(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "A Journey Round the Library of a Bibliomaniac: Or, Cento of Notes and Reminiscences Concerning ..."

Google 



This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 

to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 

to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 

are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other maiginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 

publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing tliis resource, we liave taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 
We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain fivm automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attributionTht GoogXt "watermark" you see on each file is essential for in forming people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liabili^ can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 

at |http: //books .google .com/I 



BlLl^.tH 




Sim: 













i 







JOURNET ROUND 



THS 





OF 

A BIBLIOMANIAC: 

OB, 

CENTO OF NOTES AND REMINISCENCES 

CONCEBNING 

RARB, CURIOUS, AND VALUABLE 

BOOKS. 



By WILLIAM DAVIS, 

Author of << The Olio of Bibliographical and Literary Anecdotes 

and Memoranda." 



I-. 



UonlKon : 

Pbimtw for W. DAVIS, Bookbeixbr, 
At iht B§dfwrd Library^ Southampton Row, RuueU Square* 

IMJ. 






^^^ 



j?-^ 



(vRO CO' I 



/C-. 



FEB 3 1892 



Manhall, Printer, Kentoa^. Bniiitwlek<«q. 



PREFACE. 



The following Work is neither a Satire like 
Swift's " Gulliver's Travels/* nor a pure Voyage 
Imaginaire like that of our Flying Friend, 
Peter Wilkins ; but a Journey, which, although 
short in its result, has been somewhat longer 
in the performance than might seem consonant 
to modern ideas of quick travelling ; and, if 
it partake in no slight degree of the dust and 
dullness usually attendant on the Biblioma- 
niac's road, let us hope that the showers of 
Spring may have imparted some of their 
freshness to a few favoured spots^ and rendered 
the account of this Journey, if not very enter- 
taining, at least endurable from its presumed 
utility ;— and the Author's aim will be amply 
achieved, if what Warton says of Archbishop 
Parker's Psalter, be also said of this Journey^ 
" that it may be deemed a fortunate acquisi^ 
Hon to those capricious Students who labour 
to collect a Library of Rarities ''^ 



/■ 



** Tbere is % kSnd of Physiognomy in the Titlos of Books no lest 
than in the Faoes of Men, by which a skilful obserrer will as well 
know what to etptti from the one as the other." 



.% 



comncNTs. 



A)idt«iiu Fiof^ntiuo {G. B.) L'Adamo 33 

Appitmos de Bellas CiVilibas • 6 

Amtotelis Poetica, Oipon 1794 91 

Am Memorii^idi Notabilis, per figuras •••• ••••• 1 

Alfaeiin Britannicsj by Myles Davies •.•........•. 49 

Auctores Classici in asuiii Delphioi — Marqais of Lans- 
doirne's, Duke of Roxbarghe'a, Lord Berwick's, and 
other copies ..•.. ..••..••••• .,..•• 6& 

Bac0fi*8 (Sir F.) Works, best ediiian 76 

Bale's (Johan) God's Promyses unto Man ••• 16 

iBaltiAiore's (Lord) Gandia Poetica •.••.••••...••• 77 

Barkiefield's (Richard) Affectionate Shepherd 22 

JBartholomteus de Proprietatibas rernm.... • 7 

Bath6 of Titns (Antient Paintings of the) copied by Carloni 94 
Behnes' (W.) Engraving of Francis the First's Portrait... 67 

Benlolre's Theophila •• 44 

Blond (Le) etl^Cbau, Cabinet d'Orleans 85 

Biblia Sacra, Latine Ynlgata, Moguntl^iO 3 

— Polyglotta. Comphtti 1614, &c 9 

Blufedell (H.) Collection of Statues, &c 93 

Bouchet; LesS^r^es de.. ..•••...•....•.....•.•• 34 

Boze; Monnoies de France ...•...•••. 70 

Breydenbach (Bern de) Peregrinatio in Montem Syon, &c. S 

Brubo; Spaccio della Bestia Trionfante 53 

Bruno's Expulsion of the Triumphant Beast 68 

Bruscambille ; (Euvres de ........••«• 33 

l^ant's Ancient Mythology 82 

Bash's (W.) Voyage from Lambome to London ............ 30 

Butler's (Sam.) Budibras, First Edition 47 

■ Townley's Translation 60 

with Dr. Nash's Notes 6i 

Cabinet du Roi de France 66 

d'Orleans, par Le Blond et La Chan 86 

Carre (T.) Itinerarium • 41 

Lyra - 42 



Ti COKTENTS. 

FAGir 

Caxton (W.) Recuyell of the Historyes of Troye 7 

Cervantes Don Quixotte, First and Second Editions ...... 28 

Ibarra Edition 28 

' Translations by Shelton^ Jarvis, 

Smollett^ and Motteux .«,•• 29 

Charles (King) the First^s Works 53 

Chine; Grandes Batailles de la^ (par Cochin) ^.,, 94 

Christie's Disquisition upon Etruscan Vases 92 

Chute's (R.) Beantie Dishonoured 21 

Ciceronis Opera Philosophica, Delphini. — Means of 

distinguishing the True from the Spurious Edition ... 56 

Clarendon's (Lord) History of Charles II 51 

Confessions de Rotfsseau — Explication des noms laisses en 

blanc 95 

Coningsby's (Earl of) Collections concerning the Manor of 

Marden 60 

Coryat's (T.) Crudities (List of Plates in) 4to 31 

De Lolme, Constitution de I'Angletenre 78 

Dialogues of Creatures Moralized 11 

Dick's (Sir W.) Lamentable and Distressed Case....... 52 

Dido, a Tragedy, by Marlowe and Nash 21 

Diodorus Siculus; — Booth's English, and Macault's 

French Translation of. 57 

Dodsley's Old Plays, Fine Paper, 1780 84 

Dryden's Absalom and Achitopel; Key to 63 

Fenelon, Directions pour la Conscience d'un Roi 65 

Telemachus, 4to. 1734 68 

Foxe's (John) Actes and Monuments 11 

Gethin's Lady Grace) Remains 76 

Googe's (B.) Eglogs, Epytaphes, and Sonnets 23 

Hackluyt's Voyages — Means of Detecting the Reprint 

of the Cadiz voyage 24 

Hall Stevenson's Crazy Tales, &c 34 

Harvey's (Gabriel; Three Letters 17 

Letters and Sonnets ........^ 17 

Uawkesworth's Account of Captain Cook's First Voyage 
round the World ; Means of distinguishing the Ftrst 

Edition of. 81 



CONTEIfJS. VII 

PAGE 

ReaUi's (James) Chronicle of the Ciyil War> (list of 

Plates contained in) ••••, 46 

Heinsins deContempta Mortis, on vellum ••• 38 

Histriola-— Life of Matthew, Archbishop of Canterbury «.. 12 

Hog-Faced Gentlewoman 41 

Holland (H.) Herwologia; — (List of Portraits in) 36 and 37 

Hollinshed's Chronicles •• 22 

Homeri Batrachomyomachia, 4to, I486, and Maittaire's 

Fac-simile of ditto 8 and 9 

Horatii Opera Sedani -. 38 

Joannis de Janua, 1460 , 6 

Johnson's (Dr. S.) Journey to the Western Islands, First 
Edition, 1775 82 

Ksmpier's (E.) History of Japan; by Scheuchzer 63 

Kmg's (Dr. W.) Works 70 

Toast, a Poem 70 

Knight's (R. P.) Remains of the Worship of Priapus 86 

(S.) Life of Dr. J. Colet ^ 61 

of Erasmus 61 

Lazarillo de Tormes; Historie of, translated by David 

Rowland 19 

Life of a Virgyn cally'd Petrouylla 9 

Madden's Memoirs of the 20th Centnry 66 

Marlborough Gems .'. 86 

Marlowe and Nash's Tragedie of Dido 2i 

Mottley, (John) Author of Joe Miller's Jests 69 

(Colonel) Anecdote of 69 

Museum Worsleyanum 91 

Nash's (T.) Have with you to Saffron Walden '. 17 

Neale's (Sir T.) Directions how to Travel 52 

Newes from Scotland, or Life of Dr. Fian 21 

Northumberland Household Book 80 

Novum Testamentum, Sedani 38 

Parkeri (Mat.) De Antiquiiate,Ecclesiae Britannicae 15 

Peele's fGeorge) Old Wives' Tale 22 

Powell's (T.) Passionate Poet ^ 24 



ym « CONTINTS. 



PnideDti«8 Delphini, 4to , ^M 

A Goodly PrymUr in Englysbe , 10 

^balBoram Codei;^ Latine 4 and ^ 

Psalter (Arclibishop Parker's) 19 

Parehas bis Pilgrimes ^...., 40 

Ricraft's Survey of England's Champioas, (List of Piirtraits 

tberein) 49 

m Peealiar Characters of tbe Oriental Langvages ••• 4S 



Sandys's (6.) Travels tbrongh Taritey, &e 

Sedan Virgil, Horace, and New Testament ^8 

Servetns de Trinitate 01 

Shakspeare's Venos and Adonis, a Poem .•••• M 

Plays, 1st. 2nd. 3rd. & 4th Editions.. .S6 and 2C 

' Portrait, by Droesbont, and various details 

respeeting bis Editors, &c. &e 26 to 99 

Sbebbeare's Letters to tbe People of England 71 

. Severe Epitaph on Sir D R 73 

Skelton's Chaplet of Laarell — Merie Tales and Works 14 

Southern's (John) Pandora 18 

Speculum Humans Salvationis 2 

Stafford's (Marchioness of) Views in Orkney) «... 93 

Statins Delphini, 4to M 

Stedman's Surinam ....••••• t.^. 92 

Tagliacozzi Opera • * 19 

Terry's (E.) Voyage to East India (List of Plates in) 44 

Three Voyages to Greenland 30 

Unkind e Deserter of Loyall Men and Trqe Friends^ by 
N. French , d3 

ViRoiLii Opera, Zar^e5^Pa/>er, Elzevir 1676 54 

vera Edit. 1696 60 

Sedani ,.», ^ 38 

Webbe's (W.) Discourse of English Poetrie , 1^ 

Wits; (The) or. Sport upon Sport, (by R. Cox) 45 

Yfttes (James) Castell of CQurtesie ».>••«,•••«, ,.• t8 



JOURNEY 



ROUND 



^ ^(bliommint^i Sfibtars. 



Ars Memotrandi, NoiahUu per Figtaras SoangeUttarum, 
vd Memoriale Quaiuor Evangelittarum. — Small F6H0, — 
Method of Ltaming by heart the Four EvangeKtts. 

The earliest Memoria Teehnica extant, and among the 
first Books of Images with the text/ as well as one of the 
earliest specimens of wooden block printing. 

At Talleyrand's Sale in 1816^ a copy sold for 36/. 158. 

Described by Heinekin, *' Idee des Estampes/' p. 304. 
&e, and in ** Bibliotheca Spenceriana/' by Dibdin. 
Heinekin has not ventored to assign its date. - Mr. Dibdin 
thinks 1430; and Home, in his ^* Bibliography/' seems to 
coincide with this date being given it. 



* Being only preceded by Der Entkrist-^Of Antichrist, small 
fi>Ko; and ** The Fifteen Signs which Precede the Last Jadgmeut" — 
both in German. 

B 



2 JOURNEY ROUND A 

Speculum Humarue Sahaiionu. Small Folio, EdiHo 
Prima vehuiaiii, temtameu artit impreuoria, — Without 
place or date. Supposed to have been printed between 
the years 1440 and 1457. 

This first edition of the l^i^eculum must be considered as 
the most interesting and curious of books. Guttenbnrg, 
the printer^ evidently became acquainted with moveable 
types during its progress, as about one third of the Book 
is printed in characters cut on wooden blocks, juid the 
remainder with rude moveable types.- 

This work consists of sixty-three leaves, printed only on 
one side. The five first contain a Latin Preface, and the 
others oach represent a wood engraving in vignette form, 
with historical events, taken from the Bible, and enclosed 
between architectural gothic borders, with e^anatory 
inscriptions. 

Heinekin, p. 134, gives a detailed list of these vignettfMi* 

There are two editions of this Latin S^cuium, which 
are nearly of equal rarity and value. 

The first is the one, where the text of the Cuts 1, 2, 4, 
11, 13, 14, 16, 17, 21, 22, 26, 27, 46, and 65, is printed on 
wooden blocks, whilst the text of the Preface and of the 
remainder of the Cuts, is printed with moveable types. 

In the second edition, the whole of the text is executed 
with moveable types. A* fac simile of th# last plate of the 
2nd. edition, will be found ixk H^inekin, p; 443. 

At the Sale of the Merly Library, 1813, a copy of th^ 
first edition sold for 315/. and also a copy of the Flemish 
edition for 252/. which latter is now in Earl Spencer's 
collection. 



BIBLIOMANIAC'i LIBRARY. 3 

T. H. Home, in his *' Introduction to Bibliography/' 
Appendix XI. has given a fac simile of the first plate, traced 
from Mr. Willett's Copy. 



BibKa SaerUf Latine Vulgata, — 2 vols* folio. — Mogantie. 

This first edition of the Bible, and probably the first 
work printed with metal types, 'according to Heinekin, 
C Id6e/' p. 260,) made its appearance between 1450 and 
14^2 : that it was began in 1450 by Gutenburg seems to be 
agreed on all sides : — 1455 is the date usually iEtssigned by 
bibliographers as the period of its publication. 

** It is only necessary to see this first Essay,'' says 
Heinekin, '* to be convinced of the amazing pains and 
expence which must have attended so arduous an under- 
taking." 

The entire work (according to Lichtenberger) consists 
of 641 leaves, divided into two very large volumes, folio, 
having neither title-page, signatures, nor catch- words : the 
initial letters of the different books and chapters, are not 
printed, but painted by the illuminators, in order, as is 
conjectured, (De Bure Bibliographie, No. 25, p. 38,) the 
more readily to vend them as manuscripts. 

There are copies in the Bodleian Library, King's Library, 
and in those of Earl Spencer, Sir M. Sykes, Mr. G. Nicol, 
and the Royal Library at Paris. Those of Mr. G. Nicol, 
an4 one of the copies in the French Royal library are on 
vellam, as also the Hon. T. Grenville's copy, purchased 
recently at the sale of the McCarthy Library. 



JOUBNSY ROUND A 



Pfahmarmm Codex^ Latime. — ^Folio. Moguntue. J. Fust et 
P. Schoiffer, 1457. — ^Printed on TeUiiiii. 

This is a book of excessire rarity — the first book, and 
supposed (until the discorery of Pope Nicholas's LitenB 
MmdmlgeMtiarum) to have been the first article printed with 
a*date aflSxed. Baron Heinekin, in his Idee Gemerak 
<fim€ Collection Complete d^Estampes, &c. 8to. 1771> has 
most amply described it, and given specimens of its bean- 
tiful initial letters and typographical execution, the former 
of the size of the original, the latter in smalL Of five 
different copies, known to and described by Heinekin, the 
one in the Imperial Library at Vienna he considered as 
matchless, and I believe, notwithstanding other copies 
have been since discovered and described, it still retains 
the same character. 

There is a very superb copy, in the finest possible pre- 
servation, in the King's Library, procured for his Majesty 
George the Third, from the Library of the University of 
Gottingen. It is sumptuously bound in purple velvet, with 
embossed gold comers and clasps ; the title, royal crown, 
and cypher, in solid gold, are impressed on the sides; and 
It has a blue morocco case, in which it is preserved. Four 
hundred pounds were given for this Book, and the binding 
cost about two hundred pounds more.* 



In " Bibliotbeca Speoceriana," Yol. i. p. 107, a fac simile of the 
fint letter of this noble Psalter is given, eoloared exactly after the 
•riginal, whereas, Heinekin's, p, 964^ and Home's, in the ** Intro- 
duction to Bibliography," YoL i. p. 251, are in black only. Hei- 
nekin says, that in the first Bible, 1450 or 1452, no trace of engraving 
IS to be (bond ; but, in this P^ter is shown most completely, the 
skin attained by the artists on wood of that period, and the as* 
made of them in printing. 



BIBLIOMANIAC*! LIBRARY. 9 

Foamier^ in his Dictionnaire de BibKographie, says — 
" Nous ne serions point snrpris qn'un exemplaire de ce 
livre 8*il se presentait en yente publique, fut adjug6 i Idiou 
20^000 livres." 



Psalmorum Codex, Latine, 1459; 

The edition of 1459, although of tlie same size, and By 
the same printers, differs in some respects ; and I must 
refer to Home's " Introduction to Bibliography," for a 
list of the authorities where these variations hare been 
quoted. It is nearly as great a rarity as the preceding 
edition, being printed with the same characters. According^ 
to Dibdin, in his *' Bibliotheca Spenceriana," Vol. i. p. 117, 
" What may give this second impression some additional 
value in the estimation of the curious is, that it contains 
the first printed text of the Athanasian CreedJ*^ 

A copy of this second impression, at the sale of the Merly 
Library in 1813, sold for 63/. 

Meerman and his Translator, Jansen, appear to be greatly 
in error, when the latter says — *' Ces deux Editions oni 
etefaites avec des lettres gravees, et non avec des caracteres 
de fonte^ dlnsi qu'il est mal dit dans le Dictionnaire de 
Moreri, article Imprimerie ; et m^me avec des Majuscules 
dans la mani^re des Missals Romains. Dans la premiere 
qui resemble d la seconde, il y a 288 Capitales, parfaite- 
ment sculpt^es et imprimees en differentes couleurs.'' 

De V Invention de VImptimerie, 8\'o. 1809. p. 1Q» 



6 JOURNEY ROUND A 

Joannit de Janua, Summa, qwB vacatur Ckitkolicon, Folio. 
2 torn. Mogantiae. (Fast et Scho jffer.) 1400. 

This was one of the first productions of the press, aftel* 
the inrention of printing; and, according to Mr. Dibdin^ 
the fourth book printed with a date. John Balbus, or 
John of Genoa, a Dominican, was the author of this ancient 
Lexicon, and bestowed many years* labour in its compila- 
tion. Copies on vellum exist, but are extremely rare. A 
copy of this kind is in the library of the Bight Hon. T. 
Grenville, formerly belonging to the Duke de la VaUiere, 
and purchased by its present possessor, at the sale of the 
McCarthy Library. 

At the sale of Dr. Mead's Collection, 1754 and 1755, a 
copy was sold for 45^ 18s. and purchased for the King of 
France, who sent over a commission of 150/. 

R. Willett,£sq. bought West's copy in 1773 for 35/. 3s. Od« 
and at the sale of the Merly Library in 1813, the same 
copy sold for 60/. 18s. 

Four or five other copies have been sold in different 
collections within the last six years, most of which hare 
brought from fifty to sixty guineas each. 



Appianuide Btlhu CivilUms Latine Regii. Folio. 1468. 

Said not to have been noticed by any bibliographer. — ^A 
copy was purchased by Mr. Heber, at the sale of the Rev. 
B. Heath, 1810, for 2/. 9s. 



BIBOOBUNIACIi LIBRARY. 7 

Caxtan (WyUyam) Becmfdl of ike HUtorytM ef Tr&ye, iy 
Baaul k Feure^ Folio. Colen. 1471. 

The first book printed in the English language. 

The Duke of Deyonshire possesses a copy, porchased 
firom the Roxlmrghe Collection for 1060/. 18s. which 
or^^aDy belonged to Elizabeth 6ray» Queen of Edward 
theFourth* 

A copy sold in Wesfs Sale, 1773, for 32/. lis. an im- 
perfect copy sold at Lloyd's Sale in 1816^ for 126/. 



BorthoUmuBw de Proprietatilnu Rerwm. Translated into 
English and (Hrinted by Wynkin de Worde. Folio.. 
1482. 

The first book printed on paper madb in England. 

This is a General History of Nature, composed in Latin 
by Bartholomew Glanville^ an English Minorite or Fran- 
ciscan, of the family of the Earls of Suffolk. He flou- 
rished about the year 1360, and appears to have been the 
Pliny of his time. The English version was made by John 
Trevisa, a Cornish man, and Vicar of Barkley in Gioucester- 
shire.* 

At the Duke of Roxburgh's in 1812,. a copy sold for 
70/. 78. An imperfect copy at the Sale of Stanesby Al- 
chome, Esq. in 1813, sold to the Duke of Devonshire for 
lailds. 



*,8ee .DtAHce's '* Illustrations of Shakspeare," Yol. ii. p. 27$. 
tD4 Clarke's ** Repertorium Bibliographicum,'* pp. 195 and 533. 



8 JOURNEY ROUND A 

Breydenbach (Bern, de) Ptregiinatio in Moniem l^an et 
Civitatem Hierusalem. Folio. Moguntiae. Erh. Renwich. 
1486. First Edition.* 

This Rare Account of Travels of the Religious to the 
Holy Land, is perhaps the first printed Book of Travels 
existing, and is adorned with very remarkable Maps and 
Views. The View of Venice is more than five feet long, 
and the Map of the Holy Land is more than three feet 
long, besides many others equally curious. A copy on 
vellum sold at West's Sale in 1773, for 15/. 15s. Copies 
on paper have usually sold at from 21. 12s. 6d. to 3/. 13s. 6d* 
Mr. Townley's Copy, I observe, sold for 12/. 



Idem Opu9. Folio. Per P. Drach. 1400. 

Mr. Roscoe's copy of this edition sold for 15/. 58. whilst 
in a bookseller's catalogue (Priestley's) the same edition 
was marked but 3/. 13s. 6d. 

There is a Flemish translation of the above book, folio^ 
148B, as also a French ditto, folio, 1489. 



Hameri Batrachomyomachia, gr. 4to. — Venet. Leon. Cre- 
tensis. 1486. 

At Askew's Sale, 1775, a copy of this very rare Book 
sold for 14/. 14s. and in 1818, a duplicate from the British 
Museum sold for 10/. 10s. At the Pinelli Sale, 1789, a 
copy of this edition, and another edition, (Gr. et Lat.) 

* Tide in Bib. Harl. ilL 3213. A copy on yellum, and a full 
account of the Book. Also, ^' Bibliotheca Spenceriana^" Vol. iil* 
p. 316. 



BIBLIOMANIAC'S UBRART. 9 

without any indication of date or printer, but conjectured 
to be still earlier, and consisting of only twenty-six leaves, 
4to. sold together for 27/. lOs. 6d. 

Maittaire edited in 1721, a fac simile of this very rare 
Book : — 204 copies only were printed ; of these 195 were 
subscribed for, at half-a-guinea in sheets; eight were 
reserved by the Editor for himself; and only one single 
copy remained for public sale. 



Life of a Virgyn cally^d PetronyUa, whom Erie Flaecui 
desired to hii Wyf. 18mo. Emprynted by Pynson. 

A very rare Poetical Tract, consisting only of three 
leaves, 18mo. and which at Townley's Sale in 1814, was 
sold for the very moderate sum of six guineas, or two gui- 
neas per leaf, to Messrs. Longman and Co. 

M. Heber bought a copy at Horne Tooke's Sale in 1813, 
for the sum of six pounds, two shillings, and sixpence. 



Biblia Sacra Polyglotta, veteris et Novi Testamenti; Ue- 
Inraice, Chaldaice, Grace, Sfc. cum tribus interpretationi- 
bu8 Latinis: de mandate at sumptibus Cardinalis D, F. 
Frandsci Ximenes de Cisneros. 6 vols, folio. Compluti, 
Am. Guill. de Brocario. 1514, 1515, 1517. 

The Hebrew Chaldaic Lexicon in the the sixth volume 
is often wanting. — Six hundred copies were printed of this 
costly Polyglott Bible. 

A copy sold in the Merly Collection for 63/. 

Mr. Roscoe's copy, 5 vols, (wanting the Lexicon) brought 
35/. 14s. 



10 JOURNEY ROUND A 

Bat, perhaps the greatest rarities in the book world, are 
the copies printed on Tellum, onlj three or four of whida 
are known to exist : one was in the Royal Library at 
Madrid, another at Turin, and the third (said to have 
been Cardinal Ximenes' own copy) sold at the Pinelli 
Sale, to Count McCarthy for 483/. and at the sale of Count 
^Jtf 'Carthy's Library, it was purchased by G. Hibbert, Esq* 
for the sum of Hxteen thousand one hundred francs, and 
now enriches his Library at Clapham,. Surrey, a treasure 
in itself. 



A Goodly Prymer in EnglyshCy newly corrected and printed 
with certayn€ Godly Meditations and Prayers added ta 
the same, very necessarie and profitable for all them that 
ryghte assuredly understand not the Latine and Greeke- 
tongue, — Imprynted on Vellum, in red and black T)fpes^ 
with emblematical Frontispiece from a Wood-Cut.^^JRy 
JohnByddell. 1535. 

" This Prymer (printed on the 16th day of June, 1535) 
ii the earlyest or first English one I ever saw, or indeed 
ever heard of, in any public or private library in this king* 
dom. The Rev. Mr. John Lewis, (Minister of Margate) 
who examined much into, and made great inquiries after, 
antiquities of this kind, often declared it to be the earliest 
English one he ever saw or discovered : he supposed the 
anthor to be George Joy, whom Fox, in his " Acts," ^c. 
p.H340, col. 2. edit. 1st. cavils much against, for not paj^ 
ing due homage, &c* to Sayntes and Our Lady," &c. 

MS. Note of John WhUe. 

At G. Mason's Sale, 1798, a copy sold for QL Ida. ed. 



BIBLIOMANIAC'! UBBART. 11 

2%e Dialoguei of Creatures Moralized. — bL letter, with 
wood cuts. 4to. and they be to sell upon Powly^s Churche 
Yard. 

It is presumed, according to ** Bibliotheca SteeveDsiana,'' 
"where this book sold for 4/. 14s. 6d. that this was the first 
English edition, and printed, if not translated, by John 
Hastell. 

At the Doke of Roxburgh's Sale, 1812, a copy* sold for 
16/. 15s. probably the same copy, both being described 
as bound in morocco. 



Foxe (John) Acts and Monuments of these Latter and 
PeryUous Days touching Matters of the Churehe. — ^bl. 
letter, folio. 1st. edition. 1563. — Ditto, 2 vols, folio. 
1583.— Ditto, 3 vols, folio. 1684. 

The early editions of this History of Martyrdom in 
England contain numerous wood-cuts ; in some of which 
are real portraits. Sir John Harrington tells us, that 
when Bishop Bonner was shown his portrait (whipping 
Thomas Henshawe) in the Book of Martyrs, on purpose 
to vex him, he laughed at it, saying — " A. vengeance on 
the fool, how could he get my picture drawn so right?'* 

This book was ordered by Queen Elizabeth, to be placed 
in the Common Halls of Archbishops, &c. &c. for the tise 
of the common people, who looked upon it with a venera- 
tion next to the Scriptures themselves. 

The first edition is one of the parest books in our lan- 
guage. 

A large paper copy of the edition of 1684i 3 vols, folio, 
sold among Mr. WiUett's books for 7/. 78. 



12 JOURNEY ROUND A 

The Whole Psalter translated into English Metre, which 
eontaineth an hundreth and fifty Psalms, — Imprinted' by 
John Daye. (1567.) 

(By Archbishop Matthew Parker,) 

There are two copies of thiir anonymous version in the 
Bodleian Library, Oxford; in the printed catalogue of 
which, this Psalter is erroneously attributed to John 
Keeper, an obscure Poet. There are also copies in the 
Canterbury Cathedral Library, and in the Collection of 
the Hon. T. Grenville. Dr. Farmer's copy sold for 3/. 6s. 

It is so scarce, that Mr. Strype tells us he could never 
get sight ot it;* and Warton, in his *' History of English 
Poetry,*' points it out as a great rarity, adding, " It oer- 
tainly would he deemed a fortunate acquisition to those 
capricious Students, who labour to collect a library of 
rarities»Y^ 

Its rarity is conjectured to arise from the circumstance 
of only a few copies having been given away to the nobility 
by the Archbishop's wife Margaret, to whom Fuller, in his . 
^' Church History," has given a very high character. 

Parker, according to a scarce tract in the possession of 
Mr. Todd,t (said by Mr. Parke, in his edition of Nugse 
Antiquae, to be of a libellous tendency) lost all his livings, 
on account of his marriage, in the 2nd. year of Queen 



* See Master's Hist, of C. C C C. 

t Hist, of Eog. Poetry, Vol. iii. p. 1S6. 

X *' HiiTRioLA, a little SUrye of the AcUs and U/e of Matthew^ 
Arehbithappe of Canterbury,** dated 1574. 



BIBUOMANIAG's LIBRARY. 13 

Mary's reign. But, according to Harrington, '* being now 
made Archbishop of Canterbury, dissembled not his mar- 
riage, as Cranmer, in Henry VIII.*^" time, was forced to 
doe; which, because some have taken occasion to note 
with too black inke, to exclude him from the reputation of 
a rubricated martyr ; and have cy ted the testimony of his 
sonn's widdow, yet living, that she was carryed in a trunke, 
and by misfortune almost styfled, by being set by an igno* 
rant porter with her head downward, (which talke goes 
very currant among Papists ;) I can truly affirme that this 
is a meer fiction, for I have examined the gentlewoman 
herself, (being of kin to my wife, and a Rogers by name) 
and she hath sworne to me, she never reported nor ever 
herself heard of anie such misfortune." 

But now, though this Archbishop (Parker) dissembled 
not his marriadge, yet Q. Elizabeth would not dissemble her 
dislike of it. For whereas it pleased her often to come to 
Ids house, in respect of her favour to him that had beene 
her mother's chaplayn, being once above the rest greatlie 
feasted, at her parting from thence, the Archbishop and his 
wife being together, she gave him very special thanks, with 
gratious and honourable tearms, and then looking on his 
wife, ' And you, (saith she) Madam I may not call you, 
and MUtris I am ashamed to call you, so I know not what 
to call you, but yet I doe thanke you.' " § 



§ For further details, see Lort's Observations on Warton's Ac- 
count, in '' Gentleman's Magazine," 1781, p. 566 ; Clarke's Account 
of the Bodleian Library, p. Q6 ; and Harrington's Nug;» AntiqusB, 
Yol. ii. p. 13. 



14 JOURNEY ROUND A 

Skehan (Master J.) Merie Tales.— bL lei. l%mo. ImL 
Imp^ hy Thomas Colwell, (no date,) 

t 
See Campbell's Essay on English Poetry, Vol. i. p.lOi» ^ -if 

for acconnt of this author and his demerits, which seoD m^b, 
not inconsiderable for his age. 

in a note, Mr. Steevens, at whose sale this book brought ^^t 
51. 15s. 6d. says, he never saw another copy. 



SkeltmCs (J.) Pithy, Pleasannt, and Profitable WorkMs. 
12mo. 1568. 

Boxburghe, 1812, 322. lis. 
Strettell, 1820, 16/. 5s. 6d. 



A Ryghte Delectable Traytise upon a Goodly Garkmde, or 
Chaplet of Laurell, by Maister Skelton, Poet Laureuie. 
4to. bl. lett. Imprynted by Richard Faokes. 1523. 

Bought at the Pearson Sale, 1788, for 7/. 17s. 6d. it is 
now in the King's Collection, and presumed to be unique. 

This rare volume, one of the scarcest in the English 
language, has the author's portrait at full-length on th^ 
back of the title, with a branch of laurel in his hand.*' 

Skelton, who was Poet Laureate to Oxford University, 
and Tutor to Prince Henry, afterwards Henry YIII. was 
a determined enemy to Cardinal Wolsey ; his remarkable 
boldness, in singly daring, in his poetical character, to 



im^v 



* See Bihliotheca Pear8<miana, 2421. 



BIBUOMANIACi UBBART. 1^ 

ttack t^e Cardinal's imperious maimer at the Cooncil 
^Soardy is shown as a remarkable coincidence by iVeoe, in 
9iis Cursory Remarks on English Poets. The fifteentfi 
^mrticle of the charges against the Cardinal, by the Parlia- 
xnent of 1529, being precisely the same, only difested of 
^hyme : — 

" Thea lo the Chamber of Stars, 

*'. All matters there he mars ; 

** CiappiDg his rod on the board, 

^ No man dare speak a ward ; 

*' For he hath all the sajiug, 

^ Without any renaying. 

** He roUeth in his records, 

** He sajeth, how say ye, my Lords, 

** Is not my reason good? 

^ Good even, good Robin Hood« 

** Some say, Yes, and some 

** Sit still, as they were dumb." 



Pdrkeri (Mat) de Antiquitate EceleM Britannic(B. ¥oL 
John Day. 1572. 

(See West's Catalogue, 1773, No. 3936.) 

Of this edition, only twenty-five copies are said to hare 
been printed, and very few are extant in a complete state* 
Indeed, Dr. Drake, who printed an augmented edition of 
the same book in folio, 1720, asserts that he had consolted 
twenty-one different copies, and found most of them de- 
fective : some of them had not the Life of Augustine ; and 
in others, the Life of Cardinal Pole, or that of Archbishop 
Parker, was not found. 

An edition was also printed at Hanover in 1005, in folio. 

A copy of the original edition sold at Dr. Rawlinson's 
Sale for 44/. and one at Mr. Bindley's for 45/. 3s. 



16 JOURNEY ROUND A 

There is an exceedingly curious and valuable copj of 
this book in the Archbishop's Library at Lambeth^ enriched 
with MS. Kotes and old deeds, with a Letter from Dr. 
Ducarel to Archbishop Seeker, dated July 1758, giving a 
particular account of the ancient Cartas, &c. 

There is also a copy in the Eton College Library, with 
Archbiihap Parker'u MS. Corrections of the Proof SkeeU, 
in hit ovm hand-writing^ Mr. Tutet's copy, complete, 
collated by Dr. Rawlinson, as well as by Dr. Drake for his 
new edition. 

See Clarke's Repertorium, p« 103 and 139. 



A Tragedye or Enterlude^ manyfesting the chefe promyiet 
of God unto Man in all ages of the Olde Lawefrom the 
fall of Adam to the Incamacyon of the Lorde Jesus 
Christ. Compykd by Johan Bale, Anno Domini 1538. 
Black Letter, 4to, now first Imprynted by John Chark- 
wood, Lond. 1577. 

G. Steevens, 1800, 12/. 15s. 
Duke of Boxburghe, 1812, 12/. 

This performance was reprinted in Dodley's Collection 
of Old Plays. A variety of information respecting the 
Author, (who was appointed Bishop of Ossory in 1553,) 
and his various works may be found in Reed and Jones's 
Biographia Dramatica, Vol. i. p. 17, &c. and also in 
Ames History of Printing. 



BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBRARY. 17 

Harvit/'9( Gabriel) Three Proper, Wittie, Familiar Letten 
"between two Univerntie Men, touching the Earthquake 
in April last, and eur English Reformed Versifying, 4lo. 
Bynneman. 1580. 

Strettell, 1820. 4Z. I8s. 



Harvey* s (Gabriel) Letters and Sonnets, Ato, 1592. 
Saunders, 1818, 11. 12s. 6d. Strettell, 1820. 11, lOs. 



Nash's (T,) Have with you to Saffron Walden, (Harvey^e 
Residence;) or, Gabriel Harvey^s Hunt is up. 4to, 1596. 

Reed, 5/. 128. 6d. 

The Archbishop of Canterbury's order, in 1599, for 
stopping the rival invectives of Nash and Harvey, com- 
mands, ** That aU Nash's Bookes and Dr. Harvey's 
Bookes, be taken wheresoever they may be found, and 
that none of the said Bookes be ever printed hereafter." 

This circumstance, as Mr. D'Israeii observes, (Calama- 
ties of Authors, voi.ii. p. 18.) accounts for the excessive 
rarity of ** Harvey's Foure Letters, 1692," and that 
literary scourge of Nash's, ** Have with you to Saffiron 
W^den," pamphlets now as costly as if they consisted of 
leaves of gold. 

See Ritson's Bibliog. Poet. 1802, p. 284. 
6ough*s Topography, i. 358. 
Beloe's Anecdotes of Literature, i. 260, and 
Repertorinm Bibliographicum, 283 and 646. 

c 



18 JOURNKY BOUKP A 

Ftflet (Jwmiu Senrimj^wum) CoiieU of Comrte$U, wher^- 
mmio i$ wJ^agmed ike HoUe rf HmmiiUie, wUktke Ckariot 
^CkaHiiiMikeremniommmtxed. bLIeii. 4t&. Ltmd. Impr. 
«y Jokm Woife. 1582. 

G. Steeyensy 1800, tL lOs. 

At Saimder3*8 8de-Room, 1818, 2ZL 2s. 



Southern's (John) Pamdora^ the Mmeigue of the Beautiei 
of hii MiMhreete Diana, hlach letter. 4to. 1684. 



This rarity sold at King and Lochee's, Dec. 30th, 1807, 
for 12/. 12s. 

It does not appear to exist in any of the principal libraries, 
private or public; or, it may be more correct to say, that 
I have not seen it mentioiied in nuj. account of them that 
I have looked into. 



YFeUe, or Weblee* (WUL) Dioeomr$e of EngHek Poetrie, 
together with the Amthov'e Jndgwtent touekmg the Reform^ 
oHonofomr JEngheh Veroe* kLlett. 4to. Lend. Impr. 6y 
John Chmrlemood. 1686. 

Said to be muqne. Sold at T. Pearson's, in 1788, for 
3/. 6s. at 6. Steevens's, 1800, for 8t 8s. and at the Duke 
of Boxbnrghe's, 1812, for 64/. 

o In Steevens's Catalogue, 1809, firom which I hare copied the 
TiUc of this Book, it is printed '' WtbUtU JXiceurte.*' 



\ 



BIBUOMANIAC'A LIBRARY. 19 

The Pleasaunt Hutme of Lazmrilh de Tormei, a l^inmiard, 
wktrem is contained hii Mmrveihui Deedee and Life, 
drawen out of Spanish, by David Rowland of Angleeey. 
hl.lett. Mmatt9vo. Lond, Impr. by AbellJeffes, dweUing 
in the Forettreie without Crepellgate, nere Groub Streete, 
1586. 

In 6. Steevens's Library, a copy sold for 1/. lis. 6d. in 
which was his MS^ Note, where he says he never saw 
another copy. In Bindley's Sale, the same Book sold for 
14/. 



Taoliacozzi, Opera, 4to. Rome. 1591. 

Taliaootius (Gasp.) de Curtomm Chirurgia per Incisi- 
onem, lib. ii. Folio. Venetiis. 1507. 

* 

" This is a writer, who deserved a higher place in Mr. 
Shandy's Library,' than any of those whom Sterne has 
ventured to mention ; and he was the more entitled to 
notice, because his fame has been unjustly and unaccountably 
eclipsed."* 

He had the misfortune, in D'Alembert*s phrase, of 
being trop instruii pour son siecle. 

The first part of the Book contains several chapters on 
the dignity of the face, and its different features ; the fifth 
and sixth chapters, are bestowed upon the nose, and contain 
philosophy enough to have satiated Mr. Shandy himself. 

^ Dr. Fcrriar's IIIiutratioDs of Sterne. 



20 JOURNEY ROUND A « 

Dr. Ferriar seems clearly to have shewn this author to 
have heen the original inventor and artist, who replaced to 
those who had been deprived of it, that ornament of the 
face — the Nose. 

** I have too high an opinion of the genius of the late 
Mr. Hunter, to suppose that he was indebted to Talia- 
cotius for his observations on this subject. I believe thej 
were really discoveries to him ; but there can be no doubt 
that he was anticipated by the Italian author."* 

Taliacotius came surprisingly near the present theory 
of the manner in which the union of living parts is 
effected. Had the true doctrine of the circulation of the 
blood been discovered in his time, he would have been 
deficient in nothing. 

Samuel Butler, in his Hudibras, has shewn that he was 
acquainted with Taliacozzi's work, when in his famous 
simile, he alludes to it in his usual jocose manner — 

** So learaed Taliacotias from 

*^ The brawny part of Porter's bum, 

" Cut supplemental Noses, which 

** Would last as long as parent breech." 



* Dr. Ferriar's Illustrations, p. 113 to 124^ give verj copiow 
details and extracts on this subject 



BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBRARY. 21 

Newei from Scotland, declaring the damnable life of Ds. 
FiAN, a notable Sorcerer , who wai burned at Edenbrough 
in Januarie last, 1501 , which Doctor was Regitder to the 
Devilly that sundrie times Preached at North Bariekt 
Kirke to a number of notorious Witches. With Cuts. 4#o. 
blach letter. Published according to the Scottish Copie. 
Printed by William Wright, 

In Bibliolheca Steevensiana, 1800, No, 1791, a copy 
sold for 01, 6s. ; and, according to Mr. Steevens's MS. 
Note, he never saw another. 

Pearson, 1788, 12s. 6d. 
Brand, 1808, 01, 



Chute^s (A,) Beautie Dishonoured, written under the title 
of Shore^s Wife, 4to. Lond, Imprinted by J. Wolfe, 
1503. 

" Of this Poem,'* says Mr. Steevens, (at whose Sale in 
1800, it sold for 3/. 15s.) •* I never saw another copy.'** 
See Bib. Steevensiana, p. 45. 



The Tragedie of Dido, Queen of Carthage, Played by 
the Children of her Maiestie^s Chappelt, Written by 
Christopher Marlowe, and Thomae Nash, Gent. 4lo» 
Printed by the Widdowe Owin, Lond, 1504. 

Only two copies of this play are said to exist: one- was 
purchased by Mr. Malone, at Dr. Wright*s Sale in 178T, 
for 16/. 168. ; the other purchased by Mr. Reed for Is. 6d. 



22 JOURNEY ROUND A 

and presented by him in Exchange to 6. A. Steevens;-^ 
sold at the latter gentleman's sale for 17^ in the year 1800. 
But it appears that Mr. Reed did not lose by the Book he 
received in exchange, which was Harrison's Edition of 
Hollinshed's Chronicles, black letter, 2 vols. Folio. 1587, 
Major Peirson's copy ; and which, at Reed's sale in 1817, 
produced his executors 23/. lOs. 

Mr. Flackton, Bookseller, of Canterbury, is said to have 
sold a copy of " Dido" for two shillings. 

The Marquis of Stafford possesses a copy of this rare 
play, in his collection at Ashridge. 



Bamefield's (Richard) Affectionate Shepherd, containing 
the Complaint of Daphnis for the Love of Ganymede, 
4to. 1594. 

Extremely rare: sold in Bibliotheca Reediana, No. 
6885, for 15/. 10s. 



G(eorge) P(eele) — 

The Old Wives' Tale, a Pkasaunt Conceited Comedie, 
played by the Queene^i Majettie'i Players, 4to. Impr, 
by John Danter. 1505. 

At Dr. Wright's sale in L787, a copy sold for 5/. 7s. 6d. 
which I belicTe to be the one now in the Royal Library. — 
At O. StecTens's sale in 1800, the only other copy known. 



BIBLIOMANIAC'S UBRART. S9 

was sold to Mr. Nicol for 12/. ; and probably the same 
copy which Mr. Clarke, in his Rep ertorium Bibliographic 
cum, has perhaps^ fron an error of the press, represented 
the Duke of Roxbnrghe as only having given i2s. for« ^nd 
at whose sale in 1812, it brought 12/. 7s. The authors of 
the Biographia Dramatica, speaking of this Camedy, say,. 
" Perhaps the reader will join with us in sHppMing that 
MOton had read this very scarce dramatic piece" — and go 
on to shew, from the similarity of incidents^ &c. that his. 
" Comas'* probably derived his origin from it. The Rev. 
Mr. Todd, in his edition of Milton's Works, vol. vi. p. 222„ 
also seems to think that Milton sketched his plan of 
*' Comns" from this play. The names of some of the 
characters, as Sacripant, Carebus, &c. are adopted fronk 
the *' Orlando Furioso." 



^ooge (Bamabe} Eglogs, Epttaph bs, and Sonkbttbs,. 

' newfy written, • bl, letter, small Svo, Land, Ifnpr, by. 

Tho, Colwell, for Raffe Newbery, dwelynge in Fleet 

Streetey a little above the Conduit, in the late Shop of 

Tho. Bartelet, 

From Mr. G. Steevens's Catalogue, at whose sale in 
IBOO, a copy sold at 10/. Ids. in whiph was a MS. Note by 
Mr. Steevens, where he says, ** there is no scarcer book 
in the English language ; and that Dr. Farmer, Messrs. 
T. Warton^ and Isaac Reed» had never seen another copy.'" 



94 JOURNEY BOUND A 



Hackhnfet 



The Voyage to Cadiz, which is often wanting, should be 
at the end of Vol. 1. beginning with p. 607 to 610 inclu- 
sive. This has been reprinted. To discover the original 
from the reprint, p. 607 should have eight paragraphs — in 
the reprint there are only seven, which are printed with a 
larger type. The original ends at p. 610, with a wood-cat» 
and a blank page after — the reprint ends with p. 620 ; but 
without tt.e wood-cut, and no blank leaf. 

At the sale of Dr. F. Bernard in 1608, this collection of 
voyages sold for 10s. ! ! ! At G. Steevens*s Sale in 1800» 
a copy sold for 7/. 



Powell, (I7u>.) The Passumate Poet, with a De$criptiom 
of the Tkracian Ismanu, in Verse, 4to. Land, Printed 
by VaLSimmes. 1601. 

** N. B. No other copy of the above has been seen by 
Dr. Farmer, Mr. Steevens, Mr. Reed, or any other dili- 
gent collector." 

Note from Bibliotheca Steevensiana, Lot 1032, where it 
sold for 2/. 17s. 

At the sale of John Woodhouse, Esq. 1803, I find a 
copy described, as in iBvo. or 12mo. with the same date, 
which inclines me to believe it the same copy — ^it sold here 
for 4/. 4s. 



BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBBART. 25 

Venus and Adonis, a Poem, By W, Shakspeare. l2mo. 
1602. 

A copy of this rare Poem, originally Mr. Steevens's, at 
whose sale in 1800, it sold for IL lis. 6d. then Mr. 
Bindley's, and which afterwards passed into the hands of 
Amos Strettell, Esq. was, at the sale of the latter gentle- 
man's library in 1820, sold for 26/. 5s. Mr. Malone had a 
copy, which he bequeathed to the Bodleian Library. Mr. 
Heber also possesses a copy. 



Shakspeare^s ( W,) Comedies, Histories, Tragedies, Sfc. Im- 
printed by Is. Jaggard and E, Blount. 1623. Fi)rst 
Edition, Folio, 

Daly, 1792 ^30 14 3 

Heathcote (title wanting) 37 16 

S. Ireland, 1801 14 14 

Duke of Roxburghe 100 

Sebright, 1807, (title wanting)... 30 10 

Stanley, 1813, (title reprint) ... 37 17 

Sir P. Thompson, 1815 41 

Saunders's Sale-Room, Feb.l8 18 
ajine original copy of the first 

edition, in a genuine state 121 16 

The condition of so rare a Book as the first edition of 
Shakspeare, is a matter of no little importance to the lover 
of fine-conditioned and really important Books ; the appa- 
rent difference in the prices for which the various copies 
before enumerated have sold, may therefore readily be 
accounted for. 



26 JOURNEY ROUND A 

The Second Edition. Folio. 1632. 
Third Edition. Folio. 1664. 
Fourth Edition. Folio. 1685. 

The third edition is the most valuable of these editipnsy 
and a good copy nearly as valuable as the first edition. 

Of the second edition, in folio, 1632, 1 find it recorded 
in Boswell's Life of Johnson, that it is adulterated in every 
page. 

Some curious particulars respecting 'the various sums 
paid to the different Editors of Shakspeare, may be found 
in the Gentleman's Magazine. 
The most considerable appear to be — 

Alexander Pope £211 12 

Theobald 652 10 

Warburton 500 6 

Capell*..^ 300 

Dr. Johnson for the 1st. £dit.... 375 

— ^2nd. Edit.... 100 

Of Johnson and Steevens's 4th. Edition, 15 vols. Bvo. 
1793, large paper, on which paper only 25 were printed, 
one sold at Reed's for 29/. and a copy at Mr. StrettelFs in 
1820 for lOL 5s. Ritson 1803 14/. lOs. Bindley 21/. 

The Portrait of Shakspeare bjf M^ Droeshout, frontispiece 
to the title of the first folio Edition of Shakspeare^ served for 
all the four folio Editions; good or first impressions of this 
Portrait are valued by judges at about 5/. 5s. whilst infe- 
rior ones are scarcely worth One Guinea, as the lines have 
been crossed over the face, in order to give strength to the 

* Mr. Ctpell spent a whole life on Shakspeare, and it is said 
that he traoscribed the works of that illustrious Poet, ten .times 
with his own hand! 



BIfiUOMANIAC'i UBRART. 27 

impression; and Mr..Cafilfield (a competent authority in 
these matters) says, the only way to discover the genuine 
state is, by observing the shading in the face to be ex- 
pressed by single lines, without any crossing whatever. 

Of Shakspeare it has been well and truly said — 

''Each change of many-coloured life he drew, 
''Exhausted Worlds, and then imagined new: 
"Existence saw him spurn her bounded reign, 
''And panting time toil'd after him in vain." 

I may perhaps be excused for alluding to a projected 
Guide or Classed Index, to refresh the recollection of the 
admirers of Shakspeare, since the intended Publication 
is entirely abandoned. I had taken the Index to 
the Dublin Edition printed by Grierson, which had 
been collated with the original folio and quarto Editions 
as my ground-work, and had re-arranged and revised it 
under the following heads, — Section 1, Characters of His- 
torical Persons. Section 2, Index of Manners, Pas- 
sions, and their external Effects. Section 3, Of Fic- 
titious Persons, with the characters ascribed to them. 
Section 4, Index of Thoughts and Sentiments. 5, Table 
of the most considerable Speeches. Section 6, part 1 , 
Description of Places. Part 2, Description of Persons. 
Part 3, Description of Things, and Description of Times 
and Seasons, and lastly, an Index of Similes and Allusions. 

I had afterwards to consider how I was to manage that 
tliis Index might be rendered generally available, and what 
edition to select for the purpose of reference, when, I 
tumbled upon the following passage in Dr. Samuel John- 
son's Preface to his edition of Shakspeare, page 29, Vol. 1, 
8vo. London, 1765, which completely set aside all my air- 



28 JOURNEY ROUND A 

drawn schemes on the subject, and I do not regret to say, 
eaused me not only to alter my plan, bat finally to abandon 
it altogether. 

" It was said of Euripides^ that every verse was a precept; 
and it may be said of Shakspeare, that from his works may 
be collected a system of civil and oeconomical prudence. 
Yet his real power is not shown in the splendour of par- 
ticular passages, but by the progress of the fable, and the 
tenour of his dialogue; and he that tries to recommend him 
by select quotations, will succeed like the Pedant in Hiero- 
eles, who, when he offered his house to sale, carried a briek 
in his pocket as a specimen.^ 



Cervantes Saavedra (Miguel de) Historia del Ingenioso 
Hidalgo Don Quixotte de la Mancha.— ^ vols, 4to, 1606 
and 1616. — First Edition of each Part. 

At Col. Stanley's sale in 1813, a copy bound in Russia 
sold for 42/. and at the same sale a copy of the second 
edition, 4to. £n Madrid, 1608, sold for 12/. 12«. to the 
Duke of Devonshire. 

The second edition is equally necessary to be possessed 
as the first by the curious bibliographer, on account of the 
alterations in it made by Cervantes himself. 



La Misma, En Madrid, 4 vols, 4to. — Plates engraved bg 
Carmona and others, — Ibarra, 1780. 

The celebrated Ibarra edition is so well known, thi^ 
I need only refer to M. Paris's sale, 1791, where a copy 
sold for 16/. 16«. and Col. Stanley's^ where a copy sold 
for 17/. 6«. 6d. 



BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBRARY. $9 

- The earliest English translation is bj Shelton, 4to. 2 
Parts, 1020, which at Hunter's sale (1813) sold for 
^l. Is. ed. 

Jarvis anct Smollett's translations are well known. The 
first edition of the former, 2 vols. 4to. 1742, was sold in 
Sibliotheca Lansdownianai for 7/.; and the first edition of 
the latter, 2 vols. 4to. 1755, at the same sale for IL 10«. 

It may not perhaps be considered irrelevant, to notice a 
translation by Peter Anthony Motteux, whom I find 
described by Lempriere as a French writer, bom in Nor- 
mandy, 1660 ; and who, at the revocation of the Edict of 
Nantes, came to England, where he became a merchant, 
and translated Don Quixote ; lived a disorderly life, and 
died 1718. Tytler, in his Essay upon the Principles of 
Translation, says, *' That the Translation published by 
Motteux, bears in the title-page that it is the work of 
several hands ; but, as of these Mr. Motteux was the prin- 
cipal, and revised and corrected the parts that were 
translated by others, which indeed we have no means of 
discriminating from his own, he can only speak of him in 
the comparison which he has made, as author of the whole 
work." In this comparison Tytier gives the preference, 
with great reason, to Motteux. Now Motteux, though he 
has frequentiy assumed too great a license both in adding 
to and retrenching from the ideas of his original, has, 
upon the whole, a very high degree of merit as a translator. 
In the adoption of corresponding idioms he has been 
eminendy fortunate ; and, as in these there is no great 
liUtode, he has in general preoccupied the appropriate 
phrases; so that a succeeding translator, who proceeded 
on the rule of invariably rejecting his phraseology, must 



30 JOURNEY ROUND A 

have in general altered for the worse. Such, I hare mi, 
was the rule laid down by Jarvis, and by his copyist and 
improver, Smollett, who by thus absurdly rejecting what 
his own judgment and taste must have approved, has pro* 
duced a composition decidedly inferior on the whole to 
that of Motteux. 

*' On the whole (says Tytler) I am inclined to think 
that the Version of Motteux is by far the best we hare 
yet seen of the Romance of Cervantes ; and that if cor- 
rected in its licentious abbreviations and enlargements, and 
in some other particulars noticed in the coarse of this 
comparison, we should have nothing to desire superior to 
it in the way of translation." 



Admirable V&yage and Travell of William Btuh, Gentle 
maUf who with his own hands, without any other Mea/lt 
helpe, made a Pinnace, in whiche he past by Ayre, Land, 
and Water, from Lambome, in Barkshire, to the Custom* 
House Key in London, b. I, front, 4to, 1607. 

The above curious account sold among the Books of the 
late Isaac Reed, Esq. for 6/. — See Bibliotheca Reediana^ 
6461. 



True and perfect Description of Three Voyages (to Green- 
land,) so strange and wonderfull, that the like hath never 
been heard of before. Translated by William Phillip. 
4to. black letter.— Lond. 1609. 

6. Steevens, 1800^ 5/. 12s, 6d.— Col. Stanley, 1813, 
7t 17«. 6d, at whose sale it was bought by John Milner,^ 
Esq. 



BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBRARY. 31 



Cwryafs (T.) Crudities, hoMfy gobhdup in Five MometKs 
TtavelU in France, Savoy ^ Ittily, Sfc. 8fc. 4#d. 1611. 

N. B.^ The above book, when complete, should contaia 
the following plates : — 

1. Frontispiece* containing Portrait. 

2. Dedication.. to the Prince, with Plume of Feathers. 

3. Dragon, (in 3 B.) 

4. Coryat with Venetian Courtezan, p. 262. 

5. The Amphitheatre at Verona, p. 310. 

6. Strasburgh (!lock, p. 459. 

7. HeidelburghTown, p. 486. 

8. Portrait of Frederick IVth. p. 496. 

I'his book is of tolerable rarity, and varies in price, 
according to condition, binding, and completeness ; and 
has sold in the most celebrated sales of the last few years, 
at from five to twelve guineas, which latter price it brought 
at Hunter's sale. 

There is a reprint of Coryat's Crudities, in 3 vols. 
8vo. 

Coryat died during his Oriental Travels, at Sural, in 
the year 1617. 

The following amusing sketch from Granger's '' Bio- 
graphical History of England," vol. II. p. 35, cannot 
bat be acceptable : — 

Tom Coryate, of vain glorious memory, was a man of 
remarkable ' querity of aspect,* and of as singular a 

* 

* He had a bead mis-shapen like that of Thersites in Homer, 
but the cone stood in a different position ; the picked part being 
befiMv. See Fuller's Worthies in Somerset^ p. 31. 



33 JOURNEY ROUND A 

character. He bad learning, but be wanted judgment; 
which is alone equivalent to all the other faculties of the 
mind. He travelled over the greater part of Europe on 
foot, and distinguished himself by walking nine hundred 
miles with one pair of shoes, which, as he informs us, be 
got mended at Zurich. He afterwards travelled into the 
Eastern Countries; and seems to have been at least as 
frugal in meat and drink as he was in shoes ; as be tells 
bis mother in a letter to her, that in bis ten month's travels 
between Aleppo and the Mogul's Court, be spent but 
three pounds, living " reasonably well" for two pence a day. 
He sometimes ventured bis life, by bis ill-timed zeal for 
Christianity, having on several occasions publicly declared 
Mahomet to be an impostor. He delivered an Oration to 
the Mogul in the Persian Language, and spoke that of 
Indostan with such volubility, that be was an overmatch 
for a notorious scold in her mother tongue.* He, like 
other coxcombs, died without knowing himself to be of 
that character, in 1617. Cory at as ardently wished to 
walk over the world as Alexander did to overrun it with 
bis armies. The most curious account of him extant is in 
" Terry's Voyage to East India," p. 68, &c. The most 
singularly remarkable of his works, — the " Crudities." 

Had he lived to return to England, (says Mr. Aubrey, 
MS. in Mus. Asbmol.) bis Travels bad been most estimable; 
for though be was not a wise man, he wrote faithfully matter 
of fact. There is a curious Portrait • of him f iding on an 
Elephant, as a Frontispiece to his Letters from Asmere. 4to. 



♦ Wood's ^' AtbenaB Oxoniensis." 



BlBLIOBfANIAC's UBRARY. 33 

» 

JBruscamhtUe : ges (Euvres, cantenant tes Fantamet, ^c, 
Fint Edition* 12mo. Fans, 1612. 

Colonel Stanley's Sale, 8/. 

This book consists of occasional Prologues in Prose, a 
species of amasement much in vogue during the Reign of 
Louis XIII. 

Mr. Shandy had the good fortune, we are told, to get 
Bmscambille's Prologue on Noses almost for nothing ; that 
b, for three half-crowns. ** There are not three Brus- 
cambilles in Christendom, (said the Stall Man,) except 
what are chained up in the libraries of the curious. My 
father flung down the money as quick as lightning — ^took 
Bruscambille into. his bosom — ^hyed home from Piccadilly 
to Coleman Street with it, as he would have hyed home 
with a treasure, without taking his hand once off firom 
Bruscambille all the way.^f 



Andreini Fiorentino, (Giov. Bat.) VAdamo^ Sacra Ra- 
presentazione, 4to, Jig. In Milano, 1613. 

This is the work on which Voltaire supposes Milton 
formed his Paradise Lost; and Hayley, in his Life of 
Milton, supports the same opinion. 

♦ Tho Editions, Roaen, 1615, 2 toIs. 16mo. or 1635, in 12mo. 
and the Paris one, 12nio. 1619, are of inferior Talue. Colonel 
Stanley possessed all of them excepting the one of 1615. 

f Tristram Shandy, Yol. III. Chap. 35, Dr. Ferriar thinks 
there was more reason to represent the SMen of Bouchet, as an 
acquisition worthy of triamph, and seems to have rather a poor 
opfnion of Bruscambille. 



34 JOURNEY ROUND A 

At the Valliere Sale, a copy sold for 132 Urresi since 
ifhich it has home a much less Talue in France. 

Earl Spencer's Copy, in 1811, sold for 6/. ds. 

In R. Wilbraham's Collection was the same edition, 
but bearing the altered frontispiece, and dated Milano, 1617. 

R. Heathcote's Sale, 1802, 8/. 10s. 



Souchet, Sieur de Broncourt^ (G. du) Les Ser^et. Lyon, 
1614,* 3 torn. 1 voL in 18mo. 

In Colonel Stanley's Sale, a copy of the Lyon Edition 
VTBs sold to Lord Ossidston for 8/. 188. 6d. 

This rare book is mentioned by Sterne as among the 
treasures of Mr Shandy's Library, and according to Dr. 
Terriar's Illustrations it had become so extremely scarce, 
that for a long period he had made fruitless enquiries 
amongst his literary friends, and among the rest of Dr. 
Farmer, who informed him that he had never even seen 
it; and at last, he was indebted to the kindness of T. 
Thompson, Esq. for the perusal of an odd volume of this 
work. ^* I have great reason," continues Dr. Ferriar, *' to 
believe that it was in the Skeltan Library some years ago, 
where I suspect Sterne found most of the authors of this 
class ; for Mr, HalTt Poetry shews that he knew and read 
them much.t 



* There is an SditioD, Paria^ 1608; and another, Roaeo, 1685. 

f John Hall Stevensan, Esq. of Skelton Castle, was Sterne^ 
Engenius, and Author of Crazy Tales, Ate. and whose collected Poetry, 
printed in 3 vok. 8?o. Lond. 179^ is now become rather soared* 



i 



BIBLIOMANIAC'S UBBARY. 36 

The Sirees of Bauchei consist of a set of regular con- 
rersationsy held, as the title implies, in thc^ evening, 
generallj during supper, and may be regarded as transcripts 
of the petitt souperg of that age. A subject of discussion 
is proposed each evening, generally by the host, and it is 
treated characteristically with a mixture of great know- 
ledge and light humour. Every conversation concludes 
with a jest 

The chief characters supported in the volume lent Dr. 
Ferriar by his ft'iends '* are, a man of learning, such as the 
times afforded ; a soldier very fond of talking over his past 
dangers ; a physician, who is sometimes found deficient in 
his philosophy ; and a droll, who winds up all with his 
raillery.'' The conversations are not, indeed, connected by 
any narrative; but, Dr. Ferriar entertained little doubt, 
that from the perusal of this work Sterne conceived the 
first precise idea of his Tristram, as far as anything can 
be called precise, in a desultory book, apparently written 
with rapidity. The most ludicrous and extravagant parts 
of the book seem to have dwelt upon Sterne's mind, and 
he appears to have frequently recurred to them from 
memfory. 

In the 29th Seree, Shandy's Dissertation on Noses 
aeems to have originated. It is a long and able discussion 
fm the catisels tilf colour in negroes ; in the course of which 
it is asked why negroes are flat-nosed, and this question 
Irings into play the, subject of Noses, so often introduced 
in Tristram Shandy. 

One of the speakers tells the following story, with which 
I shall conclude this article, as giving a tolerable idea of 
the author's style and wit. 



ae 



JOtJRNET ItOUND A 



Ce maitre, qui eitait de nos Sereeg, noui conta qn^ui^j&itrf 
il demandtL d un sien mestayer comme il le partoit, dBpuit 
deux au trais jours que sa femme estait m&rie, tesquel M 
respondit, ** Quafidje revifu de Venterrement de ma femme, 
m^asuyant let yeux, et travaillant d plorer, chacun me 
dUoit, compere, ne te soucie, je sgay bien ton fait, je te 
donneray Hen une autre femme/' ** HelasV^ me disoit^il, 
** onne me disoit point ainn, quandfeu perdu tUne de mes 
vachesJ^ 



Holland (JB.) Hertoologia Anglicana, hoc eet Clariuimomm, 
ei Doctissimorum aliquot Anghrum qui Jloruerunt aB 
anno M. D. utq^ ad annum MBCXX. Viwe JE^giee Vitit 
et Elogia, Folio, 

Portraits engrared by Crispin Passe* 

%^ In this Book, which is often found incomplete, there 
should be a Frontispiece, 64 Portraits, and two Monu- 
ments, viz. 



h. 



Henry YIII. 

3. Thos. Cromwell. 

8. Sir T. More. 

4. Cardinal Wolsey. 
6, Cardinal Pole. 

6. Edward YI. 

7. Seymour, Earl of Somerset 
B. Lady Jane Gray. 

9. Queen Elizabeth, followed by 

a Print of hir Totmb. 
10. Henry Prince of Wales. 



IL The same, whole-length. 
Tilting, followed by a 
Print of hit Tomb. 

12. Sir John Cheeke. 

13. W. Herbert, Earl of Pem- 

broke. 

14. Devereux, Earl of Essex. 

15. Sir Nicholas Bacon. 

16. Sir H. Gilbert. 

17. Sir H. Sydney. 

18. Sir F. Sydney. 



♦ L£S SitiilS, tomeiil. p.316w Paris, 1608. 



BIBUOMANIAC1 UBRART. 



37 



19. Dudley, Earl of Leicester. 
90. Diidlej, Earl of Warwick. 
81. Sir F. Walsinghaoi. 

33. Sir a Granville. 
39. Thomas Candisli. 

34. Christopher Carlile. 

35. Sir Martin Frobisher. 
3$. Sir J. Hawkins. 

37. Sir Francis Drake. 
2S. Cecil Lord Burleigh. 



39. Herbert, E. of Pembroke. 
dO. R. Devereux, £. of Essex. 
31. O. Clifford, Earl of Cun^ 

berland. 
82. R. Cecil, E. of Salisbury. 

33. Thomas Sutton. 

34. John Harrington. 

35. John, 2nd. Lord Harring- 
ton of Ezon. 



VOLUME SECOND. 



John Colet. 
S7. William Tyndal. 
98. John Bradford. 
^)9. Bishop Latimer. 
-40. Bishop Ridley, 
^l. John Rogers. 

42. Laurance Sanders. 

43. Bishop Cranmer. 

44. John Ball. 

45. Bishop Jewel. 

4lS. Dairid Whitehead. 

47. Bishop Parker. 

48. Thomas Bacon. 

49. John Cay, M. D. 
5a Robert Abbot 



51. Jas. Montague, B. of Wiih 

52. Edward Deering.^ 
{^. Archbishop Grindall. 

54. John Fox. 

55. Archbishop Sandys.. 

56. Laurance Hnmfly. 

57. John More. 

58. William Whittaker. 

59. Alexander Nowell. 

60. William Perkins. 

61. Archbishop Whitgift 

62. John Reynolds. 

63. Richard Yaughan. 

64. Ger?as Babington.. 

65. Thomas Holland. 

riNXt.. 



Heatli^s copy sold for*?/. 178. 6d. — Merly Library, fine 
copy, 16/. 1 6s. — Clarke, Bond Street, fine impressions^ 
Mariette's copy, (1820) 20/. 



98 J0IJ[«N«Y BPUNP A 

Heintiut (Dun,) De Caniemptu Martu^ 12mo. Img. Bai 
ex OfficvML Elzeverianaf 1621. Printed on VeUmm^ 

This is the onlj book known to have been printed bjr 
the Elzeyirs on Telluni. 

Heinsios's own copy, in richly decorated binding, was 
bought by Mr. J. lioyd, at Singer's Sale, April, 1618, 
for 38/. 17s. 



c . .m 



Virgilii Opera, Ex, Edit, Jac, Pontani, (forma mtn^) 
32mo. Sedani, 1625. 

Stanley, 2/. 2s. Heath, 1810, in morocco, 4/. 14s. 6d. 
This beautiful little specimen of Literary Bijouxt6ry is 
very correctly printed, and extremely rare. 



Horatii Opera, Ex, Recens, Pet, Nannii, 32flio. Sedani, 
Jannon, 1627. 

This is as remarkable as the precedmg for the diminntiy* 
beauty of its Typography, and much esteemed; it bears 
an equally high price. 4/. 14s. 6d. 



Teitamentum (Novum) Grcecum, 32mo. Sedani Jawum, 
1628. 

The text of this is said to be as correct as the Virgil and 
Horace of the same printer, but does not bear quite so 
high a price \ about 1/. lis. 6d. is its yalue. 



BlBUpMANUC'A LtBHARY. 39 

These editions, executed bj Jaimon, a celebrated 
XVinter at Sedan^ are bigUy esteemed, especially copies 
ifk fine condition, being freqnently eitber stained or cut 
folQse in binding. 



JSan^»^$ (Geo.) Travels through Turkey^ Egypt, the Bofy^ 
Land, Greece, ^c. Folio, Lond. 1615. 

The other EditUms are \ei^, 1668, anc^ 1673. 

All the editions sbonld ccmtain a long narrow view of the 
Seraglio, at p, 32, (which is often fonnd wanting,) and a 
map and frontispiece ;-r-tbe remainder, of ^ pl^ites^ i^^vMy 
fifty in nmnber, are engra?qd, or rather printed off on the 
. letter press. Mr. Beckford*s library at Fonthill Abbey, 
Wilts, jcontains a large paper copy of the first edition of 
this book, which is considered a great rarity. 

George Sandys was greatly distinguished as an eleganl 
poetf though not so permanently as in his character of a 
learned trayeller. His tmnslation of the Metamorphoi^ 
ef^Dnd nmat have l>een very popular, for I |iave the^ 
seventh edition now before me, 12mo. dated Lond. 1678,. 
the first edition of which appeared in folio, about the year 
1632 ; indeed, both Dryden ai^d Pope declared th^t English 
poetry owed, much of its beauty to his translations; and 
Mr. T. Campbell has assigned him a niche among his 
Specimem. George Sandys was bom 1577 and died 1643*. 



•*^ 



40 JOVmSKY BOUND A 

Pmrekms, (Smwt.) kis PU^namt, m Fwe Boots. 

Tbe first contajnh^ tbe Voyages made by Ancient 
Kings, dec. — The second, m l>esciiption of all the CircmB- 
nayigations. — ^The third, Yojra^es of Engiishmqi to Africa, 
Sec* — Thefonrth, English Voyages beyond the East Indies. 
The fifth, English Voyages in the Eastern parts, 1025. — 
VoL 2, sixth, Afirica; seventh, ditto; eighth, Palestine, 
Arabia, drc.; ninth, Peregr". Assyria, &e.: tenth, Dis- 
coreries omitted, 1025. VoL 3, Per^r*. Asia, N. W. of 
America, and part of Europe, 1025. VoL 4. Voyi^es 
America, 1025. Pilgrimage, (makes a fifth rolune,) con- 
taining Relations of the World ; theological and geological 
History of Asia, Africa, and America; fourth edition, 
enlarged with three whole treatises, one of Russia, &ۥ 
by Horsey; second, of Bengala, by Methold; third, of 
Saracenic Empire, by Espenios, 1025. With Mnfs and 
Tables. 

From 37/. to 50/. is about the ralne of a good set of 
Piirchas's Pflgrimes. I beliere Mr. WiUetfs copy brought 
the lowest price, vis. 18/. of any copy $old hy auction for 
some years past 

The Hon. T. Grenville possesses an extraordinary fine 
copy, with rough leaves, bound in blue morocco. 

Sir K. Digby's copy sold, in the year 1080, for 3/. 5s. Od. 

Purohas, an indefatigable and esteemed author, died 
in 1028, at the age of 51, in distressed circumstances, in 
consequence of losses sustained by the publication of his 
book. 



BIBIJOllANUC'i UBBAKT. 41 

Tk€ Hog^Fated C^ilewaaum, called Mitireu Ttammkiu 
Skinker, who was home at Wickkam, a neuier Temne 
beiwffeem the Empenmr and ike Hollander, eeUnate on ike 
Rhine, and who eon never recover her irme ekape tell file 
be married. A Ito relating ike eaute how her Mother came 
bewitched. With Wood-Cut of the ladg and her Smior. 
410. 1640. 



tiogalar book was in the Library of Sir Bobert 
Gordon, and at its dispersion by auction in 1816, sold for 
7^ 17s. 6d. 

It was probably this book which gare rise to the ridicn- 
loos Story of the Pig-faced Lady» so preralent a year or 
two since, and which many wiseacres were crednlous 
enough to believe. 



Csroe (Thoma) Itinerarium in Legume WaUeri DevereuM, 
cam Hieteria facta Butleri, Oordon Leileg,. et aUorum. 
16»o. Mognnt, 1630-40. 

Col. Stanley's copy sold, 1813, for 202. 10s. 

Rer. Mr. Dnnster's, in 1816, for 6/. 10s. 

'' Carve, a Native of Ireland, in the latter part of his 
life, was one of the Vicars Choral of the Cathedral at 
Vienna. In his earlier years he had been Chaplain to a 
Regiment, and travelled through many parts of Germany 
during the wars of Gustavus Adolphus, of which he hath 
given a short account"--«-i^per^. Bib, 32. 



^ JOURNEY BPUND A 

Carve, (R. D. Thomce) Lyra Sive Anacephakeosis Hibef" 
nica, in qua de Exordio, sen Origine, Nomine, Moribus, 
Ritibusque Gentis HibemioB tractatur; cui accestere 
Annates ejus dem HibemicB. 4to* ^nd. edition, Sulzbad, 
1666. 

This carioas work is dedicated to Pope Alexander Vlt* 
and illustrated with a Map of Jerna, sen HibemiaVetas, p. 1 . 

Equestrian Portrait of Donatus O'Brien, quondam 
Hibemorum Rex, p. 13. 

Page 101 contains the Letter of Pope Leo to King 
Henry VIIL intimating bis having decreed him the Title 
of Defender of the Faith, and exhorting his Majesty not to 
he puffed up with pride, on account of this title, but to 
receive it humbly, and in the Faith of Christ, andjn devo^ 
tion to the Holy See, by which he had bebn exalted* 

Chart InsulflB Purgatorii S. Patricii Description p. 113. 

Portrait of King Charles I. and A circumstantial 

ACCOUNT OP HIS BEHATIOUR UPON THE SCAFFOLD, 

p. 376. 

The Author's Portrait, p. 442. 

The Rey. T. Peirson's copj^ from which the preceding 
account has been taken, sold i4 1815 for 10/. lOs. 

The Duke of Roxburghe's copy sold in 1812 for 4/. 6s« 
Copies of this book are in the Bodleian, British Museum,* 
and Antiquarian Society's Libraries. 



* The First Edition appeared in 1660. 



BIBUOMANUC'8 LIBRARY. 43 

-^^icrafi^s (Jonah) Survey of Englan^t Ckampums, and 
2V«lA's Faithful Patrioiu ; with the lively PortraUurei 
of the several Commanders, Qvo, 1647. 

This is an extremely rare book, and to be complete 
al^ould contain an account of twenty-one persons, with a 
'portrait of each ; which, although indifferently engraved, 
the book bears an extravagant price, I shall enumerate. 

11. Lord Willoagbby, of Par- 
ham. 

12. Sir Thomas Fairrax. 

13. Sir William Brereton. 

14. Sir W. Waller. 

15. Edward Massey. 

16. Philip Skippon. 

17. Sir John Meldrum. 

18. Sir William Balfour. 

19. Major General Pojntz. 

20. Lieut. General Cromwell. 

21. Migor General Browne. 



1. Robert, Earl of Essex. 

2. Alexander Lesley, Earl of 
Leven. 

3. Robert, Earl of Warwick. 

4. Edward, Earl of Manehester. 

5. Earl of Calander. 

6. Henry, Earl of Standford. 

7. Basil Fielding, Earl of Den- 
bigh. 

8. Ferdinand, Lord Fairfax. 

9. Lord Roberts. 
10.^ Robert, Lord Brooke. 

I have been told, that the name of Leicester, as well as 
Bicraft has sometimes been found upon the title-page of 
this work, as the author. 

It has ako occasionallj a Portrait of Ricraft, the author, 
by Faithome, affixed as a frontbpiece, which belqpgis 19 
reality to the same author's ** Peculiar Characters of the 
Oriental JLanguages,'' 4to. 1646. 

lU^raft's England's Champions, sold in Mr. Townley'fi 
Sale for 33/. Is. 6d. (bought by the late J. North, Esq.) 
and his Peculiar Characters of the Oriental l^nfuage$. 
with the Portrait, at Bindley's Sale, for 19/. 19si 

The Portrait of Bicraft alone is said by Mr. Canlfield 
to W worth 4/. 4s. 



MMMl* 



44 JOURNEY ROUND A ' 

Benlawes Theophila, or LoveU Sacrifice. With Cuts, 4ta. 
scarce, 1652. 

N. B. Of the above carious book, it is said that the 
Cuts of no two Copies are alike, but have always variations* 



Terry* t (Edward) Voyage to East India, 800. Land. 16^6. 

Should have a Portrait of the Author — a whole length 
of the Great Mogul — the Great Standard of the Mogul — 
and the Signet of ditto. 

This book is scarce; the copy of J. Hunter, Esq. 1813,. 
sold for el. 16s. 6d. 

G. Steevens*s, in 1800, sold for 1/. 3s. 

- " Terry was,*' according to Anthony Wood, *' an in- 
genious and polite man, of a pious and exemplary con- 
versation, a good preacher, and much respected by the 
neighbourhood where he lived" after hb return from his 
voyage, viz. Greenford, in Middlesex, of which place he 
became Rector, and where he died October 8, 1660. 

Terry commenced his voyage in 1615, and as soon as he ' 
arrived in India, was sent for by Sir Thomas Roe, 
Embassador from the King of England to the Great 
Mogul, with whom he lived as Chaplain, in the Court of 
the Mogul, for more than two years. 

The Narrative of this Voyage was written after his 
return thence, and by him dedicated and presented in MS. 
to Prince Charles, in 16|2. 



BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBRARY. 45 

Afterwards, it was added to the Travels of Pei, de la 
Valkf and abridged in 5am. Purchiut$ second part of 
Pilgrims, Book 9. 



The Witst or. Sport upon Sport; in select piecei of 
Drollery, digested into Scenes by way of Dialogue. To^ 
gether with a variety of Humours of several Nations 
fitted for the pleasure and content of all Persons, eithe 
in Court, City, Country, or Camp. The like nevet 
before published. Bvo. Printed for H. Marsh, 1662. 

Ditto, Qvo. printed' for F. Kirkman, 1672, with curious 
Frontispiece, representing the Inside of a Bartholomew- 
Fair Theatre. 

Dnringthe suppression of the Theatre by the Puritans, 
the History of which has been amusingly related by 
D^Israeli, a variety of subterfuges were resorted to, 
secretly to indulge the lovers of the Drama with their 
favourite amusement ; and, under the pretext of Rope* 
Dancing, &c. one Robert Cox, succeeded in introducing 
Humours or Drolleries, consisting of a combination of 
Scenes from different Plays, concealed under some taking 
title, for the use of Theatrical Booths at Fairs. 

These, as put together by Cox, were first collected by 
^arsh, and afterwards reprinted by Kirkman. 

A copy of Marsh's Edition was sold in Joseph Gulston's 
Sale, 1783, for 8s. 

In the Marquis of Stafford's Collection is a Copy of the 
Edition, by Kirkman. 



46 JOVBN£Y ROUND A 

Heathy (Jos,) A Brief Chronicle of the late Intestine War, 
in the three Kingdoms of England, Scotland, andlreUmd. 
In Four Parts, from 1637 to. 1663. 12iito. 1663. 

Should have HtCb following Plates :">— 

1. Frontispiece. 

2. Lord Monck. 

3. Charles I. 

4. Earl of Arundel and Northumberland, p. 16. 

5. General Lesley^ p. 23. 

6. Earl of Strafford, p. 34. 

7. Lord Digby, p. 41. 

8. Lord Lindsey, p. 62. 
0. Lord Brook, p. 70. 

10. Lord Lyttleton, p. 75. 

11. Sir WiUiam Waller, p. 93. 

12. Earl of Newcastle, p. 97. 

13. Earl of Manchester, p. 104. 

14. Archbishop of Canterbury, p. 112. 

15. Earl of Essex, p. 117. 

16. Sir Thomas Fairfax, p. 251. 
17< K. Charles on Scaffold, p. 403. 

18. Charles IL p.411« 

19. Duke Hamilton, p. 422. 

20. Earl of Holland, p. 424. 

21. Lord Cape], p. 424. 

22. Prince Rupert, p. 467. 

23. M. Montrose, p. 482. 

24. Earl of Derby, p. 569. 

25. Lord Hopton, p. 608. 

26. Van Trump, p. 644. 



BIBUOMANIAC'i UBRAttY. 47 

27. Duke of Lenox^ p. 688. 
^8. James Naylor^ p. 708. 

29. Oliver Cromwell, p. 725. 

30. Earl of Warwick, p. 733. 

31. Duke of York, p. 736. 

32. Richard Cromwell, p. 736. 

33. General Massey, p. 762. 

34. Duke of Gloucester, p. 769. 
36. Venner, p. 788. 

36. King Crowned, p. 808. 

37. King Married, p. 860. 

38. Peace, p. 860. 

Woodhouse, 6/. 6s. — Mason, 7/. 17fc-^0d*— Pitt, 1808, 
^/. 16s. 6d. — Stanley, 14/. 17s. — ^Towi^y, (wanting four 
portraits) 11/. Os. 6d. — Hunter, 16/. — Clarke, Bond Street, 
1820, with additional plates, bl. mor. gilt leaves, 16/. 16s. 



Butler's {Sam.) Budibras, First Edition, By J. G. for 
Richard Marriott, under St, Dunstan's Church, — First 
Part, 12mo. 1663.— Second Part, ditto, 1663.— Thir^ 
find Last Part, Svo. 1678. 

the often contested passage, usually quoted- 

'* He that fights and runs awa^, 
" May live to fight another day ; 
** But, he that is in battle slain, 
** Can never turn to fight again," 

tuay be found in Book III. Canto iiL Verse 248> and 
strongly reminds one of the contest between the two 
knightsi who fell to quarrelling and fighting about a statue. 



48 JOURNEY ROUND A 

which one declared to be silver and the other gold, wii 
which in the end proved to be both silver and gold ; so 
also this passage, which some denied to exist at all in 
" Hndibras/' and which others as stoutly maintained and 
battled for in the Magazines, affirming thej had seen it in 
that Poem; bat, when they made search, could not find. 

The passage, as it really stands in *' Hudibras^" is as 
follows : — 

" For those that fly may fight again, 
*' Which he can never do that's slain." 

The character of Hudibras is, with good reason, sup* 
posed to have been intended . for Sir C. Luke, and that of 
Whackum^ bat with less probability, for Capt. G. Wharton. 
See Granger, Vol. iv. p. 40. 

** Though Hudibras was published, and probably 
composed (says Hume) during the reign of Charles II. 
Butler may justly, as well as Milton, be thought to belong 
to the foregoing period. No composition abounds so much 
as Hudibras in strokes of just and inimitable wit; yet 
are there many performances which give as great or greater 
entertainment on the whole perusal. The allusions in 
Sutler are often dark and far-fetched ; and, though scarcely 
any author was ever able to express his thoughts in so few 
words, he often employs too many thoughts on one subject, 
and thereby becomes prolix after an unusual manner. It 
is surprising how much erudition Butler has introduced 
with so good a grace into a work of pleasantry and humour. 
Hudibras is perhaps the most learned composition that 
is to be found in any language. The advantage which the 
royal cause received from this poem, in exposing the fana- 



BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBRARY. 49 

Ucism and ^se pretensions of the former parliamentarj 
partj, was prodigious. The king himself had so good a 
taste^ as to be highly pleased with the merit of the work^ 
and had even got a great part of it by heart : yet was lie 
either so careless in his temper, or so little endowed with 
the virtue of liberality, or, more properly speaking, of 
gratitude, that he allowed the author^ a man of virtue and 
probity, to live in obscurity, and die in want.*' 

This latter assertion of Hume's has been contradicted on 
the authority of Dr. Zachary Pearce, by which it appears, 
that a Mr. Lowndes, then belonging to the Treasury, and 
in the reign of King William and Queen Anne Secretary 
'thereof, had declared in his hearing that by order of Ring 
dharles, he had paid to Butler a yearly pension of «£lOO, 
'Co the time of his decease. 

** In the poem of Hudibras,'' says Tytler, " we have a 
sremarkable combination of wit with humour ; nor is it easy 
^o say which of these qualities chiefly predominates in the 
composition. A proof that humour forms a most capital 
ingredient is, that the inimitable Hogarth has told the 
'^vhole story of the poem in a series of characteristic prints." 
Voltaire has attempted to give a Translation ; but, even 
the wit of the original, in passing through the alembic of 
V^oltaire, has changed in a great measure its nature, and 
assimilated itself to that which is peculiar to the translator. 
The wit of Butler is more concentrated — more pointed — 
and is announced in fewer words — than the wit of Voltaire ; 
who, though he pretends to have abridged four hundred 
verses into eighty, has, in truth, effected this by the re- 
trenchment of the wit of his original, and not by the con- 
centration of it. 

Very different from Voltaire's is the following Version. 

E 



60 JOURNEY ROUND A 

Budibrat, Poeme, trad, de PAngloit, em Vers FrangcUf 
Voh. 12mo. L(md. 1750. 

The author of this Translation of the Poem of Hadihrass- 
was a man of superior abilities, and appears to have beei^ 
endowed with an uncommon share of modesty. He presents 
his work to the public with the utmost diffidence ; and, vm 
a short Preface, humbly deprecates its censure for the 
presumption that may be imputed to him, in attempting- 
that which the celebrated Voltaire had declared to be the 
most difficult of tasks. 

Yet, this task he has executed in a very masterly manner; 
and, almost literally transfused his original into the French 
Version, clearly evincing (according to the opinion of 
A. F. Tytler, in his Essay on IVanslation,) that he pos- 
sessed that essential requisite for his undertaking, a kindred 
genius with that of his great original. 

This translation was made by Colonel Francis Townley, 
an English gentleman, who had been educated in France, 
and long in the French Service, and who had acquired a 
most intimate knowledge of both languages. And is the same 
person who suffered death at Carlisle, for his concern in 
the Rebellion, 1745-46, and 'who pleaded in vain his 
commission from the French King, as entitling him to the 
benefits of the Cartel settled with France for the exchange 
of Prisoners of War. 

At Duten's Sale, 1813, a Copy of this Book sold for 
6/. 12s. and at Mr. Bindley's for 5/. 5s. 

Galignaui, of Paris, has recently reprinted, and sells it 
for a few francs, which I suppose has diminished its 
nominal value : for, at the Sale of the Library of Amos 
Strettelly Jl^sq. in 1820, a Copy sold for 1/. 15s. 



BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBRARY. 51 

JButler^s Hudibras, Notes, by Dr, Nath, 3 vols. 4to. 
London, Rickahy, 1793. Only 250 Copies printed. 

G. Steevens's Copy sold, in 1800, for 8/. 10s. 6d^ 

It is sometimes met, with Hogarth's large plates inserted : 
'SL Copy of this description sold, at Woodhouse's Sale, for 
X 4/. 3s. 6d. 



da-^endon's (Lord) History of King Charles the Second, 
2 vols. 4to. 

This curious work was edited by Dr. Shebbcare, but 
^Kiieyer published. The following MS. Note is from Mr. 
Uleei-s CoDv: — 

" This IS the edition of Clarendon's Life of Charles the 
•Second, printed by Dr. Shebbeare, the sale of which was 
^^restrained by an mjunction of the Court of Chancery, 
^>btained by the Dutchess of Queensbury, in consequence 
^^hereof the whole impression (except a very few copies) 
^were destroyed. The Tory Introduction was never printed 
"in any other form." ' 

Pearson's Copy sold for 1/. Lis. 6d. 

A Copy sold among the books of 8. S. Baxter, Esq. at 
Ring and Lochees, May 27, 1812, for 5/. 10s. 

Another Copy sold at J. Edwards's Auction, 1804, in 
morocco, for 5/. 1:58.^^ 6d. 



B2 JOURNEY ROUND A 

Nmh'$ (Sir T.) Treatise of Diredum kow to TraveU 
safehf and profitably into Forrai^n CountrieM. Svo. 
Portrait by W. Marshall, 1664. 

A Copy, in Follett's Sale of Books at Leigh and 
Sotheby's, 1814, sold for 5/. lOs. Caulfield, in hb 
Calcographiana, values the print alone at 1/. lis. 6d. 

Granger, in his Biographical History of England, Vol. 
2, p. 336, quotes the following as from John Maire's life 
of Erasmus, in Latin, printed in Holland, 1642: — 

" Vera Efiigies Thomas Nigelli Armigeri Wamfordiensis; 
W. Marshall, Sculp. 12mo. which book, he says, is 
dedicated to Tliomas Neale, or iVe/e, Esq. whose Latin name 
is Nigellus, as Nelson is Nigelli filius, and concludes that 
both Prints represent the same person." 



Lamentable Estate and Distressed Case of Sir W. Dick, 
Knight, and his numerous Family, and Creditors for the 
Commonwealth. Folio. Plates by Vaughan. 

Sir W. Dick, was Knight, Lord Provost of Edinburgh* 
and an eminent Merchant. In the first plate he is seen 
proudly mounted on horseback, with attendants, shipping, 
army, and a town in the back ground; in the second, he 
is represented in prison, with his wife, attended by the 
gaoler and assistants; and, in the third, he is in a cofiSn, 
with his family mourning over him. At the Sale of Sir 
James Winter Lake's Collection, Mr. Caulfield purchased 
a Copy of the preceding Tract for 24/. 8s.; and, in his 
Calcographiana, he describes the prints as above. 



BI^IQMANIACH^ LIBRARY. 63 

At Weftf s Sale, 1773, a Cppy sold for 2^. 2s. ; 8n4 fit 
Sir P. Thompson's, 1815, one Copy sold for 222. lis. 6d. ; 
another for 28/. 17s. 6d. 



The Works of Kmg Charles the First. Folio, 1672. 

Some curious particulars respecting the printing of this 
ork may be found at p. 103 and 104 of the " The Olio of 
JHbliographical and Literary Anecdotes,'* 

In the Archiepiscopal Library, at Lambeth Palace, is a 
^opy with dashes of the pen through the Monarch's 
?rayers, as well as through every passage respecting the 
^vancement of the Protestant Religion. 

A manuscript note at the beginning, by Zach, Craddock, 
and dated November \st. 1678, accounts for the numerous 
expurgations as follows : — 

*' This book, being seized on board an English Ship, was 
delivered, by order of the Inquisition of Lisbon, to some 
of the English Priests, to be perused and corrected accord- 
ing to the rules of the Index Expurgatorivs Thus corrected^ 
it was given to Barnahy Crafford, English Merchant there, 
&nd by him it was given to me, the English Preacher 
resident there in 1670; and by me, as I then recieved it^ 
to the Library at Lambeth, to be there preserved." 



3^ Unkinde Desertor of Loyall Men and True Ftinds^ 
8i?o. - - Superiorum permissu, 1676. 

A Copy of this book was in the valuable Library of the 
late John Vowneley, Esq. bound in red morocco, and 



54 JOURNBt ROUND A 

appears in the Sale Catalogue of the Bibliotheca Town," 
leiana, part the first , 1B14. Where it was purchased by the 
Earl of Leitrim for 31/. 10s. and had the following note 
appended : — 

\* " One of the rarest pieces of Irish History, A most 
6eyere invective against tlie Duke of Ormond, written by 
Nicholcis French, Catholic Bishop of Ferns, an un- 
principled politician, who repeatedly changed sides. He 
went to Bmssells, and offered the Crown of Ireland to the 
Duke of Lorrain; afterwards, he proceeded to Paris, and 
requested an interview with Charles the Second, who 
refused to see him. This he attributed to Ormond, 
became his inveterate enemy, and concentrated in this 
volume every circumstance which he could collect 
injurious to Ormond's reputation." 

See the Catalogue of Mr. West's Books, No. 4623, 
where a Copy of this scarce and severe satire, sold for 
two guineas ; and, on looking over a Sale Catalogue of 
Messrs. Leigh and Sotheby, May, 1789, I observe a 
Copy there sold for 1/. lis. 6d. 



Virgilii Maronis (Pub.) Opera^ ex Recens. Nic, Heinsii 
DanielisfiliL 12mo. Amst. Elzevir, 1676. 

This Edition has been printed on three different sized 
papers. A Copy of the largest size sold for 320 livres, 
according to Fournier, chez M. de Cotte, 

At Colonel Stanley's Sale, a Copy brought 21/. 10s. 6d. 
another at Townley's Sale, 18 14, was bought by Mr. 



BIBUOMANIAC't LIBRARIT. 65 

Strettell for 14/. 14s. at whose Sale, in 1820, it only sold 
for 11/. Os; 6d. 

The 7Vtt«£^7ton of the Elzevir Virgil, 12nio. 1636> is 
also a moderately rare book. See Fonrnier. Diet, de Biblio- 
graphie, p. 547, for the means of distinguishing the real 
Edition from its counterfeits. 



Attctores Clas&ici in Uaum Delphini, 4 to. 

The Marquis Lansdowne^s Copy of these Classics, 62 
vols. 4to. and wanting the Opera Philosophica of Cicero, 
sold in 1806 for 157/. 10s. 

As complete and fine a Collection of the whole of these 
Quarto Classics, as was perhaps ever offered for sale, in 
67 vols, was bought, at the Duke of Roxburghe's Sale in 
1812, by the Duke of Norfolk, for 504/. It had formerly 
been Cardinal Huet'sCopy, and contained both the Editions 
of Dictys Cretensis and Pompeius Festus. 

The only otlier Collections of these Classics since sold 
I believe to be Lord Berwick's, July, 1817, 63 vols. 4to. 
morocco, 14!/. 15s.; Treuttell and Wurtz, 1817, 64 vols. 
236/. 5s.; aud the Rev. W. Douglas's, at Sotheby's, 
Dec. 10, 18 U), in 61 vols, uniformly bound in calf, and 
gilt edges, which sold for 112 guineas, wanting both the 
Opera Philosophica of Cicero, and the Statius — the two 
most valuable of the collection. 

The separate value of the rarities in this Collection may 
be jadgcd, by the prices which the three most difi^cult Iq 
be met with, brought at the Sale of Sir James Pulteney's 
books in 1812. 



66 JOURNEY ROUND A 

Ciceronis Opera Philoiophica, 4to. Parist 1680^ vera 
edit* 1 vol. 59/. 6s. 6d. Bought for Earl Spencer. 

PrudentiaSy 1 vol. 4to. Paris, 1687, 16/. 15s. (SA. 

* 

StatioSy 2 vols. 4to. Parisiis, 1685, 54li 12s. 



Collection of Engravings, knoum by the name of Lb 
Cabinet du Roi de France. 1677 to 1720. 

According to Baron Heinekin's List, 33 vols, various 
sizes — folio, quarto, and octavo. First and best Editions. 

Strictly speaking, the Collection is confined to 23 
volumes; but, as Louis XIV. and XV. distributed 
amongst the Sovereigns of Europe many other works, 
published either wholly or in part at their expence, ten 
other volumes are usually added to complete the Series. 

A complete list and description of the titles of the 
different volumes, as well as minute particulars of their 
contents, has been given in the *' Idee G^n^rale d'nne 
Collection complette d^Estampes ;'* and which, as the 
description alone occupies upwards of thirty pages, I can 
only refer to. 



* The true Edition of the Opera Philosoph. of Cicero, is dif- 
tiogaished by having the pages of each Philosophical Treatise 
Boparately numbered ; whereas, the tpurimu Edition has the pagM 
regularly numbered from the beginning to the end of the Volume. 



BIBUOMANIAC't UBBARY. 57 

Various copies of the 23 Tolumes have been sold in this 
coontrj ; — at the Paris Sale, 1791, one sold for 102/. 

Allan, 1792 81 

Gainsborough 97 13 

Edwards 155 

To Mr. North. 



Baoth'i (G.) Translation of Diodonu Sieuhu. Folio. 

Lond, 1700. 

It might be inferred that ,a second edition of this Book 
had been printed, as some copies hare appeared with the 
date of 1721 ; but, it is only an old friend with a new face, 
the title-page alone being reprinted. 

In the Fonthill Abbey Library, is the original MS. on 
▼ellum of Les Trois Premiers Livres de Diodore Sicilien. 
Translatez de Latin en Fran^oys, par Maistre Anthoine 
Macault, Notaire, Secretaire^ et Valet de Chamhre du Roy, 
(Francis I.) by whose express command it appears to have 
been executed. Prefixed to the MS. is a painting of the 
King, seated under a canopy, powdered with fleurs de lis, 
and surrounded by his Courtiers, ^c. For a description 
of this very valuable MS. I must refer the reader to the 
Repertorium Bibliographicum of Mr. W. Clarke^ p. 213, 
4re« Qvo. 1819, to which description is added, a copy from 
the painting, representing the portrait of Francis I. with 
his pet Marmoset seated on the table close to the King's 
left arm, drawn and engraved by Mr. William Behnes, of 
Newman Street — the first attempt and unique effort in the 
Graphic Art of this self-taught genius, whose rapid strides 



6S JOURNEY ROUND A 

to the Ligbest pitch of celebrity as a Sculptor , are too well 
known to the frequenters of the Annual Exhibition of the 
two last years at the Royal Academy, to require any notice 
on my part. The minute fidelity and admirable execution 
of this engraving, make it almost to be regretted that we 
are likely to have no other specimen of the same kind 
from the same hand, till it is recollected that Mr. Behnes 
has only laid down the pencil and the needle to take up the 
tool of Phidias ; which, if as successfully used and as 
sedulously as heretofore, is likely to chisel him into rapid 
fame as well as fortune. 



Bruno Nolano, (Giordano) Spaccio della Bestia trionfanie^ 
or the Expulsion of the Triumphant Beasts Svo. 1713. 

This famous Book', which in its original language, appeared,, 
in 8vo. Parigi, 1584, and wa& supposed to inculcate atheist- 
ical principles, appears from a critique of the work in No. 
389 of the Spectator to be a very harmless production : at 
M. Paris's Sale, 1791, it sold for 13/. 10s. but, as I only 
purpose treating of the English Translation, 1713, I must 
stop here. — It is well known that Bruno was burned alive 
at Rome, Feb. 17th, 1600. — For ample details see Peignot 
Dictionnaire des Livres Condamn^s au Feu, tom. i. p. 48, 
&c. 

In a eopy of the Translation sold at West's Sale, 1773» 
for the sum of 1/. 6s. was the following note by S. Pater- 
son: — 

** This Translation is commonly attributed to Toland ; 
but, upon the authority of the Translator himself, viz, the 



BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBRARY. 69 

late William Morehead, Esq. I am warranted to say, that 
it was hastily made by him for the private use of Mr. 
Collins, nor ever intended to be printed, though shortly 
after taken out of Mr. CoUins's Library by Toland, (as he 
believed) and sent to the press." 



Aikence Britannica ; or, a Critical Hiitory of the Oxford 
and Cambridge Writers and Writings, with those of the 
Dissenters and Romanists, as well as other Authors and 
Worthies, both Domestic and Foreign, both Antient and 
Modem. With Criticisms and Parallel Comparisons, Sfc. 
By M. D. Qvo. 1716. 

The author of this work was Mj'les Davies^ of whom 
Mr. Disraeli, in his Calamities of Authors, gives an account 
under the description of a Mendicant Author, " whose 
name has scarcely reached a few, and whose works are 
equally extraordinary and of the greatest rarity." Collec- 
tors (he observes) have sometimes met with a very curious 
volume, entitled ' Icon Lihellorum,* and sometimes the 
same book, entitled a Critical History of Pamphlets, which 
rare book forms the first volume of the AthensB Britannicae, 
and from which much literary history may be extracted. 

The Preface to the Second Volume opens his plan ; but, 
as he proceeded in forming these volumes, Mr. D*Israeli 
suspects, either that his mind became disordered, or that 
he discovered that mere literature found but penurious 
patrons. 

The copy in the British Museum is in seven volnmes, 
8vo. 



60 JOURNEY ROUND A 

Baker, the celebrated Bibliographer, never met with but 
three volames, sent him as a great curiosity by the Ear^ of 
Oxford, and now deposited in St. John's College. 

At the sale of Joseph Gulston, Esq. in 1783, a copy of 
the AthenaB BritannicaB, 6 vols. 8vo. 1116, described as very 
scarce, sold for 2/. 2s. and I know not of any other sale 
catalogue to which I can refer, for its increased value since 
that period. 



Collections concerning the Manor of Marden,Jn the County 
of Hereford. Folio. 

West, 1773, 2/. 8s.— Townley's Sale, 1814, 48/. 6s,^ 
Leigh and Sotheby's, 1813, (two sheets of the Index sup- 
plied by a reprint,) 48/. 6s. 

Thomas Earl of Coningsby, who purchased the MsiOor 
of Marden in 1717, compiled this laborious and now r^e 
History, and printed it at his own expence, with a view to 
support his right to the Lands of Amberley, &c. which he 
conceived ought to have passed into his hands with ^be 
said manor. He had served ejectments against the several 
families holding the lands ; but, not meeting the success he 
expected, most of the copies of the History of Marden 
were destroyed. The volume contains authentic extracts 
and copies of inquisitions, and other records, the originals 
of which are either scarce or not to be procured. 

The original copies have no title. The volume commences 
with signature B, page 1, and ends with 8 U 2^ page 720, 
and an Index. 



BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBRARY. 61 

The preceding account and description is extracted from 
Mr. W. Clarke's account of Mr. Towneley's copy, in the 
British Museum — to which he adds, that Mr. Dent's copy, 
after page 720, contains a supplement of 304 pages — eight 
leaves E and ** page 1 to 26 — D. E. F. and ** five leaves 
and Index. 



Servetus de Trinitate, 4to, Land. 1723. 

This Edition, which is without name of place or printer, 
and without date, was printed hy Palmer for Oshome the 
bookseller; but, as soon as completed, was seized by John 
Kent, Messenger of the Press, and William Squire, Messen* 
ger in Ordinary, on the 27th. of May in the above year, at 
the instance of Dr. Gibson, Bishop of London, and bomt, 
with the exception of a very iew copies. 

Tke first Edition, 1531-2, 2 vols. 8vo. is extremely rare, 
Mr. Heathcote's copy sold for 10/. 10s. — M. Paris 10/. 
158. Gaignat 25/. Valliere 29/. Roxburghe 1812 5/. Os. Od. 

It will be seen from the preceding prices that, Foumier 
rightly says, it is a book, the value of which is arbitrary. 

Servetus was led to the stake October 27, 1553, and 
remained two hours in the fire, on account of the wind 
driving the flames from the stake. While his torments 
were thus prolonged, it is said that, he exclaimed ** Unfor- 
tunate wretch ! Am I not to die ? What ! with the one 
hundred pieces of gold and the rich collar they have 
taken from me, could they not afford to purchase wood 
enough to consume me more quickly ! ! 



6^ JOURNEY ROUND A 

Knighfi (S.) Life of Dr. J. Colet. Svo. Loud. 1724. 

Should have the following plates : — 
Johannes Colett. — By Vertue — facing the Title. 
Sepulohnin Henrici Colet, p. 7. 
Dr. Colet's House at Stepney, p. 9. 
St. Paul's School, p. 100. 

Dr. Colet, <&c. from MS. in Public Library at Cam- 
bridge, p. 256. 
Dr. Colet's Monument at St. Paul's, p. 261. 
Sir Roger Cote's Monument, p. 430. 
Dr. Colet's Bust, St. PauFs School, p. 435. 

A large paper copy of the above book, sold in Wood- 
house's sale, for 5/. lOs. Ditto, at sale of J. Hunter Esq. 
1818, for 4/. 



Knight* i (S,) Life of Erasmus, Svo, Cambridge. 1720i 

In addition to the plates enumerated in the printed list, 
this work should contain the following: — 

Cenotaph of Th. More, p. 335. 

Inscription on Erasmus's Monument, p. 350. 

Portrait of Froben, p. 355. 

Woodhouse's sale L. P. 0/. 9s. — Hodges 1S14, 9/. 16s. 
—Bindley, 10/. 10s.— Hunter 1813, 4/. 4s. — Small paper, 
2/. 88. 



BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBRARY. 63 

KiEMPFER's (£.) History of Japan, translated by J, G, 
Scheuchzer, with Life of K^empfer. 2 vols. Folio. Plates. 
Lond. 1727. 

There is sometimes a second Appendix added to VoL 2, 
containing an Account of a Voyage to Japan, by an English 
Vessel in 1673, consisting (with Scheachzer's preface) of 
seven leaves. Folio, 1728. 

This Second Appendix is seldom found with the book. 

A copy L. P. with this Second Appendix, was in G. 
Mason's library, sold 1798, for 57. 

Colonel Stanley's copy 1813, sold for 14/. 14s. — Heath's 
copy, L. P. (1810) 8/. 16s.— Follett's (1814) for 6/. 16s. 6d. 



Explanatory Key to the Characters in DryderCs Poem of 
Absalom and AchitopeL 

Abethadin Lord Chancellor. 

Absalom Duke of Monmouth. 

Anabel Duchess of Monmouth. 

Achitopel Earl of Shaftesbury. 

Adriel • Earl of Mulgrave. 

Auriel Sir J. Seymour. 

Barzillai Duke of Ormond. 

Bathsheba Duchess of Portsmouth. 

Corah Oates. 

The Good Old Cause The B^und-head's Cant. 

Gath Flanders or France. 

God-like David King Charles II. 



64 JOUBXET BOUND A 

Hebron Scodand. 

HotLeTites Presbyterian Clergy. 

Hushai Earl Rochester and Hyde. 

The Sober part of Israel Of England. 

Old Jerusalem London. 

Jebnsites Papists. 

The Jews .*. The English. 

Jonas Sir W.Jones. 

Jotham Marquis of Halifax. 

Ishbosheth R. Cromwell. 

Israel's Monarch King Charles II. 

Isacbar T. Thynne Esq. 

Michal Queen Catherine. 

Pharoah King of France. 

Sagan of Jerusalem Bishop of London. 

Sanhedrin The Parliament. 

Saul Cromwell. 

Shimei Lord Mayor of London. 

Solyman Rout Mob of London. 

These Ad. Wits English Virtuosi. 

The Jewish Rabbins English Bishops. 

The Egyptian Rites Romish Religion. 

Zimri ...^ Duke of Buckingham. 

The Key iVom which this is copied, was printed at 
Dublin in 173 1, and said to have be<>n never before 
published. 



BIBLIOMANIAC'S tIBRARY. 65 

Madden^i (Dr. Sam.) Memoirs pf the 20th Century, being 
Original Letters of State under the Reign of GeorgeVL 
8vo. Lond. 1733. 

This book is considered one of the rarest in the English 
language : it was intended to have been comprised in six 
volumes, only one of which was ever printed. In order 
to expedite the printing and delivery, three printers, 
Bowyer, Woodfall, and Roberts, were employed, and 
One Thousand Impressions of the First Volume struck 
off — but suppressed on the day of publication. Eight 
Hundred and Ninety copies were delivered to Dr. Madden, 
and all supposed to have been destroyed by him. Mr. 
Tutet possessed a copy, and never heard but of one other, 
although he made diligent search for that purpose. 

A Copy was purchased by Mr. Bindley, at Saunders's 
Sale Room in 1818, for £^ 15s.— See also Bibliotheca 
Marshalliana, by Stewart. 



Fenelon (Fr. de Salignac de la Matte) Directions pour 
la Conscience d'un Roi. Folio. Amst. 1734. 

This work, the result of a secret correspondence between 
Fenelon and his Pupil, the Duke of Burgundy, during 
this Prelate's Exile to his Diocese, after his dispute with 
Bossuet, on the subject of Quietism, was infinitely more 
obnoxious to Louis XIY. than the Telemachus of the same 
author. 

When this Monarch, after the Dauphin's death, found 
the MS. among his papers, he indignantly threw it into 

F 



66 JOCSNCY HOUND A 

the fire, enraged no doubt at the bitter satire on his own 
reign, contained in Fenelon's Energetic Pictore of the 
"Duties of nojalty. 

'* Tout Prince *«age doit souhaiter de n'^tre que 
Texecuteur des Lois, et d'avoir un conseil supreme qui 
mod^re son uutorite," is one of Fenelon's maxims, which 
was not likely to be agreeable to royal ears ; and in these 
** DireetioM*' many similar ones are to be found. 

•* Ayez-vous," writes Fenelon to his Pupil, " Ayez-yous 
etudi^ la yraie forme du gouyemement de yotre Royaumef 
II ne suffit pas de sayoir les lois qui r^glent la propri^t6 
des terras et autres biens entre les particuliers ; c^est sans 
doute la moindre partie de la justice : il s'agit de celle que 
yous deyez garder entre yotre nation et yous, entre yous et 
yos yoisins. Ayez-yous ^tudi^ s^rieusement ce qu'on 
nomme le droit des gens, droit qu'il est d'autant moins 
permis 4 un Roi d'ignorer, que c'est le droit quit r^gle sa 
conduite dans ses plus importantes fonctions ? — Ayez-yous 
«faerche d connoitre, sans yous flatter, quelles sont les 
bornes de Totre autorite ? — Comment les choses ont pass6 
d r^tat present? sur quoi ce changement est fonde? ce 
que c'est que ranarcbie; ce que c'est que la puissance 
arbitraire, et ^ce que c*est que la royaute reglee par les 
lois, milieu entre ces deux extr^mites 1 

** N'avez-vous point donn6 oulaisse prendre d yos ministres 
des profits excessifs que leurs services n'ayaient point 
merit^s ? Les recompenses que le prince donnent d ceux 
qui servent -sous lui doiyent ayoir certaines homes. 

** Un Ministre, quelques serrices qu'il ait rendus, ne doit 
point paryenir tout d coup d des biens immenses pendant que 



BIBLIOMANIAC** LIBRARY. 67 

les peuples sonfiront. H est encore moins permis de donner 
de telles fortunes d des favoris, qui d'ordinaire ont eneore 
moins serri F^tat que les ministres. Avez-vous cherch^ 
les moyens de soulager les peuples, et de ne prendre sur 
eox que ce que les vrais besoins de I'etat vous ont contraint 
de prendre pour leur propre avantage? Le bien des 
peuples ne doit ^tre employe qu' d la vraie utilite des 
peuples m^mes. 

" L'Amour du Peuple, le bien publit, Tint^r^t general de 
la soci^te doirent ^tre la loi immuable et universelle des 
souyerains ; cette loi est ant^rieure 4 tout contrat ; elle est 
fondee sur la nature m^me ; elle est la source et la rdgle 
siire de toute les autres lois ; celui qui goureme doit £tre 
le premier et la plus ob^issant 4 cette loi primitive : il pent 
tout sur les peuples ; mais cette loi doit tout pouvoir sur 
Ini. Ce n'est pas pour lui-m^me que Dieul'a fait Roi; il 
ne Test que pour ^tre Thomme des peuples ; et il n'est 
digne de la Royaut6, qn'autant qu'il s'oublie r^ellement 
Ini m^me pour le bien public/' 

Sucb are some of Fenelon's Maxims in Politics ; his 
advice to his pupil in matters of religion is equally 
excellent and judicious ; and I shall conclude my notice of 
this work vi^ith an extract worthy of being impressed in 
letters of gold : — 

** Sur toute choses, ne for cez jamais vos sujets d changer 
de Religion; nulle puissance humaine ne pent forcer ie 
retranchement impenetrable de la liberte du cceur. La 

FORCE NE PEUT JAMAIS PERSUADER LES HOMMSS: ELLE 
NK FAIT QUE DES HYPOCRITES." 

I have omitted to mention that these '' Directions pour la 



^ 






y 



tIB JOURNEY ROUND A 

Conscience dPun Ro€' first appeared attached to the' £ditioli 
of Telemachns, in 4to. Amst 1784 * and Large Paper, m 
Folio, edited by the Marqais de Fenelon, who in addition 
to these Directions prefixed a life of his Uncle, both of 
which were suppressed " en vertu d'ordre tuperieur." An 
edition of 'these suppressed Directions was printed at the 
Hagae in 1747, but were not penmtted in France till 1774, 
when Louis XVI. ascended the throne, at which period 
the Editor took especial care to inform the public that he 
bad the express permission of the king tor their publication. 



Joe Millen^s Jests, 1745. 

Joe Mffler, of mifth-exciting memory, was a lirely 
tcomic actor, a great favorite of the town, and a very 
facetious companion ; I am therefore sorry to strip him of 
his laurels, but as legitimacy is the t>rder of the day, I 
must needs place the crown which Joe Miller has usurped 
so long and successfully, upon the head of him who has 
the most just claim to it. 

These Jests then, which are as well known, and almost 
as often quoted as Sbakspeare, are the production of Mr. 
lobn Mottley, who died October 30, 1760, Author of 
several Dramatic Pieces ; is also said to have had a hand 
in the composition of that many-fathered piece, " The Demi 
to Payr aind M'ho was the Author of '^ The Life of ike 
Czar, Peter the Great J^ It has also been surmised, and 



* A Copy of this Edition, Large Paper, in Folio, sold at Colonel 

Stanley's Sale for £2i 68, Od. 



BffiUOMjmUCii LIBKARY. 69^ 

\ritb some appearance of reason, (See Reed's Biographisr 
Dramatica,) that Mr. Mottley was the Compiler of the 
Lives of the Dramatic Writers, published at the end of 
Whincop's Seanderheg^ It is certain that the Life of Mr. 
Mottley in that work is rendered one of the most important 
in it, and is particularized by such a number of various 
incidents, as it seems improbable should have been known 
to any but himself, or some one nearly related to him. 
Among others, he relates the following anecdote, which 
contains some point : — 

" When Colonel Mottley, (our author's father) who was 
a great favorite with King James II. came over on a 
secret expediti<m from the abdicated Monarchy the govern- 
ment, who had by some means intellfgeuee of it, were 
y^ry diligent in- their endeavours to have him seized^ The 
Colonel, however, was happy enough to ekide their search, 
but several other persons were at different times seized 
tlirough mistake for him. Among the rest, it being well 
l^nown that he frequently supped at the Blue Posta^ 
"Xavem, in the Haymarket, with one Mr. Tredenhara, a 
Romish gentleman, particular directions were given for 
searching that house. Colonel Mottley, however, hap- 
'|>ening not to be there, the messengers found Mr. 
*Tredenham alone, and with a heap of papers before him i 
tbese and himself they seized and carried before the Earf 
of Nottingham, then Secretary of State. 

His Lordship, however, who could not fail but know 
him, as he was a member of the House of Commons, and 
nephew to the famous Sir Edward Seymour, asked him 
what all those papers contained : Mr. Tredenham mado: 
aofiwer,. that they were only th» several scenes of a pla}^^ 



70 JOURNEY BOUND A 

which he had heen scribbling for the amusement of a few 
leisure hours, upon which Lord Nottingham requested 
just to look over them, which haying done, he returned 
them again to the author, assuring him that he waa 
perfectly satisfied ; for, ' Upon my wwdy said he, ' loan 
find no plot in them J ^ 



King^s (Dr, Wm,) Works, viz. The Toast, An Heroic 
Satirical Poem, Templum Libertatis, Epistolce ohjurgato- 
ria, — Apology, £fc. 4to, Large Paper. Oxford, 1736. 

This volume was never published, and, on the death of 
the author, all, except sixty copies, were destroyed. See 
Bibliotheca Reediana, No. 2204, where a copy, with MS. 
key annexed, sold for 10/. 10s. 



King's (Dr. W.) Toast, a Poem. 4to. Privately Printed. 
1747. 

Gulston, 1783, 1/. Is. 



BozB, Monnoies des Prelats et Barons de France, (rassem- 
blees par M. Claude de Boze,) Keeper of the French 
King's Coins and Medals, in 1752. 

45 Plates, royal Ato. 

Of this collection of French Coins, M. de Boze, made 
presents to various persons of several detached plates. 
But had only three complete copies taken off: one for him* 



BIBUOMANUC's UBRARY. 71 

silfp ime ba presented ta tlxe late Dr. Mead, which at his 
Sftle was purchased by Dr. Andrew 6i£ford F. S. A. and 
the Uiird he ga(Ve to Dr. Andrew Coltee Ducarel, of 
Doctor's Comiv^nsi ; which latter cop3% with two original 
Letters of Y>% Boze to Ducarel, was sold at Genghis Sale, 
April IQIO, for 8j* and pasned into the library of Mr. 
Btckford. 



Shbbbeabb's (Br. J,) Seven Letters to the People of 
England, and a Second Seventh Letter to Ditto. Qvo, 

Dr. Shebbeare was pilloried in 1759 for this Work. 
Smollett^ in his continnation of Hume« says, the severity 
of the Government was about this period (1758) exercised 
on Dr. Shebbeare, a public writer, who, in a series of 
printed letters to the people of England, had animadverted 
on the conduct of the Ministry, in the most acrimonious 
terms; stigmatized sopie great names with all the virulence 
of censure; and even assaulted the Throne itself with 
oblique insinuation,^ and ironical satire. The Ministry, 
incensed at tiio boldness, and still more enraged at the 
success, of this author, whose writings were bought with 
avidity by|the public> determined to punish him severely for 
his arrogance and abuse, and he was apprehended by a 
warrant from the Secretary's Office. His Sixth Letter to 
the People of England was pitched upon as the foundation 
of a prosecution. After a short Trial, in the Court of 



72 JOURNEY ROUND A 

King's- Benchy he was found guilty of haring written tbe 
Sixth Letter, adjudged a libellous pamphlet, sentenced ta 
stand in the Pillory, to pay a «niall fine, to be imprisoned 
throe years, and give security for his future good beha- 
viour: so that, in eflfect, this good man suffered more for 
having given vent to the unguarded effusions of mistaken 
zeal, couched in the language of passion and scurrility, 
than was inflicted upon Hemsey^ a convicted Traitor, who 
had acted as a Spy for France, and betrayed his own 
Country for hire I 

^* N. B. The prosecution of Dr. Shebbeare was on ac- 
count of the Sixth Letter ; the imperfect Seventh Letter, 
which follows it, may be considered as a curiosity, as it 
never was compleated or published, and is the same Copy 
which was seized by the messenger Carrington, whose 
signature it has, and I suspect it to be the only Copy which 
exists, for every inquiry I have made has not been suffici- 
ent to point out any other." MS. Note of the late Isaac 
Reed, Esq. 

On the Accession of George III. Dr. Shebbeare obtain- 
ed a pension from Lord Bute, and defended the conduct of 
Grovemment in several Pamphlets. He died in 1788, at 
the advanced age of 70. 

The following MS. Epitaph, found among the papers of 
a gentleman recently deceased, has been presented me by 
his Executor, as an original Production of Dr. Sheb- 
beare's: it certainly has caustic enough in it for the 
severest satirist ; but whether it is an original or not, I^ 
who have little acquaintance with Dr. Shebbeare's Pro-^ 
ductions, am not competent to determine. — W. D. 



BIBLIOMANIAC'S UBRART. 7^ 

Here 

Bests at last. 

From aH his sangainar j desires 

S^ D y R ^r, K 1, 

Whose lore of Monej 

Was only exceeded 

By his Lust of Panishment. 

Fonn'd by Nature for all the Chicanery 

Of the Law, 

Improved by the double 

And deceitful Education 

Of A 

Presbyterian; 

By unvaried Application 

To his own Interest; 

By prostituting his Conscience, 

And 

A true time-serving Spirit; 

In spite of Genius 

From the Basest Original, 

He acquired the Immense Sum 

Of Three Hundred Thousand Pounds ; 

And Wriggled himself into Post 

Of Attorney General. 

In the Execution of this Office 

BKs Heart constantly felt Affliction, 

His Eye ever flow'd with Sorrow — 

When the Innocent escaped Unpunished. 

Hence by slavish Obedience 

To Ministerial Mandates, 

In wrestmg Laws to Arbitrary Purposes ; 



74 JOUSNSY ROUND A 

He ascended the seat 

Ot 

hotd Chief Justice. 

The same Thirst of Vengeancer 

Still waited oa his Footsteps ; 

Those whoM he long'd to Punish 

A» Attorney, 

He now condem'd 

WiOk DeUghl 

As Judge : 

Truth found no Justice, 

Virtue no Favour, 

When in oppc^lition to Conrt Measures r 

Zealous to establish TyranQjr 

In the Grown Law, 

Against all but * Robbers 

Of the Publicfc Money, 

Tq whem from Sympathy, 

He was fnerei6il beyond pleasure. 

Ji&nemy to liberty, 

Steady in bis Covntry's Ruu», 

Encouraged and adapted 

By all the Qualities of Head and Heart 

Which dtsgPMe Hwnan Nature, 

To request Nobility, 

He Asfc'd 
And it was granted- 

♦ Vide L p's Trial, where, after beingr found gailtj of 

illegally possessing Tweaty Thousand Pounds, he was only fined 
the Interest of the money he had in his hands, still preserving all 
his places but one. 



BIBLIOMANIAC** LIBRARY. 75 

Heaven and Monarohs 

Behold with different Eyes : 

Him whom his Sovereign Summoned 

To a Peerage, 

God snatch'd to answer for his Crimes, 

For know the Almighty will not 

Always Unresenting, 

Permit the Ambitious to receive, 

Nor Kings to bestow, those Honours 

On the Nefarious, 

Which are only the Just Reward 

Of 
Virtue. 



BaemCs (Francis) VUcfmnt ^St. Alban's, Works. 6 vols. 
4lo. Land. 1765. 

This is esteemed as the best edition of Lord Bacon's 
Works; it was corrected throughout, according to 
Nichols's Anecdotes of Bowyer, 4to. p. 864, by the learned 
and industrious Mr. Gambold, and the Latin volumes were 
accurately revised by Mr. Bowyer. 

Its nominal value is from nine to thirteen guineas ; the 
intrinsic value may be more justly ascertained from Bishop 
Watson, who has said, *^ That nature has been very spa- 
ring in the production of such men as Bacon ; they are a 
kind of superior beings; and the rest of mankind are 
usefully employed for whole centuries in picking up what 
lie poured forth at once. Make Bacon, then, and Locke, 
(continues the learned Bishop of Llandaff) and why should 
I not add, that sweet child of nature Shakespeare, your 



76 JOURNEY BOUND A 

chief companions through life ; let them he ever upon your 
table ; and when you hare an hour to spare from business 
or pleasure, spend it with them, and I will answer for 
their giving you entertainment and instruction as long a* 
you live." 

The compQers of the Greneral Biographical Dictionary^ 
give it as the opinion of the judicious Brucker, I suppose 
from his Histmia Critiea PkUosopkue, ''That an attentive 
and accurate reader already not unacquainted with Philo- 
sophical subjects, will meet with no insuperable difficulties 
in studying the works of Bacon;, and, if he be not a 
wonderful proficient in science, will reap much benefit, as 
well as pleasure, from the perusd. In fine," adds this 
judicious writer, " Lord Bacon, by the universal consent 
of the learned world, is to be ranked in the first class of 
modem philosophers. He unquestionably belonged to that 
superior order of men, who, by enlarging the boimdaries 
of human knowledge, have been benefactors to mankmd; 
and he may not improperly be styled, on account of the 
new track of science which he employed, the Columbus^ 
of the Phaosophical World." 

It is rather a remarkable circumstance that CongrevCr^ 
who highly eulogized the reputed authoress of what has 
long been considered a very rare book ; that the Editor of 
the same work; that later writers who have referred to it; 
and that even Mr. Noble, who was favoured with the as- 
sistance of Mr. Bindley in compiling the continuation te< 
Granger's Biographical History of England, should not 
have discovered that the sentiments in Reliqua GethiniipUB, 
or Bemains of Lady Grace Gethin, 4to. 1890, are almost 
literal transcripts from the works of Lord Bacon ! ! 1. Well 



BIBLIOMANUC't LIBRARY. 77 

might this yooDg lady, odIj twentj-ODe yeatrs of age, be 
tnunpeted forth us a Prodigy, and have her portrait in 
mezzotinto prefixed, for the admiration of physiognomists, 
and I question whether it would not hare puzzled even 
Spurzheim himself to have dfscoyered in the Cranium of 
this young lady, any organ of similitude so strong as to 
hare exonerated her from the charge which Mr. D^Israeli 
in his Curiosities of Literature, maintains against the 
Editor of her Remains ; for it does not appear that she 
was any party to the cheat, having had the good sense to 
select passages from Bacon for her common-place book, 
which her friends appear to have been wise enough to 
suppose the effusions of her own brain. 



Lord Baltimore's Gaudia Poetica, or Pleasures of Poetry, 
Lat, Eng^ and French. Large Quarto, with a variety 
of beautiful Copper-Plates, Aug, 1770. 

Of this rare and uncommon Book, privately printed, 
only Ten Copies were struck off, and those given by his 
Lordship to his particular friends. 

In Reed's Sale, 6682, a copy sold for 6/. 10s. with MS. 
Note, referring to Este's Travels, p. 351 ; in Randolph's 
Sale, 1814, for 5/. 15s. 6d. and Mr. StrettelFs Copy sold 
at Evans's in 1820, to a Mr. Miller for 3/. 3s. — 
Mr. Burnham, of Northampton, in his Catalogue for 1796, 
said that he had inquired of several curious gentlemen, as 
well as of those in the trade, but could not meet with any 
one who had either seen or ever heard there was such a 
book. 



78 JOUBN8Y ROUNP A 

Dc Lolme, (J.) CmuHhUum de LAngUierre^ coaipcrec 
«MC la Forme RepubHcame ei lei Mamarekiei de rEwr^pe* 
Hvo. Londres, 1770. 

De Lolme's Essay on the English Constitntion, was first 
written in French, and published in Holland, according to 
the author's own advertisement, prefixed to the first 
English Translation, 8vo. 1775. The author was a citizen 
of Geneva, and only twenty-eight years of age when he 
wrote this celebrated work, which continues to be regarded 
as the most rational and enlightened survey of the English 
Constitution, and has never yet been superseded by any 
other work on the same subject. 

De Lolme's work was strictly prohibited in France in 
1771; which, says Peignot,* ought not to surprise us, 
when it is known that the author, after having rapidly 
traced the History of the three great Epochs of the English 
Constitution, viz. the Reign of John — that of Edward the 
First — and, lastly, the Expulsion of James the Second; 
or, rather, the Exaltation of the House of Brunswick to 
the Throne in 1888, thus expresses himself on the subject 
of this latter event : — 

*' The Revolution (of 1689) is therefore the third Grand 
iBra in the History of the Constitution of England. The 
Great Charter had marked out the limits within which the 
Royal Authority ought to be confined ; a few outworks 
were raised in the reign of Edward the First ; but it was 
at the Revolution Uiat the circumvallation was completed. 
It was at this asra, that the true principles of civil society 

* Diet, det Li?ret Condamnte aa Feu, lapprim^ on e«nsur^ 



BiBLIOMAKIACt LIBRARY. 79 

'wefe fdny edtabli^hed. By tlie expulsion of a King who 
had violated his oath, the doctrine of resistance, that ulti- 
mate fe.«ottrce of an oppressed people, was confirmed 
1>eyond a doubt. By the exclusion given to a family here- 
<ditfiiHly despotic, it was finally determined, that nations 
are not the property of kings. The principles of passive 
obedience; the divine and indefeasible right of kings; in 
a word, the whole scafiblding of false and superstitions 
notions, by which the royal authority had till then been 
mpported, fell to the ground ; and, in the room of it were 
fubstituted, the more solid and durable foundations of the 
love of order, and a sense of the necessity of civU govern- 
ment among mankind." 

Lastly, the key-stone was put to the arch, by the final 
establishment of the Liberty of the Press.* 

D^Israeli, in his Calamitiesof Authors, vol. 2, p.265y&c. 
has paid a very high eulogium to De Lolme ; but, in his 
concluding paragraph, has, in my humble opinion, passed 
unmerited censure. " De Lolme^* says Mr. D'lsraell, 
^* ought not to have congratulated himself that he had been 
allowed the Liberty of the Press, unharrassed by an INQUI- 
SITION — this sarcasm is senseless! or, his book is a mere 
Jktion r 

This I think an unfair construction. — De Lolme clearly 
meant, as appears to me, that, however little he owed to 



*■ The Liberty of the Preu was, properly speaking, estahliihed 
•Illy four years afterwards, in consequence of the refiual of the 
Parliament, at that time, io continue any longer the restrictions 
mhUh had heen set mpon tt.— Bell's De Lolme, p. 33« 



aO JOURNEY ROUND A 

England, she at least allowed him to write nnmoleated by 
the Inquisition, or by other persecution — an advantage, 
perhaps, peculiar at that time to this country, and which, 
from the circumstance of the rigid proscription of his book 
in France, it is erident he had too nrach reason to expect 
in other countries. 



Tht RegulatwM and Ettabliihment of the Houfekold of 
Henry Percy, Jifth Earl of Northumbbrland, at kis 
Catties of Wre8$il and Lekinfield in Yorkihire, begun 
4. I>. 1512. 8vo. London. Printed 1770. 

Usually called the Northumberland Household 
Book. 

Heathcote, 10/. 15s. — Roxburghe, 6/.— Montolieu,72.12s. 
— ^Steevens, 5/. — Rev. J. Brand, 11/. lis. 

Title, as above — Preface, 26 leaves — Advertisement, 1 
leaf — Kalendar, 4 leaves, 3 to 10 — ^Household Book, 1 to 
410— Title to Notes, I leaf— Notes, 19 leaves, 413 to 450 
— Account of Wressil Castle, 451 to 464 — Extract from 
Leland's Itinerary, 1 page — Index to Notes, and Errata, 
3 pages. 

Dr. Percy, Bishop of Dromore, edited the Northum- 
berland Household Book, which was not printed for sale. 

A copy, illustrated with numerous prints, &c. relative to 
the History of the Percy Family, elaborately arranged in 
chronological series, from the beginning of the reign of 
Henry YIII. the work of the late Sir W. Burrell, in 
3 vols, folio, sold at his Sale in May, 1796, for 75/. 128« 



BIBLIOHAKUC'i UBRART. 8t 

HatDkeiwarth^s (Dr.) Account of the Voyages undertaken 

for making Digcoveries in the Soutkem Hemisphere^ and 

successively performed by Commodore Byron, Captains 

Wallisy Carteret, and Cook. 3 vols. 4to. Lond. 1772. 

At Sir W. Guise's Sale, 1812, a copy sold for 9/. 9s. 

Captain Cook's First Voyage was performed in the 
Endeavour, which returned to England in July, 177 1 . The 
account of this voyage, together with that of Byron, of 
Wallis, and of Carteret, was compiled by Dr. Hawkesworth, 
from the journals of the several Commanders, and published 
tmder the above title ; and, it may not be misplaced in- 
formation, to those who are unacquainted with the circum.- 
stance, that the First Edition of this Book is known 
by the paging of the Second and Third Volumes, which 
begins at Volume II. and runs on to the end of Volume 
III. without beginning again at Volume III. as in the 
subsequent edition. 

I find it recorded upon good authority, that Dr. Hawkes- 
worth received <£6000 for compiling this work. 

Hawkesworth, the elegant translator of Telemachus, and 
author of the Adventurer, indulged his imagination in 
'working up these journals of our celebrated circumnavi- 
gators, till he digressed into misplaced pruriency. Inquiries 
which he seemed to think innocent, were condemned by 
the public, as criminal. He is said to have been the 
victim of his own misplaced opinions, in the storm which 
they raised up against himself — and that which ought to 
have tended to increase his reputation, proved his banCj^ 
and finally caused his deatli. 



W JDURNST BOUITP A 

BryanVs fJ.) New Stfstemf or a» Anmhfm of AMcUmi 
Mythology. 3 vols, 4to. Lond. lH9,^e. 

In this Book, Vol. ii. p. 392, should be a print firom the 
famous gem of Capid and Psyche, in the Marlborough 
Collection, by Bartolozsi. This is fireqnently supplied by 
copies from Bartolozzi, by Sherwin, &c. 

The value of this book raries from eight to twelve guuieas, 
according to condition. 



JohnunCs (Dr. SamK) Jowmey to tke Wutem JUands q 
Scotland. 8vo. First Edition. Land. 1775. 

Dr. Lort's copy sold in 1791, for 15a.; and, besides 
Tarious MS. and printed additions, contained, accordiDg t^ 
Mr. darkens Repertorium Bibliographiomm, *' the cancelled. 
part of p. 48, relative to Lichfield Cathedral; and^ 
likewise, the cancelled part of p. 296, respecting the Cava 
at Egg, and the transaction there." 

With respect to the first cancel, p. 48, in my copy of tho 
First Edition, which formerly belonged to W. Williams, 
of Peniarth XJchaf, I find the following passage, speaking 
of the authorised dilapidations and unroofing of the 
Cathedrals of Elgin and Aberdeen, after the Reformation, 
Dr. Johnson says, ** the order was obeyed; the two 
Churches were stripped, and the lead was shipped to be 
sold in Holland. I hope every reader will rejoice that 
this cargo of sacrilege was lost at sea. 



BiritmMAiflACs UBRART. 83 

^ Let US not, faowerer, make too much haste to despise 
our neighbotirs. Our own cathedrals are mouldering hj 
nnrfegarded dQapidatiofi. It seems to be part of the 
despicable philosophy of the time to despise monuments 
of sact^d itilignifi(^nce ; and we are in danger of doing 
that deliberately, which the Scots did not do but in the 
misettled state ttt an imperfect constitution." 

The othei* passo^ is as follows : — " The inhabitants of 
Aum are fifty-eight families, who continued Papists for 
8<Ntee time afttfi* the Laird became a Protestant. Their 
adherence to the 0I4 religion, was strengthened by the 
edtnit^ance of the Laird's sister, a zealous Romanist, till 
<me Sunday, a^ they were going to mass under the conduct 
of their patroness, Maclean met them on the way, gare 
one ef them a Uow on the head with a yellow stick, I sup- 
pose a cane, for which the Earse had no name, and drove 
thMB to the Kifli, from which they hare never since de- 
puted. Since the use of this method of conversion, the 
iiihahkli^ts 6f ^g and Canna, who continue Papists, 
call the Protestantism of Rum, the religion of the Yellow 
^ick. 

The only Popish islands are Egg and Canna. Egg is 
the principal island of a parish, in which, though he hatf 
no congregation, the Protestant Minister resides. I have 
heard of nothing curious in it, but the cave in which a 
former geheration of the islanders were smothered by 
Macleod. 

If we had travelled nt^ith more leisure, it had not been 
fit to haYe neglected the Popish islands. Popery is fa- 
vourable to ceremony ; and, among ignorant niations^ cere- 



84 JOURNEY BOUND A 

mony is the only preservative of tradition. Since Pro« 
testantism was extended to the savage parts of Scotland, 
it has perhaps been one of the chief labours of the Minister 
to abolish stated observances, because they continned the 
remembrance of the former religion* We therefore, who 
came to hear old traditions, and see antiquated manners, 
shonld probably have found them among the Papists." 

I doubt that the quotations I have here made from the 
First Edition in my possession, are the individual cancels 
alluded to, as being contained in Dr. Lort's copy ; but, 
whether they be or be not the same, they are extremely 
amusing ; and no one I think can object to have placed 
before his eyes anything written by Dr. Johnson. And I 
must be excused for not being more certain with respect to 
these cancels, as I spent a considerable time in fruitlessly 
examining Boswell's Life of Johnson, to see if any mention 
is there made of the circumstance; and, after all, perhapa 
overlooked what I was in search of; but, as I have referred 
to the cancelled pages, my mistake, if I have committed 
one, will I trust soon meet correction. 



Dodsletfs Collection of Old Plays. 12 vols. 12mo. 1744. 
Ditto. 12 vols. 8vo. 1780. Second Edition. 

Of this Second Edition, only six copies, on fine paper, 
were printed, and disposed of as follows : — 

1. Mr. Reed's Copy, which, at his Sale, Lot 8880, sold 
for 10/. 158. to Mr. Baker, Lace-Merchant, of St. Paul's 
Church-Yard. 



BIBLIOMANIAC'! LIBRARY. 85 

"2. Geo. SteeveDs, Esq. in Bibliotheca Steevensiana, 
Ko. 1407, bound in Russia, sold for 12/. 12s. to Manson, 
tmd probably the same copy which afterwards in 1803, 
sold at Woodhouse's Sale for 14/. 16s. 

3. £dm. Malone, Esq. 

4. T. Pearson, Esq. he dying, the copy remained with 
Mr. Reed. 

5. Mr. Dodsley. 

6. Mr. Nicols, Printer. 

A copy at the Duke of Grafton's in 1815 sold for 11/. 15s. 
and one in Heathcote's Sale, May 2nd, 1808, bound in re4 
morocco, gilt leaves, for 32/. 10s. which of the six copies 
these may have been I am unable to say. 

By a fire which happened at Mr. Dodsley's warehouse 
in Wild Court, in June, 1787, almost the whole impressions 
(for few had been sold) were destroyed. 



Blond (Le) et La Chau, Description des Prindpakt 
Pierres Gravies du Cabinet du Due cTOrleans. 2 vols. 
Folio. Paris. 1780—1784. 

Copies, Grand Papier de Hollande, containing the sup- 
pressed plates, four in number, of Medailles l^intriennes, 
are extremely rare. 

Col. Stanley's Copy sold for 48/. 6s. containing the sup- 
pressed plates. 

Talleyrand's Copy sold for eighteen guineas ; but, I do 
not know if it contained the Spintrian Medals, which are 
usuaUy found in tom. i. p. 262. 



86 JOURNEY BOUKD 4 

W. Beckfordy Esq. possesses the Abb£ Jjd Blond's own 
Copjy containing several curious variations of the plates, 
printed expressly for the Abb^, on ColaaUner paper, and 
brilliant impressions. Small paper copies sell nsvaUy from 
jBre to eight guineas. 



Marlburieniis, (G. Spencer, Dux) GemnuB Aniiyuie, — 
Choix de Pierres Antiques Gravies, de son Cabinet. 
S torn. Large Folio. Lond. 1781—1790. 

Only one hundred copies were struck off for presents. 
The Latin Exposition to the First Volume was written by 
Mr. Jacob Bryant^ and the French Translation by the late 
Mr. Maty. The Exposition to the Second Volume was by 
Dr. Wm. Cole, Chaplain to the Duke, and the Translation 
into Frepch by Mr. Dutens. 

At the Gainsborough Sale, 1813, a complete copy was 
aold to the Marquis of Bath for 204/. 16s. — ^At M. Paris's 
Sale, 1791, Vol. i. sold for 73/. 10s.— aqd at S. Rose'f 
Sale, May 25th, 1820, a copy of the two vols, in boards, 
only sold for 73/. 10s. 



Knighfs (R. P.) Account of the Remains of the WorsMp 
of Priapus. 4to. With Plates. Lond.l'JM. 

This, although only a thin quarto volume, is extremely 
rare ; and, whenever it has chanced to be exposed for 
public sale, has brought from nine to sixteen guineas. Tlie 
engravings in illustration of the subject are copied firoip the 



BIBUOMANUCt EIBRART. 8t 

antique ; and in the eyes of some of the purchasers of the 

beoky Ihaf^eno doubt, form its principal attraction: this 

they may be the less inclined to acknowledge, after 

reading the following extract from Matthews's Journal of a 

Tour in Portugal, Italy, &c. 8vo. 1820. Speaking of a 

collection of these remains in the Mnseo Borbonrco, he 

says, ** that interestmg as these curiosities are in throwing 

light upon the manners of ancient times, they are justly 

offensive to modem delicacy. The most extraordinary of 

Aeae remains wre the ornaments and decorations of the 

Temple of Isis, and nothing can more clearly demonstrate 

the coarseness and corruption of ancient taste, unless it 

"be the monstrous conjunctions consecrated by their 

abominable superstition, which are still more shocking 

evidences of the depravity c^ their imaginations." 

Brydone, a traveller of somewhat earlier date, in his 
Tour through Sicily, Malta, &c. 2 vols. 8vo. 1774, 
speaking of a temple dedicated to a like purpose, thus 
amusingly continues: — " It has now been purged and 
purified from all the infection contracted from the heathen 
rites, and is become a Christian church, dedicated to the 
blessed Virgin, who has long been constituted imiversal 
legatee and executrix to all the antient goddesses, celestial,, 
terrestial, and infernal; and, indeed, little more than the 
names are changed, the things continuing pretty much the 
same as ever. — ^The Catholics themselves do not attend to 
this : — ^but it is not a little curious to consider, how small 
is the deviation in almost every article of their present 
rites from those of the antients. I have somewhere seen 
an observation, which seems to be a just one : that during 
the long reign of Heathenism, superstition had exhaustect 



so JOUBNBT ROUND A 



Brydone, who was no oDtliiimity thiui yemiUjF «pQlognpf» 
for the inferior Catholics adoration of the Y irgim Vvj^ 

" Were jon to attempt to give a country-fellow an ide* 
of the deity ; were yon to tell him of a being that is 
immaterial, and yet whose essence penetrates aU matter; 
who has existed from all eternity, and whose extension Is 
equally boundless with his duration; who fills and pervades 
millions of worlds, and animates every object they contain;^ 
and who, in the sublime language of our poet, — 

** Tho* chang'd thro' all, i« yet in all the same, 
** Great in the Earth, as in the JStherial frame : 
** Warms in the sun, refreshes in the breeze, 
** Glows in the stars, and blossoms in the trees ; 
" Lives through all life, extends thrq' all extent ; 
*' Spreads undivided, operates unspent 

To him no high, np low, no great, no small; 

He fills, he bounds, connects, and equals all." 

Now what do you imagine he would think of sneh a 
being? I am afraid his understanding would bo so 
bewildered, ihat he could not think at all. But set up 
before him the figure of a fine woman, with a beautifid 
child in her arms, the most interesting object in nature ; 
and tell him she can procure him every thing he wants ; he 
ki^ows perfectly weU what he is about; feels himself 
animated by the object, and prays to her with all his mi^t.** 






BlttUOMANIACft LIBRARY. B9 

"WGfidd mak^ the Airies Chrigtians too, for surely tbey 

"^^onld be much the better for it — Bat, obsenring the fignre 

of St. Anthony, he would exclaim with astonishment — 

Sot what do I behold ! — ^Jnpiter, the sovereign «f gods 

and men, with a ragged cloak over his ^ofdders 1 What a 

Iramiliating spectacle! Well do I remember with what 

a.i;re we bent before that once respectable image. But 

*«irliat has become of the thnnderbolt which he held in his 

Iiand to chastise the world; and what is that he has got in 

its place ? His conductor would tell him, that it was only 

SL piece of tope with knx>ts upon it to chastise himself; 

cidding, that he was now doing penance for his long 

"Usurpation, and that the thunder had long ago been put 

into better hands. However^ he would soon find that 

even these saints sometimes change their names, according 

to the enthusiastic caprice of the people ; and from this 

versatility he would still be in hopes, in process of time, 

to see his friend Jupiter re-assume his bolt and dignity. 

Do you remember Did Huet-— the greatest of all originals? 

One day, as he passed the Statue of Jupiter in the 

Capitol, he pulled off his hat and made him a bow : — a 

Jacobite gentleman, who observed it, asked him why he 

paid so much respect to that old gentleman; — for the same 

reason, replied Huet, that you pay so much to the 

pretender. Besides, added he, I think there is greater 

probability that his turn will come round again, than that 

of your hero ; I shall therefore endeavour to keep well with 

him, and hope he will never forget that I took notice of 

him in the time of his adversity .'' 

After some further pertinent remarks on the connexion 
between the Heathen and Catholic deities and ceremonies, 



so JOUBNST ROUND A 

Brydone, who wm no entlmiii^t, thiui feniibljF upologpit^ 
for the inferior Catholics adoralioii of the yirgw Muj* 

" Were you to attempt to give a coimtry-fellow an idea 
of the deity ; were you to tell him of a being that is 
immaterial, and yet whose essence penetrates aU matter; 
who has existed from all eternity, and whose extension Is 
equally boundless with his duration ; who fills and pervades 
millions of worlds, and animates every object they ooBtain;^ 
and who, in the sublime language of our poet, — 

*' Tho' chang'd thro' all, i$ yet in all the same, 
** Great in the Earth, as in the JStherial frame : 
** Warms in the sun, refreshes in the breeze, 
** Glows in the stars, and blossoms in the trees ; 
** Lives through all life, extends thrq' all extent ; 
*' Spreads undivided, operates unspent. 
** To him no high, np low, no great, no small; 
** He fills, he bounds, connects, and equals all." 

Now what do you imagine he would think of arnh a 
being? I am afraid his understanding would be so 
bewildered, that he could not think at all. But set up 
before him the figure of a fine woman, with a beautiful 
child in her arms, the most interesting object in nature ; 
and tell him she can procure him every thing he wants ; he 
knows perfectly weU what he is about; feels himself 
animated by the object, axid prays to her with all his mi|^f 



4niMai$ Paeiiea, ft. M. eUd. T. I^kit. (hm 1794L 

Of the Largai Paper, in Polio, only thirty copies were 
printed, these were intended as presents to crowned heads, 
public librmes, and distinguished personages, twenty of 
irhich bayi) been dispersed. 

A% the Dofce of Soxbiiigbe'S Anotion, in 1814, a Copy 
faU for mi. les. 

Jfusemn Wonieyanum, or a ColkeHon of 4Mi9V^ fosse- 
refetoet, But^of, Siatuei, and Oewu; with Viem of 
Plaou tn tht LeoanU, takaa on fAe spol t» the yoan 
178&-6-7. (By Sir X. Wordeg,) 9 volt. foKo. Ltmdom. 
PrtMied by Bnlmer, 17M. 

Of this work 250 Copies were printed, none of which 
were ever sold daring the life of the author* In the 
beginning of the year 1804, no more than tweiity*seTiii 
cqpies had been presented by him to particular friends, and 
snob was his anxiety to prevent its being offered for sale, 
^llM he pnrclMwed a Copy for SOO/. from the execntors of 
aiiQ of the gentlemen to whom he had presented it, in 
order to bipder its falling into the hands of a bookseller. 
The expencef attending this publication, including the 
author's travels, lire sajd to hare amounted to upwwli of 
27,000(. 

l^ej^p ia % fevy good analysis sf it in the first toIuiim of 
^ya(;e> Idihwrian, 

GrenyiUe, 1810, sold for 67/. 15s. 

Shr W. Mamflton, Ul lOs. 

Townley, 96/. 128. 



92 JOUaNEY ftOUND A 

Dis^intian up<m Etruican Vases, dupJayvsg their pr^Babte 
connection with the Shows at Eleusis, and the Chinese 
Feast of Lanterns. Plates, 4to. 1806. 

This privately printed and unpublished book was written 

by Mr. Christie of Pall Mall, its merit and rarity give it a 

fair place in any library, and the price it has brought in 

the following sales sufficiently cTince its estimation among 

collectors. 

£. s. d. 
Hon. C. F. Greville, April 3, 1810 ... 12 

R. Gough, Esq. April 5, 1810 10 O 

Asde, 1816 14 6 O 

Dutens, 1813 15 16 O 

Sir P. Thompson, 1815 10 15 



^ 



Stedman^s (Captain J. G,) Narrative of a Five Years 
Expedition against the Revolted Negroes of Surinam^ in 
Guiana, on the Wild Coast of South America, from the 
year 1772 to 1777, elucidating the History of that 
Country, and describing its Productions, 3 vols. 4to» 
with a Portrait of the Author, engraved by Bartolozzi, 
and 80 Engravings from Drawings by the Author.* 
Lond. Johnson, St, PauPs Church Yard, 1806. 

Copies, with the plates coloured, of which I believe 
very few exist, are rarely met with; a Copy of this 
description sold among the books of J. Follett, Esq. in 
1814, for 7/. 

* At tho end of each volume is a List of Plates and directions 

for placing the same. 



BIBUOMANIAC's LIBRARY. 93 

Jobn Oabriel Stedman was a native of Scodand, and 
died at Tiyerton, Devon, March 1^ 1797» at the age of 62. 
He was buried at Bicklej, near Tiverton, with this 
Epitaph, written by himself, and at his own desire, placed 
over his tomb. 

This Stedman leaves to yon; 

" As you'd be done by — do.** 

The rest, memento mari ; 

Here ends poor Stedman's story. 



ViewM in Orkney and on the North^Eoitem Coati of 
Scotland: etched hy the Marchioneu of Stafford^ toitk 
Descriptions. Folio. 1807. 

. A limited number of these views were struck off to 
present to particular friends, after which all the plates 
were broken up. 

At the Hon. G. F. Greville's Sale, 1810, a copy sold 
for 16/. 16s. 

Duten's Sale, 1813 ... j^l4 3 6 

Pinkerton's, 1813 15 15 

Stewart's, 1814 10 10 



Engravings and Etchings of the Principal Statues, Busts, 
Bas Reliefs, Sepulchral Monuments, Cinerary Urns, 
Sfc. in the Collection of Henry BlundeU, Esq. at Ince, 
2 vols, imperial folio, 1809. 

Not prints for Sale, and only Twenty Copies said to 
have been struck off. 



'' this Codecticm Jnlfclia««d fWim the ^aH MbUjA «tad 
Este, was transfeiivd ftota thence by the late ptoptibM 
to Ince Blundell, near Lirerpool, where he eretDted, tft a 
repository for them^ a rdttmda of great ib^hit^ctiiid 
beauty, upon the plan of the Pantheon at Rome.^ 

The only Copy which has hitherto occurred for pnblic 
sale, was in Payne and fosses Catalogue for 18 15, where 
it is marked at 73/. 10s. 

There is a Copy in the British Museum. See Clarke*s 
Repertorium, p. 30. 



The Antient Paintings of the Jbathk of Tihti^ dime from 
the Originals, by Carkmi. Atlas Folio, 61 Coloured 
Drawings^ various sizes. 

Not more than fweWe Copies were exeettted. Oi^v bf 
tiie^ Hold at M. {''arises Sale, in lt6l, for iW. Sh. 



Chine — Les Grandes Sdtailtes de la Chine, gravees som 
la Direction de M, Cochin. Atlas Polio, and Description 
in Quarto. 

The original designs of these prints were sent by the 
Emperor of China to be engraved in France. Wken tkey 
were done, the plates were sent to China, and Telry ftw 
impressions remained in Europe. 

At M. Paris's Sale in 1791, a copy sold for 54/. 12s. 



BIBtJbMAMtAC^t LIBIURT. 95 

t&pKeatum de9 PHmeipaiU Nams laiiteM en hiane dam la 
- SkMtdk Partit dn ' CokfesHaiu de J. J. Rwueau/ 
Edition de <S^tmi)ie. 

Iff* D n.... .••••« Monsieur Dapin. 

M**. D u. •• »•• Madame Dapin. 

M.lePresidentdeL ^n. Lamoignon. 

M. le Prince de C . ... Conti. 

M. de 7 Monisiear de FrancaeQ. 

Mad"«. de F Madame de Francuefl. 

M. le Comte de M '» ou 

simplement M. de M. ... Monsieur le Comte de Mon- 

taigtt, Attbassade da Roi 
Venise. 

M. D' J Monsieur d'Epinay. 

Mae D» y Madame D'Epinay, qui donne 

d Rousseau THermitage. 

M"«. la Comtesse de H , 

ou simplement M""** de H. Madame la Comtesse d'Houp* 

tot, Belle Soeur de Madame 
d'Epinay , et dont Rousseau 
deTint i TAge de 45 Ans si 
eperdument amoureux. 

