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A history of the 
Swedish-Americans of Minnesota 

Algot E. Strand, Lewis Publishing Company 




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A HISTORY OF 

The Swedish-Americans 

OF 

MINNESOTA 



A Concise Record of the Struggles and Achievements of the Early 

Settlers, together with a narrative of what is now being 

done by the Swedish- Americans of Minnesota in the 

development of their Adopted Country. 



ILLUSTRATED 



WITH THE VALUABLE COLLABORATION OF 
NUMEROUS AUTHORS AND CONTRIBUTORS 



COMPILED AND EDITED BY 

A. E. STRAND 



VOL. II 



PUBLISHED BY 

THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 
CHICAGO 

1910 

AC. / 



Clieckecf Digitized by VjOOQu 



THE NEW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 

4859^7 

AfTOH, LENOX AND 

TH.D£N Fe>UN0*1 ION6. 

R 1910 ^ 



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CHAPTER XVIII. 

CHISAGO COUNTY.. 

This county, located on the west bank of the St. Croix river, be- 
tween the counties of Pine on the north, and Washington on the south ; 
the St. Croix river on the east and the counties of Isanti and Anoka 
on the west, iM-esents an agreeable variety of surface, upland and gen- 
erally undulating, covered with hard and soft-wood timber, well watered 
by lakes and streams. Its lake scenery is surpassed in beauty only by 
some of the lakes in Sweden. The cotmty takes its name from the 
largest and most beautiful lake. In its aboriginal form it was Ki-chi-saga ; 
from two Chippewa words meaning, "Kichi," large, and "Saga," fair 
or lovely. For euphonic considerations the first syllable was dropped. 

Chisago Lake is conspicuous for its size, the clearness of its waters, 
its winding shore and islands, its bays, peninsulas, capes and promon- 
tories. It has fifty miles of meandering shore line. Its shores and islands 
are well timbered with maple and other hard woods. It has no waste 
swamps, or marsh borders. In 1830 this beautiful lake was unknown 
to fame. No one had seen it, or could point out its location. Indians 
brought fish and maple sugar from a lake which they called Ki-chi-sag^, 
or Sagi-a-gan, or "large and lovely lake." This lake, they said, abounded 
with "kego," fish. 

Erik U. Norberg, bom June 22, 1813, in Ullkarfva, Vestergotland, 
came to America in 1842 and settled a short distance west of Milwau- 
kee, Wisconsin. From there he moved to the state of Michigan, where 
he lived until 1848, when he came to Bishop Hill, Illinois, became a 
member of the Eric Jansson colony, and, in the same year married Brita 
Johnson from Ostnmda parish, Vestmanland. As he was a well edu- 
cated man, having filled the office of sheriff (lansman) in his native 
province, he became a very prominent and useful member of the colony. 
Two children survive him, namely: Gustaf Norberg, a leading attorney 

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368* SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

of Holdrege, Nebraska, and Mrs. John A. Jones of Galva, Illinois. When 
Norberg came to the beautiful Chisago lake from Bishop Hill, in April, 

1850, he certainly found it what its Indian name imparts, "fair and 
lovely water." The government had, in 1850, completed a survey of 
the lake and it was high time that it should be given a name, by which 
it should be designated on the map and recognized by civilized visitors. 
What name more beautiful and appropriate than that which the Indians 
had already g^ven it? Being well pleased with the k)cality, Norberg 
came back with a colony of Swedes, including Peter Berg, Andrew 
Swenscm, Peter Anderson, Peter Sjolin, Daniel Rattig, and Jonas Wes- 
terlund. They came by steamboat, landed at Taylor's Falls June 24, 

1851, cut a road to Chisago lake and took undisputed possession of its 
shores, finding no trace of human occupancy save some deserted Indian 
tepees and the claim cabin of a Mr. Van Renselaer on the island. Peter 
Berg settled on the east part of lot 3, section 35 and southwest quarter 
of southwest quarter of section 26, township 34, range 20. Peter An- 
derson on the east part of lot 3, and northwest quarter of northeast 
quarter of section 35, township 34, range 20. Andrew Swenson on lot 
5, section 27, township 34, range 20. Erik Norberg had come to the 
country at the invitation of Nils Tomell, who was murdered in 1848, 
near St. Croix Falls, by some Indian assassins hired to commit the 
deed by one Miller, a whiskey-seller. Norberg intended to make his 
home at Chisagfo Lake, where the former island, on which Center City 
is now situated, for many years was called "Norbergsholmen" by the 
Swedes, but died at Bishop Hill, while on a visit, in 1853. 

For a long time the lake was called Swede Lake, until its present 
name was permanently adopted. 

Oscar Roos could claim the honor of having been, probably, the first 
Swedish settler not only in Chisago county, but in Minnesota. He was 
bom in Vestergotland in 1827 and came to America in 1850, locating during 
the first summer at Rock Island, Illinois, but in the fall coming to 
Taylor's Falls. In his company came, among others, Lars J. Stark, who 
later also settled in this county. On the advice of Rev. Unonius, in 
Chicago, Roos, together with two other young men, Femstrom and 
Sandahl, went to Minnesota. They arrived in Marine, Washington 
county, in October, 1850. During 1851-1852 Roos, with other new- 
comers, worked on the road which the United States government was 
then building from Mississippi to Lake Superior and which for quite 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 369 

a distance is running along the St. Croix river. This road was named 
the "Point Douglas and St. Louis River military road." Roos made 
his headquarters at Marine, working at timbering and logging until 
1860, when he settled at Taylor's Falls, and' was appointed postmaster 
at that place. In the same year he was elected register of deeds in Chi- 
sago county, which office he held for eight years. Those positions he 
kept until 1870, when he was appointed register of the United States 
Land Office at Taylor's Falls. He resigned that office in 1875 and was 
elected treasurer of Chisago county, an office he held for a number of 
years. The confidences thus bestowed upon him, by his fellow citizens, 
go to show, that he was not only well liked but also highly trusted. He 
later engaged in exchange, loaning money, selling land, etc., and! had a 
branch office in Center City. He was married to Hanna Swanstrom in 
1870. 

The colony in 1852 raised the first rye, barley and flax in the 
county. It also raised potatoes, green com and vegetables, cut out 
roads, cleared timber, and made other improvements. Peter Berg raised 
flax and made linen thread in 1852 and soon after came the Petersons, 
Strands, Johnsons, Frank Mobeck, Dahlin, Porter and others. A post- 
office was established in 1858; A. Nelson, postmaster. The town was 
organized in the same year. The first supervisors were Ephraim C. In- 
galls, chairman; Frank Mobeck and Daniel Lindstrom. 

The first church organization in the county was that of the Swed- 
ish Evangelical-Lutheran, in 1854. Here, in Center City, was built the 
first church edifice in 1855; a frame structure, subsequently enlarged, 
but later superseded by a brick building. This was set afire by light- 
ning in 1882, and a new, fine church, costing $30,000, was erected. Its 
dimiensions are 116 by 66 feet, ground plan, and the spire is 135 feet 
in height. This church is an ornament to the town and the state, and 
would be creditable even to our great cities. The first pastor was Rev* 
P. A. Cederstam. His first successors were Revs. C. A. Hedengran and 
John Frodeen. 

Center City, the county seat of Chisago county, was platted in 
May, 1857, on lot 5, section 27, township 34, range 20, the proprietor 
being Anders Swensson. Few villages are more beautifully situated. 
It contains two hotels ; a number of stores ; the largest bank in Chisago 
county, with average deposits of $300,000; the Chisago Lake Swedish- 

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370 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Lutheran Church, which congregation is the oldest and as to member- 
ship the largest Swedish church in Minnesota ; schoolhouse and a num- 
ber of fine residences. During the Indian outbreak in 1862, and the 
uncertainty as to the probable attitude of the Chippewa Indians, the 
people of Chisago Lake built breastworks for protection, on the isthmus 
connecting Center City with the mainland, and planted cannon upon 
them for defense. 

Anders Swensson, the founder of Center City, came from Smiland 
to the shores of the lake in 1851, and made his home on the present site 
of the city. He was bom in 1817, came to America in 1850, and remained 
a short time in New Orleans before coming to Minnesota. He was a 
farmer and married to Katarina Peterson in 1838. He died in July, 
1887, leaving two sons and two daughters who are all living at the 
present writing and mentioned in the biographical sketch of John 
Swanson. 

Nils Nord was bom in Linkoping, Sweden, in 1819. In his eight- 
eenth year he enlisted in the Swedish army and served twelve years. 
He came to America in 1855 and located on Chisago Lake in the north- 
east quarter of section 32, township 34, range 20. He was married in 
Sweden to Lisa Anderson. They had! one son, John P. Nord, who for a 
number of years was the popular and efficient auditor of Chisago county. 
He was married in 1878 to Hilda, daughter of Rev. C. A. Hedengran. 
They had one daughter. Mrs. Nord having died, Mr. Nord now lives 
a retired life at the Park Hotel, Center Gty. 

Lars Johan Stark was bom in Sweden in 1826, came to America 
in 1850, and settled at Chisago Lake in 1852. He was married in 1865 
and again in 1870. He had eleven children. In Sweden he had served 
as clerk ten years. In his American home he followed farming chiefly. 
He served as justice of the peace and county commissioner and also 
filled some town offices. He was engrossing clerk of the house of repre- 
sentatives in 1864. He was a member of the house in the sessions of 
1865 and in 1875. In 1868 he moved to the town of Fish Lake, and in 
1877 to Harris, where he died. One of his sons b probate judge Stark, 
who resides at Harris. 

Andrew N. Holm, formerly Andrew Nelson, his name having been 
dianged by legislative enactment in 1867, was bom in Sweden in 1829. 
He learned the trade of a carpenter, came to America in 1855 and located 
at Center City in 1857, of which village he was the first postmaster. He 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 371 

served! as a soldier during the Civil war and at its dose removed his 
family to Taylor's Falls, where death ended his days. 

Peter Anderson brought the first cattle, a yoke of oxen and a cow, 
to the settlement. One of the oxen was slaughtered in the fall and the 
other sold to Peter Berg, who made a special kind of wagon, or, rather, 
cart, for this team. It did not take the help or skill of any blacksmith 
to manufacture this vehicle, which was a good thing, as there was no 
such artisan or iron material to be found in the settlement. The wheels 
consisted of one single solid block, sawed off a large oak log. In the 
center a hole was made for the axle, which also was of wood. On ac- 
count of the uneven condition of the "roads," the "hubs" soon were 
worn so they lost their circular shape, which gave to the vehicle a very 
shaky and uneven movement not altogether pleasant for travel. But, 
better that than carry the loads on their own backs, thought the pio- 
neers. Such carts soon became very common in the settlement and for 
a long time the only means of transportation. In them were transported 
not only smaller loads on the farm but also the necessaries of life from 
Taylor's Falls. The standing price for the use of this rig for a short 
or longer distance, was five dollars. An American, living at Taylor's 
Falls, charged twelve dollars for carrying a load from that place to 
Chisago Lake. 

Sven Anderson came to Marine Mills in the fall of 1852, bringing 
with him four cows, which he sold to the settlers. Anders Swenson 
bought two of those, and Per Wiklund one. The first really good* yoke 
of oxen in the settlement belonged to Daniel Rattig and Peter Shaleen, 
and they rented them to the farmers for plowing at five dollars a day. 

Of the above mentioned pioneers most have since died, but left the 
settlement before and moved to other places. Peter Anderson moved to 
Cambridge, Isanti county ; Peter Berg to Fish Lake, Wiklund to Anoka 
and Bylund to Kandiyohi county. 

Late in the fall of 1851 arrived at Chisago Lake, in extremely poor 
circumstances, a former sergeant in the Swedish army, by the name of 
A. M. Dahlhjelm from Ostergotland, at the time of his coming an old 
man. He was permitted to stop over winter in a shanty situated on an 
island in the lake and own^d by another old man, a recluse named Van 
Renselaer, who lived there in a kind of half-starving misery. Dahl- 
hjehn's wife, Ulrika Pfeiff, belonged to the Swedish nobility. A son 
of Dahlhjelm, Claes Dahlhjehn, bom in Vallerstad, Ostergotland, July 



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372 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

7, 1828, is still living at Center City. He was married to Miss Eva Carl- 
son Ek, of Herrikra, Smiland, by whom he has had twelve children, of 
whom nine are living. One daughter is married to Mr. James E. Melin, 
president of the Chisago Coimty State Bank, at Center City. 

Gustaf Hultquist is another of the old settlers still living; hale and 
hearty, at the age of seveyty-sevcn years. He was bom July 26, 1832 ; 
came to America in 1853, stopped at Chicago, where he remained imtil 
1855, when he came to Chisago Lake. He had experienced a terrible 
voyage on the ocean. Of 219 passengers 64 died from cholera. Mr. 
Hidtquist has been married and has had fourteen children, nine of whom 
are living. During the war he was drawn for service, but took sick 
and was laid up in the army hospital at Fort Snelling. He is now 
leading a retired life at Center City. In his younger days he held a 
number of county, town, village and school offices. He is a remarkably 
bright and intelligent man, with a never failing memory and brimful of 
information con<;eming the first Swedish settlement in Minnesota. Be- 
sides Mr. Hultquist is a well read man and has a library of many times 
the ordinary size generally found in a farmer's home. 

During the year 1852 only a few settlers arrived. John Smith came 
from Ortofta in the spring of that year. Ahead of him, he declared, 
were only five settlers at Chisago Lake. He took land near the lake, 
just west of where the church now stands. Smith had read an article 
written by Norberg in a Swedish-American paper (Hemlandet) in which 
the soil and conditions of Minnesota were praised to the sky and that 
article induced him to emigrate. In his company came also John Ander- 
son from Ostergotland. 

Peter Svenson from Algutsboda, Kronoberg's Lan, arrived in Knox- 
ville, Illinois, in 1852. Also he had read the article by Norberg and 
by the same was induced to emigrate. Accompanied by six other Swedes^ 
he came to St. Paul. Thence he went to Carver and St. Peter, but 
finding that part of the country wild and entirely unsettled, he returned 
to St. Paul, whence he went to Chisago Lake, settling to the east of 
that water. 

Erik U. Norberg, who is mentioned quite often in this volume,, 
seems, in a large degree, to have been instrumental in directing the 
stream of Swedish immigrants to Minnesota. In his letters and news- 
paper correspondence he called the attention of his countrymen to the 
fertile soil which was here awaiting willing hands to cultivate it, and 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 373 

reap the reward for their labors which in such an abundant measure was 
to come to them. It is stated that he received fifty dollars from the 
people of Taylor's Falls for his efforts to bring Swedisl) settlers to Chi- 
sago county, and he certainly made good his promise. Another man 
should also be kept in kind remembrance by the Swedes of Minnesota, 
namely — Rev. Gustaf Unonius, who built the St. Ansgarius (or Jenny 
Lind) church in Chicago, Illinois. He was the first Swedish minister 
who visited the Chisago Lake settlement and preached and officiated 
among the few settlers in 1852. During this visit he tied the nuptial 
knot between a daughter of Daniel Nilson in Marine and Fredrik Lam- 
mer, a German, living a couple of miles from Taylor's Falls. Mrs. 
Lammer was probably the first Swedish girl to be married in Minnesota. 
In his little excellent historical pamphlet, "Svenskama i St. Croix- 
dalen," Mr. R. Gronberger relates the following incident : The wife of 
Anders Swenson made this year (1852) a very unpleasant trip. One 
fine morning she went out in the woods to look for her cows. In the 
tall grass and brush she could trace the direction in which they had 
passed. She followed their path through the wilderness without knowing 
in what (Erection she was going. A woman in our days with less deter- 
minaticm and a less stout heart would probaUy have given up such a 
task as looking for cows in the wild woods where wild animals and prowl- 
ing Indians were the only living beings to be encountered. Not so 
Mrs. Swenson. She would imder no circumstances lose her good milch- 
ers, so she continued all day without finding them. Toward evening, in 
the vicinity of where Vasa, in the Marine settlement, was later located, 
she met a man who said that he had met a pair of cows, but that was 
so long before, that there was no possibility for her to overtake them. 
The man being afraid lest she was going to get lost if she continued 
her search in the dark, offered to build a fire at which they could "camp" 
during the night. Thanking him for the offer she, however, declined 
it, and, having received a few matches to be used in case she would need 
to build a fire and camp out alone, she went. Before it was entirely 
dark, she was lucky enough to reach the house of a farmer in the 
neighborhood of Marine. This farmer had caught and locked in the 
so eagerly sought for cows. The distance from this farmer's to her 
home was fifteen miles, as the bird flies, and as the cows' path probably 
did not lay in such a direct course, Mrs. Swenson had walked a much 
longer distance. The following day she returned over the same route 



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374 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

but this time driving the cows before her. We must admire Mrs. Swen- 
son's energy and endurance all the more when we are informed that 
she bore a fine girl baby two months later. This child was bom November 
22, 1852; baptized by A. M. Dahlhjelm, receiving the name of Christine 
Mathilda. She is married to Mr. John P. Johnson and they now live 
at Lindstrom. She and Christina, a daughter of Peter Anderson, were 
bom on the same day and were the first children bom of Swedish parents 
in this settlement and> for that matter, probably^ in all Minnesota. 

The first really serviceable boat made of boards in Chisago Lake 
was owned by Anders Swenson. By dbing housework in the hotel of 
Ansel & Smith at Taylor's Falls, Mrs. Swenson had earned the money 
with which to buy the boards. Other boats in the lake owned by Swedes 
were mostly hollowed logs. To indicate how high the prices of cattle 
were at that time may be mentioned that John Smith had to pay sixty 
dc^rs for a cow, which he bought in St. Paul. 

Frans Mobeck, a former corporal in the Smiland Grenadier r^- 
ment, came to Chicago in 1852. On the advice of Rev. Unonius he 
went to Minnesota in 1853, arriving in St. Paul, where he remained 
two years. He visited the Swedish settlement at Chisago Lake and 
bought the piece of land on which he afterwards lived. He did not oc- 
cupy it, however, before 1855. 

During the years 1853-1854 quite a number of Swedish immigrants 
arrived, most of them from Kronoberg's Lan. Among them were Peter 
Wiberg, Magnus Jonson, Carl Lind, Anders Porter, Daniel Peterson, 
Peter Gustaf Gustafson, Gustaf Collen, A. P. Glader, John Holmgren, 
Hikan Larson and others. Although the largest number of settlers 
came from Kronoberg's Lan, the very first ones came from Ostergot- 
land and Norrland. During the first three or four years in the history 
of the settlement most of the land around the lake was taken up and 
settled. Later arriving immigrants had to go farther into the coimtry 
in order to secure homesteads. 

The two brothers, Otto and Anders Wallmark, came from Halmstad 
in 1854, bought land and settled near Chisago City. The land was owned 
by Bemheimer & Arnold of Philadelphia, who platted the village site and 
started in to erect buildings. A store was opened in which Otto Wallmark 
became clerk. Saw- and flour-mills were built, which, however, burned 
down in 1860. Anders Wallmark was foreman for the workingmen who 
graded and cleared the land for the village site. Otto Wallmark was 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 375 

auditor for Chisago county during a number of years. Anders Wallmark 
was register of deeds since 1868. To this office he was elected six times. 
Major John Swainson in St. Paul bought in 1856 in Missouri a large 
herd of cattle which he pastured at Rice Lake during the summer. These 
he sold on the easy payment plan to his new-coming countr)rmen. This 
was a great help for them, as they had no money to pay cash but badly 
needed milch cows and oxen. 



In his "History of the Swedish-Lutheran Churches in America" Dr. 
E. Norelius, who qame to Chisago Lake in 1854 and remained there from 
May 24th to September 11th, says that inj Taylor Falls were at that time 
very few horses, and that no Swedish family lived there, but a short 
distance from the city, in the direction ofl the lake, lived a wagon-maker, 
Anders Anderson, his son-in-law, Daniel Fredin, Peter Wiklund, 
who had moved there frcxn the lake, his brother and a man by the 
name of Bylimd. Besides these there were Fred Lammers, whose wife 
was a daughter of Daniel Nilson in Marine. The road to the lake did 
not run exactly as it does now, but in numerous curves, and was bad to 
the utmost degree. To drive a load over it was a hard job, indeed, but 
there was not very much traffic at that time. The things one bought in 
the city were carried on the back or in the hands. After leaving Anders 
Anderson's place there were no houses to be seen until at the lake. The 
first house was Per Anderson's, which stood south of the road, and 
diagonally in the direction of the bay that of P. Sheleen's. A little to the 
west livexi Peter Berg, where the rectory of the Chisago Lake church 
was located until last year, when the new rectory was completed. Here 
also was the first house at Chisago Lake located, a log cabin, which 
stood there for many years and had been used as meeting house, or 
church, and school house. On the peninsula on which Center City and 
the church are now situated, lived Frans Mobeck and Anders Swenson. 
From P. Berg's place, looking north, was a path to the little lake, and 
following it one came to Hans Smitt's place, and near by lived P. Norelius. 
Looking west from here and north of the little lake, lived Daniel Peterson, 
who later moved to New London. South of the little lake lived P. Kron 
and B. Franklin, who later sold his farm to Peter Swenson. West of the 
little lake lived Peter Lund, who later moved to Grove City. On the north 
side were Hakan Svedberg's, A. P. Norelius' and other places located. 
North of the big lake were Magnus Olsson's, A. M. Ahlstrom's and others' 



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376 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

places. On the east side of the bay and next to Per Anderson's, lived 
Peter Johanson, and on the south of his place Anders Molin aqd Peter 
Svenson. On the southeast and south side were Magnus Jonasson's, 
Glader's, Garberg's, and on the peninsula between the two branches of the 
lake, Nord, Nojd, Daniel Lindstrom and others. 

Many immigrants arrived during the summer and settled all around 
in the woods. Aroimd the small log cabins were to be found patches 
cm which vegetables were planted. The woods were hewn down by and 
by, and between the stumps the ground was turned by hoes and planted 
with any seed the settlers happened to have handy. 

Here we enter a list of the first settlers at Chisago Lake up to 1855, 
according to the church register kept by Rev. Cederstam, As aUnost all 
of the settlers were members of the Lutheran Church there have probably 
not been many settlers whose names are not in the list Among those 
few Dr. Norelius remembers Hans Smitt and family, Jonas Norell and 
Per Norell. 

Arrivals in 1850: Per Anderson with family, Daniel Rattig with 
wife, and L. P. Sjolin, from Hassela, Helsingland; Pehr Berg with 
family, from Hog, Helsingland; Anders Swenson, with family, Kittil- 
stad, Ostergotland ; L. J. Stark, Lidkoping, and his wife, Amalia C. 
(nee Lengquist) Karlshamn. 

Arrivals in 1851 : Johan Smith and Jonas Anderson, from Ortomta, 
Ostergotland ; A. M. Dahlhjelm and Qaes Dahlhjelm, Wallerstad, 
Ostergotland ; and Magnus Olsson with wife, Brunflo, Jemtland. 

Arrivals in 1852: Peter Johan Kron, from Algutsboda, Kronoberg's 
Lan; Mathis Bengtson, Orkened, Kristianstad's Lan; Per Johan Lund 
and wife, Oppmanna, Kristianstad's Lan; Erik Abrahamson and wife, 
Wirdsnas, Ostergotland; Carl Jonason Lind, Hofmantorp, Kronoberg's 
Lan ; Carl Magnus Peterson and wife, Nobbeled, Kronoberg's Lan ; Truls 
Lindquist, Orkened, Kristianstad Lan ; Anders Peter Anderson, Ortomta, 
Linkoping's Lan; Magnus Jonason, Linneryd, Kronoberg^s Lan; and 
his wife and children, Hofmantorp, Kronoberg's Lan; Johan P. Back. 
Girdsby, Kronoberg's Lan, and his wife, Inga Lena Swensdotter, Wist, 
Ostergotland ; Anders Peter Anderson, Ortomta, Ostergotland ; and Frans 
Mobeck. with family, Stenberg^, Kronoberg's Lan. 

Arrivals in 1853 : Anders P. Norelius and family, P. Norelius and 
family, and Jonas Norelius and family, from Hassela, Helsingland ; Tuf ve 
Pehrson and family, and Nils Pehrson and wife, NiUa, Glimikra, Kris- 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 377 

tianstad's Lan; Johan P.'Abrahamson and wife, Langasjo, Kronoberg's 
Lan ; Johannes J. Lonnquist and wife, Dadesjo, Kronoberg's Lan ; Erik 
Garberg and wife, Linneryd, Kronoberg's Lan; Nils HSkanson and 
family, Peter Magnus Johanson and family, and Johan Peterson Stenberg 
and family, Algutsboda, Kronoberg's Lan ; Peter Johan Carlson and wife, 
and Anders Swenson Agren and wife, Hofmantorp, Kronoberg's Lan; 
Daniel Peterson and family, Ostra ThorsSs, Kronoberg's Lan ; Joh. Helin 
and family, Dadesjo, Kronoberg's Lan; Peter Johanson and family, 
and Joh. Johnscm and wife, Maria Peterson, Algutsboda, Kronoberg's 
Lan ; Daniel Nilsson, Ostra ThorsSs, Kronoberg's Lan ; Anders Magnus 
Ahlstrom and family, Elghult, Kronoberg's Lan; Hakan Larson Swed- 
berg and family, Backaryd, Bleking; Elx-Schoolteacher Joh. Hikanson, 
Vexio, Kronoberg's Lan ; Daniel Lindstrom and wife, Hassela, Helsing- 
land; John Johnson, Hinneryd, Kronoberg's Lan; Anders G. Blom and 
Peter Johanson and family, Ostra Thorsis, Kronoberg's Lan; Joh. 
Jonason Lind and wife, Hofmantorp, Kronoberg's Lan; Sven Mag. 
Peterson and family, Algutsboda, Kronoberg's Lan; Anders Johnson's 
wife, Helena Nilsdotter, Furuby, Kronoberg^s Lan; Carl J. Lind's wife, 
Lena Kajsa Jcmasdotter, Hofmantorp, Kronoberg's Lan; Gaes Dahl- 
hjelm's wife, Eva Karlsdotter, Dadesjo, Kronoberg's Lan; And. Peter 
Jonason Lind, Hofmantorp, Kronoberg's Lan; Nils Nilson, Gammaltorp, 
Bleking; Johan Akeson and Mans Akeson, Hofby, Bleking; Ola 
Jonasson and wife, Tving, Bleking; Joh. Peter Quarfot, Ljuder, 
Kronoberg's Lan; Anders Peter Glader and family, Hofmantorp, 
Kronoberg's Lan ; Carl Svensson Ek, Dadesjo,. Kronoberg's Lan ; Nicolaus 
Jonasson and family, Elmeboda, Kronoberg's Lan ; Carl Peter Dolk and 
family, Dadesjo, Krcmoberg^s Lan ; Johan Johanson and wife, Hofman- 
torp, Kronoberg's Lan; Sven Magnuson, Vexio, Kronoberg's Lan; 
Gustaf Jonsson Hultquist and wife, Ingatorp, Jonkoping's Lan; Jonas 
Magnus Molin and wife, Asarum, Bleking; Carolina Molin, Asarum, 
Bleking; Carl Israelson and wife, Tving, Bleking; Erik Magnuson's wife, 
Johanna Jonasdotter, Hofmantorp, Kronoberg's Lan ; Carl Abrahamson's 
family, Lingasjo, Kronoberg's Lan ; Peter Gustaf Gustaf son and family^ 
Elmeboda, Kronoberg's Lan ; Lorens Johansson and family, Hofmantorp, 
Krcmoberg's Lan; Tufve Pehrson and family, Glimikra, Kristianstad's 
Lan; Otto Ferd. Makrill and family, Tving, Bleking; Ake Johnson and 
family, Asanmi, Bleking; Peter Magnus Peterson and wife, Hofmantorp, 
Kronoberg's Lan; Carl Gustaf Pehrson and wife, Linneryd and Ronneby; 



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378 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

And. M. MoHn's wife, Lena Stina with children of her first marriage, 
Algutsboda, Kronoberg's Lan; And. Janson Porter's wife, Helena, 
and John Carlscm, Furuby, Kronoberg's Lan. 

Arrivals in 1854: Swen Nilsson and family, from Orkened, Kris- 
tianstad's Lan; Nils Hikan Bystrom and wife, Hofby, Bleking; Jons 
Nilson and family, HjersSs and VSnga, Kristianstad's Lan; Samuel 
Peterson and wife, and Peter Peterson, Furuby, Kronoberg^s Lan ; Widow 
Helena Magnusdotter and family, and Gustaf Collin and family, Elme- 
boda, Kronoberg's Lan; Peter Person and family, and Johan Jonasson, 
Dadesjo, Kronoberg's Lan; Anders Carlson and wife, and Carl Gustaf 
Paulson, Hofmantorp, Kronoberg's Lan; Elias P. Fast and wife, Nob- 
beled, Kronoberg's Lan; Peter Anderson, Herr&kra, Kronoberg's Lan; 
Tuve Trulsson, Knisslinge, Kristianstacfs Lan; Peter Swenson and 
family, Jemshog, Bleking ; Johannes Person and family, Dadesjo, Krono- 
berg's Lan; Frans O. Moquist, Hofmantorp, Kronoberg's Lan; Carl 
Gustaf Johansson and wife, Ostra Thorsis, Kronoberg's Lan; Sven 
Carlson Kron and wife, J. Helin's wife, Sara Eriksdotter, and her sons 
by a former marriage, Carl and Jakob, Dadesjo, Kronobergf's Lan ; David 
Pehrson and wife, Elmeboda and Linneryd, Kronoberg's Lan; Widow 
Kajsa Erengissledotter and family, Linnaryd, Kronoberg's Lan; John 
Smith's wife, Maja Lena, Elmeboda, Kronoberg's Lan; Mathis Bengts- 
son's wife, Hanna, Orkened, Kristianstad's Lan; John Johnson's wife, 
Kajsa, Elmeboda, Kronoberg's Lan; Nils Daniel Anderson and family, 
Furuby, Kronoberg's Lan; Jonas Erikson and family, Dadesjo and 
GSrdsby, Kronoberg's Lan; Mathis Mickelson and family, Asarum and 
Dadesjo, Kronoberg's Lan ; Jonas J. Nojd and wife, Ortomta, Linkoping's 
Lan ; Jons Olsson, Ronneby, Bleking ; Johannes J. Elmquist and family, 
Elmeboda, Kronoberg's Lan; Magnus Peterson and wife, Dadesjo and 
Taf velsSs, Kronoberg's Lan ; Magnus Magnusson, Elmeboda, Kronoberg's 
Lan; Kristina Peterson, Dadesjo, Kronoberg's Lan; Swen Nilsson and 
family, Hemsjo, Kronoberg's Lan; Carl Samuelsson and family, 
Ortomta, Linkoping's Lan; Johan J. Brage and family, Olmestad, 
Jonkopingfs Lan; Carl P. Bolin and wife, Ronneby, Bleking; Carl 
Johan Korsberg, Furuby, Kronoberg's Lan ; Carl J. Ljungquist and Peter 
Swensson, Asarum, Bleking ; Johan Olsson and family, Ronneby, Bleking; 
Truls Lindquist's wife, Sissa, Ola Thomasson and Pehr Mattson, Opp- 
manna, Kristianstad's Lan; Johan Peter Nilsson and family, Peter 
Jonsson and family and Carl Jonasson, Ostra Thorsis, Kronobergf s Lan ; 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 379 

Peter O. Petersson and wife, Dadesjo, Kronoberg's Lan; Martha Kajsa 
Petersdotter, Furuby, Kronoberg's Lan; Gustaf Johannesson, Dadesjo, 
Kronoberg's Lan; Ake S. Dahlberg and wife, Ronneby and Hofby 
Bleking; Ola Anderson, Backaryd, Bleking; Carl Johansson, Ostra 
Thorsis, Kronoberg's Lan ; Carl P. Vigren, LSngasjo, Kronoberg's Lan ; 
Erik MagTiusson, Ostra Thors&s, Kronoberg's Lan; Jonas P. Peterson, 
GSrdsby, Kronoberg's Lan; Eva Kristina Petersdotter, Hbfmantorp, 
Kronoberg's Lan; P. G. Gustaf son's wife, Sara C, Elmeboda, Krono- 
berg's Lan ; Anders P. Wallmark, Asige, Halland ; P. J. Folin and >yife, 
Karlshamn, Bleking; Hakan J. Dahlstrom and wife, Backaryd, Bleking; 
Israel Jonasson, Hofmantorp, Kronoberg's Lan ; Pehr Matson and family, 
Oppmanna, Kristianstad's Lan ; Anders Nilsson and wife, Ostcrslof , Kris- 
tianstad's Lan; Jonas Johansson, Jath, Kronoberg^s Lan; Anna Maria 
Magni, Sandsjo, Kronoberg's Lan ; Eskil Trulsson and wife, Knisslinge, 
Kristianstad's Lan ; Peter Johan Johansson and wife, Furuby and Dadesjo, 
Kronoberg's Lan ; Gustaf J. Melander, Ostra Thorsis, Krcmoberg's Lan ; 
Carl G. Pehrsson's wife, Kajsa, Ronneby, Bleking; Joh. J. Lindahl and 
family, V. ThorsSs, Kronoberg's Lan ; And. P. Anderscm's wife, Martha 
Magni, V. Thorsis, Kronoberg's Lan; Johanna Magni, V. Thorsis, 
Kronoberg's Lan; Anders Magnus MoHn, Asanmi, Bleking; Anders J. 
Porter and family, Tafvelsis, Kronoberg's Lan; Johan Magnussen and 
wife, Nobbeled, Kronoberg's Lan, and Otto Alex Bemhard Wallmark 
and wife, Asige, Halland. 

In 1855 the immigration amounted to almost nothing, because the 
cholera of the preceding year had scared people from leaving their homes 
in the old country. From 1856 to 1860 not a few came, but it would take 
too much space to give their names. 

LiNDSTROM Village. — Located on the line of the Taylor's Falls 
branch of the St. Paul & Duluth Railroad (now in the Northern Pacific 
System), on lot 5, section 33, town 34, range 20, was platted in 1880. 
The proprietors were then James and Elizabeth Smith, who had bought 
the land of Daniel Lindstrotn. Lindstrom was bom in 1825 in Helsing- 
land, Sweden. He had no early advantages for obtaining an ed'ucation 
and spent most of his youth herding goats and cattle among the mountains 
in his native province, In 1854 he came to America and located on 
Chisago Lake, choosing a beautiful location which since was laid out as a 
village and has become a place of popular resort. Lindstrom was mar- 
ried first in Sweden, and then here, his first wife having died in 1864. 



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38o SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

He had a family of three children of whom a son, O. F. Lindstrom, is 
cashier of theJocal state bank. 

The village of Lindstrom was incorporated in 1894, with a resident 
population of 245 inhabitants, on petition of the following : John A. Nel- 
son, B. L. Brorson, P. M. Dedon, S. M. D. Hallberg, O. F. Lindstrom, 
C J. Anderson, Gust Peterson, P. H. Tyrrell, G. Femlund, Evart K Hall, 
F. W. Hall, Gust Lantz, D. Lindstrom, John Turnquist, J. H. Frye, P. M. 
Holt, Carl Otis, John Kroonblawd, Chas. Andrews, J. Ostergjen, A. 
Erlandson, John Peterson, M. Norman, J. C. Larson, George J. Symonds, 
Chas. Kronblad, J. A. Holt, August L. Anderson, Gus. W. Anderson, 
C. M. Hall, H. C. Manders, C. A. Bergren, J. Pitts, F. A. Johnson, J. 
A. Peterson, and Martin Peterson. 

The first village president was Mr. A. Erlandscm, and the first vil- 
lage clerk or recorder, Ludwig Andrews, who is now postmaster of the 
place. Of the three villages on the Chisago Lake, Center City, Lind- 
strom and Chisago City, Lindstrom is very much the largest and as a 
business place the most important. It has schools, two churches, post- 
office, bank, a good hotel, two restaurants, a large creamery run on the 
co-operative plan by the farmers, several general merchandise stores, 
drug store, two physicians and one dentist, printing c^ce and a weekly 
paper, a fine city well, 240 feet deep, furnishing the best drinking water 
imaginable, hardware, agricultural implements, harness and shoe 
stores, meat market, bakery, saw-mill, lumber yards, wagon 
shop, blacksmith shop, flour mill, elevator, millinery, clothing 
and tailoring store, three saloons, livery stable, jewelry store and 
two photograph studios. Lindstrom has a number of fine and comfort- 
able residences and small cottages for the accommodation of summer 
guests, who come here in large numbers to spend their vacation. For 
them it also has a boat house with gasoline launches and rowboats. 

Chisago City. — ^The village of Chisago City is located on a hard- 
wood ridge between Chisago and Green lakes, in sections 6 and 7, town- 
ship 34, range 20. It was platted, in 1855, by Isaac Bemheimer & Com- 
pany, of Philadelphia. They built a hotel, several dSvellings, and a saw 
and grist mill on the banks of Chisago lake. These mills were burnt in 
1872. A stave factory was built on the site of the burned mills, whidi 
was operated successfully for many years by George Nathan, Otto 
Wallmark, W. D. Webb, and others. This stave mill gave a new im- 
petus to the prosperity of the village, under the influence of which the 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 381 

county seat was transferred to it from Taylor's Falls. Its subsequent 
growth, however, did not justify expectations. It was for many years 
without even a postcrffice. In 1875 the county seat was removed to Cen- 
ter City. The Swedish-Lutherans had here one of the finest church 
buildings in the county. This church burned down, but a new 
frame edifice was erected in its place and dedicated in the spring of 
1909. The lake location witl\ splendid train service of the Northern 
Pacific Railway Company gives to the village the patrcmage of a large 
summer resort and tourist business, well taken care of by it's three 
hotels, as well as its colony of summer houses of Twin City people, 
who are yearly adding to their holdings in and around Chisago Gty. 
The business enterprises have grown fast in the last few years. The 
pioneer business places are three hotels, two large and well managed 
general stores, blacksmitli and implements, creamery, sprayer manu- 
facturing, lumber yard, livery, meat market, tailor, millinery, dressmaker, 
physician, harness and shoe store, four elevators, watch maker, with 
additions of stock buyer, feed mill, barber shop, drug store, state bank, 
excellent schools. Residences are being built summer and winter and 
brick blocks are in evidence in which are conducted the business inter- 
ests of the community. The farming and dairy interests surrounding 
are ably conducted by a class of well to do and thrifty farmers, whose 
principal products, live stock and dairying, potatoes, feed crops and hay, 
and whose prosperity is noticeable to all. The future possibilities for 
growth and advancement are very good for this village. 

Along the branch of the Northern Pacific Railroad are two other 
villages, Shafer and Franconia. 

Shafer. — Comprises all of the territory of township 34, range 19 
excepting the plat of Taylor's Falls, and fractional sections in the N. 
£. comer of the township. It is now all settled and has many fine 
farms. A Swedish colony settled here in 1853, consisting of Peter 
Wicklund, Anders Anderson, Erik Bylund, Tuve Waldemarson and 
others. The town organized first as Taylor's Falls, but the name was 
changed to Shafer in 1873, after Jacob Shafer, who as early as 1847 
cut hay in sections 4 and 5. He seems to have been in no sense worthy 
of the honor conferred upon him, as he was but a transient inhabitant, 
and disappeared in 1849. No one knows his subsequent career. The 
honor ought to have been given some of the hardy Swedes, who were 
the first real pi(^eers, and the first to make substantial improvements. 



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382 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Peter Wicklund came from Sweden in 1853 and settled in the north- 
east quarter of section 26. He moved to Anoka in 1860, and was 
drowned in the Rirni river in 1880. His son Peter became a prominent 
merchant in Anoka. 

Tuve Waldemarson was bom in Sweden in 1812. He was a member 
of the Swedish colony of 1853. Mr. and Mrs. Waldemarson reared a 
fine family of children. By hard work, close attention to business and 
frugality the family prospered abundantly. 

Anders Anderson came also in 1853 and settled in the east half of 
the northeast quarter of section 34. He moved to Taylor's Falls in 
1859 and died there in 1873. He left but one child, the wife of Daniel 
Fredin of Shafer. Andersoa was a bom humorist and fond of practical 
jokes. On one occasion his ready wit was exercised at die expense of a 
man to whom he had mortgaged his farm. Deeming the house in which 
he lived his own, in the absence of the mortgagee, he removed it to 
Taylor's Falls. The mortgagee, E. W. Holman, told him, he had stolen 
the house and must replace it. Anderson told Holman to take the 
house and replace it himself, but if he took his (Anderson's) family 
along with it, he would have him sent to the penitentiary. Holman did 
not see his way clear and the house was not disturbed. 

Erik Bylund settled in the west half of the southeast quarter of 
section 23. In 1860 he sold out and moved further west. The farm 
he left has since been owned by John Nelson and is one of the finest 
farms in Chisago county. 

Jakob Peterson was bom in 1847 and came with his parents to 
Chisago county in 1854. They located on a beautiful spot in Franconia, 
on the shore of a small lake, where they made a farm and where Jakob 
passed his boyhood and youth. In 1881 he commenced business at 
Shafer station as a merchant and dealer in wood. He was the first 
postmaster at Shafer and was married to Mary Helin. 

Franconia. — ^Jonas Lindahl was for many years an enterprising 
and prosperous business man in Franconia. He opened up an extensive 
wood trade with St. Paul, in which C. J. Vitalis was his successor. Lin- 
dahl represented his county in the senate of the fifteenth and sixteenth 
legislatures. He was accidentally drowned from a barge of wood at 
Hastings in May, 1872. His widow married Chas. J. Vitalis. 

Charles J. Vitalis was bora in Smaland in 1843, came to America 
in 1868 and settled in Franconia village. He was for five years em- 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 383 

ployed as clerk. In 1873 he embarked in the mercantile and wood 
business. In one year he shipped 13,000 cords of wood and averaged 
for the following fourteen years 7,000 cords, making a total of 100,000 
cords. He was married to Josephine Nelson, widow of Jonas Lindahl, 
in 1873. He had four brothers, Elof, John, Elias and Hans, who all 
resided in Franconia. 

Frank N. Peterson, came to America in 1865, and in 1866 settled 
in the valley of the St. Croix. He attended school at Carver, Minne- 
sota, one year, when he became a traveling salesman for Leopold & 
Company of Chicago, and in 1881 settled in Franconia. He organized 
the lumbering firm of Borens Brothers and Peterson, which continued 
until 1886, when a new organization was formed, called the Franconia 
Lumber Company. Peterson has been the president of Franconia since 
its incorporation. In 1869 he married Miss Ingrid Johnson, daughter 
of Erik Jdmson, a pioneer of St. Peter, Minn. Mr. Peterson owned 
one of the finest houses in the valley, romantically situated and supplied 
with pure spring water. It was a pride to the village and attracted gen- 
eral attention. He was also the inventor and patentee of the Lindholm 
& Peterson adding machine. 

Olof S. Werner, M. D. — Among the able and highly educated Swed- 
ish-Americans of Chisago county, none stands higher, than Dr. Olof 
S. Werner of Lindstrom, who has attained prominence both in the clerical 
and medical professions. Bom near Helsingborg, Sweden, November 
II, 1866, he received his early education in the public school and at the 
age of fourteen entered the collegiate high school of his native city, 
from which he graduated in 1888. He then matriculated at the Uni- 
versity of Lund, where he at first pursued studies in philosophy for two 
years, and in 1890 came to Minnesota, wjjiere his mother was living. 

In the fall he entered Augustana Theological Seminary, graduating 
therefrom in 1892, and receiving the degree of Bachelor of Divinity, an 
unusual honor. Dr. Werner was then ordained as minister of the 
gospel at Lindsborg, Kansas, his first charge being a congregation at 
Warren, Minnesota. Later he came to Tustin, Michigan, where he 
remained for two years. During the last year of that pastorate he took 
up the study of medicine at the Michigan College of Medicine and Sur- 
gery, Detroit, finishing his studies at Milwaukee Medical College, now 
the medical department of Marquette University, in 1897. He then 



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384 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

located at Ludington, Michigan, where he maintained a general practice 
for one year, followed by two years at Manistee, thaf state. In 1899 he 
took a post-graduate course at the Chicago Post-Graduate College, and 
moved to Center City, Minnesota, during that year. ' In 1901 he located 
at Lindstrom, where he has since conducted a growing practice among 
the best people in the place. He has also been honored with several 
local offices, both village and county. 

In 1892 Dr. Werner married Miss Ellen Rundstrom, of Lindsborg, 
Kansas, and they have five children, as follows : Victor J., bom August 
28, 1893; Conrad O., bom December 14, 1895; Lillie E., bom August i, 
1897; Ebba Maria, bom August 13, 1899; and Robert Fredrik, born 
April 4, 1901. In the fall of 1909 Victor J. entered Gustavus Adolphus 
College at St. Peter, Minnesota. Conrad O. has decided mechanical 
gifts. The family are members of the Swedish Lutheran church. All 
have musical talents and have a family orchestra of five instruments. 
Mrs. Wemer is a music teacher and organist of the English Lutheran 
church. Dr. Wemer is a member of the Chisago County Medical So- 
ciety, Minnesota State Medical Society, the American Medical Asso- 
ciation, the American Electro-Therapeutic Association. 

John J. F. Swanson, of Lindstrom, Chisago coimty, is one of the 
pioneers of this part of Minnesota, his father being among the first of 
his countrymen to settle near Center City. For a period of fifty-eight 
years the son has been a growing business man and a progressive citizen 
of the county and for the greater portion of that time has been operating 
a saw or planing mill. He was born in Vena parish, Ostergotland, 
Sweden, May 28, 1848, to Anders Fredrik and Katarina (Peterscm) 
Swenson. In 1850, with his parents, he came to America in a ship 
which was six months in making the voyage from Gothenborg to New 
Orleans. From the latter city the family took passage on a river steamer 
to St. Louis. They remained there through the winter, the father sup- 
porting his family chiefly by loading and unloading steamboats. The 
cholera was then raging in the city and Mr. Swenson lost one son and 
a new-bom daughter by the dread disease. Jenny Lind was then in St. 
Louis and in the tendemess of her heart and generosity to her country- 
men, she gave the bereaved father fifty dollars with which to bury his 
son and daughter and pay passage to Stillwater, at which place the 
remaining members of the family were transferred to a smaller steamer, 
which brought them to Taylor's Falls. Thence they went afoot to 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 385 

Center City, where they settled about one-half mile north of where the 
court house now stands, and put up a log cabin. Anders F. and 
Katarina Swenson had seven children, of whom four are living; Mrs. 
Johanna Nelson, widow of Peter Nelson, who died in 1890 ; John J. 
F. Swanson, of this sketch; Christina Mathilda, married to Peter J. 
Johnson, of Lindstrom, and Henry Edwin Swanson, who lives near 
Center City. 

When one sees the fine farms and flourishing little villages, which 
now are considered beautiful summer resorts at Chisago Lake, it is hard 
to imagine what hardships and privations the early settlers had to 
suffer, surrounded by not altogether friendly Indians and in the winter 
by howling wolves. Mrs. Johanna Nelson relates how once she saw a 
flock of forty wolves coming over the ice, steering their course directly 
toward their log cabin. There being no schools at first, the children 
were taught by their parents to read Swedish. In three or four years, 
however, the Swedish settlers so increased that a little district school 
house was built. 

John F. worked on farms until nineteen years of age, when (in 
1868) he made a trip to California and Washington, via New York and 
Panama. He made quite a little money on the coast, but after two years 
returned to Center City, where he bought a general merchandise store, 
located in the old school and meeting house, in partnership with 
John Elof Peterson, now postmaster in Center City. They paid seven- 
teen hundred and fifty dollars cash for the store and continued in busi- 
ness for a short time; when they separated, Mr. Swanson going to 
North Branch, where he bought a lot and built a store, and Mr. Peter- 
son taking the Center City store. Mr. Swanson operated the North 
Branch store from 1870 to 1884, when he sold out and went to Trade 
Lake, Wisconsin, where he bought a combined hotel and store in part- 
nership with P. V. Delamater. They continued in this enterprise a 
couple of years and then sold their business at auction, Mr. Swanson 
returning to Center City, where he remained for a time, inactive but 
alert for opportunities. In partnership with his father, he next built 
a saw mill at Almelund, Minnesota, which he continued to run for nine- 
teen years and then moved the machinery to Lindstrom, where he built a 
large saw mill. The first year he employed twenty-two men, but now, 
when mostly planing is done, it is operated by Mr. Swanson and his 
sons. 

25 



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386 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Mr. Swanson has been married three times. In 1871, he wedded 
Miss Emma Swenson, who died in 1877, bearing two children, of whom 
Miranda is married to Victor Anderson, of Minneapolis, and one son 
died in infancy. In 1879, he married Miss Martha C. Larson. They 
had two daughters and one son, the latter dying when three years of 
age. The daughters are Sally F., born August 11, 1882, living at hoine, 
and Martha, bom January 2, 1884, who is living with her maternal 
grandmother. Their mother died in 1884. In 1887 Mr. Swanson mar- 
ried a third time to a sister of his second wife, Miss Elizabeth J. Larson. 
They have had five sons and one daughter; Arnie B. C, born in 1890; 
Dellner E. F., bom in 1894; George H. J., bom in 1896; James K. L., 
bora in 1898; Pearl Eva Josephine, born in 1903, and Merle N. O., born 
in 1905. 

# 
John Artig. — ^The long, industrious and honorable career of John 
Artig, of Lindstrom, has been laid in Chisago county since he was 
eighteen years of age, and has covered, farming, lumbering and mason- 
ry. In his old age he is the fortunate proprietor of a nice home and, 
although he is able to review some business misadventures, there is no 
smirch of trickery or dishonor on his name. Mr. Artig was bora in 
Furuby parish, near Vexjo, Smiland, Sweden, on March 14, 1836. His 
parents were Anders and Petronella (Petersdotter) Artig, the former 
bora in Herrakna and the latter in Dadesjo. Anders Artig served as 
a soldier in the Swedish army for thirty-eight and one-half years, par- 
ticipating in the war with Russia when Sweden lost Finland; in the 
battle of Leipsic against Napoleon, and in the war with Norway in 
1814. He died when eighty-seven years old and the mother at the 
age of ninety-eight, both in Sweden. To them were bom ten daugh- 
ters and one son, the subject of this sketch. John received a common 
school education and was confirmed in the Lutheran church, always 
standing high both in his literary studies and his religious training. 

. On September 16, 1854, Mr. Artig emigrated to America, coming 
in the Canibria, which sailed from the port of Carlshamn on June 22nd, 
and spent nearly three months in crossing the Atlantic. The Cambria 
carried more than five hundred emigrants, mostly from Smiland. They 
landed at New York, sailed across the lakes to Chicago and thence went 
to Rock Island, where they boarded a Mississippi steamer, bound for 
Stillwater. At Stillwater they boarded a smaller steamer, the Pioneer, 
which brought them to Taylor's Falls. They landed on October 6th. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 387 

From Taylor's Falls they traveled on foot to Chisago Lake, where they 
were received by a Mr. Glader. 

At first John Artig went across the St. Croix river to Wisconsin, 
where he worked on a farm for six months, receiving his board therefor 
but no wages. His next job was on the government road as cook at 
one dollar per day and board. This employment lasted more than five 
months, and young Artig saved every cent of his earnings and sent to 
his old father, one thousand kroner ($265), thus enabling him to pay 
off a mortgage on his little place in Sweden. This filial act also saved 
his mother from going to the poorhouse, as she was able to retain the 
family homestead after her husband's death. During the following win- 
ters, young Artig went lumbering, and in the summers built dams, 
having learned the mason's trade in Gotland, Sweden. Later he ven- 
tured into the logging business, but was unfortunate in his specula- 
tion and had to sell eight hundred thousand feet at two dollars and fifty 
cents per thousand. But as the venture was his alone, the loss was his 
only. A second log speculation had unfortunate results, and he also 
lost nineteen hundred dollars on cord-wood. So that he finally con- 
cluded that speculation was not his strong point, and dropped it. 

In 1858 Mr. Artig married Mathilda Stenberg, of Algutsboda, 
Sweden, and settled on a farm, which he bought for $1,100 near Tay- 
lor's Falls. He cultivated his farm during the summer, going to the 
woods in the winter and driving logs in the spring. Thus he passed a 
busy existence and prospered by hard work. With his wife he has had 
five children: Mary, who is married to Ludvig Andrews, postmaster 
at Lindstrom; Nella (Petronella), married to W. F. Hall, a railroad 
man in St. Paul ; Charlotta, married to Edward Andrews, a farmer and 
mail carrier; Minnie, who is clerking in the post office at Lindstrom, 
and Frank Victor, who is cashier in a bank at Sauk Rapids. In 1864 
Mr. Artig enlisted in Company G, Eleventh Minnesota Voltmteers, and 
served for one year, participating in several skirmishes but was not 
wounded. He was honorably discharged at the end of the war July 11, 
1865, and is a member of Sherman Camp No. 6, G. A. R. In his reli- 
gious faith he is a member of the English Lutheran church, and is a 
man of solid moral traits and sturdy character. 

Charles Lindahl. — For nearly forty-five years that sturdy Swe- 
dish-American farmer, Charles Lindahl, has been the proprietor of a 
beautiful place located on a cape which juts out into Lake Superior 



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388 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

and is embraced by Chisago county. He has lived and labored upon this 
dear homestead since 1854. Mr. Lindahl was bom in Furuby parish, 
Kronoberg's Ian, Sweden, October 7, 1831. His parents, Johan and 
Kristina (Nilson) Hikanson, rented a small place (in Sweden called 
torp) belonging to a larger farm Vestra Truedsgird. They had three chil- 
dren: Charles, of this sketch, who took the surname of Lindahl to dis- 
tinguish himself from the many Johnsons ; Frank Johnson, who lives in 
Duluth; Salomon, who is deceased. 

Educational facilities were very unsatisfactory then in Sweden, whose 
public school system was inaugurated in 1848 and since has been greatly 
improved. If a youngster knew his catechism by heart and could read 
his New Testament, it was considered that he possessed a sufl5cient lit- 
erary education. Such an education did Charles receive, and was duly 
confirmed in Furuby church by Minister Krook. After confirmation he 
worked on the farm until 1854, when he came to America in company 
with his parents and brother Frank. They sailed in the good vessel 
Cambria, landing in New York September 15th. From New York they 
journeyed (via Albany, Buffalo, and the great lakes) to Chicago, thence 
to Rock Island and up the Mississippi and the St. Croix rivers to Still- 
water, where they changed to a smaller steamer. Knap, which brought 
them to Taylor's Falls and Chisago Lake, where they arrived on October 
3rd. A brother of Mrs. Hikanson (the mother), by the name of P. A. 
Glader, was already settled there, and in his log house they were 
sheltered the first winter of their residence in Minnesota. During that 
winter Charles worked in the woods, and in the spring and summer helped 
clear the farm, which his father had bought from the government at one 
dollar and twenty-five cents per acre. This continued for two years; 
but the father was killed the first winter while cutting timber. The two 
eons then continued breaking the farm and cultivating it. 

Buying his mother's and brother's interest, Mr. Lindahl became sole 
proprietor of the farm in 1865. In i860 he married Anna Jonasdotter, 
who was bom in Furuby in 1826, and came to America in 1858. She is 
living yet, although bedridden as the result of hard pioneer work and age. 
They have three children; Frank Oscar, bom 1863, who is renting his 
father's farm; Salomon, bom in 1865, who is a farmer in the neighbor- 
hood ; and Christina, bom 1867, who lives at home. All are members of 
the Swedish-Lutheran church. In politics Mr. Lindahl is a Republican, 
but the first vote he cast was for Buchanan for president. In this con- 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 389 

nection it is remarkable that at that time all the Swedes voted the Demo- 
cratic ticket, but since have gone over almost in a body to Republicanism. 

Charles Andrews, prominent for many years in the business and 
public life of Chisago county, was born at Chisago Lake August 15, 1857, 
a son of Andrew Peter and Martha (Carlson) Anderson, both of whom 
were bom in Sweden, the father in Ortomta and the mother in Ostra 
Thorslis. Coming to the United States in 1852 Andrew P. Anderson 
lived for one year at Galena, Illinois, and there his first wife died, leaving 
him with two children. Coming then to Chisago county, Minnesota, in 
1853, he purchased one hundred acres of government land here, improved 
and developed his place in time and continued to carry on general farm- 
ing. In 1856 he married Martha Carlson, and of the nine children which 
were bom of their union six are now living. During the Civil war 
Andrew P. Anderson served three years as a member of Company C of 
the Seventh Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, and he died in 1889, at the 
age of seventy years, his widow surviving him until 1907 and dying at the 
age of seventy-three years, and both now lie buried in Fairview cemetery 
at Lindstrom, the cemetery being a part of the old Anderson homestead. 

Charles Andrews received a common school training at Lindstrom 
and remained on his father's farm until 1890, managing the old place 
and also operating a threshing machine on his own account. Moving 
then to Lindstrom he engaged in a general mercantile business, which he 
continued for nine years, while for five years he was the assessor of the 
township of Chisago Lake and in 1886 was elected the sheriff of the 
county. He remained in that office for eight years, and then after an 
interim of six years was again made the sheriff of Chisago county and 
served for another eight years, making in all sixteen years of faithful 
service in this capacity. In 1891 he opened a lumber business in Center 
City in partnership with William Carlson, and in 1907 he also purchased 
a lumber yard at Lindstrom from A. Earlson, and maintains a large busi- 
ness at both places. 

Mr. Andrews married, on December 10, 1892, Ellen C. Swanson, 
bom near Ystad, in Sweden, in 1865, but she has been a resident of the 
United States since seven years of age. A son, Raymond C. Andrews, 
was bom to them on October 19, 1893, and is now a pupil in the Lind- 
strom public schools. Mr. and Mrs. Andrews are members of the English 
Lutheran church, Mr. Andrews being the present treasurer of the church 



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390 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

committee, and he is a member of the fraternal order, Modem Woodmen 
of America. 

Nils J. Smith. — ^A live, energetic man, skilled in mechanical pur- 
suits, Nils J. Smith is actively associated with the promotion of the indus- 
trial interests of Lindstrom as one of the leading blacksmiths of this part 
of Chisago county, and is a worthy representative of the honored Swedish 
citizens who have, by sturdy perseverance and wise thrift, achieved suc- 
cess in their various lines of occupation. A son of the late Jons Nelson, 
he was bom, August 13, 1855, in Blekinge, Sweden, where he lived until 
attaining his majority. 

Jons Nelson spent his entire life in Si\eden, learning the black- 
smith's trade in Blekinge, and there following it until his death, in 1875. 
His wife, Anna Nelson, remained in her native land until 1887, when she 
emigrated to the United States, locating in Whiteside county, Illinois, 
where she still resides. To her and her husband eight children were bora, 
namely: Nils J., the special subject of this biographical sketch; Cary, 
deceased ; John August, of Port Adelaide, Australia ; Bertha, wife of John 
Karlstrand, a furrier in Chicago, Illinois ; Axel Harold, deceased ; Anton 
William; Alexius, a farmer in this county; and Axel, the second, de- 
ceased. 

After leaving school, Nils J. Smith worked with his father in the 
smithy, learning the trade of a blacksmith. In 1876, with the enterprise 
characteristic of his countrymen, he determined to boldly venture forth in 
search of fortune. With this end in view, he came to the United States, 
and for five years thereafter worked as a farm laborer near Sterling, 
Illinois. Going from there to Chicago in 1881, he followed his trade'for 
a year, and then migrated to St. Paul. Finding employment on the large 
farming estate of J. J. Hill, Mr. Smith was time-keeper there a year and 
a half, after which he continued work for Mr. Hill for ten years, being 
employed as a blacksmith and an engineer. Taking up his residence in 
Lindstrom in 1894, he opened a blacksmith's shop, which he has since 
operated successfully, having won an extensive and remunerative patron- 
age. 

Mr. Smith married, April 2, 1885, Mary Dahlberg, a daughter of J. 
P. Magnusson, of Smiland, Sweden, and into their household four chil- 
dren have made their advent, namely: Anna, employed in the Swedish 
Hospital, in Minneapolis ; Nils, James, and Esther. Religiously Mr. and 
Mrs. Smith are worthy members of the English LutHeran church.' Po- 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 391 

litically Mr. Smith is quite active in the Republican party, and for three 
years served as a member of the village council, and for six years was 
clerk of the school district. 

Alfred Melin. — Prominent among the foremost merchants of Chi- 
sago county is Alfred Melin, who is successfully engaged in the clothing 
business in Lindstrom, being at the head of the firm of Alfred Melin & 
Co. He was bom, September 9, 1874, in Center City, Chisago county, 
Minnesota, of Swedish ancestry, being a son of John Melin. 

A native of Sweden, John Melin was bom, bred and educated in the 
province of Blekinge. Choosing the independent occupation of a farmer, 
he was there employed in tilling the soil for a few years, but in 1868 came 
to this country with the especial purpose in view of becoming a land- 
holder. Locating at once in Chisago county, he bought a tract of land, 
and began the arduous task of clearing and improving a homestead, labor- 
ing with a resolute will, he succeeded in his efforts, and has since been 
prosperously emptoyed in general farming. To him and his wife, whose 
maiden name was Celia Nelson, eight children have been bom, namely: 
James E., a banker in Center City, Chisago county ; Alfred, the special sub- 
ject of this sketch; Victor, engaged in agricultural pursuits in Chisago 
county ; Minnie, wife of W. D. Olson, of Isanti county ; Amanda, wife of 
Elmer Nelson, a farmer in Sugar Grove, Pennsylvania; Effie, wife of 
Russell Carlson, a monument dealer in Little Falls, Minnesota ; Alphine, 
living at home ; and Irving, also at home. 

Receiving while young a practical common school education, Alfred 
Melin was likewise well trained in the various branches while living on 
the home farm. Going to Minneapolis in 1899, he was there employed 
in business as a grocer for two years, when, in 1901, he located in 
Lindstrom, where, in partnership with his brother, James E. Melin, he 
has since carried on a substantial clothing business under the firm name 
of Alfred Melin & Co., being the leading merchants in that line in this 
part of the county. 

Mr. Melin married, December 31, 1900, Ida Engelson, daughter of 
S. C. Engelson, of Center City, Minnesota, and they are the parents of two 
children, namely : Ardella and Lester. Politically Mr. Melin is an active 
worker in the Republican ranks, and has served most satisfactorily as pres- 
ident of the Village Council. Religiously he is a member of the English 
Lutheran church, and fraternally he belongs to the Modern Woodmen of 
America. 



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392 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Otto Anderson, retired farmer, residing near Lindstrom, in Chisago 
county, Minnesota, was bom October 7, 1835, at Ugnanas, in Hofmantorp 
parish, Smiland, Sweden, his parents being Anders and Kajsa Anderson. 
As he was the youngest in a family of eight children, he was named Otto, 
or "Atto," which, in Swedish, means eight. 

The first of his family to leave his native country for America was 
Peter G., the oldest brother, who arrived here in 1867. Samuel, another 
brother, followed about thirteen years later, and, like his brother, settled 
in Chisago county. Both are now dead, and Otto, the subject of this 
sketch, is the only survivor of the family. 

Andreas, the father, possessed a decidedly mechanical nature, and he 
built and operated, a grist mill, a cloth finishing plant and a dyeing estab- 
lishment ; but getting old and feeble, and not having sufiicient capital to 
continue so many industries, he abandoned all except that of dyeing. 

Otto finished a short course in the parish school and became con- 
firmed, when he was sixteen years old ; but even at this youthful period, 
the conditions of the family became such as to make it necessary for him 
to succeed his father in the dyeing business, and he thus assumed the 
whole management of the plant, and continued it until he departed for 
America, seventeen years later. 

Through his business relations in Sweden he acquired an extensive 
acquaintance, and by all his acquaintances and friends he was called "Otto 
Fargare," which meant Otto the dyer. This name followed him to Amer- 
ica, and is still used by his older friends. 

Mr. Anderson came to the United States in 1868, arriving by boat at 
Taylor's Falls, with but two dollars in his pocket. His wife and the 
three children were left in Sweden until he could earn enough money to 
pay their passage, which was accomplished iq less than a year. 

Upon the arrival of his family in 1869, Mr. Anderson bought, on easy 
terms, a tract of school land. This land was six miles south of Taylor's 
Falls, near the St. Croix river, on the so-called "stage-road." He built 
a small log house thereon, which of necessity was constructed on princi- 
ples of stem simplicity and rigid economy. The land was heavily tim- 
bered, requiring many years of hard labor to clear enough to sustain a 
family. In the meantime Mr. Anderson was obliged to work out as a 
harvest hand during the summer months, the scene of his labors being near 
New Richmond and Hudson, Wisconsin. This was arduous work for a 
man imaccustomed thereto ; but the native courage, determination and per- 
severance, so characteristic of "Smilandingar," conquered all difficulties. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 393 

Great was his triumph when enough land had been cleared to plant, 
between the huge stumps, six bushels of wheat, three bushels of rye, and 
some potatoes ; but his joy was of short duration, for a cyclone, accompa- 
nied by hail, entirely destroyed his first crop. This was the most trying 
year of Mr. Anderson's existence ; but, undaunted in spirit, he worked and 
persevered until he recovered from the blow. After a period of prosper- 
ity he was able to buy more land, and finally became the proud possessor 
of one hundred and twenty acres, which, in its high state of cultivation and 
development, constituted one of the best and most productive farms in 
Chisago county. His labors, and those of his estimable wife, who in all 
the trying years had performed her full share, had at last been rewarded. 

Before emigrating Mr. Anderson had married, in 1859, Miss Johanna 
Malmberg, bom October 4, 1836, in Jonkoping parish, Sweden. They 
have had ten children, of whom seven are living. 

August J., the oldest, born in Sweden, i860, has served four years as 
a representative in the State Legislature, and is now a State Food In- 
spector. He is married to Miss Josephina J. Holm, of Taylor's Falls. 
They have three daughters and reside at Lindstrom. 

Ida J., bom in Sweden, is married to Herman Hallstrom. For many 
years they resided on a homestead near Seattle, Washington, and later 
moved to a farm in Sibley county, Minnesota. 

Victor C, bom in 1871, being the first bora on the old homestead, in 
Chisago county, was for thirteen years Deputy Auditor of Chisago county, 
and now occupies a responsible position in the State Grain Inspection Serv- 
ice. He is married to Miss Miranda Swanson, a granddaughter of Anders 
Swenson, who was one of the first three settlers of the Chisago Lake Coun- 
try, and who owned the land on which the townsite of Center City is now 
located. 

Mary E. is married to John Taylor, a Government engineer at Fort 
Missoula, Montana ; Josephina H. is engaged in the millinery trade in Min- 
neapolis, Minnesota ; Clara M. is a book-keeper in Seattle, Washington ; 
Anna resides with her parents. 

In 1905 Mr. Anderson sold his farm and purchased a beautiful 
wooded tract of fifteen acres, near Lindstrom, where he and his wife will 
probably spend the balance of their lives. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Anderson, despite the years they are carrying, 
and the many hardships they have experienced, are still enjoying fairly 
good health and are happy in their beautiful home, surrounded as they are 
by all the ordinary comforts of an age of comforts. They attend regularly 



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394 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

the services of the Swedish Lutheran church at Center City, of which 
they have ever been consistent and devoted members. 

Mr. Anderson has always been of a cheerful and happy disposition, 
kind hearted and inflexibly honest, while Mrs. Anderson is a splendid type 
of those sturdy pioneer women, whose persistent toil and watchful frugal- 
ity have constituted the most potent factors of ultimate success. Mr. and 
Mrs. Anderson enjoy, , as they deserve to enjoy, the respect and esteem 
of all who know them. 

Albert F. Carlson is the proprietor and operator of a busy saw mill, 
box factory and planing mill at Chisago City, and the owner of timber 
lands both in Minnesota and Wisconsin. He was bom four miles north 
of Chisago City, March 9, 1877^ and his parents are John W. and Lina S. 
Carlson, the former born in 1840 and the latter in 1836. They hail from 
Sandsjo, Smiland, John W. having come to America in 1870 and Mrs. 
Carlson in 1871. They had five children, of whom two daughters died in 
infancy, in Sweden. The others are as follows: Amanda C, at home; 
Edward A., book-keeper and shareholder in the Farmers' Co-operative 
stores in Lindstrom and Chisago City, and Albert F., of this sketch. He 
was educated in the district school and confirmed in the Chisago Lake 
Swedish Lutheran church. At eighteen years of age he bought his father's 
farm, which he continued to operate until 1901, when he sold it and bought 
land at Kost, Chisago county, on which he built a saw mill and a box 
factory. This he conducted until 1907, when he bought a tract of timber 
land in Wisconsin, on which he also erected a saw mill and box factory, 
which he sold to his partner, Elmer F. Erickson, in 1909, retaining the 
saw mill, which he at once removed to Chisago City. Here he has built 
a box factory, a saw mill and a planing mill on a scale that is extensive 
for this part of the state, equipping his plant with all kinds of modem 
machinery. The business was incorporated under the laws of the state 
of Minnesota in 1909 by A. F. Carlson, Edward A. Carlson and O. F. 
Peehl, A. F. Q^rlson being the president and manager of the concern, Mr. 
Peehl, vice-president, and Edward A. Carlson, secretary and treasurer. 
The corporate capital is $15,000. 

Mr. Carlson is, as can be gathered from the foregoing, a very indus- 
trious and enterprising young man. To use his own words, he has been 
so busy "he has had no time to get married." He still retains his one 
hundred and twenty acres of land at Kost and one hundred and forty acres 
of timber land in Polk county, Wisconsin. He also has a half interest in 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 395 

a threshing machine, which is well patronized by the farmers of Chisago 
county. Mr. Carlson is a member of the Modern Woodmen, and sociable, 
as well as industrious and successful. 

Peter Johan Gustafson, a widely known agent for agricultural im- 
plements and a skilled blacksmith and farmer, was born in Elmeboda 
(Brannebo), Smiland, August 10, 1865. His parents were Gustaf and 
Maja Lena (Peterson) Johanson. To them were bom two sons, the sub- 
ject of this sketch and Carl Ferdinand Gustafson. The latter is a cook in 
Minneapolis. Peter Johan received his education in the public schools in 
Sweden and was confirmed in the Swedish Lutheran church at Chisago 
City, being among the first class of 1881. At an earlier period the children 
from Chisago City were confirmed in the Swedish church at Center City. 

Mr. Gustafson came from Sweden to Chisago City in 1879, having 
been sent for by his uncle, Peter Johan Johanson, who was running a 
blacksmith and horse-shoeing shop, and is still living at the age of seventy- 
four. Under him Mr. Gustafson learned his trade, and worked for him 
several years, and in 1886, was taken iilto partnership. In 1897 he turned 
over the business to Mr. Gustafson and retired. While working in part- 
nership with his uncle and being of a commercial mind, Mr. Gustafson had 
commenced selling farming implements and machinery on his own ac- 
count, making considerable money in that line. People who know him 
best claim that he is the leading agent of the implement and harvesting 
machine companies in this region. For years he has been doing a very 
extensive business in that line, as well as in horse-shoeing, blacksmithing 
and repairing. He has by honesty and fair dealings won the unqualified 
confidence of the farmers in the surrounding country, and when his cus- 
tomers needed to buy on time, Mr. Gustafson always acconmiodated 
them, being able to hold their notes without discounting them in bank and 
extending them when needed. 

On June 9, 1888, Mr. Gustafson married Jennie Berg, whose parents 
came from Ojaby, near Vexio, Sweden. She was bom in old Chisago City, 
July 6, 1869. They have three children: Minnie Alvida, bom June 2, 
1889; Carl William, who was bom August 9, 1891, is a graduate of Min- 
nesota College, now pursuing a scientific course at the Gustavus Adolphus 
College, St. Peter, and expects to matriculate at the University of Minne- 
sota ; and John Henry, born May 12, 1895, who is attending school at Chi- 
sago City. The family are members of the Swedish Lutheran church of 



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396 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

that place, and Mr. Gustafson is a member of the Modem Woodmen of 
America. He owns a fine farm of forty-three acres in old Chisago City, 
where he has his home. 

Victor Ludwig Johnson. — One of the most prominent of the men 
of worth in Chisago county is found in the person of Victor Ludwig 
Johnson, a senator, a banker and a business man of the highest ability. 
Bom in Chisago Lake township of Chisago county, January 9, 1871, he is 
a son of Sven L. and Wilhelmina (Nord) Johnson, and the father, bora 
in Ostra Thorsas parish, Smiland, in 1835, is living now with his daugh- 
ter Anna in North Dakota. He came to America in 1868, while his wife 
came to this country with her parents from Ostergotland in 1856, and she 
died in 1880. Of the five children in their family Victor Ludwig was the 
first bom ; Edward is a merchant in Montana ; George F. is the editor of 
the Chisago County News ; Anna married M. M. Borman, of Abercrombie, 
North Dakota, and Hilda, who was quite small at her mother's death, was 
adopted by J. P. Nord and his wife, and she is now the wife of A. T. 
Riley, a banker at Windermere, North Dakota. 

From the public schools Victor L. Johnson passed to the State Normal 
School at St. Cloud, where he pursued a teacher's course and afterward 
taught country school for eight years. He then began the study of law 
in the office of Peter H. Stolberg at Harris, and later pursued a full course 
of study in the law department of the University of Minnesota and grad- 
uated from that institution in 1895 with the degree of LL. B. But he had 
hardly time to engage in practice before he was nominated by acclamation 
for the office of treasurer of Chisago county, and was elected in 1896 and 
served for four terms without opposition either at the primaries or at the 
polls, being elected without a single dissenting vote. At the expiration of 
his fourth term he voluntarily withdrew in order to engage in the banking 
business. The Chisago County State Bank, of which he is the cashier, was 
originally organized as a private bank by James E. Melin, John C. Carlson 
and Victor L. Johnson, each taking a third interest, but in the year of 1906 
this institution was incorporated as a state bank with a capital of twenty- 
five thousand dollars, Mr. Melin becoming its president and Mr. Johnson 
its cashier. The bank is now the largest in the county, and has deposits 
amounting to three hundred thousand dollars. Mr. Johnson is also a part 
owner of the State Bank of Scandia, Minnesota, and with others is inter- 
ested in Minnesota land, of which four thousand acres are timbered and 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 397 

one thousand in farm lands. In 1906 Mr. Johnson became a candidate for 
the office of state senator and was elected by a three to one vote, and his 
career in that office was characterized by the highest integrity and is well 
worthy of emulation. 

He married in 1899 Miss Ida Tuvey, bom at Taylor's Falls, Chisago 
county, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nels Tuvey, who came to this coimty 
as pioneers in 1858. Of the two children of this union the daughter died in 
infancy and the son, Cyril, was born October i, 1901. Mr. Johnson is a 
Blue Lodge Mason and a member of the Knights of Pythias and the Mod- 
em Woodmen. 

Henry Augustus Swenson^ surveyor of Chisago county at Center 
City, and a civil engineer who has eamed a fine reputation in railroad, har- 
bor and drainage work, is a splendid credit to himself, his family and his 
Swedish ancestry. He was bom near Chisago City, July 12, 1857, his par- 
ents being John and Sara (Shaken) Swenson. His father was a chorister, 
organist and school teacher at Ormesberga, Smiland, who came to Amer- 
ica and Chisago Lake in 1855 ; pre-empted a homestead in Chisago Lake 
township (section 30, township 34 north, range 20 west), settled down 
and raised a family. He died in 1883 and his wife in 1908, and they are 
both buried in Lindstrom cemetery. To them were born eight children, 
of whom four are living. One daughter and one son died in infancy; 
Jennie C, wife of Frank Erlandson, died in 1879, and Emelie F., at Lind- 
strom in 1908, the same year as her mother. The living children are: 
John Alfred, bom in Sweden in 1854, who is cashier of the Scandinavian- 
American Bank, St. Paul ; Henry A., of this sketch ; Oscar W., superin- 
tendent of construction with Foley Bros., Larson & Co., railroad con- 
tractors, and Olive Agnes, wife of George W. Martin, who is in the rail- 
road supply business at Duluth. 

Henry A. Swenson attended the district school at Chisago City until 
1873, having been confirmed in the Chisago Lake Swedish Lutheran 
church in the preceding year. In 1874-75, while still in his teens, he 
taught school in Chisago and Isanti counties. He then attended grammar 
school at Taylor's Falls and Carleton College (1876-1877), and during 
a portion of 1877-78 he was clerk in the office of the state superintendent 
of public instmction, David Burt. 

In 1879-80, Mr. Swenson continued his scientific course at Carleton 
College. After leaving college he worked in the engineering department 



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398 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

of the St. Paul and Duluth Railroad until 1888, occupying the position 
of chief engineer during the last five years of that period. He then en- 
gaged in the real estate business at West Superior, Wisconsin, and from 
1890 to 1892 was principal United States Government inspector of the 
harbor improvements on the Superior side of the Duluth-Superior har- 
bor. In 1893-95 he engaged in private engineering and surveying in 
Chisago and adjoining counties, and subsequently, at different times, was 
assistant engineer for the Great Western, Great Northern, St. Paul & 
Duluth and the Northern Pacific Railroads, and the St. Paul Union 
Depot Company. In 1903, Mr. Swenson was appointed superintendent 
on the drainage work then being projected in Chisago and part of Wash- 
ington and Isanti counties, in which position he has been serving until 
the present time. In 1906 he was elected surveyor of Chisago county and at 
the completion of his term, January i, 1909, he declined a renomination, 
but his successor, Harry Colwell, having resigned, Mr. Swenson was 
appointed to fill the position until the next term. In connection with 
other duties, since 1899 he has continuously maintained an office for the 
general practice of general engineering and surveying. He is a member 
of the Civil Engineers' Society of St. Paul, of the Commercial Qub of 
St. Paul, and of the Minnesota Historical Society — a man of broad and 
able professional character, and a popular and sociable gentleman. 

Rev. Andrew Sjoberg. — Without thought of self, and with the 
spirit of the Master manifested in his labors. Rev. Andrew Sjoberg is 
faithfully ministering to the spiritual needs of his congregation at the 
Swedish Mission church of Rush City, Minnesota, where he has served 
as pastor for ten years. He was bom, December 5, 1865, in Vermland, 
Sweden, where his parents, John Larson and Britta (Erickson) lived and 
died, being engaged in agricultural pursuits. The parental household 
consisted of eight children, as follows : Sophia, who married W. F. Ber- 
gen, an iron worker of Sweden ; John and Lars, both engaged in farming 
in their native land; Lina, married Carl Johnson, an iron worker in 
Sweden ; Louisa, wife of E. Palmquist, of Sweden, also an iron worker ; 
Andrew, the special subject of this brief biography; Anna, wife of G. 
Brostrom, a farmer, in Sweden; and Charles J., deceased. 

Receiving his rudimentary education in the common schools, An- 
drew Sjoberg remained at home, assisting his father in the care of the 
farm until 1892. Emigrating in that year to the United States, he fol- 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 399 

lowed farming in Grant county, Minnesota, for seven months, when, 
having been interested in religious matters from early life, he began pre- 
paring himself for the ministry. Going to Minneapolis, Mr. Sjoberg 
studied theology in that city two years, after which he continued the 
study in Chicago for a year, then returned to Minneapolis, where he 
again studied for a year. Being then sent out in the mission field, he 
was in North Dakota for six months, in Iowa seven months, and at 
Winnipeg Junction, Minnesota, three and one-half years. For the past 
ten years Mr. Sjoberg has been pastor of the Swedish Missions church 
in Rush City, Minnesota, in 1902 being ordained as a minister, and is 
performing the duties connected with his positon most faithfully. 

On April 15, 1902, Mr. Sjoberg married Amanda Berg, of Moor- 
head, Minnesota, and they have three children, namely: Herbert Ver- 
non, May Harriet, and Wendell Vernon. Politically Mr. Sjoberg is a 
Republican. 

Rev. Carl A. Stenholm. — Although he has been in the ministry a 
comparatively short time, Rev. Carl A. Stenholm, as pastor of the Swe- 
dish Lutheran church at Rush City, Chisago county, is carrying on a 
most successful work in the building up of his congregation. He is well 
educated, a deep thinker, and as broad and liberal in his spirit as he is 
sincerely devout in his convictions. A Swede by birth and breeding, he 
was bom, December 13, 1873, in Grongolsmlila Tving, Blekinge Ian, 
where his parents, Sven Manson and Ellen Olson, spent their lives. His 
father, a farmer by occupation, died in 1875, in manhood's prime, leaving 
two children, namely : Carl A., the subject of this sketch ; and Ida, wife 
of Magnus Abramson, a farmer in Lindstrom, Minnesota. The mother 
subsequently married for her second husband Andrew Pilquist, by whom 
she had two children, also. Alma and Walfried. 

Coming to America in May, 1888, a lad of fourteen years, Carl 
A. Stenholm worked as a farm hand in Almelund, Chisago county, Min- 
nesota, until 1895. Having by that time a sufficient sum of money to 
warrant him in so doing, he entered Gustavus Adolphus College, in St. 
Peter, from which he was graduated in 1905. Going afterwards to Rock 
Island, Illinois, Mr. Stenholm was graduated from the Theological De- 
partment of Augustana College in 1908, and on June 14, of that year 
was ordained to the ministry in Chicago, Illinois. Since his ordination 
Mr. Stenholm has had charge of the Swedish Lutheran church in Rush 



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400 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

City, where, by his ability, his quiet persuasion, and his earnest enthu- 
siasm, he is improving the material as well as the spiritual welfare of 
those who look to him for help, comfort and advice. 

On June 23, 1908, Mr. Stenholm was united in marriage with Eliza- 
beth Hedberg, daughter of Revisorn i Kongl. Kammar-Ratten Erland 
George and Hilma (Spangberg) Hedberg, of Stockhohn, Sweden. Po- 
litically Mr. Stenholm takes an intelligent interest in local affairs, and is 
a stanch supporter of the principles of the Republican party. 

Charles A. Johnson, of the firm of Johnson & Sandberg, Rush 
City, Minnesota, has been identified with this place since 1899, and is 
classed with its worthy and substantial citizens. Mr. Johnson is a native 
of Sweden. He was born in Falkenberg, Halland, October 15, 1869, son 
of S. A. and Annie Johnson, natives of the same place. S. A. Johnson 
was a blacksmith. He came to the United States in 1878 and settled 
at Williamsport, Pennsylvania, where he spent three and a half years, 
at the end of that time returning to Sweden. He died in Sweden in 
1908. His widow still lives there. Nine children comprise their family, 
of whom brief record is as follows : Phena, of Sweden ; Charles A., the 
subject of this sketch; Henning, a blacksmith, of Sweden; Augusta, 
married and living in Brooklyn, New York; Hilma, wife of Gust Carl- 
son, a conductor of Falkenberg, Sweden ; Matilda, wife of Carl Treffen- 
berg, a railway car repairer of Sweden; Victoria, of Sweden; Oscar, a 
carpenter of Brooklyn, New York; and Fritdjof, a farmer of Missouri. 

In the public schools of his native land, Charles A. received his edu- 
cation, and in his father's blacksmith shop he learned his trade. In 1888, 
he came to the United States, stopping first in New York City, where he 
spent one year, and then coming west to Minnesota, Here he at once 
found railroad work. He was employed on construction work at various 
places along the line, and w^ thus occupied until 1899, when he came to 
Rush City. Here he opened a blacksmith shop, with Wille Sandberg 
as partner, and has since conducted a prosperous business. 

December 17, 1904, Mr. Johnson married Miss Anna Louisa Rolan- 
der, and they have three children: Raymond, Franklin, and Elsie. The 
family attend the Swedish Mission church. Mr. Johnson is a member of 
the Modem Woodmen of America, and, politically, is a Republican. 

Wille Sandberg, who is associated with Charles A. Johnson in 
running a blacksmith shop at Rush City, Minnesota, is one of the re- 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 401 

spected citizens of this place. A brief sketch of his life gives the follow- 
ing facts: Wille Sandberg was born in Smiland, Sweden, March 28, 
1873, son of Carl and Louisa Sandberg. The father, a blacksmith by 
trade, passed his life and died in Smiland, his death occurring in 1894; 
the mother died there in 1906. In their family were six children, namely : 
John, deceased; Alfred, a blacksmith; Carl, a farmer; Amelia, wife of 
Jon Anderson; Johannes, a blacksmith, and Wille. All, except Wille, 
are residents of Sweden. Wille grew up in Sweden, receiving his edu- 
cation and learning his trade there. Previous to his learning the black- 
smith trade, he worked for some time in a spool factory. He came to the 
United States in 1897, went direct to Dakota, and there engaged in farm 
work. After spending four months in farm work, he came to Minneap- 
olis and turned his attention to his trade. The following siunmer, how- 
ever, he returned to Dakota, and worked there during the harvest season. 
In the fall he came back to Minnesota and in Rush City resumed work 
at his trade. Four years later he formed a partnership with Mr. John- 
son, which has since been successfully continued. 

April 29, 1903, Mr. Sandberg married Miss Qara Malmsteen, of 
Grass Lake, Minnesota, who died July 2, 1905, leaving him with a little 
daughter, Agnes Genevieve Amelia. Politically Mr. Sandberg is a 
Republican. He is a member of the Swedish Mission church, and is a 
teacher in the Sunday School. 

Swan A. Carlson. — Among the thrifty and enterprising Swedes of 
Chisago county Swan A. Carlson is deserving of mention, hav- 
ing achieved success in the business world through his own efforts, being 
now prosperously engaged in mercantile pursuits as a harness dealer at 
North Branch. A native of Sweden, he was bom, September 16, 1857, 
in Hallen, where he spent the earlier years of his life. His parents, Carl 
and Mary (Anderson) Swanson, life-long farmers of Sweden, reared 
five children, as follows: Lena, widow of the late Carl Anderson; 
Amanda, wife of Fred Whitcomb, a harness dealer in Atwater, Minne- 
sota; Swan A., the subject of this short personal history; Inga, wife of 
John Moore, a farmer in South Dakota ; and Emily, wife of Mr. Lund- 
gren, of Atwater. 

Acquiring his early education in the public schools of his native 
country. Swan A. Carlson obtained an excellent knowledge of agricul- 



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402 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

ture while working with his father, and there followed farming until 
1 88 1. Determining then to make a decided change, he emigrated to 
Minnesota, and for about four years was employed in tilling the soil in 
Atwater. Going then to Minneapolis, he was there in the employ of 
the C. A. Smith Leather Company for eighteen consecutive years, in the 
time becoming familiar with the leather business. In 1903 Mr. Carlson 
located at North Branch, Chisago county, and has here been exceedingly 
fortunate in establishing a prosperous business, being one of the leading 
harness dealers in this section of the state. 

Mr. Carlson married, January 26, 1895, {Catherine Fredeen, a native 
of Vermland, Sweden, and they are the parents of three children, namely : 
Roy Merriam, Florence, and Helen. Politically Mr. Carlson is a sound 
Republican, and fraternally he belongs to the Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons. 

Rev. Alexis Andreen. — ^A man of earnest convictions, talented and 
cultured. Rev. Alexis Andreen, of North Branch, Chisago county, is 
widely known as an earnest worker in religious undertakings, and as 
pastor of the Swedish Lutheran church is meeting with eminent success. 
A native of Illinois, he was bom, March 28, 1875, in Mercer county, a 
son of Rev. A. and Hilda Andreen. 

Rev. A. Andreen was bom in Grenna, Jonkopings Ian, Sweden, and 
was there bred and educated. He subsequently taught several terms in 
a parochial school in his native land. Resigning his position in 1853, he 
came to America in that year, and subsequently studied theology at Au- 
gustana College, in Rock Island, Illinois. Entering then upon a minis- 
terial career, he held pastorates in various places in Indiana and Illinois, 
continuing his labors until his death, in 1880. His wife, also a native of 
Sweden, was bora in Oskarshamn, and died in this country in 1878. Of 
the twelve children bom of their marriage, seven are living, as follows : 
Rev. Dr. Gustaf, president of Augustana College, Rock Island; Mrs. 
Lydia Carlson, of Lindsborg, Kansas; Mrs. Hilda Larson, of Turlock, 
California ; Rev. Philip Andreen, of San Francisco, California ; Mrs. Vic- 
toria Erickson, of Wakefield, Nebraska; Carl, of San Francisco, em- 
ployed in the govemment service ; and Alexis, the special subject of this 
brief biographical notice. 

Entering Bethany College, Lindsborg, Kansas, in 1890, Alexis An- 
dreen was graduated from that institution with the degree of A. B. in 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 403 

1895, after which he continued his studies at Yale University for a year, 
completing his seminary course at Mount Ayr, Philadelphia, in 1900. 
Two years later, in 1902, he was graduated from Augustana College, and 
the same year was ordained to the ministry. Mr. Andreen began his 
ministerial labors in Clinton, Iowa, remaining there until 1906, when 
he accepted his present position in North Branch, where his work has 
been blessed to the advancemjsnt of God's kingdom. During his pastorate 
in this vicinity, Mr. Andreen has made many warm friends, endearing 
himself not only to those of his congregation, but to people in general, 
as a man of upright principles and enlightened views, winning the good 
will of all with whom he comes in contact. 

On, September 16, 1903, Mr. Andreen was united in marriage with 
Esther Monteen, and they have two children, namely : Bertil Alexis, and 
Bertha Esther. In his political affiliations, Mr. Andreen is an Inde- 
pendent Republican, and has served as chairman of the school board. 

Rev. Andrew Hult, pastor of the Swedish Lutheran church at 
Harris, Minnesota, was born in Vermland, Sweden, October 24, 1833. 
His parents, Sven and Maria Hult, were bom, passed their lives, and died 
in Vermland, the father being a harness-maker. In their family were 
five children: Christina, deceased; Anna, still living in Sweden; Sven, 
deceased; Louisa, also deceased, and Andrew, the subject of this sketch. 

Andrew Hult was educated at Thorsby, Fryksanda socken, his edu- 
cation being directed with the ministry in view, and previous to his enter- 
ing the work of the ministry he gave ten years to school-teaching in Swe- 
den. Then, in 1868, he came to the United States and settled at Chicago, 
where, the following year, he was installed as minister in what is now 
Salem Congregational church on the South Side. He was pastor of that 
church until 1871. The next seven years he lived in Campbell, Massachu- 
setts, where, in addition to preaching, he was interested in literary work. 
He started there the publication of a Sunday School paper called Bam- 
vannen, the first Sunday School paper published in the Swedish language 
in the United States. He also published the first Sunday School song 
book, called "Bamvannens Lyra." Returning to Chicago in 1878, he 
continued to write for the publication mentioned. About this time he 
also published a primer and one "Familiestejeman," and some others. He 
spent nine and a half years as pastor at New Scandia, Washington 
county, Minnesota, and eleven years and three months at Thread Lake, 



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404 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Wisconsin, following which, in September, 1906, he came to Harris and 
took up the work of his present charge. 

In 1882, Mr. Hult married Miss Freda Matilda Jacobson, of Smi- 
land, Sweden, and they are the parents of three children, namely : Anna, 
wife of A. Bergene, Ph. D., of Lindsborg, Kansas ; Marie, and Gothf red 
Emanuel, Professor of Greek, Grand Forks, North Dakota. The son mar- 
ried a Miss Lawrence. Mr. and Mrs. Bergene have three children: 
Adele, Ruth, and Esther. Mr. Hult is a Republican, and a member of the 
Anti-Saloon League. 



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CHAPTER XIX. 
WASHINGTON COUNTY. 

The Marine Settlement. — The Swedish settlement Marine is lo- 
cated in the northeast comer of Washington county, embracing towns 
31 and 32, range 20, together with a narrow strip of land east of range 
19. The northern part of town 32 was originally and exclusively settled 
by Swedes. They came mostly from Smaland and Dalsland, although 
Vestergotland, Vermland and Helsingland also have contributed their 
quota. 

The land which is elevated about 500 feet above the level of the 
St. Croix river, is watered abundantly by a number of small creeks, of 
which Silver creek is the largest, as well as by beautiful lakes. The 
largest of these is Lake Vasa or Big Marine Lake, commcmly called Big 
Lake. It extends its water four miles in length and three miles in 
width. West of this lake is White Rock Lake, named for a large 
white stone in the middle of the lake. In the northern part of the 
settlement is Bony Lake, which received its name after Peter Bony or 
Bondy (Bonde), one of the first Swedish settlers on this lake. Then 
there are Goose Lake, Hay Lake, Long Lake and Fish Lake. All these 
lakes are in town 32 or the original Swedish settlement. 

The city of Marine, or Marine Mills, was founded in 1839. This 
neighborhood was probably the first settled in Minnesota. In 1848, when 
Wisconsin was admitted as a state in the Union and Minnesota organ- 
ized as a territory, the town of Marme held its first election. 

Among the first Swedes who lived in this vicinity is mentioned a 
man by the name of Jacob Tomell. He lived among the Indians, with 
whom he traded in furs and skins. He was killed in 1847 by an Indian. 
The murderer was caught and tried before a jury made up of new set- 
tlers from Marine, Stillwater and other places on the river. He was 
fotmd guilty and was hung at St. Croix Falls. At the execution almost 
the whole white population, about fifty persons, were present It was 

405 



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4o6 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

almost expected that the Indians who were there in large numbers 
would try to free the prisoner, but, although four hundred warriors 
strong, they were quietly looking on while the murderer suffered the 
penalty of his misdeed. 

The first Swedes to take up claims and settle here were three young 
men who came in 1850. One of them was Oscar Roos, who later be- 
came a prominent politician and business man in Chisago county, another 
was Charles Femstrom, who later moved to Iowa, and the name of 
the third was Sandahl, who later returned to Sweden. They pre-empted 
land and settled at Hay Lake, but the following spring transferred their 
rights to Daniel Nilson who had just then arrived. 

In the spring of 1851 six families arrived from Helsingland. They 
all intended to settle at Chisago Lake, but two of them, Daniel Nilson 
and Englund found the land there covered with too much heavy timber 
and consequently hard to clear for which reason they decided to hunt 
for scMwe places better suited to their tastes. They went south and 
settled at Fish Lake, just north of Big Lake in town 32. The other 
four families remained at Chisago Lake, or Swede Lake, as it also was 
called, and were the first Swedes who settled in Chisago county. Daniel 
Nilsonf and Englund immediately set about building themselves log 
homes and already the same spring planted some com and potatoes. 
The crops they gathered the following fall were the first harvested by 
Swedes in the Marine settlement. Of those old settlers Daniel Nilson 
later moved away from the settlement. Englund died and his widow 
married Christian Rosengren and was still living a few years ago. 

With the exception of the little city of Marine, which had a few 
inhabitants, there were no other settlers in the surroimding country 
than Daniel Nilson, Englund and a German nobleman by the name of 
Paul Edward von Kuster, who with his family owned the place which 
later came into the hands of Fred Lammers, son-in-law of Daniel Nil- 
son. This von Kuster and his family were among the first members of 
the Swedish-Lutheran church which later on was organized. 

In the fall of 1851 Sven Anderson arrived. He was bom in Dais- 
land, but had left his home when young and lived in Denmark some 
years. In the spring of 1851 he came to America and lived scwne time 
in Illinois. When he heard about the new Swedish settlements in Min- 
nesota, he decided to come up here and settle. He bought a lot of grub 
and four cows which he brought with him. When he landed at Marine 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 407 

it was too late to get fodder for the cows, so he sold them to the Swed- 
ish settlers at Chisago Lake and Marine. These cows were the first 
domestic animals owned by the Swedes in these parts of the country. 
For the winter he secured work in Marine and part of the time in 
Areola. In 1852 he worked at Areola. He was then sent on horseback 
on some errand to Taylor's Falls. At Marine he happened to join a 
company of mounted soldiers who were sent out from Fort Snelling 
to hunt up a band of Chippewa Indians who had been in St. Paul the 
preceding night and committed some depredations. A couple of miles 
south of Taylor's Falls the soldiers overtook the depredators who, during 
the night, had passed the Icmg way from St Paul on foot. The soldiers 
opened fire, which was returned by the Indians who, however, were 
soon scattered and hid themselves in the woods, one of their number 
having been killed and two wounded. The following day, when Ander- 
son returned home he found on a small elevation near the trail the 
foot of an Indian mounted on a stick which was standing upright in 
the earth. Scattered around were different objects, such as cooking- 
pots, pans, etc., indicating that the Indians had had a feast there during 
the night. 

During the years 1853, 1854 and 1855 immigrants commenced to 
arrive in larger nimibers. In 1853 Bengt Jonson and Ake Jonson came, 
both from Bleking. Bengt settled at Goose Lake. The same time arrived 
from Helsingland Olof Olin and Ericson, who took their claims at Hay 
Lake. During 1853-54 Eric Carlson and Ostberg were found at Sand 
Lake. Carlson later removed to Cambridge, Isanti county, where he 
died. Cstberg returned to Sweden. 

The first Swedes who settled near the St. Croix river, between 
Marine and Taylor'^ Falb; were Erland Peterson and Johannes Peterson 
from Kronoberg's Lan who came in 1854. The latter called his place 
Yfslycke from his old home in Sweden. Elrland Peterson still lived in 
1881 on the same old place where he first settled. Johannes Peterson 
died before that time. Among other Swedish immigrants who arrived 
in 1854 we note Jonas Granstrand, Anders Peter Jonson, Magnus Hol- 
comb, Jonas Gabrielson, Johan Svenson, Gustaf Peterson, Johannes Hi- 
kanson, Rosell and Carl Eklund, and others. In 1858, or thereabout, 
came Nils Bengtson, Salomon Holcomb, Johan Holcomb, Carl Ekdahl, 
Johan Magnuson, Anders Larson, Magnus Hakanson, Sven W. Johan- 
son, Lindg^en, and others. All those mentioned settled as farmers. 



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4o8 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Among the older settlers from this time we note Major John Swainson, 
well known among the Minnesota Swedes. He later removed to St. 
Paul where he died a good many years 9fpy, betng rated as a good and 
well posted writer on subjects concemmg the Swedes. He buUt housei 
and cultivated a farm in the vicinity of Tarpent Lake, in town 31, about 
1854. This farm was later sold to an Englishman, Morgan May. In 
the city of Marine arrived and settled a mason by the name of Gustaf 
Carlson from Sm&land. Another Swede, Axel Ljunggren, who removed 
to Wisconsin, is mentioned as clerk with the mercantile firm of Judd, 
Walker & Company about 1854. About that time, or a little later, came 
O. Westergren. The first houses in the city, owned by Swedes, belonged 
to Gustaf Carlson and O. Westergren and were built in 1856. 

In 1854 there were no draft animals in either Chisago jLake or Ma- 
rine settlements, except a few belonging to the Marine Lumber Com- 
pany. In order to get the trade of the Swedish settlers this Company 
cleared up ways through the timbers both to Chisago Lake and in other 
directions. With their drafters they transported the goods which the 
farmers bought in their store. This work they did not do without fairly 
good compensation. For carrying a barrel of flour from Marine to 
Chisago Lake the charge was one dollar. That those greedy \mericans 
should well imderstand how to make a niee profit on goods sdd the 
new-comers was only natural. As a fair example may be mentioned that 
a barrel of flour, which in Illinois could be bought for four or five dol- 
lars, would cost delivered to the consumer ten to fifteen dollars. A 
pound of pork cost twenty-five cents ; coffee, tea, sugar and other neces- 
saries in proportion. Our poor new-comers had to exercise thrift in 
the highest degree and make a virtue out of necessity. Nature, however 
treated them better. The woods fairly swarmed with all kinds of g^anie, 
and the lakes abounded with the most delicious fish, which could be 
caught with the same ease winter and summer in unlimited quantities. 

