference, (21), the result obtain- 
ed by taking one number from 
another. 

Digits, the ten symbols of the 
decimal notation. 

Dimensions, (254), length and 
breadth of a surface, or length, 
breadth, and height of a solid. 

Discount, (219), a deduction from 
the face of a debt; (202), in 
Stocks, the rate the market value 
is below par. 

Dividend, (43), in Division, the 
number to be divided; (72), in 
fractions, the numerator; (202), 
in business, the income of a 
stock company. 

Division, (43), the process of find- 
ing how many times one num- 
ber contains another; the pro- 
cess of separating a number into 
ecpial parts. 

Divisor, (43), the number by which 
we divide; (72), in fractions, the 
nominator. 

Draft, (229), a written order l)y 
one person upon another to pay 
money to a third. 

Drawee of a draft, (see p. 229). 



Drawer of a draft, (see p. 229). 

Duty, (199), a tax on imports or ex- 
ports. 

Equation, a statement of equality 
between two numbers or sets of 
numbers. 

Equation of payments, (233), aver- 
age of payments. 

Even number, one having 2 for a 
factor. 

Exact divisor, (63), one contained 
in the dividend an exact num- 
ber of times ; may be integral or 
fractional. 

Exact interest, (209), interest for 
days computed on a basis of 365 
days to a year. 

Exchange, (228), the method of 
making payments to parties at 
a distance by drafts. 

Exponent, (63), a figure placed to 
the right and above a number, 
showing how many times the 
number is to be usecl as a factor. 

Extremes, (176), the first and last 
terms of a proportion. 

Face, (214), the sum of money 
mentioned in a business paper. 

Factor, (35), an integral exact 

divisor. 
Figures, (5), the ten symbols of the 

decimal notation. 
Firm, (178), the name under which 

a company does business. 

Formula, ( 17(')), a rule expressed by 
symbols or figures; a very brief 
statement. 

Fraction, (72), an indicated divis- 
ion ; one or more equal parts of 
a unit. 

Franc, (157), the unit of French 
money. 

Frustum, (252), the part of a cone 
or pyramid left after cutting otl" 
the top by a section parallel to 
the base. 

Gain, (185), the amount by which 
the selling i)rice of an article 
exceeds its cost. 

Grace, (218), an allowance of 3days 
made by some states for the pay- 
ment of a debt after the set time 
has expired. 



ARITHMETIC. 



267 



Gram, (145), the unit of metric 

weight equal to 15.43 grains 

Troy. 
Great circle of a sphere, (254), one 

that cuts the sphere into two 

equal parts. 
Greatest common factor, (65), the 

greatest factor common to two 

or more numbers. 
Greenback, (221), U. S. currency 

note, now payable in gold. 
Gross -weight, (200), the weight of 

packed goods, including the 

weight of the boxes or other 

packing material. 
Guarantee, or guaranty, the w^ar- 

ranting by another of the pa}-- 

ment of a debt. 

Hekto- ,( 127), a prefix in the French 
metric sj^stem meaning 100. 

Horizontal, (246), parallel to the 

horizon. 
Hypotenuse, (245), the longest side 

of a right-angled triangle. 

Imports, (199), goods brought into 
a country. 

Improper fraction, (73), one whose 
numerator equals or exceeds its 
denominator. 

Indorse, (214), to write on the back 
of a business paper. 

Indorsement, (214, 215), any writ- 
ing on the back of a business 
paper; as a name or a partial 
payment. 

Insolvent, unable to pay debts 
in full. 

Inspection, (64), a careful exam- 
ination ; obtaining a result with- 
out working the example. By 
inspection I find that 2, 3, 5, and 
11, are not factors of 223. 

Installment,(215), a part payment. 

Insurance, (194), a security against 
loss ; the value put upon proper- 
ty to be paid in case of loss. 

Integer, (72), a number of one or 
more units; that part of a deci- 
mal at the left of the decimal 
point. 

Interest, (204), money paid for the 
use of money. 

Kilo-, (127), a metric prefix mean- 
ing 1000. 



Least common denominator, (76), 
the smallest denominator com- 
mon to two or more fractions. 

Least common multiple, (68), the 
smallest nnniber that will con- 
tain each of several numbers. 

Liabilities, (178), the debts of a 
firm or individual. 

Link, (126), a division of a survey- 
or's chain, 7.92 inches in length. 

Linear unit, (128), any line taken 
as the unit, as the foot, yard, or 
m eter. 

Liter, (leeter), (141), the unit of 
metric liquid measure; equal to 
1.0567 liquid quarts. 

Long division, (53), the method of 
writing the work in division in 
full. 

Longitude, (150), distance in de- 
grees east or west of the meri- 
dian of Greenwich, Eng. 

Loss, (185), the amount the cost of 
an article exceeds the selling 
price. 

Lowest terms, (75), when the nu- 
merator and denominator of a 
fraction contain no common 
factor. 

Market value, (201), the price of 

stocks in the market. 
Maturity of a note, draft, or bill, 

(214), the date when it tiecomes 

due. 

Means, (176), the second and third 
terms of a projiortion. 

Measuring unit, (127), a unit in 
which the quantity measured is 
expressed. 

Mensuration, (246), measuring 
and calculating the contents of 
surfaces and solids. 

Meter, (127), the unit of length 
from which the decimal system 
of weights and measures is 
named, equal to 39.37 inches. 

Metric system, (127), the decimal 
system of weights and measures. 

Milli-, (127), a metric prefix mean- 
in o- _ J of 

Miner's inch, (157), flowing water 
at the rate of 10.4279 gallons per 
minute. 



268 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



Minuend, (21), the number in Sub- 
traction from which another is 
taken. 

Minus, (21), less, or diminished by ; 
the name of the sign of subtrac- 
tion. 

Mixed number, (73), a whole num- 
ber and fraction combined. 

Mortgage, (226), a grant of proper- 
ty to a creditor as security for 
the payment of a debt. 

Multiple of a number, (07), a num- 
ber that contains it an exact 
number of times. 

Multiplicand, (34), the number to 
be multiplied. 

Multiplication, (34), the process of 
finding a number of times a 
given number. 

Multiplier, (34), the number by 
which we multiply. 

Myria-, (127), a metric prefix 
meaning 10000. 

Negotiable, (214), can be transfer- 
red to another part}^, as a note 
or draft. 

Net proceeds, the sum remaining 
from a sale after the payment 
of all expenses. 

Net weight, (200), the weight of 
packed goods, not including the 
weight of cases, or packing ma- 
terial. 

Notation, (5), writing numbers. 

Note, (214), a written promise to 
pay money. 

Number, (5), one or more units. 

Numeration, (9), reading of num- 
bers written decimally. 

Numerator, ( 72), the number above 
the line in a fraction; corre- 
sponds to the divisor in division. 

Odd number, not containing two 
as a factor. 

Oral, spoken. 

Order, (224), a written direction to 
one person to pay money to 
another. 

Parallel, (240), having the same 

direction. 
Parallelogram, (240), a 4-sided 

figure whose opposite sides are 

parallel. 



Partial payment, (214), payment 
of a part of a note. 

Partners, (178), associates in busi- 
ness. 

Partnership, (178), an association 
of persons to carry on business 
together. 

Par value, (201), nominal of face 

value. 
Payee, (229), one in whose favor a 

draft or check is drawn. 

Payer, (229), the drawee of a draft 
or check. 

Per, by. 

Per cent, (181), hundredths; liter- 
ally, by the hundred. 

Percentage, (181), a number ob- 
tained by taking a per cent of 
another. 

Perch of masonry, (138, 155), 10^ 
or 24| cubic feet, according to 
custom. 

Perimeter, (247), the boundary 
line of a polygon. 

Perpendicular, (246), at right an- 
gles with; vertical. 

Personal property ,(198),movables, 
including money and stock. 

Plane, a surface straight in all di- 
rections. 

Plus, and, or added to, (14), name 
of the sign of Addition. 

Poles of the earth, points of the 
surface which have no motion 
in the daily revolution. 

Policy, (194), the written contract 
in insurance. 

Poll tax, (198), a tax assessed 
equally upon men without re- 
gard to property. 

Polygon, (246), a plane surface 
bounded by straight lines. 

Pound, (157), the unit of English 
money, .$4.86. 

Power, (63), the product of.a num- 
ber repeated as a factor. 

Premium, (194), the percentage 
]iaid for a policy of insurance; 
(202), the rate of the market 
above par value of stocks. 

Present worth, (212), the present 
vahie of a debt due at a future 
time. 



ARITHMETIC. 



269 



Prime factor, (63), one not made 
np of other factors. 

Prime number, (63), one not made 
up of factors. 

Principal, (204), money lent at in- 
terest. 

Prism, (252), a solid whose side 
faces are parallelograms and 
whose ends are equal parallel 
polygons. 

Problem, something to be done. 

Proceeds, (190), sum left after tak- 
ing out a discount or commis- 
sion. 

Product, (34), the result of multi- 
plying one number hy another. 

Pront, (185), gain. 

Proof, (18), a test of correctness of 

work; no arithmetical proof is 

a perfect test. 
Proper fraction, (73), one whose 

numerator is smaller than its 

denominator. 
Proportion, (176), two equal ratios. 
Pyramid, (252), a solid of plane 

faces whose base is a polygon 

and summit a point. 
Quadrant, (146), the fourth part 

of a circumference; ninety de- 
grees. 
Quadrilateral, (246), a polygon of 

four sides. 
Quantity, anything that can be 

measured, weighed, or counted. 

Quintal, (142), 100 pounds, by the 
long ton table 112 pounds. 

Quotient, (43), the result of di- 
viding one number by another. 

Radius, (146), distance from the 
center to the circumference of a 
circle. 

Rate of interest or discount, (181), 
per cent for a given time. 

Ratio, (176), the indicated division 
of one number by another of 
the same kind. 

Real estate, (198), lands and 
houses, immovable property. 

Receipt, (119), a written acknowl- 
edgment of something received. 

Rectangle, (128), a polygon of four 
sides and four square corners; 
a right angled parallelogram. 



Reduction, (123), changing a num- 
ber; (74), or fraction in name 
without changing value. 

Remainder, (21), number left after 
taking away one number from 
another. 

Remittance, (193), money or an 
order for money, sent to a dis- 
tant place. 

Right angle, (146), a square cor- 
ner. 

Roman notation, (12), writing 
numbers by capital letters of 
our alphabet. 

Root of a number, (237), one of 
its equal factors. 

Rule, a direction for working 
problems. 

Section of land, (129), a mile 
square. 

Security, a pledge for the pay- 
ment of a debt. 

Share, (201), one of the equal 
parts into which the capital of a 
company or corporation is di- 
vided. 

Short division, (50), division in 
which the result only is w^ritten. 

Sight draft, (229), one payable on 

presentation. 
Simple number, (122), a multiple 

of a single unit; expressed in 

terms of a single unit. , 
Slant height, (252), the shortest 

distance down the side of a cone 

or pyramid. 
Solid, (134), a body having length, 

breadth, and thickness. 
Solution, the process of work- 
ing a problem, also the answer 

obtained. 
Specific duty, (200), a tax on the 

measure, number, or weight of 

imported goods. 
Sphere, (252), a solid body having 

a uniformly curved surface. 
Square, (128), a rectangle of equal 

sides ; the product of two equal 

factors. 
Square root, (237), one of the two 

equal factors of a number. 
Standard time, (154), the time of 

the meridians of 75°, 90°, 105°, 

and 120°. 



270 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



Statement, (226), a tabular ar- 
rangement of assets and liabili- 
ties. 

Stock, (178, 201), the capital of a 
firm or comi)anj\ 

Subtraction, (21), the process of 
taking one number from an- 
other. 

Subtrahend, (21), the number to 
be taken from another. 

Sum, (14), the result obtained by 
adding; money. 

Surface, (128), that which has 
length and breadth ; the outside 
of a solid. 

Symbol, a letter or other charac- 
ter used for a member. 

Tangent, (146), an indefinite 
straight line touching a curve. 

Tax, (198), a sum charged by the 
government or other authorit}^ 
upon property or person. 

Terms of a fraction, (72), the nu- 
merator and denominator. 

Time draft, (229), one payable a 
certain specified time after pre- 
sentation or date. 

Trapezium, (246), an irregular four 
sided polygon. 



Trapezoid, (246), a trapezium with 
two opposite sides parallel. 

Triangle, (246), a polygon of three 

sides. 

Troy weight, (143), used for gold, 
silver, precious stones, etc. 

True discount, (212), the differ- 
ence between a sum due at a fu- 
ture time and its present value. 

Unit, (5), a single thing; a collec- 
tion of several things taken as 
one. 

Value of a fraction, (72), the re- 
sult of dividing the numerator 
by the denominator. 

Vara, (154), a Spanish measure of 
length equal to 2.782 feet. 

Vertex, (246), the point opposite 
the base of a cone, pyramid, or 
triangle. 

Vertical, (246), at right angles to 
the horizon. 

Volume of a solid, the product of 
its three dimensions; its con- 
tents. 

