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Full text of "The advance : yearbook of Indiana State Normal School"

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

FORT WAYNE & ALLEN CO., IND. 



U^^-C^^i^ 



3 1833 01715 7683 

^c 977 . 202 T27ad" 1917? 
Indiana State College- 
The advance 




THE ADVANCE 

YEARBOOK 

of 

INDIANA STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

TERRE HAUTE, INDIANA 



""'"'•£ /,/^ 



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Published by 

CLASS of 1919 



ASSen County Public Lib/arv 
900 Webster Stf€it '^"' 
PO Box 2270 
fort Wayne, IN mQhtm 



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Co ©nv ^Ima iWater: 

With love and gratitude for 
the truth she has revealed to 
us, for the ideals she has set 
for us, for the future she has 
opened to us — we dedicate 
this Advance. 



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IrxdLana. o/d/e ilormal Uckool, 
(jhe ye.ar i^i^-i'pi'p. 

Ueor- f^^^c/e-r-^^ 

We ar~& ^3erxc/ini6 forrh. for you, a 
llille akronicle. of Ike hap/Dsnirig^ oj^ fk<^ sV&nffu/ yeor- 
f^ore ka^ ki.aJDbeio.ecl oul in. /^e wo<-/c/ arxd nzior-e h.oj, 
IzLaphietisd a/ I.<3.N than, cou/ol he foi^-l- LKiio a liararp 
trui i^e /zoi/e carefully ,5e/ec/ec/ th.e. yirirxci^ci/ Hdvance 
of Ikie. year for our Hnnua/ arxdl f>uT lh.e.rn. ii^ra hicrur-e, 
oncJ -sfory ^^///^ //je /20/be ihoi i^lo&r^ you hci\/e. rurne.cJ ■ 
0\/er rhe. f>aQe% cincJ an^is/e-cJ c/T TrlG Hdieu', you 1^1 II 
fee./ ikai you Aa^e. had a /:ileci^orx-/- /ijiT /o our /Q//n.a 
r/akr- 

Ver-y Truly yourj, 

3J^e C/ea^^ af \yty. 



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COULRQE. LIFE, 



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Let knowledge grow from more to more. 
But more of reverence in us dwell. 
That mind and soul, according well. 
May make one music as before. 

— Tennyson. 



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' Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers, and we linger 

on the shore, 
And the individual withers, a fid the world is more 

and 7nore." 

— Tennyson. 



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" Through tne the way is to the city of woe, 
Through me the way is to eternal pain. 
Through me the way is among the people lost, 
All hope abandon, ye who enter in. ' ' 

— Dante. 



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' The truly educated man or woman can work skillfully 
with the hands as well as with the head. 



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" Science peddling with the names of things. 

— Lowell. 



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Here we find stored the heritage of the ages. Oh, Phaed- 
rus, if we only kneiv the truth what would we care for 
men 'j opinions ? 



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'People must be amused, squire, somehow, they can t be 
always a working, nor yet they can t be ahvays a learn- 
ing. Make the best of it, says I, not the worst. 

— Dickens. 



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" Eat, druik and be merry, for today we live and 
tomorrow we die." 



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* The perfectiofi of teaching is, like the perfection of all 
things, partly given by nature, but this is assisted by 
art, and if you have the ?iatural power, you will be 
famous as a teacher if you only add knowledge and 
practice. 

— Plato. 



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WILLIAM WOOD PARSONS 



Our Faculty In Service 




BIRCH E. BAYH 







FRED DONAGHY 




BERNARD SHOCKEL 



THOMAS J. BREITWIESER 




ARTHUR CUNNINGHAM 



ARTHUR LUEHRING 



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William Wood Parsons, A.M., LL.D., President and Professor of Philosophy 
of Education. Tuscola, Illinois High School. Indiana State Normal 
School — graduated with the first class. Elected President July 1, 1885. 
Indiana University, honorary A.M., 1888. DePauw University, honor- 
ary LL.D. 

Robert Greene Gilluji, A.B., Professor of Physies. Indiana University, 
A.B. Postgraduate work at Indiana University, Harvard University, 
Chicago University. Thirty-two years' work in the science department 
of the Indiana State Normal School. Memher of the Terre Haute Science 
Club, and the Indiana Academy of Science. 

Louis John Rettger, Ph.D., Professor of Physiology. Indiana State Normal 
School, issC). Johns Hopkins University, A.I5.,' 1888. Graduate student 
and laboratory assistant, Johns Hopkins University, 1888-1889. Indiana 
University, A.M., 1890. Heidelburg ITniversitv. Berlin Universitv. Johns 
Hopkins University, Ph.D., 1909. 

Arthitr Cunningham, A.M., Librarian and Professor of Lilirary Seieiire. 
DePauw University, A.B., 1887, A.M., 1890. Intliana State Normal Libra- 
ry since 1890. Thirty years' experience in library work. Member of the 
American Library Association. Charter member of the Indiana Library 
Association. 

Charles Madison Curry, A.M., Professor of Literature. Franklin College, 
A. B., 1891, A. M., 1896. University of Michigan. Oxford University. 
Chicago University. Indiana State Normal School since 1892. Asso- 
ciated with Professor Stalker in editing "The Inland Educator." Author 
of "A Reading Note Book," "An Advanced Reader." "Literary Read- 
ings." "A New Reading Note Book," and joint editor of the Holton-Curry 
Readers. 

Francis Marion Stalker, A.M., Professor of LListory of Education. Prince- 
ton University, A.B., 1884, A.M., 1887. Graduate work at Columbia Uni- 
versity. Experience in rural schools, high schools, private academy, and 
as superintendent. Indiana State Normal School since 1892. Associated 
with Professor Curry as founder and editor of "The Inland Educator." 
President State Teachers Association. 

Mary Elinor Moran, Ph.B., Assistant Professor of IJteratitre. Indiana State 
Normal School, 1890. University of Chicago, Ph.B., 1902. 

William Thomas Turman, A.B., Professor of Penwanship and Drawing. 
Union Christian College, A.B. Chicago Art Institute. Zanerian Art 
School, Columbus, Ohio. Chicago Art Academy. Terre Haute Art School. 



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ERNEST L. WELBORN 


FREDERICK GILBERT MUTTERER 


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JOHN BENJAMIN WISELY 



ROSE MARIAN COX 



A. 





SHEPHERD YOUNG 



IVAH RHYAN 



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John Benjamin Wisely. A.M.. Profcxxor „f Kixi'llxh. Indiana: State Normal 
School, 1885. Cook County Nonnal .Scl„„',l. siinnner 1886. Michigan 
University. Indiana Cniversity. A.B.. ls'.)0. A..M.. 1891. Harvard Uni- 
versity. Universitv (if California. Experience in the schools of Owen 
County, the Terre Haute eitv schools. State Normal School at St. Cloud, 
Minnesota. Indiana State Norma! School since l.Si)4. 

Oscar Lynn Kelso, .\.M.. Professor of Miitlivmaths. Indiana State Normal 
School, 1879. Indiana University, B.S., 1SS4. A.M.. 1S9(). University of 
Chicago. Experience in the county .schools of Indiana, as ]5rincipal of high 
schools at Bruceville, Ander.son, and Richmond. Iiuliana State Normal 
School for twenty-five years. Author of "An Arithmetic for High Schools, 
At-adeniies. and Normal Schools." eloint author with Professor R. J. Aley 
in re\ising the Cook-Cropsey Arithmetics. 

William Allen McBeth, A.M.. Act'uK/ I'rofcssor of freohx/i/ inxJ fh'oqra phy. 
Battle firound Colleo-iate Institute. Indiana State Normal Schocil, 1895. 
Wal)as]i (\)llege. Ph.P... Is9(',. A.M., 1905. Harvard Universitv. Fellow 
of the Indiana Academy of Science. Member of the National Ceographic 
Association. Indiana State Xorunil School since 1897. 

Frank Rawdon Hiogins, A.M., AssJstdiif Professor of Matkeiiudics. Acadia 
University, l.sDl. Electrical engineering students at Halifax. Cornell 
Uni\crsity. A. M. Chicago Universitv. Experience in Acadia Villa 
Academy at Ilorton, Nova Scotia, and in Ithica, New York. A.ssi.stant 
Examiner in Mathematics, Department of Education, Nova Scotia. In- 
diana State Normal School since 1897. 

Ro.sE Marian Cox, A.M., Ass'isfant Professor of Roi„iiin-e LaiKjiKKjes. Wiley 
High School. Indiana State Normal School. Indiana University, A. B. 
Private School, Paris, France. Berlin Uni\ersity. Cornell University, 
A.M. Chicago University. 

Frederick (iiLiuoRT MrTrERi-.i!, A.B.. Assisfdiif Professor of Ijd'in. Illinois 
State Universitv, 1S94. Chicaa'o Universitv, A.B., 1902. University of 
Berlin. Principal of (ialena, Illinois High .Srhool. Teacher of Latin'and 
German, El<iin, Illinois Academv. Indiana State Normal School since 
1902. 

FuEOKHUK Henry Weng, A.M.. Aef'nui Professor of Liifni. ITniversity of 
Michigan. Ph.B., 1898. A.M.. l'.»()(). Cliicau-o Universitv. Experience in 
the Marine Citv. Michigan Iliiih School, the Detroit School for Bovs, and 
the Leadville. Colorado High School. Indiana State Normal School since 
1903. 

Frank SMrrii BdcjARnrs, A.B., I'rofessor of IPistoni ami Keoitoiit'ies. Spring- 
Held Illinois Ilio-h School. l,si«. Illinois State Normal Universitv, 1896. 
University of Illinois, A.B., li)()4. (iraduate work at the University of 
Chicago. Indiana State Normal School since 1904. 




OSCAR LYNN KELSO 


FRANK RAWDON HIGGINS 




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MARY ELINOR MORAN 



LOWELL MASON TILSON 



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Ulysses Orange Cox, A.M., l>ea„ of the FaniJf;/. Profes><or of Zoohn/i/, Ilotamj 
and Agriculture. Farmland, Indiana Hio;h ScIkjoI. Indiana State Nor- 
mal School, 1889. Indiana University. A.B., 11)00. A.M.. 1902. Field work 
with the United States Fish Commission. Assistant in the ITniversity of 
Minnesota, also in charg-e of parties of the Biological Survey. Indiana 
State Nonnal School since 1905. 

Edwix Morris Bruce, S.M., Professor of Chemistry. Lebanon High School. 
DePanw University. Indiana State Normal School. 1897. Indiana ITni- 
versity, A.B.. 1899. Chicago University, M.S. Graduate work at Chi- 
cago University. Twent_y-eight years experience in tlie county .schools and 
high schools of Indiana, as superintendent, and in the State Normal schools 
of Oregon, North Dakota, and Indiana. Indiana State Normal School 
since 1905. 

Merit Lees Laubach, Professor of Inchisfridl Arts. Bloomsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania Normal School, 1895. Teacher's College, Columbia University. 
Cornell University. Bradley Polytechnic. Experience in the schools of 
Luzerne County, Penns3'lvania, Bloomsburg Normal School, and high 
school, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. . Indiana State Normal School for 
fouiteen years. 

Charles Baldwin Bacon, A.M., Professor of Puhlic Speaking and Reading. 
Peddie Institute, Highstown, New Jersey. Columbia University, A.B., 
1899. Harvard Uni\ersity. A.M., 1900. Postgraduate work at Harvard. 
Experience in Peddie Institute. Cambridge. Massachussetts High School, 
as as.sistant instructor at Harvard, and in the Nonnal School, Stevens 
Point, "Wi-sconsin. Indiana State Normal School since 1909. 

Charlotte Bertha Schweitzer, Ph.B., Dean of Women. Indiana State Nor- 
mal School. Chicago University, Ph.B., 1919. Experience in the grades 
and high schot)l of Waveland, Indiana, and in the English department of 
Normal. Appointed Dean of Women, 1910. 

IvAH Rhyan, Professor of Domestic Economy. Indiana State Normal School, 
1907. Bradley Polytechnic, 1910. Him't Trade School, 1914. Teacher's 
College, Columbia University. Chicago University. Thirteen years ex- 
perience in the grades as primary teacher and in-inci])al. Indiana State 
Normal School since 1911. 

Victor C. Miller. A.M.. Axsistanf Profrsxor of Kuqlixh. Indiana State Nor- 
mal School, 1905. Chicago I'niversity. A. 15., iiHii. A.M.. 1914. Hea.l of 
the English in the BluH'ton High School. Indiana State Normal School 
since 1912. 

Charles Roll, A.M., Assistant Professor of IIi.'<tory. Indiana State Normal 
School, r.)0(). Indiana University. A.B.. 1910. Wisconsin University, 
A.M., 191;i. Fellow in American History, Uniyersity of Wisconsin, 1912- 
1913. Indiana State Normal School since 1913. 

Bernard Schockel, S.M., Professor of Geography and Geology (on leave). 
Indiana State Normal School. University of Chicago, S.B., S.M., gradu- 
ate woi'k. Indiana State Normal School," 1913. 




LOUIS JOHN RETTGER MERIT LEES LAUEACH RUDOLPH ACHER 




ETHEL LEE PARKER 



GRACE L. WILLITS 



MINNIE L. IRONS 




ULYSSES ORANGE COX WILLIAM THOMAS TURMAN EDWIN MORRIS BRUCE 



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Thomas J. Bkkitwiksf.R, A.M., Axs'isfaiif l'r,,f,ys,>r of luhii-nfioiidJ J'xiichoh,,!}/. 
Central Normal College, B.S. Iii(liaiu» rnivcisitv, A.H.. A.M. (\)lum- 
bia University. Indiana State Normal Si-liool since I'.tl-t. 

ATiTiiri! H. I>rr.iii!iNo, Ass'/xf<iiif Pi-afrxxor iif_ Iiidiistnal Arts. Milwaukee 
High School. Apprentice.! to the machinist's trade. Evening cour.se in 
tool making in the Milwaukee School of Trades. Several years' exper- 
ience as machinist and foieman tool-maker. University of Wisconsin. 
Stout Institute. At present instructor in machine shop practice. 

Lowell Mason Tilsox. Prafcxxor ,,f Music. Franklin College. Indiana Col- 
lege of Music. Private instruction from Car] Schneider, F. X. Arnes, and 
W. IT. Poutins. Experience in AVestfield College, and as supervisor of 
music at Lebanon and Connersville, Indiana. Indiana State Normal 

since 1!.»1."). 

Minnie L. Irons, Asststaut Profesx,,,- of Domestic Ecouoiinj. Pockford Col- 
lege. Departmental course. Teacher's College. Columbia University, 1915. 
Twelve years' experience in the city schools of Eockford, Illinois. Indiana 
State Normal School since 1915. 

Ernest L. Welborn, B.S., Professor of Ohserration, Methods and Practice. 
Mt. Vernon High School. Indiana State Normal School. Teacher's Col- 
lege, Columbia University, B.S. Deputy State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction for five years. Indiana State Noi-nnii School since 1917 . 

En)OLPH AciiER. Ph.D., Professor of Kdiicatioiud Psychology. Indiana State 
Normal Sclucl. !'.)()•_'. Indiana University. A. P..," 1908. Clark University, 
Ph.D.. 1!>1(). Superintendent of Scliools. Osgood, Indiana, and Kipley 
Count\'. Fellow in Psychology, Clark University. Member Faculty 
Chil.Ireii's Institute. Clark University. Professor of Psychology, Valley 
City State .Xormal School. Indiana State Normal School since 1917. 

Birch Bayii. A.B., Professor of Physical Training. Clay City High School, 
1911. Normal College of North American (iymnastic Union, summer, 1915. 
Indiana State Normal School, A.B.. 1917. Elected Px-ofessor of Educa- 
tion. June, 1917. In the service of the United States until January, 1919. 

Haurv A'ixcent AVann. A.:\I., Professor of Ponuince Pa„(im,qes. Wabash Col- 
lei;-e. A.l!.. I9(),s, A.:\I., 1909. Marburg University. University of Lau.s- 
anne. Switzerland. Instructor in En<i-lish. Kobert College. Canstantinople. 
Travel aiul studv in France and Italv. summer. 1911. .Vctiuir I'rofessor of 
Komance Languages, AA'abash College, 1911-l!)l:i. Instructor in French, 
University of Michigan, 191-J-1917. Director of Cercte Franctis. E.xten- 
sion Lecturer, 1914-li)17. Si)ecial studies in the Romance Languages, 
University of Michigan (iraduate School. Now candidate for the Ph.D. 
degree. 

SiiEiMiEitn YoiNo. Professor of Coiiuiirreiaf Sufijects. Kentucky State Xor- 
mal. Southern Business University. AVest ' Kentucky. A. B., 1918. In- 
<liana Slate Normal School since 1918. 



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CLARA JUNE HADLEY 



ELIZABETH DENEHIE 



EDNA BROWN 



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Grace L. AVii.i.its. l^.S.. A.slsfunf Prnfv.s„r of Dnnust;,- Kmuotmi. Topeka, 
Kansas \\\^y\\ Scliool. li)J2. Kansas State Ao-riciilt iiral ('(.lleiie. Depart- 
ment of Home Economics. B.S. Indiana State Normal School' since 1918. 

Ethel Lee Parker. A.B., Asahiant Professor of Domestic Kcoiiomi/. Indiana 
State Normal School, 1913. University of "Wisconsin. Cliica<ro Univer- 
sity. Indiana State Xormal School. A.R.. 1917. Experience in Home 
Economics in Mooresville, Clinton and Brazil. Indiana State Xormal 
School since 1918. 

S. C. Morrill, A.B., Assisfaitt Pfofexsor of Ilhfoni. Indiana State Normal 
School, 1910. Indiana State Xormal School, A.B., 1915. College gradu- 
ate work. 

Fred Donaghy, A.B.. Afi!<iKfuiit Profrsx,,r nf H,>f,nni uml A(ir!r>ilfiin'. Indiana 
State Normal School, 1911, A.B.. 191;',. Indiana University. A.B.. 1911. 
p]xperience in the Indiana State Normal School, r.)l:i-li)13. Kansas State 
Manual Trainino- Normal, 191.-.. 1!)17. Indiana State Normal School 
since 1919. 



tlTraining ^cfjool 



Elizabeth M. Craweord, Pi'liicipitl hikJ Teocher of Enfilhh. Indiana State 
Xormal School. University of Chicago, Ph.B. Ti-avel and study abroad, 
summers of 1910 and 1913. Teacher of English in the Training School 
since its organization in 190T. Principal since 1912. 

Walter H. Woodrow, Teacher of Sciotce. Indiana State Xormal School, A.B., 
1908. University of Chicago. Experience in the rural schools, Brazil city 
schools, and Xormal High School. 

Mabel Bonsall, Asftistonf Prine'ipoJ ami Teci'hcr of .]/af/iriiHtf!rs. Thorutown 
High School. Indiana State Xormal Scliool. Indiana University, A.B., 
1901. Teacher's College, Colunil)ia University. 

Minnie Weyl. TcarJwr of Ilistor;/. Franklin High School. Franklin College, 
A. B. Indiana State Normal School. (N)luniliia University. A.M. 

HowAifi) BvKX, Tciicher of Lot'm ond Phi/K'iidl T rahi'iiKj. Indiana State Xor- 
mal School, 1910, A.B.. 1911. University of Chicago. A.M.. 1915. 

DovNE KooNCE, aovroJ Tcarlu-i: Xormal High School. Indiana State Xor- 
mal School, .V.B. University of Chicago. 

Hariuet Joslin, Tcnclu-r of Doiiu'sflr Krononni. I)e Pauw T^niversitv. Pro- 
fessional training in uuisic in Chicago and Boston. American Institute or 
Normal Alethods. Twelve years" expei'ience as director of nnisic in the 
])ul)lic schools. Training in Home Economics in Stout Institute, and Co- 
lumbia Universitv. 



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HARRIET JOSLIN 



ELIZABETH M. CRAWFORD 



4S. 



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Eeubkn B. Snitz. Tnirhrr nf MiuhkiI Trnhuiiii. Andrews Ilijrh Sdiool. ISflS. 
Indiana State Normal School. I'.MfS. A.H.', 1!)1l'. Columbia I'niversity. 

EiJ.EX IU-ssEi,L, Trnrhrr nf MuxH- ,n.<I Dnnv'nui. Indiana State Normal 
School. Indiana Tnivcrsity. Metropolitan School of Music. AVilliam L. 
Tondin's School for Sni)ervisor"s in Chicasi-o. 

Leeta S. (tI'ehnsey. Teiifhcf of French. iSIaster's dei>Tee and fellowship, AVis- 
consin University. Experience in Iowa State Agricultural College. Adrian 
College. Highland Park College. 

Teh-laii PvOBINSox. drinJrs Srr,-ii mid Ehihi . AVestHt'ld College. B.S., M.S. 
Indiana State Normal School. Leland' Stanfoi'd riiiversitv, A.B. 

Eva M. Davis, (irades Three utid Four. Vincennes High School. Indiana 
State Normal School. Experience in the ^^incenncs [mlilic schools and the 
Evansville Training School. 

Joy MucinioitE. (imdex One and Tiro. Indiana State Normal School. A.B. 
Wisconsin University. Columhia University. 

May Abbott. (rriidef< Fire and Sir. Huntington High School. Indiana State 
Normal School. University of Chicago. Seven years teaching experience. 

Elizabeth Deneiiie, RiiraJ Tnunhiij Srhoid. Wiley High School, 1003. In- 
diana State Normal School, lit IT. Eive years' teaching experience. 

ilibrarp 

Edna Brown, As.v»tant Lihrur'xtti. Newport High School. Indiana State Nor- 
mal School. Indiana State Noi-nial Lihi'ary School. Seven years teach- 
ing experience. Indiana State Noiinal Library since li>ll. 

Clara Jine Hadley. Asxlsfont Ud,r,irnni. Manual Trainina' High School. 
Indianapolis. Butler College. Earlham College. State Library Com- 
mission School, Earlham. "Assistant Librarian since 1016. 

Anne Clare Ke.vtino, AxHtstnni IJhnrrhm. Terre Haute High School. In- 
diana State Normal School. Pratt School of Library Science. 



Mabel E. Marshall, Assistant Lihrarlan. Gaylord, Michigan High School. 
Michigan State Normal School at Ypsilante. University of Michigan. 
A. B.. University of Illinois Library School. A.ssistant Lil)rarian since 
100.-.. 




V!' ALTER H. WOODROW 



REUBEN E. SNITZ 




MINNIE WEYL 



MABEL EONSALL 





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HOWARD BYRN 



LEETA S. GUERNSEY 



S; isr. 

0Uitt Jforce 

Cyeil C. Connelly, Bookl'cejicr (ind Rcj/istrdi-. 
Emma x\gnes Smith, Sei-rt-fi/ri/ fa the Presidoit. 
RtTBY Duncan, Assistant Bookkeeper and Registrar. 
Laura J. Barker, Assistant Bookkeeper and Registrar. 

Snsitructors; anb ilaboratorp ^ggigtants! 

]Merrill Eaton, Laljoratory Assistant in I'lnjsics. 
Otis WiLSdX. L(d>oratori/ As.sixtanf in /'h>/s!,Jogi/. 
Ruth McCollum, L<il>oratorg Assist'int in /I, dang. 
Fairie 'Phiiaaps, Laboratory Assi.'<tant in (' In n^isfrg. 
Marian Elsie Boyle, Lahoratorg Ax.^ixfunt in t'luinisfrg. 
Frieda Feimu'sox. Laliaratoi'i/ As.'<istanf in Rttgchidogg. 
Paul A.siier, Lahoratorg Assistant in Indastrial Arts. 
Arle Sutton, Instructor in Geography and Geologg. 



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DOYNE KOONCE 








ELLEN RUSSELL 




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MAY ABBOTT 



TELULAH ROBINSON 




EVA M. DAVIS 



JOY MUCHMORE 



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MARIAN ELSIE BOYLE FAIRIE PHILIPS FRIEDA FERGUSON 




MERRILL EATON RUTHA McCOLLUM 



OTIS WILSON 



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LAURA ;. BARKER CYRIL C. CONNELLY RUBY DUNCAN 




MABEL E. MARSHALL 



ANNE CLARE KEATING 




CORA DAVIS 



EMMA AGNES SMITH 



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Commencement OTeefe 



Friday, June 6. 



8:00 P. M. Tenth Annual Commencement, Normal Training High 
School. Normal Hall. Address by Dr. Thomas E. Howe of Butler Col- 
lege. 

Satueday, June 7. 

8 :00 P. M. Junior Entertainment and Dance for Seniors, Normal Train- 
ing School. 

Sx'NDAY, June 8. 

10:30 A. M. Baccalaureate Address, Normal Hall. 

Mo^■DAY. June 0. 

Kegist ration of Iveturuing Soldiers at Student Building. 

8:00 1'. M. Eeception to all I. S. N. men who were in service, their 

friends ami I. S. Is', students by Board of Trustees and Faculty. 

Tuesday-, June 10. 

9 :30 A. M. Memorial Services, conducted by Prof. Ciiarles M. Curry. 
12:15 A.M. Conijilimeutary luncheon to I. S. N. men who were in the 
service l)y the Y. W. C. A. School Cafeteria. 
2:00 P.M. Home Coming exercises for men who were not overseas. 

Conducted by Maj. Birch E. Bayh. 
8 :00 P. M. Class Day Program, Normal Hall. 

Wednesday', June 11. 

9 :30 A. M. Home Coming exercises for men who were overseas. Con- 
ducted by Prof. Frank Smith Bogardus. 
12 :30 P. M. Picnic for men who were in service by Seniors and Faculty. 

I'ort Harrison Country Club. 
8 :30 P. M. Reception and Dance by Board of Trustees and Faculty to 
all men who were in service, their friends, Seniors and 
Alumni. Elics Hall. 

TiiUKSDAY, June 12. 

9 :30 A. M. Annual Commencement, Indiana State Normal School, 
Normal Hall, Address by Dr. Burr of Cornell University. 



■#• 



3sr. 




Se(rftai\, Spiiiig Te 



■siE Hill 

, Winter Term. 




