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1 



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J (fUr^. <JLm^JL WAUL . 



01.11 CHURCH AT CRANE'S CORNERS 



10O1 



A HISTORY 



-OF— 



OLIYE BRANCH LODGE, 



No. -40, 



IF. & Ho M 



— AND A- 



Biographical Sketch of Members 



•WITH A 



■i i nm ^^— » 



Short History of the Towns 



■OF- 



Frankfort, Schuyler and Litchfield, 

Compiled by Brothers Charles B. CJeland and 
E. LaGrange Smith, by order of tne Lodge. 



«»» 



FRANKFORT, N. Y. 



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v — ' 

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Press of The RBGistBr, Frank fort^ *h V* 



><«-»^-S> *<•-> 



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PRKFACE. 

The people of a locality are largely interested in its 
local history. Men, places and events are of great val- 
ue in the makeup and accuracy of the history of a 
community. Organizations, like the individual* have a 
life, a character, a record, and are factors in the world 
and life they touch. 

Many times the expression has been made, that a 
history of Olive Branch Lodge, No. 40, ought to be 
written. To meet that want this effort has been made. 
Research has failed to disclose some things of general 
interest to the Lodge. Faulty records and memories 
have been met everywhere, but from all information 
obtained, facts have been sifted and this little book 
compiled; and to the members of the Lodge, living and 
dead, it is dedicated. 

The Lodge is one of the oldest in the state. Its his- 
tory is honorable, men, the best, have given it char- 
acter and standing; have gone from it into the world 
with the principle taught in its lodge room, and made 
for themselves a name and place among their fellows. 

This little book is sent out freighted with faith, 
charity and hope. Faith in the Fraternity, charity for 
the ills and faults of life, hope that it will meet with 
the good will and welcome of the brethern. 

Ex La Grange Smith, 

Frankfort, October $t, 1901. 



The Town of Frankfort 

The town of Frankfort was set off from German 
Flatts February 5, 1796, by an act^ of the Legislature. 
In 1798, a portion of the Northwest part was annexe! 
to Deerfield. It extends from German Flatts on the 
East to Oneida county on the West, a distance of nine 
miles, and from the Mohawk river on the North to the 
town of Litchfield on the South, an average width of 
four miles. It is hilly except along the Mohawk. Is 
a dairy country, having a large milk condensary at the 
village of Frankfort, a butter factory and several cheese 
factories. It is well watered with springs and creeks, 
the principal creeks being Moyer creek in the Eastern 
portion and running through the village, the Briden- 
becker creek in the Central portion and Ferguson creek 
in the Western part, and all flowing northerly into the 
Mohawk. The town contains the village of Frankfort 
of 2,700 inhabitants, the hamlet called the Harbor of 
about sixty, and the hamlet of Frankfort Center of 
about 50 inhabitants. 

The town has many industries. The Utica canning 
factory at the Harbor. Aside from the cheese factories, 
saw mills, feed and grist mills, it has a number of in- 
dustries located in and about the village of Frankfort, 
consisting of the Frankfort Linen Manufacturing Co., 
the Acme Road Machinery Co., the Utica Steam Guage 
Co., the Pratt Chuck Works, the Michigan Milk Con- 
densary, the Continental Tool Co., and the West Shore 
foundary. The village has two splendid high school 
buildings, and an average attendance of 500 pupils, a 
successful national bank, of which Henry Churchill is 
President and George H. Watson, Cashier, occupying 



%L iM. L~&. t***' sfrU-t; fL> 









other welf. 

Hasenclever built an ashery, the first factory erected 
within the limits of Schuyler and was located on the 
lands of Luther P. Staring. A saw mill was built on 
the land formerly owned by Ira Finster, near New 
Petersburg, the name of what is now East Schuyler. 
Thirty families comprised the settlement. Among 
them as handed down and remembered are Briden- 
becker, Staring, Bargy, Clemens, Widrig, Oyer, Finis- 
ter, Keller, Stein way Munterback. Some of the fami- 
lies still occupy the land of their forefathers.^ 

Early in the Revolution near the spring on the Lu- 
ther P. Staring's land, and on the rise of ground where 
the house now stands, was erected what the settlers 
called a fort. The ground was enclosed by pickets 10 
or 12 feet high, log houses were built within the en- 
closure to which the families of New Petersburg gath- 
ered at night for safety. 

The Indians made raids, assisted by the Tories. 
These became so frequent that the people retired to 
Fort Dayton, and abanded t'.ieir homes until the close 
of the war. Frederick Oyer was killed in the battle of 
Oriskany, and the land he occupied is still in the Oyer 
family and the lands of Baltis Brklenbecker still re- 
main in his direct descendants. 

The Eastern part of the town and including Stone 
Arabia were settled by the Germans coming up the 
Mohawk in toats, being no roads through the forest. 
The Central and Western part of the town was settled 
later by people from different parts of the country. 
Among the earlier ones were : Elisha Ladd, Budlongs, 
onathan Richardson, Stephen and Elisha Rose, Thorn- 



1 1 



as Wood, Charles Brown, Charles Christian and one 
Sweet. 

Schuyler early became a dairying town; the soil and 
surface of the country being well adapted for that pur- 
pose. Much gardening is also carried on, the farms 
; n the Eastern portion being kept in the highest and 
most improved state of cultivation. 

The first building, aside from private houses, used 
for religious purposes was the Ashery built by Hasen- 
clever; later a building was erected for the purpose, 
and used as a school house and chuich. It was erected 
on the site of the school house in District No. 4. The 
first worshipers were Lutherans, and the first church a 
Lutheran church. The church and society has long 
ceased to exist. All that remains of the society, says 
Alexis Johnson, the grand old man of Schuyler, is the 
old sermon book and the britannia chalice. The cup 
is now in the keeping of Hiram L. Johnson. Finster, 
Oyer, Clemens, Rima, Widrig, Bargy and Lints were 
associated with that society. 

In 182 1 a Baptist society was started at East Schuy- 
ler, but like the Lutherian society has passed away and 
the Methodists occupy the land. Schuyler has schools 
and churches, but no hotels or saloons. She has, ai d 
is, demonstrating that to a highly civilized people the 
saloon is not necessary. Her schools are of the best, 
and hei people devout and prosperous. The cheese 
factory has taken the place of the saw and grist luill. 
For its size, number of people and interests to be cared 
for, the town's annual expenses will compare favor- 
ably with the most wisely conducted and economical 
town or municipality in the state. 



12 



On April 2, 1793, the inhabitants met at the house 
of Captain George G. Weber and elected the following 
town officers : Isaac Brayton, supervisor; Francis Guil- 
lean, town clerk; George Witherie, G. G. Weber, W. 
Farming, and J. Stafford, Sr., assessors; Ezra Pain, 
John Ladd, and Thomas Nichols, commissioners of 
highways; Abel Austin, collector; James Denslow, Abel 
Austin and Andrew Bennett, constables; John Warren 
and Peter Tron, poormasters; and Isaac Brayton, 
sealer of weights and measures. Schuyler has furnish- 
ed her full quota of public men, and discharged her 
full duty to the public good. As the Hon. Chauncey 
Depew said before a Senate committee in the city of 
Albany, "There is nothing small about Schuyler, even 
to the assessment she places upon the property and 
franchises of the New York Central railroad within 
her borders." 



The Town of Litchfield. 

The town of Litchfield was taken with the town of 
Frankfort from German Flatts by act of Legislature, 
February 5, 1796. It is a rich farming section. The 
soil is productive, lime stone and the Utica slate un- 
derlying a great portion of it. It is hilly and well wa- 
tered with springs, ponds, small lakes and creeks, the 
principal creek being the Budlong creek flowing North- 
easterly into the Moyer creek. It has many lime kilns. 
The first settlers in the town were Elijah Snow and 
David Scott in 1786. In 1787, the year following, Wil- 
liam Brewer, Ezekiel Goodale, John Andrews^ Chris- 



*3 

topher Rider, John and Ebeneeer Crosby. Ebenezer 
Drewsly and John Everett settled in the town. From 
thence forward the town became rapidly settled, the 
land cleared and the hillsides made productive. The 
first man to be married in the town was Joseph Hay in 
1798; the first birth that of Lake Andrew in 1790; the 
first death, Betsey Burns in 1793; the first school was 
taught by Jeremiah Everett. David Davis kept the 
first store; Joseph Sheppard, the first tavern; John 
Littlejohn run the first grist mill and oneTalcott the 
first saw mill. It is said the first daisies were brought 
from Connecticut by Benjamin Wood in the hay brought 
in his sleigh, and in many respects it may be called a 
<daisy town. The town is dotted with cheese factories. 
A large quantity of the milk is now being brought to 
the condensary at Frankfort. The town at one time 
produced a great deal of wool, but that industry is 
giving way to the dairy. 

In 1824 William Hosford established at Cedarville a 
tannary, which continued in operation until about the 
year 1880. 

The first town officers of the town were chosen at 
the home of Josiah Sheppard on the 5th day of April, 
1796, and were :Abel Brace, supervisor; Josiah Shep- 
pard, town clerk; John Littlejohn, William C Jones, 
Jeremiah Hoknes, assessors; Joseph Hooker and Jos- 
eph Walker, overseers of the poor; Asa Way, Oliver 
Harwood and Samuel .Murray, commissioners of high- 
ways; Peleg Harwood, Abel Brace, Jr., Timothy Green- 
ley, constables; Abel Brace, Jr., and Timothy Greeniey, 
collectors; Abel Brace, Tilly Richardson and Josiah 
Shepard, school commissioners. One of the first ordi- 



/ 

• / 
J 1 



x 4 

nances passed by the first town board was : "Swine to 

run loose, being well yoked and ringed." The first 

road laid out and recorded as a town road is from Aaron 

Budlong's to J. Shepard's, surveyed by Isreal Porter 
and recorded May 10, 1796. 

The town has always stood for the best, and the 
voice of her people has ever responded to the better 
sentiments and principles that go to make a progres- 
sive people. As early as 1846 she voted no license by 
a majority of 66 out of a vote of 168. Her roads are 
the best in Central New York, her school well kept up 
to the mark fixed by public opinion. School houses 
and churches and church societies are liberally scatter- 
ed and well looked after. Methodists, Baptists, Pres- 
byterians, Congregationalists and Universalists all have 
followers among its people. Cedarville, Norwich Cor- 
ners, North Litchfield and Cranes' Corners are the 
hamlets within its limits. A good share of the busi- 
ness of the town is done at Cedarville. Henry Deven- 
dorf, the first settler there, came in 1803; John Thurs- 
ton Mabbit started the first store in 1823; a postofflce 
was established there in that year. It is now a place 
of some 300 inhabitants having three stores, a hotel, a 
tannary, grist mill, cheese factory, saw mill and sever- 
al machine shops. 

The Baptists organized the first religious society in 
the town. This was at the house of Nathaniel Ball, 
March, 15, 1795; J 4 2 different pastors have occupied 
the pulpits of the town, among whom are such giants 
as M. E. Dnnham, Dolphus Skinner and Canfield. 

The town has little, if any debt, its farms all occu- 
pied; little. any waste land; its products, the finest 



15 

Vha\ tfbme to the market; its people contented and pro- 
gressive. 

From ^uch ^surro an dings, the towns of Prank Fort, 
Schuyieratid Lkchfreld, Olive Branch Lodge has grown 
vand prospered. 



Olivfe Branch Lodge, No. £21, 

<NOWN0.4o.5 

The earliest "record of f O live S ranch Lodge, No. 22*, 
is in the form of a petition signed by; 

Rosweil Holcomb, Curtiss F. Ross, 

Timothy "Snow, Joseph Diefeo-dorf, 

Jonathen Butler-, ^Stephen Trank, 

Theron Plumb, -Edward Mott, 

Daniel AryleSworth, Truman Merry, 

and directed to the M. W. 'DeWittOinton, Grand Mas- 
ter of Masons 4n the State of New York, praying for a 
warrant -empowering them to form -a lodge at Crane's 
Corners, in the town of Litchfield, county of Herkimer, 
state of New York, to be named Olive Branch Lodge, 
and nominating Brother : H email Bush to -be Master, 
Brother Ratph Merry to be Senior Warden and Broth- 
er Stephen Dow to be Junior Warden. The, petition 
was received by the Grand -Lodge, Mar. 4, 181 2 and on 
the 10th day of June in the same year the following 
'C&istfter was granted. 



i6 

Sit lux, et lux fuits 

[seal] 

De Witt Clinton, Grand Master. 
Martin Hoffman, Deputy Grand Master. 
Capwallader 1). Golden, Senior Grand Warden. 
Phillip S. Van Rensselaer, Junior Grand Master. 

We, the Grand Lodge of the moft Ancient and Hon- 
orable Fraternity of True and Accepted Mafonf, of the 
State of New York, in Ample Form Affembled, accor- 
ding to the Old Conftitution, regularly and folemnly 
under the aufpicef of Prince Edwin, at the City of New 
York, in Great Britain, in the year of Mafonry 4926, 
viz : 

The Moft Worfhipful, The Honarable DeWitt Clinton, 

Grand Mafter. 

The Right Worfhipful, Martin Hoffman, 

Deputy Grand Mafter. 

The Right Worfhipful Gadwallader D. Golden, 

Senior Grand Warden. 

The Right Worfhipful The Hon. Philip S. VanRensselar, 

Junior Grand Warden. 

Do, by thefe prefentf, appoint, authorize and em- 
power our worthy Brother Heman Bush to be the Mafter; 
our worthy Brother Ralph Merry to be the Senior War- 
den; and our worthy Brother Stephen Dow to be the 
Junior Warden, of a Lodge of Free and Accepted Ma- 
fonf, to be by virtue hereof, conftituted, formed and 
held in the Town of Litchfield, in the County of Her- 
kimer, which Lodge fhall be diftinguifhed by the name 
or ftyle of Olive Branch Lodge, No. 221, and the faid 
Mafter and Wardenf, and their succeffors in office are 
hereby refpectively authorized and directed, by and 
with the confent and affiftance of a majority of the 
faid Lodge, duly to be fummoned and prefent upon 



HOUSE OF WIDOW CRANE (remodeled), old barn on right 



17 

such oceafionf to elect and inftall the officerf of the 
faid Lodge af vacancies happen, in manner and form af 
if, or may be, prefcribed by the Conftitution of thif 
Grand Lodge. 

And Further, the faid Lodge if hereby invefted with 
full Power and Authority to affemble upon proper and 
lawful oceafionf, to make Mafonf. and admit Memberf, 
alfo to do and perform all and every fuch Actf and 
Thingf appertaining to the Craft af have been and 
ought to be done, for the Honor and Advantage therof ; 
conforming in all their proceeding^ to the ConftitU 
tion of thif Grand Lodge, otherwise thif Warrant, and 
the powerf, hereby granted, to ceafe and be of no fur- 
ther effect. 

Given under our Hands and the Seal of our Grahd 
Lodge, at the City of New York, in the United States 
of America, this tenth day of June, in the vear of our 
Lord, One Thousand Right Hundred and Twelve, and 
in the year'of Mafonry, Five Thousand Eight Hundred 
and Twelve, 

Jorttf WklLs, Grand Secretary. 

Registered in the 

Book of the Grand 
Lodge, page 225, 



The first recorded meeting of the lodge was held 
July 16, 1812, an account of which from the lodge re- 
cords is as follows ! "Pursuant to a Charter issued by 
the Grand Lodge of the State of New York, and a War- 
rant authorizing our Brother Simeon Ford, Worship- 
ful Deputy Grand Master to install a lodge in the town 
of Litchfield by the name of Olive Branch Lodge. The 
lodge assembled this day at the house of Widow Crane, 
The lodge Was duly opened by the Grand Master and 
his Grand Wardens, after which they moved in solemn 



i8 

pfOCesSiort to the church under the direction of Broth- 
er John I. Pendergrast, Grand Marshall, where an ex* 
cellent and appropriate discourse Was delivered by 
Brother Eber Cowles, R. A. C. The Deputy Grand 
Master then installed the officers. The procession 
re formed and marched back to the house of the Wid* 
Ow Crane Where the lodge Was Closed. They then re 
paifed to a bower where they partook of a repast pro- 1 
vided by Brother Ralph Merry, where good fellowship 
reigned and which Was recorded in the quaint words of 
our first Secretary as follows \ "As unity, peace and 
harmonv afe the characteristics of real Masons it id 
Useless to mention how the company retur ned only to 
say they retired at an early hour." Thus concluded 
the first communication of this lodge, the precursor of 
many hundreds; 

At the next communication, the committee appointed 
to draft suitable by-laWs, made their report and sub* 
mitted the following which is reproduced verbatim et 
ttttratitHx 



-*♦*- 



fey-laws* 

The stated meetings shall be held on every Tues* 
day, next preceding the full moon in eVery month, and 
the lodge dhall be opened exactly at 2 o'clock p. m., 
and closed at 7 p. m. 

Every membef attending shall pay One shilling and 
six pence for lodge expenses^ which money shall be paid 
before the lodge isclosed each regular lodge night. 

All Candidates must be endowed with an estate, office, 
trade, occupation or some visible Way of acquiring ad 






»9 

honest and respectable livehood as becomes thisancient 
and honorable Fraternity* 

The master, wardens and othef members oT this lodge 
shall have full poWer and authority to make, amend, 
correct or explain these or such othef rules and regu- 
lations as may seem proper and convenient for the weU 
fare of the lodge, provided such alterations do not re* 
move the ancient landmarks of FVee-masonfy. 

No brother shall interrupt another, nor until he re- 
sumes his seat, nor shall any brother speak twice on 
the same subject unless permitted by the Master, and 
the brother that refuses to be silent at the sound of the 
gavel shall pay a fine not exceeding one dollar, accor- 
ding to the nature o( the offense which shall be deter* 
mined by the brethren* 

Any brother desirous of a special lodge shall pay the 
expense thereof and the Master's warrant shall be suf- 
ficient to call the same* 

It shall be the duty of the Secretary to read the 
by-laws once every regular lodge day if required so to 
do by the master, 

Adopted, July 16, t8i2. 

The foregoing code of laws Was adopted the Same 
evening. At this meeting it was voted that the lodge 
should meet at the house of Capt. Miller, at Which 
place they continued to meet until Oct. 29, 1816, 

It is thought best at this point to make some brief 
extracts from the minutes, which from their Varied sub j 
jects may prove of some interest to the Craft, and also 
to show their Wanderings which action gave rise in other 
lodges to the term movable, 

Nov. 14, 1815 
Brothers Aylesworth add King Were appointed a com- 
mittee to inquire into the expense of adding a Masonic 
Hall to the School-house to be built in Pist, No. 6 in 
the town of Litchfield, 



20 

Dec. 16, 1815* 
The evening dues were reduced to \2)fc cents. 

# Jan. 9*. 1816* 

They Voted to pay Brother Prentice Yeomans tha 
sum of $1 per evening for lecturing to the members. 

Oct i> i8i6v 
It Was Voted that the lodge should be removed to 
the house of Benjamin Denslow* 

Jan. 20> 1818. 
It Was voted that the lodge move to the house of 
Capt. Samuel Miller 

April 6. 18 19. 
It was voted to pay Esq. Campbell $1.25 for cider. 

Nov. 31, 1819. 
It Was Voted that Brother Washburn take our vine- 
gar and deliver 2 gals* of cider for one of vinegar. 

May 23» t8»o. 
A committee of 4 Was appointed to consult nearby 
Masons and ascertain whether they Would join this 
lodge providing it wouid meet at John S> Avery's house* 

Dec* *9> 1820. 
They Voted to petition the Grand Loage to remove 
to Frankfort. 

The permission for removal Was granted* 

Oct. 19, t82t. 
It was voted to remove the lodge! to the house of 
Peter Bargy > Jr. v in Frankfort* The site of this build* 
ing is now occupied by the Central hotel* 

April 30*, 1822. 
It Was moved and carried that Brother Douglass 
Saterlee provide a barrel of cider*, a suitable quantity 
of crackers and one cheese* 



It Was the custom in the early part of the Century to 
furnish refreshments*. Consisting of crackersj cheesd 
and liquid* at the regular meetings, and collect th€ 



21 

sura of one shilling six pence from every member pres- 
ent (except the secretary and tyler) and every visiting 
brother, after his first visit, which sum was to pay for 
refreshments and other expenses. This practice was 
continued until by enactment of the Grand Lodge the 
introduction of intoxicating liquors within a Masonic 
lodge room, or any room adjoining was forever pro- 
hibited. This custom accounts for many of the fore- 
going extracts from the minutes. 

The lodge at its formation opened on the first de- 
gree and continued to do so until July, 1844. 

In 1822 they appropriated the sum of fifty dollars 
toward purchasing shares of stock in a public library 
which was known as the "Union Library" and on Dec. 
10, it was moved and carried that those brethren who 
should be absent two meetings out of three, previous 
to the quarterly meetings of the library society would 
be deprived of the privilege of drawing books. 