The Indians were everywhere in the woods. There was almost in- 
cessant fighting going on between the Chippewas and the Sioux; the 
former had their abodes in Chisago county; the Sioux in Washington 
county. During the winters the Sioux used to take up their headquar- 
ters on an island in Big Lake, which is yet called Indian Island. Here 
they had a regular city with straight streets between the tepees. On a 
promontory to the north there was always kept a watch against a sur- 
prise from the hated enemy. During the winter the young warriors 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 409 

made a terrible slaughter of deer. One winter they killed 1,200. These 
Indians were always friendly to the settlers. Not one instance is on 
record where they molested the white people. They used to visit the 
cabins and trade venison for bread and other eatables, or hay for their 
horses. The white women and children, however, were awfully afraid 
of them, and no wonder, as the Indians would call when the husbands were 
away working in the woods. It is hard for us, who have come here later, 
when we see the well cultivated fields, the big herds of well-fed cattle in the 
pastures and the elegant and comfortable farmhouses, to form any cor- 
rect idea of all the hardships, sufferings and deprivations which our 
pioneer countrymen had to fight before they had won the prosperity and 
independence, of which they are so well deserving. 

The first Swedish minister who visited this settlement was Rev. 
Gustaf Unonius, well known as the founder of the St. Ansgarius (or 
Jenny Lind) Church in Qiicago, Illinois. He was here early, probably 
in 1852, and was instrumental in getting many immigrants here. He 
held service in Daniel Nilson's house, in which one couple was married, 
and two children baptized. One of those children belonged to von 
Kuster, mentioned before in this sketch. Rev. Unonius belonged to the 
Episcopal church. Another early settler was. Rev. P. A. Agrelius who 
had been a Lutheran minister in the Swedish State Church. Here he 
went over to the Methodist church. He visited the settlers in their 
homes, holding prayer meetings and preaching before any church was 
yet organized. 

Stillwater, the county seat of Washington county, was settled 
comparatively early. The first Swedish family to settle here was that 
of Sven P. Smith, of Jonkoping's Lan, Sweden, who arrived in 1855. 
He had been in Chicago since 1853, during which time four of his chil- 
dren died from cholera. Smith set about to build himself a small house 
or rather a "shack," but took sick with cholera and died before the 
house was ready. His wife also caught this mortal disease, but 
survived. During those trying and sorrowful days the sick were cared 
for by their fourteen-year-old daughter who was assisted by Mr. Charles 
Sandberg. American families brought eatables to the sick, but being 
afraid of the infectious disease, did not dare to enter the shanty and 
left their gifts outside. After her recovery Mrs. Smith kept a boarding 
house for many years. 

John P. Larson came from Halland, in 1855. At Stillwater were 



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4IO SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

already then three saw-mills running. Quite a number of young un- 
married Swedes were working in the mills and logging. Peter Nord- 
lund, who later moved to Chisago Lake, came here in 18S7. 

In 1858 a company of about one hundred unmarried people arrived 
from Kronoberg's Lan, among them Anders Olson. He went to Chi- 
sago Lake but returned to Stillwater in 1860. John Borin came from 
Vexio and served in the war. Of other Swedes from Stillwater, who 
served their adopted country are mentioned Olof Liljegren who was 
promoted to a lieutenancy, and Sven Johan Johanson and Charles 
Hessle, who lost their lives during the campaign. A large number of 
Swedes, running into the thousands, have since then come to Stillwater, 
and it would be out of the question to enumerate them. 

J. A. Johnson was bom near the city of Vexio, Smiland, Sweden, 
April 24, 1842. In 1854 he emigrated! with his parents to the United 
States, arriving at Marine Mills, Washington county, Minnesota, late in 
the fall of that year. He remained at Marine and Stillwater until 1858, 
attending school a large portion of the time. In the fall of that year 
he went to school at Dubuque, Iowa. After completing the course of 
study he learned the trade of a locomotive engineer^ which occupation 
he followed until 1866, being in the employ of the United States govern- 
ment the last year of the war, in Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee. After 
the close of the war, in 1865, he returned north as far as St. Louis, 
Missouri, where he married Miss Agnes A. Coler of that city. They 
had five children, three boys and two girls. His health having been im- 
paired in the government service, he returned to Marine in 1866, where 
he remained until January 1, 1874. In the fall of 1873 he wa^ elected to 
the office of sheriff of Washington county, which position he held for 
six years and was twice re-elected without opposition. Retiring from 
the sheriff's office in 1880, he moved to Fargo, North Dakota, and en- 
gaged in the sale of agricultural implements, in whicfi business he con- 
tinued until his demise. During his residence in the city of Fargo he 
held several offices, such as alderman, member of the board of education, 
etc. In the fall of 1884 he was nominated for the territorial senate and 
received a majority of 1,133 votes in Cass county, and 835 out of a 
total of 1,669 in the city of Fargo. In the spring of 1885 he was elected 
mayor of Fargo by over 300 majority, after one of the most hotly con- 
tested campaigns in the political history of the city. In 1886 he declined 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 411 

a re-election. While sheriff of Washington county he devoted his leisure 
moments to the study of law, and was admitted to practice in all the 
courts of Minnesota. Although not in active practice his knowledge of 
law was of great value to him in the business in which he was subse- 
quently engaged. 

John W. Jackson. — Noteworthy among the more progressive and 
energetic business men of Washington county, Minnesota, is John W. 
Jackson, who has for several years been actively identified with the ad- 
vancement of the mercantile growth and prosperity of Stillwater, where 
he is now carrying on a large and remunerative trade as proprietor of 
"The Pure Food Grocery," being located at No. 116 South Second street. 
A native of Smiland, Sweden, he was bom, September 18, 1877, son of 
August and Christina Maria Jackson, who still reside in their native 
land. 

When he had completed his school life, at the age of twelve years, 
John W. Jackson began work in a grocery store, and continued thus em- 
ployed for three years. When fifteen years old, he bade adieu to parents 
and friends, and immigrated to the United States, coming directly to 
Stillwater, where he had acquaintances. He began life here by rafting 
logs on the St. Croix river summers, and during the winter seasons being 
engaged in the northern woods. In 1898 he entered the employ of Paul 
Beauvais & Co., and for five years delivered groceries for that firm. On 
Jime 19, 1903, having saved two hundred dollars ($200) by means of 
persistent industry and wise thrift, Mr. Jackson formed a co-partnership 
with Walter Johnson, and for three years carried on a grocery business 
as junior member of the firm of Johnson & Jackson. Selling his interest 
then to his partner, Mr. Jackson, September 12, 1906, purchased the 
grocery stock of J. E. Poirer & Co., and carried on business at the old 
stand of the firm he bought out until November i, 1907. His trade then 
demanding more spacious quarters, Mr. Jackson removed to his present 
location, where he is conductin.e: the "Pure Food Grocery" with unques- 
tionable success, being one of the most progressive and popular grocers 
in the vicinity, employing five clerks. 

On April 19, 1898, Mr. Jackson married Hildur Vesall, and they 
have six children, namely: Marvin August Hamilton; Verlie Thelma 
Marie ; David Wilhelm Dwight ; HoUis Clarence Theophil ; Grace Hildur 
Linnea, and Myrl Amanda Victoria. Mr. Jackson is a member of the 
Odd Fellows, United Foresters, Equitable Fraternal Union and Vasa, 



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412 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

and also a trustee and treasurer of the Swedish Lutheran church of Still- 
water, one of the largest congregations in the cit>', and he is financial 
secretary of the Swedish Order Vasa. Mr. Jackson left December 5, 
1909, for a three months' visit to his old home in Sweden. 

David Linner was bom in Linnaryd socken, Kronbergs Ian, Swe- 
den, October 28, 1857, a son of Gustof and Johanna (Johnson) Girlson. 
Gustof Carlson, a farmer, as well as carpenter and builder, lived and died 
in Sweden, and his widow is still living there. In their family were chil- 
dren, as follows: Carl Johan, living on the old homestead in Sweden; 
Ida, who married Frans Green, a shoemaker in Sweden; Frank, a con- 
tractor and builder of Stillwater ; David, here mentioned ; Alex, of Colo- 
rado, deceased ; John, a carpenter in Minneapolis ; Joel, who died in Still- 
water; Otto, who died in infancy. 

After obtaining his education in Sweden, David Linner came to 
America in 1880, and located in Stillwater. He first secured employment 
as a carpenter for the Minnesota Thresher Company, and soon afterward 
entered the employ of the North West Thresher Company, with which he 
has ever since been associated, for the past twelve years as foreman of 
their separator erecting shop. 

He married, on September 17, 1881, Miss Gustafa Carlson, a daugh- 
ter of Carl Johanson, a farmer in Langasjo socken, Kronberg's jan, Swe- 
den, and they have had four children, as follows : Claus Willmar Leon- 
ard, a machinist of St. Paul; Ernot Herman Julius, a machinist of St. 
Paul; Elna Malvina Elillian; and Florence, who died in infancy. The 
family are members of the Swedish Lutheran church. Politically Mr. 
Linner is a Republican, and his fraternal relations are with the Modern 
Woodmen of America. 

Frank W. Linner. — A fine representative of the successful busi- 
ness men of Washington county, Minnesota, Frank W. Linner has for 
many years been prominently identified with the industrial prosperity 
of Stillwater, where, under the firm name of Frank Linner & Co., he is 
carrying on a general contracting and building business, one of the lar- 
gest of the kind in this part of the state. He was bom, September 4, 
1854, in Linnaryd socken, Kronbergs Ian, Sweden, being a son of Gustof 
and Johanna (Johnson) Carlson. Gustof Carlson, a farmer as well as car- 
penter and builder, lived and died in Sweden, and his widow is still living 
there. In their family were the following children : Carl Johan, living on 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 413 

the old homestead in Sweden ; Ida, who married Frans Green, of Sweden ; 
Frank, the subject of this article; David, a foreman at the North West 
Thresher Company; Alex and Joel, deceased; and John, a carpenter in 
Minneapolis. 

After completing his studies in the public schools of his native land, 
Frank W. Linner served an apprenticeship at the trades of a carpenter 
and wagon maker, becoming proficient in both. In 1879, becoming en- 
thused at the wonderftd descriptions given of life in America, he emi- 
grated to this country, arriving June 5, and making his way across the 
country to Stillwater, his point of destination. Entering the employ of 
the Minnesota Thresher Company, he continued with that firm as a car- 
penter for three years, the following seven years working for a large 
contractor. He subsequently worked as a wagon maker for two years, 
and from 1891 until 1897 was employed by Sven Berglimd. Having 
during all of those years acquired valuable experience, and an excellent 
knowledge of business methods as conducted in the United States, Mr. 
Linner embarked in business on his own account in 1897, in partnership 
with John Granquist and Charles Larson, under the firm name of Frank 
Linner & Co., starting a general contracting and building business. This 
enterprising firm met with success from the very first, and still continues 
its operations, each year adding to the number and magnitude of its con- 
tracts, which are many and important. 

Mr. Linner married, November 29, 1879, Augusta C. Johnson, 
daughter of John Johnson, a native of Sweden, and into the household 
thus established six children have been bom, nSunely : Anna E., who for 
six years prior to her marriage taught school, is the wife of D. H. Jcrfin- 
son, a Chicago artist ; Alice O., employed as a clerk in St. Paul ; Jennie 
W., a public school teacher; Frances Esther, a reviser at the West 
Publishing Company, in St. Paul ; Elmer Edwin, attending school ; Law- 
rence Washington, also in school. Politically Mr. Linner is an active 
supporter of the principles of the Republican party, and during the years 
of 1904, 1905, and 1906 was a member of the City Council. Religiously 
he is a consistent member of the Swedish Lutheran church, of which he 
is a trustee. Fraternally he is a member of the Modem Woodmen of 
America ; of the Knights of Pythias ; and of the United Order of Forest- 
ers. Mr. Linner is a self-made man in every sense implied by the term, 
and has had a busy and successful career, having set forth with a pur- 
pose in life, and never resting until he had accomplished it. 



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414 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Charles C. Peterson. — During many years Charles C. Peterson 
has been identified with the mercantile interests of Stillwater, and he is 
now at the head of the firm of Peterson & Company, proprietors of one 
of the largest mercantile establishments in the city. He was bom in 
Sjobylund, Westmanland, Sweden, January i, 1868, a son of Peter An- 
derson and Brigeta Christina Olson, also from that country. During 
many years the father was employed as a caretaker of machinery at the 
mines, but later in life, purchasing a tract of land, followed agricultural 
purusits for four or five years. Coming to America with his family in 
1883, he located at Crookston, Minnesota, and continued as a railroad 
employe until his retirement from active work in the year 1908, still 
maintaining his home in Crookston. He was the father of the following 
six children : Robert P., engaged in mining at Dawson City in the Yukon 
territory ; Louis E., section foreman on the !*Soo" Railroad at Hazel, Min- 
nesota; Charles C, mentioned below; William, engaged in mining at 
Susitna river, Alaska ; Mary, who married Henry Peterson, of Crookston ; 
and Lillian E., a stenographer at Grand Rapids, Minnesota. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. Peterson were members of the Swedish Lutheran church. 

Charles C. Peterson received his educational training in the com- 
mon schools of his native land of Sweden, and coming to America with 
his parents, he worked for a year on a farm. He next secured employ- 
ment as a clerk in Crookston, and later at Warren, Minnesota, and from 
there came to Stillwater in 1888 and secured employment in a dry goods 
store. After ten years there he, with two partners, Elie Papineau and 
Mrs. M. Watier, entered the dry goods business in this city. This was in 
the year 1898, and after a time he bought the interests of his partners 
and has since been at the head of Peterson & Company, a well known 
firm in Stillwater. He is a self-made man, winning his success entirely 
through his own efforts, and he now devotes his time exclusively to the 
business which he has built. In politics a Democrat, he was at one time 
its prominent candidate for the State Legislature, and later was a member 
of its ticket for the office of alderman. Although defeated at the polls for 
that office, he made a splendid run and reduced the normal Republican 
majority of two hundred in his ward to twenty-two, thus giving evidence 
of the esteem in which he is held. He is an orator of note, and his serv- 
ices as a speaker are always in demand during political campaigns and at 
the meetings of the clubs and societies which he attends. He is a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias, the Ancient Order of United Workmen, 
the M. B. A., the D. of H. and the Vasa Society, and has filled all of 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 415 

the M. B. A., the D. of H. and the Vasa Society, and has filled all of 
their offices. He is also a consistent member of the Swedish Lutheran 
church, of which he has been secretary of the board of trustees for many 
years, and during six years served as a director of the chorus. 

Mr. Peterson married, October 22, 1889, Miss Charlotte, a daughter 
of N. P. Swanson, a farmer near Stillwater. Their three children are 
C. Arthur, Evangeline E., and Roy W., all at home with their parents. 

John Ogren. — Throughout Washington county the name of Ogren 
is synonymous with thrift, enterprise, and prosperity, John Ogren, the 
special subject of this brief biographical sketch, having been a resident 
of Stillwater for thirty years, during which time he has, by intelligent 
industry, good management, and wise investments, accumulated a for- 
tune. A man of high moral principles, excellent ability, clear-headed and 
far-sighted, he has been in truth the architect of his own fortunes. Be- 
ginning life even with the world as regarded his finances, he worked 
steadily, saved his earnings, made judicious investments, and soon found 
prosperity smiling on his every effort, bringing him well merited success 
in all of his undertakings, and placing him among the leading men of the 
city. 

A native of Sweden, he was bom, July 10, i860, in Vexio, Smaland, 
a son of Gustaf and Kate (Danielson) Ogren, life-long residents of Swe- 
den, being engaged there in agricultural pursuits. The parental house- 
hold consisted of nine children, as follows: Christine, died in infancy; 
Johanna, died at the age of twenty-one years ; Mattie Christine, died in 
Center City, Minnesota, at the age of thirty-six years ; Svan Johann, en- 
gaged in farming in South Dakota ; Carl, died in infancy ; Carl August, of 
South Dakota, a farmer; John, the special subject of this biography; 
Anna Matilda, died in 1890; and Carolina, wife of John Gagnelius, en- 
gaged in the grocery business in Monmouth, Illinois. The parents were 
faithful members of the Swedish Lutheran church, and reared their 
children in the same religious belief. 

At the age of nineteen years, having received a practical education 
in the public schools of Sweden, John Ogren came to America in search 
of fame and fortune. Locating in Stillwater, Minnesota, he began his 
career in the new country as a lumber jack, working on the river and in 
the woods. Ere long, his confidence in his powers increasing with his 
knowledge of the business, he began lumbering and contracting on his 
own account, meeting with almost phenomenal success from his first 



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4i6 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

venture, and continued actively until 1907, when he retired from active 
pursuits, his private interests demanding his entire time and attention. 
Mr. Ogren has important interests both in and out of the state, owning 
timber lands of value in the state of Washington and in British Colum- 
bia ; having mining interests, with John G. Nelson, in Montana ; being in- 
terested in a packing plant in Winona, Minnesota; and, also, in a shoe 
factory in Stillwater. 

On September 10, 1887, Mr. Ogren was united in marriage with 
Carrie Agnes Erickson, daughter of Ole Erickson, and to them seven 
children have been bom, namely: Vemie G. O., Hilda Olivia, Ruth K. 
P., John Russell, Melvin Leroy, Elenora Jeanette, and Myma Christena. 
In his political affiliations, Mr. Ogren is a stanch Republican, and reli- 
giously, true to the faith of his forefathers, he is a member of the Swe- 
dish Lutheran church, in which he is a deacon. He is also a member of 
the School Board, and a director and member of the board on the Beth- 
esda Hospital of the Minnesota Conference. 

August Booren. — Noteworthy not only for the part he has con- 
tributed towards the promotion of the mercantile prosperity of Stillwater, 
but for the excellent service he rendered his constituents in the State Leg- 
islature, and as county treasurer, August Booren is especially deserving 
of more than passing mention in a work of this character. His faithful- 
ness in all his duties, his integrity and his good sense and judgment in all 
matters of business have caused him to be highly respected, not only in 
Stillwater, his home, but throughout this section of Washington county. 
A native of Sweden, he was bom, March 6, 1850, near Vexio, Smiland, 
a son of Peter Pehrson and his wife, Sara Nelson, life-long farmers in 
Sweden. He was one of a family of thirteen children, namely: Anna, 
died in infancy; Anna Kathrina, widow of John Jcrfinson, of Sweden; 
Jdin, living in Stillwater, Minnesota ; Peter Magnus, deceased ; Johannes, 
deceased ; Gustaf , of Stillwater ; Carl, died in Sweden ; Andreas, also died 
in Sweden ; August, the subject of this sketch ; Louisa the first and Louisa 
the second^ both died in infancy ; Andreas the second and David, likewise 
died in early life. The parents were members of the Swedish Lutheran 
church and reared their children in its faith. 

August Booren attended the public schools of Sweden until sixteen 
years old, when he bade good-bye to his friends and home and came to 
Minnesota. The following winter he continued his studies in the schools 
of Red Wing, this state, and then located in Stillwater, where for three 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 417 

years he worked as a laborer, either on river or lake, or in the woods, 
accepting any honorable employment. Embarking then in the hotel busi- 
ness in this city, he served as "mine host" for a period of fourteen years. 
Forming then a partnership with John Deagnelius, he was for two years 
at the head of the firm of Booren & Deagnelius, clothiers. The ensuing 
four years, as senior member of the firm of Booren & Lammers, he car- 
ried on a successful wholesale and retail cigar business. In 1891 and 
1893 Mr. Booren represented his district in the state legislature, after 
which he served three terms, or six years, as county treasurer. At the 
expiration of his third term in this position Mr. Booren again entered 
the clothing business, forming a partnership with John Anderson, with 
whom he was associated under the firm name of Booren & Anderson, 
tmtil 1908, when he sold out his interest in the business. 

Mr. Booren married, M^rch 2^, 1873, Karen Adolfina Wigren, and to 
them eight children have been bom, namely: Albert, died in infancy; 
Winnie, living at home ; Victor, died in infancy ; George, a dentist at Thief 
River Falls, Minnesota, married Linda Robbecke ; Qifton, studying medi- 
cine at the University of Minnesota; Walter, died in childhood; Harry, 
engaged in the insurance business in Stillwater; and Olive, attending 
school. Politically Mr. Booren is an earnest supporter of the principles 
of the Republican party. Religiously he belongs to the Swedish Lutheran 
church. Fraternally he is a member of the Knights of Pythias. 

John Booren, brother of August Booren, was born in Sweden, Octo- 
ber 19, 1837, 2tnd in 1858, ere attaining his majority, came to this country 
to live. He settled first in Stillwater, Minnesota, from there going to 
Louisiana, where he spent several months before the Civil war and during 
the early part of the conflict. Returning to Stillwater, he enlisted, August 
13, 1862, in Company C, Eighth Minnesota Volunteer Infantry, and in 
addition to serving against the Indians, on the frontier, for two years, 
participated in the battle of Murf reesboro, and was at the front in various 
skirmishes of minor importance. At the close of the war he again took 
up his residence in Stillwater, and has since been variously employed, 
having been not only hardware merchant, hotel keeper and lumberman, 
but for four years, under the administration of President Hayes, was 
postmaster. H^ is now proprietor of a good boarding house, which he 
is managing most successfully. 

John Booren has been twice married. He married first Carrie Smith, 
who bore him two children, namely: Carl Edward, deceased; and 

27 



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4i8 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Clarence, living at home. He married second Sarah L. Johnson, and of 
this unic«i five children have been bom, namely : Josephine, wife of Gust 
Johnson, of Stock Center, Minnesota ; Meda ; Herbert ; John ; and Olive, 
deceased. Politically he is a stanch Republican, and religiously he is a 
member of the Swedish Lutheran church. Socially he belongs to the 
Grand Army of the Republic. 

James Benson, who for many years has been connected with the 
Northwest Thresher Company, was bom in Christianstads Ian, Ousby, 
southem Sweden, October 23, 1850, a son of Bengt Swenson and Bengta 
Johnsdotter, who were also from southem Sweden, the father bom in 
1822 and the mother in 1825. Bengt Swenson for many years supple- 
mented his agricultural labors with the operation of a saw mill and thresh- 
ing machine, and he spent his entire life in Sweden. He is survived by 
his widow, who resides in the land of her birth. They were the parents 
of eleven children, namely : Anders, who died at sea while serving with 
the navy, being but twenty-seven years of age at the time of his death ; 
next Swan, who died in Paris at the age of twenty-eight years ; Nels, who 
died in the army, aged twenty-six; James, mentioned below; Elsa, who 
married Nels Feline, a carpenter at Willmar, Minnesota ; Olof , who died 
at the age of three ; Hannah, the wife of Henry Herru, of Minneapolis ; 
Olof, who died in infancy ; August, a farmer in Sweden ; Olof, of Helena, 
Montana ; and Tilda, who died at the age of seventeen. The family were 
members of the Swedish Lutheran church. 

After the completion of his educational training in his native land 
James Benson first took up agricultural pursuits and then mechanical 
work, and continued along that line until reaching his twenty-ninth year. 
He then made the voyage to America, and locating at Stillwater entered 
the employ of the Minnesota Thresher Company, and has ever since 
remained with that company and its successor, while during the past 
twenty-two years he has been the foreman of their wood department. In 
1905 he returned to his native land of Sweden for a visit, and this was 
the first vacation he had ever taken during the many years of his connec- 
tion with the corporation. 

On the 19th of August, 1881, Mr. Benson was united in marriage to 
Miss Mary Charlotte, a daughter of Johannes Peterson, of Skmf , Sweden, 
and their three children are: John, who died when but eleven years of 
age; Oscar Bemhardt, who died at the age of thirteen; and Anna, at 
home with her father. Mrs. Benson died on the 22d of March, 1900. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 419 

Mr. Benson is a prominent member of the Swedish Lutheran church, in 
which for nineteen years he has served as a trustee. He is a Republican 
in politics and is a member of the fraternal order of Modern Woodmen 
of America. 

Andrew John Holm, the treasurer and office manager for the North- 
west Thresher Company at Stillwater, was bom near Vexio, Sweden, 
August 15, 1857. His father, John Holm, was a farmer in Sweden for 
some years, but leaving there in the spring of 1865, he arrived in Still- 
water on the 28th of August of the same year. He located on a farm 
northwest of Marine, about fifteen miles from Stillwater, and spent the 
remainder of his life in tilling and cultivating its fields. His death 
occurred in the year of 1896, and that of his wife in 1895. Their issue 
was as follows : Martha, deceased ; Peter, who is farming the old home- 
stead ; Christine, who married Hans Leander, now a retired farmer living 
at Center City; Mary, the wife of John Lund, of Marine; Gustaf, de- 
ceased ; Matilda, who married Fred Magny, deceased, and she is living on 
the old homestead with a daughter. Ruby ; and Andrew J. The parents 
were members of the Swedish Lutheran church. 

A lad of eight years when he came with his parents to the United 
States, Andrew J. Holm was educated in the country schools and this 
training was supplemented with one year's attendance in the schools of 
Stillwater and a course in Carleton College at Northfield. He earned his 
own way through school by teaching and other work, following the pro- 
fession of teaching for five years. After the completion bf his education 
he returned to Stillwater and worked in the county auditor's office for 
two years. During the succeeding four years, or until 1887, he was an 
employe in the office of a lumber company, and at the close of that period 
he became associated with E. S. Brown, receiver for the Northwestern 
Manufacturing & Car Company, and continued in the employ of its suc- 
cessors. Starting as a bookkeeper and cashier, he has worked his way 
upward to the responsible position of treasurer and office manager for 
the Northwest Thresher Company. 

Mr. Holm, warned, on the 3d of October, 1883, Miss Hannah Char- 
k)4te Copas, a daughter of John Copas, of Scandia, and their three chil- 
dcBS sht: John D., Eva Caroline and Sara. The son is pursuing post- 
graduate work at Yale, and the elder daughter is attending the University 
of Minnesota. Sara the younger is a junior in the Stillwater high school. 
Mr. Holm is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church, in which he has 



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420 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

held some office almost continually and takes an active part in its work. 
He is a Republican in politics and during the past twelve years has served 
as a member of the board of education of Stillwater, having been secre- 
tary all that time, and has been reelected for another term of four years. 
He is a member of the fraternal order of Knights of Pythias. 

Oscar N. Brodeen, a well known business man of Stillwater, was 
born in Smiland, Sweden, November 9, 1868, a son of Gustof Cickrcson 
and his wife Hilda, farming people of Sm&land, where they spent their 
lives, their issue being as follows : Louisa, who married John Isaacson, 

of Sweden ; Christena, who married John ; Emma ; Anna, who 

died at the age of twenty-two years; Carl Oscar, of Canada, whose 
daughter. Alma, is teaching school at Minot, North Dakota; Jonas; 
Johann Gustof, an educator and a newspaper man; Elif, of Stillwater; 
and Oscar N. The parents were members of the Swedish Lutheran 
church. 

Oscar N. Brodeen was but a lad of ten years when he left school to 
begin the battle of life for himself, and until twenty-one he worked at 
various kinds of labor in the land of his birth. Coming then to America 
he located at Stillwater, Minnesota, and for seven years worked on the 
lake and river and in the woods logging and lumbering. Following the 
close of that period he was a clerk in a clothing store until 1896, and in 
that year and in association with Peter Mattson he established the firm 
of Brodeen and Mattson, dealers in gentlemen's furnishing goods and 
one of the well known commercial establishments of Stillwater. 

Mr. Brodeen married on June 15, 1889, Miss Selma Erickson, a 
daughter of Ole Erickson of Big Lake, Scandia. Their three children 
are Rouno, Vivian and Elpha. The family are members of the Swedish 
Lutheran church. Mr. Brodeen is independent in his political affiliations, 
and he is a member of the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Inde- 
pendent Order of Foresters. 

John Alfred Anderson^ a licensed engineer and the master mechanic 
and foreman of the machine shops and chief engineer for the North- 
west Thresher Company, was bom in Schalebohl, Ereckstad socken, 
Dahlsland, Sweden, February 26, 1858, a son of Andrew Johnson and 
B. Christina Anderson. Andrew Johnson was a merchant while in 
Sweden, but after coming to America in 1884 he entered the employ of 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 421 

the Minnesota Thresher Company, while later for some years he was in 
the employ of Isaac Staples, and he is now connected with the North- 
west Thresher Company. He is a Republican in his political affiliations 
and is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church. He is the father of 
five children, as follows : John Alfred ; Eric Taylor, of Stillwater ; Anna 
Elizabeth, deceased; May, also deceased; and Alfreda, who married 
Charles Olson, of St. Paul. 

John A. Anderson after attending the schools of Guttenberg at the 
age of fifteen began working in a blacksmith shop and later was con- 
nected with an engine. And in that same year of 1873 he went to 
Christiania, Norway, and learned the trade of engineering, and in 1879 
he went from there on a whale fishing trip as an engineer. In 1880 he 
came to America'and located near La Crosse, in Hudson county, Minne- 
sota, where he attended school for one winter, and in the following 
year of 1881 came to Stillwater and entered as an employe the machine 
shops of the Northwest Thresher Company. Severing his connection 
with that company in 1890 he spent two years in Duluth as a chief engi- 
neer, and returning to this city in 1897 he again became connected with 
the Minnesota Thresher Company, now known as the Northwest Com- 
pany, and is master mechanic, foreman of the machine shops and chief 
engineer. He was made a licensed engineer in 1884. 

Mr. Anderson married, on June 27, 1881, in St. Paul, Miss Andrina 
Hanson, a daughter of Hans Peterson, of Christiania, Norway, and they 
have ten children: Hilda May, Jennie, Alfred W., Agnes, Dagmar, 
Nellie, Stanley, Conrad, Florence and Gordon. The family are mem- 
bers of the Swedish Lutheran church, in which Mr. Anderson has held 
all of the offices, and takes an active part in the work of his church. 
His politics are Republican. 

Carl E. Berglund and Carl E. Peterson. — Prominent among the 
rising young business men of Stillwater, Minnesota, are Carl E. Berg- 
lund and Carl E. Peterson, who, under the firm name of Berglund & 
Peterson, are carrying on a substantial and lucrative business as general 
merchants, and are numbered among the capable and intelligent men 
who are contributing so much towards making this city desirable as a 
place of residence, both from a social and from a financial point of view. 
Beginning operations on a modest basis, these enterprising gentlemen 
have gradually increased their business, and when their trade demanded 
more commodious quarters moved to their present establishment at No. 



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422 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

807 North Fourth street, where they have a complete stock of groceries, 
hardware and general merchandise, in their efforts to please their numer- 
ous customers keeping an assortment of goods seldom fotmd in a store 
of this kind. 

Carl E. Berglund was. born, December i, 1873, in Sweden, a son 
of Nicholas and Eva (Larson) Berglund, who came to America in 1881, 
locating in Washington county, where the father bought land, and, in 
connection with farming, worked at his trade of a blacksmith for many 
years. After leaving the public schools, Mr. Berglund was graduated, 
in 1898, from the Northwestern Business College, after which he was 
engaged for five years as clerk in a grocery, working first for August 
Wennerberg and later for A. E. Edholm. When ready to establish 
himself in business on his own account, in November, 1903, he formed a 
partnership with Carl E. Peterson, as above mentioned, and the firm of 
Berglund & Peterson has since been one of the leading firms of the 
kind in this part of the city. 

On June 20, 1900, Mr, Berglund married Gertrude Wickstrom, 
daughter of John and Margaret Wickstrom, who emigrated to Minne- 
sota from Sweden a few years ago, and they are the parents of two 
children, namely: Eva, born August 17, 1902; and Arnold, bom Decem-' 
ber 29, 1903. Politically Mr. Berglund is a Republican, and religiously 
he attends the Swedish Mission church. 

Carl E. Peterson, junior member of the firm of Berglund & Peterson, 
was bom February 10, 1878, in Sweden, and when but three years old 
came with his parents, John A. and Emma Peterson, to Stillwater, Min- 
nesota, where his father is now engaged in mill work. Receiving a prac- 
tical education in the public schools of this city, Mr. Peterson began life 
for himself as clerk in a grocery store, during the year that he was thus 
employed obtaining an excellent knowledge of the business, and an ex- 
perience in business that has been of inestimable value to him. In 1903, 
in company with Carl E. Berglund, he started in business for himself as 
junior member of the present firm of Berglund & Peterson, and has met 
with excellent success as a general merchant, in the few years that have 
since elapsed winning a fine reputation as a good business man, and as a 
progressive and public-spirited citizen. 

Mr. Peterson married Stella Lizotte, who was bom in this country, of 
English ancestry, being a daughter of Joseph Lizotte, for many years a 
shoemaker in Stillwater, and they have one child. In his political affilia- 
tions Mr. Peterson is a Republican, and in religion he is a Swedish Luther- 



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SWEDISH-'AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 423 

an. Fraternally he belongs to the United Order of Foresters, to the Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America, and to the Equitable Fraternal Union. 

Charles O. Linquist has attained prominence in the business circles 
of Stillwater and vicinity as the manager of the Bluff City Lumber Com- 
pany, one of the leading corporations of its kind here. He was born in 
Smiland, Sweden, February 24, 1865, a son of Johann Johnson and Anna 
Cecelia, who were also born at that place. Johann Johnson, a farmer, lived 
and died in Sweden, passing away in 1873, ^"^ ^^s wife died in the year 
1869. They were members of the Swedish Lutheran church, and they 
were the parents of three children: Frank August, a stone mason at 
Taylor's Falls, Minnesota ; Elif William, of St. Paul ; and Charles O. 

Charles O. Linquist came to America in the year of 1884, and after 
continuing for a short time his educational training in the schools of this 
country he located at Taylor's Falls and obtained work on a farm. Later 
ior one year he was employed in a brick yard, and from that time until 
1905 worked for J. S. Anderson and his successor, the East Side Lumber 
Company. At the dose of that period and in association with Robert 
E. Skith, he engaged in business for himself under the name of the 
Bluff City Lumber Cc«npany, dealers in all kinds of building material, 
wood, coal, etc., and the business is managed by Mr. Linquist. 

On the 5th of May, 1893, he was united in marriage to Miss Emma 
Samdahl, a daughter of Gustof Samdahl, of Stillwater, and their three 
children are Elda Oscar, Myma Helena and Reuben. Mr. Linquist is a 
member of and a trustee in the Swedish Lutheran church ; also a member 
the fraternal orders of Odd Fellows, the Modem Woodmen of America, 
and the Vasa. In politics he is a Republican. 



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CHAPTER XX. 
GOODHUE COUNTY. 

The part of Minnesota, which next after Chisago and Washington 
counties and St. Paul was settled! by Swedes, was Goodhue county, or 
rather the north and northwestern parts of this county. The south 
and southwest parts are settled by Norwegians. The Scandinavian popu- 
lation of this county is by far in the majority. 

Goodhue county is situated at the upper end of Lake Pepin and 
along the Mississippi river from a point a little above Lake Qty to 
about midway between the cities of Red Wing and Hastings. Its western 
limits are thirty-six miles from its eastern, and its greatest length from 
south to north is also thirty-six miles, but the county forms no square 
on the map. It comprises twenty-four townships, with an area of 764 
square miles. There are no lakes but a number of rivers and creeks. 
Besides the Mississippi there are the Vermillion, Cannon and Little 
Cannon, the two branches of the Zumbro river, Prairie creek, Spring, 
Hay and Wells creeks. The county is a natural prairie, though generally 
undulating and uneven. Along the waters it is well wooded, enough for 
local use, and everywhere one sees small gloves, especially around the 
farmhouses. The soil is fertile as a rule, since a more rational mode of 
cultivation has been adopted. 

The First Swedish Settlement. — In September, 1853, Colonel 
Hans Mattson, with a little company of Swedish immigrants, came up 
to Minnesota from Moline, Illinois, to hunt up a place for a Swedish 
settlement where land could be obtained cheaply. Minnesota was then 
a territory but little known, but our immigrants had heard of its beauti- 
ful lakes, forests, prairies and salubrious climate. Mattson being the 
only one of the party who could speak English, was naturally appointed 
its leader. His father also went with them and so did Mattson's brother- 
in-law, S. J. Willard, and his wife, the whole party taking deck passage 

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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 425 

on a Mississippi steamer, and arriving at St. Paul in the month of 
September. 

In his "Story of an Emigrant" Mattson gives a vivid description 
of the founding of the Swedish settlement, Vasa, and with the kind per- 
mission of his relatives we will reproduce it here as being both reliable 
and interesting: 

"At that time St. Paul was an insignificant town of a few hundred 
inhabitants. There we found Henry Russell, John Tidlund, and! a few 
other Swedish pioneers. Mr. Willard and I had very little money, and 
for the few dollars which we did own we bought a little household fur- 
niture and some cooking utensils. We therefore at once sought employ- 
ment for him, while the rest of our party started off in search of a 
suitable location for the proposed settlement. 

"We had been told that there were a number of our countrymen 
at Chisago Lake and! a few near Carver, but that all had settled on tim- 
ber lands. We also learned that near Red Wing, in Goodhue county, 
places could be found with both timber and prairie, and an abundance 
of good water. Having looked over the different localities we finally 
decided on the present town of Vasa, about twelve miles west of Red 
Wing. The first claims were taken at Belle creek, south of White 
Rock, and afterwards others were taken at a spring known as Willard 
Spring, near which the large brick church now stands. 

"After selecting this land my father returned to Illinois. In com- 
pany with the other explorers, I went to St. Paul, where a council was 
held in which all participated, and at which it was decided that three 
of us, Messrs Carl Roos, A. G. Kempe, and myself, should go to our 
claims that fall and do as much work as possible, until the others could 
join us the following spring. 

"Having made the necessary preparations we three went to Red 
Wing by steamboat and found a little town with half a dozen families, 
among whom was the Rev. J. W. Hancock, who for several years had 
been a missionary among the Indians. The other settlers were Wm. 
Freeborn, Dr. Sweeney, H. L. Bevans, and John Day. Besides these 
we also met two Swedes, Peter Green (whose Swedish name was Sjo- 
gren), and Nils Nilson, and a Norwegian by the name of Peterson. 
On the bank of the river the Sioux Indians had a large camp. The 
country west of Red Wing was then practically a wilderness, and our 



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426 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

little party was the first to start in to cultivate the soil and make a 
permanent settlement. 

"At Red Wing we supplied ourselves with a tent, a cook stove, a 
yoke of oxen, carpenter's tools, provisions and other necessaries. Having 
hired a team of horses, we then packed our goods in a wagon, tied the 
cattle behind, and started for the new settlement. The first four miles 
we followed the territorial road ; after that we had nothing but Indian 
trails to guide us. Toward evening we arrived at a grove on Belle 
Creek, now known as Jemtland. Here the tent was pitched and our 
evening meal cooked, and only pioneers like ourselves can understand 
how ^e relished it after our long day's tramp. The team was taken 
back the next day, and we were left alone in the wilderness. 

"After a day's exploration we moved our camp two miles further 
south, to another point near Belle Creek, where Mr. Roos had taken 
his claim. 

"It was now late in September, and our first care was to secure 
enough hay for the cattle, and in a few days we had a big stack. Having 
read about prairie fires, we decided to protect our stack by burning 
away the short stubble around it. But a minute and a half was suffi- 
cient to convince us that we had nmde wrong calculations, for within 
that time the stack itself was burning with such fury that all the water 
in Belle Creek could not have put it out. Still, this was not the worst 
of it. Before we had time to recover from our astonishment the fire 
had spread over the best part of the valley and consumed all the remain- 
ing grass, which was pretty dry at that time of the year. Inexperienced 
as we were, we commenced to run a race with the wind, and tried to 
stop the fire before reaching another fine patch of grass about a mile 
to the north; but this attempt was, of course, a complete failure, and 
we returned to our cheerless tent mourning over this serious misfortune. 

"The next morning we all started out in different directions to see 
if any grass was left in Goodhue county, and fortunately we found 
plenty of it near our first camping ground. Having put up a sec<md 
stack of very poor hay, we proceeded to build a rude log house, and had 
just finished it when my brother-in-law, Mr. Willard, surprised us by 
appearing in our midst, having left in Red Wing his wife and baby, 
now Mrs. Zelma Christensen of Rush City, who is, as far as I know, 
the first child bom of Swedish parents in St. Paul. Mr. Willard, who 
was a scholarly gentleman and not accustomed to manual labor, had 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 427 

found it rather hard to work with shovel and pick on the hilly streets 
of St. Paul, and made up his mind that he would better do that kind of 
work on a farm. Messrs. Roos and Kempe having furnished all the money 
for the outfit, I really had no share in it, and as we could not expect Mr. 
Willard and his family to pass the winter in that cabin, I immediately 
made up my mind to return with him to Red Wing. In an hour we 
were ready, and without waiting for dinner we took the trail back to 
that place. I remember distinctly how, near the head of the Spring 
Creek Valley, we sat down in a little g^ove to rest and meditate on the 
future. We were both very hungry, especially Mr. Willard, who had 
now walked over twenty miles since breakfast. Then espying a tempt- 
ing squirrel in a tree close by, we tried to kill it with sticks and rocks; 
but we were poor marksmen, and thus missed a fine squirrel roast. 

"Tired and very hungry wej reached Red Wing late in the after- 
noon, and soon found my sister, Mrs. Willard, comfortably housed 
with one of the families there. Her cheerful and hopeful nature and 
the beautiful baby on her arm gave us fresh joy and strength to battle 
with the hardships that were in store for us. Mr. Willard and his wife 
had taken along what furniture they owned, a few eatables and five 
dollars and fifty cents in cash, which was all that we possessed of the 
goods of this world. But who cares for money at that age? Mr. 
Willard was twenty-five years old, my sister twenty-three, and I twenty, 
all hale and hearty, and never for a moment doubting our success, no 
matter what we should undertake. 

"Our first work was wood chopping, for which we were less fit 
than almost anything else. We had to go to a place about three miles 
above Red Wing, where a man had made a contract to bank up fifteen 
hundred cords of wood for the Mississippi steamers. There was an old 
wood chopper's cabin which we repaired by thatching it with hay and 
earth, putting in a door, a small window, and a few rough planks for 
a floor. In a few days we were duly installed, baby and all, i in the 
little hut which was only twelve by sixteen feet, but to us as dear as a 
palace to a king. 

"We began to chop wood at once. The trees were tall, soft maples 
and ash. and our pay was fifty-five cents a cord for soft and sixty-five 
cents for hard wood. At first both of us could not chop over a cord a 
day together; but within a week we could chop a cord apiece, and be- 
fore the winter was over we often chopped three cords together in a 



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428 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

day. After a few days we were joined by four Norwegian wood chop- 
pers for whom we put up a new cabin to sleep in ; but my sister cocrfced 
for us all, and the others paid for their board to Mr. Willard and 
myself, who had all things in common. Those four men were better 
workmen than we, and one of them, Albert Olson, often chopped three 
cords a day. They were quiet, industrious, and generous fellows, so 
that we soon became attached to each other, and we were all very 
fond of the little Zelma. My sister managed our household affairs 
so well and kept the little house so neat and tidy that when spring 
came we were all loth to leave. 

The weather being fine and the sleighing good in the beginning 
of January, we hired John Day to take us with his team to our claims 
while there was yet snow, so that we might chop and haul out logs for 
the house which Mr. Willard and I intended to put up in the spring. 
My sister remained in the cabin, but Albert went with us for the sake 
of company. We put some lumber on the sled, and provided ourselves 
with hay and food enough to last a few days, and plenty of quilts and 
blankets for our bedding. John Day, who was an old frontiersman 
with an instinct alnK>st like that of an Indian, guided us safely to 
Willard Spring. A few hundred yards below this, in a deep ravine, 
we stopped near some sheltering trees, built a roaring camp fire, and 
made ourselves as comfortable as possible. Having supped and smoked 
our evening pipe, we made our beds by putting a few boards on the snow 
and the hay and blankets on top of those. Then all four of us nestled 
down under the blankets and went to sleep. 

During the night the thermometer fell down to forty degrees below 
zero, as we learned afterwards. If we had suspected this and kept our 
fire burning there would, of course, have been no danger. But being 
very comfortable early in the night and soon asleep, we were uncon- 
scious of danger until aroused by an intense pain caused by the cold, 
and then we were already so benumbed and chilled that we lacked 
energy to get up or even move. We found, on comparing notes after- 
wards, that each one of us had experienced the same sensations, namely, 
first an acute pain as if pricked with needles in every fibre, then a 
deep mental tranquility which was only slightly disturbed by a faint 
conception of something wrong, and by a desire to get up, but without 
sufficient energy to do so. This feeling gradually subsided into one 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 429 

of quiet rest and satisfaction, until consciousness ceased altogether, and, 
as far as pain was concerned, all was over with us. 

"At this stage an accident occurred which saved our lives. Mr. 
Day, who lay on the outsidte to the right, had evidently held his arm up 
against his breast to keep the blankets close to his body. His will-force 
being gone, his arm relaxed and fell into the snow. As the bare hand 
came in contact with the snow the circulation of the blood was accelera- 
ted, and this was accompanied by such intense pain that he was roused 
and jumped to his feet. 

"Thus we were saved. It took a good while before we could use 
our limbs sufficiently to build a fire again, and during this time we suf- 
fered much more than before. From that experience I am satisfied that 
those who freeze to death do not suffer much, because they gradually 
sink into a stupor which blunts the sensibilities long before life is extinct. 

"It was about four o'clock when we got up. Of course we did not 
lie down again that morning, nor did! we attempt to haul any timber, but 
started in a bee line across the prairie for the ravine where Mr. Willard 
and I had seen the tempting squirrel a few months before. We soon 
fotmd that going over the wild, trackless prairie against the wind, with 
the thermometer forty degrees below zero was a' struggle for life, and in 
order to keep warm we took turns to walk or run behind the sleigh. 
In taking his turn Mr. Willard suddenly sat down in the snow and! would 
not stir. We returned to him, and it required all our power of persua- 
sion to make him take his seat in the sleigh again. He felt very com- 
fortable, he said, and would soon catch up with us again if we only would 
let him alone. If we had followed his advice, he would never have left 
his cold seat again. After a drive of eight miles we arrived! at a house 
on Spring Creek, near Red Wing, where we found a warm room and a 
good shed for the horses. After an hour's rest we continued the jour- 
ney, and safely reached our little home in the woods before dark. I do 
not know that I ever appreciated a home more than I did that rude cabin 
when again comfortably seated by its warm and cheerful fire-place. 

"A few weeks later I had an opportunity to visit St. Paul, and while 
there attended the wedding of a young Norwegian farmer from Carver 
coimty and a girl just arrived from Sweden. The ceremony was per- 
formed by the Rev. Nilsson, a Baptist minister, who had been banished 
from Sweden on account of prosel)rting. Among the guests was Mr. 
John Swainsson, who since became well known among the Swedes of 



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430 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Minnesota, and who died in St. Paul a short time ago. I also madte the 
acquaintance of one Jacob Fahlstrom, who had lived forty years among 
the Indians and devoted most of that time to missionary work among 
them. He was a remarkable man, and was well known among the Hud- 
son Bay employees and other early settlers of the Northwest. As a boy 
he had deserted from a Swedish vessel in Quebec and madte his way 
through the wilderness, seeking shelter among the Indians; and, by 
marrying an Indian girl, he had become ahnost identified with them. I 
think he told me that he had not heard a word spoken in his native 
tongue in thirty-five years, and that he had almost forgotten it when he 
met the first Swedish settlers in the St. Croix valley. His children are 
now living there, while he has passed away< to the unknown land beyond, 
honored and respected by all who knew him, Indians as well as white men. 

"On my return from St. Paul I stopped at the cabin of Mr. Peter 
Green, at Spring Creek, near Red Wing. The only domestic animals 
he had was a litter of pigs, and as Mr. Willard! and I intended to settle on 
our land in the spring I thought it might be well to start in; with a couple 
of pigs. Accordingly, I got two pigs from Mr. Green, put them in a 
bag which I shouldered, and left for our cabin in the woods. According 
to my calculations, the distance I had to walk ought not to be over three 
miles, and in order to be sure of not getting lost I followed the Canncm 
river at the mouth of which our cabin stood. I walked on the ice where 
the snow was about a foot deep, and, if I had known of the meandering 
course of. the river, I would never have undertaken to carry that burden 
such a distance. From nine in the morning until it was almost dark I 
trudged along with my burden on my back, prompted to the greatest 
exertion by the grunting of the pigs, and feeling my back uncomfortably 
warm. These were the first domestic animals I ever owned, and I think 
I well earned my title to them by carrying them along the windings of 
the river at least ten miles. Both I and the pigs were well received 
when we reached the cabin. We made a pig pen by digging a hole in 
the ground and covering it with poles and brush, and fed them on the 
refuse from the table. Before we were ready to move one of them 
died, while the other, after being brought to our new farm, ungratefully 
ran away, and was most likely eaten up by the wolves, which perhaps 
was just as agreeable to him as to be eaten by us. 

"While living in this camp we saw more Indians than white men. 
A band of Sioux Indians camped near us for several weeks. They were 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 431 

very friendly, and never molested us. The men brought us venison and 
fresh fish, which they caught in great quantities by spearing them through 
the ice. We gave them bread and coffee, and sometimes invited one or 
two to dinner after we were through. Their women would stay for 
hours with my sister and help her take care of the baby. Indeed they 
were so fond of the white-haired child that they would sometimes run a 
race in vying with each other to get the first chance to fondle her. Some- 
times we visited them in their tents in the evening and smoked Kinikinick 
with them. Several of their dead reposed in the young trees near our 
cabin. When somebody died it was their custom to stretch the dead 
body on poles which were tied to young trees high enough to be out of 
the reach of wild beasts, then cover it with blankets, and finally leave 
some com and venison and a jar of water close by. At some subsequent 
visit to the neighborhood they would gather the bones and bury them at 
some regular burying ground, usually on a high hill or bluff. 

"Once we saw a regular war dance in Red Wing. A few Sioux 
had killed two Chippewa's and brought back their scalps stretched on a 
frame of young saplings. At a given hour the whole band assembled, 
and, amid the most fantastic gestures, jumping, singing, yelling, beating 
of tCMn-toms and jingling of bells, gave a performance which in lurid 
savageness excelled anything I ever saw. The same Indians again be- 
came! our neighbors for a short time on Belle creek the following winter, 
and we rather liked! them, and they us. But eight years later they took 
part in the terrible massacre of the white settlers in Western Minnesota, 
and thirty-nine of their men were hanged on one gallows at Mankato 
in the fall of 1862, and the rest transported beyond our borders. 

"Thus our first winter in Minnesota passed without further inci- 
dents, until the beginning of March, when the weather turned so mild 
that we were afraid the ice on the Mississippi might break up, and we 
therefore hurried back to Red Wing. By our wood chopping and Mrs. 
WiHard's cooking enough money had been earned to buy the most neces- 
sary articles for our new home. When we had procured everything and 
taken a few days' rest, we again hired Mr. John Day to take us out 
to our land with his team. Hundreds of thousands of immigrants have 
had the same experience, and can realize how we felt on that fine March 
morning, starting from Red Wing with a wagon loaded with some boards 
on the bottom, a cook stove and utensils, doors, windows, a keg of nails, 
saws, spades, a small supply of provisions, a bedstead or two with bedding. 



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432 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

a few trunks, and a little box containing our spotted pig, Mrs. Willard 
in the seat with the driver, her baby in her arms, her husband and myself 
taking turns as guides, John Day shouting to his horses, laughing and 
jdcing; all of us full of hope, strength and determination to overcome 
all obstacles and conquer the wildness. The snow was now nearly gone, 
and the air was spring-like. 

"After a twelve miles' heavy pull we arrived at our destination, and 
made a temporary tent of sticks and blankets, very much after the Indian 
fashion. Two of the Norwegians had accompanied us to help build our 
cabin. Mr. Day stopped a couple of days hauling building material, 
and before night the second day the rear part of our cabin was under 
roof. After a few days the Norwegians left us, and Mr. Willard and 
myself had to finish the main part of the building which was also made 
of round log^. For many a year this rude log cabin was the center of 
attraction, and a hospitable stopping place for nearly all the settlers 
of Vasa. 

"In the month of April cold weather set in again, and it was very 
late in the season when steamboat navigation was opened on the Mis- 
sissippi. At that time all provisions had to be shipped from Galena or 
Dubuque, and it happened that the winter's supplies in Red Wing were 
so nearly gone that not a particle of flour or meat could be bought after 
the first of April. Our supplies were soon exhausted, and for about 
two weeks our little family had only a peck of potatoes, a small panful 
of flour, and a gallon of beans to live on, part of which was a present from 
Messrs. Roos and Kempe, who had remained all winter on their claims, 
three miles south of us. They had been struggling against great odds, 
and had been compelled to live on half rations for a considerable length 
of time. Even their oxen had been reduced almost to the point of starva- 
tion, their only feed being over-ripe hay in small quantities. 

"We would certainly have starved if it had not been for my shot- 
gun, with which I went down into the woods of Belle Creek every 
morning at day-break, generally returning with pheasants, squirrels, or 
other small game. One Sunday the weather was so disagreeable and 
rough that I did not succeed in my hunting, but in feeding the team 
back of the kitchen some oats had been spilt, and a flock of blackbirds 
came and fed on them. Through an opening between the logs of the 
kitchen I shot several dozen of these birds, which, by the way, are not 
ordinarily very toothsome. But, being a splendid cook, my sister made 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 433 

them into a stew, diickened with a few mashed! beans and a handful of 
flour — in pur estimation the mess turned out to be a dinner fit for king^. 
"Our supplies being nearly exhausted, I started for Red Wing the 
next morning, partly to save the remaining handful of provisions for my 
sister and her husband, partly in hc^s of obtaining fresh supplies 
from a steamboat which was expected about that time. Three days 
afterwards the steamer arrived. As soon as practicable the boxes were 
brought to the store of H. L. Bevans. I secured a smoked ham, thirty 
potmds of flour, a gallon of molasses, some coffee, salt and sugar, strapped 
it all (weighing almost seventy pounds) on my back, and started toward 
evening for our cabin in the wilderness. I had to walk about fourteen 
miles along the Indian trail, but in spite of die heavy burden I made the 
distance in a short time, knowing that the dear ones at home were threat- 
ened by hunger; perhaps the howling of the prairie wolves near my path 
also had something to do with the speed. There are events in die life 
of every person which stand out like milestones along the road, and so 
attract tfie attention of the traveler on life's journey that tfiey always 
remain vivid pictures in his memory. My arrival at our cabin that even- 
ing was one of diose events in our humble life. I will not attempt to 
describe the joy which my burden brought to all of us, especially to the 
young mother with tfie little babe at her breast. 

3|t 4c 4t 

"We had now commenced a new career, located on our farm claims 
in the boundless West, with no end to the prospects and possibilities 
before us. We felt that independence and freedom which are only at- 
tained and appreciated in the western wildfe of America. From the Mis- 
sissippi river and almost to the Pacific Ocean, was a verdant field for 
the industry, energy, and enterprise of the settler. To be sure, our means 
and resources were small, but somehow we felt that by hard work and 
good conduct we would some day attain the comfort, independence and 
position for which our souls thirsted. We did not sit down and wait for 
gold mines to open up before us, or for roasted pigs to come running by 
our cabin, but with axe and spade went quietly to work, to do our little 
part in the building up of new empires. 

"In the beginning of May, my father came frcmi Illinois and brought 
us a pair of steers and a milch cow; this made us rich. We made a 
wagon with wheels of blocks sawed off an oak log; we also bought a 

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434 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

plow, and, joining with our neighbors of Belle Creek, had a breaking 
team of two pair of oxen. That breaking team and that truck wagon, 
with myself always as the chief ox driver, did all the breaking, and all 
the hauling and carting of liunber, provisions, building material and 
other goods, for all the settlers in that neighborhood diuring the first 
season. 

"Soon others of our party from last year joined us. Some letters 
which I wrote in Hemlandet describing the country around us, attracted 
much attention and brought settlers from different parts of the west, 
and while the Swedes were pouring into our place, then known as 'Matt- 
son's Settlement' (now well known under the name of Vasa), our 
friends, the Norwegians^ had started a prosperous settlement a few miles 
to the south, many of them coming overland from Wisconsin, bringing 
cattle, implements and other valuables of which the Swedes, being mostly 
poor new-comers, were destitute. Many immigrants of both nationali- 
ties came as deck passengers on the Mississippi steamers to Red Wing. 

"There was cholera at St. Louis that summer, and I remember how 
a steamer landed a large party of Norwegian immigrants, nearly all 
down with cholera. Mr. Willard and myself happened to be in Red 
Wing at the time,, and the American families, ccmsidering these Norwe- 
gians cholera patients our countrymen, hastily turned them over to our 
care. We nursed them as best as we could, but many died in spite of 
all our efforts, and as we closed their eyes, and laid them in the silent 
grave under the bluffs, it never occurred to us that they were anything 
but our countrymen and brothers. 

"From these small beginnings of the Swedish and Norw^an settlers 
in Goodhue county, in the years of 1853 and 1854, have sprung results 
which are not only grand but glorious to contemplate. Looking back 
to those days I see the little cabin, often with a sod roof, single room 
used for domestic purposes, sometimes crowded almost to suffocation 
by hospitable entertainments to new-comers; or the poor immigrant 
on the levee at Red Wing, just landed from a steamer, in his short 
jacket and other outlandish costume, periiaps seated on a wooden box, 
with his wife and a large group of children around him, and wondering 
how he shall be able to raise enough means to get himself ten or twenty 
miles into the country, or to redeem the bedding and other household 
goods which he has perchance left in Milwaukee as a pledge for his 
railroad and steamboat ticket. And I see him trudging along over the 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 435 

trackless prairie, searching for a piece of land containing if possible 
prairie, water and a little timber, on which to build a home. Poor, be- 
wildered, ignorant and odd looking, he had been an object of pity and 
derision all the way from Gothenburg or Qiristiania to the little cabin 
of some countryman of his, where he found peace and shelter until he 
could build one of his own. 

"Those who have not experienced frontier life, will naturally wonder 
how it was possible for people so poor as a majority of the old settlers 
were, to procure the necessaries of life, but they should remember that 
our necessaries were few, and our luxuries a great deal less. The botmti- 
ful earth soon yielded bread and vegetables; the woods and streams 
supplied game and fish ; and as to shoes and clothing, I and many others 
have used shoes made of untanned skins, and even of gunny-sacks and 
old rags. Furthermore, the small merchants at thei river or other points, 
were always willing to supply the Scandinavian immigrants with neces- 
sary goods on credit, until better times should come. Our people in this 
country did certainly earn a name for integrity and honesty among their 
American neighbors, which has been a greater help to them than money. 
Some of the men would go off in search of work, and in due time re- 
turn with means enough to help the balance of the family. 

"Frontier settlers are always accommodating and generous. If one 
had more than he needed, he would invariably share the surplus with his 
neighbors. The neighbors would all turn in to help a new-comer, — haul 
his logs, build his house, and do other little services for him. The iso- 
lated condition and mutual aims and aspirations of the settlers brought 
tfiem nearer together than in older communities. On Sunday after- 
noons all would meet at some centrally located place, and spend the day 
together. A cup of coffee with a couple of slices of bread and butter, 
would furnish a royal entertainment, and when we got so far along that 
we could afford some pie or cake for dessert, the good housewives were 
in a perfect ecstasy. The joys and sorrows of one, were shared by the 
others, and nowhere in tfie wide world, except in a military camp, have 
I witnessed so much genuine cordial friendship and brotherhood as 
among the frontier settlers in the West. 

"One fine Sunday meaning that summer, all the settlers met under 
two oak trees on the prairie, near where the present church stands, for 
the first religious service in die settlement. It had been agreed that some 
of the men should take turns to read one of Luther's sermons at each of 



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436 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

these gatherings, and I was selected as reader the first day. Some pray- 
ers were said and Swedish hymns sung, and seldom did a temple contain 
more devout worshipers than did that little congregation on the prairie. 

"Before the winter of 1854-55 set in, we had quite a large community 
in Vasa, and had raised considerable grain, potatoes and other provisions. 
During the winter die Sioux Indians again became our neighbors, and 
frequently supplied us with venison in exchange for bread and coffee. 
The following spring and summer the settlers increased still faster, sev- 
ral more oxen and other cattle, with a horse co- two, were brought in, 
and I had no longer the exclusive privilege of hauling goods on the 
little truck wagon. 

"That summer I again went to Illinois to meet a large party of 
newly-arrived emigrants from Sweden, who formed a settlement in 
Vasa, known as Sk&ne. The people from different provinces would 
group themselves together in little neighborhoods, each assuming in 
common parlance the name of their own province; thus we have Vasa,. 
Sk&ne, Sm&land and Jemtland. 

"About this time a township was formally organized, and, at my sug- 
gestion, given the name of Vasa, in commemc«ation of the great Swed- 
ish king. Roads were also laid out legally, and a district organization 
perfected. A school district was formed and soon after an election pre- 
cinct, and as I was the only person who was master of the English 
language the duty of attending to all these things devolved upon me. 
We were particularly fortunate in having many men, not only of good 
education irom the old country, but of excellent character, pluck and 
energy, men who would have been leaders in their commtmities if they 
had remained at home, and who became prominent as soon as they had 
mastered the English language. This fact, perhaps, gave a higher tone 
and character to our little community than is common in such cases 
and Vasa has since that time furnished many able men in the county 
offices, in the legislative halls, and in business ancf educational circles. 
There can be much refinement and grace even in a log cabin on the wild 
prairie. 

"In the beginning of the month of September, 1855, Rev. E. Norelius^ 
visited the settlement and organized a Lutheran church. Thirty-five years 
(this was written in 1890) have elapsed since that time, and many of 
those who belonged to the first church at Vasa now rest in mother earth 
close by the present stately church edifice, which still belongs to the 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 437 

same congregation, and is situated only a short distance from the place 
where the latter was organized. Rev. Norelius himself lives only a few 
himdred yardis frc«n the church building. Thirty-five years have changed 
the then cheerful, hopeful young man into a veteran, crowned with 
honor, and full of wisdom and experience. His beneficent influence on 
the Swedes of Goodhue county and of the whole Northwest will make 
his name dear to coming generations of our people. 

"On November 23d, in the same fall, the first wedding took place in 
our settlement. The author of tfiese memoirs was joined in matrimony 
to Miss Qierstin Peterscm, from Balingslof, near Kristianstad, whose 
family had just come to Vasa from Sweden. By tfiis union I found the 
best and most precious treasure a man can find — sl good and dear wife, 
who has faithfully shared my fate to this day. Rev. J. W. Hancock, 
of Red Wing, performed the marriage ceremony. Horses being very 
scarce among us in those days, the minister had to borrow an Indian 
pony and ride on horseback twelve miles — irom Red Wing to Vasa. 
On the evening of our wedtling day tfiere happened to be a severe 
snowstorm, through which my young bride was taken from her parents' 
home to our log house, on a home-made wooden sled, drawn by a pair of 
oxen and escorted by a number of our young friends, which made this 
trip of about a quarter of a mile very pleasant, in spite of the oxen and 
the snow storm. 

"The next winter was very severe, and many of our neighbors suf- 
fered greatly from colds and even frozen limbs. But there was an 
abundance of provisicMis, and, as far as I can remember, no one was in 
actual need after the first winter." 

The very first settlers in these parts were, besides Mr. Mattson, 
fromf Onnestad, Sk&ne, his brother-in-law, ex-teacher S. J. Willard, from 
Fjelkinge, Skine ; Peter Sjogren, or Green (which name he adopted here) 
from Ljuder, Kronoberg^s Lan; Carl Roos, a surveyor and ex-officer 
of the Swedish army, from Lingbanshytan, Vermland, and a tanner, 
Anders Gustaf Kampe, from Varola, Vestergotland. Mattson and Wil- 
lard settled on the place which later belonged to P. Friman, directly 
south of the present Lutheran church. Each one of them had a log 
cabin. Roos and Kampe settled where Peter Nilson later lived in a 
conmion loghouse near the postoffice in White Rock. Their wives came 
from Sweden a few years later. Peter Sjogren located at Spring Creek 
where Carl Carlson now lives, about three miles from Red Wing. 



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438 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

A church was organized at a meeting September 3, 1855, by Rev. 
E. Norelius. Its first members, who were also, with a few exceptions, 
the first Swedish settlers, are mentioned below: 

Carl Carlson with wife, three sons and a foster-daughter, Hilda Maria 
Kindgren, who was married to Rev. Boren, from Karlskc^, Nerke, 
came to America in 1854. His first place was one-half mile northeast 
from the present church, in section 15. Carlson had been a prominent 
man in his community in Sweden. 

Ola Olsson, widower, with his sons, Ola Knut and Per and the 
daughter, Else, from Mjallby, Bleking, came to America in 1854; lived 
near the highest point west of Belle Creek, in section 8. Their cabin 
was for a long time alone in the brush, and was often visited by the 
Indians. 

Jon Bergdahl, widower, with a daughter, Malena, came from On- 
nestad, Kristianstad's Lan, in 1853; lived a short distance south from 
the church, in section 15. He is dead. The daughter married N. P. 
Malmbei^. 

Samuel Johnson with wife, Etina Lena, from Algutsboda, Krono- 
bcrg's Lan ; came to America in 1854. Their daughter, Maria, was one 
of the first, if not absolutely the first, child bom and baptized at Vasa. 
The parents moved to Nehalem Valley, Oregon; the daughter is living 
in Prairie Island, Goodhue county. 

Gustaf Carlson with wife, Lovisa, and the sons, Frans August 
Alfred and Aron, came from Algutsboda, Kronoberg's Lan, to America 
in 1854. They lived in Smiland, section 10. Carlson was killed in the 
woods by a falling tree, in 1880. The oldest son, who served as sheriff, 
removed with his mother to Red Wing; the second son lives in Hector, 
Renville county, and tfie third son in Featherstone. 

Erik Anderson, his wife, Helena Lovisa, and daughter, Martha 
Ellen, came from Vestra Ryd, Linkoping's Lan, to America in 1850. 
The wife born in Lonneberga, Kalmar Lan, came to America in 1848. 
Their daughter was bom at Jamestown, N. Y. This family settled in 
Smiland, section 2. Their daughter married Gustaf Larson in Feather- 
stone. 

Swante Johan Willard, with wife, Anna Mattson, and daughter 
Zelma Adelaide. Willard was a school teacher in the old country and 
bom in Fjelkinge ; his wife, a sister of Colonel Hans Mattson, the founder 
of the settlement, was bom in Onnestad; came to America in 1853. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 439 

Their daughter was the first Swedish child bom in St. Paul and baptized 
in Vasa. She is married to a Dane, Mr. Christiansen, and lives at Rush 
City. Willard finally lived in Red Wing and was County Auditor for 
a number of years. 

Jonas Fredrik Gustafson, bom in Bjurkarn, and his wife, Kristina 
Lovisa, bom in Arsta, Orebro Lan, came to America, be in 1853, she in 
1854. Their son Gustaf Adolf, was one of the first children born in 
Vasa. At first they settled on Belle Creek, behind the children's home 
in "Jona Land," but later removed to the town of Belle Creek. In his 
younger diys Jonas was known for his tremendous physical strength. 
If his team could not pull their load of logs, he would take off the big- 
gest log and carry it on hfe shoulder. 

Nils Peterson from Stoby, with wife, Elna, from Hoglinge, Kris- 
tianstad's Lan, came to America in 1854; lived one-half mile south of 
the church in section 21. He died, but she remarried and moved to 
the vicinity of Hallock, in the Red River valley. 

Per Nilson, his father with wife, Pemilla, and daughters, Hanna, 
Kjersti, Nilla and Anna, came from Stoby, in 1855, and lived a little dis- 
tance east of John Nilsson's place, section 27. They were one of the 
wealthiest families who came to Vasa at the time, for which reason he was 
known among the settlers as "Rike-Per." The old couple departed from 
this life long ago ; Hanna is married and lives at Minneapolis ; Kersti mar- 
ried Hans Mattson, and Anna was? married the last time to an American. 

Nils Westerson, from Ifvetofta, with wife, Sissa, three sons, Svante, 
Per, Jons, and one daughter, Annette, came from Vestra Karup, in 
1854, and lived a couple of miles from the church in section '20. They 
keep their old homestead but live in other parts. 

August Jonasson, single, came from Algutsboda and' died in 1857. 
Lived in Smaland, near Vasa. 

Peter Johanson, with wife, Karolina, from Algutsboda and Ekebcrga, 
Kronoberg's Lan, respectively, came to America in 1854. Their son, 
Johan Wilhelm, was one of the first children born in Vasa. Mother and 
son died long ago, the father remarried and moved to the town of 
Goodhue. 

Swen Jacobsscm, from Halland, with wife, Mathilda (Soderberg), 
from Ostergotland, came to America early, but the date of their arrival 
is unknown. Their son, Josef, was born in Moline, Illinois. They 



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440 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

lived on A. P. Johnson's place in Smiland's-roten, and buried one child 
there, in August, 1856. After a few years they went back to Moline. 

Anders Nilsson, from Viby, with wife, Kersti, from TroUe Ljungby, 
Kritianstad's Lan, came from TroUe Ljungby in 1855, with a son, Nils, 
and a daughter, Kama, and lived at first in Skine-roten. 

Swen Swensson, with wife, Nilla, a son, Swen, and two daughters, 
Kama and Beng^a, came from Sweden, in 1855; lived in Skine-roten. 
Swen moved to Moorhead, and the daughters were married in Minne- 
apolis. 

Swen Olsson, from Nynio, with wife, Kama, from TroUe Ljungby, 
and daughter, Martha, came from Sweden in 1855 and lived in Skine- 
roten on section 14. Moved later on another farm near Potato Mound. 
His wife died and he married Anna B. Bemsdotter. Their (laughter, 
Martha, married a Scotchman in Minneapolis. 

Bengt Anderson, from TroUe Ljungby, with wife, Elna Larson, 
from Fjelkestad, arrived in 1855 and lived in Skine-roten. 

Ola Swensson, an old bachelor, lived in Smilands-roten. Died long 
ago. 

Signild Andersdotter, a maid from TroUe Ljungby, came in 1855. 
She married a man by the name of Anders August Johnson. They moved 
to Baileytown, Indiana. 

Matts Mattson had two sons, Hans and Lars. With Lars he came 
from Onnestad, Sk&ne, in 1852, and lived some time in Moline. Hans, 
whose biography appears on another page, came to America in 1851. 
Lars lived on Belle Creek in section 20, but later removed to Hallock, 
in the Red River valley. 

Matias Flodquist was a traveling salesman frcxn Eker's parish, 
Nerke. Together with the men, whose names follow here, occupied 
the land which later became known as Jemtland. He moved away to 
parts unknown. 

Carl and his brother, Gustaf PeterscMi, from Arvika, came in 1854. 
They moved away in the early sixties. 

Olof Peterson, with wife and one child, came from Stoby and lived 
on the place later occupied by Per M&rtenson on Belle Creek. The 
wife was drowned in Spring Creek, and he moved to Iowa. 

Niklas Peterson, the former's brother, with wife Helena^ came from 
Finja, Kristianstad's Lan, in 1854. Their farm was near White Rock. 

Bonde Olson, a bachelor, unknown. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 441 

Nils Ekelund, a bachelor, canje from Bosjokloster, Skine, in 1854. 
Lived on the place formerly occupied by J. Norelius ; married a Norwe- 
gian widow, a sister of Rev. J. Johnson, and finally moved to Cambridge, 
Iowa, in 1865. 

Bengt Kilberg, a carpenter, came from Munktorp, Sk&ne, in 1855. 
Built the old church at Vasa in 1862. Later lived in Red Wing. 

Peter Vedin, a bachelor, unknown. 

Carl Roos, with wife and two children, came from Lingbanshyt- 
tan, Vermland, in 1853. Served in the Third Minnesota regiment during 
the war. Died in May, 1889. 

Anders G. Kampe, a tanner from Varola, Skaraborg*s Lan, came 
in 1853 ; lived with Roos, moved to Red Wing, where he died. 

Besides the now mentioned there were a few other families and 
unmarried people living in the settlement, as Carl Himmelman, and 
Erik Erikson from Karlskoga, a widower, Per Larson with a daughter 
from Winslof; Peter Anderson and family from Mjolby, Unkoping's 
Lan, all having come to America in 1851. Jons Olsson and wife from 
Hjersis; T. G. Pearson and wife, from Stoby, and Onnestad, came in 
1851 and 1852, respectively. They lived for a few. years at Knoxville, 
Illinois, before coming to Vasa. Pearson was a school teacher in Sweden. 
He served in the state legislature and was a justice of the peace for 
many years. 

These were the first settlers and original members of the Lutheran 
church at Vasa. 

During the summer of 1856 there were many new arrivals, both 
directly from Sweden and from Illinois. The ones, who came from 
Sweden were mostly from Trolle Ljungby and other adjoining parishes 
of Kristianstad's Lan. Among them may be mentioned: Lasse Pehr- 
son with a large family ; Per, Lars and Nils Jonsson ; Jons Nilson on the 
hill; Jons Nilson in the valley and Ola Anderson, all of them from 
Trolle Ljungby; Jons Olsson, Jr., with family, from Kiaby; Nils Per- 
son with family, from Kiaby ; Abram Nilsson from Gustaf Adolf s parish ; 
Anders Minson from Fjelkinge; Per Minson from Viby. From different 
places in America came: Goran Johnsson with family from Frinnaryd, 
Jonkoping^s Lan, came to America! in 1854; Swen Turner with wife from 
Wislanda, to America in 1853, came from Batavia, Illinois; John John- 
son with wife from Ljunga and his brother, Anders August Johnson, 
emigrated in 1854; Jacob Robertson (Rasmusson) with family from 



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442 SWEDISH-AMERICAXS OF MINNESOTA 

Katslosa, Sk2ne, came to America in 1852 and had lived at Pecatonica, 
Illinois; Sven P. Peterson from Kisa, Linkoping's Lan, to America in 
1849, lived in Sugar Grove, Pennsylvania, a few years; Nels P. and 
Johan Ahfelt from Farlof to America in 1852, came here from St. Paul, 
Johan killed in the war; Nils Swensson, irom Fasum, Kristianstad's 
Lan, to America in 1853, and here frc«n St. Paul; Bengt Nilsson with 
family from Karda, Jonkoping's Lan, with wife, Johanna, and children, 
from Sweden in 1852, and here from Pecatonica, Illinois, settled on 
Cannon river in town of Cannon Falls ; at the same time and in tfie same 
locality a man by the name of Krants, who had served in the Swedish 
cavalry, and family settled. Hikan Olsson, Jr., witfi family from Mjellby, 
Bleking, came to America in 1854 and here from St Charles, Illinois; 
A. G. Kampe's wife and children from Varola J Carl Johanson with fam- 
ily from Varo, Halland ; Anders M&nson and wife from the same {^ce 
had immigrated to Wisconsin in 1854, from where they came here. 

There were hard times during the year 1857 and they did not im- 
prove tmtil the beginning of the war. During that summer and fall 
quite a number of new settlers arrived, among whom were not a few 
Methodists: Olof Palsson with family from Sveg, Herjedalen; Erik 
Paisson, Per Sjulsson and family from Sveg, Herjedalen ; Per was killed 
by lightning a few years later ; Erik Jonasson with family ; Jons Zakrisson 
with family; Olof Hansson with family; Jon M&nsson with family 
from Storsjo and Tannas, Herjedalen. AH of them came directly 
from Sweden and took land in that part of the settlement 
which for them was called Jemtland. Anders Erik Bellin, a 
coppersmith, with family, came from Karlskoga. Johan Sundell, 
with family, from Sund, Ostergotland, came to America in 1851, 
and here from Sugar Grove, Pennsylvania. Germund Johnson with 
family from Kisa, emigrated in 1846 and came here from Sugar Grove ; 
Nils AndersscMi with family from Essunga, Vestergotland, came to Amer- 
ica in 1854 and here from Illinois. 

Spring Garden is another Swedish settlement in Goodhue county. 
It is situated southwest of Vasa, and it is about nine miles between the 
two churches. The soil in Spring Garden is of the very best in Good- 
hue county and the land is more level than in Vasa. Part of it was 
originally prairie, but most of it wooded. Its numerous clear springs 
were the origin of its name. Cultivation has made the land much drier 
than it was before. , 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 443 

Among the first Swedish settlers in Spring Garden we note: Carl 
Andersson Haggstrom, who was bom at Vrigstad, Jonkoping's Lan, 
in 1826, and emigrated with his wife, Martha Stina, in 1854. In company 
with eight other families they came from Chicago to Geneseo, Illinois, 
and, scMne of them having relatives at Andover, they all went there. 
This was during the terrible cholera-epidemic, and many new-comers 
died from it. They spent the winter in Andover. 

In April, 1855, Haggstrom, in company with Magnus Edstrom 
and family, from Voxtorp, came to Red Wing. There came also Jo- 
hannes Wanberg, from Chicago, who had emigrated from Sweden 
in their company. In Red Wing they left their families and 
set out to hunt up some place where to settle. In the present town 
of Leon they found what they were looking for, a beautiful and 
fertile prairie, surrounded by good wood-land with excellent and 
plentiful water. Here they took land and built a small loghouse. 
On October 6th they went back to Red Wing to get their families. 
Edstrom who was well fixed economically and had helped the others, 
bought a team of oxen so the women and children had a ride. They drove 
from Red Wing to Belle Creek where White Rock is now. From 
there was no trail for six miles to their selected homesteads. "How 
long are we going to continue in this manner?" Mrs. Haggstrom 
asked. "Well," Edstrom said, "I guess we will have to stand it until 
we find some little cabin to rest in;" and so they drove on until they 
reached the little claim-cabin. The three first families to settle at 
Spring Garden were consequently those of Magnus Edstrom, C. A. 
Haggstrom and Johannes Wajiberg. Later on, in the fall, they were 
joined by Anders Wilhelm Johnson from Torpa, Jonkoping's Lan, who 
had emigrated earlier, Johan from Stabbarp, near Grenna, Peter Jonson 
from Thorstuga, Jonkoping's Lan, and Anders Enberg from Ignaberga, 
Kristianstad's Lan. It can easily be imagined that with all those people 
huddled together in one cabin, there could not be much room to spare. 
They passed the winter there, however, and suffered much from the 
ague, or intermittent fever. They had a hard time getting their neces- 
saries of life, as the nearest town. Red Wing, was more than twenty 
miles distant with hardly any road at all. What they bought they had 
to carry home on their backs. In the beginning of 1856 their supply 
of flour ran short, and it was hardly possible to get any at any price. 
Haggstrom had, however, bought a barrel at Red Wing for eleven dol- 



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444 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

lars and paid one dollar to get it hauled to old man Chandler's at Belle 
Creek; but it was a mighty hard task to bring it the other six or eight 
miles from there to their home. During both this winter and the fol- 
lowing the Indians were swarming around the little settlement. They 
were staying around and hunting and paid the frightened new-comers 
daily visits. The Indians were, however, friendly, and did not molest 
the settlers in any wise, but tfiey were always hungry and looking for 
something to eat. 

During the summer of 1856 there came to this settlement two dif- 
ferent parties who materially added to its population. One of those 
came from Geneva, Illinois, where tfiey had arrived from Sweden in 
1854. This was tfie large Holm family. The head of it was Johannes 
Holm from Habo. His sons were Isak, Anders, Gustaf, Carl, Johan, 
August and Per (who died in the war), and his sons-in-law, Wdf, 
Johan Miller, P. Gustafson and Jacob Johnson. This family settled in 
the eastern part of Spring Garden. 

The other party came from Butler county, Iowa, and its leader was 
Anders Swensson from Dunarp near Grenna. With relatives and friends 
he had emig^ted from Sweden in 1853 and stopped a short time near 
Lafayette, Indiana. From that place they went to Iowa, remaining imtil 
1856, but not liking it there they came to Minnesota. Some of them 
settled at Spring Garden, as Magnus and Peter Lundell; others settled 
in the vicinity of Cannon Falls and were among the first Swedish set- 
tlers there. Later single families from various parts arrived. Carl and 
Johan Lagerstrom from Geneva, Ludwig Miller from Chicago, Anders 
Kallberg from Slatthog, Kronoberg's Lan, Peter Johan Johansscoi from 
Voxtorp, Bengt Anderson from Varo, Halland ; Carl Saf , bom in Gren- 
na, had lived at Yorktown, Indiana, since 1853 ; Nils and Fredrik Ander- 
son from Langserud, Dalsland, and others. 

The life of these new-comers probably was no worse than that in 
other localities, but the long distance to the nearest city during the first 
years made it harder to procure the necessaries of life, and this taught 
the settlers to try and make themselves as independent as possible. 
They arranged for themselves accordingly, and it took them a pretty 
long time, before they built better houses. Haggstrom's first house cost 
him only $2.50 in cash money, and it was used both to live in and 
as meeting-house for many years. The settlers were careful not to run 
into debt, and the settlers are few who are better fixed financially than 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 445 

those at Spring Garden. Because they postponed the erection of new 
houses until a time when they could easily afford it, one now sees so 
many good and well-built houses at Spring Garden. 

The Spring Garden settlement came into being in a very quiet way, 
and no outsider in Goodhue county seemed to know anything about it, 
nor did the Spring Gardeners know anjrthing about their neighbor, Vasa. 
On Sunday, July 6, 1856, Rev. Norelius was preparing to go to church 
in the school house at Vasa, when an ox-team came driving from the 
. south over the prairie with a whole wagon-load of people. Among them 
were two families who had each a little baby that, they wanted baptized. 
One was Magnus Edstrom and the other Johan Johnson Wanberg. Rev. 
Norelius, as well as his parishioners, were quite surprised when they 
heard of this neighboring settlement. The settlers did not know where 
Vasa was located, but they set out to find the place. They had driven 
up and down hill, over the trackless prairie, as they had heard in their 
comer of the world that there was a minister at Vasa, and they were 
anxious to have their children christened. They also were very desirous 
to have Rev. Norelius come and visit in Spring Garden, which he also 
did on the 17th of the same month. 

Cannon Falls^ the little city on Cannon river, commenced to be 
settled a little in the spring of 1856. The first Swedes to come there were 
of those who accompanied Anders Swensson from Iowa in 1856. Johan 
Peter, August Peter and Carl Johnson settled on the sand-prairie imme- 
diately south of Cannon Falls, but did not remain there long, as the soil 
was too poor. They found another and better piece of land on the other 
side of the river and three miles below the city. In the fall of 1856 came 
Nils Hikanson and Carl J. Anderson from West Point, Indiana, and 
took land on the Cannon river below the falls. The former built a house 
at Cannon Falls. Not long afterwards Anders Svensson settled there. 
Gustaf Westman and several others came from Rusheby, Chisago county, 
and Gustaf Anderson from Visingso, and others came from West Point, 
Indiana. In 1857 a whole crowd of mostly young people arrived from 
various places around Lafayette and Attica, Indiana, and lived for a time 
at Cannon Falls. Most of them were members of one or two families, 
namely, that of "Asarpaenkan" (the widow from Asarp) from Grenna 
and "I-ars pa Rasta" from Skarstad. In the fall these went to Waseca 
county, where they settled in the vicinity of Wilton, and founded the 
settlement Vista. Before i860 most of the Swedes at and near Cannon 



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446 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Falls were from the city of Grenna and adjacent parishes. They had ull 
lived a longer or shorter time in Indiana around Lafayette. Among the 
exceptions to this rule were J. Jonson Engberg, Sr., from Bergs jo, Hel- 
singland, and A. P. Norelius with his relatives, from Chisago Lake. They 
settled in the Clark valley. Anders Peter Johnson, from Vestergotland, 
came from Elgin, Illinois; P. O. Tilderquist, later in Vasa, from Sodra 
Rorum, Skine; Anders Lindstrom from Gotland, and others. Some of 
them built houses in the village, but the majority settled east and north- 
east of the village on both sides of the river; the largest number at the 
latter place, where quite a settlement grew up, and a little church was 
built in 1862. With the exception of a shoemaker, a tailor, a carpenter 
and a blacksmith there were no Swedish business men before i860 at 
Cannon Falls, which is now a town of 1,500 inhabitants. One or two 
would earn a small income by hauling for the flour mill or for the 
merchants, but there was no money in it. The Swedes at and around 
Cannon Falls were, however, a generous and lively class of people, who 
seemed to be gifted with the faculty of looking at life from its brightest 
side. 

The Swedes who first settled at Cannon Falls lived on the north 
side of the river a little below the old mill, where they bought village lots. 
By and by, however, they moved out on their farms, so that very few 
were left in the village. 

SviTHiOD. — ^This place, which later became known as Goodhue, and 
embraced a township of Goodhue county, with the northwest corner bor- 
dering on the township of Vasa, had a few settlers before i860. The 
land was partly covered with some shrub-oak and bushes and looked 
poor, for which reason it was taken up later than the surrounding country. 
It was, however, later found to be among the very best in Goodhue 
county. The first Swedish newcomers settled in the northwestern comer 
in 1859, ^^^ of ^^^ ^rst being A. P. Friman, from Veta, Linkoping's Lan, 
who had come to America in 1852 and lived at Chicago, St. Paul and 
Red Wing before coming to this place. He finally lived near the church 
of Vasa. He settled on a piece of land which later became the property 
of C. J. Fors. Simultaneously or shortly after came Samuel Johnson 
and settled on the land later acquired by McQuine. Paul Nilsson settled 
near Friman, but in Belle Creek township, and then came, by and by, 
Sven Nilsson, who later moved to Templeton, California, J. Nordquist, 
Gudmund Naslund, Jonas G. Lagerstrom, who later became a minister, 
Rev. J. P. C. Boren, C. J. Fors, P. G. Veber, Anders Swensson, Daniel 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 447 

Larson and a few Norwegians and Danes. When Rev. Boren settled 
here in 1862 he organized a church, which he named Svithiod, and min- 
istered to same until he moved to Stockholm, Wisconsin. The congrega- 
tion later joined the one at Vasa until in 1869, when it became an inde- 
pendent parish under the name of the Zion Evangelical Lutheran church 
of Goodhue. 

Red Wing. — ^When Hans Mattson came to Red Wing in order to 
hunt up a place for a Swedish settlement, he found here a little town 
with only half a dozen families, among whom were two Swedes, Peter 
Green (Sjogren) and Nils Nilson (the Doctor's Nils, as he was called, 
because he was Dr. Sweeney's hired man). Green moved to Spring 
Creek, three miles from Red Wing. At the arrival of Dr. E. Norelius, 
in 1855, there were several others, of whom, may be, the best known was 
Johan Nilsson, who emigrated with his family from Ostergotland, lived 
some time in Moline and came here in 1854. Dr. Norelius, in his history 
of the Lutheran Augustana Synod, says that Nilsson probably was the 
first Swede who built himself a house there, and that many of the 
Swedish newcomers were accommodated by him. J. Nilsson was very 
deaf and had acquired the habit of speaking louder than necessary, for 
which reason he was nicknamed "Skrikare-gubben." He was quite a 
character, outspoken and with unpolished manners, but in all his acts 
straightforward and honest. Although not very religiously inclined, 
he would permit Rev. Norelius and his little flock to hold their meetings 
in his house until they had time to build a church, and more than one 
time he came to Norelius clad in his sheepskin coat and with a sack of 
flour on his wheelbarrow, saying: "I suppose the preacher must have 
his tithe." One Sunday after the service in his house Rev. Norelius had 
left his hand Bible on the window sill. Nilsson took the Bible and 
read a little, whereupon he said: "It is a long time since I read the 
Bible, but I can see that they understood how to kill chickens in Old 
Testament days." 

When Rev. Norelius organized a congregation at Red Wing, Sep 
tember 3, 1855, the first members were: Hakan Olsson, with wife and 
six children, from Mjellby, Bleking, came to America and St. Charles in 
1855 and to Red Wing in the spring of 1855. Olsson was the leading 
man within the organization, as well as the first who earnestly worked 
in order to get it started; Anders Carlson, with wife and one child; 
Peter Sundberg^ with wife, turned Methodist, moved to Spring Garden, 
and thence to Iowa ; Bengt Anderson, with wife and two children, moved 



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448 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

to Spring Garden; Carl Anderson, a carpenter, with wife moved to 
Minneapolis ; John Nilsson Bylo, a tailor, with wife, came from Indiana, 
but moved away soon; Marten Pehrson, with wife and six children,, 
from Bleking ; Peter Johansson ; Nils Kallberg, with wife and one child, 
from Kronoberg's Lan, moved first to Spring Garden and thence to 
Iowa ; Anders Johan Johnsson from Ostergotland, skipped the town ; Nils 
Trulsson, with wife and two children, from Bleking, moved to Dakota 
county; Anders Peterson, Swen Swensson and Lars Westerson, with 
wife and child, from Ifvetofta; Anders Westerson, from Ifvetofta; 
widow Anna Brita Persdotter, with two children, from Halland; Nils 
Nilsson; Peter Anderson, with wife and four children, from Mjolby, 
Ostergotland, came to America in 185 1 and here from Rock Island in 
1855, moved to town of Cannon Falls; Anders Wilhelm Jonsson, with 
one child, moved to Spring Garden; Elna Persdotter, later Mrs. Mattes 
Pehrson, came to America from TroUe-Ljungby in 1855, moved to Vasa ; 
Inga Swensdotter, later Mrs. A. Danielson, arrived from the same parish 
at the same time, as well as Karin Larsdotter and Anna Nilsdotter ; Carl 
and his son, Samuel Beckman; Edward Soderlund, with wife and two 
children, and Peter Sjogren (Green), with wife and five children, came 
from Ljuder, Kronoberg's Lan, in 1852; Swen Kallberg, with wife, came 
from Hems jo, Kronoberg's Lan, in 1854. 

Hardly any of those first settlers are now left in Red Wing. Most 
of them moved away and very few are yet living. Red Wing is now the 
county seat of Goodhue county and has a population of about 9,000 
inhabitants. There are four banks and quite a number of Swedish mer- 
chants and artisans who are doing business there. 

Rev. Dr. Norelius in Goodhue County. — In a History of Goodhue 
County, published in Red Wing, in 1878, by Wood, Alley & Co., there 
is an interesting account of the Vasa settlement, written by Rev. Dr. 
Eric Norelius for that publication. It is partly in the form of extracts 
from his diary: "1855, August 31. Landed at Red Wing at 12 o'clock 
at night ; took lodging at a miserable hotel ; tried to sleep, but could not 
for the mosquitoes. September i, made an attempt to scale Barn BluflE 
before sunrise, but was recalled by the breakfast bell. I made some 
inquiries to find out if there were any Swedes, but I obtained no informa- 
tion. After a while I met with a Swedish servant girl, who told me that 
there was quite a number of them in Red Wing and gave me directions 
how to find them. After having spoken to several of them and explained 
the object of my visit, I proposed to hold a service in the evening if a 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 449 

place could be had. They told me that the Presbyterians had a meeting 
house — ^a shanty — in the burgh and that we possibly might get it. I 
then went to the Presb)rterian minister (Rev. Mr. Hancock), introduced 
myself, and asked for permission to use his chapel, to which he ccm- 
sented, provided I would preach the sound gospel. In the evening I had 
about one hundred hearers; many among whom, no doubt, were hard 
cases. One old fellow told me that 'the old devil may run after preachers, 
but he would not' However, not a few seemed to be edified and desired 
me to hold as many services as my time would permit. 

"September 2, the Lx>rd's day, I remained at Red Wing and preached 
in the afternoon in the Presbyterian chapel, the house being full; and 
making a new appointment for Monday night, I got a horse and a guide 
in the evening and went out to Vasa, word having been sent before for 
divine service in the forenoon on Monday. We went up the Spring 
Creek Valley and got over the prairies to Mr. Carl Carlson after dark. 
Carlson lived in a log house, a little to the northeast from the present 
brick church. I was hospitably entertained at his house and on the fol- 
lowing morning I was to hold service there, September 3. Almost every 
soul in the settlement came together at Mr. Carlson's. No Swedish min- 
ister had visited them before in their new home. After the service it was 
proposed to organize a congregation and resolutions to that end were 
adopted. The following persons handed in their names as members : 

"Carl Carlson, wife and four children ; Ola Olson, Sr., widower, and 
four children ; John Bergdahl, widower, and one child ; Samuel Johnson, 
wife and one child; Gustaf Carlson, wife and three children; Erick 
Anderson, wife and two children ;.S. J. Willard, wife and one child; 
Jonas Gustaf son, wife and one child; Nils Peterson and wife; Peter 
Nilson, wife and four children ; Nils Westerson, wife and four children ; 
August Johnson, single ; Peter Johnson, wife and one child ; Swen Jacob- 
son and wife; Anders Nilson, wife and two children; Swen Swen- 
son wife and three children; Swen Olson, wife and one child; 
Bengt Anderson and wife; Ola Swenson, single; Signild Anders- 
dotter, single; Carl Peterson, single; Olof Peterson, wife and one 
child; Niklas Peterson and wife; Bonde Olson, single; Nils Eklimd, 
single ; Bengt Kilberg, single ; Peter Wedin, single ; Carl Roos, wife and 
two children ; A. G. Kempe. In all eighty-seven persons. 

"It was now the great desire of the congregation to secure a pastor. 
On the same occasion three children were baptized, viz.: Maria, bom 

29 



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450 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

at Vasa, August 21, 1855, daughter of Samuel Johnson and his wife, 
Stina Lisa; Seltna Adelaide, born October 15, 1853, daughter of S. J. 
Willard and wife, Anna ; John Wilhelm, born on Good Friday, 1855, son 
of Peter Johnson and wife Carolina. 

"In the afternoon I went to Red Wing and preached in the evening 
and organized a congregation and baptized two children. 

"Three weeks after that time, when I returned from an extended 
tour to St. Paul, Stillwater, Marine and Chisago county, divine service 
was held at Vasa in Nils Peterson's new log house, which is still (in 
1878) standing, opposite to N. P. Holmberg's place. It was the 21st of 
September, in the midst of the equinoctial storms ; the rain was pouring 
down and I was suffering badly from the fever and ague, which I had 
brought with me from Indiana. A young man had taken me out from 
Red Wing in a lumber wagon hitched to a pair of horses, a great insti- 
tution in those days. The Lord's supper was also to be celebrated at 
this occasion, the first in the history of the congregation at Vasa. After 
having preached the sermon, or just at its end, I had a very bad attack 
of the chills and had to g^ to bed, the people in the meanwhile patiently 
waiting till the spell was over, after which I got up and administered 
the communion. On the 24th of September I bade the good people of 
Vasa farewell and was exceedingly glad to find an ox team to take me 
down to Red Wing. 

"Soon after I had left, or on September 30, a meeting was held by 
the congregation at Vasa for the object of electing a pastor. It was 
then unanimously resolved to extend a call to me. The simi of $200 was 
guaranteed as salary for the first year, with the expectation that the 
congregation at Red Wing, which desired to participate in the call, would 
contribute a like amount. 

"With a view that most of my parishioners in Indiana who owned 
land there would go along with me to Minnesota and settle there, I 
accepted the call and moved to Goodhue county in the spring of 1856. 
I was then in my twenty-third year and had been married nearly one 
year. I knew that a life of hardships was before us, but I had made 
up my mind beforehand, with the help of God, to conquer or to die. I 
told my excellent young wife that we would have to swim or else to 
sink, and she consented to do her part. 

"On the 25th day of May, 1856, on the first Sunday after Trinity 
Sunday, I preached my introductory sermon at Vasa in Mr. Peter Nil- 
son's new log house, which was filled to overflowing. My sermon was 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 451 

on the text for the day, treating of the rich man and Lazarus, and I 
tried to tell my new parishioners that it was better for them to be truly 
pious with poverty and go to heaven with Lazarus than to be ungodly 
with riches and go to hell with the rich man. I told them plainly that 
my object in coming here was to preach and teach the pure gospel of 
Jesus Christ, and by a steady, earnest and patient work to build up a 
Christian congregation ; not by spasmodic extraordinary efforts and occa- 
sional high steam, but by diligent and faithful instruction in the word of 
God. And I also assured them that the true prosperity of a community 
necessarily must rest upon the pure principles of the gospel. 

"Looking back now upon these twenty- two years (this was written 
in 1878), we have witnessed many movements and changes, but I have 
had no occasion to regret or change my standpoint which I took 
from the first, and I modestly think that my labor, under God's blessing, 
has not been altogether in vain. 

"There was one circumstance connected with that text and sermon 
which I can never forget, and which perplexed me not a little at the time 
and might have led to great mischief if my object had not been under- 
stood to be wholly unintended. For it so happened that the old gentle- 
man, Mr. Peter Nilson, at whose house I preached and stayed for some 
time, was known by the sobriquet "the rich man," on account of being 
a man of means, of which fact I was perfectly ignorant. No trouble, 
however, followed, and I was always on the best terms with the old 
gentleman and his estimable wife as long as they lived. I buried both 
of them many years ago and they have long rested in their graves. Peace 
to their ashes ! 

"For several weeks we lived at Peter Nilson'f, In the same room in 
which I preached. Our whole property conwstcd of a bedstead of the 
rope bottom kind, a plain square table, air old bureau^ an old cooking 
stove and some few books. Bacon and flour were high at Red Wing 
and it cost $4 to bring a sack of flow and d, ham home to Vasa. 

"In the spring pf 1856 a log house, designed for ft school and meet- 
ing house, had been put up on Mr. Willard's Itfm, but it was not com- 
pleted at the time when I arrived, and it took the v^ole summer to get 
it in order for winter uie. However, we twed it for divine service during 
the sutnmer after tbe floor had been pttt lll# 

"On the 22d day of June, tS$d, t business meeting of the congre- 
gation was hekf, when a conrtitu^on lot the church was adopted, the 
principles ol which are still ill fdfce^ ifthough considerably developed in 



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452 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

1857, and then again in 1870. The question as to the location for a 
church and graveyard was also brought up. Mr. Willard proposed to 
donate ten acres of land to the congregation for this purpose round 
about the schoolhouse, a short distance to the southeast from the present 
brick church, and the oflfer was thankfully accepted. As Mr. Willard, 
however, had the misfortune to lose his land, the congregation could not 
secure a deed to the property, consequently could not avail itself of his 
oflfer. A number of dead were buried there and the schoolhouse was- 
occupied as a meeting house up to 1862. This locality is on Mr. A. P. 
Freeman's farm. 

"On the 6th day of July, 1856, a meeting, was held for the election 
of three trustees and the following persons were duly elected: Peter 
Nilson, for a term of one year; Carl Carlson, for the term of two years; 
and Olof Peterson, for a term of three years. A certificate of incorpora- 
tion of the trustees of the Swedish Evangelical Lutheran Church of Vasa. 
was made out the same day, duly acknowledged on the 13th day of July, 
before Mr. Willard, being then a justice of the peace, and filed for 
record on the 17th day of July, 1856, and recorded in First Bode Re- 
ligious Societies, pages 9 and 10, by J. M. Hancock, register of deeds^ 

"From that time the congregation may be said to be fully organized.. 
My object now will be to show something of its development during the 
subsequent twenty-two years of its existence. My own history is so- 
much interwoven with that of the congregation at Vasa (not to mention 
that of Red Wing and other places in this county) that I cannot well 
relate the one without having to touch the other. And I hope, therefcM-e,. 
that the reference to myself will not be looked upon as too egptistical. 