M. G , Le S'. G -, ou 

€r M. Grimm, Lecteurdu Prince 

Hereditaire de Saxe Gotha. 

M^*. de P -X..H Madame de Pompadour. 

M. de C ^x Monsieur de Chenonceaux. 

M**. de C n Madame de Chenonceaux. 

Le Baron d'H k, ou 

simplement d'H ^k. M. le Baron d'Holback. 

W\ d'H ^k Mad-MaBaronnc d'Holback. 

M. d'A — Monsieur d'Argenson. 

M"^ F— Mademoiselle Fel. 



• 




t 


M. de St L— t 


cin GtoneYou. 






^ tAetAemie Fran^oise, 
et Auteur da Poeme des 
Saiflons. 



Le P. B r »••.• Le Pdre Berthier. 

M. de B • MoniieHT de BonvQIe^ 

M. de L. de M b^ ou 

timplement M. de M. ••• Monsieur de Lamoignoir de 

Malsherbes. 

M.de C ■■ ■ ■ MonBieurleDacaeChoiseaU; 

L'Abb^ de B — s Bonfflers. 

M"*' JaComteMe de B b 

ou simplement Mad"'^ de 

B 8 Madame la Comtegse de 

Boafflers. 

Le Mal^uis de V— — y... Villeroy* 

M* M Monsieur Monlton. 

M. Du P Monsieur Du Peyrou. 

M. D'l 8. •• Monsieur D^lFeniois. 

La Marichale de M x. Mirepoix^ 

La C ..•• La Cheyretle. ) Maisons de Campagne de 

£-^ Epinay. y Madame D'Epinay. 

J'ai trouT^ cette explication en manuscrit dans une copie 
des ** Confessions de J. J. Rousseau/' Edition de Geneve^ 



» •* 



FINIS. 



Mwihall, Ptiotcr, Keotoa SUect, Braitiwick Square. 







A fMOMD 

JOURNEY ROUND 



Of 

A BIBLIOMANIAC; 

OB, 

CENTO OF NOTES AND REMINISCENCES 



CONCSENIlfQ 



RARE^ CURIOUS^ AND YALUABLR 



BT 

WILLIAM DAVIS, 

AV1B0E or ^ TBI QUO OF BIBLIOOmAVHlCAL AND ItimAET AMBCBOTBp 

AND MmOEANDA." 



LONDON: 



PRINT£D FOR W. DAVIS, BOOKSELLER, 

AT THS BKDPORD L|BRAKY, SOUTHAMPTON KOW, KUI8KLL fQUABJC. 

1886, 



- ir 



■ ^ . 



-J 
f'l 




■11; ,• 



..: • • ;... ' 
:: ■: :'■• ^:; 



: M-- !. 



i^rp'' 



C TATLOfty nilNTSm^ LAMB*f OOKDVIT FA88AOB, IKD UON SQUARE. 



PREFACE. 



Many know to their cost the trath of Hanrood's re- 
mark '' that the knowledge of Books, like the knowledge 
of every Art that is arduous and useful, must be purchased 
at a high price, and can only be acquired by an assiduoua 
and judicious application to this pivsuit for a considera- 
ble number of years." Experienced individuals will also 
readily admit, with Oldys, in his Librarian, '' that the 
most industrious part in performances of this kind, is 
that which is most invitiible ; the mass 9t reftreiiee and 
reading therein required bearing no pr^iertiOli tb f hH 
small qtuntity of writing that appears." It has therefore 
usually happened, that any attempt to facilitate such 
knowledge, has been received with indulgence, if not 
with approbation. Without such encouragement to the 
Author's former productions, the present performance had 
never been submitted to public scrutiny; and having pub- 
licly but uselessly invited the more valuable suggestions 
or contributions of others, he only trusts that the sanc- 
tion he has hitherto experienced may not in the present 
instance be diminished, — " And if I have done well and 
as fitting the occasion, it is that which I desired — but 
if slenderly and meanly, it is that which I could attain 

unto." 

W. D. 



\ I 



■ • *> 



h 



^N«lwe win kftT6 her eoone^ and dnll Booka will be nrgofteni^ 
^ntedT Bibliographers." '' 






TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAGE. 

Acuaa Descubrimiento de las Amazonas^ 4to. 1641 ... . 84 

Annalia Dubrensia, 4to. 1 636 85 

^rnolde's Chronicle • 35 

Arthur (Kynge) and his Knyghtes, Caxton, 1485 28 

Barksdale's Nympha Libethris^ 12mo. 1651 87 

Baron s Cyprian Academy^ 8vo. 1647 83 

' Pocula Castalia, 1 650 84 

BasQentinus's Freei Will, a Tragedy, 4to ..••••••.«%•••' 57 

Bateman s Travayled Pilgrim, 1569 ••.....•.; 51 

Bible^First Protestant) 1535 37 

(First edition of Luther's) 1541 38 

— (Bill and Barker s) Bunyan's copy, with account of 

Bunyan * 38 

Blanchardyne (King) and Princess Eglantine, Caxton, 1485 28 

Boccius*s Boke of Consolation, 1525 37 

Borde's Book of Knowledge, &c. , 43 

Bracelli Bizarie di Vare Figure, 1624 11 

Brusonii Facetiarum, folio, 1518 ^ 34 

Bry (De) Peregrinationum, &c. 1590-1634, folio 60 

Bury (De) Phylobiblion, 1473 10 

Carmeliani Carmen, 4to. Pynson 32 

Cases (J.) Angelical Guide, 8vo. 1697 101 

f hroniques de France, 1476 16 

de Nonnandie, 1487 16 



e CONTENTS. 

PACir. 
Churchyardc's (T.) Works * . .... . % * ♦ .6*> 

Clizia> L'Infelice Amore di Giuliae Romeo» 8<^o. 1553 •:« :'43> 

CoUins's Families of Vere, Cavendish, &g« folio, 1 7.62 ^ « H^« 

Court and Kitchen of Elizabeth Cromwell, 12nK>* .1664 W% 

Cowley*s Poetical Blossoms, &c. 4to. 1633, &c.: ..••,,.« < 79j> 

Anacreontic Odes on Gold, the Grasshopper, 

and the Epicure •••••«•:,<. ^ ;Ql)\ 

Cromwell the Perfect Politician, 8vo. 1680 ♦^ . •^ -- 3.1- 

Dance of Death (The History of) . 2f . 

Danse Macabre, 1485, &c » • • 29r 

--. — des Morts, 1744, &c • ^3^ 

Darcie*8 Annalcs of Queeu Elizabeth, 1625 . . . • * iTXi 

Dee's (Dr. J.) Arte of Navigation, folio, 1557 . . ^ ^ . .^.,i ^5^^ 

Demosthenis, Aldus, 1 504 32 

Taylori, 1748-57 ^V • J^ 

El Diablo Coivelo, 8vo. 1 646 •••:•?: : ,§7 

Drayton's (M.) Poly Oibion 73 

Queen Elizabeth's Prayer, or Boohe of Christian Prmers *Ylt* 

Fazio Dita Mundi, 1474 ; . . . ... .'^T^'W 

Fraunce's Countess of Pembroke's Ivy Chntch i Aiai^jfeta^* ' '^ 

&c. 4to. 1591, &c 62 

Froissart Chroniques de JFrance, &c ^ ....'.•. '.'' *2&^ 

Froissart's Chronicles, Pynson, 1523, &c. • 30 

by Johnes '. : . .' . ^^^ 

Fuller's Worthies of England, folio, 1662, (DirefcOoiii - ^ **^ 

for Collating) '. V. . '. . ' '^Jf * 

— Church History (plates in) ..,.#.•; 95^' 

^ Abel Redivivus (Collation of) i'^ 



A«^* PACE. 

^**^^*xi%mfe'8 (Sir R.) Briefe lUport of Virgima, foUo, 1590 61 
^^^'^^^twe* (L©fd> LawyerVFortnne. • • 108^ 



« 



"~ ^ (Jo8i) Dkcoveiy of a Ncw'Wwrk^ 8vo. 05 

^' ViigediiHiarhBi^ 12iiio. 1597^1598 ••...♦ m 

^^"^'^^y'^ (Patrick) NigfctiBgdte^ &c. 9vo. 1622 72 

^^^^ej (TO Act* Apostrfonim, Svo. 1715 .....;. . /. W»J 
™?S^^^^ood'fi'('J.) Spiderand Flie and other Works, 15S6- '• ' 

^^^^C2i «tc... ^Wr 

W^'Ue^'tj Ecclesiastical PoUtie/ Moi 1 7!» .........•«» 

^^^^'^leglas (Merie Jests of) 4S' 



10^ 



' ■- ...,;■«< . 



^^^« (Dr;) Toast; (Key to^ the Charactenr in) witth - 
l^^ctraets. lOiS* 

........ •; ,....(i 

*f;5>^uet*8 Jirnios Brutus's Defence of Liberty, 4to. 1648 88 



* *. 



^^Xiador, or the Knight of the Sun of Gold 31 

^^^^Xierp^.Jpcafvresde) 97] 






^5^ Wanton, (Interlude of) 4to. 1560 52^ 



V « 



9grave s Eclaircissement de la Langue Francoise, 1530 40 

^^^traiOt, Homines Illustres, folio, 1696-1700 .... 100 

, (L.) Romeo e Giulietta • 42 

La Gipliette, 1539 . . , 43 



8 GOMTBllfV. 

lilmtiB* (Busty) Hilt Anoareate det G»d« 96 

Itahtion de k Kfiere des AamMoom, pv Gonbemfie, 
1682 » 



SmAQriaal, Paris, iSlGand 1523 IS 

Sidhist, 4to. 1475 ..••• 15 

SisMlMhri Histmig &c Lyon, 1549 26 

Smiths (Capt. J.) History of Vii|^a, folio, 1624 ... • 75 

> I Travels in Eorope, &c. 1680 ..»••• 77 
SsBoBett's Adventures of an Atom (Key to the Characters 

in) .•••.^•.. .>.••••>• l» 

8peiieer*s Faerie Qneene and other Works, 15$0, &c. • . • 58 

Spenoe's Pdymetis, folio, 1747 105 

• • • - • • 

ToBStaDns de Arte Snppatandi, Pynson, 1522 36 

Towneky's Translation of Hndibras 119 

Viigilii Opera, 1469 9 

Wallers (Edmd.) Poems, 17U HK 









BIBtJbliAMiAC^t UBIURT. 95 

iBtcpUeaium de» PHmeipafliK Nams laiaiM en Umc dam la 
See&nde Pariit ilct ' Cohfesnaiu de J. J. Rwueau/ 
Edition de -Ginite. 

tH* D n Monsieur Dapin. 

M^. D n. •• »•• Madame Dapin. 

M.lePresidentdeL ^n. Lamoignon. 

M. Ic Prince de C . ... Conti. 

M . de 7 Monisiear de Francneil. 

Mad'*^ de F • Madame de Francnefl. 

M. le Comte de M ^, ou 

simplement M. de M. ... Monsieur le Comte de Mon- 

taigti, Ambassade da Roi 
Venise. 

M. D' J Monsieur d'Epinay. 

M^e D» J Madame D'Epinay, qui donne 

d Rousseau THermitage. 

M"*. la Comtesse de H , 

ou simplement M""** de H. Madame la Comtesse d'Houp- 

tot, Belle Soeur de Madame 
d'Epinay , et dont Rousseau 
devint i TAge de 45 Ans si 
eperdument amoureux. 

M. G , Le 8'. G -, ou 

Cr M. Grimm, Lecteurdu Prince 

Hereditaire de Saxe Gotha. 

M^*. de P -r.k^ Madame de Pompadour. 

M. de C ^x Monsieur de Chenonceaux. 

M***. de C X Madame de Chenonoeaux. 

Le Baron d'H k, ou 

simplement d'H ^k. M. le Baron d'Holback. 

M^. d'H ^k Mad^MaBaronne d'Holback. 

M. d'A — Monsieur d'Argenson. 

M"«. F— « Mademoiselle Fel. 




06 JOUMOifc^tl^JlfD A 

T •• Le Doctenr Tronchiiiy Mede- 

cm Grenevou. 

M. de St. L 1 Monsieur 4e Saint Lambert^ 

de FAiMdeniie Fran^oise, 
et Auteur da Poeme des 
Saisons. 

LeP. B ^r »•••• Le P^r© Berthier. 

M. de B e Monsieur de Bonville.. 

M. de L, de M s, ou 

simplement M. de M. ••• Monsieur de Lamofgnon de 

Malsherbes. 

M. de C Monsieur leDncd'eChoiseuil. 

L'Abb6 de B s Boufflers. 

M'^'.laComtesse de B s 

on simplement Mad™®, de 

B s Madame la Comtesse de 

Boufflers. 

Le Mal*quis de V y... Villeroy* 

M, M Monsieur Monlton. 

M. Du P Monsieur Du Peyrou. 

M. D'l 8 Monsieur D'lyemois. 

La Marichale de M n. Mirepoix. 

La C ..•• La Cheyrette. ) Maisons de Campagne de 

£ Epinay. j Madame D'Epinay. 

J'ai trouY^ cette explication en manuscrit dans une copie 
des *' Confessions de J. J. Rousseau/' Edition de Geneve.. 



4 '■ 



FINIS. 



Mwihall, Ptiotcr, KeaUm Street, Bnuuwlck Sqiiare^ 



o 



A nOOMD 

JOURNEY ROUND 



SftMrms 



or 

A BIBLIOMANIAC; 

OB, 

CENTO OF NOTES AND REMINISCENCES 

CONOBBNIRO 

RARE^ CURIOUS^ AND VALUABLE 



BY 

WILLIAM DAVIS, 

▲VTBOE OF ^ TOE OLIO OF BIBLT06RAFHICAL AlfD LimAKT AMBCDOTB^ 

Aia> MUfOEANDA." 



LONDON: 

PRINTED FOR W. DAVIS, BOOKSELLER, 

AT THB BBDFORD L|BBABY, SOUTHAMFTON ROW, RUS8BLL 8QUABB.. 

18%, 



IS acoND jcmrnxwr soniD 



hand TVeanrer of Eagkzid is 1344. His Bask idatei fSkt 
aeaMres lie took togntifj kis frvwite pMOoi^ tkefaieof 
books ; whilst Treasurer and Chancellor of Ff^iiiMl ke took 
Us perquisites and mtw year** fUU m booka j and by Edwaid 
tke Third's byor mramaged the librariea of ^e puacip al Men, 
and bro u g ht to tight many books which had bees kicked «p lor 



At ATigiioii, in the year 1331, nMmg the ^stiBgwaked aad 
learned men with whom Petrarch becaine acqwated, lUchad 
de Bory is thas characterized by the Anthor of the life of 
Petrarch. 

^ One of these wzs Itichard of Bnry or Aongervilks who 
came to Avignon this year. He was sent thither by Edward 
t}^ Third, his Pnpil and his Kin§^. Edward wrote a letter to 
the Pope, recommending to him in particular Richard of Bnry^ 
and Anthony of Besanges, whom he had sent with an en* 
basiy to his Court. Richard of Bury had a piercing wit> a 
cultivated understanding, and an eager desire alter every Idnd 
of knowledge. Nothing could satisfy this ardour, no obstacle 
could stop its progress* He had given himself up to study 
from his youth. His genius threw light on the darkest^ and his 
penetration fathomed the deepest, subjects. He was pasaipn- 
ately fond of books ^ apd laboured ^fl his life to collect the 
largest library at that time in Europe. A man of such nMrit, 
apd the Minister an4 ^Eivorite of the King of England> was re- 
ceived with every mark of distinction in the society of Cardinal 
Colonna.** 

His stay at Avignon M^as short : Edward, who could not do 
without him> recalled him to England soon after. On his 



T%U^rn hepo«sefl6ed idl th^ confidence and Uyov of his Mas^ 
ter^' wlio, first fiuhcte him Bishop of Durham^ ChaiiiceUor the year 
^plkmi^ then High Treasurer, and I^enipotentiary for a treaty 
of iieacef vHth. FVance. 

. .Richard of Bury did in England what Petrarch did in 
Tmtkce,UaiYi and Germany j he gave much of his attention^ 
and spait great part of his fortune, to discover the manu- 
scripts of ancient Authors, and have them copied under his 
iMnediate inspection^ and kept binders, illuminators, and wri- 
ter^ in his palaces. Richard in his Philobiblion, a Treatise. 
\vhich: he wrote on the love and choice of books, relates the 
incredible expense he was at to form his famous Library, not^ 
wilhstandii^ he made use of the authority which his dignity 
and fikvor with the King procured him. He mentions the arts 
he: waS: <il>liged to .use to compass his design, and informs us 
that the first Hebrew and Greek Grammars that ever appeared 
w<9re derived finom his labours. He had them composed for 
the EngUsh students f persuaded that without the knowledge 
of .these two < langiiagesj and especially the Greek, it was 
impassible to understand the principles of either the ancient 
Heathen or Christian Writers. Richard de Bury died in 
1345i ;and is said to have possessed more books than all the 
Bishops ;, of England together. Besides the fixed librarieft 
whieh he had formed in his several Palaces, the floor of his 
common apartment wius so covered with books that those who 
entered could not .with due reverence approach his presence. > 

ijSef; |H>meforther curious partioilars in. the new edition of 
Warton s History of English Poetry, vol. i. 8vo. p. cxlvii, Ac 



U' SECOND /OURNE¥ jROUfBm 

Fagh Dita MundL Fofto. 1474. 

Aekmrdy in his Cfmm de BUfiiographie, torn. iii. p. Wl," 
places this amongst the Poemes Scientifiques, and fswa. ac^d^ 
inipection of a fine copy in the Pitblic Library at Murseilks, 
plumes himself upon being the first Bibliographer who 1iai» 
accurately described k. I shall content myself by giving ito 
title from Achard, and adding a few miscellaneouB remarks, 
omitting some of his details, as of little general interelst. ft9 
title is as follows : 

Jncominea el Libra pritno Dka Mundi eumpanuHyper Fmda 
Di Gl Ubertl da flrenea. Ei prima de la huMa di^oHHMe 
rhe egli ebe airetam da gU fitn ei ^agwe le ykiHUei 
CupUuolo prima. 

Ekicb following chi^ter is headed by its argument, with its 
number in Roman figures, and the whole woFk is printed Is 
double columns. It is not paged, neither has It ootchwonb. 
It has signatures only to the gatherings, whidi begin with 
a, and extend to and comprise the letter a; these gatherings are 
all of eight leaves, excepting n, which oniy has six, and a, 
which only comprises 4 leaves. 

It is remarkable that the signatures of the gadieriags are 
entirely at the bottom of the page, therelbite if the book* 
binder happen to be at all liberal in the application of hk 
knife — the signatures must be found wanting. 

Payne fr Catologne for 1801 refera for an account of ti^ 
Work to the Irish Philosophical Trans^ctiions by Lord 
('harlemont. 

In book iv. cap. xxiii. of DUa Mundi there is an account of 

a nation of tailed men, and it is well known that Lord Monboddo 



A MBUOICANIAC'JS %tBRkBX. 15 

bdkHred in ihb teistende of such d t^ace.* Jeaii Strays, 
Voyages In M«sp6vie, &c. po&tively lunieits that he saw a 
raoe^f men -in Formosa with tails. 

In Bnlwer 8 Artificial Changling^ scene 22 relates to tailed 
nations and breech gallantry. 

A copy of this rare first edition sold at the Valliere sale for 
480%ands. Hi-tTreVen^s f6r 136 francs. PInem's> 1789-90, 
for ^. 10#. : affd ^FldncieVs, whicjh, lu;corditig to Brnnet, was 
a very beantlM copy, foV BOO 'francs 3— and '' tWreby hangs 
a iye^I*& it^ ^.'* ^6nCd*S t^fpj, ^cbrdin^ to the AMbi^ 
Si. iMig^ist uto longer exists. -An English amatenr kavii^ 
cemriuMMied sMne 4ae to bny tt for Inm without fbdi^ the 
jnic^ <liieiMk>k was ran up to the enormbns stun of 800 francs, 
at which price it was purchased for luin, bnt when he received 
it -he w«8 «d ii^liited at having been made t6 pay so deaily for 
hb i^lly> %httt he thiiew the book oat of i^pite into the fire. 
*' Happily/* says the quizzical French Bibliographer, *' EiigUsh 
Bibliomaniacs do not act so spitefully now a days for so 
trifling a matter, otherwise at the prices which they give for 
rarei Books, it might be expected that entire Libraries would 
share the fiite of the Dita Mundi.' 



I* >* 



Saiiusi. 4to. FalentuB. 1475. 

Unnoticed by Dibdin. Beloe says it is by far the turest of 
all the editions of Sallnst. 

Valentia was the first place in Spain where the art of 

Printing was introduced. The names of the Printers were 

* Siee Aneient Metaphviics toU iil p. 350. 4to* 1784. 
-j^ See Bmnet Mannel du Libpaire, torn. ii. p. 12. 



CONTENTS. 

PACf. 

Churchyanics (T.) Works s * ♦ .M* 

Clizia> Llafelice Amore di Giulia e Romeo, 8<^o. 1553 « « . '^.Tt 
Collin8*6 Families of Vere^ CaTendish^ &c. folio, 17^ » • 1 1^» 
Court and Kitchen of Elizabeth Cromwell, I2nK>. i664 Wf 
Cowley*s Poetical Blossoms, &c. 4to. 1633, &c. ...••»,• -•■ .i 79) 

Anacreontic Odes on Gold, the Grasshopper, 

and the Epicure .^ - &i\ 

Cromwell the Perfect Politician, 8vo. 1660 «•«... ^L 

r iM 

Dance of Death (The History of) , ,2^^ 

Danse Macabre, 1485, &c » • ,p 2Qi 

-~— des Morts, 1744, &c , . . . . "25 

Darcie's Annalcs of Queen Elizabeth, 1625 77. 

Dees (Dr. J.) Arte of Navigation, folio, 1557 . • * ^ • . ^ . . ,5Gj 

Demosthenis, Aldus, 1 504 32 

Taylori, 1748-57 V v Ma 

El Diablo Coivclo, 8vo. 1 646 .,/^§7 

Drayton's (M.) Poly Olbion 73 



~. • r 



Queen £lizabeth*8 Prayer, or Boohe of Christian Prater's *iiT 

Fazio Dita Mundi, 1474 u^'W- 

Fraunces Countess of Pembroke's Ivy Church} Amyiita^ ^-^-M 

&c. 4to. 1591, &c 62 

Froissart Chroniques de JFrance, &c •.....'...•' IW^ 

Froissart's Chronicles, Pynson, 1523, &c 30 

by Johnes -^<J^ 

Fullers Worthies of England, folio, 1662, (Dir5(jtkm» ^ ^ '^^ 

for Collating) ......'«<* 

— — Church History (plates in) Ofr 

- Abel Redivivus (Collation of) *^^ 



A soKURMttAMAe'isr LiBitAiErr. If 

Gw^ (M^J^C^i^Mk^ Anmti0, thai k io^^hi M^%e, 

^'idmfim^bn of the Lover. Folio. JSmprgnted at 

W9km$9ire by Wyllytm Caxion. (1493 by fnistt^e for) 

1483. 

West, 1773, 9/. 9*. Daly, 1792, 15/. 7*. Id. Gulston, 
7/. \0e. Mason^ 1807, (first and last leaves wanting,) 15/. 15«. 

Duke of Roxbnrgbe 336/. bought by the Duke of Devon- 
shire. Merly library, 315/. bought by the Marquis of Bland- 
ford, at whose sale, after he became Duke of Marlborough, it 
sold for 205/. 169. to Watson Taylor, Esq.; and when this 
latlter Gentleman s Library was brought to the hammer in 1823, 
thfo^ame book, being found to be imperfect, only sold for 
57L159. 

It may amuse to learn Heame*s opinion of the vsdne of the* 
Ha fip fe hcBf eopy, which is deseribed as an extraordinary fair one. 
He^e never isiaw so complete a book of this edition, and 
thought it worth more than Two Guineas ! ! ! Frognall Dibdin 
enthusiastically adds, "twenty times two guineas could not 
now proctre a perfect copy.'* 

On this piece, says Warton, Gower^s character and reputa- 
tion as a Poet are almost entirely founded. His French Son* 
nets, according to Campbell in his Essay on English Poetry,^ 
(p. 74,) are marked by elegance and sensibility,^ and his* 
English Poetry contains a digest of all tlmt constituted the 
knowledge of his age. His cotemporaries greatly esteemed 
him ', and the Scottish as well as English Writers of thesubse-^ 
quent period, speak of him with unqualified admiration. 



* Mr. Todd has transcrihed some of them firam the original MSSi.- 
in the Marqnis of Sti^ord's Lihrarj. See his Illustrations of Oewer 
and Chaucer, p. 102 to 108. 



ft mcaso JOUBNSY ;waB9m « 

Aotii Warton and Campbell hme dettikd the fJaa.Mt 
csecation of the C<mfemo ^mtmiU, and w^db tkc laHer w^s 
if pecuEarly ill contrived. 

A lover^ whose case has not a particle of interest^ afq^fes 
aooording to the Catholic ritoal to a Confessor* who, at .4ie 
same time, whimsieally etio^gh, beast the addifeioMl chamet^ 
of a Pagan Priest of Venus, and Mkethe Myfetagc^ae in 4^e 
Pifdnre of Cebes, is called Genius. The Hd^ Fath^, itia 
tme, speaks like a good Christian, and commluiicatf« mtee 
scandal about the intrigues of Venus than P^^ Author 
ever told. A pretext is ailcNrded by the cetemooy : of cm' 
fession, for the Priest not only to initiate his Pupil in the. AUJes, 
of a lover, but in the wide range of ethical and ji^ysical 
knowledge $ and at the mention of every virtue and vioe» a tale 
i9 introduced by way of iUnstration. Does the Gonfesaor 
msh to warn the Lover ugmnst impertinent cariosity^ .He 
introdnces a popos to that foiling, the History of Aetseei^.of 
peeping memory. The Confessor inquires if he is addicted to < 
a vain glorious disposition; because if he u, he cam tellJdm «• 
story about Nebuchadnezzar. Does he wish to hear lof the viitue 
of conjugal patience ? it is aptly inculcated by the anecdote 
respecting Socrates, who, when he received the contents of 
Xantippe*s pail upon his head repHed to the provocation only 
by a witticism. Thus with shrieving narrations, and. didactic 
speeches, the work is extended to thirty thousand lines, im 
the course of which the virtues and vices are all irc^gulstly 
allegorized.^ 

The Cot^essio ^mantis (says Warton) was written at the 
command of Richard 2d, who, meeting our Poet Oewer 



V Campbell's Essaj. 



M«irtaai*MM«»i^M«nMv*i 



BIBtlOMAlttAC^t UBlURT. 96 

dei PHneipmHK Nomt laitiis en hkine dam la 
Seta^nde ParHt dm * Cokfesnaiu de J. J. Rauaeau,' 
Editimi de Gtni^e. 

Iff.D n....« MoDsieur Dapin, 

M^. D 41 »•• Madame Dapin. 

M.lePresidentdeL n. Lamoignon. 

M. le Prince de C . ... Conti. 

M. de F Monsieuf de FrancueH. 

Mad"*, de F Madame de Ffancuefl. 

M. le Comte de M ■» %m 

simplement M. de M. ..• Monsieur le Comte de Mon- 

taigtl, Attbassade da Roi 
Venise. 

M. B' J • Monsieur d'Spinaj. 

]M[de ])' y Madame D'Epinay, qui donne 

d Rousseau THermitage. 

M**. la Comtesse de H , 

ou simplement M'^^ de H. Madame la Comtesse d'Houp-^ 

tot. Belle Soeur de Madame 
d'Epinay, et dont Rousseau 
devint i TAge de 45 Ans si 
eperdument amoureux. 

M. G , Le S'. G -, ou 

G M. Grimm, Lecteurdu Prince 

Hereditaire de Saxe Gotfaa. 

M**. de P r,.^ Madame de Pompadour. 

M. de C ^x Monsieur de Chenonceaux. 

M^. de C ^x Madame de Chenonceaux. 

Le Baron d'H k, ou 

simplement d'H ^k. M. le Baron d'Holback. 

M**. d'H ^k Mad'^MaBaronne d'Holback. 

M. d*A ^- Monsieur d'Argenson. 

M"«. F— Mademoiselle Fel. 



9& JOVRl^^ j^gJOirD A 



*■ . 



T Le Docteur Tronchin, Mede- 

cin Genevois. 

M. de St. L 1 IMFoinietir 4e Saint Lambert^ 

■dci FA^Ademie FraD^oise, 
et Auteur da Poeme dea 
Saisons. 

Le P. B ^r »«••. Le P^re Berthier. 

M. de B e • Moiuieiir de Bonvflle.. 

M. de L, de M s^ ou 

simplement M. de M. ... Monsieur de Lamoignon de 

Malsherbes. 

M.de C — ••..» Monsieur le Dae deChofsetill; 

L'Abb6 de B s Boufflers. 

M**.laComtesse de B s 

ou simplement Mad'^^ de 

B s Madame la Comtesse de 

Boufflers. 

Le Mal'quis de V y... Villeroy. 

M. M Monsieur Monlton. 

M. Du P * Monsieur Du Peyrou. 

M. D'l s Monsieur D'lveniois. 

La Maricbale de M x. Mirepoix. 



La C .... La Cbevrette. ) Maisons de Campagne de 

£^ Epinay. 3 Madame D'Epinay. 

J'ai trouY^ cette explication en manuscrit dans une copie 
des " Confessions de J. J. Rousseau/' Edition de Geneve.. 



FINIS. 



Marshall, Printer, Keaton Street, Bnuuwick Square^ 







▲ taeovD 

JOURNEY ROUND 

or 

A BIBLIOMANIAC; 

OB, 

CENTO OF NOTES AND REMINISCENCES 

COMCXSNINO 

RABE^ CURIOUS^ AND VALUABLE 



BY 

WILLIAM DAVIS, 

▲fTTHOE OF ^ TBE OLIO OF BIBLTOORAFHICAL AlfD LITBRAKT AMBCDOTBB 

AND MEMOEAirDA.'' 



LONDON: 

PRINT£D FOR W. DAVIS, BOOKSELLER, 

AT TUB BBDFORD LIBRARY, SOUTHAMFTON ROW^ RUS8BLL SQUARE.. 




o# 17331 lif die Wa0frOlidol,rii«fe; it 

to almost 

«f die IViiiiMj^n lie b ad- 
dreasiiig. Hie VigBette to ^ Titit pay icyeacot a four 
Sidetoiis pbyin^ m cnaccit, om haqay^ hM r dy 8Brdy> liup» 
fipe and tailor. At Ae bv^ «f the Tide, ia a vepreaeirtatkm 
of the AatiMir, aod haag kni three fywaitiril figures, and 
beaeatkaie 16fiMsnaiPcna. ThoMxtkafbegiiis the Work 
bj a rcpctitioB of the MgMtte oa Aa Tide, and a FDedcal 
Qaartetto by these Skdeton FeifonMn^ aad, as a speciiiiem^ I 
ahaD gire the chaat of 

Le Traisieine Mort. 
rje ¥«tts dm 

ct TKUC* petHs eC f^rmdli^ 



T<Mc«ps 



Et qjvoy qae Pon tiire eeat i 
Ces cent aas Mat bientot 

These foar releatjess personages then qnit their tronbitdoar 
occnpation, and b^n to lay violent bands on the Pope^ the 
Emperor, the Cardinal, and the King: the Pope wishes to ex- 
cuse himself firom qnadrilling witb Death, and pleads iiieffae- 
toally bis sanctity as God*s Vicar, and the bearer of'8t 
Peter*s keys. — ^Tb'e Emperor seems less nnwilfing, as he does 
iwl know where to appeal against Deatb^s onmanneflyckatiani 
and thinks a death bed easier and lighter than an Empfemr's 
throne and diadem. — Tbe Cardinal is told be moat throw off his 
rich robes with his astonishment, : and j<Ha u\ iki^^dgoficoir*^ 
Deatb tben addresses the (Cing as follows ; 



PREFACE. 



Many know to their cost the trath of Harwood'8 
mark '^ that the knowledge of Books^ like the knowledge 
of every Art that is arduous and useful^ must be purchased 
at a high price, and can only be acquired by an assiduous 
and judicious application to this piursuit for a considera- 
ble number of years." Experienced indiyiduab will also 
readily admit, with Oldys, in his Librarian, ^* that the 
most industrious part in performances of this kind, is 
that which is most inviBible ; the mass of referenee iettid 
reading therein required bearing no pin^ortiM tf» fhB 
small quantity of writing that appears." It has therefore 
usually happened, that any attempt to facilitate such 
knowledge, has been received with indulgence, if not 
with approbation. Without such encouragement to the 
Author's former productions, the present performance had 
never been submitted to public scrutiny ; and having pub- 
licly but uselessly invited the more valuable suggestions 
or contributions of others, he only trusts that the sanc- 
tion he has hitherto experienced may not in the present 
instance be diminished, — " And if I have done well and 
as fitting the occasion, it is that which I desired — but 
if slenderly and meanly, it is that which I could attain 

unto." 

W. D. 



.. . :> 



■ '-.A 






..•H 



. *'N«tare win kaTe her course^ tnd dull BooIes will be Ibr^^tteii ill 
iqpite o£ Bibliogntphen.r'' '^' 



■ ) 



-. >V 






'-'•: r 



Mttty wkiek, SB time bad in some degree ej&oed both ilie Biuit- 
iife§fMi4.the I|iBipipeiAii8> ^e Magistrate had them retoidied 
III 1568.by one Klauberof Bi)e> who succeeded so well in 
)ii9, rcistpratiou, tt»at it U daid not the smallest diffeiieiice from 
the origiiuil wast perceptible. In the whole length of the wall 
.Aere yet remained some 3pace> the painter therefore added the 
Vnagpe. of the pious and. lesoned Jean Oeeolampade, in me- 
inoiy c^ the Heformatiooi recently effected : via. in 1529, aod^ 
410 a finish to the wwk^ he pourtrayed himself^ wifei and 
.fihfldren in the dress of the period. It again experienced 
reparation many years after, and in its then state Merian 
jkpictedit.^ 

It jMs be the true, history of the Dance of Death, which I 

^ajt fpresi^^ see no reasoii to disbelieve, similar sepiesentiitions 

..(ir.ji^ies were soon transmitted And becaiae p(if>iilar in other 

Qfj(Bi9{);ra99ong the rest the walls of St. Innocent's Cloisteri at 

Pafj^. were tibns^omamented» and atcoording to Wactonin his 

^il^l^enQ^qns on Spenser,, one Macbabre, a French Poet» wrote 

,^ d^^l^ptidni of- it in verse } whence no doubt (xiginated the 

^fii^.i^^.fiaHse Macabre.'* Stow, in his Survey of London, 

spe^aking of the cloi$ters which anciently belonged to St. 

Pf^|]^*s .Cborch^ says, about this cloister was artificially and 

richly painted the Dance of Machabray, or Dance of Pauls -, 

the'Uke wliere<^ was painted about St. Innoeent^s Cloister at 

■^HiP»Ai • * »■ III il l ii I i i ' ■ ■ '^ iii ■ 1 I I 1. . ■ ■ I. p 

* Hie 85th and last plat^ ia Meriau's book is a very singnlar one ; 
it perfectly representfi ^ good lookiag hefikliy man, intb wltiskers> Lear<l, 
. tiair, and a fulT round Bis neck ; tarn the book upside domn, and a 
> horrible Death's head, as. acruratelj dclint atcG[» pr^ents )iscl£ 



6 CONTENTS. 

PAcir. 
Churchyardc's (T.) Works * . .•...% m.^-. . W» 

Clizia^ L*Infelice Amore di Crialiae Romeo, 8<^o. 1553 «h* -^>49i 

Collin8*8 Families of Vere, Cavendish^ &c. folio, 17^ a « 1 1^ 

Court and Kitchen of Elizabeth Cromwell, 12mo* .1664 9f^ 

Cowley 8 Poetical Blossoms, &c. 4to. 1633, &c. .••»>• » . 79^ 

Anacreontic Odes on Gold, the Grasshopper, 

and the Epicure ••••....* • • • «•»<•/: ^i\ 

Cromwell the Perfect Politician, 8yo. 1660 , «««u.. dL 

Dance of Death (The History of) ♦ . 2;f . 

Danse Macabre, 1485, &c » « ^ 2Qt 

-*- des Morts, 1744, &c "23 

Darcie*8 Aniialcs of Queen Elizabeth, 1625 7^. 

Dee*8 (Dr. J.) Arte of Navigation, folio, 1557 . • ^ v . . , ,. :. ^56. 

Demosthenis, Aldus, \ 504 32 

Taylori, 1748-57 V • J^ 

El Diablo Coivclo, 8vo. 1 646 •••••'. Tt : J'^ 

Drayton's (M.) Poly Oibion 73 

Queen Elizabeth's Prayer, or Booke of Christian Praters *Y/ 

Fazio Dita Mundi, 1474 •......,.. 'i^'-'W 

Fraunce's Countess of Pembroke's Ivy Church) Ajiyrita^- ' '^'^ 

&c. 4to. 1591, &c 62 

Froissart Chroniques de JPrance, &c • . . • . .•*.;. V ^(K 

Froissart's Chronicles^ Pynson, 1523, &c 30 

by Johnes .'. : ... ^'i^^ 

Fuller's Worthies of England, foHo, 1662, (DifOCaoAii ^ ^ ^'^ 

for Collating) '.'. .... ' 9H^ 

— — Church History (plates in) , . # . . ; 9ff^ 

" Abel Redivivus (Collalioii of) 1^^ 



Oninfille's (Sir R.) Briefe Report of \rirgini% Mq» 1590 61 . 
OAnstone*-*- (Lord) LawyerVFortmie. • • • » ; % . . • 103^ 



> < 



Htt*8 (Jor.) DwcoTor^r of a New^f^k^ Svo; • . • « • • • • ^ 

--^ VirgodiiBiarhni^ 12iiio. 1597^1598 .4...« m 

Him ayV (P^tridl) Nigiitiiigi^j kcr. Sro. 1^2 77 

H^ame^ (T.^ Act* Apostdioniiii, (^ro. 1715 ........... V9^^ 

l%wood*6 (J.) Spkbr-and Flie and other Works/ 15S6- ^' -^ 

i662> &c... ^m 

HboWa Ecdesiasticai Politie/ Mo; 1 729 .....,••.. Mt 

Itbwleglas (Merie Jests of) • • • 46- 

Kkg^ (Dr;) Toast; (Key to- tkc CKaractew in)- witth - 
' extracts 108 * 

l(a^agaet*8 Junios Brutus's Defence of Liberty^ 4to. 1648 88 

Moliador, or the Knight of the Sun of Gold 31 . 

Moliere, (Oei^vres de) 97, 

^•^ .. , . ^• 
Nice Wanton, (Interlude of) 4to. 1560 5^^ 



* i>- 



lUsgrave^s Eclaircissement de la Langue Francoise, 1530 40 

Perraidt, Homnpies Illustres, folio, 1696-1700 ........ 100 

Borto, (L.) Romeo e Giulietta « 42 

-r^ LaGinlietta, 1539..,. 43 



94 iotmktlr Mtkl) A 

'' This Codectiou piifchaied (ttm tbe Vt&wi MvditA tod 
Este^ was tralisfeii-ed (torn theno^ by the late ptopiibtot 
to Ince Blundell, near Literpool^ where he erdcted, 2A H 
repository for them^ k rotunda of great di^faftectui^ 
beauty, upon the plan of the Pantheon at Rome/' 

The only Copy which has hitherto occurred for public 
sale, was in iPayne and Foss*b Catalogue for 1815, where 
it is marked at 73/. 10s. 

There is a Copy iu the British Museum. See Clarke*! 
Repertorium, p. 30. 



Tke Antient Paintings of the £atk$ of Tikt$, dime from 
the Originals, by Carhni. Atlas Folio. 61 Coloured 
Drawings^ various sizes. 

Not more than Twelve Copies were exeetlted. Om df 
tket^ Hold at M. Paris^s Sale, in Itdl, for iW. ft. 



Chine — Les Grandes Sdtailtes de la Chine, gravies seus 
la Direction de M Cochin. Attas Polio, and Description 
in Quarto. 

The original designs of these prints were sent by the 
Emperor of China to be engraved in France. When they 
were done, the plates were sent to China, and vefy hw 
impressions remained in Europe. 

At M. Paris's Sale in 1701, a copy sold for 64/. 12s. 



BIBtl6MAMtA0*t UBlURT. 96 

tBtpUeaium de9 PHneipaiiK Nana lames en blane dam la 
ISht&iuk Pariit dn * Cbn/emoiu de J. J. Rmmtau,* 
Edition de '€kni^. 

1^4 D &.•.•••••. ••••• Monsieur Dapiiu 

M^. D ■ i i> •• 4*. Madame Dupin. 

M.lePresidentdeL n. Lamoignon. 

M. le Prince d« C . ..• Conti. 

M. de 7 Monsieur de Francueil. 

Mad"*, de F Madame de Francueil. 

M. le Comte de M ^, ou 

simplement M. de M. ••• Monsieur le Comte de Mon- 

faigu^ Ambassade du Roi 
Venise. 

M. Jy J ..•• Monsieur d'£pinay« 

M^% D' y Madame D'Epinajr, qui donne 

d Rousseau THermitage. 

M"*. la Comtesse de H , 

ou simplement M"*'* de H. Madame la Comtesse d'Houp- 

tot, Belle Soeur de Madame 
d'Epinay , et dont Rousseau 
devint i TAge de 45 Ans si 
eperdument amoureux. 

M. G , Le S'. G -, ou 

G M. Grimm, Lecteurdu Prince 

Hereditaire de Saxe Gothn. 

M***. de P r,kH Madame de Pompadour. 

M. de C X Monsieur de Chenonceaux. 

M**. de C ^x ••••. Madame de Chenonoeaux, 

Le Baron d'H k, ou 

simplement d'H ^k. M. le Baron d'Holback. 

M**- d'H ^k Mad*°MaBaronne d'Holback. 

M. d' A — Monsieur d'Argenson. 

M^. F— , Mademoiselle Fel. 



9& JOUmfSfe^^ftUlfD A 

T • Le Docteur Tronchin^ Mede- 

cin Genevois. 

M. de St. L 1. ••• ]M(oiifieur4e Saint Lamberti^ 

■db' FAftftdemie Fran^oise, 
et Auteur du Poeme dea 
SaisoDs. 

LeP. B ^r ».,•. Le P^re Berthier. 

M. de B « Monsieur de Bonvflle.. 

M. de L, de M s^ ou 

simplement M. de M. ••• Monsieur de Lamoignoir de 

Malsherbes. 

M.<te C — — -- ••• Monsieur le Due dbChoisetdlr" 

L'Abb6 de B s BouflBers. 

M'^'.laComtesse de B s 

ou simplement Mad'"^ de 

B s • Madame la Comtesse de 

Boufflers. 

Le Marquis de V y... Villeroy* 

M. M Monsieur Monlton. 

M. Du P •• Monsieur Du Peyrou. 

M. D'l s Monsieur D-Ivemois. 

La Maricbale de M x. Mirepoix. 



ft- — . "^ 



La C .... La Chevrette. ) Maisons de Campagne de 

E-^ Epinay. y Madame D'Epinay. 

J'ai trouy6 cette explication en manuscrit dans une copi^ 
des ** Confessions de J. J. Rousseau/' Edition de Geneve*. 



« •• 



FINIS. 



Marshall, Printer, Kenton Street, Braniwick Square., 



o 



A neoMD 

JOURNEY ROUND 



auiMrms 



OF 

A BIBLIOMANIAC; 

CENTO OF NOTES AND REMINJSCENCES 

coNcnmMo 

RARE^ CURIOUS^ AND VALUABLR 



BY 

WILLIAM DAVIS, 

▲V1H0R OF ** THB QUO OF BIBLTOGSAFHICAL AITD LimtAlY AMlCOOTXf 

AND mMOlAHDA." 



LONDON: 

PRINTEI) FOR W. DAVIS, BOOKSELLER, 

AT THE BEDFORD MBBARY, SOUTHAMPTON ROW, RUISBLL SQUARE.. 

1826, 



3||P| 89C9ND. lOU^Nirt ROPMB 



1 * 



br^r^p. 67, kc.', andAVartoo, in liis Hktey of JEmfiflT. 
Poetry, is not a little indebted to hira iar nvmerow iflnstratiTt 

quotations, 

',*'* i- 1 ■ ' • •■}■'."■.-•'•■. J 

■ ■ ■ 't ' .-• ''^ 

Carmeliani (Petri) Carmen, Ato, fHthout date. Lokd&k, 

Richard' P^nsQtt. 24 leavei dnfy. 

This little Poem contains some carious details relative to tlie 
prelected marriage between Charles of Castile^ Archduke of 
Austria (afterwards Charles the 5th) and the Princess Mary, 
daughter of Henry the 7th of England. 

T)i^re was a copy on vellum in the Harleian Library, No. 
748^1 which, says Brunet, probably was the same sold in the 
Mo Ctfthy sale for 1000 francs, and which, I believe, the Rt, 
Hoa* T. Grenville now has; 



Ih^itiithema Oratianea, fjfc, Gr. FoVu>, f^enet. Aidw. 1504, ' 

first Oreek Edition of this Author. Aldus printed two dii- 
tions of this book the same year. In the first, which is tlie 
most rare, the Dolphin and Anchor (on the Htle-page) alls in 
outline only, with the word Aldus between two stars m m§& 
Side ^f the Anchor, and Ma. Ro. on the other. The second- 
cdittoUi which is most esteemed by schohirs, on account M its 
greater correctness and better execution, has the IMphm and 
Anchor shaded M'ith Al on one side and Dv9 on the oth^. ^ 

The value of the second edition varies aecording to oomditiMi 
at from 18/. 18«. to 25/. The first edition being the fteareer if ' 
preItT ueariy of equal value when in good preeervntioBi 



A mftvHmjt^xt*B ttMtxnr: 3i' 



2» »i M»n j fc< l» Op^ii Ommn. dr. Lot. BdmU Jt. Tnyhr. 
4io. 7hm.2et3. Cantab. 1748—1^97. 

Large paper copies of this excellent edition, (the first volame 
of which never appeared,) and which was intended to have 
been completed in 5 vols, are rare and valuable. 

At Heath's sale, ldlO> 9/. 14#. 6(/. 

Merly Library, 1813, 6/, 6#. 

Viscount Harberton, 1 822, 8/. 8*. 

Small paper copies bear a very limited price. 



SwU OrSuai fL'Hktoire ou ie Roman duj qnt ett k fonie* 
9wnt de la Takie Ronde. Translate da Lat. en Ryme Fr&n* 
^ais, et de Rune en Pro$e. Par Rob. Borron om B&irom4 ' 
1 vol. in folio, Parit. DuprS. 1516. 

Roxburghe, 17/. 17*r 

SainU Greaal contenant la Congueste du t^ef Smn&t irreoat 
(fakte par Lancelot du Lac J Lett. Goth. Jig', en beie. . 2 
torn, en I. FoUo. Parte. 1523. 
CroftB, 5/. 7s. Sd. 

'< Tbe Holy Grafe, that is, the Reid Blood ^f our Blessed 
Saviour. Kng Arthur^s Knights are represented as adventnr* ' 
ing in: quest of the Sangreal or Sangmie Realie. This expecfi^ 
tioA was one of the first subjecta of the old Romance." 

See Warton on Spenser, vol. i. p. 51, and vol. ii. p. 287>Sec. 

8t Graal, or Sangr«il, is elsewhere denved from GtasiJ, 
which wgnifies a cup in old Frendi, or from the Sanguis Realis, 
with which it was snppooedto have been filled. According to 



I - 

A 

J- 



■ >. ■ .- . I •■ 



v-.Ai 



'<N«t«re win kave ber eoune^ and dull Books irill he Ibrgottefii^ 
IppiteofBibliographen." ' ^' 



-1 

■ •;« 
■ ;.:m 

4 • 

.•-■■. » 



-.: "^ 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAO*. 

Acmi-ea Descubrimiento de las Amazonas^ 4to. 1641 ... • 84 

An-ttalia Dubrensia, 4to. 1636..... 85 

Arxiolde s Chronicle 35 

Artltnr (Kynge) and his Knyghtes, Caxton, 1485 28 

Barksdale s Nympha Libethris, 12mo. 1651 87 

Baron's Cyprian Academy, 8vo. 1647 83 

Pocula Castalia, 1650 84 

.^asj5iei|tiBU8*s Free Will, a Tragedy, 4to ....^..^.v^^w' 57 

Bateman*s Travayled Pilgrim, 1569 ^i3\ 

Bibles .^Fjrgt Protestant) 1535 37 

(First edition of Luther's) 1541 38 

(Bill and Barker's) Bunyan's copy, with account of 

^unyan 38 

^*^^chardyne (King) and Princess Eglantine, Caxton, 1 485 28 

^^^clus's Boke of Consolation, 1525 37 

^<>»'de's Book of Knowledge, &c 43 

^^'^OeUi Bizarie di Vare Figure, 1624 77 

^'^sonii Facetianim, folio, 1518 34 

^^ CDe) Peregrinationum, &c. 1590-1634, folio 60 

^^*> (De) Phylobiblion, 1473 10 

^^'^eliani Carmen, 4to. Pynson 32 

2^^^'s (J.) Angelical Guide, 8vo. 1697 101 

^^'oniques de France, 1476 16 

— — — de Normandie, 1487 16 



6 CONTENTS. 

Churchyardc's (T.) Works .^ .^ % ^ ♦ .6* 

Clizia^ L'Infelice Amore di Crinlia e Kameo, 8to. ^553 •-.« . h|3> 
Collinses Families of Vere, Cavendish^ &C.. folio, 17-^ a « 1 Ifti 
Court and Kitchen of Elizabeth Cromwell, 12iik>* i664 : Wh 
Cowley's Poetical Blossoms, &c. 4to. 1633, &o.. •• • «,• > .« 7$tr 

Anacreontic Odes on Gold, the Grasshopper, 

and the Epicure • « •« •!»<• ,-: .$|\ 

Cromwell the Perfect Politician, 8yo. 1680 • « • •^ .. dX. 

Dance of Death (The History of ) , ,2^^ 

Danse Macabre, 1485, &c • • • * * • 2(f^ 

-*- des Morts, 1744, &c ■ "23 

Darcie^s Anualcs of Queen Elizabeth, 1625 ••....«.•• T^i 
Dee's (Dr. J.) Arte of Navigation, folio, 1557 . .r» • •"•.^ ,,^§4 

Demosthenis, Aldus, 1 504 32 

Taylori, 1748-57 V v ^A 

El Diablo Coivclo, 8vo. 1646 .,^7 

Drayton's (M.) Poly Olbion 73 

Queen Elizabeth's Prayer, or Booke of Christian Praters *Yr 

Fazio Dita Mundi, 1474 /. r^'*!* 

Fraunce's Countess of Pembroke's Ivy Church i AiA^tai,- ' * "'^ 

&c. 4to. 1591, &c 62 

Froissart Chroniques de JPrance, &c • 1 . . ..'.:'. '• 'IMK 

Froissart's Chronicles, Pynson, 1523, &c 30 

by Johnes ..:... -^ 

Fuller's Worthies of England, foHo, 1662, (Difettioi^ '^ ^ ^"^ 

for Collating) '.'. . .'• . -9^^ 

— — — Church History (plates in) ,.#..; ^fr 

- Abel Redivivus (Collation of) • i^^ 



Gi^np^rsays^ this is. tlM first Treatise on Arithmetic pitlh 
Ijished ia this country. ■ i. 

It is jby no means a rare book^ and I have seen more t)uia 
one copy sell at a very cheap rate. ,; 

At Sir Peter Tliompso^ s sale^ in 1815, a copy was l^i^A^ 
by Mr. Heber for 2/, ICk. . :, . .,i. 

Bishop Tpi|stall*8 own copy^ upon veiium, is in the JRn^if^ 
Library at Cwnbridge. . ..ig 






Boechis Bohe ojf Consolation, Folio. Printed by Iff. Ctui^t^j^ 

At the Alchorne sale^ 1813, an imperfect copy of tJ^is^jix^lft 

solid for 53/. 11«. ,.,,„, 

Boecius, translated inlQ English. 4to. Tavestck* 1^3u,i\ 
W^,t*« ^ale, 3/.) Dr. Askew, 5/.) Forster, 7/. lO^^i .Ma^<[to» 
17/. J Gongh, 27/. 6s.t (resold, being imperfect, for 14/»3#,flrf^)f. 
i No Rom^n Writer appears to have been more, studied. md! 
estei^med £rom the beginning to the end of the barbar0tt«/ceic^ 
turjes ^than, Boetiuf. <' His Consolations of Philosophy", nras 
tr^^lated. into Saxon by King Alfred, and illustrated ,wttb %• 
Qypmentary, by Ass^, Bishop of St. David*s. 

See Warton s History of English Poetry, vol. ii. 8fO. p> 242vi 



, ■v 

La Bible qui est toute la Sahte Ecriture, translatSe en Fran- 
qois par Robert Pierre OUvetan (aidS de Jean Calvin.) 
Folio. Neufchatel DeJVingle. 1535. 
This 18 the first Bible published by the Protestants :tt- 
ies ia good preserra^n are difficiilt to be met with. The 



94 ^otJittnSt Mtisto k 

** this Codectiou piitchased frdm tbe VfA»i M^MtA itid 
Este, was tralisfe]i*ed fihoin theno^ by the late pi^prietoi' 
to Ince Blundell, near Lirerpool^ where he erdeted, aft H 
repository for them, k rdttmda of great di^hilectciFal 
beauty, upon the plan of the Pantheon at Rome/' 

The only Copy which has hitherto occurred for public 
sale, was in iPayne and Foss*b Catalogue for 1815, where 
it is marked at 73/. 10s. 

There is a Copy iu the British Museum. See Clarke*! 
Repertorium, p. 30. 



7%e Antient Paintings of the iatki of Titm, dime from 
the Originals , by Carhnu Atlas Felio. 61 Celonred 
Drawings^ various sizes. 



Not more than Twelve Copies were exeettted. Ott# df 
tiieiie sold at M. Paris^s Sale, in lt6l, for iW. ft. 



Chine — Les Grandes Sdtailtes de la Chine, gravees soiit 
la Direction de Mi, Cochin. Attas Polio, and Description 
in Quarto. 

The original designs of these prints were sent by the 
Emperor of China to be engraved in France. WhoB tlley 
were done, the plates were sent to China, and vefy ftw 
impressions remained in Europe. 

At M. Paris's Sale in 1701, a copy sold for 64/. 12s. 



BIBtl6MAMtA0*t UBlURT. 96 

iBxpUeatum dn PHneipanUe Nanu laiah en hlane dam la 
Skt&iuk Pariit dn * Gokfesriaiu de J. J. Romtean/ 
Editimi de -Cfimi^. 

tH.jy n *••• Monsieur Dapiiu 

M^. D ■ i i> •••.•..•.•••«••••• Madame Dupin. 

M.lePresidentdeL n. Lamoignon. 

M. le Prince de C . ... Conti. 

M . de 7 MoHdienr de Francueil. 

Mad"*, de F Madame de Francueil. 

M. le Comte de M ^, ou 

simplement M. de M. ... Monsieur le Comte de Mon- 

talgu, Ambassade du Roi 
Venise. 

M. B' j:**» ••• Monsieur d'Epinaj. 

]M[<ie D' J ^ Madame D'Epinay, qui donne 

d Rousseau THermitage. 

M"*. la Comtesse de H , 

ou simplement M'"^ de H. Madame la Comtesse d'Houp* 

tot, Belle Soeur de Madame 
d'Epinay , et dont Rousseau 
devint i TAge de 45 Ans si 
eperdument amoureux. 

M. G , Le S'. Q -, ou 

G M. Grimm, Lecteurdu Prince 

Hereditaire de Saxe Gotha. 

M**. de P -r.i^. Madame de Pompadour. 

M. de C X Monsieur de Chenonceaux. 

M**. de C ^x. •.•••••.. Madame de Chenonoeaux. 

Le Baron d'H k, ou 

simplement d'H ^k. M. le Baron d'Holback. 

M*«. d'H k Mad»MaBaronncd'Holback. 

M. d' A - ■ • Monsieur d'Argenson. 

W\ F— MademoiseUe Fel. 



'Vi'«i.':> 



96 JOUBipjftiiftlJirD A 

T • Le Docteur Tronchin^ Mede- 

* cin Genevois. 

M. de St. L 1. ••• • AfoiifiQurde Saint Lambert. 

: '^- FjMMemie Fran^oise, 
et Auteur du Poeme dea 
SaisoDs. 

Le P. B r »•••• Le P^re Berthier. 

M. de B e Montieiir de Bonvflle.. 

M. de L, de M b^ ou 

simplement M. de M. ••• Monsieur de Lamofgnon de 

Malsherbes. 

M.^e C ■ ■ ■ ••• Monsieur le Due deChbisetill; 

L'Abb6 de B — ^s BouflBers. 

M'^'.laComtesse de B s 

ou simplement Mad"'^ de 

B s Madame la Comtesse de 

Boufflers. 

Le Mai*quis de V y... Villerey* 

M, M Monsieur Monlton. 

M. Du P •• Monsieur Du Peyrou. 

M. D'l s. ..»• Monsieur D'lvemois. 

La Marichale de M x. Mirepoix. 

La C ..•• La Chevrette. ) Maisons de Campagne de 

E-^ Epinay. y Madame D'Epinay. 

J'ai trouY^ cette explication en manuscrit dans une copi^ 
des *' Confessions de J. J. Rousseau/' Edition de Geneve*. 






FINIS. 



Marshall, Printer, Kenton Street, Bmniwick Sqoare., 



© 



A neoMD 

JOURNEY ROUND 



or 

A BIBLIOMANIAC; 

OB, 

CENTO OF NOTES AND REMINJSCENCE3 



CONCUNIMO 



RARE^ CURIOUS^ AND VALUABLR 



BY 

WILLIAM DAVIS, 

AVIBOl OF " THB QUO OF BIBLI0GBA7HICAL AlTD LimiAlY AMBCDOTXi 

AND MmOBAMBA." 



LONDON: 

PRINTED FOR W. DAVIS, BOOKSELLER, 

AT THX BKDFOBD LIBBABY, SOUTHAMPTON ROW, BUB8BLL 8QDABK. 



42 SECOND iouhnby round 

Hie Mid John Pdsgrave hath also (contifit^es Wodd) uritten 
several Bpitties, and poblished a Translation of a Book> inti- 
tuled, Ecpkrasies Anglica in Comwdiam Acolm^, Or, th€ 
Comedjf 9f AcoliiHus trtmfiaied into 0ur Bmfihh Umgw, after 
9uck « manner m CkHdven nre taughi m the Gtnmmar Sckdol; 
firtt word 6^ word &s the Latin fyeth, and aftcrwarde a^tprd- 
mg te the sense and meaning of the Latin eentencee, 8fe^ 4io. 
Lend. 1540. 

Which scarce Play, at FWmer a sale, sold for 4/. 5». 6(f. A 
copy at the sale of Hayley*8 library brought 22/. \s. 

An account of this Play, which is a version of the Prod^al 
Son, written originally in Latin Verse by Gaill. FuUoi»ius,* 
may be found in Reed ajid Joneses Biographia Dramatica, where 
also an account of Palsgrave may be met with, but containing no- 
thing more than the account given in Wood's Athenae, but with- 
out any acknowledgment of the source whence derived. 

Dibdin, in his edition of Ames, vol. iii. p. 368, describes 
Palsgrave's translation of ** Acolastus'* It is also mentioned 
by Percy in his Reliques; vol. i. p. 134 (note p.) 2d edition. 



Porto (L.) Istorla di due Nobili Amanti (Romeo e Of»kl\etta»J^ 

8&0. f^enice. No date, 
Bprrpmeo, 1817, 15/. 



* See Brunei Manuel du lahraire for an account of ihe eariiest edi- 
tions of the Latin originaL 



Uk BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBBAR Y. 43 

JPwto fLdi) Rme e Proaa^cwS ia GiuUeUa Nopeiia^ ' Svo, 
' ' • f^ice. 1539. 

mOrMnRdrlta. ¥ii\R\!&,bLb9. 
■ V i> Thi^ 18 the earliest novel i^n the unhappy, lovv^ of 
^ R^m^o and Jiilkt> printed seFeral years prior to that of Ban- 
^<ietto on Uitt same tabject^ 

'' Thore is a translation of it in the Res Liieraria, notic^ in 

the Gentleman's Magazine^ Dec, 1^ 1822. 

Clislia Llnfetke Amore di Giuliae Romeo, in ottava rlma. 

8z^o. F'enet, Gioiito, 1553. 
" JWbffiii; Plbremre, 1807, 33 francs. 

Bakdi^ii^i J^iatory of Romeo and Juliet was metrically pa- 
f^rtasiA by :;4rthUf Brooke, xadprmteddy R. Tothtll, 1562. 

• * ' ^<^8,ih Phillijis's Theatrum Poetarum, 8vo. Canterbury, 

* -iSOO;;^. 128, says, '*^ the Editors of Shakspeare have discoyeired 
this tb have been the original of Shakspeare's Romeo and 

• » I . < : » I I • . . . . - 

Borde (Andrew J A Boke of the Introduction of Knowledge, 
the whkh doth teache a man to speake part of all maner of 
languages, and to know the usage and fashion of all maner 
of countries, and for to know the most part of all maner of 
doins of money, Ato. Black letter. Imprint by William 
Copland, fFithout date. 
Dedicated to the Lady Mary, daughter of King Henry the 

Eighth-^which dedication is dated from Mountpelyer, May 3,, 

1542. 
Pearson, 1788, 41, lbs, to Mr. Bind^y. 

D 2 



44 SECOND JOURNEY ROinND 

This book is partly written in verse and partly in prose, con- 
tained in 39 chapters, before each of which are wood cuts ^ith 
representations of men. Before the first chapter, in which he 
has characterized an Englishman, is the print of a naked man, 
witli a piece of cloth lying on his right arm, and a pair of sheers 
in his left hand, under which is an injscription in verse, of which 
the following are the four first lines : 

^ I am an English Man, and naked I stand kef e. 
Musing in my mind what rayment I shall were : 
For now I will were thys, and now I will were that. 
And now I Viill were I cannot tell what,'' &c. 

Before the 7th Chapter is the portrait of the Author himself, 
standing in a pew with a canopy over it, habited in a loose 
gown with wide sleeves, and on his head a chaplet of lanrd, 
with a book before him on a desk, with the following title of 
the said chapter beneath : 

" The Vll Chapyter sheweth how the auctor of this Boke 
had dwelt in Scotland and othet Hands, and did go thorow and 
round about Christendom qnd out of Christendom declaring ike 
J^ropertics of all the Regions, Countries, and Provinces, the 
which he did Travel thorow'' 

This Portrait, according to Herbert's Memoranda, served 
also for a Portrait of Skclton, Poet Laureat. Sec DibdSn i 
Ames, vol. iii. p. 160. 

Mr. Upcott edited a re-print of 100 copies of this curious 
tract, with wood-cuts, one of which is in Rivington's Catalogue 
for 1824, marked at 1/. 11«. 6if. The cut of the English- 
man from this reprint is given- in Dibdin's account of it, who 
says of it in conclusion, " this is probably the most curious 
and interesting volume ever put forth from the press of Cop- 
laud." 



A BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBRARY. 45 

Andrew Borde was a whimsical . being, and said by Granger 
to have been Physician to Henry Vlllth ; whether from his 
fiicetioiis mode of practice according to Phillips^ or from the 
Harleqninism of his pursuits and writings^ he gave rise to the 
name and character of Merby Andrew, seems uncertain : he 
appears to have applied his iQind to many subjects, and, like 
most quacks, to have been equally confident in all. 

The Book of Knowledge, 

The Breviary of Health, 

The Dietary of Health, 

Merry Tales of the Mad Men of Gotham, 

Merry History of the Mylner of Ahington, 

Book of Prognostics, 

'• Vrine^^ 

■ Roads, 

are specimens of what he aimed at; 

According to Wood's Athenae, vol. i. p. 61, folio, " It was 
Borde's practice, when living at Winchester, where, as at other 
places, it was his custom to drink water three d^ys in a week, 
to wear constantly a shirt of hair, and every night to hang his 
shroud and socking, or burial sheet, at his bed's feet, accord- 
ing as he had done, as I conceive, while he was a Carthusian. 

" He always professed celibacy, and did zealously write 
against such Monks, Priests, and Friars, that violated their 
vow by marriage, as many did when their respective houses 
were dissolved by Henry VIII." 

This zeal caused his opponents to promulgate various scan- 
dalous stories, to the discredit of the Doctor's continence — for 
which see Athencs Ojponiensis. " But letting these matters 
pass, I cannot otherwise but say," continues Wood, " that our 



6 CONTENTS. 

taqM. 
Churchyarde's (T.) Works *. ...^.. .% *t vj&» 

Clizia^ L*Infelice Amore di Giolia e Romeo, 8to. 1553 <;# n 'r49jt 

Collinses Families of Vere^ Cavendish, &c» folio, \7lB2 t* llfi 

Court and Kitchen of Elizabeth Cromwell, 12mo* .1664 9fh 

Cowley 8 Poetical Blossoms, &c. 4to. 1633, &c. . •••«.«« .« 7% 

Anacreontic Odes on Gold, the Grasshopper, 

and the Epicure • •••«••»•.««•»> ^. $|i^ 

Cromwell the Pterfect Politician, 8vo. 1680 -*.•.... S^L 

Dance of Death (The History of ) , 2;f . 

Danse Macabre, 1485, &c • » 2^> 

des Morts, 1744, &c • • . . ., "23 

Darcie's Annalcs of Queen Elizabeth, 1625 ,.••...•.•• 77^ 
Dee's (Dr. J.) Arte of Navigation, folio, 1557 . .^ .' . .^ • * 5^. 

Demosthenis, Aldus, \ 504 32 

Taylori, 1748-57 vv Ma 

El Diablo Coivelo, 8vo. 1 646 .....!.•, ,^^7 

Drayton's (M.) Poly Oibion .73 

Queen Elizabeth's Prayer, or Boohe of Christian Praters *Yr 

Fazio Dita Mundi, 1 474 ...•......•-' PJK 

Fraunce's Countess of Pembroke's Ivy Chufchi Ai^yiitai,- 'jC'J/ 

&c. 4to. 1591, &c 62 

Froissart Chroniques de JFrance, &c ♦.....*.•• V ^2^ 

Froissart's Chronicles, Pynson, 1523, &c • 30 

by Johnes .-. : . . V ^'i^ 

Fuller's Worthies of England, folio, 1662, (Dir©c*iatt» ^ ^ ^'^ 

for Collating) .V'. * i . . ' 9X^ 

— Church History (plates in) ,.#..; 9fr 

- Abel Redivivus (Collation of) • '^^ 



A BlBtlOM ANIAC'S UBRARY. 4T 

'' U n weU kBOWB/' says Percy, "^ that Dnunatic Poetry in 
this Mi4 oiost other nations of Eorope owes its origin, or at 
least its lenval, X0 those rsUgions shows, which in the dark 
a^s weie osnaNy exhibiled on the more solemn festivals. At 
thoise times they were wont to rq[iresent in the Churches the 
lites and miracles of the Saints, or some of the more important 
litories of Scripture.' And as the most mysterious subjects were 
frequently choseui such as the Incarnation, Passion, and Resur- 
rection of Christ, &c. these exhibitions acquired the general 
name of il^Heriet. At first they were probably a kind of 
diunb shews> intermingled, it may be, with a few short speeches i 
at length they grew into a regular series of connected Dialogues, 
formally divided into acts and scenes. Specimens of these in 
their mo«t improve^ state (being at best but poor artless com- 
positions) may be s^en among D^sleys Old Plays, and in the 
Harldan Miscellany.** How they were exhibited in their most 
simple form, we may learn from a '^ A merye Jest of a man that 
was called Howl^las,** whose waggish tricks are the subject 
of the book at the head of the present article. After many 
adventures, he comes to live with a Priest, who makes him his 
Parish Clerk. This Priest is described as keeping a Leman, 
or Concubine^ who had but one eye, to whom Howleglas owed 
a grudge, for revealing bis rogueries to his master. The story 
thus proceeds : *' And than in the meane season, while Howie- 
'' glas was Parysb Clarke, at Easter they should play the rcsur- 
" rection of our Lorde : and for because than the men wer not 
" learned, nor could not read, the Priest toke his Leman, and 
'* put her in the grave for an Aungcll : and this seing, Howk^ 
glas toke to hym iij of the symplest persons that were in the 
towne, that played the iij Maries 5 and the Person (i. e. Par- 



ft 



8 COMTBNtt. 

Rdmtin* (Bossy) Hist Amonieiifle det Gnte • • • fi 

Rdatioii de la Riviere des AnuuKmes* per CkmberTiUe, 
1682 W 

Seint Or^iial, I^uris, 1516atid 1523 S8 

SaUnst, 4to. 1475 15 

Sinoladiri Historiup &C. Lyon, 1549...».: 16 

Smith's (Capt. J.) History of Virginia, folio, 1624 ... . 75 

■ ■ Travels in Europe, &c. 1680 •.*••• 77 
SinoUett's Adventoresof an Atom (Key to the Characters 

Sp«ii5er*s Fserie Qtaeene and other Works, 1590, Sec* • • • 58 
Spmice's Polymetis, folio, 1747 106 

. * , - - • 

TonstaUns de Arte Sappatandi, Pynson, 1522 36 

Towneley's Translation of Hadibras 119 

Virgilii Opera, 1469 9 

Wallers (Edmd.) Poems, 1711 KH 



A ifBtiiOBfAlnAC'S LIBRARtr. 49 

Heywotfd^s fjm) fFMrkes\ cohtairmg the Spider and the 
Flie, Hi» DM&guhs wi English Proverbes, and his 600 
Bpigramines, ' Ato, 1 562. 
Miison, 3/. 13». 6rf.; Farmer^ 5/. lO^.j Deyonshire Dupli- 

cAttJS, 18^15, 7LS tyakt of Roxburghc, 21/. 

' Another Edition. 4to. 1 576. Sold at Mr. Strettell's sale 
in 1820 for 7/. 17*. 6(/. 

fJejfujQQd\s (John) Dialogue on English Proverbes. 4to, 
First edition. . 1546^ 
Pvike of Roxburghe, 1 812, 41. 10*. 

Haywood's largest and most laboured work is the Spider and 
Flie, iwhidi forms a pretty thick quarto in old English verse, 
printed in the black letter ; and at the beginning of each of the 
77 chapters of wlueh the Parable consists, appears the figure 
of the Author, either standing or sitting before a table, vnih. a 
Ikn^ oi^ H, near a window hung with cobwebs, flies, and. spi- 
dersv By way of frontispiece is a wooden print of the Author 
at iuU length, and. probably in the habit he usually wore, for 
he is dressed in a fiur gown, resembling that of a Master of 
Arts. He has a round cap on his head, and a dagger hanging 
to his girdle ^ his chin and lips appear close shaven. 

HoUinshed, in his Chronicle, says of Heywood, that in his 
Book of the Spider and Flie, " he dealeth so profoundlie, and 
" beyond all measure of skill, that neither he himself that made 
" it, neither anie one that readeth it, can reach unto the mean- 
** ing thereof/* 

Speaking of the Author of the " Spider and Flie," who was 
also a Dramatic Writer, and a list of whose plays may be found 
in Reed and Jones's Bic^aphia Dramatica, Mr Warton says 



6Q $^0^P.iOimN£T.ROj[JffS> : 

*^ that be ifcas one i^f U&e very 6rat* Dnivptic- Wrilei8<ths[£0Br 
^ isfend produced.. He drew the Bibk from the stagiVi nod 
'^ intrpdiioed representatious of fiuidliar Hfe and popuiar paar 

John Hejrwood, aocordinig to Isai^ Reed*8 ao6nmW anA 
which is extzacted almost yerbatim from fVooi^ Athm^ was 
bom at North Mims^ near St. Alban*s^ in Hertfordshire,. and 
was educated at Oxford \ but the sprightliness of his dispoaitioii^ 
not being, well adapted to the sedentary life of an academieian*' 
he went, back to his native place^ which being in the nei|^« 
bourhood of the great Sir Thomas More, he presently contrac- 
ted an intimacy with that great MsBcenas of wit and genius, 
who introduced him to the knowledge and patronage of tlM 
Princess Mary. Heywood*s ready wit and aptness for jest and 
repartee, together vrith the possession of great skill both in 
yocsbI and instrumental mnsic, rendered him a &voarite wHk 
Henry VHI. who frequently rewarded him very highly.f Ob 
the accession of Edward VL he still contanned in &Tor, thoiu;li 
the Author of Tke Art of EngU^ Poeiry says it was ^ imr 
''the mirth and ^quickness of oondrat^ more than any gMdl 
'"' learning that was in him." 

He continued a great ftivorite with Queen Mary after shif 
came to the throne, and even till her death, after wbkh> 
being a bigoted Roman Catholic, he became apprehensive thai 
some of the severities which had been practised on the Pk>otes 

* Anthony Wood, in his Athena Oxonientis, does not whicribe to 
tliis opinion. 

f Granger, in his Biographical Hist of England, says, ^ I have some- 
where seen John Hey wood mentioned as Jester to King Henry YIIL** 
vo!. i. p. 170. 



A BlBIilOBIANlAd'fl UmAAr. 81 

taiits in the preceediiif telgn, might be retaliated on those of 
a c^ntrtiiy persnadfon in that of Marfn vnccessor^ Qneen Eli- 
zabeth ; he Ihen^fbre thought it best for the aeenrity of his 
person, and the preservation of his Religion* to quit the King- 
dom and retire to Modifiir> Where he died in 1565, leaving 
several ehildren behiftd hftn, to whom he had given liberal 
edtieatiohs. 

'**Ifis settling at Meehlin/* %hfs sly Antheiny Wood, ''is a 
wonder to some, who will allow no Religion in Poets, that 
thi<9 person aAioold above all his profession be a volnntary exile 
for it." 



Bat0mtm*9 fStt^henJ TtWffied PUgnm$ hrmgmgNewe^frwm 
nil P4rivs 0^ #Atf fF6rld9^ mtch like semrce heard of d^fi^e. 
i^6S^. Black huer, emdeiikked mM • grtM mmker ^f 

Bltson introduces this writer in his Catalogne of English 
Poela. Beloe knew of only one copy of this Poem, vix^ in the 
British Museum, and from the specimen given by him in his 
Anecdotes of Literature, voL ii. p. 100, I think the world is 
no kxier by the rarity of the book. A copy has been recently 
sold (1822)y at the dl^rsion of Mr. Perry's libmry, for 26/. 
15^. ^d* and bought by Mr. Hail. 

Mention is made of this author, and of one or two other 
productions by him, in Wartoh's History of Poetry, 8vo. vol. iv. 
p. 318. 



fif 'ffi0O9fD JOtnonf MO^tfD 



The Nice W^ 
A premiy ImUrimde cmUed Nice Wmmt9m. 

Tkree farauMaes «f a jll free, 
TbeMolkcr and Wr CUUrea Oree, 
Tvoo angkt aad one godlje. 

Eail J ifcarpe dbat wyfl be dune 
Soon yfl dbat wiD be MUigbt, 
To be nxa^tiL better mibonie 
Better ufed tiban nang^itfl j tangbt. 
4/i». Black letter, Lemd. 1660. 

See Gentleman's Magazine for 1787, p. 400 and 689, iirom 
whence Beloe has eiLtracted two specimens of the Songs, one 
of which b added here, on aoooont of the extreme rarity of the 
book, no other copies bdng known than the one in Uie Rox- 
bnrghe collection, and another in the possession of Mr. Wen- 
geve, of Suffolk. The Roxborghe copy sold for 20/. 19«. 

S0N& 

It is good to be merj-. 
Bat who can be mery ? 
He that hath a pure conscience 
He may well be mery. 

Who hath a pore conscience ? tell me : 
No man of himself I ensure thee : 
Then most it follow of necessitie. 
That no man can be mery. 

Paritie itselfe may pnrenesse give. 
Yon must aske it of God in true beleye. 
Then wyl he geve it and nere reprcvc. 
And so we may le mery. 



PREFACE. 



SIa;ky know to their cost the trath of Harwood'8 re- 
mark ^^ that the knowledge of Books^ like the knowledge 
of every Art that is arduous and useful^ must be purchased 
at a high price^ and can only be acquired by an assiduous 
and judicious application to this piu*suit for a considera- 
ble number of years." Experienced individuals will also 
readily admits with Oldys^ in his Librarian^ ** that the 
uiost industrious part in performances of this kind, is 
tliat which is most invitfible ; the mass ef refb^enee iatid 
leading therein required bearing no prepertiM tb fhH 
small ^oiitity of writing that appears." It has therefore 
usually happened^ that any attempt to facilitate such 
knowledge, has been received with indulgence, if not 
with approbation. Without such encouragement to the 
Author's former productions, the present performance had 
never been submitted to public scrutiny ; and having pub- 
licly but uselessly invited the more valuable suggestions 
or contributions of others, he only trusts that the sanc- 
tion he has hitherto experienced may not in the present 
instance be diminished, — " And if I have done well and 
as fitting the occasion, it is that which I desired — but 
if slenderly and meanly, it is that which I could attain 
unto;* 

W. D. 



00 JOUBNBT VOUND A 

Brydooe, who vai no entbamit> thiu leniibly ^ptologPlfv- 
for the inferior Catholica adoralioii of the Yirg^i Mtfy« 

" Were you to attempt to give a country-fellow an idea 
of the deity ; were you to tell him of a heing that i» 
immaterial, and yet whoge eiaence penetrates all mattery 
who has existed from all eternity, and whose extension i& 
equally boundless with his duration; who fills and pervades 
millions of worlds, and animates every object they ooBtain^ 
and who, in the sublime language of our poet, — 

** Tho* chang'd thro' all, i^ yet in all the sa^ie, 
^' Great in the Earth, as in the jSltherial frame : 
** Warms in the sun, refreshes in the breeze, 
*^ Glows in the stars, and blossoms in the trees ; 
'^ Lives through all life, extends thrq' all extent ; 
** Spreads undivided, operates unspent. 
** To him no high, np low, no great, no small; 
** He fills, he bounds, connects, and equals alL^ 

Now what do you imagine he would think of sipeh a 
being? I am afraid his understanding would be so 
bewildered, that he could not think at all. But set up 
before him the figure of a fine woman, with a beautiful 
child in her arms, the most interesting object in nature ; 
and tell him she can procure him every thing he wants ; he 
knows perfectly weU what he is about; feels himself 
animated by the object, wA prays to her with all his 



Of die Lairgnt Paper ^ in Folio^ only thirty copies were 
jprintedy these were intended as presents to crowned heads, 
IpobliB libr^iie^y and distingwhed personages, twenty of 
-yrlliQh hayi^ been dispersed. 

At the Duke of Boxboi^he^s Anotion, in 1814, a Copy 
ftdd for 81/. les. 

Jfusemit Wom^anum^ or a Collection of 4*i^[^ Baao^ 
releivos, Bustos, Statue$, and Gems; with View» of 
Placet in the Levant, taken on ^ke spot in the yeart 
1785-6-7. (By Sir R. Wonley,) S voli. folio. Laiulon. 
Printed by Bulmer, 1794. 

Of this work 250 Copies were printed, none of which 
were ever sold during the life of the author. In the 
beginning of the year 1804, no mare than twenty-seTMl 
i^ies had been presented by him to particular friends, and 
SQioh was his anxiety to prevent its being offered for sale, 
ij^ he purch|uied a Copy for 300/. from the executors of 
(^ of the gentlemeii to whom he had presented it, in 
order to }i|nder its falling into the hands of a bookseller. 
The expencef attendk^ this publication, including the 
author's travels, ^e said to hare amounted to upwwls of 
27,000?. 

"fherp is % ^evy good analysis ef it in the first rolume of 

GrenviUe, 1810, sold for 57/. 158. 
Sir W. Hamilton, 52/. 10s. 
Townley, 96/. 12s. 



Btfi §fi»<mD ioiasna*<mmmD A 



|K)||Cil»ftconmimd, him wavndeAy Jni tAkra pn 
0iff4 twice by jneam lafiadiet olcoaadfHBiwMN trilii.flpii«ii^ 
appi^f be ingntiated himseli So that nUlrniig::kHMfiW 
8€fi|g;bt again after a wiie^ and* whether he toak eaft ia tralb-i* 
capn^tellj nor how hi^ IJife was spent after 1580^"^ ^^Vi^ *'^ 

}.,Ch«rchyard died poor, and b bvried near gk^elftimiii 8iiiA(-* 
MfMTffM'et e Chorch, Westm^ister. From the Pnish Regi^trl 
i^ipfll^ars his burial was 9n the 4th ^ Aprils: 1604. ' -rn; 

t.lM Dibdin-8 Library Companion, the prodacttoiis ol.ChsrdH' 
ysyrfl*s.inns^,in print> are said to consist of xvii pieces raliAte'^ 
there (p. 888) questions if any one possesses «tttrfect4id^^{ 
them? 



.W '■■ 






AwV fDr: Jd.J Oetierai and Rare Memoriais Pert'dynh^}q 
' tke' perfect Arte of Navigation. Annexed to the Pal^odAiAl 
^Cufnpas, in Piaf/ne. Now fint pudiisked: Ti^'yirreSt' after 
iheflm Invention thereof Folio, 1 5 77. ' ' * ' "^ '' ^ 

This Book, of which 100 copies only were printed, WaU'CdAr 
sidercd by Mr. Isaac Reed as one of the scarcest lit'^he Gir- 
lish language. His copy sold for 3/. ISs. 6(f. "' '." '* "^ 
Bcloe, in his Anecdotes of Literature, vol. ii. p. 263 to 293i 
has extracted the whole of Dee*s Advertisement; andtl^riodi^^ . 
tion from a copy in the British Museum* on acq^nnt.o(,tbl}.i|iki-. 
rity of the book and the whimsicality of the Ahing.it^tU^ . . • * 
Sec a list of Dr. Dec's Works in Chalmers** Bi^iaijpi yaa l ' 
Dictionary, vol. xi. p. 387 and 388. ' \ 

John Dee (says Granger) was a man of extensive Icarningj 



BIBUOMANIAC'i LIBRARY. 93 

John Gabriel Stedman was a native of Scotland, and 
died at Tiyerton, Deron, March 1, 1707» at the age of 52. 
He was hnried at Bicklej, near Tiverton, with this 
Epitaph, written by himself, and at his own desire, placed 
over his tomb. 

This Stedman leaves to yon; 

" As you'd be done by— do.** 

The rest, memenio mori ; 

Here ends poor Stedman's story. 



View9 in Orkney and on the Narth^Easiem Cooii of 
Scotland: etched by the Marchioneu of Stafford, with 
Descriptions, Folio. 1807. 

. A limited number of these views were struck off to 
present to particular friends, after which all the plates 
were broken up. 

At the Hon. C. F. Greville's Sale, 1810, a copy sold 
for 16/. 16s. 

Duten's Sale, 1813 ... j^l4 3 6 

Pinkerton's, 1813 16 16 

Stewart's, 1814 10 10 



Engravings and Etchings of the Principal Statues, Busts, 
Bas Reliefs, Sepulchral Monuments, Cinerary Urns, 
4*c. in the Collection of Henry Blundell, Esq. at Ince, 
2 vols, imperial folio, 1809. 

Not printed for Sale, and only Twenty Copies said to 
have been struck off. 



Bll S6xx^ jotntifkT itoihli'* 



Ai^cor&ng toRecd and Jineiri BidgpAplda t>Miaitk4''l!Ke 
original Italian, entitled Tyagedia del Libero \ArhUno, 4tt^ 
1546^ as aliso a Latin Version by the Aatkor Lims^'^VM 
printed at Geneva, may be both fonnd in the Poibiic library 
at Cambridge. See, in addition, what Warton, In his Ifimjfy 
of English Poetry, toL iii. p. 185 to 192, Svo. Load. 18i)> 
says on the subject of Moralities. ' "* 



iSpenser 9 (EdnumdJ Faerie Quetne. Fir$tedkkn, 4l». 15M-tF. 

Ireland, 1801,3/. 13^.5 Townley, 12/,) Sotbeby)1821,2/.3«i> 
G. Nassau, 1824, 5/. bf.-, Thorpe, 1824, 3/. 13#. 6i/.; i>kttf, 
41. l4i. 6</. in rossia. •' • ^■ 

iThe Poet supposes that the Faekie Queens, aocordinj^ 
an annual custom, held a magnificent feast, which 
twelve days ; on each of which respectively, twelve s^ral 
complaints are presented before her. Accordingly,, in «i4^ 
to redress the injuries which were the occasion of thesvft^ve- 
ral complaints, she dispatches, with pr^;>eT cofnadirfbns, 
twelve different Knights, each of which, in the particolid ad- 
venture allotted to him, proves an example of some jnrticplar 
virtue, as of Holiness, Temperance, Justice, Chastity ; and has 
one complete book assigned to him, of which he is ^ Hero. 
But besides thes^ twelve Knights, severally exemplifying tw«i^ 
moral virtues, the Poet has constituted one principal Knight or 
g^eral Hero> viz. Prince Arthub. This personage tepre- 
sents Magnificence ,• a virtue which is supposed to be the pcf- 
fectiott of all the rest. He moreover assists in ev^ Book, 
and the end of his actions is to discover and win Glolitgotti^; gr 



'* The Poet intended Gloriana in praise of onr Qneea Elizabtth. 




VmUblkXttthXfu UBttART. 95 

Keatiam dm PHmeiptnUc Nanu laiaes em Mane dang la 
MStt&iuk Partis 4tt ' Cokfessumi de J. J. Rsmuetm^' 
^^XdiHan de -Chm^fe. 

^ ]) n.,,. «,,, Monsieur Dapin. 

. D — ^Hi ...••• »•. Madame Dapin. 

.kPresidentdeL ^n. Lamoignon. 

. le Prince de C . ... Conti. 

. de F • Motusienf de Francaeil. 

ad*"*, de F . •••• Madame de FrancueO. 

. le Comte de M ^, ou 

simplement M. de M* ... Monsieur le Comte de Mon- 

taiga, Ambassade du Roi 
Venise. 

. D' J Monsieur d'Epinay. 

de £)» y Madame D'Cpinay, qui donne 

d Rousseau THermitage. 
'M"*. la Comtesse de H , 

on simplement M"^^ de H. Madame la Comtesse d'Houp- 

tot, Belle Soeur de Madame 
d'Epinay , et dont Rousseau 
devint i, TAge de 45 Ans si 
eperdument amoureux. 

M. G , Le 8'. G -, ou 

G M. Grimm, Lecteurdu Prince 

Hereditaire de Saxe Gotha. 

M**. de P -r.i^ Madame de Pompadour. 

M. de C ^x Monsieur de Chenonceaux. 

M**. de C ^x Madame de Chenonceaux. 

Le Baron d' H k, ou 

simplement d'H ^k. M. le Baron d'Holback. 

M*«. d'H ^k Mad^MaBaronne d'Holback. 

M. d'A — Monsieur d'Argenson* 

M"^ F— Mademoiselle Fel. 



T Le Doctenr Tronchin, Mede- 

cin Genevois. 

M. de St. L 1. ••• • ]M(Qiift<9far4e Saint Lambert^ 

ife- EAMieinie Frangoise, 
et Auteur du Poeme des 
Saisons. 

LeP. B ^r. • •^••« Le P^re Berthier. 

M. de B e • « MomieHr dd Bonville^ 

M. de L. de M s^ ou 

simplement M. de M. ••• Monsieur de Lamoignon de 

Malsherbes. 

. \ y/^ ^Sl ■•*\ 

M.H!e C ' ' ' Monsieur le Due deChoiseotlr 

L'Abb6 de B s Bonfflers. 

M'^'.laComtessede B s 

on simplement Mad'°^ de 

B s Madame la Comtesse de 

Bonfflers. 

Le Matquis de V— — -y... Villeroy* 

M. M Monsieur Monlton. 

M. Du P •••••••• Monsieur Du Pe3rrou. 

M. D'l 8 Monsieur D?Iyeniois. 

La Marichale de M x. Mirepoix. 

La C .... La Chevrette. ) Maisons de Campagne de 

£-^ Epinay. ) Madame D'Epinay. 

J'ai trouv^ cette explication en manuscrit dans une copio 
des *' Confessions de J. J. Rousseau/' Edition de Geneve*. 



I •• 



FINIS. 



Marshall, Printer, Kenton Street, Brmuwick Square. 



A BXaUOMANIAC -S ^UBBARY^- ^ 

A>t^th^/lsale Q^thoMerly collectioi^ 18i3i « -copsr^vif aofting 
11 leaves^ and some plates, sold for 126/,, aad was.j^rahasfiH 
by Messrs. Atch, who were fortunate enough to coi^plete cathat 
was wanting, and make some additions, and in its impiloKred 
state they sold it to the Hon. T. Grenville for 240/. who has 
since rendered it, according to the Rev. T. F. Dibdin s account, 
the. most complete copy in the world. 
. Polonel Stanley s copy, which was sold in 1$13^ cont^^ned 
anpiScates of parts x. and xi. and a considerable number ot du- 
j&hUle plates } it was bound in 7 vols, folio, blue morocco, and 
sold foir 546/., and I believe now is in the Duke of Devon- 
feh&fe**ccaection. 

'"Mr.' Bbckford's c<^y 8<dd at Fonthilli in 1823, for JOO jgS- 
tiikSrV I do hot know whether Mr. Dibdiii is correct iii Bstj/mf; 
itiWfis M.-'Pwis's copy, and supposed to be perfect "' ^'* ' 
•^'ffeliic library of the Right Hon. T. GrennUe is a cohijitetfe 
Ifet 6f these Voyages, very copiously described in Dibdin*!^ £^- 
bilElrf.C6ihpaiik>n, p. 373, kc. containing also thie English piirt 
^f\1r|^iiia,* dedicated to Sir Walter Raleigh by De Biy ; ft 
fe^'priwto the Latin part, of the same date, Flrancof. 1590. — 
l^is/^ditioii of this part is unnoticed by M. Canms^ The fdl- 
Id^ilig^ is its title : • /^ 

^ briefe and true report of the neu^ found Land of Virgwla^ 
Xfcovered by Sir Richard Gr^vile, Knt^ in \ 585, translated 
into English by Thomas Hariot, at the cktmges of Sir 0^dtter 
Raleigh, und som Pictures of the PicteSi which m the olde 
Tyme dyd habite me part of the Great Brettaine, found in a 
&6ld English Chronicle, plates bj^ He Bry. Folio. Francof. 

* This coi^ is said tD hare cost Hariey Earl of Oxfbid 100 gviSiteafl, 
who, after many years^ search, ob^aedit at FrankfiHrtibr that subl 



te SfiCOND JfOtJRI^EY ROtJSD 

The copy of 6. Ih^assan/Esq. sold, in 1824, for tOO/L and in 
his Catalogue it is said that not more than four perfect copies 
of this part are known to exist. 



.• . I 



Frauncen (Abraham) Couutesse of Pembroke's Ivtf Chutik, 
^ conteming the afflscHonate Life and unfortunate Dh'aik of 
' PhUih and Amyntas, that in a Pastoral, this in a FH^rA 

4io. London. 1591. 

Dodds, 41. 7s.', Mason, 3/. 13*. 6d.', Roxburghe, 6/. tSs. M. 

Ditto, with Fraunces Emanuel,* at SAunders', 1818, 
13/. 2s. 6d.', Bindley, 25/. 4s,, bought by Perry, at whose sa!e> 
in 1822, it sold for 21/. lOs: 6d. 

Lord Spencer is said to have given White 21/. for his copy j 
White asked 25 guineas for it. 

G. Nassau, Esq. 1824, 5/. ISs. 
-^— — mrd Part of Ditto, entitled Aminitu 

Dale, being Tales of the Heathen Gods, in English Hexam- 
eters. 4to. 1592. 

A copy of this third part, which is very rare, with the Title 
and two leaves in MS. sold at Saunders*, in 1818, for 15/. }5s, 
' This Author is classed amongst Dramatic Writers, but his 
production, says Beloe, can hardly be called a Play) it consists 
of a translation of Tassos Aminta, which is interwoven in the 
body of a Pastoral, entitled Ivy Church. A specimen of this 
whimsical performance is given in Beloe*s Anecdotes. Phillips, 
speaking of Fraunce, characterized him as '' a versifier in 
Queen Elizabeth's time, who, imitating Latin measure in Eng- 



* O. Nfluwan, (the Emtaml only), 1834, 1/. lOf. 



A BIBLJOMANUC'S LIBITAAr. jS3 

lish verse, wrote his Ivie Charch, and some other things in 
Hexameter : some also in Hexameter and Pentameter ; . nor 
was he altogether singular in this way of writing 5 for Sir y. 
Sidney^ in the Pastoral Interludes of his Arcadia, uses not only 
these but all other sorts of Latin measure, in which no wonder 
he is followed by so few, since they neither become the Eng- 
lish^ nor any other modem language.** , ,/* 
y HciW^ true Phillips*8. opinion on the subject Is, haa been 
e;YiPf^ in our day, by the attempt and complete failure;, of ft 
celebrated Poetical Luminary to tread in the steps of Abra- 
ham Fjoauoce. 

A jconcis^. account of FVaunce, and some of hi£L productions, 
v^y be .found in the Thea.trum Poetarum, 8vo. p. 108» 9 s ip4 
also some particulars in Warton, voL h. 8vo, p. 230,- r 



.»•.'" 



Hooker 9 (Richard) Lawes of Ecclesiastical Pafuie, Folio. 

Best Edition. 1723. 

There are various other folio and octavo editions of this 
Work. 

*' This," according to Neal, in his History of the Puritans, 
*^ is esteemed the most learned defence of the Church of Eng- 
land, wherein all that would be acquainted with its constitu- 
tion (says a learned Prelate) may see upon what foundation it 
is built. 

*f Several champions appeared about this time (1594) for the 
cause of Episcopacy, but the most celebrated performance, and 
of the greatest note, was Hooker's Ecclesiastical Polity^ in 
eight books \ the four first of which were published this year. 



• '-/^ 



**li§JBwe win kftftt ]i«r conne^ vid dnll Books will be Ibrgofteni^ 
ppite of Bibliographenr'* ^ ' 



;i 



# 1 



J 



dtot^-iitid'l dcKjibt not that in a ftitiire edition tke jtealdm BS^ 
fionioik^^ will bring this EcckmsHcal Canon inWfii!ll play, 
iiKA-i{ 'hi» ffreat gun fail in silencing such pe{ty tavSIek's'/ 1 
think he will be perfectly justified; as a trae son of the Cf^f^% 
Mltiidit^ itt khobking bis opponent down with tihe fit^1({^o 
<diti^ of Hookers Ecclesiastical Politic ; ^t l/H himiake' \^ur^ 
i^d not injure the Portrait! < j /:- .:iL 

':/ ^■■.•.■■' .:....„ •»" '• • .\. ' ./" .:.r;i'«/v 

•-^rjv V.' ■•■. . ' ■ ■ . . - -^ .., . ^ - .' /v-.,^/> 

Hair 8 (J 08.) Mundu8 alter et idem : she Terra ^ustralhiMB^G. 

^itad semper incognifa, 8fc, futhorc Mercifrio firitatimcp. 

,6»a. First edition, taiih frontispiece bv Kip, , . n 

' Sold at Brand's sale for \L Is.y at G. ]>fassau s, 1824, 1/. 13^.. 

Reprinted, with the Maps, in Pratt s edition oj IJall^s 

rVorks, 10 vols. 8vo. Lopd. 1808. . '' '' 

HpiVs (Jos.) Discovery of a New. fVorld^qra^Desef^titmi^' 
./South Indies, hitherto unknown, by an English Merimt$>. %^ 

J^o date. Imprinted for E, Blount. , 

Unknown to Ames or Iferbert. , 
Brand's sale, 1807, 3/. 7s.} G. Nassau's, 1824,2/. Is. 
The preceding Work by Hall, Bishop of Norwich, was tibe 
protfitype whence Dean Swift Jbprrowed the idea of Oulli?i^s 
Trayels^^ Mr. Campbell, speaking of thiB saturical j6i(sti^»i 



i • 



'*' It i^ also very probable that Swifl derived ^me portion of lusYpjage 
to L^pata from Bishop Godwin's ^ Mem in the Moon, or a JH8cour89ofa\ 
Voyage thither by Domingo GonsalesP Svo. 1638. ^ In this PhOosopliical 
Romance,' which was repeatedly printed, Domingo Gonsales, a dinunii- 
tive Spamard> i;^ supposed to be shipwrecked on an uninhabited island. 



6 CONTENTS. 

PACt. 

Churchyardc 8 (T.) Worka • .^ ... .... ..s .^ ./&* 

Clizia, L'Infelice Amore di Gioliae Romeo, 8^0. 1553.0 ^4^1 
Collin8*6 Families of Vere, Cavendish^ &c^ folio, 17^ 1 « 1 19) 
Court and Kitchen of Elizabeth Cromwell, 12mo* 1664 W\ 
Cowley's Poetical Blossoms, 8cc. 4to. 1633, &o.. . • • «r« > a 7% 

Anacreontic Odes on Gold, the Grasshopper, 

and the Epicure « • .;»«. ^ .$)i 

(^mwell the Perfect Politician, Svo. 1660 ^ ««.... ^L 

Dance of Death (The History of ) .2^^ 

Danse Macabre, 1485, &c • « . 2^^ 

desMorts, 1744, &c "23 

Darcie*8 Annalcs of Queeu Elizabeth, 1625 ...•......; 77 j 

Dee's (Dr. J.) Arte of Navigation, folio, 1557 . • ^ • • • -• .v^.^fi 

Deraosthenis, Aldus, 1 504 32 

Taylori, 1748-57 V- Jf^ 

El Diablo Coivelo, 8vo. 1 646 ••-.:: vM^ 

Drayton's (M.) Poly Oibion 73 

Queen Elizabeth's Prayer, or Boohe of Christian Prater's *Yr 

Fazio Dita Mundi, 1474 r^'F*^ 

Fraunce s Countess of Pembroke's Ivy Church 3 kBSijtX?^ti ' *''^ 

&c. 4to. 1591, &c 62 

Froissart Chroniques de JFrance, &c. .••.••.... ..'.;. \' ^^ 

Froissart's Chronicles^ Pynson, 1523, &c 30 

by Johnes -lJ<^ 

Fuller's Worthies of England, folio, 1662, (Direfctiww ---'''^ 

for Collating) ..''.. w .."»?{ * 

— — Church History (plates in) ..,.#..; 9fr 

- Abel Redivivus (Collation of) '^^ 



A BIBLIOMANUG'S LIBRAKY. (St 

Reprinted at Oxford. 12«o. 1753. 

O. Nassan, 1824, 12*. ^ 

Gray, the Poet, in a letter to his friend Dr. Wliaitwi; of 
Durham, alluding to this edition, says, '^Bishop HalFs Satires, 
called Vit^demiarium, are lately republished. They are f|dl of 
spiHt and poetry, as much of the first as Dr^ Donne, akid te 
inore of the latter ; they were H^tten when he was about 23 yeatv 

ijilB. 

-These Satires, with Notes by Singer, in addition to Wartcm's 
observations, have been republished in 8vo. 1824. They* may 
also be found in the 10th volume of Hairs Works, 8vo, 1808> 
with Warton s Notes, as well as Mr. £}]is*s and Mr< Pratt's 
Ilkistrations. 

Of our Satirical Poetry, taking satire in its moral and dig- 
nified sense, l^all, according to Campbell, claims and may be 
idlowed to be the founder : thus in the Prologue to his Satires 
he says — 

I first adTentnre with fool hardy might. 
To thread the steps of perflovs despight: 
I first adventure, fi>now me who list. 
And he the second finglSsh Satyrisi 
Hairs Prologue to Book 3, implies his knowledge of former 
Satirists. 

" Some say my Satyrs orer-loosely flow. 

Nor hide their gall inoogh from open show: 

Not riddle like, obscaring their intent; 

fint, packe-stafie plaine, uttering what thing they neant, 

Cotttrairie to the Roman Ancients, 

Whose words were short, and darksome was their senoe. 

Who reads one line of their harsh poesies, 

Thrise must he tak his wind, and breath him thrise. 

Mff mujge would follow them that havefort-gmte, 



94 iotTkMtr llcitkrfi A 

'* This Collection pithcbaied fi'&in (be VSiwi UK attd ihd 
£8te> was tratisfeited (torn theno^ by the late ptoptittat 
to Ince Blundell, near Liverpool, wkere he er^ted, at n 
tvpository for them, a rotunda of great itfefaitectai^ 
beauty, upon the plan of the Pantheon at Rome/' 

The only Copy which has hitherto occurred for public 
sale, was in Pajme and Foss*s Catalogue for 1815, where 
it is marked at 73/. 10s. 

There is a Copy in the British Museum, See Clarke*a 
Repertorium, p. 30. 



The Antient Paintings of the J^atki of TOui, dime from 
the Originah, by Carhni, Atlas Folio. 61 Cehmred 
Drawings^ various sizes. 

Not more than Twelve Copies were exeetltCKl. Om 6f 
tiieUe ftold at M. Paris's Sale, in lf6l, for l74l. Ih. 



Chine — Les Grandes Sdtailtes de la Chine, gravies sous 
la Direction de Mi. Cochin. Attas folio, and Description 
in Quarto. 

The original designs of these prints were sent bj th« 
Emperor of China to be engraved in France. When they 
were done, the plates were sent to China, and velry ftw 
impressions remained in Europe. 

At M. Paris's Sale in 1791, a copy sold for 64/. 126. 



BIBtJ6tfAMU0*t lAttART. 95 

tBtpBeatum dm PHmelpaiUs Nami lamei en blane dam la 
S$Muk Partis dm * Cokfessumi de J. J. JUuaeau/ 
Editum de '€^en^fe. 

M* D &•••• • *••• Monsieur Dapiiu 

M^. D — ^Hi. •• •»•. Madame Dapin. 

M.kPresidentdeL ^d. Lamoignon. 

M. le Prince de C . ... Conti. 

M. de F Monsieiif de FrancneO. 

Mad*"*, de F Madame de FrancneO. 

M. le Comte de M ^, ou 

simplement M. de M. ... Monsieur le Comte de Mon- 

taigtt, Ambassade du Roi 
Venise. 

M. D' y Monsieur d'Epinay. 

M^'. D' J Madame D'Cpinay, qui donne 

d Rousseau THermitage. 

M"*. la Comtesse de H , 

ou simplement M"^^ de H. Madame la Comtesse d'Houp* 

tot. Belle Soeur de Madame 
d'Epinay , et dont Rousseau 
devmt i. TAge de 45 Ans si 
eperdument amoureux. 

M.Q , LeS'.G -, ou 

G M. Grimm, Lecteurdu Prince 

Hereditaire de Saxe Gotha. 

M**. de P -r.i^ Madame de Pompadour. 

H. de C X Monsieur de Chenonceaux. 

M**. de C ^x Madame de Chenonoeaux. 

Le Baron d'H k, ou 

simplement d'H ^k. M. le Baron d'Holback. 

W\ d*H ^k Mad<°MaBaronne d'Holback. 

M. d'A — Monsieur d'Argenson. 

M"«. F— Mademoiselle Fel. 



T Le Doctenr Tronchin, Mede- 

' cin Genevois. 

M. de St. L 1. ••• • ]M(Qiift9ar.4e Saint Lambert^ 

^^FiUMemie FraD^oise, 
et Aatear du Poeme des 
Saisons. 

LeP. B ^r •...••^••. Le P^re Berthier. 

M. de B e « Moniieiir de BonviJQe.. 

M. de L. de M s^ ou 

simplement M. de M. ••« Monsieur de Lamoignon de 

Malsherbes. 

M. <le C ' ■ ■» • Monsieur le Due deChoisetill;' 

L'Abb6 de B s Boufflers. 

M'^'.laComtessede B s 

on simplement Mad'°^ de 

B s Madame la Comtesse de 

Boufflers. 

Le Matquis de V— — -y... Villeroy. 

M. M Monsieur Monlton* 

M. Du P Monsieur Du Peyrou. 

M. D'l 8 • Monsieur D'lyemois. 

La Maricbale de M x. Mirepoix. 

La C .... La Cbevrette. ) Maisons de Campagiie de 

£-^ Epinay. ) Madame D'Epinay. 

J'ai trouv^ cette explication en manuscrit dans une copio 
des *' Confessions de J. J. Rousseau/' Edition de Geneye*. 



% •• 



FINIS. 



Marshall, Printer, Kenton Street, Bmnswick Square^ 



A BIBtrnMANIAC'S LIJBRASY. 71 

Life and Death of Edmund Genhtges, (aUaa Ironmonger.) 
Ato, Portrait and Plates. St. Otnets. ' 1^14. ' 

Gulston, 2/.; Townley, bl., G. Nassau/ld24^ blue morocco, 
12/. 5*. 

'' Edmund Jennings/* says Granger, ^ was admitted into 
the English College, at Rheims, under Dt. afterwards Cardinal 
Allen, and when he was 20 years of age, <HttaiBed Prie^. He 
was soon afterwards sent into England, where he was appre* 
hended in the act of celebrating M^s. He was executed by 
hanging and quartering in Gray's Inn Fields, Dec. 10th, 1591.*' 

In the above rare book are several Historical Prints, repre- 
senting the principal circumstances of his Life and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expence by the Pa- 
pists^ in order to perpetuate the remembrance of tvro * Mira- 
cles,** which are there said to have happened at his death. 
The first is, that, after his heart was taken out, he S£ud, 
'* Sancte Gregori, ora pro me^ which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, ** God*s wounds ! see his heart is in my hand > yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth.'* The other is, that an holy Virgin 
being desirous of procuring some relick of him, contrived to 
approach the basket into which his quarters were thrown, and 
touched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy f^om 
its having been employed in acts of consecration and elevating 
the Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
or discovery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
the greatest care. 



. ..'t 



Q9^ty(mhYsnfnaMQitadkM.{iito^ tmA.y^if^^ 

imi^afi be iiigritiajted UmaeU. So that Mt«hii|ig!!lhMiefMi 
8oi|ght.|iglda.jiiftcr a wiie^ aiid*whethier ke to«k-oai^ n tafShb-ii 
capii^.|el)i por how his UJfe was spieiit after l&80/< «>;• *^^ 

. Chiinchyai4 died poor» aad is bvried near 6kf3l$(m'iii Baiiitr' 
MargiM^fl Cluurcli^ Westm^iister. From tbe Parisli Repafteri 
i^«PiV9ar8 bifl buarial was ^n the 4tb ofApili 1604. ' 

: Ia IKbdin*s Library Companion, the productM^s ofChareh** 
y2^*a lans^jin print, are said to consist of xvit pieeeai ap&liie'^ 
there (p. 888) questions if any one possesses a perfect adt^^'j 
them? 



\t 



...%•.*. . . \ .... • . - \. 

AwV fDr: Jo, J Oienerat and Rare Memorials Pi^rta^nlhgiq 

' the perfect Arte of Navigathn, Annexed to the Paraddsiid 

Cuinpa», in Piatfne. Now first published: 24" ycr^i ajfter 

the fim Invention thitreof. Folio. 1577. ' »' s'v. 

This Book, of which 100 copies only were printed. Was cBA? 

sidered by Mr. Isaac Reed as one of the scarce^ in'tte EtigT 



lish language. His copy sold for 3/. 13s. 6rf. ' '. ' ' '^ 

Beloe, in his Anecdotes of Literature, vol. ii. p. 263 to 2J3, 
has extracted the whole of "Dee a Advertisement and.lMrodac- 
tion from a copy in the British Museum* on ^cqpun^.o^,tt]|^.#i^<>, 
rity of the book and the.whimsicaJity. of the.ljhingit(j»ll, . . • -r 
See a list of Dr. Dee*s Works in Chalmers-s Biogra^pyeal ' 
Dictionary, vol, xi. p. 387 and 388. 

John Dec (says Granger) was a man of extensive learning. 



A *maabwamitifB uniar. if 

biilBim»)iHnj.«isdiii»dii^«]ilutotk«ii«ilic. ItowMMvpiii 

lUrioflHiuy0i vtoM dedtanwlie iMMed to wMi^tageniets; tti 
IMtM « gMit^s dhreamer'liiuiMtf tu Iny «ff tkaC'^ilcMlf. 
He appears fo-faste.Men %y' tiunis a dupe aad a eheak> iMit Kb^ 
qniM prodii^ioiis lepatatioD. He tvaTdled e^ver great ptft W 
Eaiepe/tuid aebms to have been highly eaCeemed by ttMy 
penonji of rmk and eodnenee. He pretended that a MrdI* 
si9^.$t9pectiitmi, which he made great nw oC warf bMiigtit 
hiiii by Angehi and (kat he was particularly intimate uMi lUe 
pka^smdOahrieL 



Boitenimuis Free fFUl a Trdgedy. 

^ A eeriayne Tragedk wry Hen fyr9te m liaihm hy F. N. B. 
(Franci$cuiJ^er BMemimuJ cntitaled Faaa^Wvi) 4Mf 
trimfifafei kUo EnglUh by Henry Ck^eie, wkertm Mitfvl 
fiorth^ m mmmer €fti Tragedk, the deuy^ieh dtmm Hjf ike 
PapUk ReUgim, ^.** 4/«. Bhek htter^ Ni> ^aie (utp- 
p^ttin^out 1989), 
'X!^ ^9;One of the very old Moral Phyau A eopy at thto 

Roxbnrghe sale brought the snm of 5/« 15«. M 

I I I 11 ■ ■ ■.-■■IP ■ ^ ■» ■ I » ■ ! > • 

^ tliis blfc): atone into which Dee naed to call his spirit* was sacces- 

MT^ in (be Collections of the EarUiof Peterboro% Lady Eliz. Oermaine, 

ihe^Boh^ of Argyle, and Mr. Walpole. Upon examination it turns out 

to ba ttothti^ bat* a polished piece of canal coal This is what Butler 

aitMa fthmi hs tajn^ 

^ Kelly (7)m'« Coadjutor) did all his feats npon 
The Devil's liooking Glass, a ston^" 

Hndibras, part iL canto iii t. €3). % 



^il»aimiing,of.tLe,avU1ViirS.". . ■ i-,,-- ■■■> ;:l<. ■»! )tiii/l( 
Qj|@p^, it), biBAnecdotea of literature, 4B}t4"'K^tberiWdlM 
ij^^,f4(b.pf Hooker, nor &Mh»p Gaudeii^ boa «aiky MthBs 
tbrt give an acconat of Hoolter aud.Itia Wntin^H-WBlni 4ll)^ 
mention of the Booki or Tracts which gave occasipn , to his 
Wfiting The Ecclesiaatica] PoUty. Whitgift tad written an 
Answer to the j^dmomlioa to the ParlUimeiit, ami thereby en- 
^^^ed'la a controversy with Ttoaiaa Cartwrijrlit, the supposed 
^S^dr of it. Hooker, in tbh his oxc^tiilcnt \\'oy\i, undertook 
the defeoce of our &ocl«8iastic^ E^tabhshmtut, ai^aiiiBt which 
Oirtwnght appears to have been the most powerful of all the 
oji^ioiients."* 

Plooker was some time Master of the Temple, and aAerwards 
BectoT Of Qlshopsboume in Kent. There Is aPbrtraUfiMillt^' 
12»6. ffo/lartculp. from Sparrow's Rationale of DieCAnUtfoD 
Pi»yer; and another in fotiQ, Gail. Faitiornetculp.biiaiMj^^ 
to his EccJesiastical Polity, and according to Granger the' best 
itupressions are to be ftmod iq the earliest editions of tkstlhutc, 
C«4tM«ng only the life books. 

■i/tath mirprise hna been expressed at the Iter. T. P. IMb^V' 
omiailon of this work in his " Library. €impanim;"f its'«T 

* Beloe'i AaecdotcB of Literature, roL L p. S% %, fi(Tiu«lie« a. d|)t*fl<d 
lilt of tluiK rontTDTcrBiil WritingiL ■'-,.., 

[J: There a u old folio Book, called " Tie SltidaU'i. f.ar<taf^.0'rfl(ffl > 
JhoKlit Atleitiaa Oraclti," Mmewliat apyrpxiqiatiiig .t*>| Jiff Vj^a^if^ 
jJa^: bvl,aiDeresk«1eh)n, both !d bulk apd ipatter, in coiiipp^p^^4 
tJie Rer. Gentlematfa "tlteie laatrygklt utr/ull" Tolume. 



dtdC-^iihA-l dopbt not tlutia a fittqre edition tb^'seiddi^ KiW 
BoiawM, will bring this Ecckiiaiticml €Miiit''aita''ftia'fl^i 
imS^if '^ great gV7t ftul in gUendng sBch p^ Utah's';' 't 
ttuok he will be perfectly jugtifted,'aSBtrw«ota of ike C^rt% 
MUkdit; !»• ibixkmg bis opponent dtrtrnvritt tbe'fiHrtl^o 
cdillteof //bn^CT-'jEceteafasticdPoKUe; ftqt let hhnli^lArt! 
>t«i oatiDJure the Portnut! ' ' ' ' ' ' ' ''"'-^ '-''-' 



ttmTi f/os.J Mundus alter et idem : tive Terra AuHralia, i^e 

j'aiiiiemper ncog^a, ^c. futhorc Mercario lintanaivo. 

Jw, tlril edition, with fronthiptece by Kip. ,. 

'_idd at Brand's aaleforU- 7*.; atG.Nassaiis, ]e2J, lk^3,*., 

Keprinted, witU the Maps, in Pratt's edition 0/ Haifa 

fffor^, 10 vols. 8to. Lond. 1808. . !>,!ii 

Ha/i'» fJos.J Discover!/ "/" ^^'''' ff^or(d,„qr .«,i*fM>^titti 4^ 

. . iSouth iadies, Mtierto unknown, by m E'gUth JUerwfji^ SifO. 1 

.I^odale. Imprmted for E. Blount, ,, .,vi 

t/jiinouin to Ame» or Iferbfrt. , .' ...,, 

^xand'asale, 1807, 3/. 7i.; G. Na3aa«s, 18?4,2/. U. , , 

The preceding Work by HaU, Biahop of Norwich, wasMw- 

Piqtp^^ W|hmc^ BetuD Swift JMirowed the idea of I^UUror'a 

Tr^yehi.* Mr. Campbell, speaking of this palinol fifitiMi. 

'*''|t ihalso verjprobftbtethtt SwiftdemedwmeiNntionof huV'ajag* 
to Lafnta froni Biahop Oodwin'i " Man in the Moon, or a Diteourtt ofci\ 
Vofagi Hither by Domingo Gonaaia^ 8f a. 1G3B. " In tbia PhiloiopiiicB] 
XUniance,' which wu Tepeatedl]' printed, Darning OoiualeB, a dinuns^ 
tire ^aniiiH, ]a supposed to be Bhipwrecked en ui "litiliiMtfd Jilud, 



6 CONTENTS. 

FAC*. 

Chiirchytrdc*8 (T.) Worlu « ..« . .^ • . • «^ .^.^ « • «-• .us M^fr.&S* 
Glizia> Llnfelice Amore di Ginlia e fUnaso^ Sco. |]$53«'« ^Ntfji 
Oollin8*6 Families of Vere> Cavendish, kc>, folio, 17i§2a« )Ub 
Court and Kitchen of Elizabeth CromweIl> 12nK>* i 064 .-Ml 
Coirley 8 Poetical Blossoms, &c. 4to. 1633, &c. . ^ • •»• if 7% 

Anacreontic Odes on Gold, the Grasshopper, 

and the Epicure • •• • « <• $\ \ 

Cromwell the Perfect Politician, 8vo. 1660 «•«... dL 

... I J 
Dance of Death (The History of ) .2.^. 

Danse Macabre, 1485, &c » • • 2Q^ 

-•*— - dcs Morts, 1741, &c 23 

Darcie*s Anualcs of Queen Elizabeth, 1625 •«•..••.•• ^ 77. 
Dee*s (Dr. J.) Arte of Navigation, folio, 1557 . .^^ . •^,.i^5j^. 

Demosthenis, Aldus, 1 504 32 

Taylori, 1748-57 V • J?^ 

Bl Diablo Coivclo, 8vo. 1 646 ••••••'.!-. :M'^ 

Drayton s (M.) Poly Olbion 73 

Qneen Elizabeth's Prayer, or Booke of Christian Praters 'zT' 

Fazio Dita Mundi, 1474 '..... ...r^'^'W 

Fraunce*s Countess of Pembroke's Ivy Church} AAyntai, " * '^ 

&c. 4to. 1591, &c 62 

Froissart Chroniqnes de JFrance, &c ••.••..'••••' ^9^^ 

Froissart's Chronicles, Pynson, 1523, &c.. • • 30 

by Johnes ..:... -^^ 

Fuller's Worthies of England, folio, 1662, (Dire^tkmii ^^'^ 

for Collating) ^ . • . ' 9i^ 

— — Church History (plates in) •......«••• Sfr* 

Abel Redivivus (Collation of) i>^ 



A BtSlMmAMkCB UBKAXtr; 0t 

«. NassM, 1824, 12». 

Gray, the Poet, in m letter to Vm friend I>r. WkMim, of 
Durham, aUuding to this editioii, says, ''BidM^ Hall*s Satires, 
ckfied VikgideiiiiariaHi, are lately lepaUisked. TheyareAdof 
spiH^Mid poetry, as ■oAofthefirstasDr. Domc!, andte 
more of the latter; they were writtm when he was abo«t SIS yeaH 
HA? 

^^n^se Satires, with Notes by l^]iger,iii ad^Eition to WaitQii*^ 
obsermtions, have been tepoblished ia 8vo. 1824. Theyas^y 
also be fouud in the 10th vofamie of Half^ fFbrki, Svo, 1809^ 
fi^h Warto&'s Notes, as well as Mr. EQis's and Mr^ Fiatt*8 
lUostratioBS. 

Of our Satirical Poetry, taking satire in its moral a^d4>fir~ 
nified sense, l^all, according to Campbdl, claims and may be 
allowed to be the founder : thus in the Prologue to his Satires 
he says — 

I first adrentiire with feel hardy mighty 
To thread the steps of perflons despight: 
I first adTentnre, fellow me who list. 
And be the second finglSsh Satyrist 
Hall*s Proli^oe to Book 3^ implies his knowledge of former 
Satirists. 

'* Some say my Satyrs orer-loosely flow. 

Nor hide their gall inongh from open show: 

Not riddle like, obscuring their intent; 

But, paoke-staffe plaine, littering what thing they BMaat, 

Ooiitrairie to the Roman Ancients, 

Whose words were short, and darksome was their senoe. 

Who reads one line of their harsh poesies, 

Itirise must he tak his wind, and breath him thrise* 

JIfy muj/e woM follow them that have fort-gone. 



'« this Collection ptth^haied fi^m tito Villain MbM Ahd 
£8te> was transferred ftom theno^ by the late pi^prietoi^ 
to Ince Blundell, near Liverpool, where he erdtted, tft n 
repository for them, ft rdttulda of great dif^^hitectai^ 
beauty, upon the plan of the Pantheon at Rome/' 

The only Copy which has hitherto occurred for public 
sale, was in Payne and Foss*s Catalogue for 1815, where 
it is marked at 73/. 10s. 

There is a Copy in the British Museum. See Clarke*s 
Repertorium, p. 30. 



The Antient Paintings of the ^atki of TOuip d&tte from 
the Originals, by Carhni. Atlas Folio* 61 Coloured 
Drawings^ various sizes. 

Not more than twelve Copies were exeetlted. Ont# df 
tiieiie sold at M. Paris's Said, in Itftl, for 1741. %. 



Chine — Les Grandes Sdtailtes de la Chine, gravees souf 
la Direction de JUL Cochin, Attas Potto, and DeseripHon 
in Quarto, 

The original designs of these prints were sent by the 
Emperor of China to be engraved in France. Wkea Uley 
were dime, the plates were sent to China, and very few 
impressions remained in Europe. 

At M. Paris's Sale ia 1791, a copy sold for 64/. 128. 



BIBtldMilMtAO^t LttlURT. 95 

Keatum dm PHneipmUs Nomt laiuis en blane dam la 
- fi^MiuA) Pariit dm * C&kfeMnmu de J. J. Rouatau,' 
Edition de -Gifni^e. 

^flbS« D & •• «•«• Monsieur Dapin. 

[«B, D ' n . •• «•• Madame Dupin. 

[.lePresidentdeL ^il. Lamoignon. 

M. le Prince de C . ... Conti. 

]M[, de F Moti8ienr de FrancueO. 

Mad■"^ de F Madame de Francuefl. 

M. le Comte de M '., on 

simplement M. de M. ... Monsieur le Comte de Mon- 

talgtl, Ambassade da Roi 
Yenise. 

M. D' J • Monsieur d'Epinaj. 

M***. D' y Madame D'Epinay, qui donne 

d Rousseau THermitage. 

M"*. la Comtesse de H , 

on simplement M"^^. de H. Madame la Comtesse d'Houp* 

tot. Belle Soeur de Madame 
d'Epinay , et dont Rousseau 
deVint d TAge de 45 Ans si 
eperdument amoureux. 

M. G , Le S'. Q -, ou 

G M. Grimm, Lecteurdu Prince 

Hereditaire de Saxe Gotha. 

M***. de P 'T.kH Madame de Pompadour. 

If. de C ^x Monsieur de Chenonceaux. 

M^. de C ^x Madame de Chenonceaux. 

Le Baron d'H k, ou 

simplement d'H ^k. M. le Baron d'Holback. 

W\ d'H ^k Mad-^MaBaronne d'Holback. 

M. d* A Monsieur d'Argensom 

M"«.F— Mademoiselle Fel. 



96 JOUSId^ JlgJUlTD A 






. r-r-'-j-rr- "^aTi^J^^t* 



T Le Docteur Tronchin, Mede- 

xin Genevois. 

M. de St. L 1. ••• ]M(Qiii(4wr4e Saint Lambertji 

db FA^Momie FraD9oi8e, 
et Auteur du Poeme des. 
Saisons. 

Le P. B ^r •^.•. Le P^re Berthier. 

M. de B e Monsieur de Bonville.. 

M. de L, de M s^ ou 

simplement M. de M. ... Monsieur de Lamoignon de 

Malsherbes. 

M. ^e C • Monsieur le Dae deChofsentI: ^ 

L'Abb6 de B s Boufflers. 

M'^'.laComtesse de B s 

ou simplement Mad'°*^ de 

B s Madame la Comtesse de 

Boufflers. 

Le Marquis de V y... Villeroy. 

M* M Monsieur Moulton. 

M. Du P •• Monsieur Du Peyrou. 

M. D'l s « Monsieur D'lvemois. 

La Marichale de M x. Mirepoix. 

La C ..•• La Chevrette. ) Maisons de Campagne de 

£-^ Epinay. y Madame D'Epinay. 

J'ai trouY^ cette explication en manuscrit dans une copie 
des '' Confessions de J. J. Rousseau/' Edition de Geneve^ 



s •' 



FINIS. 



Marshall, Printer, Keoton Street, Bnuuwick Square.. 



Life and Dedth of Edmund Genin^isn, (nlkutlrowMonger.) 
Ato. Portrait and Ptdtiss. ' Sti Omem ' 16 1 4. ' 

Gulston, 2/.; Townley, bty G. Nassau,"! 624, Btue mbroccoy 
12/. 5*. 

''Edmund Jennings," says Granger, ^was admitted into 
the English College, at lUieims, under Dr. afterwards Cardinal 
Allen, and when he was 20 years of age', (MPdaEned Pjriefift. He 
was soon afterwards sent into Ehglaifd,^ where he Was appre* 
hended in the act 'of celebrating Mllss. He Waar exechted by 
hanging and quartering in Gray^s Inn Fields, Dec.lOtlij 1591." 

In the above rare book are several Historical Prints^ repre- 
senting the principal circumstances of his Life and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expence by the Pa-^ 
pists, in order to perpetuate the remembrance of tvro * Mira- 
cles,** which are there said to have happened at his deathL 
The first is, that, after his heart was taken out, he said, 
'* Sancte Gregorl, ora pro me^ which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, '' God*s wounds I see his heart is in my hand > yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth.'* The other is, that an holy Tirgin 
being desirous of procuriiig some irelick of hiiH/ c6ntr!ved to 
aj)proach the basket into which his quarters were thi'dvhi, and 
touched his risht hand, which she esteemed most holy f^om 
its having been employed in acts of consecration and'elev%tin|p 
the Host, and immediately his thumb came off witliodl' force 

or ^scovery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 

>•/ ?t- ' . 

the greatest care. 

T i -■ f ■ . • • . 

'"■>;■. . ,\ • ...... 



jIwk — Stmgt and Somtet*. Svo. For Mai. Sutler. 1623^ 

Wttk Portrait of the Authmr m' th^ engraeed Title. 

*• Of this Sonnetteer," »yB OraHgtri folJli. p.'1?;^*'( find 
BO mentioB nade t^ aniy of oof Bl<^rapticBr Ajiibbi!|. 

Beloe, in his Ajiecdotes, c^; die aboyp '' a f>m^,^ no 
mmu of common occBFrc,nce i". .^d baja iti .egtiJi i ii U yit^ftong 
<Mle«to>s, if we nwy judge from the price jthaft^uWi i in 
three recent seks/ he &iq>ear8 to have bean pi«ttf mmotfti hi« 
a|^>reciatioii of ks rarity. ■':!•!* 

At Mr, Bindley's sale it prodnced 357. \As.; at Mr, Perry's, 
182i| 3S/. (w. described as conttdning the Portraits of iJannay 
and of bis Patroness, Anne of,Deninark, Sir M, Syltca's so^y, 
which had been Mr. Bindley's, sold, iiv 1)^24, fur -12/. 10*. 6d. 

Tie following extracts m&y be fonnd in Boloe's Anecdotes 
of Uteratnre, vol. vi. and which I hope I shall be excnsed fo 
abstncting, considering the value of the Book cited, and thi 
difficulty oi obtaining even a glance at anch BibEomaaiacd 
Derideprta. :*■'.-■ >?,- -^^^^-l 

■ 'Si^erienced Natnre in this latter Rgc, . 

waiiog her muter-piece liwild then be (mwfett, '' '■*''^'*-' 

. .Sac^.wj(«ire Celiaaetoa Euih'a largo dags, . .--:.c;V'. '/> 
Aa all Ihe Coil< in emulation bron^t, ■ ; 

For they did Ihioke if Nature only m^t 

firag ofber wordi, abe shonld insdt o're tbem; ^ 

Wherefore thej "greed to have an eqnal right, " "*" 
Tbat tbef of herperfectioa partnngtit clann*: "'■"'' *■"*'*' 

Pallai gare wiadoine, Joao stateKDran, '■ ' '''-' '■'^' 

And the milde morniiig gave ber m 



A BIBLIOMANUC'S LlBlUmr. 9f 

Reprhaed at Oxfird. l2mK 1753. 

O. Nassau, 1624, 12#. 

Gray, the Poet; is a letter to Ins friesd Dr. WkMim; of 
Durham, alluding to thia edition, saya^ ** Bishop Hall's Satires, 
diiled Vitgidemiarium, are lately republished. They are AdI of 
spdrit and poetry, as nndi of the first as Dr. Donne, and te 
more of the latter; they were vHritCen when he was aboot 23 yeaH 

Mr 

These Satires, with N6tcs by Singer, in adi&tion to Wartoa'a 
cbserwitions, have been republished in 6vo. 1824. Theyaa^y 
also be found in the lOth yofaime of HtUV^ fFarkt, Svo. 1808, 
with Warton ri Notes, as well as Mr. Ellis's and Mr. Fiatt's 
lUnstrations. 

Of our Satirical Poetry, taking satire in its moral and d^ig- 
nified sense, l^all, according to Campbefi, daims and may be 
allowed to be the founder : thus in the Prologue to his Satires 
he says— 

I first adTentnre with feel hardy might. 
To thread the steps of perflons despight : 
I first adyentnroy fellow me who list. 
And he the second &ngKsh Satyrist 
Hall*s Prologue to Book 3, implies his knowledge of former 
Satirists. 

'* Some saj my Satyrs orer-loosely flow. 

Nor hide their gall inongh from open show: 

Not riddle like, obscuring their intent; 

But, paoke-stafie plaine, littering what thing they aMaat, 

Ooiitrairie to the Roman Ancients, 

Whose words were short, and darksome was their senoe. 

Who reads one line of their harsh poesies, 

Hurise must he tak his wind, and breath him thrise* 

Mjf muMe woM follow ikem thai havefort'^one, 



tauu forests casdea Iw Hflijilalui4 iMcfniffidiritli its 
i);;i(»4(able nttiqnities rantics, mi coiuioctiti^ ^ j^R?^ 
IJe^ to vlion fbiB first put i*jl«<^c*t^ *«4-f^ T^^^'* 
e^i^l^ a, Pnirt» wa nulrtary postjire, c wreiai Bg ^ p^^ Iwl 
^^fyr^ \lie Pfiet eome sipgnhi' n«ta of trn. Avyr ^ uj^jc^ 
{(;^,^ea^ therefore of tluvymyigSrifiRv wn»g7<p)»{oaAto 
^ liVra are eigbto^n aonge mttn* Ti)hiBie,ipafi^|ftta^ v^th 
the learned notes of Selden and tb^re ve mi^ ^fo^ {Q*^ 
Bongi frherein the ciUqb inotiiitBinBxfoEest^ r^rei% &c Ve re- 
presented by the ^nres of men. aud w omeo. His metre of 
twelve syllai;ileg|i>a>gaow tfib^nated, it is quoted moee for 
tt^e History dun the ^batr^ is-it and i^i that inspect la so 
Tery pxact that as Bishop Nicholson observes it affhnis a 
much tmer accoont of this kingdomand the domiuiou of \S ales, 
than conld well be expected bora the [ten of a Poet It ig id 
fenroreD with many fine ^iisodfa of the conquest of this 
I^td by the RoniaBS of && comiug tf the Saxons, t^e 
Dane; and the Normans with an account of their Kings , of 
English Wamors NangatorS) Sustii and of the Civil W ara of 
England &c This volnme was rcpnntid m 16". nitli the 
S t WB ^ftrt ereentumHon of twelve Songs more makinc 
Hmtgim Aa whole,, and dedicated to Pnnce € horlcs- to whom 
he gives hopes of beatowing the ISte pains upon Scotland 

WnstViteys ia l^s^ IavM' of the Engliell Poats, say^ of Dra^-- 
toiithfA "he was a Poet of a pions tea^r, his, C9iie9pncs; 
lMniigaJf«^»,ttN» •otSBiMAaf his fcaey; mtf taafmtt»in 
li« lijie^ eUW' <£ vec«k» mA mtlSanAm n wp h a yi '■th' 
4auiffAVmiaimAi»^cnmn'ia gkarfy tUM» ISSiVWi WM' 
bvitttiji Wflitminata Abbey." ^"''' '< ' 



A'-fittteMMili-i imUr. ti 

'•'trlHt'tsMiiu-tilit: "«.*. i86». '»«l'M-ai8iJ)«M, 
•"m HkelUMiiiimtifmM Pi>mMtfiluiimil 

'''M m-m^ifHeieMgUkt^ Kit UHtnl HUfHi^ M 

vmm:' **. IBit ■ ■ ■^"•'' "" 

. A fine copy of this book, bandsomely bowBd, was In Collins 
tSe DookaeUcr's catalc^e, a few years back, marked 8/. &>. — 
ftyne and Foss mark a copy at 6/. 6.!. — At Cr. l'. tiemar^i » 
sale, in 1 C98, a copy Bold for four shiUinga and two pence ! i 
A large paper copy at Hniiter's Bale, in 1813, prodoced 

m 6,, 

. It \s remarked by Mr. Grenville (says f>ibdin), ttat steet 
Uin this work is suppressed, and that tlie defective paging 
nom 66 to 105 is not aapplied in ju,l the copies of this book, 
, Capiaiii Jotn Smith, Admiral of New England, (says Gran- 
ger,) deserves to be ranked with the greatest traveliera and 
adventurets of his age. He was sometime in the service of the 
Emperor, and the Prince of Transylvania, against the Grand 
Signior, where he distinguished himself by challenging three 
Turks of quality to single combat, and cutting off their heads, 

««lleft hmktMwrr rffaMi^ (.{New B%I«ri( sri ab* MmimMtmt 
«i|SWtl«ili>atkM-MiylH>laiigij«gt«lU«uui.ai«D9. &•<>««<(>>■*& 
i-P-399, ,,,.. , ,., . ,., , 

t An EditioD, folio, datcdI632, iritfa Portoutl uj Plktoi, idU in tU 
<ale of d. KufBo's LiW^, tm. t^iL 



6 CONTENTS. 

PACC 

Churchyardc's (T.) Works .•...% .^ . .&» 

CiiziSL, L'Infelice Amore di Giolia e Romeo» 8<^o. I553«0 ^4$ji 
Collins 6 Families of Vere> Cavendish^ &c* fblio, 17^62 » ^ 1 l^i 
Court and Kitchen of Elizabeth Cromwell, 12mo* 1664 9<h 
Cowley 8 Poetical Blossoms, &c. 4to. 1633, ^. . . • .^^ f .TIL^ 

Anacreontic Odes on Gold, the Grasshopper, 

and the Epicure ••••.. ••«•>;./ fBi\ 

Cromwell the Perfect Politician, 8vo. 1680 - • ♦^^ 91- 

Dance of Death (The History of ) ,2;^^ 

Danse Macabre, 1485, &c » 2Qr 

— ^- des Morts, 1744, &c "23 

Darcie*8 Anualcs of Queeu Elizabeth, 1625 .•..,.....; 77 j 
Dee's (Dr. J.) Arte of Navigation, folio, 1557 . . ^ • . . , . , ^56. 

Demosthenis, Aldus, 1 504 32 

Taylori, 1748-57 V Ma 

El Diablo Coivelo, 8vo. 1646 '"'.l-.vM^ 

Drayton's (M.) Poly Oibion 73 

Queen Elizabeth's Prayer, or Boohe of Christian Prater's "2/ 

Fazio Dita Mundi, 1474 .....;.....• iiT^'W 

Fraunce's Countess of Pembroke's Ivy Church i Amyiitaiit; 'uoJ/ 

&c. 4to. 1591, &c 62 

Froissart Chroniques de JFrauce, &c ..•.•*.•••' *29^ 

Froissart's Chronicles^ Pynson, 1523, &c 30 

by Johnes .'.:.... -^^ 

Fuller's Worthies of England, folio, 1662, (Dir©fctkm» - ^'^ 

for Collating) ..V, ..-.. •■»;<< 

— — — Church History (plates in) ,.#..; 95' 

Abel Redivivus (Collation of) 5^^ 



A BimOMANtAC^ll LIBRAKT. 71 

Life and Death of Edmund Genhfet, falkuf Trommmger.J 
4io. PortraU and Plates. St. Omen. 1614. 

Gnkton, 21.; Townley, 5/.; O. Nassau, 1824, blue morocco^ 
12/. 5#. 

'' Edmund Jennings/* says Granger, " was admitted into 
the English College, at Rlieims^ under I>r. afterwisds Cardinal 
Allen, and when he was 20 years of age, ordained PHeSt. He 
was soon afterwards sent into England, where he was appre- 
hended in the act of celebrating Mass. He was executed by 
hanging and quartering in Gray*s Inn Fields, Dec. 10th, 1591.** 

In the above rare book are several Historical Prints, repre- 
senting the principal circnmstances of his Life and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expence by the Pa* 
pists, in order to perpetuate the remembrance of two * Mira- 
cles," which are there said to have happened at his death. 
The first is, that, after his heart was taken out, he said, 
'' Sancte Gregorl, ora pro me, which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, ** God*s wounds ! see his heart is in my hand ; yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth.** The other is, that an holy Virgin 
being desirous of procuring some relick of him, contrived to 
approach the basket into which his quarters were thrown, and 
touched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy from 
its having been employed in acts of consecration and elevating 
the Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
or discovery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
the greatest care. 



a 



>U i «IKiRH> lfHilll»T>«QI{)fBl 



.4||^,C4iit #f Etizabetli are iqmrUaa^ ytpfiA »»C9|4^ .^i^Ahp 
fwnll cotiioonlytiie twolait Ter>wiB cgiiM»<Mipnn;tf|j^|l^Mj|^ 

iilV^riMf €kaiies^ in ktteisof j^. Qs^JMAl^if^l^ 
j|*;jb m tvfflia&t IWtrait -of Barcie by Ddanuiv of lyrljLU^.filio 
impmsions are to be found in tbe copes pop^eaacd p:fJfkf 
r^^fngm oTStaflbr^, General IDow^esvi^^ and iii.|9r, 3{^WF'< 
iM|5Fi wW at Sotbeb^s, in 182?^ ft^ IW^ . . .jy^, 

-■ ' ■ • • • . .imO-* 

= ■"■■ .■•;■*. iii\fllly.k 

€kmkyU fAhrakamJ Poetical B1o$som$. TTUk VniKfAiMf 
' -Om AiUlwr is 1m \Zik, jgear, h^ F^ugkam. 4Ǥ. \^^,*, 
.ASulMigBomCn fi^lio^heca Ang.Tpcft. ^ copy, v^th tb(9^}^ 
trah^ is marloed -at 1B/.| and anoflber, w%iitu|^ (be fQ^to^ 

.Beiry'ssale^ 1822^4/. ...,..jjf 

€l9wiejf*0 Jjmi€9 Middle, a PaUaral Cpme^^ wniiem ^Jkf 

, 4me of ki$ being a King 9 Sc\3flk^ in Westm^^fer. Sfiiftfifi. 

^ ffrUh Pwrtrmt, 1638. i ,// 

, lO. Nassau, Esq. 1824, 3A 10#. , ,. 

TVItf ff^orks of Mr. 4brtiham Cowley, con^^ tfiiat^^^MA 
' were formerly printed, and thooe which he deigned for' ike 

preee. Now published out of the Author oOrighalOofiei. 

\2ma. Lond. 16SI. ■ ■'' '^ 

l9econd Part (fjPiito, including hi^ Poetical Blomoim^ imd^ 
- -11682. .■■■'-'■ 

' Tliis lattef edition of Cowley's Works conti^ivs Dt- Sprains 
If Account of tbe y fe and Writings of Cowley, writt^m 16 Mrt 



BIBll6]tAMtAO*0 UBlURT. 96 

Keaiiom dm PHneipa^ Nonu laiiti$ en hlane dans la 
Set&iuk Pariit dm * Chkfessimu de J. J. Rmuteau/ 
Editum de <h»^e. 

4M[. D n MoDsieur Dapiiu 

Ufae. D n. •*••• •••••».. Madame Dapin. 

M. lePresident deL ^il. Lamoignon. 

M. le PriiMSe de C . ... Conti. 

M. de F Monsietur de Francaeil. 

Mad"*, de F Madame de FrancueQ. 

M. ie Comte de M ' , ou 

simplement M. de M. ... Monsienr le Comte de Mon- 

faigtt, Ambassade du Roi 
Yenise. 

M. D' ^7... Monsieur d'Epinaj. 

M***. D' y Madame D'Epinay, qui donne 

d Rousseau THermitage. 

M"*. la Comtesse de H , 

ou simplement M""'. de H. Madame la Comtesse d'Houp* 

tot. Belle Soeur de Madame 
d'Epinay , et dont Rousseau 
devint sL TAge de 45 Ans si 
eperdument amoureux. 

M. G , Le S'. Q -, ou 

G M. Grimm, Lecteurdu Prince 

Hereditaire de Saxe Gotha. 

M***. de P T.,H Madame de Pompadour. 

M. de C X. Monsieur de Chenonceaux. 

M***. de C ^x Madame de Chenonceaux. 

Le Baron d'H k, ou 

simplement d'H ^k. M. le Baron d'Holback. 

W\ d'H ^k Mad"»MaBaronne d'Holback. 

M. d' A — Monsieur d'Argenson. 

H"«. F— Mademoiselle Fel. 



9& 

M. S-^ «,.„^..^^.^.„ M^^^ii^^'^c»r 

T .••••.••.••• Le Doctenr Tronchiny Mede- 

cin Genevoifl. 

M. de St. L 1 • AfonviQar 4e Saint Lamberti^ 

i& PA^JMemie Fran^oue, 
et Aatear du Poeme des 
Saisons. 

Le P. B ^r ..»•••• Le P^re Berthier. 

M. de B e Motuieiir de Bonvffle.. 

M. de L, de M s^ ou 

simplement M. de M. ••• Monsiear de Lamoignoir de 

Malsherbes. 

• '' '-'^ '-^ '"l" 
M.nle C ■ ■ ■ Monsieur le Dae d'eChoisemt;' 

L'Abb6 de B s Boofflers. 

M^^iaComtesse de B s 

on simplement Mad"'^ de 

B s Madame la Comtesse de 

Boufflers. 

Le Matquis de V y... Villerey* 

M» M Monsieur Monlton. 

M. Dn P • .•.. Monsieur Du Peyrou. 

M. D'l s »« Monsieur D'lveniois. 

La Marichale de M x. Mirepoix. 

La C ..»• La Cherrette. ) Maisons de Campagne de 

£-^ Epinay. y Madame D'Epinay. 

J'ai trouY^ cette explication en manuscrit dans une copie 
des " Confessions de J. J. Rousseau/' Edition de Geneve.. 

FINIS. 



Mwihall, PrinUr, Kenton Street, Brantwick Sqoare. 



A' ftittloAtAMAtrft tttitAHr. tft 

^' M*m'9tan*i^' hk}i. fS>m. \f!2A. ffiU PrbniBpik^, 

^^iiiii MkcS'CkMeM i Mo tkeiddi'c^ F^oHhahi tjfiketfUdikht 
'['iffHidUHMid Mt XTatoMd*^ ike PtsHttAt bfiJ^ptn. htiM 

V\««ito. jrtrilb. Ifctt '^'^ 

^ A fine copy of thu book, bandsomely bo«ia> wM in Cdmns 
the c>ooKseUer*s catalogue^ a tew years Wi, marked 8/. 6i.—^ 




6 



remarked by Mr. Grenvitle (says f^ibdin), ttiat sneet 
O in this work is suppressed, tjA that the defective pagine 
from §6 to 105 is not supplied in all the copies of this book, 
Capib^n John Sdiith, Actmiral of New England, (savs Gran-^ 
ger^) aeserves to be ranked with the greatest travellers an^ 
advejituref's of nis age. He was sometime in the service of ther 
emperor^ andf the tVince of 'f ransylvania, against the Grand 
Signlor, T^liere he aistlngoishect himself by cnaBehging three 
Tnrkii of quality to single combat, and cuUing o^ their hea(ls> 



* -. J, » ' 



mkhh laaiciMMr of tfcnIiiiolKew Bi^landk nd abo Moancf^twil 
tifBV .i|pp^.9Qptk(Hr Maf heloiifi%[ to tU iuubm Bag^otej. She OHmgm$ynk 

i.p.399. .i . . .Ml 

f An Edition, folio, dated 163% with Portraits and jpfates, sold in th* 
sale of 6, NaMan's Library, U^, for iL 

w2 



turn, foreats, aaOe*, hg-mOamb^at, MtMAa ai wtOt it's 
wpwdaUe adqutiei, notk^ mii ammotlkt* .^?F%(f. 
licHj, to wkom fUi fint part MjWjrat^i^ and ^ .1^I9<I^ i^ 
e^lubito^ Vnat, in » militvy peatai^ ofVOMf ■ pilw»,h*d 
j^ff I n the Poet soiae wng oto aMiki of hia &t(ic : tU^ ■?■<>?*' 
frv«fMli,th(Tdore, ttOmjmmgWihfe^mMfff^ipw.to 
fi^. Tkenaieeii^aaenjmgamtlMTobmiViPa^^lktetfvitb 
tbe learned notes oT Seldoi ; and t^rawe vmgt petot^ fSffrf 
wo^ Trboean the dties, moaiitdns, forests, riveis, &c. arc re- 
presented by the- ^gniea of mea and woioeo. Hie metre <ff 
tiidre *jllables> beu^ kw anti^iiiated, it u tpioted mote fw^ 
U^, Hiatmy Aoa th* Vbetry in it r aiid id liiat fespect) is p6 
ray exact, that, aa Kafcop NicholsoB observes, it affinxts a 
maiai tmer acconitt of tli& kingdom andthe dominion of Vi'alt^, 
^an could well be expected horn the p«n of a Poet, ft is jd- 
ferworen with many toe Episodes ; of the conqaest of this 
AbM; by the Romaa^i of the coming of the Saxooa, t^e 
Danes, and the Nonnana, with an account of their Kings ; of 
Sfni^lisli Wanioni,NaTig»tor9, Saints, and of the Civil Wars of 
England, &c. This Tolame was reprinted in 1622, with the' 
Smm^ tMtf m eontunalion of twebe Siagt mens, miiEhie 
dti^iB (As whole,. aBddedfcatodtvnrace C3iatilEa> ^wHon 
he py^ hopes of bestowing the ISro pains njiOB- Sea^wL" ' 
Wnstoifcy. in ¥s iJvc4'or Uie En^iiA Pbato,' 'aa^ (rf Iny- 
tpn that "he waa a Poet of a pious teaq^er, his qwHOpius: 
bwriMgaJiMq^tto MowMdaf hia haej; miy ta^)iii«t»{n 
h«t Hlft, ekd* «f sfeee^ antit ioaffairfir n aa w pt fi v-B» 
<4HnaHl Wk )aw<il, fiff ft cTMni. of gbr^ aiiM l«)H'^aHi M^ 
Inwwti)! Wattwaatci Abb^." . '^'''' '' ^ 



a'li ili'nf it».-'^~''--' ■ .K- '■ ■■■■'•■ ■> .■^J'vii =,'">Ti1 .BfiiE* 

MiM ri^;>'<l<ili AK»a^ if »^^; Mv^Mf, 

••»W W*i««iii*j, auttkmM /vsWte »/f&*««ys 
"'^«fsii**f aw #««(»>• tt,i Pmnii'if-f%t0:-iaM 
'>mmiif^tftn» mgitki. Mi tmMii»0iflipt lit 
V'in*»:' ■»».■ »«it ■ ■■.""■''ii 

, A fine copy of this book, handsomely bosBd, was in Ccimns 
ttte bookseller's catalogne, a few years bacic, marked 8/. 8f. — ■ 
ftyne and Foas mark a. copy at 6/. 6».— At ftr. F. ScrniurS* 
sale, ia 1 698, a copy sold for four Bhillings and twfa peace ! I 
A.lwge paper copy at rfunter's sale, in 1813, produCect 

. \i is remarked by Mr, drenvllle (says bibdin), tliat sliew 
O JD this work is suppressed, a.aA that tlie defective pagioz 
firom 96 to 105 is not supplied in all the copies of this book.' 
CajftMn John Smith, Admiral of Xcw England, (says Gtanj 
ger,) deserves to be ranked uith tlic grcalfst travellers and 
{^Tentiircrs of his age. He was sometime in the service of Up 
Emperor, and the Prince of Transylvania, against tte Grwifl 
Signior, Where he distinguished himself by cliallenging three 
Turks of qnality to single combat, and cutting off their hea^> 

WMIWIM, MMi'iiNMVHIftittIf rttMV(it«tfM«i«bHrftHtM|l 

tipffMitootkBrM** belen^mtolhattuMHMDrr. &*QN>w<r>'«<i 
i-p.3W. ,,„. ,-. . ^., , 

t Ad Edition, folio, dated 1G3% with P(»1ruti and Platet, lold in tfa* 
Uc of d; Husan's ldltTU7, lS31, lor^j: 






.. . ,:> 



■ -I'-A 



• ;♦ 



. **N«lwe win kftTe her eoun^ md Ml Books trill be Ibrgottoh idi 
ipite of BiUit^gnpherAr" ^* 



-. ^» 



« 1 



I 

, 'i 



: r 



a' BtfLlOMANiAC'S llBRARY. 77 

^roli'Foiftliill library was a presentation copy 5 otKer large ppf 
^jjw'icfiles.are in the Libraries of some of our principal Bibli- 

Smttys 7^(web and Adventures in Europe^ Asia, Africa^ and 
Amenea^ Small folip. Sixty pages only- With Phte^ 

"'m ., ' ■ , : ■ ■■.■■■■:,; 

^" Mr. (Jrenyille*8 copy, according to Dibdina Libi^jpc^- 
""j^a^on, p. ik4, cost him 51. 5s. 



• . » . . . ^ , i » 



It was reprinted in vol. ii. of Chnrcliill*s Collection of Vpyfuges 






^ Mi^dccettt VlGrtot;. jBaM Bizarie di Vam Figure. Svo. ohlqn^ 

' See tKc Mepertorium BibRograpMcum. wbere it is describ^P^ 
~ as '^ A 9i6st rare and sinirnlar Book, containing Prints of humau 
^ rigores lormed by the strangest materials, as diamonds, hoops^ 

madders, pieces of carpentery, battledores, chains, culinary 
^ntensUsi &c. When the correctness of the deli^eations, a^i 
""ine boi^ess of the attitudes, are considered — we s^ the iu^d 

Br a great !Master through the laughable whimsicality of bi^ 



^1 



"^^A^fiopy is in the Strawberry Hill Collection, and one was 11^ 
m tihirai^ at PonthiU. 



•j'.jmK 



1 

^JtyScle (AbrahamJ Annates of the famous Empresse Elizabeth^ 
'''^"Queene of England, ^c. translated out of French. Large 
^'p(^er^2vols.Ato. Benj. Fisher. (No date.) 

Large paper copies differ from the small in the following 
jf^tvliH: viz, that the date (1625) is wanting in th^mi 



e CONTENTS. 

PACf. 

Churchyardc's (T.) Works . ....•• .^ .>...•. .:•> • ♦ j&* 

Clizia^ L'Infelice Amore di Giolia e Romeoy 8<^o. 1553 «^# ^ ^43»> 
Collins 6 Families of Vere> Cavendish^ &c* fblio, 17^ ^ « 1 1^ 
Court and Kitchen of Elizabeth Cromwell, 12mo* i664 9^ 
Cowley's Poetical Blossoms, &c. 4to. 1633, &c. : ...«,•• , 79j 

Anacreontic Odes on Gold, the Grasshopper, 

and the Epicure « •(•<• ^ .$1\ 

Cromwell the Perfect Politician, 8vo. 1680 - • ♦ .. 51- 

: n 

Dance of Death (The History of) • ^ 2f . 

