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Full text of "Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly [1979-1980]"

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THE 



ALUMNAE QUARTERLY/VOLUME 58 NUMBER 1 



CONTENTS 
1 ASC Career Network 

4 Fund Report 

Summary Report by Classes 
Special Gifts 
Giving by Classes 
Parents and Friends 
Businesses and Foundations 

19 Endowments 

Special Funds 
Memorial Funds 
Scholarship Funds 
Library Funds 
Student Loan Funds 
Annuity Funds 

29 President's Report 

43 Book Reviews 

44 Evelyn Hanna Visited 
46 Freshman Class Profile 

48 Denise McFall Joins Staff 

49 Association Tours 
51 With the Clubs 

55 From the Classes 
News and Profile 

67 Alumnae Council 1979 

68 Nominations 



ALUMNAE QUARTERLY STAFF: 
Editor / Virginia Brown McKenzie '47 
Managing Editor / Juliette Harper '77 
Design Consultant / John Stuart McKenzie 

ALUMNAE OFFICE STAFF: 

Director of Alumnae Affairs 

Virginia Brown McKenzie '47 

Coordinator for Clubs 

Jean Chalmers Smith 38 

Assistant to the Director 

Juliette Harper '77 

Secretary 

Frances Strolher 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OFFICERS: 
President / Cissie Spiro Aidinoff '51 
Vice Presidents 
Region I / Susan Blackmore Hannah '64 
Region n / Polly Page Moreau '62 
Region m / Jackie Simmons Gow '52 
Region IV / Peggy Hooker Hartwein '53 
Secretary / Lebby Rogers Harrison '62 
Treasurer / Susan Skinner Thomas '74 

Member / Council for Advancement and 
Support of Education 



Published four times yearly: Fall. Winter. 
Spring, and Summer by Agnes Scott College 
Alumnae Office, Decatur, Georgia 30030 



Second class postage paid 
at Decatur, Georgia. 
(U.S.P.S. 009-280) 




ALUMNAE/STUDENTS/CAREERS 



TWORK 



°o 



. 



TUNE IN TO the ASC 
Network this fall and turn 
on an Agnes Scott student to 
the career she's been looking 
for all along. 

We've formed a national 
network of alumnae in various 
professions to advise students 
of opportunities in your 
fields, and we need your help. 
Your sponsorship and advice 
can provide the vital link 
between the knowledge the 
student acquires in the 
classroom and the skills she 
needs to implement that 
knowledge after graduation. 

We want you to join the 
ASC Network and help a 
student make a better 
informed choice about her 
future career. 

We've listed the various 
programs for bringing a 
student into your office for a 
look behind the scenes — 
whether you are a sales 
manager or a chemical 
engineer. 

SHADOW PROGRAM 

Invite a student to spend an 
afternoon with you in your 
office. She'll be interested in 
learning not only what you 
do, but why you like your job 
(or why you don't). She'll 
want to know the educational 
requirements of the job, what 
goes on in the office, and how 
you get things done. 

Your advice to her about 
job opportunities within your 
field will help her make a 
more informed career choice. 



EXTERN PROGRAM 

Give a student the chance not 
only to see but to experience 
your daily work routine. An 
extern would spend a week 
during Christmas or spring 
vacation (on an unsalaried 
basis) with you and your 
colleagues. This short, but 
intensive, program makes 
career exploration possible 
for many students who 
otherwise might not have a 
chance for "on-the-job" 
exposure. 

INTERN PROGRAM 

Challenge a student by 
creating a new or filling an 
existing intern position. This 
longer 'on-the-job" training 
should provide a good 
introduction to a career field 
while giving the student 
practical experience at 
performing responsible 
duties. Our flexible program 
allows several options, 
including taking a student on 
a salaried or unsalaried basis, 
part-time or full-time, during 
the academic year or summer. 
Many times an internship 
may complement a student's 
studies and earn academic 
credit, but this is not a 
requirement. 

SPEAKER 

Contribute to the College by 
sharing your work, graduate 
school, and/or lifestyle 
experiences with current 



students and other alumnae 
as a speaker for a career 
conference or workshop. 

ADVISER 

Offer to talk informally with 
a student or alumna seeking 
advice about your career field 
and entry-level jobs. Help 
someone relocating to your 
area get a jump on researching 
the local job market by 
sharing your knowledge and 
contacts with her. 

MENTOR 

Help an Agnes Scott student 
or alumna enter and advance 
within your organization or 
career field. Perhaps now 
your main contribution may 
be contacting us about job 
openings, but keep in mind 
our highest goal — a network 
of professional women who 
will serve as mentors for 
bright, aspiririg protegees. 



Here's how you can let us 
see your prime time efforts. 
You can be an ASC Network 
affiliate by returning the 
attached card indicating your 
sponsorship of one or more of 
the above programs. If you 
have any questions about the 
ASC Network, please contact 
KathleenK. Mooney, Director 
of Career Planning, Agnes 
Scott College, 404-373-2571, 
ext. 365. 

Let us hear from you soon. 
Remember, it's your show! 



Join the ASC network 
It's your show! 



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By Paul McCain. Vice President for Development 



Under the leadership of Alumnae Fund Chairman Dorothy 
(Dot) Holloran Addison '43 of Atlanta. 2.845 alumnae gave 
$289,648 to the 1978-79 Agnes Scott Fund. This figure 
includes $13,387 in bequests from four alumnae. This 
number of donors represents 32 percent of the active 
alumnae. Assisting in the Fund Drive were 55 class fund 
chairmen and 510 class agents. 

During the past year combined gifts of 3,958 alumnae, 
parents and friends, businesses and foundations to Agnes 
Scott totaled $815,009. This amount includes gifts for 
endowment and for the renovation of Buttrick as well as for 
scholarships, equipment, and many other improvements. 

Except for those who preferred to give anonymously, all 
individuals, foundations, and businesses who made their 
gifts directly to Agnes Scott are listed on the following 
pages. These donors made their gifts to the College from 



July 1, 1978, through June 30, 1979. Gifts received after the 
latter date will be shown in the report for 1979-80. 

The Tower Circle is that group of donors whose gifts were 
$1,000 or more. The Colonnade Club includes those who 
gave $500 or more, the Quadrangle Quorum for donors of 
$250 or more, and the Century Club for those who gave $100 
or more. The asterisk (*) in the class listing indicates an 
alumna who served as a class agent. Double asterisks (**) 
are for donors who are now deceased. 

Please let the Agnes Scott Fund Office know of any 
corrections which may be needed so that we can be sure our 
records are accurate. 

To worker and donor alike, the entire College community 
welcomes this opportunity to thank you and express our 
appreciation for your fine response. 



Vice President for Development Paul McCain and Alumnae Fund Chairman 
Dorothy Holloran Addison '43 




SUMMARY REPORT BY CLASSES 







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Guard 


Maryellen Harvey Newton 


149 


40 


$ 


47,339 


1951 


Jeanne Kline Brown 


41 


25 




6,593 


1923 


Alice Vlrden 


37 


31 




2,920 


1952 


Barbara Brown Waddell 


43 


27 




1,997 


1924 


Frances Gilliland Stukes 


32 


31 




3,120 


1953 


Jane Hook Conyers 


48 


36 




1,661 


1925 




44 


38 




5,295 


1954 


Eleanor Hutchinson Smith 


35 


29 




4,030 


1926 


Rosalie Wooten Deck 


41 


37 




2,240 


1955 


Sarah Petty Dagenhart 


43 


29 




3,185 


1927 


Louise Lovejoy Jackson 


56 


40 




7,060 


1956 


Louise Rainey Ammons 


42 


29 




4,415 


1928 


Miriam Anderson Dowdy 


48 


41 




4,326 


1957 


Elizabeth Ansley Allan 


49 


28 




8,095 


1929 


Helen Ridley Hartley 


73 


50 




6,820 


1958 


Carolyn Tinkler Ramsey 


51 


31 




4,047 


1930 


Shannon Preston Cumming 


46 


37 




2,362 


1959 


Eleanor Lee McNeill 


59 


34 




2,164 


1931 


Martha Sprinkle Rafferty 


41 


42 




14,543 


1960 


Becky Evans Callahan 


45 


26 




2,525 


1932 


Varnelle Braddy Perryman 


41 


35 




5,135 


1961 


Mary Wayne Crymes Bywater 


56 


30 




3,340 


1933 


Mary Sturtevant Cunningham 


50 


40 




2,097 


1962 


Lebby Rogers Harrison 


52 


27 




3,263 


1934 


Nelle Chamlee Howard 


46 


40 




3,040 


1963 


Mary Ann Lusk Jorgenson 


40 


20 




1,719 


1935 


Julia McClatchey Brooke 


39 


32 




5,030 


1964 


Lucy Herbert Molinaro 


60 


30 




2,208 


1936 


Sarah Frances McDonald 


46 


36 




3,230 


1965 


Anne Schiff Faivus 


57 


29 




1,859 


1937 


Kathleen Daniel Spicer 


43 


38 




3,080 


1966 


Anne Morse Topple 


58 


28 




2,490 


1938 


Goudyloch Erwin Dyer 


53 


37 




3,230 


1967 


Anne Davis McGehee 


49 


26 




1,324 


1939 


Lou Pate Jones 


64 


50 




4,340 


1968 




60 


29 




2,071 


1940 


Helen Gates Carson 


53 


36 




54,956 


1969 


Julie Cottrill 


72 


31 




2,226 


1941 


Gene Slack Morse 


47 


32 




3,217 




Mary McAlpine Evans 










1942 


Claire Purcell Smith 


57 


38 




14,463 


1970 


Mary-Wills Hatfield LeCroy 


65 


30 




1,813 


1943 


Anne Paisley Boyd 


46 


37 




14,045 


1971 


Christy Fulton Baldwin 


62 


30 




1,811 


1944 


Betty Williams Stoffel 


43 


30 




2,977 


1972 


Sharon Jones Cole 


43 


20 




1,308 


1945 




50 


34 




2,587 


1973 


Judy Hill Calhoun 


54 


24 




1,522 


1946 


Mary McConkey Reimer 


50 


30 




3,780 


1974 


Lib McGregor Simmons 


42 


22 




850 


1947 


Marguerite Born Hornsby 


51 


34 




3,755 


1975 


Debbie Shepherd Hamby 


39 


22 




1,264 


1948 


Rebekah Scott Bryan 


47 


31 




3,233 


1976 


Nancy Leasendale Purcell 


41 


22 




1,630 


1949 


Nancy Huey Kelly 


56 


34 




3,853 


1977 


Ann Pesterfield Krueger 


35 


23 




1,015 


1950 


Pat Overton Webb 


30 


21 




1,253 


1978 


Kay Cochrane 


22 


12 




379 



Tower Circle 



**Mary Donnelly Meehan '10 
Louise Hunter Marshall '10 
Julia Smith Slack '12 
Annie Tait Jenkins '14 
Mary West Thatcher '15 
Alma Buchanan Brown ' 16 
Maryellen Harvey Newton ' 16 
Ruth Anderson O'Neal '18 

**Julia Ingram Hazzard '19 
Lulu Smith Westcott '19 
Lillian G. Patton '20 
Myrtle C. Blackmon '21 
Ida Brittain Patterson '21 
Quenelle Harrold Sheffield '23 
Mary Keesler Dalton '25 
Frances Tennent Ellis '25 
Dora Ferrell Gentry '26 
Olivia Ward Swann '26 
Caroline McKinney Clarke '27 
Willie W. Smith '27 
Louise Woodard Clifton '27 
Ruth Thomas Stemmons '28 
Ethel Freeland Darden '29 
Mary Warren Read '29 
Violet Weeks Miller '29 
Julia Thompson Smith '31 



Margaret G. Weeks '31 


Mr. 


Diana Dyer Wilson '32 


Mrs. 


Betty Lou Houck Smith '35 


Mr. 


Marie Simpson Rutland '35 


Mr. 


Martha Marshall Dykes '39 


Mrs. 


Marian Franklin Anderson '40 


Mr. 


Virginia Milner Carter '40 


Mrs. 


*Marie Scott O'Neill '42 


Mr. 


Betty Henderson Cameron '43 


Mr. 


Dorothy Holloran Addison '43 


Mr. 


Betty Scott Noble '44 


Dr. 


Scott Newell Newton '45 


**Mr. 


Mary Duckworth Gellerstedt '46 


**Mrs. 


Dorothy Peace Ramsaur '47 


Mr. 


Vanesse Orr Rowe '48 


Dr. 


Mary Elizabeth Hays Babcock '49 


Dr. . 


Cissie Spiro Aidinoff '51 


Miss 


Catherine Warren Dukehart '51 


Dr. , 


Louise Hill Reaves '54 


Mr. i 


Helen McGowan French '54 


**Miss 


Jo Ann Hall Hunsinger '55 


Mr. 1 


Nancy Thomas Hill '56 


Mr. 1 


Suzella Burns Newsome '57 


Mr. 1 


Betsy Jefferson Boyt '62 


Mr. . 


Mr. M. Bernard Aidinoff 


Mr. 1 


Mr. W. 0. Alt 





Paul H. Anderson 

Louise Risley Barnes 
Dan D. Cameron 
Clifford M. Clarke 

Howard P. Conrad 
Harry L. Dalton 

Isobel A. Fraser 
Alex P. Gaines 
L. L. Gellerstedt, Jr. 
John S. Hunsinger 
and Mrs. Rudolph W. Jones, Jr. 
David N. Landers 

Helen B. Longshore 
J. Erskine Love, Jr. 
and Mrs. Paul M. McCain 
James Newsome 

Bess Patton 
and Mrs. Marvin B. Perry, Jr. 
C. Oscar Schmidt, Jr. 

Gertrude K. Sevin 
Hal L. Smith 
P. L. Bealy Smith 
Ferdinand Warren 
James H. Wells 
T Wilson, Jr 



* Fund Agent ** Deceased 
Fall 1979 



Quadrangle Quorum 



**Jesse Z. Ham '15 
Agnes Ball '17 
Eileen Dodd Sams '22 
Virginia Wing Power '26 
Catherine Mitchell Lynn '27 
Evelyn F. Satterwhite '27 
Patricia Collins Dwinnell * 28 
Mary King Fowler '28 
Nannie Graham Sanders '28 
Ann Todd Rubey '28 
Helen Gouedy Mansfield '29 
Jane Bailey Hall Hefner '30 
Crystal Wellborn Gregg '30 
Myra Jervey Bedell '31 
Fanny Willis Niles Bolton '31 
Imogene Hudson Cullinan '32 
Lila Norfleet Davis '32 
Lovelyn Wilson Heyward '32 
Elizabeth Alexander Higgins '35 
Betty Fountain Gray '35 
Nina Parke Hopkins '35 
Lisalotte Roennecke Kaiser '35 
Laura Whitner Dorsey '35 
Annie Galloway Phillips '37 
Dorothy Avery Newton '38 
Zoe Wells Lambert '38 
Jane Hamilton Ray '39 
Lou Pate Jones '39 
Haydie Sanford Sams '39 
Eloise McCall Guyton '40 
Anne Chambless Bateman '42 
Betty Medlock Clark '42 
Ruby Rosser Davis '43 
Mabel Stowe Query *43 
Lucile E. Beaver '46 
Anna George Dobbins '47 
Charlotte Hevener Nobbs '47 
May Turner Engeman '47 
Anne Irwin Smith '50 
Harriet Durham Maloof '54 



Anne Patterson Hammes '54 

Virginia Love Dunaway *56 

Helen Sewell Johnson '57 

Sue Lile Inman '58 

Martha Holmes Keith '59 

Charlotte King Sanner '60 

Sally Smith Howard '60 

Elizabeth Dalton Brand '61 

Robin Patrick Johnston '63 

Margaret Murphy Hunter '65 

Mary Chapman Hatcher '69 

Sally Elberfeld Countryman '69 

Lou Frank Guill '69 

Susan E. Morton ' 71 

Sharon Jones Cole '72 

Julia C« Goodloe '73 

Ms. Carol Aycock 

Mrs. George M. Bevier 

Mr. Otis Burnham 

Mr. Scott Candler, Jr. 

Mr. Neil 0. Davis 

Mrs. Barbara Derketsch 

Mr. Earl H. Elberfeld 

Mrs. Rachel R. Gordon 

Mrs. Esther A. Graff 

Mr. Sam F. Hatcher 

Mr. Samuel M. Inman, Jr. 

Mr. K. Webb Kennedy 

Lions Club Schwabisch Hall 

Mr. James Ross McCain 

Dr. Kate McKemie 

Mr. M. Lamar Oglesby 

Col, and Mrs. Henry A. Robinson 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank E. Rockwell 

Mr. Hansford Sams, Jr. 

Mr. W. A. L. Sibley, Jr. 

Mrs. Carolyn Snow 

Dr. and Mrs. Frederick H. Thompson 

Mr. William C. Wardlaw 

Mrs. Henry C. West 



Colonnade Club 



Mary E Hamilton '15 

Oman Buchanan Albaugh '16 

Goldie Suttle Ham '19 

Marguerite Watts Cooper '19 

Jean McAlister '21 

Elizabeth Flake Cole '23 

Jane Knight Lowe '23 

Frances Cilliland Stukes '24 

Victoria Howie Kerr '24 

Mary Ben Wright Erwin '25 

Pearl Kunnes '27 

Roberta Winter '27 

Mary Shewmaker '28 

Hazel Brown Ricks '29 

Raemond Wilson Craig '30 

Mary Effie Elliot '32 

Elinor Hamilton Hightower '34 

Hyta Plowden Mederer '34 

Carrie Phinney Latimer Duvall '36 

Frances Wilson Hurst '37 

Helen Gates Carson '40 

Aileen Kasper Borrish '41 

Louise Isaacson Bernard '46 

Amelia Davis Luchslnger '48 

Katherine A. Geffcken '49 



Emy Evans Blair '52 

Sara Mclntyre Bahner '55 

Susan Hogg Griffith '58 

Nancy Holland Sibley '58 

JoAnn Sawyer Delafield '58 

Carolyn Tinkler Ramsey '58 

Elizabeth Harshbarger Broadus '62 

Suzanne Jones Harper '68 

Jeanne Jones Holliday '76 

Susan Kathleen Bethune '79 

Mr. Wo A. Bethune 

Mr. Thomas H. Broadus 

Mrs. Aline M. Brown 

Dr. Robert P. Coggins 

Dr. Julia T. Gary 

Mr. Ben S. Gilmer 

Mrs. Edward Hansell 

Mr. and Mrs. James B. Markert 

Dr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Martin 

Mr. J. A. Minter, Jr. 

Mr. C. B. Rogers, Jr. 
**Mrs. Susan V. Russell 

Mr. John A. Sibley 
**Mr. Edraond H. Smith, Jr. 



Century Club 



LIzzabel Saxon '08 
Gladys Camp Brannan '16 
Margaret T. Phythian '16 
Virginia Allen Potter '17 
Janet Newton '17 
Regina Pinkston '17 
Virginia Haugh Franklin '18 
Katherine Seay '18 
Lucy Durr Dunn '19 
Alice Norman Pate ' 19 
Elizabeth Witherspoon Patterson 
Margaret Bland Sewell '20 



Romola Davis Hardy '20 
Marian Harper Kellogg '20 
Julia Brantley Willet '21 
Lois Compton Jennings '21 
Lucile Conant Leland '21 
Elizabeth Enloe MacCarthy '21 
Mary Finney Bass '21 
Sarah Fulton '21 
Sarah McCurdy Evans '21 
Eleanor Buchanan Starcher '22 
'19 Helen Burkhalter Quattlebaum '22 
Emma Proctor Newton '22 



Ruth Scandrett Hardy '22 
Viola Hollis Oakley '23 
Lucie Howard Carter '23 
Martha Mcintosh Nail *23 
Attie Alford '24 
Martha Eakes Matthews '24 
Katie Frank Gilchrist '24 
Elizabeth Henry Shands '24 
Barron Hyatt Morrow '24 
Corinne Jackson Wilkerson '24 
Mary L. McCurdy '24 
Margaret McDow MacDougall '24 
Isabel Ferguson Hargadine '25 
Virginia Perkins Nelson '25 
Sarah Tate Tumlin '25 
Memory Tucker Merritt '25 
Pocahontas Wignt Edmunds '25 
Helen Bates Law '26 
Edyth Carpenter Shuey '26 
Elizabeth Chapman Pirkle '26 
Gene Dumas Vickers '26 
Edith Gilchrist Berry '26 
Gertrude Green Blalock '26 
Juanita Greer White '26 
Catherine Mock Hodgin '26 
Florence Perkins Ferry '26 
Norma Tucker Sturtevant '26 
Margaret Whitington Davis '26 
Willie May Coleman Duncan '27 
Mildred Cowan Wright '27 
Grace Etheredge '27 
♦Clarice Hollis Fears '27 
Elizabeth Lilly Swedenberg '27 
Elizabeth Lynn '27 
Ruth McMillan Jones '27 
Virginia Sevier Hanna '27 
Elizabeth A. Vary '27 
Mary Weems Rogers '27 
Madelaine Dunseith Alston '28 
Louise Girardeau Cook '28 
Sarah Glenn Boyd '28 
Olive Graves Bowen * 28 
Kathryn Kalmon Nussbaum '28 
Anna Knight Daves '28 
Evangeline Papageorge '28 
Mary Shepherd Soper '28 
Gladys Austin Mann '29 
Virginia Branch Leslie '29 
Lucile Bridgman Leitch '29 
Bettina Bush Jackson '29 
Sally Cothran Lambeth '29 
Sara Douglass Thomas '29 
Elise M. Gibson '29 
Marion Green Johnston '29 
Elizabeth Hatchett '29 
Cara Hinman ' 29 
Katherine Hunter Branch '29 
Elaine Jacobsen Lewis '29 
Sara Johnston Hill '29 
Mary Alice Juhan '29 
Geraldine LeMay '29 
Katharine Lott Marbut '29 
Edith McGranahan Smith T '29 
Katharine Pasco '29 
Lillian Adelaide Wurm Cousins '29 
Helen Hendricks Martin '30 
Carlton Jones Bunkley '30 
Lynn Moore Hardy '30 
Dorothy Daniel Smith '30 
Sara Townsend Pittman ' 30 
Sara L. Bullock '31 
Ruth Etheredge Griffin '31 
Dorothy Grubb Rivers '31 
Ruth Pringle Pipkin '31 
Harriet L. Smith '31 
Martha Sprinkle Rafferty '31 
Ellene Winn '31 
Catherine Baker Evans '32 
Varnelle Braddy Perryman '32 
Penny Brown Barnett '32 
Susan Love Glenn '32 
Ruth Conant Green '32 
Louise Hollingsworth Jackson '32 
Louise H. Stakely '32 
Nell Starr Gardner '32 
Jura Taffar Cole '32 
Miriam Thompson Felder '32 
Page Ackerman '33 
Bernice Beaty Cole '33 
Julia Finley McCutchen '33 
Caroline Lingle Lester '33 
Frances Oglesby Hills '33 
Letitia Rockmore Nash '33 
Mary Sturtevant Cunningham '33 
Annie Laurie Whitehead Young '33 
Marie Whittle Wellslager '33 
Helen Boyd McConnell '34 
Pauline Gordon Woods '34 
Lucy Goss Herbert '34 



Louise McCain Boyce '34 
Frances M. O'Brien '34 
Dorothy Potts Weiss '34 
Gladys Pratt Entrican '34 
Virginia F. Prettyman '34 
Mabel Talmage '34 
Dorothy Walker Palmer *34 
Carol Griffin Scoville '35 
Elizabeth Heaton Mullino '35 
Anna Humber Little *35 
Julia McClatchey Brooke '35 
Jacqueline Woolfolk Mathes T 35 
Mary Beasley White * 36 
Meriel Bull Mitchell '36 
Louise Jordan Turner '36 
Sarah Frances McDonald '36 
Louisa Robert Carroll '36 
Mary Margaret Stowe Hunter '36 
Mary Vines Wright f 36 
Eloisa Alexander LeConte '37 
Kathleen Daniel Spicer '37 
Lucile Dennison Keenan * 37 
Fannie Harris Jones '37 
Barbara Hertwig Meschter '37 
Dorothy Jester '37 
Rachel Kennedy Lowthian '37 
Vivienne Long McCain '37 
Enid Middleton Howard *37 
Marjorie Scott Meier '37 
Frances Steele Garrett '37 
Elizabeth Blackshear Flinn '38 
Martha Brown Miller '38 
Jean Chalmers Smith '38 
Lulu Croft '38 
Doris Dunn St. Clair '38 
Goudyloch Erwin Dyer '38 
Eloise Estes Keiser '38 
Bertha Merrill Holt '38 
Nancy Moorer Cantey '38 
Virginia Suttenfield '38 
Grace Tazewell Flowers "38 
Virginia Watson Logan '38 
Elsie West Duval '38 
Louise Young Garrett '38 
Jean Bailey Owen '39 
Helen Moses Regenstein '39 
Mary Murphy Chesnutt '39 
Margaret Pleasants Jones '39 
Julia Porter Scurry '39 
Mamie Lee Ratliff Finger '39 
Elinor Tyler Richardson '39 
Margaret Barnes Carey '40 
Evelyn Baty Christman '40 
Eleanor N. Hutchens '40 
Mildred Joseph Colyer '40 
Ruth Ashburn Kline '41 
Louise Franklin Livingston '41 
Caroline Gray Truslow '41 
Anne Martin Elliott '41 
Marjorie Merlin Cohen '41 
Martha Moody Laseter '41 
Pattie Patterson Johnson *4l 
Gene Slack Morse '41 
Frances Spratlin Hargrett '41 
**Carolyn Strozier '41 
Jane Vaughan Price '41 
Betty Alden Waitt White '41 
Rebekah Andrews McNeill '42 
Betty Ann Brooks '42 
Susan Dyer Oliver '42 
Francis Ellis Wayt '42 
Doris Henson Vaughn '42 
Julia Patch Weston '42 
Louise Pruitt Jones '42 
Margaret Sheftall Chester '42 
Frances Tucker Johnson '42 
Mary Jane Auld Linker '43 
Betty Bates Fernandez '43 
Maryann Cochran Abbott '43 
Margaret Downie Brown '43 
Sterly Lebey Wilder '43 
Clara Rountree Couch '43 
Barbara Wilber Gerland '43 
Katherine Wright Philips '43 
Bettye Ashcraft Senter '44 
Frances Cook Crowley '44 
Elizabeth Edwards Wilson '44 
Elizabeth Harvard Dowda '44 
Julia Harvard Warnock '44 
Martha Lasseter Storey '44 
Margaret Powell Flowers '44 
Marjorie Tippins Johnson '44 
Virginia Carter Caldwell *45 
Elizabeth Farmer Gaynor '45 
Elizabeth Glenn Stow '45 
Mary Ann Turner Edwards f 45 
Dorothy Lee Webb McKee '45 
Martha Baker Wilkins '46 
Edwina Bell Davis '46 



Fund Agent ( * Deceased 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 








— 










Bible professor Mary Boney Sheats. 



Conradine Fraser Riddle '46 
Anne Lee Mitchell '46 
Celetta Powell Jones '46 
Marie Beeson Ingraham '47 
Virginia Brown McKenzie '47 
Jane Cooke Cross '47 
Helen Catherine Currie '47 
Genet Heery Barron '47 
Marianne Jeffries Williams '47 
Margaret Kelly Wells '47 
Betty Radford Moeller '47 
Barbara Smith Hull '47 
Barbara Anne Blair '48 
Adele Dieckmann McKee '48 
Virginia Drake Blass '48 
Kathleen Hewson Cole '48 
June Irvine Torbert '48 
Marybeth Little Weston '48 
Mae Osborne Parker '48 
Rebekah Scott Bryan '48 
Betty Blackmon Kinnett '49 
Bettie Davison Bruce '49 
Betty Jeanne Ellison Candler '49 
Kate Durr Elmore '49 
Martha Goddard Lovell '49 
Rudy Lehmann Cowley '49 
Reece Newton Smith '49 
Nancy Parks Anderson '49 
Betty Jo Sauer Mansur '49 
Virginia Vining Skelton '49 
Jo-Anne Christopher Cochrane '50 
Jessie Hodges Kryder '50 
Margaret Hunt Denny '51 
Jimmie Ann McGee Collings '51 
Sarah McKee Burnside ' 51 
Ann Boyer Wilkerson '52 
Jeannine Byrd Hopkins '52 
Catherine Crowe Merritt '52 
Kathren Freeman Stelzner '52 
Jean Robarts Seaton '52 
Jackie Simmons Gow '52 
Bertie Bond '53 
Ann Cooper Whitesel '53 
Belle Miller McMaster '53 
Patricia Morgan Fisher '53 
Mary Ripley Warren '53 
Louise Ross Bell '53 



Norma Wang Feng '53 
Jane Williams Coleman '53 
Ulla E. Beckman * 54 
Sue Born Ballard '54 
Julia Grier Storey '54 
Eleanor Hutchinson Smith '54 
Mitzi Kiser Law '54 
Ellen Prouty Smith '54 
Nancy Whetstone Hull '54 
Susanna Byrd Wells '55 
Harriet Hampton Cuthbertson '55 
Helen Hinchey Williams '55 
Catherine Lewis Callaway '55 
Sarah Petty Dagenhart '55 
Joan Pruitt Mclntyre '55 
Dorothy Sands Hawkins '55 
Agnes Scott Willoch '55 
Margaret Burwell Barnhardt '56 
Claire Flintom Barnhardt '56 
Sallie Greenfield '56 
Harriett Griffin Harris '56 
Sarah Hall Hayes '56 
Emmie Hay Alexander '56 
Nancy Jackson Pitts '56 
May Muse Stonecypher '56 
Anne Sayre Callison '56 
Robbie Ann Shelnutt Upshaw '56 
Mary D. Beaty '57 
Carolyn Herman Sharp '57 
Elaine Lewis Hudgins '57 
Katherine Miller Nevins '57 
Jean Price Knapp '57 
Ann Shire Penuel '57 
Miriam F. Smith '57 
Anne Terry Sherren '57 
Martha Davis Rosselot '58 
Patricia Gover Bitzer '58 
Sara Margaret Heard White '58 
Carolyn Magruder Ruppenthal '58 
Mary Jane Milford Spurgeon '58 
Phia Peppas Kanellos '58 
Blythe Posey Ashmore '58 
Caroline Romberg Silcox '58 
Cecily Rudisill Langford '58 
Harriet Talmadge Mill '58 
Jane King Allen '59 
Mildred Ling Wu '59 



Suzanne Heath Manges '59 

Ann Rivers Payne Hutcheson '59 

Jean Salter Reeves '59 

Carolyn Wright McGarity '59 

Nell Archer Congdon '60 

Margaret Collins Alexander '60 

Shannon Cumming McCormick '60 

Carolyn Anne Davies Preische '60 

Rebecca Evans Callahan '60 

Louise Florance Smythe '60 

Marcia Tobey Swanson '60 

Grace Woods Walden '60 

Ann Avant Crichton '61 

Barbara Best Teckemeyer '61 

Sally Bryan Minter '61 

Kay Gwaltney Remick '61 

Janice L. Henry '61 

Julia Maddox Paul '61 

Barbara Mordecai Schwanebeck '61 

Nancy Stone Hough '61 

Patricia Walker Bass '61 

Martha Campbell Williams '62 

Carol Cowan Kussmaul '62 

Betty Pancake Williams '62 

Marjorie Reitz Turnbull '62 

Lebby Rogers Harrison '62 

Sarah Cumming Mitchell '63 

Dorothy Laird Foster '63 

Suzanne Smith *63 

Diane David Hamrick '64 

Harriet King Wasserman '64 

Martha MacNair McMullen '64 

Anne Minter Nelson '64 

Margaret Moses Young '64 

Lila Sheffield Howland '64 

Doris El-Tawil Krueger '65 

Diane Miller Wise '65 

Sandra Wilson '65 

Alice Airth '66 

Nancy Bruce Truluck '66 

Mary Jane Calmes Thomas '66 

Jan Gaskell Ross '66 

Anne Morse Topple ' 66 

Malinda Snow '66 

Martha Thompson '66 

Ruth Van Deman Walters '66 

Louisa W. G. Williams '66 

Anne Diseker Beebe '67 

Jane Keiger Gehring '67 

Susan Stevens Hitchcock '67 

Susan Stringer Connell '68 

Minnie Bob Mothes Campbell '69 

Martha Wilson Keesler '69 

Sherian Fitzgerald Hodges '70 

Cheryl Granade Sullivan '70 

Ann Mizell Millar '70 

Catherine Oliver '70 

Sandra Wilson Harris '70 

Mary Alice Isele Johnson '71 

Ann A. Jarrett '71 

Granville Sydnor Hill '71 

Bernie Todd Smith ' 71 

Deborah Jordan Bates '72 

Linda Maloy Ozier '72 

Resa L. Harris ' 73 

Judith Maguire Tindel '73 

Mary Louise Brown Forsythe '75 

Shelby White Cave '75 

Sally Stenger '75 

Emily Dunbar ' 76 

Susan Grier Phillips '76 

Lark Todd Sessions '76 



Elizabeth Doscher Shannon *77 
Linda Shearon '77 

Barrow-Gwinnett-Newton Agnes 

Scott Alumnae Club 
Decatur Agnes Scott Alumnae Club 
Triangle Area Agnes Scott 

College Alumnae Club 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Abernathy 
Mr. and Mrs. Lee A. Barclay 
Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Benson 
Mr. E. L. Bothwell 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry L. Bowden 
Mr. Harllee Branch, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Bringhurst , Jr. 
Mr. Morrison W. Brinker 
Mr. and Mrs. Waverly C. Broadwell , Jr. 
Mrs. Helen S. Carchidi 
Mr. John H. Carter, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Collar, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. William M. Curd 
Mrs. Jean M. Davis 

Decatur Music Teachers Association 
Dr. F. William Dowda 
Mr. and Mrs. George B. Dunbar 
Mr. and Mrs. G. S. Dunbar 
Mrs. Julia C. Duncan 
Dr. and Mrs. E. M. Dunstan 
Mr. and Mrs. Percy Echols 
Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Elebash 
Mr. Lawrence L. Floyd 
Mr. and Mrs. James C. Gaither 
Mr. Blake P. Garrett 
**Mr. James R. Gilliam, Jr. 
Mrs. N. Howard Gowing, Jr. 
Dr. Marjorie Grene 
Mrs. James E. Hara 
Mr. and Mrs. John S, Harrison 
Mr. W. E. Hunter 
Mr. Donald R. Keough 
Mr. Kenneth L. Kinney 
Dr. C. Benton Kline 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter W. Leroy 
Mrs. Elsie W. Love 
Dr. Kathryn A. Manuel 
Dr. and Mrs. Frank Matthews 
Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Mcintosh 
Dr. W. Edward McNair 
Miss Elisabeth Mitchell 
Dr. Chester Morse 
Mr. Herbert H. Nussbaum 
Mrs. John Pancake 
Dr. and Mrs. Walter B. Posey 
Mr. and Mrs. Francois L. Sheats 
Mr. Horace H. Sibley 
Mr. and Mrs. Roff Sims 
Mrs. L. Noel Smith 
Mr. and Mrs. George A. Speer, Jr. 
Dr. Chloe Steel 
Mr. Augustus H. Sterne 
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Stimson 
Mr. and Mrs. John E. Swink 
Dr. J. Randolph Taylor 
Mrs. W. M. Terrill 
Dr. and Mrs. J. N. Thomas 
Mr. and Mrs. Glenn E. Thompson 
Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Wallace, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Wendling 
Mrs. J. Parham Werlein 
Mr. John C. Wilson 
Women of the Church, 

Decatur Presbyterian Church 
Mr. and Mrs. William M. Zarkowsky 



Institute 



Annie Wiley Preston 



Academy 



Lillian Beatty Cory 
Mildred Beatty Miller 
Julia Green Heinz 
Ruth Green 
Susie E. Johnson 



1908 



Lizzabel Saxon 



1910 



**Mary Donnelly Meehan 
Emma Eldridge Ferguson 
Louise Hunter Marshall 
Lila Williams Rose 



1906 



Ida Lee Hill Irvin 



1911 



Mollie McCormick McCord 
Ruby Stevens Cone 



Fall 1979 



1912 

Martha Hall Young 
Julia Smith Slack 
Carol Stearns Wey 

1913 

Mathilde Brenner Gercke 
Margaret Roberts Graham 

1914 

Theodosia Cobbs Hogan 
Annie Tait Jenkins 
Kathleen Kennedy 
Linda Miller Summer 



1915 



Anonymous 
**Jesse 2. Ham 
Mary E. Hamilton 
Mary Hyer Dale 
Isabel Norwood 
Grace Reid 

Almedia Sadler Duncan 
Mary West Thatcher 



1916 



Elizabeth Bogle Weil 
Alma Buchanan Brown 
Omah Buchanan Albaugh 
Gladys Camp Brannan 
Evelyn Goode Brock 
Maryellen Harvey Newton 
Katherine Hay Rouse 
Margaret T. Phythian 
Janie Rogers Allen 
Jeannette Victor Levy 
Clara Whips Dunn 



1917 



Virginia Allen Potter 

Gjertrud Amundsen Siqueland 

Agnes Ball 

Gladys Gaines Field 

Mildred Hall Pearce 

Jane Harwell Heazel 

Janet Newton 

Regina Pinkston 

Katharine Baker Simpson 

Alice Zachry 



Goldie Suttle Ham 
**Julia Ingram Hazzard 
Virginia Newton 
Alice Norman Pate 
Lulu Smith Westcott 
Marguerite Watts Cooper 
Llewellyn Wilburn 
Elizabeth Witherspoon Patterson 



Agnes Scott Income 
1978-79 



1920 



Margaret Bland Sewell 

Eloise Buston Sluss 

Roraola Davis Hardy 

Sarah Davis Mann 

Julia Hagood Cuthbertson 

Marian Harper Kellogg 

Cornelia Hutton Hazelhurst 

Eunice Legg Gunn 

Margery Moore Tappan 

Lillian G c Patton 

Margaret Sanders Brannon 

Louise Slack Hooker 

Mary Beall Weekes Clements 

Margaret Woods Spalding 

Rosalind Wurm Council 



1921 



Myrtle C. Blackmon 
Julia Brantley Willet 
Ida Brittain Patterson 
Thelma Brown Aiken 
Eleanor B. Carpenter 
Lois Compton Jennings 
Lucile Conant Leland 
Virginia Crank Everett 
Frances Dearing Hay 
Elizabeth Enloe MacCarthy 
Mary Finney Bass 
Elizabeth Floding Morgan 
Louise Fluker 
Sarah Fulton 
Sophie Hagedorn Fox 
Helen Hall Hopkins 
Hariwill Hanes Hulsey 
Margaret Hedrick Nickels 
Anna Locke Ingram Liles 
Melville Jameson 
Anna Marie Landress Cate 
Jean McAlister 
Sarah McCurdy Evans 
Gladys McDaniel Hastings 
Charlotte Newton 
Eddith Patterson Blair 
Edith Roark Van Sickle 
Eula Russell Kelly 
Elizabeth Smith DeWitt 
Julia Tomlinson Ingram 
Evelyn Wade Harwood 
Margaret Stuart Wade 
Marguerite Wat kins Goodman 
Helen Wayt Cocks 



Student Charges 
43.0% 




Agnes Scott Expenditures 
1978-79 




Student \ 
Services 
^ 7.6% 



Administration 
20.2% 



Instruction and 

Library 

33.0% 



Scholarships 

7.8% 



1918 



Hallie Alexander Turner 
Ruth Anderson O'Neal 
Elva Brehm Florrid 
Martha H. Comer 
Ruby Lee Estes Ware 
Olive Hardwick Cross 
Virginia Haugh Franklin 
Susan B. Hecker 
Alvahn Holmes 
Margaret Leyburn Foster 
Dorothy Moore Horton 
Katherine Seay 



1919 



Margaret Grace Barry Owen 
Cora Mae Bond LeVert 
LaGrange Cothran Trussell 
Elizabeth Dimmock Bloodworth 
Lucy Durr Dunn 
Lois Eve Rozier 
Louise Felker Mizell 
Mary Ford Kennerly 
Katherine Godbee Smith 



1922 



Agnes Adams Stokes 
Sarah Alston Lawton 
Elizabeth A. Brown 
Eleanor Buchanan Starcher 
Helen Burkhalter Quattlebaum 
Eunice Dean Major 
Caroline Farquhar 
Catherine Haugh Smith 
Genie Blue Howard Mathews 
Lilburne Ivey Tuttle 
Julia Jameson 
Anne Ruth Moore Crawford 
Carolyn Moore Gressette 
Emma Proctor Newton 
Dinah Roberts Parramore 
Ruth Scandrett Hardy 
Louie Dean Stephens Markey 
Emma Julia Thomas Johnston 
Frances White Weems 



Food Service, 

Dormitories 

20.0% 



1923 



*Dorothy Bowron Collins 
Margaret Brenner Awtrey 



Thelma Cook Turt6n 
Mary Cooper Christian 
Louise Crosland Huske 
Rebecca B. Dick 
Eileen Dodd Sams 
Christine Evans Murray 
Helen Faw Mull 
Elizabeth Flake Cole 
Maud Foster Stebler 
*Philippa C. Gilchrist 
Emily Guille Henegar 
Jennye Hall Lemon 
Quenelle Harrold Sheffield 
Elizabeth Hoke Smith 
Viola Hollis Oakley 
Lucie Howard Carter 
Ruby Hudson Baker 
Jane Knight Lowe 



Plant ^ 
Operation 
11.4% 



Lucile Little Morgan 
Elizabeth Lockhart Davis 
Josephine Logan Hamilton 

*Beth McClure McGeachy 
Martha Mcintosh Nail 

*Anna Meade Minnigerode 
Susye Mims Lazenby 
Elizabeth Molloy Horr 
Caroline Moody Jordan 
Lillian Moore Rice 
Fredeva Ogletree 
Elizabeth Ransom Hahn 
Edith Ruff Coulliette 
Nancy Tripp Shand 
Jessie Watts Rustin 
Mary Lee Wilhelm Satterwhite 
Margaret Yeager Brackney 



Fund Agent '* Deceased 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



1924 



Anonymous 

Elizabeth Askew Patterson 

Attie Alford 
*Grace Bargeron Rambo 

Rebecca Bivings Rogers 

Sara Brandon Rickey 

Helen Lane Comfort Sanders 

Martha Eakes Matthews 

Katie Frank Gilchrist 

Frances Gilliland Stukes 

Ann Hatton Lewis 

Elizabeth Henry Shands 
^Victoria Howie Kerr 
*Barron Hyatt Morrow 

Corinne Jackson Wilkerson 

Mary L. McCurdy 

Margaret McDow MacDougall 

Sara McDowell Joiner 

Annie Will Miller Klugh 

Mary Mobberly 

Pauline Murphey Gradick 
*Catherine Nash Scott 

Weenona Peck Booth 

Margaret Powell Gay 

Merle Rhyne Walker 

Carrie Scandrett 

Isabelle Sewell Hancock 

Daisy Frances Smith 
*Polly Stone Buck 

Augusta Thomas Lanier 

Annadawn Watson Edwards 

Helen Wright Smith 



1925 



Frances Alston Everett 
Frances Bitzer Edson 
Lulawill Brown Ellis 
Mary Brown Campbell 
Louise Buchanan Proctor 
Mary Caldwell McFarland 
Catherine Carrier Robinson 
Isabel Ferguson Hargadine 
Frances Gardner Welton 
*Lucile Gause Fryxell 
Alice Greenlee Grollman 
Ruth Harrison McKay 
Sallie Horton Lay 
Margaret Hyatt Walker 

*Annie Johnson Sylvester 
Mary Keesler Dalton 
Eunice Kell Simmons 
Georgia May Little Owens 
Martha Lin Manly Hogshead 
Josephine Marbut Stanley 
Mary K. McCallum 
Anne McKay Mitchell 
Mary Ann McKinney 
Lillian Middlebrooks Smears 
Virginia Perkins Nelson 
Julia F. Pope 
Floy Sadler Maier 
Josephine Schuessler Stevens 
Elizabeth Shaw McClamroch 
Mary Sims Dickson 

*Carolyn Smith Whipple 
Ella Smith Hayes 
Emily Ann Spivey Simmons 

*Sarah Tate Tumlin 
Frances Tennent Ellis 

*Eugenia Thompson Akin 
Memory Tucker Merritt 

*Mary Belle Walker 
Virginia Watts Beals 
Frances White 
Pocahontas Wight Edmunds 
Mabel Witherspoon Meredith 
Mary Ben Wright Erwin 

*Emily Zellars McNeill 



1926 



Helen Bates Law 
Mary Louise Bennett 
Lois Bolles Knox 
Esther Byers Pitts 
Katharine Cannaday McKenzie 
Edyth Carpenter Shuey 
*Elizabeth Chapman Pirkle 
Clarkie Davis Skelton 
Louisa Duls 
Gene Dumas Vickers 
Jeffie Dunn Clark 



*Ellen Fain Bowen 
Dora Ferrell Gentry 
Mary Freeman Curtis 
Edith Gilchrist Berry 
Gertrude Green Blalock 
Juanita Greer White 
Olive Hall Shadgett 
Charlotte Higgs Andrews 

*Hazel Huff Monaghan 
Mary Elizabeth Knox Happoldt 
Betty Little Meriwether 
Margaret Lotspeich Whitbeck 
Catherine Mock Hodgin 
Virginia Peeler Green 

*Florence Perkins Ferry 
Allene Ramage Fitzgerald 

*Nellie Bass Richardson 
Mildred Scott 
Susan Shadburn Watkins 
Sarah Quinn Slaughter 
Mary L, Smith 
Elizabeth Snow Tilly 
Evelyn Sprinkle Carter 
Olivia Ward Swann 
Norma Tucker Sturtevant 
Margaret Tufts Neal 

*Margaret Whitington Davis 
Maud Whittemore Flowers 
Virginia Wing Power 
Rosalie Wootten Deck 



1927 



Evelyn Albright Caldwell 
Reba Bayless Boyer 
Maurine Bledsoe Bramlett 
Josephine Bridgman 
Annette Carter Colwell 
Dorothy Chamberlain 
Susan Clayton Fuller 
Lillian Clement Adams 
Willie May Coleman Duncan 
*Mildred Cowan Wright 
Martha Crowe Eddins 
Marion Daniel Blue 
*Catherine Louise Davis 
Mabel Dumas Crenshaw 
Grace Etheredge 
Katharine Gilliland Higgins 
Mary Heath Phillips 
Mary Rebekah Hedrick 
Elizabeth Henderson Palmer 
**Clarice Hollis Fears 
Katherine Houston Sheild 
Mae Erskine Irvine Fowler 
Lelia Joiner Cooper 
Pearl Kunnes 
Louise Leonard McLeod 
Elizabeth Lilly Swedenberg 
Georgia Linkous Bivins 
Louise Love joy Jackson 
Lamar Lowe Connell 
*Elizabeth Lynn 
Virginia MacDonald 
Carolina McCall Chapin 
Caroline McKinney Clarke 
Pauline McLeod Logue 
Ruth McMillan Jones 
Catherine Mitchell Lynn 
Elizabeth Norfleet Miller 
Stella Pittman Dunkin 
Miriam Preston St. Clair 
Douglass Rankin Hughes 
*May Reece Forman 
Edith Richards 
Evelyn F. Satterwhite 
Virginia Sevier Hanna 
Mamie Shaw Flack 
Sarah Shields Pfeiffer 
Miss Mary Shive 
Willie W. Smith 
*Emily Stead 
Edith Strickland Jones 
Elizabeth A. Vary 
Mary Weems Rogers 
Roberta Winter 
Louise Woodard Clifton 
**Grace Zachry McCreery 



1928 



Myrtle Bledsoe Wharton 
S. Virginia Carrier 
Patricia Collins Dwinnell 
Lucy Mai Cook Means 
Nancy Crowther Otis 
Mary Cunningham Cayce 
Mary Ray Dobyns Houston 
Madelaine Dunseith Alston 

*Carolyn Essig Frederick 
Irene Garretson Nichols 
Margaret Gerig Mills 
Hattie Gershcow Hirsh 
Louise Girardeau Cook 
Sarah Glenn Boyd 
Olive Graves Bowen 
Elizabeth Grier Edmunds 
Muriel Griffin 
Rachel Henderlite 
Mary Hough Clark 
Alice Louise Hunter Rasnake 
Kathryn Kalmon Nussbaum 
Mary King Fowler 
Anna Knight Daves 
Virginia May Love 
Irene Lowrance Wright 
Katharine MacKinnon Lee 
Mary Bell McConkey Taylor 
Elizabeth McEntire 
Sarah McFadyen Brown 

*Gwendolyn McKinnon Oliver 
Geraldine Menshouse Condon 
Frances New McRae 
Evangeline Papageorge 
Martha Riley Stephenson 

*Elizabeth Roark Ellington 
Nannie Graham Sanders 
Mary Sayward Rogers 
Mary Shepherd Soper 
Mary Shewraaker 
Mary Stegall Stipp 
Ruth Thomas Stemmons 
Ann Todd Rubey 
Edna Volberg Johnson 
Josephine Walker Parker 



1929 



Class of 1928 

Elizabeth Allgood BIrchmore 

Leila W. Anderson 

Miriam Anderson Dowdy 



Pernette Adams Carter 

Margaret Andreae Collins 

Gladys Austin Mann 

Therese Barksdale Vinsonhaler 

Lillie Bellingrath Pruitt 

LaRue Berry Smith 

Virginia Branch Leslie 

Lucile Bridgman Leitch 

Miriam Broach Jordan 

Hazel Brown Ricks 

Bettina Bush Jackson 

Virginia Cameron Taylor 

Dorothy Cheek Callaway 

Sally Cothran Lambeth 

Sara Douglass Thomas 

Mary Ellis Knapp 

Mary Ficklen Barnett 

Nancy Elizabeth Fitzgerald Bray 

Elizabeth Fliedner Crowell 
*Ethel Freeland Darden 

Lenore Gardner McMillan 

Margaret Garretson Ford 
*Betty Watkins Gash 
*Elise M. Gibson 

Helen Gouedy Mansfield 

Marion Green Johnston 

Mildred Greenleaf Walker 

Amanda Groves 

Pearl Hastings Baughman 

Elizabeth Hatchett 

Cara Hinman 

Marian Hodges Anthony 

Ella Hollingsworth Wilkerson 
*Hazel Hood 

Katherine Hunter Branch 

Dorothy Hutton Mount 

Elaine Jacobsen Lewis 

Sara Johnston Hill 

Evelyn Josephs Phifer 
*Mary Alice Juhan 

Jean Lamont Dickson 
*Geraldine LeMay 

Katharine Lott Marbut 

Mabel Marshall Whitehouse 

Mary Lou McCall Reddoch 

Alice McDonald Richardson 

Edith McGranahan Smith T 

Elinore Morgan McComb 

Esther Nisbet Anderson 

Eleanor Lee Norris MacKinnon 



Katharine Pasco 

Rachel Paxon Hayes 

Susan Pierce Murray 

Letty Pope Prewitt 

Mary Prim Fowler 

Helen Ridley Hartley 

Louise Robertson Solomon 

Rowena Runnette Garber 

Martha Selman Jacobs 

Sally Southerland 

Mary Gladys Steffner Kincaid 

Clara Stone Collins 

Susanne Stone Eady 

Dorothy Turner Gravatt 
*Mary Warren Read 

Violet Weeks Miller 

Frances G. Welsh 

Effie Mae Winslow Taylor 

Hazel Wolfle Frakes 

Katherine Woodbury Williams 
*Ruth Worth 

Lillian Adelaide Wurm Cousins 



1930 



Pauline Adkins Clark 
Walterette Arwood Tanner 
*Marie Baker Shumaker 
Elisabeth Branch Johnson 
Frances Brown Milton 
Emily Campbell Boland 
Lucille Coleman Christian 
Lois Combs Kropa 
Lilian Cook McFarland 
Katherine Crawford Adams 
Gladney Cure ton 
Elise Derickson 
Elizabeth Dodd Thomas 
Clarene H. Dorsey 
Anne Ehrlich Solomon 
Alice Garretson Bolles 
lone Gueth Brodmerkel 
Jane Bailey Hall Hefner 
Helen Hendricks Martin 
Alice Jernigan Dowling 
Carlton Jones Bunkley 
Katherine Leary Holland 
Sarah Marsh Shapard 
Mary McCallie Ware 
Ruth McLean Wright 
Frances Messer Jeffries 
Blanche Miller Rigby 

*Emily Moore Couch 
Lynn Moore Hardy 
Carolyn Nash Hathaway 
Margaret Ogden Stewart 
Shannon Preston Cumming 
Elsie Roberts Dean 
Lillian Russell McBath 
Dorothy Daniel Smith 
Helen W. Snyder 

*Martha Stackhouse Grafton 
Sara Townsend Pittman 
Mary P. Trammell 
Crystal Wellborn Gregg 
Evalyn Wilder 
Harriet B. Williams 
Pauline Willoughby Wood 

*Raemond Wilson Craig 

*Missouri Woolford Raine 
Octavia Young Harvey 



1931 



Margaret Askew Smith 

Laura Brown Logan 

Sara L. Bullock 

Marjorie Daniel Cole 

Annie Dean Norman 
*Helen Duke Ingram 

Ruth Etheredge Griffin 

Marion Fielder Martin 
*Helen Friedman Blackshear 

Dorothy Grubb Rivers 

Sarah Hill Brown 

Anne Chopin Hudson Hankins 
*Myra Jervey Bedell 

Elise C. Jones 

Marian Lee Hind 

Ruth McAuliffe 

Anne McCallie 

Jane McLaughlin Titus 

Shirley McPhaul Whitfield 

Katherine Morrow Norem 

Frances Musgrave Frierson 

Fanny Willis Niles Bolton 



Fall 1979 



Ruth Pringle Pipkin 
Katharine Purdie 
Alice Quarles Henderson 
Kitty Reid Carson 
Jeanette Shaw Harp 
Elizabeth Simpson Wilson 
Elizabeth Smith Crew 
Harriet L. Smith 
Martha Sprinkle Rafferty 
Laelius Stallings Davis 
Cornelia Taylor Stubbs 
Julia Thompson Smith 
Martha Tower Dance 
Cornelia Wallace 
Louise Ware Venable 
Annee Watson Reiff 

♦Martha Watson Smith 
Margaret G. Weeks 

*Ellene Winn 



1932 



Virginia Allen Woods 
*Catherine Baker Evans 

Sarah Bowman 

Pat Boyles Smith 

Varnelle Braddy Perryman 
♦Penny Brown Barnett 

Louise Cawthon 

Mary Dunbar Weidner 

Diana Dyer Wilson 

Mary Effie Elliot 

Grace Fincher Trimble 

Marjorie Gamble 

Susan Love Glenn 

Nora Garth Gray Hall 

Ruth Conant Green 

Louise Hollingsworth Jackson 

Julia Grimmet Fortson 

Anne Hopkins Ayres 

Martha Elizabeth Howard Reeves 

Alma Fraser Howerton Hughes 

Imogene Hudson Cullinan 

Elizabeth Hughes Jackson 

La Myra Kane Swanson 

Pansey Kimble Matthews 

Martha Logan Henderson 

Clyde Lovejoy Stevens 

Louise McDaniel Musser 

Mary Miller Brown 

Lila Norfleet Davis 

Mimi O'Beirne Tarplee 

Mary Claire Oliver Cox 

Flora Riley Bynum 

Sara Lane Smith Pratt 
*Louise H. Stakely 

Nell Starr Gardner 

Jura Taffar Cole 

Velma Taylor Wells 

Miriam Thompson Felder 

Mar tine Tulle r Joyner 

Lovelyn Wilson Heyward 

Louise Winslow Taft 



1933 



Page Ackerman 

Mary Alexander Parker 

Maude Armstrong Hudson 

Bernice Beaty Cole 
*Margaret Bell Burt 
*Elizabeth Grier Bolton 
*Nell Brown Davenport 

Alice Bullard Nagle 

Evelyn Campbell Beale 

Josephine Clark Fleming 

Sarah Cooper Freyer 

Ora Craig Stuckey 

Eugenia Edwards Mackenzie 

Margaret Ellis Pierce 

May Belle Evans 

Mary Felts Steedman 

Julia Finley McCutchen 

Thelma Firestone Hogg 

Betty Fleming Virgin 

Mary Carretson 
*Margaret Glass Womeldorf 

Virginia Heard Feder 
*Lucile Heath McDonald 

Anne Hudmon Reed 

Mary Hudmon Simmons 

Margaret Jones Clark 
♦Cornelia Keeton Barnes 

Roberta Kilpatrick Stubblebine 

Blanche Lindsey Camp 



Caroline Llngle Lester 

Margaret Loranz 

Vivian Martin Buchanan 

Rosemary May Kent 

Eulalia Napier Sutton 

Gail Nelson Blain 

Frances Oglesby Hills 

Mary Louise Robinson Black 

Letitia Rockmore Nash 

Sara Shadburn Heath 

Laura Spivey Massie 

Ethel Stein Wise 

Mary Sturtevant Cunningham 

Marlyn Tate Lester 

Margaret Telford St. Amant 

Johnnie Frances Turner Melvin 

Annie Laurie Whitehead Young 

Marie Whittle Wellslager 

Amelia Wolf Bond 

Katharine Woltz Farinholt 

Lucile Woodbury Ranck 



1934 



Sarah Austin Zorn 
Alae Risse Barron Leitch 
Helen Boyd McConnell 
Dorothy Bradley 
Laura Buist Starnes 
Nelle Chamlee Howard 
Mary Dexter Boyd 
Martha Elliott Elliott 
Martha England Gunn 

♦Pauline Gordon Woods 

*Lucy Goss Herbert 
Jean Gould Clarke 
Mary Grist Whitehead 
Elinor Hamilton Hightower 
Elaine Heckle Carmichael 
Lillian Herring Rosas 
Elizabeth Johnson Thompson 
Marguerite Jones Love 
Edith Kendrick Osmanski 
Janie Lapsley Bell 
Marion Mathews 

*Louise McCain Boyce 
Mary McDonald Sledd 
Carrie Lena McMullen Bright 
Ruth Moore Randolph 
Sara Moore Cathey 

♦Frances M. O'Brien 
Reba Pearson Kaemper 
Lola Phillips Bond 
Hyta Plowden Mederer 

♦Dorothy Potts Weiss 
Gladys Pratt Entrican 
Florence Preston Bockhorst 
Virginia F. Prettyman 
Dorothy Ramage Thomas 
Carolyn Russell Nelson 
Louise Schuessler Patterson 
Mary Louise Schuman Barth 
Caroline Selden 
Rosa Shuey Day 
Mary Sloan Laird 
Rudene Taffar Young 
Mabel Talraage 

Virginia Tillotson Hutcheson 
Dorothy Walker Palmer 
Eleanor Williams Knox 



1935 



♦Elizabeth Alexander Higgins 
♦Vella Marie Behm Cowan 

Mary Borden Parker 

Marian Calhoun Murray 

Jennie Champion Nardin 

Virginia Coons Clanton 

Mary Lillian Deason 

Alice Dunbar Moseley 

Fidesah Edwards Alexander 

Willie Florence Eubanks Donehoo 

Mary Jane Evans 

Betty Fountain Gray 
♦Jane Goodwin Harbin 

Mary Green Wohlford 

Carol Griffin Scoville 

Anne Scott Harman Mauldin 

Elizabeth Heaton Mullino 

Katherine Hertzka 

Betty Lou Houck Smith 

Anna Humber Little 

Josephine Jennings Brown 

Frances McCalla Ingles 



Julia McClatchey Brooke 
Marguerite Morris Saunders 
Clara Morrison Backer 
Nina Parke Hopkins 
Aileen Parker Sibley 

♦Nell Pattillo Kendall 
Juliette Puett Maxwell 
Martha Redwine Rountree 
Grace Robinson Hanson 
Lisalotte Roennecke Kaiser 
Sybil Rogers Herren 
Marie Simpson Rutland 
Elizabeth Thrasher Baldwin 

♦Amy Underwood Trowell 
Laura Whitner Dorsey 
Jacqueline Woolfolk Mathes 
Elizabeth Young Hubbard 



1936 



♦♦Lena Armstrong Albright 

Catherine W. Bates 

Mary Beasley White 

Jane Blair Roberson 

Sally Brosnan Thorpe 
♦Meriel Bull Mitchell 

Elizabeth Burson Wilson 

Alice Chamlee Booth 

Bazalyn Coley Mynatt 
♦Mary Comely Dwight 

Marion Derrick Gilbert 

Florrie Lee Erb Bruton 
♦Sara Frances Estes 

Emily Gower Maynard 

Lilian Grimson Obligado 

Jean Hicks Pitts 

Mary Henderson Hill 

Marjorie Hollingsworth 

Frances James Donohue 

Louise Jordan Turner 

Augusta King Brumby 

Ruth King Stanford 

Carrie Phinney Latimer Duvall 

Kathryn Leipold Johnson 

Ann Bernard Martin 

Alice McCallie Pressly 

Josephine McClure Anderson 
♦Dean McKoin Bushong 

Sarah Frances McDonald 

Frances Miller Felts 

Sadie Morrow Hughes 

Frances Napier Jones 
♦Sarah Nichols Judge 

Janie Norrls 

Myra O'Neal Enloe 

Mary Richardson Gauthier 

Louisa Robert Carroll 
♦Mary Alice Shelton Felt 

Mary Margaret Stowe Hunter 

Marie E. Townsend 

Virginia Turner Graham 

Mary Vines Wright 

Mary Walker Fox 

Virginia Williams Goodwin 

Irene Wilson Neister 

Martha Young Bell 



1937 



♦Eloisa Alexander LeConte 
Lucile Barnett Minnan 
Frances Belford Olsen 
Louise Brown Smith 
Millicent Caldwell Jones 
Virginia Caldwell Payne 
Frances Cary Taylor 
Cornelia Christie Johnson 
Kathleen Daniel Spicer 
Lucile Dennison Keenan 
Helen DuPree Park 

♦Jane Estes 
Sara Forester Pitts 
Michelle Furlow Oliver 

♦Annie Galloway Phillips 
Nellie Gilroy Gustafson 
Alice Hannah Brown 

♦Fannie Harris Jones 
Barbara Hertwig Meschter 
Dorothy Jester 
Catherine Jones Malone 
Molly Jones Monroe 
Rachel Kennedy Lowthian 
Mary Jane King Critchell 
Jean Kirkpatrick Cobb 
Martha Sue Laney Redus 



Florence Lasseter Rambo 
Vivienne Long McCain 
Mary Malone Martin 
♦Isabel McCain Brown 
Enid Middleton Howard 
Ora M. Muse 
Mary Pitner Winkelman 
Marjorie Scott Meier 
Marie Stalker Smith 
Frances Steele Garrett 
Virginia Stephens Clary 
Vivienne Trice Ansley 
Carlene Wallace Willis 
Dorothy Williams Guess 
Jessie Williams Howell 
Betty Willis Whitehead 
Frances Wilson Hurst 



1938 



Anonymous 

♦Jean Barry Adams Weersing 
Nell Allison Sheldon 
Jean Austin Meacham 
Nettie Mae Austin Kelley 
Dorothy Avery Newton 
Louise Bailey White 
Genevieve Baird Farris 
Mary Alice Baker Lown 
Tommy Ruth Blackmon Waldo 
Elizabeth Blackshear Flinn 
Katherine Brittingham Hunter 
Martha Brown Miller 
Frances Castleberry 
Jean Chalmers Smith 
Sara Corbitt McDaniel 
Lulu Croft 

Doris Dunn St. Clair 
Goudyloch Erwin Dyer 
Eloise Estes Keiser 
Mary Ford Lallerstedt 
Carol Hale Waltz 
Helen Julia Hawkins 

♦Nell Hemphill Jones 
Ruth Hertzka 
Catherine Hoffman Ford 
Sarah Hoyle Nevin 
Winifred Kellersberger Vass 
Ola Kelly Ausley 
Mary Anne Kernan 

♦Ellen Little Lesesne 
Martha Long Gosline 
Jeanne Matthews Darlington 
Elizabeth Maynard McKinney 
Elizabeth McCord Lawler 
Lettie McKay Van Landingham 
Bertha Merrill Holt 
Nancy Moorer Cantey 
Margaret Morrison Blumberg 
Helen Rodgers Dopson 
Joyce Roper McKey 
Mary Smith Bryan 
Virginia Suttenfield 
Grace Tazewell Flowers 
Anne Thompson Rose 
Mary Tribble Beasley 
Doris Tucker 
Ellen Verner Scoville 
Elizabeth Warden Marshall 
Virginia Watson Logan 
Zoe Wells Lambert 

♦Elsie West Duval 

♦Louise Young Garrett 



1939 



Alice Adams Williamson 
Mary Allen Reding 

♦Jean Bailey Owen 
Ethelyn Boswell Purdie 
Alice Caldwell Melton 
Catherine Caldwell Wallace 
Rachel Campbell Gibson 
Lelia Carson Watlington 
Alice F. Cheeseman 
Sarah Cunningham Carpenter 
Jane Dryfoos Bijur 
Margaret Edmunds O'Brien 
Catherine Farrar Davis 
Virginia Farrar Shearouse 
Jeanne Flynt Stokes 
Elizabeth Furlow Brown 
Susan Goodwyn Garner 
Dorothy Graham Gilmer 
Frances Guthrie Brooks 

♦Eleanor T. Hall 



Fund Agent ! * Deceased 



10 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



rfh r t jy| " 



/ 



8%»ti ,...„„ 






«^ ' "'V-ii"'' ;1 ' 





Jane Hamilton Ray 

Emily Harris Swanson 
* Jacqueline Hawks Alsobrook 

Mary Hollingsworth Hatfield 

Cora Kay Hutchins Blackwelder 

Phyllis Johnson O'Neal 

Katherine Jones Smith 

Elizabeth Kenney Knight 

Jenny Kyle Dean 

Dorothy Lazenby Stipe 

Helen Lichten Solomonson 

Emily MacMorland Wood 

Ella Mallard Ninestein 

Martha Marshall Dykes 

Sara McCain McCollum 

Emma McMullen Doom 
*Mary Wells McNeill 
*Marie Merritt Rollins 

Helen Moses Regenstein 

Mary Elizabeth Moss Sinback 

Mary Murphy Chesnutt 

Carolyn Myers King 

Annie Houston Newton Parkman 

Lou Pate Jones 

Margaret Pleasants Jones 

Julia Porter Scurry 

Mamie Lee Ratliff Finger 

Jeanne Redwine Davis 

Virginia Rumbley Moses 

Betty Sams Daniel 

Miriam Sanders 

Haydie Sanford Sams 

Mary Elizabeth Shepherd Green 

Alice Sill 

Penny Siraonton Boothe 

Selma Steinbach El rod 

Dorothy Still Freeman 
*Mary Frances Thompson 

Sarah Evelyn Thurman Fuller 

Virginia Turalin Guffin 
*Elinor Tyler Richardson 

Ann Watkins Ansley 

Mary Ellen Whetsell Timmons 



1940 



Elizabeth Alderman Vinson 
Grace Anderson Cooper 
*Margaret Barnes Carey 
Evelyn Baty Christraan 
Marguerite Baum Muhlenfeld 
Susan Blackmon Armour 
Anna Margaret Bond Brannon 
Joan Brinton Johnson 
Virginia Brown Cappleman 
Jeanette Carroll Smith 
Helen Gates Carson 
Ernestine Cass Dickerson 
Mary Chalmers Orsborn 
Lillie Bell Drake Hamilton 
Anne Enloe 
Carolyn Forman Piel 



Annette Franklin King 

Marian Franklin Anderson 

Florence J. Graham 

Nettie Lee Greer Howard 

Wilma Griffith Clapp 

Mary Heaslett Badger 

Margaret Hopkins Martin 
*Gary Home Petrey 

Louise Hughston Oettinger 

Eleanor N. Hutchens 

Mildred Joseph Colyer 

Sara Lee Mattingly 

Mary Matthews Scott 

Sarah Matthews Bixler 

Eloise McCall Guyton 

Virginia Milner Carter 

Nell Moss Roberts 

Betty Jean O'Brien Jackson 

Esthere Ogden Blakeslee 
*Beth Paris Moremen 

Katherine Patton Carssow 

Irene Phillips Richardson 

Nell Pinner Wisner 

Mary Reins Burge 

Hazel Solomon Be a z ley 

Edith Stover McFee 

Ellen Stuart Patton 
*Louise Sullivan Fry 

Mary Mac Templeton Brown 
*Henrietta Thompson Wilkinson 

Emily Underwood Gault 

Grace Ward Anderson 

Polly Ware Duncan 

Violet Jane Watkins 

Willomette Williamson Stauffer 

Claire Wilson Moore 

Jane Witman Pearce 



1941 



Mary Arbuckle Osteen 
Ruth Ashburn Kline 
Myra Barber Caven 
Elizabeth Barrett Alldredge 
Miriam Bedinger Williamson 
Martha Boone Shaver 
Nina Broughton Gaines 

*Sabine Brumby Korosy 
Gentry Burks Bielaski 

*Harriette Cochran Mershon 
Freda Copeland Hoffman 
Virginia Clayton Corr White 
Doris Dalton Crosby 
Dorothy Debele Purvis 
Martha Dunn Kerby 
Ruby Leone Evans Andrews 
Louise Franklin Livingston 
Lucile Gaines MacLennan 
Caroline Gray Truslow 
Nancy Gribble Nelson 
Florrie Guy Funk 
Ann Henry 



Rebekah Hogan Henry 
Aileen Kasper Borrish 
*Helen Klugh McRae 
Julia N. Lancaster 
Sara Lee Jackson 
Anne Martin Elliott 
Marjorie Merlin Cohen 
Martha Moody Laseter 
Margaret Nix Ponder 
Pattie Patterson Johnson 
Elta Robinson Posey 
Louise Saras Hardy 
Lillian Schwencke Cook 
Hazel Scruggs Ouzts 
Gene Slack Morse 
Frances Spratlin Hargrett 
Elizabeth Stevenson 
**Carolyn Strozier 

Elaine Stubbs Mitchell 
Dorothy Travis Joyner 
Jane Vaughan Price 
Betty Alden Waitt White 
Grace Walker Winn 
Cornelia Watson Pruett 
Mary M. Wisdom 



1942 



*Rebekah Andrews McNeill 
Martha Arant Allgood 
Jean Beutell Abrams 
Betty Bradfield Sherman 
Betty Ann Brooks 
Martha Euffalow Davis 
Edwina Burruss Rhodes 
Harriett Caldwell Maxwell 
Edith Candler Thomas 
Anne Chambless Bateman 
Jane Coughlan Hays 

*Edith Dale Lindsey 
Mary Davis Bryant 
Dale Drennan Hicks 
Carolyn Dunn Stapleton 

*Susan Dyer Oliver 
Francis Ellis Wayt 
Virginia Franklin Miller 
Lillian Gish Alfriend 
Margery Gray Wheeler 

*Margaret Hamilton Rambo 

*Julia Harry Bennett 

*Margaret Hartsook Emmons 
Kathleen Head Johnson 
Doris Henson Vaughn 
Neva Jackson Webb 

*Mary Kirkpatrick Reed 
Ila Belle Levie Bagwell 
Caroline Long Armstrong 
Susanne McWhorter Reckard 
Betty Medlock Clark 
Virginia Montgomery McCall 
Dorothy Nabers Allen 

*Elise Nance Bridges 



Jeanne Osborne Gibbs 
Mary Louise Palmour Barber 
Julia Patch Weston 
Louise Pruitt Jones 
Claire Purcell Smith 
Tina Ransom Louis 
Prise ilia Reasoner Beall 
Theodosia Ripley Landis 
Elizabeth Robertson Schear 
Edith Schwartz Joel 
**Marie Scott O'Neill 

Myrtle Seckinger Lightcap 
Margaret Sheftall Chester 
Marjorie Simpson Ware 
Eleanor Smith Bischoff 
Ruth Smith Wilson 
Jane Stillwell Espy 
Jane Taylor White 
Mary Olive Thomas 
Frances Tucker Johnson 
Myree Wells Maas 
Annie Wilds McLeod 



1943 



Emily Anderson Hightower 
Mary Anne Atkins Paschal 
Mary Jane Auld Linker 
Mamie Sue Barker Woolf 
Betty Bates Fernandez 
Anna Black Hansell 
Mary Brock Williams 

*Flora Campbell McLain 
Mary Jane Campbell Mitchell 
Alice Clements Shinall 
Maryann Cochran Abbott 
Joella Craig Good 

*Jane Dinsraore Lowe 
Margaret Downie Brown 
Betty DuBose Skiles 
Jeanne Eakin Salyer 
Anne Frierson Smoak 
Nancy Green Carmichael 
Susan Guthrie Fu 
Helen Hale Lawton 
Betty Henderson Cameron 
Nancy Hirsh Rosengarten 
Dorothy Holloran Addison 
Dorothy Hopkins McClure 
Mardia Hopper Brown 
Imogene King Stanley 
Sterly Lebey Wilder 
Bennye Linzy Sadler 
Mary Martin Rose 
Anne Paisley Boyd 
Betty Pegram Sessoms 
Frances Radford Mauldin 
Hannah L. Reeves 

*Ruby Rosser Davis 
Clara Rountree Couch 
Margaret Shaw Allred 

*Helen Smith Woodward 



Fall 1979 



11 



Aileen Still Hendley 
Regina Stokes Barnes 
Mabel Stowe Query 
*Mary Ward Danielson 
Marjorle Weismann Zeidman 
Barbara Wllber Gerland 
Kay Wilkinson Orr 
Harjorie Wilson Ligons 
Katherine Wright Philips 



1944 



*Bettye Ashcraft Senter 
Betty Bacon Skinner 
Virginia Barr McFarland 
Clare Bedinger Baldwin 
Claire Bennett Kelly 
Marguerite Bless Mclnnis 
Louise Breedin Griffiths 
Mary Carr Townsend 
Mary Frances Carter Dixon 
Margaret Cathcart Hilburn 
Jean Clarkson Rogers 

*Frances Cook Crowley 
Barbara Jane Daniels 

♦Mary Louise Duffee Philips 
Anna Eagan Goodhue 
Elizabeth Edwards Wilson 
Ruth Farrior 
Sara Agnes Florence 
Pauline Garvin Keen 
Elizabeth Harvard Dowda 

*Julia Harvard Warnock 
Claire Johnson Yancey 
Catharine Kollock Thoroman 
Ruth Kolthoff Kirkman 
June Lanier Wagner 

*Martha Lasseter Storey 
Quincey Mills Jones 
Margaret Powell Flowers 
Martha Rhodes Bennett 

♦Anne Sale Weydert 
Betty Scott Noble 
Julia Scott Rogers 
Marjorie Smith Stephens 
Katheryne Thompson Mangum 
Johnnie Tippen 
Marjorie Tippins Johnson 
Betty J. Vecsey 
Mary E. Walker 
Mary Cromer Walker Scott 
Mary Frances Walker Blount 
Anne Ward Amacher 
Betty Williams Stoffel 
Oneida Woolford 



1945 



Ruth Anderson Stall 
Carol Barge Mathews 
Marian Barr Hanner 
Elizabeth Blincoe Edge 
Virginia L. Bowie 
Frances Brougher Garman 
Ann Campbell Hulett 
Betty Campbell Wiggins 

♦Elizabeth Carpenter Bardin 
Virginia Carter Caldwell 
Geraldine Cottongim Richards 
Mary Cumming Fitzhugh 

♦Elizabeth Daniel Owens 
Harriette Daugherty Howard 
Betty Davis Shingler 
Ruth Doggett Todd 
Pauline Ertz Wechsler 
Mary Elizabeth Espey Walters 
Jane Everett Knox 
Elizabeth Farmer Gaynor 
Joyce Freeman Marting 

♦Barbara Frink Allen 
Elizabeth Glenn Stow 

♦Elizabeth Gribble Cook 
Anne Hall King 
Betty Jane Hancock Moore 
Mia Hecht Owens 
Emily Higgins Bradley 
Jean Hood Booth 
Eugenia Jones Howard 
Dorothy Kahn Prunhuber 
Beverly King Pollock 
Jane Kreiling Mell 
Mary Louise Law 
Martha Mack Simons 
Alice Mann Niedrach 



♦Bettie Manning Ott 

Sylvia McConnel Carter 
♦Montene Melson Mason 

Molly Milam Inserni 

Sara Milford Walker 

Scott Newell Newton 

Mary Norris King 

Marilyn Schroeder Timmerman 

Emily Singletary Garner 

Julia Slack Hunter 

Lois Sullivan Kay 

Mary Ann Turner Edwards 
♦Dorothy Lee Webb McKee 

Frances Wooddall Talmadge 



1946 



Jeanne Addison Roberts 
Vicky Alexander Sharp 
Mary Lillian Allen Wilkes 
Martha Baker Wilkins 

♦Margaret Bear Moore 
Lucile E. Beaver 
Helen Beidelman Price 

♦Emily Bradford Batts 
Mary C. Cargill 

♦Mary Ann Courtenay Davidson 
Joan Crangle Hughey 
Lu Cunningham Beville 
Edwina Bell Davis 

♦Mary Duckworth Gellerstedt 

♦Conradine Fraser Riddle 

♦Harriet Frierson Crabb 
Elizabeth Horn Johnson 
Betty Howell Traver 
Louise Isaacson Bernard 
Martha Johnson Haley 

♦Lura Johnston Watkins 
Peggy Jones Miller 
Barbara Kincaid Trimble 
Anne Lee Mitchell 
Stratton Lee Peacock 
Betty Long Sale 
Harriet McAllister Loving 
Mildred McCain Kinnaird 
Mary Frances McConkey Reimer 
Anne Murrell Courtney 
Marjorie Naab Bolen 
Ann Noble Dye 

♦Anne Noell Wyant 
Celetta Powell Jones 
Mary Ragland Sadler 

♦Anne Register Jones 

♦Louise Reid Strickler 
Eleanor Reynolds Verdery 
Claire Rowe Newman 
Mary Russell Mitchell 
Carolyn Ryle Croxson 
Mary Jane Schumacher Bullard 
Margaret Scott Cathey 
Peggy Trice Hall 
Lucy Turner Knight 
Verna Weems Macbeth 

♦Elizabeth Weinschenk Mundy 
Winifred Wilkinson Hausmann 
Eva Lee Williams Jemison 
Elisabeth Woodward Ellis 



1947 



Marie Adams Conyers 
Louisa Aichel Mcintosh 
Elizabeth Andrews Lee 
Glassell Beale Sraalley 
Alice Beardsley Carroll 
Marie Beeson Ingraham 
Marguerite Born Hornsby 
Virginia Brown McKenzie 

♦Eleanor Calley Cross 
June Coley Loyd 
Jane Cooke Cross 
Sara Frances Cooley Mason 

♦Helen Catherine Currie 
Anna George Dobbins 

♦Anne Eidson Owen 

♦Mary Fuller Floyd 
Dorothy Galloway Fontaine 
Mynelle Blue Grove Harris 
Genevieve Harper Alexander 
Marjorie Harris Melville 
Genet Heery Barron 
Charlotte Hevener Nobbs 
Ann Hough Hopkins 
Louise Hoyt Minor 
Sue Hutchens Henson 




English professor Anne Warner. 