"After having lived for several weeks at Mr. Peter Nilson's, we 
moved to a place in the neighborhood of White Rock, on Belle Creek,, 
the place later owned by Jon Monson and widow Abram Peterson. I 
bought the improvements on a quarter section from old Mrs. Bockmaa 
for $130, proved up the claim, and paid the government price the 
following winter. When I bought the claim there was a small log hut 
on it, 8x10 feet in size, with a flat sod roof, withou^l any floor. This^ 
was to be our kitchen department. I got some common Itmiber at 
Red Wing, at a high price, and put up an addition to the hut — a shanty 
12x16 feet — intended for parlor, sitting room, bedroom, etc., all in one. 
We moved in when three sides were up, without roof or floor, without 
doors or windows. Well do I remember the first night in that house, 
if house it was. We made our bed on the ground on a pile of shavings 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 453 

and hay, with the blue sky above us. I had filled the mattress with 
new cut grass, and, unintentionally, put in with it a small snake. No 
wonder, then, that in the nwming, when my wife made up the bed, she 
got hold of the dead snake in the mattress! By and by the roof and 
ceiling were made, consisting of sheeting; the floor was laid of common 
lumber, and the carpet put on; the walls were papered, and — ^then we 
had a nice, clean and cozy house to live in. The only inconveniences 
we experienced was when it was storming and raining, for the carpel 
then stood like a bellows and the rain came pouring down through 
both roof and ceiling. On such occasions we used an umbrella. It 
was only a little odd to sleep under an umbrella in the house. In the 
middle of September we had a visit of the well-known Rev. Dr. Passa- 
vant, of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, who stayed with us one night. He 
had a dream. In his nocturnal imaginations he thought he was laying 
under the bottom of a lake, and somehow a hole had been made in the 
bottom. And no wonder, for it rained that night. 

"A little later a number of our friends from Indiana came up and 
for some weeks we were no less than twenty-one persons, and the 
weather was at the time very ugly. Houses were yet scarce. Our 
neighbors were in no better condition, and some a great deal worse off 
than ourselves. My friend and neighbor, J. Robertson, first used a 
big loom for a house; then he dug himself down in the ground, till he 
got a small log cabin put up. Mr. T. G. Pearson, our nearest neighbor, 
was busy putting up a solid log house that summer; in the meantime 
he lived in the same primitive way as we did. 

"My time was divided between Red Wing and Vasa and other 
places, and my duties often called me away from home. On this 
account it was a trying time for my wife, especially as the Indians were 
occasionally visiting there. In the fall the prairie fire threatened to 
bum down our house while I was away, my wife having to fight for 
dear life. We continued to live in our frail house until November 4, 
when we moved to Red Wing in a snowstorm. 

"I now return to the congregation and my pastoral work. As 
soon as I got to be 'fixed' a little, I bought a horse and a rickety old 
wagon. Most of my trips, however, were made on horseback or a-foot, 
as roads were poor and far between. 

"During the sunmier I made a pretty thorough canvas of the whole 
settlement. People were pouring in very fast and settled down on the 
unoccupied land. On the 8th of November I could report to a special 



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454 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

meeting of the congregation that the church numbered 185 members, of 
whom loi were communicants. At the same meeting it was deter- 
mined to establish a congregational school, and on November 15 it was 
opened. Mr. Jonas Engberg was the first teacher, with a monthly 
salary of $35. Ever since that time the school has been a fixed insti- 
tution in the congregation, and has done much good for the religious 
instruction of the children. 

"The winter of 1856 and 1857 was a long and cold one, and the 
snow was very deep. One Sunday morning, when I went from Red 
Wing to preach at Vasa, I got stuck in a snowdrift just as I got up on 
the prairie, and I had to return. I learned afterwards that only three 
persons had ventured out to meeting that day. It was a very cold day, 
and they displayed their warm religious disposition by grumbling over 
the non-appearance of the preacher. This was the only appointment I 
missed that winter. 

"Having sold my horse to buy bread, I had to foot it between Red 
Wing and Vasa and other places. This necessarily caused me some 
hardships. On New Year's day, 1857, I had early service in the school- 
house at Vasa — that is to say, at five o'clock in the morning. As the 
weather was fine and mild, I determined to walk to Cannon Falls and 
preach there in the afternoon. There was no direct road to the Falls 
at that time, but we were obliged to go round by White Rock, then 
cross the Belle Creek and over the prairie by what later was G. M. 
Englund's place. I started a- foot after breakfast ; the sun shone brightly, 
the weather was mild, but the snow was very deep and there was no 
track. By the time I got down to Belle Creek the weather had changed 
entirely. A high, cold wind commenced to blow, and very soon a 
bitter blizzard was blowing in my face. It was only with the greatest 
difficulty I got over the prairie into the bush. There were no houses on 
the road. My scanty clothing, which had become wet by dragging 
myself through the snow, now began to grow stiflF by the cold. I laid 
myself down under the first bush I reached, entirely exhausted, with 
little hope of ever rising any more. Yet after some hours a little 
strength returned and by the greatest exertion I finally reached Cannon 
Falls in the evening^, but my ears, nose, hands and feet were frozen, 
and I could not speak for a long while. After having thawed out and 
taken some food, I was able to hold service at night, and on the following 
day I returned to Red Wing. 

"In the fall of 1857, I started a paper at Red Wing by the name of 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 455 

Minnesota Posten. It was designed as a family paper, treating of 
political as well as religious matters, besides containing general news, 
etc. I still think that some good in various ways was accomplished by 
that paper, although I had to regret that I ever tried my hands at politics. 
For some time I was suspected of having considerable political influence 
among the Swedes of Goodhue county ; but to tell the truth, I never was 
a politician; although at various times I have discussed general moral 
principles of right and wrong, touching politics, but I have never taken 
any part in political managements, caucuses, meetings, nor have I ever 
preached politics. I have never sought any political office in my life. It 
is true, I was elected county auditor in 1858, but this was done while I 
was away on a journey to Illinois, and I knew nothing about it before I 
came home. I did not accept the office, and Mr. Going was appointed 
in my stead. But to return to my paper. It was published only twice a 
month, but the burden of editing a paper of that kind, together with the 
already crushing load of pastorsd and missionary work which I had rest- 
ing upCMi me was rather too much for me. My health broke down, and 
in the spring of 1857, I ^^ ^ severe hemorrhage of my lungs. After 
having carried on the paper for one year — ^and the year 1857 was the 
hardest one in the history of Minnesota — it was prc^osed to merge it 
with Hemlandet, the Swedish paper published at Galesburg, Illinois, and 
that the united paper be removed to Chicago. This proposition was agree- 
able to both parties. 

"In the meantime I had been appointed agent to solicit funds in the 
East for a Scandinavian professorship at the Illinois State University. 
I accepted the appointment and moved with my family to Chicago. As 
the times, however, were too unpropitious, my agency was dropped, and 
I was instead elected editor of Hemlandet and another religious month- 
ly paper. After one year I relinquished the editorship^ and served a 
Swedish congregation at Attica, Indiana, for one yea^. I was then ap- 
pointed traveling missionary for the State of Minnesota, and moved to 
St Paul. In this capacity I continued to September, 1861. 

"When I left in November, 1858, the congregations at Red Wing 
and Vasa called the Rev. J. P. C. Boreen, who had recently come from 
Sweden, to supply my place for one year. At the end of that time he 
was elected, in 1859, permanent pastor at Red Wing ; but at Vasa he was 
called only as vice-pastor, or supply, because the congregation had hopes 
I would return. During his time a few families separated from the 
church at Vasa and organized the Methodist Episcopal and the Baptist 



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456 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

congregations there. Considerable trouble and some bad feelings also 
arose in the congregation with reference to the question of a new loca- 
tion for a church which was in contemplation. Many meetings for this 
purpose were held, and the question was earnestly discussed, but resulted 
in no definite termination. The old log house continued to be used for 
the meetings, but was, of course, altogether insufficient to hold so large 
a congregation. In June, 1861, the number of communicants were 143. 
The inccmveniences were, therefore, very great, and the necessity of a 
new church edifice was imminent. Mr. Boreen was no doubt a good, ear- 
nest, well-meaning man. He afterwards removed to Stockholm, Pepin 
county, and died there March 22, 1865, and was buried at Vasa. 

"In September, 1861, I was recalled to the pastorate at Red Wing, 
where I resided up to January, 1870, and entered upon the discharge of 
my duties. In order to bring the question of a location for the church 
to a close, a meeting was called for September 7th, 1861, at Vasa, when 
a committee of eleven was appointed, consisting of such persons as lived 
round the whole settlement and farthest away frcwn its center, and this 
committee was authorized to decide upon a site for the church, and by 
its decision the congregation was to abide. The committee soon after 
met and decided upon the location where the present church 
stands: the north-west quarter of south-east quarter of Section 
15, town 12. In order to secure the site the committee had first to buy 
80 acres of Dr. Whitmore, of Wabasha, for the sum of $320. The con- 
gregation bought 40 acres, and the other 40 acres was sold to a private 
person. Now, the place was decided upon and at a meeting called on 
the 1 2th of October, it was decided to go to work and build a church. 
It was to be built of frame, 60x38 feet. Soon, however, a number of 
families in the southern part of the settlement were dissatisfied with the 
location, and some other things relating to the building of the church, 
and withdrew from the congregation. They even organized a new con- 
gregation and talked of erecting a church of their own. The congrega- 
tion paid no attention to this new movement, but went to work and built 
a small church on the beautiful hill it had decided upon. But in view of 
so many families having withdrawn, the dimensions were reduced to 
40x26, with a small sacristy. In June, 1862, it was so far finished that 
the Scandinavian Evangelical Lutheran Synod of North America could 
hold its annual meeting there — an occasion of historical note. The move- 
ment of the seceders fell to the ground, and by and by most of them 
returned to the old congregation. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 453r 

"We viere now in the times of the great civil war, and the minds 
of all the people were occupied by that all-absorbing theme. It was not 
a time favorable to the growth of spirituality and the peaceful develop- 
ment of the kingdom of God ; the times were too exciting for that. Nev- 
ertheless, the grace of mercy in caring for the sick and wounded, and 
the people, was during that time awakened in the congregation as never 
before. Not a few of its members went into the war, and many never 
returned. In numbers and material wealth, the congregation continued to 
grow during the war. At its close it had 314 communicants. On this 
account the church soon became too small for the ccMigxegation. At the 
annual meeting of 1865, it was proposed to move the edifice from the top 
of the hill to the east side of the lot, put a stone basement under it and 
to make preparations for erecting a larger church. This preposition was 
adopted, and the church was moved during the summer. In the follow- 
ing fall and winter the basement was occupied by the congregational 
school and by the orphan home, then in its incipiency. In regard to the 
erection of a new church, there were many deliberations from December, 
1865, to January 2, 1867. It was then resolved by the congregation that 
I should take the whole matter in my own hands — solicit subscriptions 
and direct the work from beginning to end. Dbring the winter and 
spring I had about $8,000 subscribed towards the new building, and dur- 
ing the summer Messrs. J. Paulson and J. Wilsey made 350,000 bricks. 
My health failing again, I had to ask for leave of absence for one year — 
from November, 1867 — and leaving the pastoral work to my assistant, 
and the erection of the church to the trustees and a building committee, 
I went to Sweden in the beginning of 1868. The foundation of the new 
church was laid in the summer of 1868, and the church was put up in 
1869, Mr. D. C. Hill, of Red Wing, being the architect and contractor for 
the work. In the early summer of the next year the church was finished 
and consecrated. Its dimensions are : Length, 1 18 feet ; width, 50 feet ; 
side walls, 22 feet high. A parsonage was also erected late in the season 
of 1869. The whole cost of the new church and the parsonage as com- 
pleted amounted to $31,065.22. The gentleman to whom belongs the 
credit of having collected and disbursed the greatest part of this sum is 
Hon. J. W. Peterson, who, since 1870, has been the worthy treasurer of 
the congregation. With the beginning of the year 1868 the pastorate 
of Red Wing and Vasa was divided. I then resigned the former, retain- 
ing the latter ; but I did not remove to Vasa before January, 1870. 

"From 1873, on account of my many duties as president of the 



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4S8 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

synod, I withdrew from the active duties of my pastoral office in the con- 
gregation, and the Rev. P. J. Sward, formerly missionary among the sea- 
men at Constantinople, Turkey, and lately at Baltimore, Md., was elected 
vice-pastor. Rev. Sward died in Sweden several years ago." 

Charles A. Erickson, of Red Wing, Minnesota, was bom in Linkop- 
ing, Sweden, December 25, 1841, son of Eric and Sarah Erickson, farming 
people of Sweden. Erick Erickson brought his family to America in 1857, 
and settled in Red Wing, Minnesota, where, soon afterward, he died. Fol- 
lowing are the names of his children, in order of birth : Charles A. ; Eric 
Gustaf , a printer of Minneapolis, Minnesota ; Anna Sophia, who married 
Nils J. Skoog; Claus William, a carpenter of Kansas City, Missouri; 
John Frederick, Christina Mathilda and Peter Axel, who died in infancy ; 
and Oliver T., an electrical engineer of Seattle, Washington. 

Charles A. Erickson attended the public schools in Sweden until 1857, 
when he came with his father's family to America, and after their settle- 
ment in Red Wing he spent nearly four years in the public and parish 
schools. His first employment was as a farm hand. 

March 25, 1862, he enlisted in Company H, 5th Minnesota Volunteer 
Infantry ; was mustered into the service at Fort Snelling, Minnesota, and 
was assigned to the Department of Tennessee in the Southwest. At the 
expiration of his term of enlistment, March 27, 1864, he was honorably 
discharged at Alexandria, Louisiana, after which he re-enlisted. He was 
wounded in battle at Nashville, Tennessee, December 15, 1864. Quoting 
from Mr. Erickson's war record on file at St. Paul : "He was in all the 
campaigns with the regiment from the first skirmish at Corinth, Missis- 
sippi, May 28, 1862, until after the battle of Nashville, Tennessee, Decem- 
ber 15, 1864. The regiment during that time marched seven or eight 
thousand miles and was in more than twenty different engagements with 
the enemy. He has always been a faithful soldier." After being wounded 
he was taken to the hospital at St. Louis. His final discharge is dated 
September 6, 1865. 

Returning home at the close of the war, young Erickson entered 
Hamline University, where he was a student three years. Afterward he 
clerked in a hardware store, and in 1873 he began the business of man- 
ufacturing carriages, wagons and sleighs, in which he is still engaged, 
and he now also deals in farm machinery. 

July 6, 1873, he married Miss Augusta Albertina Foss, daughter of 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 461 

C. J. Foss, of Goodhue county, Minnesota, and the fruits of their union 
are eight children, namely : Hilma Sophia, who married C. A. K. John- 
son, of Red Wing, by whom she has two children, Loel Alberta Regina 
and Ivan Schubert Carlyle; Wilhelmina Charlota, a school teacher; 
Charles Earnest, Arthur Russell, and Anton Theodore, deceased; Edna 
Verginia, a clerk in the Red Wing post office ; Ruth, deceased ; and Ruby, 
who died in infancy. 

Mr. Erickson has long been identified with the English Lutheran 
church, and for over twenty years has faithfully served as deacon and 
trustee; also, for a number of years, he has been superintendent of the 
Sunday School. Politically, he is classed with the Independent Repub- 
licans; he has served as alderman and president of the City Council of 
Red Wing. Like the majority of Civil war veterans, he has a member- 
ship in the G. A. R. ; and he is a worthy member also of the Scandinavian 
Benevolent Society. 

Peter N. Allen, one of the representative citizens of Cannon Falls, 
Minnesota, dates his birth in Kristianstad, Hammar Ian, Skine, Sweden, 
January 9, 1845, ^md is a son of Nils Nilson and Gunilla (Pearson) 
Alsen, as the name was originally spelled. His parents were farming 
people in Sweden, and there spent their lives, and died, the father in 1871 
and the mother in 1889. Of their family, we record that Nils is engaged 
in the insurance business in Hiawatha, Kansas; Nellie, who was the 
wife of Nils Lewis, a hotel-keeper of Seattle, Washington, died in 1908 ; 
Louis, for seven years a resident of America, returned to Sweden, where 
he now lives; Swan, deceased, was a tanner in Sweden; Peter N., the 
subject of this sketch, was the next in order of birth; Anna is the wife 
of Biom Anderson, a farmer of Sweden ; Gunilla married Swan Hanson, 
a farmer of Sweden ; Penilla died in infancy ; Thore is engaged in farm- 
ing in Sweden ; and Pelle at this writing holds the position of treasurer 
in Kristianstad, Sweden. 

In 1868 Peter N. Allen, then a young man in his early twenties, 
emigrated to America, and soon after his arrival here took up his abode 
at Moline, Illinois, where for a time he worked on a farm and attended 
school.' He farmed, worked as a coal miner, and traveled. He spent 
three years in California and Oregon, and in 1875 he sailed from San 
Francisco for his old home in Sweden, where he spent the next two 
years. Returning to America in 1877, he directed his course to Kansas, 



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462 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

from whence the following year he came to Cannon Falls, which has 
since been his home. At the end of a year spent here as clerk in a 
hardware store, he paid another visit to Sweden, and on his return 
engaged in the saloon business, which he conducted for ten years, from 
1879 to 1889. Then he purchased a furniture store, and the next seven 
years gave his attention to it. This business he sold to John Danielson 
& Son, and has since conducted an undertaking business with C. Daniel- 
son Furniture Company. 

On account of the confusion which obtained because of the similarity 
of the names Alsen and Olson, Peter N. Alsen, soon after coming 
to America, changed his name to Allen. 

September 15, 1879, he married Miss Magdalena Pearson, of Sweden, 
and they have the following named children: Herman, who is em- 
ployed in the office of the Northern Pacific Railway Company, of St. 
Paul, Minnesota; Alice, wife of E. J. Peters, a hardware salesman of 
Minneapolis, has one child, Marian; Martha is a saleslady in a dry 
goods store ; Gertrude, Evelyn and Louis are at home. 

Politically Mr. Allen is a Republican. For the last seventeen years 
he has been a member of the local board of education, most of this time 
serving as treasurer of the board, and for eleven years he has been a 
county commissioner, and is still serving in both positions. He is iden- 
tified with the Swedish-Lutheran church, in which he has filled the office 
of deacon. 

P. A. Peterson, postmaster of Cannon Falls, Minnesota, was bom 
in Winslof, Kristianstad Ian, Sweden, January 24, 1855, son of Ake and 
Anna (Nelson) Peterson, natives of that place, where the father fol- 
lowed the trade of carriage-maker. The Peterson family emigrated to 
America in 1869, when the subject of this sketch was a boy in his teens, 
and settled at Cannon Falls, and here the elder Peterson carried on farm- 
ing for several years, until he retired. He lived to a ripe old age, and 
died in 1906; his wife died in 1895. They were members of the Swedish 
Lutheran church, in which faith they reared their children, a daughter 
and son. The former, Nellie, married David Jepson. She died in 1873. 
The son, the subject of this sketch, received his education in the public 
schools of Sweden and America. From 1871 until 1880, he clerked in 
a drug store, during those nine years thoroughly familiarizing himself 
with every detail of the business, and in 1880 he entered the drug busi- 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 463 

ness on his own account, and continued the same successfully until 
August 20, 1889, when he received the appointment of postmaster of 
his town. This office he has since held by reappointment. Meanwhile, 
until 1908, he retained his interest in the drug business, selling in that 
year. 

June 24, 1880, Mr. Peterson married Miss Mary Swanson, daughter 
of J. F. Swanson, of White Rock, Minnesota. She died in 1895, leaving 
one child, Edna, and five years later, October 4, 1900, Mr. Peterson 
married Miss Hilma Hohner, daughter of H. J. Holmer, of Cannon 
Falls. This union has been blessed in the birth of two children, Holmer 
and Elaine. 

For eighteen years Mr. Peterson has been secretary of the Swedish 
Lutheran church, and during the same time he was treasurer and a 
trustee of the church. He has for years taken an active interest in local 
politics, at one time serving as a member of the City Council. He is a 
Republican. Fraternally he is identified with the M. W. A., Samaritans, 
Scandinavian Benevolent Society, and Swedish Benevolent Society. Of 
the last named organization he has been secretary and treasurer. 

Fred C. Carlson, manager of the Cannon Falls Dry Goods Co., 
Cannon Falls, Minnesota, was bom in Red Wing, this state, March 14, 
1873, of Swedish parents. In his youth he attended the public schools 
of Cannon Falls, and at the early age of thirteen years was employed as 
clerk by A. O. Bergren, for whom he worked eight months. The next 
year he clerked in the general store of B. Van Camipen, following which 
he was for two years in the employ of Van Campen & Rosing, shoe deal- 
ers, leaving this firm to work for J, Danielson & Son, proprietors of a 
general store. In 1900 he went to Zumbrota, where he remained two 
years in the employ of Myer & Johns. January i, 1903, returning to 
Cannon Falls, he organized the Cannon Falls Dry Goods Company, of 
which he has since been treasurer and general manager, and which is 
to-day regarded as the largest establishment of the kind in the town. 

October 30, 1900, Mr. Carlson married Miss Amanda C. Danielson, 
daughter of John Danielson. Mr. Carlson takes an active interest in local 
politics, and has been honored by being elected to the office of president 
of the Republican Club of Gannon Falls. He is a member of the Mod- 
em Samaritans, the Swedish Benevolent Society, and the Swedish Luther- 
an Church. He is a brother of John H. Carlson, also of Cannon Falls, 
personal mention of whom will be found elsewhere in this work. 



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464 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

William M. Ericson, county attorney, Red Wing, Minnesota, was 
born in this city, July 15, 1880, a son of Swedish parents, John F. and 
Johanna Marie (Helsing) Ericson. John F. Ericson was bom in Gutten- 
berg. In 1871, while still a boy, he left his native land and emigrated 
to America, stopping first in Chicago and there spending two years. 
From Chicago he went to Lake City, and while there met the young 
woman who afterward became his wife. She was bom in Jothland, Swe- 
den. On coming to Red Wing, he engaged in farming and railroad con- 
struction work, and afterward was for several years employed in a shoe 
factory. In 1884, he opened up a retail shoe business, which he con- 
ducted until 1890, selling his store that year. At this writing, he is en- 
gaged in shoemaking. Of the children bom to John F. and Johanna 
Marie Ericson, the record in brief is as follows : George E., an attorney 
of Spooner, Minnesota; Esther, deceased; Esther O., head-fitter in a 
dress-making establishment in St Paul, Minnesota ; Alice A., wife of B. 
P. Canfield, a barber of St. Paul ; William M., the subject of this sketch ; 
Eleanor and Edgar, both of whom died in infancy ; and Lillian, who is 
employed in the office of her brother, William M. The father is a 
Republican, and a Lutheran, being identified with the Swedish-Lutheran 
church of Red Wing, of which he is secretary. 

William M. Ericson grew up in his native town, receiving his edu- 
cation in the public school, and graduating with the Red Wing high 
school class of 1900. Then he entered the office of Hon. F. M. Wilson, 
in Red Wing, and took up the study of law, in connection with which he 
did some newspaper work. From 1902 to 1904 he was employed in an 
editorial capacity on the Red Wing Daily Republican. In January, 1906, 
he passed the examination of the State Board, and was admitted to prac- 
tice at the bar, and from March i, 1906, until December i, 1906, he was 
a partner of F. M. Wilson. On December i, of the last named year, he 
opened an office for himself, and has since conducted a law practice. 
That same year he was elected on the Republican ticket to the office of 
county attorney ; was re-elected in 1908, and still fills the office. 

Mr. Ericson is identified with numerous fraternal organizations, 
among them being I. O. F., K of P., A. O. U. W., B. P. O. E., I. O. O. 
F., Yeomen, M. W. A., Eagles, and I. O. R. M. In the last named or- 
ganization he has been honored with the office of Great Sachem, or presi- 
dent, of the state of Minnesota Also he is a member of the Commercial 
Qub, the Strollers' Club, the Floradora Club, and the Aurora Ski Club, 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 467 

as well as the Red Wing Historical Society and the American Society of 
Curio Collectors. 

Charles J. Westman, a grocer of Cannon Falls, Minnesota, was 
bom in Wireda socken, SmSland, Sweden, November i, 1858, but was 
brought to this country at an early age and soon became Americanized. 
Mr. Westman is a son of August and Lottie (Johnson) Westman, natives 
of Smiland, where his father followed the trade of shoemaker until the 
time of his emigration to this country, in 1865. Arrived here, he settled 
near Cannon Falls, Minnesota, and for ten years followed farming. Then 
he began repairing shoes in the town, which he continued up to the time 
of his death, in 1906. His widow now makes her home in Minneapolis. 
To them were bom the following named children : Christina, who mar- 
ried John Lewis, a machinist of Minneapolis ; Charles J. ; Hulda Caroline, 
who married William Hanson, of Hastings, Minnesota; Gustof Adolph, 
a master mechanic in the employ of Winston Bros., railroad contractors ; 
Herman, who was drowned at the age of four years ; Emma, who mar- 
ried William Bergholtz, a plumber of Minneapolis ; Luther H., a plumber 
of Minneapolis ; Esther, who married Ernest Peterson, a stenographer in 
the employ of the German Life Insurance Company, of St. Paul. 

Charles J. Westman was a small boy when he came with his parents 
to America. He attended the common schools, and worked two years 
at the carpenter's trade, then he entered the general store of .G. West- 
man & Co., as a clerk, and was employed in that capacity twelve years. 
In 1887 he was engaged in the grocery business in St. Paul. Since 1890 
he has owned and conducted a grocery in Cannon Falls, where he is 
classed with the prosperous and successful merchants of the town. 

September 8, 1887, Mr. Westman married Melvina Hawkinson, 
daughter of Nels Hawkinson, a farmer living near Cannon Falls. They 
are the parents of seven children: Ansel, who died in infancy; Ruby 
Elvira, Carl August, Eva Charlotte, George Wendel, Esther, Theodore 
Ulysses — all at home. Mr. Westman is a member of the Swedish Lutheran 
church, of which he is a trustee; in his political views he is a Repub- 
lican, and for three years has been a member of the City Council; and 
he is identified with the A. O. U. W. and the Swedish Benevolent Society. 

Emil J. Holmes, a real estate dealer of Cannon Falls, Minnesota, 
was bom in Spring Garden, this state, October 12, 1865, a son of Swedish 
parents, Gustaf and Anna (Felt) Holmes. Gustaf Holmes was a native 



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468 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

of Smiland, Sweden, where he was educated and where he followed 
farming until the time of his emigration to America in 1856. On his 
arrival in this country he settled at Bishop Hill, near Galesburg, Illinois, 
where he farmed two years. In 1858 he came to Goodhue county, Min- 
nesota, and here he passed the rest of his life, and died in 1890. His 
widow survives him. Of their ten children, three are living, namely: 
Walter, a farmer of Goodhue county ; Julius, of Montana, and Emil J., the 
subject of this sketch. 

Emil J. Holmes received a *public school education in Goodhue 
county. Then he entered Gustavus Adolphus College, at St. Peter, where 
he spent four years, and graduated with the class of 1888. Immediately 
after the completion of his college course, he engaged in the hardware 
business on his own account, and continued the same until 1904, when he 
came to Cannon Falls and turned his attention to the real estate business, 
to which he has since been devoting his energies with a fair degree of 
prosperity. 

October 12, 1892, Mr. Holmes married Miss Emily Daniekon, daugh- 
ter of John Danielson, of Cannon Falls, and they have three children: 
Milton, Alvin, and Mabel. 

Reared by Lutheran parents, Mr. Holmes continues in this faith, 
and is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church. He is a Republican, 
and has filled various town offices. Also he is a member of the Swedish 
Benevolent Society of Cannon Falls. 

Charles Danielson. — Occupying a substantial position among the 
leading citizens of Cannon Falls, is Charles Danielson, who has spent the 
larger part of his life in this city, and since attaining manhood has been 
identified with its mercantile interests, being now at the head of the C. 
Danielson Furniture Company. A son of the late John Danielson, he was 
bom, January i, 1867, in Ottumwa, Iowa, of Swedish parentage. 

A native of Sweden, John Danielson was bom in Smiland, and was 
there reared and educated. After leaving school he leamed the trades of 
a carpenter and miller, and there worked a few years as a joumeyman. 
Coming to America in 1865, he spent a few months in Illinois, and then, 
in search, of a more favorable opportunity for increasing his finances, 
went to Wapello county, Iowa. Locating near Ottumwa, he engaged in 
farming, and in addition to his agricultural labors also followed his trade 
of carpenter to some extent. Moving with his family to Cannon Falls, 
Minnesota, in 1871, he, in company with the late Mr, Gustavus Westman, 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 469 

established a general store and conducted it most successfully for many 
years. Mr. Westman died in 1887, but his interest was taken by Mrs. G. 
Westman, and the business was continued as before imtil 1890, when 
Charles Danielson, the subject of this sketch, purchased Mrs. Westman's 
interest, and the firm name was changed to J. Danielson & Son. In Febru- 
ary, 1903, the senior member of the firm died, and the business was sub- 
sequently conducted as an estate for four years, when, in 1907, Mrs. 
Westman bought the interest of the estate, and the firm, under its present 
name of the C. Danielson Furniture Company, has since carried on a large 
and thriving trade, not only in Cannon Falls, but is Zimibrota, where it 
has a branch house. 

John Danielson married Christine L. Magnusson, a native of Sweden, 
her birth having occurred in 1841, and of the union five children were 
bom, namely : Charles, the special subject of this brief personal sketch ; 
Emily, wife of Emil J. Holmes, of whom a sketch may be found on an- 
other page of this work ; Esther, wife of Magnus Olson, clerk of Cannon 
Falls; Amanda, wife of F. C. Carlson, of whom a short sketch may be 
found elsewhere in this volume; and Mary, wife of Thore R. Johnson, 
attorney of Cannon Falls. Politically John Danielson was an active mem- 
ber of the Democratic party, and for a number of terms was a member 
of the school board, and for twenty years represented his ward in the City 
Council. He was a trustee, and one of the leading members of the 
Swedish Lutheran church, and drew the plans, and built, the first church 
of that denomination in Cannon Falls. He passed to the life beyond 
February 8, 1903, and his widow died April 16, 1907, having survived 
him a little more than four years. 

A lad of four years when he came with his parents to Cannon Falls, 
Charles Danielson acquired his early education in the city schools, subse- 
quently in the employ of his father obtaining a thorough knowledge of 
mercantile affairs. As previously noted, he became associated with his 
father in business in 1890, and has since been numbered with the success- 
ful and progressive merchants of the city, his business ability and judg- 
ment being unquestioned. To meet competition of mail order houses, 
he compiled and published the first retail furniture catalogue in the state 
of Minnesota, thus bringing his establishment into prominence before the 
public, and greatly increasing his extensive trade. 

Mr. Danielson married, June 8, 1891, Eva Josephine Westman, 
daughter of the late Ole Norelius and Josephine Norelius Westman, of 
Cannon Falls, and they have one child, Laveme Norelius, now attending 



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470 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

schcx)l. Mr. Danielson is a musican of considerable talent, and for fifteen 
years was the leader of a band which he was instrumental in organizing. 
He is interested in embalming, and has a state license as an embalmer. 
He is vice-president of the Retail Furniture Dealers' Association and 
chairman of the buying committee. Politically he is a Democrat, and 
religiously true to the faith in which he was reared ; he is a member and 
an ex-trustee of the Swedish Lutheran church. He is a member of vari- 
ous secret societies, belonging to the Ancient Order of United Workmen ; 
to the Woodmen of the World ; the Modem Woodmen of America ; the 
Modem Samaritans; and to the Star of Bethlehem. 

Peter A. H. KempE;, a well-known citizen of Red Wing, Minnesota, 
where he has lived for over thirty years, was bora in Tidaholm, Wester- 
gotland, Sweden, April 3, 1856, son of Aaron and Hedwig Charlotte 
(Lunden) Kempe. His parents were natives of that same province, and 
there passed their lives, the father dying there in 1885, the mother in 
1866. Their family comprised five children, of whom we record that 
Peter Aaron Hjalmar, the subject of this sketch, is the eldest; Grerda, 
Sven, Bertha and David are in Sweden. Bertha is the wife of Adolph 
Limdmark, a minister; Sven is a physician, and David is a government 
factory inspector. 

Peter attended the Skara high school, in Sweden, and later was a 
student in a commercial college at Rostock, Germany, where he com- 
pleted his course at the age of twenty years. Then, for two years, he 
was clerk in a ship broker's office on Hamburg, Germany. August i, 
1878, he landed in Red Wing, Minnesota, and entered the employ of John 
Kempe, grocer, with whom he remained in the capacity of clerk for sev- 
eral years. In 1883, he engaged in the retail grocery business on his 
own account, and continued the same until 1894. That year the firm of 
Friedrich & Kempe Co. was organized, with Peter A. H. Kempe as vice 
president. This company does an exclusive wholesale grocery business, 
has made rapid and substantial growth from the beginning, and to-day 
employs five traveling salesmen. Mr. Kempe has charge of, the city 
sales. 

June 22, 1882, he married Miss Mary Dadlow, of Goodhue county, 
Minnesota, and they have one son, Walter A. F. Mr. Kempe is a mem- 
ber of the United Conmiercial Travelers ; is independent in politics ; and 
in his religious faith is a Methodist, being a trustee of the Methodist 
Episcopal church at Red Wing. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 473 

John H. Carlson, a hardware merchant of Cannon Falls, Minnesota, 
dates his birth in Smiland, Sweden, August 22^ 1866, His father died 
when John H. was young, and in 1869 his mother, Anna Sophia Carlson, 
camte with her little family to American. Two years after landing 
in this country, they took up their abode near Cannon Falls, Minnesota, 
and here John H. received a common school education. When he grew 
up he gave his attention to the lumber business, in which he was engaged 
for a period of twenty years, up to 1906, a part of that time as manager 
of the branch office of the Chas. Betcher Lumber Co., of Red Wing. 
In 1906 he embarked in the hardware business, which he still continues. 

November 29, 1893, Mr, Carlson married Miss Delia M, Peterson, 
daughter of Johannes Peterson, a farmer of Vasa. Three children are 
the fruits of thi$ union ; Gladys E,, Irene A„ and Mildred J., deceased. 
Mr. Carlson is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church, in which he 
has been honored by being made trustee and treasurer; also he is treas- 
urer of the Lutheran Orphans' Home at Vasa. Politically he is a Repub- 
lican, 

OscAH Fred Peters, a hardware merchant of Cannon Falls, Minne- 
sota, was bom in Goodhue county, this state, November i8, 1861, son of 
Swedish parents, John and Christine (Johnson) Peters. John Peters 
was a native of Jonkopings Ian, Smiland, Sweden, where he lived and 
worked at the carpenter's trade until 1851, when he emigrated to America, 
landing in this country on May 6th< After a few years spent in the state 
of Indiana and the city of Chicago, he came to Goodhue county, Minne- 
sota. That was in 1855 or 1856. Here he purchased a tract of land and 
engaged in farming; prospered and occupied a representative place among 
the Swedish people of the locality. Politically, he was a Republican; 
religiously, a Lutheran, and up to the time of his death was a deacon and 
trustee of the Swedish Lutheran church. He was the father of five chil- 
dren, namely : John August, a farmer on the old homestead in Goodhue 
county ; Matilda, who married John Swanson, a tailor of Cannon Falls ; 
William, who died in 1906; Oscar Fred, and Ella, who married Charles 
Berg. 

Oscar F. Peters was educated in the common schools of his native 
county, and after leaving school entered the employ of D, E. Yale, 
dealer in hardware and farm implements, with whom he remained in 
the capacity of clerk for nine years, In 1892, he and Peter S. Prink 
bought the business of Mr. Yale, and as partners they conducted the 



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474 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

store the next two years, until 1894, when Mr. Peters purchased Mr. 
Prink's interest. Since that date Mr. Peters has conducted the business 
alone, and now has the largest and best equipped store in Cannon Falls. 

September 10, 1893, he married Miss Ella Brockner, daughter of 
Charles Brockner, a farmer of Rochester, Minnesota, and they have five 
children: Lee, Georgia, June, Leona and Bemice. Mr. Peters is a 
Republican, and an alderman of his town. Fraternally, he is an A. F. 
& A. M., an I. O. O. F., and an A. O. U. W., and, religiously, he affiliates 
with the Episcopal church. 

Alfred Johnson. — Numbered among the citizens of good repute and 
high standing in Goodhue county is Alfred Johnson, a well-known resi- 
dent of Cannon Falls, where for nearly three decades he has been pros- 
perously employed as a blacksmith and wagon maker. A native of Swe- 
den, he was bom, April 18, 1846, in Linkoping, where he spent the 
earlier years of his life. His parents were both born in Sweden, the birth 
of the father, J. M. Johnson, occurring in 1817, and that of the mother in 
1821. In 1885 they emigrated to America, the loved home of so many 
of their nearest and dearest kinsmen, and after farming in Minnesota for 
twelve years retired from active pursuits, locating in Cannon Falls, where 
they are now living, honored and respected, being the oldest Swedish 
couple in the city. 

Having received a practical education in the public schools of his- 
native land, Alfred Johnson was subsequently employed in various occu- 
pations, being in turn carpenter, farmer, printer and miller. Industrious 
and enterprising, with a laudable ambition to take advantage of every 
offered opportunity for advancing his financial condition, he came to the 
United States in 1869, making his way directly to Minnesota. The ensu- 
ing year he was engaged in general farming at Red Wing, from there 
going to Hastings, Dakota county, where for ten years he operated a 
blacksmith and wagon-making shop. Removing with his family to Can-^ 
non Falls in 1880, Mr. Johnson has since been actively associated with 
the development and advancement of the industrial and manufacturings 
interests of the city, as a wagon manufacturer and blacksmith carrying on 
an extensive and lucrative business. 

Mr. Johnson married Christine Swanson, who was born, in 1853,. 
in Smiland, Sweden, and was there brought up and educated. Mr. and 
Mrs. Johnson are the parents of four children, namely: Hilma, living 
at home ; Thore R. ; Carl C. F., of Cannon Falls, clerk in a drug store ; 



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ANDREW SWANSON 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 477 

and Esther, engaged in school teaching. In his political views Mr. Johnson 
is independent, voting for the best men and measures regardless of party 
restrictions. Socially he is a member of the Scandinavian Benevolent 
Society, and religiously both he and his wife are worthy members of 
the Swedish Lutheran church. 

Thore R. Johnson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Johnson, laid a sub- 
stantial foundation for his future education in the public schools pf 
Cannon Falls, in 1900 receiving his diploma from the high school. Sub- 
sequently entering the University of Minnesota, he was graduated from 
the Law Department in 1903, after which he was engaged in the practice 
of his chosen profession in Clinton, Minnesota, for a year. Returning 
then to Cannon Falls, he has continued his law practice with excellent 
success, being now one of the leading attorneys of the city. On June 22, 
1905, he married Mary Danielson, daughter of John Danielson, of Can- 
non Falls, and they have one child, Marian Lorine. Religiously Thore R. 
Johnson is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church, and politically he 
is identified with the Democratic party. He takes an active interest in 
municipal affairs, having been a member of the Board of Education and 
of the Park Board, and is now serving most satisfactorily to all concerned 
as city attorney. Fraternally he belongs to the Scandinavian Benevolent 
Society ; to the Modem Woodmen of America ; and to the Woodmen of 
the World. 

{ 

Andrew Swanson. — For nearly half a century Andrew Swanson 
was numbered among the sterling and honored citizens of Red Wing, 
the metropolis and judicial center of Goodhue county, and here he died 
on the i6th of March, 1906, secure in the high regard of all who knew 
him. He was a pioneer of this section of the state and here he not only 
gained for himself a position of independence and marked prosperity, 
but he also contributed to the development and material upbuilding of 
the city that has so long represented his home. Such was the character 
of the man and such his achievement as one of the world's productive 
workers that he is specially well deserving of a tribute in the pages of 
this history. 

Andrew Swanson was bom in Hudena socken, Elfsborgs Ian, Sweden, 
on the 9th of November, 1833, and was the son of a substantial farmer 
of that section. He was thus reared to the sturdy discipline of the 
great basic industry of agriculture, and his early educational advantages 
were those afforded in the schools of the place and period. In 1852, 



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478 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

when nineteen years of age, he severed the ties that bound him to home 
and fatherland and set forth, to seek his fortunes in America. Soon 
after landing in New York City he made his way westward to Galesburg, 
Illinois, in which city and its vicinity he found requisition for his 
services in various lines of employment. He worked on farms, in flour 
mills and other general work, besides which he was for a time employed 
as a laborer on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. He was 
ever ready to turn his hand to any honest work that he could secure, and 
his intrinsic integrity of character gained to him confidence and respect 
wherever he was employed, as was also true during the entire course 
of his long and successful career as an independent business man in 
later years. He maintained his home in Illinois until 1857, when he 
came to Minnesota and established his residence in Red Wing, which was 
then scarcely more than a mere frontier village. In the early pioneer days, 
being without financial means or knowledge of any trade, he was com- 
pelled to employ himself in such general work as it was possible for him 
to secure. Under these conditions, none too auspicious, it was given this 
sturdy and ambitious young man to press forward to better things and 
eventually to achieve a success worthy of the name and worthy of him- 
self. He literally "grew up with the country," and none better than he 
appreciated the changes that were wrought in this favored section with 
the passing of the years. He was ambitious and frugal, and as soon as 
he had acquired a little capital he engaged in various small business 
enterprises, — such as draying, minor contract work, etc. In 1862 he 
entered into a partnership with J. G. Gustafson, under the firm name of 
Swanson & Gustafson, and engaged in the handling of grain, flour and 
feed. At that time Goodhue county was sparsely settled, but in the 
midst of an active immigration, and the products handled by the firm 
of Swanson & Gustafson were shipped here in large quantities from the 
lower and older Mississippi river districts in Illinois. The firm did a 
strictly retail business, but their receipts at times reached as high as 
one thousand dollars in a single day. In after days, when Red Wing 
had become a world-famous shipping point, one could hardly believe that 
this great and fertile section of the state at one time imported such 
products by the barge-load. 

Upon disposing of the business mentioned Messrs. Swanson & 
Gustafson joined the firm of Simonson, Olson, Busch & Company, gen* 
eral merchants, which thereafter continued operations for several years. 
Mr. Swanson, however, took no active part in the detailed affairs of this 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 479 

business. He engaged in the shipping and selling of horses, and later 
entered into a partnership with W. Fleron in the livery business. In 
1874 he became associated with Charles Erickson in the furniture busi- 
ness, under the title of Erickson & Swanson, and soon afterward they 
began the manufacturing of and wholesale dealing in furniture, having 
purchased the Koch factory, on Dakota street. In 1880 their business 
was reorganized by the formation of a stock company, which was duly 
incorporated as the Red Wing Furniture Company. Mr. Swanson 
assumed the management of the retail branch of the business, of which 
department of the enterprise he became the purchaser in 1882, in which 
year the Red Wing Furniture Company discontinued its retail operations. 
After conducting the business individually for a short interval Mr. 
Swanson merged the same with that of the retail store of Charles 
Erickson and with the furniture factory of D. C. Hill, whereupon a 
stock company was formed under the name of the Red Wing Manu- 
facturing Company. Mr. Swanson took charge of the company's retail 
business, of which he became the owner a few years later, by purchase, 
and with this enterprise he continued to be actively identified until the 
close of his long and useful life.- The business is still continued, under 
the original firm title of A. Swanson & Son. 

Andrew Swanson was a member of the Swedish Lutheran church 
for nearly half a century, having identified himsdf therewith in 1858, 
soon after taking up his residence in Red Wing, and for many years he 
was a trustee of the local church of this denomination. No man in the 
community commanded a higher measure of popular confidence and 
esteem and he was a citizen of influence in both business and civic affairs. 
In politics he was aligned as a supporter of the cause of the Demo- 
cratic party, on whose ticket he was elected city treasurer of Red Wing. 
He was a member of Minnesota Scandinavian Relief Association, was 
generous and kindly in his relations with his fellow men and stood 
exemplar of those sterling traits of character that have made the 
Swedish-American element so powerful and valued a factor in the devel- 
opment and progress of the great state of Minnesota. 

On the 3d of December, 1859, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Swanson to Miss Oliva Olson, daughter of Hokan and Hannah Olson, 
who immigrated from Sweden to the United States in 1854, locating 
first at St. Charles, Illinois, whence they came to Red Wing in 1855. 
Here Mr. Olson followed his trade of cabinetmaking and here he con- 



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48o SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

tinued to maintain his home until his death, in 1897, ^^ ^^ venerable 
age of eighty-seven years. He was one of the honored pioneers and 
patriarchs of this section of the state when he was thus summoned to 
eternal rest. His wife died in 1856, soon after the family removal to 
Red Wing. Mrs. Andrew Swanson survives her honored husband and 
still remains in the attractive home that is endeared to her by the gracious 
memories and associations of the past. Mr. and Mrs. Olson became the 
parents of eight children, — four sons and four daughters. The sons 
are living, but all of the daughters are now deceased. John Frederick, 
eldest of the sons, is individually mentioned in this work; Henry A. is 
traveling salesman for the Scandia Furniture Company, of Rockford, 
Illinois ; Theodore A., is engaged in business in Red Wing ; and Charles 
A. IS engaged in the jewelry business at West Superior, Minnesota. 

John F. Swanson. — One of the essentially representative business 
men and honored and influential citizens of Red Wing is John Frederick 
Swanson, who is a native son of this city and a scion of one of its 
sterling pioneer families. On preceding pages of this work is entered 
a memoir to his honored father, the late Andrew Swanson, and thus it 
is not demanded that the data concerning the latter's career be repeated 
in the sketch at hand. 

He whose name initiates this article is a worthy representative of 
the stanch Swedish element that has contributed so largely to the civic 
and material development and upbuilding of the great state of Minne- 
sota, to which his loyalty is of the most insistent type. He was bom in 
Red Wing, the county seat and metropolis of Goodhue county, Minne- 
sota, on the 19th of January, 1861, and is a son of Andrew and Oliva 
(Olson) Swanson. In this attractive little city he was reared to ma- 
turity and here he has continuously maintained his home. He was 
afforded the advantages of the public schools. He entered the employ 
of the firm of Erickson & Swanson, of which his father was junior 
member, and in 1878-9 had charge of a branch furniture store at Cannon 
Falls. In 1880 he became shipping clerk for the Red Wing Furniture 
Company, which succeeded the firm of Erickson & Swanson and which 
handled furniture both at wholesale and retail, besides which it con- 
ducted a well equipped though not extensive furniture factory. Under 
the new regime Mr. Swanson continued to be identified with the enter- 
prise and later he was secretary and bookkeeper of the Red Wing Manu- 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 481 

facturing Company, which is still in existence. In 1888 Andrew Swanson 
purchased the retail department of this company's business and entered 
into partnership with his son John F., of this review, under the firm 
name of A. Swanson & Son. With this enterprise the father continued 
to be identified until his death, in March, 1905, and the business is still 
successfully conducted under the original title. 

In 1894, while still actively associated with his father in the retail 
furniture business, John F. Swanson entered into partnership with John 
Augustine and engaged in the retail hardware trade, under the firm name 
of Augustine & Swanson, on Bush street. In September, 1896, J. L. 
Anderson purchased an interest in the business, whereupon the title of 
the firm, which at this time purchased the hardware stock of A. F. 
Anderson, was changed to Augustine, Anderson & Company. The two 
stocks were combined and the firm removed to a more eligible location 
on Main street. The partnership alliance continued unchanged until 
the 1st of July, 1905, when Mr. Augustine withdrew from the firm, 
and since that time the business has been successfully continued under 
the title of Swanson & Anderson. The finely equipped establishment 
of the firm is the largest in Red Wing and controls an extensive and 
appreciative trade. The store is essentially modern in all its appoint- 
ments and the stock in all departments is kept at the highest standard. 
Fair and honorable dealings have begotten public confidence and esteem, 
and the result is shown in the large and substantial business. 

As a citizen Mr. Swanson is essentially progressive and public- 
spirited and while he has never sought or desired office he takes a loyal 
interest in all that touches the welfare of his native city. In politics he 
maintains an independent attitude, giving his support to the men and 
measures meeting the approval of his judgment, without reference to 
partisan lines. He is an active and valued member of the Red Wing 
Commercial Club and was formerly identified with Company G, Minne- 
sota National Guard. He holds to the religious faith in which he was 
reared and both he and his wife are zealous members of the English 
Lutheran church in their home city, where they are held in high regard 
by all who know them. 

In the city of Utica, New York, on the 22d of June, 1904, was 
solemnized the marriage of Mr. Swanson to Miss M. Louise Reichert, 
daughter of John Reichert, of that city, and they have one son, Fred- 
erick Reichert Swanson, who was bom on the 28th of September, 1906. 

81 



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482 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Andrew Lindgren, of Red Wing, Minnesota, was bom in Blekinge, 
Sweden, January 30, i860, but was brought to this country when a small 
boy and became Americanized and grew to manhood. Mr. Lindgren's 
father, Andrew Lindgren, a native of Sweden, followed the various voca- 
tions of harness making, shoemaking and farming in the old country. In 
1868, he came to America and settled at Red Wing, and the following 
year his family joined him here. He worked at the trade of harness- 
maker the rest of his life. He died in 1884, and his wife, whose name 
before marriage was Elna Lundquist, died in 1901. They were the parents 
of three children: Hannah, who married P. J. Peterson, of Red Wing; 
Andrew, the subject of this sketch ; and Anna, who died in 1868, at the 
age of two years. 

Andrew Lindgren received his early education in the schools of Swe- 
den. After the removal of the family to Minnesota, he attended school at 
Red Wing for four years, and subsequently was a student at Gustavus 
Adolphus College, St. Peter. In his youth he learned his father's trade, 
that of harness-maker, and worked at it until May 24, 1883, when he 
entered the employ of the Minnesota Scandinavian Relief Association, 
with which he is still connected, in the capacity of secretary. 

June 6, 1887, Mr. Lindgren married Miss Charlotte Malm, of Red 
Wing, who bore him three children : Frances V., Eva C, Lawrence W. 
This wife died January 21, 1903, and on January 4, 1905, Mr. Lindgren 
married Miss Anna Constantine. 

His parents being Lutherans, Andred Lindgren, of this sketch, g^ew 
up in the Lutheran faith, and is a trustee of the church. On reaching 
his majority, he cast his vote with the same party his father supported, 
the Republican party, and has been a Republican ever since. For two 
years he served as a member of the City Council of Red Wing, and at 
present he is a member of the board of trustees of Oakwood Cemetery. 

Claes Otto Berg, a merchant tailor, of Red Wing, Minnesota, dates 
his birth at Nykoping, Sweden, August 5, 1844. He received a common 
school education there and learned the tailor's trade, first from his father 
and later graduated from the Cutters' School. In the year of 1869, arriv- 
ing in this country, he settled at Austin, Mower county, Minnesota, where 
he worked at his trade and made his home for nine years. The next 
three years he spent at Dodge Center, and from there went to Zvunbrota, 
where he remained until 1903, at which time he came to Red Wing. Here 
as a merchant tailor he has since conducted a successful business. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 483 

Mr. Berg married, in 1868, Chariotta Zatterlund, and their union 
was blessed with seven children, as follows : Lottie, who married L. Bal- 
lard ; Mary, married Ed. Petterson ; Bettie, who became the wife of Carl 
Lunde; Hattie, married Nils Everson, printer, of Minneapolis; Oscar 
Berg, engaged in dairy supply business in Chicago; Charley, a building 
contractor in West Superior, Wisconsin, and Nellie, at home. Mr. Berg 
is a member of the Scandinavian Relief Association of Red Wing, and 
believer of the true Church of the Living God. 

August George Rosing, a well-known citizen of Red Wing, Minne- 
sota, for over forty years and now a resident of Minneapolis, was bom 
in southwestern Sweden, September i, 1822. He was educated in the 
schools of his native land, and *was there employed as a book-keeper by 
the government, in addition to serving in the army. In 1868, eager to 
better his condition and afford his children broader opportunities than 
he had in his youth, he emigrated with his family to America, and settled 
on a farm near Red Wing. Here he lived for twenty years, then, July 
1, 1888, he moved into the town and entered the employ of the Minnesota 
Scandinavian Relief Association, an organization formed, in 1879, for the 
purpose of aiding and assisting the widows and orphans of deceased 
members. From that date until March i, 1909, when he resigned, he 
filled the position of secretary and general manager, during this period 
rendering a service of untold value to many of his unfortunate country- 
men. 

In 1851, in Sweden, Mr. Rosing married Miss Maria Marguerite 
Charlotte Flint Berg, and is the father of five children, namely : Hjalmar 
Frederic, assistant treasurer of the South Side State Bank, Minneapolis ; 
Ora Gustof , a merchant of Schaf er. North Dakota ; Leona A., of Merriam 
Park, Minnesota; Mary Elizabeth, who married a Mr. Doyle, died in 
1878 ; and Sidrid, who died In infancy. Mr. Rosing is a Republican, and 
has served as justice of the peace, town clerk, and county commissioner. 

Clarence L. Skoglund, who is engaged in a harness and saddlery 
business at No. 322 Plum street. Red Wing, Minnesota, was born in this 
city September 23, 1884, son of Swedish parents, Andrew G. and Caroline 
(Malm) Skoglund. Andrew G. Skoglund was a native of Vermland, 
Sweden, bom September 17, 1852, and was educated there. In 1870, he 
came to America. At Red Wing, Minnesota, he found emplo)mient, first, 



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484 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

on the construction work of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad, 
and later as brakeman on the same road. Afterward he learned the trade 
of harness-maker, and ran a shop, with J. B. Ashelman as partner, under 
the firm name of Ashelman & Skoglund. Subsequently Mr. Skoglund 
bought Mr. Ashelman's interest, and continued the business alone until 
his death, which occurred February 12, 1904. He was a worthy member 
of the Swedish Lutheran church, of Red Wing, of which for some years 
he served as trustee and treasurer. Politically he was a Republican, and 
filled the office of alderman. Also he was a member of the cemetery 
board. His six children, in order of birth, are as follows: Hilda V., 
Clarence L., Walter L., Reuben A., Herbert L., and Ruth Marion. 

Qarence L., after his graduation from the Red Wing high school in 
1902, was for two years employed as book-keeper by the Friederich- 
Kempe Company. At the death of his father, he took charge of his 
father's business, learned the trade, and has since successfully run the 
harness and saddlery shop. Mr. Skoglund takes an active interest in 
church work, being trustee, and at this writing being president of the 
Young People's Society of the Swedish-Lutheran church. He is secre- 
tary and treasurer of the Library Board of the Carnegie Library of Red 
Wing, and his political affiliation is with the Republican party. 

Charles E. Beckmark, the leading retail shoe merchant of Red 
Wing, Minnesota, was bom in this city, January 8, 1869, son of Conrad 
and Charlotte (Swanson) Beckmark, natives of Eastern Jothland, Swe- 
den. Conrad Beckmark was a blacksmith and engineer. He emigrated 
with his family to America in 1868, and settled in Red Wing, where at 
first he was employed as an engineer. Later he was a member of the 
police force of Red Wing, in this latter capacity serving for a number of 
years. He died in 1883, and is still survived by his widow. Of their six 
children, Hilma married Charles Anderson, miller, of the Red Wing 
Milling Company; Gust is a miller of Red Wing; August is engaged in 
the hotel business in Seattle, Washington ; and Elizabeth, and Charles E. 
One child is deceased. Mr. Beckmark was a member of the Swedish 
Lutheran church, and, politically, he was a Republican. 

Charles E. Beckmark was educated in the public schools of Red 
Wing. After leaving school, he was employed in a book store, where he 
remained for about five years. The next eight years he clerked in the 
shoe store of C. Beckman, at the end of that time going out on the road 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 485 

as traveling representative for "Star Brand" shoes, a position he filled 
up to 1904. Then, with an experience of eight years as clerk and eight 
years as traveling salesman in the shoe business, he engaged in the retail 
shoe business on his own account, and to-day has the largest and best shoe 
store in Red Wing. 

January 3, 1893, Mr. Beckmark married Miss Caroline Hawkins, 
daughter of George W. Hawkins, sign painter of Red Wing. They have 
two children: Phyllis, bom July 6, 1897, ^"^ Margaret, April 17, 1907. 

Mr. and Mrs. Beckmark are members of the Episcopal church, and, 
fraternally, he is identified with the following organizations: K. of P., 
B. P. O. E., I. O. F., M. W. A., and A. O. U. W. Also he is a mem- 
ber of the Commercial Club, and has been honored with a position on the 
Red Wing School Board. Politically, he is a Republican. 

Axel Haller^ probate judge of Goodhue county, Minnesota, was 
bom in Vermland, Sweden, December 11, 1858, son of Andrew and Kari 
(Bengtson) Haller, natives of the same province. Andrew Haller, a car- 
penter and contractor in Sweden, after his emigration to America, in 
August, 1867, settled in Goodhue county, and here worked at his trade 
until his retirement ; here he and his wife still reside. They are members 
of the Swedish Mission church. In their family were seven children, 
namely: Ingeborg, deceased, was the wife of Erick Hanson, of Good- 
hue county; Olof and Andrew A., farmers of Goodhue county; Axel, 
whose name introduces this sketch; Nels, a farmer of Goodhue county; 
Anna, deceased, was the wife of Fritz Peret, a mail carrier; and Edward, 
who died October 19, 1908, was a merchant of Wanamingo township, 
Goodhue county. 

Axel Haller, when a small boy, accompanied his parents to America. 
He was educated in the public schools and at Red Wing Seminary, and for 
thirteen years was employed in teaching school. For four months, during 
1892, he was engaged in the general merchandise business in Wanamingo 
township. This business he sold at the end of that brief period, and in 
the spring of 1893 he went to Zumbrota, where he was one of the organ- 
izers of the First State Bank of that place, of which he was assistant 
cashier until November, 1894. He was then elected probate judge of 
Goodhue county, which office he has since filled. On assuming the duties 
of this office, he took up the study of law, and in 1902 was admitted to 
practice by passing the State Board examination. Judge Haller is a 



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4«6 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

director of the Bank of Pierce, Simmons & Co., and is secretary of the 
Red Wing Advertising Company. Politically, he is a Republican ; relig- 
iously, he is identified with the Lutheran church. 

Deceml)er i6, 1882, he married Miss Inger Ottum, daughter of Nels 
and Bertha Ottum, of Red Wing, and they have nine children: Alma 
C, Nels B., Adolph I., Helen Marie (who died in infancy), Helmer M., 
Carl A., Chester A., Ferdinand V., and Florence J, 



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CHAPTER XXL 
CARVER COUNTY. 

The King Oscar Settlement, which four years after its beginning 
was called The Union Settlement, is located in Carver county, about thirty 
miles north of Fort Snelling along the Minnesota river. The soil in the 
interior of the county is of the very best, and the county is well watered 
by a number of lakes, of which the largest and most beautiful is Clear 
Lake; also called Wakonia Lake. The land was abundantly wooded, 
making cultivation hard and slow, but the labor expended has been richly 
rewarded. 

As early as in 1850 steamers were running from the Mississippi up 
the Minnesota, and with this means of transportation the Swedes in 1853 
commenced to hunt for a place suitable for settlement The first Swede 
to locate at Union was Nils Alexanderson, from Kronoberg's Lan,.who 
the following year, was joined by Johan Hult with family and his two 
brothers, Anders and Peter Hult. This nucleus of a settlement was 
during the summer of 1854 augmented by Sven Gudmundson and family 
from Hossna ; a couple of months later by Jonas Carlson and family from 
Naum, and in the fall by Anders Stomberg with family and a little com- 
pany from Leklisa. 

All of these people had arrived in America during 1852 and 1853, 
but had stopped at other places before coming here. They selected their 
claims in the vicinity of the place where the East Union Church now 
stands, and named it King Oscar's Settlement, in honor of their former 
ruler, King Oscar I of Sweden and Norway, the father of King Oscar II 
and grandfather of the present King of Sweden, Gustavus V. The name 
of the settlement was four years later changed to The Union Settlement. 
Simultaneously with the Swedes, a number of Norwegian families also 
came. These settlers liked the land so well that they encouraged their 
relatives and friends in Sweden and Norway to join them, and year 
by year they came in large numbers, settling in the neighborhood before 
other nationalities had time to take up claims there. The woods were soon 
so well filled with Swedes and Norwegians that about i860 an important 

487 



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488 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Scandinavian settlement was already established here. Of course, these 
new-comers had to contend with the same hardships and privations of all 
kinds that are inseparable from pioneer life in the wilderness, but here, 
as in other places, Swedish energy, thrift and incessant labor surmounted 
the difficulties and came out victorious. 

The city of Carver, on the Minnesota river, was already platted by a 
Norwegian by the name of Gorgesen when the first Swedes arrived, but 
consisted of only one house. The Swedish settlement began four miles 
west of this place, which in the future became its most important market. 

A partial list of the first Swedish settlers is here given from Dr. 
Erik Norelius' valuable work, "History of the Swedish Lutheran Con- 
gregations in America," and which shows that the larger part of the pop- 
ulation came from Vestergotland : 

Swen Gudmundson and Johan Gustafson, from Hossna, Vestergot- 
land ; Carl Abramson, Anders Carlson, Johannes Carlson, Swen Mellgren, 
Jonas Carlson and Pehr Carlson, Naum, Vestergotland; Johannes Hult, 
Anders Hult, Peter Hult, Kajsa Larsdotter and Kerstin Petersdotter, 
Bittema, Vestergotland; Johannes Anderson, Anders Stombcrg, Olaus 
Anderson, Swen Larson and Joh. Anderson, Lek&sa, Vestergotland ; Peter 
Lundquist, Maja Swensdotter and Joh. D. Skone, Herri junga, Vester- 
gotland ; Anders Wass, Lars Anderson and Otto Tapper, Wedum, Vester- 
gotland; Peter Nilsson and Joh. Kyllerstrom, Torsled, Vestergotland; 
Anders Larson, Eggum, Vestergotland; Lars Anderson, Goteborg, Ves- 
tergotland ; Jonas Johnson and Carl Aim, Ganmialkil, Ostergotland ; C. J. 
Stenberg, Asby, Ostergotland ; Peter Swensson, Sund, Ostergotland ; C. A. 
Hedengran, and Swen MSnson, Godelof, SkSne; Swen Pehrson, Nasum, 
Sk&ne; Bengt M&nson, Gumlosa, Sk&ne; Ola Pehrson, Farlof, Skine, 
Joh. Adolph Hellstrom, Jonkoping; Johan Johnson, Lekaryd, Smiland; 
Swen Dahlberg, Asenhoga, Smiland ; Anders Hogstedt, Skiro, Smiland ; 
Samuel Arvidson, Nottja, Smiland; Henrick Anderson, Ny, Vermland; 
Nils Alexanderson, Nafvelsjo, Smiland, and Jonas Anderson, Ny, Verm- 
land. 

GoTAHOLM, another Swedish settlement in Carver county, is de- 
scribed in an article in Hemlandet, 1859, by J. P. Miller. The first Swe- 
dish settler here was Daniel Justus, from the southern part of Helsingland, 
who came here walking through the woods in August, 1856. He took a 
claim at a little lake, which later was called Swede Lake. The following 
winter he was joined by Jons Jonsson, Ulrik Ingemarson and Carl Swens- 
son. The following years there were several new arrivals, and in 1858 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 489 

an ex-member of the Swedish Riksdag (Congress), Olof Anderson, from 
Vermland, arrived. The first settlers took up their ckums around the 
little Swede Lake. Besides the cultivaticm of the soil the new comers 
made maple sugar and also earned quite a little extra money by picking 
cranberries and digging and gathering "ginseng" in the woods. 

Not a few Swedes came here before i860 frcwn Jamestovm, New 
York, and Sugar Grove, Pennsylvania. Among those may be mentioned 
Philip O. Johnson, Hendricks, Miller, Aberg, Brown and others. Most 
of the settlers came from Smiland, Vestergotland, Vermland, Helsing- 
land, etc. They have all made a success as settlers and are now in com- 
fortable circumstances. 

At the time when J. P. Miller sent the letter mentioned above there 
were twenty-three Swedish families, in all about 100 people. "The set- 
tlement is located two miles south of Watertown^ which city is located 
on the south branch of the Crow river. The land," he writes, "is wooded 
with several kinds of hardwood trees, widi plenty of lowland and mea- 
dows, where a splendid grass is growing excellent as pasture and fodder 
for the domestic animals. There is an abundance of timber, both for 
building, fuel and for sale In the neighborhood there are several lakes. 
The soil is a rich loam on day bottom. The Swedes in this settlement 
have about 3,000 acres of land, amd when they have been here ooe or two 
years they all have plenty and are happy and contented, as far as I 
know. Everywhere one now sees roads and clearings and ccnnmodious 
houses are to be found on* almost every claim, where two years ago was a 
wilderness. All the laad here is taken, but there is plenty held by yankee 
speculators, which at present can be bought at three to six dollars per 
acre." 

The reason for calling the settlement Gotaludm, Mr. Miller explains^ 
is that as most of the settlers were from the southern third of Sweden, 
of olden known as Gota Rike, it was deemed meet that such a fact should 
be recognized; s^d the second part of the name (Holm) was selected in 
honor of the Swedish missionary. Holm, who in the seventeenth century 
preached the Gospel for the American Indians. From this combination 
emanated Gotaholm. On the maps the place is now known as Gotha. 

ScANDiA is another Swedish settlement located on the east shore of 
Clear Water Lake, a name which this beautiful sheet of water wdl de- 
serves. The distance from Carver is about ten miles, and from Gotaholm 
about six. The lake is most beautiful, as is the surrounding country, 
which originally was covered with dense woods. 



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490 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

Mr. A. Bergquist wrote in Hemlandet, September 8, 1858, about this 
place: **This settlement is in my opinion the best and most beautiful 
in Carver county, situated as it is on one of the most beautiful, if not the 
most beautiful, lakes in the whole state. This is also the common consen- 
»sus of all the travelers who have visited us. The lake is twelve square 
miles, surrounded by a rich growth of sugar maple, and the soil is ex- 
tremely fertile. The Swedes own most of the land contingent on the lake, 
and fourteen claims border on its shore. The price of land here is six 
dollars per acre at present. The Swedes, who have settled here, come 
from different provinces of Sweden, and most of them embrace the 
Baptist faith. They have already erected a meeting house. In 1855 
only seven families had settled at Scandia, but they were soon increased 
to twenty-two. Some of them came from Galesburg, Illinois ; others from 
Burlington, Iowa, led by the Baptist preacher, Fr. O. Nilson. Some 
Swedish Lutheran families, who had settled here, did not like to mingle 
with the Baptists, wherefore they sold their land to Germans who bought 
large tracts of land south of the lake." 

ScANDiAN Grove. — In a letter to Hemlandet, dated June 19, 1858, the 
first Swede, Mr. A. Thorson, who settled at this place, writes in part as 
follows : "Our settlement is located seven English miles northwest of St. 
Peter, which place is already a flourishing city with some 200 or 300 
houses, and destined to grow still faster when the two railroads that 
are going to cross each other will be ready. In our settlement there are 
about 1,200 acres of wooded land, of which 400 acres are in the hands 
of Swedes, the rest belonging, to Norwegians. The price of the wooded 
land in sixteen dollars an acre. Four miles west of here there are many 
thousand acres of prairie land, to be had at the government price, one 
dollar and twenty-five cents an acre." 

In a communication to Dr. E. Norelius, Mr. Thorson gives a sketch 
of his own life, in which he relates how he and two other young men were 
induced to emigrate to America by a glowing letter from a Mr. Igelhard, 
who was living in Chicago. The other two were Lars Theorin and Carl 
H&kanson. They went via Helsingor to Havre de Grace in France and 
thence on an emigrant ship destined to New York. The ship having been 
damaged in a hurricane finally landed at Charleston, South Carolina, Octo- 
ber, 7, 1847. There the young trio remained resting up for three weeks, 
after which they continued their journey to New Orleans. Thorson, after 
many trials and tribulations, secured a position as waiter in a hotel, where 
he finally was promoted as steward ; Theorin went to the Mexican war and 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 491 

died on his way there, and H&kanson got a position as carpenter. In the 
fall of 1848 Mr. Thorson set out for California via the Chagres and Pana- 
ma, from which place he worked his way to San Francisco. The latter 
place was very little settled at that time, and in Sacramento not a single 
house was to be found. In company with Americans he went directly to 
the mountains, where by hard work and extreme economy during three 
years he succeeded in saving about $2,000. He then became homesick and 
returned to Sweden. In Sweden he rented a farm belonging to Count 
Hugo Hamilton and married Miss Anna Nilsson, a sister of Andrew 
Nilsson, who now lives in Scandian Grove. 

Thorson soon became disgusted with farming in Sweden and decided 
to return with his family to America, encouraged in this by his father-in- 
law and his brothers-in-law, who were also intent on emigrating. Their 
property was consequently converted into cash, and they started on their 
journey in the middle of April, 1855. There were thirty persons in the 
company — Thorson with wife and one child, his wife's parents and her 
brother A. Nilsson, Thorson's brother Nils and sister Bengta, a cousin, 
Anna Osirom, besides six young women and fifteen young, men ; all of 
them from the vicinity of Christianstad. In the English Channel they 
were run down by another ship, but all were saved except a sailor. Their 
ship was towed to Dover, where it was repaired in six weeks, after which 
they continued their journey to New York. From there they went to 
Chicago and Princeton, III. Some of the company remained in Chicago, 
but the others, including Thorson and his relatives, went to Princeton, 
where they had relatives to visit. After a few weeks' sojourn in Prince- 
ton Thorson, accompanied by his brother-in-law, P. Benson, went to Min- 
nesota. They first went to Red Wing, where they locJced about for a 
while, and next to St. Paul, "from where we went on foot up along the 
Minnesota river through Carver to Henderson. The land there did not 
suit us, and we returned to St. Paul. Here we met with a man by the 
name of Schonbeck, who described and eulogized the land around St. 
Peter, and with my brother-in-law, Mr. Benson, I decided to go there 
and take a look at it, but changed my mind and went down to Princeton. 
A few days later a letter from Mr. Benson informed me that he had bought 
a claim of a Norwegian for $300, and asked us to come immediately and 
take possession of the land. In company with my family, my wife's par- 
ents and her brother, Andrew Nilsson, I started at once, arriving in Scan- 
dian Grove October 7, 1855. Our other companions from the old country 
remained at Princeton, while some of them came to us later on. Upon 



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492 SWEDISH-AMEMCANS OF MINNESOTA 

our arrival we immediately erected a house and made hay for twenty 
cattle, which I had bought at St. Paul. The autumn was marvelously fine^ 
and the winter was to the greater part spent in company with Indians, 
of whom a great number encamped in the woods. There were four or 
five Norwegian families settled before our arrival, but we were the first 
Swedes there. In the spring of 1856 came the Orilgren brothers from 
Rickanum, Skine, M&ns H&kanson and wife» and my sister Bengta Thor- 
son, all of whom had stopped for some time at Princeton before comings 
here. During the latter part of the siunmer arrived directly from Sweden 
Swen Larsson with family from Farlof, Skine, and some others, who soon 
moved away. Then came my brother, Nils Thorson, with family from 
Princeton. In 1857 arrived Anders Westerberg with family from Smi- 
land, and Carl Hamberg from the same neighborhood- These families 
had stopped at Geneva, Illinois, for some time. The same year came 
Nils Nilsson and Christian Anderson with their families and others from 
Farlof. During 1858 came among others: Martin Peterson, John 
Nilsson, Carl Nilsson with family, Erik Johansson and Peter Carlsson 
with families, all of them from Sk&ne, and Ekelund with family and others, 
frcmi Sm&land." 

Among the men in this community who have had extraordinary 
success and taken a great interest in the welfare of its inhabitants, both 
in spiritual and worldly matters, Andrew Nilsson, the brother-in-law of 
Thorson, stands prominent before the others. By hard woric, strict at-^ 
tention to business, thrift and economy he has become one of the wealth* 
iest Swedish farmers in Minnesota. He has served his district in the- 
State Legislature and been one of the pillars of Gustavus Adolphus 
College. 

The Swedish Settlement at Vista (Waseca County). — ^Early in 
the Spring of 1857 some Swedes came from Indiana to Minnesota huntings 
for land. They first stopped at Cannon Falls> but partly finding the soil 
there not coming up to expectations and partly the land pretty well taken 
up by earlier comers, they sent out a party in a southerly direction, where 
in the little Waseca county they found what they were looking for. The 
distance from Cannon Falls was fifty miles and from the nearest market 
places. Red Wing and Hastings, seventy miles. This, however, did not 
deter them from going out to settle in the wilderness. Some of them had 
a yoke of oxen and wagons, but none of them more than the absolute 
necessaries of life. So far away from civilization their privations and 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 493 

suflFering were harder than those of many other settlers. Most of them 
lived in dug-outs and sod-houses. When they went to market at Hastings 
or Red Wing with an ox-team, it took them more than a wedc. However, 
they kept on woricing, and as the years passed on they got good crops 
of wheat, for which they received very high prices when the Civil war 
commenced. They now built better houses, raised horses, cattle and 
swine, etc., and prospered in general. A little later the railroads were 
extended through their settlement, which fact, of course, considerably 
increased the value of their land. 

In August, 1858, when Rev. E. Norelius visited Vista, a congregation 
was organized and he gives the following list of its members: Carl 
Johanson with wife and one child; Johan Anderson with wife and one 
child ; Anders i Hultamilen, widower ; Lars Predrik Peterson with wife 
and one child ; Lars Hikanson, with wife and four children ; Johan Larson, 
with wife and two children ; Johan Nilson, with wife and two children ; 
Johanna Peterson (widow), with three children; Carl Johanson, Nils 
Kant, Swen Swenson, Magnus Johanson, Gottfrid Bjorklund, Johan 
Peterson, Johan Peterson and Greta Anderson. These thirty-six people 
formed the first stock of population. Later on the settlement received 
several increments by new arrivals, and is now one of the most prosperous 
in Minnesota. 

John A. Anderson, of Waseca, Minnesota, was bom in Carver 
county, this state, December 28, 1870. His father, Rev. Svante Anderson, 
the well-known pioneer preacher, is now a resident of Avoca, Murray 
county, Minnesota ; his mother, who before her marriage was Miss Annie 
Erickson, died in 1908. Of the seven children composing their family 
only three are now living, namely : Ida, wife of C. G. Carlstedt, with the 
Minnesota Transfer Company, St. Paul; Hanna, wife of Charles F. Peter- 
son, a dealer in general merchandise. South Haven, Minnesota, and 
John A. 

John A. Anderson obtained his early education in the public schools 
and later took an academic course at Gustavus Adolphus College, after 
which he accepted a position as clerk in a clothing and gents' furnishing 
store. Here he remained for about one year. Then he started a clothing 
store of his own at Worthington, Minnesota, which he conducted for seven 
years, at the end of that time selling out and moving to Madelia, Waton- 
wan county, where he engaged in the hardware and farm machinery 
business. After four years and a half he discontinued this business, went 



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494 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

to Minneapolis and became connected with the Deer & Weber Company, 
for which house he traveled six months. In 1905 he made a deal by which 
he exchanged some real estate for a clothing and gents' furnishing goods 
business at Waseca. He then moved to Waseca to take charge of the 
store, and has since lived here and conducted a prosperous business. 
Meantime he has been considerably interested in real estate, buying and 
selling land and other property. 

In 1903 Mr. Anderson married Miss Ella Broberg, daughter of Peter 
Broberg and wife, both of whom are living, Mr. and Mrs. Anderson 
have one daughter, Winnifred, bom July i, 1905. Fraternally Mr. Ander- 
son is identified with the Masonic order, the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America. Also he is a member of 
the Commercial Club of Waseca. - 



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CHAPTER XXII. 
CITY OF MINNEAPOLIS. 

Minneapolis, Queen of the Northwest, is one of the many remark- 
able results of the development of this part of the country during the last 
fifty years. The original name of the city was St. Anthony, and it was 
situated on the east bank of the Mississippi, the broad rolling plain on 
the west bank being then a government reservation, with the exception of 
a quarter section which had been granted to Col. John H. Stevens, and on 
which he had built a home. St. Anthony Falls at that time had less than 
fifty inhabitants. In 1854 the reservation was opened to settlement, and 
a new town was established and named Minneapolis — a compound of the 
Indian word Minne — ^water, and the Greek word Polis — city. 

Until 1872, Minneapolis on the west side and St. Anthony on the east 
side, were separate municipalities, but on April 9th of that year, they were 
united as one city under the present name. The united town at that time 
had a population of about 20,000 souls. In seven years, or in 1880, it had 
increased to 46,887 ; during the following ten years to 164,738, while the 
government census of 1900 showed a population of 202,718. The state 
census of 1905 credited Minneapolis with 262,718, and it is a fairly good 
guess that the government census of this year (1910) will enumerate 
about 315,000 inhabitants. 

Such is, in brief, the story of the remarkable growth of Minneapolis 
in population. Equally wonderful is its development in fifty years from 
a frontier village to its present position, as the commercial and manufac- 
turing metropolis of the Northwest. The secret of this growth is revealed 
by the strategical character of the city's location, midway between the 
extensive pine regions to the north and the prairies to the west and south ; 
between the vast agricultural areas to the west and northwest and the 
great markets for food products to the east and south, coupled with 
the opportunity for the development of cheap power from the falls. 

The first industries established were the lumber sawing and flour 
milling, and in these lines the city long since attained, and still retains, first 

495 



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496 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

place among the cities of the world. The sawmills in 1909 cut 570,000,000 
feet of lumber, while the twenty-two flour mills, grouped about the falls, 
ground 17,000,000 barrels of flour. Minneapolis is the largest wheat 
market in the world. In 1908 over 95,000,000 bushels of wheat and 40,- 
000,000 bushels of other small grains were received at its terminal ele- 
vators, which have a capacity of 25,000,000 bushels. 

The first Swedish settler in Minneapolis was a shoemaker by the 
name of Nils Nyberg. He came in 1851 and opened a shop ia St. An- 
thony, being also the first Swedish owner of real estate in the city. He 
died February 23, 1890. With the exception of some of the oldest settlers 
very few Swedes in Minneapolis, when they read in the newspapers of his 
demise, knew that he was the first Swede who made his home in Minneap- 
olis. Nils Nyberg was born at Oiristianstad, Skine, January 8, 1827. 
His father being a shoemaker by trade apprenticed both of his sons, Ola 
and Nils, to the same trade. The prospects for the future did not look 
very prcnnising to the iKOthers, and they decided to try their fortune 
in the new world; consequently they emigrated. They stopped over in 
Chicago, where Ola probably remained, but Nils came to St Paul and 
later in the same year, 185 1, to Minneapolis, or then SL Anthony, where 
he was employed by a pioneer shoedealer by the name of Wenzinger. 
Shortly after He moved over on the west side of the river and opened 
a shoe shop of his own on Hennepin avenue, between Washington avenue 
and Second street He had some land in the Pepce Opera House block, 
but sold it and bought a property at the comer of Washing^ton and Fourth 
avenues. North, where he continued in the shoe business for a number of 
years. Although Nyberg steadily lived in Minneapolis for about forty 
years, he was very little known among the Scandinavians, He was an 
expert shoemaker who gave satisfaction to his customers, and before 
his death had amassed a comfortable fortune. His death occurred 
February 23, 1890. His good widow, so widely known among the pioneer 
Swedes of Minneapolis, died in that city February i, 1910, at the age of 
seventy-nine. She was survived by her son and two daughters — Henry 
Nyberg, a resident of Golden Valley; and Mrs. D. R. McNaught and 
Mrs. Sadie Smith, of Minneapolis. 

The next Swede to settle in Minneapolis, after Nils Nyberg, was C. A. 
Widstrand, A. M., who came in 1854, and is still living. Mr. Widstrand 
was born June 25, 1828, at Stockholm, son of Jacob Widstrand, a clerey- 
man of that city, and Anna Gustaf son Annell, a daughter of the Reverend 
Johan Annell of Ytter, Selo, Sodermanland. Mr. Widstrand was edu- 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 497 

cated in the academy of Orebro, the Collegiate Gymnasium of Strengnas 
and the University of Upsala. Believing his chances of advancement in 
Sweden too small, Widstrand emigrated to America, arriving in New 
York May 20, 1854. The trip over the Atlantic from Hamburg, in the 
bark, EHida, took thirty-five days. 

Mr. Widstrand, upon the advice of Fredrika Bremer and with three 
letters of introduction from her, went directly to St Paul, where he 
arrived on June 10, 1854. The following month he was stricken by the 
cholera and his good German doctor left him one evening at 10 o'clock, 
fully believing there was no hope. The doctor died himself before 6 
o'clock the following morning, but Widstrand was much improved and 
finally got well. He remained in St. Paul until December, 1854, when 
a Mr. S. A. Jewett persuaded him to move to St. Anthony and settle 
there. In St. Paul he had acted as organist and teacher from his arrival 
to the end of the year. In St. Anthony he continued to follow his profes- 
sion, acting as organist in several churches, among others in the Gethsem- 
ane church from 1856 to 1863. In 1869 Mr. Widstrand went to Wash- 
ington, D. C, where he became clerk in the Census Bureau and later in 
the Government Land Office, but returned to Minneapolis, where he se- 
cured employment as bookkeeper in the State National Bank, and later in 
the Security Bank. His native country he has visited in 1874, 1885 and 
1890. The old gentleman is at present bookkeeper with Sodergren & Co., 
manufacturing chemists, Minneapolis. 

The real immigration to Minneapolis, as was quite natural, did not 
commence until after the Civil war, the immigrants, of course, hesitating 
to bring their wives and children here until matters had become settled. 
During 1865 came J. B. Chilstrom with family, Otto Johnson, Andrew 
Bergstrom, John West, Erik Peterson (commonly called "Stor-Erik," — 
"Big Erik") ; the Klingenberg brothers, C. W. Vanstrum, August John- 
son, L. Erickson, and George H. Johnson and his brother. In the spring 
of 1865 Chilstrom started the first Scandinavian boarding house, in the 
fall of the same year being followed in the same line of business by L. 
Erickson. 

At the end of the year 1866 the Swedish population of Minneapolis 
did not exceed 30 persons, whereas the government census of 1880 gjave 
the ntunber of persons born in Sweden as 3,048, and persons bom of 
Swedish parents as 1,042, or a total of 4,090. In the suburbs, there were 
98 Scandinavians. In 1895, when the state census was taken, the number 

82 



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49B SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

of Swedes in Minneapolis, born in Sweden, were 21,170. In this number 
the many thousands of persons bom in America of Swedish parents were 
not included. The state census of 1905 gave the number of Scandinavian 
immigrants from the old country as 42418, which seems a rather low 
figure. At the same time our Swedish countrymen are known for their 
quiet and contemplative mind, as well as for their religious tendencies. 
They were located in Minneapolis a good many years before they could 
afford to build a house of worship, or call a minister. Nevertheless, al- 
though far away from the call of a church bell, they would meet on the 
Sabbath day at the homes of either C. W. Vanstrum or August Johnson, 
where, in the greatest simplicity, they oflFered their prayers to their Cre- 
ator and by singing hymns and reading sermons encouraged their spiritual 
natures. In 1870 there were 2,193 Scandinavians in Minneapolis, but five 
years later their number was more than double. According to the census 
of 1875 ^c Swedes numbered 2,676, the Norwegians 2,263, and the Danes 
153, making the total number of Scandinavians 5,092. After 1875 such a 
great number of Swedes came to Minneapolis that we have no means of 
keeping track of them. 

Our Scandinavian pi<Mieers in the business world were mostly located 
on Washington avenue, South, between Third and Fourth avenues, oppo- 
site the present Chicago^ Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad depot The Swe- 
dish business men in that locality were P. J. E. Clementson, shoe dealer ; 
Alfred Backdahl, druggist, and A. H. Edsten, furniture dealer. Even if 
everything in this neighborhood was plain and simple, it was nevertheless 
here that our first Scandinavian merchants laid the foundation for their 
future fortunes. This whole block on Washington avenue has long ago 
been replaced with more modem structures except that old landmark, 
Backdahl's drug store, which was not rebuilt until the summer of 1909, 
when the present proprietors, Alfred and Carl Backdahl, erected an up-to- 
date drug store with doctors' offices and photograph gallery upstairs. 

During the seventies the Scandinavians of Minneapolis did not have 
any Odin Club, and their amusements and recreations were few. Still fun 
and sociable meetings were not lacking altogether. "Edsten's Back Yard'* 
was a household word among them, because that was the place where they 
used to meet on warm summer nights exchanging yarns of former experi- 
ences, real or imagined. 

In the year 1877 there was already one Swede filling a professor's 
chair at the University of Minnesota, viz. : Prof. J. H. Lundeen, but only 
two Swedish students, P. P. Bodeen and Andrew Holt. The latter was the 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 499 

first Swede who graduated from the university, and has for a number of 
years been a prominent judge in Minneapolis. There are at the present 
time about 600 students of Swedish descent, as well as several professors 
and instructors at the university. 

In an interesting autobiography Rev. P. Carlson, commonly known 
among the people as "Carver-Carlson," on account of his living near Car- 
ver, Minnesota, writes of his first visit to Minneapolis : "One week before 
Christmas, in 1857, 1 came to Minneapolis, riding horseback. Minneapolis 
was then a small town with only one Swedish family, and they were free- 
thinkers to boot! As late as during the winter of 1862 I had a pretty 
hard job trying to locate another Swedish family who were said to be 
living there. I drove street up and street down inquiring for them. At 
last I found them on a farm one mile outside of the city limits, where is 
now North Minneapolis. They sent word down town to three bachelors and 
two servant maids to attend service in the evening at the farm. Besides the 
first mentioned family those were the only Swedes then living in Minne- 
apolis." 

During the early sixties several Swedes arrived in Minneapolis. Many 
of those were farmers who had been frightened by the Indians. At that 
time it was not, however, considered safe to settle in this city. A minister 
of the Minnesota Conference wrote to one of the first settlers, asking 
whether he considered it right for a Christian to move away from among 
good Christian people and live in such a wild and ungodly place. 

Quite a number of Swedes settled on "The River Flats." The earliest 
Swedish preachers did missionary work among them, and by voluntary 
contributions a fund was raised to build a little chapel 30 feet long, 20 
feet wide and 16 feet high, in 1884. A Sunday School was organized there 
and regular services held every Tuesday night. This chapel was later sold 
to the Lutheran Slavonians, who are now occupying the "Flats." It is 
still used for services and Sunday School. 

The first Scandinavian teacher of any public school in Minneapolis 
was Miss Isabella Johnson, who is 1879 was appointed teacher at the 
Monroe school, in the southern part of the city. In this connection we 
will mention a little bright Swedish lass, Maria Anderson who, in 1892, 
among 4,200 contestants, won a prize of ten dollars which the Minneapolis 
Times had oflFered for the best paper written by the smaller children in 
the public schools of Minneapolis. The subjects were to be selected by the 
children themselves, and little Maria took for hers "The Rabbit." She was 
born in Sweden, March 2, 1881, and came with her parents to Minneapolis 



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500 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

November i, 1889, none o£ them being able to speak English upon their 
arrival. It is certainly remarkable that she had acquired the language in 
so short a time and to such an extent that she could carry off the prize 
among 4,200. 

Swedish Sloyd was introduced in America the first time by Lars 
Erikson, who was bom in Nis parish, Stora Kopparberg's Lan, October 
24, 1847, *^d came to Minnesota, where his oldest daughter and other 
relatives had emigrated earlier. Unfamiliar with the English language, 
he was at first obliged to limit his endeavors among his own countrymen 
and gave his first lecture about Sloyd, or manual training, at the Swedish 
Augustana Church in November, in such convincing manner that its pas- 
tor. Rev. J. Temstedt, Street Commissioner A. P. Anderson and several 
other church members, contributed sufficient money to buy eight carpenter 
benches and other tools. So the first Sloyd school in the United States 
was started on December 8, 1884. The school was opened in the basement 
of the church, but the fire insurance regulations did not permit of any 
carpenter work being done there; consequently a vacant store at 1218 
Third street. South, was rented and the school continued there for some 
time. 

The school was, however, working under difficulties. Many of Erik- 
son's own countrymen were openly laughing at him and called him an idiot 
that was occupying his time with such "trifles" in a country like America, 
where everything was manufactured by machines. "America is not Swe- 
den," they said. Erikson, however, continued his work, raising money 
for the support of his school by entertainments, fairs, etc. He would not 
allow his school to come to naught, even if he was starving himself. His 
duties, as the head of a family, obliged him, however, to give up the Sloyd 
and accept a position with the Century Music Company, where he re- 
mained for about two and one-half years. The Sloyd, however, was al- 
ways in his mind, and when the Young Men's Association of the Plymouth 
Church opened a Sloyd school on Fourteenth avenue. South, Erickson 
became its instructor, giving lessons a couple of hours every evening. 
He was then taken down with a serious illness, which kept him in bed 
for a long time and left him incapacitated for many months after. Erik- 
son then thought that he would have to abandon the Sloyd idea, for 
which he had left a good and lucrative position in Sweden* But Fate 
was milder than that. In 1888 the Sloyd idea commenced to be dis- 
cussed in the East in real earnest 

Mr. C. Falleen had come over from Gothenburg, Sweden, to Boston, 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 501 

and started a Sloyd school there according to the so-called Naas sys- 
tem, but he had soon become convinced that this system did not give 
exactly the training required by the American public schools. Conse- 
quently, he gave up the school and came to Minneapolis, where he lodced 
up Mr. Erikson and induced him to come to Boston and manage the school 
started there. He did not have to ask Erikson twice. In February, 1889, 
he left Minneapolis for a more fertile field. In Boston the Sloyd question 
was at fever-heat, and Erikson worked there night and day, summer and 
winter, two and a half years, teaching about 120 pupils selected from the 
public schools and 50 male and female teachers. This was, however, 
too hard work for one man, and Erikson finally had to leave Boston 
for Minnesota, in order to recuperate his health in its bracing climate. 
Having regained his health and strength, Erikson in 1894 opened a pri- 
vate Sloyd school for the St. Mark's Boys' Qub, mostly consisting of 
newsboys, at St. Mark's Church, on Sixth street, between Nicollet and 
Hennepin avenues. During three years, or until the fall of 1897, he 
conducted this school with good success. When he organized his colony 
at Mille Lacs Lake, Mille Lacs county, Minnesota, the instructorship at 
the school was continued by his youngest son, Erik R. Erikson. 

Erikson had a hard time of it introducing Swedish Sloyd, but he 
had the satisfaction of being the father of the Swedish-American sys- 
tem, and we Swedes of Minneapolis may well feel proud of the fact that 
the first Sloyd school in the United States was started in Minneapolis 
by a Swede. 

The sociability among the Scandinavians can justly be said to form 
a characteristic trait, in consequence of which societies for varbus pur- 
poses have been inaugurated only to live a short time, and then to be 
abandoned or disserved, or simply to die. 

The Swedish Labor Association was organized in March, 1871, but 
died after having existed only one short year. The real reason for its 
existence being of such a short duration was the loss of its president, 
John Ekstromer. The association had a labor bureau at Bridge Square, 
which was managed by Capt. John CHilson and C. A* Wahlstrom. 
Through it more than 200 Swedish girls secured emptoyment in Minne- 
apdis families. 

The Scandinavian Press Association of the Northwest was organized 
by the Scandinavian newspapers in the Twin Cities December 13, 1883. 
The following papers were represented: Gamla och Nya Hemlandet, 
Skaffaren och Minnesota Stats-Tidning, Svenska Folkeis Tidning, Bud- 



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502 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

stikken, Skandinaven, Nordvesten, Faedrelandet og Emigraten and Folke- 
bladet. The officers of the association were: Luth Jaeger, president; 
Magnus Lunnow, vice-president; Christopher Brandt, secretary; Alfred 
Soderstrom, corresponding secretary; Hjalmar Eger, treasurer. The 
only notable achievement of this society before its passing away was a 
great literary anniversary, which was held at Market Hall, March 14, 
1884. 

On January 11, 1887, ^ ^^w Scandinavians met at the home of A. 
H. Edsten with the purpose of getting up a society of Scandinavians who 
had settled here before the year 1867. At a second meeting, February 
8th, of the same year, a permanent organization was perfected of the Old 
Settlers' Association, with George H. Johnson as president and Adolph 
Edsten as secretary. The following thirty, among the oldest settlers, 
registered their names: A. C. Haugan, A. H. Edsten, O. Throbeck, 
Samuel Throbeck, John W. Anderson, Peter Johnson, J. O. Skore, Ole 
M. Shelley, Charles Holgren, John A. Widstrom, Ernest Dean, Even 
Newman, Amund Olson, Swan Walton, J. Aug. Johnson, John L. John- 
son, J. Otto Johnson, Geo. H. Johnson, N. H. Gjertsen, C. A. Blomquist, 
P. J. E. Clementson, Andrew Bergstrom, Peter Clausen, C. A. Smith, 
John M. Gardner, Andrew Loberg, J. W. Hernlund, Halvor Hoef, 
Adolph Edsten and C. J. Johnson. Notwithstanding its noble purpose, 
the society existed only a little over one year. All that is known of its 
activity is that it held a reunion entertainment at Dania Hall and partici- 
pated in the Swedish military parade October 14th of the year it was 
organized. 

During the eighties many new societies g^ew up like mushrooms, 
only to disappear ignominously after an ephemeral existence. The sing- 
ing societies will be treated of in this volume by an expert historian in 
that field, so we simply omit them here. 

The Jenny Lind Society had quite an accidental origin. A company 
of ladies were invited to an afternoon tea at the home of Mrs. J. F. 
Peterson, during the winter of 1882, when someone happened to men- 
tion a Scandinavian family who were in extremely reduced circum- 
stances on account of sickness and lack of work. They did not belong 
to any church and did not know how to apply to the poor board for help. 
Right then and there the ladies made an informal organization for assist- 
ing the family in question. The following week a meeting was held at 
the house of Mrs. Col. Hans Mattson, when officers were elected and 
the organization made permanent. About twenty ladies present joined 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 503 

as members. The society was called "Ladies' Aid Society," and its 
purpose was to assist any Scandinavian who was in need of immediate 
succor. By the members paying a small fee and giving various enter- 
tainments and voluntary contributions from outsiders, the cash fund 
grew and enabled the society to do much good. Mrs. Hans Mattson 
became the first president, which position she held for many years. 
Among the earliest members we note Mesdames A. Bergstrom, P. P. 
Swenson, N. P. Peterson, K. Bendeke, J. F. Peterson, Luth Jaeger, P. 
Clausen, Dr. Svanoe and Miss Sahlgaard. The society continued its noble 
and humanitarian work for many years. But a period of disinterested- 
ness came. After a couple of years, however, some sad case of poverty 
and distress was sufficient, to stir up the society to renewed activity and 
eflFort. A meeting was held in 1890 at the home of Mrs. P. P. Swensen, 
and a new period of good work followed. In order to give the organiza- 
tion its decided place among the charitable societies of the community 
it was resolved at a meeting at the house of Mrs. Bertha Nilsson and 
at the instance of Mrs. Luth Jaeger, to change the name. The selection 
was "Jenny Lind Society," a name signifying everything in Swedish 
womanliness and charity. The Jenny Lind Society made its new name 
well known and highly respected, often collaborating with the Associated 
Charities and at one time contributing many hundred dollars for the 
amelioration of suflFering among the poor of the city. The anniversary 
of the society, which was celebrated with a ball, or other large festivity, 
was always one of the most fashionable, and attracted the very best peo- 
ple of Minneapolis. The membership was constantly increasing, and the 
society flourished for a new period of many years until 1897, when most 
of its active members resigned. After a few months of inactivity, a meet- 
ing was called at the home of Mrs. Jacob Swanson, at which it was 
decided to dissolve the society. 

On June 11, 1886, twelve good and true Swedish- Americans met at 
the home of Mr. Charles Olander with the avowed purpose of organizing 
a Swedish-American National Association. Its program was to be utility 
in conjunction with pleasure by discussions, music, singing, lectures, mil- 
itary drill and gymnastics, together with other soul and body elevating 
pastimes, and to mutually aid each other in case of sickness, etc. Society 
Gustavus II Adolphus and its military branch. The Swedish Guard, held 
its first meeting at Norden Hall July 2, 1886. Thirty-two Swedes met 
there, who all joined the society as members. At this meeting the organ- 
ization was effected, and the members had the choice of simply remaining 



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5Q4 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

as members or of joining the Guard, as both branches belonged to the 
same body. Officers were elected, the first ones being: Robert Engdahl, 
president; Andrew Sandberg, vice president; Lambert Gisslow, corre- 
sponding secretary; E. Bodin, financial secretary; Alex. Carlson, treas- 
urer. For the military branch were elected : J. A. Dahl, captain ; Sam 
Rossell, first lieutenant, and John A. Werner, second lieutenant. Under 
favorable conditions the g^rd continued its drills and exercise until 
the spring of 1888, when some of its leading men proposed that it join 
the State Militia as a Battery of Artillery, which subsequently was done 
on January 25th. Everything now went on smoothly fw some time, but 
it did not take very long before some unruly spirits succeeded in sowing 
the seeds of discord, in consequence whereof twenty-five men of the 
battery at a private meeting March 14th decided to resign. At the next 
drill meeting thirty-two others followed their example. This happened 
just at the time when the battery was ready to muster in. These disagree- 
ments did not look propitious for the society, and its existence was cer- 
tainly threatened. But the remaining members were men who could not 
be easily discouraged, although badly in the minority. On December 
16, 1889, the society was incorporated by the following charter mem- 
bers : P. W. Edman, J. Ekstrom, Hans J. Johnson, August Clarine, C J. 
Nelson, and J. August Peterson. The military branch continued until 
May I, 1893, when it was dissolved on account of a new constitution 
having been adopted- The society has been steadily growing and gaining 
ground, both financially and socially. Large sums have been expended 
to help sick and poor members, for which purpose a large and strong 
committee has been elected. Many thousands of dollars have been paid 
to help sick or worthy people who are not members of the society, and 
its work has been highly commendable. 

Battery B, or, as it was popularly called, Captain Bennet's Battery, 
belonged to the first artillery battalion of the Minnesota National Guard 
and was mustered into the service of the state March 25, 1888, with Carl 
C. Bennet as captain, Frank P. Bruce as first lieutenant, and Andrew C. 
Haugan as second lieutenant. Before mustering in, the battery was 
called the Artillery Reserve — later the Second Battery — and was organ- 
ized on January 25, 1888, as part of the Emmet Light Artillery, St. Paul. 
By an enactment of the legislature, February 12, 1889, ^ battalion was 
made to consist of two batteries of artillery and one troop of cavalry, 
the whole under the command of a major with his staflE of officers. The 
St. Paul battery was designated A, the Minneapolis battery as B, and the 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 505 

cavalry as First Troop of Cavalry. Second Lieutenant Andrew C. Hau- 
gan resigned March 26, 1889, when First Sergeant Andrew Olson became 
his successor. On the 29th of September, 1892, Olson resigned and was 
succeeded by N. P. Nelson, who on May 11, 1899, was promoted battalicHi 
quartermaster, with the rank of first lieutenant. Lieutenant Nelson's 
former command was transferred to Al F. Pray. From its start Battery 
B was the pride and ornament of the militia. The combination of disci- 
pline, carriage and skill, which characterizes the officers, has permeated 
and stamped the entire corps. The trifolium of Swedish officers, whom 
the battery felt proud of being commanded by, are a credit to the Swedish 
nationality in Minnesota, and in their "boys" they have inspired genuine 
Swedish, that is — ^true military spirit. On October 21, 1892, the Minne- 
sota National Guard participated in the inauguration of the World's 
Columbian Exposition at Chicago, on which occasion Battery B won 
the unqualified admiration of the public, the press and its comrades for 
its splendid drill and discipline. During 1890 a terrible cyclone visited 
Camp Lakeview, upon which occasion Captain Bennet and his officers 
and men displayed great courage and presence of mind. On October 8, 
1898, Battery B was ordered out to the scene of the Indian outbreak 
at Leech Lake and prevented threatening, atrocities at Deer River during 
a two weeks' service. 