Danse Macabre, 1485, &c » , 2^^ 

— — des Morts, 1744, &c v..^^ 

Darcie's Annalcs of Queen Elizabeth, 1625 ••...••••• 77. 
Dee's (Dr. J.) Arte of Navigation, folio, 1557 .. ^ w ..-,.; ^5fe 

Demosthenis, Aldus, 1 504 32 

Taylori, 1748-57 V J^ 

El Diablo Coivelo, 8vo. 1 646 ••••••. !t : xI'^ 

Drayton's (M.) Poly Oibion 73 

Queen Elizabeth's Prayer, or Boohe of Christian Praters *^* 

Fazio Dita Mundi, 1474 ::r^'W 

Fraunce's Countess of Pembroke's Ivy Church i Ai^yiita^ •»;>!/ 

&c.4to. 1591, &c 62 

Froissart Chroniques de JFrance, &c ♦....•*.•.'•' ^W 

Froissart's Chronicles^ Pynson, 1523, &c 30 

by Johnes .-. . ... *3# 

Fuller's Worthies of England, folio, 1662, (Dir©fciiott» ■ ^ ^'^ 

for Collating) '.-. • ^ - . ' ^3<* 

— — — Church History (plates in) ,.#... 9fr 

Abel Redivivus (Collalion of) '^^ 



te WW It adiool bay at Westtninfltoir; Uiree ofitioiii bad beeb 
jBoM^ and the book liad become ¥nry scucet, wbeA the fi^itfUi 
$ditioiiii|gmred« in 1^2, tbe Town, accoiding to ihe Ao^H- 
Mltf#iMv«MiCmenl^ bitf% affi»i4itog^^ tXfpf^ TbeMMI^ 
ittg^Addreaditd tiie MKter^ by Cknrky UsMtf, ir^iteeMD^ty 
caferlovii ^Mk eiilts «im mmhI, andfovtiie tettftittbgltiifr 

^' R^or, (I lanow not yet Whether gentle or ilOi) (MMM^f 

toowliaye been angry i(I dare not a8tiiiDOitlHlih4aMr>of<tlilJilr 

"^lUlgeir) t«t my Bwiti^d BdMnetSi ^and iMa^ied in \nitte>>VWiyit 

^dins^lids ethefsmts — earliness: odiers whd -aifi^^ihei*^ h 

weak fidth or strong malice have thought me liker a pipo, #kich 

neter aoandaibntwhen ''tisblowedin, toiriadlaoMliift Alfra* 

^^aaiGowky, bafe AsAom^JiiMmpaxtm} T^ lk^ ^ii^ Im^ 

rtfar^\Di«t'4t^^ AA '^▼ion^ Ftdst la^ikAi ^ips Uic^«b^aft^M 

hlQpall^.(lk«yia{q^ear 1}^ i4» Itoktteir, Ito keJi^.^h^ 

wovat Homicide wh6 atrives to mnrlker aacf^ier'a faiK(e*t ten 

bo<ii& Ihntvit ia a ffidifiuloaa ioSytOt^toadaomor k%kj|t;tlie 

Stars, because the Moon and Sun shine brigfater* l^aimdl 

^Btft^i keam kdMhef Idiwn thanmtin|f<dakad ky4V«ilK|ftd, 



"* this Cotteetioii ptttchMiBd ftom tbelT^fflttf MtMitaA 
£st6, WIS tralisfeiteil froih dieno^ by the kite prt ^fti b Urf 
to Ince Blundell, near Literpoo!, wbere lie tMbUfi, ttl Ik 
tvpository for them, ii rottmda of great itffelril6 c l tt id 
beaaty, upon the plan of the Pantheon at Rom^.^ 

The only Copy which has hitherto occurred for public 
sale, was in Payne and Fosses Catalogue for 1815, where 
it is marked at 73/. 10s. 

There is a Copy in the British Museum. See Clarke's 
Repertorium, p. 30. 



The Antient Paintings of the j6atki of TUm, dbm from 
the Originals, by Carhnu Aths Folio. 61 Ceioured 
Drawings^ various sizes. 

Not more than twelve Copies were exeetitM. Ott9 tft 
tiieUe sold at M. Paris^s Sde, in lY6l, for l74l. ft. 



Chine — Les Grandes Bdtailtes de la Chine, gravees tarn 
la Direction de Mi. Cochin. Attas Polio, and Description 
in Quarto. 

The original designs of these prints were sent b/ tike 
Emperor of China to be engraved in France. Wkem tkej 
were done, the plates were sent to China, and velry ftw 

impressions remained in Europe. 

At M. Paris's Sale in 1791, a copy sold for 64/. 12s. 



iMfett In tb^ VM of aU Mr, Cowl^y'b foemsr ' ' 
t:^iie«<N[<'tw» 9^)^chMM df tbemlieffe cantKiitMb pnteiut* 
depttBbli^ ttd^will 60iivey thek own excuse (br the qiece t&ey 



■t::ii } 









»«♦ ) 



. • J * I . • • / /i 



»'. 1 



GOLD. 

• • • 

A mightj {Nun to lore it it. 
And 'tis a pain that pain to miai^ 
Bat of aD pains the greatest pain 
It S« to loTo— >lmt lore in taiiL 
Vtrttte Mw Mr Nokia Blaod* 
Nor Wit bj Lore is understood ; 
Gold fkttf does passiiNi JMOio* 

GoldinonopolizrsIiOTe! , .'\ 

A corse on her, and on the man 
Wko this traffick Uios began! 
A cntse on bim who found the ore! 
'A cone OB Um irho digg'd the sforei 
A cniM Mi him who did nfiat H ! 
AcqvseoahimidmfifstdidooiniAl '. o 

A coise aD corses else abore 
On him, who ns'd it first in I>OTe ! ! 

Gold begets in Brethren^ hato ; . , 

G<4d in Families, debate ; 
' <3lo1d does fViendships separate. 
Gold dM« OitiLWars create; 
Tbf«wliie smallest harms of iti 
Gokt ahs| does horp beg«^ . 

THE GfitASSHOPFER. 

Happy Insect what can be 

f n Happiness compared to Thee ? 

F<ed wi^ nowrislnneBt dGvine, 



.. •> ' / 



T Le Docteur Tronchin, Mede- 

ciii GenevoiB. 

M. de St. L 1. •••••••••^ AfoiMiiQur 4e Saint Lambertj^ 

. 'do- PAlJMeinie Fran^oue, 
et Aatear du Poeme dea 
Saisons. 

LeP. B ^r •...•»•••• Le P^re Berthier. 

M. de B e Montieur de Bonvffle., 

M. de L, de M s^ ou 

simplement M. de M. ••• Monsieur de Lamoignon de 

Malsherbes. 

M.de C - ■ ■ ■ Monsieur le Dae deChoisbnth 

L'Abb6 de B s Boofflers. 

M'^MaComtesse de B s 

on simplement Mad°'^ de 

B s Madame la Comtesse de 

Boufflers. 

Le Matquis de V y... Villeroy* 

M» M Monsieur Moulton. 

M. Du P Monsieur Du Peyrou. 

M. D'l 8 Monsieur D'lyemois. 

La Marichale de M x, Mirepoix. 

La C ..•• La Cherrette. ) Maisons de Campagne de 

E-^ Epinay. > Madame D'Epinay. 

J'ai trouv^ cette explication en manuscrit dans une copio 
des '' Confessions de J. J. Rousseau/' Edition de Geneve*. 



I •• 



..■•■■•''•.■» 

FINIS. 



Marshall, Printer, KeaUm Street, Bmniwick Sqaare^ 



A^d IM IIP ehwfWar Sllhil^ 

Like the Wine tndJIiM^ flttiku 
Crown'd with Roeei ire ootfw 
Oyge'i wealiky fUadoM. 
T^Dm$49mutf9; wlMift4»5r«*le«r? 

JUr« tm4 it l^afUf, ikM Ujwu 
Jl'^i^ at leii#C MiK.«ft imMi^f. 
Let'0 baviih Biisinen« Vaailik SeVfWVf 



Bwm9 (H^) Cffgmm Aimigm^. Sin. 1^47. 
Aci«f 8qU .^t S«Riid«ss:» 1818, fixr 6/. 16«. M 
TUf AoqnuiQe VM imttan when the Jknthor wm oidy 17 
years, of «g<u «ii4 ip it be iotndvccv two Dnqaalio Pieeee, en* 
titled '' Deorum Dono^ and '' Gripui and HeigkT The Au- 
thor was nephew of Jaim99 H^mfU, Author of the Famliar 
Letters, who thus speaks of it in his Letters, %vo. p, 432^ 
i^mi. 1^54, 

T^ Mr- fi^ JBarQtt,at Pmis. 
Cientle Sir, 
I veeelved and pes^tly xm over your Cyprimk Academy, 
with much greediness and no Tulgar deiigbt^ and Sir, I hoht 
myself much honoured fbr the Oedicalnon you^ha^ been pleased 
to make thereof lo m^, fbor it deserred « fur higher patronage^ 
Truly I must tell you without any compliment, that I have sel« 
dom in^ with sw^h aii ingenioqfr Miisctnie «f ^soso and yerse^ 
MM;erwo¥<m with fm\ vmelies of faiiqr «nd ciMrmihg strama 



St MOMID JOUK^t'ttMn^D 



panioiiB, which hate luide aD tte^LilS^ 6P the 
in love with yoo. If yon hegia already to cotiii theM\i^^ 
aoihandMOiely, and have got soch feotiBg on Pm%iBtitk$; ^oa 
■vin time be Lord of the whole Hill? and those idee Gii)^, 
bebnae Apollo is now grows mwiddly and ok^ and niaylnidk^ 
didbe of yoa to officiate in his room and pteside over themi 

•'l^ere if nsoally a Portrait prefixed to the CyprimAtMemy 
of the Author, aged 19, without his name, bat thk, firoitr^^^ 
date, must have been intended iw the Work I shall next men- 
tion: viz. 
fpcula Coitalia, ^c. Poems, 8rp. 1650. fy M. ^^OTfi^ 
Which sold at Woodhoase*s sale for 2/. 8«. . <>,,v/^ 

According to the Author of Censnra Literaria, yoU i. Fh<v]^6, 
R. Baron, the Anthor of these Poems, was bom 1630«,edu' 
cat^ at Cambridge, and afterwards at 6ray*s Inn» Mf*. .6|b^ 



.(I»«j : 



who ha? g^ven a specimen of his writings, says, f^ Wh^tf^i' jf 
Poetical in him appears to be pilfered from other Writftrs^*'^'^ f 



A(m^€t (Christoval dej Nuevo deMcubritmento del Orqm/Jifo^ 
, /o^ Amazonas, . Small Ato. En Madrid ei^ la empHntm dfl 

, TWs very rare book contains only 46 leayef^oftextxpiE^ceded 
by six leai^s of preliminary matter, including tl^ tit)e« ^ !> f ; , : • 

Camus de Limare 248 francs; Saint Ceran ISt .^famcKi 
G^^t 170 francs; Paris sale, 1791, 10/. lO^.j HealhC^, 
^fn\S§.^d.\ Stanley, 16/. -.;: > i\''' 

The Author, a Spanish Jesuit, was sent on a missio^ijto tbb 
^tneri^pan Indians: but the projects expected from its disco* 



A.ifjIift.W)]WA«lAQ'.^ IiITOA»y. 



.^99 $^Bjtif#;aiily were known to e^st^ ^tnedtHkhfirVfitumn 
^l^fff%i.^: <WtW iu'thfi possession of^M^ cteiGfAibAonttsi 
whp^t|^^^l^t^{i^^ul|kp Fj^ench under the tltjk.of i . ./ 1( 3 )ioil> 

J&fr^iti^i?? :■.. •-..... .-1:,./ .11.1 v.. 



^flOOl 1X'»ji ;.!'.t= 



• . . ;i-. ^ ;*iil> 



.?vl« 



A^iS^im x)mre7isidl Upon the Yearly Ceh^ratwn of Idr^ 
Robert Dover s OBkipick Games upon Cotswold wtts, §t- 

•"teeiVdik, tr. 2s.'i Townley, 3/. 3*. (reprint); ^unifersi 
l#iS, 1^/. 28. ft/.; Bindley, December, 1818, 12/: l^*:- jtfoji: 
fi.''?^!^' ' 1824,7r<?pfiW^; 2/. 1 U. Gd. tbofpe's Catifpgu^ 

i824;w:^8i: • '-' •' ' '' ''■''^^'' 

The Frontispiece to the above Book represents the Games 
imd Sports, sioch as men playing at cudgels, wrestling, leap- 
ing, pitching the bar, throwing the iron hammer, handling 
rtre^'^e^ feslpitig dvcr the heads of men kneelitfg, ^itanAiifg 
tq^li^^tbdr bfiknds,' &c. Also women dancing, m^ii htinj^ing 
and coursing the hare with hounds, greyhounds, &cf/'' Vnth 
l?Jjtet^bcSlfrbfbwird8, on a hillock, with gtins th^eita fimg, 
and the '^tUttk <yf tfhe great Directdr, Ci^tain t)6M^6i 
lOfM^^Ji; tiding fVom place to pMce. ' ' ' •' * 

.^jlTbte'^^fiAoki '-Which hath the running title CottiooliiSiiMii 
on every page, consists of verses made by scvfcral fcindi,' ow 
^ ^iSL'jiittktiia Dubrensla, 'These Gateies were begun and 
eoi^ut^, at ki certain time in the year, for 40 years, by one 



Rotexi DoVtt*, 8ii Attofif ^, tff Bafto^ oft tti€? IfelCb, fa Wlif^ 

fett^fltiuD' Kfi^ jibxtcs ttt, iiBkast a ^llMCtr'oft 6lEili(Vrdls ffSnii/-iit 

<Am1ioIi Potter/ 6m}. « itatrre of thfr^ ^^vti^, ^Unil ft «idfV«|jklf»^ 
tfliicf King; to encotfdge DoT«r, gfti^ Mm flbtfi^ ^tb^lSt^^ 
dbthes^ with a hat^ feather^ and rnff^ poiposdy io6fbe'tEtiBi ta^ 
tifci occasion of tbese Sports. Povor used to bg ^ i OiWu Ay 
there in person> tins decked oat and wefl monihted'aaidiM^^MI^^ 
ti^, ttsd wa6 th^ diief Director and Manager of tIkl6d4SI<fii£fiB, 
yfMdk were frequented by the Nobtlity and Gonliy; f^9n^^ 
niifesf rdund, 'till, as blunt Anthony Wood^xpressief^lti^^^lhyfi 
rascaUy RebeBion was began by the Presbytet4ffiM/ i^Mdilgtfi^ 
a stop to their proceedings, and spoyled all that was generoQ» 
or ingenious elsewhere." These sports were afterwards revired^ 
b^t not^ I imagine, with their original apiiit ^ I^ r^p^ketn 
that Qeoffiry W^dgoose and hi» saen Tugwell*8 first Essay in 
Sjifiitual Quixotism, is described by the Rev^ l^r. G^^fp^^fa 
taking place at Dover's Hill ReveL* j ^ .^^ -^j^ 

The Poetry in the Annalia Diibrensia, wa^ tbe^ iir^rjc^j^ ^ 
veral Poets, some of whom were then, as Wood says, the 
chiefest of the Nation, as Michael Drayton, Thomas Randolph, 
of Cambridge 3 Ben Johnson } Owen Feltham > Captain John 
Mennes;^ Shakerky Manniouy Esq.) T«HcywQod^>^eiifc^jn^§i<U\ 
Others of lesser note were Jolm Truss^ who .«^Utii(i|fdicl 
Darnels' History of England^ Job. Monsoai f . JtMtlecisunW- 
Baase^i W, Denny, &<5. &€• = vr ^vO\ \n *hC» 

'**' ' . • > \s\-4 V»C^ 

II ■ ■ ~ ■ - ■ ' 11 I .IK . 

' U •'* I 

* See tW Spiritval Quixote, rot i. cliap. ix. 



A cDfSbtDBIilMlMilf 9 ttSftUMr. 

* 

AmMnlt^ii' (I^Vim^sQ^ .A^wipAa Z4^l^ IT Ar <amf(i^ 

U|3ml%('MU' in aesAr «li jBMmdm'g^ in M;% ibr M^ lyfif^ 

.?Ki¥iijlF»f^'<<(lct^l'>i)if>^ *»Mmft of Batktdalr mukU/h 
T^jlp^Mm^priHiittlbai, acyft tiuit l^ ii«dj& has i«il^ii|| «U 

<JU<n MS'*"; ' .. " ■ . . ♦ .'■•*■' f. 



i^I^'lli^d Coivelo, NovelOf de la otra viifa. ^w. BarcetimlilJ^ 

Xe'^E^ U supposed to bave fonncEeid bis JDiaSk Soke§r bki'^ 
this work. 
X eiji^TtfliroyrB sale, 181?, r/;2i. 



'^pi^p^li^ein Prmeipemi, legHma patestate, StefHta^m fum¥ 

JJuf Ai PnwnMCtt UgiihfUf dv fVku&ttft I0 Pwftph^ €t db P4f$fi^ 
pi&tur fir Printer trai. rflrlftff. ^j»»r Prmmh J^ttenneJ Stfo, 
1581. 



6 CONTENTS. 

taqM. 
Churchyardc's (T.) Works ^ . . . . . .% . • .6* 

Clizia^ Llnfelice Amore di Gioliae RomeOy 8to. 1553 «^ .'-47> 

Collinses Families of Vere^ Cavendish^ &c* folio, 17^ » « 1 1ft 

Court and Kitchen of Elizabeth Cromwell> 12iik>« 1664 W^ 

Cowley*s Poetical Blossoms^ &c. 4to. 1633> &c. .••«,• • i 7^ 

Anacreontic Odes on Gold, the Grasshopper, 

and the Epicure ^ • t^ - S) ii 

Cromwell the Perfect Politician, 8yo. 1680 ^ « «. .. dL 

Dance of Death (The History of ) .2,^^ 

Danse Macabre, 1485, &c » 2^^ 

-— - des Morts, 1744, &c •..'23 

Darcie*8 Annalcs of Queeu Elizabeth, 1625 ........•• . TJJj 

Dee*s (Dr. J.) Arte of Navigation, folio, 1557 . • # it . . ^ .,> /,^f j 

Demosthenis, Aldus, 1 504 32 

Taylori, 1748-57 V • ,Wa 

El Diablo Coivelo, 8vo. 1 646 ••••••::, t^^^ 

Drayton's (M.) Poly Oibion 73 

Queen Elizabeth's Prayer, or Boohe of Christian Prater's 'Yr 

Fazio Dita Mundi, 1474 .;.....•• .Z^'*!^* 

Fraunce's Countess of Pembroke's Ivy Church i Am^tBi, ' '^'^^ 

&c. 4to. 1591, &c 62 

Froissart Chroniques de JPrance, &c ...•'... i' ^^ 

Froissart's Chronicles, Pynson, 1523, &c.. 30 

— ^— by Johnes .'. ^ . . • *'i^^ 

Fuller's Worthies of England, folio, 1662, (Directiimii • ^ '"^ 

for Collating) .'. • . . . ' '55<* 

Church History (plates in) .,.#... Sfr" 

Abel Redivivus (Collation of) i'^ 



i*Wl»i<M» *»»'»w4 <rf thU wtichi, edituMW» FraahltrC 1(!08, 

tkt^ gUM <iKe (Stnct fron tUa B«ok, vhiok ti«iit» .uiiply 
of the aobjecto before enpBerated) in order to shew the m»n- 
^tfliJA^^iMl^ ^.author hiMQea his subjcctp and for theslgrl^ 
^ J^Ufl^- Ulfli l^lAslfttioii. as made. 

i^JHIV ^jr ^ '' Hitherto we have treatqd of a l^iof r 
<gi( fasf J^«^- . I it Qow vesta wee doe somewhat moiieAiilK 
4^91^ ^ T^nmt. Wee have shewed that hejs a ^i9g, wUp!| 
)9l9^iiilf4(f»i]sme6 a kii^jpdome» either derived to him by sQpQWn 
•Wflf. ^: CQi^miited to him by electiou. It foUowes ther^rq 
thm^, be is rei^iitGd a Tyrant^ which as oppesito to « Kiif ». either. 
fOTH^ ill Hitgfffrm by violence, or indirect nieans> or bfinf in^ 
vested therewith by lawful election or snceesaioii^ goifepnof H 
]K^jiO|»f#Bg tp law and eqiutie> or negltcta tboie oestfflkcts 
and agreements, to the observation vrhereof ho was . stnkKly 
n^jgHtf^at his reception. All which may very well oecmrei in 
one and tjbe same person. The first is commonly called mUf:* 
r^i^t,^!^^ title ; the second a Tyrant by pmctiae* Kow it 
mf^i.well.so come to passe, that he which posseaseth himsolfil 
of a kingdome by force^ to govenie justly, and he on wbon^ it 
dfi|,cends by a lawful! title, to rule unjustly. But for 80 mnch 
41^ a kingdom is ra^er a right than an inheritance, and an. o^ 
Ice than a posse«Hoo i he seems rather worthy the name of .a 
T)Tant, which unworthily acquits himselfe of his charge;, than 
h A which entered into his place by a wrong door. lathe smne 
SKince is ibePepe called an intruder whidi entered by imlicosl 
pi«aiV9> into ti^ Pi^ !^ y : and he an abuser which gavtnM^iil'iii 

it; 



'♦* 



p. 103 and 4 of the English TraasUlioo. 



tW the i^w W tiimA oi 6oa be iniimtaiii*d*: Msttd^' r^^ 
q^res that Tyrants and Destroyers be compelled tti fdii^'i^ 
Charity chall^iges the right of relieving and Te8tbrli%'^'<lp- 
pressed. Those that make no account of these things d6^ «8 
miich as in them lies to drire pietie^ jnsfioe^ and chai^ xMktfof* 
this World, that they may never more be heard of.*^ "^ 

* Afc One, in his Life of Andrew Melville, vol. f. pi 4&4^'%f6t 
^t^^ says, this Work resembles HoHomaits F^ane& ijMtmti 
and that Langoet's Work is properly only an enhtf^meM^ 
Bezaf suppressed Work, I>e Jure ifagii&iatuum, andiilfidigllr 
more guarded, yet stUl far from evasive in the ctpte^Hb^&t 
Hberaf opinions. : •! >;: -^ifp 

ft'! ^ .••• .- ■ » ' ^ 

f. I . , . 

.' ' : < 1 'Ml - *l 
- * ' j •* 






ir..! < 



Tii^ Court and Kitchen of EHzab&th, edited Joak 'C^r&mmM} 
/fc ^^^ 0/ the late Usurper y truly described aUkd f^jsW*^ 
denied, hmo. fJTlti her Portrait as afhmUsjnect: timil 
ttt64. "... ;*;'■' 

Mason, 1798, 2/. 12#. ^d.-, Woodhonse, 1803, 71 lO^.j G. 

Nassau, 1824, 4/. 6*. 

• . Underneath the frotitispiece are the folloiv'ing liuea : ^^ 
t .' . From feigned glory and niurped Throne, 

And all the greatness to me falsely AeWn, 
And from the arts of ^yemraeni set free; ' ' 
8^ liow Protectress and a Drti^ agrees , . • 

Over the right shonlder of the poftndt i« ivpiettnted a 
HMkkey, in lOlnsion to a vulgar adage. Mr. NoUe^^iti ht» Mt* 
nuin «f the CtomweU Family, has caused a tofff to be oi- 

* p. 148 and PiiM. 




%c#«i9ft-KH:.„,.. ...... _■ .,.v. ;V'^.,^,,^ 

. J^)^^pl( jtfielf> .which is very , scarce, is a violent Sjftiire^ ;. 

^^^^lffii!^^9^^J^y^^ shewn in satire ^ to ^loyyl WM 

tp)aJl;ij9^.«iU,Uie i^posite party guilty or innocent.^ " ^ ' 

QraDger-l^ says of; the subject of this satire> ''^E}li^v^^ 
<}9«i||^^of Sir James Bourchierj and wife of Oliver Gropv^^ 
inM\§^?P^<WMM;V'l|^ ^. enlai^d understandings and an elev^i ' 
%li9i;(<)}7(^^ .w;^ an picelknt housewife, and as capable (^ de 
^tf8»4}M:^4j^«^^^fi!'^lw^ with propriety, as she was of actfiflT 
i^llf^^^^^k^ %X^Aioiii with dignity. It has been ass^rte^ tMt 
she as deeply interested herself in steering the Kelmj^ ^ shje had^ 
often done in turning the spU ; and that she was as Constant 
a spur to her husband in the career of his ambition, as she had 
ltjNp^i^.j^bfr,se;rYantfi in their culinary em|4oyments : ceiiain|il 
iiMJtl^. 9h^ a^ti^.a.mnch more prudent part as Protectr^s, than 
Henrietta .di^.a^ Q^een; and that 9he educated, her children 
with as much ability, as she governed her family with add^^." 

Cromwell-^fhe Perfect PoMcian, or a Ml Fieip dft^^Mife 
and Actions of Oliver Cromwell, with Portraits, Svo. 1680. 
A copy, with^t^o pprtraits of Cromwell, De^sbrow, and Ire- 
ton, added, sold.j^.HoUe^' sale, April, 1817, for 29/. 
t VBmmm^mf¥y^f^ and satisfactory ^iccount €^ tl^^ y^ji^9 
IfttJtirf ^ille Prfl^ctpr OJiypr, by the diffj^j-j^nt f utj^ojrg^'y'^ 



^.Noble's House of Cromwell, voL i. p. 131. 
t Bi0^apLicia KUit. 4/ Bogiand, rol. iii. p. U 

G 2 



'■"• <■: tV^^e.i 



10 SECOND JOURNEY jaOUND 

sold it again to an English dealer in books for iS50, and 
doubtless believed he had turned his Hock to rery good account. 
I have nevertheless heard that the nobleman above alluded to 
did not obtain possession of this literary treasure for a less sum 

than je4oo;* 

See the V^allicre Catalogue^ No. 2432, where it sold for 
4101 livres. 



Bury (Richardi dej Phylobibllon de querimomU Llhrorum 
omnibus liter arum amatorlhus perulUe. Ato, Spine. 1473. 

Ditto, ("Said to be prior ta th edition at^ve ckifd*J Ato, 
Coien, 1473. 

The Editions of Paris, Frankfbrt, Leipsic, &c. are various. 

7%« Oxford Edition, 1599, is most known in this country, 
but is rare, like most of the other Editions. 

Copies of this curious book may be. found in most- of oar 
Public Libraries. 

The learned an^ munificent. Prelate, whose, paterjial name 
Wits Richard,de Aungeryille, but which he alteredl upoia talqng 
religious orders to that of. D^ Bury, from thje plaoe of, his 
nativity, founded ar Pul^lic Library, at Oxfoi[d,f for the benefit 
of the Students : having furnisheii ,it with the best cpUectic^A 
of Books then in England, he wrote his Phil(4)^liop^ a Trear 
tise pontaining RqI9s.%; the miM^iagement of the Library, how 
the Books were to be preservcid, and on what oQ&ditipna. 
lent out to thj^ Scholars. It is written, according to .Hprnis^j^ 



i^.ai •r,-f7- 



* OhalmerB is in error ^mthe flays' ^ ihdiA Otfnllirid^ 
f lati^nctionto 9iUipgira|di7i.ToL J.|i.6li!8l».' 



"^'iH -.Jiff lo :vi. --^1/ '. . . ..' . • : , .. . ■ , ..y ,. ->-,^ 

tb^. monkey aotTecJ to the portr^'of Elizabeth Croofiw^liiiHltad 
be a mbre proper appendage to that of hier husbarid Oliver,' ff 
the story told by Audley, brother to the famed Civilian of thtit 
naLHie, from tlie Rev, Dr. librt's MSS. be true — it is ks follows : 
^ ** His very in&n<:y was marked with a peculiar accident that 
seemed to threaten the existence of the fiitnre ProteCTbr't ft^r 
liis grand&ther. Sir Henry Cromwell, having sent forhiiiito 
Hmchinbrook, when an infant in arms, a monkey took h^t& 
from the cradle, and ran with him upon this lead that covered 
the roiofing of ihe House; alarmed at the danger Oliver Was iir, 
uie family brought beds to catch him upon, fearing the <ir«t^ 
ture^s cirbpping him; but the sagacious animal brou^t^lfe 
^ fortune of England' down in safety : so narrow an esCaj^liV^ 
he/ who was doomed to be the conqueror and sovereign rfiagis^ 
jtrate o^three mighty nations, from the paws of amorikefr'-^'f 

tc'xl (•.'.••..;. ^ 

;. 1 < I /.■■..,.■ . , 

"''' ••!•:,. .... vv 

fuWrs (To fTorihleS of England. Folio. 1662. WUh 

Portrait of Fuller by Loggan. ' l 

, Vaiue about 10/. 10*. — Mr. Malonc bouglit Stevens*s cO|)j^, 
containing IMS. Notes by Oldys and Thoresby, and Stfe\"erte's 
own additions, for 43/. 

This book is so incorrectly printed as frequently to leave A 
doubt as to its being perfect. ^ 

Tlie following are directions for ascertaining a perfect co\if, 
on cQlJation, left in MS. by a person whose whole life ws^ 
directed to such pursuitg. 

Page 30-33, wrong, but the catchword right, viz. Ckap. 
42, catch w6rd wrong : 2 Even done, should be of. 



IS fflBCOKD JOURNEY RO^^KD 

Our Author was i^ipointed Bishop of DurhaEm in 1333, and' 
Lord IVeasnrer of England in 1344. His Book relates the 
measnres he took to gratify his fiiyonrite ^assion^ the love of 
books ; whilst Treasurer and Chancellor of England be took- 
his perquisites and new year's gifts in books $ and by Edward 
the Third's feivor rummaged the Libraries of the principal men, 
and brought to light many books which had been locked up for 



At Avignon, in the year 1331, aipong the dijstinguished and 
learned men with whom Petrarch became acquainted, Richwd/ 
de Bury is thus characterized by the Author of the life of 
Petrarch. 

** One of these yi'ivs Richard of Bury or Aungerville, who 
came to Avignon this year. He was sent thither by Edward- 
tl^^ Third, his Pupil and his King. Edward wrote a letter to- 
the Pope, recommending to him in particular Richard of BuFy> 
and Anthony of Besanges,- whom he had sent with an enK' 
baasy to his Court. Richard of Bury had a piercing wit, si 
cultivated understandings and an eager desire after every kaiid- 
of knowledge. Nothing could satisfy this ardoiur, no obstacle^ 
could stop its progress> He had given himself up to study' 
from his youth. His genius thr^w Mgfat on the darkest^ and his 
penetration fiEithomed the deepest, subjects^ He was passipn*^ • 
ately fond of books 3 ai^d laboured ^ his Ufe to collect the 
largest library at that time in Europe. A man of such merits 
a|id the Minister and favorite of the King of England, was tt- 
ceived with every mark of distinction in the society of Cardinal 
Colonna." 

His stay at Avignon was short : Edward, who could not do 
without him, recalled him to England soon after* On bis 



«t^^^^^9f|^ Bible in Little Brfttain. ' I8fei; ^ ' *' 
^ -^ ji^ |i(^^^^l^ : j>iifified by J. G. W. L^ and W. (j. 1 ooJj. " 
Tbe];e lijas.,]^^^ a reprint of Fuller's Worthies, with Noi^, 
by J, Nichols. 2 vols. 4to. published at 5/. 5s. LonQ. 1^1. 

■ r 

-'■''"■ ^ • 

— "^"i"^" * " ■ ■>«•-•. -. 

/WfefV C^prrcA ^^y af Britmn, from the JBir/A af Ciri^ 
4 ^ • *i7/ia48. Folio. J 655, 

A i3«pyiiii the Mierly cpUcption sold lor 8/. 8^. 
** %'s^ Should hare the following plates : 

ArBifl #f the Kuights and Monks of Ely, p^ge i6$. 
Two ]da^ oi Lit^Meld Cathedral, oue by HoOs^, the either 
by Vaughan, at pag^ 174. , . 

El«iri»f C^nbridge, to face page 1 of the H^t. otCfmbnijp 
.ViUsiyersity. ,,j 

And Seals of Arms of all the Mitred Abbies in JSuglaS^, at 
tb^ end 1^ the bpol^ 






Futl^'s (Tkos.J Abel RedivlvuB: or the Deetd fet Spkukhn^. 
The Lives and Deaths of the Modeme Divines wrktm liy 
several! dhte and learned Men; and now digested intobne 
volume. 4/0. 1 65 1 . Frontispiece by Vaughan of the Au- 
thor, with his right hand on a book, and Poitraits ob the 
letter-press. 
At page 440 Life of Bishop Andrews and Portrait, 10 leaves, 

concluding with Finis. Page 441 to 599 follow and finish the 

volume.* 

'• t *'•• t < I I III H , ' ■ ■» ■ ■ ! ! .11 I I t^ III ■ ■! ■ ■ J lI J i JW i>l* 

* Set Grangr^r. vol. ii. p 171. ftnd Ccnstura Literaria, rot i. P*"^!* 



. .1 






•':'■• A 



li 



.. **K«i«re>wi]l 1wt6 her eonrae^ and dnU Booki triU be ibr^tteniii 
ipite of Bibliogntplien*'' ^ ' 

OtamfbtU. '^ 



» » 

■J 



I 



I'?: I 



^fcn'kHrii estate. Me ~ba^ entnisted Us m«iuiBcr{t>t' 'to lu 
ttm inMe finind tl^ Muchioness (rf Beuunie, who Itar&g uBea 
wl''WfliiiiHi,' i^ it pftoted oot of spite. -x '■"•■- 



Xm Oeuvra de Jemm B^. Pi,c^i»dm dg HoSert. ^ tt^^ 

i!n 1 / .^ ^^' '^"^ -YdM/CTJoifc 1675. ",„::., 

, Tbii<,iiiK|f>mmon little editioD. to wtuch is often wA^eA,.f^ip 
de Motiere, Amtt. 1705, which fonasft 6th rolome, nnl^, 1^4* 
the Efzcvir collectioa, and has aold in France for ISO^^frffcs, 
ukJ'*!!! London, at the sale of Amos Strettell, £sc|. L82(jt,t^ 
o.Tola. bound in morocco, for 4/. 154. ... ,^^ .-. 

In this edition the Fe»t'm de Pierre of Coronlle, kk yene.^ 
iiidndedj instead of that of MoUcre ; the 5th yotom^ %tX}pir 
pi^ vfitii L'OmArede Moliere petiie Comedie._ ,, 

The .edition of Moliere, 6 toni. 12ino. Wetstein, j^Emffcff^fn^ 
l^i, IS tomewhat remarlcabte, as containing the noted, Sc^fte 
oifDon Jnan and the Mendicant, torn, iii- p. 38, and whiffr 
BraUet says, he hae met with in no edition of Moliere prij^^ 
in France earlier than 1817, with the exception of a aiiq^ 
copy of the Oeuvref PMthumet, torn. vii. Pari*, 1 682. 

This scene was suppressed on the 2d representation of the 
Fe»t'i» de Pierre to quell the clamoura which it excited against 
tke'Asther, by the too strong colours perhaps withnhictM 
had depicted the reasoning villainy of his hero. 

The following is the passage as ^ven by Bret in his edition 
of Moliere. 

^niMtfr Jnan meets B beggar In the Forest, of whom he asks 
IMwt^ftff^seB'his life! who answers— " ^ jurter Dleu'jioirtet 
kmUt^jlViii jtfi flw don»enC taumine. n paste* "la'vte'ji 



^m - :MMIJBM> HmXifVf.JimfW 



M^>»tieur,je mm poi iomvent ie qf$oi mmkger. tjeim mtM^ffpi 
<pm; DmM nemmrok Imtter momrir tU /mmee^Jf fti 
A Mtr am ma^ : Aem, voM tm lams ttor, nuutje ie Im 
pdkf fammr de thmwmmUr 

'Ilk tlie Dvtdi cditioD the passage accotding to Bnncft Ji 
«Mdi Mdiar, viz. Je vms ie domner am Limu tfOr, imi m 
• fkiUTB, pomnu que iu vemlle jurer. 

• Hiest paiticttlan baye lost saine (^ theb interest^ abupieilie 
ma^ fotnes have been reprinted in Didot's 8yo. editkoLaiki jn 
M* Anger's. 

Bfet*t ecHtioo, 6 vols. 8to. 1773, with Morean*8 pbt^ fst- 
J«yed the repatation for many years of being the best c^.tUs 
anthef ^ bat according to the ktest French catalogues, i>ippcfvra 
to be superseded in reputation by that of M. Aiiger^ I^u^9 
1619 and 20> 9 vols. 8to. with prints after Vemet, wbjbd^is 
apolMn cif in rapturous terms by Brunei : *' Pour la pureii^ 
ieMie^ Ie tnerite du cammeniaire, la beauii de Vimpremou ef Ie 
/M dei gyratmres" 

To ihis^ as to every other 8vo. edition, may be added 31 4^- 
jgtavings, done from the new drawings of M. Morei^u, which 
are much superior to those of the same artist made in 1773.! 
: The editions of this celebrated Author are nearly as nume- 
rous as our Shakspeare, and it would be an endless as weUas 
aseless task to enumerate even a tythe of them, I shalt there- 
fcH-e only add one more edition to my list, viz. that of Paru, 
1734, 6 vols. 4to. with plates^ as it was revised from the 'ori- 
ginal editions of Moliere*s Plays, and served ^s the t^xt, from 
which Bret's edition was printed. 

There are two editions of the same date and size : the Jirsi 
tHif/ be9t is recognized by a lault in torn. vi. page 360, line 12> 



^"Vmbd^WL^Co^ei^ ■ ■ ■ ;■.,,.,.,>/' 

*"^*T5a'Haj?|)^ iii lu6 Xkxm dttia LUtertture, says, ^ AaAntlior's 
^^iikifi^iidatkdftVis in his own w^ks :' and it mtiyjusUijbe ilid 

tfaatMoliere 8 eukqi^iim is contained betii in liie works lD£llli(i|p* 
'^^t^^irbj) preceded aJi well As succeeded him, soccMipkbelyihave 
^ l^li "^ass^s b^ (fistanced by him. He certaikily idasaes 

among the front rank (^ Moral Phildsophers^ Dr. Blair>ift Us 
^^Xidc!lfimes on BeHes Lettres and Rhetoric, calls hiai a&. Author 
'^in'i^tidbi t&e $*rench glory most, and whom they jnstiy sphoe 

at the head of all their Comedians. There is tnd^dJ.'lia 



-n 



' M'dl (he frokM and disUngmi^ied age <tf Loais^'XIV. 
^who^ha^a'ttained a higher reputation than MoUere^ 6r m^ 
"^^fia^'i^oretiearly readied the summit of perfection in vki8ii0wa 



Mih:^ 



' Bstt\ aicscotdin^ to the judgment of all the French, GrititS'^i^— 
"^^t^lij^surel^oidly pronounced him to be the most eminent 4]!«tiic 
^ Twt' ot amy age or Conntry ; nor perhflps, k this the davi^ian 
^^<n'mere partiality, for taking him iopofl the wholes hhnvw 
none who deserves to be preferred to him. M^ere is alwtKya 
3ie sahrist only of vice and folly. He has selected a great va- 
riety of ridiculons characters, pectdiar to the times iawhickhe 
Iiv^, aiid hie generally placed the ridicale justly. : He possessed 
^ strong coifiiic powers ; he is full of mirth and pleasantry: and 
nis pleasantry Is always innocent. Inline, iiOtwithstandkig 
^ somefew imperfections and improbabilities, which are mere 
' 'speck's on the disc of this luminary, few writers, if any^ ©rer 
possessed tlie spirit or attained the true end of comedy, sa 
perfectly, on thfe M'hole, as Molicre. '■'' 



f.u 






S CONTBNtS. 



Mmtin* (Bossy) Hist. Amoarease det Cbalai • • • 9i 

Rdation de la Riviere des Amasones, par GombemUe, 
1682 W 

Spout Gr^aal, Paris, 1516atid 1523 3S 

Sallnst, 4to. 1475 ..••• 15 

SisM^achri Historic &c, Lyon, 1549; . • » • • 26 

Smith's (Capt. J.) History of Virginia, folio, 1624 . • • • 75 

Travels in Enrope, &c. 1680 . . » . . . 77 

Smollett's Adventures of an Atom (Key to the Characters 

Speaeer'f Ffterie Qtieene and otheir Works, 15^0, &c. . • • 58 
Spenoe's Polymetis, folio, 1747 10& 

Tonstallns de Arte Supputandi, Pynson, 1522 • • 36 

Towneley's Translation of Hndibras • 119 

Virgilii Opera, 1469 9 

Waller's (Edmd.) Poems, 1711 KH 



■fc . 



I 



* 



'10 



* . ■. 

, . . . .. t 



*^mhm*!W^'^ w^W' M 



i 



**^The ^d^elical Gui(fe, shewing M^ and ff^omen their, j^ 
OM Chance^ in this elementary ^\f['^\ r^* AiBoots, B^John 
Case, MM. Svo. 1 697. . 7^ 

^ ^'d. Nassau, Esq. 1824, 1/. 8*. 

" "Th^f^ «ays Granger, " is one of the. most profound astror 
^ojncal pieces that the world ever saw. The Diagrams would 
proMU)^ have puzzled Euclid, though he had studie4 Astrolbgr. 
immiisdiately after the unintelligible Hieroglyphic iusciibed^ 
' jiaam in Paradise^* is this passaii^e, selected as a specimen^ 
of the, work :-r' Thus Adam was created in that pleasant placQ 
Paradise, about the vear before Christ 4002, viz. on Apnl 24^ 
at twelve o clock or midmirht. Now this place Paradue is m 
Mesopotamia, where the Pole is elevated 34 deir. 30 min. and 
the Sun riseth four hours sooner than under the elevation, of 
the Pole, at London. Now our curious Reader may be ^nnul&l-^ 
tive concerning this matter. If you yrAi not credit these rea- 

i^t>l<M»'J', ^'•y": ■*^.' • . "■ • • '■ r ;. ;-^) ,««.{ biit- )na 

Sims laid down, pray read Josephus : there ypii mil see some** 
thing ^of this matter, nz. of the nrst pnmum mobile or movinr 
posture pf tne World, and place of Riradise, and elevation of 

ita Pole. Many controversies have been about the time and 

ni h■niy^'Y'r^'\ "'..-. • / -'^ -. . ,• : . .-■••.■.-. .^i;? n-.iii^ 

a^ason. of the year, therefore I shall not trouble my reader any 

fmlner with them. Let the Scripture be our guide in this mat- 

ter. Let there be (saith the word) and there was : and also 

the nflh day s work of the creation, when the grasshoppers 

wer^, ,^d the trees sprang put ; this may give us tounderr;* 

stand that the time of the Creation must have its beginning in 

the spring. Now for the place or centre of the earth, from 

'^ ^ ¥lie ^Philosophical f%are dedbcedhy «n An^elical^an^ Afitro'lo- 
gical]j,>« seems to be equally unintelligible. See this figiire at p. !254J'- '- 



10 SECOND JOURNEY ROUND 

sold it again to an Engltsh dealer in books for £50, and 
donbtless believed he had turned his Hock to very good account. 
I have nevertheless heard that the nobleman above allnded to 
did not obtain possession of this literary treasure for a less sun 
than ^^400.** 

See the Vallicre Catalogue, No. 2432> where it sold for 
4101 livres. 



Bury fRichardi dej Phylohiblion de guerifnomis Librorum 
omnibus liter arum amatorlbuB perut lie, Ato, Spira, 1473. 

D'^to, (Said to be prior ta tie edition above cihfd*J 4lo. 
Colen. 1473. 

The Editions of Paris, Frankfbrt, Leipslc, &c. are various. 

The Oxford Edition, 1599, is most known in this country^ 
but is rare, like most of the other Editions. 

Copies of thi^ curjous book may be found in most of our 
Public Libraries. 

The learned ancj^ munificent. Prelate^ whose. paterAal name 
W|is R|chard,de Aungeryille> but which he altered u^^ taking 
religious orders to that of D^ Bpry, from thje place of, his 
nativity, fpupded ar Public Library at Oxford^f' for the benefit 
of the Students : having furni8hei|d,it with the best cpllectiQV^ 
of Books then in England, he wrote his Philob^lion^ a Tr^ 
tise Qpntaining Rql^s.fo^ the mi^nagement of the Library, how 
the Btooks were to be preserved> and on what oqiiditiona. 
lent out to the Scholars. It is written, according to Horn.e^f' 

in — " • ' - 'r • I r ■ • - i i- III i i rP i TT- . - . • 

* Chabners is in error ivhen bi sayii ^ yniiJt Cin0Nrid{^ 
f Iiiti^iictioDte9lbliogi«|kh}iToLi.|L.6IK^' 



A atBLlOMIlNlAO'S LlffRAmT. NS 



r ,J' 



%^ ^m. Lord Fh^aimt Orimttme. 4m. 17A5. $00. md 
l2mo. 1736. 

<?. NasMUi, 1824, 7#. 

liord'Oiimstoue, who wrote tliis Comedy when a school bojr 
at ^e age of 13, afterwarda, as &r as lay in his power, at- 
tempted it*8 snpptession, by buying np the copies. This attempt 
to obliterate all trace of anthorahip, of which his Lordship's 
maturer years rendered him ashamed, would most probably have* 
succeeded, had not the malevolence of Sarah Duchess of Marl- 
borough procured a copy, at a time when his Lordship was 
Candidate for the Borough of St. Albans, and when she took 
occasion to interest herself in opposition to him ; and as a 
moans to- forward her plans, caused an impression in 8ro. to 
beiprintad anddistribated amongst the electors, at her own sole 
chaagO) with a frontispiece, ** conveying,** says the Diograpfaia 
Drastatica, ** a most indecent and unmannerly r^ection on hia 
Ij>rdahq»a.4indent8Bdingy under the allegorical figure of a» 
elepifent (dancing on a rope.** This edition he also bought vjp 
as nttady as he was able, upon which she sent a copy to Hol*^ 
landitb be lepriatod. The 8?o. edition has a sarcastic dedic»* 
tiosiy/aiid some ill-natmred notes. 

l)&wift^ in alkiuon to this Play and its Author, says, 
*^ The Lesdoii Crown devoH'd to thee 
Oreat Poet of the HoHow TVce.** 

See Walpole*s Royal and Noble Authors, Noble*s ContiL 
tion of Qxanger^ and Biqgraphia Dramatica. 



HI 4SSQ0ND iOURKET EOVlfP « 

.^^^bwU Qoutaio theibUavrng Fltte« by Vertve and Yiiijii 
fgcht. ... ./*v«b.' 

^ jPpitnit of the Author in his 23d ye$r. : ^>.> >' 

Edmond Waller^ aged 76> at end of the life. :'-''';• 

^^^onument of ditto ditto 

^,|2oll^|teia of Carlisle 

,., j i ii.t^ > - of Sunderland 

,. JBeu Joimaon .... 
Jack Fletcher .... 

^ lip^j Jioytoji .. .... 

General Montague^ afterM-ards Earl of Saadwick ' ^^f^^MI 

William and Mary 325 

Col. Townley's copy^ large paper, in morocco^ sold te 

AtW ■■■■ '■ 

' Ordihuy copies are of moderate value. 



•■-14* 



k .' ■••"■^ 






■^ : .:r.. 



•>'. • -• j' 



Heame, (T,) 
Jtcia Apostolorum, Gneco Latine, LUterU Afnjtescuiu "J?. 
■ Codice Laudtano, Sfc, 8fc. Svo, Ojron, 1/15. 

'^ Large paper, Gough, 20/. 

* ■ 't' 

*' To the disgrace of opulence and our countr>'," says BelMj 

. * ■ ■ ■ 

** wheti the learned Hearue published proprosals for priiitiug 
no more than 120 copies of this book from the very cumua, 
manuscript of the Acts of the Apostles in the Bodleiuu Lilii.my> 
he could only obtain the names of 41 Subscribers nor dis|<ose 
of ^ore thau 76 copies. 

A suitable account of Hcanie, who in the words of XobIe» 
" Might be said to have no nlutious but /tiu.iu crjt.sj uo a^ 



kmi ^k»ip parckmenU; Mr fr e g mig inl mK§9i 
fN^gmmmmf tfMijfsi^r with m oopiottraeeoiiiit efUi tiOM^ 
«(fe4 «i4;^ file AatiqMriui^ the IfiMoriui, nd tfie jftdlifci, 
mefid ptdyBcitieiis, woold be a most ^stmbk preeest tr1l» 
Lkeniy WmU, aad wlricb I am glad to hear it WYSkOfwmk 
topoateas. 

I ahaH only add here, in order to give some idea of UmUMI 
iiftWin which Heames pnbfications are hdd, thKtit'IMI 
fjgrBond 8 sale at King and Lochee*s« April 29lh/ 1808>l]Mj- 
4WiB^ VobnDea only, (sold in separate lots,) prodoeed Uw Viif 
ifttetiXto<tf 19#. 

r^9mpiB9r's attempt at republishing these works has pwvwi m 
timjl^klbt fitthire, from the want of support. 



Slf9m€t9 Pol^metUi or, an Enquiry amcermng- the Agwm-^ 
meni between ike fTorks of the Roman Poete, mndthe £r- 
swlat of the Amtient Artwts, Folio, London. 1747. 
Heath, 1810> 7/. 9s, Gd,-, marked usually by booksellers at 
7/. 7#. in their sale catalogues. 

The Vignette at the eud of the 17tb Dialogue in the Jim 
ejkion of tiie Polymetis contains a caricature of Dr. Cooke* 
Tlrovost of Eton, in the character of a pedagogue with an asa's 
bead* The resemblance is said to have been too strikiug not 
"to Itt^ ^a imstftntly perceived by those who knew him. . It 
ygkm removed in the third editkn of the Poij^meiis, 1774, and 
sittMftfter Vignette of Hermes the Egyptian Mercwry inserted in 
^ atead«* flpence cU^ared 1500/. by his Polymetis akuie't 



^ipj— iJiif'^ < ■ .■> ■ ■ ■ ■ ' ■■■■!■■ I i—^i4wy» 

^ See ikile't'IeUcr to Walpole, in tlie Britiah Moseum, qvotod bf Vif, 

SSagtlr, in his f cUtion er Sp ence*t Anecdotei. 

X 



'Wgtah, and illmracedwith Netet ttM i9fiM^%SdioM. if 

"j^'ireffrke 0' Donald, E*^. JOtthih^pihuH'.' 'Kaid«»~ 
" rej^r'mled, Ato. ffiiAFronttij^ce. if-tf.' ' ' ■-^''' * 

■riiis Poem, by Dr. Wta. Brig, Principd cif ^ti~ Muy'i, 
Oxfcrdj, ■>' which much hu been add, bttt die coMenta ai 
wnicn have been a sealed book eicept to the select few, 4 ■ 
vkdeDt utirei and, if not true, a virulent llbd agaiiiii hia >d' 
Torearies, in a law snit abont an estate in 0«lway^; '{<^irl^ 
tbe Dr. la^ cUip, as having lent Vu iincte, ^'mit()^it|&, 
urge snms on mortgage, previous to hb deJ^VW J'wt fth 
clum waa contested, and snbseqnently comprdtnisbtf. ''* 

In the former Jonrney Round a Bibfiomaliiac'BlSibVsi^i I 
mentioned a MS. Key, as bring contained'in' the cb^^W w. 
King's Works, sold In Isaac Reed's sale for fOl.iHt} ^ThitB^w 
iri'my'poBse'Hidti acopy of the 7biu(, fn>mw&l<lhth'eii6^T'^^ 
cileS title is correctly extracted, and containing InrttUttiaBcript 
tt« fo^owipg ErplatiattM of the ptnohi aUttSeHu iti (feVeflfe.- 

^ii Mjfm.'^f^Mij Frwnixa Bnidenal, /ceMro^. jl^i;gy»- 

ilneiteij aister to the Earl o( C^Mljigan, wwiJed first 

.k--<^i/ OonnfcMeirtMirgh, afterwards t«iiordBellew,;f^ktf{Jy 

^ ^. <» SirThdi. Smith, I^. Kill's npcln,. bnt 0^> match 

" ' iraB'&at«WBcd, •■iL:--v:-\-:i 

.■■SL-OM^Walpole. ■ : ^^ \ - ~ .-,„,i^ .a 

- '6, mem we Vof^-Cv^ John Pm», Z^qmlgr/Vw^^^^W' 

* Sm NdUc** continiiBtion ef Oraager for tmut p(il|<MBt ef thja I#^' 
i>l. L f. sea uil 8M. 



^6 ,«.^ol^Pfe^ \^ it ift blared ; died in ttef l^l^^ 
~«o\^y^ fl[e ^WlWNr !^,M Swl^c, Bwitlicr of Smt i^^ 
7. Mart Chepj^.-^StirThos. Bmitb, the Autl^OTft uidt; 

« ^ 4fi)r^Z>f-rMcs. De^toIi« another inAft's wifei wh{e|i .»« 

-iw «.«! Jn««s/w* "ixmf 5000/. . . . :;^j^.,^» 

v(*flftgff«8!f?^— J>'f';Hort, .,AH**Mliop of Tnaa, ;;^ * 
rfJiSv'^' Q^JiBge BOtttie^M Chief)— Bntler, a Li<Mtenaii{ 



of tbp Y^men of the Guards. . , 



mani 

' M'^mr^ yi^^^ ^•— Lofd Viacoont Aflen. , \,, Q,^ 
-^^/<^^'T7;Ql=^ Trotter, a Master in ChaoMery/ or^ » ami^bec 

^'V*^5iPP»tT^R^Pb^Jo<^ly»>^E^^ Attorney denerai at^tUt 
time, and afterwards Loid Chancellor of Ireland. ,, 
Ne^Al!lU'lPU«k^.-*^SkJigletoo, 0^ Prtfnkr Sei$CBnlv^xail&- 
'^"'^ ^^<»i^te^ lidid Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. 
^^'4r.^ ^/^r >f/f.-^Lady Alien, wife to Lotct Viacontit Allea^ 
j^iois.-n 1^^^ nUbthei' of Lady Carysfort and Lddy Kewhnrgh of 
Casdemaine. She was the daughfer -etf ar Dlftek Jdw. 
84. Pi^cy.—Sir Edward Pierce, Sttry63ror''G^neFfll of IldMfci 
"^HM/iCo^'i^A»KVl>r. Hoit, ArcfalMih^ of TnamreiiAsd IW 
"ByDffanSwtft. 



6 CONTENTS. 

Ghnrchyanlc s (T.) Works ^ .-.-.. . • • .:.a j^ ; A* 

Cfizia, L*Infelice Amore di Giolia e Romeo, 8to. 1553 V^ ^ .stf^i 
Collinses Families of Vere, Cavendish^ &c. folio, 17^62 1 « - lift 
Court and Kitchen of Elizabeth Cromwell, 12mo« .1664 . 90\ 
Cowley 8 Poetical Blossoms, &c. 4to. 1633, &c. ••••>• » .< 7fh 

Anacreontic Odes on Gold, the Grasshopper, 

and the Epicure . . . • <• 81 1 

Cromwell the Perfect Politician, 8yo. 1660 ^••..dl. 

Dance of Death (The History of ) , . 2.f . 

Danse Macabre, 1485, &c • 2Qi 

-~— des Morts, 1744. &c • . . . . 23 

Darcie*8 Annalcs of Quceu Elizabeth, 1625 ......•.•• 77^ 

Dee's (Dr. J.) Arte of Navigation, folio, 1557 . .^ij . .^ ..= ^.^* 

Demosthenis, Aldus, 1 504 32 

Taylori, 1748-^57 V .Pa 

El Diablo Coivclo, 8vo. 1646 -'-rTil-^^ 

Drayton s (M.) Poly Oibion 73 

Qneen Elizabeth's Prayer, or Boohe of Christian Praters *itt* 

Fazio Dita Mundi, 1474 ;. .r^'F*« 

Fraunce's Countess of Pembroke's Ivy Church 3 Amyilta^, ' *"-'*'^ 

&c. 4to. 1591, &c 62 

Froissart Chroniques de prance, &c '..••" ^9^ 

Froissart's Chronicles, Pynson, 1523, &c.. • • 30 

■ -— by Johnes -^' 

Fuller's Worthies of England, folio, 1662, (Directkww - ''^ 

for Collating) .,•/..'»?{* 

Church History (plates in) 9fr 

- Abel Redivivus (Collation of) i^^ 



A' B1BU0IUNUC8 UnAIT. IflA 

^^aJnov^ hna "ji^l-.v* -i ..;-r.-"' -" ,"- ' , -^y.-W .10; 

1 49. iWA— CooiMUor IHIIob. 

150. Jft6il^\it!-Cirty,aWrt*mt»e«.' ■• -^. ' ,.> 
15C. (Note.)-^iyr. King^a mra CMC. - •■ r-l ■ V-. 
157. OntBliandJ. Om».— ZKllon ud Jbc^. ' '"^ '''' 
I5a Amwyar.— Cbailn WittMn, broOcrnB-lMrto W^Htilg. 
168. •• • *.— Duke «rfft»ftoii.» . ^ ' »<.■' 

8— i—gtm.Sl6imgia,m wtKtot Lord Mn. - '■""•'' 

193. £«nf /— .— Jutma, Loid AUes's DUK. '- -''' 

In^ titije |o ft fanner edition of the Tout, 4io'. Xona.^ 

1 736, after PeregtiDe O'Donald, Eiq. in the TlUe-pin,' Wu^' 

Pm cffiM fatawm, 

Dr. Wn. King was alao Author of the fdlowiDg^lmf,, 
whidi, wHfa the Tout, were printed in a quarto toIqiMi atmer' 
the title of '' Open GmL Kvtg, L. h. />■" His volume was 
iwTer published, and on the death of the Author the whole im-' 
pieanon, except 60 copies, were deitroyed by hta Executors } 
Mw, of these was sold in Reed's nle, No. 2204, vith MS. Ktif,' 

ifi&rio^.;: ; ; , . '^' 

iilif&ni EinsfabTad PolUonein. (Lord Polwirtb-H/ 

Senno Pedestris. ', '.' ' , , 

Scamnnin Ecloga. ''^'^ 

Tcmplum Libertatis. " "" 

Tres OiatinncoUe. " ^ '"" 

Antonietti E[nstola ad Corses. ..--.. 

Joba OMeoyne. 174^ ',,.",,,. "' •■ « 

-^ See Ki^s Anecdolni dTitt DWii Tlae^ SVo. iHrni. ial4i'}f »1. 






ticmn lixfMXr'-mbiiiA * 



v. 



Orrtio in tlicatro ShcMoniawi. . i.-./of> 

EpirtokOlgiiigatoria. . . .r,.< ^4v 
Aviti Epiitob ijid Perinan. 

Onitiiiiicak in Dmm CoiiTpcatioiib Oxos, :.,^ 

Epitaphiiim Ridiardi Nash. 7 

King's Apology or Viadicatkm of hiimelfv . -o 

There is a striking likeness of Dr. Ring in Woifid^l^ Vieir 
of tlie Installation of Lord Westmoreland, as ChwMrlfnf of 
Oxford, in 1761. * ' ' ^ 

In the MS. Account of Dr. King, i^tadied to tbe Qopyypf his 
Work whence the preceding Key hasJbeen extracted* itt^ re- 
eonnted that he iras no frieiid to the two ^rst Giecnrges^ bat 
soon after the accession of George the Third to fli^ tVrone, 
he renounced his former antipathy to the Hanoreriaii family, 
and transferred his allegiance from James to George. \, 

On the Dedication of Radclifle*s Library in 1749 bf&^fpoke 
the Latin Oration^ which was received with the hlgh^si^ accla- 
mations by a splendid auditory ; and Mr. Warton, in hi& I' TVtr 
vmphs o/IsU,** pays him a very great compliment on thd*^ com- 
position. • • • I .•: 

Mr. ChalmcrSi in the Biographical Dictionary, after relating 

1'. , 'I 

various particulars of our Author, upon the authority of Ni- 
cholses Life of Bowyer and Swift's Works, meQ^ons,..t)iat he 
was the Editor pf the Five First Fohctncaf^i Dr.SmK^iMm' 
fnom^my manuscript account says he was £dit6r of iAn^^Fke 
IMT Folumei. . .: ^ '..ji ai 



f See King's AnccdoUg of bis own Times, Sm Inmd^ 181^' f. 1^ 



As I have Dr. King's Work now before me. I shopld be 
tbongfat negligent were I not to extract a specimen \ "wlSltn, as 
devoid of any personality, shall be firom the Nifhf Hatkbh of 
the Sum, and hi* Ftni to Dmhlm. Book i. 

"Sol WIS now IB die Ocean ; hii Horpes were drett; 
And the Hoosehold of Thetis wu order'd to rest ' - 

When his Qodship, or cdrioas to ^it old M%hl^ .';.'> 

To see how we supply the defect of hit Llflit) > ^^i 

Or perhaps to iniciil a new sahject of mirth, -.;.-' 

^f} 2; "/T^.a, h^i^jU} stroll lor one Eyening on Earth. 
\^ ^.Bnt he doft all hU rays, and his bow he laid down : 

For a Qod by his ensigns of honour is known ; ' '' 

As an Idiot's distingwish'd by patting a bib on, .< a ' > 

2iii ^Aiit^gk^tChevaHerby acrassandaribboo. ..r ,(! 

rn ^ Tils'. tlM Magi assues OS, the &(ii is aot iVQad» ^ ,^„ ^,,,7^ 

U^f\ l^e^Jos habit was made of the brightest bine Clood 
^3ft(,.-)^«il faibr^idered and spangled : He seem'd a mere Beaii; 
ylhj 'F*^ h? knew that fine clothes are a passport below. 
Nor his tresses neglected now flow in the Wind, 
But were furl'd, and with art in a sflk bag con£m«i, 
' Wiio of all the smart Toupees so gracefid appeaia? . > > w 
-ii' :>' i|y|^ ean please the Nymph's more by pc^dnciag.yfl caj^? 
'i<\ Vmok the head of the Xiphias* ha cut of a aiKo^d, ... 
'iiio-^ ?iil to-graee a n*w ^ayor, tho' he*$ titled. ]M[y ]U»rd_; , 
For the handle was pearl, and the scabbard shagreen; 

«. ... , > .Aad his sword-knot unsully'd had garter 'd a Queen« 

gif. J: I- ^'-■' •". ''',;• • • . ■ „. 

. ,. .From a tortoisesUell trident he shap'd a neat cane. 

^'' ^ iipMas, k fish laiiger than a Dblp/Um, by the ItaUjiBp cfUedf^^^v^e 

'^/iufyi/hy tke ^etwh, L'EmpereWy by th| G&wwis,. Sqkwer^ ^H^* 

oai^ h^{tA'ik^:Sw^d Shhf Se^ a description of it in J^Hnift^ QEpian, and 

in the Natural History of Johan Johnstone. Xiphia are likewise a sort 

of Stars or Comets which appear in the form of a sword^ in Mucronem 



"•"O. 



-•> 



• it?' • 



I '■ 



IK 




• 

He ■[■■■i'JU dbat sh«ifiifcB •an'd ft» ligk ¥iBii fill aili^T 



by ti^ir flbiBkiBr sore ddl. . 



'-' tWt lie tmjien 

A^ ^ IfeHM Vei* MTV r«t«M «k ^H f^t^fliiteir '':''- '»'' 

Of te lUnbeaa, coadat^ te duan of h^ djunea. '^no\TO 



rV^< 



lb a Berlia, whose ^iierd wae a 



Mioo|i 



v^" /-i; .o«o ?rrt 



^*''ti»eti^gyut^dbrwfiidi.'«^^ '"'^ 



How the l«ltaii|i«ti^{iaMM»<i^)i^W<^^ 

He %WiMKlii^4«f#«^'lio^ f^«iVl0tii'Ji^ ""^ 

So to CW»rt#i§fk»lrf'tiliJt»*olW8rW« '•^•«* '^ "^ 

Hero the iMMgieslR^^^bitf^nll^irl^^ 

M«€h tte<«lA*4»yUklMNh ta^ hefnMd^th^Wi^^ ^'^ 

Such a radiance can mattef iOnatm&Adie^ du^jl' '''^^ ^° ^ 

As if thMMi^rii nb^ffctide; Ills n^ Wfti aii clW -"' '"'^f^''^ 
Nor himself coiAJhMai# ^^ilj^eti ttorfr pliSidy^ iiipp«tt^^^'^ «^«f»^ 
He distinguiabed Lor* MHihf ^nMf^O^^ H^^ iho^^m 
And obsenr^ift iiii« eM^ililM grao^M ViMLQM^?<Htf nr^W^ 
Hn^ty Davbs set widi dhOMidi, aaft IriSTeft^ iMllf«M>; «^ 
Wh<wr<iidwiuj:fcr iMrii9r*)ii)f-« iMMMtif k^adr^ •<'^ ^^ ^^^ 
Mitred Prmsts idpahesideira^gMd MiMat^ 
Here enjoy jiH«Ae:oiiM» goodlhiogs of thii lilte: r^i«> '>'^^ ^«^«^ 
Who rdM^^r. whal^liRrp ail^ ^ithbh t^ k^wiaeii. wjMiir #il f^<*^ 
And ardbn^ila^HK^ tfao*^ die giiltf ijdnD^^>f4}od$?>:^!<^bjrfM Hrft 
Fair reTeiraes vnd Lorddnpff r Horteiidh»/afld^t^QM%r^-*^<^ o*^ 
*lVitgpiw9iiri'ab<dies «■»!■»■< jfenM.^-^' ^*^^" J'^^itmintiR 

kit age, tmd^^wiu i^fihS In Sdiing Ciurck^, 'Vf mtltl^tfli'fei 

Oxford. .e^n^cJ. J:^'.(V -...o •■• •;•:--• ».^ ;> --?«?* ^ -^ti^>0 

I fbel pieasectsftt'bdi^ «M>led to 4^,*^^lra«iit^lh«4Ebg8 
Anecdotes of 1iiB«Oii^Ttaie»,** iH^lrii^^^^ 
tlie MS. In tMr^J^ildn brtwb^Tid^s/^ftt^^^ 
his own accoun*iPof tW pd!)1icafloV o^^^ 
the Toast ig,^?mgj^r,'^%t Ifi^ ^ Injt^iiS^ 
I iu4jcsiichided the Becond. Boohv I laidLasidfe. Afe wortrand 1 
dU not Ulkm iToip^ifnii tfil^tomd jm^Mi^^ lilhe j^risaSnf 



"i ■«. 



. . Jit 



•■'-.A 






• n 



:.0 

^Nainre wQl ^Te her eoane^ tnd dull Books will be Ibrgofte^iii 
ppiteofBibliographerv/' ^^* 

CkmpbeU. '^^ 



-t 






•.-.■>r 



* I ' 



1 • .^ > '** 



Kli^Vii^yer i^n' piMitbed: I'haW indkie& ppbiekiefd^wflm 
ii^ki io wm plends, on' ^v\^ me their honour iha«^tiW)k 
^dttld not safferiliie books ta go oat of tbeir hands witkoiltlqi 
cf6nsent One'df these persons^ howev^> forfeited hit hofioilii 
ik th^ basest ntaniie^ by potting his copy into t&e'lMki4»^ 
hisAcovr, dnd the rest of the Oscfoid informers yhtK^ nM^ik&f 
had no^EV to the work^ and did not nnderstaad or^lduynr^iiqnil 
tb apply the characters^ they were content to caB it^inesbtit^ 
blc bookV and throw dirt at the Author t and thiis, in t&eit; jifa^ 
ttent^ is the inost efiectnal way of answering any porfoniaHoe 
ofifritand humonr."* v =^ u^ ,>1M 



' ••:••■// Oil 

■'•-.■.• j'->xc'? 

K$y to Smolktii History and Adventures of m^iom*' • 2,0i^ 

l2mo. Zfond, 1749. , >.v :.-.r.M/ 

The Adventures of an Atom exhibit under fictitioiia cba|»({t 
ters the conduct and dissensions of the several political pai^if 
in Great Britain^ from the commencement of the FriQncb HM 
in 1754, to the dissolution of Lord Chatham's Adniii4^tn(iti(M| 
iiiA76S* It is rather a Novel in form than in substances ,Th|e^ 
circumstances, are true in the main> though occasi^ally. es^a^ 
gerated by the flights of fancy, or obscured by the clopd^..^ 
pre^dice. " Smdlett seems/' says one of ^ hift Blqgraphernf 
** m this Work to have relaxed in his attachment to Lord fiifu^ 
asmuch as he -did in the Continuutio^ ^f Jm History. ^o^fjOfii, 
Chatham ; indeed he had been equally disappointed in hi|.^9«^ 

r 

. . I ' . , . . ' 

"' ■ in i ■ i J «ii»«ii t i l <i ■ • «i < 1 1 1 r <^— «— ^4»i»^ ' " ' J. < . ' » >')»»i l i* i')' | ■' 

'"^■^e "^Polxtital aftd Idt^aryAaecdotesiif'IuvOim^ Tildes. :Sy^0f^ 
VTi Kihf,'» ?6HB\9^ liOndb 181^. p; ^T^JkOi^ • ^ ^. v-.: <:„ a^M^ 



6 CONTENTS. 

Churchyardc's (T.) Works * .s *4 j6* 

CiiziSL, L'Infelice Amore di Ginlia e RomeOy 8ro. 1553 .^^ .f43> 
Collinses Families of Vere> CaTendish^ kc^ folio, 1762 » « 1 19) 
Court and Kitchen of Elizabeth Cromwell, 12iik>. 1064 : 9i^ 
Cowley 8 Poetical Blossoms, &c. 4to. 1633, &c.. ••.»,«•.« 79jf 

Anacreontic Odes on Gold, the Grasshopper, 

and the Epicure • • • • • • •«•»«. ^ .$)\ 

Cromwell the Perfect Politician, 8vo. 1680 « • «^ .. dl. 

Dance of Death (The History of) • . 2;f . 

Danse Macabre, 1485, &c * « ^ 2Qr 

-~— des Morts, 1744, &c v.. 23 

Darcie*8 Annalcs of Queeu Elizabeth, 1 625 ........ . • . ? 77 > 

Dee's (Dr. J.) Arte of Navigation, folio, 1557 . • ^ • • • -»/.» ,^9.i 

Demosthenis, Aldus, 1 504 32 

Taylori, 1748-57 V J^\ 

Bl Diablo Coivclo, 8vo. 1 646 ., fp7 

Drayton's (M.) Poly Oibion 73 

Queen Elizabeth's Prayer, or Boohe of Christian Piraiers *Yr 

Fazio Dita Mundi, 1474 .T^'W 

Fraunce's Countess of Pembroke's Ivy Church} Amj'iita*, ''^'■^*^ 

&c. 4to. 1591, &c 62 

Froissart Chroniques de JFrance, &c '. . . V '^2^ 

Froissart's Chronicles, Pynson, 1523> &c 30 

byJohnes ..:..; -^# 

Fuller's Worthies of England, folio, 1662, (Directk^ ^^^ *^ 

for Collating) .V. • ^ - . ' 9H^ 

Church History (plates in) ..,.#... 9fr 

Abel Redivivus (Collation of) i'^ 



A BIBLIOMANlAC'i>( LIBRARY. 117 

Gothama-baba George 2iid Lha-dobn Lanck^a 
Gfttt^MiP .r Wio^-B«dfor*e:arfcob^«fbb*7^.^ ' 'B^ t^Ap^^*^^ 

Geo. iu Cbief Earl of Loudon Lo Yaw Freocb 




Gio-Gio woTi* George SAa vi >.;?LI«r-tliftr^ --i^^CfcirffliHP^ 
Hy lab Bib ,i«^b .^-i^^* Ley-nab i'^f^hiiSgm'^^ 

Hob iWfci : ) vHoi>*Mikv f •Jiu.sKl^-Yawter (Geu.) aliaaidA 
He Rbumu ^Vfioire r Hotao -^^ '^ I^*l<^^^ h^uoAA 

HeU y otte, . fillibtt . . •< .'r- 'Mura^llarti'^ttWrayi^Bari?^ 
H^MMtf ,i>..: ui MiCmtagw .x.;. < J. >■ * »^MttAjfield <*^"^ 

Japan .dkitish £mpnpe^ Mantcfaoa :-•:** -^^'^ ^^ 

Japanese-,: ^ English. •.;/:.•- Taitart''^ TUifeijAi?'-"--^^^ 
Jedfi^i ,.v // Gertnauy. ^^ ; u. Myn Than >^ 'Mfeiien ^AoA-Bdi 
J^-on-i'] vfSirWvi^-^H. MonaTVmd;«*i^ ti^^aoSL 
Island t^: w.Cfqpe Breton -Meaco-'--'^^ (tJ^fiiAon 
Japa^Q9$^Comi!i£itrl of^LwdMi Kinkom-pooiE»«*)lii. OlftS^°^ 
Jan-ki-dtzin . »»»es . ISiphon ^^^€t^t SKfeAtf'^^H 

Jacko .vr>: . :: ' ^^ Nd>HHdl> < t *d: SB^^-^^-^ontt 

Kowkin ., ; B7r*f-y - (Mmirt^ ^^^arj ixobf^dmsD 

Nembuds-ju: » -> • i «^"53 

Ostrog ■ A%Btm ^^^n\^^ 

Om-bas ' *^0*fetif >^Tna;twO 
<Ild Rich Hag Duchesi^ i^^^ 
i,ic/7;5ll^lbro' ^'^^ 

Pekin Paris ^>v*«7<i3b^ 

Poi-ha8Mui'AkM»ti vmntr^ 

Phal Khn HawW ^* i-tmo") 
Pfcyll-Kt)B ' CoNflle -^ ^'i '^ » 
rpjaff.patti|j|ibgg'' ftraA' ^ ««^^ 



Koan 1 


Biffddock 


Ka-liff 


CUve 


Ka-ltitra'': s 


. Cfipa Breton 


Kunt^;A'Jtori. 


■Count Daun,' - 


Kho-rh« 


Goree "^ 


Kha^rfl ;.. 


>Ktt}l^l . f . 


Kbufltit Whang Cook 


Kc^H^wi. 


/Albemarle 


Kift-rc/^/.^ r 


e-j. } t- 


Kurd 


- . » ' • • 


J^atter s Post 


Strilv Hodgee 



S CONTBNfik 

Rabiitiii* (Bossy) Hist Amourease des Gaalas • • • 9i 

RdbUion de la Rivione des Amaiones^ p«r Oomberrills, 
1682 M 

Spint 6r6aal, Paris, i516a&d 1523 18 

SaUust, 4to. 1475 *•••• 15 

Sjipolachri Historic &c» Lyon, 1549. . • ^ • • * M 

Smith's (Capt. J.) History of Virginia, folio, 1624 75 

— ! Travels in Eorope, &c. 1680 ...... 77 

Spdlett*s Adventures of an Atom (Key to the Characters 

8pe9cer^s F^e Qtieene and other Wotks, 15^, 6x7. • • ^8 
Spoioe's Polymetis, folio, 1747 106 

Tonstalhis de Arte Supputandi, Pynson, 1522 36 

Towneky's Translation of Hudibras ..•• lift 

Virgim Opera, 1469 9 

Waller's (Edmd.) Poems, 1711 HK 



'# 



« . • 



The f^^mi^ PdrtCEOtsj :&6. shoald b(i^at|kitaii]#^|j||^^ 
above work> which was ^a^mpiled by d^UiiMI* ft the r^f§i^^^ 
Lady Oxford^ mother to the Duchess Dowager of.PrOrtJj^^p 

1. :}^dy£liz. Cavendish^ ^^ P^USf*^^ 

2. Wm. Cavendish, Duke of Newcastle * . « ; . .,^ ^ . j 25 

3. TVuDb of the Duke and Duchess of Newc^M^ljle ^^^ ■: » .* ./^ 

4. DeiHsil Barcm HolKs, of Meld . . . ^ . . , ,y . JM 

5. Tomb of John Hollis>Duke of Newcastle *. .j , ..j.^if^ 

6. Thos. Harlcy, Af Bramton Bryan . • -.t. ip tr^v /na 43f 

7. Sir Robert Harley, of ditto . . * . s • .•/) » irx -^Sf 
«i)£^'E,iHarley, Kat. . . ., , .= :.= ;. j ;^,. ,. , r 2Q^ 
9. Hon. E* Harley - • . . . .. - . ; . ,^ . )^ 

10. R. Harley, Esq. of Oxford, &c- . , ,,, - ' u ! .?il^ 
4:U £dw^ni. Earl of Oxford . . . » ;. ... . . 2}$ 

12. Horace* Lord Vere, of Tilbury , , * . . ^ j ^ ^ •'5!^ 



' 'o j.v"!? 



Tospnele}^ % French Translation of Builers Hudidr^, ' 
1 wish ;bef<pre^ concludiiig the present JourjB^y to corr]ect u 
error in iny former one, respecting this translation oi Huifi* 
bras. I tjiere .attributed it to Col. Francis Townelev, being 
misled l]|y T^ytler in his Essfy on Translation, and my erro^fu^ 
thejF <;^n6r|ned by Nicjiols ii^ his Biographical Anecdotes ,tf 
Hogartlj,:Siud by Ray in his History of the Rebellion,, 174^ 
but I n9W, &nd that it was /ohn and not Francis Towhel^yv 
who was author of this translation, and that he was tinfle to 
Charles Towneley, Esq. celebrated for his noble and elegant 
collection of Marbles. 

riNis. 



Hi ITOTICB. 



» Datu it praptfiag; and, if eDooangement be giveo, will 
pdMitli, A Thiid Jcnnej, comprising an enlarged and 
eoneeted editimi (being the third) of his Olio of BibUograpfai- 
eal aad Uterarjr Anecdotes and Memoranda, nniformly printed 
Irilh Us first and second '' Joomies nrand the Library of a 
nUiomraiac;' 



( 



Eecenify pubiiihed, price 3#. ejftra bourdt, 

WUtilnf (EH^anralriSf an) (ZTonttittrrums, 

Ti^ greaier part of wJdoh kaoe never be/are been pmblUked; 

WITH A 
PakFACE ON THE ANTIQUITY OP RIDDLES. 



^ Aad jnttly the wise man tliui pretch'd to uf all, 
** DefpiM toot the value of tfaingi that are smalL** 

Oid Ballad, 



printed for W. Datis, at the Bedford Library, 15, Sonthamp- 

ton Row, Rnssell Square. 



The Publisher considers this as a most acceptable pre- 
sent to the youth of both sexes, and has no hesitation in say- 
ing, that it is the most extensive and best Collection of Riddles, 
Charades, and Conundrums extant, the greater part now for 
the first time presented to the Public, by a Lady, and the re- 
mainder selected with the greatest care and attention, so as 
to render the entire Work an innocent exercise of ingenuity to 
youth, and a source of considerable amusement to the adult. 
He has also the gratification of being able to recommend it, 
as containing nothing that can raise a blush on the clietk, cr 

olTend the taste >|(1^ most fastidious female. 

% 

[tt. Taylor, P^iAl^r, I^;nb'» (uuH ait Pa«Mg<>, Ur«i L •!! $i|r.«rt. 



10 8BC0ND JOUBNBY ROUND 

sold it again to an EngliBb dealer in books for £60, and 
doobtless believed he had turned his Hock to Tery good account. 
I have nevertheless heard that the nobleman above alluded to 
did not obtain possession of this literary treasure for a less snm 
than ^$400." 

See the ValUcre Catalogae, No. 2432> where it sold for 
4101 Uvres. 



Bury CRickardi dej Phylohibllon de querhnonili Librorum 
ommibus Uterarum amatoribu9 perutUe, Ato, Spirit, 1473. 

Diit0. (Said to be prhr to tke edition above citfd*J 4io. 
Colen, 1473. 

The Editions of Paris, Frankfbrt, Leipsic, &c. are various, 

7^ Oxford Edition, 1599> is most known in this conntryj 
but is rare> like most of the other Editions. 

Copies of this curious book may be found in- most- of onr 
Public Libraries. 

The learned an4 munificent. Prelate^ whose patenval name 
W|LS Richard ,de AungerviUe^ but which he altere4.upoA taking 
religious orders to that of D^ Bury> from the plape of, his 
nativity^ founded a Public Library at Oxioxd,* for the bfinefit 
of the Students : having furnished, it with the best collection 
of Books then in England^ he wrote his PhilobjOblion, « Trea- 
tise conUdning Rul^s.fojr the management of the Library^ how 
the Books were to be pre8erved> and on what c4^iiditions. 
lent out to the Scholars. It is written^ according to Homejif 



i*M^ 



* Chalmers is in error tvheii he says lH mdH Oiliiilnidgfe^ 
f iBirodaction to Bibliography;. toL I |i».6IS»J 



'jr 






IS mcoND jouBMSY %wnm 

Cor Aullior wtt appointed Biskop of Duliani in 13d3>. 
Lord TVeamnrer of Engkiid in 1344. His Book relatei tke 
meaavres ke took to gratify kia fimmnte pM8ion> tke lofe of 
books ; whilst Treasurer and Chancellor of England be took 
kis perquisites and new year*s gifts in books s and by Edward 
tke Tkird's flavor rummaged the Libraries of tke principal nett, 
and brought to light many books which had been locked up for 

At Avignon^ in the year 1331, aqiong tke distingnished and 
learned men with whom Petrarch became acquainted, Rickari^/ 
4e Bury is tkus characterized by the Author of the life 61 
Petrarch. 

^ One of these ypas Richard of Bury or Aungerville, who 
came to Arignon this year. He was sent thither by Edward- 
tl»^ Third, bis Pupil and his King. Edward wrote a letter to- 
the Pope, recommending to him in particular Richard of BuFy> 
and Anthony of Besanges, whom he had sent with an eoH' 
bassy to his Court. Richard of Bury had a piercing wit, s^ 
cultivated understanding, and an eager desire after every kilid- 
of knowledge. Notkhig could satisfy tkis ardour, no obstade^ 
could stop its progress* He bad given himself up to study • 
from his youth. His genius thr^ H^t on the darkest, and kb 
penetration ^Etthomed the deepest, subjects. He was passion-* 
ately fond of books; ai^d laboured ^fi bis life to collect tke 
largest library at tkat time in Europe. A inan of such merit, 
apd the Minister and favorite of the King of England, was r^-^ 
ceivod with every mark of distinction in tke society of Cardinal 
Colonna/' 

His stay at Avignon was short : Edward, who could not do 
without him, recalled him to England soon after. On his 



A BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBRABY. 13 

rstinm he possessed all the confidence and favor of his Mas- 
ter^ who first ma& him Bishop of Dnrhanij Chancellor the year 
f<pllQWuig, then High Treasurer^ and Plenipotentiary for a treaty 
€^ .peace with FVance. 

. JUcbard of Bury did in Dngland what Petrarch did in 
FiiOKieeji Ualy> and Gerinanyj he gave much of his attention^ 
aikd spait ^at part of his fortune, to discover the manu- 
scripts of ancient Authors, and have them copied under hin 
iiafl[iediate inspection, and kept binders, illuminatorSi and wri- 
ters in his palaces. Richard in his Philobiblion, a Treatise. 
\rhich: he wrote on the love and choice of^books, relates the 
incredible e3cpense he was at to form his famous Library, nots 
wilfhstaiidii^ be maile use of the authority which his dignity 
and ^Mror with the King procured him. He mentions the arts 
he wasi obliged to .use to compass hia design, and informs us 
that the first Hebrew and Greek Grammars that ever appeared 
wcare dcarived firom his labours. He had them composed for 
the En^Usb students f persuaded that without the knowledge: 
of .these two JangiiageSi and especially the Greek, it was 
impossible to understand the principles of either the ancient 
Heathen or Christian Writers. Richard de Bury died in 
1345i.,and is said to have possessed more books than all tiie 
Bishops.; of England together* Besides the fixed Libraries 
which h« had fornied in his several Palaces, the floor of hl« 
common apartment was so covered with books that those who 
entered could not with due reverence approach his presence. < 

,3ot^ some further curious particulars in. the new edition of 
Wartons History of English Poetry, vol. i. 8vo. p. cxlvii,.&c; 



14* WGONB /OURNEY ItOIHfD ' 

» ■■■ 

Fagio Dita MwuH. Fofio. 1474. 

Ackardf in his ComrM de BibHograpkle, torn. iii. p. 191^' 
))lace8 this amongst the Poemei Sclentifiguei, and trmtn wiMA 
inspection of a fine copy in the VvbUc Libnury at Mairseillis^ 
plames himself upon being the first Bibliogn^pher who hm 
accurately doscribed it. I shall content myself by girkig Hi 
title firom Achard^ and adding a few iniscellaneoos remnAx, 
omitting some of his details, as of little general interest. Itff* 
title js as follows : 

Incommxa el Libra prhno DUa Mmndi eump<m»to*per Fmiib 
D\ Gl Uberti da Firenxa. Et prima de la huena ^ t tp o M ime 
rke egR ebe odretarM da gli f^itii ei 4agmre ie f ^irhde i 
CapUuolo prima. 

Each foUowing chi^yter is headed by its argnmeBt, with 'its' 
number in Roman figores, and the whole work is printed is' 
doable columns. It is not paged, neither has it ootchwofdi. 
It has signatures only to the gatherings, whidi be^n witi^ 
a, and extend to and comprise the letter a; thjBSe gatherings are' 
all of eight leaTCs, excepting n, which oniy has six, and -», 
which only comprises 4 leaves. 

It is remarkable that the signatures of the gatherings are 
entirely at the bottom of the page, Uierefore if the book- 
binder happen to be at all liberal in the application of hie 
knife — the signatures must be found wanting. 

Payne's Catologue for 1801 refers for an account of tliis 
AVork to the Irish Philosophical Transactions by Lord 
C'harlemont. 

In book iv. cap. xxiii. of Dila Mundk there is an account of 
u nation of tailed men^ and it is well known that Lord Monboddo 



A iraUIOMANIA€!S l^ll^AftV. IS 

bdk^ed in ihb fexistende of such a lOice.* Jean Strays^ 
Voyages in M«so6i»e> &c. positively asserts that he saw a 
racei«tf men an Formosa with tails. 

In Bnlwer s Artificial Changling> scene 22 relates to tailed 
nations and breech gallantry. 

A copy of this rare first edition sold at the Valliere sale for 
480l&an68. lii.t:JreVenWs for 136 francs. Knelli's, 1789-90, 
for ^. We. : at(d ^FlbncieVs, which, lux;ording to JBmnet, was 
a very beantifid copy, foV ^06 'fitihcs 5— arid '* thereby hangs 
a ttile^rfi tdft it.'* !Fl6ndel% '<^y, acc6rdi«(g to the Abb^ 
St. Lc^i^t Ho loiter exists. -An English amatetir ha\^g 
CMKftussi^iied sMne one to buy it for hita %t^(mt ibdng the 
piic^ ikeb6o\i was run tip to the ehorm<yns sum of 800 francs, 
at which price it was purchased for him, but when he rec^ved 
it ^e was ^ ii^teited at having been made t6 pay so deaily for 
his lii>Uy, tfattt-he thpew the book ^t of sopite into the fire. 
" Happily/* says the quizzical French Bibliogri^pher, ^^ En^ish 
Bibliomaniacs do not act so spitefully now a days for so 
triiUng a matter, otherwise at the prices which they give for 
rare. Books, it might be expected that entire Libraries would 
share the fate of the Dita Mundi.** 



Saliust. 4/0. F'alentits. 14/5. 

Unnoticed by Dibdin. Beloe says it is by far the tares! of 
all the editions of Sallnst. 

Valentia vras the first place in Spain where the art of 

Piinting was introduced. The names of the Printers were 

* S(B6 Ancient Metaphysics ToU til. p. 35Q« 4ta 1784. 
•\ See Birunet Manuel du Libpaire, torn. ii. p. 12. 



l^\ s$co^n jcnmvEY ^bm^qi. ^ 

AloBZO,aQ4feniandez.cl£ CcvdoTa u^hmhatjf^ikaut, TUar 
Sallimt wa9 t^ secom) book there priateiby these Printers. 
Accordiijlg^.to Bdoe, iy. 70. there was a oopy of it attMasi^ 
heim. » 



. /: 



Ckronigiies (lei GrandetJ de France depuis hi Troienijui^^^ 

fa mart de Charlei VIL en 1461. 3 Um^foho, . 

Parli^ Poiq. Banhamme. 1476* 

These Chronicles are kiiowii under the mwe oC ^' Cjkrp* ., 
niq^pi ^ Saint Denyi;* and this edition, which jb| the£ra|b» ia^,, 
also thc^ first book known to have been printed at Faris ^th,! ^ 
the date added. A detailed description of the book may be . 
seen in Brunefs Manuel^ torn. i. p. 394. 

Count Mc Carthy bought his copy at the Valliere sa)e fo^ . 
300 francs — and at Count Mc Carthy's sale the same copy jjBfOr. \ 
dttced 500 francs^ 



I ,' 



Chroniqvei de Norman^. Foiio, Reuen. 1487.^ 

Very rare, and the first known book printed at Ronen witb 
a date— ^ the Litre C&uetumer de Normandie, in folio dated 
1483, has no name of place, and perhaps its date is that ol 
its composition. 

See Bumet Manuel da Libraire, torn. i. p. 477. 



A SflBLfOlilAMAC^S LIBRAltr. If 

Gdwer (JohmyCmfmm Amitniiviy that w to 9aye in BnglSuie, 
the Conftmfon of the Lover, Folio. Emprt^nted at 
Wekmestre by JVyllyam Cojpton, (1493 by mistake for) 
1483. 

West, 1773, 9/. 9». Daly, 1792, 15/. 7*. \d. Gulston, 

Ti, 10«. Mason, 1807, (first and last leaves wanting,) 15/. 15«« 

Dnke of Roxbnrghe 336/. bongbt by tbe Dnke of Devon- 

8liire. Meriy Library, 315/. bought by the Marqois of Bland- 

A^rd, at whose sale, after he became Dnke of Marlborough, it 

^old for 205/. 16^. to Watson Ta^^or, Esq.5 and when this 

1. 9MterGentleman*8 Library was brought to the hammer in 1823, 

^^liis ^iftme book, being found to be imperfect, only sold for 

-S7M5jr. 

It may amuse to learn Heame*s opinion of the value of the^ 

1^Ia(rle2aBl eopy, which is described as an extraordinary fedr one. 

IHeame never daw so complete a book of this edition, and 

'fclought it worth more than Two Guineas ! ! ! Frognall Dibdin 

enthusiastically adds, ** twenty times two guineas could not 

^ww procure a perfect copy.'* 

On this piece, says Warton, Gower*s character and reputa* 

^'on as a Poet arc almost entirely founded. His French Son* 

^ets, according to Campbell in his Essay on English Poetry, 

tP- 74,) are marked by elegance and sensibility,* and his^ 

English Poetry contains a digest of all that constituted the 

'^'^owledge of his age. His cotemporaries greatly esteemed 

"^«ia 5 and the Scottish as well as English Writers of thesubse* 

iT^ent period, speak of him with unqualified admiration. 



"^ Mr. Todd hai transcribed some of them firom the original MSft.- 
*^ the Marquis of Stafford's Library. See his ^lustrations of Gower 
^^'ad Chaucer, p. 102 to 108. 



tt MCOMP ./OUBK£T .ttOm» ^ 

fiolh Wartoii and Campbell hMve doWikd Kbe fJui.Md 
CBecataon of the Cmtfemo AmmUit, and i?Ucb tke laMr viys 
if peculiarly ill contiiyed. 

A lover, whose case has not a particle of interest, ap^fes 
aoooidiag to the Catholic ritual to a Confessor, who, at .Ae 
saaie time, whimsically etioqgh, bent the addifeienal diameter 
of a Pagan Priest of Venns, and fike-the Myitagogoe in the 
Pielare of Cebes, is called Genius. The IM^ Fath^, il^is 
trae, speaks like a good Christian, and coinmtaicales miHre 
scandal abont the intrigues of Venns than Fsgan Avthor 
efer told. A prete!ct is afibr^d by the cetemoney «f con- 
fession, lor the Priest not only to ibitiaibe liis Papil inthe.dnties. 
of a lover, but iu the wide range of ethical and {^ysical 
knowledge 3 and at the mention of every virtue and vice, a tale 
i9 introduced by way of Ukistration. Does tiie Confessor 
wish to warn the Lover against impertinent cmioedty^ . He 
introduces a propos to that fialiug, the HirtcNry of Act8eiMi» of 
peeping memory. The Confessor inquires if he is addicted io . 
a vain glorious disposition; because if he is» he can telllum a 
story about Nebuchadnezzar. Does he wish to hear of the virtue 
of conjugal patience ? it is aptly inculcated by the anecdote 
respecting Socrates, who^ when he received the contents of 
Xantippe*s pail upon his head replied to the provocation only 
by a witticism. Thus with dirieving narrations, and. didactic 
speeches, the work is extended to thirty thousand lines, in 
the course of whidi the virtues and vices are all fcgulstly 
allegorized.* 

The Confessio Amantu (says Wartcm) was written at the 
command of Richard 2d, who» meeting our Poet GoviPer 



^1^^— ^. I mmmm^mmmmttrnt^m 



V Campbell's EssajT. 



^mkig^mt Mb mmes near Iwdoi^ iiinted liim iiitb<lbe 

$fime ftew thing"* 

-^£kM)i«r*i' pwtiookuringAelXsftys Warton) appearsto luui3e>boeft 
JMiti i^f MeDaW'i?aiiui««r J^ Z0 Rote, He toi> h«weiroi^< 
aeidMi flittei^pted^ 4» iioitafte the piotiueBqiia iiDageriei» ^ad-t 
€^relNU¥e ^Qfsomficiatioiia^ lof /that ^MjusBite attegiaiqi^: Hit^ 
B^^at atrikiQg p<»foaita, wbidi yet ase oenoeived mJth aio fpovf'* . 
en #f creati0Di> «er liduieated with any fertility of feiKS|r> <«» 
idle&ea)B> avtipnce^ michene or thieving, and ne^igeace-the Bdore- 
taiy of sloth. Instead of boldly dothing these qualities wiA 
c«r{Ki«eai attribateB, a|>tly : and poetically imagined, he coUly, 
yet ^(onsibly^ deserihes ^eir operations and enumerates thcit^ 
properties. .1 • ^. 

What Gower wanted in invention he supplied fi^om* hitr: 
eoinmon-plaoe Book, which appears to have been stored with' 
aninedumstible fund of instructive maxims, pleasant Bavrar 
tioiiB, and philosophical definitions. It seems to have, bees 
Us object to croud all hb eradition into this elabinrate perfona 
aaee ; and there is often some degree of contrivance and art m 
his manner of introducing and adapting sulijects of a ¥ery dis*^. 
tant natUTBi and whidb are totally foreign to hia general design^ 
Considered in a general view, the ' C&nfeuio Amaw^ may 
be pronounced to be no unpleadng miscellany of those shorter 
tales which delighted the readers of the middle age. 

The only Classics wliich our Author cit6s are Virgil, Ovid, 
Horace, and Tully. Amidst his grave Literature, he appeavB 
to have been a great reader of Romances.^ 
Ilie Rev. }Ar. Todd, in his Account of tiie Lives and Wri* 



■ f o* « i f i > I I > i lt* ifK ii r . .<. I . . .lAiii . 



VMWMM4MV* 



* W«Pt6«. 



S COMTBHtS. 



Mbntiiit (Biisty) HiftAnooieiisedetOnki ••••••.. 9f 

lUhtion de k Riviero des Amtmonn, fut OoBbenrills, 

1682 m 

Sfttiik Gr^aal, Pkris, 1516atid 1523 S8 

Sdfaitt, 4to. 1475 15 

Sinobchri Historii^ &c Lyon, 1549;..^.; 26 

Smith's (Capt. J.) History of Viigiiiia, Mo, 1624 .... 75 

Travels in Europe, &c 1680 •.4... 77 

Spdlett's Adventores of an Atom (Key to the Cbancters 

8pmer*s Fi»rie Qtreene and oih^ WofJbs, 15^, &eV. . . ^ 
6penoe*s Pcdymetis, folio, 1747 • 105 

■ • • • • • 

Tonstallns de Arte Snppntandi, Pynson, 1522 36 

Towneley's Translation of Hndibras 119i 

Virgilii Opera, 1469 9 

Waller s (Edmd.) Poems, 1711 1^ 



"If 



. . ) 





?.'^<'T> ^ ..• 


* 




... ^' ■ •*; ^ : ^ "- ■'■■■ 




<j8 




. 4 < 

i. I 


It 


SECOMD 

* • 

JOURNEY 





ROUND 



|l ifil^Itonraniat'i^ S^tlitrars^ 



•A'l 



"/ 



Virgllu Opera, Folio. Printed by SweynJ^im and Pannartz 

at Rome. 1469. - O ;;V3:;!iV 

Of this edition of tbie Mantuan Bard, which Beloe calla 

MMo Princeps, he, in his Anecdotes of Xii^ntttire/Vd.'*7r^f^ 

85^tells the following amusing anecdote. 

'' It seems that a copy was discovered in a Monastery in 

^%&iabia, whence it has found its way into the coHection of a 

' Noble Earl. The anecdote which belongs to it is rather lu- 

<iicrous.' The good Monks to whom this and other valuable 

l>poks belonged were not, it seems, to be prevailed upon by 

ti&oney to part with them. It happened however that they 

^ere remarkably fond of old hock, and for as much of this 

same hock as was worth seven guineas^ they parted with this 

Virgil to a kind friend and acquaintance, lliis gentleman 

B 



10 8BC0ND JOURNBY ROUKD 

sold it again to an English dealer in books for iS50, and 
doobtless believed he had turned his Hock to rery good account. 
I have nevertheless heard that the nobleman above allnded to 
did not obtain possession of this literary treasure for a less mm 
than ^6400." 

See the Vallicre Catalogue^ No. 2432> where it sold for 
4101 livres. 



Bury (Jlichardi de) Phylobiblion de querhnofdu Librorum 
omnibus liter arum amaiortbus per utile. Ato, Spine, 1473. 

D^t0. f Said to be prior to tie edition above' ckifd*J 4lp. 
Colen, 1473. 

The Editions of Paris, Frankjhrt, Lelpslc, &c. are varions, 

7%e Oxford Edition, 1599> is most known in this country^ 
but is rare, like most of the other Editions. 

Copies of thi^ cur|ous book may be. found in most of oor 
Public Libraries. 

The learned an^ munificent. Prelate, whose. paterjuJ, name 
W|is Richard ,de Aungeryillei but which he altered!. upon taking 
religious orders to that of, D^ Buryi from th/e, plape of, his 
nativity, founded ar PuUlic Library, at Oxford/ for the benefit 
of the Students : having furnisheid.it with the best cpllectioft 
of Books then in England, he wrote his PhilobM>lion^ a Tretir 
tise containing Rql^s.fo^ the mimagement of the Library, how 
the Books were to be preserved^ and on what of^Mlitiona. 
lent out to the Scholars. It is written, according to .HQriie^j[; 



■ 1 I ■ ' r 111 r, T i fT- , ■ 



* Ohalmeri is in error tvhsttke says HifmdiA OitaiKri^^ 
f latrodaction (o Piblipgra|»liy>. toL \, f..bX9^ 



m^e^fWUfontM Latm> in a^dedainatory styie, and is <tivhled 
uitio-twealy (%apters. 

'" lift clia|)ter T the Author pi'alses Wi&don^, and the Books ib 
Hifficli it is contained. 

2. That Books are to be preferred to Riches and Pleasing. ' 

3^ Tliat thfey onght always to be bought. 

4. How much good arises from Books^ aad that th^ abfe 
only misused by ignorant people. 

5. That good Monks write Books^ whilst bad' ones are 
differently employed. 

6. The praise of the antient begging Priars, with a reproof 
of the modem ones. 

7. He bewails the loss of Books by fires and wars. 

'8. Me 'shews what fine opportunities he had of collecting' 
iftbbkis while he wias Chancellor and Treasurer^ as^ weU aS dur- 
ing his Embassies. 

9. That the antients surpassed the moderns in hard sttidyibg. 

10. That learning arrives at perfection by degireesj and'tKat' 
t^ hkd procured a Greek and Hebrew Grammar. 

11. llbat the Law and Law fiooks are hot properly le^min^^ 

12. Hie' usefiilness and nex^ssity of Gramtniu'. 

I3l An Apology for Poetry, and the usefiilness' of it. 

14. Who ought to love Books. 

15. The manifold advantages of Learnitjg. 

16. Of writing new Books and mrending oM ones. 

17. Of u$ing Books well, andin whatmahher they shottld be 
{i^ed. 

18. An Answer to his Calumniators. 

1 9i 0|ii what eonditio&s Books are t» be lent to stnmgert; 
^0, GondaBion, 

b2 



IS 88C0ND JOUBMBY ROVHD 

Our Author wm ap|K>iiited Bishop i^ Dorinm in 1333,. 
Lord IVeamirer of Engbuid in 1344. His Book relates the 
measures he took to gratify his &?oiirite passion, the loveof 
books ', whilst Treasurer and Chancellor of Etigland he took 
his perquisites and new year*s gifts in books $ and by Edward 
the Third's ftivor niminftged the Libraries of the principal mtA, 
and brought to light many books which had been locked up for 
ages. 

At Avignon, in the year 1331, aqiong the diis^gnished wid 
learned men with whom Petrarch became acquainted, Richai4[' 
4e Bury is thus characterized by the Author of the life of 
Petrarch. 

^ One of these i^ras Richard of Bury or Aungerville, who . 
came to Avignon this year. He was sent thither by Edward- 
tl>^ Third, his Pupil and his King. Edward wrote a letter to- 
the PopCy recommending to him in particular Richard of Bupy> 
and Anthony of Besanges, whom he had sent wHh an eiBK 
bassy to his Court. Richard of Bury had a piercing ¥fit, it 
cultivated understanding, and an eager desire alter every kind- 
of knowledge. Nothing could satisfy this ardour, no obstacle' 
could stop its progress^ He had given himself up to study ^ 
from his youth. His genius threw Hght on the darkest^ and his 
penetration fathomed the deepest, subjects. He was passi^^n** ' 
ately fond of books 5 apd laboured ^ his life to collect the 
largest library at that time in Europe. A man of such mteril^ 
apd the Minister and fovorite of the King of England, was t^^ 
ceivcd with every mark of distinction in tke society of Cardinal 
Colonna." 

Hjs stay at Avignon M^as short : Edward, who could not do 
without him, recalled him to England soon after. On his 



A BIfiLIOHANUC'S LiBRABT. 13 

rstara he possessed 2SI the confidence and favor of his Mas- 
ter^ who first made him Bishop of Durham^ Chancellor the year 
f^^Jowing, then High Treasurer^ and Plenipotentiary f<»- a treaty 
ol.peace mth fVance. 

JUichard of Bury did in England what Petrarch did in 
'Fmoce^Uaiy, and Germany j he gave much of his attention^ 
and spoit great part of his £6rtnne> to discover the manu* 
scripts of ancient Authors, and have them copied under hi« 
i«Q«iediate in8pection> and kept binders, illuminators, and wri* 
ters in his pakces. Richard in his Philobiblion, a Treatise. 
\fhich- he wrote on the love and choice of books, relates the 
incredible expense he was at to form his famous Library^ nots 
wilihstaiidii^ he made use of the authority which his dignity 
and iavor with the King procured him. He mentions the arts 
he wa8><^liged to. use to compass his design, and informs us 
that the first Hebrew and Greek Grammars that ever appeared 
wcare dcarived finom his labours. He had them composed for . 
the Ei^Ush students ^ persuaded that without the knowledge : 
of these two languages^ and especially the Greek, it was . 
impossible to. understand the principles of either the ancient 
Heathen or Christian Writers. Richard de Bury died in 
1346i .and is said to have possessed more books than all tike 
Bishops w of England together. Besides the fixed libraries 
which he, had fom^d in his several Palaces, the floor of his 
comsAon apartment wiis so covered with books Uiat those who 
entered could not with due reverence approach his presence. <^ - 

.(Se^QOmefiirther on'ious particulars in. the new edition of 
Wartons History of English Poetry, vol. i. 8vo. p. cxlvii, &c; 



^ • f 



'-/•^ 



*'N«tve win hKft her Mon^ Mid chdl Bookf will he hrgMttiih 
ipiteofBibliognplieni'* ^* 



-. 1 



I 



• ■' 



. ■ ■ ) 



> ■» 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAOK« 

Acuna Descubrimiento de las Amazonas^ 4to. 1641 ..•• 84 

Annalia Dubrensia, 4to. 1 636. ••.. 85 

Arnolde's Chronicle • • 35 

Arthur (Kynge) and his Knyghtes, Caxton, 1485 28 

Barksdale's Nympha Libethris^ 12mo. 1651 87 

Baron s Cyprian Academy, 8vo. 1 647 83 

Pocula Castalia, 1 650 84 

BasQentinus*s Free Will, a Tragedy^ 4to .•.••••«• «<w • ' 57 

Bateman s Travayled Pilgrim, 1569 .........; 51 

Bible (First Protestant) 1535 37 

(First edition of Luther's) 1541 38 

(Bill and Barker s) Bunyan's copy, with account of 

Bunyan « 38 

Blanchardyne (King) and Princess Eglantine, Caxton, 1 485 28 

Boccius*s Boke of Consolation, 1525 37 

Borders Book of Knowledge, &c. , 43 

Braceili Bizarie di Varc Figure, 1624 77 

Brusonii Facetiarum, folio, 1518 ^ 34 

Bry (De) Peregrinationum, &c. 1590-1634, folio 60 

Bury (De) Phylobiblion, 1473 10 

Carmeliani Carmen, 4to. Pynson 32 

Cases (J.) AngeUcal Guide, 8vo. 1697 101 

Chroniques de France, 1476 16 

de Normandie, 1487 16 



6 CONTENTS. 

PAC«. 

Chorchyardcs (T.) VVorka ^.^..., . .% *^ .A* 

Glizia^ L*Infelice Amore di Ginlia e Romeo, 8to. 1553 4 :« . hKji 
Collinses Families of Vere, Carendish, &c« fblio, 17$2 a • I U? 
Court and Kitchen of Elizabeth CroinweIl> 12iik>. 1664 . 90i 
Cowley 8 Poetical Blossoms^ &c. 4to. 1633, ix.. ... •.» • ..,-7fb 

Anacreontic Odes on Gold> the Grasshopper, 

and the Epicure « i^i, v ,^\\ 

Oomwell the Perfect Politician, 8vo. 1660 ^-^91- 

Dance of Death (The History of) ^i^^ 

Danse Macabre, 1485, &c 2^j 

-— --desMorts, 1744, &c •••.. 53 

Darcie's Annalcs of Queen Elizabeth, 1 625 ......•...», ^1 

Dee's (Dr. J.) Arte of Navigation, folio, 1557 . • ^ • • • -^.•.i ,^fi 

Demosthenis, Aldus, 1 504 - 32 

' — Taylori, 1748-57 V- Ma 

El Diablo Coivelo, 8vo. 1 646 ••••-. Tt 3J 

Drayton's (M.) Poly Olbion 73 

Queen Elizabeth's Prayer, or Boohe of Christian PraieriT *ifr 

Fazio Dita Mundi, 1474 .••...•/. '^^-'W 

Fraunce' s Countess of Pembroke's Ivy Church i An^^iita^,' ''^'>^ 

&c. 4to. 1591, &c 62 

Froissart Chroniques de JFrance, &c .•-....'...'•' *29^ 

Froissart's Chronicles, Pynson, 1523, &c 30 

_^ by Johnes .' . .'. '^"S^ 

Fuller's Worthies of England, folio, 1662, (Direfciiwhi -^^^'^ 

for Collating) '.'. • i - . ' 9^^ 

Church History (plates in) ..,.#..; 9fr' 

Abel Redivivus (Collalion of) i^^ 



*^ * ' PACK. 

Qmiiige'8me.aivEkI>fl0t]i». 4teu ld6l<4. . •^^.i.^.^^^^^^^.^KBb 
GMwiaft >^;)/tftuhBir tbeJMflMK. 8m. Lfi^.. . .« .<i.. ... \«R 

0»ein?ilte's (8ir R.) Briefe Report of Virginia, Mo> 1^90 51 ^ 
0l^8tofie*-s- (Lord) LawyerVPortnne. • . • ^ • , . . • 103^ 

MiQ*B (Jor.) Discovery of a New^l^^l(^ 8vo; • • • i . . . • ® 

- .rr , -Virgedfaaiarittm? 12iiio. 1597-15^ .*•.*♦ W 

Htoay^ (Patridi) Niglitingrite^ &c: 9va. 1^2 72" 

Heiame^ (T.y Acta Apostrionim, ^o. 1715 ....,=.. -.'.Itrt^ 
J^eywood'fi (J.) Spider-and Fiie and other Works, 15^6- 

\t62, &c... 

3Htok>l6B^*» Ecclesiastical Politie,- Mo; 1 728 ...,., ^ ... 158* 

It^owleglas (Merie Jests of) • • 46-- 

3K&g« (Ehr;) Toast; (Key to- the Characters in)- wilfih - 
N^racts .....,..• 1^8* 

let's Junius Brutus's Defence of Liberty, 4to. 1648 88 



:uM 



i 3 



liador, or the Knight of the Sun of Gold 31 

^Wolierpy v(pei^vres de) 97, 



i ■ ■ , 



L.' 



^cc Wanton, (Interlude of ) 4to. 1560..... 52^ 

^Usgrave's Eclaircissement de la Langue Francoise, 1530 40 

l^erraidt, Homi]|ies Illustres, folio, 1696-1700 ...,.,,. 100, 

^^)Qi;rto, (L.) Romeo e Giulietta • 4^ 

'"^ La Ginlietta, 1539 . . , , ... 43 



" I • 



S COMTBHtS. 

Mmtiiif (Bvssy) Hiit Anooreiise det OwAm ••••••. 

Rdskion de k Rifiero des AmaioiMS, fv Gombemlk, 

1682 m 

Sfdnk Gr^aal, Faiin, 1516atid 1523 S8 

Sdfaitt, 4to. 1475 ....• 15 

Simladiri Hi8t<»rii^ &c Lyon, 1549...^.. M 

Smith's (Capt. J.) History of Viiginia, Mo, 1624 ... . 75 

.- TrBTelsin Europe, &c 1680 •.4... 77 

SiMdIett's Adventures of an Atom (Key to the Cbaracters 

8petteer*s Fserie Qtieene and other Wcftlbk, 1590, &e« • • • SS 

6peiioe*s Pcdymetis, folio, 1747 106 



Tonstalhis de Arte Snppatandi, Pynson, 1522 36 

Tawneley's Translation of Hndibras 119 

Virgilii Opera, 1469 9 

Wallers (Edmd.) Poems, 1711 1^ 






II 

1 *.■•,.•''.* 






•• • 1 



,i»i*t>'i.) ;\'^w, V. 






?:*. SECOND ^.,a r..u«i 



•^ ':-^ 



JOURNEY . -^^^^^^^ 



ROUND 



.' 






I r 




mWotttmiiut'^ WLfbvnxS^ 



••c* 




"^liii Opera. Folio. Printed by SweynJ^eim and Pannartg 

at Rome. 1469. ■ ..\)> u/h^-nV 

this edition of the Mantuan Bard> which Beloe calla 

io Priuceps, he, in his Anecdotes of Literutfire> Vd.*?.-^^ 

^tells the following amnsing anecdote. 

'' It seems that a copy was discovered in a Monastery in 

ia, whence it has found its way into the collection of a 

^>ble EarL The anecdote which belongs to it is rather lu- 

^nrous' The good Monks to whom this and other valuable 

^^t^ks belonged were not, it seems, to be prevsuled upon by 

*^oney to part with them. It happened however that they 

^^ere remarkably fond of old hock, and for as much of this 

^Bme HOCK as was worth seven guineas, they parted with this 

Virgil to a kind friend and acqusdntance. lliis gentleman 

B 




10 SECOND JOUBNEY ROUKD 

sold it again to an EngUsb dealer in books for i650, and 
doubtless believed be had turned bis Hock to rery good aocoant. 
I have nevertheless heard that the nobleman above allnded to 
did not obtain possession of this literary treasure for a less sum 
than 4^400." 

See the V^alUcre Catalogue, No. 2432> where it sold for 
4101 livres. 



Bury (Rtckardi de) Phyloh\hllon de querltnomli Ltbramm 
omnibus liter arum amatoribu9 per utile. Ato, Splr^e. 1473. 

Ditto, f Said to be prior to tie edition above cii^d^J 4lo. 
Coien. 1473. 

The Editions of Paris, Frankfbrt, Leipslc, &c. are various. 

T%e Oxford Edition, 1599> is most known in this country^ 
but is rare, like most of the other Editions. 

Copies of this curious book may be found in most- of oar 
Public Libraries. 

The learned an^ niunihcent. Prelate, whose, paterjial name 
W9B Richard ,de Aungeryille> but which he altered upo^n t^ng 
religious orders to that of D^ B^uy, from th^e^ plape of, his 
nativity, foupded a Public Library, at Oxfoird,f for the benefit 
of the Students: having furnisheid.it with the best cpllectio^n 
of Books then in England, he wrote his Philob^lion, a Tr^ 
tise containing Rql^s.fc^ the management of the Library, how 
the Books were to be preserved^ and on what o^foditions. 
lent out to the Scholars. It is written, according to Honu^j[; 

* Chalmen is in error tvlteii he says H jndiA Ctftnlnrid^ 
f latroctoction to 9iMtpgraidiy>. ToLj. iw.6l^' 



'Mf : veiy^iRdifibrew^ Latiin> m » declamatory style, and is divided 
^«tK> ^twenty (%apteni. 

tiri <;liapte^ T the Author praises Wisdom, and the Books ih 

it is cohtdned. 
2« Tliat Books are to be preferred to Riches and Pleasure. 
3.' Hiat th^y Ought always to be bought. 
^^ How much good arises from Books, and that thtey H^ 
misused by ignorant people. 
. That good Monks write Books, whilst bad* ones are 
ferently employed. 
G . The praise of the antient begging Friars, with a reproof 
^^ tlie modern ones. 

^. He bewails the loss of Books by fires and wars. 

>. Me ishews what fine opportunities he had of collecting 
>kis wMle he was Chancellor and Treasurer, as weU as dur- 
his Embassies. 
^. That the antlents surpassed the moderns in hard studying. 

10. That learning arrives at perfection by dcgireeisi and that' 
hkd procured a Greek and Hebrew Grammar. 

11, ThAt the Law and Law Books are not properly le&ming^ 
. 12l The' usefulness and necessity of Grammsu". 

131 An Apology for Poetry, and the usefulness of it. 

14. Who ought to love Books. 

15. The mailifold advantages of Learnitig. 

16. Of writiiig new Books and mending old ones. 

17. Of using Books well, and in what manner they shoiild be 
Ib^^fficeS. 

18. An Answer to his Calumniators. 
\% Oil what conditiens Books are t& be lent to strangers^ 
?0, Gondosion, 

b2 



IS acmw JCHFBMBT monvD 

Our Antlior wm ap^iiiM Bitkop d Dutem hi 1333,. and* 
Lord TVeamnrer of Engkud in 1344. Hit Bodk f^datM tlM 
meatnres he took to gratUy kis firronnte pMtioii, tko kuve of 
books; whilst Treasurer and Chancellor of fitogland kotook 
his perquisites and new yearns gifts in books $ and by Edward 
the Third's fiivor nimmaged the Libraries of the principal nea> 
and brooght to light many books which had been locked up for 

At Avignon, in the year 1331, aiyiong the distingoished and 
learned men with whom Petrarch became acquainted, Richard 
do Bary is thos characterized by the Author of tho life of 
Petrarch. 

^ One of these y^ta Richard of Bury or Aungerville, who 
came to Avignon this year. He was sent thither by Edward 
tl^ Third, his Pupil and his King. Edward wrote a letter to 
tfae P6pey recommending to him in particular Richard of Bury, 
and Anthony of Besanges, whom he had sent wHh an em* 
bassy to his Court Richard of Bury had a piercing wit, « 
cultivated understanding, and an eager desire after every Idud 
of knowledge. Nothing could satisfy this ardour, no obstacle 
could stop its progress* He had given himself up to study ' 
from his youth. His genius threw light on the darkest, and hit 
penetration fathomed the deepest, subjects. He was passipn-* 
ately fond of books $ ai^d laboured ^ his life to collect the 
largest library at that time in Europe. A man of such merit, 
apd the Minister and favorite of the King of England, was r^ 
ceivod with every mark of distinction in the society of Cardinal 
Colonna." 

His stay at Avignon was short : Edward, who could not do 
without him, recalled him to England soon after. On his 



A BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBBAHY. 13 

return he possessed all the confidence and ^eivor of his Mas^ 
teF> who first made him Bishop of Durham, Chancellor the year 
ffkUowing, then High Treasurer, and Plenipotentiary for a treaty 
ol pefM^e mth FVanee. 

. Richard of Bury did in fiugland what Petrarch did in 
FrvuDMoe;. Italy, imd Germany j he gave much of his attention^ 
and spent great part of his fortune, to discover the manu- 
scripts of ancient Authors, and have them copied under his 
ivunediate inspection> and kept binders, illuminators, and wri- 
ters in his palaces. Richard in his Philobiblion, a Treatisid. 
Vhich he wrote on the love and choice of books, relates the 
incredible expense he was at to form his famous Library, Bot^, 
"wiljhstandii^ be niade use of the authority which his dignity 
and ii^or with the King procured him. He mentions the arts 
he wa6:ol>Iiged to. use to compass his design, and informs us 
that the first Hebrew and Greek Grammars that ever appeared 
wcare dcarrmd from his labours. He had them composed for . 
tke Ei^Vsh students f persuaded tl\at without the knowledge 
of .these two languages, and especially the Greek, it was. 
impossible :to understand the principles of either the ancient 
•Heathen or Christian Writers. Richard de Bury died in 
^345i .«ndr is said to have possessed more books than all the 
^bhopS:;of England together. Besides the fixed libraries 
M'hich hit had forniied in his several Palaces, the floor of his 
Common apartment w|is so covered with books that those who 
Entered could not .with due reverence approach his presence. ^ • 
, 8e^ some further curious particulars in. the new edition of 
'Warton s History of English Poetry, vol. i. 8vo. p. cxlvii, &c; 






- ' .'ait 



in Vf., 



*<K«lwtt win \Kft ha eoime^ aad ddl Books will be Ibfgotti^ 
qpite Q£Bibliograplieii/> 



'1 



■I ( 



' ii' 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



mm 



PAGE* 

Acuna Desaibrimiento de las Amazonas^ 4to. 1641 .••• 84 

Annalia Dnbrensia, 4to. 1 636 85 

Amolde's Chronicle • 35 

Arthur (Kynge) and his Knyghtes, Caxton, 1485 28 

Barksdale's Nympha Libethris^ 12mo. 1651 87 

Baron s Cyprian Academy, 8vo. 1647 83 

Pocula Castalia^ 1 650 84 

Bass[ent:inu8*s Free Will, a Tragedy, 4to ..••••••.«</•»- 57 

Sateman*s Travayled Pilgrim, 1569 .........; 51 

Bible (First Protestant) 1535 37 

(First edition of Luther's) 1541 38 

— (Bill and Barker s) Bunyan*s copy, with account of 

Bunyan « 38 

Blanchardyne (King) and Princess Eglantine, Caxton, 1485 28 

Boccius's Boke of Consolation, 1525 37 

Borde s Book of Knowledge, &c. , 43 

Bracelli Bizarie di Vare Figure, 1624 77 

Brusonii Facetiarum, folio, 1518 ^ 34 

Bry (De) Peregrinationum, &c. 1590-1634, folio 60 

Bury (De) Phylobiblion, 1473 10 

Carmeliani Carmen, 4to. Pynson 32 

Case's (J.) Angelical Guide, 8vo. 1697 101 

f hroniques de France, 1476 16 

de Normandie, 1487 16 



6 OOmiENTS. 

FAC*. 

GlMircliyftvde*8 (T.) Worlu « . • • «^ .^ •.«:• • ^L.Uh ■s^ft:^69^ 

(XzuL, L*Iiifelice Amore di Giulia e Romeo, 8to. ^53 4-^ >vl43> 
ColliDS 6 Families of Vere> Cafendish, &c^ fiolio, 17j62 a « ^llA} 
Court and Kitchen of Elizabeth Cromwe]l> 12nK>« .1664 ; M» 
Cowley*8 Poetical Blossoms, &c. 4to. 1633, &o. .«••»• • 1 7^ 

Anacreontic Odes on Gold, the Grasshopper, 

and the Epicore •« • »^ y Jllw 

Cromwell the Perfect Politician, 8vo. 1680 «« • «..^ ftl^ 

Dance of Death (The History of ) • ,J^^ 

Danse Macabre, 1485, &c • « » 29| 

— — des Morts, 1744, &c ?S 

Darcie*s Anualcs of Queen Elizabeth, 1625 ••....••••. . 77> 
Dee's (Dr. J.) Arte of Navigation, folio, 1557 . ♦ ^ w . . , • ^ ^56, 

Demosthenis, Aldus, 1 504 32 

Taylori, 1748-57 V • Ma 

Bl Diablo Coivclo, 8vo. 1 646 -". ,. ,^.§7 

Drayton's (M.) Poly Olbion '^ 73 

Queen Elizabeth's Prayer, or Booke of Christian Praters *2/ 

Fazio Dita Mundi, 1474 r^'*4^ 

Fraunce s Countess of Pembroke's Ivy Church i Amyilta^' ^jv>I/ 

&c. 4to. 1591, &c 62 

Froissart Chroniques de Prance, &c .•...'... i' *29^ 

Froissart's Chronicles, Pynson, 1523, &c 30 

■ -^— by Johnes • ^ • . v "-^tf^ 

Fuller's Worthies of England, folio, 1662, (Dire6tiori '^^^^"^ 

for Collating) /. • ' '«<* 

— Church History (plates in) ,,.*... ^fr^ 

- Abel Redivivus (Collation of) i'^ 



PAGB. 

lingers Life. muGlDoHtli^ 410. ];614...«^».»».«^..«,*^ .3A 
CS ^ fo dwiafc <B^.)/Muh» tbeiMMm Sink hSSBu ..... .4.. . .. Wi 

^^1Ib>' werCcafapaio Amaatis,. 1.483«.«...^«.«.^.«.««^.^^». !i7 
Cdnr^inTille's (Sir R.) Briefe Report of Virginia, folio, 1590 61 • 
i8to&e*-fl* (Lord) LawyerVFortune.. • . . • KW 



« 



Ts (Jor.) Discoyery of a New^^rkb 8vo. $B 

ViigedimiarhiDu 12iiio. }S97^1598 69^ 

ayV (Patrick) Nigbtiiigaiei kc: 9vo. 1022 77 

W^^ame, (T.) Actar Apostrionim, »ro. 17!5 ........... VH^ 

»^^^fi5iywood*6 (J.) Spider-and Flie* and other Works, 15^6- " ■ 

_I ^662i &c 48f 

l*-<iioke^» Ecdesiastic^ Politic, fMioi 1 72S «* 

nL^wleglas (Marie Jests of) 46- 



^SLSiig'-s (Dr;) Toast; (Key to- the Charactery in) witfih - 
"" ixtracte 108* 



1 



■ i\ 



\^^et*8 Junius Brutus's Defence of Liberty, 4to. 1648 88 

M#tdor, or the Knight of the Sun of Gold 31 

Molier^, .(Oeuvres de) 97, 



::.' 



Nice Wanton, (Interlude of) 4to. 1560 5^ 



li'' 



AJsgrave^s Eclaircissement de la Langue Francoise, 1530 40 

PerraiO^ Homines Illustres, folio, 1696-1700 100 

Dg^, (L.) Romeo e Giulietta 42 

■ j"> ■■■■■ - La Giulietta, 1539 43 



8 Goirmit*. 



Mbidiii. (Buqr) Hilt Asoamne dflt 
B<htioii de k Rivine det AnuoMS, pr OoabernBi^ 
1682 '» 

SfttntOff^aal, IHuris, 1516aiid 1523 IS 

Sdhist, 4to. 1475 15 

Sinolachri Historia* kcLfoa, 1549 • 36 

Smith's (Capt. J.) History of \rirginia. Mo, 1624 ... . 75 

.- Travels in Europe, &c 1680 77 

Spollett's Adventures of an Atom (Key to the Cbaracten 

Speaeer's Fterie Qneene and other Works, 1590, &c« • • • 58 
6peiioe*s Pdymetis, folio, 1747 105 

ToQStalhis de Arte Snppntandi, Pynson, 1522 36 

Toimelry's Translation of Hndibras lU 

VirgiKi Opera, 1469 

Wallers (£dmd.)IV)ems, 1711 I 



> •*>■■'■'•' • 



t^ SECOND ...^uyyru^ 



• I ■* 






JOURNEY -> 



ROUND 




^(tilUmmiint^& WLfbxKtS4>, 






^'':^g^iiu Opera. Folio* Printed by Swei/n/teim and Pannartx 

at Rome. 1469. N -i'.avV 

f this edition of the Mantoan Bard, which Beloe calla 
ioPnuceps, he, in his Anecdotes of literutiire, vol.'fr^^ 
^^.»^ tells the following amnsing anecdote. 

It seems that a copy was discovered in a Monastery in 

isy whence it has found its way into the collection of a 

^oble Earl. The anecdote which belongs to it is rather lu- 

^onoug* The good Monks to whom this and other valuable 

WK>lg belonged were not, it seems, to be prevsuled upon by 

^oney to part with them. It happened however that they 

^^le remarkably fond of old hock, and for as much of this 

s^Dae HOCK as was worth seven guineas, they parted with this 

Virgil to a kind friend and acquaintance, lliis gentleman 

B 



10 SECOND JOUBNEY ROUKD 

wM it again to an EngUsb dealer in books for i650, and 
doubtless believed he had turned his Hock to very good aocoiuit. 
I have nevertheless heard that the nobleman above allnded to 
did not obtain possession of this literary treasure for a less aom 
than 4^400/* 

See the V^alUcre Catalogae, No. 2432> where it sold for 
4101 livres. 



Bury (Rickardi dej Phylohibllon de querltnomli Librorum 
omnibus iiter arum amaioribu9 per utile. Ato, Spir€B. 1473. 

D'tfito. r*Said to be prior to tie edition above. ciiwd*J 4lo. 
Coien. 1473. 

The Editions of Paris, Frankfort, Leipsic, &c. are various. 

T%e Oxford Edition, 1599> is most known in this country^ 
bnt is Tore, like most of the other Editions. 

Copies of this curious book may be found in- most- dT oar 
Public Libraries. 

The learned an^ nmni&cent. Prelate^ whose, paterpal name 
W9S Richard ,de Aungeryille, but which he alteredi upoia t^ng 
religious orders to that of D^ Bujy« from tbe place of, his 
nativity, founded a Public Library at Oxfoirdj^ for the benuefit 
of the Students: having furnished, it with the best cpllecticin 
of Books then in England, he wrote hb Philob^lion, a Trear 
tise pontdning Rul^s.fcir the management of the Library, how 
the Books were to be preserved^ and on what o^foditiona. 
lent out to the Scholars. It is written, according to .Hprne^j* 



I '\-"\T' 



* Chalmers is in error tvhen he says H ^w^dii Ctfuilirid^ 
f Introduction to bibliography^ toL i|. ^.6f8»J 



At ^IBESOMSU^fiMS^S tXMmtY. 11 



:lftf . vetf. mdifferaal Latiii> in «' declamatory style, and is divided 
Mttia -tweaty Chapters. 

ill eUapter Ithe Author praises Wisdom, and the Books itl 

it ijb'contdned. 
2. Hiat Books are to be preferred to Riches and Pteasw. 
3 J Hiat th^y crnght always to be bought. 
4. How much good arises from Books> and that th^ aife 

misused by ignorant people. 
^ - That good Monks write Books, whilst bad' ones are 
ferently employed. 
• The praise of the antient begging Friars, with a reproof 

e modem ones. 
« He bewails the loss of Books by fires and wars. 
, He shews what fine opportunities he had of collecting 
kis wMle he was Chancellor and Treasurer, as weU as dur- 
his Embassies. 

. That the antients surpassed the moderns in hard studying. 
X 0. That learning arrives at perfection by degi^es, and that 
lad procured a Greek and Hebrew Grammar. 
H, That the Law and Law Books are not properly learning! 
121 The' usefulness and ne^cessity of Gramtnsu'. 
l3l An Apology for Poetry, and the usefulness of it. 

14. Who ought to love Books. 

15. The manifold advantages of Leamiiig. 

16. Of writing new Books and m'ending old ones. 
*17i Of u$ing Books well, and in what maiiher they should be 

fftfiifced. 

18. An Answer to his Calumniators. 

19^ Oil what conditions Books are to be lent to strangers^ 

iOf Gondusion, 

b2 



IS SBCOND JOURNEY ROCfKD 

Our Author was appointed Biskop <tf Duriimi is 1333, 
Lord TVeamnrer of England in 1344. His Book relates tke 
meatares he took to gratify his firronrite passion^ the knre of 
books ', whilst Treasurer and Chancellor of England he took 
his perquisites and new year's gifts in books $ and by Edward 
the Third's &vor nimmiiged the Libraries of the principal men, 
and brought to light many books which had been locked np for 

At Avignon, in the year 1331, aqiong the distinguished md 
learned men with whom Petrarch became acquainted, Richard 
4e Bury is thus characterized by the Author of the life of 
Petrarch. 

^ One of these y^tts Richard of Bury or Aung^rville, who 
came to Avignon this year. He was sent thither by Bdwatd- 
th^ Third, his Pupil and his King. Edward ¥n:ote a letter t<»: 
the Pope, recommending to him in particular Richard of Bury, 
and Anthony of Besanges, whom he had sent with an em- 
bassy to his Court. Richard of Bury had a piercing wit^ n 
cultivated understanding, and an eager desire after every kind 
of knowledge. Nothing could satisfy this ardour, no obstacle 
could stop its progress, He had given himself up to study 
from his youth. His genius threw light on the darkest, and his 
penetration fathomed the deepest, subjects. He was passion- 
ately fond of books $ ai^d laboured ^ his life to collect the 
largest library at that time in Europe. A man d such merit, 
apd the Minister and favorite of the King of England, was re- 
ceived with every mark of distinction in the society of Cardinal 
Colonna." 

His stay at Avignon was short : Edward, who could not do 
without him, recalled him to England soon after. On his 



A BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBRABY. 13 

reiurn he possesfied all the confidence and favor of his Mas- 
ter, who first madie him Bishop of Durham^ Chancellor the year 
ff^wing, then High Treasurer, and Plenipotentiary f<Mr a trei^ty 
<4,peac^ mth FVance. 

..Kicbard of Bury did in England what Petrarch did ia 
F|iai!Qeiyttf4y>«md Germany J he gave. much of his attentioni 
and sp^t greal; part of his fortune, to discover the manu* 
scripts of ancient Authors, and have them copied under Im 
i|a«iediate inspection, and kept binders, illuminators, and wri- 
ter^ in his palaces. Richard in his Philobiblion, a Trea^Ua, 
^hich: he wrote on the love and choice of books, relates the 
incredible expense he was at to form his famous Library, jiot^ 
wilihstanding he made use of the authority which his dignity 
and &vor with the King procured him. He mentions the arts 
he wa8:Cl>liged to.usd to compass his design, and informs us 
that the first Hebrew and Greek Grammars that ever appeared 
wcare dcarrmd from his labours. He had them composed f&r. 
the Bi^lish indents f persuaded that without the knowledge 
of , these two languages> and especially the Greek, it was . 
impossible :to. understand the principles of either the ancient 
Heathen or Christian Writers. Richard de Bury died in 
I346i jmdr is said to have possessed more books than all Uie 
Bbhops:,of England together. Besides the fixed libraiies 
Hrhieh h«, had formed in his several Palaces, the floor of his 
common apartment w|is so covered with books that those who 
entered could not with due reverence approach his presence. '^ ■ 

,Set^ some. further curious particulars in. the new edition of 
'Warton's History of English Poetry, vol. i. 8vo. p. cxlvii, &c; 



. » ' -. -v 



\ ^' 



. ^ 



■ ■■:':- A 



. ''Naive wQl kaire lier mdim^ tad doll Booka will be fefgtitleniji 
^pteoTBibliograplieii.'* 



OmmfUU, 



. -i) 



'. ff 



■i 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PAOK. 

Acuna Descubiimiento de las Amazonas^ 4to. 1641 ..• . 84 

Aonalia Dnbrensia, 4to. 1 636 85 

Amolde*s Chronicle • • 35 

Arthur (Kynge) and his Knyghtes, Caxton, 1485 28 

Barksdale s Nympha Libethris, 12mo. 1651 87 

Baron s Cyprian Academy, Svo. 1 647 83 

-^— — Pocula Castalia^ 1 650 84 

Bassentinus*s Free Will, a Tragedy^ 4to w . • « • • ' 57 

Bateman*s Travayled Pilgrim, 1569 • • 51 

Bible (First Protestant) 1535 37 

(First edition of Luther's) 1541 38 

— (Bill and Barker s) Bunyan's copy, with account of 

Bunyan * 38 

Blanchardyne (King) and Princess Eglantine, Caxton, 1 485 28 

Boecius*s Boke of Consolation, 1525 37 

Borde's Book of Knowledge, &c. , 43 

Bracelli Bizarie di Varc Figure, 1624 11 

Brusonii Facetiarum, folio, 1518 ^ 34 

Bry (De) Peregrinationum, &c. 1590-1634, folio 60 

Bury (De) Phylobiblion, 1473 10 

Carmeliani Carmen, 4to. Pynson 32 

Case s (J.) Angelical Guide, Svo. 1697 101 

Chroniques de France, 1476 16 

de Normandic, 1487 16 



6 CONTENTS. 

PAC<. 

Chorchyardcs (T.) Works ^.^ .. . . . .% .,♦ M» 

Clizia> L*Infelice Amore di Giuliae Komeo, 8to. 1553 «^ '43> 
Collin8*6 Families of Vere> Carendish, &c. folio, IT^^ » « I lih 
Court and Kitchen of Elizabeth Cromw«Il, 12ino* 1664 W\ 
Cowley 8 Poetical Blossoms, &c. 4to. 1633, iic. ••••.*» i 79} 

Anacreontic Odes on Gold, the Grasshopper, 

and the Epicure ••.. •«••••• .^v^ . dii\ 

Cromwell the Perfect Politician, 8yo. 1660 ««,«...dl. 

Dance of Death (The History of ) , 2| . 

Danse Macabre, 1485, &c • » • . iQ j 

--^ — des Morts, 1744, &c • . - . . 25 

Darcie's Annalcs of Quceu Elizabeth, 1625 ••....•.•• , 77. 
Dee's (Dr. J.) Arte of Navigation, folio, 1557 . • ,. j • ., . = ^56, 

Demosthenis, Aldus, 1 504 32 

Taylori, 1 748-57 V • Jih 

El Diablo Coivclo, 8vo. 1 646 ....•' . ., . f^7 

Drayton's (M.) Poly Oibion 73 

Queen Elizabeth's Prayer, or Boohe of Christian Praters ^Y/ 

Fazio Dita Mundi, 1474 iT^'W 

Fraunce's Countess of Pembroke's Ivy Church ) Amyiitai^' ' '''^ 

&c. 4to. 1591, &c 62 

Froissart Chroniques de J'rance, &c .-'... V '*29^ 

Froissart's Chronicles, Pynson, 1523, &c 30 

by Johnes ..." . . . -^Stf^ 

Fuller's Worthies of England, foHo, 1662, (Dxr©6tkm» ' •" ^"^ 

for Collating) .'.\ * i - . " "»?{^ 

Church History (plates in) ,.#.;; ' 9fr 

Abel Redivivus (Collation of) i^^ 



GaMflWITOw 7; 

PAGE. 

ge's life. and* DflRtli, 4to« 1^614. ..^^^.^....^^.^.^^an 
iAl'(6p.)/&6u^Bktbe:MM]ii 8«ft. Ii6a9i..,»»«.^i..... ifti 
r.Cgii^Q3aio. Amantis,. 1483« •«.••««• «.^*«m4^ .^.^ <•. :I7 
rilte's (Sir R.) Briefe Report of Virginia, Mo> 1590 61 
toae*-s- (Lord) LawyerVFortune. • . • • lOS^ 



« 



(Jo9i) Discovery of a New Wwl^ 8vo. •..,••.. ^ 

— — — Virgedlndariiimj 12mo. I597'-1598 •*•••« 6^^ 

jr'^ (Patrick) Nigiitingdei &c; 9vo. 1^2 72 

e> (T.) Acta Apostarionim, »vo. 1715 .... .'. . . .% IW* 

ood'fi (J.) Spider-and Flieand other Works, 1556- " ' 

2> &C 4»r 

jrs Ecclesiastical Politic/ fWioi 172S .;...«•••• iBJ 

tglas (Merie Jests of) 46- 



r. . . :••• 



(Dt;) Toast; (Key to- the CHaractfenr' in)- witth 
acts 108 



;i. 



Bt*s Junius Brutus's Defence of Liberty, 4to. 1648 88 

• ■ ■ ■•••',' 

lor, or the Knight of the Sun of Gold 31 

e, (Oeuvres de) ^1^ 

Vantou, (Interlude of) 4to. 1560 52 

ive's Eclaircissement de la Langue Francoise, 1530 40 

It, Hommes Illustres, folio, 1696-1700 ........ 100 

(L.) Romeo e Giulietta • 42 

La Giulietta, 1539 . . , , 43 



OOMTBirNk 



Btiitioii de k RifSero des Aamaonm, yv OombemBfB, 
1682 

Sprat Gr^aal, Paris, 1516aiid 1523 

SiOliut, 4to. 1475 15 

SiBiolachri Historipp &c. Lyon, 1549...W 26 

Smith's (Capt. J.) History of Virginia^ folio, 1624 . • • • 75 
Travels in Europe, &c. 1680 ...... 77 






Spdlett's Adventures of an Atom (Key to the Characters 

Spmer^f Fseiie Qtosene and other Works, 1590, &e. • • • 38 
j^enoe's Pdymetis, folio, 1747 106 



TonstaHns de Arte Snppatandi, Pynson, 1522 •••••••• 36 

Toiriieley's Translation of Hndibras 119t 

Viigilii Opera, 1469 9 

Wallers (Edmd.) Poems, 1711 UK 



f. 





?'^ >:•?•♦*,• 


4 


• 1 • - 


. %i ■■■■'* "^ ■ ' •'■:■■:■.'. 


■ H'- •".'i.-'^.'Cft 


eg -^^i.-»- 








SECOND 

* 1 *" 


i-v.-- -ili^ -szisit^ 




JOURNEY 




■<« ■ 


ROUND 


i r 



|sr i$(ibii0matilat'iE^ i2^tibra^A 



•-JJ ■■ 



rf* 



Vlrgllu Opera, Folio. Printed by Sweynlieim and Pannartx 

at Rome. 1469. v'>-^'*'^' 

Of this edition of the Mantuan Bard^ which Beloe caUa 
BMo Princeps, he, in his Anecdotes of litfcratttre, Vo!/?.'^f^ 
85,vtell8 the following amusing anecdote. 

" It seems that a copy was discovered in a Monastery in 
J^AMdi, whence it has found its way into the collection of a 
' rfoble Earl. The anecdote which belongs to it is rather lu- 
dicrous. The good Monks to whom this and other valuable 
books belonged were not, it seems, to be prevailed upon by 
sAoney to part with them. It happened however that they 
were remarkably fond of old hock, and for as much of this 
same hock as was worth seven guineas, they parted with this 
Virgil to a kind friend and acquaintance, lliis gentleman 

B 



10 SECOND JOURNEY ROUND 

sold it again to an English dealer in books for £M, and 
doubtless believed he had turned his Hock to very good account. 
I have nevertheless heard that the nobleman above alluded to 
did not obtain possession of this literary treasure for a less Sam 
than ^6400." 

See the Vallicre Catalogue^ No. 2432, where it sold for 
4101 livres. 



Bury (Richardl dej Phylohiblion de guerhnomis Librorum 
omnibus liter arum amatoribu9 perutile, Ato, Spine, 1473. 

Ditto, fSeid to be prior to th edition above citfd^J 4to. 
Coien. 1473. 

The Editions of Paris, Frankfbrt, Leipsic, &c. are various. 

7%e Oxford Edition, 1599, is most known in this country, 
but is rare, like most of the other Editions. 

Copies of this cui^ous book may be. found in most of our 
Public Libraries. 

The learned m^ munificent. Prelate, whose patenial name 
V|kS R^hard.de Aungeryille, but which he altered upon taking 
religious orders to that of . P^ Bury> i^om th/d^ plape of, his 
nativity, foupded ft Public Library, at Oxford,* for the bex^fit 
of the Students : having furnisheid.it with the best cpllectk^ft 
of Books then in England, he wrote his Philob^lion^ a Trea? 
tise containing Rid^s.fc^ the msmagement of the Library, bow 
the Books were to be preserved, and on what c^inditiona. 
lent out to the Scholars. It is written, according to Hpnie^f ^ 

* Chahnen is ib error ivlnicbe says H iittdii Citmliri^eL 
f lBtrodaction(o9iblipgn]ih7>.toLi.]i^.6f8».' . 



tmaifrv^ladUfbrovt Iiatiii> in a'dedamaU^ory style^ and is diiMed 
mjitoi •tweiity Cbapters. 

-- ' tii istiaptei' rtlie Atttbor prused Wikloiii, and the Booker ik 
'^*i«ficB It is contriinea. 

2. That Books are to be preferred to Riches and Pleasiirtr.' 
^ '3; That thby Onght always to be bonght. 

4. How much good arises from Books> aad that tlhief 'He 
only misused by ignorant people. 

_ 5. That good Mbnks write Books> whilst bad' ones are 
differently employed. 

.6. The praise of the antient begging Priars, with a reproof 
of the modem ones. 
7. He bewails the loss of Books by fires and wars. 
8: Me shews what fine opportuiiities he had of Collecting 
itix^ks while he wias Chancellor and TreasiiWr, asr well aS dur- 
ing his Embassies. 

9. That the antlents surpassed the moderns in hard sttidjrihg. 

10. That learning arrives at perfection by degi*eesj ^d'tnat' 
fe hkd procured a Greek and Hebrew Grammar. 

11. Hbat the Law and Law Books are riot properly lekmlb^I 

12. tiEi^' usefulness and necessity of Gramtnu*. 

13^ An Apology for Poetry, and the usefulness^ of it. 
14.' Who ought to love Books. 

15. Ther niaidfold advantages of Learning. 

16. Of Writing new* Books and mending oM ones. 

I7i Of usitig Bobks well, and in what mariner they should he 



18. An Answer to his Calumniators. 

1 9i Oil what conditioiis Boote are t& be lent to strangers; 

^0,' GondttBion, 

b2 



IS 8BG0ND JOUBMBY 

Our Author wm appointed Bishop of Durham in 1333, and' 
Lord TVeasurer of Enghuid in 1344. His Book relates the 
measures he took to gra^ his fiiTQurite pas6ion> the love of 
books ; whilst Treasurer and Chancellor of England he took 
his perquisites and new year's gifts iu books $ and by Edward 
the Third's fiivor rummaged the Libraries of the principal men, 
and brought to light many books which had been locked up for 



At Avignon, in the year 1331, aipong the dis^gnished mid 
learned men with whom Petrarch became acquainted, Richait}/ 
4e Bury is thus characterized by the Author of the life of 
Petrarch. 

^ One of these y^tts Richard of Bury or Aungeirvil]e» who 
came to Avignon this year. He was sent thither by Edwaard 
tl^ Third, his Pupil and his King. Edward wrote a letter to 
the Pope, recommending to him in particular Richard of Bury, 
and Anthony of Besanges, whom he had sent withan em* 
baasy to his Court. Richard of Bury had a piercing wit, a 
cultivated understanding, and an eager desire after every land 
of knowledge. Nothing could satisfy this ardo«ur, no obstacle 
could stop its progress, He had given himself up to study 
from his youth. His genius threw Eght on the darkest, and his 
penetration fathomed the deepest, subjects. He was passion- 
ately fond of book^; ai»d laboured ^ his Ufe to collect the 
largest library at that time in Europe. A man oi sudi inerit, 
apd tke Minister and favorite of the King of England, wbs re- 
ceived with every mark of distinction in the society of Cardinal 
Colonna." 

His stay at Avignon vvas short : Edward, who could not do 
without him, recalled him to England soon after. On his 



A BIBLIOMANIAC'S tlBRAHY. 19 

x^tiuD he possessed idl the confidence and favor of his Mas- 
t^F^ who first made him Bishop of Durham, Chancellor the year 
^^pUawiiig, then High Treasurer^ and Plenipotentiary iot a treaty 
<^.peace mth France. 

. Kicbard of Bury did in En^^d what Petrarch did in 
JPlMiieeu ltQly> and Germany^ he gave nmch of his attention^ 
^uad sp^it great part of his fortune^ to discover the manu- 
scripts of ancient Authors^ and have them copied under his 
^fMQiediate inspection^ and kept binders^ illuminators^ and wri- 
ters in his palaces. Richard in his Philobiblion, a Treatise, 
%fhich: he wrote on the love and choice of ;books> relates the 
incredible expense he was at to form his famous Library^ not*} 
wiAhstandii^ be made use of the atithority which his dignity 
and &Vdr with the King procured him. He mentions the bHb 
he waSi obliged to .use to compass his design, and informs us 
that the first Hebrew and Greek Grammars that ever appeared 
weare d^ved finom his labours. He had them composed for. 
tlie English students $; persuaded that without the knowledge: 
of , these two < languages^ and especially the Greek, it was . 
impossible to understand the principles of either the ancient 
Heathen or Christian Writers. Richai-d de Bury died in 
I346i..andr is said to have possessed more books than all the 
Bishops;, of England together. Besides the fiixed libraries 
which h« had formed in his several Palaces/ the floor of bis 
common apartment wi^ so covered with books that those who 
entered could not with due reverence approach his presence. ^ - 
.^et^soinefiirther curious particulars in. the new edition of 
Warton*s History of English Poetry, vol. i. 8vo. p. cxlvii, &e; 



tl* «fiOONJD jlOURMEy ftaiBm 



DUaMundu FoCto. 1474. 

Ackardf in his Cours de Bibtiograpikie, torn. iii. p. 191/ 
places this amongst the Poemes Scientlfiguei, and £(Mn wdtoA 
inip^ction of a fine copy in the Public Libnury at Marseilles, 
plumes himself upon being the first Bibliogn^her who hm 
accurately described it. I shall content myself by gifing tto 
tide firom Achard, and adding a few iniscellaneoiis remailcs, 
omitting some of his details, as of little general interest. Its 
title }B as follows : 

Incommza el Libro pruno Dka Mmndi eumpotuUo'per Path 
Dl Gl Ubertl da flrenza. Et prima de la huma dutp oi Mon e 
eke egli ebe adretard da gli yUu ei eagwre ie yktiUe 
Capkuoio primo. 

Each f^lowing chapter is headed by its argiiimeBt, with its 
number in Roman figures, and the whole work is printed la 
double columns. It is not paged, neither has it oeitchwofds. 
It has signatures only to the gatherings, whidi be^ witii 
a, and extend to and comprise the letter o; these gatherings are 
all of eight leaves, excepting n, which oi^ has six, and », 
which only comprises 4 leaves. 

It is remarkable that the signatures of the gatherings are 
entirely at the bottom of the page, therefore if the book- 
binder happen to be at all liberal in the application of his 
knife — the signatures must be found wanting. 

Paynes Catologue for 1801 refers for an account of this 
l^'ork to the Irish Philosophical Transactijsns by Lord 
( .'harlemont. 

In book iv. cap. xxiii. of Diia Mundi there is an account of 
SI nation of tailed men, and it is well known that Lord Monboddo 



A mmbioMAmAC's xiBRAav. IS 

in ihb ^sten^ of such Ji i^uce.* Jean Strays, 

^V'oyages in Aftspovie, &c. potttivdy asserts that he saw a 

x^ace^^f men-in Pormosa with tails. 

In Bnlwer 8 Artificial Changling, scene 22 relates to ta3ed 

icitilions and breech gallantry. 

A copy of this rare first edition sold at the ValHere sale for 

-480 iraats. lA.tJreVenWs fdr 136 francs. Knetli's, 1789-90, 
£or ^5. 10^. : aifd !Fl6nCeVs, Which, iu^cording to Bnuiet, was 
« very beantifrd copy, fo¥ BOO 'firahcs j—arid '* tWreby hangs 
a tt^-^Ill >te^ ^" tl^nCeY^ 'ctfpy, accbrdilig to tlie A1>b^ 
Si. Lc^i^t ilo toiger exists. -An English fitmateor haViii^ 
com^bissMfed s^me ^one to bnyit for hitn %i1^6at fixii^ the 
pnce^ ikebfkik wa^ itm ^p to the enomi<HiS snm of 800 fittnics, 
at which price it was purchased for him, but when he recdved 
it -he ^iras ^ ii^tated at having been made t6 pay so deaily for 
his f^Uy^ %l]«t-he threw the book dut of e^prte into the fire. 
" Happily/' says the quizzical French Bibliographer, '' English 
Bibliomaniacs do not act so spitefully now a days for so 
trifling a matter, Q^erwise at the prices which they give for 
rare. Books, it might be expected that entire Libraries would 
share the faite of the Dita Mundi.** 



Sailuat. 4to, FaleniuB, 1475. 

Unnoticed by Dibdin. Beloe says it is by far the ifurest of 
<b11 the editions of Sallust. 

Valentia was the first place in Spain where the art of 

Printing was introduced. The names of the Printers were 

- — I ■ I 

* Siee Ancient Metaphysics ToL ill. p. 350'^ 4t04 1784. 
\ Se« Brunei Mannel au Libpaire, torn. ii. p. 12. 



14 1 S^GOViB lOtJENRY iWWNII. ^ 

Akmxo aiijiPeniaiulez.de Cordova and JiMibeitP TUr 

Sallimt wa9 ttie second book there printed by theae Ptmtata. 
Accordiii^ to Bclo^ iv. 70. there waa a copy of it at> VHBOf 
heiin. 