Anne Jackson Smith 
Marianne Jeffries Williams 
Kathryn Johnson 
Clara Jones Black 
Rosemary Jones Cox 

♦Margaret Kelly Wells 
Mary Ann Martin Pickard 
Margaret McManus Landham 
Edith Merrin Simmons 
Florence Paisley Williams 
Betty Lou Patterson King 
Dorothy Peace Ramsaur 
Betty Radford Moeller 
Ethel Ragan Wood 
Ellen Rosenblatt Caswell 

♦Lorenna Ross Brown 
Nancy Shelton Parrott 
Barbara Smith Hull 
Sarah Smith Austin 
Caroline Squires Rankin 
June Thomason Lindgren 
May Turner Engeraan 
Mary Wakefield Tipton 
Ann Wheeler TImberlake 
Barbara Wilson Montague 
Christine Yates Parr 



1948 



Dabney Adams Hart 
Virginia Andrews Trovillion 
Rose Ellen Armstrong Sparling 
Ruth Bastin Slentz 
Betty Bateman Willingham 
Martha Beacham Jackson 
♦Barbara Anne Blair 
Lela Anne Brewer 



Flora Bryant Hackworth 

Barbara Coith Ricker 
♦Mary Alice Compton Osgood 

Edna Claire Cunningham Schooley 

Susan Daugherty 

Amelia Davis Luchsinger 
♦Nancy Deal Weaver 

Adele Dieckmann McKee 

Virginia Drake Blass 
♦June Driskill Weaver 

Mary Faulkner James 

Ruth Gait HoneKamp 
♦Harriet Gregory Heriot 

Minnie Hamilton Mallinson 

Martha Hay Vardeman 

Jean Henson Smith 

Kathleen Hewson Cole 

Amanda Hulsey Thompson 
♦June Irvine Torbert 

Marybeth Little Weston 

Sheely Little Miller 

Mary Manly Ryman 

Louise McLaurin Stewart 

Vanesse Orr Rowe 

Mae Osborne Parker 

Lora Payne Miller 

Betty Powers Crislip 

Harriet E. Reid 

Anna Clark Rogers Sawyer 

Teressa Rutland Sanders 

Rebekah Scott Bryan 

Anne Shepherd McKee 
♦Mary Gene Sims Dykes 

Martha Sunkes Thomas 

Anne Page Violette Harmon 

Lida Walker Askew 

Barbara Waugaman Thompson 

Barbara Whipple Bitter 

Sara Catherine Wilkinson 



* Fund Agent "* Deceased 
12 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



1949 



1951 



Rita Adams Simpson 
Mary Aichel Samford 
Eugenia Akin Martin 
Caroline Alexander Bryan 
Mary Jo Amnions Jones 
Beverly Baldwin Albea 
Betty Blackmon Kinnett 

*Susan Bowling Dudney 
Frances Brannan Hamrick 
Roberta Cathcart Hopkins 
Alice Jean Caswell Wilkins 

*Lee Cousar Tubbs 
Alice Crenshaw Moore 
Josephine Culp Williams 
Marie Cuthbertson Faulkner 
June Davis Haynie 
Bettie Davison Bruce 
Betty Jeanne Ellison Candler 
Kate Durr Elmore 
Elizabeth Flanders Smith 
Evelyn Foster Henderson 
Katherine A. Geffcken 
Martha Goddard Lovell 
Joyce Hale McGlaun 
Mary Elizabeth Hays Babcock 
Nancy Huey Kelly 

*Henrietta C. Johnson 
Nancy Johnson Reid 
Mary Frances Jones Woolsey 
Winifred "Lambert Carter 
Rudy Lehmann Cowley 
Rebecca Lever Brown 
Carolina Little Witcher 
Frances Long Cowan 
Reece Newton Smith 
Nancy Parks Anderson 
Patty Ann Pershon 

*Lynn Phillips Mathews 

*Georgia Powell Leramon 

*Mary Price Coulling 
Dorothy Quillian Reeves 
Betty Jo Sauer Mansur 
Carmen Shaver Brown 
Sharon Smith Cutler 
Edith Stowe Barkley 
Rachel Stubbs Farris 

*Doris Sullivan Tippens 
Jean Tollison Moses 
Newell Turner Parr 
Virginia Vining Skelton 
Martha Warlick Brame 
Julia Weathers Wynne 
Olive Wilkinson Turnipseed 
Jeanette Willcoxon Peterson 
Elizabeth Williams Henry 
Harriotte Winchester Hurley 



1950 



*Louise Arant Rice 

Hazel Berman Karp 

Jo-Anne Christopher Cochrane 

Betty Cole Houten 
*Betty Jean Combs Moore 

Dorothy Davis Yarbrough 

Elizabeth H. Dunlap 
*Jean Edwards Crouch 
*Elizabeth Flowers Ashworth 

Ann Gebhardt Fullerton 

Anne Haden Howe 

Sarah Hancock White 

Marie Heng Ho 
*Jessie Hodges Kryder 

Anne Irwin Smith 

Marguerite Jackson Gilbert 

Norah Anne Little Green 

Alline Marshall 

Carolyn Sue McSpadden Fisher 

Miriam Mitchell Ingman 

Jean Osborn Sawyer 

Pat Overton Webb 

Ida Pennington Benton 

Polly Anna Philips Harris 
*Ann Pitts Cobb 

Joann Piastre Britt 

Ann Sartain Emmett 

Martha Stowell Rhodes 

Marguerite Taylor Paullin 

Sally Thompson Aycock 



Nancy Anderson Benson 
*Mary Hayes Barber Holmes 

Noel Barnes Williams 

Su Boney Davis 

Nancy Cassin Smith 

Julie Cuthbertson Clarkson 
*Anna DaVault Haley 

Harriett Everett Olesen 

Lorna Floyd Hardy 

Luverne Floyd Smith 

Nell Floyd Hall 

Betty Jane Foster Deadwyler 

Freddie Hachtel Daum 

Cornelia Hale Bryans 

Louise Hertwig Hayes 

Nancy Hudson Irvine 

Margaret Hunt Denny 

Mary Page Hutchison Lay 

Sally Jackson Hertwig 

Charlotte Key Marrow 

Mary Lindsay Eastman 

Janette Mattox Calhoon 

Eleanor McCarty Cheney 
*Jimmie Ann McGee Collings 
*Sarah McKee Burnside 

Jackie Sue Messer Rogers 

Julianne Morgan Garner 

Tiny Morrow Mann 

Carol Munger 

Mary Anna Ogden Bryan 

Eliza Pollard Mark 

Mary Roberts Davis 

Annelle Simpson Kelly 
*R. Jenelle Spear 

Cissie Spiro Aidinoff 

Martha Ann Stegar 

Marjorie Stukes Strickland 

Ruth Vineyard Cooner 

Catherine Warren Dukehart 

Joan White Howell 

Ann Marie Woods Shannon 



1952 



Charlotte Allsmiller Crosland 

Katie Berdanis Faklis 
*Ann Boyer Wilkerson 

Mary Jane Brewer Murkett 

Barbara Brown Waddell 

Jeannine Byrd Hopkins 

June Carpenter Bryant 
*Sybll Corbett Riddle 

Patricia Cortelyou WInship 

Catherine Crowe Merritt 

Theresa Dokos Hutchison 

Clairelis Eaton Franklin 

Emy Evans Blair 

Shirley Ford Baskin 
*Kathren Freeman Stelzner 

Phyllis Galphin Buchanan 

Kathryn Gentry Westbury 

Ann Hays Greer 

Ruth Waldo Heard Randolph 

Betty Holland Boney 

Margaret Inman Simpson 

Louise Jett Porter 

Margaret Ann Kaufmann Shulman 

Helen Land Ledbetter 
*Margaretta Lumpkin Shaw 

Wynelle Melson Patton 

Sylvia Moutos Mayson 
*Ann Parker Lee 

Edith Petrie Hawkins 

Hilda L. Priviteri 

Catherine L. Redles 

Lillian Ritchie Sharian 
*Jean Robarts Seaton 

Frances Sells Grimes 

Jackie Simmons Gow 

Jeanne Smith Harley 
*Winnie Strozier Hoover 

Pat Thomason Smallwood 

Alta Waugaman Miller 
*Lorna A. Wiggins 

Sylvia Williams Ingram 

Anne Winningham Sims 

Florence Worthy Griner 



Geraldine Armstrong Boy 

Mary Birmingham Tiramons 

Bertie Bond 

Georganna Buchanan Johnson 

Julia Clark Williams 

Frances Cook 

Ann Cooper Whitesel 

Virginia Corry Harrell 

Margaret Cousar Beach 

Jane Cray ton Davis 

Jane Dalhouse Hailey 

Anne DeWitt George 

Donya Dixon Ransom 

Susan Dodson Rogers 

Georgia Dudney Lynch 

Donna Dugger Smith 

Mary F. Evans 

Patricia Fredricksen Stewart 

*Frances Ginn Stark 
Sarah Hamilton Leathers 
Florence Hand Warren 
Virginia Hays Klettner 
Peggy Hooker Hartwein 
Ellen Hunter Brumfield 
Anne Jones Sims 

*Sarah Leathers Martin 
Betty McLellan Carter 
Margaret McRae Edwards 
Belle Miller McMaster 
Patricia Morgan Fisher 
Carlene Nickel -Elrod 
Sue Peterson Durling 
Mary Ripley Warren 
Mary Beth Robinson Stuart 
Ethel Ross Spilos 
Louise Ross Bell 
Rita May Scott Cook 
Dianne Shell Rousseau 
Priscilla Sheppard Taylor 
Lindy Taylor Barnett 
Charline Tritton Shanks 
Norma Wang Feng 

*Vivian Weaver Maitland 
Barbara West Dickens 
Jane Williams Coleman 
Mary Ann Wyatt Chastain 



1954 



Ulla E. Beckman 
Sue Born Ballard 
Harriet Durham Maloof 
Martha Duval Swartwout 

*Florrie Fleming Corley 
Chor Jee Goh Chow 
Julia Grier Storey 
Ellen Griffin Corbett 
Nancy Hall Bond 
Katharine Hefner Gross 
Louise Hill Reaves 
Barbara Hood Buchanan 
Eleanor Hutchinson Smith 

*Carol Jones Hay 
Jacquelyn Josey Hall 
Patricia Kent Stephenson 
Mitzi Kiser Law 
Caroline Lester Haynes 
Helen McGowan French 
Mary Louise McKee Hagemeyer 
Clara Jean McLanahan Wheeler 
Joyce Munger Osborn 
Anne Patterson Hammes 

*Judy Promnitz Marine 
Ellen Prauty Smith 
Mary Rainey Bridges 
Caroline Reinero Kemmerer 
Mary Frances Sistar Minick 
Anne Sylvester Booth 
Carol Tye Dozier 

*Joanne Varner Hawks 
Nancy Whetstone Hull 
Gladys Williams Sweat 
Chizuko Yoshimura Kojima 
Jane Zuber Garrison 



1955 



1953 



Charlotte Allain Von Hollen 
*Allardyce Armstrong Haraill 



Joan Adair Johnston 
Betty Akerman Shackleford 
Carolyn Alford Beaty 

*Ann Allred Jacksor. 
Yvonne Burke White 

*Susanna Byrd Wells 
Georgia B. Christopher 



Carolyn Crawford Chesnutt 
Constance Curry 
Sara Dudney Ham 
Beverly Espy Dayries 

Jane Gaines Johnson 
Letty Grafton Harwell 
Lib Grafton Hall 
Grace Greer Phillips 
Jo Ann Hall Hunsinger 
Patty Hamilton Lee 
Harriet Hampton Cuthbertson 
Ann Hanson Merklein 
Vivian Hays Guthrie 
Ann Hemperley Dobbs 
Helen Hinchey Williams 
Anne Hoover Gulley 
Beverly Jensen Nash 
Mary Knight Swezey 
Catherine Lewis Callaway 
Mary Love L'heureux Hammond 
Evelyn Mason Newberry 
*Callie McArthur Robinson 
Sara Mclntyre Bahner 
Margaret McMillan White 
Pauline Morgan King 
Patricia Paden Matsen 
Sarah Petty Dagenhart 
Joan Pruitt Mclntyre 
Louise Robinson Singleton 
Anne Rosselot Clayton 
Dorothy Sands Hawkins 
Agnes Scott Willoch 
Georgia Syribeys Sotus 
Clif Trussell 
Beverly Watson Howie 
Margaret Williamson Smalzel 
Elizabeth Wilson Blanton 



1956 



Ann Alvis Shibut 
Paula Ball Newkirk 
Barbara Battle 

*Stella Biddle Fitzgerald 
Juliet Boland Clack 
Mary Lee Bridges Traxler 

*Judy Brown 
Anne Bullard Hodges 
Nancy Burkitt Foy 
Margaret Burwell Barnhardt 
Vivian Cantrall White 
Mary Jo Carpenter 
Carol Ann Cole White 

*Alvia Cook 
Memye Curtis Tucker 
Claire Flintom Barnhardt 

*June Gaissert Naiman 
Nancy Gay Frank 

*Guerry Graham Myers 
Sallie Greenfield 
Ann Lee Gregory York 

*Harriett Griffin Harris 
Sarah Hall Hayes 
Louise Harley Hull 
Emmie Hay Alexander 
Nancy Jackson Pitts 

*Virginia Love Dunaway 
Carolyn Moon Horn 
May Muse Stonecypher 
Jacqueline Plant Fincher 
Louise Rainey Ammons 
Rameth Richard Owens 
Betty Richardson Hickman 

*Anne Sayre Callison 
Marijke Schepman deVries 

*Robbie Ann Shelnutt Upshaw 
Sally Shippey McKneally 
Justine Stinson Sprenger 
Jane Stubbs Bailey 
Nancy Thomas Hill 
Sandra Thomas Hollberg 
Virginia Vickery Jory 



1957 



Elizabeth Ansley Allan 
Peggy Beard Baker 
Mary D. Beaty 
Susanne Benson Darnell 
Margaret Benton Davis 
Elizabeth Bohlander Bazell 
Suzella Burns Newsome 
Bettye Carmichael Maddox 
*Betsy Crapps Burch 
Catharine Crosby Brown 



Fall 1979 



13 



Laura Frances Dryden Taylor 
Harriet Easley Workman 
Dede Farmer Grow 
Sally Fortson McLemore 
Jeannlne Frapart Row 
Catherine Girardeau Brown 
Patricia Guynup Corbus 
Marian Hagedom Briscoe 
Helen Hendry Lowrey 
Carolyn Herman Sharp 
Margaret Hill Truesdale 

*Frances Holtsclaw Berry 
Katharine Jenkins Loworn 
Jacqueline Johnson Woodward 
Mary Jones Helm 
Rachel King 
Elaine Lewis Hudgins 
Marilyn McClure Anderson 
Virginia McClurkin Jones 
Katherine Miller Nevins 
Grace Molineux Goodwin 
Nancy Nixon McDonough 
Frances Patterson Huffaker 

*Jean Price Knapp 
Barbara Quattlebaum Parr 
Dorothy Rearick Malinin 
Virginia Redhead Bethune 
Martha Riggins Brown 

*Jackie Rountree Andrews 
Helen Sewell Johnson 
Jene Sharp Black 
Ann Shire Penuel 
Miriam F. Smith 
Nancy Ann Snipes Johnson 
Eleanor Swain All 
Emiko Takeuchi 
Anne Terry Sherren 
Sara Townsend Holcomb 
Eleanor Wright Linn 



1959 



1958 



Paula Bagwell Camp 
Anne Blackshear Spragins 
Mary Byrd Davis 
Mary Clapp Carden 
♦Jeanette Clark Sparks 
Mary Helen Collins Williams 
Martha Davis Rosselot 
Nancy C. Edwards 
Patricia Gover Bitzer 
Eileen Graham McWhorter 
Ann Juliet Gunston Scott 
Helen Hachtel Haywood 
Jo Hathaway Norton 
Sara Margaret Heard White 
Catherine Hodgin Olive 
Marjorie C. Hoge 
Susan Hogg Griffith 

♦Nancy Holland Sibley 
Nancy Kimmel Duncan 
Nora A. King 
Eugenie Lambert Hamner 
Sue Lile Inman 

*Carlanna Lindamood Hendrick 
Sheila MacConochie Ragsdale 
Carolyn Magruder Ruppenthal 

*Maria Martoccia Clifton 
Janice Matheson Rowell 
Louise McCaughan Robison 
Caro McDonald Smith 
Martha Meyer 
Mary Jane Milford Spurgeon 

*Phia Peppas Kanellos 
Blythe Posey Ashmore 
Gene Allen Reinero Vargas 
Dorothy Ann Ripley Lott 
Grace Robertson McLendon 
Caroline Romberg Silcox 

*Cecily Rudisill Langford 
Joan St. Clair Goodhew 
JoAnn Sawyer Delafield 
Elizabeth Shumaker Goodman 
Deene Spivey Youngblood 

*Langhorne Sydnor Mauck 
Harriet Talmadge Mill 
Delores Ann Taylor Yancey 
Joyce Thomas Pack 
Carolyn Tinkler Ramsey 
*Marilyn Tribble Wittner 
Rosalyn Warren Wells 
Mary Ruth Watson 
Margaret Woolfolk Webb 



Wardie Abernethy Martin 

Theresa Adams Parkins 

Charlene Bass Riley 

Martha Bethea 

Nancy Blount Robinson 

Mary Bryan DuBard 

Helen Burkitt Evans 

Cynthia Butts Langfeldt 

Celeste Clanton Hutchinson 

Betty Cobb Rowe 

June Connally Rutledge 

Helen Culpepper Stacey 
♦Ruth Currie McDaniel 
*Anne Dodd Campbell 

Caroline Dudley Bell 

Mary Dunn Evans 

Betty Edmunds Grinnan 

Marjorie Erickson Charles 

Gertrude Ann Florrid van Luyn 

Patricia Forrest Davis 

Sara Anne Frazier Johnson 
♦Katherine Freeman Dunlap 

Betty Garrard Saba 

Judy George Johnson 
**Marianne Gillis Persons 

Theresa Hand DuPre 

Harriet Harrill Bogue 

Martha Holmes Keith 

Rosalind Johnson McGee 

Hazel King Cooper 

Jane King Allen 

Jane Kraemer Scott 

Eleanor Lee McNeill 

Patricia Lenhardt Byers 

Mildred Ling Wu 

Helen Maddox Gaillard 

Suzanne Heath Manges 

Leah Mathews Fontaine 

Martha McCoy 

Runita McCurdy Goode 

Lila McGeachy Ray 
*Donalyn Moore McTier 

Mary Morris Hurlbutt 

Ann Rivers Payne Hutcheson 
*Paula Pilkenton Vail 
*Carol Promnitz Cooper 

Lucy Puckett Leonard 
*Susan Purser Huffaker 

Jean Salter Reeves 

Marianne Sharp Robbins 

Anita Sheldon Barton 

Roxana Speight Colvin 
*Annette Teague Powell 

Linda Todd McCall 
♦Barbara Varner Willoughby 

Delos Welch Hanna 
*Susie White Edwards 

Pauline Winslow Gregory 

Carolyn Wright McGarity 



1960 



Angelyn Alford Bagwell 
Nell Archer Congdon 
Nancy Awbrey Brittain 
Marion Barry Mayes 
Gloria Branham Burnam 

*Mildred Braswell Smith 
Margaret Collins Alexander 

*Phyllis Cox Whitesell 
Celia Crook Richardson 
Shannon Cummlng McCormick 
Carolyn Anne Davies Preische 
Nancy Duvall 
Rebecca Evans Callahan 
Anne Eyler Clodfelter 
Louise Florance Smythe 
Margaret Goodrich Hodge 
Margaret J. Havron 
Katherine Hawkins Linebaugh 
Louise Healy Patterson 
Eleanor Hill Widdice 
Carolyn Hoskins Coffman 
Dana Hundley Herbert 
Linda Jones Klett 
Julia P. Kennedy 
Charlotte King Sanner 
Frances McFadden Cone 
Ellen McFarland Johnson 
Helen M. Milledge 
Ashlin Morris Burris 
Warnell Neal 

*Everdina Nieuwenhuis 



Jane Norman Scott 
Ann Parker Thompson 

*Emlly Parker McGulrt 
Mary Jane Pfaff Dewees 
Rosemary Roberts Yardley 
Ann Sims Dennis 
Sally Smith Howard 
Barbara Specht Reed 
Sybil Strupe Rights 
Marcia Tobey Swanson 
Edith Towers Davis 
Raines Wakeford Watklns 
Carrington Wilson Fox 

*Grace Woods Walden 



1961 



Anonymous 

Ann Avant Crichton 

Ana Maria Aviles McCaa 

Barbara Baldaut Anderson 

Elizabeth Barber Cobb 

Barbara Best Teckemeyer 

Pamela Bevier 

Alice Boykin Robertson 

Nancy Bringhurst Barker 

Sally Bryan Minter 

Margaret V. Bullock 

Joan Falconer Byrd 

Judith Clark Larsen 

Mary Clark Schubert 

Edith Conwell Irwin 

Jane Cooper Mitchell 

Mary Wayne Crymes Bywater 

Elizabeth Dalton Brand 

Lucy Davis Harper 
*Julia Doar Grubb 

Harriett Elder Manley 
*Alice Frazer Evans 
*Kay Gwaltney Remick 

Nancy Hall Grimes 

Janice L. Henry 

Patricia Holmes Cooper 
♦Judy Houchins Wightraan 

Harriet Jackson Lovejoy 

Sarah Kelso 

Margaret Lipham Blakely 

Julia Maddox Paul 

Ginger Marks Espy 

Ann McBride Chilcutt 

Millie McCravey Clarke 
*Sue McCurdy Hosterman 

Mary Ann McSwain Antley 
*Mary Jane Moore 

Nancy Moore Kuykendall 

Prudy Moore Thomas 

Barbara Mordecai Schwanebeck 

Grace Ouzts Curry 

Emily C. Pancake 

Anne Pollard Withers 

Joanna Roden Bergstron 
*Lucy Scales Muller 

Joyce Seay Teel 

Page Smith Morahan 
*Nancy Stone Hough 

Virginia Thomas Shackelford 

Patricia Walker Bass 

Mary Elizabeth Webster Richardson 

Jane Weltch Milligan 
♦Florence Winn Cole 

Marian Zimmerman Jenkins 

Mildred L. Zimmerman 



1962 



Sherry Addington Lundberg 

Vicky Allen Gardner 

Nancy Bond Brothers 
*Carey Bowen Craig 

Martha Campbell Williams 

Gail Carter Adkins 

Vivian Conner Parker 

Carol Cowan Kussmaul 

Julia Duncan Sather 
*Pat Flythe Koonts 
*Peggy Frederick Smith 

Elizabeth Gillespie Proctor 

Elizabeth Harshbarger Broadus 

Jean Haynie Stewart 

Jan Heard Baucum 

Judy Heinz Luxford 

Ann Hershberger Barr 

Margaret Holley Milam 

Amanda Hunt White 
*Betsy Jefferson Boyt 



*Norris Johnston Goss 
Beverly Kenton Mason 
Milling Kinard 
Lynne Lambert Bower 
Letitia Lavender Sweitzer 
Laura Ann Lee Harris 
Dorothy Lockart Matthews 
Linda Locklear Johnson 
Peggy McGeachy Roberson 
Mary Ann McLeod LaBrie 
Ann Middlemas Johnson 
Susan Mustoe Lloyd 
Jane Nabors Atchison 
Nancy Nelms Garrett 
Ethel Oglesby Horton 
Pauline Page Moreau 
Betty Pancake Williams 
Sylvia Pruitt Karcher 
Marjorie Reitz Turnbull 
Lebby Rogers Harrison 
Robin Rudolph Orcutt 
Elaine Sayers Landrum 
Ruth Seagle Bushong 

*Ruth Shepherd Vazquez 
Carolyn Shirley Wimberly 
Margaret Shugart Anderson 
Jo Allison Smith Brown 
Sandra J. Still 
Angelyn Stokes McMillan 
Mary Stokes Humphlett 
Bebe Walker Reichert 
Jan Whitfield Hughen 



1963 



Angelina Bagiatis Demos 

♦Frances Bailey Graves 
Bryce Burgess Beasley 
Nancy Butcher Wade 
Lucie Callaway Majoros 
Teresa Carrigan Simmons 
Lynne Cole Scott 

♦Sarah Cumming Mitchell 

♦Leland Draper 
Janie Fincher Peterson 
Anna Belle Freeman Pyle 
Mary Ann Gregory Dean 
Jane Hancock Thau 
Margaret Harms 
Judith Hawley Zollicoffer 
Ellen Hodgson Oakes 

♦Mary Hunt Rubesch 
Dorothy Laird Foster 
Elizabeth Lee Neal 
Betty Libby Alderman 
Lyn Lindskog Deroy 
Carol Lown Clark 
Anne Miller Boyd 
Laura Mobley Pelham 
Lucy Morcock Milner 
Patricia 0* Brian Devine 
Robin Patrick Johnston 

♦Linda Plemons Haak 
Ann Risher Phillips 
Suzanne Smith 
Kaye Stapleton Redford 

♦Nell Tabor Hartley 
Elizabeth Thomas Freyer 
Mary Beth Thomas 
Louisa Walton McFadden 
Lydia Wammock Thompson 
Elizabeth Webb Nugent 
Miriam Wilson Knowlton 
Susan Winbigler Ware 
Kay Younger 



1964 



Susan Aspinall Block 
Lucia Bacot 
♦Nancy Barger Cox 
Karen Baxter Harriss 
Mary Evelyn Bell 
Susan Blackmore Hannah 
Sylvia Chapman Sager 
Eleanor V. Chiu 
Carolyn Clarke 
Judy Conner Scarborough 
Charlotte Connor 
Carolyn M. Craft 
Dale Davenport Fowler 
Diane David Hamrick 
Anne Foster Curtis 
Garnett E. Foster 
Karen Gerald Pope 



* Fund Agent 



Deceased 



14 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Nina Griffin Charles 

Martha Griffith Kelley 
*Elizabeth Hemphill Echols 

Judith Hillsman Caldwell 

Judith Hollingsworth Robinson 

Dianne Hunter Cox 
*Susan Keith-Lucas Carson 

Lila Kelly Mendel 

Harriet King Wasserman 

Mary Louise Laird 

Jan LaMaster Soriero 

Lynda Langley Burton 

Nancy Lee Abernathy 

Shirlev E. Lee 
*Martha MacNair McMullen 

Jean McCurdy Meade 

Joanna McElrath Alston 

Susan McLeod Holland 

Anne Minter Nelson 
*Mary Mitchell Saunders 

Margaret Moses Young 

Laurie Oakes Propst 

Pauline Richardson Crolley 

Carol Roberts Collins 

Sandra Shawen Kane 

Lila Sheffield Howland 
*Lib Singley Duffy 

Marion Smith Bishop 

Margaret Snead Henry 

Judith Stark Romanchuk 

Elizabeth Stewart Dimmock 

Kitty Strickland Croxton 

Sylvia Thorne 

Jane Wallace Brosnan 

Ninalee Warren Jagers 

Mary Lynn Weekley Parsons 

Frances Weltch Force 

Suzanne West Guy 

Barbara Ann White Hartley 

Leonora I. Wicker 

Florence Willey Perusse 

Mary Womack Cox 
*Maria Wornom Rippe 



1965 



Sally Abernethy Eads 
Barbara Adams Hilliard 
Betty Armstrong McMahon 
*Nancy Auman Cunningham 



Roberta Belcher Mahaffey 

Margaret Bell Gracey 

Dorothy Bellinger Grimm 

Rita Bennett Colvin 

Sally Blackard Long 

Pauline Boyce McLean 

Joanne Branch Grant 

Jane Brannon Nassar 

Mary Broach McGee 

Betty Brown Sloop 

Patricia Buchanan Masi 

Lynne Burton-Haigh 

Sally Bynum Gladden 

Kathryn Coggin Hagglund 

Helen Davis Hatch 

Molly Dominy Herrington 
*Ann Durrance Snead 

Doris El-Taw±l Krueger 

Nancy Hamraerstrom Cole 

Lillian Harris Lockary 

Kay Harvey Beebe 

Carol Jean Holmes Coston 

Linda Kay Hudson McGowan 

Gay Hunter Culp 

Marty Jackson Frame 

Betty Johnson McRae 

Jere Keenan Brands 

Kenney Knight Linton 

Angela Lancaster 

Elisabeth Malone Boggs 

Elizabeth W. McCain 

Marcia McClung Porter 

Linda McElfresh DeRoze 

Diane Miller Wise 

Brandon Moore Brannon 

Margaret Murphy Hunter 

Elaine Kay Nelson Bonner 

Nina Nelson Smith 

Sandra R. Nelson 
*Dorothy Louise Robinson Dewberry 

Barbara Rudisill 

Harriette Russell Flinn 
*Laura Sanderson Miller 

Anne Schiff Faivus 
*Catharine Sloan Evans 

Elyene Smith Thompson 

Nancy Solomonson Portnoy 

Susan Stanton Cargill 
*Sandra Wallace 

Charlotte Webb Kendall 

Sandra Wilson 

Sue Wyatt Rhodes 



1966 



Economics department computer aids students. 




Alice Airth 
*Beverly Allen Lambert 

Elizabeth Allgeier Cobb 

Teena Biscoe Rodgers 

Nancy Bland Towers 

Marilyn Breen Kelley 

Barbara Brown Freeman 
*Mary Brown Bullock 
*Nancy Bruce Truluck 

Emily Anne Burgess 

Mary Jane Calmes Thomas 

Vicky Campbell Patronis 

Carol Davenport Wood 

Alice E. Davidson 

Jenny Dlllion Moore 
*Martha Doom Bentley 

Virginia Finney Bugg 

May Day Folk Taylor 
*Jan Gaskell Ross 

Mary Jane Gilchrist Sullivan 

Susan Goode Douglass 

Marganne Hendricks Price 

Suzanne Holt Lindholm 

Frances Hopkins Westbrook 

Ellen King Wiser 

Mary Kuykendall Nichols 

Linda E. Lael 

Adelia MacNair Hall 

Connie Magee Keyser 

Helen Mann Liu 

Margaret Marion Ryals 

F. Ellen McDaniel 

Barbara Minor Dodd 

Portia 0. Morrison 

Anne Morse Topple 

Sara Moseley Junkin 

Julia Murray Pensinger 

Beverly Myers Pickett 

Carolyn Newton Curry 

Margaret Peyton Stem 
*Linda Preston Watts 

Virginia Quattlebaum Laney 

Betty Rankin Rogers 

Kay Roseberry Scruggs 

Deborah A. Rosen 

Gail Savage Glover 

Suzanne Scoggins Barnhill 

Lucy L. Scoville 

Louise Smith Nelson 

Malinda Snow 

Karen Stiefelmeyer Leffingwell 

Sarah Stowers Moore 

Barbara Symroski Culliney 

Martha Thompson 

Sarah Uzzell-Rindlaub 

Ruth Van Deman Walters 
*Carol Watson Harrison 

Louisa W. G. Williams 



1967 



Judy Barnes Crozier 
Mary Lynn Barnett Tennaro 
Cynthia Carter Bright 
Sara Cheshire Killough 

*Linda Cooper Shewey 
Ida Copenhaver Ginter 
Marsha Davenport Griffin 
Anne Davis McGehee 
Jane Davis Mahon 
Anne Diseker Beebe 
Anne Felker Cataldo 
Celia Ford Fisher 

*Mary Helen Goodloe-Murphy 
Fontaine Harper Fulghum 
Andrea Huggins Flaks 
Elizabeth Hutchison Cowden 
Judith Jackson Mozen 
Linda Jacoby Miller 
Jo Jeffers Wingfield 
Mary Jervis Hayes 
Lucy Jones Coo ley 
Jane Keiger Gehring 
Susan King Johnson 
Karen Kokomoor Folsom 
Caroline Lester Tye 
Jane McCurdy Vardaman 
Clair McLeod Muller 
Ann Miller Morris 
Mary Mitchell Apple 
Sandra Mitchell 
Judy Nuckols Offutt 
Diana Oliver Peavy 



Caroline Owens Crain 
Ann Roberts Divine 
Eliza Roberts Leiter 

*Carol Scott Wade 
Pamela Shaw Cochrane 

*Susan Sleight Mowry 
Patricia Smith Edwards 
Isabelle Solomon Norton 

*Susan Stevens Hitchcock 
Nancy Tilson Loop 
Rosalind Todd Tedarda 
Anne Waldrop Allen 
Lucy Waters Clausen 
Janice Weatherby Riley 
Sandra Welch Reeder 
Vicki Wells Reddick 
Grace Winn Ellis 



1968 



Anonymous 

Anonymous 

Elizabeth Alford Lee 

Judith Almand Jackson 

Sarah Bainbridge Akridge 

Lucie Barron 

Margie Baum Pearsall 

Patricia Bell Miller 

Jane Boone Eldridge 

Louise T. Bruechert 

Wallace Bryan Ribnik 

Jan Burroughs Loftis 

Mary T. Bush 

Laurie Carter Tharpe 

Anne Cates Buckler 
*Carol Cole Renfro 

Mary Corbitt Brockman 

Gretchen Cousin Autin 

Patrice Cragg Darden 

Rebecca Davis Huber 

Betty Derrick 

Katherine Doster Stoddard 

Paige Dotson Powell 

Ellen Drew Conway 

Sally Elberfeld Countryman 

Louise Fortson Kinstrey 

Ethel Gilbert Carter 

Nina Gregg Bush 
*Lucy Hamilton Lewis 

Sylvia Harby Hut ton 

Charlotte Hart Riordan 

Olivia Hicks 

Candace Hodges Bell 

Janet Hunter 

Barbara Jenkins Hines 
*Suzanne Jones Harper 

Adele Josey Houston 

Caroline Kludt Rlcketts 

Gail Livingston Pringle 
*Susan McCann Butler 

Katherine McCracken Maybank 

Becky McRae McGlothlin 

Katherine A. Mitchell 

Margaret Moore Hall 

Cue Pardue Hudson 

Martha Parks Little 

Patricia Parks Hughes 
*Nancy Paysinger Hove 

Cindy Ferryman Burleson 

Cynthia Pharr Brackett 

Susan Philips Moore 

Catherine Price Laube 

Lucy A. Rose 

Angela J. Saad 

Johanna Scherer Hunt 
*Patricia Stringer 

Susan Stringer Connell 

Christine Theriot Woodfin 

Ann Wilder 

Stephanie Wolfe Sidella 



1969 



Anonymous 

Anonymous 

Patricia Auclair Hawkins 

Catherine Auman Maere 

Beth Bailey 

Peggy Barnes Carter 

Sandra Beck Scott 

Carol Blessing Ray 

Mary Bolch Line 

Joette Burkett Yarbro 

Penny Burr Pinson 

Mary Chapman Hatcher 



15 



Martha Cooper Maddux 

Julie Cottrill 
*Janie Davis Hollerorth 

Barbara Dings Kent 

Christine Engelhard Meade 

Lou Frank Guill 
*Jo Ray Freiler Van Vliet 

Prentice Fridy Weldon 

Alyce Fulton Perkins 

Pam Gafford McKlnnon 

Anne Gilbert Potts 

Margaret Gillespie 

Mary Gillespie Dellinger 
*Lalla Griffis Mangin 
*Diane Hampton Flannagan 

Ruth Hayes Bruner 

Marion Hinson Mitchell 

Nancy Holtraan Hoffman 
*Jean Hovis Henderson 

Holly Jackson 
*Sara Jackson Chapman 
*Carol Jensen Rychly 

Kathy Maria Johnson Riley 

Kay Jordan Sachs 

Beverly LaRoche Anderson 

Letitia Lowe Oliveira 

Patricia May Touw 

Mary McAlpine Evans 

Suzanne Moore Kaylor 

Katherine Moorer Robinson 

Kathryn Morris White 

Minnie Bob Mothes Campbell 
*Mary Anne Murphy Hornbuckle 

Jean Noggle Harris 

Kathleen Pease 

Virginia Pinkston Daily 

Elta Posey Johnston 

Elizabeth Faye Potter 

Patsy Rankin Jopling 

Carolyn Robinson Caswell 

Flora Rogers Galloway 

Mattie Sayrs Anderson 

Dorothy Schrader 

Nancy Sowell Williams 

Eliza Stockman 

Anne Stubbs 

Tara Swartsel Boyter 
*Jeanne Taliaferro Cole 

Ann Burnette Teeple Sheffield 

Sally Thomas Evans 

Jane Todd 
*Sarah Walker Guthrie 

Sheryl Watson Patrick 

Shelia Wilkins Harkleroad 

Martha Wilson Keesler 

Rose Wilson Kay 

Sally Wood Hennessy 

Sharon Yandle Rogers 
*Betty Young von Herrman 



1970 



*Janet L. Allen 

Martha Allison Parnell 

Susan Atkinson Simmens 

Aria Bateman Redd 

Diane Bollinger Bush 
*Bonnie Brown Johnson 

Patricia Brown Cureton 

Leslie Buchanan New 

Mary Bullock Shearon 

Deborah Ann Claiborne Williams 

Lily Comer Foster 

Carol Cook Uhl 

Carol Crosby Patrick 

Barbara L. Darnell 
*Linda DelVecchio Owen 

Susan Donald 

Mary Douglas Pollit 

Sharron Lee Downs Landers 

Catherine DuVall Vogel 

Sherian Fitzgerald Hodges 

Marion Gamble McCollum 

Lynne Garcia Harris 

Hope Gazes Grayson 
*Cheryl Granade Sullivan 

Edi Guy ton Edmiston 

Sharon Eunice Hall Snead 
*Martha Harris Entrekin 

Mary-Wills Hatfield LeCroy 

Camille Holland Carruth 

Harriette Huff Gaida 

Ruth Hyatt Heffron 

Amy Johnson Wright 

Barbara Kinney 

Maria A. Lindsay 

Mary Margaret MacMillan Coleman 




Judy Mauldin Beggs 
Eileen McCurdy Armistead 
Carol Ann McKenzie Fuller 

*Chris McNamara Lovejoy 
Gail Miller 

Caroline Mitchell Smith 
Ann Mizell Millar 
Catherine Oliver 
Christine Cope Pence 
Martha L. Ramey 
Susan Reeve Ingle 

*Nancy Rhodes 
Eva C. Saggus 
Norma J. Shaheen 
Carol Sharman Ringland 
Beverly Shepherd Oxford 
Sally A. Skardon 
Martha Smith Rumora 
Sue Snelling DeFurio 
Sally Stanton 
Claudine Sumner Jones 
Pamela Taylor Clanton 
Sally Tucker Lee 
Jean Wall Olstin 
Sue Weathers Crannell 

*Ruthie Wheless Hunter 
Sandra Wilson Harris 
Norris Wootton 
Sue Wright Shull 



1971 



*Cynthia Ashworth Kesler 
Deborah Banghart Mullins 

*Carol Banister Kettles 
Evelyn Brown Christensen 
Vicki Brown Ferguson 
Jane Carlson 
Julia Couch Mehr 
Mary Carolyn Cox Perkins 
Sallie Daniel Johnson 

*Dale Derrick Rudolph 

*Carol Durrance Dunbar 
Jane Duttenhaver Hursey 

*Rose Anne Ferrante Waters 
Sandra Finotti Collins 
Dianne Floyd Blackshear 
Frances Folk Zygmont 
Christine Fulton Baldwin 
Margaret Funderburk O'Neal 
Carolyn Galley 
Harriet Gatewood Parker 

*Janet Godfrey Wilson 
Deborah Haskell Hurley 
Paula Hendricks Culbreth 



Susan Hopkins Moseley 
*Mary Alice Isele Johnson 

Ann A. Jarrett 

Edith Jennings Black 

Mary Pearl Landrum Squires 
*Linda Laney Little 

Candace D. Lang 
*Karen Lewis Mitchell 

Patricia Lindsay Green 

Edna Patricia Lowe Swift 

Mary Martin Smith 

Lee H. McDavid 
*Stella McDermid Haberlandt 
*Alexa Mcintosh Mims 

Bonnie Mcintosh Roughton 
*Marti McLemore Boyce 

Constance Morris Heiskell 

Susan E. Morton 
*Katherine Mueller Wright 
*Stewart Nelson Mead 

Vicki Nesbitt White 
*Eleanor H. Ninestein 

Betty S. Noble 

Rebecca Owen Crim 

Linda Ozee Lewis 

Elizabeth Palme 

Grace Pierce Quinn 
*Jan Roush Pyles 

Sarah Ruffing Robbins 

Patricia Schellack Wright 

Katherine Setze Home 

Jane Stambaugh 
*Granville Sydnor Hill 
*Dea Taylor Walker 
*p e ggy Thompson Davis 

Bernie Todd Smith 
*Caroline Turner 

Wimberly Warnock 
*Ellen Willingham 



1972 



Harriet E. Amos 

Pamela Arnold Milhan 

Mary Jane Beaty Watkins 

Deborah Boggus Hays 

Mary E. Brandon 

Patricia Carter Patterson 

Kathryn Champe Cobb 

Lizabeth Champe Hart 

Susan Correnty Dowd 

Madeleine del Portillo Smith 

Barbara Denzler Campbell 
♦Beatrice Divine 

Ellen Flynn Giles 
*Jerry Kay Foote 



Mary Susan Fryer 
*Dianne Gerstle Niedner 

Terri J. Hiers 

Claire Hodges Burdett 

Leila Elizabeth Jarrett Hosley 

Sharon Jones Cole 
*Deborah Jordan Bates 
*Anne Kemble Collins 

Sidney Kerr 

Susan Landers Burns 
*Sally Lloyd Proctor 
*Linda Maloy Ozier 

Jane Martin Wright 

Susan Mees Hester 

Mary Jane Morris MacLeod 

Nancy Owen Merritt 

Mary Ann Powell Howard 

Gayle Saunders Dorsey 

Margaret Smith Alexander 

Montie Smith Acuff 

Linda Story Braid 

Nancy Thomas Tippins 

Rose Trincher Prisant 
*Susan Watson Black 

Nancy Weaver Willson 

Pamela Westmoreland Sholar 
*Paula Wiles Sigmon 

Susan Williams Gomall 
*Juliana Winters 
*Ann Yrwing Hall 



1973 



*Faye Ann Allen Sisk 
Carolyn Arant Handell 
Susan Bell Bohler 
Sally Bryant Oxley 
Kathleen Campbell Spencer 
Nancy Carter Dunn 
Deborah Corbett Gaudier 
Ann Cowley Churchman 
Deborah Dalhouse Riser 
Ivonne delPortillo Betancourt 
Sheryl Denman Curtis 
Virginia Lee Estes Hill 
Debbie Gantt Mitchell 
Julia C. Goodloe 
Ellen Gordon Kidda 
Mary E. Gray 
Marsha L. Hall 
Judith Hamilton Grubbs 
Lelah Ruth Hamilton Riccio 
Andrea Hankins Schellman 

*Resa L. Harris 

*Carolyn Hassett-Powell 
Judy Hill Calhoun 



* Fund Agent 



Deceased 



16 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Melissa Holt Vandlver 
Meredith Howe Pharis 
Julia LaRue Orwig 
Margaret B. Lines 
Anne MacKenzie Boyle 
Margaret MacLennan Barron 
Judith Maguire Tindel 

*Jerrilyn McBride Berrong 

*Janifer Meldrum 
Louise Minor Lyon 

*Deborah Newman Mattern 

*Priscilla Offen 
Donna Parker Underwood 
Elizabeth Rhett Jones 
Marti Ryman Koch 

*Nadja Sefcik-Earl 
Judy Sharp Hickman 

*Clare P. Smith 
Tinsley Swann 
Pamela Todd Moye 

*Joy Trimble 
Laurie Turner Walburn 
Eleanor Vest Howard 
Nancy Vick 
Nancy Wallace Davis 
Edith Waller Chambless 
Betsy Watt Dukes 
Cynthia Wilkes Smith 
Jocelyn Williams 
Elizabeth Winfrey Freeburg 
Lady Louise Wornat Emrich 



1974 



*Sara E. Barrett 

Elizabeth Bean Burrell 
Diane Beller Cormani 

Julie Bennett Curry 

Betty Binkley 

Marianne Bradley 
*Patsy Cook Bates 
*E. Celeste Cox 

Elizabeth Crabill Shirk 
*Teressa S. Dew 

Judy Carol Duncan Baxley 

Angie Dunn Thompson 

Davara Dye Potel 
*Lynn Ezell 
*Mary Gay Bankston 
*Tania M. Gumusgerdan 

Rosanne Harkey Pruitt 

Rebecca Harrison Mentz 

Wendy Hellings Aldrich 

Cecilia Henry Kurland 

Beth Holmes Smith 

Patricia Hughes Schoeck 

Mar^ Jane Kerr Cornell 

Gretchen Keyser 

Carolyn Lacy Hasley 

Amy Ledebuhr Bandi 

Teresa Lee Echols 

Lib McGregor Simmons 

Patricia R. McGuire 

Ann McMillan 
*Melisha Miles Gilreath 

Melanie Moore 

Claire Owen 

Linda Parsons Stewart 

Ann Patterson 

Ann Poe Mitchell 

Gayle Rankin Meyer 
*Martha Rutledge Munt 
*Janet Sarbaugh 

Susan Skinner Thomas 
*Martha Stephenson Kelley 

Christine Weaver Ternenyi 



1975 



''Susan Balch Clapham 
*Vicki Baynes Jackson 

Connie Bowen Hart 

Mary Louise Brown Forsythe 

Melodye G. Brown 
*Victoria Burgess Stephan 
*Anna Case Winters 
*Shelby White Cave 

Rose Ann Cleveland 

India Culpepper Dennis 

Louise Dawsey Caldwell 

Sharon Forney Lee 

Allison Grigsby Spears 
*Motte Hay Turner 

Denise Hord Mockridge 
*Susan Landham Carson 

Mae Logan Kelly 



Vail Macbeth 

Frances Maguire 

Susan McLarin Johnson 
*Rebecca McSwain Reynolds 
*Mary Gay Morgan 

Marie H. Newton 

Jayne L. Peterman 

Ellen Phillips Smith 

Catherine Pirkle Wages 

Melinda Rapp Stuk 

Irmina L. Rivero 

M. Christi Roberts 
*Victoria A. Roberts 

Margaret A. Robison 

Angie Rushing 

Lyn Satterthwaite MIchaud 

Sally Stenger 

Shelley Tapp 

Martha Thrift Simmons 
*Anne Darby Tison Hunter 
*Rebecca M. Weaver 
*Beth Wickenberg 



1976 



Eva A. Ad an 

Katherine W. Akin 

Lisa Banks 
*Elizabeth Holland Boney 
*Brandon Brame 

Pamela S. Braswell 
*Jan Brisendine Funs ten 

Alexandra Coclin 

Alethea Dillard 

Sue Diseker 

Emily Dunbar 

Sally Echols Leslie 

Susan Grier Phillips 
*Lea Ann Grimes Hudson 
*Pamela Jane Hamilton Johnson 
*Sherry Huebsch Druary 
*Jeanne Jones Holliday 

Julie K. Jordan 

Frazer Kinnett Loomis 

Nancy Leasendale Purcell 
Henrietta B. Leland 

Jane Maas 

Jonoise McGehee Morehead 
*Peggie Miller Chamblee 

Melissa Mills Jacobs 

Genevieve New Chaffee 
*Janet Lynn Norton 

Jennifer Rich Kaduck 

Lori Riley Day 

Martha Sue Sarbaugh Veto 

Elizabeth Scott Guynes 
*Martha Marshall Smith 

Pedrick Stall 

Janet Tarwater Kibler 
*Lark Todd Sessions 

Win Anne Wannamaker Hipp 

Lynda Weizenecker Wilson 

Denise C. Westbrook 

Dorothy Wilkes 
♦Barbara Ann Williams 

Jeani Williams Rochelle 



1977 



*Mary Anne Barlow Alford 

*Lydia Maria Bendeck 

*Nancy Burnham Schwahn 

*Renee Davis Hall 

*Dana deWitt Truitt 
Anita R. Dodson 
Elizabeth Doscher Shannon 
Elaine Francisco Carlos 
Martha Ann Hackl 
Glenn Hankinson Paris 

*Cynthia Hodges Burns 
Caroline Inman Dubberly 
Sue Jinks 
Melissa S. Landon 
Gloria A. Lewis 
Marianne Lyon Howard 
Beth Mason 
Eleanor McCain Jinks 
Patricia M. McWaters 
Melinda Morris Knight 
Beverly Nelson McCallum 
Dana Nichols Stuckwish 
Clara O'Kelley Bennett 
Francine Oliver 
Julie Ann Pflughaupt Boyd 
Julie Poole Knotts 

*Linda Shearon 



*Tamara A, Shell 
Susan L. Speigel 

*Sarah Shurley Hayes 
Caroline Swink 
Lois Turner Swords 

*Lydia Wilkes Barfoot 
Kay Williams Barnard 
Lynn Wilson 



Susan Willoch Shaver 
Catherine Winn 
Sarah W. Workman 



1979 



1978 



Ellie Autrey Alderman 

Judy Bartholomew 

Janet A. Blount 

Ann Burchenal Tabb 

Mary C. Downey 

Sue Fisher 

Sue Jordan 

Janet Kelley Jobe 

Linda Kimbrough Cook 

Laura McDonald 

Jeanie Moores 

Alice L. Newton 

Mary Jane Norville 

Kathleen Ann O'Brien 

Sharon Pittraan Powell 

Madelyn Redd 

Thelma F. Ruddell 

Kathryn Schnittker White 

Sally J. Stamper 



Susan Kathleen Bethune 

Bess Cox 

Ragnhild Steineger 



Alumnae Clubs 

Agnes Scott Alumnae Club of 

Anderson, South Carolina 
Barrow-Gwinnett-Newton Agnes 

Scott Alumnae Club 
Agnes Scott Alumnae Club of 

Cobb County-Marietta 
Decatur Agnes Scott Alumnae Club 
Huntsville Alumnae Association 
Shreveport Alumnae Club 
Agnes Scott Alumnae Club of 

Tidewater, Virginia 
Triangle Area Agnes Scott 

College Alumnae Club 
Associated Alumnae Clubs of 

Washington, Do C. 



Parents and Friends 



Mr. 

Mrs. 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Mr. 

Ms. 



and Mrs. Ralph Abernathy 
Henry W. Adams 

and Mrs. LeRoy Adams 

and Mrs. S. Everette Adams 

Tom Adams 

M. Bernard Aidinoff 

Hooper Alexander, III 
0. Alt 

Paul H. Anderson 

Carol Aycock 
Mrs. James A. Bain 
Mr. A. B. Baker 
Mr. and Mrs. D. Banyar 
Mr. and Mrs. Lee A. Barclay 
Mr. and Mrs. Dean D. Barger 
Mrs. Louise Risley Barnes 
Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Benson 
Col. and Mrs. Leo E. Bergeron 
Mr. W. A. Bethune 
Mrs. George M. Bevier 
Mr. Gordon Bondurant 
Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Bondurant 
Mr. E. L. Bothwell 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry L. Bowden 
Mr. Harllee Branch, Jr. 
Christabel P. Braunrot 
Mrs. Henrietta F. Breen 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Bringhurst, Jr. 
Mr. Morrison W. Brinker 
Dr. and Mrs. Rufus K. Broadaway 
Mr. Thomas H. Broadus 
Mr. and Mrs. Waverly C. Broadwell 
Mrs. Aline M. Brown 
Mr. and Mrs. Martin P. Brown 
Mrs. Carl J. Bruechert 
Mr. William D. Burch 
Mr. William Burchenal, 

Otis B. Burnham 

and Mrs. George B. 

and Mrs. Ronald L. 

and Mrs. William A. 



Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 



Jr. 

Butler 

Byrnside 
Calder 



Mr. Dan D. Cameron 

Mr. Scott Candler, Jr. 

Mrs. Helen S. Carchidi 

Mr. and Mrs. William C. Carlso: 

Mr. John H. Carter, Jr. 

Ms. Jane Cauvel 

Mr. Clifford M. Clarke 

Dr. Robert P. Coggins 

Mr. Carleton H. Collar 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry N. Collar 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Collar 

Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Collar, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Collins 

and Family 
Mrs. Howard P. Conrad 
Mr. James T. Cook 
Mr. and Mrs. George F. Cooper, 



Dr. Lee B. Copple 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert F. Cox 

Mr. and Mrs. M. T. Cribbs, Jr. 

Dr. Alice J. Cunningham 

Judge and Mrs. R. S. Cunningham 

Mrs. S. M. Cunningham 

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Curd 

Mr. Harry L. Dalton 

Mrs. Janie P. Davenport 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Davidson 

Mrs. Jean M. Davis 

Mr. Neil 0. Davis 

Decatur Music Teachers Association 

Mr. and Mrs. L. del Portillo 

Dr. Marshall Dendy 

Mrs. Barbara Derketsch 

Mrs. Frances S. Diseker 

Dr. F. William Dowda 

Mr. and Mrs. L. N. DuBard 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Dunbar 

Mr. and Mrs. George B. Dunbar 

Mr. and Mrs. G. S. Dunbar 

Mrs. Julia C. Duncan 

Dr. and Mrs. E. M. Dunstan 

Mrs. Frances P. Durham 

Mr. and Mrs. Percy Echols 

Mr. Earl H. Elberfeld 

Mrs. J. C. Elder 

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Elebash 

Dr. George E. Engelhard 

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Estes 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Geer Ezell 

Faculty Flower Fund of 

Agnes Scott College 
Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Farley, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. P. F. Farmer 
Mr. Walter S. Flory 
Mr. Lawrence L. Floyd 
Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Foreman 
Ms. Sara A. Fountain 
Mr. William C. Fox 
Mrs. Isobel A. Fraser 



Robert V. Frierson, Sr. 
and Mrs. W. Joe Frierson 
Alex P. Gaines 
and Mrs. James C. Gaither 
Blake P. Garrett 
Dr. Julia T. .Gary 
Mr. L. L. Gellerstedt, Jr. 
**Mr. James R. Gilliam, Jr. 
Ben S. Gilmer 
Lois J. Goodman 
Rachel R. Gordon 
N. Howard Gowing, Jr. 
Esther A. Graff 
Graham Bible Class, 

First Presbyterian Church 
Dr. Elvena M. Green 



Mr. 
Dr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 



Mr. 

Mrs. 

Mrs. 

Mrs. 

Mrs. 



Fall 1979 



17 



Dr. Marjorle Grene 
Mrs. Lydell Grey 
Mrs. S. H. Griffin 
Mr. Edwin R. Haas, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Hagan 
Mrs. Edward Hansell 
Mrs. James E. Kara 
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Harling, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Harris 
Mr. William R. Harris 
Mr. and Mrs. John S. Harrison 
Mr. Sam F. Hatcher 
Mrs. John Hearn 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Hellender 
Mrs. Horace Henry 
Miss Mary Leila Honiker 
Ms. Ruth Alice Howell 
Dr. Claire Hubert 
Mrs. R. E. Huggins 
Mr. John S. Hunsinger 
Mr. W. E. Hunter 
Mr. Conley Ingram 
Mr. Samuel M. Inman, Jr. 
Mrs. Glenn W. Ives 
Mr. James Jackson 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J. Jones 
Dr. and Mrs. Rudolph W. Jones, Jr. 
Mrs. W. H. Jones, Sr. 
Dr. and Mrs. William H. Jones 
Mr. and Mrs. William T. Justice 
Mr. and Mrs. Alan Keith-Lucas 
Mr. K. Webb Kennedy 
Mr. Donald R. Keough 
Mrs. Joseph Kesler 
Mr. Samuel C. Ketchin 
Mr. and Mrs. George S. Kiefer 
Mr. Kenneth L. Kinney 
Ms. Helen Neal Kleiber 
Dr. C. Benton Kline 
Ms. Evangeline B. Klug 
Mr. Ellwood L. Koch 
**Mr. David N. Landers 
Mr. C. R. Lawrence 
Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Leggett 
Miss Susan F. Leonard 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter W. Leroy 
Mrs. Elsie W. Love 
Mrs. Valeria W. Lewis 
Ms. Mary Lichlyter 
Lions Club Schwabisch Hall 
Mrs. W. H. Little 
Mr. and Mrs. Homer A. Locke 



♦♦Mrs. Helen B. Longshore 
Mr. J. Erskine Love, Jr. 
Mr. Murray Lumpkin 
Mr. and Mrs. Ian MacFarlane 
Dr. and Mrs. Arch L. MacNair 
Dr. Kathryn A. Manuel 
Mr. and Mrs. James B. Markert 
Dr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Martin 
Mr. Ferrin Y. Mathews 
Dr. and Mrs. Frank Matthews 
Dr. and Mrs. Robert E. Maynard 
Patricia and Megan McAtee 
Mr. James Ross McCain 
Mr. and Mrs. Marvin McCain 
Dr. and Mrs. Paul M. McCain 
Mrs. Sue McCollister 
Col. and Mrs. Thomas G. McCunniff 
Mrs. Katie Houston McDonald 
Ms. Terry S. McGehee 
Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Mcintosh 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph T. McKean 
Dr. Kate McKemie 

Dr. and Mrs. Alexander S. Mc Kinney 
Mr. John C. B. McLaughlin 
Miss Rozelle McLendon 
Mr. C. B. McLeod 
Dr. W. Edward McNair 
Mr. and Mrs. Jesse M. Meadows 

and Family 
Mr. Dennis W. Michaud 
Mrs. S. Allen Middleton 
Mary Lou Miles 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Mills 
Mr. J. A. Minter, Jr. 
Mr. C. B. Mitchell 
Miss Elisabeth Mitchell 
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Mitchell 
Mr. and Mrs. S. Richard Morrison 
Dr. Chester Morse 
Mrs. A. L. Moses 
Miss lone Murphy 
Mrs. E. A. Murray 
Mr. Heidt F. Neal, III 
Ms. Debbie Neely 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Nelson, Jr. 
Mrs. Robert H. New 
Miss Lillian Newman 
Dr . James Newsome 
Mr. William E. Nuessle 
Mr. Herbert H. Nussbaum 
Mr. M. Lamar Oglesby 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lamar Oglesby 



Mr. and Mrs. William B. Owens 

Mrs. John Pancake 

Ms. Lillian Parks 

Miss Bess Patton 

Mr. and Mrs. James N. Payne 

Dr. and Mrs. William J. Pendergrast 

Mrs. Virginia Key Penn 

Mrs. Lucile D. Perkins 

Dr. and Mrs. Marvin B. Perry, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Glenn Petty 

Mr. John Pfeiffer 

Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Pittenger 

Mrs. W. W. Plowden 

Dr. and Mrs. Walter B. Posey 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Pridgen 

Mrs. Julia Y. Promnitz 

Mrs. Bona Purswell 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom W. Rankin 

Mr. Robert S. Riley 

Col. and Mrs. Henry A. Robinson 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Robinson 

Mr. William Walter Robinson, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank E. Rockwell 

Mr. C. B. Rogers, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred C. Rogers 

Mrs. Minnie B. Rogers 

Mr. and Mrs. R. 0. Rogers 

Mr. Joseph M. Rubens, Jr. 
**Mrs. Susan V. Russell 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald D. Salter 

Mr. Hansford Sams, Jr. 

Mr. J. Maryon Saunders 

Mr. C. Oscar Schmidt, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred H. Schrader 

Mr. William L. Scobee 

Mrs. Burton A. Scott 
**Miss Gertrude K. Sevin 

Mr. B. M. Sharian 

Mr, and Mrs. Francois L. Sheats 

Mrs. R. L. Sheffer 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Shepard, Jr. 

Mr. Horace H. Sibley 

Mr. John A. Sibley 

Mr. W. A. L. Sibley, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Alden Simpson 

Mr. Tom Simpson 

Mr. and Mrs. Roff Sims 

Mr. and Mrs. Harlon P. Sisk 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Skellie, Jr. 
**Mr. Edmond H. Smith, Jr. 

Mr. Glenn B. Smith 

Mr. Hal L. Smith 



Mr. John E. Smith, II 

Mrs. John R. Smith 

Mrs. L. Noel Smith 

Mr. P. L. Bealy Smith 

Mrs. Carolyn Snow 

Mr. and Mrs. George A. Speer, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry B. Spence 

Ms. Margaret H. Spencer 

Dr. Chloe Steel 

Mr. Augustus H. Sterne 

Mrs. J. L. Stevens 

Mrs. Edith Stewart 

Mrs. Frances Stewart 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Stimson 

Dr. E. L. Stoffel 

Ms. Frances Waggoner Strother 

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Strozier 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Summer 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Swink 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Talton 

Dr. J. Randolph Taylor 

Mrs. W. M. Terrill 

Dr. and Mrs. J. N. Thomas 

Mr. and Mrs. Pierre Thomas 

Dr. and Mrs. Frederick H. Thompson 

Mr. and Mrs. Glenn E. Thompson 

Dr. and Mrs. W. P. Tinkler 

Mrs. Margaret Towers 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Randall Tuten 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Walker 

Mrs. C. J. Walker 

Mr. Robert J. Wall 

Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Wallace, Jr. 

Mr. William C. Wardlaw 

Mr. Ferdinand Warren 

Mrs. T. H. Weatherly 

Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Weinburgh 

Mr. James H. Wells 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Wendling 

Mrs. J. Parhara Werlein 

Mrs. Henry C. West 

Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Westmoreland 

Mr. Wendell K. Whipple 

Mr. John C. Wilson 

Mr. W. T. Wilson, Jr. 

Harry and Penny Rush Wistrand 

Women of the Church, 

Decatur Presbyterian Church 
Mrs. Clara C. Wyatt 
Mr. and Mrs. William M. Zarkowsky 



Fund Agent 



Deceased 



Businesses and Foundations 



Anonymous 
Anonymous 

Akers Foundation, Inc. 
♦Alexander & Alexander, Inc. 
American Credit Foundation 
of North Carolina, Inc. 
♦American Mutual Liability 

Insurance Company 
♦American Telephone and 
Telegraph Company 
Arthur Anderson and Company 
Atlanta Coca-Cola Bottling 

Company 
Atlanta Gas Light Company 

* Atlantic Richfield Foundation 
♦The Badger Company, Inc. 

Baxley Federal Savings and 
Loan Association 

Bergstrom Endowment Fund 

Blake Builders Supply Company 
*The Boeing Company 
*Boise Cascade Corporation 

Burnham Enterprises, Inc. 
*Celanese Corporation 
*The Chase Manhattan Bank 
*Chevron U. S. A., Inc. 
*Citizens and Southern Fund 
*The Coca-Cola Company 

* Colgate-Palmolive Company 
*Columbia Gas Transmission 

Corporation 
♦Connecticut Mutual Life 
Carle C. Conway Scholarship 

Foundation 
Harry L. Dalton Foundation, Inc. 
♦Daniel International Corporation 
Decatur Federal Savings & Loan 
Association 
♦Duke Power Company 
The John C. Echols Memorial Fund 
Emory Woods, Inc. 



♦The Equitable Assurance Society 
of the United States 

* Exxon USA Foundation 
Sylvia M. and Frank W. Ferst 

Foundation, Inc. 

* Fireman's Fund American Foundation 

* The First National Foundation, Inc. 
First Presbyterian Church of Houston 

*Ford Motor Company 

John and Mary Franklin Foundation, Inc. 
♦General Electric Foundation 

Georgia Foundation for Independent 
Colleges, Inc. 
♦Gulf Life Insurance Company 

Stella and Charles Guttman Foundation, Inc. 
♦The Hartford Insurance Group Foundation 
♦The Harvey Hubbell Foundation 
*Hercules, Inc. 
*Hewlett-Packard 

* Honeywell Fund 

Household Finance Corporation 

* Illinois Tool Works Foundation 
*Integon Foundation, Inc 
international Business Machines 

Corporation 

* International Paper Company Foundation 
♦Jefferson-Pilot Corporation 
*Johnson & Higgins of Georgia, Inc. 
*The Kendall Company Foundation 

Lanier Brothers Foundation 
*Martin Marietta Corporation 

Metropolitan Foundation of Atlanta 
*Milliken and Company 
♦Mobil Foundation, Inc. 
*Monsanto Fund 
*M0NY - Mutual of New York 
*The N. C. R. Foundation 

* National Distillers & Chemical 

Corporation 
*New York Telephone Company 
Patterson-Barclay Memorial Foundation, Inc. 



♦Pfizer, Inc. 

The Presser Foundation 
*Provident Mutual Life Insurance Company 
*The Prudential Insurance Company 

of America 
* Raytheon Company 
*Reliance Insurance Companies Foundation 

Robinson-Humphrey Company, Inc. 
*Rohm and Haas Company 

Savannah News-Press 
*Shell Companies Foundation 

The Sears-Roebuck Foundation 
♦Simmons Company 
♦SmithKline Corporation 
*South Carolina National Bank 

Southeastern Electric Exchange, Inc. 
*Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph 

Company 
♦Southern Natural Gas Company 
*Sperry Rand Corporation 

♦J. P. Stevens & Company, Inc. Foundation 
*The Sun Company, Inc. 
♦TRW Foundation 
*Texaco, Inc. 
♦The Torrington Company 
*Trust Company Bank 

The J. M. Tull Foundation 

D. A. and Elizabeth B. Turner Foundation 

UPS Foundation 
♦Union Oil Company of California 

Foundation 
♦United States Gypsum Foundation, Inc. 
♦United Technologies 
♦United Virginia Bankshares Foundation 

Gertrude and William C. Wardlaw 
Fund, Inc. 
*Western Electric Fund 
*Westinghouse Educational Foundation 

The David, Helen, and Marion Woodward 
Fund 



♦Made matching gifts 



18 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Agnes Scott's Endowment and 
Other Permanent Funds 



Through the Years alumnae and 
friends of Agnes Scott have provided 
gifts to build the College and to 
strengthen its programs. Many of these 
gifts have made it possible to improve 
faculty compensation, to increase finan- 
cial aid to students, and to add books for 
the Library and equipment for the 
classrooms and laboratories. 

Most of the gifts received each year 
are unrestricted. The College can apply 
them to scholarship awards or to some 
other budget needs. When a gift is 



designated for a specific purpose, the 
College respects the donor's wish. 

Some restricted gifts are made for the 
Endowment so that the principal will be 
held intact and only the income will be 
used for general or specific purposes. 
Gifts for student loan funds are meeting 
a growing need. Sometimes a donor will 
make a gift but will select a life-income 
plan such as an annuity, thereby benefit- 
ing both the College and the donor. 

Agnes Scott is indebted to alumnae 



and friends for their interest and 
generosity in establishing the following 
permanent funds for the College. The 
amount shown for each fund represents 
the total of all gifts received through 
August 31, 1979. This list describes 
individually all funds of $1,000 or more, 
but it does not include scholarships 
provided annually by the donors. 

Please let the Development Office 
know of any errors or omissions so that 
corrections can be made. 



Special Funds 



The Walters Fund, established in 1955 
through a bequest from Frances Winship 
Walters, represents the major part of 
Agnes Scott's Endowment. Mrs. Wal- 
ters attended Agnes Scott Institute and 
served as a trustee for sixteen years. As 
the residual beneficiary of her estate, 
Agnes Scott received $4,291,630, the 
largest amount by far that the College 
has ever received from any source. 

The English Fund was established in 
1947 by a grant of $500,000 from an 
anonymous foundation. The income is 
used for maintaining and strengthening 
the program of the English department. 



The History and Political Science Fund 

was established in 1964 through a grant 
of $500,000 from an anonymous founda- 
tion which the College had to match with 
an equal amount from other sources so 
that the total would be $1,000,000. The 
income is used to maintain and 
strengthen the program of the Depart- 
ment of History and Political Science. 

The General Endowment Fund of 
$2,008,850 represents the gifts of indi- 
viduals, corporations, and foundations 
whose gifts ranged in amount from a few 
dollars to several hundred thousand 
dollars. 



Memorial Funds 



Wallace McPherson Alston Professorship 
of Bible and Religion of $500,000 was 
established in 1973 by the Board of 
Trustees in honor of Agnes Scott's third 
president at the time of his retirement 
after a quarter century of distinguished 
service to the College. 

Anna Josephine Bridgman Fund of 
$2,030 was established in 1974 by the 
Board of Trustees in her honor when she 
retired after twenty-five years of service 
as professor and chairman of the biology 
department. The income is used for the 
Bridgman Biology Library. 

William A. Calder Fund of $2,035 was 
established in 1971 by the Board of 
Trustees to honor this professor for his 
twenty-four years of service as chairman 
of the Department of Physics and As- 
tronomy. The income is used to pur- 



chase equipment for the department. 

John Bulow Campbell Fund of 
$142,945 was established in 1940 by this 
generous trustee from Atlanta as the first 
gift to the College's Semi-Centennia! 
Fund. The income is available to 
strengthen the College's operations. 

Charles Murphey and Mary Hough 
Scott Candler Fund of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1963 by their three sons — Scott, 
Murphey, and Milton — as a memorial to 
these friends, neighbors, and supporters 
of Agnes Scott, Mr. Candler having 
served as a member of the Board of 
Trustees from 1889 to 1935 and Mrs. 
Candler having been a daughter of 
Colonel Scott, the College's founder. 

Marion T. Clark Research Fund of 
$4,335 was established in 1978 by his 
family and friends as a memorial to this 



William Rand Kenan, Jr., Professor of 
Chemistry and chairman of the depart- 
ment and in recognition of his eighteen 
years of service at Agnes Scott. The 
income is used to assist the student 
research program. 

Mary Keesler Dalton Art Fund of 
$30,914 was established in 1972 by Harry 
L. Dalton of Charlotte, North Carolina, 
in honor of his wife, Class of 1925. The 
income and principal, if deemed appro- 
priate, is to be used to purchase works of 
art for the College's Dalton Galleries. 

Charles A. Dana Professorship Fund of 
$556,000 was established in 1973 with a 
grant from the Charles A. Dana Founda- 
tion and matching funds from Agnes 
Scott. The income is used as supplemen- 
tal compensation for at least four Dana 
Professors. 

Christian W. Dieckmann Fund of 
$3,425 was established in 1961 by his 
friends to honor this professor and 
musician for enriching the lives of 
generations of students from 1905 until 
his retirement in 1950. The income is 
used for musical recordings and other 
equipment in the music department. 

Agnes Scott Donaldson Fund of $10,000 
was established through a bequest from 
this member of the Class of 1917. The 
income is used where it is most needed. 

Letitia Pate Evans Fund of $100,000 
was established in 1955 through a be- 
quest from this generous benefactor and 
trustee of the College to provide an 
income for the maintenance of and 
improvements to the Dining Hall named 
in her honor. 

William Joe Frierson Research Fund of 
$3,715 was established in 1975 by the 
Board of Trustees and friends to honor 
him for his twenty-nine years of service 



Fall 1979 



19 



as professor and chairman of the chemis- 
try department. He was the College's 
first William Rand Kenan, Jr., Professor 
of Chemistry. The income is used to 
assist student research. 

Robert Frost Prize Fund of $1,105 was 
established in 1963 by members of the 
Class of 1963 to provide an award for 
creative writing and to honor this distin- 
guished and frequent visitor to the 
campus. 

Paul Leslie and Carolyn White Garber 
Fund of $4,453 was established in 1976 
by the Board of Trustees and friends 
upon Professor Garber's retirement after 
thirty-three years of service during 
which he was professor and chairman of 
the Department of Bible and Religion. 
The income is used to purchase Bible 
teaching aids. 

General Memorial Fund of $102,318 
was established with gifts from many 
alumnae and friends to strengthen the 
program of the College. 

Agnes Raoul Glenn Fund of $15,010 
was established in 1944 by Thomas K. 
Glenn of Atlanta in memory of his wife. 

Nancy Groseclose Visiting Scholars 
Fund of $3,240 was established in 1979 
by the Agnes Scott trustees and other 
friends to honor this professor and 
chairman of the biology department for 
her thirty-two years of service. The 
income is used to bring to the campus 
visiting scholars in biology and closely 
related fields. 

Amy Walden Harrell Fund of $3,000 
was established in 1972 by a bequest 
from her husband. Bishop Costen J. 
Harrell of Decatur, as a memorial to this 
alumna of the Institute. 

George P. Hayes Fellowship Fund of 
$2,825 was established in 1967 by the 
Board of Trustees in honor of this 
professor and chairman of the English 
department upon his retirement after 
forty years of service. The income is 
used to provide assistance to a graduat- 
ing senior or recent graduate who is 
beginning a program leading to a M.A. or 
Ph.D. degree in English. 

Jessie Lawrie Johnson Hicks Fund of 
$3,121 was established in 1960 by Dean 
and Mrs. C. Benton Kline of Agnes 
Scott in honor of Mrs. Kline's mother. 

Fred A. Hoyt Memorial Fund of 
$25,000 was established in 1971 with a 
bequest from this Atlanta friend of the 
College. The income is used to purchase 
capital equipment and to enhance our 
admissions and public relations pro- 
grams. 

Charlotte Hunter Memorial Fund of 
$1,265 was established in 1974 by her 
classmates and friends in appreciation of 
this member of the Class of 1929 who 
had served for ten years as assistant 
dean of students. Use of the income is at 
the discretion of the president. 



'rV\A/3 







Visiting professor in religion Benton Kline. 



Samuel Martin Inman Fund of 

$194,953 was established in 1923 with a 
bequest from Jane Walker Inman of 
Atlanta, as a memorial to her brother 
who was chairman of the Board from 
1903 to 1914. 

William Rand Kenan, Jr., Professor- 
ship of Chemistry of $500,000 was 
established in 1969 by the William Rand 
Kenan, Jr., Charitable Trust to per- 
petuate this business leader's interest in 
strengthening higher education. 

Wilma St. Clair Huot Kline Fund of 
$2,300 was established in 1960 by Dean 
and Mrs. C. Benton Kline in honor of his 
mother. 

Ellen Douglass Leyburn Professorship 
of English of $303,509 was established in 
1969 by the Board of Trustees and her 
friends as a memorial to this member of 
the Class of 1927 who as professor of 
English and chairman of the department 
inspired her students during her thirty- 
two years on the Agnes Scott faculty. 



Adeline Arnold Loridans Professorship 
of French of $300,000 was established in 
1956 by the Charles Loridans Founda- 
tion in memory of this alumna of the 
Institute who was the wife of the 
long-time French Consular Agent in 
Atlanta who had created the foundation. 

William Markham Lowry Fund of 
$25,000 was established in 1910 by 
Robert J. and Emma C. Lowry of 
Atlanta in memory of their son. The 
income is used for the natural science 
departments. 

Mary Stuart MacDougall Museum 
Fund of $2,505 was established in 1952 
by alumnae and friends in her honor at 
the time of her retirement as professor 
and chairman of the biology department 
after thirty-three years of service. The 
income is used for the improvement of 
the MacDougall Museum. 

James Ross McCain Lectureship Fund 
of $30,740 was established in 1966 by the 
students, faculty, alumnae, and friends 



20 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



of Agnes Scott as a memorial to the 
second president whose total span of 
distinguished service to the College had 
been fifty years. The income is used to 
provide a series of lectures on some 
aspect of the liberal arts and sciences 
with reference to the religious dimen- 
sions of human life. 

Michael A. McDowell, Jr., Fund of 
$2,095 was established in 1975 by the 
Board of Trustees to honor this musician 
upon his retirement as professor and 
chairman of the music department after 
twenty-five years of service on the 
faculty. The income is used to purchase 
audio equipment for the music depart- 
ment. 

Louise McKinney Book Prize Fund of 
$1,692 was established in 1937 by friends 
in honor of her service as professor of 
English from 1891 until her retirement in 
1937. The income is used to provide a 
prize for the student who, in the opinion 
of the faculty of the English department, 
has accumulated during the year the best 
personal collection of books which can 
be the foundation of a lasting library. 

Mary Angela Herbin McLennan Medi- 
cal Fellowship Fund of $25,000 was 
established in 1975 by Alex McLennan, 
Atlanta attorney, in memory of his 
mother. The income is used to provide a 
grant for an Agnes Scott College 
graduate to attend medical school. 

Walter Edward McNair Fund of $2,735 
was established in 1977 by the Board of 
Trustees to honor this member of the 
English department upon his retirement 
after his twenty years of service to the 
College which included not only his 
teaching but also his being an assistant to 
the president and director of develop- 
ment and public relations. The income is 
used to fund the visits of Phi Beta Kappa 
lecturers and visiting scholars. 

Mildred Rutherford Mell Lecture Fund 
of $4,963 was established in 1960 in her 
honor by her college associates and 
other friends upon her retirement as 
professor and chairman of the 
economics and sociology department 
after twenty-two years of service during 
many of which she was also chairman of 
the Lecture Committee. The income is 
used to bring outstanding speakers to the 
campus. 

Ellen White and William Wyeth New- 
man Prize Fund of $2,859 was estab- 
lished in 1976 by Dr. Eleanor Newman 
Hutchens '40 of Huntsville, Alabama, in 
honor of her grandparents who made it 
possible for her to attend Agnes Scott. 
The income is used for the Writers' 
Festival prizes in poetry and prose. 

Joseph Kyle Orr Fund of $21,000 was 
established in 1941 by the trustees as a 
memorial to this Atlanta business leader 
whose twenty-three years of leadership 
as chairman of Agnes Scott's Board of 



Trustees saw the College attain rapid 
growth and recognition. The income is 
used to strengthen the administrative 
work of the College. 

Mary Noble Phelps Memorial Fund of 
$10,000 was established in 1974 by her 
mother, Mrs. A. M. Noble of Smithfield, 
North Carolina, in memory of this 
member of the class of 1938. 

Frank P. Phillips Fund of $50,000 was 
established in 1950 with a bequest from 
this friend of the College from Colum- 
bus, Mississippi. 

Margaret T. Phythian Fund of $3,145 
was established in 1964 by the trustees 
and friends in honor of this member of 
the Class of 1916 upon her retirement as 
the first Adeline Arnold Loridans Pro- 
fessor of French as well as chairman of 
the department after a teaching career of 
forty-one years at the College. The 
income is used to assist a student in a 
special summer study of French. 

Janef Newman Preston Poetry Fund of 
$3,495 was established in 1962 by this 
1921 graduate and long-time member of 
the English department and her friends 
to encourage creative writing. The in- 
come is used for annual awards to the 
Agnes Scott students writing the best 
original poem and the best prose piece. 

George Washington Scott Memorial 
Fund of $29,000 was established in 1909 
by the citizens of Decatur to strengthen 
the College which he had helped to 
establish. The income is used for one of 
the academic departments. 