Aug, 19, 1823. 
They voted the sum of fifteen dollars for the pur- 
pose of erecting a steeple, purchasing a bell and paint- 
ing the Baptist Meeting House in Schuyler. 

Jan. 13, 1824. 
It was voted to open the lodge in the future at pre- 
cisely five o'clock p. m. and it was provided, that should 
there not be brethern enough present at that time to 
open the lodge, the lodge should not be opened that 
term. 

Feb. 18, 1824. 
The Rev. Bralbeen Bradley being present, it was 
voted to purchase twelve copies of his address to Ma- 
sons relative to establishing an academy for the pur- 
pose of educating the orphans of Masons. 



22 



March 10, 1824. 

It was moved and carried that we celebrate S". John's 
Jay, June 24. A committee of five was appointed, 
insisting of Brothers Prentice Yeomans, Douglas Sat- 
terlee, Samuel Ethridge, Russell Hopkins and John 
Litliejohn to make all arrangements for the celebra- 
tion. It was further ordered that a special invitation 
be given to the adjacent lodges to attend the celebra- 
tion and likewise published in 'the newspapers and that 
a special invitation be given to the Royal Arch lodge 
at Herkimer and a general one to all chapter and Royal 
Arch Masons. 

This celebration seems not to have taken place. 

The year 1824 marks the first building epoch in the 
history of this lodge. Nov. 30,1824, a committee of 
three were appointed to draft a plan and make an esti 
mate of the probable expense of erecting a Masonic 
Hall of wood or brick and immediately after circulate 
subscriptions to endeavor to raise said amount. Broth- 
ers Mason Barker, Prentice Yeoman and Reuben He- 
cox were appointed said committee. At the first meet- 
ing in 1825 it was resolved to build the building of 
wood and the committee were empowered to sell the 
subscriptions at their discretion for the purpose of 
erecting said building. On this date there was in the 
hands of the Treasurer $67.34. A plan for the build- 
ing was drawn by Prentice Yeomans for which he was 
paid the sum of $1.25. 

The following is the subscription list : 

Douglass Satterlee, nails, trimmings, Frankfort. . .$ 25 

John Little, jr., material " .... 30 

Chauncey Hannahs " .... 30 

Samuel Ethridge, labor " 25 

James M. Winn 10 

Frederick Bassett 10 



n 

George Montague, labor 15 

Abner Fields, Litchfield 15 

Henry C. Bloodgood, painting, Frankfort 5 

J. W.Doyle 5 

William B. Maxwell 1 

Peter Bargy jr., material, Frankfort 15 

George W. Henry, Frankfort 10 

Anthony I. Quackenbush, furniture 15 

Judson Foster, painting, Frankfort 5 

Amasa Mann 5 

William Ethridge, labor, Schuyler 15 

Jacob P. Oyer 10 

Louis M. Randall 1 

Rufus Howard, material, etc.. Frankfort 10 

Stephen Bosworth, labor and cash, Frankfort 25 

C. Johnson 1 

Joseph Collis, Frankfort 10 

Sylvester Joslin, timber, Frankfort 5 

William P. Dygert, " u 10 

Asa C. Sharp, mason work 10 

Christopher Greene 5 

John Richardson 10 

M. O. Stevens, Frankfort 1 

Chauncey Pierce, Frankfort 3 

Otis Dexter, hemlock and cash, German Flatts. ... 10 

Thomas Pierce, Franktort 2 

Elias Palmer, sr., Frankfort 5 

Isaac Niles 2 

George W. Drxter, oil, German Flatts 15 

Dennis Dygert, hemlock delivered, Frankfort 5 

Daniel Dygert, '* " " 5 

John Fagotte 1 

Nicholas Steele 1 

Thomas B. Gillispie, German Flatts 2 

Harvey S. Ethridge, labor 10 

Amos Larlin, mason work, Frankfort 10 

Erastus Smith, Frankfort 15 

Jacob W. Putney 3 

Robert Shoemaker 5 



24 

Merry Ford, labor 3 

John Mann, " 10 

Prentice Yeomans, labor, German Flatts 25 

Jacob Weber, cash and team work, Frankfort. ..... 20 

Lucas Hager, labor, Frankfort 15 

L Harter . 3 

Adam Diefendorf 2 

Ransom Curtiss 3 

Warner Folts, Frankfort 10 

Henry Fillyers, hemlock 10 

M. Sharp z 

William Black 2 

Thomas Gay nor 3 

Edward Laury : 2 

Josiah Woodruff, Frankfort 5 

Jacob Burckdorff, " 10 

E. Stone, Schuyler 5 

George Lonis 2 

L. Hutchins, lumber. . . 15 

Reuben Hecox, lumber and team-work 15 

Mason Barker, " " " 10 

John Walker, jr 5 

Henry Johnson 10 

William Williams 2 

George A. Clapsaddle, timber 5 

John B. Dvgert, team-work, Frankfort 5 

William W. Dygert, u " 5 

Samuel Hoard, Frankfort, 5 

Rev. Eliada Blakesly 5 

Caleb Budlong, team-work, Frankfort 5 

George Bridenbecker, Frankfort 5 

Jacob Brown 2 

Jacob L. True, Frankfort 2 

Ed win Adams. " 3 

Russell Hopkins, iron ware 5 

Daniel Budlong, Frankfort 10 

John Snyder \. . . . . 1 

Samuel Dexter, jr., Schuyler 3 

Benedict S. Joslin, Frankfort 1 



25 

Moses Wadleigh, Frankfort 20 

Richard Ramsey : 15 

W. Satterlee 7 

Timothy I. Campbell, Frankfort 30 

Joseph Greene 4.50 

E. Anhandell 3.50 

Samuel Howard 50 

Total &759-5° 

For these subscriptions the lodge issued scrip which 
was to be redeemed by the lodge with interest. The 
form of the scrip was as follows : 

This certifies, that Caleb Budlong is entitled to $5 
out of the funds of Olive Branch Lodge, No. 221 and 
Olive Branch Chapter, No. 93, to be payed with inter- 
est, at such times and by such installments as said 
Lodge and Chapter shall direct. 

Harvey Prior, 

Treasurer of Lodge and Treasurer of Chapter. 

The Hall was built in 1825, but in what month it was 
finished, or when it was first occupied the minutes do 
not state. It was a two story building situated on the 
corner of Main and Litchfield streets where the pres- 
ent Masonic block now stands. The first floor was 
used many years for a public hall. Here the young 
people of the vicinity received their early education 
and it was here the Universalist and Baptist churches 
held their religious services prior to building their 
church edifices, and for years the Free Methodists held 
their meetings there, so with truth it may be said that 
the building moulded the public, private and religious 
sentiments of the inhabitants of this village in its early 
days. The building was occupied by the Fraternity 



26 

until the year 1896 when it was removed to make place 
for a larger and more pretentious one. It still stands 
on Sawmill street where it bids fair to celebrate the 
100th anniversary of its existence, its present condi- 
tion well attests the honesty of material and workman- 
ship employed in its construction. 

Mar. 16, 1825, it was voted to celebrate St. John's 
day, June 24, and that the notice of the celebration be 
published in a Utica paper and the two papers in Her- 
kimer county. Brothers John Littlejohn, Otis Dexter 
<nJ Chauncey Hannahs were appointed a committee 
to make all necessary arrangements. Mar. 29, the 
committee were directed to request Rev. Brother E. 
Blakesly to deliver a sermon to the fraternity on that 
occasion and that Brother John Littlejohn deliver an 
oration. Apr. 12, Brother F. B. Gillispie reported that 
he had made a contract with a band of music for that 
occasion which was duly approved by the lodge. 

The bills for publishing the notices of the celebra- 
tion amounted to $7.50. 

Daring this year the lodge was on a floodtide of 
prosperty no less than 20 persons becoming members. 

In 1826 their gain was 7; in 1827 the gain was 10. 

It was not till 1827 that the lodge received a deed 
of the land on which the Hall was erected. 

Masonry was prosperous during these 3 years. The 
utmost harmony prevailed. No expulsion marred the 
peace and harmony of the brotherhood. The brother, 
widow and orphan in afftction were kindly cared for. 
In 1827 the wave of anti-masonry swept over the coun- 
try, distracting Church and State and leading to most 
disastrous results. Anti-masonry was made the agent, 
on the part of scheming politicians, for advancing their 
own interests and for the purpose of clothing them- 



27 

selves with power. But most of those demagogues who 
opposed Masonry (in later years") were ashamed to 
have it known that they had reproached and slandered 
such men as Warren, who fell at Bunker Hill, Paul 
Revere, Washington, Lafayette, Gen Herkimer and 
others who achieved the independence of the country, 
Clinton and Tompkins, governors of our own state, and 
thousands of others who have occupied high positions 
as statesmen, divines, warriors and citizens. 

Olive Branch Lodge felt the full effects of the spirit 
of anti -masonry. Many were hindered from joining 
by the false representations of those opposed to mason- 
ry through ignorance of its principles, while others 
withdrew through timidity or the earnest solicitations 
of friends, until in 1843 they numbered no more than 
15. Of these there can be called to mind, George B. 
Judd, Stephen Bosworth, Edwin Adams, Prentice Yeo- 
mans, Robert M. Shearer and Timothy I. Campbell. 

How strong public opinion was against Masonry may 
be inferred from the fact that not one man was initia- 
ted from Jan. 29, 1828 to Jan. 10, 1844. The wave of 
anti-masonry seems to have spent its force about the 
year 1840 as many who had withdrawn renewed allegi- 
ance in the ensuing year. We cannot do too much honor 
to those heroic souls who, despite the scoffs and jeers 
of friends and enemies shielded the light through those 
stormy and tempestuous times and preserved for us the 
proud distinction that although 180 other lodges char- 
tered prior to our own gave up their charter, yet old 
Olive Branch Lodge pursued the even tenor of her 
way, electing her officers each and every year as the 
years rolled by. Herkimer county in the year 1827 had 



2$ 

six lodges, five of which had surrendered their charters. 
It was during this period of meagre membership and 
the impoverished condition of the lodge that they sold 
and conveyed by deed the lower part of the building to 
Stephen Bosworth, who in 1837 left this village. Jan. 9 
1847. George B. Judd was paid $14.72 for his services 
in recovering the property back from Bosworth. But 
alas, this deed like Banquo's ghost, would not down and 
seventy years after the lodge was constrained to pur- 
chase a re-conveyance from Bosworth's heirs. 



DEATH OF HENRY CLAY, 

On the 29th day of June, 1852, Henry Clay, one of 
America's greatest statesmen, a leader of the people, 
idolized by his followers, for nearly half a century a 
conspicuous and commanding figure in public and na- 
tional affairs at home and abroad, departed this life. On 
July 27, the Lodge duly assembled and an eulogy was 
pronounced upon the worthy brother and illustrious 
dead, and the Lodge room ordered draped in mourning, 

Oct. iz, 1852, Brothers Nathan Whitney, Amos H. 
Prescott, Joseph Strauss, Daniel R. Devendorf, Leon- 
ard Lewis, Ezekiel Spencer, John T. Golden and Sam- 
uel Schemerhorn withdrew to form Mohawk valley 
Lodge No. 276. 

From 1852 to 1895 nothing occurred in the history 
of the Lodge out of the ordinary. 

The subject of a new building was often canvassed. 
Talk finally crystalized into action. On March 12. 
T895, tne following committee was appointed to take 



*9 

Cfttiot) directed to erecting a three-story building not 
to exceed $7,000: Charies Aiaud<> W. I. Piper* C. B, 
Cleland, J. Donaghy^ H, Sk Getman, E. J. Carner and 
H. M. Wood. On August 15., of that year the trustees 
of the Lodge wene added to the building committer 
fcnd thence forward to a finished three-story brick 
block occupying the site of the oJd building at a cost 

Of  1 0,000V 



Masonic Fair* 

From February TO to the *8th, 1896, a fair Was held 
Sit the opera house for the benefit of the Lodge, at 
Which the strtn of $3^000 was realised-. The persons 
having charge of the fair were^ President:, Charles 
Aland} vice presidents, C W. Nipe > Wm. Wayne* F. 
Parkhurst} secretarj^ H. S. Getman; treasurer* G.C 
Harten The Ladies'' executive Committee •: Mrs S. S* 
Richards* chairman; Mrs, G. N, Lehr* vice-chairman; 

Miss Genevieve Wood and Mrs. H. S. GettftatH asso^ 
ciates. 

The following program Was successfully carded outi 

OHDER OF EVENTS. 

Opening Address* - ^ fc. LaGrange Smith 

Orand Concert - »■ West Shore Shop Band 

TufcsbAY fivENlN^ 

COMEDY, 
By ftest Local Talent* Entitled Ths 



3° 

Little Country Store. 

Music, ' * - - Frankfort Orchestra 

E. Gerrard, Pianist; F. Parkhurst, Violinist; H. E 

Garner, Cornetist; F. Watson, Flutist. 

Wednesday Evening. 

Laughable Sketch, * Uncle Johnathan's Alburn 

Singing, - - llion Standard Male Quartette 

Solo, - . - - Miss Maude Lewis> 

Recitation, - - * Miss Grace Watkins 

Piano Solo, - - - Prof. Rockwell 

Thursday Evening. 

IL10N NIGHT, 

Under the management of the Ladies of Eastern 

Star Chapter, O. E. S. 

Music, - - - llion Brass Band 

Stereoptican Views, - - Mr. Samuel Skinner 
Singing, etc, 

Friday Evening. 

Promenade Concert, - West Shore Shop Band 

Saturday Evening. 

Nestor's Celebrated Orchestra, 
Singing, - Frankfort Quarette 

Messrs. Haynes. Carner, Weaver and Thomas. 
Solo, - ' - Mrs, James Hagan 

Character Sketch, - - - Magher Bros, 

Monday Evening, 

Comedy — The Little Country Store, 

Music, - - - Frankfort Orchestra 

Tuesday — Closing Night, 

Special Features. 

A door prize will be given each night. 
Refreshments will be served each night during the 
fair. 



3* 

A smoking room will he provided and cigars on sale. 

A cloak room wilt also be provided. 

Concert by the wonderful graphaphone «very even- 

Contest between E. R. Weaver, Hook and Ladder 
Co. No. 3 and Vt. R. Bennett, H. M. Wood Steamer Co, 
No. 3, for a solid gold fireman's badge. 

Also a contest for a beautiful 5P. M. Jewell. 

In opening the fair, Mr. Smith said in closings refer* 
Sngtothe work of the order a«d the beautiful home 
near the city of Utica ; "Almost within sight of this 
spot stands a silent and impressive witnessth to its ob- 
ject is large enough, and its charity broad enough to 
cover both the casket, which has a yesterday, and the 
cradle, which has a to-morrow^ It mingles sympathy 
and compassion with sorrow and distress, and blends 

into life\s defeat the hope, that forever banishes de- 
spain*' 

Great credit is due to the ladies who had charge of 

the several booths and to those who took an active 

part in the conduct of the fair. The success X3f this 

^effort was largely due to the energy, good judgment 

and work of the ladies. Especially to the Eastern 

Star Chapter of Ilion is the Lodge deeply indebted, 

and here it wishes to acknowledge that indebtedness. 

The ladies having charge of the several booths were. 

Knight Templars Booth— Miss Genevieve Wood, 
Mrs. (>has. Christie, Mrs. Geo. Smith, Mrs. Finn, Mrs. 
Parkhurs^ Mrs. Rich, Mrs. Bliss. 

Eastern Star Booth, llion~-Mi\ and Mrs. Manchett, 
Mr. and Mrs, D„ Ross, Mr. and Mrs. J. Whitfield, Mrs, 
Whitney, 

Mrs. Rose* Booth--Mrs, JYaleich, Mrs. teargy, Mrs, 
Valentine^ 



Candy Eooth — Mrs. S. Johnson, Miss May Thomas, 
Miss Maude Lewis, Miss Nellie Hoard. 

Young Ladies' Table— Miss Anna Piper, Miss Maude 
Ballard, MissOrla Potter, Miss Estella Dudleston,Misa 
Bertha Potter, Miss Anna Thomas, Miss Beulah Thomas, 

Refreshment Booth — Mrs. Charles Aland, Mrs. Chip 
Taber, Mrs. C B. Cleland, Mrs. J. I. Ingersoll, Mrs. 
Stearns, Mrs. Homer Carder, Mrs. Bettner, Mrs, A. R, 
Givin, Mrs. E. D. Potter, Mrs. B. Scammell, Miss Sadie 
Piper, Miss Grace Wickens. 

Country Store — Charles Nipe. 

Annex — Mrs. C. Nipe, Mrs. Wm. Wayne, Mrs. G. 1. 
Seaman, Mr§. H. H. Ingham, Mrs. E. LaGrange Smith. 



The Last Meeting in the Old Hall, 

The last meeting in the Old Hall was held May i2 f 
1896. There was sadness on the features of Worship- 
ful Master Ingersoll as he rapped for order. It was* 
understood that this was to be the last meeting in the 
old room and the attendance was large. Visiting 
brothers were present from Ilion, Herkimer, Utica, and 
other places. After conferring the second degree a 
social time was enjoyed by all present. Charles L, 
Fellows of Newport, District Deputy Grand Master, 
addressed the brethern, Charles B. Cleland gave an in- 
teresting and instructive history of the Lodge; Myron 
K. Ellsworth spoke on the "Past Masters;" Charles 
Aland made appropriate remarks on the fair lately held 
by the order; remarks were also made by N. A. Hanch- 
ett of Ilion, and W. I. Taber of Herkimer. Refrseh- 
ments were served in the room, after which E. La 
G range Smith was called on to answer the toaat, "The 



33 

Old Lodge Room/ Answering he said ! 

Mr. Toast Master and Gentlemen i— »The relation of 
this room With the Masonic Fraternity ceases to-night, 

Like some good, tried, faithful old friend it has met 
its object and fulfilled its mission faf bettef than most 
of us. As we are about to desert it, sentiment gives to 
it a life, a feeling, a personality* Fancy peoples it with 
the past, and fills it with reality; feason animates it 1 , 
the imagination clothes it with an existence* a being 
which will go out into the darkness as we pass out into 
the night. 

It has a life, and life under any Condition is grand. 
It will die, and death in any form, is sublime. We 
never appreciate anything until it is lost to us. The 
veneration, the respect, the affection that surround ob- 
jects lost, depend upon our associations with them, and 
the more intimate those associations are with our own 
lives, the greater the veneration and regard, the 
more poignant and bitter the sense of their loss, 

When we go from this lodge room to-night, and view 
it from the street, as the Tyler turns, for the last time 
the key, from these windows, like eyes to a human soul, 
like the look upon the face of a departing spirit, will 
flash the memories and associations of years agone, 
and, in our mind's eye, we will gee the old building giv- 
ing the grand hailing Sign of distress, 

For seventy years it ha* stood a representative, a 
home, an altar of the fraternity, These give it a Val- 
ue, and throw about it a halo that commands our at j 
tention and calls forth our admiration and regard, In 
it man has been taught his highest duty, here he has 
seen the highest good, and at times, Caught glimpses of 
the ultimate goal. From it men have gone, filled with 
the spirit of its surroundings, and, guided by the light 
of its truths, made life a grand success, and, when the 
ahadoWs len«*ther>:?d, tho.jj truths bscanis an invert- 



34 

ed torch, guiding their feet through the dark Valley in- 
to the light. 

Brothers, after to-night) this lodge room will be to 
some only a memory, to others an ever living fact* 
Shadow or substance, to some of us, in its modesty, its 
humility, its consistent and venerable past, it will ever 
far outshine its more beautiful and imposing successor* 
Let us hope that the iessons here taught, the precepts 
here given, and the memory of this lodge with its as- 
sociations go with each and every one of us, to cheer 
and light our way, to lift our burdens, and finally, if it 
heeds be, to soften the somber hue of our destiny. 

The gavel was called into requisition for the last 
time and Olive Branch Lodge was forever dismissed in 
the historic old building. The members took a final 
look, clasped each other's hands and bid the room fare- 
well. At 11:30 the place was Vacant, the lights were 
out. 



THE CORNER-STONE LAID IN DOE AND ANCIENT FORM. 

In the afternoon of September to, 1896, in the pres- 
ence of a large audience and brethren from Little Falls, 
Herkimer, Mohawk and Ilion, the Corner-Stone of the 
hew building was laid with impressive masonic cere- 
monies by Deputy Clrand Master Duncan of Fort Plain. 
Rev, C E. Miller, pastor of the M. E. Church and a 
brother, opened With prayer. 

The Copper box, Containing a Bible, 19 Coins, 3 shin 
plasters, t Jewell, 1896 almanac, photograph of old 
building, history and rooster of Olive Branch Lodge, a 
World almanac, copies of Xltica Herald* tltica Press* 



35 

Vtica Observer, Utica Saturday Globe, West Winfiekl 
Star, Ilion Citizen, Herkimer Citizen, Little falls Journ- 
al and Courier, Herkimer Democrat, Little Falls Even- 
ing Times, Herkimer County News, Frankfort Regis- 
ter, maps of Utica and Frankfort, Frankfort directory, 
G. A. R. badge and button, list of town and Village 
officers, souvenir of Masonic fair, the constitution and 
by-laws of the different orders and lodges in Frankfort, 
the constitution and by-laws of the Masonic Lodge and 
of the Eastern Star Chapter of Ilion, was placed and 
the corner stone laid. 