Chf9mque9 (hi GrtmdeiJ de Frtmce depuit lei Tnienijuigu ^ 
ia mortde Charia f7/. em 1461. 3 tam.foRo. 
JPumr Pmj'. JBoaAoaiifi^. 1476* 

Tfiese Chronicles are known under die nane oC ^ Ciff . 
ai^^t ^ SamtDenyi'*' and this edition, which )a the fira^ ia 
also the first book known to have been printed at Fsria with 
the date added. A detailed description of the book may be 
seen in Branct*s Manuel^ torn. i. p. 394. 

Count Mc Carthy bought his copy at the Valliere sale for 
300 francs — and at Count Mc Carthy*s sale the same copy pro- 
duced 500 francs. 



Ckromqvei de NormamKe. Folh. Reuen* 1487* 

Very rare, and the first known book printed at Rouen witl^ 
a dat«-*as the Ltm^e Ctmetunuer de Nomumdie, in folio dated 
1483, has no name of place, and perhaps its date is that of 
its composition. 

See Bnroet Manuel dn Labratre, tom. i. p. 477* 



A BflBLlO^AKlAC'S LIBRAltr. If 

€r9»er (John)' Confirm Amttndit, that is to $aye in BnglUshe, 

the Confetspon of the Lover. Folio. JSmpri^nted nT 

Weetmestre by JVyllyam Caxton. (1493 hy mistake for) 

1483. 

West, 1773, 9/. 9*. Daly, 1792, 15/. ?*. \d. Gulston, 
7/. 10«. Mason, 1807, (first and last leaves wanting,) 15/. 15«. 

Dnke of Roxbnrghe 336/. bought by the Duke of Devon- 
shire. Merly Library, 315/. bought by the Marquis of Bland- 
ford, at whose sale, after he became Dnke of Marlborongh, it 
sold for 205/. 16«. to Watson Taylor, Esq.3 and when this 
latter Gentlemans Library was broiight to the hammer in 1823, 
this ^ame book, being found to be imperfect, only sold for 
hit 15*. 

It may amuse to learn Heame* s opinion of the value oJP ther 
Hsrlehn copy, which is described as an extraordinary fiedr one. 
Heame never saw so complete a book of this edition, and 
thought it worth more than Two Guineas ! ! ! Frognall Dibdin 
enthusiastically adds, ** twenty times two guineas could not 
DOW proofire a perfect copy.*- 

On this piece, says Warton, Gower*s character and reputa- 
tion as a Poet arc almost entirely founded. His French Son*- 
nets, according to Campbell in his Essay on English Poetry, 
(p. 74,) are marked by elegance and sensibility,^ and his* 
English Poetry contains a digest of all tlmt constituted the 
knowledge of his age. His cotemporaries greatly esteemed 
him ', asnd the Scottish as well as English Writers of the subset- 
quent period, speak of him with unqualified admiration. 



* Mr. Todd haf transcribed some of them, from ike original MSSi.- 
in the Marquis of Stafford's Library. See his fllustrations of Oewer 
and Chaucer, p. 102 to 108. 



M acoMD iousMET wsnm» « 

Bodi Wartcm and CantpbeU lum dMifed tke I^ui.mA 
eaecutaoii of the Confemo Anumiu, and w4idli Ihe Jailer ^s 
if peculiarly ill contaived. 

A lover, whose case has not a particle of interest, afifdlBS 
aooDidiag to the Catholic ritnal to a Cottfessor* who, «t the 
same time, whimsicaHy . etioqigh, bean the adriiticwMil diai«et6r 
of a Pkigan Priest of Vemns, andMhethe Myatagogse in 4be 
PiBtnre of Cebes, is called Genius. The IMy Fatlmr, i^is 
true, speaks like a ^^ood Christian, and coiDnluucates mcMre 
scandal aboat the intrigues of Venns than .Pman Author 
e^er told. A ]M«text is afforded by the cetemoiiy of cqm* 
fession, for the Priest not only to initiate his Pupil im* the.. 4aties: 
of a lover, but in the wide range of ethical and j^ysical 
loiowledge 3 and at the mention of every virtue and vice, a tale 
i9 introduced by way of Ukstration. Does the Confessor 
wish to warn the Lover against impertinent ciuioaity^ . He 
introdnces a propos to that luling, the History of Actseen^of 
pee[nng memory. The Confessor inquires if he u addkted io . 
a vain glorious disposition; because if he •«» he can tell Jiim a* 
story about Nebuchadnezzar. Does he wish to hear .x>f the. vir^koe 
of conjugal patience ? it is aptly inculcated by the anecdote 
respecting Socrates, who, when he received the.. contents of 
Xantippe*s pail upon his head repEed to the provocati^i only 
by a witticism. Thos with shrieving narrations, and. didac^ 
speeches, the work is extended to thirty thousand lines, in 
the course of whidi the virtues and vices are all fcgolatly 
allegorized.^ 

The Confessio Amantk (says Warton) was written at the 
command of Richard 2d, who, tne^tiag Kmr. Piiet Gower 



^ Campbell's EssajT. 



i*«MM. 



m&9riiDgmft tttt invnes near iL«ii4pi]w iodfted.Umlnfeb'llie 
viifiil iMitlfe^^atd jtfUr inuflii cooiRerBation fvqutsled himrte .^ir 

-^0W«rd pftKti(mIar2iio4el(8»ys Warton)^.appeMr0'to liaf»>boett 
Mkkk i»i MmsLA RmumMt de la Rote* He hsa^ hmveireiV' 
aeUi»lQ fftteinpted 4;e inoatate the .pictiupesqiie iiiia§eriei»t mmAy 
^sptemnve |)6f«oDi£iQatioiis> «/ /tluit esqwite aikgmj^ Hit^ 
V9!08t striking p<Mrtvaito> whvih:j%t ai^ oonoeived mtbtto ^hmt^v 
en ^f creation^ ««r ikikieated with any fertility i»llBmf|r> <ai€ 
idtetie^, avi^ice, iiiicherie cor t)iie¥iag, and negligeaeethe aeorar 
tary of sloth. Instead of boldly clothing these qualities witi^- 
cerpQffeal attrHmtes^ a|)tly and poetkally imagined^ be cokHy> 
yet «ettsibly> desciibes 1;heir operations and enumerates theirv 
properties. .. i. . ,- >! 

What Gower wanted in indention he supplied from hi9 
coiilmon-place Book> which appears to have beoi stored' wilb^ 
an inesdkaustible fund of instmctive maxims, pleasant aaivaf 
tion0> and philosophical definitions. . It seems to have, beeir 
his object to croud all his emditioa into this elaborate perfona 
aaee ; and there is often some d^ee of contrivance and art itt 
Us manner of introducing and adapting subjects of a very dis^. 
tant nature, and which «re totally foreign to hia^neral idesign^ 
Considered in a general view, the ' Confemo Aman^ may 
be pronounced to be no xmpleasing miscellany of thoise shorter 
tides which delighted the readers of the middle age. 

The only Classics which our Author cites aone Virgil, Ovid; 
Horace, and Tully. Amidst his grave Literature, he appeaiB 
to bave be^ a great reader oT Romances.^ 

The Rev. Mr. Todd, in his Account of tlie I^ves and Wri* 



iViriiirtfi tii.<ii>w B<.ii 



■MMMaMMlaBVi 



* Waftoa. 



!)9 SBCOND JOURMBY RO¥KD . 

tings of Gower and Chancer, has iqptly iUnstntad WatjtBii's 
preceding remark, by citing from the Lambeth MSS« a'be^ 
qaeat by Gay Beanchamp Earl of Warwick, to the Abbey of 
Bordesley in Worcestershire, of a long list of Romances, 
some of which are allnded to by Gower himself, and it is 
therefore reasonable to suppose that he was well acquainted 
with many others in this collection. It is an exceedingly 
curioos illustration of Ancient Literary History, and will amply 
repay the inquisitive reader for the trouble of turning to p. 161> 
of the ''Illustrations of Gower and Chaucer,'* 8yo. London, 
1810. 

Mr. Ellis, in his Specimens of the Early English Po^, 
Tol. i. has pointed out some portions of Crower's work, which 
he thinks might be reprinted with advantage 



Dan$e Macahre. La Danse Maeahre, Firtt tldition. 

Smaiifoiio. Paris. 1485. 
Ce prisent Lhre est appeU Miroer saiuiaire ptntir ioutes 

gens, — La Danse Macahre nauvelie, — La Danse Macatre 

des Femmes, et le debat du Corps et de tAme. FoRo. Impr. 

d Paris par Guyot Marchani. 1486. 

At the Valliere sale 45 francs* 

A copy on vellum, with 35 highly finished illuminations, is 
in the Archiepiscopal Library at Lambeth. 

There was also a copy of the first part of this volume 
printed on vellum, with 19 illuminations, sold at the Valliere 
sale for 220 francs. 

The dates of some of the other editions of this .rarity ^are, 
149(S 1491, 1499, 1501, 1531, 1950, and 1589. - , . 



A BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBRARY. St 

' E^. de Troye9, Fofw. Sans date, Nicholas Le Rtntge. 
Sold for 19 francs at the Oaignat sale. 

XfG (rrande Danse Macabre des Hommes et dee Femmee, 
HUteriie et RetiouvellSe de vieuj* GauloU en Langage le 
plus poly de n6tre terns, 
Jje debat du Corps et de tAme, 
XtcComplmnte de VAme damnie, 

avec 
U Exhortation de bien vivre et de bien mourir. 
La P'te du mauvais Ante-Christ, 
Les quinze signes. Le Jugement, 
A Troyes Chez la Veuve Oudot. Ato, 1 723. 

This is a very singular axid curious production^ as much on 
account of the spirited wood cuts^ which resemble in form 
those ornamenting the earliest Speculum^ as for the French 
Versification pr Dialogues by Marot^ in explanation of this 
Dance of Death — the original of which evidently aj^xsars to 
have been Hans Holbein's exemplar in his ^ TViomphe de la 
Mortj"* wherein he has taken pretty ncariy all the personages 
in the Danse Macabre, and amplified the subject; but to my 
mind the story is much better and more distinctly told in its 
rude original, than in what seems to be only a more polish^ 
copy. Hans Holbein was born 1498, and the first edition of 
tl^e Danse Macabre appeared 1485. 



* It if Walton's ofiinion that the Dance of Death cat in Wood vm th*^ 
work of Albert Durer and not of Hans Holbein. Rnbens set tlie higbeal^ . 
nine on it and recommended it to Sandraart, informing him at the sum 
tbike Ihat kein nis youth had copied it— ^ee more on this sobjeet in Wfui* 
^a'0 Obsenraiions, vol ji p. 117, ke, \ 



nooND io9Rianr'''ttMM> 



TheTroyes^oditioii of 172% by the Widow Oudot^ T htfve -, it 
/consists of 38 leaves, hsviiig^ woochctif^ bead^fneoes to almost 
wrary page: each cat of the Danse Macahrt oonlaiiis four 
figiire0> viz; two of Death and- two of the Personages he is ad- 
dressing. The Vignette to the Title-page represents four 
Skeletons playing in concert, oa ba^ip^ hurdy^ giurdy, harp, 
pipe and tabor. At the back of the Tide, is^ar^presentatioB 
of the Author, and fadng him three eoiblematical fignres, and 
beneath are 1 6 lines in- verse. The next leaf beg^ the Work 
by a repetition of the Vignette on the Titk, and a Poetical 
Qoartetto by these Skeleton Performers, and, as a specimen, I 
shall give the chant of 

Le Troisi^me Mort.. 

Entendez ce q;ae je tous dis 

Jennes et Tieax, petits et gravd^ 

De jour en jeur dedans bm litS/ 

Gomme amis alles a^oaraai!, 

Voi corps iront diminiiMii, 

Coaune noas ant^es IVepasses 

Bt qaoy qoA Von Tive eent ana* . . ^ ^ 

Ces cent ans aont bientot paasez. ■ ._ 

These four relentless personages then quit ^eir UovfnfiwJF 
occupation, and begin to lay violent hands on thp Pope, tbo 
Emperor, the Cardinal, and the King: the Pope wishes to ex- 
cuse himself from quadrilling with Death, and pleada ifieffee^ 
tually his sanctity as 6od*s Vicar, and the bearer of" St. 
Peters keys. — ^Th'e Emperor seems less unwi^ng, as -he ddes 
Im4i know where to apf)eal against Death*s tmmttRieiiir'^^tti^n) 
and thinks a death bed easier and lighter than an lBnfpfeF0r*3 
throne and diadem. — The Cardinal is told he mual tbi»!ir ^fl^^his 

rich robes with his astonishmemt^.^ad j<Ht ^^■tM<*4i||co^n«> 
Death then addresses the fCing as follows ; 



k 



A BISOilOftrAKIAC'S XAftABT, SI 

LaMovt 
V<;lies Bcible Roj Coimiiii^ • 
Renomm^ p«r Totre prouease^ 
D'^n .Sceptre vcms futcMi ornd 
Par T«Ktre pompeiue noblesse, 
Mak maintenant tonte haaiesse. 
Tons faut laisserpour dtre seal, 
Dites adieu a votre ricbesse, 
Le plus riche li'a qu'nn KnceuL 

Reponse da Roy. 

Je n^ay^pas ajipris ^ Danser, 
Votre Danse est un peu trop sauragB, 
O Mori ! Yous pouyez me laisser. 
* Cherchez quelqu'autre personnage, 
n est bien vrai puisq* Alexandre, 
A marcb^ sur yos tristes pas. 
Que comme luj je dois me rendre 
A'lx Loix fatales do Trepas. 

In the succeeding pages Death dances a measure with men 
of varions conditions and situations in life^ from the highest 
to the lowest 3 with the Sage> the B^Lffoon, the Soldier^ as well 
as the Ecclesiastic. The last trumpet then sounds^ and a 
Vision in verse succeeds. After which comes La Danse Maca^ 
hre des Femmes^ &c. &c. 

Im Danse des Moris, camme elle est depeinte dam la Imtahla 
et celebre Ftile de Basle, pour servir d'un Mirolr de la 
mature humaine, gravie sur l* original de Math, Merian, aveo 
des Vers h chaque fig. en Allemand et en Francois. 4to^ 
1744, 1756^ and 1789. 

The first edition (1744) of this Work is looked upon as the^ 
besty oit ae^oimt of t^ eaily inqmsinonfi It diftrs inata^ 



M SECOKD ^omoiEPt ^yWHjy 



' iriaUx'fttMft &6«c)ttr'8 Etckisgs ' of Hblbeiti'lj '1>e9^s/' miSf 'if 
al^o-totiilly drffisrent i» to i^ertltoktioii lH*mthelJ§iiK^l^ 
-m^fe'bbftife rtentKmed; * ' ^ ^" ' ^^'^ ''^® 

' I'be Histoid' <^ tbe oiighi'of thifi ttietiniinei^ i^^iSxiAMj^ 
d^ioted in tbc cnnetiy neaar the Ddmhdcib Oon^n^^'^fle, 
'^tlihiwfmliglrt'oii the subject^ >i4iich I bi^lSdve 1Mt'to'!>^''g1ye- 
i rally llnUyvrti^ h appears to haye been cOttmemohMfte'^f '%e 
*pla|rne which raged at BAle in the ytear 1439/ dmii]^ '^^e 
fitting of' the Great ConncU^ «nd which conumtted great de- 
. vABtation^ and amongst the rest carried off vafions persons of 
-i|«ality4 as well as Cardinals -and Prefaites> mfainy of whom wete 
>')tnterFed m this Cemetry> hnt still^ greater numbers iii tfte 
CkMretae. ^•^'^%^' 

The Emperor Sigismund being ap enconrager of the aits, 

- ■ 

' either employed J^an d*Eick, who, according 'to Meran,^ in- 

^ vented the art of oil painting,* (painting in distemper l[]ie&ig 

Hie only mode preyionsly known,) or some other ^^dbi^difid 

* Arti^ whose name may hare been lo6t> to exepati^ this pMsio 

Worthy 'work. It is very remarkable, says Mi^rian;' thiii^'ln 

this Work men of a}most all cpnditio9S and r«tn[kd M iMft- 

ndly depicted, and in the dress of the peridd. The'-^g^oii^^ 6f 

the Pope represents Felix V. who was elected ih' tW jAaider^f 

Bugene. The representation of the Emperor is ihe%rM-Pbf- 

trait of Sigismund 3+ that of the King is the PortMt df ARieJi 

I ' ■ I w M II ■ P% » » ■■ n ■ I ■ I I I > III I ilii ii I i' Pt \ f 1 ^ i ■! I fu lfi l 4 \ i^ ■ ft I 

f Bepkiuap, io hi» History of Inrentioni^ if h remeinlMr edteeeil^, 
dates the Origin of Oil. Painting much earlier than Jean. d'.£i«k^t« 



t A rude representation certainTy, but as'Orangfcr'says of ibp Por- 
traits of William the ConY[ueror, ** Accuracy t>fl)rawing"isjiot Co. l 
expected ill an ige in which the generality 'of Ar^ts '^ad' not' aitnre 
at sufficient precision tO distingu(jsh t>etWe<!Yi )a 'NL6nLef and alif iai!'^ 



. ikcjM^ O^fKiiif of tJNe Eoiai««.^-nAU tbetft V^rf^ttagw Oh 
drifted at the CowkciL . Tbe deaci^ti^S'lieBeflftk weie in. Ger- 
Man, whick, as time had ia some degree effMcd both the Pftint- 
jo§a&4 the loacriptions, the Magistrote had them retouched 
Jlli ^68.by o&e Klauber. of Bile> whoavoceeded so well ia 
)us. rc;8toratu)n, QvBii, it ia aiud not the smalle&t diffeseace from 
the original waa. perceptible. In the whole length of the wall 
. Aere yet revained some space, the painter therefore a^ied the 
ijOiage of the pious and le^vmed Jean Oeeolam|mde, in me- 
Hiory of the Reform^ion recently effected : yi2. in 1529, «iid, 
|ia a fiinish to the work, he poartrayed himself, wifei aiid 
jUldren in the dress of the period. It again experienced 
rejparation many years after, and in its then state- Meriaa 

J^]^Ct/^ it.* ; . * ' i 

If this be the true, history of the Dance of Deaitk, whteh I 

j^ ff^sm% see no reason to disbelieve, sinular nepitttenlatioAS 

..OTfiQ^ies were soon transmitted and becaiae p^afaur in other 

t^^^fi^ih^ong the rest the walls of St. Innocent's Cloiateri at 

Pafjf^^ were^ tjms ornamaited, and according to Wactonin his 

.Q^rvajtiona on Spenser,, one Machabre,^ a Frendb Ploet, wrote 

,^ djEffmptioi^ ofritin verses whence no doubt originated the 

\pi^r^'f.J)aftse MacadreJ* Stow, in his Survey of London, 

8pK|aking of the cloisters which anciently belonged to St. 

F^*8 ^. Churchy says, about this cloister was artificially and 

richly pmnted the Dance of Machabray, or Dance of Pauls i 

the- like whereof was punted about St. Innocent's Cloister at 

^ The . 85tk and last plat^ iyi Meriau's booV ta a yerj singular one ; 
i( perfecdj representfi ^ go^d looktB^ k^i^Ky man, with whiskers^ Imard, 
itir. and a.futf round bia ikec\; turn the book upside down, an4 .» 
liqiblMrnble 0eadi*t k^ad. a^.acairatelv dcliutatcet pr^enU ii«cl£ 

v." • . I ..• . ♦ t . ■. ' . 






-«. > 



Mi 



as fTBCOffD JOUBNBT ROOM) 

Birii.x the metres or Poesie qf. this Dance were tnnysbte^Jkfu 
of.FreiH^h into Engliab by John Lidgate> Monk of Bafy«, --^s 
Warton mentions two editions of Lydgate*s Translation 
Qni9;.^y Tottell, 1554« and another^ 159% ;he also naBvesr 
MS. Dance Macabre as among the Cottonian MSS« • ■.•;£... 

^l-y3gatc, describing the Lady Abbess, says, • . *^\ 

. ^< * • And ye my Ladie, geatle Dame Abfaease, 
s :•,' , . With yo«r maatlet 6aiTed» large* and wide» 
, . , . , Your v€iie, your wimj^e pasaing great licbea. , . , 

Profixed is a wood cut^ which was afterwards engrared^by 
H^Uwr, in Dogdale's Mpnasticon> ¥ol. iii. p« 368. ■■' -.■ ^ui}- 
i }fi,urU>n thought— -and from all the investigatioA'l ba^e beeii 
able to bestow on the subject, his conjeetuiie was: wdl*i&)nnded 
-Htbat the Douse Machabray was the original printed <80il!ibe ^ 

whence most of the other Dances of Death were derived**^! ^ I'l ^ '^' ^'* 

• )Xhe book from M'hich Hollar copied his cuts is*entitled /oMc^i ^ '^'^ 
Mortis, Basil. \ji)4. • ■ ' i.-k/ ^x -^'* 

Spenser, in whose time the representations ' of 'Dd^*s ^ 
DiTKfi were fashionable and familiar, says, '■""* ^- 

All Masicke sleeps where Death doth lead the Bounce'; ' ' '' 

and Mr. Disraeli, who in his second series of the Chrioisiti^s 
of TJtcrature has an entire chapter on the Book of D^h'lttiil 
the Skeleton of Death, says, " the Dance of Death" wits' a ifh-' 
vourite pageant or religious mummery performed \tk 'ChurcA^, 
in which the chief characters in society were suppoTOd^in'a ",' 
sort of masquerade, mixing together' in a general dince/Wtner *' 
course of which every One in his tnrn vanished from f tc* sbBke^^'^ 
to shew how one after the other died off." 

- ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ... 4 I, . ., , . 

* ^ Simolachrl Histaria, &c. Lyons, 1549,** with the Iiiacriptioiip,SiS. 
in Italian, was the earliest book on the subject Warton had s^cik-. 



i 



A BIBUOMANIAC^S liXaRART. 



a 



' S^ei'^ ilhMhttionof this, in the article entitled ''A M&ri& 
^ut of A Mm that woi taihi Howleglas,'* in the pr<to^nt 

Wlnldt oil the Subject of Death's Dance^ it may not be amhs 
to mention the 

*' Booke of ChrUtian Praiers" nsually called Queen EUia- 
hetKs Prayer Book. 4to. 1569, 1578, 81, 90, and 1608, 

Containing the Portrait of the Queen, each page bordered 
with spirited and appropriate marginal wood-cuts, and among 
the rest> the Dance of Death, apparently from Holbein s do- 
signs, with the name of the personage whom Death seized ^ 
ab^t^ each cut, and beneath every design a couplet in doggi^l 
rbyinei' addressed by Death to his victim. . ■" 

'The edition of 1569, by Jo. Day, is in the Lambetb Library. 
Mr. Roscoes copy of the edition of 1581 sold for 10/. lO^.j Mr. 
TWaleys for 8/. 8«.) one at Saunders*s in 1818 for 4/.^ Iiiid 
(G, Nassau's, 1824, for 7/. 7s. 

TJ'^ie.^iition of 1590, at Evans s, in 1817> for 4/. 5«. 

A copy of the 1608 edition^ at Saunders's, November, 1823i 
At, 14*. 6rf. 

^B|^for^ I conclude this desultory account of Death^s Dance, 
I i)t|j|st;npt omit to mention, in reference to Merian's History,, 
of^its ori^n« that the Editor of the new edition of Wartons- 
Hi8t9ry pf English Po^etry, in the notes to that woric^ vol. ii« p. 
36.4^ refiei's to some Paintings on the same subject . in public, 
boilings a^ Minden in Westphalia, as early as 1383, but I do 
no^ perce^v^ upon what authority the statement is made. 



.,>,-■ :,x>-. 



€2 



dS M9C0KD JOURNEY ROUllD« 

Arthnr fK^ngeJ and kii Kn^fjg^kies. 
A Bwh of ike Noble Hjf^orm of Kynge Arikw^ anAefe4tr 

tat/ne ofhM Knygktes : reduced into Englysshe by Syi^ Th^ 

WW Mafory, Knighi. Folk. Fr'miod by W. Caxton. 1485. 

Earl Spencer purchased a copy of this book at the «fite of 
John Lloyd, Esq. of Wygfeir, January, 1816, for ^2Q. 

Mr. Southey has edited a reprint from this copy, in % ?q]j9. 
4to. with notes. 

There is a copy of the original in the Library at Osterley 
Park^ which has been amply described in Dibdins Ameei, >ol. i> 
p. 241 to 255. 

There are also two miniature reprints, o«Q in two and^tho 
other in three volumes ; the latter of these, in its prefitxJ^d^ad^ 
vertisement, contains a notice of the six earliest editions. - ' 



The Hystorye of Kynge Blanchardyne and Prhiceis Eglanr 

tyne. Folio, Caaton, 1485. 

Of this book ther^ is no other than an imperfect copy knbwn, 
which once belonged to Mr. G. Mason, at whose s^ale it ' wite 
bought by John Duke of Roxburghe for 21/. and at the Duke*s 
sale in 1812 purchased by Earl Spencer for 215/. 6«. 

For an account of this volume see Dibdin s Ames, vol* il p. 
346 to 349. • 

It appears that at Mason s sale, the two noble per8onc^es> 
Earl Spencer and the Duke of Roxburghe, had wh^ in book- 
sellers* and brokers* slang would be called a regular knock out, 
and then resorted to the elegant amusement of toss up to de- 
cide their gains. By the single to.99 up for the book just named 
the Duke of Roxburghe 8 Execntars became ultimately gainers 
ofnearlv 200/, 



▲ BIl^LIOMANIAC'S LlBRAftY. SB^ 

^^Voiiworr fjehanj Les Grands Ckroniques de France, iAngie- 
terre,' d'Ecasse^ dEspaigne, de Breiaigne, Sfc, depuU 1326 
•: -'•*-^1400,^^ C(mtlnu6es jusquen 1498, par un amnyme. 4 
' i&M^fiUo. Park, Anth* f^erard. 

Original edition, of which well conditioned cc^es are ex- 
ceedingly rare. 

A copy printed on vellum, with 18 miniatures in gold and 
Colours, sold at Gaignat's for 540 francs, at the Valiere sale 
for 920 francs, and at Count Mc Carthy's for 4250 francs. 

7'/ie Ed&tlon by Michael Le Noir, 4 vols, folio, Paris 1505 
^t \ 5 13> sometimes bound in 2 vols, is said by some French Bih- 
liograpbers to be scarcely less rare than that of Anthony Verard. 

A copy in Bibliotheca Lansdowniana sold for 8/. \3s, 

-. //M MBmes. 4 torn, folio, Paris, G, Eustace, 1514. 
-A fine copy of this edition, printed on vellum, brought 3000 
^apcs, in the Soubise collection 3 and one sold at M. Paris*s 
3ale, 17dl, for 149/. 2s,, bought by Col. Johnes. 

- lees MSmes. 4 torn, en 3 vols, folio, Paris, Jehan Pefif 
^t F. Regnauli, 1518. 

, La Valliere 52 francs ; 36 francs dAguesseauj 170 firaincs 
Thierry. 

Dkto. 4 torn, en 2 vol. folio. Paris, J, Petit. 1530. 
•^ La Valliere 29 francs 5 Roxburghe 91, 1 4s. 

Copies of Froissart are sometimes met with consisting of 
"volumes belonging to different editions, 

^ According to De Bure, all the Gothic Editions of this Histo- 
Tian were, for a long tjjne, little if at all esteemed, because it 



36 siBtOKD joxfkstrt ro^d 

was imagined that the Edition by Dent/it SoMvage,* 4 Wik ^ 
voU. folio, Lyon. 1559, ^c, was correct and entire ; butilai 
the contrary has been proved, they hai^ since been infinutjely 
more sought after and esteemed, and it is very diflkolt to &itd 
a good and well conditioned copy of the first and original odi- 
tion, which is most esteemed by the curious. 

Fromaris Chronicles of England, France, Spam, Portugal^ 
Sfc. translated by John Bourchier, Lord Bemers. Imprinted 
Jjondon by Richard Pynson. 2 voh. Fbfto. 1523-25. 

Notwithstanding Mr. Uttersons reprint of this translation 
of Froissart, 2 vols. 4 to. 1812, it still bears a very high price, 
jSX Mason 8 sale it brouglit 36/. 154r. 

— the Dt^ke pf Roxburghe*s 63/. 

— Townley s 42/. Stanley s 38/. IOjt. 
"fr- the Marquis of Bland ford*s 34/. 2*. 6d, 

Ditto, Middleton. 2 vols. Folio. 1525. 

Verbatim from Pynson's edition. 

Steevens 1 7/. Bibliotheca Lansdownia, a fine copy in jnissiai 
24/. ^s.'j bought by Mr. Digge. Stanley, 38/. 17*. Lord 
Peterborough, 1815, 47/. 15*. 6</. 

See Censura Liter aria, vol. i. p. 116, 17, and 18^ for the 
distinguishing marks of these editions. 

Col. Johness Translation. 4 vols. 4to. Hafod. 1803-4. 
A copy, at a sale of some of Earl Spencer^s duplicates,. bonncU 
in russia, sold for 35/. 3«. M, 

Ijarge paper copies of this edition are rare. 

■ ■ ■ , I . - , ■ ■ I .1 ,.i . I . , . I fl 1 . I I . 11 !■ , ■ 

I 

'*■ At the sale of the Merly Library, 1813, a copy of this ediilo9^.h9i|iii 
in morocco, sold for 13Z. 13a: at the Bibliotheca Larttidovmiana. 18(M, 
fopy, 4t«>1s. ii| 1. sold for 6/. 6a Roxhnrrjhe 71. 2». 



V 'QK^rei.is» ^o a|i edition^ I? i;o&. S)Uo. with a 4to»- Atlas of ' 
PJa^a. JUmtofi. 1805. Published at 7/. 4«. . 

f' Jdm(Froissart> a native of Valencieiiine^, and an al^la.pi^t/^ ' 
]$ft^ vt^hbse Chronicle has been abridged by jS/tfi«i[a;f , cap^e ^^ei; 
to^ngbad^ni the reign of Edward 3dj to offer to Philippa,. ]^9^ 
countrywoman^ the hrst part of his History. She. ifeceiyi^ 
i^^^d' his work graciously^ and is said to have rewarded hio^ 

Froisaart was a great traveller, and generally in the tram of 
Some elevated pcrsoiiaffe ; whilst attached to W inceslaus of 
i^uxem]^ourg, Diite of Brabant, he was employed ciy Mm in 
iriakiig a Collection of his Songs, Rondeaus, and Vlf^ta^'^^ aJd 
X-^roissart adding some of his own to those of the Prii'd^, lof&ed 
a. sort of Romance, under the title of Meliaddr, dt'ChS Knight 
cj/" the Sun of Gold, In 1395 he visited Englaiid a second 
t^ime, after an absence of 27 years, and was wellVecS^lired'by 
lR.ichard 2d, and the Royal Family, and had the hohbur of pre- 
senting his Meliador to the King who was much delighted 
^Miitlt.' ■ • ■ ..-;'i'.t-: 

'Re has been accused of lavishing his panegyric on the Eiuglish, 
at the expence of his own conntr}'men. Mr. Johnes has *tii»- . 
cti^ted his character from this aspersion 3 he certainly had no 
great reason to falsify events in favor of his Countrymen, d?om 
wMotii the benefits he received were as nothing* in ^oiiapaiicon 
^iQlha^good {ijension he received from the English. .The His- 
torian mourns over the death of each yaliaj^t Knight, exults. in 
the success of every hardy enierprize, and sterns aln^pslr.C£UTied 
away by his chivalrous feelings, independently of party con- 
'ISBerations. 
iliere is a good account of Froissart in Olctr/iis BfifUk i^i 



^ 
•t i 



t '♦ 



3|^ nCONO. lOUtNBV .JMtOlilt. ^ 

ir^r^ p. 67, &e.-, and Wutoa, is Ju« HiUflV^ of JEm^plC 
Poetry, is Dot a little indebted to him fioor nvmoriNn flbstra^Ttt 
quotations, 

-.,"■'. • • •• ■ • ; ■ ;.-■ ■. ■^vt''. ' - * 

:,,..'■ w .-. :-:-.W' i'V 

Carmerumi (Petri) Carmen, Ato. fFithout date, LffhdSk, 

Richard P^MQn, 24 leaves &nfy. 

This little Poem contains some curious detuls relative to the 
prelected marriage between Charles of Castile, Archduke of 
Austria (afterwards Charles the 5th) and the Princess Mary, 
daughter of Henr)- the 7th of England. 

Th^re w^ a copy on vellum iu the Harleian Library, No. 
7485, which, says Branet, probably was the same sold in the 
Me C^hy sale for 1000 francs, and which, I believe, the Rt, 
HoiL T. Orenville now has; 



Dem$9ihem8 Orationea, fyc, irr. Folio, f^enei, u4ldu9^. 1504^ ' 

Rrst Greek Edition of this Author. Aldos pHnted two edi- 
tions of this book the same year. In the first/ which is tlie 
most rare, the Dolphin and Anchor (on the Title-page) ate in 
outline only, with the vrord Aldcs between two stars = oa ione ^ 
Bide^f the Anchor y and Ma. Ro. on the other. The seeond-' 
edition, which is most esteemed by scholars, on account of its 
greater correctness and better execution, has the IMphin and 
Anchor shaded with Al on one side and Drs on tl» otiier. -^ 

The value of the second edition varies according to OosditiOfI 
at from 18/. I8«. to 25/. The first edition being the soareer if* 
pretty neady of equal vahie whra. is pod piesefvn tioni : *' ^* ' 



A mmM^AWxt'i^ttimiiir: sir 

-' ' ^ 4ios ThfH, 2 et 3. Cantab. l7AS—f7d7. • ' '' * 

Large paper copies of this excellent edition^ (the first volume 
of which never appeared,) and which was intended to have 
been completed in 5 vols, are rare and valuable. 

^t JJ<^th'8 sale, 1810, 9/. 14^. 6d. . - > 

Merly Library, 1813, 6L 6s. 

Viscount Harberton, 1 822, 8/. 8*. 

Small paper copies bear a very limited price. 



>': ■.:.'•;> 



8(^ Qriuai (^L^Histoire ou le Roman dvj qui est Ufonie^ ^ 
wefi^ 4e la Takh Ronde^ Translate du LaL en Ryme Fr&n^^i 
^tds, et de Rune en Prose. Par Rob, Borfon ou SiMroth^i 
I vol. in /olio, Paris, Dupri, 1516. 

Roxburghe, 17/. 17 s, 

SainU Greaal contenant la Conqueste du diet Smn&t €rr«atef ^' 
(faicte par Lancelot du Lac, J Lett, Goth, fig, en boi^, . 2 
^om.en\. Folio, Paris, 1523. ,.' 

Crofts, 5/. 7s, 6d. ... s.r.-- 

'< The Holy Grale, that is, the Red Blood ^f our Blessed ' 
Saviour. King Arthur's Knights are represented as adventiu^^"^ 
lag in quest of the Sangreal or Sanguis Realis, Thl^ iCxpecK^ 
tiQBL was one of the first subjects of the old Romance.'* 

SeeWarton on Spenser, vol. i. p. 51, and vol. ii. 'p,2&7,bc^ 
St. Graal, or Sangreal, is elsewhere, demed from Glra94}> 
wluch signifies a cup in old French, or from the Sanguis Reialisj ' 
with which it was supposed, to have beeii filled* Aceorditig td 



Dunlop's History of Fiction, the Sangreil is the scarcest Ro* 
nrance of tho Round Table.. > . • > ... ,j;*t^^ 

In Warton s History of English Poetry, vol. i. 8vo. p. 69 to 
85^r is a long and learned dissertation bj the Edit^r^^oirf he 
History of the Holy Gi-aal or Sacred Cup, which , the, cnf ioju^ 
on this subject would do well to refer to,— *See also the ]^ir 
tor*8 note at p. 138 of the same voluoi^e, respectaog the A^t^hor 
of the *' Roman du Saint GraaL** 



! ' t 



Brusonii (L, DomiiVj Facetlarum et E.vemplaram libri P^IL 

Folio. RonuB. 1518. -'' 

This work contains a collection of merry conceits, tales, and 
bon mots, extracted from various authors. 

The edition above cit^d, which is the original ^ne, is fery 
rare, and much sought after, on account of its being tfie cftdy 
complete edition of the work : all those which have succe^diA 
it, and which have been published either under its true titles ^it 
under that of Speculum Mundi, having been grtjatly curtaBfeff; 

The title of the AVork is on a separate feaf, theii ffa^W 
three specimens of Latin Epigrams on another leaf, ^fti{*h 
commences the body of the Work with p. I, and whibh'gcMs 
on and finishes by an Index at p. 221, after which c6me two 
distinct leaves of errata. 

Copies of this book have sold at the following large prlcefS te 
this countr)^ : Bibliotheca Parisiana, 1791, 5/. 15*. 6</.j at 
Col. Stanley's sale 40/. 19*.; Sotbeby'S;, 1818, 18/, 7i. 6</.i 
Marquis of Blandford's 27/. 10*. > : ^. - -^/ 



4 



Amoldea Chronicle, or the Customs of Louden. Fpii^ Bheh 

letter. No date, ' . ■ 

'•OtQstoni 2/i 2#»; Lansdowne> 71. 178. 6</.j Mason, 15/. 15«.j 
Sir P. Thompson, 1815, I8/.5 Rev. J. Brand, 1807-8, in rasa^ 
ife/1 I8iy.; Roxburghe, 1812, 22/. U. 

Hie title of tlie first edition is given in the Censura LiteFaiii^ 
vol. vi. p. 113; its date seems to be 1502. The edition der 
scribed by Oldys is supposed to be of the date 1521 5 see Dib- 
dins Ames, vol. iii. p. 34. 

Prior availed himself of the Poet's licence, when, in the fii^t 
edition, 1718, of his " Henry and Emma," he said, 

. . Np losger stall the Nut-brown Maid be old; 

Though since her youth three hundred years have roll'd : 

For the " Ballad of the Not Browne Mayde' first appcar«4 in 
t^ Chronicle above cited. ^'The Nut Brown Maid and her 
Lover," which Prior paraphrased in his beautiful ball^^ of 
Henry and Emma, are with some reason conjectured t9 have 
been a young Lord, the Earl of Westmoreland^s son, and a 
Lady of equal quality. This conjecture has been advanced by 
WMtaker, in his History of Craven, but some dates in contra^ 
vention of this surmise may be consulted in Censura Lit. voL 
viL p. 95. 

Wartonf says of this now exceedingly rare Chronicle, " that 
Jt is perhaps the most heterogeneous and multifarious miscel^ 

* The two Ballads may be uompared m the edition of Prior's Poetical 
Works, 2 vols, post 8to. Lend. 1779. The Original Poem irom the 
Chronicle is also carefully copied in the Censura Literaria, toL vi. p.ll4i 
It is also the first article in CapePs Prohssions^ 8vo. 1760. 

■\ Hist, f f Englhih V^tirj, \o\, iii 8to, p. 419, 



^4 ll«b^NI> feURNKt RtWjlD • 

Utt^ith&t' ever existed. The collector set4$ out with a eatialc^gue 
of the Mayors and Sheriffs, the customs andt charters of tl[d 
CItjr of London. Soon after^rds we have receipts to pickle 
•tnrgeott, to make vinegar, ink, and gunpowder; how to 
nitll^'t^iifsley m an hour ; the arts of brewery and soap making ; 
an estimate of the livings in London ; an account of th^last 
i4i!totiofr of Bt. Magnus's Church ; the weight of Essex cheese ; 
and a letter to Cardinal Wolsey. The Nut Browne Maydeis 
introdoced between an estimate of some subsidies paid into the 
Exchequer; and directions for buying goods in Flanders. 
Okiys, in his British Librarian, says this book cannot be better 
d^^ril>ed than by a recital of the contents of the several ohap- 
t6i^ ini tne table or kalendar prefixed, which recital occupies 
three closely printed 8vo. pages, and may be referred to in the 
BriM Llbtarim, 8vo. 1738, p. 22, &€, 

'WaKon*s remarks on, and comparison of, the ancient and 
liiikrtk versions of the Nut Brown Maid, are well worthy of 
tiUng turned to ; and I am glad that the new edition in 8vo. of 
tblfli^ work- will enable any person of moderate means to do so. ' ' 

There is a 4to. reprint ofAmold*s book, edited by Mr. DoiKdb, 
in the pfedtce to which be conjectures the Nut Brown Maid 
to derive its origin from an old German Ballad, translated into 
X^tih by Bebcliqs. 



ToMtal/us (Cuthb.) De Arte Supputandi, libri quatuor^ Ato.. 

Pynzon, 1523. 
See Dibdin*s More*s Utopia, vol. i. p. 20, for some accovpt 
of Tupstal, and his Typographical Antiquities, ypl, ii, foritbe 
full title and description of this book, . n , ^ : • * .- . . 



Gn^Dger say8> this is. tke first Treatise ou Arithmetic pol^ 
llsl^ed in this country. i. 

It is by no means a rare hock, and I have seen more thaa 
pi^e copy sell at a very cheap rate. 

At Sir Pet^r Thompsons sale^ in 1815^ a copy was j^i^jht 
hy Mr. Heber for 2/, !&• 

Bishop ToQStall's own copy^ upon vellum, is in th^ l?I^^P; 
I4hrary at Camhiidge. . , 






Boeclus Boke of Consolation, Folio. Printed by If^,^ ClMXtfi^j^ 

At the Alchome sale> 1813^ an imperfect copy of .U^i9,b<^lft 

«old for 53/. 11«. , , ,.v 

Soecius, translated inlQ English. 4to. Tavestak^^lMii^iS 
-West's sale, 3/.} Dr. Askew, S/.j Forster, 7/. 10«,|(.Ma^n, 
17/.) Gough, 271. 6s. f (resold, bring imperfect, for l4L2i4^Qd,y 
. No Roman Writer appears to have beesn mora studied :jRod) 
estei^med from the beginning to the end of the barbar^ua/ceiL-:? 
turjes than. Bpelius. " His Consolations of Philosophy-*, ivitas 
tr^n^ktted into Saxon by King Alfred, and illustrated , with a. 
Cfomx^entary, by Asser, Bishop of St. D,avid*9* . =: / 

See Warton s History of English Poetry, vol, ii. 8^v0..p> 3^ I 



La Bible qui est toute la Samte Ecriture, translatie en Fraii" 
qois par Robert Pi6rre Olivetan (aidS de Jean Calvin.) 
FoVio. Neufchatel. De JVingle. 153S. 
This is the first Bible published by the nrotestanjU itt , 

••pies ia good preservation are difficvdt to be mef with, lie 



stco*» 



*^ edition <»t ^** 8V5. l^tvtV^'^^ « weto»«*^^o*' *^ 
J. td**^ ' -.t^cTtVo*'/ ^ 891. ^5«. 

eo«**^^!r see V.VS 1-^'^' -^.^^^""^ 

'*^ V ^ 128- p,^„geT tot *« ^ itf«r 






K: an 

= :»rfc 

is life 

Jst as 



A ftlBUtOM Afl^IAifS I^IfiDAl^Y. 80 

Itf^'HrUtind go to Ifeaven, or have thy sms and go to Hefl?'^ ufx)* 
which he lifted up his eyes in great amazement towards hea*- 
"itii, i^heiice'the voice carne^ and thoi^ht he saw Christ looMng 
down upon him.^ This had a great effect upon his mind : but 
He grew* .&i. m<Nre serious upon a casual conference which h* 
held with four poor women of Bedford^ upon the subject of the 
new birthw ' From that time he applied himself diligently to 
reading the Scriptures> and in a few years became a Preacher 
and Writer of not«. He was long confined in the county gaol 
of Bedford for holding Conventicles ; here he spent his time 
in preachings writing books> and tagging laces for his support. 
^^U^ l|is enla^mentj he traveUed into many parts of the king" 
d9ip>^ ^1 to visit and comfirm the brethren.'* These visitations 
pc^ur^d him the nick-name of Bishop Buntfon. When he 
ai;iived at the sixtieth year of his age, which was the period pf. 
h^Jifenflie' had written books equal to the number of his yc^s f 
bat as many of these are on similar subjects, they are very 
mudiialHcei. His Master Piece is his *' Pilgrims Progress,'* one 
of :4fee most pop9lar, and I may add, one of the most ingenious 
book^'in the English Language. 

Bunyan, who has been mentioned amongst the least and 
longest of onr writers, and even ridiculed as a driveller by those 
who have never read him, deserves much higher rank than is 
commoidy imagined. His " Pilgrims Progress" gives us a 
clear. and distinct idea d Calvinistical Divinity. The allegory 
is admirably carried on, and the characters jastly drawn and ; 
on^rmly supported." 

Bk^raphical History of England, vol. iii p. 347-8 8vo. 1 775. 

*■< ■■■ ■■■■■■ I ■ M I ■■..■■■■■■■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ . I .i^M ■ -I ■ ■■ 

'-• ■ • f . - . ■ 

* Thi« 18 the substance of his own account in his " Grace Abonndiiig/* 
which contains the History of kis Ck>nTersioB and many olkcr puiici^aii 
of hislife. ' < ' . -1 \ 



.40 SBCONP tOVftm^rJHUm^ ' 

'.••.••.•«''' >-i**''t;; •.•■»»«!?••/ v.- ; 

LeicUrcissemmU d§ U laMgu$ Fnmfiu^mf <igwi;»ifi y<|i J|iim 
/fioii Pakffrave, Anghffa nMigfiimj49fu(if^\fl.OfmkffkS$ 
Pwrii. TTkici folio. The JmfiqffUmg fyt^^ttMk t^ M^ 
Hauithi, the Xf^IJltk dutf fkfjuig^ the ^mm ^^0ml ib^tA 

God 1^30. . i ..^teef^ 

bimott of my notices I havte endctTMired t« ^obl Mr^Mit 
I cosoeivcd to be either curioiis, ▼ftkntbk, er eBtartain%;'Mil' 
in ponuance of Ihii pbm, I present tlie tibofis tangiAHt aadf littr 
production to my reader, as an bonorable iettittOiiM'^-lllib^ 
abilities of a Loodoser, and as a aingvlar proofs addM rtr lc B ge tt 
by French Bibliographers, of the first attempt at rdM^ttb— 
French tongue to grammatical rules $ and that elfecied 'tf^itf 
Englishman^ and aa the title says nat^de L&nd^m. -t'^ '''^ 

Onr Author, according to that indefatigable ChfOfttcKar^lAttl^ ' 
thony Wood, was bom in Jjondon, and edacaited iift^ Otinl^iair 
learning there, studied Logic and Philosophy at Caimbrita||tf' 
tiU he became Hatehelor of Arte; afterwartis went'tsi'htis^ 
where also spending sereral years in PbiloBophicsl abtd ^»d^ 
learning, he took the degree of Master of the said Faeolty^'aad 
became so excellently skilled ki the French tongue, that lie n^ 
thought 6t and •f>poii^:ed to be tntor to the Lady Mairy, dang&^ 
ter of King Henry VIL and siater to onr Kii^ Henry VttK' 
when she was betrothed at the age of 1 8, frova motivea cif sMc^ 
policy, to the i^ed and decrepid Monavch; , Louia XII^^ «i 
France, who very shortly survived the conanminajtioa of -tirip 
unequal match. On the death of this Monarch .Mary» noiebt^ 
come Queen Dowager of Ytvo£»9 waa pfivsiUdy mArriod to ker 
first lover the Duke of Suffolk, and havbg made her peace with 
her Royal Brother for so degrading an act, returned to her na« 



• It 

A *MHLl^MAMiAO'l^ ttBR ART. 41 * 

tive conntiy with lier hasband, and John Palsgrave, our author 
SMMdj^ttMi^iM^^al'Pbpil.' Onhis return he^«^ appointM 
^ki^iill^HetfHy VAL tatil^ht the French language to hiytx^ 
^itMrjlMv^^tMttMy, «nd became well beneficed. In l^dl he 
jjkliJi l»Oifbld'lilr aiime, %nd the next year being incor^rited 
Master of Arts^ was> in a few days afterwards, admitted to the 
^IgO^tfi B»9^elor;«if Dkinity, *' and esteemed the first ^t&or 
alfffga-jfit^lifmiif^ honestt Anthony says,) or of the i^enehmen/ 
U^lNlAMdv^edthe French tongue under certain niksV^ttid^ 
t||^%ft^ilkrtiNlt;kind of exercise that did begin to labouri*^ as* 
jg^lMJlyt l^^pfmw by ik^\% E9<}larn86€ment, which is^a thick fblio;' 
^AfHttolklryjiivided into tbree parts or books^ and preced^by 
^^gpwpiltllil^iiction ill English. ' '-''"''■ ' ' 

Dibdin^ i» hi»^d voL of Ames's Typographical Anti<i(dtiei»>^ 
iOf^p|;i^mfl^,>|^vi]^if ^61^ BXid examined live copies *, and' Gollatibhs 
ol^j^.JPk^lf^by Collins and Herbert are given at p. 366'of^thtEt'^ 

.^^py^aj^lL^at Henry VIII. granted Palsgrave the excluMt^' 
rig|l^,tq,t^,printing^nd profits of this book for seven years.-'" 

;,J^' J 9Wej; "J^ saw/' says. Wood, in his Alhenee Oxoniensis, ' 
%fe^i^ OUQ copy: of this book, which, beitig filled with marginal 
noJbe^^Xby ,wham.l know not) in a scribbling hand, was bdu|(ht 
by][ ^hf lefxn^ Sel.deny a,nd in his librsury at Oxon I perused it^-'-* 

;Mr. Bdoe>'in his Anecdotes of Literature, vol. vi. p. 344, 
h^ gl^ aii> account of this book from two copies in tlie pos- 
aes^ii of the Bishop of Ely and Mr. Douce 3 and Brunet, in 
lii6» Manuel {da' Libraire, has given the collation of a copy, torn. 
iik<ir^.^B,>illttbeMasarine Library at Paris. 

dOEHbdM «|iy8y^ Palsgrave's book is so scarce as ' to be worth 
^Ui^at^liBaiM;. 



» I . ■ . • ■ ■ ■ " 



48 SECOND lOURNBY ROmiD 

The said John Palsgrave hath also (contan^es Wodd) mritten 
several EpUties, and published a Translation of a Book^ inti- 
tuled, Ecphrastes Af^lica m Comwdhm Acoimli, Ot, the 
Comedy efAcolaetus trgmtnttd wie &ur Emglkh TJmgwf, after 
euck a numner tu Chtfdren nre taught m the Gtnmmar Schd^l; 
first ward by word as the Latin lyethj and aficrwarde adtpfd- 
mg ta the sense and fneamng of the Laim sentences, ^. 4io, 
Lmid. 1540. 

Which scarce Play, at F^urmer s sale, sold for 4L 59. 6</. A 
copy at the sale of Hayley*8 library brought 22/. \s. 

An account of this Play, which is a version of the Prodigal 
Son, written originally in Latin Verse by Goill. FnllQi^ins,^ 
may be found in Reed ajid Jones*s Biographia Dramatics^ where 
also an account of P^sgrave may be met with, but containixig no— 
thing more than the account given in Wood*s Athenae, but with.— 
out any acknowledgment of the source whence derived. 

Dibdin, in his edition of Ames, vol. iii. p. 368, describes 
Palsgrave's translation of * Acolastus^ It is also mentioned 
by Percy in his Reliques,* vol. i. p. 134 (note p.) 2d edition, 
1767. 



Porto (L.) Istoria di due Nobill Amanti (Romeo e OMietta.) 

Swo. Fenice. No date. 
Borrpmco, 1817, 15/. 

* See Brunei Manuel du Labrmre for an account of the earliest edi- 
tions of the Latin originaL 



\k- BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBBARY. 43 

sPorio (L d$) RtamB e Proaa^ewS h GwHetia Nwella* Svo, 

• .' : Penice* 1639. 

IM Gr&nBarka, Pinelli, 5/. 5«. 
w-t^ This h the eariiest novel upon the unhappy, lov^ of 
R^meo and Juliet, printed several years prior to that of Ban- 
^deMo on the same subjects 

Th^e.is a translation of it in the Re8 Llteraria, noticed in 
the €rentleman*s Magazine^ Dec, 1, 1822. 

Clisiia LInfettce Amore di Giuiia e Romeo, m ottava rima. 

8vo. F'eneU GMto, 1553. 

• VlaiM, Florence, 1807, 33 francs. 

Bmd^llb's History of Romeo and Juliet was metrically pa- 
)ffdifiirtaa^ by Arthur Brooke, and printed by R. Tothill, 1562. 
"" B!«y(%es,in Phillips's Theatnim Poetarnm, 8vo. Canterbury, 
'iSOO, p. 128, says, "^ the Editors of Shakspeare have discovered 
this td have been the original of Shakspeare's Romeo and 



« < 



t . « . 



Borde (Andrew,) A Boke of the Introduction of Knowledge, 
the which doth teache a man to speake part of all maner of 
languages, and to know the usage and fashion of all maner 
of countries, and for to know the most part of all maner of 
coins of money. 4to. Black letter. ImprinA** by PFilliam 
Copland. fFithout date. 
Dedicated to the Lady Mary, daughter of King Henry the 

Eighth — which dedication is dated from Mountpelyer, May 3,. 

1542. 
Pearson, 1 788, 4/. 15*. to Mr. Bind^y. 

D 2 



44 SBCOND JOURNEY ROUND 

This book is partly written in Terse and partly in prose, con- 
tained in 39 chapters, before each of which are wood cuts with 
representations of men. Before the first diapter, in which he 
has characterized an Englishman, is the print of a naked man, 
with a piece of cloth lying on his right arm, and a pair of sheers 
in his left Land, under which is an inscription in verse, of which 
the following arc the fonr first lines : 

^ I am an English Man, and naked I stand here. 

Musing in my mind what rayment I diall were : 

For now I will were thys, and now I will were that. 

And now I will were I cannot tell what,** &G. 
Before the 7th Chapter is the portrait of the Author himself, 
standing in a pew with a canopy over it, habited in a loose 
gown with vride sleeves, and on his head a chaplet of laurel^ 
with a book before him on a desk, with the following title of 
the said chapter beneath : 

" The VII Chapyter sheweth how the auctor of this Boke 
had dwelt in Scot/and and other Hands, and did go thorow and 
round about Christendom qnd out of Christendom declaring tke 
Properties of all the Regions, Countries, and Provinces, the 
which he did Travel thorow'* 

This Portrait, according to Herbert's Memoranda, served 
also for a Portrait of Skclton, Poet Laoreat. See Dib£n*f 
Ames, vol. iii. p. 160. 

Mr. Upcott edited a re-print of 100 copies of this curious 
tract, with wood-cuts, one of which is in Rivington*s Catalogue 
for 1824, marked at 1/. 11«. 6i/. The cut of the English- 
man from this reprint is given- in Dibdin*s account of it, who 
says of it in conclusion, " this is probably the most curious 
and iuten^sting volume ever put forth from the press of C!op- 
land." 



l*M«PWW^—*"-W 



A BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBRARY. 45 

Andrew Borde was a whimsical. being, and said by Granger 
*o have been Physician to Henry Vllltb 5 whether from his 
fiEac«tiou6 mode of practice according to Phillips^ or from the 
Jdarleqoinism of his pursuits and writings^ he gave rise to the 
iiisune and character of MERav Andrew, seems uncertain : he 
CLppears to have applied his iQind to many subjects, and, like 
ost quacks, to have been equally confident in all. 

The Book of Knowledge, 

The Breviary of Health, 

The Dietary of Health, 
, Merry Tales of the Mad Men of Gotham, 

Merry History of the Mylner of Ahington, 

Book of Prognostics, 

■' Urine^, 

' Roads, 

are specimens of what he aimed at; 

According to Wood's Athenae, vol. i. p. 61, folio, " It was 
Borde*s practice, when living at Winchester, where, as at other 
places, it was his custom to drink water three djiys in a week, 
to wear constantly a shirt of hair, and every night to hang his 
shroud and socking, or burial sheet, at his bed's feet, accord- 
ing as he had done, as I conceive, while he was a Carthusian, 

" He always professed celibacy, and did zealously write 
against such Monks, Priests, and Friars, that violated their 
vow by marriage, as many did when their respective houses 
were dissolved by Henry VIH." 

This zeal caused his opponents to promulgate various scan- 
dalous stories, to the discredit of the Doctor's continence— for 
which see A thence Oa^oniensis. " But lettin<r these matters 
pass, I cannot otherwise but say," continues Wood, " that our 



4ff SECOM) lOUliNl&Y HOOttD 

author B&rdtmia esteetfied Ai^iHtblfb^ a Wfttjr «id ii^^erimuF 
pcrsdtt, And an excellent nyeleian of lil^ ^nie i aild tha* K6 W 
reported by some to hare been, tiot only Physician to Klftf 
Htnry 8th, btit also a Member of the Clikgt 4/ FkftkImB <! 
London, to whom he dedicated lus 

Dreviane o/Heaitk. Ah. 1562. 

DiHo. 1557. 



A Merle Jest of a Man thai was caikd Ihtoiij^iik, Und of 
many tnarveyhus Thhtges and Jeit9 thai kt dfd \n MIf kfflt. 
Ato. With a rude "Htle-page, Tepresentin|^ two mlHui ]^«^; 
one of whom is a Peasant^ holding a pftchfbrk in liis tMM^ 
addressing a Prince with a crown on his head A&d a soepti^ 
in his hand. Printed by fFyliyam Copland^ 
An imperfect copy was in the YMsr of RoxbiafliCi^s ^StfAi^ 

tion^ and sold fot 14/. bs. and is now, I believe, in Mr» He- 

ber B possession. 
Mr. Beloe, in his Anecdotes of literature, toI. L p. 407> &c# 

has ennmerated the marveylous things and jests of this l^fister 

Howleglass, from the table of contents, of a perfect c<^y in the 

Garrick Collection ; and has a specimen at length of how thia 

Howleglto cheated some milk-maids of their cream \ as also a 

" Dialogue between Howleglas and a Scholar** 

It should seem that this Howleglas was a sort of Lazarillo 

or Scapin, and that the book is a translation from the Dutch- 

language, M'herein he is named Ulenspiegle. 

Percy, in liis " Essay on the Origin of the English Stage,** 

8cc. Relics, vol. i. p. 1 26, quotes this old novel to show how 

our ancient mysteries were represented in their most simple 

form^ 



A li^eililOfiiANIAC'S UBRARY. 47 

** It is wdl knowa/* says Percy, *' that Dramatic Poetry in 
ihis a&d most other nations of Europe owes its origin, or at 
least its retival, t^ those religious shows, which in the dark 
ages were usually exhibited on the move solemn festivals. At 
those times they were wont to represent in the Churches the 
Utes and miracles <^ the Saints, or some of the more important 
stories of Scripture; And as the most mysterious subjects were 
frequently chosen^ such as the Incarnation, Passion, and Resur- 
rection of Christ, &c. these exhibitions acquired the general 
name of Mysteries. At fitst they were probably a kind of 
dumb skews, ij^rmingled, it may be, with a few short speeches i 
at length they grew into' a regular series of connected Dialogues, 
formally divided into acts and scenes. Specimens of these in 
their most improve^ state (being at best but poor artless com- 
positions) may be se^ among D^^^^^ys Old Plays, and in the 
HarMan Miscellany.'* How they were exhibited in their most 
simple form, we may learn from a '^ A merye Jest of a man that 
was called Howleglas,'* whose waggish tricks are the subject 
of the book at the head of the present article. After many 
adventures, he comes to live with a Priest, who makes him his 
Parish Clerk. This Priest is described as keeping a Leman, 
or Concubine, who had but one eye, to whom Howleglas owed 
a grudge, for revealing his rogueries to his master. The story 
thus proceeds : " And than in the meanc season, while Howle- 
" glas was Parysh Clarke, at Easter they should play the rcsuv- 
" rection of our Lorde : and for because than the men wer not 
" learned, nor could not read, the Priest toke his Leman, and 
" put her in the grave for an AungeU : and this seing, Howle- 
" glas toke to hym iij of the sympiest persons that were in the 
" towne, that pkyed the iij Maries ; and the Person (i. c. Par- 



4^ S^CQiNP JOmiHBY. KpjOMD 



it 

* 

it 
€t 
t( 



^^..or Rector) played Cluriste, :^dth ,t ba^^^jn.kift tiaad. 
;'.iX)iaa. aaijde Houl^gias to the sypple poi^Kms,. Wheit ihe 
Aungell asketh you whome youseke^ yon viay asf^^ th^ f^- 
hOj\% Leman with one iye. Tim k fortiiiv94 that t)i^.tyine 
was come that they must playe ;. «|i4 the Aongel aske^ thfSfii 
" whoip they sought^ and then sayd tbey^ as Hpwleglas^ad 
" shewed and lerned them afore, and than answered, t^y^ 
" * Wc seke the Priest's Leman with one iye.* And than the 
" Prieste might heare that he was mocked. And when the 
' Priest's Leman herd that, she arose out of the grave, and! 
" would have smyten with her fist Howleglas npk>li the cHeke, 
'^'but she missed him and smote one of the symf^e persons 
'* that played one of the thre Maries > and he gave hcaranothetf 'l 
" and than U^ she him by the heare (hair) \ and that 'seiif 
^his wyie came running hastely to smite the. Priest^s L«nlan>i 
'rand than the Priest seing this, caste down hys bnner^ani 
'^ went to help his woman, so that the one gave the other seise 
<' strokes, and made great noyse in the churche. And than 
'' Howleglas seyng them lyinge together by die eares id die 
*^ bodi of the churche, went his way out of the village, and 
" came no more there." 



Hey wood (Jghn.) A Parable of the Spider and File. 4to, 

Lond, 1556. 
Pearson, 1/88, 21. ISs. 6d,; Gordon, 9/. 9s,', Stewart's, 
1814, 10/. 10.9.> Townley, 16/. 16*.5 G.Nassau, Esq. 1824, 
(the last leaf a reprint in fac simile,) 2/. 12«. 6d. 



A UMiittM^ANiAC'S LIBRARY. 49 

Heywoi^8 fimi) fFifdrke$; contahimg the Spider and the 
Flk, If»'Dkthgu^' cm English Proverbes, and his 600 
Bpigi-tttMiesJ Ato: 1562. 
Miison^ 3/. I3». 6€f.; Farmer, 5/. lO^.j DevonsWre Dupli- 

catite, 1815, 7/;5 rKikff of Roxbnr^e, 21/. 

'Another Siitum. 4to. 1576. Sold at Mr. Strettell's sale 
in 1820 for 7/. 17*. 6e/. 

ffe^wooi's (JohnJ Dialogue on English Proverbes. 4to. 
First edition. 1546. 
Dftke of Roxburghe, 1812,4/. 10*. 

Heywood's largest and most laboured work is tlie Spider and 

Flie,^ iwhich forms a pretty thick quarto in old EngUsk verse, 

jMcilited in the black letter y and at the beginning of each of the 

77 chapters of wluch the Pku^le consists, appears the figure 

of ilie- Author, either standing or sitting before a table, with a 

book OQ it, near a window hung with cobwebs, flies, and spi- 

derfl. By way of frontispiece is a wooden print of the Author 

at full length, and. probably in the habit he usually wore, for 

he is dressed in a fur gown, resembling that of a Master of 

Arts. He has a round cap on his head, and a dagger hanging 

to his girdle 3 his chin and lips appear close shaven. 

Hollinshed, in his Chronicle, says of Heywood, that in his 
Book of the Spider and FUe, " he dealeth so profoundlie, and 
beyond all measure of skill, that neither he himself that made 
it, neither anie one that readeth it, can reach unto the mean- 
ing thereof.'* 

Speaking of the Author of the " Spider and Flie," who was 
also a Dramatic Writer, and a list of whose plays may be found 
in Reed and Jones's Biographia Dramatica, Mr Warton says^ 



« 

€( 
U 



6Q 9W0iiPi/ouit)Wr/Rp)W9 ' 

«" ^iMit )ie was one ^ Ihe veiT firvt* Diaiflptfe Wri^ 

^ whod produced. He dievr tke ]^Uc firon die slagib- «od 

^ introdaocd representatious of finuliar life and popoiar manr 

JobQ Heywood^ aooording to ba^c Reed's apeoiiiit» and 
wbich is extxscted almost Terfaatim from fFood^ Athmue, was 
bom at North Mims^ near St. Alban*8, in Hertfordshire, and 
was edueated at Oxford ; hot the sprigfatliness of his disposition 
not being wen adapted to the sedoitary life of an academician^' 
he went back to his native place, which bdng in the nei^* 
boorhood of the great Sir Tliomas'More, he presently contrac- 
ted an intimacy with that great Maecenas of wit and genins, 
who Introduced him to the knowledge and patronage of the 
Princess Mary. Heywood*s ready wit and aptness for jest and 
repartee, together with the possession <^ great skill both in 
Tocfal and instrumental music, rendered him a fimrarite with 
Henry VXH. who frequently rewarded him very h^hly.f Os 
the accession of Edward VI. he still continued in &Tor> though 
the Author of The Art of Eng^lUk Poetry says it was ^ for 
''the mirth and quickness of eomant^ more than any goad 
<'' learning that was in him.*' 

He continued a great fifivorite with Queen Mary after ehef 
came to the throne, and even till her death, after which, 
being a bigoted Roman Catholic, he became apjMeheadive thai 

some of the severities which had been practised on the Protes 

■ ■ ■■ ' ■ ■ I 

* Anthony Wood^ in his Athena Oxomensta, does not nbscribe to 
tliis opinion. 

-[- Granger, in his Biogp^hical Hist of England, says, ^ I have some- 
inhere seen John Heywood mentioned as Jester to King Henry VHL' 
vol. i. p. 170. 



A BteX^IOMAMAd'S LIBRART. Si 

^tttsin-thepreceediiig reign, might be retidiated on those of 
^ (fdntrttty petsnai^on in that of Mary's successor. Queen Eli- 
zabeth) he thercifore thotight it best for the security of his 
person, and the preservation of hisReligion> to quit the King^ 
dbtti aiid retire to Mcchfiit> Wh^^ he died in 1565, leaving 
seir^Tal'ehflAren behiftd him, to whom he had given liberal 
efticatiWi*. 

'**'irrt8ettllttgat Mechlin," sayw sly Anthdiry Wood, ^isa 
wbtoaer to some, who will allow no Religi(m in Poets, that 

thiis'persoti should above all his profession be a voluntary exile 

/bi»it--' 






J^twif/tt 9 {Stephen) Ttmiayied Pilgrim, bringing Newes from 
iffif Partes of ike fFbrlde^ luch like scarce keatd of h^nre. 
1569. BlfUik letter, mnbeHieked with a grettt nmnder of 
y^Qoi engruvings, 

Rits<»i introduces this writer in his Catalogue of English 
Poets. Beloe knew of only one copy of this Poem, viz. in the 
British Museum, and from the specimen given by him in his 
Anecdotes of Literature, nA. ii. p. 100, I think the world is 
no loser by the rarity of the book. A copy has been recently 
sold (I822)> at the dispersion of Mr. Perry's library, for 26/. 
15^. 6(f. and bought by Mr. Hail. 

Mention is made of this author, and of one or two other 
productions by him, in Warton s History of Poetry, 8vo. vol. iv. 
p. 318. 



A preaiy Interlude catted Nice l^anifm: 
Wherein ye may see 
Hiree braimcet of an yll tree. 
The Mother and her CluIcLren three, 
Twoo naught and one godlye. 

Early aharpe that wyU be thome 
Soon yU that wiU be nanght. 
To be nanght better nnbome 
Better nnfed than naughtily tanght 
4to. Black letter. Land. 1560. 

See Gentleman's Magazine for 1787» p. 400 and 689, from 
whence Beloe has extracted two specimens of the Songs, one 
of which b added here, om account of the extreme rarity of the 
book, no other copies being known than the one in the Rq%- 
burghe collection, and another in the possession of Mr. Vfen- 
geve, of Suffolk. The Roxburghe copy sold for 20/. I9s. 

SONCL ^ ■ 

It ui g^ood to be mery» 

But who can be mery ? . . t > 

He that hath a pore conadenoe > i- 

He may weU be mery. 

Who hath a pore conscience ? tell me : 
No man of himself I ensure thee : 
Then must it follow of necessities 
That no man can be mery. 

Poritie itselfe may purenesse give, 
' You must aske it of God in true belere. 
Then wyl he geve it and nere reprcvc. 
And so we may le mery. 



A BIBLIOMANUG'S LIBRARY. &| 

iWhiit is the practise of a conscience pure ; 
To love and fear God, and other allure. 
And for his sake to helpe hys neig bour. 
Then may we well be mery. 

What shell he have that can and wyll do this? 
After this life everlasting blisse, 
Yet not by desert, but by gyft I wisse, 
Then God make us all mery. 



^^^urchyardes (ThosJ Sparke of Friendship, ^c, 1558. 
^^etUent'wn betwixt Churchy arde and Cornell upon David Dy- 
cera Dreame, Ato. Black letter. 1560-4. 
■0. Stevens, 1800, (with curious M,S. notes,) 41. 9*. • 

Ckurchyardes Lamentable ff^arres w Flounders. 

Mr. Perry's sale, 1822, 5/. 15*. 6d. 
ChurchydrdesChippes.* 4to. 1575. 

Dr. Wright's Library, 1787, 3/. 13*. 6d.} Farmer, 1798, 
18*. 6d.; Fillingham, 1805, 14/. 14*.} Longman, 12/. 

Ditto. 4to. 1578. Saunders', 1 8 1 8, 1 4/. 1 4*. 

The earliest edition of Churchy arde's Ch^es, is of the date 
)565, and only to be found ip. Mr. Heber s collection. 

Churchy arde s Three First Bookes of Ovid de Tristibus. 4to. 

1578. 
Rev. R. Farmer, 1798, SI. 4b.i said to be the only known 
copy, and now in the collection of Earl Spencer, who has re- 
printed it for the use of the Roxburghe Club. * 

* See Censura Literaria, vol. ii. p. 305 and 6. 



S4 'iMOm> lOTOKBYiMUmD 

ChurcA^drd^s Choke, it^. 1579. in Mr. FVe6liiig« €ol« 
lection. 

Chmrokjfarde's Dlaeourte of th$ Queenes Mqfefties enter- 
tmnment in Suffolk and Norfolk, Sfc, 4to. 1579. G. Ma- 
809> 1798, 3/. 3#. 

Ckurckyardei Ligkt B^ndel tfJLmiif Disc€iw*^% ^c, Ato^ 
Blaek letter. 1580. Reed, 1807, U/. 5«^ Perr^^ 1822, W^ 

Ckurcktfttrdes Chance, cantanuMg' Fancies, f^erse^, JSpiiaph^^ 
^c. 4to. 1580. 

Churchy arde 9 Worthiness of Wales. First ediHafk.- itv, 
1587. Fvmer, 1798, It 2*.> Irejawl 1801, 3/. Is. ^ ,..i ,.. 

Churchyardes Challenge.'^ Ato. Black UUea^ ',\\^^3> 
Isaac Reed a sale, 1807, with a copious MS. aQi;oimt o^Chi|^l»- 
yard*8 WorkSj and a small Svo. Tracts ^^tl^/^^ JPisc^mr^e 
of Rebellion;^ 1570, 17/. 10*.) Lpngman, ^A/^. T^lsJ 4pl,,, 

Churchy arde s Musical Consort of Heavenljf Harmome.' ,4^* 
1595. Reed, 8/. 15«.; Longman and Co. 40iC 

This has been copiously descrjibed in the Censora liteiftiia^ 
vol. iii. p. 337, &c. 

Churchy arde' s Honour of the Lawe, Ato» 1596. P^rry, 
1821,10/. 15*. . -,.,.. 

Churchy wrd€ s fVorks, ^s^is. Ato. 1^60, if c, . 

Several of the ^eces in these tolnmes are said to have iieen 
nnknown to Ames or Heii)eit. €ke the D«ke'«f'(RgidBKtr|^s 
Catalogue, No. 3318, where they sold for 96/.; and atlhe thdoe 
of Marlborough s, in 1819, they sold foir 65iL Dihdin, in his 
Library Companion, has enumerated the pieces edhta^nedin 
t^ese volunfes. 

* An account of which is given i|i the Geasora Literaria, vol. ii. p. 307, 



A BIBiilOM AN lAC'S LIBRARY. 65 

JOkurchgttfdes fForks, containing lus ^ Challenge, 4to. 
^^olfe. 1593." *' Chippes. Ato. Mmshe. 1578." And 
" ^ortkmess dffraie». Robinson. 1587." G. Ma8on> 1798, 
1 5/. Its. 

Thos. CLurcliyard is merely named by Philips in Ks TTiea- 
^Tum Poetarum. He was born at Shrewsbury. Wood, in his 
t^sual quidnt manner, gives a curious account of him.* ** Being 
utieh w}dicted to letters when a child, caused him to be care- 
fully educated. When he came to the age of about 17, he left 
Ills father and relations, and with a sum of money then given 
to him, he went to seek his fortune 5 and his heels being 
equally restless with his head, he went to the Royal Court, 
laid aside his books, and for a time, so long as his money 
lasted, became a roaster. At length being reduced in purse, 
he was taken into the service of the poetical Henry Howard, 
Earl of Surry, with whom he lived as his servant four years, 
towards the end of K. Hen. VIII. By the EarFs death in 
1546, he lost his patron, turned soldier, travelled, and Tcturning 
spent some time in Oxon, in the condition at least of an Hospes 
among his countrymen of Wales. After getting employment 
in the Scotch war, where he was taken prisoner, upon a peace 
he regained his liberty, poor and bare, spoiled of all, and his 
body in a sickly and decayed condition. Being now about 30 
yoirs old, he went to Shrewsbury for recruits, and as it seems 
for a time to Oxon. At length he was taken into the service of 
Robert Eaii of Leicester, but found him not such a master as 
Surrey, being as much different as gold is from glass. After 
an unsuccessful fit of love — notwithstanding his farmer resolu- 

^ Athense, t^ I p. 31& 



0i|>e4 twice by means <tf iadies o£.e<Muiid^(Blw>iH inlh«f!|^teltr^ 
appi^ars be ingimtiated himseUL So that- wt«huiig:iiMaieiiMi 
80i]|gbt.)lgiun after a wiie^ and • whether ke took- qaft ib tralb-i* 
cano^.teUi por how hia hte was spent after IddOi*'^ M*j' *^^ 

:,.C)^iirchyar4 died poor, and b buried near SM^ob ii| 8aiati> 
Mfurgaret fl Chnrch^ Westminster. From the Parisli Regiilci^^ 
i^ tpppars his burial was qn the 4th ^ Aprili. i6D4. ^ ' ■ * ^ '«i 

r.Ia Dibdins Library Companion, the productiems <if>Chttrdi^' 
ysyr^'amnsejin print, are said to consist of xvii pieoopj ati&kiS'^ 
there (p. 888) questions if any one possesses a^rfeotf^t^^' I 
them? 

.»\ .. • . ' "^ ■■••; • •• ^ 

Atfe's (Dr. Jo.) General md Rare Memorials Pertdj^nhig'lq 

' the perfect Arte of Navigation, Annejced to the PalraddiiiU 

'Cufnpas, in Platfne. Now first published: ^"^y^iiis after 

4he first Invention thereof Fofw. 1577. ■ -'^ ■ » • v''^ 

Tliis Book, of which 100 copies only were printed," 'WaS'^dftr 

sidered by Mr. Isaac Reed as one of the scarcest m'1;Be Eh|;- 

lish language. His copy sold for 3/. 13s. 6(f. " ''" ' ''^ 

Beloe, in his Anecdotes of Literature, vol. iii p. 263 to 253, 

has extracted the whole of Dee's Advertisement aiid,I;Ur|pdnq-. . 

tion from a copy in the British Museum, on accpantr.o([,tt]^.i|BiT\ 

rity of the book and the whimsicality of the >^ng itodl^ . . * •' 
See a list of Dr. Dec's Works in Chalmers s BH>§r^phieal ' 

Dictionary, vol. xi. p. 387 and 388. ' 

John Dee (says Granger) was a man of extensive learning. 



BidMnfaipimMM duknm^e KMeaed to WRit#a§;enie8d| iM 

IMIMI ai gMfttb'flreiniflHihitiM^ fts Haj Hfi ^kB»^tm^^. 

He appears to*Ui#eMm%y'tanis adbp^ and ft dieall *bat^tfb^ 

Vma prodi|(&^ repatation. He traT^Ued ov^ gr«^i ^Mt W 

Bb»iWi:^urti«fem8 to have been highly esteemed b^'titt^y' 

jeraona of nadc and eonneno^. He pretended that ^ bUtdk* 

*i$i^'0t'.;^p0fmJh^ which he made great use' dC wa^ Uixii^t 

Iklili iqr'Angehi: ahd (irat he was particnlarly intimate -irillrtUh^ 

tribM'«iid.t}abiieL ------ - • 'i_;:>^>^' 



BassenHnus'g Free PFiii a Trdgedtf. 
•* A certayne Tragedie wrytten fyrste in Italian by F. N» B» 
f^j^^^^mpui^Nif^^ BassentinusJ cntitnled ¥iu&n^Wtt} tmd 
^PSW/l^^ ^^ ^V^ifh by Henry Obeeke^ vjhertinWi^Met 
fi^h Jm.nHmnerjjf^ Tragedie, tie deuyilinh dmiM i^^tke 
Popish Religion, dfcJ* Am, Black htter*. No date (wp- 
gf^ei.t^]^ ^^9), *• 

T^jjif^n^ Qf.t^.very old Moral Pteya, A <»py at thi» 
Rdxburghe sale brought the sum of 5/. 1 5^« 6dl ^ ' i 



.it 



.ill^i'L 



^ t!ln9^\fefi. stbBe into which Dee used to call his spirita ^as jsjaccech. 
mdljf'iikw CotlectioiiB of the Earls of Peterboro% Lady Eliz. Germaine» 
th6*'Bnk6 of Alible, and Mr. Walpole. Upon examination it turns out 
to he notUag' bat' a pohshed piece of canal coaL This is what Bader 

" Kelly fDee*8 Coadjutor) £d all his feats apon 
The De?il's Looking Glass, a ston^** 

Hndibras, part iL canto iii t. 63}. 51. 



original Italian^ entitled 'tyagedia del Libert 'ArVihrw, 4ttf. 
1546^ as also a Latin Version by the Aii^r lumii^^'^A 
printed at Genevi» may be both found in the Pnblic' lilinry 
at Cambridge. See> in addition, what Warton, inhisHIMOTy 
of English Poetry, vol ui. p. 185 to 192, 8vo. Load. 181^ 
8ay8 on the subject of Moralities. " ' ' 



fSpen9er»(EdnumdJ Faerie Queene. Fvr$te^Mon. 4^. 159^(^. 

Ireland, 1801,3/. 13^.; Townley, 12/,> Sotheby> 1821,2/.'2i^ 
G. Nassau, 1824, 5/. 5#.; Thorpe, 1824, 3/. 13«i 6tf.-, DHttt, 
4/. l4*. 6</. in russia. • :•.; 

The Poet supposes that the Faekis Queekb, lu»ordinj|^ tl^ 
an annual custom, held a magnificent feast, which cohtinded 
twelve days -, on each of which respectiTcly, twelve s^^eral 
complaints are presented before her. Accordingly, in «i4^ 
to redress the injuries which were the occasion of thesv fetve- 
ral complaints, she dispatches, with pn^per commi^bns, 
twelve different Knights, each of which, in the partioalM ad- 
venture allotted to him, proves an example of some particplar 
virtue, as of Holiness, Temperance, Justice, Chastity 3 and has 
one complete book assigned to him, of which he is the Hero. 
But besides these twelve Knights, sevierally exemplifying twdite 
moral virtues, the Poet has constituted one principal Knight or 
g^eral llero, viz. Prince Ariphur. This persoiKsige «epre* 
sents Magnificence; a virtue which is Hopposed to bethepef- 
fection of all the rest. Fie moreover assists in every Book, 
and the end of his actions is to discover and win G]otiapa9*,.,igF 

^ The Poet intended Gloriana in praise of our Qu'eeR Elizabtth. 



A BlBUpMAN,JU^;S LIBRARY. ^ 

Cuorjr. , III 9 vor4ft in t^ chanuctor the Poe( professes to. pour- 
tl^y ''.The. image of abrare Knight perfected in the twelve 
priyatp moral yirtues." 

. T^ the foregoing^ which is a sketch of the Poem by Phillips^ 
Wltoipka iiephew^ I shall here add Pope's opinion of the " Faerie 
Qf^^n^p** given in 1743-4, only a year before his death, and 
printed in Spence's Anecdotes. 

'. ** After reading a Canto of Spenser two or three days ago 
to an old lady between 70 and 80 years of age, she said, *Uka^ 
I'imt been-.ehotomg.her a Gallery of Picturee.** I don't know 
how it is, but she ^aid rery. right. There is something in 
$pei|s^ that pleases one as strongly in one's old age as it did 
xn one's youth. I read the Faerie Queene, when I was about 
twfjhre> . with infinite delight i and I think it gave me as much 
Iwhfinliiiead it over ^ut a year or two ago.*' 
.' :i.Tbe following are among the most esteemed editions, of 
iS^ensor's Works. 6 vols. 12mo. by Hughes, Lond,, 1715. 
M/I>itto>d vols. 4to, Lond. Brindley, 175L 
. >. JCl!iifctoy by the Rev. H. J. Todd, 8 vbls. 8vo. 1805. 
w.IMtto, byDr. Aikin, 6 vols. 8vo. 180Q« 

It imght be thought rembs in me t6 omit, in a Bibliomaniae^s 

tMjniiY, the mention of 

•»/',■. 

Hi^MPf0r'« (Edmond) ComplakHe, contahung suudrie 9mall Pa- 
ernes 0/ the 0^orld*erarietie. 4io. 159L 

't:3^ 'Hiis inchides the 1st editions of the Ruhm of Tm^, 
Tear^bftheMueee^ Mother Hubberd*e Tale, &c. 
"At the Akhome sale/ May, 1813, af copy sold to Mr* B<^- 

land fot 6// 8*. 

e2 






to ndOKD iODBNBT ftOQirD 

At tbe Rmbuglie lale «< Speuer^ ShtpkHtri^i KMlnti^r, 
4to. 1586. sold lor 21/. 
Ditto, 4to. 1597, G. Nassan, Esq. 1824, 4/. 19#. 
Ditto, 4to. 15;9> first ecBtion. 



J9rjf fTheodorus, Jokanneg-Theodonu, Itrael dej et Maiikeui 
MeruM Collectkmcs Peregrmationum m Indmm OriemUkm 
et Indiam Occideniaiem, xxYpartibus campreAen8€P. Frtmco* 
furti adMitnum, 1590—1634. 25 parii U folio. 

The above is the general title, under which tiie 25 partg of 
this important and rare work is known, and which, wheh com- 
plete, is of considerable value, as the c<^ies I shall presently 
instance will testify. To give an exact and detaikd descrip* 
tion of the different parts and their Tariations, wonld, as Bninet 
aajTS, occupy about 40 pages. I shall therefore only notice, at 
the foot of the page, where the details may be fonnd/ and iai* 
mediately proceed to a few more general remarks on the anljeoti. 

The denomination of *' Grands et petits Voyages'* has beea 
occasioned by the thirteen separate parts which concern tte 
West Indies being printed on a rather larger size, than .the 
twelve which relate to the East Indies. 

The copy in the Pkuis sale, 1791^ was knocked down at 2 1(M1 
and bought in at that price. 

■■ . ■ I. ■ Ill III < ■■■ i mV i 

'*■ I)e Bore Bibliographia InstnietiTe^ ^ 

Camii^ Memoires var la CoUection de grands et petita Vpyagei^ ftc 
4to. Paris. ISOa 

Blbliotheca Paririana. Na 486. 1791. 

Brunei Manuel dn Libraire, ton. i. p. 291. Parit. 1821. 



\ 



A BUIUOMANIAC'S .UBBARY. fil 

AtttheV^ate Q£iMMecly coUectioOi .1813^ «<c9p;r^ .itacfting 
11 leaves^ and some plates^ sold for 12Q/;» and waspunchasfill 
by Messrs. Al^hy who were fortun^tQ enough to complete iwhat 
was wanting, and make some additions^ and in its ImpnoK'ed 
state they sold it to the Hon. T. Grenville for 240/. who has 
since rendered it, according to the Rev. T. F. Dibdins account, 
the most complete OQpy in the world. 

. Colonel Stanley s copy, which was sold in 1813; contfq^ied 
duplicates of parts x. and xi. and a considerable number of du- 
plicate plates ; it was bound in 7 vols, folio, blue morocco, and 
sold for 546/., and I believe now is in the Duke of Devon- 
ihafeVcoHeetaon. '^^ 

'''Mr. Beckford's copy sold at Fottthilli in J823, for 800 gdS^ 
iiimv I do not know whether Mr. Dibditi is correct in Bdyu^ 
itJ v^BS M.'^P^ris's copy, and supposed to be perfect • « • ?• ' 
• ^16 liie library of the Right Hon. T>. Grenville is a cotti^fete 
Itet6f these Voyages, very copiously described in Dibdins' Ef- 
biiekrf. Companion, p. 373, &c. containing also thie English p^ 
iif Virginia,* dedicated to Sir Walter Raleigh by DeBt^j^ It 
fci'priwtothe Latin part, of the same date, PWtncof. ISi^O.-— 
*!lii5 edition of this part is unnoticed by M. Camus* The fdl- 
irfWlig is Its title r • - /^ 

-^ briefe and true report of the neu^ found Ldni of Virginia^ 
dkcovered by Sir Richard Gremvile, Knts in 1 5Sb, tr aviated 
into English by Thomas Hariot, at the ckdffges, of Sir WdUer 
Raieighy and som Pictures of the Pictes^ wtich in the oide 
Tyme dyd habite one part of the Great Brettaine, found in a 
oold EngRsh Chronicle, plates bg J)e Bry, FoVw. Ff:ancof. 
1590, 



.-J ? '. • ■ •,. !• i i^J 



* This coi^ it said to hare cort Hlorley Earl of Oxibri lOa^tiBas, 
who, after many yetrs^ seardi, ol^inBcd it at Frankfort kr that sum. 



tli sBfioto jroMi^EV miftni 

. ' . . . 

The copy of 0. Nassau, Esq. sold, in 1824, for tOOZ^ an^ in 
his Catalogae it is said that not more than four perfect copies 
of this part are known to eidst. 



. ..I 



Frounces (Ahraham) CouHin$e of Pembroke*$ Tvif Clhtftk, 
' eaniemhg the affhethnate Life and unfortunate D^iM' of 
* PhUiU and Amyntas, thai m it Pastoral, this w a FUn^tat, 
4to, London, 1591. 

Dodds, 4/. 7s.i Mason, 3/. ISs. Gd.*, Roxborghe, 6/. V6s. M 
Ditto, with Fraunce's Emanuel,* at Stonders*, iS18, 
13/. 2s, 6d,', Bindley, 25/. 4s., bought by Perry, at whose sale, 
in ]822, it sold for 21/. 10«: 6d, 

Lord Spencer is said to have given White 21/. for his copy; 
White asked 25 guineas for it. 
G. Nassau, Esq. 1824, 5/. I8s, 

— TVrd Part of Ditto, entitled AmhOiis 

Dale, being Tales of the Heathen Gods, in English Hexam- 
eters, 4to. 1592. 

A copy of this third part, which is very rare, with the Title 
and two leaves in MS. sold at Saunders', in 1818, for 15/. }5s. 
This Author is classed amongst Dramatic Writers, but his 
production, says Beloe, can hardly be called a Flay) it consists 
of a translation of Tassos Amtnta, which is interwoven in the 
body of a Pastoral, entitled Ivy Church. A specimen of this 
whimsical performance is given in Beloe*s Anecdotes. Phillips, 
speaking of Fraunce, characterized him as '^ a versdfier in 
Queen Elizabeth's time, who, imitating Latin measure in Enj^- 



I- I- ■;'.• •' 



* O. NaMtn, (th ISsuami onfyj, 1834, U 1^ 



A 9IBL|0MANUC'S LIBIURV. 03 

lisb verse;, wrote his Ivie Churchy and some other things in 

Hexameter: some also in Hexameter and Pentanieter ; . nor 

<■'*".'•.■■•,, . ■ ■ 

was he altogether singular in this way of writing 5 for Sir P- 
Sidney, in the Pastoral Interludes of his Arcadia^ uses not only 
these but all other sorts of Latin measure^ in which no wonder 
he is followed by so few> since they neither become the £ng- 
li^hA nor any other modern language.*' 

•y Hqw ^^roe Phillips's opinion on the subject is» has been 
^ppi^ ii;i onr day, by the attempt and complete &ilnre of a 
celebrated Poetical Lmninary to tread in the steps of Abra- 
H?pn jPraonce. 

^. ^ concise acccmnt of FTaonce, and some of hi& prodncli^^ns, 
i^y be found in the Theatrum Poetarum, 8vo. p. 108, 9 3 and 
also some particulars in Warton, voL iv. Svp, p. 230,- ^ 



•»;:-' 



Hoaiefs (Richard) Lawes of Ecdesiustlcal PoTule, Folio. 

Best Edition. 1723. 
There are various other folio and octavo editions of this 
Work, 

. *' This/* according to Neal, in his History of the Puritans, 
** is esteemed the most learned defence of the Church of ikig- 
land> wherein all that would be acquainted with its constitu** 
tion (says a learned Prelate) may see upon what foundation it 
is built. 

. '^ Several champions appeared about this time (1594) for the 
cause of Episcopacy, but the most celebrated performance, and 
of the greatest note, was Hooker's Ecclesiastical Polity, in 
eight books -, the four first of which were published this year. 



«ftfr ]ii$,}iim^ 'fox wtMiiPtmm mtm^hm^ tutpeciBt^tib^P^lb 

VH»9ie^i io-Uv AMeodotesofiitorator^ ajtya^ :^'>^lber> WiMM 
1(1^ ji^s.I^fo pf Hooker, nor Bitb^ iGmdetoi ^oi\ 40a«y ittiluM 
thut give an aocQont of Hoqker and.hi^ Wriliii§[«»r-qniBlif|( #ny^ 
mention of the Books or Tracts wluch gave occasioif « to his 
writing The Ecclesiastical Polity. Mliitgift had written an 
Answer to the Admonition to tfte Parliajnent, and t^reby^en- 
gii^ in a controversy with Thomas Carjtwrjght, the sa{^>OMa 
A^iithor of it. Hooker> in this his e^'oellent Work^ i^ideruxik 
the defence of our Egcl^iastic^ Establishment, a§ppn,st yvh^ 
Cartwright appears to have been the most powerful of ail the 
opponents."* 

Hooker was some time Master of the Temple, and afkerwards 
Rector of Sishopsboume in Kent There is a Forimt of hiii^'^ 
12nio. Hollar tculp. from Sparrow's Ration^e of the Obimiion 
Prayer ; and another in foliQ> OnU, Faltbome stulp, fronti8{^eee 
to his Ecclesiastical Polity, and according to Granger the best 
impressions are to be fbnnd ii^ the earliest editions of thafwdnc^ 
coQtaimng only the fivis books. ' ^ : -^ 

Much surprise has been repressed at tbc tlev. T. F. IHb£itM' ^ 
omission of this work in his '^ LibrajyXJompamon:"f itis rtV 

* Beloe's Anecdotes of Literature, vol L p. 523, 23, {omi^hes a d^^od 
list of these controversial Writings. 

f lliere is an old folio B^tok, called "* Th Student's. fAbrqfy^^ffk^^ ^ 
from the Athenian OracUsp somewhi^t apj^pxi^^ing to^ |||jp. Qil^jti^ 
|)lap : but a xpere skeleton, both in bulk and matter^ in comp^nso^,^^,. • 
the itcT. Gentlema^ " ff/«eic andryghte usejull^ volume. 



dkit, "iihA'} &0^ notthatin a fatore editioti th^'ltetdfl^ 1^ 
hnt^inmt, will bifrag this EcckAuiicul Caiufnvt^HSl >iay^ 
iMil^tf Isan great gun M in sikndng such pdSty t&i^i^; t 
think he will be perfectly justified; asr a true «oii of the C^r^fk 
MMf^ ittf kh^^ddug bis oppoaent down with lihe'fif8t'#io 
elM^ 0f^o<M(^*« EbcledBSticaiPofitie ; IW^ IM lumii^k^tf^ 
a^d not injure the PortraitI '^ . • v:v aL 

fi'lT ♦»' ••' " •' ■ ' ■ . . - . ■. ,' 'h ; 'jK:: .;.. 

'■U' n-:'.-' '■ ;.;'::„ . ' ■ •" '• • .\. ' .»"•" \,VM'iti 

Hair 9 (J OS A Mundus alter et idem : skfe Terra Australia, amis 
^Aad semper incognha, Src, Authore Mercifrio BrUanmco. 
.6vo. First edition^ with frontispiece ^ Kip. . r. 

$i>ld at Braud*8 sale for I/. 7«.5 atG. Nassans^ 1824. ILlSs^^ 
Reprinted^ with the Maps> in Pratt s edition oj' If airs 
fForhs, 10 vols. 8vo. Lopd. 1808. 

Hafl's (Jqs,J Discovery of a New, World,^qr a^fiea^r^tmi^. 

, fSiouth Indies, hitherto unknown, iy an English Merct^^ %o. ^ 

. No date. Imprinted for U, Blount, ., „v: 

l/nknoion to Ames or Iferbert,, 

;Bfand s sale, 1807, 3/. 7*.^ G. Nassau's, 1824, 21. Is. 

The preceding Work by Hall, Bishop of Norwich, wa^ tibu^ 
Pfptfityp^ w^^ce Pesga Swift horrowed the idea of pulUv^y^s 
Tr^^rels,.^ Mr,. f^fiBipbell, speaking of this satijv^ jSi^ti^liii 



'^ It ik also very prob&ble th^ Sw^ derived some portion of his Vpyage 
to L^ata from Bishop Godwin's ^ Man in the Moon, &r a Discourse of a \ 
Voyagk thOker by Domingo QonsalesP %7o, 16^ *" In this Phflosopl^cal 
Romance,' which was repeate^y printed, Domingo Gonsales, a diipanii- 
tive Spa]iiard> iB supposed to be shipwrecked on an uninhabited Istan^, 



SBOOliD JOURNI^Y BIHJJKP 



» •* 



BtL^u, that Hnder the pretence of deacrilbiiig the Tarra AuHroJ^^ 
Incogfuta, Hall reversed the plan of Sir T. More*8 Utofya, 
and characterued the vices, of existing nations. \ 

Halfs fJ,J ffirgedemUtrium. ; " 

The three first Books, called *'TootUe$§SaUre9,..P0€tu»i, 

Jlc4kkmicai, and Moral," were first printed djr T« Creed Jmr. 

R.Desrter. \2mo. L^md. 1597. 
The three last Books appeared nnder the Title of yhrgeA* 

mUnrhm, The three last Beokes ef By ting Satfree. l2mo. 

Lend. Printed by R, Bradockefor R, Dexter, fyc. 15981 it 

b^ns with Satires of Book 4. 

' This original edition complete is estimated by Dibdm at liL 

Longman and Co. in the BibL Ang, Poet, mark a ci^y at'26^ 

The next edition (of the whole) is entitled Flrgedhmarkhn, 
the three last (in reality all six) Bookes of the By ting Safytte, 
corrected and amended with some addlHons by «/• H. l^nWi, 
Lond. for R. Dexter, fyc. 1599.* 

G. Nassau, 1824, 1/. 1*. 
Ditto. Bvo. 1C02. 

Brand, 21. \2s, 6d.', Stevens, 3/. 3s. 



-where he taught seyeral Oanzas or Wild Geese to fly with a light 
chine, and to fetch and carry things for his QonTeBienGe. He after some 
time ventured to put himself into the machine, and they earned him with 
great ease. He happened to be in this JS^il Chariot when Ihese Oanzas, 
which were birds of passage, took their flight to the Moon, and was di- 
rectly carried to that Planet He giyes a Tery ingenions descrip^n of 
what occurred in his Journey, and alse of (he Wonders he saw when he 
arrived there." 

* See Warton's Observations on l^nse,;Kel.k p^ 1S7, Sva 



A BfBLrOMANtAC'8 LIBRARY. 91 

n^'Med at Oxford. l2mo, 1753. 

O. Nassati, 1«24, 12*. - 

Gray, the Poet; in « letter to his friend Dr. Wkafton; of 
Durham, alluding to this edition,' says, '^Bishop HalVs Satires, 
diiled Vik-^demiarium, are lately republished. They are f|dl of 
splHt and pbetry, as much of the first as Dr. Domiey a&d ftr 
more of the latter; they were m^rttten when he was elMmt 23 Teatv 

' These Satireir, with N^tes by Singer, in addition to Wait(m'f 
observations, have been republished in 8vo. 1824. They- may 
also be found in the 10th volnme of Hairs TVwrhs, Svo. 1806, 
with Warton'^ 'Sates, as well as Mr. Ellis's and Mn Pratt's 
lUostrations. 

Of our Satirical Poetry, taking satire in its moral and 4ig- 
nified sense, ]^all, according to Campbell, claims and may be 
allowed to be the founder : thus in the Prologue to his Satires 
he says — 

I first adyentare with fool hardy migh^ 
To thread the steps of perOons despight : 
I first adyentare, fellow me who list. 
And he the second English Satyrist 
HalVs Prologue to Book 3, implies his knowledge of former 
Satirists. 

" Some say my Satyrs oyer-loosely flow. 

Nor hide their gall inongh from open show : 

Not riddle like, obscuring their intent; 

But, packe-stale plaine, uttering what thing they sieant, 

Contrairie to the Roman Ancitnts, 

Whose words were shorty and darksome was their sence. 

Who reads one line of their harsh poesies, 

llirise mnst he tak his wind, and breath him thrise. 

Mff mute woM follow them ihat have fore-gone, 



8BC0M1I wuamT Borao 



Bui etomot wHJk m J^jImkPkmm* r :.v..:i «• ,.:1 

For looke how fiarw the Ai^jent OqJMJii. ■ "« -' > fT 
PMtfermerSatgmmlMrlihectM; • < - /f^:).fr 
So fiuTo Bill miBfl yacUa ulB thm olcUU^ - - •-. -^ 
Tk better be taa b«d» Omui he ilo bold 

Prologue to B«dL^& 

The first satire of the third fiook affords a fidr specimen or 
the Author, and^ in the opinion of Mr. Ellis, strikingly resem- 
bles the Vlth Satire of Juvenal 3 it exhibits a lively contrast 
between the olden time and the effominacy of thcS^iti^rists own 
cotemporaries. .. 1 <. ^^i 

Book OLr-^ATinK 1 
Time wai, and that waa tem'd the Time of OelA» 1 . 
Whoee world and time were yong» that bow are eldt .. 
(When qaiet Saturn iwaid the mace of Le4d; 
And Pride was yet anhome, and yet uBhred.) 
Time was, that, whilea the Antonne 611 did laal^- . ^, t 

Our hongry Sirea gap^t for the laUiqg Bfaat ..» t 

Of the Dodonian oke& . ^s: 

Could no unhusked akome leave the tri^. 
Bui there was challenge made whose it might hae. ,1 
Andy if some nice and Uknorooa a^^tite r 

Desir'd more daiotie dish of rave delite^ / • 

They scal'd the stored Crab witbclatq^ kne^ • . . ' 
Till they had sated their delicious eie : 
Or search'd the hopefnll thicks of hedgy-iowes^ 
For brierie berries, or hawes, or sourer aloes: 
Or, when they meant to (an fin'st of all. 
They lick't oake-leaTes besprint with hony falL - • 

As for the thrise three-angled Beechnut sheD, 
Or Cliesnut's armed hoske and hid kemeU, 
No Squire durst touch, the Law would not vSM, >- 
Kept for the Court, and for the Kings owaa borcL ' 



A mBLfbHAKVjLb^ lOtUMt. 99 



f ■ 



J ■ 



K \ 



''^^^^ , 






. V - , 



•:i 



Their Royall Plate wm^a^ o# wood, ovitew^ ' ^ . d 

The Vulgar, saYO hia kaiid» elgfthadhc none. 

Their onlj- seller was the neigiilKKir WsoolBet ^ •.:..> 

None did for betfeet cara^ for better lopko; ^ ^ ' '« ' < 

_ • ' • ■ -I 

Was then no paying of ^ BreiMr'S'Soapo^ ; i 

Nor grfeedio YintiicAr mixt the strained grape. 
5^iang»sPaviU^^wafltlie|nraw3r.gwn,^ , ^ .^ ,, , 
Un4er safe shelter 4>f the shadie treen. 
Under each banke men layd their lims along; 
Not wishing any ease, not fearing wron^: 
Cfsd With tiieir owne, iis tliey were made of old, 
Kot fearing shame, not feeling any cold. • * ; .^ ; :> ^o^ 

But when, by Ceres hnswifiry and paine 
Men learii^iio- bury tbefeTitii^gvatne; • 
And faliier Jaavi tanghttiie new fovai Vine- 
Rise on the Elmi^^ with many a Fri^ifly Twine ^. 
And base desire bade men to delTen low. 
For needlease mettals ; tiien ^gan nnackief grow. * 
Then farewell, fayreit age, the worlds best dayes; 
Thriving in 91, as it in age decaies.^ — 
Then crep^in Pride, andPeerishCOTetise; ■'^■•■ 
And Men grew gredy, diseordsns, and nieeu • 
Now Mao, t^t eant baile^follow was widi Beapit, 
Woxe on to weene himselfe a God at least ' 
No aery foole-ean take so high a ffight, 
Tho' she her daring wings in clouds have dight ; 
Nor Fish can dive so deep in yeelding sea, 
Tho' Thetis' self riieald swear her tfafotie ; 
Nor fearefon Beasli ean dig his cave so lowe^ - 
As conld he fiirther than: Earth's centre go; •■ 
As that the ayre^ -the earth, or oceon^ - 
Should shield them finom the gorge of greedy Jjfan. 
Hath ntmostlnde ought better, than his owne? 
Then utmost. Inde is neare, and rife to gone. 
O Nature ! was the World ordain'd for nought 



-\. * 



'' I. J'. 

• Ml 



fp asooifQ ipoBNsir ^9lmTf 

Bttt fill ILui'i maw, tad feed Bfan'i idle dMmglit 7 

T%j Oraadiire's werdf 0«|!«mr'd of tioiftie leeko^ - 

Or naiilf garlick; Imt thy fiinace jeekes 

Hole gteans of wine; and can aloofe detcrie 

liie drunken draogliti of fweete antsnuniBe. ' 

They naked went ; or clad in mder hide. 

Or honte-spon' nuMC^ void 0f fttfndse ^rtder ' 

' Bit Qion canat nrtake-i^'gariih gaadarie ^ - ' 

Ta amite a feole's far-fetched lirerie. 

A Freadi head join'd to necke Italian: 

TLy thighs from Oermanie, and breast fro* Spain : 

An Englishman is none, a fool in all : 

Many in one, and one in scTeralL i!' 2 ' 

Then Men were Men ; hot now die greater ]^ 

Beasts are in Hfe, and Wowen are in heart - . 

Goad natare 'selfe, that homely Bnipeiwu; : .• <,.ii 

In proudest ponfe waa not so dad of yore, 

Aa is the nnder Oroome of die Ostlerie, 

Husbanding it in work day yeomanrie. 

Lo ! the long date of those expired dayes^ ' ' 

Which the inspired Merlin's word fete-says; 

When dunghill peasants i^aUbe dight aa OKinga 

7%«fi eiM 0of^i(i»Mf anodier brings: 

Then fere well, fairest age, the Worlds best di^^ei 

TliriYing in all, as it in age decayed 
In Phillips 8 Tbeatrum Poetarnm, 8to. Canterbury, 1800, 
p. 326, &c. may be found a concise and satisfectory account of 
Bishop Hall. " He is universally allowed^** says Phillips, " to 
have been a man of great wit and learning,, and of as great 
meekness, modesty, and piety." His works, published at va- 
rious periods in folio, quarto, and octavo, ** are filled/' says 
Bayle, '' with fine thoughts, excellent morality, and a great 
deal of piety." 



ife and Dedth of Edmund Getdngisis, Caliag Ironmonger. J 
Ato, Portrait and Ptdtiia. ' St: Omm. ' 1614, ' 

Gnlston^ 2/.; Townley, S/.j G. Nas8au/'l824/btue morocco, 
>2/. 5*. 

*' Edmund Jennings/' says Granger, ^ wa9 admitted into 
t^he English College, at Rheims, under Dr. afterwards Cardinal 
Allen, and when he was 20 years of age', ordafitted Plriet(t. He 
was soon afterwards sent into Englaiid, where he Was appre- 
hended in the act '^of celebratinff Mliss. He was executed by 
hanging and quartering in Gray^s Inn fields, Dec. 10th, 1591.*' 

In the above rare book are several Historical Prints, repre- 
senting the principal drcumstances of his Life and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expence by the Pa^ 
pists, in order to perpetuate the remembrance of two * Mira- 
cles,** which are there said to have happened at his death. 
The first is, that, after his heart was taken out, he said, 
" Sancte Gregori, ora pro me!!* which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, " God*s wounds ! see his heart is in my hand > yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth." The other is, that an holy Virgin 
being desirous of procuripg some relick of himV contrived to 
approach the basket into which his quarters were thtdWn, and 
touched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy from 
its having been emjployed in acts of consecration and elevating 
the Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
of (^scovery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
ihe greatest care* 



V ■ • •. . 



'If. 



99^ flMMD jotnntvf ^' 



M- •' , . ^Vi ■'.•■. •» '*ri''. i fl<k 



jUtme^Sangg and Sotmets. 8ro. For Mai. Bmtler. 1622# 

^SPi^il Portrait of the Author &n the engraved Title. 

" Of this Sonnetteer/ mjn Gnmg^r; ^ol. iL p. 1^, *'l find 
no mention made l^ any of our Bio^phicaT AnihoSn^* 

Beloe, in his ^ecdotet. calls the above '' a bpoV mr no^ 
meant of common occarrcnce ^'* aqd from its eaitinMttiya jpiong 
Collectois, if we may judge from the priee it haft. obliiaBd in 
three recent sales^ he appears to have been pretty eonreolib hb 
appreciation of its rarity. >• l•^^ 

At Mr. Bindley 8 sale it produced 35/. 14^.; at' i/trlTitrjB, 
1 822. 38/. 6*. described as containinir the Portruts otHannay 
and of his Patroness^ Anne of Denmark. ^^Jr M^Sfjkfi^Ji f^VJf 
which had been Mr. Bindley s, sold> ia 182^» fojr 4^4 ^Av* ^ 

The following extracts may be £cmnd in Beloe« Anetdofes 
of Literature^ vol. vi. and which I hope I shall be excused fo 
abstracting, considering the value of the Book cited« and th^ 
difficulty of obtaining even a glwce at such Bibliomaniac^ 
Desiderata. :• ^v»:t^«^^ 

Bs)ierienced Katiire in Uiis latter age. 

Willing her master-piece skcmld then be wroo^t. 

Such ny 6ire Celia set on Earth'a large uUg/^ - r* ' '^ 

As all the Gods in emulation brooght, ' - 

For they did thinke if Nature only might 

iBrag of her worth, she should insult o're them^ „ 

Wherefore they *grted. to have an equal right. 

That they of her perfisction part might daimc : ** ' ' '^^ * "" 

Pallas gave wisdoQie, Juno stateHnein, * '-^.< ^T* 

And the milde morning gave her nedestie ; *-'^-- vt 





^^^^. ., .^..^ .^ r^^^^BM 1^ naoe Aer BUM.' ' 

Kfurlel itMines east HeaveD adorne^ . ,. 

Caefaa^i caamber aped : 

^^ H4||Mi]tok'«allto^iiliy'did^^cloatk»1^ ^.«<^> ) 

flka fiv^iglil and tall, her treaaea trailed* i».f^tm»^ .,\ .;« v; : . < . f #; 
•V V»#f^^/!**^ thmkiiigiaydeereJbadfeee^ ; , ;i ;/ i,i.. 

W|Ui taMiUl bliudi mj blisse fled I once aeene, ^ . 

^^'^^''IJIi iife^tmiia&med aa it were in stone, 

»W "rtkilSrfl^ftkWevertohaTcriStaained, ' r ^. >*^ ;! *./ *f 

iWl^>>llli* iUi^Hbiit <ti^*d, afcd 1 my aight retaiaad. i ^ ^ . ^ >^r 

<?i iMJiW/": * ■». - •.».,:■• 'V. . . • ' ^- .y' J: .i-: :■') t.^ >"> 

DnylM*« (Michael) Poly-Olblon, with the second p^fUfaii^^ 
. From$i$piece mid Portrait of Prmpe Hmtjf.by Sfo^e^mid uU 
§he other Pia/fiNt,^ . J613— 162?, 

CoL SUiiley*8Md6^ l8iS> Ul^e.ed.^ 6. NadMyE«At/i824, 

^ ........ ., -.. .- 

** la 1613," says * PhiBips's Thratnim Poetaiim>8vo. IpOO/ 
** Dim3Ftoa pni^isked the "first part cf his Poly-iofbh^ by^whidi 
Qnek title, 8igiiyfyu^.«<fy.Ji«y9^^ a» 

the aotknt name of Albiaa is hy Msie dermd ^raw - Olbioiv 
happy. It is a chorographieal dcseiiptioii 4>f the liTtrs^tHOiia- 

F 



*> 



,»i^^i iii,U9 AMOcdotesof LUeifatiura^ wya^ ^' K^itber. WfttM 
i^Ji^s.I^fo pf Hookey nor Bitb^ G«iidai« em ^nany iitivim 
thut give an aocQont of Hoqker and ..hi9 WrMini«j»-90llft' #09 
mention of the Books or Tracts whkh gave occasion, to his 
writing The Ecclesiastical Polity. Whitgift bad written an 
Answer to the Admomtwn to ilte Parliafneni, and tht^by en- 
gii^'in a controversy with Thomas t!arlbwHgkt> the sopfHiMa 
Autlior of it. Hooker> in this his exoellent Woii;, ^derum: 
the defence of our Eod^iastic^ Establishmeuty agj^n^t y^hjucm, 
Cartwright appears to have been the most powerfdl* of all the 
opportents."* 

Hooker was some time Master of the Temple, and afterwards 
Rector of Sishppsbonme in Kent There is a Bartriut' of Hth^"^ 
12mo. Hollar iculp. from Sparrow's Ration^ of the€ditttiion 
Prayer ; and another in foUp^ Ouil, FaUkome sculp, frontisj^^ 
to his Ecclesiastical Polity, and according to Granger the focist 
impressions are to be fbnndii^ the earliest editions of' that "Wmc, 
coQlaining only the fivis books. * ( "■ > 

Much surprise has been expressed at the Rev. T. F. Dib^^'^ 
omission of this work in his *^ Library fJfmpaMon:"\ its'itr' 

* Beloe's Anecdotes of Literature, vol L p. 523, 23, fiuniishea a d^^tafled 
list of these controversial Writings. ,..,.,...: 

•]- lliere is an old folio Book, called "^ Tke Student' a. fJ^rt^^^f^l^^ i 
from the Athenian Orofilesp sonieirhi^t apy r <«»y«ti "g . tOj 1^ ^ ^^^ ^ i^,] 
|)la^ : but a mere skeleton, both in bulk an4 ™^.^T> in .coiiqp|M[^|^;ptit, . , 
the RcT. GentlemaiE^s " jr/«eie andryghte turfull^ volume. 



fKII»(ii(fl^')^l«db8^ay ioqpte^ dui^ IbHilk' aM* 

dkit, 'iihd'} dfipbk not that in a (otore edition tk^'ltetdo^ 1^ 
fiooMMk^, wiU bring this BcckAtfHcmi Cam^n ioU>'ha i^^ 
tod'lf 'ly|f-^^ii/^» M in silendng such petty t&i^kW/ 1 
think he will be perfectly jostifted/asr a true «on of the €f^r^% 
MWidir, itti IdtObking bis opponent doim with tih6-fik^li[io 
<ditite ^Hooktrs BtdedasticaiPoHtie ; iVut liet hhniriLe li^iA 
^d not injure the Portrait! ' * ; v.^i :ib 

■:r|T *!.- .•.-■ ■. • . ••■ ' •■ ' •■ '■■•■' " r '■•■.•. . V ■ OP': i.r, 

•;-• r>', '.■* •- ;•■ V 'ii.. ■. ' ■ •" '• = ■' •\- ' M* '" yiVM'\t< 
••n . ■-.*-' .•■..■• • • ' ^' •• >^ -v. ^ ■■ ■' ■ i"^'- nP" 

Hall s (Jos,) Mundus alter et idem : me Terra ^ustralifi.mUA 
^iioc semper incognka, Sfc, Authorc Mercurlo BrUanmcp* 
'Bivo. First edition^ wUh frontispiece i^ Kip* . ,, 

$old at Braud*8 sale for \L 7s.', atG. l^^assans^ 1824, 11. 13s. y 
Reprinted^ with the Maps^ in Pratt s edition o/ If airs 

f Forks, 10 vols. 8vo. Lopd. 1808. ". V' 

HM's (Jos,J Discovery of a New. World,,qr a.Dea^r^tmn^i^. 

, South indies, hitherto unhnoum, by an English Menmf^ %0; ' 

.^0 date. Imprinted for JS. Blount. 

UnknoiontoAmesorlferbert^ 

Brands sale, 1807, 3/. 7s.} G. Nassau's, 1824,2/. Is. 

The preceding Work by Hall, Bishop of Norwich, wa^ tibe 
prptptype Wjh^ce I>ea^ Swift borrowed the idea of QulllTey^s 
IWels^^ Mrv f^.^mpbell, speaking of this satirical Apti^tu 






'^ It is also very probable th^ Sw^deriredflome portion of his Vpy age 
to Lapata from Bishop Godwin's ^ Man in the Moon, or a JXscotirse^qf'a 
Voyage thUher by Domingo Consoles,** Svo. 1638. ** In this Phflosopl^cal 
Rbnian^' which was repeatedly printed, Domingo Gonsales, a diiiuna- 
live Spaniard^ is supposed to be shipwrecked on an nninhabited Istan^, 



OB 5B00ND JOURNSr lUHJ^. . 

says, that Hnder the pretence of deaoifaing the. 7Wr(( -^vftrfij^m 
Incognita, Hall reversed the plan of Sir T. More*8 Utopa^ 
and chancterued the vices, of existing nations. . . > 

Haifs fJ,J fflrgedemUtrium, . i -'I 

The three first Books, called '* Toothleu Saiir09^,P0eiki^ 

Jlcademicai, and Morale" were first printed djr T» Creed ifif. 

B**DeMier. l2mo. L4md. 1597. v i<: 

The three last Books appeared nnder the Title of yirgeA' 

miarimn. The three last Beohee of By ting Satyree, 12iftio. 

Lend. Printed by R. Bradochefor R, Dexter, fyc. 1398l ft 

b^ns with Satires of Book 4. 

' This original edition complete is estimated by Dibdin at lli& 

Longman and Co. in the BibL Ang, Poet, mark a copy at'2fiL 

The next edition (of the whole) is entitled Flrgedhntaiitiinf 
the three last (in reaHty all six) Boohes of the By ting Sdtytiik',' 
corrected and amended with some additions by J, H. tinW: 
Lond. for R. Dexter, Sfc. 1599.* 

G.Nassau, 1824, 1/. 1*. 
Ditto. Svo. 1C02. 

Brand, 2/. I2s, 6d,', Stevens, 3/. 3s, 



where he taught seyeral Oanzas or Wild Geese to fly with a light 
chine, and to fetch and carry things for his QonTenieiiGe. He after some 
time yentored to put himself into the machine, and ihey carried lum with 
great ease. He happened to he in this JS^il Chariot when these Oanzas, 
which were hirds of passage, took their flight to the Moon, and was di- 
rectly carried to that Planet He gi?es a Tery ingenions descrip^n of 
what occurred in his Journey, and alse of (he Wonders he saw when he 
arrived there." 

* See Warton's Obserrations on l^n8e,;Ml' i p 1S7, Svow 



A BfBLrdMANtAC'8 LIBRARY. $f 

^^fkieddtOaford. Unto. 1753. 

•'OVNa^sati, 1-824, 12*. . '^ . • 

Gray, the Poet, In a letter to lii» friend '!>r.Wkaft6fi; of 
Hhirham, alluding to this edition, says, '5 Bishop HalVs Satires, 
c^yifid V^^demiariam, are lately repuUished. They are fiiS of 
spiHi «n(it i^oetry, as much of the first as Dn Domiey abd ftr 
tnore of the latter ; they were n^tten when he was about 23 yeai^ 

>^^se Satbeff^ with N<6te9 by Singer, in addition to Waitiin^ 
observations, ha^'e been republished in 8yo. 1824. They^maj 
also be found in the 10th volume of Hairs fForks, Svo. 1808# 
With Warton ^ Notes, as well as Mr. Ellis's and Mr« Pratt's 
Ilkistrations. 

Of pur Satirical Poetiy> taking satire in its moral i^d 4ig~ 
nified sense, J^all, according to Campbell, clsdms and may be 
idlowed to be the founder : thus in the Prologue to his Satires 
he says — 

I first adyentare with fool hardy migh^ 
To Ihread the steps of perilous despight: 
I first adyentare, follow me who list. 
And he the second fioglish iSatyrist 
HalVs Prologue to Book 3, implies his knowledge of former 
Satirists. 

" Some say my Satyrs 0¥er4oosely flow. 

Nor hide their gall inongh from open show : 

Not riddle like, obscuring their intent; 

fiat, packe-stafie plaine, uttering what thing they meant, 

Contrairie to the Roman Ancients, 

Whose words were short, and darksome was their senoe. 

Who reads one line of their harsh poesies, 

llirise must he tak his wind, and breath him thrise. 

My mute woM follow them ihat have fore-gone, 



I 4 



■ . » • 

Bui etomotwUk m Mmjlmk Pmnmt r .^ o^ ^'^;!1 

For looke howfiurre Om Ai^bieiit OolMdM " -. ' ^rft 
PMtfermerSatsmmlMrLAeKtie; • * v-^UAT 

So fiurre mil miad yacUa ulB tkMi fllWdi^ '. I * '^tiu'^. 

Tk better be tooibodftlMaikeilo bold. ?}.<// 

Ptologae to B«d|}Si 

T 

The first satire ci the ibird Book affords a fidr ^paotn 
th^ Author, and, in the opinion .of Mr. EUis, stnldngly r 
bles the Vlth Satire of Juvenal^ it exhibits a lively cp 
between the olden time fipd the ejBBpninjMry of thc; S^jj^if^ 
cotemporaries. - .. -itf.^i 

Book DXr-rJSlATUis 1 . w.i^ Jtiit 

Timewai, andtbatwMiterai'dtkeTiBioof OoldUr |. :/. 
Whoee world tnd time were yong; that bow art M,t '. .-. /. 
(When quiet Satora swaid the aiacc of Le4d; ^. :) 

And Pride was yetanbomei, and yet vabred.) ^ ^ u^ a 
Time was, tiiat, wbfltatiieAiitHaine&lldidiaat^' . .. inl 
Our hnngry Sirea gap't £ar ,tbe laUiag. Mait : . . c . ..i r 

Of the Dodoaian oke& . ^I'l 

Could no unhoflked akoma leaye the tr^. • . . . t . ; { 
But there was challenge mfuAt whoBO it plight baa. .1 
Andy if some nico and Ukuoffwaa^Hietite , . r- ,• /r 
Desired more daintiedidi' of rave daUt!e» ^ . - fi 

They scal'd the stored iCrrab .iiritbclatq^ kaa^ ; ^ ...'* 
Till they had sated their delicions eie : 1 

Or search'd the hcq^t^fnU thicks of hedgy-rowes^ > : ^: 

For brierie berries, or hawes, or sourer aloea; 
Or, when they meant to fiure fin'st of ally -^ .0 

They lick't oake-leaTes besprint with bony falL . • ^ « 
As for the thrise three-angled Bcechnat shdl, ^ - /.' 

Or Chesmif 8 armed hoske and hid kehwU,' ' ' . .*'i^A 
No Squire durst touch, the Law woiild nol a&r4» «- ' 'i^H 
Kept for the Court, and for the Kings owBobonL < ■' ■•' I 



.< 



-A 



t ■ 



J 



. r.. 1.1 ; 



*'/•<• *w:. . ■*.• .» «■ .; • • ••• --^ ■. .-. ■^■,:\ 



.t\0 ' 



A BIBL|6HAiAA€fa UJULAXi. $9 

t 

Their Royall Plate w«i«l«^ or wooi, w (hltae^ ' /.; i^^ii 

The Valgar^ saye k« luttd, elie htid he none^ ''' - '* '^ 

Their only seller was the neighbour hfookee ' 

None did for fa«tler care, for better loplra* 

Was then no paying of the Brewer's aoaf^ 

Nor grbedie Y intner mixt the strained grape. 

fk^. I^ing^ PayHiQii was t|ie grassy gr^n, 

Un4er safe shelter of the shadie treen. 

Under each banke men layd their lims along; 

Kot wishing any ease, not fearing wrong: 

Clfttd with ^elr owne, as <!iey were made of old^ 

Not fearing shame, not feeling any cold. 

But when, by Ceree hnswifiry and paine 

Men learM tobnry tiie reTiYing gvatne; 

And faArer Jaang tanghtlbe new fovnd Vine 

Rise on the ISHrn^, itrith many a Friendly Twine t. 

And base desire bade men to dehren low. 

For needkne metbds ; then *gan misdtief groir. ' 

Then fiurewell, &yrett age, die worlds best dayes; 

Ttunring in ill, as it inage decaies.^ — 

Tlien crep^in Pride, andPeefishCo?e(iso; 

And Men grew gredy, discordsos, and niee. - 

Now Man, t)iat eant kaile-feUew was with Beafit, 

Woxe on to weene himselfe a God at least 

No aery looleeaB take so high a ffight, 

Tho* she her daring wings in clouds have dight ; 

Nor Fish can dive so deep in yeelding sea, 

T%o' HMtts* self shoald swear her Safetie ; 

. Nor leirefidl BeasK ean dig bis eaye so lowe^ ■ 

As ooold he finrilier than Earth's centre go; 

As that the ayroyihe earth, or ocean^ 

Should shield them fimn tlie gorge of greedy Man. 

Hatb utmsst- Inde ought better, than his owne ? 

T%en utmost Inde is neare, and rife to gone. 

O Nature ! was the World ordain*d for nought 



up WOONQ ipCB^Y ^9V^P^ 

Bui fill Maii^i mmw, aad lieed Man's idle iiioiiglit f 

I%7<}rmBdtir5*swordi9a:Fpar'iofdiiHtiele«ke%. ^ 

Or mnlj garlick; Imt tliy fiinitceTeeket 

Hote itoaBM of wine : and can aloofe descrie 

llie drunken draoglita of fweete antmnmitie. 

They naked went; or clad in mder bide. 

Or homespun' nuael, void of ibihraSse ]^iMr: ' 

'%ttlioacanatnuiake-i»gariikKaadcrie^ - th 

T« imite a fbole's far4etdied Kverie. : « !/- 

A French bead join'd to necke Itafian : 

TLj thighs from Oermaiue, and breast fro' Spain : 

An Englishman is none, a fool in all : 

Man J in one, and one in scTeralL ' '' ^ '->"'' 

Then Men were Men ; bat now the greater jMort " 'i'^ :^ 

Beasts are in Hfe, and Women are in heart ! ' r> :i<,^ 

CUiad natmre *selfe, that homely Bmp c f mu, : ^^.:ii 

in proudest pooqpewaa not so dad of yore. 

An is the under Oroome of the Ostlerie, 

Husbanding it in work day yeomanrie. 

Lo ! the long date of those expired dayei^ ' ' ' 

Which Uie inspired Meriin*s word fore-sayt; 

When dunghill peasants shall be dight as Kings 

Tftcft MM oon/witDfi anodier bring*: 

Then fare well, fairest age, the Woilds best dayes 

Tliriying in all, as it in age decayes. 
In Phillips's Theatrum Poetarom, 8vo. Canterbury; ISw^ 
p. 326^ &c. may be found a concise and satisfrMstory account of 
Bishop Hall. " He is universally allowed/ says Phillips> '* to 
have been a man of great wit and learning,, and of as great 
meekness, modesty, and piety." His works, published at var 
rious periods in folio, quarto, and octavo, *♦ are filled/ says 
Bayle, " with fine thoughts/ excellent morality, and a great 
deal of piety." 



-tLi/e and Dedfh of Edmund Gtnmget, faliatt Ironmonger. J 
Ato, Portrait anH Plates. ' St: Omers. 1614. ' 

Gulston^ 2/.; Townley, 5/.j G. Nassau/ 1824^ Wue morocco, 
12/. 5*. 

*' Edmund Jennings/* says Granger^ ^ was admitted into 
the English College, at Rheims, under Dr. aftervnords Cardinal 
Allen, and when he was 20 years of age> ordained Priest. He 
was soon afterwards sent into England, where he Was appre- 
hended in the act of celebrating Miiss. He was executed by 
hangiDg and quartering in Gray's Inn Fields, Dec. 10th, 1591." 

In the above rare book are several Historical Prints, repre- 
senting the principal circumstances of his Life and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expence by the Pa* 
pists, in order to perpetuate the remembrance of two * Mira- 
cles,** which are there ssdd to have happened at his deathi. 
The first is, that, after his heart was taken out, he said, 
" Sancte Gregori, ora pro me!!* which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, ** God's wounds ! see his heart is in my hand > yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth." The other is, that an holy Virgin 
being desirous of procuring some relick of him| contrived to 
approach the basket into which his quarters were thrbivn, and 
touched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy from 
its having been employed in acts of consecration and'elevating 
the Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
or ^scovery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
the greatest care. 



f'.- 



a. 



91^ aMOMi aoDaannt>4nMtt. *• 




y/MM — 8ong9 tmd Sotmets. Svo, For Mai, Bniler. 1622.^ 

With Partriut of the Author &m the engraved 'Hile. 

•' Of this Sonnetteer,*^ says Grktigwr; iiAilL p. I^^^'l And 
so mention made by any of our Biocraplucaf Aulho^i. 

Beloe> in his ^ecdotes^ call^ the above ** a bode .bf no 
means of common occiirn^iQe^'* and from jtf egtimntipa jpong 
Collectois, if we may judge fpom the {uioe jt hnaoblabKd in 
three recent sales, he aj^iears to ha?e been pretty correolib hik 
appreciation of its rarity. * **^'^ 

At Mr. Bindley's sale it produced 35/. 14^^; at' tifrrf^ry's* 
1822, 38/. 6«. described as containimr the Portraits o^'Swnnay 
and of his Patroness, Anne of. Denmark. J^\rM«Ss]^%J.fopy> 
which had been Mr. Bindley*s, sold, iiv 182^4,.i(«r 42^ IQv* 0dl 

Hie following extia^ may be Ibnnd in Bekee Aaatdoteis 
of Literature, vol. vi. and which I hope I shall be excused fo 
abstracting, considering the value of the Book cited, and tB^ 
difficulty of obtaining even a glance at such Bibfiomamaod^ 
Desiderata. •• " > '' '^V^. ^'^rn^^S. 

Expeneiiced Nature in this latter age. 

Willing her ma«ter.piece should then be mroa^lii^ ' * . - * V^. 

Sodi^ my if^t C«lia set on Earth's laige iUfe« ' .- • : .^^ \ ■> *.-'*^ 

As all the Gods in emolation brought, V.; 

For the J did thinke if Nature only might 

Brag of her worth, she should insult oYe them;; 

Wherefore they 'greed to haye an equal right. 

That they of her perfection part might clidmt : ' '*■' 

Pallas gave wisdome, Jmo stateHneSK, ^- *' ' '^^ •■^^ 

And the milde morning gave her SMdcstie; *''f i^ 



■ ■'* ; 






Aa4 «a, Witt acfunet Itmrnea east Heaven adome^ , ., 

Iti bv«nMi]te«iW»l6itaito«dcloatli»)M»ri«tt^ ^ivt^I^/) 

%ki\ tWiminmh tOilm wi^^rkite^ her basA^iereiuf^ - ^.^ j^.i. •intr 

fliM itraigbi and tall, ker tresaes trailed to'4prf«n4^ . .,\>;j>; si:;#i 

Wim Dashtuu Dlndi my Uisse fled I once aeene, 
^ V ^ %JUi w» tranwHtned as it were m stone, 

*^ tytiKl-i^liliaieYcrtoliaYcretaained, ' >- -.>t ;I>*.^*^ 

i^^'teidtiie'lNiltfli^'d^andlnijfliglitretaiiHA ^^ -^'^v: ^ff 

»»:+t i:u-S /.■>'-•.> "t ••>>'' ' ■• • > ' '■ ■ ' .••' ..." . .■--.:. ^^ ;.-. •■^i>(t\5<w■';^. 

i*.*viJtm;iv--' *i ^; • - ^ • • • .> . . .V. .•• »• \'?jj^a*x:; 

thni§^9 CMlchaelJ Poly-Olbum, with tie seemed pmU.^iJmf^i 

. jnromHspiece and Portrml oj Prmpe HmrSf .^11 M^^l^ ^^ 
ike ether Pleiee, .1613—1622, ,. .; ,,.. -^n 

C^ St«aley*8 8dto» I8ld> U l%e. Gd.) 6. N^lrtte>^Si^.'t824, 

U .......■• ;.', - >■ y- 

: <' Ib 1613/' says '■ Phiffips's Tkeatnim Poetonim^Syo 1^00/ 
** DraytOB pubUsked the tot part of his Poly-^bh^ by vhidt 
Qfoek title, signyfyii^.o^.Jw^^, he denotes Eaji^aad:^ as 
the antient name of Albion is by seeie 4effived ^ontOibioay 
hafipy. It is a chorogtaphieal dcscriptioii ^ the livert^iBOBA- 

F 



«> 



{ 



M fMOom ^loiamBiroittiiniar 

•Utir VMidoiMJifi for which, mmm wMM'Jme mipectPifiii^pilO 

^F^lii^ibih^ AU»^' fimirvhoMcqpy abeyyp«Ri |i9Qllid iiteil 

<)i#l4^» iahii AMocdotes of litoratme, 4iiy% f'M^ilber.WdM 
^■^Jy^JMfe of Hooker, nor BUhop <««nidm# boc^ 4Mu^r iiidiiirs 
thutgivean aocotint of Hooker and.biQ Writiiig«i»qw)ifti^ 
mention of the Books or Tracts which gave occasi^.tohis 
writing The Ecclesiastical P(dity, M^tgift had written an 
Answer to the Admonition to tJ^e Parllafnent, and th^idby^en- 
gaged in a controversy with Thomas Cai^twrig^, the snpposea 
Autlbor of it. Hooker, in thb his e^'oellent Woi^ ;^ndeit<jfllE 
the defence of our Eodesiastiail Establishment Agjpuirt ^hich 
Cartwright appears to have been the most i^owerfal' of all die 
opponents."* ' \ 

Hooker was some time Master of the Temple, and afterwards 
Aector of Bishppsboume in Kent. There is a I\)Ftrait' of hhn^' 
12no. Hollar fculp. from Sparrow's Rationisle of the Comiiion 
Prayer ; and aiiother in folip^ OuU. Faitkome sculp, froutisj^^ 
to his Ecclesiastical Polity, and according to Oranger the best 
impressions are to be fonnd ii^ the earliest editions ofthatirbrk, 
containing only the five books. '} 

Much snrprise has been expressed at the Key. T. F. DibdiiiM" 
omission of this work in his '^ Library .Compamon y*f its lie* 

* Beloe's Anecdotes of Literature, vol L p. 23, ^, fiumiahes a dotsjlod 
list of dieae controTersial Writings. 

rj- Hiere is an old folio Book, called "< The Student's, IJirtBr^f.fek^ i 
from the Athenian Oracles^** somewhi^t aj)yrpximating to. Mjip. Itfbd^Ul^ 
plap : but. a inere skeleton, both in bulk and matter, in coiap|i,i^i^ wltt^ • 
the ItcT. Gentlema^ ^ sieele and ryghte usefull^ Tolnme. 



d^nt^'ihflvl dci^bt not that in a fotore edition tM'lteadc^ 1^' 
K^nmki^, wiU bring this EcekfHokical C^<iM9it'iiJtb'M'^Uy> 
^iltfd^iClaks great gun ftul in silencing such 'pf^ ^4^)^','1l 
think he will be perfectly justifted/asr a tfae«ota oOhe €f^r^% 
MUkdininiA6dimg bis oppoikent ^yim with <fti«'fiMl{|[io 
€diti^ <yr^o0^i^*«£t^)edAdticai Politic /IVvt let himirice'\iikAf 
^d not injure the Portrait J ' -^^ . ! vi% -.ib 

i>iif 4>.' /.- ■•. ■.. '■- f .* t ,. .•-,••"■ .. .;..J; .,: '^♦, ^tuitfi >ir< 

JjfW/ ^ (JosjMundusaher et idem : she Terra f^^HtvaliaMUt 
wwui semper incogwfa, fyc^ .futhorc M^rcjfrh ^i^jfan^nffi^f 
,fivo. Pirst edition, with frontispiece ^ Kw* . . ; r* 

Sold at Brands sale for XL 7s.\ atG. Nassans^ 1824, 1/, 13a.^ 
Reprinted, with the Maps> in Pratt s edition o/ ffall's 
fForhs, 10 vols. 8vo. Lond. 1808. "/ i 1 

Hfiil's (Jqs,J Discovery of a New. ^orid^t^r.a.jl^es^f^tmf^. 

. . fSoufh indies, hitherto unknown, by an thiglish Jkfer0^^>. %a; ) 

.J^O,date^ Imprinted for JS. Blount, , .. ,,,,V' 

Unknown to Ames or Jferbert^ , / ..,: . 

^iiandssale, 1807, 3/. 7s.', G. Nassau's, 1824,5/. 1*. . ,. 

The preceding Work by Hall, Bishop of Nond^cb, w)B«i-tihe. 

PSQlHi<^¥F^ Wjh^c^ BeaiL Swift Jiorrowed the idea of ,(^ul}iv)^s 

Tt^^* Mr, Csunpbell, speaking of this satif^ A^tJ^M 



') • 



'^* ftik also yery prob&bld thitt Swift derived Dome portion of his'Vp jage 

to Lisq^ta from Bishop Godwin's ^ Man in the Moony or a Piacourse^of'a^ 

ViO^k thither hy Vonungo GonaalesP ^o. 1638. *" In ihii PhiloBopkcal 

tidnikiiikbe,' wmch was repeatedBy printed, Domingo Gonsales, a dixmnu- 

tiV^'l^^arc^ \a supposed to be shipwrecked on an uninhabited Island, 



SBCOND JOURNRY EOJU^B. . 

8&y%, that Hnder the pretence of deacrihiiig the TVra ^u/Hrafh 
Incognita, Hall reversed the plan of ^ T. More*s Utop^ 
and diaiaderused the vices, of existing nations. .. ..^ 

HaiVs CJ,J ffirgedemUirium, • i T' 

The three first Books, called " Tatrthieu Suiirefy F0eiUisi, 

Jtcademkfoi, and Mora!,* were first printed djr T* Creed fif. 

Bi'Desrter. \2mo. Land. 1597. 
The three last Books appeared under the Title of F'trgeit' 

mlarhtm, Tlie three last Beokee of Byting- Satffree, \2mo. 

Land. Printed by R. Bradockefor R. Dexter, fyc. 159Sl ft 

begins with Satires of Book 4. 

' This original edition complete is estimated by Dibdin aft ISL 

Longman and Co. in the BidL Ang, Poet, mark a copy at'25it 

The next edition (of the whole) is entitled PtrgedmUiriim, 
the three last (in reality all six) Bookes of the By ting Sd^riH',' 
corrected and amended with some adtUtions by •/. H. tifiM: 
Lond.for R, Dejeter,^c. 1599.* 

G.Nassau, 1824, 1/. 1*. 
Ditto. 8vo. 1602. 

Brand, 21. \2s. 6d.', Stevens, 3/. Ss. 



where he taught several Oanzas or Wild Geese to fly with a light 
chine, and to fetch and carry things for his conTeBience. He after some 
time yentnred to put himself into the machine, and they carried him with 
great ease. He happened to be in this .^phrial Chariot when these Ganzas^ 
which were birds of passage, took their flight to the Moon, and was di- 
rectly carried to that Planet He gives a very ingenious description ofl 
what occurred in his Journey, and also of the Wonderi he saw when h^ 
arrived there." 

* See Warton's Observations on Speii8e,>oL i pi 1S7, 8va 



A BiBLlOMANtAC'S LIBRARY. 9f 

X^prkttedatOaford. 12mo. 1753* 

O.Na8sati,1824, 12*. . v 

Gray, the Poet; In a letter to bis friend Dr.' Wkai»<m; of 
Xhirliam, allading to this edition/ says^ '^Bishop HalFs Satires, 
<:iJlal Vit^demiariam, are lately repablished. They are ffdl of 
8^Ht and pfbelry> as much of the first as Dr. Donney abd te 
inore of the latter ; they were mitten when he was about 23 yeaH 

These Satires^ with N6te9 by Singer, in addition to Wartpn'a 
observations, have been republished in 8vo. 1824. They^uiay 
also be found in the 10th volnme of HalV^ IForke, Svo. 1808^ 
wkk Warton ^ Notes, as well as Mr. £J]is*s and Mr« Pratt*s 
Ilkstrations. 

Of our Satirical Poetry, taldng satire in its moral a|id 4ig- 
nified sense, l^all, according to Campbell, claims and may be 
dlowed to be the founder : thus in the Prologue to his Satires 
he says — 

I first adyentore with fool hardy might. 
To ihread the steps of perilous despight: 
I first adyentore, follow me who list. 
And be the second fingEsh Saityrist 
Hairs Prolc^ne to Book 3, implies his knowledge of former 
^tirists. 

'* Some say my Satyrs ovBr-loosely flow. 

Nor hide their gall inongh from open show : 

Not riddle like, obscuring their intent; 

But, packe-stafie plaine, uttering what thing they meant^ 

Colitrairie to the Roman Ancients, 

Whose wturds were short, and darksome was their sence. 

Who reads one line of their harsh poesies, 

Ihrise must he tak his wind, and breath him thrise. 

Mjf mme woM follow them that have fort-gone, 



rtf..t|0^* • ,:,V 










■.•\ 



it 






L 



/ ► 



A BIBL|6HAiftiL€fa UBaASlT. tff 

* 

Their Rtfyall Plate w«i«l«^ or wooci, m (tteae^ ' a 

The Vulgar, saye k« luttd, elsfthtid he none^ • ^ 
Their only acller was the neighbour hfooket ' • •' ■"■•■ ' * 
None did for better care, for better kpke. ^ /' < 

Waa then no paying of the Brewer'amp^ '^ 

Kcrfrteedie Yintnor mixt the strained grape. 
, IV. King's PaviUQ^wa^tlieigrasBygr^n,. = ^ j^ ,. ,.. { 
Under safe shelter of the shadietreen. ... 

Under each banke men lajd their lims along: 
Not Wishing any ease, not feanng wrong: 
'•' "" Clfacd Wfth their ownc, as they were made of old, " ^ ' " '^^'^ 
Not fearing shame, not feeling any cold. ' ' r ' -'^^^ ^ 

But when, by Ceres hnswifiry and paine 
Men learM to bury tiie reTiYiDg gyatne; 
AndfaArer JaiNiitaaghilbeiiewfovBdViMe ■ ■ -' '^ 
Rise on the ]^o> with many a Friendly Twinet. ' '-^ 
And base desire bade men to debren low, •« • 

For needlease mettels ; then *gan misdtief groir. •• 
Then farewell, &yrett age, die worlds be«t dayes; ■*■ ' ' ' 
Tturiying in ill, as it in age decaies.^ — 
Tlien crep^in Pride, and Peerish Co?e(ise; -'^ '■ 
And Men grew gredy, discordsos, and nice. • 
Kow Man, t)iat eant kaile-felWw was with Beaity 
Woxe on to weene himselfe a God at least * 
No aery fouleean take so high a ffight, 
Tho' she her daring wings in clouds have dight ; 
Nor Fish can dive 80 deep in yeelding sea,' '''^ 

Tho' Thetis' self shoald swear her Jia&tie; ' 't 

Nor feirefbll BeasH ean dig his eaye so lowe^ ,•<••. 
Aiconld he fiirilier than Earth's centra go; • 
As that the ayre, ihe earth, or ocean^ 
Should shield them fimn tlie gorge of greedy Man. : 
Hathntmsstlnde ought better, than his owne? 
Then ntmost.Inde b neare, and rife to gone. 
O Katore ! was the World ordain*d for nought 



.1 : 



. -.»! 



I M» 



rtf 



Up WOO^Q ipUBNlY 9QIW^; 

Bui fill MaiiHi mmw, tad lieed Man'i idle tlioiiglit?' 

Vky Ormadiurd'fl wordi Monm'i of tiinftie le«ke%» ,^ 

Or ntnly garlick; Imt Hkj fiinitce jreeket 

Hote itoaBM of wine ; and can aloofe descrie 

llie drunken draagliti of gweete antmnmitie. ' 

They naked went; or clad in mder bide. 

Or home-span'' nuMl,' void dffbhraine j^iide? ' 
"]Mtlioacanilnuiake-i»gariikgaadcrie^ - -j- 

I > T« imite a fbole's far4etdied Kverie. : r ! /> 

A French head join'd to necke Itafian : 

TLj thighs firom Oermanie^ and breast fro' Spain : 

An Englishman is none, a fool in all : 

Many in one, and one in seTeralL 

Then Men were Men ; bat now the greater jMort " " ' ' 

Beasts are in Hfe, and Women are in heart 

CUiod natmre *selfe, that homely Baqw om, ..j | 

in proudest pompe waa not so dad of yore. 

An is the vnder Oroome of the Ostlerie, 

Husbanding it in work day yeomanrie. 

Lo ! the long date of those expired dayes^ ' 

Which Uie inspired Meriin's word fore-sayt; 

When dnnghill peasants shall be dight an Kings 

Tftcft MM oon/wiibfi aaodier brings r 

Then fare ivell, fairest age, the Worlds best di^eft 

Tliriying in all, as it in age decayes. 
In Phillips's Theatrum Poetamm, 8vo. Canterbury, I8()6, 
p. 326, &c. may be found a concise and satis^BMstory account of 
Bishop Hall. " He is universally allowed,** says Phillipi^ « to 
have been a man of great wit and learning, and of as -great 
meekness, modesty, and piety.*' His works, published at va^ 
rious periods in folio, quarto, and octavo, *♦ are filled," saya 
Bayle, " with fine thoughts, excellent morality, and a great 
deal of piety." 



ife and Dedfh of Edmund Genmget, (alkut Irommonger.) 
Ato. Portrait anil Plates. St: Omers. 1614. '• 

Gulston^ 21.', Townley, 5/.j G. Nassau, l624, Wue morocco, 
12/. 5*. 

*' Edmund Jennings/* says Granger, ^ was admitted into 
tlie English College, at Rheims, under Dr. aftervnords Cardinal 
Allen, and when he was 20 years of age', orduned Priest. He 
vrs8 soon afterwards sent into England, where he l/ras appre- 
liended in the act of celebrating M^s. He was executed by 
hangibg and quartering in Gray^s Inn Fields, Dec. 10th, 1591.*' 

In the above rare book are several Historical Print8> repre- 
senting the principal circumstances of his Life and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expence "by the Pft* 
pists, in order to pei'petnate the remembrance of two * Mira- 
cles,** which are there said to have happened at his death! 
The first is, that, after his heart was taken out, he said, 
" Sancte Gregorl, ora pro me^ which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, ^* God*s wounds ! see his heart is in my hand > yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth.'* The other is, that an holy Virgin 
being desirous of procuring some relick of him, contrived to 
approach the basket into which his quarters were throivn, and 
touched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy from 
Its having been employed in acts of consecration and elevating 
the Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
or mscovery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
the greatest care. 



■;f. 



H^ aMiOMi aooaanntv 



,rf..-. ■■.. .^:!\:- ' /,'i.i*\ri »" M«^'i *m\ 



Anne—SoMft tt»d Sotmets. 8vo. For Mat. Butter. 1622,> 

fFUk Portrait of the Authat &m the engrmed Title. 

« Of this Sonnett«er/ ftys Orinigtr; foLIL p:'i7,'*'i find 
BO mentioa made bjr ^r of o«rBio|jrapiic^ Anthoig^;^^ 

Bdoe, in his Anecdotes^i call^ the above ** a book .mr na 
means ofcommon occurc^ioei'V^d frpjfn Uf e^^mi^it^oBf 
CeUe^lofs, if we may judge fpom the price it, hm^oblafaKd m 
three recent sales^ he appears taha?e been pretty correol lb hik 
appreciation of* ks rarity. • •*:»'?•=? 

At Mr^ Bindley's sale it produced 35/. 14^.; at' StrJ Pi^ry's* 
1.822, 387. 6^:. described as containing the Por^riSts pt'fiunnay 
and of his Patroness, Anne of,D^np[iark. ^\r M. S^^J.fopy, 
which had been Mr. Bindley*s,. sold> iiv 182(4,.»;h' 4|^i^ l(l|r. Ml 

Hie following extia^ may be Ibnnd ia Beloee J^—tdofei 
of Literature, vol. vi. and which I hope I shall be excused io 
abstracting, considering the value of the Book cited, and tE^ 
difficulty of obtaining even a glance at such Bibfiomaniacdt 
DesMnraftft*- ' ■■ -• " • " ' '"■" '^*^**'?«^ 



•- r ,^% 



.A-»>YTrt 



Experitoced Nature in thk latter age. 
Wilting her ma«ter.piece ahoiild then be Imyoj^lfty ' * '-"'"^ 
, Sod^. iny l^ire Celia set on Earth'a laige jiafe^ . • s^^.\y: ■ .^S 
As all the 0<>ds in emolatioB brought. 
For they did thinke if Nature only niight 
Brag of her wor^, i^e should insult o're them;; 
Wherefore they 'greed to have an equal right, 
ThttI they ofher perfection part might clidmt: - '*' ' "^ *^*^** 
Pallas gave wisdome, Jmo stateHneSK, ''- *' -'=<-»^ **"* 

And the milde morning gave her aMdcatie; ' ' .^V^*^ 



•■>->■ t . 