Carrie Scandrett Fund of $7,288 was 
established in 1969 by Agnes Scott 
alumnae, faculty, students, administra- 
tion, and trustees to honor, upon her 
retirement, this 1924 graduate who re- 
mained at Agnes Scott to become the 
College's second dean of students and to 
serve her alma mater with distinction for 
forty-four years. The income is used for 
the student affairs program. 

Thomas G. Snow Memorial Fund of 
$4,000 was established in 1972 by Melin- 
da Snow '66 of Atlanta in memory of her 
father. The income is used by the 
English department to sponsor activities 
of intellectual value. 

Chloe Steel Visiting Professor Fund of 
$2,932 was established in 1976 by trus- 
tees and friends upon her retirement 
after having been professor and chair- 
man of the French department during 
her twenty-one years of service. The 
income is used to bring to the campus a 
visiting professor of French. 

Laura Mayes Steele Fund of $159,307 
was established in 1977 from the estate 
of this member of the Class of 1937 who 
served the College for forty years, first 
as secretary to the president and later as 
registrar and director of admissions. 

Mary Frances Sweet Fund of $184,000 
was established in 1956 with a bequest 



from this College physician and profes- 
sor of hygiene who served in these 
capacities from 1908 to 1937 and re- 
mained a campus resident until her 
death. The income is used for the 
College's health services. 

Mary Nancy West Thatcher Fund of 
$47,600 was established in 1962 by this 
generous member of the Class of 1915 
who served as president of the Alumnae 
Association in 1926-27 and as an active 
trustee from 1947 to 1971. 

Lillian Dale Thomas Award Fund of 
$2,500 was established in 1977 by her 
cousins — Lucia B. Donnelly, Frances B. 
Hulver, and Beverly S. Burbage — in 
memory of this 1930 graduate whose 
devotion to sharing her love of Greek 
and Latin led her to a career of teaching. 
The income is used to provide an award 
for excellence in these languages. 

Margret Guthrie Trotter Fund of 
$2,330 was established in 1977 by the 
Board of Trustees and her friends as a 
memorial to this professor of English 
who for thirty-three years had encour- 
aged her students to be more creative as 
writers and poets. The income is used to 
help finance Agnes Scott's Writers' 
Festival, an event which she launched in 
1972. 

Frances Winship Walters Fund of 
$50,000 was established through a be- 
quest from this generous alumna and 
trustee. The income is used for the 
operation and maintenance of the Wal- 
ters Infirmary. 

Annie Louise Harrison Waterman Pro- 
fessorship of Theatre of $100,000 was 
established in 1953 by this generous 
alumna of the Institute and trustee from 
1947 to 1953. 

George Winship Fund of $10,000 was 
established in 1957 through a bequest 
from this Atlanta business leader who 
had served as a trustee for twenty-five 
years, eighteen of which he was chair- 
man of the Board. 

Roberta Powers Winter Fund of $4,277 
was established in 1974 by the Board of 
Trustees and her friends in honor of this 
member of the Class of 1927 upon her 
retirement as the College's first Annie 
Louise Harrison Waterman Professor of 
Speech and Drama as well as department 
chairman after thirty-five years of ser- 
vice. The income is used to bring visiting 
speakers from these fields to the 
campus. 

Myrna Goode Young Latin Award 
Fund of $2,000 was established in 1979 
by the Agnes Scott trustees to honor this 
professor of classical languages and 
literatures for her twenty-three years of 
service. The income is used to establish 
an award to the graduating senior with 
the highest scholastic average in Latin 
with a "B" or better grade as the 
minimum. 



Fall 1979 



21 



Scholarship Funds 



Martin J. Abney Scholarship Fund of 

$5,000 was established in 1975 by a 
bequest from Louise Abney Beach King 
"20 of Birmingham. Alabama, as a 
memorial to her father. 

Akers Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was 
established in 1978 through the interest 
of business leaders C. Scott Akers of 
Atlanta and John M. Akers of Gastonia. 
North Carolina. 

1 ucile Alexander Scholarship Fund of 
$5,056 was established in 1951 by her 
friends to honor this 1911 graduate who 
returned to her alma mater to teach first 
chemistry and then mathematics before 
she received an advanced degree in 
French from Columbia University. Hers 
was the first graduate degree earned by 
an Agnes Scott alumna. She was head of 
the French department for twenty-eight 
years before her retirement in 1948. 
Preference is given to students majoring 
in French. 

Louisa Jane Allen Memorial Scholar- 
ship Fund of S3. 546 was established in 
1958 by her friends and family as a 
memorial to this 1956 graduate after her 
tragic automobile accident. 

Mary Virginia Allen Scholarship Fund 
of S3.064 was established in 1979 by the 
Agnes Scott trustees and friends to 
honor this alumna of the Class of 1935. 
professor and chairman of the French 
department, for her twenty-eight years 
of service. The income is used to assist a 
French major to study in France for an 
academic year. 

Samuel Harrison Allen Scholarship 
Fund of $1,965 was established in 1969 
by Clara May Allen Reinero '23 and her 
family of Decatur in memory of her 
father. 

Mary McPherson Alston Scholarship 
Fund of $6,930 was established in 1960 
by Dr. and Mrs. Wallace M. Alston to 
honor this mother of Agnes Scott's third 
president. 

Wallace McPherson Alston Scholarship 
Fund of $9,000 was established in 1973 
by his many friends at the time of his 
retirement in appreciation of his distin- 
guished service during his twenty-five 
years at Agnes Scott, twenty-two of 
which he served as the president. 

Sara Davis Alt Scholarship Fund of 
$1,400 was established in 1979 by her 
husband. William O. Alt. of Atlanta, in 
memory of this member of the Class of 
1935. 

Neal L. Anderson Scholarship Fund of 
$15,000 was established in 1976 by Ruth 
Anderson O'Neal '18 and her husband. 
Alan S. O'Neal, of Winston-Salem. 
North Carolina, as a memorial to her 



father, a Presbyterian minister and 
trustee of Agnes Scott from 1923 to 
1931. Preference is given to a student 
who is majoring in Bible and religion. 

Arkansas Scholarship Fund of $4,800 
was established in 1962 by alumnae in 
that state. Preference is given to stu- 
dents from Arkansas. 

Armstrong Memorial Scholarship Fund 
of $2,000 was established in 1924 by 
George Ferguson and Lucy May Camp 
Armstrong of Savannah. Preference is 
given to students who are interested in 
serving with the Young Women's Chris- 
tian Association. 

Atlantic Ice and Coal Company Schol- 
arship Fund of $2,500 was established in 
1924 by the employees of this company 
when William B. Baker of Atlanta was 
its president. Preference is given to a 
student from a community where the 
company plants have operated. 

Atlas Finance Company Scholarship 
Fund of $1,100 was established in 1963 
by the firm when Robert R. Snodgrass of 
Atlanta was its president. 

Man Reynolds Babcock Scholarship 
Fund of $25,000 was established in 1964 
by the Mary Reynolds Babcock Founda- 
tion of Winston-Salem. Preference is 
given to students from North Carolina. 

Charlotte Bartlett Memorial Scholar- 
ship Fund of $4,791 was established in 
1972 by Ruby Stafford (Mrs. Charles 
W.) Bartlett of Tampa in memory of her 
daughter of the Class of 1950. 

Nelson T. Beach Scholarship Fund of 
$25,000 was established in 1954 by 
Louise Abney Beach '20 of Birmingham. 
Alabama, in memory of her husband. 
The Presbyterian Foundation holds 
S15.000 of this amount for the College. 

Mary Livingston Beatie Scholarship 
Fund of $1 1.500 was established in 1950 
by W. D. Beatie and Nellie Beatie of 
Atlanta in memory of their mother. 

Annie V. and John Bergstrom Scholar- 
ship Fund of $1,500 was established in 
1924 by Martha Wynunee Bergstrom of 
Atlanta in honor of two of her children. 

.lulianne Williams Bodnar Memorial 
Scholarship Fund of $3,457 was estab- 
lished in 1972 by her classmates and 
friends as a tribute to this member of the 
Class of 1963. 

J. O. Bowen Scholarship Fund of 
$6,000 was established in 1950 by J. O. 
Bowen, Decatur businessman. 

Martha Bowen Scholarship Fund of 
$1,000 was established in 1935 by her 
classmates and friends as a memorial to 
this member of the Class of 1925 from 
Monroe. Georgia, who had died before 
graduation. 



Bovd-McCord Memorial Scholarship 
Fund of $6,500 was established in 1976 
with a bequest from Miss Clem Boyd as 
a memorial to her parents. William and 
Frances McCord Boyd, of Newton 
Counts. Georgia. 

lain MacDonald Brittain Scholarship 
Fund of $15,000 was established in 1963 
by Fred W. and Ida Brittain Patterson 
'21 of Atlanta in memory of her mother. 

Judith Broadaway Memorial Scholar- 
ship Fund of $16,588 was established in 
1966 by her classmates, family, and 
friends as a memorial to this member of 
the Class of 1966 who had died just 
before graduation. Preference is given to 
a student majoring in philosophy. 

Celeste Brown Scholarship Fund of 
$3,665 was established in 1964 by 
Dorothy Brown (Mrs. John H.. Jr.) 
Cantrell '29 of Spartanburg. South 
Carolina, in memory of her mother. 

Dorothy Dunstan Brown Scholarship 
Fund of $2,300 was established in 1965 
by Edgar and Florene Dunstan of 
Decatur in honor of their daughter of the 
Class of 1947. 

Maud Morrow Brown Scholarship 
Fund of $1,500 was established in 1961 
by Annie Graham King '06 to honor her 
teacher of Latin and Greek while she 
was at Agnes Scott. Preference is given 
to students in classics. 

John A. and Sallie Burgess Scholarship 
Fund of $1,700 was established in 1950 
by these Atlanta friends of the College. 

Caldwell Memorial Scholarship Fund 
of $1,600 was established in 1960 by 
George E. and Lida Rivers Caldwell 
Wilson ' 10 of Charlotte in memory of her 
parents, the late Dr. and Mrs. John L. 
Caldwell. Preference is given to students 
from North Carolina and Arkansas who 
are daughters of ministers serving in 
small churches. 

Laura Berry Campbell Fund of 
$100,000 was established in 1964 with 
gifts from Mrs. John Bulow Campbell of 
Atlanta because of her interest in the 
College and its students. 

Annie Ludlow Cannon Fund of $1,000 
was established in 1949 by this member 
of the Class of 1909. Preference is given 
to daughters of missionaries and minis- 
ters or to students interested in Christian 
service. 

Ella Carey Scholarship Fund of $5,550 
was established in 1969 by a grateful 
member of the Class of 1927 to honor 
this maid and friend to students and 
faculty alike during her years of service 
in Main Hall. Preference is given to 
Black students. 

Captain James Cecil Scholarship Fund 
of $3,000 was established in 1950 by his 
daughter. Preference is given to descen- 
dants of those who served the Confed- 
eracy. 

Chattanooga Alumnae Club Scholar- 



:: 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 




*rr 



6 ( 



New film room in Buttrick seats eighty. 



ship Fund of $2,009 was established in 
1961 by alumnae in that community. 
Preference is given to students from that 
area. 

Dr. and Mrs. Tolbert Fanning Cheek 
Scholarship Fund of $1,500 was estab- 
lished in 1929 by Mary Simmons Cheek 
to be a memorial to her husband, but it 
now honors both members of this 
pioneer family of Birmingham, 
Alabama. 

Irvin and Rosa L. Cilley Scholarship 
Fund of $59,084 was established in 1964 
by Melissa Cilley, a member of the 
Spanish department at Agnes Scott from 
1930 to 1963, as a memorial to her 
parents. She later bequeathed her estate 
to the College for this fund. 

Citizens and Southern National Bank 
Scholarship Fund of $25,000 was estab- 
lished in 1962 as a part of this bank's 
interest in the education of youth. 

James J. Clack Scholarship Fund of 
$1,500 was established in 1922 by this 
friend of the College from Starrs ville, 
Georgia. 

Caroline McKinney Clarke Scholarship 
Fund of $14,625 was established in 1961 
by Louise Hill Reaves '54 in honor of her 
mother, an alumna of the Class of 1927, 
a lifelong friend, neighbor, and support- 
er of the College. 

Class of 1957 Scholarship Fund of 
$9,316 was established in 1962 by mem- 
bers of this class. 

Class of 1964 Scholarship Fund of 
$3,994 was established in 1964 by mem- 
bers of this class. Preference is given to 
students from other countries. 



Class of 1965 Scholarship Fund of 

$1,174 was established in 1965 by mem- 
bers of this class. The award is given to a 
student for her junior or senior year and 
is based on both merit and need. 

Class of 1968 Scholarship Fund of 
$1,325 was established in 1968 by mem- 
bers of this class. The award is given to a 
Black student. 

Jack L. Cline, Jr., Memorial Scholar- 
ship Fund of $2,665 was established in 
1962 by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jasper 
(Jack) L. Cline of Atlanta. 

Howard P. Conrad Scholarship Fund 
of $28,000 was established in 1971 in his 
memory by his wife of St. Clair, 
Michigan. Their daughter, Patricia, was 
a member of the Class of 1963. 

Augusta Skeen Cooper Scholarship 
Fund of $15,100 was established in 1949 
by Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Inman Cooper 
in honor of this member of the Class of 
1917 who had stayed on at Agnes Scott 
to teach chemistry for thirteen years. 
Preference is given to students in that 
department. 

Thomas L. and Annie Scott Cooper 
Scholarship Fund of $12,511 was estab- 
lished in 1935 through gifts from this 
Decatur family, Mrs. Cooper being the 
daughter of Colonel George W. Scott, 
the founder of the College. 

Laura Bailey and David Robert Cum- 
ming Scholarship Fund of $1,000 was 
established in 1961 by Laura Cumming 
Northey '43 of Charlotte, North Caroli- 
na, as a memorial to her parents. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Cunningham 



Scholarship Fund of $7,305 was estab- 
lished in 1950 by their family and friends 
in recognition of their service to the 
College for more than thirty years. 
Preference is given to students from 
missionary families or from foreign 
countries or to students interested in 
mission work. 

Mary Cheek Davenport Scholarship 
Fund of $2,000 was established in 1925 
by this friend from Marietta to assist 
primarily the daughters of missionaries 
or a student interested in missionary 
work. 

Andrewena Robinson Davis Memorial 
Scholarship Fund of SI, 000 was estab- 
lished in 1961 by her cousin, Patricia 
Morgan Fisher '53, to honor this member 
of the Class of 1932. 

Lillian McPherson Davis Scholarship 
Fund of $2,570 was established in 1962 
by Jean M. Davis of Greenville, South 
Carolina, in memory of her young 
daughter. 

Marie Wilkins Davis Scholarship Fund 
of $4,000 was established in 1939 by her 
mother's bequest as a memorial to this 
alumna who attended Agnes Scott Insti- 
tute. 

Emily S. Dexter Memorial Scholarship 
Fund of $1,365 was established in 1974 
by her cousin, Ethel S. (Mrs. Charles R.) 
Cady, of Green Bay, Wisconsin, in 
recognition of her thirty-two years ser- 
vice as a teacher at Agnes Scott. 
Preference is given to students in 
psychology. 

Emily S. Dexter Scholarship Award 
Fund of $10,610 was established in 1972 
by Ruth Pringle Pipkin '31 of Reidsvilie, 
North Carolina, to recognize and honor 
Miss Dexter for her service as a teacher 
of psychology at Agnes Scott from 1923 
to 1955. A special committee selects the 
recipient from members of the rising 
senior class who are taking advanced 
courses in psychology. 

S. Leonard Doerpinghaus Summer 
Study Scholarship Fund of $4,602 was 
established in 1968 by the students, 
colleagues, and other friends as a 
memorial to this professor who had 
taught in the biology department for 
almost ten years before his untimely 
death. A special committee makes this 
award for use in summer study at a 
biological field station. 

David Arthur Dunseith Scholarship 
Fund of $1,250 was established in 1963 
by Wallace M. Alston and Madelaine 
Dunseith Alston '28 in memory of her 
father, a Presbyterian minister in 
Clearwater. Florida, and former trustee 
of the College. 

Georgia Wood Durham Scholarship 
Fund of $6,500 was established in 1938 
by the late Jennie Durham Finley in 
memory of her mother. Preference is 
given to students from DeKalb County. 



Fall 1979 



23 



James Ballard Dyer Scholarship Fund 

of $38,453 was established in 1949 by 
Diana Dyer Wilson '32 in memory of her 
father. Preference is given to students 
from Virginia or North Carolina. 

Inez Norton Edwards Scholarship Fund 
of $1,103 was established in 1978 by her 
family and friends as a memorial to this 
Auburn, Alabama, mother of Agnes 
Scott alumna, Nancy '58 and Helen 
Propst '50. 

Kate Durr Elmore Fund of $25,295 was 
established in 1949 by Stanhope E. 
Elmore of Montgomery, Alabama, in 
memory of his wife. Preference is given 
to Presbyterian students, particularly 
those from East Alabama Presbytery 
and other parts of the state. 

Jennie Durham Finley Scholarship 
Fund of $5,000 was established in 1938 
by this friend of the College to assist 
students, preferably from DeKalb 
County. 

Rufus C. and Wynie Coleman Franklin 
Memorial Scholarship Fund of $50,000 
was established in 1978 in their honor by 
their daughter, Marian Franklin (Mrs. 
Paul H.) Anderson '40. of Atlanta. The 
income is used for students from 
Emanuel County, Georgia, where she 
was reared. 

Helen and Ted French Scholarship 
Fund of $3,250 was established in 1977 
by this Atlanta member of the Class of 
1974. The income is used to assist 
Return-to-College Students. 

Lewis McF"arland Gaines Scholarship 
Fund of $1,300 was established in 1963 
by Ethel Alexander Gaines, an alumna 
of Agnes Scott Institute, in memory of 
her husband, the son of the first presi- 
dent of Agnes Scott. 

Gallant-Belk Scholarship Fund of 
$1,000 was established in 1951 by W. E. 
Gallant of Anderson, South Carolina. 

Kathleen Hagood ( .amine II Scholar- 
ship Fund of $10,000 was established in 
1963 by E. Smythe Gambrell of Atlanta 
as a living memorial to his wife who was 
an alumna. The award is made to an 
outstanding student preparing for Chris- 
tian service. 

Iva Leslie and John Adam Garber 
International Student Scholarship Fund 
of $7,451 was established in 1968 initially 
as a memorial to Mrs. Garber by her 
husband. Dr. John A. Garber. and her 
son and daughter-in-law, Dr. and Mrs. 
Paul Leslie Garber, of Agnes Scott. 
Upon the death of Dr. John Garber in 
1975 this scholarship became a memorial 
to him as well when further gifts from 
family and friends were received. The 
recipients must be students whose citi- 
zenship is other than that of the United 
States of America. 

Jane Zuber Garrison Scholarship Fund 
of $1,175 was established in 1963 by Mr. 
and Mrs. Ozburn Zuber of Anderson, 



24 



South Carolina, in honor of their daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Robert C. Garrison '54. 

Leslie Janet Gaylord Scholarship Fund 
of $2,525 was established in 1969 by the 
trustees of Agnes Scott to honor her for 
her forty-seven years of teaching in the 
mathematics department. Preference is 
given to students in that department. 

General Electric Scholarship Fund of 
$2,000 was established in 1966 with the 
grants received by the College when its 
student team appeared twice in the 
General Electric College Bowl in March 
of that year. 

General Memorial Scholarship Fund of 
$56,687 was established with gifts from 
many alumnae and friends to provide 
financial assistance to students. 

Georgia Consumer Finance Association 
Scholarship Fund of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1962 by its members throughout 
the state. 

M. Kathryn Click Scholarship Fund of 
$5,364 was established in 1974 by the 
Board of Trustees along with many of 
her students and friends in recognition of 
her thirty-six years as a teacher, of 
which for twenty-eight she was chairman 
of the Department of Classical Lan- 
guages and Literatures. Preference is 
given to a student in this department. 

Frances Gooch Scholarship Fund of 
$2,025 was established in 1978 by the 
Board of Trustees as a memorial to this 
associate professor of English for her 
teaching speech and theatre from 1915 to 
1951. 

Lucy Durham Goss F'und of $3,239 was 
established in 1938 by Jennie Durham 
Finley in honor of her niece, Mrs. John 
H. Goss, a student in the Institute. 

Esther and James Graff Scholarship 
Fund of $15,127 was established in 1960 
by Dr. Walter Edward McNair of Agnes 
Scott in honor and appreciation of Mr. 
and Mrs. James R. Graff. 

Sarah Frances Reid Grant Scholarship 
Fund of $6,000 was established in 1935 
by Mrs. John M. Slaton of Atlanta in 
honor of her mother. 

Kenneth and Annie Lee Greenfield 
Scholarship Fund of $3,375 was estab- 
lished in 1962 by Sallie Greenfield Blum 
'56 of Kernersville, North Carolina, in 
honor of her parents. 

Roxie Hagopian Voice Scholarship 
Fund of $1,000 was established in 1963 
by this member of the music department 
for fourteen years. 

Louise Hale Scholarship Fund of 
$4,417 was established in 1951 by 
Elizabeth Anderson Brown '22 of Atlan- 
ta in memory of this member of the 
French department for thirty years. 
Preference is given to students taking 
French. 

Harry T. Hall Memorial Scholarship 
Fund of $10,000 was established in 1919 
by Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Bradley of 



Columbus in memory of Mrs. Bradley's 
brother. Preference is given to students 
from Muscogee County. Georgia. 

Sarah Belle Brodnax Hansell Scholar- 
ship Fund of $5,000 was established in 
1961 by Granger Hansell of Atlanta in 
memory of his wife, a member of the 
Class of 1923. 

Weenona White Hanson Music Scholar- 
ship Fund of $2,500 was established in 

1925 by Mr. and Mrs. Victor H. Hanson 
of Birmingham to honor Mrs. Hanson 
for her years of encouragement to 
music. Preference is given to students 
from Alabama. 

George W. Harrison, Jr., Scholarship 
Fund of $18,000 was established in 1938 
by a bequest from this Atlanta friend. 

Quenelle Harrold Scholarship Fund of 
$20,320 was established originally in 

1926 as a graduate fellowship by Mrs. 
Thomas Harrold of Americus in honor of 
her daughter, Mrs. Frank Sheffield, of 
the Class of 1923, but in 1976 it became a 
scholarship fund. 




Harwell-Hill Scholarship Fund of 

$10,000 was established in 1974 through 
a bequest from Ann Rebecca (Rebie) 
Harwell (Mrs. Lodowick Johnson) Hill 
'13 of Atlanta and is a memorial to her 
and her sister, Frances Grace Harwell 
'23. 

Margaret McKinnon Hawley Scholar- 
ship Fund of $5,066 was established in 
1940 through a bequest of Dr. F. O. 
Hawley of Charlotte, North Carolina, as 
a memorial to his wife, an alumna of 
Agnes Scott Institute. 

Loudie and Lottie Hendrick Scholar- 
ship Fund of $5,000 was established in 
1935 by Lottie Hendrick of Covington, 
Georgia, and is a memorial to these 
sisters. 

Gussie Parkhurst Hill Scholarship 
Fund of $2,000 was established in 1950 
and is named for the donor. Mrs. DeLos 
L. Hill of Atlanta. Preference is given to 
daughters of ministers. 

Betty Hollis Scholarship Fund of $1,343 
was established in 1947 as a memorial to 
this 1937 graduate by Julia Lake Skinner 
(Mrs. E. R.) Kellersberger ' 19 who is the 
author of the inspirational biography, 
Betty, A Life of Wrought Gold. 

Robert B. Holt Scholarship Fund of 
$10,471 was established in 1954 by Dr. 
Phillippa G. Gilchrist '23 in honor of her 
former professor and colleague who 
served as professor of chemistry at 
Agnes Scott for twenty-eight years. 
Preference is given to students in 
chemistry. 

Nanette Hopkins Scholarship Fund of 
$294,068 was established in 1973 by a 
bequest from Florence Smith (Mrs. 
Joseph T.) Sims '13 of Berkeley, Califor- 
nia, as a memorial to Dean Hopkins for 
her outstanding service to Agnes Scott 
from 1889 to 1938. Assistance is given to 
promising music students. 

Jennie Sentelle Houghton Scholarship 
Fund of $10,400 was established in 1945 
by Dr. M. E. Sentell of Davidson, North 
Carolina, in honor of her sister. The 
recipient must have already attended 
Agnes Scott at least one year. 

Waddy Hampton and Maude Chapin 
Hudson Scholarship Fund of $4,691 was 
established in 1968 by Anne Chapin 
Hudson (Mrs. Frank H., Jr.) Hankins '31 
in memory of her parents. Preference is 
given to Black students. 

Richard L. Hull Scholarship Fund of 
$3,000 was established in 1961 by Nora 
Glancy Hull (Mrs. Baxter) Maddox in 
memory of her first husband. 

George Thomas Hunter Memorial 
Scholarship Fund of $25,000 was estab- 
lished in 1963 by the Benwood Founda- 
tion of Chattanooga to honor its founder, 
who was a pioneer in the Coca-Cola 
bottling industry. The recipients are 
students from Chattanooga or Ten- 
nessee. 



Louise and Frank Inman Fund of 

$6,000 was established in 1951 with gifts 
from these Atlanta leaders, Mr. Inman 
having been an Agnes Scott trustee for 
thirty-five years. 

Louise Reese Inman Scholarship Fund 
of $3,829 was established in 1963 by Sam 
and Sue Lile Inman '58 of Greenville, 
South Carolina, in memory of his grand- 
mother, Mrs. Frank Inman, an alumna of 
Agnes Scott Institute. 

Jackson Scholarship Fund of $56,816 
was established in 1953 with a bequest of 
Elizabeth Fuller Jackson, a member of 
Agnes Scott's history department for 
twenty-eight years. It is a memorial to 
her and her parents — Charles S. and 
Lillian F. Jackson. 

Louise Hollingsworth Jackson Scholar- 
ship Fund of $7,720 was established in 
1965 by Mr. and Mrs. Mell Charles 
Jackson of Fayetteville, Georgia, to 
honor Mrs. Jackson, a member of the 
Class of 1932. 

Ann Worthy Johnson Scholarship Fund 
of $5,000 was established in 1971 by 
Agnes Scott alumnae and other friends 
in memory of this member of the Class 
of 1938 and in appreciation of her 
leadership as director of alumnae affairs 
at Agnes Scott for sixteen years. 

Gussie O'Neal and Lewis H. Johnson 
Voice Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was 
established in 1973 with a bequest from 
this member of Agnes Scott's music 
department for forty years who, with his 
wife, a former student of the Class of 
1911, developed the voice section of the 
department. 

Jones-Ransome Memorial Scholarship 
Fund of $1,000 was established in 1963 
by Georgia Hunt (Mrs. William E.) 
Elsberry '40 in memory of her aunts, 
Leila and Azile Jones and Elizabeth 
Jones Ransome, who made it possible 
for her to attend Agnes Scott. 

Annice Hawkins Kenan Scholarship 
Fund of $50,000 was established in 1969 
by a grant from the Sarah Graham 
Kenan Foundation of Chapel Hill, North 
Carolina, in memory of this early alumna 
of Agnes Scott. Preference is given to 
students from the Atlanta area or from 
North Carolina who intend to teach. 

Annie Graham King Scholarship Fund 
of $1,000 was established in 1970 by Mr. 
and Mrs. James A. Minter of Tyler, 
Alabama, in memory of this alumna of 
1906. 

Martin Luther King, Jr., Scholarship 
Fund of $9,605 was established in 1968 
by gifts from students, faculty, and 
friends to provide financial assistance to 
Black students. 

Mary Elizabeth Trabert Kontz Scholar- 
ship Fund of $1,005 was established in 
1937 by Judge Ernest C. Kontz of 
Atlanta in memory of his mother. 



A. M. and Augusta R. Lambdin Schol- 
arship Fund of $2,200 was established in 
1963 by Henrietta Lambdin (Mrs. Hugh 
J.) Turner '15 of McDonough in memory 
of her parents. 

Lanier Brothers Scholarship Fund of 
$2,540 was established in 1971 by a gift 
from the Atlanta foundation established 
by these three brothers who have been 
business leaders in the state: Sartain, 
Thomas H., and J. Hicks Lanier. 

Ted and Ethel Lanier Scholarship Fund 
of $1,000 was established in 1950 by 
these Atlanta friends of Agnes Scott who 
were especially interested in its music 
department. Preference is given to stu- 
dents from the Atlanta area. 

Harriett Haynes Lapp Scholarship 
Fund of $2,040 was established in 1978 
by the Board of Trustees as a memorial 
to this member of the physical education 
department who had served for forty 
years before her retirement in 1964. 

Kate Stratton Leedy Scholarship Fund 
of $1,000 was established in 1923 by 
Major W. B. Leedy of Birmingham in 
memory of his wife. Preference is given 
to students from Alabama. 

Ruth Leroy Memorial Scholarship 
Fund of $5,715 was established in 1961 
by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter W. 
Leroy, of Baltimore. Maryland, and by 
friends of this 1960 graduate. 

Lindsey Scholarship Fund of $7,000 
was established in 1923 by Mr. and Mrs. 
Dennis Lindsey of Decatur. Preference 
is given to students from the metropoli- 
tan area of Atlanta. 

Helen Burk Longshore Scholarship 
Fund of $73,370 was established in 1977 
through a bequest from this aunt of 
Jackie Pfarr (Mrs. D. S.) Michael '53 of 
Ridgewood, New Jersey, whose daugh- 
ter Susan was a member of the Class of 
1974. 

J. Spencer Love Memorial Scholarship 
Fund of $18,000 was established in 1962 
by his wife, the former Martha Eskridge 
'31, who is now Mrs. Nathan M. Ayers 
of Greensboro, North Carolina. 

Captain and Mrs. John Douglas Malloy 
Scholarship Fund of $3,500 was estab- 
lished in 1926 by their sons, D. G. and 
J. H. Malloy, of Quitman, Georgia. 

Maplewood Institute Memorial Schol- 
arship Fund of $2,500 was established in 
1919 by alumnae of this once well-known 
institution which had served as a pioneer 
in higher education for women in 
Pittsfield, Massachusetts, from 1841 to 
1884. 

Volina Butler and B. Frank Market 
Scholarship Fund of $2,000 was estab- 
lished in 1976 by James B. and Dorthea 
Swann Markert in memory of his 
parents. 

Nannie R. Massie Memorial Scholar- 
ship Fund of $2,000 was established in 
1921 by her sister, Mrs. E. L. Bell, of 



Fall 1979 



25 



Lewisburg, West Virginia, in memory of 
this teacher of French and history at 
Agnes Scott who had to resign for reason 
of health after teaching a few years. 

Pauline Martin McCain Memorial 
Scholarship Fund of 515,479 was estab- 
lished in 1954 by friends of this beloved 
wife of Dr. James Ross McCain, the 
second president of the College. 

Alice Mcintosh Memorial Scholarship 
Fund of $3,130 was established in 1963 
by her husband and former trustee of the 
College. Henry T. Mcintosh, and daugh- 
ter, Martha M. (Mrs. George W.) Nail 
'23, of Alabany, Georgia. 

Sarah Agrippina Pipes McKowen 
Scholarship Fund of $2,840 was estab- 
lished in 1949 by May McKowen (Mrs. 
B. B.) Taylor '06 of Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana, and Jane Taylor (Mrs. Ed- 
ward S.) White '42 of Atlanta in memory 
of their mother and grandmother. 

Mary Angela Herbin McLennan Schol- 
arship Fund of 52,328 was established in 
1961 in her memory by her son, Alex 
McLennan, of Atlanta. Preference is to 
be given to graduates of Decatur High 
School. 

Lawrence McNeill Scholarship Fund of 
51.000 was established in 1925 as a 
memorial by his wife, Florence McCon- 
nell McNeill, of Savannah, Georgia. 

Hvta Plowden Mederer Scholarship 
Fund of 59,000 was established in 1962 
by this alumna in the Class of 1932, Mrs. 
Leonard John Mederer, of Valdosta, 
Georgia. 

Mary Donnelly Meehan Scholarship 
Fund of 51,000 was established in 1978 
through a bequest from this member of 
the Class of 1910. 

Jacqueline Pfarr Michael Scholarship 
Fund of 51,000 was established in 1963 
by her father, John S. Pfarr, in honor of 
this member of the Class of 1953. 

Mills Memorial Scholarship Fund of 
51,000 was established in 1924 by George 
J. Mills of Savannah. Georgia, and is a 
memorial to him and his wife, Eugenia 
Postell Mills. 

James A. and Margaret Browning 
Minter Scholarship Fund of 521,750 was 
established in 1963 by their son, James 
A. Minter, Jr.. of Tyler, Alabama, an 
active trustee of Agnes Scott from 1959 
to 1978. 

William A. Moore Scholarship Fund of 
55.000 was established in 1892 from a 
bequest in his will. This leading citizen 
of Atlanta provided the College's first 
endowed scholarship. Preference is 
given to students whose parents are 
Presbyterians. 

John Morrison Memorial Scholarship 
Fund of $3,000 was established in 1919 in 
memory of her husband by Iola Bell 
Morrison of Moultrie, Georgia, the 
mother of Ella Bell Morrison (Mrs. John 
B.) Carlton, an alumna of Agnes Scott 



Institute. Preference is given to a student 
from Colquitt County, Georgia. 

Margaret Falkinburg Myers Scholar- 
ship Fund of 51.000 was established in 
1971 by Mrs. Arthur W. Falkinburg of 
Atlanta in memory of her daughter, a 
member of the Class of 1941. 

Elkan Naumberg Music Scholarship 
Fund of $2,000 was established in 1919 
by this New York established manufac- 
turer who desired to encourage training 
in classical music. 

New Orleans Alumnae Club Scholar- 
ship Fund of $5,643 was established in 
1955 by members of this Agnes Scott 
group. Preference is given to students 
from that area. 

Maryellen Harvey Newton Scholarship 
Fund of $7,164 was established in 1972 
by her husband, Henry Edgar Newton, 
of Decatur, to honor this member of the 
Class of 1916 and other members of their 
family who are alumnae: Jane Anne 
Newton Marquess '46, Martha Reese 
Newton Smith '49, and Anne Marquess 
Camp '70. 

Katherine Tait Omwake Scholarship 
Fund of $2,000 was established in 1973 
by the trustees of Agnes Scott in 
recognition of her forty-three years of 
service as a member of the psychology 
department. Preference is given to stu- 
dents majoring in psychology. 

Ruth Anderson O'Neal Scholarship 
Fund of $25,000 was established in 1962 
by her husband, Alan S. O'Neal, of 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina, to 
honor this leader of the Class of 1918 
who served as president of the College 
YWCA. Preference is given to students 
majoring in Bible. 

Marie Scott O'Neill Scholarship Fund 
of $12,015 was established in 1978 by a 
bequest from this member of the Class 
of 1942 from Atlanta. She was a great 
granddaughter of Colonel George W. 
Scott, the founder of the College. 

Elizabeth Roberts Pancake Scholarship 
Fund of $1,040 was established in 1969 in 
her memory by members of her Class of 
1959. 

Wingfield Ellis Parker Memorial Schol- 
arship Fund of $7,284 was established in 
1970 by her parents, William Douglas 
and Frances Tennent Ellis '25, and her 
husband, Richard K. Parker, all of 
Atlanta. Preference is given to students 
majoring in English or Bible. 

Lillian Gertrude Patton Latin Scholar- 
ship Fund of $10,000 was established in 
1979 by her sister. Bess Patton, of 
Chattanooga, Tennessee. The award 
honors this 1920 Agnes Scott graduate 
for her untiring devotion to the Latin 
language and for her forty-nine years of 
distinguished and dedicated teaching of 
this language. The scholarship is 
awarded on the basis of financial need 
and for excellence in Latin. 



John H. Patton Scholarship Fund of 

$1,000 was established in 1967 by his 
daughter, Sarah Eunice Patton (Mrs. A. 
V.) Cortelyou '18. as a memorial to her 
father who was the long-term minister of 
the First Presbyterian Church in Mari- 
etta, Georgia. 

Pauley Scholarship Fund of $1,000 was 
established in 1951 by William C. and 
Frances Freeborn Pauley '27 of Atlanta. 

Barbara Murlin Pendleton Scholarship 
Fund of $2,608 was established in 1975 
by alumnae and friends as a memorial to 
this graduate of the Class of 1940 and in 
appreciation of her leadership in all 
phases of the Alumnae Office at Agnes 
Scott for nine years. Preference is given 
to alumnae returning to the College for 
further study. 

Colonel Joseph B. Preston Memorial 
Scholarship Fund of $1,000 was estab- 
lished in 1926 by his wife, Clara J. 
Preston, of Augusta. Preference is given 
to students from Georgia. 

George A. and Margaret Morgan 
Ramspeck Scholarship Fund of $2,000 
was established in 1920 by their daugh- 
ter, Jean Ramspeck Harper, to honor 
one of Agnes Scott's first trustees and 
his wife, both of whom were active 
leaders in Decatur. 

Mary Warren Read Scholarship Fund 
of $45,537 was established in 1960 by 
this alumna of the Class of 1929 who has 
been active in promoting the College and 
who has been a trustee of Agnes Scott 
since 1964. 

Frederick Philip Reinero Memorial 
Scholarship Fund of $1,105 was estab- 
lished in 1974 by his wife, Clara Mae 
Allen Reinero '23. of Decatur. 

Alice Bovkin Robertson Scholarship 
Fund of $1,235 was established in 1969 
by her parents. Judge and Mrs. Samuel 
J. Boy kin of Carrollton. Georgia, to 
honor this member of the Class of 1961. 
Preference is given to students majoring 
in mathematics. 

Henry A. Robinson Scholarship Fund 
of $3,825 was established in 1970 by the 
Agnes Scott trustees to honor this 
professor who served as head of the 
mathematics department from 1926 to 
1970. Preference is given to students 
majoring in mathematics. 

Louise Scott Sams Scholarship Fund of 
$1,500 was established in 1979 by her 
niece, Betty Scott (Mrs. J. Phillips) 
Noble '44, of Charleston, South Caroli- 
na, in memory of this member of the 
Class of 1903 who was the granddaugh- 
ter of George Washington Scott. 

Bettie Winn Scott Scholarship Fund of 
$4,940 was established in 1961 in her 
memory by her children to recognize her 
role along with that of her husband, the 
late George Bucher Scott, a long-time 
Agnes Scott trustee, in sustaining the 
College in its early years. 



26 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 




Julius J. Scott Scholarship Fund of 

$2,000 was established in 1962 by this 
trustee who served as a member of the 
Board from 1920 to 1976. Preference is 
given to daughters of missionaries. 

William Scott Scholarship Fund of 
$10,000 was established in 1938 in his 
memory by his wife, Annie King Scott, 
of Pittsburgh. He was a nephew of 
George Washington Scott, founder of 
the College. 

Scottdale Mills Scholarship Fund of 
$7,010 was established in 1962 to provide 
financial assistance for the daughters of 
missionaries. 

Mary Scott Scully Scholarship Fund of 
$11,409 was established in 1942 by C. 
Alison Scully of Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, in memory of his mother, a 
granddaughter of the Agnes Scott for 
whom the College was named. The 
award is made to a student who has 
completed at least one year at Agnes 
Scott. 

Mary Boney Sheats Bible Scholarship 
Fund of $2,297 was established in 1973 



by her family and friends in recognition 
of her service as a professor of Bible at 
Agnes Scott and as a leader in the 
Presbyterian Church. The award is given 
to a student majoring in Bible and 
religion. 

Mary D. Sheppard Memorial Scholar- 
ship Fund of $2,500 was established in 
1924 by alumnae and friends of this 
former professor of philosophy and 
German at Agnes Scott from 1891 to 
1903. Perference is given to students 
from Haralson County, Georgia. 

Wade E. Shumaker Scholarship Fund 
of $1,000 was established in 1978 as a 
memorial to him by his wife, Marie 
Baker Shumaker '30, of Decatur. 

Margaret Massie Simpson Scholarship 
Fund of $1,515 was established in 1978 
by her family and friends for this 
member of the Class of 1934, the wife of 
George E. Simpson of Smithfield, Ken- 
tucky. 

Slack Scholarship Fund of $8,663 was 
established in 1953 by Searcy B. and 
Julia Pratt Smith Slack '12 of Decatur in 
recognition of their daughters, Ruth S. 
Roach '40 Eugenia S. Morse '41, and 
Julia S. Hunter '45. 

Hal and Julia Thompson Smith Schol- 
arship Fund of $65,798 was established 
in 1959 by this Agnes Scott trustee and 
alumna of the Class of 1931. Mr. Smith, 
a prominent Atlanta business leader, was 
an active member of the Board from 
1952 to 1977 and served as its chairman 
from 1956 to 1973. 

Lillian Smith Scholarship Fund of 
$2,000 was established in 1978 by Agnes 
Scott's trustees as a memorial to her for 
thirty-three years of service before her 
retirement in 1938 as professor of Latin. 

Evelyn Hanna Sommerville Fund of 
$8,000 was established in 1965 by the 
Roswell Library Association in honor of 
its president, Mrs. Robert L. Sommer- 
ville '23. Preference is given to students 
desiring to be librarians. 

South Carolina Scholarship Fund of 
$1,106 was established in 1968 with the 
gifts of students from the state who had 
made their pledges while enrolled in 
1964. Preference is given to students 
from South Carolina. 

Bonner and Isabelle Leonard Spearman 
Scholarship Fund of $10,654 was estab- 
lished in 1962 by this member of the 
Class of 1929 in appreciation of the 
opportunities the College offers its stu- 
dents. 

Carolyn Strozier Scholarship Fund of 
$10,715 was established in 1979 by her 
mother and friends as a memorial to this 
member of the Class of 1941 who had 
been active in the Alumnae Association 
while on the staff of Rich's. 

Frances Gilliland Stukes and Marjorie 
Stukes Strickland Scholarship Fund of 
$14,006 was established in 1962 by Dean 



Emeritus Samuel Guerry Stukes. The 
scholarship honors his wife, '24, and 
daughter, '51. 

Samuel Guerry Stukes Scholarship 
Fund of $21,010 was established in 1957 
by the Board of Trustees to honor Dean 
Stukes upon his retirement after forty- 
four years of distinguished service as a 
member of the faculty. He also served as 
an active trustee from 1944 to 1971. The 
income is used for awards to the three 
Stukes Scholars, the students who rank 
first academically in each of the rising 
sophomore, junior, and senior classes. 

Jodele Tanner Scholarship Fund of 
$2,010 was established in 1950 by class- 
mates and friends as a memorial to this 
1945 graduate who remained to teach in 
the biology department. Preference is 
given to students in one of the sciences. 

James Cecil and Hazel Itner Tart 
Scholarship Fund of $1,665 was estab- 
lished in 1963 by this Treasurer Emeritus 
who served Agnes Scott for forty-eight 
years. 

Martin M. and Agnes L. Teague 
Scholarship Fund of $2,175 was estab- 
lished in 1962 by Annette Teague (Mrs. 
Monteith) Powell of Whiteville, North 
Carolina, in honor of her parents from 
Laurens, South Carolina. 

Henry Calhoun and Susan Wingfield 
Tennent Scholarship Fund of $4,093 was 
established in 1973 as a memorial to her 
parents by Susan Frances Tennent (Mrs. 
William D.) Ellis '25 of Atlanta. Prefer- 
ence is given to students majoring in 
history or English. 

Mary West Thatcher Scholarship Fund 
of $50,598 was established in 1954 by 
this 1915 graduate who is now a resident 
of Miami and whose service to the 
College includes being president of the 
Alumnae Association in 1926-27 and an 
active trustee from 1947 to 1971. Prefer- 
ence is given to Christian students from 
other countries and to other students 
preparing for Christian service. 

Pierre Thomas Scholarship Fund of 
$2,100 was established in 1978 by the 
Board of Trustees to honor this member 
of the French department for his sixteen 
years of service to the College before his 
retirement in 1967. 

Martha Merrill Thompson Memorial 
Scholarship Fund of $2,000 was estab- 
lished in 1924 by members of the Class 
of 1905 and other friends of this alumna 
from Thomasville, Georgia. Preference 
is given to students who plan to do 
missionary work. 

Samuel Pierce Thompson Scholarship 
Fund of $5,000 was established in 1933 
by his wife as a memorial to this resident 
of Covington, Georgia. Their daughter, 
Julia (Mrs. Count D.) Gibson, was a 191 1 
graduate. 

Henry Claude Townsend Memorial 
Scholarship Fund of $5,000 was estab- 



Fall 1979 



lished in 1920 by his wife, Nell Towers 
Townsend, of Anderson, South Caroli- 
na. Preference is given to students who 
plan to be missionaries. 

Elizabeth Clarkson Tull Memorial 
Scholarship Fund of $55,000 was estab- 
lished in 1959 by Joseph M. Tull of 
Atlanta in memory of his wife to assist 
students selected on the basis of Chris- 
tian character, ability, and need. 

Joseph M. Tull Memorial Scholarship 
Fund of $55,000 was established in 1964 
by the J. M. Tull Foundation to honor 
this outstanding business, church, and 
civic leader of Atlanta and to assist 
students worthy of Agnes Scott's ideals. 

Kate Higgs Vaughan Fund of $115,000 
was established in 1975 through a be- 
quest from this member of the Class of 
1924. The income is used annually for 
the Wilson Asbury Higgs Mathematics 
Scholarship and the Emma Baugh Music 
Scholarship as memorials to her father 
and mother. When more income is 
available, it is used to fund additional 
memorial scholarships. 

Wachendorff Scholarship of $1,000 
was established in 1932 by Charles and 
Edward Wachendorff of Atlanta in 
honor of their mother. 

George C. Walters Memorial Scholar- 
ship Fund of $5,000 was established in 
1920 by his wife, Frances Winship 
Walters, Agnes Scott alumna, trustee, 
and benefactor. 

Annie Dodd Warren Scholarship Fund 
of $29,568 was established in 1961 by Dr. 
and Mrs. William C. Warren, Jr., of 
Atlanta in honor of his mother. 

Ferdinand Warren Fund of $2,035 was 
established in 1968 by Mr. and Mrs. 
Romeal Theriot of New Orleans and 
their daughter, Christine (Mrs. Richard) 
Woodfin '68, of Atlanta in honor of this 
artist and member of the National 
Academy who served as professor and 
chairman of Agnes Scott's art depart- 
ment for eighteen years. Although ini- 
tially the income was used for a fellow- 
ship, the donors later designated it as a 
scholarship for an art major. 

Washington, D. C, Alumnae Club 
Scholarship Fund of $1,437 was estab- 
lished in 1961 by its members during the 
College's Seventy-fifth Anniversary 
Campaign. Preference is given to stu- 
dents from that area. 

Joy Werlein Waters Scholarship Fund 
of $2,756 was established in 1963 as a 
memorial by her friend. Dr. Rosemonde 
Peltz, physician at Agnes Scott, and 
mother, Isabel O. (Mrs. J. Parham) 
Werlein of New Orleans. Preference is 
given to students majoring in art. 

Eugenia Mandeville Watkins Scholar- 
ship Fund of $6,250 was established in 
1915 as a memorial to this 1898 graduate 
of the Institute by her father and Agnes 
Scott trustee, L. C. Mandeville, of 




Carrollton, Georgia, and her husband. 
Homer Watkins. of Atlanta. 

W. G. Weeks Memorial Scholarship 
Fund of $5,000 was established in 1963 
by his wife, Lily B. Weeks, of New 
Iberia, Louisiana. Their four daughters 
are alumnae: Violet (Mrs. Maynard M.) 
Miller '29, Margaret Weeks '31, Olive 
(Mrs. Henry C.) Collins '32, and Lilly 
(Mrs. Lee D.) McLean '36. 

Lulu Smith Westcott Scholarship Fund 
of $31,481 was established in 1935 by her 
husband, G. Lamar Westcott, of Dalton, 
Georgia, in honor of this 1919 graduate 
of the College. Mr. Westcott served 
actively as a trustee for more than thirty 
years. Preference is given to students 
interested in missionary work. 

Llewellyn Wilburn Scholarship Fund of 



$2,025 was established in 1978 by the 
Board of Trustees to honor this member 
of the Class of 1919 for her forty-three 
years of service in the physical educa- 
tion department, of which she was 
chairman at the time of her retirement in 
1967. 

Josiah James Willard Scholarship Fund 
of $5,000 was established in 1919 as a 
memorial to this Presbyterian business 
leader by his son. Samuel L. Willard, of 
Baltimore, Maryland. Preference is 
given to the daughters of Presbyterian 
ministers of small churches. 

Nell Hodgson Woodruff Scholarship 
Fund of $1,000 was established in 1935 
by her husband, Robert W. Woodru-ff, of 
Atlanta. 

(Continued on page 41) 



28 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



The President's Report 




"RELEVANCE" REEXAMINED 



One of the rallying cries for the student protests of the late 
sixties and early seventies was "Relevance." Academic 
programs, campus movements, educational policies — even 
faculty and trustees — had to be "relevant," to relate directly 
and at once to what were felt then to be the educational, 
political, and social needs of the day. Even campuses which 
escaped actual upheaval felt the pressure to overhaul their 
academic offerings, and often their traditional structure of 
governance, in order to satisfy the insistent demands of 
students, and some faculty members, that courses and 
teaching methods (including testing and grading) be 
"relevant" to student concerns and needs. Looking back, 
we boicnow what some of us suspected then: that much of 
the "relevance" of those heady times was faddish, 
superficial, and ephemeral. A truth of history became again 
apparent: that little of the currently "relevant" is apt to be 
truly relevant in the future. 

As the tumult and upheaval of the early seventies subsided 
into the new calm — or the old apathy — of the decade's 
middle years, the call for "relevance" in higher education 
began to reflect increasingly a new concern: the anxiety of 
young people for jobs in a time of continuing inflation and 
rising unemployment. This anxiety was shared by college 
administrators and faculty, who were experiencing the 
beginnings of the predicted decline in college enrollments 
and the increases in financial troubles which such declines 
were causing in more and more institutions. 

One result of these concerns over shrinking enrollments 
and tighter budgets — and they continue to be legitimate 
concerns — was a renewed wave of educational changes: in 
curricula, in educational philosophies, in admissions 
policies, in testing and grading. Some of these changes were 
soundly conceived, in a spirit of genuine academic 
experimentation; others were little more than gimmicks 



designed to attract students in an increasingly competitive 
market. 

Now, with the advent of the eighties, many colleges and 
universities are beginning to reexamine the changes made in 
recent years, especially those designed to insure survival by 
bolstering enrollment and so increasing income. To be sure, 
some of the changes were salutary and effective; others, 
however, have not worked, or worked only until their 
newness wore off. In addition, and more serious, some 
innovations were altering the essential nature of the 
institution, thereby endangering the very survival they were 
designed to insure. For example, numerous career-oriented 
programs introduced in some liberal arts colleges were 
shifting the colleges' traditional emphasis from liberal 
learning to professional training. In other cases, the influx of 
large numbers of part-time (often adult) students, in evening 
or weekend programs, was changing the nature of a formerly 
homogeneous, full-time student body in a residential campus 
setting. A third phenomenon was a declining emphasis on 
the role of religious and moral values in the curriculum and 
in campus life, especially in church-affiliated institutions. 

The present reexamination of the effects of these changes, 
and others like them, has served to focus attention on some 
of the traditional strengths and values inherent in programs 
and philosophies which were abandoned or watered down on 
some campuses in the name of educational "relevance" and 
fiscal security. A renewed concern for traditional programs 
and values is bringing a fresh appreciation of their 
long-range relevance and usefulness and a realization that 
survival may be possible without abandoning the heritage 
which, over the years, has given an institution its reason for 
being. 

What has been Agnes Scott's response to these pressures 
of recent years? Certainly we have felt them. We are well 
aware of the current desires of students, and their parents, 
for "relevant" and "practical" educational programs, for 
vocational and professional training that will develop salable 
skills. We are sympathetic with such concerns, and we have 
moved to meet them, with new courses and programs, with 
an expanded and strengthened Career Planning Office. But 
we have done so without sacrificing our emphasis on the 
liberal arts and our faith in their value and usefulness both 
for living and for earning a living. Similarly, we have 
recognized the widespread interest of women today in 
continuing their formal education, for pleasure as well as for 
profit. Our very successful "Return to College" program is 
one answer, and today about ten percent of our students are 
in this program. In its development and administration, 
however, we have to see that it is harmoniously assimilated 
into the campus life and programs of Agnes Scott's 
traditional residential character. (Our proposed new Student 
Center will be another step in enriching the campus life of all 
our students.) 

Most important, in a larger society characterized by 
increasing secularism and moral confusion, Agnes Scott has 
emphatically reaffirmed its continuing commitment to our 
Judeo-Christian heritage and the moral and religious values 
inherent in it. Our Honor System continues strong and 
strongly supported; our students show an increasing 
willingness to assume the responsibilities, as well as the 
freedoms, of self-government; our total educational program 
still seeks to recognize and stress both the intellectual and 



Fall 1979 



29 




President Marvin B. Perrv 



the moral, or spiritual, dimensions of the life of the mind. 

As I have said before in these columns, Agnes Scott has 
traditionally moved to the beat of "a different drummer," 
rarely responding to the rhythms of "trendy" academic 
bandwagons or falling into the lockstep of dominant national 
fads. Rather, we have insisted on adherence to our own 
stated purposes and principles, sometimes against the 
current of strong and seductive fashions in education. 

It is tempting to say — a bit smugly, perhaps — that our 
traditional academic practices and principles are once more 
in fashion; that we have never deserted the "new" programs 
and policies, viz. a core curriculum, distribution 
requirements, rigorous standards, which many colleges are 
"discovering" again today. But, despite our good fortune in 
difficult times, we have no cause for complacency; and we 
must continue to welcome sound experimentation and 



innovation, to combine our traditional standards of 
excellence and coherent structure with flexibility and 
imaginative concern for the individual student's interests 
and needs. 



THE COLLEGE YEAR: 1978-79 



Among the pleasures of academic life is the college 
calendar, a unique combination of repetition and change, of 
traditional rites and annual innovations. Each year a fresh 
start, with its hopes and resolutions: new faces, new 
courses, new activities. But behind the kaleidoscope of 
change there flows the steady current of custom and ritual 
and steadfast purpose. The 1978-79 year, Agnes Scott's 
ninetieth, was no exception: enthusiastic freshmen, some 
new teachers and staff, changes in programs and schedules, 
the disruptions of campus renovation; but also Black Cat, 
football weekends, Honors Day, Investiture, Sophomore 
Parents' Weekend, Founder's Day, and, at last, 
Commencement! 

It is my hope that our efforts in recent years to increase 
the flow of campus news to our various publics have made 
unnecessary a detailed account of each College year in these 
annual reports. In this conviction, this year's review is more 
selective, describing briefly events and developments of 
1978-79 which should be of particular interest to alumnae 
and other friends of Agnes Scott. 

Academic life at Agnes Scott continues to be demanding 
but reflects increasingly our current need to combine our 
traditional strengths with adaptations and innovations which 
serve better the needs of young women preparing today for 
lives which almost certainly will include some form of 
gainful employment. We continue to stress those courses 
which develop not only skills of writing and calculating but 
also those equally important intellectual disciplines of clear 
thinking, logical analysis, discrimination in terms of moral or 
ethical values, and cultivation of creativity and imagination. 
At the same time, we are broadening our offerings here 
which give students somewhat more specific acquaintance 
with fields of study and skills which they may find 
immediately helpful in later job opportunities. Our efforts 
this past year to strengthen our program in astronomy 
constitute a case in point. In addition to new course 
offerings and the opening of a refurbished planetarium under 
a professional director, we are also making available to 
students, especially those interested in sailing, a very 
practical course in navigation, to be offered at the Bradley 
Observatory by a widely respected sailing school in the area. 
Our Preparatory Program for Business, offered for the first 
time last year, has created great interest among students if 
we are to judge from last year's registration in the courses 
comprising it. 

Gratifying also is the continuing strong interest in our 
Return to College program under there capable direction of 
Assistant Dean of the College Mildred Love Petty '6 1 . The 
Office of Admissions received more than 350 inquiries in the 
past year, and enrolled students in this program constituted 
approximately ten percent of our student body. Seven RTCs 
were in this year's graduating class, including a 
grandmother. Of those enrolled in the 1978-79 academic 
year, almost twenty were over forty years of age, twenty 



30 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



were between thirty and forty, and twenty-eight were under 
thirty years of age. Some eighty percent were married, with 
the remainder single or divorced or widowed. More than 
eighty percent had children. As of spring 1979, more than 
half our RTCs were degree candidates; twenty-five were 
full-time students, and thirty-two were part-time students. 
Their academic interests range across the entire spectrum of 
our curriculum. Their academic performance was definitely 
above average, and a significant proportion captured 
competitive academic honors in various fields. We are 
enthusiastic about this program, and we hope to make it 
increasingly attractive to women of all ages in the Atlatna 
area. To that end, we are stressing the availability of 
financial aid for RTC students. Last year more than half of 
them received some form of financial aid from Agnes Scott. 

In her annual report to me, Dean Julia Gary pointed out 
her perception of "an increased awareness on the part of our 
faculty for the necessity of professional growth and 
development." As evidence, Dean Gary called attention to 
the increase in faculty attendance at national and regional 
professional meetings and at seminars and conferences in 
particular disciplines. Almost fifty percent of the full-time 
teaching faculty attended a national meeting during the year, 
and at least as many participated in regional or local 
meetings. Faculty publications during the year represented 
more than one-third of our academic departments, and 
members of some half dozen departments presented papers 
at various national and regional meetings. Faculty summer 
grant proposals in 1979, according to Dean Gary, were 
"exceptionally strong and numerous." In response to this 
increased interest in summer work, I was able to increase 
our budget for summer grants, and all proposals 
recommended by the faculty committee were funded. While 
superior teaching remains our chief academic concern, it is 
certainly true that teaching is enhanced by opportunity for 
productive scholarship and further study. We intend to 
continue to make such opportunities available for our 
faculty through our summer grants program and our 
sabbatical policy. 

Our "new" McCain Library is a source of much pleasure 
and satisfaction. Librarian Judith Jensen reports that the 
addition of some new equipment has facilitated the handling 
of incoming inter-library loan requests and the preparation 
of cataloging the new materials we acquire. She reports 
further that "the Library is operating smoothly," that we are 
increasing our collections at a steady rate, and that both 
student circulation and total circulation in 1978-79 were the 
highest in the past several years. 

The Agnes Scott community suffered a grievous loss with 
the sudden and untimely death of Professor Marion Thomas 
Clark on September 9, 1978, at the very beginning of the 
College session. Dr. Clark, who was William Rand Keenan, 
Jr., Professor of Chemistry and Chairman of the 
Department, suffered a fatal heart attack in the mountains of 
North Georgia, where he and his wife were visiting friends. 
A native Georgian, Marion Clark earned his B.A. and M.A. 
degrees in chemistry at Emory University and his Ph.D. at 
the University of Virginia. Before joining the Agnes Scott 
faculty in 1963, he served as an acting chairman at the 
Oakridge Institute of Nuclear Studies and taught at 
Birmingham Southern College and Emory University. 
During his busy career he was a visiting scholar in chemistry 
at Stanford University, President of the Georgia Academy 



of Science, and Chairman of the Georgia section of the 
American Chemical Society. His many honors included 
membership in Phi Beta Kappa, Omicron Delta Kappa, and 
Sigma Xi. His contributions to Agnes Scott were many, and 
they will last: as dedicated and compassionate teacher, 
imaginative scholar, and Christian gentleman. Professor 
Clark was succeeded as Chairman of the Department of 
Chemistry by Dr. Alice Cunningham, who has done a superb 
job in rallying and carrying forward the strong department 
which Marion Clark had done so much to maintain. 

The close of the academic year brought the retirement of 
three of Agnes Scott's most able and devoted teachers, 
whose combined service at the College totaled some 
eighty-three years: Mary Virginia Allen '35, Adeline Arnold 
Loridans Professor of French; Nancy Pence Groseclose, 
Charles A. Dana Professor of Biology; and Myrna Goode 
Young, Professor of Classical Languages and Literatures. 
All too rare today is the combination of commitment and 
competence which each of these splendid teachers and 
colleagues exemplified. Each was honored on Alumnae Day 
by tributes read by their former students at the annual 
meeting of the Alumnae Association, and the Board of 
Trustees established appropriate endowment funds in their 
honor. At the close of the academic year each was further 
honored at dinners sponsored by their departmental 
colleagues. A fourth long-time faculty member, Mary Fox, 
Instructor in Chemistry, retired from academic duties but 
will continue to edit the College catalog. We are grateful for 
her dedication and competence as both laboratory instructor 
and editor. 

In the area of student life and student activities, it was, in 
Dean of Students Martha Kirkland's words, "a busy, good 
year." Even the inconveniences caused by the renovation of 
Buttrick Hall, which were borne with cheerfulness by 
students and faculty alike, turned out to have advantages for 
the campus community in bringing about a change in class 
locations, traffic patterns, and social group gatherings. We 
also learned that good teaching and learning could go on 
wherever good students and dedicated teachers met 
together. 

There is little question, however, that the renovation of 
Buttrick Hall was the central fact of life at Agnes Scott 
during the past year. Now that this very sizable project is 
complete, at a cost of over a million dollars, it is evident that 
we have virtually a new classroom building, with a modern 
heating and cooling plant, new wiring and lighting, wall to 
wall carpeting in corridors and classrooms, and enlarged 
audiovisual facilities. New to the campus is the Media 
Resource Center which covers a large part of the ground 
floor of Buttrick Hall. Under the direction of Linda 
Hilsenrad, the Center contains a refurbished language 
laboratory, sound room and control room, a production 
room for the preparation of audiovisual materials (films, 
slides, T.V. programs), and a new film room for showing 
slides and motion pictures. With the completion of the 
Buttrick Hall project, the humanities and social sciences 
departments now have a teaching center which should give 
efficient and comfortable service well into the next century. 

Beyond a doubt, the issue which generated most 
discussion in 1978-79 was the proposed revision of the policy 
regarding the use of alcoholic beverages on campus. 
Originating in the Representative Council of Student 
Government, the proposal was approved and forwarded to 



Fall 1979 



31 



to the Administrative Committee of the College (students, 
faculty, and administrators), where it was revised and 
returned to Representative Council for further 
consideration. The process was repeated before a final 
version reached the Executive Committee of the Board of 
Trustees in May, where after careful consideration it was 
approved and forwarded to the full Board for action at the 
spring meeting. In the light of Agnes Scott's history and 
customs, this issue was understandably one on which there 
were differences of opinion. After serious discussion, the 
Board approved the revised policy. It provides that alcoholic 
beverages be permitted in dormitory rooms, dormitory 
kitchens, and in a designated public room in each dormitory. 
Consumption of alcoholic beverages is not permitted in 
hallways and in other public rooms of the dormitories. 
Enforcement of the new policy will be the responsibility of 
the officers and appropriate committees of Student 
Government, subject to review by the Administrative 
Committee of the College, and ultimately by the Board of 
Trustees. The policy will be examined at the end of each 
year and revised or revoked if such action appears necessary 
for the overall good of the College. During my tenure at 
Agnes Scott no issue has received more thorough and 
prayerful consideration than the policy relating to the 
consumption of alcoholic beverages on campus. It is my 
judgment that the Board has acted wisely in expressing its 
confidence in the ability of our students, through Student 
Government, to regulate this controversial area of their 
social life on campus. I have found our students responsible 
and trustworthy, and I believe they will administer this new 
policy to the credit of the College. If they are unable or 
unwilling to do so, I shall not hesitate to intervene. 

It is especially fitting, in the light of our new alcohol 
policy, that the coming year will see consideration given to 
the development of a Campus Alcohol Abuse Prevention 
Program at Agnes Scott. The Program will be planned and 
carried out with the cooperation of the Student Health 
Service, and will undoubtedly adapt aspects of similar 
programs already in effect at other colleges and universities. 

We have been pleased with the very favorable reception 
given our new student health policy and program. In an 
attempt to involve students in evaluating our health services 
and their professional personnel, Director of Student Health 
Services Rosemary Kriner circulated to students last May a 
general questionnaire. Of those who returned the 
questionnaire, almost 909f reported a generally positive 
experience with our health services program and staff. A 
number of helpful suggestions were made, and some of these 
will be incorporated in the coming year. As a part of our 
health education emphasis, the Health Services staff 
prepared and made available to students in the past year a 
non-technical handbook designed as a guide for self-care in 
cases of common aches and pains, fevers and chills. The 
manual was well received, and plans are under way to make 
it more widely available. 

In her first year as Director of Career Planning, Kathleen 
Mooney has increased markedly the services and scope of 
the Office of Career Planning, including weekly circulation 
to students of information on job opportunities, part-time 
work, and interviewers scheduled for campus visits. A 
recent survey of the Class of 1978 by the Office reaffirms 
the fact that within a very short time after leaving the 
College, the great majority of Agnes Scott graduates are 



successful in finding jobs, enrolling in graduate programs, 
and otherwise establishing themselves in their new lives. 
Under consideration for the near future are the expansion of 
these programs and the gradual development of a women's 
center at Agnes Scott to serve women of the Atlanta area. 
Services will include career counseling and testing and 
information about opportunities for women of all ages at 
Agnes Scott and other institutions. 

Director of Financial Aid Bonnie Brown Johnson '70 
reports increasing interest and use of all our financial aid 
opportunities, including private, state, and Federal 
resources as well as those of Agnes Scott. There is a steady 
increase in the number of students requesting and receiving 
financial aid, and a consequent increase in paper work and 
record keeping. We are very proud of our financial aid 
program, under Mrs. Johnson's direction, which is still able 
to meet 1009f of officially indicated need among our 
students. Approximately 70% of our student body now 
receives some form of financial aid, with over 40% receiving 
more than one-half million dollars annually of Agnes Scott 
funds. 

Assistant Dean of Students Mollie Merrick '57. in her 
annual report, found student attitudes in this past year to be 
"extremely positive." Student housing and transfer patterns 
were indicative of this positive attitude. We began the year 
with a small increase in boarding students and an 889r return 
of upperclassmen. Only eighteen students left the 
dormitories during the year as compared with thirty-one the 
year before. The number of students having academic 
transcripts sent to other institutions, an indication of 
possible transfer, was markedly lower. Our retention rate is 
accordingly far better than the national average. For these 
positive student attitudes and performances, the wise and 
understanding efforts of Dean Kirkland and Assistant Dean 
Merrick have been ably supplemented by Dean Gary and her 
staff, especially Gue Pardue Hudson '68, Class Dean for 
Freshmen and Sophomores. During the winter quarter the 
College gave students the opportunity to take an intensive 
reading and study skills improvement course offered on the 
campus by a professional organization. One hundred 
students completed the course, pronounced it very helpful, 
and recommended that the College continue to provide this 
service. 

Despite our gratifying student retention levels of the past 
three years, the attraction to Agnes Scott of sufficient 
numbers of qualified students continues to be our chief 
priority. Our Director of Admissions, Judy Maguire Tindel 
'73, and her staff have left few stones unturned in seeking to 
reach and interest students throughout the world who may 
meet Agnes Scott's requirements. College admissions is an 
increasingly competitive activity, one in which Agnes Scott 
must continue to make its programs and strengths known 
amid a flood of lavish recruiting publications with which we 
must compete without compromise of our standards. I have 
the greatest respect for the energy and imagination with 
which Director of Admissions Judy Tindel and her staff have 
planned and carried out our admissions programs in a time 
which is fraught with uncertainties and frustrations. 
Although Agnes Scott has a stable admissions situation at 
present and an enviable student retention record, we are still 
unsatisfied with our recruiting efforts; and we are continuing 
to seek ways to improve them while remaining true to the 
mission and character of the College. 



32 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 




Student Government President Kemper Hatfield meets with President Perry weekly. 



Our Return to College program, to which I have referred 
above, is one of the most encouraging and significant of 
recent developments here. The growth of the program, its 
enthusiastic reception, and the splendid performance of our 
RTC students promise a continuing strong future for it. 

A new major effort to attract outstanding all-round 
students to Agnes Scott will be inaugurated in September 
1980, when our first Honor Scholars arrive on campus. 
Approved in principle by the Board of Trustees in May of 
1978, the Honor Scholars Program has been worked out by a 
faculty-administrative committee, and announcements of its 
inauguration have been sent to some 20,000 high schools 
throughout the country. In addition, alumnae screening 
committees have been formed, and additional information 
releases planned. The program is designed to bring to Agnes 
Scott each year at least ten outstanding freshmen whose high 
school records in both academic and extracurricular areas 
indicate outstanding ability and promise. Honor Scholars 
will be chosen through a national selection process from 
candidates who present superior secondary school records, 
high Scholastic Aptitude Test scores, and evidence of 
leadership qualities. Three regional alumnae committees will 
screen the applicants, and thirty-five finalists will be brought 
to the campus, as guests of the College, to be interviewed by 
the Honor Scholars Program Committee. Up to ten students 
will be named Agnes Scott Honor Scholars and will be 
eligible to receive scholarships of $2,500 each year that they 
continue to exhibit superior academic work while at Agnes 
Scott. Need is not a factor in the selection of Honor 
Scholars, but any proven financial need up to total College 



expenses will be met through the Agnes Scott College 
financial aid program. It is hoped that many of the thirty-five 
finalists each year will become interested enough in Agnes 
Scott to enroll here. There are a number of such programs 
already in operation at American colleges, and the number is 
increasing. We are well aware that the competition for such 
outstanding young women will be keen indeed. But the 
program is designed not only to attract and enroll superior 
students but also to give alumnae and other friends a large 
share in the finding and selection of such students. In its 
approval of this program, the Board of Trustees emphasized 
that its support should in no way decrease funds for our 
financial aid programs for needy students. Accordingly, 
funds to support the Honor Scholars Program must be 
"new" money designated for this purpose. I am glad to 
report that sufficient funds are now in hand to begin the 
program, but more will be required as it moves beyond its 
initial year. We believe that there will be a number of 
alumnae and other friends who are interested in recognizing 
outstanding students who may have no financial need. 

Our efforts in recent years to increase the variety and 
attractiveness of Agnes Scott's publications were 
recognized by the Council for the Advancement and Support 
of Education (CASE) at its national meeting in New Orleans 
in July. Agnes Scott publications received awards and 
citations in eight categories ranging from letterhead 
stationery to College events calendars and student recruiting 
brochures. Hundreds of colleges and universities competed 
together, and no other college of Agnes Scott's size won as 
many awards. The chief credit for this fine showing goes to 



Fall 1979 



33 



our Director of Public Relations, Sara Fountain, and her 
staff and consultants. 

A very important function of the Office of Public 
Relations is the dissemination of news of coming events at 
Agnes Scott and of the achievements and recognition of 
students, faculty, and alumnae. The notable increase in both 
the amount and quality of such news stories is due in large 
measure to the excellent work of Agnes Scott News Director 
Andrea Helms. The many concerts, lectures, dramatic 
presentations, along with our summer conferences, 
constitute still another important aspect of our public 
relations program. Success of such events in recent years 
has been largely the result of the conscientious and efficient 
work of our Coordinator of Campus Events and 
Conferences Dorothea Markert, with the untiring efforts of 
Director of Physical Plant Vaughan Black and his staff. I am 
happy to express my appreciation to these administrators 
who have made not only the College events themselves but 
the advance announcements of them such an effective part 
of our total public relations program at the College. 

Each succeeding year is a rich one in the quality and 
variety of educational, cultural, and social events which 
occur on the campus, most of them open to the public 
without charge. Again space forbids a complete listing of 
such events, but the following '"highlights" are a sample: 



JANUARY 

14- —Invitational Art Show— Works by Atlanta Black 

February 15 artists 

21-24 — Focus on Faith — Preacher: Professor David Willis. 

Princeton Theological Seminary 

FEBRUARY 

1 — Lecture — "Genius and Poetry," Professor Richard 

Poirier, Rutgers University 
6 — Lecture — "Black and Woman," Professor Gloria 

Gayles. Talladega College 

8 — Dance Concert for children — Agnes Scott Studio 

Dance Theatre 
9, 10 — One-act plays- — directed and designed by Agnes 

Scott theatre students 
17, 18 — Children's Play — Cinderella, produced by theatre 

19, 20 department and Blackfriars 

18- — Student Art Show — works by Agnes Scott art 

march 8 students 

21 — Founder's Day Convocation — Dr. Mark Curtis, 

President, Association of American Colleges. In- 
scription unveiled on gravestone of founder George 
Washington Scott in Decatur Cemetery. 

22 — Synchronized swimming show — Agnes Scott Dol- 

phin Club 
26 — Lecture — ""The Woman's Journey," Professor 

Emeritus Joseph Campbell, Sarah Lawrence 

College 
28 — Celebration Mime Theatre of South Paris, Maine 



HIGHLIGHTS OF THE 1978-79 COLLEGE YEAR 



SEPTEMBER 
18 

24- 

OCTOBER 19 



-Registration and orientation open Agnes Scott's 

ninetieth session 
-Art Show of paintings by Ferdinand Warren, 

Professor Emeritus of Art, former chairman of the 

art department 



OCTOBER 

4 
16 



22- 



— Honors Day Convocation — Speaker: President Mer- 

rimon Cuninggim, Salem College 
— Lecture — "The Romantic Will in Creative 

Women," Elizabeth Hardwick, novelist, essayist, 

and advisory editor to The New York Review of 

Books 
— Art Show of American paintings on loan from the 
December 7 Robert P. Coggins collection of American paintings 



NOVEMBER 

4-5 



10, II 

17, 18 

DECEMBER 
3 



— Investiture — Speaker: Dr. Margaret Pepperdene, 
Ellen Douglass Leyburn Professor of English; 
Preacher: The Reverend Richard G. Hutcheson, Jr., 
Chairman, General Assembly's Committee on Re- 
view and Evaluation, Presbyterian Church in the 
United States 

— Reading — Eudora Welty, Pulitzer prize-winning 
author 

— Lecture— "La France des Lumieres, essai d'ana- 
lyse d'une civilisation," Professor Paul Verniere, 
The Sorbonne 

— Blackfriars production — 
Ladyhouse Blues 



-Christmas Concert — the Agnes Scott Glee Club and 
Madrigal Singers 



MARCH 

7 



27 
29 



8-29 

11, 12 

12 

19 
19, 20 

25 

26, 27 

27-29 

MAY 
11, 12 

18, 19 

14 



JUNE 

3 



-Foreign Language Drama Contest for Georgia high 

school students 

-Concert — Guarneri String Quartet 
-Lecture — "Fundamentalism," James Barr, Regius 

Professor of Hebrew, Oxford University 



-Concert — Atlanta Chamber Players, professional 

chamber music ensemble in residence at Agnes 

Scott 
-Lecture — "Is Gandhi's Philosophy Relevant 

Today?", Dr. G. Ramachandran, private secretary 

to the late Mohandas K. Gandhi 
-Art Show — National Invitational Color Blend Print 

Show 
-Writers' Festival — Speakers: Harry Crews, Donald 

Davie, Josephine Jacobsen 
-Romeo and Juliet, presented by The Acting Com- 
pany of New York 
-Spring Concert — the Agnes Scott Glee Club 
-Applicants' Weekend — prospective freshmen visit 

campus 
-Phi Beta Kappa Convocation — Speaker: President 

Robert Q. Marston. University of Florida 
-Spring Dance Concert — Agnes Scott Studio Dance 

Theatre 
-Alumnae Weekend: over 700 alumnae return! 



-Blackfriars production — 

Babes in Arms 
-Illustrated Lecture — "Degas in New Orleans," Dr. 

Jean Sutherland Boggs. Director of the Philadelphia 

Museum of Art 



-Ninetieth Commencement — 121 seniors awarded 
degrees. Baccalaureate preacher: Dr. Sara Bernice 
Moseley, Moderator, General Assembly, Presbyte- 
rian Church in the United States 



34 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Late summer saw the completion of the renovation of 
faculty offices and classrooms in Buttick Hall, the second 
major project of our overall physical plant modernization 
program begun in 1974. The renovation of McCain Library 
was completed in 1977; other projects include the rewiring 
and lighting of the campus (1973-74), the air-conditioning of 
Gaines and Maclean Chapels in Presser Hall (1974), the 
air-conditioning of Winship Dormitory (1974), a new roof for 
Rebekah Dormitory (1975), and the renovation of the Dana 
Fine Arts Building (1977-78). Indeed, further work on the 
roof of Dana has been undertaken this summer, and roof 
repairs have been made on Presser Hall. Currently nearing 
completion is the strengthening of the roof of Bradley 
Observatory in order to make possible the installation of 
outside telescope mounts as a part of our developing 
astronomy program. According to Dr. Robert Hyde, 
recently appointed Assistant Professor of Astronomy and 
director of the Bradley Observatory, "Students at Agnes 
Scott are very fortunate in having the opportunity to 
experience astronomy directly rather than just read about it 
in textbooks. The Bradley Observatory is one of the finest 
astronomical facilities in the Southeast." Housed in the 
Observatory with a thirty-inch Beck telescope are numerous 



small telescopes, an astronomy library, and a planetarium, 
as well as darkroom facilities and a lecture hall. 

Engineering studies are now in progress for what will 
almost certainly be a third major renovation project: the 
modernization of Campbell Hall, classroom and laboratory 
building for the natural sciences. In addition to modernizing 
laboratories and other facilities, alterations and 
improvements will be made to incorporate the latest 
instructional procedures and to meet current safety 
regulations for scientific laboratories. 

Planning is under way for a student center and a new 
recreation center (gymnasium, swimming pool, exercise 
rooms, and playing field). Also a major project, this social 
and recreational complex will be Agnes Scott's first new 
building in more than a decade. 

The wide ranging activities of the Agnes Scott Alumnae 
Association made 1978-79 another great year in alumnae 
affairs. Major credit for this banner year belongs to national 
Alumnae Association President Cissie Spiro Aidinoff '51 
and Director of Alumnae Affairs Virginia Brown McKenzie 
'47, and their colleagues of the Alumnae Council throughout 
the country. Hundreds of other alumnae served the College 
as Agnes Scott Fund agents, alumnae admissions 




Conley Ingram chairs the development committee. 



Fall 1979 



35 




36 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



representatives, and officers and members of fifty alumnae 
clubs throughout the country. Again I had the pleasure of 
visiting a number of alumnae groups, where my admiration 
for our alumnae and my gratitude for their loyalty to alma 
materwere renewed. 

A highlight of the alumnae year was the November visit to 
Washington, when alumnae traveled from Atlanta and other 
cities for three days of touring the capital (including the 
White House) and meeting with Washington area alumnae. 
Originated by Alumnae Association President Cissie 
Aidinoff and coordinated by Continuing Education 
Chairman Sylvia Williams Ingram '52, the Washington visit 
was a great success; and a similar trip is planned for New 
York City in the coming year. The Alumnae Council meeting 
in October set a new record when some 125 members met on 
the campus for an intensive day of workshops and 
discussions. Similarly, Alumnae Day in April set a record 
when more than 700 alumnae returned for the annual 
meeting and luncheon. Recipients of the Outstanding 
Alumnae awards on this occasion were Penny Brown 
Barnett '32 (Service to the College), Goldie Ham '19 
(Community Service), and Martha Stackhouse Grafton '30 
(Distinguished Career). 