Weight, (142), the force wdiich 
draws a body downward. 

Width, (246), one dimension of a 
surface or solid. 



ARITHMETIC, 






AE"SW 




271 



Exercise 22. 

i. 818. 
2. 393. 
^. 2756. 
4. 7931. 
J. 9448. 
6\ 9135. 
7. 3099. 
<§. 7938. 
.9. 13872. 

10. 6752. 

ii. 11110. 

12. 26700. 
i^. 18701. 
14. 18287. 
i5. 13945. 
i<?. 10019. 
17. 11210. 

Exercise 23. 

1. 388. 
^. 286. 
^. 441. 

4. 421. 

5. 353. 

6. 392. 

7. 443. 
<^. 517. 
9. 417. 

i(?. 269. 

11. 346. 
i^. 454. 
iJ. 303. 
14. 418. 
i5. 168. 
16. 428. 
i7. 408. 
i5. 393. 
19. 350. 
^(?. 397. 
21. 335. 

Exercise 24. 

i. 7984. 

2. 6241. 
^. 7226. 

4. 8529. 

5. 4726. 

6. 5532. 
7., 13507. 



<S. 2840. 

9. 11792. 

if. 16784. 

ii. 1066197. 

12. 1405655. 

13. 10674073. 
i^. ''5908144. 
15. 13100. 



29. 14029088. 

30. 136815. 

31. 658198. 
5^. 1731895. 
33. 584184. 
J^. 101102016. 
35. 20121022. 



16. 6862. 


Exercise 36 


i7. 970. 


1. 


44. 


18. 5528. 


2. 


221. 


i5. 8246. 


3. 


511. 


20. 5712. 


4. 


233. 


ii. 10042. 


5. 


401. 


^^. 5137. 


6. 


111. 


23. 23210. 


7. 


111. 


;.^-^. 6354. 


8. 


101. 


25. 1585323. 


9. 


102 


^^<?. 634650. 






t?7. 432724. 


Exercise 37 




1. 


196. 


Exercise 25, 


2. 


171. 


i. 1732. 


3. 


1476. 


2. 5036. 


4. 


70. 


^. 8082. 


5. 


531. 


^,. 30886. 


6. 


479. 


5. 221528. 


7. 


6899. 


6. 719733. 


8. 


199. 


7. 75008. 


9. 


528. 


5. 325466. 
9. 11094. 


Exercise 39 


10. 9105. 


1. 


188. 


ii. 25537. 


2. 


74. 


12. 8879. 


3. 


1326. 


iJ. 144224. 


4. 


3745. 


i^. 75359. 


5. 


162. 


15. 739557. 


6. 


7209. 


i6\ 4139G. 


7. 


410. 


17. 1868. 


8. 


481. 


ic5. 38729. 


9. 


8591. 


i.9. 226139. 


10. 


504. 


20. 65584. 


11. 


3087. 


^i. 40596. 


12. 


6174. 


22. 76773. 


13. 


6190. 


^=?. 1104692. 


14. 


7092. 


^.^. 419302. 


15. 


2898. 


25. 707451. 


16. 


1728. 


^6. 422395. 


17. 


8730. 


27. 58849. 


18. 


100. 


^<?. 3344048. 


19. 


270. 



20. 370. 

21. 82. 

22. 241. 

23. 42(). 

24. 3852. 

25. 8970. 

26. 1158. 

27. 2211. 
h'. 718. ' 

29. 2904. 

30. 132. 

31. 2907. 

32. bTiS. 

33. 8721. 

34. 7981. 

35. 497. 

36. 5229. 

37. 1492. 

38. 888. 

39. 1383. 

40. 22. 

Exercise 40. 

1. 3922. 

2. 269. 

3. 82. 

4. 3153, 

5. 953. 
6*. 161. 
7. 3959. 
5. 3493. 
9. 4573. 

if. 4982. 
ii. 1260. 
12. 780. 
iJ. 7198. 
14. 304. 
i5. 389. 
i6\ 707. 
17. 1262. 
i<?. 1106. 
19. 190. 
fa 3131. 
fi. 70. 
22. 4248. 
;^^. 4113. 
24. 689. 
f J. 3219. 
f6. 3299. 
27. 5601. 



272 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



28. 1709. 

29. 493. 
SO. 344. 

31. 924. 

32. 943. 
5J. 2480. 
3/i.. 681. 
55. 7168. 
56\ 6626. 
S7. 4014. 
55. 5517. 
39. 8493. 
^0. 8267. 
^i. 352193. 
Ji2. 1884. 
^5. 19904. 
41,.. 571010. 
^5. 515136. 
^.(?. 497707. 
Ji7. 539997. 
^^. 145204. 
J,9. 99182. 
50. 404884. 
5i. 698238. 
52. 356048. 
55. 3834791. 

54. 965149. 

55. 5004054. 
56\ 397949. 
57. 19861. 
5<?. 518058. 
50. 3699962. 
60. 3490819. 

Exercise 41. 

1. 4191. 

2. 351. 

3. 792. 
^.. 4120. 

5. 409. 

6. 3722. 

7. 6894. 

8. 85. 
5. 156. 

i6>. 1296. 

11. 4318. 

i^. 135. 

13. 80. 

i^. 2302. 

i5. 149. 

m. 1268. 

i7. 3161. 

18. 6487. 

i9. 1503. 

^a 2976. 

21. 350309. 

^^. 18020. 

23. 42290. 



^^. 394793. 

^5. 342190. 

26. 4190839. 

^. 417810. 

28. 498197. 

f.9. 4273. 

50. 3167. 

31. 851. 

5^. 7283. 

33. 34. 

5^.. 205. 

55. 5521. 

36. Tib. 

37. 4007. 

38. 6990. 
50. 370213. 
-^0. 102914. 

41. 3492601. 

42. 100248. 

Exercise 42. 

i. 390. 

^. 22. 

5. 3332. 

^. 153. 

5. 6886. 

^. 1. 

7. 405. 

8. 8595. 
0. 890. 

10. 810. 

ii. 3155. 

i^. 484. 

13. 7466. 

i^. 4372. 

15. 2827. 

i6\ 63. 

i7. 110. 

18. 497. 

iO. 1031. 

20. 202. 

^i. 166. 

^^. 3520. 

23. 35. 

^^.. 7074. 

25. 187. 

^e. 217. 

f7. 8783. 

28. 1078. 

^0. 998. 

30. 3343. 

5i. 672. 

5^. 7654. 

33. 4560. 

5.^. 3015. 

35. 251. 

56. 298. 

57. 685. 



38. 1219. 

50. 4. 

40. 364. 

^i. 3718. 

^^. 233. 

43. 7272. 

-^^.. 385. 

45. 19. 

46\ 8981. 

^.7. 1276. 

48. 1196. 

^5. 3541. 

50. 870. 

5i. 7852. 

5^. 4758. 

53. 3213. 

5^. 449. 

55. 496. 

56. 883. 

57. 1417. 

58. 86. 
50. 282. 
60. 3636. 
(5i. 151. 
6^. 7190. 
63. 303. 
6^. 101. 
65. 8899. 
66\ 1194. 

67. 1114. 

68. 3459. 
60. 788. 

70. 7770. 

71. 4676. 
7^. 3131. 
73. 367. 
7^. 414. 

75. 801. 

76. 1335. 

Exercise 43. 

1. 3269. 

^. 601. 

5. 6868. 

-^. 7247. 

5. 300. 

6. 4925. 

7. 4903. 

8. 1213. 
0. 130. 

iO. 218. 

11. 383. 

i^. 197. 

13. 4171. 

i^. 2917. 

i5. 1266. 

16. 2. 

i7. 2475. 



24. 
25. 



18. 204. 

iO. 221. 

20. 2426. 

^i. 198. 

22. 368. 

2634. 

1497. 

3347. 

26. 3344. 

^7. 647. 

^<5. 4997. 

29. 4200. 

50. 299. 

31. 378. 

5^. 161. 

55. 5514. 

34. 4378. 

55. 5866. 

36. 1486. 

57. 3116. 

55. 3612. 

39. 183. 

^0. 155. 

41. 302913. 

^^. 645913. 

^5. 299400. 

44. 540987. 
^5. 550032. 
46. 889. 
^7. 5106. 

45. 346013. 

49. 375020. 

50. 170214. 

51. 4035600. 

52. 3691753. 

53. 499978. 

54. 5099931. 

55. 956940. 

56. 420042. 

57. 309007. 
55. 556295. 

Exercise 44. 

1. 3870. 

2. 6267. 
5. 4625. 
.^. 22. 

5. 88. 

6. 165. 

7. 1254. 
5. 4183. 
0. 2679. 

10. 17. 

ii. 566. 

12. 3002. 

i5. 3. 

i4- 2697. 

15. 3901. 



ARITHMETIC. 



273 



16. 79. 

17. 1136. 

18. 1488. 

19. 49f5. 

20. 3429. 
^i. 343000. 
f^. 34G513. 
2S. 3045. 
^^. 549143. 
25. 351119. 
£6'. 29007. 
^'. 4205814. 
28. 343847. 
^;7. 4599953. 

30. 4142991. 

31. 111035. 
J^. 247288. 
33. 2998. 
^4. 278. 
35. 295. 
^6\ 12. 

-57. 2458. 
38. 3200. 
^^9. 650. 
40. 4279. 
^i. 7002. 
#. 313. 
43. 43600. 
.^4. 2156. 
45. 23901. 
^6. 514061. 
^7. 3643013. 
4S. 667330. 

Exercise 47. 

1. 3463 A. 

^. 1326 trees. 

3. $230. 

.^. 66 mi. 

5. 365 days. 

6\ $3081. 

7. 5137 people. 

<?. 63 vr. 

9. ISIo., 231 mi. 
10. 39373 votes. 
ii. 9141 votes. 
,^ ) $485, drew; 
^^- t $1890, rem. 
(91145, both; 

13. < 58905, more 

( Chinese. 

14. 85 nut trees. 

15. $27. 

i6\ Wash.; 11 yr. 

( 1401 ■ 
17. < 3052 

(5729 
i<?. 1782 A 



cen- 
tals. 



18— A 



3311 sheep. 
$210. 
618. 
$275. 

2404 mi. to C. 

3367 mi. to 
N. Y. 
S. F. to 0. 461 

mi. further. 
19 1957 votes. 
13181 votes. 
7855 votes. 
$13. 
222. 
459! 
843. 
$1100. 

77 marbles. 
1519. 

$6100. 
581 pupils. 
308 girls. 
1790. 
11699902. 
( 18199 mi.; 

1 4983 mi. 
181 days. 
170 ct., one; 

120 ct., the 
other; 50 ct. 
more. 

$1487. 

$204. 

1480 

424 centals. 

2352 B. C. 

14162 ft. 

482 mi. 

$145. 

$505. 

303 sh'p; $873. 

$2450. 

$11300. 

1208 arrests. 

153 days. 

818 years. 

$1975. 

2 days. 
1848. 
30379 ft. 
115 ct. 

56 1. trees. 

Exercise 58. 



19. 
20. 

22. 
23. 

24. 

25. 

'27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 
35. 
36. 
38. 
39. 
40. 
41. 
42. 
43. 

44. 
45. 
46. 



1. 1448. 

2. 1566. 

3. 1284. 



4. 369. 

5. 886. 

6. 3555. 

7. 24G3. 

8. 2440. 

9. 28488. 

10. 16804. 

11. 4608. 

12. 45055. 

13. 28088. 

14. 9966. 

15. 12696. 

Exercise 59. 

1. 125. 

2. 1673. 

3. 3924. 

4. 12792. 

5. 9444. 

6. 10284. 

7. 1636. 

8. 32200. 

9. 216. 

10. 5040. 

11. 2284. 

12. 894. 

13. 9171. 

14. 1416. 

15. 3780. 

16. 32064. 

17. 1530. 

18. 3339. 

19. 7104. 

20. 10008. 

21. 4476. 

22. 22955. 

23. 3699. 

24. 61383. 
^5. 87849. 
26. 20020. 
^7. 1978. 
28. 28068. 
^5. 25680. 
^0. 12609 
31. 3282. 
5^. 57672. 

33. rrm. 

34. 46900. 

5J. 11750. 

36. 9093. 

^7. 4420. 

38. 15132. 

^9. 59994. 

Exercise 61. 

/. 50. 
^. 75. 



3. 100. 

4. 150. 

5. 175. 

6. 200. 

7. 225. 

8. 478. 
5. 717. 

i(?. 956. 
11. 1195. 
i^. 1434. 
13. 1912. 
i^. 2151, 
i5. 872. 
16. 1308. 
i7. 1744. 
18. 2180. 
i9. 2616. 
;?(?. 3052. 
21. 3488. 
^f . 6396. 
23. 9594. 
^4. 15990. 
;?5. 19188. 
26. 22386. 
^. 25584. 
28. 28782. 
^5. 14166. 
JO. 18888. 
31. 23610. 
J^. 28332. 
33. 33054. 
^4- 37776. 
.55. 42498. 
36. 6856. 
J7. 13712. 
38. 17140. 
59. 20568. 

