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Full text of "Advanced projects in woodwork"

YC i 8269 

UC-NRLF 




By IRA S. GRIFFITH, A. B. 

Assistant Professor of Manual Arts, Bradley Polytechnic Institute, Peoria, Illinois. 

Author of "Essentials of Woodworking," Woodwork for Amateur Craftsmen," 

"Correlated Courses in Woodwork and Mechanical Drawing," and 

"Projects for Beginning Woodwork and Mechanical Drawing." 




THE MANUAL ARTS PRESS 

PEORTA, ILL. 



COPYRIGHT, 

IRA S. GRIFFITH, 

1912. 



PREFACE. 

* ADVANCED PROJECTS IN WOODWORK is a collection of projects designed to meet the needs of classes 
in high school woodworking. These projects presuppose familiarity with woodworking processes, 
tools, and the two simple joints required in the making of projects contained in the author's Pro- 
jects in Beginning Woodwork and Mechanical Drawing. 

The drawings are complete only as to their general dimensions. The working out of details, 
such as the sizes of mortises and tenons and their locations, is left for the pupil in his work in 
drawing and design. 

It is expected that the projects will afford suitable basic material for classes in woodworking 
design. It remains for the instructor to point out the manner in which this material may be used. 
For illustration, many beginning students are slow in appreciation of possible modifications in 
structure or decoration. Circular tops may be used instead of square or octagonal, and vice versa. 
Modification of the manner of filling side spaces with slats offers variety in initiative. Vertical 
posts may be made tapering and vice versa. Rails and stretchers may be variously employed. 
There is almost always a choice in the matter of joints, keyed or thru or blind tenon. Fig. i is 
suggestive as to possible modifications of a type. 

In addition to the possible structural modifications, the plates suggest variation in the matter 
of decorative ornament such as pierced and carved forms and simple inlay. Such ornament will, 
of course, be kept subordinate to the structural design. 

The upholstering of stool tops and seats for chairs provides another problem in variation. 

Little, if any, use is made of dowels as substitutes for the mortise-and-tenon. While it is true 
that modern commercial practice makes much use of dowels in this way, the author feels that 
such practice is too often contrary to the principles of good construction. Its genesis lies in 
economy of material rather than in any superiority as a fastening device. 

In the designing of these projects the author has had in mind at all times the thought that most 



ADVANCED PROJECTS IN WOODWORK 



of the students using them would have access only to a band-saw or jig-saw and a miter-box in ad- 
dition to the regular hand tool equipment. For this reason such projects as hall clocks, mission 
beds, etc., have been excluded. The exceptional student will find projects of sufficient size to 







FIG. 1. 



tax his ability and muscle. Easier projects and lighter projects have been provided for the weaker 
members of the class while the use of slats or their omission will provide additional variation in 
time of execution. 

The use of stock ordered 8-4-8 (surfaced on four sides) has not been anticipated. The use 
of stock S-2-S and moldings such as are carried in stock by lumber yards is presupposed. If a 
working principle for the use of stock partly prepared were asked for it would be : Any material 



PREFACE 5 

that is carried as stock and which does not have to be ordered especially worked for the project 
a boy elects or designs may be made use of legitimately. Such a principle would permit the use 
of stock S-2-S, moldings of stock pattern, hardware such as hinges and locks without any sug- 
gestion of deception. It would exclude table legs and tops, etc., especially prepared at a mill, and 
offers a rational dividing line between two extremes, neither of which is desirable. 

Of course, these projects may be used in the teaching of the use of woodworking machinery. 

No definite notes as to methods of procedure are given in this book for the student is supposed 
to have acquired, thru experience with the projects in the elementary book, enough insight to en- 
able him to proceed of his own accord. Definite instruction in making the new joints, in wood- 
finishing, etc. will be found in Essentials of Woodworking, a companion book. 

While these projects are especially arranged for use with the courses outlined and discussed in 
Correlated Courses in Woodwork and Mechanical Drawing, by the author, there is nothing in the form 
of the plates themselves to prevent their being used with any course in woodwork. 