Once again the generous contributions of alumnae were a 
major factor in the success of the Agnes Scott Fund, to 
which some 3,200 alumnae contributed almost $290,000 to 
the total of almost $820,000. Indeed, as Cissie Aidinoff 
wrote to alumnae in the summer Quarterly, Agnes Scott is 
"alive and well ... an enlightened and strong academic 
community." Our condition owes much to the continued 
interest and support of our alumnae everywhere, and we are 
deeply grateful. 

The energetic efforts of the Office of Development, under 
Vice President Paul McCain's direction, and the careful 
financial planning of Vice President Lee Barclay and his 
staff resulted in another good financial year. All employees 
received salary increases, which this year, in keeping with 
President Carter's guidelines, averaged approximately 7%. 
The Board of Trustees authorized an increase in our 
guaranteed pension formula, resulting in larger income for a 
number of our retired employees. A good health record for 
the year enabled us to increase significantly our major 
medical coverage in the coming year for all employees with 
practically no additional cost to them. 

As in the past, Agnes Scott received in the 1978-79 fiscal 
year the financial support not only of alumnae but also of 
hundreds of other friends — individuals, corporations, 
foundations — support which has again enabled us to 
continue strengthening our programs, facilities, and 
resources. For this support, in whatever amount, we are 
truly grateful. The accompanying table indicates the sources 
of these gifts and the uses to which they were allocated in 
1978-79. We have tried to send out personal thanks to every 
donor. A number of gifts and grants are worth of special 
mention, however, and I am glad to record them here. From 
two anonymous foundations we have received generous 
grants of $166,850 and $20,000, the first to aid in the 
renovation of Buttrick Hall, the second for scholarships. 
Marian Franklin Anderson '40 (Mrs. Paul H.) and her 
husband made a gift of $51,306 to establish the Rufus C. and 
Wynie Coleman Franklin Memorial Scholarship, the income 
from which will aid Agnes Scott students from Emanuel 
County, Georgia. From the estate of the late Mrs. Helen B. 



Longshore came an additional $21,368 to be added to the 
scholarship established in 1977 in her memory. With a gift of 
$20,000 the John and Mary Franklin Foundation completed 
the last two-thirds of its grant for audiovisual equipment. 
The J. M. Tull Foundation gave $20,000 for student 
scholarships. Mrs. Howard P. Conrad, mother of the late 
Patricia Conrad '63, added $15,000 to the Howard P. Conrad 
Scholarship established in 1971 in memory of Patricia. To 
assist in the renovation of Buttrick Hall, the David, Helen, 
and Marion Woodward Fund made a grant of $15,000. From 
Ruth Anderson O'Neal '18 (Mrs. Alan S.) came gifts of 
$12,000 for additions to the Ruth Anderson O'Neal and the 
Neal L. Anderson Scholarships. A bequest of some $11,800 
from the estate of the late Marie Scott O'Neill '42 (Mrs. 
Frank Q.) established the Marie Scott O'Neill Scholarship. 
From Mr. and Mrs. Hal Smith we have received a gift of 
$11,298 to add to the Hal and Julia Thompson Smith '31, 
Scholarship Fund. An unrestricted gift of $10,650 was 
received from Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Cameron (Betty 
Henderson '43). With a gift of $10,000 Miss Bess Patton 
established the Lillian Patton Latin Scholarship in honor of 
her sister of the Class of 1920. From the Gertrude and 
William C. Wardlaw Fund came a gift of $10,000 to aid in the 
renovation of Buttrick Hall. 

Agnes Scott's share of the contributions made by Georgia 
business firms to the Georgia Foundation for Independent 
Colleges in 1978-79 was $43,188, the largest in recent years. 
We continue to be most grateful for this expression of 
confidence in Agnes Scott by the Georgia business 
community. 

In the summer issue of the President's Newsletter I 
introduced to you two new members of the Board of 
Trustees. Pictures and biographical sketches of these new 
trustees were included; accordingly, I shall merely record 
their names here, together with my conviction that they will 
bring fresh vision and strength to the leadership of Agnes 
Scott: Edward P. Gould, President of the Trust Company 
Bank of Atlanta, and the Reverend Wallace M. Alston, Jr., 
Minister of the Nassau Presbyterian Church, Princeton, 
New Jersey. Two faithful trustees of many years, Mary 
Warren Read '29 (Mrs. Joseph C.) and William C. Wardlaw 
were elected Trustees Emeriti. We have been enriched by 
their wise counsel and active support. Also at the spring 
meeting of the Board of Trustees Alex P. Gaines was 
succeeded by Lawrence L. Gellerstedt, Jr., as Chairman of 
the Board. The College is greatly indebted to Mr. Gaines for 
his wise and efficient chairing of the Board through a 
significant period in life of the College. He will remain active 
as a trustee. Succeeding Mr. Gellerstedt as Vice Chairman 
of the Board is trustee G. Conley Ingram. As Vice 
Chairman, Mr. Ingram will chair the Executive Committee 
of the Board. He is also Chairman of the Board's 
Development Committee. 



PLANNING FOR A LEAN DECADE 



It has been my hope since coming to Agnes Scott that 
these annual reports of each year's activities should serve as 
periodic reassurance to the College community and our 
friends that we on the campus continue true, and freshly 



Fall 1979 



37 



responsive, to the historic mission of the College. Our 
alumnae and others who support us are entitled to such 
reassurance, especially in times so fraught with difficulties 
for private liberal arts colleges. I hope that these reports 
show also that as we seek to deal with daily concerns in each 
College year we are also actively mindful of Agnes Scott's 
future needs. Again this is especially important in a time 
when virtually all projections point to the 1980s as a decade 
which will sorely try the survival power of many American 
colleges and universities, especially those in the private 
sector. Population projections indicate a significant drop 
nationally in the number of young people of traditional 
college age. Combined with continuing inflation and 
widespread economic uncertainty, this decline will bring to 
many colleges grave financial problems. 

It is with these somber predictions very much in mind that 
our planning for Agnes Scott's future has been carried out. 
Last year I reported to you that the Long-Range Planning 
Committee (consisting of students and faculty as well as 
administrators, trustees, and alumnae) submitted to the 
Board of Trustees its analysis of Agnes Scott's needs — 
human, material, and financial — for the next quarter 
century, together with proposals for securing the resources 
which will enable the College to meet the demands of this 
crucial period. I think you will be interested in the brief 
summary statement of the Long-Range Planning 
Committee's report entitled, "Agnes Scott Looks to the 
Future": 

"As Agnes Scott approaches its centennial in 1989 and 
then prepares for the twenty-first century, the Long-Range 
Planning Committee recommends to the Board of Trustees 
for its consideration the following development program: 

1. Attract and retain a select student body by maintaining 
a curriculum strong in traditional liberal arts disciplines 
and values yet responsive to the needs of young women 
interested in professional and business careers. 

2. Attract and retain a highly qualified faculty through 
competitive compensation and ongoing opportunities 
for their professional growth. 

3. Encourage the factors which strengthen the College's 
Christian emphasis and heritage, its Honor System, 
and its representative Student Government. 

4. Plan and construct new physical education and 
recreational facilities as well as a new student center 
and complete the renovation and improvement of the 
present buildings on campus. 

5. Organize and launch a financial drive which will 
provide as soon as possible the $50,000,000 Agnes 
Scott will need to accomplish the above objectives." 

The Board of Trustees has accepted in principle these 
recommendations of the Long-Range Planning Committee. 
They constitute a large order, with a large price tag. One's 
immediate reaction is apt to be: Can Agnes Scott raise in the 
next twenty years such sizable funds, funds which in effect 
will double our present resources? 

In considering such a question, I turned to College records 
of twenty years ago, in the 1958-59 College catalog and in 
President Alston's annual report for that College year. I 
found encouragement in such a review. It revealed evidence 
of steady growth, in resources as well as expenses, when the 
figures are compared with those of 1978-79. For example, 
our Library collection has doubled in size since 1959, from 
75,000 to over 150,000 volumes; from 339 periodical titles to 




Chairman of the Board L. L. Gellerstedt, Jr. 




Vice Chairman Conley Ingram 



38 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



almost 800 today. Our operating budget has increased from 
approximately $1,354,000 in 1959 to over $5,500,000 in 1979. 
Our assets in plant and equipment have almost tripled from 
just over $5,000,000 in 1959 to almost $15,000,000 in 1979. 
Finally, our endowment income has increased from some 
$365,000 in 1959 to over $2,250,000 in 1979. The clear 
implications of these growth figures of the past twenty years 
are twofold: first, we must maintain this kind of growth in 
resources if we are to continue as an outstanding college; 
and second, such goals are nor unrealistic. We have more 
than doubled our resources in the past twenty years, thanks 
to the hard work, careful planning, and generosity of many; 
and we can do it again in the next twenty years ! 

In concluding this report of another good year, let me 
return again to the summary statement of our 
recommendations for the future. They deal primarily with 
people and with human values. They call for the 
maintenance of a select student body, of a highly qualified 
faculty, for the continued encouragement of our heritage of 
academic excellence, Christian principles, and concern for 
the individual. Finally, they call for the maintenance of a 
physical plant and educational equipment which a select 
study body and a strong faculty will need for the quality 
educational experience which Agnes Scott has always 
sought to provide. Most of the needed new money will go for 



additional endowment for academic development (including 
faculty and programs) and student financial aid. People and 
their needs thus continue to be our chief concern. 

Implicit in these recommendations for the future is the 
renewed dedication of Agnes Scott's leadership to the 
principles which have guided the College since its founding: 
a positive commitment to liberal arts education, i.e., to the 
joys as well as the uses of learning; an abiding faith in the 
human values of our Judeo-Christian heritage ; the 
maintenance of academic and personal standards of 
excellence; concern for the individual's twofold search for 
self-fulfillment and service to others. This is the kind of 
college we have been for almost a century. It is the kind of 
college which this report and its recommendations indicate 
we intend to be in the future. Significantly, it is the kind of 
college which current educational research is showing to be 
the most effective and satisfying college experience yet 
devised in this country. 

Plans are already under way for organizing and carrying 
out the programs necessary to secure the funds and with 
them the resources needed to meet the challenges of the next 
quarter century. I know our efforts can be successful. I am 
convinced, too, that these efforts will enable us to transmit 
to those who follow us at Agnes Scott a strong and lively 
institution, proud of its heritage and confident of its future. 



y/?UA^ *~y^ 



PERSONNEL CHANGES 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES: 

Elected to Board, May 1979: 

Edward P. Gould 

Wallace M. Alston, Jr. 
Elected Trustees-Emeriti, May 1979: 

Mary Warren Read 

William C.Wardlaw 

Elected Officers of the Board, May 1979: 
L. L. Gellerstedt, Jr. — Chairman 
G. Conley Ingram — Vice Chairman 

FACULTY APPOINTMENTS EFFECTIVE DURING ACADEMIC YEAR 

1978-79: 
David W. Boykin (Ph.D.), Visiting Professor of Chemistry 

(part-time, fall quarter) 
Robert L. Brown (M.A.), Lecturer in Music (part-time) 
Carol Lyn Butcher (Master's candidate), Lecturer in Music 

(part-time) 
M. Eloise Brown Carter (M.S.), Instructor in Biology 
Caroline Matheny Dillman (M.A., Ph.D. candidate), Instructor 

in Sociology and Anthropology (part-time) 
Paul W. Frame (Ph.D.), Assistant Professor of Biology 
David L. Giberson (B.S., Ph.D. candidate), Lecturer in 

Chemistry (part-time, fall quarter) 
Charles Steven Hall (M.M.), Lecturer in Music 
Robert S. Hyde (Ph.D.), Assistant Professor of Physics and 

Astronomy; Director of the Bradley Observatory 
Ayse Ilgaz-Carden (Ph.D.), Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Mani P. Kamerkar (Ph.D.), Lecturer in History (spring quarter) 
Jean Lemonds (B.M.), Lecturer in Music 
Warren Little (B.F.A.), Lecturer in Music (part-time) 
Gordon E. McNeer (Ph.D.), Lecturer in Spanish (part-time) 



Bruce L. Taggart (Ph.D.), Visiting Assistant Professor of 

Classical Languages and Literatures (fall quarter) 
John W. Toth (Ph.D.), Assistant Professor of Theatre 
Joyce Cummings Tucker (M. Div.), Lecturer in Bible and 

Religion (part-time, spring quarter) 
Anne Bradford Warner (Ph.D.), Assistant Professor of English 
Donald F. Young (Ph.D.), Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND STAFF APPOINTMENTS EFFECTIVE DURING 
YEAR BEGINNING JULY 1, 1978: 

Vaughan W. Black, Director of Physical Plant 

Dee Chubb, Manager of the Bookstore 

Maria M. Cimadevilla (M.A.), Assistant Food Service Manager 

Susan Stringer Connell (B.A.), Assistant in the Department of 

Chemistry 
Emmanuelle Desquins, Assistant in the Department of French 
Natalie C. Endicott, Manager of the Alumnae House 
Juliette J. Harper (B.A.), Assistant to the Director of Alumnae 

Affairs 
Linda M. Hilsenrad (M.A.), Director of Media Services 
Lucile R. Jarrett (B.A.), Assistant to the Director of Admissions 
Margaret H. Kirk (B.A.), Assistant to the Dean of Students 
Kathleen Krank Mooney (M.A.), Director of Career Planning 
Janet L. Norton (M.A.), Assistant to the Dean of Students 
Linda L. Palmer (B.A.), Assistant to the Dean of Students 
Cynthia T. Richmond (B.A.), Technical Services Assistant, 

Library 
Katherine J. Schreiner (M.S.L.S.), Technical Services Librarian 
Anita Moses Shippen (B.A.), Special Projects Coordinator. 

Office of Admissions (part-time) 
Jean Chalmers Smith (B.A.), Coordinator for Clubs, Alumnae 

Office 



Fall 1979 



39 



Julius D. W. Staal (F.R.A.S.), Director of the Planetarium of the 

Bradley Observatory 
Jane B. Sutton (M.A.), Assistant to the Director of Admissions 
Rosa S. Tinsley, Secretary, Office of Career Planning 
Elizabeth Dowd Wood (M.Ed.), Groups Coordinator, Office of 

Admissions (part-time) 

FACULTY PROMOTIONS EFFECTIVE SEPTEMBER 1978: 

Steven A. Haworth to Assistant Professor of Political Science 
Jack L. Nelson to Professor of English 

SABBATICAL LEAVES DURING 1978-79: 

Penelope Campbell. Associate Professor of History and Political 

Science (year) 
Jay C. Fuller, Assistant Professor of Music (year) 
Linda L. Woods. Associate Professor of English (fall) 
Elizabeth G. Zenn, Professor of Classical Languages and 

Literatures and Chairman of the Department (fall) 

RETIREMENTS EFFECTIVE JUNE 1979: 

Mary Virginia Allen. Adeline Arnold Loridans Professor of 

French and Chairman of the Department 
Verita M. Barnett, Manager of the Bookstore 
Nancy P. Groseclose, Charles A. Dana Professor of Biology and 

Chairman of the Department 
Myrna G. Young, Professor of Classical Languages and 

Literatures 



Mary Louise Currie, former Deferred Giving Officer, 

Development Office. August 15, 1979 
Eloise Hardeman Ketchin. Retired Manager of the Alumnae 

House, February 5, 1979 
Joe B. Saxon. Retired Supervisor of Buildings and Grounds, 

April 20, 1979 
Florence E. Smith, Associate Professor of History and Political 

Science, Emeritus, May 5, 1979 
Lou Henderson Voorhees, Retired Assistant to the Dean of 

Students, November 30, 1978 
Merle Grubbs Walker, former Associate Professor of 

Philosophy and Chairman of the Department, February 3. 

1979 



GIFTS, GRANTS, AND BEQUESTS 
RECEIVED 1978-79 



sources: 

Alumnae 

Parents and Friends 

Business and Industry 

Foundations 



$289,648 

140,874 

62.388 

322,099 

5815,009 



deaths: 

Annie May Christie, Associate Professor of English, Emeritus, 
September 7, 1978 

Marion Thomas Clark, William Rand Kenan, Jr., Professor of 
Chemistry and Chairman of the Department, September 9, 
1978 



uses: 

Current Operations 

Endowment 

Plant 

Other restricted purposes 



$328,389 
211,072 
221,396 

54,152 

$815,009 



SUMMARY OF CURRENT REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 



educational and general: 

Student Charges 
Endowment Income 
Gifts and Grants 
Sponsored Programs 
Other Sources 



1978-79 


1977-78 


$1,778,831 


$1,568,046 


2,382,957 


2,263,769 


328,389 


303,182 


8,559 


85,341 


208,962 


107,113 


$4,707,698 


$4,327,451 



AUXILIARY ENTERPRISES: 

Student Charges 
Other 



717,094 
374,868 



$ 699,148 
403,002 



$1,091,962 $1,102,150 



EXPENDITURES 



EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL: 



AUXILIARY ENTERPRISES 



TOTAL EXPENDITURES 



1978-79 



1977-78 



Instruction 


$1,593,884 


$1,454,210 


Sponsored Programs 


6.880 


70,199 


Library/Academic Support 


243.910 


217,130 


Student Services 


424,385 


358,750 


Institutional Support 


1.131,310 


994.145 


Operation/Maintenance of 






Plant 


639.108 


572,774 


Student Financial Aid 


434,091 


445,109 



$4,473,568 $4,112,317 



$1,118,503 $ 979.653 



$5,592,071 $5,091,970 



TRANSFER FOR ENDOWMENT, LOAN, 

PLANT, AND RESTRICTED PURPOSES $ 190,000 $ 210,781 



TOTAL REVENUES 



$5,799,660 $5,429,601 



TOTAL EXPENDED OR TRANSFERRED 



$5,782,071 $5,302,751 



EXCESS OF REVENUES OVER 

EXPENDITURES AND TRANSFERS 



$ 17,589 $ 126,850 



40 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



(Continued from page 28) 

Helen Baldwin Woodward Scholarship 
Fund of $25,365 was established in 1963 
by her daughter, Marian Woodward 
(Mrs. John K.) Ottley, of Atlanta. 
Preference is given to students of out- 
standing intellectual ability and 
character. 

Anna Irwin Young Scholarship Fund of 
$13,531 was established in 1942 by Susan 
Young (Mrs. John J.) Egan, an alumna of 
the Institute, in memory of her sister, an 
1895 graduate, who served as professor 
of mathematics for twenty-two years. 
Preference is given to students from 



other countries. 

Mason Pressly Young Scholarship of 

$10,000 was established in 1979 by the 
Blake P. Garrett, Sr., Family of Foun- 
tain Inn, South Carolina, in memory of 
this long time Presbyterian medical 
missionary to China and father of two 
alumnae: Louise Young Garrett '38 and 
Josephine Young (Mrs. Francis) Sullivan 
'44 of Greer, South Carolina. 

Lucretia Rohbins Zenor Scholarship 
Fund of $2,453 was established in 1962 
as a memorial to her through a bequest 
from her daughter, Mary Zenor Palmer, 
of Yazoo City, Mississippi, an alumna of 
the Institute. 



Library Funds 



Agnes Lee Chapter of the United Daugh- 
ters of the Confederacy Book Fund of 

$1,000 was established in 1956 by this 
Decatur chapter with the transfer of this 
amount -from its loan fund. The income 
is used to purchase books on southern 
history and literature. 

Edna Hanley Byers Book Fund of 
$4,573 was established in 1962 by Agnes 
Scott's librarian whose active service 
spanned thirty-seven years prior to her 
retirement in 1969. The income is used to 
acquire books of general interest to the 
college community, including biography 
and literature. 

Asa Griggs Candler Library Fund of 
$47,000 was established in 1940 by the 
Board of Trustees from the generous 
gifts of this prominent Atlanta business 
leader who was one of the chief promo- 
ters of Christian education in the South. 
The income supports the operation of 
the Library. 

Andrew Carnegie Library Fund of 
$25,000 was establilshed in 1951 by the 
Board of Trustees in recognition of Mr. 
Carnegie's generosity in having provided 
funds to build the College's first library 
in 1910. The income supports the opera- 
tion of the Library. 

Annie May Christie Book Fund of 
$2,186 was established in 1962 by the 
Board of Trustees to honor this member 
of the English department from 1925 to 
1962. The income is used to acquire 
books in American literature. 

Melissa A. Cilley Book Fund of $2,212 
was established in 1963 by the Board of 
Trustees to honor this member of the 
Spanish department at the time of her 
retirement after thirty-three years. The 
income is used to purchase books in 
Spanish and Portuguese. 

Class of 1928 Memorial Book Fund of 
$4,770 was established in 1978 by the 
members of this class as a part of their 
fiftieth reunion. The income is used to 
place books in the Library as memorials 
to members of this class. 



Class of 1933 Book Fund of $1 ,619 was 
established in 1978 by the members of 
this class as a part of their forty-fifth 
reunion. The income is used to place 
books in the Library as memorials to 
members of this class. 

Florene J. Dunstan Fund of $2,823 was 
established in 1974 by the Board of 
Trustees and friends to honor this 
professor and chairman of the Spanish 
department who taught at Agnes Scott 
for thirty-three years. The income is 
used to enhance the collection of Latin 
American literature. 

Muriel Ham Book Fund of $2,839 was 
established in 1965 by the Board of 
Trustees and friends in memory of this 
professor of German and Spanish who 
taught at Agnes Scott from 1921 to 1964. 
The income is used to purchase books in 
the fields of German and Spanish. 

G. Benton Kline Book Fund of $1,972 
was established in 1969 by the Class of 
1969 to honor this former dean of the 
faculty for his eighteen years of service 
as teacher and administrator. The in- 
come is used to acquire books in 
philosophy and religion. 

Emma May Laney Book Fund of 
$7,853 was established in 1956 by a 
group of her associates and former 
students to honor this professor of 
English upon her retirement after she 
had served thirty-seven years on the 
faculty. The income is used for the 
acquisition of rare books in English 
literature. 

The McCain Book Fund of $16,040 was 
established in 1951 by faculty, students, 
alumnae, and friends to honor President 
James Ross McCain upon his retirement 
after his twenty-eight years of out- 
standing service as president of the 
College. 

Eleanor Brown McCain Book Fund of 
$1,560 was established in 1979 by her 
family and friends as a memorial to her 
for her role in the life of the campus and 



community. The income is used to 
purchase books in the humanities. 

Isabel Asbury Oliver Book Fund of 
$1,025 was established in 1962 by 
Creighton M. Oliver, Jr., of Trenton, 
Florida, in memory of his wife, a 
member of the Class of 1947. 

Wingfield Ellis Parker Book Fund of 
$2,000 was established in 1977 by Wil- 
liam D. and Frances Tennent Ellis '25 of 
Atlanta as a memorial for their daughter. 

Elizabeth Gray and Marvin B. Perry, 
Sr., Book Fund of $2,000 was established 
in 1978 by President Marvin B. Perry, 
Jr., in memory of his mother and father. 

Walter Brownlow Posey Book Fund of 
$2,389 was established in 1970 by the 
Board of Trustees in honor of this 
professor and chairman of the history 
and political science department for his 
twenty-seven years of service. The 
income is used to purchase books in the 
field of American frontier religion. 

Janef Newman Preston Memorial Fund 
of $1,045 was established in 1973 by 
family and friends in memory of this 
member of the Class of 1921 who was a 
member of Agnes Scott's English de- 
partment for forty-six years. The income 
is used for the acquisition of books in 
English literature of the nineteenth 
century. 

Gertrude K. Sevin Book Fund of 
$2,832 was established in 1979 through a 
bequest from Agnes Scott's first profes- 
sor of biology when it became a separate 
department in 1911. She served in this 
capacity for four years. 

Florence E. Smith Book Fund of $2,655 
was established in 1965 by the Board of 
Trustees to honor this member of the 
history department for her thirty-six 
years of service. The income is used to 
purchase books in history. 

Alma Willis Sydenstricker Book Fund 
of $1,300 was established in 1960 by her 
friends as a memorial to this professor of 
Bible who served from 1918 to 1943. The 
income is used to acquire books in 
Biblical studies. 

Time, Incorporated Book Fund of 
$10,000 was established in 1966 with a 
grant from Time, Incorporated as a part 
of its effort to recognize and strengthen 
selected colleges. 

Catherine Torrance Book Fund of 
$1,215 was established in 1962 by her 
family as a memorial to this teacher who 
had come to Agnes Scott in 1909 as 
co-principal of the Academy and who 
from 1913 until her retirement in 1943 
served as professor of Greek and Latin. 
The income is used for books in classical 
art, archaeological literature, and 
philosophy. 

Edgar D. West Book Fund of $3,762 
was established in 1966 in his memory by 
his brother, H. Carson West, of Spartan- 
burg, South Carolina. 



Fall 1979 



41 



Student Loan Funds 



Fund of SI, 000 was 
1945 through gifts of 



Alumnae Loan 

established in 
alumnae. 

Bing Crosby Loan Fund of $5,500 was 
established in 1966 by the Bing Crosby 
Youth Fund to provide financial assis- 
tance to deserving students who have 
completed their freshman year satisfac- 
torily. 

General Student Loan Fund of 
$171,306 has been established with gifts 
from alumnae and friends and grants 
from the Board of Trustees. 

Lucy Havden Harrison Loan Fund of 
$1,000 was established in 1919 by her 
parents. Mr. and Mrs. George W. Harri- 
son, and her brother, George W. Harri- 
son, Jr.. of Atlanta as a memorial to her 
by giving funds to the College which had 
been in her saving account. 

Pearl C. Jenkins Loan Fund of $1 1.000 
was established in 1925 by Mrs. Jenkins 
of Crystal Springs, Mississippi, whose 
daughter, Annie Tait Jenkins, was a 1914 
graduate and who herself has added 
substantially to the fund. 

Nell Jones Memorial Loan Fund of 
$4,605 was established in 1973 through a 
bequest from her mother. Eleanor 
Branch (Mrs. Roy G.) Jones, of Decatur. 

David N. Landers Student Loan Fund 
of $4,775 was established in 1979 from a 
trust through the generosity of this 
former Atlanta business leader 

Mary Louise Latimer Loan Fund of 



$29,940 was established in 1962 with a 
bequest from her mother. Chloe Fowler 
(Mrs. William A.) Latimer, of Decatur, 
as a memorial to this member of the 
Class of 1935. 

Hugh L. and Jessie Moore McKee Loan 
Fund of $5,500 was established in 1940 
by Mrs. McKee, and Atlanta friend of 
the College. 

Virginia Peeler Loan Fund of $1,000 



was established in 1926, by Mary Vir- 
ginia McCormick of Huntsville, Ala- 
bama, in honor of this 1926 graduate. 

Fugenia Williams Schmidt Loan Fund 
of $4,000 was established in 1975 by her 
husband, C. Oscar Schmidt, Jr., of 
Cincinnati, Ohio, in memory of this 
member of the Class of 1940. 

Ruth Slack Smith Loan Fund of $5,000 
was established in 1953 with a bequest 
from this 1912 graduate. Mrs. Smith had 
served as a university educator and 
administrator before becoming execu- 
tive secretary of the Student Aid Foun- 
dation during her "retirement.'" 



Annuity Funds 



Grin C. and Florence Schuler Cathey 
Fund of $1,000 was established in 1962 
by this alumna of the Institute and her 
husband of Keatchie, Louisiana. 

Martha Curry Cleckley Fund of 
$10,288 was established in 1975 by 
Virginia Prettyman '34 in appreciation 
for the devotion Mrs. Cleckley had for 
Dr. Prettyman's mother. 

Annie Tait Jenkins Fund of $21,000 
was established in 1976 by this member 
of the Class of 1914 from Crystal 
Springs, Mississippi. This will become 
an addition to the Jenkins Loan Fund. 

Lois Compton Jennings Fund of $5,560 
was established in 1973 by this member 
of the Class of 1921 from Ponca City, 
Oklahoma. 

Shields-Pfeiffer Fund of $5,000 was 
established in 1976 by Sara Shields (Mrs. 
John) Pfeiffer '27 of Atlanta. This will 



establish a scholarship in her name. 

Mary Shive Fund of $1,150 was estab- 
lished in 1979 by this alumna of the Class 
of 1927 from Norfolk, Virginia. 

Frances Gilliland Stukes Fund of 
$10,000 was established in 1976 by this 
member of the Class of 1924 from 
Decatur. This will become an addition to 
the Frances Gilliland Stukes and Mar- 
jorie Stukes Strickland Scholarship 
Fund. 

Olivia Ward Swann Fund of $5,000 
was established in 1978 by this alumna of 
the Class of 1926 from Birmingham, 
Alabama. 

William C. Warren Fund of $77,375 
was established in 1975 by Dr. William 
C. Warren, Jr., of Atlanta. This will 
become an addition to the Annie Dodd 
Warren Scholarship Fund which he 
established in honor of his mother. 




42 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Book Reviews 




Burnsite by Shirley Graves Cochrane 
'46. The Washington Writers' Publishing 
House, Washington, D.C. $3.00. 
Reprinted with permission from 
Washington Review, August-September 
1979. 

Shirley Cochrane's collection of 
poetry, Burnsite, is a strong one, offer- 
ing thirty-three poems whose thematic 
undercurrents are those of loss and 
renewal. It is satisfying to read poems 
which have been seriously assembled 
with a plan in mind, poems which clearly 
assert a reason for their being bound 
together. These poems are subtle and 
tough, mature and generous. 

The title poem, "Burnsite," placed at 
the beginning of the book serves with the 
last poem, "After the Fire," as a frame, 
the former posing a question and the 
latter approaching an answer. What falls 
in between is almost always an array of 
heartening and impressive work. 

There is a suggestiveness in Coch- 
rane's work which, curiously enough, 
leaves no room for doubt. She is able to 
write around a subject, without naming it 
exactly, leaving the reader to draw from 
a poem its certain knowledge. 

Shirley Cochrane's poetry is intimate. 
One senses a person, perhaps a member 
of her family, behind her poems, 
prompting their inspiration. But the 
integrity of her images allows these 
poems to include us all. 

The poems in Burnsite are, in the best 
sense, like relatives, individual in their 
form and content, while belonging to the 
same family tree. "After the Fire" 
makes a highly satisfactory closing 
poem, calling forth echoes from the first 
poem in the collection, in which the 
process of life persists, as does this 
smart and honest poet. Gardner McFall. 




Halfway Home by Julia Coley Duncan 
'62. St. Martin's Press, New York, New 
York. $10.95. 

Reprinted with permission from the An- 
niston Star. June 10, 1979. 

If you were raised in a small Southern 
town a few years ago, and perhaps the 
custom survives, you'll remember the 
call of a young friend: "Walk me 
halfway home!" 

Julia Coley Duncan remembers. She 
remembers in exquisite, sometimes bit- 
tersweet joy that point in childhood 
when the edge of young wonder meets 
the first hard, resisting, and instructing 
stones of maturity. Her twelve-year-old 
Annie Trammell, growing up (to her own 
wonder and amazement and to the 
frequent astonishment of her family) in 
small, railroad-through-the-middle-of- 
town Winton in the fifties, fights the 
walls of the grown-ups' world pressing 
inward upon her. 

But the world is not about to let any of 
us alone very long, and it doesn't ignore 
Annie. The fifties are a time of change, 
and change often means pain. In small 
towns like Winton, the change in the 
fifties meant the pain of challenge and 
loss as old ways had to accommodate the 
new. It also meant the pain of ugliness 
sometimes which, in turn, often revealed 
nobility. 

In the explosive crisis that crackles 
across Winton, Annie bears a deep, 
crucial witness, not only to the event 
that shocks her town and stirs her father, 
but also to her first close experience with 
the personal loss of death, the pain of a 
beloved small world breaking up and the 
burdens of maturity. 

If Halfway Home sounds a little like 
To Kill a Mockingbird II, that is both 
fortunate and unfortunate, fortunate in 
that Julia Coley Duncan shares qualities 
of things long remembered with Harper 
Lee, unfortunate in that Halfway Home 
is its own book, and it owes no debts to 
other works. Cody Hall 




Unravelling Yarn by Jeanne Osborne 

Gibbs '42. H. Dan Abrams, Atlanta, Ga. 

$8.95. 

Reprinted with permission from Georgia 

Life, Autumn 1979. 

In her second book of poems. Unravel- 
ling Yarn, Jeanne Osborne Gibbs, well- 
known Georgia poet, has set words free 
in extraordinary ways. Her writings 
reveal a sensitive and provocative search 
for the meaning of life and the entangled 
skein of circumstance. The author pre- 
sents a true lyric adventure in a medita- 
tive world. 

Her poems take their form straight 
from life but escalate their impact 
through alternating symbol and reality. 
The energy of her expression seems to 
flow from an appreciation of the original 
Source. Her poetry has that consistent 
life and strong sense of abundance 
shown in these lines: 

Where once I saw all men by 
my reflection, 

I see a hand that points a 
new direction. 

In poverty there is a certain form of 
wealth which is reflected in her poem, 
"Poor Man's Paradise": . 

Why is it flowers never bloom so 
well 

As on some low unpainted 
hollow shell 
Of house where poor men dwell? 

The publisher has made a distin- 
guished book with format and illustra- 
tions worthy of the poetry. Unravelling 
Yarn is dramatically illustrated by Vee 
Brown, professor of art at Young Harris 
College. He seems equally skilled in 
abstract, imaginative, and realistic draw- 
ings. 

Jeanne Osborne Gibbs has a strong 
commitment to craftsmanship, and she is 
attuned to the purity of sound and its 
significance. Her contribution to litera- 
ture helps to restore man's belief in his 
own image and self. Jannelle Jones 
McRee 



Fall 1979 



43 



Evelyn Hanna, Author of 



B\ Jane Guth 



Back behind the fountain on Ros- 
well Square, surrounded b\ old magno- 
lias and oaks, overlooking two verandas, 
white-columned and windowed from 
floor to ceiling, in a green armchair- 
desk, sits a brilliant mind, housed in the 
body of Evelyn Hanna. Now seventy- 
eight, the author of Blackberry Winter, 
Sugar in the Gourd, and The History of 
Upson County, continues to read vora- 
ciously and to comment on everything 
with a breathtaking wit and insight that 
both startles and delights. 

What does she think of the novels of 
today? "Oh. this is the age of biog- 
raphy." she replies, and spreads her 
hands over several books on the ottoman 
before her. "Some of the best biog- 
raphies ever are being written now — 
really good ones, well-researched. Take, 
for example, this book on the life of 
Charlotte Bronte. Then there have been 
others in recent years on Thomas Wolfe, 
Edith Wharton, but of course the really 
superb biography, the best ever written 
is Boswell's Life of Johnson." 

One of the daily tasks of Chestene, the 
indispensible caretaker of "Miss Eve- 
lyn," is to return armfuls of books to 
Roswell's Public Library, which Evelyn 
helped found and to bring back another 
armful for the next few days' reading. 
"The mind just keeps on working," 
Evelyn explains, "although the body is 
degenerating." 

To understand the mind of Evelyn 
Hanna is to go back to the days when she 
was young — a fiery-eyed young lady, 
quite surprisingly the author of a novel 
which was being considered for a 
Pulitzer Prize Award, standing in the 
office of her English publisher in Lon- 
don, demanding to know why the word, 
"Rebs" in her novel had been changed 
to "Reds," and "muscadine wine" to 
"nettle beer"! Surveying her. in her 
tartan-plaid suit and her red felt breton. 
Robert Sommerville. who was to be- 
come her husband, must have been 
amused and impressed that an American 
author would cherish her southern tradi- 
tions to the extent of crossing the 
Atlantic to defend them. Of course, the 
words "Rebs" and "muscadine wine" 




Evelyn Hanna Sommerville '23 

were reinstated in the next English 
edition of Blackberry Winter which was 
issued to an eager public under the 
modest library advertisement of "Much 
better than Gone with the Wind." 

And to understand how Evelyn Hanna 
became a writer is to go back to her 
childhood when she wrote her first essay 
one Sunday afternoon on "The Cruelty 
of Parents," after being told by her 
mother that she must take off her best 
Sunday dress on coming home from 
church and Sunday School. The essay 
proved to be a very satisfying experi- 
ence, as well as theraputic. Then, not 
long after leaving college. Evelyn was 
commissioned by the Upson County 
Historical Society to write its story. 
Accompanied by her mother, she went 
into courthouses and family archives to 
uncover pages of fascinating facts equal 
to any early American pioneer drama. 
The seeds for her forthcoming novel 
were found here. 

Like any red-blooded American au- 
thor. Evelyn wound up in New York 
City, with a manuscript under her arm 
and stars in her eyes. Here she and a 
girlhood friend took an apartment and 
soon made contact with Columbia Uni- 



versity, where two professors suggested 
important changes in the sequence of her 
novel. After much work, "hard, labori- 
ous work," as Evelyn reminds young 
writers. Blackberry Winter was pub- 
lished and she became the newest 
discovery of the literary world. Her 
scrapbooks of newspaper articles show 
the acclaim she received and the audi- 
ences she lectured to, from New York to 
California. Among her literary acquain- 
tences and advisors were Jonathon 
Daniels, Conrad Aiken (whose house she 
lived in in England) Edna Ferber. Robert 
Nathan. Colonel and Mrs. Clifford 
Early, and many others. 

After a long and arduous pursuit, 
Robert Sommerville finally won the 
hand of his American novelist. They 
settled down in a flat in London — she to 
write for several years her famous 
column for the Atlanta Constitution and 
he to continue to manage the business 
which he had inherited from his father, 
Robert L. Sommerville, Esquire. Robert 
also continued to hold the position of 
sub-editor of the London News Chroni- 
cle. Eventually, the couple came to 
America and to the South, where Evelyn 
really belongs. For the next decade, their 
antebellum house built in 1840 absorbed 
their creative abilities. As director of 
Atlanta's transit system and lecturer at 
Emory University, the University of 
Alabama, and the University of Wiscon- 
sin. Robert Sommerville gave to the 
business world and to the intellectual 
world distinct contributions. He and 
Evelyn were "at home" on "Holly 
Hill," their restored raised cottage in 
Roswell, and at their beautifully fur- 
nished apartment in Atlanta. In 1968 
Robert had a series of heart attacks 
which finally claimed his life. Evelyn 
was left a widow. 

Wandering through the house which 
she and her English squire restored, 
Evelyn points out many reminders of the 
past. A bronze vase she found in Italy, 
the wrought iron fencing she and Robert 
brought over from an old English man- 
sard roof in London, the Italian marble 
fireplaces that were shipped to Savan- 
nah, then carried by oxcart to "Holly 



44 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Mackberry Winter Visited 



)des '38 



Hill" when the house was being built. If 
you are lucky and the weather is right, 
you may have tea and shrimp bisque 
served by Chestene on the back veranda 
which runs the full length of the house. 
Looking down on the landscaped 
grounds below you can see the small 
greenhouse where Robert grew his favo- 
rite orchids. 

Finally, you will most certainly walk 
up the twenty-three steps to fiddler's 
gallery where the Hanna library is 
housed. Here where orchestras once 
played for balls in the spacious hall 
below, row after row of books, first 
editions, bearing famous autographs, 
appear. Recently, Evelyn has divided 
most of her books between Emory and 
Agnes Scott, to be awarded after her 



death. For she says, "These are my 
children. I have never had any others." 
In the coveted collection are a first 
edition of A Connecticut Yankee in King 
Arthur's Court, a first American edition 
of Lord Byron's poems, and a first 
edition of John Brown's Body. Auto- 
graphed editions include Boswell's Jour- 
nal of a Tour to the Hebrides with 
Samuel Johnson and a novel by Somer- 
set Maugham. A rare volume, a first 
editon of Blackberry Winter bound in 
maroon morocco leather, will go to her 
nephew in New York. And a few 
volumes of special interest will go to her 
niece in Atlanta, who is already "on the 
downward path" of becoming a book- 
worm, as Evelyn puts it. 
Of her brief stay at Agnes Scott, 



Evelyn says, "Agnes Scott is tough. You 
have to be tough to graduate from there. 
I couldn't take the math and science. I 
wanted only to read and write. By the 
time I entered high school I had already 
read all of the classics in my father's 
library — Thackeray, Dickens, Shake- 
speare, Sir Walter Scott, Edward Bulwer 
Lytton, and others. 

Perhaps the spirit of Evelyn Hanna is 
in part of every character she has 
created in her novels. Whatever it is, she 
possesses determination. Although a 
semi-invalid, she walked up the twenty- 
three steps to her fiddler's gallery each 
day in preparation for her appearance as 
one of our beloved and revered alumnae 
authors at Agnes Scott College's 1979 
Alumnae Day. She is indomitable. 









- ***** \ y\M 




gefAgs .--— r ^ 



wm> -;^^ r ^mm^----' « \ 



Holly Hill, drawn by Ernest E. DeVane for The Roswell Historical Society 



Fall 1979 



45 



Freshmen Score High on Academic/ Leadership Ability 



By Judy Maguire Tindel '73 
Director of Admissions 



On September 5, nearly 150 new 
freshmen arrived at Agnes Scott. The 
day was the culmination of what had 
been for many of the students a long, 
intensive search for the right college. 

The members of the class of 1983 were 
carefully selected by Agnes Scott's 
Admissions Committee from a slightly 
larger freshman applicant pool than in 
recent years. The Admissions Commit- 
tee had spent many hours in 1978 and 
1979 reviewing hundreds of files before 
offering admission to the young women 
who gave evidence of the ability to 
succeed in Agnes Scott's demanding 
programs. The class of 1983 chose Agnes 
Scott over many other colleges by which 
they were also accepted; these colleges 
include Emory, Vanderbilt, UNC- 
Chapel Hill, Duke, Randolph-Macon 
Woman's College, Rice, Georgia Tech, 
University of Georgia, William and 
Mary, and Furman. The students' pri- 
mary reason for enrolling at Agnes Scott 
was the College's reputation for 
academic excellence. 

The academic profile of the class is 
outstanding. Nearly 33% of the fresh- 
men ranked by their schools placed 
within the top 59? of their high school 
classes, 51% ranked within the top 10%, 
seventy-eight within the top 25%, and 
virtually all within the top 50%. Seventy- 
three percent of the class graduated from 
public schools and 27% from private. 
There are four Agnes Scott College 
National Merit Scholars in the class. 

SAT averages for the Agnes Scott 
class contrasted to national trends to- 
wards declining scores and increased 
over 1978 averages by several points. 
1979 SAT score averages for women are 
as follow: 

Southern Agnes 

National Regional Georgia Scott 

Verbal 423 405 385 538 

Math 44'- 423_ 405. _5_2? 

Composite X66 828 790 1067 

The 1979 ACT profile is much the 
same with the Agnes Scott average of 25 
substantially higher than the national 
average for women of 17.9 and the 
southern regional average of 16.5. 

The geographical distribution of the 
class includes twenty-one states, Puerto 
Rico, Austria, Australia. Colombia, Fin- 
land, and Germany. The Southeast con- 
tinues to be the most heavily represented 




region and Georgia the largest state. 
Forty-four percent of the class are 
residents of Georgia. 

Extracurricular activities of the class 
reflect heavy academic honors with 85% 
of the class having received awards. 
There is great interest in civic and 
community involvement with 57% of the 
class noting such commitments while in 
high school. Nearly 50% of the class 
listed active involvement in athletics 
including among others soccer, gymnas- 
tics, track, cross country, and even 
weight lifting! Over a third of the class 
held positions of leadership in school or 
extracurricular activities. A third of the 
class listed interest and involvement in 
activities related to the fine arts. 

There are eighteen daughters of alum- 
nae and twelve sisters of alumnae in the 
class. The educational level of parents of 
the freshmen is varied: 26% of the 
fathers and 45% of the mothers have no 
or some college, 33% of the fathers and 
41% of the mothers hold bachelor's 
degrees, 11% of the fathers and 11% of 
the mothers hold master's degrees, 21% 
of the fathers and 1% of the mothers 
have advanced professional degrees, and 
9% of the fathers and 2% of the mothers 
hold Ph.D.s. Parental occupations vary 
greatly, although a high percentage of 
fathers are employed in the medical, 
legal, and engineering professions and in 
business. In addition, there are, among 
others, ministers, college professors, 
members of the armed services, a 
mayor, a diplomat, a forklift driver, an 
aircraft mechanic, a sheet metal worker. 



and an FBI agent. Mothers' occupations 
include many elementary and secondary 
school teachers, three college profes- 
sors, a physician, an accountant, a police 
department radio dispatcher, a marriage 
and family counselor, and an interior 
designer. 

Financial aid continues to be essential 
to students entering Agnes Scott and 
Agnes Scott continues its commitment to 
meet their financial need. Nearly 45% of 
the 1979 freshmen receive institutional 
need-based aid. The college tuition, fees, 
room, and board total $5,050 in 1979. Of 
those freshmen receiving financial aid. 
the following chart provides a picture of 
income ranges and average awards. 









Average award 






% of aid re- 


(including ASC 






c i p i e n t s 


grants, loans. 


Total 




within each 


employment. 


Family 




i n c o m e 


and State and 


Income 




range 


Federal grants) 


S 0- 


9,999 


15% 


$4,620 


$10,000 - 


14,999 


18% 


$4,381 


$15,000 - 


19,999 


18% 


$3,849 


$20,000 ■ 


24.999 


26% 


$2,694 


$25,000 - 


29.999 


12% 


$2,134 


$30,000 - 


34,999 


9% 


$1,963 


$35,000 ■ 


39,999 


1% 


$ 400 


$40,000 - 




1% 


$3,604 



A quick review of the freshman class 
academically, geographically, socio- 
economically. and socially reveals a 
strong, able, and diverse group of 
well-rounded young women. We are 
proud to call them Agnes Scott students. 



46 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Franklin Scholarship Fund Established 



By Andrea Helms 



Swainsboro, Georgia, native Marian 
Franklin Anderson '40 of Atlanta has 
established, in memory of her parents, 
the Rufus C. and Wynie Coleman 
Franklin Memorial Scholarship Fund for 
Emanuel County (Georgia) high school 
girls who attend Agnes Scott. 

Marian's father. Dr. Rufus C. Frank- 
lin, was a physician in Emanuel County 
for over twenty-five years, and her 
mother, Wynie Coleman, was a native of 
the county. 

The chief purpose of the Franklin 
Memorial Scholarship Fund, in Marian's 
words, is "to encourage the attendance 
at Agnes Scott of superior students from 
Emanuel County who wish to receive an 
education of high quality such as the one 
which was offered me by the College." 

Marian has given over $50,000 for the 
scholarship fund. This gift is large 
enough to provide a student from 
Emanuel County with at least $2,500 a 
year while she is attending Agnes Scott. 

Should a scholarship student have 
financial need above the amount of the 
Franklin Memorial Scholarship, such 
need will be met fully through Agnes 
Scott's regular financial aid funds. How- 
ever, financial need is not a primary 
qualification for being awarded the 
scholarship. 

Recipients of the Franklin Scholarship 
will be selected by the College on the 
basis of character and superior academic 
achievement and promise. The scholar- 
ship is renewable so long as the reci- 
pient's performance lives up to the 
promise indicated by her entering 
record. 




Marian Franklin Anderson '40 



Alumnae Clipping Service Requested 



The Agnes Scott news office and the 
alumnae office are establishing an Alum- 
nae Clipping Service. We're asking 
alumnae everywhere to send us clippings 
about Agnes Scott College, her students, 
her faculty and administration, and her 
alumnae. 

The news service sends out hundreds 
of stories each year and needs to 
evaluate their usage throughout the 
country. The alumnae office wants clip- 



pings about alumnae to augment its 
records. The office of alumnae affairs 
keeps individual folders to preserve 
information and correspondence pertain- 
ing to each alumna. 

The College is interested in any item 
that mentions Agnes Scott, her history, 
her present scene, her students, her 
alumnae; stories about Honors Day, 
Who's Who, Founder's Day, alumnae 
club meetings; births, marriages, deaths; 



news stories, feature stories, pictures 
with cutlines. 

If you send us a clipping at the 
Alumnae Office, Agnes Scott College, 
Decatur, Georgia 30030, we'll send you a 
postpaid return envelope to use the next 
time you find an Agnes Scott item in one 
of your local publications. We'd ap- 
preciate your help by being the Alumnae 
Clipping Service. 



Fall 1979 



47 



New Assistant joins Staff 



fiy Jet Harper '77 




Denise McFall, left, and students confer. 



Denise Hunter McFall has joined the 
Agnes Scott staff in a dual role as 
assistant to both the director of admis- 
sions and the dean of students. A 
graduate of North Carolina Central 
University with a B.A. in English and 
education and a native of Westchester 
County, New York, Denise comes to 
Agnes Scott after two years at Emory 
University. 

From the Admissions Office Denise 
works with Student Admissions Rep- 
resentatives and also travels for recruit- 
ment, focusing on national metropolitan 
areas, particularly in the Southeast. In 
addition. Denise serves as liaison be- 
tween the Admissions Office and the 
Public Relations Office. Her work in the 
Office of the Dean of Students consists 
of advising various student organiza- 
tions, such as Students for Black Aware- 
ness, and she will also assume counsel- 
ing activities. 



While at Emory's Nell Hodgson 
Woodruff School of Nursing, Denise 
was project director for a federally- 
funded project aimed at the recruitment, 
admission, and retention of minority 
students into the university's various 
academic programs. Denise was respon- 
sible for the development and implemen- 
tation of this program, as well as the 
creation of appropriate academic and 
non-academic support systems, such as 
tutorial sessions and counseling. She 
belonged to several committees, includ- 
ing the university's Affirmative Action 
Subcommittee on the Handicapped, 
Committee on the Status of Women, 
Black Caucas, Employee Training Task 
Force, and the nursing school's Affirma- 
tive Action Committee. She was the 
chairperson of the school's Minority 
Recruitment and Retention Advisory 
Committee. 

Prior to moving to Atlanta, Denise and 



husband Bernard lived in Charleston. 
South Carolina, where she was assistant 
advertising director and media specialist 
for the Sam Solomon Company, and 
earlier, copy chief and production coor- 
dinator for a radio station there. Her 
work in New York, where Denise lived 
before moving to Charleston, includes 
media and broadcast work as well as 
teaching in an elementary school. 

Denise is pleased and excited to be 
part of the Agnes Scott community. She 
sees the College's flexibility in fitting the 
job to the person as one of the strengths 
of a small college. Denise says she is 
working in "three areas of great interest 
to me — interacting with students, re- 
cruiting and admissions, and also utiliz- 
ing my public relations background." 
With her talents and experience. Denise 
is a welcome asset to the College 
community. 



48 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Association Plans Tours 



Great Britain Trip 

The Agnes Scott Alumnae Associa- 
tion is planning two trips in 1980, one to 
Great Britain and one to Italy. Both 
tours offer two options. 

In August of 1980, alumnae will leave 
Atlanta for London. The nine-day Op- 
tion I will provide accommodations in 
small inns or hotels in Stratford, Conti- 
nental breakfast and dinner, free use of a 
rental car with unlimited mileage allow- 
ance and deductible collision insurance 
throughout the stay (exclusive of 
gasoline), transfer from London airport 
to Stratford and return, and a fully 
staffed hospitality desk. This option 
costs $989 per person. 

Option II of the Great Britain tour is a 
nine-day bus tour through England and 
Scotland with stays in London, Strat- 
ford, Harrogate, Edinburgh, and Carlisle 
and includes Continental breakfast and 
lunch or dinner every day and a tour 
escort. Cost is $1,099 per person. 





Italian Trip 



The Italian trip is scheduled for 
October of 1980, leaving from Atlanta 
and arriving in Rome, with a duration of 
eight days and seven nights. Option I 
will concentrate on Rome and the 
Vatican City with optional tours that 
can be arranged to Florence; 
Naples/Capri/Sorrento; Pompeii; and 
Venice. The cost for Option I is $689 per 
person. 

A bus tour, Option II visits Rome, 
Venice, and Florence and costs $829 per 
person. Both options of the Italian tour 
provide accommodations in first class 
hotels (double occupancy), Continental 
breakfasts every day, private bus trans- 
fers from airport to hotels and return. 
Option I will provide a hospitality desk, 
and Option II includes a full-time tour 
director. 

Watch for further notices. 



49 



In Memoriam 



Arthur F. Raper, B.A.. M.A., Ph.D., 
former acting professor of sociology at 
Agnes Scott from 1933 until 1939, died 
August 10, 1979. He was a resident of 
Oakton, Va. 

In the late 1920s and for most of the 
1930s Mr. Raper was research secretary 
for the Atlanta headquarters of the 
Commission on Interracial Cooperation. 
He subsequently served as a U.S. 
adviser on rural, urban, and industrial 
development to foreign countries. He 
was the author of Tragedy of Lynching, 
Preface to Peasantry, Sharecroppers All, 



Tenants of the Almighty, and Rural 
Taiwan — Problem and Promise. 

Mary Currie, B.A., M.C.E., a former 
director of Christian education who 
came to Agnes Scott in 1965 to serve on 
the dean of students' staff as senior 
resident, died August 15. 1979, at the 
home of her sister in Hamlet, N.C. 
Before she left the campus in 1976, she 
had served as assistant dean of students 
and later, as special development 
officer. 

Eleanor Brown McCain, wife of Paul 
Moffatt McCain, died July 5, 1979. 



Though she was not an alumna nor a 
member of the faculty or administrative 
staff, she was an integral part of the 
College community. She first became 
associated with the College as daughter- 
in-law of former President James Ross 
McCain; then.in 1969 when her husband, 
Paul, became Agnes Scott's vice presi- 
dent for development, they moved to 
South Candler Street, adjacent to the 
campus, where she lived the remainder 
of her life. She was a friend to all who 
knew her. 



Sentimental Pilgrimage 



By W. Edward McNair 



This past summer it was my good 
fortune to journey for the fourth time to 
Stratford, Ontario, to attend the marvel- 
ous dramatic performances that are 
annually presented there. This time 1 
planned my trip to include a stop in 
Alexandria, Huntingdon County, Penn- 
sylvania, so that I could visit the grave of 
Agnes Irvin Scott for whom Agnes Scott 
College is named. Some might call this a 
sentimental pilgrimage. Perhaps it was. 

At any rate, in the early afternoon of 
August 10 I reached Alexandria, a small 
town in the Juniata River valley. Alexan- 
dria (population 495) is off the main 
road, and one will not ordinarily pass 
through it unless he takes special pains 
to do so. It is located in the mountainous 
country of central Pennsylvania about 
two hundred miles west of Philadelphia. 
When one observes the rugged terrain, 
he cannot help marveling at the determi- 
nation and strength of those who. like 
Agnes Irvin and her mother, pursued 
their way into such territory before the 
days of canals, railroads, and highways. 

Agnes Irvin came to Alexandria from 
Ireland in the spring of 1816. She was 
then almost seventeen years old. Five 
years later she married John Scott. In 
1829 her fourth child, George, was born, 
and it was he who founded Agnes Scott 
College and named it for his mother. 

The old Presbyterian burying ground, 
now the town cemetery in Alexandria, is 
on a gentle rise overlooking the com- 
munity. I had no knowledge of which 
grave was Agnes Scott's; thus, there was 
no way of finding it but to canvass all the 
graves in the old part of the plot. 
Fortunately, because the grave is clearly 




Edward McNair visits Agnes Scott's grave. 



marked, I was able to find it in a matter 
of minutes and pay my respects to this 
woman whose name I have used 
thousands of times. 

On the gravestone there is simply her 
name and the appropriate dates, etc.. but 
nothing about how she has been immor- 



talized through one of America's most 
distinguished colleges for women. 
Perhaps the correction of this omission 
might become a College project. Any- 
way, I'm glad I went to Alexandria — 
possibly the first Agnes Scott College 
person ever to visit Agnes Scott's grave! 



50 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



With the Clubs 



Barrow-Gwi nett- 
Newton 

BGN Alums turned out in the largest 
numbers yet to hear Dr. Edward 
McNair's popular talk on "Anecdotes of 
Agnes Scott" at their September 14 
meeting in Lawrenceville, Ga. Club 
President Julia Kennedy '60 reported 
that a letter from Lois Turner Swords 
'77, assistant to the director of admis- 
sions, was read, informing the group that 
seven high school students from the 
BGN area were entered at Agnes Scott. 
The club was thanked for its successful 
recruitment efforts. Plans for the future 
include a business meeting in November 
and guest speakers for February and 
May. 




Charleston 



A Summer fete honoring current stu- 
dents and prospective students of the 
Charleston, S. C, area took place 
August 21 at the home of Ruth Hyatt 
Heffron '70 in Mount Pleasant. Club 
President Allyn Smoak Bruce '68 re- 
ported "a very successful evening," 
which gave alums, students, and pros- 
pective students an opportunity to get 
acquainted. 



Columbia 

South Carolina alums in the Columbia 
area invited returning and prospective 
Agnes Scotters to a Coke party given at 
Quail Run Apartments August 11. Club 
Secretary Janet E. Short '73 wrote that 
the group is very much interested in 
helping the College recruit new students 
and has hostessed a number of parties in 
the past also for this purpose. 



Dallas-Fort Worth 

Freshman Anne Drue Miller and her 
parents, John and Jane Miller, were 
honored by alums and husbands at a 
dessert party August 22 at the home of 
Susan Aspinall Block '64. Reporting on 
the event, Susan wrote, "Have you ever 
seen a stack of Silhouettes spanning 
almost 40 years of Agnes Scott? During 
dessert and coffee Anne Drue viewed all 




Director of Admissions Judy Maguire Tindel '73 speaks at Charleston meeting. 



Fall 1979 



51 



With the Clubs 



the annuals brought by alumnae, ranging 
from Winnie Kellersberger Vass '38 to 
Martha Parks Little '68. Joan Lawrence 
Rogers '49, Lucy Hamilton Lewis '68, 
and Marsha Knight-Orr '73 told the 
Millers of their own freshman experi- 
ences. Club President Mary Monroe 
McLoughlin '45 expressed each alum- 
na's vicarious pleasure at seeing Anne 
Drue's excitement as she enters her first 
year at Agnes Scott." 

Decatur 

Alumnae from the Decatur area wel- 
comed Dr. and Mrs. Marvin B. Perry, 
Jr., at the club's annual fall luncheon 
September 27 at Druid Hills Golf Club. 
A very large group of about seventy 
listened as campus events and develop- 



ments were described by the president in 
his talk. Mrs. Perry gave the blessing. 
Assistant Director of Career Planning 
Libby Dowd Wood, Dean of Students 
Marty Kirkland, and members of the 
Alumnae Office staff were among the 
group present. Club President Mary Ben 
Wright Erwin '25 presided. 

Evening 
(Metropolitan Atlanta) 

The Evening Club began its new year 
of programs September 24 with Dr. Bill 
Weber of the economics department 
speaking on the importance of 
economics at Agnes, Scott. With the 
Alumnae House's living room full and 
overflowing. President Susan Balch 
Clapham '75 led the meeting, and com- 



mittees were formed for the club's 
annual book discussion in January, an 
ice cream social for seniors, and a 
financial seminar for students. 



Muscle Shoals Area 

A Beautiful Afternoon tea drew 
together alumnae from the northwest 
part of Alabama at the home of Mary 
Hollingsworth Hatfield '39 in Florence 
September 27. Co-hostess was Jane 
Kelly Watson '62. Katherine Akin "76. 
assistant to Agnes Scott's director of 
admissions, in Alabama to interview 
prospective students for" the College, 
was honor guest and speaker. Illustrating 
her talk with a slide show, she presented 
"A Campus Update" for the alums and 
mothers of current students. 




Kentuckiana Club holds annual picnic in July. 



New Orleans 

Hurricane Bob blew away plans for 
the mid-summer meeting of the New 
Orleans Club, planned for July 11 at the 
New Orleans Hilton. The storm hit the 
very day an alumnae luncheon was to 
bring together Regional Vice President 
Peggy Hooker Hartwein '53, New Or- 
leans Club President Sarah Turner Ryan 
'36, Betty Brougher Campbell "43, Peggy 
Lamberson '78, Mary Elizabeth Barrett 
Alldredge '41. Mary Catherine Matthews 
Starr "37, Gail Nelson Blain "33, Noel 
Barnes Williams '51, Ruth VanDeman 
Walters '66, Mary Seagle Edelblut '42, 
and Evelyn Baty Landis '40. Alumnae 
Director Virginia Brown McKenzie '47 
was already in town attending a confer- 
ence and had planned a campus update 
for the group but cancelled the gathering 
as winds blew stronger. No bad alumnae 
damage or casualties except the lun- 
cheon. 



Kentuckiana 

For the third summer alums and 
families of the Kentucky-Indiana border 
area gathered for fun and picnicking July 
7. Anne Eyler Clodfelter '60 and hus- 
band Don hosted the event at their 
lakeside home in Brownstown, Ind. 
"Swimming, boating, water-skiing, and 
fishing made the day fly by," wrote Club 
President Edith Towers Davis '60. 
"Three members of the class of '60 — 
Anne, Edith and Mary Carrington Wil- 
son Fox plus Mary Cla-yton Bryan 



DuBard '59 enjoyed reminiscing about 
shared experiences at Agnes Scott. 
Elaine Orr Wise '65 told about the 
changes when she attended five years 
later. Toward dusk the group sat on the 
dam and watched dirt track racing 
below. Everybody left tired and happy 
and looking forward to next year's 
outing." The club has invited Dr. Mar- 
garet Pepperdene as luncheon speaker 
next March. 



Young Atlanta 

The Young Atlanta Club opened the 
year's programs with a very successful 
gathering September 11. Melissa Holt 
Vandiver '73. professional wardrobe 
consultant, gave an interesting and infor- 
mative program entitled "Expressing 
Your Personal Style: how to dress well 
on a budget and still knock 'em dead." 
The group of about thirty-five -met in 
Rich's auditorium at Lenox Square for 
Melissa's talk, demonstration, and prac- 
tical tips. 



52 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 




Linda Preston Watts '66; Debbie Jackson Williams '73; Sally Lloyd Grace Harris Durant '15. Gladys Gaines Field '17. Dr. Perry, and 
Proctor '72, President; and Carolyn Webb Thomas '75 are officers for Edith Roark Van Sickle '21 attended Mobile club dinner in March, 
the newly formed club of Mobile. 




Beth McFadden '75 date, and parents of prospective students mingle at dinner at Martha Lambeth Harris '61 and Vivian Weaver Maitland '53 
Country Club of Mobile. at Mobile club dinner 





Lu Cunningham Beville '46 planned candlelight dinner for Perrys, alumns, Ann Tiffin Hays Greer '52 and Ellen Perry chat with Gladys 
prospective students and their parents. Field. 



Fall 1979 



53 




Eva Ann Pirkle Winter '40 advises students. 

Construction Is Her Special Field 



Mathematics opened the door 
to a career in teaching building 
construction management for 
University of Nebraska-Lincoln 
associate professor Eva Ann Pirk- 
le Winter '40. Eva Ann is one of 
the few women educators in con- 
struction management nationally 
and the only one at UN-L. A 
mathematics and Latin major and 
Phi Beta Kappa graduate of 
Agnes Scott, Eva Ann received 
her master's in mathematics from 
Duke University in 1944. She 
leads a busy life as professor, 
advisor, author, wife, and mother 
and is the recipient of awards and 
honorary memberships. 

Eva Ann returned to work in 
1967, after a twenty-year ab- 
sence, as math instructor at UN- 
L. In 1974 the university trans- 
ferred and promoted her to the 
College of Engineering as an 
assistant professor in construc- 
tion management. The move 
came when Eva Ann indicated 
she possessed the skills necessary 
to teach two of the construction 
management courses in computa- 
tion and analysis. She had the 
mathematical skills and know- 
ledge of the application of compu- 
ters in the construction industry 
and of the contruction industry 
itself. In 1977 Eva Ann was 
promoted to associate professor 
of construction management and 
given tenure. 

She is faculty advisor to both 
the student chapters of the Socie- 
ty of Women Engineers and the 
Associated General Contractors 
of America. Eva Ann wrote For- 
tran for Construction, used by the 
construction management depart- 
ment as a textbook for a course 



required of all construction man- 
agement and architecture majors. 
Also, she designed and developed 
the Construction Management 
Achievement Survey, a follow-up 
of graduates asking for informa- 
tion on kinds of jobs they hold, 
geographical locations, salary 
levels, additional education, etc. 

The culmination of all this 
activity came in 1977 when Eva 
Ann received the undergraduate 
Teaching Award for the College 
of Engineering. These $1,000 
awards, established in 1977 by the 
Nebraska State Legislature, en- 
courage excellence in under- 
graduate teaching. The College of 
Engineering was authorized to 
present one award that year, and 
Eva Ann was the college's first 
recipient. Another indication of 
Eva Ann's skill and ability came 
when she was granted member- 
ship in the Society of Women 
Engineers, although she is not an 
engineer. 

In addition to her regular 
teaching activities, Eva Ann ac- 
tively participated in the instiga- 
tion of a new and very successful 
workshop on careers in science 
for women. The 1977 workshop 
was financed and encouraged by 
UN-L's Colleges of Arts and 
Sciences, Engineering, and Ag- 
riculture. Eva Ann represented 
the College of Engineering on the 
planning committee. Based on the 
experience gained in this work- 
shop, two members of the UN-L 
Graduate Women in Science ap- 
plied for and received a National 
Science Foundation grant to con- 
duct a workshop on the same 
topic in 1978. A planning commit- 
tee was organzied to implement 



the grant, and again Eva Ann 
served as the representative of 
the College of Engineering. In the 
1978 workshop Eva Ann was 
responsible for securing the dis- 
cussion leaders. There were twen- 
ty-six of these women, all recog- 
nized as leaders in their own areas 
of expertise. The workshop was 
an outstanding success with over 
200 students attending. A discus- 
sion panel was videotaped by the 
University of Nebraska's educa- 
tional television station, and the 
program has been aired re- 
peatedly. 

Never idle, Eva Ann is present- 
ly working on a new course she'll 
begin teaching in the spring of 
1980 — a survey of data manage- 
ment systems as related to the 
construction industry. To get in- 
formation on the "state of the 
art" among Nebraska contractors 
who are members of Associated 
General Contractors, Eva Ann 
will conduct a survey to deter- 
mine what use Nebraska contrac- 
tors currently are making of com- 
puters and what uses they antici- 
pate or would be interested in in 
the future. 

Eva Ann's honorary member- 
ships include Sigma Lambda Chi, 
national scholastic honor society 
for construction; Tau Sigma 
Delta, national honor society for 
architecture and allied arts; and 
Sigma Xi, national science honor 
society of which she is an as- 
sociate member. She will be listed 
in the 1980 (Fifth) edition of 
World Who's Who of Women. 
published in Cambridge, England. 

Jet Harper 



60 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Deaths 



Faculty 

Arthur F. Raper, August 10, 1979. 



1940 

James McGinnis, son of Sam 
Olive Griffin McGinnis, May T. 
1979. 



1914 

Zollie McArthur Saxon, July 10, 

1979. 

1923 

Ethel Cockrell, July 22, 1979. 

Imogene Allen Booth, April 22, 

1979, sister of Clara May Allen 
Reinero. 

1929 

Mrs. Carroll E. Greenleaf, 

mother of Mildred Greenleaf 

Walker, May 24, 1979. 

Gilberta Knight Davis, March 13, 

1979. 

Jack McDonald, brother of 

Eugenia McDonald Brown, June 

24, 1979. 

1931 

Julia Wilson McMillan, June 8, 

1979. 

1932 

Henry Joyner, husband of Mar- 
tine Tuller Joyner, November 19, 
1978. 

1933 

Jack McDonald, husband of 
Lucile Heath McDonald, June 24, 
1979. 

1939 

Imogene Allen Booth, sister of 

Mary Allen Reding, April 22, 

1979. 

Terry Trux Lackland Cheeseman, 

mother of Alice Cheeseman, May 

3, 1979. 



1941 

Carolyn Strozier, May 25, 1979. 
Mary Julia Means Head, October 
30, 1978. 

1945 

Louis Isaacson, father of Ramona 
Isaacson Freedman, June 7, 1979. 

1946 

Louis Isaacson, father of Louise 
Isaacson Bernard, June 7, 1979. 

1948 

Zollie McArthur Saxon, mother 
of Ann Saxon Johnson, July 10, 
1979. 

1954 

Mrs. J. H. Kite, mother of 
Catherine Kite Hastings, May 29, 
1979. 

1959 

Rudolph Johnson, husband of 
Sara Anne Frazier Johnson, April 
14, 1979. 

1964 

Jill Keith-Lucas, mother of Sue 
Keith-Lucas Carson, April 16, 
1979. 

1965 

Elmo Harvey, father of Kay 
Harvey Beebe, April 19, 1979. 

1966 

Imogene Allen Booth, mother of 
Martha Booth Burleigh, April 22, 
1979. 



Fall 1979 



65 



66 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Mail Attached Card Now 

Alumnae Association Seeks Nominations 



Election of the following officers, with two-year terms, 
will be held at the Annual Meeting on Alumnae Day, April 
19, 1980: 

The President is the national head of the volunteer work of 
the Alumnae Association and is responsible for the work of 
the Executive Board. She works closely with the director of 
alumnae affairs on implementation of Association policy. 

The Vice President serves as leader and resource person for 
clubs, projects, and other activities of her region. (Vice 
president of Region III must be from Florida, Georgia, or 
Tennessee. Vice president of Region IV must be from 
Alabama, Mississippi, or any state west of the Mississippi 
River.) 

The Secretary takes minutes at all meetings of the Executive 
Committee, the Board, and the Alumnae Association. She is 
also responsible for writing letters on behalf of the Board at 
the president's request. 

The Awards Chairman appoints a committee to select 
Outstanding Alumnae to be honored at the Annual Meeting. 



The Class Council Chairman heads all class officers in their 
work for the Association and Agnes Scott. She corresponds 
with class presidents, vice presidents, and secretaries and 
coordinates their efforts relating to news gathering, re- 
unions. Alumnae Weekend, and Alumnae Council. 

The Club Chairman, in cooperation with the regional vice 
presidents and the alumnae office, encourages the establish- 
ment of new clubs and assists in facilitating the operations of 
all clubs. 

The Entertainment Chairman assists in planning social 
events connected with Alumnae Weekend, Alumnae Coun- 
cil, and any other Alumnae Association activity as needed. 

The Projects Chairman researches possible fund-raising 
plans which may be requested by individual clubs or the 
Association. 

The Publications Chairman is available to assist the alumnae 
office staff in matters pertaining to the Alumnae Quarterly 
and other alumnae publications. 

Please list your nominees on the attached card accom- 
panying this page and return to the alumnae office. 



Christmas Citrus Purchases Benefit College 



Tree ripened oranges 
and grapefruit delivered 
fresh from a grove in the 
heart of the Florida citrus 
belt. Order from November- 
May. Prices include 
shipping charges except 
for the far west. No 
shipment to Texas or 
Arizona. Guaranteed for 
safe arrival. Perfect gift 



- ' ' 




for holidays and anniversaries. Deadline for Christmas 
order is December 1. Phone orders accepted. 

Send check and order form to: 

Benson Groves, Inc. 

3315 N. Orange Blossom Tr. 

Orlando, FL 32804 Pho. (305) 293-8482 



10% benefits the Central Florida ASC Alumnae Club. 
Please mention our name when ordering additional fruit. 



TREASURE TRUNK: Use this woven, dome top basket SHIP ORDER TO: 
long after the '/; bushel of citrus has been enjoyed: 
$22.00 for a basket of oranges ; grapefruit_ . ; Xmas del. . 

mixed_ 



ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT 
$19.95 for a bushel box of oranges 

; mixed 

$16.95 for 3 A bushel box of oranges 

; mixed 

$13.50 for Vi bushel box of oranges 

; mixed 

$ 8.95 for !4 bushel box of oranges 

; mixed 



$26.50 for a basket of citrus, pecans, tropical candy, Street or box # 
marmalade, and jelly p. 

Phone, if known 
; grapefruit Gift card signed: 
Sender's name _ 



; grapefruit 
; grapefruit 
; grapefruit 



Street address 



City 



Other del. date 



State 



Zip 



State 



Zip 



Phone 



68 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



From the Director 



Virginia Brown McKenzie 



Executive Board Officers, 1979-80 



Organized in 1895, the Alumnae As- 
sociation of Agnes Scott has as its 
purpose the futherance of the intellectu- 
al, spiritual, and financial aims of the 
College. Its work is done under the 
leadership of an Executive Board 
elected by the membership. 

Pictured on this page are the members 
of the Executive Board. Under each 
name is noted the alumna's position and 
her term of office. It is important for us 
all to know who these creative and 
dedicated volunteers are. 

In January the Nominations Commit- 
tee will name their choice for ten of the 
jobs on this Board. The remaining 
positions will be filled the following 
year. Each office is for a two-year term. 
Please consider carefully the ten offices 
described in this publication and send 
the postpaid card with your nominations 
to the Alumnae Office. 





Cissie Spiro Aidinoff '51 
President 
1978-80 




Susan Blakemore Hannah '64 

Vice President Region I 

1979-81 



Polly Page Moreau '62 

Vice President Region II 

1979-81 





Jackie Simmons Gow '52 

Vice President Region III 

1978-80 



Peggy Hooker Hartwein '53 

Vice President Region IV 

1978-80 



Lebby Rogers Harrison '62 

Secretary 

1978-80 




Susan Skinner Thomas '74 
Treasurer 
1979-81 



Jane King Allen '59 

Alumna Trustee 

1976-80 



Mary Duckworth Gellerstedt '46 

Alumna Trustee 

1978-82 



Kathy Blee Ashe ' 

Career Advisory Chairman 

1979-81 



Anne Foster Curtis '64 

Class Council Chairman 

1978-80 




Eleanor Lee McNeill '59 

Club Chairman 

1978-80 



Betty Fountain Edwards Gray '35 

Education Chairman 

1979-81 




Gayle Gellerstedt Daniel '71 

Entertainment Chairman 

1978-80 



Barbara Wilber Gerland '43 

House Chairman 

1979-81 




Mary Ben Wright Erwin '25 

Nominations Chairman 

1979-81 




Blythe Posey Ashmore '58 

Projects Chairman 

1978-80 



Caroline McKinney Clarke '27 

Publications Chairman 

1978-80 







Anita Moses Shippen '60 

Alumnae Admissions 

Reps. Chairman 





Dorothy Holtoran Addison '43 

Alumnae Fund Chairman 

1978-80 



Nelle Chamlee Howard '34 

Alumnae Garden 

Chairman 



ALUMNAE QUARTERLY, AGNES SCOTT COLLEGE, DECATUR, GEORGIA 30030 




THE 




ALUMNAE QUARTERLY / WINTER 1980 



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THE 



ALUMNAE QUARTERLY/VOLUME 58 NUMBER 2 



CONTENTS 

1 Association President's Letter 



2 Update: 

The Department of Mathematics 

By Dr. Sara Ripy 



5 Women and the Freedom to Achieve 

By Dr. Ayse Ilgaz-Carden 



8 With the Clubs 



9 From the Classes 



Front Cover 

Pythagorean theorem symbolizes verities of mathema- 
tics. 

Back Cover 

Alumnae Weekend Schedule 



ALUMNAE QUARTERLY STAFF: 
Editor / Virginia Brown McKenzie '47 
Managing Editor Juliette Harper '77 
Design Consultant John Stuart McKenzie 

ALUMNAE OFFICE STAFF: 

Director of Alumnae Affairs 

Virginia Brown McKenzie '47 

Coordinator for Clubs 

Jean Chalmers Smith '38 

Assistant to the Director 

Juliette Harper '77 

Secretary 

Elizabeth Wood Smith '49 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OFFICERS: 
President / Cissie Spiro Aidinoff '51 
Vice Presidents 

Region I / Susan Blackmore Hannah '64 
Region II / Polly Page Moreau '62 
Region III / Jackie Simmons Gow '52 
Region IV / Peggy Hooker Hartwein '53 
Secretary / Lebby Rogers Harrison '62 
Treasurer / Susan Skinner Thomas '74 

Member . Council for Advancement and 
Support of Education 



Published four times yearly: Fall. Winter. 
Spring, and Summer by Agnes Scott College 
Alumnae Office. Decatur. Georgia 30030 



Second class postage paid 
at Decatur. Georgia. 
(U.S.P.S. 009-280) 



Alumnae Association President 
joins National Work Force 



Back to work. How many times have 
those of us who were once professional- 
ly employed dreamed of or even thought 
about going back to work at a full-time, 
nine-to-five, paying job? 

We all remember the fun, the glamour, 
the glory, and the excitement. We may 
even still remember the challenges and 
the exhilarating feeling of a job well 
done. We may still see the people at the 
other desks and remember the thrill of 
handling a complex problem or of 
meeting a nearly impossible publication 
deadline. Clearly, we remember the 
paychecks and even some of the things 
on which we spent those paychecks. 

Two months ago, I received that 
long-thought-about phone call. "Come 
to work," the voice said. The job was to 
be terrific, the people exceptional, and 
the work challenging. In the beginning, 
the hours would be flexible, and I could 
set up the structure of the organization 
as I considered most effective. 

Who could turn down such terms? I 
couldn't; so on Monday, November 26, 
1979, 1 became the Executive Director of 
the New York Citizen's Committee for 
the Democratic National Convention. 

During the past three weeks, I have 
been busy! My flexible hours are more 
than nine to five. I have been to 
twenty-seven meetings and have written 
ninety-six letters. I have made and 
received dozens of phone calls and have 
been able to leave the office for lunch 
only three or four times. I have begun to 
draw up specific projects and programs 
and have hired my staff and some of our 
consultants. I have also begun to realize 
what is truly involved in going back to 
work. 

I have learned that I must get out of 
bed an hour and a half earlier each day to 
organize my house and my life. No more 
leisurely reading of the New York Times 
over my second cup of tea in the 
morning; I scan the headlines for politi- 



By Cissie Spiro Aidinoff '51 
President, Alumnae Association 

cal news and hope that 1 am not too tired 
to "read" the paper at the end of the 
day. I cannot hear the fascinating lec- 
tures and speeches which are available 
on almost every day of the week at one 
or another of New York's finest institu- 
tions. No more matinees or opera re- 
hearsals. No more twice-a-week tennis, 
and absolutely no more of those long, 
talky lunches with friends who have just 
done this or read that. And most 
importantly, no more board meetings. I 
have already missed two International 
Center board meetings where notes were 
taken and decisions made which sub- 
stantially affected the work of the 
Center and its funding for its foreign 
student programs for the coming year. 

Why then have I taken this job? Why 
am I working? Why have I given up my 
comfortable (and rewarding) life style 
for the problems of approximatley 6,000 
delegates, 2,500 alternates, hundreds of 
foreign dignitaries, and scores of press 
and accompanying persons at a political 
convention? 