40. 23996. 

41. 27424. 
4^. 30852. 

43. 818. 

44. 1227. 

45. 2045. 

46. 2454. 

47. 2863. 

48. 3272. 
45. 3681. 
J(?. 9200. 
51. 13800. 
5^. 18400. 

53. 23000. 

54. 27600. 
J5. 36800. 

56. 41400. 

57. 72. 

58. 108. 

59. 144. 
6(?. 180. 
61. 252. 



274 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



62. 288. 

63. 324. 

64. 2016. 

65. 3024. 

66. 4032. 
(J7. 6048. 
68. 7056. 
65. 8034. 
ZO. 9072. 
71. 1142. 
7^. 1713. 
73. 2855. 
7.:^. 3426. 

75. 3997. 

76. 4568. 

77. 5139. 

78. 593. 

79. 1192. 
<§(?. 1490. 
81. 1788. 
<5^. 2086. 
83. 2384. 
,?^. 2382. 
55. 2038. 
86. 3057. 
,^. 4076. 
88. 5095. 
59. 6114. 
9(9. 7133. 
91. 8152. 
9^. 472. 
93. 708. 
9^. 944. 

95. 1180. 

96. 1652. 

97. 1888. 

98. 2124. 

99. 1512. 
iW. 2268. 
101. 3024. 
i9;?. 4536. 
103. 5292. 
i04. 6048. 
i6'5. 6804. 
106. 8016. 
i97. 12024. 
108. 16032. 
199. 20040. 
ii9. 24048. 
111. 28056. 
ii^. 36072. 
113. 2295. 
ii^. 3030. 
ii5. 3825. 
116. 4590. 
ii7. 5355. 
118. 6120. 
ii9. 6885. 
i^9. 954. 



121. 1431. 
i;?^. 1908. 
123. 2385. 
ii?^. 2862. 
i.^5. 3816. 
126. 4293. 
i^7. 1776. 
128. 2664. 
7^9. 3552. 
im 4440. 
131. 5328. 
15^. 6216. 
133. 7992. 
iJ^. 2224. 
iJ5. 3336. 
136. 4448. 
iJ7. 5560. 
138. 6672. 
iJ9. 7784. 
i^.9. 8896. 

Exercise 62. 

1. 1290. 

2. 15750. 
^. 30000. 
^,. 143400. 
5. 1570500. 
6\ 2187000. 
7. 214000. 
5. 15022000. 
9. 333500. 

10. 750000. 
22. 540000. 

Exercise 63. 

1. 13675. 

^. 130733. 

3. 238492. 
^. 1749306. 
5. 2582934. 
(?. 1875116. 

7. 223723. 

8. 2516200. 

9. 19392. 
10. 551376. 
2i. 180225. 
i^. 1722951. 

13. 3143124. 

14. 23054382. 

15. 34040898. 

16. 24712452. 

17. 2948481. 

18. 33161400. 

19. 259524. 

20. 7266672. 

21. 202000. 

22. 1931120. 



23. 3522880. 

24. 25839840. 

25. 38153760. 

26. 27698240. 
^. 3304720. 

28. 37168000. 

29. 290880. 

30. 8144640. 

31. 167500. 

32. 1601300. 

33. 2921200. 

34. 21426600. 

35. 31637400. 

36. 22937600. 

37. 2740300. 

38. 30820000. 

39. 241200. 

40. 6753(]00. 

41. 58750. 

42. 561650. 

43. 1024600. 

44. 7515300. 

45. 11093700. 
4.6. 8055800. 
47. 931150. 
4.8. 10810000. 

49. 84600. 

50. 2368800. 

51. 15715. 

52. 724409. 

53. 1321516. 

54. 9393138. 

55. 14312382. 

56. 10390268. 

57. 1239;;79. 

58. 13942600. 

59. 109116. 

60. 3055248. 

61. 27625. 

62. 264095. 

63. 481780. 

64. 3533790. 

65. 5217810. 

66. 3787940. 

67. 451945. 

68. 5083000. 

69. 39780. 

70. 1113840. 
7i. 189150. 
7^. 1808274. 

73. 3298776. 

74. 24196068. 

75. 35726652. 

76. 25933248. 

77. 3094494. 

78. 34803600. 

79. 272376. 

80. 7626528. 

81. 249975. 



82. 2389761. 

83. 4359564. 

84. 31976802. 

85. 47215278. 

86. 34276572. 

87. 4089591. 

88. 45995400. 

89. 359934. 

90. 10078992. 

Exercise 65. 

1. $925. 

2. 768 hr. 

3. $176. 

4. 95040 ft. 

5. 552 mi. 

6. 9372 trees. 

7. $1164625. 

8. $72000. 

9. 22490 lb. 

10. $900. 
ii. $552. 

12. $494. 
i5. $6300. 

Exercise 74. 

i. 1233. 
^. 411. 

3. 4242. 

4. 91. 

5. 91. 

6. 31. 

7. 641. 

8. 532. 

9. 501. 
i9. 1001. 

11. 701. 
i^. 301. 

Exercise 76. 

1. 29|. 
^. 26. 
3. 19|. 
^. 12f. 
5. 161. 
5. 17. 

7. 21. 

8. 18f. 

9. 39*. 
10. 22|. 
i2. 88^. 
i^. 72. 

13. 19L 

14. 102. 

15. lOU. 
i6. 214i. 
i7. 58^. 



ahithmetic. 



275 



18. 60. 

19. 64^ 

20. 758§. 

21. 1400|. 

22. 888|. 
^5. 949. 
^^. lllf. 
^5. 1432. 
;?6. 813|. 
27. 1229. 
^.^. H75. 
;g.9. 1151. 

30. 3401f. 
^2. 145402|. 
32. 6492|. 
5J. 11250. 
5^. 144701i 
35. 19575|. 
56. 9889. 
37. 2546C§. 
5<?. 7350. 
59. 57578|. 

Exercise 76. 

1. 218104. 

2. 109052. 
5. 87241f. 

r2701|. 
62315^. 
54526. 

7. 48467|. 

<?. 29218. 

9. 19478§. 
i6>. 14609. 
11. 11687i. 
i;?. 9739|. 
i5. 8348. 
14. 7304|. 
iJ. 45000. 
16. 30000. 
i7. 22500. 
i5. 18000. 
19. 15000. 
2(?. 128571. 
21. 10000. 
^^. 361753. 
£5. 241168§. 

24. 180876f. 

25. 120584f. 

26. 103358. 
^. 90438|. 
^c^. 80389|. 
29. 58726. 
56>. 39150|. 

31. 29363. 
5^. 23490a. 
55. 16778f 
34. 14681|. 



6. 



35. 13050S. 
.%\ 44500i. 
37. 29667r 
55. 222501 
55. 17800^. 
40. 14833|. 
^/. 12714f. 

42. U12^. 

43. 38200. 
^^. 19100. 
45. 15280. 
^(>. 12733a. 
47. 10914f. 
^5. 9550. 
^.9. 8488|. 
50. 4900. 
Ji. 3075. 
52. 2940. 
55. 2450. 
5^,. 2100. 
55. 1837|. 
J(?. 1633|. 
57. 259103. 
55. 172735J. 
5.9. 129551|. 

60. 1036411. 

61. 86367|. 

62. 74029a. 
65. 64775|. 

Exercise 78. 

1. 350 2 rem. 

2. 400. 

5. 159 16 rem. 
4- 50 1 rem. 

5. fi^ 16 rem. 

6. 233 12 rem. 

7. ^6Vi 20 rem. 

8. 126 16 rem. 

9. 55 11 rem. 
29. 143 6 rem. 
i2. 275 2 rem. 
2^. 200. 

25. 94 36 rem. 
24. ^5 1 rem. 

15. 107 16 rem. 

16. 140 2 rem. 

17. 160. 

i5. 75 46 rem. 

19. 20 1 rem. 

20. 85 46 rem. 
^2. 116 42 rem. 
f;?. 255 20 rem. 

23. 63 16 rem. 

24. 16 41 rem. 

25. 71 36 rem. 
;^6. 100 2 rem. 
^. ii.^ 20 rem. 



2:). 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
38. 
39. 
40. 
41. 
42. 
43. 
44. 
45. 
46. 

48. 

49. 

50. 
51. 

52. 
53. 
54. 
55. 
56. 
57. 
58. 
59. 
60. 
61. 
62. 
63. 
64. 
65. 
66. 
67. 
68. 
69. 
70. 
71. 
72. 
73. 
74. 
75. 
76. 
77. 
78. 
79. 
SO. 
81. 
82. 
83. 
84. 
85. 
86. 



54 16 rem. 

14 21 rem. 
61 26 rem. 
87 42 rem. 
100. 

47 36 rem. 
12 41 rem. 
53 56 rem. 
77 72 rem. 

55 80 rem. 
42 16 rem. 

11 11 rem. 
47 66 rem. 
32 111 rem. 

12 58 rem. 
47. 

40 57 rem. 
119 9 rem. 
21 211 rem. 

5 58 rem. 
31 100 rem. 
^6 257 rem. 
79 109 rem. 
16 111 rem. 

6 58 rem. 
23 200 rem. 
20 57 rem. 
59 209 rem. 

13 11 rem. 
4 458 rem. 
18 400 rem. 
16 57 rem. 
47 309 rem. 

10 511 rem. 

4 58 rem. 

15 400 rem. 
13 257 rem. 
39 409 rem. 

9 211 rem. 

5 358 rem. 
13 300 rem. 

11 357 rem. 
34. 9 rem. 

8 111 rem. 
5 58 rem. 
11 600 rem. 

10 57 rem. 
£9 609 rem. 

7 211 rem. 
^ 658 rem. 
10 400 rem. 

8 857 rem. 
£6 409 rem. 
218 208 rem. 
£?9 436 rem. 
45. 

361 1506 rem 
58 1452 rem. 
i.^ 1208 rem 



57. i9 1436 rem. 
55. 30. 

89. 241 506 rem. 

90. 39 452 rem. 
91. 109 208 rem. 
92. 14 2436 rem. 
95. 22 2000 rem. 
9.^. 259 3506 rem. 

95. 29 1452 rem. 

96. 87 1208 rem. 
97. 11 3436 rem. 
95. 18. 

99. 144 3506 rem. 
100. 23 2452 rem. 
i9i. 72 4208 rem. 
i9^. 9 4436 rem. 
103. 15. 

i9.^. 120 3506 rem. 
295. i9 3452 rem. 

106. 62 2208 rem. 

107. 8 2436 rem. 

108. 12 6000 rem. 
i99. 103 2506 rem. 
2i9. 26 5452 rem. 

111. 54 4208 rem. 

112. 7 2436 rem. 
113. 11 2000 rem. 
ii^. 90 3506 rem. 
i25. i^ 5452 rem. 

116. 4-8 4208 rem. 

117. 6 4436 rem. 
118. 10. 

219. 59 3506 rem. 

120. 13 452 rem. 

Exercise 80. 



1. 
^, 
5, 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7, 
5, 
9. 

19. 

12. 

1^. 

15. 

14. 

15. 

16. 

17. 

18. 

19. 

20. 

21. 

22. 



110 21 rem. 
83 37 rem. 
67 12 rem. 
73 87 rem. 
65 76 rem. 
I|r7 34 rem. 
77 43 rem. 
70 1 rem. 
5^ 33 rem. 
97 12 rem. 
.^2 39 rem. 
31 40 rem. 

25 33 rem. 
^ 82 rem. 
24 82 rem. 
<^ 10 rem. 
29 22 rem. 

26 40 rem. 
51 9 rem. 
36 46 rem. 
159 19 rem. 
120 40 rem. 



276 



CALIFORNIA SEMIFS, 



23. 96 88 rem. 
^. 106 72 rem. 

25. 94 94 rem. 

26. 184 16 rem. 

27. Ill 76 rem. 

28. 101 7 rem. 

29. 118 78 rem. 

30. 140 20 rem. 

31. 136 33 rem. 

32. 103 23 rem. 

33. 83 6 rem. 

34. 91^9 rem. 

35. 81 38 rem. 
^(5. 157 50 rem. 
^7. 5J 77 rem. 

38. 86 59 rem. 

39. 101 78 rem. 

40. 120 17 rem. 
^i. 403 32 rem. 
-^^. ^6>5 19 rem. 

43. 245 44 rem. 

44. 270 49 rem. 

45. 240 49 rem. 
<^6'. 4.66 43 rem. 
^7. .?>b-5 37 rem. 
4S. 256 1 rem. 

49. 301 30 rem. 

50. 355 24 rem. 
Ji. 7333 21 rem. 
J^. 55.:^;? 32 rem. 

53. 44J6 96 rem. 

54. 4056 80 rem. 

55. 440(> 14 rem. 
56". 8553 5 rem. 
J7. 5iP^ 80 rem. 

58. 4630 38 rem. 

59. 5521 49 rem. 

60. 6510 38 rem. 
<5i. 990 26 reni. 
6;?. 7^.9 14 rem. 