George A. Smith then took charge of the exercises. 
Letters of regret from Hon. John W. Vrooman and 
others were read. The Frankfort Quartet sang a Ma- 
sonic hymn, followed by the literary part of the program, 
Frank B. Parkhurst opening with a fine address. In 
closing he said ; 

The sentiments which actuate the laying of this 
corner stone are of deep significance. These cere- 
monies cause us to consider the elevating tenets which 
will be inculcated in the commodious and substantial 
structure which is to grace this spot -a suitable home 
for Olive Branch Lodge, an honor to the Craft and an 
ornament to this village. 

The remaining Greek and Roman Temples, With 
all their beauty of outline and imposing designs, evince 
a lower ideal thafi that which ttioVes Us at this hour ! 
Those ancient edifices were erected to propitiate many 
vengeful gods; while we, in this enlightened age, under 
the single benign and ever living Diety, build to His* 
glory and our mutual moral betterment, Tribal preju' 



36 

dice engendered the spirit of national intolerance, which 
ever lingered in the Agora and the Forum, hovering 
over the Acropolis and the Capitol, and ultimately 
appearing in the provinces to the confusion of those 
heroic peoples* In the Temple which is to stand here 
the spirit of fraternal kindliness Will predominate, to 
ennoble character and assist in the advancement of 
society. 

Ih seeking the causes which prompt this rejoicing 
We learn that not in the mystic pfovince alone but also 
in the broad empire of simplicity) the Fraternity ha4 
received sublime impulses; here all civilisations, from 
Egypt to the present) speak to us in familiar discourse; 
here we learn that Cunning and falsehood are the 
resources of the weak and perishable; that sincerity 
Is the resort of the strong and enduring. It is this that 
has held the attention of contemplative man, giving 
Masonry its dignity and usefulness shedding honor 
Upon its name to this hour, amid our liberal political 
institutions. With all these civil advantages, which 
give opportunities to the Citizen and harmony and 
strength to the State* what student will deny that in 
the conflict of good and evil, of virtue and vice, 
Masonry has been, and still is, an auxiliary of civil* 
ization? And if history should fail to chronicle the 
highest attainments of the age, may the preservative 
gehius of the Craft, as in the vicissitudes of the centuries, 
charm the imagination of coming generation^ and thus 
assist the progress of humanity. 

It is meet that we cement this corner stone with 
well tempered mortar,, that it may support the mairt 



37 

edifice foi our mutual good, afford benefits which will 
redound to each individual member without sacrificing 
conscience or citizenship, that it may conduce to a 
higher development of manhood by exemplifying the 
truths of our Order. Thus inspirations and good 
deeds combine to form the figurative keystone in the 
sublime arch ot our faith. Hopeful that this endeavor 
will culminate in the advancement of all true and 
accepted Masons, who here assemble, or may hereafter 
assemble, to partake of refreshments, which are health- 
ful to the mind as well as to the body, we congratulate 
ourselves, and hail all visiting brethren with joy, 
fidelity and brotherly love. Welcome, thrice welcome! 
Charles Cleland followed with a history of the Lodge. 
He said in part : 

At Grain's Corners in the town of Litchfield in the 
year 1812 a settlement, which was then larger than the 
villages of Ilion or Frankfort, Olive Branch Lodge 
sprang into existence. As the war clouds of 1812 
settled over the land, we find a number of the members 
enlisted in their country's cause. At the expiration of 
their service they started for their distant homes 
without money or provisions, until Richard Smith, a 
mason both operative and speculative, securing employ- 
ment, enabled them to live in comfort as they slowly 
wended their way back to the Mohawk Valley. In 
1822, with the advent of the Erie Canal and the 
increase of population, along its course it was deemed 
advisable to move the Lodge to Frankfort village. In 
1825 a building was erected by the Fraternity which 
gave place in 1896 to a more pretentious one. In 1859 
the tide of emigration flowing westward carried many 
of its members with it, where they attained to positions 
in state and nation. Many of the members have held 



3» 

positions of public trust in town, county and state In 
the '6o's, when the clangor of war rolled over the land, 
many joined the army, and of its membership between 
the year i860 and '68 one-third had served with honor 
and distinction in the Union army. Not one deserter 
mars her record. Some of those veterans are here 
with us today, while others sleep beneath Virginia's 
soil, and her pines are singing requiems o'er their 
graves. Seventy-one long years ago a little handful 
gathered on this self-same spot and consecrated it to 
Masonic use. That sturdy, old New England stock, 
who composed that little handful, experienced harder 
times than we ever knew. Yet, as they wielded axe, 
hammer and saw in the erection of their Masonic 
tabernacle, their hearts were as blithe as the birds 
about them, for their faith was unbounded and their 
belief in Masonic tenets unlimited. How well they 
builded we alone do know. They builded for posterity. 
They shielded the light through stormy and tempestuous 
time, and for their devotion to Masonry, "full weU we 
love them, but we ne'er can love them well enough. " 

Joseph J. Dudleston being called, responded, saying 

among other things : 

We are called together today by an occasion of 
rejoicing. The prospects of the early attainment of 
a long desired object is ours, and we are glad to 
assemble here with our friends that we may rejoice 
together. The laying of a corner stone is a waymark 
in an undertaking. It points both to the past and the 
future. It tells of work already accomplished, while it 
is eloquent with praise of that which is yet to be. It 
is, therefore, highly fitting that we pause at this time 
and contemplate the true meaning of the occasion; that 
we briefly survey the work already accomplished and 
consider something of the local significance of its suc- 
cessful completion. Men enjoy most that which they 
have themselves earned. The Allwise ruler hath 



39 

decreed that man should live by the sweat of his own 
brow. He has further added, as a still higher incentive, 
for man to labor, the highest degree of enjoyment in 
the fruits of his own toil : Happy is the man or that 
woman who is partaker of such an enjoyment ! Happy 
the communitv whose men and whose women are self- 
reliant ! I am proud of the fact that I am able to 
congratulate such men and such women here today ! 
Men and women who have proven themselves able to 
cope with great difficulties and to rise above all dis- 
couragements. They have proven themselves to be 
self-helpful. They have' manifested the spirit that 
4 will either find a way or make one.' They sat not 
down and waited for some person of wealth to do for 
them; they have wrought for themselves. In the oft- 
quoted words of the old Roman poet: "They were able 
because they seem to be able." Olive Branch Lodge 
has done well. A host of Masonic brethren not 
members of Olive Branch have done nobly, but if it 
were not for the active, united aiid most generous 
assistance of the men and women of the entire village 
and community we would not be here today. The 
laying of a corner stone is truly a time for rejoicing 
It quickens and lends encouragement. A corner stone 
possesses a typical significance. It is a symbol of that 
which is of fundamental importance. What a fitting 
memorial, then, to the industry, the perseverance and 
the tireless energy of the men and women of our town 
and of our community. Their efforts may most fittingly 
be regarded asthe corner stone of this enterprise. 

E. LaGrange Smith closed the literary exercises with 

a short address. He said in part : 

No ship leaves shore without compass and anchor. 
The compass for the storm, the cloud, the dark; the 
anchor for the wave, the surge, the billow. When, 
with troubled, turbulent waters beneath, tempest and 
lightning above, the ship rides the abyss below, when 



40 

the sea and cloud meet, when it is dark, the trembling 
needle still guides to port and home. When the angry 
swell of the sea lifts amid breakers and the rolling surge 
beats and breaks upon rock, the anchor holds * * * 
There is something inspiring, grand, yet terrible, in 
the onward march of human society. * * * As the 
sea has its currents, its whirlpools, its reefs; the sky 
its shadows, its storms, its tempests, its stars, s:> 
civilization has its m.)ral gulfs, its hideous precipices, 
its highlands, its mountain tops * * * Masonry, 
like the Christian Church, is constructive. It builds 
individuality; it grows character. The trend of our 
civilization is to absorb and destroy individuality. The 
multitude press toward Sinai and gather about Olympus, 
but the individual picks his way, in hope, to Carniel, 
and stands redeemed, regenerated, renewed at the Rock 
of Joseph . . Masonry is noble, in that it 

stands for, and has ever represented a higher, a better, 
a truer civilization; noble, in that it is just to the indi- 
vidual, generous to the living, and, in charity, coffins 
with this body of clay the faults of man and the frailties 
of life. 

The craftsmen and brethren had well performed their 
duty. 



The Home of Olive Branch Lodge Dedicated. 

On the evening of March 29, 1897, the new building 
was dedicated with appropriate exercises. Joseph B. 
Duncan of Fort Plain, representing the Grand Lodge 
of the State, was Master of Ceremonies, and was 
assisted by I. T. Burney, Master of Little Falls Lodge, 
acting as Deputy Grand Master; \V. I. Taber, Master 
of Herkimer Lodge, acting as Senior Grand Warden; 
J. I). Fitch, Master of Mohawk Lodge, acting as Junior 



4t 

^rand Warden; X. G. Hanehet, Master of llion Lodge, 

acting as Chaplain; and Hon. David G. Hackney of 

Fort Plain, Grand Marshal. Many from Little Falls, 

Herkimer, Mohawk and llion were resent. The 

audience was large and the rooms well filled. The 

ceremonies were interesting and impressive. Brother 

Frank B Parkhurst, from the Masters' station in the 

East, delivered an able address, which was given close 

attention. The orator said : 

Most Worshipful Grand Master and Brethren: 
The hour has arrived when we may celebrate an 
important epoch in the history of Olive Branch Lodge 
of Free and Accepted Masons. In this dediejiticn v u 
manifest an appreciation of the benefits and privileges 
vouchsafed to every loyal Mason. This consecration 
prompts us to consider our obligations to Him who led 
our ancient Brethren out of darkness into the light, 
not for their edification alone, but for the improvement 
of the generations who were to follow. 

The original tabernacle of our Egyptian Brethren 
was a rude affair indeed compared with the elaborate 
temple situated upon Mount Mori ah, or even with this 
edifice. Yet, within the four walls of that oblong in 
the wilderness, was revealed much that has led to 
rational thought and rational action. Even as a legend 
it would still impart useful instruction. The Syrians 
and Greeks, while they added to architectural forms, 
and were exclusive in their customs and rites, often 
gave emphasis at their shrines and in their literature to 
rules of conduct transmitted from the banks of the Nile, 
through Palestine, and across the blue Mediterranean. 
August Rome, in the height of her power, did not 
completely ignore the experience which had gone 
before; even when human dignity and virtue seemed 
to have perished in the cruel reign of Nero, when law 
ceased to protect, and the remnant of hope began to* 



4* 

faie in the pagan Capital, those who treasured in the 
secrecy of their hearts that which no persecution could 
obliterate invoked the ever living: God for consolation 
and r3&re3S. The impress of Hellenic reasoning; and of 
the Pandects is not only seen in the civil laws and 
manners of Europe, but the humane spirit of Hebrew 
legislation has been traced by the scholar to the civiliza- 
tion of our day : there is indubitable evidence that 
elevating institutions rest upon long settled precedents 
as well as upon present customs and enactments. 

Vain and illusory would be the claim of modern man 
that by his own ingenuity he has reached his present 
status. Well may we, as Masons, cherish those traditions" 
which emanated from the light-givingincidents in Moses' 
and Solomon's time, traditions which have been so 
heroically preserved by our organization through the 
gloim of centuries, which are typified in this chamber,, 
a symbolical representation which has conduced to 
Masonic growth and permanency. 

To the reflecting and consistent Mason, Masonry 
is an intelectual repository and a moral guide. Like 
all institutions wrought out by worthy motives, and 
perpetuated by rigid discipline, this of ours stands by 
the highway of civilization like an obelisk whose 
inscription is eloquent in the recital of achievements, 
as well as admonitory in the record of trials and 
tribulations. 

Contemplative man, comparing the principles sug- 
gested by the emblems of art and the undeviating 
truths of philosophy, erected this system, as unique 
as it is instructive in design. By the light of 
experience he has been able to develop a fundamental 
plan, which, in affording glimpses of Supreme 
Wisdom, inspired him to clothe his deductions in a 
figurative language as sublime and beautiful as ever 
fell from human lips. 

So long as comparison is a requisite of knowledge, 
^ Ions will symbols be utilized to retain and advance 



43 

acquirements. By analogy we trace the hidden threads 
that bind the creation into unity. No man can 
completely fathom and explain the mystery of his 
own being — the most wonderous sentient symbol' in 
the terrestrial sphere — yet, his consciousness, speaking 
through his natural body, constantly tells of the 
revelations found by diligent research and speculation 
in the moral code of Diety; and it is significant that 
advanced science, although quickening the human 
mind, has not disproved but confirmed the tenets of 
our Fraternity. The Jehovah of the fathers is the 
Masonic God of this day resplendent in his govern- 
ment of the universe ! 

As the pen is a symbol suggestive of written thought, 
and as the compass and quadrant hint of the s.ife 
navigation of the deep, so the working tools of Free- 
masonry symbolize their utility. The mortar and rock 
could not be moulded into strength and beauty by the 
human mind unaided by the tools of the operative 
workman, but together they have accomplished marvels 
for the comfort and advancement of mankind. The 
architect, conceiving the design, delineates it upon the 
trestleboard; the skilled artisan, faithful to established 
principles, simulates the draft in material form. 

The accusation that modern civilization has cancelled 
our usefulness, because despotism, or lawlessness, do 
not stifle rational freedom in this quarter of the globe, 
is an error known to the member who stands upon 
principle and not upon mere ceremony; to him there 
is a deeper meaning in the sublime laiiguage of Masonry; 
to him its influence is continuous and not momentary; 
not by pretentions has he been led to profitable medi- 
tations; but from the deep fraught arguments of the 
Order he has imbibed healthful nourishment as a man 
and a Mason. Theinspiration derived from this source 
has, and ever will, elevate its adherents, so long as 
their souls seek expansion. We do not deny that we 
have had those who, from waut of reflection, have failed 



44 

to % enjoy that which Masonry gives. But the great 
majority of the Brotherhood, in the spirit of chivalry, 
have often reclaimed its delinquents, and shielded the 
refo/ming Brother from public gossip; charity is not 
base$J r i.*pon money alone 1 The acme of its power is 
reached by disinterested deeds and righteous endeavor. 

Whatever the assumptions of men, and the hypocrisy 
of the world, eternal truth will yet remain to warn and 
edify. The tie that binds for good, and the principles 
that bring unalloyed happiness, are just as sacred as in 
the days of old, and we verily believe the palmy period 
of the Order lies not behind but betore. As the world 
expands in thought and heart the better appreciated 
wiil be the genius of Masonry; it "gathers strength as 
general enlightenment extends its empire, and a higher 
moral altitude is attained by mankind." When the 
race is emancipated from passion and prejudice, then 
will the usefulness of our Order cease. Here we not 
only learn self-watchfulness but of the sure rewards 
which come from honorable conduct toward our fel- 
lows, else why these aspirations I No secret society 
can be a menace to republican institutions so long as 
its members repel selfishness and corruption, and value 
integrity and justice — the motives which bring and 
maintain order and wholesome laws — they will remain 
loyal to the government of their country; men of quick 
sensibilities and dispassionate feelings, of whatever 
faction, will readily concede the utility of such lessons. 
Although we have passed the ages of gross ignorance 
and superstition, and while enlightened justice aud 
sympathy are gradually assuming sway, we still bear in 
mind the necessity of self-control and personal refor- 
mation. 

Masonic history is not only a history of moral 
culture and moral power, but its ritual points to a 
superlative degree beyond — a condition attainable not 
only by the embellishment of the mind, but also by 
broadening the heart. We have learned that, from its 
genesis to the present, Masonry has held in high regard 



45 

those cardinal virtues which develop mankind and 
impel the progress of social order, drawing to its foid 
many of the cultured in every dime> and enriching the 
minds of Us devotees with maXrnis of wisdom. These 
truisms wrtl ever remain dear to every reflecting Mason* 
it was these primal principles that moved that en- 
lightened sovereign the great Frederick of Prussia > 
to indite these words > **A society which enjoys itself 
only in sowing the seed acid bringing forth the fruit of 
every kind of virtue in my dominions, may always be 
assured of my protections I pray Ikxl to take you 
-and your lodge under His holy and deserved pro- 
tection. w 

We have learned that Masonry not only teaches 
^exterior scrutiny,, but also prompts self-examination, 
that it seeks by introspection the correction x>f evils, 
which otherwise couid not l*e eradicated from the body 
social; that, by reforming and encouraging the in- 
dividual, it not only gives happiness to the community, 
but strengthens the State; in short, tlvat its aim is, 
when followed in the spirit and not in name, second 
only to the benign influence of Christianity, of which it 
is a handmaid. In the forceful words of an astute 
Brother; <4 If Freemasonry is not a religion., it stands 
-guard at the gate of the ^reat temple in which all 
•creeds are blended into one> where Jew and Gentile 
may worship side by side, where the prayers of all 
nationalities may ascend together to the father of all." 

Mistaken^, ind-eed, is the stranger to our faith who 
surmises that we will meet in this commodious room, 
the pride of our hearts, simply for relaxation from 
•business to amuse^jourselves by rehearsing frivolous 
words and stilted forms. Here men wiH abandon 
strife and expediency, and contemplate the rewards of 
forbearance and kindliness. Shut in from the cares 
and bickerings of the world they will here think upon 
manhood's worth. Nay, in these reflections the com- 
pact of society, of the family and of the brotherhood 
of raan, wiN be better understood and appreciated 



46 

amid the duties of daily life. Within this domain men 
are not given to exaggeration, distortion and injustice; 
rational thoughts bring rational deedsand contentment. 
Such meditations not only stir their hearts with grati j 
tude, but build a self-respect which is a solace and 
armor through good and through evil report. We are 
not deaf nor blind to the fact that experience exhorts 
us to prudence and moderation, that we are required, 
by wisdom and caution, to conserve and administer our 
material resources that we may ultimately reach that 
periud in our history so ardently desired. Difficulties, 
my Brethren, are often but momentary tests of con- 
stancv. The duties of the present and the future c\o 
not dissuade but stimulate to new efforts in the ad- 
vancement of the Craft. 

The motives involved in the dedication of this temple 
go as deeply as the roots «)f social life and individual 
progress. The scope of religion embraces futurity, the 
genius of our Order teaches mutual moral obligation — • 
those tenets of public and private virtue so necessary 
for bnman advancement in every calling, the abandon- 
ment of which would cause mankind to return to a 
brigandage worse than feudalism, " 

In building this edifice we raise another monument 
to the truths of speculative Masonry, another abode 
wherein we may, m solemn conclave, inculcate those* 
ennobling principles which echo through the ages f and 
which will leave their enduring marks in the future. 
Such is the glorious mission of our Order, and such a 
simple tribute to an Organization whose altar has been 
pressed in meekness by the hands of a Washington and 
a La Fayette, 

In putting off the old and assuming the new we do 
not forget our allegiance; we hold sacre i the exalting 
affiliations ot the past. To the attentive ear and faith- 
ful breast those influences which have been of utility 
never vanish, but linger to elucidate the present and 
guide the future. Material forms may change, but by 
adhering to immutable truths the mysteries of infinite 



4? 

Wisdom ate gradually unfolded to the understanding*, 
lierein our consciousness deceives a response from 
&bove~-^inspiratton which the world cannot give nor 
take away. Above the ever-shifting scenery of the 
olouds is the calm celestial Vault illuminated by the 
handiwork of the Creator, Vast and immeasurable, yet 
harmonious and souUstirring in its significance! 

So we have hope > we have faith> that Ire who seeks 
Jight hi the true spirit will be uplifted by the just and 
benevolent Master t>f the Universe, who has granted 
intelligence to man that he may, by due consideration 
-and rational conduce obey the eternal law,, and thus 
•advance from apprenticeship here below to that sublime 
'degree, the mysteries of wheh will ultimately be re* 
Vealed in "that house not -made with hands eternal in 
the heavens.* 

Brethren, however imperfect the Version, we know 
that Masonic lessons and motives pre-eminently con- 
cern matins immediate welfare, and do they not also 
suggest his eternal well-being^ that ""this shred of life 
cannot be all the web f" While they practical ly teach 
the advantages of self-deniai, living in peace, and 
bearing each other's burdens, do they not direct the 
mind to the marvelous scheme of the Infinite? every 
revelation of which stirs the divinity within us, in- 
timating, in our faith., the logic of human events, and 
the harmony of nature, the immortality of man? 

After the address a banquet, provided by the ladies, 
Was enjoyed in the banquet hall, after which the assem- 
bly was again called to order in the lodge room by E> 
LaGrange Smith, acting as toast master, and the follow- 
toasts were answered % 

The Mohawk Valley.... »».»»•*» *...)a.* B. fcaffer y>f Mohawk. 