The Swedish Brothers is the strongest Swedish society in Minneap- 
olis, both financially and in membership. It was started in P. Osander 
& Company's shop November 26, 1876, by P. Osander, John Frisk, A. 
I. Beckman, G. Lundell, N. P. Liljengren, E. W. Erlandson, Fred Petter- 
son, P. Howard, A. Lindahl and P. A. Lindstrom. As is the case with 
most similar organizations, there is much hard work and little thanks to 
the originators, and when financial difficulties are added it becomes still 
worse. The "Swedish Brothers" proved no exception to the rule, and 
several of the originators withdrew, so that the only ones who took active 
part in its promotion were P. Osander, Fred Petterson, N. P. Liljengren, 
A. I. Beckman, and E. W. Erlandson. After having held a few meetings 
in Osander's and A. I. Beckman's shops the society rented a place on the 
comer of Washington and First avenues, South, where the meetings 
were held during three months. Then the society moved to Snider's 
Block on Hennepin avenue near Bridge Square, and later to Center 
Block on Nicollett avenue. At this time, in 1877, the number of mem- 
bers was twenty-five. In January, 1878, the society was incorporated 
under the state laws of Minnesota and, having held its meetings in Cen- 



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So6 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 

ter Block for five years, it moved to Vanstrum's Block on Hennepin ave- 
nue, remaining there about four years. During that time the desirability 
of a permanent home made itself felt, with the result that on August 3, 
1886, the society bought its present hall, at the comer of Fourth street 
and Eighth avenue. South, for a sum of $10,000. Every cent of this sum 
was paid up by August, 1897. The society is growing in membership 
and popularity and its future locrfcs very bright. In order to become a 
member a person must be not less than twenty nor more than forty-five 
years of age. The society consists of three degrees. A brother can 
become a member of the second degree after having been a member 
of the first degree at least two weeks ; and in order to become a mem- 
ber of the third degree it is necessary to have been a member of the 
second degree at least two weeks. The society is a regular mutual aid 
and benefit organization. Many families and individuals have been 
helped by this association. 

There are, or have been, quite a number of other societies in which 
the Swedes are interested, but as they are not exclusively Swedish men- 
tion of them is omitted. 

Frithiof R. Noble, of the firm of Whitcomb & Noble Company, of 
Minneapolis, was born in Bralanda parish, on the Bergsbol Estate, Dais- 
land, Sweden, September 19, i868, and is the son of Johannes and Maria 
Christina Jonasson Olson. They were the parents of seven children, of 
whom the following six are living : Anna C, Andrew J., Christina, Gus- 
taf W., Frithiof R. and Charlotte, the last-named being the wife of O. F. 
Holstrom, general manager of the Osgood & Bloodgett Company, of St 
Paul. 

Mr. Noble received his early education in the public schools of his 
native parish, and was confirmed in the Lutheran church. At the age of 
seventeen he came to America, arriving in Minneapolis, May 9, 1885. The 
first employment he found was as farm laborer, but a short time later he 
returned to Minneapolis, where he found employment as clerk, and in the 
evenings he took advantage of the evening sessions of the public school. 
Later he began wcwking for Bradstreet & Turber Company, dealers in up- 
holstered and other furniture, and here he learned the details of the busi- 
ness in which he has since been engaged. He first started independently 
in 1890, in partnership with Herman Berg, under the name of Noble & 
Berg, and nine years later closed out the business ; he accepted a position 
as salesman for a concern in St. Paul, and spent four years there. At the 
end of that time he accepted a position as traveling salesman for John A. 
Dunn Chair Company, and in the meantime gained the friendship and 
confidence of the manager, C. E. Whitcomb, who agreed to go into busi- 
ness with Mr. Noble in the same line. They organized under the name 



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iPUBLlCLlBrAKV 



A«TOR,'-tNC»X AND 
TILDtNrOUNf 




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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 509 



of Whitcomb & Noble Company, with Mr. Noble as president, and the 
firm was incorporated in 1904. They are manufacturers and jobbers of 
furniture, their factory and salesroom being situated at 605-7 First Ave- 
nue, Northeast They have a capital stock of $75,000, the shares being 
equally divided among Messrs. Noble and Whitcomb. They have two 
buildings for factories, and employ forty to fifty men. The members of 
the firm are all enterprising; ambitious and energetic business men, and 
the aflfairs of the company are in a floiu'ishing and prosperous condition. 
They also have a branch house at Seattle, Washington.. 

Mr. Noble was married in 1894, to Maria Louise Anderson, of Min- 
neapolis, who was bom in Vestergotland, Sweden, in 1870, and they have 
been blessed with two children, Angelica Lucile, bom April 19, 1895, and 
John Olof Frithiof, born September i, 1898. They are members of 
the Christian Scientist church. Recently they moved into their new 
residence, built in 1908, at 713 Delaware street, Southeast. 

Charles A. Welton^ senior partner in the firm of Charles A. Welton 
& Son, ladies' and gents' tailors, 924 Twentieth avenue. North, Minne- 
apolis, was bom in Broby, Lannaskede parish, Sweden, March 8, 1861. 
His parents, now deceased, were Peter and Gustafua Maria Peterson. 
His mother died when Charles A. was only six years old, and his father 
in 1898. Their family comprised three children: Christine, a resident 
of Minneapolis, is a widow and has two children ; John M., retired, living 
in Minneapolis ; and Charles A. 

In his native land Charles A. received a public school education and 
leamed the tailor's trade. Then, in 1880, he came to America, landing 
in Minneapolis on the nth of June. His brother, John M., had been 
here several years and, having found that there were enough Petersons 
in Minneapolis, had changed his name to Welton, which name Charles A. 
also took upon his arrival here. The latter at once found employment 
at his trade and worked for various firms until 1894, when he engaged 
in business on his own account at Iii7j4 Washington avenue, North, 
from whence a year and a half later he moved to his present location, 
where, in partnership with his son, he is doing a prosperous business. 

Christmas eve, 1883, he married Miss Amanda Gustafson, who was 
bom in Norra Solberga parish, November 6, 1866, and who came from 
Sweden to America in 1883. Of the three children bom to them only 
one is now living— Gilbert Conrad Welton. He was bom October 15, 
1886, and attended the North Side high school, graduating in June, 1906. 
On Christmas eve, 1907, he married Miss Signe Malm. They have an 
infant son. Charles A. Welton resides at 141 5 Irving avenue. 

John N. Johnson. — Possessing much force of character and an 
especial aptitude for business, John N. Johnson is successfully employed 
in mercantile pursuits in Minneapolis, being secretary and treasurer of 
the Union Clothing Company, which is located at No. 1101-1103 Wash- 



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Sio SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



ington avenue, South. Like many of the city's most enterprising and 
useful residents he was bom in Sweden, his birth occurring Novemlw 26^ 
1857, in Konna parish, Smiland. His father. Nils P. Johanson, residing 
on his well improved homestead in Chippewa county, Minnesota, married, 
in Sweden, Brita Stina Peterson, and of the eight children bom of their 
union six are living, as follows: John N., the subject of this brief 
sketch ; Salomon, a farmer in Minnesota ; John August and Carl Fredrik 
are farming in South Dakota ; Peter Gustaf, of Worthington, Minnesota,, 
is manager of a lumber yard ; and Ingrid Christina is the wife of Jerome 
Hallock, who has the management of the parental homestead, in Chippewa 
county. 

After studying for a short time in the public schools of Sweden,. 
John N. Johnson came with the family to America, and here continued his 
studies in the Minnesota schools. After his confirmation in the Lutheran 
church, he entered Gustavus Adolphus College, in St. Peter, where he 
took a general course, including bookkeeping. Thus fitted for a mercan- 
tile career, Mr. Johnson looked about for a favorable opportunity, and in 
1886, in company with Isaac Ekbery and Frank A. Peterson, opened a 
clothing and gents* furnishing establishment at his present business 
address, and by his wise management and practical ability has built up 
an excellent trade. In 1894 the business was incorporated under the 
name of the Union Clothing Company, Frank A. Peterson becoming 
president, Isaac Ekbery vice-president, while Mr. Johnson was made secre- 
tary and treasurer of the firm. In this capacity Mr. Johnson has ably 
assisted his partners in establishing a prosperous business, which has 
already assumed large proportions, being one of the most substantial of 
the kind in the city. 

In 1889 Mr. Johnson married Marjorie A. Covskic, who was bom 
May 30, 1866, of thrifty Scotch parentage and ancestry. Mr. and Mrs. 
Johnson are the parents of four children, namely: Gladys Louise, bom 
October 26, 1890, was graduated from the Minneapolis high school ; Ruby 
Blanche, bom Febmary i, 1892, is a student in the high school; Hazel 
Marjorie, bora April 7, 1893, ^Iso attends the high school; and Marion 
Corinne, born December 19, 1898, attends the public schools of the city. 
Fraternally Mr. Johnson is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and religiously he and his family are valued members of the 
St. John's Lutheran church. 

G. I. IvERSON, president of the Commercial Electrotyping & Supply 
Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota, landed in this country when a young 
man under twenty, unable to speak the English language, and, unaided, 
has worked his way to his present success. Mr. Iverson, bom Iver Gus- 
tafson, dates his birth in Sweden, April 4, 1863, his parents being Gustaf 
Jonson and wife, Anna Anderson, farmers in Gardstakop, Gothery 
socken, Kronobergs Lan, Smiland. In their family were twelve children, 
six sons and six daughters, namely: Iver, Emil, August, Carl Isak,, 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 511 



Victor, Josef, Johanna, Clara, Christina, Segrid, Clara, and Elise, Iver 
being the eldest of the sons. 

Until he was nineteen the subject of our sketch worked on his 
father's farm and attended the public schools of his native town, develop- 
ing a vigorous constitution and acquiring a common school education. 
Then he came to America. He arrived at St. Paul, Minnesota, May 27, 
1889, without friends or acquaintances. One of his fellow travelers had a 
letter of introduction to the A. E. Johnson Land & Immigration Company. 
Together the young men went to the office of this firm, where they were 
advised to buy a ticket to some point in Wisconsin, at which a railroad 
was under construction, and where they were informed they could find 
work at $1.60 a day. They bought their tickets and started. Before they 
reached their destination, however, they passed a large sawmill at Shell 
Lake, Wisconsin, and decided to stop there and seek work. Before they 
made their decision they were twelve miles beyond the mill, but they grot 
off and walked back. That day the thermometer registered about 98 
degrees in the shade. They reached the mill tired and hungry, found 
lodging at the boarding house where the mill hands lived, and the next 
morning went to work for the Shell Lake Lumber Company at $1.65 per 
<lay. 

After working at the mill two months, without seeing an opportunity 
for advancement there and realizing the disadvantage under which he 
labored on account of being unacquainted with the language, young Iver 
returned to St. Paul, where he found employment at the home of Mr. 
Gilbert, secretary of the St. Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Company, his 
work here being to do the chores about the house and care for a horse, 
and his compensation was board and lodging and the privilege of attend- 
ing public school. He remained there a year, a portion of Sie time also 
attending an evening school, in which he took a course in bookkeeping 
and civil engineering. Afterward he was for a short time in the employ 
of an electrotyping concern, but the salary was not sufficient for his 
needs, so he left, and locJced elsewhere for work, with the result that he 
went to Princeton, and became clerk, bookkeeper and general utility man 
in Mr. Head's store, where he received $20 per month and board and 
washing. At the end of two years he had saved $275, the last year his 
salary having been increased $5 per month. Then he returned to St. 
Paul. With a liberal disposition and meeting old friends in the city, his 
savings soon dwindled down to a small sum. After this he was variously 
employed. For a year he was with J. H. Cobb & Son, St. Paul; two 
months with K. Aslemen, Minneapolis; a short time assistant surveyor 
with the Great Northern Railroad in the vicinity of Lake Minnetonka; 
six months ran a saloon in St Paul, and afterward was in the grocery 
business. 

After going out of the grocery business, Mr. Iverson again entered 
the employ of tfie Minnesota Type Foundry Company, where he closely 
applied himself and mastered the business of electrotyping and stereotyp- 



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512 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



ing. He was two years with this firm, a year and a half with the Price- 
McGill Printing Company, of St. Paul, and two years with the American 
Type Foundry Company, of Minneapolis. About this time his brother 
August and C. H. Perry opened a new eleqtrotyping plant. Iver was 
engaged as its general foreman, and for eight years filled the position, 
saving his earnings during that time and buying a home, he having mar- 
ried several years previously. Deciding to engage in the electrotyping 
business for himself, he and a partner purchased a $3,000 equipment of 
machinery, which they installed in a room 22x65 f^et at 118 North Fourth 
street, and for which they gave their notes to the firm of Ostrander- 
Seymour Company, of Chicago. Their only cash capital when they started 
out in this enterprise was $300, furnished by the partner. At the end of 
six months' time Mr. Iverson bought the interest of his partner and in 
his stead took into the business Mr. A. J. Johnson, which partnership 
also lasted only six months, Mr. Iverson's brother Carl buying Mr. John- 
son's interest. Increasing business soon rendered necessary the removal 
to larger quarters. These were secured in the rear of 112 North Fourth 
street, ivhere the finn is now located, with a floor space of 6,000 square 
feet. Here is installed the latest equipment for the economic conduct of 
the business; twelve expert electrotypers are employed; the firm is selling 
agent for manufacturers of printing material of all kinds. December i, 
1908, the business was incorporated for $25,000, with a working capital 
of $10,000, under the style Conmiercial Electrotyping & Supply Q)mpany, 
with officers as follows : G. I. Iverson, president ; A. J. Anderson, vice- 
president; and C. I. Johnson, secretary. 

November 5, 1087, Mr. Iverson married Miss Mathilda Anderson, 
daughter of And. and Anna Anderson, who were then residents of St. 
Paul. In the Anderson family were five children: August Joel, Claus, 
Clara, Christina and Mathilda. Mr. Anderson died of sunstroke in 1885 ; 
his widow is still living, now eighty-seven years of age, and makes her 
home with her son August, in Minneapolis. Mr. and Mrs. Iverson have 
eight children, namely: Levi Arthur, Gustave Walter, Robert Leonard, 
Aiinie Mabel, Lillie, Eba Violet, Alice Myrtle, and Daisy Victoria. 

Edward Johnson, of the firm of Johnson & Company, 281-283 Cedar 
avenue, Minneapolis, dates his birth in Bralanda parish, Dalsland, Sweden, 
July 8, 1 86 1, son of Jonas and Chartotta (nee Olson) Erickson, and one 
of a family of four children, of whom one, a son, died before reaching 
maturity. The others are residents of Minneapolis, namely : Mary, wife 
of Peter Hammer, and John, who is engaged in the grocery business, 
and of whom personal mention will be found elsewhere in this work. 
The father, a farmer, died many years ago; the mother is still living, 
now a resident of Minneapolis. 

In the public schools of his native parish Edward Johnson received 
his early training. When he was twelve years old he came to America, 
landing in St. Peter, Minnesota, where he had relatives, on October 9, 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 515 

1873, and here he was sent to public school until after his confirmation. 
Then he worked on a farm near Red Wing for two years and was simi- 
larly employed for the same length of time at Hector, both in Minnesota. 
The next three years he farmed rented land in Travers county, and from 
there came to Minneapolis to try city life. After working in a meat 
market for a short time he engaged in business on his own account, in 
partnership with C. A. Beckman and J. A. Nordell, under the firm name 
of Johnson & Company, at Eighth street and Eleventh avenue. South, 
where they conducted a meat market, and at the same time became inter- 
ested in buying and selling cattle. This place they sold out and then 
bought another at 259-261 Cedar avenue, and still later they bought the 
property at 281-283 Cedar avenue, where they also have a grocery store 
and are now doing a prosperous business. 

Mr. Johnson is married and resides with his family at 1607 Tenth 
avenue, South. Mrs. Johnson was formerly Miss Anna Peterson. She 
was bom in Red Wing, Minnesota, August 17, 1867, daughter of Charles 
Peterson and his wife Louise (nee Hertstrom). Charles Peterson is a 
brother-in-law of Dr. Eric Norelius, the well-known pioneer preacher 
and author, of Vasa, Goodhue county, Minnesota. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson 
were married August 9, 1887, and are the parents of two children : Paul 
Buford, bom September 5, 1889; and Katarina Beatrice, September 4, 
1896. At this writing the son is a student in the law department of the 
University of Minnesota. The family attend the English Lutheran 
Messiah church. Mr. Johnson is a member of the South Side Com- 
mercial Club, and politically his affiliations are with the Republican party. 

Dr. Gilbert Seashore, a leading physician and surgeon of Minne- 
apolis, is the first Swedish-American coroner of Hennepin county and 
fully deserves the office and his high standing in the community as a 
member of his profession and a conscientious, able and broad-minded 
citizen. He is a native of Iowa, born on a farm near Dayton, on the 
14th of July, 1874, to Alfred and Sophia Seashore (Sjostrand). His 
parents, who are natives of Sweden and both living, have had seven 
children, as follows : Edwin ; Annie ; Minnie, who has studied music at 
Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, and is keeping house for her 
brother. Dr. Gilbert Seashore; Emma, who is a graduate from the 
business department of the Minnesota College and a stenographer ; Esther, 
who married William Blomquist, both of whom reside at the old Seashore 
homestead ; and Selma, who is also a graduate of the Minnesota College 
and a stenographer with the Success Magazine, living with the doctor 
and her sisters. 

Dr. Seashore completed both the academic and the collegiate depart- 
ments of the Gustavus Adolphus College at St. Peter, finally graduating 
after six studious years as valedictorian of his class. In the year of his 
graduation (1896) he was called to the principalship of the city school 



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Si6 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



at North Branch, in which capacity he served a year, and in 1897-8 held 
the same position at Marine Mills, Minnesota. The doctor then com- 
menced the systematic study of medicine, spending two years at the 
University of Iowa and a like period at the Minnesota University, grad- 
uating from the latter with his degree of M. D. in 1902. Before actively 
entering the field of his profession as a private practitoner he served for 
one year as house physician at the Swedish Hospital of Minneapolis; 
has since been a member of its staff and a progressive practitioner of 
Minneapolis. In accord with the accepted standard of the modern pro- 
fession. Dr. Seashore has kept in close touch with the masters of medi- 
cine, surgery and diagnosis by taking post-g^duate courses in the 
European centers of theoretical and practical education. In 1907, for 
instance, he attended clinics in the hospitals of London, Stockholm, 
Berlin, Rome and Milan, and enjoyed several post-graduate courses at 
the University of Vienna. He is a member of the Hennepin County 
Medical Society, Minneapolis Medical Club, State Medical Society, 
American Medical Association and the Swedish Medical Society of 
Minneapolis and St. Paul (of which he is secretary). In 1908 Dr. Sea- 
shore was a candidate for the office of coroner and was both nominated 
and elected. His office is in the Andrus building and his residence at 
1 104 Adams street. An earnest member of the Swedish Emanuel 
Lutheran church, he has been a trustee of the local organization for a 
number of years. 

Henry John Gjertsen, one of the most prominent attorneys of the 
city of Minneapolis, was born October 8, 1861, near the city of Tromsoe, 
in the stift bearing the same name, a son of Herman J. and Albertina V. 
(Wulf) Gjertsen, the latter a native of the same place. Herman J. 
Gjertsen was a native of Bergen, son of a business man of that city, and 
the family is, according to "Overland's History of Norway," descended 
from the King of Mandal, one of the old petty kingdoms of which Nor- 
way is now composed. Like many of the inhabitants of Bergen, Herman 
J. Gjertsen was a sailor and navigator, and for many years commanded a 
brig plying between Norland and Bergen. He was also engaged to some 
extent in farming. In 1868 he removed with his family to this country 
and settled in Hennepin county, Minnesota, in what is now a part of the 
city of Minneapolis. He was there engaged in farming;, and died April 
22, 1905. The farm is still held by the family, being situated on the east 
side of Lake Amelia, and the wife resides in the city of Minneapolis. 
Mr. Gjertsen and wife were Lutherans in religion, associated with the 
Hauges Synod. While he was an earnest supporter of the Republican 
principles, he did not attempt to take any part in public affairs. This 
was, in fact, largely precluded by his age at the time of arrival in 
America. Of his nine children eight are still living. The eldest, Nels H., 
died at the age of forty-two years, in Minneapolis, where he was engaged 
in the grocery trade. John C, Eli O., Henry J. and Lewis C. all reside 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 517 



in Minneapolis, where the last named is engaged in the practice of law. 
The sixth, Sarah, is the wife of Carl F. Goebel, an attorney at Milaca, 
Minnesota; Emma and Sophia reside in Minneapolis, the former being 
the wife of Bernhard Hage and the latter of Harry Jones. George H., 
the youngest, is an attorney at Bow Belles, North Dakota. 

Henry J. Gjertsen was six years old when the family came to this 
country, and he received his primary education in the public schools of 
Minneapolis, graduating from the high school of that city in 1878. He 
subsequently attended the Hauges Seminary at Red Wing, Minnesota, 
graduating in 1881. He immediately took up the study of law with 
Judge Lang, of Minneapolis, and was admitted to the bar at the age of 
twenty-three years, in 1884, passing an examination before Judge Lochren. 
For some time he engaged in the practice of his profession alone, and 
was subsequently associated with Robert Christensen and afterwards with 
L. M. Rand. In 1904 he formed a partnership with Harry A. Lund, 
under the style of Gjertsen & Lund, and this association has since con- 
tinued with most satisfactory results to both partners, as well as to their 
large list of clients. They carry on a general practice before all the 
courts and occupy a leading position among the attorneys of the state. 
Mr. Gjertsen was appointed a member of the First Charter Commission 
of Minneapolis, on which he served two years. He was subsequently 
appointed inspector general on the staff of Governor Lind, and was 
judge advocate general under Governor Van Zant. On January i, 1902, 
he became a member of the State Senate and served in that capacity for 
four years. Mr. Gjertsen is an active supporter of Republican policies 
and his counsel is often sought by his colleagues in the management of 
party affairs. He is a member of the State and National Bar Associ- 
ations and with numerous York Rite Masonic bodies, being a member 
of the Mystic Shrine. He is a Past-Chancellor of the local lodge. Knights 
of Pythias, and a member of the B. P. O. E., of the Sons of Norway, 
the Commercial Qub, and the Odin Club, the latter being a very promi- 
nent Scandinavian club with a membership of more than three hundred, 
including the leading citizens of Minneapolis. He is president of the 
Pacific Coast & Norway Packing Company, of Petersburg, Alaska, which 
operates a saw mill and general store, and is very extensively engaged in 
the packing of salmon for the market. Mr. Gjertsen was married Jan- 
uary 4, 1883, to Gretchen Goebel, who was bom February 22, 1862, at 
Frankfort-am-Main, Germany, a daughter of Kaspar and Elizabeth 
Goebel, both representatives of old families of Frankfort. They have 
one child, Beatrice, now twenty-two years of age. For the past four years 
she was a student of music in Germany and completed her musical educa- 
tion by making her debut as "Elizabeth" in Tannhauser (Wagner) with 
the Royal Opera in Weimar in February, 1909, with the result that she 
was immediately engaged as leading dramatic soprano for a period of 
five years at Hof Opera in Weimar. She has been singing there for the 
past year with splendid success. 



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5i8 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Axel Wilhelm Bjorklund is prominently identified with the busi- 
ness interests of Minneapolis as a member of the Minneapolis Creamery 
Company and as a grocery merchant. He was born at Westmanland, 
Sweden, April 6, 1876, a son of John and Augusta Bjorklund, farming 
people in that country. The father died when his son Axel was quite 
young, but the mother is yet living, a resident of her native land of 
Sweden. 

Axel W. Bjorklund attended the public schools of his native town 
and worked on his father's farm and at other employment during his 
early life, and for three years was an employe in an electrical establish- 
ment in Sweden and became quite a proficient electrician. Coming to 
the United States in 1902, he made his way to Minneapolis, Minnesota, 
and during the harvest season following his arrival here he worked on a 
farm. He afterward followed various kinds of employment until starting 
in business for himself in 1904, With a partner he then embarked in the 
creamery business under the firm name of the Minneapolis Creamery 
Company, with offices at 2509 Twenty-seventh avenue, and three years 
afterward, in 1906, he was able to purchase his partner's interest in the 
business, which he continued alone under the old firm name. In later 
years he also added a grocery department to his creamery, and in both 
lines had good success. In March of this year he sold the business and 
is now connected with the Twin City Piano Company, Minneapolis. He 
has purchased a farm in Billings county. North Dakota, which he has 
rented out. 

Mr. Bjorklund married, June 19, 1907, Miss Augusta Nelson, a 
daughter of Andrew Nelson, of Minneapolis, but originally from Sweden, 
as is also his daughter. The first child of this union, a son, Nels W., 
died in infancy. A daughter, Florence Evangeline, was bom May 26, 
1909. 

Nils O. Werner, the president of the Scandinavian-American 
National Bank of Minneapolis, has enjoyed long and thorough training as 
a lawyer; has served on the probate bench for a decade and for twenty 
years has applied his strong practical and professional abilities to the 
development of the banking facilities specially provided for those of 
Swedish and Scandinavian origin. There is no citizen of the state who 
is better posted on the financial needs of his people, or more thoroughly 
qualified to meet them. Mr. Werner was born in Fjelkestad, near 
Christianstad, January 19, 1848, his ancestors for several generations 
having been numbered among the independent yeomanry of Sweden, who 
have always wielded such power in the politics and general progress of 
the motherland. Until he was thirteen. Nils O. attended the common 
schools of the parish, then entered the College of Christianstad, from 
which he graduated in 1868, at the age of twenty. 

Soon after leaving college the young man emigrated to the United 
States, the month of October, 1868, finding him a resident of Princeton, 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 519 

Illinois, and a student in the law office of James S. Eckels, father of the 
late James H. Eckels, former comptroller of the currency. Mr. Werner 
remained with the elder Mr. Eckels until September, 1870, when he 
located at Red Wing, Minnesota, and continued his legal studies with 
Hon. W. W. Phelps until his admission to the bar in 1871. Although 
his coming to that city was as a stranger with seventy-five cents in his 
pocket, he forged independently ahead and so won general confidence by 
his brightness and perseverance, as well as his absolute integrity, that 
when he opened an office for practice clients naturally gravitated to him. 
Three years after commencing practice in Red Wing Mr. Werner was 
elected probate judge of Goodhue county, and continued on that bench 
without opposition for a period of ten years. During most of that time 
and until he moved to Minneapolis he was in partnership with Hon. O. M. 
Hall. He had also been a municipal leader, having been for nine years 
a member of the Red Wing board of education (a portion of the time 
chairman of the high school committee) and for a number of years a 
city councilman. 

In 1888 Judge Werner assisted in the organization of the Swedish- 
American Bank of Minneapolis, and, as its cashier and general manager, 
he became a resident of the city. When the institution was nationalized 
in 1894 he was chosen to the presidency, holding that office until 1909, 
or its merging into the Northwestern National Bank of Minneapolis. 
In answer to the demands for a Scandinavian bank, in the summer of 
that year Mr. Werner and others organized the Scandinavian-American 
National Bank, of which he has since been the energetic and able 
president. 

Mr. Werner's political affiliations have always been with the Repub- 
lican party. He has served as a delegate to various state and congres- 
sional conventions and was a member of the state committee from 1886 
to 1888, but, aside from the local offices held in Red Wing, has never 
served his party in any public capacity; his inclinations have all been 
toward the cultivation of the professional and financial fields, and he has 
conscientiously eschewed politics. He has established a jirm reputation 
as a careful and sound banker, of splendid training and broad views, 
and his fellow countrymen have every reason to have the highest confi- 
dence in his business and moral character. In his religious faith he is a 
Lutheran. Mr. Werner was married August 17, 1872, to Miss Eva 
Charlotte Anderson, by whom he is the father of Carl Gustaf, Anna 
Olivia and Nils Olof Werner. 

A. Backdahl & Company. — The proprietors of the old established 
drug store at 313 Washington avenue, South, are Alfred and Carl Back- 
dahl, among tfie enterprising business men of Minneapolis. This loca- 
tion has been occupied by a drug store for many years, and the original 
building was built by their uncle, Johan Alfred Backdahl. He came to 
America from Sweden in 1867, locating at Maiden Rock, Wisconsin, 



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S20 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



where he had at first to work as a laborer, although he was a registered 
pharmacist in his native country. Not being satisfied with his position, 
he removed to Red Wing, Minnesota, where he found employment as a 
drug clerk with the firm of Jones & Cole. In 1870 he located in Minne- 
apolis, where he owned a frame building, and established the store which 
became so widely known as Backdahl's drug store, and became a land- 
mark in that section oi the city. 

John Alfred Backdahl was bom in Barkeryd parish, Smiland, Sweden, 
in 1842, and died January 20, 1889, at the close of a very successful 
career in his line of business. He was of a genial, friendly disposition, 
and had a large circle of friends, who earnestly mourned his loss. In 
the rear of the old stpre were often gathered a goodly company of his 
friends and acquaintances among the Swedish-Americans of the city, 
who sat around the cheerful stove and retailed stories of their own and 
others' adventures, and when the company was larger in number thar 
the chairs, many sat on packing boxes. These pleasant evenings are well 
remembered by all who took part in them. 

Mr. Backdahl, when in middle life, induced his two nephews to join 
him in Minneapolis and assist in conducting the business, and at his 
death they purchased the business, the proceeds of the sale being sent 
to his aged mother and his two brothers and two sisters. The first of 
these young men to come was Johan Alfred, Jr., born July 10, 1870, in 
Jonkoping, and son of Johan and Christina (Backdahl) Johanson. Upon 
his arrival in America, for the sake of the convenience, he took the name 
of his mother and uncle. His father was a wholesale merchant in the 
line of grain and butter, exporting butter to Norway ; later he opened a 
retail general merchandise store. He died in 1907, at the age of seventy- 
two years, and his widow still resides in Jonkoping. Alfred received his 
early education in the Collegiate High School of Jonkoping, and at the 
time of starting for America had passed through the fifth standard. Upon 
his arrival in Minneapolis, in August, 1885, he became a student and 
apprentice in his uncle's store, and later took a course at Dr. Drew's 
College of Pharmacy, where he continued until he passed the examina- 
tion of the Board of Pharmacy of Minnesota. He is a member of the 
Odin Club, and unmarried. In 1892 he visited his native country. 

Carl Anders Backdahl, cousin of Alfred, was born at Milen, in 
Norra Solberga parish, SmSland, Sweden, July 23, 1865, and is the son 
of Anders Johan and Mathilda Backdahl. His father is a prominent 
farmer and has served in several public offices ; he has now retired from 
active life. The mother died in 1904. Carl A. Backdahl received his 
education in the public schools, and then remained on his father's farm 
until he reached the age of twenty-two, at which time he came to Minne- 
apolis. He first worked about six months for P. J. Clementson, and 
then entered his uncle's drug store as clerk. 

In 1906 Carl A. Backdahl visited his native country and upon the 
return trip met on the vessel a fine Swedish singer, Clara Ahlberg, bom 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 523 



in Stockholm, and making a trip to America as a member of the world- 
renowned Diihring Ladies' Quintette, and upon arriving at Chicago she 
became Mr. Backdahl's wife. Mr. Backdahl is a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America, of the Gustavus Adolphus Society, and of the 
Odin Club. 

In March, 1909, the proprietors of the drug store though it advisa- 
ble, in order to keep up with the i^pid development of Minneapolis, to 
tear down the old frame buildfng in which they were doing business and 
replace it with a modern building. They decided to build a brick struc- 
ture and on the upper floors fitted up suites suitable for doctors' offices 
and a fine photograph gallery. They have a splendid business location 
on land belonging to the Public Library, and have still a long lease of 
the ground. 

Anton Dahlgren, proprietor of a store and dye-house in Minne- 
apolis, was born in Kalmar Smiland, Sweden, April 25, 1865, and is a 
son of Anton Oscar and Christina (Olson) Dahlgren, the former a dyer 
by trade. They had four children, namely : Alma, married Jens Jensen, 
a farmer of Velva, North Dakota ; Oscar, a tinsmith, lives in Stockholm, 
Sweden; Ellen, married Albert Manson, and lives in Kalmar, Sweden, 
and Anton. The parents still live at Nybro, Kalmar Lan. 

Anton Dahlgren received his education in the public and collegiate 
schools of Vexio. He was then apprenticed to learn his father's trade at 
the renowned dyeing establishment of Ernst von Scheele, in Alfvesta, and 
three years later became a journeyman, in which position he continued 
to work three years in the same establishment. He then accepted a posi- 
tion as foreman in the establishment of Alfred Anderson, in Halmstad, 
which he held for two years, and then spent two years in the establish- 
ment of Mrs. Emilie Lomell, in Vemamo, where he took complete charge 
of the business. 

In the spring of 1881 Mr. Dahlgren emigrated to the United States, 
and located at Minneapolis, where he secured employment with the Min- 
neapolis Dye House, remaining there three years. He then embarked in 
business for himself, in partnership with Mr. Wintyser, which they con- 
ducted two years, and then Mr. Dahlgren sold his interest to his partner 
and returned to his former position with the Minneapolis Dye House for 
four years. Later he took a position of foreman with the Twin City Dye 
House, where he remained two years. In 1901 Mr. Dahlgren again 
started in business for himself, being sole proprietor; his dye-house is 
located at 620 Second street. Northeast, and he has an office and store 
at 219 Central avenue; also a store at 704 Hennepin avenue. He has met 
with gratifying success in his enterprise, and enjoys a fine reputation 
for honest dealing and good work. Mr. Dahlgren on March 13, 1909, 
admitted as a partner Miss Olga Meyor, who looks after the office work 
and bookkeeping and relieves Mr. Dahlgren of the confinement of the 



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524 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



office. She has been connected with the Minneapolis Dye House for 
years, and is familiar with every detail of the business. 

Mr. Dahlgren married in 1892, Mary Opsahl, of Hedemarken, bom 
in 1867, and they have one daughter, Myrtle, bom March 4, 1895. They 
reside at 2200 Grand avenue, South, and are members of the Lowry Hill 
Congregational church. He is a member of the Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, in which order he has taken the thirty-second degree. 

Carl Johan Emil Lindblom, linotype operator for the Svenska 
Amerikanska Posten, Minneapolis, Minnesota, was bom in this city, 
January 21, 1876, son of Swedish parents. His father, C. L. Lindblom, 
was born June 10, 1842; and his mother, Maria (nee Nelson), April 9, 
1847. I" their family were seven children, all now residents of Minne- 
apolis, the subject of this sketch being the eldest. The others are: Ida 
Maria Charlotta, bom October 18, 1877, is the wife of Louis Zahler, a 
traveling salesman; Frank Oscar Julius, bom December 21, 1879, is a 
machinist; Axel Fredrik Wilhelm, bom June 12, 1882, is an engineer; 
Hilda Amanda Sophia, born September 10, 1884, is with Byron & Willard 
Printing & Bookbinding Company; Arthur Theodore Oliver, bom De- 
cember 23, 1886, is an art-glass cutter with Ford Brothers ; Otto Harry, 
born October 22, 1889, is a clerk with the Twin City Rapid Transit 
Company. 

After completing his course in the public schools and being confirmed 
in the Lutheran church, Carl J. E. Lindblom served an apprenticeship 
to the trade of printer in the office of the Svenska Amerikanska Posten, 
with which paper he remained until 1905, when he entered the employ 
of the Baneret Publishing Company, but a year later returned to the 
Posten, where he still works. In the meantime, in 1898, young Lind- 
blom made a trip to Montana, where for a time he worked at odd jobs 
and on the railroad, but grew tired of the life there and returned home. 

Since his boyhood Mr. Lindblom has been interested in politics, 
affiliating with the Democratic party, and for a number of years has 
filled the office of vice-president of the Sixth Ward Democratic Club. 
In 1904 he was a candidate for state representative in "the bloody sixth 
ward," but was defeated by a Republican. He has been a delegate to 
four Democratic conventions, ward, state and county, and is looked upon 
as aldermanic timber for the campaign of 1910. 

Mr. Lindblom is a member of the Svithiod, Lodge Ymer No. 33 ; of 
the I. O. O. F., Hennepin No. 4, and of the Ridgley Encampment, No. 22, 
of the same order, and of the Canton Advance, No. 7, Minnesota, of that 
order. The whole family are members of the Swedish Lutheran Augus- 
tana church. 

Dr. Johk a. Regker, 2224 Central avenue, Minneapolis, Minnesota, 
was born in Sweden, January 10, 1856, son of Jones Regner, a farmer. 
In 1876, at the age of twenty. Dr. Regner came to America. Previous 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 525 



to this time his only educational advantages had been those of the public 
schools. He was ambitious, however, to gain a first-class education, and 
after coming to this country he bent his energies in that direction, with 
the result that to-day he is one of the most highly educated physicians 
in the city of Minneapolis. On his arrival in the United States he came 
to Marine, Washington county, Minnesota, where for a time he did 
various kinds of work in summer and during the winter attended public 
school, saving a little of his earnings. With the money thus saved he 
entered Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, Minnesota, in 1879, and 
spent five years there, burning the midnight oil while he pursued his 
studies, and working at odd jobs during college vacations. The next 
three years he was a student at Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois, 
and in 1886 he entered the medical department of the University of 
Minnesota, where he graduated in 1889. In 1895 he took a post-graduate 
course at the Post-Graduate School in Chicago; in 1898-9 took another 
post-graduate course in the Post-Graduate School of New York; in the 
spring of 1899 returned to Chicago and pursued special studies under 
the tutorship of several prominent physicians of that city; and in 1900 
he went to Berlin, Germany, and attended special clinics in noted medical 
colleges of that city. In the meantime he spent several years in the 
practice of his profession. He practiced first at Winthrop, Minnesota, 
beginning in 1889 and remaining there two years. He was in Superior 
City, Wisconsin, two years ; Wheaton, Minnesota, ten years ; Alexandria, 
Minnesota, two years, and since 1906 has occupied his present location 
in Minneapolis. 

In April, 1900, Dr. Regner married Miss Selma E. Carlson, of Lake 
City, Minnesota, and they are the parents of three children : Adele, 
Anna and John Hilding. Dr. Regner is a member of the Modem Wood- 
men of America and ^e Swedish Lutheran church. 

Swan Anderson, tailor, 205 Third street. South, Minneapolis, is 
ranked with the prosperous Swedish-Americans of this city. Mr. Ander- 
son was bom March 27 , 1854, in Fyrunga, Jungs parish, Skaraborgslan, 
Vestergotland. His father was Anders Osterplan, a tailor in Jungs 
parish; his mother, Ingrid, was a daughter of Andreas Anderson, of 
Skarstads parish, Skaraborgslan. The patemal grandfather, Johannes 
Osterplan, was from Osterplana parish. Mr. Anderson has one brother 
and two sisters, namely: Johan Anderson, born October 14, 1845, ^s 
married and has two children, and is a street foreman in Minneapolis. 
The elder sister, Maria Stina, is the wife of Charles Johnson, of Minne- 
apolis, and has children as follows: Jokan Anselm, married and living 
at Idaho Falls, Iowa; Claus Vilhelm, Oscar and Harry, all of Minne- 
apolis; Ida, wife of Gustav Linder; Selma, wife of John Weiss, and 
Annie, of Spokane, Washington. The younger sister of Mr. Anderson 
is Annie, widow of a well-known railroad contractor, Gustof Younggren, 



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526 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



who died in St. Peter in 1883. Mrs. Younggren still lives in St. Peter. 
She has four children : Algot, Hilda, Euclie and Nannie. 

March 27, 1881, in Fyrunga, Sweden, Swan Anderson married 
Emma Mathilda Svensdotter, his cousin and daughter of Swen T. Oster- 
plan, of Jungs parish. Mrs. Anderson was bom January 25, 1857. She 
has three brothers, Gustof, Alfred and Frank August, residents of Min- 
neapolis, and one brother, Johan, in Sweden. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson 
have three children: Hilna Eugenia, bom July 31, 1881, married C. J. 
Story, manufacturer of tents and awnings, Seattle, Washington. They 
have one son, Walter, bom in 1902. Gustof Adolph, bom October 16, 
1883, is foreman for Butler Bros., of Minneapolis. Nathalia Ingeborg, 
bom March 27, 1891. This son and the younger daughter reside with 
their parents at 161 5 Sixth street. South. 

At his old home in Sweden, Mr. Anderson learned the tailor's trade, 
serving a four years' apprenticeship, and after having mastered his trade 
he moved to the city of Vera, where he at once found employment. 
Growing tired of being in the employ of others, he engaged in business 
on his own account, which he successfully conducted for five years. 
About this time the "American fever" obtained a strong grip upon him 
and he emigrated to the United States, landing in New York June 15, 
1 88 1, and soon making his way to the interior as far as Osage City, 
Kansas, where he worked at his trade one year and eight months. The 
Kansas town, however, was not what he expected, and he decided to cast 
his lost in the "North Star State," where many of his countrymen had 
settled. Accordingly he came to Minneapolis. He arrived here in Jan- 
uary, 1882, and here he has remained ever since. For sixteen years he 
worked for others — three diflferent firms — and in 1897 he engaged in 
business on his own account, at 205 Third street. South, where he has 
since conducted a prosperous business, meeting with the success due his 
earnest efforts. He owns the valuable home in which he and his family 
reside. For many years Mr. Anderson has been a member of the Wood- 
men of the World. 

Hans Gude Grinndal, journalist, Minneapolis, Minnesota, was 
bom May 11, 1884, in Jarna parish, Dalecarlia, Sweden. Unlike most 
Swedish boys, he did not attend public school, but when of statutory age 
he entered the collegiate high school of Falun, in which he remained 
until he reached the seventh standard. Then, becoming disgusted with 
the "red tape" of the school, he left it and went to Gothenburg, where he 
became a student in the Gothenburg Business High School, of which he 
is a graduate with the class of 1900. Immediately after his graduation 
he accepted a position with the great colonial importing house of Ander- 
son & Lenngren, and afterward was employed in the capacity of English 
and German correspondent for Anderson & Lindberg, large exporters of 
iron. Mercantile life, however, was not suited to his taste, and he 
resigned his position to enter the journalistic field. He was employed 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 529 



on the editorial staflf of several periodicals in Gothenburg, where he 
remained until the fall of 1904, when he paid a visit to his old home at 
Hedemora. There he accepted a place on the staff of the local paper. 
In the spring of the following year he was a victim of the "America 
fever" and decided to try his luck in the great American republic. Ar- 
rived in this country, he went from one State to another, working at 
different occupations until the fall of 1906, when he landed in Minne- 
apolis and immediately found a place on the editorial staff of the Svenska 
Amerikanska Posten, where he has since remained. 

September 24, 1908, Mr. Grinndal married Miss Ingrid A. Johnson^ 
daughter of Alfred Johnson and wife, whose acquaintance he formed and 
to whom he became engaged during his sojourn in Gothenburg, They 
were married in Brooklyn, New York. 

GusTAF Lagerquist, a successful manufacturer of Minneapolis, was 
bom in Oja parish, Smiland, June 26, 1855, and is a son of Magnus and 
Elin Lagerquist, the latter still living at Oja, and the former deceased. 
Gustaf Lagerquist received his education in the public schools of his 
native country until he was confirmed in the Lutheran church, and he 
was then apprenticed to learn the trade of carpenter; later he worked 
in the flour mills of Helgevarma. Upon coming of age he served the 
required two years in the Swedish army and at the end of his service emi- 
grated to the United States, landing at New York in April, 1879. ^^ 
proceeded to Sycamore, Illinois, where for two years he was employed 
in a machine shop. At the end of that time he removed to Chicago, where 
for three years he worked in an elevator manufacturing shop. He then 
located in Minneapolis, which has since been his home. Upon reaching 
this city he immediately embarked in business for himself, beginning on a 
small scale, at first doing repair work, and from time to time increasing 
his undertaking, as the growing business demanded, until at the present 
time he has a plant for manufacturing both freight and passenger elevators 
of many kinds and sizes. He usually employs about thirty men. He is 
located at 514 to 520 Third street. North. Mr. Lagerquist is a man of 
unusual energy and ability, and well deserves the business success he is 
enjoying. 

Mr. Lagerquist married, in Chicago, September 29, 1884, Emma Nel- 
son, a native of Wederslof, the birthplace of the noted singer, Christine 
Nilson, Countess de Casa Miranda. To Mr. and Mrs. Lagerquist have 
been bom three children, namely : Frank W., born July 23, 1885 ; Helen 
Evelina Maria, born June 20, 1889; and Carl, bom in 1894. Frank W. 
Lagerquist is an officer in the navy ; Helen is a student at the University 
of Minnesota, and Carl is a student in high school. The family attends 
the Congregational church and resides at 701 Ell wood avenue. Mr. 
Lagerquist is a Knight Templar and a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite 
Mason. He is a member of the Surah Temple. 

84 



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S30 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Peter Nelson, a well-known railroad contractor, and an ex-alder- 
man of Minneapolis, was bom in Fullofta parish, Skine, Sweden, October 
15, 1857, and is a son of Nels and Hanna (Olson) Person, who lived on 
a farm. They had six children, and five of them are living, namely: 
Ole, a farmer and trustee and treasurer of Fullofta; Andrew, a cattle 
dealer of Minneapolis ; Nels, a hotelkeeper in Seattle, Washington ; Emma, 
married Frank Cedarborg, a police sergeant of Minneapolis; and Peter. 

Peter Nelson received his education in the public schools of his 
native parish and was confirmed in the Lutheran church, after which he 
worked on his father's farm until the spring of 1878, at which time he 
emigrated to the United States, locating at Winona, Minnesota. The 
following year he removed to Minneapolis, where he has since resided. 
Since living in Minneapolis Mr. Nelson has, except for the three years 
in which he conducted a hotel, been engaged in railroad work. While 
keeping the hotel he was also interested in wholesale commission busi- 
ness and also kept a stable. In 1885 he started railroad contracting, with 
the Sioux Railroad, for which he has since done general contracting, 
save for the three years above mentioned. His main office is located at 
655 Temple Court Building, but he has several branch offices as local 
headquarters where he is doing work for the railroad. He has been 
extremely successful in his business, and has built up a good reputation 
for carrying out his promises. Mr. Nelson was elected in 1896 to serve 
the Eleventh ward in the City Council of Minneapolis, and served in that 
position eight years. He is a shareholder in the Swedish Hospital, is a 
member of the Modern Woodmen of America and a charter member of 
the South Side Commercial Club. 

Mr. Nelson married, October 6, 1883, Mary Nelson, who was bom 
January 7, i860, in Smiland, and came to Chisago county, Minnesota, 
when twelve years of age. They have two children, Wadter N., bom 
August 21, 1888, and Ruth Irene, bom July 15, 1896. Walter N. is 
working as brakeman on the fast mail with the Chicago, Milwaukee & 
St. Paul Railroad, and Ruth is attending school. They reside at 1853 
Fifteenth avenue. South, and attend the Lutheran Augustana church. 

Charles C. Johnson, contractor and builder, Minneapolis, Minne- 
sota, was bom in Solvesborg, Sweden, January 7, 1866, son of Jons 
Jonson and wife, Kersti Peterson. His father died when Charles C. was 
two years old, and his mother, who lived to the ripe age of seventy-two 
years and six months, died in 1908. In their family were three children. 
The eldest. Per, at the age of five years, was taken ill with brain fever, 
as a result of which he was deaf and dumb. He was educated in the 
state school for deaf-mutes at Carlskrona and is now married to a former 
teacher in the school for deaf-mutes at Lund. By trade he is a shoe- 
maker. A sister, Elsa, died in infancy. 

At the early age of seven years, Charles C. began assisting in the 
support of the family, and his advantages for obtaining an education 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 531 

were of necessity limited. His first work was herding sheep. This he 
did in summer, and in the winter he drove a yoke of oxen to a threshing 
machine. He did not always have work, however, and sometimes his 
mother was so poor that he even had to go out begging food for her 
and his unfortunate brother. After his confirmation he was appren- 
ticed to learn the carpenter's and cabinetmaker's trade, which he com- 
pleted in Sweden. Then on April 5, 1886, he left his native land to try 
his fortunes in America, where so many of his countrymen had come 
and prospered. Upon his arrival in St. Paul, Minnesota, he sat down in 
the waiting room of the depot, with only fifty cents in his pocket, not 
knowing where to go or what to do, and feeling himself at a sad disad- 
vantage because he did not understand the English language. A kind- 
hearth Swede by the name of Asphlund came and took the young man 
to his home and assisted him in getting work. For three weeks he car- 
ried stone for the First Swedish church, then being built, at the rate of 
$1.25 a day, and half of his first week's wages he sent back to Sweden 
to his mother. As soon as he could save enough money with which to 
buy tools, he found work at his trade, and he then received $1.75 per 
day, and as he prospered he was able to contribute more toward his 
mother's support. 

In 1889 Mr. Johnson began contracting, on a small scale, and year 
by year by honest efforts and thorough work he has won the confidence 
of the public and his business has increased. He has built several 
churches and apartment houses and numerous residences. In North 
Minneapolis alone he has built and sold forty-five residences, and on 
Tom Lowry Hill as many as twenty residences were built and sold by 
him, he having built the first house on the hill, and that before the hill 
was graded. 

December 30, 1889, Mr. Johnson married Miss Mathilda Hultman, 
a native of Sandsjo, Smiland, bom December 30, 1864; and their union 
has been blessed in the birth of four children : Robert C., bom in 1890 ; 
Agnes May, in 1893; William McKinley, in 1896; and Esther Mathilda, 
in 1905. They reside at 3700 Pillsbury avenue. 

In politics Mr. Johnson has always taken an active interest, affiliat- 
ing with the Republican party. He served one year as president of 
the Third Ward Republican Club. In 1902 be was heavily supported 
ior the office of county sheriflf, but was defeated at the primaries, 
although receiving a flattering vote. He is a member of the Odin Club 
of which he was one of the charter laembers, and for which he has acted 
as tmstee for two years. He Md his family belong to the Swedish 
Lutheran Bethlehem church* In 1897 Mr. Johnson went to Sweden to 
visit his mother and taking: Itanfe of her again caused him much sorrow. 

Capt. Joseph E^ Oskrn, the first Swedish-American conductor of 
oratorio with Sw^cfiill chorus and orchestra, the first Swedish publisher 
of an American daily paper, the Moline Citizen, the first publisher of 



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532 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



"Bamvannen," one of the few living pioneers who came to America in 
the '40S and the president of the first Scandinavian Press Association in 
Minnesota, such in part are the achievements of Capt. Joseph E. Osbom, 
well known in professional, public and business circles. He was bom at 
Hille, Gastrikland, Sweden, July 12, 1843, ^ son of the Reverend Pro- 
fessor L. P. Esbjom and his wife, Amalia Maria Lovisa Planting Gyllen- 
boga. The family emigrated to America in 1849, ^tnd settled at Andover, 
Illinois. The son Joseph attended school for two terms at the Capitot 
University, Columbus, Ohio, in 1853-4. He also worked as printer's 
devil on the Hemlandet when it was first published at Galesburg, Illinois, 
and is now the only one living of those connected with the paper at that 
time. Moving to Princeton, Illinois, with his father in 1856, and to 
Springfield, that state, in 1858, he attended three terms at the Illinois 
State University in the latter city, and during that time formed a per- 
sonal acquaintance with Abraham Lincoln and his son Robert, the latter 
having attended the university of which the Reverend Professor Esbjorn 
was a member of the faculty. From Springfield the family moved to 
Chicago in i860, where Joseph worked on the Evening Journal, Hem- 
landet and in other printing ofHces. 

On the 6th of August, 1861, at the age of eighteen, Joseph E. 
Osbom enlisted in Stolbrand's Battery, which rendezvoused at DeKalb, 
Illinois, and was mustered in September 5th at Camp Butler, Springfield. 
He had previously enlisted in several companies that were not accepted. 
With his command he was ordered to Cairo, Illinois, in the fall, and 
thence down the Mississippi river, occupying Columbus, Kentucky, imme- 
diately after its evacuation by the rebels. During the bombardment of 
Island No. 10 the command was ordered to Hickman, Kentucky, from 
where they were marched out one Sunday afternoon, together with the 
Fifteenth Wisconsin Regiment, and surprised and captured Union City, 
Tennessee. In the fall of the same year, 1862, the twittery was ordered 
to LaGrange, Tennessee, where General Grant was organizing an army 
one hundred thousand strong, and Mr. Osbom's command was assigned 
to General Logan's division. Marching down through Mississippi they 
had a brush with the enemy below Oxford, but had to immediately retreat 
owing to the lamentable fact that General Grant's army supplies for the 
winter, gathered at Holly Springs, Mississippi, had been burned one 
morning by the rebel General Forrest. After fourteen days of starvation 
on the Tallahatchie river the supply train from Memphis reached them, 
and returning they went into winter quarters at Memphis. In the fol- 
lowing spring the entire army was sent on transports down the Mississippi 
to Milliken's Bend and Young's Point, Louisiana, and from that point 
General Grant made his famous detour around Vicksburg through the 
swamps and bayous of Louisiana coming out below Grand Gulf, Missis- 
sippi. Crossing the river there to St. Joseph, a series of marches and 
battles commenced which ended with the surrender of Vicksburg. Fol- 
lowing the siege and surrender of that city Mr. Osborn was placed on 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 533 



detached service at General Logan's headquarters, and there became 
connected with one of his niost unique incidents of the war. Being a 
printer, together with another of the same profession of the Eighth 
Illinois, he was ordered to take charge of the printing office of the 
Vicksburg Citizen. EKiring the siege of that city supplies of all kinds 
had given out, and the Vicksburg Citizen was printed for some time on 
wall paper. This was a great curiosity, and the officers and soldiers of 
the victorious army desired copies to send home as mementoes of the 
siege. Forms of the last issue of that journal were found locked up, and 
the two in charge put them on the press and printed copies of the paper 
as long as there was any wall paper left in Vicksburg. It had the largest 
run of any paper with which Mr. Osborn was ever connected, and copies 
are yet found among the survivors of the war and among the archives 
of the State Historical Societies, while two are on file in the State 
Historical Society of Minnesota. 

In the fall of 1863, after the surrender of Vicksburg, Mr. Osbom's 
command was placed on transports and sent up the river to Columbus, 
Kentucky, to join General Smith's corps, and they went into winter quar- 
ters there. Mr. Osborn reenlisted as a veteran January i, 1864, and was 
then acting orderly sergeant of the battery. During the month of March 
he made application to go before an examining board for promotion to 
a commissioned officer. Passing the examination successfully he was 
commissioned on the 9th of July, 1864, by President Lincoln as second 
lieutenant and assigned to Company G, Fourth United States Colored 
Heavy Artillery. After joining the command he was immediately placed 
on the staff of Major General Ord to take command of the United States 
ordnance depot at Columbus, Kentucky, an unusually responsible position 
for one so young, as it made him personally and financially responsible 
to the government for over a million dollars' worth of guns, arms, 
ammunition and accoutrements. After eight months he was relieved from 
that command and appointed post commissary at Columbus, relieving 
Major Overton, and after serving three months as such he was appointed 
provost marshal of the Freedman's Bureau, Department of Kentucky. 
Late in the fall of 1865 he was relieved from that command and returned 
to the regiment, taking command of his company. The regiment was 
shortly afterward ordered down the river to Little Rock, Arkansas, where 
they were mustered out of the service on the 26th of February, 1866. 
The government offered to retain Captain Osborn in the service of the 
regular army with the sjime rank, but not accepting he returned to civil 
life and served in various capacities until in 1870 he was appointed by 
the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy and the Burlington & Missouri Rail- 
road Companies to advertise their Iowa and Nebraska lands in the Scan- 
dinavian countries in Europe. Sailing for Sweden in July, he estab- 
lished headquarters at Gothenburg, and the literature which he circulated 
in Sweden, Norway, Dienmark and Finland made Iowa and Nebraska 



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534 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



known to the Scandinavian people and helped to populate these states 
with their people. 

Returning to America in 1872, Captain Osborn located in New York 
and established a Swedish bookstore and an ocean steamship and foreign 
exchange business, but this venture unfortunately failed owing to the 
dishonesty of his confidential clerk. While in New York Captain Osborn 
began the publication of Barn Vannen, In 1874 he moved to Boston, 
and was there married, September 19, 1876, to Anna S. Bergman, bom 
at Carlskoga, Swedeo, May 15, 1852, and the children of this union 
are : Constance Theodora, bom at Andover, Illinois, July 18, 1877, is a 
noted pianist and teacher of music; Esther Eugenia, bom at Andover, 
December 17, 1878, is a prima donna soprano with the Royal Opera, 
Stockholm, Sweden ; Paul Eugene, bom at Andover, died at the age of 
nineteen years; Carl Rudolph, bom at Andover, November 19, 1882, is 
an art glazier; Joseph Secundus, bom at St. Paul, Minnesota, died in 
infancy ; Harold Phillip, bom in North St. Paul, October 28, 1888, is a 
clarinetist and student and served as page of the Minnesota senate during 
the session of 1905; George Albert, born at Minneapolis, October 6, 
1892, is a draughtsman and cellist ; and Annette Hildegard, bom in Min- 
neapolis, August 14, 1894, is attending high school. 

In 1877 Captain Osbom moved to Andover, Illinois, where he was 
an organist and school teacher of the large Lutheran congregatwn at 
that place. In 1880, with Professor O. Olson, of Augustana College, he 
organized the Augustana Oratorio Society, the first Swedish Oratorio 
choms in America, and under the musical direction of Captain Osbom 
this society gave six public recitals of the oratorio "The Messiah" at the 
following places: Moline, Geneseo, Galesburg, Altoona, Galva and 
Andover. The chorus numbered about one hundred singers gathered 
from the places above mentioned, all Swedish-Americans, and the 
orchestra was composed of Augustana students. From the proceeds of 
these concerts the Jubilee Hall at Augustana College was erected. Fol- 
lowing these performances Captain Osbom directed five recitals of the 
Lindsborg, Kansas, Oratorio Society, organized by Dr. and Mrs. Carl 
Swenson, also a Swedish-American chorus and orchestra. From the 
proceeds of these concerts the first building of the Lindsborg College 
was erected. In 1883 he conducted two jubilee concerts in Jubilee Hall 
at Augustana College; the first evening they gave Oratorios, and the 
second Wennerberg's David's Psalms. These concerts were the most 
impressive ever held at that college and the audiences were immense in 
size and were deeply impressed. On this occasion the choms was aug- 
mented by a large number of singers from Chicago, where the pro- 
gramme was practically repeated under Captain Osbom's direction at 
Music Hall, which was filled to overflowing. During his residence at 
Andover he became associated with Captain Eric Johnson in the man- 
agement of the Swedish Citizen, which was later merged into the Daily 
and Weekly Moline Citizen. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 535 

In 1883 he moved from Andover, Illinois, to St. Paul, Minnesota, 
and became general manager of the Skaffaren and Minnesota Stats Tid- 
ning, and from an editor he drifted into politics and was appointed clerk 
of various committees during several sessions of the Minnesota legisla- 
ture, serving as chief clerk in the Secretary of State's office from Sep- 
tember 25, 1886, to January 2, 1887. He was nominated for county 
auditor of Ramsey county by the Republicans in 1888, but was not 
elected, although he ran twelve hundred and seventy votes ahead of his 
ticket. On August 12, 1889, he was appointed public examiner's clerk, 
and resigned September 15, 1891, to become actuary of the Railway 
Building & Loan Association. Captain Osbom served as assistant 
marshal of the Republican National Convention in 1892 ; was reappointed 
assistant to the public examiner in 1893 ^^d served until January, 1896; 
served as clerk in the state weighmaster's office from January, 1899, to 
January, 1901. He was then in sundry business ventures until 1903; 
served as special agent for the Bureau of Incorporations, U. S. Depart- 
ment of Commerce, from February to August, 1904, and was then 
appointed clerk in the state auditor's office, where he has ever since 
served. He took an active part in political campaigns during all those 
years as campaign speaker, convention delegate and on committee 
service. The life's span of Captain Joseph E. Osborn has covered years 
of purposes well directed, an era of splendid achievement. 

Lewis R. Larson, ex-municipal judge of Eau Claire, Wisconsin, 
and a prominent attorney of Minneapolis, is a native of Norway, having 
been bom September i, 1849, in Haugesund, his parents being Filing and 
Martha (Bjomson) Larson, both natives of the same locality. EUing 
Larson was a son of Lars, of Stueland, Bergenstift, Norway, and was a 
farmer in that place, where the son, Filing, was bom. In the spring 
of 1850 the last named, with his family, came to America and settled at 
Columbus, Wisconsin, where he continued at his trade of cooper until 
his death, January 14, 1877. He was an industrious man and brought 
up his family well, providing his children with the best educational facili- 
ties at his command. He was an opponent of human slavery and was 
among the enthusiastic supporters of the Republican party from the time 
of its organization. His wife survived him twenty-two years, and died 
at the home of her son, John B., in Fau Claire, August 29, 1899. They 
were active church members, known as Haugeans. They were the 
parents of five sons, of whom the subject of this sketch is the eldest. 
The second, William A., is now a resident of Seattle, Washington, where 
he is a contracting mason and also engaged to some extent in farming. 
Abraham, the third, died October 20, 1890, at St. Louis, Missouri. He 
was by trade a cooper, and was a student and thinker. The fourth, John 
B., resides at Portland, Oregon, where he is a land owner and dealer in 
lands. Filing F., tihe youngest, is a newspaper man at Ashland, Wis- 
consin, where he has taken an active part in the conduct of aflfairs. 



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536 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



having served as city clerk, elected in a strong Republican community, 
although he is himself a Democrat in politics. 

Judge Larson began his education in the public schools of Columbus 
and graduated from the high school of that city about 1865. He was 
subsequently instructed by private tutors and entered the University of 
Wisconsin as a sophomore in the fall of 1869, graduating three years 
later, being the first academic graduate of Scandinavian birth or parent- 
age from that institution, and we believe of any American state uni- 
versity. There have been thousands since. He took up the study of 
law with A. G. Cook, Esq., of Columbus, and was admitted to the bar 
at Portage, Wisconsin, in May, 1874. For the first year he engaged in 
practice in association with his preceptor, and on June 14, 1875, settled 
at Eau Claire, where he continued in practice until the close of the year 
1891. He early took an active interest in the progress of his home 
community, as well as of the nation, and was appointed city attorney of 
Eau Claire less than two years after his settlement there. As such he 
procured the condemnation of the land for "The Dells Pond." From 
1878 to 1886 he served as municipal judge of that city, with credit to 
himself and satisfaction to the general public. After retiring from the 
bench he acted as a court commissioner, and was a director of the Public 
Library there until his removing from the city. Being deeply interested 
in the success of the Democratic party, he took prominent positions in 
its councils, and in 1884 was both temporary and permanent chairman 
of the State convention of his party. In the same year he was its candi- 
date for Congress from the Eighth district, a very strong Republican 
community, and ran far ahead of his ticket, but the overwhelming major- 
ity of the opposition prevented his election. He was again permanent 
chairman of the State convention in 1886, and was for many years a 
member of the State Central Committee. 

While a student at the State University, Judge Larson took a promi- 
nent part in the athletics of the institution, and was a member of the 
'Varsity baseball team, and at that time ran the bases in fourteen and 
one-half seconds, which is still the amateur record and not beaten by 
a professional until 1908. 

His first visit to Minneapolis was made at the age of nineteen years, 
when he was employed for a time in making barrels, and in this manner 
earned a portion of his expenses in completing his studies at the Wis- 
consin State University. He removed to Minneapolis to engage in the 
practice of law in December, 1891, and has ever since occupied a promi- 
nent position at the bar of that city. Judge Lawson has always been noted 
for his eloquence as a speaker, and has been in demand on public occa- 
sions. On July 4th, 1876, he attended Northwestern Celebration of the 
Scandinavians, and gave an address in the English language which was 
spoken of by the Twin City Press as the chief speech of the occasion. 
On the occasion of the visit of Bjornson, the noted Norwegian author 
to Eau Claire, Judge Larson made the welcoming speech at the banquet 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 539 



tendered him by the citizens of that city. This address was spoken in 
the Norwegian language. In its preparation it was written out in 
English, and was translated as it was delivered. By this means a full 
English copy was preserved, and this was published in the Pioneer Press 
of St. Paul with most favorable comment. In 1885 a banquet was g^ven 
at Minneapolis to the Scandinavians in the State Legislature, which was 
attended by many prominent citizens of all nationalities. On this occa- 
sion Judge Larson responded to the toast, The United States, and this 
address was referred to by the Twin City Press as the speech of the 
occasion, and was the only one published in full by the papers of these 
cities. An affable and jovial gentleman, Judge Larson makes friends of 
all with whom he comes in contact, and his native ability and studious 
habits have made him one of the most successful of attorneys and he 
occupies an enviable position among the citizens of his home city. He 
was married September i, 1886, to Alice May Hurlbut, daughter of 
Henry C. and Esther (Boardman) Hurlbut, natives of Vermont. She 
died January 4, 1888, leaving a daughter, Alice Hurlbut, who is now 
a student, and was the only one able to respond, when a teacher in the 
Minneapolis schools, asked how many of her class were descended from 
the Pilgrims. From her mother's line she comes of several of the oldest 
of American families, and could be a member of the different women's 
colonial and revolutionary societies, but will not accept over her father's 
objection, so long as they retain their present aristocratic instead of dem- 
ocratic character. 

Mrs. Gurli Gummesson is well known in Minneapolis, as well as 
in a more extended territory for her skill in the treatment of complaints 
through massage and physical culture, having accomplished probably as 
much as any other member of the profession to dispel the former preju- 
dice against this method of treatment. She was bom in Stockholm, 
Sweden, February 11, 1871. Her father, Sven Johan Nyman, was bom 
in Tryserum parish, Kalmarlan, Sweden, and after finishing school was 
successively engaged as overseer for the extensive estates of Count von 
Rosen and Baron Raab. After his marriage, desiring to change his vo- 
cation, he moved to Stockholm, where he completed a course in the 
Royal Navigation School and graduated with the certificate of a captain. 
Captain Nyman is now retired from active life and lives in comfort as a 
resident of the Swedish capital. Mrs. Gummesson's mother was a Span- 
ish lady who moved with her parents to Sweden in her early girlhood, 
and there she adopted the Swedish name of Christina Edvall. Her death 
occurred on March 6, 1886. 

Mrs. Gunmiesson obtained her education in the public schools of 
Stockholm, a private institution and at Dr. Jonsson's business college. 
She obtained a position with the gentleman whom she afterwards mar- 
ried, Carl Olof Gummesson, a prominent man of the University of Up- 
sala, who was especially well-known as a monopolist in the manufacture 



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S40 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



of caps for the college students of Sweden. Their marriage took place 
in 1886, and Mr. Gummesson died in 1897. Of the several children that 
were bom to them only one is living, Carl Christian Engelbrecht Gum- 
messon, who was born in Upsala January 19, 1889. The young man 
came to this country with his mother on August 4, 1903, and is now 
studying medicine in the University of Minnesota. His progress while 
in this country has been quite remarkable, for when he reached Minne- 
apolis he had no knowledge of the English language, notwithstanding 
he graduated from the Jefferson public school after a course of two years, 
and three years later, in 1908, from the Central High School, finishing a 
regular four years' course in three years. 

After her husband's death Mrs. Gummesson took up the study of 
Swedish massage, physical culture and gynecology, at the famous insti- 
tute conducted by Dr. Abraham Kjellbargs, an institution that has sent 
to the United States some of its best known masseurs and masseuses. 
After three years of study the doctor graduated from that institution in 
1900, then she finished a year's course at the Lofvenstromska "Lans Hos- 
pitalet." The well-known surgeon, Dr. Mikelson, is the physician in 
charge of that hospital, and for six months Mrs. Gummesson acted as his 
assistant in all his immediate operations and treatments, her superior tak- 
ing great pains to thoroughly instruct her in hygiene, anatomy and physi- 
ology. She practiced as a masseuse in Norrtelje and Visby during the sum- 
mer time, and in Stockholm in winter until 1903. After the death of her 
second son, she sailed for America. Her progress during the first years of 
her residence in Minneapolis was by no means smooth, as she established 
herself with very limited means, since by selling her practice in Stock- 
holm and her office furniture she was able to raise but three hundred 
dollars, which was duly disposed of when she arrived at her destina- 
tion, not only without friends, but without a knowledge of the language 
of the country. Nothing daunted, however, she applied to the rental 
agencies, and opened an office at 800 Nicollett avenue, and when the mag- 
nificent Auditorium building was finished she was one of the first of its 
tenants. As has been stated before, Mrs. Gummesson has been instru- 
mental in overcoming the prejudices of the people against her methods 
of treating disease, and disorders of the body; in fact, massage was 
originally practiced by uneducated, not to say ignorant people. The doc- 
tor has done even more than her share in bringing about all the successes 
of the massage as a healing power. As a result she not only has an 
honorable standing, but has established the largest practice of its kind 
in Minneapolis. The medical fraternity of the regular schools has such 
confidence in her that they send a certain class of their patients to her 
for treatments, and her patronage has even extended as far as the Pacific 
coast, and the far southern states. In 1907 the doctor founded what is 
known as the Gummesson Massage Institute, which is not only largely 
tenanted by patients, but has a large class of graduate nurses who have 
enrolled themselves as students. The medical director of the institute 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 541 

is a regular graduate of the medical school of the state university — ^Dr. 
M. A. Mellenthin, who, by the way, was married to Mrs. Gummesson 
October 14, 1908, but she retained her old name. Mrs. Gummesson is 
not only a thorough believer in her method of treatment, but has long 
held that prevention is even better than cure, and a very important fea- 
ture of her work is to instruct the patients how to preserve their health 
by proper living. In the extension of this work she very often visits neigh- 
boring cities, where she lectures on personal hygiene and organizes physical 
culture classes in connection with her lectures. Several of these clubs 
are now flourishing, nearly all the members of whom are Americans. It 
is evident that Mrs. Gummesson has survived the hardest of her strug- 
gles and is now riding on the up wave of success. She resides in a com- 
fortable residence at 3025 Pillsbury avenue, South Minneapolis. 

Oscar Alexander Mattson. — Numbered among the successful and 
popular merchants of Minneapolis is Oscar A. Mattson, whose store, 
devoted to the sale of sporting goods of all kinds, is located at No. 406 
First avenue, South. A son of Captain Alexander and Hilda Mattson, 
he was bom. May 26, 1867, in Stromstad, Sweden. His father, formerly 
a sea captain, and superintendent of Maseskar Lighthouse, died at a com- 
paratively early age, leaving his widow and two sons, namely: Hilding 
Arthur, captain of a steamship; and Oscar A., the special subject of this 
sketch. 

Completing his early studies in the Collegiate High School of Strom- 
stad, Oscar A. Mattson was confirmed at the age of fourteen years, after 
which he became clerk in a store of general merchandise, retaining the 
position two years. Becoming somewhat familiar with the work, he then 
entered the employ of J. H. Syhander & Co., merchants, with whom he 
remained several seasons, during the last five years of the time buying 
and handling all of the grain for that firm. At the age of twenty-two 
years, ambitious to try the hazard of new fortunes, he sailed for America, 
landing in New York City on Augxist 13, 1889, from there coming 
directly to Minneapolis. The following two years Mr. Mattson was 
clerk in a hardware establishment in this city, after which he was simi- 
larly employed in a sporting goods store until 1897. Fcwming in that 
year a partnership with Mr. N. P. Nelson, he opened a sporting goods 
store, becoming junior member of the firm of Nelson & Mattson. At the 
end of six years the partnership was dissolved, and Mr. Mattson has since 
continued the business alone at his present location, having a finely- 
equipped and well-managed store, which he is conducting with both profit 
and pleasure. 

Mr. Mattson married, in 1899, Augusta Wicklund, who was born 
in Fahlun, Sweden, and came to St. Paul when a child with her parents, 
Anders and Anna Wicklund. Mr. and Mrs. Mattson have two children, 
namely: Marion Elizabeth, bom January 7, 1902, and Oscar Alexan- 
der, bom March 27, 1905. Religiously Mr. Mattson and his wife attend 



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542 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



the St. John's English Lutheran Church. Socially Mr. Mattson is a 
member of the Modem Samaritans. 

Nels Peter Nelson. — ^A man of sterling character and principles, 
eminently trustworthy, Nels Peter Nelson, living at No. 1400 Monroe 
street, Minneapolis, has been employed for the past sixteen years as 
custodian of the Government building of this city, in that capacity per- 
forming the duties devolving upon him with commendable fidelity and 
ability. A native of Skine, Sweden, he was bom at Broby, near Engle- 
holm, September 10, 1858, being the oldest child of Nils and Anna Maria 
(Person) Monson, farmers. His parents reared five children, namely: 
Nels Peter; Mathilda, wife of Nils Olson, a farmer; Amanda, care- 
taker of the parish Poor Farm ; Otto, engaged as a boc4c-keeper in Min- 
neapolis ; and Axel Bonde, living on the old homestead in Sweden. 

Leaving the public schools at the age of sixteen years, Nels P. Nel- 
son continued his studies for awhile in a private institution of learning, 
after which he attended a private agricultural school. At the age of 
twenty years, like so many of his sagacious and enterprising country- 
men, he turned to America as the field of promise for a successful 
career, and came directly to Minneapolis in 1879. In consequence of 
his early arrival in Minnesota, he is one of the oldest Swedish settlers 
of this vicinity, and has been acquainted with every Swede of any promi- 
nence in Minneapolis. The first year and a half after coming to this 
city he was employed in a sash and door factory, after which he was 
foreman in another factory of the same kind for five years. Opening 
then a sash and door factory on his own account, Mr. Nelson carried on 
a successful manufacturing business for a number of years, when he 
had the misfortune to lose his right arm in his own factory. Selling out 
at that time, he was afterwards foreman in different factories until 1893, 
when he accepted his present position as custodian of the Government 
building in Minneapolis. Prior to that time, before Government em- 
ployees were forbidden to do so, Mr. Nelson had been active and promi- 
nent in local politics, and in 1890 represented the Second and Ninth 
wards, which then embraced the Thirtieth Legislative district, in the 
State Legislature, holding the office one term, or two years. 

Mr. Nelson married, in 1886, Hanna Olson, who was bom in Carls- 
hamn, Sweden, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Olson, neither of whom 
are now living. Her father was a man of some prominence in his coun- 
try, where he was for many years foreman in a cotton spinning factory. 
Five sons have blessed the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson, namely: 
Fritz Harry, born April 30, 1887, *s connected with a contracting firm 
in New York City ; Axel Bemhard, bom in August, 1888, is book-keeper 
for a firm of contractors in Minneapolis ; Earl Jacob, bom May 21, 1895 ; 
Nels Harvey, born August 17, 1900; and Wilfred Quentin, bom May 4, 
1903. The three younger children are pupils in the public schools, and all 
of them attend the Swedish Elim Baptist Church. Fraternally Mr. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 543 



Nelson is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; of the 
Knights of Pythias; and of the Modern Woodmen of America. He is 
also the oldest member of the Society Norden, with which he united 
nearly thirty years ago, and in which he has held every office, at the 
present time being its treasurer. Mr. Nelson and his family have a 
pleasant home at No. 1400 Monroe street, and there give a glad welcome 
to their friends and acquaintances. 

GusTAVUS Johnson. — A renowned pianist, ex-president of the Min- 
nesota Music Teachers' Association and founder and proprietor of the 
Johnson School of Music, Oratory and Dramatic Art, there are few 
Swedish-Americans in the northwest, who stand higher in their circles 
of true culture than Gustavus Johnson, of Minneapolis. His parents 
were Peter and Henrietta (Hole) Johanson, his father being a native 
of Sormjole parish, near the city of Umei, where he was born on the 
9th of December, 1819. As a youth the latter emigrated to England, 
where he entered mercantile pursuits, resided about twenty-five years 
and became a leading wholesale merchant. In that country he married 
a daughter of Admiral Hole, who at his demise in 1870 had been senior 
admiral in the British navy for many years. The admiral was bom in 
1778, as a young officer participated in several battles against the fleets 
of Napoleon while the French commander was returning from Egypt^ 
and finally took part in the historic battle of Trafalgar. With his family, 
which had been bom in England, Peter Johanson retumed to Sweden in 
i860, and at Stockholm entered into a business partnership with D. 
Forsell, under the firm name of D. Forsell and Company. He died in the 
Swedish capital in 1886. 

Gustavus Johnson, who was bom in Hull, England, November 2, 
1856, was therefore in his fourth year when the family located in Stock- 
holm, and it was in that beautiful and cultured city that he was educated 
and reached young manhood. Successively, he became a pupil at St. 
Jacob School, the New Collegiate High School and Schartau's Business 
College. In the meantime he had commenced his instruction on the 
piano under Miss Hammar, who had also taught Her Royal Highness 
Princess Louise, only child of King Charles XV, and was considered 
perhaps the leading teacher of the piano in Sweden. Having thus laid a 
solid foundation for future development in this field of music, later he 
enjoyed the tutorage of Director Albert Lindstrom on the piano. Pro- 
fessor Winge of the Royal Conservatory of Music in theory, and Kapell- 
meister Conrad Nordquist and Hakanson of the Royal Opera, in harmony 
and singing. In 1875, when in his twentieth year, Gustavus emigrated 
to the United States and, after a short sojourn in the east, came to St. 
Paul and Minneapolis, his home having since been in either one of the 
Twin Cities, with the exception of a short time spent in Chippewa Falls 
and Hudson, Wisconsin. In Minneapolis he commenced giving piano 
lessons, and his methods soon became so popular that within a short time 



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544 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



he was ranked as its leading teacher. In 1898 he founded the Johnson 
School of Music, Oratory and Dramatic Art, an academy for culture in 
these branches which is now renowned through the northwest. The staff 
of teachers is complete, and all the facilities modern, the location 9f the 
institution being at No. 1025 Nicollet avenue, Minneapolis. As a pianist, 
Mr. Johnson is widely recognized as an artist of rare execution, thor- 
ough technique and warm sympathy, and has given concerts in all the 
larger cities of Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa and Illinois. He has also 
made his mark as a composer, among his productions being "Concerto for 
Piano and Full Orchestra," "Trio for Piano, Violin and 'Cello," and 
many pieces for the piano, songs, quartettes, etc. In 1905-6 Mr. Johnson 
served as president of the Minnesota Music Teachers' Association, which 
was a marked indication of the attitude assumed by his co-laborers toward 
his talents and his personality. In 1882 Professor Johnson wedded Miss 
Caroline Frances Winslow, who, on her father's side, is a direct descend- 
ant of Governor Edward Winslow, the first colonaial governor of Massa- 
chusetts. They have one child, Laura Louise Johnson, bom in 1890. 
The family are all members of St. Mark's Episcopal church. 

Erick Elmer Peterson is proprietor and founder of the E. E. 
Peterson Sign Manufacturing Company. For twenty-nine years in busi- 
ness this company has occupied the one location at the comer of Wash- 
ington and Nicollet avenues in Minneapolis for twenty-six years, which in 
many respects is a landmark in the business progress of the city. It is 
the largest of its kind in the northwest, being likewise the oldest estab- 
lishment of the kind in Minneapolis and practically the only factory for 
fine brass and other high-class signs in the city. 

The success and progress of the business have from the beginning 
depended on the personality and energy of its proprietor. Mr. Peterson 
is still in his fifties and one of the alert business men of the city. He was 
born in Risinge parish, Ostergotland, February 22, 1855. His parents 
were Johan and Marg^reta, the former an inspector or superintendent of 
a large estate in the old country until 1870, when he brought his family 
to New York, and from there to Charles City, Iowa. He became the 
owner of a considerable body of land in Floyd county that state, but 
after he had disposed of it he came to Minneapolis to spend his last years 
with his son Erick, at whose home he died in 1903. There were four 
children altogether, one of them being deceased, the two brothers of 
Erick being: Carl Oscar Fredrick, formerly a tanner, who now lives 
in Berkeley Springs, West Virginia ; and John A., a contractor and builder 
in Minneapolis. 

The future sign manufacturer spent the first fifteen years of his life 
in Sweden. In addition to the education received at the public and private 
schools he attended, for one season, the technical college at Stockholm. 
The training he there received in designing, drawing and sign writing 
was continued after the family came to America, and in New York he 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 547 

attended a night school for the purpose of perfecting his knowledge of 
the English language. Until reaching his majority he lived in the east 
and south, and the first time he visited Minneapolis was in 1875. He 
lived a time at St. Louis, was in business for three years at Charles 
City, Iowa, and on March 2, 1880, established in Minneapolis the busi- 
ness which has since been so prosperous. The possibilities and scope of 
the business have enlarged greatly under his management, and signs of 
almost every conceivable kind are now manufactured by this company, in- 
cluding brass signs, wire signs, board signs, sheet-iron signs, glass signs, 
electric signs and raised letter signs. The business is of such proportions 
to demand the services of a number of expert sign writers and designers, 
and the ouput of the establishment is distributed among banks and busi- 
ness men in all parts of the northwest. 

Mr. Peterson has taken almost all the Masonic degrees; became a 
member of Hennepin Lodge, A. F. & A. M., No. 4, in 1894, was senior 
steward in 1896, junior deacon in 1897, junior warden in 1898, senior 
warden in 1899 (acting as master in the same year), and became wor- 
shipful master in 1900. He is a member of Ark Chapter No. 53, R. A. M., 
of Minneapolis Council, No. 2, R. & S. M., of Darius Commandery No. 
7, K. T., and of the Ancient Scottish Rite Bodies, Southern Jurisdiction ; 
also a member of Palestine Chapter No. 112, O. E. S., and past patron of 
that order. The Peterson home is at 2424 Grand avenue, South. Mrs. 
Peterson was formerly Miss Ida C. Cedarquist, a native of Smiland, 
Sweden. Their marriage occurred November 16, 1881. 

Hans A. Hanson, a real estate dealer of Minneapolis, was bom in 
Rlne and Eke parish, Gotland, Sweden, August 30, 1858, and is the 
son of Mathias and Maria Lorentina Hanson, both natives of Sweden. 
Mathias Hanson was a sailor, fisherman and farmer, and died several 
years ago; his widow now resides at Butjerfves, Alfva, Gotland. Hans 
Hanson acquired most of his education through his own efforts, as he 
attended the public schools only eighteen months, and after three months 
of private tuition, being then confirmed in the church, became appren- 
ticed to learn the trade of cabinet maker and carpenter, with L. Lund- 
gren, at Hablingebo, Gotland, a prominent man in the business. In 1879 
Mr. Hanson opened a shop on his own account, in hi? native town, but 
after a few months in business decided to emigrate to the United States. 
He embarked May 18, 1880, landing at New York, and located at Strat- 
ford, Iowa, where he entered the employ of the Chicago & Northwestern 
Railway Company, in their bridge and station houses, where he spent 
about a year; he then removed to Chicago, where he was employed by 
the Pullman Company in their sleeping and dining-car shops, and in that 
position worked on the first vestibule car for the New York Central 
Railroad. After removing to Lyon county, Minnesota, in 1889, Mr. Han- 
son received, unsolicited, a highly complimentary letter of reconmienda- 



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548 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



ticMi from the Pullman Company, written by John Dixey, then superin- 
tendent of the passenger and sleeping-car department, and approved by 
the company seal of H. H. Session, the company's manager. 

In Lyon county Mr. Hanson cleared a farm of two hundred and 
forty acres which he purchased and which he still owns, the present value 
being sixty-five dollars an acre; he cultivated this farm until March, 
1904, in the meantime establishing himself in business at Russell, Minne- 
sota, in the line of farm implements and hardware, which business he 
sold in 1900 to George Sparling & Company. Before his remvoal to 
Minneapolis Mr. Hanson spent a few years in dealing in farm lands and 
other investments in connection with his farming and stock-raising. 
For some years now he has been established in Minneapolis in the real 
estate line, and has helped considerably in the improvement and devel- 
opment of the city. He is a prominent member of the Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, being affiliated with Minneapolis Lodge No. 19, Mar- 
shall Chapter No. 65, Royal Arch Masons; Minneapolis Council No. 2, 
Royal and Select Masters; Zion Commandery No. 2, Knights Templar; 
Minneapolis Consistory No. 2, Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite; 
Zurah Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, and 
Eastern Star Chapter Plymouth No. 19. He also belongs to the Modem 
Woodmen of America. He resides at 21 18 Fourteenth avenue, North, 
and with his family attends the Foss Methodist Episcopal church. While 
living in Lyon county Mr. Hanson organized a school district, of which 
he served twelve years as clerk. 

Mr. Hanson was married, first, in 1880, at Boone, Iowa, to Maria 
Johnson, who died in February, 1890. They had two sons, Emil and 
William, who have charge of his farm, and a daughter, Alice, who mar- 
ried Carl Rash, of Russell, Minnesota. Mr. Hanson married, second, in 
July, 1891, Sigrid Olson, of Minneapolis, who was bom at Mellangarden, 
Alsan, Bleckasen, Jemtland, Sweden, and they have five children, four 
daughters and a son, namely: Ruth, Agnes, Hattie, Mabel and Albin. 
Mr. Hanson carries on his business at 401 First avenue. South. 

Nels J. Nelson. — A gentleman in the prime of life, active and ener- 
getic, Nels J. Nelson, whose home for nearly three decades has been at 
No. 2017 Sixth street, South, Minneapolis, has contributed his full quota 
towards advancing the interests of his ward, which he has served as 
alderman for eight years, in the meantime winning for himself a good 
reputation as a citizen of worth and integrity. One of the nine children of 
Anders and Kerstin (Anderson) Nelson, five of whom are now living, he 
was bom in Sosdala, Melby parish, Sweden, near Christianstad, September 
3, 1867, and there spent the first thirteen years of his life. 

Coming with his parents, brothers and sisters to Minneapolis in 1881, 
Nels J. Nelson completed his early education in the public schools of this 
city, attending three years, after his graduation being confirmed in /the 
Swedish Lutheran church. He subsequently pursued his studies at Afchi- 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 549 



bald's Business Q)llege for four consecutive terms, being graduated from 
there in the spring of i886. Thus fitted for a business career, he obtained 
a position as book-keeper with L. Paulle, show case manufacturer, with 
whom he remained until 1892. The following year, Mr. Nelson was simi- 
larly employed in the office of the Northwestern Implement and Wagon 
Company. Accepting then a position with the Frazer & Shepard Sash and 
Door Manufacturing Company, he was at first book-keeper and collector, 
but was soon promoted to estimator, in which capacity he remained with 
that firm until December 5, 1895. From that date until January, 1899, he 
was book-keeper and cashier for Longfellow Brothers & Co., commission 
merchants, and since that time has filled a like position with the Napa 
Valley Wine Company, with the exception, however, of two years that 
he was employed in the office of the county auditor. 

For many years Mr. Nelson has taken a very active interest in local 
politics, on the Republican side, and in 1900 was induced to accept the 
nomination for alderman from the Sixth ward, was elected to the office, 
and served with such fidelity and ability that at the expiration of his term 
he was re-elected to the same position. May i, 1909, he was appointed 
cashier of the Water Works Department in the City Treasurer's office. 

Mr. Nelson married, in 1894, Emma Carolina Johnson, a native of 
Linneryd parish, Smiland, Sweden, and to them five children have been 
bom, three of whom are living, namely: Hilda Marie, bom April 10, 
1895; Ward Raymond Earl, born May 23, 1900; and Ruth Evelyn, bom 
January 26, 1906. 

Oscar Person. — Energetic, capable, and eminently tmstworthy, 
Oscar Person is actively identified with the industrial interests of Minne- 
apolis, as a saloonkeeper and dealer in wines, liquors and cigars, being 
located at the corner of Twentieth and Washington avenues. North. 
Like so many of the city's most valued citizens he is a native of Sweden, 
his birth having occurred December 13, i860, in Raivisher township, Elfs- 
borg. His father, the late Per Anderson, married Johanna Olson, and 
they became the parents of three children, namely : Aron, having charge 
of his mother's homestead property, at Billeberga, Eriksgard; Oscar, the 
special subject of this brief sketch; and Gustaf Hilmer, a general mer- 
diant at Backefors, Raflunda, Sweden. 

Acquiring his early education in the public schools of his native land, 
Oscar Person was confirmed, and subsequently worked as a stable hand 
and coachman, being at Katrineberg, in Rapasjo, two years, and at 
Stommen two years. He afterwards worked on the home farm for a 
year and a half, but as a tiller of the soil was not content. In 1882, 
having served his first conscript year in the Swedish Army, he emigrated 
to the United States, locating in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the home of so 
many of his countrymen. The following three months, Mr. Person was 
employed on the railroad, after which he learned the trade of plasterer^ 
at which he worked for a year. This trade he followed as a joume)mian 



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550 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



for three years, after which he started in business on his own account, 
and in its management has been exceedingly successful, his place being 
one of the best in this part of the city. 

Mr. Person married, March ii, 1887, Mathilda Erickson, who was 
born in Dalsland, Sweden, and they have four children, namely ; Minnie, 
bom March 28, 1888, is the wife of Emmet Getten, a shipping clerk in 
a Minneapolis bakery; Leonard, born March 19, 1890, is clerk in a lumber 
office, in Minneapolis; Ernest, bom August 13, 1894, attends school; and 
Dorothy, bom November 25, 1903. The two older children were con- 
firmed in the Swedish Lutheran church, but Ernest attends an American 
church. Socially Mr. Person belongs to several organizations, being a 
member of the Swedish Brothers; of the Ancient United Order of 
Druids ; and a charter member of the Knights of Odin. Mr. Person and 
family reside at No. 2423 Fremont avenue, and he and his wife have well 
performed their part in sustaining the intellectual and moral status of the 
community, and are held in high esteem by their neighbors and friends. 

Westman Brothers, proprietors of a gents' furnishing and cloth- 
ing store at 305 and 307 Cedar avenue, Minneapolis, Minnesota, are 
among the enterprising young business men of the city. This firm is 
composed of Richard E. and Gustaf Henrick Westman, natives of Heme 
parish, Vestergotland, the former born September 19, 1874; the latter, 
May 19, 1876. Their parents, Henrick and Carolina Sophia Anderson, 
are now residents of Minneapolis, where Mr. Anderson is engaged in the 
manufacture of what is called malt ale. In their family were fourteen 
children, of whom ten are living. Of these we record that John and 
Victor Westman conduct a meat market; Hilda is the wife of August 
Friberg, an employe of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad 
Company; Anna is the wife of August Fallander, connected with the 
North Star Woolen Mill ; Carl and Andrew are barbers ; Ellen is the wife 
of Charles Lund, who is connected with the Great Northern Express 
Company, and Frank Joseph Valentine is employed in his brothers' 
clothing store. 

After having received a common school education in their native 
land, Richard E. and Gustaf H. came, in 1891, to America, where two 
brothers and one sister had preceded them, and soon the whole family 
were reunited here. They went to Murray county, Minnesota, where the 
father bought a farm. After a few years, Richard and Gustaf purchased 
the farm from their father, who moved to Minneapolis and became a 
brewer. Subsequently they sold the farm and they, too, came to Minne- 
apolis, where Richard became foreman in the painting department of the 
St Anthony Furniture Factory, where he was employed for a period of 
nine years; while Gustaf was employed in the Palace Qothing House, 
with which he was connected seven years. 

In 1905, Gustaf Westman engaged in business for himself, opening 
a clothing and gents' furnishing store. Two years later, in 1907, he was 



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A. A. M. CARLSON 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 553 



joined by his brother Richard, who invested additional capital, with 
which they enlarged the business, becoming equal partners, and they have 
met with prosperity in their venture. 

In 1903, Richard K Westman married Miss Anna Erickson, whose 
death occurred the same year. She left no issue* May 17, 1909, he 
married Miss Minnie Bumsen, of Minneapolis. 

In 1907, Gustaf H. Westman married Miss Helga Bunes, a native 
of Norway, by whom he has one child, Alton Lemoine, bom May 24, 
1908. Both gentlemen are members of the Modem Woodmen of 
America. 

Oscar Gustaf Juuus Gustafson was bom at Jonkoping, Sweden, 
January 19, 1871, and is the son of Carl and Margaretha Gustafson, both 
deceased. They were the parents of six children, of whom two girls 
married German husbands and both died in Hanover, one daughter lives 
in Hanover, one son is deceased, one lives in Minneapolis, and the other 
is Oscar G. J., also of Minneapolis. 

Oscar G. J. Gustafson was first employed in Hamburg, where he was 
traveling salesman for Meyer & Sjoberg, of that city, in whose employ 
he remained four years. He then came to the United States, locating in 
Minneapolis, where he found employment with the J. W. Day Lumber 
Company (later the E. H. Day Lumber Company became the name of 
the firm), first in their sawmill, and by his diligence received rapid 
promotion, becoming superintendent, and finally manager, which office 
is now held by him. He has mastered thoroughly the details of the busi- 
ness, and through close attention to the interests of the firm, has become 
very successful in this line, so that he now owns a one-third interest 
in the E. H. Day Lumber Company, 511 South Third street. 

In 1902 Mr. Gustafson sent to Sweden for his aged mother, and 
upon her arrival cared for her until her death, in 1907. He owns two 
buildings at 1402 and 1404 Twentieth avenue, North, and lives at the 
former address, in his brother's family. Mr. Gustafson is a member 
of the Swedish Lutheran Bethania church. Fraternally he belongs to 
the Independent Order of Foresters ; also to the Knights of Pythias ; and 
he is also a member of the Societies Vasa and Norden, in both of which 
he is president. 

Anders August Melcher Carlson, a well-known merchant of Min- 
neapolis, was bom in CMcna parish, Smiland, Sweden, January 2, 1870, 
and is the son of Carl Peter Samuelson and Christina Lovisa (Sjolin) 
Samuelson, who lived on a farm. Mr. Samuelson still resides in his 
native country, and his wife died in 1904; they were the parents of 
twelve children, of whcxn eight are living, five of them in the United 
States. Anders A. M. Carlson attended the public schools of his native 
country until his confirmation, and then became a clerk in a general 
merchandise store, where he remained until May 24, 1888, at which time 



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SS4 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



he emigrated to America. He spent a short time in Minneapolis and then 
removed to Ironwood, Michigan, where he was for a year employed in 
the mines, and then accepted a position as clerk in a gents' furnishing and 
clothing establishment, which position he held three years. Returning 
to Minneapolis, he entered the employ of Ringjund & Olander, and later 
on Altman & Company; he remained with the latter company a number 
of years, and then entered the employ of Nicolett Qothing House, where 
he remained until 1902. In that year he embarked in business on his own 
account, in partnership with A. Olson, a prominent merchant tailor, 
conducting a tailoring establishment, in connection with furnishings and 
clothing, at 227 Nicollet avenue, where they have since built up a flour- 
ishing business. Both members of the firm of A. Olson & Company are 
well known to their patrons for straightforward business dealings and 
fair treatment. 

Mr. Carlson is affiliated with the Ancient Free and Accepted Ma- 
sons, and belongs to the Mystic Shrine; he is. also a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and its Rebekah degree, and belongs 
to the Modern Samaritans and the Odin Club.^ He married, October 
5, 1898, Minnie Wallin, bom in 1871, in Elmalioda, Smiland, Sweden,, 
and they reside at 1718 Eleventh avenue, South, at the present time. 

Dahlin Brothers, of Minneapolis, manufacturers of furniture at 
515 First avenue. Northeast, are sons of Olof and Anna (Johnson) 
Dahlin, the former from Rattvik, Dalame, and the latter from Gardsby,. 
Smaland, Sweden. Olof Dahlin emigrated to the United States in 1865, 
and located in St. Paul; Anna Johnson came one year later, and they 
were married in 1868. They had four children, three of whom survive, 
namely: Frank J., born in 1871, is a farmer of Wright county, Minne- 
sota, and quite prominent in local politics;. Archie Albert, bom Febru- 
ary 8, 1879, 2tnd Oscar C, bom September 25, 1881. 

Archie Albert, the second son of Olof Dahlin, was educated in the 
public schools of Minnesota and later attended Minnesota Business 
College, at that time conducted by Reverend E. A. Skogsbergh ; he alsa 
took private courses in various branches. Later he was apprenticed to 
learn the trade of machinist, and from the position he first held, cleaning 
floors, advanced rapidly until he held the position of superintendent of 
the factory. He afterwards held the position of foreman four years and 
superintendent two years, in the employ of Schock Manufacturing Com- 
pany. In 1907 he started business on his own account, in partnership 
with his younger brother and Oscar E. Davis, manufacturing all kinds 
of special fumiture. Mr. Dahlin married, Febmary 8, 1899, on his 
twentieth birthday, Esther Davidson, daughter of John August and 
Carolina Davidson, both now deceased. Both he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Swedish Evangelical Lutheran Emanuel Church, in which he 
has held the office of trustee for three years; he is the oldest member 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA . 555 

of its choir, with which he has been connected fifteen years. He is 
president of the Order of Vasa and member of the district lodge of that 
order. 

The other member of the firm, Oscar C. Dahlin, was educated also 
in the public schools of Minnesota. In 1905 he married Dora M. Tailfer, 
of French-Canadian extraction, and they have one child, Ernest Oscar, 
born February i, 1907. Both brothers are members of the Modem 
Brotherhood of America, Swedish Order of Vasa and North American 
Union, and both have hosts of friends. In their business enterprise they 
are meeting with most gratifying success, and are increasing their out- 
put continually ; in 1908 the amount of business done by them amounted 
to about fifty thousand dollars. Both are keen, ambitious men of busi- 
ness, and conduct their affairs in a business-like manner. 

Adolph Peterson, rug and carpet dealer and manufacturer of Min- 
neapolis, was bom in Grave, near Orebro, Sweden, October 6, 185 1, and 
is the son of P. E. and Sarah Peterson. P. E. Peterson was a farmer 
and a public official of the county. Adolph Peterson attended the public 
schools of his native parish, and afterwards studied five years at the 
Orebro University. He sailed for the United States and arrived Septem- 
ber 14, 1869. He worked as a clerk in Chicago, until the time of the 
great fire, October 9, 1871. He then proceeded to New York, and 
worked in various positions in that city and Philadelphia, and in 1880 
began business on his own account. He made a new departure in the * 
rug and carpet trade, cutting and making mgs and carpets to order, and 
in 1890 started a branch of the business in Minneapolis. He made his 
home in New York for sixteen years, then removed to Philadelphia, 
where he remained until 1904, at which time he took up his residence in 
Minneapolis. Mr. Peterson is now treasurer and manager of the Peter- 
son Carpet Company, of Minneapolis, which concern was incorporated in 
1903, and also of the Peterson Carpet Company, of Philadelphia, incor- 
porated in 1901. He has continued to advance in his methods of manu- 
facture since first establishing his business, and has also been granted 
twelve patents on carpet pattem display machines. 

Mr. Peterson is an enthusiastic advocate of temperance, and in 
1883 founded the society known as the International Order Templars of 
Temperance, a fratemal and beneficial order now having a membership 
of sixty thousand. He has offices in Minneapolis and Philadelphia, and 
resides in the former city. Mr. Peterson is a member of St. Anthony 
Commercial Club ; he belongs to the Lutheran church and his family to 
the Methodist church. 

Mr. Peterson married, September 26, 1875, Eva Cecilia Carlson, 
born in Linkoping, Sweden, and they have one daughter, Lillie Ger- 
trude, bom August 18, 1884, and married to Hjalmar Melville Newton, a 
chemist of Minneapolis. 



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556 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Oscar Edward Norman. — ^Distinguished not only for his own clean 
record as a man of integrity and worth, but for the honored ancestry 
from which he is sprung, Oscar Edward Norman is the lineal descend- 
ant of a family that during the past two centuries has been prominent 
in the history of Sweden, many of its members having intermarried 
among the nobility, or into families of equal prominence and influence. 
He belongs to the Holland line of this family, of which there are several 
branches, its Swedish name being Nerman, which in America has been 
changed to its present form, Norman. One memj)er of the Nerman 
family, Klas Ulrik Nerman, who was born in 1792, and died in 1852, 
was elevated to the nobility in 1843. He held many offices of dignity 
and distinction, among others being those of governor (Landshofding) 
of Kalmar laen; commandant of the Castle of Kalmar; and Knight 
of the North Star and of the Order of Vasa. 