63. 602 42 rem. 

64. 664 4 rem. 

65. 530 26 rem. 
66\ 114s 41 rem. 
67. 6r>5 56 rem. 
6'c?. 628 32 rem. 
63. 733 55 rem. 
70. 872 12 rem. 
7i. 1525 25 rem. 
7^. iiJJ 66 rem. 

73. 927 81 rem. 

74. 1022 64 rem. 

75. 909 9 rem. 
76\ 1764 36 rem. 

77. i6'7i 36 rem. 

78. 967 69 rem. 

79. 1139 19 rem. 

80. 1343 19 rem. 
<5i. 12262 48 rem. 



5^. .9^75 56 rem. 

83. 7458 80 rem. 

84. 8221 58 rem. 

85. 7308 14 rem. 
<S'6\ I4.I86 20 rem. 
57. <5'6'i5 14 rem. 

88. 7779 59 rem. 

89. 9158 24 rem. 
90. 10798 40 rem. 
S'i. 1990 42 rem. 
5^. iJf^ 62 rem. 
93. 1210 82 rem. 
94. 1334 60 rem. 
95. 1186 38 rem. 
ry6\ 2302 50 rem. 
57. i^5<? 20 rem. 
98. 1262 86 rem. 
99. 14.86 58 rem. 

100. 1753 1 rem. 
iC'/. Ill 645 rem. 
i(^.v^ iJ.^ 297 rem. 
103. 185 386 rem. 
104. 174 261 rem. 

105. 125 501 rem. 

106. 207 198 rem. 

107. 381 228 rem. 

108. 211 381 rem. 

109. 689 120 rem. 
iiO. 16 4057 rem. 
iii. 55 780 rem. 
112. 132 368 rem. 
113. 159 239 rem. 
114. 140 410 rem. 
ii5. 107 644 rem. 
ii(;. 276" 38 rem. 
117. 327 209 rem. 
118. 181 380 rem. 
119. 592 32 rem. 
2^^(9. 14 2074 rem. 
2^2. i.b' 372 rem. 

122. 25 300 rem. 

123. 30 330 rem. 

124. 28 420 rem. 
i^5. 20 540 rem. 
/^6\ ^.^. 114 rem. 

127. 63 21 rem. 

128. 35. 

i^,9. ii,5 123 rem. 

130. 2 4082 rem. 

131. 651 10 rem. 

132. 899 382 rem. 
iJJ. 1081 407 rem 
iJ^. 26*26^ 46 rem. 
135. 731 658 rem. 
136. 1207 403 rem. 
137. 2224 14 rem. 
iJ<?. 1233 346 rem. 
iJ.9. ^.6'27 13 rem. 
140. 97 3233 rem. 



141. 8 6348 rem. I 
14:2. 23 1902 rem. 
143. 6 2036 rem. 
i^^. 7 2037 rem. 
145. 2 10818 rem. 
I4G. IS 254 rem. 
147. 47 1926 rem. 
/.^cb^ 12 4652 rem. 
2^.9. 2^ 4654 rem. 
150. 4 22216 rem. 
151. 13 4358 rem. 
152. 36 513 rem. 
25^. 9 4401 rem. 
25-^. 22 374 rem. 
155. 3 17574 rem. 

Exercise 81. 



25 cows . 
31 da. 

11 mo. 
24 hr. 
93 A. 
35 mi. 
9!J0 A. 
346 chests. 

12 mo. 
10. 11 ponies. 



9. 



Exercise 82. 

2. 2250 yd. 

2. 21(3 T. 

3. $21280. 

4. 4800 rd. 

5. $341. 

6\ 107 t\ T. 

7. 3525 ft). 

(^. Blf bales. 

.9. 14f bags. 
2a 1800 eggs. 
11. AOni da. 
2^. 8760 hr. 
13. $23800. 
2.^. 141 calves. 

15. 3 mi. 

16. $1925. 

27. $12624550. 
2c?. gOOSi-^sV sacks. 

19. 12iftf centals. 

20. $91.25. 
^2. $200. 
^. ( $4.20. 

" ( 42 loaves. 

23. $1570. 

24. Latter, $5. 

25. $49. 

26. 45 ct. 



28. 
23. 
30. 
31. 
32. 

33. 

34. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
38. 
39. 
40. 
41. 
42. 

43. 

44. 
45. 
46. 

47. 

43. 
49. 
50. 
51. 
52. 
53. 

54. 

55. 

56. 
57. 

58. 

59. 
60. 
61. 

62. 

63. 

64. 
65. 
66. 
67. 
68. 
69. 
70. 
71. 
72. 
73. 
74. 
75. 
76. 
77. 
78. 



j 1425 ct. 
t 150 ct. 
$5. 
400 ct. 

124 oranges. 
175 bbl. 
46375 K). 

f 288 mi. a da. 

( 12 mi. anhr. 

1435 vd. 

$700.^ 

$84. 

714. 

65 mi. 

61 mi. 

10. 

25. 

$31835. 

j $657. 

t 1314 da. 

8.302 f§ bales. 

Train, 480 mi. 

$1781. 

j $6080. 

I $960. 

60 da. 

55 sacks . 

125 cd. 
112 trees. 
144 da. 
375 boxes. 

( 63000 or'g's. 

t 5250 doz. 

$630. 

32 da. 

$100. 

j 15 watches. 

( 5 rings. 

32 mo. 

$2928. 

$2. 

$8820. 

f $4166^«.. 

t $200000. 

$14. 

$17. 

$104. 

$655. 

$2805. 

24 watches. 

$418. 

$50. 

$2. 

$2280. 

$240. 

14.553 cu. in. 

$315. 

$180. 

$75. 



I 



ARITHMETIC. 



211 



79. $4. 


8. 3. 


29. 660. 


iJ. 120 yd. 


80. 24 marbles. 


5. 15. 


50. 672. 


14. 340. 


81. 70 ct. 


i(?. 102. 


J2. 156. 


i5. 15. 


82. 45 vr. 


11. 18. 


32. 208. 


jQ 1 $300. 
-'^- t $1200. 


83. 225 %. 


i^. 3. 


<?5. 3450. 


84- 155 girls. 


13. 6. 


34. 99. 


,~ ( 28 pupils. 
^^- \ 7 cards. 


85. 423 rd. 


i^. 16. 


J5. 312. 


<S'6'. 293 steps. 


i5. 9. 


J6\ 600. 


18. 154 ct. 


87. 33 da. 


16. 47. 


37. 1344. 


v^ j 3 each. 
^^'' \ 17 children 


88. $15. 


i7. 31. 


J5. 612. 




IS. 71. 


39. 1530. 




Exercise 86. 


ifA 9. 




Exercise 98. 


1. 6. 


^^. 13. 
21. 29. 


Exercise 92. 


1- W, W- 


^. 11. 
3. 24. 


^^^ 3. 
23. 3. 


i. 945. 

2. 1183. 


^. 9» , 1 5 . 

3- Hf ^ W- 


^. 45. 


^-^.. 3. 


^. 1014. 


-^- i¥^, -¥^. 


5. 9. 


^J. 2. 


4. 15708. 


<^- W, ^f^- 


g. 5. 


^6\ None. 


J. 12936. 


^ 12 83 r,?.j 


7. 24. 




<?. 2583. 


"• To ' To • 

7 is+i aoji 


8. None. 


Exercise 89. 


7. 1176. 


'^^ T » 14 • 


5. 3. 




cS'. 1110. 


10. 4. 


1. 7. 


9. 105. 


.9. W, %V-- 


ii. 15. 


^. 21. 


2(?. 84. 


ia 5|i, n4i. 


i^. 36. 


^. 41. 


ii. 80. 


11, £|i 59» 


13. 35. 
i^. 9. 


4. 13. 

5. 53. 


12. SCO. 
i^. 180. 


-'-'• 8 ' 15 • 


15. 11. 


6. 31. 


14. 108. 


Exercise 101. 


i6\ 20. 




iJ. 32. 


1. 1 


i7. 12. 


Exercise 90. 


i6\ 567. 


IS. 15. 




17. 448. 


^- #• 


iP. 30. 


i. 90. 


i<?. 132. 


•^- t¥t' 


20. 13. 


2. 504. 


19. 23391. 


4- t\. 

5. f 


^i. 12. 


^. 40. 


^C. 33033. 


f;?. 7. 


4. 60. 


f i. 609. 


^J. 7. 


J. 504. 


22. 32250. 


^^. 41. 


6. 300. 


^J. 38178. 


/. #TT.^ 


25. 55. 


7. 120. 


24. 77499. 


'^. 1^.%. 


£6\ 3. 


<§. 924. 


£(5. 5922. 


5- It- 


£7. 13. 


9. 840. 




10. #. 


28. 30. 


iO. 108. 


Exercise 94. 


/7 -V- 


^^9. 33. 


ii. 210. 




-'■-'■' ITTI' 


30. 15. 


12. 60. 


1. 3 ft. 


^^. fSf. 


5i. 12. 


ic?. 72. 


^. 8 ft. 


13. H. 


5;?. 17. 


14. 240. 


3. 60 mi. 


U- \%- 


33. 7. 


i5. 420. 


, j 120 ft. 
'^- 1 7 lots. 


15. ^\ 


^^. 2. 


itf. 750. 


-^^' 1 oIT' 


35. 14. 


17. 180. 


{ 80 mill. 




J6\ 10. 


i5. 360. 


5. < 400 rd. 




19. 4752. 


i 320 rd. 


18. |. 


Exercise 88. 


i?(?. 462. 


J. 120 qt. 


i.9. 1. 




^i. 5544. 


C 105 t). 


^0. ,v 


1. 135. 


22. 4200. 


7. < $10 B. 


^. 9. 


;?J. 630. 


($18 W. 


4>^ 1 


3. 26. 


24. 840. 


<?. 840 ct. 


tCii. 2- 


^. 1001. 


^5. 105. 


.9. 120 ct. 


£5. ;v 


5. 725. 


^^6\ 570. 


10. 28 each. 


f^. \i. 


6. 29. 


27. 108. 


11. 252 nuts. 


25. f . 


7. 3. 


^<5. 390. 


12. 240 marbles. 


^f>'. HI- 



278 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



27. \ 

28. i 

29. I 

30. i 

31. I 



34. Jv 

36.1 
37. f . 

38.1. 
39. ^j. 

p. ^. 
41.1. 

42. i. 

43. h. 



4e. h- 
47.1 
4.8. tV 
49. if 

50.^. 

SI. tV 
32. i|. 
53. f. 
54- H- 

56. |. 

57. i. 

58. f. 

59. J. 
66». l 
61. f . 
6^. if. 
63. tV- 



67. i. 

68. |. 

6V). *. 
70. j%. 



Exercise 104. 

1 35 24 iSO 
■^* 47) 4T5» 4Tr* 

•^- T:?- > "1T> T7- 
? 18 4 J -. 3 



5. 
6. 
7. 
(?. 
5. 

ii. 

12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 



20 .135 uiia 

40) 4C ' 4TI • 



r. 375. 7 
5) '9 > 9* 
IS 1 661 

TT) IT) IT • 

_2 5 1_1 7_Q. 12 
ITJTT) luo > TOTJ- 
tl 15.0 2 24 
TJ5T)) 3oU) 35 0* 
15 10 lA 
4^) 48) 48' 



802 25 2 47 
■5B"TJ) 2S^(T) 2(TIi' 
5 2.004 45 
T"2) 72 "'7"^- 
49 3ii 36 
5B"> 56) 5<I* 
33 14 21 
4^) 42) 4^- 
75 4 5 5 11 203 
^19') "¥T9")1TT9 
80 64 49 

Tl¥) IT'S) Tr"?- 

1040 203 1 
""5B~) "5 (T") 5^- 



Exercise 107. 



1. 
2. 
3. 

4- 
5. 

6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 

10. 2|^ 

12. U. 

13. 

14. 

15. 

16. 

17. 

18. 

19. 

20. 

21. 

22. 



123 
•^30- 

119 

^24- 

5- 

1. 
117 



9 » 

It' 
If- 

41 
TTO- 

II 
5T5- 
31 

19 

04- 



25. 

26. 

27. 

28. 

29. 

30. 

31. 0, 

32. 



2- 
1 3 

H- 

15 
"58- 

1 
^¥' 

ft- 
3 



Exercise 109. 

1- 94^.. 
^. 22^f 
3. 92fi. 



^. 3if. 

5. 291^. 

6. 15i|. 
1871 

77tV 

20iS 



7. 

<5. 

5. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 



35TJ- 

9723 



1259 

^25'0 

78IS 



1^ 



"^TT^" 

29f\: 

21tV 

loyj,. 



Exercise 111. 

1. 45.?^, 72^V 
^. lOOyV, 24|i. 

^ 1^7131 18104 

^. 140H, 13pft. 

5. nm. i6f i 

6. 84U, 62|4. 

7. 48HJ) 20^|. 

5. 239H, m- 
q 1467 1735 

io. I03ii 1031. 