ISkilaii CiiAl'i'h I 1 K 
Chiiiniiun. Social Coiiiiiiitte 



^'aUL H. WiLLUMS la ( II [ \ U III 

Athletic Otficer ( liciirin.in 

Sprint;- Term. Cap and (towh ( (unniitt 



I. 



s. 



3sr. 



• ••lir### 






Thomas E. Arvin, Loog-ootee, Intl. 
Daedalian 
ilajor — History 
Taug'ht six years. 
Graduate Normal Course, 191S. 
Army Service, 5 months. 

J. HOBART P.AKR, Knox, Iiid. 
Trojan 

Graduate N.orth Jndson High School, 1914. 
Secretary Senior Class, Fall 1918. 
PgB Degree, Valpariso. 

Harry H. Boyie, Riley, Ind. 



Major — Chemistry 

Graduated Pimento High School. 1913. 
Assistant in Chemi.sti-y, 1917. 
Taught 1 year. 



Marian Boyle, Terre B 
raduated Wiley High School, 1915. 
S. X. S. Chemistry Assistant, 1919. 



RoLLiE M. Brooking, Huntington, Ind. 
Trojan 
Public Speaking and Literature 
Graduated Rock Creek High School, 1914. 
V. M. C. A. Cabinet, 1918-1919. 

■Irc-nsiin-r V. \[. C. A., 1918-1919. 
Ciiciilnli.iii Manager Advance, 1918. 
Altciiiati- lntfr->State Debate. 
(Iraduate .Normal Course, 1918. 
'I'aught 3 years. 

Gladys Brown, Terre Haute 

Gamma Gamma 
Philomathean 
Major — Mathematics 
(iraduated Garfield High School, 1915. 



^ 



I. 



3sr. 



>:s. 



Bernice Burk, Terre Haute 

Kappa Kappa 

Alethenai 

Major — History 
Graduated Garfield High School. 1916. 
Annual Staff. 1918: Annual Staff. 1919. 
Y. AV. C. A. Cabinet, 1918-1919. 
Secretary Advance Board. 1918-1919. 
Treasurer Woman's League, 1917-1918. 
Secretary Woman's League, 1918-1919. 
Vice President Kappa Kappa. 
Cap and Gown Committee. 

Arvel Caldwell, Winfall, Ind. 
Major — English and Latin 
Graduated Windfall High School, 191.3. 
Taught 4 years. 



Caspar Clark. F 

Forum 
Graduated Francesville High School. 1914. 
Advance Staff, 1917-1918. 
President Junior Cla.ss, 1917-1918. 
Base-ball Captain. 1917-1918. 
Basket-ball Manager. 1917-1918. 
Taught 2 years. 

William A. Dow. Martinsville. 

Trojan 

Graduated Martinsville High School. 1914. 
Chemistry Assistant, 1917-1918. 



LoLs Duvall, Terre Haute 



Major — Literature and Latin 
Woman's League Vice President. 

Helen Louise Ehrenhardt, Terre Haute 

Athleta 
Alethenai 

Major — History and Literature 
Graduated Wiley High SchooL 1916. 
Vice President Athletic Board, 1919. 




3sr. 




Esther Hance, Terre Haute 



Major — Literature 
Graduated Normal High Sclioo], 1915. 
President Alpha. 
Taught 1 year. 

Olivia Haas, Boonville, Ind. 
Llamarada 
Major — Latin 
(iraduated Boonville High Sehool, mi."). 

Harriet Hubbard, Terre Haul 
Gamma Gamma 



ted Garfield High School, 1915. 
ry (launua Gamma. 
•csiili'iit Senior Class. 
IMitor (if 1919 Annual. 



EuTH Hughes, Teire Haute 
i-aduated Garfield High School, 1915. 



Katheyn Hikes, Terre Haute 
Gradiiated Wiley High School, 1915. 

Helen Hitch, Terre Haute 

Gamiua Gamma 

Alethenai 

Major — Domestic Economy 

Graduated Normal High School, 1914. 

V. \V. C. A. Cabinet. 1917. 



■0- 



3sr. 



>j^. 





JuDSON L. Stark, Hymera 


Ind. 






Trojan 




Graduated 
Taug-ht 4 


Hynie 


•a High School, 1913. 




M 


RS. Jane Shackelforii, Loi^an 


s]„,rf, Ind. 






J. P.. G. Cliil) 




Graduated 


Logan 


sjiort Hig-h Scliool, 1911. 




Et 


jEr, Seward, Frankton, 
Athleta 
p:clectic 


Ind, 


Graduated 


Frankton High School, 1915. 






Is^ 


B. MuLUKiN, Terre H 


ante 






Gamma Gamma 
Philomathean 




Graduated Acadeuiy. Womau's Colleo-e, 
Taug-ht 1 year. 


TacksonviUe 




Helen McCullough, Hrazil 


, lud. 






Alpha 
Philomathean 




Graduated Brazil High School, 1915. 
Attended Western College, Oxford. 






Joseph R. Kleuh, Jasper, 


Ind. 






llajor — Psychology 




Graduated 
Track. 
Taught 6 


Yalpa 


•also High School, 






IsT. 



1 1 1 wt • i> 








S 



1 1| 11 1 i 



Katiiryn Jarvis, Elkhart. Ind. 

Llmarada 
Philomathean 

Uradiiated Anderson High School. 

Kay Warmouth, Stilesville, Ind. 
Forum 
Graduated Eminence High School, 1912. 
Base Ball Manag-er, 1019. 
Taught 4 years. 

Otis M. Wilson, Aurora, Ind. 





Daedalian 
Science Club 




Major — Physiology 


Graduated Moore.s Hill Academy, 1915. 
Baseball. 1916-17-1S-19. Captain, 1919. 


liaskctha 
I'lvsident 

President 
I'livsLdoL, 
Physical 


1 Manager. 

Athletic Association, 
ative Board of Control. 

Senior Class. 
\- Labratory Assistant, 1918-19. 
Training Assistant, 1918. 


Geneva 1 
Taught 1 


epresentative, 1916. 
year. 



Dorothea Wyeth, Terre Haute 
Philomathean 
Major — Latin 
Graduated Wiley High School, 1915. 



Margj 



K. Zerhe, Terre Haute 



Major — Literature 



Graduated Garfield High School, 
Treasurer Womans' League, 191! 
Gamma Leader. 
Staflf Weekly Advance. 



LuciLE N'lEiiE, Terre Haute 



Major — Mathematics 
ited Wiley High School, 1914. 



Gai 



Committee. 

1918. 



Secretary-Treasurer .lunior Class. 
Chairman »Sociiil Conuuittee, Juniors. 
Entered as Sciiilniiovc I'rcini Wisconsin Univers 
Member I. I. P. A., 1919. 



3sr. 




casiircr Athletic Association, IVll". 
ailiKil.Hl I'rairie Creek High School. 

Frieda Fehguson, Teri-e Haute 
Psi Theta 
Alethenal 

n.liiiiti.d Cartield High School, lOla. 
s.Miali' lulitor Advance. 

I'sidcnt Science Clid). 
i Theta Leader, 191s. 
W. C. A. Social Service C cmniiltcc. 
ychology Laboratory Assistant since lliKl. 

Mrs. Ida R. I'ost, Terre Haute 

College Course 

Ahijor— Literature 

Zelma Hiei!. Ilnntingtoii, Ind. 
Joseph (■(•iii'iiini:ii, CualnKJiit 



IZABETH Williams, Washington, 
ifajor — Donie.sl ic Science 



ted Washingt.. 
d City College. 



Cmma ^rcl'iiEETEHS, llui 

C. N. C. College 

Major — Domestic Sci 



3ST. 



Esther Arnold, Terre Haute 
Kappa Kajipa 
Major — History 
Gradiiatecl Seymour High Scliool 1913 
Taught one year. 



Masiie Aspberger, Riley, Ind. 



Cecil Austin, Coalmont, Ind. 

Ciceronian 

Psychology Club 

Major — English 

Taught One Year. 

y. M. C. A. Cabinet ; Y. M. C. A. Quartette. 
Army Service, one year. 



Ora Rarton, Spencer, Ind. 
Taught ele\en terms. 



Lucille Bauman, Oxford, Ind. 
Psi Theta 
Eclectic 



Oxford High School, 1913. 
Taught 5 years. 



Ethel Heard, West Terre Haute 
I'hiloinathean 
ilajor — English 
i'aught 2 years. 




3sr. 



>^. 



Beilaii Chappei.le, Teire Haute 
Philoinathean 
Graduated Indiana Central University. 
President Y. W. C. A. 
Field Secretary. Y. W. C. A. 
President Philomathean. 
President Mnsic Club. 



Evelyn Urii.ev. Terre Haute 

Psi Theta 

Graduated Jasonville High School, 1915. 
Taught 3 years. 



Edith Boyd, Terre Haute 
Graduated Garfield High School. 1916. 



Ophia Brown, English, Ind. 
Major — Geography 
Graduated I^nglish High School, 1915. 



Taught 2 years. 



A. Elizabeth Brown, Washington, Ind. 

Graduated Washington High School. 
Taught 10 years. 



Grace Eleanor DeVaney, Terre Haute 
Omega 
Major — Literature 
Graduated Wiley High School, 191fi. 



• # •iirii' • «i 







^^, ■^^' 



f 




$ ♦ # • II 



X. 



>T. 




Edith Drane, Greensburg, Ind. 
Graduated Greensburg High School. 



Katherine Eaton, Evansville, Ind. 
Omega 
Gradnated Evansville High School, 1916. 
Taught 1 year. 



\Yalteb H. Ellw anger, Lanesville, Ind. 

Trojan 

Jlajor — History 

laduated Elizabeth High School, 1915. 
aught 3 years. 



Bessie ER^VIN, West Terre Haute 
Eclectic 
raduated West Terre Haute High School, 
aught 2 years. 



Ei.siE Fail, Terre Haute 
Psi Theta 
Graduated Wiley High School, 1915. 
Taught 3 years. 

Mary Jewel Febc.itson, Terre Haute 



Graduated Garfield High School, 1915. 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet. 
Y. W. C. A. Artist. 
Indiana Centennial. 



-^ 



3^^^. 








Kell I 


'ERGUSON, Plainfield. Ii 
Ciceronian 


ul. 


Graduated 


Plainfiek 


High School. 






lONE 


FiRSiCH, Fairland. Ind. 


Graduated 


Fairland 


High School. 1910. 






Hazel 


Grenard. Hillsboro. I 
Llamarada 
Eclectic 
Major— Music 


id. 


Graduated 
Taught 4 . 


Hillsboro 
•ears. 


High School. 1912. 






Naomi 


Grenard, Hillsboro, I 

Llamarda 
Eclectic 

Major— Music 


nd. 


Graduated Hillsboro Hioh School. 
President Y. W. C. A. 1919. 
Taught 6 j'ears. 






Albertine Gleeson, Leopold, 


Ind. 




St. 


Llamarda 
Alethenai 
Thomas Aquinas Club 




Graduated 
Taught 4 


Fill City High School, 
years. 






Gertrude 


Grossman, Boonville 
Llamarda 


Ind 




JIajor — Domestic Science 




Graduated 
Taught 1 


Boonvill 
year. 


- High School, 1915. 






I. 



^. 



3^. 




J. Carlton Hannah. Coal City, liul. 
Daedalian 
Graduated Coal City High School, 1914. 
Bvisiness Manager Annual, 1919. 
Associate Editor Advance, 1916-17. 
Baseball Manager, 1917. 
Basket Ball, 1916-17; 1918-19. 
Interstate Debate. 1917, 1919. 
Daedalian Debating Team, 1917. 
President Oratorical League. 

Opal K. Harris, Terre Haute 
Epsilon Delta 
Ciraduated Wiley High School, 1911. 
Taught 7 years. 



Elizabeth Hart, Terre Haute 

Pi Zeta 

Major — Music 



Liij.iE Hazzard 



Eva Hein, Terre Haute 
Epsilon Delta 



Major — Mathematics 
Graduated Glenn High School, 1915. 
Taught 2 years. 



Vera Herring, Terre Haute 
J. B. G. Club 
Graduated Wiley High School, 1916. 



I. 



3sr. 



Helen Hawkins, West Terre Haute 

Epsiloii Delta 
Alethenai 



Graduated West Tene Haute llif.! 
Taught 2 years. 



JIaude Hays, i[auek])ort, lud. 
Major — Physics 
Graduated >rauckport High School, 1915. 
Secretary of Athletic Association. 
Taus'ht 4 years. 



Inez HiNCHMAN, I'.utlerville, Tud. 
Graduated Butlerville High School. 
Taught 6 years. 



Lois Holland, Terre Haute 
J. B. G. Club 
Graduated Wiley. 1917. 



Verna Humphrey. Muucie, liid. 
Alethenai 
Major-— Music 
Graduated iluncie High School. 1910. 
Taught 2 years. 

Florise Hunsucker, Yallonia, Ind. 

Pi Zeta 

Philoniathean 

Major — Literature 

Y. W. C. A. 

Graduated Brownstown High School, 1912. 
Taught 6 years. 




3sr. 




Erma Kint. Ray, Ind. 
Valparaiso University, B.S., '12. Pg'.B., "13. 
Hanover College, 2 terms. 
Indiana University, 1914. 
University of North Dakota, 1916. 
Graduated Tri State College. 

Norman K. Knaud, Patoka, Ind. 
Torjan. 
Major — History 
Gaduated Patoka High School, 1913. 
Charter Member Builder.s' Association. 
Inter-Society Debating Team. 
Track, 1916." 
Taught 5 years. 

Byrl McC'lure, Cloverdale, Ind. 
Llaniarada 
Graduated Cloverdale High School, 1911. 
Taught 8 years. 



IJuTHA jNIcCoi.lum, Linton 
Major — Biology 



Tanglit ;; years. 

Emma McGuirk, Terre Haute 

Alethenai 

St. Thomas Aquinas Club 

Major — Literature 

Graduated Garfield High School. 



Ora McReynolds, Cynthiaua, Ind. 



Omega 
Eclectic 



Graduated Cyulhiana High Scl 



^ 



I. 



3sr. 



•Tii Mauki.kv, IlhitTl 



(iradiiated Illiifftc 
Taught 7 years. 



Elva Maetin. Terre Kautt 
Vice-rresklent .T. V.. G. Chil). 
OraduatiHl CarHt-ld High School, 1010. 



Myrtle M. :Mii.i.er. 'Per 
Aletheiiai 
Major — Latin 



Editor Advance. UilS-in. 
Treasin-er Y. W. C. A. 
Jlember I. I. P. A. 



Harriet II. .^Iorris, West Terre Haute 

Epsilon Delta 

Jlajor — Jfat hematics 



IvUTH Morrlson, Terre Haute 
Kappa Kappa 
Major — Eiig'lish 
Secretary and Treasurer Kappa Kappa. 
Graduated Wiley High School, 191,i. 
Taught 3 years. 



V. R. MULLIKS. Sunnnitville, Ind. 
Ciceronian 
Graduated Swayzee High School, 1910. 
Interstate Debating Team. 1919. 
Principal Swayzee High School. 2 years. 
Superintendent Summitville High School. 4 years. 




I. 



3sr. 



>:^. 







%■%%%%% 



Dessie Nickels, Kewanna, Ind. 

Epsilon Delta 

Eclectic 

Major — Literature 

Graduated firass Creek High School, 1014. 

Taiio-ht 4 years. 

Marguerite O'Connell, Bedford, Ind. 



Major — Literature 
Graduated Bedford High School. 1913. 
Taught 5y, j'ears. 

Hazel Oj.iphant. Pendleton, Ind. 



Graduated Pendleton High School, 1011. 
Secretary Senior Class. 
Treasurer Senior Class, Spring Term. 
Taught 6 years. 

Mamie Overpeck, Rosedale, Ind. 

Psi Theta 

Eclectic 

Major — Mathematics 

Graduated Rosedale High School, lOl.'j. 
Treasurer Psi Theta, 1918-19. 
Secretary Eclectic Society, 1918-19. 
Taught 3 years. 

Belle Painter, Darlington, Ind. 

Pi Zeta 

Eclectic 

Major — Domestic Science 

Graduated Darlington High School, 1916. 

Lois F. Payton, Clinton, Ind. 



Major — Domestic Science 
Graduated Helt Township High School, 1916. 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 1916-17. 



3sr. 



>:^. 



Mrs. Artie B. Pierce, Indiaiiapoli; 
Major — Home Economics 
Graduated Manual Training- High School. 
Taught 3 years. 



EuTH Pointer, Terre Haute 
Major — Mathematics 
Graduated Wiley High School, l'J16. 



Lois Eva Purlee, Saleni, Ind. 

Major — Home Economics 

Graduated Salem High School, 1910. 
Taught 8 years. 



Mathilde Roberts, Terre Haute 



Eva Robinson, DeLong, Ind. 

Eclectic 
Major — Li t erat ure 



Graduated Leiters Ford High School, 1913. 
Taught 5 years. 



Gladys Rollings, West Terre Haute 
Major — Mathematics 
Graduated West Terre Haute High School, 1916. 
Taught 2 years. 




3sr. 



>s^. 




Frieda W. Schneidee, Brookville, Ind. 

l[ajor — Mathematics 

(iraduated Brookville High School, 1913. 
Taught 2 years. 



Irene Shirley, Terre Haute 
Major — Music 
Graduated Normal High School, 1910. 



Taught 8 years. 



Helen M. Smith, Terre Haute 
Epsilon Delta 
Graduated Garfield High School. 1916. 



Irene Spitz, Washington, Ind. 
Graduated \Yashington High School. 

Gladys Stephenson, Salem, Ind. 
Pi Zeta 
Major — Literature 
Graduated Salem High School, 1913. 



Taught 5 years. 



Ethel Sullivan, Salem, Ind. 
Major — Literature 
Graduated Salem High School, 1911. 
Taught 7 years. 



^ 



3>q-. 



Florence Thompson, Indianapolis 



Clay J. Townsend, Algiers, Ind. 
Graduated Otwell High School. 
Taught 3 years. 



KoLESTER Van Dyke 
J. B. G. Club 
Graduated Clark High School. 



EvERATT Van Winkle. Biistow, Ind. 

Y. M. C. A. 

Graduated Bristow High School, 1913. 
Taught 5 years. 



Josephine Walls, Petersburg, Ind. 
Epsilon Delta 
Graduated Petersburg High School, 1912. 



Taught 5 years. 



Eugene Watson, Eminence, Ind. 




X. 



3sr. 




E. C. Weller. Dale. Ind. 
Graduated Dale High School, 1910. 



Dorothy Whiteman, Russiaville. Ind. 
Aletheiiai 
Major — Domestic Science 
Graduated Forest High School, 1913. 
Taught 4 years. 



Jane E. Collings, Underwood, Ind. 



Ileen Binning, Terre Haute 
Mu Zeta 
Graduated High School, 1914. 
Taught 3 years. 



Inda Wise, Frankton, Ind. 

Athleta 

Eclectic 

Major — Domestic Economy 

Graduated Frankton High School, 1914. 

Taught 1 year. 

MoREE Craig, Crawfordsville, Ind. 
Llamarada 
ilajor — Latin and Literature 
Graduated Darlington High School, 1913. 



Taught 41/2 years. 



■0- 



So 



isr. 



Madola IIarbaugh. Clay City 
Major — H ist ory 

Graduated Clay City Hig:h School. 
Taught 3 years. 



Delpha Sefrit, Odon, Ind. 
Major — Literature 
Graduated Odon High School. 



Taught 4 years. 



Eleanor Taylor, Rosedale, Ind. 
Llamarada 



Graduated Rosedale High School. 
Taught 1 year. 



Virgil Fisher 
College Course 




Herbert Lahk. Bippus, Ind. 



Margaret Demarree 



■^ 



isr. 



>j^. 




KATHERINE 



DOROTHEA 



2sr. 




BEULAH 




■#■ 



X. 



43. 



3sr. 



>^. 





2sr. 



>^. 




ELIZABETH 




isr. 




^ 



I. 



3sr. 




JUNIORS 



2ST. 



Junior (Officers; 









It is rarely necessary for an individual or an oriinnization to call attention 
to its own accomplishments. Usually they are self-evident. It is so with the 
class of 1920; eonsetiuently. it is to our ah-^ent classmates rather than those who 
are with us that we wish to dedicate these few line.s. 

To those wdiose eyes hrighten and \Yhose memories are stirred by the men- 
tion of Argonne Forest, Belleau Wood and (chateau-Thierry — to those who 
spent many long months preparing them.selves for the task they had undertaken ; 
yet were denied the privilege of every fighter's desire — ser\ice overseas — and 
last but not least to those who sacrificed more than words can exjiress in order 
that they might "Keep the Home Fires Burning." 

It will not be long till we are all again united, working for a conunon end 
and bound with mutual ties and, in our reunion there can be but cme purpose 
and one desire, — to make the class of 1920 worthy to HU the place of the class 
of 1919. 



I. 



a>T. 



>^. 




Alfca Van Ulzen D. Mabel Churchman Herman Riche.y Georgia Baker Ethel Runyan 




Ruby Keeling Jacob Machling Lillian Wright Fay J. Wall Ann.; Cooky 



^. 



3sr. 



^'^ 






Evelyn Wills Mabel Hood Laban J. Fisher Luella Marmor Gertrude Kanz: 




Evangeline Hildrcth Gertrude Garrell Gladys Spencer Norma Buchanan Clare AUen Lelah Stephen 




%i^At 




Virginia Davis Vernon K. Storms Rachael Wilhite Loren Reed Cary Surrell 



2>q-. 



SDPHDMDRES 



B.BRRRELL-KK 




m 



1ST. 



>opi)omore 0iiitttsi 




In the Fall term, a meeting of all sophomores was called by Edson Wisely 
to organize the class. At this meeting, the following otl'icers were elected: 
Edson Wisely, president; John Young, vice-president; Dorothy (llenn, secre- 
tary-treasurer. Russell Binning was chosen as Sophomore editiir for the An- 
nual. John Young and Estelle Perkins were elected as rejjresentatives to the 
Oratorical and Debating League. 

Although the class has had no social activities, it has aided all that the 
school has undertaken. You can see Sophomore.s working at all times to boost 
T. S. N. S.— on the athletic teams, on the staiF of the Advance, in the Y. M. C. 
A., and Y. W. C. A. "Loyalty tu our school" the thing for which every Sopho- 
more stands. 




FRESHMEN 



I. 



I^q", 



jFresifjman 0iiittv^ 




Due to several interriiptions of school I'outine. the Freshman clas^ had no elass orgiiniza- 
tion during the Fall quarter. It was not, in fai.'t, until the last of February that a elass meet- 
ing was held. At this meeting, F. B. Manhart was elected president; Irene Boots. vice-]n-esi- 
dent; Hubert Huebner, .secretary, and Edwin Kelley, treasurer. Bruce Shanner was elected 
Freshman representative on the Advance Boai-d and Hazel Wills, Freshman Editor on the 
Annual staff. At a subsequent meeting, a dance to be given in the near futui'c was planned 
which will start the class activities. 



tCfje Jfrcstnran Class! 



O Freshman class! O Ki-eshiuan Class! how 
smiling were our faces ! 
Green not alone in registering. 
But in each class room's numbering ! 
O Freshman Class ! O Freshman ! how 

lengthy grew our faces ! 
O Freshie friends ! O Freshie friends ! how 
many were our troidiles ! 
How I'oud laughed tlicy. the S.i 



At each blunder 
O Freshie friends! O Frcshi,- friends! 

transient were oin- I i-oiililcs ! 

The Seniors wise, the Seniors wise, we 

took for our examples! 

How fast we learned liciw wise we 

Joyously "A's" we sometimes view! 

O Seniors wi.se ! O Seniors wise ! we'r 

glad for your example ! 
Yet Normal School ! Old Normal Schoo: 
treasui'ed in deep friendship. 
That lusts as long as falls the rain, 
No years will ever let It wane. 
Old Normal School ! Old Normal Schoo 
treasured in our friendship ! 



) gay, 
but 



3sr. 



Jf resiftman ^napg 




THE TWINS 




"THE BIG DRIVE" 



■LONG BOY" 



I. 



3sr. 



>^. 



i 

1 « E 


ih-- -E7' 






" '"^r^ ^Bll '^Nl ^^^H 




X. 



3sr. 



>^. 




MLL GF HCROR 

LllTLn- A l>rKUl\ £ C Kc I- Kill YEl^ 
SITKGEAW^- l-AUL DliCLl 
CADlir CKAlxLtS L-ASSWAriEl^ 

ui^Aiz i=vcisi=:Kr bitkwiei-t 

rclAlMTSI- CLYDE lSl!n-MAK 

ISYKCW CCX 

ILliLxl DAVte 

JCKW TLLCK 

Kl5:RlSlf:L=^V KliCK 

ISA^IL LArcLLIII--!- 

DCVLE 1S.£Ln11-CLn! K'AbAKS 

LllKCY KiAKK 

L E C W A l^D IV\ V T ll L=.£ C K 

FLCYb PCUKL 



I. 



3sr. 




LEROY MANN 



CHAS. B. PASSWATER DOYAL BENTON McADAMS 






LIEUT. ARTHUR SHOPMEYER 



JOHN L. FUCK 



LEONARD PATTERSON 



■^ 



43. 



>T. 



>:». 




ANCIL LA FOLLETT 



ROBERT BENNETT 



ROBERT E. ANDREW 




FOREST BULTMAN 



PAUL DUCK 



CLARENCE BEALL 

FLOYD POUND 



GUY S. McCLANAHAN 
HERBERT HUCK 



>q-» 



Many loxcd Truth, and lavished life's best oil 

Amid the dust of books to find her. 
Content at last, for guerdon of their toil. 

With the east mantle she hath left behind her. 

Many in sad faith sought for her, 

Many with crossed hands sighed for her, 

But these our brothers fought for her, 

At life's dear peril wrought for her, 

So loved her that they died for her. 

Tasting the raptured fleetaess 

Of her divine completeness: 

Their higher instinct knew 
They love her best who to themselves are true. 
And what they dare to dream of, dare to do; 

They followed her and found her 

Where all may hoi>e to find. 
Not in the ashes of the burnt-out mind 
But beautiful with danger's sweetness "round her 

Where faith made wliole with deed 

Breathes its awakening breath 

Into the lifeless creed. 