Well, I'm not absolutely sure; and as 
there are two vice presidents from a 
major international corporation waiting 
to discuss with me what their company 
can do for the convention, and as I have 
an ad agency representative who wants 
the Committee's business due in my 
office in fifteen minutes, and as I have 
on my phone "hold" button the person 
with the greatest souvenir ever that he 
wants me to buy and distribute to all 
delegates, I just don't have the time to 
figure out why I have done this. How 
can I tell you why I have put myself in 
this wild situation? I guess in my heart I 
really do know why. It's fun; I work 
extremely hard, and the job is most 
rewarding. There is a great deal of 
excitement, and, not insignificantly, I 
am expecting my first paycheck at the 
end of this week. These things are all 
part of going back to work, and I love it. 




Winter 1980 



U pdate 



The Departmer 



The Mathematics Department at 
Agnes Scott offers a curriculum which 
has three fundamental purposes: to 
serve all students in a liberal arts 
environment, to give mathematics 
majors a solid background for more 
advanced study, and to help students 
develop skills and acquire mathematical 
tools which will be beneficial in the 
marketplace. The statement: 

The curriculum in the Department 
of Mathematics is designed to help 
students to think clearly and 
logically, to analyze problems, to 
understand and be able to use the 
language, theory, and techniques 
of mathematics, and to develop 
skills and acquire mathematical 
tools needed in the applications of 
mathematics, 

which appears in the mathematics 
section of the 1979-1980 catalog, is itself 
new. but the ideas it represents are not. 
In so far as I know, that has been the 
design of the department's curriculum 
for many years. It is true that there have 
been some changes from time to time but 
basically the curriculum is a core 
curriculum, and not subject to numerous 
changes. 

The following is a list of courses in the 
curriculum at the present time. The 
number in parentheses after a course 
indicates the year in which it was added 
to the curriculum. The courses with no 
number in parentheses were offered in 
some form in the 1958-59 session. In 
many of them there have been changes 
in the level, the title, the number of 
credit hours, the emphasis, or even the 
content to some extent. 

101. Finite Mathematics (1965) 
115. Elementary Statistics (1967) 

120. Introductory Calculus. Analytic 
Geometry I 

121. Introductory Calculus, Analytic 
Geometry II 

150. Introduction to Computer 

Programming (1969) 
201. Differential and Integral Calculus 
301. Fundamentals of Real Analysis 

(1967) 




Sara Ripy, department chairman, specializes in classical analysis. 



307. Linear Algebra 

309. Differential Equations 

310. Advanced Calculus 

312. Introduction to Numerical 
Analysis 

314. Introduction to Modern 
Geometry 

315. Topology (1962) 

32 1 . Introduction to Modern Abstract 
Algebra (1959) 

322. Modern Abstract Algebra (1959) 
328. Mathematical Statistics and 

Probability 
345. Topics in Mathematics (1974) 
352. Theory of Functions of a 

Complex Variable 

410. Special Study 

41 1. Mathematics Seminar (offered 
1968-71. dropped, and added 
again in 1978) 

490. Independent Study 
Even though the above listing is 
complete, perhaps a few comments are 
appropriate. In 1958 the basic course 
was college algebra and trigonometry. 



Elementary analysis (now 120. 121) was 
added in 1959. Gradually it became the 
basic course. College algebra and 
trigonometry was dropped in 1965 and 
finite mathematics was added. The 
major upper level course changes have 
been the additions of abstract algebra in 
1959. topology in 1962. and 
fundamentals of real analysis in 1967. 
Mathematics 345 enables us to enlarge 
the curriculum without the commitment 
demanded by the normal addition of a 
course. One course offered as a topic. 
Mathematical Models and Applications, 
will be added to our curriculum next 
year. Other topics that have been or will 
be offered are number theory. Boolean 
algebra, calculus on manifolds, and 
game theory. A course in the history of 
mathematics will be added next year. 
Mathematics 410 and Mathematics 490 
offer the student the opportunity to do 
independent study in an area of interest 
to her. More structure for the major was 
approved in 1972. The specific 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



f Mathematics 



Ripy 








Bob Leslie's emphasis is in differential equations. 




Albert Sheffer's areas of interest are Lie algebra and Lie groups. 



requirements for the major at the present 
time are 201, 301, 307, 321, one of 310, 
315, 352, and one of 309, 312, 328, with a 
minimum of forty-five credit hours and a 
maximum of seventy-two credit hours. 
Next year the seminar will be required 
for the major. 

During the decade of the sixties one 
hundred and sixty-six students 
graduated from Agnes Scott with a 
major in mathematics. During the 
decade of the seventies there were 
seventy-six. 

Our majors have adequate preparation 
for graduate study. In recent years 
majors have been accepted for graduate 
work in mathematics at such universities 
as Clemson, Colorado State, Duke, 
Emory, Texas, and Vanderbilt. 

The department has maintained a 
traditional liberal arts approach to the 
study of mathematics and has not 
succumbed to the increasing demands 
for strictly career-oriented courses. It is 
true that mathematics is a practical 
major as well as an intellectually sound 
and stimulating one. Also it is true that 
employers do appreciate the skills which 
are developed in studying mathematics. 
Courses such as statistics and 
probability, computer programming, and 
numerical analysis provide the student 
with mathematical tools which are useful 
in many professions. Recent majors 
have been employed by corporations 
such as IBM. International Harvester, 
Southern Bell, and Westinghouse. Other 
mathematics majors have completed 
M.B.A. programs. Still others have 
become teachers and/or administrators 
at the elementary level, at the secondary 
level, and at the college level. 

In 1975 a dual degree program in 
engineering with Georgia Tech was 
established. Later the joint program was 
extended to include information and 
computer science, industrial 
management, and management science. 
A participant in the program attends 
Agnes Scott for three years and Georgia 
Tech for two. Upon the completion of 
her work, she receives the B.A. degree 
from Agnes Scott and also a bachelor's 
degree from Georgia Tech. The 



Winter 1980 



Mathematics 

(continued) 

engineering student takes mathematics 
through linear algebra and differential 
equations. One student (a mathematics 
major here) has completed the program 
and two students are studying at Tech 
now. A number of our present students 
have indicated an interest in the 
program. And last year the faculty 
approved an interdepartmental major in 
mathematics-physics. 

Majors in disciplines such as 
chemistry, economics, physics, physics- 
astronomy, and sociology are required to 
take certain mathematics courses. 
Mathematics 101. 115, 120, 121, 150, and 
328 are courses which may be taken as 
part of the Preparatory Program for 
Business. The dual degree program, the 
business prep program, and majors in 
other disciplines are not under the 
direction of the mathematics 
department; nonetheless, the 
mathematics courses included in each 
are a concern of the department. They 
must be considered in planning our 
curriculum. 

The department believes that 
mathematics is a basic component of the 
liberal arts and that a knowledge of 
mathematics is a valuable possession. 
Besides possessing intrinsic beauty and 
value, higher mathematics is 
indispensable to a genuine understanding 
of much of man's intellectual 
achievement. Its study is challenging and 
can be very rewarding. It serves as the 
common language of the sciences, even 
the social sciences to an increasing 
extent. Morris Kline puts it this way: 

Mathematics is a model of exact 
reasoning, an absorbing challenge to 
the mind, an esthetic experience for 
creators and some students, a 
nightmarish experience to other 
students, and an outlet for the 
egotistic display of mental power. But 
historically, intellectually, and 
practically, mathematics is primarily 
man's finest creation for the 
investigation of nature. The major 
concepts, broad methods, and even 
specific theorems have been derived 
from the study of nature; and 
mathematics is valuable largely 




'Morris Kline. Mathematics and the Physical 
W-W/i/INew York: Thomas Y. Crowell Company. 
1959), p. vii. 

-'Michael Spivak. Calculus on Manifolds: A 
Modern Approach to Classical Theorems of 
Advanced CalculusiNew York: W. A. Benjamin. 
Inc., 1965), p. v. 



Don Young's speciality is control theory. 

because of its contributions to the 
understanding and mastery of the 
physical world. These contributions 
are numerous. 1 

Mathematics is not static. All one 
needs to do to get some indication of the 
current areas of research activity in the 
discipline is to look at a recent issue of 
the Mathematical Reviews. In 1965 
Robert Gunning and Hugo Rossi wrote; 

Mathematics has been expanding in all 
directions at a fabulous rate during the 
past half century. New fields have 
emerged, the diffusion into other 
disciplines has proceeded apace, and 
our knowledge of the classical areas 
has grown ever more profound. At the 
same time, one of the most striking 
trends in modern mathematics is the 
constantly increasing interrelationship 
between its various branches. Thus 
the present-day students of 
mathematics are faced with an 
immense mountain of material. In 
addition to the traditional areas of 
mathematics as presented in the 
traditional manner — and these 
presentations do abound — there are 
the new and often enlightening ways 
of looking at these traditional areas, 
and also the vast new areas teeming 
with potentialities. Much of this new 
material is scattered indigestibly 
throughout the research journals, and 
frequently coherently organized only 
in the minds or unpublished notes of 
the working mathematicians. And 
students desperately need to learn 
more and more of this material. 3 

In the fall of 1977 Dr. Stephen 
Puckette, who is a member of the 



mathematics department at the 
University of the South, visited our 
campus as a mathematics consultant. 
This service was provided at our request 
by the Mathematical Association of 
America. At that particular time it 
seemed most appropriate to have the 
department examined impartially with 
special attention given to the curriculum 
and recommendations made for a 
replacement for Mr. Wilde. Ron Wilde 
(M.A.T.. Duke University) taught in the 
department from 1965 until his 
retirement in 1978. 

The members of the department at the 
present time are Robert Leslie (Ph.D., 
University of Georgia), who came in 
1970; Albert Sheffer. Jr.. (Ph.D.. Rice 
University), who came in 1976; Donald 
Young (Ph.D., University of Virginia), 
who came last year; and Sara Ripy 
(Ph.D., University of Kentucky), who 
came in 1958. 

No update of the mathematics 
department at Agnes Scott would be 
complete without a word of 
acknowledgement, appreciation, and 
gratitude to Leslie Gaylord (M.S., 
University of Chicago) and Henry 
Robinson (Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins 
University). Miss Gaylord came to 
Agnes Scott in 1921 and retired in 1968. 
"Dr. Rob" came in 1926 and retired in 
1970. They each made significant 
contributions to the department and to 
the College. Those of us in the 
department now are indebted to them. A 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Women and the Freedom to Achieve 



By Ayse Ilgaz-Carden '66 



While I was a student at Agnes Scott, 
I can remember sitting in one of those 
chairs on a number of occasions and 
listening to a speaker. Quite often I 
would not be just listening but carrying 
on a silent dialogue with the speaker. 
The essence of my contribution to the 
dialogue was, "If you would just let me 
tell you what's important, significant, 
and relevant. . . ." And here I am, and 
believe me, one part of me is extremely 
happy for a dream come true. But there 
is another part of me — the part that I try 
to discourage and keep under lid and 
cover, the part that would give anything 
to be sitting with you down there and 
carrying on a silent conversation with 
the speaker. My psychologist colleagues 
would tell me that this is only a reflection 
of the conflict and anxiety I must feel 
over achievement. Being a woman, I am 
supposed to be more prone to that kind 
of thing. That is what I want to talk to 
you about today: women and whether 
we are free to achieve. I do not think that 
I need to apologize for my topic to the 
male members of my audience; after all, 
I am going to talk about your daughters, 
wives, friends, mothers, or students. 
In 1968 Matina Horner reported the 
results of her research which led her to 
theorize a motive to avoid success 
among women. Since then the study of 
achievement-related conflicts has 
attracted a great deal of attention and 
generated considerable controversy. The 
theorized motive and the findings of the 
relevant studies have been dissected 
many times, from a variety of view 
points, and revisions have been 
introduced both by the original author 
and others. One finding, however, has 
remained relatively consistent through 
these years, consistent even in the 
context of changing definitions of and 
attitudes toward success and the 
increasing impact of the women's 
equality movement: the finding that 



Ayse Ilgaz Carden '66, assistant 
professor ofpyschology, delivered this 
address at Senior Investitute on October 

27. 




Dr. Ayse Ilgaz-Carden 
Assistant Professor of Pyschotogy 



women continue to display indications of 
a motive to avoid success and behave in 
ways consistent with the existence of 
such a motive significantly more 
frequently than men. Reviewing some of 
these findings recently Horner 
concluded that young men and women 

still tend to evaluate themselves and to 
behave in ways consistent with the 
dominant stereotype that says 
competition, independence, 
competence, intellectual achievement, 
and leadership reflect positively on 
mental health and masculinity but are 
basically inconsistent or in conflict 
with femininity. Thus, despite the fact 
that we have a culture and an 
educational system that ostensibly 
encourage and prepare men and 
women identically for careers, the 
data indicate that social and, even 
more importantly, internal 
psychological barriers rooted in this 
image really limit the opportunities to 
men (Horner, 1975,p.207). 

The kinds of activities we choose to 
engage in and our eventual level of 
competence in these activities are in 
great measure determined by our 
expectations. There are many studies 
which indicate that men in general have 
higher expectations of success than 
women. According to Frieze, this is true 



"Not only in clearly defined masculine 
tasks and apparently 'sexless' 
intellectual tasks, but also, in some 
cases, for feminine tasks" (Frieze, 1975, 
p. 161). One implication of such findings 
for women is clear: they will seek 
activities traditionally consistent with 
the female role since expectations of 
success will be highest and achievement 
motivation will be untainted by anxiety. 
In fact, we know that this is happening 
on a grand scale all over the country. 
Alexander Astin, in his study of the 
impact of college experience on the 
American youth concludes that 
"Perhaps the most important factor 
influencing career outcomes is sex" 
(Astin, 1978, p. 159). According to his 
findings, 

Men and women differ considerably in 
their educational and their intellectual 
development during the undergraduate 
years. Although women earn higher 
grades than men, they are less likely to 
persist in college and to enroll in 
graduate or professional school. 
Moreover, women's aspirations for 
higher degrees decline, while men's 
aspirations increase during the 
undergraduate years. Compared with 
men, women are more likely to 
acquire general cultural knowledge 
and skills in foreign languages, music, 
typing, and homemaking (Astin, 1978, 
p.129). 

What about our judgments as to why 
we experience success or failure? To 
what factors do we attribute our 
successes and failures? Although 
research results are not very conclusive 
about certain aspects of the attribution 
question, a relatively stable pattern of 
sex differences can still be detected 
(Frieze, 1975). In general, men are more 
likely to interpret their successes in 
terms of their ability. Women, on the 
other hand, more readily see external 
factors, such as luck, as being 
instrumental in their success. Causes of 
failure experiences also appear to be 
interpreted differently by men and 
women although in the case of women 
findings are not as clear cut. Men tend to 
see lack of effort as a frequent cause of 
failure while women are as likely to see 



Winter 1980 




lack of ability or presence of adverse 
external conditions as possible causes of 
their failure. The implications of these 
findings are very important, especially in 
understanding what happens after 
success or failure. As one would predict, 
men are more likely to continue working 
toward achievement in the face of failure 
because it was lack of effort on their part 
which caused the failure to begin with. It 
is an internal quality which they can 
control. What about women after 
failure? They are much less likely to 
continue because, after all, how can they 
affect the lack of ability or identify and 
deal with adverse external conditions? 
They do not fare any better with success 
experiences, either. While men see 
success in terms of their ability, their 
continued success experiences will 
enhance their self-esteem and add to the 
security and stability with which they 
approach similar experiences. Since 
women, however, do not see an internal 
stable characteristic such as ability as 
the cause of success, when they 
succeed, the"y need not experience 
increased motivation to approach similar 
experiences or have increased self- 
esteem as a result of success. These 
different expectations and perceived 
reasons for success and failure will 
continue to flourish in the fertile milieu 
of sexual stereotypes and the absence of 
appropriate role models. 

"To stereotype," according to Elliot 
Aronson, "is to assign identical 
characteristics to any person in a group 
regardlesss of the actual variation among 
members of that group" (Aronson, 1976, 
p. 175). Thus, if to be a woman is to be 
"nice," gentle, dependent, expressive, 
impulsive, emotional, passive, and "not- 
too-numerically-inclined" and to be a 
man is to be independent, aggressive, 
competent, dominant, and unemotional, 
and these expectations are directed to a 
person because of the person's sex, they 
will have a limiting effect on the choices 
available to that person. In this sense. 



stereotypes are detrimental to the 
potentially rich growth process of the 
individual because of the limitations they 
place on the availability of choices and 
rigidity they impose on possible roles. 
As Aronson points out. 
The notion of sex roles appropriate to 
sex identity, is quite useful in 
understanding the pressures that 
society places on both men and 
women. The most striking feature 
differentiating male and female sex 
roles is the greater diversity of 
acceptable role behaviors available to 
men and the lack of such choice and 
diversity for women (Aronson, 1976, 
p.183). 

Rosenthal's now famous research into 
the phenomenon of "self-fulfilling 
prophecy" reaffirms how powerful 
these societal expectations can be in 
shaping our cognitive and emotional 
behavior (Rosenthal, 1968). 

Behind the usually subtle pressures of 
stereotypes we can still see various 
forms of active discrimination. Higher 
admission requirements for women 
practiced by certain colleges, even some 
state colleges, higher availability of job 
opportunities to men, more exacting 
standards applied to women in hiring 
practices as well as in subsequent on- 
the-job performance evaluations, and 
unequal salaries are all easily 
documented areas of possibly 
diminishing but nevertheless continuing 
discrimination. One of Alexander 
Astin's recent findings relates to this last 
area of discrimination. Concerning 
beginnning salaries in teaching, which is 
traditionally considered to be a more or 
less feminine profession, Astin reports 
that "Even after background factors 
such as interests, high school and college 
grades, and fields of study are 
considered, men earn better than $1000 
more in salary than women" (Astin, 
1978, p. 159). 

Fewer Support Systems 

The picture that emerges indicates that 
women in fact have every right to feel 
anxious in the face of possible 
achievement since it is realistic to 
assume that they will be achieving in a 
less supportive environment both in 
subtle and overt ways. This recognition 
leads Irene Frieze to conclude that 
achieving women 

must be professionally better than 
men in order to experience any career 
success. Furthermore, they perform at 
this high level without many of the 
enviromental supports that 
professional men frequently have. 
These supports which are unavailable 



for women include the many services 
of the wife and general societal 
recognition and support for 
achievement (Frieze, 1975, p. 166). 

Role Models Needed 

The absence of appropriate role 
models serves to compound the effects 
of the stereotypes on women's 
orientation toward achievement. How 
can a young girl aspire to achieve in 
professions where there are no or only a 
few females? How can she have very 
good feelings about competence and 
achievement when almost all the role 
models demonstrating these qualities in 
the textbooks she reads and the movies 
she sees are depicted to be men? The 
importance of the availability of role 
models is clearly seen in the results of a 
number of recent studies investigating 
the backgrounds of high-achieving 
women. As we would expect, these 
women quite often have highly educated 
mothers who provide the much needed 
role models for them. In cases where the 
mother is not a professional herself, she 
is very likely to be a person who believes 
in the values of achievement and 
competence and actively tries to 
inculcate these values in her daughters. 
According to Birnbaum's findings, for 
example, this is a mother who 

is recalled as having been a somewhat 
attractive, dominant, and very 
competitive woman who often worked 
outside the home and yet also was 
perceived as somewhat dependent on 
and very close to her husband. In 
many ways, she sounds like an ideal 
role-innovative model, a competitive, 
work-oriented woman of considerable 
energy and independence who is also 
comfortable with closeness or 
dependency (Birnbaum, 1975, p. 409). 

In this respect, the role of fathers and 
husbands is also of great interest. 
Women who show high achievement 
orientation most often report having 
fathers who are high achievers 
themselves and both by role modeling 
and by active encouragement support 
their daughters' achievement strivings. 
The support of husbands is also crucial. 
Again, according to the results of the 
Birnbaum study, most achieving women 
have extremely supportive husbands 
who view marriage in terms of mutual 
enrichment and friendship and are proud 
of their wives' accomplishments. This is 
attested to informally by the personal 
communications of many of our own 
Return To College women as well as a 
number of the female members of the 
Agnes Scott faculty, among whom this 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



speaker is very happily included. 

The modeling and support of family 
members, however important, are not 
sufficient to free the female to achieve. 
The variety, quantity, and quality of the 
female role models which the greater 
society provides are also significant 
factors. As the number of women in high 
achievement roles increases and they are 
recognized and supported in these roles 
by both men and women, achievement 
motivation will begin to be freed from 
conflicts originating from sex roles and 
will be, for men and women alike, 
merely "an internalized standard of 
excellence, motivating the individual to 
do well in any achievement oriented 
situation involving intelligence and 
leadership ability" (Horner. 1969). 

What can be done to help women to be 
free to achieve? Irene Frieze suggests 
the institution of programs designed to 
directly affect expectations and causal 
attributions of women. The teaching of 
the consistency of femaleness and 
achievement, in terms of actual success 
experiences and active role modeling, 
would be at the core of such programs. 
Helping women have more confidence 
in their abilities would benefit both 
traditional and career-oriented women 
since it would provide them with a 
better basis upon which to determine 
the most appropriate life style for 
themselves (Frieze, 1975, p. 168). 

I suggest that there are already 
existing programs in the country which 
incorporate these essential elements in 
the encouragement of women toward 
achievement and, judging by the 
outcome, they are doing a very effective 
job. I am referring to women's colleges. 



Impact of College Years 

In 1978, Alexander Astin published his 
book, Four Critical Years, in which he 
presented the major findings from the 
first ten years of a highly comprehensive 
longitudinal research project conducted 
jointly by the University of California 
and the American Council on Education 
in Washington. The research was 
designed to study the impact of the 
college experience on the American 
youth and included more than 300 
colleges and universities of all types and 
collected data on more than 200,000 
students. Among the many findings 
concerning the impact of college 
experience there was one finding which 
was, according to Astin, highly 
"dramatic" and quite unexpected: single 
sex colleges were found to have almost 



uniformly positive effects on their 
graduates. This finding is made even 
more significant by the fact that, again 
according to Astin, "only a handful of 
those institutions that were single-sex in 
the early 1960s have been able to resist 
the temptation to become coeducational 
through the late 1970s" (Astin, 1978, p. 
246). 

Value of Women's Colleges 

Virtually all of the findings concerning 
the effect of women's colleges on their 
students are positive and involve 
dimensions which further achievement 
in women. For example, these colleges 
were found to increase involvement in 
academic pursuits among their students, 
increasing both the likelihood of 
completion of the degree and the 
aspirations to higher degrees. The 
students attained higher levels of 
intellectual self-esteem compared to 
students from coeducational institutions. 
This esteem was readily manifested, for 
example, in higher levels of verbal 
assertiveness in the classroom. 
Furthermore, these students reported a 
great deal of satisfaction with the college 
experience which allowed them active 
participation and greater involvement in 
campus life. They reported great 
satisfaction with the fact that they could 
attain positions of leadership and be 
actively involved in roles instrumental in 
the actual running of the college. 
Another source of satisfaction involved 
their close interactions with the faculty 
and the quality of student friendships. 
These are significant findings and show, 
in fact, that in terms of the teaching of 
achievement values, these colleges are 
doing a highly effective job of providing 
motivation, active support, experience, 
and modeling. In these times when the 
quality of the education process at all 
levels is under criticism, even the 
secretary of HEW, Mrs. Patricia Harris, 
must have been impressed indeed by 
these findings. September 24 issue of 
The Chronicle of Higher Education 
reports her quoting Astin's findings in a 
meeting on September 18 in Washington, 
attended also by our own president, 
where she pledged active support of 
women's colleges. This would have been 
very good news indeed to Margaret 
Mead, the famous anthropologist, who 
many years ago experienced many of the 
realities that Astin's research revealed in 
1978. In Blackberry Winter, reminiscing 
about her early years in college, she 
writes: 



in the setting of this coeducational 
college (DePauw) it became perfectly 
clear both that bright girls could do 
better than bright boys and that they 
would suffer for it. This made me feel 
that coeducation was thoroughly 
unattractive. I neither wanted to do 
bad work in order to make myself 
attractive to boys nor did I want them 
to dislike me for doing good work. It 
seemed to me that it would be much 
simpler to go to a girls' college where 
one could work as hard as one pleased 
(Mead, 1972, p. 100). 

At a later page, she continues: 
By the very contrast it provided, 
DePauw clarified my picture of the 
kind of college at which I wanted to be 
a student — a place where people were 
intellectually stirred and excited by 
ideas, where people stayed up all night 
talking about things that mattered, 
where one would meet one's peers 
and, still more important, people with 
different and superior minds, and not 
least, where one would find out what 
one could do in life (p. 101). 

In the fall of 1920 she came to a women's 

college, Barnard College, 

Where I found — and in some measure 
created — the kind of student life that 
matched my earlier dreams. In the 
course of those three undergraduate 
years friendships were founded that 
have endured a lifetime of change, and 
by the end of those years I knew what 
I could do in life (p. 102). 
I hope that Agnes Scott is as good to 

you. It was to me. A 



Aronson, E. The social animal. San Francisco: 
W.H. Freeman, 1976. 

Astin, A. Four critical years. San Francisco: 
Jossey-Bass, 1978. 

Birnbaum, J. A. Life patterns and self-esteem in 
gifted family-oriented and career-committed 
women. In M. T. S. Mednick, S. S. Tangri. and 
L. W. Hoffman (Eds.). Women and achievement. 
Washington. Hemisphere Publishing Corporation, 
1975. 

Frieze, 1. H. Women's expectations for and causal 
attributions of success and failure. In M. T. S. 
Mednick, S. S. Tangri. and L. W. Hoffman 
(Eds.), Women and achievement. Washington: 
Hemisphere Publishing Corporation. 1975. 

Horner. M. S. Sex differences in achievement 
motivation and performance in competitive and 
noncompetitive situations. (Doctoral dissertation. 
University of Michigan) Ann Arbor, Mich.: 
University Microfilms, 1968. 

Horner, M. S. Fail, bright women. Psychology 
Today. 1969 (November). 

Horner, M. S. Toward an understanding of 
achievement related conflicts in women. Journal 
of Social Issues, 1972, 28, 157-175. Reprinted in 
M. T. S. Mednick, S. S. Tangri. and L. W. 
Hoffman (Eds.), Women and achievement. 
Washington: Hemisphere Publishing Corporation. 
1975. 

Mead. M. Blackberry winter. New York: William 
Morrow, 1972. 

Mednick, M. T. S.. Tangri, S. S.. and Hoffman. 
L. W. Women and achievement. Washington: 
Hemisphere Publishing Corporation. 1975. 

Rosenthal. R.. and Jacobson. L. Pygmalion in the 
classroom: Teacher expectation and pupils , 
intellectual development. New York: Holt. 
Rinehart& Winston, 1968. 



Winter 1980 



With the Clubs 



Atlanta 



Such an overflow crowd of alums and 
friends turned out October 18 to hear 
President Marvin B. Perry. Jr.. at the 
Piedmont Driving Club that the number 
of tables outgrew the room for which the 
luncheon was planned and had to be 
moved to the ballroom. Classes from 
many decades were represented. Atlanta 
Club President Jane Taylor White '42 
presided, and Frances Ellis Wayt '42 
introduced the speaker. Margaret 
Shepherd Yates '45 was luncheon chair- 
man. Dr. Perry assured his listeners that 
the College has maintained its high 
academic standing and that S.A.T. 
scores of entering freshmen are far 
above national scores and are above 
those of recent classes, whereas the 
national trend is down this year. He told 
alumnae they could help Agnes Scott by 
remaining the active, well-informed and 
supportive group they are; by mention- 
ing the College with pride and helping to 
publicize her name; by helping locate 
outstanding prospective students; by 
helping find job opportunities for 
graduates; and by continuing to contri- 
bute "your hard-earned dollars." He 
said he has found alumnae to be "tre- 
mendously interested, loyal, and 
generous." 

Cobb County 

Career Planning Director Kathleen 
Mooney's talk October 20 at the Cobb 
County Club's coffee brought forth a 
lively discussion and many questions 
from alumnae about the work of her 
office and how it could help them as well 
as current students. The speaker re- 
ported that she herself "had a really 
good time" and enjoyed the exchange of 
ideas with alums, some of whom plan 
follow-up visits to the campus. Many of 
them shared reasons for choosing their 
occupations and told of special 
memories of Agnes Scott days. "It was a 
warm gathering of friends," wrote Club 
President Florrie Fleming Corley '54, 
"and likely friends — from as far away as 
Cumming, Ga." A special story by 
Susan Aikman Miles '68, club secretary 
and a columnist for the Marietta Daily 
Journal, featured Kathy's message and 
Agnes Scott's career planning program. 



Susan and her fellow-columnist and 
fellow-alum, Nancy Dendy Ryle '49, 
were co-hostesses at Nancy's home. 



Decatur 



An impressive planetarium demonstra- 
tion by Director Julius Staal on the 
Christmas star plus a fascinating com- 
mentary and showing by Dr. Bob Hyde 
of slides from his wondrous collection of 
pictures of the universe enthralled De- 
catur Club members who visited Bradley 
Observatory on campus December 6. 
Coffee was served in the "back room" 
amidst Christmas greens and berries, 
and the rainy day interfered with fes- 
tivities not a bit. Observatory Director 
Hyde and Mr. Staal offered another 
program for alumnae, faculty, staff and 
friends of the College December 18. 

The new film room in Buttrick. ele- 
gantly carpeted and furnished, was the 
setting for the club's October 25th 
program by Dr. Michael Brown, profes- 
sor of history. The room was filled 
nearly to capacity, as members and 
friends crowded in to enjoy Dr. Brown's 
colorful photographs of gardens and 
famous buildings in England taken dur- 
ing "Alumnae Travels in England," trips 
on which many in the audience had 
accompanied the speaker. 

Delaware Valley 

Dr. Art Bowling, assistant professor 
of physics, gave his popular talk on 
"Black Holes in Space" for alumnae of 
the Philadelphia area October 27. His 
listeners were delighted, and Program 
Chairman Nancy Boothe Higgins '61 
wrote afterwards, "He has opened my 
eyes to a body of information 1 knew so 
little about. Everywhere I read now I am 
recognizing some point he made. He is a 
great asset to the College." Dr. Bowling 
reported on his return to campus that the 
alums in the Philadelphia area were very 
enthusiastic over prospects of steering 
students towards Agnes Scott and were 
pleased to hear about the new honors 
scholarships being offered. 

Fairfield-Westchester 

Party responsibility in the changing 
structure of political life in the U.S. was 



the topic of discussion by Dr. Gus 
Cochran, assistant professor of political 
science, at a September 29 luncheon in 
Cos Cob, Conn., at the home of Sister 
Davis Luchsinger '48. A congenial group 
of alums enjoyed his stimulating talk and 
then joined in a spirited discussion 
reflecting their "sincere involvement in 
the political affairs of their communities 
and the country," wrote Club President 
Martha Stowell Rhodes '50. Dr. Cochran 
is on sabbatical at Boston College this 
year but has continued to speak to 
alumnae groups. He wrote that he 
enjoyed visiting with the Fairfield- 
Westchester area alums and that "it was 
good to see a little bit of Agnes Scott a 
long way from home." 

Gainesville 

Dr. Michael Brown of the history 
department and Director of Alumnae 
Affairs Virginia Brown McKenzie '47 
drove up from the campus to Gaines- 
ville, Ga., for a delightful luncheon 
meeting of North Georgia alumnae at the 
home of Bess Sheppard Poole '45 Sep- 
tember 27. Dr. Brown gave his presenta- 
tion of "Alumnae Travels in England." 
President Becky Deal Geiger '57 pre- 
sided, and Donna Reed Newell '72 was 
program chairman. 



Houston 



Club President Barbara Faris Gram 
'76 wrote enthusiastically about a party 
for prospective students at the home of 
Elizabeth Heaton Mullino '35 the 
weekend of October 19 planned by the 
College's alumnae admissions represen- 
tatives in the Houston area. The AARs 
included Mary Margaret McMillan Cole- 
man '70, Fran Amsler Nichol '73. 
Melody Snider Porter '78. and Sybil 
Corbett Riddle '52. 



Middle Tennessee 

A sunny autumn day set the scene for 
a gathering of alums in the Nashville 
area October 20 at the home of Ann 
Shires Penuel '57. Although it was 
primarily a social occasion, the brunch 
provided a chance for the large group 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



present to hear a campus update by 

Director of Alumnae Affairs Virginia 

Brown McKenzie '47, who flew up that 

morning for a quick visit. "It was a 

really nice surprise to have Virginia with 

us!" wrote the outgoing club president, 

Anne Hoover Gulley '55, "and our 

whole brunch was very successful." 

Incoming officers are Terri J. Hiers '72, 

president; Emasue Alford Vereen '58, NCWYOfk 

vice president; and Marcia McMurray 

'72, secretary-treasurer. 



Johnson '70, and Director of Alumnae 
Affairs Virginia Brown McKenzie '47, 
spoke of how the group could help the 
College and described changes which 
have taken place on campus. The New 
Orleans group has one of the oldest 
alumnae club scholarships established 
for Agnes Scott. 



New Orleans 



A lovely morning coffee at the home 
of Club President Sarah Turner Ryan '36 
brought together about twenty-five 
alumnae October 30 for a pleasant visit 
and a campus update. Director of Ad- 
missions Judy Maguire Tindel '73, Direc- 
tor of Financial Aid Bonnie Brown 



National Alumnae President Cissie 
Spiro Aidinoff '51 was hostess at her 
apartment overlooking Central Park Oc- 
tober 11 at an elegant luncheon for New 
York alums and an alumnae group 
touring Manhattan. Dr. and Mrs. Marvin 
B. Perry, Jr., were special guests. 
President Perry brought news from the 
campus to the group at Cissie's, which 
numbered around fifty. Alexandra Coc- 
lin '76 is president of the New York 
Alumnae Club and was one of the local 



alums who joined the travelers for the 
Broadway play Evita and a dinner party 
at the Cosmopolitan Club the following 
night. Former Alumnae President 
Marybeth Little Weston '48 also took 
part in some of the events. 



Winston-Salem 

The many alums and friends who heard 
Dr. Margaret Pepperdene discuss poetry 
and liberal arts at their Winston-Salem 
luncheon September 29 were en- 
thusiastic in their praise of the program, 
which one called "the best thing I ever 
heard." A large group attended the 
meeting of the recently organized club, 
which is making splendid progress under 
the leadership of Anne Pollard Withers 
'61. Mrs. Pepperdene herself reported 
she had "a glorious time and came back 
laden with apples and pumpkin bread." 



IX 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Deaths 



Academy 

Bessie McCowen Medlock, August 

24. 1979. 



1913 

Lav alette Sloan Tucker, 

1979. 



July 28. 



1917 

Lilly Currell Simrill, July 7, 1979. 

1918 

Catherine Montgomery William- 
son, February 13. 1979. 

1919 

Goldie Ham Hanson, September 
22, 1979. 

Sallie Kate McLane Johnson, sis- 
ter of Mary McLane Lawrence, 
September 1, 1979. 

1920 

Paul Tappan, husband of Margery 

Moore Tappan, September 24. 

1979. 

Juliet Foster Speer, October 4, 

1979. 

Lilly Currell Simrill, sister of 

Elise Currell, July 7, 1979. 

1921 

Mrs. Mark Britt, sister of Sara 
McCurdy Evans, October 14, 
1979. 

1922 

John Hardy, husband of Ruth 
Scandrett Hardy. October 18, 
1979. 

1923 

Anna Belle Glenn, November 5, 

1979. 

Mary Stewart McLeod, October 

21, 1979. 

1924 

Mrs. Mark Britt, sister of Mary 
McCurdy, October 14, 1979. 
Charles Booth, husband of Nonie 
Peck Booth, May 12, 1979. 

1926 

Linton Deck, husband of Rosalie 
Wooten Deck, October 5, 1979. 



Mrs. Charles Norfleet, Sr., 
mother of Elizabeth Norfleet Mil- 
ler. September 12. 1979. 
Wayne Bramlett, husband of 
Maurine Bledsoe Bramlett. Sep- 
tember 26, 1979. 



1928 

Virginia Norris, 

1979. 



September 24, 



1929 

Frances Juhan Garner, sister of 
Mary Alice Juhan, October 21, 
1979. 

Virginia Norris, sister of Eleanor 
Lee Norris MacKinnon, Sep- 
tember 24, 1979. 

Tom Gash, brother of Betty 
Gash, August 11, 1979. 
Helen Fox, July 27, 1979. 
Thyrza Ellis Durden, sister of 
Mary Ellis Knapp, September 30, 
1979. 

1931 

Elaine Exton, July 17. 1979. 
William Smith, husband of Ruth 
Peck Smith, September 1979. 

1934 

Percy Butler, husband of Tennes- 
see Tipton, April 5, 1979. 
Mrs. J. W. Chamlee. mother of 
Nelle Chamlee Howard, 
November 7, 1979. 

1936 

Mrs. J.W. Chamlee. mother of 
Alice Chamlee Booth, November 
7, 1979. 

1937 

Thyrza Ellis Durden, September 

30, 1979. 

1938 

Nell Scott Earthman Molton, Oc- 
tober 7, 1979. 

Lavalette Sloan Tucker, mother 
of Nancy Tucker Bayer, July 28, 
1979. 

1939 

Frances Juhan Garner, mother of 
Mary Evelyn Garner Davis, Oc- 
tober 21, 1979. 



1927 

Grace Zachry McCreery, August 1942 

2, 1979. Bessie 



mother of Betty Medlock Clark, 
August 24, 1979. 

1943 

Myrtle Dinsmore. mother of Jane 
Dinsmore Lowe, July 14, 1979. 

1945 

O. L. Whatley. father of Martha 
Whatley Yates, December 1978. 

1948 

Mrs. J. J. McManmon, mother of 
Patricia McManmon Ott, Sep- 
tember 15, 1979. 

1950 

Bessie McCowen Medlock, 
mother of Dorothy Medlock 
Rivine, August 24, 1979. 
Catherine Montgomery William- 
son, mother of Ann Williamson 
Young. February 13, 1979. 

1951 

Joan Wood Sayles, November 19, 

1979. 

Joan Stickney McDowell, April 27, 

1979. 

1955 

Goldie Ham Hanson, mother of 
Ann Hanson Merklein. Sep- 
tember 22, 1979. 

1958 

Goldie Ham Hanson, mother of 
Elizabeth Hanson Duerr, Sep- 
tember 22, 1979. 

Robert Butler, husband of Ann 
McWhorter Butler, September 9, 
1979. 

1959 

Marianne Gillis Persons, August 

13, 1979. 

D. C. Westbrook. father of Laura 

Westbrook Kemp, August 20, 

1979. 

1963 

Mrs. Thomas Hartley, mother of 
Nell Tabor Hartley, September 
12. 1979. 

1967 

Maudine Arnau Wilson, mother 
of Suzanne Wilson, February 15, 
1979. 



McCowen Medlock, 



Winter 1980 



19 



20 Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Campus Scenes on Prints and Stationery 
Offered by Alumnae Office 



Six pen and ink sketches of campus scenes by John Stuart 
McKenzie have been printed on fine text paper suitable for 
framing. The drawings which may be displayed singly or as a 
group are 5" x IVi" printed on paper 1 3 A" x 1 1". The set of six 
may be purchased from the Alumnae Office for ten dollars 
($10.00) including tax and mailing cost. 

Stationery suitable for gifts and for your personal 
correspondence is now available also. These same six 
sketches have been printed on folded note paper and 



packaged with matching envelopes. Each package contains 
twelve folded note cards (two copies of the six scenes) and 
twelve envelopes. The package of stationery may be 
purchased from the Alumnae Office for five, fifty ($5.50), 
which includes tax and mailing cost. 

If you wish to order either of these items, fill out the form 
below and mail it with your check to the Alumnae Office, 
Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Georgia 30030. 




9/,i,*i Oewr, AepttSutt 





touMOtniArts'Biityuig, AtjHtiScettColuge /--. >u 



9nsKT0fe>& '.JgmSeottCityt 



WT - 




Ef.tHiUninij "ini!. AgmiScett CcQtqe w. 





•Bunnell 9tatl. Aqntt Seen Celine jut, wza,, 



■Er.u'/c;/ Ofaavatont. Agw >">vrr Cetltgt i~ " 



Alumnae Office, Agnes Scott College 

Decatur. Georgia 30030 



Enclosed is $_ 
Enclosed is $_ 

Name 



for 
for 



set(s) of prints of campus scenes (5 $10.00. 
packages of Agnes Scott stationery (S $5.50. 



Street . 



Phone 



City, State, Zip, 



ALUMNAE QUARTERLY, AGNES SCOTT COLLEGE, DECATUR, GEORGIA 30030 



Make Plans 


Friday, \oril IH 


ive Board meeting 


Now for 
Fun, Friends, 


(HI p.m. 


Luncheon — 50th Rem 1930 


and Festivities 


p.m. 
S "irday, April 1") 


Repi 




10:00 — 10:50 a.m. 




Alumnae 
Weekend 


11:00 a.m. 

10 p.m. 
1:15 p.m. 
'Mowing Luncheon 


il Alumnai 

ling alumi 
President Perry's greeting 

Reunion class meetings for photographs 

Luncheon and recognition of 

-ert for alumnae, faculty, and retired 
faculty in Quadrangle 




10 — 4:00 p.m. 


Authors' reception 




Evening 


inion funt.' 




Sunday April 20 

8:15 — 9:00 a.m. 


Tray-through-the-line bi 


April 1 8-20 
1980 


9:00— 10 
10:00 a.m. 
11:00— 12:00 noon 

Added VllraiiK 


Observat* 
d Buttrick will open foi 




ands and children, including annual (ennis 

icnt for men 




Cia Cefc hrating Reunions: 


• 


1975 

10th 


160 — 20th 1940 — 40th 1920 — 60th 
Mh 1935 — 45th 1915 — 65th 
(V— 30th 1930— 50th Any earlier cla 
sth 1925— 55th 



Ames Scott 



ALUMNAE QUARTERLY / SPRING 1980 




THE 




ALUMNAE QUARTERLY/VOLUME 58 NUMBER 3 



=*z= 



CONTENTS 

1 Honor Scholars Weekend 

2 Update: 

The Department of Music 

By Dr. Ronald Byrnside 

5 Glee Club's Winter Tour 

6 Four Personal Views of the 
Middle East 

14 Registration for the Draft 

15 Book Reviews 

16 With the Clubs 

19 The ASC Network 
21 From the Classes 

32 Association President's Letter 

33 From the Director 

Daughters of Alumnae 



About the cover: 

Cover shows new designer scarf which is being sold 
by the Alumnae Association. For more informa- 
tion, see page 20. 



ALUMNAE QUARTERLY STAFF: 
Editor Virginia Brown McKenzie '47 
Managing Editor Juliette Harper '77 
Design Consultant John Stuart McKenzie 

ALUMNAE OFFICE STAFF: 

Director of Alumnae Affairs 

Virginia Brown McKenzie '47 

Coordinator for Clubs 

Jean Chalmers Smith '38 

Assistant to the Director 

Juliette Harper '77 

Secretary 

Elizabeth Wood Smith '49 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OFFICERS: 

President / Cissie Spiro Aidinoff '51 

Vice Presidents 

Region I / Susan Blackmore Hannah '64 
Region II / Polly Page Moreau '62 
Region III / Jackie Simmons Gow '52 
Region IV / Peggy Hooker Hartwein '53 

Secretary / Lebby Rogers Harrison '62 

Treasurer / Susan Skinner Thomas '74 

Member , Council for Advancement and 
Support of Education 



Published four times yearly: Fall. Winter. 
Spring, and Summer by Agnes Scott College 
Alumnae Office. Decatur. Georgia 30030 



Second class postage paid 
at Decatur, Georgia. 
(U.S.P.S. 009-280) 



Academic Awards 



First Honor Scholars Weekend Held 



By Mary K. Owen Jarboe '68 



On February 14-16, 1980, thirty-five 
outstanding high school seniors visited 
the Agnes Scott campus as finalists in 
the first Agnes Scott Honor Scholars 
competition. The new no-need awards 
have been established to recognize 
superior academic achievement and 
leadership and are being offered for the 
first time to freshmen entering in 
September 1980. Students selected as 
Honor Scholars will receive $2500 
awards which are renewable based upon 
successful college performance. Honor 
scholars who have financial need above 
the $2500 awards will have that need met 
through the Agnes Scott Financial Aid 
Program. In establishing the Honor 
Scholars Awards, the Board of Trustees 
stated that new money was to be raised 
to fund the program so that the need- 
based aid program would not be affected 
in any way. 

In order to be eligible for the 
competition, students had to be accepted 
applicants for admission with superior 
high school records and Scholastic 
Aptitutde Test scores of at least 600 on 
both the verbal and mathematics 
sections. The thirty-five finalists were 
chosen from a large group of students 
who entered the competition. The 
finalists came to the campus from eleven 
states. In addition to their outstanding 
academic records, the students selected 
as finalists presented evidence of 
involvement in various ways in their 
schools, churches, and communities. 
Many are active in student government, 
musical groups, service clubs, and 
athletics. Their interest areas are 
diverse, but a number commented on 
interests in science and mathematics. 

During Honor Scholars Weekend, 
each finalist spent fifteen minutes with 
an interview panel composed of 
Professors Bowling, Brown, 
Pepperdene, Pinka, Tumblin, Wistrand; 
President Perry; Dean Gary; Dean 
Kirkland; Director of Admissions Judy 
Maguire Tindel '73 ; and alumnae Jane 
King Allen '59, Marian Franklin 




Honor Scholars finalists met with four department chairmen. 



Anderson '40, and Joyce McKee '75. 
The interviews were interesting and 
rewarding for the panel members, and 
the finalists were able to learn more 
about the College through these 
sessions. Personal interests as well as 
current events were discussed with the 
finalists. 

In addition to the interview sessions, 
the finalists attended a dinner at the 
Atlanta Historical Society on Thursday 
night with members of the interview 
panel, the admissions staff, and the 
director of financial aid. Lawrence and 
Mary Duckworth Gellerstedt '46 also 
attended the dinner as trustees of the 
College. Before the dinner, everyone 
enjoyed seeing an exhibit on women in 
Atlanta's history which featured a 
number of articles from Agnes Scott. A 
question and answer session was held 
after the dinner. 

On Friday, the students visited classes 



of their choice, met with faculty 
members, and participated in the 
interview sessions. Friday evening, the 
finalists attended either the Atlanta 
Symphony or the Alliance Theatre. 
Finalists stayed in the dormitories 
Thursday and Friday nights with student 
hostesses. All of these activities were 
planned with the idea of giving the 
finalists an opportunity to learn about 
the academic program, student life, and 
the many opportunities available to 
Agnes Scott students in Atlanta. 

Based upon comments from the 
finalists, interview panel members, 
faculty, and current students, the first 
Honor Scholars Weekend appears to 
have been quite successful. It is hoped 
that a number of the thirty-five finalists 
will be students at Agnes Scott in 
September. The names of the Agnes 
Scott Honor Scholars will be released 
after May 1 . ▲ 



Spring 1980 



Update 



The Department of 



By Dr. Ronald Byrnside 




Professor Ronald Byrnside, chairman, earned his doctorate at the University of Illinois. 



There is no evidence that man has any 
physiological need for it, yet in the most 
remote corners of civilization and in the 
most distant reaches of history it seems 
that man has everywhere and always had 
music. Since he doesn't need it. but has 
always had it, one must conclude that 
music is very important to man. It is, in 
fact, one of man's self-created treasures. 
This idea is at the core of the philosophy 
that guides and animates music 
instruction at Agnes Scott College. 
Music is more than a discipline, hut it is a 
discipline — a humanistic discipline, and 
one that is a central part of a truly liberal 
education. 

Our curriculum in music is designed to 
be rich and diverse enough to 
accommodate the special needs of both 
music majors and non-majors. The 
department currently offers nineteen 
different courses in music theory, 
history and appreciation, and applied 
music instruction in voice, piano, organ, 
harpsichord, flute, clarinet, bassoon, 
violin and 'cello. Beginning next year, 
qualified students will be accepted into 
the newly created program in music 
education. 

One of the biggest changes in the 
make-up of the music department over 
the past few years has been the growth 
of instrumental music. A string quartet, 
a woodwind quintet, and a 
baroque/classical ensemble are now 
active on campus. Several members of 
the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra have 
joined our part-time faculty to help meet 
these new demands in instrumental 
applied music. The College now owns a 
single manual Burton harpsichord which 
is used for ensemble and solo purposes. 
The instrument was built from a kit in 
the summer of 1976 by our own 
Professor Theodore Mathews. 

The Atlanta Chamber Players, now in 
its fourth year of residency at Agnes 
Scott, has enjoyed wide critical acclaim 
and was recently awarded a much 
coveted grant from the Paul Chamber 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Music 



Music Foundation of New York. Harold 
Schonberg, music critic of the New York 
Times, had high praise for the ACP, 
listing them first in a list of distinguished 
regional chamber music ensembles. In 
addition to formal concerts the group 
regularly offers a series of open 
rehearsals to which our students and the 
public are invited. 

Jean Lemonds is the newest member 
of our full-time music faculty. Professor 
Lemonds has appeared as recitalist at 
numerous colleges in the Southeast and 
at several Atlanta churches. She is also 
director of the Agnes Scott Opera 
Workshop which very successfully 
produced Menotti's The Telephoneand 
Barab's A game of Chance in February. 
As part-time accompanist, Sandra 
Barnes works closely with Professor 
Lemonds and also with many students of 
applied music, since she regularly 
accompanies many of them at quarterly 
applied music juries. 

Professor Raymond Martin joined the 
faculty in 1950. In addition to his duties 
as College organist, Professor Martin 
teaches organ, harpsichord, music 
theory, and various courses in the 
history and practice of church music. 
Last year Professor Martin completed a 
term as an officer in the American Guild 
of Organists. He also directs the Organ 
Guild at Agnes Scott and is coordinator 
of student recitals on campus. 

Professor Ronald Byrnside, chairman, 
is a member of the Council of the 
American Musicological Society, a 
consultant to the National Endowment 
for the Humanities, and lecturer in the 
winter series cosponsored by the Atlanta 
Symphony Orchestra and the High 
Museum of Art. He is the author of two 
books and scholarly articles on a variety 
of musicological topics. 

Professor Theodore Mathews 
continues his good work with the Agnes 
Scott Glee Club, a group that regularly 
provides enthusiastically received 
programs on and off campus. In May 



Spring 1980 




Professor Raymond Martin received his S.M.D. from Union Theological Seminary 
(New York). 

Assistant Professor Jay Fuller studied at the Johns Hopkins University. Peabody 
Conservatory of Music. 




The Department of Music 



(continued) 



1979 the Glee Club appeared with the 
Atlanta Symphony Orchestra in a 
performance of Hoist's The Planets. 
During the past Thanksgiving/Christmas 
recess, the Glee Club enjoyed a highly 
successful tour of England and Russia. 
Professor Mathews also teaches music 
theory and is the architect of the new 
music education certification program. 

Professor Jay Fuller, recently 
returned to us from a richly-deserved 
sabbatical (1978/79), is presently the 
president of the Decatur Music 
Teachers' Association. Professor 
Fuller's gentle ways, intensely musical 
attitudes, and solo recitals continue to 
serve the College and her aspiring 
pianists in indispensable ways. 

Ultimately the worth and value of the 
College and her several departments 
must be measured by the quality of her 
graduates. We are particularly proud of 
this year's graduating music majors. Of 
the nine music majors in the Class of 
1980, four will go on to do graduate 
work, two are teaching privately and 
playing in their community orchestras, 
and one wil pursue a career as a 
composer/performer in the field of 
contemporary church music. 

Every one of these students gave a 
formal senior recital. Attempting to 
perfect one's musical abilities with skill, 
intelligence, and sensitivity is a very 
demanding and time-consuming 
undertaking. These students have 
accepted the challenge, paid the price, 
and have met with no little success. 

What is of overriding importance and 
what makes these students special is that 
their musical studies and 
accomplishments were pursued and 
achieved within the larger context of a 
first class liberal arts education. Two of 
these students were double majors in 
music and math, one was a double major 
in music and classics, one in music and 
chemistry, one in music and French and 
one in music and history. Four were 




Associate Professor Ted Mathews 
received his Ph.D. from the Universi- 
ty of Michigan. 



Lecturer Jean Lemonds was trained 
at Westminster Choir College. 



members of Mortar Board; Kemper 
Hatfield (pianist) was president of the 
Student Government Association, and 
Jenny Spencer ('cellist and organist) was 
president of Honor Court. 

The Nannette Hopkins Music 
Scholarship program (begun in 1976/77) 
has been a positive force in attracting to 
the campus students who are 
academically solid and musically gifted. 
We urge you, the alumnae, to bring this 
program to the attention of gifted high 
school seniors in your area and to help us 
as we endeavor to find the very best 
students for Agnes Scott College. We 
hope you wil visit the campus soon and 
often, and when you do, please stop by 
to say hello to us in Presser Hall. ▲ 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Glee Club Overseas 



ASCs Good Will 
Ambassadors 



"Do you have your passport?" "How 
many travelers' checks do you have 
left?" "Can we stop at the beriozka shop 
again?" "Where's Oz?" "Where is that 
fish and chips shop?" "What time is 
breakfast tomorrow?" With these and 
many other questions, the Agnes Scott 
College Glee Club Tour Group set out to 
enjoy themselves in "MerrieOlde 
London Towne" and the unfamiliar 
territories of Leningrad and Moscow in 
the Soviet Union. 

Thanks to family, friends, school and 
alumnae support. President Perry's help 
and the revised calendar which provided 
a longer Christmas break, the England- 
Russia concert tour finally happened 
after three years of involved planning. 
The group of Glee Club veterans, 
Andrea Helms of the Public Relations 
Office, and Glee Club director Ted 
Mathews and his family finally got 
underway on November 26, 1979, from 
the Atlanta Airport. The direct Delta 
flight was exciting, but not half as 
thrilling as the landing at London's 
Gatwick and the scenic drive into 
London to disembark at our new home, 
the Ivanhoe Hotel. 

Under the auspices of our beloved 
courier, Oz, the next two weeks were a 
whirlwind of early breakfasts, short, 
hurried rehearsals, concerts, and lots of 
shopping and sightseeing. The first three 
days in London involved a concert at the 
Ernest Bevin School, a bus sightseeing 
tour of all the high spots (London 
Bridge, the Tower, Big Ben, 
Buckingham Palace, and Trafalgar 
Square), another concert at Oxford 
Polytechnic, a walking tour of the 
colleges of Oxford (New College, 
Merton College, Christ Church, and all 
of their beautiful chapels and 
quadrangles), plus enough time left over 
for dinners on the town, pub visits, 
shopping on Oxford and Regent Streets, 
and, of course, theatre visits. Annie and 
Eva were two favorites. 



Spring 1980 



By Dottie Enslow '80 

This non-stop pace had a slight respite 
when we left London for Russia. 
Waiting in Heathrow Airport, we 
experienced the proverbial Aeroflot 
delay: "Have eighty pence worth of light 
refreshments" wait. But it was worth it 
when we finally arrived in Leningrad at 
midnight to greet Irina, our guide, sleepy 
customs officials, and the first snowfall 
of the year. If we thought the pace in 
London was fast, in Russia we did 
double-time. In Leningrad we visited the 
Hermitage, the Opera, the Revolution 
Museum, the Revolution Cruiser 
"Aurora," the Peter and Paul Fortress 
(where all the czars are buried), the 
Piskarouskoye Cemetery (for 
Leningrad's 600,000 who died during 
World War II), as well as any and all 
beriozka shops, the foreign currency 
souvenir store, being always on the 
lookout for china tea sets. We sang one 
concert at the Leningrad Music College, 
but we always returned to our Hotel 
Kievski for bony fish and ninety-cent 
Pepsis. 

The sleeper train which took us to 
Moscow was a highlight. Moscow was 
fascinating, and our hotel, with a view of 
the Olympic Stadium, was extremely 



modern. The group gave two concerts, 
one at an International Students' Club 
and the other at the Moscow Music 
Institute. Between these concerts, we 
had a tour of Moscow which included 
the Kremlin, Red Square, Lenin's Tomb 
(with his embalmed body on display), the 
Tretyakov Museum, several stops on the 
elaborate and immaculate Metro, the 
Exhibition of Economic Achievements, 
featuring a space exploration hall, and, 
of course, the beriozka shops again. 
Everyone agreed that Russia was 
interesting, but the bitter cold winds, 
beet salads, and constant bony fish 
dishes were gladly left behind on our 
return to London. 

The afternoon of our return saw us 
visiting the State Apartments of Windor 
Castle. The next day was free, so 
everyone went out until the group met to 
go see Ira Levin's Deat ht rap that 
evening. Our final concert abroad was at 
Richmond Parish Church on Sunday 
morning with a farewell party for Oz that 
afternoon. Our terms as goodwill 
ambassadors were over, but everyone 
looked forward to January back at Agnes 
Scott to share our pictures and memories 
of this once-in-a-lifetime trip. ▲ 



Gretchen Lindsay '81 in Church Square at the Kremlin 




Four Personal Views of the Middle East 



As the Terror Began in Iran 



By Willa Wagner Beach '49 



In April of 1974 my husband accepted a 
job with Bell Helicopter International in 
Tehran, Iran. Never having been the 
adventurous type, I wasn't exactly 
enthusiastic. For the first four months I 
was the classic example of a culture 
shock victim. However, after a language 
course, which included instructions in 
history, customs, and Ta'rof, their 
politeness code, I threw off my fears, 
began to ride city buses and taxis, and 
was able to go around town for shopping 
and social visits with enjoyment. The 
Iranians were more than friendly. One of 
my earliest and nicest memories is of an 
old man stopping me on the street and 
presenting me with a rose. Once, while 
we were sightseeing in the nearby 
mountains, we came upon some workers 
having their lunch. Nothing would do but 
that we join them to share their tea, 
barbari bread, and onions. No matter the 
language barrier; just all smiles, 
hospitality, and delight when we uttered 
a few words in Farsi, the Persian 
language, even badly pronounced. They 
were eager to help us correct our 
pronunciation. Our syntax was beyond 
even their help. 

The two questions most often asked of 
me on my return have been: "What was 
housekeeping like over there?" and 
"What else did you do with your time?" 
Housekeeping was very much the same 
for us as Stateside except that I spent 
more time in the kitchen. Absence of 
convenience foods meant back to the ol 
do-it-yourself recipes. All fresh 
vegetables, fruits, and eggs were first 
washed, then soaked in Clorox or other 
disinfectant. Just getting the groceries 
was the biggest problem. I walked much 
more than any other time in my life. 
Eventually, we bought a car, but I would 
not drive in their undisciplined traffic. 
All neighborhoods had small kuche 
(alley) stores and there were some 
supermarkets loosely patterned on ours 
here. As time went on, more and more 
imported European and American 
products began to appear on the shelves. 



Nice to have, if you didn't mind paying 
two dollars for a can of Campbell's 
tomato soup! I have many fond 
memories of our little kuche store. My 
trying to ask for things in Farsi, with my 
southern accent, often got blank stares, 
smiles, and a shrug. When all else failed, 
I pointed. 

Helping run Bell's Thrift Shop and 
participating in the activities of the 
American Women's Club kept me quite 
busy. The AWC had many interest and 
activity groups: bridge, bowling, skiing, 
geology, archaeology, gemology, and 
travel, to name a few. Every other year 
the AWC ran a Charity Christmas 
Bazaar for the benefit of the Iranian 
orphanage. It was such a large 
undertaking that we began work on the 
crafts and projects in June. 

My social life was never dull: visiting 
friends, entertaining at home, or dining 
out in the many good restaurants. There 
were three theaters which occasionally 



showed foreign language films. Of the 
three television channels, two were in 
Farsi, natural or dubbed, the other was 
in a foreign language, usually English. 
The Farsi channels would often 
simulcast the original on FM radio, so 
we could have two-language stereo! 
Like all large metropolitan areas, 
Tehran had its problems with power 
outages. We kept candles and our naft 
(kerosene) lantern always ready. The 
stores did a brisk business in flashlights, 
batteries, and gas lanterns. In the 
summer of '78, as unrest began with 
strikes and demonstrations against the 
Shah, we were never sure if power 
failures were due to poor maintenance or 
deliberate cuts by protesting workers. 
As the power could be off up to 
twenty-four hours, we became frugal 
about going into the refrigerator or 
freezer. Many a time our ancient Philco 
did an unplanned and messy defrost. In 
October, during a time of planned, 




Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Willa visits the tomb of poet Saadi in Shiraz. 



nightly, power cuts, we began to be 
serenaded by Iranians out on their flat 
rooftops chanting "Allah Akbar" and 
"Death to the Shah." We thought it an 
impressive demonstration of their piety 
and anger until we noticed that when the 
electricity came back on, they all 
vanished downstairs to their television 
sets. 

As riots and demonstrations 
increased, the foreign language news 
broadcasts became heavily censored, 
then curtailed. We began to listen to 
short wave BBC, VOA, and Radio 
Moscow news programs. It was the only 
way to discover what had happened that 
day, as even the Farsi news broadcasts 
were more rumor than fact. The 
American Embassy issued daily bulletins 
advising which areas of town to stay 
away from and always admonished, 
"Keep a low profile." The constant use 
of that phrase made all of us groan, for 
we felt that if our profile got any lower 
we'd have to go underground. 

As riots and strikes increased, so did 
shortages of consumer goods, especially 
bottled gas for cooking, gasoline, heating 
oil, and kerosene. We became 
apprehensive about using our cooking 
gas bottle and began to cook only one 
meal a day. Many people, foreign and 
Iranian, wanted to leave; but there were 
no commercial flights, and trains and 
buses were not running. Driving to the 
border would have been almost 
impossible; no gasoline enroute, 
brigands on the road, thieves and 
religious fanatics attacked some cars and 
trucks. Even if we had reached the 
border, the customs men would not have 
processed our exit papers. So, we kept a 
low profile and ventured out of our 
apartments only into the immediate 
neighborhood. 

In mid-January the Shah left the 
country. For a week everyone relaxed 
and life went back to almost normal. 
However, the provisional government 
proved useless and the revolutionary 
factions couldn't agree among 




themselves, except they all agreed, 
"Yankee, go home." When the official 
word from the company came, I had less 
than two weeks to sell the apartment 
furnishings, pack and try to ship our 
personal possessions, pack for travel, 
then move into the Hilton Hotel to be 
processed out. We spent only one night 
in the hotel, one night which became the 
most frightening of any I had spent since 
the troubles began. I had heard the 
stories of room searches, money and 
valuables taken, windows being shot out 
as a few loyalists and the revolutionaries 
clashed over control of the nearby radio 
station; but nobody had told me that the 
hotel grounds were the fire-base! The 
place was an armed encampment. We 
couldn't turn around without bumping 
into a very young Khomeini guard 
amateurishly fondling his rifle. One 
guard managed to tear-gas the lobby, 
just playing around with the canister ! 
Bedtime started with a bomb scare. 
Everyone in the lobby was turned 
outside, everyone else told to stay in his 
room. Happily, there was no bomb. 
About 2 a.m., right under my second- 
story window, the nightly "fire drill" 



started. No one ever knew the real 
reason for these firings, but it is difficult 
to sleep through machine gun chatter and 
carbine firings. I got very little sleep. 

At 5 a.m. we loaded onto buses and 
were escorted to the airport. After 
seemingly endless hours of standing in 
line, thorough search of our single 
permitted suitcase, passport check, 
identification check and recheck, we 
were allowed to leave. Pan American 
Airways "Freedom Flight 6" lifted off at 
2:30 p.m. January 19, 1979. Shouts and 
tears released our emotions. Farewell, 
Iran. 

Iran is a country of extremes: ancient 
and modern, very rich, very poor, with a 
middle class just beginning to emerge. I 
saw many evidences of the good that the 
Shah was trying to accomplish in 
education, welfare, medicine, 
technology, and transportation. 
Khomeini appears bent on destroying 
these progressive steps and turning the 
clock back to medieval times. I am 
saddened to see the turmoil and unrest 
where, for almost five years, we were 
happily at home. It is frightening to 
realize the global repercussions. ▲ 



Spring 1980 



Growing Pains for Abu Dhabi 



By Mariana Guion Mabry '64 



Abu Dhabi, land of mystery, oil, sand, 
frustration, and progress? Certainly the 
last four — and perhaps a bit of the first. 
Ahu Dhabi is the largest, and, because of 
its extensive oil resources, the most 
important of the seven former Trucial 
States which make up the United Arab 
Emirates (U. A. E.). The U.A.E. was 
established December 2, 1971, a 
federation of Abu Dhabi, Dubai, 
Sharjah, Ajman. Umm al Quawain, Ras 
al Khaimah, and Fujairah. The ruler of 
Abu Dhabi, HH Sheik Zayed bin Sultan 
al Nahyan, is the president of the 
U.A.E. . and HH Sheik Rashid bin Saeed 
al-Maktoum, ruler of Dubai, is the vice 
president. He and the rulers of the other 
Emirates make up the Supreme Council 
of Rulers. 

The U.A.E. is thus a relatively new 
voice in the Middle East, and has so far 
tended to follow the lead of Saudi Arabia 
in the areas of politics and oil pricing. 
Sheik Zayed, relatively conservative in 
his outlook and determined to use the 
country's one limited resource wisely, 
has nonetheless authorized a 
tremendous amount of expenditure in his 
effort to develop Abu Dhabi for his 
citizens' benefit. The per capita income 
of Abu Dhabi may be the highest in the 
world, for although the population of 
Abu Dhabi has been estimated at more 
than 200,000, the native population 
probably numbers less than 50,000. 

As is to be expected in a land which 
has only one shot at prosperity, there is a 
variety of laws designed to protect the 
interests of the Abu Dhabians and to 
ensure that whatever commercial 
interests are developed, the nationals 
benefit from all ventures. For example, 
no foreigners may own land or buildings; 
none may come to Abu Dhabi without a 
local sponsor, and, thus, no business 
may be established without an Abu 
Dhabi citizen participating as majority 
partner. Since there is no provision for 
naturalization, this means a native-born 
Abu Dhabian. 




If these terms seem stringently self- 
protective, it should be noted that Abu 
Dhabi has nothing but the oil beneath its 
sands, and whatever the laws. Abu 
Dhabi is inundated with foreigners 
making money hand over fist, with 
hundreds more waiting for a sponsor in 
order to come in and cash in on the 
riches. Many schools have been built, 
perhaps more than can ever be needed, 
and health services are free at the local 
hospital and maternity clinics, although 
most Westerners seem to prefer the 
better-established hospital at Dubai for 
any serious illness. Low-cost and free 
housing has been made available to 
encourage the nomads to live in the 
town, and Sheik Zayed has a policy of 
giving houses to nationals to be rented to 
foreigners as a source of income. 

Although there is a cadre of educated 
Abu Dhabians who serve at the higher 
echelons of the government agencies and 
various businesses, one does not see 
many native Abu Dhabians in daily life. 
The menial work is done mainly by the 
Baluchis, while the Arabs from other 
Middle Eastern countries, in addition to 
the vast numbers of Indians, 



Palestinians, and Lebanese, fill most of 
the clerical and shop positions. The work 
force is thus swelled by over 100.000 of 
these people who have flocked to Abu 
Dhabi because they can earn more there 
than in their own countries. 

Of the seven Emirates, only Dubai, an 
important Arab trading port for 
centuries, was in any sense developed 
before the discovery of oil. Abu Dhabi 
was little more than a patch of desert, 
with the town of Abu Dhabi, a small 
fishing village perched on an island close 
to the mainland. The oil revenues, which 
began to flow in the mid-1960s, have 
brought the town leaping into the 
twentieth century. In its rapid push 
toward urban and social development, 
Abu Dhabi has become a boom town, 
with the attendant inevitable problems. 
Construction is rampant, and since there 
is a great deal of "get-rich-quick-itis," 
buildings are going up as rapidly and 
cheaply as possible. Construction is 
almost exclusively of cement blocks, 
and the cement is most often made with 
salty sand, leading to cracks and leaks in 
the newest of structures. Houses, 
apartments, office buildings, and hotel 
rooms are inadequate for the masses of 
people flooding into the country from all 
over the world. 

One's introduction to Abu Dhabi, 
after the bleak drive from the airport into 
town on Airport Road, is typically 
unpredictable. Does one still have the 
hotel room that was booked? Can one 
keep it until a house is available? To say 
that hotel space is at a premium is a gross 
understatement. The government 
"reserves" 60 percent of all hotel space 
on a permanent basis. The companies 
operating in Abu Dhabi pay to "reserve" 
a room or two for their incoming 
personnel. All of these rooms, however, 
are constantly filled, and if the 
government decides to preempt them, 
one either finds lodging with friends or 
one leaves the country. 

We were in a hotel for almost four 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 








Spring 1980 



Abu Dhabi 



(continued) 



months, from October 1975 to early 
February 1976, waiting to find a house 
with access to water and electricity, and 
we were exceedingly fortunate to keep 
our room when the annual December 
celebration of the establishment of the 
U. A.E. brought hundreds of government 
guests to Abu Dhabi. The cost to the 
firm for this extended stay at the hotel 
for our family of four was over $24,000. 

After a three-month search, we found 
an empty house, with a city water main 
running close by. and electricity already 
installed. It took almost another month 
to find out who was responsible for 
renting it and to get the lease signed. The 
lease called for a two-year rental period 
at 80,000 dirham ($1 equaled 
approximately 4 dirham) per year. Lease 
notwithstanding, when the second year's 
rent was due, the owners asked for 
140,000 dirham, and a compromise of 
100,000 dirham was reached after 
lengthy negotiations. We knew several 
families in the same area who were 
forced to leave because they could not or 
would not meet the huge annual increase 
in rent. 

The housing complex where we lived 
presents an interesting example of Abu 
Dhabian expediency. There were about 
thirty houses built in this particular area. 
Some months prior to our arrival, Sheik 
Zayed had needed space to house a 
number of his guests. Twelve of these 
houses were completely furnished on a 
crash basis with wall-to-wall carpeting, 
drapes, water, electricity, air 
conditioning, telephones, and all 
appliances and furniture to 
accommodate the visitng dignitaries, 
who stayed for several weeks. At the 
end of their stay, Sheik Zayed ordered 
the houses stripped of all furnishings and 
appliances, and the now-empty houses 
were given, one each, to a native Abu 
Dhabi family to rent as a source of 
income. As our house was one of the 
twelve, we were able to move in with a 
minimum of difficulty by Abu Dhabi 
standards. Nonetheless, we still had to 
have a pipe connecting the house to the 
main water line, a water tank added to 
the roof, and an electric pump installed 
to pump the water to the roof tank in 
order to have water for use in the house. 




Planted and well-tended roundabout and new construction 



This water was orange in color because 
of the rusty pipes, and due to the flimsy 
nature of the tank coverings, could not 
be considered sanitary. We bought 
expensive bottled water for drinking and 
cooking. 

Daily life for Westerners in Abu Dhabi 
was a blend of near-idyllic living with a 
myriad of continual frustrations. Our 
children attended the French School, 
which began at 8:00 a.m. and finished at 
1:00 p.m., due to the intense heat in the 
afternoons. Since these hours meshed 
nicely with my husband's working hours 
(8:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m.; 4:00 p.m. -7:00 
p.m.), we were able to enjoy a long lunch 
together, often with a family swim at the 
Club. The Club was originally 
established by the British but had been 
opened for membership to all 
nationalities by the time we arrived in 
Abu Dhabi. Since it was the only facility 
of its kind in Abu Dhabi, sporting a 
lovely beach and sailing facilities, a 
swimming pool, two cement squash 
courts, two tennis courts, a billiard room 
and a very good restaurant, the waiting 
lists for membership were long, and it 
often took more than a year to be 
considered for membership. 

With their shortened school hours, our 
children had plenty of time to finish their 
homework and play before dinner. There 
was not much adult entertainment in 
Abu Dhabi, so one's friends, always 
invaluable, took on an added 
importance. There were only about a 
half-dozen restaurants to choose from, 
and apart from the Club, or dancing or 
bowling at the Hilton, one would join 
friends in the evening for dinner, bridge, 
or conversation. The movie theaters 
were usually too crowded to be 



comfortable, but there was a good 
selection of films, and many people had 
television sets which provided a limited 
number of programs in English. Almost 
all types of consumer goods were 
available in Abu Dhabi if one could 
locate them and could afford to pay 
prices which were generally exhorbitant. 

What tended to make life in Abu 
Dhabi difficult for Westerners were the 
problems encountered in getting what 
elsewhere would be considered as 
routine tasks accomplished. If power or 
water failed, there was no one to call. 
One simply waited until it was restored. 
Appliances were sold without 
guarantees, so if an appliance failed, 
which they did with annoying frequency, 
one could buy a new one, but there was 
little or no hope of having it repaired. We 
were not allowed to test drive our new 
car, and when we got it, we discovered a 
cracked window (hidden by a dealership 
sticker), a speedometer which didn't 
work, a gas gauge which didn't register, 
and the radio, tape deck, and air- 
conditioning inoperative. 

Obviously, not all difficulties 
encountered were as troublesome as the 
above. We learned to deal with lice 
(horrors!) and sunburn, and found that 
we had a great deal of leisure to develop 
friendships and a variety of projects and 
hobbies. If this article seems to present a 
somewhat mixed attitude to life in a 
foreign country, it may reflect fairly 
accurately my feelings after two years in 
Abu Dhabi. It was an interesting 
experience, as any such adventure must 
be, and the memories are on the whole 
pleasant or, at least in retrospect, 
amusing. Perhaps, one should not ask 
for more. ▲ 



10 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Alumna Marries Turk, 
Adopts New Culture 



By Letitia Moye Unver '61 



A 1961 graduate of Agnes Scott, I met 
my Turkish husband in America when he 
came to study for a master's degree. In 
1965 we returned to Turkey and taught in 
a boys high school in Tarsus, an ancient 
town in the south. Later we moved to 
Ankara, the modern capital located on 
the central Anatolian Plateau. My 
husband has been involved with a 
private development foundation: 
working in rural areas with a chicken 
project near Tarsus, a dairy proect in 
Diyarbakir in far eastern Turkey, and 
improvement of bee keeping in the 
Ankara region. I taught English several 
years and have two sons, twelve and 
eight. Not working full-time recently has 
given me time to enjoy my boys and take 
part in various activities related to the 
development foundation. 

Actually, daily living takes more and 
more energy. This past winter 
has been colder than usual 
with snow most of January, and 
our apartment has had no fuel oil for 
three separate periods of weeks. We 
stayed warm with a small coal and wood 
stove in the living room. Electricity has 
also been cut off almost every morning 
from 8:30 to 12:30. 

Our condominum in a building with 
eight other families is typical of Ankara 
housing, there being almost no suburbs 
and single family dwellings. Of necessity 
I speak Turkish now with my neighbors 
and when shopping. My boys are 
bilingual and attend a private school 
where math and science courses are 
taught in English. 

Excellent seasonal fresh fruits and 
vegetables, yogurt and lamb are among 
the staples in our diet; as yet, frozen 
foods haven't reached us. These staples 
take a lot of preparation as well, but a 
maid once a week helps with the heavy 
cleaning. 




Letitia's Husband, Altan Zeki, Writes: 



The increase in oil prices on the 
international market hit Turkey very 
hard because the country has to import 
about 80 percent of its oil ; but Turkey 
does not have enough foreign exchange 
to pay for the oil imports — the total of its 
annual exports of goods and services will 
not be enough for the oil imports alone. 
The result has been acute shortage of 
gasoline and fuel oil. Curtailing of other 
imports has created stagnation in the 
industry, thereby creating 
unemployment. Prices have been 
soaring. Recently, the prime minister 
warned about three digit inflation, 
instead of just two digit inflation — that 
is, inflation that has been running close 
to 80 percent annually may soon go over 
100 percent. 

The political situation is not very 
comfortable either. Considerable tension 
and conflict exists between the extreme 



right and left wing political factions. The 
situation is further complicated by the 
endless divisions and factions within the 
left. Political violence and assassinations 
are quite frequent; both between the left 
and right wing groups, and also within 
the left. 

Basically, Turkey is still a working 
democracy, mildly left of the center 
government which was voted in with the 
1977 elections. However, when the 
economy and the political violence did 
not improve, the voters n the 1979 
elections brought in a more conservative 
government. Situated next to Iran, and 
not too far from Pakistan and other 
trouble spots in the Middle East, and 
with a long border with the Soviet 
Union, Turkey's geographic loation and 
political position are certainly both 
critical and significant. A 



Spring 1980 



11 



Istanbul scene taken b\ author 



She Calls Istanbul Home 



By Betsy Boatwright Goksel '62 




Betsy and youngest daughter 



"Go to Ireland and dig peat!" was Dr. 
Hayes' advice as I wavered, or rather 
stagnated, among classmates who were 
either discussing the very new Pill in 
preparation for June weddings or G.R.E. 
results in preparation for graduate 
school. Ireland and Turkey in 1962 
seemingly had nothing in common, not 
even the terrorism that besieges them 
both today, but "Kismet" or Fate led me 
to The American College for Girls in 
Istanbul, a division of Robert College at 
that time. Kismet was helped along by 
Dr. Hayes, who had taught at Robert 
College from 1921 to 1925; Dr. Catherine 
Sims, a former Agnes Scott history 
professor who was the dean of the Girls' 
College; and Ipek Aksugur, a graduate of 
the Girls' College and member of the 
class of '63 at Agnes Scott. I accepted 
the job with no idea of my salary and 
only a vague notion of where Turkey 
was. Ahead of me were two years of 
adventure before having to make 



serious, life-binding decisions in an 
unknown, mysterious country far from 
home. 

The two years have extended to 
eighteen years, the "serious life-binding 
decisions" having been made here after 
meeting a young Turkish military officer 
at an International Work Camps meeting 
shortly after my arrival in Turkey. 
Istanbul is now my very familiar home, 
yet in many ways Turkey remains 
unknown and mysterious. 

The Girls' School, where I continue to 
teach, has merged with its counterpart 
and is now Robert College, a coed junior 
and senior high school consisting of 
bright, highly-selected Turkish students, 
many of whom continue their education 
in the United States. Its campus is an 
oasis of green and beauty in a rapidly 
sprawling city. 

My three daughters — Tuba, Dilara, 
and Diba Nigar — are both bilingual and 
bicultural, celebrating with equal 
enthusiasm Turkish national holidays 
and the holidays and traditions that I 
hold dear. 

The haunting call of the muezzins 
awakens me in the morning to red 
streaks of dawn silhouetting the gentle 
Asian hills, the sparkling Bosporus with 
its ferryboats and colorful fishing boats 
continues to thrill me, and the street 
sellers with their wares of yogurt, 
vegetables, or pots and pans create an 
exciting, oriental scene. 