A native of Sweden, Oscar Edward Norman was bom, September 
II, 1867, in Vireda, Smiland, and was there bred and educated. His 
parents, Christer Richard and Christina (Swenson) Nerman, had seven 
children, namely: Alfred, deceased; Ella Christina, wife of Johannes 
Johanson Krans, of Sweden ; Carl Gustaf , engaged in farming in Cokato, 
Minnesota; Claes Alfred, of Chicago, Illinois, a piano maker; Augusta 
Josephina, died in North Dakota; Swen Johan, of Minneapolis, is pro- 
prietor of the Norman Bakery Company ; and Oscar Edward, the special 
subject of this brief biographical sketch. 

After leaving the public schools, Oscar E. Norman turned his 
attention to the cultivation of his musical talent, and when but seven- 
teen years of age passed an examination as an organist. He subsequently 
took a course of study at the Seminary for School Teachers, in Vexio. 
Leaving his native land in 1888, he emigrated to the United States, and 
for about six months thereafter was employed in the McCormick Har- 
vester Company's Works, in Chicago, Illinois, in the meantime serving 
as organist in the Zion church. Coming from there to Minneapolis, Mr. 
Norman was here employed in a grocery store until 1895. Venturing 
then to set up business on his own account, Mr. Norman purchased a 
grocery store, and is now located at No. 236 Twentieth avenue. North, 
and has here built up a good mercantile trade, dealing in fancy and 
staple groceries, of which he carries a complete stock. 

Mr. Norman married, in 1897, Eleanora Maria Johnson, of Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota, a native of this state, and they are the parents of 
three children, namely, Edward Ansfred Marion, born April i, 1898; 
Maynard Elvoy Emanuel, bom December 19, 1899; and Carl Johan 
Christer, born March 5, 1903. Fraternally Mr. Norman is a member of 
the Independent Order of Foresters, and of the Modem Woodmen of 
America. Religiously he and his family are members of the Bethlehem 
Lutheran church, in which he was organist and choir leader for five 
years. Mr. and Mrs. Norman reside at their pleasant home. No. 1402 
Emerson avenue, North. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 55? 



Charles J, Johnson. — ^Among other good lessons which the sons 
of Sweden and their immediate descendants may justly teach the aver- 
age native-bom American is that it is not necessary to wholly engross 
ones-self in business, in order to obtain high and broad standing in that 
field. It is seldom that those who come to this country to enjoy its many 
advantages and to gain a foothold among its constantly expanding com- 
merce and industries do not, at the same time, bring with them some 
strong love of music, science or literature, which proves to them, as the 
years pass and they become prosperous and independent, the saving grace 
of their lives and tiie deep satisfaction of their later years. Most of them 
become comfortable and many of them rich, and the vast majority of 
them have deep sources of enjoyment outside of the mere activity and 
excitements of money-getting. In this regard Charles J. Johnson, vice 
president of the C. A. Smith Lumber Company, of Minneapolis, with 
its allied concerns, stands as the highest t)rpe of his fellow countrymen. 
His three decades as a moving figure in the lumber business and his 
quarter of a century with the C. A. Smith Company have given him high 
standing in the world of trade and commerce, and, as a thorough believer 
in Republicanism, he has also made himself broadly useful in practical 
work of a public nature ; yet, through all these years, he has retained his 
love for books, which was so strong an early trait, and has considered 
it both a duty and a pleasure to indulge his scholarly and literary tastes. 
His mind is therefore still bright and elastic, outside of business sub- 
jects, and is his most enjoyable and refreshing field of recreation. It 
may be also added that much reading and communion with the masters 
of thought gives a man a certain air of reserve force and modest dignity 
which no other experience will bestow. In the words of one of Mr. John- 
son's friends, "he is a very unassuming and quiet man, with lovable man- 
ners," all of which may be accounted for by the fact that he is a book- 
lover and a thinker, and not solely a business man. 

Mr. Johnson's birthplace is Hofmantorp, Sweden, and the date of 
his birth, September 12, 1849, ^^ being the son of John and Johanna 
(Peterson) Johnson. The son passed his early life on the home farm, 
attended the public schools until he was fourteen years of age. He then 
commenced to take up the practical work of the world, busying himself 
on his father's farm and in a small sawmill, run by water power, located 
on the home place and owned by his father and neighboring farmers. 
The latter branch of his boyhood labors fixed his subsequent business 
career. In June, 1869, when twenty years of age, he located at Red 
Wing, Minnesota, and the following year became a resident of Minneap- 
olis, where he was immediately employed in the lumber yard of Dean 
and Company. Wishing to continue his studies which had been inter- 
rupted in Sweden, he entered the public school and later the Universi^ 
of Minnesota, and continued therein for a year. During this period of his 
life he remained in Minneapolis for ten years, and in 1879 nioved to 
Evansville, Minnesota, there establishing a retail lumber business in 



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SS8 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



association with C. A. Smith, of the C. A. Smith Lumber Company. 
Upon his return to Minneapolis in 1884, Mr. Johnson commenced the 
identification with that company which has since remained uninterrupted. 
His steady advancement has elevated him to the office of vice president 
of the C. A. Smith Lumber Company (the controlling corporation), as 
well as of the C. A. Smith Timber Company (which supplies the mills 
with timber) and the Northwestern Campo-Board Company (which man- 
ufactures a patent board from the lumber sawings). 

For many years Mr. Johnson has been an influential Republican, 
having served for two years as president of the Evansville village board 
and for six years as a member of the Minneapolis Park Board. Socially, 
he is a member of the Odin Club, of his residence city. In 1861 Mr. 
Johnson married Miss Mary L. Kraft, of Minneapolis, and they have 
three sons — Victor, Guy and Ansel, aged, respectively, twenty-four, 
twenty-one and nineteen. 

John Edman. — Endowed by nature with inventive and constructive 
talents of a high order, John Edman, an honored resident of Minneapolis, 
has made his mark in the field of mechanics and invention, having origi- 
nated, invented and patented many serviceable articles, the use of which 
the general public has not been particularly slow to appreciate. A man 
of rare genius, with an active and fertile brain, he has often found it 
difficult to decide which of several devices suggested to his mind would 
best serve his purpose, but his sound and practical judgment has invari- 
ably enabled him to choose such as led him to success. He was bom, 
June 7, i860, in Vibyggera parish, Vesternorrland, Sweden ,a son of 
Matts and Magdalena Edman, both of whom passed to the life beyond 
in 1908, the father at the time of his death being ninety years of age. 
The parental household consisted of eight children, as follows: Nils, 
a contractor ; Matthias, a carpenter and builder ; Per, a merchant ; John, 
the subject of this sketch; Erik, a carpenter and contractor; Johannes, 
a contractor; Olof, having charge of the old homestead; and Karin, 
living with Olof. 

Spending but four days of his life in the public schools, John Edman 
had but little opportunity in his youthful days to acquire an education. 
His father, however, taught all of his children to read, write, and figure 
a little, and, had not circumstances interfered, would have been a far 
better instructor than many of the public school teachers. At the early 
age of nine years, John began earning his living as errand boy in a lum- 
ber yard, after which he worked in a sawmill in the Angermanelf for 
awhile, subsequently being employed as clerk in a store. At the age of 
nineteen, traveling on foot across the high mountains, and through the 
dense forests, he went to Sundsvall, where he found employment on the 
steamer "Flottistin", being deck hand for four months, after which he 
was promoted to mate, a capacity in which he served for four years. 
His chief, Mr. Thureson, having in the meantime been impressed with 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 561 

Mr. Edman*s mechanical skill and ingenuity, then sent him to the Sunds- 
vall Machine Works, a very large concern, where he spent three years, 
becoming a master machinist. The following two years he was employed 
as chief engineer and foreman in the Sundsvall Mortar Company, during 
which time that company built a steamer called the "Viking", and of 
this Mr. Edman was then made the captain, and served in that capacity 
until 1892. The positon was considered a good one, paying about twenty- 
five hundred kroner a year, and this sum he invested in a building enter- 
prise. Shortly after came the fearful panic of 1892, when many for- 
tunes, large and small, including Mr. Edman's were irretrievably lost. 

Discouraged with the result of his venture, Mr. Edman made up his 
mind to seek a new opening, and emigrated to this country, coming im-« 
mediately to Minneapolis. His first employment in this vicinity was the 
building of a grain elevator in the country. Having not the slightest 
knowledge of the English language, he then entered the employ of an 
American farmer in order to learn the language, and at the same time 
to earn his living. At the end of six months Mr. Edman visited the 
Worlds* Fair in Chicago, and while working on the Fair grounds raised 
the big flag pole on the building of the Adams Express Company, a vast 
undertaking. From Chicago, in June, 1893, he went to Duluth, Minne- 
sota, where he had the worst experience of his life, during the latter part 
of that year working at anything he could find to do, even going to the 
woods as a blacksmith. After six months of that precarious existence, he 
secured employment with the Scott & Graft Lumber Company, for whom 
he was chief engineer four years, the following year serving in the same 
capacity with the Murray & Jones Lumber Company. He was then pro- 
moted to superintendent of the lumber plant, and retained the position 
three years, or until Murray & Forbes rented the mill to their book- 
keeper, with whom Mr. Edman was in partnership the ensuing year. 

Returning then to Minneapolis, Mr. Edman, who in the meantime had 
taken upon himself the responsibilities of a married man, built his present 
home, at No. 2910 Bryant avenue. North, and here established his family. 
In 1905 he was engaged by the Bahama Lumber Company to build a 
sawmill in Abico, West Indies, where, after the completion of the mill, 
he remained for nearly two years, superintending the plant, and break- 
ing the natives to take charge of it. 

In 1907 Mr. Edman was again in Minneapolis, and soon was well 
established in business for himself as an inventor, locating his shop at 
No. 2121 Washington avenue, North. He has made many inventions of 
minor importance, both in Sweden and in America, and among those 
of practical value to the public mention may be made of a freight-car, or 
grain-car, door, a puncture-free automobile wheel, a shoe protector, a 
fire starter, a window cleaner, and a United States mail car. He is vice- 
president and head foreman of The Wallof Motor Truck Company, 
incorporated with a capital of $100,000. Mr. Edman is also a man of 

30 



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562 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



fine business ability and judgment, and has acquired considerable wealth, 
owning in addition to his city pr(^)erty a valuable farm of three hundred 
and twenty-five acres in Big Stone, Lake county, Minnesota. 

On January 15, 1897, Mr. Edman married Hanna Lidholm, who 
was bom February 22, 1874, a daughter of Carl and Christina Lidholm, 
of Minneapolis. Three children have blessed their union, namely : Hil- 
dur Magdalena Christina, bom April 17, 1898; Florence Eleonora, bora 
Septem^r 29, 1900 ; and Anna Edith Linnea, bora June 30, 1907. 

f 

Dr. Nimrod a. Johnson has gained distinctive prestige as one of 
the most able and successful of the young practitioners of medicine in 
the city of Minneapolis. He was bora near Winthrop in Sibley county, 
Minnesota, October i, 1880, a son of Nels and Augusta (Gunderson) 
Johnson, both of whom were born in Sweden but came to the United 
States in their early lives. Nels JohnscMi was one of the early pioneers 
of Sibley county and was very prominent in its early history. He located 
there when a young man, and securing government land he made a 
good farm there, and as the country became more thickly settled and 
seeing the necessity of railroad facilities he was active in agitating the 
questions, and to him belongs the honor of being one of the most impor- 
tant factors in securing to Sibley county its first railroad. He still re- 
sides on and owns the land which he secured in pioneer days, and is one 
of the honored early pioneers of that county. In his family were six 
children, — Nimrod A., Arthur, Sidney, Norton, May and Alice. 

After a public school education in Sibley county Dr. Nimrod A. John- 
son enrolled in Carlton College and from there passed on to the Univer- 
sity of Minnesota and was graduated from its medical department in 
1905. During the year following his graduation he served as house 
physician in the Swedish Hospital, and then (^>ening an office at the 
comer of Twenty-fifth street and Twenty-seventh avenue in Minneapolis 
he is maintaining his position among the leaders of the medical frater- 
nity here. He is a member of the Hennepin County Medical Society, 
the American Medical Association, the Swedish American Medical Qub, 
the South Side Commercial Club, the Brotherhood of American Yeomen 
and the Ancient Order of Woodmen. 

Dr. Johnson was married, March 16, 1909, to Miss Dora Anderson, 
daughter of Mrs. J. W. Anderson, of Minneapolis. Mrs. Johnson is of 
Swedish parentage, but was born and educated in Minneapolis. 

Dr. Carl Johnson Lind, a substantial physician and citizen of 
Minneapolis, is a representative of the best type of the Swedish-American 
— typical of a racial element which for half a century has been entering 
into the material and intellectual development of the northwest with ever- 
increasing persistency and force. Untiring in patient application, deep 
in scholarship, going to the root of things, yet practical and enterprising, 
in his hard-fought and progressive life Dr. Lind has demonstrated 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 563 

the best traits of his countrymen, among whom he is proud to number the 
great botanist and master of medicine, Linnaeus. He himself was born 
in Smiland, the same Baltic region of southern Sweden which was the 
native locality of the founder of the Linnean system, and his parents, 
John and Helena Johnson Lind, also claimed that Scandinavian kingdom 
as their mother country. The father was a faithful, honorable farmer, 
the head of a household embracing nine children, as follows: Matilda, 
who married Andrew Johnson ; Amanda, who became Mrs. A. J. Berg- 
quist; Carin and Anna Maria, both deceased; Maria, who married 
Edward Peterson ; Vendla, now Mrs. Nels Dahlman ; Jenney, who mar- 
ried A. J. Peterson ; Carl J. ; and Anna, who became the wife of a Mr. 
Mickelson. The father of this family died in 1887, ^"d the mother fol- 
lowed him, two years later, both devoted and life-long members of the 
Lutheran church. 

Carl J. Lind received his fundamental education in a private school 
of Sweden and in 1889, ^^^^ seventeen years of age, emigrated to the 
United States, choosing for the field of his activities a state with whose 
best progress his fellow countrymen are closely associated. As a poor, 
friendless and determined boy he first located at Winthrop, Minnesota, 
but after a short residence there removed to St. Paul, and the following 
year fixed his abiding place at its twin city of Minneapolis. There he 
became a clerk in a drug store, with the object both of studying phar- 
macy and of earning sufficient money to pursue the study of medicine — 
the mastery of that profession being his ultimate ambition. These were 
certainly days of hard and continuous struggle for the ambitious Swe- 
dish youth — a period not only of ceaseless and intense work, but of real 
privations, which included the cutting down of his daily rations to one 
meal. What keen physical suffering this brought need not be described 
to anyone who has been a hearty, growing boy. But the youth's brave 
determination and high ambition overcame all obstacles; he weathered 
all the gloom and storms, and while still a young man sailed into the port 
of success, with his colors flying. A hard student, he first became profi- 
cient in pharmacy, and the time which he could snatch from this business 
was devoted to his medical studies. Finally he matriculated at Hamline 
University, graduating from its medical department June 10, 1897. He 
immediately began the practice of his profession at Minneapolis, and soon 
established a large and lucrative clientele. He was also instrumental in 
establishing the Swedish Hospital, has been a member of its medical 
staff since its founding, and is now its chief of staff, and has faithfully 
aided in its promotion both by his professional skill and financial means. 
He also belongs to the Hennepin County Medical Association, State Med- 
ical Association and the Swedish-American Medical Club of Minneapolis. 

Dr. Lind has not only advanced to prominence in his profession, 
but has evinced such sound and far-seeing business qualities that he is 
now one of the wealthy citizens of Minneapolis. From the first he was 
a firm believer in the solid future of Minneapolis, and persistently and 



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S64 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



wisely invested the profits of his profession in city real estate. Its rapid 
increase in value has been one of the chief means by which he has 
reached his present substantial position as a man of means. Social, 
generous and charitable in his private relations, these traits are also 
brought into play through his membership in the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Brotherhood 
of America. 

On June i, 1901, the doctor was united in marriage with Miss Betty 
Parten, of Minneapolis, and in his selection of a wife he chose a lady 
who was congenial in every respect, even to the point of rendering him 
intelligent sympathy and assistance in his professional work. Before her 
marriage, for several years, Mrs. Lind was a trained nurse in the City 
Hospital, and is a cultured lady of Swedish parentage. They have one 
child, Melva, born March 16, 1902. 

Alfred J. Anderson. — Conspicuous among the energetic and pro- 
gressive men who are so ably conducting the mercantile interests of Min- 
neapolis is Alfred J. Anderson, a produce commission merchant, who as 
junior member of the well-known firm of Nelson & Anderson, is carrying 
on a business amounting to between $135,000 and $150,000 per annum. 
The representative of one of the early Swedish ifamilies to settle in 
Minnesota, he was born, September 6, 1871, in Wastedo, Goodhue 
county, this state, a son of Andreas Anderson. His father was bom in 
1835, in Landa, Halland, and his mother, whose maiden name was Beata 
Johanson, was born in 1839, in Landa, Halland. In 1869 they emigrated 
to America, coming here from Kongsbacka, Halland, locating in Good- 
hue county, Minnesota, with their family. Eleven children were born 
to them, seven of whom survive, as follows: Andrew, bom in 1866, is 
a minister in the Mission Friends* denomination at Norway, Michigan; 
Alfred J., the subject of this sketch; Albertina, born in 1874, married 
C. E. Lundberry, a salesman in Minneapolis; Frank E., bom in 1876, 
is working for Nelson & Anderson; Carl L., born in 1878, is an elec- 
trician, in the employ of the Twin City Telephone Company ; Nora, bom 
in 1880, is the wife of Walter Johnson, a farmer in Hector, Minnesota; 
and John, bom in 1885, is in the employ of Nelson & Anderson. 

In common with his brothers and sisters, Alfred J. Anderson was 
educated in the public schools, and confirmed in the Lutheran church at 
Spring Garden. He subsequently worked four years as a farm laborer, 
and was afterwards engaged in carpentering until 1896, when, forming 
a partnership with August S. Nelson, he embarked in the produce com-^ 
mission business, with which he has since been actively identified, the 
firm Nelson & Anderson being one of the most successful in Minne- 
apolis. 

Mr. Anderson, on May 21, 1902, was united in marriage with Maria 
Anderson, who was born in Stora Tuna, Dalame, Sweden, in 1880, a 
daughter of Peter and Anna Anderson, the former of whom came to 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 565 



America in 1880, and the latter in 1882, bringing the family with her. 
Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have two children, namely: Gladys Marjorie. 
bom February 13, 1903; and Wilford, born February 3, 1909. Mr. 
Anderson and his family live at No. 2508 East Twenty-second street. 

Mr. Anderson is an active and valued member of the Minneapolis 
Produce Exchange, and has served in the past as a member of its Butter 
Committee, and at the present time is ser% ing on its Finance Committee. 

Charles Olson, the popular and well-known jeweler, at 215 Central 
avenue, Minneapolis, was born in Tjarlof, Gumlosa parish, Sweden, 
March 11, 1867, and is the son of Ola and Kerstin (Nelson) Carlson. 
They were the parents of eleven children, of whom four reside in 
America, namely: Nels (born May i, 1864) and Charles, who are in 
partnership in business; Ellen, who works in the jewelry store, and 
Mathilda, who keeps house for Nels and Ellen. 

Charles Olsen received his early education in the public schools of 
his native parish, and after his confirmation worked on his father's farm 
until he reached the age of eighteen, when he became an apprentice to the 
watchmaker's trade, at Hessleholm, and finally became master of the same. 
In which he became skillful. He came to the United States in 1890, at the 
age of twenty-three, and for one year worked at his trade in South 
Dakota; he then removed to Minneapolis, where he has since resided. 
After working six months here, he embarked in business for himself, in 
partnership with his brother, at their present location. By his skill as 
an expert in his line, his fair dealing and close attention to his business, 
Mr. Olsen has met with pleasing success, and the business is steadily 
growing, the present stock being worth about thirty thousand dollars. 
He is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen and of the 
Odin Club. Mr. Olson married, in 1901, Betsey Rosenquist, who was 
bom in the same village as her husband. 

August SoDERUNa — The success and popularity of August Soder- 
ling, of Minneapolis, in the business fields of real estate and fire insurance 
are readily understood from a close contact with that quiet, unassuming, 
honest, even-tempered, big-hearted and able gentleman. His character 
is a guarantee of instinctive and permanent confidence and his varied 
experience has given him a sure "line" on all classes of men and women 
— something quite necessary in the making of a successful real estate 
and insurance agent. Mr. Soderling was bom in Wederslof parish, near 
Wexio, Sweden, June 16, 1858, to Sven Magnus and Christina (Larson) 
Soderling. The father was organist and chorister of the parish besides 
being a practical agriculturist. He died in America in 1890. There were 
six children in the family of whom four are living, the oldest being 
August, of this sketch ; the second Carl, who died while a child ; Ingeborg 
Christina, married Thomas Kane, with the Milwaukee branch of the 
Standard Oil Company ; Blanda, died in Minneapolis when nineteen years 



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S66 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



of age ; Charles Fredrik, a mining engineer of Baker City, Oregon ; and 
Harry W., connected with the General Electric Company, of Spokane, 
Washington. 

August Soderling was educated in the public school of his native 
parish and in 1870 came to America with his parents. At first the family 
settled in Moline, Illinois, for a few months and then moved to Chicago, 
where they lived about twelve years and where August was confirmed in 
the Swedish Lutheran Immanuel church. Before confirmation he attended 
the common school and later the North Chicago high school for one year. 
He then became clerk with Berlizheimer and Stensland on the west side 
for about four years. Next he was a clerk in the Sherman House some 
three and one-half years and then located at Denver, where he was 
successively employed as a clerk and storekeeper in mercantile establish- 
ments and as clerk in the Alvord House, remaining in the city three years. 
In the meantime he became one of the founders and a director of a 
Swedish weekly called Colorado-Post en, which is still continued imder 
another name. Later, Mr. Soderling went to S^n Francisco, where he 
secured employment with M. A. Gunst and Company, then the largest 
wholesale and retail tobacco dealers in that city, remaining with them 
for two years. 

In 1887 Mr. Soderling became a citizen of Minneapolis, where he 
has resided ever since. At first he clerked in the dry-goods store of 
Ingram and Olson for one year. He next went into the insurance busi- 
ness with Judge E. B. Ames for a couple of years. He next established 
an insurance business of his own, continuing thus until 1907, when he 
former a partnership with James Nelson in a city real estate and fire 
insurance business, in which they are still engaged, with offices in the 
Temple Court building. Mr. Soderling is an Odd Fellow and a member 
of- the Linne Lodge, Order of Vasa. 

John Monson, the well-known Minneapolis florist, was born in 
Farlof, near Christianstad, May i, 1865, son of Mons Person and his 
wife, Inga, nee Person. Both parents are deceased. An only brother, 
a gardener, still lives in Sweden. His father a farmer, John was 
reared on the farm, and he attended the public schools until confirma- 
tion time. Afterward he worked on some of the large estates, which 
are so abundant in Skine, in order to learn gardening. Then he com- 
menced what may be called his grand tour du monde, which lasted for 
six years. He visited Denmark, Germany, Holland and Belgium, in 
every one of which countries gardening and flower culture are at their 
highest, and he made a six months' sojourn in St. Petersburg, Russia. 
On his return home, he intended to start in business in Visby, but 
through a partner met with financial losses, which changed his course. 
He went back to Skine, and for four years was engaged in business 
there. 

In the spring of 1894 Mr. Monson came to America. At Minne- 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 569 



apolis he at once secured employment with the C. A. Smith Floral Co., 
with which firm he remained six years in the capacity of foreman. In 
1900 he began a business on his own account at Thirty-sixth street and 
Calhoun, near the Lakewood Cemetery. He started with five green- 
houses ; to-day he has thirty-two. He ships his floral product all over the 
Northwest, to the Dakotas, Montana, Wyoming, Northern Michigan, 
Wisconsin and Manitoba, and his extensive plant furnishes employment 
to from twenty-five to thirty-five men. By hybridizing he has produced 
a number of new varieties of roses, and from the Society of American 
Florists, whose motto is "Progress," he has received two medals, one 
in bronze for a new rose called "Miss Katie Moulton," at the rose show 
in Cincinnati, Ohio, March 10, 1906; and, in 1905, a silver medal was 
received for the same rose. Mr. Monson had a fine exhibit at the St. 
Louis Exposition, but having no time to attend to it in person, his roses 
were not shipped in a perfect condition, and a competitor carried off the 
first prize. Also, Mr. Monson has received a number of diplomas from 
various floral associations and others at Chicago, St. Louis, Boston, Mil- 
waukee and Little Rock. He is a member of the Minnesota State Flor- 
ists' Association, the Society of Arperican Florists, and the American 
Rose Society, and he belongs to the Odin Club and the Masonic Order. 
Through reading, observation and experience, he has become a well- 
informed man, and has developed a business along modem lines and in 
accordance with high ethics. Such a record should serve as a source 
of inspiration and encouragement to others, for on his arrival in Minne- 
apolis this young man had only a dollar with which to make a start in 
the new world. 

Nils Anton Pearson, of the firm of Meier, Pearson Co., furniture 
dealers, 404-406 Twentieth avenue. North, Minneapolis, Minnesota, is a 
native of Sweden, bom in Farstorp, Skane, September 7, 1873, son of Per 
and Pemilla {nee Tufveson) Nilson. Up to this writing death has not 
entered their family, and of the six children composing it, we record that 
Thilda is the widow of John Anderson, of St. James, Minnesota, and has 
four children ; Emma is the wife of M. W. Sandquist, justice of the peace 
and an insurance man at St. James ; Nelly lives with her parents in Swe- 
den ; Anna is the wife of Olof Anderson, a contractor of St. James, Min- 
nesota ; Per Theodore, also a contractor, is engaged in business at Carlton, 
Minnesota ; and Nils Anton is the subject of this sketch. 

The last named, after receiving the usual educational advantages in 
the public schools of Sweden, and being confirmed in the Lutheran church, 
worked on his father's farm until the early spring of 1892. Then he 
came to America, St. James, Minnesota, being his objective point, where 
for some years he worked at the carpenter's trade. Feeling the need 
of a better education, he went to St. Peter, Minnesota, and entered Gus- 
tavus Adolphus College. He took a complete business course, after 
which he accepted a position as book-keeper in the Citizens' Bank of St 



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570 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



James, with which he was connected three years, going thence to Hector, 
Minnesota, as assistant cashier in the State Bank of' Hector, a position 
he filled one year. His next position was at Carlton. There he was 
secretary and treasurer of the H. Ivarson Co., a general merchandise 
concern, in which he was financially interested, and with which he re- 
mained until 1906, when he disposed of his interest and came to Minne- 
apolis. In January of the following year he identified himself with the 
furniture house of Haugen-Meier Co., on Twentieth avenue. North, in 
which he purchased an interest; and in May, 1908, the firm name was 
changed to its present style, Meier-Pearson Co. 

In 1904, Mr. Pearson married Miss Mary Amelia Larson, who was 
born at St. James, Minnesota, November 16, 1882. To them have been 
given two sons : Carl Anton, bom July 10, 1905, and John Edgar, Feb- 
ruary 8, 1907. Mr. and Mrs. Pearson are members of the Bethlehem 
Swedish Lutheran church, of which he is trustee, financial secretary, and 
assistant Sunday School superintendent for the English branch. In De- 
cember, 1896, Mr. Pearson visited his parents in Sweden, and the follow- 
ing year also visited the Stockholm exposition. 

August J. Anquist. — Noteworthy among the valued and respected 
citizens of Minneapolis is August J. Anquist, an ex-alderman, who is 
actively associated with the industrial progress of the city, being one of 
the leading blacksmiths and wagon manufacturers of the city. A Swede 
by birth, he was bom, June 16, 1864, in Frykerud, Vermland, a son of 
the late Jonas Anquist, and his wife, whose maiden name was Maria An- 
derson. He is one of a family of six children bom to his parents, namely : 
Clara, widow of the late John Nelson, of Minneapolis ; Lars Magnus, who 
has charge of the old home farm in Sweden ; Maria, living with her wid- 
owed mother in Sweden; August J., the subject of this sketch; and two 
that died in early life. 

Education being compulsory in Sweden, all children, unless their par- 
ents prefer to employ private tutors, are educated in the public schools, in 
which, it is unnecessary to say, August J. Anquist obtained his rudimen- 
tary knowledge of books, afterwards being confirmed in the Lutheran 
church. Brought up on the home farm, he became familiar with agricul- 
tural pursuits as a boy, remaining with his parents until eighteen years 
of age. Beginning the struggle of life for himself, he then came to the 
United States, locating in the spring of 1883 in Kansas, where, on July 
4, 1883, he took out his first naturalization papers. After working as a 
farm laborer in that state for six years, Mr. Anquist, in 1888, came to 
Minneapolis, and, having previously learned the blacksmith's trade, se- 
cured employment in a smithy, and for five years worked by the day for 
Mr. Joseph Guy, who then admitted him to partnership. At the end of 
seven years, Mr. Guy sold his interest in the shop to Mr. David Ekberg, 
who has since continued as a partner of Mr. Anquist, and with him has 
built up a large and constantly increasing business as a wagon-maker and 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 571 



general blacksmith, the firm being widely and favorably known as one 
of the most reliable in the city. 

Mr. Anquist married, in 1895, Sina Holee, who was bom in Bergen, 
Norway, February 10, 1874. Of their union four children have been bom, 
two sons and two daughters. Both sons died in infancy. The daughters 
are Margaret Olivia, bom June 2^^ 1905 ; and Adelaide Sylvia, bom July 
25, 1908. Being of different nationalities, and reared in different 
religious faiths, Mr. and Mrs. Anquist contribute to the support of two 
churches, a Swedish church and a Norwegian church. Fraternally Mr. 
Anquist stands high in the Masonic Order, belonging to several of its 
branches ; he is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows ; of Shlere Lodge, No. 53, A. O. U. W., of which he has been 
recorder seven years, and financier one year; and of Society Norden. 
He has also belonged to various other organizations, but has dropped 
his membership in them. On October i, 1897, Mr. Anquist received 
his final citizenship papers, and has since been identified with the Repub- 
lican party, supporting its principles by voice and vote. Elected an 
alderman frcMn the Tenth ward of Minneapolis in the fall of 1903, he 
took his seat in January, 1904, and during his term of four years served 
on various committees. 

NoRE A. Erman, proprietor of a meat market at 259 Cedar avenue, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, dates his birth at Bark&kra, Skine, Sweden, 
October 14, 1867. His father, Fredrik Erman, a minister in the Swedish 
Lutheran State church, died some years ago; his mother, Sophia 
Josephine {nee Gronquist) is stilV living in Sweden. In their family 
were eight children, of whom the following are living: Anna Helene, 
who is taking care of her mother ; Fredrik Joseph, a farmer in Sweden ; 
Paul Gustaf Bemhard, also a farmer in the old country; Clara Char- 
lotte, wife of Nils Person, in Skine; Anshelm Israel, postmaster of his 
town in Sweden; and Nore A., the youngest, and the subject of this 
sketch. 

Nore A. received the usual public school training in his native land. 
From the time of his confirmation until he reached his majority he 
worked on the farm, then he served one year in the Swedish army, and 
after that he came to America, landing in Litchfield, Minnesota, in 1889. 
Here he worked on a farm the first summer and the following winter 
attended public school, also taking private lessons in order to perfect 
himself in the English language. The next year he came to Minne- 
apolis. Here he worked on the streets two summers and spent the win- 
ters in the timber, and while employed in the timber regions he met 
with a serious accident, splitting his foot with an ax. As a result of this 
injury he was laid up during the following summer. In the fall he was 
sufficiently recovered to accept a position in a meat market, and he 
worked there for nine years, until 1901, when he engaged in business 
for himself at the comer of Oak Grove and Nicollet avenues. At the 



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572 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



end of sixteen months he sold out, and the following fall opened a new 
store at 259 Cedar avenue, where he has since conducted a prosperous 
and lucrative business. 

Mr. Erman has a wife and four children, and the family residence is 
at 1300 Eighth street, South. June 6, 1900, he married Miss Josephine 
Elizabeth Peterson, who was born in Kil, Vermland, Sweden, October 28, 
1873. Five children have been bom to them, one of whom, Herman, 
died in infancy. Those living are : Helen Sophie, born May 19, 1901 ; 
Nore Per Fredrik, October 7, 1903 ; Robert Wallace, June 3, 1905 ; and 
Agnes Fredrique, February 27, 1907. Fraternally Mr. Erman is iden- 
tified with the Modern Woodmen, the Royal League, and the Modem 
Samaritans. 

Joseph Gustave Wiluams, manager of the Church Paper Union 
and The Messenger, the latter being the organ of the Swedish Mission, 
Swedish Free Mission and Congregational churches, is one of the ablest 
and most progressive of the younger Swedish-Americans of Minneapolis. 
He was born November 26, 1875, in Kumla, Nerike, Sweden, and there 
was also bom his father, Gustave Larsson, in 1842. His father, who was 
a shoe manufacturer, and now engaged in the retail shoe business, in 
1877 moved from Kumla to Gothenburg, where he is engaged in the 
shoe trade industry. The mother, who is dead, was formerly Miss Jose- 
phine Blixt, also a native of Kumla, and became the mother of five of the 
following children: Alma Josefina, bom in 1869 and married; Emma 
Charlotta, bom in 1871 and residing in Gothenburg, although she has 
paid two rather extended visits to the United States; Ellen Sofia, bom 
in 1873, who also lives in that city; Joseph Gustave, of this sketch; Emil 
Oscar Landin, born in 1877, and now a traveling salesman for one of the 
largest shoe houses in Orebro, Sweden ; Maria Elizabeth, who was bom 
in 1880 and married M. Strand, a Gothenburg furrier; David Emanuel 
Landin, born in 1882, a university graduate and since 1908 teacher in a 
missionary college in China; and Annie Louisa, the youngest, who was 
born in 1885. The father of this family was twice married, the last 
three children being the issue by his second union. 

After passing through the public school at Gothenburg and attend- 
ing the local high school for two terms, Joseph G. commenced to leam 
the printer's trade on the Aftonbladet of that city, completing his appren- 
ticeship on two other papers. In 1882 he emigrated to the United States, 
residing successively at Worcester and Boston, Massachusetts. In the 
latter city he was identified with the Argus for a year, when he was 
offered a superior position with Scandinavi, of Worcester. But he soon 
embarked in business for himself with three partners, Carl and Olof 
Person and Carl Swenson, establishing the Swedish weekly newspaper, 
Nya O St ems Veckoblad, In 1887 Mr. Williams disposed of his interest 
and retumed to Sweden, but after remaining in the old country for a 
year, again sought his adopted land. Six months in the United States 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 575 

followed, when he again visited Sweden for a year, and upon his return 
to the United States resided in Denver for a year. 

Mr. Williams became a citizen of Minnesota in 1902, when he 
settled in Duluth as head of the mechanical department of the Nord- 
vesterns Handelstidning, which position he held until 1905, when he 
moved to Minneapolis. Soon after his arrival in that city, with A. C. 
Ullberg, of Minneapolis, and Axel Olson, of St. Paul, he commenced 
the publication of the weekly newspaper called the Messenger (Bud- 
bareren), the organ of the Swedish Mission, Swedish Free Mission and 
Congregational churches, as already stated. This enterprise has proved 
a pronounced success and gives Mr. Williams an assured high standing 
among the best Swedish-Americans of the Northwest. 

Mr. Williams is not only a leading member of the Mission church, 
but a charter member of Linnea Lodge, Order of Vasa. He has been 
twice married — first to Miss Lydia Sandberg, born 1885 and daughter 
of A. Sandberg, of Duluth. Mrs. Lydia Williams died in 1904, after 
one year of married life, and in 1907 the widower married Miss Esther 
Gustafson, who was born in 1885 and is a daughter of A. E. Gustafson, 
connected with the C. A. Smith Lumber Company. 

Oscar Erik Larson, an ex-alderman of Minneapolis, was born Au- 
gust 27, i860, in Bonas, Mora Dalame, Sweden, and is a son of Olmats 
Lars Person and Smids Anna Person, farmers. He received his educa- 
tion in the public schools and at a seminary, and passed an examina- 
tion entitling him to a teacher's diploma ; he continued his studies at the 
Baptist Seminary of Orsa. He left Sweden in 1881, arriving in Minne- 
apolis October 19, and worked four months in the pineries. Upon return- 
ing to Minneapolis he took a position in a sash and door factory, and con- 
tinued in that business for fourteen years, most of which time he was a 
foreman. 

During the financial crisis in the early nineties, Mr. Larson started 
in business on his own account, in partnership with Gustaf Nordquist, 
and continued until 1900, when their plant burned and they closed out 
their business. In the fall of that year Mr. Larson was elected Demo- 
cratic alderman for the Ninth ward, and served a four-year term. Dur- 
in the year 1901 he started a hardware and undertaldng business at 
1909-11 Central avenue Northeast, which he still conducts. He was 
again nominated for alderman in 1908, but was defeated at the polls. 
During his service as alderman he served on the license and sewer com- 
mittees, and was instrumental in clearing the city of its wine-rooms and 
low resorts. He also used his eflforts towards securing an appropriation 
of thirty-five thousand dollars (out of one hundred and eighty thousand 
dollars) for a trunk sewer line in his ward. In conjunction with the 
First, Ninth and Tenth wards, he secured the Thirty-second Avenue 
Bridge over the river. His ward, which holds nearly one hundred miles 
of streets, received its due share of appropriations while he served as 



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576 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



alderman, and he was instrumental in giving them several small collateral 
sewers. He also secured three thousand dollars from the general fund 
to put the stockyard road in shape, as well as the Silver Lake road, thus 
securing for Minneapolis a large share of country business which hith- 
erto had gone to St. Paul because of the better roads in the direction of 
that city. 

Mr. Larson was formerly a member of the First Baptist church, of 
which he was treasurer, collector and Sunday School teacher, as well as 
member of the choir, but at the time of the organization of the Elim 
Swedish Baptist church in 1888, on the Northeast Side, he became one of 
the charter members. In this church he has acted as Sunday School 
Superintendent, deacon and chairman, and has also had charge of the 
choir most of the time. He and his family have resided on the Northeast 
Side for the past twenty years. Mr. Larson has a wide circle of acquaint- 
ances and friends, and has gained the respect and admiration of all who 
have dealt with him, either in business .or socially. He is honest and 
upright, and of unquestioned integrity. 

Mr. Larson married. May 11, 1887, Louise Anderson, a native of 
Waconia, known as Old Scandia, Carver county, Minnesota ; her father, 
a union soldier, died in 1906. Mr. and Mrs. Larson have tfiree daugh- 
ters, Edith Abigail, bom in 1889; Lillie Viola, in 1890, and Myrtle, in 
1892. 

Peter P. Quist, state weighmaster of Minnesota, is a native of 
Sweden, bom August 18, 1854, in Rinkaby, province of Skine, being a 
son of Peter N. and Karin (Hokanson) Quist. The father was for 
twenty-six years a member of the Swedish army, serving in a cavalry 
regiment. In 1865 he removed to America and immediately settled in 
Nicollet county, Minnesota, taking a home at Scandia Grove, in the 
town of Lake Prairie. He was an active member of the Lutheran 
church, as was also his wife, and like his son, was a steadfast supporter 
of the Republican party in political lines. They were the parents of 
eleven children. Three sons and a daughter died in infancy. Following 
is 2l brief account of the survivors: Nels, the eldest, came to America 
in 1857, being the pioneer of the family in this country, and resided for 
two years in Illinois. In 1859 he settled at Lake Prairie. He was 
accompanied by his brother Andrew, who served five years in the Civil 
war, being a member of the First Minnesota Regiment, and was wounded 
4t the battles of Gettysburg and Antietam. He now resides in Grafton,. 
North Dakota. The elder brother, Nels, died at Lake Prairie. Ole, 
the third, was the founder of a Swedish paper at St. Peter, known as 
Skordimannen, and died recently. John, the fourth, is a merchant at 
Winthrop, Minnesota. Hokan, for twenty-six years a Lutheran min- 
ister, died quite recently. The sixth is Peter P., who is mentioned at 
length below. Martin, the seventh, is a farmer and merchant, also 
postmaster, at New Sweden, Minnesota. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 577 

Peter P. Quist attended the schools of St. Peter, Minnesota, and 
the Ansgari Academy at East Union. Having decided upon a commer- 
cial career at the age of twenty years, he took employment in a hardware 
store, where he became familiar with the details of the business and also 
with the handling of farm machinery. In 1882 he established himself at 
Winthrop, Minnesota, in that line of business, being associated with his 
brother, John P. Quist and C. J. Larson, under the firm style of P. P. 
Quist & Company. After a very successful career in this line of trade, 
extending over a period of eighteen years, the senior member sold out 
his interest in the establishment to Mr. Larson. While actively engaged 
in business at Winthrop, Mr. Quist was also identified with many of 
the leading interests of the town and was highly respected and esteemed 
as a useful and public spirited citizen. He became a director of the 
State Bank of Winthrop and the Scandinavian Relief Association of Red 
Wing. In 1883 he was appointed postmaster of Winthrop by President 
Garfield, and served in this capacity for ten years. He was one of the 
incorporators of the Sibley County Telephone Company, of which he 
was many ytars treasurer, and was also president of the Winthrop Board 
of Trade. He also served on the Board of Education of the village and 
was six years its treasurer. While always active in sustaining the prin- 
ciples of the Republican party, he was naturally chosen by his fellow 
citizens to fill various official stations. He served as a member of the 
State Central Committee. He is among the incorporators of the Swedish 
Lutheran church of Winthrop, of which he was many years treasurer. 
He is now a member of the Lutheran Augustana church of Minneapolis, 
and of the Odin Club. On March 15, 1901, he was appointed state 
weighmaster, and has ever since filled the duties of that position with 
credit to himself and satisfaction to the state. Immediately after his 
appointment he sold his home in Winthrop, and has since been a resident 
of Minneapolis. He was married February 5, 1881, to Emma Matilda 
Falk, who was born March 8, 1858, in Red Wing, and was for some 
years a teacher there. She is a member of the State Territorial Asso- 
ciation, having been born in Minnesota before the admission of the state. 
The family includes six children, namely: Ida Amanda; Hugo Edgar, 
a resident of Marshfield, Oregon; Chester Alvin, Ferdinand Mauritz, 
Walter Peter and Lydia Matilda. 

Adolph Fredrik Grant, grocer at 2020 Washington avenue, South, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, was bom in Elga parish, near Ariska, May 23, 
1859, one of the eight children of Johannes Anderson and his wife 
Martha (nee Erickson). Of their family only four are now living, 
namely: Christine, wife of a Swedish soldier by the name of Ruden; 
Johan, a stonecutter in Sweden; Emma, wife of Carl Olson, foreman in 
a paper mill ; and Adolph Fredrik. 

After receiving the usual public schooling and being confirmed in 

87 



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578 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



the Lutheran church, Adolph F. went to Norrland, where he was em- 
ployed in sawmills and on railroad construction work until 1880. That 
year he came to America. His first summer in this country he worked 
on a railroad with a surface gang at North Branch, Minnesota. After- 
ward he went to St. Paul, from there to Grand Forks, North Dakota, 
and later to Winnipeg, Canada, in both Dakota and Canada working 
on railroads. Returning to North Branch, he spent three winters there, 
variously employed, and during the summers worked in the timber 
regions. Next he todc a contract for the Great Western Railroad, 
covering four months' time. In 1885, in partnership with his brother 
Charles, Mr. Grant opened a grocery store at Two-and-a-half street and 
Twentieth avenue. Subsequently they moved to Twentieth and Wash- 
ington avenues, and in 1893 ^^ Twenty-first and Washington, where the 
business was conducted for sixteen years. In the meantime, in 1902, 
Charles Grant died. April 20, 1909, the store was moved across the 
street to its present location, 2020 Washington avenue, South, near 
the embankment and bridge over the Mississippi river. 

Mr. Grant's residence is at 604 Ontario avenue, Southeast. In 
1889 he married Miss Jennie (Johanna) Monson, who was bom in 
Loushult parish, SkSne, October 31, 1863, and they have four children: 
Clarence Edward, born August 9, 1892; Mabel Elvira, November 12, 
1895; Agnes Marie, January 5, 1897; and Albert Fredrik, May 2, 1904. 
The children all attend the Swedish Augustan Lutheran church. Mr. 
Grant is a member of the Swedish Brothers and the Modern Woodmen 
of America. 

Herman Mauritz von Krusenstjerna was born December 3, 
1856, in Korkeslatt, Asaka parish, Skaraborgs Lan, Sweden, and is a son 
of Herman Victor and Syster Johanna Karolina (Linroth) von Kru- 
senstjerna. His father, bom in 1824, died December 19, 1892, and his 
mother died in 1859. Herman Victor von Krusenstjerna was major of 
Skaraborgs royal regiment, and a Knight of the "Svardsorden" ; he was 
married in 1853, ^md had three children, namely: Carl Herman, born 
December 11, 1854, a postmaster in Gamleby, Smaland, Sweden; Her- 
man Mauritz; and Ina Hermina, born April 29, 1859, married Edward 
Malm, city physician in Mofala, Sweden. 

Herman M. von Krusenstjerna received private instruction at home 
until ten years of age, and then entered college at Jonkoping, passing 
through five grades there. Afterward he spent some time farming and 
as bookkeeper on the estate of Lieutenant Flach. In 1876-7 he studied 
at Alnarp Agricultural College, from which he was graduated. He then 
took a position as general manager on the Svanas Estate, in Smiland, 
and remained here until the spring of 1883, when he married. He then 
rented a farm owned by Svanas, which he cultivated five years, and the 
spring of 1887 emigrated with his family to America, coming direct to 
Minneapolis. The first work he secured here was in the employ of 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 579 



Lakewood Cemetery Association, where he spent his first siunmer, and 
occupied himself with various work until October i, 1888, at which time 
he secured a position in the machinery shops of Minneapolis & St. 
Louis Railway Company, where he is still employed. He is a good 
workman and stands well with his fellows. 

Mr. von Krusenstjerna is a member of a very old family, coming 
originally from Saxony to Sweden, one of whom was knighted in 1649 
by King Charles Tenth of Sweden, and in 1650 was introduced in the 
Swedish "Riddarhusel" (House of Knights). Mr. von Krusenstjerna 
is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America. In 1900 he pur- 
chased a very comfortable and convenient home at 263 Bryant avenue, 
North, where he now resides, and he has since added the adjoining 
property. 

In 1878 Mr. von Krusenstjerna married, in Svanas, Kronabergslan, 
Kristina Jonason, bom in 1858, daughter of Jonas Person, a farmer in 
Knutskog, Asa parish, Kronabergslan. They had children as follows: 
Karin Hermina, born October 28, 1879; Ernest Mauritz, born October 9, 
1883; Elin Christina, born April 17, 1885, died June 8, 1887; Folke 
Oscar George, bom August 26, 1887; Gustaf Edward, born April 13, 
1890; and Syster Ebba Christina, born October 24, 1892, died October 
15, 1896. Karin Hermina married Olof Ericson, a machinist in Min- 
neapolis, with Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Ste Marie Railway Com- 
pany, and they have three children. Ernest Mauritz is a foreman with 
the St. Paul Gas Company; he married Sophia Rathman, and they have 
two daughters. Folke is with the traffic department of the Minneapolis 
& St. Louis Railway Company, and married Helen Augusta O'Dell. 
Gustaf Edward is a dealer in coal and conducts a transfer business in 
Minneapolis. 

Alvin Ferdinand Anderson, one of the rising young attorneys of 
Minneapolis, was bom March 30, 1881, at Star Prairie, Wisconsin, a 
son of Andrew and Betsey (Wilen) Anderson, the former a native of 
Bohuslan and the latter of Varmland, Sweden. The father was for many 
years a sailor, chiefly traveling between the United States and Sweden 
and also making some voyages in the Mediterranean Sea. About 1868 
he removed to the United States, and after residing about one year in 
Illinois settled at Star Prairie, Wisconsin, where he is engaged in farm- 
ing. He is a member of the Mission church and a stanch supporter of 
the Republican party. His family includes three sons and three daugh- 
ters: Charles L. and Nellie, twins, are residing respectively in Minne- 
apolis and New Richmond, Wisconsin, the latter being the wife of Rev. 
N. O. Olson. The subject of this sketch is the third. Oscar H., the fourth, 
is a graduate of the medical department of the University of Minnesota, 
in the class of 1909. Mabel, the fifth, is a teacher, and the youngest, 
Ruth, is also a teacher. 

Alvin F. Anderson was educated in the district schools of his native 



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S8o SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



place and in the New Richmond high school, from which he was grad- 
uated in 1901. He then entered the law school of the University of 
Minnesota, from which he graduated in 1905, and was immediately 
admitted to the bar at Minneapolis, where he has since been engaged in 
the general practice of law with good success. He is associated with a 
lawyer of standing and has his office in the New York Life BuildiYig, 
and is rapidly taking rank among the leading attorneys of the Flour 
City. He is a member of South Side Commercial Qub, of Minneapolis, 
and of the Order of Vasa. 

On August 12, 1909, Mr. Anderson was married to Miss Lydia 
Hedback, daughter of R. W. Hedback, a retired farmer of New Rich- 
mond, Wisconsin. 

Andrew S. Sandberg was bom in Wirestad, Smiland, Sweden, 
November 10, i860, and is the son of Sven Person and Kerstin Svenson. 
To them were born two sons and five daughters, of whom three are 
living, Andrew and his two sisters. One sister, Emma, married Fred 
Jorgensori, of Escanaba, Michigan, a Norwegian, and they now reside 
in Norway; the other, Elin, married August Anderson, a farmer at 
Scheffer, Michigan. 

Mr. Sandberg came to the United States in 1882, landing at New 
York; he proceeded to Ishpeming, where his maternal uncle, Hikan 
Svenson, was an early settler. After working in the mines one year, he 
removed to Escanaba, where he spent three years on the coal and iron 
docks. He started in the hotel and restaurant business in Escanaba in 
1886, and carried it on for ten years. During this time he served two 
terms as city supervisor of the Third ward. In 1896 Mr. Sandberg came 
to Minneapolis, where he has taken up a permanent residence, and 
embarked in the cafe business. For the past few years he has also been 
associated with Oscar H. Carlson in the firm of Carlson & Sandberg, 
florists. He also represents the "Company" in the firm of C. Bergquist 
& Company, jewelers and watchmakers. He has been very successful 
in all his business enterprises, and is looked upon as one of the representa- 
tive business men of Minneapolis. He is a member of the Druids, Sons 
of Sweden in America, and the Knights of Odin, a benefit society 
organized in 1908. 

Mr. Sandberg married, January 30, 1885, Carolina Nelson Back- 
lund, born in Vestra Emtervik, Vermland, Sweden, in 1854, and came 
to Escanaba, Michigan, from Sweden, in 1883. They have become the 
parents of two children, namely: Wilhelmina (Minnie), bom at Esca- 
naba, April 7, 1886, graduate of high school and business coUegfe, and 
Carl Albin, born October 20, 1892, a high school graduate. The family 
attend the Swedish Evangelical Lutheran church, of which E. O. Stone 
IS pastor. They reside at 2227 Bloomington avenue. Mr. Sandbei^ 
visited his old home in 1891, with his family, and at this time made an 
extensive tour through Sweden. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 583 



Nils Nilson, well known in Minneapolis as a steamship ticket and 
land agent, was born in Broby, Kroppa parish, Vermland, Sweden, Octo- 
ber 19, 1855, and is the son of a farmer. After attending the public 
schools of his native parish until the time of his confirmation in the 
Lutheran church, he worked on his father's farm and later on his uncle's 
farm, until seventeen years of age ; he was then apprenticed to the trade 
of stone cutter, which he worked at nine years, becoming very skilled 
in this field of labor. At the age of twenty-six he embarked for 
America, landing in New York April 19, 1881. Continuing his journey, 
he located at St. Paul, where for a few years he worked at his trade. 
While thus occupied he made a number of friends and acquaintances 
and commenced helping them buy tickets to send to their relatives in 
Sweden; this enterprise finally attained such proportions that in 1884 
he was oflFered a position in the ticket and land office of a firm at whose 
head was the well-known Swedish consul in New York, A. E. Johnson. 
He remained in this position until 1897, at which time he was appointed 
general agent for the Northwest, of the Dominion Line, Montreal & 
Boston service. In 1905 he received the appointment of general north- 
western agent for the Anchor Line, New York, Glasgow service, which 
he now holds. In this capacity he has induced many thousands of 
persons to travel on the line represented by him. 

Besides the enormous transactions he carries on in the line of 
selling tickets, Mr. Nilson has large holdings of land; he buys large 
tracts of Minnesota lands or procures an option on them, and subse- 
quently divides them into small farms, many of them settled by his 
countrymen, and in this way he contributes a large share to the progress 
and development of the state. 

Although Mr. Nilson is a patriotic citizen of his adopted country, 
he retains a warm affection for his native land, and as a representative 
of the Swedish Tourist Association he has made known to many Ameri- 
cans the beauty and charm of Sweden, and its desirability to tourists. 
In December, 1906, the directors of the Royal Swedish State Railroads 
appointed Mr. Nilson their representative, giving him unlimited power 
to sell coupons for travel on all Swedish railroads, also on most of the 
steamships that touch the cities on the Swedish coast. His business 
interests are thus many and varied, and require considerable care and 
attention, as well as the mastery of many details, and in Mr. Nilson is 
reposed the utmost confidence of a large niunber of persons and 
companies. 

Mr. Nilson married, June 22, 1887, Minnie. Noren, of Quistbro, 
Orebro Lan, Sweden, born May 24, i860. They have no children. 

Edward Swanson, of Minneapolis, was bom in Ryssby parish, Kal- 
mar, Sweden, June 29, i860, and is the son of Sven Lorens and Emma 
Sophia (Peterson) Svenson, both living in Sweden. They were the 
parents of twelve children, of whom four now reside in Minneapolis, 



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584 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



namely: Edward; Charles E., a farmer; John S. is an engineer in the 
Bank of Commerce Building; and Hulda, married to Elmer Anderson, 
a fireman. 

Edward Swanson attended the public schools of his native parish 
and then learned the trade of stationary engineer. He emigrated to the 
United States in 1880, and after spending one year in Pennsylvania 
removed to Minneapolis, where he obtained a position as engineer on a 
steamer on Lake Minnetonka, where he remained five years, after which 
he spent eleven years in the employ of the city. For the next four 
years he held positions as engineer in various shops and mills, and 
January i, 1900, took his present position as manager of the Bristol- 
Eldorado-Rock Island apartments. Mr. Swanson is enterprising and 
progressive in business methods, and gives his diligent attention to the 
details of his post. He is a member of the Order of Vasa, Lodge 
Runeberg, of which he is also treasurer and presiding officer, and has 
also been affiliated with Independent Order of Foresters, Modem Wood- 
men of America and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He and 
his family attend the Portland Avenue Church of Christ. Besides con- 
siderable city property, Mr. Swanson owns a handsome summer resi- 
dence at Medicine Lake, nine miles out of the city, where for the past 
twelve years the family has spent the summer months, residing the 
remainder of the year in the Bristol apartments. 

Mr. Swanson returned to Sweden in 1885 for his sweetheart, and 
upon their arrival in the United States they were married; she is Anna, 
daughter of Nils Johan Wiren, of Aby, Sweden. They are the parents 
of four children, namely: Albert Lorenz, born June 25, 1889; Mabel 
Anna Marie, bom November 29, 1894 ; Edna Violet, born April 7, 1896 ; 
and Edith Mildred, born August 20, 1899. Albert L. is associated with 
the North American Life Insurance Company at Minneapolis, and the 
daughters are attending school. 

John O. Hoglund. — The name of John O. Hoglund is a familiar 
one in the business circles of Minneapolis, and he has been identified 
with his present line of work throughout nearly his entire business career. 
Born in Sweden, near Melrud, March 25, 1858, he is a son of Olef Hog- 
lund, a life-long farmer. After a public school education in his native 
land John O., the son, leamed and followed the stonecutter's trade until 
coming to the United States in 1880. Locating first at St. Paul, he was 
employed at railroad work there for a time, and then leaming the stone- 
mason's trade was employed along that line during the following four 
years. At the close of that period Mr. Hoglund entered upon his suc- 
cessful career as a contractor and builder, with office at 406 Boston 
Block, Minneapolis, and in partnership with August Bergman, but after 
three years that partnership was dissolved and in 1901 Mr. Hoglund 
became associated in business with his brothers, C. O. and Isaac Hog- 
lund, and in 1905 another brother, M. O., was admitted to a partnership, 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 585 



and they formed one of the largest contracting corporations in Minne- 
apolis. Their business during the past few years grew to enormous 
proportions, extending not only over the state of Minnesota, but also 
into Wisconsin, North and South Dakota and as far west as the Mon- 
tana line. After seven years that partnership was dissolved, in 1909, 
and John O. Hoglund commenced contracting by himself. As contractor 
and builder John O. Hoglund occupies an enviable position and has 
achieved the success which is the logical result of enterprise and straight- 
forward methods. 

Mr. Hoglund married, in July, 1885, Miss Jensina Anderson, of 
Bay City, Wisconsin, and they have had nine children, but two died in 
infancy and those living are: Julia C, who married C. O. Sonsteby, 
Jr.; Oscar S., Florence V., Martin, Ruth, Rudolph and Joseph. Mr. 
Hoglund is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church. 

August Cedarstrand^ a prominent contractor and manufacturer of 
Minneapolis, was bom at Kjafsjo, SmSland, Sweden, September 29, 
i860, and is the son of Jonas and Inga (Isakson) Johanson, natives of 
Sweden. Jonas Johanson was a carpenter and builder. 

The son August attended the public schools of his native parish 
and at the age of thirteen years moved with his parents to Jonkoping, 
where he began work for his brother, owning one of the largest furni- 
ture factories in Sweden; he now has a large sash and door factory, 
exporting goods to England and other countries. Here Mr. Cedar- 
strand remained until eighteen years of age, and then removed to Stock- 
holm, where he became employed as cabinetmaker by Hjalmer Ohman, 
a prominent furniture manufacturer, with whom he remained two years. 
Mr. Cedarstrand then emigrated to the United States, reaching Minne- 
apolis in 1880, and there entered the employ of Wheaton, Reynolds & 
Company, then conducting the largest sash and door factory in the city. 
The character of the work he was able to do is shown by the fact that 
his salary was doubled in six months* time, and he remained with the 
firm until 1893, serving several years as superintendent. In that year 
Mr. Cedarstrand began business on his own account as contractor and 
manufacturer of inside finishing and bank and office furniture. The first 
place of business was 516 Central avenue, in a small one-story building, 
and in 1901 the factory was built at Central and Third avenues. North- 
east, still occupied by the concern. In 1902 Mr. Cedarstrand took into 
partnership his brother, Henning A. Turmstrand, who had been for 
several years in charge of a similar factory at Boston, Massachusetts, 
and they have met with pleasing success. The factory covers about ten 
thousand square feet, two stories high, and is equipped with a complete 
outfit of modern machinery; the concern employs about one hundred 
men, mostly Scandinavians. Besides fine hardwood finish for interior 
work, they manufacture a line of art furniture and store fixtures and 
the business amounts to about $200,000 a year. The members of the 



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S86 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



firm are enterprising and aggressive business men, and have achieved 
success through earnest effort. Mr. Cedarstrand and his fanwly attend 
St. John's EngHsh Lutheran church. They have an elegant home at 
Diamond Lake, containing five acres of land, beautifully wooded with 
oak trees, and having a lake frontage of a handsome stretch of ground. 
Mr. Cedarstrand married, in 1^8, Ida G. Brooberg, of Center City, 
Minnesota, and they became the parents of seven children, five of whcnn 
are living, namely: Stella S., born February I, 1889; Cora A. C, bom 
November 7, 1891 ; Walter M., bom Febmary 17, 1893; Grace M., bom 
March 23, 1899; and Stanley S., bom Febmary 16, 1901. 

A. Hen KING Frei«rikson, of the Northwestem Packing Company, 
1017 Washington avenue South, Minneapolis, was bora in the city of 
Jonkoping, Sweden, May 24, 1881. His parents, Peter and Hulda (nee 
Lind) Fredrikson (as the name is spelled in Sweden), are deceased. 
They had four children: Elin Frederikson, a resident of Minneapolis; 
Elsa, wife of Julius Ebbeson, organist in the church of Grenna, Sweden ; 
Gehard Frederikson, of Minneapolis, and A. Henning, the subject of this 
sketch. 

The father was a butcher by trade, and A. Henning at an early 
age served an apprenticeship under him. He attended public school at 
Grenna, and in due time was confirmed in the Lutheran church in that 
city. He remained with his father until his eighteenth year, when he 
became foreman in the abattoir at Mjolby. Returning to Grenna in 
1904, he bought his father's business, and conducted the same for one 
year, at the expiration of which time his father bought it back. A. Hen- 
ning then took a positon as cattle buyer for the Gothenborg Abattoir Co., 
remaining with that concem for two and a half years. Then he decided 
to try his fortune in this country. He sailed for America on July 11, 
1907, and on the 26th of the same month arrived in Minneapolis, which 
has since been his home, and where he has met with justly deserved 
prosperity. Immediately after his arrival here he entered the employ of 
E. Johnson & Co., on Cedar avenue, and worked for them there until 
January 20, 1908, when he was made manager of their store at 1017 
Washington avenue South. This business is conducted under the 
name of the Northwestem Packing Co. In January, 1909, Mr. Freder- 
ikson purchased an interest in the establishment, and since that time 
has had entire charge of the business. 

May 27, 1905, Mr. Frederikson married Miss Alice Hammar, who 
was bom April 11, 1885, daughter of Carl Gustaf Hammar and his wife, 
Ada Mathilda Jacobson. Her mother died in Gothenborg, Sweden, April 
10, 1887; her father is still living. The latter is a saddler by trade, and 
has a non-commissioned officer's rank in the Gota Artillery Regiment. 
Mr. and Mrs. Frederikson have one daughter: Lisa Margaret, bom 
September 23, 1906. 

Fraternally, Mr. Frederikson is identified with the Swedish Brothers, 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 589 



and is secretary of the org:anization in Minneapolis. He is also a mem- 
ber of the M. W. of A. 

Erland Lind, attomey-at-Iaw at Minneapolis, was bom in Trafvad 
parish, Vestergotland, May 16, 1875, and is the son of Johannes and 
Maja Stina Persson ; they were the parents of several chilcken, of whom 
three sons are living, all residents of Minnesota. Erland Lind came to 
Minnesota in 1888 to join his two elder brothers, who had established 
themselves there. He had attended the public schools of his native 
parish, and upon his arrival in Minnesota he entered Gustavus Adolphus 
College at St. Peter, in 1889, and graduated in 1896, with degree A. B. 
The following year he entered the law department of the University of 
Minnesota, graduating in 1900, and in that year was admitted to the 
Minnesota bar. He took a post-graduate course at the university, and 
in 1901 received the degree LL. M. Since that time he has been in 
successful practice of his profession in Minneapolis, where he has a 
large clientele. 

Mr. Lind is secretary of the Cuban Land & Colonization Company, 
of which his brother. Dr. A. Lind, is treasurer, and the president is E. G. 
Dahl, a clothier situated at Washington and Twentieth avenues, North. 
The land in which this company is interested is at Bayate and Palmarito, 
Oriente, Cuba. Mr. Lind is also secretary of the Palmarito De Cauto 
Sugar Company. He is a member of the North Star Benefit Associ- 
ation. Having always been deeply interested in church work, he is an 
active member of the Ebenezer Lutheran Augustana church, of whose 
English Sunday school he has been superintendent. He has been elected 
delegate to the Minnesota Conference for the past six years and for 
three years has been delegate to the Augustana Synod. In 1908 he was 
elected a member of the Synodical Council. Mr. Lind's brother, August, 
is a farmer at Winthrop, Minnesota. Mr. Lind married, June i, 1909, 
Miss Medora Anderson, daughter of C. J. Anderson, a farmer of Maple 
Plain, Minnesota. Mrs. Lind is a graduate of Gustavus Adolphus Col- 
lege at St. Peter, and has been a teacher of elocution at Gustavus 
Adolphus College and at Minnesota College. In 1907 Mr. Lind spent 
four months in Europe, visiting his parents, who still reside in Sweden, 
and also visiting England, Norway, Denmark, Germany, Austria, Italy, 
Switzerland, France and Belgium. He is a man of unusual enterprise 
and ability, and takes a keen interest in public affairs and interests. 

Andrew Theodore Rydell, formerly a contractor and builder of 
Minneapolis, and president of the North Side Lumber, Sash & Door 
Company, was bom at Bjennesby, Norra Sandsjo parish, near Jonkoping, 
Sweden, March 18, 1866, and is the son of a Swedish farmer. His 
parents, Anders and Helena (Sandberg) Rydell, both of whom are 
deceased, had seven children, of whom one died young and five are 
living in the United States, and one daughter is living in Sweden. 



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590 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Andrew T. Rydell received his education in the public schools of 
his native country until his confirmation in church, after which he was 
instructed by a private teacher. He came to the United States in 1881, 
in company with his oldest sister, arriving in Minneapolis May 26th of 
that year. He first learned the trade of bricklayer and mason, and then, 
feeling his education inadequate to fit him for business life, for about 
two years attended Gustavus Adolphus College at St. Peter, Minnesota, 
taking a general course. For a period of about two years he was engaged 
in real estate business, and in 1888 began work at his trade, and four 
years later started contracting, in partnership with B. L. Carlson. In 
1903 they established the North Side Lumber, Sash & Door Company, 
of which Mr. Rydell is president and treasurer, B. L. Carlson vice-presi- 
dent, and M. Quarnstrom secretary. Mr. Rydell owns a controlling 
interest in the enterprise, which has proved very successful, now owning 
about sixty-six thousand dollars' worth of property. They own the 
property where the business is located, and employ about ninety-five 
men, mostly Scandinavians. 

Mr. Rydell is a public-spirited citizen and an upright and straight- 
forward business man. He is a member of the Modern Woodmen of 
America. He married, in 1887, Amanda Nelson, of Minneapolis, and 
they have had four children, of whom the only daughter died at the 
age of four years. Their sons are: Edmund Theodore Israel, bom 
August 20, 1888, is a high school graduate, has studied one year at the 
University of Minnesota and taken a one-year course at Minnesota 
College, in the business department; Carl Emil Harold, born June 10, 
1896, and Earl Milton Andre, bom Febmary 3, 1898, are both attending 
the public school. The family reside at 21 14 Dupont avenue, North, 
and are attendants and members of the Swedish Lutheran Bethlehem 
church. 

Axel Edlund, the proprietor of one of the best equipped meat 
markets in the southem section of Minneapolis, was bora at Mellerud, 
Sweden, a son of Adolph L. and Beata Edlund. The father, who was a 
photographer, died when his son Axel was only about nine years of age, 
but the mother is yet living, her home being in Sweden. They became 
the parents of six children, but only three are now living — Axel, Henry 
and Anna, the daughter being the wife of Richard Nystrom. 

When but a youth Axel Edlund was apprenticed to learn the car- 
penter's trade, and after serving his time and mastering the details of 
the trade he decided to seek a home in the United States. Arriving in 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, in 1891, he found employment with the masons, 
who were engaged in the construction of the clubhouse at First avenue 
and Sixth street, and during the first two winters of his residence here 
he attended night school with a view of preparing himself to enter 
business on his own account. But securing employment in the railroad 
shops of this city as a helper in the blacksmith department, he was 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 591 



thus employed for about seven years, in that time thoroughly mastering 
the details of blacksmithing and becoming, a proficient workman at the 
anvil. He then opened a meat market at 2705 East Twenty-fifth street, 
and in this venture his efforts have been rewarded with success and he 
is now the proprietor of a splendidly equipped market and enjoys a 
lar^e trade, a reward for his honorable and straightforward methods of 
business dealing. He is a member of Flour City Lodge 118, I. O. O. F., 
and of the Royal League, both of Minneapolis. Also is a member of 
South Side Commercial Club. 

Mr. Edlund married, October 11, 1904, Miss May Johnson, a 
daughter of Alonzo M. Johnson, and they have two children, Raymond C. 
and Bemice, born respectively on the 6th of June, 1905, and on the 
24th of July, 1907. 

Joseph Johnson, assistant engineer in the county building and 
courthouse, Minneapolis, Minnesota, is a native of Norrkoping, Sweden, 
born December 10, 1867, son of Fredrik and Christina Johnson. His 
father is still living ; his mother died in 1903. Their family consists of a 
daughter and three sons, namely: Johanna Christina, who is married 
and a resident of Stockholm, Sweden ; Axel, a mechanic of Minneapolis ; 
Joseph; and Herman, a miner in Alaska. 

Joseph Johnson received his early education in the public schools 
of his native land, and was there confirmed in the Lutheran church. At 
the age of twelve years he entered upon an apprenticeship to the trade 
of machinist and engineer, under his father's instructions, his father 
being a practical engineer; and when he was fifteen he left Sweden to 
come to America. At Minneapolis he joined his brother Axel, who had 
previously settled here. His first six months in this city, Joseph spent 
at work in a blacksmith shop. Then, wishing to see something more of 
the new country in which he had cast his lot, he went west to Portland, 
Oregon, "beating his way," and upon his arrival there went to work in 
a machine shop. He was employed there one year and nine months, 
after which he returned to Minneapolis, and this city has since been 
his home. At first he worked in machine shops and later on railroads, 
fourteen years altogether, eight years of that time in the capacity of air 
brake inspector for the Northern Pacific Railroad. Upon his resignation 
from the service of that company he received the following testimonial, 
signed by Mr. M. W. Smades, foreman of the car department: "Mr. 
Johnson is an all-around mechanical man and his services were always 
satisfactory; he left service on his own account, and I can cheerfully 
recommend him to the kind consideration of anyone in search of a good 
man." 

Mr. Johnson's next employment was at the pumping station, where 
he remained four years. In 1906 he was appointed to his present 
position in the courthouse. 

Of Mr. Johnson it may be further said that he is more than an 



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592 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



all-around mechanic; he is also an inventor and patentee. In 1903 he 
was awarded letters patent on an invention which, when introduced, 
will benefit humanity, especially that part of it which lives in the cities 
where the water supply is not pure, as is the case in Minneapolis. This 
invention consists of a purifier of both water and other liquids, the 
purifying being done by oxygen and an electrical current. It has been 
tested and found to kill as many as 96 per cent of all the bacteria in 
the water, and it also clears the water about 50 per cent, which is an 
excellent result. In the fall of 1908 a plant was installed at the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota. The cost of electric current is 54 cents per 
1,000,000 gallons of water, and in view of the low cost it is expected 
that the invention will soon come into general use. 

In 1889, Mr. Johnson married Miss Mary Fagel Bird, who was 
bom in Tjedum parish, May 27, 1866. Her parents were farmers, and 
are both deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have two children: Gottfrid 
Wilhelm Johnson, bom June 5, 1891, is assistant boddceeper in a Min- 
neapolis wholesale house, and Esther Maria, bom November 10, 1893. 
The family residence is 2510 Lyndale avenue. North. Mr. Johnson is 
a seventh degree Mason, and a member of the Independent Order of 
Svithiod, Knights of Odin, Swedish Brothers, and Degree of Honor. 

Seth Lundquist, an attomey of Minneapolis, is a native of Swe- 
den, bom March 12, 1882, at Orebro, Nerike. His grandfather, Carl 
Erlandsen, was a farmer and native of Smiland, Sweden, and owned 
a farm, where was born his son Carl. The latter married Eva Charlotte 
Anderson, also a native o£ Sweden, and in 1884 the family immigrated 
to Minneapolis. The father is a carpenter and builder and resides now 
in that city. He and his wife are members of the Swedish Tabemacle, 
Church of the Covenant. They have three sons living, viz. : Seth, Enoch 
and John. The second is a bookkeeper employed by the Minneapolis 
Journal, 

Seth Lundquist was educated in Minneapolis, graduating from the 
high school in 1901. He subsequently took up special work in English in 
the University of Minnesota and also pursued a course in the law depart- 
ment of that institution, graduating in 1906. He was at once admitted 
to the bar, and since the first of August of that year has been engaged 
in the general practice of law. He plans to make a specialty of federal 
work. Mr. Lundquist has been and is an eamest student, and has ever 
striven to keep abreast of the times and to qualify himself for his work, 
and his friends predict for him a brilliant career at the bar. He has 
not been an active politician, but adheres to the Democratic party and 
Its principles. 

Henry Westin. — Noteworthy among the representative Swedes of 
Minneapolis is Henry Westin, one of the leading merchant tailors of the 
city, who, as senior member of the firm of Westin & Son, is carrying on 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS . OF MINNESOTA 595 



an extensive and remunerative business. A son of Christman Westin, 
of Cambridge, Minnesota, he was born, October 17, 1848, in Borgsjo 
parish, Medelpad, Sweden, and was there reared and educated. 

Christman Westin, a shoemaker by trade, emigrated with his family 
to Minnesota, locating in Cambridge, where he still resides, a man of 
venerable years, honored and respected as a man and a citizen. To him 
and his wife, whose maiden name was Martha Carlson, seven children 
were born, namely: Henry, the subject of this brief sketch; Katarina^ 
wife of C. E. Erickson, a farmer in Cambridge, Minnesota; Christina, 
wife of John Vasenius, who is engaged in farming at Braham, Minne- 
sota; Annie, wife of John Teeman, of Harris, Minnesota, a farmer; 
Martha, widow of the late John Bergstrom, a Cambridge farmer ; Ellen, 
wife of John Bjork, a well-known contractor and builder of Minne- 
apolis ; and Charles E., of Cambridge, a Baptist missionary. 

Leaving school at the age of thirteen years, Henry Westin was 
apprenticed to learn the tailoring trade, but soon gave it up, and instead 
learned the trade of a brewer at Johannesberg. Before becoming a, 
master brewer, however, he was seized with the American fever, which 
at times takes a violent form in Sweden, and in 1868 emigrated to Min- 
nesota, locating first at Red Wing, where he was employed on a fann 
during the harvest season. The work proving too strenuous, Mr. Westin 
went to Hastings, Minnesota, where he worked with a threshing gang 
for six weeks, afterwards being employed for a year in the tailoring 
shop of Mr. Lamphere. Going then to Nebraska, he followed his trade 
for six weeks in Omaha, subsequently working six months in North 
Platte for a tailor by the name of Rosenbloom. Mr. Westin then bought 
out Mr. Rosenbloom, and there continued in the tailoring business until 
the fall of 1872, when he sold out, and came to Minneapolis, where he 
has since resided. Forming a partnership with George Gallagher in 
1873, ^^ continued in business with him three years, when, in 1876, he 
sold out to his partner. Mr. Westin then entered the employ of Rots- 
child & Company, merchant tailors, and the ensuing thirteen years was 
cutter and manager for that firm, filling the position ably and satisfac- 
torily. Starting in business on his own account in 1889, he has con- 
tinued it successfully until the present time, being one of ttie best known 
and most extensively patronized merchant tailors in the city. He has 
recently admitted his son, C. O. Westin, into partnership, the firm 
name being Westin & Son. 

Mr. Westin married, in 1871, Eva Swanson, who was bom at Var- 
garda, Vestergotland, Sweden. She died January 19, 1907, leaving three 
children, namely: Katie Eveline, bom June 5, 1872, is the widk)w of 
the late S. E. Linn, who died in 1902 ; Alma Josephine, bom November 
25, 1876, is the wife of F. G. Smith, a real estate dealer in Minneapolis ; 
and Carl Oscar, bom June 13, 1879, ^^w in partnership with his father, 
married Marie Eck, of Minneapolis, and they have one son, Emmet, 
bom in 1904. Mr. Westin married, second, July i, 1908, Mrs. Marie 



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596 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Brooks, who was born in Kingston, Jamaica, British West Indies. By 
her first marriage Mrs. Westin has one daughter, Genevieve Brooks, 
bom in 1902. Fraternally Mr. Westin is a Blue Lodge Mason; a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; of the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen ; and of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Jambs Nelson, a prominent real estate dealer of Minneapolis, was 
bom in Sandby parish, near Hesselholm. Sweden, March 30, 1871, and 
is the son of Nils and Bengta Akeson, who lived on a farm ; his mother 
is dead, and his father still lives in Sweden. They had eight children, 
of whom seven are living, onlv two of them having left their native 
country, namely : James and Axel. Axel Nelson was for a number of 
years engaged in a banking business, and is now deputy county auditor 
at Tacoma, Washington. 

After receiving his education in the public schools of his native 
parish and being confirmed in the church, James Nelson woriced on his 
father's farm until the year 1889, when he came to the United States 
with a relative, who resided at Stillwater, Minnesota. On his arrival 
he attended public school about two and one-half years, took a course of 
six months at Caton's Business College, and spent one year at Archibold's 
business College. He was able to do this only as the result of his own 
efforts, as he was obliged to work between the courses. He then 
attended Minneapolis Academy, with a view to studying dentistry, but 
changing his mind, removed to Chicago, where he spent two years as 
bookkeeper in the employ of Montgomery Ward & Company. Returning 
to Minneapolis, in company with his brewer, he established two grocery 
stores, one at Adams and Summer streets. Northeast, the other at 
Eighth avenue and Tenth street. South. After two years of successful 
business they sold their interests and Axel Nelson returned to his native 
country on a visit. 

Mr. Nelson's first venture in the real estate line was in company 
with C. E. Nelson (of the same name, but not related to him), and 
after three years the partnership was dissolved and James Nelson has 
since carried on the business in his own name. During the last seven 
years Mr. Nelson has been located at 555 Temple Court Building, where 
he has a thriving and profitable business, dealing in farm lands and 
other real estate, loans, etc. He is also interested in fire insurance, and 
in company with August Soderlind, under the firm name of Soderlind- 
Nelson Company, does business in the same office. Mr. Nelson also 
holds mining interests. He is a member of the Ancient Free & Ac- 
cepted Masons, Modem Samaritans and the Vasa-Orden Society. 

Mr. Nelson married. May i, 1900, Ella M. Zacherson; her parents, 
John E. and Carolina Zacherson, reside on a farm near Litchfield, Min- 
nesota. In 1906 Mr. and Mrs. Nelson made a visit to Sweden, visiting 
his parents in Skine, and also spending some time at the old home of 
Mrs. Nelson's parents in Varmland, where she has two uncles; this 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 597 



being her first sight of Sweden, she was much impressed and delighted 
with the beautiful meadows and lakes, its mystic forests and streams, 
and grew very enthusiastic over the charms of the landscape and 
surroundings. 

Peter Erickson, the well known grocer, comer Plymouth and 
Emerson avenue, Minneapolis, Minnesota, is a native of Lindesberg, 
Nerike, Sweden, born September 11, 1847, son of Erik and Katarina 
(Anderson) Erikson, and one of a family of six children, four sons and 
two daughters, he being the only one of the family to make his home in 
America. The others are married and settled in Sweden. 

Peter had the advantage of a public school education, and at the 
proper time, according to the custom, was confirmed in the Lutheran 
church. He served an apprenticeship to the carpenter's trade in Sweden, 
and was married there. Accompanied by his wife, he came to this 
country, and they settled at Red Wing, Minnesota, where he first found 
employment on a farm. Later he worked at his trade there for some six 
years, after which he moved to Minneapolis. Here, for two years longer, 
he worked at the carpenter's trade. In 1889 he opened a grocery busi- 
ness in South Minneapolis, in partnership with John Erickson and 
Charles Johnson. After two years he sold his interest in the store and 
opened a grocery, under his own name, on the South Side. This store 
he conducted for nearly ten years, selling it in 1900, and soon thereafter 
buying another, at his present location, comer of Plymouth and Emerson 
avenues. Here he subsequently erected a new store building, with living 
rooms above, and here he continues to do a prosperous business. 

In 1879 Mr. Erickson married Miss Mathilda Carlson, a native of 
the same parish in which he was born. Their union has been blessed 
in the birth of one daughter, Myrtle Maria, bom March 16, 1889. Miss 
Erickson is a member of the Pilgrim Congregational church. A quiet, 
unassuming man, attending strictly to his own business, Mr. Erickson 
goes his way through the world without "fuss" or noise, enjoying the 
success he has earned by his honest efforts. 

Nels G. Nelson, a merchant tailor of Minneapolis, was bom in 
Bladinger, Smaland, Sweden, September 27, 1855, and is the son of Nels 
and Katarina Nelson. His father, a farmer and merchant, is now eighty- 
three years of age, and resides in Wislanda, and his mother died at the 
age of eighty-seven. They were the parents of six sons, of whom four 
survive, namely : Nels G., one in Duluth, one in Calumet, Michigan, and 
one in British Columbia. 

Mr. Nelson received his education in the public schools of his native 
parish and at an early age was apprenticed to the trade of tailor in Wis- 
landa. In the sjM-ing of 1873 ^^ emigrated to America, landing at 
Duluth, where he worked two years at his trade. In 1875 he removed 
to Minneapolis, and worked five years at his trade. In the spring of 



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598 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



1881 he embarked in business on his own account and two years later 
sold his interest to G. S. Butler, with whom he remained seven years in 
the capacity of cutter. He then started again in business on his own 
account and has since that time been located at 412 Nicollet avenue. He 
is thoroughly skilled at his trade, and through hi^ integrity and business 
ability has built up a good trade. 

Mr. Nelson is a trustee of the St. John's English Lutheran church, 
where the family attend divine worship. He married Anna Johnson, 
of Carver county, in 1881. Her parents removed from Sweden when 
she was only four months old, and were the first Swedish settlers 
in Carver county. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson have three children, namely: 
Alice Hattie, bom March 8, 1883, married, in September, 1908, Allen B. 
Calhoun, a mining engineer, of Roseland, British Columbia; Arthur 
Willard, born February 9, 1885, resides with his parents, and is a clerk 
for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad Company; Ruth, bom 
November 30, 1898, attends school and studies music. The family resi- 
dence is 3100 Portland avenue. 

Otto S. Lofgren, merchant tailor, 21 and 23 South Fifth street, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, has been a resident of this city since 1883, 
when he landed here from his native land, Sweden, a youth of fifteen. 
He was bom May 7, 1869, in Skaraborgslan, Sweden, son of John and 
Kasja Lofgren. He had only a public-school education before coming 
to this country. Arrived in Minneapolis, he became an apprentice to the 
tailor's trade in the establishment of Lofgren Bros. (P. J. and Frank 
Lofgren), where he closely applied himself and mastered every detail 
of the business. He remained with Lofgren Bros, about seven years. 
In 1894 he formed a partnership with his brother, Alexander Lofgren, 
under the firm style of Lofgren & Lofgren, and they soon built up an 
extensive business. This partnership was dissolved about 1900. Mr. 
Lofgren moved to his present location, 21 and 23 South Fifth street, 
in 1907, where he has the finest equipped merchant tailoring establish- 
ment in the city, well stocked with a choice selection of goods, and 
where a high standard of work is maintained, the establishment having 
a reputation for honorable dealing. Here Mr. Lofgren furnishes em- 
ployment to from twelve to fifteen people. 

September 8, 1897, Mr. Lofgren married Miss Ellen Akenson, who 
was born and reared in Minneapolis, daughter of N. P. Akenson, of 
this city. They have had three children — Gladys J., bom July 16, 1898; 
Sanford G., April, 1900 ; and Joel, April, 1903. The youngest child died 
December 31, 1906. Both Mr. and Mrs. Lofgren are active members 
of the Swedish Mission church, he being a member of the board of 
tmstees. 

John Algot Nordin. — Noteworthy among the leading members of 
the legal profession of Minnesota is John Algot Nordin, of Minneapolis, 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 6oi 



who has a great natural aptitude for his chosen work, being industrious, 
conscientious, earnest and persistent in the advocacy of his client's cause, 
while his record gives evidence of his wide research and learning, and 
his excellent powers of reasoning winning him success as a lawyer. He 
is a fine representative of the native-bom Swedes of his community, his 
birth having occurred, September 23, 1871, in Pjetteryd parish, Sm&land, 
Sweden. 

Brought up in his native land, John A. Nordin received his elementary 
education in the public schools. Coming to Minnesota in 1889, he con- 
tinued his studies in Minneapolis, first in the public schools, and subse- 
quently with private tutors, fitting himself for college through his own 
efforts. Having determined to enter the legal profession he was grad- 
uated from the Law Department of the University of Minnesota in 
1898, and during that year was admitted to the bar. Commencing the 
practice of his profession in Minneapolis in 1899, Mr. Nordin has since 
built up a prosperous and profitable general practice, his office being 
located in the Temple Court Building. With characteristic determination 
and self-reliance he has overcome all obstacles that beset his professional 
pathway, bravely competing with those older in years and longer estab- 
lished in practice, winning marked success in his legal career. 

Mr. Nordin married, in 1902, Beda F. Nelson, a native of Minne- 
apolis, and their home is pleasantly located at No. 2220 Eleventh avenue, 
South. In 1907 Mr. and Mrs. Nordin made a trip to Europe, visiting 
more especially in Sweden. Taking a deep interest in political matters, 
Mr. Nordin has served as president of the Republican Ward Club, and is 
now president of the Monitor Republican League. In 1908 he was the 
Republican candidate for the state legislature, but failed to receive the 
nomination. He is a member of the State Bar Association and has been 
secretary and one of the trustees of the Lutheran Augustana church, of 
which he and his wife were active and influential members. He is a 
charter member of the Messiah Evangelical Lutheran church, an English 
congregation within the Augustana Synod, and was active in its organi- 
zation. He is a member of the board of trustees. Mrs. Nordin is 
treasurer of the Ladies' Aid Society of the same church. 

Oscar Edward Wadensten. — Inheriting to a marked degree the 
habits of industry, perseverance and honest endeavor characteristic of 
the Swedish people, Oscar Edward Wadensten has achieved success in 
his business career, and obtained an assured position among the respected 
and valued citizens of Minneapolis, where, as a merchant tailor, he has 
built up an extensive and remunerative patronage. A son of Sven Johan 
and Anna (Johanson) Wadensten, he was tern, March 3, 1870, in 
Halmstad, Sweden, and there received a practical common school educa- 
tion, and was afterwards confirmed in the Lutheran church. 

The son of a tailor, Mr. Wadensten was put on the bench to work 
when a youth, and under his father's tuition learned the tailor's trade. 



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6o2 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



With an inborn desire to try the hazard of new fortunes, he obtained 
the consent of his parents to leave home, and at the age of eighteen 
years emigrated to America, which he had been led to believe was the 
poor man's paradise. Coming directly to Minneapolis, Mr. Wadensten 
worked at his trade with various firms for a period of fifteen years, 
gaining wisdom and experience. In 1893, in company with Mr. Nels 
Ringdahl, he launched into business on his own account, opening a tailor- 
ing establishment in the same block in which he is now located, and 
continued until 1895, when he bought out the interests of Mr. Ringdahl, 
who moved to Litchfield, Minnesota. Mr. Wadensten has since been in 
business alone, and at his present store, at No. nil Washington avenue. 
South, has a patronage that is unexcelled in this part of the city, his 
reputation for skilful and^ satisfactory work being widely known. He 
has been financially very successful, and in addition to his city property, 
at No. 525 Twelfth avenue. South, has a pleasant summer home at Lake 
Minnetonka, and in Itasca county, Minnesota, has a farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres, which he purchased about ten years ago. 

In 1898 Mr. Wadensten married Hilda Johnson, who was bom in 
Karlstad, Sweden, and came to the United States with her father in 1888. 
Fraternally Mr. Wadensten is a member and ex-secretary of the Swedish 
Brothers Society, Gustavus II Adolphus ; a member and ex-secretary of 
Uniform Rank of the Knights of Pythias; a member of the Modem 
Woodmen of America; and a member of the United Ancient Order of 
Druids, of which he has been a trustee for the past three years. Re- 
ligiously Mr. and Mrs. Wadensten attend the Lutheran church. 

Carl Magnus Oberg, M. D., of Minneapolis, Minnesota^ was bom 
in Strengnas, Sweden, July 14, 1876, son of a well known musical director 
and for eighteen years the organist of the cathedral in that city. When 
the time came for Carl to begin his education he was sent to Stockholm, 
where, in the fall of 1884, he was joined by his parents, his father having 
resigned his positions at Strengnas. 

After young Oberg had studied a few years at the Jacob Latin 
School in Stockholm, his parents decided to emigrate to America. Ar- 
rived here, the family first settled in Boston, later moved to Rockford, 
Illinois, and finally came to Minneapolis. In this city Director Mucices 
Oberg was organist in various Swedish churches, the last positon filled 
by him being in the Augustana Synod church. His death occurred in 
1892. In this country, Carl continued his studies until his father's death, 
after which he was thrown upon his own resources and supported himself 
by work in various stores. While this interrupted his studies, he was not, 
however, to be deterred from obtaining an education. Deciding to enter 
the medical profession, he matriculated at the University of Minnesota, 
where he received the degree of M. D. in 1899. After his graduation 
he became a general practitioner, and gave four years to this work in 
Minneapolis. Then he took a post-gjaduate course in order to fit himself 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 603 



for the work of a specialist in the diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, 
pursuing his studies under the best specialists in this country. Returning 
to Minneapolis in 1904, Dr. Oberg established himself in his present ele- 
gant offices in the Globe Building, and has since limited his practice to 
diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. ^ 

In 1898 Dr. Oberg married Miss Anna Maria Svenson, and they 
have one daughter, Anna Margareta. Dr. Oberg is examining physician 
for the Society of Ben Hur, and is a member of the K. of P. and the 
F. & A. M. He is also a member of Hennepin County Medical Society, 
State Medical Society and American Society. 

GusTAF Malmquist, Minneapolis, Minnesota, was bom in Julita, 
Sodermanland, September 27, 1855, son of J. P. and Katarina Malmquist, 
both now deceased. In their family were seven children, of whom the 
only survivors are Gustaf and Peter W. Malmquist, the last named a 
resident of La Moure, North Dakota. The father was for many years 
superintendent of a large estate in Sweden. 

After having received his early education in the public school and 
being confirmed, Gustaf entered Ultuna Agricultural College, where he 
prepared himself for the profession of gardener and florist, and where 
he was finally placed in charge of the experimental station, a position 
he filled three years. He finished his course at the Royal Summer Castle 
of Hoga, near Stockholm. Then he was employed at different places, 
including Skokloster, and was connected with the seed business of Tjader 
& Son, in Stockholm, as foreman for their nurser}' for about five years. 

In 1882 Mr. Malmquist came to America and, like others of his 
countrymen, directed his course to Minnesota. On account of not being 
familiar with the English language he was handicapped, and at first he 
worked at any odd jobs that offered themselves. He worked on the rail- 
roads and in the streets. During his first winter in Minnesota he studied 
English, and in the spring of the following year he secured a position 
as gardener in St. Paul. In 1884 he was offered the place of private 
gardener and florist for Anthony Kelley, the wholesale grocer of Min- 
neapolis, and for two years remained in his employ. After this he went 
to Sharon, Pennsylvania, to take charge of a greenhouse as foreman. 
He remained there, however, only six months. In the spring of 1886, 
Mr. W. D. Washburn, of Minneapolis, sent for Mr. Malmquist to return 
to this city as his private gardener, the position and inducements offered 
being so flattering that they were accepted, and Mr. Malmquist has 
remained here ever since. 

In 1891 Mr. Malmquist married Miss Maria Louisa Erickson, who 
was bom February 27, i860, in Westmanland, Sweden. They have two 
daughters: Ellen Louisa Elizabeth, bom November 19, 1892, and Hazel 
Selma Anna Marie, May 23, 1898, at this writing both high school 
students. 

Mr. Malmquist is a member of the Swedish Brothers, in which 



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604 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



society he has held all the offices except that of president, and for the 
last four years has been treasurer. Also he is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias and the United Workmen. The family attend the Bethlehem 
Presbyterian church. They reside at 2607 Grand avenue. 

Carl Magnus Emil Carlson. — A man of keen foresight, energetic 
and progressive, with a clear head for business, C. M. E. Carlson, as he 
now writes his name, has for many years been a prominent factor in 
promoting and advancing the manufacturing interests of Minne- 
apolis and ranks well among its most desirable citizens. He is talented 
and cultured, and possesses mechanical ability of a high order, being 
an expert in the use of tools. He was bom in Jareda socken, Kalmar 
Ian, Sweden, December 25, 1859, a son of Carl Johan ahd Lovisa 
(Hultgren) Carlson, who spent their entire lives in Sweden, dying 
in Jareda, in its beautiful cemetery their bodies being laid to rest. 
Four sons and four daughters were bom to them, and of these the elder 
and the younger daughter died in childhood, and the older and the 
younger sons are living in Minneapolis, both being connected with the 
Northwestern Mantel Company. 

Educated primarily in the public schools of his native parish, C. M. 
E. Carlson was confirmed in the Jareda Lutheran church, after which 
he worked on the parental homestead until nineteen years of age, when 
he began learning the trade of a cabinet maker. On attaining his ma- 
jority, he went to Stockholm, where for ten months he was employed 
during the day in the Ligna Sash and Door Factory, while in the even- 
ings he attended the Technical Slojd School, studying drafting and de- 
signing. Going from there to Virserum, where a factory for the making 
of high grade furniture is located, Mr. Carlson remained in that city 
three years. Returning then to Stockholm, he secured a position in 
Ekman's Sash and Door Factory, spending his evenings during the first 
year at Borgarskolan, and during his second and third year's stay attend- 
ing the drafting and designing department of the Stockholm Technical 
School. He was subsequently instructor in the University Slojd School 
at Upsala, and in the early part of 1888 was awarded the first prize for 
sketch and full size details of buffet at the Copenhagen Industrial Ex- 
position. 

Emigrating to America in May, 1888, Mr. Carlson came directly 
to Minneapolis, where he has since resided. He at once secured employ- 
ment as a turner in the Minneapolis Sash and Door Factory, with which 
he was connected until it closed down, in the spring of 1891. He sub- 
sequently worked for a few months in the Bardwell-Robertson Company's 
Sash and Door Factory, resigning his position to open a small factory 
on his own account, at the corner of Nineteenth avenue North, and Sec- 
ond street. This factory be operated for a year, only, as in the mean- 
time he had been instrumental in organizing the Northwestern Mantel 
Company, of which he was both secretary and manager from its incorpo- 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 607 



ration until the spring of 1908. Mr. Carlson is now financially interested 
in mining properties, and is serving as president of the Auriferous Min- 
ing Company, of Nome, Alaska. 

In 1896 Mr. Carlson was united in marriage with Mathilda Peter- 
son, of Otisco, Minnesota, a daughter of S. P. and Margaretta Peterson. 
Of the five children that blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Carlson, 
four are living, namely: Ethel Mathilda, born July 18, 1897; Carl 
Homer, bom November 22, 1901 ; Margaret Lovisa, bom December 8, 
1903; and Chester Magnus Emanuel, bom April 25, 1907. Religiously 
Mr. Carlson and his family are members of the Evangelical Mission Tal>- 
ernacle, of which he is a trustee and an ex-secretary. He has been a 
member of the Modem Woodmen of America ; is a trustee of the Macca- 
bees; and is treasurer of the Western Creamery Company. Besides his 
business property on Sixth street, Mr. Carlson owns his residence, at No. 
1814 Eleventh avenue South, and has three other valuable pieces of 
property. Mr. Carlson has been connected with the publishing of good 
literature ever since coming to Minneapolis, and is at present connected 
with "The Weckoblad," as a member of the board of directors. 

Swan Gustaf Johnson, brick manufacturer, residing at 2715 Lyn- 
dale avenue, North, Minneapolis, Minnesota, was born in Aboda, Slatthog 
parish, Smaland, Sweden, Febmary 20, 1849, son of Johannes and Ingrid 
Maria Gustafson. His father, who was a tailor and beside kept a small 
general store, is still living, now ninety-two years of age, the date of his 
birth being December 3, 181 7. 

In his youth Swan Gustaf had limited advantages for obtaining an 
education, as he was needed to work at home. Nine weeks covered the 
whole period of his public school attendance, but then and in later years 
in the practical school of experience he acquired sufficient knowledge to 
enable him to keep his own business accounts and to exercise a manage- 
ment in his affairs, thus working out a greater degree of success than 
has been reached by many whose advantages in early life were far 
superior to his. At the age of twenty-three, with the earnings he had 
saved he purchased a farm called Elertstorp Ostragard, in Quenneberg^ 
parish. After living on this farm two years he sold it and returned to 
his father's home, where he remained one year, or until his coming to 
America, where he landed at the age of twenty-seven, in 1876. Coming 
directly west, he settled first at Stillwater, where he spent two years, 
working in mills and on farms. 

In 1879 Mr. Johnson came to Minneapolis. Here, after working 
two years in a brick yard, he engaged in the manufacture of brick on his 
own account, having as partners two Germans, Herman Vogt and John S. 
Bour. At the end of two years Mr. Bour sold his interest in the busi- 
ness to Otto A. Benson. The partnership continued until 1888, when 
Mr. Johnson retired from the firm, disposing of his interest to his part- 
ners. He then spent more than a year in travel, visiting various points 



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6o8 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



in the far west, looking for opportunities for investment and advance- 
ment, but returned to Minneapolis satisfied that there was no better 
place than this to be found for an enterprising young man. The next 
year he bought and sold brick, buying in large quantities and retailing, 
and afterward he purchased S. D. Morrison's brick yard, which he still 
owns, and from which he has made a snug little fortune. His trans- 
actions, however, have not been confined to brick. He has for years 
been dealing in land, and at this writing is the owner of five hundred 
acres of choice land. 

Mr. Johnson's first wife, who was Miss Emma Johnson, a childhood 
friend, and a native of the parish in which he was bom, died in 1881, 
the year after their marriage. In 1884, he wedded Miss Anna B. Lind- 
strom, of Stode, Vesternorland, and they are the parents of four chil- 
dren: Minnie, born July 22, 1885; Harry Ludwig Leander, August 13, 
1887 ; Dora Eleanor, April 19, 1894, and George Carl Clarence, June 29, 
1895. Harry Ludwig Leander took a business course in Northwestern 
Business College, Minneapolis. 

Mr. Johnson has twice visited his old home, in 1889 and in 1907. 
He is a member of the I. O. O. F., Svenska Broder, Modem Woodmen, 
and A. O. U. W., and, politically, he is a stanch Republican. Mr. Johnson 
recently erected a fine flat building at 2511-13 Nicollet avenue, at a cost 
of about $14,000. He resides in his elegant home at 2715 North Lyndale 
avenue, which he built about twenty years ago. 

Gust Andrell, one of the well known Swedish-Americans of busi- 
ness abilities in Minneapolis, is a native of Mariestad, Sweden, bora 
April 8, 1865. He is a son of Nils and Maria Christina (Person) Ander- 
son, his father being a sea captain who died in 1875, ^^ ^^^ ^S^ ^f forty- 
seven years, and his mother daughter of a prosperous farmer of Bjor- 
sater parish, who passed away in 1896, when sixty-nine years old. Six 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Nils Anderson, as follows: Otto, 
July 3, 1854, who is now a druggist at Norberg, Sweden; Katharina 
Elizabeth, September 4, 1856, now residing, in New York ; Ulrika Olivia, 
October 10, 1858, who married Per Gustaf Malmberg, of Minneapolis; 
Carl Albin, July 19, 1862, a master brewer who has lived in the United 
States since 1904; Gust, of this sketch; and Mathilda, who was bom 
February 25, 1873, ^^^ married August Anderson, a farmer of Maple 
Plain, Minnesota. 