The Grand t»odge * . . . Hoik W. C. Prescott of Herkimer. 

Our tfew dome... -..%.. ».»..%• Chas. D. Thotrta* of Herkimen 

The Be*ch.... ........ .Hoik I-. R% Devendorf -of Herkimer. 

Our Country „ ....^Cha*. Bell of Herkimeis 

'The Flag. ..-. ....«-* ....*■». .»..% . ...* J* B. Fitch of Mohawkv 

To the Ivadies.. *.*>...*.. .»^..*..%.sJo.«k J. DudlesUtn of Frankfort 



43. 

Music was' furnished by the Frankfort Male Quartet, 

composed of Charles Haynes, Edward Carner, Martin 

Weaver and D. E. Thomas; also by May Thomas, 
Maude Lewis, Irene Duncan, daughter of the Grand 
Master, officiating, and the Grand Master, who sang 
"The Anniversary" with fine effect. The ceremonies, 
the address, the banquet, the toasts, the music, and the 
object of the gathering made it an occasion long to be 
remembered, never to be forgotten by those present, 



Centennial of the Death of Washington. 

Agreeable to the suggestion of the Grand Lodge of 
the State of New York, this Lodge held memorial ser^ 
vices to commemorate the Centennial Anniversary of 
the death of George Washington, at the M. E. Church 
on the evening of December 3i, i&99. 

The Lodge assembled at the rooms at 6: SO p* m. anil 
inarched in full regalia to the Church, where the follow- 
ing program was given : 

Organ Recital ........... ... ....... ........... ....Miss Buell. 

Iiyniu: " Trust in Our Fathers' God"..., Choir, 

Invocation , „ Rev, H, Skeel, 

Authenv: "Praise the Lord" , .Choir. 

Oration ........... . ...,Rew M, G. Seymour, 

who took for his text: Psalm, 4 5 '.17; *I will make thy 
name to be remembered in all generations; therefore 
shall the people praise thee forever and ever." The 
Church was crowded and the audience gave great 
attention to one of the best efforts from the pulpit. 
In closing, he said; "Let me commend the Masonic 
Order for their patriotism in thus arranging, for these 



49 

memorial services all over our land, and the world; and 
hiay the mustard seed of liberty and equal rights grow 
until it becomes a tree to spread over the whole earth* 
Washington became a member of the Order in i852, 
and was buried with the funeral rites of the fraternity. 
May the members of Olive Branch Lodge, each one, be 
the possessor of the qualities which made Washington 
respected." 

Hymn: America.. .......... ..... Choir and Congregation. 

Benediction *...., .Rev, M. G. Seymour. 



Death of President McKintey* 

On the 1 4th day of September, i90i, President 
William McKiniey, one of the few born to a great and 
tragic destiny, a leader of the multitude, a follower 
of the people, whose resplendent virtues shone in every 
Vocation, walk and act of an upright and honorable 
career ; whose whole life, public and private, was a 
living epistle of the nobility of a royal and loyal man- 
hood; one in whom the world saw and respected, 
the spirit an<J genius of the great Republic, 
died at the citv of Buffalo from the effect of bullet 
bounds at the hand of an assassin . The President 
lived and died a Mason, and the Fraternity throughout 
the state, nation and world paid him kind and loving 
tribute. The Lodge duly met and passed appropriate 
resolutions and ordered the rooms draped. * 



48. 

Music was furnished by the Frankfort Male Quartet, 

composed of Charles Haynes, Edward Carner, Martin 

Weaver and D. E. Thomas; also by May Thomas, 
Maude Lewis, Irene Duncan, daughter of tht Grand 
Master, officiating, and the Grand Master, who sang 
"The Anniversary" with fine effect. The ceremonies, 
the address, the banquet, the toasts, the music, and the 
object of the gathering made it an occasion long to be 
remembered, never to be forgotten by those present, 



Centennial of the Death of Washington, 

Agreeable to the suggestion of the Grand Lodge of 
the State of New York, this Lodge held memorial ser- 
vices to commemorate the Centennial Anniversary of 
the death of George Washington, at the M. E. Church 
on the evening of Decerning 3i, i&99. 

The Lodge assembled at the rooms at 6-:30 p, m. aiul 
marched in full regalia to the Church, where the follow 
ing program was given : 

Organ Recital ........... ... ....... ........... ..wMiss Buell. 

Hymn: " Trust in Our Fathers' God" . . . , Choir, 

Invocation , ..-Rev, H, SkeeL 

Anthem: "Praise the I/ord" , ,Choir. 

Oration ........... ... ....--Rev, M, G. Seymour, 

who took for his text: Psalm, 45:17; *I will make thy 
name to be remembered in all generations; therefore 
filial I the people praise thee forever and ever." The 
Church was crowded and the audience gave great 
attention to one of the best efforts from the pulpit. 
In closing, he said: "Let me commend the Masonic 
Order for their patriotism in thus arranging, for these 



49 

memorial services all over our land, and tlie world; and 
taay the mustard seed of liberty and equal rights grow 
until it becomes a tree to spread over the whole earth* 
Washington became a member of the Order in i852, 
and was buried with the funeral rites of the fraternity. 
May the members of Olive Branch Lodge, each one, be 
the possessor of the qualities which made Washington 
respected." 

Hymn: America ... Choir and Congregation. 

Benediction »*...* .» .Rev, M. G. Seymour. 



./wu-^. , 



Death of President McKintey. 

On the 1 4th day of September, i90i, President 
William McKinley, one of the few born to a gfeat and 
tragic destiny, a leader of the multitude, a follower 
of the people, whose resplendent virtues shone in every 
Vocation, walk and act of an upright and honorable 
career ; whose whole life, public and private, was a 
living epistle of the nobility of a royal and loyal man- 
hood; one in whom the world saw and respected, 
the spirit ancj genius of the great Republic, 
died at the citv of Buffalo from the effect of bullet 
Wounds at the hand of an assassin. The President 
lived and died a Mason, and the Fraternity throughout 
the state, nation and world paid him kind and loving 
tribute. The Lodge duly met and passed appropriate 
resolutions and ordered the rooms draj>ed. * 



50 



Present Officers of the 



Charles Aland, 
Edward R k Weave?, 
Bert C> Sterling, 
Carl E» Hoyt, 
Wm. H. Rushmer, 
George Reed, 
Charles B. Cleland, 
Charles VV 4 Kipe, 
James Donaghy, 



Richard Rose* 



Trustees* 



Simon P. Weaver, 



Lodge* 

Master. 

Senior Warden. 

Junior Warden. 

Senior Deacon* 

Junior Deacon. 

Tyler. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer; 

Chaplain. 



S. S. Richards. 



Officers of Olive Branch Lodge, No. 40. 

J8J2— 190J. 



The following is a list of the officers who have served 
as Master and Wardens of this lodge from date of 
organization*. July i6th, i8i2 % to December* 1901 : 

Year, Mastbrv Senior WAfeDfeNi Junior \Vardeni 

1812 » Ralph Merry >* Stephen UoW 

1813 

1814. 

1815. 

1816. 

1817. 

1818. 

1819 

1820 



.. Ralph Merry ....* Stephen Dow Daniel Iteald 

. . Ralph Merry Stephen Dow , Daniel tteald.i 

. Stephen Dow * Daniel AylesWorth. ..Jonathan Butler » 

..Truman Merry Jonathan king..* Julius Ci Kelson 

. Truman Merry Solomon Leonard i Julius C» NelRott 

..Solomon Leonard Truman Merry Daniel Roberts* » 

..Richard Smith toseph Alvord Solomon Leonard » ...» 

..Jonathan Butler Jacob I*. True . » William Barnett 

1821 Preiitice Yeomans Jonathan Butler. Julius C. Nelson » 

1822 Hamiiel Dexter ..Andrew Joslin k , . . kk . k Samu*l Ethiridge.. ..i» 



5* 

Year. Master. £eniof Warden. Junior Wordort. 

1823.... Prentice Yeomans... William P. Dvgert kussell Hopkins 

1824... William. P. Dygert. ..Russell Hopkins Mason Barker.... 

1825 Kussell Hopkins. Mason Barker Peter Bargy, Jr 

1826 Prentice Yeoman") Leonard Dean » Chauncey Hannahs... 

1837.... Leonard Dean. Otis Dexter Asahael Roberts 

1888 ...Otis Dexter Joseph P, Roberts. .... Amos Laflin ' 

1829 Joseph P. Roberts. ...Prentice Yeomans — Stephen Bosworth — 

1830 John Littlejohti, Jr.... George B. Judd William T. Sheldon... 

1S31 Prentice Yeomans . Joseph P. Roberts Daniel Tucker 

1832.... Stephen Bosworth. .. .Prentice Yeomans George B. Judd 

1 M9*t " * • " " " " 

* ^^3*3 .... .... .... .......I 

1834 Prentice Yeomand ...Joseph P.Roberts Edwin Adamd 

1835.... " «' ....Robert M. Shearer.... " * 4 

1837.... Joseph P. Roberts.... " " .... " " 

1838 Robert M. Shearer ...Edwin Adams Daniel Tucker 

1839.... " " .... " " " " 

1840..-. ,4 " .... " " " " 

1841 .. Timothy 1. Campbell.. John B. Dvgert William T. Sheldon... 

1842.... •• •' .. •« •' " " ... 

1843 .. Tohn B. Dygert Wm. T. Sheldon Edwin Adams 

1844 George B. Judd Lyman Mead Daniel Tucker 

1845 ...William T. Sheldon... . " " " " 

1846.... Lyman Mead Daniel Tucker fames Piper 

1847.... Daniel Tucker Ezra Graves •.. Henry S. Devcndorf.. . • 

1848 .. William T Sheldon... Lucas Hager Klkanah T. Cleland.. 

1849. ...Lucas Hager Elkanah T. Cleland.. .William Dygert 

1850 .. Elkanah T. Cleland... William Dygert Chauncey Elwood.... 

1851.... William Dygert Chatihcey Elwood Rudolph W. Dygert.. 

1852 Chauncey Elwood.... John L. Hoard Garwood L. Judd — 

1853 William T. Sheldon... Garwood L. judd T« Watson Dunham.. 

1854 " " ...Lambert Henslef Cornelius Hegaman.. 

1855 l^ambert Hensler...... Charles Howell D wight Mather 

185«.... Charles Howell John L. Hoard David Billings 

1857.... William T. Sheldon... " " " " 

1858 •* " ... " " Chauncey Elwood 

1859.... " " ...Judson Joslirt ...Edwin I,. Hager 

1860... J ud son Joslirt George A. Ken yon ...Charles Howell 

1861.... " " ...Robert Ethridge William T. Sheldon.. 

1862 " " John D. Pish Thomas Richardson . 

1863.... " " Thomas Richardson.. George A. Kenyon.... 

1864... " " Albert H. Sheldon ...Charles K. Staring... 

1865 ...Albert H. Sheldon... . Chas. E- Staring *Leander Atwell 

1866....Jtidson Joslin " " Thomas Devetidorf. . . 

1867 " " Thomas Devendorf... . Josiah A. Steele 

1868.... " " tosiah A. Steele San ford Getman 



5* 

V#flr, Master. senior Warden, Junior Warden. 

1869 ...George A. keiiyoii....D. Webster Greene. . ..Abram B. Steele 

1*70. ...D, Webster Greene.... George A, Smith Andrew J. Budlong. 

1871.... George A, Smith Andrew J. Budlong.i.. William Wickens 

1872 ... •« 

•••••• i... ».... 

1873.... " «« George A. Kenyoil ...William 1. Piper 

1874.... William t. Piper Walter Deuel Myron K, Ellsworth. 

1870 ...Judson Joslin '..William Wickens " 

1876.... William L piper James J 4 Poller....',. '..Charles A. Willard.. 

1877 ...Myron K. Ellsworth.. " •« G. Pliny Richardson. 

1878 ...James J, 2oii e r Myron K. Kllsworth . George R, Lewis 

_™ •" " " " " ..Charles Hotaling 

1880. ... »■ .. .. tl (> „ „ * 

J881. ...Myron K.Ellsworth. .Charles Hotaling. ...!g. Pliny Richardson. 

iS"" ** mes *> ^^ " " ....Richard R. Rising .. 

1888... k Myron K. EllsWorth " «« «» »* 

™ S4 --- " " ..Charles A. Pooler.... Charles M, Rich 

1885. ... William t, Piper . ...Charles M. Rich Lewis M. Churches.. 

f 886 ••• " " James ). Zollef " . 

1887... .Myron K. Ellsworth.. Jay A. Ford Seymour S. Richards' 

io2r/""i ayA ' F ° rd Seymour S.Richards.. Arthur R, Givin 

1889... l ChariesA k Pooler William D* Allen .. James Donaghy 

!oo?"'*M " " '••■ i ames donaghy » Charles Aland 

1891.... Charles Aland William Blanford Edward J. Carner.... 

1892.... << » k Charles Bi Cleland ... 

] H y."" U " ^Edward J. Cafner.... Irving W» lugersoll' 

i«* • Ch f, rles3t Cleland.. .. Irving W. Ingersoll...ChipTaber 

J??'*" " " ••••*** Seymour Getman.. Samuel S» McGowan. 

1896. ...Irving W, IngersolK ..Samuel 8. McGowan -ChaUrtcey C. Harter. 

1897i, ik " •« «i it ( i ,i 14 

... k i 

1898. ...H. Seymour Getman.. " <« ..Carroll E* Hoyt 

1399.... Charles Aland E> LaGrange Smith... Erank A, Russell.... 

J??""' f " " " ...Edward R. Weaver.. 

,901kklk " " ••» Edward R k Weaver.... Bert C. Sterling 



tint of members who served in the Army and Navy during the 
Wars of 1812 and the Civil War, as far as we have been able to ascertain 
With accuracy t 

*?"<»** BaulcK Sm!th ftichard 

tutlqoh. jno., Jn 'i>w„«„d, *,cari a* 

•Wlson, Julius C\ 



Barry, James F. 
Beeler, James H. 
Blanford, William. 
Brown, Darius. 
Bud long, Andrew J. 
Coburn, Daniel. 
Crosby, Theodore 3. 
Davis, Totan. 
Deuel, Walter. 
Devendorf, Daniel B. 
Ellsworth, M. K. 
Fish, John D. 
Gorham, Eugene. 
Haraer, David L,. 
Haskell, Darius. 



53 

Civil War. 



Hensler, Lambert. 

Howell, Charles. 

Johnson, Joseph W 

McGowan, James. 

Myers, Alonzo C. 

Richardson, G. Pliny. 

Richardson, John O. 

Sheldon, Hazard H. 

.Staring, Charles E. 

Staring, DeWitt Clinton. 

Steele, Josiah A. 

Sterling, Adam H. 

Tillinghast, J. Clark. 

Wood, Henry M. 

Zoller, Wellington. 



Fair of 190 J. 



After considerable canvassing, it was concluded to 
hold a fair at the Opera House, commencing December 
7th. The following committees were appointed and 
program arranged : 

Executive Committee — S. S. Richards, S. P. Weaver* 
Richard Rose, C. B. Cleland, C. W. Nipe, W. H. 
Waterbury, J. H. J. Watkins and Chas. Aland. 

Chairman of Printing Committee — J. \V. Jones. 

Chairman of Entertainment Committee — H. S 
Getman. 

Chairman of Reception Committee — S. S. McGowan. 

Chairman of Soliciting Committee — J. J. Dudleston, 

Jr. 

Chairman of Decorating Committee — Jas. Donaghy- 
Chairman of Lighting Committee — Homer W. Carder- 
Chairman of Booth Committee — Charles M. Widrick. 



54 

Chairman of Music Committee — E. Gerrard. 
Ladies' Committee — Mrs. S. S. Richards, Miss 
Genevieve Wood and Mrs. C. B. Cleland. 



PROGRAM: 

Saturday Evening. 

Opening Address Hon. John W. Vrooman 

Solo Miss Bessie Thomas 

Selections .Frankfort Band 

Solo Miss Bessie Thomas 

Monday Evening. 
Charles Haynes' entertainment, a two-act farce, entitled 
"Dorothy Clyde," under the direction of Miss Mamie 
Farrell. 

Tuesday Evening. 
Ilion Night Ilion Masonic Lodge 

Wednesday Evening. 
Refined vaudeville, under the direction of F. S - 
Cresson; also a comedy, entitled "Cupid, M. D." 

? . .. Thursday Evening. 
Entertainment Prof. J. H. J. Watkins 

Friday Evening. 
Herkimer Night Herkimer Masonic Lod^e 



55 



Biographical Sketch of the Members of Olive 

Branch Lodge, No. 40, Arranged in 

the Chronological Order of 

Their Membership. 



In a great many instances it has seemed impossible 
to procure original data. In these cases tradition has 
been used. Should this pamphlet fall into the hands of 
any who can give authentic data, it will be considered 
a great favor if they will kindly communicate with the 
undersigned, w r ho will furnish blanks for that purpose. 

C. B. CLELAND. 



1812. 

Merry Ralph, merchant, came from Middlesex, Mass., 
to Litchfield, where he resided when he became a mem- 
ber of this lodge. He afterward moved to Ilion, where 
he died, aged 87. Was a member of Warren lodge, 
155, Columbia, N. Y. 

Dow, Stephen, resident of the town of Litchfield. 
Was a member of Warren lodge, 155. 

Daniel Aylesworth, resided in Litchfield. Was born 
March 21, 1777, in the State of Vermont; by occupation 
a farmer; died at Litchfield September 28, 1851; for- 
merly of Warren lodge 155. 

Butler, Jonathan, merchant, resided in the town of 
Litchfield, lie was the first secretary of Olive Branch 
lodge; was supervisor of Litchfield in 1838-39. Where 
he died or when is unknown. Formerly of Warren 
lodge 155. 



56 

Merry, Truman, farmer, born in Middlesex, Mass. 
Resided in Litchfield at time of joining. 

Snow, Timothy, farmer, resided in Litchfield. For- 
merly of Warren lodge 155. 

Moses, Elisha D., farmer, resided in Litchfield. 
Formerly of Warren lodge 155. 

Palmer, Wyatt, farmer, resided in Litchfield. For- 
merly of Amicable lodge 22. 

Heald, Daniel, farmer; lived in Litchfield. Warren 
lodge 155. 

Willard, Adam, resident of Litchfield; was born 
April 9, 1764, in the town of Pomfret, Conn. By 
occupation a farmer; died at Litchfield November 26, 
1829. Amicable lodge 22, Herkimer, N. Y. 

Stephen A. Matteson, resident of Litchfield. 
Was born 1790 ; by occupation a farmer. First 
person initiated in Olive Branch lodge. Died at 
Litchfield October 9th, 1366. 

1813. 

John Joslin, resident of Frankfort. Was born 
October 9, 1765, in the State of Rhode Island; 
by occupation a farmer; moved to Frankfort 1800; 
supervisor of Frankfort 1807 to 1822. Died at Frank- 
fort September 6, 1845. 

Ellis, Nathan, farmer, resided in Litchfield. 

Dygert, Dennis, merchant, resided in East Frankfort. 
Yeomans, Prentice, carpenter, resided in German 
Flatts; moved to Ionia, Mich., in 1837. 

David Bali resided in Litchfield. Was born 
October 24, 1783, in Temple, N. II. ; moved to Litchfield 
in 1790; by occupation a farmer; moved to Ortonville, 
Mich., in 1838. Died at Ortonville, Oakland countv, 
Mich., September 6, 1858. 

Andrews, Asahel, farmer, Litchfield. 



\ 



57 

Hobs, Artemas, fanner, Litchfield. 

' Richard) Smith, moved to Litchfield in i7«8; was 

born May 25, 1774; in the State of New Jersey; In- 
occupation a farmer. Member of Assembly in 18*27. 
Died at Litchfield in 1846. 

Warren, Elijah, farmer, Litchfield. 

Amos Xewton, farmer, Litchfield. 

1814. 

Julius C. Nelson, born February 14, 1793, in the 
State of Connecticut; by occupation a farmer. Moved 
to Litchfield, afterwards to Sheridan, N. Y., in i83(>. 
In war of 1812- was elected county clerk of Herkimer 
county in 1832. Died at Kings, Ohio, April 12, 1882. 

King, Jonathan, Litchfield. 

Washburn, Josiah. 

Furnace, George, blacksmith, resided in Litchfield. 

Zacariah Townsend, resided in Litchfield. Was 
horn August i5, i782 in the town of Dutchess, 
Dutchess county, now Putnam county, State of New 
York; by occupation a farmer. Moved to Litchfield in 

1 792, thence to Saquoit in 1838. Captain of a volunteer 
company in 18 1 2; went to Sacketts Harbor; company 
raised in Herkimer county. Died at Saquoit, Oneida 
county, N. Y., October 28, 1874. Masonic funeral 
when buried. 

Jonas Washburn. 