They saw her plumed and mailed. 

With sweet stern face unveiled. 
And all-repaying eyes look proud on them in death. 
James Russei.l Lowj 



#■ 



X. 



s. 



3>q-. 




3ST. 



0\xv pops! in ^erbice 



npiling has been difficult 



LT. HARItY E. AliBOTT 
ALBEKT E. ACHER 
LT. GLENNWOOD ADAMS 
PAFL ADDIROX 

])i:\vn"r ali-:xaxdki; 

CI.AKKXCK ALEXANDER 

■\VM. 1'. Ai,i:xAxm:i; 

SCI'. CIIIMSrA ALIIIOX 

.IAS. .\i,i;i;i(;irr 

JOIIX ALIUiUaiT 
CAltROL R. ALL 
LT. FRED ALLEN 
L. .\. ALI.KX 

jiAi;i;\ WAVXi': allisox 

• Klh: AI.I.SMAX 
AV.\I. I>. .\LLVX 

ii!.\ c. axi)t;ews 
E.\i;i. Axi)i:i:soN 

HARLEV .VXDKliSON 
RALPH liaiX .\X1)EI!S0N 

RALPH Axi)i:i;s(»x 
ci.KX AXi)i;i':\v 

JIOKKirr AXDKKW 
:\l.\i;i()X .VIM'I.KliA'PE 
PAUL .\i;('Illl!AI,l) 

w. F. .\i;xi:sM.\x 

FRED (). .Mi.MSTUOXG 

JOYCE A. ASHDY 

PAUL WARREN ASHBY 

FLOYD ASHER 

PAUL ASHER 

RALPH ASHWORTH 

CECIL AUSTIN 

R.VIJ'H V. AUSTIN 

JOSKPH .\YERY 

TIIOS. E. .\P,VIN 

LKWIS CL.VUDK ARVIN 

L'l'. FUlOl) r.ACOX 

JA.MKS II()I'..\I;T llAltR 

ROP.Eirr IIAKTLKY 

SOT. WM. L. I.'.ASS 

CORP. .1X0. F. K.VTTICIGER 

MAJ. PIKCH IIAYU 

Scrr. KOI'.EKT BAYLES 

WM. BEADLES 



ILAItEXCR BK.VL 
A'FKTIS F. BF.VSLEY 
l/r. lUUCF P.FLL 
AV.\I. IIOWAKI) BELL 
ROBFKT r. I'.FXNETT 
MOinoX BFXII.VM 

S(;t. w.m. bkkjins 
russell s. bixxing 
sot. in.man p.ird 
clifford bl.vck.m.vx 
corp. atw(ioi) i5mss 

CLIFFOliD P.OGGEKLY 
RAYMOXD liLUXK 
■1X0. S. BOLLHOEFER 
EDWIN B. 1!00TS 
JESSE iM. BOSTON 
CLIFFORD BOULDEAUX 
RAY- BOULTINGHOUSE 
CORP. NOAH BOWMAN 
DON BOWERS 
SGT. BERNA T. BOWERS 
HARRY H. BOYLE 
RALPH BRANDENBURG 
LT. THOS. J. BREITWIESER 
ATTIAL BRIDGES 
CORP. LOWELL BRIDGES 
LT. L. F. BRIER 
I KA J. BRIGHT 
WM. H. BRIGHT 
FULLER BRILEY 
HARRY R. BRILL 
WINSTON BRITTON 
EWING A. BRITTON 
VIRLYX BROADSTREET 
CL.VRFXCF S. BROWN 
CURTIS F. BliOWN 
GEORCiE BROWN 
HARRY BROWN 
RAYMOND T. BROWN 
LT. LUTHER BROWN 
I'AEKE T. BROA\TSr 
LT. LLOYD BRUilBAUGH 
HKRirAN BltUXEC, KAFF 
CLAUDE E. JiUUXER 
WARD BRYANT 



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43. 



3ST. 



LT. CROFFORD H. BUCKLES 

LT. EDWARD RUCKNER 

FORREST C. BULTArAX 

LT. JAY M. BURK 

MAURICE H. BURKE 

ELI C. BUSING 

LT. CHAS. E. BURTON 

AMOS P. BYRNE 

LT. BASIL BYRNE 

LT. CADET HERMAN BYRNE 

CURTIS CALDWELL 

ERNEST C. CAMPBELL 

WAYNE CAMPBELL 

SETH CARPENTER 

D. H. CARTER 

LT. DAYTON P. CARTER 

WILL L. CHAMBERS 

PAUL V. CHAMPION 

BUFORD A. CHAMBERS 

LT. HOWARD R. CHAPMAN 

A. LEAMON CHESTNUT 

CORP. HARVEY' E. CHILDRESS 

LT. CASPAI! CLARK 

RAY CLARK 

WM. CLAUSER 

URBAN L. CLEMENT 

ORVILLE A. CLINGER 

EVAN BERN.ARD CLOGSTON 

DWIGHT J. COFFIN 

WARREN M. COFFIN 

HENRY H. COLVIN 

CLARENCE COURTNEY 

LIVINGSTONE COURTNEY 

A. RUSSEL COLBERT 

JAMES CONOVER 

JOSEPH E. COOPRIDER 

DEWITT CORN 

CLARENCE A. CORNELL 

EMERY GOUTS 

BYRON COX 

ERIC E. COX 

CORP. LAWRENCE R. COX 

RAYMOND COX 

SGT; WALTER COX 

GEO. S. CRAPO 

OSCAR L. CREE 

LT. CASPER R. CRIM 

ALBERT CRIST 

ESKIN E. CROMWELL 

HOB ART CROMWELL 



LT. GEO. CROMWELL 

PHILLIP R. CROMWELL 

HOWARD CROSS 

WM. W. CROSS 

CLYDE CUNNINGHAM 

LT. RAY M. CUNNINGH/VM 

ERNEST CURTIS 

CORP. FRiVNK E. CURLEY 

GLENN CURTIS 

LT. HERBERT CURTIS 

OiiER FRANCES DAGES 

VIRGIL F. DAUGHERTY 

ELLIS RHYS DA VIES 

BEN H. DAVIS 

WARD B. DAVIS 

CHAS. L. DAVIS 

CLARENCE E. DAVIS 

WM. R. DAVIS 

WM. R. DAVIS 

J. A. DEAL 

CORP. HAROLD DEBAUM 

JNO. A. DENSFORD 

EDWARD K. DEPPE 

LT. JOSEPH S. DICKEY 

LT. ELDER W. DIGGS 

SGT. ARTHUR L. DILLARD 

WM. A. DILLARD 

GEO. DINGER 

LT. FRED DONAGHY 

KILBOURNE DONHAM 

PAUL DONOVAN 

CLYDE DOOLEY 

J. CLINTON DOUGHTERY 

RICHARD H. DOUGLAS 

WM. A. DOW 

EMIL H. DOWELL 

DALLAS DOWTSriNG 

LAFAY E. DRAKE 

PAUL I. DUCK 

MARION S. DUDLEY 

JNO. DURRIT 

LT. OSCAR DYE 

MERRIL T. EATON 

LT. HOMER S. EBBINGHAUS 

SGT. GEO. ECKERLY 

RALPH B. EDWARDS 

H. RAY EDWARDS 

H. CLIFFORD ELLEMAN 

MERRILL ELLIOT 

BERT ELLIS 





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SGT. H. R. ELLISON 
WALTER ELLW ANGER 
IRA ENGLEHART 
LT. OTTO T. ENGLEHART 
HOWARD R, EVANS 
LORAIXE :\r. EVANS 
ELIiKirr KWIXG 
LT. .IAS. G. I'AGIN 

j.\(). i''Ai;iti:i; 
FKKi) c. Fi':i;(;rsoN 

LT. lOldl-.M': FIOltGUSON 
LESTEK ITHLUS ■ 
BEN J. F. FIGG 
BYRON FISHER 
LAB AM J. FISHER 
LLOVI) \'. FISllKi; 

siiioi;ma.\ i'isiier 

JAS. ]>. FLIC.MING 

ROY FLINT 

JNO. L. FLICK 

LT. (ii:0. M. FOSSLER 

J.\.S. A. FOSTICK 

HAi;i;\' i-()i;sTER 

LT. GH.\S. B. FOWLER 
LEE FOX 
JNO. II. FRANCES 
OltVILLE E. FRAKES 
CLIFFOKI^ V. FREDERICK 
S(iT. (T>.VrDK FliENCH 
LT. WM. FlU'SIIOUR 
LT. IIAIIKV T. FULTZ 
W,\LTKi; F. FFNCANNON 
W.\r. M. FFSO.X 
ELMO F. (lAUKETT 
I'.VFF G.VUIiFTT 
RODLIIC V. (JAItRETT 
CLEMENT GETTLEFINGER 
FRANKLIN \. GEIS 
EDISON GIBSON 
•L-VS. E. GLEESON 
JAS. E. GTL^rORE 
FRANK GR.MLVM 

CAF. AiriiiFi; I). gi;ay 

CILMM.FS F. (IKAY 
GLF.W (IFl'.F.V 
CFAFDh: (. IIKKGORY' 
COFFMF.FS (IKIFFITH 
ELF,i:i;'l' (IIJIFFITH 

c.\i;f i;. (;i;i(;sf,y 
HAiJoFi) (;i;f\i 

S(iT. WM. (iltOSE 



LT. FRANK GROVK 
CHESTER GUNN 
SGT. A-IRGIL GUNN 
I'.VFF GWIX.Nf 
R.\^•.\1()XI) I!. HAUCH 
CHAKFFS S. IFVYDEN 
GrS'l'AVIC A. II.VWKINS 
FI!.\XK' .\r. IF\RT 

i'.\FF F.. iF\i;i;is 

SdT. SIMOX F. HARRIS 
(•F('ll> HAKl.'ISOX 
R.\V ILVIiRlSOX 
JNO. IFVFF.FRSTADT 
LT. H.\KRV W. HARBAUGH 
LT. E. LFXSFORD HALL 
DON H.VRF.IX 
PAUL R. H.MiRIS 
IVFERLE D. HARBLX 
WILBUR HAR.\[ON 
Ht^GH F. HARNEY' 
i;OY K. H.MiDESTY 
ROF.FilT IIARKXESS 

i/r. foimxg c. halberstadt 
fj;ed hi-:i;xey 
willard a. hall 

GEO. W. HAHN 

DEWEY L. BANNER 

CHAS. W. HANSON 

CARLTON HANNAH 

RALPH W. H.VRRTS 

TITOS. A. IFWS 

CORP. ('.\RL X. 1F\1!B.VUGH 

ALLKX IF\XSII()E 

S<iT. I ; !■:(». IF\XLIN 

OSCAR ilAXKV 

S(;-|'. MICMAIOL HAIG 

CAF. IFVROFI) H.VNKY 

R.W.MONI) C. BARTER 

EDWIN J. HEMMER 

H. F. HENSLEY 

ELLSWORTH P. HOSTETTER 

HARRY R. HERM.VN 

CHAS. HEIN 

ALBERT HEITHECKER 

LEO HEIDARN 

JNO. HENDERSON 

LT. N. B. HENSON 

IRVIN A. HERRMANN 

JNO. C. HIBERLY 

ALBERT S. HIRTH 




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43. 



INT. 



O. G. IIICKMAX 

cnrns i>. uisicy 
LT. \v.\r. c. IIIXSII.VW 
CORP. HARliV }nLL 
HARRY HOWICK 
JNO. L. HAYi:S 
CLAREXCE A. HOFF^rAN 
T/r. ItOiri'. C. HOFFMAN 
CLIFFOltD HOFFMAN 
.TEin;Y HOA(lLANl) 
WARD HOUSFL 
TIPTON HOCHSTFTLFR 
WHEN G. HOCHSTETLER 
MARION W. HOLLINGSWORTH 
GLENN HOUnC 
LAWIJKXCl-: llOAVER 



VEK.XFK HOWELL 
GOnFI!i:Y m'F.ER 
MARIOX HFIiER 
LT. JXO. W. HI'BER 
HERIiERT HUCK 
LT. AliXOLD D. HITNT 
EKNEST O. TIUNT 
El)(iAi; IIFXT 

.jesse m. ihxt 
l.v\\t;I':xcj-: iilxt 
^lvhlon c. hunt 
m.vrcus hunt 
luther r. tiughey 

('L.\^' G. IllFF 

JXO. li. urus'i' 

LEWIS in'MAX 
T/r. GAltL IIVOE 
HFGII liVMAX 
\V>r. IKWIX 
R.VLIMI IliOXS 
MAJ. EDWAKO S. IMEL 
OTIS C. JAMISON 
V.VN JAMISON 
RAYMOND JARED 
FRED JEFFERS 
CAP.ERT JENKINS 
MORltIS K. JESSUP 
ROY JEWELL 
CLIFFORD JINKS 
HAROLD JOHNSON 
PAUL F. JOHNSON 
CORP. R. A. JOHNSON 
KDGAll LEROY JONES 



ORVILLE P. JONES 

i;OY .lOXES 

IL W. JORDAX 

CORP. GARItOT L. JORDAN 

CORP. ILVY.MOND J. KAHRE 

DAVID P. K.VRDOKUS 

RAYMOXD KAUTZ 

GEO. .1. KAMM 

JXO. J. KEIFXEi: 

OVID W. KELLER 

EDWIX \V. K ELL FY 

HAROLD KKLLEY 

FliAXK KELLY 

GEO. KELLY 

SGT. D. HERMAN KENNETT 

LT. CII.VS. I. KERR 

EDW.\RD KENT 

LT. (iEO. KERR 

PAIL S. KERR 

SGT. LIXXIOAGS KIDD 

GRO\i:i! C. KIL.MKR 

PREXTICE L. KIXMAN 

RICIl.VRD G. KIRK 

SGT. IIARRV F. KIRK 

.JlLirS KIRKH.UM 

JXO. KLIXG.VMiVN 

NORMAX l\. KXATTR 

LT. IIICXRV KXAI'TH 

LT. CIIAS KXOWLIXi; 

(■APT. PRICXTICIO I!. KXOX 

S<iT. IlEXRV F. KOIIL.MEYER 

ROPERT L.VFOLLETTE 

■\XCIL L.VFOLLIOTTE 

LT. HERP.ERT (i. LAHI! 

SGT. EDW.VRD LAPPING 

CORP. WILL.VRD P. LASH 

CARL H. L.\UR 

F1!.\XK L.VUGIILIN 

SGT. r>ESTEi; LAUGHLIN 



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WALTER LEMEN 
W.M. LEMINGER 
ARTHUR LETSINGER 
LT. RORERT W. LEWIS 
HERSHEL LIECHTY 
LT. DAVID LIXGLE 
SGT. RALPH LINVILLE 
J. HUBERT LITTLE 
HORACE LOLLAR 
CLARENCE LLOYD 



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Edgar Hunt Lavii) Karbokus Fred 'Strickles 







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JXO. R. LLOYD 
LUTHER LOCKWOOD 
CORP. ROY LOCKWOOD 
FLOYD D. LONG 
LKWIS O. LONG 
JESSE L. LORD 
PAUL LOSER 
PAUL R. LOSTETTER 
ROBT. P. LOWNSDALE 
LESTER LOWERY 
AUGUSTUS LUCAS 
WM. EARL MACKEY 
F. B. MANHART 
JERRY J. iEAHONEY 
JNO. J. MAEHLING 
MARTIN J. MANDEVILLE 

C. D. MANHART 
LEROY MANN 
AUSTIN F. iNLVRCHAND 
CLAUDE R. MARSHALL 
ROBERT C. MARSHALL 
HAROLD A. JIAltTIN 
JAKE R. MARTIN 
A.LONZO MARTIN 
ROBT. A. MARTIN 
ROY E. MAXWELL 

D. P.. ]\[rADAMS 
THOS. G. McBRAYER 
FRED JFeBRIDE 
RLDO >[cCA.MM()X 
JNO. N. .\[((AULEY 
GUY S. .\U-CI,AXAHAN 
LT. PLATO McCLAP.REN 
EVERETT .\r(CLELLAN 
FLOYD .McCORD 
LAUREL G. McCOSKEY 
LT. THOS. McCONNELL 

SGT. HOWARD C. McCRACKEN 
HORACE McCROCKLIN 

iRL Mcdonald 

HERBERT C. McKAY' 
ROBBIE McKIGG 
JOSEPH McKINNEY 
WiL M. McPHEETERS 
RICHARD MrPHERRIN 
ALBERT R. McQUEENEY 
LESTER McSHANOG 
RALPH McWILLIAMS 
CLARENCE A. MEDLOCK 
THOS. MENDENHALL 



WALTER R. iLEHRINGER 
HAROLD W. :\rERI!lLL 
LT. RAY.MOXI) MERRILL 
LOTUS .1x0. M|-|-(lli:i,L 
JXO. D. MnXIIIOI.L 
RAYMOND P.. MILLEIt 
WAYNE MILLER 
WAYNE L. MILLER 
W. F. MILLKR 
SGT. I'AUL I!. MILLER 
LKMUKI^ ('. MILLER 
H.VRLAN H. :MILLER 
EARL :\riLLER 
CHAS. iriLLER 
LT. CARL N. MILLER 
CAXA R. MILLER 
■WILP.ri; MILXOR 
ROY MONTGO^fERY 
ALBEItT L. irOORE 
FLO^D M:. .MOIiEHART 
SGT. LKO.VAKI) F. MOORE 
DEXTi:i; MOIiRIS 
JESSE R. MOMAX 
liOLMIC .MORE.X 
EDGAl! L. MORPIIET 
VIRGIL I!. MULLINS 
MAIRK !•: MURPHY 
CORI'. lli:.\RV II. MURRAY 
P.\rL MUSSELMAN 
LT. ROSCOE T. ilYERS 
LT. JOSEPH P. MYERS 
OSCAR myi<:rs 
OWEN MYERS 
EDG.VR NACE 
WALTER NEILL 
OLIVER R. NEES 
LOREN H. NEWBY 
SGT. W.VYXE NEWTON 

"\VM. ij:e m-avton 

J. lOl.lllORT XICE 
CLARKXCIC E. XOBLITT 
1)EWE^■ I. X^OP.LITT 
IV.\X E. NOBLITT 
PETER NOLAN 
FRANK J. NOWLING 
SHERMAN B. OBERHOLTZl 
LT. EUGENE O'BRIEN 
WM. J. OX'ONXELL 
LT. R. KEITH OFFUTT 
JNO. W. ORMAN 



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SOT. PERRY OVERMEYER 

GEO. ir. OVERl'ECK 

MYIMCK ()\V1':.\S 

ERAXK PADDOCK 

RAI.EKiH U. PADGP:TT 

LEE PANCAKE 

SGT. HERSHEL F. PARKER 

CHAS. I!. 1-ASSWA'l'Ei; 

CARL R. ]'A'II-: 

LEONARD l'A'l'ri':i;SON' 

^lELYY I'AYNI-: 

LT. FPvAZIEl! J. PAYTON 

GEO. R. PELL 

CORP. MAI!SIIAr,L PELL 

BE.V FI;A.\K I'E.XNINGTON 

SUYARIO l'El;<•Il^L\N 

MERL Y. PERRY 

TRVIN S. PEl'TIFOItD 

SGT. H.\RRY ANSIL PllILLL 

LUKE PHILLIPS 

HALE PICKETT 

EVAN pickh.vi;dt 

PAUL PIKE 
BROOKS PIN.VICK 
CLAl'DE IMTT.\I.\N 
DALLAS O. PLU-NLMER 
CORP. CT>.\I!EXCE A. POPE 
FELIX H. POPE 
RICHARD L. PORTER 
CAPT. J. P. PORTER 
CORP. THURL POTTENGER 
FLOYD POUND 
HORACE POWELL 
WiL PRIBBLE 
ELMER PATTEN 
GEO. POWERS 
EDWARD RAGSDALE 
HENRY W. RAFFETY" 
ORA RAFFETY' 
LYJLYN R. RAINFARTH 
EDGAR RANS 
LT. EVERETT E. RASOR 
EZRA L. EAWT:.EY 
HER>L\N RAY 
JULL\N V. RAY 
HOWARD A. RAY 
HOWARD A. REA 
EDGAR W. REAGAN 
JESSE REAVIS 



THOS. W. RECORD 

WM. R. REDICK 

LOREN REED 

NEWTON W. REED 

HOMER REYNOLDS 

GLENN R. REYONLDS 

I!.\.LrH F. REYNOLDS 

RAY M. RHINEHART 

S(iT. PAUL RHOADES 

CHAS. EDWARD IMEHL 

SGT. VKItNEI! .1. inCE 

AUGUST M. RICHARDS 

WALTER W. RIClLVPtDS 

WM. N. RICHARDS 

HERMAN G. RICHEY 

WM. RIECKIN 

J. MAURICE RIEKEBEKG 

FLOYD RIGGS 

REID RINGER 

S.\MITEL R. RINKARD 

ORVILLE A. RISLEY 

CLAY RITTER 

FRANK ROBEItTS 

LEWIS C. ROBERTS 

LT. CHAS. H. PvOP.INSON 

CHAS. E. ROCHELLE 

COKI'. OSCAI! \V. KOKSINGER 

CLVDK IIOGKKS 

CORP. IIAKLi:^' M. ROHM 

SHERMAN ROLAND 

EARL ROUGH 

GROVER ROLL 

RAY ROSS 

CLARENCE D. ROTRUCK 

E. A. ROW 

HERSHEL ROYER 

HERVEY E. ROYER 

LT. WM. C. ROYSE 

ORA E. RUMPLE 

ELMKi; \'. lUTHERFORD 

LEWIS KUTIIKRFORD 

ViVNE R. RUTHERFORD 

WM. J. RUTLEDGE 

HUBERT H. SAKEL 

WILLET E. SANDERS 

LT. LOREN SANFORD 

CLARENCE D. SANil 

R.AI.PH SCHAUPP 

LT. RAI.PH E. SCHENCK 

WALTER J. SCHIERLING 



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CLAREXCE O. SCHLEGEL 
BERNARD H. SHOCKEL 
LT. A. C. SCHOr.MEYER 
RALEIGH SCHOFvLING 
NELSON F. SCHIiOEDER 
CPL. ERNEST J. SCHULTZ 
MARK C. SCHINNERER 
JXO. SCOFIELD 
NfELVTN E. SCOTTEN 
KAI.I'll >r. SCO'l'T 

i/r. i;ai.imi si:(1ii>ki! 
Airriiri; skvuold 

liASIL SH ACKKl.EORD 

I'AIL I!. SllAFFKR 

LT. J. ]!AY>rO.Nri) SItAHAX 

LT. W. H. SKAXNKi; 

JOHN SHAUr 

KEXXETH S. SHAIJI' 

( LVDF. SHAW 

i;ay shfltfx 

lt. evix m. siifruill 

JESSE M. SHElLnS 
IRWIN C. SHOFMAKFR 
SGT. PAUL R. SIIOFSTALL 
ORVILLE V. SI1()1;T 
CORP. JXO. SlIOTWELL 

PAFL siio\v.\.r;iM-:i; 

i;r. WALTF.i; o. siumner 

(ilOO. SIF.FKT 
LT. RUSSFLL SIGLFR 
FRED A. SLMOX 
JAS. L. SIMFSOX 
VFIiXOX D. SLXGER 
ClIICSTEFv SINK 
SGT. JAS. E. SIPE 
11. P.. SKELTON 
WALTER SKINNER 
ADF.OX P.. SLUDER 
AULA l,KO S^F\IL 
UALI'll W. SMILEY 
ALGFU SMFPII 
CORP. CHAS. W. SMITH 
RLMER L. SMITH 
MILLARD SMITH 
EVERT SMITH 
PAUL K. SMITH 
RALPH W. SMITH 
ROBERT F. SMITH 
ROY R. SMITH 
VIRGIL O. SMITH 



WALTER G. SMITH 

ALONZO SNYDER 

RALPH SPARKS 

HOYT SPENCER 

LT. LAURENCE SPULLER 

JNO. STARK 

JUDSON STARK 

LAMBERT STARKS 

CORP. B. F. STEPHENSON 

C. A. STEPHENSON 

PAUL STEVEXSOX 

THOS. STEVENSON 

ODIE E. STEVEXS 

W. D. STEA'ENS 

LT. EMMET C. STIOWAIJT 

LT. ROY" C. STIGLKi; 

WORTH .STOXFF.riJXEF. 

HARVEY E. STORK 

R.VLETGH STOTZ 

FRED STRTCKLER 

LT. ROBEF.T K. STRTCKLER 

MILF.Y IIAYMOXI) STROUD 

MYKICK SUFI.K'I'TF 

S!IFF>:\L\X SUF.LF'ITE 

XKWEL jr. SUMMKRS 

AF.LE H. SUTTOX 

JOK SWAXGO 

LT. MFRVFV K. SWAXGO 

liASlL SWrXFORl) 

VERXOX K. STOF..MS 

MELVIN E. SCOTTEN 

EVART SMITH 

LT. JOSEPH H. STAHL 

HARRY STORM 

VERNON K. STOR^rS 

LEE TAYLOR 

LT. THOMAS C. THOMAS 

SCiT. I! AY THOilAS 

BEN J. R. THOMPSON 

MAURICE M. THOMPSOX 

PARKE L. THOMPSON 

RICHARD E. THOMPSOX 

ROGER M. THOMPSON 

E. L. TIERNEY 

LT. J. L. TIE1!NI':Y 

JESSE H. THOMl'SOX 

CHAS. CLYDE TLNLMOXS 

JAS. H. TOWER 

J. C. TRANBARGER 

FITZHUGH TRAYLOR 



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CLAEENCE WH ITEHEAD 

HAEPvY \X. WIUTTENBURG 

GEO. A. WIGGS 

UOSCOE E. WILDMAN 

JNO. WILLIAjMS 

LT. PAUL B. WILLIA^rS 

F. E. WILLIS 

LEOXAPvD S. WILLIAiLS 

IXG. AYILJI 

MJTIIUR T. WILSON 

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PAUL A. AVJTTV 
LT. FREDEEICK WOOD 
JESSE A. WOOD 
SGT. WALTER WOOD 
WILLAED L. WOOD 
HOMER WRIGHT 
OLIVER DEXNIS WIUG] 
WKXDKLL WM. \VI!I( 
LKKOV ('. WYTHE 
SVLVAiX A. YAGER 
SIMEON D. YOCUM 
LUKE F. YOUNG 
STANLEY P. YOUNTS 
WALTER B. ZERBE 



IIT 



JAS. N. TRIMMER 

RUSSEL TROTTER 

BOYD E. TRYON 

LESTER R. TUCKER 

RUSSELL TUCKER 

LT. CL.VUDE K. TURMAN 

CORP. .\R'|-|irR V. TUR^LVN 

EUCKXK C. TCRXKE 

W.\r. ( . rXNKRKKRTII 

A. R. VAXCLKAVI': 

S(iT. 11!A II. V.VNCLKAVE 

SGT. CLINTON VANPELT 

JNO. VERMILLION 

FEED VOLKER 

LT. WALTICi; ^\■.\KEFII<:LD 

CLARENCK .1. WAGXICP. 