Until he was fifteen years of age Gust Andrell attended the public 
and high schools at Mariestad, after which, until 1882, he was employed 
in a hardware and grocery store. In that year he emigrated to the 
United States, first working in a factory at Waterbury, Connecticut, 
for about two years; then spending a year in New York City, and 
finally, in 1885, locating at Minneapolis. After working along various 
lines for a year, in 1886 he secured a position with the Lakewood Ceme- 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 609 



tery Association, which he held for eight years, during the last five of 
which he was connected with the office force. 

Mr. Andrell obtained his first experience in the field which he has 
since occupied as a principal, in 1894, when he commenced clerking in 
a grocery store. A little over two years in that capacity brought him 
such training and practical knowledge of the business that in 1897 he 
established himself as a tea and coffee merchant. Five years thereafter 
he sold his business, and in April, 1902, with his brotfier-in-law, Mr. 
Anderson, started a grocery at his present location, No. 3348 Hennepin 
avenue. After a year and a half of substantial partnership business, Mr. 
Andrell purchased the Anderson interests and has since conducted the 
establishment with characteristic energy and sound business discretion. 
In 1909 he erected a modem and commodious double store of brick, con- 
sisting of meat market and grocery store, which he is now conducting. 
A fine suite of rooms is on the second floor, in which the family resides. 
Aside from his membership in the Modern Woodmen of America, he 
is not associated with any of the fraternal orders. 

On July 31, 1888, Gust Andrell wedded Miss Carolina Wilhelmina 
Widen, born December 31, 1863, daughter of Deputy Sheriff Johan 
Abraham Widen, who died at Nora, Sweden, in 1900, and his wife, Maria 
Louisa Sjogren, who was born in 1827 and is still living in the mother 
country. Besides Mrs. Andrell, the offspring of this union were as fol- 
lows : Maria Elizabeth, who was bom May 5, 1858, and married August 
Sword, of Jersey City, and Johan Adolph, bom in 1861 and manager of a 
dry-goods store at Nora, Sweden. The children bom to Mr. and Mrs. 
Gust Andrell were as follows: Bertha Elizabeth, April 9, 1891, who 
is cashier in her father's store; Arthur Felix and Victor Hugo, bom 
respectively January 22, 1894, and January 9, 1896, and who are attending 
public school ; and Florence Maria, who was born on the 14th of Febru- 
ary, 1898. 

Axel Anderson, of Minneapolis, was bom at Broby, near Chris- 
tianstad, Sweden, October 6, 1869, son of Carl and Bengta (nee Olson) 
Anderson. After having received a common school education in Sweden, 
he came to America in 1884, in company with an older brother, their 
objective point being. Clear Lake, Iowa, where they stopped for a short 
time, coming thence to Minnesota, and Minneapolis has since been their 
home. Here Axel attended the graded schools and also took a course 
in a business college, in order to perfect his English and prepare himself 
for a commercial life. On leaving college, he accepted a position in the 
general freight department of the Great Northern Railway Co., which he 
held for several years. For two years he was in the office of the Mechan- 
ical Superintendent of the "Soo" Line, and later was in the office of 
the Commercial Agent of the Omaha Railway. In 1902, he engaged in 
the fire insurance and real estate business, meeting with success from the 
39 



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6io SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



first, and has built up a prosperous business, with office in the new Secur- 
ity Bank Building. He is also interested in the manufacture of brick, 
under the firm name of M. Anderson Brick Co., being General Manager 
of the concern, and during the busy season employs a large number of 
men. 

Mr. Anderson has always taken a deep interest in musical affairs. 
He was responsible in no small degree for the g^and and successful sing- 
ing festival of the American Union of Swedish Singers held in Minneap- 
olis in 1903, of which organization he was president. He has long been 
identified with the Lutheran Augustana Church, of which for several 
years he was a trustee ; and he is a member of the Board of Directors of 
Minnesota College. 

In 1903 Mr. Anderson married Mrs. Maria Peterson (widow of 
the late N. P. Peterson), and since the fall of 1908 their home has been 
at "Villa Anderson" on Calhoun boulevard, one of the most beautiful lake 
boulevards in the country. 

Nels Oscar Welander. — A thorough-going, popular and honorable 
business man and citizen of Minneapolis, Nels O. Welander is proprietor 
of one of the largest and most complete undertaking establishments in 
the city and state. In him the typical Swedish traits of perseverance, 
faithfulness, courtesy and sound judgment are grafted on his American 
character of enterprise and adaptability, the combination making him a 
valuable and progressive citizen. Mr. Welander is a native of Moline, 
Illinois, being a son of Peter and Caroline Welander, both bom at Smi- 
land, Sweden. His parents emigrated to Moline in 1866 and four chil- 
dren have been bom to them — Nels Oscar, Bessie, Arnold and Emma. 

Mr. Welander obtained his elementary education in the public schools 
of Moline, continuing his studies at Augusta and Rock Island, Illinois, 
and completing a thorough business course in 1892. He began the appli- 
cation of his commercial knowledge at Cleveland, Ohio, and for about 
seven years conducted a grocery house in that city. He then came to 
Minneapolis and engaged in the undertaking business, his unvarying 
success proving his adaptability to it. His courtesy, no less than his good 
business judgment has enabled him to found an extensive and complete 
establishment. The building which he occupies on Franklin avenue was 
designed and erected especially for his business, and is a model of taste . 
and modern convenience. 

Perhaps there are few men in Minneapolis who are better known 
among fratemalists than Mr. Welander. His connections in this regard 
include an active membership in the A. F. & A. M., I. O. O. F. and a 
number of other orders. His broad social and benevolent character is 
evinced by these activities. On September 19, 1895, Mr. Welander wed- 
ded Miss Ida Quist, daughter of Peter P. Quist, who for many years 
has held the office of weighmaster of the state. Their union has resulted 
in one child, Gertrude C, bom September 18, 1907. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 613 



Edward Jacobson, well known in Minneapolis business circles as 
a real estate dealer, was bom at Rochester in this state December 17, 
1870. His father, Ole Jacobson, was bom at Slavenged, Norway, but 
left there when a young man for the United States, and arriving in this 
county without means he began work on a farm. Persevering, industri- 
ous and economical, he was able in a short time to go to Deuel county, in 
South Dakota, and purchase a farm. That county has ever since been 
his home. He gives his political support to the Republican party and is 
a member of the Lutheran church. By his second marriage he became 
the father of five children, namely: Jacob; Anna, who married Louis 
Poison ; Randey, who married J. R. Sp&ndy ; Bertha, the wife of Nels 
Ohsman; and Edward. 

Edward Jacobson attended the public schools of Rochester and the 
Red Wing Seminary, and at the age of eighteen he started out on his 
business career by working at the carpenter's trade, while later for a 
short time he was a clerk in a furniture store at Hendricks, Minnesota, 
and then returning to Minneapolis, he pursued a course of studies at the 
State Normal School. When his studies were completed he embarked 
in the grocery business in this city, but after about three years as a 
grocery merchant he disposed of his stock and turned his attention to 
the real estate business, dealing in both city and farm property, insur- 
ance and rentals. Through his energy and close attention to details 
he has become well established in business and has earned a reputation 
for fair and honorable dealings. He is besides the architect of his own 
fortunes, for he began his business career without assistance and has con- 
tinued on unaided, building wisely and well. His politics are Republican, 
and he is a member of the Lutheran church and a teacher in its Sunday 
School. 

Edward G. Dahl. — A man of superior business ability, tact and 
judgment, Edward G. Dahl holds a position of prominence and influence 
among the leading men of Minneapolis, being intimately associated with 
some of its foremost industries and organizations. A native of Sweden, 
he was born, July 8, 1869, in Frandefors, near Venersborg, which was 
his home for two years. His parents, Gustaf and Karin Dahl, emigrated 
with their children to Minnesota in 1871, locating at Rush Lake, where 
both spent their remaining years. They reared five sons and two daugh- 
ters, as follows: John, a farmer at Rush Lake; Augusta, wife of H. 
Fredin, a Rush Lake farmer; Anna, wife of Charles Ekberg, of Rush 
Lake ; Aron N., a shoemaker in Minneapolis ; Charles, engaged in business 
with his brother Edward G. ; J. Hans, head of the firm of J. H. Dahl & 
Co., general merchants at Camden place, Minneapolis; and Edward G. 

But two years of age when he came with his parents to Minnesota, 
Edward G. Dahl received his elementary education in the district schools 
of Rush Lake, after which he took a commercial course at Gustavus 
Adolphus College, in St. Peter, Minnesota, being graduated from there 



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014 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



in 1888. The following year he was employed as a clerk by S. E. Olson, 
later serving in the same capacity with J. H. Thompson, at No. 118 Hen- 
nepin avenue. In 1891, forming a partnership with his brother Charles, 
Mr. Dahl, started in the clothing business at No. 232 Twentieth avenue. 
North, and in the years that have since elapsed has built up a large and 
thriving trade in that vicinity, the firm being noted for its square and 
honest dealings, and its judicious management of affairs. In 1896, in 
company with his brothers, J. Hans and Charles Dahl, he opened a 
store of general merchandise at Camden place, Minneapolis, and in its 
management is meeting with equally good success, having a large and 
lucrative trade. 

These three merchants, Edward G. Dahl, Charles Dahl, and J. Hans 
Dahl, are actively interested in the Swedish Land Colonization Company, 
incorporated under the State Laws of Minnesota, and doing business 
in the province of Santiago, Cuba, Edward G. Dahl being president of the 
corporation. He is likewise one of the directors of the Merchants' and 
Manufacturers' State Bank of Minneapolis, a local institution for North 
Minneapolis. He was one of the incorporators of the Swedish Hospital 
Building Association, of which he was chosen the first vice-president, 
Mr. C. A. Smith serving as its first president. At the end of the first 
year, Mr. Smith resigned his position, and Mr. Dahl was made his suc- 
cessor, and has held the office continuously since. 

Mr. Dahl married, in 1894, Bessie Olson, who was bom in Sunds- 
vall, Sweden, and came to Minnesota with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
A. Olson, of Rush Lake, Minnesota. Of the four children born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Dahl, three are living, namely: Alice Irene, bom September 
16, 1896; Gladys Viola, bom July 20, 1898; and Myron Edward, born 
January 20, 1900. Mr. Dahl is a member of the Board of Directors of 
Minnesota College, and is a trustee of the Bethlehem Lutheran church, 
to which he and his family belong. In 1902 Mr. Dahl crossed the ocean, 
visiting many countries in Europe, including Sweden, Norway, Denmark, 
Germany, Belgium, Holland, France, England, and just touching Ireland, 
being away from his home, which is at No. 2227 Dupont avenue. North, 
about three months, in the time seeing the more important places of 
interest, and gathering valuable information on commercial subjects. 

Hon. Erick Johan Swedback, ex-senator of Minnesota and a 
retired lumberman of Minneapolis, is a man of wealth, ability and sterling 
character, and is a credit to a long line of substantial ancestors of the 
old world, as well as to the more active American spirit which he has so 
fully imbibed. Bom in Ensillre, Borgsjo parish, Vestemorrlands Ian, 
Sweden, on the 23rd of June, 1845, ^^ received his early education in 
the public schools of his native land, and remained at home until 1868. 
In that year Mr. Swedback left for the United States bound for that 
favorite destination of his countrymen. Red Wing; Minnesota. That 
period of his life was no exception to any other — ^in the particular that 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 615 



"whatever he found to do, he did with all his might." In the spring of 
1869, however, he started out to find a better location for his business 
talents. 

Mr. Swedback first stopped for a year at St. Anthony (now Minne- 
apolis), but as he was sick and unable to secure work for most of that 
time the location naturally failed to impress him as favorable, and he 
moved on to Delano, Minnesota. There he established himself in the 
furniture and wagon manufacturing business and commenced a career of 
uninterrupted success, achieved only by the exercise of a tireless physique 
and an active and sound brain. After disposing of his business at Delano, 
in 1897, Senator Swedback moved to the new city of Bemidji, where he 
engaged so extensively in the manufacture of lumber that virtually the 
raw material for all the houses came from his mill. Until 1907, his 
business was conducted independently of the large lumber monopolies, 
but in that year he disposed of his plant to the Crookston Lumber Com- 
pany, which is owned by the well-known lumberman, Thomas Shevlin. 
Since that time Mr. Swedback has been virtually retired from active 
business, but is looking after his interests in other companies and the 
improvement of his Minneapolis properties. His former residence was 
at 2523 Bryant avenue, but he has erected a handsome modem home at 
2419 Colfax avenue, South, where he now resides. Mr. Swedback's 
strength as a business man and a sterling and popular gentleman induced 
his numerous friends to put him forward as a Republican candidate for 
the State Senate, in 1904, and his decisive election over Mr. Street, then 
prosecuting attorney of Beltrami county, was a signal tribute to personal 
worth. He served with high credit for one term, but refused a re-nomi- 
nation. 

Senator Swedback was happily married many years ago, and is 
the father of two daughters. Dora, born in Delano, in 1871, married I. 
C. Stewart, who is the proprietor of a harness business and a ranch at 
Williston, North Dakota, and Hattie S., bom in that place in 1874, is 
the wife of H. W. Haines, formerly connected with the general offices 
of the Great Northern Railway at St. Paul, and at present residing in 
Lenox, Iowa. 

Olof Axel Hedin, dealer in real estate, whose office is in the Secu- 
rity Bank Building, Minneapolis, was bom June 10, 1867, in the town of 
Arctander, Kandiyohi county, Minnesota. His father, Lars Hedin, was 
bom in Ransater parish, Vermland, Sweden, September 2, 1833 ; he came 
to America and settled in the town of Arctander, Minnesota, June 6, 
1867, four days before his son Olof A. was bom. Mr. Hedin died 
March 16, 1904 ; he married Anna Maria Olson, also a native of Ransater 
parish, who is now living in Willmar, Minnesota. They were parents of 
five children, of whom only two survive, namely : Olof A. and Andrew 
G. The latter was bora in 1869 and is in the butcher business at Will- 
mar ; he is married and has three children. 



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6i6 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Olof A. Hedin received his education in the public schools and 
remained at home until 1881, being then fourteen years of age; on 
account of crop failure and financial stress he had to leave home and 
earn his own living, which he has done ever since. In 1882 he secured 
employment in a store in Morris, Minnesota, and remained about a year, 
when he removed to Willmar and secured a position in a store there. 
He worked at such occupation until 1892, and in that year established a 
general store of his own, which he carried on successfully until 1898. 

Although Mr. Hedin never attended school after reaching the age 
of fourteen years, he has constantly made the most of his opportunities 
for obtaining learning and culture, and is an unusually intelligent, well- 
read man. He was very popular and well known in Kandiyohi county, 
and was elected by a good majority to the office of register of deeds, 
in 1898, serving until 1900. 

In 1900 Mr. Hedin began dealing in land, and two years later spld 
his interests to remove to Turlock, California, to the Swedish Colony, 
but as the other members of the family did not like it there, he remained 
only a short time. Returning to Minnesota, he located in Minneapolis, 
and soon engaged in his present business, having since resided here. 
He spent one year in the brokerage business before settling down to 
the real estate business, in which he is now very successful. By his 
straight and business-like dealings Mr. Hedin has won the confidence 
of the public, and is well established in business. He handles large tracts 
of farm lands, both wild and improved, and also city property. He is a 
member of the Swedish Mission church, and owns a fine home at 221 1 
Buchanan street, Northeast, where he resides. 

In the fall of 1893 Mr. Hedin married Maria Railson, bom in 1869, 
daughter of Andrew Railson, a well-known farmer and prominent mem- 
ber of the State Legislature from Kandiyohi county. They have two chil- 
dren, AUyn, bom October 8, 1894, and Mildred, born December 20, 1895, 
both bom at Willmar and now attending school at Minneapolis. 

Verner Hjalmar Nilsson, D. D. S., was bom in Boston, Massachu- 
setts, April 19, 1884, son of the well-known Minneapolis newspaper man 
and singing instmctor, Hjalmar Nilsson, and his wife Christine (nee 
Neumann). In their family was one other child, Christine, the wife of 
Carl Chindblom, county commissioner, Chicago. Verner H. received his 
early education in the public schools of Boston and later in Worcester, 
Massachusetts, where he graduated as valedictorian in the high school 
class of 1903. In July of the same year his parents moved to Minneap- 
olis, where he entered the dental department of the University of Minne- 
sota, that fall. In June, 1906, he completed his course and received his 
degree, and immediately thereafter he entered upon the practice of his 
profession at Seven Comers, Minneapolis. January i, 1908, he came back 
to Minneapolis and established himself in his present office quarters in 



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OH^l 









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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 619 



the South Side State Pank Building, on the comer of Cedar and River- 
side avenues. 

June 10, 1908, Dr. Nilsson married Miss Alma Ophelia Larson, con- 
tralto singer in the St. Lawrence Catholic church, and a daughter of O. 
L. Larson, who has charge of the patent department of the Twin City 
Separator Company. They reside at 1720 Tenth avenue, South, and their 
home is blessed in the birth of a son, February 9, 1909. 

The Doctor is a member of the Minnesota State Dental Association, 
the Scandinavian Dental Society of Minneapolis, the Twin City Alunmi 
Association, the Xi Psi Phi Dental Fraternity and the Modem Samaritans, 
and both he and his wife belong to the English Gethsemane Episcopal 
church. 

Nels Ne3-son occupies an enviable position in the business circles 
of Minneapolis, and stands at the head of the Nelson Paving Company, 
one of the leading corporations of its kind in the city. He is a native son 
of Sweden, bom at Skona on the 20th of August, 1859, ^ son of Nels 
and Truen (Swenson) Nelson, who were farming people in that country. 
Nels, the son, obtained his educational training in the schools of his 
native town, and he assisted his father on the farm from his early youth 
until his emigration to the United States in 1881. Locating at Minneapo- 
lis, Minnesota, he found employment with the Northwestem Railrpad 
Company, and during his nineteen years of service with that corporation, 
covering the intervening period between 1881 and 1900, he gradually 
advanced from a clerkship to the position of shipping and receiving clerk, 
and was thus employed at the time he left their services to engage in 
business for himself, forming in 1900 a partnership with his brother, 
Swanson Nelson. They continued business for two years under the 
firm name of the Minneapolis Paving Company, but at the close of that 
period the partnership was. dissolved by mutual consent and Nels Nelson 
formed the firm of the Nelson Paving Company, and has since been one 
of the leading contractors in his line in Minneapolis. He gives constant 
employment to a number of workmen and does all kinds of paving and 
concrete work. During his residence here he has established an excel- 
lent reputation for honorable and straightforward dealing, which has 
rewarded him with a constantly rapid increase in the volume of his 
business. 

Mr. Nelson married in 1886 Miss Charlotte Johnson, of this city, 
and their two children are Huldah C. and Alvin C. 

Peter Thompson. — No finer representative of the enterprising and 
progressive Swedes of Minnesota can be found than Peter Thompson of 
Minneapolis, secretary and treasurer of the National Cut Glass Com- 
pany, which established the first factory of its kind this side of Chicago. 
A native of Sweden, he was bom, December 22, 1865, at Pibro, near 
Hessleholm, Skine, a son of Troed and Hanna (MoUenborg) Jeppson, 



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620 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



neither of whom are now living, his father having died in 1879, and his 
mother in 1892. To his parents seven children were bom, namely: Jo- 
hannes Troedson, a farmer in Vittsjo, Sweden; Nels Thompson, a 
tailor in Minneapolis, Minnesota; Axd Troedson, a merchant tailor in 
Copenhagen, Denmark ; Anna, wife of Fredrik Lauritzen, part proprietor 
of the Lauritzen & Brothers Machine Works, at Bekke, Lundskow, 
Denmark; Elna, wife of a Mr. Hansen, chief engineer on one of the 
United States Steamship Company's steamers; Peter Thompson, the 
subject of this sketch; and Jons Troedson, a merchant tailor in Copen- 
hagen, Denmark. From the foregoing record it will be seen that the 
children still living in Europe retain their father's Christian name, while 
those in America have adopted a name better understood in this country. 

Having obtained a practical education in the public schools, and 
been confirmed in the Lutheran church, Peter Thompson went to Copen- 
hagen, Denmark, to learn the tailor's trade with Terkelson, tailor to the 
King of Denmark. When he had mastered his trade, he went to Lon- 
don, England, where he worked for seven months before starting for 
America, He landed in New York City in 1885, and, passing through 
Chicago, made his way to Red Wing, Minnesota, where he folfowed his 
trade for about two months. Coming then to Minneapolis, Mr. Thomp- 
son was employed in various tailoring shops until 1889, when, having 
become familiar with the customs of the country, he embarked in busi- 
ness on his own account, forming a partnership with George J. Backus, 
under the firm name of P. Thompson & Co. At the end of a year the 
firm was dissolved, and Mr. Thompson went to River Falls, Wisconsin, 
where he was in business for a year. Not liking Wisconsin very well, 
he came back to Minneapolis, and a short time later sailed for Europe. 
Locating in Svendborg, Denmark, he was cutter in a tailoring estab- 
lishment for two and one-half years. Returning to Minneapolis in 1893, 
Mr. Thompson, in partnership with Mr. Frank Moren, opened an estab- 
lishment, under the firm name of "The New York Taitors", on the east 
side, near the Saint Anthony Falls Bank. A year later, Mr. Thompson 
bought out his partner, and continued the business in that location for 
another two years. Removing then to the other side of the river, he 
established himself on Third street, where he was busily employed until 
June 14, 1907, when he organized the National Cut Glass Company, with 
which he has since been connected. This company was incorporated 
with T. S. Amidor as president and treasurer; Mr. Thompson as vice- 
president ; and F. M. Nelson as secretary. It is the only factory of the 
kind in the state, and is carrying on a substantial business, buying the 
glass in blanks, and cutting it to suit the demands of the trade, its 
designs being original and artistic 

Mr. Thompson married, in 1887, Anna Nelscm, who was bom, 
January 30, 1866, in Sibbarp, Skine, Sweden. Of the seven children bom 
to Mr. and Mrs. Thompson, five are living, namely: Ruth Florence 
Standia, bora April 18, 1891 ; Harvey Ludvig, bora January 27, 1894; 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 621 



Ruby, born October 8, 1895; Roy, born July i, 1897; and Philip, born 
August 20, 1901. Religously Mr. Thompson and his family attend the 
Free Mission church. Fraternally he is a member of the Modem 
Woodmen of America ; of the Royal League ; and of the Order of Vasa. 

John W. Olson, member of the merchant tailoring firm of Stein & 
Olson, is a representative Swedish-American tradesman and citizen. 
He is a native of Lennartsfors, Trankils socken, Vermland, Sweden, 
bom on the 19th of January, 1881, and is a son of Olof Lord and Anna 
(Swenson) Anderson. His father was a sailor in the merchant marine, 
and as he was drowned in 1882 on the South American coast, the son 
never saw his sire. The mother, bom in Blongskog socken, in 1858, was 
the daughter of Olof Swenson, and died in 1894; her father, born in 1818, 
is still living as a farmer in Blongskog socken. 

John W. was brought up by his grandparents until he was twelve 
years of age, when he was apprenticed to a Lennartsfors tailor, with the 
privilege of attending school until he was fourteen. He remained under 
this arrangement until he was seventen years of age, when he located at 
Christiania, Norway, and there continued in the employ of a tailoring firm 
for two years. At this point in his career he was seized with the Ameri- 
can fever, and in the year 1900 emigrated to the United States, spending 
his first six months in the United States as a resident of Red Wing, 
Minnesota. Thence he moved to St. Paul and secured employment with 
Hagstrom and Thomquist, one of the oldest and most reliable concerns 
of the kind in the city. After retaining his connection with that house 
for two and a half years, he was offered a position as cutter for O. H. 
Ingram, which position he held for one year, when he accepted an oflFer 
from Brown Brothers' Mercantile Company to become the head of the 
cutting department of their large establislunent. Mr. Olson eflSciently 
performed the duties of this important position for a period of foui; 
years, or until the spring of 1909, when he decided to make an independ- 
ent business venture. In partnership with J. C. Stein, he therefore 
established a modem tailoring establishment at 816 Nicollet avenue, 
Minneapolis, under the firm name of Stein & Olson. As both partners 
had enjoyed a long and prominent connection with the trade, and were 
popular as well as experienced, the enterprise has been an assured success 
from the first. 

On the 23rd of October, 1905, Mr. Olson married Miss Agnes 
Mathilda Dahlman, daughter of A. Dahlman, the well known contractor 
of St. Paul, and tfiey have one child, William Richard, bom July 25, 
1906. The family residence is at 1907 Chicago avenue. 

Lewis S. Nelson, the proprietor of one of the best equipped hard- 
ware stores in South Minneapolis, was bom in Wapello county, Iowa, 
near the town of Frederick, a son of Andrew J. and Matilda (Jepson) 
Nelson, both of whom were bom in Sweden and came to the United 



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622 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



States in 1869 and 1871, respectively. Locating in Iowa, Andrew J. 
Nelson secured employment on a railroad. He moved to Steams county, 
Minnesota, in 1881, and followed farming till his death in 1894. They 
became the parents of seven children, but four of the number died in 
infancy, and those living are Nels P., Lewis S. and Emma, who mar- 
ried Swan Anderson. 

Lewis S. Nelson attended the public schools of Sauk Center, Minne- 
sota, where his father had located when he was nine years of age, and 
after the completion of his education he worked at farm labor untU about 
twenty-three years of age. He then secured a clerkship in a general 
mercantile store for a few months at Sauk Center, and then coming to 
Minneapolis became a clerk in the hardware store of Janney, Semple, 
Hill & Company, with whom he remained for about five years, and in 
that time mastered all the details of the hardware business. In 1903 
he started in business for himself, and is now the owner of one of the 
leading stores of its kind in South Minneapolis. He is a successful 
and progressive business man. 

In February, 1904, Mr. Nelson married Signa A. Johnson, a daugh- 
ter of Alfred Johnson of this city, and they have one child, Marjorie, 
born May 19, 1907. Mr. Nelson and his wife are members of the Swe- 
dish Tabernacle church, of which he was formerly a member of the board 
of trustees. 

Axel A. Eberhart, of Minneapolis, one of the most talented and 
progressive among the younger lawyers of the Twin Cities, is a brother 
of Hon. Adolph O. Eberhart, who by the death of the lamented John A. 
Johnson became governor of Minnesota September 21, 1909. The two 
were associated for several years at Mankato, when the future governor 
was becoming established as a lawyer and a Republican and when the 
future able lawyer of Minneapolis was taking a course at the Normal 
School, as a preliminary to his education in the law. There is every 
evidence that the younger brother has also a most bright and sub- 
stantial future, as the chief executive of the state and the private and 
alert citizen of Minneapolis have not a few strong traits in common. 
Chief among these are their persistency and the high value they place 
on a thorough education. The latter was gained by Axel A. only after 
such hard struggles as well tested both his stable and his practical 
character. 

Mr. Eberhart is a native of As, Kihl parish, Vermland, where he 
was bom April 28, 1876, and where his father (Anders Olson) long re- 
sided as a fanner. The latter was bom in 1834 and his wife {nee Louisa 
Anderson) is a native of Frykerud parish, that province, born in 1844,. 
and now living with a son at Obertin, Nebraska. The father died at 
Limegrove, that state, in 1900. The five children of these parents were 
as follows : Johan Alfred Olson, bom in Sweden July 4, 1868, an Ober- 
lin (Nebraska) grain buyer, married and the father of eight children; 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 625 

Adolph O. Eberhart, born June 23, 1870, the able lawyer, business man 
of Mankato, ex-lieutenant governor and now governor of the state, mar- 
ried and the father of five children ; Axel A., of this sketch ; Maria, born 
July 18, 1878, who is married to Maurice J. Blatchford, a farmer of New 
Castle, Nebraska, and is the mother of three children; and Oscar A. 
Olson, born June 27, 1884, in Limegrove, Nebraska, married and a 
farmer residing at Obertin, that state. The family emigrated to the 
United States in 1881, but a scarcity of family funds made it necessary to 
leave Adolph O. with a relative in Sweden. He re-joined the household 
in the following year at St. Peter, and after a total residence of two years 
in that city the family settled on a farm near Dickson, Nebraska, which 
remained the homestead for ten months, or until the land was entered one 
mile from Limegrove, that state, which became a comfortable home for 
all and the birthplace of the youngest child. 

Axel A. attended country school and worked on the Nebraska home- 
stead until 1897, not only becoming a thoroughly qualified farmer but 
prosecuting those studies in private in which he realized his deficiency. 
In the fall of that year, when a few months past his majority, he hired out 
to a neighboring farmer for one month, thereby earning enough money 
to support himself at the University of South Dakota for three months. 
The next year he repeated the performance, also selling his pony for 
forty dollars; grand result, six months' attendance at the same institu- 
tion. In 1898 he accepted an invitation from his brother, Adolph, recent- 
ly married, to make his home with him at Mankato and pursue a course 
of study at the State Normal School. From the fall of that year until 
the spring of 1902 Mr. Eberhart was a student at that institution and 
his brother's assistant in his law office. After his graduation he served 
one year as deputy clerk of the district court of Blue Earth county and 
for four months as deputy clerk of the United States circuit and district 
courts at Mankato. 

In the fall of 1903 Mr. Eberhart entered the law department of the 
University of Minnesota, from which he was graduated with the class 
of 1906. His professional education was mastered under the same finan- 
cial difficulties under which he had always labored as a poor but inde- 
pendent young man. He decided to finish his legal course free of debt, 
or not at all. His first employment, as a means of support, was as night 
clerk in a hotel ; but the hours were such that he was obliged to resign 
that position. His next experience was as a general utility man in a 
restaurant — washing dishes, peeling potatoes, waiting on table, etc. In 
this way he managed to prosecute his professional studies in the univer- 
sity and graduated in 1906 without being incumbered with one cent of 
indebtedness. It is this kind of grit and honor which has made him 
admirers and friends among his personal and professional associates. 
On August I, 1906, he opened an office in the Andrus building, Minneap- 
olis, and on June nth of the following year formed a partnership with 

40 



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626 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Clinton M. Odell, that connection being dissolved when Mr. Odell be- 
came state agent for the Northwestern Life Insurance Company of Min- 
neapolis, January i, 1909. Mr. Eberhart's practice is solid and growing and 
his circumstances are now such that he is about to build a summer home 
at Mille Lacs Lake. He is an ardent church worker, being a prominent 
member of the Hope Chapel of the Presbyterian church, where he teaches 
a Sunday School class, has had charge of the reading room for three 
years and is president of the Men's Brotherhood and the Christian En- 
deavor Society. He has confined his fraternal activities to the Royal 
Arcanum. 

Nels p. Lofgren has achieved distinction in Minneapolis as a 
landscape and portrait artist. He was bom in Sweden March 19, 1872, 
a son of Peter P. Lofgren, a farmer, and in whose family were six 
children, namely : Peter, Bertha, Marit, Nels P., Lars and Anna. In his 
early life Nels P. Lofgren supplemented his school work by helping his 
father on the farm and working at the blacksmith's trade. Coming to 
the United States in 1893, he spent a short time at railroad work at 
Fargo, North Dakota, after which for a year or more he was emptoyed 
at farm labor, and then coming to Wright county in Minnesota he 
worked on a farm during the summer months and attended school in the 
winters. In the meantime he had come to Minneapolis to pursue a 
course of instruction in portrait work under the well-known portrait 
artist 1. E. Burt. Mr. Lofgren then combined his farm labor with his 
portrait work until 1897, when he came to Minneapolis and has since 
devoted his entire time to his art, having a studio at 220 Kasota Build- 
ing, at the comer of Hennepin avenue and Fourth street. His work 
with the bmsh has received deserved praise, and he has established an 
enviable reputation as a portrait artist. He is a master of his art, and 
does oil kinds of portrait work in crayon, water colors, pastel and oils 
from photographs and from life. 

Mr. Lofgren married, August 11, 1900, Miss Hanna Axelina Shel- 
berg, and they have one child, Dauphin Eugene LeRay, born July 23, 
1905. They are members of the Lutheran church. The family home is 
at 3916 Oakland avenue, Minneapolis. Mr. Lofgren is recognized by the 
noted New York artist, Nicholas R. Breuer, as a man of superior ability 
in his line, and unusually successful in producing likenesses. 

John S. Norman. — ^The representative of a family that has long 
been prominent in Sweden, John S. Norman, ranks high among the 
esteemed and prosperous Swedish citizens of Minnesota, the record of 
whose lives fills an important place in this volume. In the sketch of 
his brother, Oscar E. Norman, which may be found elsewhere in this 
work, a more comprehensive history of his ancestors is given. Both 
brothers are identified with the mercantile interests of Minneapolis, Oscar 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 627 



E., as a grocer, while John S. is at the head of the Nonnan Baking 
Company. 

One of the seven children of Christer R. and Christina (Swenson) 
Norman, John S. Norman was bom, May 25, 1865, in Vireda, Smaland, 
Sweden, and was there educated and confirmed. He subsequently worked 
on the parental homestead until 1883, when he came to America, joining 
his brother Qaes Alfred, who was already well settled in Minnesota. 
After working as a farm hand for a year, he was employed as a coach- 
man in Minneapolis for an equal leng^ of time. Going then to North 
Dakota, Mr. Norman took up a homestead, but at the end of two years 
sold that property and returned to Minneapolis. The following two 
years he was variously employed, and after that worked as a driver for 
a bakery company for five years, during which time he learned the 
bakery business. In 1893 Mr. Norman started a bakery of his own, 
which he operated for a year, and then sold out, and resumed his for- 
mer occupation. Buying his present place of business in 1895, Mr. 
Norman has built up a fine plant, having the most modem and up-to-date 
equipments, and is carrying on a substantial business as a wholesale and 
retail baker. In 1906 the business was incorporated as The Norman 
Baking Company, Bread Bakers and Shippers, with a capital of $7S,ooo, 
and with the following-named officers: John S. Norman, president and 
treasurer ; I. T. Norman, vice-president ; and Oscar Rask, secretary. 

Mr. Norman, in 1890, was united in marriagje, at Minneapolis, with 
Sophie Nelson, of Varberg, Sweden. She died, of puerperal fever, in 
1899, leaving two children, namely: Ruth Roseman, born January i, 
1893; and Gladys, who lived but a brief time after the death of her 
mother. Mr. Norman married, second, in 1902, Ida Theresa Larson, who 
was bom January 3, 1874, in Sweden, her birth occurring in Haurida 
parish, Smaland. Two children have blessed this union, namely: Elsie 
Theresa, bom July 10, 1903; and Norma Evelyn, bom April 16, 1905. 
Mr. and Mrs. Norman are people of sterling worth, and are held in high 
regard throughout the community in which they reside, their home being 
pleasantly located at 191 1 Fourteenth avenue. They attend the Swedish- 
English Lutheran Messiah church, in which they are faithful workers. 
Fraternally Mr. Norman is a member of the Modern Woodmen of 
America. 

John E. Goldner, dmggist, 1854 Central avenue, Minneapolis, Min- 
nesota, was bom December 28, 1869, in Jonkoping^ Sweden, son of A. J. 
Anderson. His father, a well-known minister of the Mission Friends' 
denomination, died in 1892, and in infancy Mr. Goldner lost his mother. 

After attending the public schools and the collegiate high school, 
in the latter of which he attained the lower seventh standard, John E. 
begun the study of pharmacy in the old and well-known drug store 
Kronan (The Crown) in Gothenburg, where he remained two years, 
from 1889 to 1891* after which he transferred to Mariestad. In May, 



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628 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



1892, he graduated from the Pharmaceutical Institute at Stockholm. 
Then returning to Mariestad, he took charge of the laboratory depart- 
ment of the drug store for one year. 

The next year, 1893, he came to America, and in the fall landed 
in Chicago. The financial depression which immediately followed in the 
wake of the World's Fair, made it difficult for Mr. Goldner to find em- 
ployment, and the following March he decided to try his luck in Minne- 
apolis. Here he passed the examination of the State Board of Phar- 
macy, and soon obtained ernplo>Tnent. For four years he worked in 
various drug stores in Minneapolis; from 1898 to 1903 he was in other 
towns and cities ; upon his return to Minneapolis in 1903 he entered into 
partnership with Dr. Oscar A. Fiesburg, with whom he was associated 
in business one year. Then he opened his present drug store at 1854 
Central avenue, where he has since conducted a prosperous business. 

Mr. Goldner is a great reader and a lover of good literature. He 
is a member of the National Association of Retail Druggists, the Modem 
Woodmen of America, the I. O. O. F., and the New Boston Commercial 
Club. 

In 1896, he married Miss Thilda Larson, who was bom in Arvika, 
Sweden. Of the four children bom of this union, two sons and a daugh- 
ter are living: Sigurd Axel, Thor Hemfrid and Anna Emilia Mathilda. 

August Berg, a grocery merchant of Minneapolis, was bom in 
Sweden June 29, i860, a son of a farmer, John Berg. After completing 
his education in the schools of his home place August Berg came to the 
United States in 1880 and located at Center City, Minnesota, where for 
a few years he worked at farm labor. From there he went to Duluth, 
this state, and woriced in a lumber yard, and then coming to Minneapolis 
in 1893 he entered upon his successful career as a grocery merchant at 
his present location, 1335 Franklin avenue, in partnership with Peter 
Limblom. But after four years this partnership was dissolved, Mr. 
Berg buying, his partner's interest, and he has since continued in busi- 
ness alone. He has been very successful in his ventures, and now owns 
one of the largest and best equipped grocery stores on Franklin avenue. 
Honorable and upright in all his dealings, these principles combined with 
his progressiveness and industry have contributed largely to his business 
success. 

He married, in October, 1907, Miss Julia Hawkins, who was bom 
in Minneapolis and also educated in the public schools of that city. 

Oscar C. Swanson, florist, 618 Nicollet avenue, Minneapolis, was 
born in Varnas, near Christianstad, January 11, 1864, son of Peter and 
Helena Swanson. Peter Swanson was a florist and gardener, and died 
in the old country, but his widow, now seventy-seven years of age, is liv- 
ing in Minneapolis. They were the parents of six children: August S., 
a florist of St. Paul, Minnesota ; Herman N., a fruit farmer of Lake Min- 



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OSCAR C. SWANSON 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 631 



tietonka, Minnesota; Oscar Carl, the subject of this sketch; Svante 
Leonard, who lives in Omaha, Nebraska; Augusta and Shunne Raime, 
both of Minneapolis, the latter a florist. 

When Oscar C. was a few months old his parents moved to Mar- 
strand, where they made their home for eight years, at the end of that 
time going to Boras. At the latter place he passed through the grades in 
the public schools, and was confirmed in the Lutheran church. At the 
age of seventeen, with his two brothers, Leonard and August, he emi- 
grated to America and went to Missouri, where they joined his brother 
Herman, who had preceded them to this country. That was in 1881. 
About three years later Oscar came to Minneapolis. He had worked as 
a gardener and florist both in the old country and in this, and in Minne- 
apolis he entered the employ of Mr. Kilvington, at that time the most 
prominent florist in the city, and with whom his brother August was 
already connected. A year later, Oscar C. rented a truck garden farm 
north of Minneapolis, to which he devoted his energies for six years. 
In 1892, he was oflFered a position with the State Training School at 
Red Wing, Minnesota, as gardener and florist, a position he filled four 
years. The next two years he conducted a florist business in Red Wing. 
Returning to Minneapolis in 1898, he opened a retail florist store at 618 
Nicollet avenue, where he has since remained, engaged in a successful 
business. 

In April, 1892, Mr. Swanson married Miss Anna Peterson, of Hec- 
tor, Minnesota. She was bom in Skine, Sweden, April 28, 1872, and is 
a sister of Mrs. August Swanson. In Mrs. Swanson's family are foui 
sisters, all of whom married men by the name of Swanson, three of 
them being Swedes and one a Norwegian. She also has three brothers. 
Oscar C. Swanson and wife have four children: Helen Christine, bom 
in 1893; Esther Isabelle, in 1897; Dean Oscar Le Roy, in 1899; and 
Evangeline Anna, in 1901. They reside at 2415 Bayhles avenue. Re- 
ligiously, they are Methodists and attend the church of that denomina- 
tion in St. Anthony Park, the suburb in which they live. Mr. Swanson 
is a member of the Publicity Club, which is boosting Minneapolis. 

Frederick A. Hultquist, proprietor of the Great Westem Labor 
Agency, Minneapolis, accomplishes a useful service to the community 
and conducts a prosperous business by furnishing reliable workmen to 
the railroads, lumber companies and other concems which he carries on 
his books. He is a native of Sweden, born October 8, 1879, i" Norr- 
socken, Bringelsjo, Vermland, two miles Jfrom Karlstad, and is a son 
of Eric M. and Christina Hultquist. His father, a shoemaker, is a native 
of Ericstad, Sweden, bom in November, 1840, and is living with his son 
in Minneapolis, while the mother, also of Norrsocken, di^ in St. Paul 
in 1886. The two daughters of their household are both dead, but the 
two sons are living in the United States. 

In 1883, when four years of age, Mr. Hultquist came to St. Paul 



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632 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



with his parents. After attending both the public schools and a parish 
school, he entered the store of Field, Mahler & Company as a cashboy, 
and, after remaining in their employ for some time, became connected 
with the McMillan Packing Company. He was also identified with the 
health department of St. Paul under Commissioner Ohage, but in May, 
1904, established himself in an independent business venture by the 
establishment of the Great Western Labor Agency, which has become 
one of the leading business institutions of the city. 

On February 15, 1900, Mr. Hultquist married Miss Rosa Anna A. 
Urman, daughter of Max Urman, a former resident of St. Paul and 
an honored citizen, now deceased. Three children have been bom to 
this union, as follows : Frederick Frank, bom October 12, 1903 ; Will- 
iam Alex, born August 16, 1905, and Henrietta Maria, bom July 22, 1907. 
The family residence is at 2210 Minnehaha avenue, where Mr. Hult- 
quist owns a handsome piece of property. This is but one of the evi- 
dences that his industry, good business judgment and honorable conduct 
have placed him in a prosperous and secure position. Since coming to 
America he has been able to make one European trip and not only visit 
the scenes of his nativity and early life but to extend his travels into other 
countries. When he crossed the Atlantic his father accompanied him. 
They left Minneapolis December 19, 1906, visiting Sweden, Norway, 
Denmark, Great Britain and other parts of Europe, returning by way of 
Canada to their American home, April 28, 1907, and being actually on 
their travels for more than four months. 

Carl Johan Cederstrom, who maintains his home in Minneapolis, 
is a worthy representative of the sterling Norseland race from which 
he is spmng and has attained success and prestige in connection with 
practical business activities, being now the popular general agent of the 
Eisenstadt Manufacturing Company, of St. Louis, Missouri, in their 
Northwestern territory. This substantial concern, in which he is an 
interested principal, is engaged in the wholesale jewelry business and 
controls a large and widely disseminated trade. The company are also 
direct importers of diamonds and other precious gems. 

Mr. Cederstrom was born in Elfsbacka, Vermland, Sweden, on the 
22d of November, 1857, 21"^ is a son of Carl Johan Cederstrom, Sr., who 
likewise was a native of the parish of Elfsbacka, where he was born in 
the year 1822. He moved to Nyed, same province, in 1868. He spent 
the last years of his life on his homestead, Karlberg, near the village of 
Fernsvicken, Nyed parish, where he died in 1897. His devoted wife, 
whose maiden name was Christina Jonsson, died in 1883, at the age of 
fifty-one years. They became the parents of seven children, of whom five 
are living, namely : Carl J., who is the immediate subject of this review ; 
Louise, who was born in i860, and who is now the wife of Carl J. Palm- 
quist, a civil engineer in the employ of the Missouri Pacific Railroad, 
with residence in the city of St. Louis ; Ida, who was born in 1866, and 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 633 



who is the wife of Eric W. Palmquist, a mechanical engineer, in the em- 
ploy of the American Steel Company in St. Louis, Missouri; Anders 
Wilhelm, who was bom in 1870, and who is engaged in the clothing 
business at Eldorado, Arkansas; and Gustaf Albin, who was bom in 
1876, and who is now secretary of the American Stove Company, in the 
city of St. Louis. 

Carl J. Cederstrom gained his early education in the excellent schools 
of his native province, where he also received private instmctions, con- 
tinuing his studies until 1873, when, at the age of sixteen years, he se- 
cured a position in the Nysell hardware establishment at Filipstad, Swe- 
den, where he continued to be engaged for six years, at the expiration of 
which, in 1879, he emigrated to the United States and took up his resi- 
dence in the city of St. Louis, Missouri, where he was in the employ 
of a hardware concem until 1884. He then engaged in business on his 
own responsibility, going into the wholesale jewelry trade. He later 
disposed of this business and entered the employ of the Attleboro Jewelry 
Company, a leading exporting concem of St. Louis. He became one of 
the interested principals in this company, for which he was a traveling 
representative for five years, covering principally the trade territory in 
Mexico and South America. At the expiration of the period noted Mr. 
Cederstrom sold his interest in the business and acquired an interest in 
the Eisenstadt Manufacturing Company, of St. Louis, with which he has 
since been identified and for which he has been general agent for the 
northwestern territory for the past decade, with headquarters in Minne- 
apolis, where he took up his residence in 1905. The company are exten- 
sive importers of diamonds and other precious gems, and in this line 
and in the general wholesale trade in jewelry they command a large and 
important business. Mr. Cederstrom has been indefatigable in his efforts 
and has shown marked initiative and executive ability, the results of 
which are evidenced in the fine business he has built up for his concem 
throughout the wide radius of territory assigned to his charge. He 
passes a considerable portion of his time in representing his house as 
a traveling salesman, and his popularity with his clientage is of the most 
unequivocal order, based upon objective appreciation of his fairness and 
integrity in all his representations and dealings. Of him the following 
pertinent statements have consistently been made: "Mr. Cederstrom has 
made an admirable record for industry and enterprise, having been busy 
every day since he arrived in America and having no inclination for apa- 
thetic ease or even temporary idleness. He is popular and highly re- 
spected, and in his New Year's mail each year receives gpreetings from 
all parts of the United States, as well as from Cuba, South America and 
his native land." 

In politics Mr. Cederstrom gives a loyal support to the cause of the 
Republican party, and while a resident of St. Louis he was a zealous 
member of the Gethsemane Swedish Lutheran church. In Minneapolis 
he and his wife are valued members of the Wesley Methodist Episcopal 



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634 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



church. Several years ago he purchased his present spacious and 
beautiful residence at 151 1 Nicollet avenue, and in this attractive home 
is dispensed a generous and gracious hospitality. 

In 1893 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Cederstrom to Miss 
Hilma Vinberg, who was bom in Vestervik, Sweden, and who is a daugh- 
ter of Gustaf Vinberg, who was a successful manufacturer of shoes and 
an honored and influential citizen. Mr. Vinberg was also well known 
as one of the chief promoters of the organization of the temperance 
union in his home city. Mr. and Mrs. Cederstrom have three children, 
namely: Eva, who was bom on the 12th of January, 1897; and Carl 
and Gertrude, twins, who were born on the 6th of July, 1901. 

John Bjorkman. — No more worthy representative of the indus- 
trious, intelligent and progressive members of the Swedish race can be 
found in the entire state of Minnesota than John Bjorkman, senior mem- 
ber of the firm of Bjorkman Brothers, plumbers and gas fitters, located at 
No. 712 Tenth street. South, Minneapolis. A man of keen foresight, 
wide awake and alert, he is ever ready to seize every oflFered opportunity' 
for advancing his material interests, and in addition to building up an 
excellent business has, by his honorable and straightforward dealings 
with his fellow men gained the confidence and esteem of his neighbors, 
friends and patrons. A son of Jonas Bjork, he was bom .in Bollnas, 
Sweden, September 11, i860, and was there bred and educated. 

Jonas Bjork, whose death occurred in 1901, in Sweden, where he had 
spent his entire life, was a carpenter by trade. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Martha Anderson, survived him, and is still living in Sweden. 
Of their union nine children were born, of whom one, Martha, who came 
to Minnesota, and here married, died in Minneapolis, in 1893, and the 
other eight are living, as follows: Anders Johnson, a carpenter in 
Bollnas, Sweden; Karin, wife of Anders Hellstrom, who is engaged in 
shoemaking near Bollnas ; Jonas Bjorkman, a carpenter and stonecutter, 
in Sweden ; Lars Bjorkman, of Sweden, a general utility man, or what 
would be called in this country a "Jack of all trades,'* is a blacksmith, 
wagon maker, horseshoer, and is skilful in the use of all tools, even the 
dentist's ; Erik Johnson is a farmer in Sweden ; Brita, who is unmarried, 
is a dressmaker and modiste in Sweden ; Olof L. Bjorkman, of the firm 
of Bjorkman Brothers, Minneapolis; and John, with whom this sketch 
is chiefly concerned. 

After his confirmation in the Lutheran church, John Bjorkman 
worked as a miller and shoemaker until 1885. Having saved his money, 
he then set sail for America, and after his arrival in Minnesota worked 
for a few months in stone quarries. Returning then to his trade, he was 
in the employ of a shoemaker for a year, when, having, become familiar 
to some extent with the language and customs of this country, he started 
in business for himself, managing a shoe shop for a year. Being then 
offered a position by Aron Person as a salesman in his "New Jersey Shoe 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 635 



Store," on Washington avenue, South, Minneapolis, Mr. Bjorkman 
accepted, and was with Mr. Person six years, after which he was head 
clerk in the shoe department of J. W. Kerr's store for a year and a half. 
Being taken seriously ill, Mr. Bjorkman was forced to give up that 
position, and to spend nearly two years in recuperating. Having recov- 
ered his former physical vigor, he embarked in the upholstery business, 
in partnership with John Rydbeck, and when Mr. Rydbeck made up his 
mind to return to Sweden the business was sold out. 

In the spring of . 1897 Mr. Bjorkman formed a partnership with 
his brother, Olof L. Bjorkman, who had the previous year established 
himself as a plumber and gas fitter at No. 525 Second avenue, and before 
the year was out the firm of Bjorkman Brothers had so largely increased 
its business that more ample accommodations were necessitated, and the 
firm removed to its present location, at No. 712 Tenth street. South, as 
mentioned above. The business, which is very extensive, includes plumb- 
ing, heating, gas fitting, etc. This firm has acquired a wide reputation 
for its artistic and durable work, and has filled many contracts of impor- 
tance and value, among the larger contracts executed by Bjorkman 
Brothers being the installation of plumbing in the dormitory of St. Olaf 
College, in Northfield, Minnesota ; a part of the plant in the City Hospital 
of Minneapolis; the plants in the Quarantine and Swedish Hospitals; 
Folwell Hall of the State University of Minnesota; the plant in a part 
of the State's Prison at Stillwater; the heating and plumbing in many 
church buildings, including St. John's Lutheran church, St. Paul's 
Lutheran churdi, the Grace Free Mission, the First Swedish Methodist 
Episcopal, the Baptist church at the comer of Twenty-fourth street and 
Twenty-eighth avenue, and in many smaller cljurch edifices. To enumer- 
ate the ntunber of school houses and the many spacious residences in 
which this enterprising firm has installed heating plants and gas fittings 
and fixtures would be well nigh impossible, but special mention may 
well be made of the beautiful residence of Swan J. Tumblad, publisher 
of the Svenskct Amerikanska Post en, in which Bjorkman Brothers had 
entire charge of putting in the heating and plumbing, a business amount- 
ing to some $20,000. 

On June 13, 1889, Mr. Bjorkman married a fair Swedish maiden. 
Miss Josephine Carlson, who was born December 19, 1865, in Hohult, 
Maleras parish, Kalmar laen, Sweden. Five children have been bom to 
Mr. and Mrs. Bjorkman, of whom two, both sons, died in infancy, and 
three are living, namely: Ruth Agneta, born January 20, 1890, is a 
young woman of much talent and many accomplishments, being a fine 
pianist and a good singer and an artist of ability, having taken lessons 
in painting since a school girl ; Martha Linnea Josephine, bom April 20, 
1897, attends school ; and Anna Elvira Jeanette, bom March 9, 1904. 

Mr. Bjorkman has always been an ardent temperance worker and 
since 1882 has belonged to the Independent Order of Good Templars. 
Fraternally he is a member of the Modem Woodmen of America, and 



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636 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



of the Odin Club. He is an accomplished musician, and it was mainly 
through his efforts that, on July 21, 1892, the singing society, the "Young 
Svca" (Unga Svea), was organized. It was subsequently made a part 
of the Swedish-American Singers' Union, and participated in the great 
Saengerfest at the Chicago World's Fair in 1893. On May 17, 1896, 
the ** Young Svea" won the prize at the large international singing con- 
test in the Minneapolis Exposition Building, it being awarded to 
the society by popular vote, and in 1898 it won another prize at the 
contest arranged by the "Carnival of Fire." This society would certainly 
now be in existence if its promoter, Mr. Bjorkman, had not been taken 
ill and forced to abandon its management. After his recovery Mr. Bjork- 
man was for several years a member of the Orpheus Singing Society. 
In 1896, accompanied by his family, Mr. Bjorkman crossed the ocean, 
and in addition to traveling extensively on the continent visited Edin- 
burgh and Scotland on their way back to Minneapolis. 

Alfred Lind, M. D., of Minneapolis, Minnesota, and Bayate, Cuba, 
is one of the most energetic, scholarly, practical and altogether remark- 
able Swedish- Americans of the Northwest; for, although his business 
and promotional abilities are now chiefly diverted to the prosperous 
Swedish colony which he has established in the Spanish-American island 
to the south, he is still classed as a leading resident of the Twin Cities. 
He is a graduate in medicine of three countries and entitled to practice in 
four; is one of the founders of the great Swedish Hospital in Minne- 
apolis, and for the past four years has dropped a large and lucrative 
practice in that city in order to place the colony at Bayate on a paying 
basis, as he had interested numerous personal friends in the enterprise. 
It was a matter both of conscience and pride with him, and there is every 
probability that he will succeed in what has never heretofore been accom- 
plished — ^the planting of a permanent Scandinavian colony in the American 
tropics. During the first year of the Cuban enterprise the native congress 
appropriated two hundred thousand dollars for the encouragjement of 
Swedish immigration to the island, but through various politicsd intrigues 
the action of the government came to naught The outcome, or rather 
lack of outcome, was a setback to the colony which Dr. Lind had planted, 
but he never faltered and the movement has since steadily progressed. 
One of the plans of the founder for insuring the permanence of the 
colony, which he has already placed well under way, is the erection of a 
sugar factory at Bayate. To sustain the incessant and strenuoua labors 
connected with his professional and business careers, the doctor is blessed 
with a splendid physique and a seemingly inexhaustible fund of mental 
and physical energy. 

Dr. Lind was bom three miles from the city of Lidkoping, Vester- 
gotland, Sweden, on the banks of the Lidan river, March 11, 1862. He 
was one of ten children raised on the farm in this locality, and as his 
parents were much limited as to means it may be imagined that frugality 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 639 



was the order of the days and years, and that the privileges of education 
were trimmed accordingly. Alfred well remembers that his school days 
in Sweden were mostly occupied in memorizing Bible literature and 
Lutheran catechisms. However the youth may have grown mentally 
up to the age of eighteen is uncertain, but as he then had reached the 
physical height of six feet his increase of stature in that direction was 
noteworthy. It is also evident that he had commenced to "feel his 
inches," for in 1880 he started from Sweden to test his manhood in 
America. 

First locating at St. Peter, the center of a stalwart Swedish popu- 
lace, he made that vicinity the scene of his varied labors for the suc- 
ceeding ten years. In such manner he paid his way through the Gustavus 
Adolphus College, St. Peter, Augustana College, Rock Island, and the 
University of Minnesota, thus obtaining the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Medicine. In the year 1894 he 
passed the examination for the degree of M. D. in Berlin, Germany; in 
1899, the same degree, with honors, in Stockholm, Sweden; and in 
1908 a similar degree was granted to him by the University of Cuba, at 
Havana. He therefore has the almost unique distinction of being entitled 
to practice in four different countries, but has qualified himself to prac- 
tice in Swedish, German, English and Spanish. Dr. Lind is also a grad- 
uate of the Central Institute of Gymnastics at Stockholm, and for several 
years lectured on physical culture and hydro-therapeutics at the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota. He became a resident of Minneapolis in 1895, and 
continued to win a high reputation there as a physician and surgeon and 
a lecturer on professional subjects, until his business aflfairs in Cuba 
forced him to resign both his practice and his professorship. To a very 
large extent it was his energy, unselfishness and foresight which have 
made the Swedish Hospital what it is, and to him is also due, in great 
measure, the existence and to some extent the high standing of the 
Minnesota College as a private educational institution. Despite his really 
notable accomplishments and his deep and varied knowledge, he is 
noticeably quiet and unassuming, but back of all is instinctively recognized 
a'determined, intense and progressive personality. 

Dr. Julius Johnson is a prominent representative of the medical 
profession in Minneapolis, and has gained a distinctive prestige in the 
practice of his chosen calling. Bom at the town of Sacred Heart, Minne- 
sota, December 21, 1877, he is a son of Ole and Lizzie (Hendrickson) 
Johnson, who were farming people in Renville county, near Sacred 
Heart. In their family were four children, Frederick and Henry, twins, 
August and Julius. The father of this family died in the year 1891, and 
boA he and his wife were members of the Lutheran church. 

Dr. Julius Johnson in his early life enjoyed good educational advan- 
tages. He attended the public schools of Sacred Heart until he was sev- 
enteen, and then entering the State Normal he studied there for two 



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640 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



years, after which he taught for a similar period, and then again entered 
the State Normal for another year. From there he went to Hamlin 
University and graduated from its medical department in 1906, and then 
for one year was house physician at St. Barnabas Hospital. In June of 
1907 Dr. Johnson opened an office at 2123 Chicago avenue in Minneap- 
olis, and has since been engaged in the practice of medicine here, at the 
same time fully demonstrating that he is well informed concerning the 
principles of the medical science and their correct application. He is a 
member of the Hennepin County Medical Society, of the State Medical 
Association ; also the American Medical Association, the Swedish Broth- 
erhood and the order of Good Templars. He is also member of the 
Lutheran church. 

Andrew August Holmgren, general manager of the Baneret, Min- 
neapolis, Minnesota, has been a resident of this country since 1893. Mr. 
Holmgren was bom at Bjurholm, Vesterbottens Lan, Sweden, Octot)er 11, 
1866, son of Anders Holmgren and his wife, Eva Margareta Andersdotter 
Skarin. In his youth his only educational advantages were those of the 
public schools. In 1886 he was converted and joined the Baptist church, 
and soon thereafter began preaching the Gospel. He attended two terms 
of Bible school at Sundsvall, and until 1893 served his church in the 
capacity of district Sunday school missionary. Then he came to America. 
With headquarters at Minneapolis, he traveled throughout northern Min- 
nesota in mission work among his countrymen, being thus occupied two 
years. In 1895 he took charge of Baptist churches at Lake Sarah and 
Burchard, Minnesota ; a year later he accepted a call to Stratford, Iowa, 
as pastor of the Swedish Baptist church in that city, and in 1898 moved 
to Burlington, Iowa. At first he devoted his time wholly to the church, 
but in 1898 he took charge of Ungdomens Tidning, a Baptist monthly 
paper, which had been started, in 1^6, in Chicago. The Rev. Holmgren 
decided to enlarge the paper, and for that purpose moved it to Minne- 
apolis and made it the regular organ of the Baptist church. In 1902 he 
bought a paper entitled Fyrbaken, which he consolidated with the other 
paper, and the name has been changed to Baneret (The Banner), May 
I, 1907, The Baneret Publishing Company was incorporated under the 
laws of the state of Minnesota, the first board of directors of the com- 
pany being as follows: M. Lawson, president; O. Bodine, vice-presi- 
dent ; V. E. Hedberg, treasurer ; C. A. Aldeen, director ; A. A. Holmgren, 
general manager; and J. O. Backlund, secretary and editor. The paper 
is issued weekly. 

In 1890 Mr. Holmgren married Miss Alma Maria Charlotta Ander- 
son, of Sundsvall. They have six children : Alice Mary, Harold August, 
Ruben Garret Jonathan, Rosie Margxeta, Herbert Isadore, and Milton. 
The family are members of the First Swedish Baptist church of 
Minneapolis. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 641 



Andrew P. Ortquist^ proprietor of a laundry in Minneapolis, was 
bom in Elfsbacka, Vermland, Sweden, January 11, 1866, and is the son 
of Anders Peterson and Greta Ortquist, both now living in Sweden. 
They were the parents of six children, of whom the following survive: 
Carl J. Anderson, bom in 1863, emigrated to America, but returned to 
his native country, where he is now engaged in farming; Andrew P.; 
Reverend Lars Gustaf Anderson, bom in 1870, pastor of the Mission 
Friends' church in Minneapolis ; Maria Catharina, bom in 1872, married 
Emanuel Anderson, a farmer in Vermland, Sweden. 

Andrew received his early education in the public schools and was 
duly confirmed in the church at Elfsbacka, after which he worked several 
years on his father's farm. Mr. Ortquist came to America in April, 
1887, and located in Minneapolis ; he could find no work in the city and 
was obliged to go to the country and work on a railroad, and he relates 
the fact that on nearing the place where he was to find work and pre- 
paring to pay for his last meal, the price of which was twenty-five cents, 
he was possessed of only nineteen cents. After spending three months 
on the railroad he returned to Minneapolis and worked some time for 
the city, then putting in a water works system. Later he entered the 
employ of Oscar Lindquist, contractor and builder, where he leamed 
bricklaying and masonry, and continued to work at this trade until the 
fall of 1894. During the winter of 1895 Mr. Ortquist started business 
at his present location, 722 Eleventh avenue. South, under the name of 
The Lincoln Laundry, and through his energy and enterprise has been 
able to build up a remunerative and growing business. 

Mr. Ortquist has supplemented his early education, finding in busi- 
ness the advantage of wider knowledge. During the winter of 1887-8 
he attended evening sessions of the Adam School, and the following 
winter took a course at the Emanuel Academy of the Swedish Lutheran 
Augustana church, under the teaching of Professor Edquist, of St. Peter. 
During the following winter he took another course at the evening ses- 
sions of the Adam School. He is popular socially and is a member of 
the Independent Order pf Odd Fellows, and has also been a member of 
the Society Gustavus Adolphus and the South Side Commercial Club. 
In politics he is an adherent of the Republican party, and in 1896 was 
elected to the City Council from the Eleventh ward, this being a recog- 
nized Democratic ward, and received the largest majority ever received 
in that ward by one of his party. In his service as a member of the 
Council he took a strong stand against the passage of the thirty-year 
electric franchise, which passed that body but received the veto of the 
mayor. He has taken a similar stand in regard to other franchises of a 
like nature, and has made his views and presence known in the body of 
which he is a member by his fearless stand for the legislation he believes 
to be for the city's good. 

Mr. Ortquist married, December 12, 1896, Anna, daughter of Jonas 

41 



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642 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Peterson, of Osceola, Wisconsin. Her parents, who live on a farm, 
have three daughters besides Mrs. Ortquist, namely: Eva, Hanna and 
Clara. 

Peter Anderson, proprietor of a meat market at 1905 Washington 
avenue, South, was bom in Tullofta, Skine, Sweden, January 31, 1867, 
and is a son of Anders and Anna (Tykesson) Person. They had nine 
children, five of whom survive, as follows : Nels, who has a meat market 
in Minneapolis ; Hanna, married Andrew Nelson, a cattle dealer in Min- 
neapolis; Peter; Andrew, also in a meat market; and Anna, married 
Gust Nelson, who is a member of the fire department of Minneapolis. 

After receiving his education in the public schools and being con- 
firmed in the Lutheran church, Peter Anderson worked on his father's 
farm until he was nineteen years of age, and in 1886 emigrated to the 
United States. Upon his arrival in Minneapolis he at first had to work 
at anything he could find to do; he worked some time at tanning, and 
for the last twenty years has been in the butcher and meat business. In 
1893 he went into business on his own account, taking his brother 
Andrew for a partner, and four years later purchased his brother's share 
of the business; since then he has been sole proprietor of the business, 
in the neighborhood where he is now located. He has built up a fine 
trade, and keeps a first-class line of meats. 

Mr. Anderson also owns a half interest with Adolf Holm in a 
meat market at 1123 East Franklin avenue, under the firm name of 
Anderson & Holm, Mr. Anderson being owner of the building. He is 
also interested in the Builders' Hardware G)mpany. In company with 
his brother Andrew he holds land in Seneca, South Dakota, and in com- 
pany with his brothers Andrew and Nels he holds three and one-half 
sections of land at Monaco, Wisconsin. He owns a fine lot in a good 
location in Minneapolis, where he purposes building himself a residence. 
He holds an interest in Mockeln's sawmill, in Smiland, Sweden, and also 
holds stock in several other enterprises in America. 

Mr. Anderson married, June 2, 1894, in Minneapolis, Bertha Ekberg, 
born June 2, 187 1, at Onsby, Skine, Sweden, and a daughter of Jon and 
Svenborg (Nilson) Jonsson. They became the parents of six children, 
of whom five survive, namely : Mauritz William, bom July 5, 1895, died 
in Sweden while the family was visiting there, and was tnere buried; 
Arnold Sigurd, born August 7, 1896; Hilding Mauritz, bom August 27, 
1898; Malcolm Reinhold, bom October 28, 1901; Einar Calvin, bom 
June I, 1903; and Beauford Waldemar, bom November ^, 1009. They 
attend the Swedish Lutheran Augustana church and reside at 1818 
Two-and-one-half street Mr. Anderson is a member of the Modem 
Woodmen of America and of the Royal League. 

Dr. Carl A. Lindgren^ of Minneapolis, Minnesota, was bom, Jan- 
uary 6, 1877, at Steneby socken, state of Dalsland, Sweden, son of John 



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SWEDISH^AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 643 

and Maria Lindgren, natives of that place. His father was by trade a 
bookbinder, but was somewhat prominent in other lines of business and 
only at intervals followed his trade. For several years he was post- 
master and he was also manager of a branch banking house. He passed 
his life and died in Sweden, his death occurring in 1901. He was the 
father of five children: Amanda, who married Frank Olson; John, 
Tekla, Carl A., and William. 

Carl A. Lindgren in his youth attended public school and also 
received instruction from a private teacher, who prepared him for 
college. Before he entered college, however, his father met with financial 
loss by fire, with the result that plans for the young man's education 
were necessarily changed. Early in life he had the medical profession 
in view, and while he was debarred from college, he spent his leisure 
in study, and it was his good fortune to have access to the many choice 
books which were brought to his father's place to be bound. Mean- 
while he became a photographer's apprentice and mastered the business 
in all its details, but from this he soon turned his attention to the study 
of telegraphy, in which he soon became proficient. Obtaining a position 
as supply telegrapher on the Uddevalla Lelangen Railroad, he worked in 
this capacity for about two years, during which time he served at nearly 
every telegraph station on the entire road. And all the while he read 
every medical book within his reach. He was yet a mere boy, only 
sixteen, but at this early age he went on the platform as a lecturer and 
enjoyed the distinction of being the youngest lecturer in Sweden. He 
lectured on temperance, politics and kindred subjects in various sections 
of Sweden, Norway, Finland and Canada, this work covering a period 
of twelve years. He delivered a course of lectures on "The Effect of 
Alcohol on the Human Body," and for this received remuneration that 
enabled him to further pursue his studies under the instructors from the 
Royal Carolinean Institute. Subsequently he became the editor and pro- 
prietor of a newspaper, which he established and successfully conducted 
for a short time, and which is still in a flourishing condition. 

In 1902 Dr. Lindgren came to the United States. After spending 
a short time in New York and Chicago he came to Minneapolis and 
entered the employ of S. P. Eg^n, photographer, with whom, however, 
he remained only a short time, leaving that place to travel and lecture in 
the interest of the Good Templars. As lecturer and organizer of Good 
Templar lodges he traveled over the states of Missouri, Wisconsin, Illi- 
nois, Iowa, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Kansas, New York and 
Canada. He has estimated mat in his travels in this and foreign coun- 
tries he has covered over two hundred thousand miles, or what would 
be equal to eight times around the world. 

In 1904 we find Dr. Lindgren in Chicago, studying medical gym- 
nastics, psycho-therapeutics, etc. He graduated there in 1905. August 
12, 1907, he returned to Minneapolis. He settled at Twenty-second and 
Central avenue, and a short time afterward moved from there to 1910 



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644 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Central avenue, where he established himself in his profession. He is 
now located at 301-2-3 Century Building and has a large and growing 
business. 

Dr. Lindgren is a member of the American Medical Union and the 
Minnesota Naturopathic Association. October 23, 1900, he married Miss 
Ida T. Olson, and they have one child, Carl Tore Isidore Lindgren, bom 
November 27, 1901. 

Joseph O. Jacobson. — Among the leading musicians of Minneapolis 
and the Swedish-Americans of the northwest, is Professor Joseph O. 
Jacobson, a thorough instructor and a popular composer. He is a native 
of Gothenburg, Sweden, born November 13, 1876, and is a son of J. T. H. 
and Hilda (Runquist) Jacobson. His father, who was bom on the island 
of Gothland in 1843, was a wholesale dealer in Gothenburg, but removed 
to Stockholm, where he is now living. His mother is the daughter of the 
late M. Runquist, director in the Kalmar Enskilda Bank. Besides Joseph 
O., the children of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. H. Jacobson were as follows: 
Helf rid, who is now Mrs. N. Lindahl and a resident of Stockholm ; Fred- 
rik, married, also living in that city; John, who came to the United 
States and died as a Minneapolis engineer in 1900; Gustaf, of Stockholm; 
Herman, who is married and is in Minneapolis; William, a shipping 
clerk, who is similarly situated ; and Gunnar, who lives in Stockholm. 

Professor Jacobson was only six months old when his parents moved 
from Gothenburg to Stockholm, and at the latter city the boy attended 
the public schools and received his musical education. At the age of ten 
years he commenced his professional studies under the best private tutors,^ 
including Professor Lagergren, organist in Slottskyrkan. In 1895 he 
entered the Royal Swedish Conservatory of Music, where he studied 
for two years. Deciding that the United States presented a more favor- 
able field for him than Sweden, or any other European country, in 1897^ 
he emigrated to this country in company with his father; but the latter, 
after a residence of about three years in Massachusetts, returned ta 
Stockholm. The Professor's first professional work was in Worcester, 
Massachusetts, but after teaching there for a few months he located in 
Boston, where he remained for a year. While he was a resident of the 
Hub, the silver jubilee of King Oscar II occurred, and in honor of that 
occasion he composed "King Oscar's Jubilee March," which was en- 
thusiastically received by five thousand music-loving people. 

In 1899 Professor Jacobson carried out the plan which had been 
firmly forming in his mind to locate among his enterprising and able 
people of the northwest, settling for that purpose in Minneapolis. With- 
in the past decade he has established an unrivaled reputation as a teacher 
and an organist, and is widely known in the northwest as a composer. 
For several years he filled the position as organist in St. Ansgaria 
Swedish Episcopal church, resigning to accept more remunerative and 
more responsible engagements. The best known of his compositons are. 



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(y3 .yt (t-c^M^^h^n^^ 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 647 



perhaps "Minnesota Thirteenth Regiment March," of which eighty thou- 
sand copies were sold, and "Minnehaha Waltz," both published by the 
Donaldson Company of Minneapolis. With his wife, Professor Jacobson 
resides at 2301 East Twenty-second street, and no Swedish-American 
couple is more deeply respected or more warmly welcomed into the social 
and professional circles of Minneapolis. 

On May 15, 1902, the Professor wedded Miss Engla Sofie Frisen- 
dahl, daughter of Daniel Frisendahl, of Ragunda parish, Jemtland, Swe- 
den. Mrs. Jacobson was bom November 17, 1875, ^"d is descended from 
one of the oldest and best known families of that province. Her honored 
parents are now living in Minneapolis. 

Nels p. Nelson, assistant credit manager of the Minneapolis Brew- 
ing Company, was born November 18, 1862, at Munka Ljungby, Chris- 
tianstad Lan, Sweden; his parents are both deceased. He received his 
education in the public schools until the time of his confirmation in the 
Lutheran church, and then took a course in the business college at 
Engelholm. His first position was as a bookkeeper and clerk in the 
general merchandise store of his brother at Munka Ljungby, and he 
remained there two years. He then took a position with Carl Hjalmar 
Agardh as bookkeeper and remained with him three years. 

In 1882 Mr. Nelson embarked for the United States, arriving in 
Cannon Falls, Minnesota, September i of that year. He lived there 
with a brother for some time and took a course at the high school, having 
learned the English language before leaving his native country, so that 
he was able to profit well by this course. He worked three years as 
clerk in general merchandise stores, but recognizing the small oppor- 
tunity offered him for advancement in so small a town, he removed to 
St. Paul and took a full course in the C. C. Curtis Business College, 
after which he was offered a situation with John Orth Brewing. Com- 
pany, and remained there eight years. At the end of that time the 
breweries of Minneapolis consolidated and Mr. Nelson accepted a position 
as cashier with the combination, now the Minneapolis Brewing Company. 
After holding the position of cashier three years he was promoted to that 
of traveling auditor for the company, which post he held three years. 
Mr. Nelson then engaged in business on his own account, in the sporting 
goods line, in partnership with Oscar Mattson, under the firm name of 
Nelson & Mattson ; they continued in business six years and in 1903 the 
partnership was dissolved, Mr. Nelson selling his interest to Mr. Mattson. 
He accepted a position as local manager at Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 
for John Gund Brewing Company, of La Crosse, Wisconsin, where he 
remained two and one-half years and then resigned, deciding to make a 
tour of the western states; he traveled one year, most of the time in 
California. Returning to Minneapolis in the fall of 1906, he was offered 
the position he now holds. He has had a wide business experience, 
having not only gained it in working for others, but by managing 



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648 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



business on his own account, and is well fitted to take care of the duties 
assigned to him. 

Mr. Nelson takes considerable interest in Swedish societies. For 
several years he acted as treasurer of the Orpheus Singing Society and 
was one of the five members of the executive committee that had charge 
of the great Scandinavian Singing Festival at Minneapolis in 1900. He 
was very active in the organization of the Odin Club, and one of the 
fifteen charter members ; he has been president of the club for one year. 
Mr. Nelson is also affiliated with, the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
and for fourteen years was an officer of the National Guard of Minne- 
sota, serving seven years as lieutenant in Battery B and six years as 
battalion quartermaster of the artillery. He is now on the roll of retired 
officers. 

Mr. Nelson has many friends, both in his native country and in his 
adopted country, and all are proud of him and glad to claim his friend- 
ship. His strict attention to duty, his honesty and reliability, have gained 
for him success in business life and the respect of all who know him. 
In the fall of 1895 he visited his native country, and before returning to 
the United States traveled through Denmark, Norway, Germany, Hol- 
land, France and England, returning to Minneapolis the following 
spring. 

Nels Person Eklund, a prominent clothier of Minneapolis, was 
born in Glimakra, near Christianstad, Sweden, August 10, i860, and is 
a son of Per and Olie Person. He received his education in the public 
schools of his native country, and at the age of eighteen years emigrated 
to the United States and located at Burlington, Iowa, where for some 
time he worked at various things as opportunity offered, and the second 
year found employment in a grocery store. Next he took a position in 
a clothing store, where he remained twelve years, and at the end of that 
time established himself in the clothing business in Minneapolis, Minne- 
sota, under the firm name of Nelson & Eklund; eleven years later he 
purchased his partner's interest, and since then has been sole proprietor, 
doing, a flourishing business. His partner,. P. J. Nelson, was a boyhood 
friend of Mr. Eklund. In partnership with John Olson he had opened 
a small store in 1891, under the name Nelson & Olson. Mr. Olson sold 
his interest in January, 1894, and the business was then conducted under 
the name of Nelson & Eklund. The following fall Mr, Nelson died. 
The widow retained her husband's interest eleven years, then sold her 
interest, which was at that time one-quarter, to Mr. C. A. Anderson, of 
Burlington, Iowa. The firm name then became Eklund Clothing Com- 
pany. Two years later Mr. Anderson sold his interest and since then 
Mr. Eklund has conducted the business independently. By the good 
management and business acumen of Mr. Eklund the business has 
attained eight times its former proportions. 

Mr. Eklund is a member of the Knights of Pythias, Independent 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 649 



Order of Odd Fellows and Society Norden, of which he is trustee. 
He is also a director of St. Anthony Conunercial Club, The family 
residence is 723 Tenth avenue, Southeast, and they attend the Swedish 
Lutheran Emanuel church, of which Mr. Eklund has been trustee three 
years. 

In 1896 Mr. Eklund married Anna Swanson, of Burlington, Iowa, 
who died in December, 1899. He married (second), in 1904, Augusta 
Swanson, of Minneapolis, by whom he had three sons, namely: Knut 
Arnold and Allan Person, twins, bom April 16, 1905, and Neil Bayard, 
bom April I2, 1908. 

Peter Monson, president of the Central Machine Works Com- 
pany, of Minneapolis, was born at Reslof, Skine, Sweden, August 3, 
1856. He is a son of Mins and Elsa (Olson) Person, now both de- 
ceased. He received his education in the public schools of his native 
parish, and was confirmed in the Lutheran church. He spent some time 
in farming and carpenter work, and at the age of twenty-one, having 
served the required two years in the Swedish Army, he went to Lands- 
krona, there to learn the trade of machinist. Mr. Monson emigrated to 
the United States in May, 1880, settling first in St. Paul; later he 
removed to Minneapolis, which has since been his place of residence. 
He worked seven years for the Crown Iron Works, part of the time as 
superintendent, and then for two years worked for the Enterprise 
Machine Company. At the expiration of this time he organized the 
Central Machine Works Company, of which he has been president since, 
with John Englund secretary and treasurer. The other principal share- 
holders are J. Cullen and Fred Nilson. They manufacture all kinds 
of machinery, making a specialty of woodworking machinery, and their 
volume of business is about sixty thousand dollars annually. 

During the summer months Mr. Monson and his family reside at 
their home at Lake Minnetonka and the remainder of the year at 1522 
Madison street, Northeast. The company's shops are located at Central 
and Thirteenth avenues. Northeast. Mr. Monson is a member of 
Nicollet Lodge No. 16, Ancient Order United Workmen. The family 
attends Elim Swedish Baptist church, of which Rev, V. E. Hedberg is 
pastor, and Mr. Monson holds the office of deacon and trustee. He 
became an American citizen October 27, 1897. In 1903 Mr. Monson 
visited his native country and afterwards traveled in Denmark, England 
and France, returning via England to the United States, and spent four 
months in this pleasant way. 

Mr. Monson married, in 1882, Charlotta Carlson, of Stallarholmen, 
Sodermanland, who died in 1885, leaving one daughter, Esther Aurora, 
born December 8, 1883, who married Petrus Nelson, of Minneapolis. 
In 1886 Mr. Monson married (second) Louise Swanson, bora in 
Wackels^ng parish, Smaland, Sweden, and they became the parents of 
six children, of whom four survive, namely: Edwin Gustaf, bora De- 



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650 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



cember 22, 1888 ; Aaron Gottfried, bom October 3, 1893 ; Daniel Walter, 
bom July 4, 1895 ; and Amy Evangeline, born May 5, 1901. Edwin G. 
is employed in the Central Machine Works shops, and the others are 
attending school. 

Carl Wilhelm Werdenhoff, a well-kno>\Ti railroad contractor of 
Minneapolis, was born February 15, 1846, at Tackhammer, Sodermanland, 
Sweden, and is a son of August Leonard and Inga Beata (Nordberg) 
Werdenhoff. The family belong to Swedish nobility, their ancestors 
having come from Bremen, Germany, and the first Swedish member of 
the family was elevated to the rank of noble in 1652, and in 1675 was 
introduced in the House of Nobles and Knights of Stockholm. August 
L. Werdenhoff was superintendent of the large landed estates of Counts 
Hamilton and Wachtmeister. He reared a family of seven children, as 
follows: Frans August, Elizabeth, Edla Charlotte, Hilda Wilhelmina, 
Carl Wilhelm, Gustaf Leonard and Evald Reinhold. Frans, Hilda and 
Gustaf are deceased; Evald Reinhold is superintendent of a large dairy 
and creamery at Flen; Elizabeth married Magnus Larson, a superin- 
tendent of estates, now deceased; and Edla is the widow of Gustaf 
Mellstrom, a railroad station master. 

Carl W. Werdenhoff received his primary education at Nykopmg 
and later attended school at Askersund, and at the age of eighteen secured 
emplo\Tnent as a bookkeeper on the estate of Homsberg, Tryserum 
parish, Kalmar Ian, where he remained four years. He spent two years 
on various other estates, and in 1870 emigrated to the United States, 
landing in New York May 26th and arriving at St. Paul June ist of that 
year. The first summer was spent by him in working for farmers in 
Goodhue county. During the autumn of that year he worked on the 
Mississippi river and in the winter went to work in the timber. In 1873 
Mr. Werdenhoff worked a short time on the Wisconsin Central Rail- 
road and went from there to Michigan, where he found employment in 
the mines and remained there three months, the panic in the fall of that 
year suspending all work. He returned to Minnesota, worked in the 
woods during the winter, as before, and in the summer on the railroad. 
He soon began taking small subcontracts for the railroad, increasing 
them from time to time as he was able, and at this occupation he has 
since continued, with great success. He uses the firm name of C. W. 
Werdenhoff & Company, and has come to have a reputation for his 
ability in this line. He is at present interested in work with Winston 
Brothers Company, having previously been connected with Langdon & 
Company, also with Foley Brothers & Larson Company. Mr. Werden- 
hoff conducts both grading and bridging in the course of his labors. 

In performing his duties he has necessarily encountered many dan- 
gers, and since coming to this country he has undergone many hardships 
and privations, yet his step is firm, his bearing erect, and his movements 
like those of a man of thirty. He is very fond of outdoor life, is a 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 653 



skilful hunter and sure shot ; he also takes considerable interest in antiqui- 
ties and in anthropology. Mr. Werdenhoff is a member of the Odin Club. 
He and his family attend St. John's English Lutheran church, and reside 
at 103 1 Sixth avenue, South. With his family he visited his native 
country in 1888 and again in 1908, also spending some time in traveling 
through other European countries. 

Mr. Werdenhoff married, May 17, 1882, Anna Carolina Birgitta 
Sherdahl, of Nordfjord, Eide, Bergen's Amt, Norway, and their union 
has been blessed with ten children, of whom seven survive, as follows: 
Beata Christine, bom September 15, 1884, married September 15, 1909, 
to Henry Elwood Cass, an employe of the Northwestern National Bank ; 
Lillie Amalia, June 25, 1887; Agnes Ingrid Wilhelmina, February i, 
1891 ; Frank Robert, November 26, 1892 ; James Henrik, November 4, 
1894; George Harold, January 9, 1897, and Martha Sophia Victoria, 
October 7, 1898. 

Frithiof Ferm, captain of police of the third precinct (south side 
station), Minneapolis, is one of the bravest officers and best disciplinari- 
ans connected with the force. His personal character would insure him 
the former qualification, and his thorough military education in Sweden 
has done much to bring him superiority as a skilful and popular handler 
of men. He joined the army, in 1875, when seventeen years of age, as a 
soldier in the Vestgota-Dal infantry regiment. The next year he received 
orders to attend the military school at Karlsborg, where he spent that 
year, as well as 1878 and 1879. I" ^883 he was promoted to be sergeant, 
but finding his future rather dark he resigned from the army and emi- 
grated to the United States, coming direct to Minneapolis, with his 
wife, in the year mentioned. He has therefore been a resident of the 
city for more than twenty-six years and has become one of the most re- 
spected and popular (among law-abiders) of the Swedish-Americans. 

Captain Ferm is a native of Ryr parish, Dalsland, born September 
19, 1858, to Josef and Johanna Ferm. His father, who was bom May 10, 
1825, is still living in Sweden, while his mother (daughter of Magnus 
Magnuson, a Ryr farmer), who was bom October 3, 1828, died in 1885. 
The children of this union numbered ten, as follows : Anna, who married 
Gustaf Larson, a farmer in Ryr ; Maria, who died at the age of sixteen 
years; Aaron, a laborer residing in Chicago, married and the father of 
one ch\ld ; Herman, owner of a shoe store in that city, who is married and 
has five children ; Frithiof, of this sketch ; Augusta, who married August 
Dahlgren, a Chicago baker, and is the mother of three children ; Otto, a 
Chicago carpenter, who is married and has eight children; Maria, mar- 
ried to Albert Johnson, a farmer of Shadow, Nebraska, and the mother 
of three children; Sophia, who died in her youth; and John, who died 
as a Minneapolis police officer in 1909. 

Captain Ferm spent his first two years in Minneapolis in the em- 
ploy of a lumber firm, but in 1885 commenced to learn the trade of an 



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654 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



iron moulder. This he followed until 1894, when he was appointed a 
patrolman on the central station detail, retaining that position for seven 
years. In 1901 he was advanced to the mounted force of the fourth pre- 
cinct, north side, and in 1905 promoted to the lieutenancy. On June i, 
1907, he was appointed captain of his present precinct (the third), then 
considered the most tr>'ing district in the city, but through his fearless- 
ness and fine discipline disorders have been reduced to a minimum. As 
an officer of the law, Captain Ferm has a record which i(xr faithfulness 
and efficiency is the best in Minneapolis, as during the entire period of his 
sixteen years* service not one demerit has hem entered against him. 
The captain was married in 1880 to Miss Annie Elofson, who was bom 
October 3, 1858, and is a daughter of Gustaf Elofson, of Ryr. The four 
children bom to them were : Robert, who is now a machinist in St. Paul, 
married and himself the father of one child, Lloyd; Esther, who lives 
with her parents and is attending high school ; Edmund, who has been a 
student for two years in Minnesota College, and is now leaming the 
machinist's trade; and Alice, who is also a high school pupil living at 
home. The handsome and comfOTtable family residence is at 4135 Emer- 
son avenue North. Captain Ferm and his family are members of the 
Salem Lutheran church at Camden Place, Minneapolis, and the former 
is an active member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Modem Woodmen of America. 

Andrew Anderson, proprietor of a meat market on Franklin avenue, 
in Minneapolis, is a splendid example of the success that can be attained 
by energy and enterprise, coupled with intelligence and thrift He was 
born in Fulltofta, Skine, Sweden, May 5, 1869, and is the son of Anders 
and Anna Person ; his parents, who resided on a farm, had nine children, 
five of whom survive, all being inhabitants of Minneapolis, namely: 
Nels, bom in 1859, is engaged in the meat business; Hanna, bora in 
1863, married Andrew Nelson, a cattle dealer; Peter, bom in 1867, has 
a meat market; Anna, bom in 1873, married Gust Nelson, employed in 
the Minneapolis Fire Department. 

Andrew Anderson received his education in the public schools of 
his native parish, and then worked on his father's farm until he reached 
the age of eighteen years, when he came to the United States. He had 
purchased a ticket through to Minneapolis, but in his stop at Chicago 
he spent his last quarter for dinner, therefwe arrived at the former 
place absolutely penniless. He worked in a cement stone factory for 
about a year and a half, and for two years in a meat market. After 
which, in company with his brother, Peter, he opened a market. Two 
years later his brother bought out his interest, and he opened a business 
on his own account in 1895, buying the place now occupied by him at 
1535 East Franklin avenue. The business is constantly increasing, and 
besides this enterprise he owns interest in other meat markets in the 
city. He is a man of recognized honesty and integrity and has won 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 655 



universal confidence. He is also a stockholder in the Minneapolis Build- 
ers' Hardware Company, of which he is treasurer, and holds consid- 
erable land. He is a member of the Odin Club, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons, the Royal League, the Modern Woodmen of America 
and the Vasa Orden (Order of Vasa). He resides at 2408 Elliott 
avenue. 

Mr. Anderson married, December 31, 1891, Anna Swanson, daugh- 
ter of Sven and Ingrid Olson, bom October 25, 1867, in Ousby parish, 
Sweden ; she came to the United States in 1884. Mr. and Mrs. Ander- 
son have three daughters and two sons, as follows : May, born May 29, 
1893; Mabel, bom August 12, 1894; Carl, bom January 29, 1897; Viner, 
bom February 4, 1903; and Alfhild, bom September 16, 1907. The 
children have lately joined the Evangelical Lutheran English church, 
and since their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have been members of 
the First Swedish Lutheran Augustana church. 

Peter Philmore Swensen was bom at Viby, Sweden, Febmary 
10, 1844. His mother, a strong and deeply religious woman, died when 
he was a babe; his father, Peter Swensen, strong and virile, puritanical 
in his exactions, lived to see his sons become respected citizens of Min- 
nesota, He died in 1888, on his homestead near Center City, Chisago 
county, Minnesota, where he had settled with his family in 1854, having 
emigrated from Viby the same year. Many of the older residents of 
the state remember the stem-faced man, whose farm was bounded by 
Little Swede Lake, as the small body of water was called, and where his 
widow, since remarried, still lives. 

Peter P. Swensen was educated in the school of experience. In 
addition to the practical knowledge which he derived from tilling the 
soil, he leamed the rudiments of English from the mde but honest 
preceptors, who saw hope in the western forests. 

When the war of the Rebellion broke out, young Peter immediately 
went to St. Paul and thence to Fort Snelling, where he sought enlist- 
ment, but the officer in charge, who knew his father, commanded the boy 
to retum to the farm, telling him that Lincoln had not made a call for 
mere boys. Undaunted by the repulse the youth boarded a slow going 
steamer and went down the Mississippi. In Iowa he enlisted in the 
regoilar army, the i6th U. S. Infantry. It was not long before he was 
in the enemy's country on the fighting line in the South. At the bloody 
conflict of Shiloh he was one of the many soldiers who helped to tum 
the tide in favor of the North. He shouldered a musket in the cam- 
paign at Chickamauga and Stone River, and received wounds which for 
a time incapacitated him. One day, detailed on picket duty preliminary 
to the battle of Stone River, he was selected as a target by a "Johnny 
Reb," with the result that his forehead to this day carries an indentation 
where the southem bullet savagely clipped out a piece of flesh and skin. 

Peter Swensen's army experience was one of striking episodes, 



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656 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



hairbreadth escapes and great hardships, but his wonderful physique 
successfully carried him through many a crisis. 

In speaking of Mr. Swenscn, his division commander of the 14th 
Army Corps, General R. W. Johnson, once said : "I am always interested 
in the welfare of the old soldiers who served under me during the war, 
and of the many men I had the honor to command none excelled Peter 
P. Swensen in bravery and in every quality of a thorough s<rfdier." 
When General Johnson was sorely wounded at Peach Creek, Georgia, 
Mr. Swensen was one of the first to come to his aid and relief. An 
interesting relic of Mr. Swnesen's army life is the diary of events he 
kept during 1863 and 1864. 

At the close of the war young Swensen worked in a planing mill 
at Cincinnati, Ohio. Later he conducted a mill of his own, which sub- 
sequently was destroyed by fire. He then located at St Louis, Missouri, 
where he remained but a short time, after which he removed to 
Minnesota, 

In the early '70s he was employed as a clerk in various clothing 
establishments in Alinneapolis, the best known of which was the Big 
Boston One Price Clothing Store. It was during his employment at the 
**Big Ik>ston," as it was familiarly called, that Mr. Swensen became 
personally known to almost every citizen in Hennepin coimty, and also 
to many others throughout the state. It was chiefly through his eflForts 
and popularity that the **Big Boston" became the most important retail 
establishment in the Northwest, and it was not long before E. H. Steele, 
the proprietor, established Mr. Swensen as his manager. 

In the early *8os Mr. Swensen saw increased opportunities in the real 
estate business, and it was then that he severed his connection with the 
"Big Boston," although Mr. Steele proffered him increased salary if he 
would remain. Mr. Swensen embarked in the real estate business on his 
own account and met with immediate success therein, and it was not 
long before he carried on also an extensive steamship, ticket and trans- 
portation business. 

During these years Mr. Swensen served as captain of the Scandi- 
navian Rifle Company of the Minnesota National Guard, and he was 
affiliated with various clubs and societies and took more or less active 
interest in politics. 

While in the steamship business, Mr. Swensen often had on hand 
large amounts of money entrusted to his care for transmission to various 
persons in foreign countries. * His chief clerk, one Westergaard, was 
an accomplished linguist and also an efficient business man, and in him 
Mr. Swensen reposed implicit faith. One morning, however, he was 
missing, and all available money was gone. The matter was at once 
placed in the hands of the police authorities, but the best the detectives 
could do was to trace Westergaard to eastern points, and to this day 
his whereabouts are unknown. In order to repay the lost money — a large 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 657 



amount, most of which was held by Mr. Swensen as a bailee for foreign 
peasants — ^he was compelled to borrow currency at a high rate of interest. 

In politics he is a Democrat. In 1884 he was the unanimous choice 
of his party for the office of sheriff of Hennepin county ; but so successful 
had been the Republicans in previous years that it seemed entirely futile 
for any Democrat to hope for office. Tremendous pressure, however, 
was brought to bear upon him by representatives of his party and Mr. 
Swensen finally consented to make a "try" for the position of sheriff, 
then the most lucrative office in the state. Opposing him on the Repub- 
lican ticket was Mr. Winslow M. Brackett, a respected and popular 
citizen of Minneapolis, but a man who did not have the "speaking ac- 
quaintance" which Mr. Swensen possessed. It was generally conceded 
by politicians that there would be a great fight on for the position of 
sheriff, and almost the entire fighting force of the Republican machine 
was directed to bring about Mr. Brackett's election, as it was well 
understood at the time that the other Republican candidates were assured 
of election. It was the tricks of that machine, in no wise attributable to 
Mr. Brackett, which caused Mr. Swensen's defeat. 

Those were the days of "stickers," as they were called. If a Repub- 
lican desired to vote for a Democrat (or vice versa) he would stick a 
small strip of paper containing the name of his choice over the opposing 
name on the ballot. In the balloting for sheriff extensive "scratching" 
was being adopted by the voters. It was well known that Mr. Swensen 
had great voting strength with the laboring element which worked in 
the "shops." The Republican machine knew that the voters from the 
shops would leave the polls shortly after six o'clock in the evening, 
and, when the psychological hour was at hand, bought up, wherever 
possible, the Swensen posters or stickers from men who were handling 
them at the polls. Shortly before the polls closed there was a great 
demand for Swensen stickers and a corresponding shortage of the same. 
Hurry-up calls were sent to the Swensen headquarters for more stickers, 
but it was too late to prevent the consummation of the trick. Mr. 
Brackett was elected by a small majority. 

In 1886 again Mr. Swensen and Mr. Brackett were , opposing can- 
didates for the same position, and this time Mr. Swensen was elected 
with a large majority of the ballots cast. Mr. Swensen retained James 
H. Eges as his chief deputy, who had served in the same position under 
Mr. Brackett, and appointed to other positions men of integrity and 
ability, some of whom are now wealthy and well known residents of 
Minneapolis. 

Mr. Eges having aspirations, resigned in the summer of 1888 and 
in a stubborn fight defeated his former chief in the political battle of 
the following autumn. In 1890 Mr. Swensen again became a candidate 
and Mr. Eges was retired. But although a bitter campaign was waged 
between them, today both are firm and fast friends. Mr. Swensen's 

42 



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658 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



service as sheriflF was most satisfactory. The lawyers in general 
stamped his administration as most efficiently conducted. In 1890 he 
was elected for a second term of two years and served most efficiently. 

When Mr. Swensen stepped out of the sheriff's office in 1892 that 
ended his political career, although he has oftentimes been mentioned 
for various offices, county and state. 

Retiring from office, Mr. Swensen reentered the real estate busi- 
ness. In 1895 and 1896 he conducted a large mercantile business, in 
which he met with instant success. In 1897 he was a stockholder in 
several banks of the city of Minneapolis, all of which succtunbed to 
insolvency through the crisis of the period and incidentally involved 
Mr. Swensen in much financial trouble, and in that same year his entire 
fortune was wiped out. Added to this blow was the serious bereave- 
ment which he suffered in the loss of his wife, Annie J. (Lenmi) Swen- 
sen, who died in the year 1900. They were the parents of five children, 
two of whom, Charles J. and Bertha A. M., died at ages, respectively, 
of sixteen and seven years. The children living are: Annie P., Char- 
lotte M., and Harry S. 

After his financial losses of 1897, Mr. Swensen carried on a real 
estate business, dealing principally in Minnetonka lands. In 1905 he 
received severe internal injuries from a runaway horse, which super- 
induced partial paralysis, and since that time he has been an invalid. In 
the face of his great trouble, however, he is patient and philosophical, 
his chief pleasure being to meet the many friends who knew him in the 
days of his robust health. 

Harry S. Swensen, attorney at law, was bom in the city of Min- 
neapolis in 1875, and is the only son of Peter Philmore and Annie J. 
Swensen, 

He received his early education in the public schools of Minne- 
apolis, attending the old Lincoln school, formerly near Sixth avenue 
and Washington avenue, North, and the old Washington school, which 
stood on the present site of the courthouse. He was graduated from 
the Minneapolis Academy in the spring of 1894, when he had the honor 
to be one of the speakers on the graduation program. In September of 
the same year he entered the University. Immediately he became active 
in college affairs. He was an editor on the Junior Annual and The 
Ariel, the college weekljr; was an officer of the Oratorical Association, 
also various literary societies. 

In 189s he became editor and publisher of a literary journal devoted 
to philately and numismatics. For a time it was the most important 
publication of its kind in the country and Mr. Swensen was recognized 
as an authority on philatelic subjects. Many of his articles were trans- 
lated into foreign languages. In 1889 he possessed one of the most 
complete philatelic libraries extant. In 1899 he received the degree 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 659 



LL.B., and was admitted to the Minneapolis bar, and the following year 
he received the degree of Master of Laws from the State University. 

Since his graduation he has been actively engaged in the practice 
of law in state and federal courts, practicing alone, with the exception 
of the year 1905, when he had as associate the Hon. Francis H. Clark, 
now of Portland, Oregon. Mr. Swensen has been retained as counsel 
in many important legal cases and is regularly employed as attorney 
by a number of the larger business concerns in the Northwest. Among 
trial lawyers he is one of the busiest. He was selected as secretary by 
the Committee on Relief for the famine stricken sufferers of Finland, 
Norway and Sweden in 1903-5, and under his direct management over 
twenty-five thousand dollars were received for the relief in Hennepin 
county. 

Mr. Swensen is a member of various clubs, societies and associations. 
He is of a literary turn of mind and many of the current magazines con- 
tain his contributions from time to time. His interest in politics is that 
prompted by duty. He is affiliated with the Democratic party and is 
usually a delegate to its county and state conventions. In June, 1909, 
Mr. Swensen was elected a supreme director in the Brotherhood of 
American Yeomen, to serve for a period of four years. 

In 1902 he married Ariel B. Small, daughter of Dr. E. Small, of 
Excelsior, Minnesota. They have two children, Harry S., Jr., and 
Charles Philmore. 

GuSTAF Emil Rydell. — ^The enterprising, thrifty and successful 
business men of Minneapolis have no more worthy Swedish representa- 
tive than Gustaf Emil Rydell, a well-known and prosperous merchant 
tailor and clothier, located at the comer of Hennepin and Washington 
avenues. A native of Sweden, he was bom, January i, 1873, 'n Sandsjo, 
Smiland, a son of Andreas and Helena Rydell. His parents reared six 
children, namely: Mrs. Anna Svenson, wife of a farmer, still lives in 
Sweden; Claus Edward, engaged in farming in Benton county, Minne- 
sota; Theodore, of whom a brief sketch appears on another page of 
this work ; Hulda, wife of Nels Clausen, jailer of Hennepin county jail ; 
Alfred, of Minneapolis, is a painter by trade; and Gustaf Emil. The 
parents spent their entire lives in Sweden, dying at a comparatively 
early age. 