4^«Mi Witt actrietltmmefl east Heaven adone^ , n 

^i ^'9MlAltokMbl6'^iito'did'cloatlil|lMri««idl/"'' * .''^'»t'/^t^2ol) 
fliM itrwgbl and tall, her tresaes traile4^to4prf«ni^ .. viv^;rv;^^(lt 

w^ basUnll Dinali my Uisse fled I once aeene, 

.t^^*t^a^4^;ifoiiieda.itwe^ ' -'* -*^ ^ ' ^^ 

.W) t^ dlf^I iHftliBe ever to We retakined, ' '^ ' -^' '^ ^^^^^^ 

iH>St.tM#ieflMl«ll^'d»aiMlImy8igli(retaiiHA .:>.w.- ^ff 

i*jteiid(**9fu;^"i''''-^ •-•:•.'•• '. .- ••.•■■..... .V .■.'.• >■■■ y7u?iiPi!:* 

ihw§i9ms (Michael) Poitf-Oidion, wUh the second ptigi^^fi^i 
. fVam^jdece and Portrta£ of JPrmpe H^jf.kn. ffofe^jmd aU 
ihe aiker Piai^,^ J613— 162?. . . ... .... .o. , ^* 

bi. ■•■■'■• ■••■ ••^- ■" ""; '' ■[ y 

'. ** la 1613/* says * PhOKps's ITioMrum Poetmm»8vo.^^^^^ 
** DraytOB psl^isked the ^rst part c^ his Pol^-^dk^, hf^wbkh 
Gnck title^ ^g^^T^ywg^verjf'hf^i/ij he diauxfceB Eaji^bMi^ as 
IIk aatient aame of Albion ia by sone 4Mmd ^ont -Oil»otr^ 
iMfipy. It is a cberogfi^ilmal dcscrip^on ^ tbe lii^s^iAOiia- 

F 



-> 



taina, foreaU, cuUea, Aft in Ok- hli«i hMufaaJ wftb it's 

IJoraiJto lylwi (hja firet pMt UjfodVart^d, «!# j^f ,f^^t?^ it 
e^ftit It Kiiit, w a. military paatoR^ w ewiaiiy lt,Bijl^i„lMd 
^{iflir^. Mi«;.?^ """^ aipgiAr m«rtf> of bw hw^z : .fb^ qa^' 
ff^^^e^ tberafore, of Ma jmaag Mm4 W« i| j^pjtat^^.to 
1^. , TV"! we eightapn viDgi i» thif ■M^ft^9b(f(»«|Kf mth 
the learned notes of SeMen ; and t£f r« we m^ ^efoB^-e*^ 
Boag, j^herein th^ (»t^^ npuiiUivSj(foE«Bt«^n7Qi9; &(^ «{e^ 
prcsenUd by the- t^cores o^ hkh. and woiaea. HU ^etre of 
twelve syllabled) Wag aDH Wi ti^mt wV ifc W quoted moee for 
t^ History Am tha Ptwtry i»il^ and k that peHpect is ^o 
very ^xact, that, >a Bbhop Nic&obon obaerres, it alTbrds a 
miicii truer account of tlh& kuigdoiiiand'tAedamtuioD of A\'a]ea^ 



^an could well be expected from the pen of a Poet. 
u^oven with niany ^e Etjpuodes ; of the conquest of thia 
IsL|Uld,'by the Ronuta^; (tf ttaa- cvnisg! of the Saxoas, fhe 
Danes, and tlie Normans, with an account of their Kings ; of 
^i^luh Warriors, Nangatorst Saiats, and of the Civil Wars of 
£n^W^, &c. This volome was reprinted in 1622, with the 
Si— a^ 9m^ m eom^natf on of »welMt Sch^ moiCi B MBB g 
dwtiria HU wh(4e, aKAdedtcated't^Priace Ohuin^ iM^idien. 
he gives hopes of bestowing the likepawsajiimSeonHa.' 
'WinsMdey.iibWq LivafoftbeGnflJid lE^taO^'i^aiilfc^- 
ton that " he wa* a Poet of a {nous tea^r^ ImA, p^Sf^fftieB. 
lnf*iga]jiKy»th» taammA^^m few;! mi^ toaptatvin 
W lU^ slW" «f 4«^ aaA mtemUm- m • iuMjUwyi <:B» 
<tenarib Wk hwwl. 1^ a. crMr» af gbtyv lUM USVMi ««■ 
baaed, ip Watumtca AUjay."" ' , .^ '■''''■ '' ' 



'•mFtXi'iJmif'tm: aa iam. mit framfim, 

'^'miWMIfi/tieiiillligUkt, Mil tMnlsU0Bli^mi 

t'i«tf».' **. l«2».t ■ '"■'■"" 

. A fine copy ol tlus book, hnodBomely boaBfl, Toi in Cffllinfl 
tie twoiiaclWa catalogue, a few years back, marked 8/. 8». — 
Piiype and Foss mark a copy at 6/. 6^.— At Dr. f- ticmaid'a 
a copy sold for four shillings and two pence ! ! 
I^-Iarge paper copy at Muntcr'a sale, in 18]3, produced 

.it Js remarked by tAt. Grenville (says f)ibdln), tlat elieet 
Oin this work is sapprcased, and that the detective pagiag 
from 96 to 105 is not supplied in ma. the copies of this Wot. 
Captain Joliii Smith, Admiral of New England, (says Gvaii-: 
sen) deserves to be ranked with tlic greatest travellers and 
adventurets of his age. He was sometime in the service of the 
Emperor, and ttie Prince of Transylvania, against the Grand 
Signior, tfliere he distinguished himself by ciiallengiog three 
Turks of quality to single combat, and cutting ofF tlicir heads, 

^ " Tnrt^*fl(L%ft W'sfUMito; b^Biitfim ntte, AnA l4 ^Idbm Of OaK' 

Mtkft ImbA lavMT «Clb> ftU^ l>f Mew Bt^lMrii aaailw MMMMti^ 
tgaff M»»otk« M<9.1wloi>ii«i to lU ttaaJmiaj. a-Qrmtm-v4t 
i-^S*"- -.■ ...c .^,,w.. ....,.,„..< 

\ An EdhioD, folia, dated 163% wiA Pi»tniii and PTaiei, k^ in lU 
iiii of d. Uuaan'i tdtruj, tS3t, lor l^JL 



i/#i 



0CCOMD K)1HDISV^ 909ND « 



.> 



BuieamiotmfiikmMmffimkPmitat* n -<-'*>. Ip-Hrr,.!! 
For looke how iwre tke Ai^kiifc Cateidi« . ' <:. . ' ^^T 
Paft former Satyn a kcr libectie; • - *- v< - - ' m v ^ i ci )^ 
SofoireiBuimiii^yMidflWiteiliMiolcUibi >• • '^i"^ 

Tkbetterbetii^biicU^iMmbet^lwU. . .: ^ ^^' 

Peologne U> Btol^& 

The. first satire of the tbird Book affords & fek ^piedbien of 
theAvth<Nr, and, in the opinion .of Mr/ EUb^stnkingly resem- 
bles the Vlth Satire of Juvenal j it exhibits a Uvely cpntrast 
between the olden tiine fi^ (he e#epiinpry of dw^t^Myi^ oiwn 
cotempoi^ries. i . .;..,. mk^; 

Book nir-^Axmc & ^ .1 ..-. k.^. <»'<« 
Time was, and that wM|.tenii'dthe Time ofOM^i i- /. 
Whose world and time were yoD(^, that bow ar^^Uit f .; /. 
(When quiet Satan swaid the puce ef Leid; -,. . .:t 
And Pride was yet anbome, aiidyetiad>red.).: . ' ' {h^ 
Time was, ihat« whfltstii»Aiitamie foil did Jaaty ... >i.'f 
Our hungsry Sires gapt^nr the falling^Mast! . - . c <..J r 

Of the Dodonian okea. . . vu 4 

Could no unhnaked stone lea^ thf) tri^. r.->.\ - . t • : ' 
But there was challenge aiade whose it jnighi ^a. ,1 
And, if some nice and liknMrfKis. appetite. . .» ... r- /^ 
Desired more daiotie dish' of ran dfilitjB* .. / - fi 

They scal'd the stored i^abjirithrclaspedkaec^ ; .< /• 
'Till they had sated their delicioiiieie: 1 

Or searched the hopc^U thicks of hedgy-vowei^ 
For brierie berries, or hawes, m aaarer sloes; ' 
Or, when they meant to fore fin'st of all, •. 'i 

They lick*t oake-leayes besprint with hoay folL ■!■•.. ^ • 
As for the thrise three-angled Bcechnnt sh^, ^ •...'■.- )', 
Or Chesnnf s armed hnske and hid kehml],' ' ' M. < i^f^. 
No Squire durst touch, ike Law woidd noa affiat^ ^' ■'''iM 
Kept for the Court, and for the Kings owiwhord.' > ■' '^ 



A filBLf bMAk\jL(f a UBBARir. tff 

Their Rtfyall Plate wa■>cl•g^ or woo^ «r itoae^ ' '■ > ^^^ 
The Vulgar^ saye hk hand^ ebfrhadhc none. - ^^^ ^ '^'^ 
Their only seller was the neigiibonr htsociter'' r-'^ t^',4 
None did for bettei^ care^ for better lookar> ' < a « >^i^^ '^f. 
Was then no paying of die Brewtr'siieip^ i? . ^ > V 

Kor grfeedio Yintner mixt the strained grape. 

^. r r ?%«? King** PavilJQ^ wa^ tjiejgraasygrcjen,^ . , ^ j^^,, .^^, - 
Under safe shelter of th^ shadie treen. .. » 

Under each banke men layd their lims along. 
Not wishing any ease, not tearing wrong: 

'^•'" Cladwiththeir owne/asdiey wereiiiad^of old/^^ -[ •• ••"'^^'■ 
Not fearing shame, not feeling any cold. - ' " { " '» •>^'^' > 

But when, by Ceres hnswifiry and paine 
Men learn'd to bnrythe reTinng gvatne; i' v< i 

And falser Jaani tanght^ new fowMl Viae- '•r-n' ^i 

Rise on the £l»i^» widi many a FriendSy TwiiM^/ < *' ^''; 
And base deare bade men to d^fon low, - ' ' ' '• ^ ' 

For needlesie mettsls ; tiiea *gan nuscldef gro^. *• ^ 

Then farewell, fayirest age, the worlds betftdaj^; 
Thriving in ill, as it in age decioes. — 
Then crept»in Pride, and Poerfish Covetisi^^ 
And Men greir gredy, diBcord4ntt> and nice. - ^ '^^^ 

Now Man, t^at eant kaile-felkw was iridi Beapd, - ; < 
Woxe on to weene himselfe a CUid at least ■ > • ^ = ^ 

No aery fouleean take so high m 4^t> 
Tho* she her daring wings in cloads \M9t dight ; ' T 

Nor Fish can dive so deep in yeelding ^ea, * '^'-^ 

Tho' Thetis' Bdfshealdswearh«ria&tie; * . r % 
Nor fearefiill Beasli can 4ig hisectve so 'lowe> ^< < f *' ''^"* 
As conld he finrtiier than* Earth^'s centra go f ' 
As that the ayre, ihe earth, or ocean^ - 
Shonld shield them &om tihegorge of greedy JIsb, 
Hath utmost Inde ought better, tiian his owne? 
Then utmost Inde is neare, aad rife to gone. 
O Nature ! was the World ordain'd for nought 



^* 



. ) . t . ■ \ ••'•■«,/• 



» :*.'.: • .1 } 



»' .1 ^. 



I <ll 



iP a&OOHQ iOpiNSY ^omlf 

But fin Min^s maw, and feed Man's idle Uioaght f 
Tk^ OraBdiire*8 wordf HCFour'i of Anftie leekev 
Of nanly garlick; Irat thy fiiniace reekei 
Hote steanw of wine : and can aloofe descrie 
the dninken dranglits ofiweete aafnmmi^ ' 
They naked went; or clad in mder bide, 
Orhome-spim'rasMt, ToiddflbihraiBej^tMe? *' 

' "^ttlioa canst maake- in* garifhgaaderie^ - .: :t 

: I Ta imite a feole'a far^bidied HTerie. , ; /. 

. . A French head join'd to necke Itafian: 

Thy thighs firom Oennanie, and breast firo' Spain : 
An Englishman is none, a fool in all : 
Many in one, and one in sereralL i^:':; '•■ 

Then Men were Men ; but now the greater ]Mri "" 
Beasts are in life, and Woawn are in heart ' ■:.' '•:.>' 
Goad nature 'selfe, tiiat hondy Bniycimi r, : . .«- ^. m i 

In prondest ponqpa was not so dad of yore, 
Aa is the under Oroome of the Ostlerie, 
Husbanding it in work day yeomanrie. 
Lo ! the long date of those expired dayei^ ' ' ' 

Which ihe inspired Merita's woird&re-sayif ' ^ 

When dunghill peasants dlaU be dtght aa Kings - 

7%<n MM oon/vsfDfi anodier brings : 
Then fare well> fairest age, the Worids best di^ei 
Thriying in all, as it in age decayes. 
In Phillips's Theatrum Poetaram^ 8vo. Ganterbuiy/ 1806/ 
p. 326, &c. may be found a concise and 8afis£ACtory account of 
Bishop Hall. *' He is universally allowedi|** says Phillips^ " to 
have been a man of great wit and learning,, and of as great 
meekness, modesty, and piety." His works, published at va-^ 
rious periods in folio, quarto, and octayo, '♦ are filled,** saya 
Bayle, " with fine thoughts, excellent morality, and a great 
deal of piety." 



A\tottb]tAN|Vkb'iS filtaAKY. 71 

Life and Dedth of Edmund Genhgen, falkut Ironmonger, J 
Ato. Portrait and Ptdties, St. OmetB. ' 1614. ' 

Gulston^ 2/.; Townley, 5/.} G. Nassau^ 1624, blue morocco, 
12/. 5*. 

'^ Edmund Jennings/* says Granger, ** was admitted into 
the English College, at Rheims, under Dr. afterwaards Cardinal 
Allen, and when he was 20 years of age, ordained Priefit. He 
was soon afterwards sent into England, where he Was appre- 
hended in the act of celebrating Mliss. He was executed by 
hanging and quartering in Gray s Inn Fields, Dec. 10th, 1591.*' 

In the above rare book are several Historical Prints> repre- 
senting the principal circumstances of his Life and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expence by the Pa- 
pists, in order to perpetuate the remembrance of two • Mira- 
cles,** which are there saad to have happened at his death. 
The first is, that, after his heart was taken out, he said, 
'* Sancte Gregori, ora pro meP which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, ** God*s wounds ! see his heart is in my hand > yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth." The other is, that an holy Virgin 
being desirous of procuring some relick of him| contrived to 
approach the basket into which his quarters were thrown, and 
touched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy from 
its having been employed in acts of consecration and'elevatiDg 
the Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
or discovery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
the greatest care. 



f' •. > 



■••». 



9t^ mf!tim^iwmt!tiMmm. r 




^''^^yff^^g^Mmnm^'^ 

Anne^-Songs and Sonnets, Svo, For Mat, Butter. 16S22# 

fFitk Portrait of the Autimr &n'th^ engraved Title. 

•* Of this Sonnettoer/ §nji Ortnigtir- foK !i. p.'1f,''^1t find 
no mentioa made bV ^nrV of oof Bfdffrapifirdu Aiilhc%. 

Beloe> in his Anecdotes;, ciJl^ the ,aboT|B *\j^ poAIff no 
means of common occurc^nce j," .^i^d frpjin '^9 5^^tij|iiiittipn.jpiong 
CellegtorSi if we mity jlM}g« from the {nice Jt;httK<iblgltKd in 
three recent sales^ he appears taha?e been pretty «omollh hiis' 
appreciation of* its rarity. '• >^ -.* 3«'* 

At Mr. Bindley 8 sale it produced sii 14^^; W ii*frffftipy*s. 
1822, 38/. Qs. described as containing the JPor^i^ P^£E^^ 
and of hi» I^roness^ Anne ,of,DQn|n^k. ^ J^yr J^^Sjj^fyti^py^ 
which had been Mr. Bi^(lley s^ sold> iiv 18^4,1^ ^ lA^- 6d. 

Hie following extn^^ may be found im Belaet« JbwtdoM 
of Literature^ vol. vi. and which I hope I shall be excused fo 
abstraciingy considering the value of the Book cited, and th^ 
difficulty of obtaining even a glmce at such BlbBomaniacdl 
Desidnrata.- " ■'•'• ^*-^ '-" "^.^ ^^^^^^^^ 

' lst)ierihlceA Nature in tlus latter age. 

Willing her master-piece shoiild then iMrimNi^l^ * * "'^ 
vfihui^^ipy %ire Celia set 4m Earth'* laige jlafs^; v ' i^Ai^v^. : /V 
As all the Gocb in emnlation brought, \.i 

For they did thinke H" Nature only nught 
iBrag of her worth, the should insult o Ye them 
Wherefore they 'greed to have an equal right. 
That tiiey of her perfectionyart might climntfr^ .t-^i-it ^*W't 
Pallas gave wisdome, Imo stateKneSie, o ^< -i -^.r ^ 

And the milde morning gave her mtdestits -.y^f,-^ 






i:,tf . £i 



•V 



' S •«• 'i» 



'.v;;-'*f«t<3 



I Mr pmec^imdlote maiaeler bium; ^ 

AM ml wift ictrlet Hreames east Heaveii adone^ , , ^ 

V tamj Burett dsfia's c^amW ipejl : ' 

«i^^Wittlto^'«alll«^aitodidcloatlil|lwiw4 v^ .t^i^Io) 

~«t«1 fA»iii|iii««iriM|V«i^«kitoi kerkaai^iMrtluNbr^^ r-v^^^n -.r/tb 

81m atraiglit and tall, her trewet trailed^W^^ri^Ml .;U;«>; r^iifA 

w^ MaUiin Dlaah my Uisie fled I once aeene, 
'^^^* tiMi jA^bmiiafonned as it were in stdne, 

^ tyiJ5»iirfckiM> eyer to liaTe remained, ' -' ->i ,4***!> 

H^'Meitiie^^irtl^'d^aiidlmynglKretaiMd' .' <> a1>/: ^ff 

«?» ;» ti>bi« <•: ■• i' i . • ..... '.' .•'."•.*- T.r/*.!-i >f> 

^^r btii /.*'.-•.. :t .. ;' '.; i ' » . • •.-?...*'-. v ■*>:/«* Jk»-1*. 

thm^itmi (Michael) Poly-Olblon, with the $ecmiipm^jjtit^} 
. FtmUiij^ce and Portrak of Fri^ HmfU^V ff^*^ ^ 
$K$ other Plaip9, . j613— 162?, . ,. .„. ..; , w 

€<^ Sto]iley*8Mde^ I819> %t. \99.%d.i 6. NasM^^^f. t824, 

'« la 1613/* says ' PhilKps's Theieitnim Peetaram>8yo. 1^00/ 
^ Draytoa pal^slied the tot part ^ his Pofyit^bn^ b]pwiiidi 
Onek title, sigayfyutg.c^-JtfyE^y, he d^MitoB Eagbttd^T s^ 
the antient name of Albioa is by somm 4smed ham QVbmtg 
haf^y. It is a chorogn^ieal dcscriptkm ef the ilTOrSjittoiiA- 



*> 



94 .Mm'm^' iwwiwif ,fl 

tuni, forests cuUes 9m.- is dk' ls&a4 hfcw iipjl lAh it'« 

if^DtKKoble wtiqmties, rmtitm, aad cofiniwfi^ ^ JQf^ 

exVt>(^ ^ Eni^ W a. military posfaiKv OT wa si wg f^.f^^.fud 
f {ifDr^ ^^P^et aoiM sipgdhr twuki of ttia fiTpK : ttu^ >s;^p>' 
((^^e«(Jj,tl)erefofe, olfl^ywag »*»%»• !»«»p>«,^ to 
t^fO TVnwe etghtofn soaginsAii Toln^na^^taifi^t^l^th 
the kamed notes of Seldeji ; and t^re we uofp ^fb^j^vpy 
soDfp srhereio tli^ (ntKOi mouutains, forests, rivers, &c. are re- 
presented by the ^garet of men aud women. His ipctre of 
tv^elve B;}Iqt'^lw»9W>v antiquated, it is quoted mone for 
tl^e History tfwB tlM Vbetry in it y ai\d itt Bhat wspect is po 
very foadt, that, as Sbliop Nicholson observes. It alFords a 
mncD tmer accmnt of Ctus kingdom and' the dominion of vy'ales^ 
than G^tild well be expected from tlie pen of a Poet, ft is iri- 
tUvoTen with many ijie Episodes ; of the conquest . of this 
Bland by the Rodmb^, of the coming of the Saxoo^ the 
Dancf and the Normans, with an account of their Kings ; of 
l^nghsh Wamors, N«Tigator», Saints, and of the Ci>-il Wsira of 
England, &c This volume was repiinted in 1622, with tlfe 
S a wB ^ 9»tt, w CffiriimiiatioTi of twelve Songs more, maliitg 
fttaly » lAs whol^ mi dedicated to Prince Charles-, to whom 
be gives hopes of bestowing the Ulte pains upon Scotland." 

mnntwtfcyK uvUs Lives of the English Poets, sny^ of Br^^- 
top tbftt " he WIS a Poet of a piopa tea^r, l^s, Cfifi^fffnca. 
iMraigaJMiq^thi laommivtim feovy; mt^ taapigttvm 
im hfe>, slw «f 9ec^ aoA iptfliwdw Ik ■ ipw p >«p i <--Bm 
(laiiaiA^lawal,brftCMw»*f gbtyv HUk^UailiHltfiWM' 
bwutdm Wat^Mta AU)^" .„^'''''<^ 



e'liiiihrii!-/:". ■■■■ ■ :>■ '■■ ■■■■•■ ■> .^■■'v^i :"wn .^nic? 

^'mtiit'sMKftiia. 'ft*, ms: mitAua^si^, 
-'miMtiitkUiiiMiihtiiifaPtmanflhlmttli 
'I'M Humpi/tffwMtmil, mi mMliM'Mfi mi 

'i^ma: VM,. im.if ■ ■■••'■■'■>'' 

A liae copy of this book, handsomely IxKHa, was in Cdffins 
the bookseller's catalogue, a few years bacft, marked it. bf>— 
Payne and Foss mark a copy at 6/. 6*. — At Dr. F. Bernara • 
rale, in 1 696, a copy sold for fonr shiltiogs and two pence ! f 

A-Jarge paper copy at MuHter'a »ale, in 1813, prodU»a 

^ ■^'■' 'fidi 

. It 18 remarked by ilr. Grenville (says t)ibdin), ttat sSwE 

Oin thU work !s suppresMed, and that the defective pagiw 

Dpm 96 to 105 is not supplied in all the copies of this '>ook.. 

. CapUiu John Smith, Admiral of New England, (aay9 Gian^ 

xer,) deserves to be ranked u-ith tlic greatest travellers ua 

aiiVenturet'S of his age. He nas sometime in the service of tftb; 
Emperor, and the Prince of Transylvania, against the Grand 
^gnior, (there he distinguished himself by cIiaDeuging three 
Turks of ((uality to single combat, and cutting off their hea^> 

Mtfcft knAi>nfr iCdn ftUri of New Bt^lMrii Ma-lb* MMEMtM^ 
limr tjD«iKttkerM<9bal<»i^*a to Iha Mme Hiatal^ a-OftmrwH, 
i-P^SSO- „ ■ ■ .-... .,.. - -.....-W 

t An Edition, folia. dated168% with Putruii and PIttM, ao^ in llw 
iile (^ 6. Nuaao's UliraTJ, 1S21, tm il 
w2 



76 ^SECOND JOUKWEy ,|tpI{IfD, 

for which achievement he bore on his coat of arms ^hilS^,ViHrjE0 
H^a^. He afterwards went to America, whQ]|[e .he,wa&j(a|(^ 
prisoner by the savage Indians^ from whom he found jDjiea^^ 
escape. He often hazarded his life in naval eniraffem^nts with 
inrates, Spanish Men of War, and in other adventures;^ and 
fiada considerable hand in reducing New England to tine , obe- 
dience of Great Britain, and in reclaming the. inhabitants ipom 
Imrbarism." All which exploits are detailed in the History of 
Vii^nia by himself. «! 

Matoako, alias Rebecca, daughter to Pouhatan, Sovereign 
of Virginia, and who is called Pocahontas by Capt. Smith in 
his History, may be considered as a national benefiEi^ress, jks 
to her (says Granger, vol. ii. p. 58) we arie indebted for the 
preservation of Virginia, when in the state of an infant colony. 
In 1607, when she was about 12 or 13 years of age, sl^e not 
only procured the liberty, but saved the life of Capt. Smith, 
wiiom, together with his men, her father intended to mura^ 
Dy surprize. In 1612, she was herself a prisoner y aj|id soon 
after married Mr. Rolfe, whom Smith calls a gentleman. In 
1616, after she had been instructed in our language an<| tb^ 
Christian religion, she was brought to England, and introduce^ 
and graciously received at Court. The next year, up<;n her re- 
turn home, she died on ship board at 6|raveseo4» ^!^<^^^y J^' 
pressed with religious sentiments. The good sense, humanity, 
and generosity of this woman, do her honour, as they carried 
her far above the prejudices of her education, and the barba^(yB8 
customs of her country. She was the first Vii^nian who -was 
converted to Christianity, that could speak our langiuigej^ or 
had a child by an Englishman.** 
' The Library at Eton contains King James lst*s 'coipy,jEipd^Jin 



A BlbLlOMANUd'lS LIBRARY. 77 

'^lEiToJitibm Library was a presentation copy 5 otoer large p^ 
'^n' Copies, are in the Libraries of some of our principal Bibfi^ 
vul&^i^cs. 

omitlifs Travels and Adventures in Europe^ Asia, j1fric(K tfn4 
America^ Small folio. Sijptt^ pages only* fUtA Phtes^ 

;;;|Mo.;,^; - ' ' • '■ ^■- '■- 

[' Mr. Qrenyille*8 copy, according to Dibdins UUbx^f^f^" 

pamon, p. 264, cost 1dm 5/. 5#. ...,.» 

It was reprinted in vol. ii. of Charcliill*s Collection of Vpyjiges. 



it; .Jtii.'r' 



BMcctitt (Giov. Bat,) Bizarie di Vane Figure. Sro, ohl^ngs, 

' i^ T^e JRepertorium Bibliographicum,, where it is dei^cpb^ 
as/' AVosi rare and singnlar Book, containing Printspf hmjiaii 
'figiires Ifbhned by the strangest materials, as diamonds, hoops. 
Diadders, pieces of carpentery, battledores, chains, culinary 
'utensils, &c. When the correctness of the deli^eations, ai^d 
ine boldness of the attitudes, are considered — we s^ the lumd 
iira great Master through the laughable whimsicality of his 

toj^.*' " ■'■ ■;■; 

''^'' A'iidpy is in the Strawberry Hill Collection, and one was in^ 
(lik tibtBjy at Ponthill. 



IrMr.t^ 



^£yafcie (Abraham) Annales of the famous Empresse Elizabeth^ 
''''^iieene of England, 8fc. translated out of French. Large 
^^' pi^erl 2 tols.Ato. Benj. Fisher. (No date. J 

Large paper copies differ from the small in the following 
Jtorititialafs : VIZ. that the date (1625) is wanting in th^iQ| 



^9i iimmpmimm>mmA 

Wft^t M^Sj^MSMed l^thf fmS^ lij^qr s^^i,,,44 y)etj^<l«f 

j^9«ll copkiionlj tl|e tw<o iMt yersi^ ia cgiowoa |iprf^f9|^|qy^ 
. Mr^TpCiffeiifUlehMaiuiepaiMBrci^ 
Ml?^^€%«le8, in letters of 1^. Q^l£he^Jfyifi9|.^ 

impressions are to be found in the copies p^i^esscjd^.^ 
r|i|||rfi|ji. irfBtaflodli ^leiieral Dow^swi^Pt ^^ m jMk, flm^r^u 
^f^t^ Mid at Sotkebys, in 182?^ ft^T tOt 1^ . . > .,y^| 

»(■• *«' >• '•■ . •■.■.'■; ^'^■^7/ 'jif 

(kMh^U fMrakamJ Poetical Blossomi. WUk I?$rtstfl^\i^ 
y\-iike49ikc!rmidtl3$k.^ear,^ritH^kam. 4i^ h^^u 
.ASa:lMgiDMistB B^lkitlieca ^Vi^, Tpi^ ^ copy, witb tb/^^l^ 
tnilt> is maf1fled'a]tllS/.$ and anoCher^ w%iitii|^ (b^T^^pti^^ 

; il^nyVvak^ 18f2, 4/. . .^,.j)f 

.£l»wlejf^0i Love^^ Ridilct^ a PaUorai Comei^^ wrUton ji^Jf^ 
,. Mmeof M$, hemg a Kmgs Sc^t^ m Westn^^erSfii^^ 
iJf^HhPorir^t. 1638. :f< iw/ 

,.iG. Nasaaiv Esq, 1824, 3/. IQ^ ,. .> 1^,,^^ 

7^A<f ^orks of Mr. 4brahmn Cowley, co^^^ikmh^UA 
' ' were foffkerly printed, and those w^h he de^gkett/or^ikB 
press. Note published out oftke Authors OrightalGqM, 
l2mo. Lond. 1691. : i[ t>,<i, 

$econd Pt$rt tfPUto^ including hJi^ Poetical Blqosojliu^' fml^ 
■ '11682. ■ :.- t. .: >.ti .^7>: 

This lattef edition of Cowley's Wcyrl^ eonti^iV^ Pt* ^pn&a 
If A^^Qui^t of t^^ I4f« and Wnt^ogs of Cowte^, wri^qt ii>. if^, 



^4arie»i«[,'^ W"^^ ^m^^im^ iiiiAMmMli^ 

Ji0 irfts It achool bay «it Westtniiiflteri three editiotiB bad beeh 
^old« and the book had become Tery scmrcei, when tiie fdiiflH 
edition uppoared^ in 1^2^ the Town> according to the tiodk* 
Ml^V M^vei^dCmenl^ hiildly aflfo txtpf^^ Thc^ftttiiil^- 

litg'A^Ares^itK) the leader^ by Govky UittlK^^ ir^iieeMiiigiy 
(ttHMi; tbofii oiiiiti iivm a6o0!imt, aiid:^^^^ tel<»f ^Asibgf^^ 
ij^^tfiiOikiihii ^ludy^rodiu^ionti u :^ n^^ 

^' ReadeTi (I Jaiow not yet whether gentle of rH^]) MiM^ 
kiowliaye been angry :(I dure not assiim^^ihdiwtff^f'thdi: 
^%ar) iv$ my FMtiedi BdMnesSi And tdadkod bA ^nk)e>KWiidt 
eicMtnendsethet suits — earliness: others wh^ Mt^diih^^f a 
weak £pdth or strong malice have thought me like a |npe/ virhicb 
neter sounds [but when '4is.bIowedin>ind read Hit fldfi Aft J4^ 
li^aaiGowkf, b«t AnlhoieHi AiMmpmint T^ 4ih64i^ I«9^ 
rtfwei^x fhafc 4t Ss «n ^i^moua Ftdst whiqh^^qiis D^^bk^M 
bdopK^s^Mtk^y tappeat qitidkly : to the kUei^> ttM he i^ 4h^ 
worst Homicide whd strives to marlfaer antirt;hef*s facae-t ten 
botiH^ that .it isf a lidieukMis ^foUy to^aoHdema<« la%b:ilt:t}ie 
Stars, because the Moon and Sun shine brigdter* '[tkettmall 
Bfarer j have isdHAhei Ubwn tiian ^ting^hlid bjf:^l^i^^^ftd. 



49 flf«j»iiwiji(H?Mixi«0a¥ft A 

this third editi^^ „ 'Wb^>tb<ms^Jtt!tietiieKM^it^ /Il^iftta^ 

goffer Shipwrack, it shall somediing content me> that it(^Mll^ 
plj^uB^d myself and the Bookseller. In it yon shall find one 
argument (and I hope I shall need no more) to confute un^ 
believers 5 which is^ that as mine age» and bdnsn^tiently expe- 
rience (which is yet but little) bathi increased^ ^9^^7 ^^^ 
not left my Poesie flagging behind them. | ahovdd not be 
angry to see any one bum my Pj^Pdrntu mid &l^ai^, nay I 
would do it myself^ but that I hope a paard<mnMt|f easily be 
gotten for the errors of ten years ofnge^ '^OtikHaMda md 
'PhAletna confesseth me two years older wheb' X tviil it. The 
irest were made since upon several occasions^ a|id ^rhaps do 
not bely the time of their birth. Such as th^y are* they were 
created by me, but their fate lies in your hands j <it is only 
you can effect that neither the Bookseller |«pent himielf of his 
phaige io Priiiting them> nor I of my fad^our in' composing 
them. FareweU.*' . . - 

A. COWLBY. 

However un&shionable in our days Cowley pay have be* 
come from the harshness andconceit of 80^leaf;^fiomposi- 
tions, there are still many who think both. highly^ aiid''}ustly of 
him as a Poet — ^he was considered by his oHeaipldfearies as 
excelled by none, and King Charles II. when told of ids death, 
declared '' That Mr. Cowley had not left a better man behind 
Jum in Jlngk^pd,'- , 

I certainly think with Dr. Blair, that Cowley s ^^^Mcreontic 
P4^s, are b^ isx the happiest of his efforts; ''t]»e^arerSinoQtl| 



.1 t 



■fr' ; 1 . ■> 



aoGhe«or'tw<>'SJp^tt^tt8 <^ them' here otni^ Mi pi^re'At^ 
4)tpttd)ic^:aiid^wiU' convey their own excttse Amt the JB^ti^'i&lsy 

tjjM t:;j' 'h-.'. • •■ . • • ■ •...'•• 'i -y-if.-y:*) 

GOLD, 

.A mighty pain to lore it 10, 

And 'tis a pain that pain to miss, 
'*''''' iBut of all pains the greatest pain 

' It is to loye— rhttt lore in vain. 
\ / i . • . ViHae now mot Noble BlMd, 
„•' A':^. Nor WithjLereisQnderstood; 

Gold alon^ does passion raoTe. 

Qold monopolize Lore ! . 

A corse on her, and on the man 

Who this traffick thus beg^ ! 

"A cnhie on him who found the orel 
/^ >: A cone on him who ^Ugg'd the stoi^i 

^;^ . . . ^ cnffse on him who did refine It ! 
., A corse on him ^1^ first did coin ilk ( .. 

A corse all corses else abore 

On him, who os'd it first in Lore ! ! 

Gold begets in Brethren, hate ; 

Gold in Families, debate ; 

"Cold does Friendships separate, 
' C^oMdoetfOitil-Wars create; 
. .... Xbfoe the smallest harms of it { 

G0I4* «1»H does Lovp begef, . 

THE GBiASSHOPFER, 

Happy Insect what can be 
In Happiness compared to Thee ? 
' ' ftd wi^ nonrishniekit diviiWf 



•,]• -iji ;^«^ 



yy i'- 



■ i iHUt)lli< 


-'.'..:->fl.»'l 


•>ii';f! 


■ (rA Kfii 


'■:) ".V(fif- 


-.= . i;ii'«yw 


^Ol ■••-,-^V.r^ 


; -.*: 1 Aivv*\" 


: *v. tj^»-i 


, 1 y''v\ jO'iJ 


, : I'ju'^r. 


■ '/ .'i''! i' -•'' 


0." 'y-2 ''^'^ • 


••^ nrri- 


■ *:<;r). 


.• ■ ■■• 'ji/IO / 


; -r. rw' 


■ > ix\\:' 


■ \ ':.•■-'■ ' .y ■ 













.iV 






.-. r 



.'.-.I > 



%i ' 






a. 






-,\V 






,rV'"'»^^'^ 



Like the Wine ^dJftoi9i «iBiUu. 
jCrown'd with Rosea Ire cw wi t ^inn 
Oyge's wedihy diadoB. 
T^ Day U ew^s ; wht* d»ire<fe«r? 
Sb i)<iy itJMP'iV ^*® k«v»>itihMra« 
I^mfff tr««^ it kiAfUjr, iWt ^:iiif^ 
J|%4 at le«^ vwitK^w tiB>8l«y« 
Let's banish Businest, baailih £forrovf 
Tp the Gods bdonip Tb-ilorfvic* 



^ i' 



TMs Ronpanoe ims wHtton whea the Jbithor WM only 17 
years, of fig^ imcl ui i)t be iotripdvces two Braiaalio-Pieees, en« 
titled *' Deorum Dono^* and '* Gr^us and Hegio** The Au- 
thor was nephew of James JSowfiU, Author of the Familiar 
Letters, who thus speaks of it in his Letters, %vo. p, 432^^ 
Umd. I7£i4, 

Tb Mt' B'i JSarQ»» at Paris. 
Gentle Sir, 

I received and presQptly xm over your Cypnam Academy, 
with much greediness and no Tulgar delight^ and 8ir, I hold 
myself much honoured for the Dedication you;have been pleasecl 
to make thereof to m^, fboc it deserved a ht higher patronage^ 
Truly I must tell you without any compliment, that I have sel^ 
dom met with si^h an ingenknift inuctiife of iwoM and verse^ 
ioterwovim with gucb vc«ielk« of foncqr temd dMffnihg strahrs 



76 .^SECOND JOlJBlJ£y.|tp{{yD, 

for which achievement he bore on his coat of arms 4b|fi^,Tq|;^ 
H^^. He afterwards went to America, whe^ .he,wau|.Jta|Q^ 
prisoner by the savage Indians, from whom he found jd;^;9^|j|^ 
escape. He often hazarded his life in naval engagements ivit)i 
Wrates, Spanish Men of War, and in other adventures j^ and 
had. a considerable hand in reducing New England to the ,obe- 
dience of Great Britain, and in reclaiming the. inhabitants ^om 
bkrbarism." All which exploits are detailed in the History of 
Virginia by himself. * i 

Matoako, alias Rebecca, daughter to Pouhatan, Sovereign 
of Virginia, and who is called Pocahontas by Capt. Smith in 
his History, may be considered as a national bene£E^$ress,^^ 
tb her (says Granger, vol. ii. p. 58) we are indebted for the 
preservation of Virginia, when in the state of an infant colony. 
In 1607, when she was about 12 or 13 years of age, sl^e not 
only procured the liberty, but saved the life of Capt. SmilJb, 
whom, together with his men, her father intended to mi^nitf 
t>y surprize. In 1612, she was herself a prisoner > and spon 
after married Mr. Rolfe, whom Smith calls a gentleman,, In 
1616, after she had been instructed in our language an4. tikp 
Cbnstian reli^on, she was brought to England, and intijodnpf^ 
and graciously received at Court. The next year, up<^n hei re- 
turn home, she died on ship board at 6ravesen4» st^Q^ly im- 
pressed with religious sentiments. The good sense, humanity, 
and generosity of this woman, do her honour, as they carried 
her hi above the prejudices of her education, and the barbai^^ 
customs of her country. She was the first Virginian wjici was 
converted to Christianity, that could speak our lang^oage^ or 
had a child by an Englishman." a . . ; 

' The Library at Eton contains King James lst*s copy, fi|i4,Jiu 



A^ BrtiioMANIAe'S ilBRART. 77 

iJie Fontnin Library was a presentation copy 5 otlii^r large par 
'|>a' copies, are in the Libraries of some of our principal Bibli" 
obf&iiacs. 

jSimti s Travels and Adventures in Europe^ Asia, AfrictHp^i^ 
.America^ Small folio. Sixty pagea only, fFith Pfa^e^ 



..,T.r' ■' ■• ■ ' 



:«'!:i 



tifr. Qrenyille*s copy> according to Dibdina Libri^ ,<f4(^<- 
pahion, p. 2S4, cost him 5/. 5*. , , . , i » 

It was reprinted in vol. ii. of Churchill's Collection of VQypiges. 

Bi^dictiU (Giav. Bat.} Bizarie di Vam Figure.^ Sv(l opfy*^^ 

ll .r; ,!',""' ^ 1624. ; '^,.. .,,,!.;!.,,,;' 

' See 7^ JRejoertorium Bibliographicumy where it 18 de^m^ 
^ /^ AVost rare and sinirnlar Book, coutidning Ppnts of humaii 
'Figures tohned by the strangest materials^ as diamonds, l^oops. 
Duulders, piieces of carpentery, battledores, chains, culinary 
'otensils^ &c. When the correctness of the deli^eations, tujiii 
me lK>laness of the attitudes, are considered — we s^ the nwd 
W a 'l^'reatt Master through the laughable whimsicality of Jus 



^^ A^ikipy 'IS in the Strawberry Hill Collection, and one ^as ii\^ 
m lilbrti^ at f onthill. 

-Jfydfiie (Abraham) Annates of the famous Empresse Elizabeth^ 
' ^'^Xfileene of England, 8fc, translated out of French. Large 
^^ p^ierJ"*2 vols. 4to. BenJ. Fisher, f No date. J 

Large paper copies differ from the small in the following 
X^aVitedlaf!^: VIZ. that the date (1625) is wanting in th^mji 



wti^t it>!f.«diM t»^ mhA iijnr npM&.ii^ iiiil^.i^f 

•maU oo|He»OB]hf die UP»lMt venqt ia owHBoapnn^gigilq^ 
. Mpp T, Gnnnlle haa >lMga piper cppy^^ with ti».4dHp|jjw> 
Ml^^jie9<Cluulei, in letters of' «tld. QQthckWtlMfjOCxoL 
Ji*>jl9 YiN^liaat FNtnit of Barde by Ddaranv oi vflfi^j^ 
impressions are to be foond in the copies possessed ^yj^ 
Ijlirfiik i^8taff»rd« General fkfyri^Bsvnfkj tsA in^fx, )niiwr's 
IFV^ Md «t So%l,y8, in 182?, tor tot l»«. .^ .,„,;, 

(M»ifay*if fAhrakanO Poetic^ Shiaomt. WUk PmrUt^i^ 
! -$k9 Amikor m kit }3ik, fear, h^ F^ugham. 4#i. Ifl33t^ ,. 

traits is marke4 *a^ l^/-j And anoCher^ w^tiq^ Ae .Po]to|jt| 

^PenyV8Bte4l8?2, 4/. ...^i/ 

€lNr/eyV £m^^*# /?M?^/f^ a PaOoria CoiueXej^ wrtiUu if^yfhf 

iime of kit, bekg a Kings ScJ^t^ in Westwid^ter. S fiM Hf* 

ffrUhPwirMt. 1638. .:.,/ 

G. Naasan, Esq. 1824, 3A 10«. ,;»> 

T'Atf ^<M*ib ^ Jtfr. 4brftham Cowley, eoami^ ^ikotxi^MiiA 
were formertg prmied, and ihooe wkick he tMgned' for^ike 
press. NoU) published out of the Authors Origkuil€tpkk. 
l2mo. Lond. 1691. '"'' 

(Second Pttrt tfJPitto, including ilif Poetical Bhss^^m^ fy^ 
11582. . ..-'.^^ 

Tliis lattef edition of Cowley*s Worlv conti^^i^ Dr. Spnifo 

<f Acconu^t of tb^ I4fe and Writings of Cowley, wriH^a to ifi, 



^^H^iAndk |ii)r Bitt^ U cofi^AMP^-MSfdi^lM&il- 

lbrAiij^gaitt^^ •• ■■■• --^•^•^•-.-''iqin' 

Ji0 iv»8 t achool bay at Westtniiiateir ; three editiotiB bad b^h 
jiold, and the book had become yery scarce^ wbeii tiie fdttflK 
edition vj^pwxd, in 1^2^ the Town> according to the tiodk- 
!i«Uei^V AAvtfftiiktmentiy faitfdly aff&idifeg <^ oopf.^^ Tlieftll9#- 
iitg^A^lbreMHtd Ihe teaderi by Cknrley bimii^^ iv^eibBei^ngly 
ifllrk^^' boCh edits own ado^imt, aodifar-the tel el^filltbg>^6 

^' Readofj (I loKxw not yet whether gentle of liOi) MiM^ 

bUOwliaTe been angry ;(I dare not assdmettte^hdiwtfr^'thdir 

l%elr) :«t my Fbetieal BdlAiifdMi and idMted 'ki Wlne>KWit^ 

ie<HBtee|idB othet suits — earliness: others wh^atft ^ih^^f a 

weak feith or strong malice have thought me Hke a ipip^, v^hicb 

neter aoanda [but when 'tis bkmed in, lin^readtt* flM^ Aiks.-' 

iMaiGowkiy« bBfc Aulhavem Airaaynmin ; "3^0 -Ih^ $xb^ I .«9^ 

^iwet^xthiytAit^ wi'MTioua Ftost wlikih dipt tji«^ blosll^ih^ 

hdciMM:<lkeyM«iq[>e«tf qiUdUy^^ to Ijbe kttel:> Ibi^ he.h,4h^ 

worst Hoitiicide wh6 strives to martker another's fanie't ta 

bQtt& that it h a tidictdoas loQy to.coHdemn ^ k%li ilttbe 

Stars, because the Moon and Sun shine brighter, llioivmall 

Birsij bove k dttAet bkiwn Uitti^tin|pdsh«d bjf/|^9^^Ad, 



tliis third edition, 'WlHAitlK>fghJtibefliegietfta4i2!t i^JssM^ 

^i>fky§diyy-€»QtajM^Git»ew* »?Iliaiffl 
puffer Sh^wrack^ it shall Bomediing content me, that ifc^Mtf^ 
ple)|8^ n^yaelf and the fiookseUo*. In it yon shall find one 
argument (and I hope I shall need no more) to confute n»- 
believers } which is> that as mine age, and oon^iiently expe- 
rience (which is yet bnt little) hath increased^ Q<^^y ^^^^ 
not left my Poesie flagging behind them. I ^hpq)d not be 
angry to see any one bum my Ppmmmi mud miMe, nay I 
would do it myself, but that I hope n pardon ana|^ easily be 
gotten for the errors of ten years ofnge, ^bltfUHMiim^ mnd 
PHieiua confesseth me two years older wheb I wril it. The 
rest were made since upon several occasions, and perhaps do 
not bely the time of their birth. Such as ihey are* they were 
preated by me, but their &te lies in your hands; 'it is only 
you can effect that neither the Boolneller ffspent himself of his 
charge in Printing them, nor I of my kbonr in' cdmposing 
them. Farewell.'^ . - '^ 

A. COWLBY. 

However unfashionable in our days Cowley pif|y have be- 
come from the harshness and conceit of son^pf.l^« composi- 
tions, there are still many who think both. highly^and^justly of 
him as a Poet — ^he was considered by his co^empitMraries as 
excelled by none, and King Charles II. when toM of his death, 
declared '' That Mr. Cowley had not left a better man behind 
him in Jlngl^Ai*- 

I certainly think with Dr. Blair, that Cowley s Al^i*^!^^ 
P4^s, are b^ far the happiest of his efforts; <Ubey aresmootl^ 



itdOhecx>r'tw^'fi^|p^ttQtt8^ them here e&o^ pH^reAi^ 
'^ipOifoiey^inid^U' temey their own isxcttse fbr (ht^f^Jb&'^Ais^ 

:<n«.» hiH- -i^.V' ■ -. ; .. .... " .. : '-. -I b:«ij;'»Mj 

GOLD, 

. A mighty psdn to lore it w, w >;i wf 

And 'tis a pain that pain to miss. 

Bat of all pains the greatest pain 
^^ • 'Ititftblove-4mtloveinvaiiL ' '• * --■'' 

il /i>.. . .'Viftiie now Bor. Noble Bl«»d, ■■"-• '=-^' .''^^"^"^ 

ff </(;.. Nor Wit hj Lore is nnderstood; »• •> i.4i'o7/ 

,.^ v., ,. Gold «lQn9 does passion raoTie^ ,..,.... ^;. xoi ?\y?^«.'^ 

.j. , Qoldmonopoliz»LoYc! ,; :• > . •.t:v;,i^<\ 

J A corse on her, and on the man . « ,7- t^ »■• 

''''*' Who this traffickthns began! 
n^.s A cttrte on him who found the Orel 
v:Jn < AailP»eonWmwhod%g*dthestore^ * t^n.^r 

AcQtse onfahnwho-didrefinelt! • ' ' ' -'' ^'■'''' 

A £urse on him ^i^ first did coin iik| .; \<. . ■ .< ' 1 *j: o;g .^<<i : 

A carse all corses else above - ,• - ^ ■ '^ >.r^ ■! *" 

On him, who os'd it first in Lore ! I 

Gold begets in Brethren, hate ; 

Gold in Families, debate ; 

is 6ld do^s Friendships separate, 

G(M does Oitil^Warseremie; 

Th^e die smallest harms of it I ^> i^i:' 

iJold, alas, does Loyp begefr : 



^ir* : 



«'. : 



'-■'.,*• ' ^ » 









; :.-•;■ r::>-^' 



THE GBiASSHOPPiER, 

Happy Insect what can be 

In Happiness compared to Thee ? 

ftd wi^ nonrislmietat divine^ 



N I • 



Natwe wmIi iipoft'tiwt^itai ' ' ^- ^ 

Andtfajyerdantciq^'^^esfi^ ' -' 

"Ha fili'd wbereerer Choa^oA ttetdl 

Thon dtmt dnok, anddaiiot, mdanii^; 

Happier than the liqpi^kit Kkift • 

All the fields which dM» dort Me, 

All the Plwte bebBg<to1h0% ' ' 

All that Siiin]iier4Mm*prefliiOB; 

Fertile made with ^arlj jfaee. 

Man for thee doea Sow and^Fknigli ; 

Farmer He, and Landlord Tkou! 

Tlioii doest innocenti J foy ; 

Nor does thj Lnxorj destroj; 

Hi^ Shepherd gladly hearetkiiiee, ■ -, . (\ 

More Hannonions tiiao He. .• . /. 

Thee, Country hinds with giadnestlieiuv ... p 

Fhyphet of the ripened year"! 

Thiee Phoebus loves, and^does insi^ ; ' ' *V ' - •>^ {, 

PhoBhos is Mmeclf AySirc • > v\ r >lJJj 

Toiheeofalllhingsiipoa-EaHh, i ; . ? w' loiit 

I^iile is no longer than ihy aMi* ■■.''' . •sWjA 

Happy Insect, hiqfipy tton, / \^^,^,^ \ 

Dost neither Age mh^ Winter fcnoWf \ 

But when thou'st ^mnk, and danc'd, and fwur, , ^ 

Thy fill, the flow>y fjeswes amoi^, 

(Viiluptuous, andwJwithaD; ' ''* I'r/ -rn I 

HpionrseatfAnimafr^ • r' -vr/u r::>uiii liji-^r 

Sated with ihy SumiRcr'f^ast, ■ -.,/.,' ••■^iii?» tb^vflA 

ThqpirettresttoendUtsjrest . • .ih :iix;m o* 

THBEPICtRfc ■ "^ ' '^^'-^ *'^^'"'^' 
Fm the Bowl wia ttMTO WiM,. • • ' ^^^'''' ^->f'^ m**^ 

AnNiiidoiSrTemplefiBAM«#«rM " '^ ii:n»v/n>3ni 



Like the Wine ^^(fit^ MdiUu, 
jCrown'd with Rosesi Ire cwwit^mn a 

Oyge's wedihy diadeik 
T^DayUew^a; wlit* d»ire>fe«r? 

I^mf^ treM it ^AfUf » iWt ^imv 
Jl%4 at le«^V '^untlli^w tiB.8l«y< 
Let!? banish Businesf, baauih £forfevf 
Tp the i?euib bdonip SVrilomw, 



. . 1 



Tbip nGUpanoe w^ wHtton whea the Jbithor im only 17 

^ars. of «g^ im4 iii it b^ iioti:ail9ce8 two Braioatio- jPieeee^ en« 

titled " Deorum Dono^' and *' Grants and Hegw*' The Au- 

^%or was nephew of James HiHOfilh Author of the Famliar 

-"^ettersj who thus speaks of it in his Letters, %vo, p, 432^^ 

T^ 4fir. Bx Baron, at Paris. 

Gentle iSir, 

I veeeived and pfesQptly xfm over your Cyptiani j^cademy, 

X^ith much gr^ediaeas and no Tulgar delight ^ and 8ir^ I hold 

^^yself much honoured fbr the Dedication you^have been pleased 

^A make ther^f to m^^ fbr it deserved a ht higher patronage^ 

rrmly I must tell you without any compliment, that I have sel^ 

^om met with such an ingeiiioQ& inisctiife of pioso and yerse> 

lofcc^rwoyfm with ftucb vaiklkw of faiic^ fmd dMffnilig straios 



76 ^SECOND JOUBl^EyitpIIIfD; 

for which achievement he bore on his coat of arms ^bifi^^Tmiltf 
H^a^. He afterwards went to America, w)ie^ be ,wa/^.Jta|^ 
prisoner by the savage Indians^ from whom he found jDy^ea^i^^^ 
escape. He often hazarded his life in naval engagements wU)i 
iSratcs, Spanish Men of War, and in other adventures j^ and 
had. a considerable hand in reducing New England to the, obe- 
dience of Great Britain, and in reclaiming the. inhabitapts^om 
baiWism." All which exploits are detailed in the History of 
Vii^nia by himself. . 

Matoako, alias Rebecca, daughter to Pouhatan, Sovereign 
of Virginia, and who is called Pocahontas by Capt. Smith in 
his History, may be considered as a national bene£B^ress,jKS 
tb her (says Granger, vol. ii. p. 58) we are indebted for the 
preservation of Virginia, when in the state of an in&nt colony. 
In 1607, when she was about 12 or 13 years of age, sl^e not 
only procured the liberty, but saved the life of Ca^^t. Smith, 
wlibm, together with his men, her father intended to n|i)idc9r 
py surprize. In 1612, she was herself a prisoner; and soon 
after married Mr. Rolfe, whom Smith calls a gentleman^ In 
1616, after she had been instructed in our language an^ %e 
Christian reli^on, she was brought to England, andintrodm^ 
and graciously received at Court. The next year, up<»n If e^ re- 
turn home, she died on ship board at 6|ravesen4» ^y^Jf^^f iffr 
pressed with religious sentiments. The good sense, humanity, 
and generosity of this woman, do her honour, as they carried 
her far above the prejudices of her education, and the barb^ji^cHis 
customs of her country. She was the first Vii^nian wha was 
converted to Christianity, that could speak our iimj^^ or 
had a child by an Englishman.** 
' The Library at Eton contiuns King James lst*s copy, iipd^ji^ 



^(^V^ jP^BJ^^ the .giireat JUfer svete A^^emards disoMuitfty 

^S^S&^^Y ,tb(^v{ioii$(e <a£ Br^^^aazaj atid ]RbUipiiy./Oi4ered all 

21^ c^^^^,.|Qf, th^ GwrjkKus l)ooktobe.desii«yQdi so tkait^£c»i 

J^V9 ¥WM^^'<H4y were known to e^8t> oneanthfiVfitioBii 

J[4^fffu^b^: aiiptlier in<Ui€( possession of.M^ dcilG^inbomlb^ 

\^^\l:S^^kf^ ^'^ ^^^^^^^ ^^ ^fnazones.y 2 torn*- ISino* 

•flOin iiT'-'j' ;'tii- : ^ ■' ^ ■ '. ' ^: • ' ■ • ■ •'■ x < *^il> 

' ' • :. . woi; 

A^^im ^uirensidl Upon the Yearly Celetration o^f'M^ 
Robert Dover s Ollinplck Games upon Cotswold flAts, S^c^ 

'''^fteiVriii, If.- 2s,', Townley, 3/. 3*. (reprint) 5 Saniiftersi 
ffifiiS, 1^/. 2*. erf.; Bindley, December, 1818, 12/: li?.; Hon: 
O.'^NaJ^i^,' ' 1 S24/ frepr'mt J 2L\\ s. Od. TborpeV Cat^ogu^ 
1824,^^81:' 8*. ^■-^■- •......: ^ w.-.. 

The Frontispiece to the above Book represents the Grames 
and Sports, such as men playing at cudgels, wrestling, leap- 
ing, pitching the bar, throwing the iron hammer, handling 
rile'^\kej feapitog bver the heads of men kneelinfg, standing 
tq^H'^libdr Mnds,- &c. Also women dancing, men htinifangf 
and coursing the hare with hounds, greyhounds, &cf. "''With 
i^^iksi^bi^ltrbfbeards, on a hillock, with gtinis'thi^ein' fimgi 
and the ^ttttrk M^f taie great' Birectdr/C^^tain I>6iH'^ <&^ 
httw^bkcV tidfeg from place to pMce. * . ?'»-J 

. -'iThtt-'itAoki -irhteh hath the running title CotsieoldiSfmii 
on every page, consists of verses made by scvferal Iiind]i,\ Oil 
t^d "^(Si j44ikafia Dubrensia, "These Gamies were begun and 
eoftiikucjd, At ii eertaiti time in the year, for 40 years, by one 



76 . SECOND J0171Q9EJ.|tp||]jrD, 

for which achievement he bore on his coat of mns ifjtt^ef^^FnrffB 
H^«^. He afterwards went to Amoricm wii^ ht,'^^^^^ 
prisoner 1)y the savage Indians, from whom he found jii(^q9||f^ 
esci^. He often hazarded his life in naval engageinents wit)i 
iPlrateSj Spanish Men of War, and in other adventures j^uid 
had. a considerable hand in reducing New England to the .obe- 
dience of Great Britain, and in reclaiming the. inhabitants ipom 
buWism." All which exploits are detailed in the History of 

yi,^ by himself. •;•:;,■ 

Matoako, alias Rebecca, daughter to Pouhatan, Sovereign 
of Virginia, and who is called Pocahontas by Capt. Smith in 
his History, may be considered as a national bene&ctress, Jfs 
tb her (says Granger, vol. ii. p. 58) we are indebted for the 
preservation of Virginia, when in the state of an in&nt colony. 
In 1607, when she was about 12 or 13 years of age, she not 
only procured the liberty, but saved the life of Capt. Smith, 
whom, together with his men, her Neither intended to mi^fdcf 
by surprize. In 1612, she was herself a prisoner; and sopn 
after married Mr. Rolfe, whom Smith calls a gentlem^., |n 
161j6, after she had been instructed in our language ui4 ^e 
Christian religion, she was brought to England, and intcoduc^ 
and graciously received at Court. The next year, upon her re- 
turn home, she died on ship board at Gravesend^ stronglF ji/ff^- 
pressed with religious sentiments. The good sense, humamty, 
and generosity of this woman, do her honour, as they carried 
her far above the prejudices of her education, and the barbaiqvs 
customs of her country. She was the first Vii^nian who^was 
converted to Christianity, that could speak our langu^^ or 
had a child by an Englishman.** 

The Library at Eton contiuns King James lst*s copy, aiidin 



a' BliiiioMANiAC'S ilBRART. 77 

'TOJ'Fdiitliill Library was a presentation copy j otKer lar^ ppr 
^JJwii^es.are in.the Libraries of some of our principal Bibti-< 

Smths Travels and Adventures in Europe^ Asia^^^rica^ifMfl 
''America^ Small folw. Sixty pages only, fFith Plt^e^ 
""'Mo.-. ■ '. .,;., 

Mr. QrenTiDe's copy, according to Dibdina Libi^,^!^- 
panion, p. 2^4, cost him 51. 5s. .«..,, 

It was reprinted in vol. ii. of Churchill's Collection of VQyjiges. 



.itji'jj'*;-. r". 



Bidccetlt C'f^iav. Bat.) Bizarie di Varie Figure. 8t;<^ ohkn^ 

nh -tol :.\- >?■■ ^ ,^^^ ^ . . • v^i ^'» 

. 1624. ..,•,..-.-•: 

' See 7% itfpertorium Bibliographicutny where i^ is dei^ciibed 

aa '^!^Vost rare and sinirnlar Book, coutidnin£ Ppnts of human 

'Figures tohhed by the strangest materials, as diamonds, hoopS;^ 

DiiAacters, pieces of carpentery, battledores, chains, culinary 

"iitensils^ kc. When the correctness of the deli^eations, and 

'ine boldness of the attitudes, are considered — we s^ the n^d 

of a great Master through the laughable whimsicality of his 






A^ddpy IS in the Strawberry Hill Collection, and one was jn 
fHi liibKuy at Ponthill. 






tydfiiis (Abraham) Annates of the famous Empresse Elizabeth^ 
'''^%[iieene of England , Sfc. translated out of French. Large 
'"' /ji«giw^i 2 vols. 4to. Benj. Fisher. (No date. J 

Large paper copies differ from the small in the following 
|foritenlaf^ : viz. that the date (1 625) is wanting in th^m^ 



<% :F^ «f gfeab^Mi are (9'K^ y^V¥^ W»^«% M»?iti» 
«9Udl oopie$x>vXj tl^e tipo hat vers^ ia can^aoa pri^Sfi^lUMB^ 

^ l^^96f Clluales, in lettefs of ' j;oSd. Qq l£he ^ J^y^jOl.^ 
^•,|il ^ iNnSiaat Fwitnit -of Barde by Pdanuiv of w)M(^.f^ 
impressions are to be found in the copies pQg^esscjd j^.|j^ 
r|i|||n|iii«. Df 8taAHr4> tieneral 9ow^eswi^^ and Ui 14', 1^^' * 
iWfjF. wW at Sotbeb^s, in 182?, tortO^ IH . .,,„,,l 



. . I , 



Omh^ifAhrukanO P^tical BhuofM. ma Pprtttt^ii/ 

>[ dh).LoDgina|i*i| Rblkitlieca ^Vn^. Tpelt ft c<^y, vitb tb^f^f^ 
tniH> is mafkedat 1^/^ and anoCher^ w^ntiq^ AePo^t^^ 

)PenryVaak4l82^2>4f. . ^..,/ij| 

.4CW%V Xrtfv^V Riddle*, a Pomral ComeXcj written M^Jf^ 

i ,j9^itkPartri^t* 1638. : > i.:*// 

lO. Nassau^ Esq. 1824, 3/.. IQ«. ... rr/^ir 

The fV&rk$ ef Mr. j^braham Cowley, «op#w(|i||^ V4A9«?NpUA 
were formerfy printed, and those whkh he d^igne^ forMke 
preset NeU) published out of ike Author 9 OrigkkthGtpkk, 
I2ma. Lond. 1691. ^ ^-^^ 't 

(Second Puff t tfPUto, mhdmg h^ Paeticai Blos0^m^' fy^. 

• 1682. ■ -■ -•' ,.:-^.>''< 

This latter edition of Cowle^> Works conti^A9 l>t- Bjarails 

If fi^^Gcm^ of tl|^ Life and Writings of Cow)ejr, wri^B 40 if^, 



Ji0 inas ik school bay At Westtniiiflteri tiiree oditiottB bad beeii 
jBoM^ and the book had bacome very scmrcei, when tiie f^iillh 
edition ii|jNHu?ed« in 1^2^ the Town^ according to the tiodk- 
!i«U^ViMv^Mihnenl^ hiitd>y^^ tKfpf^y Th^ftlftiyli^ 

utg^AddrenHM th«' mkK^ by Gwk^fhitaiM, UwkeeMli^^y 
OfikMi jMli oiitits iiwti afto^iaitt, andforli^ tel*tl^fiidbg<lh6 
4J^^«in(l^hb'Mdyfr0di]etioiiaii;^ ii >^ bt9 

^' Reader^ (I koaw not yet whether gdntle of liOi) (idfiM 
fcHOwliaTe been angry ^(I dare not astdmet^^hdiittisr^f^thdlr 
'l^gfi^) :B(t ^y BMtMial BdMxiesfli and Ibiastted in ^kieyVWiiit 
ei^iW^pds othef suits — earliness : others wkd aft ^ih«i<^ h 
weak fidth or strong malice have thought me liker a pipe, ^kich 
neteraoanda {but when *ti8.bkn«ed>in> dntErOadl&AfiMil Jti!^a<^ 
ii^ifkiGa^itf, bttt AaAovem^AnaDy^iitm ; T^ 4k^ fy» I«i^ 
ciw^\4taik-;it4a jm ^^Tiooa Ftost whjkih ^ipa Ib^^blQai^ 
telQpvttli^ Mlk«y<i«[qpoair qiUct^^^ i^ ih&hmk, UkA> heJil.<th^ 
worst Homicide wh6 strives to marlher anotkef's fasie-t ten 
boy& thiit. :it i» a xificidoas >foSy tO'Coad^ai^ ^ ktigd ^A^ 
Stars, because the Moon and Sun shine brighter, ll^otvimdl 
Warei4 iem ia (Mhef bkwn tliaQ<eKtin|f(d8lKid by t^tit^!!^ 
Air dhft Mitif Poew^y^beii^ a^gei^ ili«^^ 



this third editi^^ 'Wb«t|jtiia9gkititN^riieg]biM^ AisdM^ 
1 4Mn.#iHni> ib^ fynii book wbidb h^ 4i|^h|ed>.Vk>bMxnooBibdeii 

9affer Shipwmck^ it shall somedung content me^ that it(|Mtf^ 
pll^MS^ n^yself and the Bookseller. In it yon shall find one 
argument (and I hope I shall need no more) to confute n»- 
believers ; which is^ that as mine age, and odin^n^ntly expe- 
rience (which is yet but little) bath increased^ 9<^;^hcy haye 
not left my Poesie flagging behind them. ) dippU not be 
angry to see any one bnm my Pppmmii tmd (l^^sibe, nay I 
would do it myself, but that I hope n pardon maif easily be 
gotten for the errors of ten year9 oftige;, My'CbkMom/ta md 
FhUeius confesseth me two tf ears older Vfheii t iMt it. The 
rest were made since upon several occasions, apd ^ierhaps do 
not bely the time of their birth. Sudi as th^y axes they were 
created by me, but their &te lies in your haiids ; 4t is only 
you can effect that neither the Bookseller iwpent kim^lf of his 
chaige in Printing them, nor I of my bd^oor in' cdmposing 
them. Farewell.'' . . / 

A* Cqwlby. 

However unfiEishionable in our days Coivl^y Jf^ ba^^ be* 
come from the harshness andconceit of som^ of. ]^ composi- 
tions, there are still many who think both higblyiaiBfd^justly of 
him as a Poet — ^he was considered by his co^tempidliraries as 
excelled by none, aud King Charles II. when toM of Ms death, 
declared " That Mr. Cowley had not left a better man behind 
|dm in jplnglsgid*^- 

I certainly think with Dr. Blair, that Cowley sf ^/Vnau^reontic 
P4^s, are bv far the happiest of his efforts; ^'tb^ar&smootli 



Life and Dedth of Edmund Gewnges, (lalkut Irbntmnger.J 
Ato, Portrait anH PtdtSs. " St. Omeftr. 1614. ' 
Gulston^ 2/.; Townley, bl.y G, Nassau/l 824/ Blue morocco, 
12/. 5*. 

*' Edmund Jennings/* says Granger, ^ was acb&itted into 
the English College, at Rheims, under Dr. aftemrords Cardinal 
Allen, and when he was 20 years of age', ordaEtt^ PiieM. He 
was soon afterwards sent into England, where he liras appre- 
hended in the act of celebrating MUss. He wasr exectited by 
hanging and quartering in Gray^s Inn Fields, Dec. lOttj 1591." 
In the above rare book are several Historical Prints, repre-- 
senting the principal circumstances of his Life and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expence by the Pa^ 
pists, in order to pei^petuate the remembrance of twa * Mira- 
cles,** which are there sud to have happened at his death. 
The first is, that, after his heart was taken out, he said, 
*' Sancte Gregori, ora pro me^ which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, ** God*s wounds ! see his heart is in my hand > yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth." The other is, that an holy Virgin 
l>eing desirous of procuripg some relick of hiitiV contrived to 
mproach the basket into which his quarters were thi-dvm, and 
touched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy from 
lis na\dng been employed in acts of consecration anil elevating 
t^e Host, and immediately his thumb came off witlioui; force 
or mscovery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
tie greatest care* 

•If. 



9$ . YMOOm ^ilffNWoRimVQr 

r)i)|^|9^i iii.jbi« iAjiecdotes of litefati»9« m^% ''Klsitbei^Witeli 
iftii^s.JMfOnPf Hooker, mipr* Bi«bop <^r«wltiPr «ai^ 40^1^ 
tluit give an accoanjt of Hooker audvbte WrMtng^rrtiBlWv ^ 
mention of the Books or Tracts which gave oecasi^ito his 
writing The Ecclesiastical Pc^y, Wliitgift had written an 
Answer to the Admonition to t/te Parllafnent, f^nd. th^i;eby en- 
gi^d'tii a controversy wit)i Thomas (]!ar;fcwrig<^> the sai^posea 
A^^<^ 6^it. Hooker^ in this his e^qeUent Worif^ .^^ideruMili: 
the defemre of o\ir Bpcl^iastic^ Establishinent^ suppn^ ^nuh 
Ckrtwright appears to have been the most powerful* of aJOL the 
oi)tiortent8."* ' - 1 / 

Hooker was some time Master of the Temple, and afterwards 
Aectet dif J^slippsbourne in Kent, Thare is a FbFtridt' 0f hH^/ 
12tt6. ffoitat^cufp, from Sparrow's Ration^ of tlie€dtt^n 
Prayer } and aiLother in foH^^ (hiL Faithome fdulp, firotitlspi^ 
to his Ecclesiastical Polity, and according to Granger the best 
impressions are to be ftmndiQ the eaiiiest editions of tkaAliwc, 
co^lidiling only the fiy/3 books. r *'. "^ ^ 

Mueh siirprise has been expressed irf; Ac ftev. T.F. JKbfijtV' 
omissionof thisiworkin his *^ Library 'Cr^npamon Tf its'i*^" 

* Beloe's Anecdotes of Literature, yoL i. p. 22, 23, funu^hea^^d^^dl 
list of theae controTersial Writings. , -i -Vi^.: 

f|: Tfiere ia,m old folio Book, caUed ** Th9 Siu^^\fj^ka^ty.^(^k^^^ % 
from the Athenian Orafifes^ 9omevhi^t a|i|^()xi)jiating t0| Jf;^ I]^^ 
plap : h\ji^9. mere skeleton, both in bulk an^ ms^ter, i^ compp^^ v^tji, . * 
tiie 6cT. Gentlems^ ^ st^ehe and ryghte usefull^ Toli^me. 



^ito«/«Mv| d0|ibt notihatin a fotore edition th^'Detddiri Vi^ 
!K<>dMiiHM, will bring this BcckmkicMi Cakon'yto'hQ^ip^^ 
4ltii[^ ^'lak- great g^n fsiil in silencing sncli pd!^ >ett^^hW/ 1 
think he will be perfectly justifted/acT a tfae'«oh Of the C^f^tt 
iMHr^Q utt» iik(kMiig bis opponent dotm with tlh«'fik'£itlf|[io 
eSM^ (nfNook^^sE^ks^va^cAVoMe / ly^t let Iumiyce'\[^iAf 
apd not injure the PortPButl ' '^ . jviv ^b 

.^fff o* ,-.• - ■■- ■•' >••«•- :•'•.■■' •• -'...•.. i; •,- 1*. rOllr: »ir. 

-«•//;*■■"•.•' •• .,• ,'•.•■ '• ,.' • ••*■•..,>• V '■■'.' v; • /v'.uA 

Sfall s (J 08,) Mundus alter et idem : sUfe Terra AustrafiBi 9Bt€L 
:^lf^»^P^ h^g^?.>. *^' -futhorc M<lfcjfrio p^itan^^fc^, 
j^o. Pirst edition, with frontispiece ^Kw. ■ r4 

SojLd at Brand*s sale for 1/. 7 s.', atG. Nassaus, 1824. \(.13sk^ 
Reprinted^ with the Maps, in Pratt s edition oj HalVs 
fForfts, 10 vols. 8vo. Lo^d. 1808. \ .5 

H^IVb (Jqs.J Discovery of a New, fForld^.qr .^Kl^^tm» i^. 

. , ^pt^h Indies, hitherto unknown, by an English J^crtmfS^ ^f^ ' 

.^ifdate. Imprinted for JS. Blount, ., ..V; 

.Unknown to Avics or Iferb^t. , / ..,: , 

^ii^dssale, 1807, 3/. 7s.) G, Nassau's, 18?4,2/. I*. . ,. 

The preceding Work by Hall, Bishop o£ Norwi^b, wsNGitjh^. 

PlS^^yp^ wjheiice Dean Swift Jborrowed the idea of (pUdUvi^s 

T^^* Mrv Campbell, speaking of thi« satirical j$|Pti«ti>i 

'^ 'it ili ako very prob&bie that Sw^derired some portion of his Voyage 

%o Iii^ta from Bishop Godwin's ^ Man in the Moon, or a PUcourseo/a^ 

Xojiffigi thiiher by Domingo Gonmles,'* Sto. 163& «* In ihis Phiiosoplacal 

^^tdkhitM,^ ynach was riBpeateAy printed, Domingo Oonsales, a diquna- 

tiv^'S^tbdard> k supposed to be shipwrecked on an uninhabited Islan^j 



SBQQliiD JOURNB¥ K(HJN0, , 

8ays> that under the pretence of describing the Ternf \^u0r^^^ 
Incogmta, Hall reversed the plan of Sir T. Mores Uto^a^ 
and dwrederuped the vices, of existing nations. ,^.. . ^\ 

HiUVs (J,) P^irgedemlarlum. • ,.Ji«<f 
The three first Books, called "T(>othiet0Suiire9^iF0eHM^ 
Acddemicaii and Mwral^^ were first printed by T* Qrtedfiif. 
Ri'Dei^er, \2mo. Ltmd. 1597. < ' jc 

The three last Books appeared under the Title of F'irgeA' 
nUttrUtm^ The three last Bookea iff Byting Salyree. 12iao. 
Ijtmdi Printed by R. Bradockefor R. Dexter, ^a ld9dk R 
feK^jhis with Siatires of Book 4. > 

^ Thii original edition complete is estimated by Dibdin kit iSL 
Longman and Co. in the BibL Ang, Poet, mark a copy att2fiJ[J 

The next edition (of the whole) is enixiXei. Flrgedimtafittmf 
the three last (in reaHty all six) Bookea of the Byting Satyi^^ 
corrected and amended with some additions by J, H, Him:' 
Lond. for R. Dexter, ^c. 1599.* ^ ' 

G.Nassau, 1824, 1/. 1*. - 

Ditto. 8tw. 1602. 

Brand, 2/. \2s, Gd,-, Stevens, 3/. 3s, 



where he taught several Ganzas or Wild Geese to fly with a light itw^ 
chine, and to fetch and carry things for his oonTenience. He after some 
time rentnred to put himself into the machine, and they carried him with 
great ease. He happened to he in this i^rial Chariot when these Ganzas, 
which were birds of passage, took their flight to the Moon, and was di- 
rectly carried to that Planet He gtyes a Tery ingenionfl deacriptSon of 
what occurred in his Journey, and alsa of (he Wonders he saW when he 
arrived there." 

* See Warton's ObserrationB on Sp&aae^jnl i, pu 187» Sv«k 



SfS^^. ^^I^3^^¥€ :lbe ,(B^0at RiTer meifi ^fi^erwardsilisoMuitfii^ 
Pf^iff9^,]j[Y tb^.fiou^^ o£ ]3r9gaazaj atid I^bUipIV^^ideredidl 
$1)9 9^^viQf thifl curious l)ook tob^destioyedj fio ihaitfoi 
J^M y^A)tw^:<»ily were known to e^st^ oneanlherVfitiaBii 
M^f^^:fih'^. aiiotbi^r mthe possession of.M^ <kijG^Aib!ervUk> 
whp t^^psl^teddt^^injbp Fjrench under the titk^of .-..f u. > siujl ; 
\^^*^M^^i9^ 4!? io^ R^v'^^ d^^ Amazanes'-. 2 torn*- li2lao. 



-— ' - . . f- 

' ' V • •• 'V 

Al/i*tktta ^uirensid. Upon the Yearly Celebration of Mr* 
Robert Dover's Olimpick Games upon CotswoldHtltt, Sfc^ 
"^MtifJ Ldnd. 163«. ' ' ■■"'^''\ 

^'^teeiVcfiib, t^ 2s,i Townley, 3/. 3*. (reprint) ; ^niiifersi 
rcfiiS, 13/. 2s. U.) Bindley, December, 1818, 12/: 12^.5 Hon. 
O.'^Nia**'^; 1 824, preprint J 2/. 11 s. Gd. Tfaorpe's Cata^ogii^ 
1824,^"8/:'8if. • ■ •'■ " ■•' •■ "■ ■ '^' 

The Frontispiece to the above Book represents the Crames 
and Sports, snch as men playing at cudgels, wrestling, leap- 
ing, pitching the bar, throwing the iron hammer, handling' 
rile^^^ke, feaping bver the heads of men kneeling, Wtiiing 
^^ti^^their hfknds, &c. Also women dancing, men htin%ingf 
and coursing the hare with hounds, greyhounds, &cf. '''With 
i^iftwtiebmlt' of boards, on a hillock, with guns 'th^ein'fiHb^, 
and the Ptctttrfe ^f the great Director, Captain 0Weif;'<fii 
b»«wbkck, tiding fVom place to J)Mce: ' " ' ' " * 
'>?^14= ft^ki %hfch hath the running title Cotslcoldijfmdi 
on every page, consists of verses made by several Mnd^,' oil 
tto ^\d Aif^Ua Dudrensia, "These Games were begun and 
eofttikmfd, At It eertain time in the year, for 40 years, by one 



for which achie?ement he bore on hbeoaftpf iarii|i |^i|i|3f3^3V^^ 
H^^ds* He afterwards went to Amines, whefe hB;9m^Jji^m 
piisoner by the savage Indians, from whom he found .^ogq^^m^ 
escape. He often hazarded his life in naval engageqi^ts witb 
rtratcs, Spanish Men of War, and in other adventures;^ and 
had. a considerable hand in reducing New England to the, obe- 
dience of Great Britain, and in reclaiming the. inhabitaptsipom 
butmiism." All which exploits are detailed in the History of 
Vii^nia by himself. t{ 

'Maloako, alias Rebecca, daughter to Pouhatan, Sovereign 
of Virginia, and who is called Pocahontas by Capt. Smith in 
his History, may be considered as a national bene&^ress, j^ 
to her (says Granger, vol. ii. p. 58) we are indebted ibr the 
preservation of Virginia, when in the state of an in&nt colony. 
In 1607, when she was about 12 or 13 years of age, she not 
only procured the liberty, but saved the life of Capt. Smith, 
wiiom, together with his men, her father intended to m^ra^ 
t>y surprize. In 1612, she was herself a prisoner; at^ so^n 
after married Mr. Rolfe, whom Smith calls a gentleman^ la 
1616, after she had been instructed in our language and the 
Christian religion, she was brought to England, and inti;odpi^ 
and graciously received at Court. The next year, upp|i her re- 
turn home, she died on ship board at Gravesend^ strongly me 
pressed with religious sentiments. The good sense, humanity, 
and generosity of this woman, do her honour, as they carried 
her far above the prejudices of her education, and the barbi^j^cHU 
customs of her country. She was the first Virginian who ^?as 
converted to Christianity, that could speak our language;^ or 
had a child by an Englishman." 
The Library at Eton contains King James lst*s copy, aiid,ji^ 



A BlbLlOMANIAC'S llBRARY. 77 

TO^'Foiitliill Library was a presentation copy j otlier large pp^ 
^jCTfcoples.are in the Libraries of some of our principal Bibli- 



-1*. "•,..• ! .'•' ••'•' 

omtns Travels and Adventures in Europe^ Asia^.u^rtqijiptfi^ 
"' Ametiea^ Small folio. Sixty pages only* fflth PltttP^^ 

iiw. ., ■ .'■■.,■ ■■■,■■■ '.;,;, 

^ Mr. (Jrenville*8 copy, according to Dibdins Libi^ry £omL- 
pamon> p. 284, cost him 5/. bs. 






It was reprinted in vol. ii. of Churchill's Collection of Vpypiges. 



I 

jaMcettt ((jiov. Bat,) Bizarie di l^arie Figure^ 8i;o. obl^ngK 
' See 7^e JRepertorium Bibliographicumy where i^ is dej^cribe^l 



fif 



?{ ''^ A most rare and sinimlar Book, containing Prints of human 
ignres lormed by the strangest materials, as diamonds, noopSj^ 
nladaers, pieces of carpentery, battledores, chains, qiHnary 
utensHs^ &c. When the correctness of the delii^eations, ai;idi 
ine boldness of the attitudes, are considered — ^we s^ the lumd 
iif a'great !Master through the laughable whimsicality of bis 

tojfes:" ■ •■ „ T'!' ;';.'. 

''^^ A"'i;<)py -is in the Strawberry Hill Collection, and one was i^ 
lifife liibtiry at Ponthill. 

^Jfyafcte (Abraham) Annales of the famous Empresse Elizabeth^ 
'^^^^^iieene of England, 8fc, translated out of French. Large 
^^ paper^ ' 2 vols. 4to, Benj. Fisher. (No date. J 

Large paper copies differ from the small in the following 
ps^^CnUH: viz. that the date (1625) is Wanting in th^mi 



v7« . tfUMftev mi»iM>mm^ 

^^«i|| ftf E^z^Mi are f^vtcQH vmsig W><#m^ MH^AP 
^mUoopiesoniytlie tii^ hat vertiw ia cwubqii pwtfMffK^ 
. JMTp Tr GffennUe has a lay paper cgpy^ wit|t..tti^, ,^i j g j »!i 
^T^r^€l|ailei, in kitten of'j^* Q^^JaAlfifif^S^IBo^ 
■J4.,|il aiNn31iaat Faitrait ^of Barde by Dekuraov of i9Gl)a|q|^.^ 
impressions are to be found in the copies p9I^W|S|i^j^J()!ip 
lijtirqEaia irfBtsffur^i tieoer^ 
^:?|i5F. wOd at Sotbetys, in 182?, ft^ . ,.„^;. 

- ■• '■ ■" ''■if'-, ,'fil*0> 

""■ ■ .«:•;». oor"»fi»» 

:A In Ixmginaii^s Kblkitlieoft ^b^. Tpelt ft e^^y^ vitk t^}^ 
tralt^ is marlBe4tU; 16/.; and anoCher^ w%atii)^ (b»PoftQu(^ 

:Perry8 8ale4l822»4f. , ..,,jf 

43^iep*0i Lwei^ Ridikt a Pa94oraI CqmeXe^ wriiiem ^iiJf^ 
4ime of ki$ being a Kmg9 Sclfi^t^ in Wesimi^ter. Sl/^ifiiif§* 
fFUh Partrmt. 1638. r i,: ,,, 

G. Nassau^ Esq. 1824, 3A lOs. . ,,.,,, ^ 

The fV&rkB of Mr. j^braham Cowley, cotms^afikfW^^^ikH 
were formerly prkUed, and ihooe wkick ke de^gtufttfor'tke 
press, Noio published out of^ke Authors OrigkuUGtfkk. 
\2mQ. Lond. 1691. ^ ^ 't 

/Second Part tfX>itto^ including 1^ Poetical Blosis^^m, JMA 
11582. ..-'r.-: 

This lattef edition of Cowle^*s Works conti4A9 i>r- Bjffai^ 
1^ Ac^rO'^t of tb^ I4fe and Writings of Cow)ejr> wrilt^m to iftt 



imt j Okey^^rt rfirtt pri^ited trt the ^mftf ^ «f (9>4[M WWIft 

Ji0 inas t school bay At Westtnuiateri three editiotts had beeii 

«old, and the book had become very scmrcei, when the fduHh 

edition uppoaredj in 1^2^ the Town^ according to the tioOk- 

)i[(IM^# Adv^lJftidCment, hiitd}jr b£^ Th^fttt^H^ 

iilg^^4dre«Hto the tead^i by Govky hititiNdtf^ ir^nleeMliigly 

AtHo^i; bcffii oiidts iiwti a6o^i«itt, and for lie tet«tf/fildbg^^6 

4p^« ti(li&db hii Mdy fvOdncti^ e; v^ii 

^' Reader^ (I Jaww not yet ni^hether gdnde of mi) ^6M4 

IfWOwliaTe been angry i(I dare not a8siiin««h<s^hdd»«r^f ithdir 

^^ckg!^) :B(t my BMtieal BdhhiesSi ^and Ifk^teii in ^iiiei^KWiiit 

igdti^6pd8 othef suits — earliness: others wkd-flM^^ih^'^ a 

weak fidth or strong malice have thought me lik& a pip^, ithich 

neter aounda [but when 'tis ,bkiwed .in> dntlNiadiMl fiMil JiDtara* 

4yiiit)Ckmtey« btti) AaAovem^Aiia^jrBHtm ; 3r# "tii^ #(^ Im* 

ri»^e^\jtttaik 4^ '^ «u^ ^enTiooa Ft ost which ^ips .lh^^bk)iM<»iM 

lHk3piOi^^(tkeyiaff>eat qitidUy^: t^ Iho Mtto^^ tki^ h<9,l|,.^h^ 

W0T9t Homicide wh6 strives to mnrlher anflrtihef'd fasie-t tcH 

botil^ thufeiii i» a xificidoas ^y to.coadMaa^ latigk-^tHie 

Star8> because the Moon and Sun shine brighter^ l^^iv^d 

nHrai j taw krdMhei bkmrn than^eKtinifcdshiid hjf:^tMifl|^li$ftd^ 



9$ fW9BmJ> JWMtt^oKOttUlk 

^>i)@|B|9«i ui'bi« iAjiQcdotes of JLitorati»9, 91^ f'KlsilberiWdM 
iAJ>i|s>JMfo pf Hooker^ nor Bitbop Givodekir aoj^ ^dapiy /i^kbim 
tlmt give an accoanjt of Hogker audvU^ WrMtupa^qiBfelT ^ 
mention of the Books or Tracts which gave occasipv ito his 
writing The Ecclesiastical Polity, Whitgift had written an 
Answer to the Admomtlon to the Parliament, and th^eby en^ 
gii^^'iii a controversy with Thomas (]!ai;t\iTight> the sii]^po8ea 
Aut%<^ of it. Hooker> iu this his e^qeUent Woi^ 3^idertM)|^ 
the defence of o\ir Bpd^siastic^ Establishineut^ a|Bp^nj»t ;whu!i 
Cartwright appears to have been the most powerful of aU Jlie 
opportents. * w 

Hooker was some time Master of the Temple, and afierwaids 
Jftectet^ Of Qislippsboume in Kent, There is a Fbrtreiit' pi- H^ 
12tt6. Holhtkculp.-fy^m Sparrow's Ration^ of the Cdnntion 
Prayer > and aiLother iu foHp^ OnU. Faltkome sculp, frontispi^ 
to his Ecclesiastical Polity, and according to "Granger the h^ 
impressions are to be ftmndii^ the earliest editions of thatliriU^c, 
co^laiidng only the fii^ books. i : ■'* 

Mueh Biirpnse has been expressed i^ the Ret. T. ^. Dibfiii^f' 
<Hni8Sion of thi^ work in his *^ Library ffontpdmon :"f its it 

* Belqe's Anecdotes of Literature, vol L p. 2Si, 23^ funii^hea a^ ^ajlod 
list of theae controTersial Writings. -'•.::.* 

^ T^ere is.ioi old folio Book, caUed ** 7%« SUufsle^U'a.fii^t^^^f^l^f^^ i 
from the Athenian Orofi^isp 9omevhsft a|)|^rpxii?9t^ing ,to^ ..M^ I]t^ll»4^||^ 
pla^ : |)i^,a m^re skeleton, both in bulk and ipatter, in poi>H[»fir^i)^ wit)i, . < 
the 6cT. Gentlems^ ^^sleeke andryghte usefull^ Tolame. 



•'J 



^ . 



^taC/<iih9v| d0|ibt itotihatin a fotiire edttioti th^'itefdcyiii 'BSS^ 
Ik^itftt^/wiU b#iBg this Ecchdakictil (7«HiK7»'irito M'^Ia^^ 
^itiiL^^'\^' great gun fail in silencing sacli pe% ^tttvSI^k's'i- 1 
t:hink he will be perfectly justifted/as: a tiftie^oh of the €!i^f^ 
jilWii/MQ^ittt leh^tkitig bis opponent dotm with tlh«''fi]t^#io 
^SM^ <yf^o(Mh^*« BtcledastiGaiPolitie ; ly^t Lit hiniiyce'ii^ 
^d not injure the Pk)rtraitl ' ^ . j ri J^cib 

?ii^ i\''iVrrn \y..\ -h.. ... ' ' '» • : ' ■• .^■\'- ' m"" v^tunw 

Mall s (Jos J MunduB alter et idem : iUie Terra ^ustralisi ankL 

vAflc^ ^emper incogfufa, ^d .Authorc M^rcj^rio Prifamif^^ 

.filvo. Pirst edition, with frontispiece ^ Kip. ,, . r. 

Bom at Brand's sale for \L 7s.', at G. IJJassaus, 1824^ U. JLJ^^ 

Reprinted^ with the Maps, m Pratt s edttion ^JT H^f^^^. 

iForks, 10 vols. 8vo. Lond. 1808. . \j 

JH^l!a/J(^i).J>i^overtf of a New, ^orld,^^<fr a.JDes^r^tm i^ 
.,/Siou^hJM^s, hifkertfk unknown, by an E^gliish Meri}^^ %o; ) 
.N[t^.d(Eite^, Imprinted for E. Blount^ , . 

fJ^k^mn,0,Ames or ffprb^t. , 
flx^^>,$i4e, 1807, 3/. 7s.) G. Nassau's, 1824,2/. 1*. 
The preceding Work by Hall, Bishop of Norwich, wsngj'^. 
Piq^i^jjfm Wjjhcaic^ rP^ Swift borrowed the idea of pulliv^y^s 
Tr^ejl^*: A^c.p.wplKJll, speaking of thi« satirical jS^ti«ti>i 

. ^— ii^w— — III ■ I — — — ilii wtmmamm^tmmmm^l^ - 

'^ ^^ alsd ittf prob&ble thbit Sw^derivedsome portion of his iTpjage 
to It^pnta from Bishop Godwin's ^ Man in the Moon, 6r a Discourse t^ a \ 
Y(^nm^iyVon^go(hnsalesr%7o. 163a «* In this PhiiosopUcal 
R^lii^TCi^ \nuch was riepeatefly printed, Domingo Oonsales, a diqunu- 
tii^^'fi^^bkSard^' ^ supposed to be shipwrecked on an uninhabited isian^j 



uVi 



MI- 



m SBQQMD J0URM8¥ IUHJ2II0. . 

says, that «nder the pretence of deacnlbiiig the, Tarr^ -^ufirfiJ^ 
Incogniia, Hall reversed the plan of Sir T. Moi;e*8. IftqiffA, 
«i4:diMBCteri9ed the vices. of existing nation^. . , , . ,> 

HalVs (J.) f^irgedemlarium. ...-. .]-•«<? 

The three first Books, called "Taothieu SiUlres^.P^edM; 
Academical, and Morali^ were first printed dy 71 Creed »fif. 
Ri'De^er. \2mo. Land. 1597. m: 

The three last Books appeared under the Title of F'irgeA' 
miarimn. Hie three last Bookes of Byting Satyree. 12iio. 
Land, Printed by R. Bradockefor R. Dejpter, £fc, ld98L • R 
bfej^ with Satires of Book 4. 

* ThU original edition complete is estimated by Dibdin Ift iSL 
Longman and Co. in the Bibl. Ang. Poet, mark a copy at^2fiJ[J 

The next edition (of the whole) is entitled FlrgedimiatHm, 
the three last (in reality all six) Bookes of the Byting Satyi^^ 
corrected and amended with some additions by J» H. Hfiliil 
Lond. for R. Dexter, ^c. 1599.* ' ' 

G. Nassau, 1824, 1/. 1*. 
Ditto. Svo. 1602. 

Brand, 21. I2s. 6d.} Stevens, 3/. 3s. 

' ■ ■ > 

where he taught several Ganzas or Wild Geese to fly with a light maf'' 
chine, and to fetch and carry things for his oonTeBience. He after some 
time rentnred to put himself into the machine, and they carried him with 
great ease. He happened to be in this JBntHi Chariot when these Ganzas, 
which were birds of passage, took their flight to the Moon, and was di- 
rectly carried to that Planet He gtyes a very ingenions deacripdbn of 
what occurred in his Journey, and alsa of (he Wonders he saw when he 
arrived there." 

* See Warton's ObserrationB on Sp&aae^jnl. i, pu 187, 8vik 



A BiBLlOMANiAC'S LIBRAKY. AT 

Jiiip^ed at Oafofd. I2mk 175^ 

'^W;Na8sati/1824, 12«. •! 

Gray, the Poet; in a letter to his friend Dr. Whaiton; of 
I>urhaiB, allading to this edition/ says, '5 Bishop HalFs Satires, 
^^yied Vbrgidenuatinm, are lately republished. They are fidl of 
tt]^i and pf^betry, as much of the first as Dn Donne, and ht 
liaiore of the latter; they were vhitten when he was about 23 yean 



v.. 



* TTh^se Sative#, with N6tes by Singer, in addition to Warton's 
<ibservtttions, have been repd[>lished in 8vo. 1824. They- may 
also be found in the IQth volume of HalVs fForhs, %vo. 1808, 
v^h Warton'^ Notes, as well as Mr. £)]is*s and Mr« Pratt*s 
lUnstratioBS. 

Of pur Satirical Poetry> taking satire in its moral aiid Sig- 
nified sense, (lall, according to Campbell, claims and may be 
sdlowed to be the founder * thus in the Prologue to his Satires 
he says — 

I first adyentnre with fool hardy might. 
To thread the steps of perilous despight : 
I first adyentnre, fellow me who list. 
And be the second ISngKsh Satyrist 
Hall*s Prologue to Book 3, implies his knowledge of former 
Satirists. 

** Some say my Satyrs over-loosely flow. 

Nor hide their g^l inongh from open show : 

Not riddle like, obscuring their intent; 

Bv^ paoke-stafle plaine, uttering what thing they neant, 

Oolitndrie to the Roman Ancients, 

Wkote worda were shorty and darksome was their senoe. 

Who reads one line of their harsh poesies, 

Tlurise must he tak his wind, and breath him thrisc. 

Mff wutte woM follow tkem that have fore-gone, 



n rnixmm lomMBV^iMiWD^ 



oimmomifk {mmWm, which hs^ mlMle dl tf^LUfiA it^^ 
htkk in love with you. If yo<i begm already tO" eMU the^lMsAli 
■6thiaidbomely> and have got anch tSootlag on PahuMiil* ^foA 
my in'' time be Lord of the whole Hill; and those idee QiM, 
b^tanae ApoUo is now grown nniiaddly and okt aiAd may'mte 
chdice of you to offidate in his room and preside trver tBeih: 

"lliere is ndually a Portrait prefixed to the Cypriak Atitdemy 
of the Author, aged \9, without his name, but thki'froi^^e 
date, must have been intended for the Work I shall next men- 
tion: viz. 

Ppcuia Castalia, ^c. Poems. 8rp. 1650. fig M. ,^^4i^^p^ 
Whjch sold at Woodhouse*s sale for 2/. 8«. , ;-. v .' A\ 
According to the Author of Censura Literaria, tqU i. p^A^fO, 
R. ^arouy the Author of these Poems» was bom |,63Pr, (edu- 
cated at Cambridge, and afterwards at Gray a Iniu |il^. £Hv^ 
who ha? ^ven a specimen of his writings, says, f^ W)u^(^r jf 



.V: 

r] 

i • . 

Poetical in him appears to be pilfered from other Writfurs^'" 



■/. \v.\t. 



'••i ^"• 



Jicunq^ Cdrisiovai dej Nuevo descubrlmento del.Ortfn/JifO!^ 

las ^mazonas. . Small 4to, En Madrid an I0 emprinttiidfl 
, H^yno, 1641. \ J I . » \i\f. 

This very rare, book contains only 46 kavefkof text><pseeeded 
by six leavea of prelimipary matter, including U^ titje« ,; : ha -. 

Camus de Limare 248 francs; Saint Ceran ISt .^fiiancs^i 
Gaignat 170 francs; Paris sale, 1791, 10/. \0s4 HealheKe, 
8/. 18». 6rf.; Stanley, 16/. .... > no 

The Author, a Spanish Jesuit, was sent on a mission: it(» te 
Ameri^^ Indians ; but the projects expected from its diaco* 



;^/ffi^ I'^jES^eftiug the tfipreat Rlter m&ae fdjsfitw^xis difamamttn 
I^^i^^My tb^.iiouf(Q a£ Br^gaA^j and !RhUipriy.rOidered idl 
J}|)9 capj[ej9 of this cimoiDi book to be d^siroiyedi sa tkat'foc 
!^M y^ivs.tw^ only were known to e^st^ oneanthfiiVfitioiiii 
j^^^^^iii W4 anotbf^r in tbe possession of.M- d€^jGi>inbArinlfa^ 
wh9,t|if^nsl^t^;i|;.intp French under the titjciof ../ :<. ) mnl :< 
sswl.Ji^^P^ d^ la Biviere des Amazonesr. 2 tonbl^lno* 

AiifHttta i)u6rcnsid. Upon the Yearly Celebration of Mr^ 

Robert Dover 8 Olimplck Games upon Cotswbld tittts, ^c^ 

'^'^Mt&J Ldnd. \6S^. : • t M :wA ^ 

*'^^^Vci*ife, t/. 2^.3 Townley, 3/. 3s, (reprint); ^nnJfersi 
IflfW, 13/. 2s. 6(f.; Bindley, December, 1818, 12/: 12j?.; Hoii. 
O.'^Nai^*^; 1 824, preprint J 21. 1 1 s. (jd, Thorpe's Cata^pgii^ 
1824/8/:'8*. ' ■•' *' •'■•' ''^"^''^ 

The Frontispiece to the above Book represents the Grames 
and Sports, snch as men playing at cudgels, wrestling, leap- 
ing, pitching the bar, throwing the iron hammer, handling 
tile ^)ke^' teaping over the heads of men kheeliiig, ^stanJting 
^^H' 'their hiknds,- &c. Also women dancing, men htnbng 
and coursing the hare with hounds, greyhounds, &cf! ' With 
4^iittSt^bi51t?ofb©ards, dn a hillock, with ghns'thi^ein'fifmg; 
and the Plettirfe ^ tihe great Dir^ctdr, Ci^tain I>6Vef/^<Wl 
h»W«bkcV tiding from place to pMce. " ''** ^ 

.-»^*lllU= ft^ki^hlch hath the running title CotsioolOjiimii 
on every page, consists of verses made by sev^eral handi^,' Oil 
tto «lud yiMktiia Dubrensia, ^These Games were begun and 
eofttikuck), ^t it certain time in the year, for 40 years, by line 



76 SECOND JOUKKETltplIirD. 

for which achievement he bore on his coat of arms tiirfi^ Tmibi 
H^a^. He afterwards went to America, wheife hxi ;w9f^tf^ff^ 
prisoner by the savage Indians, from whom he found jQdie^^^j^^ 
escape. He often hazarded his life in naval engagements widi 
Ffaratcs, Spanish Men of War, and in other adventures j^ and 
had, a considerable hand in redjacing New England to the, obe- 
dience of Great Britain, and in reclaiming the. inhabitaptsipom 
bBrbarism." All which exploits are detailed in the History of 
Viiginia by himself. . r ii 

Matoako, alias Rebecca, daughter to Ponhatan; Sovereign 
of Viipnia, and who is called Pocahontas by Capt. Smith in 
his History, may be considered as a national benefii^ress^^ 
tb her (says Granger, vol. ii. p. 58) we are indebted for the 
preservation of Virginia, when in the state of an infant colony. 
In 1607, when she was about 12 or 13 years of age, sue not 
only procured the liberty, but saved the life of Caj^t. Smith, 
wiiom, together with his men, her father intended to mi^rdon 
t>y surprize. In 1612, she was herself a prisoner; lUid soops 
after married Mr. Rolfe, whom Smith calls a gendeman., Iol 
1616, after she had been instructed in our language an4 tto 
Christian religion, she was brought to England, and introduce^ 
and graciously received at Court. The next yjear, up^n bei re- 
turn home, she died on ship board at Grayesend^ stjic^.^lY im- 
pressed with religious sentiments. The good sense, humanity, 
and generosity of this woman, do her honour, as they carried 
her fetr above the prejudices of her education, and tt|^ barb^i^ 
customs of her country. She was the first Virginian whq^jvas 
converted to Christianity, that could speak our lang^mffe^ or 
had a child by an Englishman." 
' The Library at Eton contains King James lst*s copy. apd,Ji^ 



a' BliaLiOMA^iAC'S tiiRARY. 77 

wi'Fdirtlilll Library was a presentation copy 5 other large ppf 
'•JJwiojpies.are inthe Libraries of some of our prinapal Bibli- 
vultibiikcs. 

. »• I • . ! I . ' . •. ■ 

omtis Travels and Adventures in Europe^ Asia, /ifriiQa^ifn^ 
''America^ Small foih. Sixty pages of^ly, ]9^h JPlate^ 

^ Kir. Qrenyille*8 copy, according to Dibdins Libi^^^^i^r 

'panion, p. 2S4, cost bim 5/. 5*. . > . , ^ » 

It was reprinted in vol. ii. of Cbnrchill*s Collection of V^y^iges. 

jaMcceitt ((Hov. Bat.) Bizarie di P^arie Figure. 8vq, okk^&s 
^,,,, ... ^^^^' ■ •.....•.;,:••..-'..: 

' See tKc jRepertorium BibliograpMcum], where it is dej^oib^ 
as/^Axpbst rare and singular Book, containing Prints pf human 
'figures tormed by the strangest materials, as diamonds, hoops. 
Duidders, pieces of carpentery, battledores, chains, culinary 
nfiensus^ &c. When the correctness of the d£!U^eations, ao^dl 
'ibe bNOianess of the attitudes, are considered — we s^ the lumd 
%t ft 'grealt IVtaster through the laughable whimsicality of his 

toy^v- • ■ . ':\„;., 

''^^A^'fepy-is in the Strawberry Hill Collection, and one was ii\^ 

m liibtary at tonthiU. 

//iinf:a\r^> ■..■■■■ ■ ■ . . , o., 

^Jtydi^clis C^brahamJ Annales of the famous Empresse Elizabeth^ 
'^^^Xftieene of England, ^c, translated out of French, Large 
'*^ p^erJ' '2 vols, Ato, Benj. Fisher, (No date,) 

Large paper copies differ from the small in the following 
']^mriV(^itrafi^: viz. that the date (1625) is wanting in th^mjt 



19 . sumiP iwt»M>mwiK 

!% 1^ ^f giizabl^Ml are igvteon Km« !»*<#«% Jt»fc>?iJfil# 
^ypii #vyUif ^»iy ♦^ ^^y^ ^ynt Y^'-ytf 'p yvi^rf^ r^r^^^iwrt' 
Mr. Tr GrenfiUe has a large papfgcopyjt. with,.fli»..j|<}dic|^ 
:t9 IVittCf 4C:iuuies, in lettiBfs of jjold. Q^tlie>utt.liyifjO{^ 
Ji..|f atii3lia&t IWtniit of Darde by Deburaa^ of w]i(kj|\.^|i|o 
impressions are to be found in the copies jto/^usaa^Jti^.^ 
^Ivqaktiit'Btbihitdt ^leneral Oow^swiiP^ and iii Jjifr, ]nbi|^'s 
fpifjF, s«4d at Sothetys, in 18??, tor l:Ot 1^ . . : .,„^| 

^■' ■ ■ '■ ' ■■'■:■: Ailo^ 

Xki^hyi jAhrakam) Poeticc^ Shuoms. WUk P^rirtAiUi/ 
^\, Mhe Author h^kkntk^€ar,h^ Fiiug 4t^ W^^m 

■\X'bi liongmi^i*! ffiblkCheca jb^, T^i^ ^ cc^y, with th^I^ 
traits is marked at 1^.} and anoCher^ w%iitii||( (hepe^t^i^ 

BenyVaak, 18?2>4/. ....^^ 

4ime of Att bciMg' a Kings Scl^f^ in WeMtm^^ter. S fii ^ f, 
ffrUhPartrdt. 1638. : t «>w/ 

,0. Nassau^ Esq. 1824, 3A IQ#. . , ,3,> 

7^^ ^ofi^ ^Afr. 4bruhmn Cowley, con^^tfUmehMA 
were /brmerfy printed, and those wkkh he detigne^fsnry ike 
preset Noio published out of the Author sOrighalG^iM, 
l2mo. Lpnd. 1631. .1 ^'H'H 

l9econd Pifrt tfJPitto, including hi^ Poetical Bloi^m^- ' t^^ 
r682. •..•.:= ...-,:< 

Tliis lattef edition of Cowley^s Worl^ conti^AS ^^ Spnills 
^f Acconii^t of th^ Ljfe and Wntbgs of Cow)ey, writl^B ki iQ'i 



J|0 Wft8 It school bay tit Westtniiifller ; tliree 6^ti<mB h$A b^h 
fiold, and the book had b^ome very acatce, wheii tiie fdii#^ 
i^dition uppfHited^ in 1^2^ the Town, according to the tioidM- 
Mta^'tf Adv^ldtoenl^ hiirdly affi»idi^^ Thc^ftlMl^ 

iitg^itidAre8#it() &e Mider^ by Gavtey hifiiiK^, U^9^MMiig\y 
IttHoMi ^kyA oniits €wti atio^mtt, and totk^ teli«£<ftlikigl^% 
^^« id^ hb iNudy f^^ ^1 .^i'T^ 

^' Rjsadeir, (I Jamir not yot whether gdntle of liOi) ^^iM4 
Iwowliare been angry :(I dare not assiilnvitlNi^hdfiMr^'thdir 
^i^g^) t«e hiy B^etkal BdldiiesSi ^and^Mmiied b* %ikie>Kwiyit 
i^Hi^^nds ethet suits — earliness: others wk^^iM dllh^*^ h 
weak fidth ior strong malice have thought me Uker a ipipe, #hicb 
neYorsounda [but when 'tis bbwed.m^iiiitl road iM^MItl J4))ra« 
4Mai€ioi»ky« b«t> AuAofem ^AnonyBiQm ; 3^0 ihe :'^^sm, I,.w^ 
Tive^X Jbil 4^ 110^ Ml MHkTioua Ft dst wUoh riip<> ^ tbk^M 
faMM>.(lk«y^Yapi>oat qitidU^^^ i4> the Mttet> Ita^ heyli.^he 
W0V9t Homicide whd strives to mftrther an€rt^ef*s faoie't ten 
boffin thiijkvit i# II li&uloss flbOy to.ooadama «r k%ii.4(t<t|Ksf 
Stars^ because the Moon and Sun shine brighter^ T^vottad 
rK»|4 3mM tkdUAeir bktWv thimmtingidsM^ bjf/t^i^il^ 

ibeinlr BaiigmAMmit99^%fi^a^ 



i 



49 flMfflfft jTQ^lWimHimilYlil A 

this third edition . 'VVli«titbaigk|tibetiicgkM6(k2|t AJfoM^ 
1 4Wii.#iii^ «b9 ^tell^ iMok whkb hOfa Ji^tted^^ 

suffer Shipwrack^ it shall somediiiig content me^ that it^Hik 
pl(^AS^ n^yself and the Booloeller. In it yon shall find one 
argument (and I hope I shall need no more) to confiite uah 
believers j which is, that as mine age, and bdnsieqiiently expe- 
rience (which is yet but little) haUi increased^ sp^^hcy hate 
not left my Poesie flagging behind them. ) shovdd not be 
angry to see any one bum my Ppramm mid (SMtibe, nay I 
would do it myself, but that I hope a pardofl^may easily be 
gotten for the errors of ten years oft^e. Mfi^ihuiianiia mnd- 
PhUeiut confesseth me two years older ^Yt&titiMiit. Tlie 
irest were made since upon several occasions, and perhaps do 
not bely the time of their birth. Sudi as they are* they were 
created by me, but their fate lies in your hands j At is only 
you can effect that neither the Bookseller inqient himself of his 
charge in Pri^itiDg them, nor I of my fad^onr in* c6mposing 
them. Farewell.*' . - -^ 

A* Cqwlby. 

However un&shionable in our days Cowley ^lay have be- 
come from the harshness andconceit of someiol.lpiafiomposi- 
tions, there are stiU many who think both highlyialBid^justly of 
him as a Poet — ^he was considered by his co^tempidbaies as 
excelled by none, and King Charles II. when toM of M^ death, 
declared '* That Mr. Cowley had not left a better man behind 
jum in Fngl^pd.*- 

I certainly think with Dn Blair, that Cowley's Ma^^^ntic 
P4^s, are by fieur the happiest of his efforts; <' they are smootll 



A BiBLlOMAINiAC'S LlBRAirY. AT 

RhprMed at Oaford. l2mo. 1753. 

W.Na8sati,1824, 12*. 

Gray, the Poet; In a letter to his friend Dr. Wlitt<*6ti; of 
Durham, alluding to this edition, says, '^ Bishop HalFs Satires, 
ckUed Vitgidemiarium, are lately republished. They are fidl of 
s^t aiujb poetry, as much of the first as Dn Donne, and fiir 
inore of the latter; they were vhitCen when he was nbont 23 yeati 

^^^se Batbesy with Ndtes by Singer, in addition to Wart(m# 
observations, have been republished in 8vo. 1824. They^maj 
also be found in the IQth volume of Hair* fForks, Svo, 1808^ 
with Warton'^ Notes, as well as Mr. £)]is's and Mr,* Pratt*8 
lUostrations. . ;.-., i 

Of our Satirical Poetry^ taking satire in its mora} a^d 4^^ 
nified sense, (lall, according to Campbell, claims and may be 
^wed to be the founder : thus in the Prologae to his Satires 
he says — 

I first adyentnre with fool hardy might. 
To thread the steps of perilous despight: 
I first adyentiire, fellow me who list. 
And he the second ISngHsh Satyrist 
Hairs Prologue to Book 3, implies his knowledge of former 
Satirists. 

" Some say my Satyrs over-loosely flow. 

Nor hide their gall inongh from open show: 

Not riddle like, obscuring their intent; 

But, packe-staffe plaine, uttering what thing they neaat, 

Gotatrairie to the Roman Ancients, 

Whose worda were shorty and darksome was their senoe. 

Who reads one line of their harsh poesies, 

Hunse must he tak his wind, and breath him thrise. 

Mff muse would follow them that kavefore-aone. 



68 SEciMSii jomawti oeio9M> a 



. # 



BuieaimotwitkmSmifimkPim^* n 'v*. U^...H^'nii 
For looke how&rre tke Aiiibieiit Ofliittdi«- . i' <i > ' -^'iT 
Paft former Sat}Eini ai W liberties -^^ -A'-- ^ i* ^;i»f P 
SofiaTeiinsimiiiiiyMlds«iil5tbMii«ftUi|^i >i •« oa-./; 

Tk better be Umhid, ^Imii be Mo bold. i r. .■•h' 

Peologne to Btok^a 

The. first satire of the tfeiird Book affords t har ^ptJcimea of 
theAuth^nr, and^ in the opiaioii .of Mr. Ellis^stnkingly resem- 
bles the Vlth Sadre of Juvenal) it exhibits a lively cpntrast, 
between the olden tune f^id the eiepun9cy Qf.th<^^^%is(s o(wn 
cotemporaries. .» . ■f.....«i*>i 

Book IUw-*rSAZijiK 1 . > , tv.- '^'-^ 
Tune was, andtbat wMi^tenn'dtb^ Tinoof Gold#i , ■'■(. 
Whose world and time were yoiig» that bow art^oldt : .. /. 
(When quiet Sahirm iwaid the mace of Leidf .:f 

And Pride was yet niibonie, and jretniBAred.).: 'vt./* 
Time was, that, whilts tho Antume &11 did last;' > ,. Mi 
Onr hungry Sires gap't for the laUimf.Mast ; -' . c ...>} r 

Of the Dodonian okea. . ^si 

Could no unhnskfid okome loave thfi tr^ ; . 4 . T r^ 
But there was challenge made whose it inigh^ hoe. ,i 
And, if some nice and Uknoxoiis. appetite. ■-■, .■ •> . /^ 
Desir'dmore dawitaedidi-of ruvedeUle* / - fi 

They scal'd the stored i>ab.'«irith<olai^^bieiU : * •* 
'Till they had sated their delicious eie: 1 

Or searched the hopi^fiiU thicks of hedgy-rowes^ 
For brierie berries, or hawes, or sourer sloes; 
Or, when they meant to £ue fin'st of all, -. -^ 

They lick't oake-leayesbesprint with bony £dL ; !■ . . >' 
As for the thrise three-angled Beechnut shdl, * . .^ /. 

Or Chesnufs armed huske and bid kehnU,' ' M. . >•> 

No Squire durst touch, the Law woMd nod vffiH^- v ^-''^^' 
Kept for the Court, and fi>r the Kings owBobord.; <^ - ■•'' ^ 



/ 



hiWaMOmMM&» <U»MiT. 



;ji\ 



And UX OS chewrf|(}ljf mdul^ .^ 
Like the Wine ^d Jtqt^ «IDik>- 
^IJrown'd with Rosea ire ctomUma 
Oyge's wealthy d fod c aa. 
Tf Day is eur'a ; whaitdowe^ear? 
Jb Unv i9mf^9f «e kaw.itihare^ • 
U^% traa^ it kiUfUf, iM U;i|i%y 
Wuh, at leaa^ vHoitbuqa tia.fltliy. 
Let's banish Businesa, baaiph Sorfoari 
Tp the Gf>d» belong TbrJUarron^ 



V 



Bt»rtd$ (B\) €ppri0>k Aimlkmy. Sin. mA7. 

Tbip IRomanc^ w^ vn^tton when the Jbithor i?Bt otily 17 
^ears of «g^ im4 in >it be iiotrod^cos two BiraMnatio-Pieeefl^ en* 
titled " Dearum Dono" and " Gripus and H^gwT The Au- 
thor was nephew of James Homeli, Author of the Familiar 
Letters, who thus speaks of it in his Letters, %vo, p, 432^^ 
Lond. 1734, 

JTfl 4fr. JPr Sartms at Paris, 
Gentle Sir, 

I received and pfes^tly rfui avor your ^Cjfpmm Academy^ 
with much gr^e^ness and no Tulgar delight^ mad Sir, I hohl 
myself much honoured f^r the Dedication you^haw been pleased 
to make thereof to m^, for it deserved a ht higher patronage. 
Truly I must tell you without any compliment, that I have seK* 
dom met with s^ch an ingeniooft inixtiiie ef ^woee and verse, 
Uiterwoven with Quch vari^lm <i( fimey tend dMn&lhg stnto 



76 .SECOND JOUKKEY.ItplJND. 

for which achievement he bore on his coat of anus ^hrfi^.TqrjE^ 
H^9^. He afterwards went to America, whe:^ he ,wa^ Jkia^c^ 
prisoner by the savage Indians^ from whom he foondj^^eo^^ 
escape. He often hazarded his life in naval engagements wit}i 
Phratcs, Spanish Men of War, and in other adventures j;. and 
had. a considerable hand in reducing New England to the .obe- 
dience of Great Britain, and in reclaiming the. inhabitants ^om 
ba];1[>ansm.'' All which exploits are detailed in the History of 
Vin^niabyhin^elf. Vlf 

Matciako, alias Rebecca, daughter to Ponhatan, Sovereign 
of Virginia, and who is called Pocahontas by Capt. Smith in 
his History, may be considered as a national bene&^ress,^^^ 
tb her (says Granger, vol. ii. p. 58) we are indebted for the 
preservation of Virginia, when in the state of an infant colony. 
In 1607, when she was about 12 or 13 years of age, s^e not 
only procured the liberty, but saved the life of Capt. Smitb> 
whom, together with his men, her father intended to m^rae|r 
t>y surprize. In 1612, she was herself a prisoner > okid soon 
after married Mr. Rolfe, whom Smith calls a gentleman., In 
1616, after she had been instructed in our lai^age M14. the 
Christian reli^on, she was brought to England, andintroduf^ 
and graciously received at Court. The next year, upQubei re- 
turn home, she died on ship board at Gravesend^ stjcQ^fAv im- 
pressed with reli^ous sentiments. The good sense, humanity, 
and generosity of this woman, do her honour, as they carried 
her far above the prejudices of her education, and th^ barbaji^ 
customs of her country. She was the first Vii^nian w^o ^ras 
converted to Christianity, that could speak our langsagej^ or 
had a child by an Englishman." 

The Library at Eton contains King James Ist^s copy, apd^jin 



A BtbLlOMANtAC'd LIBRARY. 77 

%"tf FoJitJiill tibrary was a presentation copy 5 otner large pp^ 
'J)^ idpies are in.tlie Libraries of some of onr principal Bibji- 

Stmtys Travels and Adventures in Europe^ Asia^ Africti^tfiii^ 
'America^ Small foiia. Sixty pages only* ]91tA jPhtps, 

^ Mr. Qrenville s copy, according to Dibdins Libi^sry .Gomr 
panion, p. 284, cost him 5/. 5s, 






It was reprinted in vol. ii. of Charchill*s Collection of Vpyiiges. 

Bi^dccetit /'(jtov. Bat.) Bizarie di P^arie Figure^ 8vq. obl^ne\ 

» , . 1624. _ .^. ,.^^..,.,,, 

' i$ee 7% jRepertorium Bibliographicumy where if is dej^oibecL 

as '^ A Vost rare and sinimlar Book, containing Prints of human 

'Figures lormed by the strangest materials, as diamonds, hoops^^ 

l^laaders, pieces of carpentery, battledores, chains, culinary 

litensils^ &c. When the correctness of the d£!li^eations, and. 

'ine bNoi^ess of the attitudes, are considered — we s^ the Ji^nd 

'^f a gresit !Ntaster through the laughable whimsicality of his 



o. 



fi!i:iiiJL»<j^^>«» 



" '^^ A'^iidpy IS in the Strawberry Hill Collection, and one was 1^ 
"«feiiib^^attonthill. 

^lyi^cle (AhrahamJ Annales of the famous Empresse Elizabeth^ 

'^^^XfUeene of England, 8fc. translated out of French. Large 

paperJ''2vols.4to. Benj. Fisher. (No date.) 

Large paper copies differ from the small in the following 

^^iriVenlafs: VIZ. that the date (1625) is wanting in th^mji 



<%:^«iiit ^f PizabiBqi are £^«r(e^ Kp^u Hl»<#^ M^j^ 
f 99dl oopies only tbe twe Iwt verses in cQinMVQn p^ry^f9|g(|fqH|^ 
. Mr» Tr GieiifiUe has Ai«iSopap(wc9pyit>9iitli^tii^.4^^JCa|f;j|^ 
iM ?^^ Chaiies, in lettefsof j^. Q^ia&€^>utt.;i^jQ|.^t 
iif)js a tii3lia&t Faitrait of Barde hy Delaran)^ of if)M5iI^,9|9o 
impressions are to be found in the copies pos^^c^ss^ ji^J^ 
j)|||rfi|fs af StaflM, ^leneral Oow^swi^^ anfl in IQr, )(^|fq^r's 
««f!jF» sc^d at Sotbeby 8, in 182?^ ft^ tOt ^$1^ [ . > .,,,^1 

a-: -1^ .-■ :■ ■ ■ . ....; ■ ..; ;; ^.c-rf i,j| 

OHi[^%'if jMrahamJ Poetical Shuomi. WUk ^^rtr^ki-l/ 
vl. '#*^ u^mikor in hk J3rt. |feiir, i^ ra^gkam. 4i%. im^^u 
^(JlaljQnginaii^f ffibliotlieca jb^, T^i^ {t cc^y* vilh th(9^|^ 
traits is marked *a)t 1^/^ and anoCher^ w%atii||( fbe^ Peft|§M|^ 

)]feny s sak^ I8?2> 4/. ,.,,^jf 

£ifwlejf$i Lwe^ Kiddie,, a PMieral Co$nedk^ written ifAjkf 

f. Mme of kii^ being a Kings SSct^t^ in JFestnfy^(er,,SI/^if^ 

i ff^ith Pwrtrokt. 1638. : u ilvm 

^■iG. Nassau^ Esq. 1824, 3A IQ*. ;..... i-c^^^^v 

The fFofki of Mr, 4brnhmn Cowley, eo^^tfikm^ <fiirt 
' were formerly printed, and thooe whkh he de^gktfi^ fgr>ike 
press. Note published out of^ke Author oOrighal^OsfiBk, 
\2mQ. Lpnd. 1691. : i t>/<^ 

$econd Part ({fPitto,, including hi^ Poetict^ Blqe^o^^ 4Mtf« 
■ ^682. -^^Ki ,^7>.T> 

' This lattef edition ol Cowleys Worl^ eonti^A9 |>t, Spiails 
ff Account of tl^^ Life and Writings of Cow)e^, wrifC^ i^ ifi'i 



Ji^ Wft8 It school bay mt Westtniiiateri three o^tiotiB had beeh 
jsoM^ and the book had become very sciurcei» wheii tiie ^li#lh 
edition npjNHuced, in 1^2j the Tonm^ according to thefioidk- 
MltfVAAv^iftiiCmenl^ hiird^ Tk^ftlMl^ 
ing^ibe«HtO &e leader^ by GimltyMioMi, U^9iio&Miig\y 
(StSikmi ^Mii onits ^wau/MKBit, aodftxrliie tel*«E^fildbgl^% 

^' Be«der« (I koaw not yet whether g^tle of liOi) tkiiM^ 
lOKnrliaYe been angry ^(I dare not assiilnfttlNi^hdilMrfOf'thdir 
"^i&ii^) tuit tny Pb^tieal BdldxieftSi ^and iMailieii "^b* Jbkiej^Kwi^ 
iddlttk6nd8 ethet sndts — earliness: others wk^^citfi^dilh^^ a 
wefdi fidth or strong malice have thought me liker a p^y #hicb 
neYor sounds {but when 'Usblowed^in^ ikntlriiMilMfMNlil iQDra* 

rir^x Ihlifc4^ lis «xi nsikTioua. Ftdst wbk^A^ips vlhc^t^^^^^ 
hk)pi«M!(lk«y<Yapf>eat ^qiti l4» t]ti0i|«ittotr, Itet he.ll.^h^ 

worst Homicide whd strives to martfaer »ioi^ef's fa^ie-) ten 
botil^ thill. :it>is a ri^etdoss ^y. to«ooadenin. o> la%tl ,^:t)ie^ 
Stars^ because the Moon and Sun shine brighter* llMK^imdl 



i|Il^f)l4#f ^19^ jf,iirt^ afiNimcfo tmifrnm^^Tf^imifiafm 
this third editi9% . ^WbfttjtbofglrltibenietlM:^}!^ il^JsdM^ 
1 4mi.#iinb tii9 im ^ook which hath JigMedulPolMeeoiooBdbdNi 
^ytoyed by -C^olu JMMi Groceaau: i U ut«H iiiMugiKdgpMid^st 
9affer Shipwnick, it shall somediiiig content me, thatit(|H(d^ 
plj^u^d n^yself aad the Bo<^cseller. In it yon shall find one 
argument (and I hope I shall need no more) to confute n»* 
believers ; which is, that as mine age, and odnsigqiiently expe- 
rience (which is yet but little) liath increased^ si^r^y ha?e 
not left my Poesie flagging behind them. I ahp^ t^o^ be 
angry to see any one bum my P^rmrna and (PU^be, nay I 
would do it myself, but that I hope n pardon maf easily be 
gotten for the errors of ten yean of age, ytfOdlsHanUta amd. 
PhUetu8 confesseth me two years older wheh f wril it. The 
rest were made since upon several occasions, and ^rhaps do 
not bely the time of their birth. Such as they aie« they were 
(Created by me, but their &te lies in your bands) ^t is only 
you can effect that neither the Bookseller iwpent himielf of his 
charge in Pri^tiDg them, nor I of my laboiir in* cdmposing 
them. Fareweir . . , ^ 

A. Cqwley. 

However un&shionable in our days Cowley jpmy have be* 
come from the harshness and conceit of som^ of. ^composi- 
tions, there are still many who think both highly^ afeid^justly of 
him as a Poet — ^he was considered by his co-^tempinraries as 
excelled by none, aud King Charles II. when told ef his death, 
declared ''That Mr. Cowley had not left a better man behind 
|iim in ^ngliyad,-- 

I certainly think with Dr. Blair, that Cowley sAi^i'^ntk 
Pdes^ are b^ fer the happiest of his effgrts; '' ^bey are smpotli 



A BfBLlOMAINlAO'S LIBRAKV. AT 

S^primied at Oaf ord. I2im. 1753. 
•■'0';Na8sati,1824, 12«. .....'...•-. 

Gray, the Poet; In a letter to his friend Dr. Wkarton; of 
Durham, allading to this ediUon/says^ '^Bishop HalVs Satires, 
dJ^ed Vit^demiarinm, are lately republished. They are ffdS of 
8^t and pb^ry, as much of the first as Dr; Donne, a^ &r 
inore of the latter ; they were n^tten when he was aboitt 23 yeaH 
oB.^'-- ■ - ■ .T 

' ITh^se Satireir, with Notes by Singer, in addition to Wartcm^ 
observations, have been republished in 8vo. 1824. They^joaay 
also be found in the 10th yolnme of HaiVs fForka, 8vo, 1808> 
with Warton s Notes, as well as Mr. Ellis*^ and Mr^^, Pratt's 
Ilhistrations. .,t. 

Of our Satirical Poetry, taking satire in its moral a^d 4ig~ 
nified sense, J^all, according to Campbell, ^Isums and may be 
allowed to be the founder : thus in the Prologue to his Satires 
he says — 

I first adyenture with fool hardy might. 
To thread the steps of perilous despight: 
I first adventure, fottow me who list. 
And he the second ISngfish Saityrist 
Hairs Prologue to Book 3, implies his knowledge of former 
Satirists. 

" Some say my Satyrs over-loosely flow. 

Nor hide their gall inongh from open show : 

Not riddle like, obscaring their intent; 

But, packe-staffe plaine, uttering what thing they meant, 

Oontrairie to the Roman Ancients, 

Whose words were shorty and darksome wu their senoe. 

Who reads one line of their harsh poesies, 

Hirise must he tak his wind, and breath him thrise* 

My mu»e would folhw them that have fore-gone, 



98 ABCMRD lOUmiSVaiOHlID^* 



BuieamiotwUkmMmglmkPkmcm* K ' > ..H ^rjl 
For looke how fwra tilt AldbientOatoidU.. i' r^-.^^f r^dT 
PMtfennerSatsaniailMrLibectio; ^* .< - / i> ^H^rr 
SofiofremsimiiiiyMidafUitotliMioftU^'. >! « '^i ./ 

Tk better be iMflMid^ ^iMUi be t*o boy. : ^ /.' 

PMlogue to Btokvft 

The. first satire <tf the tbird Book affords A fear specimen o 
theAvth<Nr^ and, in the opiuon of Mr. ElUs, strikingly resem 
bles the Vlth Satire of Juvenal ^ it exhibits a lively cpntrast 
between the olden time fvid the efepiinpcy of. thc;S^^ta^pB^ owi 
cotempoiaries. ...•(<• ^i 

Book IlLr^ATUUel . t i t^,.^ ..ii:-i 
Time WM, and that wMi^tenii'dtbe Timo of G«ld«< . /. 
Whose world and time were yong, that now art oldt .. ' 
(When quiet Satvm awaid the mace of Leid; :i 

And Pride waa yetanbome, and yetmd>red.).: «. ^ 

Time was, that, wMWsthe^Autamie&U did leal;- . ^'j 
Our hungry Sires gapt £9r the lallinf .Mast ; . : . j r 

Of the Dodoaian okea. 



W^<4 



Conld no nnhnaked Aome leaye the trgfu .■ , > . . :\ 

Bat there was challenge miide whose it might bee. .1 • ; . 
And, ifsoBM nice andUkiiorfms.ej^tiie. -./r 

Desir'd more daintie dish of rave delite, , ft 

They scal'd the stored i[>ab .irith^claBped kaetu - ■ ^ •/* 
Till they had sated their delicious eie : - 1 

Or searched the hop^fiill thicks of hedgy-rowes^ ^/. 

For brierie berries, or hawes, or sourer sloes; 
Or, when they meant to fiire fin'st of all, ■ -■ '/) 

They lick't oake-leaTes besprint with heny falL ... ^ « 
As for the thrise three-^mgled Beechnnt shell, . J - /..' 

Or ChesBoi's armed huske and hid ketnell, ' ' >' ;•> 

No Squire durst touch, the Law woqld not afford, ^* • 'i^< 
Kept for the Court, and for the Kings owne bord. > ' ■' ^ 



A fifBLlbHAkYlLCf fl UBBAM, MT 

Their Royall Plate WM'da^ of woodi, «v Ateae^ ' ^ .; ^ a 
The Vulgar, sayehkhaady elie had he nonew - •^••' 
Their only seller was the neigUMMir hvoeicet ' • :•- '<-'-^ 
None did for better care^ for better lopke; ^ ^ > m'^ .r< 
Was then no paying of ^ Brenter's-mpey ^ • ' V 

Korgrfeedio Yintner mixt the strained grape. 

' - - , Th^Kng** PayiliQ^.wafl tte grassy, grqen,,. . , .. j,. ^^ c., { 

it ^ ■ ^ Under safe shelter of the shadie treen. ■ > 

^^ j ^ ^ ^ Under each bank^ men layd their lims along; 

f^^ 'i^oi wishing any ease, not fearing wrong : 






> «:i: 



•» ■' ' 



i^nA With ^eir owne, as ^ey werO made of old^ 

Not fearing shame, not feeling any cold. 

Bnt when, by Ceres hnswifiry and paine 

Men learii'4 to bnrytiie feTinng gyatne; ^- <^ 

And fallter Janiii fanghtihe new fooad Viiie 

Rise on the £l»e» Urith many a Fri^Ay THritie j. > ^-0 

And base de»re bade men to delTen low, - - 

For needlesse mettals ; Ihen ^gan miscidef gt^f^, " 

Then farewell, fayrestage, tiie worl&be$t48ye8; 

niriying in ill, as it in age docaks.^ — 

Then crept»in Pride, and Peensh Cove(is«; •' > 

And Men grew gredy, diwordMS, and nieeu - 

Now Man, t^at eafist kaile-lelkw was widi Beafity 

Woxe on to weene hinselfe a God at least 

No aery fonle ean take so high a ^ght, 

Tho' she her daring wings in clouds have dight ; 

Nor Fish can dive so ^ep m yeelding sea, 

Tho* Thetis' self riioald swear her liafetie ; 

Nor fearefiill Beasli can dig his e^ye se lowe^ 

As could he fiirther than Earth's ^centre go ; 

As that the ayre, ^e earth, or oeeany 

Should shield them from tkegorge of greedy Jlfan. 

Hath utmost Inde ought better, than his owne? 

Then utmost .lade is neare, and rile to gone. 

O Nature ! was the World ordain'd for nought 



"t'n;^)Tv.> 



'7 






fp flHBOQHQ IpqBNBY mW^f 

But fill BlAif « maw, uid feed Man's idle thought f 
Ilij Oraadib^'s wordi wFirar'd of ^ffiftie leeketv 
Or nanly garUck ; hat thy fonitce Teeket 
Hote steams of wine ; and can aloofe descrie 
Itie dnmken dranghts of sweete aatnmmitie; 
They naked went ; or clad in mder hide. 
Or home-span Tttssc^ void of fetraine y^dde? ' 
'But thou canst miske in- ganskgaodcrie^ ' 
1 1 Tsi smite a CmIc's far-fetcihed KTene. 
A French head join*d to necke Italian : 
TLy thighs from Qermanie, and hreast fro* Spain : 
An Englishman is none, a fool in all : 
Many in one, and one in seyeralL 
Then Men were Men ; hat now the greater port 
Beasts are in Hfe, and Women are in heart - 
Goad nature 'seife, that homely Bmperoar, 
In proudest ponpe was not so dad of yore. 
An is the under Groome of the Ostlerie, 
Husbanding it in work day yeomanrie. 
Lo ! the long date of those expired dayes^ 
Which the inspired Merita's woid ^vre-saiys; 
When dunghill peasants shall be dight as Kings 
7!i«» MM oim/ifivMi anoAer brings: 
Then fare weU, fairest age, the Worlds best di^es 
Thriving in all, as it in age decayes. 

In Phillips's Theatnim Poetarnm^ 8yo. Canterbury/ ISUU, 
p. 326, &c. may be found a concise and satisfru^tory account of 
Bishop Hall. " He is universally allowedi,** says Phillips, " to 
have been a man of great wit and leaming,^ and of as great 
meekness, modesty, and piety." His works, published at va- 
rious periods in folio, quarto, and octavo, *♦ are filled,** says 
Bayle, " with fine thoughts, excellent morality, and a great 
deal of piety." 





•.! ::-M 


.' »• 


■.rAf 


- /« 


• . <x\H 


r 


•J^M M» 


' ^: 


I' 'jiir.:* 


, .,'• 


1 • i » 


I » ••. 


.'•T.'r.Jr 


• . ^ .* 


- -Jill 


i 


. '*"n 




, .-.i-^ 



•t » 



>, • 



Life and DeAth of Edmund Genrngtsn, faikut Tjtnmonger.J 
Ato, Portrait and Ptdtts. ' Stt. Omm. 1614/ 

Gnlston^ 2/.; Townley, 5/.) G. Nassau/ 1624, blue morocco, 
12/. 5*. 

^' Edmund Jennings/* says Granger, ^ was admiUed into 
the English College, at Rheims, under Dr. aftemmrds. Cardinal 
Allen, and when he was 20 years of age, ordaiAed Piieirt. He 
was soon afterwards sent into England, where he tiras appre- 
hended in the act of celebrating Mliss. He way exechted by 
hanging and quartering in Grays Inn fields, Dec. lOtK, 1591." 

In the above rare book are several Historical Prints, repre- 
senting the principal circumstances of his Life and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expence by the Pa- 
pists, in order to perpetuate the remembrance of two • Mira- 
cles,** which are there said to have happened at his death! 
The first is, that^ after his heart was taken out, he said, 
'' Sancte Gregori, ora pro me,** which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, " God*s wounds ! see his heart is in my hand > yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth." The other is, that an holy Virgin 
being desirous of procuring some relick of hini^ contrived to 
approach the basket into which his quarters were thr6^, and 
touched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy from 
its having been employed in acts of consecration and elevating 
the Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
or dS^scovery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
the greatest care. 

■•l'-' r ■ ■ ■ 

. -If. 




HMtw$ (Patrkhl.—The i^tt^nJ^; St^^^.^' 

^Mie — fi9ii^# and Sonnets. Svo, For Mat. Butler. 1622^ 

JFitk Portrait of the ^utkar bn' tk^ en^ravedHile. 

•• Of this Sonnetteer/ «iys Ormigtr* *^'^^ pltf/^^t find 
BO mentioa made b^ ftiry of our B2<)grapii!<^ AahQ^'"^ 

Beloe, in his Anecdotes^i call^ the above ** a poqlc .mr no 
means of common occHrrc^nce V* -^qd frpifn iil;« 5tf|)tj|i>|j^iyajpioay 
Collectors, if we may judge from the iHiceit,^ieiL4)blglMDd in 
three recent sales^ he appears to have been pretty eiDRefliltb hik 
appreciation of its rarity. «.:,.-. ^ jirf* 

At Mr. Bindley s sale it produced sii i4i;j W iSHt:Titrf\ 
1822. 38/. ^. described as contsdnimr the Por|inits pLUuinay 
and of his Patroness^ Anne of^D^n^nark. ^ S\r JM^Ss]^^J(,fopy> 
which had been Mr. Bindley s, sold> ij^lBii^,.J^ 4^4 lA** ^« 

Tlie following extn^^ may be Ibund ia Belae« -A antdofeii 
of Literature^ vol. vi. and which I hope I shall be excused fo 
abstaractingy considering the value of the Book cited, and th^ 
difficulty of obtaining even a glmce at such BiMiomaniarsi 
Derid^rata.. " • • ;•• " j ''' =^^^^*^^<L 

"■■ 'fit)ieneikced Nature in this latter ag«, . . 

Willing her master-piece should then be" 1*T0«|ti^ v , - Af ^ , 
. 8iid^.iiiy {lire Celia set 4m Earth's laige iUfe». ^ > ' / .-L^o v^ f j^i 

As all the Gods in emnlation brought, \ .; 

For thej did thinke if Nature only mkhi ^ «• r .■».'. 

iBrag of her wori^, she should insult o're them;: . ^^ ^ 
Wherefore they 'greed to have an equal nght. 

That they ofherperfeetioB part nri^clafantrr"^ ''"''^' ^**^*' ' 

Pallas gave wisdoqie, Juno stateKnetse, o ^^ -^v^jr *j^ 

And the milde morning gave hern^destie; .•.:v^;ii 






Aa4 oil wi9| Ktrlet Itretmea east Heaven adone/ , ^^ 

«i W4|MUikltoiiWtto^aih^idid^^c1oatii6W ^'^4ruU») 

81m itraiglil and tall, her tresses traile4'to:Cr*nM^ .-.u>r'v; ;>>(<»> 
- v'Y^!#f*ff^ \ff^ thmkiiig X07 deere .had beejpe * ,^ ; } , ;/ ^ ^. 

^ W^ MmIiiIj Diuflh my blisse fled I once seene, 

^t'^^'tSiia^lianilormedasitwere . ^'* ^^i^> J c* 

*W» <fyt ^i ,r|»kiM» ever to liaye ntoained, ' ^- " ** '^^' ^ 

Il1>»^^^nilillie^ib«k4rti^'d, and I my sight fetamsd. ' -^ '-^ >^^ 

yn^t tsiu />■'^ . 'fv ;' ^'. • " * ■■ ' • •' .....■.-•>."■. V Oij^^^s^v-i. 

Jhm§t9m4 (MkhmelJ Poly-Olblon, with the second p0gi,.^ii0i' A 
, Fnmti$jAece and Portrait oj Frmpe Hmry bj/ Ifole^tmd uii 
§he other Piat^, .J613— 162?. . 

€oL Staaley*8 n^ I819> 9h I9e. ed.f G. Na3Mii1Mf. 1324, 

u ■ - • •■■■■■■■- " ■ ' ; 7 

** In 1613," says ^ PtiBips's Theatrum Poete^tt>8W^^l^ 
** Dntytoa pnblislied the ^rst part of Ms Poiy-i^bk^ by^wliidi 

IIk antient name of Albioa is by sone ifcenved ^from Oibion^ 
luifypy. It is a chorogtapbicid description ^ the rirers, moiu^ 

F 



The copy of G. Nassau^ Esq. sold> in 1824^ for tOO/L and in 
his Catalogue it is said that not more than four perfect copies 
of this part are known to exist. 



Fraunce$ (AhrtUuim) Counieue of Pembroke*^ Ivy Ckuftk, 
' contemhg the affbcHonate Life and unfortunate Difittk' of 
' PhUlU and AmyntaSy that in it Pastoral, thk m a FUn^graif 

4to. London. 1591. 

Dodds^ 4/. 7s.) Mason^ 3/. ISs. Cd.', Roxburghe, 61. V6s. €d. 

Ditto, with Frounce' s Emanuel,* at Sftunders*, 1818, 
13/. 2s. 6d.i Bindley, 25/. 4s., bought by Perry, at whose sale, 
in 1822, it sold for 21/. lOs: 6d. 

Lord Spencer is said to have ^ven White 21/. for his copy i 
White asked 25 guineas for it. 

G. Nassau, Esq. 1824, 51. ISs. 
•^ Third Part of Ditto, entitled Ananias 

Dale, being Tales of the Heathen Gods, in English Hexam- 
eters. 4to. 1592. 

A copy of this third part, which is very rare, with the Title 
and two leaves in MS. sold at Saunders*, in 1818, for 15/. )5s. 
• This Author is classed amongst Dramatic Writers, but his 
production, says Beloe, can hardly be called a Flay] it consists 
of a translation of Tassos Amnta, wMch is interwoven in the 
body of a Pastoral, entitled Ivy Church. A specimen of this 
whimsical performance is given in Beloe*s Anecdotes. Fhillips, 
speaking of Fraunce, characterized him as '' a versifier in 
Queen Elizabeth's time, who, imitating Latin measure in Eng- 



* O. NaMEQ, (ih Emmmi cnf^J, 1834, U lOt. 



A 9IBL|0MANUC'S L|BI(ARY. (S3 

Ksl^ verse, wrote his Ivie Church, and same other things in 
Hexameter ; some also in Hexameter and Pentainfeter ; nor 
was he altogether slDgnlar in this way of writing 5 for Sir ^. 
Sidney, in the Pastoral Interludes of his Arcadia, uses not only 
these but all other sorts of Latin measure, in which no wonder 
he is followed by so few, since they neither become the Eng- 
U^h^ nor imy other modem language.** . 
^. IJpw true Phillips's opinion on the subject \a, has been 
n;Yin^[^ in our day, by the attempt and complete failure', of a 
celebrated Poetical Luminary to tread in the steps of Abra- 
H^m Fraunce. ,: ; 

^. f\ concise account of Fraunce, and some of hi& productions, 
i^y be found in the Theatrum Poetarum, 8vo. p. 108^ 9 s ap4 
also some particulars in Warton, vol. iv. 8vp, p. 23C|** [■'.■. 



-G-' 



Hqoier 8 (Richard) Lawea of Ecdesiaatlcal P^Vuie. Folio, 

Best Edition. 1723. 
There are various other folio and octavo editions of this 
Work. 

. ^ This," according to Neal, in his History of the Puritiins, 
*f is esteemed the most learned defence of the Church of Eng- 
land^ wherein all that would be acquainted with its constitu*- 
^ipn (says a learned Prelate) may see upon what foundation it 
isf.built. 

, '^ Several champions appeared about this time (1594) for the 
c^use of Episcopacy, but the most celebrated performance, and 
of the greatest note, was Hooker's Ecclesiastical Polity, in 
eight books \ the four first of which were published this year. 



9$ f9mm» ^¥jmc»roR»wiir 

^^i)^ip]^i in. lib Anecdotes of literatttre, 9«li^ak 5^iKlsilbe|^Wi9lAft 
i^ ji/s.|^fo .pf Hooker, nor Bkb^ Gadidein^ ^iOiv WMsy /i4ibli» 
tiuitgivean accpant of Hogker aud .,lii9 WrUiDg^t^qiBleirt ^ 
mention of the Books or Tracts which gave occasioo,<ta his 
writing The Ecclesiastical Polity, ^^'hitgift had written an 
Answer to the Adm<mtion to the ParUatnent, and th^by^en* 
gk^din a controversy with Thomas ^ar^wright, the siipfHMea 
A^uthor 6^it. Hooker^ iu this his e:^'Qellent Woik:^ jindeiiMk 
the defeni::e of our Eocl^siastic^ Establisluneut, agj^nj»t yvhA 
Ckitwright appears to have been the most iK>wer£ui of aU Uie 
ojportents."* . ' t< 

Hooker was some time Master of the Temple, and afterwards 
Iiec«mr^ Of BJslippsbounie in Kent, There is a Farty^aitof ftiirii^ 
12tt6. Hollat kculp.'from Sparrow's Ration^ of the Cotton 
Prayer > and aiLother in folip^ OviL FmtkomesiMlp. frontis^^^ 
to his Ecclesiastical Polity, and according to "Granger the bcist 
iu^pressions are to be fbtindii^ the earliest editions of tkat'irmCy 
co^laii^ng only the fivebooks. '* ^ 

l»foeh surprise has been eixpressed at the iter. T. !F. Dibfiii\i'i 
(Hnission of thisf work in his ** Lihrartf .Compamon :'*f i^'it*' 

* Belqe's Anecdotes of Literature, vol L p. 22, 23, (unM^lies a. detailed 
list of these controversial Writings. • • • ,.m -' 

r|: Tfiere is.an old folio Book, called ^ The Student's, fsj^rf^fy^ff^f^^ 
from the Athenian Oracles^ somewhat a|)g^rpxu?)ating to^ ||Ii^ I^lj^j^^ 
pia^ ; bi^t,a vvete skeleton, both in bulk and miitter, in :PoinpfMC^i)|.wi% . 
the ftcT. Gentlemai^ ^ sleeh and ryghte usefuW" voli^me. 



^^nt^ <iihd } cl«pbt not that in a Aitore edition tk^'HetdoirA 'B^ 

l^MH^, wiU bring this EcckmiHcttl Canon uitohH '^hsft 

^mi^^ ''l^- great ffun M\ in silencing sncb pe% tav^ky^^-t 

^hink lie will be perfectly justifted/ftsr a true «oii of the C^i^ 

MiUidin^Mi 1kk6tk\stg bis oppoikent doim with t^e^fiMlftio 

^M^ Of jyo0j^*« BtickdatsticflaPoKtie thnthtt hiniidce'tiiA^ 

^d nafcittjure the PortraitI ' '^ . • vm >:iL3 

■*0'' U'*"^jv ' * ' ••■ '■ • ■ ' , ' ■•-..,». '^ '-,',' • /v'.iiA 
fffl/r* (Jos,J Mundus aiter et idem : me Terra t^^^^^TojU^^jif^ 

. Aflw^ jfemper incogn^a, fyd Authorc Mercjrio Prifan^if!/9f 

jflivo. ^trst edition^ toUh frontispiece by Kip, , , .. ,. 

Sojd at Brand's sale for U. 7s.} at G. IJfassaus, 1824, 1/. 13*.^ 

sprinted, with the Maps, m Pratt s edition of If all's 



ff^orhs, 10 vols. 8vo. Lond. 1808. < , . 

l^l"a(Jo*.J Discovery of a New, ff^orld,,qr a.fhs^t^tm i^ 
. ,fSou^h Xnt^es, hitherto unknown, by an English iferifHT^ %o; > 
.JCfif.date, Imprinted for E» Blount. ., oVi 

^^MknosMktoAv^sorlferbert^, . < ..,: . 

^i:aiid>8ale, 1807, 3/. 7«.i G. Nassau's, 1824,2/. Is. 
The preceding Work by Hall, Bishop of Norwich, wa(S|>^. . 
X^iq^^fP^ w(henc^ Dean Swift horrowed the idea of .(^Uvi^s 

't^nf^^if^* Mcv.(<wpl>dl, speaking of this satirical ftpti^M 

— — "^— ^^ ■■■ ■■ ,...,„..„„„^,,,„,^,,^,^,i,„,^,^^. 

'^'Btlii also tetj probCible thbt Swift deHyeddomie portion of his Vpjage 
I L^pata from Bishop Godwin's ^ Mem in the Moon, or a discourse of a 
'JTeyagi thither hy Domingo OonsaUsP Byo. 163a «* In this PhilosopKLcal 
^^jbmk&tse^ wiuch was repeatedly printed, Domingo Gonsales, a diqunii- 
l^tbliard^ lis supposed to be shipwrecked on an uninhabited Jstan^, 



4t «ffffoifi> soiuuaa*mmm> A 

^|*cit»ftcowmiitid, 9i^ wa«iidB4r<ABd;'likini.p]»nei^ 
ci|>e4 twice l^y^nie8naiifJbdiei.o£.^^ tnlii«f9||Hlaiiftr^ 

affj^i^airs beingimtiatod himselfl So that- Mtaksiiig'.iiMBefiM 
soqghtii^n jiftcr a wiiey and* whether he^todp-oaft ni tniibif 
capo^.telld por how. hia lj|e was spieiit after ISSQir'? : ^^v^t •( ^ 

M.Chm|chyar4 died poor, and is buried near l^jdiKiaiii Baiatf* 
H^xg^^*» Charch, Westoipster. From the Pnisb RegiifeiK^ 
i^«]^i|0iur8 hisburial was <^n the 4th oCAprili^ 1604 • ' ••. '^ ^^i 

;:Ia Dibdin a Library Companion, the productMtas <^v,CkttrdH 
ysyr^Vneins^iln prints are said to consist of xvii ^^fomi ati&lipa<t 
there (p. 888) questions if any one possesses m ptrfeets^^! 
them? 






^•. 






AroV fDr: Jo. J Gieneral and Rare Memorial PeWd^id^^iq 

> tkcperfrct Arte of Navigation, Annealed to the Pa^oddiAl 

•€ufnpaft,'in Platfne. Now first published: 24' y^e/ii after 

4he first Invention thereof . FoRo. 1577. • '^ » -V^ . 

This Book, of which 100 copies only were printed,' illrali'dAAT 

std^red by Mr. Isaac Reed as qne of the scatcek itf '1;he £ti|[- 

lish language. His copy sold for 3/. I3s.6d. '• "^ '/' '* "^ 
Beloe, in his Anecdotes of Literature, vol. iii p. 263 to 2J3, 

has extracted the whole of Dee's Advertisement; M4,I^r<;MlY^-.,. 

tion from a copy id the British Museum* on acc9nnfr.o||^,ttW'#^ ^. 

rity of the book and the whimsicality of the tihingoitf^ll^ . . ' •.< 
See a list of Dr. Dee's Works in Chalmers^ -Biofni^pihteal '' 

Dictionary, vol. xi. p. 387 and 388. ''... 

John Dee (says Granger) was a o^an of extensive learning. 



hitibh»m9^mm^4^nAi^tk^mxdint^ He w«ii4^itt^ 

BddoHfap>/vlK^ cMnii»1ie IbM^d to WR^iMgeniefldi iM 

He appears W*fiii#e^:bitei %y^tanift a dup« and a dusa^i 'bml^lO^ 
ipiiaH proditJMNfll repatatiom. He tray^Ued ifv» gr«ai fMii-W 
BiO[W#^taa «fem8 to have been highly esteemed I^'^oMY 
feraons of nAili and emineneb. He pretended that a MM* 
i^lflfiMriijt^^^ he made great nse' of; wai^ i^i^t 

Uii ^' Aoipefaii : and (^ he was particolarly intimate H^h^^ tUh 
|piiii4«iid.«abiieL - • - ' • .. .>':^: <:;:>.>n^ 

Basfeneinuss Free fFlll a Trdgedy, 

^ A eertayne Tragedie wrytten fyrste in Italian by F, N. B. 

ff^^limfiusJ^er Bojuentinusj cntituled f^iusa^Wvi) and 

[ffji^liffe^ i»fQ EngH$h by Henry Cheeke^ wherein %9^9et 

J^tQph^b^maimer^of^ Tragedie, the deuyiliMh deuUie ^^e 

Popish Religion, Bfc** 4tit. Blach letter*, No date ($9^ 

T^jjIiOQe <>f the. very old Moral Pl^ys* A <Jopy at thte 
~ Rdxbnrghe sale brought the sum of 5/. \5s. Sd, > ' 






v; " ' L ' ■ 



%f 



^ ttiM blacti »t6ne into which Dee used to call his smrita ipra^ j^accesr . 
■iT^i'n'ik Cotleetioiui of the Earls of Peterboro% Lady Eliz. Oermaiiie» 
tWBite of Arisfte, and Mr. Walpole. Upon examination it turns out 
to be ttotUagr bat- a polished piece of canal coaL This is what Butler 

Kelly fDee*8 Coadjutor) did all his feats npon 
The Denl's Looking Glass, a stone^'' 

Hndibras, part ii. canto iii t. 63). fL 



t, 

u 



to mmh 3cr«rf^ Itbthlir 

original ' italiaii, entitled mragedia del Liberd^'Artiiino, ^4^* 
154^> as also a Latin Version by the Autlior liim^^yif^^^^^ 
printed at Genevii, may be both found in the Pnblie library 
at Cambridge. See> in addition, whatWarton, ikihis^HtiStOTy 
of English Poetry, vol. iii. p. 185 to 192, 8vo. Load. 18^ 
says on the subject of Moralities. «i"«> 



iSpeHstrsfEdmond) Faerie Queene, FiretedUyn, 4t». 15^9. 

Ireland, 1801,3/. IS^.j Townley, 12/,^ Sotheby, 1821,S2//2i»i^ 
'G.Nassau, 1824, 5/. 5*.; Thorpe, 1824, 3/. 13#i €c/.-, fyiM, 
^?. t4i. Gcf. in russia. • - rr- 

The Poet supposes that the Faerie Queei^b, aocordinj^ to 
an annual custom, held a magnificent feast, whidh «oii1dniied 
twelve days; on each of which re8pectivcly> twelve s^^eral 
complaints are presented before her. Accordingly, IH' «m4^ 
to redress the injuries which were the occasion oi thesv Mtc- 
ral complaints, she dispatches, with pn^>er commisdbns, 
twelve different Knights, each of which, in the particoliid ad- 
venture allotted to him, proves an example of. some particailar 
virtue, as of Holiness, Temperance, Justice, Chastity -, and has 
one complete book assigned to him, of which he is the Hero. 
But besides thes^ twelve Knights, severally exempHfyingtw^^ 
moral virtues, the Poet has constituted one principtil Knight or 
g^erai Hero, viz. PRtNCB Arthur. This pecsonsqige repre- 
sents Magnificence ; a virtue wliich is Supi^osed to.bethe pef- 
fectiott of all the rest. He moreover assists in evc^ Book, 
and the end of his actions is to discover and win GloHa^Jiai^. gr 



* The Poet intended Gloriana in praise of our QueeB Ellzabttk. 



CSpiy. , 1^ a wor4ft in tjiift cbaractor the Poe^ professes toponr- 
tir^y '*. The image of a brave Knight perfected in the twelve 
p^riyat^ moral virtues." 

., T^ the feregoing, which is a sketch of the Poem by Phillips^ 
l^ilton's pepbew^ I shall here add Pope's opinion of the ^ Faerie 
i^^^y given in 1743-4^ only a year before his deaths and 
printed in Spence's Anecdotes. 