July, 1912. IRA S. GRIFFITH. 

The inking of the drawings and the making of the 
perspectives in this book is the work of Mr. George 
Gordon Kellar. 



LIST OF PLATES. 



1. Exercises Keyed tenon, Blind 

Mortise-and-Tenon. 

2. Exercises Miter Joint, Glue 

Joint. 

3. Exercises Modeling, Hammer 

Handles. 

4. Necktie Rack. 

5. Footstool. 

6. Book-rack. 

7. Upholstered Stool. 

8. Leg Rest. 

9. Cricket. 

10. Wall Shelves. 

11. Stool (square). 



GROUP IX. JOINERY. 

12. Taboret (octagonal top). 

13. Taboret (round top). 

14. Small Table. 

15. Taboret (square top). 

16. Piano Bench. 

17. Piano Bench. 

18. Book Stand. 

19. Umbrella Stand. 

20. Umbrella Stand. 

21. Jardiniere Stand. 

22. Magazine Stand. 

23. Roman Seat. 

24. Light Stand. 

25. Stool (square). 



26. Book Trough. 

27. Screen. 

28. Tea Table. 

29. Hall Rack. 

30. Wall China Rack. 

31. Side Chair. 

32. Arm Chair. 

33. Morris Chair. 

34. Electric Reading Lamp. 

35. Pedestal. 

36. Occasional Rocker.- 

37. Mission Chair. 

38. Drop Leaf Table. 



39. Exercises Mortise-and-Tenon 

Joint, Rabbeted Joint, 
Grooved Joint. 

40. Exercises Thru Multiple Dove- 

tail, Half-blind Dovetail. 



GROUP X. CABINET WORK. 

41. Waste Paper Box. 

42. Wall Cabinet. 

43. Telephone Table. 

44. Sewing Cabinet. 

45. Writing Table. 



46. Chafing-dish Stand. 

47. Cabinet. 

48. Library Table. 

49. Writing-desk. 

50. Dressing Table. 

51. Linen Chest. 



PRICE LIST FOR YEAR 19_ 

LUMBER Quality, 1st, clear, and kiln-dried. 



KIND OF WOOD 


Per 1000 feet when surfaced on two sides 


Thickness in the Rough 


%' 


Yz" 


%" 


%" 


1" 


W 


IK" 


2" 


Yellow Poplar 


















White Pine 


















# Sawed White Oak 


















Mahogany 


















% Sawed Red Sycamore 


















Black Walnut 


















Plain Sawed Red Oak 



















HARDWARE 

For prices on hardware consult Hardware Catalog provided for you. 

Figure retail price, that is, figure screws at price per dozen, not price per gross. 

WOODFINISH 

Per square foot of surface covered. 

LABOR 
Per hour. 



(Form for high school use) 



BILL OF MATERIAL 



NAME 






DAT 


E BEGUN 










CLASS 






DAT 


E FINISHED 










ARTICLE 






EXT 


RA HOURS 




























Pieces 


Size 


Description 


Price 


Feet 




C 


JSt 




2 


K * SM x 12^ 


Walnut Slats S-2-S to % in. 


.10 


5 

TTT 




.05 






1 


1 x 8X x 14K 


Stretcher y& in. i 














6 


1 x 3J4 x 12K 


" Rails 


.10 


3 r 9 ir 




.39 






1 


1 x 14 J^ x 14K 


" Top 














4 


IK x IK x 24^ 


" Posts " IX in. 


.11 


2 




.22 




.66 


8 


2 inch No. 10 


Flat Head Brt. Screws 


.00^ 






.04 






4 


IK inch No. 10 




.oox 






.01 




.05 




13 sq. feet 


Wood Finish 


.01 










.13 






MATERIAL COST.. 












.84 




30 hrs. 


Labor 


.15 








4 


.50 



TOTAL COST $5.34 



INSTRUCTIONS FOR MAKING BILL OF MATERIAL. 



Under "pieces" put the number of parts that are alike. 