Yet in many other ways, both subtly 
and obviously, the Turkish scene has 
changed over the years. Now 
interspersed among the street sellers are 
soldiers with machine guns. Each day 
the newspapers bring dread, fear, and 
desperation into Turkish homes as the 
number of deaths from anarchy 
increases and inflation soars. Many 
necessities — coffee, margarine, toilet 
paper, gasoline, and fuel oil, to list a 
few — are unavailble, and depression is 
hard to fight off, as schools close for 
lack of heat, and businesses stop 



production. Turkey's economy, as well 
as its internal peace, is at its lowest ebb 
since the founding of the Republic in 
1923. 

As a foreigner in Turkey I have 
enjoyed the privilege of being forgiven 
for foolishnesses (such as rolling in the 
grass with my children) or social slights 
that a Turkish lady would never commit. 
I have been respected as a teacher, an 
honored profession in Turkey. I have 
felt fear, not as a foreigner but as a 
human being caught in the anarchy that 
rages here. I have never felt hostility 
aimed at me because of being American, 
though perhaps my marriage to a Turk 
and my relative fluency in Turkish has 
helped to counteract this. I have felt a 
coolness, even antagonism, towards the 
United States as a power, beginning 
around 1965 and continuing now with 
great resentment because of the arms' 
embargo. However, this antagonism is 
very rarely extended to a personal level, 
and tourists are usually surprised and 
warmed by the hospitality and kindness 
of the Turks. 

I must state that my knowledge of 
Turkey is limited to Istanbul. The 
attitudes in Istanbul, the center of 
culture and industry, are not 
representative of all of Turkey. In some 
areas the Anatolian Turk is more 
hospitable and helpful, while in others he 
is more intolerant. Turkey is a large and 
varied country, from the sophistication 
and westernization of Istanbul to the 
remote backward villages of the East, 
isolated by lack of roads, education, 
medical care, communication; from the 
overwhelming beauty of the 
Mediterranean coast to the bare plateaus 
of Central Anatolia. Today the country 
is being torn apart by various factors — 
religious, nationalistic, and political. I 
have identified myself with this country, 
so rich in history, natural beauty, and 
human values, and I hope, as we all do, 
that the future will bring a settlement of 
the many troubled areas. A 



12 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 




Spring 1980 



13 



Draft Registration: Yes and No 



By Gina Philips '81 



"Women in the Military — Should They 
Be Drafted?" and "Women in Combat — 
Closer than You Think" are recent 
articles from Newsweek and U.S. News 
and World Report, respectively. These 
articles have provided information used 
in my formulating an argument against 
drafting women. The arguments for and 
against have proven to be valid and 
evenly matched. The question no longer 
pertains to draft registration but to the 
expansion of women's employment in 
combat-related jobs or actual combat. 
President Carter has assured us that 
breaking the 204 years of military 
tradition will "not be a move away from 
an all volunteer force but simply a 
time-saving measure to help mobilize 
troops in case of an emergency." The 
U.S. News article clearly points out that 
women in combat follows closely at the 
heels of accepting women for the draft. 
In conjunction with this reality, it is 
imperative that one sees the argument 
against the draft from political. 




economical, and, most importantly, 
sociological points of view. 

Politically, Congress is split on the 
debate. Those opposed question the 
advantage of drafting women, excluding 
any combat-related jobs. Volunteers 
already cover non-combat military jobs, 
and there is an excess of volunteers. 



Presently, no woman is stationed closer 
than fifteen miles from a combat area. 
One Congressman concludes that 
instigating the women draft excluding all 
combat-related jobs defeats the purpose 
and becomes a mere gesture. 

Economically, one can look at the 
employment percentages of women in 
the military today without the draft. The 
precentage of volunteers is expected to 
increase from an 8 percent portion of the 
total military to a 12 percent portion by 
1985, and the overall portion of men is 
expected to drop by 25 percent by the 
1990s as the percentage of women 
increases. With this increase of women 
in the military service is an increase of 
military pregnancies. It is calculated that 
of the 14 percent of women pregnant 
during the year, 8 percent are pregnant at 
one time, but even more astounding is 
the fact that one-half of the pregnancies 
are to unwed mothers. Issues of 
abortion, child support, and parental 
(continued on page 20) 



By Carol Chapman '81 



I OPPOSE selective slavery for anyone, 
male or female. However, since there is 
no avoiding the fact that President 
Carter is seeking from Congress the 
authority to register women for non- 
combat military service, we should now 
attempt to determine what advantage, if 
any, there may be in the registration of 
women. 

The question of whether or not women 
should be required to join their male 
friends and relatives in filling out 
registration forms at their local post 
offices is probably the most inflammable 
fuel to feed the pro-ERA fires in quite 
some time. The 150.000 women 
currently serving in the all-volunteer 
armed forces have proved that the 
incorporation of women in the military is 
not the far-fetched notion it was once 
thought to be. As Carter acknowledged 
in his February 8 statement. "There is 
no distinction possible, on the basis of 
ability or performance, that would allow 
me to exclude women from an obligation 
to register." Furthermore, the principle 




of equal rights means equal obligations, 
including the obligation of possible 
mandatory military duty. Carter himself 
further stated, "In every area of our 
national life, women are meeting the 
responsibilities of citizenship . . .Just 
as we are asking women to assume 
additional responsibilities, it is more 
urgent than ever that the women in 



America have full and equal rights under 
the Constitution. Equal obligations 
deserve equal rights." 

Unfortunately, "full and equal rights 
under the Constitution" is still not a 
reality. It is with this fact in mind that 
some women are bitterly retorting. "We 
meet the responsibilities, but where are 
the accompanying rights and privileges? 
Why should we be called upon to defend 
a constitution in which we are not even 
included? No ERA, no registration, no 
draft." Their indignation is justifiable. 
Required draft registration is a slap in 
the face to the women who have fought 
long and hard for a guarantee of equal 
rights under the Constitution. 

Yet, properly wielded, the registration 
of women for the draft could be a 
powerful tool for the ratification of the 
Equal Rights Amendment. It would be 
hypocritical of our feminist friends to 
demand equal rights in every facet of 
American society on the one hand, but, 
faced with the prospect of required 
(continued on page 20) 



14 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Book Reviews 




Tennessee 
roots 





Fefcia Stewart MD. 

FeUcia Guest 

:, Gary Stewart, MB, 

ffipbert Hatcher, MJ3. 



Art for All the Children, by Frances E. 
Anderson '63. Charles C. Thomas, 
Springfield, Illinois. $18.75. 
Reprinted with permission from National 
Art Education Association Newsletter, 
July, 1979. 

Art for All the Children was created out 
of desperate need for literature that 
integrates the concepts of special educa- 
tion with those of art education and 
developmental psychology, and it speaks 
to those needs with a clarity, organiza- 
tional logic, and thoroughness that is 
refreshing and comforting. 

One of the particularly valuable as- 
pects of this book is its reliance upon 
discoveries made about learning specific 
to diverse handicapped conditions. The 
author's definitions of various impair- 
ments form a social, intellectual, and 
physical profile that is most helpful for 
identification purposes. She cautions the 
reader that while description is neces- 
sary for understanding, labeling and 
catergorizing special children can aggra- 
vate feelings of stigmatization. The 
profiles provided include the learning 
disabled, behaviorally disordered, hear- 
ing impaired, mentally retarded, visually 
impaired, and physically handicapped. 
She then explores the issues of evalua- 
tion and assessment, the success or 
failure of an activity being dependent 
upon the criteria for judging the merits 
of an art experience. Since this book is 
designed to help parents as well as art 
teachers and therapists, the author does 
not assume the reader's fluency with 
development theory and presents a dis- 
tilled summary of the stages of chil- 
dren's artistic development with a help- 
ful breakdown of behaviors in a check- 
list of age-appropriate skills. 

This book is a welcome addition to the 
growing literature addressing art ac- 
tivities for impaired children. It belongs 
on the bookshelves of college libraries, 
on the desks of art educators, art 
therapists, recreation therapists, and 
parents. Dvora Krueger 



Tennessee Taproots by Paul and Sophie 
Montgomery Crane '40. Earle-Shields 
Publishers, Old Hickory, Tennessee. 
$9.95. 

This book of discovery is the first to 
bring together all ninety-five county 
courthouses of Tennessee, with color 
pictures of each one. A symbol of the 
county, each courthouse reflects the 
economic activity, civic pride, and the 
health of local government. The county 
courthouse system is a basic building 
block of democracy in America and is 
still the place at which the ordinary 
citizen meets his government. 

Primarily a picture book, Tennessee 
Taproots presents each courthouse as it 
looked in 1976. Each is an example of 
the style of architecture in public build- 
ings at the time it was built. A table, 
giving the construction dates, shows the 
architectural history of the courthouse 
and the changing styles. 

The book presents three types of 
information: factual information, which 
may be readily available but has not, in 
recent years, been complied in one 
volume; information that deals specifi- 
cally with the courthouse itself; and 
points of interest, significant happen- 
ings, and famous personalities of each 
county. 

The factual information gives the date 
of the founding of the county, the origin 
of the name of the county and the county 
seat, the land area in square miles, the 
principle rivers which drain the county, 
and the population figures as reported in 
the U.S. census reports of 1850, 1900, 
and 1970. Each county is ranked by 
population in the state. 

The courthouse information includes 
the number of courthouses built in each 
county with the dates, cost, and the 
names of architects and builders where 
they could be found. Noteworthy trials 
and special events involving the cour- 
thouses are listed. 

Under "points of interest" are listed 
various items which highlight each 
county. 



My Body, My Health: The Concerned 
Woman 's Guide to Gynecology by 
Felicia Guest '66, Felicia Stewart, M.D., 
Gary Stewart, M.D., and Robert 
Hatcher, M.D. John Wiley and Sons, 
New York, New York. $6.95. 
My Body, My Health was written be- 
cause women and their doctors are now 
making health care decisions together. 
Women who read My Body, My Health 
will find the thorough, up-to-date infor- 
mation they need to make informed 
decisions on everything from birth con- 
trol to major surgery. 

Written by two gynecologists and two 
family planning experts, My Body, My 
Health is a comprehensive, unbiased, 
readable, illustrated guidebook for 
women of all ages. It avoids the pitfalls 
of obsolete data, paternally reassuring 
attitudes, limited viewpoints, and politi- 
cal overtones. The book covers forty- 
one major topics, including breast and 
pelvic examinations, early signs of preg- 
nancy, methods of birth control, deci- 
sion-making about unplanned preg- 
nancies, abortions, sterilization opera- 
tions for both men and women, repro- 
ductive tract infection, and menopause. 
More than 130 illustrations, along with 
practical checklists and actual case his- 
tories, illuminate the text. 

Designed as a standard reference, My 
Body, My Health will be updated regu- 
larly as new information becomes availa- 
ble. A professional edition of the book, 
which includes additional information 
for clinicians, has been published also. 



Spring 1980 



15 



With the Clubs 



Atlanta 



Winter programs for the Atlanta Club 
have included '"New Roles of Women," 
presented by Dr. Connie Jones, assistant 
professor of sociology, at the home of 
Flake Patman Jokl '44 in November; 
"Liberal Arts in a Business Career," by 
Dr. William Weber, associate professor 
of economics, at the home of Christie 
Theriot Woodfin '68 in January; and a 
visit to the campus for the College 
Founder's Day celebration in February. 
Succeeding Jane Taylor White '42 as 
president of the Atlanta group is Frances 
Ellis Wayt '42, who has been program 
chairman. Serving with her will be 
Frances Steele Garrett '37, first vice 
president; Gail Savage Glover '66, sec- 
ond vice president; Nell Floyd Hall '51, 
secretary; and Martha Davis Rosselot 
'58, treasurer. 



Augusta 



Dr. Caroline Dillman's talk on 
"Southern Culture in Transition" was 
"most interesting," reported the club 
president, Linda Todd McCall '59, after 
the luncheon meeting March 1 at the 
Augusta Country Club, "and our mem- 
bers were very responsive." The sociol- 
ogy professor and her husband, Fred, 
drove down for the occasion and com- 
bined her speaking engagement with a 
little family research, for Dr. Dillman 
herself has "roots" in the area. Incom- 
ing officers for the Augusta Alumnae 
Club are Susan Bell Bohler '73, presi- 
dent; Carol Jensen Rychley '69, vice 
president; and Patsy Rankin Jopling '69, 
treasurer. 

Barrow, Gwinnett, 
Newton 

BGN alums returned to the campus 
February 16 for a look at the miniature 
reproduction of Solomon's temple in 
Rebekah Reception Room and a talk by 
Dr. Paul Garber, professor of Bible 
emeritus, whose research was behind the 
model's creation. Among guests in the 
audience were Mr. and Mrs. Morris S. 



Hale, Jr.. of Atlanta, who later wrote to 
the Alumnae Office expressing apprecia- 
tion for the "informative and well- 
presented" talk and praise for the club's 
entire meeting. Following an introduc- 
tory prayer by Elizabeth Cash Gilmer 
'28, Club President Julia Kennedy '60 
presented a check for $150 from the club 
to the College for use in Alumnae 
Association work and invited members 
to stay for lunch in Evans Dining Hall. 



Charleston 



Birmingham 



Dr. Constance Shaw's slide presenta- 
tion of the "Student Trip to Spain" for 
the Birmingham Club February 16 was 
both "entertaining and informative," 
according to reports from President 
Mary Anne Murphy Hornbuckle '69 and 
Vice President Pam Coffey '74. The 
Spanish professor, who heads the de- 
partment at ASC, said she had "a lovely 
time" and would have liked visiting with 
the alums even longer. The group met at 
the home of Cissie Harris Anderson '62 
for a "delightful luncheon, for which 
everyone brought her favorite dish. We 
enjoyed the change from meeting in a 
restaurant — we were far more comfort- 
able and able to talk to friends," said the 
officers. Serving with Mary Anne and 
Pam are Virginia Finney Bugg '66, 
secretary; Betty Young vonHerrmann 
'69, treasurer; and Carol Sharman Ring- 
land '70, career liaison person. 



Central Florida 

Orlando area alums were so en- 
thusiastic about the talk and pictures on 
"Agnes Scott — Summer in Marburg" 
given at their March 1 luncheon meeting 
by Dr. Giinther Bicknese. chairman of 
the German department, that they now 
hope he will plan a similar trip for 
alumnae. The Central Florida Club's 
meeting was at Dubsdread Country Club 
in Orlando, with President Melba 
Cronenberg Bassett '59 presiding. Vice 
President Mary Ann Gregory Dean '63 
took Dr. Bicknese for an afternoon tour 
of the city. The professor said he had "a 
great time" on the whole trip to Florida. 



"It never snows in Charleston," but it 
surely did the weekend Dr. Ayse Ilgaz- 
Carden '66 and her husband, John, drove 
over for a visit to the Charleston Club. 
"Women and Success" was the title of 
the psychology professor's talk to alums 
at a luncheon March 1 at the Colony 
House. Everyone was so enthusiastic 
over the talk and interested in the 
subject that the meeting lasted into late 
afternoon. Then the snow came. The 
Cardens were snow-bound at their inn 
until Monday morning, when the high- 
way patrol finally opened one lane of the 
interstate. Safely home. Dr. Carden 
described the weekend as "a fantastic 
experience" — in more ways than one. 
The Charleston steering committee is 
headed by Allyn Smoak Bruce '68. 



Charlotte 

Dr. Michael Brown, professor of 
history, and his wife, Lee, drove to 
Charlotte February 23 for a presentation 
of his beautiful slides of "Alumnae Trips 
to England" for the club's Founder's 
Day luncheon at the Myers Park Country 
Club. An early social hour drew together 
a large group, visiting with the Browns 
and each other. Club President Resa L. 
Harris '73 and Secretary Helen DeWitt 
'75 reported that the program was "a 
tremendous success," enjoyed by some 
fifty alums. Incoming officers are Sarah 
Petty Dagenhart '55. president; Judy 
Hamilton Grubbs '73. vice president; 
Kathy Fitch Piette '78, secretary; and 
Fran Woodward Clark '72, treasurer. 



Cobb County 

"Mary Boney Sheats captivated us 
with her masterful overview of women 
in the Bible," wrote President Florrie 
Fleming Corley '54 after Dr. Sheats 
spoke at the Cobb County Club Found- 
er's Day luncheon February 23 at the 
Morrill House Restaurant in arietta. Ga. 
"Many had further questions for her 



16 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



afterwards." Dr.Sheats told the group to 
"read the Scriptures with open eyes" — 
that the Bible is more balanced towards 
male and female than is generally 
thought. Academy Graduate Bertha 
Hudson Whitaker, now eighty-seven, 
was present with her sister, Ruby Baker, 
and brought her 1907-08 College Bulle- 
tin. Bertha went to Agnes Scott on the 
street car from Marietta and has wonder- 
ful tales to tell. 



Decatur 



Columbia 



Alums in the Columbia area are among 
the latest groups to enjoy Dr. Edward 
McNair's popular "Anecdotes of Agnes 
Scott." The English professor and direc- 
tor of public relations emeritus flew to 
South Carolina February 23 for the 
club's Founder's Day luncheon at Hud- 
son's, a historic home turned restaurant. 
Club President Jackie Rountree An- 
drews '57 sent an enthusiastic report of 
the day and commented, "Dr. McNairis 
such a delight; everyone loved him. The 
whole occasion was a special treat, and 
no one seemed to want to leave." Helen 
Wright Smith '24 brought her book of 
"Songs of Agnes Scott — 1922," and 
several Agnes Scott yearbooks and club 
scrapbooks were on display. The club 
voted to present a book to the College 
library in memory of Mildred Derieux 
Gantt '47, "a faithful member for many 
years." Incoming officers are: Judy Hill 
Calhoun '73, president; Margie Richard- 
son '73, secretary; and Dr. Christina 
Yates Parr '47, treasurer. 



Dallas, Fort Worth 

Dr. Ted Mathews, who headed a group 
of Glee Club students touring and 
performing in England and Russia this 
winter, flew to Dallas and gave a slide 
presentation of the trip for texas alums. 
A large group thoroughly enjoyed his 
program, and the music professor re- 
ported "a great time" himself. The 
spring luncheon was at Pittman House in 
Dallas. 



Founder's Day this year included the 
lavish morning coffee at which the 
Decatur Club entertained in Rebekah 
Reception Room preceding the Convo- 
cation talk by Dr. Edgar F. Shannon, Jr., 
president of the United Chapters of Phi 
Beta Kappa. The College community 
and Atlanta as well as Decatur alums 
were invited to the celebration. In 
January the club, which is headed by 
Mary Ben WRIGHT Erwin '25, enjoyed 
a musical program by the Agnes Scott 
Madrigals. 



"a great success." In February the 
College's public relations director, Sara 
Fountain, told members of the club how 
word of Agnes Scott is being spread and 
her publications revamped and updated. 
Her talk was entitled "Agnes Scott: 
What It Takes— the ASC Marketing 
Campaign" and took place in the Alum- 
nae House. 



Jacksonville 



Evening 
(Metropolitan Atlanta) 

Another outstanding book discus- 
sion sponsored by the Evening Alumnae 
Club drew more than fifty alums and 
friends to hear and take part in a session 
led Dr. John Gignilliat, of the history 
departent, on Restoring the American 
Dream by Robert J. Ringer. Participants 
gathered by the fireside in Winship 
Dormitory for a three-hour presentation, 
and many stayed for lunch afterwards in 
Evans Dining Hall. President Susan 
Balch Clapham '75 reported the morning 



"Near East Women" was the topic for 
discussion by Dr. Mildred Davis Harding 
'38, who was the speaker for the 
Jacksonville Club at its Founder's Day 
celebration February 23. Mildred has 
lived in Cairo, Baghdad, and Beirut, 
where she and her husband taught. The 
group et for a pot-luck "of great variety 
and superb quality," wrote President 
Elizabeth Lynn '27, in the home of 
Peggy Ringel Zell '53. Mothers of cur- 
rently enrolled Agnes Scotters from the 
Jacksonville area were invited. Officers 
were prevailed upon to serve one more 
year, and in addition to Elizabeth in- 
clude: Anne Elcan Mann '48, vice 
president; Betty Libby Alderman '63, 
secretary; and Betty Ann Green '53, 
treasurer. Barbara Duncan '78 is career 
planning representative. 




Some alumnae attending the Dallas, Ft. Worth meeting in March. Front row, I to r: Virginia 
Gray Pruitt '32, Louise Sullivan Fry '40, Esther Rich '29. Back row: Joan Scott Curtis '73, 
Norah Little Green '50, Mary Lou Kleppinger DeBolt '54, Martha Parks Little '68, Ann Morris 
Synowsky '68, Anne Sylvester Booth 54, Cherry Wood '73. 



Spring 1980 



17 



Kentuckiana 

The Chapel Restaurant in Louisville 
was the setting for this year's spring 
luncheon of the Kentuckiana Club, and 
Dr. Edward McNair, professor of En- 
glish and director of public relations 
emeritus, was guest speaker. President 
Edith Towers Davis '60 wrote after- 
wards that his talk on "Anecdotes of 
Agnes Scott" was delightful and was 
enjoyed by everyone. The club will have 
its annual family picnic during the 
summer and another gathering at Edith's 
farm in September, alice Finn Hunt '67 
has been elected to succeed Edith as 
president for the next two years. Barba- 
ra Hunt Gresham '66 will serve as career 
planning liaison, and Dr. Catherine 
Bates '36 will be admissions representa- 
tive, following Mary Bryan DuBard '59. 
who is moving to Birmingham. 



Knoxville 



An enthusiastic group of alums in the 
Knoxville area has met with Montene 
Melson Mason '45 in her home to plan 
for a new alumnae club. It is scheduled 
to get underway this spring at a luncheon 
featuring a talk by Dr. Wallace M. 
Alston. Agnes Scott's president 
emeritus, to renew old ties with the 
College. The steering committee in- 
cludes Vicky Allen Gardner '62, Polly 
Anna Philips Harris '50, Maureen Wil- 
liams Bates '72, Ruth Shepherd Vazquez 
'62, Dana Nichols Stuckwish '77, and 
Sue Czarnitzki Ayers '62. 



Tallahassee, 
Thomasville 



Alumnae in the Tallahassee- 
Thomas ville area had a "perfectly mar- 
velous time" together at their first 
meeting February 22. a luncheon at the 
home of Nancy Love Crane '57 in 
Tallahassee. Alums car-pooled down 
from Georgia's Thomasville for a happy 
gathering with the Floridians. One of the 
main hopes of this new club is to make 
active efforts to reach prospective stu- 



dents for the College, and they plan to SUPlCOaSt 

have an update from the Agnes Scott 

admissions staff in order to be current 

with campus developments, academic 

changes, and admissions requirements. 

Florence Worthy Griner '52 has steered 

the group in its successful beginnings. 



San Francisco 

President Bev Myers Pickett '66 had 
preparations complete for alums in the 
Bay Area to meet at her home in San 
Francisco February 24, when heavy 
rains paralyzed travel in parts of Califor- 
nia and caused a cancellation of the 
Sunday evening get-together. Admis- 
sions Representatives Katherine Akin 
'76 and Ceil Jarrett '77, who were to 
bring the group a "Campus Update." 
had to postpone their visit to the west 
coast. Bev hopes to plan another event 
later in the year — perhaps a downtown 
luncheon in San Fran. 



■ Will 



Alums in the Tampa-St. Petersburg- 
Sarasota area have chosen a new name 
and are hereafter the "Agnes Scott 
Suncoast Alumnae Club." President 
Pam Arnold Milhan '72 wrote that the 
group had enjoyed very much Dr. Marie 
Pepe's "fascinating slide presentation 
about women in the arts" on February 
16 and that afterwards they partook of 
"the great Florida sunshine." The club 
is planning meetings in various parts of 
the large territory covered by its mem- 
bership, and this event was a Continental 
breakfast in Sarasota. Many had driven 
great distances in order to be present. 
Marie Pepe reported that the club had "a 
marvelous group"in attendance and that 
its number was swelled by many hus- 
bands, including her own Charlie. Future 
club plans include a seminar-workshop 
at another location. 





in; 




Suncoast Club met October 20. Speakers were Katherine Akin 



4Lv 

76 and Stephanie Segars '81. 



18 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



TH 




m 




ALUMNAE/STUDENTS/CARUI RS 



NETWORK 



"Tune in to the ASC Network . . . and 
turn on an Agnes Scott student to the 
career she's been looking for all 
along. " 

This line, signaling our first national 
effort to establish an ASC Network, 
appeared on page one of the fall 
Quarterly. I stress national, because last 
April we did a preliminary mailing to 
Atlanta-area alumnae to test potential 
interest in such an advisory network. As 
a result of these first efforts, ninety-five 
alumnae (and nineteen husbands) are 
charter members of the ASC Network. 
By joining the Network, you become 
part of a group of alumnae who have 
offered to assist students and other 
alumnae to explore, enter, and advance 
in their career fields. Perhaps you can 
sponsor a student for one of our off- 
campus experiential programs: 

The Shadow Program — Invite a 
student into your office to spend a 
few hours discussing your job, its 
responsibilities, satisfactions and 
dissatisfactions, and background 
required for entry-level jobs. 
The Extern Program — Help a 
student experience your job by 
having her work with you and your 
colleagues for an unsalaried week 
during a school vacation. 
The Intern Program — Provide a 
long-term experience (perhaps a 
summer, or part-time during the 
year) that enables a student to 
perform responsible duties while 
providing a good introduction to 
your career field. 
As a "Networker" you might prefer to 
assist in other ways, perhaps as a 
workshop speaker or an informal career 




Joan Loeb spent an externship learning about 
Oriental rugs at Sharian's. 



adviser. If you are in a position to help a 
student or alumna enter and advance 
within your organization or career field, 
please sign on as a mentor. A Network of 
professional women who will serve as 
mentors for bright, aspiring protegees 
remains our highest goal. 

Perhaps when you read the original 
copy, you did not apply it to your 
situation. We hope you will consider it 
now. The only requirement for joining 
the Network is an interest in helping 
students and other alumnae. We need 
women working outside the home to be 
sponsors and mentors, but we need all of 
you who are living in other parts of the 
country to share your knowledge about, 
and contacts in, your area with someone 
moving there and seeking employment. 
Your experiences and friends may be all 
she needs to get started. 

If you still hesitate, you are not alone. 
Comments from those already "signed 



on" have ranged from concern about 
their helpfulness from a distance to 
whether a particular career field is of 
interest to students. In spite of this 
hesitation, they wrote to us and our 
formal Network now stretches from 
Massachusetts to Texas to Alaska. Your 
role may be different at a distance: you 
may be asked to write more advice than 
to sponsor an extern, but full-time 
internships are possible anywhere, and 
career mentors are needed in every field 
regardless of geographic area. 

How has the Network helped already? 
Most apparent is the new Extern 
Program. As a result of last year's 
Atlanta mailing, twenty-eight students 
spent a week during their Christmas or 
spring break working with alumnae, their 
spouses, or friends, in such career fields 
as corporate planning, pediatrics, retail 
management, and teaching. Next year 
we hope to expand this program to other 
areas, especially in the Southeast, but to 
do this we need to hear from many more 
of you. 

What other practical benefits has the 
Network had? We can count one student 
internship (several have been offered, 
and now the first has been arranged), 
several Shadow Program sponsors, 
numerous people called upon for 
informal advice, and two jobs being 
vacated by ASC alumnae that have been 
filled by other ASC women. 

Some of this happened through the 
years, but the ASC Network now gives 
you a means to increase the frequency of 
such contacts and assistance in the 
future. Sign on to the Network today by 
returning the coupon on this page to 
Kathleen K. Mooney. Director of Career 
Planning, Agnes Scott College, Decatur, 
Georgia 30030. A Kathleen Mooney 



Mail to Kathleen K. Mooney, Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Ga. 30030 

Sign me on as an affiliate for the following programs: 

□ Shadow □ Speaker 

D Extern D Adviser 

D Intern D Mentor 



Name 

Address. 



CI 



ass. 



Career Field. 



Tributes of Appreciation 



Since April 15, 1979, gifts have been 
made in honor or in memory of the 
following: 

IN HONOR 

Mary Virginia Allen 

Alma Buchanan Brown 

Dorothy D. Brown 

Sally Elberfeld Countryman 

Florene Dunstan 

Kenneth and Annie Lee Greenfield 

Nancy P. Groseclose 

Mary Boney Sheats 

Roberta Winter 

Myrna Goode Young 

IN MEMORY 

Julianne Williams Bodnar 

John A. and Sallie Burgess 

Ella Carey 

Melissa Cilley 

Marion T. Clark 

Jean McPherson Davis 

David A. Dunseith 

James Ballard Dyer 

Inez Norton Edwards 

George E. Erwin 

Isabelle S. Fink 

Helen Fox 

Lucy Durham Goss 

James E. Gilliam, Jr. 

Frances K. Gooch 

Goldie Ham Hanson 

Rebekah Hough Scott Harman 

Muriel Harn 

Cleo Hearon 

Robert B. Holt 



Waddy and Maude Hudson 

Mariwill Hanes Hulsey 

Sally Kate McLane Johnson 

Emma May Laney 

Ellen Douglass Leyburn 

Volina Butler and B. Frank Markert 

Mec Mclntyre McAfee 

Eleanor Brown McCain 

John McCain 

Pauline Martin McCain 

Grace Zachry McCreery 

Fanny McCaa McLaughlin 

Claude Candler McKinney 

Louise McKinney 

Bessie McCowen Medlock 

James A. and Margaret Browning Minter 

Nell Scott Earthman Molton 

Mrs. Charles Norfleet, Sr. 

Virginia Norris 

Marie Scott O'Neill 

Mr. & Mrs. H. B. Patterson. Sr. 

H. B. Patterson. Jr. 

John H. Patton 

Elizabeth Gray and Marvin B. Perry, Sr. 

Marianne Gillis Persons 

Sarah Shields Pfeiffer 

Janef Preston 

Jeb Russell 

Eugenia Williams Schmidt 

Florence E. Smith 

Laura M. Steele 

Carolyn Strozier 

Samuel Guerry Stukes 

Merle G. Walker 

W. G. Weeks 

Ruth Blanton Wood 

Mason Pressly Young 



Show Your College Ties 



The projects committee of the Alum- 
nae Association arranged with designer 
Frankie Welch to produce a scarf espe- 
cially for us. The 33" x 7 3 Ia" cranberry on 
nude scarf illustrated on the cover of this 
magazine bears an Agnes Scott motif 
and the words, "Agnes Scott Alumnae 



Association." 

Won't you show your College ties and 
accent your spring wardrobe. Mail the 
coupon below to the Alumnae Office. 
Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Georgia 
30030. ▲ 



Alumnae Association, Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Georgia 30030 

Enclosed is $ for scarves (5 $10. 

Name: 



Address:_ 



Phone: 



Philips 

(continued from page 14) 

care become economically important 
factors. 

Sociologically, one knows that the 
most fundamental structure or model of 
our society is the family. The divorce 
rate has skyrocketed, and the structure 
of the family has fallen apart, yet we 
continue to act amazed when our 
national fiber begins to crumble. 
Watergate and Abscam should be of no 
surprise as the family structure 
continues to disintegrate. If women are 
drafted and if women ultimately see 
combat duty, how are we going to begin 
to restructure our nation's stability? The 
drafting of women is more than an ERA 
issue. Instead, it is a question of the 
nation's priorities. 

Clearly, there is a need for women in 
the military services in order to release 
men for combat duties. But with a 
surplus of volunteers today, is it 
necessary to draft women unless the 
combat-related jobs are included? And 
are we ready to bring home women in 
body bags? This argument against as 
well as the argument for need further 
study before either can be enacted into 
law. ▲ 



Chapman 

(continued from page 14) 

military service, to amend their battle- 
cry to "Equal rights in everything but 
this!" I believe there is a middle 
position. It is only fair that if men are 
forced to register for the draft, then 
women should be, also. That is, we 
should assert the eligibility of women for 
the draft. However, until the Equal 
Rights Amendment is ratified, we should 
stand firmly in opposition. 

Even if the ERA is finally added to the 
Constitution, if only to justify the 
registration of women for the draft. I still 
personally object to the draft. But I also 
refuse to be sexist. I am ashamed of the 
woman who would stand and watch. 
without the slightest sense of guilt, her 
husband or brother — but not herself — 
be drafted. And I sympathize with the 
woman who. in an ERA-less society, is 
suddenly being proclaimed "equal" in 
such a cursory but potentially deadly 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Deaths 



, ERRATUM 

> In announcing the death of the 
mother of Nell Tabor Hartley '63 
in the winter issue, we listed her 

j name incorrectly. It is correctly 

j listed in this issue. We regret the 
error. 

Institute 

Kitty Huie Aderhold, February 4, 

1980. 

Frances Ardelle Carlton Sibley, 

September 18, 1979. 

Academy 

Lillian Beatty Cory, sister of 

Mildred Beatty Miller, September 

23, 1979. 

Blanche Burch Harp, February 8, 
' 1980. 

Annie Aven Smith, October 14, 
: 1979. 

! 1910 

Annie Inez Smith Moore, January 

! 20,1980. 

Keturah White Marshall, Sep- 
: tember 18, 1979. 

J 

1 1911 

Eleanor Coleman Burchard, De- 
cember 20, 1979. 
Kate Young Miller, May 23, 1979. 

1916 

Jeannette Joyner Locke Welch, 

, October 24, 1979. 

i 1920 

i Lucy Beman, December 10, 1979. 

L 

I 1921 

Mariwill Hanes Hulsey, January 
• 11, 1980. 

Adelaide Park Webster, De- 

: cember 12, 1979. 
i Lewis Ingram, husband of Julia 
\ Tomlinson Ingram, January 20, 
1980. 

I 

1922 

Gena Callaway Merry, January 

26, 1980. 



1926 

Helena Hermance Kilgour, 

November 17, 1979. 
Julian Sturtevant, husband of 
Norma Tucker Sturtevant, Au- 
gust 20, 1979. 

Clifford Bennett, brother of Mary 
Louise Bennett, November 23, 
1979. 

1927 

Sarah Shields Pfeiffer, December 
23, 1979. 

Wayne Bramlett, husband of 
Maurine Bledsoe Bramlett, Sep- 
tember 26, 1979. 

1929 

Mary Hughes Jones, July 8, 1979. 

1933 

Leone Evans Andrews, sister of 
May Belle Evans, January 6, 
1980. 

1934 

Helen Eidson Hooper, November 

8, 1979. 

Isabel Lowrance Watson, January 

29, 1980. 

Frederick Woods, husband of 

Polly Gordon Woods, November 

19, 1979. 

1941 

Leone Evans Andrews, January 6, 

1980. 

1945 

Robert Howard, husband of 
Eugenia Jones Howard, De- 
cember 4, 1979. 

1946 

Gertrude Day Woodward, 

November 18, 1979. 

1947 

Mildred Derieux Gantt, December 

10, 1979. 

1949 

Thomas Fancher, husband of 



Nelda Brantley Fancher, January 
25, 1980. 

1952 

A.B. Bottoms, father of Anne 
Bottoms Wouters, December 8, 
1979. 

1959 

Neill Roderick McGeachy, father 
of Lila McGeachy Ray, De- 
cember 17, 1979. 
Eugene Witherspoon, father of 
Mary Mac Witherspoon Harrell, 
December 21, 1979. 

1961 

J. R. Mitchell, husband of Flor- 
ence Gaines Mitchell, January 7, 
1980. 

Mrs. J. W. Chambers, mother of 
Kacky Chambers Elliott, March 
2, 1979. 

J. W. Chambers, father of Kacky 
Chambers Elliott, July 11, 1979. 

1962 

Neill Roderick McGeachy, father 
of Peggy McGeachy Roberson, 
December 17, 1979. 

1963 

Mrs. Roy Tabor, mother of Nell 
Tabor Hartley, September 12, 
1979. 

1964 

Mrs. J. W. Chambers, mother of 
Barbara Chambers Donnelly, 
March 2, 1979. 

J. W. Chambers, father of Barba- 
ra Chambers Donnelly, July 11, 
1979. 

1966 

Neill Roderick McGeachy, father 
of Libby McGeachy Mills, De- 
cember 17, 1979. 

1976 

Mildred Derieux Gantt. mother of 
Eva Gantt DuPree, December 10, 
1979. 



29 



Youth Not Wasted on the Young 



By Cissie Spiro Aidinoff '51, President, Alumnae Association 



This column is the last one I shall write 
as president of the Agnes Scott Alumnae 
Association. It seems impossible that 
two years have passed since my election, 
but my term is now almost over. 1 do 
serve until June 30, 1980; but the real 
work (and fun) ends Alumnae Weekend 
when I have the honor of passing the 
gavel on to the president-elect. 

Throughout the two years, I have 
shared my thoughts and impressions of 
the College with you through this 
column, and I hope that I have given you 
some feeling of what I have been seeing 
when I visited the campus. It is quite 
difficult to be a student at Agnes Scott 
today. I treasure my years there, but I 
couldn't do it again. 

I couldn't put in those hours of 
studying and then talking. I don't have 
the stamina to jog for miles, play all that 
bridge, and eat that dining hall food! 
Also, the women today face basic moral 
questions that we never had to deal with. 
We knew that one didn't drink or smoke; 
the rules told us so, and we generally did 
what the rules told us to do. Today the 
women must decide for themselves 
whether to smoke and whether or not (or 
when and how much) to drink. 

We never had to make decisions on 
how to run our social lives; with our 
double date sitting in the back seat, it 
was not difficult to say no or to move a 



hand. Today, with the privilege of going 
to a man's dormitory room at Emory or 
Tech or having a man in your room, 
decisions and courses of action or 
inaction must be thought about and 
settled ahead of time. 

For us communism was evil and 
totalitarianism had to be eliminated. 
Today students have to work out detente 
and the draft. Are they for ERA but 
really not willing to fight alongside their 
"equal" brothers'? 

I respect and admire the students who 
are at Agnes Scott today, but I do not 
envy them. Some people feel that youth 
is wasted on the young — that one's 
college years are the best years of one's 
life. Nonsense, I say. Only young people 
have the stamina to deal with the 
problems and make the decisions of 
these difficult years. You have to be 
young to have the energy to face and 
resolve the issues which affect your 
entire life. These college years are just 
the beginning. If young women have 
survived at Agnes Scott, then they have 
had to come to grips with and develop 
basic values and standards. This is as 
true today as it was when each of us was 
at Agnes Scott. My superior Agnes Scott 
education helped me to get a trainee job 
in the field in which I had studied. I was 
able to "succeed" in my work by 
adapting my Agnes Scott learning 




techniques and skills. In addition, along 
the way, I found an intelligent, sensitive, 
supportive husband and together we 
have two attractive, bright, and funny 
children. 

I am lucky, I know, but I would not 
have been able to build my life as I have 
without the background, challenges, and 
values that I found at Agnes Scott. I 
didn't spend the happiest or best years of 
my life at the College; I am having these 
years now. 

I must attribute a great deal of what I 
am to Agnes Scott and for that I thank 
the College. I also thank you, the 
alumnae of Agnes Scott, for giving me 
the honor and privilege of serving as 
your president and for being part of two 
of the best years of my life. ▲ 




Trips to 

Britain 

and Italy 



Won't you join the alumnae who have 
already signed up for the Alumnae 
Association's two trips this year. We 
travel to Great Britain from August 
24-September 1 and to Italy from Oc- 
tober 28-November 5. There are just a 
few more weeks to sign up before the 
deadline. 

Write or call the Alumnae Office for 
information; Alumnae Office, Agnes 
Scott College, Decatur, Georgia 30030. 
(404) 373-2571, ext. 207. 




32 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



From the Director 



Virginia Brown McKenzie '47 




Come to the Aid of Your College 

Now is the Time for All Good Women 



Although the overall response to our Million Dollar 
Challenge Fund is encouraging, we now have fewer alumnae 
donors to the Agnes Scott Fund as compared to the same time 
last year. One conjecture of opinion is that we have many new 
givers for the Million Dollar Challenge Fund while a great 
number of our regular sustaining contributors are delaying 
their annual gifts for some reason. 

The cause for delay may be that money is tighter this year, 
and our regular donors are postponing their gifts until the last 
possible moment. Or some of our regular contributors may 
not understand the method of giving this year and are waiting 
for clarification. 

Let us urge you to continue your loyal support of the 
College. Undesignated annual gifts to the Agnes Scott Fund 



are essential because they may be used where the College 
needs them most. We do want to sustain the usual thoughtful 
giving to our Annual Fund. Please act now to send in your 
regular gift. In addition, we would appreciate your con- 
tributing or pledging to the Million Dollar Challenge Fund. 

If you have any question about giving at this time, please 
talk with someone in the Development Office or the Alumnae 
Office. We can assist you and will gratefully appreciate your 
generosity. 

We know that the alumnae will follow their usual 
magnanimous bent to support the needs of Agnes Scott 
College. A 



Daughters of Alumnae 



First row, I to r: Patti Higgins '82 (Martha Richardson 
Higgins '57). Elizabeth Walden '83 (Grace Woods Walden 
'60), Bonnie Armstrong '83 (Rae Carole Hosack Armstrong 
'60), Lane Langford '83 (Cecily Rudisill Langford '58), 
Sarah Campbell '81 (Ann Williamson Campbell Young 
'50), Becky Lowrey '82 (Helen Hendry Lowrey '57). 
Second row. Laura KJettner '81 (Virginia Hays Klettner 
'53), Emily Sharp '83 (Carolyn Herman Sharp "57), Cheryl 
Andrews '83 (Jackie Rountree Andrews '57), Summer 
Smisson '83 (LaWahna Rigdon Smisson '52), Kitsie 
Bassett '83 (Melba Cronenberg Bassett '59), Lynda 
Wimberly '81 (Joyce Skelton Wiberly '57). Third row: 
Margaret Sheppard '82 (Anne Thomson Sheppard '53), 
Maryellen Smith '82 (Reese Newton Smith '49), Gina 
Philips '81 (Virginia Dickson Philips '47), Robin McCain 
'83 (Wendy Boatwright McCain '60), Jenny Howell '82 
(Jean White Howell '51). Fourth row: Katie Miller '83 
(Libby Hanna Miller '59), Teace Markwalter '82 (Maria 
Harris Markwalter '59), Scottie Echols '83 (Billie Rainey 
Echols '57), Becky Durie '81 (Betty Averill Durie '51), 
Polly Gregory '82 (Pauline Winslow Gregory '59). Fifth 
row: Malinda Roberts '81 (Shirley Heath Roberts '52), Uisi 
Inserni '83 (Molly Milam Inserni '45), Laura Newsome '81 
(Sis Burns Newsome '57), Darby Bryan '81 (Patricia 
Boring Bryan '54), Susan Roberts '83 (Shirley Heath 
Roberts '52). 

Not pictured: Ellen All '81 (Eleanor Swain All '57). Ellen 
Anderson '81 (Nancy Parks Anderson *49), Nancy Blake 
'82 (Nancy Brock Blake '57), Beth Brittingham '82 (June 
Strickland Brittingham *43), Anna Bryan '80 (Mary Anna 
Ogden Bryan '51), Margaret Conyers '81 (Jane Hook 
Conyers '53), Cindy Dantzler '80 (Nancy Niblack Dantzler 
'58), Lynn Garrison '83 (Jane Zuber Garrison '54), Carol 
Goodman '83 (Carolyn May Goodman '56), Grace Haley 
'80 (Anna DaVault Haley '51), Kemper Hatfield *80 (Mary 
Hollingsworth Hatfield '39), Margaret Kelly '83 (Genny 
Lucchese Kelly *55), Jennifer Knight '80 (Dorothy Adams 
Knight '51), Sharon Maitland '80 (Vivian Weaver Maitland 
'53), Martha McGaughey '81 (Martha Patterson 
McGaughey '45), Mildred Pinnell '82 (Leonice Davis 
Pinnell '59), Carol Reaves '82 (Louise McKinney Hill 
Reaves *54), Jenny Rowell '83 (Janice Matheson Rowell 
'58), Kim Schellack '83 (Mary Elizabeth Walker Schellack 
'44), Beth Shackleford '82 (Betty Akerman Shackleford 
'55), Martha Sheppard '81 (Anne Thomson Sheppard '53), 
Becky Sprenger '82 (Justine Stinson Sprenger '56), Lynn 
Stonecypher '81 (May Muse Stonecypher '56), Patti 
Tucker *80 (Patricia Conner Tucker '57), Lisa Wise '80 
(Patricia Singley Wise '69). 




ALUMNAE QUARTERLY, AGNES SCOTT COLLEGE, DECATUR, GEORGIA 30030 




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ALUMNAE QUARTERLY / VOLUME 58 NUMBER 4 



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CONTENTS 

1 Fifty- Year Club 

2 1979-80 Giving 

Summary Report by Classes 
Special Gifts 
Giving by Classes 
Parents and Friends 
Businesses and Foundations 

16 Update: 

The Department of Philosophy 

By Dr. Richard Parry 

19 An Agnes Scott Education 

By Dr. Martine Brownley 

22 With the Clubs 

26 Alumnae Weekend in Review 

28 Recent Gifts and Bequests 

30 From the Classes 

44 Association President's Letter 

45 Three Outstanding Alumnae Honored - 



ALUMNAE QUARTERLY STAFF: 
Editor / Virginia Brown McKenzie '47 
Associate Editor / Juliette Harper '77 
Design Consultant / John Stuart McKenzie 

ALUMNAE OFFICE STAFF: 

Director of Alumnae Affairs 

Virginia Brown McKenzie '47 

Associate Director 

Jean Chalmers Smith '38 

Assistant to the Director 

Juliette Harper '77 

Office Manager 

Elizabeth Wood Smith '49 

ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OFFICERS: 
President / Jackie Simmons Gow '52 
Vice Presidents 

Region I / Susan Blackmore Hannah '64 
Region II / Polly Page Moreau '62 
Region III / Jean Salter Reeves '59 
Region IV / Marcia Knight-Orr '73 
Secretary / Margaret Hopkins Martin '40 
Treasurer / Susan Skinner Thomas '74 



Member / Council for Advancement and 
Support of Education 

Published four times yearly: fall, winter, 
spring, summer by Agnes Scott College 
Alumnae Office, Decatur, Georgia 30030 

Second class postage paid 
at Decatur, Georgia 
(U.S.P.S. 009-280) 



Front cover: 

This photograph by Floyd Jillson, reprinted by permission 
of Atlanta Newspapers, was run on the front cover of the 
June 1. 1980, issue of the Atlanta Weekly magazine, with 
the caption "Pick the Agnes Scott Woman." All six are 
Agnes Scott women. Bottom row, 1-r: Beth Maisano '82, 
'79-80 sophomore class president; Yu San Chooi, interna- 
tional student from Malaysia. Center row: Burlette Carter 
'82, a Truman Scholar; Helen Anderson '81, 80-81 
interdorm council chairman. Back row; Carol Tveit, a 
Retum-to-College student; Pat Arnzen '80, editor of the 
'79-80 Silhouette. 



Back cover: 

After Agnes Scott's ninety-first Commencement June 1 , 
economics professor Bill Weber congratulates graduate 
Katherine Zarkowsky Broderick. 




Class of '30 and earlier classes filled Rebekah Hall a! candlelight dinner. 



Fifty-Year Club 



Charter Members Inducted 



It really was a good party, the first meeting 
of the Fifty-Year Club, made so by the 
purpose, the place, and the people. 

Traditionally, the fiftieth reunion class has 
been specifically honored during Alumnae 
Weekend. The College has wanted to give 
recognition also to those graduating earlier 
than the fifty-year class. So the Fifty-Year 
Club was created. A steering committee 
(Mary Ben Wright Erwin '25, chairman; 
Carol Stearns Wey '12, Llewellyn Wilburn 
'19, Frances Gilliland Stukes '24, Louisa 
White Gosnell '27, Mary Warren Read '29) 
was appointed to plan something special. A 
seated dinner in Rebekah Reception Room 
(formerly Rebekah Dining Room) on Friday 
evening, April 18, was the result. The 
response was enthusiastic. The 175 guests 
included the oldest alumna, Annie Wylie 
Preston, 101, Class of 1899, more than forty 
members of the Class of 1930, and represen- 
tatives from most of the years between. They 
came from far and near. Many who could not 
attend expressed regrets in nostalgic letters. 



By Mary Ben Wright Erwin '25 

many of which were read during the evening. 

President Perry was master of ceremonies 
and Mrs. Perry returned thanks and asked 
God's continued blessings. Dr. Paul McCain 
recognized Annie Wylie Preston of the 
earliest class and Juanita Greer White '26, 
from Nevada, who came the greatest dis- 
tance. Dr. Edward McNair, emeritus profes- 
sor of English, now College historian and 
archivist was the speaker, relating stories of 
Agnes Scott in the '20s and '30s. Frances 
Gilliland Stukes '24, with Dr. McNair at the 
piano, led us in singing the Alma Mater and 
Annie Wylie Preston prayed the benediction. 

Officers who were elected for 1980-81 
are: president, Josephine Bridgman '27 of 
Decatur, vice president, Carolyn Smith 
Whipple '25 of Perry, Ga.; secretary- 
treasurer, Mary Prim Fowler '29 of Atlanta. 
Plans are already being made for the next 
meeting at the time of Alumnae Weekend in 
April, 1981, for classes 1931 and earlier. 

It really was a good party. The purpose — 
early Agnes Scott alumnae were honored and 




urged to help the College maintain its 
standards of excellence and its rich tradi- 
tions; the place — dear to all of us; the 
people — bound by love for Agnes Scott. 



Summer 1980 



Report on 1 979-80 Gifts to Agi 



By Dr. Paid M. McCain. Vice President for Development 



During 1979-80, [he second year Dorothy (Dot) 
Holloran Addison '43 of Atlanta served as 
Alumnae Fund Chairman. Agnes Scott received 
$1,299,117 from 2.544 alumnae representing 29 
percent of the active alumnae This amount 
included gifts to the Agnes Scott Fund and the 
Million Dollar Challenge Fund. This gift total 
from alumnae was one of the largest in the 
College's history. This figure, however, includes 
$642,500 in bequests from five alumnae. The 
fifty-seven class fund chairmen and the 351 class 
agents had key roles in this successful effort. 

During the past year combined gifts of 3,618 
alumnae, parents and friends, businesses and 
foundations to Agnes Scott totaled $1,810,513. 
This amount includes all gifts for endowment, 
scholarships, equipment, and many other im- 
provements. 

Except for those who preferred to give anony- 
mously, all individuals, foundations, and busi- 
nesses who made their gifts directly to Agnes Scott 



are listed on the following pages. These donors 
made their gifts to the College from July 1 . 1979, 
through June 30, 1980. Gifts received after the 
latter date will be shown in the report for 1980-81. 

The Tower Circle is that group of donors whose 
gifts were $1,000 or more, the Colonnade Club 
includes those who gave $500 or more, the 
Quadrangle Quorum for donors of $250 or more, 
and the Century Club for those who gave $100 or 
more. The asterisk (*) in the class listing indicates 
an alumna who served as a class agent. Double 
asterisks (**) are for donors who are now 
deceased. 

Please let the Agnes Scott Fund Office know of 
any corrections which may be needed so that we 
can be sure our records are accurate. 

To worker and donor alike, the entire College 
community welcomes this opportunity to thank 
you and express our appreciation for your fine 
response. 




Dot Holloran Addison '43 and Paul McCain. 



Summary Report by Classes 



Honor 

Guard 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 



Chairmen 

Maryellen Harvey Newton 

Alice Virden 

Frances Gilliland Stukes 

Rosalie Wooten Deck 
Mary Lovejoy Jackson 
Miriam Anderson Dowdy 
Pernette Elizabeth Adams 
Frances Glover Welsh 
Shannon Preston Cumming 
Martha Sprinkle Rafferty 
Varnelle Braddy Perryman 
Mary Sturtevant Cunningham 
Nelle Chamlee Howard 
Julia McClatchey Howard 
Sarah Frances McDonald 
Kathleen Daniel Spicer 
Goudyloch Erwin Dyer 
Mary Hoi lingsworth Hatfield 
Helen Gates Carson 
Gene Slack Morse 
Claire Purcell Smith 
Anne Paisley Boyd 
Bettye Ashcraft Senter 

Mary McConkey Reimer 
Marquerite Born Hornsby 
Rebekah Scott Bryan 
Jo Culp Williams 
Pat Overton Webb 
Jeanne Kline Brown 



(4 






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131 

32 
26 
41 
41 
47 
42 
53 

56 
40 
44 
46 
45 
42 
41 
37 
45 
55 
61 
43 
49 
41 
45 
55 
46 
38 
46 
49 
34 
39 



36 

27 
25 
35 
37 
34 
36 
36 

46 
41 
38 
37 
39 
34 
32 
33 
32 
43 
42 
29 
33 
33 
32 
37 
28 
25 
30 
30 
24 
24 



Amount Chairmen 

$740,531 1952 Barbara Brown Waddell 

4,231 1953 Jane Hook Conyers 

4,305 1954 Florence Fleming Corley 

15,470 1955 Sarah Petty Dagenhart 

7,285 1956 Louise Rainey Ammons 

10,492 1957 Elizabeth Ansley Allan 

5,650 1958 Carolyn Tinkler Ramsey 

10,128 1959 Jane Kraemer 

1960 Becky Evans Callahan 

7,145 1961 Mary Wayne Crymes Bywater 

316,905 1962 Lebby Rogers Harrison 

7,584 1963 Mary Ann Lusk Jorgenson 

4,250 1964 Marion Smith Bishop 

4,953 Lucy Herbert Molinaro 

8,185 1965 Anne Schiff Faivus 

3,605 1966 Ann Morse Topple 

4,455 1967 Anne Davis McGehee 

13,210 1968 

9,465 1969 Carol Blessing Ray 

8,124 1970 Mary-Wills Hatfield LeCroy 

5,385 1971 Christy Fulton Baldwin 

3,625 1972 Sharon Jones Cole 

4,806 1973 Judy Hill Calhoun 

2,255 1974 Carol Culver 

4,200 1975 Debbie Shepard Hamby 

6,630 1976 Nancy Leasendale Purcell 

5,450 1977 Ann Pesterfield Krueger 

3,259 1978 Kay Cochrane 

3,850 1979 

2,720 1980 Ann Huffines 
9 , 1 1 5 



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Amount 


47 




30 


5,038 


36 




27 


3,122 


29 




24 


5,370 


32 




22 


4,310 


46 




32 


5,672 


42 




24 


5,466 


44 




27 


6,254 


40 




23 


2,335 


44 




25 


3,205 


57 




31 


5,345 


40 




21 


7,054 


37 




19 


3,405 


41 




21 


2,305 


58 




29 


2,658 


49 




24 


2,905 


40 




21 


1,837 


55 




27 


2,963 


64 




28 


3,119 


51 




24 


2,055 


55 




27 


3,4 38 


44 




21 


1,929 


40 




18 


2,023 


28 




15 


885 


28 




16 


2,481 


33 




18 


1,731 


22 




15 


785 


12 




7 


310 


11 




6 


200 


9 






5 


615 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



s Scott College 



Tower Circle 






| 1 11 ! ! 


L___ 



/ 




Bertha Hudson Whitaker Acad. 

*Mary Wallace Kirk Ml 
Annie Tait Jenkins '14 
Mary West Thatcher '15 
Alma Buchanan Brown ' 16 
Oman Buchanan Albaugh '16 
Maryellen Harvey Newton '16 
Lulu Smith Westcott '19 
Myrt le Blackraon ' 21 
Ida Brittain Patterson '21 
Elizabeth Enloe MacCarthy '21 
Jean McAlister '21 
Mary Stewart McLeod '23 

♦Victoria Howie Kerr '24 
Mary Keesler Dalton '25 
Mary Ben Wright Erwin '25 
Dora Ferrell Gentry '26 
Juanita Greer White '26 
Florence Perkins Ferry '26 
Caroline McKinney Clarke '27 
Mary Shive '27 
Willie Smith '27 
Louise Woodard Clifton '27 
Ruth Thomas Stemmons '28 
Hazel Brown Ricks '29 
Ethel Freeland Darden '29 
Mary Warren Read '29 
Violet Weeks Miller '29 
Raemond Wilson Craig '30 
Julia Thompson Smith '31 
Margaret Weeks '31 
Diana Dyer Wilson '32 
Mary Elliot '32 
Elinor Hamilton Hightower '34 
Betty Lou Houck Smith '35 
Carrie Latimer Duvall '36 
Louise Young Garrett '38 
Jane Hamilton Ray '39 
Martha Marshall Dykes '39 
Betty Sams Daniel '39 
Haydie Sanford Sams ' 39 
Helen Gates Carson ' 40 
Virginia Milner Carter '40 
Ruth Slack Roach '40 
Aileen Kasper Borrish '41 
Dorothy Holloran Addison '43 
Scott Newell Newton '45 



Mary Duckworth Gellerstedt '46 

Louise Isaacson Bernard '46 

Elizabeth Walton Callaway '47 

Cissie Spiro Aidinoff '51 

Catherine Warren Dukehart '51 

Jean Roberts Seaton '52 

Louise Hill Reaves '54 

Susanna Bryd Wells ' 55 

Jo Ann Hall Hunsinger '55 

Nancy Thomas Hill '56 

Suzella Burns Newsome '57 

Nancy Holland Sibley '58 

Jo Ann Sawyer Delafield '58 

Emi ly Bailey Bigby '61 

Elizabeth Jefferson Boyt ' 62 

Sally Stenger '75 

Mr. Maurice J. Bernard, III 

Mrs . Howard P. Conrad 

Mr. Harry L. Dalton 

Capt . J. Wallace Daniel 

Mr. Carlton Duggan 

Mr. Howard M. Duvall, Jr. 

Mr. Blake P. Garrett, Sr. 

Dr. Julia Gary 

Mr. L. L. Gellerstedt , Jr. 

Mr. William H. Hightower, Jr. 

Mr. John S. Hunsinger 

Mrs. Judith Bourgeois Jensen 

Dr. Rudolph W. Jones, Jr. 

Mr. J. Erksine Love, Jr. 
**Mrs . E leanor Brown McCain 

Dr. Paul M. McCain 

Dr. James D. Newsome 

Dr . and Mrs . Marvin B . Perry, Jr. 

Mr. C. B. Rogers , Jr. 

Mr. Hansford Sams, Jr. 

Mr. C. Oscar Schmidt, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francois Sheat s 

Mr. John A. Sibley 

Mr. W. A. L. Sibley, Jr. 
**Dr. Florence E. Smith 

Mr. Hal L. Smith 

Mr. P. L. Beal Smith 

Mrs . Ona Strozier 

Mr. William C. Wardlaw, Jr. 

Mr. G. L. Westcott 

Mr. W. T. Wilson, Jr. 



Colonnade Club 



Jane Harwell Heazel '17 
Katherine Seay ' 18 
Quenelle Harrold Sheffield '23 
Jane Knight Lowe '23 
Frances Gilliland Stukes '24 
**Helena Hermance Kilgour '26 
**Marie Whittle Wellslager '26 
Mildred Cowan Wright '27 
Pearl Kunnes '27 
Roberta Winter '27 
Patricia Collins Dwinnell '28 
Mary Shevrasker '28 
Josephine Barry Brown '30 
Fanny Niles Bolton '31 
Martha Williamson Riggs '32 
Elizabeth Cobb Boyd '33 
Mary Virginia Allen '35 
Anne Scott Harman Mauldin '35 
Nina Parke Hopkins '35 
Frances Steele Garrett '37 
••Margaret Watson '37 
Frances Wilson '37 
Evelyn Baty Christman '40 
Nell Echols Burks '40 
Sara Lee Mattingly '40 
Pattie Patterson Johnson '41 
Margaret Downie Brown '43 
Ruby Rosser Davi6 ' 43 
Barbara Wilber Gerland '43 
Betty Smith Satterthwaite '46 



Jane Cooke Cross '47 

Charlotte Anne Hevener Nobbs '47 

Katherine Geffcken '49 

Ida Pennington Benton ' 50 

Patricia Cortelyou Winship '52 

Jane Williams Coleman '53 

Sara Mclntyre Bahner '55 

Nancy Wheeler Dooley '57 

Susan Hogg Griffith '58 

Carolyn Tinkler Ransey '58 

Martha Holmes Keith '59 

Elizabeth Harshbarger Broadus '62 

Robin Patrick Johnston '63 

Suzanne Jones Harper '68 

Virginia Pinkston Daily '69 

Jeanne Jones Holliday ' 76 

Mr. T. Maxfield Bahner 

Mr. Thomas H. Broadus 

Mrs. Alline M. Brown 

Mr. Otis B. Burnham 

Mr. J. R. Calloway, Jr. 

Mr. Alex P. Gaines 

MrB. Rachel Gordon 

Mr. and Mrs. James B. Markert 

Dr. and Mrs. Raymond Martin 

Col. and Mrs. Henry A. Robinson 

Mr. Joseph W. Satterthwaite 

Dr. Erica M. Shiver 

Mr. and Mrs. James H. Wells 



Quadrangle Quorum 



Margaret Phythian '16 

Agnes Ball '17 

Margaret Bland Sewell '20 

Romola Davis Hardy '20 

Mary Finney Bass '21 

Sara McCurdy Evans ' 21 

Eleanor Buchanan Starcher '22 



Helen Burkhalter Quattlebaum '22 
Viola Hollis Oakley '23 
Isabel Ferguson Hargadine '25 
Sarah Tate Tumlin '25 
Catherine Mock Hodgin ' 26 
Virginia Wing Power '26 
Catherine Mitchell Lynn '27 



Summer 1980 



*Fund Agent 



Evelyn Sattervhite '27 

Mary King Fowler '28 

Ann Todd Rubey ' 28 

Helen Gouedy Mansfield '29 

Jane Bailey Hall Hefner '30 

Dorothy Daniel Smith '30 

Martha Stackhouse Grafton '30 

Sara Townsend Pittman '30 

Crystal Wellborn Gregg '30 

Pene lope Brown Barnet t ' 32 

Susan Love Glenn '32 

Imogene Hudson Cullinson '32 

Ruth Conant Green '32 

Lila Norfleet Davis '32 

Lovelyn Wilson Heyward '32 

Letitia Rockmore Nash '33 

Laura Spivey Massie ' 33 

Mary Sturtevant Cunningham '33 

Nelle Chamlee Howard ' 34 

Pauline Gordon Woods ' 34 

Mary Hamilton McKnight '34 

Elizabeth Alexander Higgins '35 

Betty Fountain Gray '35 

Mary Green Wohlford '35 

Anne Humber Little '35 

Mary Beas ley White '36 

Eloisa Alexander LeConte '37 

Fannie Harris Jones '37 

Goudyloch Erwin Dyer '38 

Nancy Moorer Cantey '38 

Julia Porter Scurry '39 

Eloise McCall Guyton '40 

Ethelyn Dyar Daniel '41 

Ann Henry '41 

Martha Moody Laseter '41 

Gene Slack Morse '41 

Frances Spratlin Hargrett '41 

Anne Charabless Bateman '42 

Julia Patch Weston '42 

Margaret Sheftall Chester '42 

Frances Tucker Johnson '42 

Maryann Cochran Abbott '43 

Barbara Connally Kaplan '44 

Elizabeth Farmer Caynor '45 

Martha Baker Wilkins '46 

Luci le Beaver '46 

Marianne Jeffries Williams '47 

Barbara Blair '48 

Anne Jones Crabill '48 

Rebekah Scott Bryan '48 



Betty Jeanne Ellison Candler '49 

Ruby Lehmann Cowley '49 

Helen Edwards Propst '50 

Martha Stowell Rhodes '50 

Mary Hayes Barber Holmes ' 5 1 

Sara McKee Burnside '51 

Carol Hunger ' 51 

Emy Evans Blair '52 

Ann Herman Dunwoody '52 

Jean Isbell Brunie '52 

Ellen Hunter Brumfield '53 

Patricia Morgan Fisher ' 53 

Harriet Durham Maloof '54 

Anne Rosselot Clayton '55 

Virginia Love Dunaway '56 

May Muse Stonecypher '56 

Jean Salter Reeves '59 

Phyllis Cox Whitesell '60 

Charlotte King Sanner '60 

Sally A. Smith Howard '60 

Ann Broad Stevenson ' 61 

Betsy Dalton Brand '61 

Marguerite Dickert Ligon '61 

Ann Leigh Modlin Burkhardt '61 

Ann Hutchinson Beason '62 

Lebby Rogers Harrison '62 

Elizabeth Thomas Freyer '63 

Becky Reynolds Bryson '64 

Laura Dorsey Rains '66 

Lucy El len Jones Coo ley ' 67 

Sally Elberfeld Countryman '68 

Georganne Rose Cunningham ' 68 

Evelyn Brown Christensen '71 

Ann Jarret t '71 

Susan Morton ' 71 

Deborah Jordan Bates ' 72 

Mary Louise Brown Forsythe '75 

Mrs . George M. Bevier 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph H. Birdsong 

Mr. Scott Candler, Jr. 

Mr. Neil 0. Davis 

Mr. Earl H. Elberfeld 

Mrs. Esther A. Graff 

Mr. Garnett L. Keith 

Mrs. Elsie W. Love 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Minter, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Pepe 

Mr. Wesley G, Pippert 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert L. Stuhr 

Mr. and Mrs. Pierre Thomas 



Century Club 



Louise Van Harlington Ingersoll Inst. 

Annie Wiley Preston Inst. 

Gladys Camp Brannan ' 16 

Katherine Hay Rouse ' 16 

Virginia Allen Potter '17 

Janet Newton ' 17 

Regina Pinkston ' 17 

Katherine Simpson '17 

Virginia Haugh Franklin '18 

Elizabeth Dimmock Bloodworth ' 19 

Lucy Durr Dunn ' 19 

Elizabeth Witherspoon Patterson '29 

Marian Harper Kellogg '20 

Elizabeth Lovett ' 20 

Margaret Bell Hanna '21 

Julia Brantley Willett '21 

Lois Compton Jennings '21 

Lucile Conant Leland '21 

Sarah Fulton '21 

Cama Burgess Clarkson '22 

Ruth Scandrett Hardy '22 

Harriet Scott Brown '22 

Eileen Dodd Sams '23 

Elizabeth Hoke Smith '23 

Lucie Howard Carter '23 

Lucile Little Morgan '23 

Martha Mcintosh Nail '23 

Edith Ruff Couliette '23 

Attie Alford '24 

Martha Eakes Matthews '24 

Elizabeth Henry Shands '24 

Barron Hyatt Morrow '24 

Corinne Jackson Wilkerson '24 

Mary McCurdy '24 

Margaret McDow MacDougall '24 

Catherine Nash Scott '24 

Helen Wright Smith '24 

Mary Caldwell McFarland '25 

Bryte Daniels Reynolds '25 

Mary Ann McKinney '25 

Lillian Middlebrooks Smears '25 

Harriet Pade Prouse '25 

Carolyn Smith Whipple '25 



Memory Tucker Merritt '25 

Pocahontas Wight Edmunds '25 

Helen Adelaide Bates Law '26 

Edyth Carpenter Shuey '26 

Elizabeth Chapman Pirkle '26 

Gene Dumas Vickers '26 

Edith Gilchrist Berry '26 

Mary Elizabeth Knox Happoldt '26 

Grace Ogden Moore '26 

Sarah Quinn Slaughter '26 

Olivia Ward Swann ' 26 

Norma Tucker Sturtevant '26 

Margaret Whitington Davis '26 

Reba Bayless Boyer '27 

Blanche Berry Sheehan ' 27 

Lillian Clement Adams '27 

Martha Crowe Eddins '27 

Mabel Dumas Crenshaw ' 27 

Grace Etheredge '27 

Elizabeth Henderson Palmer ' 2 7 

Maude Jackson Padgett ' 27 

Elizabeth Lilly Swedenburg '27 

Louise Lovejoy Jackson '27 

Elizabeth Lynn ' 27 

Kenneth Maner Powell '27 

Mary Ruth McMillan Jones '27 

Douglass Rankin Hughes '27 

Virginia Sevier Hanna '27 

Mamie Shaw Flack '27 

Emily Stead ' 27 

Elizabeth Vary '27 

Leila Anderson '28 

S. Virginia Carrier '28 

Madelaine Dunseith Alston '28 

Louise Girardeau Cook '28 

Sarah Glenn Boyd '28 

Olive Graves Bowen '28 

Muriel Griffin '28 

Anna Knight Daves '28 

Evangeline Papageorge '28 

Elizabeth Roark Ellington '28 

Virginia Branch Leslie '29 

Lucile Bridgman Leitch '29 



Bettina Bush Jackson '29 

Virginia Cameron Taylor '29 

Sally Cothran Lambeth '29 

Sara Douglass Thomas '29 

Elise Gibson '29 

Elizabeth Hatchett '29 

Cara Hinman ' 29 

Katherine Hunter Branch ' 29 

Sara Johnston Hill '29 

Mary Alice Juhan '29 

Geraldine LeMay '29 

Katherine Lott Marbut '29 

Eleanor Morris MacKinnon '29 

Katharine Pasco '29 

Letty Pope Prewitt '29 

Helen Ridley Hartley '29 

Effie Mae Winslow Taylor '29 

Lillian Wurm Cousins '29 

Margaret Armstrong Durdin '30 

Lucille Coleman Christian '30 

Elise Derickson '30 

Clarene Dorsey ' 30 

Dorothy Dudley McLanahan '30 

Mildred Hutcheson Rouse '30 

Alice Jernigan Dowling '30 

Leila Carlton Jones Bunkley '30 

Judy Maloney Officer '30 

Sarah Marsh Shapard '30 

Mary McCallie Ware '30 

Frances Messer Jeffries '30 

Blanche Miller Rigby '30 

Lynn Moore Hardy ' 30 

Carolyn Nash Hathaway '30 

Jo Smith Webb '30 

Belle-Ward Stowe Abernethy '30 

Mary P. Trammel ' 30 

Harriet Williams '30 

Sara Bullock '31 

Ruth Etheredge Griffin '31 

Dorothy Grubb Rivers '31 

Anne Hudson Hankins '31 

Anne McCallie '31 

Katherine Morrow Norem '31 

Ruth Pringle Pipkin '31 

Jeanette Shaw Harp '31 

Harriet Smith '31 

Laelius Stallings Davis '31 

Martha Watson Smith '31 

Catherine Baker Evans '32 

Varnelle Braddy Perryman '32 

Grace Fincher Trimble '32 

Marjorie Gamble '32 

Elizabeth Hughes Jackson '32 

Louise Stakely ' 32 

Jura Taffar Cole '32 

Miriam Thompson Felder ''32 

Martine Tuller Joyner '32 

Bernice Beaty Cole '33 

Louise Brant Habel '33 

Josephine Clark Fleming '33 

Mary Felts Steedman '33 

Julia Finley McCutchen '33 

Caroline Lingle Lester '33 

Elizabeth Lynch '33 

Annie Laurie Whitehead Young '33 

Marie Whittle Wellslager '33 

Helen Boyd McConnell '34 

Sybil Grant '34 

Mary Grist Whitehead '34 

Lucy Goss Herbert '34 

Lillian Herring Rosas '34 

Elizabeth Johnson Thompson '34 

Louise McCain Boyce '34 

Marion Mathews '34 

Frances O'Brien '34 

Dorothy Potts Weiss '34 

Gladys Pratt Entrican '34 

Virginia Prettyman '34 

Rosa Shuey Day '34 

Mary Sloan Laird '34 

Dorothy Walker Palmer '34 

Eleanor Williams Knox '34 

Carol Griffin Scoville '35 

Katherine Hertzka '35 

Julia McClatchey Brooke '35 

Laura Whitner Dorsey '35 

Virginia Wood Allgood '35 

Jacqueline Woolfolk Mathes '35 

Meriel Bull Mitchell '36 

Lilian Grimson Obligado '36 

Ori Sue Jones Jordan '36 

Louise Jordan Turner '36 

Ruth King Stanford '36 

Sarah Frances McDonald '36 

Dean McKoin Bushong '36 

Louisa Robert Carro 1 1 '36 

Mary Alice Shelton Felt '36 

Mary Margaret Stowe Hunter ' 36 

Mary Vines Wright '36 

Mary Walker Fox '36 



Lucile Dennison Keenan '37 
Kathleen Daniel Spicer '37 
Annie Galloway Phillips '37 
Alice Hannah Brown '37 
Barbara Hertwig Meschter '37 
Barton Jackson Cathey '37 
Dorothy Jester '37 
Sarah Johnson Linney '37 
Vivienne Long McCain '37 
Isabel McCain Brown '37 
Enid Middleton Howard '37 
Marjorie Scott Meier '37 
Dorothy Avery Newton ' 38 
Elizabeth Blackshear Flinn '38 
Martha Brown Miller '38 
Jean Chalmers Smith '38 
Lulu Croft '38 
Doris Dunn St. Clair '38 
Eloise Estes Keiser '38 
Martha Long Gosline '38 
Bertha Merrill Holt '38 
Virginia Suttenfield '38 
Anne Thompson Rose '38 
Elizabeth Warden Marshall '38 
Zoe Wells Lambert * 38 
Jean Bailey Owen '39 
Elizabeth Furlow Brown '39 
Frances Guthrie Brooks '39 
Phyllis Johnson O'Neal '39 
Emma McMullen Doom '39 
Mary Wells McNeill '39 
Mary Ruth Murphy Chesnutt '39 
Lou Pate Jones ' 39 
Mamie Lee Ratliff Finger '39 
Jeanne Wilson Redwine Davis '39 
Elizabeth Shepherd Green '39 
Aileen Short ley Whipple '39 
Penny Simonton Boothe '39 
Virginia Tumlin Guffin '39 
Elinor Tyler Richardson '39 
Ann Watkins Ans ley '39 
Betty Alderman Vinson '40 
Margaret Barnes Carey '40 
Marguerite Baum Muhlenfeld '40 
Elizabeth Davis Johnston '40 
Mary Lang Gill Olson '40 
Eleanor Hutchens '40 
Mildred Joseph Colyer '40 
Virginia McWhorter Freeman '40 
Mary Reins Burge '40 
Louise Sullivan Fry '40 
Mary Mac Terapleton Brown '40 
Henrietta Thompson Wilkinson '40 
Ruth Ashburn Kline '41 
Virginia Corr White '41 
Louise Franklin Livingston '41 
Caroline Gray Truslow '41 
Helen Hardie Smith '41 
Beth Irby Milam '41 
Dorothy Travis Joyner '41 
Jane Vaughan Price '41 
Mary Wisdom '41 
Betty Ann Brooks '42 
Susan Dyer Oliver '42 
Doris Henson Vaughn '42 
Louise Pruitt Jones '42 
Claire Purcell Smith '42 
Elizabeth Robertson Schear '42 
Marjorie Simpson Ware '42 
Dorothy Webster Woodruff '42 
Olivia White Cave '42 
Mary Jane Auld Linker '43 
Mary Brock Williams '43 
Laura Cumming Northey '43 
Nell Floyd Hall '43 
Susan Guthrie Fu '43 
Frances Radford Mauldin '43 
Lillian Roberts Deakins '43 
Clara Rountree Couch '43 
Kay Wilkinson Orr '43 
Bettye Ashecraft Senter '44 
Betty Bacon Skinner '44 
Frances Cook Crowley '44 
Elizabeth Edwards Wilson '44 
Elizabeth Harvard Dowda '44 
Julia Harvard Warnock '44 
Martha Lasseter Storey '44 
Margaret Powell Flowers '44 
Marjorie Tippins Johnson '44 
Anne Ward Amacher '44 
Ruth Anderson Stall '45 
Elizabeth Carpenter Bardin '45 
Virginia Carter Caldwell '45 
Pauline Ertz Wechsler '45 
Elizabeth Gribble Cook '45 
Sue Mitchell '45 
Mary Neely Norris King '45 
Bess Sheppard Poole '45 
Mary Ann Turner Edwards '45 
Suzanne Watkins Smith '45 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Dorothy Webb McKee '45 

Frances Woodall Talmadge '45 

Jeanne Addison Roberts '46 

Emily Ann Bradford Batts '46 

Mary Ann Courtenay Davidson '46 

Conradine Fraser Riddle '46 

Mildred McCain Kinnaird '46 

Ann Noble Dye '46 

Bettye Phelps Douglas '46 

Celetta Powell Jones '46 

Eleanor Reynold Verdery '46 

Elizabeth Weinschenk Mundy '46 

Virginia Brown McKenzie '47 

Eleanor Calley Cross '47 

Betty Crabill Rogers '47 

Helen Catherine Currie '47 

Dorothy Galloway Fontaine '47 

Genet Louise Heery Barron ' 47 

Margaret Kelly Wells '47 

Marguerite Mattison Rice '47 

Virginia Owens Watkins '47 

Betty Jean Radford Moeller '47 

Ellen Rosenblatt Caswell '47 

Lorena Ross Brown '47 

Barbara Smith Hull '47 

Jean Williams Hand '47 

Adele Dieckmann McKee '48 

Jean Henson Smith '48 

Kathleen Hewson Cole "48 

June Irvine Torbert '48 

Marybeth Little Weston '48 

Emily Lady Major '48 

May Comer Osborne Parker '48 

Ann Rogers Sawyer '48 

Barbara Whipple Bitter '48 

Bettie Davison Bruce '49 

Kate Durr Elmore '49 

Katherine A. Geffcken '49 

Martha Goddard Lovell '49 

Ruby Lehmann Cowley '49 

Harriet Lurton Major '49 

Katherine McKoy Ehling '49 

Nancy Parks Anderson '49 

Patty Ann Persohn '49 

Betty Jo Sauer Mansur '49 

Virginia Vining Skelton '49 

Jo-Anne Christopher Cochrane '50 

Sarah Hancock White '50 

Marie Heng Jan '50 

Jessie Hodges Kryder '50 

Dorothy Medlock Irvine '50 

Anna DaVault Haley '51 

Lou Floyd Smith ' 51 

Nell Floyd Hall '51 

Margaret Hunt Denny '51 

Mary Caroline Lindsay Eastman '51 

Mary Anna Ogden Bryan '51 

Ann Boyer Wilkerson '52 

Catherine Crowe Merritt '52 

Kathren Freeman Stelzner '52 

Ruth Heard Randolph '52 

Louise Jett Porter '52 

Edith Petrie Hawkins '52 

Frances Sells Grimes '52 

Jackie Simmons Gow '52 

Bertie Bond '53 

Ann Cooper Whitesel '53 

Belle Miller McMaster '53 

Mary Ripley Warren '53 

Louise Ross Bell '53 

Julia Grier Storey '54 

Eleanor Hutchinson Smith '54 

Carol Jones Hay ' 54 

Mitzi Kiser Law '54 

Anne Patteron Hammes '54 

Caroline Reinero Keramerer ' 54 

Anne Sylvester Booth '54 

Nancy Whetstone Hull '54 

Jane Zuber Garrison '54 

Jo Hinchey Williams '55 

Catherine Lewis Callaway '55 

Peggy Anne McMillan White '55 

Sarah Petty Dagenhart '55 

Joan Pruitt Mclntyre '55 

Dorothy Jean Sands Hawkins '55 

Agnes Scott Willoch '55 

Barbara Battle * 56 

Margaret Burwell Barnhardt '56 

Shirley Calkins Ellis '56 

Mary Jo Carpenter '56 

Sarah Davis Adams '56 

Claire Flinton Barnhardt '56 

Priscilla Goodwin Bennett '56 

Sallie Greenfield '56 

Ann Gregory York '56 

Harriett Griffin Harris '56 

Sarah Hall Hayes '56 

Emmie Hay Alexander '56 

Helen Haynes Patton '56 

Nancy Jackson Pitts '56 



Anne Sayre Calliaon '56 

Robbie Ann Shelnutt Upshaw '56 

Margaret Benton Davis '57 

Margery DeFord Hauck '57 

Carolyn Herman Sharp '57 

Frances Holtsclaw Berry '57 

Rachel King '57 

Elaine Lewis Hudgins ' 57 

Margaret Minter Hyatt '57 

Jean Price Knapp ' 57 

Martha Riggins Brown '57 

Anne Terry Sherren '57 

Carolyn Wright McGarity '57 

Martha Davis Roaselot '58 

Patricia Gover Bitzer '58 

Nora King '58 

Carolyn Magruder Ruppenthal '58 

Maria Martoccia Clifton '58 

Mary Norton Kratt ' 58 

Phi a Peppas Kane 1 los '58 

Blythe Posey Ashmore '58 

Dorothy Ripley Lot t '58 

Caroline Romberg Si lcox '58 

Harriet Talmadge Mill '58 

Delores Taylor Yancey '58 

Marilyn Tribble Wittner '58 

Jane King Allen '59 

Jane Kraemer Scott '59 

Mildred Ling Wu ' 59 

Ann Rivers Payne Hutcheson '59 

Nell Archer Congdon '60 

Gloria Branham Burnam '60 

Carolyn Davies Preische '60 

Linda Jones Klett '60 

Julia Kennedy '60 

Ashlin Morris Burris '60 

Everdina Nievwenhuis '60 

Jane Norman Scott '60 

Marcia Tobey Swanson '60 

Grace Woods Walden ' 60 

Ann Avant Crichton '61 

Pame la Bevier ' 61 

Sally Bryan Minter '61 

Mary Clark Schubert '61 

Lucy Davis Harper '61 

Julia Doar Grubb '61 

Harriett Elder Manley '61 

Katherine Gwaltney Remick '61 

Janice Lynn Henry '61 

Sarah Kelso ' 61 

Barbara Mordecai Schwanebeck '61 

Emily Pancake '61 

Harriet Smith Bates '61 

Nancy Stone Hough '61 

Patricia Walker Bass '61 

Isabel Kallman Anderson '62 

Marjorie Reitz Turnbull '62 

Robin Rudolph Orcutt '62 

Virginia Allen Callaway '63 

Frances Anderson ' 63 

Frances Bailey Graves '63 

Judith Brantley '63 

Sarah Cumming Mitchell '63 

Mary Ann Gregory Dean '63 

Bonnie Hatfield Hairrell '63 

Dorothy Laird Foster '63 

Anne Miller Boyd '63 

Kaye Stapleton Redford '63 

Suan Keith-Lucas Carson '64 

Harriet King Wasserman '64 

Martha MacNair McMullen '64 

Anne Minter Nelson '64 

Julia Norton Keidel '64 

Lila Sheffield Howland '64 

Elizabeth Singley Duffy '64 

Lenora Wicker ' 64 

Mary Womack Cox '64 

Patricia Gay Nash '65 

Molly Gehan Garrison '65 

Kenney Knight Linton '65 

Elyene Smith Thompson '65 

Judith Weldon Maguire '65 

Sandra Hay Wilson '65 

Barbara Brown Freeman '66 

Alice Davidson ' 66 

Jan Gaskell Ross '66 

Ellen McDaniel '66 

Anne Morse Topple '66 

Julia Murray Pensinger '66 

Gail Savage Glover '66 

Malinda Snow ' 66 

Sarah Uzzell-Rindlaub '66 

Louisa Williams '66 

Judith Jackson Mozen '67 

Julia Nuckols Offutt '67 

Caroline Owens Crain '67 

Susan Stevens Hitchcock '67 

June E. Derrick '68 

Susan McCann Butler '68 

Allyn Smoak Bruce '68 



Patricia Stringer '68 

Susan Stringer Connell '68 

Ann Teat Gallant '68 

Evelyn Angeletti '69 

Mary Chapman Hatcher '69 

Margaret Frank Guill '69 

Jo Ray Freiler Van Vliet '69 

Diane Hampton Flannagan '69 

Minnie Bob Mothes Campbell '69 

Elta Posey Johnston '69 

Anna Eliza Stockman '69 

Betty Young von Hernnan '69 

Peggy Chapman Curington ' 70 

Deborah Ann Claiborne Williams '70 

Sherian Fitzgerald Hodges '70 

Cheryl Granade Sullivan '70 

Ann Hoefer Henderson ' 70 

Catherine Oliver '70 

Martha Ramey ' 70 

Deborah Banghart Mullins '71 

Julia Couch Mehr ' 71 

Mary Carolyn Cox '71 

Rose Anne Ferrante Waters '71 

Gayle Gellerstedt Daniel '71 

Mary Martin Smith '71 

G. G. Sydnor Hill '71 

Bernie Todd Smith ' 71 

Anne Stuart Kemble Collins '72 

Linda Maloy Ozier '72 

Anastacia Coc lin '73 

Julia Cox Goodloe '73 

Resa Harris ' 73 

Margaret Lines ' 73 

Judith Maguire Tindel '73 

Cynthia Wilkes Smith '73 

Shelby Cave '75 

Marie Newton ' 75 

Emi ly Dunbar ' 76 

Susan Grier Phillips '76 

Martha Marshall Smith '76 

Lark Todd Sessions '76 

Elizabeth Doscher Shannon '77 

Linda Shearon ' 77 

Jan Burroughs Loftis '80 

Katherine Zarkowsky Broderick ' 80 

Mr. Thomas M. Adams 

Dr. Wallace M. Alston 

Mr. and Mrs. D. Banyar 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee A. Barclay 

Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Benson 

Mr. Herbert Bolton 

Mrs. Henry L. Bowden 

Mr. Harllee Branch, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Bringhurst, Jr. 