• *' After reading a Canto of Spenser two or three days aga 
to an old lady between 70 and 80 years of age^ she said^ ^'tha^ 
IJkmi i^en,shotcmg,h^ a Gallery of Pictures" I don t know 
haw it is, but. she 48aid very. right. There is something in 
Spei^eic that {deases one as strongly in one*s old age as it di^ 
IB one's youth. I read the Faerie Queene^ when I was about 
vtwtBJhrOi nwith infinite delightj and I think it gi^ve me as much 
imhaa.hveud it over ftbout a year or two ago.'* 
/•.v.Tbe following are among the most esteemed editions, of 
£^«sor'8 Works. 6 vols* 12mo. by Hughes* Lond«, 1715. 
;^/fiitt(Vd volsv 4to* Lond. Brindley, 175L 
<u JGIiftto^l>y the Rev. H. J. Todd, 8 v6ls. 8vo. 1805. 
U.BitlWfi by.Dr, Aikin, 6 vols. 8vo« 1806^ 

a n^tflfht be thouirht remiss in me to omit, in a Bibliom'aniae*^s 

■^£^lfef^etj4 fSdiMmd) Co^pkmte, containing eundrie email Pth- 
iu r; . - emee oftheWorWe Vartetle. 4to. 159U 

^^tP" Thh bidndea the 1st editions of the Ruinee of Tme, 
'Ptbnt'bfiheMveea, Mother Huhberd'e Tale, &c* 
■i^^yii lAe Abhonie sale. May, 1813, » copy sold to Mr, B<^- 

landlb^d/^8«. 

1:2 



y.l- 



; s-^. 



Ho < SEOOKD /ofmNEY Mmn> 

At tbe RoKlmrgbe sale '^ Spemer^ SkepHedrdTi 
4to. 1586, sold for 21/. 

Ditto> 4to. 1597, 6. Nassau, Esq. 1824, 4/. 19«. 
Ktto; 4to» 1579, first ecfition. 



I"- 






' <■■ • 



• I 1 ■ ir 



^ry (The^dorus, Johanneg-Theodorus, Israel de) et Maiibfus 
Merian Coiiecttoncs Peregrmatumum m Indiam Orie^tt^lei^ 
et Indiam Occideniaiem, jolv parous comprekensa, Frtmcp^ 
farti adMcenum^ 1590—1634. 25 parts in folia, ^^ ' 

The above is the general title, nnder which Ae25 porMof 
tlu^ important and rare work is known, and wluch> wbeh,^m- 
plete, ia of considerable valne, as the copies' I shall presieiiktjy 
instance will testify. To give an exact and detailed desci^p* 
t^qn of the different parts and their yariaticms, would>;as Brwet 
^s, ocpapy about 40 pages. I shall therefore oBly.uolitie>i^ 
t)f(^ foot pf jthe page, where the details may be fiwiiid^^ and mv 
jnediately proceed to a few more general remarks on the «&b}eet. 

The denomination of *' Grands et petits Voyages** has t>eea 
i^c^asioned by the thirteen separate parts whiqh .conqent v1^ 
West Indies being printed on a rather larger .sLjse.tti^jtbe 
twelve yhich relate to the East Indies. 

The copy in the Pkiis sale, 1791, was knocked down.at 2 UMl 
and bought in at that price. 

•■ ' ■■ ■.■!■■ , 1 !■ ■■■ " I w .iiii^iiii II <.!■■ t li wii m hiii V ^ 

* De Bure Bibliographia InstmctiTVk v.^-.^.^V 

Camu9 Memoires BUT la Collection de grands j&t peljta.yqyytgBa^'.^ 
4to. Paris. 18031 

Bibliotheca Parisiana. Na 486. 1791. 

Brunei Manuel du Lihrasre, ton. i. |i. 391. Paris. l9Sii^ 



A BIBUOMANUC'S .LlfiBAR Y. & 

Attte.fealeoftheMerly collection, 1813, «'C^py,:.ifaiAing 
11 leaves, and some plates, sold for 126/., aad was puixihased 
by Messrs. Alrch, who were fortunate cnoiigh to complete wthat 
was wanting, and make some additions, and in its impnyred 
state they sold it to the Hon. T. Grenville for 240/. who has 
since rendered it, according to the Rev. T. F. Dibdin*8 account, 
the m<^t complete copy in the world. 
. Colonel Stanley*s copy, which was sold in 1$13; contig^ned 
aupCcates of parts x. and xi. and a considerable number of du- 
pH^aJbe plates ^ it was bound in 7 vols, folio, blue morocco, and 
sold for 546/., and I believe now is in the Duke of Devon- 
^hafeVcoBection. 

* "^Mr. Bsckford^s copy sold at Fonthill, in 1823, fbt JOO giS- 
trftf«»:^ 1 do not know whether Mr. Dibdin is correct in sa jWj; 
iti Was M.-'Paris's copy, and supposed to be perfect. ■ ■ i- ' 

^^'ffi^e library of the Right Hon. T. Grenville is a colrijJtete 
^tdf these Voyages, very copiously described in Dibdin s Li- 
lH!llrf Compamon, p. 373, &c. containing also the English pait 
^ Vlrgiiiia,* dedicated to Sir Walter Raleigh by De Bry ; it 
fe'Jmwto the Latin part, of the same date, Fsrancof. 15^0.*- 
^I%is;4^ditioii Of this part is unnoticed by M. Camus. The f61- 
Idfrittg^ is its title: •'' 

^ brief € and true report of the neu^ found LdndofVirgmia^ 
^^scetiered by Str Richard Gremvile, Knts in 1585, translated 
into English by Thomas Hariot, at the charges, of Sir 0^dtter 
Raleigh, 4md eom Pictures of tie t^ictesf which in the olde 
Tyme dyd habite one part of tie Great Brettaine, found in a 
Md English Chronicle, plates by De Bry, Folio, Francof, 
1590, 

1 ,. . .J • • ■ ! J ! .- 

■ • — r- 

* This coj^it said to have eogt Harley Earl of (hdbid 100 gultoas, 
who, after muiy years^ search, ohiaiaedl it at Fraakfort for that Bum. 



64 sfifioio) VotjRSEY ti6xrim 

The copy of 0. Nassau, Esq. sold, in 1824, for iOOt 'an<i in 
his Catalogue it is said that not more than four perfect copies 
of this part are known to exist. 



Frauncei (AbrahamJ Counteme of Pembroke's Tv^ CMuftk, 
' contemlng the affectionate Life and unfortunate DSatk' of 
' Phiiiis and Amyntas, that in n Pastoral, this m a Fun^etui, 

4io. London. 1591. 

Dodds, 4/. 7sr, Mason, 3/. I3«. Gd.-, Roxburghe, 6/. V6s. M. 

Ditto, with Fraunce*s Emanuel,* at Siunders', 1818, 
13/. 2s. €d.; Bindley, 25/. 4s,, bought by Perry, at whose sale, 
in 1822, it sold for 21/. \0s: 6d. 

Lord Spencer is said to have ^ven White 21/. for his copy. 
White asked 25 guineas for it. 

G. Nassau, Esq. 1824, 5/. I8s. 
-^ • mrd Part of Ditto, ehtitled Amelias 

Dale, being Tales of the Heathen Gods, in EngRsh Hexamr 

eters. 4to. 1592. 

A copy of this third part, which is very rare, with the Title 
and two leaves in MS. sold at Saunders*, in 1818, for 15/. 15s. 
- This Author is classed amongst Dramatic Writers, but his 
production, days Beloe, can hardly be called a Flay) it consists 
of a translation of Tassos Aminta, winch is interwoven in the 
body of a Pastoral, entitled Ivy Church. A specimen of this 
whimsical performance is given in Beloe*s Anecdotes. Ftullips, 
speaking of Fraunce, characterized him as '^ a versifier in 
Queen Elizabeth's time, who, imitating Latin measure in Eng- 



11 ■ ■! ■* 



t O, Namau, (the Enuami onfyJ, i834, U 10». 



A BIBLIOMANIAC'S LIBRARY. 03 

Kslii yer^ wrote his Ivie Chnrch^ and some other things in 

hexameter : some also in Hexameter and Pentameter -, nor 

*■''"■■■•■. 

"^vas he altogether singolar in this way of writing 5 for Sir P. 
Sidney, in the Pastoral Interludes of his Arcadia, uses not only 
these but all other sorts of Latin measure, in which no wonder 
he is followed by so few, since they neither become the Eng- 
UshAitor any other modem language.** 

\, HQ)fir true Phillips's opinion on the subject is^ has been 
QYiA^oed in our day> by the attempt and complete failure of a 
celebrated Poetical Luminary to tread in the 9teps of Abra- 
i^lm Fraunce. 

>.. jA concise account of FVaunce, and some of his productions^ 
U^y be found in the Theatrum Poetarum, 8vo« p!. 108» 9 ; and 
idso some particulars in Warton, vol. iv. 8vq, p. 230,- -^ 



•♦;:-' 



Hooker 9 (Richard) Lawes of I^cclesiastical Polide, Folio. 

Best Edition. 1723. 
There are various other folio and octavo editions of this 
Woa-k. 

. *' This,'* according to Neal, in his History of the Puritans, 
** is esteemed the most learned defence of the Church of Eng- 
land» wherein all that would be acquainted with its constitu- 
tion (says a learned Prelate) may see upon what foundation it 
is built. 

. 'f Several champions appeared about this time (1594) for the 
cause of Episcopacy, but the most celebrated performance, and 
of the greatest note, was Hooker's Ecclesiastical Polity, in 
eight books ; the four first of which were published this year. 



ij^Ji/s.J4fo pf Hooker, nor Sith^ Gvudckif sxii^ 4aapy /»tblrii 
tb^t give an accpant of Hooker aiidvbi9 Wri|in9#A^r«wilft1 ^ 
mention of the Books or Tracts which gave occasionF. to his 
writing The Ecclesiastical Polity. Whitgift had written an 
Answer to the Admonition to the Parllafnent, and th^jijeby^eif- 
gii^^' in a controversy with Thomas t!arjtwr|ght, the siirnxMea 
4^Utli<^ 6t it. Hooker« in this his e^'oellent. VTorl^ ;i|ndertoAk 
the defence of our Eqcl^siastic^ Establishinent, agj^nirt ^h]bch 
Ckrtwnght appears to have been the most powerfdi of aM the 
opportents."* \ 

Hooker was some time Master of the Temple, and afterwards 
Sector' of Bfislippsboume in Kent, There is a Baftriitt' 0f liHir/ 
12nio. ffoilat^culp, from Sparrow*8 Ration^ of the Cdmidon 
Prayer } and another in folip^ OaiL FtutkometMp, frontispiece 
to his Ecclesiastical Polity, and according to Oranger the b^rist 
in^pressions are to be fband ii^ the earliest editions ofthafl'wdrK, 
cotlpuiring only the fiv/s books. « ! -^ 

Afach mirprise has been expressed at the tter. T. *F. DibffliV 
omission of thisf work in his '^ Lihrary:,Compamdn:'\ its'rtr 

* Belqe'g Anecdotes of Literature, vol L p. 23, ^, fumi«hea a, d$$t«|led 
list of these Gontrorersial Writings. ., - -y. .... 

ft l^ere is an old folio Book, called "" Th^ Stud^i^^fJ^^art/^^^ffi^^ i 
from the Athenian Orofihsp somevh^t a])j^rp3U]pating to^ Ji$. I^ljj^lil^ : 
p!a^ : but; a loere skeleton, heth in bulk aa4 ]pattei> .i^J'^^fM^f^.'Vitll, ' 
the Rer. Gentlemsijfs ^ ff/0e;&e andryghte usefull^ Tolqme. 



^^iit/'kidv} d0)ibt not thatin a fotmre edition tk^'iietdcyM K^' 
IBoidMitti, wiU b/ing this BcckriaiHcMl r^^i^Ji iiito' M '^Iay> 
iltti[^if'}^'gpe(U^n fful in sUendng sncb pe% tlei^^kW/ 1 
think he will be perfectly justifted^ftsr a tfae«oto iifthe €fAtr^% 
MVkdiiihii i!k(kMiag bis oppoikeot do«m with tlh« fik^ !%io 
eSM^ <yf^o(M^'« BecledasticaSPoKtie ; IVat iiH hini'triLe'lftti^ 
1^ not injure the PortraitI '^ . • vi^. :ib 

■-n-i •■/>-^-^' -■• • ■■■.•■■'■■ ' / ■•-; ••^^- .^ '■ '' ■'• • /v Jl/' 
£/a// « /JosjMundusaiter et idem : me Terra ^ufitraiia^^f^^^ 

is '^^- w«^««i(f?> *^' J^ut^pre Mefi:ifrh prifanmcp^^ 
'4vo, P^trst edition. toUh frontispiece In/ Kip* , , u 

Sold at Brandos sale for I/. 7«.i at G. IJfassaus, 1824. !/• IS**. 
Reprinted^ with the Maps, in Pratt s edition ojTffaHj 



f Forks, 10 vols. 8vo. Lopd. 1808. . , . 

^IfifVa (Jqs.J Discovery of a New. World^^qr ti.fieiit^r^tmi^ 
, ISiouth Indies^ hitherto unhnown, by ^n EtigGsk VenOHf^ %0. > 

.JNo^date, Imprinted for JS* Biount, , „-,'; 

Unknown to Atnes or If prbert^ < .;,; 

flrand'ssale, 1807, 3/. 7«.i G. Nassau's, 1824, J2/. U. . ,. 

The preceding Work by Hall, Bishop of Norwich, wa^ tibe 

^fotfytyp^ Wjhenc^ JDeaa Swift l)orrowed the idea of (^Urey's 

Tx^vfihr* Mr, P^iHipbeU, speaking of tbi« saturV^ A6tt«ii»t 



I « 



'^' Vti^ also very prob&ble that Sw^deriredi^oiiiie portion of lusVojage 
to Liijmta from Bishop Godwin's ^ Man in the Moony or a BiacoursBpfa 
Yt^a^k ihiiher hy Vomingo GoMoles** ^o. 163a ^ In ihis Philosopiucal 
lUmu^' wluch was repeatedly printed, Domingo Oonsales, a dii^unu- 
tive Spaniard> i^ supposed to be shipwrecked on an uninhabited jsiaii^. 



SBQOND JOURNQ¥ |UH7^I». . 

says, that Hnder the pretence of describing the Tarr^ i^^^ 
Incogiuta, Hall reversed the plan of Sir T. More*^.,]^j^ 
and chnniclerised the vices . of existing nations. . : . /^^ • 

Hairs fJ,J f^irgedemUirium, • • ,,:u/l 
Tiie thite first Books, called " Tooihieu Satire9^:!.g4M 
Actidndctdi and Moraif" were first printed bjf Tt Grtedi 
Ri^ Dewier. \2mo. Land, 1597> .ntwj 

The three last Books appeared under the Htle of F'irgt 
ndarimn, T%e three last Bookes of Byting Saiyree. -AS, 
Land. Printed by R, Bradockefor R. Dexter, fyd 15961 
tm^its with Satires of Book 4. : )• 

* This ori|^nal edition complete is estimated by Dibdin kk I 
Longman and Co. in the BibL Ang, Poet, mark a copyat^S 

The next edition (of the whole) is entitled Flrgedhmri 
the three last (in reality all six) Bookes of the Bytmg Sitijjri 
corrected and amended with some additions by J. IT, ' t2; 
Lond.for R. Dexter, fyc, 1599.* '^ 

G. Nassau, 1824, 1/. 1*. 
Ditto, Svo, 1602. 

Brand, 21, I2s, 6d,', Stevetus, 3/. Ss, 

where he taught several Ganzas or Wild Geese to fly with a light 
chine, and to fetch and carry things for his conTenience. He after w 
time yentured to pat himself into the machine, and they carried him i 
great ease. He happened to he in this .^Irial Chariot when tiiese Gan 
which were hirds of passage, took their flight to the Moon, and was 
rectly carried to that Planet He gtyes a yery ingpenioos descrip^i 
what occurred in his Journey, and also of the Wonders he saW whei 
arrived there.'' 

* See Warton's Obserratioiis on Speofle,;wL L pi 1S7» 8nK 



A BlBLlOMANtAO'S LlBRAItY. 67 

l^tkiiedatOaford.UmK 1753. 

OV^assati, 1824, 12*. ^ . 

Gray, the Poet; in a letter to his friend Dr. Wlutflimi'of 

IHhirham, alluding to this edition, says^ ^f Bishop Hall's Satires, 

^^c^led V^rgidemialinm, are lately republished. They are f|d) of 

^spiHt «u^ p^ry, as much of the first as Dn Donne, aiOidflir 

-more of the latter ; they were n^tten when he was about 23 yeaH 



vlli^ Sadiei^, with Nbtes by Singer, in addition to Wartcxii'^ 
iibserviations, have been republished in Svo. 1824. They-naj 
also be found in the 10th yolnme of Half 9 f Forks, %vo, ISOS^ 
with Warton'i^ Notes, as well as Mr. £}lis*s and Mr, Pratt's 
UkistratioBS. 

Of pur Satirical Poetry, taking satire in its moral aiid Sig- 
nified, sense, l^all, according to Campbell, clmms and may be 
allowed to be the founder r thus in the Prologue to his Satires 
he says— 

I first adyentare with fool hardy might. 
To thread the steps of perilous despight: 
I first adTenture, follow me who list^ 
And be the second JSngKsh Satyrist 
Hall's Prologue to Book 3, implies his knowledge of former 
Sa^tirists. 

^ Some say my Satyrs over-loosely flow. 

Nor hide their gall inongh from open show : 

Not riddle Hke, obscaring their intent; 

Btit^ packe4rtaffe j^aine, nttering what thing they meant, 

Ooiitrairie to the Roman Ancients, 

Whose words were shorty and darksome was their senoe. 

Who reads one line of their harsh poesies, 

Tlurise must he tak his wind, and breath him thrise. 

My wnmie woM follow them that have fore-gone, 



.^j/ 



68 fiECO«S> K)UailSl^'909M>A 

BtUeaimotmfiikmSmgimkPmibm* V -u-'^ Uv-.H ^'-^1 
For looke how itfTO tile AnfcientiCMnidia.. r's ^'">r{T 
Put lbnnerSatjt»ai her liberties --^ J -- .» t'^.'jWr 
So£uTemwimi]iiiyMUfl«iil6tkMi«lflUi|^ vj i • oa.«/ 
11pbetterheto«(biid* ^iMOiheMobold. i • r. v /.' 

Peologaeio Btok>ai 

Tbe, first satire of the ibird Book affords k fidr f^pecbien of 

theAiith<»^^ and^ in tbe opiaion .of Mr. EIlis> stnikingly resem- 

• • • ■ .] 

bles the Vlth Satire of Juvenal 3 it exhibits a lively cpntiast 
between the olden tinie f^id the et^sfidi^iCY,<4.^^fitipf^ own 
cotemponuries. i . i.;.. .iw-^i 

Book IU.r-*rS4.TUi« lb - .. :-< .c v:.>\ -'"-i 
Time was, and that wMitenu'd Ao Time of 6$ld# > i ;/. 
Whose world and time were yoiig» that aow are Mt ' .; /. 
(When quiet Satam swaid the mace of Lead; . . ;} 
And Pride was yet nnbome, and yet niAred.): '''.u^ 
Time was, that, wMltstii»AQt«Bne &Udidla»ly . ,. m'i 
Our hungry Sires gap't fortthe laUiBg.Mast i .^' re <.< J r 

Of the Dodonian okea ^ -^si 

Could no wnhnsked ajmme leave the tr^. r,^.\ : -t • .^ 
Bat there was challenge made . whose it might h<KV «i 
And, if some nice and UkoOTfyoB. appetite. ;...>« . v^ i- .^^ 
Desir'dmore daintiedidiofraiedeUtie* . ; / ^ /-• 
They scal'd the stored iilrab .fridkclaiq^ \at^ ;.««.• >^ 
Till they had sated their delicious eie: .1 

Or search'd the hc^pefaU thicks of hedgy-iowes^ 
Forbrierieherriesy.orhawes, or sourer slo^ - 
Or, when they meant toi&ure fin'st of all» 
They lick't oake-leaTSs besprint with homy fall 
As for the fhrise three-angled Beechnut shelly 






Or Chesmifs armed huske andhidkerne]!,' ' - i ^•Iv:•^'t> 
No Squire durst touch, the Law woidd nol aiffovd, ^' '^i>^^ 
Kept for the Court, and hr the Kings pwnc'bord.' < ■'■■■' • 



./^ 



}rt 0\ 



I-- » 



(V 



"f 



ti 



: N i.r.;:)V:>. 



A KBLIOHAK^ACffi LDMLUI^. W 

Their Royall Plate WM*elag% o» voodt <* A >t tj ' ''> -^^ 
The Vulgar, save hk lumd, elgehttdhe wumo •■•■ >/'•'" '< '^ 
Their only seller was the neSghbonr hntkiot ■- < -^ ' ^ 
None did &r better care, for better lopkeu 
Was then no paying of tiie Brewer's eaqp^ 
Kor grteedie Vintner mixt the strained grape. 
. I^. King's Pavilip^ wan the |;raaB7. gre^n» . 
Under safe shelter of the shadie treen. 
Under each banke men layd their lims along; 
Not wishing any ease, not fearing wrong: 
Cfad with tiieir owne, as they were made of old« 
Not fearing shame, not feeling any cold. 
Bat when, by Ceres hnswifiy and paine 
Men leam'd to bory the reTinng gtatne; ■ 
And faArer Jaani tmight Ihe new fovad Vitte 
Rise on the J&m^^ tifith many a Friendly THrinet. 
And base desire bade men to ddren low, ■ 

For needleise mettals ; tiien *gan muwldef grMr. - •' 
Then ferewell, fayreit age, tiie worldB best daye*; 
Huiving in ill, as it in age decaies^ — 
Then crep^in Pride, andPeefishCoTelise; -' 
And Men grew gredy, dincor^^siis, aad meeu < 
Now Man, t|iat earst baile-felWw wae ^dl^Beaply 
Woxe on to weene himselfe a Qod at least 
No aery foole ean take so high m flight, 
Tho' she her daring wings in doiids have dight ; 
Nor Fish can di?e so deep ift yeelding sea, 
Tho' Thetis' s^ riiedd twear her iafetie ; 
Nor fearefiill BeasC tan dig bis eave se lowe^ 
Aaconld he fiirther than: Earth's centre go; > 
As that the ayre, ihe earth, or ocean^ 
Should shield them fimn the goige of greedy Man. 
Hath ntmoet Inde ought better, than his owne? 
Then ntmostlnde is neare, and rife to gone. 
O Nature ! was the World ordain'd for nought 



;;*' ; 



rO ffiOPHQ iODBNSY ^9VWf, 

Bitt fill Maii^s maw, «id feed Man's idle thought ? 

TSiyOraadiire'swordtwnrar'dQfflinftieleeke^y. . -^ 

Or manly garlick; hat thy fitrntceTeekes 

Hote steams of wine : and can aloofe descrie 

the drunken dranghts of sweete aatmnmitie. 

They naked went ; or clad in rader hide, - . ; 

Or honto-spnn'msseft, voSd of Ibtraine ^oAAtr: ' * ' 

' >BtitUMNi canst mttskfr i» garish gandcri^ - vij- 

! t Xa smite a liMile's far-fetched Kverie. , t rj A 

A French head join'd to necke ItaKan : 

Thy thighs firom Oermanie, and hreast firo* Spain: 

An JBnglishman is none, a fool in all : 

Many in one, and one in seyeralL ji=;un».i» 

ThenMen were Men; hut now the greater jHBTt " "'i si 

Beasts are in Hfe, and Women are in heart ' . < <i:n>r 

Ctood nature 'selfe, that homely Bmpenmr, ...| 1 

In proudest ponpeWM not so clad of yore, ^ 

An is the under Oroome of the Ostlerie, 

Hushanding it in work day yeomanrie. 

Lo ! the long date of those expired dayes^ ' ^ ' ' ' 

Which the inspired Merita's word fore-sa:yi; 

When dunghill peasants rikallbe dight as Kings- 

7!l<n 0IM 0on/i(i»fi anodier brings : 

Then &re well, fairest age, the Worids best di^es 

Thriving in all, as it in age decayes. 
In Phillips's Theatrum Poetarom^ 8to. Canterbury; 
p. 326^ &c. may be found a condse and satiflf&ctory account of 
Bishop Hall. " He is universally allowed/* says Phillip8> '^ to 
have been a man of great wit and learning, and of as great 
meekness, modesty, and piety." His works, published at v^^ 
rious periods in folio, quarto, and octavo, '♦ are filled,** saya 
Bayle, ** with fine thoughts, excellent morality, and a great 
deal of piety." 



^ MlttbttAN&lb'll £fBllART. 71 



:.. ']. 



ife and Dedtk of Edmund Gewngen, (alkut Ironmonger,) 

Ato. Portrait and Ptdtisf. St. Omer9. 1614. ' 
Gnlston^ 2/.; Town]ey> 5/.j O. Nassau^ 1^24^ blue morocco, 
12/. 5*. 

'' Edmund Jennings/* says Granger, ''was admitted into 
the English College, at Rlieims, nnder Dr. aftenfwds Cardinal 
Allen, and when he was 20 years of age, ordained Priest. He 
was soon afterwards sent into England, where he was appre- 
hended in the' act ^of celebra^ng Miiss. He was executed by 
hanging and quartering in Gray*s Inn Fields, Dec. 10th, 1591." 
In the above rare book are several Historical Prints, repre- 
senting the principal drcnmstances of his Life and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expence by the Pa- 
pists, in order to perpetuate the remembrance of two • Mira- 
cles,** which are there said to have happened at his death. 
The first is, that^ after his heart was taken out, he said, 
** Sancte Gregori, ora pro me,** which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, *' God*8 wounds 1 see his heart is in my hand -, yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth." The other is, that an holy Virgin 
being desirous of procuripg some relick of him, contrived to 
approach the basket into which his quarters were thrdwn, and 
touched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy from 
its having been employed in acts of consecration and elevating 
the Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
or discovery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
the greatest care. 



f '■ ■ ■• . 



.*f. 



Ml 

,.:... ...;.,...;,.^...,.-..^,r,^ 

Aww~8<mgi trnd'SontitU.' 8vo. ' For Mtu.S*thr. 1622, 

ffttk PortraU of the Auttiffbmtl^engrmed Title. 

" Of this Sonnetteer," fcyg OrtogM-; V<rt: U. p-'lf,-*'! find 
BO mention made ^ any of our Blograplitw An^ii^. 

BelM, in his Anecdot«i, c^lil tke nborp " ^, f>9w^% no' 
aeuu of common occarn^ioe j", . wl ^fW U>.«iti jW ttiyajW<»S 
Cellecton, if w« may jndge from the [Hiceit.liM,4btalMed in 
three recent sales, he am>ean to have bem pr e Uy o n eotfc hik 
B|qireeiatioii of ks rarity. '■' "^'-"^ 

At Mr. Bindley's sale it prodaced 35/, 14^.; at Mr. Perry'g, 
1822, 387. 6«. described as containipg tlic Portraits of'Hannsjr 
and of hi» IVtroness, Anne of,D«niuark. Sir M. Sykes'* copy, 
which had been Mr. BiudteyV "o)d, in 1824, for 12/. 10«. U. 

The following extracts may be fmiDd is Selaefl AaMriotcs 
of Literature, vol. ti. and which I hope I shaQ be excused %a 
abstncting, considering the valne of the Book dted, and tht 
diGEcnlty of obtaining even a glimce at such BiMJomaniacrf 
■:■• ■' , --.■ ■«.';■. M'tti^it:^ 

'Rs)ieriedced Nihrre in this lattop ^:e, '" ^ ^' 

Willing her ii.«ler.pieceihdnMtken be WfldgJt' ••■^^'^^ 
.^iich.B;6ireCeliBwtoBB«idi'flMg«riV*t '"-l»>v^ '.^ 
As all the Oodt in emalalion brooght, \\ 

FoTlhe7ilidtliKtkeifNatiire only might '-.••. 

brag of her wDiik, ike glioiildiiiBiilt o're them.; -. _ 

Wberefore tlwj 'greed to twe in eqoal ngfe. ''-^ i*-*"*!^ ' 
ThitllMiyiifberpeTfeetionplutmlglltGlmM: ' ' ' '^'"^ ^***'' 
PaUu gate wisdooie, Jnao rtateHnene, '■' ' *' " '^ ■' ^ 

And the milde momiBg gave btr aMdntit; .' ' -ff^-i 













R¥aL•■4e«lihdieir.powend^oQntl^ ^y 

A'VLi .v*W1V .t*^\t ;. \ -s.V. V.t>, ■.•».:. A — •^*;^V, 

Aa4 ^ wifli acarlet itreames east Heaven adorneir , ^^ 

•^« €l^fye.tc4l!a^8cli'ainteripeir .-.•.K-.>f$ 

Hill fWimitmilm tmaim wm^hilU, her k«Ml j^ore 6df% ^ ^^'^> .'^i'r < fitii 
SIm Atnogbi and tall, her treasee trailed W^^rv^B^l ^ i > ^>^ > ; > {^ ;#. 
(.'v«<(Mp^ (^tood^ thkikini; xajr deere Jbad bee^e 
_^Jhm*d |odd^Mcu every tense to sight vfaago^e, 
^^ivmwMiimi tiloflh my blisse fled I once aeene, 

^^'^^^LMiie^thuiifoi^edasit were in stone, ' ' ^ « « /■ . » ,a> 

^V»** tWl <&i ^fchiM> ever to have remained, ' ' '^ "-^ -^^•- ^ 

H^lt.tlgiihe'lMiltfli^'d, andl my nghl retatnad. -^ ^ - ^''^ 

>init h»^J[ /.•>•.»•-., V. v." •- ', • > ■ I" ■ ■ • •• ... • . .- r. •• ;; .*^:.-f^YS<v-'>. 

Jbrmtms (Michael) Poly-Olblony with the second pm^.^tti0^1 
. Fnmfypiece and Portrmt oj Prinpe Henr^f hy Ifafe^tmd alt 

$he other Platfii, .J613— 162^, ... ., , .,...; w<: 

€oL Stanley 8 sala^ 18 19> U I9e. ed.i Q. N8dM/Bf^.^i824> 

; « la 1613/' says ^ PhiBips's l%OTtram Poeteriim^S^. 1^ 
** Drayton pnblisked the ^-st part of his Poly-^bk^ b]pwhidt 
Ohnck title^ signyfyiog.vfiy.Jbiiysy?^, he denofeea Edif^aiid; aa 
Ike aatient name of Albion is by sevie deimd #on Olbioir, 
happy. It is a chor<^n^ieal dcscriptioii 0f the mtgtB, nounr 

F 



^;i6ie^, in. bis Anecdotes ofliteratnnvqiyitr^'KbitfaefiWdtM 
ip,}(tfa,l4k (rf Honker, nor BitWp Gxadoii «0A «Uay MiUitm 
tlvrt give an ucoDot of HoQlier uid..bia WntiDg««mrillti 4)^ 
mention of the Booki or Tracta wkich gave ocGau9n,to hia 
writing llie Eccdesiastica] Polity. Wliitgift bad written an 
Answer to the Admotution lo the Parliament, and thereby cij- 
gSj^ed in a controverey with Thomas <:av.tvtTi^lit, the supposed 
Avtlibr of it. Hooker, in tbh bis esuclltiit M'ork, iindertnA 
the defence of our EoclesiBsticql Esti^blisluDLut, ag^ntt wliicb 
Ckitwnght appears to have been the loost puu'erful of all the 
oJ>p(>iienta."* \t 

Hooker v»a some time Master of the Temple, and afterwards 
AcctpT'oif Qjsktpsboume in Kent There is aRirtndt'ftf hl0b^ 
13mo. Hollar »culp. from Sparrow's Ratioittle of theCtimWon 
Prayer i and aiwther in foHo. G*H- Faitionu tc^. frODtispteCe 
to bis Ecclesiastical Polity, and according to <}i»i^er the best 
impressions are to be flmnd !■) tbs earliest edit^ns of tbafWiitt^, 
coBtnimng only the five-books. ' "' 

Mneb snrprise has been expressed at tbo Her- T. P. DibdUl^' > 
oaiiasion of this work in bia " Litrary .Gompanioit ;"f its'tt?' 

• Bcloe's Anecdotes of Litentun, vol i. p. 23, ^ flimisbei ;■, detailed 

li«t of theie coalToieraia] Writings. 

^ Here is an old blio Book, caUed " IK* StiJaU\f.iiraaf,^tr^0)t t 
fimn the Atktaian Oraclea," jomBwh^t «p|^][ i yti n g ,to, fSf- I^t^jLi^ ' : 
jilop: bytftiD^re skeleton, boUi in bulk ajiil mailer, iq conpf^JB^ yfitb. . > 
the ftcT. Geatlemui^ " slttle and tyght* mtfitll" Tolunw. 



d<bi«>'<^$'l ^^^^ not that in a fotore edition tk^'^eaic^ 1^' 
fif^niiMM, will bring this EccbHoiHcal Cakionvd^fiXi '^laj^) 
imA^ki^\a»- great gun Ml in silencing sach p^ta^^kW/t 
think he will be perfectly justtfted.'asr a tm^'iioto of the €hkr^% 
MUkdieiAXi^ &ii6iBk»tg bis oppoikent doirn witli tbe^fijc^K^io 
«(!M4n (xf^ooi^VEtiele^ddticaaPoKtie ; %tli^ luni^e'iiia^ 
i^d not injure the Portrait J • ^^ ^ ^^ . j /i^^ .:ib 

»Ii^ n^; !:.;''- \.—> •:!....' -■' ^' »■ "^ ■■.^•^' ' '•»"■' v»ii-tn/v 

^n-)'z^^- ,' ',, ... . .-• . • • ^. ,: • • ••^- ..\».. A.. '• ''•.': '/.v.'lA 

Hairs /Jos J Mundus alter et idem : ske Terra AustralU.imtA. 
\iia^ [semper incogpjfa» fyci ..Authare M^rcifrio pritatkni^f 
„wo. Plrst edition, with frontispiece ^ Kip. • r. 

Sojd at Brandos sale for \L 7s,', atG. Nassau's, 1824, 1/, 13*.% 
printed, with the Maps, m Pratt s edition oj HaJfs 
fForhs, 10 vols. 8vo. Lopd. 1808, ' , ', ; 

H^l-a (Jqs,J Discovery of a New, IF^oridf qr .0^j[h0^t^tm j^ 
.,fSiou^hJ[n<Ues, hitherto unknown, iy an JS^gM iler^mt^ %0. > 
.Xff^.date, Imprinted for E. Blount, . , . . .,■ .,v ; 
Jilnhuwm to Ames or If^b^t, , . / •,: 

^i;and>8ale, 1807, 3/. 7*.3 G. Nassau's, 1824,2/. 1*. , , 
The preceding Work by Hall, Bishop of Norwich, wa<sftibe 
p^q^xt^rp^ Wjh^c^ I>ean S wUt l)orrowed the idea of (^llv«i/8 
IV^eJiip* Mr, P^mpbeJl, speaking of this satii^il i^m^ 



\ « 



*^ ft Ik alflo very probable that Swift deriVed Home portion of his Vpyage 

to Li^fvata from Bishop Godwin's ^ Man in the Moon, &r a Discourse of a 

V&iifd^ithiikerhyDommgo^ 1638. ^ In diis PhilosopliScal 

^Idmi^e^' wluch was ri^peatedly printed^ Domingo Gonsales, a dimmu- 

tiV4'Sp^ard> h supposed to be shipwrecked on an uninhabited Jstan^, 



original Itallaii, entitled 'jHragedia del LlbSrd'i^rbiirio, Wi* 
1546^ as also a Latin Version by the Aiitlior tiimi^J'l^ 
pnnted at Genevi^ may be both found in the I\ibli6^ library 
at Cambridge. See, in addition, what Warton, inhis^Hi^tWy 
ibr English Poetry, voL iii. p. 185 to 192, 8vo. Lond. 18i)> 
says on the subject of Moralities. ^ ''"^ 



Spe^ersCEdmondJ Faerie Queene. First edkkm. 4t9. l$M-5. 

Ireland, 1801,3/. ISs.-, Townley, 12/,} Sotheby, 1821,2A^2»ij 
■G.Nassau, 1824, 5/. 5*.; Thorpe, 1824, 3/. 13#i €(t/.-, f)M, 
4J.\4s,6d, in russia. -^^ - n; 

The Poet supposes that the Faekie Qusenb, Aocordinj^vtCK 
an annual custom, held a magnificent feast, which cohtiniifid 
tweli^e days ; on each of which respectiTclyi twelve s^^eral 
complaints are presented before her. Accordingly,- in «i4^ 
to redress the injuries which were the occasion of thess Mye- 
ral complaints, she dispatches, with proper commiiifibns^ 
twelve different Knights, each of which, in the-partioalsiJad— 
veiiture allotted to him, proves an example of, some ^|>articplar^ 
virtue, as of Holiness, Temperance, Justice, Chastit-v > and ha» 
one complete book assigned to him, of which he is the Hero^ 
But besides thes^ twelve Knights, severally exemplifying tw^^^^^ 
moral virtiles, the Poet has constituted one principal Knight oic^ 
gfeneral HerO/ viz. Princb Arthub. This pecsonBuge «epre — 
Bents Magnificence,* a virtue Which ia supposed to bethe pef^ — 
fection of all the rest. He moreover assists in evcury Book.^ 
and the end of his actions is to discover and win Glokiajqaj*,,^:^' 

* The Poet intended Gloriana in praise of our QueeB Elizabtth. 



CSpry. , {i^9 wor4»mti^i»charai^rUieIV>€t;pn>^^ 

tr^y ''The image of abrade Knight perfected in the twelve 

priyatp ipond virtues." 

. T^ the foregoing^ which is a sketch of the Poem by Phillips^ 
l^Uto^'s pephew, I shall here add Pope*s opinion of the " Faerie 
a^^ncr given in 1743-4^ only a year before his deaths And 
printed in Spence's Anecdotes. 

• ** After reading a Canto of Spenser two or three days aga 
to an old lady between 70 and 80 years of age^ she said^ ^'tha^ 
J-imt teen.Moiomg,hr a Gallery of Pkturee** I don t know 
liovi^it is> but she .said very. right. There is something in 
SpeHseiC that pleases one as strpngly in one*s did age as it di4 
in one's youth. I read the Faerie Queene> when I was aboi](t 
= twt|^e>>wath infinite delight j and I think it gi^ve me as wch 
iifhfiii.ItDead it over ^bout a year or two ago." 
'^ vTbe following are among the most esteemed editions, of 
»SjpeiiSMr's Works. 6 vols. 12mo. by Hughea, Lond. 1715. 
-^/fiitto^d voUh. 4to. Lond. Brindley* 175L 

•.JK«toy.t»y the Rev. H. J. Todd, 8 v6ls. 8vd. 1805. 

UlMttOi by,Br« Aikin, 6 vols. 8vo« 1806« 

It nu^t be thought remiss in me t6 omit, in a Bibliomamae^s 
^^O^.tHe mention of ' 

- ^i%^«f:> .fEflfnondJ Conqflmite, contaiining sundrle emali Pa- 
r.i\.:^:eme»0ftheB^orid'eFarietie. 4to» 159 L 

''^tS^ lliis iadndes the Ist editions of the Ruined of Ttm, 
^f^'bf the Muses, Mother Hubberd's Tale, &c. 
' '"Ai tfie Alehome vale/ May, 1813, » copy sold to Mr. B<^' 

e2 



'•/•»-". . Vj-i 



tiS SECOND /OURNEY tUMnm 

At the Rosbvgbe sale ^ «S^90iwerV SkepHeardPi K^^Mlwr^ 
4to. 15S6, sold for 21/. ' ' ' 

Ditto, 4to. 1597, G. Nassau, Esq. 1824, 4/. 19#. -' /'' 

IMtt»; 4to» 1579, first ecfitioa. 






Brif CTheodorus, Johannes-Theodorus, Israel dej et Mattkfus 
Merian CoHecthncs Peregrmatienum in Indium OrienUfleiit, 
et Indiam OccidefUalem, xxy.partibus comprekensaf FrffUjpz 
/urti ad Mcenum, 1590 — 1634. 25 parts in folio. 






The above is the general title, nnder which tlie,25i parMrftf 
tJus ioiportant and rare work is known, and which> wbeh,f;iBm<* 
plet^» ia of considerable Talne, as the copies* I shall pres<^4y 
instance will testify. To give an exact and detaiied desc^pr 
t^qn of the different parts and their variations, would, as Bri^et 
aa^s, pcpnpy about 40 pages. I shall therefore oiily.n0li<!9,Ti| 
th^ foot pf jthe page, where the details may. be ioiaodj^ iKMl.|mt 
.inediately proceed to a few more general remarks on the atitj^vt^ 

The denomination of " Grands et petits Voyages" has.beeft 
9€f;asioned by the thirteen separate parts whiph .conoGtJiJt^ 
West Indies being printed on a rather larger si^^tl^^t^ 
twelve V^hich relate to the East Indies. 

The copy in the Paris sale, 1791, was knocked doi^.at 2102. 
and bought in at that price. 

* I)e Bure Bibliogpraphia lostmctiVVk ,> . . >>% >v>'«x'V 

r 

Camii^ Memoires sur la Collection de grands pi petits y^yftKN^slMf- 
4to. Paris. 1803. . . , 

Bihliotheca Parisiana. Na 486. 1791. 
JBraoet Manuel du Lihraire, torn, i p. 39L Parii. IflS^w 



A BUUOMANIAG'S .UBAARY. & 

Attbe/%alea£iheMerly coUectioi^ 181d« ««c9py» vrarting 
11 leaves, and some plates, sold for 126/., aad wasponchasfid 
by Messrs. Arch, who were fortunate enough to compLeteowhat 
\¥as wanting, and make some additions, and in its imprdtred 
©tate they sold it to the Hon. T. Grenville for 240/. who has 
since rendered it, according to the Rev. T. F. Dibdin*8 account, 
the. most complete copy in the world. 

. Colonel Stanley 8 copy, which was sold in 1$13; centred 

onpiicates of parts x. and xi. and a considerable number of du- 

^•featSe plates ', it was bound in 7 vols, folio, blue morocco, and 

sold for 546/., and I believe now is in the Duke of Devon- 

^ha^BfcoHection. ' 

"'Mr. Beckford*8 copy sold at Fonthilli in 1*823, for SOO ^ 

ikii»:' I do not know whether Mr. Dibdin is correct in tajhifi 

it! i^ras M.''Pari8's copy, and supposed to he perfect. • • ^ •• 

•^'fft^c library of the Right Hon. T. Grenville is a cohijiliEite 

htt6t these Voyages, very copiously described in DibdhiV ti- 

lAlliy. Companion, p. 373, &c. containing also thie English part 

^fviq^nia,* dedicated to Sir Walter Raleigh by De Bry j-^ It 

li* jriifwr to the Latin part, of the same date, Plrancof. 1596.— 

1^ edition of this part is unnoticed by M. Camus. The Mr 

IdfFittg^ is its titk : '' 

^ brief e and true report of the neu^ found LandofVirgmia^ 

£icof)eredby Sir Richard Greinvile, Knt^ in 1585, translated 

into English by Thomas Hariot, at the charges of Sir iVdtter 

Haleigh, imd som Pictures of tie IPicteSf which m the olde 

Tyme dyd habite one part of the Great Brettaine, found in a 

^Id English Chronicle, plates by De Bry. Folio. Francof 

1590, 

\ .< . . . J = ' • ■..!■,*-.■ 

■ ' ■ — — '- ■ . '■■ I ■ 

* This copy it said to hare cost Hsrley Earl of Oxford liDO gtdtfeas, 
Who, after many years' search, ohiuBei it lU Frankfort ibr that sum. 



tut sfetoicD VotJRi^EY Roxna> 

The copy of 6. Nassau^ Esq. sold, in 1824, for tOOJL and in 
his Catalogue it is said that not more than four perfect copies 
of this part are known to exist. 



Fraunceg (Abraham) Comtieme of Pembroke's Ivp Church, 
' conieming the affectionate Life and nn/ortunatS Db'aik of 
• Phiiiii and Amyntas, that in a Pastoral, this m a Fiineral, 

4io, London. 1591. 

Dodds^ 41. 7s.', Mason, 3/. I3s. Gdr, Roxburghe, 6/. I6s. 6d. 

Ditto, with Fraunce*s Emanuel,* at SAnnders', 1818, 
13/. 2s. 6d.} Bindley, 25/. 4s,, bought by Perry, at whose sate, 
in 1822, it sold for 21/. lOs: 6d. 

Lord Spencer is said to have ^ven White 21/. for his copy -, 
White asked 25 guineas for it. 

G. Nassau, Esq. 1824, 5/. IBs. 
•^ T^rd Part of Ditto, entitled Ananias 

Dale, being Tales of the Heathen Gods, in English Hexam- 
eters. 4to. 1592. 

A copy of this third part, which is very rare, with the Title 
and two leaves in MS. sold at Saunders*, in 1818, for 15/. ]5«. 
* This Author is classed amongst Dramatic Writers, but his 
production, says Beloe, can hardly be called a Flay; it consists 
of a translation of Tassos Aminta, which is interwoven in the 
body of a Pastoral, entitled Ivy Church. A specimen of this 
whimsical performance is ^ven in Beloe*s Anecdotes. Phillips, 
speaking of Fraunce, characterized him as "^ a versifier in 
Queen Elizabeth's time, who, imitating Latin measure in Eng- 



•i\ ; I. 



.Ju 



* O. NaMan, (th9 ]Smmm4 only), 1834, \l l^ 



A BIBUOMANUC'S LIBRARY. |S3 

lish verse, wrote his Ivie Chnrcli^ and some other things in 

Hexameter; some also in Hexameter and Pentameter; nor 

vras he altogether singular in this way of writing 5 for Sir P. 

Sidney^ in the Pastoral Interludes of his Arcadia^ uses not only 

these but all other sorts of Latin measure^ in which no wonder 

lie is followed by so few^ since they neither become the Eng- 

lidiABor any other modem language." 

^. Hqw true Phillips's opinion on the subject is> has been 

Qppf^ in our day, by the attempt and complete failure, of a 

celebrated Poetical Luminary to tread in the steps of Abra- 

l^lm Fraunce. 

, ,A concise, account of Fraunce, and some of his productions, 
u^y be found in the Theatrum Poetarum, 8vo. p. 108^ 9 ; and 
also some particulars in Warton, vol. iv. 8vo, p. 2^0^' r 



•-. --iV'' 



Hooker s (Richard) Lawes of Ecclesiastical Pofuie, Folio. 

Best Edition. 1723. 
There are various other folio and octavo editions of this 
Work. 

. *' This," according to Neal, in his History of the Puritans, 
" is esteemed the most learned defence of the Church of Eng- 
land, wherein all that would be acquainted with its constitu- 
tion (says a learned Prelate) may see upon what foundation it 
is built. 

. '^ Several chanipions appeared about this time (1594) for the 
cause of Episcopacy, but the most celebrated performance, and 
of the greatest note, was Hooker's Ecclesiastical Polity, in 
eight books 3 the four first of which were published this year. 



r)i)P|B^i in,hi9 Anecdotes of lite^tore!, i»f% 5']^lber.WtkMi 
iji^Ji,|s,)4fo pf Hooker, nor Bisb^ G«odfini eoi^ ^Viany iiili^ 
tluit give an aocQimt; of Hooker aiidvbi9 Wri|iii99«irisiB|ifrf ^. 
mention of the Books or Tracts which gave occaM^vto his 
writing The Ecclesiastical Polity. ^A'liitgift had written an 
Answer to the Admonition to tJte Parliament, and th^by en- 
gi^dln a controversy with Thomas £)arjfcwr|ghi, the suppoMa 
Antli^ of it. Hooker^ in this his exqellent Worl^ ;^ndeit<M!k 
the defenre of our Eqcl^siastic^ Establishment, agj^ni^t ]/m^ 
Ckrtwright appears to have been the most powerful' of aU the 
opportents.*'* 

Hooker was some time Master of the Temple, and afterwards 
ttcctor of Bishwpsboume in Kent, There is a Btirtjniiit' pfhife' 
12ni6. ffoilar ^culp. from Sparrows Ration^ of thte Cdnwiion 
Prayer , and aiiother in fofio^ Ouii* Fakbome scuip, frontispiece 
to his Ecclesiastical Polity, and according to Oranger the b^t 
impressions are to be found in the earliest editions of 'that^Wmc^ 
coiilniidng only the fiV^ books. ^^ . ■ •*> 

Much surprise has been expressed at the ttev. T.F. Dibdiii^' 
cwussion of this work in his '^ Libraiy ,€ompamon :"f i^'rtr' 

* Belqe's Anealotes of Literature, vol L p. 22, 23, (unM^Jies % d^tajled 
list of these controTersial Writings. 

r|: Ihisre is. ah old folio Book, caUed " The Studef^'8.f4Sra^^y,f(!^^^ i 
from the Athenian Oraclesp somejwH^t a|)|^rp:iu]^^ing. .to^ ,||I|^ I)|lf^|^^ 
]ila^ : bi^t.a mere skeleton, both in bulk aii4 matter, in coo^fii^i^.^^. • 
the ficT. Gentlemaifs ^ ff/(0e;le andryghte tuefuU^ Toli^me. 



% . ,. 



d^iK/'idEiA'l d«i)rt>l not that in a fotiire edition tke'lteidam T^l^ 
Mt>i»ABkik, will bring this EccbmtHc^l Cawon'vc^'hiSL pla^) 
4Md^4f '^\&»-gre(iU gun M in silencing snch petty tai^kWl t 
think he will be perfectly justifted.'asr a tme «oii of the €^r^% 
JMMr/ttQ >iil( &ii6ddtig bis opponent down with tbe'^jc^liiio 
«AM4n (aNookirs B^le^astica^ PoKtie ; IVut kt hini-teke^i^tf^ 
a^dnotinjore the Portrait} *^ * v. . iL 

f;»jl o.' ,••■;••.•.■ ■• ■' ' « • •• •• -■■.♦ 'i. !i,\i:. >:. 

\:r i\';],\' ', i.-.\ •::_ .' *■■ "• ' ■\- ' •♦"■■ v^rin'* 

•-«•, ■>c*"-»' .••■:.. •• • ■ ^" ■•-..,, V ■•.'.• /v- n/^ 
Ifairs (Jos J Mundus alter et idem : me Terra /^ustraOa.mia 

./Muf semper inco^wfa, ^c, futhorc M^rci^rlo ^ritatinicpf 

,^0. Pirst edition^ with frontispiece ^ Kip. . r. 

po]d at Brand's sale for \L T%»\ atG. Nassaus^ 1824. XUXis^y 

iprinted, with the Maps, in Pratt s edition oj IJall^s 

fForhs, 10 vols. 8vo. Lopd. 1808. . '' ' 

^a//*« (Jqs,J Discovery of a New, fForid, (fr a.J^es^r^tm i^ 
..JSlotUh Indies^ hitherto unknown, by an English ifertm^g^ 89a* 
,^tfdate. Imprinted for E. Blount, ..V; 

,ljMknown to Annes or Iferbert. ' •» ■ 

Ruanda sale, 1807, 3/. 7s.', G. Nassau's, 1824,2/. 1*. 
The preceding Work by Hall, Bishop o£ Norwich, wa<sf tibe 
p^t{>t^rp^ wlience Dean SwUt Jborrowed the idea of Qullivev^s 
Tr^d«.^ Mr, ([l^ampbell, speaking of this satincal isMmti 



\ • 



**' 'ft is alflo very probable that Sw^deriyed some portion of hisATpjage 

to Lt^fvata from Bishop Godwin's ^ Man in the Moon, or a J)iscour89ofa\ 

V&yagk ihiiher by Vonungo Consoles** Bro. 163& ^ In ihis Philosoplucal 

ll4hiiiii^' wluch was repeatedly printed, Domingo Gonsales, a duinina- 

tiV^ Sp8Uiiard> is supposed to be shipwrecked on an uninhabited Island, 



W SBQOMD JOVRNI^Y EOjUNP. . 

say8> that under the pretence of describing the Tarr^ \4u^r(dji$ 
Incognita, Hall reversed the plan of Sir T. More*8 Utof^a^ 
andcharaderused the vices. of existing nations. . v 

HalVs fj,) f^irgedemutfium, , • J •'? 

The three first Books, called *' Taotkl^^ SatUref^.P^etUtd, 
j4c4demicai, and Moral,*^ were first printed 6jr T* Creed fir 
Ri^ Dewier. \2mo. Land. 1597. 

The three last Books appeared under the Title of f^irgedt' 
n^mimnj The three iast Beohee of By ting Satyree. l2mo. 
Ijfmd. Ptmted by R. Brndockefor R. Dexter, fyc. Id98i It 
tife^hs with Satires of Book 4. 

^ This original edition complete is estimated by Dibdin kit liL 
Longman and Co. in the Bibl. Ang, Poet, mark a copyat-SfilL 

« 

The next edition (of the whole) is entitled /^r^etfimMf^i^, 
the three last (in reality all six) Bookes of the By ting Satyf%i^ 
corrected and amended with some additions by J. H. Itmii 
Lond. for R. Dexter, ^c. 1599.* 

G.Nassau, 1824, Ills. 
Ditto. Svo. 1602. 

Brand, 21. I2s. Gd.-, Stevens, 3/. Ss. 

•• m ■ ■ ■ - ■■■ ■ ■ I ■ ... 

where he taught several Ganzas or Wild Geese to fly with a light iiui^ 
chine, and to fetch and carry things for his GonTeBience. He after some 
time ventured to put himself into the machine, and they carried him witk 
great ease. He happened to he in this JBtidl Chariot when these Ganzas, 
which were birds of passage, took their flight to the Moon, and was di- 
rectly carried to that Planet He gives a very ingenious description of 
what occurred in his Journey, and also of the Wondemi he saWwhen he 
arrived there." 

* See Warton's ObserratioiiB on S^ii8e,;Ml. i, p 187, Sva 



A BfBLrOMANlAC'S LlBRAmr. AT 

M^fii^ed at Oxford. Uma. 1753* 

OV Nassati, 1624, 12*. . ^ 

Gray, the Poet; in a letter to his friend Ihr.Wlutftoti; of 
Xhirham, alluding to this edition,' says, *^ Bishop HalVs Satires, 
ddled VSt^demiarinin, are lately republished. They are fidl of 
spiHi and poetry, as much of the first as Dn Donne, alid te 
inore of the latter r they were n^tten when he WHS about 23 yeati 

^Th^se Satire^, with Ndtes by Singer, m addition to Wartpn's 
observations, have been republished in 8vo* 1824. Tkey^may 
also be found in the 10th volume of Hairs Works, Svo. 1808^ 
with Warton's Notes, as well as Mr. £}]is*s and Mr« Pratt*s 

ISoistrations. ;.t. 

Qf our Satirical Poetry, taking satire in its mora} a^d 4ig- 
nified sense, l^all, according to Campbell, ^Udms and may be 
aDpwed to be the founder : thus in the Prologue to his Satires 
he says — 

I first adTenture with fool hardy might. 

To thread the steps of perilous despight: 

I first adyentnre, follow me who list. 

And be the second ISngfish Satjrist 

Hairs Prologue to Book 3, implies his knowledge of former 
Satirists. 

" Some say my Satyrs oirer-loosely flow. 

Nor hide their gall inongh from open show: 

Not riddle like, obscuring their intent; 

But, packe-stafie plaine, uttering what thing they meant, 

Cokitrairie to the Roman Ancients, 

Whose words were sbort, and darksome waa their sence. 

Who reads one line of their harsh poesies, 

Tlurise must he tak his wind, and breath him thrise. 

Mff muae woM follow them that havefort^gone, 



08 SBcoansi sovmntr '^oimo a 



.> 



For looke howivre tkt Anliieiit Coinidift- . v r, ^ :«HT 
Pact fenner SatjM a 1i«r libertie; ■^*' ■J'-'^ '■!■< >;')Hr 
SofiuTemuimi]idlyMlds«iitetliMiiiffUi(^i rl « ^i ./ 
Tif better be totfbdU ttmn be Uo boM. . : • • ^ .'.' 

PKolognetoBtok^a 

The, first satire of the tbird Book affords A fidr i^jMSchien of 
theAvth<Nr^ and^ in the opiaion.of Mir/ ElUs^stnldngly resem- 
bles the Vlth Satire of Juyenal^ it exhibits a lively cpntras^ 
between the olden time f^kL the elTeynin^ry oC th<^^^tii(ris^ <xwn 
cotemporaries. • .» . ;;..,- .im:>i 

Book UXr-^ATUUB & • .« --i .>- is-,.-. .inH 
Time was, and that waa^^tenu'd the Time of C^d# ,■ ■ , .u'. 
Whose world and time were yong» that bow art 4»ldt '. .,f, 
(When quiet Satiura swaid the mace of Le4d> :f 

And Pride was yet luibonie, ondyetni^red.).! ..(,a 

Time was, tfiat, whSkstbeAntioBne&UdidlasI^ ,-,. m/j 
Onr hungry Sires gap't for the leiUiBg.Maet ! . ' . c . ..i r 

Of the Dodonian okcn . v^'; 

Could no unhnsked akome Uavo the tr^. ; ..< . -7 • < ( 
But there was challenge ,mi4e whose it might bee* o 
And, ifsome nice and likivHTfms.i^petilQ. : . « .. i- '■< 
Desir'd more daintie dish of ra«iB4«Ul^« .. /^ /.• 

They scal'd the stored iTrab.ijridirolaiqpedhBei^ ;.« ...^ 
Till ihey had sated their delicious eie: ■ ■'...• \ 

Or search'd the hop^U thicks of hedgy-rowei^ > >~^ 
For brierie berries, or hawes, or sourer sloes: 
Or, when they meant to £ure fin'st of ally 
They lick't oake-leaves besprint with homy falL ^ '.■'.•• -'- 
As for the thrise three-angled Beechnut shell, ' . . . ? - / . 

Or Chesnnfs armed huske andUidkehielly' ' ' M^.^*^; 
No Squire durst touch, ike Law wtwild adl uSori^' U' ! : 1. U 
Kept for the Courts and &r the Kings owae' beard. < ' < 



A KBLIOHAKkiLCffl UBRAMT. 09 






Their Rtfyall Plate WM-dtf, otymn^L, 

The Vulgar, save hii ha&d» eWhadhe none. ^- ' ^^ 

Their only seller was the neigUKNur htookei ^ . - - . i :^ m 

None did for better care, for better kpke; ' > ^ ' >< 

Was then no paying of the Brewer's- mpe,^ ' >'^ 
Nor grfeedie Yintner mixt the strained grape. 

Under safe shelter of the shadie treen. 
Under each banke men layd tbeir lims along. 
Not wishing any ease, not fearing wronjg^: 
*^ ' ^a^ With their owne, ks &ey were made of oId« 

Not fearing shame, not feeling any cold. * ' j ■ ■ • ■> ^'^ 

Bat when, by Ceree hnswifiry and paine 

Men learn'd to bnry the feTinng gvaine; 

And fa<iier Jann# tanght Ihe new fonad Vitte » ' ^ 

Rise on the £l»e^ with many a FriendSy Twinet/ ' ^ - j 

And base denre bade men to debren liow, - 

For needlesee iiietlials ; ^en ^gan nusckief gP6f«r. •• 

Then farewell, fayrest age, the worlds best da;^; ^ ' 

Tluriving in ill, as it in age decaies. — 

Then crep^in Pride, and Peerfish CdTelisii; •' - : • <^ 

And Men grew gredy, diBcordmis^ and niee. • ' « 

Now Man, that earst haile-felkw was widi Beafity 

Woxe on to weene himselfe a God at lea^t - - 

No aery foole ean take so high » ^ght, 

Tho' she her daring wings in doads have dight ; i 

Nor Fish can di^e so deep in yeelding sea, 

Tho' Thetis' self i^oald swear her iii^ie ; ' 

Nor fearefull Beasli can dig his eave so lowe> < > • - « ' 

As could he fiirther than Earth's centre go; 

As that the ayre, 4he earth, or ocean^ - 

Should shield them from the gorge of greedy J^an.^ 

Hath ntmest Inde ought better, than his owne? 

Then utmost Inde is neare, and ri^B to gone. 

O Nature ! was the World ordain'd for nought 



1 ■■».',. •.it 



08 amcatm jovmmv noma> i^ 

ForlookehowivretlMl^ieiitCainidift.. ' '. ' ^ IT 
Pastfenner SatjEt^alierliliertie; •-» -(^- / <> ^;n>ir 
SofiuTemuiminiyaddsmiilatliMiiiffUii^ V M • oi,./ 

Tlf better be totflMid^ tlMB ke Uo boU. : •; v // 

PKologne iaBtok>a 

The. first satire of the tbird Book affords A fidr i^pechien of 
thj^Avth<»';^ and^ in the opiaion .of Mr/ EUu^s^ldngly resem- 
bles the Vlth Sadre of JuTenal^ it exhibits a lively cpntrast, 
between the olden time fipd the eiernin^cy of th<^^l^ti^riB^ o(wn 
cotempomries. , . .mu^ 

Book nXr^ATUS & .^ « , i...- xi-i 
Time was, and that wM^^tenu'dtke Time of C^d^r ■ ,. /. 
Whose world and time were jotig, that bow are 4»ldt >. ^ 
(When quiet Satiur» swaid the Biace of heidj - :.< 

And Pride was yet imboni^ and yet sirred-).- '-■;./' 
Time was, tfiat, w]ill«stlieAutiame&Udidlaet^< ,. m i 
Onr hungry 8irea'gapMt for .the laUing. Mast i . " . c ...J r 

Of the Dodonian okcn -^si 

Could no unhnsked akome leave the tr^. r. ,.< . t . :^ 

^ . , « , 

But there was challenge made whose it might bfo* ,i 

And, if some nice and likuoxovs.i^petilo. . . « .. i- ■ < 

Desired more daintiedi^' of i^aredelil^* . / /.^ 

They scal'd the stored iTrab .ijrithrclMqped hnei^ • ■ ^ . . < 

Till ihey bad sated their delicious eie: 

Or search'd the hcqpefuU thicks of hedgy-rowei^ 

For brierie berries, or hawes, or sourer sloes: ' 

Or, when they meant to £aure fin'st of all. 

They lick't oake-leaves besprint with bony falL . ■ . . 

As for the thrise three-angled Beechnut shell, t ...? ■ /. 

Or Chesnni's armed huske andlddkehielly' ' ' ^L. >!>. 

No Squire durst touch, the Law wotddncK 9iSor4,U' r-U^^^ 

Kept for the Courts and &r the Kings owae beard. < ' ' < 






A MBLIOHAKVlLO'fi UBBAfi^. 98 

' ■ - ■■ . 

Their Rtfyall Plate wM«l«g^ of woodt « itewj ' ^^ ^ 

The Vulgar, saye liii iumdy elfe^hadlhc Bone^ 

Their only seller was tke neigblKNir hnwket 

None did for htHbtt carer for better kplM; 

Was then no paying of die Bnmn*»^aokf9^ >^ 

Kor gt^edio Yintiiifr mixt the strained grape. 

^^ n^V^^^'^^'Pa^P^'waii^f^jrawygr^ie^ ..r. in.r 

it, ' ^ Under safe shelter of tho shadie treen. 

•,i ^^ ^ Under each banke men layd their lims along. 

t\^3f ^^^ wishing any ease, not fearing wrong: 



' ' • I i ' ,"1 "■ i ' 

'' ■ <^i^ With tiieir owne, iu Aey were made of old, • • • • " ^ > 
Not fearing shame, not feeling any cold. 



Bat when, by Ceres hnswifiry and paine 
Men learii^ to bnryiiie teTiriiig giatne; - 
And f«ArerJaaiig taaghtihe new foaad Vine 
Rise on the Vim^^ urith many a Frieiiffly TtHne j. 
And base denre bade men to delren low. 
For needlesse metfsls ; tiien *gan misckief groir. » 
Then farewell, fayrest age, die worlds be9t dayes^ 
Huriving in iU, as it in 'age deeaies.^ — 
Then creptin Pride, and Pecrrish Govetise; •' 
And Men greir gredy, discordmtty and nieeu • 
Now Man, t)iat earat haBe^lBlkw was %ridi Beapt, 
Woxe on to weene himnelfe a QoA at leatft • 

No aery fooleean take so high a fiight, 
Tho' she her daring wings in doiids have dight ; 
Nor Fish can dive so deep ut yeelding sea, 
Tho'Hietis' self riioald swear ber tffl^ie ; ^ 
: Nor fearefiill BeasH can dig bis eare so lowe, ' 
Asconldhefiirther than: Earih's ventre go; ■ < 
As that the ayre,^ earth, or ocean^ 
Should shield them from die gorge of greedy Jilm. 
Hath utmost Inde ought better, tkan his owne? 
Then utmost .Inde is neare, and rife to gone. 
O Nature ! was the World ordain*d for nought 



'■'i' '■ 



'i 



.1 ; 



iV.; ~ 



; 1.'- 






Up aBooHQ ioimOTY ^QlmTf 

* ■ - * 

Bitt fin BfAn^s maw, and feed Man's idle thonght f 

I9ij Oraadturd's wordt lunroor'd of ftiiftie leiQkev 

Or manly garlick ; Imt thy fornaee reekes 

Hote steams of wine : and can aloofe descrie 

llie dnmken dranglits of Sweete antmmni^ 

They naked went; or clad in itider hide. 

Or home-span' msset, void of fttfroise ^^aAAb". ' 

' Bat thoo canst mtiske in-gariih yaadtrie, - * 
: I Ta smite a fi>ole*8 £u4eidked KTcrie. 

A Frendi head join'd to nedce Italian: 

Thy thighs from Oermanie, and hreast fro* Spain : 

An Englishman is none, a fool in all : 

Many in one, and one in severalL 

Then Men were Men ; hat now the greater part *' 

Beasts are in Ufe, and Women are in heart . 

Good natnre 'adtfe, that homely Bmpenmr, .. r| 

In proadest ponpe wis not so dad of yore. 

As is the under Groome of the Osderie, 

Hoshanding it in work day yeomanrie, 

Lo! the long date of those expired dayefl^ '^ 

Which the inspired Meriin's word fore-says; 

When dongfaill peasants shaUhe dight at Kings ' 

7!l«ft MM con^ii^fbfi anodier brings: 

Then fare well, fairest age, the Woildaheft dayei 

Thriving in all, as it in age decayes. 
Ill Phillips's Theatrum Poetarum^ 8to. Canterbury; I806, 
p. 326, &c. may be found a concise and satis&ctory account of 
Bishop Hall. *' He is universally allowed/ says PhilUps^ " to 
have been a man of great wit and learning,, and of as great 
meekness, modesty, and piety." His works, published at va- 
rious periods in folio, quarto, and octavo, '* are filled/* says 
Bayle, ** with fine thoughts, excellent morality, and a great 
deal of piety." 



Jk ^ABttbMANjtAiC'll filBRASY. 71 

/ . 

••■■'• • ■ ' • • • .• • . . • 1 • ■, . •»■■', 

Xife and Dedth of Edmund Gemng^en, (aHwt Ironmonger,) 
4to, Portrait and Ptates. St. Omen. 1614/ 

GulstoD^ 2/.; Townley, hl.y G. Nassau/ 1^24^ blue morocco, 
12/. 5*. 

''Edmnnd Jennings/* says Granger, ^was admitled into 
the English College, at Rheims, under Dr. afterwards Cardinal 
Allen, and when he was 20 years of age, ordaEned PneM;. He 
was soon afterwards sent into England, where he tras appre- 
hended in the act of celebrating MsUis. He was executed by 
hanging and quartering in Gray's Inn Fields, Dec. 10th, 1591." 

In the above rare book are several Historical Prints, repre- 
senting the principal circumstances of his Life and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expence by the Pa- 
pists, in order to perpetuate the remembrance of tvro • Mira- 
cles,** which are there said to have happened at his death. 
The first is, that, after his heart was taken out, he said, 
" Sancte Gregori, ora pro me, which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, '* God*s wounds ! see his heart is in my hand > yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth." The other is, that an holy Virgin 
being desirous of procuring some relick of him, contrived to 
approach the basket into which his quarters were thrdwn, and 
touched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy from 
its having been employed in acts of consecration and'elevatiDg 
the Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
or ^scovery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
the greatest care. 



•j». 



Tbe copy of G. l^^assani/Esq. 8old> in l8ii4^ ]^or IfOOf'and In 
ills Catalogue it is sdd that not more tlian fooir per£ec£ c^ies 
of this part are known to exist. 



^■1 



FrauMcet (Abraham) Ctnmte^e of Pembroke $ Jvy Church, 
' dntehdng the qffkcHonate Life and unfortunate D^iaih' of 
' PMiils and Amyntas, that m it Pastorul, this m a Fitn^eraif 

4io. London. 1591. 

Dodds^ 41. 7s.i Mason, 3/. I3«. Gd,*, Roxburghe, 6/. V6s. 6d. 

Ditto, with Fraunce'g Emanuel,* at Stonders*, 1818, 
13/. 2i, 6d,', Bindley, 25/. 4»., bought by P^rry, at whose sale, 
in 1822, it sold for 21/. 10«; 6d. 

Lord Spencer is said to have given White 21/. for his copy ; 
White asked 25 guineas for it. 

G. Nassau, Esq. 1824, 5/. IBs. 
— : TKrd Part of Ditto, entitled Amhdu 

Dale, being Tales of the Heathen Gods, in English Hexamr 

eters. 4to. 1592. 

A copy of this third part, which is very rare, with the Title 
and two leaves in MS. sold at Saunders*, in 1818, for 15/. I5«. 
' This Author is classed amongst Dramatic Writers, but his 
production, says Beloe, can hardly be called a Flay) it consists 
of a translation of Tassos Armnta, which is interwoven in the 
body of a Pastoral, entitled Ivy Church. A specimen of this 
whimsical performance is given in Beloe's Anecdotes. Phillips, 
speaking of Fraunce, characterized him as '' a versifier in 
Queen Elizabeth's time, who, imitating Latin measure in En^- 



* O. Nassau, (th$ Bnam4 only), 1834, 1/. IDs. 



A J^IBLIOMANIAC'S LIBEARV. ^ 

lisl^yers^ wrote bis Ivie Chnrch, and some other things in 
Hexameter: some also in Hexameter and Pentaineter ; . nor 
was he altogether singular in this way of writing 5 for Sir 1^. 
Sidney, in the Pastoral Interludes of his Arcadia, uses not only 
these but all other sorts of Latin measure, in which no wonder 
he is followed by so few, since they neither become the Eng- 
l|3hA 9or any other modem language." 

^, Hqiyfr true Phillips's opinion on the subject is> has been 
n;^^nf;^ in our day,^ by the attempt and complete failure;, of a 
celebrated Poetical Luminary to tread in the 9teps of A}>Tar 
llfon Fraunce. 

>. tik concise account of Fraunce, and some of hi& produpiljqns, 
Q^y be found in the Theatrum Poetarum, 8vp. p;. 108» 9 s &p4 
also some particulars in Warton, voL iv. 8vp, p. 2?Q^' r 



..,;-• 



Jiooiers (Richard) Lawes of Ecclesltistical PQUtie, Folio, 

Best Edition. 1723. 
There are various other folio and octavo editions of this 
Work. 

. *' This," according to Neal, in his Histpry of the Puritiins, 
** is esteemed the most learned defence of the Church of JSng- 
l»ad^ wherein all that would be acquainted with its constitu- 
tiqn (says a learned Prelate) may see upon what foundation it 
is-built. 

. '^ Several champions appeared about this time (1594) for the 
cause of Episcopacy, but the most celebrated performance, and 
of tiie greatest note, was Hooker's Ecclesiastical Polity, in 
eight books j the four first of which were published this year. 



9$ fmsm» /o¥j»QE»r(>Rflfivar 

^|iA,l^aftM^ottli«^;Oivil'Warti." . = i «; .-; ' :;.> :u\ slniilj 
^^i)9ie]i9^4 m.ki9 Anecdotes of Iiterati»«(, qitya^ f''Kmtber>WilfiMl 
i^ ji^s.jyfo, pf Hooker, nor Bkibop €a»d0n« «ai\ 4)aiiy /i^tbiM 
thutgivean accpant of Hooker aixlvU^ WrMstng^Ar-^WifciiTti^p^ 
mention of the Books or Tracts which gave occasion, to lus 
writing The Ecclesiastical Polity, Whitgift had written an 
Answer to the Admmution to the Parliament, and th^by en* 
gi^d'lii a cohtroversy with Thomas Car^wrfght, the sa^^potea 
Autli^ of it. Hookerj in this his e^'oellent Worl^ ^derml^ 
the defence of our Eqcli^siastia^ Establishment, agiaan.st yvix^ 
Ckrtwright appears to have been the most i>owerfui of all die 
o|)port6nt8. * 

Hooker was some time Master of the Temple, and afterwaras 
]^fctor <tf 3|slippsboiHTie in Kent, There is aPbrtmtof W8^^ 
12nK6. Hollar ^culp.-ftttm Sparrow's Rationale of the €6iDfttion 
Prayer > and aiiother in foHo, OuiL Faitkome tcfulp, froQtispi^ 
to his Ecclesiastical Polity, and according to Granger the' b«^ 
impressions are to be foiind 14 the earliest editions of that iTtVlky 
coiiliuidng only the five-books. : "i J 

M«eh iBiirprise has been cixpressed at the ReT.T.F.DibdUfti'J 
omission of thisf work in his *' Library ,Compam0n:"f its' tt^ 

* Belqe's Anecdotes of Literature, vol L p. 523, ^, fumislies a dfit^ed 
list of these controversial Writings. ,.,.., . 

f): Tfiere is. an old folio Bopk, called ^ T^eStudetU'a.fi^^rt^^yjf^lt^^^ i 
fiom the Atheman Oracles^ somewhift a|)j^rP3U]a»ating to^ ^B||!^ I]t|l$^^^ 
pla^ : hi^,a. ipere skeleton, both in bulk apd matter, in comp|i,i^i^mt|t . > 
the itey. Gentlemsfd^ ^sioeie andryghte wefull^ volume. 



^ . 



ditot;^ 4hflv| difpHI>t aoeihatin a fntore editioti tk^'iBefd(>iri 1^' 
SomiMMi^/wm bring this EcckHOfHctti Cakon ytofita'^^^^ 
Mi^^'^y^-gr^ae ffnn fail in silencing such peCty tav9(ekW/ 1 
think he will be perfectly justifted,'aar a true son oftheC^r^ 
M9UiMn'i'A^1i!k6tk\itg bis opponent d<rfm with tlhe^fit^stlKio 

^d notinjiire the Portiwtr ' ^^ . j /:n cib 

■'I!-' '/(*-^'.-. • • '• •• . •■ • ■ • ,' ■' \ '■^' ■ -^ '■ '' •' ■''■*'' ti^ 
^o// « /i/M.J Mundus alter et idem : s'ufe Terra t4u9tf[alU,imUL 

'^ y*rst edUUmywUhfrmtispkce^^ . . , ,.^ ^^^^ 

' $ald at i3raud*8 sale for \l 79.-, at G. ]>^assaus, 1824^ 1/. 1^^ 
Reprinted, with the Maps, m Pratt 9 edition ojT ffalf^^^ 
fFork9, 10 vols. 8vo. Lopd. 1808. , ' \ ' 

Hi^V9(J[q9.J DUcovery of a New, fForld^.qr a,J}e8^r^tw» i^ 

. , fSlot^h J(ndie9, hitherta unknown, hy ^» Englkh Uenmf^ %A; > 

.^t^. date. Imprinted for E.Blount. . .. ..vj 

JjMknotim. to u^me9 or Iferberty , .»: . 

J^^^^d & sale, 1 807, 3/. 7*.5 G. Nassau's, 1 824, 21. U. . r . 

The preceding Work by Hall, Bishop o£ Norwicbi wa<si tibi» 

^^^¥F^ w^^ce I>ea^ Swift borrowed liie idea of QnlUv^y^s 

Tr^elft.* Mr, P.^Hipbell, speaking of this satirical 6$tmhi 



I » 



^^'ft Ik also rery prob&ble that Swift derived nomie poiriibn of lus'V'pyage 

%o L^mta firom Bishop Godwin's ^ Man ik the Moon, or a JHacourae of a 

Tajfdjfirkitker hy Domingo Ckmsalea,^ ^o. 1638. ** In ihis Philosoplucia 

^BMU&tfi,^ wmch was repeatefly printed, Domingo Gonsales, a diqunu- 

tiV^ l^ibtiard> U supposed to be shipwrecked on an uninhabited jstaiiiii 



OS SBGOND JOURNRY JUHJ^. . 

says, that iinder the pretence of deacribing the Torra Au9tr<J^v 
IncogwUay Hall reversed the plan of ^ T. More*s Utopia, 
and characteriaed the vices. of existing nations. . , 

Halt's (J,) VtrgedeniMirmm* . .,■■ .v M 
The Uiree first Books, called ** Toatkleu Smihrm^ .F0€ihai, 

J^csdemicai, and Moralf^ were first printed bif T* Creed fif 

R. Dewier, ISnio. Limd, 1597. 
The three last Books appeared under the Tide of F'hrge£r 

miarhnn. The three last Beokes of By^ng Saiffree, \2mo, 

Ltmd. Printed by R. Bradockefbr R. Dexter, fyc. 1598L It 

bC^^ins with Satires of Book 4. 

* This original edition complete is estimated by Dibdbi aft 

Longman and Co. in the Bibl. Ang. Poet, mark a copyat'l 

9 

The next edition (of the whole) is entitled f^rgedhnlarhimy 
the three last (in reality all six) Bookes of the By ting Satyri^,' 
corrected and amended with some additions by J. H, \im6i 
Lend, for R. Dexter, ^c. 1599.* 

G. Nassau, 1824, 1/. 1*. 
Ditto. Svo. 1602. 

Brand, 21. \2s. 6d,', Stevens, 3/. 3s. 



where he taught several Ganzas or Wild Creese to fly with a light 
chine, and to fetch and carry things for his conTenience. He after some 
time rentured to pat himself into the machine, and they carried him with 
great ease. He happened to he in this JEntl Chariot when these Ganzas, 
which were birds of passage, took their flight to the Moon, and was di- 
rectly carried to that Planet He girea a Tery ingenious deacrip^bn o€ 
what occurred in his Journey, and alse of the Wonden he t»W' when he 
arrived there." 

^ See Warton's Observations on S^nfle,;Ml. i. p 1S7, Sva 



A BIBLIOMANIAC'S LlBRAITY. AT 

JR^rkied kt Oxford. l2n«K 1753* 

O:.' Nassati, 1624, 12*. v 

Gray, the Poet; in a letter to liis friend Dr/Wfearton; of 
Durham, alluding to this edition, 8ay8> 'f Bishop HalFs Satires, 
ckUed V^gidemiarium, are lately republished. They are (vdl of 
apiHt and pbeiry, as ntueh of the first as Dn Donne, aiiid ftr 
iaore of the latter -, they were n^ritten when he was about 23 yeati 

V Th^se Satire^, with N6tCQ by Singer, in addition to WartQna 
observations, have been republished in 8vo. 1824. They^xaay 
also be found in the 10th volume of HalVs fVorhs, Svo, 1808^ 
with Warton 1^ Notes, as well as Mr. E)lis*s and Mr^ Pratt's 
lUastrations. ^ ,.t, 

Of our Satirical Poetry, taking satire in its moral a|id 4ig- 
nified sense, l^all, according to CampbeU, cUdms and may be 
allowed to be the founder : thus in the Prologue to his Satires 
he says — 

I first adyentare with fool hardy might. 

To thread the steps of perOous despight: 

I first adyentare, fetlow me who list. 

And be the second JSngKsh Satyrist 

Hall*s Prologue to Book 3, implies his knowledge of former 
^Satirists. 

" Some say my Satyrs over-loosely flow. 

Nor hide their gall inongh from open show : 

Not riddle like, obscuring their intent; 

Btity packe-staffe plaine, uttering what thing they meant, 

€olitrairie to the Roman Ancients, 

Whose words were short, and darksome was their sence. 

Who reads one line of their harsh poesies, 

Hurise must he tak his wind, and breath him thrise. 

Mjf muMC ujoM follow them that have fore-gone, 



9B BEcom^ H)vmntv nowim A 

• .» • ' . 

Bui eaimot m/itk — MmgUakPiman n > * .'^r H ^( J'i 
For looke how han% tk6 Anfcieiit Cflintdie • • r' -i ^ ^ h HT 
Pact fiinner SatjiM m lier libertie; ■ ^ - (..;..(■, f ;<}HT 
So fiore m«Bi min^ y»elds «iiIb thtm of tUU^ i > I =< '>at'» 

Tic better be toofbad^ |)Mn be Mo bold. ; r, ^U 

PiEologue to Btolbft 

The. first satire of the tbird Book affords a feir |$|N(i^iieii 
theAuth<Nr^ and^ in the opiiuon of Mh Ellb^ sl^rikingly rese 
bles the Vlth Sadre of Juvenal 5 it exhibits a lively cpntr 
between the olden time f^id the effeminacy of t^<^ ^^tji^if^ or 
cotemponuies. , . ... ., uM. 

Book HIt^atuis 1 > ( c «... Juit 
Time was, and that wmi- terv'd the Time of GWd# i : .• )/. 
Whose world and time were yong* that now are oUt '. .. /. 
(When quiet Saturn awaid the mace of Leid; - ;) 

And Pride was yet nnbome, ond yet moored.) : ' \.n^ 
Time was, ibat, wMl«s the^ Antmnne &U didiaeV .. ^r/^ 
Our hungry Sires gapt for .tbe laUing.Mast i .... . .«l r 

Of the Dodonian ohefti , vj 4 

Conld no iinhnsked . Apme leave the tr^fu .' « < . t . , ( 
But there was lehalloige made whose it plight bee. ,« 
Andy if some nice and UkuM^OllB.vnpetite -.'..a 

Desir'dmoredaintiedii^of raivd^Uii^t / - h 

They scal'd the stored i?rab .ijrithrclaaped IpieiU ; " • ^"^ 
'Till they had sated their delicious eie: 1 

Or searched the h(^p<|fbU thicks of hedgy-rowes^ ■-,/: 

For brierie berries, or hawes, or sourer 8loe»: 
Or, when they meant to &re fin'st of all, - ■■.:-^. 

They lich't oake^leaTes besprint with bony fall. ... - « 

As for the thrise three-angled Bcechnnt shell, . ■ • /v 

Or Chesnafs armed hoske and hid kferneU,' ' ' ; Mv :!>; 
No Squire durst touch, tiie Iiaw woidd not afford* u' ■■■''. i-M 
Kept for the Court, and &r the Kings owne'bord. < -'2 



./ * 



'I 



'if: 0\ 






A BIBLIOHAKViLCffi UBBAfiir. 99 

■ 

Th^ Royall Plate tln0«l«g^ of woodt « iteae^ ' -.^ ^ 

The Vulgar, save hk hand, elie had he Bone^ 

Their only seller was the neigUxmr hnwket ^ 

None did for iMttef care, for bettor kplu; 

Was then no paying of die BreiMr'S'Soap^ 

Kor gt^edio Ysntaor mixt the strained grape. 

/ :, . 3VJ^ng^Pa¥Uip^wai|t|io«ra»ygw 

„ , . . Under safe shelter of the shadie treen. 

, _ ^ Under each banke men layd their lims along^ 
Kot wishing any ease, not fearing wron^: 
ijiiA With tiieir owne, as tliey were made of old, 
Kot fearing shame, not feeling any cold. - <<.;•' ■> ^o ^ 

Bat when, by Ceres hnswifiry and paine 
Men learnt to boryiiieteTiTiiiggiatne; ^ 
And faArerJaangtaaghtilie new foaad Vine . '7 

Rise on the Vim^p urith many a Frieiiffly TtHne^. "'j 
And base desire bade men to dobren low, -^ - 

For needloMe mettals ; tiien *gan misckief groir. > 
Then farewell, fayreit age, die worlds bett da^; * - 
Tliriying in ill, as it inage deeaies^ — 
Then creptin Pride, and Pecrrish GovetisO; ' ' 
And Men greir gredy, dtBcor^kras, and nieeu - ^ ' '« 

Now Man, that earst haile^lBUow wa0 %ridi Beapl, 
Woxe on to weene himselfe a Ckid at leatft 
No aery foole ean take so high m flight, •• 

Tho' she her daring wings in doiids have dight ; 
Nor Fish can dive so deep in yeelding sea, 
Tho' Hietis' self shoald «wear her (iafetie ; 
Nor fearefiill BeasH ean dig biseaye so lowe, 
As could he fiirther than Eartb's centre go ; ' 

As that the ayre, ^e earth, or ocean^ 
Should shield them from tiie gorge of greedy JUm. 
Hath utmost Inde ought better, than his owne ? 
Then utmost .Inde is neare, and rife to gone. 
O Nature ! was the World ordain*d for nought 



', lll 



up QBOPHQ JMHmNlEY ^9^J^Tf 

* • . • • . • 

Bitt fin BfAn^B maw, and feed Man's idle tHought f 

Hij Onuidturd's wordt wnroor'd of ftriftie leiekea^ 

Or manly garlick ; Imt Ay fimiace reekea 

Hote steams of wine : and can aloofe descrie 

lie dnmken dranghts of sweete anfommi^ ' 

They naked went ; or clad in rader bide. 

Or home-spiin' nisset, void of fbtndne pdAtn ' 
' * ■' Alt tboQ canst moke- i»gariikg«aderie^ - 
li Ttt smite a feole*8 fiEur-fetehed KTCfie. 
. A Frendi bead join'd to nedce Itafian : 

TLy thigbs from Oermanie, and breast fro* Spain : 

An Englishman is none, a fool in all : 

Many in one, and one in severalL ' '' *=--'' 

Then Men were Men ; bat now the gteiiter pflirt '<- ^ m'i i> 

Beasts are in Hfe, and Women are in heart ' * '.^ '^^■.fy:'.l•t. 

Good nature 'selfe, that homely fimpenmr, ' • : ^ • -.. J I 

In prondest ponpe wis not so dad of yore. 

As IS the under Groome of the Osderie, 

Husbanding it in work day yeomanrie, 

Lo ! the long date of those expired dayets^ - . t * ! 

Which the inspired Meriin's wordfore-sajv;^ ' •' 

When dunghill peasants shaU be dight as Kings 

7!l«ft MM oon/kifbfi anodier brings ^ 

Then fere well, fairest age, the Worlds best dayei ' 

Thriving in all, as it in age decayes. 
Ill Phillips's Theatrum Poetarum^ 8to. Canterbury^ I8J)6, 
p. 326, &c. may be found a concise and satisfectory accoiant of 
Bishop Hall. '' He is universally allowed,** says Phillips '^ to 
have been a man of great wit and learning,, and of as 'great 
meekness, modesty, and piety." His works, published at va^ 
rious periods in folio, quarto, and octavo, '♦ are filled,** say& 
Bayle, " with fine thoughts, excellent morality, and a great 
deal of piety." 



Jk ^^ABttb]!tARti4b'iSl J&mKASY. 71 



Xife and Dedth of Edmund Gemnges, (aViM Ironmonger.) 
Ato, Portrait and Ptdtisfs. '' St. Omenr. ' 1614. ' 
GnlstoD, 2/.; Townley, 5/.} G. Nassau/ 1824, blue morocco, 
12/. 5*. 

'' Edmund Jennings/* says Granger, ^wa3 admitted into 
the English College, at Rheims, under Dr. afterwards Cardinal 
Allen, and when he was 20 years of age', ordiEiied PneM;. He 
was soon afterwards sent into England, where he tras appre- 
hended in the act '^of celebrating Mliss. He was^ executed by 
hanging and quartering in Gray's Inn Fields, Dec. 10th, 1591." 
In the above rare book are several Historical Prints, repre- 
senting the principal circumstances of his Life and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expence by the Pa^ 
pists, in order to perpetuate the remembrance of two • Mira- 
cles,** which are there sud to have happened at his death. 
Tke first is, that, after his heart was taken out, he said, 
*' Sancte Gregori, ora pro met** which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, ^* God*s wounds ! see his heart is in my hand > yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth.'* The other is, that an holy Virgin 
being desirous of procuring some relick of him; contrived to 
approach the basket into which his quarters were thrdivn, and 
touched his ris^ht hand, which she esteemed most holy from 
its having been employed in acts of consecration and'elevating 
the Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
or mscovery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
the greatest care. 



•u. 



AnMi$'^8ang9 and Sonnets, Svo. For Mai. Bmler, ld22*» 

fFUh Portrmi of the Author on th^ engraved Thle. 

«* Of this Sonnettoer/ «iys Orkikg«r; ^d. !i. p-'l^'^'t find 
no mentioB made |^ iiii)r of our Blo^pfiidBLT AaQtoKL 

Beloe, in his AnecdoteSji (»U4 the aix^?^ ^^i'^P?^^^ '^ 
means of common occarrc^nce y\ .^d frojm its ,fii|tijiiitfapitjpioag 
GoUeiftois, if we msy judge from the prioeitjhMoblitaBBd in 
three recent sales/ he appears to have been pratty mneelib hik 
iqplNre^ia^oii of its rarity. * • '•'* ^'^^ 

At Mr. Bindley 8 sale it produced 3^14^4'^ fettrfA-ry's, 
1 822^ 38/. 6«. described as containing the Ponws oi^ unnay 
and <tf his I^roness^ Anne of^D^npoark. j|^M^^]g^p|^ 

which had been Mr. Bindley V ^d> iiV l^^J^ ^ Iftr. 6d* 
Tlie following extim^ may be found in BekM JinetdoUs 
of Literature^ vol. vi. and which I hope I shall be excused fo 
abstractisgy considering the value of the Book cited, and th^ 
difficulty of obtaining even a glance at such BibEomnniacal 
Deridarata* ■ ■• ^' ■• - ■ ■^?:' ^V6»^»*^\ 

-'■ JtsptneticeA Nature in fHaa latter age, 

WiUing her master-piece ahodd then be ^mftilSt, ' "* ' ' ' *' 
.Snc^^my fiure Celia set oa Eartk'k laige jtafv* / /jy* v*. ■ _' < 
Aa all the Gods in emulation broaght, \.; 

For they did thinke tf Nature only mil^t 
iBrag of her worA, ahe should insult o*re them.;: 
Wherefore they 'greed to have an eqnal right. 
That they ofher perfection part might daime: ' ^'' ' ^'•**- 
Pallas gave wiadome, Juu> stateKnetK, ••-<.' ft>^ 

And ^milde morning gave her aadcstit; '^.^V-^ 






-;.-■.'? ■A.r'^rit.iQ 



t?m«a4 earth tlieirMwenMeQa^ ^« 

*^*»^M»I ^^■^' •*>T«^?»^.M. ;w. ., ,..c;,i >5o .»(. 
▲ad onIL wiS icanet Itreamefl east Heaveii admne^ , ^ 

<.^ iyjt^y^e^iJa^eii'^w^i:^^ - - '-^'^^^ 

^^^*m«*Mtf*i»45!i», afec^ «rtii1>ii« ofker lui&e, ' "^^" ' " *•*»•'"** 

*<«) ^^IVUklto%W»li'faito^d'cloatli6lMrr««i^^ - ...tr><:>> 

«ii4l dBimimh ntrnhn wain>hit»# kerkaMl4|«rtfiaf«w - v.w^v>.>#f(ij 

81m atvaicflii and tall, ker tresses trailed W-^rf«&4^ . «,, - v : : . j . (#i 

. v'Y*'^'f^. \f^"^ tlmiiiig »jr deere Jiad bce^ 

' ' ^R"^*^ f^^^?*^ every sense to s^bt vfw gone, 
ifik\mkil blaah my blisse fled I once seene, 

^X^A'^'tiM jA^ l^nifon^ed as it were in stone, 

«^ tyttlMi^iirlik'BO ever to bare remained/ 

HH^-^mklii^lMMj^d^ and 1 my sigbt retained. 

Wr SwiJr .'>•«-■. V V-..*' ■- • " " ■ ■ ■ ■' ....•.-• r.. 

Jhni§iom9 (MichaelJ Poly-Olblon, with the aecomd ptitKU fiiitft^ 
. PtmUi$jMece and Portrait of Prmpe Hegiry by J^ok^ tpd iUt 
|A# other Platei, . J613— 1622< 

CoL Stanley's sato^ 18 19> Ul9e.ed.l 6. NadMi/Eflq: 1824, 

'« Ift 1613/* says ^ PhiBips's Th^tram PcKstanim^Svo. 1^/ 
** Draytoa pablisbed the ^st part of his Poly-^bum, by vhidi 
Greek title> BAgayfyiag ,verjf~'h^y, he deDOtee iAf^bwl; as 
the antient name of Albioa is hy sone derived hom GUbiimg 
hj^y. It is a chorographieal dcscriptkm df the rivers^ mouor 



.;j 




^/•. 


*•■' 


"1 




,'•'1 


f.i.\ 


«■, Li* 


-.. •• 


■.^A 


:^*;.*'*^ 


'•■"»♦. 


'f-'. 


Jt 




..^- -.;.i \r 


^ 


: i^ 


jii^J^tj 


1 


'? 





9flm W%i4^4«i 'for which, miffpn neiMitoTO vdipetpM^tt^^nt^ 

l^j^ipol^tod, ^Ikotigh Ah«pil^emd0l(98y;i9A4&Jilii|e,iMMte 

f^\^]f^t iii.hi9 iAaecdotes of lito^tiur^ qtya^ f^l^lbefiWidtoMl 
ij^Ji/s.jyfo pf Hooker, wxr Bmhop GmiAmr^Mt^ Wi^ 0O^m 
thut give an accQunt of Hoqker aiid^.bi^ Wf^g^»^:Vpfi^ll»i ^ 
meation of the Books or Tracts which gave occasion, to his 
writing The Ecclesiastical Polity. Mliitgift had written an 
Answer to the Admonition to the Parliament, and^tli^by en- 
gi^|ed' in a controversy with Thomas Cai:|bwr|ght> the soj^knm^ 
^^Ulii^ 6t it. Hooker^ in this his e^'oellent Woi^ .^ndert^m 
the defence of our Eqcl^siastic^ Establishinent^ <^9^ ^nuph 
Clutwright appears to have been the most powerful of all the 
OJ)port6nt8."* 

Hooker was some time Master of the Temple, and afterwards 
Jftectior' of g}shopsboume in Kent. There is a Portrait* of hHir/ 
12nii6. ffoiiar ^culp. from Sparrow's Ratioh^ale of the Cdndrion 
Pmyer ; and aitother in foliQ, Ouii. Faitkome fcfuip, froiittsj^^ 
to his Ecclesiastical Polity, and according to Oranger ther bcsst 
iu)pressions are to be fbnndi^ the eaiiiest editions of thsAliriuic^ 
co^lpuiring only the five books. « ■.; i) 

Mueh surprise has been expressed at the ttev. T. F. DIl)dUi^'> 
omission of this work in his " Likrartf ,Cofnpam6n:"f its'ttr 

* Belqe's Anecdotes of Literature, vol L p. 22, 23, fiuiushea a, d^^ed 
list of these controTersial Writings. -i • ^ .;■. 

rt: lliere is »n old folio Book, called "" J^ SUudemt'9.f4i^^rmf7^,f^^^ ) 
from the Athenian OrofilesP somevh^ apyypxiyating tQ| Jjfe Hjl)|^]i||!^ 
pla^ : hi^t.a vuere skeleton, both in bulk an^ ?p^tter, ija con^i^^^ wttfi 
the 6eT. GentIemaiS*s ** ff/eeite andryghte usefull^ volame. 



^ . .. 



dtot^ ihflv| d«i)ibt not that in a fbtare edition th^'ltefddii^ 1^' 
fiMMMitti, wiU bring this Ecckrioiticai r^im<?ii'uiWlilill'j^lay^ 
iK^^ i('}a»' great ffun fail in silencing such pe% >til^^kW> t 
think he will be perfectly justifted.'aflr a tme «oh of the C^r^% 
itfttb^/; itt> ldi6ickiiig bis oppoikent do«m with tihe'' first l^io 

^dnotinjurethePortmtJ ' —^ . mv:^ iL 



* * . * 



I 



tt'i ■'/;*■■"■.■ • ■ • ■ ' / ■• «^ .., % , A '■ .' .'• ■ /v- n/> 

fo// « (^/(M J Mundus alter et idem : she Terra ^ustraliB, oAtA 

. Aii;^ semper incogf^a, fyc, .futhorc Mercifrh PrifqimfiPf 

jfiivo, Phrst edition^ with frontispiece hi Kip. , , u 

$oj[d at Brandos sale for \L 7s,', at G. Nassau s^ 1824. 1/. 13«;^ 

Reprinted, with the Maps, in Pratt s edition ojT ffal^j^ 

f^orhs, 10 vols. 8vo. Lopd. 1808. 

''.bur.'- ■;:•• .• . , ■ •' ■ -. ..•...;•. ■ «. '\>-v.ii 

ff(^l's (Jqs,J Discovery of a New, fForld^qr a,J>ea^f^tmi^' 
.,/S!outh Indies i hitherto unknown, by an English ^er(mf$>^ %0» > 
.Jfodate, Imprinted for E> Blount. ..v- 

^UnkfUHonto^mesorlferb^t. '..,:. 

grand's sale, 1807, 3/. Ts.} G. Nassau's, 1824,2/. 1*. 
The preceding Work by Hall, Bishop of Norwich, wjm^ . 
^fOt^jfP^ w^^c^ Dean Swift lM>rrowed the idea of ,Qul|iv0f^s 
Tr^dfr* Mr, P?impbell, speaking of this saturicvl j$^tii»t)M 



•» • 



'^' It lU also very probtible that Swift derived some portion of his 'V'ojs^ 

'to Liqpata from Bishop Godwin's " Man in the Moon, or a J)iwowr89.o/a\ 

Voyagk thither hy Domingo CoMOles,** ^o. 163a «* In this Philosoplucal 

lUmiuAice,' wluch was repeate^y printed, Domingo Oonsales, a dinuna- 

tiv^ Spaniard^ ia supposed to be shipwrecked on an nninhabited Island. 



m SBQOND JOURNRY JUHJI^Q 



i if 



8ay8> that onder the pretence of descrihiiig the. Tinrta AuHrtifii 
Incognita, Hall reversed the plan of ^ T. Mores Utopia, 
and characterised the vices, of existing nations. ..._\ 

Halfs fjj f^ifgedemUtrium. . i '^! 

The three first Books, called *' Twaklea^ Sutirm^.P^etML, 
jiciidemictU, and Morali^ were first printed ^jr T^ Creed fif. 
Ri'Demter, \2mo* Lend, 1597. 

The three last Books appeared nnder the Title of VirgeSr 
miarhnn, TTie three last Beokes of By ting Satyree. \2mo. 
Lend. Printed by R, Bradockefor R. Dexter, fyc. Idda R 
b^j^bs with Satires of Book 4. 

' This original edition complete is estimated by Difadin tit iSiL 
Longman and Co. in the BibL Ang, Poet, mark a copy att2fiL 

The next edition (of the whole) is entitled /^r^^onMiriyr»» 
the three last (in reality all six) Bookee of the By ting Satyi%k^ 
corrected and amended with some additions by J» H, HfMi 
Lend, for R. Dexter, ^c. Ib99.* ^ ^ 

G.Nassau, 1824, 1/. Is. 
Ditto. Svo. 1C02. 

Brand, 21. \2s. 6d.', Stevens, 3/. 3s. 

' ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■■■- . . ■ , - ,^ 

where he tanght seyeral Ganzas or Wild Oeese to fly with a ligkt im^ 
chine, and to fetch and carry things for his oonTenience. He after some 
time yentnred to put himself into the machine, and they carried him with 
great ease. He happened to he in this iGrial Chariot when these Oanzas, 
which were hirds of passage, took their flight to the Moon, and was di- 
rectly carried to that Planet He gives a very ingpenions dfi8Giip66n ot 
what occurred in his Journey, and also of the Wonders he saW when he 
arrived there." 

^ See Warton*s Observations on Speofle,;^!. i p^ 1S7, Svvk 



A BlBIil6MANtAC'S LIBRARY. $t 

It^p'fhiled at Oxford. I2fm. 1753* 
"GVNa8sati/1624, 12*. ..: ^ 

Gray, the Poet; in a 4ettcr to his' friend Dn'WIwftimj of 
Durham, alluding to this edition/ 8ays> '^Bishop HalVs Satires, 
ckiled \%^demiiifium, are lately republished. They are f|dl of 
spiHt and^ poetry, as much of the fitst as Dr; Donne, aftd ftr 
more of the latter ; they were n^tten when he was aboiit 23 ^^eai^ 

^ Th^se Satire^, with Notes by Singer, in addition to Waiton^ 
observations, have been republished in 8vo. 1824. They-mi^ 
also be found in the lOth volume of HalV^ fVorks, 8vo. 1808# 
H^th Warton ^ Notes, as well as Mr. £}]is*s and Mr, I^ratt*8 

Ukistrations. ;m, ;, 

Of our Satirical Poetry, taJdng satire in its moral a^d 4ig- 
nified sense, l^all, according to Campbell, clmms and may be 
aQpwed to be the founder *. thus in the Prologue to his Satires 
he says — 

I first adyentore with fool hardy might, 
To thread the steps of perOous despight: 
I first adventure, follow me who list. 
And he the second iSngfish Satyrist 
Hairs Prologue to Book 3, implies his knowledge of former 
i^tirists. 

** Some say my Satyrs over-loosely flow. 

Nor hide their gall inongh from open show : 

Not riddle Hke, obscoriDg their intent; 

fiat, packe-staffe plaine, uttering what thing they meant, 

Ckmtrairie to the Roman. Ancients, 

Whose words were short, and darksome was their senoe. 

Who reads one line of their harsh poesies, 

llrise must he tak his wind, and breath him thrise. 

Mjf mujte icouid follow them that have fort-gone, 



08 0BCOKB JOVmfKV %omiD 






BuieamiotwiikmM»gimkPimmn K > ' :>>H '?>.!! 
ForlookehowfiurretlMAiiibieiitOaiiMdU.. - <i ' > !T 
Paat £Dnner StApm m hue LAertie; - • . i .. ^ . .(•> ^i-id P 
So fiurremuimiitfyieUfl villa thtaioftUiWv > 1 ''>i«/ 

lis better be to*bid» ^tMUi be Mo bolii . : -Jf 

PiBokgne to BtoktR 

The. first satire of the tbiid Book affords A fidr ^peermen of 
theAuthcn*^ and, in the opiaion .of Mr. Ellis, strikingly resem- 
bles the Vlth Sadre of Juvenal ^ it exhibits a Uvely cpntrast 
between the olden time fvid the efepiin^cy of. thiQ,g^tiyiit8 own 

cotemporaries. i . ;;...; .u*^; 

Book DIw-^rSAZUtd .. .-i ,-. is■,^ j»>.i 
Time was, and that wMhtem'd tke Tiine of CM»ldji r 
Whose world and time were yong* that mow are M,t 

(When quiet Satara twaid the mact of Le4d; :} 

And Pride was yet onbomo, andyetaabred.).! % < i.^/ 
Time was, that, wMks the Aataame &U M-laot^; , ,. m 't 
Our hungry Sires gap't for the lallinip.Mast i . .- . c ...>) y 

Of the Dodonian okea. ^ ^ j'J 

Could no unhoskedakorat leave the tr^. r ,4 . t . . ( 
But there was diallenge made whoso it might b^e* ,1 
And, if some nice and UkaoKoastM^ti^. : . » .-. W t /r 
Desir'dmore daiotiedidiofraivdelM^t r ; ' f: 

They scal'd the stored .Crab .'vrith^laspedkaMU '/•■ * ."' 
Till they had sated their delicious eie: 1 

Or search'd the hop^fnU thicks of hedgy-rowei^ ^ >>*: 

For brierie berries, or hawes, or sourer idoet: ' 
Or, when they meant to &re fin'st of ally 

They lick't cake-leaves besprint with homy fall: !•' > 

As for the thrise three-angled Beechnut shel)^ '..!. • /. 

Or Chesnnf s armed huske and hid kehmUv' ' ' i ^ ^L.'!T<^I 
No Squire durst tondi, the Law woqldnfA afibi^'^i' ^^''i'^< 
Kept for the Court, and fi>r the Kings owacbord.- 



Lr«v' 



ii 



-'; 



A &IBL|bHAKVJL(fa UMAftlr. W 

r . " 

Their Royall Plate wa■«l»]^ of woo^ «r Ateae; ' v^ 
Tke Vulgar, save hk hand, ebehad be wum^ •■ > '^ 

Their only seller was the neighboiir hroelKii '' r..5 u 'i 
None did for belled care, for bettar lopka. < ' > *i ' < 

Was then no paying of die Bremeer's Mf^ ^ > i 

Nor grfeedi^ Yintner mixt the strained grape, 
r • 3V King's PaviHQ^wafltlieigrasBygrqen,. , . ^, )v,^p r.^. i 
Under safe shelter of the shadietreen. .j > 

Under each banke men layd their lims along, 
Not wishing any ease, not feanng wron^: 
■''' tffad with tiieir owne, as Aey were made of old, ' ■ ' " '^^'^ 
Not fearing shame, not feeling any cold. ' -. ■ ;. ;^>Vj h 

But when, by Ceres hnswifry and paine 
Men learn'd to bmry tilie tOTini^ gtatno; - -v i 

And faliier Jaiini tanghtlhe new fooad Vine' 
Rise on the Elm^y n^tk many a Frientfly TtHtte^/ 
And base denre bade men to d^ren low, - - 
For needlesee mettab ; ^n *gan nuscidef gre^. •< 
Then farewell, fayrest age, the worlds bett Avfe^X » ' ' ' 
Tliriying in ill, as it in age deeaies.^ — 
Then crept»in Pride, and Peerish CdTeliMi ; -^ ' v ; < ^ 
And Men grew gredy, diBeord»iui, and niee. - ■''■ -^-^-^ 
Now Man, that earst bafle-liBlWw wa« with Beaft, - ; 
Woxe on to weene himselfe a God at lea^t * ' 
No aery foole «an take so high « ffight, 
Tho' she her daring wings in doads have digbt ; t' 

Nor Fish can dive so deep in yielding sea, ' -^ 

Tho' Thetis' self ^oald swear heriialetie ; ' ' > 

: Nor fearefiill BeasH can <lig bis e4ye M lowe> < < • - ' ■ ^ 
As conld he fiirlber than Eartk's ventre go; - 
As that the ayre, the earth, or oeean^ 
Should shield them from tkeg^rge of greedy Jim. 
Hath utmost Inde ought better, tkan his owne? 
Then utmost Inde is neare, and rife to gone. 
O Nature ! was the World ordain'd for nought 



• ;i; 



'•»>.'. • •»« I 



fp mopNQ wmwx Jft9vwf 



'l.r 



I ■ i s- 



But fill llui^s maw, tad feed Man't idle ihonglit f 

Tkj Oraadiire's words MToVd oCtfnnftie leekei^ 

Or manly garlick; but tiiy fimitce jreekes 

Hote steams of wiae ; and can aloofe descrie 

liie dmnken dranglits of sweete aataminitse. 

They naked went ; or clad in ruder hide. 

Or home-spun' rosset, void df fbtraine ^ride? ' 

' But Umq canst maske- in- garish gandirie^ - - .: :j- 

Tsi smite a feole's far-fetched Kverie. 

A French head join'd to nedte Italian : 

TLy thighs from Oermanie^ and breast fro' S^ain r 

An Englishman is none, a fool in all : 

Many in one, and one in seyeralL ■ - • '.- ii' j «. 

Then Men were Meii ; but now the greater i>fJrt '" • "hi. 

Beasts are in Hfe, and Women are in heart ' : ■ \* -. ti^, >. 

Good nature 'selfe, that homdy E mperonr, ..:| | 

in proudest ponjpe. was not so dad of yore, 

Aa is the under Oroome of the Osilerie, 

Husbanding it in work day yeomanrie. 

Lo ! the long date of those expired dayes^ ' 

Which the inspired Merlin's word fore-says ;^ 

When dunghill peasants shall be dight aa Kiifa- 

Tien oiM Mm^kiwff another brings: 

Then fere weUy fairest age, the Worlds best di^es 

Tbriving in all, as it in age decayes. 
In Phillips's Theatrum Poetariim> 8to. Canterbmy, I8t)^, 
p. 326, &c. may be found a concise and satisfectory account of 
Bishop Hall. " He is universally allowed/ says Phil]ips> " to 
have been a man of great wit and leaniing,. and of as great 
meekness^ modesty, and piety." His works, published at va-^ 
rious periods in folio, quarto, and octavo, '* are filled/' saya 
Bayle, '' with fine thoughts, excellent morality, and a great 
deal of piety." 



WP 



Life and Dedth of Edmund Gtmnges, falkut Irojumnger.J 
4to. Portrait and PT(Ut9. '' St: Omerst. ' 1614. ' 
Gnlston, 2/.; Townley, 51.-, G. Nassau/ 1^24^ blue moroccoy 
12/. 5*. 

" Edmund Jennings/' says Granger. * was admitled into 
the English College^ at Rlieims, under Dr. aiten>nards. Cardinal 
Allen^ and when he was 20 years of age', ordaitted Prietit. He 
was soon afterwards sent into England, where he Iras appre- 
hended in the act of celebrating Mttss. Re was exechted by 
hanging and quartering in Gray^s InnPlelds, Dec. 10th« 1591.*' 
In the above rare book are several Historical Prints> repre- 
senting the principal circumstances of his Life and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expenoe by the Pa- 
pists, in order to perpetuate the remembrance of two ^ Mira- 
cles^** which are there ssdd to have happened at his death! 
The first is, that, after his heart was taken out, he said, 
** Sancte Gregori, ora pro me^ which the Hangman hearing, 
Bwore, ** God*s wounds ! see his heart is in my hand > yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth/* The other is, that an holy Virgin 
l>eing desirous of procuring some relick of him', contrived to 
approach the basket into which his quarters were thtdivn, and 
tx>uched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy from 
Its having been employed in acts of consecraition and elevating 
the Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
oi- <&eovery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
the greatest care. 



flftfr W^i^tbfi 'for .wbi«h« fKmpn 1101MI torn v^ipetplBttib^piilD 

^N#^« 10.^9 Anecdotes of iitofatora, ^ya^ f'K^lber^WillM 
i^Ji/s.jyfo pf Hooker, dot Bishop Gwaid0Ki,^mi^ ms^ 0OM^ 
thutgivean aocQunt of Hoqker aiKi .lu9 WFk«iig«j.-qwllt(<n9^ 
meation of the Books or Tracts which gave occasion, to his 
writing The Ecclesiastical Polity. Whitgift had written an 
Answer to the Adm<mition to tlie Parliatnent, and thti^by en^ 
giii^d'iii a controversy with Thomas Carjtwright, the suj^posea 
^ijitli^ bfit. Hooker^ iu this his exoellent Woijky 3^l^ 




the defence of our Eqcl^siastic^ Establishment, ag^nj»t yni^ 
CluHwright appears to have been the most powerful of all die 
opportents."* . ' %< 

Hooker was some time Master of the Temple, and afterwards 
ftectior' of Sishopsboume in Kent There is a Pbrtrait' of hh^^^ 
12n6. Hollat kculp.-itom Sparrow's Ration^ale of the Cdiftiiion 
Prayer ; and aiLother in foUp^ OulL Faitkome sculp, froiitis]^^ 
to his Ecclesiastical Polity, and according to Oranger the h^ 
iu)pressions are to be fmindi^ the eaiiiest editions of thsAiiwCy 
coillpdiling only the five books. '^ 

Mueh Btirprise has been expressed at the Rev. T. F. Dibffiii'V't 
omission of thisf work in his *' Library fJompamon .-"f its' ife^ 

* Belqe's Anecdotes of Literature, vol i. p. 23, 23, furnishes %,_ d<^^ed 
list of theae controversial Writings. ^ i>:.; 

ft: IVre is.an old folio Book, called "^ Th€ Siudtmt'sjjj^k'i^^.:!^^ i 
fiom ike Athenian Oracles*^ somevh^ ap^xhpating to^ Jdi;^ V^hf^^j^yi 
pla^ : hvt,a ipere skeleton, both in bulk and matter, in con^^^risQ^ wit||, . . 
the &ej. Genilemixfn ^ sieeie andryghte usefull^ Toliune. 



^ 



4Mi,'iihti'1f d«pbt noeibatin a fbtiire edition th^^fletddit^ 1^' 
ISfidMMk^, will bring this EcckHokical (7«^o»'iiiftb<M j^Uy] 
kltSi^hi^!^ great gnn fail in silencing such pe%^^kW;t 
think he will be perfectly justifted,'fts^ a trtie Soil 6f the ^iliif^it 
iiBUdktiiW kk^tckit]^ bis oppoikent down with tb6> first' l^io 
iOSA^ otNooktrs B^ele^asticsft PoHtie / IVut let }uniiriLe'\6a^ 
^ not injure the Portmt J • ^^ •'■''' . « vi^^ >:ib 

ftfff <».• ;•■':•■ •' --^ ?-.i.. ,.:<.-.•■., r -i-vi; ^: "i*- J!{>i1f:ur. 

ffo// s (Jos. J ifundus alter et id^n : skfc Terra i^ustrafia.aMia 
J, Ju^ [semper incognifa, fyd Autharc M^rciffilo p^^jfqnmf^fff^ 
.JQ/vo, Pirst edition^ with frontispiece h/ Kip. .if* 

Sold at Brandos sale for \L 7s.', at G. Nassau's, 1824, 1/, JLSa.^ 

^tU !«-- '■'■ .wi. •■-■ ■ • ■■. ^ .< • •; ■ ■■■■ , • -•■G;< •., • -.Ju'-urn" ' 

Reprinted, with the Maps, m Pratt s editton, o/' ffaiQ ^ 
irorks, 10 vols. 8vo. Lond. 1808. , ' ', , 

HfUlJsfJos.J Discovery of a New, ^orfd, qr .0^J>iM^r^tm i^ 
,,fSlo}Ath inches, hither tik unknown, by ^n English Uerift^^ %«t. > 
,j^qdate. Imprinted for E. Blount, , .,V; 

^IJnkfmDn to Auies or If^b^t* , J '.i; . 

^i!and>8ale, 1807, 3/. 7*.j G. Nassau's, 1824,2/. 1*. , ./ 
The preceding Work by Hall, Qishqp of Norwich, wa«i tibw^. 
p|qtpf^3fP^ W|h^ce Dean Swift l>prrowed the idea of .(^liv^v^s 
l^ejft.* Mr, pftropbell, speaking of this satiricd A^timtn 

'^' It iii also very probable thfeit Sw^ derived i^oine portion of lus'V'pjBge 

^o Lqputa from Bishop Godwin's ^ Man in the Moon, 6r a Discourse, of' a ' 

Toj^ii^i thicker hy Domingo G0tsales**t^o,ltit8. ** In this PhilosopUcal 

^Idmknee,' Which was repeatedly piinted, Domingo Oonsales, a dirninu- 

^v4'Stii^ard^ k supposed to be shipwrecked on an nninhabited Island, 



OS SBQOND JOURNEY HOjUje^B, ,. 

8B,ys, that Hnder the pretence of descrihiiig the Torres Au^rfifyli 
Incognita, Hall reversed the plan of Sir T. Mojce*8 Uto^ya^ 
and characterised the vices, of existing nations. . . ;> 

HalfsfJJ^irg'edemutrmm.^' , . ;lM'(f 
The three first Books, called " Tootkle99Satire9^ P^eHM^ 
j^cademieal, and Moral i^ were first printed ^jr jT* Ctretd^fif. 
Ri^Dester. \2im. Land, 1597. wc r 

The three last Books appeared nnder the Title of F'irgeA* 
mkrhtm,' The three last Boohes of By ting Satyrm. \2ino, 
Londi Printed by R. Bradockefor R. Dexter, fyc. Id9dt ft 
lifej^his with Satires of Book 4. : > ,.^;. 

"- This original edition complete is estimated by Dibdin kit MSL 
Longman and Co. in the Bibl, Ang. Poet, mark a copy att2fil[J 

The next edition (of the whole) is entitled /^r^^'rfrmwmow, 
the three last (in reality all six) Bookes of the By ting Sdtyt^'^ 
corrected and amended with some additions by J. H. Itnlii:' 
Lond.for R. Dexter, Sfc. 1599.* ' "'■ 

G.Nassau, 1824, 1/. is. 
Ditto. Svo. 1602. 

Brand, 21. I2s. Cd.-, Stevens, 3/. 3s, 



-k-r 



where he tanght seyeral Ganzas or Wild Oeese to fly with a light Hn^ 
chine, and to fetch and carry things for his conTenience. He after some 
time yentnred to put himself into the machine, and they carried him with 
great ease. He happened to be in this iGrial Chariot when these Oanzas, 
which were birds of passage, took their flight to the Moon, and was di- 
rectly carried to that Planet He gives a very ingpenions deserip^n of 
what occurred in his Journey, and also of the Wonders he saW when he 
arrived there.'' 

^ See Warton's ObserrationB on Speofle,;ML h ^ 1S7, 8vik 



A BlBIilOMANtAC'S LIBRARY. W 

JR^pfk^^ dt Oaford. l2mK 1753. 

G; Nassati, 1624, 12*. . « 

Gray, the Poet; in a letter to his friend Dr/Wkil^oti; of 
Durham, allnding to this edition, '8ays> '5 Bishop Hairs Satires, 
<:kfied \%^demiftriam, are lately lepublished. They are f|dl of 
spHrit and) poetry, as Hsmch of the fitst as Dn Donne, aftd ftr 
more of the latter ; they were ii^tten when he was laboiit i23 ^^eai^ 

^>Th^ Satirei^, with NotC9 by Singer, in addition to Wait<in'f 
observations, have been republished in 8vo. 1824. They^mi^ 
also be fonud in the lOth volume of Halfs Works , Svo. 1808# 
wkk Warton*!^ Notes, as well as Mr. Ellis's and Mr., I^ratt*8 

Uktstrations. .^r. . 

Of pur Satirical Poetry, taJdng satire in its mora} a^d 4ig- 
nified sense, l^all, according to Campbell, chdms and may be 
allowed to be the founder ! thus in the Prologue to his Satires 
he says — 

I first adyenture with fool hardy mighty 
To thread the steps of perOous despight: 
I first adventiire, fellow me who list. 
And be the second iSngfilh Satyrist 
Hall's Prologue to Book 3, implies his knowledge of former 
Satirists. 

" Some say my Satyn orer-loosely flow. 

Nor hide their g^l inongh from open show : 

Not riddle like, obscoring their intent; 

BtA, paoke-staie plaine, uttering what thing they meant, 

Oobtrairie to the Roman Ancients, 

Whose words were shorty and darksome was their sence. 

Who reads one line of their harsh poesies, 

llrise must he tak his wind, and breath him thrise. 

M]f muMe woM follow them that haoefore-gone, 



08 meom Mmmv^cnoQifD a 



A I 



Bui eamtotwUkm tk§lmkPhmmii=^ -iy^'i :;«v.>H ^hdl 
For looke liow&n^IlM AUbieiitOaliniit/.^ ..n.^iu'^ !iHt 
PMtfiiniierSa^d»ailM9rLAertie$ -^^ ..{'..-. /.loiiirfT 
So 6fre mui min^ yieUfl-wili thtai of tUiw ^ > I * "i-"^ 
Tif better be to* bid» ^tMUi be Mo bolii . . : ^-i: v; // 

PiBologue to BtokiSt 

The, first satire of the tbird Book affords a fidr iptxAmesi of 
th^Avtiuv, and^ in the opifiion. of l^/EIlis>, strikingly resem- 
bles the Vlth Satire of Juvenal 3 it exhibits a lively cpntrast 
between the olden time fvid the effeyninpcy of th<^^l^ti;nt(s o(wn 
cotemponuries. ,. .;..,. mk.^i 

BoOKIU.1 — SaTUHBI- . m .«->i-;,f. JipH 

Time was, and that wMhtem'dtkeTioio of GWd#r : r </. 
Whose world and time were jong, that mow irt M,t '. >\r, 
(When quiet Satora swaid the nace of Le4dj . ■ : < 

And Pride was yetonbome, and yet unbred.). : '•> >.u /^ 
• Time was, that, wMkatberAutamne WdidJaot^' .,. ^'f 
Oar hungry Sires -gapt for the lalling.Mast ; . •' . c ^ .J r 

Of the Dodonian okea . -^'^ 

Could no unhosked akome leave the tr^. r^.t , -t « ; ( 
But there was diallenge made whose it inighi baa* o 
And, if some nice and liknoKOW.tnE^tito. .. < ... |. .../r 
Desir'd more daintie dish of raivdelil^f .. , r. h 

They scal'd the stored .Crab .^rithrelasped kaocu ;.«•<'« 
Till they had sated their delicious eie : • 1. 

Or searched the hop«fu)l thicks of hedgy-rowei^ ;. -: 

For brierie berries, or hawes, or sourer idoes; 
Or, when they meant to &re fin'st of ally 
They lick't oake-leaTes besprint with homy fidL i ■ . . 
As for the thrise three-angled Bcechnat' sheQ^ ., •' ■. •). 

Or Chesnnf s armed huske and hid kehmUy' ' ' . M^.< -iV-: 
No Squire durst touch, ^ Law woqld mA affoi^- ; ^* '- 'i- ^ * 
Kept for the Court, and fi>r the Kings owac'bord. < ' ' < 



•i 
f * 



Their Royall Plate wa■'d»]^ of wood, or Ateae} ' ^ a 
The Vulgar^ save hk kand, ebehadbc none^ 
Their only seller was the neigkboor hroolKic ^ ■■■••: < ' •"■•■'■^ 
None did for iMtter care, for bettor kM^a> < x * < '^ ' < 
Was then no paying of die Bnmmt*^aekf€^ h' -^ /V 
Nor grfcodie Vintner mixt the strained grape. 
A --^ .. , Th^.^ing'M FaviliQ^wafl tlie|;rasfBy grqen, , ^ .^. ,, c., ; 

. ^. Under safe shelter of the shadietre^n. , ,^, . 

^ Under each banke men layd their lims along^ 

Not wishing any ease, not fearing wrong: 
^ ^"' df ad Wrth 4eir owne, ks diey were made of old, ." ^.^ 

Not fearing ^ame, not feeling any cold. < « ^: ;^>io :•> 

But when, by Cereb hnswifiry and pmne 
Men leara'd to bnry tilie roTini^ gffatne; 
And faArerJaiinitaiightIhe new fooad Viae' - "' '^ 

Rise on the ]^e^ with many a Frientfly Twine ^. * ' - '; 
And base denre bade men to delTon low, - ' -^ • 

For needlesw mettials ; ^n *gan fwecidef giww. *• ^ 
Then farewell, fayrett age, tiie worlds bett da^; '■ ' ' " 
Tliriying in iU, as it in age deeaies.^ — 
Then crep^in Pride, and Peofish Cdvetise; ' < ' 

And Men grew gredy, diBCordean, and niee. - < 

Now Man, t)iat earst haHo-ftllow waa with Beapily 
Woxe on to weene himselfe a God at leaat 
No aery foole «an take so high « flight, 
Tho' she her daring wings in clouds have dight ; t 

Nor Fish can dive so deep nt yeelding sea, 
Tho' Thetis' self ^oald swear her daletie; ■' ^ 'r 

Nor fearefbU Beast' can dig his e4ye M'lowe> < ' < • - ' ' 
As could he fiirther than: Earth^s centfo go; 
As that the ayre, the earth, or ooean^ 
Should shield them from the gorge of greedy JUul 
Hath utmost Inde ooght better, tkan his owne? 
Then utmost .Inde is neare, and rife to gone. 
O Nature ! was the World ordain*d for nought 



.1 : 



1 . J 



rp fmdwv lomwi^ mvupc 

But fill BIaii^s maw, and feed Man's idle thonglit ? 

Tkf KinaMn'B words saroVd oCtfnnftie leekes^ 

Or manly garlick; but tiiy finrntce xeekes 

Hote steams of wine : and 6an aloofe deicrie 

liie dmnken dranglits of sweete aatommi^e. ' 

They naked went ; or clad in ruder hide, . > 

Or home-spun' russet, void of fehvine^ridet' ; *• 

' But Umq canst mKske in- garish gavderi^ - ' ui' 

M Til smite a l(M>le's far-fetched Kverie. - >; I A 

. A French head join'd to nedce Italian : 

TLy thighs from Oermanie, and breast fro* Spain: . ^ 

An Englishman is none, a fool in all : 

Many in one, and one in seyeralL .in-unr.!' 

Then Men were Men ; hut now the greater pairt " ' "U -.i 

Beasts are in Hfe, and Women are in heart : :' •(fiTfiOr- 

Good natnre 'selfe, that homdy Brnpeimnv ^ w' ^1)11 

in proadest ponpe was not so dad of yore, ^ 

Am is the under Oroome of the Ostlerie, 

Husbanding it in work day yeomanrie. 

Lo ! the long date of those expired dayes^ ' ^ ''^ ' 

Which the inspired Merlin's word ^9re-sa;ys ; 

When dunghill peasants slkall be dight as Kiiigs 

7%«» oiM cofi/kifMi another brings : 

Then fiure >weU> fairest age, the Woilds best di^ei 

Tbriving in all, as it in age decayes. 
In Phillips's Theatrum Poetarnm, 8vo. Canterbury, 
p. 326, &c. may be found a concise and satis&ctory account of 
Bishop Hall. *' He is universally allowed,*' says Phillips, '* to 
have been a man of great wit and learning,, and of as 'great 
meekness, modesty, and piety." His works, published at v^^^ 
rious periods in folio, quarto, and octavo, '* are filled,*' saya 
Bayle, ** with fine thoughts, excellent morality, and a great 
deal of piety." 



'\fe and Dedth of Edmund Gemng^, faitM Ironmonger. J 
Ato. Portrait and Ptaits. St. Ometi. ' 1614. ' 
Gnlston^ 2/.; Townley, 5/.} G. Nassau/ llS24/bttte morocco, 

''Edmund Jennings/' says Granger, ^was admitted into 
^he English College, at Rlieims, under Dr. afterwards Cardinal 
Allen, and when he was 20 years of age, ordained Prie^. He 
was soon afterwards sent into England, where he Ivas appre- 
bended in the act of celebrating Mliss. He was executed by 
hangibg and quartering in Gray's Inn Fields, Dec. 10th, 1591." 
In the above rare book are several Historical Prints, repre- 
senting the principal circumstances of his Life and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expence by the Pa-^ 
pists, in order to perpetuate the remembrance Of two * Mira- 
cles,** which are there ssud to have happened at his death! 
The first is, that, after his heart was taken out, he said, 
'* Sancte Gregorl, ora pro me^ which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, *' God's wounds I see his heart is in my hand > yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth." The other is, that an holy Virgin 
being desirous of procuring some relick of him, contrived to 
Sipproach the basket into which his quarters were thr6^, and 
jbonched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy from 
^ts liaving been employed in acts of consecration and elevating 
't^he Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
c>r m^overy, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
%&e greatest care. 

^-',;^.- .s- ■ ■ ■ 

^vy\ . i ■ _ ..■ . . . ■ 

■ -a. 



^),}^|e|9#| iQ.M8 Aaecdotesof litecatur^^ ^f% 5' iKisilbert Wiilftft 

tlmt give an accpant of Hoqker aiid..bi9 Wriltng^QiBliQY <i^ 
mention of the Books or Tracts which gave occasionF^.to his 
writing The Ecclesiastical Polity. Whitgift had written an 
Answer to the Admonition to the Parliament, and th^eby en^ ' 
gi^d'iii a controversy with Thomas Carjfcwr|ght> the sii^^KMea 
4^Ut1i<^ oMt. Hooker> in this his e:^*QeUent Woi^ ;^nde^ml!: 
the defence of our Bqcli^siastic^ Establishment^ apin^ ^W^ 
Ckiilwriglit appears to have been the most powerful of au the 
opponents. * 

Hooker was some time Master of the Temple, and aderwards 
ft(frtwr ciif Sjshwpsbourne in Kent, There is aPartrnt'Offiisi^^ 
12n[6. ffoilaf^^eulp.-fyoiti Sparrow's Ration^e of the Cbttiition 
Prayer } and another in foUo^ OuiL Fattkome itmip. froiitis{^^ 
to his Ecclesiastical Polity, and according to ixranger the bfist 
impressions are to be ftmndi^thaeaiiiestedi^onsof'tlfattrmCy 

I -IN 

conlaii^tig only the iiit^'books. ' ' ' 

Mueh^iirprise has been expressed at the Her. T. ^. Dibffii^'i 
omission of tluS work in his *' Library ,Cotnpamon .-"f its* i^ 

* BelQe*8 Anecdotes of Literature, vol L p. 22, 23, {unM9hea .«, df^^ed 
list of dieae controTersial Writings. •■ .- jk.> « 

^ IVre is.fua old folio Book, called ^ TheStutUnt'a.f^^irfi^^^f^^^i^ 
fromtfte Athenian Orofifesf^ some'wh^ a|)j^r(>xi]99ating ,tOj Jl|^ QJI^^^^ ^ 
pla^ : h^,a ipere skeleton, both in bulk and matter, in ,Gomp|^r^i^ wi^,. • 
the 6eT. Gentlemaii^ ** st9eke and ryghte usefull^ volume. 






^^itoCi, 'idiQvf ddiibliioeihatiii a fotnre edition tk^'fleidoiti K^' 

:noi«JMMi/wiU b^g this EeckaioiHcai CamnmWftia'fU^ 

-^lUfi^^'li^-gpeat^n M in silencing such petty t&^^kWi-l 

^hink he will be perfectly justified,' fttf a tfuc «on oftheCfAtf^ 

.MVk'Mi; itii &ii6bkiiig bis opponent dotm with t&e fik^lffiio 

<^ill^ <fi Hooker 9 Btictesiasticsi Politic ; Ihit in him^^li^ 

.^d n<iHnjure the PortreitJ ' ^ ^ ' ■ '-^^ -*^^ 

.^rjf o."? ,:•'■:■.■''• ■•■ "•" ^ ■' « •■ '-•"■ •' - ■•■•■.••". V r^ttf: nr; 

'-n^i •■/(*-'*^j.' ♦ '..,■.••-•• ■■ / ■• - •^- * ■■ '' ■• ■■ • /v-.u^ 
Jialra (Jos J Mundus alter et idem : she Terra t^ustraHs.iuUiiBL 

.fuuf iemper incogmfa, ^c, Authorc Mercjrio ^r^an^jiff^^ 

,.wa. First edition^ with frontiapiece ^ Kip, , < t* 

Sold at Brandos sale for \L 7s.', at G. Nassau s, 1824. lL13s^^ 

'"fitui.i'- .in-. '^ •. ••■.<•,• • ,• ••••;,■.•> ■•f^-uTTnr> 
sprinted, with the Maps, in Pratt s edition o/ fftdfj 

IP^orks, 10 vols. 8vo. Lond. 1808. . ' \ j 

JififlU^fJos.) Discovery of a New. fForld,,qr a,f)e8er\ptmi^ 
../Sie^h MSes, hitkertp^ unknown, by an English Meri^$>, %o. ) 
^^ti^date^f. Imprinted for E.Blount, 
^^JjMhf^oum,0AmesorIferbert^, .;, 

;S?;^4>^ale, 1807, 3/. 7s.', G. Nassau's, 1824, J2/. 1*. 
The preceding Work by Hall, Bishop o£ Norwich, wa^ tibk^ 
P^^ltan^ w^enc^ DeajEL Swift borrowed the idea of (^ulliv^f^s 
'^\^^* Mr,, P.awpbell, speaking of this satirical i^tiis^^ 

'-^'ftli^ also very prob&ble that Swift derired some portion of his iTpYBge 

^o L^Qta from Bishop Godwin's ^ Man in the Moony or a Discourse of ci 

^^^iiS^nitker hy Domingo Gonsales,** Svo. 1638. "* In this Philosoplucsa 

^^^Sidi^i^ici^ wmch was repeatedly printed, Domingo Gonsales, a dinunu- 

^v^'£^4ttiard> ik supposed to be shipwrecked on an uninhabited Island, 



I . O 1 (. 



'( !- 



m SBQOMD lOVBIilHaC Mf^W^, . 

Btiy%, that Hnder the pretence of deacrijUuig |;he^?SvT(| -^ugfrfi^ 
Incogmia, Hall reversed the pkin of Sh Ti iS^K^A V^^^ff^ 
mod iimtBtUTVBed the vices, of existing nations. . ... /hi > 

Hairs (J,) P^lrg^denmrUtm. • . • ' , • u il • ■ • < ! 

The three first Books, called *' TootUeu Suthrm^iF^MM, 
jicmlemicai, ami Morai,** were first printed djf 71 Creed Jmr 
Ri^De^ter. \2mo. Land. 1597. 

The three last Books appeared under the Title of F'hrgeA' 
mkuhnn^ The three last Boohes of By ting Saifres. l2mo. 
Landi Printed by R, Bradockefor R. Dexter, fyc. 15981 It 
fcng^fais with Satires of Book 4. » 

' This original edition complete is estimated by Dibdin Irt; liL 
Longman and Co. in the BidL Ang, Poet, mark a copy at'2&L 

* 

The next edition (of the whole) is entitled Flrgedimuirliim, 
the three last (in reality all six) Boohes of the By ting Satyriss, 
corrected and amended with some additions by •/• If. linw. 
Lend, for R. Dexter, Sfc. 1599.* 

G. Nassau, 1824, 1/. 1*. 
Ditto. Svo. 1602. 

Brand, 21. I2s. Gd.; Stevens, 3/. 3s. 



where he tanght scTeral Ganzaa or Wild Geese to fly with a light 
chine, and to fetch and carry things for his conTenience. He after some 
time yentnred to put himself into the machine, and they carried Imn with 
great ease. He happened to he in this iErial Chariot when Ihese Oanzas, 
which were birds of passage, took their flight to the Moon, and was di- 
rectly carried to that Planet He giTes a Tery ingenious deseriptSbn of 
what occurred in his Journey, and also of the Wonderi he saW when be 
aniTed there." 

^ See Warton's ObserrationB on l^n8e,;pol. i. p^ 1S7, 8va 



A BIBLIOMANIAC'S LlBRAirY. W 

^JtSpfkied at O^tford. l2mo. 1753. 

OV JTassati, 1624, 12«. . ^ 

Gray, the Poet; in a letter to his friend DnWhftitoti; of 

IDiirham, alluding to this edition, 'says, '^Bishop HalFs Satires, 

-<;)ificd Vit^demiitfiam, are lately republished. They are Ml of 

^B^tvamj^ p(^tyi as much of the first as Dn Donne, attd 6r 

inore of the latter ; they were nlritten when he was aboitt 23 yeali 

^>^^8e ^tirei^, with N^tcs by Singer, in addition tO Wartpn'a 
observations, have been republished in 8vo. 1824. Thefma^ 
also be found in the 10th volnme of Half^ fForks, Svo, 1808# 
wkk Warton'd Notes, as well as Mr. EUis 4 and Mr* Pratt's 
Dkutrations. . jr. > 

0£ pur Satirical Poetry> taking satire in its moral a^d 4ig- 
ni^ad s^nse, l^all, according to Campbell, elsdms and may be 
aijpwed to be the founder : thus in the Prologue to his Satires 
fee says — 

I first adyentore with fool hardy mighty 
To thread the steps of perilous despight: 
I first adventure, follow me who list. 
And be the second fingfish Satyrist 
Hall*s Prologue to Book 3, implies his knowledge of former 
&itirist8. 

** Some say my Satyrs over-loosely flow. 

Nor hide their gall inongh from open show : 

Net riddle like, obscuring their intent; 

Btit, packe-stafie plaine, uttering what thing they meant, 

Cotatrairie to the Roman Ancients, 

Whose wordft were ehoirt, and darksome was their senoe. 

Who reads one line of their harsh poesies, 

Thrise must he tak his wind, and breath him thrise. 

JIfy mujie woM follow them that have fort-gone, 



08 0BCOMD MSHNEVdlO^lID 



. » 



But emmot wUk m Mmhtk Pmmmt: -n -»'m Uz-H T^^ii 
FwlookeliowfMrTOtlMAlAieiitOateidM.^V rr^^iiry!«Ht 
Pftft fimner Satjo* im ker Iiberti« ; ^ • ,('--' .'-f *.> ttoHT 
SofttremutniiBiyMUflviitotbiniiiftU^r.) [ •« oa^V^ 
Tit better be to»bid» IImb be tto boU. . ; • • • n ^\U 

Peob^e to Bfokvft 

Tbe. first satire <^ the third Book affords a &ir ^pedmen o 
th£ AntiuM'j and> in the opiaion of Mr. ElUs> strikingly iresem 
bles the Vlth Satire of Juvenal \ it exhibits a lively cpntras 
between the olden time fipd the ejeminpcy of thc; ^^tj^ris^ ofwi 

cotemporaries. .,..1 

Book DliT-^ATUiK JL uP^i 

Time was, and that wM^term'd tbe Time of 6^d«. . / 



Whose world mnd time were yong, that aow are oldt '.-.'. 
(Wben quet Satnni swaid tbe mace of Leikd; -t 

And Pride was yet onbome, and yet nnbred.) ' 
Time was, tiiat, wliHes tbo Antname &11 didiast;' .. •>• 1 
Ovr ban^ry Sires gap't for tbe laUing. Mast : . .. . . .» r 

Of tbe Dodonian oketL . ^.j'; 

Conld no unbosked akome leaYO tbe tr^<u r . • . - :\ 

Bat tbere was cballenge made wbqse it migbt bee. .1 
And, if some nice and liknofoiM.tiH^tite , t .-.a 
Desired more daintie disb of rave delite, / it 

Tbey scal'd tbe stored .Crab iridvclaq^ kne<^ • ■ ^ , .f 
Till tbey bad sated tbeir delicioas eie : . - 1 

Or searcb'd the b(^pefa]l tbieks of bedgy-rowes^ 
For brierie berries, or bawes, or sourer sloes: 
Or, wben tbey meant to &re fin'st of all, . >; 

Tbey lick't oake-leayes besprint with bony falL 
As for the tbrise tbree-ang^ed Beecbnnt sbeU, - /.' 

Or Chesnnfs armed boske and bid kemell, ' . :..■•;-< 
No Squire dnnt touch, tbe Law woiild not afford, ^- ■ '\M 
Kept for the Court, and &r tbe Kings owne bord. - ' * 



' • 

Their Rojrall Plate wM^eli^ or wo€»4 «r ihme) • a 

The Vulgar, save hkKand^ eliehadhf wax^ 
Their only seller was the neigUMmr kiodcer^ • ■ ■ " ' 
None did for beHteiT carer ior betlar lojoka^ i * "^ ' >< 

Was then no paying of the Brewer'gaoape^ • ■ i 

Kor gt^edie Ysnt&er mixt the strained grape. 
, . T^]^ng*fPaviHQ^wai|tJieigrawf gr^i^n^. , ^ j^ ,. ..^. I 
.^^ Under safe shelter of the shadi^treen. ... • 

^ Under each banke men layd their lims along; 

Not Wishing any ease, not fearing wrong: 
""' ■ Cfad with llieir owne, as Aey were made of old, " * ^^' 



>?-■* 



Kot fearing shame, not feeling any cold. 
But when, by Cereto hnswifiy and paine 
Men learnt to bmryiiie feTinng gvatne; ^- 
And follrerJaiini tanghttiie new fovad Vise' 
Rise on the Eliwe^ with many a Friracfly Twine t. 
And base derire bade men to dehen low, - * 
For needleflse mettals ; Ihen *gan wisGldef gro^. •• 
Then farewell, fayrett age, the worlds best day^es; 
Huriving in ill, as it in 'age decaies.^ — 
Then crept^in Pride, and Peerish Covetistt; •= < 
And Men grew gredy, diBcor^tras, and nieeu - 
Now Man, t)iat earst kaile-^folkw was widi Beapt, 
Woxe on to weene himselfe a God at least 
No aery foole ean take so high « ffight, 
Tho' she her daring wings in clouds have dight ; 
Nor Fish can dive so deep in yeelding sea, 
Tko' Thetis' self riiedd swear her liafotie ; 
Nor fetoefuU BeasH ean <Kg his eave so lowe, < > 
As could he fiirtber thas Eartb's centre go; 
As that the ayre, -the earth, or ocean, - > 

Should shield them from tke gorge of greedy JUan. 
Hath utmost Inde ought better, than his owne ? 
Then utmost lade is neare, and rifo to gone. 
O Nature ! was the World ordain'd for nought 



• •«;:.;'.>vj.5 



V 



'i 



..h: / 



^■i 



.1 ; 



- -.•» 



Jl- • ■ » 1/- 



■1 M» 



19 ffoowM wraNsv ^9vwf 

Bttt fill IMUn^e maw, and feed Man's idle thonght 7 

Iliy Oraad«ird*8 wordf sayoor'd of timftie leejkeiV ^ 

Or manly garlick ; Imt tiiy fmrnace reekei 

Hote steams of wine : and can aloofe descrie 

The drunken dranghts of sweete antmnmiBe. 

They naked went; or clad in roder hide. 

Or home-span' msseft, void of Ibihraine pdAtr: ' ' 
'^ ^ 'Bat thoa canst mttikei»gariikg«aderie^ • ' . -^ 
1 i Tm smite a fixile's far-fetehed KTCtie. 
. . A French head join'd to necke Itafian : 

Thy thighs from Oermanie, and breast fino' Span : 

An Englishman is none, a fool in all : 

Many in one, and one in severalL ■ .t 'H i:):j... • 

Then Men were Men; hut now the gtealer jMri "-^ '■■'• •' 

Beasts are in Hfe, and Women are in heart ' • '.'' '-j:f*r:i *' 

Good nature 'selfe, that homely BnqMroar, : v ..' ., j | 

In proodest poB^ was not so dad of yore, 

Aa is the under Gk'oome of the Ostlerie, 

Husbanding it in work day yeomanrie. 

Lo! the long date of thioee expired dayefl^ '^ 

Which the inspired Meriin's wordfore-sa^yi; 

When dunghill peasants i^all be dight as Kk^ps- * 

7!lcn «n< <»n/iii»Dfi another brings: 

Then fare well, fairest age, the Woilds best dayei 

Thriving in all, as it in age decayes. 
In Phillips's Theatrum Poetarom^ 8to. Canterbury; i8i)6r 
p. 326, &c. may be found a concise and satis&ctory account o^ 
Bishop Hall. '' He is universally allowed/ says Phillips, « to 
have been a man of great wit and learnings, and of as great 
meekness, modesty, and piety.** His works> published at ya-^ 
rious periods in folio, quarto, and octavo^ *♦ are filled,** saya- 
Bayle, '' with fine thoughts/ excellent morality, and a great 
deal of piety." 



Ji\tot!bMANjb4b'd I&TMARY. 71 

Life and Dedth of Edmufid Gemn^eg, faliait Ironmonger. J 
Ato. Portrait and Ptates. Stt. Ometi. 1614. ' 
Gulston, 2/.; Townley, 5/.} G. Nassau/ liS24/1)tue morocco, 
12/. 5*. 

'' Edmund Jennings/* says Granger, ^ was admitted into 
the English College, at Rheims, under Dr. afterwards Cardinal 
Allen, and when he was 20 years of age, ordained Prie^. He 
was soon afterwards sent into England, where he Ivas appre- 
hended in the act of celebrating Mllss. He way exfecuted by 
hanging and quartering in Gray*8 Inn fields, Dec. lOth, 1591." 
In the above rare book are several Historical Prints^ repre- 
senting the principal circumstances of his Life and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expence by the Pa^ 
pists, in order to perpetuate the remembrance of two* Mira- 
cles,** which are there said to have happened at his death. 
The first is, that, after his heart was taken out, he said, 
*' Sancte Gregori, ora pro me^ which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, *' God*s wounds ! see his heart is in my hand > yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth." The other is, that an holy Virgin 
being desirous of procuring some relick of him; c6ntr5ved to 
approach the basket into which his quarters were thi-bVn, and 
touched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy from 
its haiang been employed in acts of consecration and'elevatiug 
the Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
or mscovery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
toe greatest care. 



. a. 



f^\i/^lf^t io^Ms AMecdotes of litoratace^ 9i]^a^ 5'.K^Iber>Wittftft 
ij^Ji^s.jyfo pf Hooker, nor Bitb^ X;«idfln« «yoi^ ^naivy Mtem 
tlmt give an accoanjt of Hooker aiHl,.bi9 Wn|iiif«A» swlnTr #»ir 
mention of the Books or Tracts which gave occasiqn.tohis 
writing The Ecclesiastical Polity. Whitgift had written an 
Answer to the Admonition to the Parllmnent, t^Dtdth^by en- 
g^^i^'Iii a controversy with Thomas Cai:^wr|gb^ the sii{^p<Mea 
4^Vtb<^ of it. Hooker, in this his exqellent Woi^ , ipideruiok 
the defence of our Eqcl^iastic^ Establishineut, £My;9iBj»t ^h&fa 
Ckrtwright appears to have been the most powerful* of all the 
oJ)j)brtenti."* , x 

Hooker was some time Master of the Temple, and aftem^aids 
Ikcctor ' ciif JHshopsboume in Kent, There is a Partrait* pfr hhir/ 
12n[0. ffoilar ^cuip. from Sparrow's Ration^ of tbe£ldlfttiion 
Prayer ; and another in foUo, CfuiL FaitkomesMp, froutisi^^ 
to his Ecclesiastical Polity, and according to Orangcr the bcist 
impressions are to be found i4 the earliest editions of thtfllttdrKy 
co^lpuwtig only the iivis books. ; ■'[ • * ^ 

Mueh mirprise has been expressed at the Rev. T,^. DibfiJiM' * 
omission of thist work in his *^ Libraiy ,Cotnpamony*f ita'ttr' 

* Beloe'fl Anecdotes of Literature, voL L p. 22, 23, funii^hea a, d|;t^ed 
list of these controversial Writings. • .^ i • t ,..: 

ft IVre is an old folio Book, called "" The Studknt\pSirmfv.,f^^^^ i 
fiom the Athenian Oracles** someiirh^ apyrpxiyating to^ .fS^ TtSl^^j^ ' '■ 
pla^; hyt,a iiiere skeleton, both in bulk an4 lpi^ter, in pon^i^ii^^ wi^y • 
Ike ftey. Gentlemaifs ^ ff/«ele andryghte tuefull^ ToUme. 






dtot^ xlihQ.f ddiiblr noe that in a fotnre edition tk^'fleido^ 1^' 
Ke^iittak^, will bring this Ecciemkical (7«rM?»'inWftlI play) 
^Huft^tf '^)d^' great gun ful in silencing such p^% ^4iSS^^^ 1 
think he will be perfectly justifted/atf a tra« «on of the G'^fi(^)l 
iMSf^Q itt> &fk6ckiiig bis oppoikent dotm with t^e'£i)*stK%io 
«IMto (A Hooker slS^\&^\ii^cAVoY\%\t ; JyutlM; hini'hile'lbtu^ 
I0d not injure the PortreitI ' '^ r « /:^i :iL 

'■*0'^ U'*" ■' " • '.• . • • ' ,' ■ •• ^- •■^'- -^ '" '' ■■■'" ■ /■^■•?tA 

Hairs (Job,) Mundus alter et idem : she Terra Australia. ontB. 

Jm4 semper incogn^a, fyd Authorc M^rci^rlo Prifmnjiepf 

,JSivo. Pirst edition, with frontUplece hi Kip. , i r* 

Sojd at Brandos sale for \L 7s,', at G. IJfassaus, 1824, lL13s*y 

sprinted, with the Maps, in Pratt s edition oj ffail^'s 

frorks, 10 vols. 8vo. Irond. 1808. 

^/.> (J(is.J Biscovertf of a New, f^orld^qr a,t>esef^tm i^ 
„fSlouth Xn^s, hither tp^ unknown, hy an English JHeri^^ %o* 
.^lidate^ Imprinted for E^ Blount, , .. . ■ .,v 

JLfnknotJDntoAmesorlferbert* -'.*;■ 

J^iiand'asale, 1807, 3/. 7*.} G. Nassau's, 1824, J2/. 1*. 

The preceding Work by Hall, Bishop o£ Norwich, wa^ tibe 

Pm^yp^ w^^c^ Dean Swift l>prrowed the idea of .(^ulUv^f^s 

"iSn^dfr* Mr, Cwpb«ll» speaking of this satirical ApU^Dm 



•I » 



'^''ft ik' also very probable that Swift deriVedsomie portion of his ^Tpjage 

%o Lii^ta from Bishop Oodwin's ^ Man in the Moon, or a Discourse of a 

Toffdi^ Ihilker hy Domingo Omsales,** ^o. 1638. "* In this Philosophacsa 

^^^mHikx,' vluch was repeatedly printed, Domingo Gonsales, a dimlnu- 

^V^'S^tknhird^ k supposed to be shipwrecked on an uninhabited Island, 



m SBQOMD JOUR)SB¥ «0|Di^. . 

8ay8> that Hnder the pretence of deacrijbiiig the. 7Vr^ ^ujiftrfifift 
Incogtuta, Hall reversed the plan of Sir T* Moppets. ^tc^f^ 
9iid dMiBCterized the vices. of existing nation^. . , ■ t 

HalVs (J,J l^lrg^denmrlum, .> , . i " 
"Tlie three first Books, called ** TooihieuSuiirm^.LF^eitM, 
jicidemicai, ami Moral," were first printed ^jf T* Creed far 
Mi^DeMter. \2mo. Ltrnd. 1597. .(- 

The three last Books appeared under the Title of P^irgeiBr 
mkhimn. The three last Bookee of By ting Saifrm. l2mo. 
Lfmdi Printed by R. Bradockefbr R. Dexter, Bfc. 13981 ft 
Wj^toB with Satires of Book 4. 

' This original edition complete is estimated by Dibdin at IkL 
Longman and Co. in the Bibl, Ang, Poet, mark a copy at'26Zr 

The next edition (of the whole) is entitled Flrgedhmarhim, 
the three last (in reality all six) Bookes of the By ting Satytisi; 
corrected and amended with some additions by J. H. 'Itmi 
Lond, for R. Dexter y^c, 1599.* 

G. Nassau, 1824, 1/. 1*. 
Ditto. Svo. 1602. 

Brand, 2/. \2s. Cd,; Stevens, 3/. 3s, 
■ ■ ■ .t ■ . ' II. - ■ , 

where he tanght several Ganzaa or Wild Geese to fly with a light nw^' ' 
chine, and to fetch and carry things for his convenience. He after 8om» 
time ventared to put himself into the machine, and they carried Imn witk 
great ease. He happened to he in this iErial Chariot when these Oanzas, 
which were birds of passage, took their flight to the Moon, and was di- 
rectly carried to that Planet He gives a very ingenious descriptlbn oC 
what occnrred in his Journey, and also of the Wonders he saw when li9 
arriyed there." 