11. 78H, 49/i.. 

r^ Q103 18113 

Exercise 114. 

4. mn. 

k 59 

^- U9- 

^ 07 

7. 137^1 rd. 

8. 154if lb. 

9. 65^^^ hr. 
10. 85if| mi. 
ii. 57f§yd. 

12. 48^ ft. 

14. 162-1%% cd. 
i5. 406^41 mi. 



63Hf mi. 
286iH A. 



21 

TTTI- 
63a ft. 



i6 

17. 
18. 
19. 

20. $124^. 

21. 95i^ hr. 

Exercise 116. 

1. 505J^, 801t'TT- 
^. 1207|, 281tV 



3. 639A, 209H- 
^. 1549|, I56J4. 

5. 178, 229|. 

6. mm, 828tV 

7. 644f , 272t\. 
5. 31241, i3H_i^. 
9. 258i%, 309i|. 

10. 1771f, 18 K)^. 
ii. 13401, 848/^. 

12. 173/^, 328^. 

Exercise 119. 

1. $193|. 
f . $49f. 
3. $10480. 
^. 378 gal. 

5. $1921. 

6. 39i^"mi. 

7. 22i| hr. 
<?. 74f pp. 
9. $8746. 

iO. 440 yd. 

Exercise 122. 

1. 10. 
;?. 19J. 
3. 20§. 
^. 15|. 

5. 12. 

6. 6. 

7. 0. 

8. 16. 

9. llj. 
10. 18. 

ii. 9i 

13. 18f. 

i^. I5f. 

i5. 12. 
16. 8f 
i7. 3. 
18. 6. 
i9. lOf. 
^0. 13f. 
21. 194. 
£;^. 24. 
23. 16f . 
f^. 18f. 
^5. 12|. 
^6'. 19|. 
^7. 225. 
28. 44|. 
^9. 40. 
50. 31^. 
31. lOj. 
5^. 3§. 
33. 14^. 
5^. 45. 
J5. 51S. 



72' 



ARITHMETIC. 



279 



36. 25. 

S7. 30. 

38. 35^. 

39. 11§. 

40. 6|. 
^i. 401. 
^^. 44^. 
43. 51§. 
^^. 20|. 
45. 27|. 
^6*. 15. 
^7. 35. 
4S. 42i 

Exercise 125. 

2- rV- . 
<?. f. 

|. j%. 
J. 3. 

(J. 4- 

^!*- 

2 35 
'^^ 35T- 

10. f. 

11. l 

12. iU- 

13. |. 

14. If. 

77 _9 o_ 

■^' • 151' 

Exercise 126. 

I. 31i. 

^- 21-i\. 

^. 85tf . 

^. 67f. 

5. 611. 

6. 64|f 

7. 704 

8. 48A. 

9. 64^. 

10. 99s. 

ii. 25|. 
i^. 52*. 
13. 83M. 
i^. 62f 

15. 12n;i. 
i6\ 92:7^. 
i7. 33i7i3. 
18. 280813. 
i.9. llOSifi. 
W. 2001 H|. 
21. 2411^. 
£^. 5448^1-0. 
23. 1037|i. 



:^^. 2515H. 
£5. 276/^. 
^S. 11132^V- 
^. 39371^. 

28. igiVifA- 

Exercise 128. 



424S lui. 

$Gir;|. 

268| ct. 
2305g lb. 
f40i. 
$'37-jf^. 
14911 mi. 
264-iJ^ mi. 



Exercise 134. 

1 i^ 

■'■■ TK' 
& 5 5 

■*• -sr' 
^ 73 

^- m- 

5. 2r\. 

6. ^. 

O ^83 

''• TouTJ- 

9. 1^. 

iO. l|f 

ii. if. 
i^. Iff. 
13. 1^. 

i6. 2e. 



Exercise 135. 



11 chairs. 
70f da. 

8ft yr. 
13 dresses. 
13 dresses. 
4 sons. 
27 div. 

8. 9 steps. 

9. bl da. 
10. 12i cu. ft. 

Exercise 136. 



2. 3; 

5. 5f. 

5. 5. 

^- #3- 

7. Hf 



<S. If. 

P. 8. 

10. 17. 

ii. 2^. 

12. 5 
i.5. i 

i5. I 

16. 8 

^7. § 

18. h 

19. i 

20. * 



Exercise 138. 

1. 150. 
^. 176. 

3. 428. 

4. 405. 

5. 1290. 
6'. 600. 
7. 1440. 
<?. 413. 
5. 273. 

10. 1001. 

Exercise 140. 

i. $45. 

2. I. 

3. 625 sheep. 

4. $1890. 

5. $18450. 

6. $8610. 
7 5 

<?. $4i. 

5. $66§. 

10. $15360. 

ii. $3840. 

ii. ,\ 

13. I, I 

14. 240 A. 

15. 2000 sheep. 

16. $3. 
77 7 

18. $525. 
ia |. 
20. 14300. 

Exercise 142. 

i. 6 vd. 

2. 29i A., $1176S. 

3. mh 
4. 3. 

5. $3948|. 
g. 16 K). 

7. $3150. 

5. 61 coats. 



9. $2.12^\. 

ia 10 1b.' 

ii. 76 A. 

12. l 

13. $29^1. 

14. 19 fd. 
i5. 1760 yd. 
16. $490^\. 
i7. 8 lots. 
18. m yd. 
i5. 20| ct. 
20. 18^V T. 



23. 171 cattle. 
( $1,302 A. 

24. < $1953 B. 
{ $1519 C. 



I 10 suits. 
I 2 vests. 



f5, 

26. 6|?- da. 
£7. ll centals. 

28. 720 hogs. 

29. $246|. 

30. $907^3. 

?7 1_3 

J^. $72^. 

55. A, by Ij mi. 

f All 8 da. 
5^.<^17f A, 24 B, 

35. $80. 

36. $f. 
57. f yd. 

55. 52 sheep. 
39. 4 children. 
.^0. $76.^ 
41. $15. 
.^^. $140. 
,. ( $432 A. 
^- t $1293 B. 
44- $170')^. 
^.5. 122. 

46. $78 on all. 

47. 85^9^. 
C$630 A, 

.^. < $12G0 B. 

i $945 C. 
49. 85 ct. 

f$30o0 A. 
oO. < $5100 B. 

i$7140C. 

51. $144f. 

52. $4036-^. 

55. 800 ce"ntals. 
( 1S|- sum. 

54. < n dif. 

( if prod. 
55. 56 2). 



280 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



56. $3. 

57. $200. 

58. $li5i 

59. ^. 

^^ J $100 A. 
^^- 1 $200 B. 
6i. 1692^ yd. 
62. 9i cwt. 
(55. 4,7^ T. 
64. 87(J6hr. 
(55. $90i 

. j $14.25 rec'd. 

• t $1.50. 



66 



67 



50 mi. to S. .1 



( 50 

t 483 " to L. A 

{ $2.05 1st. 

68. < $(3.15 2d. 

i $4.10 3d. 

69. 93|f mi. 

70. li| mi. 

71. 11 bbl. 

72. G collars. 

73. $99x^5. 
7^. $10. 

75. $3.50. 

76. $31. 

~-y j 2?- mi.R. 
^^- t3'mi. W. 
75. $228|. 
79. 9 boxes, 
o^ j $l(ii Fred. 
^^- 1 $8 Frank. 

Exercise 154. 

1. 1^03.52207. 
£. 9242.12079. 
S. 28347.257307. 

4. 7703.1697. 

5. 1603.178. 

6. .34407. 

7. 4489.9514. 

8. 12515.2574. 

9. 300.244187. 

10. 67.28521. 

11. 688.1695. 

12. 27231.6101. 

13. 52.872. 

14. 85.05435. 

15. 4041.1615. 

16. 11.62. 

17. 83.668. 

18. 320.39. 

19. 927.155. 
m 32.1. 
;^i. 12.71. 
22. 9.6585. 

Exercise 155. 

1. 75.015. 



^. 772.0686. 

^. 857.03592. 

4. 857.13709. 

5. 452.13. 

6. 778.36. 

7. 12.929G. 
5. 164.3105. 
9. 27134.6793 

10. 81.0972. 

Exercise 158. 

1. 5346.0196. 

2. 9.3925. 

3. 935318334. 

4. 5.89849. 

5. 526.50598. 
6'. 9.8786558. 

7. 104437.086. 

8. .683774. 

9. 9.3925. 

10. .oiry.m. 

11. 16.391375. 

12. .0098125. 

13. .875875. 

14. .01643375. 

15. 173.7375. 

16. .0011375. 

17. 112397.62534. 

18. 11155.4977534 

19. 9.71418448. 

20. .38159121. 

21. 53109.3(>631. 

22. 10330.50018. 

23. 267.5593924. 

24. 1024657.893262 

25. 67.28549. 

26. 6.6781049. 

27. .00581528. 

28. .000228435. 

29. 31.793285. 

30. 6.18423. 

31. .1(]01714. 

32. 613.399157. 

33. 49.5443949. 

34. 140.1421021. 

35. 1201.0782784. 

36. 190182.24225. 

37. 3338.2649. 

38. 3386.480798. 

39. .491239749. 

40. .987987. 

41. .929584929. 

42. 2.629439441. 

43. 22.5354304<)4. 

44. 3568.3258725. 

45. (;3.197(>29. 

46. 69.16820758. 

47. .00921693729. 



48. .01853727. 

49. 114120.93327. 

50. 1403.93799. 

51. 4378283.6829. 

52. 5684788.293. 

53. 407281.42407. 

54. 65521.2759. 

55. 41198.0259. 

56. 14037.99. 

57. .74717643. 

58. .00919191. 

59. 28.6656461. 

60. 37.219637. 

61. 2.66656663. 

62. .4289831. 

63. .2697331. 

64. .09191. 

Exercise 160. 

1. 43.5. 

2. 34. 

3. .98. 

4. .5184. 

5. .512. 

6. 42.66«. 

19. 453. 

20. 414. 

Exercise 162. 

1. 3757. 

2. 6.25. 

3. 6556.55. 

4. 3.925. 

5. 350.35. 

6. 6.5735. 

7. 69495. 

8. .455. 

9. 9022.5263 + . 

10. 895.4884 + . 

11. .779 + . 

12. .0303 + . 

13. 4263.263+. 

14. 829.263 + . 

15. 21.477 + . 

16. 82252.6526 + . 

17. .02162 + . 

18. .0311 + . 

19. .5241 + . 

20. 83.0022 + . 

21. 1.47 + . 

22. 1.6089 + . 

23. .000214 + . 

24. .0004 + . 

25. 81.294 + . 

26. 1 + . 

27. 3118.882 + . 

28. 4049.574 + . 



29. 290.128 +. 

30. 46.0742 + . 

31. 29.3475+. 

32. 10. 

Exercise 168. 

1. 151.3575 bales. 

2. 299.25 K). 

3. $3339. 

4. .25. 

5. $4.50. 

6. 81.12 A. 

7. 12 books. 

8. 74.25 mi. 

9. 11110.501 cu. 

in. 

10. $407. 

11. 16.5 rd. 

12. 187.46 mi. 

13. 31.241 mi. 

14. 1415.425 A. 

15. 16 pr. 

16. 7276.5 cu. in. 

17. 121 rd. 

18. 240.43+ turns. 

19. $17.50. 

20. 21 cd. 

21. 30.76 A. 

22. $1538. 

23. $100. 
^^. .21§. 
^5. 63 cd. 
26. $477. 

^7. 64 times. 

28. 336.6 rails. 

29. 22.4482 in. 
50. 127.5 gal. 
31. $164.40. 
5^. 127.4 mi. 

33. 11 hr. 

5^. 150.7968 sec. 
35. 25132.8 mi. 

Exercise 172. 

1. $25.12i. 
^. $26.49."' 
3. $4.87|. 
.^. $18. 

5. $59.50. 

6. $100. 

7. $7.55. 

8. $6.05. 
5. $6,281. 



I 



i 



30. 



Exercise 174. 

15887 ft. 



/ 15887 f 
t 5295.6{i 



,y<i- 



ARITHMETIC. 



281 



^^ f no in. 
^^- t S.Oogi yd. 
.^ j 5315 ft. 
"^^^ t 1.0066+ mi. 
^^ j 768 in. 
'^'^- \ 64 ft. 
., ( 462 in. 
'^'^- 1 38.5 ft. 
^- ( 63810 in. 
'^^^ i 1772.5 yd. 
g.. ( 17160 ft. 
^^- \ 3.25 mi. 
^.v j 10596 ft. 
'^'- \ 2.00G8+ mi. 

693 in. 

;.5 rd. 



.. ( 83G0 yd 



r5 mi. 



,n j 159831 ft. 

^^- 1 5327.75 vd. 

41. 1485 in. " 

43. ^§4 mi. 

44. .83J mi. 
^.5, 120 rd. 

46. .1553 + rd. 

47. .2047 + mi. 
^,y. .723 — . 

4d. .1324 + mi. 

50. .40'i5 + rd. 

51. /WV- 

5^. HIi mi. 