Caleb Budlong, resided in Frankfort. Was 

born in Rensselaer county, N. Y\, October i7, i79i ; 
by occupation a physician. Moved to Frankfort in 

1793. First postmaster of Frankfort in [815; member 
of assembly in 1824; supervisor of Frankfort in i835. 
Graduated from Fairfield Medical School in 18 1 3. Died 
at Frankfort Nov. 3, i805. 

Ileald, Oliver. 



5* 

1815. 

Lewis, ShubftI, fanner, Litchfield. 

Stephen, Catlin, resided in Litchfield; was born in 
Conway, Mass., November 27, 1781; by occupation 
fanner and carpenter. Moved to Litchfield about 1803. 
Died in Litchfield March 23, i 8t>8. 

Allen, Stutelv. 

Joseph Alvord, resided in Litchfield; was born May 
30th, 1 79 a, in the town of Milford, Vt. Moved ti> 
Litchfield, thence to Eagle, Wis., in 1845, Member 
of Crescent lodge 97, F. &A. M., Mazomarae, Wis. 
Died at Eagle, Wis., September 7, 1869. 

Samuel Dexter, Jr., resided in town of Herkimer; was 
bom ly87 in the Stateof Rhode Island; by occupation a 
fanner. Moved to Herkimer, thence to Ionia, Mich., 
in 18$:*. Member of assembly in 1825, elected associate 
judge of Ionia Co., Mich., in 1840; appointed to the 
United States Land office in i841. Died in Ionia, 
Mich., in i85(>. 

Roberts, Daniel, fanner, Frankfort. 

1816. 

Silas Hitchcock. 

Dexter, Winsor." 

Leonard, Solomon, resided in Litchfield. Western 
Star 5(5, Bridge water, X. Y. 

Denslow, Benjamin, school teacher, Litchfield. 

Allen, Samuel. 

Conable, William. 

1817. 

Benjamin Bently, resided in the town of Litchfield; 
was born June, i795; by occupation a moulder. Died 
at Rome May i4, 1854. 



59 

Jacob L. True, resided in the town of Litchfield; 
was horn February i4, i789, in the State of Maine; In- 
occupation a furnaceman. Moved to Litchfield and 
later to town of Frankfort. Died at Frankfort August 
31, i876. 

1818. 

Dain, Ebenezer, farmer, resided in Frankfort. 
Dain, William, farmer, resided in Frankfort. 
Coats, David. 
King, William, Litchfield. 

1819. 

Barnett, William. 

Gage, Eliab, farmer, resided in the town of Litch- 
field. 

Con able, John, Jr. 

1820. 

Andrew Joslin, resident of Frankfort; was born 
April?, i789 in the State of Rhode Island; by occupation 
a farmer. Moved to Frankfort in i800. Was in Col. 
Matthew Myers' regiment in war of i8i2. Died at 
Frankfort May 28, i840. 

Briggs, Thomas, innkeeper, Schuyler. 

Hollister, Russell, in connection with his brother, 
John, erected a sawmill in Frankfort in i*794. They 
lived on lot 5i, Crosby's Manor, where Mrs. John L. 
Hoard now lives. Clinton lodge 2 58. 

Samuel Ethridge, resided in town of Frankfort; was 
born in Adams, Mass.; by occupation a millwright. 
Moved to Frankfort in 1820. Supervisor of Frankfort 
in 1825. Died February 18, '04. 

Gillispie, Robert, merchant, resided in German Flatts. 



50 



Present Officers of the Lodge* 

Charles Aland* ....... 

Edward R> Weaver, 

Bert C* Sterling, .... 



Carl E* Hovt, 
Wm. H. Rushmer, 
George Reed, 
Charles B. Cleland* 
Charles VV 4 Nipe, 
James Donaghy* 



Trustees* 



Richard Rose, 



Simon P. Weaver, 



Master. 

Senior Warden. 

Junior Warden* 

Senior Deacon* 

Junior Deacon* 

Tyler. 

Secretary* 

Treasurer* 

Chaplain. 



S. S. Richards. 



Officers of Olive Branch Lodge, No. 40* 

1812—1901. 



The following is a list of the officers who have served 
as Master and Wardens of this lodge from date of 
organization* July 16th* i8i2» to December* 1901 . 

Year* Mastbr* Senior Wardeni Junior Warden* 
1812 Ralph Merry k » Stephen DoW 

1813 ...Ralph Merry Stephen Dow... k Daniel tteald 

1814 ... Ralph Merry Stephen Dow * Daniel Heald.v 

1815... Stephen Dow v Daniel Aylesworth. ..Jonathan Butler * 

1816 Truman Merry Jonathan king.. Julius G* Nelson, 

1817. 

1818. 

1819 

1820 

1821. 

1822 



Truman Merry Solomon Leonard* Julius C» NelBotl * 

. Soloimon Leonard Truman Merry Daniel Roberts* « 

. Richard Smith — .... toseph Alvord Solomon Leonard t . . . » 

.Jonathan Butler Jacob I*. True . „ William Barnett 

.Prentice Yeomaris Jonathan Butler. Julius C. Nelson 4 

ftamiiel Dexter — > k w.Andrew Joslin kk . .>*.* Samuel Ethridjje.. ..».* 



5t 

YeAf. Master. Senior Warden. Junior Wordoti. 

1823.... Prentice Yeomans... William P. Dygert kussell Hopkins 

1824 — William. P. Dygert. . .Russell Hopkins Mason barker — ..... 

1825.... Russell Hopkins Mason Barker Peter Bargy, Jr 

1826 Prentice Yeoman «» Leonard Dean . Chauhcey Hannahs... 

1837.... Leonard Dean. Otis Dexter . Asahael Roberts 

1828 ...Otis Dexter Joseph p t Roberts. — Amos La ft in 

1829 Joseph P. Roberts. ...Prentice Yeomans — Stephen Bosworth 

1830.... John Littlejohfa, Jr.... George B. Judd William T. Sheldon... 

1S31 Prentice Yeomans . Joseph P. Roberts Daniel Tucker 

18S2.... Stephen Bosworth. . ..Prentice Yeomans George B. Judd — .... 

1 H3M ' ' " " " " " 

j fj'jfj -... .... .... ••*••••. 

1834 — Prentice Yeoman 3 ...Joseph P.Roberts. Edwin Adams' 

1835..*. •• «• ....Robert M. Shearer.... " " 

IttJIA <i •< it ■> «> >• 

* vj»ni .... •••• .... •••••••• 

1887.... Joseph P. Roberts.... " " .... " " 

1838.... Robert M. Shearer ...Edwin Adams Daniel Tucker 

1839.... " •• .... " " " " 

1840..-. " " .... " " " " 

1841 .. Timothy 1. Campbell. .John B. Dygert William T. Sheldon... 

1842.... •• " .. •• "•' " " ... 

1843 .. John B. Dygert Wm. T. Sheldon Edwin Adams 

1844 George B. Judd.. Lyman Mead Daniel Tucker 

1845 ...William T. Sheldon... . " " " " 

1846.... Lyman Mead Daniel Tucker fames Piper.. .. ..... 

1847.... Daniel Tucker Ezra Graves \. Henry S. Devcndorf.. . • 

1848 .. William T Sheldon... Lucas Hager. Klkanah T. Cleland.. 

1849. ...Lucas Hager klkanah T. Cleland.. .William Dygert 

1850 .. EtkanahT. Cleland... William Dygert Chauncey El wood.... 

1851.... William Dygert Chauncey Klwood Rudolph W. Dygert.. 

1852 — Chauncey Elwood.... John L. Hoard Garwood L* Judd — 

1853.... William T. Sheldon. ..Garwood L. Judd J. Watson Dunham.. 

1854 " " ...Lambert Hensler Cornelius Hegaman.. 

1855.... Lambert Hensler...... Charles Howell. ...... Dwight Mather 

1856.... Charles Howell John L. Hoard David Billings 

1 857.... WilliamT. Sheldon... " " " " 

1858 " " ... " " Chauncey Klwood 

1859.... " " ...Judson Joslirt Edwin L. Hager 

1860... Judson Joslitl ...George A. Ken you ...Charles Howell 

1861.... " " .........Robert Kthridge William T. Sheldon. . 

1862.... " " John D. Pish Thomas Richardson . 

1863.... " " Thomas Richardsotl.. George A. Itenyon.... 

1864... " " Albert H. Sheldon... Charles H. Staring ... 

1865 ...Albert H. Sheldon.... Chas. E. Staring Leander AtWell 

1866 Jndson Josliu " " ..Thomas Devendorf 1 ... 

1867 " " Thomas Devendorf. ...Josiah A. Steele 

1868.... " " Josiah A.Steele Sanford Cetman 



5° 



Present Officers of the Lodge* 



Charles Aland, 
Edward R» Weaver, 
Bert C Sterling, 
Carl E. Hovt, 
Wm, H. Rushmer, 
George Reed, 
Charles B. Cleland, 
Charles VV> Nipe, 
James Donaghy, 



Richard Rose, 



Trustees* 



Simon P. Weaver, 



Master. 

Senior Warden* 

Junior Warden. 

Senior Deacon* 

Junior Deacon. 

Tyler. 

Secretary. 

Treasure i 4 . 

Chaplain. 



S. S. Richards. 



Officers of Olive Branch Lodge, No. 40. 

1812—1901. 



The following is a list of the officers who have served 
as Master and Wardens of this lodge from date of 
organization*. July 16th, 1812, to December* 1901 : 

Year. Mastbr* Senior Warden. Junior Warden. 
1812 Ralph Merry v. Stephen Dow 

1813 ...Ralph Merry ....» Stephen Dow... k Daniel iteald 

1814 ... Ralph Merry Stephen Dow k Daniel tteald.i 

1815. 

1816. 

1817. 

1818. 

1S19 

1820 

1821. 

1*22 



,. Stephen Dow v Daniel Ay lesworth. ..Jonathan Butler » 

...Truman Merry Jonathan king.. Julius G* Kelson 

,. Truman Merry Solomon Leonard k .... Julius C k Nelfcort. ....» 

, . .Solomon Leonard Truman Merry Daniel Roberts* » 

..Richard Smith Joseph Alvord Solomon Leonard >... » 

..Jonathan Butler Jacob I*. True » William Barnett » 

. . .Prerttiee Yeomans Jonathan Butler. Julius C. Nelson • 

Aamiiel Dexter ... » t . .Andrew joslin» k . . kk ^Samuel Kthridjje.. ..»% 



5' 

Year. Master. Senior Warden, Junior Wor don. 

1823 Prentice Yeomans... William P. Dvgert Russell Hopkins 

1824 — William. P. Dygert.. .Russell Hopkins Mason Barker.... 

1825 Kussell Hopkins. Mason Barker Peter Bargy, Jr 

1826 Prentice Yeomans Leonard Dean » Chauticey Hannahs... 

1827.... Leonard Dean. Otis Dexter Asahael Roberts 

1828 ...Otis Dexter Toseph P. Roberts. — Amos Laflin 

1829 Joseph P. Roberts. ...Prentice Yeomans — Stephen Bosworth — 

1830. ...John Littlejohti, Jr... .George B. Judd.. William T. Sheldon... 

1831 Prentice Yeoman* . Joseph P. Roberts Daniel Tucker 

1832.... Stephen Bosworth.. ..Prentice Yeomans George B. Judd 

I 0*J»J •... .... a... ........ 

1834 — Prentice Yeomans ...Joseph P. Roberts. Edwin Adams 

1835.... " " ....Robert M. Shearer.... " " 

moA *i *< ii «i <* • • 

1837.... Joseph P. Roberts... " " .... " " ........ 

1838 Robert M. Shearer ...Edwin Adams Daniel fucker 

lnOn . , . . .... • • 

1840..-. " *' .... " •• " " 

1841 .. Timothy I. Campbell.. John B. Dvgert William T. Sheldon... 

1842.... " " .. •• '" " " ... 

1843 .. John B. Dygert , Wm. T. Sheldon. Edwin Adams 

1844 George B. Judd tyman Mead Daniel Tucker 

1845 ...William T. Sheldon... . " " " " 

1846.... Lyman Mead Daniel Tucker fames Piper 

1847.... Daniel Tucker Ezra Graves '.. Henry S. Devcndorf... • 

1848 .. William T Sheldon... Lucas Hager Klkatiah T. Cleland.. 

1849. ...Lucas Hager Elkanah T. Cleland.. .William Dygert 

1850 .. Elkanah T. Cleland... William Dygert Chauncey K.wood.... 

1851 William Dygert Chauncey Elwood Rudolph W. Dygert.. 

1852 ...Chauncey Elwood.... John L. Hoard Garwood L. Judd — 

1 853.... Wi lliam T. Sheldon... Garwood L. judd T. Watson Dunham.. 

1854.... " " ...Lambert Hensler Cornelius Hegaman.. 

1865.... Lambert Hensler...... Charles Howell. ......Dwight Mather 

185*.... Charles Howell John L. Hoard David Billings 

1857.... William T.Shtldon... " " " " 

1858.... " " ... '* " Chauncey Elwood 

185ft.... " " ...Judson Joslirt Edwin I.. Hager 

1860... Judson Josliit George A. fCenyon ...Charles Howell 

1861.... " " .........Robert Ethridge William T. Sheldon.. 

1868.... " " John D. Pish Thomas Richardson . 

1863.... " " Thomas Richardsoil.. George A. tfenyon.... 

1864... " " Albert H. Sheldon ...Charles K. Staring ... 

1865 ...Albert H. Sheldon.... Chas. E. Staring .Leander AtWell. ..... 

1866 Judson Joslin " " Thomas Devendorr... 

1867 " " Thomas Devendorf... .Josiah A. vSteele 

1868.... " " Tosiah A. Steele Sanford Gfftman 



6 4 

Frankfort. Died at Frankfort, Aug. 28, 1880, 

Joseph ?. Roberts. 

John B. Dygert, resided in Frankfort, was born 
February 24, 1792 in German Flatts. N. Y.; by occupa- 
tion a farmer. Member of Assembly in 1829. Super- 
visor of Frankfort in 1826. Died at Frankfort, March 
18, 1854. 

Hannibal H. Kimball, resided in Frankfort, was 
born in 1804 in the State of New York; by occupation 
a sadler. 

1828. 

Flavins J. Lutlejohn, resided in Herkimer, was born 
in Litchfield, N. Y.; by occupation an attorney. Moved 
to Michigan in 1836. Judge and Senator in Michigan* 
Died some 20 years ago in Allegan, Mich, 

Stephen Bosworth, resided in Frankfort, merchant, 
moved to Poughkeepsie, where he died, date unknown. 

Samuel Phillips, an attorney and resident of Frank- 
fort. 

Daniel Chapman, resident of Herkimer, was born in 
1780, in the State of Conn.; by occupation an attorney, 
Moved to Herkimer in 1797. Surrogate of Herkimer 
county 1803-1807; 1808-1816. Died in Montgomery 
Co., in 1850, 

1829. 

George B, Judd, resident of Frankfort, was born 
March 26, 1801, in Watertown, Conn. Moved to Frank- 
fort in 1820. By occupation an attorney; admitted at 
Supreme Court, N. Y, May 18, 1827. Dist, Attorney, 
Herkimer county 1847- 1850. Moved to Racine, Wis., 
in 1857; admitted as attorney in Circuit court, Racine 
Co., Wis., Apr. 3, 1857. Member of Lodge 18, F. & A, 
M., Racine, Wis., transferred from Olive Branch Lodge, 
No. 40, in 1857 or 1858. Died at Racine, Wis., Jan. 23, 
1883. The Lodge attended funeral in a body. 



65 

Timothy I. Campbell, resided in Frankfort, was born 
Aug. 31, 1788, in German Flatts, N. Y. ; by occupation, 
a miller. Member of Assembly in 1834. I)ied Kt 
Frankfort. Nov. 1842. 

Reuben Hecox, innkeeper, resided in Schuyler, 

Amos Roberts, inn-keeper, German Flatts. 

Robert M. Shearer, resident of Frankfort, Was born 
in 1804, in Upper Canada; by occupation a merchant. 
Moved to Frankfort in 1829. Died at Frankfort, Feb. 
*6, 1846. 

1831. 

Edwin Adams, resided in the town of Frankfort; was 
born March 7, 1799, in the town of Pomfret, Conn.; by 
occupation a moulder. Moved to Litchfield, thence to 
Frankfort village in 1830. Member of Western Star 
Lodge 56, Bridgewater, N. Y. Died at Frankfort, Feb. 
14, 1881. 

1836. 

Daniel Tucker, resided in the town of Frankfort; was 
born August 21, 1782 or J783, in the town of Samson, 
N H.; by occupation a miller and stone tmson, Moved 
to Frankfort, thence to Wis. in 1847 or 1848. Died at 
Green Co., Wis., Jan. 5 or 6, 1857. 

1841. 

Lyman Mead, resided in the town of Frankfort; was 
born in 1795 m the state of Conn.; by occupation a 
shoemaker. Moved to Rome. Died in New York city, 
March 30, 1869. 

James G. Ferguson, resided in the town of Frank- 
fort, was born in 1796, in Oneida Co., N. Y.; by occu- 
pation a farmer. Died at Frankfort, April 4, 1847. 

William P. Wickham, resided in Frankfort, was born 
in 1796 in the state of New York; by occupation a 
laborer. Died at Frankfort, June 23, 1848. 



54 

Chairman of Music Committee — E. Gerrard. 

Ladies' Committee — Mrs. S. S. Richards, Miss 
Genevieve Wood and Mrs. C. B. Cleland. 



PROGRAM : 

Saturday Evening. 

Opening Address Hon. John W. Vrooman 

Solo Miss Bessie Thomas 

Selections # . .Frankfort Band 

Solo Miss Bessie Thomas 

Monday Evening. 

Charles Haynes' entertainment, a two-act farce, entitled 
"Dorothy Clyde," under the direction of Miss Mamie 
Farrell. 

Tuesday Evening. 
Ilion Night Ilion Masonic Lodge 

Wednesday Evening. 

Refined vaudeville, under the direction of F. S* 
Cresson; also a comedy, entitled "Cupid, M. D." 

 '. . .v Thursday Evening. 
Entertainment Prof. J. H. J. Watkins 

Friday Evening. 
Herkimer Night Herkimer Masonic Lodge 



55 



Biographical Sketch of the Members of Olive 

Branch Lodge, No. 40, Arranged in 

the Chronological Order of 

Their Membership. 



In a great many instances it has seemed impossible 
to procure original data. In these cases tradition has 
been used. Should this pamphlet fall into the hands of 
any who can give authentic data, it will be considered 
a great favor if they will kindly communicate with the 
undersigned, who will furnish blanks for that purpose. 

C. B. CLELAND. 



1812. 

Merry Ralph, merchant, came from Middlesex, Mass., 
to Litchfield, where he resided when he became a mem- 
ber of this lodge. He afterward moved to Ilion, where 
he died, aged 87. Was a member of Warren lodge, 
155, Columbia, N. Y. 

Dow, Stephen, resident of the town of Litchfield. 
Was a member of Warren lodge, 155. 

Daniel Aylesworth, resided in Litchfield. Was born 
March 21, 1777, in the State of Vermont; by occupation 
a farmer; died at Litchfield September 28, 1851; for- 
merly of Warren lodge 155. 

Butler, Jonathan, merchant, resided in the town of 
Litchfield. He was the first secretary of Olive Branch 
lodge; was supervisor of Litchfield in 1838-39. Where 
he died or when is unknown. Formerly of Warren 
lodge 155. 



56 

Merry, Truman, farmer, born in Middlesex, Mass. 
Resided in Litchfield at time of joining. 

Snow, Timothy, farmer, resided in Litchfield. For- 
merly of Warren lodge 155. 

Moses, Elisha D., farmer, resided in Litchfield. 
Formerly of Warren lodge 155. 

Palmer, Wyatt, farmer, resided in Litchfield. For- 
merly of Amicable lodge 22. 

Heald, Daniel, farmer; lived in Litchfield. Warren 
lodge 155. 

Willard, Adam, resident of Litchfield; was born 
April 9, 1764, in the town of Pomfret, Conn. By 
occupation a farmer; died at Litchfield November 26, 
1829. Amicable lodge 22, Herkimer, N. Y. 

Stephen A. Matteson, resident of Litchfield. 
Was born 1790 ; by occupation a farmer. First 
person initiated in Olive Branch lodge. Died at 
Litchfield October 9th, 1^66. 

1813. 

John Joslin, resident of Frankfort. Was born 
October 9, 1765, in the State of Rhode Island; 
by occupation a farmer; moved to Frankfort 1800; 
supervisor of Frankfort 1807 to 1822. Died at Frank- 
fort September 6, 1845. 

Ellis, Nathan, farmer, resided in Litchfield. 

Dygert, Dennis, merchant, resided in East Frankfort. 
Yeomans, Prentice, carpenter, resided in German 
Flatts; moved to Ionia, Mich., in 1837. 