Mrs . John A. Butler 

The Covenant Class of the 

Decatur Presbyterian Church 
Mr. Emmett B. Cart ledge , Jr. 
Mrs. Helen Carchidi 
Mr. and Mrs. William C. Carlson 
Mr. W. L. Clifton, Jr. 
Mr. John H. Cross 
Mr. William M. Curd 
Mr. Al Daniel 
Dr. Walter Ray Davis, Jr. 
Mr. Hugh Dorsey 
Mrs. Elizabeth R. Dowd 
Dr. F. William Dowda 
Mr. and Mrs. Gary S. Dunbar 
Mr. and Mrs. George B. Dunbar 
Dr. and Mrs. E. M. Dunstan 
Mr. and Mrs. Percy Echols 
Mr. C. C. Elebash 
Mr. and Mrs. Earl G. Ezell 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Ferst 
Dr. Julia T. Gary 
Mr. L. L. Gellerstedt, Jr. 
Mrs. Mary C. Gowing 
Dr. Nancy P . Grose close 
Mr. William B. Hairrell 
Mrs . James E . Hara 
Mr. and Mrs. John S. Harrison 
Mr. and Mrs. Cecil B. Highland, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene S. Homey 
Mr. Conley Ingram 
Dr. and Mrs. C. Benton Kline, Jr. 

and Chris 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Knox 
Dr. and Mrs. Leon Lenoir, Jr 
Mr. and Mrs. L. W. McClurkin 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Mcintosh 
Mr. and Mrs. Drayton McLane, Sr. 
Dr. W. Edward McNair 
Dr. C. W. Morse 
Mrs. Edward A. Newman 
Mr. W. A. Parker 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Pepe 
Mr. Wesley G. Pippert 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph F. Potter 
Mr. William R. Riers 



Mr. John E. Smith, II 

Dr. Chloe Steel 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Swink 

Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Wallace, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs Robert L. Wendling 

Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Westmoreland 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifton B. Wilburn 

Mr. John C. Wilson 

Women of the Church , 

Decatur Presbyterian 
Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Yandle 
Mr. and Mrs. William Zarkowsky 



Institute 



Louise Van Harlingen Ingersoll 
Annie Wiley Preston 



Academy 

Ruth Green 

Bertha Hudson Whitaker 

SuBie Johnson 

Mary Russell Green 

Isabelle Simpson Fink 

Johnetta Wright Mathyer 



1908 



Rose Wood 



1909 



**Lutie Head 



1911 



**Lena David Farrar 
**Mary Wallace Kirk 

Mollie McCormick McCord 
Mary Robinson Myrick 



1912 

Martha Hall Young 
Julia Smith S lack 
Carol Stearns Wey 

1913 

Jame W. McGaughey 
Margaret Roberts Graham 



1914 



Theodosia Cobbs Hogan 
Mildred Holmes Dickert 
Annie Tait Jenkins 
Kathleen Kennedy 
Linda Miller Summer 



1915 



Mary Hyer Dale 
I sabe 1 Norwood 
Almedia Sadler Duncan 
Louise Warren McMilla 
Mary West Thatcher 



1916 



Alma Buchanan Brown 
Oraah Buchanan Albaugh 
G ladys Camp Brannan 
Maryellen Harvey Newton 
Katherine Hay Rouse 
Margaret T. Phythian 
Mary Glenn Roberts 
Clara Whips Dunn 



Summer 1980 



♦Fund Agent 



1917 



1922 



Virginia Allen Potter 

Gjertrud Amundsen Siqueland 

Agnes Ball 

Ai Is le M. Cross 

Mildred Hall Pearce 

Jane Harwell Heaze L 

Janet Newton 

Regina P. Pinkston 

Katharine 8. Si rap son 



1918 



Elva Brehm Florrid 
Martha Comer 
Ruby Est es Ware 
Virginia Haugh Franklin 
Susan B. Hecker 
Margaret Leyburn Foster 
Dorothy Moore Horton 
Katherine Seay 



1919 



Margaret Grace Barry Owen 

Elizabeth Diraraock Bloodworth 

Lucy Durr Dunn 

Lois Eve Rozier 

Louise Felker Mizell 

Mary Ford Kennerly 

Katherine Godbee Smith 

Mary Parks Mason 

Lulu Smith Westcott 

Marguerite Watts Cooper 

Llewellyn Wilburn 

Elizbeth Witherspoon Patterson 



1920 



Marga 

Elois 

Romol 

Sarah 

Julia 

Maria 

Elizai 

Virgi 

Marge 

Marga 

Mary 

Marga 

Rosal 



ret Bland Sewell 
e Buston Sluss 
a Davis Hardy 

Davis Mann 

Hagood Cuthbertson 
n Harper Kellogg 
beth Lovett 
nia McLaugh 1 in 
ry Moore Tappan 
ret Sanders Br anno n 
Weekes Clements 
ret Woods Spalding 
ind Wurm Council 



1921 



Anonymous 

Margaret Bell Hanna 
Myrt le Blackmon 
Julia Brantley Willet 
Ida Brittain Patterson 
Thelma Brown Aiken 
Eleanor Carpenter 
Lois Compton Jennings 
Lucile Conant Leland 
Elizabeth Enloe MacCarthy 
Mary Finney Bass 
Betty Floding Morgan 
S. Louise Fluker 
Sarah Fulton 
Sophie Hagedorn Fox 
**Mariwill Hanes Hulsey 
Melvi lie Jameson 
Anna Marie Landress Cate 
Jean McAlister 
Sarah McCurdy Evans 
Gladys McDaniel Hastings 
Charlotte Newton 
Eddith Patterson Blair 
Edith Roark Van Sickle 
Eula Russell Kelly 
Elizabeth Smith De Witt 
Julia Toralinson Ingram 
Evelyn Wade Harwood 
Margaret S. Wade 
Marguerite Watkins Goodman 
Helen Wayt Cocks 



Agnes Adams Stokes 
Sarah Alston Lawton 
Eleanor Buchanan Starcher 
Cama Burgess C lark son 
Helen Burkhalter Quattlebaum 
Eunice Dean Major 
Otto Cilbert Williams 
Mary Louise Harle 
Catherine Haugh Smith 
Genie Howard Mathews 
Julia Jameson 
Anne Ruth Moor Crawford 
Carolyn Moore Gressette 
Dinah Roberts Parramore 
Ruth Scandrett Hardy 
Harriet Scott Brown 
Louie Stephens Markey 
Laurie Stubbs Johns 
Emma Thomas Johnston 
Frances White We eras 



1923 



♦Dorothy Bowron Collins 
Margaret Brenner Awtrey 
Louise Crosland Huske 
Rebecca Dick 
Ei leen Dodd Sams 
Christ ine Evans Murray 
Helen Faw Mull 
Maud Foster Stebler 
Emily Cuille Henegar 
Quenelle Harrold Sheffield 
Elizabeth Hoke Smith 
Viola Hoi lis Oakley 
Lucia Howard Carter 
Jane Knight Lowe 
Lucile Little Morgan 
Elizabeth Lockhart Davis 
Josephine Logan HamiLton 

♦Elizabeth McClure McCeachy 
Martha Mcintosh Nail 
**Mary Stewart McLeod 

*Anna Meade MinniRerode 
Susye Mims Lazenby 
Elizabeth Molloy Horr 
Caroline Moody Jordan 
Fredeva Oglet ree 
Elizabeth Ransom Hahn 
Edith Ruff Coulliette 
Dorothy Scott 
Nancy Tripp Shand 
A 1 ice Vi rden 
Jessie Watts Rustin 
Margaret Y eager Brackney 



1924 



Attie Alford 

*Grace Bargeron Rambo 
Helen Comfort Sanders 
Martha Eakes Matthews 
Emmie Ficklen Harper 
Frances Gilliland Stukes 
Ann Hatton Lewis 
E lizabeth Henry Shands 

♦Victoria Howie Kerr 

♦Barron Hyatt Morrow 
Cor inne Jackson Wi lkerson 
Marguerite Lindsey Booth 
Mary McCurdy 

Margaret McDow MacDougall 
Annie Miller Klugh 
Pauline Murphey Gradick 

♦Catherine Nash Scott 
Weenona Peck Booth 
Lucy Rhyne Walker 
Carrie Scandrett 
Isabelle Sewell Hancock 
Daisy Frances Smith 
Polly Stone Buck 
Augusta Thomas Lanier 
Annadawn Watson Edwards 

♦Helen Wright Smith 



1925 



Mary Bowdoin 
Lulawill Brown Ellis 
Mary Brown Campbell 
Louise Buchanan Proctor 
Mary Caldwell McFarland 
Catherine Carrier Robinson 
Elizabeth Cheatham Palmer 
Bryte Daniels Reynolds 
Isabel Ferguson Hargadine 
Frances Gardner Welton 
Lucile Gause Fryxell 
Alice Greenlee Grollman 
Eleanor Hardeman Cain 
Margaret Hyatt Walker 
Annie Johnson Sylvester 
Mary Keesler Dalton 
Georgia Little Owens 
Martha Manly Hogshead 
Josephine Marbut Stanley 
Mary Mt_Callum 
Anne McKay Mitchell 
Mary Ann McKinney 
Lillian Middlebrooks Smears 
Harriet Pade P rouse 
Julia Pope 
M. Priscilla Shaw 
Mary S lms D icks on 

♦Carolyn Smith Whipple 
Marianne Strouss McConnell 

*Sarah Tate Tumi in 

♦Eugenia Thompson Akin 
Memory Tucker Merritt 

♦Mary Belle Walker 
Virginia Watts Beals 
Frances White 
Pocahontas Wight Edmunds 
Mabel Witherspoon Meredith 
Mary Ben Wright Erwin 

♦Emily Zellars McNeill 



1926 



Helen Bates Law 

Mary Louise Bennett 

Esther Byers Pitts 

Edyth Carpenter Shuey 
♦Elizabeth Chapman Pirkle 

Edythe Coleman Paris 

Clarkie Davis Skelton 

Louisa D. Duls 

Gene Dumas Vickers 

Jeffie Dunn Clark 
♦E lien Fain Bowen 

Dora Ferrell Gentry 

Mary Freeman Curt is 

Edith Gilchrist Berry 

Juanita Greer White 

Olive Hall Shadgett 
♦♦Helena Hermance Kilgour 
♦Hazel Huff Monaghan 

Charlotte Higgs Andrews 

Pilley Kim Choi 

Mary Knox Happoldt 

Elizabeth Little Meriwether 

Catherine Mock Hod gin 

Grace Ogden Moore 

Virginia Peeler Green 
♦F lorence Perkins Ferry 

Ailene Ramage Fitzgerald 

Nellie Richardson 

Mildred Scott 

Susan Shadburn Watkins 

Sarah Quinn Slaughter 

Elizabeth Snow Tilly 

Evelyn Sprinkle Carter 

Olivia Ward Swann 

Norma Tucker Sturtevant 

Margaret Tufts Neal 
♦♦Marie Whittle Wellslager 

Virginia Wing Power 

Maud Whittemore Flowers 
♦Margaret Whitington Davis 

Rosalie Wootten Deck 



1927 



Frances Alston Everett 
Frances Bitzer Edson 



Reba Bayless Boyer 
Blanche Berry Sheehan 
Maurine Bledsoe Bramlett 
Charlotte Buckland 
Annette Carter Colwell 
Dorothy Chamber lain 
Susan Clayton Fuller 
Lillian Clement Adams 
Willie Mae Coleman Duncan 



♦Mildred Cowan Wright 
Martha Crowe Eddins 

♦Catherine Louise Davis 
Ma be 1 Dumas Crenshaw 
Grace Etheredge 
Emilie Ehrlich Strasburger 
Katharine Gilliland Higgins 
Elizabeth Henderson Palmer 
Katherine Houston Sheild 
Maude Jackson Padgett 
Lelia Joiner Cooper 
Pearl Kunnes 
Louise Leonard McLeod 
Elizabeth Lilly Swedenburg 
Georgia Linkous Bivins 
Louise Love joy Jackson 
Frances Lowe Conne 1 1 

♦Elizabeth Lynn 
Carol ine McKinney C larke 
Mary Ruth McMillan Jones 
Catherine Mitchell Lynn 
Kenneth Maner Powe 1 1 
Elizabeth Norfleet Miller 
Miriam Preston St. Clair 
Inez Patton Cunningham 
Edith Richards 

♦May Reece Forman 
Douglass Rankin Hughes 
Evelyn Satterwhite 
Virginia Sevier Hanna 
Mamie Shaw Flack 
Mary Shive 
Willie W. Smith 

♦Emily Stead 
Edith Strickland Jones 
Elizabeth Vary 
Roberta Winter 
Louise Woodard Clifton 



1928 



Elizabeth Allgood Birchmore 

Leila W. Anderson 

Miriam Anderson Dowdy 

Myrtle Bledsoe Wharton 

Frances C. Brown 

Virginia Carrier 

Patricia Collins Dwinnell 

Lucy Cook Means 

Nancy Crowther Otis 

Mary Cunningham Cayce 
♦Mary Dobyns Houston 

Madelaine Dunseith Alston 
♦Carolyn Essig Frederick 

Irene Garretson Nichols 

Margaret Gerig Mills 

Hattie Gershcow Hirsch 

Louise Girardeau Cook 

Sarah Glenn Boyd 

Olive Graves Bowen 

Elizabeth Gner Edmunds 

Muriel Griffin 

Rachel Henderlite 

Mary Hough Clark 

Mary King Fowler 

Anna Knight Daves 

Virginia Love 

Irene Lowrance Wright 

Katherine MacKinnon Lee 
♦Mary McConkey Taylor 

Elizabeth McEntire 

Geraldine Menshouse Condon 

Frances New McRae 

Evange line Papageorge 

Martha Riley Stephenson 
♦Elizabeth Roark Ellington 

Mary Sayward Rogers 

Mary Shewmaker 

Mary Stegall Stipp 

Ruth Thomas Stemmons 

Ann Todd Rubey 

Edna Volberg Johnson 
♦Josephine Walker Parker 



1929 



Margaret Andreae Collins 
Gladys Austin Mann 
Lillie Bellingrath Pruitt 
LaRue Berry Smith 
Virginia Branch Leslie 
Lucile Bridgman Leitch 
Miriam Broach Jordan 
Hazel Brown Ricks 
Bettina Bush Jackson 
Virginia Cameron Taylor 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 




Faculty members in graduation procession: Connie Jones, Steve 
Haworth, Ayse Ilgaz-Carden, Bob Hyde, John Toth, Anne Warner, 
Don Young. 



Dorothy Cheek Callaway 

Sally Cothran Lambeth 

Sara Douglass Thomas 

Mary Ellis Knapp 

Nancy Fitzgerald Bray 
*Ethel Freeland Darden 

Lenore Gardner McMillan 
*Betty Gash 
♦Elise Gibson 

Helen Gouedy Mansfield 

Amanda Groves 

Pearl Hastings Baughman 

Elizabeth Hatchett 

Cara Hinraan 

Ella May Hoi lingsworth Wilkerson 
♦Hazel Hood 

(Catherine Hunter Branch 

Dorothy Hutton Mount 

Sara Johnston Hill 

Evelyn Josephs Phifer 
*Mary Alice Juhan 
*Geraldine LeMay 

(Catherine Lott Marbut 

Esther Nisbet Anderson 

Eleanor Norris MacKinnon 

Katharine Pasco 

Letty Pope Prewitt 

Mary Prim Fowler 

Helen Ridley Hartley 

Louise Robertson Solomon 

Martha Selman Jacobs 

Helen Sisson Morrison 

Sally Southerland 

Mary Gladys Steffner Kincaid 

Clara Stone Collins 

Susanne Stone Eady 
*Mary Warren Read 

Violet Weeks Miller 

Frances G . Welsh 

Effie Mae Winslow Taylor 

Hazel Wolfe Frakes 
♦Ruth Worth 

Lillian Wurm Cousins 



1930 



Margaret Armst rong Durdin 
Walterette Arwood Tanner 

*Marie Baker Shumaker 
Josephine Barry Brown 
Ruth Bradford Crayton 
Elizabeth Branch Johnson 
Frances Brown Milton 
Mary Brown Armstrong 
Emily Campbell Boland 
Lucille Coleman Christian 
Lois Combs Kropa 
Lilian Cook McFarland 
Gladney Cureton 
Elise Derickson 
Clarene Dorsey 
Dorothy Dudley McLanahan 
Anne Erhlich Solomon 
Alice Garretson Bolles 
lone Gueth Brodmerkel 
Jane Hall Hefner 
Emi 1 ie Harvey Massicot 
Mildred Hutcheson Rouse 
Alice Jernigan Dowling 
Leila Jones Bunkley 
Katherine Leary Holland 

*June Maloney Officer 
Sarah Marsh Shapard 
Mary McCallie Ware 
Ruth McLean Wright 
Frances Medlin Walker 
Frances Messer Jeffries 
Blanche Miller Rigby 

*Emily Moore Couch 
Lynn Moore Hardy 
Carolyn Nash Hathaway 
Mera Neary Cannon 
Margaret Ogden Stewart 
Shannon Preston Cumming 
Helen Respess Bevier 
Elise Roberts Dean 



Lillian Russell McBath 

Nancy Simpson Porter 

Dorothy Daniel Smith 

Jo Smith Webb 
*Martha Stackhouse Grafton 

Belle Ward Stowe Abernethy 

Mary Terry Cobb 

Sara Townsend Pittraan 

Mary P. Trammell 

Crystal Wellborn Gregg 

Evalyn Wilder 

Harriett Williams 

Pauline Willioughby Wood 
*Raemond Wilson Craig 
♦Missouri Woolford Raine 

Octavia Young Harvey 



1931 



Margaret Askew Smith 
Laura Brown Logan 
Sara Bullock 
Eleanor Castles OBteen 
Annie Dean Norman 
Helen Duke Ingram 
Ruth Etheredge Griffin 
Marion Fielder Martin 

*Helen Friedman Blackahear 
Jean Grey Morgan 
Dorothy Grubb Rivers 
Sarah Hill Brown 
Anne Chapin Hudson Hankins 
Elise Jones 
Marian Lee Hind 
Helen Manry Lowe 
Ruth McAuliffe 
Anne McCallie 
Jane McLaughlin Titus 
Shirley McPhaul Whitfield 
Katherine Morrow Norem 
Frances Musgrave Frierson 
Fanny Niles Bolton 
Ruth Pringle Pipkin 
Katharine Purdie 
Alice Quarles Henderson 
Martha Ransom Johnston 
Jeannette Shaw Harp 
Elizabeth Simpson Wilson 
Elizabeth Smith Crew 
Harriet Smith 
Martha Sprinkle Rafferty 
Mary Sprinkle Allen 
Laelius Stallings Davis 
Cornelia Taylor Stubbs 
Julia Thompson Smith 
Martha Tower Dance 
Louise Ware Venable 

*Martha Watson Smith 
Margaret Weeks 



1932 



Virginia Allen Woods 
*Catherine Baker Evans 
*Pene lope Brown Barnet t 
Sarah Bowman 

Varnelle Braddy Perryman 
Pat Boyles Smith 
Mary Louise Cawthon 
Diana Dyer Wilson 
Mary Elliot 
Grace Fincher Trimble 
Julia Forrester 
Majorie Gamble 
Susan Love Glenn 
Nora Garth Gray Hall 
Ruth Conant Green 
Julia Grimmet Fortson 
Louise Hollingsworth Jackson 
♦Anne Hopkins Ayres 
Alma Howerton Hughes 
Imogene Hudson Cullinan 
Elizabeth Hughes Jackson 
LaMyra Kane Swanson 
Pansey Kimble Matthews 
Martha Logan Henderson 
Clyde Lovejoy Stevens 
Hettie Mathis Holland 
Louise McDaniel Musser 
Mary Miller Brown 
Lila Norfleet Davis 
Mimi O'Beirne Tarplee 
Mary Oliver Cox 
Bell Owens Livingston 
Flora Riley Bynum 
Jane Shelby Clay 



Sara Lane Smith Pratt 
*Louise Stakely 
Jura Taffar Cole 
Velma Taylor Wei Is 
Miriam Thompson Felder 
Mart ine Tuller Joyner 
Martha Williamson Riggs 
Lovelyn Wilson Heyward 



1933 



Mary Alexander Parker 
Bernice Beaty Cole 

Willa Beckham Lowrance 

Margaret Bell Burt 

Elizabeth Grier Bolton 

Louise Brant Habel 
*Nell Brown Davenport 

Alice Bullard Nagle 

Evelyn Campbell Beale 

Josephine Clark Fleming 

Elizabeth Cobb Boyd 

Sarah Cooper Freyer 

Ora Craig Stuckey 

Eugenia Edwards Mackenzie 

Margaret Ellis Pierce 

Helen Etheredge Griffin 

Mary Felts Steedman 

Julia Finley McCutchen 

Thelma Firestone Hogg 

Mary Lillian Garretson 
*Margaret Glass Womeldorf 

Virginia Heard Feder 
*Lucile Heath McDonald 

Anne Hudmon Reed 

Mary Hudmon Simmons 

Margaret Jones Clark 

Polly Jones Jackson 

Nancy Kamper Miller 
*Cornelia Keeton Barnes 

Roberta Kiipatrick Stubblebine 

Margaret Loranz 

Caroline Lingle Lester 

Elizabeth Lynch 

Vivian Martin Buchanan 

Rosemary May Kent 

Eulalia Napier Sutton 

Gail Nelson Blain 

Frances Oglesby Hills 

Letitia Rockmore Nash 

Sara Shadburn Heath 

Laura Spivey Massie 

Mary Sturtevant Cunningham 

Marlyn Tate Lester 

Annie Laurie Whitehead Young 

Marie Whittle Wellslager 

Amelia Wolf Bond 

Katharine Woltz Farinholt 



1934 



Sarah Aust in Zorn 

Alae Risse Barron Leitch 

Helen Boyd McConne 1 1 

Laura Buist Starnes 

Nel le Chamlee Howard 

Martha Ellis Brown 

Martha Boyd Elliott 

Martha England Gunn 

Sybil Grant 

Mary Grist Whitehead 
*Pauline Gordon Woods 
*Lucy Goss Herbert 

Jean Gould Clarke 

Elinor Hamilton Hightower 

Mary Hamilton McKnight 

Lillian Herring Rosas 

Elizabeth Johnson Thompson 

Marguerite Jones 

Janie Lapsley Be 11 
*Louise McCain Boyce 

Mary McDonald Sledd 

Carrie McMullen Bright 

Marion Mathews 

Ruth Moore Randolph 

Sara Moore Cathey 

Martha Norman 
♦Frances 0' Brien 

Reba Pearson Kaemper 
♦Dorothy Potts Weiss 

Gladys Pratt Entrican 

Florence Preston Borkhorst 

Virginia Prettyman 

Dorothy Ramage Thomas 

Carolyn Russell Nelson 

Louise Schuessler Patterson 



Summer 1980 



*Fund Agent 




Class of '80 joins ranks of alumnae 



Caroline Selden 

Rosa Shuey Day 

Mary Sloan Laird 

Rudene Taffar Young 

Mabel Ta Image 

Virginia Tillotson Hutcheson 

Tennessee Tipton Butler 

Dorothy Walker Palmer 

Eleanor Willians Knox 

Bella Wilson Lewis 



1935 



Class of '35 

•Elizabeth Alexander Higgins 
Mary Virginia Allen 

*Vella Marie Behm Cowan 
Dorothea Blacks hear Brady 
Mary Borden Parker 
Marian Calhoun Murray 
Jennie Champion Hardin 
Carolyn Cole Gregory 
Sarah Cook Thompson 
Fidesah Edwards Alexander 
Willie Florence Eubanks Donehoo 
Betty Fountain Gray 

*Jane Goodwin Harbin 
Mary Green Wohlford 
Carol Griffin Scoville 
Anne Scot t Harman Mau ldi n 
Elizabeth Heaton Mutlino 
Katherine Hertzka 
Betty Lou Houck Smith 
Anne Humber Little 
Frances McCalla Ingles 
Joseph ine Jennings Brown 
Julia McClatchey Brooke 
Marguerite Morris Saunders 
Clara Lee Morrison Backer 
Alberta Palmour McMillan 
Nina Parke Hopkins 
Aileen Parker Sibley 

*Nell Pattillo Kendall 
Juliette Puett Maxwell 
Martha Redwine Rountree 
Grace Robinson Hanson 



Sybil Rogers Herren 
Mary Summers Langhorne 
Elizabeth Thrasher Baldwin 
*Amy Underwood Trowe 1 1 
Laura Whi tner Dorsey 
Virginia Wood Allgood 
Jacqueline Wool folk Mathes 
Elizabeth Young Hubbard 



1936 



Catherine Bates 
Mary Beasley White 
Meriel Bull Mitchell 
Elizabeth Buraon Wilson 
Alice Cham lee Booth 
Mary Comely Dwight 
Sara Cureton Prowell 
Florrie E rb Bruton 

♦Sara Frances Estes 
Emily Gover Maynard 
Lilian Grimson Obligado 
Mary Henderson Hill 
Jean Hicks Pitts 
Marjorie Hoi 1 ingsworth 
Frances James Donohue 
On Sue Jones Jordan 
Louise Jordan Turner 
Ruth King Stanford 
Carrie Latimer Duvall 
Ann Bernard Martin 

*Alice McCallie Pressly 
Josephine McClure Anderson 
Sarah Frances McDonald 

*Dean McKoin Bushong 
Frances Miller Felts, Jr. 

♦Frances Napier Jones 
Sarah Nichols Judge 
Janie Norris 

Mary Richardson Gauthier 
Louisa Robert Carroll 

*Mary Alice Shelton Felt 
Margaret Smith Bowie 

*Mary Margaret Stowe Hunter 



Virginia Turner Graham 
Mary Vines Wright 
Marie Townsend 
Mary Walker Fox 
Ann Carolyn White Burrill 
Virginia Williams Goodwin 
Irene Wilson Neister 
Martha Young Bell 



Vivienne Trice Ansley 
**Margaret Watson 

Frances Wilson Hurst 



1937 



*Eloisa Alexander LeConte 
Luc l le Barnett Mirman 
Frances Belford Olsen 
F. Louise Brown Smith 
Virginia Caldwell Payne 
Frances Cary Taylor 
Cornelia Christie Johnson 
Lucile Dennison Keenan 
Kathleen Daniel Spicer 

Mane Estes 
Michelle Furlow Oliver 

*Annie Galloway Phillips 
Alice Hannah Brown 

*Fannie Harris Jones 
Barbara Hertwig Meschter 
Barton Jackson Cathey 
Dorothy Jester 
Sarah JohnBon Linney 
Catharine Jones Ma lone 
Molly Jones Monroe 
Mary Jane King Critchell 
Jean Kirkpatrick Cobb 
Martha Sue Laney Redus 
Florence Laaseter Rambo 
Vivienne Long McCain 
Mary Malone Martin 

♦Isabel McCain Brown 
Enid Middleton Howard 
Ora Muse 

Elizabeth Perrin Powell 
Marjorie Scott Meier 
Marie Stalker Smith 

♦Frances Steele Garrett 
Virginia Stephens Clary 



1938 



Anonymous 

*Jean Adams Weersing 
Nell Allison Sheldon 
Nettie Mae Austin Kelley 
Dorothy Avery Newton 
Genevieve Baird Farris 
Mary Alice Baker Lown 
Tommy Ruth Blackmon Waldo 
Elizabeth Blackshear Flinn 
Katherine Bnttingharo Hunter 
Martha Brown Miller 
Frances Cast le berry 
Jean Chalmers Smith 
Lulu Croft 

Mildred Davis Harding 
Doris Dunn St. Clair 
Goudyloch Erwin Dyer 
Eloise Estes Keiser 
Jane Guthrie Rhodes 
Sarah Hoyle Nevin 
Winifred Ke 1 lersberger Vass 
Ola Kelly Ausley 
Mary Anne Kernan 

♦Ellen Little Lesesne 
Martha Long Gosline 
Jeanne Matthew Darlington 
Ellen McCallie Cochrane 
Elizabeth McCord Lawler 
Lettie McKay Van Landingham 
Jacquelyn McWhite James 
Bertha Merrill Holt 
Nancy Moorer Cantey 
Margaret Morrison B 1 umber g 
Helen Rodgers Dopson 
Joyce Roper McKay 
Mary Smith Bryan 
Virginia Suttenfield 
Grace Tazewell Flowers 
Anne Thompson Rose 
Mary Tribble Beasley 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Jane Turner Smith 
Elizabeth Warden Marshall 
Zoe We 1 Is Lambert 
Elsie West Duval 
Margaret Wright Rankin 
Louise Young Garrett 



1939 



Mary Allen Reding 

*Jean Bailey Owen 
Ethelyn Boswell Purdie 
Alice Caldwell Melton 
Rachel Campbell Gibson 
Lelia Carson Watlington 
Alice Cheeseman 
Sarah Cunningham Carpenter 
Jane Dryfoos Rau 
Margaret Edmunds O'Brien 
Catherine Farrar Davis 
Elizabeth Furlow Brown 
Susan Goodwyn Garner 
Dorothy Graham Gilmer 
Frances Guthrie Brooks 

*Eleanor Hall 
Jane Hamilton Ray 

^Jacqueline Hawks Alsobrook 
Ruth Hertzka 

Mary Ho llingsworth Hatfield 
Cora Kay Hutchins Blackwelder 
Phyllis Johnson O'Neal 
(Catherine Jones Smith 
Elizabeth Kenney Knight 
Jenny Kyle Dean 
Dorothy Lazenby Stipe 
Helen Lichten Solomonson 
Emily MacMoreland Wood 
Ella Mallard Ninestein 
Martha Marshall Dykes 
Emma McMullen Doom 
Mary Wells McNeill 
Marie Merritt Rollins 
Mary Moss Sinback 
Mary Murphy Chesnutt 
Carolyn Myers King 
Annie Newton Parkman 
Amelia Nickels Calhoun 

*Lou Pate Jones 
Julia Porter Scurry 
Mamie Ratliff Finger 
Jeanne Redwine Davis 
Betty Sams Daniel 
Haydie Sanford Sams 
Elizabeth Shepherd Green 
Aileen Shortly Whipple 
Alice Sill 
Mary Penny Simonton Boothe 

*Mary Frances Thompson 
Virginia Tumlin Guffin 

*Elinor Tyler Richardson 
Ann Watkins Ansley 
Elizabeth Wheat ley Malone 
Mary Ellen Whetsell Timmons 
Annie Lou Whitaker Reynolds 



1940 



Betty Alderman Vinson 
Grace Anderson Cooper 
Marguerite Baum Muhlenfeld 
Betsy Banks Stoneburner 
Margaret Barnes Carey 
Evelyn Baty Christman 
Marguerite Baum Muhlenfeld 
Majorie Boggs Lovelace 
Joan Brinton Johnson 
Virginia Brown Cappleman 
Ruth Byerley Vaden 
Jeannette Carroll Smith 
Helen Gates Carson 
Ernestine Cass Dickerson 
Margaret Christie Colmer 
Elizabeth Davis Johnston 
Lillie Drake Hamilton 
Nell Echols Burks 
Anne Enloe 
Ruth Ey.les Lewis 
Annette Franklin King 
Marian Franklin Anderson 
Mary Gill Olson 
Florence Graham 
Nettie Greer Howard 
Sam Olive Griffin McGinnis 
Wilma Griffith Clapp 
Penn Hammond Vieau 



*Mary Heaslett Badger 

Margaret Hopkins Martin 
•Gary Home Petrey 

Eleanor N. Hutchens 

Mi Id red Joseph Co Iyer 

Jane Knapp Spivey 

Sara Lee Mattingly 

Eloise McCall Guyton 

Virginia McWh or t e r F reeraan 

Sarah Matthews Bixler 

Virginia Milner Carter 

Nell Moss Roberts 
*Beth Paris Moremen 
*Katherine Patton Carssow 

Irene Phillips Richardson 

Nell Pinner Wisner 

Mary Reins Burge 

Isabe 11a Robertson White 

Ruth Slack Roach 

Hazel Solomon Beazley 

Harriet Stimson Davis 

Edith Stover McFee 

Ellen Stuart Patton 

Louise Sullivan Fry 

Mary Mac Templeton Brown 

Henrietta Thompson Wilkinson 

Emily Underwood Gault 

Polly Ware Duncan 

Violet Jane Watkins 

Willomette Williamson Stauffer 

Claire Wilson Moore 

Jane Witman Pearce 



1941 



Frances Alston Lewis 

Mary Arbuckle Osteen 

Ruth Ashburn Kline 

Elizabeth Barrett Alldredge 

Miriam Bedinger WilLiamson 
*Sabine Brumby Korosy 

Gentry Burks Bielaski 
*Harriette Cochran Mershon 

Freda Copeland Hoffman 

Virginia Corr White 

Doris Dalton Crosby 

Dorothy Debele Purvis 
*Martha Dunn Kerby 

Ethelyn Dyar Daniel 

Louise Franklin Livingston 

Caroline Gray Truslow 

Nancy Gribble Nelson 

Florrie Guy Funk 

Helen Hardie Smith 

Ann Henry 

Rebekah Hogan Henry 

Beth Irby Milam 

Aileen Kasper Borrish 

Helen Klugh McRae 

Julia Lancaster 

Sara Lee Jackson 

Margaret Lentz Slicer 

Martha Moody Laseter 

Valgerda Nielson Dillard 
*Pattie Patterson Johnson 

Georgia Poole Hollis 

Elta Robinson Posey 

Louise Sams Hardy 

Lillian Schwencke Cook 

Gene Slack Morse 
*Frances Spratlin Hargrett 

Elizabeth Stevenson 

Dorothy Travis Joyner 

Jane Vaughan Price 

Grace Walker Winn 

Cornelia Watson Pruett 

Nancy Willstatter Gordon 
*Mary Wisdom 



1942 



Martha Arant Allgood 
Elizabeth Bradfield Sherman 
Betty Ann Brooks 
Martha Buffalow Davis 
Edwina Burruss Rhodes 
Harriett Caldwell Maxwell 
Anne Chambless Bateman 
Gay Currie Fox 
Edith Dale Lindsey 
Mary Davis Bryant 
Dale Drennan Hicks 
Carolyn Dunn Stapleton 
*Susan Dyer Oliver 



Margery Gray Wheeler 
Kathryn Greene Gunter 

•Margaret Hami It on Rambo 
Julia Harry Bennett 
Margaret Hartsook Emmons 
Kathleen Head Johnson 
Doris Henson Vaughn 
Frances Hinton 
Neva Jackson Webb 
Elizabeth Jenkins Willis 
Mary Kirkpatrick Reed 
Caroline Long Armstrong 
Susanna McWhorter Reckard 
Virginia Montgomery McCall 
Dorothy Nabers Allen 

*Elise Nance Bridges 
Jeanne Osborne Gibbs 
Mary Louise Palmour Barber 
Julia Patch Weston 
Louise Pruitt Jones 
Claire Purcell Smith 
Tina Ransom Louis 
Elizabeth Robertson Schear 
Edith Schwartz Joel 
Myrtle Seckinger Lightcap 
Margaret Sheftall Chester 
Marjorie Simpson Ware 
Jack le Stearns Potts 
Jane St i L Iwe 11 Espy 
Jane Taylor White 
Mary Olive Thomas 
Frances Tucker Johnson 
Dorothy Webster Woodruff 
Myree Wells Maas 
Olivia White Cave 
Nancy Wimpfheimer Wolff 



1943 



Emily Anderson Hightower 
Mary Anne Atkins Paschal 
Mary Jane Auld Linker 
Sue Barker Woolf 

*Betty Bates Fernandez 
Anna Black Hansell 
Mary Brock Williams 

*Flora Campbell McLain 
Alice Clements Shinall 
Maryann Cochran Abbott 
Joella Craig Good 
Charity Crocker Cole 
Laura Cumming Northey 

*Jane Dinsmore Lowe 
Margaret Downie Brown 
Betty Dubose Skiles 
Jeanne Eakin Salyer 
Anne Frierson Smoak 
Susan Guthrie Fu 
Helen Hale Lawton 
Dorothy Holloran Addison 
Dorothy Hopkins McClure 
Mardia Hopper Brown 
Benny e Linzy Sadler 

*Mary Mart in Rose 
Bryant Holsenbeck Moore 
Anne Paisley Boyd 
Betty Pegram Sessoms 
Frances Radford Mauldin 
Hannah Reeves 
Lillian Roberts Deakins 

*Ruby Rosser Davis 
Clare Rountree Couch 
Margaret Shaw Allred 
Aileen Still Hendley 
Regina Stokes Barnes 

*Mary Ward Danielson 

*Marjorie Weismann Zeidman 
Barbara Wilber Gerland 
Kay Wilkinson Orr 
Katherine Wright Philips 



1944 



Bettye Ashcraft Senter 
Betty Bacon Skinner 
Zelda Barnett Morrison 
Virginia Barr McFarland 
Clare Bedinger Baldwin 
Claire Bennett Kelly 
Marguerite Bless Mclnnis 
Louise Breedin Griffiths 
Mary Carr Townsend 
Margaret Cathcart Hilburn 
Jean Clarkson Rogers 
Ethlyn Coggin Miller 
Barbara Connally Kaplan 



Frances Cook Crowley 

Barbara Daniels 

Agnes Douglas Kuentze 1 

Pauline Garvin Keen 

Ann Eagan Goodhue 

Elizabeth Edwards Wi Ison 

Sara Agnes Florence 

Pauline Garvin Keen 

Elizabeth Harvard Dowda 
*Julia Harvard Warnock 

Catharine Kollock Thoroman 

Ruth Kolthoff Kirkman 
*Martha Lasseter Storey 

Martha Liddell Donald 

Quincy Mills Jones 

Aurie Mont gomery Mi 1 ler 

Margaret Powell Flowers 

Martha Rhodes Bennett 
*Anne Sale Weydert 

Betty Pope Scott Noble 

Marjorie Smith Stephens 

Katheryne Thompson Mangum 

Johnnie Tippen 

Marjorie Tippins Johnson 

Martha Trimble Wapensky 

Betty Vecsey 

Mary E. Walker 

Mary Walker Scott 

Mary Frances Walker Blount 

Anne Ward Amacher 

Betty Williams Stoffel 

Oneida Wool ford 



1945 



Ruth Anderson Stall 

Carol Barge Mathews 

Marian Barr Hanner 

Mildred Beman Stegall 

Elizabeth Blincoe Edge 

Virginia Bowie 

Frances Brougher Garman 

Leila Burke Holmes 

Ann Campbell Hulett 

Betty Campbell Wiggins 
*Elizabeth Carpenter Bard in 

Virginia Carter Caldwell 

Geraldine Cottongim Richards 

Mary Cumming Fitzhugh 
*Beth Daniel Owens 

Harriette Daugherty Howard 

Betty Davis Shingler 

Mary Anne Derry Triplett 

Ruth Doggett Todd 

Pauline Ertz Wechsler 

Jane Everett Knox 

Elizabeth Farmer Gaynor 

Joyce Freeman Marting 

Barbara Frink Allen 

Carolyn Fuller Hill Nelson 
^Elizabeth Gribble Cook 

Anne Hall King 

Mia Hecht Owens 

Emily Higgins Bradley 

Jean Hood Booth 

Eugenia Jones Howard 

Beverly King Pollock 

Frances King Mann 

Jane Kreiling Mell 

Mary Louise Law 

Martha Mack Simons 

Alice Mann Niedrach 

Molly Milam Inserni 

Sara Milford Walker 

Sue Mitchell 

Scott Newell Newton 

Margaret Norris 

Mary Nee ly Norris King 

Isabel RogerB 

Ceevah Rosenthal Blatraan 

Marilyn Schroder Timmerman 

Bess Sheppard Poole 

Emily Singletary Garner 

Julia Slack Hunter 

Joan Stevenson Wing 

Lois Sullivan Kay 

Mary Ann Turner Edwards 

Suzanne Watkins Smith 

Dorothy Lee Webb McKee 

Frances Woodall Talmadge 



1946 



Jeanne Addison Roberts 
Mary Lillian Allen Wilkes 
Martha Baker Wilkins 



Summer 1980 



*Fund Agent 



♦Margaret Bear Moore 

Lucile Beaver 
•Emily Bradford BattB 

Kathryn Cameron Burns 

Mary Cargill 
*Mary Ann Courtenay Davidson 

Edwina Bell Davis 
*Mary Duckworth Gellerstedt 
*Conradine Fraser Riddle 

Shirley Graves Cochrane 

Elizabeth Horn Johnson 

Betty Howell Traver 

Louise Isaacson Bernard 

Martha Johnson Haley 
*Lura Johnston Watkins 

Peggy Jones Miller 

Stratton Lee Peacock 

Ruth Limbert G ri scorn 

Betty Long Sale 

Mary Martin Powell 
•Mildred McCain Kinnaird 

Mary McConkey Reimer 

Anne Murrell Courtney 

Marjorie Naab Bolen 

Ann Noble Dye 

Bettye Phelps Douglas 

Celetta Powell Jones 
*Anne Register Jones 
*Louise Reid Strickler 

E lea nor Reynolds Verde ry 
*Mary Russell Mitchell 
*Betty Smith Satterthwai te 

Jean Stewart Staton 

Doris Street Thigpen 

Martha Sunkes Thomas 

Marguerite Toole Scheips 

Peggy Trice Hall 

Lucy Turner Knight 

Mary Vinsant Grymes 

Verna Weems Macbeth 
♦Elizabeth Weinschenk Mundy 

Winifred Wilkinson Hausmann 

Eva Lee Williams Jemison 



1947 



Virginia Barksdale Lancaster 

Joanne Benton Shepherd 

Marguerite Born Hornsby 

Virginia Lee Brown McKenzie 
•Eleanor Calley Cross 

June Coley Loyd 

Jane Cooke Cross 

Betty Crabill Rogers 
*Helen Catherine Currie 

Anne Eidson Owen 
*Mary Jane Fuller Floyd 

Dorothy Galloway Fontaine 

Mynelle Grove Harris 

Genevieve Harper Alexander 

Charlotte Anne Hevener Nobbs 

Genet Louise Heery Barron 

Anne Hough Hopkins 

Louise Hoyt Minor 

Sue Hutchens Henson 

Marianne Jeffries Williams 

Rosemary Jones Cox 
•Margaret Kelly Wells 

Mary Jane Love Nye 

Marguerite Mattison Rice 

Edith Merrin Simmons 

Virginia Owens Watkins 

Betty Patterson King 

Betty Jean Radford Moeller 

Ellen Rosenblatt Caswell 

Lorenna Ross Brown 

Nancy Elizabeth Shelton Parrott 

Barbara Smith Hul I 

Sarah Smith Austin 

Caroline Squires Rank in 

Elizabeth Walton Callaway 

Jean Williams Hand 

Barbara Wilson Montague 



1948 



Dabney Adams Hart 
Jane Barker Secord 
Ruth Bast in S lentz 
Martha Ellen Beacham Jackson 
•Barbara Blair 
Lela Ann Brewer 
Barbara Coith Ricker 
Mary Alice Compton Osgood 
Edna Cunningham Schooley 



•Nancy Deal Weaver 
Adele Dieckmann McKee 

•June Driskill Weaver 
Anne Ezzard Eskew 
Josephine Faulkner James 
Nancy Geer Alexander 

•Harriet Gregory Heriot 
Martha Hay Vardeman 
Jean Henson Smith 
Kathleen Hewson Cole 
Caroline Hodges Roberts 
Amanda Hulsey Thompson 

•June Irvine Torbert 
Anne E. Jones Crabill 
Marybeth Little Weston 
Sheely Little Miller 
Barbara Macris Darby 
Emi ly E . Lady Major 
Mary Man ly Ryman 
Lou McLaurin Stewart 
Mae Comer Osborne Parker 
Betty Powers Crislip 
Harriet Reid 
Ann Rogers Sawyer 
Zollie Saxon Johnson 
Rebekah Scott Bryan 
Anne Shepherd McKee 
Charlien S imma Miller 

•Mary Gene Sims Dykes 

•Jacqueline Stewart 
Page Violette Harmon 
Lida Walker Askew 
Barbara Waugaman Thompson 
Barbara Whipple Bitter 
Sara Catherine Wilkinson 
Emily Wright Cumming 
Margaret Yancey Kirkman 



1949 



Class of 1949 

Rita Adams Simpson 

Gene Akin Martin 

Caroline Alexander Bryan 

Mary Jo Amnions Jones 

Beverly Baldwin Albea 

Louisa Beale McGaughey 
•Susan Bowling Dudney 

Alice Caswell Wilkins 

Roberta Cathcart Hopkins 

Lee Cousar Tubbs 

Alice Crenshaw Moore 

Jo Culp Williams 
*Bettie Davi son Bruce 

Betsy Deal Smith 

Betty Jeanne Ellison Candler 

Kate Durr Elmore 

Evelyn Foster Henderson 

Katherine Geffcken 

Martha Goddard Lovell 

Nancy Huey Kelly 
•Henrietta Johnson 

Winifred Lambert Carter 

Katherine Lee Wal lis 
•Ruby Lehmann Cowley 
•Rebecca Lever Brown 

Frances Long Cowan 

Harriet Lurton Major 

Katherine McKoy Ehling 

Nancy Parks Anderson 

Patricia Persohn 
•Lynn Phillips Mathews 
•Georgia Powell Lemmon 
•Mary Price Coulling 

Dorothy Quillian Reeves 

Betty Jo Sauer Mansur 

Carmen Shaver Brown 

Shi r ley Simmons Duncan 

Sharon Smith Cutler 

Edith Stowe Barkley 

Doris Sullivan Tippens 

Jean Tollison Moses 

Newe 11 Turner Parr 

Virginia Vining Skelton 

Martha Warlick Brame 

Jeanette Willcoxon Peterson 

Elizabeth Williams Henry 

Harriotte Winchester Hurley 

Betty Wood Smith 



1950 



Catherine Davis Armfield 

Dorothy Davis Yarborough 

Elizabeth Dunlap McAliley 

Helen Edwards Propst 
•Jean Edwards Crouch 

Ann Gebhardt Fullerton 

Anne Haden Howe 

Sarah Hancock White 

Marie Heng Jan Ho 
•Jessie Hodges Kryder 

Marguerite Jackson Gilbert 

Norah Anne Little Green 

Alline B. Marshall 

Carolyn Sue McSpadden Fisher 

Dorothy Medlock Irvine 

Miriam Mitchell Ingman 

Jean Niven Morris 

Jean Osborn Sawyer 

Pat Overton Webb 

Ida Pennington Benton 

Polly Philips Harris 
•Ann Pitts Cobb 

Joann Piastre Britt 

Emily Pope Drury 

Emily Ann Reid Williams 

Joyce Rives Robinson 

Martha Stowell Rhodes 

Isabel Truslow Fine 

Sarah Tucker Miller 



1951 



Esther Adler Schachter 

Nancy Anderson Benson 

Mary Hayes Barber Holmes 

Noel Barnes Williams 

Nancy Cassin Smith 

Anna DaVault Haley 

Harriett Everett Olesen 

Lou Floyd Smith 

Nell Floyd Hall 

Suzanne Lorna Floyd Hardy 

Betty Jane Foster Deadwyler 
•Anna Gounaris 

Freddie Hachtel Daum 

Nancy Lee Hudson Irvine 

Margaret Hunt Denny 

Mary Page Hutchison Lay 

Sally Jackson Hertwig 

Charlotte Key Marrow 

Jeanne Kline Brown 

Kay Laufer Morgan 

Mary Caroline Lindsay Eastman 

Patricia McCartney Boone 

Eleanor McCarty Cheney 
•Jiramie Ann McGee Collings 

Sarah McKee Burnside 

Julianne Morgan Garner 

Ca rol Munger 

Mary Anna Ogden Bryan 
*Eliza Pollard Mark 

Barbara Quattlebaum Parr 

Mary Roberts Davis 

Stellise Robey Logan 

Caronelle Smith Garren 
*Jene I le Spear 

Cissie Spiro Aidinoff 
•Martha Ann Stegar 

Catherine Warren Dukehart 

Joan White Howell 

Marie Woods Shannon 



1952 



Class of '50 
Louise Arant Rice 
Hazel Berman Karp 
Jo-Anne Christopher Cochrane 
•Betty Jean Combs Moore 



Charlotte Allsmiller Crosland 
•Ann Boyer Wilkerson 

Mary Jane Brewer Murkett 

Barbara Brown Waddell 

June Carpenter Bryant 

Patricia Cortelyou Winship 

Landis Cotten Gunn 

Caroline Crea Smith 

Catherine Crowe Dickman 

Clairelis Eaton Franklin 

Emy Evans Blair 

Betty Finney Kennedy 

Shirley Ford Baakin 
•Kathren Freeman Stelzner 
•Phyllis Galphin Buchanan 

Kathryn Gentry Westbury 
•Barbara Grace Palmour 

Susan Hancock Findley 

Ann Tiffin Hays Greer 

Ruth Heard Randolph 

Shirley Heath Roberta 

Ann Herman Dunwody 



Kathryn Howard Mahlin 
Margaret Inman S imps on 
Jean Isbell Brunie 
Louise Jett Porter 
Margaret Ann Kaufman Shulman 
Helen Land Ledbetter 

•Margaretta Lumpkin Shaw 
Sylvia Moutos Mayson 
Ann Parker Lee 
Edith Petrie Hawkins 
Hi Ida Priviteri 
LaWahna Rigdon Smisson 
Lillian Ritchie Sharian 

•Jean Robarts Seaton 
Frances Sells Grimes 
Betty Jane Sharpe Cabaniss 

•Jackie Simmons Gow 
Katherine Jeanne Smith Harley 
Winnie Strozier Hoover 
Pat Thomason Smallwood 
Frances Vandiver Puckett 
Lorna Wiggins 
Sylvia Williams Ingram 
Anne Winningham Sims 
Florence Worthv Griner 



1953 



Geraldine Armstrong Boy 
Evelyn Baaaett Fuqua 
Bertie Bond 

Georganna Buchanan Johnson 
Sarah Frances Cook 
Ann Cooper Whitesel 
Virginia Corry Harrell 
Susan Dodson Rogers 
Rene Dudney Lynch 

•Frances Ginn Stark 
Sarah Hamilton Leathers 
Florence Hand-Warren 
Virginia Hays Klettner 
Peggy Hooker Hartwein 
Ellen Hunter Brumfield 
Anne Jones Sims 
Rosalyn Kenneday Cothran 

•Sarah Leathers Martin 
Betty McLellan Carter 
Margaret McRae Edwards 
Belle Miller McMaster 
Patricia Morgan Fisher 
Martha Norton Caldwell 
Mary Ripley Warren 
Mary Beth Robinson Stuart 
Louise Ross Bell 
Shirley Samue Is Bowden 
Rita May Scott Cook 
Dianne Shell Rousseau 
Triocilla Sheppard Taylor 
Lindy Taylor Barnett 
Margaret Thomason Lawrence 
Anne Thomson Sheppard 
Charline Tritton Shanks 
Vivian Weaver Maitland 
Jane Williams Coleman 



1954 



Mari lyn Be lanus Davis 
Lois Dryden Hasty 
Harriet Durham Maloof 
Martha Duval Swartwout 
Florence Fleming Corley 
Julia Grier Storey 
Katharine Hefner Gross 
Louise Hill Reaves 
Barbara Hood Buchanan 
Eleanor Hutchinson Smith 

*Carol Jones Hay 
Jacquelyn Josey Hall 
Patricia Anne Kent Stephenson 
Mitzi Kiser Law 

*Mary Lou Kleppinger DeBolt 
Caroline Lester Haynes 
Mary Louise McKee Hageraeyer 
Clara McLanahan Wheeler 
Joyce Munger Osborn 
Anne Patterson Hammes 

•Judy Promnitz Marine 
Mary Newell Rainey Bridges 
Caroline Reinero Kemmerer 
Anne Sylvester Booth 

*Joanne Varner Hawks 
Nancy Whetstone Hull 
Chizuko Yoshimura Kojima 
Jane Zuber Garrison 



10 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 




Molly Milam Inserni '45 and daughter Uisi '83 at reunion time 



1955 



Betty Akerman Shackleford 
Carol Alford Beaty 
Helen Ann Allred Jackson 

•Susanna Byrd Wells 
Constance Curry 
Elizabeth Grafton Hall 
Letty Grafton Harwell 
Wilma Hachtel Fanz 
Jo Ann Hall Hunsinger 
Patty Hamilton Lee 

•Vivian Hays Guthrie 
Jeanne Heisley Adams 
Jo Hinchey Williams 
Beverly Jensen Nash 

•Mary Evelyn Knight Swezey 
Sallie Lambert Jackson 
Catherine Lewis Callaway 
Mary L'heureux Hammond 
Callie McArthur Robinson 
Sara Mclntrye Banner 
Peggy McMillan White 
Pauline Morgan King 
Sarah Petty Dagenhart 
Patricia Paden Matsen 
Joan Pruitt Mclntyre 
Anne Rosselot Clayton 
Dorothy Jean Sands Hawkins 
Agnes Scott Willoch 
Clif Trussell 
Pauline Waller Hoch 

*Margaret Williamson Sraalzel 

•Elizabeth Wilson Blanton 



Mary Clark Hollins 

Carol Ann Cole White 
*Alvia Cook 

Memye Curt is Tucker 

Sarah Davis Adams 

Claire Flintom Bernhardt 

Jane Frist 
*June Gaissert Naiman 

Nancy Gay Frank 

Priscilla Goodwin Bennett 
*Guerry Graham Myers 

Sallie Greenfield 

Ann Gregory York 
•Harriett Griffin Harris 

Sarah Hall Hayes 

Louise Harley Hull 

Emmie Hay Alexander 

Helen Haynes Patton 

Nancy Jackson Pitts 
•Virginia Love Dunaway 
*Carolyn Moon Horn 

May Muse Stonecypher 

Jacqueline Plant Fincher 

Louise Rainey Amnions 

Rameth Richard Owens 

Betty Richardson Hickman 
•Anne Sayre Callison 

Marijke Schepman de Vries 
•Robbie Ann Shelnutt Upshaw 

Sarah Shippey McKneally 

Jane Stubbs Bailey 

Nancy Thomas Hill 

Sandra Thomas Hollberg 

Vannie Traylor Keightley 

Virginia Vickery Jory 



1956 



1957 



Ann Alvis Shibut 

Paula Ball Newkirk 

Barbara Battle 
*Stella Biddle Fitzgerald 

Juliet Boland Clack 

Martha Bridges Traxler 
*Judy Brown 

Anne Bullard Hodges 

Margaret Burwell Barnhardt 

Shirley Calkins Ellis 

Mary Jo Carpenter 



Elizabeth Ansley Allan 
Peggy Beard Baker 
Margaret Benton Davis 
Marti Black Slife 
Nancy Brock Blake 
Suzella Burns Newsome 
Bettye Carmichael Maddox 
Elizabeth Crapps Burch 
Catharine Crosby Brown 
Becky Deal Geiger 
Margery DeFord Hauck 



Laura Dryden Taylor 
Dede Farmer Grow 
Catherine Girardeau Brown 
Marian Hagedorn Briscoe 
Helen Hendry Lowrey 

*Carolyn Herman Sharp 
Margaret Hill Truesdale 

♦Frances Holtsclaw Berry 
Rachel King 
Elaine Lewis Hudgins 

*Marilyn McClure Anderson 
Virginia McClurkin Jones 
Mollie Merrick 
Katherine Sue Miller Nevins 
Margaret Minter Hyatt 
Grace Molineux Goodwin 

♦Frances Patterson Huffaker 

*Jean Price Knapp 
Dorothy Rearick Malinin 
Virginia Redhead Bethune 
Martha Jane Riggins Brown 

*Jacquelyn Rount ree Andrews 
Ann Shires Penuel 
Frazer Steele Waters 
Nelle Strickland McFather 

*Eleanor Swain All 
Anne Terry Sherren 
Nancy Wheeler Dooley 
Carolyn Wright McGarity 
Eleanor Wright Linn 
Margaret Zepatos Klinke 



1958 



Anne Blackshear Spragins-Harmuth 
•Jeanette Clark Sparks 

Betty Cline Melton 

Martha Davis Rosselot 

Sara Hazel Ellis 

Katherine Freeman Dunlap 

Patricia Gover Bitzer 

Ann Gunston Scott 

Helen Hachtel Haywood 
*Jo Hathaway Norton 

Catherine Hodgin Olive 

Susan Hogg Griffith 
*Nancy Holland Sibley 
♦Nora King 

Eugenie Lambert Hamner 

Carolyn Magruder Ruppenthal 
♦Maria Martoccia Clifton 

Janice Matheson Rowell 

Mary Louise McCaughan Robison 

Martha Meyer 

Judith Nash Gallo 

Nancy Niblack Dantzler 

Mary Norton Kratt 
*Phia Peppas Kanellos 

Blythe Posey Ashmore 
*Dorothy Ripley Lott 

Grace Robertson McLendon 

Caroline Romberg Silcox 

Joan St. Clair Goodhew 

JoAnn Sawyer Delafield 

Romona Segrest Peyton 

Elizabeth Shumaker Goodman 

Shirley Spackman May 

Deene Spivey Youngblood 

Katherine Sydnor Piephoff 
*Langhorne Sydnor Mauck 

Harriet Talmadge Mill 

Delores Taylor Yancey 

Joyce Thomas Pack 

Carolyn Tinkler Ramsey 
♦Marilyn Tribble Wittner 
•Rosalyn Warren Wells 

Mary Ruth Watson 

Margaret Woolfolk Webb 



1959 



Margaret Abernathy Martin 
Charlene Base Riley 
Nancy Blount Robinson 
Mary Bryan Dubard 

*Helen Burkitt Evans 
Betty Cobb Rowe 
Helen Culpepper Stacey 
Mary Dunn Evans 

•Elizabeth Edmunds Grinnan 
Majorie Erickson Charles 
Gertrude Florrid Van Luyn 
Patricia Forrest Davis 
Sara Anne Frazier Johnson 
Betty Garrard Saba 
Judy George Johnson 



Theresa Hand Du Pre 
Harriet Harrill Bogue 
Maria Harris Markwalter 
Martha Holmes Keith 
Rosalind Johnson McGee 
Hazel King Cooper 
Jane King Allen 
Jane Kraemer Scott 
Eleanor Lee McNeill 
Patricia Lenhardt Byers 
Mi ldred Ling Wu 
Helen Maddox Gaillard 
Leah Mathews Fontaine 
Runita McCurdy Goode 
Lib McGeachy Ray 

*Donalyn Moore McTier 
Ann Rivers Payne Hutcheson 
Lucy Puckett Leonard 
Susanne Rosinson Hardy 

•Jean Salter Reeves 
Isabella Strait Huffman 
Edith Tritton White 
Nancy Trowell Leslie 
Barbara Varner Willoughby 

*Susie White Edwards 



1960 



Angelyn Alford Bagwell 
Lisa Ambrose Hudson 
Neil W. Archer Congden 
Nancy Awbrey Brittain 
Marion Barry Mayes 
Gloria Branham Burnam 
Cynthia Butts Langfeldt 

*Phyllis Cox Whitesell 
Shannon Cumming McConnick 
Carolyn Davies Preische 
Louise Feagin Stone 
Margaret Goodrich Hodge 
Margaret J. Havron 
Eleanor Hill Widdice 
Carolyn Hoskins Coffman 
Frances E . Johns 
Linda Jones Klett 
Julia P. Kennedy 
Charlotte King Sanner 
Kathleen L. Kirk 
Ellen McFarland Johnson 
Helen Mabry Beglin 
Frances McFadden Cone 
Caroline S. Mikell Jones 
Helen M. Milledge 
Ashlin Morris Burria 
Linda Nichols Harris 

*Everdina Nieuwenhuis 
Jane Norman Scott 

♦Emily Parker McGuirt 
Diane Parks Cochran 
Mary Jane Pfaff Dewees 
Kay Richards Summers 
Martha Sharp Smith 
Sally A. Smith Howard 
Barbara Specht Reed 

*Sybil Strupe Rights 
Marcia Tobey Swanson 

*Edith Towers Davis 
Raines Wakeford Watkins 

*Ann Whisnant Bolch 
Carrington Wilson Fox 
Rebecca Wilson Guberman 
Grace Woods Walden 



1961 



Judith Albergotti Hines 

Ann Avant Crichton 

Ana Aviles McCaa 

Emily Bailey Bigby 

Pamela Bevier 

Nancy Jane Bringhurst Barker 

Anne Broad Stevenson 

Cornelia Brown Nichols 

Sally Bryan Minter 

Margaret Bullock 

Joan Falconer Byrd 

Mary Clark Schubert 

Betsy Dalton Brand 

Lucy Davis Harper 

Sandra Davis Moulton 

Marguerite Dickert Ligon 

Julia Doar Grubb 

Harriett Elder Manley 
*Alice Frazer Evans 
♦Katherine Gwaltney Remick 

Nancy Hall Grimes 



Summer 1980 



*Fund Agent 



Janice Lynn Henry 

Harriet Higgins Miller 
*Patricia Holmes Cooper 
♦Judith Houchins Uightman 

Linda Ingram Jacob 

Harriet Jackson Lovejoy 

Sarah Kelso 

Rosemary Kittrell 

Margaret Lipham Blakely 

Eugenia Marks Espy 

Betty Mattern York 

Ann McBride Chilcut t 
♦Sue McCurdy HoBterman 

Edna McLain Bacon 

Mary Ann McSwain Ant ley 

Anne Leigh Modlin Burkhardt 

Barbara Mordecai Schwanebeck 
*Mary Jane Moore 
*Nancy Moore Kuykendall 
*Prudy Moore Thomas 

Grace Ouzts Curry 

Emi ly Pancake 

Anne Pollard Withers 

Joanna Roden Bergstrom 
*Lucy Scales Muller 

Harriet Smith Bates 

Page Smi th Mo rah an 

Nancy Stillman Crais 
*Nancy Stone Hough 

Kay Strain King 

Virginia Thomas Shackelford 

Patricia Walker Bass 

Jane Weltch Milligan 

Florence Winn Cole 

Betty Sue Wyatt Wharton 

Marian Zimmerman Jenkins 



1962 



VioLet Allen Gardener 

Sara Blomquist Swartz 
*Carey Bowen Craig 

Gail Carter Adkins 

Vivian Conner Parker 

Carol Cowan Kussraaul 
*Patricia Flythe Koont s 
*Peggy Fredrick Smith 

Kay Gilliland Stevenson 
♦Elizabeth Harshbarger Broadus 

Jean Haynie Stewart 

Ann Hershberger Barr 

Margaret Holley Milam 

Lynda Horn George 

Amanda Jane Hunt White 

Ann Hutchinson Beason 
♦Elizabeth Jefferson Boyt 

Norris Johnston Goss 

Isabel Kallman Anderson 

Beverly Kenton Mason 

Milling Kinard 

Let it ia Lavender Sweitzer 

Dorothy Lockhart Matthews 

Ann Middlemas Johnsjn 

Nancy Jane Nelms Garrett 

Ethel Oglesby Horton 

Pauline Page Moreau 

Sylvia Pruitt Karcher 
♦Marjorie Reitz Turnbull 

Lebby Rogers Harrison 

Robin Rudolph Orcutt 

Ruth Seagle Bushong 
*Ruth Shepherd Vazquez 

Carolyn Shirley Wimberly 

Margaret Shugart Anderson 

Jo Allison Smith Brown 

Sandra Still 

Mary Stokes Humphlett 

Ray Taggert Thomson 

Burnam Walker Reichert 



1963 



Virginia Allen Callaway 
Frances Anderson 
Frances Bailey Graves 
Leewood Bates Woodell 
Judith Brantley 
Doris Bray Gi 1 1 
Cantey Bryan Mills 
Lucie Ca 1 laway Majoros 
Teresa Carrigan Simmons 
*Sarah Cumming Mitchell 
M. Leland Draper 
Janie Fincher Peterson 
Lucy Gordon Andrews 
Mary Ann Gregory Dean 



Jane Hancock Thau 
Margaret Harms 
Bonnie Hatfield Hairrell 
Judith Hawley Zollicoffer 

*Mary Louise Hunt Rubesch 
Dorothy Laird Foster 
Lyn Lindskog Deroy 
Carolyn Marie Lown Clark 
Anne Mi 1 ler Boyd 
Lucy Morcock Milner 
Robin Patrick Johnston 

*Linda Plemons Haak 
Ann Risher Phillips 
Jane Sharp Poole 

* Nancy Sibley Rerape 
Suzanne Smith 
Kaye Stapleton Redford 
Nell Tabor Hartley 
Elizabeth Thomas Freyer 
Louisa Walton McFadden 
Elizabeth Webb Nugent 
Flora Jane Womack Gibson 
Kay Younger 



1964 



Eve Anderson Earnest 

Nancy Barger Cox 

Karen Baxter Harriss 

Ann Booton Currie 

Carolyn C larke 

Judy Conner Scarborough 

Charlotte Connor 

Anne Foster Curtis 

Ga met t E . Foster 

Karen Gerald Pope 

Judith Hillsman Caldwell 

Dianne Hunter Cox 

Susan Keith-Lucas Carson 

Harriet King Wasserman 

Mary Louise Laird 

Jan LaMaster Soriero 

Eleanor Lee Bartlett 

Nancy Lee Abernathy 

Shirley Lee 
*Martha MacNair McMullen 

Joanna McElrath Alston 

Susan McLeod Holland 

Anne Minter Nelson 
♦Mary Mac Mitchell Saunders 

Julia Norton Keidel 

Laurie Oakes Propst 

Polly Paine Kratt 

Becky Reynolds Bryson 

Lila Sheffield Howland 
♦Elizabeth Singley Duffy 

Marion Smith Bishop 

Margaret Snead Henry 

Pamela Stanley McCaslin 

Mary Lynn Weekley Parsons 

Suzanne West Guy 

Barbara White Guarienti 

Margaret Whitton Ray 

Leonora I. Wicker 

Mary Womack Cox 
*Maria Wornom Rippe 



1965 



Class of '65 
♦Barbara Adams Hilliard 

Betty Armstrong McMahon 
♦Nandy Auman Cunningham 

Roberta Belcher Mahaffey 

Margaret Bell Gracey 

Dorothy Ann Bellinger Grimm 

Rebecca Beusse Holman 

Sara Blackard Long 

Pauline Boyce McLean 

Joanne Branch Grant 

Jane Brannon Nassar 

Elizabeth Brown Sloop 

Patricia Buchanan Mas i 

Lynne Burton-Haigh 

Sally Bynum Gladden 

Virginia Clark Brown 
♦Kathryn Coggin Hagglund 

Jean Crawford Cross 

He len Davis Hatch 

Mary Beth Dixon Hardy 

Molly Dominy Hernngton 
♦Ann Durrance Snead 

Betsy Feuerlein Hoffmann 

Elizabeth Fortson Wells 

Patricia Gay Nash 

Molly Gehan Garrison 



Nancy Hammerst rom Cole 
Kay Harvey Beebe 

♦Lucia Howard Sizemore 
Linda Kay Hudson McGowan 
Marty Jackson Frame 
Bettye Johnson McRae 
Kenney Knight Linton 
A. Angela Lancaster 
L lbby Ma lone Boggs 
Elizabeth McCain 
Marcia McClung Porter 
Linda McElfresh DeRoze 
Diane Mi 1 ler Wise 
Brandon Moore Brannon 
Elaine Nelson Bonner 
Nina Nelson Smith 

♦E laine Orr Wise 
Sandra Robertson Nelson 
Dorothy Robinson Dewberry 
Harriette Russell Flinn 

♦Laura Sanderson Miller 
Anne Schiff Faivua 

♦Catharine Sloan Evans 
E lyene Smith Thompson 
Nancy Solomon son Portnoy 
Betsy Feverlein Hoffmann 

♦Sandra Wa 1 lace 
Charlotte Webb Kendall 
Judith Weldon Maguire 
Sandra Hay Wilson 
Sue Wyatt Rhodes 
Nancy Yontz Linehan 



1966 



Beverly Allen Lambert 
Frances Baldwin Hodges 
Harriet Biscoe Rodgers 
Nancy Bland Towers 
Marilyn Breen Kelley 
Barbara Brown Freeman 
Mary Brown Bullock 
Emily Burgess 
Vicky Campbe 11 Patronis 
Carol Davenport Wood 
Alice Davidson 
Jenny Dillion Moore 
Martha Doom Bent ley 
Laura Dorsey Rains 
May Day Folk Taylor 
Jean Gaskell Ross 
Susan Goode Douglass 
Sue Ellen Hipp Adams 
Suzanne Holt Lindholm 
Frances Hopkins Westbrook 
Ayse I lgaz-Carden 
Mary Kuykendall Nichols 
Linda Lael 
Connie Magee Keyser 
Helen Mann Liu 
Margaret Marion Ryals 
F. E lien McDaniel 
Frances McKay Plunkett 
Barbara Minor Dodd 
Anne Morse Topple 
Sara Moseley Junkin 
Julia Murray Pensinger 
Beverly Myers Pickett 
Margaret Peyton Stem 
♦Linda Preston Watts 
Sandra Robertson Nelson 
Kay Roseberry Scruggs 
Deborah Rosen 
Gail Savage Glover 
Suzanne Scoggins Barnhill 
Lucy Scovi 1 le 
Louise Smith Nelson 
Malinda Snow 
Susan Thomas 
Sarah Uzzel 1-Rindlaub 
Carol Watson Harrison 
Nancy Whiteside 
Louisa W. G. Williams 
Donna Wright Mart in 



1967 



Jane Watt Balsley 

Mary Lynn Barnett Tennaro 

Linda Bixler Whitley 

Margaret Calhoun 

Sara Cheshire Killough 

Linda Cooper Shewey 

Ida Copenhaver Ginter 

Marsha Davenport Griffin 

Jane Davis Mahon 



Anne Diseker Beebe 

Gayle Doyle Viehman 

Anne Felker Cataldo 
♦Mary Helen Good loe-Murphy 

Gale Harrison 

Anne Hunter 

Elizabeth Hutchison Cowden ^ 

Judith Jackson Mozen 

Jo Jeffers Wingfield 

Mary Jervis Hayes 

Lucy Jones Cooley 

Penny Katson Pickett 

Karen Kokomoor Folsom 

Jane McCurdy Vardaman 

Claire McLeod Muller 

Ann Mi Her Morris 

Sandra Mitchell 

Julia Nuckols Offutt 

Caroline Owens Crain 

Ann Roberts Divine 

Eliza Roberts Letter 

Carol Scott Wade 
♦Susan Sleight Mowry 

Patricia Smith Edwards 
♦Susan Stevens Hitchcock 

Nancy Tilson Loop 

Rosalind Todd Tedards 

Anne Waldrop Allen 

Janice Weatherby Ri ley 

Grace Winn Ellis 

Julie Za chow ski 



1968 



Anonymous 

Sharon Adams Donohue 

Sarah Bainbridge Akridge 

Lucie Barron 
♦Jean Binkley Thrower 

Linda Bloodworth Garrett 

Louise Bruechert 

Mary Thomas Bush 

Laurie Carter Tharpe 
♦Carol Cole Renfro 

Mary Corb ltt Brockman 

Gretchen Cousin Autin 

Rebecca Davis Huber 

June Derrick 

Katherine Doster Stoddard 

Janet Eastburn Amos 

Sally Elberfeld Countryman 

Donna Evans Brown 

Louise Fortson Kmstrey 
♦Lucy Hamilton Lewis 

Sylvia Harby Hutton 

Olivia Hicks 

Candace Hodges Bell 

Janet Hunter 

Barbara Jenkins Hines 

Margaret Susan Johnson 
♦Suzanne Jones Harper 

Adele Josey Houston 

Victoria Justice 
♦Rebecca Lanier Allen 

Eleanor McCallie 
♦Susan McCann Butler 

Katherine McCracken Maybank 

Betty Miller Layng 

Katherine Mitchell 

Margaret Moore Hall 

Martha Parks Litt le 

Patricia Parks Hughes 
♦Nancy Paysinger Hove 

Susan Philips Engle 

Catherine Price Laube 

Gene Allen Reinero Vargas 

Georganne Rose Cunningham 

Angela Saad 

Johanna Scherer Hunt 

Allyn Smoak Bruce 

Patricia Stringer 

Susan Stringer Connell 

Ann Teat Gallant 

Ann Wendling Price 

Elizabeth Whitaker Wilson 

Ann Wilder 

Stephanie Wolfe Sidella 



1969 



Anonymous 
Evelyn Angeletti 
Patricia Auclair Hawkins 
Catherine Auman DeMaere 



12 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Beth Bailey 

Mary Gene Blake Wiseman 

Carol Blessing Ray 

Mary Belch Line 

Mary ELlen Bond Sandridge 

Cheryl Bruce Kragh 

Carey Burke Jones 

Joetta Burkett Yarbro 

Penny Burr Pinson 

Mary Chapman Hatcher 

Julie Cottrill Ferguson 

Janice Cribbs 

Janie Davis Hollerorth 

Virginia Davis Delph 

Margaret Frank Guill 

*Jo Ray Freiler Van Vliet 
Pamela Gafford McKinnon 
Mary Garlington Trefry 
Anne Gilbert Potts 
Glenda Goodman McKinnon 

*Lalla Griffis Mangin 
Sara Groover Frazier 
Nancy Hamilton Holcomb 
Diane Hampton Flannagan 
Ruth Hatcher Thomson 
Marion Hinson Mitchell 
Lee Hunter Eise 

*Sara Jackson Chapman 

*Carol Jensen Rych ly 
Margaret Johnston Nesbit 
Kay Jordon Sachs 
Beverly LaRoche Anderson 
Mary McAlpine Evans 
Dianne McMillan Smith 
Suzanne Moore Kaylor 
Kappa Moorer Robinson 
Kathryn Morris White 
Minnie Bob Mothes Campbell 

*Mary Anne Murphy Hornbuckle 
Jean Noggle Harris 
Kathleen Pease 
Virginia Pinkston Daily 
Elta Posey Johnston 
Elizabeth Potter 
Patsy Rankin Jopling 
Carolyn Robinson Caswell 
Dorothy Schrader 
Anna Eliza Stockman 
Tara Swartzel Boyter 

*Jeanne Taliaferro Cole 
Burnette Teeple Sheffield 
Sally Thomas Evans 

Elizabeth Thorne Woodruff 
Jane D. Todd 
Sheryl Watson Patrick 
Shelia Wilkins Harkleroad 
Rose Wilson Kay 
Sally Wood Hennessy 
Sharon Yandle Rogers 
*Betty Young von Herrmann 



1970 



*Janet Allen 
Aria Bateman Redd 
Diane Bollinger Bush 
Patricia Brown Cureton 
Leslie Buchanan New 
Mary Bullock Shearon 
Marcia Caribaltes Hughes 
Frances Lynn Carssow 
Peggy Chapman Curington 
Deborah Claiborne Wil 1 iams 
Carol Crosby Patrick 
Barbara Darnell 

*Linda Del Vecchio Owen 
Susan Donald 
Mollie Douglas Pollitt 
Catherine DuVall Vogel 
Sherian Fitzgerald Hodges 
Marion Gamble McCollum 
Lynne Garcia Harris 
Hope Gazes Grayson 

*Cheryl Granade Sullivan 
Edi Guyton Edmiston 
Sharon Hall Snead 

*Martha Harris Entrekin 
Mary-Wills Hatfield LeCroy 
Ann Hoefer Henderson 
Camille Holland Carruth 
Harriette Lee Huff Gaida 
Amy Johnson Wright 
Barbara Kinney 
Judy Mauldin Beggs 
Patricia McCurdy Arraistead 
Carol Ann McKenzie Fuller 

♦Christine McNamara Lovejoy 
Colleen Nugent Thrailkill 




Dr. Margaret Pepperdene and friends. Alumnae Weekend 



Catherine Oliver 
Martha Ramey 
Susan Reeve Ingle 

*Nancy Rhodes 
Carol Sharman Ringland 
Sally Skardon 

*Martha Smith Rumora 
Betsy Sowers 
Sally Stanton 
Pamela Taylor Clanton 
Jean Wall Olstin 
Sue Weathers Crannell 
Ruthie Wheless Hunter 
Rita Wilkins Chambers 
Elizabeth Winey Bunn 
Norris Wootton 



1971 



Gertrude Person Allen 
Cynthia Ashworth Kesler 
Deborah Banghart Mul lins 

*Clare Bard Perkins 
Evelyn Brown Christensen 
Swanna Cameron 

*Jane Carlson 
Linda Corder Muldoon 
Julia Couch Mehr 
Mary Carolyn Cox 

*Dale Derrick Rudolph 
Karen Derrick Moon 
Carol Durrance Dunbar 
Jane Duttenhaver Hursey 

*Rose Anne Ferrante Waters 
Sandra Finotti Collins 
Frances Folk Zygmont 
Margaret Funderburk O'Neal 
Carolyn Gailey 

*Harriet Gatewood Parker 
Gayle Gellerstedt Daniel 

*Janet Godfrey Wilson 
Anna Gordon Burns 
Carol Hacker Evans 
Deborah Haskell Hurley 
Paula Hendricks Culbreth 
Ann Jarrett Smith 
Edith Jennings Black 
Charlene Kruizenga 
Mary Landrum Squires 

*Karen Lewis Mitchell 

.Edna Lowe Swift 
Mary Martin Smith 
Tyler McFadden 
Alexa Mcintosh Minis 
Marquis McLemore Boyce 
Margaret Morrison Hamilton 
Susan Morton 

*Katherine Mueller Wright 



*Eleanor Ninestein 
Rebecca Owen Crim 
Barbara Paul 
Grace Pierce Quinn 
Arabelle Plonk Shockley 
Susan Propst Craben 
Patricia Schellack Wright 
Katherine Setze Home 
Jane Stambaugh 

*"G. G." Syndor Hill 

*Dea Taylor Walker 

*Peggy Thompson Davis 
Bernie Todd Smith 
M. Caroline Turner 
Wimberly Warnock 

♦Ellen T. Willinghara 



1972 



Harriet Amos 
Mary Beaty WatkinB 
Deborah Boggue Hays 
Kathryn Champe Cobb 
Lizabeth Champe Hart 
Susan Correnty Dowd 
Made leine del Portillo 
Barbara Denzler Campbell 
Beatrice Divine 

*Jerry Kay Foote 
Debra Ann Gay Wiggins 

*Dianne Gerstle Niedner 
Louise Roska-Hardy 
Terri Hearn Potts 
Claire Hodges Burdett 
Mary Jean Horney 
Leila Jarrett Hosley 
Elizabeth Johnston 
Sharon Jones Cole 

*Deborah Jordan Bates 

*Anne Kerable Collins 
Sidney Kerr 
Sally Lloyd Proctor 
Deborah Long Wingate 
Linda Maloy Ozier 
Martha Jane Martin Benson 
Susan Mees Hester 
Mary Jane Morris MacLeod 
Nancy Owen Merritt 
Mary Ann Powell Howard 
Gayle Saunders Dorsey 
Amante Smith Acuff 
Gretchen Smith 
Linda Story Braid 
Barbara Thomas Parker 

*Nancy Thomas Tippins 
Rose Trincher 

*Susan Watson Black 
Nancy Weaver Willson 



Pam Westmoreland Sholar 
*Paula Wiles S igmon 

Susan Williams Gornall 
*Julianna Winters 
*Ann Yrwing Hall 



1973 



Carolyn Arant Handell 
Edith Bailey Laetsch 
Sally Bryant Oxley 

*Anastac ia Coc lin 

* Deborah Corbet t Gaudier 
Ann Cowley Churchman 
Deborah Dalhouse Riser 
Ivonne del Portillo 
Sheryl Denman Curtis 
Virginia Lee Estes 
Debbie Gantt Mitchell 
Julia Cox Goodloe 
Judith Hamilton Grubbs 
Andrea Hankins Schellman 

*Resa Harris 
Cynthia Harvey Fletcher 
Judy Hill Calhoun 
Melissa Holt Vandiver 
Meredith Howe Pharis 

*Debra Ann Jackson Williams 
Margaret Lines 
Anne MacKenzie Boyle 
Judith Maguire Tindel 
Janifer Meldrum 

*Deborah Newman Mattern 
Jane Parsons Frazier 
Libby Rhett Jones 

*Nadja Sefcik-Earl 
Judy Sharp Hickman 
Janet Short 

*Clare Smith 
Laura Tins ley Swann 
Pamela Ann Todd Moye 

*Joy Trimble 
Nancy Wallace Davis 
Edith Waller Charabless 
Suzanne Warren Schwank 
Betsy Watt Dukes 
Cynthia Wilkes Smith 
Laura Jocelyn Williams 
Elizabeth Winfrey Freeburg 



1974 



Elizabeth Bean Burrell 
Julie Bennett Curry 
Betty Binkley 
Marianne Bradley 



Summer 1980 



*Fund Agent 



13 



*Patey Cook Bates 
Davara Jane Dye Potel 

*Lynn Ezell 
Mary Gay Bankaton 
Rosanne Harkey Pruitt 
Rebecca Harrison Mentz 
Cecilia Henry Kurland 
Patricia Hughes Schoeck 
Mary Jane Kerr Cornell 
Mary Frances Lawless Luke 
Amy Ledebuhr Bandi 
Teresa Lee Echols 
Lib McGregor Simmons 
Ann McMi llan 

*Welisha Miles Gilreath 
C lsire Owen 
Ann Patterson 
Anne Poe Mitchell 
Gayle Shute Rankin Meyer 
Martha Rut ledge Munt 
Carolyn Siak Deadwyler 

♦Martha Stephenson Kelley 
Kathenne Tarwater Smith 



1975 



Susan Balch Clapham 
*Vicki Baynes Jackson 

Mary Louise Brown Forsythe 

Melodye Brown 

Debra Carter 
*Anns Case Winters 

Shelby Cave 

India Culpepper Dennis 

Sarah Harrison 

Denise Lea Hord Mockridge 

Susan Landham Carson 

Mae Logan Kelly 

Frances Maguire 

Ruth McManus Mansfield 

Mary Gay Morgan 

Marie Newton 

Jayne Peterman 

Ellen Phillips Smith 

Catherine Pirkle Wages 

Irmina Rivero Owens 
♦Victoria Roberts 

Angie Rushing Hoyt 

Lyn Sat terthwaite Michaud 

Sally Stenger 

Melissa Stretch Druckraan 

Marsha Thrift Simmons 

Rebecca Weaver 

Becky Wilson 



1976 



Katherine Akin 

Lisa Banks Kerly 

Gay Blackburn Maloney 



E 1 izabeth Boney 

E. Brandon Brame 

Alexandra Coclin 

Sky Eva Craft Joiner 

Emily Dunbar 
*Sarah Franklin Echols Leslie 
*Susan Grier Phillips 
*Jeanne Jones Hoi 1 lday 

Liz Hornsby 

Deborah Huband Smith 

Mildred Frazer Kinnett Loomis 

Nancy Leasendale Puree 1 1 
♦Henrietta Leland 

Laurie Jean McDonald Fite 

Melissa Mills Jacobs 

Jennifer Rich Kaduck 

Lori Riley Day 

Elizabeth Scott Guynes 

Martha Marshall Smith 

Pedrick Stall 

Jane Sutton 

Janet Tarwater Kibler 
*Lark Todd Sessions 

Laura Underwood 

Lynda Weizenecker Wilson 

Denise Westbrook 

Karen White Holland 

Angele Willcox Dunlap 

Barbara Ann Williams 

Laurie Williams Attaway 



1977 



Mary Anne Barlow 

Holly Anne Bennett Rielly 
*Nancy Burnhara Schwahn 
♦Elizabeth Doscher Shannon 

Martha Hackl 

Glenn Hankinson Paris 

Jet Harper 
*Cynthia Hodges Burns 

Sue Jinks 

Melissa Landon 

Melinda Morris Knight 

Beverly Nelson McCallum 

Alice Newton 
*Clare O'Kelley Bennett 

Susan Pedrick McWilliams 

Julie Pflughaupt Boyd 

Julie Poole Knotts 

Sandra Saseen 

Linda Shearon 
*Sarah Shurley Hayes 

Nancy Sisk Chancey 

Kay Williams Barnard 



1978 

Mary Brown Diehl 
Nilgun Ereken Turner 




Dr. Henrx Robinson attends Alumnae Luncheon. 