53. i%. 

K r. 4921 TYIT 

Exercise 177. 

9. 5 yd. 2 ft. 2.3 
in. 

10. 38 yd. 2 ft. 2.8 

in. 

11. 3.59 4- mi. 

12. 199566.11 + me. 

Exercise 178. 

^„ f 39204 sq. in. 
^^- \ 4351.0 sq. ft. 

13. 98027 .sq. ft. 
^6>. 130380 sq. ft. 
n. 9293318:^ sq. 

yd- 

22. 24^ sq. ft. 

23. 685 sq. ft. 166 

sq. in. 

24. 28sq.rd.25sq. 

yd. 8 sq. ft. 

25. 10 A. 13 sq. yd. 

2). .^n3 157.46 +"; 



Exercise 179. 

10. 64000000 sq. 1. 
12. 128o9 sq. ch. 

14. 64110625 sq. 1. 

15. 8 A. 4 sq. ch. 4 

sq. rd. 90 sq. 

16. 253A.7sq.ch. 

6 sq. rd. 146 
sq. 1. 

17. 617 A.2sq.ch. 

2 sq. rd. 
IS. 1 sq. mi. 345 

A. 7 sq. cli. 
10. 470A.8sq.ch 
20. I. 

\ A. lost. 

,yj;cultivat'd 

8 'ch. 

6.89 A. 



21 



Exercise 180. 

3. 4.3217.68 sq.m, 
5. 6477.732 ares. 

Exercise 181. 

1. 39| yd. 

2. Each 46| yd. 
<^ j 25§ yd. cross 
'^- \ 25'yd.length 

4. $64.58^ 

5. .$103,121. 
6'. $32,741: 

7. 12(:01isq.yd. 
S. 1447' sq. yd. 
0. 110| sq. yd. 

10. $34.75. 

11. $9.50. 

12. $30.25. 

13. $8.19. 

14. 10.8 M. 

15. I'^O; bricks. 
10. 2210 sq. ft. 
17. $43.66§. 

IS. 60 tiles. 

Exercise 183. 



M 



2910 cu. ft. 

108| cu. yd 
2. 15ff cd. 
12. 6 cu. ft. 
IG. 625536 cu. in. 

17. 426829 cu. in. 

18. 3 cu. yd. lieu. 

ft. 752 cu. in. 
10. 29108 cu. in. 
20. 44 cu. yd. 



21. 1440 cu. in. 

22. 4725 R). 

23. 762048 cu. in. 

24. 1014 ft. 

25. 12 cu. yd. 19 

cu. ft. 
20. llif cd. 
27. $26.41. 
2S. 9#y cu. yd. 
20. 2930§ cu. yd. 

30. .$3005.86. 

31. .75 cu. yd. 

32. .125cu.'ft. 

33. yV cvi. yd. 

34. 31992 cu. in. 

35. 26 cu. ft. 561. 6 

cu. in. 

36. 48 cu. ft. 

Exercise 184. 

3. 7.866 cd. 

4. 6.75G48 cd. 

Exercise 185. 

1. $511.64. 

2. 57309 bricks. 

3. $832.61. 

4. 240 perclies. 

5. 1280 perches. 

6. 870181 bricks. 
^ j 18§ ft. 

'■ \ $1.40. 

0. 1621ft. 
10. $16,681. 
ii. .$15.12. 

12. 540 ft. 
i.?. $62.98. 

14. 8 ft. 
i5. 240 ft. 

16. 280 ft. 
i7. (.00 ft. 

15. 3 ft. 
10. 384 ft. 
m 13J4ft. 
21 7121 ft. 

Exercise 186. 

13. 257 pt. 
i^.. 036 qt. 
15. 252 pt. 
i(>. 12! '5 pt. 

17. 19 pt 
i5. 66 qt. 

19. 255 pt. 

20. 62 bbl. 11 gal. 
21 37 bbl. 29 gal. 

3 qt. 1 pt. 



22. 75 bbl. 23 gal. 

Iqt. 

23. 343 bbl. 13 gal. 

1 qt. 1 pt. 

24. 214 bbl. 13 gal. 

25. 128 bottles. 

26. $27.05. 
ir7. $59.06. 
28. $40.80. 

^^ ] 3000 cans. 
'^'^- \ $525.00. 
J6>. ii bbl. 
31 23 gal. 2 qt. 
Ipt. 

5.^. .0238+ bbl. 

Exercise 187. 

4. 5605.611. or kg. 
r \ 1481.28 gal. 
"• \ 12332.32 lb. 

Exercise 189. 

39. /^ lb. 

40. .2025 t). 
^i. 191 pwt. 
43. .375 R). 



^^. 



T. 



45. .15025 T. 

46. 8 centals 33 

ft). 5g OZ. 

47. 1 cental 50 !b. 
4.8. If. 

5a .875 T. 

Exercise 190. 

fllb. loz. 18 
pwt. 15.912 
gr. TroY. 
15 OZ. 125.412 
gr. Av. 

4. 74620.837 li. 

5. 119.2 h. 

6. 150937.5 li. 

Exercise 191. 

.9. 106526". 
10. 232° 9' 25". 
11 16° 52' 30". 
1^- T?5^(J quadr't. 

13. i-,. 

14. .03 circumf er. 

15. \. 

16. .3763 + . 



282 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



17. h 

18. f 30". 

Exercise 192. 

10. 13 hr. 20 mill. 

10 sec. 

11. 7 mill. 45 sec. 

12. $312. 

13. 18925 sec. 

14. 1037052 min. 

15. 97863853 sec. 

16. 1 yr. 317 da. 

11 hr. 49 
min. 39 sec. 

17. 33 da. 2 hr. 35 

min. 

18. 4 da. 22 hr. 42 

rain. 9 sec. 

19. 109 da. 9 hr. 

40 min. 

20. 99 da. 3 hr. 59 

mill. 43 sec. 

21. 530 min. 

22. 13 hr. 42 min. 

19 sec. 

23. 31 da. 16 hr. 

25 min. 

24. 202 hr. 

25. 304 da. 4 hr. 

26. fiji da. 

27. i. 
■lhr.48min. 

4 da. 9 hr. 
2S. \ 137 da. 23 hr. 

16 min. 48 

sec. 
23. H week 

30. 211 da. 16 hr. 

48 min. 

31. .125. 

32. 355 da. 21 hr. 

33. 45 da. 15 hr. 
34^. I mo. 

36. -iVtj week. 

37. ^^ da. 

3S. 4 yr. 239 da. 
1 hr. 48 mill 
39. .446 + weelc. 
4.0. .333 +. 
41. .0125. 

Exercise 193. 

8. 36° 16' 30". 

9. 21° 4'. 

10. 48° 37'. 

11. 73° 18'. 



12. 62° 3'. 

i5. 102° 41' 30". 

14. 131° 26' 45". 

15. 1 hr. 57 min. 

17 sec. 

16. 1 lir. 4 min. 

19|- sec. 

17. 3 hr. 57 min. 

5!)yV !?ec. 
i5. 3hr.'l3 min. 
364 sec. 

19. 7 hr. 51 min. 

42 sec. 

20. 35 min. ISif 

sec. 
^i. 29 mill. 32* se. 

22. 11 hr. 19 min. 

48| sec. 

23. 8 hr. 18 min. 

58 j7^ sec.p.M 

24. 6 hr.'30 min. 

9|- sec. A. M. 
next da. 

25. 1 hr. 51 min. 

50Y^5sec.A.M, 
next da. 
f 168° 56' W. 
^. J 62° 41' W. 
"^^ "i 81° 26' W. 
[ 159° 49' E. 
27. 46° 28' E. 
2S. 152° 20' 22" E. 
20. 108° 56' 30" E. 

30. 133° 54' 38" W. 

31. 84° 41' W. 

32. 3'5° 4' W. 

33. New York. 

34. 72° 35' 74" W. 
^5. 13 minr 364 

sec. past 6 
A. M. same 
da. 

36. 64° 45' 3" W. 

57. 60° 57' W. 

Exercise 194. 

1. 1 mi. 125 rd. 3 

yd. 2 ft. 

2. 22 yd. 2 ft. 10 

in. 

3. 19 rd. 1 yd. 2 

ft. 2 in. 
.^. 74 mi. 96 rd. 
2 yd. 3 in. 

5. 80 rd. 4 yd. 3 

in. 

6. 46 mi. 252 rd. 

2 vd. 8 in. 



7. 103 mi. 41 rd. 

5 yd. 3 ill. 

8. 3 yd. 1ft. 4 in. 

9. 3 yd. 1 ft. 

10. 240 rd. 3 vd. 1 

ft. 6 in. 

11. 3 mi. 60 ch. 1 

rd. 23 1. 

12. 109 A. 154 sq. 

rd.3 sq. yd. 

6 sq. ft. 72 
sq. in. 

13. 80sq. rd.5sq. 

ft. 

14. 96 sq. rd. 14 

sq. yd. 1 sq. 
ft. 

15. 19cd.3cd.ft. 

13 cu. ft. 

16. 281 cu. vd 

22/^ cu. ft. 
.,. (49ga].lqt. 
^^- 1 $19:70. 

834 boxes. 
$10.44. 



19 



(8J 
t$] 



il. 5grosslldoz. 

3. 
22. 6353 sheets. 
^^ ( £23 16s. 
"^- t $115.67. 

24. $3,174. 

25. 60 Tr 7 cwt. 

44 1). 
^5. 241 T. 6 cwt. 

51 R). 4 oz. 
^7. 11 S). 9 oz. 18 

pwt. 

Exercise 195. 

1. 47A.89sq.rd. 

2. 3 mi. 234 rd. 

5 yd. 6 in. 

3. 12A.7.26|sq. 

ch. 

4. 19 cu. vd. 14 

cu. ft. 1464 
cu. in. 

5. 2gal.2qt.lpt. 
$14,444. 
8 gal. 1 qt. 

7. i cwt. 59 B). 

10 oz. 

8. 3.25 Troy oz. 

9. 93 fi). 15"oz. 



6 



10. 2 oz. 7 pwt. 6 

gr. 

11. llb.2oz.6dr. 

13 gr. 

12. 2 yrs. 2 mo. 1 

wk. 4 da. 4 
hr. 

13. 2 mo. 1 wk. 2 

da. 15 hr. 40 
min. 31 sec. 

14. 10 da. 

i5. 1 wk. 6 da. 5 
hr. 17 min. 
16.8 sec. 

16. $322.18. 

17. 193rd.5#5-vc1- 

18. 345600 sec. 

19. 20 yr. 1 mo. 1 

wk. 1 da. 4 
hr. 35 min. 
37J sec. 

20. 6 T. 7 cwt. 

18t% K). 
^i. 43 sq. yd. 

22. £9 2s. 8d.' 3 

far. 

23. 21° 36' 40". 

24. 5 t). 3 oz. 10 

pwt. 

25. 10.^. 7jd. 
^6. 2070 sq. ft. 

Exercise 196. 

i. 45 mi. 258 rd. 
2 yd. 2 ft. 3 
in. 

2. 6 mi. 79 ch. 3 

rd. 11 1. 

3. 10 A. 148 sq. 

rd. 4 sq. j'd. 
2 sq. ft. 6 
sq. in. 

4. 1275cd.46cu. 

ft. 1214 cu. 
in. 

5. 136bbl.22gal. 

3qt. 

6. 63 lb. 2 oz. 4 

pwt. 

7. 1027 T. 12 cen- 

tals 56 lb. 14 
oz. 

8. 608 yr. 9 mo. 

1 wk. 2 da. 
10 hr. 14 
mill. 24 sec. 
.9. 70 rd. 4 yd. 4 
in, 



ARITHMETIC. 



283 



10. $623.51. 

11. 273 mi. 105 rd. 

1 yd. 1 ft. G 
in. 
('18bbl.26gal. 

12. < 2 qt. 

($1187. 

13. The wine, $992 

14. 56 A. Ill sq. 

rd. 5 sq. yd. 
7 sq. ft.'^Sij 
sq. in. 

15. 4 oz. 9 pwt. 6 

gr- 
Exercise 197. 

1. 1 mi. 8 rd. 4 
yd. 1% in. 

£. 11 ch. 1 rd. 
20§1. 

3. 18 sq. rd. 16 

sq. vd. 8 sq. 
ft. 1411 sq. 
in. 

4. 3cd. 59cu. ft. 

1454^^cu.in. 

5. 1 bbl. 8 gal. 

l^ pt. 

6. 3 K). 9 oz. 11 

pwt. 23* gr. 

7. 91 1). 9f oz. 

5. 1 yr. 5 mo. 2 
wk.3da. 11 
hr. 59 min. 
14j2^ sec. 

9. 70tVV te- 
i^. 6 lb. 4||- oz. 
i2. 371 A. 6 sq. 

ch. 2 sq.rd. 

40|^ sq. 1. I 
12. 3 rd. 2 yd. 2 

ft. 3Ulin. I 
i,?. 162 culft. 432' 

cu. in. 

14. 46 cups. 

15. 352 rails. 