Under "size" put the various dimensions of pieces. In 
finding the sizes of the various pieces of lumber, examine 
the working drawings for finished dimensions, making due 
additions for tenons, then add *4" to the width and J4" to 
the length to allow for cutting out and squaring up. Tho 
you are to make use of stock mill-planed to thickness, you 
are to specify the thickness from which this mill-planed 
stock is got. Allow at least l /%" for mill-planing. 

Remember that length always means along the grain. 

Fractions of an inch in width and length are not con- 
sidered. Neither are fractions of a cent in the final results. 
If the fraction is l /2 or over, take the next higher whole 
number. If it is less than l /2, drop it. Fractions of an inch 
in thickness that are over 1" and fractions of a cent in 
the price per foot are to be figured as they are. 

Lumber is measured by the superficial foot which is 1" 
x 12" x 12". Boards that are less than 1" thick are sold 
by surface measure. In other words, boards less than 1" 
thick are figured for quantity as 1" thick. 

Standard sawed thicknesses are 1", 1J4", l/'z", 2", 2 l / 2 ", 



3", 35/2", 4". Thicknesses less than 1" necessitate re- 
sawing these sizes. In some communities the price per 
square foot for re-sawed stock varies for each difference 
of J4" in thickness. 

In figuring, multiply the length by the width by the 
thickness, by the number of pieces. If any piece is less 
than 1" thick figure it as 1". Combine all results that are 
the same in price per foot. Reduce to square feet by 
dividing by 144. Reduce decimally and do not carry the 
result beyond tenths place. Dispose of any fractional part 
beyond tenths as directed above. Write your result in 
fractional form that the decimal point may not be over- 
looked and be the cause of trouble. 

The price list gives the price of lumber per 1,000 feet. 
The price per foot is readily obtainable. 

In figuring finish for these cabinet pieces, double the 
number of feet of stock as given by the stock bill to get 
the number of feet of finish. This is only an approximate 
method but is sufficiently accurate for such pieces as are 
to be made in first year high school, as specified in Ad- 
vanced Projects in Woodivork, Group IX. 



10 



(PREPARATORY TO GROUP 'X) 



KEYED TENON 




BUND MORTISE * ND TENON 



. 






n 




[ 



\Hti 


"0 


r 


i / 
i f 




f 











PLATE 1. 



CXCLrT C/OCL ( PREPARATORY TO GROUP IX ) 

GLUE JOINT- DOWELING 



MITER JOINT 





M.Q 



DOWELS HE* 



-10 



PLATE 2. 



PREPARATORY TOCrtOUP/X 

(CHOOSE owe) 



^ 



-13 




HANDLE ro* CLAW HAMMER 



4 



* 







-14 



PLATE 3. 



NECKTIE RACK 





htr 



-18 



* 







i 



i- 



PLATE 4. 



FOOT STOOL 




PLATE 5. 



BOOK RACK 





PLATE 6. 



UPHOLSTERED STOOL 



fl 



r 




-/8 



14 



18 



14- 




PLATE 7. 



LEG REST 





PLATK 8. 



CRICKET 





24 




PLATE 9. 



WALL SHELVES 





-JO 



(OR LESS) 



PLATE 10. 



STOOL 




| | .__ j. 



V 

-il-i- 

I 

-ft* 



T -$ 




-17^- 



-B-* 



.J 



:t_ 



-JU 



PLATE 11. 



TABORET 





PLATE 12. 



TABORET 




PLATE 13. 



SMALL TABLE 





PLATE 14. 





PLATE IS. 



PIANO BENCH 




-J6 



16 




-/o 



PLATE 16. 



PIANO BENCH 




PLATE 17. 



END OF 
LOWER SHELF 



END OF 
MIDDLE SHELVES 



BOOK STAND 

16 





DETAIL OF JOINT 
AT A-5 




PLATE 18. 



UMBRELLA STAND 







20- 



-28 



2 L 2 i 



PLATE 19. 



UMBRELLA STAND 





PLATE 20. 



JARDINIERE STAND 




"h- c=5 



I I 

If-ll 

:oi 

i n i 

:! 
M 



^S 



i | 



!f]j 

ili! 



y> - 



n ~ 



^ 



-28- 



PLATE 21. 