CORP. SI.MOX \V.\M)1:N 

F. J. WALL 

JNO. W. WALL 

JNO. R. WALSH 

IIEEBEET WANN 

RAYMOND WARMOTH 

I. WARNER 

EARL WARRIXFR 

COl'RTNKV W.\.TS()X 

SILVIAX 1). WK.WKP. 

THOS. WEBBER 

JNO. GLENN WEBER 

MARCUS H. WEBSTER 

LT. O. D. WELCH 

MILTON W. WELLS 

\^TVL F. WELLS 

SGT. L. D. WESNER 

MAX WHEELER 

IJ..OYD WHELAN 



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C/earjina House. Mali C«lII- All ^rc^ent 








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HELD ylRT/LLtRY hEF t^TH /^ERO SqUADRON 




ROY E.Max WELL 
336 INF.BAND 



LlEL/t.CHARLE5 FOWLER UevT.EDWARD BUCKNER 
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J.CddtOTiHannak Russell Siller Marian MiWer 



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■ p.irticiilar i-c^-inieiit :iiul one parti- 
k Mild thill. And it was no case of 
lot only maiiap-ed to find a bite for her 
c for lier. Tliat Belle ajipreciated this 



Tliis is Verdun r.ell(', ^^hn c.uue no one kiie« no 
tells us — to the trenehes near Verdun. She sc'ec ted ( 
cular private for her very own, and stuck lIumuuIi tl 
unrequited love, for we are told her yoniiii mister in 
always in his nle^^s kit, Init also contrived a <ia 
was shown by her never failing answer to the first alerte. 

In jNIay two important things hajjpened. Belle presented the regiment with nine ])ups, 
and an order came for the very own regiment t) move across France to help stem the (ierman 
tide at the Marne. In the excitement Verdun Belle and her family were forgotten by all 
save her very own private, who found a niark't basket in which he carried the piijis. followed 
i)v the grate if ul Mother Belle. 



It was a hard way for the very o 
road was black with hurrying troops, 
of refugees trundling their most cliei 
And in the confusion Belle was lost, 
very own private was left desolate wi 



vn private and Belle and the i)iips. for by this time the 
lumbering lorries, and a desolate retreating })rocession 
ished possessions in wheelbarrows and baby carriages. 
Day followed day and still no Belle, and meanwhile the 
h the two pups who had survived. A kindly French 
him milk and an eye-dropjjer, but the contrivance was not very successful. The 
last minute came. The very own private was ordered into action. In despair he thrust the 
deserted pups on a lieutenant and obeyed orders. 

In a few more days a fresh contingent of marines arrived with food, ammunition, fresh 
hope — and Verdun Belle. It was a happy reunion, save for the absence of the very own 
]Drivate. And then one evening he came — wounded, just an ordinary case of shell shock, 
ordinary to the regiment and the medicals, that is, but to V^erdun Belle it was the very own 
private and happiness once more. And yet some young psycholigists say that dogs cannot 
remember. 



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It may have 
awakened by the coiitiniio 
city. One by one other \vh 
outnumber and outdo tlie 



anb tf)e <goob i?EtD£( Came to QTcrre ?|aute 

ibmit -I'M, on ^londay morning, Noveml)er eleven, that we were 

nioiis l)l(iwing of a few whistles out toward the northeast part of the 

whistles. l)ii;- and little, joined in; then the l)ells began and tried to 

whistles, but. when the big bass voiced roared from the distillery 



whistles opened, all else was lost and the whistles rtded. 

The order seems to be to roar, then rest, then loud and louder roar again. This was 
kept up for some time and then we began to hear autos tuning up and the newsboys calling 
and our eyes were not sleepy any more and we read aloud to the family at attention the good 
news. Tliere could be but one cause for all this commotion and we felt that the news must 
be true this time. Then Ave hurried to get ready to go to school and to get up town for we 
were hearing that there were "doings" going on up there. 

At 7 :25 we came to Wabash Ave., at Sixth street and a parade of Vandalia shop men 
and of miners were marching west. 

And there was noise everywhere and shouting and singing and people walked "like life 
was young." And we went to our classes and somehow managed to keep the gas low and 
the cut-outs closed during that first i)eriod. When we assembled for chapel it was almost pos- 
sible to see something big was up Pres. Parsons' sleeve. It boded well for the underworked 
students who had had an enfoi'ced vacation of five weeks. 

Now could we do anything more appropriate than to sing "The Star Spangled Banner," 
or could Pres. Parsons read anything more fitting than to "make a joyful noise unto the 
Lord" and to "sing a new song"? 

After the singing and reading the Presid'^nt spoke of the signing of the terms of the 
armistice and of the great things that had been accomplished. 

We adjourned to meet at 10 o'clock ready for the parade and we hurried for flags and 
horns and other instruments that seemed to contain "joyful" noises. The gathering was along 
Eagle street and extended from Sixth to the Student Building and was headed by a drinn corps 



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coinposed of Prof. Victo 
others. Pre.s. :uul Mrs. 1* 
then the men. then the S 
iny: school. "We marched 



Miller, tifer: Charlie Call, Library custodian, drummer, and 
irsons led and were followed by the yonnf^ ladies of the faculty; 
, A. T. C\ boys: thenlndiana's choicest and then came the Train- 
west to Fifth street, south to Cherrv, west to Fourth, then south 



nd disbi 
ements 



ide 



We had 

:'shals or 



to AVabash Avenue; east to Ninth and back to Seventh, then north 
to force our way into the procession as there was no order of arrai 
suj^er persons anywhere to boss thini>s. 

The plan seemed to go ea.st on the south side of Wabash Avenue, and west on the north 
side and parade where you jjleased, when you pleased and as lonji' as you liked. People 
walked or rode in wagons or buggies or trucks, or Ford.s or Packards and these i)eo})k' were 
making merry and made beautiful noises by hammering on circular saws and lioiler plates; 
by bells mounted and swinging or bells pounded by vigorous youngsters. Wa.sh boilers, 
wash tubs, empty oil cans, garbage cans and scraps of sheet iron were tied dog tail and tin 
can fasjhion to the rear of vehicles. Immature cannons were hauled on trucks and the com- 
mon run of dead level racket was punctured with large periods. 

The principal exercise of the day was held at Seventh and Waba.sh between 10 ::'.() and 
11:30. Speaking was im])ossible but band niiisic and singing gave vent to the desire to re- 
joice. The .streets at this intersection yere jammed full of people; traffic stood still; great 
loads of scrap paper and i)aper streamers were thrown from the top windows of the Trust 
Building. The most inqMessive thing of the whole day of rejoicing was on the stroke of 
eleven. A few minutes before eleven a spoksmen. on the balcony of the Terre Haute House, 
recjuested tluU at the stroke of eleven everybody bow the head and join in the silent one 
minute prayer and thank God for the Victory and Peace. 

Then the band i)layed and the people sang and waved flags and the noi.se continued but 
all eves were turueil toward the timekee})er on the balcony and. at the signal from him. that 
eleven oclock had come, "the shouting and tunndt" ceased and tyjjical America .stood with 
bared, bowed heads at prayer. 

Then we sang, "Praise (iod From Whom All Blessings Flow." 




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atije lienor 3RoU 

The boys upon the honor roll, God bless them 

all, I pray 
God watch them while they sleep at night, 

and guard them through the day. 
We've stamped their names upon our walls, 

the list in glory grows, 
Our brave boys and our splendid l)oys who 

stand to meet the foes. 
Oh, here are sons of mothers fair and fathers 

fine and true, 
The little ones of yesterday, the children that 

we knew; 
We thought of them as youngsters gay, still 

laughing at their games. 
And then we found the honor roll enil>laz- 

oned with their names. 
We missed their laughter and their cheer; it 

seems but yesterday 
We had them here to walk with us, and now 

they've marched awa}'. 
And here where once they were seen we 

keep a printed scroll; 
The absent boys we long to see are on the 

honor roll. 
So quickly did the sununons come we scarcely 

marked the change. 
One day life marched its normal pace, the 

next all things seemed strange. 
And when we questioned where they were, 

the sturdiest of us all 
We saw the silent honor roll, on each familiar 

wall. 
The laughter that we knew has gone; the 

merry voice of youth 
No longer rings where graybeards sit, dis- 
cussing sombre truth. 
No longer jests are flung about to rouse our 

weary souls, 
P'or they who meant so much to us are on our 

honor roll. 



^ patriotic Creeb 

To serve my country day by day 
At any humble post I may ; 
To honor and respect her Flag, 
To live the traits of which I brag ; 
To be Amercian in deed 
As well as in my printed creed. 

To stand for truth and honest toil, 

To keep my little j)atch of soil 

And keep in mind the debt I owe 

To them who died that I might know 

My country, prosperous and free, 

And passed this 'heritage to me. 

I must be guided in trouble's hour 

Be guided by the men in power; 

For God and country I must live. 

My best for God and country give; 

No act of mine that men may scan 

Must shame the name American. 

To do my best and play my part, 

American in mind and heart; 

To serve the flag and bravely stand 

To guard the glory of my land ; 

To be American in deed, 

God grant me .strength to keep this creed. 

tKfjE Can to fetrbicE 

These are the days when little thought 

Must cease men's minds to occupy; 
The nation needs men's larger creeds. 

Big men must answer to her cry ; 
No longer selfish ways we ti'ead. 

The greater task lies just ahead. 
These are the days when petty things 

By all men must be thrust aside ; 
The country needs men's finest deeds. 

Awakened is the nation's pride; 
Men must forget their selfish strife 

Once more to guard their country's life. 

Edgar A. Guest. 



X. 



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Lt. Leon H. Rockwell Lt. Levi D. Jones Lt. Andrew J. Moynihan 



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mtc/ti^'s 7?unt T?e.cru,vts^^Feirecut. Armstrov^ Awkward'Aie,' At ATTENTION: 



129 



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On OctolHT :.. the first of the Xuriiial .^ 
;crvi(r. In m few days the cdniijany liad n 
Ired and sixty men. This eonipany reniai 
)f seven men to I'nrdue and the deatli of oni 



A. T. C. unit was mustered into 
•hed a total strenii'th of one luui- 
'd intact exee])t for tlie transfer 
omrade. Private Forest Hultmaii. 
wlu> ilied of influenza. Miieh credit is due Sgts. "Wisely. Schinnerer, Lloyd, and 
Herrmann who went to the R. O. T. C. at Camp Sheridan last summer and 
were returned here. Sgts. Kamm and Kerr were connected with the personnel. 
P'or some time Lt. Rockwell was forced to work alone due to the illness 
of Lts. Babson and Moynihan. hut later was i-elieved to some extent by the 
arrival of Lt. Jones and the recovery of Lt. Moynihan. 

A Y. M. V. A. secretary was sent here and did much in securing entertain- 
ment. The closing of school on accoinit of the inlluenza made a very large 
amount of time available for drill and Held work and the company was a well 
drilled organization when demolnlization began on Dec. 13. Several men were 
expecting to leave at once for (). T. V. but were not called owing to the signing 
of the armistice. All members of the organization are loud in their praise of 
the fine treatment they received from President Parsons, the school, and our 
never tirinir commandant. Lt. Rockwell. 



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At tile beg-iiiniiiii' of the Fall tcnn "is. new iu'tivities hesi-un to display 
themselves around the eani])us and thruuiiii the halls of 1. S. X. S. 

We all adored the khaki and now we wei-e to have it near at hand. We 
beg-un to hear hoi. nails echoinii' and re-ec'hoin- thi'on-i'h the halls as these 
young g-iants moved to and fro from class rooms. 

All went well for the first few weeks until one night a guard was jxisted 
and these fellows had to walk post at night an<l go to school the next day. Then 
life became more strenuous. AA'hcn some pi-ofcssor would call the name of 
Charles Smith. Private Smith would be suddenly awakened, stand at attention 
and answer. "Here Sir." About this time this Kaiser hater would b;'gin to 
rei-ite. an orderly would appear at the door and call that Pvt. Charles Smith 
should report at the tu'derly room at once. Pvt. Smith would k'uock. enter, 
salute, stand at attention and tell the lieutenant that the third liiiure in his 
pay number was an eight insti'ad of a seven, and that he knew absolutely 
nothing about the apples that disappeared from the cafeteria and that he was 
not in charge of the barracks jHilice the morning that the scraps of Esthers 
letter were found behind the ra.liator near the bulletin board. Then Saturday 
morning there is a hurry to break-fast and a hurry away. The barracks were 
thoroughly nnmicured and the cots and riHes gotten ready for inspection. 
About ten o'clock every man appeared with shoes shined. clean blouse and 
leggings, with all of the cosmoline out of the chamber of the rifle. 

After inspection. i)asses were granted for week end leaves, and the bar- 
racks were desolate until about eiglit o'clock Sunday night. AVednesday P. M. 
everybody interested in foot ball or base ball went to Par.son's Field and there 
foot ball and other games were played. 

We would like to know why Sixth Street was the most jiojiidai- place 
around camp from chow until study period e\-ery night. We would like to 
know why Lieutenant Jones said fall out an<l fall in at attention on the other 
side of the fence when he came to the gate at Parsons Field. Also if thei'e wei'e 
any vocal solos heard in the barracks between 10:00 and 11:00 except the 
first niii-ht. 




IITIIIIIII 




X. S. >q-<, >J^. 



Birectorp 

Alpha Bess Garver 

Athleta Lillian Eppert 

Epsilon Delta Georgia Baker 

Gamma Gamma Margaret Zerbe 

Kappa Kappa Norma Buchanan 

Llamarada Elsie Hill 

Mu Zeta Blanche Allen 

Omega Mabel Lahr 

Pi Zeta Florice Hunsucker 

Psi Theta ' . Mary Hollis 

Philomathean Evelyn Wills 

Alethenai Rosa Schwartz 

Eclectic Lois Duvall 

Forum Raymond Warmouth 

Daedalian Otis M. Wilson 

Ciceronian Frank Grove 

Trojan Edson Wisely 

Psychological Research Club .... Frieda Ferguson 

Y. W. C. A Estelle Perkins 

Y. M. C. A Dean Pattison 



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Wf)t W&oman*^ Heague 





BERNIE E BURK MARGARET ZERBE 



The Woman's League wms orgiuiized in 1S!»7 as a society of upper class- 
women to aid and welcome the new women students. Membership was open 
to all women students upon payment of an annual fee. 

In 1905 the Con.stitution was changed. Chajjters were formed but all 
were governed by the Executive Committee composed of the officers of the 
League and of the various chapters. The object of this new organization is 
"to strengthen the spirit of unity and sense of individual responsibility among 
the women students of the school." 

The League sees that the social standards of Nornnil is made and kept ,high. 

The greatest step to this "spirit of unity is the Big Sister Movement" begun 
by the Y. W. C. A. and the league. Each section girl becomes a Big Sister to 
the entering student and cares for her during her period in school. With this 
impetus the league begins the year that will be the most successful of its 



3sr. 



^Ipba 



Organized 1S99 
CoLons — Yellow and White P'l-cnvr.iis — Yellow Ciirysiuitheinum 

Charter iHemberg 

Mrs. Beth PiU-ker Kidder. Mrs. Helen Layman I)i.\, Mrs. Edna Regan Ly- 
brand, Mrs. Edna Crapo Hynenian, Mrs. Catherine Gilkeson Dickens. Mrs. 
Sallie Dickenson Craiii'. Mrs. Bertha Blythina- Watkins, Mrs. Charlotte Os- 
trand.er Wagner, and the Misses Addah McWillianis. Blanche Tyrrel, Zayda 
Scovell. Alice Wood, AVinifred Mnir, Cecil White, and Anne Keating. 



aictibc iWcmtjerg 



1919 
Helen McCnllough 
Hazel Olii^hant 
Esther Hance 

1920 

Helen Kennedy 
Helen Kingery 
Frances Sclianfler 
Evelyn Wills 



19l>l 
Elizabeth Laatz 



Mil 

Anne M 
Kuth Tnrnian 
Edna Bennett 
Bess (ilarver 
Doris Porter 
Hazel Wills 



V Malone 



1922 
Eleanor Lessig 
Dorothv Gerard 
Hallie Miller 
Vera Bates 
Esther Harter 
Audrie Steele 



^Ipja 




Helen McCuIIough Eleanor Lcssig 

Edna Bennett Doris Porter 

Evelyn Wills Dorothy Gerard 

Hazel Oliphant 

137 



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atfjleta 




Cd.oiis— TU'.l 



Founded lfl04 



Cljarter iWemfarrs! 



Floaver — Red Rose 



Mary Erown, Clara Lane, I\Ial.el Paine, I'.ess ( 'rawfnrd, Fva Black, \gnes 
White, Flizaheth Carrot, Rena Catinii'. Leola Moore. Jess Hrowii. Jess Keyes, 
Pearl Hilton, and Myrtle Sevhold. 



1919 
Inda Wise 
Fthel Seward 
Helen Ehrenhardt 
Beulali McCullougl) 
Maynie Asperger 

1920 
Lillian Ejopert 
Ellen Modi sett 
Luella IMarnior 
Mary Kruse 
Elaine Dranei- 



19-21 
Edith Warner 
Mary Campbell 
Rnth Niedbriigge 

1922 
Margaret Miller Erwin 
Henrietta Moore 
Margaret Richards 
Ruth Ladd Brown 
Louise P^ckert 



atJjleta 





I 






^' ^ V 



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I 




Ruth Ladd 
Mary Krusc 
Inda Wise 



Ethel Seward Margaret Rii 

Louise Ecfcert Ellen Modise 

Lois Duvall Helen Ehren 



Lillian Eppert 
Luella Marmor 
Mamie Asperger 



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Cpgilon Belta 



Ct)i-(ut,s— I'urpk" a 



Organized 1910 
White 

Cljarter Mtmtttsi 



Flower — Aster 



Anna Cox, Nelle Wolf, Edith Bhiydes, Ro.se Aklinger, Jennie King, 
Nellie Settles. 

^ctibE iWembersi 



1919 








1920 


Opal Harris 








Gladys Spencer 


Loi.s Paj'ton 








Georgia Baker 


Helen Smith 








I{;iizal)eth Williams 


Eva Hein 








Alka Van Ulzen 


Helen Hawkins 








1921 


Dessie Nickels 
Josephine Walls 
Harriet Morris 








Irene Boots 
Vola Potts 
ISbuy Amour 


Ethel Beard 








Bessie Erwin 
















1922 




Ceci 


il Payne 






Lau 


ra 


AViu: 


ianis 




Rul: 


lie 


Peed 






(}la: 


dys Co^^ 


an 



€psilon Belta 




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A 



Organized 1902 
Coi.diis — Red and White Flower — Red Rose 

Cfjartcr Mtmhtti 

Fern Casto Eppert, Edith Flood, Sarah Hunt, Florence Redifer, Grace 
Riehle "\^"ischnleYer, Rose Duenweg Rush, Georgia Plood, Bess Locke Bailey, 
]\Iaybelle Steeg Lammers, Henrietta .Herz Cohen. 

actibe iWcmberg 

1919 1920 

Gladys Brown Virginia Davis 

Helen Hitch Mabel Fuqua 

Harriet H. Hiibhard Eleanor Mayrose 

1921 



Isa MuUikin 
Lncile Viehe 



, „ , Nelle Braden 

Margaret Zerbe ^^^^^^^^^^ McFarland 

Lucille Witty 
1922 
Eva Ferree 
Mildred Chranicki 
Ruth Harris 
Mary Laubach 
Martha Niblack 
Helen Perkins 
Alberta Rice 
Dorothy Dowden Wible 
Dorothy Spencer 
Marjory Swan 



(^amma #amma 




Marjory Swan Margaret Zcrbe Eva Ferrce 

Mabel Fuqua Gladys Brown Grctchcn McFa 

Alberta Rice Lucile Viehe Dorothy Spence 

Harriet Hubbard 



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Eappa Eappa 



OliCANIZEI) 1903 

Colors — Laveiulcr ami "White Flower — White Rose 

Helen Layniiiii, Cecil White, Mrs. C. K. Dryer. 

Cfjarter iWcmticrsf 

Ethel Hartley, Adda Beeler, AA'yonia liarnett, Exu Kehrer, Christiana 
Jolmson, Ojial McCraeken, Jessie Harrison, Katherine Hanna, Mamie Richey, 
Eva Davis, Elsie Kirchoff, Ora Preswell, Lydia Grarre, Alice Kelso, Marjory 
JMcAJpine, Eldna KirchotT, Bernice McCracken. 



^ctibe iWcmticrsi 



191f) 
Berniece Bnrk 
Ruth ^Morrison 

1920 
Norma L. Buclianai 
Ethel Meurer 
Mabel Mclntyre 
Helen Milks' 
Gertrude (Jarrell 
(Tertnide Connellv 



1021 
Dorothy Bell 
Volta Edwards 
Mary Henry 
Nadine Meehan 
Geraldine Nicliolson 
Lusyl Penna 
Marjory Retherford 
Margaret SJiarp 
Flora Templeton 
Elvada Tessman 



3^appa llappa 




Mary Henry Mabel Mclntyrc 

GcraMinc Nicholson I ucyl Penna 

Bcrniecc Burfc Gertrude Garrcll 
Flora Tcmpleton 



Ethel Meurer 
Margaret Sharp 
Dorothy Bell 
Nadine Mehan 



Elvada Tessma 



Ruth Morrison 
Mariory Retherford 
Helen Milks 
Gertrude Connelly 



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llamaraba 



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Oecanized IDOi 
Colors — Green and AVhite 

Ctarter iWcmbcrsf 



Fi.owER — Daisy 



Frances Snider Montgomery, Anna Forbes, Irene Ramsdale, Jennie 
Thomas AVright, Lorelle Slidler Cornelius, Hannah Kiester Kinimell, Lora 
pjvans Comins, Mabel Carter AA'eathers, Lor;i Ivove Nance, Grace Cassid}'^ 
Burns, Lena Hodges. 





actibe mmbevi 


1919 






1920 


Ruth Markley 






Alildred Hixson 


Eleanor Taylor 






LaVonne Maish 


Delpha Sefrit 






Mary Bailey 


Gertrude Grossman 




Mildred Self 


Albertine Gleeson 






Ruby Keeling 


Olivia Haas 






Naomi Grenard 


Hazel Grenard 






Anne Cooley 


Elsie Hill 






1921 


Byrl McClnre 
Moree Craig 






Pearl Hopps 
Ruth Parish 


Katherine Jarvis 






June Wiley 






W-2 


:2 




Ruth Lee 






Mabel 


Parker 




Marie 


Siner 





Ulamaraba 




isr. 



0in Heta 



Ohganized 1905 
CoLons— Pink and White Flower— Pink Carnation 



B. r 



Charter 0tm\}tvi 

Emma Al)l)<.tt. Lulu 



Pound NevmuTi. 



191!) 
Ilene Binning 
Enlala Meyers 

19-20 
D. Mabel C\um-h 
Lelah Stepliens 
Pv. Blanch Allen 
Mabel Adams 



^cttbc iilEmtjers! 

1921 
Estelle Perkins 
Dorothy Glenn 
Rosa Schwa i-tz 
Margaret Jakel 
"^'^ Anna Ryan 

Isabel French 

Katherine Farmer Williams 

1922 
Mildred Hansel 
Chloral Conrtney 
Dorothy Rncker 
Irene Faust 
Marjory Cain 
Reba ZoUer 
Znla Junker 
Carmen Byers 



iHu Heta 







Mildred Hansel 
Lelah Stephens 
Blanche AUen 



Dorothy Ruckcr 
D. Mabel Churchman Mabel F. Adams 



I. 



isr. 



>j^. 



d^mega 



V 



FotTNDED 1899 

Coi>oi!s — Pink aiul Green FLdwr.R — Moss Hose Bud 

Charter Mtmhtti 

Zellii Carney, Mrs. Acher, and the late Mrs. Donghiie. 



1919 
Grace Devaney 
Katherine Eaton 
Ora McReynolds 



Mabel Lahr 
Bernice All 



attibe iflemlicrs 



19:21 



Mildred .^enonr 
Olive Stewart 
Anne (Jrogan 
Anna Carle 
Bliss Asher 
Valda Kichholtz 
Lanrentia I^vnani 
Loretta I>ynani 
Alberta Steele 
Pansev Bobbins 



Audrey Lundstroni 
Mary Helen Farsch 
Jennie Brolyer 
Eachael Pickle 



#mcsa 










V- I 




M 





Grace Dcvancy 
Lorctta Lynam 
Pansey Robbins 



Anne Grogan Alberta Steele 

Kathcrine Eaton Mabel Lahr 

Olive Stewart Ora McRcynoIds 



Laurentia Lynam 
Mildred Senour 



3sr. 