Exercise 198. 

1. 8 mi. 203 rd. 

4 yd. 7 in. 

2. 1202 ra. yd. 18 

cu. ft. 

2. Metric,1201cvi. 

yd. 

3. 570cwt.63i!b. 

4. 56^\ mi. 

4. Jfe«rtc,90396.97 
meters. 



5. 5cu.ft.700cu. 38. 200 rd. 6 ft. 4 



13. 
14 
15. 
16. 

17. 
17. 
IS. 
18. 

ID. 

20. 
20. 
21. 

22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
25. 
26. 

27. 

28. 
29. 
30. 



35. 
36. 
37. 



in. 
J/efric,cu.me 

.152686385. 
120§ sq. ft. 
4014489600 sq. 

in. 
Metric^ hekt. 

259.1093. 
2t1t cd. 
Metric^ steres, 

7.846544. 
6rd. 

73 spoons. 
6 yr. 10 mo. 1 

wk. 3 da. 12 

hr. 24 min. 

18 sec. 
$135. 
$400.95. 
$2,881. 
.125 mi. 
225.28 centals, 
$386.29. 
Metric, same. 
2723if mi. 
Metric, met. 

587420.78. 
1 K). 3 oz. 8 

pwt. 21 gr. 
$574.42. 
i¥('<nc,$573.96. 
2680 cu. yd. 

20 cu. ft. 

6 qt. U pt. 
90.75 cu. ft. 
48f lots. 
$22.96. 
Metric,%'l.Vih. 

I da. 1 hr. 43 
min. 30 sec. 

158 A. 31 sq. 

rd. 
$18.28. 
1120 times. 
22 sq. yd. 4 

sq. ±t. 82 sq. 

in. 
56 yd. 
$21.40. 
278i| cu. ft. 
138 sq. rd. 27 

sq. yd. 2 sq. 

ft. 99 sq. in. 

7 hr. 57 min. 
18 sec. A. M. 

II hr. 37 min. 
20 sec. A. M. 

.375. 



38. Metric,1007.7Cj 

meters. 

39. 3| ft. 

40. $10.41. 

41. 60 yd. 

41. Metric, 53.99 

meters. 

42. 23J yd. 

43. $1015. 

44. $.91. 

,. ($209.04. 
^^- 1 2SS yd. 
46. ^ yd". 
4:7. 57 rd. 9 ft. 104 
in. 

45. A cd. 
4d. $12.25. 

50. 1 

( Lots 45x145 

51. < ft. 

( Gain $1300. 

Exercise 199. 

22. 256 K). 

23. 39 books. 
$54,621. 
64 1b." 
$10.50. 
$81. 
152 1b. 
$732. 
$1230.60. 
45i yd. 
14 chickens. 
$141. 

34. 512 bags. 

35. 28 tons. 

36. $601. 

37. $22.50. 

38. $(;3. 

39. 43 lb. 

40. 20 sheep. 

41. $765. 
$403. 

1143 rolls. 
$664. 
$605. 

46. $1859.26. 

47. $6283.75. 
4^. $591.36. 
40. $18345.55. 

50. $307.90. 

51. 76 cwt. 

52. $188.58. 

53. $592.54. 

54. 1333J B). 



25. 
26. 
27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 



42. 
43. 

44. 
45. 



55. $27.67. 

56. $248^1^. 

57. $15.52". 

58. $124. 

59. $250. 

60. 50 eagles. 

61. 200 half dol- 

lars. 

62. 100 quarter 

dollars. 

63. 500 dimes. 

64. 297.6 half dol- 

lars. 

65. 3681^ pieces. 

Exercise 200. 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 



$70. 
7 days. 
$189. 
517 mi. 
105 T. 
27 A. 
/ . 40 chairs. 

8. $25. 

9. 9 men. 

10. 24 men. 

11. $142.80. 

12. $12.50. 

13. 11§ da. 
$891. 
22 cows. 

n yd. 

$562.50. 

18. $360. 

19. $72: 
90 horses. 
18 da. 
4000 lb. 
201 yd. 



14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 



20. 
21. 

22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27 
28. 



2hin. 



24 da. 

9 brooms. 
5 men. 
Ida. 
$56. 
$3.15. 

10 ft. 
10 ft. 
14 da. 
32 gal. 

35. $238. 

36. $148. 

37. 87idoz. 

38. 239 lb. 

39. 3000 sacks. 

40. 84 weeks. 

41. 21 sacks. 



30. 
31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 



284 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



Exercise 201. 



'■{ 



A. $1150. 

B. $690. 
$245. 



0. 



10. 



■ \ B. $392. 

1st $44. 

2d $52. 
, j 1st $4000. 
^- I 2d $2000. 

A. $1612. 

B. $2015. 

C. $2418. 

G. $45, $60, $90. 
fA. $666§. 
I B. $1000. 

7. { C.$1200. 

I D. $1333^. 
LE. $1800. 

8. 83J ct., $1100. 
CA. 54T. 

{ B. 75 T. 
i C. 120 T. 

A. $131. 

B. $393. 

C. $262. 
I A. $1800. 

11. < B. $600. 

( C. $1200. 
j^ ( 1st $3571. 
^"- t 2d $642!i. 
J. ($171.60. 
^^- t $257.40. 

(432. 

14. < 576. 

(720. 
( A. $990. 

15. < B. $750. 

( C. $1350. 

Exercise 209. 

1. $2500. 

2. $432. 

3. $37.50. 
4- 20%. 
5. $6(). 

6'. $4500. 
7. $1728. 

S-i%. 
0. $4555. 
10. $6. 

^^- 9*%. 
1£. $52. 
iJ. $(!73.30. 
i^. $450. 
15. $1094.70. 

io. m%. 

17. $10. 



i5. $27. 
i.9. 16§%. 
iSO. $625. 

Exercise 212. 

i. $99. 

f $250 board. 
I $125 cloth- 

2. i ing. 

I $450 inci- 
i, dentals. 

3. $300. 

4. ^%; 15%. 
^. I; 12J%. 

6'. $5. 

7. $40. 

5. 141%. 
.9. $40000. 

i(?. $900. 

Exercise 214. 

/. $25. 
£. $9.90. 

3. 124%. 

^. $4.50. 

$96 loss. 
$3744 8. P. 

0. 20%. 

7. 331 %. 

S. $1.20. 

£^. $1.50. 
iO. 331 %. 
ii. 12%. 
if. $1.37|. 
7. J $49 0. 
^'^- t .$42 S. P. 

14. 20 ct. 

15. 8h ct. 
i6\ 11%. 
17. 80 ct. 

ici^. 11^% loss. 
10. 2H% gain. 
m. 2^% loss, 
fi. 90 ct., $1.14, 
$1.32. 

22. 331%. 

23. 10 ct. 
f^,. $15.13. 
25. $37. 
^6. $82.50. 



^^ i $14.40 

<i:l% Ic 
$1,944. 



^o i $1.94 
29. $1.50. 



15 



Exercise 216. 

^ ( $112.50 loss. 
^- 1 $1387.50 !S. P. 
,, ( $20000 cost. 
"• \ $20500 S. P. 
o ( $131 loss. 
^- ) $13331 cost. 
, I 3f % loss. 
^- t $1925 S. P. 
. ($85.25 gain. 
'^- \ $1170.258. P. 

6. 28tV% gain. 
^ (.$2100 cost. 
^- 1 $2247 8. P. 
o j $2502 cost. 
^- \ .$417 loss. 
9. 20% loss. 

.^ ($1,231 loss. 
^^- t $19,731 cost. 
;. ($1350 cost. 
^^- 1 $1,395 8. P. 

12. $1690 8. P. 

13. $750 cost. 
i.^. $654/v cost. 

' $138 loss. 

$782 S. P. 
.p j $6300 cost. 
^^- \ $5460 8. P. 
17. 61% gain. 
IS. 14f % gain. 

.$980 gain. 

"^980 8. P. 
^^ ($51 cost. 
'^^- \ $76.50 8. P. 
21. P:'§%rate. 
^j, ( $3 loss. 
^"- 1 $12. 8. P. 
23. $18 cost, 
f^. $1000 cost. 

Exercise 218. 

y ($21 com. 
^- 1 $679 net. 

^. !<■§%. 

^. $566.50. 

^ I $3000 value. 

^- \ $120 com. 

5. $4.99J- ($5.00.) 

6'. 30 ct. 

7. $315. 

5. 300 bales. 
$2905. 
9g^JjC. per lb. 

10. 800 vol. 

11. $2920. 

;^ ( $80 com. 
^^- ] $.3420 net. 
i^. 21%. 



19 I '^^ 
^^- t $7' 



9. 



21. 



J900( 



u- 34%. 

i5. $4100. 
16. 141%. 
..V ($262.50 com. 
^' • \ $.3937.50 val. 
IS. $2100. 
i.9. $1.59g. 
f(>. 79500 t). 
9000 !b. 

ct. perft, 
;.^f. 1000 R). 
f J. $432. 
^ , ( $.506.25. 
"■^- t 23750 lb. 
25. 2%. 

Exercise 220. 

. ( 2*% rate. 
1 $6435 pro. 
2. $8000 cost. 
^ j $5463.41 C. 
'^^ 1 $136.59 com. 
, ( $900 8. P. 
^- \ $886.50 pro. 
r ( $174.64 com. 
^- \ $8557.36 pro. 

6. 21% rate. 

7. 3% rate. 
S. 6% rate. 
9. 6§% rate. 

.,. ( $2140 cost. 

^^- t $42.80 com. 

ii. 11% rate. 

12. $1756 8. P. 

13. 2.8% rate, 
i^. 1% rate. 
15. $1188 cost. 
10. $5 com. 

Exercise 222. 



( $44 prem. 
\ $5456 loss. 
$4000. 

f%. 

$1980. 

$3750. 
0. 2%. 

.V ( $100 prem. 
' \ $7500 val. 

1|%. 
$6756. 

$6.34. 

u%. 

First. 

$2184. 

$58.32. 
100/ 

is%- 



9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 



ARITHMETIC. 



285 



16. $3168. 

17. $500. 

18. $5.25. 

19. $2116.80. 

20. 111%. 

Exercise 225. 



$30,50. 
$2900. 
$40.50. 
45 ct. 
$500000. 
j $1000000. 
t 3 mills. 



^- 1 $7. 
9. U%. 

10. $86. 

11. $873. 
A'. $42.86§. 
i^. $!^00000 
14. 12%. 

Exercise 227. 

1. $43. 
;^. $375. 

^. $221.76. 

4. $4448.30. 

5. $813.50. 

6. $3806. 

7. $1084.50. 
5'. $3. 

9. $750. 

if. $320. 

11. $54. 

i^. $18.80. 

iJ. $18. 

Exercise 228. 

2. $1022.50. 

, j 80 sh. 

^- t $8160. 
. ( 80 sh. 
^- I $4800. 
6?. 4f|%. 
7. F.N.-^-f%. 
o ( 160 sh. 
•^^ 1 $13120 cost. 
9. ^' early 214%. 

10. Each 5%. 

11. 16 sh. 

12. $376.87*. 

13. 11%. - 
i^. $251.25. 



16 



15. 40 sh. 
( 95 sh. 
\ $6317.50. 
Or. Nav. 
12 sh. 
10 sh. 



Exercise 231. 



$11.91. 
$191.41. 



1$ 

1$ 
f $57.20, 
\ $382.2( 
( $146.19 

1.1 



$904.94. 

$142.03. 
1 $1166.28. 
( $7.21. 
1 $591.71. 
j $55.77. 
t $781.61. 
( $83.02. 
t $470.97. 
( $.17. 
t $42.37. 



Exercise 232. 

1. $6; $7.50; $9. 

2. $43.54 ; $60.95 

$(i9.66. 

3. $57.46. 

4. $94.07. 

5. $109.69. 

6. $59.48. 

7. $83.77. 

8. $11.23. 

9. $14.65. 

10. $16.92. 

11. $180.24. 
i:^. $154. 

Exercise 238. 

1. 4 yr. 6 mo. 
^ f 1 vr. 4 mo. 
^- t 1 vr. 2 mo. 
3. $500. 
^. 8%. 
^. 6§%. 

6. $240. 

7. $679.61. 
<?. Umo. 
9. $392.16. 

10. $11.36. 

11. Offers equal. 

12. 1 yr. 6 mo. 20 

(ia. 

13. $705.59. 



A'. $147.06. 
iJ. 12^%. 
^6\6%. 
17. $4.32. 
i,^. $20000. 
19. $760. 
^a 11 mo. 

21. 3"yr. 3 mo. 18 

da. 

22. 6%. 
^5. $218.75. 
24. $6250. 
^5. $484. 

26. Jan. 2, 1882. 
^7. 3 yr. 1 mo. (5 
da. 

28. $885.75. 

29. $1.92. 

30. 6 %. 
^/. $750. 

32. 3 yr. 1 mo. 3 

da. 

33. 92 ct. 
^^. $780. 

36. $1970.50. 



Exercise 240. 

1. $577.38. 