Receiving his elementary education in the public schools of his 
native land, Gustaf E. Rydell there began as a boy to learn the trade 
of a taik>r. Emigrating to the United States in 1886, when a lad of thir- 
teen years, he continued working at his trade in the daytime and in the 
evening attended school, materially advancing his education. Becoming 
proficient at his trade, he started in business for himself in 1890 as a 
merchant tailor, and ere many years had passed had gained a sut^tantial 
patronage in Minneapolis, the only place in which he has lived since 
coming to this country. On May 28, 1906, Mr. Rydell enlarged his 



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66o SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



operations by opening a clothing' and furnishing store in connection with 
merchant tailoring, and in its management met with such an amount of 
success that in 1909 the entire building had to be remodeled in order 
to afford him sufficient space to meet the demands of his large and con- 
stantly increasing business, his establishment being now entirely up-to- 
date in its equipments and appoii^tments. 

On February 24, 1893, Mr. Rydell married Emma Bergstrom, who 
was born in Minneapolis, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Bergstrom, 
and their residence, at No. 1627 Twenty-seccMid avenue, North, is ever 
open to their many friends. Politically Mr. Rydell is a steadfast Re- 
publican, ever loyal to the interests of his party. Fraternally he is a 
Blue Lodge Mason; a member of the Knights of Pythias, and of the 
Royal Arcanum. Religiously Mr. and Mrs. Rydell, true to the faith of 
their ancestors, are Swedish Lutherans, belonging to the Bethlehem 
church, of which he has been a trustee for eight years. 

Albert Borup, foreman at the C. A. Smith Lumber Company's 
sawmill, the largest sawmill in the world, has been in the employ of this 
company since he came to Minneapolis in 1898, and has worked his way 
up to his present position, to which he was promoted in 1907. 

Mr, Borup is a native of Polk county, Wisconsin. He was bom 
February 5, 1877, son of John and Hilda Borup, who came to this coun- 
try from Vestergotland in 1870, and settled on a farm in Wisconsin, 
where the father is still living, the mother having died in 1885. They 
were the parents of five children : William, who runs a hotel and hitch- 
barn in Grantsburg, Wisconsin; Mary, wife of John Swanson, who is 
employed at the Hillside Cemetery; Charles, a clerk at Lindstrom, Min- 
nesota ; Louise, married and settled in Washington ; and Albert. 

Albert attended public school until he was twelve years old, when 
he went to work on a farm. Later, about the time he was twenty, he 
pursued a course of study in mechanical and electrical engineering, re- 
ceiving his instructions from the Scranton Correspondence School. After 
working on a farm three years, he came to Rock Creek, Minnesota, and 
found employment in the sawmill of Dunn & Marcia, where he remained 
six years, working his way from night watchman to stationary engineer. 
It was while he was employed in this mill that he took the course in the 
correspondence school. In 1898, he came to Minneapolis and went to 
work as a millwright helper for the C. A. Smith Lumber Co., and here, 
as already stated, he has since remained. At one time while at Rock 
Creek, Mr. Borup came near losing his life, being scalded by steam from 
a burst steam pipe. On account of this accident he was disabled for 
more than five weeks. 

In 1901, Mr. Borup married Miss Elsie Sybrandt, who was bom 
at Harris, Minnesota, February 28, 1881 ; and they had two children: 
Beatrice, born May 24, 1904, and Blanche, August 19, 1908. Mr. Borup 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 663 



owns the home in which he lives, on the corner of Forty-second and 
Dupont avenues. Fraternally, he is identified with the Maccabees. 

Victor Roman is a prominent figure among the well-known Swedes 
of Minneapolis, where he has resided for many years. A brief review 
of his life gives the following facts. Victor Roman was bom at Bon- 
derud, Vamum parish, Vermland, Sweden, November 2, 1848, son of 
Anders Anderson and wife, Anna Maria (nee Roman), the name Roman 
being adopted by him on account of certain property rights. In his 
youth he had meagre advantages for an education. After spending only 
a short time in attendance at the public school, and after being con- 
firmed, according to the custom, in the Lutheran church, he went to 
work on at farm, and later as a fisherman in Lake Venem, where he 
remained until of legal age, in 1869. About this time he was a victim 
of the "America fever*' and sailed for this country. He landed in New 
York on May 5th, came west to Minnesota, and went to Litchfield, 
where he had a cousin. Soon he found employment in the timber regions. 
For fourteen years he spent the winters in the forest and the summers 
in the lumber yards of Morrison Brothers, working with all the strength 
of his young manhood and accumulating a snug little sum. Then, in 
1883, he went back to his native land, where, on June 23, 1883, he mar- 
ried Miss Charlotta Magdalena Carlson, daughter of Carl Matson and 
wife, Anna Maria Johnson. 

Accompanied by his bride, Mr. Roman returned to the home of his 
adoption, and the following year, 1884, he engaged in business for him- 
self in Minneapolis. Four years later he took a partner, Oscar Person, 
with whom he was associated until 1908, when he sold out to Mr. 
Person, intending to retire and spend his declining years in the old 
country, where three estates in Vermland had come to him as inheritance. 
But after considering further the matter of return, he decided to remain 
in Minneapolis, where the best years of his life have been passed, and 
where he is rich in the possession of a host of friends and acquaintances. 
Vigorous and active, although past the sixtieth mile post, no sooner had 
he disposed of his business than he began to find monotony in inactivity, 
and he was anxious to have something to occupy his time. So he pur- 
chased an interest in the firm of Hord & Johnson, with which he is now 
identified. He has large real estate interests in Minneapolis and owns 
two cottages at Lake Minnetonka, near Brown's Bay. His Minneapolis 
residence is at 1833 North Fourth street. 

As a pastime for years Mr. Roman has found pleasure and interest 
in the collection of rare coins, and today is the possessor of one of the 
finest private collections in the United States. 

For thirty-eight years he has been a member of the Knights of 
Pythias. While he has never identified himself with any church organi- 
zation since coming to this country, he has always contributed liberally 
to both churches and charities. 



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664 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Emil L. Anderson is identified with the business life of Minne- 
apolis as a photographer and he has been very successful in his chosen 
line. He began his preparation for his profession in his native land of 
Sweden, where he was born at Herrljunga February i8, 1868. His 
father, who was a contractor, died when he was but eleven years of age, 
and after attending the public schools and the Technical School he 
became a bookkeeper and during his leisure hours while thus employed 
studied photography. On coming to the United States in the fall of 
1892 he located in Minneapolis and later found employment as a clerk 
in a dry goods store in St. Paul. While there he saved a little money, 
and being anxious to add to his educational training he entered the 
Northwestern University and pursued a two years' course of studies. 
Returning to St. Paul to resume his clerkship he remained there for six 
years, and then going to Milaca, Minnesota, he was a photographer 
there for five years. 

At the close of that period Mr. Anderson made a visit to his old 
home in Sweden, and on returning to Minneapolis in 1903 he established 
himself in business here as a photographer at 300 Cedar avenue. He 
is a master in his profession and is the proprietor of a well equipped 
studio, thoroughly up-to-date in all its arrangements, and through his 
unusual skill in his art he has become well established in his adqpted 
home and is steadily working his way upward to greater success. 

Oscar Nelson. — The name of Oscar Nelson is well and prominently 
known in commercial circles in this city, and he is now the business 
manager of the clothing department for the Palace Clothing Company. 
He was bom in Bjerby parish, Skaraborgs Ian, Vestergotland, Sweden, 
May 20, i860. His father, Johannes Nelson, was a lawyer and what is 
known in America as a gentleman farmer. He was bom in Dalsland, 
Sweden, February 2*j, 1827, and died in the year 1893, while his wife, 
who bore the maiden name of Maria Helena Malmstrom, was bom in 
Bjorke, Elfsborgs Ian, Sweden, and died in 1908. Their family num- 
bered nine children, namely: August, who was born August 8> 1850, 
is married and is a farmer in Dalsland, Sweden; Nels Gustaf, bom in 
1854, is married and is a mechanic with the American Hoist & Derrick 
Company, of St. Paul; Carl Victor, bom in 1856, is a butcher in Min- 
neapolis; Christina, born in 1858, is the wife of Carl Erickson, an 
employe of the Bohn Manufacturing Company ; Oscar, mentioned below ; 
Alexander, born in 1862, is married, and is a lawyer in Trollhattan, 
Sweden ; Gustafva, bom in 1865, married Anders Johanson, a farmer in 
Gerdhem, Elfsborgs Ian, Sweden; Anna Charlotta, bom in 1867, is the 
wife of John Larson, a building contractor in St. Paul; and Matilda, 
bom in 1872, married Charles Stohl, formerly a farmer in Lindstrom, 
Minnesota, but now a machinist in St. Paul. 

Oscar Nelson obtained his education first in public schools and 
then in Leffler's Business College in Vennersborg, from which he g^d- 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 665 



uated in 1875. On leaving school he accepted a position with a hard- 
ware merchant at Trollhattan, with whom he remained until the fall of 
1879, and then after remaining at home with his parents for a few 
months he decided to emigrate to America, where he arrived in the 
harbor of New York in the spring of 1880. Coming directly to St. Paul, 
Mr. Nelson like others of his countrymen had to resort to manual labor, 
and his first position was with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Rail- 
road Company, while during the winter of 1880-1 he worked in a lumber 
camp near Moose Lake, Minnesota. In the spring he secured a position 
with Herzog & Wilson, of St. Paul, but in the fall of 1882 he left that 
firm to accept an oflFer made him by his countryman Elmquist, then one 
of the largest and best known clothiers of St. Paul, and it was in his 
store that Mr. Nelson laid the foundation for his future success as a 
merchant. For five years he worked in the interest of that firm or until 
he was offered a position with the then new firm of Floan & Leveroos, 
in whose employ he spent ten and a half years. At the close of this 
period in 1899 he became the manager of the clothing department of 
the Palace Clothing Company, one of the largest business houses in Min- 
neapolis and owned by a son-in-law of the late Nelson Morris, of 
' Chicago. 

Mr. Nelson married, in 1884, Hanna Sofia Nelson, who was bom 
October 30, i860, a daughter of Carl Nelson, of Dalsland, Sweden. 
Their only child is a daughter, Helen Virginia, who was bom September 
27, 1895, and is attending school. Mr. Nelson is the owner of two fine 
farms in Todd county, to which he will retire when tired of the strife 
of city life. His home is 3321 Minnehaha avenue, Minneapolis. 

Emil Lundquist, general foreman of the woodworking department 
of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad Company at Minneapolis, 
is one of the most expert and tmsted superintendents connected with the 
mechanical operations of that great corporation. As he was bom March 
4, 1870, in Lund-VestergSrden, Varg&rda, Vestergotland, he is a Swedish- 
American in the very prime of his activities and abilities, and his career 
has but fairly commenced. The parents of Mr. Lundquist were also 
bom at VSrglrda — his father, August Anderson, in 1830, and his mother 
(Inga Stina Jonasdotter) in 1833. The former was a farmer, building 
contractor and railroad overseer, and died in his native town March 31, 
1889, but the mother is still alive. The children of the family were as 
follows: Carl Johan, also connected with the Chicago, Milwaukee & 
St. Paul Railway ; Herman, in the employ of the same company ; Aaron, 
who is now a contractor and builder at Spokane, Washington ; Emil, of 
this sketch ; and Gustaf Adolf, who succeeded to the family homestead in 
Sweden, upon which he resides. 

Emil attended the public schools of Virgirda until he was fourteen 
years of age, and then for the succeeding five years remained at home 
to assist his parents, his coming to the United States and to Minne- 



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666 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



apolis dating from 1889. Until 1891 he was employed in different lines 
of work, when he became a cabinetmaker for the Chicago, Milwaukee 
& St. Paul road at Minneapolis, woricing as such until 1900, when he 
was promoted to a foremanship. In 1905 he was appointed to a still 
more responsible position — that which he still fills — general foreman of 
the woodworking department 

In 1896 Mr. Lundquist married Miss Margareta Smith, who was 
bom in Mora, Sweden, in 1873, and is a daughter of Carl Smith, a mis- 
sionar>% who died at Liverpodf, England, in 1889. The two children of 
this union are Richard Reuben, who was bom in 1899, and is a public 
school pupil, and Esther Elizabeth, who was bora in 1902. Mr. Lund- 
quist and his family are members of the Ebenezer Swedish Mission 
church and Sunday school, and reside at 2300 Thirtieth avenue, South. 

Axel Juuus Gabriel Maria Lindahl. — One of the leading scenic 
artists of the northwest. Axel J. G. M. Lindahl, of Minneapolis, also 
stands high in the landscape field of his profession. He well maintains 
the name of his people for both thoroughness of execution, boldness of 
design and harmony of taste, and as he has but just passed his thirty- 
seventh birthday, the probabilities are all in favor of a progressive career 
of brilliant and substantial performance along the lines df his life work. 
Mr. Lindahl is a native of Stockholm, Sweden, bora on the 19th of Au- 
gust, 1872. His father, also Axel Lindahl, who died in 1902, was state's 
engineer for Varmlandslan, with headquarters in Arvika, and his mother 
(nee Hilma Carlsson), who was bora in 1850, and was a daughter of 
Carl Carlsson, a Stockholm grain dealer, is also deceased. Axel, who 
was the only issue of their union, received his early education in the 
public schools of the capital ; then studied six years at the Sodralatinlaro- 
verket; in 1888 entered the Technical School of Stockholm and, after 
a two years* course therein, became a student in the School of Higher 
Mechanical and Technical Arts (H6gp"e Konstindustriella Skolan). Grad- 
uating: from the last named, while still within his majority, the thoroughly- 
qualified young man was received into the staff of that great art insti- 
tute, his Alma Mater, and after teaching for some time resigned his posi- 
tion to become superintendent of large industrial works in Gothenburg. 
When he severed his relations with the School of Higher Mechanical 
and Technical Arts, its dean, Victor Adler, paid him the high compliment 
of stating: over his signature that the institution never had a better 
teacher than Mr. Lindahl. During his year's residence in Gothenburg, 
Mr. Lindahl made several trips to Germany and Norway, in the prosecu- 
tion of his artistic studies and investigations, and then returaed to Stock- 
holm. There he established a bureau of engraving, which he conducted 
until 1902, when he emigrated with his wife and son direct to Minneap- 
olis. 

Shortly after his arrival in Minneapolis Mr. Lindahl secured a 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 669 



position as interior decorator with the leading firm of Bradstreet and 
Company, but remained with them but one season, when he accepted 
a more responsible and remunerative connection with the Twin City 
Scenic Studio. Three years later he was appointed chief artist for the 
scenic department of the Lyric Theater, in which position he has decid- 
edly broadened and strengthened his artistic reputation. If the news- 
papers are to be believed, he is already the leading scenic artist of Min- 
neapolis and the best painter in that line who ever resided there. He is 
also a landscape artist of much talent and, outside of his regtilar work, 
contributes generously to the newspapers and^ private collections. He 
has erected a large studio at No. 3125 Riverside boulevard, Minneapolis, 
and as he owns the ground expects in the near future to build his resi- 
dence thereon. It is therefore evident that he has been successful, both 
from a financial and an artistic standpoint. In 1899 Mr. Lindahl was 
married to Miss Anna Ekman, who was bom in Stockholm and is a 
daughter of Johan Ekman and wife. They have two children: Eric 
Julius, bom March 20, 1900, and a native of Sweden ; and Carl Axel, bom 
in Minneapolis, July 12, 1904. 

Martin O. Hawkinson was born in Oljehult parish, Bleking, 
Sweden, May 2, 1870, and is the son of Hakan and Elin Person. They 
had twelve children, of who\n eight are living, namely : Johanna Mathilda, 
married Martin Erickson, of Superior, Wisconsin ; Ida Carolina, married 
Nels Johanson, of Kuggeboda, near Ronneby; Per August, lives on the 
old homestead in Sweden; Carl Edward, lives with his parents; Oscar 
Wilhelm, in the employ of Massolt Bottling Company, of Minneapolis; 
Elof, studying in Sweden; Edla Amanda, lives with her parents; and 
Martin O. 

Mr. Hawkinson attended the public schools of his native parish 
until his confirmation in the Lutheran church, and in 1886 emigrated to 
America, landing in Duluth. He had a cousin in Duluth, engaged in 
the painting and decorating business, and after working for him about 
a year, Mr. Hawkinson visited the Exposition then being held in Minne- 
apolis, and was so pleased with the city that he decided to remain. He 
entered the employ of H. M. Martin, manufacturer of soda water, where 
he remained six years, and then began to work for John P. Joseph in 
the same line of business, and remained with him four years. At this 
time he began business on his own account, manufacturing soda water, 
and took as partner Ben Benson. A year later he sold out his interest 
in the business and began working for Charles J. Johnson, a grocer at 
Fifth street and Tenth avenue. South. As this business was not con- 
genial, he left it and again worked at soda water manufacture, in the 
employ of the New England Bottling Company, located in the Boston 
Block. Here he remained* until 1907, when the concern consolidated 
with the Massolt Bottling Company, at 1 16-128 Plymouth street. They 
incorporated with a capital stock of $125,000 and Mr. Hawkinson became 



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670 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



general manager of the manufacturing department. They make a spe- 
cialty of ginger ale, and also handle bar supplies, as well as beer imported 
from Germany. 

Mr. Hawkinson is thorough master of the details of the business in 
which he is engaged, and makes use of the most modem and ujvto-date 
methods of handling same. Socially he is a member of the Swedish 
Brothers, Society Gustavus Adolphus, the Druids, and of the Red Men, 
the lodge to which he belongs and of which he is a charter member being 
the first one instituted in the state of Minnesota. 

SiGFRiD J. Cheleen, B. A., M. D., of Minneapolis, is one of the 
brightest and most thoroughly educated among the Swedish-American 
practitioners of that part of the state. Still a young man, he has been 
not only carefully trained as a progressive member of his profession, but 
has enjoyed a broad and classical education, and has earned, through 
his scholarship, the degrees of B. A. and M. D. The doctor was bom in 
Essunga parish, Vestergotland, Sweden, Febmary 15, 1874, and is a 
son of Jonas and Ingrid (Larson) Anderson, farmers. This couple had 
twelve children, all of whom are living but one daughter, Mathilda, 
who died when twenty-nine years of age. The other eleven are as fol- 
lows: Carl August, a farmer at Stromsburg, Nebraska; Johan Alfred, 
a miner in Colorado ; Emma, married to Johannes Lundstrom, a farmer 
in Sweden ; Anna Maria, now Mrs. Hans Engstrom, whose husband is a 
painter in Minneapolis; Ida Christina, unmarried, who lives in Minne- 
apolis ; Sigfrid J., of this sketch ; Augusta, living in Sweden ; Eva, mar- 
ried to Carl Johanson, a railroad man in Sweden; Hanna Elizabeth, 
single, a dressmaker in Minneapolis; Lars Victor, a cabinetmaker in 
Los Angeles, Califomia; and Hulda, a dressmaker in Sweden. 

Sigfrid J. received his primary education in the common schools of 
his parish and was confirmed in the Lutheran church. At the age of 
eighteen years he came to America and went west to Colorado, being 
variously employed there for one and one-half years. He then entered 
Luther College at Wahoo, Nebraska, where he completed the academic 
course in 1897, during vacations working on farms and railroads to pay 
his way through school. He next spent a couple of years working at 
various occupations, and in the fall of 1899 entered Augustana College 
at Rock Island, Illinois, where he took the classical course and graduated 
in 1902 as a B. A. In the fall of that year he matriculated at the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota as a student in the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, graduating in 1906, and on June 15th of the same year passing 
his examination l^fore the medical board. While studying at Augustana 
College and the University of Minnesota he supported himself by teach- 
ing in a Swedish school during vacations. Immediately after grad- 
uating in medicine he became an inteme at the Bethesda Hospital, St 
Paul, from which he received his diploma on June 10, 190^. That 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 671 



summer he visited Sweden, pursuing his studies at some of the most 
prominent clinics. As a matter of course he also visited his old parents 
and other relatives in Sweden, returning to America in the fall. In 
October of the same year (1907) Dr. Cheleen opened an office at Hutch- 
inson, Minnesota, continuing the same until June i, 1908, when he 
established himself at Lindstrom, where he was located till October, 
1909, when he moved to Minneapolis, where he has offices at 1527 East 
Lake street. On June 9, 1909, he married Miss Mathilda Morshare, of 
Gibbon, Minnesota. The Morshares are of Swedish descent, notwith- 
standing their foreign-sounding name. Dr. Cheleen is a member of the 
Phi Delta Society, the State Medical Association, and Hennepin County 
Medical Society. 

Louis N. Gayner, dealer in real estate and loans, 640 Temple Court 
Building, Minneapolis, was born on the estate of Igelsjo, Borringekloster, 
Skane, May 14, 1844, son of Nels Jonsson and his wife, Kama Larson. 
At this writing the mother is living with her son in Minneapolis, the 
father having died a number of years ago. In their family were four 
children, three sons and one daughter, of whom Louis is the eldest. The 
others are Elna, born in 1846, is the wife of Hans Martenson, of Gronby, 
SkSne, Sweden; John N. Gayner, ex-auditor of Meeker county, Minne- 
sota, is now engaged in the practice of law at Litchfield, this state; and 
Swan N. Gayner is a hardware merchant of Dassel, Minnesota. 

In his youth Louis N. had meagre opportunity for obtaining an edu- 
cation. From his ninth year until he was fourteen his time was spent 
in herding cattle. At fourteen he spent one winter attending confirma- 
tion school in Gustaf parish, and after his confirmation he did farm work 
until he was eighteen. He then served an apprenticeship to the black- 
smith and machinist's trades. 

In 1869 Mr. Gayner came to America, landing in St. Paul on the 
iSth of May. He was employed in the near-by country, working at odd 
jobs, until April of the following year, when he came to Minneapolis. 
Here he obtained employment at the Minnesota Iron Works, with which 
he remained for a period of seventeen and a half years, a part of this 
time as foreman, and until the failure of the company. 

While working at his trade Mr. Gayner saved money, which, from 
time to time, he invested in real estate, and he built and sold houses, this 
venture proving reasonably successful. All the while his thoughts went 
back to the old home in Sweden, and in 1887 he sold all his real estate 
holdings, and, with his family, returned to the scenes of his childhood. 
His children, however, did not like conditions in Sweden, and after a 
visit of four months he brought them back to America. That was in the 
spring of 1888, just after the bursting of the Minneapolis boom. He 
bought real estate and kept on trading, for some time being able to sell 
very little, but when the conditions changed he commenced to sell, and 



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672 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



made money. In the meantime he built the Gayner Block, comer of 
Eighteenth street and Ninth avenue, South, which he later sold. His 
residence, corner of Ninth avenue and Nineteenth street, South, he built 
in 1908. 

In 1871 Mr. Gayner married Miss Mary Nelson, who was bom at 
Hofmantorp, Smaland, May 28, 1846, she having come to America three 
years before her marriage. They have had three children, of whom two 
are living, one son having died in infancy: May A., born May i, 1874, 
in 1901 tnecame the wife of Eugene A. Glader, who is in railroad employ, 
having charge of the Union depot of Minneapolis at night; and Jennie 
Emilia, born June 12, 1879, on March 31, 1901, married Byron A. Lind- 
gren, who is connected with S. H. Johnson & Company of Minneapolis. 
At their weddings, Mr. Gayner presented each of his daughters with a 
modern duplex residence in Minneapolis, built at a cost of $6,000. 

Mr. Gayner and his family are identified with the Lutheran Augus- 
tana church, of which he served as trustee for thirty years, until 1908, 
when he resigned. He also acted as chairman of the Board of Trustees 
all that time. 

Herman Larson. — Perhaps one of the best-known representatives 
of the photographic art in Minneapolis is Herman Larson, the proprietor 
of an elegantly equipped studio in this city. He was born in Norrkoping, 
Sweden, September 2, 1876, a son of Samuel A. and Gustava Larson. 
The father learned and followed the carpenter's trade in his native land of 
Sweden, and he died in 1907, still survived by his widow, whose home 
is in the city of Stockholm. In their family were six children, namely: 
Herman, Gustava, Carl, Elvira, Fritz and one who died in infancy. 

Herman Larson in his early life received a good education in the 
public schools of his home city and in the Technic School, and at the 
completion of this training he was apprenticed to leam photography and 
spent nine years at Stockholm mastering all the details of the art and in 
becoming an expert in the profession. Coming then to the United States 
in 1889, he spent a few months at Mankato, Minnesota, from whence 
he came to Minneapolis and opened his present elegant studio at 1501 
Washington avenue. During the intervening years he has won a name 
as a leader in his profession in the twin cities and has won many prizes 
for his splendid work. At the Northwestern Photographers' Convention 
held in Minneapolis in September of 1908 and in St. Paul in 1909 prizes 
were offered for the best specimens in the art, and among many other 
competitors Mr. Larson won the highest prize awarded to the twin cities 
of Minneapolis and St. Paul. He is a member of the order of Swedish 
Brothers, of the Woodmen of the World and attends the Lutheran church. 

He married on December 26, 1901, Miss Laura Olson, and they have 
two children, Fred, bom in December, 1902, and Arnold, in February, 
1905. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 675 



Olof Ludwig Bruce, a young attorney of Minneapolis who has 
already attained high distinction in his profession, was bom in Vermland, 
Sweden, March 23, 1873, ^ son of Lars and Anna Bruce. His family 
name takes its origin in a distinguished Scotch family which settled in 
Sweden several hundred years ago. Soon after the death of his father 
in 1 891 his mother came with her younger children to this country and 
took up her residence in Minneapolis, whither her older sons had preceded 
her. 

Mr. Bruce brought to the practice of his profession, besides his native 
intelligence, that development which comes of earnest and careful study. 
Shortly after his arrival in this country he continued the education he had 
begtm in Sweden, first in a preparatory school known as Northwestern 
College and later in the Minneapolis Academy, from which he graduated. 
At the latter institution he won the gold medal for merit in debating. In 
1904 he graduated from the State University Law School and completed 
his studies with a post-graduate course which brought him the degree of 
Master of Laws. 

Though at once admitted to the bar of Minnesota, Mr. Bruce did not 
immediately devote all of his time to the practice of law but accepted the 
position of manager with the Minneapolis Weekly, a Swedish newspaper. 
After two years, however, he found that his constantly growing law 
clientage demanded his whole attention. He therefore resigned his posi- 
tion as active manager of the newspaper, but retained his seat upon its 
board of directors. Since that time the law practice of Mr. Bruce has 
been successful and extensive, not being confined to the Twin Cities alone 
but frequently taking him to distant points in the state. 

In February, 1909, Mr. Bruce married Miss Esther Wallgren, daugh- 
ter of the Rev. Erik Wallgren of Chicago. Mrs. Bruce is a talented and 
highly accomplished pianist, who wins friends as much with the charm 
of her personality as of her music. 

In the various movements for civic righteousness, which have accom- 
plished so much for the betterment of Minneapolis public aflfairs, Mr. 
Bruce has taken active and leading part. Politically Mr. Bruce is some- 
what independent in the bestowal of his allegiance, but is a believer in the 
principles enunciated by the Republican party. In religious work, espe- 
cially among his countrymen, Mr. Bruce is actively interested. He has 
held various positions of influence in church bodies and is at present 
president of the Scandinavian Union Mission, which is doing, eflfective 
work among a class of people not readily reached by church influences. 

Mr. Bruce is known among a host of friends and clients as a man of 
engaging presence and blameless character, and as a lawyer who brings 
to bear upon the solution of all legal problems a keen and well-trained 
mind. 

August G. Johnson. — President of the Printers' Supply Company of 
Minneapolis, a prominent business man and a leader in Swedish Lutheran 



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676 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



circles, August G. Johnson has made his way in the world and brou^t 
a good influence to bear on his associates, both through his substantial 
and sterling character and his sociable, pleasing and kindly disposition. A 
native of Goterjd, Smiland, Sweden, he was bom October 20, 1867, to 
Gustaf and Anna Jonson, residents of his native county. His father was 
bom in 1830 and his mother in 1835, the issue of their union being eleven 
children, of whom August G. was fourth in order of birth. This son 
received a public school education and remained with his parents until he 
was eighteen years of age, when he resolved to test himself in a larger 
and a more stirring field. 

In 1885 Mr. Johnson emigrated from his home in Sweden directly 
to St. Paul, where, a few days after his arrival, he obtained employment 
in a type foundry at three dollars per week. For ten years he was con- 
nected with this and other firms in the Twin Cities, and during that period 
became master of the industrj- in all its departments. 

In 1905 he with others formed a business partnership in Minneapolis 
under the name of the Printers' Electrotyping C(Mnpany. After conduct- 
ing this enterprise successfully for some years it was incorporated as the 
Printers* Supply Company (as at present), with the following officers: 
August G. Johnson, president, and Edward A. Hough, secretary and treas- 
urer. The substantial expansion of the business induced the proprietors 
to erect, in 1909, the large and convenient building now occupied at 306-8 
Sixth street. South, in the ver>' heart of the business district of Minneapo- 
lis. The steady rise in Mr. Johnson's personal circumstances have enabled 
him to enjoy two visits to the "old country," his last in 1909 broadening 
into a general tour of Europe. Besides his interest in a flourishing busi- 
ness, he is the owner of his fine residence on Colfax avenue, South, with 
other valuable properties in Minneapolis and the South. He is a Blue 
Lodge Mason, an active member of the Odin Club and deacon and treas- 
urer in the Salem English Evangelical Lutheran church. 

August G. Johnson married Miss Ida Johnson, and they have two 
children : Katherine Elizabeth, bom July 20, 1896, and Leighton Robert, 
bora October 9, 1904. 

Victor Carlson, proprietor of the Hennepin Paving Company, 247 
Security Bank building, Minneapolis, was bom September 8, 1861, in 
Hannas parish, Kalmarlan, Smiland, Sweden, and is a son of Elias and 
Sara Fredericka Carlson. Elias Carlson died in 1867; his wife, bom in 
1837, is a daughter of a farmer of Homvall in Loftahammar parish, 
Kalmarlan, and now lives in Minneapolis. They had five children, namely: 
Carl Johan, born in 1854, a farmer of Ramelsrun, Gamleby, Sweden; 
Fredrik, bom in 1856, is a contractor for stone sidewalks, living in Deco- 
rah, Iowa; Gustaf, born in 1858, is section foreman at Mapleton, North 
Dakota ; Victor ; and Sofia, bom in 1863, now living in Minneapolis. 

Victor Carlson was six years of age when his father died, and he had 
to go among strangers at an early age to eam his living. He was able to 



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ALFRED SODERSTROM 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 677 



acquire a common-school education, which he has improved by his own 
efforts since. In 1883 ^^ emigxated to America and located at Valley 
City, North Dakota, where he remained four and one-half years, being 
most of this time employed on the railroad. In December, 1887, Mr. Carl- 
son made a visit to his native land, but returned the following year, set- 
tling at Minneapolis, which has since been his home. He obtained em- 
ployment with a firm making stone sidewalks, and remained with them 
eleven years, learning the trade and gaining many ideas of business. In 
1898 he engaged in business on his own account, buying the Hennepin 
Paving Company establishment and retaining the former name. The 
plant is located at 1013 East Lake street and employs about fifteen men. 
He has done a vast amount of wc«-k in Minneapolis and vicinity and has 
a good standing in the community, both as to his business probity and 
personal qualifications. 

Mr. Carlson has been a member of the Swedish Free Mission church 
since 1893, serving eight years as trustee and since 1907 has been president 
of the society. Mr. Carlson resides at 3144 Elliot avenue, in one of the 
best residence districts of the city, where he owns a fine home. 

He married April 7, 1900, Amanda Gustafson, born March 21, 1870, 
daughter of Lars Gustafson, deceased, a farmer in Busseryd, Smiland, 
and his wife, Katharina, now living at Dassel, Minnesota. Mr. Carlson 
has four children, namely: Carl Victor, bom May 7, 1901, attending 
school ; Walter Nathaniel, born August 29, 1903 ; Ruth, May 18, 1905 ; and 
Ethel, June 17, 1907. 

Alfred Soderstrom was bom during the eventful year when the 
nations of Europe began to break the chains, in which absolutism and 
tyranny had held them fettered for centuries, the year 1848. Stockholm, 
the capital of Sweden, was the place; he was born there February 28, 
and there he was raised and educated. 

Twenty-one years of age he emigrated to this country, in the year 
1869, ^"d here he had his ups and downs, like most newcomers, ups and 
downs that have taught him the true story of life and made him what he 
is to-day. On his arrival in this country he became a painter, like most 
fellows from Stockholm that come here — that is, if they are not tailors 
already or happen to come to places where painters are not wanted. 

Soderstrom painted threshing, machines in Pitts & Son's threshing 
machine factory, located in Chicago, and he painted these machines in 
the bright, rosy, red color, the color that best agreed with his own nature, 
with his optimism, his desire to look at everything from the best side, and 
make everyone with whom he comes in contact do the same. 

After having during two summers (1869-70) worked in this trade, 
he left for the sunny South, where he secured employment on sugar and 
cotton plantations. The many romantic adventures — which would fill a 
book — that he and a faithful companion then passed through are now 
interesting memories. 



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678 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



He returned to Giicago the following year, but had not been there 
very long when he received a telegram from a friend in Alexandria, 
Minnesota, requesting him to come at once and secure a position with a 
real estate agent, owner of the hotel of the place and other enterprises. 
He started for this place one month before the big Chicago fire, which 
occurred October 9, 1871. Reaching his destination, he found that his 
duties included almost anything from milking the cow to keeping books 
on divers and interesting matters. 

The Northern Pacific Railway was then being built westward and 
Mr. Stiderstrom went to Moorhead, Clay county, Minnesota (Moorhead 
then being only a ver>' small tent camp), where he tock a preemption 
claim on 160 acres. But he, like many new settlers, became discouraged 
with the many privations gf frontier life, the cold, windy prairies in the 
winter, and the grasshoppers in the summer, and, longing for civilization 
again, he left his claim, permitting others to reap the benefit of his work. 
The courthouse in Moorhead now stands within the limits of his 160 
acres. 

Returning to Minneapolis in the fall of 1872, he started a private 
school in company with P. O. Chilstrom. In the fall of 1874 he accepted 
a position as teacher of bookkeeping and expert penmanship in Professor 
Barnard's Business College. This institution ceased to exist after one 
year. Next he started the Scandinavian Business School, which he man- 
aged during two winter terms. As assistant teacher in the class of Eng- 
lish he had a poor youth, who at that time was a student at the State 
University, i. e., John Lind, who since became congressman and after- 
wards governor of the state of Minnesota. 

During the time that he was conducting the above Scandinavian Com- 
mercial School he became agent for Si*enska Nybyggaren, of St. Paul, 
to which paper he contributed regularly under the pseudom^m of "Rulle 
Block/* and these press contributions more than an>'thing else drew him 
into the journalistic profession. His activity, however, in newspaper- 
dom has been more as a founder, publisher and business manager than 
editor. 

While he managed the business school he made the acquaintance of 
Col. Hans Mattson, and Minnesota Stats Tidning, a weekly Republican 
newspaper, was started in January, 1877. with Soderstrom as business 
manager and part owner. In the summer of 1881 the paper was sold 
to a St. Paul concern on account of Col. Mattson being appointed by 
President Garfield American consul general to Calcutta, India. 

S(X)n after the sale of this paper Mr. Soderstrom started Svenska 
Folkcts Tidning, Minneapolis, the first issue of which was printed October 
5, 1881. Mr. Soderstrom had interested over a hundred of the influential 
Swedes throughout the state to take stock in the new corporation — ^the 
Swedish Publishing Company — which enabled the paper, in the start, to 
appear in a large and imposing form. The enterprise was so favorably 
received that at the end of the first two months there were over 2,000 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 679 



subscribers. After two years' existence the subscription list of the paper 
exceeded 10,000. Mr. Soderstrom published this paper to 1898, when he 
retired, after twenty years of newspaper work. 

In the spring of 1899 he compiled and published his book, "Minne- 
apolis' Minnen" (Memories of Minneapolis), a work of 500 pages, pro- 
fusely illustrated, ably edited, showing painstaking, careful and impartial 
research. 

On Midsummer's Day of the year 1880 Mr. Soderstrom was married 
to Mrs. Wilhelmina Aim, and while the old song; "Fru Soderstrom" does 
not apply to this lady, Mr. Soderstrom most certainly is to be congratulated 
in having secured such a charming and cultured wife. Their union has 
been blessed with three sons and one daughter, of whom three are living. 

The secret of Mr. Soderstrom's wonderful success in newspaper work 
lies in his natural business ability and acumen and his love for his pro- 
fession. In that he felt that he had found his sphere, there he could do 
something to enlighten his fellowmen, especially his countrymen. 

Never tired, never disgusted, he labored persistently, and even if his 
free and too generous nature prevented him from reaping for his work the 
financial reward which justice could demand, the results of his efforts 
are still existing. He gave the readers of his newspaper the best that 
money could procure ; the ablest writers on every subject were employed 
by him, even if he had to import them from Sweden. His desire in 
managing a newspaper was not to gain the filthy lucre, but to instruct, 
to please, to make happy. The thoughts of thousands of his countrymen 
undoubtedly revert with a feeling of longing to the times that were, when 
newspapers could be read and published under his management. 

Shortly after the publication of the above mentioned book severe 
sickness settled down as a cloud upon his family and his physician advised 
a change of climate. Following this advice, in the spring of 1901 he 
moved with his family to Warroad, Minnesota, and again became a 
pioneer on the frontier (a homesteader), living in a log cabin in the 
depths of the forest, three miles from the Lake of the Woods, on the 
extreme northern borders of Minnesota and the United States. His 
health is now recovered, and the adage that "a man is as old as he feels, 
a woman as old as she looks," holds good with him. 

His literary tastes have followed him even into his retreat, where he 
is now actively engaged in gathering the material for and compiling a 
press history under the title "Blixtar Pa Tidningshorisonten," which will 
deal with newspaper life from 185 1 up to the present time, mainly con- 
cerning the Swedish-American press. 

Swan J. Turnblad. — ^The foremost of Swedish newspaper men in 
America, and one of the most successful Swedes in the United States, is 
unquestionably Swan J. Turnblad, publisher of the Svenska Atnerikanska 
Posten, of Minneapolis. Mr. Turnblad was bom at Tubbemila, Vislanda 
socken, Smiland, Sweden, October 7, i860, and came to this country in 



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68o SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



1868. together with his parents, who located at Vasa, Minnesota. After 
acquiring a good school education he moved to Minneapolis, where he 
learned the printing trade. Always industrious and economical, he 
became the owner of real estate and interested in a business enterprise 
very early — before many other young men, about his equal as to age and 
opportunities, could earn more than sufficient to pay their board. 

These facts, together with Mr. Tumblad's activity in the temperance 
movement, made him popular in large Swedish circles, and when the 
management of the Swedish-American Publishing Company, publishers 
of Srenska Amerikanska Post en, found that the company was hopelessly 
insolvent, they induced Mr. Tumblad to step in and assume the manage- 
ment. The new manager soon learned that he had tackled a g^nt under- 
taking. The paper had little or no subscribers, and the advertising 
patronage was too insignificant to mention. On the other hand, the com- 
pany was rich in debts, notes and judgments threatening on all sides. Mr. 
Tumblad was not only forced to mortgage his own hcwne to save the 
company from bankruptcy, but also to buy out many of the stockholders, 
who scrambled to get from under cover and be relieved of their liabilities 
in connection with the concern, and take up the company's notes, giving 
his own personal notes instead. 

This was a gigantic task. But Mr. Tumblad was equal to the occa- 
sion. He secured funds and steered the ship through the breakers and 
into smooth water. This required years of planning, work and sacrifice — 
and first, last and all the time, money. With his unexampled energy, 
keen business acumen and admirable perseverance he built up a great 
paper, which today is the pride of the Swedish nationality of America. 
The old company could not survive, but every stockholder who came to 
the new owner bemoaning his loss was compensated most generously. 

Besides Mr. Tumblad's excellent qualities as a business man he is 
indebted to his contemporaries for his success, because these for many years 
exhibited a vindictive jealousy against the tower of strength which 
loomed up on the horizon of the Swedish newspaper field — and the results 
proved once more that "a knock is a boost." 

Mr. Tumblad has invariably taken the lead in his profession. When 
he took charge of the Svenska Amerikanska Posten that paper's subscrip- 
tion price was only $1.00 per year. But it was also a small and insignifi- 
cant publication. Mr. Tumblad maintained the same subscription price 
and made the paper the largest, most instructive and influential of 
Swedish publications, which in time also gave him the largest circulation. 
He was the first Swedish publisher to have his paper set on linotype 
machines, the first Swedish owner of a Mergenthaler, first to use politi^ 
cartoons and color illustrations, and finally he is the only Swedish pub- 
lisher who owns and operates his own color rotary printing press. 

In 1882 Mr. Tumblad was married to Miss Christine Nelson, of 
Worthington, Minnesota, who was bom in Jemtland, Sweden. Together 
with their daughter, Lillian Zenobia, they reside at the magnificent family 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 68i 



residence at 2600 Park avenue. They have visited the Fatherland at 
various times, and on some of their trips they have toured the continent 
extensively. 

Mr. Turnblad has always taken a great interest in politics, but 
never accepted nomination for public office, although several high offices 
have been offered him. However, he has held some appointive offices, 
which he accepted only on the conditions that they should be offices 
which did not carry any remuneration. In 1899 he was appointed mem- 
ber of the State Reformatory Board for the state reformatory at St. 
Cloud. In 1905 he was appointed colonel on the governor's staff and 
in 1907 member of the State Board of Visitors. The two last named 
offices he still holds. 

Mr. Turnblad is a member of the Commercial Club, a thirty-second 
degree Mason, Knight Templar, Noble of the Mystic Shrine and member 
of B. P. O. E. His chief recreation is automobiling, he being the first 
man in the Northwest to own an automobile. 

Captain Andrew Sandberg. — Noteworthy not only as a represen- 
tative Swede of Minnesota, but as a veteran soldier of the Civil war, and 
for his excellent record as a city, county and government employe, Cap- 
tain Andrew Sandberg is now rendering appreciated service in the United 
States Custom House, in Minneapolis, filling the position to which he 
was appointed ten years ago. A native of Sweden, he was born, October 
24, 1839, in Ljung, Vestergotland, where his father was engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits, and likewise was a general merchant. He is one of a 
family of three children, of whom he and his sister Christina are now 
living. Christina has been twice married, and is now a widow. 

After his confirmation, Andrew Sandberg was employed for a time 
as a clerk in his father's store. He was always fond of military tactics, 
and at the age of seventeen years entered the Swedish army as a volun- 
teer. As the army service at that time lasted a month only of each year, 
he spent the remaining eleven months of each year as a traveling sales- 
man for Appelstam & Company, of Norrkoping, manufacturers of woolens. 
In 1861, joining the never-ceasing tide of emigration, he came to America, 
locating first in Galesburg, Illinois, where he almost immediately enlisted 
in Company C, Forty-third Illinois Volunteer Infantry, for a period of 
three years. At the expiration of his term he joined the Eleventh Mis- 
souri Volunteer Infantry, with which he served until the close of the 
war, when he was honorably discharged at Little Rock, Arkansas. While 
in the army, Captain Sandberg took part in various engagements of 
importance, including among others those at Fort Henry, Tennessee; 
the Battle of Shiloh, where he was so severely wounded in the left leg 
that he was afterwards confined for three months in the hospital; the 
engagement at Ajuca, Mississippi; the siege of Vicksburg; the battle at 
Saline River, Kansas ; and in the numicrous skirmishes of less importance. 
For his heroic services during the war he was allowed a pension of 



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68a SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



twelve dollars a month, it being awarded to him during the first admin- 
istration of President Cleveland. 

At the close of the conflict Captain Sandberg located in Chicago, 
where he was employed as a clerk in different dry goods estabUshments 
for about ten years. Entering then the government employ, he was 
connected with the Custom House for three years, afterwards being in 
the United States postoffice five years. Removing to Minneapolis in 
1883, the captain, in partnership with a cousin, embarked in the shoe 
business, but later bought out the interest of his partner, who returned 
to Illinois. Selling out his shoe business at the end of three years. Cap- 
tain Sandberg was appointed by the City Council superintendent of the 
workhouse, of which he had charge for three years. The following two 
years he was jailer of the Hennepin County Jail, after which he was 
appointed clerk in the Internal Revenue Office, where, for three years, 
he had control of the stamp department He was subsequently appointed 
to an office in the United States Custom House, with which he has been 
connected the past ten years. Captain Sandberg's record of public service 
is in every way honorable, bearing visible evidence of his ability, integrity 
and worth. 

Captain Sandberg married, in 1867, in Chicago, Illinois, Miss Elsa 
Nelson, who was bom in Onnastad, Skine, Sweden, in 1843, ^md of their 
union three children have been born, two of whom are living, namely: 
Jennie Malinda, wife of J. W. Bentley, a contractor ; and Enez Eugene, 
a contractor and builder in Butte, Montana. Captain Sandberg and 
family attend the Foss Methodist church, and are liberal contributors 
towards its support He is a member of IVIorgan Post, No. 4, G. A. R. 

Axel Hjalmar Nilsson, one of the most widely known and popular 
Swedes in the Twin Cities, was bom in the City of Nora, Sweden, Sep- 
tember 24, i860. He received his early education in the college of Ws 
native city, and later in the technical school of Orebro, from which he 
graduated after a three years' course in 1878. For a couple of years he 
was a mechanical draftsman in Stockholm and in 1881 emigrated to 
America. He settled in the east and worked at first as a mechanical 
draftsman and later as coppersmith, which trade he had learned in 
Sweden. 

During a number of years Mr. Nilsson has been employed on Swedish 
papers, both in the east and the west, as editor and advertising man- 
ager, and he came from Worcester, Massachusetts, to Minneapolis about 
eight years ago. In the Swedish-American singing world, Mr. Nilsson 
has won an enviable reputation as a singer, but still more as a 
leader. He is the happy possessor of a fine voice and he has spent both 
time and effort in promoting Swedish song in America. He has been 
honored by the Swedish Singers' Union with many prominent positions 
and his large experience and power of organization- have been of great 
value to Swedish song in America. Mr. Nilsson also possesses dramatic 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 685 



talent and moves with great ease on the "planks that represent the 
world." He is of a very happy and sunny disposition, making hosts of 
friends ; a good after dinner speaker and no mean poet. A daughter of 
Mr. Nilsson, who has been known as a fine pianist, is married to County 
Commissioner Carl R. Chindblom of Chicago, and his son Vemer 
is a dentist in Minneapolis. Mr. Nilsson has been for years a very active 
Democrat, and was honored by Governor Johnson with an appointment 
as deputy oil inspector for Hennepin county in February, 1909. 

Frank A. Gustafson, a pharmacist in Minneapolis, was bom in 
Berga socken, Kronoberg's Ian, Sweden, June 18, 1872, a son of Swenson 
and Johanna (Peterson) Swenson, in whose family were six children, 
as follows : John S., Frank A., Carl F., Oscar F., Amanda and Huldah. 

Frank A. Gustafson obtained his educational training in his native 
town, and came from there to the United States in 1890 as a lad of 
eighteen years. Locating first at Thorpe, in Wisconsin, he worked on a 
farm there for about a year and a half, and then coming to Minneapolis 
followed various employments here and at Grand Rapids, Minnesota, 
until entering the Northwestern College in 1895 to pursue a course of 
studies. In 1898 he enlisted in Company "E" of the Fourteenth Regi- 
ment of Minnesota Volunteers, and after the muster out, November 18, 
1898, of that regiment he enlisted in the regular service and spent two 
years in the Philippines during the insurrection. After the close of that 
conflict and his return to Minneapolis, being honorably discharged from 
the United States Army at Ft. Snelling, December 6, 1901, he became 
connected with the pharmacy business in this city, and has followed that 
line of trade from that time to the present. He is a member of Camp 
A. R. Patterson, an order composed of soldiers of the Spanish-American 
war and the Philippine campaign. 

Mr. Gustafson married, October 18, 1905, Mary T. Lindblom, a 
daughter of F. G. Lindblom, of Minneapolis. Mr. Gustafson is a member 
of the Swedish Tabernacle church. 

Ernest Swanson^ of Minneapolis, who is among the expert for- 
esters and gardeners of the Northwest, is a native of the city of Kris- 
tianstad, Sweden, born on the 20th of January, 1872, to Ernest and 
Christina (Albrektsson) Swanson. The father was bom March 16, 
1844, in Hammerslund, Skane, Sweden, practiced law in Kristianstad 
and neighborhood for many years, and is now living retired as a citizen 
of his birthplace. His wife, bom in 1846 on the crown estate known as 
Beckaskog, is also alive and in good health. Her father, Anders Albrekts- 
son, was long superintendent of the wagon and blacksmith works of the 
estate. There were six children in the family of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest 
Swanson. Hilda, the oldest, who was born in 1870, married Otto 
Johnsson, a machinist of Hasselholm, Sweden, who died in 1895, leaving 
his widow with two children, all of whom are now living with the daugh- 



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686 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



tcr*s parents. Ernest, whose name introduces this sketch, was the 
second-bom ; Emma, whose natal year was 1876, the third ; Jenny, bom 
in 1878, the fourth ; Hjalmar, who was bom in 1880 and lives in Florida, 
the fifth ; and Emil, who was bom in 1882 and is a telegraphic operator 
in Malmo, Sweden, is the youngest 

After passing through the public schools of Kristianstad, Ernest 
Swanson entered a military college, in which he spent 1890-2, and was 
then a pupil at the State's Forestry and Himting School for a year. In 
1893 he was appointed government forester and game warden of his 
district, holding that position for two years ; then, for some time, he was 
associated with his father in various hunting and fishing adventures. In 
1904 Mr. Swanson emigrated to North America, traveling through 
Quebec and a great portion of Canada and also visiting Michigan, Wis- 
consin, Montana, Washington, Colorado and other portions of the United 
States. 

Having friends in Minneapolis, Mr. Swanson went to that city in 
the fall of 1905. With his intimate knowledge of forestry and garden- 
ing he soon found emplo>Tnent, but soon commenced to take independent 
contracts. Deciding, however, to settle on land of his own, he toc^ a 
homestead claim in Williams county, North Dakota, and "proved up" 
in the legal fourteen months. It was his intention to bcate upon his 
farm, but as he was offered a good price for his quarter section he sold 
his property instead and retumed to Minneapolis in 1907. Since that 
time he has been engaged in his former occupation in the forestry and 
gardening lines. He is also still an ardent hunter and fisher and expects 
to again enjoy the healthful activities of country life. 

Alfred Ekman, barber, 2506 Twenty-seventh avenue, South, Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota, has been a resident of this city since 1888, when he 
emigrated to America from his native land, Sweden. Mr. Ekman was 
born in Atorp, Vermland, January 14, i8i52, son of merchant Johan 
Alfred Ekman and his wife, Ingeborg, both of whom are still living in 
Sweden, at Orebro. They have three children, Alfred and Albin being 
in this country, the latter, the eldest of the family, a resident of St, 
Louis, Missouri, and a daughter, Amelia, who lives with her parents. 

After attending the common schools, Alfred took a collegiate course 
in Orebro and Kristinehamn, and from the time of his confirmation until 
he reached his majority he assisted his father in business. Then he 
served the usual obligatory two years in the Swedish army. He remained 
with his father until twenty-six years of age, when he came to America. 
Arrived in Minneapolis, he leamed the barber's trade and was employed 
in a shop at 2506 Twenty-seventh avenue, South. After working there 
as an employe for five years he purchased the establishment and has 
since been its proprietor, meeting with a deserved success. Mr. Ekman 
has also given much time to music, being proficient on the piano, the 
double string bass and the tuba, and has played in the Minneapolis Park 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 687 



Band in various orchestras. Soon after his arrival in Minneapolis he 
reorganized the old Svea Band, which at that time consisted of only a 
few instruments. It later became a full band, under the leadership of 
Professor Oscar Ringwall. 

Mr. Ekman resides at 2510 Twenty-seventh avenue, South, and 
besides his home he is the owner of seven other properties in this 
vicinity. On February 28, 1906, he married Mrs. Mathilda Wermelin 
(nee Benztson), a native of Rudskog^, Vermland. The year previous 
to their marriage they both visited the old country. Fraternally Mr. 
Ekman is identified with the I. O. O. F. and the Swedish Brothers. 

Edwin Rodine, superintendent of Coffin's Box & Lumber Com- 
pany, Minneapolis, Minnesota, has been identified with this concern 
for nearly a quarter of a century, and for some years has been a stock- 
holder in the company. Mr. Rodine was bom at Ryagarde, Orimga 
parish, Elfsborgfs Ian, Sweden, December 24, 1870, son of John and 
Anna Maria Anderson, now residents of Minneapolis. In their family 
were four children, all born in Sweden: August, a cabinetmaker, was 
killed in a street car accident in Minneapolis, in 1895; Herman, a 
plasterer by trade, is married and settled in Minneapolis; Ada, wife of 
John Herth, died a few years ago; and Edwin. The father and eldest 
son came first to America; later were followed by another son, and, 
finally, June 24, 1884, Edwin, accompanied by his mother and sister, 
landed here, and thus the family was reunited. 

Edwin Rodine received his early education in the public schools 
of Sweden, and soon after their arrival in this country was confirmed 
by Rev. E. A. Skogsberg, in Minneapolis. In this city he attended 
public school until it became necessary for him to go to work in order 
to support his sick mother, while his father and brothers were absent, 
working in the lumber camps. Then for some time he was a student 
at night school. Finally he secured a steady job with a sash and door 
factory as a glazier and remained in that position for about one year. 
Then he entered the employ of the company with which he has since 
been connected, and in which he has worked his way frcmi one position 
to another until now he is superintendent and part owner. 

May 14, 1892, Mr. Rodine married Miss Alma A. Bolin, who 
was bom in Vestergotland, Sweden, in February, 1871, and who, in 
1884, came to Amierica with her parents, now deceased. Her father 
during his residence in Minneapolis was engaged in teaming and in a 
transfer business. Mr. and Mrs. Rodine live at 3049 Columbus avenue. 
They attend the Swedish St. Ansgarius Episcopal church, in which 
he has filled various offices, including S. E. C. warden and vestryman. 
He is a member of the West Side Commercial Club and of the Society 
Norden, in the latter of which he has served on the finance committee. 
Politically he is a Democrat 



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688 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Nels Swanson, who has a transfer, moving and express business^ 
in connection with which he conducts a wood and coal business, with 
headquarters at 1831 Central avenue northeast, Minneapolis, was bora 
and reared in Sweden, the date of his birth being September 29, i860. 

Mr. Swanson landed in America in 1881, about the time he reached 
his majority, and first went to Effingham, Illinois, where he found employ- 
ment in railroad construction work. Later this work took him into 
Missouri and other Southern states. In 1883 he came to Minneapolis 
and went to work in a tannery, a business in which he was engaged 
for a period of eleven years, during which time he mastered every detail 
of the work. After this he bought a team and engaged in business on 
his own account as a transferman. Soon he bought other teams and 
enlarged his operations, doing all kinds of hauling, moving, etc. In 
1898 he added to his other business by opening up a wood and coal yard,, 
and he has since dealt in all kinds of fuel. 

Politically, Mr. Swanson is a Republican, and in 1906 was the 
candidate of his party for alderman of the Ninth ward of Minneapolis. 
He is a member of the I. O. O. P., the Modern Woodmen of America,, 
the Modern Brotherhood of America, and the Eagles. 

In 1885 he married Miss Betsey Nelson, and to them have been 
born six children: Ethel E., Sidney S., Arthur, Oscar H., Clifford and 
Sevilla. Arthur, the third child, was accidentally killed by falling from* 
a horse, March 13, 1897, at the age of thirteen years. 

Axel Christopher Ekelund. — As head of the well-known firm 
of Ekelund & Hart, grocers and provision dealers, located at No. 1854 
Central avenue, Axel C. Ekelund is actively associated with the mer- 
cantile interests of Minneapolis. In his operations he is meeting with 
well merited success, his prosperity being due to his many years of 
untiring industry, his native good sense, and his upright business deal- 
ings. Like many of the city's most worthy residents, he is of Swedish 
birth, having been born, August 16, 1875, in the province of Dalsland,. 
Sweden. His father, Johan Anders Johnson, married Carolina Predrika 
Ekelund, and this son assumed his mother's maiden name. His father, 
a carpenter by trade, and for many years a soldier in the regular 
Swedish army, emigrated with his family to this country in 1882, 
settling in Minneapolis. 

A lad of seven years when he came with his parents to Minne- 
apolis, Axel C. Ekelund was educated in the public schools and con- 
firmed in the Lutheran Augustana church. Gifted as a boy with great 
musical talent, much attention was paid to the cultivation of this special 
gift, and when but nine years of age he played the organ in the Sunday 
School, and was subsequently organist in the St. Pauli church, and was 
the first organist in the Ebenezer church. While yet in his "teens," 
Mr. Ekelund served for four years as a locomotive fireman, after which- 
he worked at various occupations until 1895. Entering then the employ 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 691 



of his brother, he clerked in his grocery for a number of seasons, learn- 
ing the details of the business. In partnership with George O. Hart, 
Mr. Ekelund opened a grocery at No. '1903 Central avenue, but after- 
wards moved to No. 1824 Central avenue, where the firm conducted 
business for a time. Subsequently selling out his share of the business 
to his partner, Mr. Ekelund became traveling salesman for the firm of 
Slocum, Bergen & Co., in whose employ he remained a few years. In 
1906 Mr. Ekelund opened a grocery store at No. 1854 Central avenue, 
very near his former place of business, and the following year consoli- 
dated with his former partner, under the firm name of Ekelund & 
Hart. Enlarging his operations, he and his partner bought the adjoin- 
ing meat market of John Schmidler, which they have since conducted 
in connection with their grocery store, having here built up an exten- 
sive trade, carrying a choice line of staple and fancy groceries and the 
best of meats. 

Mr. Ekelund, in 1900, was united in marriage with Hanna Ander- 
son, of Red Wing, Minnesota, who presides with gracious hospitality 
over their attractive home at No. 1850 Fillmore street. Religiously 
Mr. and Mrs. Ekelund attend the Swedish Emanuel Lutheran church. 
Fraternally Mr. Ekelund is a member of the United Workmen of 
America, and of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is also 
officially connected with various business organizations, being a mem- 
ber of the Minneapolis Grocers' Association, of which he is the treas- 
urer and one of the directors ; a member and the secretary of the N. A. 
Matson Bakery Company; a member and vice-president of the United 
Retailers' Association; and a member of the New Boston Commercial 
Club. Politically Mr. Ekelund is an active supporter of the principles 
of the Republican party, and is president of the Ninth Ward Republican 
Club. 

GusTAF A. KuLLBERG, of the firm of G. A. KuUberg & Sons, 610 
Main street, Northeast, Minneapolis, Minnesota, is one of the Swedish 
pioneers of this city. Mr. Kullberg was born at Ousby Skine, Sweden, 
September 27, 1850, son of Anders and Sara Kullberg. His father was 
a turner by trade and manufactured old-fashioned spinning wheels, 
which were in use in all of the northern parts of Europe l^fore the 
cotton industry was introduced, and which are still used in certain 
localities in Sweden, Norway and Denmark. In the old country these 
wheels were called "spinnrockars." Anders Kullberg died in 1893, ^^^ 
his wife in 1905. Both are buried in Minnesota. Of their six children 
four are now living, namely: Bengt, a turner at Rochester, Minne- 
sota; Betsy, wife of John Lindquist, a farmer near Alexandria, Minne- 
sota; Olof, a machinist in Minneapolis; and Gustaf A. 

Gustaf A. Kullberg received his early education in the public 
schools of his native land and was confirmed in the Lutheran church, and 
under his father's instructions learned the turner's trade. In 1869, at 



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692 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



the age of nineteen, believing that America offered better advantages 
for a young man's advancement than did Sweden, he embarked for this 
country and made his way to Galesburg, Illinois, the old Swedish settle- 
ment. For five years he remained in Galesburg, working at his trade, 
at the end of which time he invested a portion of his earnings in a trip 
back to his old home in Skine. Soon, however, he was ready to return 
to America, and brought with him, in 1875, his sister Betsy. They 
came to Minneapolis, which has since been his home. Here he entered 
the employ of Wheaton, Re>'nolds & Company, with whom he remained 
twenty years, a portion of that time as foreman. 

In 1895 Mr. Kullberg engaged in business for himself at Fifth 
street and Fourth avenue, where he continued about twelve years, tmtil 
1907, when he moved to his present commodious factory building at 
610 Main street, Northeast. In 1902, his sons, having finished their 
schooling, were taken into th^ partnership and the name became G. A. 
Kullberg & Sons. Their business is conducted as the Central Wood 
Turning Company. 

In 1877 Mr. Kullberg married Miss Nellie R. Bergquist, a native 
of Knox county, Illinois, and a daughter of Andrew and Ellen Berg- 
quist, both now deceased. This union has been blessed in the birth 
of seven children, of whom four are living, namely: Arlence T., bom 
November 30, 1878, married, in 1906, Miss Jennie Blomgren, of Minne- 
apolis, and they have a son, Raymond, bom April 26, 1908. They 
reside at 902 Pennsylvania avenue, North; Wallace L., bom July 23, 
1883, married, in 1905, Miss Mildred Lawson, who was bom at Eau 
Claire, Wisconsin. They have a son, Winston Byron, bom November 
23, 1907, and they reside at 4012 Br>'ant avenue, South; Emest Ray- 
mond, bom April 3, 1885, is connected with the MacMartens Adver- 
tising Company; and Violet R., bom in September, 1892. 

Mr. Kullberg and his family are identified with the First Swedish 
Baptist church, in which he has long served oflftcially as trustee, secre- 
tary and deacon, having been a deacon for over thirty years. Politically 
he is a staunch Republican, but a believer in prohibition. He resides 
with his family at Abbot and Westem avenues. North. 

John Anderson. — Bringing to his mercantile employment good 
business methods and excellent judgment, John Anderson, proprietor 
of a meat market at No. 606 Sixth avenue, South, has here built up 
a large and lucrative trade, and is numbered among the respected and 
esteemed residents of this part of the city. A native of Sweden, he 
was bom, April 23, 1853, in Faringtofta socken, Skine, a son of Anders 
and Cecilia Olson, neither of whom are now livings the father having 
died in 1902, and the mother in 1908. They were farmers by occupa- 
tion, and the parents of eleven children, nine of whom are now living, 
namely: Olander, formerly a soldier in the Swedish Army, is now 
pensioned; Magnus, also a retired pensioner; John, the subject of this 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 093 



sketch ; Nils, a machinist in the Landskrona Sugar Factory ; Axel, a 
farmer in Skine; Peter, a retired cavalryman; Marie Elina, wife of 
S. A. Malmrose, of Galesburg, Illinois, a railroad man ; Aaron, a retired 
artilleryman ; and Otto Belander, a farmer. 

Having been confirmed in the Lutheran church, John Anderson 
followed the occupation in which he was reared until 1881, when he 
emigrated to this country, settling in Fargo, North Dakota, where he 
remained busily employed for four years. Yearning then to see his old 
home and friends, he visited in Sweden for three months, and on his 
return to America came directly to Minneapolis, which has since been 
his home. He at first conducted a hotel for a few years, but in 1896 
opened his present meat market and has since conducted it with well 
deserved success, his business being located on Sixth avenue, and his 
residence at No. 151 5 Elliott avenue. 

Mr. Anderson married, in 1890, Anna Peterson, who was born in 
Virestad, SmSland, Sweden, December 18, 1855, and they are the parents 
of three children, namely : Frances Athalie, born in 1891 ; Harry Vic- 
tor, born in 1895; and Raymond Belander, born June 9, 1897. Mr. 
Anderson was formerly connected with several benefit societies, but 
has dropped them. He and his family are members of the Lutheran 
Augustana church. 

Byron A. Lindgren. — ^A bright, progressive and brainy business 
man of Minneapolis, Byron A. Lindgren, secretary and treasurer of 
the H. S. Johnson Company, has already won for himself an excellent 
record in industrial circles, and enjoys to a high degree the esteem 
and confidence of his associates and friends. Descended from a Swede 
family that settled in Minnesota many years ago, he was bom, December 
2, 1876, in Stillwater, Minnesota, a son of John and Mary Lindgren. 
His mother has passed to the life beyond, but his father is still a resi- 
dent of Stillwater. They were the parents of four children, of whom 
two survive, namely: Byron A., the subject of this sketch; and Rose, 
born in 1885, is a school teacher. 

After leaving the public schools, Byron A. Lindgren was con- 
firmed* in the Lutheran church, and was subsequently graduated from 
a business college. Beginning his active career in the office of a sash 
and door manufactory in Stillwater, he continued there until 1894, 
when he was offered a similar position in Minneapolis. In 1896 Mr. 
Lindgren became associated with Mr. H. S. Johnson, who was just 
then starting in business as a sash and door manufacturer, and for 
a while was the man in the office with the exception of the proprietor. 
The business continued in this way until 1903, each year increasing in 
volume and value, and was then incorporated as the H. S. Johnson 
Company, with Mr. Lindgren as its secretary and treasurer. This enter- 
prising firm bought a new plant at the comer of Marshall and Eighteenth 
streets. Northeast, and the business has since had a constant and 



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694 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



healthful growth, now giving employment to about one himdred and 
fifty men. 

Mr. Lindgren married, in 1901, Jennie E. Gayner, who was bom in 
Minneapolis, June 12, 1878, being a daughter of a prominent real estate 
dealer of this city. Three children have been bom to Mr. and Mrs. 
Lindgren, two of whom are living, namely: Bertha Pearl Marie, bom 
October 10, 1903; and Clarence Byron, born August 31, 1907. Mr. and 
Mrs. Lindgren reside at 2324 Eleventh avenue. South, and are active 
members of the English Messiah church, and take great interest in its 
work. 

Milton G. Earl is well known throughout Minneapolis as a funeral 
director and embalmer, and he is a son of one of the oldest representatives 
of that business in this city. Peter Olson Earl, the father, was born in 
Sweden, but came to the United States when he was comparatively a 
young man. It was about twenty years ago that he embarked in the 
undertaking business in Minneapolis, and he soon became well and 
prominently known in the business, and was for years the leading under- 
taker in the city. 

Milton G. Earl was bom in Minneapolis September 19, 1886, and 
he attended its graded and high schools. When he was about seven- 
teen years of age his father's health began failing, and coming to his 
assistance he assumed the management of the large business and was 
soon admitted to a partnership, the firm name then becoming P. Olson 
Earl & Son, undertakers and embalmers. And how well the young man 
succeeded in business is best told in stating that under his management 
the trade has grown to larger proportions and the place of business has 
been made a model of its kind, up-to-date in every particular, and the 
outside equipment is second to none in the Twin Cities. Mr. Earl is a 
member of the Knights of P>'thias, the Modem Woodmen of America, 
the Royal League, the A. O. U. W., and the Yeomen. 

He married, January 28, 1908, Miss Mattie Nodell, a daughter of 
one of the most prominent and highly respected business men of Minne- 
apolis, John A. Nodell. Mr. and Mrs. Earl are the parents of one child: 
Rolland Milton. Mr. Earl is a member of the Swedish Baptist church. 

Carl G. Olsox, D. D. S., was bom at Boda, Stafnas parish, 
Vermland, Sweden, September 23, 1865, son of Olof and Marie Nilson, 
both now deceased, and one of a family of eight children. Of this 
number six are living, namely: Nils Wilhelm Olson, a retired farmer, 
living in Minneapolis: Anna Hulda, wife of Andrew Nasviken, a farmer 
of North Dakota; Christina, wife of P. P. Smith, also a farmer of 
North Dakota ; Carl G. ; Olof Albin. a North Dakota farmer, and Adolf 
Olson, a dentist of Duluth, Minnesota. 

Carl G. Olson had received a public school education in his native 
land previous to his coming to this country. In 1881, his father having 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 697 



died, he accompanied his mother and brothers and sisters to America. 
They first settled at Willmar, Minnesota, where they remained one year, 
then going to Larimore, North Dakota, where the eldest son, Nils W., 
filed claim to a homestead. Here Carl worked on the railroads three 
years, after which he clerked for five years in a general merchandise 
store. Feeling the need of a better education than he possessed, for 
some time he attended private school and afterward the South Side 
high school and in 1898 he entered the Dental Department of the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, where he graduated with the degree of D. D. S., 
in 1900. Immediately after his graduation he opened an office in the 
Simonson Block, at Seven Corners, where he still remains and where 
he has met with well earned success. 

Dr. Olson is a member of the Scandinavian Dental Society and 
of the Alumni Association of the University of Minnesota. He resides 
with his family at 73 Seymour avenue, Southeast, Minneapolis. In 1896, 
on the 23d of September, he married Miss Mary Olson, daughter of 
Anders Olson and wife Bertha (nee Overland), who was bom on a 
farm in Chippewa county, Minnesota, June 6, 1877. They are the 
parents of four children : Lydda Maria, born November 16, 1897 ; Victor 
Rudolph, October 18, 1902; Anna Kajsa, May 24, 1905; and Adolph 
William, July 13, 1907. 

Nels Hallmer, the meat market man at 310 Twentieth avenue. 
North, Minneapolis, Minnesota, dates his birth near Lund, Skane, Jan- 
uary 18, 1865, and is a son of Nils Swensen and his wife, Christina 
Charlotta Anderson, farmers. The father died in Sweden, in 1888; the 
mother died there in 1909. Of their six children five are living, namely : 
Nels ; Johan, a member of the SkSne Cavalry Regiment ; Maria, wife of 
E. Brodin, a high school teacher in Sweden; Johanna, wife of E. Lin- 
dahl, a farmer in South Dakota; and Emma, wife of Axel Anderson, a 
farmer living near Ortofta, SkSne. 

Nels attended the public school and the people's high school and 
also todc a course in a private business college. Thus equipped to make 
his own way in the world, he accepted a position as clerk and book- 
keeper in the delicatessen and meat store of Nils Christensen in Lund, 
where he remained a year and a half, after which, for one year, he 
clerked and kept books in the Hotel Krakau at Lund. Then he served 
one year in the Swedish army. That was in 1886. In 1887 he sailed 
for America, and on May 5th arrived in Minneapolis. Soon after he 
went to Ashland and Hurley, Wisconsin, where he worked on a rail- 
road for four weeks, but returned to Minneapolis and has since made 
his home in this city. His first employment here was in the Hall-Ducey 
sawmill, where he worked four months. June 27, 1888, he again iden- 
tified himself with the meat business and clerked until 1892, when he 
entered into a partnership with E. Johnson & Company, a concern that 
has five meat markets in Minneapolis. Since 1892 Mr. Hallmer has 



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698 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



been a partner in and manager of the store at 310 Twentieth avenue. 
North. 

October 13, 1893, ^^ married Miss Anna Maria Olson, who was 
bom in Carlstad, Sweden, March 10, 1875, ^i^^ came to America in 
1892. They have two children: Nels Robert, bom November 7, 1894, 
and Linnea Maria, December 2, 1895. They reside at 15 19 Fremont 
avenue. North. Mr. Halhner is a Mason and an Odd Fellow and he 
and his family attend worship at Bethlehem Lutheran church. 

Herman Godtfried Lilliencrantz. — A man of superior talents and 
culture, Herman Godtfried Lilliencrantz has attained a position of note in 
Minneapolis, where, as a massagist and a hydropathist, he has won on ex- 
tensive patronage, being very successful in the treatment of his many pa- 
tients. He was born, July 12, 1858, in Karlstad, Vermland, Sweden, being 
the only child of Olof and Bethy Lilliencrantz. His father, bom in 1833, 
was engaged during his active career in the clothing business in Karlstad, 
where his death occurred in 1892. His mother, bom in 1831, is still a 
resident of Karlstad. 

As a boy and youth, Herman G. Lilliencrantz received excellent 
educational advantages, being graduated in 1877 from the Karlstad Prac- 
tical College, and in 1882 being graduated, with honors, from the Melins 
College for Massage and Medical Treatment. After practicing his pro- 
fession for two years in his native town, Mr. Lilliencrantz emigrated to 
America, locating in 1884 in Chicago, Illinois, where he subsequently 
was graduated from the Chicago Theological Seminary. Continuing his 
studies, he next entered Augustana College, at Rode Island, Illinois, 
where he was graduated at the end of two years. He then studied for a 
year in an Episcopalian institution, the Western Theological Seminary, 
in Chicago, receiving his diploma there. After his graduation Mr. Lillien- 
crantz accepted a call as pastor of the Free Evangelical Lutheran church 
at Stronghurst, Illinois, and was there ordained to the ministry March 
31, 1891. After a successful pastorate of three years in that place, he 
came as a missionary to Minnesota, and has since continued a resident 
of this state. Since 1901 he has been actively and successfully engaged 
in the practice of Swedish Massage and Hydropathy in Minneapolis, 
having built up a lucrative patronage, his residence being at No. 2510 
Bryant avenue, North. 

Mr. Lilliencrantz married, in 1894, Ida Mellgren, who was bom in 
Vestergotland, Sweden, and to them three children have been born, 
namely : Henning Clarence Walter, Celinda Ragnhild Idalia, and Ejnar 
Clauritz Antonius. 

Dr. Edward P. Blomgren, a prominent physician of Minneapolis, 
was born January i, 1857, in Sweden, and is a son of Peter and Anna 
Blomgren. Dr. Blomgren's father died when he was seven years of age, 
and he was brought by his mother to the United States. They located 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 701 



at Isanti county, Minnesota, where he attended the public schools. Later 
he took up the study of medicine at the Bennett Medical College, 
Chicago, Illinois, where he was graduated in the class of 1884. In the 
same year he took up his residence in Minneapolis, and remained in 
practice there for one year, after which he removed to Steams county, 
Minnesota, and until 1892 remained there in active practice. He then 
returned to Minneapolis, where he has built up a large and lucrative 
practice. He is one of the oldest Swedish doctors in the city, and 
stands high in his profession, having made a specialty of diseases of the 
eye and ear; in 1892 he began a special study of this branch of surgery 
in Chicago, and has acquired* unusual skill in this line. Dr. Blomgren 
has won a large circle of friends, and has the respect and esteem of all 
who know him. He is a member of the Eclectic Medical Society, An- 
cient Order of United Workmen, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and Swedish United Sons of America. 

Dr. Blomgren married, in February, 1883, Christine Anderson, of 
Minneapolis, born in Sweden and educated ip the United States, and 
they have one daughter, Florence. 

Charles A. Olson. — A leading shoe merchant of .Minneapolis, 
prominent in the fraternal circles of the city and active in its charitable 
and religious work, Charles A. Olson was bom at Linkoping, Sweden, 
June 19, 1859. His parents were Andrew P. Olson and wife. The father 
was a shoemaker by trade. In this family were four children, three of 
whom are living: Arvid Olson, at Anaconda, Montana; Annie, who is 
married to Gust Johnson, at Center City, Minnesota, and Charles A. 

Charles A. was educated in the common schools in Sweden and in 
the public schools of New York state, in 1872 having come to America 
in company with his father, sister and brothers. A sister of Andrew P. 
Olson, the father, lived in Penn Yan, Yates county. New York, and the 
family remained with her for three years. They then moved west to 
Center City, where the father settled in 1875. Here Charles A. did all 
kinds of work, mostly farming, for about two years. He then moved to 
St. Paul, where he was employed as coachman by the well known real 
estate man, Andrew Gotztan, for about one year. That gentleman recom- 
mended him to Christ Reichert, a retail shoe dealer, with whom he clerked 
for about a year, when he went to Minneapolis and secured employment 
with Lundquist & Anderson as clerk and repairer in their shoe store on 
Washington avenue, south. Mr. Olson then came to Dean's retail shoe 
store and worked as a clerk for more than three years. He next clerked 
for Levin Lundquist, on the east side, where he remained until February 
12, 1891, when he started in business as a full-fledged shoe merchant at 
No. 421 Central avenue, with Aaron Carlson as partner. The latter still 
retains an interest, but the store is now run by Mr. Olson. 

On December 14, 1886, Mr. Olson was married to Miss Hanna 
Mathilda Carlson, a sister of his partner. She was born in Algutsboda, 



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702 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Wexio Lan, May i6, 1858, and came to America June 5, 1875. They 
had four children, of whom the following are living: Elsie Jurena, 
bom June 14, 1891, who is attending high school in Minneapolis; Carl 
Irving, born April 20, 1894, and Oscar Elvin, bom August 8, 1896, who 
both attend the Holland public school. Mr. Olson is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, Modem Woodmen of America, Modem Brotherhood 
of America. Of the latter he has been vice-president two terms and was 
assistant to the captain of the degree staff, L. F. Snow, for four years, 
arranging and leading the annual excursions. He is a member of the 
North Star Benefit Association and of the Society Norden, of which he 
has been trustee for one and one-half years and is now a trustee, and 
is a charter member of the Stenbock Lodge, No. 138, Order of Vasa. 
The family attends the Swedish Mission Friends' church. Mr. Olson 
has always been a liberal contributor to the Swedish Hospital and other 
charitable institutions. The family residence is located at 1519 Adams 
street, N. E. 

Martin Engman. — ^Throughout Hennepin county, no better or more 
intelligent representative of the progressive Swedish residents can be 
found than in the person of Martin Engman, of Minneapolis, who, 
though handicapped to some extent by the lack of educational advan- 
tages in his youthful days as regarded English studies, has since through 
home study acquired an excellent knowledge of the use of the English 
language, becoming proficient to a degree not commonly attained by a 
foreigner, and in the same manner has become familiar with historical sub- 
jects, being well informed on European and American affairs, past and 
present. A son of Peter Engman, he was born, April 22, 1868, in Skine, 
Rieseberge socken, Christianstads Lan, Sweden, of military stock. 

A native of Skane, Sweden, Peter Engman was for thirty-three years a 
faithful soldier in the Swedish Army, as a recruit being drilled on the pres- 
ent site of the graveyard at Flansburg, in Schleswig-Holstein, then a prov- 
ince of Denmark, now a German possession. During the Dano-German 
War, it fell to his lot to be one in that part of the Swedish Army sent 
to assist the Danes. He was a skilled marksman, and took several prizes 
for his shooting at tournaments held on the military grounds. He was 
a member of the famous Nora Asbo Company, Twenty-fourth Regiment, 
Swedish Infantry, as a soldier winning a noteworthy record for bravery. 
After returning to civil life, he was for a number of years engaged in 
agricultural pursuits, but is now living retired from active labor. To 
him and his wife, whose maiden name was Johanna Anderson, seven 
children were born, as follows: Nels, stationary engineer in a distillery 
at Beansberga, Skane, Sweden ; Amily, wife of Per Monson, a farmer in 
Skane; Emma, wife of Olof Wyberg, an employe of the Pullman Com- 
pany in the yards of the Northern Pacific Railroad Company, in Minne- 
apolis ; Ludwig, of SkSne, a soldier in the army ; Marie, wife of Lieuten- 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 703 



ant Carlson, of Skane, an officer in the Swedish Army ; Martin, the sul> 
ject of this sketch ; and Alice, who died at the age of five years. 

Until fifteen years old, Martin Engman attended school in Bonarp, 
Rieseberge, the place in which all military manoeuvers are usually held. 
A year later he came to the United States, in 1884 locating in Minneap- 
olis, where he found employment on a dairy farm, of which he was sub- 
sequently the superintendent for a few years. Resigning the position, 
he worked a year in the shops of the Minneapolis & St. Louis Railroad 
Company, and in 189 1 became a fireman on that road. Proving faithful 
to his duties in that capacity, Mr. Engman was made a locomotive 
engineer in 1895, and has retained the position until the present time, 
being eminently worthy of the trust and confidence reposed in him by 
his employers, and by the traveling public. 

Mr. Engman married, August 12, i8g6, Marguerite Landick, daugh- 
ter of Adam Landick, of Red Wing, Minnesota, a contractor, and into 
their attractive home two children have made their advent, namely: 
Fern, born October 28, 1898 ; and Glenn, bom April 30, 1900. Mrs. Engr 
man is a woman of culture and refinement, and a consistent member of 
the Episcopal church. Politically Mr. Engman supports the principles 
of the Republican party at the polls, and fraternally he is a prominent 
member of the Masonic order, belonging to Minneapolis Lodge, No. 19, 
F. & A. M. ; Zion Commandery, No. 2, K. T. ; and having taken the 
thirty-second degree of Masonry. He is also a member of the Brother- 
hood of Locomotive Engineers, and of the Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Firemen. 

Harry Albert Lund^ lawyer, first saw the light of day in St. Paul, 
the capital of Minnesota, on the eighteenth day of November, 1870. His 
father, Gustaf Lund, was bom in GSrdsby, near Vexio, August 10, 1847, 
and after serving his apprenticeship as a carpenter emigrated to the 
United States of America in 1866. 

Inga Sophia Lund (nee Svensdotter) was bom in Tolg parish, near 
Vexio, May 17, 1849, ^^d after a two years' residence in St. Paul she 
was married to Gustaf Lund in 1869. Shortly after the birth of Harry 
the family removed to Minneapolis, where the happy and respected 
spouses resided until the death of Mrs. Lund on July i, 1896. Gustaf 
Lund has been in the employ of the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul 
Railway Company for thirty-five years, and is a well-known and deserv- 
edly popular man in the community. 

Nine children were bom to Mr. and Mrs. Lund, of whom Harry is 
the eldest, and the names, occupations and places of residence of his sur- 
viving brothers and sisters are : Edward Carl, married to Estrid Samuel- 
son, formerly of Rockford, Illinois, and he is employed by the Chicago, 
Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Company; Harriet Sophia, the wife of 
William Linn, a merchant in Eveleth, Minnesota; Eugene N., engaged 



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704 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



in the produce commission business in Denver, Colorado; Rae Amalia, 
married to Walter J. Humphry, an electrical engineer in the service of 
the Federal Government at the Isthmus of Panama; Lawrence L. G., a 
junior student of the South Side High School in Minneapolis. Harry 
A. Lund was educated in the public schools and South Side High School 
in Minneapolis, and in the Minnesota State University and Law College 
of the latter, also in Minneapolis. He was admitted to the bar in 1897 
and has continuously engaged in the practice of his profession since his 
admission. Prior to 1904 he conducted his constantly increasing pro- 
fessional business alone, but in the fall of that year he formed a copartner- 
ship with State Senator Henry J. Gjertse under the firm name of Gjertsen 
& Lund. Both of the partners occupy a prominent place at the bar of 
their state and home city, which is evidenced to practical men by the 
splendid and well paying business of the firm. 

In addition to the professional work and high standing which Mr. 
Lund enjoys as a lawyer, he has been for years one of the best known 
fraternal men in Minneapolis, and has held, and now holds, exalted and 
important positions in a number of fraternal, musical and social organiza- 
tions. He is past chancellor commander of Nora Lodge No. 33, Knights 
of Pythias ; Past Commander Modin Tent No. 20, Knights of the Macca- 
bees, the largest Maccabee lodge in Minnesota ; past consul of Cedar Camp 
No. 4419, M. W. A., the largest M. W. A. camp in Minneapolis. He has 
held the offices of secretary in Society of Swedish Brothers, the wealthiest 
local Swedish society in the United States. Last year he was the secre- 
tary of the Odin Club, one of the foremost Scandinavian social organiza- 
tions in America, and is an officer of the Supreme Lodge, Vasa Order of 
Amerika, and president of its Grand Lodge for Minnesota. As State 
Lecturer for the M. W. of A. he is frequently called upon to deliver lec- 
tures upon fraternal subjects throughout the Northwest. 

Mr. Lund is a member of St. Ansgarius Swedish Episcopal church, 
and is a well known lay member of that ecclesiastical body. In politics 
Mr. Lund is a Democrat. He is one of the best known, most eloquent 
and effective campaigners in his state, and in his public speaking he 
employs English and Swedish with equal ease and facility. 

His interest in the cause of his Scandinavian countrymen is well 
known, and no large Scandinavian event is consummated in the Twin 
Cities in which his services and counsel are not solicited. He was one 
of the moving spirits in the organization of the Arpi Male Chorus of 
Minneapolis, was its first president and contributed greatly to the proud 
position now occupied by it in the musical circles of his state. 

Mr. Lund was married to Josephine Amalia Dahl, a native of La 
Crosse, Wisconsin, November 17, 1897. Mrs. Lund died June 14, 1903, 
leaving her surviving their two daughters, Mildred Marie and Josephine 
Amalia. 

On June 19, 1905, Mr. Lund married Louise Wettstein, of Red Wing, 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 705 



Minnesota. Two children are the issue of the last marriage, Helen 
Alberta and Horatius Odin. 

As a citizen, Swedish-American, lawyer and fratemalist Mr. Lund 
is deservedly popular in the state of his nativity and city of his residence. 
He is proud of his Scandinavian ancestry and feels a justifiable pride in 
doing everything in his power to further the cause and contribute to 
the welfare and advancement of his countrymen. 

John D. Ekstrum. — During a number of years John D. Ekstrum 
has been prominently identified with the business interests of Minne- 
apolis and in this time has become recognized as one of its useful citi- 
zens. He is at the head of the Flour City Fuel and Transfer Company, 
one of the leading corporations of its kind in this city. He started out 
on his business career along these same lines, working as a teamster for 
a number of years and then was appointed to the Minneapolis police 
force. He spent three years and a half as a sergeant of police, but before 
his appointment to that position he had embarked in the fuel and transfer 
business and he continued those lines of trade during his entire service 
on the police force. After his retirement therefrom he admitted his 
brother-in-law, Mr. N. L. Johnson, and Mr. John Olson, of the contract- 
ing firm of Ilstrup & Olson, to a partnership, and the business has since 
been carried on under the firm name of the Flour City Fuel and Transfer 
Company, their main office being at 40 West Lake street; downtown 
office at 109 Bank of Commerce Building, with six branch offices and 
yards throughout the city. This firm annually transacts an extensive 
business, requiring about sixty head of horses in their business and 
several automobile trucks, and they furnish constant employment to 
about seventy-five men. 

Mr. Ekstrum was bom in Smiland, Sweden, September 14, 1873, a 
son of Solomon and Mary Ekstrum. In their family were five children : 
John D. ; Ida M., who married Nels L. Johnson; Clause E. ; Alma A., 
who married Peter W. Anderson; and Carl A. The father learned and 
followed the mason trade in his native land of Sweden. 

John D. Ekstrum was but eleven years of age when he came with 
his mother to the United States, his father having preceded them here 
three years, and the little lad resumed his education in the public schools 
of Minneapolis, later going to work with his father at the mason trade. 
In a couple of years he had saved enough money to buy himself a team 
of horses and he continued in the teaming business until the year of 
1894, when he entered upon his business career. He married, on the 
29th of June, 1901, Ida K. Nelson, and their only child is a son, John D., 
Jr., bom March 16, 1904. 

As a Republican Mr. Ekstrum has taken an active part in the 
political work of this city and is the president of the Swedish-American 
Republican Qub, which was organized in 1906 in the Eighth ward. He 

45 



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7o6 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



is also a member of the Swedish Brothers, the Royal Arcanum, Modem 
Woodmen of America, the Order of Druids, the Odin Qub, the Order of 
Vasa, he having been one of the organizers of the Trollhattan Lodge. 
He is a director and one of the organizers of the West Side Commercial 
Club. He is a member of the Swedish Lutheran Zion church and has 
served as a trustee in his church and as a member of th^ official board. 

Gust Lundahl. — Standing prominent among the representative 
Swedish-Americans of Minnesota is Gust Lundahl, of Minneapolis, a 
well-known and prosperous railroad contractor. A son of August 
Jonson, he was born, December 21, 1862, in the parish of Hessleby, 
Jonkoping Ian, Sm&land, Sweden, where he was reared and educated. 
Born in 1833, August Jonson has spent his entire life in Sweden, being 
employed as a farmer and a logging contractor. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Khristina Bogren, was bom in 1833, and died, in Hessleby 
parish, June 14, 1907. Seven children were bom of their union, namely: 
Charles, bom in 1859, is a building contractor in Chicago, Illinois; John, 
bom in 1861, is a carpenter in Chicago; Gust, the special subject of this 
sketch; Alfred, bom in 1864, ^ farmer in Hessleby parish, still living 
in his native land; Frank, born in 1866, a railway contractor, resides in 
Minneapolis; Qacs, bom in 1870, resides in Minneapolis, where he is a 
railroad foreman; Konstan, born 1873, a farmer in Hessleby parish, 
living in his native land. 

Having completed his early studies in the public schools. Gust Lun- 
dahl remained with his parents until nineteen years of age, when he 
began life for himself, working in different places, and being variously 
employed. In 1887, desirous of trying the hazard of new fortunes, he 
emigrated to this country, making North Henderson, Illinois, his first 
stopping place. Wishing, however, to familiarize himself with all parts 
of the United States, he subsequently traveled across the country from 
Mexico to Alaska, and from Maine to California. Visiting Minneapolis 
in 1895, Mr. Lundahl was so pleased with this beautiful city that he at 
once decided to settle here permanently, and has never regretted his 
decision. Continuing his chosen work, that of a railroad contractor, 
he has met with far more than the average success in his line of industry, 
having become associated with some of the most noted railroad con- 
tracting firms of the great Northwest, including two of the leading firms 
of Minneapolis, Foley Brothers and Winston & Company, and Guthrie 
& Company, of St. Paul. 

Mr. Lundahl married, in 1905, Huldah Forslund, who was born 
July 25, 1878, in Harmanga, Helsingland, Sweden, and they are the 
parents of two children, namely: Roy, born November 18, 1906; and 
Harvor, born October 14, 1908. Mr. Lundahl is an active member of 
Society Norden, and resides at No. 411 Fourth street, Northeast, where 
he and his wife delight to entertain their friends. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 709 

John Albin Dahl^ a bright young attorney of Minneapolis, was 
bom January 20, 1866, on a farm north of Elfsborg, in Dalsland, Sweden, 
a son of Jonas and Anna L. Dahl, of the same locality, where his paternal 
grandfather was a farmer. 

In 1869, when John A. was about a year old, the family came to 
Minnesota and first settled at Jordan. The father was a tailor by trade 
and followed this occupation when he could secure emplo)anent and at 
other times performed any labor which came to his hand and enabled him 
to support his family respectably. About 1880 he removed to Minne- 
apolis and died there in February, 1887. His widow now resides in 
that city. The family has long been identified with the Lutheran church, 
and Mr. Dahl was an earnest supporter of the Republican party in poli- 
tics. With one exception all of the seven children of the family reside 
in Minneapolis. They are: Mary, John, Erick M., Christina, Sophie, 
John A. and Emma. The last named is the wife of Nels Turnbladh, of 
Duluth, Minnesota. The eldest is the wife of Louis N. Nelson, and 
the fifth of John W. Johnson. 

John A. Dahl attended the public schools of Jordan and Minne- 
apolis and the Minneapolis Academy. He pursued the academic course 
in the University of Minnesota, graduating in 1892, and was graduated 
from the law department of that institution in 1893. From 1893 to 1897 
he was located in West Superior, Wisconsin, where he was engaged in 
the general practice of law. In 1897 he returned to Minneapolis and has 
since been engaged in the general practice of the law. He is assistant 
county attorney and is now city prosecutor of Minneapolis. He main- 
tains an office at 614-15 Temple Court Building. He has membership in 
the State Bar Association. He is a member of Khurum Lodge, No. 1 12, 
A. F. & A. M., and is an active worker in the order. He is past consul 
commander of Calhoun Camp, No. 27, Woodmen of the World. He is 
also a member of the Yeomen and of the Gustavus Adolphus Society. 
Mr. Dahl was married October 20, 1895, to Emma Leveroos, a native of 
Sweden, and they are the parents of one son, William Emanuel, born 
January 20, 1903. 

GusTAVE IvAR Roos^ engineer and overseer at Bethany Home, Min- 
neapolis, is a young Swedish-American of thoroughly moral character 
and substantial business experience and training. He is a native of 
Alseda parish, Jonkopings Ian, Smiland, born on the 23rd of January, 
1871, to Gustaf Magnus and Anna Charlotta (Strand) Roos. His father 
was bom November 26, 1843, ^^^ his mother (daughter of J. P. Strand,, 
of Hult parish, Sweden) June 17, 1841. Gustaf M. Roos served as a 
corporal in the Kalmar Infantry Regiment. Five of his seven children 
were born to him before he emigrated to the United States, in 1882, and 
settled at Watertown, Minnesota, the other two being natives of that 
town. There the father died August 23, 1891, and the mother is still 
residing in that place. Besides Gustave I., the children bom to Mr. 



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710 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



and Mrs. Gustaf M. Roos are as follows: Anna Olivia, born August 
II, 1867, who married Charles Olson, a contracting painter of Minne- 
apolis, and is the mother of four children ; Josephine Charlotta Mathilda, 
bom October 8, 1873, who is a deaconness in Emmanuel Hospital, Omaha, 
Nebraska ; Per Arvid Magnus, who was bprn August 26, 1876, and died 
at Watertown, September 16, 1891 ; Ada Louisa Carolina, born May 19, 
1880, married N. P. Nelson, a contracting plumber of Minneapolis, and 
has four children; Victoria Leontina Eugenia, bom January 22, 1883, 
and the wife of Claus Hillard, a Minneapolis carpenter; and Emma 
Honnore Susanna, bom August 11, 1885, and married to David Johnson, 
a bricklayer of Minneapolis. 

Gustave Ivar attended a public school in Sweden until he was 
eleven years of age, when (in the fall of 1882) the family emig^ted to 
the United States, arriving in Watertown, Minnesota, on November 
23rd of that year. The grandfather had already established a home in 
that city and young Gustave, after a short season in the public schools, 
was obliged to contribute to the support of the new household. But, 
although thus excluded from the public institution he regularly attended 
the Swedish Lutheran Sunday school of Gothaholm church until he was 
confirmed May 24, 1885. He then engaged in farm work until 1890, 
when he became a stage driver for a year on the route between Delano 
and Watertown. In 1892 Mr. Roos became a citizen of Minneapolis, 
remaining in the employ of County Qerk Dickey from that year until 
1895. In the meantime he had been endeavoring to meet the necessary 
deficiencies of his education by taking evening courses in Archibald's 
Business College and, in pursuance of this plan, he resigned his position 
in the county clerk's office and completed a regular business course in 
that institution. Afterward he spent six months at Hibbing, on the Iron 
Range, as a prospector for Longyear, Pillsbury and Bennet. Retuming 
to Minneapolis he was employed for a year by the W. K. Morrison 
Hardware Company, and in 1899 assumed his present responsibilities 
with the Bethany Home. Mr. Roos has the full respect of his home 
community and is an especial favorite in fraternal and benevolent circles. 
In the Woodmen of the World he is serving the term 1909-11 as head 
clerk of jurisdiction D and, for the past five years, has been financial 
secretary of Calhoun Camp No. 27. He is also an active member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

A. L. Skoog, chorister at the Swedish Tabernacle, Minneapolis, is a 
leading figure in the development of Swedish-American choir music and 
h)rmnology. He has made a substantial record both as editor and author, 
and for thirty years has been one of the leading choir directors of the 
Northwest. The author of some three hundred anthems and hymnals 
not to mention his voliuninous work in the arrangement of standard 
church music, most of his compositions have found a favorite place in 
the Swedish churches of America, while some of them are sung* in the 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 711 



mother country and have been translated into Norwegian, Finnish and 
German. Deficient in technical musical training, he freely admits that 
he has never become an artist, either as a composer, singer or performer, 
but thousands will accord him a fine tone perception and harmony insight 
and an innate power over singing bodies which have brought his anthems 
and hymns so close to the popular heart and enabled him to attain his high 
standing as a chorister. Aside from special occasions when he has organ- 
ized and conducted choirs of several hundred voices, with orchestral ac- 
companiment, Mr. Skoog has devoted his talents to but three choirs — one 
at St. Paul, the Tabernacle choir in Chicago, and his present charge, 
which he has conducted (with the exception of 1904-5) since 1885. 

In picking up the threads of Mr. Skoog's life and work, it is learned 
that he is a native of Stora Arbotten, Gunnarskog, province of Varmland, 
Sweden, born December 17, 1856. His father, Anders Jonson adopted the 
name Skoog while serving in the provincial militia. His mother's maiden 
name was Maria Eriksdotter, and as her first child, Anders, died before 
the birth of the second, the latter inherited the Christian name of his little 
dead brother. It may be added that the initial "L" was adopted early by 
Mr. Skoog to distinguish him from his father, this course being taken in 
preference to assuming the customary "Jr." The son began his schooling 
at the age of five, but when he was ten, his father, a hardworking tailor, 
was obliged to use him at his trade. In 1868 the father emigrated to the 
United States, while the son continued his apprenticeship under his uncle. 
In the following year his mother, with three younger brothers and him- 
self, joined the head of the family in St. Paul, which has since remained 
their home. Until 1874, or his eighteenth year, the time of the son 
Anders was divided between his schooling and his tailoring. It is a strange 
fact to relate that during that period of his life his father made an inef- 
fectual attempt to instill a little musical training into the boy through the 
mediums of a small reed organ and a regular instructor. But the evan- 
gelical visits of the Rev. Skogsbergh to the Twin Cities in 1877-8, with 
the conversion of the young man in the latter year, had a stimulating 
effect upon his natural musical gifts and became the turning point in his 
life. At that time he was able to play ordinary hymns and possessed a 
fair, though not cultivated, voice. From the first there was a mutual 
attraction between the evangelist and the convert, and Mr. Skogsbergh 
was soon not only employing him as a singer at local services, but taking 
him to other cities. The Mission Friends also pressed him into perma- 
nent active service, both as a singer and a choir leader. At this period, 
though ignorant of the laws of harmony, the young enthusiast even com- 
posed some simple four-part hymn tunes, of which No. 53 in "J^b^lklan- 
gen" is an example. In October, 1879, he moved to Chicago to become 
the leader of the choir and music at Rev. Skogbergh's Tabernacle. Soon 
after moving to Chicago he obtained a position as a teacher in the paro- 
chial school, continuing to teach both Swedish and English for four 
years. During this period he also mastered Swedish stenography, which 



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712 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



became of great service to him in after years. In 1881 Mr. Skogsbergh^ 
his wise adviser and good friend, published his hymnal, "Evangclii 
Basun," and later a second part of the same book, as well as "Lilla Basu- 
nen," a music book for Sunday Schools. Mr. Skoog became his assistant 
in the preparation of these works, in which were included some of his own 
musical compositions. After Rev. Skogsbcrgh had moved to Minneapolis,, 
where he founded Kristna H'drolden, Mr. Skoog was called there in 1885 
to assist in editing it and to take charge of the church choir. Subse- 
quently the latter again assumed school work in the Mission church and 
had entire charge of Sondagsskol-Vdnnen, and in 1889 joined with Mr. 
Skogsbergh in a republication of "Lilla Basunen.*' Although the younger 
man was a stranger to type-setting he purchased an outfit and then laid 
the foundation of a music printing business, with which he was connected 
until quite recently. In 1891 he published his own book of anthems^ 
"Kristliga Kors&nger," and the following year established Gittit, a monthly 
sheet devoted to sacred music and church music literature. This publica- 
tion, the contents of which he has later compiled into fourteen different 
books, was discontinued in 1908, because of the determination of its 
founder to make a practice of publishing music in book form. In 1894,. 
with Mr. Skogsbergh, he published a revised edition of "Evangelii 
Basun ;" in 1896, with Rev. J. A. Hultman, of Worcester, Massachusetts,. 
a juvenile hymn book, *'JuheM2ingen;'* in 1898, with Rev. Hj. Sundquist^ 
the young people's paper, Linnea; and in 1902, "Tonstudier," an instruc- 
tion book in sight singing, of which he is the author. After discontinuing 
Gittit, he has published a collection for ladies' voices and "Evangeliska 
Korsinger," a collection of anthems. All of these publications have been 
well received and added to his standing in the Swedish-American field 
of sacred music. 