>js. 



m Heta 



Organized 1905 

Cijarter Mtmhtvi 

Caroline Crouch, Kate Black, Margaret Carlton, Nelle Loga, Zoe Boden- 
haff'er, Helen Helt, Ada Manion, Gertrude Miller, Fern Densford, Glenn Gobin, 
Delia Manion, Helen Wood. Fannie Thorp, jNIyrtle Fri.st, Ethel Carr, Xelle 
Broadhurst, Xelle r"itz<>ibl)en. 



li)19 
Floriee Ilunsucker 
lone Firsich 
Elizabeth Hart 
Belle Painter 
Verna Humphreys 

1920 
Amber Cummings 
Clara Allen 
Evangeline Hildreth 
Lillian Wright 
Hazel Fatten 
Ethel Runvan 



1921 
:Myrtle Bray 
Geneva Shipnn 



Margaret Gardner 
Marie Robards 
Ellen Wright 

1922 
Bertha Hughes 
Mary Christian 
Effie Hart 

Mildred Sculley 



^ 



li Heta 




Hazel Patton 
Mary Christian 
Bertha Hughes 
Amber Cummings 



Florice Hunsucker Elizabeth Hart 

Myrtle Bray Margaret Gardn 

Hildrcth Clare Allen 

er Effie Hart 



BeXPa'i' 



Lillian Wright 
Ethel Runyan 
Gladys Stephen! 
lone Firsich 



X. 



>T. 



>:^. 



^^i tKfteta 



Founded 1903 
Colors— Eose ami Blue Flower— La France Rose 

Cljarter Mtmbtvs 

■ Malinda Wrentz, Letta Phuniiier. Benlah Rienhart, Hannah Wolf, Laura 
Black, Rose Skinner, Ethel Tweep. Sadie Lovelace, Nora Wright, Mary AVhite, 
Rosa Dell, Fay Boone, Susan Frazeiir, Mary Dunlap. 



llctitjc Mtmhtvi 



1919 
Jewel Ferguson 
Frieda Ferguson 
Lucille Bauman 
Mamie Overpeck 
Marguerite O'Connell 
Elsie Fail 
Evelyn Briley 



1920 
Carrie Surrell 
Margaret Hall 

1921 
Jeanette Landrum 
Mary Hollis 



1922 
Dorothy Martin 
Asenith Denehie 
Margaret Doty 
Helen Burr 



^ 



J^ssi ^jjeta 



^ S # C* f^ 



> 



l^il 







4' 



SSSTT^^ 





f/3 







Mary HoUis Elsie Fail Ascnith Dcnehk 

Lucille Bauman Helen Burr Carrie Surrell 

Margaret Doty Mamie Overpeck Margaret Hall 



Dorothy Martin Evelyn Britcy 

Frieda Ferguson Jcancttc Landrum 

Jewel Ferguson Marguerite O'Connell 



isr. >:^. 



Ciceronian 

As the Ciceroniiui Debatiii<>; Society approaches its fourteenth anniver- 
sary, it is witli i) deep sense of pride that it turns back again to review those 
meaningful years. 'Tis with a feeling of great privilege that the present mem- 
bership i-ecalls those pleasant associations of the past and 'tis with a sense of 
fellowship that it views its present relations. 

Founded on a high puqjose of friendshij:), etfective expression of christian 
manhood, an appreciation of good literature, dedicated to the classic master of 
public debate of the eternal city of the seven hills, it needs no other proof of 
its stewardship than the splendid men, associated with its name during those 
years. The menil)ership of the Puri^le and White, now scattered far and wide, 
have always recalled the name of the society with pleasure. 

In the supreme crisis of our Nation's history, the Purple and AVhite -mi- 
twined with the star bedecked emblem of democracy, stood for patriotism. To 
the stirring challenge of duty, it gave a splendid response and many of its 
membership made offer of the supreme sacrifice that the great heart of America 
might live. In camp and in the second line, they served with a patriotism en- 
lightened and emiobled by understanding, and inspired l)v a ^"ision of Justice. 

To the membership wherever they be, the society extends an invitation 
to be with us during connnencement Aveek. w'hen we will renew associations by 
an outing on the banks of the Wabash. The annual dance of the winter :|iiinter 
was one of the most successful events given and it is jjlanned to make the en- 
tertainment in June as good or better. 

The year's work has been devoted to debating on current questions, par- 
liamentary drill and review of books. The inter-society debate which Avas 
to have been with the Trojan Society was cancelle<l because of failure to ar- 
range a convenient date. 

During the year the society elected to membership the following men: 
Joseph McKimiey, Loren Reed, Burgett Manhardt, Julian Austin, Harlan 
Miller, liussel Tucker, Eobert Strickler, Kell Ferguson, Stanley Yants, Virgil 
R. Mullins, Clements. 

The predominating spirit of the organization may well be expressed by 
the slogan "Quality Rather Than Quantity." 



Ciceronean 




RusscU Tucker 
Herman Richie 
Hobart CromwcU 



John Gross 
Frank Grov, 
Robert E. S 
Loren Reed 



Manhardt Harlan Miller 

.ustin Virgil MuUins 

chinnerer Kell Furgcson 



3sr. >:^. 



^letfjenai 

Fi.owERs — Pink Tea Rose. Colors — Green and Grold 

The Alethenai Literary Society was organized as a debating society at the 
beginning of the Fall term 1!)06, the membership was limited to twelve mem- 
bers and the meetings were held every two weeks. The charter members were 
Helen Crane, Eosa Dell, Addie Juday, Mabel Lovett, Myrtle Ross, Ora Stall- 
ings, Elsie Denny, Clora Sexson, Clara AVright, and Ethel Burton. 

In 1914 a new constitution was drawn up. The meuiltership of the society 
was increased to forty and the interests broadened so tluit its purpose now in- 
cludes anything wliich promotes culture, refinement, and education. 

Although the society was not active during the fall term, this year has 
been quite successful. At the beginning of the winter term the society was re- 
organized with tlie following officers : Berniece Burk, president; Mabel Church- 
man, vice-president: Georgia Baker, secretary; Helen Milks, treasurer. The 
modern drama was studied and proved to be a very interesting and profitable 
line of work. The officers were Rosa Schwartz, president; Edith Olbrich, vice- 
president; Georgia Baker, secretary; Myrtle Bray, treasurer. Representative 
authors of the different countries were used as topics for discussion at the 
weekly meetings. Parliamentary drill was an imjiortant part of each program. 

Quoting from a discussion by Miss Xeil, 1915; 'Tf the Avord, Alethea, has 
the relation that its form indicates to the word, alethenai the latter means, ac- 
cording to translation from the Greeks, truth, the ones that it should suggest 
to future members, true effort." With this thought in mind, "Alethenai" has 
really meant to us true effort and we hope that in the future as in the jiast, 
tiie Alethenai Literary Society will continue to stand for her true effort in 
some field of literature by the means of an efficient program, careful preparation 
on the part of each member, thoughtful preparation and kind, helpful criti- 
cism. 



^letftenai 



m9m 




:\ 



iV ^ ' !.j 



^ 4>^ m 



Jewel Ferguson Albcrtine Glei 

Mabel Churchiran Vola Potts 

Geraldine Nicfcclson Dorothy Whit 

Helen Hawkins Dorothy Gleni 

Myrtle Miller Georgia Bakci 



Elvada Tcssm.i 
Mary Henry 
Irene Boots 
Volta Edwards 



Rosa Schwartz Helen Milks 

Myrtle Bray Frieda Ferguso 

Gretchen McFarland Emma Mc Quit 



>T» 



>:^. 



Baebalian 



The S. A. T. C. rejrinie diirino: the fall term made effective work on the 
part of the Daedalian Literary Society almost impossible. [Iowe\er, ivgular 
meetings Avei'e held at which short literary programs were given. The old 
Daedalians returning for the fall term were Harry Boyle, Otis AVilson, Thomas 
McGnire, Elarnest Campbell, John Young, Vane IJutherfoi-d. and Clitford Fred- 
erick. At the beginning of the winter term J. Cai'lton Hannah, Thomas Arvin. 
Eollin Schafer, Glenn C^ii-tis. Mai-k Gantz. Fitzhugh Tayk.r, and Frank 
McLaughlin re-entered school as active members, and Major Birch Bayh. an 
honorary member, took his place on the faculty. 

The chief purpose of the Daedalian Literary Society is to develop literary 
talent and train its members for public sj^eaking. But the social side of col- 
lege life is not neglected. Plans are noAV being made for the annual banquet, 
the boat ride and the Forest Park picnic as well as other social "stunts". The 
Daedalians have always been represented on the Inter-state Debating Teams. 
They have won six out of eight Inter-Society Debates, four of them cunsecutive 
victories. Daedalianisni with all its cares and i)leasures means much to those 
who have enjoyed its associations. It sets a high standard of ht)nor, honesty, 
courage, and patriotism, and re(iuires all to be up and doing to maintain the 
standard. 

Baebaltan Honor 3^oIl 

:\[ajor Birch E. Bayh. L>nd Lt. Fred Allen, Thomas E. Arvin, S-t. Paul 
Gwinn. '2nd Lt. J. Carlton Hannah, Edgar Hunt. Harry Bovle, Corji. Frank 
Paddock, Kay B. Miller, Sgt. Hale Pickett. Harvey E.' Stork. I'ud Lt. (^irl 
Miller, A. R. A'an Cleave, Sgt. (First Class) Wendell Wright. Carroll All. 
Willard Hill. Fitzhugh Taylor. Ezra Eawley. Wayne Allison, Otis Wilson. 
Fonzo Martin. Earnest Campbell, Corp. Vane P. Pntheiford. Cliiford ^^ Fred- 
ei-ick, Paul Johnson. Corj). Palph I. Andei'son. Nelson Schroeder, Corp. Palph 
Irons, William McPheeters, (\)rp. Jacob Abiehling. Pussell Colbert, J. Hubert 
Little, Lafay Drake, Edwin Boots, Edgar Peagan. AA'alter P. Mehringer. 2nd 
Lt. Vernon K. Storms, Glenn Curtis, Lawrence Iloj^per, Luther A. Lockwood, 
2nd lit. Raljjh Schenck, 2nd Lt. George Kerr, Arle Sutton, 1st Lt. Henry 
Knauth, John lirandon, 1st Lt. George M. lAwsler, 2nd Lt. Paul Musselman, 
Sgt. Rolliu Schafer. Paul E. Harris. Howard Bell. Joe Lundergun. Ermal 
Move, Sgt. Benj. Stevenson, Corp. Mark Gantz, Ivan Pickhardt, 2nd Lt. 
Herman Byrne, Clyde Rogers, Sgt. Wm. L. Bass, Roy E. IMaxwell, John W. 
Orman, 2nd Lt. Ralph Sechler, Richard Sigler, J. C. Tranbarger, Max AMieeler, 
Llovd C. Whelan, Chas. Willis Dome, Shirley S. Orman, J. Freeman Pyle, 
Corn. II. E. Childress, and 2nd Lt. Wendell Shauner. 



JBaebalian 




Arlc Sutton 
Russell Colbert 
Walter Mehringcr 



J. Carlton Hannah Edwin Boots 

Harry Boyle John Young 

Fitzhugh Traylor Otis Wilson 
Frank McLaughlin 



Hubert Huebner Thcmas , 

Rolland Schafer Clyde Vo 

Jake Machling Vane Ru 



I. s. 3sr» 



^fjilomatijean 



The Philoiiiiithean Liteiaiy vSociety was oiiianized on January l*i, ]!K)9, 
by eight younii- wduumi of the school, the Philomathean Literarv and Debating 
Society. The nienibers were assisted in the organization of the society by Pro- 
fessor James L. Lardner, head of the Department of Public Speaking, who 
kindly drew up the first constitution and offered helpful suggestions. The 
charter members were Anna Pie]5enbrink, Elizabeth Ellis, Margaret Yunker, 
Mae Lamb, Beulah Keinhart. Margaret Ilardie, Eunice Asbury, and Pearl 
Crossgrave. 

The Philomathean Literary Society was reorganized in lOlf) and since 
then the members have devoted one afternoon each week to the study of litera- 
ture and art, and have found the work to be both pleasant and profitable. The 
programs given this year have been of a diversified chaiacter and have covered 
diiferent subjects of musical and literary nature. The latter part of the year 
has been devoted to study of various phases oi war literature, including poetry, 
dramas, and great peii^onalities who figured in the world war. 

The officers of the society are: Evelyn Wills, president; Katherine Jarvis, 
vice-president; Winifred Stewart, secretary-tn-asurer; INIabel Euqna, cor- 
responding-secretary; Dorothea Wveth, parliamentarian: ^Mildred Sine. ])ian- 
ist; Estelie Perkins, chorister; Jeanette Landrum, artist, and Blanche Allen, 
librarian. The other members of the society including those recently initiated 
are Ruth Turman, Gladys Brown, Ellen Modesitt. Elsie Foltz, Helen Kennedy, 
Margaret Zerbe, Tsa JNIullikin, Martha Newell, Esther Hance. Anne Malone, 
Hazle AVills, Euth Swearingen, Vivian Bard, Gladys Spencer. Helen McCul- 
lough, Gertrude Kanzleiter, Edna Bennett, Hazel Oliphant, Virginia Davis, 
Mary Hollis, Florise Hunsucker, Mabel Hood, and Beulah Chappelle. 

AVhile the society is organized for the study of literature and art that is 
not the only benefit derived by the members. It has been the means for a closer 
friendship which will last through the years to come, and the spirit of Philo- 
mathean will have a lasting eifect on all who have belonged to the society. 



■#■ 



^fjilomatfjean 




Gladys Spcn 



Kathcrine Jarvis Mary Ho 

Gladys Brown Dorothea Wyeth Hazel WiUs 

Winnifred Stewart Virginia Davis ~ ' ~' 

Mabel Fuqua Mabel Hood 

Margaret Zerbe Ellen Modisctt 



Florice Hunsucfcer Esther Hance Ruth Turman 

Edna Bennett Gertrude Kanzleitcr Mildred Sine 

Evelyn Wills Helen McCuUough Isa MuUlkin Jeanette Landru: 

Bculah Chappelle Lelah Stephens Ruth Swearingen Hazel Oliphant 

Blanche AUen Estelle Perkins 



3sr. 



>:^. 



Jforum 



Founded 1901 
Colors— Old Gold and Black 



Mtmbtti 



Glen Clodfelter. Greencastle. Ind. 
Caspar Clark, Francesville, Ind., 
Kav AVarinoiith. Stilesville, Ind., 
He'rla-rt Lahr. IJippiis. Ind.. '19 
George Pell. Brazil, Ind., '20 
Walter Zerbe, Terre Haute, Ind., 
John R. Lloyd, Terre Haute, Ind. 
Paul Harris, Terre Haute. Ind., ': 
Paul Witty, Terre Haute, Ind., ': 
Lee Fox, Bicknell, Ind.. 'I'O 
Raymond Harter, Xapanee, Ind. 
Paul Asher, (ios])ort, Ind., '20 



, '20 

"19 

19 



'21 
. '21 
21 

20 



Lewis Long, Bowling Green, Ind., '21 
Ralph Brandenburg, Clav Citv, 

Ind., '22 
Clarence Lloyd, Cayuga, Ind., '22 
William Pribble, Cayuga, Ind., '22 
"Wm. Crone, Martinsville, Ind., '21 
Andi'ew Crawford, Terre Haute, 

Ind., '22 
Albert Woolen, Terre Haute, Ind., '20 
Thomas Richert, Terre Haute, Ind., '22 
Harold Merrill, Anderson, Ind., '21 



Herl)ert Abbott, Huntington, Ind., '22 
Vern Rice, Terre Haute, '20 



The past year has been a peculiar one on account of the war. During 
the fall term there were no regular officers or meetings on account of the S. A. 
T. C. The Winter quarter found the body back in full swing with many old 
members returning from the army. The following were officers during this 
term: Ray Warmouth, president; Paul Witty, vice-iiresident ; Walter Zerbe, 
secretary, and Paul Asher, treasurer. The Spring term found the Forum 
House at 507 N. Fifth street filled to its capacity. The following officers 
were elected for the term : Glen Clodfelter, president ; Paul Asher, vice-presi- 
dent ; Herbert Lahr, secretary, and Lee Fox, treasurer. 

Fifty-seven Forum men are or have been in the army and the present 
body eagerly awaits the return of our brothers now overseas. 



Jforum 




Raymond Warmouth Paul Ashcr 

William Pr.bbk Vernon Richarl 

Paul Witty Lewis Long 
Clarence Lloyd 



Ralph Brandenburg John Lloyd Harold Mcrril 

William Crone Albert Woolen Walter Zerbe 

Glenn Clodfelter Paul Harris George Pell 

Raymond Harter Caspar Clark 



I. JS. >.T. 



eclectic 

The Eclectic Literary Society has just finished the sixth chapter of its 
history. It was organized February (5, 1913, with the assistance of Mr. Wisely, 
wlio made the first constitution and Ity-laws. The society started with fifteen 
cliarter inenil)ers. 

Tlie i)urpose of tlie society has Iteen to promote the art of pulilic sjicalving; 
and to o-ive knowledge along the lines of art, science, literature and travel. 
This pni'pose has been thoroughly carried out in the effective work done in the 
last year. 

At the opening of the fall term, the following members answered to roll 
call : Lois Duvall, Lois Payton, JNIamie Overpeck, Belle Painter, Olive Stew- 
art, Ora McReynolds, and Ethel Eunyan. During the winter, the following 
members were admitted to the society : Lucille Bauman, Evangeline Hildreth, 
Charlotte Kruzan. Hazel (Irenard, Naomi Grenard, Dessie Nickels, Evelyn 
Robinson, Glenn Asher, Inda AA'ise. Ethel Seward. Rachael Wilhite. Erma 
Kent, Euby Keeling, Pearl I!op]x's, Bertha Hughes, Clara Allen, Eleanor 
Taylor, Ruth Lee, Beulali Fisher, I)eli)ha Sefrit, Mai-guerite O'Connell, and 
Zelia Kester. 

At the opening of the spring term, Bessie Erwin and Martha Shively 
again joined the ranks while Erma Kint, Lois Duvall and Zelia Kester Avith- 
drew. 

The work this year has been devoted to the study of modern writers. The 
writers whose lives and works have l>een studied were: Arnold Bennett, John 
Galsworthy, Maurice Maeterlinck, Bernard Shaw, Clyde P'itch, and Oscar 
Wilde. Along with this, current events and parliamentary law were studied. 
At many meetings the society was favored by music and readings rendered by 
its members. 

Although there was no extensive social activity, yet the social side was not 
wholly neglected by the Eclectics. At the beginning of each term, an informal 
tea was given for prospective members. The annual picnic will be given the 
first of June. 

The members to be graduated are: Marguerite O'Connell, Lois Duvall, 
Lois Payton, Lucille Bauman, Mamie Overpeck, Evelyn Robinson, Dessie 
Nickels, Delpha Sefrit, Eleanor Taylor, Ei-ma Kint, Ora McReyonlds, Hazel 
Grenard, Bessie Erwin, Ethel Seward, and Inda Wise. 

The members have found the years' work and association together very 
pleasant. 



eclectic 




Mamie Overpecfc Hazel Grenard 

Lucille Bauman Marguerite O'Con 

Inda Wise Erma Kmt 

Pearl Hoppes Ora McReynoIds 



Naomi Grcnari 
Rachael Wilhit. 
Lois DuvaU 
Dessic Nickels 



Clare / Men Ethel Seward 

Evangeline Hildreth Charlotte Kruz 

Lois Payton Bertha Hughes 



isr. 



tS^rojan 



The Trojan Literary Society, oro-anizeil in Api-il. 1914. lias just jiasseil 
the fifth mile-stone of her history. And its nienihers may well l.e proud of 
that history. It is with <i-reat pleasure and i)ride that a new member listens io 
the "Tales of the Trojans of Ohl" and emeriivs from the same with an inspira- 
tion which gives him a vision and a task. 

The aim of tlie founders of this society was to develop self-confidence and 
increase jjersonality among its memliers. The Society welcomes men of wis- 
dom, men of ]K)wer. men who will excr keep in mind the glory of the Trojans; 
but far nH}re her desires are for men of character, men of princijde and vision, 
men Avho hold foremost in their thoughts the welfare of their fellow students 
and their Alma Mater, 

Because of war conditions, the membershi]) has been rather small but with 
the return of several men who have l)een in military service, activities are again 
increasing. Many of these men have seen overseas service and have proved 
themselves to be gallant sons of Liberty and who were not ready to return 
nntil "it was over over there." 

The regulai' meetings of the society have been very beneficial to its mem- 
bers. Debating (juestions of current history, discussions on chosen topics of 
interest, parliamentary drill, etc.. have all found a place on tlie weekly program. 

In athletic activities, the Trojans lived up to their standards bv having 
four men on the basket ball s(iuad and a goodly representation on the baseball 
team. 

The jjresent membership of twenty-one men extends greetings and best 
wishes to all associate and honorary members not in school at the present time, 
and issues to them an invitation to visit Old Xormal and the society. 

The Trojan Seniors and other mei 
missed and those remaining bid them 
wards, in turn, remain with those who ; 



l)ei 


■s who ] 


leave this vear \\\\] be sai 


h 


eartv (i 


lod-s])eed. The Seniors' 


e t 


o be thi 


" Trojanites of 11)1!)-1920. 



■^ 



Trojan 




ludson Stark 
Hobart Batr 
Ralph Harris 



Edson Wisely Dean Pattison 

Lawrence Knaub William Dow 

Harry Winters Fay Wall 

RusseU Binning: ;. G. Kirkhan 



Paul Addison 
Harold Tower 
RoUie Brookin 
Hoytc Spcnsei 



3sr. 



^£ipct)olosp d^t^tanf) Club 

On the twenty-ninth of Junnury, 1018, a o-roup of students interested in 
Psychology and research work oro-anized, nnder the direction of Dr. Rudolph 
Achcr. the psycliolouical Research Association. The membership at the end of 
its first term had i.',ro\\ ii from the ori<>-inal eleven to fifteen. Many interesting 
jihases of psychological work were presented and interest among the members 
was high. 

Due to the various interruptions during the fall quarter last year the club 
was not re-organized until after Chri.stmas. The name has been changed to 
the Psychological Kesearch Club. The work of this year has dealt with the 
sul)conscious mind. 



Charter ifflfmbers: 

Frieda Ferguson 
Zoe Lamb 
Nelle Duncan 
Paid Gard 
Frances Donovan 
Joy Phillips 
Fa"irie I'hillips 
Ross Graham 
Carol Newell 
Harry Doyle 
Dean Pattison 



atctibe Mtmhtri 



Frieda Ferguson 
Jewel Ferguson 
Marv Hollis 
Eveivn Wills 
Hazel Wills 
Jeanette Landrum 
Mable Fuqua 



Farie Phillipf? 
Carol Newell Pettus 
Rutha McCullum 
Margaret Hall 
Cecil Austin 
Dean Pattison 



Dr. and Mrs. Acher 

Mr. and Mrs. Breitwieser 

Miss Joy Mnchmore 

Dr. Rettger 

Mr. Welborn 

INIr. Woodrow 



0- 



^s;pcf)ologj> Eesiearcft Club 




I. S. 3ST. 



I?. M. c. a. 



The work done l)y the Y. M. C. A. in the Fall term was like that done by 
the "Y" in the army camps. The Stndent Army Training Ct)rps of the school 
came into existence during the first and second weeks of the Fall term and pre- 
sented problems of the army as the men were quartered in tiie Normal build- 
ings. 

The first day of the term found Mr. H. J. Thompson on the groiuids as 
"Y" secretary sent here by the A^ational War AVork Council. Through the aid 
given by him, many plans were worked out for the work to be done by this 
organization. 

The first Friday night, a reception was given the student soldiers and the 
girls of the school in which the men were initiated into the army life. 

When the influenza struck camp, a new field was o})ened for activity be- 
sides the distribution of writing material and other supplies which had to be 
done. Reading material and games were placed in the many hospitals by men 
of the Y who ^^■ere not in the S. A. T. C. When Mr. Thompson became the 
victim of the epidemic. Dean Pattison took his place as .secretary and with the 
help of Thomas Mc(iuire, the men were given the Y service. 

With the (>i)ening of the Winter Term many old men were b:u-k in school, 
chief of whom was Major Birch Bayh. This added new spirit to the work 
as he was the faculty rejii-esentative who went to Indianapolis to a state con- 
ference, coming baciv iieli>ing put on the Discussion (Ironp program, whic'h 
was the work done in the ^^'inter term. 

The Spi-ing term brought the election of Robert Strickler, Pres. ; Dean 
Pattison, Vice-1'res. ; and Edwin Boots, Sec.-Treas. The State Officer's Con- 
ference was held at the City Y. W. C. A., April 11, 12, 13, where Ro.se and 
Normal entertained forty-fi\e men. Following this was the great thing of the 
year, "Dad Elliott"' was here for three days holding a series of meetings be- 
tween Rose and Normal. These were the genesis of a new spirit life for 
Normal which is hoped will be carried on during the remainder of the year by 
the ten or fifteen men who attend the Lake (xeneva Conference. June 13 to 22. 



I. 



s. 



3sr. 




^Ck_ Visitation Committee MJ- Thomfson Bible Study DisciLssion Group leaders 




Edson \i^lyi 




L 

^lSagLl^f%V:;Bi , ,^Robert Strickler JilcmiR^dMrtori . 



f^ 

^ 




Tred Arm strong Alvm Didchaut Russet Colbert Rollie Brooking 




\ YMCA. Office DeanFattrson, Pres. Y.M.C.A. Quartet. 



s. 



3sr. 




Bemiece Burk 



Frieda Ferguson 



Georgia Baker 



Jeanette Landmm Myrtle Mil 



Jewel Ferguson 



§. Wi. c a. 



The Fall term opened very iiiaiispiciously for the Y. W. C. A., the "flu" epidemie stop- 
Ijiiiii- all the plans that had heen made. In the Winter and Sjjrini-- Quarters, however, the 
irirls made up for lost time. Each term a reception was liiveu hv the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. 
C. A. These aifairs did an invaluable service in makin<i- the student body acquainted with 
each other. Several delightful teas were also given at the Student Building. 

At the opening of the Sj^ring term. Miss Hazel Bent, the Student Secretary of the Cen- 
tral Field, spent a few davs at I. S. N. S. She ]5roved a great inspiration to the girls and 
cabinet oiticers alike. During the term, a Mid-sjjring recejjtion was 'jiven in addition to the 
one at the opening of the (fuarter. The first week in May, five of the officers attended a Cabi- 
net Council at Charleston, 111. 

The Social Service Committee has done sulendid work. Y. ^V. C. A. girls under the 
dii-ection of this committee, have been doing playground work at the Settlement House. 
Otihers have helped in the Americanization movement in the eastern part of the city. Plans 
are on foot to extend the scope of this work during the summer. 