David Bali resided in Litchfield. Was born 
October 24, 1783, in Temple, N. H. ; moved to Litchfield 
in 1790; by occupation a farmer; moved to Ortonville, 
Mich., in 1838. Died at Ortonville, Oakland county, 
Mich., September 6, 1858. 

Andrews, Asahel, farmer, Litchfield. 



57 

Ross, Artemas, fanner, Litchfield. 

Riehard| Smith, moved to Litchfield in iTss; was 
born May 25, 1774; in the State of New Jersey; by 
occupation a farmer. Member of Assembly in 1SJ7. 
Died at Litchfield in 1846. 

Warren, Elijah, farmer, Litchfield. 

Amos Newton, farmer, Litchfield. 

1814. 

Julius C. Nelson, born February 14, 179:}, in the 
State of Connecticut; by occupation a farmer. Moved 
to Litchfield, afterwards to Sheridan, N. Y., in i83t». 
In war of 1812; was elected county clerk of Herkimer 
county in 1832. Died at Kings, Ohio, April 12, 1HS2. 

King, Jonathan, Litchfield. 

Washburn, Josiah. 

Furnace, George, blacksmith, resided in Litchfield. 

Zacariah Townsend, resided in Litchfield. Was 
born August i5, i782 in the town of Dutchess, 
Dutchess county, now Putnam count v, State of New 
York; by occupation a farmer. Moved to Litchfield in 

1 792, thence to Saquoit in 1838. Captain of a volunteer 
company in 18 1 2; went to Sacketts Harbor; company 
raised in Herkimer county. Died at Sacpioit, Oneida 
county, N. Y., October 28, 1874. Masonic funeral 
when buried. 

Jonas Washburn. 

Caleb Budlong, resided in Frankfort. Was 

born in Rensselaer county, N. Y., October i7, i79i ; 
by occupation a physician. Moved to Frankfort in 

1793. First postmaster of Frankfort in 1 8 1 5 ; member 
of assembly in 1824; supervisor of Frankfort in i835. 
Graduated from Fairfield Medical School in 18 1 3. Died 
at Frankfort Nov. 3, i8(>5. 

Heald, Oliver. 



7° 

trustee of rural cemetery fourteen years; member of 
board of education fifteen years; justice of the peace 
forty-one years, justice of sessions of Niagara county 
two years; an honorary member of the 25th Sept Co. 
of National Guards; an honorary member of Col. 
Payne, Grand Army Republic, No. 281; member of 
assembly of State of New York; representative of first 
assembly district of Niagara county in 1891-92. P.M. 
Tonawanda lodge, No. 247, and secretary several years. 

Daniel B. Devendorf, resided in Frankfort; was 
born in Columbia, Herkimer connty, N. Y , March 17, 
1820; by occupation a physician. Moved to Frankfort 
in 1843, thence to Delevan, Wis., in 1855. Was surgeon 
in the army from 1861 to the close of the war in 1865, 
and examining surgeon for pensioners for the past 35 
years. Graduated at the Geneva, N. Y., Medical 
College January 5, 1845. 

1850. 

William Howard, resided in town of Litchfield; was 
born in Litchfield, N. Y., in 1818; by occupation a 
farmer. Died at Cedarville January 22, 1856. 

Richard Eddy, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
the State of Rhode Island in 1827; by occupation a 
clergyman (Uniyersalist church). Moved to Rhode 
Island in 185 1. Now resides at Chatham, Mass. 

Hazard H. Sheldon, resided in Frankfort in 1854 and 
prior; was born in Bridgewater, Oneida county, N. Y., 
March 8, 182 1; by occupation an attorney, etc. Moved 
to Niagara Falls in May, 1854. Admitted to the bar 
in 1852 at general term at Syracuse, N. Y.; appointep 
recruiting officer in 1863; enlisted in 8th N. Y. H. A. 
in February, 1864; captain of Co. M; wounded at Cold 
Harbor; discharged October, 1864. Died at Niagara 
Falls June 18, 1900. 



7> 

I8f»l. 

Weaver, John, farmer, born in Warren in 1808; 
resided in Warren. 

Fitch, David, born in 1817; a resident of Mohawk. 

Bartlett, Rev. J. A., Universalist clergyman; born \y^ 
in Massachusetts in 181 1. 

Richard U. Owens, resided in Frankfort; was born 
in Trenton, N. Y., in I816; by occupation an innkeeper. 
Moved to Frankfort in 1851, thence to Utica in 1853. 
Died at Utica Nov. 16, 1886. 

J. Watson Dunham, resided in Frankfort; was born 
in Schenectady, N. Y., in 1827; by occupation a 
teacher. Moved to Frankfort in 1850, thence to 
Schenectady in 1853, where he opened a private school. 

Van R. Brainard, resided in Cedarville; was born 
in Litchfield, N. Y., February 24, 181 7; by occupation a 
merchant. Moved to Wisconsin in 1&S7. Died in 
Central New York January 26, 1885. 

Hegeman, Cornelius, Jr., owner of the dry dock in 
East Frankfort; moved to Cold Springs, N. Y., in 1856. 

Henry H. Devendorf, resided in Herkimer; was 
born in Herkimer, N. Y., in 1826; by occupation a 
banker. Moved to Cedarville, where he died May 9th, 
1861. 

Spooner, Jacob, innkeeper, resided in Herkimer. 

1852. 

Sardis Brainard, resided in Cedarville; was born in 
Litchfield, N. Y., in 1815; by occupation a merchant. 

Davis, Richard, born at Frankfort in 1828; for many 
years followed mercantile pursuits. Moved to Nebraska 
about the year 1867. Was supervisor of Frankfort in 

Gates, George; resident of Mohawk. 



72 

Ezekiel Spencer, resided in Mohawk; was born in 
Somers county, Conn., in 1817; by occupation a farmer. 
Moved to Mohawk in 182V. Was supervisor of German 
Flatts in 1578-58-59. 

William H. Dedrick, resided in Frankfort; was born 
in Frankfort, N. Y., in 1827. By occupation an insurance 
agent. 

1853. 

Alonzo H. Slayton, born April 18th, 1824, in the State 
of New York; by occupation a merchant, farmer, 
mining, railroad and produce. Lived in Herkimer 
county until 1856; Otsego county, N. Y., and Kentucky 
until 1861; Ashtabula countv, Ohio, until 1866; 
Coshocton, Ohio, until about 1870; then Tennessee and 
to New York State about 1880. Died at Preble, Onon- 
daga county, N. Y., and buried at Coshocton, Ohio, 
June ioth, 188*3 

Adolphus S. Luce, resided at Frankfort; was born 
in Richfield Springs, N. Y., in 1832; by occupation a 
merchant. 

William P. Pruyn, resided in Schuyter; was born in 
Schuyler, N. Y., in 1827; by occupation a farmer. Died 
at Schuyler Nov. 18, 1858. 

Dwight, Mather, resided in German Flatts; was 
born in Bridgewater, Oneida county, N. Y., October 
26, 1825; by occupation a mechanic. Moved to Ilion in 
1850, thence to Utica in 1855. Died at Utica in 1900. 

1854. 

Robert F. Pierson, born in Hillsdale, Mass., February 
13, 1815. Moved to Frankfort. Died at Frankfort 
March 13, 1872. 

1855. 

Daniel M. Golden, resided in Frankfort; was born 
in Columbia, N. Y.. April 14, 1830; by occupation an 



7 



i 



innkeeper. Moved to Frankfort in 1854, thence to 
Mohawk in 1876. Canal superintendent in 1870-71. 

1856. 

George Folts, born in Frankfort December 7, 1804; 
by occupation a merchant. Died at Washington, D. C, 
Nov. 24, 1870. 

James Folts, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Frankfort, N. Y., October 2, 18 16; by occupation a 
farmer. Died at Frankfort May 1st, 1896. 

Benjamin G. Johnson, born in Frankfort, N. Y., July 
15, 1824; by occupation a farmer. 

Nelson, Horatio, farmer, born in Litchfield in 1816. 
Died January 26, 1872. 

Orrin Putnam Matthews, resided in Litchfield; was 
born in Litchfield in 181 1; by occupation a farmer. 
Died in Litchfield July 19, 1875, aged 64 years. 

Peter J. Hotaling, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
German Flatts, N. Y., March 12, 1824; by occupation 
a merchant. Supervisor of Frankfort 1856-57-58. Died 
at Frankfort March 25, 1870. 

Lorenzo Hosford, resided in Columbia; was born in 
Bridgewater, N. Y., May 22, 1&12; by occupation a 
farmer. Moved to Columbia in 1869. Was county 
superintendent of poor. Died at Cedarville April 20, 
1891. 

Sylvester Piper, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Mohawk August 22, 1832; by occupation a railroad 
conductor. Moved to Frankfort in 1846, thtnce to 
Syracuse in 1880. 

Judson Joslin, born in Frankfort April 19, 1826; by 
occupation a clerk. Was District Deputy G. M. in 1865. 
Died at Frankfort August 18, 1887. 

Daniel F. Dygert. resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Frankfort February 29, 1828; by occupation a fanner. 



74 

Moved to WilHamstown in 1866. Died at Williamstown, 
N. Y. T April 29, 1881. 

William Wallace Woodworth, resided in Mohawk; 
was born in Columbia, N. Y., January 1, 181 7; by- 
occupation a merchant; moved to Dubuque, la., in 
1857. Present residence, r 124 Benson ave., Evanston, 

111. 

William W. Crosby, born in Herkimer June 28, 1831; 
by occupation a merchant; moved to Frankfort in 
1840. Was supervisor of Frankfort in 1875-76-77-78- 
79-80-81-99-1900, 

Aaron J. Budlong, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Frankfort September 14, 1828 ; by occupation a 
mechanic. Died at Frankfort May io T 1859. 

John P. Wilson, resided in Frankfort; wa£ born in 
l8 35t by occupation an innkeeper. Died in New York 
city. 

John Dygert, born in Frankfort March 4, 1827; by 
occupation a farmer. Died at Frankfort March- 23^ 
i860. 

Sylvanus F. Dygert, resided in Frankfort; was born 
in Frankfort November 8, 1831; by occupation a 
farmer. Died in Sauls', Wis., July 28, i860. 

Charles H. Joslin, was born in Frankfort August 30,, 
1833; by occupation a farmer. 

Charles E. Palmer, resided in Frankfort; was born 
in Solsville, N. Y., June 7th, 1827; by occupation a 
nurseryman; moved to Cedar Rapids, la., in 1869, 
thence to South Haven, Mich., in 1877. Died at South 
Haven August 18th, 1897. 

Albert W. Folts, born in German Flatts in 1826; by 
occupation a miner; moved to California in 1849, 
thence to Dillon, Colo., in 1881. Was county clerk of 
Summit county in 18^3. Died at Denver,. Col. 



75 

185a 

James Segar, born in 1832; by occupation a boatman 
and merchant; moved to Utica. Died in Utica June 

24, i877. 

Thomas D. Aylesworth, resided in Litchfield; was 

born in Litchfield in 1813; by occupation a farmer; 

moved to Missouri in 1867. Died at St. Louis. 

Archibald C. McGowan,born in Pownall, Vt, August 
26, 1825; by occupation a merchant; moved to Frank- 
fort in 1854. Was member of assembly from 1862 to 
1865; state senator from 1873 to I ^7^; supervisor of 
Frankfort from 1867 to 1869. Died at Frankfort 
February 20, 1892. 

1859. 

Dolphus S. Payne, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
the State of New York in 1828; by occupation an 
attorney; moved to Frankfort in 1858. 

George A. Kenyon, born in Hopkins, R. I., September 
22, 1820; by occupation a machinist. Died at Frank- 
fort March 2, 189^. 

1860. 

George F. Kimball, resided in Frankfort; was born 
in Otsego county, N. Y., in 1836; by occupation an 
attorney. 

Amos Bridenbecker, born in Schuyler, N. Y., April 
20, 1817; by occupation a farmer. Died at Utica 
February 6, 1901. 

Robert Ethtidge, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
German Flatts in 1815; by occupation a banker; 
moved to Frankfort in 1857, thence to New York city 
in 1870. Was county treasurer in 1849-50-51-67-68-69; 
supervisor of Herkimer from 1845 to 1846; supervisor 
of Frankfort in 1861-62-64; in New York Custom 
House from 1870 until time of his death. Died at 
Frankfort July 22, 1873. 



7 6 

1861. 

Albert H. Sheldon, undertaker, resided in Frankfort, 
was born Ang. 23, 1830 in Frank fort v N. Y.; moved to 
Chicago in 1866. Died at Chicago, 111., July 27, 1892. 

Leander AtweM, boatman, was born in 1830 in Frank- 
fort, N. Y. Died at Utiea. 

Darius Rrowrr, born at Frankfort, N. Y., in 1831; en- 
listed in Co. D. y 121st regiment, N Y. V.; killed at 
Spottsylvania, Va., May io, 1864, 

Thomas Richardson, attorney, resided in Frankfort, 
was born Oct. 19, 18-30 in England; came to America 
in 1H54; moved to Ilion in 1864, Admitted to the bar 
in 1 861, 

John D. Fish, attorney, born in 1826 in Herkimer, N. 
Y. ; moved to Frankfort in 1861, Enlisted in 18^2 Co. 
D, 12 1 st regiment, N. Y. V.; commissioned captain in 
1862. Killed at the battle of the Wildernes May 25, 
8S64. 

1862. 

Lewis A. Cole, born Feb. 8, 1833 in Fowler, N. Y,; 
came to Hastings, N. Y„ in 1883; thence to Frankfort 
in 1848; moved to East Syracuse in 1886; boatman 30 
years. Deputy sheriff 9 years, town constable and vil- 
lage police while in latter place; kept hotel in East 
Syracuse. 

Eli H. Watson, resident of Frankfort, was born Jan. 
12, 1826; by occupation a boatman. Died at Frankfort, 
Mar. 3, 1866. 

Levi Ausman, resident of Herkimer, was born May 
15, 1838 in Turin, Lewis county, N. Y.; by occupation 
a farmer; moved to Frankfort in 1890. 

Will am B. Gates, born Sept. 17, 1840 in Ballston, N. 
Y.; moved to Frankfort in 1843; and to Chicago in 1882. 
Died at Frankfort in 1901. 



77 

Delos Hart, farmer, resident of Frank Fort, was bom 
in 1833 in the. State of New York; moved to Qtsego 
county in 186& 

George R. Lewis, resident of Frankfort, wa-s born in 
Schuyler, N^ Y.; moved to Cedar Rapids, la. By occuna* 
lion a merchant. Died at Omaha, Neb. in 1S87, 

1863. 

Jackson M. Huntley, farmer, was born Nov. 9, 1834 
in Exeter, N. Y.; moved to Litchfield in i860. 

William R. Warren, shoemaker, was born in 18 12, in 
Litchfield, N. Y. Died at Cedarville, K Y., Jan. 19, 
1865. 

Charles E. Staring, carpenter, Was born Oct. 22, 1834 
in Frankfort, N* Y. Enlisted in 1862, Co. D^, 121st N, 
Y. V.; commissioned 2d Lieut; mustered out in 1B63 , 

1864 ' 

David Wollaber, farmer, was born in 1842 in Herki- 
mer, N. Y., where he now resides. 

Melvin M. Morse, resident of German Flatts, was 
born March 24, 1826 m Westerloo, N. Y.^ moved to 
Jlion in 1859* by occupation a machinist. Rockford 
Lodge, Na 102, Rockford, II!. 

Albro S. Dow, sadier, was bom June 2$, 182B in 
Springfield, Otsego county, N. Y.; moved to Litchfield 
in 1848 and to Cedarville in 1858, where he died Feb. 
*4, 1892-* 

John Davis, born in 1^42 in Frankfort, N. Y. Moved 
to Wisconsin, where he died* Enlisted in 1863, Co. L., 
2d N. Y, Art.} discharged Feb. 10, 1865 

R. W. Sessions^ cheese -maker, was born in I834 in 
England. Moved to Cassville, N, Y., where he died* 

Sanford Oetman, farmer, was born in 1*826 in Colum* 
bia, N. Ys{ moved to Schuyler in I863, where he now 
Jives. 



7S 

1865. 

J. Clark Tillinghast, resided in German Flatts; was 
born in Frankfort in 1839; by occupation a farmer. 
Enlisted Dec. 25, 1861 in Co. K, 2nd N. Y. Artillery. 
Commissioned captain June 16, 1864. Wounded at 
Deep Bottom, Va., Aug. 14, 1864. Mustered out Dec, 
17, 1864. Died at German Flatts March 16, 1868. 

Thomas Devendorf, resided in Frankfort; was born 
in Frankfort in 1836; by occupation a merchant. 
Moved to Cedar Rapids in 1867. Was supervisor of 
Frankfort in 1865, 

John F. Sheldon, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Frankfort August 21, 1837; by occupation a merchant* 
Died at Frankfort January 20 r 18&1, 

Wellington J. Staring, born in Frankfort May 10 
^33; by occupation a carpenter. Died at Frankfort 
Feb. 21, 1872. 

Josiah A. Steele, born in Ovid, Ohio., May 20, 1840; 
by occupation an attorney; moved to Frankfort in 
1*64, thence to Herkimor in 1868. Enlisted in Sturgis' 
Rifles May 6, t86i; discharged Nov. r 1862. 

JacobS. Smith, resided in Fiankfort; was born in 
Duanesburgh, N, Y., Nov. 27th, 1823; by occupation 
a teacher; moved to Frankfort in i858. Died! at Frank- 
fort May i, 19OI. 

Philo Joslin r resided in Ifion ; wa& born 
in Frankfort Nov. 3*, 1824; by occupation a horse 
farrier and blacksmith; moved to Oswego in 1871; from 
there to Fulton, Oswego county, 

William Wickens, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Biddendon, Kent, England, July iO, 1832; by occupa- 
tion a carriage maker; came to America in I&52; moved 
to Frankfort in i850. 

Theodore S. Crosby f born in HerkimeY July 7, i839£ 
by occupation a merchant; moved to Frankfort in i840. 



Enlisted in the 2nd X-. Y. Artillery, Co. K^ as Q. M. 
Serjgt., Sept. 24, 1861; was promoted to and Lieut. 
June iG> 1 804; was discharged Oct. i6 > i&64, expiration 
of service. 

Charlea S, Ingersoll, resided in Frankfort} was born 
*n Frankfort in i83Q$ by occupation a farmer, miner 
, and cattle raiser; moved to Boulder, Col«> in i£77* 

Alexander D. Potter, resided in Schuyler} was born 
in Frankfort in i&35; by occupation a farmer. 

Wellington Zoller, resided in Frankfort} was born in 
Frankfort September 2i> I&38-; by occupation a clerk. 
Enlisted December 3, i863, Co. L. 2nd N. Y* H. A*; 
Wounded at Gold Harbor, Va., June 2> 1 864; discharged 
June 8, 1865;. Died at Frankfort May 12, 1866. 

D. W\ C Staring, born in Frankfort August 1,1838; 
by occupation a farmer; moved to Chicago in 1868. 
Enlisted in 1861 in the 26th regiment N. Y. V. At 
expiration of service enlisted in Battery H.-, serving as 
^captain. His was first battery to enter Richmond. Died 
at St, Louis November 8, 1872. 

T. Dwight Adams, born in Frankfort March i, 18^9; 
moved to Atlanta, Ga.» in i88u Died at Pensacola, 
Florida, June 1^ iDOi. 

Alonzo G. Myers, born in German Flatts October 
$, 1843; by occupationa grocer; moved to Minneapolis 
in 1876; Enlisted October 9, i«6i, in Co. K, 2nd N. 
Y. Artillery; re-enlisted January 5, 1 864; commissioned 
2nd lieutenant January 28, 1865; mustered out July 3 1, 
1865. 

Andrew J. Budlong, born in Grand Rapids, Mich.> 
X)ec. 2, i344^ by occupation a common carrier; moved 
to Frankfort, thence to Mohawk. Enlisted in 1861 in 
Co. K, 2nd N. Y. Artillery; re-enlisted December 1, 
i863 ; commissioned 2nd lieutenantSeptember 12, i865> 
Clustered out September 29, 1865. 



8o 

1866. 

I). Webster Greene, resided in Frankfort; Was born 
in Danube, N. Y., in i84o; by occupation a surveyor; 
moved to Colorado. 

. 1867. 

Amasa Mann, Jr., resided in Frankrort; was born in 
Frankfort in i8S9; by occupation a merchant; moved* 
to Cedar Rapids, la., in 1867, from there to Chicago 
in i89o. Died at Chicago March 20, 1897. 

David G. Bates, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Utica March 19, 18*25; by occupation a saddler J moved 
to Frankfort in i850. Held the office of Tyler 21 years, 
18G8 to 189O. Died at Frankfort October i4, 1889. 

Seymour S. Tillinghast, resided in Frankfort; was 
born in Frankfort March 9, i845; by occupation a 
farmer. 

Jeremiah Kinne, 2nd, born in Litchfield December 
(>, 1821; by occupation a farmer, 

1868. 