^ See Warton's Obserrations on l^n8e,;pol. i j^ 1S7, 8vik 



A BIBLIOMANIAC'S LiBRABfY. 9t 

M^med at Oxford. 12m. \7bZ. 
• OV Na8sati/1624, 12*. .. - 

Gray, the Poet; in a letter to lris= friend Dn'Wlittftim; of 
Durham, alluding to this edition/ says, *^ Bishop Hall's Satires, 
ckfied Vit^demiitfium, are lately republished. They are f^dl of 
s^i^ and 1:^17, as much of ihe first as Dn Donne, a&d 6r 
more of the latter ; they were n^tCen When he was about 23 yeati 

aik^-''-- ■ 'I 

' >^^s<5 Satire^, with NdtC9 by Singer, in addition to WarUm'a 
observations, have been republished in 8vo* 1824. They may 
also be found in the 10th volume of HalV^ fFork9, Svo. 1808^ 
vi^k Warton'd Notes, as well as Mr. EUis's and Mr^* Pratt's 
Ilkntrations. , ,., , 

Of pur Satirical Po0try> taking satire in its moral a^nd Sig- 
nified sense, l^all, according to CampbeU, clsdms and may be 
ai)^wed to be the founder : thus in the Prologue to his Satires 
he says — 

I first adyentore with fool hardy mighty 

To thread the steps of perOons despight: 

I first adyenture, tbfiow me who list. 

And be the second fingfish Satyrist 

Hall's Prologue to Book 3, implies his knowledge of former 
Satirists. 

'* Some say my Satyrs o?er*looaely flow. 

Nor hide their gall inongh from open show : 

Net riddle like, obscaring their intent; 

fiiit^ packe-stafie plaine, uttering what thing they meant, 

Colitrairie to the Roman Ancients, 

Whose words were abort, and darksome was their senoe. 

Who reads one line of their harsh poesies, 

Thrise must he tak his wind, and breath him thrise* 

JIfy mujfe woM follow them that have fore-gone, 






i 






08 SECOSRD K)lHDaT '3091il> A 



./ 



Bui emmot wUk «■ Bn^fUsh Pmiimi n . . * i '? • H ^oi 1 
For looke how ivre tke Anibienfc €«intdie ■ . - > o « ^^ "^ ? rfl* 
Pait fbnner Satytv im her lifaertio; - • . • -- * r» ^J*>tf P 
So favre mvsi mind y»eids vnto tlitiB of tU^ : > { >* f>au>] 
Tk better be tot(bid» Iban be tto bold. . ; ^i y^U 

Peologne to B«c4&SI 

■ . « 

The first satire <^ the third Book affords a fetr M0l 
th^Avth<Hr^ and> in the opiAion .of Mr/ElUs> strndngly x 
bles the Vlth Satire of Juvenal; it exhibits a Uvel^^ cp 
between the olden f^ime f^id the ejemin^cy of. th<^§fMiKnif$ 
GotempoiBries. .,.,\ uM, 

Book QLt-tSatuik JL . : j iv,^. Jnit 
aimewas, andthat wM^tenn'dthe Timeof G^di>i ' i. j/. 
Whose world and time were yong, that now are 4iUit • .; /. 
(When quiet Satan awaid the mace of Lead; ^^yi 

- And Pride was yet onbome, and yet ni^red) : .' (in/^ 
Time was, tiiat, whSeathfrAntmnne folldidiaat^' . ■,<. ^n^ 
Ovr hvn^rjr Sires gap't for the laUing.Mast ; .- .-z. u^Ji r 

Of the Dodonian oketL 



"U14 



Conld no unhnskedakome kaye the tr^f^. r , < . t .n 
Bat there was challenge made whose it might bee. ,i .• a 
Andy ifsome nice and liknpKpas.tiH^tite . c .<./t 

Desir'd more daintiediah' of rave delM^t / /•. // 

They scal'd the stored .Crab. T^riih^laq^knef^ ; a-jA 
Till they had sated their delidoos eie : ,1 

Or searched the h(^pefa]l thicks of hedgy-rowes^ > > \A 
For brierie berries, or hawes, or sourer sloes: > ... - i 

Or, when they meant to fare finest of all, --."a 

They lick't oake-leayes besprint with hony fall. . ■ > • . «; f 
As for the thrise three-angled Beechnut sheU, -...U -.'K 

Or Chesnoifs armed hoske and Idd kernell,' ' ' . Mu-m«^. 
No Squire durst touch, the Law woiddndl afford,' ^«' o^i')^ . 

Kept for the Courts and &r the Kings owne bofd. < ' -^'-JV 

■■■■•■ .. jf i' 



•1 
f ' 



A IHBLlbHAKkJlLCffl JAMJMt. tff 



f.-. 






■■<■ ; 



Their Royall Plate wm^w^ ounod, «r 
The Vulgar, saye hii Kand^ ebehMlhf none^ 
Their only seller was the neighbonr kroeicet '' 
None did br beHter carer for betttr lopke; - ^ • < * * <* 
Was then no paying of the Bnm&fa^aekjffy V 

Korftteedie YsntiiMr mixt the atrained grape. 
; _ 7i , , ^H^, King^ PaTilip^ ^waii ,t)ie igrawy. gr^On , 
J i * ^ . IJnder safe, shelter ef the shadie treen. 
4^ ,. ^ ^ Under each banke men lajd their lima alone, 
?( /^ • * wiMunp any ease, not fearing wrong: 

' ^ad With liieir owne, as ^ej were made of old^ 
Kot fearing shame, not feeling any cold. 
But when, by Ceres hnswifiry and paine 
Menlearii*dtobnry<iiiereTinnggyatne$ > 
And faCher Jaiini tanght 4he new fowid Vise 

Rise on the JS!bm% with many a Friraifly Twitra^. 

And base denre Vade men to dehen low. 
For needlesse mettals ; then *gan nuscldef gro^. •• 
Then farewell, fayrest age, the worlds best da^$ » 
Tlriying in ill, as it in age decaies. — 
Then crept^in Pride, and Peevish Covetise; •> < 
And Men grew gredy, diicordsvis, and nieeu • 
Now Man, t)iat earst kaile-'felkw was widi Beapt, 
Woxe on to weene himselfe a God at least • • - • 
No aery foole ean take so high a ffight, 
Tho' she her daring wings in clouds hare dight ; 
Nor Fish can dive so deep in yeelding sea, 
Tko' Thetis' self riieald i^ear her riafetie $ ' 
Nor fearefuU Beasli ean dig his cAve so lowe> ' 
As could he finrtber than Earth's centFe go ;■--' ' 
. As that the ayre^^e earth, or ocean^ 
Should shield them from the gorge of greedy Jlian. .' 
Hath utmost Inde ought better, than his owne? 
Then utmost lade is neare, and rife to gone. 
O Nature ! was the World ordain'd for nought 



Ol 



'J 






<'.l J 



'I Ml 



ro a^OQHQ iora^v m^^ 

Bat fill BCah's maw, and feed Bfan's idle thought? 
Hiy Oraadiire'8 words MToWd of dinftie le^keiv* - ^ .■ ■. , 
Or manly garlick ; hut thy fmriiaee jreekei 
Hote steams of wine : and can aloofe descrie 
Hie drunken draaghts of sweete aatmnmiBe. ' 
They naked went ; or clad in imder hide. 
Or home-spfon' rossc^ void of fetrtine ^^Mtt '■ ' * ' 

' ' Bat dioQ canst miake in- garish gandcrie^ - 
1 i Ta smite a dole's far^tehed KTcrie. ,.,!/. 

A French head join'd to necke Itafian : 
Thy thighs from Oermanie, and hreast fro' Spin ; 
An Englishman is none, a fool in all : 

Many in one, and one in seyeralL -.i-'-'J'-'- 

Then Men were Men ; hut now the greater ptti *' • "'• ' ' 
Beasts are in Hfe, and Women are in heart '^ -!' -j.t,;", „ 
Goad nature 'selfe, that homely Bmpcroar> • .^ /> i. :l I 

in proudest ponpe was not so dad of yore, 

Aa is the under Oroome of the Ostlerie, 

■ , -■ J. » 

Hushanding it in work day yeomanrie. 
Lo! the long date of those expired dayes^ ' '^ 

Which the inspired Meriin's word fore-sayt; » v 

When dunghill peasants rilall'bedight as Kings:' - * 
7%<» «n« oo»/ii^»Dfi anoAer brings: 
Then fare well; fairest age, the Wovlds best dajsi 
Thriving in all, as it in age decayes. 
In Phillips's Theatrum Poetaram, 8vo. Canterbury/ ISw^- 
p. 326, &c. may be found a concise and satis^tory account o 
Bishop Hall. " He is universally allowed,** says PhiOips^ '* U^ 
have been a man of great wit and learning,, and of as •great> 
meekness^ modesty, and piety.*' His works, pnbHshed at va^ 
rious periods in folio, quarto, and octavo, '* are fiUed,** saye^ 
Bayle, '* with fine thoughts, excellent morality, and a greats 
deal of piety." 



I, -'-'(' 



A !BiAttt)AANIi4b'lSl filBRAKY. 71 

'{fe and Dedth of Edrnund Gemnf^, (Mas Ironmonger.) 
Ato, Portrait and Ptaties. ' St. Omerar. 1614. ' 
Gulston, 2/.; Townley, 5/.} G. Nassau/ 1^24^ blue morocco, 

'' Edmund Jennings/* says Granger, ^ was admitted into 
the English CoUege, at Rheims, under Dr. alterwwds Cardinal 
Allen, and when he was 20 years of age', ordnEtted PiieM. He 
Was soon afterwards sent into England, where he Was appre- 
hended in the act of celebrating Mliss. He was exechted by 
hanging and quartering in Gray's Inn Fields, Dec. 10th, 1591.** 
In the above rare book are several Historical Prints, repre- 
senting the principal circnmstances of his Life and Death, 
lids work was published at a considerable expence by the Pa* 
pists, in order to perpetuate the remembrance of two • Mira- 
oles>** which are there said to have happened at his death. 
rrhe first is, that, after his heart was taken out, he said, 
** Sancte Gregorl, ora pro me^ which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, ^' God*s wounds ! see his heart is in my hand > yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth.** The other is, that an holy Virgin 
1>eing desirous of procuring some relick of him', contrived to 
approach the basket into which his quarters were thrown, and 
touched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy from 
its having been employed in acts of consecration and elevating 
the Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
or'cnsoovery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 



:i h.- 



t&e greatest care. 



. it 



9$ twmam ^wwaxoKxmtit 

<^;i9)^i iii.U9 Anecdotes of litefatiuo, fltnysp f'l^lber.WdttMl 
ij^Ji^s. J^fo pf Hookey nor Bkh^ <9«sd0p, ^aa ^napy /i4^bm 
thutgivean account of Hooker aiMl,.lii9 Wri|iiif^«iBfo|(#n8r 
mention of the Books or Tracts which gave occasi^, to his 
writing The Ecclesiastical Polity, Whitgift had written an 
Answer to the Admonition to the Parliatnent, and th^by^en- 
g^^^'Iii a controversy with Thomas Car;twrig^> the sa^^HNK^ 
A^^<^ ot it. Hooker> in this his exoeUent VTorl^ ;^ndeIt<{pk 
the defence of our Efscl^iastic^ Establishment, ag^injKt yr\iiiA 
Ckitwright appears to have been the most powerful of ati the 
ofportCntfl. * 

Hooker was some time Master of the Temple^ and afterwards 
ftectpr' Otf Qfslippsboume in Kent. There is a Fbrti^t' pfr hhir/ 
12tt6. Holiat^ulp. from Sparrow's Ration^e of the COittition 
Prayer ', and aiiother in folip^ OuU, Faitkomesduip, frontispiece 
to his Ecclesiastical Polity, and according to Oranger the best 
impressions are to be ftmnd i^ the earliest editions of thafwdilc^ 
conlaimtig only the five books. ; : ) 

Miteh surprise has been expressed at the Rev. T. F. Dib£jiM'^ 
omission of thie( work in his '* Libraiy ,€ompamon /'f its He*' 

* Belqe's Anecdotes of Literature, voL L p. 22, 23, fiuwhes a, df^tajlod 
list of iheae controversial Writings. -■-)•:>; 

f{: l^re IS. an old folio Book, called ** The Student' a, fsiirf^f.f^k^l^ s 
from the. Athenian Oracleep somewhift ap|pr03U]?)ating to. Vl^ I^li»^U|^v ^ 
pla^^: bvt,a niere skeleton, both in bulk and matter, in comp|i,r\SQi)^wit||, , 
the 6eT. Gentlemaufs ** sl^ehe and ryghte usefuW^ Tolume. 



d^'^lihfl') do^ibl not that in a fnture edition tke'lteidaM 1^ 
BoiMMitti, will bring this BccksiiuHcai Canon iiito'ftil iflfffl 
iM^illhki'gf^iU ^n fml in silencing such pet!ty tft^^iW;^ t 
think he will be perfectly justified; asr a tnie'«oto of the C/^r^% 
iMMf/tt/; itt> lHi6ddng bis opponent down with tlhe'fiyst'l^io 
eiM^ t^ Hooker 8 lSx^\e^igii^cAVoYii\ei\njXilt^ 
i^dnotinjure the Portraits ' . j v.\ :iL 

&r|( 4»- ,-.• ■■ ■" • I .• •-.' .' . '.. j_ j,. I (Hi:; i-;. 

Ji;^ !\';\,\' ■■ \.- ■> ■;;.. .' -' • ■ ■■• -\. ' .»'=" yiVM'iti 

Hairs fjosj Mundus alter et idem : ske Terra /iustralis, oAta 
.lui^ \8emper incognifa, Bfd Authorc Mercifrh PrifqnnieOf 
,^0. Pkst edition, wUh frontispiece In/ Kip, . . r. 

Sold at Braud*8 sale for \l, 7s,\ atG. Nassau s^ 1824, 1/, 13#.w 

•Mn tj. i- .•■' • ■ ■ .« ,• ■ ,• •■•:;■•, ..V,-i'fnT f 

Reprinted^ with the Maps^ in Pratt s edition o/ l(all^*s 
f Forks, 10 vols. 8vo. Lond. 1808. . V- ' 

fMl's CJqs,J Discovery of a New. World,^qr a,J}e8^r^t¥mi^' 
, fSiouth Indks, hitherto unknowfh by on English ilenmfi^ %0* 

stfti^date. Imprinted for E* Blount^ , -, 

JJnknowntoAtnesorJferbert. ' -i 

J^Widssale, 1807, 3/. 7*.i G. Nassau's, 1824,2/. 1*. 
The preceding Work by Hall, Bishop of Norwich, wa($ tbe 
pfo^^fp^ wjiencc Dean Swift l>orrowed the idea of Qullivey^s 
iV^fd^^ Mr. P^mpbell, speaking of this satiiical fisti^n^t 

^^' 'R % also very prob&ble that Swift derived some portion of his Voyage 

to Iisipata firom Bishop Godwin's ^ Man in the Moon, or a Discourse of a 

Vi^ajfi thUher hy Domingo GonsaUs,^ Svo. 1638. ** In this Philosophical 

K^niybee,' wluch was repeatedly printed, Domingo Gonsales, a diminii- 

tiv^' Spaniard t^ supposed tq be shipwrecked on an uninhabited Islan^^ 



on SBCK>MD JOVR)4»¥ ]UHJ^]», . 

says> that under the pretence of describing the. Tertq^ Au^fJ^ 
Incognita, Hall reversed the plan of Sir T. More*s Uto^ia^ 
and cbaittcterized the laces . of existing nations. . ^ . ;^ 

HalVs (J,) Vlrgtderm&rium, . .y-. n\A\ 
l%e three first Books, called " TootUen Satires^ ^F^eltMi 
Academicai, and Moral," were first printed dy T* Creeds fafi 
Bi'Desrter, 12«mo. Land, 1597. ( '^ iO.:' 

The three last Books appeared under the Htle of yirgeSr 
miathnn. The three last Bookes of By ting- Satyrs. 12i»o. 
Londi Printed hy R. Bradoche for R, Dexter, fyc, ld9di ft 
b^j^hs with SiEttires of Book 4. ,. ,,^ {; 

"■ This original edition complete is estimated by Dibdin k^, IBL 
Longman and Co. in the Bibl. Ang. Poet, mark a copyattSitJ 

^e next edition (of the whole) is entitled T^r^ecfunlam^, 
the three last (in reality all six) Bookes of the By ting Satyi%^i 
corrected and amended with some additions by J, H, Iflnw:' 
Lond, for R. Dexter, ^c. 1599.* ' '^ 

G.Nassau, 1824, 1/. 1*. 
Ditto. 8vo. 1 602. 

Brand, 21. I2s. 6d.', Stevens, 3/. 3s. 



—^ 



"where he taught several Ganzas or Wild Geese to fly with a light 
chine, and to fetch and carry things for his conyenieiice. He after some 
time Tentored to put himself into the machine, and they carried him with 
great ease. He happened to he in this iErial Chariot when these Ganzas, 
which were hirds of passage, took their flight to the Moon, and was di- 
rectly carried to that Planet He gives a very ingenious descrip^n oC 
what occurred in his Journey, and also of the Wonden he saW when he 
arrived there." 

^ See Warton's Observations on S^nfle,;ml. i p 1S7, 8v«k 



A BlBLlOliIANIAC'8 LIBRAKY. W 

^^'Med htOrford. 12mo. 1753. 

OV Nassati, '1624, 12*. 

Gray, the Poet; in a letter to 1»8 friend Dr. Whaftotii of 
X)urliam, alluding to this edition/ says, ** Bishop Hall's Satires, 
•^^kikd Vik'^demiaiiiim, are lately republished. They are ffd) of 
jBpiHt ttnd^ {^detry, as much of the first as Dr; Dontie, aftd ftr 
Tnore of the latter; they were vHitten when he was about 23 yea^i 

v^^se &itirei^, with Ndtcs by Singer, in addition to Wart(^> 
abserv«itions, have been republished in 8vo. 1824. They- may 
also be found in the 10th volume of HalVs Works, Svo, 1808^ 
with Warton*!^ Notes, as well as Mr. Ellis's and Mr* Pratt's 
Ilkcstrations. 

Q£ pur Satirical Poetry, taking satire in its moral i^d^ig" 
nified sense, l^^all, according to Campbell, claims and may be 
ailiowed to be the founder ! thus in the Prologue to his Satires 
he says — 

I first adventare with fool hardy might. 
To thread the steps of perOous despight : 
I first adyentnre^ fellow me who list. 
And he the second ISngfish Satyrist 
Hall's Prologue to Book 3, implies his knowledge of former 
Satirists. 

** Some say my Satyrs over-loosely flow. 
Nor hide their gall inongh from open show : 
Not riddle Hke, obscuring their intent; 
Bot, paoke-stafie plaine, uttering what thing they meant, 
Ookitrairie to the Roman Ancients, 
- Whose worcU were shorl; and darksome was their sence. 
Who reads one line of their harsh poesies, 
Ihrise must he tak his wind, and breath him thrise. 
Mff tnuge would follow them that have fore-gone, 



69 SECOSRD K)IH»IS17'J|09ia>A 



.* 



Bui cannot with tm MngUsh Pkmim* ■ ^ > • ' i/r - H ^' J'l 
For looke how furre tile Ambient Goiiwdie - . - r <k ' r^ HT 
PastfiDrmer Satjowmlier libertia; -^^ J •- ^.f'^iirfT 
So fiunre mut mindl yMlds vnlii thftm t>f ddi^ i > i • oa««>] 
Tk better be to«;bad, ^|mui be Mo bold. » .<; .- // 

Peologae to Btolb A 

The. first satire of the tbird Book affords & hit ipt^mea 
thi^Auth^^ and^ in the opiiiion .of Mr. Ellis^ stritdnglv rese 
bles the Vlth Satire of Juvenal ^ it exhibits a lively cpntn 
between the olden i^me ft^ t^he efeinin^cy of UiQ;^l^tij;iii^ op 

cotemporaries. . .; ... m«>^. 

Book DXr-^rSATiius 1 < , k,. JnH 
Time was, and that wa«. tenn'd the Time of G^d^ > ,-. i A 
Whose world and time were yon^* that now ire 4iUit ' .; /. 
(When qniet Satnni swaid the mace of LeM; • - rf 

AndPride was yetniibome, and yet aabred.) : ' lu/^ 
Time was, HktA, wh3«s tiifr Atitmnne fiUl didXast^* . .. •m'^ 
Our hungry Sires gapt for , the laUing.Mast ; ... < ..i r 

Of the Dodonian ohen . ^^'x 

Conld no nnhnsked Aqnw leave the tr^. • . « . ^ . ; { 
But there was ehallenge made whose it might bee. , « 
And, if some nice and UkiioK(>wi.4{^tite , . t- -/t 
Desir*dmore dai^ediiriiofinuvdeUtis. / u 

They scal'd the stored iTrab .ifithrclaq^ W^ ; «< • /^ 
Till they had sated their delicious eie: 1 

Or searched the hop^fbll thicks of hedgy-rowei^ . ,/-: 

For brierie berries, or hawes, or sourer sloes: ' . ' » 

Or, when they meant to fiyre fin'st of al^ - : . :^ 

They lick't oake-leaTes besprint with heay fall. ■■■.■>..■. - ^' 
As for the thrise three-angled Beechnut shell, . ' - /v 

Or Chesnnf s armed huske and Md ketneU,' ' ' 'L .v7>. 
No Squire durst touch, tlie Law woiild mUk atfiord^- ^' -'i<H 
Kept for the Court, and &r the Kings owaebord. • ' : ' r 



.Jf ;■. 



A dlBLfOHAlcYjLCfa UKUM. tff 



'■■a 

; ■* 
. '» 



Thdr Royall Plate wai^elajf* orwoo^ «r ttMK> ' 
The Vulgar, save hii lumd^ eliehadhc none^ 
Their only seller was the neigUxmr hgotAoBi ^ 
None did for beHet catre, for bettar lophe; ^ - ' '^ 

Was then no paying of the BreiMr'sseaf^ > ^ 

Kov^edie Ysntner mixt the strained grape. 

., . . ^ Under safe shelter of the shadie treen. 

^ Uliaer each banke men lajd their lims along; 
Not wufun^ any ease, not fieanng wrong: 

''''' ' t^a^ With iketr owne, ia tiey were ittade of old, • '"^^'^ 
Kot fearing shame, not feeling any cold. * ' i - - • -^^'^ ^ 

But when, by Ceres hnswifiry and paioe 
Menlearii'«liDbiiry'die teTinnggfaine; :- « 

And fallrer Jaaoi tanghtlhe new fovad Vine' > "' '^^ 
Rise on the V^^^ with many a Fnenifly THrittet ' '0 
And base desire bade men to deWen low, - •>' • 

For needlesse met^ ; ^b *gan nnsckief groir. • 
Then farewell, fiiyrett age, the worlds best dayes; » ' 
Hiriying in ill, as it in age decales.^ — 
Then crep^in Pride, and Peerish Ci>?etis«; •' 
And Men grew gredy, discorcbos, and nieeu • ' « 

Now Mao, t)iat earst haile-^Blkw was widi Beasty 
Woxe on to weene himselfe a God at leartt - 

No aery foole «an take so high m ffight, 
Tho' she her daring ttfings in clouds have dight ; 
Nor Fish can di^ so deep m yeelding sea, 
Tho'lietis' self riieald SKrear her ridiBtie ; 
Nor felarefull BeasI can 4ig his eave so lowej ' 
As could he forther than Earth's centre go; 
As that the ayre,^ earth, or oceany 
Should shield them from the gorge of gpreedy JIfan. - 
Hath utmost Inde ought better, than his owne? 
Then utmost lade is neare, and rife to gone. 
O Nature ! was the World ordain*d for nought 



».t 



' !y- 



)H 



rO WOQHQ iOra^Y ^OV»T( 

Bat fill BCah^s maw, and feed Bfan's idle thought ? 

I%7 Oraadtirfr's wordf MTtrar'i of dinftie leekeiV* 

Or manly garlick ; hut thy fmriiaee reekei 

Hote steams of wine ; and tan aloofe descrie 

lie drunken draughts of sweete aatmnmi^ie. ' 

They naked went ; or clad in mder hide. 

Or home-span' rossc^ void of fbihraine plAtt ' 

' Bat dioa canst mttkfr in- garish gaoderi^ • • 
M Ta smite a dole's far-fetched KTcrie. 

A French head join'd to necke Itafian: 

TLy thighs from Oermanie, and hreast fro' Spin : 

An JBnglishman is none, a fool in all : 

Many in one, and one in seyeralL '* ^■' -'" " 

Then Men were Men ; hut now the greater ptiri »• - »t' • •. i 

Beasts are in Hfe, and Women are in heart ' : !^ >:t)"i >> 

Goad nature 'selfe, that homely Bmpcroar> . . .r ] 

in proudest ponqpe was not so dad of yore> 

Aa is the under Oroome of the Ostlerie, 

Hushanding it in work day yeomanrie. 

Lo ! the long date of those expired dayes^ ' ' ^ 

Which the inspired Merita's word fore-saytf 

When dunghill peasants rilall he dight as Kings 

T&m «n« eon/iMHMi anoAer brings : 

Then fare well, fairest age, the Worlds best dajsi 

Thriving in all, as it in age decayes. 
In Phillips's Theatrum Poetarom, 8vo, Canterbury^ I8t)6r 
p. 326, &c. may be found a concise and satis&ctory account o^ 
Bishop Hall. " He is universally allowed," says PhiOipi^ *' to 
have been a man of great wit and learning,, and of as 'great 
meekness, modesty, and piety." His works, published at vi»-^ 
rious periods in folio, quarto, and octavo, ** are filled/' says- 
Bayle, *' with fine thonghts, excellent morality, and a greats 
deal of piety." 



A MBtlbAANMb'lSl IlilBRAirr. 71 

\fe and Dedth of Edmund Genhgen, (alkut Irowmnger.J 

4to. Portrait and Ptdtes. ' St. Omer^. 1614. ' 
Gulston^ 2/,; Townley, 5/.; G. Nassau/ ld24> blue moroccoy 

'' Edmund Jennings/* says Granger, " was admitted into 
the English CoUege> at Rheims, under Dr. alterwwds Cardinal 
AUen^ and when he was 20 yeai^ of age!, ordnEtted PHei^. He 
Was soon afterwards sent into England^ where he Was appre- 
hended in the act of celebrating Mliss. He was exechted by 
hai^ng and quartering in Gray*8 Inn fields, Dec. 10th, 1591.** 
In the above nure book are several Historical Prints>^ repre* 
senting the principal circnmstances of his Life and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expence by the Pa- 
pists, in order to perpetuate the remembrance of two • Mira- 
cles/* which are there said to have happened at his death! 
The first is, that, after his heart was taken out, he said, 
** Sancte Gregori, ora pro me^ which the Hangman hearing, 
Bwore, ** God*s wounds ! see his heart is in my hand -, yet Gre- 
^qiy is in his mouth." The other is, that an holy A^rgin 
l^eing desirous of procuripg some relick of him;^ contrived to 
approach the basket into which his quarters were thrdwn, and 
. 't^onched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy from 
:&ts naving been employed in acts of consecration and['elevatin|p 
ikne Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
w^fflSeovery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
ihe greatest care. 



-c>< , 






An»«—Songt anH SoMteta'. 8vo.' For Mat. Bnthr. ISM, 

fFUk Portrait of tkeAitthai-tM tie eiigraved'mie. 

" Of tJufi Sonnettcer," ttyi Gtsilg«t'i -iAi^. pltfi'^'t tvd 
BO mendoa made 1^ &n^ of our BIo^pttcaT Antha^. 

Beloe, ID his Ahecdotei, calli) the '■povf "_ f ww^tn' no 
neuu of common occiirc.ivQe;" wd fi^pU».ei^4J«Ktijpa.jaKMi9 
€«U«)t(»rs, if w« mKy judge from the iHTceit,hii.<ibtilli il in 
three recent ab1«t lie ai^)eare tahftve bean p«ttf«anMlftt hit( 
^ifire«ia^ou of'ks rarity. ' • ■ - ■' i^* 

At Mr. Bindley's sale it prodoced Ztl. ] 4*.; at Mr. Perry's, 
1^22, ZSl, (>«. described as conbdning the Portraits of llajioay 
wd of his EUronegs, Anne of,DeaiiuLrk. Sir M. Sykes'd copy, 
which hkl been Mr. Biodley's, sold, iiv 1824, for 12^: Kh. 6d. 

Tlie following extnct* miy be funnd in Beloe's Anecdotea 
of literature, vol. vi. and which I hope I sball be exciued fo 
■bstncting, considering the value of tlie Book cited, aad tb< 
difficulty fA c^taining even a glance at such BiUimnaniacdl 

' SltimMcedKmtiire iallui latter ag<, '"'' '■T-^*"' 

Waiing her mMtCT-plece riuwia lb«n IxTlrrooglt "* '■^"'^ '*' 

. .^huh.vj&ireCelisicIwi Etrtb*! largo ita|«t,'' •■.■■?iHt-\f: 'j'l 

Xa all die Gtida in unulatioti brcrafht, ■ :- 

For tbej did tliinke if Nature od^mi^ --./y. • ■ 

fireg of her worA, (he (hmiU iumlt D're them; .. j, 
WberefiFre thej 'greed to kave an equal rigkt. 



ntl tbcf nf her perfection pari nngllt clafaat : 



.■A\a id*)*-! 



Pallai jare wiadoQie, Jnao itateKneMo, - o - *' -?%* v^ 

And the miUe moraine ganlm Badratiti ^' '' '' '.,'<V'-'^ 



Aai oli wiS Ktriet itrvtmea east Heaveii wiome, , .. 

V tomj now Cnha's chamber sped : 

>'**^'m«g*Mi*Wife,«ftkia (String ^^^ "'"• '^ '^***''*'^ 

81m itmiglii and tall, ker treaeea trailed* to:^rf«&4^ .L.i./'v:s!.;#. 

Win mmUiilu Diuah my blisse fled I once aeene^ 
^W*t^*4a;iifomeda»ltwerein»t6ne, " '' ^'" ' ' ' "^ 

•W* tWlJ^ii^fckWeTertoliaTcretaaiiied, ' > ^-.^^^ rl k.- *r 

K^it^«kiilii»'lMl«it^'d»aMlIm7 0iglitreiaiaB4. '^ >'*^ 

• • I • i '*' 

C?4 i-'^SJUo; "» i • . K • . . >.- . . .^— »; ..» 5;> 

i*.*c-tJi#^''V-.-^ ■'•: :■.'■'. .V •■.■ » /:•■ j.-i^T;;' 

i)rif lwi*# (Mkht^lJ Poly-Olblon, with the Beamdpml^^dii^^^ 
fVmHs]^ece and Porirtui of Frmpe H^jf by ffok^tmd aU 
ike otker Piaffit, , J613— 162?- 

€oL Staaley*8 8ato^ I81d> 9h I99.6d.i O. NidM»^l!mr'i^4» 

w. ■■ '-' " ; ;• 

*' Ib 1613," says '■ Phillips's TTiefttrum Poetaram^Svo. IgOO/ 
'* DraytoB publislied the ^rst part ol his Pofy-^Ibhm, hf^whidsi 
Qro^ tkk, 9Agnyfyiag ,tW'Jif'ky^y, he denotes £a|^biid; a» 
the antient name of Albion is by soene 4erived hom Oibioiv 
happy. It is a chorogn^ieal description of the rivers, ntoaa- 



tains, forests, cutles, te.- is dto-Iiluiifc fa H Jii iteJ wfth it's 
n^lff^kakle Mtiqpitiea. raritiw, ai|< dflii^oiijlifiB., ^ ^?PHPR 
^:^j^cx,-!l9 ▼•»» »W" ^t pBrt>.4ed;pU^ ,!W#.!^ ,#Wftv •* 
«^^t^,^ Erijit, in* military pae^re, c x cKJai n g <t.t^)l^,liad 
|(l(((q|.|JiC^p9et BOiuB sipgidw tOMrkg of lua.fi(T()r : )(ii^ iflffla- 
J^^^iMjJ),,tl»erefQre. olttoy«w«gK%nw»it5r(p?»^^owt« 
(^ .,, JbcTB^ dgtitwD wngs imttMiott^ti^i^^^^^ 
the learned notes of Selden ; and t^re are maps before erery 
song, wherein the cities, mountains, forests, rivers, &e. are re- 
presented by the figures of mea and women. His ipetre tif 
twelve syllables being «ow antiqaated, it ]& quoted moce for 
tt^, Hiatury than ths Pbetry !d it ; and in t^at respect is so 
very exact, that, as Bishop Nicholson observes, it atTords a 
miicli truer acconnt of this kingdom and'the dominion of ft'ales, 
than conld well be esjiected from the pen of a Poet, ft is jn- 
ferwoTen with many fine Episodes ; of the conquest of this 
Island by the RomanB i of the coming of the Saxona, Ih^ 
Danes, and the Normans, with an account of their Kings ; of 
Eiiglish Warriors, Navigators-, Stunts, and of the Civil Wars of 
England, &c. This volume was reprinted in 1622, with the 
S«saad^ii1„ or continuation of twelve Songs Diore, mnkinff 
thivtyia tlie whole^ uid dedicated to Prince Charles-, to whom 
he gives hopes of bestowing the like pains upon Seotlsnd." 

Winstanley, ia his Lives of the EnglisH Poets, sayftof Qray- 
tflp thjit "he tn^ »Po^ of a pioaB tender, bJjB,.cf«^ncs: 
hamigajHny^tiw wmmimi^tim 4uvt; wm^imtmi^im 
kJK Ufo, alwr «£ v«^ wA ifiefindMB^ in ■-•migkmfi <-B» 



'^'m>'HU'»a^ikifmk. Piifo. is^i. rha Frbiiaptti^, 

"V itmiitAd ■ M SratadH)* Ike P»tf^ 8/ ffapis. AhUM 
'^^mM'^if}Ve»MgiitJ, Md tmi-dt^i^jtapi^ 

^';ft4ia;''1ft*.- Ifi2*.t ■■■ .-.■.Mil 

.. A &ie cony of tliu book, huidsomely bosad, wa^ in CtSffins 
ue bookieper's catidogiie, a few yeara bae^ marl^, S/. 6«.-^^ 
nyne and Fosa mart a copy at Si. G». — At Dr. F. B^nurdV 
■ue, in iS^U, a copy sold for Ibnr shillings and twb pence ft 
A.uicge paper copy at flmtter's aele. In l&)^, ^roamxa 

^re*,^, "\_' ;,'■ " ' ''"''"^ 

'.'it^u rem^ked b^ iJr. tirenyiUe (says t>iiMiiB), t^'stteA' 
O^m ttiia wi)rk is suppressed, and that tbe defective RMD^S 
from 96 to lOo is not supplied in all the copies of tlus booli., 
Ca^aio iohn Sibith, Admlrul of New ]&ng]aiid, (says Gyan- 
jjM.) deseires to be ranked witt the greatest travellers and 
MFentnret^ of his age. He was sometLme in the service of the 
Emperorj and tie if'rince ot I'ransylranta, Jtgainst the Grand 
euigliuor, iraeie lie dietingoishect himself' by clialleiiging three 
IWuofnnalitylio single combat, and cntung off their Ireads, 

M«««S:«t, SMlh'tWMirWUiililfPMMvtfiiitfM'MMttt'UM^ 

tiPMf MKDatkarMajpbelongdf telba MUBHiAprf. artOhmtmyWik, 
i-P-3^- .,.,--.. ,,-„■ 

i An Edition, folio, dated 1633, willi Pmlrub ud pfatM, soU in tW 
iiSe of d NaHiQ'a idWrj, tSM, Hail 



76 ^SECOND JOU^]S£y.|tp]q)rD, 

for which achievement he bore on his coat of anus ^br^,Tiif^ 
H^^s. He afterwards went to America whe^ .he,wiU9..J(a]q^ 
prisoner foy the savage Indians, from whom he found jDi;|ifi^.^ 
escape. He often hazarded his life in luival engageqients wit^ 
TOatcs, Spanish Men of War, and in other adventures v and 
had, a considerable hand in reducing New England to the.pbe- 
dience of Great Britain, and in reclaiming the. inhabitants ^om 
barbaiism." All which exploits are detailed in the History of 
Viiginia by himself. . 

Matoako, alias Rebecca, daughter to Pouhatan, Sovereign 
of Virginia, and who is called Pocahontas by Gapt. Smith in 
his History, may be considered as a national beuefa^ress, Jts 
tb her (says Granger, vol. ii. p. 58) we are indebted for the 
preservation of Virginia, when in the state of an infant colony. 
In 1607, when she was about 12 or 13 years of age, she not 
only procured the liberty, but saved the life of Capt. Smith, 
whom, together with his men, her father intended to mumsr 
py surprize. In 1612, she was herself a prisoner > o^d spon 
after married Mr. Rolfe, whom Smith calls a gentleman. In 
1616, after she had been instructed in our language smd the 
Chnstian religion, she was brought to England, andintroduc^ 
and graciously received at Gourt. The next yiear, upc|fi her re- 
turn home, she died on ship board at Gravesend^ stjQnglv im- 
pressed with religious sentiments. The good sense, humanity, 
and generosity of this woman, do her honour, as they carried 
her fsur above the prejudices of her education, and the barbaji^cHis 
customs of her country. She was the first Virginian who^|7a8 
converted to Ghristianity, that could speak our language^ or 
had a child by an Englishman." 
' The Library at Eton contains King James Ist's copy, apdjju 



A^' BltiiioMA^iAC'S ilBRARY. 77 

TO^'FoMtitll Library was a presentation copy j otl^r large ppr 
^|iw ic^es.are in.tbe Libraries of some of our principal Bibli^ 

oimtis Traoeb and Adventures in Europe, Asia^ Aifrica^ qn^ 
' America^ Small foVtp. Sixty pages only. fFkh Phtes,. 



'U.»4l_,M. 



[' Mr. Q^enyille*8 copy> according to Dibdins Library ^<^|I|l- 
pamon, p. i2S4, cost bim 5/ 5*. . . ...:., 

It was reprinted in vol. ii. of Cburcbill's Collection of VQyfiges. 






B^dcceltx CGiov. Bat.) Bizarie di f^arie Figure. 8f;a. ohl^ng^ 

1624. .,. ^^..,, 

* Seis 7% jRepertorium Bibliographicumy where it is dej^cpbe^ 

u/' AVost rare and singular Book, containing IMnts.pfbmnan 

"^rigares to|rmed by tbe strangest materials^ as diamonds^ l^o^P^^ 

maaders^ pieces of carpentery> battledores, chains, culinary 

'uiensils, &c. When the correctness of the delineations, andi 

ine b<>i^ess of the attitudes, are considered — we see the n^nd 

Hf a great ISIaster through the laughable whimsicality of his 

'^^A^iiopy IS in the Strawberry Hill Collection, and one was i^ 
l!flt liibrary at Ponthill. 



l)'MT\ti 



^tyiircw (AbrahamJ Annates of the famous Empresse Elizabeth^ 
'"''Qiieene of England, 8fc. translated out of French. Large 
'^~* pigieK 2 vols. Ato. Benj, Fisher. (No date.) 

Large paper copies differ from the small in the following 
jforiknlaf^; viz. that the date (1625) is wanting in th^iQjt 



' ./ ■'•■■'. 

Bui eannot with mm MmglmkPkmbm* ^ i^'*^ Uv'.H ^f>iii' 
ForlookehowikrreilMAiiibientOoinidift-. r' s . ' :>HT 
Pastfonner SatgEmmlierliliertie; •"' .-^- -» iv^iiilT 
So faire misi mind yMlda «iiteihtnii»f «Ui^ i M ' '>a'>; 
Tk better be to«(bMl» ^Imb be tiM» bold* .; . r. v 7.' 

Peologne ta Btok>% 

The, first satire af the t^ird Oodk affords & fiur i$pee!men of 
thi^ Aiithor^ and^ in the opudon .of Mr. Ellis^ st^ldIlgly resem- 
bles the Vlth Sadre of Juvenal 3 it exhibits a lively cpntias^ 
between the olden tinie f^id the efeiniiutfry <^f lM ^^%i^ ^'^^^ 
cotempoiiaries. , .Imi.vi 

Book tlLr-^ATUiB ^ - .>.•<.,-. v.-.^ 'f'^ 
Time was, and that waq^tenvi'drtbe Time of G«ld# r ,. u'. 
Whose world and (ime were jong, that now are«ldt ■ .. /. 
(When qniet Satnni awaid the mace of Leid; • :{ 

- And Pride was yet onbome, and yet niAred.). : ' < i < v /^ 
Time was, that, wMles the Antiouie &11 did-las^' '■>■. ^r> 1 
Our hungry Sires 'gap% for the lolling. Maet ! .>> r c- ; . Jr 

Of the Dodoaian oken . >^-x'X 

Could no unhnsked itome leave the tr^. • ,,< . <r « . ( 
But there was challenge made whose it pight boo* o 
And, if soae nice andJikivM^m a{^tite . , » . ..• r- . < >^ 
Desir'd more daintie dish* of ran deUtie, .. ; /.• 

They scal'd the stor^.Qrab.i|rithrel»q^luie<^ ; ^ .• 
Till they had sated their delicionseie: • .; ■ \ 

Or search'd the hop^^foU thicks of hedgy-4Powes^ 
For brierie berries, or hawes, or sourer sloes; ' 
Or, when they meant to fiire fin'st of ally 
They lick't oake^leaTes bes]^nt with homy fall. ! ■ . . 
As for the thrise three-angled Beechnut shdl, '..}■ - 

Or Chesmil's armed huske and hid kerneUy' - ^:u. •.••^. 
No Squire durst toach, llie Law woidd noil afior^,'^' -'iH 
Kept for the Courts and Ibr the Kings owncbord. < - ' < 






I 



> 



A BIBLIOHAK^Cffl UBBAM. 00* 

■ ■' ' '•. I 

Their Royall Plate wai«l«^ ot* wooci» «r itoae^ v.; . d 

The Vulgar, save hk kaiid> ebe^hadfac none^ ' "''■" 

Their only seller was the neighboiir hrooket '' : ■ • •-' '^ 

None did for betiker care, for bettar kp^e; - > i * <^^ 

Was then no paying of tiie BreiMr'S'Seape^ 

Kor gr^odio Yintncfr mixt the strained grape. 

>^^- r. ., ?V King** FaviUq^,wafl,t|ieigraaBy.gr«|^n,. , ^ j^ ,, ,.^ . 
Under safe shelter of th^ shadie treen. . .^ > 

. Under each banke men layd their lims along; 

Not wishing any ease, not fearing wrong: 

^-^^"^ <?«std ^th Aeir ownc, ks Aey were made of old, " ^ '"'^^'^ 
Not fearing shame, not feeling any cold. - * " j " > -^^^ 

Bat when, by Cereli hnswifry and puite 
Men learn'd to bmry ibe toTinng gvatne; i - * ^ 

Andfa&er Jamiitanghtibe new foosd Vine' ^ '■■-^'' '^^ 
Rise on the 'Bitmap with many a FrwaJly THrinet. 
And base denre bade men to d^Ten low. 
For needlease mettadb ; Iben ^gan miacldef gfMr. •< 
Then farewell, fayreit age, the worlds best dafes; » ' ' 
Tbriving in ill, as it in 'age deeaies.^ — 
Then crep^in Pride, and Peerish Covetisi^; " ' ^ ^ 
And Men grew gredy, diseor^bRUi, and nieeu • ^ '^-'i 

Now Mao, tjiat earst baBe^MWw was widi Beapt, . 
Woxe on to weene himselfe a God at least 
No aery fonle «an take so high « ffigbt, ^ 

Tho' she her daring wings in clouds ba¥e digbt ; 
Nor Fish can dive so deep in yeelding sea, ^ '• 

Tho^ Tlietis' self idiealdiwear her ria&tie ; ' 'i 

Nor fearefbll BeasK e«n dig biseare so lowe^ ■ 
As conld he fiirther than: Eartb's "centre go; ' 
As that the ayre, ihe earth, or ocean^ 
Should shield them from tbe -gorge of greedy lHaii. 
Hath utmost Inde ought better, ^an his owne? 
Then utmost Jnde is neare, and rife to gone. 
O Nature ! was the World ordain'd for nought 



<:-l,- >t ' 



• i.'i; 



• T '»> 



rO ^WOPHQ JCHIBNSV JIQU^Ef 

But fill Mah^i maw, and feed Man'i idle thought ? 

Thy Oraadiird's wordi pavoWd of ^nftie leeke^y. ^ 

Or manly garlick ; bat tiiy fitrnaee reekei 

Hote steams of wine ; and can aloofe descrie 

'Klie drunken dranghts of tfweete aatmnmitie. 

They naked went ; or clad in rader hide, 
'- Or home-span' msset, toid df fe^hraine pddtr. ' * « : - ' ' 
>^ ' 'But tfaoa canst mft[skeitt< garish gaideri^ :i' 

I i To> smite a Ibole's far-fetched liTerie. . , > /. 

. , . A French head join'd to necke ItaHan : 

TLy thighs from Oermanie, and breast fro' Spain : . . 

An Englishman is none, a fool in all : 

Many in one, and one in scTeralL ' '' *• -•' 

'*' Then Men were Men; but now the greiiter part "'" "'• • 

Beasts are in Hfe, and Women are in heart - ;^ 'OM >' 

€U>ad nature 'selfe, that homely Bmperour, :.,..,. ;|] 

' in proudest pon^ was not so dad of yore, 

Aa is the under (k'oome of the OsUerie, 

Husbanding it in work day yeomanrie. 

Lo ! the long date of those expired dayes^ - . r ■ - ; 

\Vhich the inspired Merlin's word fore-sa:ys^ 

When dunghill peasants shall be dig^t as Kiogs 

7!l«» MM eon/kifbfi another brings r 

Then fare well, fairest age^ the Worids best di^ei 
TliriYing in all, as it in age decayes. 

In Phillips's Theatrum Poetarom^ 8vo. Cantcrbuiy/ IStk), 
p. 326, &c. may be found a concise and satis&ctory account of 
Bishop Hall. *' He is universally allowed," says PhiOdps, '* to 
have been a man of great wit and leaming,^ and of as great 
meekness, modesty, and piety." His works> published at va- 
rious periods in folio, quarto, and octavo, '* are filled," saya 
Bayle, " with fine thoughts, excellent morality, and a great 
deal of piety." 



^ ^iftiltlbliANMb'ft fifBRAKY. 71 

Life and Dedth of Edmund Genrnj^es, (uHm Ironnvonger,) 
Ato. Portrait and Ptotes. St. Omen. ' 1614. ' 

Gnlston^ 2/.; Townley, 5/.} G. Nassau/ 1^24^ blue morocco, 
12/. 5*. 

'^ Edmund Jennings/* says Grangerj *^wa8 admiUed into 
the English College, at Rlieims, under Dr. afterwards Cardinal 
Allen, and when he was 20 years of age, ordaSaed Priei^. He 
was soon afterwards sent into England, where he was appre- 
hended in the act of celebrating Mliss. He was executed by 
hanging and quartering in Gray's Inn Fields, Dec. 10th, 1591." 

In the above rare book are several Historical Prints, repre- 
senting the principal circumstances of his Life and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expence by the Pa- 
pists, in order to perpetuate the remembrance of two * Mira- 
cles,** which are there sud to have happened at his death. 
The first is, that, after his heart was taken out, he said, 
" Sancte Gregori, ora pro me^ which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, *' God*s wounds ! see lus heart is in my hand > yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth." The other is, that an holy Virgin 
being desirous of procuripg some relick of him, contrived to 
approach the basket into which his quarters were thrdwn, and 
touched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy from 
its having been employed in acts of consecration and elevating 
the Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
or discovery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
the greatest care. 



r .•• 



• w 



AnMe-^8ong9 and Sonnets, 8&o. /or J/«/. Builer. Ifi22.» 

fFUh Portraii of the Author tn the engrm>ed Thle. 

« Of this Sonnetteer/ tfays Orm^ltr; *oL !L p.' 17/^1 find 
BO mention made I^ dlny of our Bfo^pliicu Aiilhoib. 

fidoe, in his AnecdoteSj call9 the above ** » l>0(£r.& no 
rneam ofconunon oGcarrciQcei'* ai^d from itf ;ejsti mutiya jpong 
Golle^tovs, if we may judge from the priee jt;hM.QbliiiaDd in 
three recent sales^ he appears to have been pretty «brrefl| lb his: 
iqi^preciation <rfk« rarity. ' • '** *'^* 

At MrrBindley's sale it produced 3J^/. 14^^';^ fitrrffftry'Sf 
18^ 38/. 6#. described as containing the Porpniits ptHannay 
and of his Pstroness^ Anne of, Denmark. j|\r ^«Sj«p%j(.fopy» 
which had been Mr. Bindley s, sold^ iiv 190^,.^ "^4 U¥- ^ 

The following extnicts may be found in BeloA« JJUmtdotai 
of Literature^ vol. vi. and which I hope I shall be excused fo 
abstracting^ considering the value of the Book cited, and th^ 
difficulty of obtaining even a glance at such BibEomaniacal 

Bat)ierifeikced Nahire in tliM latter ag«, 

Wilting her ma«ter-piece i^oidd then be inroiij^lil^ * ^' " 

. . Snc^.my :$pire Celia set oa Earth'0 large ifafe» / • fs^ -: ^ ' . '^ 
As all the Gods in emulation brought, \.] 

For they did thinke if Nature only mighjk 
iBrag of her worth, she should insult olre them; 
Wherefore they 'greed to haye an equal right, - v 

That they of her perfection part might claimt: ' ' ****** 

Pallas gave wisdome, Juno stateKneine, * "^-^ ^ 

And die milde momxBg gave her modestic; •'■:*^^^ 









r.lO 



fk$ Oftfto'fl MTtitgVx Ycmui lovtlaMii>> 

-^tCVl)^ .v*S»».iV .uAK >•« \ ' ' •"■■ ■*•'''• '•♦^•i'x. -..-i-' A — ^^^»'\^ 

^^ md. wi$ acArlel itreiiDefl east HeaVea adorne^ , ^ 

it) ^^«mbdi1teiiM»to^aiW^d^^clMth6)Hjrra^ ' v^'.t,ti:^> ) 

SIm atraigbi and tall, her tresaes trailed W:Cf«|i4k ,. .ai;«>; '^^;#> 
.*^y^"P^*i»***^ thmkiiigaydeereJiadbeejpc .. . /j ,^/ ^/., 

^nni VuUbin blaah my blisse fled I once aeene^ 
« vl^ JLM ille b^naformed as it were in atone, 
^^ tyt diHl I #iikM ever to IiaTe remained, ' '^''^^ -^^^ -^ *"' ^^ 

il^x.^H»iil^lMil«(ti^'d,aiNlf myoiglitretaiBeA' i^. aU; xff 

• • ■■ - « '# "^ 

Wt sw'X /.•>'••-.. '■ : r ■'. ^ • ' ' > ■ ■ •• • ...■•■.>-'.-?.'"■. v ■.*>:«"«»".?<»'i*. 

i*-.%c-tJi^>i--. ■'-' •-. • ~ '. ^ .• ••-•■•• ...v." .■'.• » • ^/?ij?iiPi5:- 
DfvylMi « (Michael) Pofy-Olbian, with the 9ecandpm^.^iJm^J 

. fVm$h]nece and Portrak oj Prmpp Hm'jf.b^, J^o^^mi alt 

** Ib 1613," says ^ PhiBips's l^eatrum Poe^ram>8vo. I^ 
** Draytoa publislied the &r8t part of his Pol^-^bk^^ b|^>ifhidt 
Qpodk tkk, 8ig]iyiyu\g.t]ifr^-J«^|(« he denirfcs Eag^awrt; as 
t]K aotient name of Albioa is by sone 4ibm9i hem Oibioir, 
haf^y. It is a chorographieal dcscriptioii ^ the nytan, ttOaor 

F 



**> 



taiu, foresta, caatles, Iw.^ i« db-lAa^ t rt mi to J wftb it'a 
n;oiK)iBble wtiqFJtiiev. nntiw, ^ CQft^^o^lj^^ A^ 
y?W^,j;o vl»)n *W> &!•* p«xt U jHlV»t^ iy>4 fjf .T^fflS, '* 
«q(i(ih^,^ Priat^ in » militwy portnnv cKitiu)^ ^.^^.^ 
ftm|P!;(i|tfi« Poet eoDie aisgnlttr muks of bk &Tvr : tb^ ■^W?''' 
((|tSi^lMji(,,tl»orafore, o*tWBy»mgKi*«wy ii«ijijp|ps«_^to 
)^ ^, jbeie are dgtitsen ungB is diU mhune^ ijIbji^TBt^ mth 
the leuned notes of Sclden ; and them ve m^ ^^9^ ;Bvp7 
■00^ ^herein tbe dticB, loonntaiaa.foEeBt^ P^^^. ^* *^/^ 
presented by the. ^fores of men and wooua- B^ |Pt^ 'K 
tvjdve sjllableai being BOW ttilifqtCe4 it '» vtoW iMR w 
tlyi^ Histoiy Am th* Vbatry i»il f and At Dhat respect is so 
Terv^xact, thatj as Bishop Nicholnm observes, i^ atTprds a 
much truer account of fhTs kingdom and'the dominion of ^'ales^ 
thanc^nld well be expected &om the pen of a Poet. Tt \b jii- 
terWoven vith maaj fate I^iisodfa i of tlie conquest of tliis 
n£md,'by the Romany } of tbs G«n>iog of tlie Saxona, i^e 
Danes, and t]i£ Normans, with an account of their Kings ; of 
|ii^UBhWarriOTi,Nangator9) Saints, and of tbe Civil Wars of 
England, &c. This Tolnme was rquinted in 1622, with thi 
SiwM^ftrty nr eontUnatJon of twelMt Songs more, malcine 
d&^iKd««hg]ekWitdttdk;at»d:t#nfJnce Chaises, to whom 
he gives hopes of bestowing the lilce paitiB upon Scotland." 

WustHdefaiihUsLivWof'thaEnf^i&h Poets, say^of Drs^- 
fa>nth|U "he was a Poet of n pions temper, hia c^mqcpfniir. 
lHriHgabwi4>th» ■rtiHwArfhJB fcwj; Mi^ ta>pHmt«bl 
hjft Ubv fllw«C ^»eedk^ aaA io<tf«Md»B m ■WMpfcuyi ^flv 
4angDdMelai)MLfi)T»m«ra'af gbr^ hum W3H' WA «M' 
hnwxt-in WutwutM Abbtf." '^'''' '< * 



'''iswm'nikmffihi. i^sb. tm: 'fmPriMi^m 

^'WiflK:' 'ift*. mi.t --■■■■■ ■^Ai 

A line copy of this book, handsomely bonad, was in CduiM 
the bookseller's catalogue, a few years bacft, marked 6/. 8«. — ■ 
Payne and Foss mart a copy at 6/- C*. — At t)v. P. fi^rpardft 
sale, ia 1^98, a copy sold for four shillings and tw6 pence ! 1 

A i^rge paper copy at Hunter's sale, in 1813, prodiuxd 

. It w remarked by I^t. Grenville (says Cibdin), ttat steet 
O ID this work is suppressed, and that the defective [M^pg 
&om Sffi to 105 is not supplied in bll the copies of this boolc^ 
. Captaiu .lohu Smith, Admiral of New England, (say9 Gran- 
ger,) deserves to be ranked vrith the greatest iravellera ao^ 
adveuturets of his nge. lie was sometime in the service of ttie 
i!niperor^ and the Prince of Transylvania, against the Grand 
Signior, where he distinguished himself by chaBenging three 
Turks of quality to single eombat, and cutting off their heads, 

^P-^- ...... ■■• .:.; ■.-■Yrf 

t An Edition, folio, dated 16% with Portruti and PlatM, wtd in lU 
iilc of b. NauBD'9 Litrarj, 18S1, Uii iL 
r2 



76 /^^p.^p ^^^^^^y-pp*{?f^^^. 

for which achievement he bore on his coat of arms ^hre^.Ti^*^ 
He^s* He afterwards went to America^ whei^ .he,wa/^.j(a]qni 
prisoner by the savage Indians^ from whom he found jD(|efj!2J|^ 
escape. He often hazarded his life in naval engagementswjdi 
TOatcs, Spanish Men of War, and in other adventures j^ and 
had, a considerable hand in reducing New England to the, obe- 
dience of Great Britain, and in reclsdming the. inhabitants Jupom 
bttfbarism." All which exploits are detailed in the History ^of 
Virginia by himself. , ' 

Matoako, alias Rebecca, daughter to Pouhatan, Sovereign 
of Virginia, and who is called Pocahontas by Capt. Smith in 
his History, may be considered as a national bene^K^ress,^JU 
to her (says Granger, vol. ii. p. 58) we are indebted ibr the 
preservation of Virginia, when in the state of an infant colony. 
In 1607> when she was about 12 or 13 years of age, she not 
only procured the liberty, but saved the life of Capt. Smith, 
whom, together with his men, her father intended to niimff 
t>y surprize. In 1612, she was herself a prisoner; al^d spon 
after married Mr. Rolfe, whom Smith calls a gentleman. In 
1616, after she had been instructed in our language an^.tb^ 
Chnstian religion, she was brought to England, and inti^odnf^ 
and graciously received at Court. The next year, np<||i bet re* 
turn home, she died on ship board at Grayesend^ strQoglF m- 
pressed with religious sentiments. The good sense, humanity, 
and generosity of this woman, do her honour, as they carried 
her far above the prejudices of her education, and th^ barbf^jma 
customs of her country. She w^as the first Virginian wh^|ira8 
converted to Christianity, that could speak our language^ or 



= :■ « 



had a child by an Englishman.** 

' The Library at Eton contains King James lst*s 'co{)¥,,^(|yin 



a' BlBLIOMANiAC'S LIBRARY. 77 



itolTofitJiill Library was a presentation copy 5 otli^r large ppf 
'JiCTic^es.are in.the Libraries of some of our prinapal Bibli^ 

.jjf^.i .'j • • ■ ' i ' 

Smtis Tiravels and Adventures in Europe, Asia, ^rtcd^qn^ 

America^ Small folio. Sixty pages only, fflth flate^ 

■"'ieSo. -. ■ .;., 

Mr. G^nyi]le*8 copy> according to Dibdins Library ,Q(^7 

panion^ p. 264> cost bim 51. 5s. . . . , 

It was reprinted in vol. ii. of Cburcbill's Collection of VQy|3iges. 






•I. 



jbi^acMttt ((jtov. Bat J Bizane dt f^arte Figure. Svo, obl^ng^ 

1624. ., ^^ . 

'' See 7% jRepertorium BUVtographicumy where it is deiscribed 

«8 /^ A Qibsjt rare and singular Book, containing Prints, pfbuinan 

' Figures rohned by the strangest materials^ as diamonds^ hoops. 

Dladders^ pieces of carpentery> battledores, chains, cuhnary 

'uiensils^ &c. When the correctness of the delineations, a^d 

'ihe bNot^ess of the attitudes^ are considered — we see the lu^ 

iifagreat Master through the laughable whimsicality of his 

'^ A^i*6py is in the Strawberry HilJ Collection, and one was ii\, 
l!flt iiabrary at Ponthill. 



'>■«'-!•>»; 



1}-MT\^.' ■'■ '■; 



'tyiWih (AbrahamJ Annates of the famous Emprcsse Elizabeth^ 
'"^%ftie(Bneof JBngland, 8fc. translated out of French. Large 
^^'p(^eri2vols.Ato. Benj. Fisher. (No date.) 

Large paper copies differ from the small in the following 
jiarit'Cnrafs; VIZ. that the date (1625) is wanting in th^nijt 



<99 ; miam> 4mmiix>im»^ 

Wt^t jtfin^id^ t»^ JUfA 99^ S^M.i44 ^nff^u^y^ 

$mfiil copiei t>iiiy ttie two bat versos m cowi^Qa piW!^ j^fiftlPVi^ 

. Mr^Tr CbreiiTUkliMaiargepapira-C9|)^j^m 
^I^^ie^^pluales, in tettmof'j^. QQiaie>^Jf^i9|^ 
Ji.,|» ubi^Bia&t IWtrait of Barck by iPfelanuiv of ^Viq|^^j^ 
impressions are to be found in the copies pagf^es9C^^.Jj||p 
r{i|||r|fiiii. 4)f BtaiRHr^i tSeneral Sow^eswf^^ tJiH Ui Jifr, )rl^j^'s 
jpcfS, »^ at Sotbebjf's, in 18?2^ tor tOt !$«. . > .^^^ 

Ort^%^if fAbrokamJ P^tlcal BloMotM. WUk r.^^^\^ 
'ApiA9idnthr m kit I3tkvear, h^ F^ugham. 4^ If^^u 
.ALS|9.]IianJ^ina|i^f Biblkitlieoa jVug. Tpcit fi copy, vi^ tli(9^|^ 
tnUt, is mafke4al; l^/«i and ano^er^ w%iitlq^ (he To]^3§i||i 

i >I^rrya«i]e4lp?2> 4/. . ,.>,,rt3f 

^iml^^tijjwe't RidUl^,, a Pastor ai Coniedkj^ written M^ 
f Mmeof kh, bewg a Kings Sckfi^i^r in Westm9fi,ter. S/ifb%f^ 

iJI^UkPortrdt. 1638. :, . > .j,,,.^ 

i.7©. Nassaiv B2sq« 1824* 3/vlQ*- . .^ irf^a 

7^A^ fFwIa sfMr. j^braham Cowley, €0^(^^ <^4Aafti?^fiM 

'wer&/(Miherfy printed, and those which he de^gke^ for>skB 

press: N&^ published out of ike Authors Original Gsjpkk, 

I2trt0. Lond: 1631. . :i ?>)<-»/ 

$econdPafpt tfPUto^ mluUng 1^ Poetical BlmojiM^' J^mA, 

•••l^83.' -•■ >.'.'■ ..^-T.i^ 

' fliis lattei* edition of Cowle^^'s Woj^s contt^i^s i>^, 3j^ni& 

If jM^icoai^t of tt|^ I4fe and Writings of Cow)eJr, wrfK^v io iftt 



ate iratf li odiool bay at Westtniiiateri three ediii<Hi8 bad beeb 
jBold^ and the book had become very scarcei, wben the fdtifib 
edition ii{rp<»red» in 1682^ the Town^ acGording to tbe tioOK- 
MtoViJMAvtfMiNhnen^ bitfd}y affi»idiftg<^ oop^v TheftlMl;- 
iitg^ydre0#^ the teaden by CWley UiaiMtf; ^^«iMdltigly 
'Olikmi ^lofli oil tits QwnaiNMitt, and^foariiie Aiei«el<Aiifiig]Nih^ 

^' BeadoTj (I kmw not yet ii^bether gentle of HOi) ^dM4 
ktOwllaTe been angry {1 dare not assdinot^^hi^dOtfrcOf 'Uitiilr 
^^9^) tttt my Bietieal BaMdesSi ^and t^a^koii ki ^kite^KwIidt 
i^dbriii^iidd ethet smts — earliness: others wb^tM dllhei^^ h 
weak fidth jDr strong malice have thought me liker a ^pe, vi^bicb 
iiet^aoanda (but when 'tis bkntedin^ ibnliroadlMfldtti Jtiffra* 
4^i^€ioiri^^ b«l^ AiittiQiem^AiiovymiKB ; 3/<^ "tii^ $1^ I wfH 
iK^e^X ilMvi<^ >!i» Au ^enTioiia Ftost \i^kdi >0qiis Ibc^^blQa^oiiHI 
fak3piMs(lb9yiik{qpeat.q^ ta the kttot, UnA he.il,<th^ 

W0V9t Homicide wbd strives to martber ancrt^ief's fmfit tdL 
bodik thulvit t« a riifodoos .^y to«oosdealn of k(lgb.^:tj|ie 
Stars> becaase the Moon and Sun shine brigbter^ l^betvi&all 
/•Hmi^ biBiimiia'tftitiief bkwn thttQAting^ 



^9 HMjmfofimaiikmimim a 

tltU third edition ,: 'W]ittitiM»«glt|tibeAie«^fN^^ /ftJfdMf 
{.|lin.#ii^ tiie ft«t book wbkh hulh JigMed..Vbtaeroio<mAden 
^iqikV^d by C^okg nad Gracem. 1 11 im.ia ibeBsgiMJgpMbqit 
goffer Shipwnick, it shall Bomedung content me, that itc^MA^ 
p^Q)|8^ niyself and the Bookseller. In it yon shall find one 
argoment (and I hope I shall need no more) to confiite nn>- 
believers 5 which is, that as mine age, and odnfl^qnently expe- 
rience (which is yet but little) bathi increased^ S^^^y have 
not left my Poesie flagging behind them. ) ^hopU not be 
angry to see any one bum my Pj^pamtti md SWule, nay I 
would do it myself, but that I hope n pankm^iliaf easily be 
gotten for the errors of ten pears ofag-e. My''€^Miantia ami 
FkUeiui confesseth me two years older wheh f writ it. The 
rest were made since upon several occasions, apd ^rhaps do 
not bely the time of their birth. Such as tiiey are* they were 
created by me, but their fieite lies in your hands} it is only 
you can effect that neither the Bookseller inspent himself of his 
charge in Pripting them, nor I of my labour in o6mposing 
them. Farewell/- . . '^ 

A. CpWLBY. 

However un£iishionable in our days Cowley may have be- 
come from the harshness and conceit of some of J^ composi- 
tions, there are still many who think both highly asidvjustly of 
him as a Poet — ^he was considered by his con te mp o raries as 
excelled by none, and King Charles II. when toH of his death, 
declared " That Mr. Cowley had not left a better man behind 
|iim in JJngli^i" 

I certainly think with Dn Blair, that Cowley s Anacreontic 
Pf^^s^ are b^ £ur the happiest of his eflprts; <' t;bey are sino<itl( 



ftofeet It th^MW of dl Aft;^€o^l^%'f ofem^.^'^' » ' ' '• ^ -^^ 
nsQiiecortw^'slp^dtf^s <tf tlieiii here ^ni)^ tftib pi^re^.^ 
^pttabii^hiid^wiU' ednvey their own excuse for thitkpit^'^^ 

GOLD, 

And 'tis a pain that pain to vusa. 

But of all paina the g^atest pain 
'^ '" 'Itiatblove-^lmtloTeinvain. ^ '' ^^^^ ^^- ' 

i /.Si.- . •.. Virtne now BotNobU Bl«od, ■ •-■- '^■' 0¥*^^ 

v,<,j ,.^.,. Ooldtlon^ does passion iQ0Tie»- .. ,••• ,.^'.. .-. -.v?'; -cti ..votto^ 

.p .,Q^ldmonqpoli«!»LoTc! - ,,, ^j f^i>\u\^ 

' A cnrse on her, and on the man ^ ^ , . ,,^, ^^,^ 

''' "^^^''-t^b this traffick thus began! , .. ' .^ 

ciiihfe on liim who found the ore1 
'^ii! ^. A cnfse on him who digg'd the stoi^f 
si6 t • f Acmseonhflnwho^drefineH! • ' ' '' ' ^' * ^' '^ 

.Acmrseon hiiniii^fiir8tdid|poini4( u' .u.-i ; '-. Oi xaTi^*! ^ 

A curse all curses else above : ; ^ :, • ' -^ i.i.?.-! 

On him, who us'd it first in Lore ! \ 

Gold begets in Brethren, hate ; 

Oold in Families, debate ; 

'Gdl^ dotes Friendships separate. 






-» " - - - 



'j'.i •» 






^'» :'v' ' GoM does OitiL Wars create; 
< l^bfse tbe smallest harm* of it { 
llpHt ahis, does LoTP b^6|^ : 



si^ '.'•! I 



^" THE Gfi[ASSHOPiPiEH. 

Happy Insect what can be 
' fit Happiness compared to Thee? 
A h >. , y^ ^0^ nourislniiettt cKvtne, 






'( 



^'i\ ''>• 



~.. ' - 



And thy yerdant «itp' does fH ' ' * 

'1^8 fili'd whereeTer thou MitkiA 
^ictare'ss^K^diy^MiiiKMAa . \ .v 

Thou dost drink, And danoe, aadrflii^; 
Happier than the hap|nest Kkif f ^ 
All the fields which tiKm dost see. 
All the Plants belong4e€iM^ ^ > r 

All that Sommer^Hian'preflnoQ^ 
Fertile made with ^aily Juieei. 
Man for thee does Sow and^Ploagli ; 
Fanner He, and Landlerd Tkou ! 
Thoa doest innocently foy ; 
Nor does thy Luxnry destroys 
l%p Shepherd gladly heareth'ttee^ . ^ ^-y.i\ 
More HaimonioQS tints Hesi ^v.-:? A 

Thee, Country hinds with S'ladnesslieMV - p 

Frophet of the ripened yeai*! 

Thee Fhoebns loves, and does inspire;* "^ *' " "^ 

/«/ FhoBlms is himself Ay Sir& ^= - i- v\ J ;!)• * 

V T6ihee of aB things Qpom^aHh, - :; \ cuv^ lod* 

l4fe is no longer than thy lur^ •; '■ ••: /.- ./,,:>\v>,V 

Happy Insect, hjqipy Then, :, ;( \v>>.^ 

Dost neither Age nor Wi^tec luMilVf \ 
But when thou'st drunk, and danc'd, and muUT. , ^ 
Thy fill, the flowery Ijeapres among, 
(Vekipltaons, and ^fise withaE, ' ^ ^^^ lwi^^^»- « 

Cpionrseatt Animal f)^ ■ ■ ' '' ••■■-n::« ii:>«ai iij<v^ 
Sate^ with thy Suminerf^as^' • .-.>.•>••, f ebji/n UtJ8'(fl:'«r 

Th^piretiresttoendkisjPest r " ;ii? .iH/sm o*^ 

Fill the Bowl with ttwieWine,' v.. > Jtiv- t')fn rno[>- 



And let Q* che!«|fl^ MnAa^:-y;-::^'.i'iV :^ a: '■ ''V 
Like the Wine ^d^otM MDikw, 
<!rown'd with Rosea ire cto B t ewm 
Oyge's wealthy diadeai. 
T9 Day is ew'a ; what do^we<fe«v? 
fb Htv i9im^9f we hsTiOiit'iMre^ '^ • . *' 

141^8 treat it JtiafUar, iM itjin^y 
WkK at lea^f^ vHUtbuwi t».8t«y. 
Let's bsMueh Busineea* baaillli fiforravf v 

Tp the Gods belong Ts^Marrow, 



Bwm9 (B^ €ppri0k ^imAfmy. Sua. im?. 

TMp Romanoe w^s wvitton when Ae Jbitiior i^ oiily 17 
years, of 9gQa imd ui it be introduces two BngnatioPieeefl, en* 
tided " Deorum Dono^' and *' Gripus and Hegw^' The Au- 
thor was nephew of James Homfilh Author of the Familiar 
Letters, who thus speaks of it in his Letters, %vo. p, 432;^ 
lipnd, 1754, 

7> Mr- B% JSaron,. at Paris. 
Gentle Sir, , i 

I received and presQotly x^» aver your Cjfprian Academy^ 
with much gr^ediiness and no rulgar delight > andSir^ I hold 
myself much honoured fbr the Dedication you^have been pleased 
to make thereof to m^^ fbr it deserved a fur higher patronage. 
Truly I must tell you without any compliment, that I have sol* 
dom met with such an ingewoiift fluxtove of {Nroeo and verse^ 
jii;Lterwoven with gvich vaii^ieff ot &ftey voA cWmihg stralos 



f4 '^WWt "'^•WwtWr^SF^ 

Uini, ferests, outlea, Im:^ m di»liki^ htefirinil wfeli it'« 

ii;ii(K)(^le Mtiquities, irotiar, ftgf vftBtu)^/!^^ Afflffl 
IJpiia,. ^ whom (Ms firat part Ujdedwst^ »a4*^ ,f^WR, '* 
q^l^t^.^ Pript, in » milkwy postiirtv c w waiitf (i,i^jks*,}iad 
^if|p;|..l|fi«;P9et toma sipgidhr puric* of bit &tvt : tb^ UW"' 
^fHfiR^tei^tberefore. of thto Touag O*^^ w*^ «?P>*.^«» *** 
)^ .„.1>en u« eigfatopn aongi is tfiia Tcdiqu^i^bijf^BtQ^ i|ath 
tbe learned notes of Selden ; bdJ tli^re are maps before every 
■ODgi ^berdn the PtieSj mountains, foreEts, rivers. Sic. are re- 
pretented by the- Qcnret of muu aud woineiv His ipetre of 
tifelve Byll^lesfbeiv^ WW aniiqu&ted, U U quoted moee foi 
fbJB^ aUtoij Am tbe Vbetr^ in it ^ and iti that respect ism 
Tcry piact, that, as Bfshop Nicholson observes, it affords a 
mncb truer acconnt of thfi; kin^om and'the damiuioo of ^alei^ 
^an coohl well be expected from the pen of a Poet. It is in- 
Mrwoven with many fine Episodes ; of the conquest ^ iW 
niniid by the Romaas} of tbe coming of the Saxony tne 
Danes, and tbe Normans, with an account of their Kings j of 
lii^/lish Warriors, Navigatora-, Saints, and of the Civil Wars of 
England, &c. Hiis voloine was reprinted in 1622, with tW 
Ssm^IMr w eentUoatioti of twetn) ^iv^, bmr/ ai^E&tr 

he pni hopes of bestowing the ISte pum ii[m» deo^lM^'' '^'' 

WiDBtatey. iih 1^. iivM> of tbft Eq^ ffMa^'MJ^o^ 
ton thpt "he was a Poet of a pions temper, hia. cfw^fp^nca. 
biragaiiiiq^tli* tmmtA rf bin twy; mt^ btmtmwIiV^im 
hm VAt, •!«»-«£ ^6M< amfr mtem^me m tt rn p^mf i ' Bm 
4«wi liK kwA te & cram. «f gloryt. wim uaH'ttd WW< 
tfwwdip WatMuta AU^r." . , ' ''■ '• ' 



a'il({:iw I.01T ■■■.' ■ ,„ : ... . .;; o r.--.i,^ ..il;-' 

tmillft itltilKMUJ ARtt»3i tfPSfgHtd, tlini Bigltit, 
''*fl»!»*iwAfe». ft*. fteS. »*lAiA^*, 

'"mifUuitlMa, iUalkeliiM PumMtfll^imtlit 

'''ilk MMlf tf tfeu MgUiJ, Mi mlfdl mttfiUfi mii 

I'fim: »Wb. imt ■■'•■■'"" 

^ A fine cop7 oftliis book, huidaomely boua, In^ in C^ns 
Ifie bookseller's cmtalogne, a few years bae^ marked 8/. St.— ^ 
Ryne and Foas mark a copy at &1. 6*. — At Dr. F. B^nunTa 
aaie, in ifi!)8, a copy sold tot Ima shilliii^ and tvb pence ! I 
A large paper copy at Madter's sale, in 1^13, |^roonbea 






.It u rem^lEal b^ Mr. GreDville (says tKb^nL t&M sixa 
Vjn toiswt^Vk is snppresaed, and that tbe detectiTe pajtu^g 
£om 96 bo 10^ is not anppCed id all the copies of tlus book.. 
CanWo. ibiin Sihith, Admiral of New England, (B^v9'feratt7 
^M'.) deserves to be rantied witb tlie greatest travellers. an^ 
tt^eiitDrel's of his a^. tie was sometime lii tlie service of Wv 
Emperor! ani] ttie Prince of Transylvaiiia, ^giuBri tbe Grioi 
Sigiuor, itbere lie aistingnisliett lumaeU' b^ cnadeng^n|; Uireij 
Tnrlu^ofniiaiity to single combat, and cnlCng o^ tfieir liea^s, 

mttm-mtHL- MM>in«r«NMiiil>tP*«(i^tr«««MiMMitoUMpl 

Mikft tNttitNTMr rf Iha M^ ci New BflKlan^ od >bB MwRMnral 
^fawMlKoottn-U^bsUiigUiitolh* uuaHiitDrj. &*aMy«',Mt 
i-p.3». ,, J . . . ^ , ,„, 

■^ An Edition, folio, dXcd 1633, «i4 Pwiruts *ai ptatM, mU in lb* 
Ue of d. Nbuhi'i VAnrj, tS^, taiiL 
r2 



76 ^SECOND JjOU9]^£y.|tQ|{lfD, 

for which acjiievement he bore on his coat of arms ^hre^,TqrjE0 
H^^ds. He afterwards went to America, wtieijfe .he,wa&Jta]c^ 
prisoner by the savage Indians, from whom he found jDy^e9^ttp 
escape. He often hazarded his life in naval engageoi^nts witb 
TOVtcs, Spanish Men of War, and in other adventures j^ and 
Kad.a considerable hand in reducing New England to the, obe- 
dience of Great Britain, and in reclaiming the. inhabitapts^om 
rorbarism." AU which exploits are detailed in the History of 
Virginia by himself. , i 

Matoako, alias Rebecca, daughter to Pouhatan, Sovereign 
of Virginia, and who is called Pocahontas by Capt. Smith in 
his History, may be considered as a national benefi^:tress, jbs 
tb her (says Granger, vol. ii. p. 58) we are indebted ifbr the 
preservation of Virginia, when in the state of an infiml colony. 
In 1607, when she was about 12 or 13 years of age, s^e not 
only procured the liberty, but saved the life of Cagt. Smiths 
wiibin, together with his men, her father intended to muraex 
by surprize. In 1612, she was herself a prisoner > ffltid sopn 
aiter married Mr. Rolfe, whom Smith calls a gentleman. In 
1616, after she had been instructed in our language ui4 the 
Christian religion, she was brought to England, and intijodaf^ 
and graciously received at Court. The next yiear, up<^n ber re- 
turn home, she died on ship board at Gravesenc^ stjrQi^F m- 
pressed with religious sentiments. The good sense, humanity, 
and generosity of this woman, do her honour, as they carried 
her far above the prejudices of her education, and the.barbai^[H|8 
customs of her country. She was the ^rst Virginian whoHfi^as 
converted to Christianity, that could speak our langpaffej^ or 
had a child by an Englishman." 
^ The Library at Eton contains King James Ist's 'copv^,iBpd,Ji^ 



a"' BltiLioMANiAC'S llBRART. 77 

toB'FoIHWII Library was a presentation copy j pih^x large p^ 
^^ti^es.are in the Libraries of some of our prin^pal Bibli- 

Stmins Tlraoeb and Adventures in Europe, Asia^ Africa ifnd 
America^ Small folio. Sixty pages only. fFith Phte^. 

,3#.'- ..." - ' ' ■ ""•■ •■■■ 

[' Mir. (Jrenyille*8 copy, according to Dibdina Uibx^ f^i^- 

panion, p. 2S4, cost him 5/. 5*. .,,,., 

It was reprinted in vol. ii. of Churchill*s Collection of Vpyftges. 



in i\Uo-r. 



jSi^dccetlt ((jiov. Bat.} Bizarie di f^arie Figure,^ 8vq. oihUfn^ 

' See Tne RepertoriumBibliographicumy where 1% is de^c^^ 
«8/^ AVost rare and singular Book, containing Priints pf human 
"" figures lormed by the strangest materials, as diamonds, hoops^ 
maaders, pieces of carpentery, battledores, chains, culins^ 
utensils, &c. When the correctness of the delineations, and 
me boldness of the attitudes, are considered — we s^ the ti^ind 
W a great Master through the laughable whimsicality of his 

'^^ A^&py IS in the Strawberry Hill Collection, and one was ii\^ 



m Library at Fonthill. 



biMTii^ > 



^tydfiib CAbrahamJ Annales of the famous Empresse Elizabeth^ 
'^ 'Qkeene of England, ^c. translated out of French, Large 
'* pi^er^ 2 vols. 4to. Benj. Fisher, (No date,) 

Large paper copies differ from the small in the following 
jW^Calafs : viz. that the date (1625) is wanting in th^mji 



«%;:^^ %{J^abpi^ are fgrnrteoii ^le^s^ »><^1^ .^>%AlP 
99)aU copies t>iiiytiie XwQhat Yei'sotia GQiwoaprjii^l^lBqy^ 
. Mtk Tp CbrennUe has a large papinr C9|>yi^ wit|^. th^^.^JodiiKj^ 
^ f^^ef <i|uaic^ ^ letters of VgoM. Qq ^^ >^it Jfi^j9{iR(f 
j^.))9l 9 i)r9Kaftt IWtrait 'of Darde by I>elanuB^ of iyl|i(^^ 
impressions are to be found in the copies jfq^^ieaaed^.j^ 
r|i|(ar^. t^HtaSfoi, "General Oow^swi^^ and i;i !4r, In^j^'t 
iWfS^ S^ at Sotheb^s, in 1822, fef W- ^?«^ . r .^,1,1 

i- ■■"-•■ ■■' ^ .•■' ■-If-; .hfos 

0i«^%*i fMrtskamJ Poetical Blossoms. Wil^ g$rkt(9i^\4^ 
V l^:.(l*^ Author m kk I3rt. ^f ar, i5^ F^ugham. Atj^ ^^y^M 
u( j!h>;li(m||inapi*l| BiblkitlLeca ^b^. Tpi^. fi copy, vil^ tb/9^}^ 
traft, is marked at 115/. j and anoCher^ w%iitii]^ (teP^j^t^l^ 

; )]^nyaaale4l8?2, 4/. v'.»fi2f 

.£imie]f^Si> Love's Bidile», a Pastor at Comedhj^ written ^J^ 
,■ Jlimeof Mr bet^g a Kings Sc^joflqr in IFestmhk^ter.SMhf^ 
, J9fUh Portrdt. 1638. : > 4,^^^ 

i/iO. Nasaaiv £»!• 1824, 3/. IQ«. ' ..' t^/aa 

ir^ ^<»fib ^Aff. 4hrahean Cowley, eontis^^ihtwhMk 

'teet&forfnerfy printed, and those which he deAgktf^ for>SlSB 

^ press^ NoiD published out of ike Author s\Onginal€i&p^, 

12»kr. Lmd. 16^1. . :? t>n*v?/ 

fSectrndPoft qfPitto, including hi^ Poetical Blm$^' ii0sA 

' fliis kttei* editioD of Cowley's Works conti^n^ Pt 6p¥B& 
If jAt(|to(ii|^t of tl|^ I4fe and Writiiigi;^ of Cow)ejr> wrimft ii> M^i 




^ilol^tdl WOiirlef 4tiMliiMt«a# M'tgiA^. 

A0 mia It acbool bay At WesttniiiatQri three e^iiofis had bcieii 
isoM^ and the book had become yery scarcei, wheii the fditflh 
edition ngpoued, in 1^2, the Town^ according to (he tioOk- 
MtoV AAr^iltiiNhnent^ faat^ eopy^^ TheftttiHi^ 

tttg^^AreAHtd the lead^ by Govley hintt<^> ir^eeteeMingiy 
<iirkM>' {Hyfti on its owti afto^ant, moAiatikt A«l««f ^Att&ig>th% 
4|^^t -iM^ hii #ayly frodne^^ e; n^i 

^' Readear« (I JaK>w not yet whether gdnCle of mi) M»6'l 
lOiawliaTe been angry ;(! dare not astiimet^^hdiUMr^f thdt 
^^iAgid) :B(t my Bdetieal BdMnesSi and tdaiiied in Wli9e>>wliit 
-i^^Mln^iids othet suits — earliness : others whd-iEM ^ihei<^ a 
weak feith or strong malice have thought me liker a pipe^ vthich 
neter aouttda [but when *ti8 bknved in^ dniireiadin# fi^ift JfOta*a« 
4iteiGoi»kiy« bi^ AoAovem .AnonymQiii t T^ ^^^ $1^ I «9^ 
rirei^\fihi^Ait 'is^n^eikTiotta Ftost whiqb rl^ tti^^bloa^iiil 
fa^QpiMdkeysaiqpeat qdidkly; :t4» the kttelr> llM he<l$4h^ 
wor^t Homicide whd strives to mnrther anoUief's faiae-t ten 
boife thai it ia a li^culoas .Miy tocoadamn of kt^k sU^ tbe 
Stars, because the Moon and Sun shine brighter, l^vnmll 
^Bntii hsm ia tittlhei blawn UianeKtingtiish^ by l^Ar^l^Ad, 
ft«r (tht kflfa of FoeaU % Mi« aq|Bei«!4 Uc(iil^^ 



49 tBeff»)|p«[ #C^IW[l)li«ftG[||» A 

this third editi0% ,.■ ^Whiiliitbatglfltilietiiegl^c^ iS^i^sM^ 
1 4Mn.#]ii% th« AnA book wbicfa hath JigMedu'^biicsroiooBMea 
^lW§d hj C^okft JMMi Grocen3»::i II tm.«dl meiis(}iidg7iMqit 
fBoffer Shipwnijck» it shall somediing content me, that %|Hd^ 
plj^as^ i^yself aad the Bookseller. In it yon shall find one 
argument (and I hope I shall need no more) to confute xsw- 
believers $ which is, that as mine age, and odns^que^ntly expe- 
rience (which is yet but little) hath increased^ 9<^r^hcy have 
not left my Poesie flagging bdiind them, ) sjioi^dd not be 
angry to see any one bum my Pi^ranmi and (P^sibe, nay I 
would do it myself, but that 1 hope « pardon -ina;^ easily be 
gotten for the errors of ten years oft^e. Mf 'iJ^Mtantia and- 
PkUehu confesseth me two years older wbtii t iM^ it. The 
rest were made since upon several occasions, apd^rhaps do 
not bely the time of their birth. Such as they are, they were 
(Created by me, but their &ie lies in your hands j 'it is only 
you can effect that neither the Bookseller r!^pent kimaelf of his 
chaige in Pri?iting them, nor I of my kbour in* c6mposing 
them. Farewell.*' ' ' ' 

However unfashionable in our days Cowley i^n^y have be* 
come from the harshness and conceit of som^Afvl^ composi- 
tions, there are still many who think both.higMyfattd^}ustly of 
him as a Poet — ^he was considered by his co^iempidburies as 
excelled by none, and King Charles II. when toM of Mis death, 
declared " That Mr. Cowley had not left a better man behind 
J4m in Fngkyad,-^ 

I certainly think with Dn Blair, that Cowley sAi^acreontic 
P4^s^ are b^ £ur t^ happiest of his eff^rta* ''|;be^ar&:SinoQtl| 



A tmi&ufnjmmm>iLmAt^. 



§f 



I -v 



■f i< 



^tpttsbliE^ieiad^^wiU' ^^dtirey their own excis 

GOLD, 

, A miglity pun to loTe it 10, 
And 'as a pain that pjain to nuM. 
' ^ * Biit of ail ptdns the greatest pain 
•^ -^ 'ititftofoTe-^lmtloTeinvaiiL 
^ /iif . >Vii^e BOW Bor. Noble Blaod, 
'^d { (i ^ ; . l^f ftr Wit l>3r l^eve is nndeiftood ; 
' ' u \^ ^ \ <• ,99^ ♦^•'•^ ^®®« passion nioie» 
\>4rr ^:9r^l^,'»o9PPoliz^Ii0ve! 

f A cone on her, and on the man 

*'" ■*'f*''''^*rtio this iraffick thus bM^an! 

A ' > ^/ ' ^ ^ A d(Me on liim who found tiie ore 1 
Ylxi <• Tji^cntse on ym who digged the sfoi^r 
^ 1 r3 t< > V A cntse on him who did refine h ! 
rt:^ « ^(^ .' , Axiprse pn hkn who first did iwin «k( . 
A corse all corses else aboye 
On him, who os'd it first in Lore ! ! 
Gold hegets in Brethren, hate ; 
^^^^ '' (HSiin Families, debate; 
* 'i 'M3tfM d6te8 Friendships separate, 
^ ^. i' : pokldoesOitil<»WBrs«reate; 
;7!hf«ie llie smallest harms of it I 






:>in(j)il/» 



... • ■•>:■ ; 2 u-vTivyr'. 






•^:-n b -, '-I ( I .s 






4^14, ahs, doeii Lofp bege^ ; . 

THE GBlASSHOPPiEH; 

Happy Insect what can be 

In Happiness compared to Thee ? 

J'^ed sfif^ noorislmielit divine, 






.-J- 



-y 



Monw ^wmmw^%mmw 



-:v. 



And thy verdant «vp' does il^ ' '^' 

'Tu fili'd whereeyer ihou d4Mlt tteatf 

^ictare*8 8^K^(liy*OMiniMAa - .^ 

Thou dost drink, And danoe, aadrflii^; '' 

Happier than the hap)^QSt Kkif I ' 

All the fields which tlum dost sae. 

All the Plants belong4o«iM^' > ? 

All that SammeriRMUsprodnoo; 

Fertile made with «arlj Juieei. 

Man for thee does Sow andflovigli; 

Fanner Be, and Landlerd 7!loii / 

Thou doest innocently foy; 

Nor does thy Luxnry destroys 

fHip Shepherd gladly heareth'ttee^ . ..^x 

More HaimonioQS tints Hew 

Thee, Conntry hinds with tf'lBdness'heiav 
Frophet of the ripened year*! 

Thee Fhoebns loves, an^ does inspire;' * " ' "* ' 
FhoBlms is himself Ay ffirfc " ' ^ * ^' ' ''^' * 

TbtheeofaBihinfsiipom'EaHli, • : / . «->» loJt 

J^ife is no longer than thy lur^ •. : ^ ^ ^ «1: /: . '.> - \^v. V 

Happy Insect, happy Thon, ; . .^ f ^ «, . V 

Dost neither Age nor Winter |utQw^ ^ 
But when thon'st ^ronk, and danc'd, and (RiiV« ; x 

Thy fill, the flow>y Ijearres among, 
(Vokpteoos, and ifise^nthaE, ' ^ '•^* ^''-^'^'^ ^ 

Bpionweaa Animal r> > r^-- r.:4 i:>"m lijiw 

Sated with thy Snminerf^as^ ■ 'v r- >../...,( li-^iin 'tbij^p; 
Th4^ retirest to endless jrest - > v ;iit r^/lr^m ot 

Fill the Bowl with mieWm^ ' -^ ^^^»'^ ^''^^ '"'^^ 



■'Y>"j A 



fkirnKdOMMUOB •UnMY' 



A«d let 00 che«ifl^ wwrnufit . -^ mx 
Like the Wine ^d .Rof^ Mnikw, 
jCrown'd with Roseci Ire wtemn 
Oyge's wealthy diadoB. 
T9 Iktif is our'a ; what do^we^feav? 
t& Zlfly i^mf^iff me hkj»:it'htm^ 
141^8 trea^ it kijMU^, <iM it:i|i%j 
JP«i4 at lea#1^ MntKoii t».8t«y, 
Let'0 banish BusuieMb baaiuli fifonp»irf 
Tp the Goeb belong JkrMamw, 



A <:<f9 sold t^t Sonndei^sl^ J1818> fbr 6/. 16t. M, 
TMp BoQiaiiQe w^ wvitton when the Aatiior wai oiily 17 
years of 9gQa imd in it be iotrod^ces two I>raiiialio Pieeee, en* 
titled '* Deorum Donor and *' Grlpus and Hegio** The Au- 
thor was nephew of James Homell, Author of the Familiar 
Letters, who thus speaks of it in his Letters, 8t^. p. 432;i 
liond, 1?54, 

Tb wjfr. iPr Saron, at Paris. 
Gentle iSir, 
I received and presQotly xw o?or your Cifprimk Academy, 
with mnch gr^ediiness and no ndgar delight > andSir^ I hoht 
myself much honoured fbr the Dedication you;have been pleased 
to make thereof to m^> fbr it deaonred a fur higher patronage. 
Truly I must tell you without any compliment^ that I have sol* 
dom met with such an ingenioQB mixtnve of ptoeo and rerse^ 
Uiterwov«n with guch vanelieff ot fuMsy tsmd dMirmihg straitrs 



7^ .Y?^^?i^^ ^^Vi^.^^Tr.fPI{?f®/ 

for which achievement he bore on his coat of anus -Ihrfi^^lHlfjEtf 
H<^9ds. He afterwards went to America^ wheijfe J^^wa&4;a)(^ 
pnsoner by the savage Indians^ from whom he found jq;^^^^^^^ 
escape. He often hazarded his life in i^aval engagemenU wit)i 
Tfartcs, Spanish Men of War, and in other adventures ^ and 
fiatt.a considerable hand in reducing New England to the, obe- 
dience of Great Britain, and in reclaiming the. inhabitaptsi^om 
IftuWism." AU which exploits are detailed in the History of 
Virginia by himself. < i 

Matoako, alias Rebecca, daughter to Pouhataif, Sovereign 
of Virginia, and who is called Pocahontas by Capt. Smith in 
his History, may be considered as a national beni^^i^ress, jbs 
tb her (^ays Granger, vol. ii. p. 58) we are indebted for the 
preservation of Virginia, when in the state of an infant colony. 
In 1607, when she was about 12 or 13 years of age, she not 
only procured the liberty, but saved the life of Capt. Smi^b, 
whom, together with his men, her father intended to murdef 
by surprize. In 1612, she was herself a prisoner^ and soon 
alter married Mr. Rolfe, whom Smith calls a gentlemsui. In 
}ol6, after she had been instructed in our lan^piag;e and the 
Jtttmstian religion, she was brought to England, andintroduc^ 
and graciously received at Court. The next year, up^nljei re- 
turn liome, she died on ship board at Grayesenc^ st^rQ^lf Vf^ 
pressed with religious sentiments. The good sense, homanity, 
and generosity of this woman, do her honour, as they carried 
her far above the prejudices of her education, and t^^ bartrau^g^s 
customs of her country. She was the first Vii^g^an who -was 
converted to Christianity, that conld speak onr ^, or 
had a child by an Englishman.** 
*' The Library at Eton contains King James Ist's co{)y. jAp^rJi^ 



A^' JBliBiioMA^iAC'S ilBRART. 77 



'•',.. Cj-s^^ :'■> 



^'y'FoJittiul Library was a presentation copy j othpr large p?y- 
^^ioplies.are in the Libraries of some of our principal Bibli- 

jonfyus Travels and Adventures in Europe, Asia. Africd^ (fn^ 

r){]f- • - >: ! Tit.- 

America^ Small folio. Sixty pages only. KfltA Platetk. 

!3^v'-.' . •' - " ' ■ ' '^- "'^ 

[' Mr. Grenville*8 copy, according to Dibdina Libi^^.Gomr 

paiuon, p. 284, cost him 5/. 5«. , . » 

It was reprinted in vol. ii. of Charchill*s Collection of Vpy^s. 

I 

jBi^dccettt ((jiov. Bat.) Bizarie di Varie Figure. 8w. ohlim&s 

1624. . . ^ , 

*' See Tiie Jf}fj9erfontfmjBid/io^tfj9Atcwm,,wberei|i8de^ 

u /^A Qibst rare and singular Book, containing Prints pf.h^?^^ 

"" Figures lormed by the strangest materials, as diamonds, hoops^ 

^ouaders, pieces of carpentery, battledores, chains, culinsuy 

^Titlensils^ &c. When the correctness of the delipeations, ai^d 

'ine bol^ess of the attitudes, are considered — we s^ the n^d 

w a great ^faster through the laughable whimsicality of bis 

"'^^ A'^i^py IS in the Strawberry Hill Collection, and one was \x^ 
'tfflfe fifcrai^ at Fonthill. 



^Ibit^cih (Ahraham) Annales of the famous Empresse Elizabeth^ 
^^'*^iieene of England, 8fc. translated out of French. Large 
^^ pi^erl '2 vols, Ato. Benj, Fisher, (No date.) 

Large paper copies differ from the small iu the following 
jtoriii^arafs: viz. that the date (1625) is wanting in th^m^ 



«%.:^(ii|| ^f j^ab^t^ are |^^r|e^ |(e$^ »>cq)<^1^ M^AP 
ypMiU copies t>iiiy ti^ two bat versos in Goanmoa fu^ ji^il^H^ 
. Mtp Tf CbrenfUle has a large papinriQi^i)^^;; wi(l|,,th9,.4^^|^%ii 
^ f^^ef ^pluuies, in letters ofgiM. Qq i&^ >y^ l^^jOisA* 
^,iJ^9,hiWmt IWtrait <^ Darck by Delaraoi^ of iy]M<^<^ 
impressions are to be found in the copies jjo/^fjeaaedji^'^ 
l^sifMis. ofBtaff;^ tieneral Oow^swi^^ tuid Ui JM[r, JE^^jjf^r's 
iWf^ wW at Sotheb^s, in 1822, fef JOt V^ . , : .^^^ 

'••■"•-■"■•■■' • ••'.;■.■; ,:'<^rf yi| 

;•■••• ^•. .■■•'■ ^ J- •■.■:K .[jfo3 

Omt^ifAkrukamJ Poeticid Bhsaom*. WUh P$rtt(9i^\^ 
'A-^^wthe Author m kk 13/A fear, ft^ F'ftugkam. 4^ LflJ?^^^ 
.Afh^lLai^ffDMft B^^ot1Leca ^s^^Tgt^ a copy, with tk^J^jg^ 
tnit, is marked ^115/^ and anoCher^ wantiq^ (WP^Ftwt^ 

^l^nys/sale, 18i2, 4/. , , .^..^^l 

.4£SNr%V X0ve'# BUdSl^ a Pa9$ora! ComeXej^ wntten 4fAj/iff 

{. :4imeof Mt i^eiffj" a ICi»g'*s Scl^ltqr in We*tm9fi!^er.Sfib^^f^ 

, fS^itkPortrdit. 1638. : > L:,^, 

aO, Nassaiv Esq. 1824, 3/. IQ«. > . ^ v o/^n 

ir^ ^<»f^ rfMf, 4hnihmn Cowley, co9^^(^4k^ wHA 

-'' were fortherfyprmfed, and those which he defigke^ fory'Ske 

press; Note published out of the Authors -, Origtual^GsfM^ 

I2nkf. Lqnd. 1691. . ! to<.## 

(Second Pqft qfP'Uto, mlufmg hJi^ Poetical Bli^^fktC' J^^, 

■'••■I1682.' ^ ■■■•.■• >■.'.»■ .r.-xM 

' fliis kttei* edition of Cowley> Works conti^AS Dt^ BfVath 

If \j^e!caii|^t of tl|^ I4fe and Wntiogf^ of Cow)ejr> wri^ar k> M^t 



Snati lAegr^eretfiratpriiilBd nt the eoPly «feMtrt6>'lM HWSI: 
J^ nwi It school bay •! Westtninater ; three ediiiotiB had beeb 
mU, and the book had become yery scarce, wheii tiie foiiflh 
isdition afrpearedf in 1^2^ the Town^ according to the fioOk- 
Mltf# AihtfMiCment^ hatd]y B^ oop^' Th^ftlhif^ 

hg^Mru(t»6 the leado^ by Comity latMM, i9t«loe6aiiigly 
Ofikmi fioA oiiita own aeo^ant, andfonrliie tel*^<fiidbgm6 

^' EeadcTj (I know not yet whether gentle or mi) (ioM4 

loidwIlaTe been angry (I dare not astilnietlie hdnaur^f 'thd^ 

''%teg^) t«e hiy Bbetieal BdldiieaSi and %kilied hi %nk)e> iHiit 

i^i>tatelkit^|id8 othe^ suits — earliness: others whd al9 ^ihet^ a 

iveak 6dth or strong malice have thought me like a ppe, ^hich 

neter aaandscbnt'when 'tisblowedin, itodreadine AiM(^ Al^a* 

^SMavGo^ik^^ biifc Aulhoiem AdoiByniam ; T6 th^ ^x^ Iw^ 

^#vM\Atiil-4t lia^ «ii*efmoaa Ftost which liips lb«^ bksapind 

MqplMsilNy f»F|>ea» qiiicMy : U> the ktteir, Ifav^ he i^.th^ 

woist Homicide wh<> atrives to marther anothef's faine t to. 

hotft fhiifc:it it a fidteuhHis ioQy toooadeinn or k%h itttlie 

Stars, because the Moon and Sun shine brighter, l^hoiamall 

.^Bha|<j jhriva ia (laihef blown than extin^hiid by Ihtsi ^WiM. 

Bt(tkftil(AtrfFoe«e!by ;beii^ai«efed inoii^a^ ^y fvW^tig' 



rp ea^OOHQ KHIBNSY ^9V^Tf. 

But SSL Bfm^s maw, snd feed Man's idle thought f 

13ijOraBd«ird*8 words sayvin'i of <)inftieleiBkeii^ . ;^ 

Or manly garlick ; hot thy fmrnaee jreekes 

Hote steams of wine ; and can aloofe deicrie 

The dmnken draughts of sweete antmnmilie. ' 

They naked went; or clad in rader hide. 

Or home-span' rnsse^ TOid of ibi^raine pAAt: ' * ' 

'l^ttlioa canst mftske- in- ganshganderi^ -r 

: < Ta smite a £M)le's far-fetched K?erie. , . i 

. A French head join'd to necke Italian : 

Thy thighs fr<mi Oermanie, and hreast fro' Spain : 

An Englishman is none, a fool in all : 

Many in one, and one in seyeralL •..'.' ^^i- 2.;'. • 

Then Men were Men ; hut now the greater padrt • '*'" "'• ;f 

Beasts are in Hfe, and Women are in heart -' : !' ^.>t.'-,>r 

Good nature 'selfe, tiiat hondy Bmpermir, ., ;{ | 

in proadest ponqpe was not so dad of yore, 

Aa is the under Gk'oome of the Ostlerie, 

Husbanding it in work day yeomanrie. 

Lo ! the long date of those expired dayes^ 

Which the inspired Merlin's word fore-saiyk;^ 

When dunghill peasants shall be dight aa 

7%<» MM <»n^if^ibff anodier brings : 

Th«n fare well, fairest age, the Worlds best dayei 

Thriving in all, as it in age decayes. 
In Phillips's Theatnim Poetaram, 8vo. Canterbury; I8t)6, 
p. 326, &c. may be found a concise and satis^EU^tory account of 
Bishop Hall. " He is universally allowed/* says PhillipSy " to 
have been a man of great wit and learning,, and of as -great 
meekness, modesty, and piety.** His works, published at va- 
rious periods in folio, quarto, and octavo, '♦ are filled,** saya 
Bayle, '' with fine thoughts, excellent morality, and a great 
deal of piety." 



' I: *: 



' I 



Life and Dedth of Edmund Gentn^en, (aUeu Ironmonger,) 
Ato. Portrait and Ptdtes. ' St: Omeft. ' 1614. ' 

Gulston, 2/.; Townley, 5/.j G. Nassau/ 1^24, blue morocco, 
12/. 5*. 

*' Edmund Jennings/' says Granger, ^ was admitted into 
the English College, at RheimSj under Dr. afterwards Cardinal 
Allen, and when he was 20 years of age^ ordiEtted Priel^. He 
was soon afterwards sent into England, where he tras appre- 
hended in the act 'of celebrating Mllss. He wks exechted by 
hanging and quartering in Gray^s Inn^elds, Dec. 10th, 1591.** 

In the above rare book are several Historical Prints, repre- 
senting the principal drcnmstances of his IMki and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expence by the Pa- 
pists, in order to perpetuate the remembrance of two* Mira- 
cles,** which are there said to have happened at Us death! 
The first is, that, after his heart was taken out/ he said, 
*' Sancte Gregori, ora pro mei^ which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, '' God*s wounds ! see lus heart is in my hand > yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth." The other is, that an holy Virgin 
being desirous of procuring some relick of him]; contrived to 
approach the basket into which his quarters were thr6ivn, and 
touched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy from 
Its having been employed in acts of consecration andf'elevatiDg 
the Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
of mscovery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
the greatest care. 



M-M 




H^ mnimmiimiM) mmm k 

^wie — iSM^« mi<f Sonnets, Svo, For Mat. Butter, 1622^ 
JfHth PortraU o/the ^utka^ 6n ti^ engraved Title. 
•* Of this Sonnetteer,*^ «iy8 Gfki^- M:1i. p.'1t,^^ 't find 
no mention made bV diiry of our Blomplifcfir Aiilh<&. 
Beloe, in his Anecdotes, calls the above " a bpok .mr no 

«e«u of co^on^.^ >: .i.4 frp^f .^^JS^ 
Co]le<ftofS| if we may judge ivom the prii»it,hfli^=abtalMBd in 
three recent sales/ he ai^ars to have been pretty raneollh hik 
aiq|>recia^on of k« mrity. .:^-^ «^* :»«* 

At Mr. Bindley s sale it produced 3hlJ\^^*id JtrrfA-ry's, 
1 822. 38/. OS. descnbed as containinir the Pormitl^ p£ Uuinay 
and of his Peitroness, Anne ,of,D^np[iark. ^ S[r M«.S^^%j|.fopy> 
which had been Mr. Bindley s^ sold, ii^ 18^43^ 4^ lA^* H 

The following exti;i^:t9 may be found in BeloM Aftitdotes 
of Literature, vol. vi. and which I hope I shall be excused fo 
abstracting, considering the value of the Book cited, and th^ 
difficulty of obtaining even a glwce at such BiMomaniaaA 

lfit)Nfi^^ed Ktthure m tliM latter age, ^-^r^ ■ » 

Willing her master-piece shodj then J^'^lmH^W ^ '"^'*^ '^• 
.^Qi^mj {lire Celia set 4m Earth** laige jiafe^ y ^ ' >''Aif»^^^. l/^ 
As all the Gods in emulation brought, \.' 

For they did thinke if Nature only mf^i :■- ^'^ r ^.^ •. 

iBrag of her wort^, ske skonld bsult o're tkem;: ., 

Wherefore they 'greed to haye an equal nght, '^^'= "^ "'*'^ ' 
That they ofher perfection part might diamt:-?^^^ ^^^'"^ ^^'^ 
Pallas g»fe wisdome, Jitao stateKnetse, ^^-^ " '■ '^ '"f*^ *tf* 

And the milde moming gave her madestic; < -.M^*i^ 






%tVti .V*WtS .X«^U. «' > •••' • w,> ';-sM-, •.»•- <^. — ^-a-.HV, 

A»i fiiwiSi icwkt itr«tmefl east Heairen adwrne^ ... 

«ii1 cg w^ i m ii tg »i ln wtimlBtor her k«iA4i|«rftlui% ^ y.A i>>i * rift) 
Mm iMgU and tall, ker tresses traile4W:Crf«a4^ . ..u;^'v :;.<•(#; 



, I? Y*#f*^ ^/l**^ thmkanu i»y deere Jiad bee^ 
L ^^j^ ap!^ f^^«wu every sense to sigbt vfMgone, 
^^^wiA WttmniD Uosh my blisse fled I once seene. 



.-.ft . ,»/ Wv 



« * ' 






^t'4'»li« a»ftMifoniied M it were in rtone, " ' ■ * " ' « ■ ^ '^ 



«^ ify^ ^1^1 ^]|iM» ever to liare retaained, 
«%i^^^MI«i»iNift4lli^'d,alidf my sight vetaiMd. >> : ^^T 

<»« }> Nmju «i;$ * >. : ,1 - . ■ '«■ • . .\i "ii/ .,» *■*> 

i»£^t btu- /^■'^ : 'c ■•.;'■ --*. • > * , ■ • ' .... .-•.?..- y ••>.«'^>J<y'^>. 

H*.«iWW«»n./^i-'"*^ : ■ '.. ,■ ■■■•,.- .V .-.■ • .'?...:ri-ilJ'i!; 

Jthmifioms (MickaelJ Poly-Olbum, with the secimd pm^^riitu^} 
. FtmUi$pkce and Portrait of Prmpe H^^.ky Ifofe^j^td aU 

i '* la 1613/* says * PhiBrpft's TKealanim Poeta]tim>8vo. 1900/ 

^* Dimytoa piiblislied the &r8t part ef his Poiy-aibk^, by^ whidi 

^)potk tkle, 8ignyfyu^p.«<9y-^/yi'^« hedeiM^efl£iB|^luftd| a» 

%]k aatient name of Albion is by sone deffiv>ed horn Olbioir, 

lyippy. It is a chorogn^icid dcscriptioii <»f the liTers^ nloaa- 



^4 s$mm^^^mm,^fmmA 

tains, forests, castles, Iw; in diii'Ialafi^ Miefaitoi mkh \t*t 

y??[I^ Jo ijrl^QPkfti8&jStpart>4ed^^»^ 
C9f;ifij3^t^.i^ EHii^ ^A military p^tocv ex*^ 
||if^.|^vP^ jp^ aipgiAr nuvl^f of liifL JE|V9r ;. ,^b^ ii^a- 

few- XV 'P*w^ ?^e ejiglitaptt: scmg^ m tJii«; T<^e^?l^g|r^ #h 
the learned notes of Sietde;! -, and t&iprQ ape njy^ ^j^^ jWHT 
BOQg, J¥kerein the ciU^o^ inpuiitai^Sjffojcest^riyei^ &Ca are^re* 
presented by the' ucorea of men. and womfin* , UJa mtre of 




^xact, that, as 3lshop NicholsoR obsenres'^ n 
mioicn tra^ account of thfs Hngdonxand'tAef ^ominron 

tan could well be expected ^om the pen of a Fqet. I£|s'in- 
rwoven Vith many i^e Episodes *, of the cozj^nm.of iiiia 
Blafid/by tlie Romanfl^i of the c^mwk: ^ tb4, $aa^M 
Danef, and the Normans, with an actonnt of their Kings Lot 

fDgiish Warriors, Navi£ators> Sunts, and of the tiiWt lY^rs of 
lu^tand, &c. This volume was repnnted m 1622, with the 

^i^im'iie whole,. aM^ (kedfeatttd t<!i> Prince 4!ftBxilsSh ^^^S&k 
he gives hopes of bestowing the l%e paitfs uinn^SeonncL , ^^, 
mn^ai4^jtii»^lis liiv^of th6iEQ|^liyk PM% s^ocB^ 
t<>p th^t ''he w^^ Pop! of a pipns teii^r^, l)ijs,.qififi|^n0i; 
iMipig abii«;4» tto MMMAcfbte luiBy; nn^ tQ^pRI«|c^fall 
1^ M^ sfaur #f lyeedli^ vaiik ifi^teitdfnBr in «i p to y» ^' Hev 
clumgilA ]|k bi«A 1^ aeCf^imr of gtarsf^ aiiM^ IS^H^MilMH* 
b^R^ili WafttWBateii AUwyl" ^^"^ '^^ 






i'si d:'m iyyiuT:-:-- ■ :^~^ '■■ .■ . ■.■■'.'■.■> ■■.--■■■"■t .■".'■i' 

-'WiP'Him^'mfteii iUotKeidifct PomJU iflt^iMltnii 
^^if-imMM Ad Mmam* ikeP»tfa&$fiJ^ipt».}SS>S!fi 

v^ftiitoMrtA.' mi^ ■.■■.■-..ii 

, A fine copy ottbia book, handsumely bound, was in (Coffins 
the Dooksellcr's catalogae, a tew years bnctt, marked 8/. 8t. — '• 
P«yne and foss mark a copy at C/. 6*. — At Dr. F, ^iit\stafi, 
sale^ ia 1698, a copy sold for four shUHngs and tw6 pence! ! 
A,large paper copy at rfunter'a sale, in 1813, prodirtea 

. It j|S remarked by Mr. tirenville (says £>ibdin), ttiat etieet 
O in this work is auppreaned, and that the defective paging 
^m §6 to 105 13 Dot supplied in all the copies of this Imok,. 
' CaplaiQ John Smith, Admiral of New England, (says Gran^ 
ffer,) .deserves to be ranked with the grcateat travellers nbA 
adveutnrcts of his age. He was Bometime in the service ofUe 
Emperor, and the Prince of Transylrania, against the Grand 
Signior, vthere he distinguished himself by ehallen^ng three 
TurJta of tonality to single combat, and cntfing off their heailsi 

mihh imiamn «<te H^of New B%ltM mai aba MwnMforrf 
ti|Bf» tnjiiwthmr M^ baloBgim l« Ai* MBS HiAoiJ. B§»(>mgir,WQL 
•■P-399- .,.,,1 

-^ An EdItloD, folio, dat«aifi32,witkPortruliudpiatM,MU in ii* 
lilc of 6. Nouia'i Id-brarj, f SSI. for tL 



SBQOND JOURN^ JlOjU^O, . 

says, that under the pretence of deacrihing the Terr^ \4u0rfll(^^ 
Incognita, Hall reversed the plan of Sir T. More*s Uto^a^ 
and cfaaracteri^ the vices, of existing nations. ^,^^ 

HalVs fjj f^irgedeml&rium, ,. .!.'(( 

Hie three first Books, called '' Toathies* Suiirea^ F^eiiMi 
Academical, and Mora!," were first printed 6jf T« Creed fiji 
Bi' Dewier. l2mo» Land, 1597. iC.r 

The three last Books appeared under the Title of F'irgeA' 
mUtrhnn,' Tlie three last Bookea of By ting Satyree, 12iao. 
JjM^. Printed by R, Bradockefor R, Dexter, 8fc. 15981^ ft 
b^j^his with Satires of Book 4. : > ,..[.. 

' This original edition complete is estimated by Dibdin kit iSL 
Longman and Co. in the Bidl. Ang. Poet, mark a copy attSAD 

The next edition (of the whole) is entitled Vlrgedimiai/iiim, 
the three last (in reality all six) Bookes of the By ting Satytik'^ 
corrected and amended with some additions by J, H, ItMii 
Lond. for R, Dexter, ^c, 1599.* ' ' 

G. Nassau, 1824, 1/. 1*. 
Ditto, Svo, 1602. 

Brand, 21, I2s, Cdr, Stevens, 3/. 3s, 



where he taught several Ganzas or Wild Geese to fly with a light 
chine, and to fetch and carry things for his conyenieiice. He after some 
time ventured to put himself into the machine, and they carried him with 
great ease. He happened to he in this .^hial Chariot when these Ganzas, 
which were hirds of passage, took their flight to the Moon, and was di- 
rectly carried to that Planet He gives a very ingenious descripdbn of 
what occurred in his Journey, and alse of the Wonders he saW when he 
arrived there." 

* See Warton's Observations on Spenae,xo\. i p. 1S7, 8va 



A BffBLlOllIAVtAO'S XlBRAirY. W 

R^prh^ed at Oxford. I2im. 1753. 
G':Na8sati,1624, 12*. , r 

Gray, the Poet, in a letter to his^ friend 'I>r.WliafUm; of 
Durham, alluding to this edition, 8ays« '^Bishop HalFs Satires, 
cyifid Vik'gidemii^ttm, are lately republished. They are fid) of 
8p^t aiujb poetry, as much of the first as Dr; Donne, a&d ftr 
inore of the latter ; they were n^tCen When he was abonl 23yea|9 

^Th^se ^tii«i^, with N6tC9 by Singer, in addition to WarUm^ 
observ^ons, have been republished in 8vo. 1824, They^nm^ 
also be found in the 10th yolnme of HalVs IVorks, Svo. 180^^ 
with Warton*^^ Notes, as well as Mr. £llis*s and Mr, Pratt's 

lUtfstrations. .,,, 

Of our Satirical Poetry, taJdng satire in its moral a^d Sig- 
nified s^nse, ^all, according to CampbeU, elmms and may be 
allowed to be the founder : thus in the Prologue to his Satires 
he says — 

I first adyentore with fool hardy mighty 
To thread the steps of perilous despight: 
I first adyentore, fellow me who list. 
And be the second ISnglish Satyrist 
Hall's Prologue to Book 3, implies his knowledge of former 
Satirists. 

" Some say my Satyrs orer-loosely flow. 

Nor bide their gall inongh from open show : 

Not riddle like, obscoriBg their intent; 

But, paoke-stafle plaine, uttering what thing they meant, 

dototrairie to ^ Roman Ancients, 

Whose words were shor^ and darksome was their senoe. 

Who reads one line of their harsh poesies, 

Hirise must be tak his wind, and breath him thrise. 

Jtfy muse woM follow tkem that have fore-gone, 



sBcoistD jovmfxv nomO) A 



.t 



But cantiotwiik mm SktgkskrPimimi'i ■•>"■ ;<^. ';f W>di 
For looke liow fwre tile Anfcieiit Goinsdie ^ ' •:: ^ nHT 
Past former Satytv m ker liberties - - J - - » ! v il'iA'f 
So flurre mui mind yadda vnto tlitm t>f ddt^ -. ^ f > '^atiVI 

Tit better be tootbad* ^ban be Uo boU .<; v; // 

Peologne to Btok»^ 

The, first satire of the tbird Book affords a feir ^piiiilmei] 
the Aiith<Nr, aiul^ in the opiaioii of Mr. Ellis^ stnkingly resc 
bles the Vlth Satire of Juvenal 3 it exhibits a lively Qpntr 
between the olden tiine ^d ^be efeinin^ of thQr^;M?;ni^ a 
cotemporaries. . .. .t i*.M 

Book HLp-tSatuls 1 . i-.,. JuU 

Time was, and that waa tenn'd: tbe Time of G^dj) ,■/ v !/. 
Whose world and fSme were yong, that now are «Mi{ ' 1 /, 
(When quiet Satnni awaid the mace of Lead; ■ -^yl 

And Pride was yet nnbome, and yet unbred.). : ' UtiA 
Time was, tiiat^ wbSles the^ Autmnne fiill didlaal;) .. M^qi 
Onr himg^y Sires gap^t ibr the £edling. Mast i . • . c . < .1 r 

Of the Dodonian oke& . ^a 4 

Conld no unhnskied itome letave the tr^cu .' ,.< . r . rt 
But there was challenge made whose it pigbt hce. , < 
Andy if some nice and liknoK(NiB.^[^tile. ... , . . t- .'/r 
Desired more daintie 4ish of ran deUJ^« . . - // 

They scaled the stored, Crab ijrith^clMped knecu - . *. .-/f 
Till they had sated their delicioos eie : - 1 

Or searched the hi^efoU thicks of hedgy-rowes^ . >/: 

For brierie berries, or hawes, or sourer sloes; >'i 

Or, when they meant to &re fin'st of all, - v. :*i 

They lick't oake-leaTes besprint with bony fall. '.■■..> •> '■. 
As for the thrise three-angled Beechnut shdl, ■..*■■ -Y, 

Or Chesnufs armed huske and hidkehieS,' '.' :■ M^a<.)>. 
No Squire durst touch, ihe Law would not vSktr^--^^ '^i')^ 

Kept for the Court, and for the Kings owncbord. < ' •' I 

■ •■■ ... * r. 



r 



A filBLlbMANkicffl UBfUMt. 09* 



■a 



;... i 
-.>* 



Their Ro^all Plate wm«1»j, o» woo^ «r itoae^ ' 
The Vulgar, saye hk kand^ elffrhad he none^ ^ 
Their only seller was the neigUMmr }moika\ ' 
None did fi>r bettet care, for better lofttke; --^ v • < u 
Was then no paying of die BreiMr'S'Seap^ ^ 

Korgttoedie YintncAr mixt the strained grape. 

f.-. . . . ?V King** PaviUpii. wail tlie|pra«ygwn,. , ^ ,^ ,, ,. /j 
Under safe shelter 4>f the shadietreen. > . ^ 

Under each banke men lajd their luns along. 
Not wiahinj^ any ease, not fearing wrong: 

^'^"^ C!ad Wfth Aelr owne, ks Aey were made of old, •; •"^>'' 
Kot fearing shame, not feeling any cold. .: >-'^: ;:)io !? 

Bat when, by Cerete hnswifiry and paiite 
Men leartt'^io bury ibe feTiniiggfatno; 
And faAterJaAQitMightlbe new fovad Viae' - '- '^ 

Rise on the Efani^^ with many a Friendly Twine t. ■ " ^''; 
And base desire bade men to delren low, ' --' 

For needleise metbb ; tiien *gan miscldef groir. • 
Then farewell, fayrest age, tiie worlds be«t daj^; » ' 
lluiying in ill, as it in age deeaies* — 
Then crep^in Pride, and Peerish GOTetise; - > * ^ 
And Men gre^ir gredy, diseordsiui, and nieeu - ^ ' « 

Now Man, tfiat earst baflo-Mkw wa« widi Beasty 
Woxe on to weene himselfe a Ck)d at least 
No aery foule ean take so high a ^ght, 
Tho' she her daring wings in clouds have digbt \ 
Nor Fish can dive so deep vtt yeelding sea, ' ^ 

Tho' Tletis' self riioald swear her liafttie ; S 

Nor fearefbll BeasH can <Ug bis care so-lowe, > • «- * 
AsGonldhefinrther than: Eartk's centre go; •■ 
As that the ayre, ihe earth, or ocean^ 
Shonld shield them finom tbe gorge of greedy Jlfan. 
Hath utmost Inde ought better, tlian his owne? 
Then utmost Inde is neare, and rife to gone. 
O Nature ! was the World ordain*d for nought " \ 



fp 9&0WM WDBNSY ^90WDf 






But SSL Bfm^s maw, snd feed Man's idle thooglit ? 
Hhj Oraadtird's wordf sarcrar'd of duiftie leekei^ . j^ 

Of manly garlick; Imt thy farnaeeTeekei 
Hote steanw of wine ; and can aloofe descrie 
Tlie drunken dranglitB of tfweete antmnmitie. ' 
They naked went ; or clad in rnder hide, ^ : . ^ 

Orhom&4piufni88e^ voiddfib!hraioe]^didtf?' '^ 

'Bottfaoacanttmlttke-in'gariflhgaiidcrie^ - :!th 

Ta imite a £M)le's far-fetched K?erie. ^. .-, ,\\f, 

A French head join'd to necke Italian : 
Thy thighs from Oermanie^ and breast fro' Sfun : 
An Englishmanis none, a fool in all: 
Many in one, and one in seyeralL -.' jii uur.i' 

Then Men were Men ; bat now the greilter ]Midrt " "'^ '» 
Beasts are in Hfe, and Women are in heart ' : i ' ^•ti^iiV'-. 
Good nature 'selfe, tiiat homely Brnpermuv ., d'l 

Inproodestponqpowasnotsocladofyore, ^ -^ 

Aa is the under Gk'oome of the Ostlerie, 
Husbanding it in work day yeomanrie. 

Lo ! the long date of those expired dayes^ ' ^ ''^ 

Which the inspired Merlin's word fore-says; .^ .- - 

When dunghill peasants shall be dight as Kioga >•: 

7%<» MM 0o»/i(isMi anodier brings : 
TbMi fere well, fairest age, &e Worlds best dayei 
Huriving in all, as it in age decayes. 
In Phillips's Theatnim Poetaram, 8vo. Canterbmy/ isbo, 
p. 326, &c. may be found a concise and satisfectory account of 
Bishop Hall. " He is universally allowed/ says Philips, '* to 
have been a man of great wit and learnings, and of as great 
meekness, modesty, and piety." His works, published at va- 
rious periods in folio, quarto, and octavo, '♦ are filled,** saya 
Bayle, '* with fine thoughts, excellent morality, and a great 
deal of piety." 



Life and DeAth of Edmund Geningi^, (alias Ironmonger.) 
Ato, Portrait anU Ptdtes, ' St. Omefs. 1614. ' 

Gulston, 2/.; Townley, bl.y G. Nassau/ 1824^ blue morocco, 
12/. 5*. 

''Edmund Jennings/* says Granger, ^was admitted into 
the English College, at Rheims, under Dr. afterwards Cardinal 
Allen, and when he was 20 years of age', ordaEtted Priel^. He 
was soon afterwards sent into England, where he tras appre- 
hended in the act of celebrating M^s. He wiur exedited by 
hanging and quartering in Gray's Inn^elds, Dec. 10th, 1591.** 

In the above rare book are several Historical Prints, repre- 
senting the principal circumstances of his IMki and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expence by the Pa^ 
pists, in order to perpetuate the remembrance of two* Mira- 
des,** which are there said to have happened at Us death. 
The first is, that, after his heart was taken out, he said, 
" Sancte Gregorl, ora pro me^ which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, ** God*s wounds ! see Ids heart is in my hand > yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth.'* The other is, that an holy Virgin 
being desirous of procuring some relick of him', contrived to 
approach the basket into which his quarters were thrdwn, and 
touched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy from 
Its naving been employed in acts of consecration and'elevatiDg 
the Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
or'd&covery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
the greatest care. 



A»»e—Songi and Sonmeit'. Svo.' ' Pot Mat. ButUr. 1(32* 

U^k Portri^ of the A*t\or im tl^ engrtmed "nile. 

" Of this Sonnetteer,"' ssys Grti^; Mi'a. p.'-t?,'*'( find 
no iMotion made lj>y anf of our Bio^pticu AiiihcA- 

Bdoe, ia bit Anecdotes, qjlti.tiie above ^^ (^9^^% "^ 
Beans of common occirnjaiiQe ;" . ^d ttofn )i« ,<ijtiflW|tijpiv,jipOBg 
Celkcton, if we nay jodge from the [Hice jt haccUllaed in 
three recent aaleaf he ^^ara tahavebesapicttyebmotki hiC 
a^ireo^oti of'ks mrity. ■ •• i-t-* 

At Mr.KndleyS sale it produced 35/. 14^.; n.t Mr. Pct'ry's, 
18£Z, 3S/. 6(. described as containii^ tijc Purtraits otoaaoAj 
■mI ofbis I^ronesa, ADne,of,I>qn|nark. Sir M. Sjkcs's icopy, 
which had been Mr. Bindley 'a, sold, in 1824, for 42/. Hit. 6d. " 

T^ie fbllowing extafit9 nuy be fonad in Balae* A mtiiatet 
of Uteratore, vol. vi. and which I hope I shall be excused fo 
i^tractiag, considering the value of the Book cited, and thti 
difficulty of obtMniog even a glance at such BiUjomaniacit 

■ SxtRiritnMX Nthire m thk Ifttler age, '" "' '■Ti''<Tfl 

WiUinj bm muter-piece dionld then be »n«SH,'' ■■^^'" '*'' 
.Sni^^7{^CeIiaBetamB«rtli'ilMKeriHtBt.: ' ■-Axr'--': '.^"i 
As all the Ooda in emulktian brongbl, \:, 

For thej did Uunke if Nature obI; m^it .-'■:■. • : 

fing of ber vord,«bc ahonld insult D^ tkcm^ ^, 

Whl-refbre tHej 'greed to tare an equal rigbt, 
ThaltbernrherperiectianpBitmiglftclHns: ' ' »:'■> "wt^'^ 
FaUai gam wiadonie, Jnao ■tateKnrtM, ' ''-' ' *' "-"•'" '•*' 

And di« Diilde moraiBg gave ber i 



fk$ Oriet'c muHtigB, VtMt lov«liiMit> 

flMkM?)n«B4 earth d»c^^ ,. ., «« 

*WJ}i .VaWH .t*».U. ^r 'i .'• .• .t.>. ^..ix. -.-i- ^.— "^*''**t^ 

AM mL«i9i actrlet itr«tmefl east Heaven acU^ne^ . ^ 

« yfWj noM CflBha'ii ciiamber iped : 

^< tr^inMHte^%Wli«^aifo«d^doatli*lMrrn»t^ vv>t^u:<>> 

81m itiaiglil and tall, ker treases traile4 Wrgr«nn4^ .mwv: '.^:(#; 
. ^. y^^ftf^ l/[topdt thinking ley 4eereJiadbce^ ,_;} ,;/ ^/, 

^ w|tii>ashtnn Dluab mj hlisse fled I once aeene, 

-•C5^a«lfc4a;ifomeda.itwereinatone, * ' '•^*^*'^-«* 
Mi tWijatliHiikiweTcrtohaTcrotaained, ' ' ' " * '^^''*' 
lWh>llii ike Um ett^^d, and f my iigkt TetaiaaA >^^ 

xft bw^ /.-vi^. . 4 -. ;' --'. • ' * ■ ■ ■ r. " '.- .i> .-tt^S^y^U. 

'4*.»feijtt*BH^^i''*-i •.. ■ ■ ^ ..V.' .V * .<' ■.■A^ii:- 

Ji)f^$9mi (Michael) Poly-Olbum, with the aecimd p€igi,jlAu^i 
, fV9t^i$pkce wd Portrait oj J^rimpe Hem^jf h^^ 
ike 0^^ P/«^, .J613— 1622-r 
€oL 8tialey*8 Mito> »819> Ul9e.ed.^ 0;NadMi,Zi^.i824, 

: '^ la 1613/* says ^ Philtipft s TKeatnim Poetaitim^Svo. 1^00/ 
** Draytoa pnblislied the &r8t part ef his Pofy-^^bh^, by wliidi 
^kmk tkle> signyfyi^g.^^. imysr/ji^^ be deiM^es Eagluidi a» 

* 

%ke aotient same of Allnoii is by sene 4effiv>ed Immb Oibioir, 
Ittf^y. It is a chorogn^ieid dcscrip^n of the iiTers/nlouft- 

F 



^^jtPie^i ia Jiig Anecdotes of litofatore, ^Lf% ^'N^tbef.WilM 
i^Ji^s.jyfo ,pf Hooker, nor Bi«b^ Gvndekii ^aa 40aiiy /tl^iiM 
thutgivean account; of Hooker audvbi9 Writftng4i»-9iB)if|f#i)||^ 
mention of the Books or Tracts which gave occasioif , to his 
writing The Ecclesiastical Polity. Wliitgift had written an 
Answer to the Admwution to the Parliament , and th^by^en^ 
g^d'tn a controversy with Thomas Car,twr|ght, the soi^KMed 
Aut^<^ ot it. Hooker^ in thra his e^'oellent VToi^ ;^ndeIioclik 
the defence of our Eocli^siastic^ Establishment, agi^B.&t ^huili 
Ckrtwright appears to have been the most powerful of all the 
oppbrt^nts."* /\< 

Hooker was some time Master of the Temple, and afterwards 
Aectmr' 6f Qjsliopsbourne in Kent. There is a Fbrtriait' of hH^>^ 
12n^. HoUai^culp. from Sparrow's Ration^ of the Cdt^ridon 
Prayer ) and another in folio, OuiL Faltkome sculp, firontisj^^ 
to his Ecclesiastical Polity, and according to Oranger the bc^t 
impressions are to be found 14 the eaiiiest editions of thactlii^mCy 
co^lididng only the fivis books. • '^ 

Mneh siirprise has been ebcpressed at the Rev. T. F. DibfiifM'i 
<wii86ion of thifif work in his '^ Library ,Cotnpdmdn:**f itisitr' 

* Belqe's Anecdotes of Literature, vol L p. 22, ^, furnishes a, d$^«d 
list of these controTersial Writings. 

^ IVre is.an old folio Book, called "* 7^ Stud^nt\f4ara!Vwf^!l'f^ i 
fiomtAe Athenian Oracle^ ^ somevh^ a|)3^rpxi^ating toj |I|;;. Ill^ljjUll^.: 
pla^ ; hyt,a ni^e skeleton, both in bulk an4 u>attei> in ,conq[»|g[^i^ wtt||, , 
the fier. Gentlemiufs ^ sltle and rygJUe luefull^ volume. 



difeii«^> i^a ]| d«|ibt noe thatin a fotore edition tk^'iteidoiU 1^' 
&>i«mM, will bring this EcchsHOitical Cmx>nv^'fikSl '^\a^\ 
i^^ki'^\i^-gteat gun fadl in silencing sacb pe^ >fca^^kW/ 1 
think he will be perfectly justified; ftsr a tfa« «oii of the CTi^H^)! 
itfttSfiU/; itfi tii6ddiig his oppoikent doim with tthe'fik^K%io 
elM^ <yf Nookars Bticledi^caa PoKtie ; l^ut kt lum^e" li^a^ 
^dnotinjure the Portraits ' '^ . v m :il 

iii^ r»o::.r - h--* r.,. ,,. ' " • ^ -.^ •>• * ^"^' v.ilin^* 

Hall s (Jos,) mundus alter et idem : skfe Terra Australifii aniiBL 
\Juul \semper incogt^a, ^Ci Autharc M^rcifrlo pritanni(^^ 
,Mv.o, Mrst edition, toith frontispiece i^ Kip^ , i u 

Sold at Brand's sale for \L 7s.', atG. IJJassaus, 1824, 1/, 13*%* 
printed, with the Maps, in Pratt s edttion ^ *' "* 




/ForM 10 vols. 8vo. Lond. 1808. . ', . 

H^l-9(Jos,J Discovery of a New, ^orld^qr a.fies^f^tmi^ 
„f^uthjnd^s, hitherto unhnown, by an English Jderxmf$y, %}. ) 
.^jQ.date, Imprinted for B.Blount, , : . ,, ..V; 

JlJnk^oumtoAmesorlfprb^t,,, / ..,: , 

J^^^djVsale, 1807, 3/. 7s.) G. Nassau's, 1824,5/. 1*. 
The preceding Work by Hall, Bishop of Nprmcb, wa^ tibie. 
p^t^y^SfP^ w^^c^ I)eajL Swift Jborrowed the idea of .QulUvi^v's 
Tt^c^* Mr,, Campbell, speaking of this satiiicd Astif»t)»t 



'1 • 



^'ft iif also very probable thfeit Sw^deriVed Bonie portion of lus "Voyage 
to L^ata from Bishop Godwin's ^ Man in the Moon, or a jyiscourseqfa\ 
Voifh^imiher hy Domingo GotwUesr Bvo. 1638. «* In Oils Philosopiucal 
H^iiiaim, wmch was repeate<dBy printed, Domingo Gonsales, a dinund- 
tiVfc'8^^ard> ii^ supposed to be shipwrecked on an uninhabited Island, 



8a;8> that Hnder the pretence of de8Ci^l{)juig (he^S^f n^^^rflfk^ 
Incognita, Hall reversed the plan of Sir T* M<we.i(.,]ptop^ 
W^'Ximncttiixied the vices.of existing nations. ,,■ . , i 

' " HalVs (J,) Vtrgtdenmrwimn .... , •,, J-n«( ! 

Ilie three first Books, called " ToothIe99 Suth'ei^ iP^eHM, 
j4i;idemicaif and Moral,** were first printed djf T* Creed >fn 
Ri} Dernier. \2mo. Land. 1597. 

The three last Books appeared under the Title of yirgedir 
mkhirnn. The three last Bookes of Byting Satyree. \2mo. 
Ijmd. Printed by R. Bradockefor R. Dexter, ^a 139a It 
\i^^ta& with Satires of Book 4. 

'^ This original edition complete is estimated by Dibdin at liL 
Longman and Co. in the Bibl, Ang, Poet, mark a copy at 26/* 

The next edition (of the whole) is entitled T^r^ecZimlein^, 
i%e three last (in reality all six) Bookes of the Byting Satynes, 
corrected and amended with some additions by «/• H. I2mo; 
Lond. for R. Dexter, ^c. 1 5 99.* 

G. Nassau, 1824, 1/. 1*. 
Ditto. Svo, 1C02. 

Brand, 21. \2s, 6d.', Stevens^ 3/. 3s. 

> ' — ..,,,.. , I I, I. ■ . » 

where he taught seyeral Oanzas or Wild Geese to fly with a light vm- 
chine, and to fetch and carry things for his conTenience. He after some 
time ventured to put himself into the machine, and they carried him witk 
great ease. He happened to be in this iErial Chariot when these Oanzas, 
which were birds of passage, took their flight to the Moon, and was di- 
rectly carried to that Planet He gtyes a very ingenions description of 
what occurred in his Journey, and also of the Wonden he saW when he 
arrived there." 

* See Warton's Obserrations on Spen8e,;n>l. l p^ 1S7, Sva 



A BlBLrOMANIAO'S LIBRARY. AT 

Kf^nk^ed at Oxford. l2mo. 1753* 
OV Nassau, 1824, 12#. m 

Gray, the Poet; in a letter to his friend Dr. Whaiton, of 
Durham, alluding to this edition, says, '^Bishop HalFs Satires, 
eldled Vi^demiarium, are lately republished. They are full of 
spiHt and poetry, as much of the first as Dr. Donne, and he 
inore of the latter; they were H^ritCen when he urasaboot 23 yean 

Ha:' ■ 

?!li^8e Satiie#, with Nbtes by Singer, in addition tp Wart<m'8 
observntions, ha^'e been repoblished in 8vo. 1824. They may 
also be found in the 10th yolnme of HalVs fForlu, %vo, 1808^ 
iK^th Warton'ii Notes, as well as Mr. £)]is*s and Mn Pratt*s 
lUnstrations. 

Of our Satirical Poetry, taking satire in its moral and dig- 
nified sense, l^all, according to CampbeU, dmms and may be 
^wed to be the founder : thus in the Prologue to his Satires 
he says — 

I first adTcntnre with fool Kardjr nugbty 
To thread the steps of perOons despight : 
I first adrentore, fellow me who list. 
And be the second ISogKsh Satyrist 
Hall's Prologue to Book 3, implies his knowledge of former 
Satirists. 

^ Some say my Satyrs o?er-loosely flow» 

Nor hide their gall inongh from open show : 

Not riddle like, obscuring their intent; 

B«^ packe«tafiB jdaine, uttering what thing they laeant^ 

Chmtrairie to the Roman Ancients, 

Whoee words were short, and darksome was their sence. 

Who reads one line of their harsh poesies, 

Thrise nmst he tak his wind, and breath him thrise. 

Mff atujfe would folhw them that have fort-gone. 



OB sEcosRD jovfBomv i^omay ^ 

But catmot wUk mm MmgUshPimtm* n >r * « ;^ . . H t' J 1 
For looke how iwre tke AiUbieiii Ooin»di« • r > <i . r ^ n HT 
Past foimer Satyt»ni her libertie; ^^^^ -i'-^ ^iiM^i-idT 
So faire mui miiui yadds vnto tkem/of flUn)^ u [ * '^i'/ 

Ttf better be io«{lMid» Amu be tto bold* ... ; ?; - ./<' 

Peologfuetfr Btok>a 

The. first satire of thetbird Book tJbrds a hoi i^pi^^en of 
tih^ Author^ and^ in the opimon .of Mr. Ellis^ s^ldngly resem- 
bles the Vlth Satire of Juvenal ^ it exhibits a Uvely cpntrast 
bejtween the olden time fipd the eiepuoitcy of t)i^<^^l^tii;rifi|s own 
C9t(^n)poDarie8. •. . .•...!■ ■ .i - ;f'-i...M«vVi 

Book iII.r-<rSATUitK 1 - -• ;-r .,-<*••>'■. -^^'^^ 

Time was, and that wa4.tenii'4 tke Tisoa of Gold^r/i:/. 

Whose world and time were joog, that bow •ire.oUit i .. /^ 

(When quiet Satiun swaid the mace of Leid^ -')\ 

'-^' And Pride was yet onbome, and yet laftned.). : , ^ ' Us^ 

Time was, Ibat, wMMsthe Atttionne fiill <iUdla«t^> » ,. >r> i 

Our hungr^r Sires gap't for the laUing.Mast r . >' . c a.-.l r 

Of the Dodonian okeiL ■..■.■xdl 

Conld no anhnsked dmme leaye thfi tr^. ^ „< . . .^ . ; ( 

Bat there was challenye made whose lit mig^tbfa. ,« 

And, if some nice uidJikiiiNrf^m^petilie. :..v, ..;. r- .> /^ 

Desired more daiotiedii^' of ir^u»4«Uills» .. , r u 

They scal'd the stored i>ab .Mrith^btf^Md Ipiecu 

Till they had sated their deUcioiui eie : 

Or searched the hopc^faU tbiehs of hedgy-rowen^ 

For brierie berries,. or hawes, or sourer ido^: .. '" i 

Or, when they meant to &re fin'st of al]> ' . ^ - . />: 

They lick*t oake-leayes besprint with homy fall. 

As for the thrbe three-angled Bcechnat shdl, 

Or Chesnnf s armed haske and lud kehmU,^ ! • ■ i ^ {>L'Mtf< 

No Squire durst touch, like Law woidd noil aiffiDv^'ii' ou){ 

Kept for the Court, and lor the Kings owBtbord; < ^ .^'^.■^ \ 

■.'■''■ .', .,. / i\ 



. • A- 3 .^ 



» \'i-'. 



. 1 



A BIBLfbHAkYiLCffl UBtUM. mf 






Their Royall Plate wmgIs^ or woo^ « 
The Vulgar, save hit hand, elafr hadlfae none^ 
Their only seller was the neigbboor hnxdEet ^ > ' -^ '< 

None did for better care^ for bettir lopke; i • •■■'*• ' < 

Was then no paying of die BroiMr'sacapcv . : ■ ' >'V 
Kor grfeedie yintner mixt the strained grape. 
. 11^ King's PanUp^ wa«| tjie«rawy gwn,. , ,^ ^ ;,. ,. ,,..'\ 
Under safe shelter of the shadie treen. . i > 

Under each banke men layd their lims along; 
Kot wishing any ease, not fearing wron^: 
' ■"' CJad with their owne, as Aey were made of old, ' ' ' ' '^ ''^ 



Kot fearing shame, not feeling any cold. 
But when, by Ceres hnswifiry and paine 
Men leam'd to bnry the reTinng gvatne; 
And fa<§ter Jann< taught the new fowMl Vine' 
Rise on the £ltt>e» Uritk many a FrienAy Twim^. ' 
And base denre bade men to detren low, - - 
For needlesse mettads ; then ^gan misoidef groir. *> 
Then farewell, fayrett age, the worldb begt d^f^ea; 
Thriving in ill, as it in 'age decaiea^ — 
Then crept,in Pride, and Peerish COTe(is<if -! ' 
And Men grew gredy, diBcordsns, and idee. - 
Now Man, that earst kaile-Mbw waa mA Besfrty . 
Woxe on to weene himselfe a God at least ^ 
No aery foule ean take so high a $g^t, 
Tho' she her daring wings in clouds bate dight ; 
Nor Fish can dive so deep in yeelding sea, 
Tho* Tietis' self shoald swear her liafetie ; ' 
Nor fearefoll BeasI ean dig bis eare so lowe^ * > 
As conld he fiirlber thanEartb^s^cemtrago; • ' ^ ■ 
As that the ayre, ^e earth, or ooeany - 
Should shield them horn the gorge of greedy Jian. 
Hath utmost Inde ooght better, ^an bis owne ? 
Then utmost Inde is neare, and rife to gone» 
O Nature ! was the World ordained for nought 



}i 



>yj ^ 









i.T ; 






rt, J. 



\ Ml 



fO vm^v wmwY ^9^^Tf 

But fill Mad^s maw, and feed Man's idle thonglit ? 
. T3iyOraadiire'8 words saTcrar'd of liffiftieleeke^' 

Or maul J garlick ; Imt thy fitrnaee jeekes 

Hote steams of wine : and can aloofe descrie 

Hie drunken dranglits of Sweete antnrami^e. 

They naked went ; or clad in mder hide. 

Or home-spun' msset, void df htrnm pMtr: ' • •'■:*' 

Bat thon canst mttikein' garish gavderior - ' ;! 

: I Ttt smite a fi>ole's far-fetched Kverie. : , ! , 

. ., ., A French head join'd to necke Itafian : 

Thy thighs from Oermanie^ and breast fro' Spain : 

An iBnglishman is none, a fool in all : 

Many in one, and one in severalL .«:■_!-'• 

Then Men were Men; but now the greater paort " • "'» • 

Beasts are in life, and Women are in heart ' : • '.^ ^.'l '.^ 

Good nature 'selfe, tliat homely Bmpermir> : • /' -..;i i 

In proudest pompe was not so clad of yore, 

Aa is the under Oroome of the Ostlerie, 

Husbanding it in work day yeomanrie. 

Lo ! the long date of thiose expired dayCfl^ ' ' 

Which the inspired Meriin's word fore-sa;ys; 

When dunghill peasants shall be dight aa Kings ' 

Tien one oon/ififefi another brings r 

Then fare weU, fairest age, the Woilds best iaj^ 

Thriiring in all, as it in age decayes. 
In Phillips*8 Theatrum Poetaram^ 8yo. Canterbury/ 181)5, 
p. 326^ &c. may be found a concise and satisfrustory account of 
Bishop Ha]l. " He is universally allowed/* says Phillips^ '' to 
have been a man of great wit and learning,, and of as great 
meekness, modesty, and piety.** His works, published at v^-^ 
rious periods in folio, quarto, and octavo, '* are filled,** saya 
Bayle, " with fine thoughts, excellent morality, and a great 
deal of piety." 



^ife and Dedth of Edmund Gemngen, (Ma» Irowmnger,) 
Ato. Portrait and Ptoits. ' St. Otneft. ' 1614. ' 

Gulston, 2/.; Townley, 5/.} G. Nassau, I $24, btue morocco, 
12/. 5*. 

" Edmund Jennings,** says Grange, ^ was admitled into 
the English College, at Rheims, under Dr. aftenfwds Cardinal 
Allen, and when he was 20 years of age', ordaitted PrieM. He 
was soon afterwards sent into England, where he liras appre- 
hended in the act of celebrating Mllss. He was^ esfechted by 
hanging and quartering in Gray's Inn Fields, DeclOtfe, 1591.** 

In the above rare book are several Historical Prints> repre- 
senting the principal circnmstances of his Lile and Death. 
This work was published at a considerable expenoe by the Pa^ 
pists, in order to perpetuate the remembrance of two ^ Mira- 
cles,** which are there said to have happened at his death. 
The first is, that, after his heart was taken out, he said, 
** Sancte Gregori, ora pro we," which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, " God*s wounds ! see his heart is in my hand > yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth.** The other is, t^t an holy Virgin 
being desirous of procuripg some relick of himV contrived to 
approach the basket into which his quarters were thfdwn, and 
touched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy fifom 
its haling been employed in acts of consecration and'elevating 
the Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
or mscovery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
the greatest care. 

if. 



Htm MS* {Pairkhl.'-The ^1ik>i0Sl Sti^Ai^.^ 

Anne-^Sangs and Sonnets. 8&o. /or ATo/. Butter. Ifi22# 

/F&A Portraii of the Aut%oir im'thd engraved Title. 

•* Of this Sonnetteer/ tfnyg Ot^j^i") *«*• ^- P^'^V^^i ^od 
no mentioB made b^ diiry of our B^djaprap^m AalhioN^. 

Beloe> in his AjiecJoteS;i csjl^ tllie a|K>Te ^'/ j. . ^>og]r^]l^ n& 
neana of common occBiTO,nfQe>*VW frpiOf^ iti f iStij!>fttiyii;jpKwifp 
CMk^fS, if we may judge fipom the piicejit Jioi.<)bliteed in 
three recent sales/ he appears to have been pretty cinncollb hia 
^ipre^iatioii ofks larity. ' v '* ^"^ 

At Mr. Bindley s sale it produced 36/M4ii; ;W 1Slti:fitrj\ 
\S2SL 38/. 6s. described as containimr the Porn^^ pLuuinay 
and of his I^roness, Anne of^D^npiark. ^ Sj|jr |^^^^^4y| fopy, 
vhich had been Mr. Bindley^s^ sold> iiv 18^<(l«Jo^ 4^ Ifti. 6<il 

Hie following extr^ct^ may be Ibund in BoIom JUMtdotes 
of Literature^ vol. vi. and which I hope I shall be excused fo 
abstnictiBgy considering the value of the £took cited, atid t&^ 
difficulty of obtaining even a glance at such BiUSomaniacal 
Deridsirata. - ' • ''* "*•' v>-/- -^.^ V4.af^*4:i 

"*" Eaqpenfeikced Katruv in thn latter age« „. ' 

Willing her master-piece shodd then be^'lrroallS; ** ^'"^^'^ ^^ 

. , vjSfoi^^wy %ire Celia set <» Earth's laige stif^^ . i-^anhs^. ? r'l 
As all ihe Gods in emolation bronghf, \:- 

For they did thinke if Nature only niieiit/ ^'^ ^ * - 

Brag of her worth, »he should insult o'retliem;: .. ^^ ^ 

Wherefore they 'greed to have an equal right, ^'-'r - ^ - 

lliat Aeyofher perfection part nrightdifiintr-V^ ^^"^ **^'' 
Pallas gave wisdoqie, Jvno stateKnem, ^ ^^ ' *^ "^''<^ ^'^ 

And the milde rooming gave her msdestit; ' '. --y^^ 



••olCVt)) .v*\»vU mM. -i \ *■•' ■• M.>. ^>'.».»-. '••»••« (^.—-'•4«»^Vx 

Aa4 mil wift ictrlet dtre^es east HeaVen adorne^ , ^. 

T|^**mi^f«l4lto4fe, seooa cbtaWng oflifet lui&e, ' '"'"' '' '•"*^''' 

81m flbraiglii and tall, her tresses trailed to:|pr««s4 >i>^,«'v; ; -^f^i 

f«^W/S^ cjery sense to sigbt was^ope,^ ^ . . , . .., , 

w|Hi oasUiiu olusn my blisse fled I once seene, ^ 

* v5^* LM ile^ ti*aBsfornied as it were in stone, 

*^ t^ ^1 i^kiM> eyer to hare retaained, " ' ' ^ '^-^^ -^- '^ 
«^^4Mi#M>^lMiftMl[^'d,aadlBij8ig1itretaiBsd. ^ au ^'f 

'ift-tsJi^w*!'*'*-,-:-'-. •-. •• ^. •.•••■... .V ■..■« • .'•?\-;-i-ii''i;: 

ik^t^ms (Michael) Poly-Olblon, with the secm^fmuA^- 
fVmHifnece and Portrait of Prif^^ H^jf by J^oie^tmd^t 
the other Piates, . J613— 1622, .... or ^ ^: 

€€i SUaleysBal^ I81S> 9/. 19#. eef.j G. NadMn^^^i: 1824, 

'* Ib 1613/* says '■ PhiBips's Tkeatrom Poetaram>8yo 1^/ 
** Drayton pnblislied the ^rst part of his Poly-eilbmht by whidi 
Qieek tstk> signyfyiogo^Jbi^l^y, he deiM^ea Koi^Mid; as 
the aotient name of Albioa is by some derived ^nmb ORhoiv 
happy. It is a chorogn^ieid dcscriptioii of the mtnt moaa- 

F 



*•> 



buns forests castles tm mltHlsluii^ iMmrise^i^li it« 
■i;OfAd(Aifk ratiquitaea ranna, pni wiwp«iv<^ jl^WMf 
Itefus. to v^toii^fkis £rst p«it i$jkiBpii^ v4 ^ ^^9!pf, '^ 
e^tn*^ t, &»% wa. miJitary pasture, exemsiim t^ pij^^ J»d 
9^(^p? ^|i# Ppet aoine Bipgidhr nwripi ofb»AT9= a«\ ^aja 
|(^^ea(Jf,tVCTefore. olt}B»y8«Bg*H(iwv**»«rp»»t<w*to 

the learned notes of Setden and tbpre are vasjp ^etai^ WftJ 
looffi wberein the ettws. nonptsios^focestS) n,vei% &c ^,i^ 
presented by tbe %aies «f meo. wd wos^ fil^ T'^T^ *fi 
twdve 8})l4^1eE^bei»9 aoM tttu^natie^ it i* ipwtte^ ncsK for 
tt^e History Aut the PiMtiy m a and i Dhat i<eapcct s ^o 
very pou^ that as "Ksliop Nicholson obserres t aFords a 
mncQ truer acccnnt of this kingdom a d the dom u ou f ^ ales^ 
Uianconld well be expected from the pen of a Pott. It is jn 
urffoven with many ^e Hpisodee ; of the conquest oi this 
Island by the Itumaa^i of &a coming of the Saxous, the 
Danes, and the Nonoans, with an account of their Kings ; of 
English Warriors, NarigBtarS) Swots, and of the Cii-i] Wars of 
England, Sec. This Tolnme was reprinted in 1622, with tijtf 
SeeiHid. Part, or contlanBtiAn of fFwelve Songs more, makiiip 
tlii«tyin the whole,, and ctedtn^led to Prince CharTes^ to whota 
he gives hopes of bestowing the lilte pains upon S<!ot;lBnil." ' , 
Winstanley,. iib his Livw of- tbe English Posts, Bay,3 of Dray- 
t(>n th»t "ho was a Poet of a pious tender) 1^, .«{ma;^ipn«. 
biimgaJini^Uw wammAvtimtaef, wmfiempmUo^im 
\m,litp^-tititi^^i^ett^ maA iptgMdwp- ht ■ w pfca y i i:-B» 



jffiHfi!!^ n^^/.fii)i; JAtoif isftnegm', mw sofas', 
''^ im^'^^mf tiki. 'nffl.. 1824. tmtrnitG^. 