Sue Ellen Fisher 

Janet Kelly Jobe 

Al ice Newton 

Mary Jane Norville 

Kathleen 0' Brien 

Kathryn Schnittker White 

Melody Kathryn Snider Porter 

Sally Stamper Hrabe 

Susan Willoch Shaver 

Sally Workman 



1980 



1979 



Nancy Atkins 

Ellanor Toomer Cullens 

Deborah Daniel-Bryant 

Susan Gledhill 

Anne Jones 

Gretchen Keyser 

Denise Koon 

Laura Lynn Peterson 

Karen Rogers Burkett 

Patricia Diann Sanders 

Susan Sturkie 



Class of 1980 

Catherine Beck 

Jan Burroughs Loftis 

Patricia Elebash 

Jodie Jeffrey 

Joanna Splawn 

Mary Tiniacos 

Katherine Zarkowsky Broderick 

Alumnae Clubs 

Alumnae Association of Cent ral Florida 
Barrow-Gwinnett-Newton Agnes Scott 

Alumnae Club 
Decatur Agnes Scott Alumnae Club 
Fairfield-Westchester Alumnae Club 
Kentuckiana Agnes Scott Alumnae Club 
Middle Tennessee Area Agnes Scott 

Alumnae Club 
Agnes Scott College Alumnae Club 

of Tidewater, Virginia 
Associated Alumnae Clubs of Washington 



•Fund Agent 



* Deceased 



Parents and Friends 



Mrs. Henry W. Adams 

Mr. and Mrs. LeRoy R. Adams 

Mr. Thomas M. Adams 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy E. Alexander, Jr. 

Dr. Wallace M. Alston 

Mrs. George Archer 

Mr. T. Maxfield Bahner 

Mr. and Mrs. D. Banyar 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee A. Barclay 

Mrs. X. Era Bark ley 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Barnes 

Mr. and Mrs. James 0. Bartlett 

Reach Park Women's Club 

Mrs. G. E . Bean 

Dr. David P. Rehan 

Benevolence Fund, Decatur 

Presbyterian Church 
Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Benson 
Mr. Maurice J. Bernard, III 
Mrs. George M. Bevier 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph H. Birdsong 
Mr. Herbert Bolton 
Mrs. Hei nz Booch 
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey G. Booth 
Mrs. William Hugh Boswe 1 1 
Mrs. Henry L. Bowden 
Mr. Harllee Branch, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. James A. Brannen 



Mr. 
Mr. 



Mrs 
Mrs 



Mr, 
Mr, 
Mr, 
Mr. 

Mrs 
Mr. 
Mrs 
Mr. 
Mrs 
Dr. 
Mr. 
Mr. 
Mrs 
Mr. 
Mrs 
Mr. 
Cir 



and Mrs. John J. Rnnghurst 

Thomas Broadus 

and Mrs. Waverly C. Broadwa 

J. C. Bruver 

Aline M. Brown 
and Mrs. Herman Brown and 
Cor inne 
and Mrs. 
and Mrs. 
and Mr s . 
and Mrs. 



Howard G. Brown 
Martin P. Brown 
Michael Brown 
Ph i I ip Brown 
. Oscar K. Bryant 
W. D. Burch 
. Christine Burroughs 
Walter E. Burton 
. John A . Rut ler 
and Mrs. Ronald L. Byrnside 
J. R. Calloway, Jr. 
Scott Candler, Jr. 
. Helen S. Carchidi 

and Mrs. William C. Carlson 
. Anne Gragg Carr 
Emmett B. Cartledge, Jr. 
cle 3, Decatur Presbyterian 
Church 

W. L. Clifton, Jr. 
and Mrs. Hall Conley 
Howard P. Conrad 



Dr. Lee Copple 
Covenant Class, Decatur 
Presbyterian Church 
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Craig and Catherine 
Mrs. Loma Crocker 
Mr. John H . Cross 
Mr. Charles B. Cunningham 
Mr. William M. Curd 
Mr. Harry L. Dalton 
Mr. Al Daniel 
Capt. J. Wallace Daniel 
Mr. Nei I 0. Davis 
Dr. Walter Ray Davis, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A. DeGrandi 
Mr. and Mrs. Ingram Dickinson 
Mrs. Caroline Dillman 
Ms. Viola Conner 
Mr. Hugh M. Dorsey 
Mrs. El izabeth R. Dowd 
Mrs. Nancy B. Dowling 
Ms. Lois M. Dubberly 
Mr. Carltun Duggan 
Mr. and Mrs. Gary S. Dunbar 
Mr. and Mrs. George B. Dunbar 
Dr. and Mrs. E. M. Dunstan 
Mr. Howard M. Duvall, Jr. 
The John C. Echols Memorial Fund 
Mr. and Mrs. Percy Echols 



Mr. Thomas K. Eddins, Jr. 

Mr. Earl H. Elberfeld 

Mr. C. C. Flehash 

Elementary Education Courtesy Fund 

Ms. Natalie Endicott 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond F.step 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl G. Ezell 

Faculty Flower Club of Agnes Scott 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Ferst 

Mr. William W. Fink 

Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Florence 

Mr. W. S. Flory, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Floyd 

Ms. Sara A . Fount ain 

Ms. Pheobe W. Franklin 

Mr. J. W. Friar 

Dr. and Mrs. W. Joe Frierson 

Mr. Alex P. Gaines 

Dr. and Mrs. Paul Leslie Garber 

Dr. Julia T. Gary 

Mr. L. L. Gellerstedt, Jr. 

Georgia Association of College Stores 

Georgia Bookstore Managers Association 

Mr. Charles B. Gmden 

Mrs. Methlee C. Goodloe 

Mrs. Rachel R. Gordon 

Mrs. Marty C. Cowing 

Mrs. Esther A. Graff 



14 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Mrs, Winifred F. Greer Ms. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Gregory, Jr. Mrs 

Mr. G. R. Griffin Mr. 

Mary, Carter and Luther Griffith Ms. 

and the Wiggins Mrs 

Colonel and Mrs. F. F. Groseelose Mr. 

Dr. NancyP. Groseelose Mrs 

Miss Roxie llagop lan Mr. 

Mr. William B. Hairrell Mr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph G. Hakanson Mr. 

Mrs. Victor Hanson Mr. 

Mrs. James E. Hara Mrs 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Harrison ♦♦Mrs 

Ms. Nina L. Hartline Mr. 

Mrs. John L. Hearn Dr. 
Mrs, Shirley Heermann 

Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Highland, Jr. Dr. 

Mr. William H. High tower, Jr. Mr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene S. Horney Mr. 

Mr. John S. Hunsinger Col 

Mr. Conley Ingram Mr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank M. Inman Mr. 

Mrs. Glenn W. Ives Dr. 

Mrs. Sue Boney Ives Mr. 

Mrs. Victoria Jenkins Mr. 

Mrs. Judith Bourgeois Jenson Mrs 
Mrs. Bonnie B. Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Johnson Dr. 

Dr. Connie A. Jones Mr. 

Dr. Rudolph W. Jones, Jr. Dr. 

Mr. William T\ Justice Mr. 

Mr. Garnett L. Keith Mr. 

Mr. Alan Keith-Lucas Dr. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Jennings Kerr Mrs 

Mrs. Frances Scott Key The 

Dr. George Savage King Mr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Dick R. Kinser Mrs 

Dr. and Mrs. C. Benton Kline, Jr. Mrs 

and Chris Dr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas P. Knox Mr. 

Mr. /ind Mrs. R 1 Iwood L. Koch Mr. 

Mr. C. R. Lnwii'iice Mrs 

Sarah B. Le land Mr. 

Dr. 



Markert 
J . Mart in 



Mays 



Mrs. 

Dr. and Mrs. Leon Lenoir 



Susan Leonard 
Desha Lester 
and Mrs. R. L. Lewis 

Pettie V. Light 

Elsie W. Love 
J . Ersk i ne Love , Jr. 

H. T. Lowery 
and Mrs. James B. 
and Mrs. Raymond 
Ferrin Mathews 
and Mrs . John E . 

Margaret McA lister 

Eleanor Brown McCain 
James Ross McCain 
and Mrs. John L. McCain and 
Paul and F. loise 
Paul M. McCain 
and Mrs. L. W. McClurkin 
Raymond C. McCreery 

and Mrs. T. G. McCunniff 
Julius A. McCurdy 
and Mrs. Robert E. Mcintosh 
Kate McKemie 

and Mrs. Drayton McLane, Sr. 
John C. B. McLaughlin 

Wallace H. McLenmore 
and fami Ly 
W. Edward McNair 
and Mrs. Edward W. McPherson 
and Mrs. Harris Minter 
J. A. Minter, Jr. 
and Mrs. Roy Morgan 
C. W. Morse 

Isabella M. Morris 
Guy Moseley Family 
James W. Mull 

Edward Newman 

Sarah Newman 
James D. Newsome 
M. Lamar Oglesby 
and Mrs. William 
. Rose F. Pancake 
W. A. Parker 
and Mrs. Richard Par 



Owens 



Mr. and Mrs. James N. Payne 

Mrs. Gerald C. Paysingei 

Mr. and Mrs, Charles W. Pepe 

Dr. and Mrs. Marvin B. Perry 

Mrs. Juliette R. Pharr 

Dr. J. Davison Philips 

Mr. Wesley G. Pippert 

Mrs. W. W. Plowden 

Dr. and Mrs. L. del Port i I lo 

Dr. and Mrs. Walter B. Posey 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph F. Potter 

Colonel and Mrs. Joseph F. Puett 

Dr. and Mrs. W. F. Quiltian, Jr. 

Mrs. George Randel 

Mrs. Jack C. Reddick 

Mr. and Mrs. William Reid 

Mrs. Paul H. Ridge 

Mr. William R. Rivers 

Col. and Mrs. Henry A. Robinson 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Robinson 

Mr. C. B. Rogers, Jr. 

Mr. Joseph M. Rubens, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald D. Salter 

Mr. and Mrs. Hansford Sams, Jr. 

Mr. Joseph W. Sat terthwa ite 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Schrader 

Mr. C. Oscar Schmidt, Jr. 

Mrs. Burton A . Scott 

Mrs. Leonard A. Scott, Jr. 

Service Corps of Retired Executives, 

Chapter 48 
Mrs. P. G. Sessions 
Mr. B. M. Sharian 
Miss Eugenie Sheats 
Mr. and Mrs. Francois L. Sheats 

Robert B. Shelley 

E rica M. Shiver 

Horace H. Sibley 

John A. Sibley 

W. A. L. Sibley, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Roff Sims 
Duckie and Virgil Smith 
♦♦Dr. Florence E. Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. Glenn R. Smith 



Mr. 
Dr. 



Mr. 
Mr. 



Spencer, Jr. 
Stephenson 



St imson 
Stiff 



Mr. and Mrs. Hal L. Smith 

Mr. John F. . Smith, TI 

Mrs. Margaret W. Smith 

Mr. P. L. Bealy Smith 

Mr. Walter A. Smith 

Dr. and Mrs . Samue I R . 

Mrs. M. K. Stamm 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. 

Mr. Augustus H. Sterne 

Ms. Kathenne Stearns 

Dr. Chloe Steel 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elbert H. 

Mr. and Mrs. Les Stiyer 

Dr. E. Lee Stoffel 

Ms. Frances Wag gone r Strother 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Stroud 

Mrs. On.T M. SL roz ier 

Dr. and Mrs. William B. Stubbs 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert L. Stuhr 

Mr. and Mrs. John F, . Swink 

Mr. Pierre Thomas 

Dr. and Mrs. W. P. Tinkler 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred G. Tobi 

Mr. Donald Wakeford 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Wall 

Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Wallace, Jr. 

Mr. William C. Wardlaw, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Watt, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Weinburgh 

Mr. and Mrs . James H. We I Is, 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Wendling 

Mr. G. L. Westcott 

Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Westmoreland 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Cody White, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifton B. Wilburn 

Mr. James A. Wilkerson 

Mr. John C . Wilson 

Mr. W. T. Wilson, Jr. 

Women of the Church, 

Decatur Presbyterian Church 
Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Yandle 
Mr. and Mrs. William M. Zarkowsky 
Mrs. Mildred Z immerman 



Businesses and Foundations 



Anonymous 
*The A. S, Abe 1 1 Company Foundation 
*Alcoa Found at ion 
♦Alexander and Alexander, Inc. 

The Allen Company 
♦Ame rican Mutual Insurance Companies 
*Amencan Telephone and 

Telegraph Company 
*Arthur Anderson and Company 
*Armco Foundation 

Atlanta Coca-Cola Bottling Company 

Atlanta Found at ion for Independent Col leges 

Atlanta Gas Light Company 
♦Atlantic Richfield Foundation 

Walter Ballard Optical Company 
*Beat rice Foods Company 
♦Be 1 1 Laboratories 

Blake Builders Supply Company 
*The Boeing Company 
*Boise Cascade Corporation 
*Bowater Carolina Corporation 
♦Burlington Northern Foundation 

Burr Brown Foundation 
♦Cardinal Federal Savings and 
Loan Association 

Carolina Mills, Inc. 
♦Carol ina Power and Light Company 
♦Chevron U.S.A. , Inc. 
♦Cities Service Foundation 
♦The Citizens and Southern Fund 

Walter Clifton Foundation, Inc. 
♦The Coca-Cola Company 
♦Columbia Gas Transmission 

Corporat ion 
♦Connecticut Mutual Life 
Insurance Company 

Container Corporation of America 
♦Continental Bank Foundation 
♦Cooper Industries Found at ion 

Carle C. Conway Scholarship 
Foundat ion 

C ross roads , Inc . 

Harry L. Dalton Foundation, 
I nc. 
♦Daniel International Corporation 

Decatur Federal Savings and 
Loan Association 

The Dover Fund 



The Camille and Henry Dreyfuss 
Foundat ion, Inc. 
♦Duke Power Company 

♦The Dunn and Bradstreet Corporation 
Foundat ion 
Eastman Kodak Company 
♦Eaton Corporation 
Florence C. and Harry L. English 
Memoria 1 Fund 
♦Exxon Education Foundation 
♦Exxon USA Foundation 
♦FMC Foundat ion 
The Sylvia M. and Frank W. Ferst 
Foundat ion 
♦Fireman's Fund American 
Foundat ion 
First Presbyterian Church 
of Houston 
♦Ford Motor Company 
John and Mary Franklin 

Foundat ion, I nc . 
The French Government 
Blake P. Garrett , Sr. 
Foundat ion 
♦General Electric Foundat ion 
Georgia Council for the 
Arts and Humanities 
The Georgia Foundation for 

Independent Colleges, Inc. 
Georgia Highway Express, Inc. 
Price Gilbert, Jr. Charitable Fund 
Griffin Hardware Company 
Stella and Char les Guttman 
Foundat ion, Inc. 
♦Halliburton Education Foundation, In 
♦The Hartford Insurance Group 

Foundat ton, I nc . 
♦Hercules Incorporated 
♦Gulf Oil Foundation 
*ICI Americas, Inc. 
♦Illinois Tool Works Foundation 
♦Integon Foundation, Inc. 
♦International Business Machines 
Corporation 
I saacson ' s 
♦Jef f erson-P ilot Corporat ion 
♦The Kendall Company Foundation 
Lanier Brothers Foundation 



The Ray M. and Mary Elizabeth Lee 
Foundat ion, I nc . 
♦The Liberty Corporation Foundation 
♦Life of Georgia 
♦Manufacturers Hanover Foundation 

Harriet McDaniel Marshall Trust 
♦Milliken and Company 
♦Monsanto Fund 
♦The Mony Trust 

National Endowment for the Humanities 
♦National Library Bindery Company 
of Georgia 

Pat terson-Ba re lay Memoria 1 
Foundat ion, I nc . 

P itney Bowes 

The Presser Foundation 
♦The Prudential Foundation 
♦The Quaker Oats Foundation 
♦Raytheon Company 
*R. J. Reynolds Industries, Inc. 
♦Reynolds Met a Is Company Foundat ion 

Walter H. and Marjory M. Rich Memorial Fund 
♦Richardson-Merrel I , Inc. 
♦Riegel Textile Corporation Foundation 
♦Rohm and Haas Company 
♦Scott's Landscape Company 

The Sears-Roebuck Foundat ion 
♦She 1 1 Companies Foundat ion 

S immons Company 
♦Southern Bell Telephone and 

Te legraph Company 
♦Southern Natural Gas Company 
*J. P. Stevens and Company, 

Inc . Foundat ion 
♦TRW Foundation 
♦Transame rica Corporation 

♦The United States Gypsum Foundation, Inc. 
♦Texaco, Inc . 

Trevathan Printing Company 
♦Trust Company of Georgia 

The J. M. Tull Foundation 
♦United Airlines Foundation 
♦United Virginia Bankshares 

Foundat ion 
♦UPS Foundation 

♦West inghouse F. due at iona I Foundat ion 
♦Westvaco Foundation 

David, Helen and Marian Woodward Fund 



Summer 1980 



*Made matching gifts 



15 



U pdate 



The Departmer 



Bv Dr. R 




In the AGNES scott ideal. President Gaines 
wrote that the College should have "a liberal 
eurriculum fully abreast of the best institu- 
tions of this country-" Many new eolleges in 
the nineteenth century must have taken this 
as part of their ideal. What was unusual in 
this instance is that the ideal was being 
enunciated for a women's institution, where 
something less was frequently thought suffi- 
cient. The early history of the College shows 
that the Agnes Scott Ideal was difficult to 
realize precisely because many parents be- 
lieved that a "finishing school" was all their 
daughters needed. But President Gaines 
persevered, and his ideal was realized and 
accepted. 

The philosophy department also has a goal 
which is difficult of achievement. It is a goal 
of a slightly different and more particular 
kind: nevertheless, it is one we pursue with 
something like the same idealism of our 
academic forebearers. The goal of the 
philosophical curriculum shows two equal 
emphases: the passing on of collected wis- 
dom of our tradition and the training of 
critical and analytic minds. It is not enough 
for our students that they learn what the 
various philosophers of our tradition have 
thought; they must also leam how to think in 
the philosophical manner. No one who 
simply knows what Plato said or what Kant 
said is philosophically educated. One must 
also know how to think in those creative and 
critical ways that define the discipline of 
philosophy. 

That twofold goal makes teaching philoso- 
phy at Agnes Scott a challenging enterprise. 
In some colleges and universities, it is 
thought enough to teach analytic thinking, 
while largely ignoring the traditional 
teachings of philosophers. In others, the rote 
learning of the philosophical teaching of 
others, without learning how to think like a 
philosopher, is thought enough for under- 
graduates. The temptation is great to fall into 
one of these two patterns. Some students 
enjoy the activity of criticism and analysis 
without the responsibility for learning the 
tradition: other students enjoy the passivity 
of absorbing the thought of others without 
the responsibility of thinking for themselves. 
We require our students both to absorb the 
tradition and to think in those critical ways 
without which the tradition is meaningless. 

The curriculum of the department is 
organized in order to realize these goals. 



Although the course offerings have remained 
essentially the same over the years, there 
have been some innovations. The greatest 
w as the addition of a series of freshmen level 
courses. These courses are designed to start 
students thinking critically about traditional 
problems, e.g.. the existence of God and the 
relation between morality and the state. 
Logic, now a freshman course, is also a was 
of beginning critical thinking. The backbone 
of the philosophy major remains the year- 
long sequence in the history of philosophy, 
stretching from the pre-Socratics to the 
beginnings of Kant's philosophy. The upper 
level courses contain standard offerings in 
such systematic areas as the theory of 
knowledge and metaphysics and in such 
historical major figures as Plato and Kant. A 
notable addition to these is a course in Marx 
and Marxism, offered jointly with the poli- 
tical science department. 

Enrollments in the department are very 
healthy. These numbers suggested to us the 
appropriateness of establishing a chapter of 
Phi Sigma Tau. the national honorary society 
of philosophy. This has been the chapter's 
first year and a successful one it was. 
Programs have included student-led debates, 
talks by visiting faculty, and even a social 
event. Topics have been women's liberation, 
the immortal Socrates, and faith's relation to 
reason. One of the few organizations on 
campus dedicated to public discussion of 
important intellectual issues. Gamma of 
Georgia chapter has gained a deserved 
reputation in a rather short amount of time. 

There are other opportunities for philoso- 
phy students to try their critical skills. Even,' 
year for the past three, the Philosophy 
Colloquium has provoked discussion by 
bringing on campus spokesmen and women 
of various controversial topics. Offered in 
winter quarter, the Colloquium has explored 
capital punishment, human experimentation, 
the Marxist, libertarian, and democratic 
concepts of freedom, and the relation be- 
tween faith and reason. Also in the winter 
quarter, philosophy students participate in 
the Undergraduate Philosophy Conference. 
The Conference, over twenty years old now . 
is composed of such colleges as Agnes Scott. 
Emory, Vanderbilt, Sewanee. and the Uni- 
\ersit\ of Tennessee at Chattanooga. The 
annual meeting is held on one of the member 
campuses: only students may present papers 
and only students may ask questions. This 



16 



Agnes Scott Alumnae yuarterl> 



of Philosophy 



D. Parry 



past year, our group went to Sewanee where 
we delivered two excellent papers. One was 
on Plato's metaphysics in the later dialogues, 
given by Cynthia Hampton '80. Carol 
Chapman '81 gave a paper on Norman 
Malcolm's assessment of St. Anselm's onto- 
logical argument. The Conference is a 
welcomed opportunity for our students to 
talk philosophically with students from other 
colleges and to compare their philosophical 
training with that of others; they always 
come back to Agnes Scott impressed with 
themselves. 

Members of the department have some 
responsibility for preparing students for such 
accomplishments. In the not so distant past, 
our complement included Mrs. Merle G. 
Walker, of happy memory, and Mr. C. 
Benton Kline. Occasional teachers in the 
department were President Wallace M. Al- 
ston, Mr. Kwai S. Chang. Mr. Richard M. 
Wolters. and Mrs. Linda B. Cornett. The 
present members are Mr. David P. Behan 
and Mr. Richard D. Parry. Mr. Behan 
received his B.A. from Yale University and 
M.A. and Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University. 
After finishing graduate school, he was Dean 
of Morse College at Yale and taught courses 
in the Yale philosophy department. He also 
pursued research as a visiting fellow at Christ 
Church College. Oxford, coming to Agnes 
Scott in 1974. Mr. Parry, presently depart- 
mental chairman, earned a B.A. at George- 
town University, an M.A. at Yale University, 
and Ph.D. from the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. He taught for one 
year at the University of South Carolina 
before coming to Agnes Scott in 1967. 

Finishing graduate school is just the 
beginning of an education in philosophy. 
And the department believes strongly in 
continued professional growth. The reasons 
are obvious. In a small college, it is all too 
easy for one's interests to become parochial; 
one's thinking can become straitened — not to 
say enfeebled — by the less than earth shak- 
ing problems of the campus. Professional 
activity can keep this myopia from setting in. 
Moreover, through research and writing one 
keeps abreast of developments within his 
field. And doing so is necessary if we are not 
to make students victims of outdated theories 
and interpretations — sometimes as old as the 
teacher's last year in graduate school. 

Accordingly, both Mr. Behan and Mr. 
(continued on next page) 




Richard Parry, department chairman 



Summer 1980 



17 



The Department of Philosophy 



(continued) 



Parry maintain active research interests. Mr. 
Behan has given papers at the Locke 
Conference in Toronto, the Hume Society, 
the Southern Society for Philosophy and 
Psychology, the Georgia Philosophical Soci- 
ety, and the Emory Philosophy Department 
Colloquium. Mr. Parry has read papers 
before the American Philosophical Associa- 
tion, the Southern Society for Philosophy 
and Psychology, the Georgia Philosophical 
Society, and the Emory Departmental Collo- 
quium. Both have attended National Endow- 
ment for the Humanities Summer Seminars. 
Mr. Behan going to work with Roderick 
Chisholm at Brown University and Mr. Parry 
working with Gregory Blastos and D. J. 
Furley at Princeton University. 

Mr. Behan's publications appear in the 
Canadian Journal of Philosophy and Philo- 
sophical Inquiry. Mr. Parry's appear in the 
Southern Journal of Philosophy , the Person- 
alis!. Philosophy and Phenomenological Re- 
search, and the Journal of the History of 
Philosophy. 

Mr. Behan's philosophical interests center 
around the issue of the person. Concentrating 
on the work of Rene Descartes, John Locke, 
and David Hume. Behan has attempted to 
reconstruct their philosophical positions on 
the concept of a person. The issue is a central 
one in the history of philosophy. In the past, 
persons have been identified with their 
physical bodies, with their souls, or with 
some combination of the two. In his writing 
and in his teaching, Behan approaches the 
issue with an insight both original and 
well-grounded in the philosophical tradition. 

Mr. Parry's interests were first of all in 
contemporary theory of action as it was 
elaborated by such analytic philosophers as 
Gertrude Anscombe and Gilbert Rylc. Some 
of his publications are in this area. However, 
he has become increasingly interested in the 
thought of Plato, especially in the early and 
middle dialogues. There Socrates insistently 
compares the virtuous man to a craftsman: 
according to this comparison, the good man 
is one who knows how to use the assets of his 
life so that he does well and is happy. The 
comparison between virtue and craft has 
been subjected to scholarly scrutiny of late; 
Parry has been among the scrutinizers. 
delivering a paper at the Christmas meeting 
of the American Philosophical Association 
which uncovered some of the flaws in a 
recent book on the subject. It might be noted 
here that the comparison has more than 
scholarly interest and, in fact, has much to 
do with teaching ethics. The comparison 




Associate Professor David Behan 



between craft and virtue offers a theory of 
morality which is based on a style of life, or 
a way of living. Such a morality offers an 
alternative to most present day theories 
which base morality on following rules. 

Finally, a word about our graduates is in 
order. Some are in law school and in 
seminary: others are in business and in 
education. If we are right about philosophy's 
contribution to developing critical powers, 
these women are more acute lawyers, mini- 
sters, business people, and educators. Natu- 



rally, a number have gone to graduate school 
in philosophy, attending Stanford. Rice. 
Chapel Hill, University of California at 
Davis, and Frankfort. The most recent 
graduate of our program will be going in the 
fall to study ancient philosophy with Regi- 
nald E. Allen at Northwestern University. 
Not all our graduates teach philosophy for a 
profession; but all are philosophers to one 
degree or another. The critical mind which 
seeks the fundamental assumptions in any 
area is not easily stilled. A, 



18 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Phi Beta Kappa Address 



An Agnes Scott Education after a Decade 



By Dr. Marline Brownley '69 



I am deeply pleased to have been asked to 
speak on this occasion honoring those whose 
academic achievements have been recog- 
nized by their election to Phi Beta Kappa. 
Speeches on these sorts of occasions usually 
seem to be directed toward the general 
advantages of a liberal arts education. But as 
an alumna of this college, as one who has 
shared with you the academic life here. I 
want to try to speak more precisely to what 
the experience of this liberal arts education at 
Agnes Scott means to a young woman, 
whether she was a student in the late sixties, 
as I was, or in the late seventies. 

First of all, I want to address something 
which as a student 1 took for granted: the 
importance to me of an education conducted 
by women for women. There were and still 
are few colleges or universities in this 
country — including many women's col- 
leges — that have on their faculties more 
than a few token women. Yet Agnes Scott 
from its founding brought to this faculty the 
best women it could find in the academic 
profession, women trained in the finest 
graduate schools in the country — women 
who were breaking ground in a profession 
which has been dominated by men since 
universities began. When I came to Agnes 
Scott, of the sixty-five faculty at the rank of 
assistant professor or higher (that is, those 
holding the Ph.D. degree), thirty-six were 
women: more than half. Given the position 
of women in this culture, both when I was in 
college and also right now, the influence of 
women faculty, administrators, and staff 
must be pervasive in order to create an 
environment in which young women can 
recognize and develop their full intellectual 
potential. 

This influence of women on women works 
at every level in the educational process. 
When 1 was in graduate school, a number of 
us were sitting at lunch one day when one of 
the graduate students mentioned that she had 
been assigned to give a lecture the next week 
for the American Literature course. She said 
that she was very nervous. All of us 
responded with the usual words of encour- 
agement: that she knew her material well, 
that she had plenty of poise, that she would 
do an excellent job. In the midst of the 
babble she stopped us. "You don't under- 
stand," she said. "I've never even heard a 
woman lecture before." Here was the crux 
of her uncertainty. I was amazed; I was even 
more amazed when 1 found out that of all the 
male and female graduate students around 
the lunch table. I was the only one who had 




ever heard any woman give an academic 
lecture. It had never occured to me that there 
was anything unusual about it. 

This example not only relates to those of 
us who left Agnes Scott and became 
teachers; it also applies to all the students in 
the College with me. For all of us. Agnes 
Scott provided women who were strong 
individuals, independent and intelligent hu- 
man beings who through their examples 
encouraged their students to be the same. 
Agnes Scott provided less feminist rhetoric 
and more feminist reality than any place I 
have seen since. In the context of liberal 
learning, the defensiveness too often charac- 
teristic of feminist polemic was unnecessary. 
Self-regard and regard for others was a way 
of life and a way of thinking integral to the 
women who taught me, and their sense of 
themselves as women, broadened and 
deepened by their humanistic learning, com- 
municated itself intangibly, unselfconscious- 
ly, but thoroughly. That influence has 
continued to provide a viable way for me to 
function in a world which at best is 
uncomfortable with and at worst hostile to 
women who desire roles beyond the tradi- 
tional ones. 

Just as my teachers conveyed what it 
means to be an educated woman without 
polemic, they also conveyed the essence of 



devotion to learning without the pretentious 
affectation or the short-sighted pedantry 
which too often characterizes the academic 
profession. I remain grateful that I received 
at Agnes Scott a rigorously traditional liberal 
arts education. My best teachers recognized 
the purpose of this kind of education and 
made me aware of it — to open the mind, to 
stimulate the curiosity with material which 
simultaneously disciplines and matures a 
mind. My time was not wasted by gimmick- 
ry or by modishly fashionable courses, 
which may perhaps speak to the moment but 
which do not last. I had none of the 
interdisciplinary courses which have diluted 
too many colleges with dilettantism - 
courses which, I have since learned, are 
more to the advantage of the faculty than to 
the student. Agnes Scott's core curriculum 
insured an education characterized by both 
variety and depth; I have recently watched 
both my graduate institution and the univer- 
sity where I now teach return from the 
do-it-yourself education of the '60s and '70s 
to the same kind of core curriculum which 
Agnes Scott has maintained all along, which 
it never gave up. 
Henry David Thoreau writes: 

Men sometimes speak as if the study of 
the classics would at length make way 
for more modern and practical studies: 
but the adventurous student will always 
study classics, in whatever language 
they may be written and however 
ancient they may be. For what are the 
classics but the noblest recorded 
thoughts of man? They are the only 
oracles which are not decayed, and 
there are such answers to the most 
modern inquiry in them as Delphi and 
Dodona never gave. 
Recognizing that those who know the past 
have the best chance of understanding the 
present and the future, Agnes Scott taught 
me the classics in every area which I studied. 
It did this so well because it recognized 
precisely what its task was. Agnes Scott left 
to the large research universities the special- 
ized professional training which only these 
institutions have the resources to offer; 
Agnes Scott left to technical schools and 
vocational colleges the practical skills which 
these institutions are best equipped to teach. 
The finest of my teachers knew that the value 
of a liberal arts education can only be 
evaluated in terms of ultimate, not immedi- 
ate, utility — in terms of the depth and 
flexibility of the trained mind. Thus, 
(continued on next page) 



Summer 1980 



19 



An Agnes Scot 




although Agnes Scott prepared me excellent- 
ly for graduate school, it prepared me 
equally well to work on a Washington 
Congressional staff, which is how 1 spent the 
first year after I graduated. My classmates 
are doctors, social workers, bankers, house- 
wives, teachers, artists, lawyers, and so on. 
They do their work well because they think 
well, not because they received specialized 
training or vocational skills in college. 

Agnes Scott prepared us for whatever we 
chose to do. for the essential reason that 
pervading the best of my education was the 
insistence that all learning must have a direct 
and vital reference to human life. It is said 
that Hegesias. a teacher in the school of 
Hedonistic philosophers in Alexandria, des- 
paired of ever attaining happiness. He 
propounded his philosophy of complete 
pessimism in the strongest terms to his 
students. Finally his lectures had to be 
legally prohibited by Ptolemy because so 
many suicides resulted from his teaching. In 
a more positive manner, the best teachers at 
Agnes Scott presented their material in such 
a way that it related directly to life as it was 
lived by their students then, and as it would 
be lived by them in the future. We felt we 
were not just an audience for performers, but 
were respected as individuals and as sharers 
in the joy of learning. As one of my 
professors noted to me years later, she was 
not simply teaching material in her courses. 
she was using material to teach students. 
Such a distinction sums up the attitude 
toward learning that I experienced at Agnes 
Scott. Learning was not allowed to exist in a 
vacuum: the material in the classroom was 
intimately connected with the life we lived. 

The strength of humanistic study in any 
discipline has always been the move from 
fact, through imagination and intellect, to 
value. The great humanists have always 
emphasized the need for this kind of move- 



Education 



(continued) 



lent. Samuel Johnson, speaking specifically 
f books, writes: 

Many of the books which now crowd 

the world, may be justly suspected to be 

written for the sake of some invisible 

order of beings; for surely they are of no 

use to any of the corporeal inhabitants 

of the world. Of the productions of the 

last bounteous year, how many can be 

said to serve any purpose of use or 

pleasure? The only end of writing is to 

enable the readers better to enjoy life. 

or better to endure it. . ." 

o enable men and women "better to enjoy 

fe or better to endure it" — to provide the 

nowledge necessary for conscious living 

ither than mere existing — that is what 

umanistic study at its best can do. This kind 

f education forces students to come to terms 

'ith what it means to be a human being and 

'hat is required to continue to realize their 

.ill humanity. Stephen Spender writes of 

the transforming power of art, which, if it 

annot save external society, can perhaps 

:deem inner life." In a culture where people 

:em unable to make lasting commitments to 

nything, and where ambiguity of every sort 

- social, religious, sexual, intellectual — 

;ems the rule, only a redeeming of inner life 

an begin to return individuals to that sense 

f their own significance which too often 

;ems lost in modern society. 

The education I received at Agnes Scott, 
/hich informed human minds instead of 
ffering professional or vocational expertise, 
/hich emphasized the organic relationship 
etween learning and living, which was 
irected toward the potential significance of 
le individual, and which was transmitted by 
lose who were themselves models of the 
ignificanceof what they taught, gave to me 
nd to many other young women the 
onscious ability "better to enjoy life, or 
etter to endure it. "A. 



*$<;% 


1 




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(?SW 




With the Clubs 



Albany 



Athens 



A brand new club is the outcome of a 
gathering graciously planned by Edith Jen- 
nings Black '71 to welcome Mary Boney 
Sheats. professor of Bible and religion, when 
she was in the area for a church seminar 
March 17. Alums were invited to the lovely 
home of Ann Hilsman Knight '43 and 
enjoyed hearing Dr. Sheats speak and bring 
news of the College. "She was the perfect 
person to make a very divergent group of 
alums feel welcome and informed," wrote 
Edith, who has agreed to serve as acting 
president. "We hope to meet next year for a 
coffee or luncheon in an alum's home, and 
several in the group are interested in helping 
entertain prospective students and an admis- 
sions representative from the College in the 
fall." Serving with Edith as acting treasurer 
is Marguerite Booth Gray'78. Classes repre- 
sented ranged from 1923 to 1978 — Scotties 
all! Edith circulated a questionnaire to get 
feed-back from the group about preferences 
for meeting times and speakers. 



DIRECTOR of Financial Aid Bonnie Brown 
Johnson '70 was honor guest and speaker for 
the annual luncheon meeting of Athens 
alumnae March 22 at Davis House. She 
showed slides of the campus and gave the 
group an update on events and changes. 
President Louise McCain Boyce '34 wrote 
that Bonnie "made an excellent presenta- 
tion!" 



Atlanta 

The widespread entry of women into the 
work force, considered by many to be the 
major social change of the century, was 
described by Dr. Caroline Dillman. assistant 
professor of sociology, in a talk to the 
Atlanta Alumnae Club March 20. She quoted 
figures from the U.S. Department of Labor 
showing that 90 percent of the country's 
families are no longer "traditional" — 




Ann Hilsman Knight '4J. hostess; Dr. Mary Boney 
Sheats. speaker; Edith Jennings Black '71 . acting 
president, at Albany meeting 



!»- 



Classmates Jo Smith Webb 'JO and 
Evalyn Wilder 'JO attend Albany 
meeting . 




headed by a man. who is the sole wage- 
earner. The large group of alums present 
joined in the discussion and had many 
questions for the speaker. Hostess Isabelle 
Leonard Spearman '29 shared informally 
with some of her guests information of 
interest about her various collections of art 
pieces. 



Columbus 




Assistant Dean of College Mildred Love Petty '61. 
center, spoke at Columbus meeting. 

A large group of Columbus area alumnae 
(and even one alum from Aubum, Ala.) 
gathered at the Big Eddy May 10 for "a 
delightful luncheon and a most informative 
talk by Mildred Love Petty '61 ," wrote Club 
President Marty McMillan Alvarez '71. 
Dean Petty told of new curriculum develop- 
ments as well as physical changes on the 
campus, and all the guests "thoroughly 
enjoyed this occasion." Marty gave the 
group a brief summary of alumnae activities 
in Columbus during the past several years 
and an up-date on new alumnae in the area. 
Serving with her will be Janet Eastburn 
Amos '68. incoming vice president. 



Danville 



Dr. Sheats. Allison Wallof Baxter '56. and Candy 
Hollandsworth Donnell '48 



Lucille Dennison Keenan '37, Eunice Tomlinson 
Owens '2J. and Ann Knight 



Danville, va . alums got themselves 
together in early May for "a delightful time" 
at the home of Elizabeth Johnson Thompson 
'34 and plan to do so again! They are 
included in the Lynchburg zip code mailing, 
but that city is a bit of a distance, so with true 
Agnes Scott initiative, the group just up and 
met. Margaret Holley Milam '62 was kind 
enough to write and let the Alumnae Office 
know about the goings-on. The group plans 
to meet in the fall and contact high school 
students who are interested in Agnes Scott. 



22 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Houston 



Houston's new club president. Melody Snid- 
er Porter '78, has found that classes of the 
alums in her area go all the way from 1911 to 
1980, and she hopes to interest all of them in 
a variety of activities this year. She has 
written to her constituents for suggestions 
and for names of possible prospective stu- 
dents for ASC. Houston's spring meeting 
took place March 22, when the group 
enjoyed Dr. Edward McNair's "Anecdotes 
of Agnes Scott" at a luncheon at Greenway 
Plaza Hotel. "We all thoroughly enjoyed 
hearing those stories — it was a delightful 
talk," wrote Marie H. Newton '75, club 
secretary and also head of Houston alumnae 
admissions representatives. "He really made 
the College seem quite alive to those of us 
living such a distance away and a number of 
years out of ASC." Marie described the role 
of our AARs and introduced two student 
applicants attending the luncheon. Colette 
Howard and Michelle Pickar. 



alumnae club. Director of Alumnae Affairs 
Virginia Brown McKenzie '47 flew up to be 
with the group and give them a "Campus 
Update." Adding a great deal to the program 
was Susan Whitten, Agnes Scott sophomore, 
speaking from a student's point of view. 
"We are all so glad finally to have an 
'official' organization here in Lynchburg." 
wrote Ann. "Virginia was wonderful and 
brought us up to date on the many changes 
taking place on campus and in the metropoli- 
tan Atlanta-Decatur area. So many of us 
were delighted to find other alumnae right 
here in Lynchburg!" Ann heard from friends 
and from alums in the area who couldn't 
make this first meeting but plan to come next 
time. Anna Katherine Fulton Wilson '38 
drove down from Lexington. Va. Ann's 
teen-age daughters Lisa. Janie, and Susan 
helped hostess. Officers serving with Ann 
will be Sally Echols Leslie '76, vice presi- 
dent, June Driskill Weaver '48, secretary, 
and Jody Hopwood Turner '73, treasurer. 



Memphis 



Associate professor Claire M. Hubert was 
honor guest and speaker for the Memphis 
Alumnae Club at their luncheon March 15 at 
the Colonial Country Club. She spoke on 
"Women In French Culture," describing 
their position as compared with that of 
American women. She brought news to the 
campus also and said that although many 
schools were gradually dropping language 
requirements, Agnes Scott still maintained 
her traditional standards in that field. Betty 
Mann Edmunds '70 heads the Memphis 
group and wrote that they all "enjoyed Mrs. 
Hubert's presentation very much." 

New England 

"Presidential politics'" was the title of Gus 
Cochran's talk for the New England Club 
March 26. A large group of alums and 



Knoxville 



The efforts and enthusiasm of Montene 
Melson Mason '45 and her steering commit- 
tee resulted in a highly successful inaugural 
meeting of Knoxville area alums. A very 
large group gathered for luncheon March 22 
at the Hyatt Regency and heard President 
Emeritus Wallace M. Alston speak on 
"Agnes Scott's Friendship With Robert 
Frost." Sis Burns Newsome '57, of the 
Agnes Scott Board of Trustees, "came up 
from Atlanta to boost the first meeting of a 
club in her hometown." wrote Montene. 
"Her mother. Mrs. Brantley Burns, came to 
the luncheon also. It was gratifying to have 
such a good group to welcome Dr. Alston. 
His program was well received, and I saw 
how much he is appreciated and loved." 
Polly Anna Philips Harris '50 has been 
chosen president, Ruth Shepherd Vazquez 
'62, vice president. Dana Nichols Stuckwish 
'77. membership chairman. Vicky Allen 
Gardner '62, treasurer, Maureen Williams 
'72, secretary, and Sue Czarnitzki Ayers 
'63, publicity chairman. 



Lynchburg 



Ann hershberger barr '62 was hostess to 
Lynchburg area alums at a luncheon in her 
home March 15 and has agreed to serve as 
president of the enthusiastic, brand new 




Bra! W 

f y, y 1 


f £^ k 



Sis Burns Newsome 
at Knoxville meeting 



Dr. Alston 



Montene Melson Mason '45, Polly Anna Phillips 
Harris '50, and Dr. Alston look at Silhouette. 




Knoxville club members and guests enjoy lunch- 
eon. 



Oak Ridgers at Knoxville meeting look 
over College information. 



Summer 1980 



23 



With the Clubs 



husbands as well as four prospective students 
and their mothers attended the luncheon at 
the Harvard Club of Boston. Associate 
professor of political science and department 
head. Dr. Cochran has been in the Boston 
area for research during his sabbatical from 
Agnes Scott and has spoken to several 
nearby alumnae groups. His most interesting 
talk provoked much discussion among listen- 
ers. Continuing as club leaders are Dudley 
Lester Tye '67. Harriet Talmadge Mill '58. 
Charlotte King Sanner '60. and Betty Whita- 
ker Wilson "68. 



Agnes Scott as it is now and seeing copies of 
the Profile and other ASC literature Julia 
brought.'" wrote Club Secretary Linda Ozee 
Lewis '71. Ann Roberts Divine '67 is 
president of the club, which plans a fall party 
for prospective students. 



Tidewater 



Richmond 



A box LUNCH gathering at the home of Kay 
Gwaltney Remick '61 brought together Rich- 
mond alums and some prospective students 
March 29 to hear Kathleen Mooney. director 
of career planning, tell of the activities of her 
office at Agnes Scott. Steering Committee 
Chairman Nancy Thomas Hill '56 wrote that 
it was "'an excellent presentation," and that 
everyone enjoyed the informal setting of 
Kay's home rather than a restaurant this 
time. Succeeding Nancy as chairman is Betty 
Alvis Girardeau '64. 



Savannah 



Tidewater area alums from the Newport 
News-Norfolk-Virginia Beach area were 
invited to a ""bring-a-salad" luncheon at the 
home of Betty Lockhart Anglin '59 March 
29 and to hear College news from Judv 
Maguire Tindel '73. director of admissions. 
"Judy was a wonderful speaker." reported 
Club President Chee Kludt Ricketts '68. 
"She made each of us very proud to have 
attended Agnes Scott and inspired us to be 
alert for other young women who might have 
an interest in ASC. She took us on a walking 
slide tour of the campus, pointing out 
physical changes, such as renovation of the 
library, and told about current requirements, 
tuition, courses, and career planning, as well 
as social changes. She suggested ways we 
could serve Agnes Scott and enthusiastically 
answered our many questions." Chee is 
succeeded by Susan McCann Butler '68. 
incoming president. Jean Price Knapp '57 is 
the new secretary -treasurer. 



A visit to Savannah by Dr. Marvin B. Perry. 
Jr.. brought alums together to receive news -p . ■ 

of the College and to renew their friendship IlianSie 
with the President. "Everyone very much 
enjoyed hearing him and being together for 
luncheon." said Lydia Wammock Thomp- 
son '63, vice president of the club. In the 
absence of the president. Nell Hemphill 
Jones '38. who was out of town, Lydia gave 
generously of her time and interest in 
planning the event, which gathered alums 
from the twenties through the seventies and 
met at the Oglethorpe Club March 22. 
Frances Belford Olsen '37 has been asked to 
serve as secretary. 



St. Louis 

Too lebrate Founder's Day. alumnae in St. 
Louis gathered at the home of Anne Fclker 
Cataldo '67 for a salad and dessert pot-luck 
luncheon March 29 and had a campus update 
from Alumna Admissions Representative 
Julia Doar Grubb '61. who had visited the 
College. "We all enjoyed hearing about 



"Penny Campbell did a wonderful job for 
us." wrote Catherine Auman DeMaere '69. 
president of Chapel Hill-Raleigh-Durham 
area alums, after their meeting April 26 at 
the Carolina Inn at which the Agnes Scott 
history professor spoke. "She brought slides 
which showed automatically during the 
social hour before luncheon, and this served 
as excellent conversation material, bringing 
back happy memories and updating everyone 
on campus changes. She particularly brought 
news of retired professors, and we were 
delighted to hear about them. She also told 
about her sabbatical time at Africare in 
Washington. D.C." Among alums present 
was Dr. Virginia Suttenfield '38. a former 
regional vice president of ASC Alumae 
Association, who has recently moved to 
Chapel Hill from Connecticut. New officers 
of the club are Betty Fuller Smith '61. 
president; Virginia Neb '72.. secretary; and 
Bettye Ashcraft Senter '45. treasurer. 



Washington, D.C. 

An ineormal get-together, blue jeans and all. 
brought alums from the District area to 
President Joan Adair Johnston's home in 
Fairfax. Va.. March 15 for a salad-casserole 
pot-luck luncheon and a sharing of ideas for 
future club activities as well as a recounting 
of what each one present had been doing, 
both fun and work. Corky Feagin Stone '60 
told of her newly published book, expanded 
from her doctoral dissertation. Plans for the 
future include a splash party and a luncheon 
with speaker from the College. Joan con- 
tinues in office and will have serving with 
her Sandra Creech Birdsong '63. vice presi- 
dent; Martha Griffith Kelly '64. secretary; 
Frances Folk Zygmont '71. treasurer; Bar- 
bara DuVall Averch '58. A.A.C.W. repre- 
sentative; and Chris McNamara Lovejoy '70. 
Maryland advisor. 

Winston-Salem 




Dr. Margaret Pepperdene. chairman of the 
English department. Has speaker at the Winston- 
Salem meeting in September '79. 




President Anne Pollard Withers '61 . Susan 
Keith-Lucas Carson '6-1. and Martha Rtg^ms 
Brown '57 at Winston-Salem meeting 



24 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterl) 



College Graduates Eight Alumnae Daughters 




Alumnae mothers and their senior daughters gathered on the steps ofPresser 
after graduation on June I. Front row, left to right: Grace Haley , Cindy 
Dantzler, Patti Tucker Zaic, Sharon Maitland, Jennifer Knight, Kemper 
Hatfield, Anna Bryan. Second row: Anna DaVaull Haley '51 , Nancy Niblack 

Alumnae Trip 
to Italy 

The alumnae trip to Italy is scheduled for 
Oct. 28 — Nov. 5, 1980, leaving from 
Atlanta and arriving in Rome. Option I will 
concentrate on Rome and the Vatican City 
with optional tours that can be arranged to 
Florence. Naples/Capri/Sorrento; Pompeii; 
and Venice . The cost for Option 1 is $8 1 9 per 
person (double occupancy). 

A bus tour. Option II visits Rome, Venice, 
and Florence and costs $1069 per person. 
Both options of the Italian tour provide 
accomodations in first class hotels (double 
occupancy). Continental breakfast every 
day, private bus transfers from airport to 
hotels and return. Option I will provide a 
hospitality desk, and Option II includes a 
full-time tour director. 

Write or call the Alumnae Office for 
information: Alumnae Office. Agnes Scott 
College. Decatur. Georgia 30030. (404) 
373-2571, ext. 207. 



Dantzler '58, Patricia Conner Tucker '57, Vivian Weaver Maitland '53. 
Dorothy Adams Knight '51 , Mary Hollingsworth Hatsfield '39. Mary Anna 
Ogden Bryan '51 . Not pictured: Lisa Wise and Patricia Singley Wise '69. 




Summer 1980 



25 





President hosts Class of '30 




Gathering to visit and sing 




Weekend draws record crowd. 




Mary thanks Cissie. 



26 



Professors Parry (philosophy) and Dillman (sociology) lecture. 

Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 






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Outstanding alumnae Papageorge '28, Scandrett '24, White '26 receive awards. 



Mumnae 
Day 




Rhodes '38 shows WOW medal. 

April 1 9, 
1980 



'75ers reunite. 





Prospective students 



Annie Wiley Preston '99 accepts ovation. 




Two generations celebrate. 
Summer 1980 



Consort Cup champ 



Perry welcomes alumnae. 



27 




Carolyn Strozier 



lHece/?t(l 




HB&ne£c(^ 




The generosity of alumnae who remember 
the College in their wills is greatly appreci- 
ated. In the month of May alone the College 
received the money from bequests of four 
alumnae: Mary Stewart McLeod '23, Helena 
Hermance Kilgour '26. Marie Whittle Well- 
slager '26. and Margaret J. Watson '37. 

One important reason Agnes Scott con- 
tinues to be a respected, academically- 
strong, solvent institution is that her alumnae 
and other friends, through gifts and bequests, 
help to provide for faculty salaries, library 
improvement, special equipment, preserva- 
tion of campus buildings, and scholarships 
for deserving students. 



Tin Carolyn Strozier Scholarship Fund of 
$10,715 was established in 1979 by her 
mother and friends as a memorial to this 
member of the Class of 1941 who had been 
active in the Alumnae Association while on 
the staff of Rich's. 

The Mason Pressly Young Scholarship of 
S10.000 was established in 1979 by the 
Blake P. Garrett, Sr.. Family of Fountain 
Inn. South Carolina, in memory of this 
long-time Presbyterian medical missionary 
to China and father of two alumnae: Louise 
Young Garrett '38 and Josephine Young 
(Mrs. Francis) Sullivan '44 of Greer, South 
Carolina. 

An alumna who wishes to remain anony- 
mous made a gift of $10,000 to establish a 
new scholarship in 1979. 




Mason Pressly Young 



ASC Women in Politics, Reply 



The winter issue of the Alumnae Quarterly, 
which will be mailed in January, will feature 
Agnes Scott women in politics. The editors 
request all alumnae now holding or running 
for an office to write to the Alumnae 
Quarterly and to list the following informa- 
tion: name: Agnes Scott class; city, county, 
state, or national office now being held or 
sought; and party affiliation. 

It the alumna has some special episode in 
her political career which she would like to 
share in writing, the Quarterly staff will be 
happy to read about it. and the information 
may be used in a story. "Agnes Scott 
Women in Politics." All pertinent informa- 
tion should be in the Alumnae Office by 
November 15 to be included in the winter 
(January) issue. 




28 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



Chapel Organ Is '80 Class Project 



As its gift to the College, the Class of 
1980 has chosen the project of restoring the 
1940 Austin organ in Gaines Chapel, which, 
aside from age. has other, more severe 
problems. A few days following the 1979 
Commencement, a leather "blowout" 
occurred in the right side portion of the organ 
in the regulator, or reservoir, which fur- 
nishes the necessary wind supply. At a 
nominal cost this was repaired in time for the 
opening of the '79/'80 session. Unfortunate- 
ly, in early September 1979. a much more 
extensive blowout occured in the leather of 
the other side of the organ. It is of such 
magnitude that even a temporary patch 
would cost more than a thousand dollars. 

The College is exploring the possibility of 
a complete rehabilitation of the instrument 
by Austin, who would replace the worn-out 
parts, bring usable pipe work up-to-date, and 
improve the overall tonal scheme. This 
would cost approximately $150,000. In the 
meantime, the College is using the 1970 
Schlicker organ in Maclean Auditorium for 
convocations held in Gaines by linking a 
microphone to the sound system in Gaines. 

The Class of '80 has donated the $300 in 
its treasury and is asking each member to 
pledge donations of at least a dollar a month 
for the next two years. In July 1982. after the 
class has made its entire donation, it will 
challenge all other classes to match its 
donation. The Class has already pledged 
$1,538, and $173 has been paid. 

Class officers are Sandy Burson. pres- 



ident; Dottie Enslow. vice president; Eliza- 
beth Mosgrove, secretary; and Ann Huf- 
fines, fund chairman. 



We applaud the Class of '80 for its timely 
gift and look forward to hearing "live" 
music in Gaines again. 








'QMifcd&ufa/en, ht 



Since April 15. 1980, gifts have been made 
in honor or in memory of the following: 



IN HONOR 

M. Bernard & Cissie Spiro Aidinoff 

Mary Virginia Allen 

Josephine Bridgman 

Caroline McKinney Clarke 

W. Joe Frierson 

Nancy P. Groseclose 

Jack L. Nelson 

Carrie Scandrett 

Mary Boney Sheats 

Myma Goode Young 



IN MEMORY 

Martha Eskridge Ayers 

Verita Barnett 

Julianne Williams Bodner 

L. A. Brown, Sr. 

Blanche Lindsey Camp 

Jere Warren Chamblee 

Render P. & Elizabeth Potter Connally 

Arden Locher Davison 

Alice Ferrell Davis 

S. Leonard Doerpinghaus 

Inez Norton Edwards 

Helen Ewing 

Mary Louise Fowler 

Marcia Mansfield Fox 

Mary E. Hamilton 

Isabel D. Hornebrook 

Louise Van Harlingen Ingersoll 

Emily Kingsberry 



Ruth Leroy 

Janet MacDonald 

Mary Stuart MacDougall 

Eleanor Brown McCain 

Pauline Martin McCain 

Carolyn McCallum 

Molly McCormick McCord 

Alice Mcintosh 

Mary D. McKee 

Floy Sadler Maier 

Marton Majoros 

Lucy Henry Patillo 

Sarah Shields Pfeiffer 

Martha McLendon Robertson 

Sallie Stribling 

Carolyn Strozier 

Louise Sloan Thomas 

Merle Walker 

Harriet Blackford Williams 



Summer 1980 



29 



Deaths 



Institute 

Louise Van Harlingen Ingersoll, 

March 10. 1980. 

Sallie Stribling, February 13. 1980. 

1909 

Lutie Pope Head, June 4. 1980 

1911 

Molly McCormick McCord, Febru- 
ary 18. 1980. 

1913 

Louise Sloan Thomas, November 1 . 

1979. 

1915 

Marv E. Hamilton, March 19, 

1980. 

1919 

Helen Ewing, January 5. 1980. 
W. J. Kennedy, husband of Mary 
Ford Kennedy, March 4. 1980. 

1924 

Flora Alford, sister of Attie Alford. 
November 1, 1979. 

1925 

Floy Sadler Maier, October 16. 

1979. 

1926 

Alice Ferrell Davis, sister of Dora 
Ferrell Gentry, February 17. 1980. 
Quillian Spratling, brother of Frances 
Spratling, May 27, 1980. 



1927 

Martha McLendon Robertson, 

November 29. 1979. 

Glenn Duncan, husband of Willie 

May Coleman Duncan, May 23, 

1980. 

Alfred Davis, husband of Sarah Jane 

Small Davis. March 16, 1980. 

Robert Buchanan, husband of Ann 

Heys Buchanan, November 9, 1979. 

1928 

Alice Ferrell Davis, February 17, 

1980. 

Emily Kingsberry, March 13, 1980. 

Caldwell Withers, husband of Louise 

Sherfesee Withers. October 19, 

1979. 

Avery Craven, husband of Georgia 

Watson Craven, January 1980. 

Herbert Rasnake. husband of Alice 

Hunter Rasnake, April 28, 1980. 

1929 

Marv Louise Fowler, December 31, 

1979. 

Lucy Henrv Patillo, February 7, 

1980. 

1930 

Harriet Williams, March 3, 1980. 

1932 

Raymond Musser. husband of Louise 
McDaniel Musser, February 5. 1980. 

1933 

Blanche Lindsev Camp, February 

15, 1980. 



Martha Eskridge Love Avers, Mav 

25. 1980. 

1935 

Jessamine Ward, sister of Man. 
Seymour Ward Tyler, May 22, 1980. 
Josephine Sibley Jennings, mother of 
Josephine Jennings Brown. May 5. 
1980. 

Carolyn McCallum, June 1979. 
Thad Morrison, father of Clara Mor- 
rison Backer, March 3, 1980. 

1938 

Mary McKee. mother of Gwendolyn 
McKee Bays. May 4. 1980. 
Thad Morrison, father of Margaret 
Morrison Blumberg. March 3, 1980. 

1939 

George Williams. Sr., husband of 
Eunice Knox Williams. Julv 13. 
1979. 

1944 

Mrs. A. A. Bless, mother of Mar- 
guerite Bless Mclnnis. November 2. 
1979. 

Render Pyron Connally and Eliza- 
beth Potter Connally. father and 
mother of Barbara Connally Kaplan. 
July 9, 1979. and February 24. 1980. 

1948 

Mrs. F. G. Brewer, mother of Lela 
Anne Brewer. November 1979. 
Mrs. E. B. Powers, mother of Betzie 
Powers Crislip. September 1979. 
Leonard Schenk, Jr., son of Sheelv 



Little Miller. March 9. 1980. 
Jennings Payne, father of Jen Payne 
Miller. March 7. 1980. 

1949 

Ellis McGlaun, husband of Joyce 
Hale McGlaun, March 1980. 

1954 

Arden Locher Davidson, May 3 1 . 

1979. 

Rosa Ormsby, mother of Connie 

Ormsby Verdi, April 15, 1980. 

1956 

Wilton Hall, father of Sarah Hall 
Hayes. February 25. 1980. 

1958 

John Law, Jr., father of Louise Law 

Hagy. April 2, 1980. 

1960 

John Law. Jr.. father of Jane Law 
Allen. April 2. 1980. 

1962 

Caldwell Withers, father of Elizabeth 
Withers Kennedy. October 19. 1979. 

1963 

Marton Majoros. husband of Lucie 
Callaway Majoros, April 6, 1980. 

1969 

Muriel Victor Auman Frazier. sister 
of Catherine Auman DeMaere, April 
2, 1980. 



Summer 1980 



43 



New President Begins Term 



Jackie Simmons Gow '52 




It is with much pride and no small amount of 
trepidation that I want to thank you for 
electing me president of the Agnes Scott 
Alumnae Association. This is a great honor 
and I hope that together you and I can be of 
real service to Agnes Scott. 

As president-elect my first assignment was 
to help Dr. Paul McCain, vice president for 



development at ASC. by organizing the 19X0 
Alumnae Phonathon. 

For each of five nights during mid-May. 
ten to fifteen Agnes Scott alumnae from the 
greater metropolitan Atlanta area spent two 
hours telephoning a total of more than 1 ,0(X) 
alumnae throughout the country. The Trust 
Company Bank graciously made some of 
their offices and telephone lines available for 
this project. 

The College and the Alumnae Association 
are grateful to the fifty alumnae who made 
these calls: 

Debbie Smith Abernathy. Jane King 
Allen. Mary Anne Barlow, Penny Brown 
Barnett. Mary' Rainey Bridges. Melodye 
Brown, Susan Balch Clapham, Margaret 
Benton Davis, Lori Riley Day, Leslie Doyle, 
Tish DuPont, Lib Blackshear Flinn, Jackie 
Simmons Gow, Martha Scott Haley. Jackie 
Josey Hall, Shelia Wilkins Harkleroad. 

Jet Harper. Caroline Lester Haynes. Can- 
dace Bell Hodges. Melissa Mills Jacobs. 
Mary K. Owen Jarboe, Anne Jones, Anne 
Register Jones. Sara Cheshire Killough. 
Julie Poole Knotts. Paul McCain, Sarah 
Frances McDonald. Martha Patterson 
McGaughey, Joan Pruitt Mclntyre. Virginia 
Brown McKenzie, Eleanor Lee McNeill, 
Clair McLeod Muller. Sis Burns Newsome. 
Lila McGeachy Ray. 

Mary McConkcy Reimer. Kathy Oates 



Roos. Martha Davis Rosselot. Sarah Quinn 
Slaughter. Betty Lou Houck Smith. Betty 
Wood Smith. Jean Chalmers Smith. Louise 
Stakely, Julia Grier Storey, Frances Gilhland 
Stukes. Elizabeth Wells, Jane Taylor White. 
Pat Cooper Wilburn, Liz Jenkins Willis, 
Virginia Allen Woods. Bettv Ann Gatewood 
Wylie. 

Although some of us felt slighty hesitant 
about our abilities in this endeavor, when the 
job was done, we all admitted it was great 
fun getting to chat with alums from every 
state. And it was quite satisfying to realize 
we had been successful in our undertaking 
for Agnes Scott. Most alumnae were delight- 
ed to have this contact with the College, and 
we who called were pleased to have com- 
ments from those reached. 

We do thank you for your interest and 
support. As a direct result of the Phonathon. 
Agnes Scott received $12,840 in specific 
pledges and. we hope, a similar amount from 
"intended" gifts and pledges. Thus, we 
expect the total gifts from the Phonathon to 
amount to over $20,000. 

Agnes Scott is indebted to all the alumnae 
who participated in the Phonathon. and we 
also sincerely appreciate the fine response of 
you alumnae who contributed. 

Again, thank you for electing me. I look 
forward to a rewarding and exciting two 
years of working with you. 



Treat Yourself to College Items 



Six PbN and ink sketches of campus scenes by 
John Stuart McKenzie have been printed on 
fine text paper suitable for framing. The 
drawings which may be displayed singly or 
as a group are 5" x 7 1 /;" printed on paper 7 3 A" 
x 11". The set of six may be purchased from 
the Alumnae Office for ten dollars ($10.00) 
including tax and mailing cost. 

Stationery suitable for gifts and for your 
personal correspondence is now available 
also. These same six sketches have been 



printed on folded note paper and packaged 
with matching envelopes. Each package 
contains twelve folded note cards (two 
copies of the six scenes) and twelve en- 
velopes. The packages of stationery may be 
purchased from the Alumnae Office for five, 
fifty ($5.50). which includes tax and mailing 
cost. 

The project committee of the Alumnae 
Association arranged with designer Frankic 
Welch to produce a scarf especially for us. 



The 33" x l 3 /*" cranberry on nude scarf bears 
an Agnes Scott motif and the words. "Agnes 
Scott Alumnae Association." 

Won't you show your College ties and 
accent your fall wardrobe by wearing one of 
these attractive scarves. 

If you wish to order one of these items, fill 
out the form below and mail it with your 
check to the Alumnae Office. Agnes Scott 
College. Decatur. Georgia 30030. 



Alumnae Association, Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Georgia 30030 

Enclosed is $ for sets of prints @ $10. 

Enclosed for packages of stationery (5 $5.50. 

Enclosed is $ for scarves (a $10. 

Name: 



Address:. 



Phone: 




^■iaiis* 



One section of College scarf 



Agnes Scott Alumnae Quarterly 



From the Director 



Virginia Brown McKenzie '47 



Outstanding Alumnae for 1980 




All of agnes SCOTT'S graduates are 
outstanding women. As President Perry 
stated in the induction ceremony for the 
Fifty- Year Cub, their "exemplary lives 
continue to be Agnes Scott's finest testimo- 
nial, the most telling measure of her suc- 
cess." The impact of these former students 
on their respective communities is frequently 
publicized in newspapers or noticed by 
classmates or other friends who send clip- 
pings to the Alumnae office or write com- 
mendations. 

The Awards Committee consider all the 
nominations and customarily select three to 
be cited during Alumnae Weekend at the 
Annual Meeting. Hand inscribed award 
certificates were presented this year to: 
Evangeline Papageorge '28, distinguished 
career, Carrie Scandrett '24, service to the 
College; and Juanita Greer White '26, 
community service. 

Evangeline Papageorge has been a human 
dynamo ever since she, as a child, dressed 
herself in her mother's tablecloth and wrote 
on the door with chalk to imitate her 
teachers. At Agnes Scott she majored in 
chemistry and was elected to Phi Beta 
Kappa; then she proceeded to Emory Univer- 



sity for her M.S.; University of Michigan, 
Ph.D.; and Yale for postdoctoral studies. 

Dr. Papageorge became Emory Medical 
School's first full-time woman faculty mem- 
ber when she was hired as assistant in 
biochemistry and progressed to executive 
associate dean. Since her retirement in 1975, 
she has been consultant to the office of the 
dean, Emory University School of Medicine. 
Having spent a half century teaching and 
advising at Emory University, she is admir- 
ingly referred to as a "catalyst of learning." 

As for service to the College, the commit- 
tee chose Carrie (Dick) Scandrett who has 
been a beloved and influential member of the 
Agnes Scott community for fifty-five years, 
first in an assistant's position in Dean 
Nannette Hopkins' office, through thirty-one 
years as dean of students, and still in 
retirement as counselor and friend. By 
administration, faculty, and alumnae she is 
known for her propriety, integrity, strength, 
and loyalty to the College. 

Her neat, inviting home, touching the 
periphery of the campus, is, and has been 
through all these years, a favorite visiting 
place for students and faculty who have 
known her and therefore grown to love her. 



The alumna who was honored for her 
community service is Juanita Greer White, 
magna cum laude. Phi Beta Kappa graduate 
from Agnes Scott and Ph.D. from Johns 
Hopkins, who has used her intelligence and 
energy to improve the situation of the aging, 
the status of women, and the outreach of 
higher education. 

In 1972 she received the Distinguished 
Nevadan Award, and in 1976 the life 
sciences building at the University of Nevada 
was named Juanita Greer White Hall because 
this soft-spoken, well-organized research 
chemist saw the need for a degree granting, 
four- year public college in southern Nevada 
and embarked on a campaign to make this 
dream a reality. 

Yes, all of our graduates are outstanding, 
and many deserve special recognition. The 
Awards Committee of the Alumnae Associa- 
tion would appreciate your help in identify- 
ing those alumnae whose achievements 
should be honored. Please fill out the 
nomination form on this page and send any 
biographical information you wish to be 
considered by the Awards Committee. This 
year's deadline for receipt of these nomina- 
tions is September 30. 



NOMINATIONS OUTSTANDING ALUMNA AWARDS 



Alumnae Association 
Agnes Scott College 
Decatur, Georgia 30030 



Service to Agnes Scott College 



Service to the Community 



Distinguished Career 



Your name and class 



ALUMNAE QUARTERLY, AGNES SCOTT COLLEGE, DECATUR, GEORGIA 30030 



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>^y-A,nes Scott Coll ege 
De catur, CA 30030 






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FOR REFERENCE 

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