Aside from his chosen field of music, whose cultivation he has made 
the main purpose of his life, he is widely connected with the religious 
and charitable progress of Minneapolis, especially in their relation to his 
people. He has served as Sunday School superintendent of the Swedish 
Tabernacle for many years, and been, at different times, deacon, trustee, 
president and secretary of the church. He is one of the incorporators of 
the City Union Mission, conducted in connection with St. James* Hotel,, 
and has served for several years as a trustee of the Swedish Hospital. 
Mr. Skoog is also a director and secretary of the Minneapolis Veckoblad 
Publishing Company, and in 1893-6 was alderman from the Eleventh 
ward of Minneapolis. He was first nominated by the Prohibitionists and 
later by the Independent Republicans (who were dissatisfied with the reg- 
ular nominee), and his course in the City Council was heartily endorsed 
by many who had opposed him when he took his seat. 

In 1883 Mr. Skoog married, in Chicago, Miss Augusta C. Delander, 
of Geneseo, Illinois, who was born in 1862 in the parish of Balaryd, county 
of Jonkoping, Sweden. Their union was blessed with twelve children, of 
whom five died in infancy. Those living (mentioned in the order of their 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 713 



tirth) are Paul Rudolph, Mrs. Addie Victoria Fridlund, Olive Esther, 
Mamie Florence, Edith Valeria, Ruth Linnea and Dorothy Vema Skoog. 
The children are all, with the exception of the married daughter, with 
their parents. 

Nils P. Benson, was bom in Breared parish, Halland, Sweden, 
August 4, 1873, one of the seven children of Elias Bengtson and his wife, 
Anna Nilsson, farming people of Sweden, where the father still lives, the 
mother having died over twenty years ago. Of the children four are still 
living, namely : Christina, wife of John Hanson, a farmer in Smiland ; 
Nils P. ; John L. Benson, who is studying for the ministry, and Alma G., 
who is living in Brooklyn, New York. 

According to the custom of his native land. Nils P. was sent to the 
public schools and in due time was confirmed in the Lutheran church. In 
1890, two years after his confirmation, he came to America, stopping in 
Connecticut, where for two years he was employed in farm work. He 
then decided to learn a trade, and became a carriage painter, pursuing this 
vocation for about three years. By this time he had come into realization 
of the fact that he needed more schooling, so he entered Upsala College, 
where he was a student one year. The next two years he studied at busi- 
ness colleges, working between times in stores in order to make his way. 
After that he traveled for a Boston mercantile house, and, later, in Boston, 
he studied to become an optician. At Worcester, Massachusetts, he en- 
tered the employ of A. P. Lundborg, where he did practical optical work, 
and in the evenings, in Boston, studied theory, remaining in this position 
five years. Thus fitted to command a better place, he went to New York 
and identified himself with E. B. Meyrowitz, Inc., the largest retail optical 
house in the world. This firm has four stores in New York and one in 
each of the cities of Paris, London, St. Paul and Minneapolis. After Mr. 
Benson had become familiar with their methods, he was sent as manager 
for the Minneapolis store. He spent a year and a half with the firm in 
New York, and has been their Minneapolis manager since September, 
1906. 

June 9, 1909, Mr. Benson married Miss Anna F. Nelson, a native 
of Vasa, Goodhune county, Minnesota, bom December 24, 1888, daugh- 
ter of Solomon Nelson and his wife, Catherine Engberg. Her father died 
shortly after her birth ; her mother is a resident of Minneapolis. Mr. and 
Mrs. Benson live at 307 Walnut street, Southeast. They are members of 
Grace English Lutheran church, in which they were married by the Rev. 
A. T. Seashore. Mr. Benson is a member of the Philharmonic Singing 
Society, and of the Minneapolis Publicity Club. 

Ola Anders Nordberg, the well-known Minneapolis dairyman, dates 
his birth at Lofvestad, Malmohus Ian, November i, 1861. His parents, 
Anders Bengtson and wife, Bengta (bom Anderson), arc still living and 
are residents of Sweden. In their family are three sons : Nels Anderson, 



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714 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Ola Anders Nordberg and Anders Anderson, the eldest and youngest 
being farmers in Skine. 

Ola A. attended public school and was confirmed in the Lutheran 
church when a youth, and until 1881 worked on his father's farm. That 
year he emigrated to America. He had an uncle on the maternal side 
who called himself Nord, and this name the younger man used as a basis 
for a new name — Nordberg — when he came to this country. Arrived 
here, he worked on a farm near Grove City, Minnesota, during the first 
summer, and in the fall he came to Minneapolis, where the next two years 
he was employed by a dairyman. Then he engaged in the dairy business 
on his own account, on Twenty-eighth avenue, South, from whence, a 
year later, he moved to Minnehaha, where he was in the milk business 
eight years. In 1892, he came to his present location, 2101 Forty-second 
street. South, Minneapolis, where his place may be described as a beauti- 
ful country home situated in a big city. Here he has since been doing an 
extensive and profitable milk and cattle business, at first retailing, but 
during the past five years confining his operations to the wholesale trade. 
At times he has had as many as sixty-five cows in his dairy. Besides his 
property in Minneapolis, Mr. Nordberg owns a section of land in Hettin- 
ger county, North Dakota, and it is his intention at some time in the 
future to move to this tract of land and develop and improve it. 

Mr. Nordberg has been married twice. In 1883, he wedded Miss 
Ingrid Jonsson, who died within a year. November 6, 1886, he married 
Miss Anna Louisa Gustafson, who was bom near Grenna, Sweden, March 
24, 1858, daughter of Gustaf Johnson and his wife, Anna Christina Nord- 
strom. Mr. Nordberg is a member of the Modem Woodmen of America. 

Dr. Elmer Nicholson is one of the rising young physicians of 
Minneapolis, but he has already demonstrated that he is well informed 
in the principles of the medical science and their correct application to 
the needs of suffering humanity, and is therefore accorded a liberal 
patronage. He received his professional training in the University of 
Minnesota, graduating there in 1905, and he spent the following year as 
a physician at the Bethesda Hospital in St. Paul. Since then he has 
been in constant practice in Minneapolis, maintaining his office at 1527 
East Lake street. He is a member of the Hennepin County Medical 
Society, of the State Medical Society, of the American Medical Society 
and of the Swedish American Medical Club. 

Dr. Nicholson was bom in the town of Greenleaf, in Meeker county, 
Minnesota, April 17, 1881, a son of Andrew N. and Johanna Nicholson, 
who were born and reared in Sweden, but leaving their native land they 
came to the United States and located in Meeker county, where Mr. 
Nicholson bought land and has since been one of the prominent and 
successful agriculturists of that county. In their family were thirteen 
children, as follows: John; Andrew; Emil, deceased; Charles, de- 
ceased; Ernest, deceased; Jacob; a daughter who died when young; 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 717 



Hannah, who married Andrew Justus; Ellen, who married Neal J. 
Nelson; Joseph, a practicing physician at Brainerd, this state; Elmer, 
who is mentioned below; Nannie, deceased; and Nannie, living. 

After the completion of his training in the graded schools of his 
home town of Greenleaf and the high school at Litchfield, this state, 
Dr. Elmer Nicholson entered the University of Minnesota and began 
his preparation for his future life work. He is a member of the fraternal 
order of Modern Woodmen and of the Swedish Baptist church. 

Peter Emanuel Wickstrom. — Conspicuous among the more skilful 
and able mechanics of Minneapolis is Peter Emanuel Wickstrom, who, as 
draftsman of the United States Printograph Company, is filling an impor- 
tant position with gjeat credit to himself and to the entire satisfaction of 
his employers. A son of Per Alfred Wickstrom, he was bom, September 
7, 1877, in Gefle, Sweden. 

Born and reared in Laurvik, Norway, Per Alfred Wickstrom moved 
when young to Gefle, Sweden, where he subsequently became superintend- 
ent for Brodin^s Shipbuilding Company. When this company, in order to 
enlarge its business operations, located in Stockholm, he went with it, and 
is still serving as its superintendent. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Lovise Johnson, was bom, in 1847, in Ekeboma, Ostergotland, Sweden. 
Two children were bom of their union, namely : Peter Emanuel, the spe- 
cial subject of this sketch; and Elis Verner, bom in 1884, lives in Stock- 
holm, with his parents. 

Having received the advantages of a common school and a collegiate 
education in his native town, Peter Emanuel Wickstrom, in 1894, went to 
Stockholm to continue his studies, entering the Technological Institute, 
one of the best schools of the kind in all Europe, from which he was 
graduated in 1898. He then worked six months for the Stockholm Gas 
Company, resigning at the end of that time to fulfill his military obliga- 
tions with the Royal Svea Engineer Corps. On his return to Stockholm, 
Mr. Wickstrom was for some time assistant general foreman in P. A. 
Sjogren's Machine Works, after which, from 1899 until 1901, he was gen- 
eral superintendent of the machine shops and plumbing business of the 
Karstop Company. The ensuing year he was in the employ of "Nordiska 
Metall Actiebolaget" as technical adviser and salesman. In the fall of 
1902 he secured the responsible position of supervising engineer in the 
building of the water works in the city of Sala, and when that work was 
completed he became general superintendent of Arvid Palmgren's Ma- 
chine Shops in Norrkoping, retaining the position until October 8, 1905. 

At that time, like so many of his enterprising and sagacious country- 
men, he turned to America as the field of promise for a successful career, 
sailing first for Rio Janeiro, Brazil, South America. Being unacquainted 
with the Spanish language, and not at all in love with the country, he 
made but a short stay in that city, coming from there to the United 
States in January, 1906, landing in Baltimore, Maryland, the fifth day of 



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7i8 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



that tnontlL Proceeding to Chicago, Mr. Widcstrom secured a position 
as timekeeper and street foreman with the People's Gas Light and Coke 
Company, and very soon afterwards accepted a better position with the 
Illinois Improvement and Ballast Company as general foreman for street 
grading and excavating work. He was subsequently offered a place with 
the Western Gas Construction Company, of Fort Wayne, Indiana, as 
foreman for the erection of gas producers, and while with that firm 
worked mostly in Gary, Indiana. His skill as a workman becoming 
known, the Gar\' Heat, Light and Water Company induced Mr. Wick- 
strom to enter their employ, offering him first a position as assistant 
engineer. His worth was at once recognized, and ere long he had the 
offer of a still better position with the Indiana Steel Company, of Gary, 
becoming erecting foreman in the blast furnace department, which is a 
position of importance, this company being a part of what is known as the 
"Steel Trust." In November, 1908, Mr. Wickstrom came to Minneap- 
olis, and at once entered the employ of the United States Printograph 
Company, which was incorporated with a capital of $500,000, at first 
serving as a machinist, later as a foreman, being promoted from time to 
time until, within a brief period, less than a year, he was draftsman of 
the work. On the first of January, 19 10, Mr. Wickstrom resigned his 
position to study salesmanship, believing there is a good field for a special 
machine salesman. 

Emil J. LuxDQUiST, a merchant tailor of Minneapolis, was bom No- 
vember 17, 1872, in Sweden, and is a son of John and Carrie Lundquist 
John Lundquist learned the trade of tailor and followed same in his native 
countr>'. and in 1886 emigrated to the United States ; he located in Minne- 
apolis, and until the time of his death, in 1904, worked there at his trade. 

Beginning his education in the public schools of Sweden, Emil J. 
Lundquist, when about thirteen years of age, came to the United States 
with his parents, and settled in Minneapolis. He attended school and be- 
tween terms he became an apprentice under his father. After he had 
learned the trade of tailoring he felt the need of higher education, and 
took a course at the Northwestern College. In 1899 he began business on 
his own responsibility, and a year later entered into partnership with Otto 
S. Lofgren, of Minneapolis, and for four and a half years they carried on 
a successful business; then dissolving that partnership Mr. Lundquist 
entered partnership with Maurice Klungness in the same line, locating at 
518 Second avenue, where they still carry on a successful business. They 
prospered from the start, and now have an established reputation for integ- 
rity and honest dealing, as well as high-class work. They cater to a fine 
trade, and furnish employment for about twelve men. Mr. Lundquist 
is also literarily inclined, and was for several years heavily interested, both 
financially and in a literary way, in The Linnean, a Swedish-American 
magazine, now discontinued. His articles on subjects of higher ideals, 
contributed by him each month, were greatly appreciated by their readers. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 719 



December 28, 1901, Mr. Lindquist married Hulda M., daughter of 
John P. Johnson, bom and educated in Sweden, and they became the par- 
ents of four children, namely : Raymond J., bom October 20, 1902 ; Carl 
Everett, born May 20, 1904; Dwight A., bom May 27, 1906, died January 
ID, 1908, and Elsie Maria, born December 10, 1908. Mr. Lundquist is a 
member of Vasa Orden of America and the Royal Arcanum. 

Charles August Ekelund, a wholesale merchant of coffee and tea, 
in Minneapolis, was bom in Bralanda parish, Dalsland, Sweden, April 22, 
1864, and is the son of Anders Johan and Stina Ekelund. They were also 
the parents of three daughters, namely : Anna Lovisa, married Abraham 
Peterson, of Willow River, Minnesota ; Emma Charlotte, twin sister of 
Anna, married John Bovin, of Buffalo, Minnesota; and Ida Fredrika, 
married John Anderson, of Buffalo. Their mother died in 1871 and their 
father married (second) Karolina Skog, a year or two later. He came 
to America in 1880, and his son, Charles August, a year later. 

Mr. Ekelund received his early education in the public schools, and 
after his arival in Minneapolis attended night school. Having to support 
himself, he was unable to attend school more than this, but has used his 
native intelligence to acquire knowledge in every way possible, to offset 
the disadvantages of a meagre education. After working three years at 
various things in Minneapolis, he became clerk in a grocery store, where 
he spent another three years, and then, having saved a few hundred dollars, 
entered into partnership with Theodore Larson, in the grocery business 
on Central avenue, the firm name being Ekelund & Larson. Mr. Larson's 
health failing, he sold his interest to Olof Anderson, and the firm became 
Ekelund & Anderson. Mr. Anderson sold his interest to Mr. Ekelund, 
who later took as his partner Emil Nerhaugen ; a year later he bought out 
Mr. Nerhaugen's interest, and changed the name to C. A. Ekelund. By 
his good management and business methods, Mr. Ekelund built up a busi- 
ness of large proportions, and in the fall of 1901 he was able to sell his 
•ntire business at a good cash price. The following year he took a posi- 
tion as city salesman with Atwood & Holstad, wholesale dealers in coffee 
and tea, and in 1907 established a similar business on his own account, 
using the name of C. A. Ekelund. He has met with pleasing success in 
his latest venture, and January i, 1908, he started in company with S. H. 
Holstad, and A. W. Kreiser, incorporated as S. H. Holstad & Company, 
Mr. Ekelund being vice president. 

Mr. Ekelund married, in 1887, Mary Peterson, daughter of Peter 
Larson. She was born in the same parish as her husband. They became 
the parents of seven children, of whom the following five are living: 
Walter, born in 1888; Ethel, in 1892; Carl Felix, in 1895; Richard 
Emanuel, in 1897, and Conrad, born in 1900. In the spring of 1908 Mr. 
and Mrs. Ekelund had the extreme sorrow to lose their second son, Her- 
man, and their youngest one, Qifford, in an accidental explosion in their 
home. Herman was a student in the Agricultural Department of the Uni- 



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720 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



vcrsity of Minnesota. The family reside at 102 1 Twenty-second avenue, 
Northeast, and Mr. Ekelund also owns five hundred acres of land in 
Aitken county, Minnesota, where they spend part of their summers. They 
are members of the Swedish Lutheran Emanuel church, of which Mr. 
Ekelund has for fifteen years served as trustee, and for the last five years 
as treasurer. 

SwAX J. Peterson. — Distinctively the architect of his own fortunes. 
Swan J. Peterson is building wisely and well and is winning for himself 
a name among the business men of prominence in Minneapolis. During 
his school days he entered the high school of Christianstad, Sweden, his 
native country, but after only six months there his father met with busi- 
ness misfortunes and the young lad was obliged to leave school and start 
in the world for himself. In 1886, when only about fifteen, he left Sweden 
for the United States with only enough money to defray his traveling 
expenses, and locating at Dubuque, Iowa, he secured emplo\Tnent as a 
laborer on the railroad. Coming to St. Paul, Minnesota, about two years 
later, he was employed on the street railroad of that city for about three 
years, and then for five years was teaming in the lumber regions. At the 
close of that time he had saved enough money to purchase a team of 
horses and a wagon, and from that time to the present has been known 
as a teaming contractor. As rapidly as his means would allow he invested 
in teams and employed them for all kinds of team work, gradually rising 
step by step in the business world through his own energy and eflForts until 
he finally became owner of about thirty teams, all of which have kept busy 
at contract work, and he is now one of the largest and most successful and 
prominent contractors of excavations in the city of Minneapolis. He has 
always had unlimited faith in the future of the city, and has invested his 
surplus money in city and farm property, which has rapidly increased in 
value. Mr. Peterson owns in addition to his town property a valuable 
farm of eighty acres at Sturgeon Lake, Minnesota, and derives a large 
revenue from same. During the last year he has branched out in the 
Transfer & Fuel business, and with the traits of his character to make a 
success by honest and square deals is sure to become one of the prominent 
men in those lines of trade in the city he has made his home. 

He is a member of Lodge Tollhattan, Vasa Orden of America, of the 
Swedish Brothers in Minneapolis, president of the Swedish American Re- 
publican L'nion of the Eighth ward, one of the strongest clubs of its kind 
in the state ; member of the Coal and Retail Dealers* Association, of the 
Team Owners' Association, of the West Side Commercial Club, and of the 
fraternal order of Modem Woodmen of America. 

Mr. Peterson was born in Asumtorp, Christianstad, Sweden, April 
18, 1871, a son of Peter Anderson and Anna P. Anderson. The mother 
died in the year of 1890 and the father, a farmer, survived her but one 
year, dying in 1891. They were the parents of children, namely: Bengta. 
Andrew, Anna, Nels, Nellie, and Swan J. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 723 



In 1899, Swan J. Peterson married Miss Anna C. Engleson, also 
from Sweden, and they have a daughter, Ruth Anna, bom in July, 1907. 
Mr. Peterson and his family are members of the Lutheran Zion church 
of the city of Minneapolis, and as one of the most active members Mr. 
Peterson was at the annual meeting 1910 chosen as one of the trustees 
of said church. 

Andrew P. Johnson, lieutenant of police in the Third precinct of 
Minneapolis, was bom November i, 1858, in Klinga Borg and Loth 
parish, Ostergotland, Sweden, son of Johan Henningson. Johan Hen- 
ningson was a farmer in Klinga, bom in 1814, and died in 1875; he 
married Eva Lisa Jakobson, bom in 1822, died in 1875, daughter of 
Jakob Jakobson. They had five children, as follows: Carolina, born 
in 1846, widow of Carl Nilson, of Ribbingstorp, Ostergotland; Carl 
Johan, born in 1849, residing in Norrkoping; Augusta Wilhelmina, bom 
in 1852, married Johan Svenson, in Norrkoping; Franz, born in 1855, 
died in 1907, in Minneapolis; and Andrew P. 

Andrew P. Johnson received his education in the public schools and 
remained at home until the death of both his parents, in 1875, when he 
was sixteen years of age; the home was broken up and he worked for 
his brother-in-law and for the state's railways as depot man until 1880, 
when he emigrated to America. He spent some time in Chicago and 
went from there to Joliet, where he worked for some time in a rail mill, 
and in 1 88 1 went to St. Paul. He was employed in railroad work that 
winter, and in the spring of 1882 located in Minneapolis; in the latter 
place he worked in the flour mills until 1887 and was then appointed on 
the police force, being stationed at the Third precinct, where he has since 
remained. He served as patrolman until 1902, and was then promoted 
sergeant; in 1904 he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant, and after 
serving one year was promoted to rank of captain, in the same precinct. 
In 1906 he again became lieutenant, and has since held this position, 
having full charge of the station during the nights. Mr. Johnson is 
a very able police officer, and has held every office except that of chief. 
He has a good record and standing, and has the distinction of being 
the oldest police officer of Swedish nationality on the Minneapolis force. 

Mr. Johnson has made many friends, and is highly esteemed by all 
who know him. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, Modern 
Woodmen of America, Swedish Brothers of America, and Police Benevo- 
lent Association. He resides at 909 Sixteenth avenue. South, where he 
owns a pleasant, comfortable home. 

Mr. Johnson married, in 1887, in Minneapolis, Hannah C. Swanson, 
bom in Wexio, Sweden, in 1862, and they have lour children, namely: 
Richard, born in 1888, a bookkeeper; Arthur R., bom in 1893, received 
a course in business college, and is employed in a store; Gustav A., 

46 



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734 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



born in 1895, attending school; and Ethel, born in 1898, also attending 
school. 

Rev. Andrew G. Johnson. — ^Among Swedish- Americans of sound 
influence, versatility, breadth and power who are entitled to representa- 
tion in an impartial account of the splendid work accomplished 
by that racial element in the advancement of the great state of Minne- 
sota, none holds a more secure place than Rev. Andrew G. Johnson, of 
Minneapolis, publisher of St^enska Folkets Tidning and treasurer of the 
Baneret Publishing Company; profound scholar, eloquent clergyman, 
practical statesman, honorable business man and a Christian gendeman, 
who has conserved his remarkable talents for the highest good of his 
fellows. Bom in Ljungby. Sweden, on Christmas of 1057, he is a son of 
Jonas and Anna (Anderson) Johnson. 

Mr. Johnson received his educatwn in the grammar and high schools 
of Sweden and at the Northwestern University and the Swedish Theo- 
logical Seminary, Evanston, Illinois. After his graduation in theology 
he was appointed pastor of the First Swedish M. El. church of Minne- 
apolis, holding that charge from 1878 to 1881 and for the succeeding 
four years holding pastorates in New York City. In 1885-90 he was a 
resident clerg\'man of St. Paul and spent the following two years in the 
work of the ministry' at Galesburg, Illinois. In 1893 he became financial 
agent of the Bethany Home, Ravenswood, Chicago, and showed such 
striking ability in that position that he was apix)int^ manager and treas- 
urer of the Swedish M. E. Book Concern at Chicago, which he held from 
1893 to 1 90 1. He then held a pastorate at Moline, Illinois, for three years 
and in 1905 returned to his former parishioners at St. Paul. He also en- 
tered the general publishing business as president and editor of the 
Royal Star Publishing Company, and in 1907-8 represented his district 
in the Minnesota State Lee:islature. For the past two years he has been 
publisher of the Svcnska Folkets Tidning and Odalmannen, and treasurer 
of the Baneret Publishing Company, with headquarters in the Tribune 
building, Minneapolis. His residence is corner of Laurel avenue and 
Victoria street, St. Paul. 

At the beginning of the year 1889 he was married to Miss Selma C. 
Johnson of Chicago. Illinois. Their union has been blessed with six chil- 
dren: D. G. Roy, bom January 27, 1890; Clarence A., bom April 26, 
1891 ; Walter Leonard Young, bom October 12, 1899; Paul Wesley John, 
born November 9, 1002; Irene Evelyn May, bom May 25, 1906; John A., 
born March 24, 1909. All are healthy and happy, and it seems as if the 
great Johnson family will still exercise some influence among the coming 
generations. 

A. E. Sandberg was bom March '31, 1868, in Ostersund, Sweden, 
the youngest of six children. The subject of this sketch belongs on the 
mother's side to one of the oldest "families of yeomen" in Jemtland, and 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 725 



the father was an influential citizen in the community. From the age 
of ten he attended the elementary school in Ostersund and passed the 
students' examination in 1887. 

He emigrated to America the same year and made his home in Red 
Wing, Minnesota, for a while. The first twelve months of his stay in 
this country he was employed on many odd jobs, familiar to those who 
have been throueh the ordeal, which in nine cases out of ten confronts 
the "green-horn : farmers' help, hotel clerk, timekeeper, at railroad 
work, etc. 

Soon he saw his opportunity to engage in newspaper business and 
secured a position with Skaifaren in St. Paul. In 1890 he moved to 
West Superior, Wisconsin, and took charge of the editorial department 
of Wisconsin Svenska Tribun, now published under the name of Svensk- 
Amerikakska Tribunen, and remained there two years, at the end of 
which he accepted the position of advertising manager for Fria Pressen, 
published at Duluth by Per Larka. He held his position with great 
credit, returned to Minneapolis in the fall of 1893 and was for nine years 
employed on Svenska Folkets Tidning and later with the Minneapolis 
Tribune. In 1902 he steered northward again to fill the position of 
assistant editor of Nordvestems Handelstidning at Duluth, and stayed 
there until September, 1905, when he was reengaged as advertising man- 
ager for Svenska Folkets Tidning, which position he still successfully 
fills. 

Mr. Sandberg was married in 1894 to Martha M. Lied, and is the 
father of two healthy boys. 

Nels p. Akenson, who conducts a meat market at 317 Cedar avenue, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, was bom at Vasa, Goodhue county, this state, 
June 15, 1867, a son of Swedish parents, Peter Akenson and wife, Hanna 
Goranson, who emigrated to America in 1864. In their family were six 
children, three of whom are living, namely: Nels P., Herman G., and 
Ellen, wife of Otto S. Lafgren, all of Minneapolis, Herman G. being em- 
ployed in his brother's store. 

On his arrival in this country, Peter Akenson dropped his trade, that 
of wagon-maker, and turned his attention to farming, of which, however, 
he soon grew tired. Moving to Red Wing, he opened a meat market, 
which he continued until 1872, when he moved to Minneapolis. Here he 
spent the closing years of his life, and died in 1880. 

After the death of his father, which occurred when Nels P. was 
twelve years old, he was thrown upon his own resources, and from that 
time until he was twenty-four he worked in grocery stores and meat 
markets. In the fall of 1892, he opened a meat market on his own account, 
at 732 E. Franklin avenue, where he continued in business about five years, 
after which he came to Washington avenue, South, and entered into part- 
nership with the Johnson Company, with which he has since been con- 
nected, now having charge of the store at 317 Cedar avenue. 



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77!^ SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Mr. Akenson married, in 1891, Miss Amy Florence Dahlgren, who 
was bom at Cambridge, Isanti county, Minnesota, August 17, 1872, daugh- 
ter of Hans and Christine Dahlgren, who came to this country from Orsa, 
Dalame. Mr. and Mrs. Akenson have five children : Grace Myrtle, bom 
January 13, 1893; Nathaniel Paul, October 10, 1895; Beatrice Amy, Octo- 
ber 19, 1897; Vera Florence, September 17, 1900, and Irma Mabel, No- 
vember II, 1902. They reside at 1108 Fifteenth street, East. Mr. Aken- 
son and his family are members of the First Swedish Baptist church. 

Charles Peterson. — An esteemed and able business man, skilled in 
mechanics, Charles Peterson is carrying on an extensive and profitable 
industry in Minneapolis as a contractor and builder, being among the lead- 
ers in his line of work. He is a Swede by birth, having been born, March 
23, 1858, p4 Stjernviks, Gods Tafvelsis socken, a son of Peter Johan and 
Brita Johanson, who came to America in 1885 in response to a call from 
their sons, Charles and Sam, who were well established in this country. 
The parental household consisted of nine children, as follows: Anna 
Maria married a Dane, Jens Jensen, and lives in Copenhagen; Mathilda, 
wife of Charles Johnson, a foreman in Minneapolis ; Charles, the special 
subject of this sketch ; Sam, a foreman in Minneapolis ; Sara, wife of Fer- 
dinand Vrae, a plumber and gas fitter in Copenhagen ; John, a foreman in 
Minneapolis ; Sophia, died in Minneapolis ; Ida, who married Sven Genell, 
returned to Sweden in 1897; and Gustaf, clerk in a grocery in Minne- 
apolis. 

Educated in the public schools, and confirmed in the Lutheran church, 
Charles Peterson subsequently worked for a short time on the railroads, 
after which he leamed the stone cutter's trade, and for a few months fol- 
lowed the sea, sailing in a coasting vessel. On attaining his majority he 
served one term in the Swedish army, and at the age of twenty-two years, 
in 1880, emigrated to the United States, locating first in Stillwater, Minne- 
sota, where he was employed in masonry work for a year. Coming then 
to Minneapolis, Mr. Peterson worked here as a stone mason two years, 
and in 1883 started in business for himself, for four or five years being 
associated with Carl P. Waldon. The partnership being then dissolved, 
Mr. Peterson has since continued alone, meeting with the same good suc- 
cess that has characterized his ventures throughout his active career. 

Mr. Peterson married, in 1881, Sara Andorson, who was born in 
Tafvelsis, Backagird, Sweden, a daughter of Anders and Malena Peter- 
son, neither of whom are now living. Three children have been bom to 
Mr. and Mrs. Peterson, one of whom, Hilma, died at the age of thirteen 
years, and two are living, namely : Anna, bom in 1884, married Walter 
Mariner, head book-keeper in the Printers' Supply Company ; and Edith, 
born in 1886, is wife of Carl Johnson, an employe of the Chicago, Milwau- 
kee & St. Paul Railway Company. Mr. and Mrs. Peterson have a pleas- 
ant home in the north part of the city, their residence being at No. 2210 
Lyndale avenue, North. Fratemally, Mr. Peterson is a member of the 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 729 



Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of the Modern Woodmen of America, 
and of the Norden Society. 

Joseph C. Hernlund. — One of the oldest, bravest and most efficient 
of the flame fighters of Minneapolis is the first assistant chief of its fire 
department, Joseph C. Hernlund. It seems as if his career was pointed 
out to him at an early age, for he was only thirteen years old when he 
witnessed the grand terrors of the Chicago fire and suffered as one of 
a family whose worldly goods were swept away in that casualty. Coming 
to Minneapolis with the homeless household, on the 12th of October, 
1 87 1, he joined the volunteer department of the city when he was but 
eighteen years of age, and from that time has been one of the constant 
and rising figures of the department. His steady promotion has been 
the result both of faithfulness and efficiency in the discharge of his 
duties, as well as heroic action in emergency. He has had many narrow 
escapes and not a few serious injuries, but, like the ideal soldier, has 
taken everything which has come to him as a necessary part of his life 
and has never posed for effect. Mr. Hernlund is one of the directors 
of the Firemen's Relief Association and, aside from that cooperative 
body of his coworkers, stands high in Masonry, being a member of Min- 
neapolis Lodge No. 19, St. John's Chapter No. 9, and Minneapolis 
Mounted Commandery No. 23, Knights Templar. As an Odd Fellow 
he is also identified with North Star Lodge No. 6. He is also a member 
of Aerie No. 34, Order of Eagles. Such connections, with his manly 
and loyal character, give him wide popularity outside his associates of 
the Minneapolis fire department. 

Mr. Hernlund is a native of Sweden, bom in Skog, Strand parish, 
Helsingland, on the 12th of June, 1858, and is a son of Michael and 
Martha Hernlund. His father, who was bom in 1830, died in Minne- 
apolis in 1888, while his mother, who was bom in 1836, is still living 
in that city. There were four children in the family: Joseph C, of 
this biography, the oldest; Anna, who married Nels Norbom, connected 
with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway at Minneapolis ; Maggie, 
who is married and resides in Omaha; and Christine, now Mrs. Math. H. 
Warren, of Kern City, California. In 1868 Joseph C. came with his 
parents and sisters to Chicago, where he secured employment with the 
Fielder-Ladder Sidewalk Light Company, attending evening school in 
order to complete his education as far as possible. As stated, the family 
lost all they possessed in the fire of 1871, and three days after their mis- 
fortune arrived in Minneapolis. The first two years of the son's stay 
in that city were spent as an employee of the N. F. Griswold Fanning 
Mill Company, and the succeeding eight years as a clerk in Vanstmm's 
grocery. 

During the period just noted (December 10, 1876) Mr. Hemlund 
joined Minnehaha Hose Company No. 5 as a volunteer, serving three 
years without pay. In 1879 Chief Brackett established what was known 



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730 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



as the Gill service, appointing Hemlnnd as a member of the night watch. 
He was then twenty-one years of age. On April 26, 1884, Chief Stetson 
promoted him to tfie captaincy of Engine Company 7, at Twenty-first 
avenue south and Franklin avenue, and he held that position tmtil 
January 30, 1895, when he was appointed second assistant chief of the 
department, with headquarters at Station 8, Blaisdell and Twenty-eighth 
streets. With the incoming of each new administration of the fire depart- 
ment Mr. Hemlund*s record was his strongest recommendation for 
advancement, although this was always supplemented by the general 
indorsement of influential citizens and his working associates. On 
October i, 1908, Chief James R. Canterbury named him as his first 
assistant, with office headquarters in the city hall, and his final step to 
the head of the department, in the estimation of Mr. Hemlund's friends, 
is only a matter of time. 

On January 12, 1892, Mr. Hernlund married Miss Emma C. Johnson, 
bom January 26, 1859, in Jamestown, New York. Mrs. Hernlund came 
to Litchfield, Minnesota, with her parents in her early childhood. Her 
father enlisted as a private in the Civil war, but after going to the front 
dropped out of sight forever. His wife and daughter afterward located 
in Minneapolis, where the latter was married to Mr. Hernlund. 

Albin Gustaf Lundquist, a promising and able young business 
man of Minneaix)lis, well known as an expert commercial printer, is a 
native of Stockholm, Sweden, bom October 19, 1882. His father, Au- 
gust, was bom in Stmdbyberg, a suburb of the capital, where he was a 
large and prosperous contractor in masonry and owner of a stone quarry, 
employing in his various lines about one hundred men. In 1886 he sold 
his business, substantial though it was, and emigrated to Minneapolis 
with the object of providing his children with broader opportunities for 
advancement than were to be found in Sweden. For the past twenty-four 
years, then, he has been a worker in the upbuilding of the Twin Cities, 
having been in business for himself during most of that period. His wife 
was born in Trollhattan. Sweden, and their union has resulted in six 
children, as follows : Ida, bom in 1880, who married Conrad Peterson, 
a Minneapolis mason, and is the mother of two children; Albin G., of 
this sketch; Oscar Emanuel, born in 1885, who is a resident of Minneap- 
olis, married Miss Kate Sundstrom, and has one child; Esther P., bora 
in i88c). who lives with his parents; Maria Elizabeth, born in 1892. a 
stenographer with Bradshaw's Wholesale Millinery, of Minneapolis ; and 
Joseph, bom in 1895, is attending school. 

In the fall of 1887, when the Lundquist family came to Minneapolis 
(with the exception of the father, who had located in the spring of the 
same year), Albin G. was four years of age. In 1899, after having grad- 
uated from the public schools, he became an apprentice with the Reporter 
Printing Company, with whom he learned his trade and remained for 
eight years. Since 1907 he has been identified as a partner with the 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 731 



growing business conducted by the firm of Martin & Lundquist, at 2937 
Chicago avenue. On October 9, 1907, Mr. Lundquist married Miss 
Ellen B. Holmgren, born at Minneapolis in 1886. Her father, Nels P. 
Holmgren, is a native of Skane, Sweden, and is a leading contractor 
and builder, who settled in this city thirty years ago. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lundquist have one son, bom August 17, 1909, and the family resides 
with Mrs. Lundquist's parents at 3435 Minnehaha avenue. 

John W. Erickson. — A Minneapolis citizen of popularity and honor- 
able standing, John W. Erickson is a skilled mechanic at the head of the 
blacksmith department of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway 
Company of that city. He was bom, December 6, i860, in Omas, Or 
parish, Dalsland, and is a son of Erick Erickson, who was born in 1821 
and died in 1898, having passed most of the years of his life as a farmer 
and a country blacksmith. The mother was Kajsa Olsdottar, bom in 
1830, who is living at the family home in Sweden, and the six children 
bom to her are as follows : Erick, now a farmer in Or parish ; John W., 
of this sketch; Maria, who is Mrs. Sahlbom, of Or parish; Carl, whose 
residence is unknown; Kristina, who married in Vestergotland ; and 
Johannes, owner and occupier of the family home. 

John W. obtained a public school education at home and learned 
the mdiments of his trade from his good and industrious father. In 
1880, at the age of twenty, he located at Minneapolis and, after working 
one year for a farmer, was employed at his trade in the blacksmith shop 
of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway Company. There he 
remained until 1884, when he obtained a position as a journeyman black- 
smith with the same corporation, being thus engaged until 1891, when he 
was promoted to the general foremanship of the blacksmithing depart- 
ment, in which position he still directs the work of seventy-five men. 
Mr. Erickson is also active in the orders of Free Masons, Odd Fellows, 
United Workmen, Knights of Pythias and Redmen, and is a social favorite 
as well as a wholly reliable and highly respected citizen. By his industry, 
thrift and economy he has already accumulated a fair working capital, a 
portion of which he has invested in the erection of a fine residence on 
Twenty-second avenue. South, but being still free of marital ties it is 
rented and Mr. Erickson maintains bachelor quarters on Garfield avenue, 
South. 

Carl Edward Wallerstedt. — The name of Carl Edward Waller- 
stedt is a familiar one in the Scandinavian circles of Minneapolis. He is 
a young man of good family, and is well fitted by education and training 
to participate in the consular service. He was bom in the city of Carl- 
stad, Sweden, January 11, 1882, a son of Edward Wallerstedt, who 
during his life was identified with commercial pursuits and other special 
lines in Carlstad. His mother was before her marriage Amina Lindbergh 
and the parents are both now deceased, the mother having died some ten 



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73% SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



years ago, and the father survived her only five years. Gtrl Edward 
was the youngest bom of their four children. His two sisters are both 
married, the older the wife of Gustaf R. Uggla, quartermaster of Infan- 
try Regiment No. 22, "Vermland," and the younger sister is the wife of 
Captain Ivan T. E. Aminoff, of Infantry Regiment No. 17, "Bohuslan." 
Werner Wallerstedt, his only brother, is yet immarried, and is a partner 
in the business left by his late father. 

Carl Edward Wallerstedt left the state college at* Carlstad when 
eighteen years of age and went to Stockholm to become a member of the 
editorial department of the Strnska Telegram Byron, After a year there 
he spent a similar period in study in Germany, chiefly in its educational 
center of Berlin, and then the time for his military service to his native 
land having arrived he performed this duty in the Swedish capital. 
During the time intervening between his different periods of service, Mr. 
Wallerstedt was mostly abroad, spending over a half year of the time in 
the city of London, and until the close of the year of 1906 he was a mem- 
ber of Sweden's editorial staff, first on the Stockholm's Dagblad and later 
on the Nya Dagligt Allahandct, While thus associated he made several 
interesting journalistic trips, including one to Finland and Russia during 
the turbulent year of 1906. 

In the spring of 1907 Mr. Wallerstedt arrived in New York City, 
and on the nrst of June of the same year became connected with the 
Royal Swedish legation at Washington, D. C, and he remained in that 
city until appointed vice-consul at the Royal Consulate of Sweden at 
Minneapolis in February of 1909. 

Arvie Queber. — Widely known as one of the most enterprising and 
successful newspaper men of Minneapolis, Arvie Queber holds a position 
of importance as assistant manager of the Svenska Amerikanska Posten, 
one of the leading Swedish publications of the United States, and exerts 
a beneficial influence, through his journal, in business and social circles, 
keeping his readers fully informed on current topics. A native of Sweden, 
he was bom, November 26, 1869, in Gotland, where his father, Lars 
Fetter Qviberg, was for over thirty years a noted teacher in the public 
schools. 

Having acquired a thorough knowledge of the common branches of 
study in the public schools of his native land, Arvie Queber, in 1886, 
emigrated to the United States, and soon after his arrival took up jour- 
nalistic work, in 1888 becoming printer's devil in Chicago. Going from 
there to Manistee, Michigan, he was made editor and manager, in 1890, 
of Norden's Medborgare, and subsequently worked on various papers, 
finally having a job office of his own in Chicago. Returning to Sweden 
in 1894, Mr. Queber was associate editor of Gotland Posten until the 
spring of 1899, when he again came to America, locating first on the 
plains of northwestern Canada, where he spent -a. time in recuperating 
his strength. Coming then to the United States, he worked on various 



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MRS. ARVIE QUEBER 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 735 



small publications for a time, in the fall of 1902 becoming associate editor 
of the Svenska Amerikanska Post en, a position that he retained a year. 
The two ensuing years he edited various country papers, both English 
and Swedish, and in the fall of 1905 returned to the Svenska Ameri- 
kanska Posten, with which he has since been actively connected, since 

1907 having filled most acceptably his present position as assistant 
manager. 

Mr. Queber is a member of both the Odin Qub and of the Inde- 
pendent Scandinavian Working^en's Association of North America, in 
the latter of which he holds the office of grand vice-president. Mr. 
Queber married Anna Hokstad, of Trondhjem, Norway, and they have a 
pleasant home at 3010 Oakland avenue. Mrs. Queber is a very talented 
woman, a ready and witty speaker and frequently delights large audiences 
with her readings and humorous stories, mostly her own production. In 

1908 she was elected grand vice-president of the Scandinavian Sisters of 
America. Mr. and Mrs. Queber have one child, Alfhild Birgitte. Just 
at the time of going to press we learn that Mr. Queber resigned his 
position with the Svenska Amerikanska Posten, leaving the newspaper 
field to become manager of The National Co-Operative Land & Invest- 
ment Company, with offices at 435 Palace Building, Minneapolis. 

Nils Herman Hord is descended from an old Swedish family, H&rd 
of Segerstad, whose head was nobilized for bravery during the reign of 
Gustavus Adolphus II, and introduced into the House of Nobles and 
Knights in 1625. Nils Herman was born in Ariska, Sweden, January 
29, 1866, son of Johan Gustaf and Ingegerd (Nilson) Hard, of Seger- 
stad. The father, a surveyor, is deceased; the mother is still living in 
Sweden. They had eight children, of whom only three are living: 
Henning Axel, with the White Star Steamship Line, in Minneapolis; 
Fridolf, a railroad man in the government service at Upsala; and Nils 
Herman, the subject of this sketch. 

After completing his studies in the collegiate high school in his 
native city. Nils H. was sent to Ostergotland to learn theoretical and 
practical agriculture on a large farm, where he spent some time. Subse- 
quent to this he went to Christiania, Norway, where he learned the 
trade of confectioner, and became a journeyman confectioner. Deciding 
to try his fortunes in America, he came to this country in 1884, landing 
in New York and immediately directing his course to Minneapolis. At 
first, he worked here as common laborer, doing odd jobs, and in 1887, 
he went west to Washington, where he worked on the Great Northern 
Railroad, then being tunneled through the Cascade and Rocky Mountains, 
and remained there until 1890, when he returned to Minneapolis, which 
has since been his home. Then for about two years he was employed as 
clerk in a clothing store, after which he clerked for the Cable Piano 
Company, and worked in different positions until 1906, when he engaged 
in business for himself, in partnership with Mr. John Johnson. 



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736 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



In 1902, Mr. Hord married Miss Caroline Anderson, of Mangskog,. 
Vermland, who was born December 13, 1868. They have five children — 
Amy Alida, Anna Christina, Agnes Hedvig, Mabel, Carolina, and Char- 
lotte Edith. The family attend the Swedish Lutheran Bethlehem church. 
Fraternally, Mr. Hord is identified with the Knights of Odin, Council 
No. I ; Independent Order of Svithiod, Ymer Lodge No. 29, and the 
Order of Vasa. He resides at 1906 Fourth street, North, Minneapolis. 

Carl August Beckman, of the firm of Johnson & Co., Minneapolis^ 
dealers in meat and buyers and shippers of cattle, was born in Bexheda,. 
Smaland, Sweden, July 30, 1867, son of John and Emma (Swensen) 
Beckman. 

Mr. Beckman's parents emigrated to this country in 1880. They 
stopped one summer at Chance Valley, Pennsylvania, and from there 
came to Minnesota, settling at St. Peter, where they remained three 
years, removing then to Minneapolis. Here the father still lives, the 
mother having died some years ago. They were the parents of two 
children, the subject of this sketch, and his sister, Minnie, who is the wife 
of John Edberg, of Wisconsin. 

Carl August Beckman received his early education in the public 
schools of his native land, and also attended public school after coming 
to this country. His first work was in a Swedish book store, where he 
remained two years. Afterward he engaged in the fish business. His- 
next venture was in a meat market, in connection with which he became 
interested in buying and selling cattle, in partnership with Johnson & Co.,. 
and traveled for about twelve years. He is still engaged in this business. 

Mr. Beckman resides wijh his family at 161 7 Tenth avenue, South. 
October 24, 1889, he married Miss Charlotte Peterson, who was bom at 
Red Wing, Minnesota, daughter of Charles and Louise Peterson. They 
have four children: Ruth Viva, born June 29, 1891 ; Vendela Louise,. 
April 25, 1893; Frances Marian, May 13, 1899; and Carl Russell, August 
13, 1904. Mr. Beckman is a member of the South Side Commercial Club, 
and, politically, is a stanch Republican. He and his family attend worship- 
at the English Lutheran Messiah church. 

Leonard Edwin Hallquist. — ^A man of far more than average in- 
telligence and ability, endowed by nature with those traits of character 
that mark the true gentleman, Leonard E. Hallquist holds a position of 
prominence and influence among the native-born Swedes of Minneapolis, 
and ranks high among the city's most highly esteemed and respected citi- 
zens. A native of Sweden, he was born, August 19, 1866, in Kollaby 
parish, Elfsborgs Ian, Vestergotland, a son of John August Hallquist, 
and grandson of Jonas Hallquist, for many years a general merchant in 
Kollaby parish. His mother, whose maiden name was Hannah Quist, was- 
born in Kollaby parish, a daughter of Leonard Quist, a sergeant in the 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 737 



Swedish army. She died in early womanhood, when her son, L. E. Hall- 
quist, was but three days old. 

Although left at such a tender age without a mother's loving care, 
L. E. Hallquist was well trained in habits of industry, honesty and truth, 
by his father, while in the public schools he received a practical education 
in the common branches of study. At the age of fourteen years he 
entered the tailoring establishment of John Jarl, in Tradgardsgatan, 
Jonkoping, where he served a full apprenticeship. Going subsequently 
to Gottenborg, where the journeyman had much greater advantages for 
advancement, he was there employed in different merchant tailoring 
establishments for three years. Finding himself at that time master of 
his trade, he emigrated to America, arriving in Boston, Massachusetts, 
August 28, 1886. Pushing on towards the west, he was soon in Minne- 
apolis, and almost immediately associated himself with the well-known 
tailoring firm of "The Moren Company," with which he has since been 
identified, being now one of the stockholders of the firm, and having 
entire control of its manufacturing department. 

Mr. Hallquist married, in 1893, Helen Swenson, who was bom in 
1871, a daughter of the late A. P. Swenson, a pioneer farmer at Chisago 
county, and they have three children, all of whom are attending school, 
namely: Burtham Edward, bom April 15, 1894; Mauritz Leonard, bom 
November 12, 1895; ^^^ Helen Grace, bom July 8, 1899. Mr. Hallquist 
and his family have a very pleasant home at No. 2624 Dupont avenue. 

The writer of this sketch has been for many years personally ac- 
quainted with Mr. Hallquist, and can truthfully say in this connection 
that he is liberally endowed with those inbred qualities of spirit and dis- 
position that make him a favorite among his friends and acquaintances, 
and win for him the respect and esteem of his business associates. Al- 
though his early education was limited, he has been an intelligent reader 
of the best books, readily digesting what he reads, and has now a better 
knowledge and a keener appreciation of ancient and current literature 
than many a college-bred man. He prefers to spend his leisure hours 
with his books, of which he has a large and valuable collection. 

Frans Victor Swanson. — One of the most energetic, businesslike 
and progressive of the younger Swedish-Americans of Minneapolis, 
Frans Victor Swanson is among the comparatively recent arrivals from 
the mother country, and for the past three years has been proprietor and 
conductor of the finest hostelry in the southem part of the city, known 
as "The Monitor Hotel." It fronts on Cedar avenue, has twenty-eight 
rooms and is modern in every respect. Attached to it is also a well 
appointed cafe, and both are largely patronized and highly appreciated 
by his fellow countrymen. 

Mr. Swanson is a native of Traheryd parish, Kronobergs Ian, Smi- 
land, Sweden, son of Sven Johan Magnusson and his wife, nee Anna 

47 



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738 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Kristina Jonsdotter. His father is still a fanner in the parish named, 
but his mother, who was bom therein in 1847, ^^^ "* 1883. Besides 
Frans V. their children were as follows : Gustav Alfred, who is a hotel 
proprietor in Sweden ; Carl W., a lawyer of Spokane, Washington ; Axel 
Frithiof, a traveling agent with headquarters at Valley City, NorUi Da- 
kota; Julia Charlotte, who married and resides in the northern part of 
Sweden; and Nannie Huldina, who married Edward Benson, a farmer 
residing at Luck, Wisconsin. 

Frans Victor, of this sketch, was educated in the public schools of 
his native parish until he was thirteen years of age, when he commenced 
to assist his father on the home farm and was thus employed until he was 
seventeen. The youth's first independent venture was then taken as a 
clerk for a cousin, who was proprietor of a store in an adjoining parish, 
but after being employed by him for three years, he went to Denmark 
on a tour of investigation. From 1897 to the simimer of 1901 he was 
in the brick manufacturing business, and then decided that his prospects 
would be brighter and his success more assured in America than in 
Europe; and in this his judgment was good. 

^Ir. Swanson arrived in Minneapolis June 15, 1901, and after a few 
months' work in a saw mill was taken with so serious a case of appendi- 
citis that he was obliged to submit to an operation. His recovery was 
rapid and complete, however, and his next employment was with the 
Rosehill Nursery Company, the largest tree-planting school in the North- 
west, with which he remained for three and a half years. But dependence 
upon others had ceased to satisfy his ambitions and in 1906 he purchased 
the "Upland Hotel," his conduct of it for two years greatly strengthen- 
ing him both in finances and reputation. The result was the establish- 
ment of the "Monitor Hotel," pronounced by good judges as the best 
public house of entertainment in South Minneapolis. The genial and able 
proprietor makes his home at his own hotel ; and he could not do better — 
under his present conditions of "single blessedness." His fraternal rela- 
tions are confined to Odd Fellowship. 

Andrew M. Wilson. — A man of enterprise and ability, possessing 
business qualifications of a high order, Andrew M. Wilson, residing at 
No. 2071 Carroll street, St. Paul, is identified with one of the leading 
industries of Minneapolis, being Northwestern manager of the Merle & 
Heaney Manufacturing Company of Chicago, Illinois. He was bom, 
August 13, 1866, in Moheda, Smiland, Sweden, being one of the ten 
children of Sven and Elma Wilson, seven of whom are still living, as 
follows: Elizabeth; Olof, cutter in a merchant tailoring establishment 
in London, England; Nils, also of London, is engaged in the ladies' 
tailoring business; Ingrid, widow of the late A. J. Johnson, lives in 
St. Paul ; Andrew M., the subject of this brief sketch ; Oscar, employed 
in the Minneapolis branch of the Merle & Meaney Manufacturing Com- 
pany ; and Amanda, who is keeping house for her widowed mother and 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 741 



her brother Oscar in Minneapolis. The father died in 1894 while yet 
in manhood's prime. 

Brought up in his native town, Andrew M. Wilson attended school 
as he had opportunity, in the meantime, his parents being in humble 
circumstances, beginning at the early age of ten years to work between 
school seasons in a sawmill. At the age of fifteen years he entered the 
Torp Machine Works, where he was employed for eighteen months. 
Going then to Jonkoping, he secured a situation with the firm of Wallen 
& Hanson, general merchants, with whom he remained until August, 
1885. Starting then for the United States, Mr. Wilson landed in New 
York City on September 9 of that year and for a few weeks thereafter 
was employed in a chair factory. Going from there to Centralia, Wis- 
consin, he was variously employed for a time, even working in the 
logging camps. On the first of April, 1886, he located in St. Paul, 
where he entered the employ of the Thomas Brennan Lumber Company, 
and after working as a scaler for a year was then promoted to foreman 
of one of their yards, a position that he retained until May i, 1888. The 
following two years he was traveling salesman for Nels Sandell, of 
St. Paul, after which he visited his old home and friends in Sweden, 
returning to Minnesota in the fall of that year. 

Mr. Wilson was subsequently employed for awhile by the Twin City 
Rapid Transit Company, but not liking that kind of work accepted a 
position as clothing salesman with Floan & Leveroos, remaining with 
that firm ten years, or until June 15, 1901. From that date until August 
31, 1904, he was manager, in Minneapolis, of the wholesale business 
house of Koehler & Hinrichs, of St. Paul, while thus employed gaining 
valuable experience. Forming then a copartnership with J. H. Kartack, 
under the firm name of Wilson & Kartack, he opened, in Minneapolis, a 
store for the sale of bar fixtures and supplies, and pool and billiard tables 
and supplies. The firm established a substantial business in this line 
of merchandise, continuing it until January i, 1906, when it was sold to 
the Merle &'Heaney Manufacturing Company. Mr. Wilson was placed 
in charge of the Minneapolis branch of this company's business, and has 
since retained the position, managing it successfully and most satisfac- 
torily to all concerned. 

On June 21, 1893, Mr. Wilson married Selma Leaf, a daughter of 
Nils and Maria Leaf, farmers in Summit, South Dakota. Mr. and Mrs. 
Wilson have two children, namely : Grace Eleonore Marie, born June 9, 
1894 ; and Arthur Magni, born August 29, 1900. Religiously Mr. Wilson 
and his family attend the English Lutheran church. Socially he is a 
member of the Knights of the Maccabees, of the Swedish Brothers, of 
the United Commercial Travelers of America, of the Iowa State Traveling 
Men's Association, and of the Norden Club. 

August Alfred Sandberg, who is one of the master printers of 
Minneapolis, has been at the head of the mechanical department of the 



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74^ SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



C. Rasmussen Publishing Company for the past sixteen years and proven 
himself one of the leading factors in the development of its extensive 
business among the Swedish-Americans of the Northwest He was 
born in the city of his life-long residence on the 24th of January, 1874, 
his parents being John and Anna Maria (Johansson) Sandberg. The 
father was bom in Vexio, Sm&land, Sweden; was a miller; came to 
Minneapolis in the early seventies and died there in 1888. The mother, 
who survives her husband and is living in Minneapolis, was bom in 
Herri junga, Vestergotland, Sweden, and her younger son, Carl H., who 
was born September 19, 1883, also resides in the Minnesota city. 

At the age of fourteen August A. Sandberg graduated from the 
public schools of Minneapolis and soon after apprenticed himself to learn 
the printer's trade with Svenska Folkets Tidning, in whose office he 
worked for several years. He then accepted employment with Nya 
Vcrlden, and when that paper was sold to the Scandia Publishing Com- 
pany and the plant moved to Story City, Iowa, Mr. Sandberg accom- 
panied it. But he soon retumed to Minneapolis, and for sixteen years, 
as stated, has been associated with the C. Rasmussen Publishing Com- 
pany as printer, foreman and general superintendent of its mechanical 
department. He has also taken an active part in the fraternal work of 
his home city, being identified with the Knights of Pythias, Woodmen 
of the World, Yeomen and D. O. K. K. Mr. Sandberg is a widower, 
his wife (formerly Alma Stien), dying in 1905 and leaving one child — 
John \'ivian, bom March 6. 1896, who is a public-school pupil and 
lives with his father at 916 Fifteenth avenue, South. 

Fritz Rydrerg is a business man of Minneapolis, principally 
engaged in the handling of real estate. He was bom on March 20, 
1872, in Grams parish, Karlstads Ian, Sweden, a son of Olof and Augusta 
Anderson. Olof Anderson, a farmer in Grams parish, died in the year 
of 1905, and his wife, bom in Fykerued parish, survived him for three 
years and died in 1908. Their three children are Louisa, Maria and 
Fritz. Louisa is a widow living in Grams parish, and Maria is the 
wife of Andrew Blomstrom, a farmer at Plum City, Wisconsin. 

Fritz Rydberg passed through the public schools and he remained 
on the family homestead, engaged in farming, until August of 1899, 
when he emigrated to America and Minneapolis. After working at 
different trades he engaged in business for himself in 1902, buying in 
that year a large tract of land in the very heart of northeastern Minne- 
apolis, which he platted into lots, and the tract is known as Rydberg's 
subdivision of Block 2, Cutter's addition to Minneapolis. He has also 
opened there a stone quarry, which has proven very profitable, the most 
of the stone being sold for building foundations. In all Mr. Rydberg- 
has up to the present time built twenty houses on his own lots, and of 
these he has sold ten, renting the others. As a yoimg man his business 
career has been more than ordinarily successful, and he has gained a 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 743 



place among the substantial business men of his chosen city. He is a 
member of a number of the Swedish fraternal societies, including the 
Druids, Svithiod, Norden and Moose. Mr. Rydberg's residence is at 
2827 Third street, North, Minneapolis. 

Arvid Peterson. — As treasurer and manager of Peterson Brothers 
Company, manufacturers of Swedish Health Bread and Toast, Arvid 
Peterson is actively identified with the development and promotion of 
the manufacturing and mercantile interests of Minneapolis, and holds 
an assured position among the progressive business men of the city. A 
native of Sweden, he was born, April 22, 1873, in Vestra, Vingaker, 
Sodermanland, a son of Per Erik and Caroline Albertina Peterson. The 
father, a blacksmith by trade, died in Sweden in 1892, and the mother 
now lives with a daughter in Boston, Massachusetts. 

Of the seven children of the parental household three died in Sweden, 
and the remaining four are living in America, as follows : Alma Alber- 
tina, wife of Axel Lofberg, an erecting engineer in Boston, Massachu- 
setts; Frida Lx)uisa, wife of Charles Foster, a contractor in Providence, 
Rhode Island ; Erik Emil, of Tacoma, Washington, a traveling salesman ; 
and Arvid, the subject of this sketch. 

After leaving the public schools of his native town, Arvid Peterson 
was confirmed in the Lutheran church at Fasterna, where his parents 
were then living. In 1893, with his widowed mother and his brother, 
he came to this country, whither his sisters had preceded him, locating 
first in Boston, where he remained eight years, in the meantime learning 
the baker's trade. Migrating then to South Dakota he was employed 
in agricultural pursuits two years in Groton. Coming from there to 
Minneapolis, Mr. Peterson, in company with his brother, Erik Emil 
Peterson, established a bakery business under the name of Peterson 
Brothers. This firm was subsequently incorporated as the Peterson 
Brothers Company, with Frank G. Broberg as president, Carl E. Petrie 
as vice-president, and Mr. Peterson as treasurer and manager. This 
concern has already built up a substantial business, amounting to upwards 
of $50,000 a year. The company buys the rye and grinds its own flour 
and ships its health bread, which is called in Sweden "knackebrod," all 
over the United States and Canada, their business being extensive and 
profitable. 

In 1902 Mr. Peterson was united in marriage with Louisa Berg* 
Strom, who was bom near Umca, Sweden, in 1868, and came to this 
country in 1893. Five children have blessed their union, namely: Emil 
Erik; Clara Louisa and Clarence, twins, bom July 16, 1905; William, 
born in 1907; and George, bom in 1909. Mr. Peterson and family 
reside in a pleasant part of the city, at No. 2615 Aldrich avenue, South. 
Fraternally Mr. Peterson is a member of the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen, of the United Commercial Travelers, and of the Odin Club. 



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744 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Fred Peterson, a grocery merchant in Minneapolis, was bom in 
Lindchurpen, Sweden, January i, 1866, a son of Peter and Anna Peter- 
son, in whose family were six children: John P., Matilda, C. A., Fred, 
Emma (deceased) and a son who died in infancy. The father of this 
family died in the year of 1890, in Sweden, and his widow is still living 
here. 

After obtaining a public school education in his native land Fred 
Peterson worked at various kinds of labor there until coming to the 
United States in 1887. Locating in Minneapolis, he soon secured employ- 
ment in the Minnesota forests, and after two years there started in 
business for himself as a creamery and grocery merchant, but in 1904 
he discontinued the creamery department and has since devoted his 
entire energies to his store, which is well stocked with a fresh and com- 
plete line of groceries. His store is located at the comer of Twenty- 
fifth street and Twenty-eighth avenue. 

Mr. Peterson married, in 1896, Miss Hedvie Ahalburg, and they 
have five children: Paul L., Huldah, Hannas, Henry and Rosey. The 
family attend the Swedish Mission church. 

Aaron Carlson. — The name of Aaron Carlson stands for all that 
is substantial and reliable in a business sense. Not only among the 
Swedish-Americans is he well known, but also among building contractors 
and thousands of others, with whom he has come into direct or indirect 
contact. He has an enviable reputation for honest dealing and for being 
tme to his promises, not only within the limits of his city and state, but 
through many other parts of the Northwest where buildings are being 
erected. Mr. Carlson was bora in Vestra Figelvik, Vermland, Sweden, 
January 28, 1857, to Carl and Maria (Olson) Anderson, both of them 
now deceased. To them were bom six children, four of whom were 
girls ; all of them reside in Minnesota, with the exception of one daughter, 
who lives on the old homestead in her native country. ^ 

.Aaron Carlson received his early education in the public schools of 
his native parish and was confirmed in the Lutheran church. He was 
apprenticed to the carpenter trade, and as he had inherited an ability in 
the line of mechanics, his vocation was well chosen. Both his maternal 
and paternal grandfathers were skilled mechanics in iron and wood- 
working. His maternal grandfather, a village blacksmith, carpenter and 
builder, was well known in that part of the province of Vermland as an 
extraordinarily skilled workman and an energetic and hustling man. He 
made a plow by hand in a day, and in six days completed seven plows; 
he was celebrated for his ready wit, and his answers were often very 
pointed and sometimes his words were stinging. 

In 1882 Mr. Carlson emigrated to the United States, arriving in 
Minneapolis May 6 of that year; he secured a position as journeyman 
carpenter and during two winters worked in the woods. Captain John 
Martin, the well-known lumber merchant and president of the First 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 747 

National Bank of Minneapolis, took a fancy to this sturdy and hard- 
working young man, and later when he was ready to embark in business 
Mr. Martin gave him his support in the enterprise. The third year of 
Mr. Carlson's sojourn in the city he was made foreman in the Flour 
City Sash and Door Factory, and after living in Minneapolis eight years 
he went into business for himself, opening a sash and door factory in 
1901. He began business in a modest way, first renting a small dry- 
kiln, where he opened a small shop and employed six men, also renting 
three machines. He had his shop destroyed by fire twice, and the second 
time built a plant of his own, on leased ground. In 1905 he purchased 
this ground, consisting of three and one-half acres, and rebuilt the plant, 
enlarging it at a cost of thirty thousand dollars. He has a floor space of 
twenty-seven thousand square feet. His specialty is interior finish, and 
he has furnished it to most of the large buildings of Minneapolis and in 
many other cities in Minnesota and other states. He employs a force 
of eighty-five to one hundred men, and one of his latest contracts is for 
eight hundred mahc^any doors for the new Hotel Radisson, now under 
construction in Minneapolis. Mr. Carlson has met with unusual success 
in his career, ajid has reason to be proud of his achievements. 

Mr. Carlson has other interests outside of his business and holds 
several positions of trust. He is oiie of the directors of St. Anthony 
Falls Bank and a member of its examining board. He is also a director 
of the Scandinavian-American National Bank and a trustee of the 
Swedish-American Savings Bank of Minneapolis. He is a shareholder 
in a number of companies and industrial enterprises and is always ready 
to lend the helping hand to any worthy cause, whether industrial or 
charitable, and his name is gratefully remembered in many a household. 
Mr. Carlson has been trustee of the Swedish Evangelical Mission Church, 
Northeast, of Minneapolis, for eight years ; since 1899 he has been trustee 
of the Swedish Mission Covenant. He is one of the trustees of the 
Swedish Hospital, of which he is also treasurer, and is trustee and presi- 
dent of the committee which has charge of the publication of the Minne- 
apolis Veckoblad, In the winter of 1900 he visited his native country, 
and again in 1908, the latter time accompanied by his family, and then 
they traveled through Norway, Denmark and England, as well as Sweden. 
At this time there were hundreds of his countrymen who had heard of 
his great success and wished to come back with him, but he advised them 
to stay in their own country if they were doing well, reminding them 
that in these days when so many have emigrated to the United States, 
Sweden has few men to spare from her own shores. He also told them 
that though he had met with great success, it did not follow that every 
farmer boy from Sweden could equal him in achievements, because the 
degree of success in the United States did not depend entirely upon 
ambition and energy, but greatly upon circumstances and opportunities. 

Mr. Carlson married, in 1886, Minnie Larson, who was born in the 
same parish in Vermland as he was, and is the daughter of Lars and 



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748 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



Anna Halvorson. They have become the parents of five children, 
namely: C Albert, bom in 1886; L. Paul, in 1889; David, in 1893; 
Earl, in 1895, and Alpha Maria, in 1901. They reside at 2309 NorSi 
Garfield street. 

Peter A. Holm, an attorney at law, has been closely associated 
with the interests of Minneapolis for many years, but his birthplace was 
Trondhjem, Norway. His father was Habor Holm, and in his family 
were eight children, as follows: Sivert and Caroline, both deceased; 
Anna, Mali, Peter, Rogna, Stephen and Hannah. The mother died 
when her son Peter was but an infant, and when he was eight years 
of age his father came with him and his sister Anna, now the wife of 
Christian Jacobson, to this country. He attended the public and high 
schools of Minneapolis, and in 1892 entered as a student the State 
University and graduated from its law department in 1896, while in 
the same year he was admitted to the bar. 

But before entering the university Mr. Holm had spent fifteen years 
as a clerk in the postal service at Minneapolis, during which time he 
was a diligent student, and the money he saved while thus employed 
enabled him to pursue his collegiate course. His splendid professional 
training is entirely the result of his own labor, for he received no out- 
side assistance, and his popularity and large acquaintance acquired while 
in the postal service served him well in his initial practice of the law. 
His politics are Republican, and in the fall of 1908 he was a candidate 
for the legislature. He is a member of the fraternal order of Woodmen 
and the Masonic fraternity, and attends the St. John's English Lutheran 
church. Mr. Holm married, in 1897, Miss Ida Hendrickson, a daughter 
of Eric Hendrickson. 

Ex-Alderman Andrew Anderson is one of the ablest, most tal- 
ented and popular Swedish-Americans in South Minneapolis. He is a 
master brickmason and hard-working citizen, although now in comfortable 
circumstances with a high reputation for honesty and ability in the dis- 
charge of municipal affairs and for his earnest and effective advocacy 
of Union principles. It was he as an alderman who succeeded in estab- 
lishing the eight-hour labor day in all the city departments of Minneapolis, 
and he has always been with the people in their protests and fights 
against the extortions of monopolies. Mr. Anderson not only is endowed 
with practical abilities of a superior order, but is one of the oldest and 
best known musicians of the city, having done more than any other one 
man to encourage military and orchestral organizations among the 
Scandinavians of South Minneapolis. 

Mr. Anderson is a native of Karlanda parish, Nordmark, Verm- 
land, Sweden, born March 29, 1866, and is a son of Per and Ingeborg 
(Xilsson) Anderson. The father, who was bom in the parish named, 
November 3, 1822, was the owner of a large farm in Sweden, but was 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 749 



employed much of the time as assistant to the state surveyor. In 1869 
he emigrated to the United States with his oldest son and settled in 
Red Wing, then one of the principal cities in Minnesota. There, for two 
years, he pursued his trade as a stone mason and in 187 1 moved to Min- 
neapolis, where he bought a home for the reception of other members of 
the family whom he had left in Sweden. After their arrival during that 
year he continued his old-time calling, some of his most important work 
being accomplished in the construction of the old Suspension bridge 
across the Mississippi river, and of the great Washburn flour mill which 
was destroyed by an explosion of flour dust May 2, 1878. The acci- 
dent was also a casualty, for eighteen lives were lost. Many other 
employees had a narrow escape from death, as only half an hour before 
the explosion Mr. Anderson had left the mill with a hundred other 
workingmen. The father died in Minneapolis April 30, 1905, his wife, 
who was bom in Jemskog, Vermland, May 26, 1826, having preceded 
him August 19, 1903. 

Mr. and Mrs. Per Anderson were the parents of five children, all 
natives of Sweden. Nils P., the first born, came with his father to the 
United States in 1869, settling as a farmer in the town of Bums, Anoka 
county, Minnesota, where he died March 9, 1904. He married Miss 
Britta Dalfors, a native of Ore parish, Dalarne, Sweden, and they had 
five children, all of whom survive. Christine, who was born January 9, 
1857, married Alderman Clarence C. Johnson, an old and widely known 
citizen of Minneapolis, who died in 1907. Stina, the third child and 
younger daughter, was bom in November, 1863, married John L. Eklund, 
a Minneapolis police officer, and has become the mother of eight chil- 
dren. Andrew was the fourth bom. Peter P., the youngest, was bom 
November 9, 1868, and is now employed as an inspector in the Minne- 
apolis city water department. He has been twice married and is the 
father of two children. 

As stated, Andrew Anderson came to Minneapolis in 1873, with 
his mother, two sisters and a brother, and at once occupied the home 
which had been prepared for them by the industrious and thoughtful 
father. The boy received his early education in Jackson public school, 
of that city, and after his graduation took a special course in architecture 
and draughting. In 1882, wishing to learn a practical trade, he appren- 
ticed himself to a brick mason and has followed that calling since he 
became master of it. As a means of recreation he early devoted himself 
to music, the love of which has only increased with the years. In his 
youth he was connected with the old Scandia bank, the oldest organiza- 
tion of the kind among the Scandinavians of Minneapolis. He was also 
one of the leading members of Normanna Band and although this was 
a Norwegian organization he was president of it for three years. Fur- 
ther, he was instrumental in founding the Svea Band, a most creditable 
organization. 

Since he was sixteen years of age Mr. Anderson has been interested 



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750 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



in political and public questions, and it was only after long urijing on the 
part of his friends that he was finally induced to become a candidate 
for office. In 1892 he accepted the aldermanic nom^naaon from the 
Sixth ward, and was elected to the council by a decisive majority. The 
record of his first four years' term was such that he was reelected in 
1896, serving his constituents altogether from 1892 to 1900 and then 
insisting upon retirement to private life. During that period he served 
on some of the most important committees within the gift of the city 
council, being chairman of the committee on gas when the decisive 
campaign was waged by consumers against the gas company for a 
reduction of rates. He was also chairman of the committee for bonds 
and accounts of city officers and a member of the committees on fire 
department, sewers, public grounds and buildings, roads and bridges, and 
street grades and additions. He was elected to the coimcil as a Union 
Labor representative and fulfilled his pledges in spirit and to the letter. 
He not only established the eight-hour day for city employees, but was 
a strong force in compelling ^e street car company to grant transfers 
on lines within the municipal limits. Such work as this has greatly 
enhanced his popularity with working people and with the general public, 
as well as established his reputation as an independent, able and honor- 
able citizen. He is also a foremost figure in the fraternities of his 
people, having been a member of the Swedish Brothers for thirty-three 
years and its president for a portion of the period. He is also active as 
a Knight of Piihias. 

In 1892 ^Ir. Anderson was united in marriage with Miss Ida 
Mathilda Johnson, bom in Safsnas parish, Dalame, Sweden, Jime 10, 
1866, daughter of Lars Johnson, a farmer residing at Madison Lake, 
Minnesota. They have five children : Herbert Qarence Anderson, who 
was bom December 5, 1892, is a graduate of the Minneapolis high school 
and is learning the plumber's trade ; Eileen Nathalie, bom May 16, 1894, 
is a high school pupil; Millard Gideon, bom July 21, 1895, is also 
attending high school; Alvin Peter Laurentius, bom December 4, 1897, 
is a public school boy; and Vema Loraine Anderson, bom March 4, 
1908, is the beloved infant daughter of the fainily. The oldest three 
children arc confirmed in the Swedish Lutheran church, of which con- 
gregation Mrs. Anderson is a member. The family home, which Mr. 
Anderson purchased several years ago, is at 1912 Third street, South. 

Harry Ronbeck, an enterprising clothing salesman of Minneapolis, 
is a native of St. Peter, Minnesota, the town from which came Governor 
Johnson. He is a son of A. J. Ronbeck, bom in Sweden, in 1859, and 
now living with his son and familv at 2413 Stevens avenue, Minne- 
apolis. Harry Ronbeck was bom June 12, 1884. He is employed by 
The Plymouth Clothing Company, the largest clothii^ store in the city, 
doing an enormous business, not only in Minneapolis, but also outside 
the city. The company is now erecting a store that will occupy nearly 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 753 



half a block in the center of the business district, a move which is war- 
ranted by their success and prosperity. 

Mr. Ronbeck is an able and experienced salesman and is able to 
command a good trade. He is an intelligent man, with a courteous, 
business-like manner and bearing, and has a large number of friends 
and acquaintances, by whom he is highly esteemed. He takes a com- 
mendable interest in public affairs and is a representative citizen. 

Philip M. Lootz, the well known mechanical engineer of Minne- 
apolis, although not a native bom son of Sweden, comes of Swedish 
extraction and received his education principally in that country. Of 
his father's family of four children he alone can speak the Swedish 
language. Mr. Lootz was born on the 13th of December, 1872, in South- 
shield, England, where his father at that time was employed as an expert 
mining engineer. In this place Philip M. received the nucleus of his 
educational training, later studying at Malmo, Sweden, and completing 
his training at Eaton College. 

Philips Lootz, the father, was born at Nognas, Skane, Sweden, in 
1829. He received an education as a mining engineer and at an early 
age became an employee of the Norfhshield Mining Company in England 
as an expert and remained with that company until his death in 1908. 
He was known throughout all Europe as an expert in his chosen pro- 
fession. Bertha (Martin) Lootz, his wife, was born in 1818 in South- 
shield, England, and she is also deceased. The following children blessed 
their marriage union: Marie, widow of Johan Monson, superintendent 
for coal mines in Northshield, England ; Sofie, the wife of M. M. Johnson, 
a resident of Stillwater, Minnesota, collecting agent for the Northwestern 
Threshing Machine Company; Emma, wife of Swan Monson, foreman 
for the Northshield Mining Company, in England ; and Philip M. Lootz, 
whose name introduces this sketch. 

Philip M. Lootz was married in 1893 to Alice F, Rutherford, a 
daughter of Domine Q. Rutherford, a farmer by occupation, who died 
at his home in Washington county, Minnesota, in 1907. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lootz have no children and reside at 3200 Russell avenue, Minneapolis, 
Mr. Lootz being the owner of his attractive residence. 

Charles Axel Smith. — Among the Swedish-Americans of Minne- 
sota who have received their finishing education and their business train- 
ing in the state none are more truly representative of the industry, broad 
judgment and practical ability of their racial stock than Charles A. 
Smith, of Minneapolis, president and managing head of the C. A. Smith 
Lumber Company and Swedish consul for the northwestern district of 
the United States. If only one fact were to be mentioned in connection 
with his business career it would be sufficient to stamp him as a man of 
remarkable enterprise and force, and that is that for years he was the 

48 



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754 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



close associate with Governor John S. Pillsbury in numerous great enter- 
prises, hereafter to be mentioned. From his early youth until he had 
reached the station of a substantial middle-aged man of large and still 
developing affairs, he was in touch with Mr. Pillsbury's wonderful energy 
and strength, and during much of that period was a confidential co-worker. 
In the light of his continuous progress and present standing, Sweden is 
proud to claim Mr. Smith as one of her sons, though she retained him 
but as a boy. He was bom in the province of Ostergotland, December 
II, 1852, and soon after coming to this country with his father and 
sister located at Minneapolis. He had already obtained a public school 
education, and in 1867, at the age of fourteen and soon after coming 
to the city, became a student at the University of Minnesota. He did 
not spare himself in his studies and, as he also spent all his spare time 
and his vacations in the employ of Governor Pillsbury, his health was so 
affected that he was obliged to leave school. He then entered the hard- 
ware store owned by Mr. Pillsbury and was thus employed until 1878, 
when he became an equal partner with, his former employer under the 
firm name of C. A. Smith & Company. The company established an 
elevator, lumber yard and implement depot at Herman, Minnesota, and 
later Mr. Smith, in association with C. J. Johnson, opened retail lumber 
yards at Evansville, Brandon and Ashby, the succeeding six years being 
marked by remarkable success in these enterprises. In 1884 Mr. Smith 
again joined Mr. Pillsbury, C. A. Smith & Company was reorganized, 
with Mr. Johnson as a partner, and for three years a brisk and profitable 
business was conducted in cutting a tract of timber owned by Mr. Pills- 
bury and sawing the logs at the Minneapolis mills. In 1887 the company 
purchased the sawmill of the John Martin Lumber Company, but the new 
plant was burned within sixty days thereafter. C. A. Smith & Company 
acquired the Clough interests in the mill owned by Clough Brothers & 
Kilgore in 1890, and after operating it for two years sold it to Nelson, 
Tenney & Company. The latter then sawed for C. A. Smith & Company 
until the present organization was effected in 1893, under the style of 
the C. A. Smith Lumber Company. 

The reorganized company erected what at the time was the most 
complete lumber manufactory in Minneapolis, and which still has an 
unexcelled reputation for economical and finished production. Its yearly 
output is about 112,000,000 feet of lumber. The so-called "waste edg- 
ings'* are utilized in the manufacture of a patent board, this branch of 
the enterprise being managed by the Northwestern Compo Board Com- 
pany, of which Mr. Smith is also president. Further, he is the head of 
the C. A. Smith Timber Company, formed to procure the raw material 
for the mill, and is one of the heaviest buyers of Pacific coast timber in 
the Northwest. For the purpose of planting a manufactory near the 
latter field of his purchases, he has placed in operation a large mill at 
Marshfield, Oregon. It is said that his timber holdings in the surr 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA ' 755 



rounding district would furnish material for this manufacturing estab- 
lishment for a century to come. 

Mr. Smith's prominence in the g^eat business and industrial field 
of his choice is evident from such official record as that he has served 
both as vice-president of the National Lumber Manufacturers' Associ- 
ation and treasurer of the Northern Pine Manufacturers' Association. 
In social life he is identified with the Minneapolis, Commercial, Auto- 
mobile and Odin clubs. A stanch Republican, both in 1896 and 1900 
he was selected by his party as a presidential elector and cast his vote 
for McKinley and Roosevelt, respectively. Mr. Smith has always been 
liberal in his support of the educational and charitable institutions of 
Minnesota and the Northwest, and for his energy and generosity in the 
movement for the relief of the famine sufferers of Norrland, Sweden, 
some years ago, he was honored with the rank of the First Degree in 
the Order of Vasa. Subsequently he received his appointment as 
Swedish consul for the Northwest from King Gustave. Mr. Smith's 
religious connections are with the Salem English Lutheran church of 
Minneapolis. He is married and the father of three daughters and 
three sons, the eldest of whom died when seventeen years of age. Those 
living are : Nann A., Adeline J., Myrtle E., Vernon A., and Carroll W. 

Theodore Carlson. — ^A man of persistent energy and determination, 
Theodore Carlson was clearly destined to be the architect of his own 
fortune, and by dint of untiring labor and a diligent use of his faculties 
and opportunities is proving himself a useful and worthy citizen of Min- 
neapolis. As proprietor of the Rosedale Meat Market, located at No. 
4302 Nicollet avenue, he has built up a successful and remunerative 
trade, becoming in the meantime actively associated with the mercantile 
interests of the city. A son of Carl Peterson, he was bom, March 12, 
1870, in Roshult, Elmeboda parish, Smiland, Sweden, and was there 
reared on, a farm. 

Carl Peterson was one of the leading agriculturists of Elmeboda and 
occupied a place of prominence and influence in the community, which 
he served in various official capacities. He held many elective offices; 
representing his district in the Landsting; being associate justice of the 
County Court; president of the Parish Board; president of the Parish 
Fire Insurance Company; a member of the Probate Board; and a bank 
director and bank examiner. He died, an honored and respected citizen, 
in 1904. His wife, whose maiden name was Anna Falk, died in 1896. 
Of the seven children bom of their union, three are now living, namely : 
Esther, wife of Frans Davidson, a farmer in Elmeboda ; Carl Ferdinand, 
who lived in the United States eight years, but returned to Sweden to 
assume the management of the old homestead, and has succeeded his 
father as a public official in many respects; and Theodore, the special 
subject of this biographical sketch. 

After obtaining a public school education and being confirmed in 



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7S6 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



the Lutheran church, Theodore Carlson assisted his father for awhile on 
the farm, after which he was employed as clerk in a general merchandise 
store, being thus employed in Wissefjerda for a year, and in Lyckeby 
for five years. In 1893, wishing to make a change of occupation, Mr. 
Carlson immigrated to America and after spending one day in Chicago 
visiting the Columbian Exposition, came directly to Minneapolis. Sub- 
sequently being persuaded by some friends to accompany them to North 
Dakota, he soon found himself shocking wheat in the fields. The harvest 
season over, he returned to this city and for awhile worked in a lumber 
yard, during the winter attending night school. Going to Skokee the 
following spring, he worked in the woods a couple of months, after 
which he was employed cutting cordwood in Wisconsin. Finding that 
work too strenuous, Mr. Carlson gave up the job and "hoofed" it back to 
Minneapolis. Times were very hard, with hundreds of applicants for 
every job, but through the influence of a Minneapolis alderman he secured 
work on the dump cars, receiving for his labors the mtmificent sum of 
ninety cents a day. He subsequently worked for a time on a hay farm, 
and then went with a section gang to work on the Great Northern Rail- 
way in North Dakota. He was next employed in the railroad yards for 
a brief time, and in the winter again went to the woods, for a couple of 
months serving as "cookie" or helper in the kitchen. 

Again taking up his residence in Minneapolis, Mr. Carlson was for 
six months clerk in a meat market, after which, in partnership with 
J. A. Swanson, he opened a meat market at No. 1003 East Twenty-first 
street, and continued there until bought out by his partner. Mr. Carlson 
then traveled extensively throughout the Northwest, being variously 
employed, and on again coming back to this city established himself in 
business at No. 2839 Chicago avenue, for several years being in part- 
nership with Axel Hartchner, who afterwards purchased Mr. Carlson's 
interest in the firm. After looking about for favorable opportunities for 
six months Mr. Carlson opened the Rosedale Meat Market, which he 
has conducted successfully since, being one of the most popular and 
prosperous business men of his community. 

In 1903 Mr. Carlson visited his father and other relatives and friends 
in Sweden, at the same time making an extended tour through the most 
picturesque parts of his native land. He is a member of the Gustafus 
Adolphus II Society ; of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows ; and of 
the Gustavus Adolphus Singing Society, in which he is quite active, his 
services in quartette singing being appreciated and in demand. He has 
never married. 

Frank P. Bruce, assistant state weighmaster, at this writing in 
charge of the Shoreham grain elevator at Minneapolis, was bom at 
Christinehof, near Christianstad, Sweden, May 14, 1861, son of Nels 
Bruce and wife Kerstin (nee Anderson), both of whom died in Sweden. 
In their family were four children : August Bruce, a machinist at Hessle- 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 757 



holm ; Frank P. ; Emma, wife of Anders Larson, died in 1905 ; and Alice, 
wife of Andrew Ljungg^en, of Charlottenlund, Skane, Sweden. 

The parents having moved to KrubbemoUa when Frank P. was a 
child of two years, he was reared at that place; was educated in the 
public schools, and confirmed in the Lutheran church at Vitaby. At the 
age of seventeen, large and robust, he enlisted in the Vendes Artillery 
Regiment, in which he served nearly nine years before he resigned and 
was honorably discharged. 

On his retirement from the army Mr. Bruce came direct to this 
country and to Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he arrived in 1885. Here 
for four months he worked in a lime and cement business. During this 
time he felt keenly the need of a better education and a knowlec]^e of 
the English language, and during the following winter he attended both 
a day and night school and applied himself strictly to his studies. The 
next year he was employed as coachman for Mr. F. E. Fisher, a promi- 
nent contractor of Minneapolis, and afterward resumed work in the 
lime business. In 1888 he started a grocery business in partnership with 
Mr. Charles Olander, on Franklin avenue, which was continued about 
three and a half years, after which the firm was dissolved, Mr. Olander 
going to Montana and Mr. Bruce accepting a position with another 
grocery store, with which he was connected a year and a half. On 
January 25, 1893, he was appointed assistant state weighmaster by Gov. 
Knute Nelson, which position he still holds. 

Mr. Bruce resides with his family at 2519 Eleventh avenue. South, 
Minneapolis. In 1885 he married Miss Anna Erickson, who was bom 
in Christianstad, July 22, 1864, and they have had four children : Alice, 
bom February 27, 1887, is a stenographer in Minneapolis; Anna, bom 
September 14, 1889, died in infancy; Frank Gustaf, born March 14, 1891, 
and Nels Hjalmar, bom November 11, 1893, ^^^ ^^S^ school students. 

In 1888 Mr. Bruce and Captain Bennet organized Battery B of the 
State National Guard, of which Mr. Bmce was made first lieutenant, an 
office he filled for seventeen years, until he resigned in 1905. This battery 
was ready to participate in the Spanish war, but was unable to get a 
sufficient supply of guns from the government ; instead, it- was called to 
assist the regular troops from Fort Snelling in quelling an Indian uprising 
at Leech Lake, Itasca county, where it served for seventeen days, armed 
with Catling guns and Springfield rifles. The Indians were subdued 
after having killed a few of the regular soldiers. Mr. Bmce is a member 
of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. 

J. Hans Dahl. — ^An enterprising and prosperous merchant of Min- 
neapolis, J. Hans Dahl is numbered among the substantial business men 
of this city, and is actively identified with the promotion of its advance- 
ment and material growth. A native of Sweden, he was bom, August 
20, 1866, in Frannefors parish, Dalsland, where he lived until five years 
old. In 1871 his parents, Gustaf and Karin (Johnson) Dahl, emigrated 



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7S8 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



to Minnesota with their family, locating at Rush Point, Chisago county, 
where the father died a month later, his body being buried in Ounbridge, 
Minnesota. The widowed mother survived her husband a number of 
years, dying in the fall of 1895, and being buried at Rush Point on 
Thanksgiving day of that year. The parents reared eight children, of 
whom seven are living, their names being given on another page of this 
work in connection with a sketch of Edward G. Dahl, the youngest child 
of the household. 

J. Hans Dahl was educated in the district schools of Rush Point, 
Minnesota, and subsequently worked on the home farm until seventeen 
years old. Coming then to Minneapolis in search of more congenial 
and profitable work, he was employed in a family to care for the place 
for seven years, after which he was variously employed, going West, 
working in the woods and trying other kinds of labor. He was subse- 
quently interested for some time in the grocery business with his brother 
Aron and Jonas Carlson, but sold his interest and entered the employ 
of his brothers, Edward G. and Charles, who were engaged in the clothing 
and furnishing business. A year later these three brothers, Edward G., 
Charles and J. Hans, formed a partnership and opened a dry goods, gent's 
furnishing goods and shoe dealing establishment at 41 59-4161 Washington 
avenue, North, and have since been engaged in the mercantile business in 
this city. Successful from the start, tfie original store soon became too 
small, and at the end of three years the firm, in order to meet the demands 
of its large and ever-growing trade, assumed possession of its new and 
spacious building in Camden Place, where an extensive and lucrative 
trade has already been established. The upright and honorable methods 
of these enterprising brothers and their willingness to oblige all patrons 
of their store, has won for them the good will of the community and an 
excellent line of customers. 

Mr. Dahl married, in 1892, Amelia Widholm, who was bom, Sep- 
tember 3, 1869, at Cannon Falls, Goodhue county, a daughter of Sven 
and Sophia Widholm. Mr. and Mrs. Dahl have three children, namely: 
Myrtle Elvira, bom July 12, 1893, is a student at Minnesota Collegpe; 
Harriet Berenice, bom February 7, 1899; and Eveline Aurora Sophia, 
born June 10, 1902. Fraternally Mr. Dahl is a member of the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows ; of the Independent Order of Foresters ; of 
the Modem Woodmen; and of the United Sons of Sweden. He has 
accumulated a fair share of this world's goods, owning his residence, at 
No. 3859 Lyndale avenue, and with others is financially interested in the 
Swedish Land Colonization Company of Cuba. 

Andrew Berglund, deputy city weighmaster for the Northwestern 
Fuel Company, Minneapolis, was bom in Ingaron, near Stockholm, 
Sweden, June 10, 1857, son of Anders and Fredrika Charlotta Berglund. 
The father was a miller by occupation, and both father and mother are 
deceased. They were the parents of three children: Andrew, of this 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 761 



sketch ; Carl August, who died at the age of six years ; and Emma Char- 
lotta, who died at the age of twenty-seven years. 

Until he was twelve years old Andrew attended public school. Then 
he had to go to work to earn his living, and found employment as errand 
boy in the porcelain factory at Gustafsberg, later working in the china 
factory, and remaining there until his confirmation in the Lutheran church. 
From the time he was fifteen until he was twenty-one he did farm work, 
during that period working on three different places. On reaching his 
majority he enlisted in the Svea Artillery Regiment in Stockholm, where 
he served five years and six months, the last two years being a sergeant 
quartermaster. He was then honorably discharged and returned to 
Gustafsberg, where he resumed work in his old position, but was soon 
promoted, and five more years he spent in the factory. Next we find 
him in Stockholm, where he worked one year in a hat factor\^ 

In the spring of 1890 he caught the "American fever" and emi- 
grated to this country, St. James, Watonwan county, Minnesota, being 
his first stopping place, where he spent a week with some relatives of his 
wife. Then he went to Duluth. His first work here was on the city 
water mains. Afterward he was employed on an extension of the 
Duluth-Winnipeg Railroad, and still later on the Great Northern Railroad, 
in Montana. However, the rough life in the railroad camps of Montana 
was not to his liking, and he sought other employment, finding it on a 
farm in Petersburg, North Dakota, where he worked , during harvesting 
time, and then returned to Minnesota. That was in the early days when 
street cars were drawn by mules and horses. In the car barns of Min- 
neapolis Mr. Berglund got a night job of cleaning cars, working for that 
well-known citizen, Tom Lowry. After this he went to the pineries, 
but some weeks later returned to Minneapolis and did odd jobs until 
finally, in the fall of 1892, he secured a position with the Northwestern 
Fuel Company, with which he has since been connected, first as a com- 
mon laborer, later as foreman and clerk in a branch office, and in 1905 
was appointed to his present post, that of deputy city weighmaster. 

In 1887, before leaving Sweden, Mr. Berglund married Miss Ida 
Charlotta Anderson, of Kjedum, Vestergotland, who died in 1895, leaving 
two children, only one of whom is living — ^Anna Maria, born September 
14, 1888. In 1898 Mr. Berglund married Miss Selma Mathilda Ander- 
son, who was bom in Storsjo, Kalmar Ian, October 15, 1869. To them 
have been given four children: Willard Sixtus, bom September 3, 1899; 
Viola Charlotta, April 10, 1901 ; Emma Charlotta, August 10, 1903; and 
Elvira Selma, March 7, 1908. Mr. Berglund is a member of the Modern 
Woodmen of America and the Gustof Adolph Society. 

Adolph Johnson. — Among the enterprising men of Minneapolis 
worthy of special mention in this biographical work is Adolph Johnson, 
president of the Anchor Stone Company, which controls one of the 
leading industries of the city. He was bom, April 22, 1855, in Ed's 



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762 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



parish, Vermland, Sweden, where his parents, Jonas and Kajsa Swanson, 
spent their lives. They had a family of eight children, of whom three 
are living, namely : Eva Elizabeth, who married F. L. Israelson, lives 
in Gothenburg, Sweden; Wilhelm, also living in Sweden; and Adolph, 
the special subject of this brief sketch. 

After his confirmation in the Lutheran church, Adolph Johnson was 
apprenticed to learn the blacksmith's trade. This he followed in his 
native country until 1879, when he emigrated to the United States. He 
spent his first six months in this country working on a railroad in 
Louisiana, after which he followed his trade of blacksmith in Peoria, 
Illinois, for eighteen months. In 1881 Mr. Johnson located in Minne- 
apolis and for ten years thereafter was foreman for the Asbestin Com- 
pany. In 1892 he embarked in the cement business for himself, and 
during the next sixteen years was associated with various partners. 
Having acquired valuable knowledge and experience in his many ven- 
tures, Mr. Johnson incorporated, in 1908, the Anchor Stone Company, 
with a capital stock of $50,000, and was made president and treasurer 
of the concern, while one son, Edward O., is vice-president, and another 
son, Arthur H., is the secretary. This company, the successor of the 
Anchor Stone Laundry Tray Company, is carrying on a thriving and 
remunerative business, being one of the foremost in its line in the county. 

Mr. Johnson married, in 1884, Celia Bjelkengren, and they are the 
parents of four children, namely: Edward O., born April 16, 1885, 
married Mabel Thompson, of Minneapolis; Arthur H., born March 11, 
1887; Mabel Amanda, bom May 8, 1889; and Ruth Marida, born July 
28, 1891. The family are members of Bethlehem Presbyterian church, 
and reside at No. 3949 Lyndale avenue, South. 

John E. Johnson, who has been engaged in the meat business at 
Minneapolis for the past twenty-two years, is one of the leading mer- 
chants in that line of the Twin Cities. He is a native of Malmskog 
parish, Vermland, Sweden, born September 11, 1862, and is a son of 
Jfon and Karin (Olson) Nilson. They had six children, three of whom 
are living in America — Nels and Anders, as farmers and partners in 
Minnesota, and John E. Johannes (his baptismal name) received his 
education in the public schools of his native parish and was confirmed in 
the Lutheran church. In the spring of 1878 he emigrated to the United 
States, first locating at Janesville, Minnesota, where his two brothers had 
already settled. 

Mr. Johnson's first year in the state and the country was spent as 
a farm hand with Nels Nyquist, later a state senator and a retired citizen, 
and then cultivating his land at that point. After another year of farm- 
ing Mr. Johnson engaged in railroad work, which he continued until his 
marriage in 1887. He then entered the employ of Johnson & Company, 
the meat merchants of Minneapolis, and in 1890 formed a partnership 
with Louis Larson, establishing a meat market at 317 Cedar avenue. 



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SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 763 



In 1893 Mr. Johnson sold his interest to his partner and founded the 
business of which he is sole proprietor at 1222-1224 Washington avenue. 
South. He is an active and popular factor both i^ business and fraternal 
circles, his connection with the latter including membership in the Swedish 
Brothers, Knights of Pythias and Druids. In the last named order he 
has also held a number of offices. 

Mr. Johnson married, in 1887, Miss Hattie M. Counter, of Blue 
Earth county, Minnesota, and the three children of their union are 
as follows : Ernest Victor, bom February 29, 1888 ; Agnes Lydia, bom 
July 24, 1891, and Ruth Carrie, bom April 11, 1895. The family attend 
the St. John Lutheran church and reside in a comfortable home, owned 
by Mr. Johnson, at 3152 Elliot avenue. 

Nels Westerdahl, the well known railroad contractor, Minne- 
apolis, Minnesota, is a native of Sweden. He was bom, September 6, 
1859, in Vennestad, Trane parish, Christianstad Ian, son of Peter and 
Christina (Nelson) Westerdahl, and one of a family of eight children, 
seven of whom are living, namely: Ingrid, wife of C. F. Carlson, a 
railroad man; Peter, a railroad contractor of Hersey, Wisconsin; Nels; 
Hanna, wife of John Kirk, a partner in the railroad business with Nels ; 
John, purchasing agent for a railroad; Andrew, a railroad contractor; 
and Ellen, wife of C. E. Carlson, a farmer in Wisconsin. 

In his native land, Nels Westerdahl received a public school educa- 
tion and, according to the custom, was confirmed in the Lutheran church. 
He was employed in farm work in Sweden until 1880, when he came to 
Minnesota. Here he continued work on farms for eighteen months 
longer, and since then he has been railroading. In 1882 he began station 
work, in partnership with his brother Peter ; in 1886 he tumed his atten- 
tion to larger contracts, and during the past nine years he has been work- 
ing chiefly in Canada, in partnership with John McDonald and his 
brother-in-law, John Kirk. His operations during the past decade have 
been large ones and have netted him handsome profits, enabling him to 
amass a comfortable fortune. 

Mr. Westerdahl married Miss Bergliot Ormbrak, a native of Nor- 
way, and they have one son, William P., bom August 30, 1888, now a 
bookkeeper in the Union State Bank of Minneapolis. Since he took up 
his residence in this country, Mr. Westerdahl has made two visits to 
his native land, in 1904 and again in 1909, the last time being accompanied 
by his son and his two sisters and their husbands. His residence in 
Minneapolis is 1518 Emerson avenue, North. 

Nels M. Pearson. — Having begun on a low rung of the ladder of 
attainments, Nels M. Pearson has labored diligently since coming from 
Sweden, his native land, to this country, and by dint of perseverance, 
untiring energy, and a wise use of his faculties and opportunities, is 
rapidly making his way upward, and is proving himself in every respect 



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764 SWEDISH-AMERICANS OF MINNESOTA 



a useful and worthy citizen. As proprietor of the Rising Sun Butter 
Market, at No. 237-241 Twelfth avenue, South, he is carrying on a sub- 
stantial mercantile business, having built up a large and remunerative 
trade in this vicinity. He was bom, November 29, 1865, in Kverrestad 
parish, Skine, a son of Per and Boel (Palson) Manson, farmers. He is 
one of a family of six children, the names of the others being as follows : 
Hanna, wife of Nils Kron, corporal in a regiment of infantry; Mans, a 
carpenter; Marie, wife of Nils Cederlund, a painter and decorator; Per, 
a farmer; and Elna, widow of Per Olson, who was a farmer by 
occupation. 

In common with the boys of his neighborhood, Nels M. Pearson 
was educated in the district schools, and confirmed in the Lutheran 
church, after which he worked for awhile on the home farm. He subse- 
quently worked for some time in a brickyard, most of the time in Skine, 
although he spent one year thus employed in Denmark. In the fall of 
1887 he went home to assist in rebuilding his father's house, which had 
been destroyed by fire, and remained there about six months. Ambitious 
to improve his financial opportunities, Mr. Pearson then started for 
America, where so many of his countrymen had already established com- 
fortable homes, and early in 1888 arrived in Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
He was employed in various ways the first few months after coming 
here, among other things working on the streets. Accepting a position 
in a coal yard in the fall of that year, he remained there until April, 1889. 
when he entered the employ of John Dahl, a dealer in butter, cheese and 
eggs, for whom he drove a delivery team for a year. The ensuing sum- 
mer he again worked on the streets, but in the fall returned to the store 
of Mr. Dahl, for whom he worked until 1891. In that year, in company 
with Henry Anderson, Mr. Pearson bought out Mr. Dahl, and until 1897 
these two enterprising men carried on an excellent business. Mr. Pear- 
son then bought the interests of his partner, and since that time has 
conducted the business alone, and by means of good management has 
built up a thriving trade, his market being patronized by those who 
demand the best of his line of products that are to be obtained. 

In 1897 Mr. Pearson married Miss Blenda Maria Larson, who was 
born in Sweden, her birth occuring in Virestad parish, Smiland. With 
the thrift characteristic of the Swedes, Mr. Pearson has achieved success 
in his business operations, and by good management has acquired prop- 
erty of much value. Mr. Dahl formerly owned the building now occu- 
pied by Mr. Pearson, but leased the ground. When Mr. Pearson pur- 
chased the business and the building, he also acquired title to the three 
lots on which the building stands. He likewise owns a building lot 
between his place and Washington avenue, and a valuable lot in Little 
Falls, Minnesota, and has also forty acres of wooded land in Steams 
county, Minnesota. Fraternally Mr. Pearson is a member of the Modem 
Woodmen of America. 



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