3. $576.67. 

4. $285.99. 
J. $603.49. 
e. $200. 

7. $1386.78. 
<?. $325.08. 
9. $209.45. 
i6>. $228.95. 

Exercise 242. 

1. $262.48. 
£. $39.71. 
3. $15.80. 
>^. $13.75. 

5. $70.23. 
6'. $2().n0. 
7. $73.33. 
<^. $12.56. 
9. $116.86. 

if. $112.58. 

Exercise 243. 

1. $690.67. 

2. $840.93. 
^. $1426.88. 
^. $908.46. 
5. $247.50. 



6. $1835.82. 


7. $519.44. 


,?. $297.83. 


5. $1141.73. 


10. $1350.56. 


11. $738.31. 


Exercise 244. 


i. $256.50. 


^- 28| %. 


^. $3.75 more. 


4. $1000. 


5. $190. 


6. $596.11. 


7. $80. 


5. $363.80. 


9. $703.25. 


if. $4.45. 


ii. $2.40. 


12. $571.20. 


Exercise 245. 


i. $5008.33. 


^. $577.10. 


.^. $1565.52. 


6. $4500. 


7. $736.56. 


8.l7o' 


9. $769.04. 


if. *% prem. 


11. $186. 


i^. 875 francs. 


Exercise 248. 


1. 7 mo. 5 da. 


;g. 3 mo. 17 da. 


0(4 mo. 14 da. 
'^- \ Aug. 22. 


4. 18 da. 


J. June 2.3. 


6. 5 mo. 


7. $330. 


5. 20 mo. 


9. June 14, 1886 


if. Oct. 15, 1884. 


Exercise 249. 


i. $3.10. 


2. 94* ct. 


3. Gj^j ct. 


i 9fl%. 


5. 291 ct. 


6. 10 ct. 


7. 45 ct. gain. 


Exercise 253. 


L 32 rd. 



286 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



58 rows. 
1280 rd. 
99 ft. 
80x40 rd. 
64 rd. 
8.54 rd. 
101.2 rd. 
A's, $90. 

10. $420. 

11. 64 in. sq. 



2. 
S. 

4- 
6. 
6. 

7. 
8. 
9. 



Exercise 256. 

1. 21 in. 

2. 61.3+ in. 
S. 8 cu. ft. 

4. 67.64 gal. 

5. 1176 sq. in. 

6. 3.17 ft. 

7. 13824 cu. in. 

8. 1.6 met. 

9. 79.875 cu. met. 

Exercise 257. 

1. 14.14 ft. 

2. 13.23 ft. 

3. 17.35 ft. 

4. 50 ft. 

5. 8.54 ft. 

6. 22.8 ft. 

7. 20.95 ft. 

8. 64.62 ft. 

9. 241.4 ft. 
i^. 33.8 ft. 
11. 51.42 ft. 
i^. 83.67 ft. 
13. 56.57 rd. 
7^,. 20 rd. 
15. 15.59 in. 

j 10.(J rd. 

• 1 112.5 sq. rd. 

17. 45.08 ft. 

18. 92.45 mi. 

19. 3 ft. .98 in. 
W. 20.59 ft. 



16 



Exercise 258. 

1. 180 sq. rd. 

2. 390 sq. rd. 
o j 69.12 rd. 

''• t380.13sq.rd. 

4. 4.55 ft. 

5. 18.46 sq. rd. 
6\ 7'sq. ft.+ 

7. 10.4 sq. yd. 

8. 15 rd. 

5. 1293 sq. ft. 

10. 42 ft. 8 in. 

11. m sq. ft. 
1£. 47| in. 

13. 30 ft.; 20' ft. 

14. 78.54 sq. ft. 
iJ. $89.68. 

16. $1518.75. 

17. $7208.85. 

18. 93 sq. ft. 

19. 420+ times. 
100.399 rd. 

£0. < dia. 

251.6 rd. cir. 

Exercise 259. 

1. 24 cu. ft. 

2. 52 sq. ft. 

3. 3.21i sq. ft. 

4. 179.07 sq. in. 

5. 3.91 qt. 

6. 795.87^ cu. in. 

7. 2.53 sq. ft. 

8. 8.17 in. 

9. 3.1416 sq.ft. 

10. 73i+ times. 

11. lcd.981-cu.ft, 
if. 6.14 bu. 

13. 1.85 sq. yd. 

14. 18.16 in. 

15. 1.47 gal. 

16. .58 qt. 

17. 11.55 in. 
ic?. 68.80 sq. ft. 

19. 54400 cu. ft. 

20. 21.38 cu. ft. 



r 201032400 sq. 
^7 ] mi. 
"^- I 268083200000 

l^ cu. mi. 

22. $1275.12. 

23. $337.92. 

24. 3+ cu. ft. 

Exercise 261. 

1. $220.50. 

2. $3.60. 

^. $3720.47. 
, j $139.71 com. 
^- 1 56312 lb. 
5. $20. 

f 104.48 me- 
^ J ters wide. 
^- j 313.4+ me- 

[ ters long. 
7. 86if . 
<§. $17.65. 
5. 27108.31 ft. 

10. 4.83 ares. 

11. $42240. 
i;i 121ff%. 

i-i. 109% nearly. 

14. 188.32 meters. 

15. $1. 

.. ( $6035. 
-^^- t $5793.60. 
17. $600. 
ii?. 15 men. 

19. 30^ sq. rd. 

20. 174 + meters. 
;?i. 259 + hektares 

22. $4001.40. 

23. 502.25. 

24. .2169+. 
^5 f 210 A. 
'^^- t 330 B. 

^^ f 41.62 sq. met. 
"^- t 25.25 cu.met. 
27. 56 da. 
^5. 64 A.; 72 B. 

23398 liters. 

23396 kilo- 
grams. 



r60A.144sq. 
rd. A. 
77 A. 98 sq. 

30. rd. B. 

i 103 A. 74§ 
sq. rd. C. 
206 A. 149J 
sq. rd. D. 

31. 3 316 ft. 

32. 194630.4 kilo- 

grams. 

33. 93.23 hhd. 
g, f 4s. 1.38d. 
'^4- \ 5.376 fr. 

35. 4.6 meters. 

36. $1031.85. 
oy j $600. 

^•184%. 
38. 187.2 steres. 
.g ( $10.31. 
^^- t $42.69. 

f $1600 A, 
^(^. < $2000 B. 

($1800 C. 
^i. 546t% ft. 
^f. $5.25. 
.^.5. 198 ft. 
.^^. 18.29 sq. me- 
ters. 

(36. 

45. < 3, 7, 21. 

i 2-', 33, 17. 

46. $3750. 
.^7. 84. 

48. 51cd. 77cu.ft, 

49. $54. 

50. 4. 

5i! 1.556.10. 
5f. 83957.8 kUo- 
grams. 

53. $761.42. 

54. $538.85. 

55. 5y\ min. past 

1 o'clock. 

5(7. 4y\ min. be- 
fore 1 o'cl'k. 

57. $1199.08. 



ARITHMETIC. 



28: 



I^^DEX. 



Accounts, 221; cash, 221; personal, 
224; barley field, 225; dairy, 225; 
bank, 227. 

Addition, 14; of several columns, 
20; of two columns, 20; practical 
work, 28; of common fractions, 
77; of decimal fractions, 108; of 
compound numbers, 158. 

Analysis: general, 172; in multipli- 
cation, 36; in division, 46; frac- 
tional, 93. 

Average, 235; of payments, 233. 

Balance Sheet, 226. 

Bills, 119. 

Brick Work, 137. 

Brokerage, 190. 

Cancellation, 86. 

Carpeting Rooms, 132. 

Cash Account, 221. 

Check, form of, 227. 

Circle: area, 250; parts of, 146. 

Commission, 189. 

Compound Interest, 216. 

Cone, 252; frustum of, 252. 

Cube, 134,241; root, 241. 

Customs, 200. 

Cylinder, 252. 

Decimal System, 5; notation, 5; 
fractions, 102; point, 5. i 

Discount, 219; in stocks, 202; true, i 
212; commercial, 218. ; 

Division, 43; short, 50; long, 53; ' 
general principles of, 55; practi- 
cal work in, 5^ ; of common frac- 
tions, 87; of decimal fractions, 
110; short methods in, 118; of 
compound numbers, 162. 

Draft, form. of, 228. 

Duties, 199. 

Exchange, 228; by postal order, 
231; by check, 231. 

Factors, 63; prime, 63; special di- 
rections for finding, 63 ; greatest 
common, 65 ; cancellation of, 86. 



Fractions, 72; terms of, 72; im- 
proper, 73; lowest terms of, 75; 
common denominator, 76; addi- 
tion of, 77; subtraction of, 77; 
practical w^ork in addition and 
subtraction of, 79; multiplica- 
tion of, 82; cancellation, 86; di- 
vision of, 87; inverting the 
divisor, 89; complex, 91; what 
fraction one number is of an- 
other, 91; finding the whole 
when a part is given, 92; practi- 
cal work in analysis, 93; oral 
review, 94; written review, 97. 
Decimal, 102; United States 
money, 105; changing from com- 
mon to decimal, 103; circulating 
decimal, 107; addition and sub- 
traction of, 108; multiplication 
of, 109; division of, 110; con- 
tracted multiplication of, 111; 
contracted division of, 112; prac- 
tical work, 113. 

General Analysis, 172. 

Greatest Common Factor, 65. 

Insurance, 194. 

Interest, 204; six per cent meth- 
od, 20:5; exact, 209; ptoblems in, 
210; compound, 216. 

Least Common Multiple, 68. 

Longitude and Time, 150. 

Measures, 122; long, 122, 154 ; sur- 
veyor's long, 126; metric long, 
127 ; surface, 128, 155 ; surveyor's 
surface, 130; metric surface, 131; 
cubic or solid, 134, 155; metric 
solid, 137; lumber, 138; liquid, 
139, 155; metric dry and liquid, 
141; circular, 146; time, 147; Cal- 
ifornia, 155, 157; beer, 155; dry, 
155. 

Mensuration, 246; lines, angles, 
and surfaces, 246; right angle tri- 
angles, 247; surface areas, 249; 
surfaces of solids, 252; contents 
of solids, 252. 

Metric System: linear, 127; sur- 
face, 131; solid, 137; liquid, 141; 
dry, 141 ; weight, 145. 



288 



CALIFORNIA SERIES. 



Miscellaneous Problems, 257. 

Money: United States, 1G8; how 
written, 105; English, 157; 
French, 157. 

Multiples, 67; least common, G8; 
practical work in, 70. 

Multiplication, 34; analysis in, 30; 
by one figure, 38; by lO's, lOO's, 
etc., 40; by several figures, 41; 
practical work in, 56; of frac- 
tions, 82; of decimals, 109; short 
methods, 115; of compound 
numbers, 161. 

Notation: decimal, 5; Roman, 12; 
of decimal fractions, 102. 

Note: form of, 214 ; payable to " or- 
der," 214; to "bearer," 214; ma- 
turity of, 214; indorsement of, 
214; race of, 214; demand note, 
214 ; indorsement on, 215. 

Numbers: writing of, 5; reading of, 
9; concrete, 36; abstract, 36; 
prime, 63; composite, 63; inte- 
gral, 72; mixed, 73; simple, 122; 
compound, 122. 

Numeration, 9; names of groups, 
9; of decimal fractions, 103. 

Parallelograms, 249; area of, 250. 

Partial Payments, 214, 215. 

Partnership, 178. 

Percentage, 181 

Plastering, 133. 

Polygons, area of, 250. 
Powers and Roots, 237. 



Present Worth, 212. 

Profit and Loss, 185. 

Proportion: simple, 176; com- 
pound, 177. 

Pyramid: area of, 253; contents 
of, 254. 

Ratio, 176. 

Receipt, form of, 119. 

Rectangle, area of, 129. 

Reduction: fractions, 74; com- 
pound numbers, 124. 

Roman Notation, 12. 

Root: square, 237; cube, 241. 

Short Methods: in multiplication, 
115; in division, 118. 

Sphere, 252; surface of, 254; vol- 
ume of, 254. 

Stocks, 201. 

Stone and Brick "Work, 137. 

Subtraction, 21; of several figures, 
24; practical work in, 28; frac- 
tions, 77; decimals, 108; com- 
pound numbers, 160. 

Taxes, 198. 

Trapezium, area of, 249, 250. 

Trapezoid, area of, 249, 250. 

Triangles : area of, 250 ; right an- 
gle, 247. 

True Discount, 212. 

Weights: Avoirdupois, 142; Troy, 
143; metric, 145; apothecaries', 
156 ; long ton, 157. 



FOURTEEN DAY USE 

RETURN TO DESK FROM WHICH BORROWED 



This book is due on the last date stamped below, or 

on the date to which renewed. 

Renewed books are subject to immediate recall. 



9 \hzt 



'58!f 



FEB 2 4 1956;^ (J 




LD 21-100m-2,'55 
(Bl39s22)476 



General Library 

University of California 

Berkeley 



TB :3bttv3c5 







/