Abrani B; Steele, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Headley's Corners, Franklin county, Ohio, January iO, 
i845; by occupation a farmer until 18^7, then a law 
student; moved to Illinois in 1845, from there to 
Herkimer in 188O, where he still resides. Was district 
attorney of Herkimer county from 188O to i885; dele- 
gate to constitutional convention in 1894. 

Josiah Bailey, resided in Schuyler; was born in 
Ireland in i8;*0; by occupation a farmer; moved to 
Schuyler in 1862. Died at Schuyler December 29, i896, 

George W. Gates, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Half Moon, Saratoga county, in i84£; moved to Osh' 
kosh in 1881, where he now resides. 

Darius Haskell, resided in Frankfort, was born in 
Newport, X. V., in »824; by occupation a mechanic; 



St 

moved to Frankfort in 1 865. 'Enlisted August, i862, 
in Co. D, 9th N. Y. Artillery, discharged August, 1865. 
Died at Frankfort June r, 1888. 

Thomas Kilkenny, born in Ireland; by occupation a 
shoemaker; moved to Utica in 189O. 

' Rev. William H. Grigsby, bom in the State of 
Virginia; by occupation a clergyman (Universalist 
church); moved to Frankfort in 1868, and from there 
to South Carolina in i869. Now resides in Washington, 
D. C. 

1869. 

George A. Smith, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Burlington, Otsego county, N. Y., September 29, 1842; 
by occupation a cheese maker; moved to Frankfort in 
1867; dairy expert since 1888. 

David J. Lloyd, born in Llanidloes, North Wales, 
October i0. 1832; by occupation a machinist; came 
to America in i846, moved to Frankfort in 1858, and 
from there to N.ew Haven, Conn., in i896; was treasurer 
from 1875 to 1898. 

Thomas Langley, born in England March 3, 1825; 
moved to Frankfort in 1859; died at New York August 
29, i880. 

Homer W. Carder, resided in Schuyler; was born in 
Schuyler January 24, i843; moved to Frankfort in 1888. 

Walter Deuel, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Stanford, Dutchess county, N. Y., July i4th, 1824; by 
occupation a merchant; moved to Frankfort in 1847, 
lived in Galen, Wayne county, from 1852 to i860, and 
from there to Chittenango in 188O. Enlisted December 
24, 1863, in Co. D, 9th New York Heavy Artillery; 
discharged September 29, 1865, at New York city. 
Died at Chittenango, March 27, 1887. 

William H Brown, resided in Litchfield; was born 
In Litchfield, April 16, i840; by occupation a physician} 



82 

moved to Crane's Corners in 1866, and from there to 
Cedarville in 1874; died at Cedarville August i4th, 
1895. 

Charles F. Wheelock, resided in Litchfield ) was born 
in Litchfield October i7, 1859; by occupation an 
inspector of academies; moved to Canajoharie in i860. 

Hamilton H> Ingham> resided in Schuyler; was born 
in Schuyler October 22* 184 1; by occupation a real 
estate and insurance agent J moved to Frankfort in 18^4 

Jeremiah D. Matteson, born in Litchfield in 1845; 
by occupation a farmer; moved to Michigan* 

Wallace N\ Horton, resided in Frankfort; was born 
in Tyringham, Mass., September 8, 1846; by occupa* 
tion a tobacconist*, moved to Little Falls in 188O, and 
from there to Albany in i8?i. 

William Burch> born in Schuyler in i83i; by oCcupa* 
tion a farmer. 

Nathaniel B. Palmer, resided in Litchfield; was born 
in Litchfield May 30* 1843; by occupation a farmer. 

1$70> 

Frank B. Parkhurst, born in Frankfort September 
4, 1848; by occupation a student at law and of 
literature. Graduated at Albany Law School in 1872, 
and admitted to the bar. 

Samuel Johnson, born in England October 22> 1828; 
by occupation a farmer* Came to America in 1830, 
moved to Litchfield in 189O, and from there to Frank* 
sort in 1875. Died at Frankfort November 23* 1892* 

Edwin L. Thomas, resided in Frankfort, wad born 
in Wales in 1836, by occupation a physician, moved to 
Syracuse* Died in Syracuse September 28, 1886. 

Warren W. Getman, resided in Frankfort, was born 
in Frankfort in 1882. By occupation a farmer* 



§3 

Delos V. Brewer* born in Litchfield November 1, 
i$48. By occupation a farmer, moved to Frankfort in 
i883> 

Peter Huntley, bom in Horsham, England, February 
3, 1 886. By occupation a farmer. Came to America 
in 1 85 1 and moved to Frankfort in the same year. 

Francis Eckert, resided in Frankfort, was born in 

Baden, Germany in i84o By occupation a tobacconis. 
Died at Ilion April, 18V5. 

Theodore P. Parker, born in Litchfield June i5, 
1847. By occupation a farmer Moved to Frankfort 
in 1 899. Was supervisor of Litchfield from 1894 to 
1897, 

187L 

C. C. Richardson, resident of Fran kf oft i Universa* 
list clergyman. 

M. K. Ellsworth, farmer, born June 22 ) 1845 in Frank* 
fort, N. Y Enlisted Oct. 16, 1861, Co. K, 2d N. Y. Han 
mustered out Oct. 15, 1864. 

Charles A Willafd, resident of Frankfort, was born 
Jan. 6, 1845 in Fairfield, N. Y.; by profession a dentist* 
Moved "to Camden, Oneida county June 1, 1876, and 
to Baldwinsville May i, r88o. 

James McGowan, farmer Was born Aug. 4, 1841 in 
Ireland; came to America in 1847. Resident of Litch- 
field since 1847 except 3 years in army and one year in 
Winfield. Enlisted Sept. 6, 186a in Co. E, 152 N 4 Y, V, 
Promoted to captain Dec 1, 1864; mustered out July 15, 
186 5 . 

A. LeKoy Budlong, farmer, was bofil May 30, 1&50 in 
Frankfort, N. Y. 

William I, Piper was born Dec. j, 1838 in Frankfort, 
N. Y. Postmaster at Frankfort many years and Jus- 
tice of the Peace 8 years, 



W 



84 

1872. 

James Hyde) cheesemaker, resident of Frankfort* 
was burn July 18, 1859, in Gosport Hants, England and 
came to America in 1870. Died at Frankfort) N. Y., 
Jan. 23) 1879. 

John N. Dudleston, clerk, resident of Mohawk, was 
born in 1833 in Whitchurch Shropshire, Eng> and came 
to America in 1846. Moved to Mohawk in 1874; Coun- 
ty clerk of Mono county, Cal. for 6 years; mail con- 
tractor and built toll road from Bridgeport, Cal. to 
Aurora, Neb. 

Orren B. Sheaf, farmer, resident of Schuyler, was 
born May 7, 1849 in Schuyler, N. Y. Moved to Chicago 
in 1833. Died at Chicago, 111., Oct. 3, 1883* 

George M Russell, farmer, resident of Frankfort, 
was born in 1840 in Frankfort, N. Y., and later moved 
to Mexico. Removed to Frankfort where he now re* 

sides. 

James J. Zoller, carpenter, resident of Frankfort, 
was born June *i, 1836 at Frankfort, N. Y> Died at 
Frankfort, March 10, 1890. 

David Lewis, resident of Frankfort, Was born July 5, 
1835 in Albany, N. Y. Moved to Frankfort iu 1853 arfd 
to Ilion in 1884. Banker and Cashier of Frankfort 
bank and Cashier of Ilion bank from 1869 to 1899. Died 
at Ilion, June 6, 190I. 

1873. 

Pliny Richardson, resided in Frankfort; Was born in 
Frankfort November 8, 1842, By occupation a con* 
tractor. Moved to San Luis, Obispo, Cal., in 1K87, and 
from there to Ballard, Wash,, in 1899. Knlisted April 
21, 1861, in Co. B, 14th regiment, N. Y. V. Discharged 
May 24, 1863. 

I. Wallace Fish, resided in Litchfield; was born in 
Litchfield April 25, 1834. By occupation a farmer* 



; 8 s 

! 

» Daniel McGucken, resided in Frankfort; by occupa- 

f tion a farmer. Was born in Massachusetts in 1850. 
> Moved to Frankfort, and from there to Utica. Died 
at Utica. 

Jerome N. Hulser, resided in Frankfort; was born 
in Frankfort in 1840. By occupation a farmer. Now 
resides at White Lake Corners. 

Genero G. Sheaf, resided in Schuyler. Was born in 
Schuyler July 19, 1847. % occupation a farmer. 

John O. Richardson, resided in Frankfort. Was born 
in Frankfort June 2, 1839. By occupation a con- 
tractor. Enlisted Jan. 13, 1864, in Co. L, 2nd regiment 
N. Y. Artillery. Discharged September 29, 1865, as 
2nd lieutenant. Died at Frankfort September 1, 1876 

Roselle T. Woodhull, resided in Frankfort. Was 
born in Frankfort in 1846. By occupation a merchant. 
Moved to Utica. 

Isaac Hayes, resided in Frankfort. Was born in 
Frankfort May 13, 1838. By occupation a blacksmith. 

George W. Bowker, resided in Frankfort". Was born 
in Marshall, N. Y., in 1844. By occupation a cheese 
maker. Moved to Nebraska, where he died. 

1874. 

Lewis M. Comstock, resided in Litchfield. Was 
born in Ohio, N. Y., in 1843. By occupation a farmer. 

Joseph J. Dudleston, Jr., resided in Frankfort. Was 
born in Whitchurch, Shropshire, England, June 18, 
1838. Came to America in 1846. By profession an 
attorney. Moved to Litchfield in 1847, anc * from there 
to Frankfort in 1861. Was district attorney from 1878 
to 1880. 

Ezra A. Weldon, resided in Schuyler. Was born in 
Schuyler in 1853. By occupation a carpenter. Moved 
to Chicago, where he now resides. 



86 

1875. 

Tryon A. Hoard, resided in Frankfort. Was born 
in Frankfort June 28, 1856; by profession a dentist. 
Opened office in Herkimer in 1872. Graduated from 
New York College of Dentistry in 1872. Died at 
Herkimer September 27, 1892. 

1876. 

R. J. Richards, resided in Frankfort. Was born in 
Wales in 1848. By profession a teacher. Now resides 
in Winfield. 

Charles A. Pooler, resided in Frankfort. Was born 
in Caughenoy May 22, 1855. By profession a dentist 
and B. and L. Moved to Frankfort in 1873, an< ^ from 
there to Syracuse in 1890. Died at Syracuse May 16, 
i9oo. 

Charles Hotaling, now resides in the city of Glovers- 
ville in 1899. Was born in Frankfort April 10, 1849. 
By occupation a glove cutter. Moved to Gloversville 
in 1889. 

Charles M. Widrick, born in Schuyler September 10, 
1842. By occupation a carpenter and joiner. Moved 
to Frankfort in 1861. 

George H. Lloyd, resided in Frankfort. Was born in 
Utica March 7, 1854; by profession a dentist. Moved 
to Rome. 

W. Estus Deuel, resided in Frankfort. - Was born in 
Galen, Wayne county, April 18, 1852. By profession a 
physician. Moved to Frankfort in 1864, and from there 
to Chittenango in 1877. Graduated from New York 
Homoeopathic Medical College March 14, 1876; from 
New York Ophthalmic School March 15, 1876. 

1877. 

John A. Taylor, machinist, was born Aug. 25, 1832 in 
Dumfries, Scotland, and came to America in i860; 



87 
moved to Frankfort in 1875 and to Ogdensbqrg in 1897. 

1878. 

Richard R. Rising, resident of Frankfort, was born 
in 1853 in Litchfield, N. \\ Died at Frankfort, Jan. 25, 
1886. 

G. I. Seaman, merchant, was born Jan. 24, 1850 in 
Parish, Oswego county, N. Y. Resident of Frankfort 
since 1869. Supervisor of Frankfort, 1882 to 1894 to 1898. 

Wm. D. Lewis, commercial traveler, was born May 7, 
1855 in Utica, N. Y. Moved to Frankfort in 1857 and 
to New Hartford in 1878; thence to Frankfort in 1880; 
thence back to New Hartford in 1881. Resident of 
Utica since Jan. 1899. Justice of Peace, also School 
Commissioner of 1st Oneida district for three years. 
Taught school in Frankfort and at Washington Mills 
about 10 years. 

John W. Barris, teacher, was born March it, 1857 in 
Danube, N. Y.; moved to Frankfort in 1876 and to 
Staten Island in 1889. Principal of school while in 
Frankfort. 

Dwight H. Wilson, merchant, resident of Frankfort, 
was born Aug, 28, 1832 in Floyd, N. Y. Moved to 
New York city in 1865. 

1879. 

Alonzo M. Lints, born in Frankfort April 22, i856. 
By occupation a merchant. 

Charles F. William Uhrlau, born in Dorndorf, Saxe 
Weimar, July 25, 1838; by occupation a potter; moved 
to Frankfort in x869. 

D. Clinton Morgan, born in Frankfort in i846; by 
occupation a grocer. Died in California April, i891. 

1880. 
Lewis M. Churches, resided in Frankfort; was born 



88 

in Frankfort April 14th, 1848; by occupation a farmer. 
Died at Frankfort December 10, 1893. 

Emory I. Bouck, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Frankfort July 7, 1855. By occupation a farmer. 

1881. 

George W. Keeler, born in Frankfort- in 1840; by 
occupation a cheese maker. Died at Frankfort October 
21, 1895. 

1882. 

John R. Lewis, was born in Frankfort in 1856. Has 
been teacher, commercial traveler, and now occupies the 
position of manager of the Continental Tool company, 
located at Frankfort. 

D. FYank Lloyd, resided in Frankfort, was born in 
Utica December 22, i857; by profession a lawyer; 
moved to New York in 1877. Assistant district 
attorney of New York city and assistant district attorney 
of the United States. 

Chas. Hyde, was born in Gosport, England, in 1853. 
By occupation a mill-hand. Came to America in 1872. 
Moved to Frankfort about i875, and to Altoona, Dako- 
ta, in 1883; from there to Albion, Mich., in i890. 

1883. 

Charles M. Rich, born in Marion, N. Y., April 20, 
1858. By occupation a jeweler. Moved to Frankfort 
in 1883. 

Gilbert N. Lehr, born in Ava, N. Y., January 13th, 
1 857; by profession a physician and surgeon. Moved to 
Frankfort in 1882, and from there to Rome in I897. 
Graduated at New York University in 1880. 



8 9 

1884. 

Newth, A. T., farmer; born in Litchfield in i846. 
Moved to California in 1883, where he now resides. 

Joseph W. Johnson, resided in Frankfort; was born 
in Piermont, N. Y., February 12, 1 844; by occupation 
an engineer, and road foreman of engines. Moved to 
Frankfort in i884, and from there to Jersey City in 
i887. Enlisted November 16, 186 1, in Co. L, 1st 
Regiment N. Y. Vol. Engineers. Promoted to artificer 
December, 1861 and to corporal in i862; discharged 
December 16, 1864. 

John Falk, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Baltimore, Md., April 28, i85o.» By occupation an 
engineer. Moved to Frankfort in i883, and from there 
to Syracuse in 1886. 

Seymour S. Richards, resided in Frankfort; was born 
in Newport, N. Y., December 28, i860. By profession 
a physician. Moved to Schuyler in 1868, and from 
there to Frankfort in 1883. Graduated from the medical 
department of the University of New York in 1883. 
Has held the office of coroner for Herkimer countv from 
1890 to 1895, and was again elected to that office in 
i890 for another term of three years, beginning January 
1, i899. 

George II. Davis, born at Clarksville, N. Y., in 
1856. By occupation a cheese maker. Now T resides in 
the town of Litchfield. 

Alonzo C. Dingman, born in Minden, N. Y., August 
23, i858; by profession an attorney. Moved to Frank- 
fort in 1884, and from there to Danube in 18 9O. Was 
deputy county clerk from 1890 to 1901. 

Milton J. Dean, born in Williamsburg, Pa., August 
29, i.5i; by occupation an engineer. Moved to Frank- 
fort l n 1884, and from there to Coeymans in 1887. 

Frederick W. Frost, resided in Frankfort; was born 



go 

in Richland, N. Y., September 29 7 1S53. B F occupa- 
tion an engineer. Moved to Frankfort in. 188 a, and 
from there to Rotterdam Junction In 1888, 

1885. 

Powers, W, J., merchant, born in Manchester^ 
England, in 1857. Moved to Brooklyn in 1887. 

Rogers, Mr F., born in Schuyler in 1849, Moved to 
Chicago in i887* 

Charles W. Waterhouse, resided in Frankfort, was 
born in Treverton, Fa., March 16, 1861. By occupation 
an engineer. Moved to Frankfort in 188&, and from 
there to Syracuse in 1887, 

1886. 

B. Scammell y resided in Frankfort, was born in 
London, England, April 24, 1857. By occupation a 
moulder. Came to America in 1881, moved to Rome in 
1S0], and from there to Frankfort in 1886. 

Maynard, John, farmer, born at Taunton, Mass., in 
1863. now resides in Frankfort. 

James Donaghy, born inMonaghan, Ireland, August, 
18^2. Came to America in i87o; moved to Frankfort 

in 1883. - 

Jay A. Ford, bom in Newark Valley, N. Y., June 15, 
1850. By profession, minister of the Gospel. Moved 
to Frankfort in 1885, and from there to Lincoln, 111., 
in J896. 

Aaron V. Joslin, resided in Frankfort, was born in 
Frankfort March 21, 1836. By occupation a merchant. 

Arthur R. Givin, born in Pine Grove Furnace, Ohio, 
April 29, 1862. By occupation a foreman painter with 
W. S. railroad. Moved to Frankfort in 1884, and from 
"here to- Newark, Ohio, in iS97. 



9 l 

Fred A. Brown, resided in Frankfort Was born in 
Watertown, N. Y., October 25, 1856. By occupation 
a stationary engineer. Moved to Frankfort in i884, 
and from there to Rome in 1886. Left Rome in i890 
to affiliate with Oriental Lodge, No. 224, of Utica. 

David W. Hempstead, resided in Frankfort; was 
born in Berne, Albany county, N. Y., April 3rd, 1860. 
By occupation a train despatcher. Moved to Frankfort 
in 1884; Kingston, N. Y., in 1886; Syracuse in 1888, 
and Yonkers in 1891. 

Charles Aland, resided in Frankfort. Was born in 
London, England, March 2, 1856. Came to America 
in 1 880. Moved to Rome in 188O, and from there to 
Frankfort in £886. Made in Roman Lodge, 223, 
of Rome. 

James F. Barry, born in Carbondale, Pa., May 1st, 
1834; by occupation a carpenter. Moved to Frankfort 
in 1870. Enlisted in Co. F, 27th regiment N. Y. 
Infantry April, 186I; discharged April, 1865. 

Halligan, Christopher, Jr., a train despatcher, was 
born in Cleveland, N. Y., in i858. Left here and went 
to Illinois. 

James II. Beeler, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Bedford, Bedford county, Pa., April 25, 1840. By 
occupation an engineer; moved to Frankfort in 1884, 
and from there to Syracuse in 1887. Belonged to Co. 
I, 22nd Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry, 2nd Division 
Armv of Shenandoah. 

* 

Young, W. H., painter, born in England in 1800, 
and moved to New Jersey in 1886, where he now lives. 

Bennett, Henry, Jr., born in Ashford, England in 
1856; by occupation a machinist. Moved to Erie, Pa., 
where he now resides. 

Philo, Geo. E., law student, born in Frankfort in 
i85i; moved to Utica, where he is now practising law. 
Was member of assembly in 1898. 



9 2 

diaries K. Baker, resided in. Frankfort; was born in 
Frankfort August 11, 1859; by profession a clergyman. 
Moved to Hamilton, N. Y., in 1888, and from there to 
Lapeer, Mich., October, 1893. Pastor of 1 st Baptist 
church. 

Merrill, W. A., drag clerk, born at Chester, Ohio, 
in 1856. Moved to Cleveland, Ohio in 1886. Resident. 

1887. 

Charles B Cleland, resident of Frankfort, was born 
Dec, 24, 1 85 1 in Frankfort, N. Y. 

Monroe G. Bliss, carpenter, was born Nov. 24, 1852 
in Salisbury, N. Y.; moved to Frankfort in 1883. 

Charles H. Steadman, painter, was born Oct. 15, 1859 
in Brooklyn, N. Y. Resident of Frankfort from July 
15, 1884 until Jan. 19, 1898 when he moved to Taun- 
ton, Mass. 

James W. Patterson, watchman, was born Jan. 1.1861 
in Bainbridge, Ohio and moved to Frankfort in 1883.. 
Thence to Coeyman's Junction in 1888. 

VVm. Wayne, carpenter, was born June 12, 1849 ,n 
New Scotland, N. Y. Resident of Frankfort since 1884, 

Eugene Gorham, farmer, was born Jan 25, 1843 in 
Buffalo, N. Y. Moved to Frankfort in i>8o. Enlisted 
in 1861, in the U. S. Navy assigned to sloop of war, 
Brooklyn; discharged 1863. 