MAGAZINE STAND 





-18 



I >l_ 

T 



T? 

TT 





QO 





-i - 



71 



-10 




PLATE 22. 



ROMAN SEAT 




PLATE 23. 



LIGHT STAND 




PLATE 24. 



STOOL 




PLATE 25. 



BOOK TROUGH 



H I 



-IQ 




13" 





PLATE 26. 



SCREEN 




-36 



r> 



~oo __ 





PJJVTE 27. 



TEA TABLE 




PLATE 28. 



TEA TABLE 





PLATE 28. 



WALL CHINA RACK 




PLATE 30. 



SIDE CHAIR 





PLATE 31. 



ARM CHAIR 




PLATE 32. 



MORRIS CHAIR 




PLATE 33. 



ELECTRIC READING LAMP 





SECTION AT A-B 



a. 


i 


> 

T 


CT 


} 1 o 


- \ 


ol n 




t 

10 






1 | D 




li' 

\ 


J_J_ =j 

< 


c 




f " 3 


'* 

-^ 




PLATE 34. 



PEDESTAL 



SECTION AT ^- 





EGG AND DART 



-37- 



CD 





-14- 



PLATE 35. 



OCCASIONAL ROCKER 




PLATE 36. 



MISSION CHAIR 



























I 




1 


<> 

o 


* 

si 








r~ 

L. 
























[1 


* 










c 


] 


3 










t 




















































c 


] 


3 




















































3 

a 
























x 


t 








































7 










, 


5 


-1 




2 


T , 


, 












f\ 
r 


J 
~) 












-j- 








I 










! 
























1 






L 


; 

















~\~ 
















If 


























10 

I 






t 


r 
















-IM 
















































i_ 


3 

r 










i 
























































Q 


10 

3 


























































- 


'? 













1 













9 


































































li. 
















PLATE 37. 



DROP LEAF TABLE 





w 



H 3 I- 



.*d. 



-/J 



HN 

I <\j 



VO 
<\J 



H/wet.s 



-13 



-i 



-i 



H 



Q 



PLATE 38. 



tx\tf\ (_x/Ot. - 



MORTISE AHO TENON -RABBETED 




HAUNCHED MORTISE AHO TENON -GROOVED 





<VJ 



-*, 

I. 



ii oiiS 
ii i 



1 


ii 


i 




1 !' 






^ ll \v 







fP*2 t 






_ _ i _ / / 


i 


VJ 


L.TJ \ * 


T 






1 






LJL 



PLATE 39. 



TO atom* X 



THRU MULTIPLE DOVETAIL 




HALKBLIND DOVETAIL 



rrn 

-~i6r 




PLATE 40. 



WASTE PAPER BOX 





PLATE 41. 



WALL CABINET 




DETAIL OF SHELF 
AT A-B 



PLATE 42. 



TELEPHONE TABLE 




-FT 




PLATE 43. 



SEWING CABINET 



-/8- 



N 



o 



^ 



III 



<O 



CD 

^J 



rw^r 

"~i-Vt-T 



^J- 
N 



^ 



-*- 




PL ATI: 44. 



WRITING TABLE 




PLATE 45. 



CHAFING DISH STAND 





PLATE 46. 



CABINET 



tt 



47 



4, 



fl=*-4 



OJ 



1" 




'^m : 



I?*- 

-14- 



~4~ 




PLATE 47. 



LIBRARY TABLE 




PLATE 



WRITING DESK 



f 



^ 



LT^- - -c.-i.-r_-in=Ll 



-^f 




'VJ 



n 



rr'T 



E 



-i_-= 



-^j 



} 




} 



COMMERCIAL DESION. 



PLATE 49. 



DRESSING TABLE 



-Ik 




-14- 



^ 



*\j 



-20 



-36 



H<\j 

2 o 

"> 



it 



*h- 



m 




PLATE 50. 



LINEN CHEST 



LI 





-39 



t 



3. 









-14 



13 



PLATE 51. 



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