The l)iggest feature in the year for the Y. W. C. A., however, was the starting of the 
"Big Sifter" nio\-ement. The new students were met at the station, helped to find rooms and 
to register, and in every way possible were made to feel that the older girls had a pleasant 
interest in them. 

The officers for the past year were: Naomi Grenard, i)resident; Jeanette Landrum, 
vice-president; Gladys Spencer, secretary, and Myrtle Millei', treasurer. For the coming- 
year, Estelle Perkins has been elected president; Marion Davis, vice-pi'esident; Mildred 
HanseJ, secretary, and Gladys Spencer, treasurer. 

The work will be carried on during the summer by the Vice-President. The Y. W. C. 
A. is looking forward to a year full of happy association and splendid service. 



^ 



I. 



^s. 



2sr. 



^t. tlCfjomasJ Aquinas; Club 



The St. TlKiniMs A(|uinMs Cliil. was (.i-o-miu/amI in is'.is to .n 
aii.l ivli-ious needs „f the Cntlidlir students at Xoruial. Since tli 
been in active operation. 

Tile \v(,rk nf the .diii> lia. I.een in tiie main tlie studv of i 
Doctrine: l.ut as occasion otlere.l. it lias l.ranciied off froiii liiis w, 
of ciin-ent interest iiave lieen stinlied. Some attention lias l.ee 
term to social functions. 

'J-he cliih ivoi-ani/.ed at the heo-innin- of the >|)i-in- <|iia 
elected oHicers. and outlined a course of work to he carried out dm 
Enthusiastic meetin-s held each week promise a suc<-essful year 

The ollicers elected for the term are: Edward Riehl. pre 
Evrnrd, vice-president, and Mariiuerite OX'onnell. secretary. 



he Chi 
rk and 



in- the 
for th< 



^ttibc iWembers 



(Miarles Edward Uiel 
Emma MeCiiiirk 
Edith OU.rick 
Bessie Brown 
Marguerite O'C'onnell 
Robert Montague 
Fred J. Evrard 
Albertine (illeeson 
Minnie Arvin 
Anne Colley 
lone Fersich 
Laurentia Lynam 
Bernadine Zellers 
Anna IJyan 
Loretta Lynam 



riev 



Amie Cu: 
Loretta (' 
Clara Thie 
Elizabeth Etuire 
Helena Miller 
Alma .AI. Hopkins 
Bernadeth Hopkins 
Olivia Pierard 
Albert McLachlin 
Nellie Heaton 
Clara Breinig 
Leo Clements 
Anna Wood 
Mai-oaret Dodt 



175 



3>sr. 



S^ememtirance 



When college da^vs are long in the dark jjast and our future selves look 
back upon our Alma Mater what is the spot in the old school that will shine 
golden? Shall we remember the lessons in psychology and physiology and 
grammar and Latin that we so patiently toiled over by the midnight lamp? 
Some of us will. Shall we remember the Prof, who guided our youthful minds 
into the pathway of truth ? Surely some of the great hearted, broad minded, be- 
loved teachers we shall never forget. Shall we recall the faces of even our 
classmates and those who seem now to us to populate the world? Doubtless 
some of us shall go through life together with a never-ending friendship, live 
together and die for one another like Damon and Pythias or perhaps die and 
be buried together like Abelard and Eloise. But these things will fade — life's 
care and joys will bring new lessons to be solved — to idols and adoration of new 
friends, but nothing in our afterlives can compare Avith the social side of col- 
lege life. It is upon the parties and dances, the teas and moonlit boatrides, 
the picnics, the friendly formal meetings of our literary societies, and religious 
organizations, the hourly recess gatherings at our corners, it is upon these things 
that the bright light of golden remembrances will shine in the days to come 
when college days are gone. 

And so, oh aspiring j'oung pedagogues with your book worniish spectacles ! 
scorn not the frivolities of the pages just gone by! Store up in your hearts 
these pages, fill your fancies with the dreams you have dreamed, Avith the dances 
you have danced, and the friends you have loved. They will pass as youth 
will pass and in years to come these pages will be the ones where you will find 
recorded the life of vour college life ! 



^ 




^tJjleticsi 



3sr. 



^tfjletic J^oarb 




Herman Richey President 

Helen Ehrenhardt A^ice-President 

Vane liutlierford Treasurer 

Mande Hays Secretary 

Prof. Gillum Faculty Eepresentative 

Otis Wilson Basket Ball Manager 

Ray Warmouth Base Ball Manager 

D. Mal)el Churchman Tenis Manager 

178 



3ST. 




Top Row — Hannah, Binning, Schinnerer, Daughcrtv. 

Middle Row — 'Wilson. Mgr. Jones, Williams, Capt. Bayh, Coach. 

Bottom Row — 'Winter, Cunningham. Curtis. 



I. 



isr. 



>:^. 



?Bagfeett)aU 




The varsity basket ball scjiiad of 1918-19 eontimied the splendid 
record made in tliis line of sjiort in previous j'ears by retaining the 
city championship for the third consecutive year and finishing tlie 
season with a firm hold on tliird place in the I. C. A. L. Wabash 
again won first place while the Earlham College quintet was award- 
ed second place by virtue of the 40-25 defeat handed to our team in 
the only game played between the two schools. 

The season's record demands no 
alibis, but yet it is only fair to 
say that several things proved a 
handicap at the beginning of the 
season. Coach Bayh. who de- 
serves a great deal of credit for 
the splendid work of the team, 
was not discharged from military 




service until late in December and 
did not resume his work here un- 
til the opening of the Winter 
Quarter. This gave him the mam- 
moth task of developing a team 
in a few weeks to compete witli 
teams havhig the advantage of "Bmy" wmiams 

several months' practice. Another handicap was that the school 
gymnasium was used by the S. A. T. C. unit until the time the unit 
was broken up. The Y. M. C. A. floor, where all Normal games are 
usually played, was closed for repairs, so no i)hice for early jiractice 
was available. Later, all practice had to be held in our small gym- 
na.sium while the games were played on the K. of C. floor. How- 
ever, these handicaps only served to make the work of the season 
shine the brighter. 




I. 



3sr. 



>JS. 



A ]i\vge squad answered the first call for i>ractice, incliulin) 
Jones, AVinter, Sehiniierer. IJinniiiji, Wisely, Addison. Koyer. Cnn 
nin<>hani. I)aiio:hei-tv, Vonnts, Kerr, Harter and Coiling. At th- 
end' of the first week, 'Mark" Ilaiinali, a letter nnui of IC-IT entere( 
school from military service and the followintj week, basket l)ai 
prospects took a sudden jump with the return of (Jlen Curtis, i 
varsity man of several years ago, and of Herb Curtis and "Billy 
"Williams star guard combination of 1('>-17. Work then began in rea 
earnest. 

At the first meeting of the squad, "Billy" was chosen as captaii 
and proved to be a scrappy, aggressive leader. Jones and Winter 
early showed marked ability to 
team together at forward and 
were chosen by Coach Bayh for 
those ])ositions. Herb Curtis was v* 

shifted to center and proved to be 
a good j)ivot man. Glen Curtis 
worked with Capt. Williams at 
guard until he left school to take 






a jMisitiou, and Cunningham was 
sent in as guard. Hannah, Binn- 
ing and Schrinerer were reliable 
substitutes and were used in most 
of the games. 

A glance at the season's record 
tells the story of the fight for the 
op«.» -'"'""' city championship. The first game 

was easily won by a score of 41 to 22 but, in the second, the Engineers 
sprung a surprise and won by a score of 26 to 22 in a thrilling con- 
test. With the championship at stake, the team was equal to the 
test and won the last game by a score of 32 to 17. thanks to the play- 
ing of every member of the .squad and the loyalsupport of the facul- 
ty and student body. 

Cai)t. AA'illiams. "Tubby" Curtis and "Jack" Hannah were play- 
ing their last year for old 1. S. N. This leaves Jones, AVinter, Bin- 
ning, Cunningham and Schinnerer and with this nucleus. pros])ects 
for a winning team next year are very bright. 



■#■ 



X. 



3sr, 




]sr. 





r— ra 


-r,^ 


^^^^^""^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ 


■11 


, 


bk. ^ari 


^ 


' '^ ^^B 




9^ A. 1 




k i^. 


1 


M^^^«iyM^BH^H. f^^^^^^^^^H 


n 





3sr. 



>:^. 






PageftaU 



Not content with luivino- liad one of the best basket 
ball records in recent years the school athletes got busy 
at the very beginning of the baseball season and have 
developed a team that bids fair at present to even eclipse 
the glory of the basket-ball record. For the first time in 
four years the Teachers have an undisputed title to the 
city chaniiiionshii) by defeating Rose Poly in the first 
two games of the series. Even now, as the Annual goes 
to press, the men are waiting eagerly for the chance to 
annex the I. C. A. L. championshi]) in the game with 
Franklin College on June 3, and Pres. Parsons, who has 
a rare gift of prophecy in Normal athletic contests, says 
"It is not a question of whether or not we are going to 
win, but a question of how large the score will be." 

Coach Bayh had a good bunch of men to pick from 
at the beginning of the season and has developed a 
smooth-working baseball machine. Kerr, star hurler for 
the last two years, entered school at the ojDening of the 
Spring Quarter and has been going better than ever this 
season. His work has stamped him as one of the best, if 
not the best, college pitcher in the state. Crawford, a new 
man from Normal High School, and Whitmer, a fresh- 
man from Clay City High School, have proved them- 
selves pitchers of ability and have been able to lessen the 
burden for Kerr considerably. 



mx 




-^M 



X. 



Tsr. 




"Cap" Clark returned from military service in 
to take his ref-Milar plaee behind the hat and is playin 
his last year in splendid form. 

his fourth and last year for X< 



AVilson. p 



nd this y> 

no- down second 1 

ear letter man. as 



tlv honored with tiie rapta 



is hoh 



miral)ly with Clodfelter. a two- 
e side-partner at short. Winter, 
the "demon slu--i:er" of the team of I'-'IT and lmsket-l)all 
star, easily reii'ahied his old position at the far corner and 
is playing- up to 



d-time form. The only place left 
vat'ant for a new man was at the initial sack and '-Pea- 
nuts" Eauseh, a Garfield star, stepped in here without any 
difficulty and completed one of the hest inHeld nia.-hiues 
that has represented the old Blue and AVhite for several 
years. 

■•Mike" Schiunerer. John Youni:-. and Johnny Lloyd 
stepped into their old places in the outfield and have 
formed a ji'ood combination there. "Billy" AVilliams, a 
basketball star, has been holdino- down the job of f.eneral 
utility man. Other members of the s(|uad are Addison, 
Siss(m. :NrcLauohlin. Ilarr. DeBaum, and Wayne. 

A«i-ain, as in basket ball, the record tells its own story. 
With almost no practice at all. the team met Indiana 
University at Bloomington and were defeated in a hotly 
contested game by a score of 4 to 1 for the oidy defeat of 
the season to date. 

The "Fighting Engineers" were humbled in the first 
game at Rose Field by a score of 7 to 1. Not yet satisfied, 
the Blue and White came back and put the series on ice in 
the second game by a score of 4 to '2. Kerr pitched both 
games and had the Engineers at his mercy at all stages. 
With a third game scheduled for June C. we hope to be 
able to make a clean sweep of the series and, with a de- 
cisive victory over Franklin in the championship fracas, 
the season's triumph will be completed in every way. 

Capt. Wilson and Clark are the only men lost by 
o-radnation this year and jjrospects for the next few years 
to come are verv bright. 



A N 



a 



i 






I. 



3sr. 




The record of the season to date is as follow; 



Indiana Univer 


sity . . 


....4 




S. 


N 


1 


Mcroni Colle^-e 




... .0 




S. 


N 


20 


K. L8. N 




....1 




S. 


X 


IS 


Mci'oni Colle£i'e 




. . . . 5 




s 


N 


8 


St. Jo.seph 




. . . .2 




S. 


X 


4 


Tvose Polv . . . . 




....1 




s. 


N 


7 






. . . . 5 




s 


X 


28 


U,)se Polv . . . . 








s. 


N 


4 



The games remaining on the schedule are: 
.May 29— E. I. S. N., at Charleston. 
May 30 — 'St. Viators, at Kankakee. 
May 31 — St. Josephs, at Collegeville. 
June 3 — Franklin College, at Franklin. 
June fi — Eose Poly, at Parsons Field. 




3sr. 



>!^. 




l>q-. 



Ztrni^ 




For iiiiiiiy years ])iist Normal has never tiken a very great interest in the game of tennis. 
In 1917 sexeral fellows were out for the ''Try-o;its" and some vei'v good material showed n|). 
Last year nothing was done to encourage the si)ort owing to the scarcity of men. But this 
year, there came a keen interest for the net game through the efforts of Manager ]\Ia1)el 
Cliurchman and Coach 15ayh. Although their plans for this season have not met with total 
success their efforts l\a\e not l)een in \'ain for a solid foundation has been laid for the sport 
next year. Normal was repi'csented at the I. C. A. L. this year by the Messrs. Frank (irove 
and Joseph McKinney, the "kScircleville Stars." The boys made a good showing and will 
make it very (if not too) interesting for the Rose strikers at the Normal-Kose meet June 7th 



I. 



l^^^. 




IbT. 



^racfe 





» iff 



'^-^ b .- 



'Jc, ~''jr^--' 



WaU, Managi: 



• Lloyd 



Knaub. Capt. 



The war raiistnl a decline in tiie interest in track for the years 1!»L7 and 
191 s hut there are now indications of a revival in the track and field sports. 
Coach Bayli uiade a call for candidates early in the Spring term and the few 
men who responded, in addition to several high school stars from the Mid- 
spring term. ha\e lieen working daily at the gym, and at Parsons Field. 

On account of the strenuous work with the baseball squad Coach Bayh 
turned the work of the thin-clads o\-er to Manager Wall and Coach IJyrn of 
the Xormal High School. Among the men trying out for the various events 
on the track anil field are Capt. Knaul), Lloyd, Andrew, Lucas, Kvrard, ]Mun- 
hart, Kichart, Fisher. Nelson, Ivichey, Hoch.stetler, Rutherford and Kider. 



-^ 



T. 



3sr. 




Owing to the lute start and several injuries, none of tlie Nurniiil entries 
placed in the I. C A. L. meet at Franklin, the meet being won In- A^'al)ash. At 
the present time, however, more interest is being manifested and more time is 
being given to practice through the help of Coach Byrn; for on June 7. Xornial 
meets Rose Poly in a dual meet on the Rose P'ield. Notwithstanding the fact 
that Poly carried off one first and placed in several other events at the I. C. A. 
L. me«t, Normal has a good chance of carrying oif the honors in the meet with 
Poly. 

It is thought that by next year I. S. N. will have reached as high a plane 
in track as it has in baseball, basketball and tennis, for there are many men now 
in school who with practice and coaching will be able to bring this ancient 
sport to that level in which it should be. 



■^ 



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3ST. 



>:^. 




Yea. Bine. Yea, White 
Yea. Normal. Let's fight. 

Rah, Kah, Rah, 
Rah, Rah, Rah, 
Rah. Rah, Rah, 



X( 



Happy Ho()li.<.-an. (^Idomy Giis, 
What in the deuce is the matter with us? 
Stryrhnine. quinine, blood and dust, 
I. S. X. S., win or hust. 

Riff, Ratr, Chitr. Chatf. 

Let's give them the horse laugh 

Chee-hee, chee-haw 

Chee-haw-haw-haw 

Yea. Normal. 



Big Chief, little chief. 

Papoose, squaw, 

I. S. N. S., Rah, Rah, Rah. 

Sis Boom Rah 

Sis Boom Rah 

Yea Normal. Rah Rah. 

Yea Normal. Yea Normal. 
N-C)-R-M-A-L. Normal. 

Crickety rex, Crickety rex 

Crickety rex, Carew 

We're the gang from I. S. N. 

W\w the deuce are you? 
Osky. wow. wow, 
Skinny, wow. wow. 
Normal, w-o-w. 



team mu 'h appreciated th 
ition at the games and. wlu 



ipport of the 
iven at Chape 



During the haskethall season th 
organized yells which were an ins|)i 
r)f enthusiasm. 

Organized yelling is impossible without g )od leadership and with our lea<lers. CI 
Lloyd and F. B. Manhart, back again next yeir we expect Normal to yell louder, longe 
faster than she ever did before. 



ool with 
stimulus 



isr. 




ACTIVITIES 



■iiiii iii iiiiii 



I. 



isr. 



Oratorical Heague 



3M 



The Oratorical and Debating Leagne got away to a late start this year 
due to war conditions, as was true of most of the organizations. All plans of 
organizing the leagne at all this year were abandoned for some time, but late 
in the "Winter Quarter the Michigan State Xormal issued a challenge to the 
school to hold one del)ate at least instead of the customary dual debate. Prof. 
Bacon notified each class to select two representatives to the league and at the 
opening of the Spring Quarter, the election of officers was held. Carlton 
Hannah was elected president; D. Mabel Churchman, vice-jn'esident : Virgi! 
R. Muliins, secretary, and Jacob Maehling, treasurer. 

The debate with the Michigan State Normal at Ypsilanti was tlic only 
activity of the year for the league. Plans are under way at jDresent for several 
activities to put the league on a solid footing for the work next year. 



I. 



>T. 




]. CARLTON HANNAH 
Third Speaker 



;OHN YOUNG 
First Speaker 



HARLAN MILLER 
Second Speaker 



The Iiuliiuia State Ncii-nial Dehatiiiji- Team met the Mi 
mal team at Ypsihuiti. Mieh.. :May U>. liUi). for the only cU 



1 State N< 
)f the selu 



The question debated was, "llesolved. Tliat all state and local taxes should 
be derived from a single tax on the economic rent of the land." 

Our team argued the negative side of the question and advanced the classi- 
fied property and income tax. 

John Young, the first negative speaker, outlined the negative field and 
showed how the tendencies in modern taxation were toward the classified and 
income taxes. Harlan V. Miller, second speaker, advanced the arguments of 
the negative plan and showed how it worked where it was now in existence. 
Carlton Hannah, final negative, showed the weaknesses of the single tax and 
how it had never worked successfully. 

The negative based its argument upon practical solutions already in ex- 
istence as favored by the National Tax Association and showed the failure of 
the Single Tax by quotations from the Canadian premiers where the single tax 
in a modified form exists. 

By a clear misrepresentation of facts, the last affirmative rebuttalist dark- 
ened the sky for the negative and an affirmative decision was rendered. The 
decision surprised a goodly number of the audience as well as the negative team. 

The debate this year was jarepared in the .shortest possible time. A very 
few days were found for delivery and drill, but under the skillful coaching of 
Prof. Bacon, the debate Avas handled in such a manner as to leave no discredit 
upon either the representatives or the school. 



0- 



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>:^. 



Cijorug Clasig 




P"or its annual in-oduction this year iimler the direction of Prof. Lowell 
Mason Tilson. head of the music department, the Chorus Class gave a recital 
of Frederic H. Cowen's famous producticm, "The Hose :M;uden." An audience 
that filled the large Normal Hall to its fullest capacity greeted the first pro- 
duction and were enthusiastic in their praises. This is the first year that the 
solo parts have been carried hy Normal .students with no helj) from outside 
talent and the clas.s de.serves great credit on this accoimt. 

The soi)rano .soloi.sts, Misses Jean Gammack, Beulah Chapi)elle. Alberta 
Steele; alto. Miss E.stella Perkins; tenor, Mr. Herbert Lahr; baritone. Air. 
Eobert Strickler, pleased the audience with their careful rendering of the 
beautiful melodies. Tlie.se voices were as pleasing when blended in duets and 



^ 



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2>T. 



poarb of Control 




[ ' i 




f 



3sr. 



^regg Club 



Our Press Club is the newest orji inizatio.i in school. It had its orijiin away hack in 
January when Normal received an invitation to send a representative to Indianajjolis to a 
meeting to be held on Feb. 1. 1019. for the pur|)o.se of reoriranizini;- the Inter-collejrate Pres.s 
Association. This organization had existed previous to the war. but had been discontinued 
for obvious reasons. It was decided to send the Editor of the weekly Advance to the meet- 
ing. Earlham. Franklin. Purdue. Indiana University, and Butler were represented at the 
meeting. Suffic'ient interest was manifested among the delegates to make it advisable to re- 
organize the association. The work of women in the war and in other activities was recog- 
nized and it was decided to rewrite the constitution so that clubs of those schools which had 
women on the stall' of the schot)l paper might also become members. When the report of the 
meeting was given and the proposition to orguiize a Press Club in Normal agitated, it was 
looked upon favorably by the members of the Board of Control. 

On April 11 and 12, a convention of the Intercol legate Press Association wa> called at 
Franklin. Indiana, and Normal was invited t > send three voting delegates to this convention. 
Three representatives were sent. Miss Lucile Viehe, Editor of the Annital. Miss Myrtle Mil- 
ler. Editor of the Ad\ance. and Jacob Maehling, Advertising Manager of the Advance. 
The comeiition was a success and the three delegates came home eager to organize a Pi'ess 
Club of their own. 

After consulting Mr. Cunningham a joint meeting of AA'eekly and Annual stall's was 
called and the matter was discussed freely. A committee was appointed to draft a constitu- 
tion and bring it before the staff members. At the next meeting the constitution was con- 
sidered and adopted and the following officers elected: Myrtle Miller, president; Jacob 
Maehling, vice-iiresideut, and Esther Hance, secretary and treasurer. 

The purpose of the club is to affiliate with othei' Press Clubs of the various colleges and 
Universities of the state to discuss questions in connection with our publications, and to im- 
prove the general condition of our newspaper work. The club has met each week since its 
organization and had some very interesting discussions on such stibjects as "Journalism," 
"The Woman's Page" and the preparation of a Jiiodel paper. Mr. C. T. Jewett, city editor of 
the Terre Haute Star also came and discussed the general field of journalism, a discussion 
that was greatly appreciated by the clul) mem Iters. We are hoping that, although this is a 
new organization, it will grow and become etfective in the ftiture activities of the school. 

Each year during the Spring, a State Convention is held at one of the schools repre- 
sented in the Association. Normal, according to her entrance into the Association, has her 
ttirn in Ifliifi and we are hoping that long ere that time a strong club will have evolved and 
be able to do the honors of Normal royally t'j the visiting clubs. 

Cfjartcriilcmbers: 

Myrtle ^filler (leorgia Baker Iviith Swearingen 

Lucile "\"iehe Hazel Wills JNIarion Davies 

Jake :\Iaehling Paul Addison Matide Hays 

Jack Hannah Dean Pattison Kosa Schwartz 

Robert Strickler Frieda Ferguson Dorothy (ilenn 

Berniece Burk Esther Hance Herman Eichey 
Mark Shinnerer 



3sr. 



OTeefelp ^bbance ^tali 




EDSON WISELY MYRTLE MILLER FRIEDA FERGUSON DEAN PATTISON 

€bitorial ^taff 

Myrtle Miller Editor-in-chief 

Frieda Ferguson Associate Editor 

]\Iary Ilollis Literary and Society Reporter 

Paui Addison Athletic Reporter 

]\rarion Davies Exchanges 

Margaret Zerbe Local and Alumni Reporter 

Edson AVisely Business Manager 

Jacoli :\Iaehling Advertising :Manager 

Ruth Swearingen Asst. Advertising Manager 

Rol)ert Shanner Asst. Cir. (:Military) Manager, Fall 

Rollie r.rooking Cir. Manager, Fall 

Vane Rutherford Asst. Cir. (Local) Manager, Fall 

Dorotliy (ilenn Circulation ^Manager. Spring 

Rosa Schwartz V.sst. Cir. (Military) Manager, Spring 

Maude Hays Asst. Cir. (Local) Manager, Spring 

Georgia Baker Asst. Cir. (Local) Manager, Spring and Winter 

Dean Pattison General Treasurer 



^ 



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m 




3^ 



MABEL CHURCHMAN VANE RUTHERFORD DOROTHY GLENN JAKE MAEHLING 




MARY HOLLIS PAUL ADDISON MARION DA VIES MARGARET ZERBE 




RUTH SWEARINGEN ROB'T SHANNER GEORGIA BAKER ROLLIE BROOKING 



I. 



l^T. 



Annual ^bbance ^taff 




LUCILE VIEHE J. CARLTON HANNAH BERNIECE BURK 



Editor-in-chief Lucile Viehe 

Assistant to Editor-in-Chii'f Beniiece Buriv 

Business Manager I. Carlton Hannah 

Circulation Manager Mark Shinnerer 

Advertising Manager Herman Kicliey 

Assistant Advertising Manager Burget Manhart 

Military and Athletic Editor Robert E. Stricider 

Literary Editor Dorothea Wyetli 

Society Editor Esther Ilance 

Art Editor Elizabeth Hart 

General Treasurer Dean Pattison 

Senior Editor Harriet Huhhanl 

Junior Editor Vane Ivutherford 

Sophomore P2ditor Russell P>iiiiiiug 

Freshman Editor Hazel Wills 



^ 




ROBERT E. STRICKLER ESTHER HANCE ELIZABETH HART MARK SHINNERER 



% « 4^ % 



HERMAN RICHEY DOROTHEA WYETH BURGET MANHART DEAN PATTISON 




HAZEL WILLS RUSSELL BINNING VANE RUTHERFORD HARRIET HUBBARD 

wm^ ^^ 



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3sr. 




■^^ 



isr. 



T^e Normal Advance 



"The Normal Advance"" began work in tlie fall somewhat under dilli.-ul- 
ties. On account of the fact that the editor who had been elected in the 
spring was called into camp, a new editor had to be chosen. This was done 
at the first meeting in October. "Flu"" broke out shortly after and all work 
was suspended for the time being. AVhen school work was resumed the new 
editor was notified oi her election and as soon as possible the statf was organized. 
The new start' went to work in earnest and the first papei' was put out on 
November ;>6, 1918. 