Adams H. Sterling, butcher, was born Mar. 31, 1846 
in Vienna, N. V. Moved to Laurens in 1867, thence 
to Frankfort in 1877. Enlisted Dec. 24, 1863 in Co. C, 
22d N. Y. Vol. Cal.; discharged June 28, 1865. 

William Birch, miller, was horn Dec. 31, 1865 in Wit- 
tersham, Kent, England. Came to America in 187 1 
and to Frankfort in 1882. 

William D. Allen, was born Nov. 25, 1857 in Nor- 
wich, N. Y.; moved to Frankfort in 1883. 



93 

Victor C. Lewis, lumber salesmen, was born Sept. 14, 
1864411 Utica, N. Y. Moved to Frankfort in 1882 and 
to llion in 1890, 

188a 

Albert L. Ashley,, pattern-maker, was born Oct. 1, 
^855 in Westmoreland, N. Y., and moved to Frankfort 
in 1884. Madt; a Mason in Roman Lodge, 223, Rome, 
N. Y. 

Harry M. Remington, was born Jan. 21, 1859 in 
Parish, N. Y.; by occupation a machine blacksmith, 

William M. Westervelt, resident of Frankfort, was 
born Mar. &, 1^836 in Ramapo, Spring valley, N. Y, Rail- 
road conductor. 

H. M. Wood^ hotel-keeper, was born Nov. 23, 1842 
in FairfielcU N. Y.; moved to Frankfort in 1880. En- 
listed Sept. 1862, Co. F, 152 N, Y. V.; discharged May 
1865. Supt. canal, 1892-93-94. 

Charles W. Nipe, merchant, was born July 7, 1852 in 
Canajoharie, N. V.^ resident of Frankfort since 1883. 

Charles L. Christie, machinist, was born Oct. 1848 in 
O^o De Agua, Durango, Mexico. Came to the U. S. 
in 1863; resident of Frankfort since 1887. 

John Willis, merchant in Frankfort, born in i860 in 
Schuyler, N. Y.; moved to Schuyler in 1890. 

La Pierre Thomas, engineer-, was born May 3, 1847 in 
Hancock, N. Y.; moved to Frankfort in i885» 

Wm. T. Link, moulder, was born Jan 10, 1864 in 
Columbus, O. Moved to Frankfort in 1^87 ami to Sa- 
lem, N. C. in 1900. 

E. H. Lenker, machinist, was born in Lykens, Pa> 
Occupied many positions on \V. S. R. R, Moved to 
Syracuse in ^89.7. 

1889. 
Hugh O, Jones carpenter, was born Aug. 29, 1853 in 



94 

Bagillt, Flintshire, N. Wales; came to America in 1869 
and to Frankfort in 1881. 

Frank S. Cresson, clerk, was born Mar. 5, 1858 in 
Hancock, N. Y. Made Mason in Hancock, 552, N. Y« 

P. E. Garrison, resident of Frankfort, was born Oct. 
26, 1846 in Paterson, N. J. Moved to Gloversville in 
1897. General manager 1\, J, & G. R. R. 

Freeman H. Howard, core-maker, was born Feb. i9, 
1837 in Frankfort, N. Y. 

Horatio Seymour Getman, machinist, was born Sept. 
8, 1865 in Schuyler, N. Y.; moved to Frankfort in 1889. 

Edward J, Carner, machinist, was born Apr, 30, 1864 
in Frankfort, N. Y.; moved to Albany, April 27, 1897. 

Albert J. Morey, blacksmith, was born Mar. 3, 1857 
in Schuyler, N, Y. Moved to Frankfort in 1878. 

Arthur J. Valentine, machinist, was born Feb. 10, 
i860 in Peekskill, N. Y.; moved to Frankfort in 1883. 

Charles S. Getman, machinist, was born Sept. 26, 
1867 in German Flatts, N. Y. Moved to Frankfort iu 
S873 and to YVilliamstown, Mass. in 1898. 

John L. Sawyer, locomotive engineer, was born in 
1861 in New York City. Resided In Frankfort in 188W; 
moved to Syracuse in 1895; went west in 1889. 

William Blanford f clerk, resident in Frankfort, was 
born Ang. 5, 183 1 m Philadelphia, Pa. Moved to New- 
burg in 1897. Enlisted April 24, 1861 for 3 months, in 
18th Regiment, Penn. Vol. (Infantry) Co. B; discharged 
Aug. 7, 1861. Re-enlisted for 3 years in Co. H., 114th 
regiment , Penn. Infantry as private. Promoted ta 
Serg't- Major, Dec 25, 1862; discharged in 1864. Died 
at Newburg, Feb, 12, 1901. 

1890. 

Bosely, Edward, born in Baltimore, Md;, in r852f 
by occupation a locomotive engineer. At present ail 



Employe of the West fctoore railroad and resides 111 
Syracuse* 

Williata ti. Bagley resided in Frankfort; was born 
in Hodman, lJ. Y., April 5th, i83B; by occupation a 
mechanic^ Moved to Frankfort in i£4&, and from 
there to Oswego in i892% 

Herbert S. Balrda> born in Frankfort September 3> 
*8*68* By occupation a butcher. 

William C. Abbott, born in Frankfort May 2i, 186S; 
by occupation a machinist. Dited at Frankfort Sept* 
18, 1892* 

Samuel & McGtytvsu^ born in Cabra, Ireland, January 
)2, i#64. Came to America in 1^880, and moved to 
Frankfort in iSqX), 

Richard Rose, resides in Frankfort; was born in 
Chatteris^ Cambridgeshire^ England, September 7, 
J856. fey occupation an engineer; moved to Frankfort 
in 1879, 

E% B. FairchiH, Resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Litchfield, Conn*, February 1*2, 1855. By occupation 
a merchant. Moved to Frankfort in 1886, and from 
thereto Herkimer in 189V* 

I. W. Ingersol^ born in Frankfort July 4, I87I; by 
occupation a grocer; moved to German Flatts in 1 898* 

Chip Taber, resided in Frankfort; was born in St. 
Johnsville April i3, 1859$ by occupation a steam fitter; 
moved to Frankfort, and from there to New York Mills 
In i£fe&. 

1B9L 

acob Frohlick, resided in Frankfort; "was born in 
liergetsfekl, Cassel, November 9- 1859. Came to 
America in 1883, and moved to Frankfort in 1859. 

C tl. Meyets bom in Pittsburg, Pa.> in 18^3; by 
Occupation a tinsmith* I)ied January i2, 1900. 



9 6 

William P. Baker, resided in Frankfort; was born 
in Aurora, N. Y., December 14th, 1865. Moved to 
Frankfort in 189O, and from there to New Orleans in 
1897. 

Daniel J. Coburn, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Haverhill, N. H., September 6, 1842; by occupation a 
millwright. Moved to Frankfort in 1884. Enlisted 
August 2, 1862 in Co. G, nth N. H. V. Discharged 
May, 1863. * 

Charles E. Spoor, born in Newville, N. Y., iu i860. 
By occupation a carpenter. Moved to Galeton ?a., 
in 1897. 

Frank E. Ballda, resided in Frankfort} was born in 
Frankfort September 19, 1866. By occupation a 
machinist. Moved to New Haven, Conn., in i898. 

Harry G. Folts, born in Frankfort June ftth, i867. 
By occupation a lawyer. Now a resident of Ohio. 

1892. 

James M. Peck, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Freeport, 111., June 10, 1856; by occupation a painter. 
Moved to Frankfort in 1889, and from there to Johns- 
town in 1894. 

Fred A. Smith, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Frankfort August 15, 1870. By profession a dentist, 
Moved to Geneva in 1897, Graduated from University 
of Pennsylvania, dental department class, in 1891, 

Lorenzo D. Ballard, resided in Frankfort; was born 
.in Stittsville. N. Y, September 20, 1849. ^Y occupa- 
tion a tinsmith. Moved to Frankfort in 1888, and 
from there to Mohawk in 1897. 

W. H. Preble, born in Bucksport, Md., in 1854; by 
occupation a locomotive engineer, Moved to Boston 

in 1897. 

George Twiss, resided in Frankfort; was born <n 
Adams, N. Y., October 5, 1866. By occupation a 



97 

matchmaker. Moved to Frankfort in 1889, and from 
there to Syracuse in 1897. 

P. Augustus Folts, resided in Frankfort; was born 
in Frankfort March n, 1853. By occupation an 
engineman. 

1893. 

Wilson L. Barnes, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Salisbury, N. Y., September n, 1846. By occupation 
a laborer. Moved to Frankfort in 1870. 

E. LaGrange Smith, a resident of Frankfort; was 
born in Duanesburgh, N. Y., December 22, 1847. By 
profession an attorney and counselor at law. Moved 
to Frankfort in 1875. Supervisor of Frankfort in 
1893; member of assembly in 1895 and 1898. Admitted 
to the bar in 1875. 

1894 

George U. Taylor, resided in Frankfort; was born 
in Dwaarskill, N. Y., August 12, 1857. By occupation 
a millwright. Moved to Frankfort in 1884. 

Charles Haynes, born in Mountain Ash, Wales, April 
11, 186 1 Came to America in 1883, and moved to 
Fiankfort in 1884. 

Eugene S. Lamberson, resident of Frankfort; was 
born in Fairfield, N. Y., Sept. 2, 1862; by occupation a 
merchant. Moved to Frankfort in 1885. 

Edward Medler, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Oswego, N. Y., Jan. 3, 1872. By occupation a machinist. 
Moved to Frankfort in i89o, and from there to Oswego 
in 1897. 

William S. Potter, resident of Frankfort; was born 
in Geneva, Ohio, Jan. 29, 1865; by occupation an 
engineer. Moved to Frankfort in 1 94. 

James C. Galloway, resident of Frankfort; was born 
Oswestry, county Shropshire, England, Sept. 10, 1864. 



9 8 

Came to America in 1885. By occupation a machinist. 
Moved to Frankfort in 1891. 

John Johnson, born in Litchfield Sept. 7, 1863. 
Moved to Frankfort in 1893. 

Fenirnore Parkhurst, born in Frankfort Oct. 12, 1870 
Graduated from Philadelphia Dental College in 189 1. 

Edward D. Hamer, born in Boylston, N. Y., Feb. 26, 

1872. Moved to Frankfort in 1892. 

1895. 

Cyrus W. Hamer, born in Boylston, N. Y., May 8, 

1873. Moved to Frankfort in 1892. 

Chauncey C. Harter, born in Herkimer June 18, 
1859. By occupation a storekeeper. Moved to Frank- 
fort in 1866, and from there to Rome. N. Y., in i899. 

Frank D. Smaltz, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Frankfort August 2, 1862. By occupation a filer. 
Moved to Il'on January 5, 1896. 

Bert C. Sterling, resident of Frankfort; was born in 
Laurens, N. Y., May 22, 1873. By occupation a painter. 
Moved to Frankfort in 1877. 

Erastus M. Bargy, resident of Frankfort; was born 
in Frankfort July 14, 1858. By occupation a watchman. 

Geo. H. Watson, resident of Frankfort; was born in 
Whitestown, N. Y., October r, 1842. By profession a 
banker. Moved to Frankfort in 1887. Cashier of 
bank from its opening, November 8, 1886. 

William Reid, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Dundee, Scotland, December 22, 1861. Came to 
America in 1886. By occupation a blacksmith. Moved 
to Frankfort in 1891, and from there to Depewin 1893. 

» 

1896. 

Alfred L. Evenden, resided in Frankfort; was born 
in Rome July 22, 1868; by occupation a blacksmith. 



99 

Moved to Frankfort in 1895, anc ^ from there to Rome, 
N. Y., in 1896. , 

William H. Waterbury, resident of Frankfort; was 
born in Frankfort April 22, 1862. By occupation a V^ 
merchant. 

Edwin Gerrard, born in Frankfort August 4, 1874. 
By occupation a musical instructor. 

John Yack, Jr., resided in Frankfort in 1855; was 
born in Meningen, Wurtemburg, Germany, January 11, 
1852. Came to America in 1853. By occupation a 
farmer. Moved to Sauquoit, Oneida county, in 1853. 

Simon P. Weaver, resident of Frankfort; was born 
in Frankfort July 22, 1844; by occupation a farmer. 
Supervisor of Frankfort in 1901-02. 

John E. McKay, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Newport, Maine, June 10, 1874; by occupation a 
machinist. Moved to Boston in 1898. 

Adam Becker, resident of Frankfort; was born in 
Hergetsfeld, Cassel, March 26, 1862. Came to America 
in 188 r; by occupation a boltmaker. Moved to Frank- 
fort in 1884. 

Frank A. Russell, resident of Frankfort; was born 
in Frankfort Hill March 30, 1869; by occupation a 
jeweler. 

H. E. Carner, resident of Frankfort; was born in 
Frankfort November 19, 1874; by occupation a jeweler. 

Henry E. Potter, resident of Frankfort; was born in 
Cannonsvilie, N. Y., May 11, 1855; by occupation a 
railroad conductor. Moved to Frankfort in 1889. 

Fred L. Hamer, born in Boylston, N. Y., December 
u, 1874. Moved to Frankfort in 1892. 

William S. Rushmer, resident of Frankfort; was 
born in Frankfort April 15, 1854. By occupation a 
mechanic. 

George H. Davis, born in Frankfort August 6, i860; 
by occupation a farmer. Resides in FYankfort. 



IOO 



John G.^ Parsons, born in Ilion August 31, 1874. 
Moved to Frankfort in 1886, and from there to Depew 
in 1897. 

Truman B. Nichols, born in Frankfort September 
24, 1872. By occupation a farmer. 

L. Starkey Whitney, resided in Frankfort; was born 
in Ilion April 16, 1874. Moved to Frankfort in 1882, 
and from there to Keene, N. H., in 1898. 

Edward R. Weaver, born in Frankfort February 18, 
1868. Occupation, clerk. 

Carroll E. Hoyt, resident of Frankfort; was born in 
LaFayette, Onondaga county, January 14, 1862; by 
occupation a carpenter. Moved to Frankfort in 1894. 

Frank P. Moore, resident of Frankfort; was born in 
Williamsburg, N. Y., October 4, 1861; occupation, 
yard master. Moved to Frankfort in 1S84. 

1897. 

L. M. Lipa, born in Center, N. Y., September 2 9, 
i872; by occupation a book-keeper Moved to Frank- 
fort in 1887, and from there to Utica in 1898. 

George M. Durst, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Schuyler October 21, 1868; by occupation a machine 
hand. Moved to Buffalo in 1898. 

Francis Trevor, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Birmingham, England, December 25, 1871. Came to 
America in 1886; by occupation a baker. Moved to 
Frankfort in 1891. 

William J. Weller, resident of Frankfort; was born in 
Moscow, Livingston county, N. Y, April 7, 1853: by 
occupation an engineer. Moved to Frankfort in 1884. 

Edward A. Mooney, resided in Frankfort; was born 
in West Rutland, Vt., December 2. 1872; by occupa- 
tion an electrician. Moved to Frankfort in 1896, and 
from there to Haverstraw in 1897. 



101 

Charles F. Parsons, born in Ilion Feb. 14, 1876. 
Moved to Frankfort in 1886. 

Charles A. Hamer, born in Bolyston, N. Y., June 6, 
1870. Moved to Frankfort in 1895. 

1898. 

John G. Stratton, born in Utica Dec. 22, 1876; by 
occupation a telegraph operator. Moved to Frankfort 
in 1897, and from there to Ilion in 1899. 

H. B. Merry, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Frankfort Jan. 10, 1877; by occupation a telegraph 
operator. 

William Manning resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Frankfort Jan. 1, 1877; by occupation a machinist. 
Went to Depew in 1898. 

E. Julius Joslin, born in Detroit, Mich., July 13, 
1872; by occupation a telegraph operator. Moved to 
Frankfort in 1880, and from there to Schuyler in 1884. 

Frank E. Cramer, resident of Frankfort; was born 
in Schuyler August 4th, 1862; by occupation a baggage 
master. Moved to Frankfort in 1898. 

Charles O. Ballda, resident of Frankfort; was born 
in Frankfort Jan. 18, 1874; by occupation a machinist. 

James H. J. Watkins, resident of Schuyler; was 
born in Abergavenny, Wales, March 10, 1843. Came 
to America in 1853; by occupation a farmer. Moved 
to Schuyler in 1868. School commissioner of Herkimer 
county, 1900-01-02. 

John McManony, resident of Frankfort; was born 
in New York city May 4, 1840; by occupation a farmer. 
Moved to Frankfort in 1884. 

David L. Hamer, born in German Flatts Oct. 2, 
1833. Moved to Frankfort in 1892. Enlisted April 
27, 1861, in Co. G, 24th Regt. N. Y. V. Discharged 
June 3, 1863. Reorganized as a cavalry regiment in 
1863 with same No., and served till end of war. 



102 

1899. 

Albert C. Gillette, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Hume, N. Y., March 12, 1876; by occupation a teacher. 
Moved to Frankfort in 1898, and from there to Andover 
in 1900. 

Charles H. Wheeler, resident of Frankfort; was born 
in Monticello, N. Y., Jan. 9, 1861; by occupation an 
engineer. Moved to Frarrkfort in 1883. 

William E. Sloane, born in Holland Patent, N. Y., 
in 1869; by occupation a commercial traveler. Moved 
to Bridgewater in 1900. 

John O. Starr, resident of Frankfort; was born in 
Ilion May 26, 1875; by occupation a tool maker. 
Moved to Frankfort in 1896. 

1 900. 

Henry Mahoney, born in Syracuse in 1875; D 3" 
occupation a locomotive engineer. At present in the 
employ of the West Shore railroad. 

George S. Reed, born in Utica July 7, 1874; by 
occupation a farmer. Moved to Schuyler in 1878, and 
from there to Frankfort in 1895. 

Edward H. Morgan, resident of Frankfort; was born 
in Frankfort July 26, 1841; by occupation a farmer. 

John H. Sticht, born in St. Johnsville, Montgomery 
county, N. Y., May 10, 1870; resided in East Hartford, 
Conn., in 1891; by occupation a freight brakeman 
and conductor. Moved to Carbondale, Pa., in 1893, 
and from there to Frankfort in i896. 

Arthur B. Davis, resident of Frankfort; was born in 
Newmarket, N. H., Nov. 2, 1873; occupation, chief 
clerk. Moved to Frankfort in 1899. 

1901. 

Alexander Thomson, Jr., born in Leven, Fifeshire, 
Scotland, in 1866. By occupation a pattern maker. 



io 3 

Moved to Frankfort in 1900, and from there to Buffalo 
in 1901, where he now resides 

James W. Jones, resident of Frankfort; was born in 
Birmingham, England, Dec. 5, 1858. Came to America 
in 1888; by occupation a manufacturer. Moved to 
Frankfort in iqoo 

George M. McCombs, born in Lyme, N. Y., Dec. 31, 
^54; by profession a physician. Moved to Frankfort 
in 1897. Graduate of Bellevue Hospital Med. Col., 1877. 

Thomas J. Lewis, born in Bridgewater, N. Y., May 
25, 1862; by occupation a commercial traveler. Moved 
to Frankfort in 1900. 

Emil Wegner, resident of Frankfort; was born in 
Brombergh, Posen, Prussia, July 11, 1866. Came to 
America in 1883; by occupation a painter and decorator. 
Moved to Frankfort in 1884. 

William E Hayes, resident of Frankfort; was born 
in Frankfort Oct. 14, 1867; by profession a physician 
and surgeon. Graduated from medical department of 
the University of New York March 24, 1891. 
Elected coroner Nov. 5, 1901. 

Frank A. Thurston, resident of Frankfort; was born 
in Frankfort August 20, 1865; occupation, hotel 
proprietor. Moved to Frankfort in 1889. 

Evan E. Jones, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Bridgewater, N. Y., Nov. 4, 1862. By occupation a 
cheese maker. 

Grove J. Morgan, resident of Frankfort; was born 
jn Frankfort Nov. 6, 1877; by occupation a farmer. 

William J. Bennett, born in Ashford, Kent, England, 
October 2, 1865; by occupation a machinist. Moved 
to Frankfort in 1883. 

Geo. E. Seeger, resident of Frankfort; was born in 
llion Feb. 10, 1875. By occupation a farmer. 

Charles W. Newell, born in Frankfort March 6, 1876. 
By occupation a farmer. 



IC4 

S. R. Brown, resided in Frankfort; was born in 
Grawville, N. Y., June 12, 1879; by occupation a 
telegraph operator. Moved to Attica, N. Y., in 1895. 
Resides in Frankfort. 

John M. Ashby, born in Northampton, England, in 
1856. Came to America in 1868. By occupation a 
locomotive engineer. 




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CallNu 


CLELMD, Charles B. 




AUTHOR 


HS 


A history of Olive 


539 


TITLE 


.F7 


Branch Lodere 


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