'"^^■iAmi»BMAa ^atodm* Ike P»tf^nfiJ^i»:)s0M 

A 606 copy of thia book, handsomely boaad, was in Couns 
tne booKseller'a catatogoe, a few years bactt, marked 8/. 8f.— 
Payne and Foss mart a copy at 61. 6fl. — At tir. f. fiemaC* 
sale, ia 1698, a copy sold for four shilKngs and two penue! I 

A l^rgc paper copy at Huntcr'a sale, in 1813, proaacea 
^71. 6*., "'T 

It is remarked by Mr. Crenville (says f>ibdm), that stftBt 
in this work is sapprcsscd, and that the defective pamag: 
from 96 to 105 is not supplied in all the copies of thia ^w.. 

Captain John Smith, Admiral of New England, (says Graiij 
ger,) deserves (o be ranked with the greatest travellers and 
advcBturel's of his age. He »»s sometime in the service of me 
Emperor, and the Prince of Transjliania, against the Gmsa 
Signior, wliere he distinguiahed himself by cballen^ng three 
Torts of (luality to single combat, and culf ing off their heai^s, 

ftU4lW4K- ' MMi'i MM rdWUtk bf PMW. Of «ir«M*iM« Utt^ 
N^feft hMuhoMMr rf te Hi4 bf New B%lurit nd tW Mau«M«Mf 

i-V-^^- ■■- ,w ■ ■ : ■;..■' 

\ An Edition, folia, dated 1 63S, wjd Portrub mnd pfatM, loU in tW 
iOiati. Haum'i IdimiTT, im. tot il 



for which achievement he bore on his coat of aarmfl %!fGfir^f^J^ 
tt^^jfc. He afterwards went to Amenc»» yfi^^i^ |^^^F^;^a)QUi 
pnsoner Dy the savage Indians, from whom he fnnnH jyFfflf ^jtf 
escape. He often hazarded his life in naval enffaseqients with 
TOtfCcS, Spanish Men of War, and in other adventures j^ and 
HbA'.u considerable hand in reducing New England to tibie, obe- 
dience of Great Britain, and in reclaiming the. inhabitants ipom 
tikifNurtsm.** All which exploits are detailed in the History of 
Yttfpm by himself. . « U 

Muoako, alias Rebecca, daughter to Pouhatan, Sovereign 
of Virginia, and who is called Pocahontas by Capt. Smith in 
his History, may be considered as a national bene&i^ress, jbs 
tb hier (says Granger, vol. ii. p. 58) we are indebted for the 
preservation of Virginia, when in the state of an infant colony. 
In \607, when she was about 12 or 13 years of age, she, not 
only procured the liberty, but saved the life of Capt. Smith, 
whom, together with his men, her father intended to nii)rac|p 
by surprize. In 1612, she was herself a prisoner > al^ sopn 
after married Mr. Rolfe, whom Smith calls a gentleman^. In 
(616, after she had been instructed in our language fm4 the 
Cttinstian religion, she was brought to England, and intcodnoe^ 
and graciously received at Court. The next year, upc^n l^er re- 
turn home, she died on ship board at Gravesen4» strooglY m- 
pressed with religious sentiments. The good sense, humanity, 
and generosity of this woman, do her honour, as they carried 
her far above the prejudices of her education, and the barbajij|^ 
customs of her country. She was the first Virginian whot |Fa8 
conyerted to Christianity, that could speak onr laiij^je;^ or 
had a child by an Englishman.'* .. . . • 

* The Library at Eton contains King James lst*s copy, ai^i^Jju 



iC' iBt^LioMANIAC'S iistRARY. 77 



^TO^'FdttHlll library was a presentation copy 5 ot^r large pftr 
'j^w' iopfes.are in.the Libraries of some of our principal Bibli- 

SAmiy* T^raveb and Adventures in Europe^ Asia, Africa^ tfn^ 
'America, Small folio. Sixty pages only. fFith Platen. 

-viim^ •:. " . ^'.. ,.', 

^ ' Mr. Qrenyille's copy> according to Dibdin a Library ,Gpp^- 

Xmiuon, p. 284, cost him 5/. 5#. ,',.,..» 

It was reprinted in voLii. of Charchill*s (Collection of VQyfiges. 



m i.V>u.-r 



Jbi^dcc^th ((liov, Bai.J Bizarie di f^arie Figure,^ Sva. obI(9ng\ 

' See 7% j^fper^offtf m jBi5/i0^a»i^*ctf m 
' »/' A Qibst rare and singolar Book^ containing Prints of human 
^figures rohned by the strangest materials^ as diamonds, hoopS;^ 
maailers, piieces of carpentery, battledores, chains, culinary 
utensils, &c. When the correctness of the delineations, aj^d 
'ihe bioidness of the attitudes, are considered — we s^ the iumd 
W a great Master through the laughable whimsicality of his 




^'^^ A 'dopy IS in the Strawberry Hill Collection, and one was w^ 
tSfe liibtary at Ponthill. 






IbUfcih (Abraham) Annates of the famous Empresse Elizabeth^ 
'^'"^^iieisne of England, 8fc, translated out of French, Large 
"^^ pii^er^ 2 vols, Ato, Benj, FTsher, (No date, J 

Large paper copies differ from the small in the following 
j^iVcnlars : viz. that the date (1625) is wanting in thcmii 



08 sEcosRD jovmoLv mowo A 

Bui eofmotwUk mm Smgikk Pimbn^y n -n'U i« -. H -> Jl 
For looke howiwre tke Aiifcieiii€oiiMdi«. . i' •^ = ' ^-^T 
Past fonnerSatyt»ni her liberties •'•' -;( -- > !•• <n.lT 
So faire mui mind yadds vnto tlwniDf flUn)^ i > ( • ^a^/? 

Tia better be toofbad^ Amu ke tto bold* . I i; v // 

Peologae to Btok^Sl 

The. first satire of the t¥i4 Bo6k tJbrds d fidi^ ^pec&nen of 
th^Aiith<Hr^ BBd, in the opimoii .of Mh Ellis^ s^ldngly resem- 
bles the Vlth Satire of Juvenal 5 it exhibits a lively cpntras^ 
between the olden timei fipd Ihe eieinin^cy qC t^(^^^tii;rk^ oiwn 
coten^pomries. j. ;..;.,, u-yi 

Book iII.r-<-SATUiL« 1 ^ .» -i .v *■:,<• ^itH 
Time was, and that waa> t^rm'd: the Time of G^d^ r ,. ;/. 
Whose world and time were yon|^» that now are ^t ' .; /. 
(When qniet Satiun awaid the mace of Leid| - : t 

- ' And Pride was yet nnbom^ andyetiiDftned.).! , ' ' {.(^^ 
Time was, Ibat, vhlMstheAtitiBBnefiiUiiUdlBst^' r ,. m^ 
Onr hungry Sires 'gap^ for .the laUing^Mast ; . - . c. ..») r 

Of the Dodonian okeiL . vu .< 

Could no unhnsked dumie leave th« tr^. r „, . .^ , ; ( 
Bat there was fihallenye .made whose ii in]ghibca> o 
And, ifsomemceuidlikiK»XpVB.anP*Btite. : .1 . i> .< -< 
Desir'dmore daMitie4iiri|:ofi[a»d«Uills» . , / - /.• 
They scal'd the stored XIrab .ijrith^lMqMd haecu • . << . /< 
'Till they had sated their deUcioui eie : . • i . 1 

Or search'd the hopefbll thicks of hedgy-rowen^ ^-i/: 

For brierie berries, or hawes, or sourer sloes; 
Or, when they meant to &re fin'st of aU> - . . /^ 

They lick't oake-leayes besprint with homy fall. 
As for the thrbe three-angled Bcechnat shell, 
Or Chesnofs armed hoske and hid kehmU,' ' - i< UL^^^^. 
No Squire durst toach, like Lair 'woi|UnfAaiffoi!i4»'^'' -'^i'^^ 
Kept for the Court, and lor the Kings owBtbord; <^ ■'-■' ^ 






A MBLIOHAKtaLCffl hmtUMt. tff 



Thar Rojrall Hate wM'dfli^ otmnd, m iteaej ' a 

The Vulgar, saya hai iMiid, elafrbad ha bom^ 
Their only seller waa the neigliboiir hvodoet '' '-■■ '^ 

None did for bailer cara, for bettarlopke; *"** >< 

Waa then no paying of the BreiMr'aaeap^ : ' i 

Kor ftteadia Vintner mixt the strained grape. 
f.-s. - ; . ^,?5^»J«*» PanUQ^iwaii t|if i^aasy.grcwn,. , ^ j^. ,. .. 
Unfler safe sheltarof the shadie treen. 

!.<«• •< »• /• M.. I ^■; • 7 . : .1 .••'7.; n. . . .' .• : .i.m \M 

Under each banke men lajd their lims alonjr. 
Not wishing any ease, not fearing wrong: 
n ^' 'J -^^^^fif^ tbeir ownc, as Aey wer« made of old. 



Not fearing shame, not feeling any cold. 
Bat when, by Cerab hnswifry and paina 
Men learii^ tD-bnrytbe refinng gwaino; 
And faAterJaaui tangle tiie new fowad Viae' 
Rise on the l^w^, with many a FrieniBy Twinet. 
And base desire bade men to dalren low. 
For needleiK mettels ; tiien *gan misdiief gr»w. >< 
Then farewell, fayrest age, the worida beat da^; 
Tluriying in iH, as it in age d^avea^ — 
Tlien crep^in Pride, andPeefiahCoTetisa; *' 
And Men greir gredy, diacordsvs, and nieei - 
Now Man, t|iat earat bafle-lelkw waa widi Beapt, 
Woxe on to weene himaelfe a God at leaat 
No aery foule aan take so high a ffight, 
Tho* she her daring wings in doads have dight ; 
Nor Fish can di^e 80 deep itt yeelding sea, 
Tho' Tlietis' s^ shoald swear her ia&tie ; 
: Nor feiarefbll BeasH aan dig bis eare sa lowe, 
Ai could he fiirther than: Earth^s centra go; 
As that the ayre, ihe earth, or ocean. 
Should shield them firam tihe gorge of greedy Man. 
Hath utmost Inde ought better, than his owne? 
Then utmost lade is neare, and rife to gone. 
Nature ! was the World ordain'd for nought 



<i;ri:)K^ 



I 



■>"■.■ • .• ■ '. • ' . ' 

But fill BlAif s maw, and feed Man's idle thought ? 
. Thy Graadidrd's words saFonr'd of <)inftie leekes^ ^ 

Or manly garlick ; but diy fnniaee reekes 

Hote steams of wine : and can aloofe descrie 

liie drunken drangiits of sweete anforamitie. 

They naked went; or clad in rnder hide, 
^ Or hmne-spnn russet, Void of fei^raine^ridet :r :*« 

i' ^ /But thon canst mttike- in- garish ganderi^ - : • 
i \ Ttt smite a Ibole's far-fetched HTcrie. : , ; /. 

,.,., A French head join'd to ned^e Italian: 

TLy thighs from Oermanie, and breast fro' Spain : 

An Englishman is none, a fool in all : 

Many in one, and one in severalL ' '' ^-^ ' 

' Then Men were Men ; bnt now the greiiter i«pt " ».<•:' 

Beasts are in Hfe, and Women are in heaort ' •:.* \'i^[:;r>r 

Goad nature 'seVe, that homely Bmpenmr, ' : ;/':;. ti i 

( In proudest ponqpe^ was not so dad of yore, , 

An is the under Oroome of the Ostlerie, 

• - • , '1. ' 

Husbanding it in work day yeomanrie. 
Lo ! the long date of thiose expired dayes^ ' ^ 

Which the inspired Merlin's word fore-saiyif v •' 

When dunghill peasants rikall be dight aa Kiii|[8 - 

7^U» MM <»n/ififbif anodier brings : 
Then fere well, fairest age, the Worlds best di^ei 
Thriving in all, as it in age decayes. 
In PhiUips's Theatnim Poetaram, 8vo. Canterbmy^ ISW), 
p. 326^ &c. may be found a concise and satisfectory account of 
Bishop Hall. *' He is universally allowed,** says PhiOipa^ '* to 
have been a man of great wit and leaniing,^ and of as 'great 
meekness, modesty, and piety.*' His works, pubHshed at vur 
rious periods in folio, quarto, and octavo, ** are filled,** says 
Bayle, ^ with fine thoughts, excellent morality, and a great 
deal of piety." 



Zjtfe and Dedth of Edfhukd Gefdtigigit, (bliMh^nMnger.J 
Ato. Portrait anU PtotSi. '' Sti Omera. ' W14,'^ 
Gnlston^ 2/.; Townley^ 5/.3 G. Nas8aii/ld24^ blue morocco, 
1 21. 5*. 

'' Edmund Jennings/* says Granger, ^ was admitted into 
t^lie English College, at Rheims, under Dr. afterwards Cardinal 
.Allen, and when he was 20 years of age, ordttAed Priel^. He 
i^as soon afterwards sent into England, where he was appre- 
liended in the act of celebrating Mass. He was executed by 
lianging and quartering in Gray's Inn Fields, Dec. 10th, 1591.** 
In the above rare book are several Historical Prints, repre- 
senting the principal circumstances of his Life and Death. 
TThis work was published at a considerable expence by the Pa- 
pists, in order to pei^petuate the remembrance of two * Mira- 
cles,** which are there said to have happened at his death. 
The first is, that, after his heart was taken out, he said, 
** Sancte Gregory ora pro me,** which the Hangman hearing, 
swore, ** God*8 wounds ! see his heart is in my hand > yet Gre- 
gory is in his mouth." The other is, that an holy Virgin 
being desirous of procuripg dome relick of him, contrived to 
approach the basket into which his quarters were thrdwn, and 
touched his right hand, which she esteemed most holy from 
its naving been employed in acts of consecration and elevating 
the Host, and immediately his thumb came off without force 
oVmscpvery, and she carried it home, and preserved it with 
t&e greatest care. 



U. 



h^ 



AuM«~-So»gt mdSomeii' Svo. ' J''orMat. Buthr. 1632, 

fFttk Portrnt of the AKtk»oiit}i^ engraved Title. 

" Of this Sonnetteer," ttys Orm^i itA'.^. pliti^f'l find 
RO mentioB nade ^ ftn} o( onf Blog^pfitott AathoSi. 

Bdoe, ia luB Anecdotes, c^^ tbe BJioTe l*^;, poAof ao 
■wau of common occaiTCinQe j" -94(1 bojin Ui .ipitfimliyiijpioBy 
C*lle«t<»i, if we may jn<Ig« Awm tlie [him jt:liM.:QMlflwd in 
three recent s&lea^ he ^wars to-lwTebe«apRt^MrMflfeftihui 
Kfiprecu^ioD ofks fxrity. ' ■■ ■■ "■' ''^■' 

At Mr.Bindleys sale it produced 3^?. 14X.; at Tifr, Perrj's, 
1,^^ 38A 6*. described as cootainiiig the Portmits of llaiinay 
aiKl of hi» I^troness, Anne of,D«Dfnark. Sir M. Sykes's copy, 
which had been Mr. BiadleyV Bold, W 1824, for -12/. lOi. Gd. 

ne following extntctf may be found in Beloe's Anecdotes 
of Lhentore, vol. ti. and which I hope I ahall be excused f» 
abetnctisg, considering the valne of the Booh cited, and th« 
difficulty of obtaining even a glance at such BlbComaiuacit 
DtMtfM. ' "■ '■ "■"■■■'■■'=■■ '■'■^ ■^'Mtp^l 

■-"' lfii)iwitiic*dN«hireiDthMUtte»age, '.r- ■•■:'..fp^Kt{\ 

WiUingherniuler.pieceskdBMaenbe'imii^ * ^'*''-^'^' 

.,^ ,)SQ(^,mf jlire Celia set OB BtTlh'i 1wgei<atli.-> 
Aiidl"flie0odl«iii 



For the; didtLiokf tf Nature onljinigfai' 
Brag of her wortk, ilie ahoQld inmh o're tbem^ 
Wherefore they 'greed to have ui eqaiJ right, 
11t>t the; nf her periectionpirl might diimtr": 
Pallu gsre wiodooie, Jmio ata&linene, 
JuA th* niUa momiap gave her t fci tiii r 



ftveii u4 ^trtli dieir^ Mweip did oqpiKim 
iKrfMec^VuidiotvmaaeBeriiiiBe.- ' 

A>4 «% widi ■ctrlet itrMnes east Heaven ad^rBe^ , ^ 

luiit (JBi»««ll&» tmktj wm^\aJb9, her lia»ia|«r*ini% < ^vA/n /* fnt; 
81m itrwglii tnd taU, her tresses trailed to^^rffiidl^ , >a^w>; f>iif#; 
,e>l#f*^^^*^ thkikiiig»ydecre.hadhce^ .*,,./j ,j/ \f^ 
^mkSSit f^^ every sense to sijfbt waa^pe, .^ , ,. ^^, , 
'^^^r^ WwUml blush my blisse fled I once seene^ 
*t^^lMlliii»^ btiBtformed as it were in stone, 
*W '^ Jil'i irfeh so ever to hare retained, ' ■- ' - -*;^ ''^^•' *" 

tl%»(itlii tfhe^lMl ^ttify'd, and 1 my n^^ht retanvd. ' '^ -^ '* • ""^ ^ 

•fc ♦ • • "f '^ 

i^it b«u /■>■'--.. -t v.;- '.^ •■ t ' » ■ ■ ■■ ■ ■ .-■■ .....•-••-••.'.>•• >.• .*i:.-/<^3«^i>. 

J b w y Wt (Michael) Pofy-Olbion, with tie second p0gi0.^tiitl^d 
. JF Vmlijy tgce am/ Portrak of jPrinpe Hegirjf by j^p^^jmduli 

CoL Staaleyssale^ I819> 9/.19^.6«r.^ O. Nadto;%^ 1824, 

•' "^ ia 1613;' says ^ PhiBips's Theatnnn Poetaram>8vo. 1^/ 
^ DftytoA published the &r8t part of his Poi^f-^bk^, by wtudi 
Qpetk tiUe, 8igayfyu^.o^--Aii^^« he denotes £digl«idf aa 
Hk aa^ent name of Albioa is by sene derived ^nhb OfiHon^ 
hifpy. It is a chorogn^ieal dcscriptioii of the rivers^ niouA- 

F 



*>* 



for which acjiievement he bore on his coat of arms 4hns^,TQiik^ 
Ifi^^ds. He afterwards went to America^ wh^i^e he.wa^A^fi^ 
pnsoner by the savage Indians^ from whom he found ja;^e9J9L^^ 
escape. He often hazarded his life in nayal engagements, wit)i 
Tftratcs, Spanish Men of War, and in other adventures ^ and 



': .~.\ f-v 



KieiH.a considerable hand in reducing New England to the,Qbe- 
dience of Great Britain, and in reclaiming the. inhabitants from 
Iftifbansm.** All which exploits are detailed in the History of 
Virginia by himself. , 

Matdako, alias Rebecca, daughter to Pouhatan^ Sovereign 
of Virginia, and who is called Pocahontas by Capt. Smith in 
his History, may be considered as a national benefactress, jbs 
td her (says Granger, vol. ii. p. 58) we are indebted for the 
preservation of Vir^nia, when in the state of an infaiU; ^^j^^y* 
In 1607, when she was about 12 or 13 years of age, s^e iiot 
only procured the liberty, but saved the life of Cagt. Smith, 
whom, together with his men, her father intended to n)i|rda' 
joy surprize. In 1612, she was herself a prisoner; and soon 
.after married Mr. Rolfe, whom Smith cjdls a gentleman, In 
1qI6, after she had been instructed in our lai^jpia^^ uid the 
ddnstian religion, she was brought to England, andintri^nG^ 
and graciously received at Court. The next year, upqnhet re- 
turn home, she died on ship board at Gravese^d^ ^tjr<iffg\v j^- 
pressed with religious sentiments. The good sense, humanity, 
and generosity of this woman, do her honour, as they carried 
her far above the prejudices of her education, and th^ barb^^j^^ 
customs of her country. She was the first Virg^an whQ|vas 
converted to Christianity, that could speak our p^g^^ or 
had a child by an Englishman." 
*' The Library at Eton contiuns King James lst*s com, I^^Jif 



A BibLIOMANUC'S LIBRARY. 77 

^"y'roJitlitll Library was a presentation copy 5 ott^r large p^ 
^i^^t* copfcs are inthe Libraries of some of our prinapal Bibli- 
'^uf&iiiu;s. 

SAmtVs Tiraveh and Adventures in Europe^ Asia^ f4frlc(H^ tf^ 
^mertca^ Smali folio. Si^ety pages only, fFith Phtet^ 

"'Mo. . ■ : , ,; 

^ 'Mr. (JrenyiDe 8 copy, according to Dibdins UAii^.f^dC^'' 
'paiuon, pi. 2^4, cost him 5/. bs. 






It was reprinted in vol. ii. of Churchill*s Collection of Vpy^s. 



jbf^dccetK ((jiov. Bat.) Bizarie di f^arie Figure. SvQ. oblongs, 

. ; 1624. ...,.,...,,..,-. 

'' iSee Tie JRepertorium Bibliographicumy where it is diesciibed 

."ton ■ >iid i'" ' " >.''('■ I. f 

' u *^A ^bst rare and singular Book, containing P^ntspf bunian 

'figures tormed by the strangest materials, as diamonds, hoops^^ 

Dutaders, pieces of carpentery, battledores, chains, culinary 

utensus, &c. When the correctness of the delipeations, and 

%he bot^ess of the attitudes, are considered — we s^ the n»^d 

W a great Master through the laughable whimsicality of his 

^^^A'liopy is in the Strawberry Hill Collection, and one was ii\^ 
1»fe !iH)rary at Ponthill. 



l)l^miti.> - ; . 



^Jfydfcie CAbrahamJ Annates of the famous Empresse Elizabeth^ 
'^^iieene of England, ^c. translated out of French. Large 
^^ pi^er^ 2 vols. Ato. Benj. Fisher. (No date.) 

Large paper copies differ from the small iu the following 
jwfenlafs: VIZ. that the date (1625) is wanting in th^Wi 












sw-t^^^i^r^'" 



f)n"1 



■.'r"L..''« 






^10 ifB8 li acbool bay wt WesttnUurteri tiiree ediiiotiB liai b^b 

jBokU and the book had b^ome very scmrcei, wheii the fdtiflh 

sedition npjKatied^ in I682> the Town« according to the fiodk- 

^IM^VAdbrilitiMlnenl^ httdly afibidi^g<^ Thc^ftHoli^ 

iitg^Ar€fl#i^ the fMte^ by Gwlty UvmHi, U^mkoeMfk^)j 

OjHo^i^i j^yfli otf litt «fm afto^fniit, aodfor^^ iMl«*l^ftllfcg]^ti^6 

^MiiOl^hb Mdyfrodoe u ^j^t^ 

^' BeadetTj (I Jokow not yet n^hether gentle of m^) MiM4 

ktOwllaTe been angry ;(I dare not a8aiiin«^ihdd»«Br^f 'thdir 

"^^Igp^) :B(t my B^etktil BdMnesSi ^and^MNied in bibe>^^)i»>itdk 

iedh^b^nds othet sxtits — earliness: others trh^ MFt^lhei'^ a 

Weak fidth or strong malice have thought me liker a pipe, v^hicb 

tteror aounda (but when *tis bhnved in/ itndrend in* fi^ift iO^a* 

liMai€loi»^fr> b««> ^^^ittofem aAj^^ .T0 "tiie ^ii^ I «I^ 

^4ir^\ iMvdt lis .wi f^bHTioua Ftdst wbicih ^ips Ih^ rb^aaoM 

tHlQpiM(tk«yiaiqpea»:s^ i^ the)attel-> HkoA he/HAh^ 

ygvmt^ Hoiaicide wh6 strives to marther ancrtihef's faioei ttji 

iMili^ thiiil^:lt itf a tidiculoos ifoSy to^ootideian ^ k%ti«^:t)r<? 

Stars^ because the Moon and Sun shine brighter, l^hotvittad 

*Smyfi|4 .tain >i9'(ffeitiiet bktirQ ihan.eKtingttishi»d by tt^0>^Ad, 

Bi»<tfal Ml of Poeme%ibeing' aqiiei^ iiiMiu^eO^iy f^ 



this third edition ;t^\^hf4ijtb<»fs^jtibetiieg)^^ i^ iuM^ 
l.m.9mh^ ^fffH^bockwUA hath JigMedl^lMiercnooBMeii 
^9^79^ ^y €^o)u j|Bd Groceiss. t di im.fi& m6iisg»dg?9Mbqi^ 
puffer Shipwrack, it shall something content me^ that itc^Mii^ 
plqis^d n^yself aad the fiookseUer. In it yon shall find one 
argument (and I hope I shall need no more) to confute wah 
belieyers 5 which is> that as mine age, and con^quently expe- 
rience (which is yet but little) liath increased^ ^9^^Y ^^^ 
not left my Poesie flagging behind them. ) 9)10^ ^ot be 
angry to see any one bum my Pfpdmm and TkU/bcy nay I 
would do it myself^ but that i hope 11 pardon ^a|f^ easily be 
gotten for the errors of ten years ofn^e; Mff^diMiatUia and- 
Philetus confesseth me two years older Vfl^tLtw"!^ it. The 
rest were made since upon several occasions^ and ^rhaps do 
not bely the time of their birth. Such as th^y are« they were 
(Created by me> but their fate lies in your haqdsi At is only 
you can effect that neither the Bookseller r!^)ent kim^lf of his 
charge iu Printing tbem> nor I of my labour in* c6mposing 
them. Farewell.'^ ' 

A. Cqwlby. 

However un&shionable in our days Cowley ^lay have be- 
come from the harshness and conceit of so^^Af.lM^^mposi* 
tions^ there are still many who think both.highlyiattdcjustly of 
him as a Poet — ^he was considered by lus c<H»nipi]iraries as 
excelled by none^ and King Charles li. when told ef Ms death, 
declared " That Mr. Cowley had not left a better man behind 
him in ^ngl^jad,*^ 

I certainly think with Dr. Blair, that Cowley's Aiut^reontic 
P4^s^ are b^ fax the happiest of his effprts;. <' th^ wesmoQtll 



:^ ^Ghe^^^ov 'tm»< sjpMigettiB <^ them* hefe ikktuk hA pi6re'i&'} 
pttMi^ieuid^U' convey thehr own excttse to €he JB^iii^'te^ 



JiiJtJ ;t:. 



I 1 ' t t 



■^•jii. bur n-.i;- ^-.. : .. . . •. • ' • • : .. ! '^ ' . i)>ifi')lq 

GOLD. 

And 'tis a pain that pain to nuMr 
But of all pains the greatest pain 

^^ '•^^' -Itii^tbloTe-anitlonjinvaiiL ■' ''' '''' ^^''' 

\ /K.. . V Virtke ttow Bor-NdbU Bl<idd, ■ • .• '-' "^ '''^i^^ 

--^r: (lir-.;.-. I^ftrWitliyLeveisnncleritoodj. ■'.■■■. '- '•'> li'ix'o'?/ 

'" ><u vj\».-M!'4^*^'^^°^P**'"*'* "*"''*►.• •■• '^ ■■^■' -.h'.' ■^<'«i •rjtto^ 

.iH' ,,9^14 »09<5K)liics Love! . ,> )t ^ y .^ :y;ui\*\ 

. A cnrse on her, and on the man -,7 xj'x-i 

^^^ \^tnib this traffick thus began! , . v 4 

*».'). V ^^^'Acaftrteonlli^l who fiinnd the Orel .^ - ; » 

^r^J5 >5 A citfse on Wm who ^Bgg'd the sfortf • < Jf/>n 

■^id *'• V'A cone on him who ^d refine H! ■ • ' ^'^ ^' ''^ 

•t» I ;H'*' , Axiprse on fasm 11^ first did «oin '^\ .; - ; ( oi y^Tiwf . 



ii •• ; "_k' 



A curse all cnrses else above ; .5 : - • , ' f > * 1 jii : 

On ^m, who ns'd it first in Love ! ! 
Gold begets in Brethren, hate ; 
''' ' iGkda iii Families, debate; 
^^ 'I') 'G({Mdo^s Friendships separate, 
'^ '. V , ^ ^ /06M does OitiLWars ereate ; 
J. i^, '/>) f s73)f0e die smallest hams of it { ^ ^ 

.^,...,|.. i^l4, ahs^ does.LoTpbegelT ;• ..•.;.••?: i vjy^' 

rr.r ,j,jjg GltASSHOPPEH. / 

Happy Insect what can be 
' jf a Happiness compared to Thee ? 
^ ' ' - T«d wi# nonridniiettt divine, 






O:-. 





4 • 



t. .» 



.t. 






T)oit neitiieif /MS , and da»c «, »» . \^ 










Ami U% Of chewifldljf «nWi^. -» - lu-i ru A- ^^n^ 

Like the Wine ^d,Rai^ wtniku, 

Ch^iwn'd with Roses we cwitwnn 

Oyge's wealtliy. diadoB. 

7b Ai|yi9 0«fr''«; wImiI do^we^fetv? 

9b Zlay »4rj«ir'^ we ]um».it'Jkwce«: • '> . vr 

X«rs tren^ it tofUr^iiWtltjiliiQr 

Jl^4, at lei^V vMotlluw i».8t|iy« 

Xiet's banish BosixieM^ bwiMh Sorrovf 

Tp the (?Q(ir belong 3b^Jf0rn»c% 



A<cQ^ sold (i^tSftnnd^iis!^. 1816^ lurG/. 16«.:6rfl 
TM9 BoutpanQe w^ wntton when tiie Jbithor imi oiily 17 
years. of ^gfu QAd w it h^ aottod^ces fcwo BiraiaalioFieeee^ en« 
titled *' Deorum Bono,*' and " Grtpus and Hegw^ The Au- 
thor was nephew of JameB HomslU Author of the Familiar 
Letters, who thus speaks of it in his Letters, 8vo. p. 432^^ 
iiOJWF, V?54, 

T(^ Mr. Bx Bar(m,at Potis. 
Gentle Sir, 
I feceiyed and presQptly x^» os&c your Cyprian Academy. 
with much greediness and no Tulgw delight > and Sir, I hok) 
piyself much honoured fbr the Dedication you^have b«en pleased 
to make thereof to m^, fbr it deserved a fat higher patronage. 
Truly I must tell you without any compliment, that I have sdU 
dom met with si^h an ingenious^ aua^tiive of {nnmb* and verse^ 
ua;erwoven with «^cb vs^ielkis of £uif7 4^ strahrs 



for which achievement he bore on his coat of anus ^bre^,7iif«|c^ 
H^^ds. He afterwards went to America^ wheiffe .he^wa^,(a]s^ 
prisoner by the savage Indians^ from whom he found ,jD;^e9^^ 
escape. He often hazarded his life in naval enipasements vnth 
iTirates, Spanish Men of War, and in other adventures j^ and 
Kad.a considerable hand in reducing New England to the , obe- 
dience of Great Britain, and in reclaiming the. inhabitants J^om 
DBi-bansm.** All which exploits are detailed in the History of 
Virginia by himself. u 

Mktoako, alias Rebecca, daughter to Pouhatan, Sovereign 
of Virginia, and who is called Pocahontas by Capt. Smith in 
his History, may be considered as a national benefa^ress, jbs 
tb Uer (says Granger, vol. ii. p. 58) we are indebted iTor the 
preservation of Virginia, when in the state of an infamt colony, 
in lo07> when she was about 12 or 13 years of age, she _ not 
only procured the liberty, but saved the life of Capt. Smith, 
whom, together with his men, her father intended to murdear 

i'.-.i' ■ . '. ■ , ■• -v>fii).«icr 

Dy surprize. In 1612, she was herself a prisoner > aiid sopn 
JBlier married Mr. Rolfe, whom Smith calls a gentleman. In 
1qI6, after she had been instructed in our lai^guage an4 the 
Qinstian religion, she was brought to England, andintrodnc^ 
and graciously received at Court. The next year, up<)ii liei re- 
turn home, she died on ship board at Gjrayesend^ stro^lr mr 
pressed with religious sentiments. The good sense, humanity, 
and generosity of this woman, do her honour, as they carried 
her far above the prejudices of her education, and th^ barb^i^fc^ 
custoins of her country. She was the first Virginian w^oivas 
converted to Christianity, that could speak our lang|iaffe|^ or 
had a child by an Englishman.** 
"Tne Library at Eton contains King James Ist's copy, Ifp^ijiu 



a'* JBliiiioMAlNiAC'S ilBRART. 77 



TO^'Fommil Library was a presentation copy j otbj^r large p^ 
'^wiopfes are in.the Libraries of some of our principal Bibli- 

pmtths Travels and Adventures in Europe^ Asia, ./ifrica^ <fin^ 
America^ Small folio. Sixty pages only > fFith Phtet^. 

, Mr. QrenyiQe s copy> according to Dibdins Lihxjs^ j^^r 
panion^ p. 2^4, cost him 5/. 5s, . , 



» » * 



It was reprinted in vol. ii. of Churchill's Collection of Vpypges. 






jBMcceltt fCiov. Bat.) Bizarie di F^arie Figure, Svo. ohlin^g\ 

1624. 

^ See Tiie R^pertorium Btbliographicumy where H is dejGjcribejl 

ms /' A Vost rare and singular Book^ containing Prints.9f human 

'^ Figures tormed by the strangest materials^ as diamonds^ hoops^^ 

%uiaders> pieces of carpentery> battledores^ chains^ culinary 

Titensils^ &c. When the correctness of the delineations^ and 

ine boictness of the attitudes^ are considered — we see the lumd 

^f a great Master through the laughable whimsicality of his 

*iW^8:" , \. 

"'^^ A^iidpy -IS ini the Strawberry Hill Collection, and one was va^ 
m !ih)rsaf at tonthill. 



■ / ► ; ■ 



^jfyd'fcte (AbrahamJ Annates of the famous Empresse Elizabeth^ 
''^^ueene of England, ^c, translated out of French, Large 
^^ pigier^ 2 vols. Ato, Benj. Fisher, (No date,) 

Large paper copies differ from the small in the following 
j^iJ^arafs : viz. that the date (1625) is wanting in th^mji 









.*rS^*'*'"' 



^-'■""s 

,»*«l«^ 






«M?»* 



«!*' 



lifc« 



^Cmd^ I tiie^^eit rfifstipiifi^ tri; the ^ttAy ii|e «r t8>^ WMIft 

^10 WM It acbool bay •! Westtninateri three oditi<Hi8 had beeb 

jfioUs and the book had become Tery scaatce, wheii tiie t&xf^ 

f^dition npjMMoed* in 1^2^ the Town^ according to the ^o6k- 

^U^V JAArdMiliinen^ hitfd)y atfei^^ TheftlM^ 

iitg^^&d^hreMHtd the teadei^ by Covley hioHH^^ ^^^eieedlDigly 

ctHovi; j^otti oaiitt owti afto^unt, aodforiiie tel*«l<fiii&ig]i|h% 

4ijs^^ff %1^ hb «lady fr^daetioM u rj^ii 

^' Bead^# (I kDQw not yet whether gentle or mi) MM^ 

fadOwliaTe been angry ;(I dare not a8sd]ne!t^ih4d»«r<of 'thdir 

iAge^) itibiBj Bbetieai BdhtoeMi ^and "tdntiked iHA bkieyKWhit 

edti^jhi^nds ethet suits — earliness: others whd itft^ihm'^ h 

weak fipdth i>r strong malice have thought me like a pipe, which 

neireraoands [but when 'tis.bkwedin> lindread^iM^fiMii jOta-a* 

•4ir^\:l|i#.4t.'ii^jB]ir^Tioua Ftost ii^Hc^^lps Ih^^bk^aioi^ 
UdQpiKli^!4k<{y lafqpeat qiUdkl^ i^ Iho kttej^> ttn^ heJi^h^ 
Viroint Homicide who strives to mnrlher anoUtef's famt ten 
IsKitfe Ihnfevii i* a ridicukms ^ioBy to<eoHdenin of la%ki(t:t)i^ 
Stars^ because the Moon and Sun shine brighter* l^hetvctrall 
•SBivei 4 .tem iatikilhet bkwn ihan.aKting<^h€id b; thi^^T!!^^ 
B«r<dift Ml of Foe8ie%^^beii^aq9ei«!4 itt«ii6Mef^>f »^ 



this third editi9% . Wi^)tb<>fgl»|t(bem€« 
l4Mn,#iur||, lAf fycjfliiiook wbkh hath jigMed /JPobucccnooBMeii 
^fiay^ {>y O^olcsilBd Grooeiis^. j II ift.«H meiis|$»dgpMl^it 
goffer Shipwrack, it shall something content me, that itc|Mli^ 
plejAS^ n^yself aad the Bookseller. In it you shall find one 
argument (and I hope I shall need no more) to confute m^ 
believers ; which is, that as mine age, and cdn8ieque;ntly ezpe* 
rience (which is yet but little) hath incr0ased» 99r^<^y ^^^ 
not left my Poesie flagging behind them. ) should not be 
angry to see any one bum my PffTdnmM and (S9ii$b€, nay I 
would do it myself, but that i h(^e b pardon mft|f easily be 
gotten for the errors of ten years afagei Mf'iJMtifantia ami- 
Fhiietus confesseth me two years older wheh I' wiriV it. The 
rest were made since upon several occasions, a|id j^rhaps do 
not bely the time of their birth. Such as th^y aie« they were 
(Created by me, but their &te lies in your hands ; 4t is only 
you can effect that neither the Bookseller ri^ient himself of his 
charge in Printing them, nor I of my labour iti' cdmposing 
jthem. FareweU.*' ' ' 

A» Cqwlky. 

However unfashionable in our days Cowley )^aay have be- 
come from the harshness and conceit of sotiae^.lpiill imposi- 
tions, there are still many who think both.highly%aiiidr}ustly of 
him as a Poet — he was considered by his co^tempidbiries as 
excelled by none, and King Charles II. when toM c^his death, 
declared '* That Mr. Cowley had not left a better man behind 
}dm in j:ngla,pd/^ 

I certainly think with Dr. Blair, that Cowley s Aw^reontic 
Pf^^s^ are b^ fsi the happiest of his efforts; <' th^ ar& smootli 



j£aaiie<>or'tw<»'sjp^i«0ftB^ them' here <^Bii^%rUb f^fbre'lfe-^ 
.itf^^pttKbks^.kad^lK^' 49diivey their own excose for thi6^f6Jt^W^ 
iii liM^iJii II ii :>i- ■ ■■' -'' •• *^*^"^ 

r-#iiM boi: ll*.*'-^ ' ■■ •• • • • ■ .. ■■ >'■ 

GOLa 

£iii -f?litlii.-v . .-.1 . ^ . j . ■ ■ -f-.i ' ! .'.• 

. A mighty pain to loTe it 10, 
And 'tis a pain that pain to miss, 
.V > jg'^^ of ail pains the greatest pain 

.d ! .. 'iiii^tofove-^hiitWeinvauL 
% Y.sii . < ¥irtae laow Bor NohU Blaod, 
-^^'j yli>'.?.-. l!^ftr Withy Love is nnderstoodf 

*• ,,vj v.,\'.' ^f^f^ »k»f does passion maw,. , ^ >,' 

^ilT i <?fl'W»ovoiM)li«»LoTe! . ,,. .; ^ 

. A cnrae on her, and on ^e man 

^^^^ "^b this traffick thus hegan! 
'*-< » V. / :rj^ j3j^ ^„ ^jjjij ^jjjj £jj^^ the Orel 

X^ff' -;' ^AcQfBeonhimwhodigg'dlhesfoi^f 
^^d t" VAcnne on him who-did refine h! 

<4 H f ^ . I'v. , A ciirse on him wbo first did coin it ( .; 
A cnrse all corses else ahoye 
On him^ who ns'd it first in Lore ! ! 
dold hegets in Brethren, hate ; 



> ». T -» 



'€k4d in Fiimilies, debate ; 



.^ — 



"1 '^ 'Gifl^ doles Friendships separate. 



^•' vi' 'Oolddoe6 0itiliWars«reate; 

e >,v ^.011 s; 73)^00 tiie smallest hams of it | 

rs ,,..K fhHx alas, doe«i Lofip hegeir ; 

"^ " '^ ' ' ' THE GB[ ASSHOPPiEH, 

Happy Insect what can be 
' ffi Happiness compared to Thee ? 



■ , \yy-jv)k\ 


'•■i :'Jlii)ili* 


■'\-,j-y\\j<i 


.•...." )tr'>h 


■■>>'■ fiA JOd 




'.:. i^il'O'W 


"Kti •'•Of^O^ 


.-. M:vMi^^- 


• .'. 'V.- Xri'.n 


'; i ;''s-^ .t«>f« 


. : \,:jivyT^ 


.. ■ / ."■i:'l i>CV'/ 


1 i?i -.rarji*- « 


' -f i.r„*'i > 


. ' ■ '^stfj 


.■■•'^ OJ\i>j 


■ ■ J .<:. / . .;!")•'. 


' ;■ ■■'(■ iV.i'J 



•y :. ' jj ' 



And thy yerdant ««p' d«e0 fl^ 

'Tis fili'd whereerer tboa do^tteatf 

V«turc«8 B«flr« tliy»OiilKiw*». • , .v 

Thoa dost drink, Mid dance, «ndrfliB|^$ 

Happier than the liap)^<9t Kkif^l - > 

All the fields which tiKm doflt Me, 

All the Plants beloBsr<to«iM^ '> ' v? 

All that Summer iwwmi p re aii O i .- ^ 

Fertile made with «arly juiee. 

Man for thee does Sow and -Pknigli ; 

Farmer He, and Landknd 7%ou ! 

Thoa doest innocently Toy ; 

Nor does thy Lnxnry destroy; 

l%p Shepherd gladly heareth^^iee, - . v -^ W 

More Harmomons ihaa He^ ....... a 

Thee, Country hinds with gladness hear, , .,. ■ .y 

Frophet of the ripened year*! 
" ' Thee Fhoebus loves, anddoesins]^;' ' "^ *' ' " ^ 

/'/• . Phoebus is himself Ay Ore. " = ^ ->: .v\ - J.jfh.ter 

M\.vV...--'\ T6theeofa]lihinfiiipOli'''EarA,' "r.-i^v^. .•.,...,,/, lotb-i-sr 

'j^j I#ife 19 no longer than thy mirdi; • : *- v.!/: .,=•.:> w^.V 

Happy Insect, hjqppy Thou, ; ,;; / \,ixrv> 

Dost neither Age nor Winter know^ \ 

But when thou'st drunk, and danc'd, and smor. . > v 

Thy ml, the flow'ry iieapres amoi^, 

(Vohip^ous, and wise withall, ' »^^^ b^>vi^J.-^-, I 

Epiouraett Animal!)' • ^' M-.^vni: ii:>um iljiw 

S«te4 with ihy Suminer^asl,' ^ . '/ .r<.>.f«>.f ii'jiiin 'tb«-(fl.» 

Th4)|iretirest to endless i*est . • >jh a>(r>m oi 

THB EPICtmfc" " • '^'^^^ ^ "^^'"'^^ 

Fill the Bowl witb VMM Wine,. : . s^ Jva. i«)m mob 

Awwu4 Pitt Tem|Jf BflK» >*k»i ^ ^-*'>^ ii:r/'.yn'>Jn> 



^WmtdOMMMff^ 4JWMyiT' 



And l«t m cl^Q«iMiir «iik%r 

Like the Wine ^nd^Rm^ fmUffPi 
<ht>wn'd with Rosea ire coatewm 
Oyge'8 we«lt^.diadcai. 
T» Doff Umu^a ; ivhttt do^we^fetir? 
Sb Dg^ ifmi^^ WB kmTie.it Jhcce^ • 

14^4 tv»M it kiAfU^Tr ikut ^iViV 
Wt^k atle«#Vvwitbuwt0.atii^, 
Let'^ banish Bqainesf^ baailih SorriMrf 
Tp the (iira«b bdonipi TkrMBmno, 



;';-.i>Mri ■ v- ,:"■ ri»T 



/^. .■ 



T^ itomuiQe w^ wntUm when iihe Jkut^ior wm only 17 

ears. oSpg^ m^ in <it be iotrod^ces two Bnq»atio Pieeee^ en* 

titled " Deorum Dono,** and ** Gripus and Hegw** The Au- 

^l}or was nepbew of James Humell, Author of the Familiar 

.betters, who thus speaks of it in his Letters, %vo, p, 432^ 

^^qnd, 1^54, 

Cn? 4fr. JP, Baron, at Pirns. 

Gentle JSiir, 

I received «nd pfes^tly Tan over your Cyprian^ ^cad€my» 

ymXh. much greediness and no Tulgar delight > and Sir^ I hob) 

^myself much honoured for the Dedication you^have been pleased 

"to make thereof to mf > fbr it deserved a far higher patronage, 

*Tnily I must tell you without any compliment, that I have sal^ 

^om m^ with such an ingmiioua mixtore of ptose and verse> 

int^rwov^ with such vurielies of fimey and dM^mihg strahrs 



I 



Un« in love with you. If y<m b^ ilready to> cottk ilie^Bm^i 
■olhlmaBomelf, end have got such footi^ oil -P^flijl^? ^^ 
msfim/tbhtbe Lord of the whole HiU? lind ihHicFi&dA CUM, 
WteWiApdllois now grown unwieidly dloA tM, otiirsaLfialam 
chcKce of you to officiate in his room ftml preside Cfiret thiiH. ' 
o/nferei0 ti^iially a Portrait prefixed to the C^iit^jti^demy 
of the Author, aged \9, without his name, but tliEsi 'froitflSie 
date, must have been intended for the Work I shall next men- 
tion: viz. 
Pficula Castalia^^c. Poems, ^vo. 1650* fy £. ^ff^ff^j^ 
WhlclLSoId at Woodhouse's sale for 2/. Ss. .^ ;-. -< -^^xSN 
According to the Author of Censura Litoraria, ypU i. IV\ViS6, 
R. ]p|aro(iy the Author of these Poems^ VFas born Ifi^^^piw- 
catei at Camhridgey. ^nd afterwards at Gray's Ian>j ^. W^ 
who ha? g^ven a specimen of his writings, 6ayB> 5^ yV^tufj^EfJ^T j^ 
roetical in him appears to be pilfered from other Wnt^ors^Vjp^ f 

'.■■v.'M»T> •.;:'.-•: ■ ■•)■'' ■•••'''{ ^•*^^ 

^^^nm C^iristavaji dej Nuevo deicubrimento del ChifnyiBfOf^ 
, ,IjBf8^m(i^ona8, Small Ato, En Madrid mMemptmtmaifi 
^^f^fyno, , 1641... .:?: v...;.-tt.-.-.» i-ii/^ 

^.TOsy^ryrare.book contains (mly46 lefavc^iof|»|ctxiH50pwle4 
by six lea^si.otprdimipary matter, including tl^^e* :•? hiirt 

Camus de Limare 248 francs; Saint Geran. )8t .^mmm^j 
Gaigi^Lt 170 francs; Paris sale, 1791, 10/. iO^.j Uealhe^te, 
Q/. 18iir.,6d^.; Stanley, 16/. . . y '> no 

Jhe Author, a Spanish Jesuit, was sent on a mission: it# Ite 
4,mer;<(^ Indians ; but the projects^ expected from itsiUfeco* 



k^jw^fp^hmAQ'^ himAm- 



^^^fy^j]j[J thj^Hou^ci of Dr^gajiza; atd I^hilip rlV^^nlered all 
^^^ c^S^ ,qC tl^A carious ]>ock to b« destroyed^ fio that i£of 
^PfffQf Y^M^^<<Hily were known to esist^ 4>iieaiith0tVfitiQBii 
t^bffif^^h^P^: apiptbi^r ia the possession of. ]VL (kiiG^nihArvilk^ 
h^jpffifa^i^B^tediip/mU> French umler the titk of . / :< 3 nod . 
;vj^l^<^ ^f)la. Riviere dee Amazones^\ 2 tom^- LSttio. 



€€ 



t'^i^t I 



-^fiom '>:'»! 



'.,1 



, .-jiir 



i?..'i ' 



.^^Mktm 't)i)tircnsid. Upon the Yearly CeletrationofMr^ 
Robert Dover 8 Ollmplck Games upon Cotswold J^ts, Sfc^ 

^Mtdj 'LSnd. ves^y / ' '''!\, 

^"teeiMk, If. 2^.3 Townley, 3/. 3*. (reprint); Siaunifersi 
l#iS, laf/. 2s. 61/.3 Bindley, December, 1818, 12/: lis.l ftoji- 
G.'^Naiiil^r ]S2i,'CreprintJ 2L\\s.()d. thorpe's Catklfoguf^ 
1824;8f:'8*. ^ ' •' ■■■,.. -•: ^- " ■■- >'-" 

The Frontispiece to the above Book represents the Games 
and Sports, snch as men playing at cudgels, wrestling, leap- 
ing^ pitching the bar, throwing the iron hammer, handling 
fllef'^ke, leaping 6ver the heads of men kneeling, Writing 
kj^H^^tbeir htknds, &c. Also women dancing, men hniiting 
and coursing the hare with hounds, greyhounds, &d. * With 
tiiS^ bmlt of boards, on a hillock, with gtins th^ein fimig, 
and the Plettif^ M^ the great' Dir^ctdr, C^jitain I>6Vet,' ^ rfii! 
he»8€Jbkck, riding fl-om place to pMce. > ' .. .kJ 

oJThl*' flAoki %hfch hath the running title Cotslooldijem^ 
on every page, consists of verses made by several hdnd^, on 
^ "9^^ AiHiaiia Dubrensla, These Gatnies were begun and 
eoAtikut^, at li certain time in the year^ for 40 years, by one 



ijUS^**^ 



•^*^is£2S 















Si**** 



^* 









ft«*^ toXui^t 



n**;Sy^^,:s «.-«^ 












a9(^ 



VfVJAlP^.'^^^J 





















\fVS» 



1^ 






vr.P**^' 



hut' 






■^jk»«eM 



^e 



t%*{B|«» 



«tVt*' 



^^(JaV^ote, 



to 



A/t. 



cW 



•1%- 



m . 

U|miS%i'MU In ft sAr ttb jBmiiNd«M'0| iji m% Jbi^lMV lAlM 

y^lf}^mfii«Km^pT^^m^ «y» tint tdiit HMDiA Im ifoiftiiii i*i< 
i4lil0>d(>iii4ih t^.<Alll«^^ Dtni^MM^ witl» wbkk ift^rliMi l9(. 



.-. ..1' •)■ 



BPl)utiii Cohelo, NoveJa de la otra vtdfa^ S&o. JBfarceHmiiJ' 

""teS^ f» siippbsef to Bave foim&^ Ms JDiaSk McH^ oki'^ 
this work. 
Xc<tpy WUbyaTs sale, 1815, 1/. 2*. ; M 

r.flJ ,r /-■ !•..'■ ... ' •: ^ — '•■ 



^P^nquekk Prmeipewi, kgUma potestat^, StefUla^ funi¥ 

Be hi Pms9tm(f& Xfgirime ^ FrkK&^mt le Fgtipht n A j^^ 
phiur fir Printer trai. rfirXcff. /j»»r jPnmt?8]& Eiienne) 9vo, 
1581. 



^9 immm>fmf»xf>misfi^ 

$)l^f;«Ui| §f glizab^tji are f9^^ M^^ 

j9lidl copietonly tj^ two Ust YersQs ia coamon prl^SJ^iqHI^ 
,^ :Jkfc,. Tr C«reiifiUe has a kr|epapero^pyi(imt^.l^f.j§Q4i(a|^^ 
iM?^^<%arie8y In im»is of giM. Q^th^>ugt]fyifjO|^^t 
4Sif>j|tp n iirSiaat IWtrait <)¥ darcie by Dekuranv of i^Jjlh^,^ 
impressions are to be found in the copies jiq^ieasefl^f^jijif 
J|ij|»rfi|i«>f tBtafib^ General Oow^eswc^], Hmfl i^Ji^r, l^yji^ 
iPffO^ »C)Id at Sotheb^s, in 1822^ fof tOt IK * , ^ om^i 

(c.'.mJ :••'.•" • ■ , . ,",-..: ~, ^if.-rf *\i\ 

Omkt^ifAhrukttBO Poetical BlouofM. WUh rprtfuiHii^ 
'ib^MO^ Amhor m kk 13/* ^enr, iff F^iugkam. 4i^ 1^3^^ 
Viiihi:i[^qii|fBii9i*f fl^Uotlieca fix^. Tpe^ ft copy, wiA tb(9^|^ 
tralt> is maf1fie4*al^ l^/*s and another, w%iitii)^ Ae^Po^Wli 

i vHeny a/sale^ 1^22, At. . .»,,,.tj( 

jEimleff^9iJjwe'9^ Bidilcs, a Pasiorai CqmeHej^ writien ^JhQ 
i- \4imeitf kU, being a Kmg^ fck^^qr m JFestmifiAter S^^ift^ 
xhlW^UhPwrirelt. 1638. : , > 1,., ,/ 

• uiG. Naaaaiv Esq. 1824, V-, 1Q#. ^ .... v<,/y,7 

The fFwkB efJMf. Abraham Cowiey, €0^^ ufikmf^wikt 
^^'feer&/ermerfy prmied, and those which he detigtuiB for>^ 

' ' ^preee: Noio published out cffke Authors ; OHghtal>Oephk. 

■ \2ni0. Lond. 1691. : -M t^n'H 

0ecmiP0rt ifPiitOj, mcludmg l^ Poetic(^l BI<^S0O^' f^, 

.'••'•11682.' ■'■-■' '»'.' .^.^>: 

' nds kttei* editkm of Cowle^*s Worl^ conti^m J^. ^prciils 

If l^jton^^t of tl^ Mfe and Writbgs of Cow)ejr> wri^^ fa^ Mt, 



j|& m» It flchool bay •! WesttnUuiter i three oditi<Hi8 bad b^b 
Molds and the book had become Tery scarcei, when tiie fdttflH 
edition uppeftred, in 1^2^ the Town^ according to the ^e^k- 

iAg^^dreMHtd the teadei^ liy Govley hioHH^^ ^^^e^eedlitigly 

iMHe!ttii; !bofli oaitt ^wnwMmA, widfarliie tel««I^Aii&igllh% 

4KJ^^ffiM^hb «ludy^^rodiu^<mBAW^ u -riH 

^' BeadeTi (I iaiaw not yet whether gentle or mi) ^oM'i 

Imw'baife been angry i(I dure not assdme^t^ibdHMHT^f'ttidlr 

^i^ge^) tfiit iny PMtieai BdMiMSi «nd Ihdaiiked lb bitoe>>>whdt 

i^bbkte^nds ethet suits — earliness: others whd Mt ^ihm^'^f a 

weak fipdth i>r strong malice have thought me lik& a pipe^ #hicb 

neter acpinda [but when 'tis .bkmed in> lindread liM^ AMti jS[ta*a* 

4iftaaiCkml^« baft AuAiOMm^Aiianymiim ; ^^ 4k^ -^m^, Iw^ 

^4»r^\ JhUl .jt^^ jan *^Tioua Ftost ii^Hoh j&pi^ Ih0 "bliQadplb^ 

teoiiMsitktiyiaFqpeNr qilidkly: i^ tho kittet> ttn^ he.l^.^h^ 

worst Homicide who strives to mnrther anotkef's fam t ten 

hotiak lhafe:ii is a riAcukms .ibSy to eondenin of h%k j(t the 

Stars> because the Moon and Sun shine brighter* l^hotvmall 

7tBi»|4 bwm iatDRlhef blawu than.€Kting<^h€id by tbl9l!^Ad« 



this third editi9^, . 7Wh»ti^hofg^Jh;ibetiicate0tag>?|t J|; jgj fc ii^ 
1 4Mn.«iwi, lAf fyc9lli book whkh hulh Ji^sMedu^PotMicircnooBdidni 
^t^J^ {>y €9oka>M4 GroceisSi, f II ift.«{l mensgwdg^MBdiqit 
goffer Shipwrack, it shall something content me, that i|(|NlJ^ 
ple^s^ myself aad Uie fioc^cseller. In it you shall find one 
argument (and I hope I shall need no more) to confute nii^- 
believers } which is, that as mine age, and conki^qiieiitly expe- 
rience (which is yet but little) hatli increased^ Q^r^^y have 
not left my Poesie flagging behind them. ) s}i0idd not be 
angry to see any one bum my PfftmimM and (JPhiBbe, nay I 
would do it myself, but that i hope u pardon ma|f easily be 
gotten for the errors of ten years of age. MfHtkitantla md- 
Fhileius confesseth me two years older wheh t wiii it. The 
rest were made since upon several occasionis, am j^rhaps do 
not bely the time of their birth. Such as th^y a]|re» they were 
(Created by me, but their &te lies in your hands ; 'it is only 
you can effect that neither the Bookseller rj^ienthimaelf of his 
charge ii| PriMting them, nor I of my labonr in c6mposing 
jthem. FareweU.*' . . ^ 

A. Cqwlky. 

However unfashionable in our day^ Cowley ;^aay have be* 
come from the harshness and conceit of some of vlpiin imposi- 
tions, there are still many who think both highly^andrjustly of 
him as a Poet — ^he was considered by his co^ te mpidfcaries as 
excelled by none, and King Charles li. when toM of his death, 
declared '* That Mr. Cowley had not left a better man behind 
|4m in JPnjgh^d/^ . 

I certainly think with Dr. Blair, that Cowley s A^i'^^tk 
P4^s^ are by fsi the happiest of his efforts; <^ the^ are smoQtlt 




-rny-} ^ 


:.*'7r.i', -M 


ul ?... 




i(i yI;<;. 


" •<".] vi'v 




•./» -'ijj.i^ 


>-i » .s ; 


^(n -/' 


^ff< ♦*• !■ 






ih tliArteikd of iJl *lt;^€d\tl4y%1^ofeiii&.^' ^ > ' '^* 
^'-^iie«or'tw»'sjp^i«eftB^ them^hefe <^Bii^%rUb pi^r&^A 
kad^wiU' eonvey their own excose for (hi6 ^ftit^'^^l^ 

GOLD, 

And 'tis a pain that pqon to miss, 
)3ai of all pains the greatest pain 
' It Sk to love— rlmt lote in vain. 

¥irt«e ftow Bor NdbU Blaod, • M":i"« 

^iTflr Wit hfjr Love is understood; - ;< ' ••> i'ii'o'/ 

Gold flon? does passion nio^ne»- >»..., »j. ^f,* .vi^^iot^ 

,Q<^ld monopolies Love! ,> t j ^ .^:vviv\*\ 

A cnrse on her, and on the man 

Who this iraffick dins began! 

''A cMO on liim who found die orel 

' A cnfBO on him who digg'd die stoi^i 

A cntse on ham who did refine h ! 

A curse on hun^R^ first did coin k( .: ,...••;'; Oi or^** 
A curse all curses else above : . ^ : ^ ' f }.i •.{ 

On him^ who us'd it first in Love ! \ 
Gold begets in Brethren, hate ; 
€k4d in Fiimilies, debate ; 
' - iStJld dotes Friendships separate. 
Gold deed OitiL Wars create ; 
Tkfii9 tiie smallest harms of it { 
., ., Pf 14, akS| doe«i Lofp bege^ 

' THE GrtASSHOPPJEH, 

Happy Insect what can be 
III Happiness compar*d to Thee ? 
' ' ' '^ TtA wift nourislnnelit cBvine, 



:*•■ 



-' :> • 



• I. 












ilU:- 



v^ttMMw 4wmmi^mtmiiw 



< k. i 



l^. 



fit 



Natwe WMteqpfm^tiiet^tai' ' - ' 

And thy Terdant «vp'd«e0 fi^ ' ' 

'Tis fili'd whereerer dioa^bMlttiteatf 
V«turc«8B«flf^tliyOiilKiw4e». * '^' 

Thoa dost drinks Mid 6xaot, mndrmagi 
Happier than the hap^pkrt Kinf I 
All the fields which tiKm doet Me, 
AllthePlaBtsbeloBSf<to«iM^ ' ^ 

All that Summeriuiwpre&M; 
Fertile made with ^mrly juiee. 
Man for thee does Sow and^Pkragli ; 
Farmer He, and Landlord 7%otf / 
Thoa doest innocently Toy ; 
Nor does thy Lnxnry destroys 
'thp Shepherd gladly heareth'^iee, '.■■'■■ . ;\ 
More Hannomons ihaa He^ ...... / 

Thee, Country hinds with dladnesi'hear. i^ 

Frophet of the ripened yeai*! 

Thee Fhoebns loves, and does inspire;' 

FhosboB is himself tiiy l^re; * 

T6 thee of all things npOM'EarA, 

JMd is no longer than thy inrdu '. '^ 

Happy Insect, ha^ipy Thon, ; . ;; 

Dost neither Age nor Winter ]|aiQWf ■\ 

But when thou'st drunL and danc'd, and svior. . , v 

Thy fill, the flow*ry Ijeapres amoi^, ' " 

(Vokpeuous, and wise withaD, ' ^ ''^ bv/.H.,n \ 

fEpiowsean Animal!)' ^. ■ • -T-s i-^ /{:>aci liji'w 

Sated with ihy Suminer'fVasI,' • .-.>./..,? '.{■)iiin'\hfi'(Pi 

Th4)|i retirest to endless jFest - i " ;iit ;M/;irn oi 

THB EPICCRE: ■• ■ '"''■•'' ^ ''^''^'^' 

Fin the Bowl witbvMieWiM,. ' : . ^ Ji,/. ^>m mob 

Around oiar Templsp BAMi Imfti , j.rv^ ir>7*.yn>Jn; 




And Ut Of ch€!«|f|% sidMlflk^^ -wva tsa .;a .i 
Like the Wine ^ndKoi^ lODiku, 
^h'own'd with Rosea ire CMwtwnn 
Oyge's wealthy diadesL 
7b HMy if 0tif*'« ; wh«kdaw«'fe«r? 
Sb JD4W irjMT'iv «e httro^it ihsre^ • 
l4ir« trea^ it tofUlTt ^Al^ Mimv 

Let*s banish Busiiiesi, baaiiih SorfMr; 
Tp the Goeb b«loii(p nrMamw, 



(» I 



r 



Tbip KomanQe wi^s wnttim urbeii tiie Jbithor wbi only 17 
7ears. of itgQ» imd in 4t be iptrodvces two Dnqnallo Pieeee, en* 
titled '* DeoruM Dtmo,** and '^ Griptts and Hegw^' The Au- 
thor was nephew of James Hitmelh Author of the Familiar 
Letters, who thus speaks of it in his Letters, 8t^. p. 432^ 
liond. 1754, 

Tb Mf- Bx Baron, at Pms. 
Gentle Sir, 

I received and presoptly xw ovor ycnir ^Cj^rUm Academy 
with much greediness and no vulgar delight^ andSir^ I hok| 
myself much honoured fbr the Dedication yott^have been pleased 
to make thereof to m^, fbr it descffV^ a fir higher patronage^ 
Truly I must tell you without any compliment^ that I have sel^ 
dom met with such an ing^vk>OB miastiiie of jiffos^ verse^ 
interwoven with such varieliet of fimey and dMrmihg strains 



UnA in love with yotr. If y<m begm idready W ccHiirt flie^lk!l^e& 
■o^blmdisomelf, wad h&ve got sucli feoimg GA-PMiOiHti,' ^(ii 
nnytki^tiiii^ be Lord df the whole^Hilli lind thdse'McJe CUM, 
\MBKUt'Apdll6\B^ikow grown nnwieidly abd old, sMiaaAfwikh 
chcSce of you to officiate in his room imd preside d#r tfit^ih. ' 
oiVtusre i0 ti^nally a Portrait prefixed to the C^nthiiib^demy 
of the Author, aged 19, without his name, but tii{s> 'froii^^lft^ 
date, must have been intended for the Work I shall next men- 
tion: viz. 
P^cula Ca8talia,^c, Poems* Svo. 1650. fyfjR.J^i^ 
Which, sold at Woodhouse*8 sale for 2ifSs, . ; . ^(.,a,a\ 
According to the Author of Censura Literaria, j^t^ i. p^\,V^6, 
R. ilipiaroiiy the^ Author of these Poems^ was born Ij^^^pi^n- 
cated at Cftmbxidge,. and afterwards at Gi^yVInn..j. ||iff . SPijl^ 
who ha^ ffven a sp^cimen of his writings, sayB> f^ Wf^sffi^ffWf^T j^ 
Poetical in him appears to be pilfered from other Wnt^ars^^'^ f 

^rtfi^i,:: • :• ■■■■■• :'■ ■-•■^i-.^t^q ,^iii 

^^f(^^,{^hrUt(^val4eJ Nuevo deicubrin^to jlet Or(m,JifOf^ 
^J^,4(^m!i^Qna8, . Small Ato. JEn Madrid ef^Mc«^ltintit(4fl 

{iflfH^^*., 1641.., .. ■■■.,'. .']i •-..i>.-'fKv> hii/v 

^T(^iif^ry rare, book contains only 46 lefEtVief^pC^^xpiepeded 

by six lea^ai^otprelimipary matter, including t^,^e^idi hcir^ 

Camus de Limare 248 francs; Saint Cemn. 18|^ifinAC9({ 

G^ilfn^t J70 fr»nc8i Paris sale, 1791, 1(W. 10**| ,H|5aliliWe, 

% ISfi.. 6d.y StimlQYf l^l* \ :.7 Yi*v^ no 

Jfhe Author, a Spanish Jesuit, was.sent on A,i»ii^ioniil9 to 

A,^!^^^i^ b^li^tts ; but the projects^ expi^fjted ir^m tesniiteo* 



lifPW ^^ffl?ff^ Ibe, great iUter iKexse ^fterwaids diflCMfttfrf 
|l||Q/()iQd,l^y thf^ttpu^e pi Br9gfiA^i aiid I^hilip r I V^ ordered idl 
^|;^^ c^e^.of. thia cwkms liooktobe d^stc^^yed^ aa ihat>£or 
R^Va ¥WMWi^ <H^^y ^^T® known to e^st^ oneanthfiiVfltioan 
^^M&fff^^n^^: aootber in the. possession of..]V{^ (k^iGfiDbifltrKxUBi 
l^hp,t^[|^isl^tedii|^.iiitp French under the titM of .. / t< > no;i ^ 
^^ ^v.>^^^^^^ ^f ^^ Ri^we ^^* Amaztmes^. 2 torn, f l2lno« 

r 

■■ 

.^i^Mktm x^uBrensid. Upon the Yearly CeleirationofMr^ 
Robert Dover 8 Ollmplck Games upon Cotswoid [ffttts, §v- 
^^MtdS 'Ldnd. 163«. ' * .' '"''V, 

*"tee^Mb; tf. 2s.', Townley, 3/. 3s. (reprint) 5 ^niijfersi 
ffifW, ISf/. 2s. 6rf.j Bindley, December, 1818, 12/: 1^*.- H'on- 
O.'^Nni*^- ' 1 S24,'CreprintJ 2L 1 1 s. (jd. Tliorpe's Catat'ogii^^ 
1824m' Sik. * • •' ■"•■ ' '• " "'' 

The Frontispiece to the above Book represents the Games 
and Sports, such as men playing at cudgels, wrestling, leap- 
ing, pitching the bar, throwing the iron hammer, handling 
ihe^^^kei teaping dver the heads of men kneeling, stanAmg 
hj^H'i^tbeir hands, &c. Also women dachcing, men htinting 
and coursing the hare with hounds, greyhouttds, ^ic'^'^'With 
i^^fcistie'bmltrbfboards, on a hillock, with gtins *th<^ein whi^, 
and the ^^tttttk df tile great Directdr, Ci^tain l>6Vef,'^ 6i 
heiWCbkcl:, tiding from place to plice. • ' .-*'>J 

.•:>3ThU'>fl^ki -Whfch hath the running title Cotsltfdldijtmei 
on every page, consists of verses made by several handii,' on 
tto "^id Aifikilia Duhrensia. 'These Gamies were begun and 
eoAtibuc^, ^t ki certain time in the year^ for 40 years, by one 



ftoftdfl U6ftt, ftA Attofittty, <Jf BaftoA oft fli€ rKftioy m Wiltf*' 
MilQlAMi, Bdkt Of Mil h^ffff^'^\V0t&lll^i(^ JkA i 4 i » iSti 

rett^'flUUl' D>.mg5iiot69 nt, tusIcuM ii pOKCtroft diuVNffll l^ffn/-ftt 

<iMMi' Porter, BMf. « imtit^ of tbb ^^tttiiy, liktii^flttrl^tfllkllp: 
tAA^' Kiilgi to enCMTAge Zli(»?0r, gai%^ bhn (ibM it^Ttli^iSrq^ 
dbthes, with a hat, feather, and raff, -padtpo^y^^'teM to^ 
tiki occasion of tkese Sports. Dover vised to bO UM ig ftu Ay 
there in person, tlras decked out and wefi moniiited^^ttKgldfi^ 
tflfeil,' liiid Wttir thfe^ chief Director and Manager &( «lkl6&tSkiti£(6, 
uMidk were frequented by the Nobifity and Oqi^/ «g»#r|gi([l^r 

n^flf i^nd, *till, as blunt Anthony Wood«i^pr^siefs^^1tp^'<lli[(s 
rascally Rebellion was began by the Presbytei4atii,' WliiiM^Mii^ 
a stop to their proceedings, and spoyled all that was generous 
or ingenioos elsewhere.'* These sports were afterwards revired^ 
b^t, Bot^ I imagifie, with their original spiiitji I^ ^$^J^^e^ 
that Oeofiry Wildgoose and his wan Tugwell's first Essay in 
Sfi^fi^i^ Qmxotism, isi desciibed by t^ J^v^ J|i^. Q^^ 
tsiing place at Dover's Hill ReveL* ^.^^^.,^ ^^^^ 

The Poetry in the AnnaUaDfibrensiai ,wa3 tli^ij^^r)^ oj^^ 
veml Poets, some ^ whom were then, as Wood says, the 
chiefest of the Nation, as Michael Drayton, Thomas Randolph, 
of Cambridge 5 Ben Johnson ; Owen Fehham ) Captain John 
M9»»e»t Shakerky Mani^uy Esq.) T^JiMijvroffAi<:Sejiii6^x%i^\ 
Others of lesser note were John Tnuisdir WhPv>«fAli^i^ 
Daaieb* History of England^ Joh«, Monsomf f.JMle«^-3K. 
Baas^'i- W.' Denny, &i!w &c • - . .» ^^■ -. ^snNy.v.s«*\ »\ %(\ 

♦ S«« tJ» Spiritiial Quixote, toi i cfa^ Jsl. ^^^* 



^^t fc iw M i ^ ^ ^fMm^K)^ A^MpAtf lM»$Mf: 0r ^ CmmU 
^jflfmn^ mU in a^Mfe «t jBttuiMto*'^ U 1^0;% Jof |»if^ ly^ 
^^^imcASMVihpnH^^ Htyir t^Mit IdMs nidiiis bus ifoldiim i*i^ 

^P2)tdtiio Cokelo, NovelOf de la otra vftta* 6vo, Barcetb/tiiil 

' te Ktig^ IS supposed to fiave foundeid Ms DiatU JShieeMJt oik'^ 
this work. 
?tcapyuil%ars sale, 1819,1/: 2*. "' 

,n(j*<>:M(f, ■*; -J^■t:*•' • ' ■ > • • r^j ^ ■ ■ - •. > • • •■..•.. 



^P^li^ein Prmeipem, kgiHma potestate, StefHoM f$imM 

JOe ht Ptttssanae UgiAme dlr tM/unttwlePmcpit €t Hm P^m^ 
ph'iur fir Prinvtr^^d* thJLaf. fl»»r Prtaimfs EtiemeJ' Seo, 
1581. - 



the Prmee. Bemg a TVeutke wriiten m 

''mkmmp.p. 148. Land. IMft ' .^ •-^u^a^ 5rt^ \<* 

''^ne^eeedingpseadonyimms pKodnc^ifflf, pdmayjitr* ijiaT 
the luune of /tmm jBr»/M, is «ttrilmteit t»iMb«rt']dili|tofi» 
TU'I^retidli transfaition made much hoise in itn drif jf*V|UH^ 

#i&\i^lbiniied pi^rsoH^ ift iiiiiiltnl In iiii il|i ftfcT]i ii^fi|iiMiiill^ 

ifad'tomifeqdently to have been sought idter MM^ ttiMMJ^ 
nWeh'TOttders its rarity Tery great. Fngirol^ krUbHMlii&te^ 
Uvkfttidndamh^s an fen, torn. i. p. 2, says/ ««'thi»^ti'titti fNU^ 
dtMJCSoniifvn ardent Republican^ who, in trealitif ^iftite 9biM# 
of the Prince o?er the People^ and of the F M H i te ''>iM*erHMi 
Prince^ leans toward the People." "*• *'*''*''' 

A Ae<>Mdii^ to the English tiunsk^on, liie qnesttdHA'dbimitoMi 
llithis Treatise are as follow : : ' > y '>:•*; 

-' 1'.- Whether subjects are bound and \\\\^\[ U\ \fi\i\^'Tl\WtAl 
ttAey oommand that which is against the kweif GdAl '^*''^ "^^■^ 
^^ 2. Whe^er it be lawful to resist a RrincewUclk^'iiMi^li^ 
fringe t^e law of God^ or ruine the Chnn^, tyy Wholii(*^hM^ 
ihd h6w ferrc it is lawfoll ? ../.,»;-? r :„ 

3. Whether it be kwfdll to resist a Prinee whidt dMr ^ 
presse or ruine a publique State, and how ferre ^M^itl^irftflli^ 
maky beextended) by whom, how, and by wteat rii^ oi^Unr'Mi 
krpemiitted? * ■ 

4. Whether neighbour Princes or States nay* lM^.'or"are 
boond by law, to give succours to the sntjeets of <>tte PrmliiB^ 
afflicted for the cause of true religion, or oppresfMlf'bf' ihMMil 
tyranny? 






>tip|^l^ Ollfr^eifcnM^frQB^ tlu» Book, which tre^^fly 
of the sobjectf before eopoeratedf in order to di^.th^jpiim- 
Wriilf ^'^M^i^iAMt^ h«iM^ «ul^)oct^ an4 ;f(V.}J^&|rtgr1^ 

4pif fWW i^f^ /' HiUierto we hare treotqd •£ .«. Ji^ii^r f 

'xjKllSfi^ ffv^^'^^ ^ ^ ^^ ''^^ ^^ ^^ 8OX0€whf^l9OCe|[d)|^ 

<^||iftl!^rJ|i'^gfpit. Wee have shewed that he;W ftJJJujig, wMpfe 

HfWlfcBf<oW»P* A kii^gdk>me, either derived to hiia by sapQ^ 

^m, i)f;^>wHtod to him by election. It followi^ ther«^r^ 

^Imtflif ii !r6|)ii|ted a Tyrant^ which as opposite to a Kiaf ,< leilh^f 

gH|miQi^)d«9d|»n by violence, or indirect means^ ittr^inf^^inn 

Tested therewith by lawful election or succestton, govieimi^ jl 

Klti-PntinTrtTTig tr lnw and equitie, or neglect^ those uotttiacts 

and agreements, to the observation whereof he waf:atriiQtly 

ijljjgil) at hi ft receiption. All which may very well ^oocnrre; in 

one and |^ sai]Bie person. The first is comffiooly called a»Xyt 

^§i^^iS^^^ title : the second a Tyrant by practise* ■ Now it 

Hf^iWioil.SQ come to passe, that he which possesseth lBm§el£s 

of a Idngdome by force, to goverue justly, and he on whom jt 

df^cenda by a lijiwfull title, to rule unjustly. But iw^ nmch 

llt^ kingdom is rather a right than an inheritance, and an. ofr 

$jpe. thap a. jgossesaion i he seems rather worthy the nam^ of ,a 

T}Tant, which unworthily acquits himselfe of his charge, thaa 

h^ which 9nt^^ into his place by a wrong door. la the same 

|f)^p(^ if the:Pe|)e:callcd an intruder which entered by iodirCAl 

ilfBp^ into ti^ Pap jjy : and he an abuser which govema illiii 

it; 



'»* 



p. 103 and 4 of the Knglifh TransUtiod. 



a 



I 







«i^o«e 



iii'« ^'"TL:;. lie Ve»^ *!C 484i'*^^ 









^dte;* 
teseto' 



(lA? 





* ».» 



< » 



M\ 



f. 









.v^x^x-^ > 






Undft^^' 



tP^^ 



i&g^' 



stitiiesa 



toi»* 



it^^"^ 



ftee» 



aoi 



I :' 









^.„^-^ 



\Ui» 



rftke 



Cto«^^^ 



:;:;»» ^*-''- 



^ii^^jflg t;^,j9V>n]!iey, and tferebytendi^f to 1*^,6 ^ _^^ 

.^^Xbf^^plfjtaeU'/ which is veiy scarce, is a viotent SNa^ire^ nw 
;^^l49|i|^y,a)4 that period was shewn iu satire;^ to ^loy^ iw« 
t3|)^a^}}i^,fi)I the opposite party guilty or innoceat.^^ ]'\ 

Graagerf tays of the subject of this satire, " Efji^^tti^ 

^^i^iji}^^: of Sir James Bourchier, and wife of Oliver Gromwtlt 

'yigp(l\^'lFOfl(Uu;viif an enlarged understandings and an elev^t 

M|j^^-^,She w^ an excellent housewife, and as capable c^4^ 

e#gil4if)€ ^ ^^ kitchen With propriety, as s^e was of &cniig 

lll^ll^f^^^^lt^ st|U:ion with dignity. It has been asserted tMt 

she as deeply interested herself in steering the heim^, ?!^r?v% ^^^ 

often done in turning the spit ; and that she was as Constant 

a spur to her husband in the career of his ambition, as she had 

V^^^/htr.siervants in their culinary employments : certain, it 

uMJ^t she acted a much more prudent part as Protectr^s, than 

Henrietta .di4 ^ Qoieen > and that she educated, her ch||d^en 

with as much ability, as she governed her family with addi;ft^." 



Cromwelt^fhe Perfect PoVitician, orafUllFieiD dpf^-lkfe 
and Actions of Oliver (tromwe(l, with Portraits. 8vo. 1 680. 
A copy, with t^9 pprt raits of Cromwell, De^b|^ow, and Ire- 
ton, added, sold, at HdH^' sale, Aprils 1847, for 29/. 
r Hve^mos^ <^piou9 ^d satisf^tory 9eopuut cf t\i^ vQ^iyu? 
liJl?eiiirf'Ui^Pr4)tectpr OUy^Ti by the #r|^ri?l»t^ I'^l^^^fSif'il? 

^^,. - ^. Noble's House of Cromwell, vol i. p. 131. ^ 

f Bio^apLic{J Hi^. 4f fiogUnd, rol. iii. p. 11 

u 2 



«? • ^?9ftNp f^wm mjf^. 



d«, ia gi^ren by Mr. |!^^le« in his M^mo^s ojT^the Pr 
^^Quse of Cromwell, w. i. 8vo. Lond. 1 787, paj^ 21 



tectoraliHonse of Cromwell, w. i. Svo. Lond. 1787, pages 



tectqra] 
to3Q0. 



. The character of the Protector Oliver, after the ablest scru- 

t4py ,Cif.;bi8, Biographers, both favourable and adverserybOTn 

^^^seqfic^i^t t0 and since the publication of Mr. Ndble s minute 

' ' ■'''ii)f'yy'<, 

jb^'^tilgation — seems never to have been more correctly drawu 

jttmiin Granirers short summary. , ... . 

' . ■■' = ".•■!>tTjLrl 

: ,fVXhis great man, whose genius was awakened by tl^e diar 
t^n^^ns of )iis country, was looked upon as one of th|^ P^^Pff 
tji^rhe. was upwards of forty years of age. He is, an. amazing 
]^B|9ta^{Qe,of what ambition, heated by enthusiasm^ restr^ned dt 
)^(igVf^^t^ di^gjiised by hypocrisy, and aided by nittiiral y,i^<W 
q£ii^,Qd^ .can do. He was never oppress*d withi the weight, or 
perplexed with the intricacy of affairs : but his deep jfcnetra- 
tion, indefatigable activity, and innncible resolution, seemed 
to render him a master of all events. He persuaded without 
eloquence ; and exacted obedience, more from the terror of his 
]Q^^, thaQ. the rigour of his administration. , . He appeared m 
a powerful instrument in the hand of Providence, and dared to 
appeal^to the decisions of heaven for the justice of his cause. 
Hi^ knfiw every man of abilities in the three kingdoms, and 
endeavoured to avail himself of their respective talents. He 
has ^^ays been regarded by foreigners, and of late years l>Y,the 
generality of his countrymen, as the greatest man this nauon 
ever produced. It has been disputed which he deserve^ most, 
' a halter or a crown 3* and there is no less disparity beiwixt 
the characters drawn of him, and the reports propagated' by his 
enemies and his fnends. 

Mr. Noble sensibly enough remarks, that the .(^ognizauce of 



mp monkey agiilcd^ to (lie port^'of Elizabeth CroniwBK^tttd 
be a morfe proper appendag<? to that of her htfsbarid OliVer,' tf 
the story told by Audley, brother to the famed Civilian of thiit 
iianie, from the Revl Dr. Lbrt's MSS. betruG — it is as follows : 
'^ His very infancy was marked with a peculiar a<^ident that 
seemed to threaten the (existence of the future Protestor Vibr 
Tiis graiidfether. Sir Henry Cromwell, having sent forhnii to 
Hinchinbrook, when an infant in arms, a monkey took hiM 
friSn the cradle, and ran with him upon the lead that covered 
th^ roofing of the house; alarmed at the danger Oliver wa!s iff, 
Che family brought beds to catch him upon, fearing the «*rea^ 
tures dropping him; but the sagacious animal brought 'tlite 
' fortune of England' down in safety : so narrow an esda^ie'lklM 
he,' who was doomed to be the conqueror and sotereign tha^fe* 

frate of^tHree mighty nations, from the paws of aiiiotikej'.'T'-^'f 

-'/•)". .'■.- r>-. .• . . . 



"PuiUrs (T.) fFarthlei of England. Folio. 1662'. Wkh 

Portrait of Fuller hj Loggan. ' -\ 

Value about 10/. 10*. — Mr. Maloiie bought Stevens*s co^, 
containing IMS. Notes by Oldys and Tlioresby, and Stfe\i6iiss 
own additions, for 43/. 

Tills book is so incorrectly printed as frequently to leave i 
doubt as to its being perfect. ^ 

The following are directions for ascertaining a perfect co^y, 
on cqljation, left in MS. by a person whose whole life wa^ 
directed to such pursuitg. 

Page 30-33, wrong, but the catchword right, viz. Ckap. 
— — 42, cdtchvrdrd wrong : 2 Even d&ne, should be of. I' 



% 'm^h uwm'isimi,^ 



— — 4|^rl49x p^9^ wroog.: ' catchworii nglit;, vi^lPcEjAtJ^ 
, 5,-7r 182-183, catchword wrong, sWuldb^ 1 idiinst^iilWi tke. 



, ^xjj- ^JJ?"?!^?, p9ged wropg, have ^oiie bact ' IM pagJSi* ^ 
\-i_ 228; no catchword. ^'- •"' ^ (^ 

^' ■ ■ 300, 317, paging wrong : catchword wrong, viz. Pern' 
broke f should be Essex : goes from Q q to T t : in somo 
'copies thie catchword Bssejt is lights ■■> '• ■ ^^\:s*\ 
368, Hantshire begins paging again 1 HantsMre, J 
16, 17, wrong paged: catchword <^i&eri^ Hmrfi^d./ 
100, 105, paged wrong: catchwOrd ri^t, viz; Lanca^kire^ 
— n 0, 1 1 1, tatchword wrong, hU, should be tbenw^ /. 
" ' •' " ^ ' 144,1 49, paging wrong : and should be Tim^. ' '1' 
- . ' ' 3^4, 315, no catchword. . '^^ ^ v«i 

* ' ■ " ** '^4^ last page begins again with Shtopshkre, pt^iU 
PfigCQ 167, 167, wrong paged and wrong catchword 3 a^VUt, 
"""• should be M;e//1 A 

198, 199, catchword wrong ; d»^ should be aiic^. - (^ 

Page 232, last page of the Worthies of England. 

^;;<^.^'3ni6<i follows the Principality of Wales, which beciijs the 
<k^ \pi^ing «new^ ^^ 

..iP£^ 40>4]> (catchword Merioneth wrong, should be Glamor- 

'^d t hj 4^:49, l^s^bword wrongs Merioneth should be Mpnwouth. 

■ 60, last page of the Worthies of Wales. . - i 

.c->/; Then should follow the Index, 12 pages, wliif;b^\|'as not 
'>'tpfiiitdd 'with the book. 

N. B. In some copies the catch wo»d at page 300 is Essejt^ 
f|id jin others Pexnlfroke, but the pages go from 300 to 317. 
There iVei*ctWo editions of the book 5 viz. London": printed 



y J. yf(^^li» 9ad ybT. G, for Thos. WUliams^ and are to be sold 
:t (1^ ska of th^ Bible in Little Brfttain. 1662. 

j; s L^^oiii: printed hy J. G. W. Lu and W. (j. li6B2. " 
Thei;e lw,,^>een a reprint of Fuller's Wortbies, with TUSEhi, 

Iby J, Nichols. 2 vols. 4to. published at 5/. 5«. LonQ/lFTl* 



i '.i-'*' 



Fnlhr^ Clmrch Hkt^y a/ Brluun, from the Birth of Cki^ 
A. . tiiilQ48. Folio. 1655, 

A Ofoy is the Mcrly colkiction sold for 8/. 8#. 
* V A Should have the following plates : 

Axm»i»t the Kiiights and Monks of £ly^ page 16S. 
Two {daM of Litdȣeld Cathedral^ one by Hollaf;; the oth^r 
by Vaoghan^ at page 174. , 

Fh« of CaBubridge^ to face page 1 of the Hist, of Oxbridge 
vUniifersHy. ,, 

And Seals of Arms of all the Mitred Abbies in £Qgla4(d> at 
tbe e]»d 4>f the book. 






1>l! 



v\.\\. 



Fulkrs (Thoa.J Abel Redlvlvus: or the De^ yet SpeMkm^. 
The Lives and Deaths of the Moderne Divines iotittem liy 
severall able and learned Men; and now digested into'bne 
volume. Ato. 1651. Frontispiece by Vaughan of the Au- 
' thor, with his right hand on a book, and Portraits on the 
letter-press. , . 

At page 440 life of Bishop Andrews and Portrait, 10 leaves, 

concluding with Finis. Page 441 to 51>9 follow and finish the 

Volume.* 

* See Granger, vol. ii. p 171, loid Ccnsura Literaria, rol i. p.*tli» 



...According tgfthe ^pistje tQ ih^^^TrffJh^.Jia^^ 
the Poetry was done by Master Qua^lef^ lat^i; ap^lpiVr/P^-- 
d^tly known for their abilities thejrein* JTie^ i^jst tf^^^fS^ 
tioncrgot transcribed out of Mr. Holland and. oth^r ,A]it^|[ij!^r|if«> 

Besides the preceding works. Fuller was author of the HU- 
tary of the Holy fFar. 1640. Folio. 

Pisgah Sight of Palestine and the Confines thereof, wM 
f^' History of the Old and New Testament: and numerous 

J* 

other less celebrated productions. The best impressions of 
Fidler's Portrait are, I believe, usiuJly found prefixed t^'the 
PWgAh sight. ■ ^ ' 

'FuDers memory is said to have been so retentive,, tfiat ne 
^^Mld'Ttipeat'a sermon verbatim after once hearing it 5 ana on 
a day walking from Temple Bar to the end of Cheapsiae* he 
Iheiftldtidd all the signs on both sides of the way either rackr 
iirai^s or foirwards, (no slight task in those days.) 

It is said that he once travelled with a friend of tbe naq^clST 
Sp^o\^-Hawk, and he could not but ask him jocosely what 
WBi^^e diilerence between an owl and a sparrow-hawk. '^ Tpe 
drflei^nce is very great," replied his companion, eyeing nj 
^6rptflent person with a smile, " for it is Fuller in the h 
fiiiSi^' id the body, and fiiller all over/* 



111 






Busjsy Ralutln (RogerJ Histoire Amourense des,. €lm*hh 

\2mo. Sans date. hkge. . »: , >/ii> !.j;d 
. . j ./?<^'o» 12wo. piege, ,.i6£5,, . .,.,[•.,{ .,i r 

Ditto. 5 torn. \2mo, Paris. 1754. ii,:i..I/>fv 

, This latter editioni in addition to the original >^'ork> ;C0iiln|^n8 

m^y pieces analogous to it. Thc^, prigi;a^ wQrk.>mus^/ill 

iiuthor nn c;ighteeB moi|th8*^i!e«i46m^ Ui. tb^ BlM$il^^^fi»Bl 



^lAfiaB^'Wu' ftiJ^ttWied to become uiexOti ibr'if mn 
i&'&n'iMrti 'btate^' He liia^ entrUBted liSs maiiiucnpt' to^ 
aiittt^ fifuid thb MarchionesB of Beaiune, who Itaring aSe^ 
mA'WfliiiOiii.'lKail It pHtitoi out of sirite. "''■' '"^'' 



^et deuvrei de Jem BigH. Pucguelm de Motiere. ^ M|f|. 
^''"'^_' 4!w«// 12nw. Amsterdam. 1675, , „„,, 

, 'n^,niicpininon little editioo, to which is oftei) addecli^f^ 
ae Moiiere, Amit. 1705, which fonnsa 6th volnnie, ibo(e^ .vi^tji 
the^ l^lzciir collection, end has sold in Prance for ISQ^^pfci, 
andiii London, at the Bale of Amos StretteU. Esq. 18.2(), jj|>e 
6 vols, bound ill morocco, for 4/. liw. . ,^^^^- 

In this edition the Fent'm de Pierre of Corneille, in yerse,^ 
iododed, iustcail of that of Moiiere ; the 5tb Tolume Xeof^ 
nates with l^OnAre de Moiiere petite Comedie. ,^ 

The edition of Moiiere, 6 torn. 1 2mo. Wetstein, AmUcr^fmfy 
lo^.l.t is ^mewhat remarkable, as contaioiug the noted. Sc^iw 
of i>oa Jnaa and the Mendicant, torn. iii. p. 38, and wb>9^ 
^ruii'et says, he has met with in no edition of Moiiere pilQ^d 
in France earlier than 1817, with the exception of a, sij^^ 
copy of the Oeaiiret Posihumes, torn, vii, Paris, 1 662. 

This scene was suppressed on the 2d representation of the 
Feitin de Pierre to quell the clamours which it excited against 
the'Aathor, by' the too strong colours perhaps with which ift 
had depicted the reaBoning villainy of his hero. 

The following is the passage as ^ven by Bret in his edition 
of Moiiere. 

' ■-■ JXm Jaan meets a beggar in the Forest, of whom he asks 
httw'te pisses his lifeJ wboanswers — "Uprier Dieapour te» 
kmMt^-gintt qi^ ate ivMi^t (aumint. fk paues'la' vht^ it 



<W ^^mfmomimWj.iimfiiP 



Momneur,je naipat mmvent de gtnn manger.^ ^^^^^l^i^fifP* 
jMi^liiDii* Ji^ mmroi$ Imser mourir de /urn ce»9^ fmle^jpfteni 

:'f^ forr Mf maim : ^em, voUh un low itar, maisje iei^jfffffe 
pdkff&ihmtrdefkunmmtS.*' , j. 

'-'^ IqI tbe Dntdi edition the passage according to Brpn^fis 

' maA bblderj vli. Je vau te donner %n Louis d^Ofj 4fiU a 
fkmr0,pour9u que iu veuUle Jurer, 

^ M'These paiticnlars have lost some of their interest^ subppe the 
wime soenes have been reprinted in Didot*9 8yo. editipiLi^id jn 
Mi Anders. 

: Bret*a e£tion» 6 vols. 8to. 1773, with Moreaus pl^t^ en- 
joyed the reputation for many years of being the best of , this 
«athior> but according to the latest French catalc^es^ f^Wf^ 
to be superseded in reputation by that of M. Auger. I^uris, 
li819 and 20> 9 vols. 8vo. with prints after Vemet, w^cbis 

^ stpolDen cif in rapturous terms by Brunei : '* Pour la purptidu 

< UJftel le merite du commentdre, h beautS de Vhnpremon eT k 

^M des gravmve" 

To ibia^ as to every other Svo. edition, may be addted 31 ^en- 
jgtavings, done from the new drawings of M. Mprei^n, which 
are much, superior to those of tbe same artist made in 1773.. 
.. The editions of this celebrated Author are nearly as nume- 

trdnsasour Shakspeare, and it would be an endless as well as 

' ■ ' j '^< »i 

Bseless task to enumerate even a tythe of them, I shall there- 

, •• ■•' ■ii''.'''. 

fore only add one more edition to my list, v]lz. tfiat of Pans, 
1734, 6 vols. 4to* with plates, as it was revised Irom the ori- 
irinal editions of Moliere*s Plays, and seryed u^ the tqxt, from 
which Bret's edition was printed. 

There are two editions of the same date and size : the firet 
ny/ host is recognized by a fault in torn. vi. page 360, line 12> 



' <A)i^ Btwai'tiie WOTtl Comteete, irUdi In lli^ TCfKUt^ h mr- 

^""^'Hnlfi^iiiluB Cours de U Litteratoiv, nys, 'AsAntiiaT's 

^liiMdifleiidatloil, is in his own vtirlu :' and it miyjuatly be Mid 

that Jrlolierc's cul<^um is contained both in the woi^ of Wft- 

''t^iMltt) preceded as well u succeeded bim, to cotApletelr^Te 

''^hii& -mases b6en ^staaced by bim. He certainly cksaes 

among the front rank of Moral Philosophen. Dr. Blair, iA Us 

"liSdiaes on Belles Lettres and Rhetoric, calls bim aa.AbthDr 

' ' m Mtom tfae French glory most, and whom tbey justly plaea 

at the head of all their Comedians. There is indcedMio 

^"Aifl^'ib'allffae fnutfiil and distingnished age of Lons'KIV. 

"who'ba^ aittuted a higher reputttion than MaKere; or- wbo 

a^ ikore tiearly reached the snmmit of p»fecdon 'in biv oma 

" "i^j Mvm-ding to the judgment of all tiie French Critic»{^-' 

"'yifture "boldly pronounced bim to be the mostei 

y^oid of loy age or Conntry ; nor perhspa, is this the d 

M'mere partiality, for taking bim upon the wfa^e, I know 

Done who deserres to be preferred to him. Moliere is always 

flie' satirist only of vice and folly. He has selected a great te- 

ri^y of ridicnlonB chaiacters, peculiar to the times iDwhichha 

lirdd, and Ue generally placed the ridicule jastly. He possessed 

strong tomic powers ; he is foil of mirth and pleasantry ,■ and 

&is pIciujRTitiy is always innocent. In fine, uOtwilhstanduig 

. &u;ue ft;v j I) > perfections and improbabilities, which are mere 

. Rpc\;ks on tliii disc of this luminary, few writers, if any, ©rw 

possessed tlie s]»rit or attained the trae end of comedy, sa 

jcrlccrty, on the whole, as Moliere. 



Perraub (Charf^s) Les JJommes Iliwtres gut otU j^aru'^en 
France pendant ie siicle de Louts XlV, avec leurg Partrtats 
aunatureL Parts. 1696—1700. 2 torn. Fojw/ 
It may have been remarked, that whenever this booh^ wlach 
is much in request, on account of the portr^ts, engraved, by 
ii^elinck/ falls into the company of book collectors, tlii^y im- 
medifitely enquire if it contain the portraits of AmaPoM i^ 
l^cal, and either turn themselves to the end of the first to| 
lume, or request some one else to make the reference for t^em. 
Hie occasion of this invariable enquiry it may not t>e cofiflj- 
' derea misplaced in a work like the present to detsul. Wlicua 
this woirk was on the point of publication, the Censor not' li'av- 
ipg allowed the lives and portraits of Arnauld and Pascal^ a^' 
pages' i^, 16—65 and ^^y to form part of the publication— tW 
publisher was under the necessity of suppressing themi, and 
filling the void thus left by the lives and portraits of Thomas^ 
sin and iW Cange. Some amateurs, however, procured C9pies 
of the suppressed portndts, and added them to their ' copi^. 
In time the cause of suppression no longer existing, the bdok- 
seller and proprietor replaced Arnauld and Pascal in the^^pn-v 
gmal situations, and Thomassin and Du Cauge disappeared in 
X^avL, Copies, therefore, in which the Gves of Apauld ano[ 
Pascal are wanting, but having their portraits inserted at' the 
end of the volume or volumes, may be considered as, first iin- 
prestsibns. About eight guineas is the value of a fine copy in 
England. The copy of G. Nassau, Esq. sold, 1824^ for 1 \L lis! 
iSifll more valuable would be a copy containing both tlie por- 
traits and lives of Thomassin, Du Cange, Arnauld, ann'PsDScai, 
so ,^h^t the pages 19 and IG — 65 and ^^^ of torn, i.;^ ji^eU ^ 
platp»^^ and 3% be found repeated* ....... - ,\\y. 



'o^ 



*•■, The^igeV^al Gui^, ihew'mg Sfv* «>«^ ff^emen lieir^Lot 

^' 'md'claace^u tiU tlementary Life" In Ahoohs. -ByJobi 

, Cote, MM. 8vo. 1697. , "[ 

J^ ji^-NMBau, Esq. 1824, J/. 8*. 

' " Tfafa/' says .prooger, " is one of the most pTofonD^ B^t^ft; 
)j^|ical pieces ihat the world ever saw. The Diagrams would 
probob^ uftTe puzzled Enclid, though he had studied Astrology. 
ImmiB^ately after the nmntelligible Hieroglyphic iuscribea 
* j4dam tn Parage!* is this passage, selected as a specim^ 
«f the, work :— ' Thus Adam was created in that pk^asaut place 
Para^Ue, about the year before Christ 4002, viz. on April 24'' 
at tATclv^ .o'clock or midnight. Now this place Puradiie is m 
MpBopcrtamia, where the Pole is elevated 34 deg. ,'i() mfti. and 
t/ie Snoriseth four hours sooner than iinder the elevation^rf 
the PolaAt LondoD. Now our curious Reader may be inijuitji'^ 
tive coqcerning this matter. If yon nill not credit thete rta- 
lont laid down, pray read Joiepkui ; there j'Qii will see soDie- 
thjng^of this matter, viz. of the first primum mobile or' moBm*- 
pOHure Qt the World, and place of I^radise, and elevation pF 
its I'olc. Mauy controversies have been about the time ddq 
season of the jear, therefore I shall nut trouble my reader any 
farther with them. Let the Scripture be our guide in this mat- 
Icr. Let there lie (saith the word) and there wat : and also 
Ihc fifth day's worlc of the creation, when the {[rasshoppcrs 
were, and the trees sprang out ; this may give us to nuderr 
stand that the time of the Creation must have its beginning iii 
the sprinjg. Kow tor the place or centre of the earth, from 

''* *■ 'Hie 1Ph!loiopbi<»l Fi^re (lednced bj an' Angelical hand Axthilo. 
Kicdly," >Miiu to be eqiult; uninteTliglltle. See thin liplre it p. ^JM^ ' ' ' 



169 UmXXSD JOURKEil 1101919 > 

whence we may observe the Poles as aforementioned in Meso- 
palKamia, where God plaeed Adam : 8» thei ^^vuijp is tiQtafliAntiMV 
sdoner there than here with us> under the e]i^1ta!tion\of ^tli^I^e 
at London.' " ^>v«', ( 

This passage is so unconnected with any Uiing elff9,,^^cg>t 
we. appose some abstruse meaning in the Hieroglyphic^ i^t 
it ^u^t, be presumed to be self-evident, or else the Aut)i^ (W^?a 
tiling Granger) must have acted like James Moore,^ i^ ^tj^'^i 
maf;ed in the following dialogue between that A^thoir .^^f^jj^^^ 

J / Reader. — What makes you write and trifle so ?> ,1,0 ))>d2 

Jifopre.r— Because tve nothing dbse to do*, , i^jnoiod 

Readen — ^But there's no. meaning to J^ .$eei^ > , 1 . } . ; k li? > 

, Moore. — ^Why that's the very thing I mew ! tt ,M)iVj. ^ .) 

Case, who was a native of Lime Regis, in I>orsetshifft,<;9aBii 
many years a practitioner both of Physic and Astrolbg}!^ iwpdd 
wiksJ^ked upon as the successor of the fiuBont Liliyi wl^wdr> 
ma^eal utensils he possessed. From the ensuing aoeisbteil 
cwmuuiieated by the Rev. Mr. Gosling to Mr. Grangdr/)iitl 
W9«ld appear that Case was no novice in lus profe8sioii.?iTtIli|si'> 
Mawdy, Radcliffe, and Case, being broi^ht to dinei tegeteKiS 
on some trifling occasion, Radcliffe thus toasted C^ueiHl'vifitKi 
Brother Case, to all the fgols your potientft;" 4Atha&fc;)^M^i 
good Brother," replied Case; "let me haveiall' tbeiool^'^d 
you are heartily welcome to all the rest of the practice." 



-«•- 






* Author o( ^The Rival Minim" 



A tm&lOlMNUO*ft' LIiaiAIIT. Ntf- 

1^ 'lMtffer0 FmiUM ;' or Love h a Hollow T^ee^ Comedf^t 
^%^fFm.Lord Fucofunt Orimitone. Ato. VJtb. %oovmi 
l2mo. 1736. ^ ?' 

^«; Nas^, 1824, 7*. » 

^iJcird'Gtimstoue, who wrote this Comedy when a school bojr' 
at' the iage of 13, afterwards, as far as lay in his power, ict^ 
teMj^ted it*s suppression, by bnying up the copies. This atterii^t 
to^bbliterate all tnke of authorship, of which his Lordshij[)*i( 
maturer years rendered him ashamed, would most probably hati!!' 
succeeded, had not the malevolence of Sarah Duchess of Marl- 
borough procured a copy, at a time when his Lordship was 
Candidate for the Borough of St. Albans, and when she took 
occasion to interest herself in opposition to him } ^hd as a 
nuaBSta forward her plans, caused an impression in 8to« to 
bbiprintod and distributed amongst the electors, at her own sole* 
charge^ with a frontispiece, " conveying," says the Diographm 
Ptaahatica, '^ a most indecent and unmannerly reflection on his 
Inrdshipsiiinderstanding, under the allegorical figure of «»" 
eleplknt (dancing on a rope.** This edition he also bought mp^ 
as nidady as he was able, upon which she sent a copy to HolJ*- 
landitb be lepnnted. The 8vo. edition has a sarcastic dedicah 
tioD^vand some ill-natored notes. 

bS^idft^ ki afinsion to this Play and its Author, says, 
; ; ^ ^^ Leaden Crown deTohr'd to thee 
Great Poet of the Hoihw TVee." 
See Walpoles Royal and Noble Authors, Noble*s Contii, 
tion oiQsmgtx, ftud Biograpbia Dramatica. 



HI ^ifii^fD tonuMnaomm 0. 






■ ■ * ■ J. 



^|pi|f«it of, Uie Author i^ his 23d yeiar. . . ; r : ■■^< : :«>/v.Ji: 
Edmond Waller, aged 7^, at end of the life. ^ . vr^'A^ ' 

jiiJlloiiugliBeiitof (Uito ditto 

l,JjJMl|^«» of Carlisle. • . .* v.;^ 

^^ Jlf-!? ■ " .of^ndcrland • .*...• -. ..■ ■V;-j;>{li 

|Sp%.^<*P«» • • ■• • ■ • ^ ' ■■"' '■'•■ ^ 

Jack Fletcher .... • ■ * -v *-^^ Jjjplp 

General Montaguej^.afterwvds Earl of SaadsrieikAl ^^^^' 

William and Mary 325 

Col. Townley*s copy, large paper, in morocco^ sold Ibt 

^fi^t^yK' ■•■■'*' •••■•. Ji •■■■■ - r-.yfflBK: 

urolnuy copies are of moderate value. 



.^n^ii j^postotomm, Grceco Latine, ' Litteru Majuicuw^ :Sf 
.^^'^Coi^ce Laudtano, 8fc, Sfc, 8vo. Oavn. ifl5- ' ' ■. 
* I2irgfe ^per; Gongh, 20/. " ' '' ' ""^ 

• ^'Pb the disgrace of opulence and our country,^ says Beioe, 
'' l^he^ the le^uned Heanie published proprdsals fo^ pf ^Ung 
n^ tnore thaii 120 copies of this book 4rom tliie vi^.CQjp^^^ 
' manuscript of the Acts of the Apostles in UieEUdL^i^^V^}^^^ 
he could only obtain the names of 41 Subscribers nor dispose 
o^ ]^oj^^,\iiBtk76 copies. : .% 

A miltable acciount of Heame, ^h6 in tje words of KoU^ 
** Might he said to have no rel^twiis but muiiu. cr'jts; no a9^ 



hmi AiMtjf pwrchmtnU} nor pr ^ g mig iui mKi$i 

mk'^-^ tiie Aatiqinui. tlie HiMoite^ sod tlie JBdiifar, 
wefcl p a bli a Uto iw, would be a most detinble praant tir-tlMi 
Xitemry Woild, and which I am glad to bear it if Kkelf aoea 
topoaaeas. 

I alnB only add bere^ in order to give some idea of tbe'gMI 
mmghi wfaicb Heame s pabHcations are bdd, tlikt all4HA 
P^bnd's sale at King and I.K)chee*8, April 29tb/ 1808,f]drty- 
ISto tobmes only^ (sold in separate lots^) prodiieed-tiie^>tiy 
ail!mof213/. 19«. 

r's attempt at repnblishing these worica IM pravvd m 
fitthire« from the want of support. 





JSlpfnces Poijfmetit} or, an En^iry concerning' the Agrm^ 
memi between the fForks of the Roman Poete, ttndtke Me- 
mam of tie Antient ArtisU, Folio. London, \iA7, 
Heath> 1810^ 7L 9«. Qd.; marked usu^ly by booksellers at 
7/. 7#. in their sale catalogues. 

The Vignette at the end of the 17th Dialogue in the fam 
e4ki on of the Polymetis contains a caricature of Dr. Cooke» 
PiroTOSt of Eton, in the character of a pedagogue with an asa's 
head. The resemblance is said to have boon too stxfldug not 
tojunre krieu instantly perceived by those who kuAw. him. It 
iAb removed in the third edition of the Poij^meih, 1774, and 
mAet Vignette of Hermes the Egyptian Mercury inserted ia 
in ateiiiiL* Spence cU>ared 1500/. by his PoJymetis abnot 



I ' I » ^ ^ .1 .,...■ ■ ' . ■ •m- ■ I ■ I II — .^^ampa 

^ See Qqle^ftleitcr to Wa1pol«, in the Britiih Maieam^ ^ot«d lif lUii. 
^agtir, in bii edition of Sp ence*f Anecdotes. 



"^ngtnallg tn Latin % F*»ieli^ Sc^jfi^^^u^^^ MM 
English, and illmtrated teith Noeet aytd tOJMW^^ioM, bg 
Peregrxne Donald E$4 ththkn—phttH^ Condom — 
*'' ftfffi^ted Ato JVith FrtMtapiece l^W ^ ^^^ ' 
'' This Poem, bj Dr \\ m Qng, l^rmcipxl tff Sti Muy'sy 
Oxfojtdf , of wjiich much has beeB said, Irtit tlie cMtents of 
vucK Dave been a sealed book ej[cept to the Belbcffnt*, ^ « 
VKdent sabre, and, if not true, a virulent 1ib<3 agidtisi lus ad- 
Tenanes, in a law suit about an estate ib OalVMt}^ Et^trl&th 
the Dt U)d claiin, as^ hanng lent his WiCle, m TH^^iAK 
kige aoms on mortgage previous to his de^h, Wu^wiinJi 
claim was contested, and subsequently compTMnisra 

In the former Joomey Bonnd a Bibfimnatdsc B 'UtAw^j I 
mentioned a MS Key as Mng contidacd in t& r^^W %-. 
Kii)KsWorks,3oldiDlBaBcReedssaIef0f I'Of If)*^ ^llA^e-^' 
in my possession a copy of tbo Thtut troOi-viiiiktiit^^ySft- 
oleS title 19 correctly estracted, and cOntainiilf^ Itr Wbbnscript 
Me foRovnngSrptaHalumoftkep«rfolUiaf*de^tffatM^<^.- 

t^JIQnn-'WLadyJVancea Bndenali^ {'eeMnttvi''iiX^'St*~ 

datnte^J «Mterta the Eail ol Cpa%m ■^WgrM first 

ti'tJ ConntNetriKo^ afterwanfa (« fU>rdA«^H(^^ la^^ 

"> ^a «»Sfr1%oe Siadh.I>i.KuWffnnGl||> hl4l% nuteb 

' iraa'BtA «WMd. vp ) 

^*«»♦,«Wdp(*i J, <\ .a 

--& *afc»s«r^o/-«apt John RrMB, J)q«i^'yi«!>;^W' 

■ Sm Noble I MatinutiMi rf Onager fcr sene |«^e«^,«r Iha I#^f 

f»l 1. f. 86» and 8H. " ' ' 



„,,j,^'V\rer^b!claM)^i«lK> v)kU»> tb*t office is ropposed to 
o«i «Tt(*W phqrtfwi Go«onuo«lit of 30 000/ He becaiiw 
yj t>0^T^ afld to 1» b«ber«d died m the MaTshalBM- 

no Ife wii«>Srt|l«rDf|iMdy 8wn])e mother of Sir Owrge. 

7 Jfort CA0«)?Ji«p— SirTbos Sipith the Author a uncle, 

g_f/a{^iflte4 Ut 17p4 R>i){[er of the Pbcenix Pule;, w 
1„ at «l»ch^*a4»I-«%e 
^ ^ J^^J}f — ^Mts DeBtoii, asolbcr nUiBwife) wWck »- 

hs rf ^lgM,Wt «lKmt 5000/ ^ 

id4ifr -<ffrrf-Vij^-r-Urd praanlle 
,iAI!rt/'«e(fw«W— J>r H«t,A«hbMlwprfTiiwi ^ 

rfM-w^ (ft^wge arotf'svtl* Chief)— Botler,*U«itonmi| 
of tbp Vunnen of the Guards 

^ t Tflfff? -^ w«» that Bntin kept 
■.^ /.iff^^^w^iU^—LoriVMCoimt Allen ''^ 

-iS?r ^<r '-I>r^ Trotter ■HaaterinCfaacery or xaMtiec 
>q 13 l^'^P; Pf ^ -'^^J' hu it Judge of the Prerogatrre Cfnirt. 

■i4ft)^i({Pf¥-rHi;^>eit Joceljn Esq Attorney Oeiteral at that 
tnne, and afterwards Laid Chaacrilor of IrelsmL 

"^'•'^ »'-«*i*Loitf Chief Justice of the eMsmra Real. 
^'4<r:' '-Eillle AH.—UAy ABen, wife to Lesir> ViaeoatiZ Allcfl, 
"3ic,-n '^^ mMher of Lady Carysfml and Udy Jfewhwgh ef 
Castlemaine. She was the daogtMer^t-Dtldi J«w. - 
84. PiCT-cy.— Sir Edward Pierce, SttrrejwGABwriirfbidted- 
"%()? £o¥Wt>Aif.-T^0r. Him, ArcMiMAp crfTimt-, eaHbd n» 
lijrl>«iiil Swift. 



108 tICOND JODBNBT BOUHU 

f^ y$>».»En.' rHiirAKoi.iBia * 

14^. Uaeear. — One Mc Cuty, mn eridence and Eivorite at 

91.* H-.G-.««lft5W7Hsw,fljd9ffl,;Ji!ie2%u Oil 
M. A)F'«--I*»*-<^nW. ■ -^lAs - -■■<,' ^,5.«. vVib«0 ^51 

Wi.* lerMtntd* Pleadwt^9C)^jji.fifl^^wt%.'^ • , ^j,| 
100 .• Otf C4«p^-Dr. Mmito. '.,■.."......'" ,^^ . ^ '" 

101. Aw«».-U4y,,AJl«u. ,^.,, ^t,«A .&Gf 

107.^&(,— l^dy Allen. , , , , , . ^^ 

~''VtSd>ii.r.,^ ; *^; : -i^ ^ •»'^^' 

— Image ot— (riort.) 

-^fl— /. Bnidenel— C— ftVfr. &in»aie. . 

rij?> iocc«.— Bowes, Lord Chief BmoO;' ,? ' ], '°. "^ 

— ■ f r.— The ChaiiceUor (Wyn^hmi.ij ' ''' ' -^-'^ ;'|='"''' 

114. Miracidee. — Lord Bellew, Mynt's md^ ', ■ '? _ 

Ilk /■— r i^—.— Peter Daly, aii Iiih Uvjwr^ 

1^5. • •.— Walpole. 

l26. Cociw.— Sir Edwani Crofton. 

E4t^ ^^"9^ *!<> ^ Thoi. Sniifh'B wi^, nijim 
of fernng it. B, i?. " ' ' 

14fi. * • * *. — Lady AJlen. , „ 

CU(^. -. . i I , T 

— c — i-c«mdi. ' "- "'^ "'■:^^'"^I 

7V«/«.-Lonl Allen. .' '^' ";""^^ "^^ 

— ^* *. — Jecelyn. — Bowet. 

— £(lJ»Md.~tio (King.) 



As I have Dr. KiDg*s Work now before me. I should be 
thought negligeDt were I ,iiot to extwi a specimen /'9ra5lni as 
devoid of any personality, shall be frpm the Nijf^nf itqmOU of 
the Sun, and his f^it to Dublin, Book i. 

"Sol was now in the Ocean; his Hordes wefelplresi ; " ''' l''^ 
And the Honaehold of Thetb was brder'd ^ ttjst' "^ T '^ ''^'^ 
When his Godslap; or cilHoiis to Visit old N^ht^ - .'^^miUnO 
To see how we supply the defect of his Light; . - > < : v at q.-:;? rq3. 
Or perhaps to invent a. new sahject of mirth* . , , / .= '^ni'/f 
Y^etp^^^a^ifiB^cgr/t^.strpUfbr one^^ 

k .,?f't,^4»Mlhbi^. andW^bowheiaiddow^^ '^ ■'"* ' 
For a God hy his ensigns of honour is known; ' 'j '\fc. i> 

As an Idiot's distinguished by putting a bib on, v ' ■ J 'Kt'txO 

^^^^ ^'^ittWgi^it Chevalier by a cross and a ribbmv -[/ nf) ,ff 
-rn Kfrifo».tli<^Miiglj«flireaus, the &«» is iwtprwiU ;,>.-. •i.jy/ >fioY/ 
lu^^ l^ihis habit was made of the brightest blue Cloud , i ^ 
^<in()-)ljl^ell ^broidered and spangled : He seem'd a mere,peai|.; 
yll^^.^Fkir h^ knew ^at fine clothes are a passport below. 

Nor his tresses neglected now flow in the Wmi f' -n? ^ ml 

, But were fiirl'd, and with art in a sflk hig coiiffned," ■ " - '* -iJ* 
'Wiio of all the smart l\rapees so graceftd appears? v: < • it^} 
-£io ..^^^ ean please the Nymph's more by pvdduci^.bia leai^.*; .,. • .<, < » 

•i-^'V f']^iathehe«doftheXi»Aifl**heciit©ffaMiwd^^ ; .,: M^Oil^ 
^/no'^ ^ to-grace a n^ w li^ayor. tho' he's titled. ^J X*ordj; . .^ 

For the handle was pearl, and the scabbard shagreen; 
tjf.,*^A4d^his sword-knot unsully'd had garter'd a Queen* ' / 

• - . ..From a tortoiseshell trident he shap'd a neat can^, ' ' ' ' ' • '• 



■ ' < » U J.n t ltf^ i 



^^^ i^'tipl&ii; k Mi laiiger (han a Z>&/i9/Ma, by the ItaUa^ c^lle4i^4«P9 

'^S^iuik^ hy^ iliie i^'e7^ch, L'Empert^ by th^ Ck^m^s^.S^JJMfior^ ^J^> 

t^%ii| l^fas^khe: Sitford thh^ Sep a. description pf it, \n Jpiin^x Qspi^^i <^d 

in the Natural History of Johan Johnstone. Xiphia are likewise a sort 

^C^.i^tars or Comets which appear in the form of a sword^ tnmucronim 



110 wci^'j(niikke'kiiim ' 

•\c, fe<^P Ti"**™ iBibliotheca ftiacliviwia.* '*'"^-'" ^'*a^">''* 
Orrtio in Tlieatro ShelcloiAuMu ' ''^^^ »i ^^^ i^' i '"fai* 
EiHstola 0)bju|'^ria. ' " '" ' '^ '^'^^ ;" "'^ »** 

Aviti Epistola ad Pcrillaiii. •"•*>'• 

Oraaancnla in^Damo ConvQcauoius Oxon, ,.., 

Epitaphium Richard! Nash. ,-j^ 

King's Apology or Vindication of himtelf*- ..^ .• ..^ ^o 

There is a striking likeness of Dr. King iil Wbrfidgfe^A^icw 
of the Installation. of Lord Westmoreland, as ClianceQor of 
Oxford, in 1761. 

• . ' •■ .• -.1. » fl:. -if: 

In the MS. Account of Dr. King, attached to jtl;»e. 9^Yj9^ ^^^ 
Work whence the preceding Key has been extracted^ iMis re- 
counted that he Vas no friend to the two iirst* €i^BorJB^ but 
soon sifter the accession of George the Third t<i th^'^rone, 
he renounced his former antipathy to the Hanoreriaii Tiimily, 
and transferred his allegiance from James to George. ' „ 

On the Dedieation of Radcliffe*s Library in 1749 hp^poke 
the Latitf OfalioB> which was received with the ^gb^^|u:cla- 
mations by a splendid auditory 3 and Mr. Warton, in U$ f TVt-. 
ftmphs o/Isis,** pkys him a very greait compliment ^ontlier com- 
position. *' '* 

Mr. Chalmers^ in the Biographical Dictionary^ ^^t mating 

Tarious particulars of our Author, upon the authority of Ki- 

eh61^*s life of Bow}'er and Swift*s Worksi mjenitioji;!!!^^ t^at he 

■%Bi the Editor of the Five First Fohakcixd Dr^Bo^Kya^JSi^' 

' mons^ia^ manuscript account says he was Editdr-itf -^^be^/five 

' •*• • • • -•■■■■■■■■< ■ . ■:>; ^ I'J -nihi<^.. Uy 

f See Kh^'s Ancedotts of bis own Timcf < ^to^ I^a^^i81^'')p^'%i8^V ^ 



A^JiftiMuioMai«itt^k vmmr. lit 



\ 



How the Urim J#«i[^tiaMW«/'%%eiiif lIs^OM^ 

He JttatliBliW tjW^lfcb'liattfctfc f^'t^tfti^fitdfl'^IMP^''^^'^*^ ^^'^ 

So to CaMfl^*efWHI \<Ftt&ate>olW^^ R«,t«^ 9Pt«i w t ©^ 

For at Court riim«6iai'B^«te%t^3Bdil»iim^ 
Here the boogies to^^^Udtm )l^i^%litfisimo#:'^ ^ ^'■'^ 
Much ikH^ril*4#yMNt^ telM he frited^tbif^^ ^'^ 

SurJi a radiance can matM tei inoriiMI, 'dni^yl' '' "^ ^'<^^ 
Can a iii^^«4b«ldtti>»'«iid<^ to^rieseiBl^le tk^ day ! -'^ ' ^' '^^^f 
As if tUb!#«f4idalii>^*4ide; his*^ #Ai ari cl^^ '"^ T'^f(<H) 
Nor himself couM^Mliii# ^^ijlsdi lMi« phiSidy '8iiip(f«i<lf "^^^ «^^^^ 
He distinguished Lofi* Mmhf ^nM&tht^ nM^f /bot^^ 
And ohser^ dOI tiho ^Me^i^ |fyai»^ ViM^-qfM^?'"^ ^^ 
Hanghty Dambs set wHki^imii^ 8Udiiiretf«i iM^fO^ ^^ 
Wh^v^D^tesite oM r di y Mf-a eewify fa icadt- •''^ ^ -'^ fns^^H 
Mibred Pribsts i»ie besidea ft|^ mte^ili»^4iii^ 
Here enjoy jOl-ter odie* good^n|^ of tirii'lifil: r '^^' '>'*> ^«^f '^ 
Who rdbmg^ whoftikvy^ail^ ^iHibhti( Hf^^iett Mttfitf tflll ^^H 
And 8rai!)bi<c*4^^4»ci^ tfao* Ae |^ an^^f^od$^>A^lbfr<^'i ^vfl[ 
Fair rerenues «nd Ix>rd^lis r'Hortentfitti) afid^t^kioflr^-**''^ o*^ 
TVrttBpiwwyiiri-Cba^hes w^lnre HiiwMiA^'^^ :^^/~' fr^iivivnrsn dfi 

/>r. King fieWmSm^^^^^^ ^^^*^^^^'7f .'S^^ 
ibis ofi"^^ andi^was l^rteH In Sating' Cturck,, ^Ji VMtM&Jfliht 
iPM erecte^^io ^hif^ Mj^mrff in tie Ckf^ek ^ ^ 4%^,,^a//, 

Oxford. ,e.^n.-c/> ;:i/.{^-^'-...'- -:•.:•.:•-•••• ». t.^-'Tnwf' «a^ 'iO 

I feel ple^ised^saftp'b^iif «odliled^'to liil)^ 
Anecdotes of MrOiii^iWilim/^l^l^ 
the MS. In thfe^^J^tebf twB'f^fesi'^r^^^^ 
his own account of the pijfclicafion or Qie xom^ 
the Toast i^i, Mgpi>^bvt I fim*^ it ji|i4(M4^|]ji»9!jf^ 
I faadcQndaded tbe.second:B6Qk» L laid aside. t3iei»adiy4^ 
did not taber iTaip^lfaiii: Ifil^ieitd ywil^ 



169 SlOOQiB JOURKEilllOinW a 

whence we may observe the Poles as aforementioned in Meso- 
paltamn, where God plaeed Adam : ' 8» thei «^«iii|p is tiQMft&ntlfAt^ 
sdoner there than here with us> nnder the eld1tatton\of .tli^I^e 
at London.* " : . . ? .\< 1 1 

This passage is so nnconnected with any Uiing el^fff^^^c^pt 
we. sappose some abstruse meaning in the Hieroglyphic^ ^^t 
it mn^t. be presumed to be self-evident^ or ebe the Author (fi^n^i; 
tinges Granger) mujst have acted like James Moore^^ i^ i^m}^-^^ 
maf;ed in the following dialogue between that Ai^thpr.^^i^ij^i^^ 

I Reader. — What makes you write and trifle so ?' ,{, ^^^ ).>ijg 
Mopre.r— Because Vve nothing else tq do.., . - .ft^f/oiod 
Beaden — ^But there's no. meaning to l?e .^eeuji . . i. : •; i i f? > 
Moore. — ^Why that's the very thing I meaja ! ,,^ ,,oi^,. . .> 

Case^ who was a native of Lime Regis, in Dorsetshift^^janaii 
many years a practitioner both of Physic and A^olbg|i^>iqidd 
wikS looked upon as the successor of the fiuBont Liliy/ wl^wd^ 
magical utensils he possessed. From the ensuing sneisdiftf(T 
cwmuuiieated by the Rev. Mr. Gosling to Mr. Graagdp/)iitl 
wmM appear that Case was no novice in his professkm.'i: A[al^> 
Mawdy, Radcliffe^ and Case> being broi^ht to dinei tegeteK^ 
on. some trifling occasion, Radcliffe thus toasted C^^^nl'JfksB I 
Brother Case^ to all the fgols your potioitft;-* iAthaHk^^^M^i 
good Brother," replied Case; 'Met me have ;all' i the iool^vMid 
you are heartily welcome to all the rest of the practice." 



* Author oi^T^e lUvaiMoilmr 






A ItBLlOBmmAO'ft' LIMAVT. 1(0 

1^ Lmfffer^ fytHtne; or Ltme In aHMvw Treei Cmmdjfi, 
^ft^ WiH. Lord FUommt Orinuttme. 4io. 1705. Boo. md 
\2mo. 1736. • * 

^«: Naswiti, 1824, 7*. 

'lyord'Grimstoue/ who wrote ttiis Comedy when a school bojr 
at iSie agie of 13, afterwards, as far as lay in his power, at^ 
tempted it^s suppression, by baying up the copies. This attempt 
to 'obliterate all trace of authorship, of which his Lord8hi][i*ft 
maturer years rendered him ashamed, would most probably hater 
succeeded, had not the malevolence of Sarah Duchess ol Marl- 
borough procured a copy, at a time when his Lordship was 
Canfidate for the Borough of St. Albans, and when she took 
occasion to interest herself in opposition to him ; abd as a 
nvBAsta forward her plans, caused an imjuression in 8to. to 
bb^ntod and distributed amongst the electors, at her own sole 
charge, with a frontispiece, ** conveying/* says the Diographia 
Diaalatica, ** a most indecent and unmannerly reflection on hia 
Ij[>rdahip*8 . nnderstanding, under the allegorical figure of an- 
elepliant (dancing on a rope.** This edition he also bought iip^ 
as aidady as he was able, upon which she sent a copy to Hol<i> ' 
lioiditb be reprinted. The 8vo. edition has a sarcastic dedic^^ 
tiof»»/ and some ill-natnred notes. 

bS^iftf ui aOusion to this Flay and its Author, says, 
. , **■ Ihe Leadon Crown devoK'd to thee 
Great Poet of the Hollow TVce.** 

See Walpole's Rowland Noble Authors, Noble*s ContiL 

tion of_C^ger» and Biq^grapbia Dramatica. 



\46. * * * 'c»#«- ., , ' •>"■■ 




A* BIBLIOMANUCS LIBRAHT. ^f^ 

:■ 49. Z)t//.— Counadlor DiUon. ^ :^- 

T56. (Note.)^^^ fen^rinrrfeasfc;^ '""^ -'' " ^^ >^^ ""'^^ 
T57. On(Kii and J. Occo.^Dmon BMJ6^iptA- H^^ -^^ 
158. i^ifroeyor.^Charles Withera/bbUvMr^in^&f^ 
168. * * * *:^tfekc 6f «fWton * - -'-^^ '^^'^^^'^ *<>^^ 
fif— A-.^a«.— StilOTgan, a sest cif Lbi^ Altetf; ^ '-^'^ '•^*^l' 

In^he titk la a former edition of t^e l^t, 4to. Xonq. 
1 736^ after Per^nne O Donald, Esq. in the Title-p«g^^ was-— 

Pu9 atque Fenenem^ . 

Rahki armami. ^ ' 

Dr. Wm. King was also Author of the li^ilowii^ K^c»s, 
'lich, with the Toast^ i^ere prints in a <juiq^ voiniiieA nnaev 
3 title of '* Opera GuL Kingt L* l^.M" , l^Taf To(i^a« waT 



i.- ••'■ A ■ -viv - . -'ii^ J" 't. V m .^ H 



"%rhichi 

%he 

^sever published, and op ilie death of the Aiithot t'Se wlioie imr 

piession, except oO copies, were destroyed by joJiQ Execators ; 

«n& of these was sold in Reed*s sale, No. 22d4; witKlSS. K^. 

Sermo Pedestris. ^v>.» ' 

Scamnum Ecloga. 

TVmiplam Libertatis. ^:' ' ; ^^ ^^^ 

Tres Oratiunculse. . ^ ^ ^^ " 

Antonietti Epistola ad Corsos. ' ' ^''^ 









>p BlPJW?^. -^acci Etonensis. ^ "' * ^-^ 

' pmioiaTTieatro bibliotheca BiacHviana.*' '^ -^'^ id^a^'orfi 
Oratio in Tfaeatro SieMofriana. - ^"1 -k u» bm/ob 

El»8tola OJguigatoria. ^ '[''''] ^ ""^ "^^ '^ <^^^<^.a\ 
Aviti Epistola^ PtrUlam. . -.,x ,/-. 

Oratiiincnla intDsmo Conyocatl<mi3 OxoOr i!.. 

Epitaphium Richard! Nash. . T 

King*s Apology or Vindication ofhims^. .. .>/ ^Q 

There is a strilqng likeness of Dr. King in Widrfid^Hr View 
of the Installation . of Lord Westmoreland, as Chancl^^or of 
Oxford, in 1761. ' '"'' 

■'■■■■ ■■■'•<>' -'i. ^A 

In the MS. Account of Dr. King, attached to jt^e, 9^W^^ ^^ 
Work whence the preceding Key ha8l)een extrai;rt;edi Utus re- 
counted that heVas no^ehd to the t^'o iirst Qeatgtsf hut 
goon afbr the accession of George the Third td th6'^rone, 
he renounced his former antipathy to the Hanoverian Timily, 
imd transferred his allegiance from James to George. 

On the Dedieation .of Radcliffe*s Library in 1 749 hp^poke 
the Latitf OMioB> which was received with the higb^sfVltccla*? 
mations by a splendid auditory 3 and Mr. Warton, in hi^ f THr 
nmphs ofUh,** pkys him n very great compliment ^n theT com- 
position. - ■ . . i. ' .t 

Mr. Chalmers^ iu the Biographical Dictioiiary, after Mating 
vmous particulars of our Author, upon the authority of Ki- 
eholtf's life of Bowyer and Swift's Works, mei^iqiiLs^r.tiiat he 
\frais tlie Editor pf the Five First F'olumcsof DnScmtK^iSiP' 
jn^ manuscript account says he was Edit6r Of Kbe^/flve 

J4^T ffolumes. . .: -^ <»iii ui 



viLf- 



' Mf iihii^, io 



f See Kill's AntcdoUi of bis own Times, 8V0; Iian$i81^'*]p;'%i8^\. 



As I have Dr. King's Work now before me. I should be 
hought negli^i^t were I not to extract a specimen'/ wmStn], as 
evoid of any personality, shall be jroox the Ni^nt nqmOlB of 
^the Sun, and hU Visit to Dubiin. Book i. 

"Sol was now in the Ocean; his Horses were dr^; ' '^ 
And the Honschold of Thetis was brdcr'd fo wist;' '^ I- ^ -^ '^^ 
When his Qodaia^p, or cilrions to Visit old K^l^ht; ^ "jiuUnO 
To see how we supply the defect of h]» Ltg^t ) . * . . ; v uV.;^) ?q^ 
Or perhaps to invest a. new subject of mirtli, . . . , / r .;j;U.>l 
^;5f^^^f|>fc|;i;icy^t9.gtr^^^ ., rV 

^^ Bnt he do|l all his rajs, and his how he laid down : 

For a God by his ensigns of honour is known; ' -- ^'^ 

As an Idiot's distinguished by putting a bib on, ; ' . . i:-id\xO 

^^^^'Att*Wgt4atdlwvalierbyacrossandaribbon. \ -f/ xj) .rf 

'^1 ^Tlj^'.tlii^jlliikgiiissiiresus, the &*»i»BotprQH«l^»^,., ,.,.^ /^^ jfioVf 
^u^j 1^;^ habit was made of the brightest blue Clpud . , i^^ . 
^f»ff (p^jl^ell fipibreidered and spangled : He seem'd a mere, peani; 

'/iii/'l?*F h^JM©''^ ^*^ fin® clothes are a passport below. 

Nor his tresses neglected now flow in the Wind, : '.; . -^A 

But were fiirl'd, and with art in a sflk bag confitned, ■ ■ * • ' ' i--^ 
-tvlio of all the smart Toupees so graceful appean? - . • :i< > 
"'^^^' AVhd essA please the Nymph's more by pr6duci«gihifl lea^!* ... i .„'> 
*i%T Vf6ik the head of the Xgahias* he cut eff,a Mi^d/. ; ■:..■ .:/ , ,,t/?n:' 
^mo'^ P4* to>grace a new Mayor, tho* he*^ titled. IVfy Lord; , ,. 

For the handle was pearl, and the scabbard shagreen; 



3«fo<J^ 



a^,; .^AQdhia sword-knot unsully'd had garter*d a Queen. 
. ,^ .From a torfoisesueil trident he shto'd a neat cane. 



.. IP 



'^ xf ^'^Iphlaa, k Mi laii^er than a Dblp/ttM, by tho ItaUfto^ c]ii\kii:^^e 

^ ^iS^/^cke^ by die fetich, L'Mmperevr, by th« Gaynmh. ,^^^'^ ^^^^* 

t>^nA hfina'ik^Sii^^ Fifih, Sep a. description of it in Plw^x Qppian. and 

in the Natural History of Johan Johnstone. Xiphia are likewise a sort 

«f stars or Comets which appear in the form of a sworct in Muctonim 



i«illA9C^ of Or* SwUt. la tfa« last let^ler wbi^ I/^^igc^fP^ 
fr^mhiiily he writes thus: ' In malice f ^iope JfffUr ^^H/kf^ 
^m/mte you to €ome&ver {to DublmJ the next te^^^.^pl^f^^ 
tUmh<^ « h$ff QM, nnd I will allow you time tq^mf^ *^^j9kM!fi 
^tt^itime J. wiii I €cmld hear of the pwgrm and.fiinj^kmgl^ ^ 
fwtnftcr qfair {Tie Toa$t} relaA^ to the mme .lap-9i^^ J^ 
tinf^im^H^ Cottrte- ahoee, upon a lull with two heads, where ij^ 
D^femdaMir^wUi OB infaUibly and more effectually be caet^ &i;* 
A^ speaUog of this Work to a lady, his near relation^ ,i^|^.^ 
wmMcMgt «fter be had perused the ^eater part of it in^^tti^ 
MS. he told her, if he had read the Toast whe^ he Wf^jiffi^ 
twenty years of age, he never would have wrote a satire. It is 
no wonder that such a singular approbation should raise the 
vanity of a young writer, or that I imagined I wanted no other 
vtikKdatioa 6f tins performance than Dr. Swift's c^pinioBb* vifl 
was chiefly pleased with the Notes, and expressed his surprise 
^ttt I had attained such a facility in writing the hurtes^e 
LaKinw. l%e motires which induced me to form the Noteii»f 
titot lii&ttder, was the judgment I made on tliose ixf MnPc^a 
Dunckfdi That Poem, it must be allowed, is an excclkM S»i 
tir^; biit there is little wit or humour in the Notes, althdtgit 
thbre i$ a great affectation of both. After Dr, ^wifklsteatiouh 
^^,1 ought perhaps to esteem die Toast abbre aH iny^jotfae^ 
Workfef f howeTer, I must confess there are «otne part^)4)^-ii| 
wMeh my riper ju(%m^iit condemns, and which 1 wish i \vdre 
ei^ptfnged; particiodarly the description of MM's 'person iiritlBB 
tl^d'Bookkl fulsome, and unsuitable to th^ |Hdite manoirs^iaf 
the- jHPesent f^e.- But if this work was more exceptionable 
tt»i^ 9iy ««emies po^fiend It to b^, J may. i|Xge,%].^y e^^use, 
tbit although it has beca'{>ruitedmtdfe.lJiaBjtliirtj[yefrii^y9l 



^^li<^4r iiyeen' piMiihed'? I have indee&ptbiemed^wfk^^ 
ii^)i6)AHU Jfti^, on giviiig me their honour thiHillltjl 
WtiMiio(r«tiffertheb6oks togo oat of their haAdswith«Ml|tlq» 
d^g^t One'Of these persotts, however, forfeited hit hoii^Mk 
^ th6 itois^nmimer, by putdng his copy into the'lMli^b^ 
ftsAob^, «md the rest of theOsford informers 5 btt.t' as^thiji 
fiitdl&d'^EV to the work, and did not nnderstand or^knowVii^ 
tdripp!)P the characters, they were content to cafl it as en^^iiL 
bid book,' and throw dirt at the Author : and this, in theii) jitdi^ 
meht, is the inost effectual way of answering any peyfbnbHOSC 
t^Wt arid humonr."* . ^ -jd :<!itA 

■■>.*! .=•■ / _ ' .-'/f on 

Mijf ^ 8m»fieU*i History and j4dventure$ ofi»Aionu « %it^ 
' ?«: 12»w. Lwd, 1749. r ; : » -ikv/ 

' >'91i6 Adventures of an Atom exhibit under fictitious >c]|a|9(}t 
ters the conduct and dissensions of the several political paiAiiSjf 
m'^feat Britain, from the commencement of the French iKUt 
is 4754, to the dissolution of Lord Chatham's Admini^tn^li 
ifii.17684 It is rather a Novel in form than in substance^ ^T^ 
cixeiUastances. are true in the main, though occasioniilly. (^i^a^ 
gemtedi by the flights of fancy, or obscured by the clojud$ii^ 
fr^dice. '' SmoUett seems/' says one of hi» Biqgraphernj 
'5i»/tbis:Wdrk to have relaxed in his attachment to Lqrd fy^JlQ^ 
osimnch aa he^lidin the ConimwUion ^f hk H\itory\^}^^ 
t^hatham \ indeed he had been equally disappointed in hi$«^¥(^ 

'^^'8^<f «<PolifieaI .and Literary Aaecdotes of kb Owa TiiMe. : Sy^;; 
WiKJ^** P^»t 8x0. XojmL 181^. p. 9r, &IV1 : ^.^ '-%. ^^l , 



^^^naflg m Latin, by Hi^^iM'-Scl^^^'iu^^iotu mta 

I'^Peregr'me O'Donald, E*4. Duiitit^p^iSi' ^Idtmttom — 
^''re^rioled. Alo. /FUh Ftiml^'ee. if^P ''■''''^ "^ 

'Tlua Poem, by Dr. Wm. King. Plincipd itf'Sti'' Mary's, 
OxfopL of which mncli haa been s^, biit Ae 'ciSteata of 
mich Ban been a aetJed book etcept to the iel^^iRrv, ^ « 
vMent satire, «nd, if not true, a Tinilent llh^^^sHlit bis ad- 
Tenaries, in a law suit abont im estate iti OtJi^/^fti^rtii^ 
the %. la^ciuin, S3 baring lent his Wicfe, Stt IT^^^ndAi, 
uigB muna on mortgage, previtifU to Us dii^'; l^^^^w^A 
claim was contested, and siibseqaently com^biinisM. " 

Id the former Jooniey Ronnd li BibGoici^Bc's'llSbVai^ I 
mentioned a MS. Key, as being CODtainedln'f&i W^yV>fw. 
Kind's Works, sold to Isaac Reed'i sale fdr lOf.'IO*.^ VuVe-^' 
ui'my poBaenioii a copy of the ThtuI, from ^ti^thWliti^Te^- 
aleS u^' i»'correetly extracted, and containing' la U&ascript 
^'todaiinng^rplaMaieno/tkepiriokiiatti^lirmtlie^J^ 
Pdge. ■■■■■■'■■■■ .. -■!: ,---c..i 

■'»ll£My>K*^«'^L)idy;£Wnces Bredenaly/ceMnt^^^Z^)Mr- 
damt c ij) Mktrto the Karl ol (^ndpgan. ,«M^ed first 
.BsSiA e0iH^N«riiiB^alterw&iidet«I«rd3e^Wk)^la9(Jly 
\n r:^TvtoSirTb«.einilh^Ik>Kiiw^opcb*ilw* ^ matck 

-■-•■■■-f ■'iMB'iuit«WBCd. -' ..I:-: ■.■<:,::ii::hKeT) 

••^»;<1 ».*>«.Wdpote. . -. '.■-:'■«- = ■>.-■- -y,-,-.iC\ .tg 

-■:* .'KUbn m- rol^-Csft. Jokn Ptm, Tpq^nij-ViTOi^^rew^ 

' 8m NoUe'i contimwAn of Qra^«r f<v Mine awoaat^gf thji ^il^' 
tbI. L ^ HS ud SH. '- - . . 



A^KiiiwDjMmA()'# >rm^' J8T 



•^^VvA\«' #i<S^*Wl«^.^ wJWytar^n thai offle^ iff ragpi|«^f^ 

^^'i wA*ygM^|Acfitrti,tOoYeT^ of 30,000/.^ p» P^f^ 

\^ ,..c^it9<dEV^ iAflA It i» b^knred d^^ in t^ Mmln^^ 

"^«ol^.fl[e iwf.JWbitt oS U^ IBwnajc, inctW o' Sir <3*wjjb. 

7. Man Ckepffiifr.^Sk /^ Snitb, the ^at^w't iu^ 



^0 3i.-trsJWM*,;^AM.%Mp-- ". ^.,.W) 

« S- #l»r!:^f-rMra. D^itoii, another bbmis wifei wl&t ii- 



f)fi 8id JSWW/W^ «^w» 5000/. . ,;.^ 

dM^Mlf^,(f^W^OftSie^M Chief)^Batier, a I^^^u;^^ 
of Ibe Yepjnien of the Guards. : - 

W^f5^#^*Tr A r>iWB» that Bntlor 1m^ 

•.^5,^;j^ /^5wo»«< ^.-*Lo^ :,, 

-^^/<fil5f^'T:tPF^ Trotter, aMasterinChaacery^ or, waiidtbet 
:rqiis?;ii<5P»y.Pttib«Bjr^jf has it, Jw%e of the Pren^rve ^w|t. 
\tft V^'^f^tT^R^*^ J<welp, Attorney Cfciicrai at tha| 

thne, and afterwards Loid dhaaceilor of IrelaiML \^ 
^MK^Altie'^^nnrM^.-^SiAgleion, then Prenner Se^eaMV'xaitar- 
^^'"^ '>'^WiMs Loid Chief Justice of the Comon Fleas. 
"iW ^tle AiL^UAy Allen, wife to Lc»i riscoittit Allett, 
ib J£;n f^^ i^her of Lady Carysfort and Liidy Newhwrgh of 
Castlemaine. She was the daug^lfer^arDlJlflli J&ff. 
84. Pi^cy.--Sir Edward Pierce, Sttry6yoi^€t6neF«li)filidteid^ 
"^^il^oHt^ t^AX.v'Or. Hort, Arc bbwh4t > of Tcaay tMoA Vifm 
■ by D^an Swift. 

'%^¥Oi^:^^^P^r^/ ■ ^ - - '■ ^- •^-- ::^^ ••-'-- -^ ^- 

• «2 ''''■■'■' ''' '*'■'' 



Itt 



/flKKtif^ iwrngtutimMismti) 



8—. '^ Town Lonisboiugj \0l 

^.^9^' "^'^^lliieeti AnlM TerAastr .v.Afriqaiuvv .v-Wjb 
QmbflbfeGufa*' ' ' ThmDH?-Kh«i*ini :. -v. ^v .b;ic^l 

^^ dtt^a, or Qua . T. Cutt^nags ! 

^^Fatzman D.ofCiitidberlaacniiiii>QaO > n '/ iT 

^bQuab ^bec TUonSyit Tf^wttsboKlf a;. 

^^Chu Guadaloape Tan Yi^ Hfti^ailiiah ^ I i> 

Is^rohirumpoo Ld. Hardwicke Zantific's ' 0ttd^rslbt{^r? 
^ilO-ftan-^ino E. ofGr— lie Tensio-dai-sin ^i ^ 

iSnhedn^es Swedes 
TScx-uon Knowles 

cnrbng Post Ticonderoga 
Sagacity of 

%iM^^ Tory 

M-ipmo Wig 
Sey-seo-Oiin Admiral 
j^-poi Savoy 

Syir)vang-ti 
Sarouf 



fj^ntus Curtinf Voltfidre 
IgJa-rin-tnmmBarr-n 
^/om-kikh Beckford 






Tartary Ruisia''' n .or 

Tartars of Yesso Hatro^cHaiit 
Village Che^bmg^ :' .'■*'. 

Scotland 
Scotchtnaii * 
Ireland ^^- ' 

Haiib^r' ^^'"'^ 
' Ge^^aife^^""^ 
Yam a Kheit Mar'sliaf ^KcitK'*^* 
YakStrot fiarlof Biiii'^^'^^^ 
Zantific SandwKk'' ' '"^^* 

•-■•■ ■ : -'/iy,- .r^J/ OifvV 



Ximo 

Ximian 

Xicoco 

YaffVai 

Yesso 

Ya-loff 



-m » ■ ' » > » !•* 



ClallHi^lSaO, BLI^^iQ. Nassau^ 4^,. ^84j> i^OSS^f^^* 
10/. Ifiti^vd^a.vJ ^v. ^i ■" V _^^ 

The f«tl9«izn^ Pdrtnntsi^&e. should b^ cObtiui^, jn^j^p^ 
above worl^ whieh was.4A>mpiled byd^Uin^y nt the r^t^o^.^ 
Lady Oxford, mother to the Duchess Dowager of .J^rOirUai^^p 
1.4^Ady£liz. Cavendish « ^ PW>^^ 

2. Wm. Cavendish, Duke of Newcastle ...... ^.{25 

3. Tomb of the Duke and Duchess of Newcm^^^e , j,,^ .; » ^ ,^ 

4. DeiHol Bawm HoUis, of Ifield . .... . . , ^^^ 

5. Tomb of John Hollis> Duke of Newcastle * . ^^ ,. . ,.\]f^ 

6. Thos. Harley, of Bramton Bryan * ., . ♦ ; ,^ , ^ j , , J^§^ 

7. Sir Robert Harley, of ditto . . *....,.;,. .,-. J^ 

^.fiir^iHarley, Knt. . . .... ^ . ;.. . .,;i^ 

9. Hon. E. Harley - . . . , ....'. 2$^ 

10. R. Harley, Esq. of Oxford, &c- . . . ., . , , ^^Ijg 

4:1* *dw«ll Earl of Oxford . . . . . .> . 2J^ 

12. HoFaee» Lard Vere, of Tilbury ... * . . ^ , . 33^ 



To^ji^fejf i JTrench Trantlatlan of Butler s Hudibr(U, 
I wish ;bef<pre concluding the present Journey to correct |n 
error in ^ fpnner one, respecting this translation ot Hn4|^ 
bras. I „tjii^a distributed it to CoL Francis Towneley, heink 
misled ^lyT^ytl^^i^ ^18 Eas^y on Translation, and myerroi;:,fur- 
th^.q^nfirinedrby Ni<^ls u^ his Biographical Anecdptes ^^ 
Hoga^t|^;;^ud by Ray in his History of the Rebellion^ 174^ 
but I now, find that it ^as John and not Francis Townel^y, 
who was author of this translation, and that he was tJnSle to 
Charles Towneley, Esq. celebrated for his noble and elegant 
collection of Marbles. 

FINIS. 



Hi yoTicnL 



W. Datis it prqwriag; and, if encoongeiiieiit be given^ vnll 
psbBtli, A Third Joanej, comprising an enlarged and 
editioE (being the third) of his Olio of Bibliographi- 
eal aad Literwy Anecdotes and Memoranda, nnifonnly printed 
Irilli Us first and second " Jonmies round the Library of a 

BiUkMumiac." 

♦ 

Ree§nily puilUhed, price 3#. ejptra boards, 

I XlflftlrSt <!n^ara&est an) (Sonunlitums, 

Ti^ greaierpart of wkkch have never before been pubiisked; 

WITH A 
PakFACE ON THE ANTIQUITY OF RIDDLES. 



^ Aad jnitly the wise man thus preach'd to ui all, 
** DetpiM not the yahie of things that are small.** 

OidBallaJ, 



printed for W. Dayis^ at the Bedford Library, 15, Southamp- 
ton Row, Russell Square. 



The Publisher considers this as a most acceptable pre- 
sent to the youth of both sexes, and has no hesitation in say- 
ing, that it is the most extensive and best Collection of Riddles, 
Charades, and Conundrums extant, the greater part now for 
the first time presented to the Public, by a Lady, and the re- 
mainder selected with the greatest care and attention, so as 
to render the entire Work an innocent exercise of ingenuity to 
youth, and a source of considerable amusement to the adult. 
He has also the gratification of being able to recommend if, 
as containing nothing that can raise a blush on the check, cr 
offend the taste^i^ most fastidious ^^male. 

^■i^— »i^— «*■— »i^B^ ■■ ■ ■ » ■ ^ ' ■ I ■ I ■ ■■ ' 

[tt. Taylor, .P^iat^, I^mb* CuuH.iit Pa«Mi^, iUA Lmn Si|i:«r«. 












' 






/6/ijrL 



y/L 



This book should be returni 
the Library on or before the last 
stamped below. 

A fine is incurred by retainii 
beyond the specified time. 

Please return promptly. 



3 2044 080 242 118