During the year the start has worked togetlier well and faithfullv. School 
work has been quite heavy and therefore it hiis been necessary to make some 
changes from time to time. At the beginning of the Winter (|uaiter aftei' the 
members of the S. A. T. C. had been discharged, some changes occurred. Nelson 
Schroeder. the treasurer, withdrew from scliool to begin work in a local bank 
and Dean Pattison who had been S. A. T. C. and Athletic Ke)K)rter was ad- 
A-anced to treasurer. AVith the removal of the S. A. T. C. unit the men of the 
school became interested in athletics and Paul Addison bi'came the official 
reporter. 

Jacob Maehling found the work in the advertising department too heavy 
for one man and Ruth Swearingen was elected to be his assistant. Rollie 
Brooking began work in the Fall Quarter as circulation manager and was 
assisted by Robert Shanner and Vane Rutherford. Because of heavy work 
the first two men resigned and Mabel Churchman was elected to the manager- 
ship. She was a.ssisted by Dorothy (Jlenn. Vane Rutherford, and Georgia 
Baker. With the opening of the Spring Quarter, on account of illness ]\Iabel 
Churchman resigned and Dorothy (xlenn took her jjlace with Rosa Schwartz 
and Claude Hays as new assistants. The remainder of the stafi' have held 
throughout the year. 

All the members of the start have worked earnestly to keep the paper up 
to the old standard. A military section has been carried all along consisting 
of letters from our boys. This has proved very interesting to the readers both 
at home and across the seas. 

The school has continued to send the paper to our l)oys in service as a 
mejins of keeping in touch with Normal and we have received many letters 
from these boys expressing their keen delight and pleasure in receiving these 
15a per s. 

Special numbers Avere gotten out for Thanksgiving and Christmas with 
the emphasis placed on messages to the .soldier boys. Letters were written Ijy 
members of the faculty and various organizations of the .school expressing 
the greetings and good wishes of the faculty and students to the men in ser- 
vicer It is intended that a special number shall be gotten out for Homecoming 
week, with which number the year will be ended. The volume number is XXTV 
and with the la.st issue there will have been 27 numbers for the current year. 

As a whole, the year has proved a pleasant one and has been financially 
successful. It has been the purpose of all on the .start' to make the pajjer the 
best that time permitted and we hope the year has not been spent in vain. 



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To YOU WHOSE NAME AND 
FAME WE HAVE APPROPRIA- 
TED FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF 
FUN AND FROLIC; TO YOU WHOM 
WE HAVE CRUELLY USED IN THE 
HOPE OF BANISHING TEARS AND 
FROWNS FROM THE NORMAL 
WORLD; TO YOU WHO CAN LAUGH 
WITH THE REST OF THE CROWD, 
WE DEDICATE THE SPICE OF 
COLLEGE LIFE. 



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>T. 



%eflex ^Actions 



nswer to the young psychologist, 
but in siviii"- words a twist, 



High in the halls of science where the lal)s and things were found 
A class in dog-dissection the prof was gathered 'round. 
"Can dogs and cats remember? Xow think before you say !" 
"Yes," they smiled and answered, but a wise one answered, "Xay !" 

" 'Tis only reflex action, they neither think nor feel. 
They learn by imitation, but no such doing's real!" 

Then the prof spoke up in ; 

Whose joy was not in livinj. 

"Now lookee here, my lady, you say 'tis thus and so. 

But you're not dog or kitten, you're human, don't you know !" 

" 'Tis only reflex action. Experiments I've tried 

By hundreds and by thousands and I've read far and wide." 

Then ujjspoke the wise professor. "You're so certain that you know, 

Now listen to this story and tell me what is so : 

"A good lad strayed from home once and wandered far and wide. 
For years in crime he drifted, and then came home to hide. 
"So changed was he his mother knew not her only son. 
For a tramp his sweeheart passed him — none knew him, no not one ! 
"But his good old dog came running, and barked and licked the hand 
Of a well remembered master — then we knew old Tim Land ! 
"We knew him — we remembered, and the dog remembered too?" 
"No, with the dog 'twas reflex action, while 'twas memory with you !" 

Dorothea Wyeth. 




X. S. >T. «- 



Calendar 

Se]3t 30 — Registration : the beginning of all things. 

Oct. 4 — Y. W. and Y. M. reception. Pleased to meet you. everybody. 

Oct. 5— S. A. T. C. induction. IfiS men enlisted. 

Oct- 7 — Flu becomes alarming epidemic. State Board of Health orders all 
IMildic meetings abandoned. I. S. X. S. closes her doors for an in- 
definite period. 

Oct. 7-11 — School closed in accordance with health orders, but S. A. T. C. 

goes on. 
Oct. 7 — Cots and blankets liere but no mattresses. Yoiing soldiers spend a 

very comfortable night on the wire springs! 

Oct. 8 — Physical exams. Smith drinivs two (puirts of water in order to weigh 
the required 11(> jjounds. 

Oct. 9 — Mattresses arrive at last, )iut where, oh where, are the uniforms? 

Oct. ITi — Pvts. IJoyd. Shinnerer, Herman, Wisely, and Kerr aj)|)ointetl ser- 
geants. ^^'isely is ujade first sergeant. Ivifles arrive and the men re- 
ceive drill in tlie manual of arms. 

Oct. 20— Flu makes its appearance in the company. The Student Building 
is converted into a temporary hospital. 

Oct. 21 — Flu grows worse. The men have tnmlile getting back from leave on 
time. Many ])i-efei' to make their entrance via the fire escape. 

Xov. 1 — Flu reaches its height. Over ninety cases. Lt. llockwell working day 
and night. Fii'st pay day. Oh you tliirty bucks! 

Xov. 7 — Uniforms! "We look more like soldiers now! 

Xov. 11 — The greatest day of all the year. T. S. X. S. opens her doors only 
to close them to let us all go out with whistles and flags and confetti to 
add to the joyous din that proclaims. "Peace on earth, good will to 
men !" 

Nov. 15— Pvt. Forest C\ Buitman dies of influenza. He was the sole casualty 
of theS. A.T. C. 



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Nov. 18 — Hurrah for the Board ! We are to receive full credit for the term 
without giving up Saturda3's or holidays. 

Nov. 28 — Thanksgiving. 

Nov. 29 — The government said we were to have school today and we had to 
mind our ITncle Samuel. 

Nov. 30 — All flu cases in the S. A. T. C. recovered. Each afternoon for some 
time the men have had to carry their l)edding out on the campus for 
airing. They comjjlain of overwork. 

Dec. 15 — S. A. T. C. Comjjany disbanded. Goodbye, soldier boys ! 

Dec. 21 — ^Merry Christmas, everybody ! 

Dec. 31 — Back again on a peace basis. 

Jan. 1 — Ring out the old, ring in the new! 

Jan. 6 — Our Alma Mater is forty-nine years old today. Big time coming next 
year. 

Jan. 10 — Y. W. and Y. M. reception. 

Jan. 18 — Basketball season opens with a victory over Indiana Dental College. 

Jan. 20 — First and only lecture of the season: Isaac F. Marcosson on "The 
War and After." 

Jan. 24 — First Rose-Normal game. Yea Normal ! Fine work, boys ! 

Feb. 12 — Mr. Lincoln's birthday. Dr. Nyce of Muncie gives a nice lecture. 
Board gives us a nice holiday. Lady faculty gives a nice tea. Nice day. 

Feb. 19 — Rose game. Roughnecks! But just you wait, we'll get 'em yet. 

Feb. 21 — Woman's League entertains in honor of Mr. Washington. 

P"eb. 27 — Rev. J. Boyd Jones' long farewell. In all my travels. . . . 

Mar. 3 — Alarum ! It is rumored that the legislature proposes to move the State 
Normal to Winona and turn our Alma Mater into an insane asylum. 

Mar. 5 — False alarm. President Parsons returns from the capital with tlie as- 
surance that it was only one of the to-be-ex]iected rumors. 

Mar. 6 — Superintendent Ellis speaks to us. 



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EvE'RYSunriEH SontTMiNC upTheirSleli/e B on csncAriD 



213 



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Mar. 7 — Bird man tells to kill all the cats. But, Mister, we like the pussies ! 

Mar. 10 — Rose-Xorinal game. We told you so! Such stuff never gets you 
anywhere in the end. City championship ours. 

Mar. 11 — Fire-drill. Professor Bayh says, put on your "bestus, no abestos, 
clothes. 

Mar. 14 — Ijetters and monograms awarded to both Normal teams, both of 
which are city champions. 

Mar. 21 — Exams all over. Enjoy your spring vacation while you may. You've 
only till Monday. 

Mar. 24 — Eegistration. Again or jet? 

Mar. 28 — Y. W. and Y. M. reception. 

April 1 — They said Governor Goodrich was to address us this morning. April 
Fool ! 

April 3 — New Superintendent of Public Instruction, Mr. Hines, gives a talk on 
the educational laws passed by the 1919 session of the legislature. 

April 7 — Baseball season opens. 

April 10 — Subject of a homecoming for the soldiers introduced. We'll all 

feel gay when Sammy comes marching home I 
April 14. 15, 16— Dad Elliott delivers a series of lectures. Stirring times. 

Christian morale greatly improved. 

April 18 — Annual goes to press. 

May 3 — First Rose-Normal game. Poly goes down to defeat ! 

May 9— Series of chapel sings inaugurated for the benefit of the home-coming. 

May 14 — Poly defeated and put in her proper place once and for all. 

May 20 — Chorus presents "The Rose Maiden." 

May 24 — Final copy due. Dear Readers, we thank you ! 



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From jxirl to irirl he ran away 
He never in one i)lace diil stay 
And while lie ran so I am tohl 
He o-rew still taller as of old. 

Fe Fi Fo Fum 
What is seen but Forum 
There are others just as liood 
But some see none l)ut Forr.m 

Goosie, goosie, <iander. 
Where do von wander ( 
Alpha corner. Kappa rorner, 
And sometime, (iannuar (ianunar. 

Where are vou goini;- mv prettv maid ^ 
To see Dean Schweitzer' kind sir she said. 
May I o-o with you my ])rettv maid;' 
No you're wliy Fm due there now. she said. 

Audrie Luudstrum went to the cuplioard 
To get her fair features done 
But'when she i;-ot there her i)aint box was hare 
And of her dates she kept none. 

Multiplication is vexation 
Division is as had 
The rule of three diith puzzle me 
But PRACTIC'K drives me mad. 

She. "How do I lo<,k toni-htr' 
He. "Oh. fair to middleton." 

Note hv editors: ( 1.'. miles at $0.0200). 



When Doc. Uetteer discourses of Phisolouv 

Tis like a picni'c— a regular spr.n', 

And Historv of Kd. is like Heaven vou"ll Hud. 

AVhile Practice is like— well, my son. never mind! 

CAPtiO TOO LAIUiE? 
A hriiiht lad once struck Terre Haute 
AVith'a (rim intellectual boat. 
He loade.l it full 
At a State Normal School 
But alas! his fine barge wouldn't float. 

HE CAME FROM LAFAYETTE 

In niv youth I have often heard tell 

Of the' wonderful Terre Haule belle 

AVhose magnifieeut feet 

AVouldn't pass in Main stivet 

Which caused her exclaimino-. "Oil well." 



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The Seniors Want To Know: 



Who the freshman was who strode into Dean 
\Veng's room in the midst of a recitation to ask the 
dean to indorse a check; and if said young man 
^\•onld not be taiig-ht a lesson if he would repeat such 
an act while Professor Kelso was conducting- a class. 

What Harry Winters is going to do with all those 
cigars he is winning by driving out two hits per game. 

If the varsity men have not learned that a major 
can be hard-boiled even after he has laid aside his 
uniform. 

If the students, faculty, and people of Terre Haute 
have noticed the new kick in Normal athletics and if 
they knew it was caused by a new kick in Normal 
school spirit. 

If the girl who tried to improve upon Webster's 
definition of a real man improved her position any 
with the young men of the school. 

Who the professor was who forgot to throw away 
his cigar before he entered his class room ; who it 
was that called his attention to the fact ; and if it 
didn't happen after the Dad Klliott resolutions were 
passed. 

Just who was that Xormal student who was so im- 
pres.aed by the talks of Dad Elliott that he tried to get 
Schomer to return the money paid in advance for 
dancing lessons, and whether or not he ad\ised 
Schomer to go to hear the said man Elliott. 

If the class at the Terre Haute House does not have 
a more regidar attendance than some of those in 
the Xormal class rooms. 

Just what Dr. Acher said when he found a new 
assistant in charge of the office of the psychological 
laboratories ; and which calling was the hardest to 
face, that of the dear Doctor or of Miss Frieda. 

If there is any connection between having the 
speech of a lecturer committed to memory and the 
fact that Dr. Parsons had to get hard-boiled in order 
to secure a sufficiently pious audience at chapel. 

^^^lo the two girls were who were visiting the 
school and were trying to get into the faculty cloak 
room and were described bv Tom Arvin to the editor 
of the Weekly Advance ; the one as having a knot 
of hair over her riaht eye: the other as squintv-eyed, 
sleepy-looking, and formerlv very po]5ular with the 
boys about Normal. 

If the increase in the length of skirts will cause 
a similar decline in the price of silk hose, and if 
not a decline in price a decline in the use of such. Or 
is there another real reason for wearing silk hose. 

If Billy Williams had any difficulty identifying 
Howard Wittenberg's history teacher from Howard's 
description. 



If the Normal girl who was with the senior, who 
turned while walking down Eagle Street to see the 
effects of the naughty wind as displayed on the 
library steps and who said to the said senior, "Well, 
look. I would too if I were a boy," wasn't a real 
girl. 

If some of the students think the commercial rooms 
are a cloak room and if. .judging from the number in 
attendance, there is a Bolsheviki movement or op- 
position chapel service run there during chapel hour. 

If a sporting editor of the calibre of Ralph ^Vliite 
and who edited a -sporting page in one of the city 
Iiajiers for numberless years should not send an as- 
sistant out to Parsons Field to discover which arm 
Kerr uses in pitching, for in his paper of April 27, 
he designated the I'ride of the Normal fans as a 
southpaw: and if such a .statement does not show a 
lack of appreciation for the Normal team. 

If the faculty, especially the majority of the 
members, knew that Normal had a baseball diamond 
named after the president and that the said diamond 
was located at Second and Canal sti-eets. Said park 
may be reached by walking. 

If a dollar and a half and And.\' Crawford's kit of 
Auto tools is not a rather high price to pay for a 
three-base hit in a twenty to nothing game. 

If the members of the state legislature, trustees 
and so on would not be glad to build a new gym- 
nasium if we could arrange to get them to play or 
attend a game of basketball in our present one. 

If our editor has not been so busy during the past 
term that vei-y few members of the student body 
have been able to recognize her as she hurried through 
the halls : and besides just what does our editor get 
for getting up this book anyway. 

If the student body would be -surprised if a member 
of the faculty forgot to give the same speech term 
after term; and if it is not about time for the 
faculty to get away from their set speeches and even 
from their classroom gossip in their chapel talks. 

If the student who was slow in seeing just where 
Dr. Acher was going with his classes, lasses, asses 
was a Freshman or Senior, and if the latter whether 
or not he is impossible or an Englishman. 

If the length of Professor Young is not rather 
disconcerting to beginning students in shorthand. 

Just what would be the proper thing to do regard- 
ing sections: decrease the number or build an addi- 
tion to the school containing mostly corners. 

If Professor Turman was aware that the draw- 
ing boards scattered around his room have at times 
been used as camouflage in a tulip bombardment 
during class periods. 



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9:50 



At exactly nine-fifty o'clock every day 
Some preacher or other comes to chapel to say 
How much it inspires him to look upon us — 
On our fresh happy faces, and all such stuff ; 
And we settle down to take a good look 
At our teachers in chapel — 'tis a veritable book ! 
Our President from the edge of his chair looks about ; 
For gigglers and gossips he's on the look out. 
And some good Professors, religiously made, 
With hands piously folded and looks stern and staid, 
Gaze on the ceiling (it really is rare) 
While many another slips down in his chair 
For a ten-minute nap. We especially note 
Our psychology Prof., and unanimously vote 
The palm to our mathematician, by name 
Higgins, you know, who's acquired such great fame 
For failing to 'wake when the amen comes 
(His head being full of such difficult sums). 
Miss Schweitzer's bright eye every day is seen 
Sharp on the look out — but, you see, she's the Dean ! 
Our artist, the one who loves purple, you see, 
With his hands nicely folded upon his right knee, 
Gazes away into blank space every day — 
'Tis our fine stained-glass windows he likes so, they say. 
Mr. Stalker's kind eyes beneath those fine curls, 
Look 'round at something, do you s'pose it's girls? 
Solemn Mary Moran, on the President's day 
Gets into the jokes about O'Flint and O'Shea. 
Mr. Curry, that literature Prof., much adored, 
We commend for his honesty — he frankly looks bored. 
Mr. Mutterer, dumb from the beginning of time. 
Has been speaking in chapel, we bet you a dime. 
We'd accomplish more wonders in this great world war 
Than thrashing the Germans and canning the czar. 
Mr. Kelso, from six minutes after, sits up 
And watches the clock, and is ready to jump 
The instant the preacher has breathed the " amen." 
And when that's done we all take a new breath, and then 
With a jolly good bounce come down out of the skies. 
And with joy we obey the President's "Please rise!" 

— Dorothea Wyeth. 

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3ST. >^. 



The Little %ed Cottage 

That glowing red building, not unlike a medieval ca.stle on the hilltop yonder, is the 
Little Red College for the scientific training of scientific pedagogues, not unlike a medieval 
castle in its towers and turrets, and more like a medieval castle than a real live college in its 
lack of campus. And notice the flag on the topmost tower that flutters so gaily against the 
blue skies of June when Commencement tim? draws near, and droops as despairingly in the 
gray da3's of November as our spirits when t'le finals are at hand. 

AVithin, tiie Little Red College is narrow and old-fashioned. The narrow halls see as lit- 
tle of the light of the twentieth century as some of the musty problems in scientific pedagogy 
expounded by the musty old professors. The class rooms are old and cracked and hermeti- 
cally sealed, like the minds of the pedagogues who there rule supreme. But there are some 
as near the land of eternal youth as the sunny skies of sunny Italy. For these and the real 
professors who inhabit them, thank God ! They rescue our Little Red College from the sor- 
did depths of scientific pedagogy. 

The inhabitants of the Little Red College are aspiring young pedagogues. They are for 
the most jiart of the fairer sex. Oh, there are a few otherwise — a few regular fellows, a few 
regular Sister Susies, and a few worth noticing, like That Is, and the Smiley Boy, and Dom 
Sci Mr. T. As for the majority party, there are old maids and snobs (sororities? yes. my 
dear, we have "em), and silly flirts, and real girls, and scliolariy young ladies in l)()ok-wonnish 
spectacles. 

In short half the Little Red College is fine and open-minded and aspires heavenward in 
the direction of the Hag on its topmost tower, and the other lialf is completely fossilize<l and 
fit for exhibition in a glass case. Dokotiiea Wyetii. 



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"-frorra^ tl^e clcjevT i corns To ll^ee- 

Ow, CI o^ddior^ okod wifk^ -fir>e. 

fln.d +l^e- uMii^d^ ar-e. lef^' Lretti-n-cJ 

Ikj, fl^e 5^eecl op n^y cle^ir'e 

I lovs i-t:?ee, I love iju-f +l^«a<9, 

Uli'lt^ a lo^e. f)^af sl^all f^o^ die 

727/ /^ v5'"? S''°^ cohJ 




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Civil JAJaf 



'T^CO)r^4-T>UCrior^ 



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T>om Sci iMr. T. 

Dom Sci Mr. T. came puiliim- and Itlow.ni;- into tlic piiysiolofi-y lal) on the first clay of 
school. He hesitated only an instant before crossina- over to a yronp of i;-ossi])ino- ladies wlio 
were discussino- the problems of tlie dom. sci. lib. Witli an extraordinary effort of his puffy 
Dver-induliied i)hysical and psycliical being D )m Sci Mr. T. nttered an "ah" and dropped 
simultaneously into the conversation and a seat be.side a fair lass, who was (though Dom Sci 
Mr. T. did not know it), the best cook in all of Perry County down state. 

"Ah !" said Dom Sci Mr. T.. "You are dis nissing the pro]:)erties of starch ! Do tell me, is 
the domestic science course offered here of very great value?'" 

The young ladies stojjped talking (but only for am instant) to look at this young man 
who had dropped upon them like a softy slusliy snowball on a late sj^ring day. A studious 
young person in huge l>ook-\vornush spectacles condescended to inform him that the courses 
in cooking were excellent, but for her i)art sh^ preferred the courses in dietetics and house- 
hold chemi.stry. A pretty dark-haired damsel, who would flirt with anything that wore 
trou.sers. lifted her black eyes and smiled irresistibly on him. The remainder of the group 
were inclined to ignore him, and one green-ey »d personage was actually ob.served to turn uji 
her nose ! 

Dom Sci Mr. T. felt himself fidly acc.'pted into the conversation, and, manlike, led 
the conversation forth upon a new i)ath. "You know," he said with a coquettish glance over 
his shoulder at the dark-haired girl. "I am very fond of domestic science." 

"You don't say so!" niurmuered the ladie-; with one accord. 

"Yes, you know. .. .I'll tell you all about it." he began, settling himself with several 
adorable little wiggles. "You see there was a girl down home who was the (irovernor's daugh- 
ter, and she was a friend of mine." 

"The (iovernor's daughter I" echoed the l)lack-eyed miss, who was beginning to l)e con- 
vinced that he would do (to flirt with, of course.) 

"Yes," carelessly replied Mr. T. "And sh- went away to school to study domestic science, 
and she was the best cook in all the county where I live.'" 

"AVhere do you live, pray r" inquired the la ly who was (though Dom Sci Mr. T. did not 
know it) the best cook in all of Perry County down state. 

"AVhy, in Pike County.'" ( lie called it ceounty in the good old Iloosier style) "Abraham 
Lincoln passetl through our county once when he was on his way to Kentucky. Yes, ma"am, 
and do you know Secretary Lansing^ yes Mr. Lansing, came and iiicked ro.ses in our 
garden once foi- his wife's a-reat grandmother's grave, and she"s buried in the Unitarian 
Churchvard. and that"s about a niile and scvn-eiahts from our house."' 

He paused for the sake of impression. The black-eyed damsel Hashed him a uu)st be- 
witching smile. I)ut the best cook in all Perry County downstate said iuii>atiently. "(io on about 
the Governor's danahter."' 

"Well, the (Jovci'nors daughter slie was the best cook in all the county, but my dad he 
made a bet that I could beat her on teacher's exam in dom. sci. So I take-^ tjie exam, and when 
the grades come back, the Governor's daughter she gets sc. and / get 'M \" 

"You must be bright." exclaimed the vo ing ladies. 

"Oh, no, I'm not bright. I ju.st know how to blufl'." \m\ he was just about to i)ut his 
finger in his mouth in the manner approved for shy country maidens, when the i)rofessor 
came forward and humbly begged all the young ladies to i)lease come to order. 

DortoriiKv A\'vf7ni. 



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Geometric Boarding 

1. All boardiiifi- hoiisi's are e(|iial to the sunie liuardiiig house. 

2. A single room is one having no parts and no nnignitude. 

3. All other rooms being taken, a single room may he said to hi' a double 
room. 

4. A wrangle is the difference between two boarders which meet hut not 
on the same floor. 

5. The landlady is a jjarallelogram. i. e.. an oblong angular figui-e which 
cau"t be described and is e(iuai to anything. 

<"). The landlady nuiy be reduced to her lowest terms by a series of ])ropo- 
sitious. 

7. Any two meals at a boarding house taken togetiier are less than one 
square I'eed. 

8. A bee line may be taken from one boarding house to another boarding 
house. 

f*. A pie may be produced any number of times. 

10. The sheets of a boarding house bed stretched ever so fai' both ways 
will not meet. 

11. On the same bill and on the same side of it. there should not be two 
charges on the same thing. 

12. Let the wrangle between tlu" tirst l)oarder and tiie landladv equal the 
wrangle between the landlady and the other boarder, tiien shall the weekly bills 
of both boarders be equal. For. if not, let the one bill lie the greater, then the 
other is less than it might have been, which is absurd. Vassar Axxfal. 

K. M. — I've l)eeu working on a }H-obleni for about a half an hour and I 
don't understand it, can you iiel}) me? 

M. O.— I'll try: what is it? 

K. M. — There is a road running due east and west, the width of the road 
is 50 feet. On the north side 80 feet from the road is a farm house, south of the 
road 90 feet is a barn. At the edge of the road between the house and the barn 
is a telephone pole 20 feet high ; perched upon the top of the pole is a crow. How 
far is the crow from the man. 

M. O. — But where is the man ? 

K. M. — Oh, he is out fishing for suckers. 

The NC-1 and the NC-2 are trvinir to cross the II-O. chemicallv >peaking. 



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Dreams of Youtl} 

(Dedicated lathe Students of I. S. N. S.) 

Youth's purple far-oil hills uprise 
Into a wondrous paradise 
Of treasures rich and vistas fair, 
Inhabited by being rare. 
These rippling rills kissed b_v the sun 
Thou glades and bowers of beauty run 
And earth and sky and sea are bent 
In scenes of joy and sweet content. 
There men are bra\e and women good. 
There hearts beat true in brotherhood, 
There love comes by each life to bless 
And great Ideals reach success. 
O Heaven forbid that one should see 
Such visions fair that may not be 
Forl)id that longing souls may grope 
In vales of disappointed hope. 
May all your earth be filled with good 
Boost for a great world brotherhood 
And may each brave adventure new 
Be one of youth's (h'eams coming true. 
Wm. Ali.en McBeth. 

To Normal 

A sonnet to our Normal? Can it be 
A subject too prosaic to be shown 
In that poetic measure? Who has known 
A higher love. School Mother, than for thee 
Is felt? Our lives in each act must agree 

With thy behests. And who has upward grown 
Within thy precincts, from thy portals flown 
Full-fledged, and not far greater heights to see? 
Then, Normal, let it never more be said 

Thou could'st not bring a sonnet into mind 
If mind sincere should concentrate on you 
To see thy good works. Inspiration true 
For nobler efforts, in thy halls we find, 
And higher aims in life bv thee art bred. 



3>T. 



>:s. 




-^ 



I. 



3>T. 




Speaking of 
:^4pp/es — 





■#■ 



X. s. 3sr. 



The Saddest T^ing of All 

At eventide lieside the salty sea, 

Upon the r<iclis stonii-wdrn through countless yeiirs 

An old man sat. white-haired, bkve-eyed, and sad. 

As he watched the soft smiles of the setting sun 

Kiss the salt sea's snowy foam to gold. 

Like some mortal sea nymph's snowy curls 

Turned gold in death l)y some immortal hand. 

He thought perhaps the oft heard myth was truth— 

Of how an ancient daui-hter of the deep. 

Who dwelt in days long dead on those black rocks, 

rnhound at each day's close her snowy hair 

And let it float upon the evening wa\es. 

And how the sun-god at that peaceful hour 

When he dies to rise again, renewed each day, 

Beheld and loved the nymph, despite her age 

And his bright youth, and kissed her snowy locks 

And withered cheeks to golden youth again; 

And so the ancient nymph and youthful god. 

Made one in age by love's immortal breath. 

Passed beyond the ocean's farthest brink 

To the land from whence we come and whither go. 

To live in everlasting joy. For there 

There is no time, no growing old, naught but 

Eternal youth, and everlasting love. 

With brooding restless eyes the old man gazed 

At the sunset's softened golds and dainty pinks 

KeHected in the gentle after-flow 

Of the broken waves upon the sandy beach. 

A music faint and soft and low tlie waves 

Brought in from out the boundless dee]), a strain 

Sweet, and like the blue eyes, gently sad. 

A song the lappina' waters sei'uied to sing 

Of vouth and hoi)e an<l h.ve all uuHlled, 

The o-entle tragedv of his sad life. 

For he had been since .•hildhoud s,,rr..wfui. 

Throuii-h all his life the sa.ldcst tliiii- on earth. 

As a child at eventide on those same i-o.-ks 

He had seen visions of a perfect joy 

Which he had left, but would soon find again. 

In later life the noise of wealth and fame 

Had drowned those faint sad memories, tliev seemed 

Of some far distant land, some distant life; 

Sonu^ distant love, a hazy picture then 

Of one sad day. — oh, why was it that he 

Must ever be the saddest thing on earth? 



I. s. isr. 



A great wave hreakiiig. foaming on the rocks. 
Broke too the magic spell whereby he saw 
Be_vond the sea, beyond the sorrowful earth. 
Where we must surely live ere we are born. 

The earth exchanged the twlight's peaceful gray 

For the silvery glory of the soft warm night. 

The mellow moon, her smiling radiance 

TTnimpaired by cloud or shadow, lit 

A magic path across the night-blue sea, 

AA'here the fairies, and the spirits of love and joy 

Lightly si>orted on the sparkling wave. 

And still the old man sat. The mystery. 

The beauty, and the peace of night's deep calm 

Charmed his restless spirit, still 

The waves brought in perplexing memories 

Of one he loved, but never had beheld. 

Though he had searched for lier through all the world. 

His heart was clo.sed to the joy that night will give 

To all that look upon her countless stars, 

And he remained the saddest thing on earth. 

All night he saw as on a stage set forth, 

Events, ambitions, people, shifting scenes, 

In short, the tragic drama of his life. 

Fir.st his boyhood days when he had played 

On yonder beach, and dreamed on those sad rocks, 

And heard the music from afar, and seen 

Visions of the land of perfect joy. 

His childhood sadly past, and in his youth. 

As leader of the quaint old fishing folk. 

He searched the sea as he had searched the rocks 

In childhood for her for whom he longed. 

He searched the wild world o'er but found her not. 

Wealth came and fame and friends, lint never love. 

Never peace and never joy. His life 

Wore on, he did much good, and many loved 

And envied the saddest thing on earth. 

And as the days wore on he quite forgot 

His search. His sorrow grew less keen, but youth 

Soon sped. Age came. His restless life was iU)ne. 

He came to his native tow^n beside the sea 

To die — his mission unfilled — to die 

As he had lived the saddest thing on earth. 

At length the bright moon dipped into the sea. 

Sank beneath the waves, and left the stars 

To guard the lonely blue-eyed man. The tide 

Went and the rocks stood high above the waves. 

The old man, alone and lonely, prayed for death 

Through that dark hour when all the world seems dead. 



^ 



X, 4s. 3sr. ^. 



And God himself asleep. The stars grew dim. 

The night hues vanished from the earth, the air 

Grew soft as the petals of a velvet rose. 

The light came slowly, then Heaven's gate 

Burst open and the day came forth, full-robed 

In burning gold and black and crimson clouds. 

In the golden east the old man thought he saw 

A city whose towers of gold and turrets gleamed 

In the freshness of the new-born day; and by 

The city flowed a narrow silver .stream, 

Wider widening till it reached a sea 

Whose golden breakers, cajjped with crimson, washed 

Away into the gray of mellow morn — 

The city beautiful for which he longed — 

The land of hope and love and j^erfect joj' ! 

At the meeting place of sky and sea a ship, 

Her gleaming sails full spread to catch the breeze 

That wafted her across the gentle sea, 

Seemed as thougli it came to carry him 

To the happy heart of the endless golden east. 

In a cloud of morning purple overhead 

He saw a face — it was I — it was ! — his search 

Was o'er ! His heart beat hajipily alas ! 

'Twas but a cloud. The sun, a great round ball 

Of blazing gold, from the deep blue sea peeped out. 

The stars were gone. The vision was obscured. 

Day and sorrow and care were couie again. 

The village woke; the children rauie to play. 
Hardy sun-tanned boys and girls to laugh, 
And shout, and dart among the rocks, and climb 
Among the boats at anchor near the shore. 
Among them was a tender gold-haired girl. 
Blue-eyed and sad, who did not romp and run. 
But sat alone beside the boundless sea. 
A hai^piness more sad than sorrow stole 
Into the old man's heart; perhaps because 
She was so like his own dead boyhood self. 
Perhaps, the picture in his heart was dim. 
The cloud face long had gone — it could not be ! 
For she was but a child ! And yet what joy, 
What peace were in his soul ! Perha^DS it was, 
For this our life is but a day on Time's 
Eternal calendar, and what to God 
Are foiu'-score vears and ten? Yes it was she. 



284 



3>q-. >J^. 



The blue-eyed child as by some magic drawn 
Came near. He took her in his arms and knew 
His search was done. He kissed her golden hair 
And the veil fell from his sad blue eyes. He saw 
That distant happy land where they had dwelt, 
By fate "the lovers" called in laughing scorn. 
He lived again that sad, sad day when time 
Had torn her from his arms and bidden him 
To earth. He heard again her parting cry, 
"Be till I come the saddest thing on earth." 
Now she was come. His life was o'er and hers 
Was just begun, and they must part again. 
He was wondering if she knew, cliild though she Avas, 
When her baby arms went around his neck, 
And she whispered, "Was it long before I came? 
Was it hard to be the saddest thing on earth?" 

Suddenly their blue eyes filled with tears; 

They screamed, but his voice was old and hers was young. 

The tide was rising higher than it wont. 

And the narrow i>ath that shut the lonely rock 

From safety lay obscured beneath the waves. 

Their feet the rising ocean washed, their cries 

The rushing water drowned. None saw until 

The great black rocks lay all beneath the waves, 

When the tide had reached the full, the earth beheld 

And all who lived within its sorrowful sphere. 

The noondays sunny sparkle dancing on 

The blue blue waves; but they whom fate had called 

"The lovers" passed beyond the whispering sea 

To that eternal Bourne where time and space 

Are naught, but hope and love are infinite. 

To live together endlessly, to know 

A joy as boundless as the sky, a love 

As long as the sorrows of our mortal earth, 

A peace as deep and calm and measureless 

As the waters of the moonlit summer sea. 

Dorothea AVyeth. 



^ 



I. ;s. 3sr. 



The Inevitable 

^[ND now the tale is told. The rush and hurry is 
^^ about ended, and the little office is almost de- 
serted. No longer is the table stacked with plates, 
and no longer are the staff members making pictures. 
At last the careworn editor has time to look up from 
her papers and pictures and reflect and read the epi- 
grams on the board which have been written by some 
despondent members of the staff. Not only to fill a 
page, but also as a last line of defense and an oppor- 
tunity to mention those who have so loyally aided in 
the construction of this book, is this page written. 
This publication is not the work of one, or of a few, 
but the result of the efforts of many persons, and it is 
for those efforts that we wish to express our appreci- 
ation at this time. 

The Editor. 



isr. 



PATRONIZE 



OUR 



ADVERTISERS 




m- 



Let Us Do Your Art Work 

WE MADE ALL THE PLATES USED FOR 

ILLUSTRATIONS IN THIS ATTRACTIVE 

BOOK 




WE MAKE 

Half-Tones, Etchings and Embossing Dies 

ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN 

Terre Haute Engraving Co. 

51 SPECTATOR COURT 



LONG-KNIGHT LUMBER CO. 

INDIANAPOLIS 

HARDWOODS 



L. D. SMITH 

Book Seller, News Dealer 

Stationer 

Sporting Goods of All Kinds 

BASE BALL GOODS 

Bowling and Running Shoes 

Fishing Tackle 

Tennis and Golf Goods 

673 WABASH AVENUE 
New Phone 6 





Suggestions for 




Graduation Gifts 


OVERFELT 


FOR THE GIRLS FOR THE BOYS 

Lavalieres Watches 
Diamond Rings Cuff Links 
Bracelet Watches Scarf Pins 
Mesh Bags Chain and Knife 


Kodak Finishing 

MAIL ORDERS 
GIVEN 


^IL Goods Sold at 

$1.00 a Week 


PROMPT ATTENTION 

We Use VELOX Paper 

629i Wabash Avenue 


Southwest Corner Eighth and Wabash 





"The Best Place to Shop, After All" 



Women's and Misses' Smart Apparel — Suits, Coats, Capes, 

Frocks, Skirts, Blouses, Millinery, Sweaters, Shoes, Hosiery, 

Gloves, Neckwear, Veils, Handkerchiefs, Ribbons, 

Petticoats, Kimonos, Corsets, Silk and Muslin 

Underwear, Toilet Articles, Jewelry, Purses 

and Bags, Negligees, 

Men's Shirts, Neckties, and All Furnishings 
Boys' Clothing 

Furniture, Rugs, Cretonnes, Curtains, Draperies, Art Goods, 

Cedar Chests, Silks, Wash Fabrics, Wool Material, Notions, 

Trimmings, Laces, Beddings, Linens, China, Glassware, 

Housewares, Lamps, Pianos and Player=Pianos, 

Victrolas, Victor Records, Trunks, Luggage, 

Sewing Machines, Groceries 

Manicuring, Shampooing — All Beauty Service. 
Lunch in Our Cozy Tea Room 



— Every departmant of this store extends a cordial welcome to the students 
of the Indiana State Normal School to make this store their Terre Haute 
shopping place, assuring to all the courteous attention, intelligent service and 
quality merchandise which has won for this store the slogan " The Best Place 
to Shop, After All." 

The Root Dry Goods Co. 

617-619 Wabash Ave. Established 1856 Terre Haute, Ind. 



FOR QUALITY PHOTOGRAPHS 



MERRILL H. DUNHAM STUDIO 

Portraits and Kodak Finishing 

We Make a Specialty in OIL COLORED PHOTOGRAPHS 
Room 327 McKeen Block 

Seventh and Wabash Ave. 
ELEVATOR SERVICE 



PAUL N. BOGART. Pre.idtn 
M. S. WEILLS, Vice Pr«idcnt 



J A. ALLEN. S«r=t;.ry 

S CRAWFORD M.KEEN. 



Ehrmann & Co. 

BEEF AND PORK PACKERS 

CURERS OF 
BREAKFAST BACON 
HAMS, AND BACONS 

Retailers and Manufacturers of 
Sausages and Lard 

Wholesalers of Beef, Pork, 
Veal and Mutton 

Phone 220 TERRE HAUTE, IND. 



Watask Savings, Loan and 

Building Association 

of Terre Haute, Ind. 

AutKorized Capital Stock, Six Million Dollars 
Assets, Two Million Dollars 

32 SoutK Sixth Street TERRE HAUTE. IND. 

6% INTEREST ON DEPOSITS 



Gifts for 
Graauation 

Sckool Rings, Pins, Bracelets 
Regular Sckool Needs 

AT ALL TIMES AT 

Normal BookStore or Craft's Book Store 

114 North Sixth Street 672 Wabash Avenue. 



BANK WITH 

The 

Citizens 

Trust Co. 

612-614 WABASH AVENUE 

SAFETY 

SERVICE 

COURTESY 



To the Students 

Of Indiana State Normal, to the friends of 
the school and to people everywhere who 
are interested in education and art; you 
are here and now invited to come to our 
shop when in need of photographs. 

Many of the cuts in this book are made 
from our photographs. We are prepared 
to handle your requirements in any of the 
following lines : 

Portraits Commercial W^ork 

Enlargements Lantern Slides 

Moving Pictures Blue Prints 

Home Portraits Etc., Etc., Etc. 



]i/fartin's 



Bell Phone 15 

New 3700 •"''• PHOTO SHOP 

SEVENTH and WABASH AVE. 



Terre Haute 
Savings Bank 



INTEREST 



4 



ON DEPOSIT 
£Sta.bi,ishb:o isoq 

S. W. Corner Sixth and Ohio Sts. 

TERRE HAUTE, IND. 



NEW PHONE 

1344 



Established 
1867 



The Swope-Nehf Jewelry Co. 

524 Wabash Avenue 

DIAMONDS, WATCHES 
JEWELRY 

CLASS AND FRATERNITY PINS 
OR RINGS A SPECIALTY 

FINE WATCH AND JEWELRY REPAIRING 
ALL WORK GUARANTEED 



]y[YERS BROS. 

The Home of Totally Different 
and Better Clothes for Students 



The accumulated experience of 40 years in buying for 
men and young men is the advantage that is enjoyed by 
the student who is clothed at Myers Brothers. An un- 
shaken guarantee extending over nearly half a century, that 
no better quality or style can be produced or at lower prices. 

High Art 

Stein- Bloch 

Sampeck 

Suits and Overcoats 

stetson and Hawes Hats 
Banister and Beacon Shoes 



OLD PHONE 1713 



NEW PHONE 154 



Andrews - Newton 
Realty Co. 



515 OHIO STREET 



Building and Loan, Insurance 



Real Estate and Rentals 



TERRE HAUTE, IND. 



S. M. COWGILL, President F. D. OAKLEY, Secretary 

JAMES LUTHER, Vice Pres. J. V. HOUPT, Treasurer 

L. R. WHITNEY, General Manager 



National Drain Tile Co. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

DRAIN TILE 

Capital Stock $600,000.00 
Largest in the World FACTORIES AT 

Annual capacity Summitville, Ind., Hillsdale, Ind. 

6000 Car Loads Terre Haute, Ind. 

TERRE HAUTE, INDIANA 



BUNTIN DRUG 
COMPANY 

H. A. SALCHERT, 

Proprietor 

TERRE HAUTE, IND. 
The Place where Drug Purity and Relia- 
bility go Hand in Hand with Fair Prices 

Fine Perfumery 

Pure Drugs and Medicines 

Fine Toilet Articles 

Chemicals, Cosmetics 

Combs, Tablets, Envelopes, Pens, Cigars, 

Brushes, Erasers, Papeterie, Mucilage, Pencils 

DEALERS IN 

Cameras and Photographing Supplies 

DEVELOPING AND PRINTING 
THE HOME of the FOUNTAIN PEN 



Hotel Deming 



COR. SIXTH AND CHERRY STS. 




'«t®K 



m^ 



STRICTLY FIREPROOF 
EUROPEAN PLAN 



Special Attention Given to Dinner Dances 
Coffee Room Open Day and Nigkt 



Both Phones 461 

Joseph MullikinS Co. 

Real Estate, Insurance 
Loan and Rental Agents 

29 South Seventh St. 

NOTARY PUBLIC 
TERRE HAUTE, INDIANA 



SUPERIOR UNDERWEAR 

STETSON HATS 

TUNE BROTHERS 

HOME OF 

Hart Shaffner & Marx 

CLOTHING 

Manhattan Shirts 
Stetson and Emerson Shoes 



College Clothes for 
College Men 

OUR SHOWING OF 

Hershberg's Master-Craft Clothes 

WILL APPEAL TO YOU 

Snappy Styles for Young Men 
Nifty Hats and Caps, Swell Haberdashery 

Your Inspection Is Invited 

Deermont Clothing Co. 

A. R. SEEWALD, Pres. 

649 Wabash Avenue 



J 



onnson s 
Luncheone^e 

FINE FOUNTAIN MENU 
PLATE LUNCHES AND 
FINE LUNCHEONETTE 

BUNTE AND LOWNEY CANDIES 

IN BULK 

OR FANCY BOXES 

615 Watask Avenue 




■^^ 




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Haute 


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3 O 
C/3 O 






YOUNG MEN 

For School and Dress, wear 

J^uppenheimer Clothes 

America's Best Ready-to-Wear Clothes 

Prices Always Reasonable 

Fine Furnishings and Hats 

We will appreciate your patronage 

CARL WOLF -^^ 



Every Normal Student 



Is most cordially invited to worship 

with us. Come and make this your 

church home. 

The Central Presbyterian Church 

Cor. Seventh and Mulberry Sts. 



SEE 



Fisher Cleaning Co. 

PERFECT WORK 




S. W. Cor. Sixth and Mulberry Sts. 
TERRE HAUTE, IND. 



FOR BEST 

MERCHANDISE 

SILKS, DRESS GOODS, 

HOUSEHOLD LINENS, 

UNDERWEAR, HOSIERY, 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS, 

U.WBRELLAS 

Levi Dry Goods Co. 

MAIN STREET 

NEAR FIFTH 




Thise Values Are Unusual in Every Sense of the Word 

Beautiful Silk Dresses 

Taffeta Dresses, Satin Dresses, Crepe de Chine Dresses — Also Smart Combinations 

Women and misses can best appreciate these wonderful values by coming here and examining the good quality 
of materials used and the attractive variety of smart, new spring styles offered 



^Vt 



n^.os 



Season's Most Desirable Styles. All Sizes 14 to 46. Worth $22.50 to $25. 

There's a genuine saving for all who purchase their Spring Dresses in this Sale. Do not delay — such values 
hese will be grasped up quickly. 



Millinery of Enc/ianting Beauty 




S«r°$5.00 



Exceptional values offered in Trim- 
med Hats — the result of an ad- 
vantageous purchase from one of 
New York's foremost designers. 

Lisere, Fancy Braided Hats, Lisere and Georgette Crepe, Transparent 
Hats, Horsehair Braids and Many Other Straws. 

Dress Hats, Tailored Hats, Street Hats, Afternoon Hats — of the individual type so refresh- 
ingly smart, and especially designed. Turbans, Sailors, Small Hats, Pokes, Mushrooms and 
Watteau effects, in all the leading shades, artistically trimmed in scores of styles. 

Basket Weave and Fine Milan Hats 
for Misses, $5.00 value 



Extra Special 



$2.98 



Sunset Waist Specials 


Special 


f^^^|Special 


Georgette 
Crepe 

and 

Crepe de 

Chene 

Waists 

$5 Value, 


Mi 


$2.65 


l^yH $3.75 


Cc 


)tton Waists 


Extra c 


^oile, Organdy and Novelty /IQk^ 
otton Waists. $1.50 Values ^ C 


LEDERE 


— Second Floor. 
R-FEIBELMAN, OF COURSE. 




Extra 

Girls' Milan 

Hats 

New Styles. 

All 

Colors. 

Ribbon and 

Flower 

Trimmed. 

$2.50 Values, 

$1.45 



New Dresses, 

Coats and 

Hats 

For Stylish Girls 

A Complete Stock of New 
Wearables for Girls from 
2 to 8 years. 

New Milan and Hemp QQ„ 
Hats; up to $2 value 70C 

New Gingham and Chambray 
Dresses, up to $2.50 (Jjl 4 ^ 
values <I|)i.40 

New Silk and Serge Coats, up 
to $8.00 values. 



$4.95 



Second Floor — Annex. 



The Battles of Life 

Are Won or Lost 

In the Days or Preparation 

By riaving a Clean, Active mind 

Gained by real education and clean 
associates. 

By Having a Strong and Healtliy 
Body 

Gained by regular exercise, diet, sleep 
and play. 

By Having a Spirit of Higli Morale 
Gained only by acliievement or cnar- 
acter and service. 

The Y. M. C. A. 

or Terre Haute 

Will Aid You 



IF 

YOU 

LIVE 

OUT 

OF 

THE 

CITY 

SEND 

BY 

PARCEL 

POST. 

SPECIAL 

ATTENTION 

IS 

GIVEN 

THIS 

DEPARTMENT 



Be Particular 

About Having Your 

Clothes Cleaned 

Properly. 

See that the Cleaner who 
handles them is equipped 
with the most modern ap- 
pliances. 

See that sanitary condi- 
tions exist and experienced 
people employed. 

The Ermisch Way of 
Cleaning has stood the tests 
for thirty- five years in Terre 
Haute. 

Try us and see how 
promptly we can clean, press, 
repair or dye for particular 
people. 

Ermisch, My Cleaner 

105 North Seventh St. 
Terre Haute, Ind. 



When in the Market for Plumbing, Elec- 
trical Supplies, Hardware and 
Heating, we will be 
pleased to 
Give You Estimates On Same 

Ask About Mout Vapor Heating 

We saved 8 tons of coal on one house 

where we installed the Vapor 

Heat last year. 



Freitag, Weinhardt & Co. 

30-32 North Sixth Street 

Opposite Deming Hotel. 

Phone 140 

TERRE HAUTE, IND. 



Bill Cody -:- Ed Sparks 

CODY'S 
Celebrated Hats 

SPARKS' 
High Class Tailored Suits 

Always in the Lead 

7/5 Wabash Avenue 



^tyle 

Supremacy 



ALTHOUGH the first chap- 
ter in the history of the A. 
Herz establishment is concerned 
chiefly with the manufacture of 
hoop-skirts — those classic gar- 
ments of a half-century ago — 
the first step into the field of 
women's fashions properly began 
with the purchase and sale ot 
twelve cloaks during the winter 
season of 1872. 

Encouraged by the success of 
his first venture, the owner 
launched boldly into this impor- 
tant branch of merchandising, 
and within a comparatively few 
years had established the Herz 
Store firmly in the confidence of 
fashionable women of this early 
period, 

Today nine-tenths of the mer- 
chandise in Herz's derives much 
of its worth from style correct- 
ness. Few staples are offered. 
This is strictly a store of special- 
ties. 

PRESTIGE in style as well as 
value is the reward of un- 
ceasing alertness, and the recog- 
nition of that subtle quality in 
merchandise — so prized anddifi- 
cult to find — personality. 



Any good article of apparel — 
a suit, a coat, a blouse, a pair of 
gloves — may be exactly suited 
to the individual beauty and fig- 
ure of one woman and complete- 
ly out of harmony with the re- 
quirements of another. 

Style, in its strictest sense, is 
something more than mere con- 
formity with the mandates of 
New York and Paris. It is the 
accurate blending of two per- 
sonalities — garment and wearer 
— the one with the other. 



SUPPLYING such a service 
requires an ample selection 
for'each special type, and a com- 
petent staff of sales persons to 
assist in choosing with good taste 
and judgment. 

The evident success with 
which we have been able to pro- 
vide this service is exceedingly 
gratifying to this fifty year old 
institution, which has from the 
beginning placed the satisfaction 
of its customers before all other 
consideratiof^s. 



A. HERZ 



RECOMMEND THESE INSTRUMENTS TO YOUR PUPILS 

The Brunswick 

THE ONE AND ONLY PHONOGRAPH THAT IS PROPERLY MADE TO 

IT POSSESSES A VIOLIN-LIKE TONE — ITS TONE CHAMBER IS MADE OF 
WOOD. IT HAS AN ABSOLUTE SILENT MOTOR, BUT IS NOT AN EXPEN- 
SIVE MACHINE. THEY ARE PRICED AS LOW AS $100.00. 

PACKARD AND BOND 

PIANOS AND PLAYERS 

Two Very High Class Instrument-! that are well worth your inspection. We shall be 

pleased to demonstrate their superior tone qualities at any time. 

There are no buying obligations at 



EMERSON 

ana 

PATHE 

RECORDS 



The Brunswick Shop 

JENSON BROS., Proprietors 

527 Wabash Ave. 



PLAYER 
ROLLS 



Next to your ABILITY comes 
your APPEARANCE 

The young man we clothe can 
travel anywhere and be WELL 
DRESSED. 

Weinstein's 

THE QUALITY SHOP 

OF TERRE HAUTE 



A. P. ASBURY Jr. Successor 



The Stone Studio 

65 IK Wabash Ave. 

Citizens Phone 3482-L Opposite Herz's 
We Solicit Your Patronage 



The Moore-Langen Printing Co. 

140 North Sixth Street - Terre Haute, Ind. 




FACTORY, SIXTH AND MULBE 



Printers, Binders and 
Blank Book Manufacturers 

Both Phones 64 



Indiana 
State Normal School 

FOUNDED AND SUPPORTED BY THE STATE FOR THE PREPARATION 
OF TEACHERS FOR THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Twenty-Five Departments Covering the entire range of work in the Public Schools 



Four- Year Normal Training Course Four- Year College Course for Teachers 



Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Philoso- 
phy in Education. 



Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
Education. 



Four- Year Courses for the Preparation of Teachers 

For vocational work in Agriculture, Domestic Economy and Industrial Arts 
Leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education 



Two- Year Courses For Preparation of Teachers for the Grades 

Graduates Given Standing in the Leading Universities 

Library of 80,000 Volumes GymnasiumS for Men and Women 
c A/r J \x; 11 T7 J D ij Athletic Grounds 

bix Modern Well hquipped Buildings 

School Open 48 Weeks Each Year 

Three Model Practice Schools „ « . i ./: . * . 'in mm 

Summer Quarter June 16 to August 29, 1919 



EASTERN DIVISION, MUNCIE, INDIANA - Benjamin F. Moore, Dean 

Address W. W. PARSONS, PRESIDENT, 

Terre Haute, Ind. 




Jfinig